Citation
The Lake City reporter

Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. : 1967)
Creator:
Lake City reporter
Place of Publication:
Lake City, Fla
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily (Monday through Friday)[<1969>-]
Weekly[ FORMER 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Community Newspapers Inc., Todd Wilson - Publisher. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
ABZ6316 ( LTUF )
33283560 ( OCLC )
000358016 ( AlephBibNum )
sn 95047175 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

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This item has the following downloads:


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000022 120110 ****3-DIGIT 32
LI OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 117007
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-1943


Dity


Roll Tide
Second-ranked Alabama
knocks off Gators in
SEC title game
Sports, I B






Reporter


www.lakecityreporter.com


Fire burns out family of 7


Officials: heater,
faulty wiring may
have been cause.
From staff reports
Columbia County
firefighters responded
to a mobile home blaze
Saturday morning that
is believed to have been


started by faulty wiring or
a heater problem, accord-
ing to reports.
Firefighters arrived at
approximately 10:45 a.m. to
a residence on NW Helen
Drive that was engulfed
in flames. Three trucks
from the Columbia County
Fire Department - along
with 16 personnel - and


a truck from Lake City
Fire Department were dis-
patched to battle the flames.
While the flames, were
doused, CCFD Chief Tres
Atkinson said the home was
a total loss.
"We have several things
we're looking at," Atkinson
said. "It's still under inves-
tigation, but it could have


been caused by some faulty
wiring or some heater prob-
lems, but we're not sure
yet."
. Atkinson said Red Cross
was on-scene Saturday
afternoon looking after the
family - Donald Lane,
Christine Cole and five chil-
dren, aging from 6-years-
old to 6-months old.


PAITIILK SLUUI IlL tI.e ilt. R�p..-er
Firefighters respond to a burning mobile home early Saturday:
morning on NW Helen Drive. "


Appreciated


National Guard unit prepares for deployment
By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
simple order , ...
was issued to a .4_ ''
local National "
Guard unit: .
L~"Serve like an
� . . . � _ mow .
American solider is expect- .,
ed to," said Columbia
County Sheriff Mark
Hunter.'
Hunter was the guest
speaker at the National -
Guard Family Day/ !-
Community Appreciation
Day Saturday, in Olustee
Park.
National Guard Unit
Alpha Company 53rd
Special Troops Battalion
leaves Jan. 7 for a yearlong
deployment to Kuwait.
'They are putting their
lives on the line for us,"
Hunter said.
. Deployments leave
families of the soldiers with
uncertainty, he said.
"Soon you will leave the
loving arms of your family
and the security of your
community,", Hunter said.
There is not enough* d",i..
training to prepare loved
ones for the separation of a
deployments, he said. The
community will watch over
families until the deploy-L
ment ends.
'We will look forward
to that day you return safe,
sound and triumphant," he
said. - .
SThe appreciation day-Was
created to recognize the
troops and serves as a fam- ANTONIA ROBINSONI L ate ' A,"i R' 1
ily readiness event. More James Weeks and Lucas Weeks, 8 months, enjoy the National Guard Family Day/Community
Appreciation Day Saturday. The event honored National Guard Unit Alpha Company 53rd
GUARD continued on 8A -Special Troops Battalion and their families. The unit will be deployed to Kuwait for a year.


Officials express

concerns on

proposed prison


Some say venture
could boost local
economy.
By TONY BRITT
toritt@lakecityreporter.com
A new prison in Columbia
County? That proposal is
generating heated interest
from community' members,
as well as 'state and local
government officials.
The Federal Bureau of
Prisons is considering one
or more contractors to build
a privately-owned and -oper-
ated, 1,250-bed correctional
facility in Columbia County.
The prison would house
male, criminal, non-violent,
illegal aliens and could pro-
vide up to 250 non-federal.
jobs at no taxpayer expense,
according to a public meet-.
ing Nov. 17. -
Columbia County is one
of two. proposed sites for,
the prison. Alternately, fed-
eral officials are also consid-
ering contracting the prison
at an alternate location in
Baldwin, Mich.
Although federal officials
held two public hearings,
one focusing on a draft
environmental impact state-
ment for adding,the. prison
to the area and the other as
a general notification meet-
ing about the proposal, resi-
dents continue to question
whether having the prison
in Columbia County would
be. a good idea for economic
and quality-of-life reasons.�
The Federal Bureau of
Prisons will end its public
comment period on the pro-
posal Dec. 21. Public infor-
mation gathered by that


INSIDE

* Locals offer input on
proposed prison, 3A
* Details on the prison's
operators, CEC, Inc., 7A

date will be included in a
final environmental impact
statement. Once the final
environmental impact state-
ment is complete, its avail-
ability will be announced,
initiating a 30-day waiting
period where the document
can be reviewed. After the
30-day waiting period, the
Federal Bureau of Prison
will announce its Record
of Decision in the Federal
Register of where the cor-
rectional facility will be
located.
During the local public
hearings a majority of peo-:
ple who attended the meet-
ings have indicated they
do not want the facility in
Columbia County, but other
residents'have said the jobs
are needed.

Concerns about
facility funding
Columbia County man-
ager Dale Williams said
the, Columbia County
Commission,, as a legisla-
tive body, has not made
a decision on whether or
not it is supporting the pro-
posed prison.
''The last" official posi-
tion on the private prison,
which would contract to
incarcerate federal prison-
ers was the letter, which
PRISON continued on 3A


Longtime Lake City resident Philip Moses dies at 90


Moses remember
for personality,
sense of humor.
By ANTONIA ROBINSON.
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
Friends and family will
remember Philip J. Moses
Sr. for his personality and
dedication to forestry.


Moses, 90, died Friday, at
Shands at the University of
Florida in Gainesville.
"He knew more about a
pine tree than anyone in
the South," said Jim Norris
of Lake City, who had been
neighbors with Moses since
1957. "I have lost a great
friend."
-Sometimes Moses was
very serious, but he also


had a great sense of humor,
Norris said. Moses made
friends very easily.
"He was just a heck of a
nice guy," Norris said.
Growing up, Lake City's
Gordon Summers and his
five siblings were often at


Moses' house, playing with
his five children and vice
versa.
"I've known him all my
life," he said.
Moses and Summer's
father were best friends, he
said, and, as an adult, Moses


became a good friend to
him too.
"I thought the world of
him," he said.
Moses was personable,
said Jim Moses, his son. ..
"He was well liked by a
wide variety of people," he
said.
One of the things Moses
loved was the outdoors, his
son said. He was a forest-


er by profession and was
always out in the woods. -
"That's all he ever did;'
Jim Moses said.
Although Moses was -i
strict father, he also was fair,
he said. He preached to his
children to do their best.
"He would say, 'Do your
best at whatever you do,
and you will be successful,'"
he said.


IA g ~I~~IW A ' ' .~ ,".~, k~ i~ ~ ~' A -'V-; ' .. ~V. .~AA


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


61 44
Partly Cloudy
WEATHER, 10OA


C� 9,
67,>


Opinion ................
Business ................
Obituaries . .............
Life ....................
Puzzles .. ...........


TODAY IN
BUSINESS
Community
food drive.


COMING
TUESDAY
School news from
the district.


SLAKE CITY

'MEDICAL CENTER 'J


S~* .~ I,
� ~Iffh~$ ~0f~.: 1'~A

~v~'~J~I&ri1 /ffjBJJC~9J.


IA


Vol. 135, No. 277 $I1.00


"He was just a heck of a nice guy."
- Jim Norris, Lake City resident


WON.

















(j 9 .P MAMeT& FLORIDA
M A1. tt.DT3. .flay+ .ea IOTO E
Friday: Saturday: Saturday: Saturday: Friday: . Wednesday: Wednesday:
10-34-36-43 11- n/a Afternoon: 5-4-9 Afternoon: 8-2-3-0 1-8-19-24-25 1-11-35-37-38-47 14-34-37-46-55
Evening: 3-8-9 Evening: 2-4-9-1 X 5 PB37 x4


AROUND FLORIDA



'Fort.Pierce company creates cultured conch pearls


By JEFF OSTROWSKI
The Palm Beach Post
FORT PIERCE
lorida's next
cash crop might
be pea-sized pink
pearls grown in
the brown bodies
of queen conchs.
Two scientists at Florida
Atlantic University's *
Harbor Branch
Oceanographic Institute in
Fort Pierce have learned
'how to.prod conchs to
produce pearls on com-
mand. Their next move:
Launching a business that
they hope will create tens
of thousands of conch �
pearls - and millions in
revenue - every year.
*. Conchs naturally pro-
duce pearls in response
lto irritation, and-the pink '
:pearl market relies on fish-
.processing plants to find
the gems as conch flesh is
-turned into fodder for frit-
ters and stews.
In the ocean, well-
formed, lustrous conch ,
pearls are truly a one-in-a-
million prize, says Megan
Davis, a Harbor Branch
scientist and co-founder,
of the start-up company
Rose Pearl Inc. Only one
)n 10,000 conchs makes
pearls, and of those, one in
100 is of gem quality. The
rest are misshapen, discol-
ored or tiny.
Now Davis aims to gen-
-erate a steady supply of.
farm-raised conch pearls.
, So-called cultured oyster
,pearls have been around
for decades,'buit coaxing .
pearls from ctonchs'has
proved tricky.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In a Tuesday photo, Megan Davis, the Center Director for Aquaculture and Stock Enhancement Harbor Branch
Oceanographic'Institute, is seen at Harbor Branch in Fort Pierce. Davis discovered how to make 'cultured' conch pearls from
the queen conchs with co-inventor Hector Acosta-Salmon, not pictured. Davis hopes to turn the pearls into a cash crop.


"People have tried and
maybe produced one or
two," Davis said. "Nobody
has been able to produce
them consistently."
With millions in sales
on the line, Davis is
cagey about exactly how
Rose Pearl raises its pink
gems. She does say that
she inserts a small piece
of mollusk shell into the ,
conch's body to spur the
growth of the pearl, and


that the conch survives the
process and can even pro-
duce another pearl.
With rich colors rang-
ing from white to pink
to orange, natural conch
pearls long have appealed
to jewelry buffs, especially
collectors in Europe and
Asia. The best of the gems
can fetch $1,500 to $2,000,
a carat.
How jewelers and jew-
elry buyers will respond


is an open question. Until
now, cultured conch pearls
didn't exist, and news of
Harbor Branch's break-
through created a stir
among conch pearl aficio-
nados.
"In the world of pearls,
this is a really big deal,"
said Peter Bazar, president
of Imperial Deltah, a pearl
distributor in Providence,
R.I. "It will affect the conch
pearl market tremendously.


Once you can start making
cultured pearls, it changes
the whole map." Bazar said
he'll be surprised if those
changes happen soon,
though..
.Production of cultured
pearls from abalones has
taken years to ramp up, he.
said.
The cultured pearls
"absolutely", will sell well,,
said George Elliott, a Palm
Beach jeweler. "Ladies just


love the color," he said.
But Elliott also frets
about falling values for
natural conch pearls.
"Now that these cul-
tureds are going to come
out, you sort of wonder
what's going to happen to
the market," Elliott said.
"It'll help the jewelry busi-
ness in a way, but that
whole (natural) pearl mar-
ket is going to be done."
The natural conch pearl
market is tiny. Fishermen
find only 2,000 to 3,000
conch pearls.a year. While
the overall pearl market
is measured in tons, the
conch pearl harvest is
weighed in pounds.
Rarity drives the value
of conch pearls, and a
pearl factory that creates
thousands of the gems a
year could pummel prices.
Wrote a commenter on the
NationalJewelerlNetwork.
corn site: "I have a 110k
cluster conch pearl ear-
rings, better sell them
.before the cultured ones
get on the market"
"I doubt it will have
a negative effect on the
natural pearl market," Tom
Moses, senior vice presi-
dent at the Gemological
Institute of America, said.
"If anything, it will prob-
ably draw more attention
to the natural conch pearl
market, and maybe create
even more of a demand."
If conch pearl prices
mimic the oyster pearl
market, where cultured
pearls fetch a third to half
the price of natural pearls,
cultured conch pearls
would sell for $500 to
$1,000 a carat.


" PEOPLE IN THE NEWS


Woods takes golf into a year of uncertainty
r'


By DOUG FERGUSON
'AP Golf Writer
THOUSAND OAKS,
:Calif. - Practically every
iiew twist in the shock-
iy tale of Tiger Woods
includes an aerial view of.
NiS Florida home where his
'troubles began, when he
,pulled his SUV out of the
:driveway and drove it into
,a tree.
More questions arise
:when one surveys the
:expanse of grass across the
:street - the practice range
:at Isleworth.
. :-Perhaps the most press-
ing: When will Woods slip
'into his spikes, step out of
his house and hit golf balls
again?
-:-There is no telling when
tjhe world's No. 1 player
will choose to return to the
'PGA Tour and the massive
'galleries that, most cer-
:tainly, will not gaze upon
-him quite the way they did
at his previous 253 tour
:events.
Woods has been out of
-the public eye since the
-car crash and subsequent
-allegations of extramarital
affairs took Tigermania
into startling new terri-
tory during Thanksgiving
weekend. He went 13 years
without a hint of scandal,
-the first $1 billion athlete
with barely a blemish,
:guarded with the media
:even in good times. That's
not likely to change now.
"I am dealing with my
:behavior and personal fail-
:ings behind closed doors
:with my family," Woods
said while confessing to
"transgressions'; on his
Web site last week. "Those
-feelings should be shared
:by us alone."
i The greater mystery is
his future.


ASSOCIATED PRESS,
This Nov. 15 file photo shows Neil Cathels (left), captain of Kingston Heath Golf club, helping
Tiger Woods don the Australian Masters Gold jacket in Melbourne, Australia.


A sport that promoted
its wholesome image as
its biggest asset now has a
tawdry mess on its hands
because of its star player,
who happens to be among
the most famous athletes
in the world.
. "What's interesting to
me about this situation is
that while its bad in the
short term, for golf, on a
global basis, it has moved
from being a sport to hav-
ing iconic, celebrity, status,
and a whole host of other
people are now inter-
ested," said John Rowady,
president of rEvolution, a
Chicago-based sports mar-
keting and media agency.
"And it may be a sport
that is not prepared for that
kifid of publicity."
The timing was not the
greatest. The PGA Tour
is struggling to find title
sponsors at four tourna-
ments and renew deals


able for comment except
for a statement in support
of Woods' family and the
player's request for privacy.
Asked if Finchem would
take questions about con-
cerns for golf's image or
whether it would affect
business, spokesman Ty
Votaw said the tour does
not comment on "hypothet-
ical situations, conjecture
and guesswork."
At the start of the
decade, Finchem was
at Pebble Beach talking
about how golf was in good
hands. He cited the new
arrivals of Adam Scott,
Charles Howell III, David
Gossett, young players
who represented the val-
ues inherent in golf.
No need to mention
Woods.
No one ever imag-
ined his name would be
splashed across anything
but the sports pages,


constantly the No. 1 sport
with the moral ethics and
things like that. So I think
we're in a very strong posi-
tion going forward."
Woods' corporate spon-
sors said they are standing
by him. Most sports mar-
keting consultants believe
the'scandal involving his
personal life will have little
bearing on TV ratings orF
contract negotiations. No
one can be sure, how-
ever, just as no can predict
where or when he will
return to golf.
"There's no impact on
the sport itself other than
the fact its best asset is a
little damaged right now,"
said Michael Gordon, CEO
of Group Gordon Strategic
Communications, a crisis
PR firm in New York. "But
it starts with'Tiger. He's
at the top of the pyramid.
When Tiger is hurt, other
assets could get hurt, too."


Celebrity Birthdays
* Jazz musician Dave Actor James Naughton
Brubeck is 89. , * is 64.
S Pro Football Hall of I' Transportation Secretary
Famer Andy Robustelli is 84. Ray LaHood is 64.
* Comedy performer 0 R&B singer Frankie
David Ossman is 73. Beverly (Maze) is 63.
* Actor Patrick Bauchau 0 Former Sen. Don
is 71. Nickles, R-Okla., is 61.
* Country singer Helen " Actress JoBeth Williams
Cornelius is 68. is 61.


Thought for Today

"'Marriage is a lottery in which
men stake their liberty and
womeo their happiness.'

- Madame Virginie de Rieux,
16th-century French writer


Lake City
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number...............752-9400
Circulation ...........755-5445
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Ha. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press. "
All material herein is property of th6 Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1799,
Lake City, Ra. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson .....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)


Reporter
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.
BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
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In Columbia County, customers should
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vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.


Director A. Russell Waters..754-0407
NEWS (rwaters@lakecityreporter.com)
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of the news staff or 752-5295. (Tuesday through Sunday)
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CORRECTION


The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items, If you have a concern, question or suggestion,
please call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifica-
tions will run in this space. And thanks for reading.


eajgIn Ag


Page Editor: Nicole Back, 754-0424


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2009


LAKE CITY REPORTER SUNDAY REPORT















Page Editor: Tray Roberts, 754-0427 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2009


"I've got mixed
emotions, but I guess
from what I've
understood I suppose I
would be open-minded
to it. I think you have to
evaluate the pros and
cons.You've gotta take-
the downside with the
upside, with 250 jobs,
you don't see that type
of opportunity very
often."


"I ljke the no-expense
on tax-payers part.
Anything that brings
more jobs in is a
wonderful thing for
Lake City. But I would
question how it is not
costing tax-payers.
Where is the money
coming from?"


"The idea of having lots
of jobs sounds wonder-
ful, but there's no guar-
antee that the govern-
ment won't change the
type of prisoners later
down the line. I think
we have our fair share
of prisoners in our area.
I'm opposed to it. I'm
not for it at all.There
are better jobs that we
should be trying to get
at the federal level."


"I think this is
something that should
be carefully considered.
There's going to be a
lot of fear and
apprehension from resi-.
dents, but the economic
advantage is going to be
worthwhile."





"During the recession,
anything that could
bring jobs and
security to non-work-
ers at this time can be
an advantage. If there's
no expense to us, then
why not. Maybe it'll give
some citizens hope
during the recession for
job opportunities."


"My personal opinion
is, when I first heard
about the prison com-
ing here a few months
ago, I wasn't really in
favor of it. But consid-
ering the current eco-
nomicclimate of the
area and the nation in
general, I would be for
the prison located in
Lake City.There are a
lot of people that lost
their'job that would be
happy to have a new
job at a federal prison
and a lot of businesses
that are close to going
out of businesses that
would like to have


"At this time I don't
think we, as a
community, need to
pull it off the table. I
think we need to gather
information in the
prospect of building
this facility. I understand
some citizens have
concerns about build-
ing this federal facility. I
think the Chamber of
Commerce is in process
of gathering more
information by
asking the government
to come back and
address some concerns.
I think some of the
concerns of the IDA
could be answered


Wendell Johnson,.
Lake City city manager


Garrett Roberts, 24,
of Lake City


I 7 , 1I
Scarlett Frisina,
Dist. 5 county commissioner


Todd Cass, 36,
of Lake City


Chris Bullard,
President of the Lake City-
Columbia County Chamber
of Commerce

those people spending
their money in their
stores."


-'4


Stephen Douglas,
Mini Storage and Record
Storage of Lake City

quickly.We need to
take a very serious look
at this and move
forward."


PRISON: Mixed views
Continued From Page 1A


was approved by the board,
which was sent stating there
was certain conditions that
had to be met," Williams
said. "Those conditions pri-
marily centered around no
financial impact to Columbia
County. On the basis of what
we've recently been told and
based on the actions of the
Industrial Development
Authority, it appears that
some of those conditions
would not be met."
In July, a majority of
Columbia County commis-
sioners decided to give a let-
ter of support for the facility
by a 3-2 margin with com-
missioners Ron Williams,
Dewey Weaver and Jody
Dupree voting in support of
the facility. All three cited.
the economic impact the
facility would have on the
county.
. Their majority vote was to
reaffirm the county's initial
letter of support if prison
officials agreed to comply
with their initial proposal
to pay ad valorem, use pri-
vate money to construct
and operate the facility and
have no impact on other
governmental entities.
During that meeting,
Weaver noted that although
a majority of the county
commission voted in favor
of giving the letter ot sup-
port, the county's letter will
not be the ultimate deciding
factor on the prison coming
to the area.
Weaver said as long
as prison officials have
the proper permits, the
United States Department
of Justice Federal Bureau
of Prisons could build the
prison in Columbia County
with little or no say so from
county officials.
However, last week the
Columbia County Industrial
Development Authority
board of directors putho-
rized its executive director,
Jim Poole, to write a letter
to federal officials address-
ing a list of concerns about
the project.
Dale Williams said once
the county receives an offi-
cial copy of the IDA's letter
of concerns, he will distrib-
ute the information, along
with the (commission's)
original position letter, to
the board of county com-
missioners.
"Then the board can
determine whether they,
have enough information
to determine whether they
wish to take another action,"
Dale Williams said.

Officials harbor
mixed views
Columbia County


CommissionerRonWilliams
said he supports the prison,
but he still has concerns.
"I said I would support
the prison come hell or
high water and I still mean
that," he said. "My personal
opinion of the proposed
correctional facility has not
changed from Day 1, but
also I would like all ques-
tions answered so the coun-
ty has no liability, whatso-
ever, about this prison."
Williams noted he
believes there is a local
group of people attempting
to undermine the prison,
but wouldn't elaborate on
that topic.'
"We're going to call an
ace an ace and a spade a
spade," he said. "If the pris-
on turns up a joker card,
then we don't want it, but if
it comes up a trump card,
we want it."
Columbia County
Commissioner Stephen
Bailey said he is not in favor
of having the prison built in
Columbia County.
"Personally I'm opposed
to it," he said. "I do not feel
that is the right avenue for
us. We already have two
of them here and I under-
stand that, but I also do not
feel that's where we as a
county need to be - espe-
cially given that the RACEC
(Rural Area of Critical
Economic Concern) we've
got.
Bailey said the county
commission as a body has
not formally discussed
whether or not it will
support the proposed facil-
ity.
"I can't speak for the
whole body," he said. "I
have reviewed the draft
environmental assessment
that was presented at the
last public hearing that was
' given to us through the mail
and have found some inac-
curacies and come up with
additional questions that I
feel the federal government
needs to answer."
Bailey noted the
Columbia County Industrial
Development Authority has
some of the same questions
and concerns.
Columbia County
Commissioner Scarlett
Frisina also said she was
not in favor of having the
correctional facility built
in Columbia County, even
though there is a possibility
it may bring more than 250
jobs to-the area.
"At a minute's glance and
all you hear is 250 jobs com-
ing to Columbia -County,
that sounds great, but I just
think there are lots and lots
of better things you have
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Locals weigh in on prison


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LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2009


Page Editor: Troy Roberts, 754-0427
















OPINION


Sunday, December 6, 2009


OUR


OUR
OPINION


Prison

would

boost job

growth

T he debate about a
private company
building a prison in
Columbia County
and contracting with
the Bureau of Prisons to house
illegal alien federal inmates
continues to stir our commu-
nity.
Those for and against are
passionate about their view-
points.
Several relevant questions
have been raised: Are the
private coinpany's financiers
solid partners? Will the com-
pany pay property taxes since
it's a private facility? Will they
pay their bills when inmates
need medical attention? Will
we have community safety
concerns if the prison locates
here?
Other concerns struggle for
traction: There will be a nega-
five impact on our local courts
system. The proposed prison
site is adjacent to the Plum
Creek property project There
will be a need for more ambu-
lance service. We'll be branded
as the prison capital of Florida.
Congressmen and senators
can't visit without scheduling
an appointment
This has been a healthy
debate and after listening to ,
both sides, we see two key
points: There is the possibility
of 250 recession-proof jobs on
our doorstep. The private com-
pany interested in building the
prison has said on the record at
the public hearing on Nov. 17
that it can privately finance the
project.
- - Unemployment currently
is more than 9.5 percent in
Columbia County. If we can
land 250 jobs and have no
risk or concession of taxpay-
ers' money to secure these,
it is a scenario worth pursu-
ing. If taxpayers are asked to
help fund this project, then
we would have concerns, but
so far, the promises from the
parties involved indicate they
can make this prison project a
reality through private invest-
ments.
Adding another prison to
our landscape, deep in the
pine scrub forests of eastern
Columbia County, does not
brand us as Florida's prison
capital any more than adding
another distribution facility
brands us as Florida's ware-
house capital.
Our location, our workforce
4hd our demographics are suit-
able for both industries. Prisons
Were here first and these did
not deter our newest distribu-
tion facilities from locating
here. Our county has proven
a'solid and successful host for
these industries and we should
play to our strengths.
: We should focus on being
the job-growth and employment
Capital of Florida.


Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
.community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
-dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
:work.


www.lakecityreporter.com


The junior high 'shocking machine'


Back in 1960 a Lake
City Junior High
School teacher
brought a small
hand-cranked gen-
erator to school to demonstrate
basic electrical principles to
students. The students came
to call the little generator "The
Shocking Machine." Here's why.
One day after class two boys
asked the teacher if they could
hold the generator's two lead
wires and touch hands while a
third kid cranked the genera-
tor so they could feel the low
voltage electricity flow through
them. The teacher agreed and
the boys felt the mild shock.
Then they found that if the
generator was cranked really
fast it produced more current
and more of a shock.
Word spread around school
about the "shocking machine"
and in no time at all lots of kids
started showing up at recess to
see who could crank the most
power and who could hold the
wires the longest and stand the
most current.
The fastest crankers could
generate enough power to
send the current through six
or seven hand holders in the
circle. When a kid couldn't
stand it and dropped his hands
the other kids howled with .
laughter.;
The "generator room" soon
filled up with boys waiting their
turn to get in the circle to see
how much current they could
stand. The late Joe DePratter
was one of the kids who could
withstand the most current
Rodney Thomas, Johnny
Smith, Larry Freeman, Howard
Register, and Randy Register '
were other students who were
good at it.
Some of those kids, now in
their 50's, still remember the
great times they had with the
old shocking machine.
The fun ended when a parent
complained to school officials


.. . .





Morris Williams
Phone:(386) 755-8183
williams_h2@firn.edu
372 W Duval St.
Lake City, FL 32055

that these students were being
"tortured." Her complaint was
untrue but it ended the days of
the shocking machine.
Ironically, Johnny Smith,
who loved tinkering with the
generator, grew up to become a
lineman with the Florida, Power,
and Light Co.

Book reminder
The book "Lake City, Florida
- A Sesquicentennial Tribute,"
by UF professor emeritus Dr.
Kevin McCarthy and I, will go
on sale at Hunter Printing, 1330
SW Main Blvd. beginning at 9
a.m. Thursday.
Those people who pre-
ordered their books) can pick
them up one day earlier, from 2
p.m. to 5 p.m. on Wednesday.
The book has 300 pages,
more than 200 pictures, and
costs $20. Make checks payable
to 'Lake City Book'.

Gator question
Ginger Hill of Lake City,:
now a doctoral student at the
University of California at
Irvine, sent me this clipping
from the St Louis Globe-
Dispatch dated. 878: "Col.
McLeod of Lake City, Florida,
has just killed an alligator in
whose stomach was found a
turtle, a pig's head, and a peck
of blackberries. The question
now is - How did that alligator
pick those-blackberries?"


'Pikes',started here
The University of Florida
fraternity, Pi Kappa Alpha, got
started in Lake City when UF
was here. The fraternity's web
site says that 11 young college
men gathered on the second
floor of the Blue Goose Inn in
Lake City.on November 17,
1904 and founded the Alpha Eta
Chapter of their fraternity.
One of those 11 youngsters
was Walter M. Hackney, des-
tined to become one of our
town's leading citizens.
When UF moved from here
to Gainesville in 1906, the frater-
nity moved with it.

The baptizing of
Shorty
The late E W. "Shorty'
Bedenbaugh joined the
Mormon Church when he was
'53 years old and he was bap-,
tized in Lake Jeffrey by his son
Arthur.
Shorty, a 50-year barber, a
20-year state legislator, and an
always-entertaining storyteller,
told this humorous story on *
himself about his baptizing.
"In my 53 years of living I had
committed just about every sin
in the book and then some, but
I didn't fully realize just how
much sinning I had done until I
got baptized and had all my sins
washed away..
When I came up out of the
water, that lake was so polluted
with all my sins that the fish and
even the alligators had to swim
to the far side of the lake to find
fresh water!"

Dyslexic atheist
He didn't believe in dog.


* Morris Williams is a local
historian and long-time Columbia
County resident.


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR


Does Lake City need
another prison?
What a wonderful year this
has been celebrating the 150th
anniversary of the City of Lake
City. How proud we can be, as
a community, of all our accom-
plishments.
Having spent my life here and
graduating from Columbia High
School with the Class of 1965,
Lake City has been my home
for 62 years.
Before us now is the issue of
"another prison" Do we really
want that for our community?
Does anyone really know the
impact these additional 1,200
plus (at the recent meeting we
were told a maximum of 2,500)
prisoners - this time criminal
illegal aliens - would make to
our community? Don't we have
enough prisons? We began with


one small prison east of town
which just kept "mushrooming".
until we already house more
than 3,000 inmates.
We are told when these
criminals are released they will
be deported. If this is true, just
deport them now and save the
millions of dollars in building the
prison and all the related costs.
It is my understanding that
Baldwin, Michigan already has a
building and wants this prison.
Please don't let this happen
to us for the sake of "jobs." In
the long run, it will cost each of
us! There is "good growth" and
"bad growth." Who will want
to move to Lake City if we con-
tinue to build and support pris-
ons? What other businesses will
want to move here and bring
their families? Do you want your
grandchildren to grow up under
these conditions?


We were also told at the
November 17th Public Hearing
that your comments will be
taken under consideration when
making this decision. Please
take the time to tell these folks
how you feel. You can write Mr.
Richard A. Cohn, Chief Site
Selection and Environmental
Review Branch or Mr. Isaac
Gaston, Site Selection Specialist,
Federal Bureau of Prisons, 320
First Street, NW, Washington,
DC 20534. The deadline for
your comments is December 21,
2009. A decision on the prison
site will be made in January.
Thank you for your time. May
God continue to bless you, Lake
City, Columbia County, and this
land we love, the United States
of America.

Ann Butler Brown
Lake City


4A


Star Parker
parker@urbancure.org


Will we

succumb to

the culture

of death?

T.he Baltimore City
Council has passed
a bill requiring cri-
sis pregnancy cen-
ters to post signs
saying they do not "provide or
make referrals for abortion or
birth-control services." Now it
awaits the mayor's signature.
Behind this unprecedented
move of government to step in
to regulate these centers is the
national "pro-choice" movement
- Planned Parenthood and
NARAL. So we can expect simi-
lar efforts around the nation.
What's driving it?
First, Planned Parenthood
is worried about the cash flow
of its abortion mill money
machine. Per Abby Johnson,
the former Planned Parenthood
director who they tried to shut-
up with a gag order, "....with the
downward economy, they are
really trying to increase their
abortion numbers, because that
is the most lucrative part of
' their business."
Second, the country is
changing. A recent Gallup Poll
showed that, for the first time,
a majority of Americans - 51
percent - are pro-life.
And third, the crisis preg-
nancy center movement has
emerged as enormously suc-
cessful competition to abor-
tion clinics, providing in-need
pregnant women information,
support, and infrastructure to
enable them to keep and give
birth to their babies.
These.centers came on the
scene a little under 40 years
ago after the Roe v Wade deci-
sion legalized abortion. Today
there are some 5,000 around
the country funded by several
hundred million dollars in con-
tributions, 80 percent of which
is from private individuals.
Baltimore city council
president Stephanie Rawlings-
Blake, the lead sponsor of the
bill, is transparently carrying
Planned Parenthood's water.
No equivalent requirement is
mandated that abortion clinics
post signs saying they offer no
pro-life counseling. And, of 50
individuals who testified before
the council's hearings, there
was not a single client of a
pregnancy center who claimed
to have been misled.
According to Rawlings-Blake,
her bill is "a step towards mak-
ing sure that women have infor-
mation they need to make the
right decision for their health
and their future."
This would be hilarious if it
weren't so sad.
I carry with me the hun-
dreds of stories of post abor-
tion trauma I've heard at my
speaking engagements at
centers around the country.
Women wracked with guilt.
Parents who, when they see
their children, recall the
aborted brothers and sisters of
these children.
When some 150 years ago
Stephen Douglas argued that
states should choose whether
or not they would have slaves,
Abraham Lincoln replied,
"God did not place good and
evil before man, telling him
to make his choice ... he did
tell him there was one tree, of
the fruit of which he should
not eat, upon pain of certain
death."
Pro-choice? Who's the
deceiver?

* Star Parker is president of
CURE, Coalition
on Urban Renewal and Education
(www.urbancure.org) and author of
three books.


Todd Wilson, publisher
Tom Mayer, editor
Troy Roberts, assistant editor
S. Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


mw










KE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE SUNDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2009


H1N1


Medicare and Medicaid Accepted


or C 10.00 ch


Those patients now eligible
for HIN1 vaccine include:
* Between 2 and 24 years of age
* Between 25 and 64 years of age who
have medical conditions associated
with a higher risk of complications
* Pregnant Women
* Living with or providing care for a child
younger than six months.
,* A health care or emergency medical
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Health Ma rt.
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Page Editor: Brandon Lockett, 754-0424


Baya-East Baya-West Baya-Jasper
780 SE Baya Dr. 1465 W. U.S. Hwy. 90 1150 U.S. Hwy 41 NW
(386) 755-6677 (386) 755-2233 - (386) 792-3355


?


';.. ', *"














LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2009


-Who is Community Education Centers, Inc.? MAC JOHNSON ROOFINGI:


104 SOUTHWEST 266TH STREET
NEWBERRY, FLORIDA 32669

352.472.4943 or 866.376.4943
website: www.macjohnsonroofing.com


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com

On May 5, 2008, the
Federal Bureau of Prisons
issued a Request for
Proposals for the manage-
ment and operation of a cor-
rectional facility to house
low security, adult male
* inmates, who are primarily
* non-United States citizens.
Less than a year later,
on Feb. 5, officials at
Community Education
Centers, Inc., were informed
their proposals for facilities
in Anson, Texas and Lake
'City were within the com-
petitive range, while three
:of their other proposals
'were excluded, for ndt being
-"highly rated." By April 28,
'the Anson, Texas, proposal
has also been eliminated by
'Federal Bureau of Prison
officials.
In July, Community
Education Centers repre-
sentatives accompanied
Federal Bureau of Prisons
officials to Lake City where
:at a public hearing they
-announced Lake City was
*being considered as a site
:tor the proposed facility
:- and the facility would
:be operated by Community
:Education Centers.
, Community Education
Centers has been in busi-
ness for more than 15 years
'and operates in 19 states
'housing about30,000 offend-
�ers. According to informa-
:tion from the company's
Web site, www.cecintl.com,
:the company has seven in-
:prison treatment programs
:in Florida at various loca-
*tions including the Mayo
:Correctional Institution,
:Taylor Correctional
:Instituittion and Gainesville
SCorrectional Institution.
"We service jurisdictions
'from local counties to state
governments, state parole


'Beulah Lee DePoyster
Mrs. Beulah Lee DePoyster, 80
Sof Lulu, passed away late Friday
'night, December 4, 2009 at the
,Suwannee Valley Care Center
,in Lake City. A native of Lulu
- and daughter of the late Loffiette
- and Lester Agnes Cox Pearce,
Mrs. DePoyster had previously
'lived in Hollywood, Fla. before
moving back to Lulu in 1974.
'She was a graduate of Columbia
High School class of 1947 and
,she owned and operated the
'Lulu General Store with her
:husband from 1974 to 1984.
"Mrs. DePoyster was a wonder-
ful cook and enjoyed cooking
'for her family and friends. Mrs.
'DePoyster is survived by her
;husband, Charles L. DePoyster,
one son, Richey DePoyster, one
'brother, Bennard Pearce all of
Lulu and three sisters, Aleen
Williams, Lake City, Juanita
'Young, Okeechobee, Fla. and
'Jeanette Gunter, Lulu. Graveside
:funeral services for Mrs.
DePoyster will be conducted
.on Tuesday, December 8, 2009
at 2:00 PM at the New Zion
Cemetery on CR 241 near Lulu
with Dr. David Morse officiat-
ing. Interment will follow.'
Visitation with the family will
be from 6-8:00 PM Monday
evening at the funeral home.
Arrangements are under the
Direction of GUERRY Funeral
.Home, 2659 SW Main Blvd.,
Lake City. 386-752-2414
TPhilip J. Moses, Sr.
Philip J. Moses, Sr., 90, of
Lake City, Florida, died late
Friday evening, December 4,
2009, at Shands UF Hospital in
Gainesville, Florida. Born on
August 17, 1919, in Lake City,
Florida, Mr. Moses was the son
of Ellis and Femila Moses and
'was one of eleven children. He
was educated in the Columbia
County School System and
graduated from Columbia
High School in 1938. Later he
joined the United'States Army
during World Wtr II. While
,enlisted he was awarded'three
European,Theater of Operations .
(ETO) Bronze Battle Stars.'
After an honorable discharge-
from the Army, he attended the
University of Florida where he
was a member of the Xi Sigma
Pi National Honorary Forestry
Association. He graduated from
UF in 1949 with a Bachelor of
Science in Forestry and Bachelor
,of Science in Agriculture and in
1952 with a'Master of Science
in Forestry.' While still in col-
lege, he fell in love with and
'married Josephine Collins on
February 5, 1948. Mr. Moses
led a very long and active life,


boards and all the federal
agencies," said Community
Education Centers' senior
vice president and com-
pany spokesman William
Palatucci. "We have over
100 contracts around the
country. We operate 47
'residential centers' includ-
ing 18 detention centers
in Texas, Pennsylvania
and Ohio. Our experience
crosses the entire breadth
of the correctional industry.
We do everything from very
secure detention facilities to
community programs."
Although . Community
Education Centers head-
quarters is in West
Caldwell, N.J., the com-
pany has a large presence
in Pennsylvania, Virginia,
'Colorado and Texas.
Community Education
Centers' officials say they
were drawn to the federal
proposal for a correctional
facility in either Lake City
or Baldwin, Mich., because
they have experience work-
ing for the federal govern-
'ment and because of a 10-
year contract.
"It's a guaranteed mini-
mum contract as well,"
said Community Education
Centers Senior Vice
President of Administration
and Operational Support
Michael L. Pelletier. "When
you get the contract it's a
guaranteed population. So,
the facility is not going to
be empty."
Palatucci said that would
translate into a very stable
working environment
"It would be an employ-
ment opportunity with a long-
term client in the federal gov-
ernment," Palatucci said.
Early reports provided
by the Federal Bureau of
Prisons indicate the pro-
posed facility would be
developed on approximate-
ly 40 acres of the 53.3 acres,


many times assuming leadership
roles. He was past president of
the School of Forestry Alumni
Association, Florida Forestry
Association, Lake City Rotary
Club, and Florida Forest Service
Advisory Council. He was past
chairman of the Florida Forest
Industries and member of the
National Council of American
Forest Products Industries, Inc.
He was a past member of the
Newell Entomological Society,
Honorary Entomology Society,
Board of Governors Southern
Pine Inspection Bureau, and
Florida Forest Industries
Committee on Timber Valuation
and Taxation - Washington,
D.C. From 1949 to1952 he was
an instructor at the School of
Forestry, University of Florida at
Lake City Ranger School. From
1952 to 1958 he was owner and
general manager of Forestry
Consulting Firm, Woodland
Managers. From 1958 to 1975
he was the manager of Land
Management Department
and Regional Procurement
Manager at Southern Wood
Piedmont Company. In 1971
he was-selected as "Forester
of the Year" by the Society of
American Foresters -Florida
Chapter. In 1976 he reentered
the forestry consulting profes-
sion as president and owner of
Philip J. Moses & Company,
Inc. where he continued to
work until his passing. In
April 2002 he was selected
as "Outstanding Alumnus of
the Year", School of Forestry,
University of Florida. When
asked about his long and suc-
cessful career, he said he chose
something that he truly loved
and made a career of it. That
way he always enjoyed going
to work. Mr. Moses is survived
by his daughter, Janis Watson,
and sons Philip Moses, Jr.
(Sarai), Michael Moses (Cathy),
Jimmy Moses (Sally), and
Jeffrey Moses (Bree). He also
had eleven grandchildren, one
great-grandchild, and one sister
Sally Moses Barnes of Atlanta,
GA. In lieu of flowers, the
family requests that donations
be made to Epiphany Catholic
Church, 1905 Southwest
Epiphany Court, Lake City,
Florida 32025, or Boy Scouts of
America, 521 South Edgewood
Avenue, Jacksonville, Florida
32205. Visitation will be on
Monday, December 7, from 5 to
7 p.m. at the funeral home. A
funeral mass will be celebrated
by Fr. William Pendergraft on
Tuesday, December 8, at 11:00
a.m. at Epiphany Catholic
Church. A private committal
service will be held at Oaklawn
Cemetery. Arrangements
are under the direction of


with the most northern 13.3
acres maintained as a nat-
ural buffer in the 80-acre
tract The total area within
the inner fence perimeter
would be 669,957 sq. ft. and
the area enclosed within the
outer security fence perim-
eter is 739,408 sq. ft. The
total gross building area
would be 187,988 sq. ft.
Inmates to be housed in
the facility will be in the facil-
ity at all times and the facility
will not have a workcamp.
"They come into the
state, are brought to the
facility, stay there and they
will not be released from
the facility," Pelletier said.
"They will bb transported to
another federal facility to be
released and deported."
During a July public hear-
ing about the proposed Lake
City facility, Michael W.
Harling, Municipal Capital
Markets Group executive
vice president, who is look-
ing to finance the facility,
indicated the facility would
provide 250 full-time posi-
tions. Staffing needs at the
facility would be based on-
Federal Bureau of Prisons'
standards.
Although the positions
will not be federal jobs,
Pelletier said employee
salaries will be based on
federal guidelines.
"Ifs a federal project and
a federal contract, so as such
well be paying according to
the Federal Prevailing Wage
Act," he said. "So, they'll be
receiving prevailing wages
at that facility."
"Since this is federal proj-
ect by the Bureau of Prisons,
a lot of these provisions are
standard for all Bureau of
Prisons contracts," Palatucci
added. "Its not something
we pick out of the air, ifs
dictated to us by the federal
government"
In addition, Community


GATEWAY-FOREST LAWN
FUNERAL HOME, 3596
South Highway 441, Lake City,
Florida (386) 752-1954. Please
sign the guestbook at www.gate-
wayforestlawn. com.
Thomas D. "Tom" Wombles
Mr. Thomas D. "Tdm" Wombles,
age 64, of Macclenny, Fla. died
Thursday, Dec. 3, in the Roberts
Care Center, Palatka, Florida
following an extended illness.
He was a native of Hannibal,
Missouri and had.resided in
Lake City aid Macclenny, Fla.
since 1983. He was the son of
the late John Dee Wombles and
Eulave Edith Main Wombles
and was preceded in death-by
a brother D.J. Wombles. He
worked as a car salesman with
Pineview Chevrolet, Macclenny,
Fla. and Eddie Accardi Chevrolet
Mazda, Lake City, Fla. for many
years. He was of the Methodist
faith, a Vietnam veteran serving
in the U.S. Army and U.S. Navy,
a member of the Elks Club #893.
of Lake City and a member of
the Macclenny Moose Lodge,
Macclenny, Fla. He is survived
by his former wife and close
companion, Evie T. Wombles of
Kingsley Lake, Fla.; Daughter,
Danie Fletcher of Macclenny,
Fla.; Sister, J.acque (Bruce)
Penstone of Pittsfield, Ill.; Four
brothers, Denny (Bird) Wombles
and David (Lynne) Wombles
both of Quincy, Ill.; Mike
(Bobbie) Wombles of Pleasant
'Hill, 111. and Kevin (Terri)
Wombles of Pittsfield, Ill.; One
grandchild, Haley D. Thomas of
Macclenny, Fla. A visitation will
be held from 2 to 4 p.m. Sunday,
Dec. 6, in the Chapel of Guerry
Funeral Home, Macclenny, Fla.
Funeral services will be con-
ducted Wednesday, Dec. 9, in the
Chapel of Niebur Funeral Home,
530 W. Adams St., Pittsfield,
Illinois with interment in Shearer
Cemetery, New Canton, Illinois.
GUERRY FUNERAL HOME,
U.S. 90 East, Macclenny, Fla. is
in charge of local arrangements.
Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


Education Centers officials
say training will be provided
for its staff and employees,
based on federal guidelines.
Palatucci said Community
Education Centers offers a
wide array of educational
and vocational programs for
inmates and the company
is known around the coun-
try for the educational and
treatment programs it pro-
vides, including GED pro-
grams, basic job skills and
substance abuse treatment.
"We think this is a great
opportunity for the area to
provide people with well-
paid jobs," Palatucci said.
"These projects are par-
ticularly well sought after
in communities around the
country for exactly that rea-
son. The Federal Bureau
of Prisons has a very good
track record of making sure
these facilities are well run,
so we're confident this will
be a real asset to the area."


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NOTICE OF TIME CHANGE FOR CITY COUNCIL MEETING TO BE
HELD BY THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF LAKE CITY,
FLORIDA ON MONDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2009 AT 5:30 PM IN THE
COUNCIL CHAMBERS LOCATED ON THE SECOND FLOOR OF CITY
HALL AT 205 NORTH MARION AVENUE, LAKE CITY, FLORIDA.
AUDREY E SIKES
City Clerk


Page Editor: Troy Roberts, 754-0427







Pag -Eitr:-rado-L-ket-75-0424--LAKE-CITY-REPORTER- LOCAL-&-STATE-SUNDAY,--DECEMBER-6,-2009 ---


McRae, McRae & Douglas

has made a charitable


contribution to


Altrusa International, Inc. of Lake City, FL
(through the Altrusa District Three Foundation)
whose efforts at improving literacy in
Columbia County are great appreciated


The Law Offices of
McRae, McRae & Douglas


318 E. Duval


Street


Lake City, Florida
(386) 755-HELP

PRACTICE LIMITED TO PERSONAL INJURY & WRONGFUL DEATH


Mory Christmas


I)erw Va-


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE SUNDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2009


7A


Page Editor: Brandon Lockett, 754-0424


I On Behalf of our Injured Clients I













LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2009


PRISON: Has potential to impact Columbia County Sheriff's Office


Continued From Page 3A
Sto. take into consideration
*when you are looking at a
*new business coming into
,the county," she said. "It's
'not up to us as a board of
:county commissioners or
:local government officials
-to decide whether they are
'or are not comifig. They
are a private business that's
coming here and as long as
they meet all the require-
'ments and specifications
'for the area, there's not
really a lot we can do about
.it, but I would prefer for
'them not to be here."
:Her reasoning, she said,
is because the prison will
*house federal prisoners
:and the Federal Bureau of
Prisons will be the ones
:that will be filling the prison
- and they could change
what types of inmates are
'secured at the facility, pos-
sibly housing American
citizens that committed
terrible crimes.
"Then their families will
be here and they're going
.to be part of our commu-


nity, and they're going to
be a burden on us and I
don't want that," Frisina
said. "I think that Columbia-
County and the surround-
ing areas -have more than
done our fair share of hav-
ing prisons and correction-
al facilities and they are
definitely places of wonder-
ful employment, and I'm
not knocking that, but we
are trying and doing our
best as a community and
local government to bring
in other types of industry
and business."
Frisina said the poten-
tial of having a prison in
the area where the RACEC
and catalyst site could be
located may also have a
negative impact.
"I just think it could
be a really big deterrent
on many great industries
and businesses that could
come and the prison would
deter them from coming
and it would be many more
than 250 jobs that could be
turned away," she said.


Frisina and Bailey recent-
ly attended the Federal
Bureau of Prisons' public
hearing' where comments
.about the facility were
recorded.
Frisina said it was inter-
esting to find out that the
Baldwin, Michigan, site
also being considered as
a potential home for the
prison, was positively
received by residents from
that area.
"The people and the
community where it was
proposed really welcomed
it and really wanted it, and
they didn't know that it was
facing so much opposition
here, and they're (prison
officials) still considering'
it," she said. "I would be
curious to find out what it
is that's driving them try-
ing to come to Lake City so
much."
Frisina said the residents
who attended the public
hearing from . Columbia
County, and people who
have called her or talked


to her when she was out in
the county, say they don't
want the prison here.
"They say this is not
what we want in our com-
munity," she said. "That's
the voice of our community
and-that's who I represent
- my constituents, and
that's what all of them are
telling me: This isn't what
we want'. It's from parents
and homeowners who live
in our community all the
way up business owners
and other people in gov-
ernment. I think it covers a
broad range of people."

Potential impact
on sheriff's office
Columbia County Sheriff
Mark Hunter said when he
was first approached by
the group looking to build
and finance the facility,
they had a proposal which
indicated they would pay
an impact fee back to the
county of $1 per day per


inmate which would go
into a law enforcement
fund..
The potential revenue
from such a proposal could
approach $400,000 annu-
ally.
"Initially they said they
would house 1,500 inmates
and then it went to 2,500
inmates, which would be
significant revenue coming
into the county," Hunter
said. "It concerns me some
caveats that are tied back
into the. proposal such
as deputizing of the staff
members and so forth out
there. It's going to require
a little bit more research'
to find out what type of an
.impact that's going to have
on our community."
Bill Bryan, a prison con-
sultant working on the
proposal, said there is no
requirement for all of the
officers to be deputized.
"Discussion has been to
work with the sheriff to
ensure an adequate emer-
gency response plan,"


Bryan said Friday in an e-
mail. "The (prison) opera-
tor assumes all liability for
the actions of their employ-
ees."
Hunter also questioned
that when there is a pris-
on facility housing that
amount of inmates, what
kind of draw it would
have to pull inmate family
members and other peo-
ple into the county, and
, in turn, the impact that
population influx will have
on local law enforcement
services.
However, he quickly
.noted the decisions will
be handled by the county
commission.
"This will be a board deci-
sion," he said. "The sheriff
of a county does not'make
the decision on prisons
being built or jails. This is
a county commission func-
tion. Sheriffs do not build
jails, they operate those
jails or detention facilities
for the county commission,
as I do currently."


KATHY RIOTTO/Lake City Reporter
Johnson 'Cookie Cutter' winner
Vivian Johnson was' fi"e infierof the LakeGifty Rep6rters 'Cookie Cutter' crossword search
game. She was presented a gift~Gertificate-by.Lake City Reporter Advertising Director Lynda
Strickland.


GUARD
Continued From Page 1A
than 300 people were in
attendance.
Events like this attest
to the support the city has
shown the unit, said Capt.
Terrell Webb. The battalion
has fought in five major
conflicts.
"You make it an honor to
serve and protect our way
of life," he said. "We are
proud and thankful."


www.lakecityreporter.com


Residential Rentals &
Property Management
Real Estate Sales


Carl *I n -sG RI
(36 6706
caa* l?/ u gginswr omca.......


SPRING OPEN REGISTRATION

NOV12-DEC 16
(ALL FEES DUE BY DEC16)

LATE REGISTRATION

ADD/DROP

JAN 4-5
(ALL FOES DUE EACH DAY)

ALL REGISTRATION DATES INCLUDE

DUAL ENROLLMENT STUDENTS
Registrar: (386) 754-4205

Admissions: (386) 754-4396

Financial Aid: (386) 754-4284

YOU MAY ACCESS SCHEDULE
INFORMATION ONLINE AT:
wwwi akecitycc.edu

Reg'ste Eary fr Fi�nc�.


Let's Fill it Up!


Saturday,


December 12th

Supporting the Food Bank of Suwannee Valley
To participate, simply leave a bag of non-perishable


foods at your Reporter paper tube or the end of
your driveway Friday night. No glass containers.
Your Lake City Reporter carrier will pick it up while
delivering your Saturday paper.


C. r, all
donations
.'ake checs
Payable to.
Food ank
fSuwannee
jn


Starting November 30th
Donations will also be accepted at the
Lake City Reporter office, located at 180 E. Duval Street, Lake City


Monday through Fridays, from 8 a.m. - 5 p.m.
and on Saturday, December 12 from 7 a.m. - Noon





Hep s FllTe ruk

Place a collection box in your place of business for donation
and you will be recognized with other business donors in the
Lake City Reporter.


Don't ^ eA *

We'll Bring You One!


Community.
Source.
Lake City Reporter
lakecityreporter.com * CURRENTS magazine


For additional
information and to
participate, please call

752-1293


Page Editor: Troy Roberts, 754-0427


oi I'llj
















BRIEFS . I 1


Iraq VP 'optimistic'
on elections

BAGHDAD - Iraq's vice
president said Saturday
there are "optimistic signs"
toward a political agree-
ment on parliamentary elec-
tions, but warned he could
again veto the plan if it does
not meet his demands for
greater Sunni outreach in
the balloting.
Tariq al-Hashemi has
held up the planning for
scheduled Jan. 16 elections
because he wants to give a
greater voice to Iraqis liv-
ing abroad, most of whom
are fellow Sunni Arabs and
could boost Sunni seats
in the new 323-seat parlia-'
ment. Al-Hashemi has until
Sunday. to decide to rein-
state his veto:

Protestors: 'Stop
climate chaos'

LONDON - Thousands
of people calling for a
deal on climate change
at next week's United
Nations conference in
Copenhagen marched
through central London
on Saturday, encircling the
Houses of Parliament in a
human wave of blue-clad
demonstrators. London's
Metropolitan Police said
about 20,000 people joined
the Stop Climate Chaos
march, which began at
Grosvenor Square and
wound its way to the
Parliament building on the
River Thames. Organizers
put the turnotit at 40,000.

Guinea junta's No.
2 returns '
CONAKRY, Guinea
- The overnight return to
Guinea on Saturday of the
No. 2 man in the junta that
seized power a year ago
makes it more likely that
the military clique will be
able to hang on to power
following an assassination
attempt on the president.
Many people, however, "
fear the army could frac-
ture and plunge the coun-
try into further violence.
The head of the presi-
dential guard who is
accused of having fired at
point-blank range on the
president was still at large,
and it is unclear how many
of the roughly 150 men
formerly under his control
will stay loyal-to him.
* Associated Press


ASSOCIATED PRESS
United States Marines from the 2nd MEB, 4th Light Armored
Reconnaissance Battalion. escort new Afghanistan National
Police officers to their base in Khan Neshin in the volatile
province of Helmand, southern Afghanistan, Saturday. The
police officers will be part of a mentoring program and work
alongside the Marines.


U.S., Afghan troop

buildup key to success


By RAHIM FAIEZ.
and DEB RIECHMANN
Associated Press Writers
KABUL- - President
Barack Obama has his
troop surge. Afghanistan's
beleaguered security forces
have theirs.
While the new U.S. war
strategy was unveiled with
worldwide fanfare, Afghan's
defense force has been
quietly planning its own
troop buildup to break the
Taliban's tightening grip on
swathes of the nation. The
Afghan surge is the one
,to watch because the suc-
cess of Obama's new war
plan is inextricably hinged
to Afghanistan's ability to
recruit, train and retain
security forces that can'
eventually take the lead in
defending the nation.
Afghan Defense Minister
Gen. Abdul Rahim Wardak
told The Associated Press
in an interview Saturday
that he's already.. assigned


one brigade to a new three-
brigade seventh corps of
the Afghan National Army.
Corps 215 Maiwand is based
in the Helhpand capital. of
Lashkar Gah, where most
of the 30,000 U.S. reinforce-
ments will be deployed.
British Prime Minister
Gordon Brown says the
Afghans have promised to
send 5,000 members of the
new corps to partner with
British troops in Helmand.
Wardak insists that will be
achieved with ease. He said
he's already begun staffing
the command's second bri-
gade.
Moreover, he said nearly
44 additional companies of
Afghan soldiers are. being
added to battalions in the
south and east. Another
Afghan commando battal-
ion, which will graduate in
January, is also headed to
Helmand - the scene of
a major weekend offensive
by 1,000 Marines and 150
Afghan soldiers.


fffJj;n~y~


Help us bring Christmas home
for the holidays.


Join us in making sure all of our neighbors have a joyful
Christmas season. Contribute during the Mercantile Bank 12
Days of Christmas, December 1-12 at any Mercantile Bank
branch, and together we'll make a gift to help local charities. It
doesn't matter how much you share; all that matters is. that you
join us to help make the holidays special for people in need
right here at home. The Mercantile Bank 12 Days of Christmas.
Just one more way we take serving our communities personally.


MERCANTILE BANK
Let's do business.
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Mercantile Bank is a division of Carolina First Bank, Member FDIC


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r 2009 Little Miss Christmas Angel
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Country Inn & Suites
Girls & Boys All Ages
, Each contestant receives a trophy and a gift.
. * For more info: 352-372-6133 or
* ' . email: moonbeamqueens@aol.com


nm


LAKE CITY REPORTER WORLD SUNDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2009


Page Editor: Nicole Back, 754-0424
















Page Editor: Troy Roberts, 754-0427


1 OA LAKE CITY REPORTER WEATHER SUNDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2009


THE WEATHER


6 I. I I.B A


G-. CHANCE C-. CHANCE I MOSTLY
4i OF RAIN OF RAIN SUNNY


721.O 1it I" 476L0 O52 HI65 6LO41
*�>i- - - ^ - '11ip i'


* 15* ~i'~

S j - -CC S. I' i~
I,.


Tallahassee
*, 57/42
Pensacola *
S55/47 Panama City
-2 ,-58/48


TEMPERATURES
High Saturday
Low Saturday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Saturday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date,


I Videsta
S 27/42 *; 0Jacksonville
Lake City, 60/47
61/44 "
Gainesville * Daytona Beach
63/47 67J/56
vOcala
4-t 49, V S


55
46
70
46
84 in 1994
27 in 1929


0.94"
1.96"
46.14"
0.35"
46.15"


City Monday
Cape Canaveral 75/67/pc
Daytona Beach 73/59/pc


Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Jacksonville


83/72/pc
82/64/pc
73/53/pc
70/53/pc
78/68/pc
71/52/pc
83/71/pc
81/65/pc
74/55/pc
76/58/pc
70/60/sh
66/59/sh
70/54/pc
76/62/pc
69/52/c
82/68/pc


i ' �, tf !R 7 Key West
S Orlando Cape Canaveral Key West
69/54 69/59 Lake City
Miami
Tampa Naples
68/56 West PalmnBeach Ocala
75/68 * Orlando
* Ft Lauderdale Panama City
Ft. Myers. 76/70 * Pensacola
73/60 * Naples * Tallahassee
� ,73/62 WMami Tampa
KeyWest , 7q/70 Valdosta
Key West* W. Palm Beach


1 0 110


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise tom.
Sunset tom.


7:13 a.m.
5:30 p.m.
7:14 a.m.
5:30 p.m.


MOON
Moonrise today 10:27 p.m.
Moonset today 11:06 a.m.
Moonrise tom. 11:33 p.m.
Moonset tom. 11:43 a.m.


Dec. Dec. Dec. Dec.
8 16 24 31
Last New First Full


- .5


� (*',,,:_,q :. . 1 .


* i-
�
f
1.
'...,

I


On this date in ,
1886. a great sn
storm hit Tme sou
ern Appalachian
Mountains. The
three day storm
produced 25 inc
at Rome. Ga.. 33
inches at Ashevil
N.C.. and 42 inct
in the mountains


4

45miuesbum
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0

to i


Tuesday
77/71/sh
78/63/sh
82/73/pc
84/67/sh
75/58/sh
72/58/sh
80/69/sh
72/56/sh
84/72/pc
84/69/pc
78/60/sh
80/64/sh
71/63/sh
71/60/sh
72/56/sh
81/67/sh
71/55/sh
84/72/pc


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.



weather.corm


, r Forecasts, data and
8 2 4 graphics � 2009 Weather
Central, Inc., Madison, Wis.
www.weatherpublisher.com








hes
le,


hes


I NATIONAL FORECAST: Mixed precipitation is possible in the central states today, with rain,
freezing rain, sleet and snow impacting portions of Kansas and Nebraska. Snowfall will
stretch into the central Rockies, where several inches of accumulation.is possible. High pres-
sure will dominate the eastern tier of states.



I I I ii


CITY
Albany NY
Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Bismarck
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Charleston SC.
Charleston WV
Charlotte
Cheyenne
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia SC
Dallas
Daytona Beach
Denver


Saturday Today
HI/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/W CITY.
37/30/.08 38/23/pe Des
35/15/0 45/26/pc Detro
22/18/0 25/16/po El Pai
43/36/0 52/36/s Falrba
44/33/.73 . 42/29/s, Green
26/19/0'. 4/-9/sn Hartff
41/33/.09 54/41/pc Honol
19/-2/0 8/-6/c Houst
34/19./0 30/13/c Indian
45/40/.05 42/31/pc Jacks
33/27/0 35/28/pc Jacks
58/50/.61 56/43/s Kansa
34 '28/.20 . 42/28!s Las V
46, 43, 05 51. 32, s Little
29'17,0 10, ]/sn LosA
32/24/0 38/28/c Memp
34/25/0 41/29/pc Miam
33/23/0 39/28/pc MInne
55/46/.03 52/36/s Mobil
47/24/0 51/36/sh New I
63/51/.68 67/56/p6 New
37/15/0 14/-l/sn Oklah


lolnes
it
inks
isboro."
ord
uluu
on
napolls
on MS
onville
as City
egas
Rock
ngeles,
phis :
eapolls
Orleans
York
oma City


Saturday Today
HI/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/W
42/16/0 31/17/sn
30/19/0 37/28/pc
44/21/0 58/37/pc
17/3/0 20/-4/pc
45/39/.30, 47/30/s
41/37/.11 42/25/s
'79/65/0 81/68/s
48/26/0 58/50/t
31/21/0 43/30/pc
44/25/0 55/44/c
57/46/.77 60/47/pc
43/18/0 37/20/sn
47/37/0 54/35/pc
44/21/0 47/35/c
59/49/0 60/50/sh
42/23/0 54/38/pc
82/73/.21 76/70/pc
26/15/0 24/14/c
49/35/.02 57/47/pc
46/36/0 62/56/c
45/35/.28 42/32/s
48/21/0 49/26/pc


CITY
Omaha
Orlando
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland ME
Portland OR
Raleigh
Rapid City
Reno
Richmond
Sacramento
St. Louis
Salt Lake City
San Antonio,
San Diego
San Francisco
Seattle
Spokane
Tampa
Tucson
Washington


Saturday Today
Hi/Lo/Pcp. Hi/Lo/W
1 43/17/0 28/14/sn
63/55/.95 69/54/pc
45/34/:32 41/31/si
57/40/0 64/49/pc
31/28/.02 37/23/pc
40/34/0 42/24/sn
35/27/0 36/23/c
48/39/.41 47/30/s
31/14/0 11/-2/sn
45/31/0 37/21/pc
48/37/.40 46/29/s'
51/39/0 52/37/pc
40/22/0 42/30/c
28/15/.04 27/20/sn
48/23/0 57/43/pc
60/51/0 61/53/sh
52/47/0 49/44/pc
41/28/0 34/22/c
28/19/0 18/5/c
63/54/.21 68/56/pc
63/35/0 64/44/pc
46/33/.59 43/31/s


NATI


CITY
Acapulco
Amsterdam
Athens
Auckland
Beijing /
Berlin
Buenos Aires,
Cairo
Geneva
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Kingston


Saturday Today
HI/Lo/Pcp. Hi/Lo/W
. 88/75/0 89/79/pc
50/39/.44 52/41/sh
na/na/.78 59/48/sh
68/55/0 62/48/sh
39/16/0 38/21/s
39/32/0 52/36/sh
63/59/0 69/48/pc
72/59/0 69/54/s
43/28/0 54/42/c
82/73/0 84/66/sh
36/32/.19 31/22/sh
68/61/0 71/56/pc
86/68/0 88/79/sh


Saturday
CITY Hi/Lo/Pcp.
La Paz 61/39/.07
Lima 73/64/0
London 52/46/.14
Madrid 46/30/0
Mexico City 72/54/0
Montreal 36/30/0
Moscow 36/25/0
Nairobi 79/59/.01
Nassau , 86/77/0
New Delhi 81/na/0
Oslo . 34/32/.07
Panama ' 91/79/0
Paris 55/43/.22


Today
HI/Lo/W
65/47/sh
75/58/pc
47/35/sh
58/43/pc
73/54/pc
28/14/c
26/10/pc
78/61/sh
79/70/sh
82/59/pc
40/31/rs
89/77/pc
50/42/sh


CITY
Rio
Rome
St. Thom
San Juan
Santiago
Seoul
Singapor
Sydney,
Tel Aviv
Tokyo
Toronto
Vienna
Warsaw


Saturday
HI/Lo/Pcp.
79/68/0
61/43/0
has VI na/na/na
PR 87/76/.05
77/48/0
43/23/0
e 86/7,7/1.98
73/64/0
70/52/0
55/48/0
32/25/0
45/30/0
41/34/0


Today
HI/Lo/W
80/68/t
58/43/pc
85/75/pc
86/76/pc
.62/40/sh
43/26/pc
86/74/t
80/66/pc
59/40/pc
46/39/pc
31/18/sf
45/31/sh'
46/30/c


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c-cloudy, dr-drizzle, f-fair, fg-fog, h-hazy, i-ice, pc-partly cloudy, r-rain, s-sunny,
sh-showers, sn-snow, ts-thunderstorms, w-windy.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER WEATHER SUNDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2009"


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Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lakecityreportercom


Lake City Reporter





SPORTS


Sunday, December 6, 2009


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS

RMS WRESTING, HOOPS
Fundraiser meals
served Monday
A fundraiser meal
to support Richardson
Middle School's girls
basketball and wrestling
programs is planned for
Monday. A pork
sandwich lunch for $5
will be served at the
school from 11:30 a.m. to,
2 p.m. Delivery is
available for orders of
five or more. There also
will be drive-through
meals served, beginning
at 3:30 p.m.
For details and orders,
call Wendy at 623-3641 or
Cindy at 466-9187.

FLAG FOOTBALL
Registration
open for 7-on-7
The Lake City
Parks and Recreation
Department is accepting
registration for its Adult
7-on-7 Football League
through Dec. 18. Entry
fee is $450. A coaches
meeting and rules clinic
is 6:30 p.m. Thursday at
Teen Town.
For details, call
Heyward Christie at
754-3607.

* From staff reports

GAMES

Monday
* Fort White High girls
soccer vs. Lafayette High,
7 p.m. (JV-5)
* Fort White High boys
soccer at Lafayette High,
7 p.m. (JV-5)
* Columbia ,High boys
soccer' at Chiles High,
7 p.m. (JV-5)
* Fort White High boys
basketball vs. Columbia
High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
Tuesday
* Columbia High girls
weightlifting at Union
County High, 5 p.m.
* Fort White High girls
soccer at St. Francis
Catholic High, 5 p.m.
* Fort White High girls
basketball vs. Suwannee
High, 6 p.m.
* Fort White High boys
soccer vs. Suwannee
High, 7 p.m. (JV-5)
* Columbia High girls
basketball at Gainesville
High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
* Columbia High boys
basketball vs. Hamilton
County High, 7:30 p.m.
(JV-6)
Wednesday
* Columbia High
soccer at Oak Hall School,
7 p.m. (girls-5)
Thursday
* Fort White High girls
soccer at Williston High,
5 p.m.
* Fort White High boys
soccer at Newberry High,
7 p.m. (JV-5)
* Fort White High boys
basketball at Santa Fe
High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
Friday
* Columbia High
wrestling at Chiles High
tournament, noon
* Fort White High girls
basketball at Newberry
High, 6 p.m.
* Columbia High
basketball vs.. Lee High,
7:30 p.m. (girls-6)
* Columbia High boys
soccer vs. Ridgeview
High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-5:30)
* Columbia High girls
soccer at Middleburg
High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-5:30)
Saturday
* Columbia High
wrestling at Chiles High
tournament, 8 a.m.
* Columbia High girls
basketball vs. FAMU
School at P.K. Yonge


School, 4:30 p.m.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
-Alabama running back Mark Ingram celebrates after their 32-13 win over Florida in the.NCAA college football SEC championship game at the Georgia Dome
in Atlanta on Saturday. - ""

Alabama wins SEC title with

32-13 win over Florida


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Florida quarterback Tim Tebow walks off the field after
throwing an interception late in the fourth quarter of their
32-13 loss to Alabama in the SEC championship game at the
Georgia Dome in Atlanta on Saturday.


By PAUL NEWBERRY
Associated Press
ATLANTA - Mark Ingram and Greg
McElroy sliced up the fearsome Florida
defense and Tim Tebow finally met his
match, no matter how hard he tried to fire
up his teammates.
With an emphatic 32-13 chomping of
the Gators, the Crimson Tide again stands
atop the Southeastern Conference. More
important, Alabama is just one win away
from an even bigger title - its first nation-
al championship since 1992, led by a coach
who believes in "The Process" instead of
the houndstooth.
Ingram, making a strong bid to claim the
school's first Heisman Trophy, rushed for
113 yards and three touchdowns. McElroy
was 12 of 18 -for 239 yards and a touch-
down to show he's no weak link and No.
2 Alabama rekindled memories of Paul
"Bear" Bryant with the convincing victory,
Saturday.
Alabama (13-0) moves on to Pasadena
for the BCS championship game. Tebow
and the Gators (12-1) will likely settle for
the Sugar Bowl, denied a shot at their third
national title in four years.
When it was over, there were a range of
emotions.
Nick Saban, the no-nonsense, process-
oriented coach who needed only three
years to bring Alabama all the way back
from a miserable era, looked totally out of
character as he leaped up to bump shoul-
ders with Ingram on the sideline.


Tebow found himself in an unusual posi-
tion, too: sitting on the bench and appear-
ing to wipe away tears as the clock ran
out. ,
The Tide led all the way, establishing its
will on the very first drive. In the second
half, Alabama shut 'em down.
Trailing 19-13 at the half, Florida took.
the third-quarter kickoff and came up a
yard short on Tebow's third-and-7 pass to
Riley Cooper. The Gators didn't know it at
the time, but it was over.
Ingram, carried it three straight times
before McElory went down the right side-
line to Maze for a 28-yard pass. A silly
penalty on Jermaine Cunningham - he
shoved McElroy in the back two steps after
the quarterback threw the ball away - set
up a perfect throw and catch.
. McElory rolled to his right,st&pped sud-,
denly and lofted the pass in the other direc-
tion, the ball dropping right over Colin
Peek as he extended his arms to haul in a
17-yard touchdown.
Ingram finished it off with his third TD
early in the fourth, powering over from
the 1 to cap an 88-yard drive - the Tide's
longest of the season.
Tebow, who came back for his senior
year in hopes of winning another title, was
20 of 35 for 247 yards but his last gasp was
picked off in the end zone.
"It's tough. You know it's not how you
want to go out," Tebow said, struggling to
contain his emotions. "They were just bet-


. SEC continued on 2B


Pike rallies No. 5 K

Cincinnati past Pitt


Bearcats come back
from 21-point first
half deficit for win.
By ALAN ROBINSON
Associated Press
PITTSBURGH - No. 5
Cincinnati trailed Pittsburgh by
21 points late in the first half,
a perfect season and BCS bowl
berth in peril. Teammate after
teammate came up to wide receiv-
er Mardy Gilyard asking for a big


play.
Gilyard listened to every'plea,
silently whispered a short prayer,
then relied on his speed and
can't-tackle-me attitude to give
the Bearcats numerous momen-
tum-swinging plays in a game
they led only once - at the end.
Tony Pike's 29-yard touchdown
pass to Armon Binns with 33
seconds left finished the come-
back from a three-touchdown
deficit, and the Bearcats stunned
CINCY continued on 3B


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Cincinnati wide receiver Armon Binns makes a catch for a touchdown against
Pittsburgh in the closing minute of the fourth quarter of an NCAA college football
game in Pittsburgh on Saturday.
















Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


2B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2009


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports
Today
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
8 p.m.
FOX - BCS Selection Show, at Los
Angeles
GOLF
I p.m.
TGC - PGA Tour, Qualifying
Tournament, fifth round, at West Palm
Beach
3 p.m.
NBC - Chevron World Challenge,
final round, atThousand Oaks, Calif.
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
3 p.m.
FSN - Miami at Boston College .
5:30 p.m.
FSN - Kansas at UCLA
7:30 p.m.
FSN - Villanova vs. Maryland, at
Washington
NFL FOOTBALL
I p.m.
CBS - Regional coverage
FOX - Regional coverage
4 p.m.
CBS - Regional coverage
4:15 p.m.'
FOX - Doubleheader game
8:15 p.m.
NBC - Minnesota at Arizona
RODEO
9 p.m.
ESPN2 - PRCA, National Finals,
fourth round, at Las Vegas
SOCCER
I p.m.
ESPN2 - NCAA Division I,Women's
College Cup, championship match,
Stanford vs. North Carolina at College
Station,Texas
3 p.m.
ESPN2 - Spanish Primera Division,
Valencia at Athletic Bilbao
WOMEN'S COLLEGE
BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN2 -Texas atTennessee

Monday
GOLF
12:30 p.m.
TGC - PGA Tour, Qualifying
Tournament, final round, at West Palm
Beach
NFL FOOTBALL
8:30 p.m.
ESPN - Baltimore at Green Bay
NHL HOCKEY
7 p.m.
VERSUS - New Jersey at Buffalo
RODEO
10 p.m.
ESPN2 - PRCA, National Finals, fifth
round, at Las Vegas
WOMEN'S COLLEGE
BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN2 - Florida at Rutgers

FOOTBALL

NFL schedule

AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East


SEC

Continued From Page 1B

ter than us today, offense,
defense, special teams."
Alabama made .up for
its 31-20 loss to Florida in
last year's SEC title game,
a result that was on their
minds every step of the
way. '
"Everything we did all
year long was to beat them,
to be better than them,"
Ingram said.
Saban led LSU to a share
of the 2003 national title
and, after a brief, unhap-
py stint in the NFL, he
returned to take over an
Alabama program that had
gone through four coaches
in seven seasons.
It didn't take long for
Saban to realize just how
passionate the Tide faith-
ful are about their football
- more than 90,000 fans
turned out for the spring
game.
Saban's first year was a
struggle (Alabama even lost
to Louisiana-Monroe) but it
was. clear he had the pro-
gram back on the right track.
In Year 2, the Tide ripped off
12 straight regular-season
wins before Florida ruined
their title hopes, rallying for
a 31-20 victory in the SEC
title game.
Turns out, Saban's team
was merely putting things
off .for a year. Alabama
went 12-0 in the regular
season again, and this time
not even Tebow and the
mighty Gators could stem
the Tide.
As the new SEC cham-
pions celebrated, "Sweet
Home Alabama" blared
over the speakers at the *
Georgia Dome.
"Roll, Tide, roll!" the fans
cheered along.
Florida was short-hand-
ed for a game that has
seemed preordained from
the very first practice of the
season.


New England
N.Y.Jets
Miami
Buffalo


x-Indianapolis
Jacksonville
Tennessee
Houston


Cincinnati
Baltimore
Pittsburgh
Cleveland


San Diego
Denver
Kansas City
Oakland


W L
7 4
6 6
5 6
4 8
South
W L
II '0
6 5
5 6r
5 6
North
W L
8 3
6 5
6 5
I 10
West
W L
8 3
7 , 4
3 8
3 8


T Pct PF PA
0.636 307 202
0.500 249 208
0.455 256 275
0.333 199 261

T Pct PF PA
01.000304184
0.545 202 255
0.455 229 289
0.455 259 243

T Pct PF PA
0.727231 174
0.545257 188
0.545 248 204
0.091 122 279

T Pct PF PA
0.727312 219
0.636 196 189
0.273 183 282
0.273 115 258


NATIONAL CONFERENCE


Dallas
Philadelphia
N.Y. Giants
Washington


New Orleans
Atlanta
Carolina
Tampa Bay


Minnesota
Green Bay
Chicago
Detroit


Arizona
San Francisco
Seattle
St. Louis


East
W L
8 3
7 4
6 5
3 8
South
W L
II 0
6 5
4 7
I 10
North
W L
10 I
7 4
4 .7
2 9'
West
W L
S7 4
5 6
4 7
I 10


T Pct PF PA
0.727 255 182
0.636 293 228
0.545 272 261
0.273 170 205

T Pct PF PA
01.000407221
0.545 272 245
0.364 199 256
0.091 181 314

TPct' PF PA
0.909 342 203
0.636 296 215
0.364216 261
0.182 193 335

T Pct PF PA
0.636 267 217
0.455 228 213
0.364223 250
0.091 130297


x-clinched division
I Today's Games
St. Louis at Chicago, I p.m.
Oakland at Pittsburgh, I p.m.
Denver at Kansas City, I p.m.
Philadelphia at Atlanta, I p.m.
Detroit at Cincinnati, I p.m.
New England at Miami, 1 p.m.
New Orleans atWashington, Il p.m.
Tennessee at Indianapolis, p.m.
Tampa Bay at Carolina, I' p.m.
Houston at Jacksonville; I,p.m.
San Diego at Cleveland, 4:05. p.m.
Dallas at N.Y. Giants, 4:15 p.m.
San Francisco at Seattle, 4:15 p.m.
Minnesota at Arizona, 8:20 p.m.
Monday's Game
Baltimore at Green Bay, 8:30 p.m.
Thursday's Game
Pittsburgh at Cleveland, 8:20 p.m.
Sunday, Dec. 13
Seattle at-Houston, I p.m.
Green Bay at Chicago, I p.m.
Detroit at Baltimore, I p.m.
New Orleans at Atlanta, I p.m.
Buffalo at Kansas City, I p.m.
Denver at Indianapolis, I p.m.
Carolina at New England, I p.m.
N.Y. Jets at Tampa Bay, I p.m.
Miami at Jacksonville, I p.m.
Cincinnati at Minnesota, I p.m.
St. Louis atTennessee, 4:05 p.m.
Washington at Oakland, 4:05 p.m.
San Diego at Dallas, 4:15 p.m.


Philadelphia at N.Y. Giants, 8:20 p.m.
Monday, Dec. 14
Arizona at San Francisco, 8:30 p.m.

BASKETBALL

NBA schedule

EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
Boston 16 4 .800 -
Toronto* 8 13 .381 8'/2
Philadelphia 5 14 .263 10'/
New York 5 15 .250 II
New Jersey I 18 .053 14'h
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
Orlando 15 4 .789 -
Atlanta 13 6 .684 2
Miami 10 9 .526 5
Charlotte 7 II .389 7'/
Washington 7 II .389 7'/
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Cleveland 14 5 737 -
Milwaukee 9 9 .500 4'/
Chicago. 7 10 .412 6
Detroit 7. 12 .368 7
Indiana 6 I I .353 7
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L .Pct GB
Dallas 14 6 .700 -
Houston II 8 .579 2'h
San Antonio 9 7 .563 , 3
New Orleans 8 II .421 5'
Memphis : 8 12 .400 6
Northwest Division
, W L Pct GB
Denver 14 5 .737 -
Utah I1 7 .611 2'
Portland ' 12 8 .600 2'/
Oklahoma City 10 9 .526 4
Minnesota 2 17 .105 12
Pacific Division ' -
W L Pct GB
L.A. Lakers 15 3 .833 -
Phoenix 14 5 .737 I1'
-Sacramento 9 8 .529. 5%'A
L.A. Clippers 8 II .421 7'/
Golden State 6. 12 .333 . 9
Today's Games
New Jersey'at New York, 12 p.m.
Cleveland at Milwaukee, 3 p.m.
Washington at Detroit, 6 p.m.
. Miami at Sacramento, 9 p.m.
Phoenixat LA. Lakers, 9:30 p.m.
Monday's Games
Denver at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Portland at New York, 7:30 p.m.
Golden State at Oklahoma City,
8 p.m.
San Antopio at Utah, 9 p.m.

APTop 25 schedule

Today's Games
No. I Kansas at UCLA, 5:30 p.m.
No. 3 Villanova vs. Maryland at the
Verizon Center, 7:30 p.m.
No. 12 Washington vs.' Cal State
Northridge, 10 p.m.
No. 14 Connecticut vs. Harvard,
I p.m.
No. 18 Clemson vs. South Carolina,
I p.m.
No. 21 FloridaState vs. Florida
International, I p.m.
No. 25 Portland at Idaho, 8:05 p.m.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Alabama's Luther Davis (96) reacts after their 32-13 win.

-" /,,,,,, " THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
L by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square, Broth with onion,
to form four ordinary words. . 7 , -- l that's all there is


Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


Answer here: A
(Answers tomorrow)
Saturday's Jumbles: GUISE FEVER EMPIRE INWARD
ay Answer: What happened when the astronauts began
working - THEY WERE "FIRED"


S. . ASSOCIATED PRESS
Florida quarterback Tim Tebowv(15) fends off Alabama defender Rolando McClain (25) as
he carries the ball during the first quarter of the NCAA college football SEC Championship
game on Saturday.


Costly


Tebo

By CHARLES ODUIM
Associated Press

ATLANTA -
was emotional
Tebow.
The, Florida
was overwhelm
the moment, a
to wipe away tea
stood helplessly
ing the Alabama
Tide celebrate as
seconds counted
the Crimson Tid
victory..
"It's tough," Te
"You know it's no'
want t6 go out."
. Tebow seemed
when the curta
down on his run f
national champion
a second Heismar
It was. an earl
quarter intercept
end zone.
Tebow had led t
down the field an
appeared ready
fueling moment
possible comeb
With the ball at
6,: Tebow was
for his tight en

ACROSS

1 Meadow
youngster
5 Strut along
8 Put down
11 Kind of rug
12 October's
stone
14 Make mistakes
15 Wrigley prod-
ucts
16 Sarge's pooch
17 Give the
go-ahead
18 Pitcher's drea
game (hyph.)
20 Fine cigar
22 Speaker's
pauses
23 Kellerman or
Dunaway
24 At - -
for words
27 Brown bird
29 Ad- - (impro-
vise)
30 Glasslike
34 Drive away


y interception ends


w s comeback bid

1 ,, Hernandez, but Alabama's more to match the Alabama
Javier Arenas picked .off attack led by quarterback
the pass. Greg McElroy and running
The end . After the errant throw, a back Mark Ingram, who
for Tim dejected Tebow jerked his rushed for three touch
. , - hin straps off his helmet, downs.
standout then lingered on the field Tebow finished with 6:
med by as the replay played inside yards. rushing while corn
appearing the Georgia Dome. He then pleting 20 of 35 passes fo:
ars as he slowly walked back to'the 247 yards with one-touch
y Watch- Florida sideline. down and an interception.
Crimson Florida coach Urban Tebow, who won the
the final Meyer, who threw his head- Heisman Trophy as a soph
down in set to the ground with the more, entered the game
le's 32-13 interception, approached as a top contender this
Tebow on the sideline and year. He rushed 'for 79(
*bow said. offered a reassuring pat yards and 13 touchdowns
t how you on his quarterback's rear and passed for 2,166 yard:
end. The two had a brief and 17 touchdowns in thi
to kilow exchange of words before regular season.
ain came Tebow was left standing. He threw only four inter
for a third alone, staring- at the field ceptions in 244 attempt:
nship and during a long timeout. in the regular season, bu
n Trophy. Tebow didn't give up. he'll have difficulty forget
ly fourth- He led Florida back into ting his only interception ii
ion in the Alabama territory on the Saturday's game.
Gators' next possession, The loss ended Florida'
the Gators .but again the 'Crimson 22-game winning streak. I
id Florida. Tide's defense held firm. was the Gators' first los
to score, Florida did not score in the since a 31-30 home setback
um. for a second half. . . to Mississippi on Sept
)ack bid. Tebow 'completed a 23- 27, 2008. The Gators thel
Alabama's yard touchdown pass to won 10 straight to finish
looking David Nelson in the, sec- 13-1 and win the national
id, Aaron ond quarter, but he needed championship.


Sm





m


37 Double helix
38 Goes bad :
39 Takes advice
41 Endow
43 Airline
ticket word
44 Rio Grande
town
46 Theme
49 Mouths,
in biology
50 Bond's alma
mater
52 Coup d'-
54 Aunt or bro.
55 Eat sparingly
56 Ms. Montez
57 Magazine
execs
58 Almost grads
59 Zipped along

DOWN


1
2
. 3
4
5


Hang back
Make - - for it
Note
Big parties
Waders


a
k


1-

3
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e
s
6
s
s
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Answer to Previous Puzzle

F IS FIG H-1RE
OR EIRA Y VIES
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MEX FA E
0LORAINOIN
LEO SIE TIHEN
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J A A CIHEIS'T
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I N-CAS OPPOS E
SL AT P NESFO0R
PA NE IDES FR I
AC ED TAD SE C


6'- out ,
(withdraw)
7 Storm track
8 Hold up
9 Peace
goddess


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10 Mex. miss
13 Lazybones
19 Capone foe
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40 Artists' stands
41 Got along
42 Where Asia
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in volcanos
44 Folk wisdom
45 Elevator
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47 Up above
48 Connecticut
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51 Above,
to a bard
53 A little bit


12-7 � 2009 by NEA, Inc.


2B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2009


BALTIR
l 1 /
7^ -- L


















Arizona hands



USC another loss


Associated Press

LOS ANGELES - Juron
Criner stumbled into the
end zone with a 36-yard
touchdown'pass from Nick
Foles with 3:14 to play, and,
Arizona. wrapped up its
best regular season in a
decade.
Foles passed for 239
yards for the Wildcats (8-
4, 6-3 Pac-10), who finally
beat USC for the first time
in coach Mike Stoops' ten-
ure by scoring the final
TD in a defense-dominated
game.
After Jordan Congdon
made a 37-yard field goal
with 7:13 .left to put the
Trojans. (8-4,- 5-4) ahead,
Arizona converted three
straight" third downs. .on,
the decisive drive., Criner
then caught a long fade
pass and fought through a
tackle into the end zone.,
After beginning the
season in search of their
eighth straight Pac-10 title
and BCS bowl berth, the
Trojans are likely to fin-
ish in sixth place. A, vic-
tory over Arizona likely
would. have put them in
the Holiday Bowl, but now
they could be headed for a
more humbling trip to San
Diego for the Poinsettia
Bowl:

No. 6 Boise State 42,
New Mexico State 7
BOISE, Idaho - Doug
Martin had four touchdown
runs and Boise State fin-
ished unbeaten for the sec-
ond consecutive season.
Kellen Moore threw for
272 yards and a score forthe
Broncos (13-0, 8-0 Western
Athletic Conference) ,-who
finished 12-0 last year but
were left out of the Bowl:
Championship Series. The
Broncos will have to wait
until Sunday night to see
if they make it into one of
the big-money bowls this
season.
Boise State's defense
held the Aggies (3-10, 1-7)
to just 49 yards passing
and 191 yards overall.

No. 24 W. Virginia 24,
Rutgers 21
PISCATAWAY, N.J.
- Noel Devine and Ryan
Clarke each ran for a
touchdown andJTThomas'
interception with 1:59 left
sealed it for West Virginia.
In beating Rutgers for
the 15th straight time,
West Virginia (9-3, 5-2 Big
East) earned a berth in.
the Gator Bowl, possibly


ASSOCIATED PR^qSS
Arizona wide receiver Juron Criner(82) and teammate
Adam Grant celebrate after Criner scored a touchdown
against Southern California during the second half of their
game in Los Angeles on Saturday.


against Florida State and
former WVU coach Bobby
Bowden in his final game.
The Scarlet Knights (8-4,
34), who dropped to 4-31-2
against the Mountaineers,
could go to any of four
bowl.
Devine, the Big East's
second-leading rusher,
:was held to 65 yards while
quarterback Jarrett Brown
completed 10 of 20 passes
for 116 yards. .4
Rutgers ' quarterback
Tom Savage' was 9 for
27 for 153 yards and two
interceptions. Mohammed
Sanu caught six passes for
105 yards.

East Carolina 38,
No. 18 Houston 32�
GREENVILLE, N.C.
- Dominique Lindsay and
Giavanni Ruffin each ran
for two touchdowns while
East Carolina's defense
hung in against Houston's
powerful offense in. the
Conference USA champi-
onship game.
Dwayne Harris had a big
day with 123 yards receiv-
ing and a 22-yard touch-
down catch. He also had
a 69-yard kickoff return to


set up East Carolina's first
touchdown, helping the
Pirates (9-4) beat the mis-
take-prone Cougars (10-3)
for their -second straight
league title.
East Carolina is the first
team to win consecutive C-
USA titles since the league
went to divisional play in
2005.
Case Keenum com-
pleted 56 of 75 passes for
527 yards and five TDs for
Houston. James Cleveland
had 19 catches for a title
game-record 241 yards and
three scores.

Fresno State 53,
Illinois 52
CHAMPAIGN, Ill. -
Offensive lineman Devan
Cunningham caught ' a
deflected pass with 2 sec-
onds left and stumbled into
the end zone for a 2-point
conversion, giving Fresno
State a wild 53-52 victory
over Illinois on Saturday.
Ryan Colburn connected
with Jamel Hamler from 19
yards to get the Bulldogs
,(8-4) within 52-5L, and
coach Pat Hill elected to go
for the win rather than take"
his chances in overtime. ,


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Cincinnati-wide receiver Mardy Gilyard (center) celebrates with teammates after making a
,batch for a two-point conversion against Pittsburgh during the fourth quarter of an NCAA
collegeeg e football game in Pittsburgh on Saturday.

CINCY: Pulls off miracle comeback


Continued From Page 1B
No. 14 Pittsburgh 45-44 on
Saturday to secure their
second straight Big East
title.
The first de facto Big
East championship game
since the conference began
playing football in 1991
was a .high-scoring clas-
sic. Freshman Dion Lewis'
three touchdowns and 194
yards rushing on 47 carries
in a Tony Dorsett-like per-
formance carried Pitt (9-3,
5-2) to leads of 31-10, 38-24
and 44-38, only to have the
Gilyard-led Bearcats (12-0,
7-0) rally each time.
Gilyard gave the Bearcats
a much-needed jolt with a
99-yard kickoff return only
.70 seconds before halftime
- immediately after coach
Brian Kelly and a half-dozen
teammates pleaded for a
game-changing play - and
he made it 31-24 in the third
quarter with a 68-yard scor-
ing catch.
Gilyard's 49-yard kickoff
return also led to Pike's
8-yard scoring pass to D.J.
Woods that cut Pitt's lead
to 38-30 early in the fourth
quarter. Gilyard has four
kickoff return touchdowns
in his career and three kick
return scores this season.
"Mardy Gilyard was abso-
lutely brilliant," Kelly said.
'The kickoff return was the
spark that got us back into
the game."
.Gilyard didn't do it all by
himself. Pike shook off a
rough opening three quar-
ters to complete his final 11


passes for 128 yards and two
touchdowns. Binns made
five catches for 104 yards
in an offense that came in
averaging 473 yards and 39
points. .
"We were going through
the motions," Pike said of
falling behind 31-10 in the
second quarter. "We were
trying to make too many
big plays. But then Mardy
got us gding, "just like he
has so many times."
Cincinnati heads off to
the BCS for the second sea-
son in a row with its first
12-0 record, while Pitt's sec-
ond consecutive loss dooms
the Panthers to a minor
bowl only two weeks after
the Panthers were 9-1 and
ranked in the top_10.
Kelly, wearing a red,
white and blue Big East
championship cap, refused
to discuss rumors that
Notre Dame is interested
in him or that he's told his
Cincinnati players he's stay-
ing.
"I'm not going to talk
about any job situations," he
said. "Let's talk about back-
to-back championships and
these kids."
PittcoachDaveWannstedt
called .it "a tough, heart-
breaking loss, to say the
least," and his players' faces
said it was eveiiworse than
that.
Linebacker Adam Gunn
became uipset with ques-
tions about' how Cincinnati
drove 61 yards in only 63
seconds for -the decisive


score. Lewis didn't talk to
reporters despite playing
one of the' best games by
any running back in school
history.
"I 'told. my teammates
that we had a terrific
ride," defensive end Mick
Williams said. "It's a tough
way to end, and I really
don't know how to describe
it."
'Lewis, breaking Craig
"Ironhead" Heyward's 1987
school record of 42 carries
in a game, put Pitt ahead
44-38 with 1:36 remaining
on a 5-yard run. But holder
Andrew Janocko mishan-
dled a perfect snap from
center and Pitt never got
off the extra point, a costly
mistake.
Lewis, whose 1,640 yards
are 46 shy of Dorsett's
freshman season total of
1,686 yards in 1973, had
116 yards on 29 carries and
.three catches by halftime.
Cincinnati also failed to,
convert an extr4 point but
made ,up f O it Vlth .a 2-
pointer. Pike was held to 8
completions in. his first 22
attempts, but went 4 of 4
on the final drive and fin-
ished 22 of 44 for 302 yards
despite throwing three
interceptionss,
"H'e had to fight through
'it,' said KelPy, 'who briefly
m warmed ,up backup Zach
*Collaros early in. the third
quarterx. "He.,made. some
mistakes, he normally
doesn't make,' but he .was
theguy. . . ;-._


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LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2009
,=


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420













LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2009


Lady Tigers


want to take


next step


By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter. comn

Columbia High returns
to the gym on Tuesday in
hopes of making another
run toward state. Coach
Mitch Shoup returns with a
group of six girls who cjuali-
fled for the state meet last
season.
Among the returnees
are Pheobe Johnson, Tara
Stephens, Ashley Shaw,
Amber Thomas, Alaina
Timmons and Celeste
Gomez. Stephens finished
second in state last season,
while Timmons tied for
first, but ended up-third.
Gomez leads the Lady
Tigers after a state champi-
onship performance in the
183-pound class.
"Celeste is coming off
a state championship year
and, you're always worried
they're satisfied with what
they've done," Shoup said.
"She received a softball
scholarship with Florida
State and that's her true.
passion. Still, we want her
to excel in weightlifting and
when she's been in the gym
she's had that same hunger
and desire every day."
- This year, Gomez has cut
weight and will move down
to the 169-pound weight
class.
"She's looking good at
169 as well," Shoup said. "I
feel pretty comfortable that
she can repeat She's work-
ing toward that."
Besides Gomez, Shoup
feels the rest of the return-
ing lifters should be ready
to go as well.
"I feel we have a pretty
solid team coming back this
year," he said. "We should,
be competitive. It's grow-
ing bigger anrd bigger every
year. There's always better
lifters. We added a couple
of really good, young girls
that are going to be strong


lifters."
Among the new group is
Zana Robers, Alex Williams,
Alyssa Barwick and Jordan
Masters. Shoup feels that
he could have a special
group with these lifters.
"Roberts, at the 199-
pound class, hasn't been lift-
ing but a couple of months,"
he said. "She just started
three weeks ago and she's
going. to be. a good one.
Barwick, at the 129-pound
class, is a freshman as well.
She's progressing quickly.
Then we have some girls
that just missed by a place
or two that have a good
chance at qualifying this
year."
One of the principal
concerns with the sport
of weightlifting is injLry.
Shoup is already battling
that this season, but the
team hopes it does not turn
into a deal breaker.
"We'll battle a couple of
injuries," Shoup said. "We
have a girl with an injured
shoulder and Alaina has
been suffering from a previ-
ous back injury. We'll nurse
it for a'week or two."
The Lady Tigers just
want to be in top form for
the state meet, where they
are expected to be amongst
the prime players.
"Spruce Creek has
won all; of the state finals
since girls weightlifting
has been in existence," he
said. "We finished third last
.year behind New Smyrna
Beach. Spruce Creek has
dominated, but the gap is
getting closer. It should be
a three way race for the top
three again. We're excited
to get going. The girls are
excited."
It all begins on Tuesday
as the Lady Tigers travel to
Union County for a 5 p.m.
meet. The first home date
is against Fort White and
Santa Fe on Dec. 15.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Texas quarterback Colt McCoy (12) is tackled as he
scrambles out of the pocket by Nebraska defensive epd.
Cameron Meredith (34) in the first half of the Big 12
Conference championship game on Saturday in Arlington,
Texas.


Texas survives

against Nebraska


Associated Press

ARLINGTON, Texas
- Colt McCoy and No. 3
Texas are headed for the
BCS championship game.
Hunter Lawrence nailed
a 46-yard field goal as time
expired, giving McCoy and
the Longhorns a 13-12 vic-
tory over No. 21 Nebraska
in the Big 12 championship
on Saturday night.
McCoy was hit, hurried
and hassled by waves of
Cornhuskers, dazing the
winningest quarterback in
college football history into


a guy who made a bunch
of freshman mistakes -
including the nearly costly
flub of letting time run out
on his chance of reaching
the title game.
Officials put 1 second
back on the clock and
Lawrence converted to keep
the Longhorns undefeated.
Texas players flung helmets
and rushed the field to cele-
brate this agonizingly close
conference championship.
The Cornhuskers slunked
off, unable to believe they
weren't going away with the
upset.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Celeste Gomez is cheered on by members of the weightlifting squad in a meet last season.
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Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420














Story ideas?

Contact
Tom Mayer
Editor
754-0428
tmayer@lakecityreporter.com


Lake City Reporter




BUSINESS


Sunday, December 6, 2009


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section C


ON BUSINESS


'Tis the season for giving


Lake City Reporter


annual community food drive under way


Jerry Osteryoung
(850) 644-3372
jostery@comcast.net

Lean

on your

suppliers

There are risks and costs
to a program of action. But
they are far less than the
long-range risks and costs of
comfortable inaction.
- John Fitzgerald -
Kennedy
Going through
these very dif-
ficult economic
times, control-
ling cost is one
of the major things that you
can do to really help your
bottom line. Now is the
time to renegotiate every-
thing from rent to cost of
goods sold.
So many of your vendors
are having such trouble
with falling sales that they
are now willing to take
significant price reduc-
tions, but you must ask for
them. Your suppliers need
to retain you as a customer
now more than ever, and
they should be willing to
SUPPUERS continued on 2C


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.comt
T rhe Second
S'Annual Lake
City Reporter
Community
_' Food Drive runs
until Dec. 12 and organiz-
ers are hoping to surpass
last year's collection totals.
Approximately 7,500
pounds of food was col-
lected and donated to
the Suwannee Valley
Food Bank during last
year's Lake City Reporter
Community Food Drive.
The amount of food col-
lected benefited 500 local
households, said Scott
Elkins, food bank director.
"I was very impressed
from the canned drive
last year," he said. "The
attitude of the folks-(at -
the Reporter) was one of
excitement."
All the food donations will
remain in Columbia County
and help local residents.
"People are hungry in
our community and while
last year's need for food
donations was daunting, the
plight of many families in
our community this year is
worse," said Todd Wilson,
publisher of the Lake City
Reporter. "The need for
food is even greater. It
is tragic to imagine that
many of our friends and
neighbors will be hungry


Lake City Reporter Circulation Director Russell Waters stands by food collected so far for the newspaper's second annual
community food drive. The drive runs until Dec. 12.


at Christmas. We hope the
community will rally around
this effort and give a few
canned goods in order to
help those less fortunate in
Columbia County."
Recommended canned


goods include green beans,'
peas and corn. Peanut butter,
jelly, rice, instant potatoes
and beans are also accepted.
"Those types of items are
real staples," Elkins said.
The present economy


has a lot of people hurting;
Elkins ,said.
"Ifs so bad a time," he
said. "There's a loss of jobs
or incomes. A lot of people
out there need help."
Elkins said he has


extreme gratitude to the
staff and management at
the Lake City Reporter of
their support.
"It's important to demon-
strate to the community we
care," he said.


I


Seasons Greetings to our patients,
their families and the North Florida community -
that we are privileged to serve.


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higher late fees if you don't make a
monthly payment in time. Many
banks are also reintroducing
annual fees on accounts that :
don't generate enough .
income through charge
volume or carrying balances. Don't
be surprised to see new monthly
maintenance fdes soon, too.
Most of us have gotten used to the
idea of "free" checking with few
fees, but that's changing, too. "Free"
checking has been profitable for
banks because of stiff fees - often
$3O to $40 - when customers over-


stocK in wmcn you no longer nave ...... .- ....- .......
** **............ .....*..*.. * ***** *drawtheiraccounts. Accordingto
Na e ha*o. confidence. Instead, you can move
SName Tat Company what's left of your money into a the FDIC, about one quarter of cus-
... 1 "more attractive stock, and aim tomers pay all these fees, essentially,
When my founder was 19, : make your money back there, subsidizing the other three quarters.
he n Th Gree F ro However, Washington may restrict
r ehe opened The Green Frog * . Do you have an embarrass- banks' ability to charge these fees,
S.. restaurant, featuring "Service ing lesson learned the hard since they fall disproportionately on
.. With"a Hop." Borr in 1968 arid . way?Boilitdown to100 ow-incomor elderlyustomers
wita Hop. Bo iw 19 8- (olss . an . e - ' " " '\wholwcan least afford dl themC.
based in Orlando, Fla.,' I'm the wo (or less) dsendeit These fees are a warning sign for
* toThe Motley Fool c/o My Dumbest Invest- investors They risk driving off cus-
S.WOrldS largest full-service-dining meant. Got one that worked? Submit to My tomers, so revenues may be at risk
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Bahama 'reeze, LongHorn Steak- LAST WEEK'S TRIVIA ANSWER
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n emissions control, telecommunications, semiconductor, aerospace, defense,
American eateries, offer no franchises , astronomy, metrology and life sciences industries. I trace my history back to


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* * *�" * . S * * * * * * * " * "" * * * * )" ....l" ............................................li.ck (
46209rl Scientists mull life with tIIrobotSOR I123/2009)

Scientists mull life with robots


In this'photo made Nov. 24, Eric Horvitz, former president of the Association for the
Advancement of Artificial Intelligence, poses for a photo with a camera from a currently
non-functioning computerized receptionist outside of his in his office at Microsoft Corp., in
Redmond, Wash., where he works as a researcher.


SUPPLIERS: Help offset losses


Continued From Page 1C
do most anything that is
reasonable to keep your
business.
We were helping a firm
that purchased over $5 mil-
lion a year from its primary
suppliers. These suppliers
had quickly passed along
their cost increases - par-
ticularly transportation
costs - to this business.
Now that sales were falling
off, the company needed
* - some relief if it was going
to survive.
When asked why they
had not requested a price
break before, the com-
ment was, "Our purchasing
ageht just does not feel
comfortable in asking for
these." As you can imag-
ine, I went livid and asked
the owner if a savings of $1
million (20 percent of $5
million) was worth asking
for.
He finally got the point
that now things had
changed and that unless
he was willing to demand
price reductions from his
suppliers, he might not be
around much longer. He


was able to get his pur-.
chasing agent to buy in by
giving him a percentage of
the savings from the cost
reductions they secured
and by very clearly dem-
onstrating how to ask ven-
dors for price breaks.
At first, the purchas-
ing agent just wanted the
vendor to give them a
better price. The owner,
however, mandated that
the purchasing agent start
off asking for a 20 percent
price reduction from those
suppliers that they knew
had nice profit margins and
could afford it. Starting
with a number established
an expectation that was
reasonable rather than just
asking for any type of price
break.
When asking for price
reductions, nothing should
be off limits. Whether it
is consultants' salaries or
office supplies, you must
demand price reductions
in these market condi-
tions. You must ensure that
your company has a cost
structure that is workable


in today's economy. Your
viability depends on this.
Even if you have signed
a contract for service,
these should be renego-
tiated as well. A recent
study found that six out of
every 10 chief information
officers are renegotiating
existing contractual agree-
ments. When renegotiat-
ing, your leverage is that
these contracts will have to
be renewed in the future,
and your willingness to
renew is going to be a func-
tion of this renegotiation
process.
Now go out and initiate
a process of renegotiating
each and every one of your
purchase contracts. This
just cannot wait. It must be
done as quickly as possible
to get the benefits flowing
into your company.
You can do this!
* FSU Finance Professor
Dr. Jerry Osteryoung is
Executive Director of the Jim
Moran Institute for Global
Entrepreneurship at Florida
State University's College of
Business.


By BROOKE DONALD
Associated Press
PALO ALTO, Calif.
- Eric Horvitz illustrates
the potential dilemmas of
living with robots by telling
the story of how he once
got stuck in an elevator at
Stanford Hospital with a
droid the size of a washing
machine.
"I remembered thinking,
'Whoa; this is scary,' as
it whirled around, almost
knocking me down," the
Microsoft researcher
recalled. "Then, I thought,
'What if I were a patient?'
There could be big issues
Ess here."
We're still far from the
sci-fi dream of having
robots whirring about and
catering to our every need.
But little by little, we'll be
sharing more of our space
with robots in the next


decade, as prices drop and
new technology creates
specialized machines that
clean up spilled milk or
even provide comfort for
an elderly parent.
Now scientists and legal
scholars are exploring the
likely effects. What hap-
pens if a robot crushes'your
foot, chases your cat off a .
ledge or smacks your baby?
While experts don't expect '
a band of Terminators to
attack or a "2001: A Space
Odyssey" computer that
takes control, even simpler,
benign robots will have
legal, social and ethical con-
sequences..
"As we rely more and
more on automated sys-
tems, we have to think of
the implications. It is part
of being a responsible sci-
entist," Horvitz said.
Horvitz assembled a
team of scientists this year


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when he was president
of the Association for the
Advancement of Artificial
Intelligence and asked
them to explore the future
of human-robot interac-
tions. A report on their dis-
cussions is due next year.
For years, robots have
been used outside the
. home. They detect bombs
'on the battleground, build
cars in factories and 'deliver
supplies and visit patients
in hospitals. '
But the past few years
haVe seen the rise of home
robots. Mainly they are
utsedfor tasks like vacuum-
ing (thinkRoomba). There
are also robotic lawn mow-.
eis,'duct cleanets, surveil-
lance systems and alarm
- clocks. There are robotic
toys for entertainment,
such as Furby. By 2015,
personal robot sales in the
U.S. will exceed $5 billion.


www.maronda.com


386-418-0224


QB4649 ....


The Motley Fool

To Educate, Amuse & Enrich


4w /f� 4 Odire'r , .&ever A4w'/

Smbearonda Home
11imberlands


E"I'IXIIM.


Page Editor: Troy Roberts, 754-0427


i V PM T,1-I'-TM a -T I




















Page Editor: Tom Mayer, 754-0428


LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS- SUNDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2009


S Weekly Stock Exchange Highlights


I NYSE
7,182.71 +112.62


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name .Last Chg %Chg
Prime pfB 5.15 +1.50 +41.1
RadianGrp 6.06 +1.59 +35.6
MGIC 5.24 +1.26 +31.7
DirREBullI 134.61 +29.87 +28.5
US Aiwy 4.43 +.96 +27.7
AMR 7.37 +1.56 +26.9
DeltaAir 9.94 +2.03 +25.7
AvisBudg 11.97 +2.35 +24.4
AirTran 5.16 +1.01 +24.3
FairchldS 9.91 +1.91 +23.9

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
GATXpf 146.65-76.72 -34.3
DirREBear 13.91 -4.47 -24.3
ProUShtRE 7.92 -1.52 -16.1
GameStop 21.33 -3.99 -15.8
BkABM RE 4.64 -.86 -15.6
McClatchy 2.55 -.44 -14.7
PrUShtSem19.91 -3.35 -14.4
LeeEnt 3.20 -.52 -14.0
DirxEMBear 5.04 -.74 -12.8
DirxSCBear 11.10 -1.62 -12.7

Most Active (si$ or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
BkofAm 20271754 16.28 +.82
Citgrp 12707934 4.06 ...
SPOR 7967265111.01 +1.44
SPDR Fncl5720313 14.63 +.35
iShEMkts 4107212 41.84 +1.71
GenElec 3930585 16.20 +.26
DirFBear rs3897421 19.49-1.75
FordM 3593272 8.94 +.21
iShR2K 3458879 60.42+2.84
iShJapn 2736971 9.99 +.62

Diary
Advanced 2,443
Declined 737
New Highs 506
New Lows 25
Total issues 3,214
Unchanged 34
Volume 23,532,688,1601


I Amex
1,792.48 +31.70


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
Ever-Gloly 3.14 +.84 +36.5
TianyinPh 4.30 +1.02 +31.1
Taseko 3.98 +.89 +28.8
AlexcoR g 3.42 +.71 +26.2
HKHighpw 6.25 +1.19 +23.4
TrioTch 3.38 +.63 +22.9
AmO&G 3.43 +.62 +22.1
Invitel 3.55 +.61 +20.7
ChinaPhH n 3.66 +.56 +18.1
Geokinetics12.42 +1.76 +16.5

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
UlEscapes 4.15 -1.25 -23.1
SoCTBcp 2.70 -.80 -22.9
Pfotalix 8.09 -2.25 -21.8
IncOpR 6.17 -1.43 -18.8
ChMda wt 4.24 -.92 -17.8
MercBcp 3.05 -.55 -15.3
IEC Elec n 3.55 -.60 -14.5
ChinaMda 10.54 -1.76 -14.3
TremisE un 7.01 -1.01 -12.6
Flanign 5.75 -.77 -11.8

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
GoldStrg 421443 ,3.71 -.03
Taseko 315066 3.98 +.89
NovaGld g 253068 6.10 +.62
Rentech 219270 1.55 +.08
GrtBasG g 182048 1.69 +.15
Protalix . 175930 8.09-2.25
GranTrrag 172469 5.99 +.31
NthgtMg 168587 3.27 +.11
CelSci 159275 1.21 -.08
NwGoldg 150195 3.80 +.22

Diary
Advanced 361
Declined 237
New Highs .65
New Lows 19
Total issues 623
Unchanged 25
Volume 740,957,823


2,194.35 +55.91


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
MdwstBVpf 2.64 +1.79 +210.6
ICO Inc 6.69 +2.57 +62.4
CompCrd 3.93 +1.41 +56.0
ChinAgrin 26.66 +8.23 +44.7
WHXCorp 2.00 +.60 +42.9
BioFuelEn 2.91 +.87 +42.8
NaugatVly 7.35 +2.10 +40.0
Oculus 2.00 +.57 +39.9
Cylod iwt 4.40 +1.20 +37.5
GSITech 4.58 +1.18 +34.7

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
ChXDPIs n 7.40 -3.38 -31.4
TakeTwo 7.74 -3.50 -31.1
ColonyBk 3.69 -1.50 -28.9
FCtyBFL 2.51 -.98 -28.1
Netlisth 4.51 -1.74 -27.8
Ziopharm 2.96 -.92 -23.7
Versant 15.14 -3.96 -20.8
StaarSur 3.00 -.71 -19.1
SalemCm 4.07 -.92 -18.4
Clearfield 2.68 -.59 -18.0

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol(00) Last Chg
PwShs QQQ415342644.12 +.61
ETrade 3161801 1.70 +.11
Intel 2662062 20.46+1.35
Microsoft 2307956 29.98 +.76
Comcast 1966284 16.13+1.25
Cisco 1894476 24.16 +.78
Dell Inc 1685457 13.46 -.68
Oracle 1259103 22.83 '+.74
HuntBnk 1203757 3.69 +.10
BrcdeCm 1054836 7.04 -.19

Diary
Advanced 1,982
Declined 910
New Highs 267
New Lows 93
Total issues 2,955
Unchanged 63
Volume 10,580,280,231


The ..Week.i..


STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST "


Wkly Wkly YTD
Name Ex Div Last Chg%Chg%Chg


AT&T Inc NY 1.64
AMD NY
Alcoa NY .12
AutoZone NY
BkofAm NY .04
BkAm pfS NY ...
BobEvn Nasd .72
BrMySq NY 1.24
CNBFnPA Nasd .66
CSX NY .68
ChampEhNY ...
Chevron NY 2.72
Cisco Nasd ...
Citigrp NY
CocaCI NY 1.64
CoIBgp NY
Coamcast Nasd .38
Delhaize NY 2.01
Dell Inc Nasd ...
DirFBear rs NY
DirxSCBearNY
ETrade Nasd
FPLGrp NY 1.89
FamilyDIr NY .54
FordM NY ...
GenElec NY .40
HomeDp NY .90
iShJapn NY .12


27.60 +.61 +2.3 -32
7.86 +1.01 +14.7+263.9
12.99 +.33 +2.6 +15.4
152.08 +2.03 +1.4 +9.0
16.28 +.82 +5.3 +15.6
15.94 ... ...
26.78 +1.45 +5.7 +31.1
25.14 -.24 -0.9 +8.1
15.92 -.55 -3.3 +42.3
50.13 +2.60 +5.5 +54.4
.20 ... ... -64.3
78.07 -.10 -0.1 +5.5
24.16 +.78 +3.3 +48.2
4.06 ... ... -39.5
57.49 +.31 +0.5 +27.0
.41 ...... -80.0
16.13 +1.25 +8.4 -4.4
79.30 +2.96 +3.9 +25.9
13.46 -.68 -4.8 +31.4
19.49 -1.75 -8.2 -94.5
11.10 -1.62 -12.7 -76.8
1.70 +.11 +6.9 +47.8
52.75 +1.17 +2.3 +4.8
28.28 -2.74 -8.8 +8.5
8.94 +.21 +2.4+290.4
16.20 +.26 +1.6
28.08 +.70 +2.6 +22.0
9.99 +.62 +6.6 +4.3


Weekly Dow Jones


Dow Jones Industrials 34.92 126.74 -18.90
Close: 10,388.90 , 'k
1-week change: 78.98 (0.8%) MON TUES WED
11,000 ... .........


-86.53 22.75


THUR FRI


" 1 0 ,0 0 0 ... .... ... ...... ......... .... . ..










MUTUAL FUNDS
Total Assets Total Return/Rank Pct gin Inil
Name Ob| ($Mins) NAV 4-wk 12-mo 5-year Load Invt


iShEMkts NY .59
iShR2K NY .83
Intel Nasd .63
JPMorgCh NY .20
Lowes NY .36
McDnlds NY 2.20
MicronT NY
Microsoft Nasd .52
Motorola NY
NY Times NY
NobftyH Nasd .25
OcdPet NY 132
Penney NY .80
PepsiCor NY 1.80
Pfizer NY .64
Potash NY .40
PwShsQQQNasd .18
PrUShS&PNY 11.47
Ryder NY 1.00
SearsHIdgsNasd ...
SouthnCo NY , 1.75
SprintNex NY
SPDR NY 2.42
SPDR FncdNY .38
TmneWm rsNY .75
US NGsFd NY
WalMart NY 1.09
WellsFargo NY .20


41.84 +1.71 +4.3 +67.6
60.42 +2.84 +4.9 +22.7
20.46 +1.35 +7.1 +39.6
41.74 +.41 +1.0 +34.0
22.88 +.92 +4.2 +6.3
61.59 -2.01 -3.2 -1.0
8.45 +1.15 +15.8+220.1
29.98 +76 +2.6 +54.2
8.18 -.02 -0.2 +84.7
8.72 -.04 -0.5 +19.0
10.06 +.56 +5.9 +27.2
78.65 -2.55 -3.1 +31.1
27.90 -1.67 -5.6 +41.6
63.85 +2.00 +32 +16.6
18.49 +.24 +1.3 +4.4
117.06 +5.42 +4.9 +59.9
44.12 +.61 +1.4 +48.4
35.82 -.99 -2.7 -49.5
42.53 +1.93 +4.8 +9.7
72.71 +.77 +1 1 .871
32.83 +1.22 +39 -113
3.69 -.06 -1610t16
111.01 +1.44 +1.3 +23.0
14.63 +.35 +2.5 +16.9
31.42 +57 +1.8 .+40.9
8.64 -1.19-12.1 -62.7
54.24 -.39 -0.7 -3.2
26.96 -.18. -0.7 -8.5


+18.2/C
+43.0/C
+29.3/D
+37.2/B
+36.0/D
+47.5/C
+34.1/C
+32.1/C
+34.9/C
+34.3/C
+40.4/A
+58.4/A'
+25.7/D
+68.6/A
+50.9/D
+53.2/B
+17.9/C
+43.8/A
+45.5/A
+27.2/D
+31.3/C
+34.3/C
+18.5/C
+49.9/B
+37.4/B
+58.9/A
+34.3/C


+7.0/A
+3.0/A
+4.3/C
+1.0/B
+4.6/A
+6.7/A
+0.5/C
+3.2/B
+1.8/B
+0.6/C
-0.3/D
+8.5/A
+0.5/C
+6,3/A
+4.2/D
+6.1/A
+6.7/A
+4.2/A
+3.8/B
+2.2/C
+5.2/A
+0.6/C
+2.6/E
+4.1/A
+1.1/B
+6.1/B
+0.7/C


NL 5,000,000
5.75 250
5.75. 250
NL 3,000
NL ' 2,500
5.75 250
NL -3,000
5.75 250
5.75 250
NL 5,000,000
NL 2,500
5.75 250
5.75 250
NL . 2,500
NL 2,500
5.75 250
NL 5,000,000
5.75 250
4.25 1,000
5.75 250
NL 10,000
NL 100,000
3.75 250
NL 2,500
NL 100,000
NL 3,000
NL 200,000,000


PIMCOTotRetlls Cl
American Funds GrthAmA m LG
American Funds CaplncBuA m IH
Vanguard TotStkdx LB
Fideity Contra LG
American Funds CpWIdGrIA m WS
Vanguard 5001nv LB
American Funds IncAmerA m MA
American Funds InvCoAmA m LB
Vanguard nstlla LB
Dodge & Co. Soci* LV
Amencan Funds EurPacGiA m FB
Amencan Funds WAMutlnA m LV
Dodge & Coi inlSe FV
Fiellit Dmiviln d FG
Amencan Funds NewPerspA m WS
PIMCOTolRelAdm b CI
Arr.encan Funds FnlnA m , LB
FrankTemp-FrSj kinh Iinme A nm CA
American Funds BalA m MA
Vanguard Welltn MA
Vanguard 500Adinl . LB '
American Funds BondA m Cl
Fidelity GrowCo LG
Vanguard TotStlAdm LB
Vanguard Totinti FB
Vanguard InstPlus LB


114,653
61,982
56,647
56,221
55,503
53,772
47,844
47,485-
46,374
43,018
39,492
38,984
37,017
35,777
31,850
31,027
30,253
28,754
28,628
28,593
28,113
27,983
27,597,
27,285
26,873
25,417
24,423


Stock Footnotes: g = Dividends and earnings in Canadian dollars. h= Does not meet continued-llstlng standards.
I = Late filing with SEC. n = New in past 52 weeks. pf = Preferrned. s = Stock has undergone a reverse stock split
of at least 50 percent within the past year. t = Right to buy security at a specified price. a = Stock has split byat
leaji 20 percenri tlen ine lias year un ,= Un.tli = In banknrocy or receiers.ip. mw - When disinbuied a =
When uned a = Wanais
Mltual Fund Footnotes: 0 : Fee covenng market crt s eais a Itrom lund assets d - Deterrea sales charge. or
redernpl.r . let I t lor 1 load isaler ct.argc"l im Mulr itpn t are aPirge NA = not avaltble p = previous aars
net adiv ulu 'i = lrid jplil nares dung the It h -k = tfnd paid a OQstnrbution during the waee Galnh@ and
Losers rra.ucl ,r nrtn ia least V2 to be l.eed in tabi. Ail lel Most Activs must be wrln al least St Volume in
nunarea: 01 n.ae: Source: The Associalta Pres Sales figures are unofficial


Money Rates'
Last Pvs Week
Prime Rate 3.25 3.25
Discount Rate 0.50 0.50
Federal Funds Rate .00-25 ,00-.25
Treasuries
3-month 0.05 0.03
6-month 0.17 0.13
5-year 2.24 2.03
10-year 3.48 , 3.20
30-year 4.41 4.21


A lreztiwS 1 0188 998 t


Large value, IH-Woild Alocation, LB -Large Bend, LG .Lar Growth, LV age aue,i MA.Moderate Akocabon, MB MKeCap ,ed, .
-Csp Vale, Hi ,peaasitWS -Wu0 d iSlod, Total Return: Ching tinV writ diondeds reinvested. Rlnk: Ho ast p s
oiers witrt same okedve: A is ip top 20%, E In bouom 20%. Mn Init Inst Miunium $ needed to invest in fund. Source: Mun ,gtar


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div.YId PE Chg %Chg Last


ABB Ltd .44 2.4
AESCorp .. .
AFLAC* 1.12 2.4
AK Steel .20 1.0
AMR ... ...
AT&T Inc 1.64 5.9
AUOptron .09 .8
AbtLab 1.60 3.0
AberFitc .70 1.9
Accenture .75 1.8
AMD ... ...
Aeropostl ... ...
Aetna .04 .1
Agnicog .18 .3
AirTran
AlcatelLuc ...
Alcoa .12 .9
Allstate .80 2.8
AlphaNRs ... ...
Altria 1.36 7.0
AmbacF ... ...
AMovilL 1.21 2.5
AEagleOut .40 2.5
AEP 1.64 4.9
AmExpi .72 1.8
AIntlGp rs ... ...
Anadarko .36 .6
AnalogDev .80 2.6
Annaly 2.29 12.6
ArcelorMit .75 1.9
ArchCoal .36 1.8
ArchDan .56 1.8
AssuredG .18 .8
ATMOS 1.34 4.7
AutoNatn ...
AvisBudg ...
BB&TCp .60 2.3
BHP BiIIL 1.64 2.2
BJ Svcs .20 1.1
BakrHu .60 1.5
BcoBrades .75 3.4
BcSBrasil n ...
BkofAm .04 .2
BkAmpfS ...
BkNYMel .36 1.3
BarrickG - .40 .9
Baxter 1.16 2.0
BestBuy .56 1.3
BigLots
Blackstone 1.20 8.8
Boeing 1.68 3.1
BostonSci ...
BrMySq 1.24 4.9
BrkfldPrp .56 4.7
CBREllis ...
CBSB ..20 1.5
CIGNA .04 .1
CVS are .31 1.0
CapOne .20 .5
CardnlHlt s .70 2.2
Carnival ......
Caterpillar 1.68 2.9
Cemex .40
CenterPnt .76 5.5
CntryTel 2.80 7.7
ChesEng .30 1.3
Chevron 2.72 3.5
Chimera .30 7.5
Citigrp
CliffsNRs .35 46
Coach .30 .8
CocaCE .32 1.6
CocaCI 1.64 2.9
Coeur rs
ConocPhil 2.00 3.9
Conseco
ConEd 2.36 5.4
ConstellEn .96 2.9
CtlAirB ...


... +.04 +23.5
17 +.58 +62.1
15 +2.18 ...
... -.17+107.9
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14 +.61 -3.2
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77 -3.84 +56.6
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...' +1.36 +62.5
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35 -.38 +55.7
16 -1.27 +21.9
... +1.22 +123.5
... +.29 +4.8
.. +.82 +15.6

... +.63 -4.9
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19 +.96 +56.6
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13 -.24 +8.1
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... -1.26 -2.2
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14 +1.61 +13.2
... +1.48 +33.8
...+3.15 -7.3


Wkly YTD. Wkly
Name Div Yid PE Chg %Chg Last


A-Power ...
ADC Tel ...
Aastrom
ActivsBliz ...
AdobeSy ...
AkamaiT ...
AlteraCp If .20
Amazon
AmCapLtd .19
Amgen
AmkorT If ...
A123Sysn ...
ApolloGrp ...
Apple Inc ...
ApIdMall .24
Atmel ...
Autodesk ...
AutoData 1.36
BeaconPw ..
BedBath ...
BrigExp
Broadcom ..
BrcdeCm ...
Bucyrus .10
CA Inc .16
Cadence ...
CpslnTrb ...
Celgene :.
CellTher rsh..
CentAl
ChkPoint
CienaCorp ...
Cisco
CitizRep h ...
CognizTech...
Comcast .38
Comc spcl .38
CorinthC


17 -1.94+264.2
+.40 +14.1
+.04 -34.4
44 -.55 +27.7
29 +1.12 +71.4
32 +1.06 +65.5
28 +1.20 +32.3
81 +5.84+168.3
... +.10 +31.8
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...+1.05+206.4.
...+1.30 -15.3
15 -1.00 -28.5
31 -7.27 +126.5
...+1.03 +31.5
... +.21 +32.6
...+1.33 +27.0
16 +.16 +11.1
... -.17 -8.5
*22 +2.16 +54.0
...+1.24+261.9
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71 +1.00 +1.2
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21 +1.12 +74.1
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25 +.78 +48.2
... +.04 -79.2
26 +.93 +146.0
15 +1.25 -4.4
15 +1.14 -5.3
13 -1.06 -15.1


Name


Wkly YTD Wkly
DIv Yid PE Cha %Cha Last


Coming .20
Cummins .70
DJIA Diam 2.60
DR Horton .15
DTE 2.12
DanaHIdg ...
Deere ' 1.12
DeltaAir
DenburyR ...
DevelDiv .08
DevonE .64
DirxEMBear...
DirFBear rs ...
DirFBull rs .53
DirREBear ..
DirxSCBear...
DirxSCBull 4.79
DirxLCBear ...
DirxLCBull 6.83
DirxEnBear ...
DirxEnBull 4.78
Discover. .08
Disney .35
DomRescs 1.75
DowChm .60
DukeEngy .96
DukeRity .68
Dynegy
EMCCp
ElPasoCp .04
EldorGldg ...
EmersonEl 1.34
EnCana 1.60
ENSCO .10
EqtyRsd 1.35
Exelon 2.10
ExxonMbl 1.68
FPLGrp 1.89
FairchldS ...
FamilyDIr .54
FannieMae ...
FstHorizon .80
FirstEngy 2.20
Fluor .50
FordM . ...
ForestOil ...
FredMac ....
FMCG .60
FrontierCm 1.00
GameStop ...
Gannett .16
Gap .34
Genworth ...
Gerdau .06
GoldFLtd .13
Goldcrpg .18
GoldmanS 1.40
Goodyear ..
GrtAtlPac ...
HCP Inc 1.84
Hallibrtn .36
HarleyD .40
HarmonyG .06
HartfdFn .20
HItMgmt ...
HeclaM
Hertz
Hess .40
HewlettP .32
HomeDp .90
Honwllntl 1.21
HostHotls .10
Huntsmn .40
IAMGId g .06
ING
iSAstla .94
iShBraz 2.03
iSh HK .54
iShJapn .12




Name Div
Costco .72
Crocs
CypSemi ...
Dell Inc
DItaPtr ...
DirecTV A ...
DishNetwk 2.00
DryShips ...
DyaxCp
ETrade
eBay
EagleBulk ...
ElectArts
EricsnTel .23
Expedia
FifthThird .04
Flextrn
GSI Tech
Garmin .75
GenBiotc h...
Genzyme ...
GeronCp ...
GileadSci ...
HercOffsh ...
Hologic
HudsCity .60
HumGen
Illumina
Incyte
IntgDv
Intel .63
Intersil .48
JA Solar
JDS Uniph ...
JetBlue ...
KLA Tnc .60
KeryxBio ...
LamResrch ...


19 +1.75 +92.3
39 -1.64 +63.5
... +.81 +18.8.
... -.40 +42.9
13 +2.34 +18.2
... +1.26+1013.5
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16 +.55 -3.2
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. +.87 +143.9
.. +.18 +85.2
70 +3.11 +18.3
18 -1.19 +53.0
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... -.44+198.5
.. -.35 -14.5
.. +.70 +67.9
... +2.32 +122.6
... +.67 +57.8
... +.62 +4.3


New York Stock Exchange'


AREA MORTG.A(GERATES


Institution Phone 30fixed 15fixed 5/1 ARM FHA/ NRGEgy ...
Institution Phone rate I pts rate/ pts rate / pts VA Nabors
,'. NatGrid 2.89
AAA Mortgage (800) 764-7598 6.13/ 0.00 5.75 /0.00 5.88/0.00 No Quote NOilVarco .40
NatSemi .32
NYCmtyB 1.00
NewmtM .40
AAXA Discount Mortgage (877) 728-3569. No Quote No Quote No Quote No Quote NiSource .92
NobleCorp '.20
NokiaCp .52
Absolute Mortgage Co. (888) 90-HOMES 6.38/0.00 5.88/0.00 6.13/0.00 No Quote Nordstrm .64
NortlkSo 1.36
Nucor 1.44
OcciPet 1.32
AmCap Funding Corp. (800) 289-6516 No Quote No Quote No Quote No Quote OfficeDpt
OilSvHT 1.60
Owensill ...
Capital Financial Mig. Corp. ,(888) 328-9328 -6.50/0.00 6.00 / 0:00 No Quote No Quote PG&ECp 1.68
PMI Grp ..
PNC .40
PatriotCoal ..
Earth Mortgage (877) 327-8450 No Quote No Quote No Quote No Quote PeabdyE .28
Penney .80
PepcoHold 1.08
PepsICo 1.80
Sst Metropolitan Mortgage (800) 548-5988 5.99 / 2.00 5.38 / 2.00 5.50 / 0.00 No Quote Petrohawk
PetrbrsA .95
S. .. Petrobras 1.30
Heidelberg Capital Corp. (800) 968-2240 6,13 / 1.00 5.75 / 1.00 5.50 / 1.00 No Quote Pfizer .64
PhilipMor 2.32
Potash .40
PS USDBull.17
Nationwide Mig. Lending Grp. (866)548-6535 6.25/0.00 5.88/0.00 5.50/0.00 No Quote PrinFnd .50
PrUShS&P11.47
PrUIShDowi6.02
We b' Mortgage Direct (800) 952-8706 6.38/0.00 5.88/0.00 6.13/0.00 No Quote PUSItQQQ.
PmllltSP .34


Rates provided by Shoprate.com. Rates are valid as of August 12, 2008. Rates are inclusive of all
fees and are subject to change without notice. Call lender directly for APR's. Lenders wishing to
participate in this service, please call 877-429-0940. For additional information on mortgages, go to:
www.shoprate.com/lakecity.aspx F


Wkly YTD Wkly
Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


iShKor .39
iShMex .61
iShSing .36
iSTaiwn .60
iShSilver
iShChina25 .53
iSSP500 2.22
iShEMkts .59
iShB20 T 3.70
iSEafe 1.49
iSR1KG .66
iShR2K .83
iShREst 2.34
iShFnSc 1.22
IBM 2.20
IntlGame .24
IntPap .10
Interpublic ...
ItauUnibH .46
J:MorgCh .20
J bil .28
JohnJn 1'.96
JohnsnCtl .52
JnprNtwk
KB Home .25
Keycorp .04
Kimco .64
Kinross g .10
Kohls
Kraft 1.16
LDK Solar ...
LSI Corp ...


. +3.06 +68.3 47.06
+2.35 +57.0 50.65
+.27 +64.7 11.61
+.24 +63.5 12.41
+.20 +62.1 18.15
... +2.22 +55.8 45.33
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.... +.69 +32.8 49.22
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13 +1.55 +51.2 127.25
37 -.97 +55.1 18.44
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25 -.10 +60.6 6.36
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27 +.41 +34.0 41.74
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64 +1.66 +56.1 27.33
... -.02 -.1 13.60
.. +.59 -27.7 6.16
... +1.74 -25.7 13.59
.. +1.10 +11.1 20.47
18 -.75 +48.3 53.70
16 -.07 -1.0 26.57
... +1.38 r-31.5 8.99
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Name
LVSands
LennarA
UllyEli
Limited
UncNat
MBIA
MEMC
MFA Fncl
MGIC
MGMMir
Macys
Manitowoc
Manpwl
MarathonO
MktVGold
MktVRus
MarlntA
*MarshM
Marshlls
Masco
MasseyEn
McDermlnt
Medtmic
Merck
MetUfe
MetroPCS
MicronT
Monsanto
Moodys
MorgStan
Mosaic
Motorola


Nasdaq Most Active


Wkly YTD Wkly
Yid PE Chg %Chg Last
1.2 24 -.84 +12.7 59.19
. ... +.30+337.1 5.42
.. +.75+130.6 10.31
.. 18 -.68 +31.4 13.46
... -.05 -81.7 .87
... 25 +1.06 +42.6 32.66
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... +.15 -40.5 6.34
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19 +.45 +69.6 23.67
7 +.36 -15.5 5.76
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2.4 ... -.24 +23.2 9.62
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4.5 13 +.32 -16.9 13.27
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1.7 ... +3.77 +63.8 35.69
... 44 +.72+1309.1 3.10
... ... +3.71 +70.5 38.20


Wkly YTD Wkly
Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


Level3
LibGlobA ...
LibtyMlntA...
LinearTch .88 3.1
MarvellT ......
Mattel .75 3.8
Maximlntg .80 4.3
MelcoCrwn...
Microchp 1.36 4.9
Microsoft .52 1.7
NasdOMX ...
NetApp
Netlist h
NewsCpA .12 1.0
NewsCpB .12 .8
NexMed
NorTrst 1.12 2.3
Novell
Nvidia
OceanFrt ...
OnSmcnd
Oracle .20 .9
OriginAg ...
PDLBio 1.00 15.7
PMC Sra ...
Paccar .36 1.0
PacEthan ...
Palm Inc
PattUTI .20 1.4
Paychex 1.24 3.8
PeopUtdF .61. 3.8
Popular
PwShs QQQ .18 .4
Qualcom .68 1.5
RFMicD ... ...
Rambus
RschMotn ...
STEC


+.20 +100.0
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23 +1.08 +26.5
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19 +.32 +24.3
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46 -.14 -9.0
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48 +.17 +26.0
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...+3.88 +33.9
16 +.61 +44.8
14 +.25 +193.2


WIy YTD WIy
Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


13.4 8


1.3 11
.8 ...
1.3 87
3.0 21

1.2 ...
... 94
3.6 43
' .7 ..
2.1
.7 .20
... 15
1.9 21
4.1 10
2.1 16
.. 15

1.3 19
1.6 16
.6 ..
.3 26


+.38 +172.7
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-.02 +84.7


ProUShL20...
ProUShtRE4.57
ProliShOG6.07
ProUShtFn ...


Name DIv
SanDisk
Santarus ...
Schwab .24
,SeagateT ..
Sequenom
ShandaGn ...
Slcnware .28
SiriusXMh...
SkywksSol
SmithWes
Somaxon
Sonus
Staples .33
Starbucks ...
StlDynam .30
StemCells ..
SunMicro ...
SunPowerA...
Symantec
Synopsys ...
TD Ameritr ...
TakeTwo ...
Tellabs ..
TevaPhrm .60
3Com
TriQuint
UAL
UrbanOut ...
Verisign
VertxPh ..
VirgnMda h'.16
Vodafone 1.30
Xilinx .64
YRCWwde...
Yahoo
ZionBcp .04


Wklay YTD W kly N
Name Div YId PE Cha %Cha Last Name


9




0
2


ProUShtBM26.58
ProURRE .17
ProUtO&G .23
ProUltRn .06
ProUBasM .19
ProUSR2K25.00
ProUItR2K .10
ProUltCrude...
ProgsvCp ...
ProLogis .60
Prudent .70
PSEG 1.33
PulteH
QwestCm .32
RRI Engy ..
RadianGrp .01
RadioShk .25
Raytheon 1.24
RegionsFn .04
RiteAld . ...
RylCarb ...
SLMCp ...
SpdrGold ...
SpdrHome .42
SpdrKbwBk .52
SpdrRetl .43
SpdrMetM .50
Safeway .40
StJude
Saks
SandRdge ...
Saral.ee .44
Schlmbrg .84
SemiHTr .56
SiderNac 1.12
SilvWhtn g...


19 -.40 ,-34.4
6 +.43 +4.3
... -.34 +69.0
... -.05 +6.1
11 +.08 +73.0
... +.98 +53.4
12, +.89 +3.1
32 -1.20 +27.9
14 '+.76 +36.5
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24 +1.22 +164.8
17 +1.65 +12.3
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26 -2.55 +31.1
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40 -1.06 +12.7
11 +1.30 +12.2
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38 -1.91 +9.1
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19 -1.71 +88.4
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15 -.91, +6.7
... -.99 -49.5
... -.46 -44.3
... +1.48+105.1
.:-.58 -64.0
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12 -.14 -6.2
33 +.39 +11.7
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20 +.08 +24.8
20 -1.56 +45.0
... +1.75 +54.1
... +1.15+176.3
... +.22 +149.9


Wkly YTD Wkly
DIv YId PE Chg %Chg Last


SimonPr6p .80
SmithIntl .48
SouthnCo 1.75
SthnCopper .44
SwstAirl .02
SwstnEngy ..
SprintNex ..
SPDR 2.42
SP Malls .68
SPHIthC .57
SP CnSt .68
SP Consum .28
SP Engy .73
SPDR Fncl .38
SP Inds .67
SP Tech .31
SP Util 1.26
StateStr .04
Suncorgs '.40
Suntech
SunTrst .04
Supvalu .35
Synovus .04
Sysco 1.00
TJX .48
TaiwSemi .46
Targ+[ 66
TeckResg ...
TenetHIth ...
Teradyn
Tesoro .20
Texlnst .48
3MCo ' 2.04
TimeWrn rs .75
TollBros ...
Transocn
Travelers 1.32
Tyson .16
UBS AG ..
US Aiwy ...
UnionPac 1.08
UtdMicro ...
UPS B 1.80
US Bancrp .20
US NGsFd ..
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UnumGrp .33
Vale SA .48
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ValeromE. .60
VangEmg 1.18
VerizonCm 1.90
ViacomB ...
Visa .50
Vomado 1.52
Walgm .55
Weathflntl a.
WellPoint ...
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WendyArby .06
WDigital ...
WstnRefin
WstnUnion .04
WmsCos .44
Windstrm 1.00
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YIngliGm
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5.3 16 +1.22 -11.3 32.83
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...... -.01 +84.0 35.88
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15.J16 -2.06 +-2.2 45.64
...... +.27 +6084.3 34.65
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...... -1.20 -15.6 18.08
6 7 -1.91 +75.7 83.00
2.6 9 -.61 +12.9 51.04
1.3 ... +.31 +43.8 12:60
...... +.42 +12.4 16.08
...... +.96 -42.7 4.43
1.7 16 +2.03 +36.4 65.22
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...... -1.19 -62.7 , 8.64
... ... -.17 +15.8 38.33.
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1.7 .... -.63+133.0 28.22
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3.7 .. +41 -24.2 16.41
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2.1 23 +.12 -.8 7.91
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... ... +1.94 +151.0 15.31
2.5 16 -1.37 +8.0 34.03


AMEX Most Active


Wkly YTD Wkly
Yld PE Chg %Chg Last
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.3 ... +.44 -46.7 13.06


Name DIv
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GoldRsvg ...
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GranTrra g ..
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Wkly YTD Wkly
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6.4 ... +.08 +51.9 6.53
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KimberRg ...
KodiakOg ...
MAGSg .. ....
Metalico
Minefnd g ...
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NAPallg ...
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... +.11 +184.0
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Wkly Wkly YTD
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Currencies

tLast Pvs Day
Australia 1.0978 1.0780
Britain 1.6429 1.6566
Canada 1.0589 1.0536
Euro .6744 .6626
Japan 90.70 88.21
Mexico 12.6600 12.6410


British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All oth-
ers show dollar in foreign currency.


.------------------------=-----=-----
















LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2009

Lake City Reporter




CLASSIFIED


Classified Department: 755-5440


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


ADvantage


One Item per ad additional
4 lines * 6 days Icn $1.10
ate applies to privae es Individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $500 or less.
This is a non-refundable rate.



S161
4 in - p e rdays Each additional
4 lines 6 ays line $1.15
Rate applies to private Individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $1,000 or less.
Each Item must Include a price.
SB ^ This Is a non- ndale rate.



One Item per ad $232
lnes m 6p~e ,ad Each additional
4 nes * 6 days line1.45
Rate apples toprivate Individualsselling
personal merchandise totaling $2,500 or less.
Each item must Incude a pd"-..*
This is a non-refundablerate.



One em per ad 26
14 lines * 6 .da 1 Each additional
Rate applies t o private individuals selling
Personal merchandise totallng $4,000 or less.
Each item must Include 8 pri*




One em per ad I
4 lines * 6 daysEach additional
Rate appl to va individuals selin
personal mehandse totaling $6,000 or less.
Each item must Include a prin.
This Is a no-efundable rate.





4ines 1750
3 days
includes 2 SIigs Eaiddtu lin le '1.6


Limited to service type advertis-
ing only.
4 lines, one month....'90.20 .
$10.80 each additional line
Includes an additional $1.55 per
ad for each Wednesday insertion.



You can call us at 755-5440,
Monday through Friday from 8:00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their
classified ads in person, and some
ad categories will require prepay-
ment. Our office is located at 180
East Duval Street.
You can also fax-or email your ad,
copy to the Reporter.
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-
porter.com





Ad is to Appear Call by: Fax/Email by:
Tuesday Mon., 10:00 a.m. Mon., 9:00 a.m.
Wednesday Mon., 10:00a.m. Mon.,9:00 am.
Thursday Wed.,10:00a.m. Wied.,:00a.m.
Friday Thurs.,10:00a.m. Tmrs.,9:00a.m.'
Saturday Fri., 10:00 a.m. Fri.9:00a.m.
Sunday Fri., 10:00a.m. Fri., 9:00 a.m.
These deadlines'are subject 10 changewithout notice




Ad Errors- Please read your ad
on the first day of publication.
We accept responsibility for only
the first incorrect insertion, and
only the charge for the ad space
in error. Please call 755-5440
immediately for prompt correc-
tion and billing adjustments.
. Cancellations- Normal advertising
.deadlines apply for cancellation.
Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440.
required regarding payments or
credit limits, your call will be trans-
ferred to the accounting depart-
ment.


Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher who
reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
. be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first, insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard
abbreviations are acceptable; how-
ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.


In Print

and Online
wwWv.lalieityreporter.comn


060 Services


NEED your house cleaned?
Please call Kristy at
386-754-9335.

100 Opportunities

04536352



MERIDIAN Behavioral
Healthcare Inc.
Foster Parents
Looking for dedicated people to
make a difference in child's life.
Provide a stable loving home for
children in Foster Care that have
emotional and behavioral
problems that require
specialized interventions.
and close supervision. We are
in need of 1 or 2 parent homes.
Due to the supervision needs the
position requires at least
1 parent that does not
work outside of the home. Must
pass background check, being
willing to work with a treatment,
and participate in ongoing
Continuing Education/Training.
Please visit www.mbhci.org for
more info and to apply under the
Careers section.
To see our current openings in
Mental Health and to apply
online, please go to:
www.mbhci.org
EOE, DFWP

04536385
Enrollment/Family Services
Analyst
Non-Profit organization is
seeking highly motivated
professional for VPK/School
Readiness Part-time Position.
Experience in Social Services
or related field preferred.
Salary: $9.62 -$12.98
no benefits.
Submit resume by:
December 15, 2009 to:
Early Learning Coalition of
Florida's Gateway, Inc.
Attn: HR
1104 SW Main Blvd
Lake City, FL 32025 or Flax to:
386-628-9321
Temporary Funding.
Not Guaranteed Employment
beyond 6/30/2010.

04536413
Position: Delivery Driver
Applicants must be at least 21
years old, have 6 points or less
on your license and have
NO misdemeanors or felonies.
Must possess a Class A CDL.
Apply within & please no phone
calls. Apply in person: North
Florida Sales, 467 SW Ring Ct.
Lake City, FI 32025

04536443
Customer Service '
Representative
Busy office needs self
motivator for a fast paced call
Center, great customer service
skills. Call center experience a
plus. Hours 8-5 Mon. - Fri.
Background check req'd.
Bilingual a plus (please
indicate). Send resume
to Joey Kitaif; P.O. Box 3116
Lake City, Fl. 32056.

A Terrific Opportunity
Liberty National Life Insurance
Company
$100,000+ Earning Potential,
Benefits, Pension, 401K & BCBS
Insurance for those who qualify!
Call 1-800-257-5500

Gainesville/Ocala Plaintiffs
Personal Injury Firm seeking
litigation associate with 3-5 years
trial experience, preferably in Civil
Litigation. Salary and bonuses
commensurate with experience.
Please fax resume and cover letter
to (352)379-9007.
Hairstylist Immediate Opening
Busy Salon -Creative Images,
Lake City Mall is seeking a profes-
sional, motivated, exp. stylist.
Comm.Base Pay. 386 365-1139.
International Company seeking
self motivated individuals for
direct marketing business.
$500-$1500/mo PT/FT Free info
www.income2profits.com






Home Improvements

CARPENTER WORK
Remodeling, framing, sheetrock,
cabinets, painting, flooring,
Call Dean @ 386-965-5331

Lawn & Landscape Service

Custom Cuts Lawn & Landscape.
Customized lawn care, trimming,
sod, design. Comm'l & Res'd. Lic.
& ins. 386-719-2200 lv msg.
New Beginnings Lawn Service
Mow, weedeat, rake. Call for
estimates on any lawn job.
386-438-9191

Services

NEED HOUSEKEEPER?
Call Ethel
386-303-1496.


Cleaning Done Your Way!


100 Job
Opportunities
Mystery Shoppers earn up to
$100 per day. Under cover shop-
pers needed to judge retail &
dining establishments. Experience
NOT req'd. Calll- 888-697-6576.
TOWER CLIMBER wanted.
Must be experienced.
Must have drivers license.
Call Don.at 386-752-1100.
TRUCK DRIVER needed for
local manufacturing plant.
Individual must possess a valid
Class A CDL license and a clean
MVR. Excellent pay.
Benefits avail after 6 months of
employment. Apply in person at
Corbitt Mfg., Inc.,
854 NW Guerdon Street,
Lake City, FL 32055
between 9am-3pm
Mon-Fri: DFW
Wanted: Companion for Senior,
north of town. 25 to 30 hrs/wk.
Must have dependable auto, must
be able to run errands. Gas allow-
ance. Bkground check - email
resume to mom.adv(live.com
Weekend/Night Auditor needed
for local Motel.
Apply in person at Best Western
3598 Hwy 90, Lake City.

12 A Medical
120 Employment

04536142
Certified Dietary
Manager Needed
LTC Experience Preferred.
Must be able to manage large
staff and oversee daily food
preparation for 180 bed facility.
Full Time with Excellent
Benefits. Email Resume to
Greg Roberts @
groberts(T gulfcoasthealthcare.com
- or Fax Resume to:
386-362-4417
L Live Oak, Fl EOE/V/D/M/F


04536353



MERIDIAN
BEHAVIORAL
HEALTHCARE
Lake City
PRN / On-Call Needs :
Psych Exp RN
Varying Shifts
LPN
Varying Shifts
Family Intervention
Specialist F/T
- Live Oak
Advocacy services referred by
child welfare or a dependency
court. BA/BS in Human Svcs.
Children's Outpatient
Program Manager
Lake City
Mental Health &
Substance Abuse
Adult Case Manager
Lake City
Exp w/ SPMI population
www.mbhci.org
to see our current needs and
online applications
EOE, DFWP

Busy Outpatient Surgery Center
has immediate openings. for
FT/PT RNs and Certified Surgical
Technicians. with previous
multi-specialty experience.
Please email resumes to:
administration@ lcsurgerycenter.com
or fax: 386-487-3935
LPN or RN needed On-call
3PM-11PM Lake City Cluster
ICF for Developmentally
Disabled Persons.
673 NW Cluster Drive,
386-755-6104
EEO/M/F/D/V
PT Medical Assistant for
busy medical clinic. Lake City
area. Send resume to:
836 SW Main Blvd. Ste. 102,
: Lake City, Florida 32025

240 Schools &
240 Education

04536136
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training
offers courses for both
beginners & experienced
* Nursing Assistant, $409
next class-12/07/09
* Phlebotomy national
certification,
$800 next class-01/23/09
* Pharm Tech national
certification
$900 next class-01/26/09.
* Continuing education
Fees incl. books,
supplies, exam fees.
Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com


240 iSchools &
240V Education
Wanted Career
Motivated Students!
If you are seeking a new career in
a high demand field, then get your
Degree or Certificate in Logistics
& Supply Chain Management!
Instant scholarships available for
qualified students. Classes start
01/06/2009, call Lake City Com-
munity College, (386) 754-4492.


310 Pets & Supplies
2 yr old. Female, part Siamese.
Spayed. de-clawed, lap cat.
Good home needed.
386-755-856J

Apricot TOY POODLE CKC,
shots & health cert., hold w/dep.
til Christmas, Born 10/25
$400. 386-719-4900.
BOSTON TERRIER
Puppy AKC
Male. $500.
386-623-4720
Christmas Puppies Home raised
Mini Dachshunds. Dapples, Black
& Tans, Health Cert., Papers,
Shots, Adorable. $350. 755-7177
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they,
have mandatory shots and are
free from .intestinal and external.
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.


330 Livestock &
Supplies
GUARD RAIL For Sale $1.75 per
foot. Post $5.00 each. Great for
Cow Pens or many farm uses.
. 386-754-9367


401 Antiques
ANTIQUES WANTED
Fum., China, Silver, Glassware,
Costume Jewelry & Gold. 35 years
exp. Cash Pd. Pete. 386-963-2621

408 Furniture
Bedroom set.
Immitation Marble
5 pieces. Light tan. $300.00
386-623-4720
COUCH for sale, $50.00 -
good condition
Call 752-7964
after 6PM


Must sell before Christmas 32 in
Toshiba color TV.in solid oak en-
tertainment center, w/4 shelves &
1 drawer on ea side. $300 for both
obo. 386-752-1496 or 961-6256
Oak Dresser &
head board. $75.
Good condition.
386-438-5637
SOLID WOOD Rocker bought in
1978. Gently used. $65.00
(cushion free w/purchase)
386-365-7117

410 Lawn & Garden
10 Equipment
12" FRONT Tine
Tiller $160:
Like New.
386-719-4833
New and Used Tractors
Zero turn mowers, lawn
maintenance equipment & trailers.
386-758-2315

Machinery &
411 Tools

Craftsman 10in radial arm saw.
Excellent condition on Craftsman
rolling cabinet, asking $325.00.
386-754-1747

416 Sporting Goods
RRA-AR-15 5.56MM
Tactical Rail/Foregrip. Flashlight.
Many extras/add-ons. $1,100 obo
386-755-6852 leave message.

418 Toys

Geo Trax Toys with railroad,
home depo work bench for boys
with ,train table $100.00
386-854-0749

420 Wanted to Buy.
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.


New Home Sales


Consultant Wanted

Excellent Commission Based

Pay and Benefits

Fax Resume to 509-756-2869
or e-mail mh newhomeiobs@vahoo.com

Maronda Homes
.- .- ,,, . 0W y �W-m jAm--MA.P'i .f


430 Garage Sales
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.


440 Miscellaneous
32" X 54" "Croft" New single
pane window silver finish. Only
$35. Call before 1 lam 758-1358
or 7p - 1lOp 386-752-3491
Christmas decor: 6 foot artificial
tree w/stand, lights, garlands.
Wreath, odds & ends. Moving, not
going to use. $100. 386-963-1211
Cordless Phones. Uniden 2.4 GHz
Power Max Two handsets and
chargers. Answering machine &
speaker phone. $20. 758-3231
Hip length black suede fringed
jacket, great for jeans, just for fun.
Pd $150.00 up North, will sell for
$75.00. 386-963-1211
MOBILE HOME
InterTherm. 36" Wood Burning
Fireplace. Brand New
$50.00 386-867-1106
NEW STANLEY Garage Door
opener. 1/4Hp w/remote. Made in
USA. Only $100. Call before 11a.
386-758-1358 or 7p-10p 752-3491
TOILETS. TWO 3-5 GALLON
FLUSH TRADITIONAL
Porcelain toilets in great shape.
$25./both 386-758-3231


450 Good Things
5 to Eat
PECAN HOUSE in Ellisville
. 1-75 & Hwy 441 @ Exit 414.
We buy, Crack and also sell
pecans. 386-752-6896 or 697-6420
The Nutcracker We buy and sell
Cracked & shelled Pecans.
Pinemount Rd (252, Taylorville)
2738 CR 252 W. Robert Taylor
386-963-4138 or 961-1420

530 Marine Supplies
40LB Thrust Trolling motor and
Deep Cycle Battery. $140..
All like new.
3 86-719-4833

610 Mobile Home
610 Lots for Rent
Residential RV lots $250.mo
Between Lake City & G'ville.
Easy access to 1-75 & 441
(352)317-1326

630 Mobile Homes
for Rent


1&1/4 AC. fenced yard, shed, .
3br/2ba, 2004 Mobile home. Pets
ok. $650.mo + 1st, last & $500
sec. Available Now! 386-752-3917
2&3 Bedroom Mobile homes.
$450 - $600. monthly & furnished
efficiency Apts. $400 -$600. mo.
386-752-6422
2bd, patio, carport, utility shed in
quiet secure park w/country
setting. $550.00 mo. Discounts
offered. 386-752-0981/755-4965
2br/lba, clean & quiet, trees,
large lot. No animals. Turner Rd.
Call: 386-752-6269
or leave message if no answer.
, 2br/2ba MH.
off Country Club on 1/2 ac. lot
$600 mo. $600 security
386-752-5911 or 466-2266
2BR/2BA SWMH.
$600. mo + $600 sec9riy deposit.
386-397-2619 or
386-365-1243
3/2, w/ screened porch. Quiet,
clean country park. No pets.
$550.mo + Deposit. References
required. 386-758-2280.
3b/2ba in Wood Gate also
2&3br's in 5 Points area
No pets. 1st month & deposit.
386-961-1482.
3BR/2BA Double wide.
$650 a month. 1st, & security.
Please call 386-397-2619 or
� 386-365-1243.
Available Now!.DW 2br/2ba.
CH/A, 2 decks, 2 car carport w/
shed on 2.5 fenced ac. outside of
Live Oak. $550mo . 386-365-1439
Convenient country living 2br/2ba.
on 1/2 ac. lot. Front/back porch.
Utility shed. $500. mo + security.
386-752-0608 or 365-2430


\630 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
FREE ELECTRIC! And all
utilities. Nice 3br/2ba in Branford
area.$500 security, $700.mo
386-590-0642 or 867-1833
FREE RENT 1st month. Spacious
3br/2ba MH. Quiet park. Small
pets'ok..$500. move in. $575. mo.
386-752-1971 or 352-281-2450
Large partially furnished 1/lba
Private op 8.5 ac w/ a large pond.
$425.mo 1st, last plus deposit, no
pets. Live Oak 386-208-1060
Late Model Mobile Homes .Quiet
area. 2br/lba from $400 & 3br/2ba
from $500 Includes water &
' sewer. No Pets! 386-961-0017
Mayo, MH 3/2
on 3 acres, $650/month,
call 386-935 2256 for info.

Remodeled 3/2 DWMH's. Include
yard maint. -& yearly carpet clean-
ing Shady Oaks. S of town on 441.
$650.mo. 386-208-4702
Why Rent when you can own?
Beautiful Lake Harper Villas MHP
Near Publix & Walmart. Own as
little as $450. mo. Rentals availa-
ble from $350. mo. Call now,
move in tomorrow 386-344-0830

/640 Mobile Homes
640 for Sale
04 PALM 2000sf. 3br/2ba (Never
lived in) Was $88K now $60K.
$450mo w/$3200 cash. First Home
Buyer. Plywood floors, Smart
Panel lap siding, (2) patio doors,
office retreat. Includes: Del & Set.
Gary Hamilton (386)758-9824 .
BY OWNER 3br/2ba Fleetwood
Doublewide. Many extras,
$19,000. You Move! 3
86-454-4195
1999 REPO 24X48
Good Shape. $15,000. OBO
Call Jared @'386-719-5560
jm.martin23@yahoo.com
FOR SALE
-4 Bedroom/2 Bath
on half acre Lot.
$3,000 down/ $550. month
Call Jared @ 386-719-5560
NO MONEY DOWN
When you own your own Land.
-3 Bed $227/month
-4 Bed $333/ month
-5 Bed $559/month
Call Jared @ 386-719-5560
jm_martin23@yahoo.com
2010 SINGLEWIDE
Set up on your Land
$21,900
Call Jared @ 386-719-5560
jm_martin23@yahoo.com

650 Mobile Home
650 & Land
Modular, New, 3br/2ba,
1/2 acre close in, Higher insulated
plus windows, driveway, decks,
and much more. Reduced to sell.
Possible Owner Finance.
Gary 386- 758-9824
www.garyhamiltonhomes.com
Owner Financing. 3 Ig. MH's
w/acreage. Jasper, LC, Mayo.,
pond, private river access. $675-
$900mo. 386-590-0642 /867-1833
.71A Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent

! LUXURY HOMES !.
*NEW*
2 BEDROOMS
!!! $649 per mo. !!!

(Limited Availability)
$299 MOVES YOU IN

FREE RENT
* 200 FREE CHANNELS
*" BAHAMA CRUISE
386-754-1800

1 BEDROOM
!!! $499 per month!!!
(4 LEFT)
386-758-8029

BAD CREDIT- OK
$400 MOVES YOU IN!
1 or 2 BR apts. and
2 or 3 BR Mobile Homes
(386) 755-2423


* 2006 Manufactured Home *
* On 2.1 Acres *
* 3 Bedrooms, 2 Baths *
* 1026 sq ft -
* Ready to move in! *
* 1850 SW Buckley Lane, Lake City, FL *






Of $60,000
Call Jeff Pressley at:

Prestige Home Center of Lake City, FL
386-752-7751 or 1-800-758-5933
Email: JeffPrestigeHomes@yahoo.com


BUY IT


SELITIT


F liI T
















LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2009


Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent





(04536186
Sugarmill Apts
Lake City, FL
386-758-5505
Move in Special $500, dep
1st month Rent Free!
/ 2Br/2Ba.
Rent $725 ~ Deposit $500
/ 3Br/2Ba
Rent $795. - Deposit $500
Pets are Welcome

1700 sf X-Clean 2/2 second
story; deck, trees, private country
acre on NW side. $600 mo + dep.
No dogs 386.961.9181
2 br/lba w/garage on the West side
2br/lba w/garage on the East side.
1st, last &security.
386-755-6867
2BR APT.
Downtown Location, Clein.
$600 mo, plus Security.
NO PETS. Call 386-755-3456
2BR. APT. 1.5ba. at
Quail Height C.C. $550 mo. 1st,
and last month. No Pets.
Phone 386-752-1865 �
3BR/2BA DUPLEX
Extremely Clean
$650. per month.
Call 386-867-1212 for details.
Close to VA! 2br/1.5ba
Duplex CH/A, W/D hook up.
Convenient location. $550.Ino 4-
sec. 386-758-9351/352-208-2421
CONDO for rent. $825 mo.
w/$825 deposit. 2br/1.5ba
screened porch. Walking dis-
tance to shopping. 386-752-7578
Garage. apt, Ib/lb quiet, private,
walk DOT $500
deposit required
386-755-0819
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
new 2BR/2BA apts., garage, W/D
hook up. patio. $600 and up, plus
SD, 386-466-7392 or 965-02761
LARGE TOWNHOUSE APT
2 story townhouse apt. 2br/1.5ba,'
Ig master br; very conveniently
located in central Lake City on
McFarlane. WD hookup w/plenty
of storage. Quiet. Pets under
201b allowed w/pet dep.
(386)752-7781 or/397-5880
LARGER 1BR/1BA Upstairs
Apt. in White Springs. $350. mo
includes water, dish TV and
WI-Fl access. 386-397-1410
Nice, 2br Apt. in town. Great
location. Close to VA and
shopping $500. mo plus deposit.:
386-344-2972
Studios & IBr's from $125 week.
Utilities & cable incl. Full size
kitchen, fridge & range.
386-752-2741 or 352-538-0292
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $525 plus security
Call Michelle 386-752-9626

720 Furnished Apts.
2W For Rent
EFFICIENCY APARTMENT
Cable & all utilities included.
$500. mo. & $150. Sec Dep.
386-697-9950
Great Country Living. Furnished
Park Model Trailers. $500 per
month all utilities provided. Call
386-961-8540/386-75524945
"The Apartment Alternative"
NO Lease, NO Deposits; ROOMS
Utilities, Cable, WI-FI, maid, -
micro-fridge, phone, Pool.
24 hour office, laundry & vending
Motel 6 (386)755-4664
Wk 1 prs. $169., 2 ppl $179 + tax

730 UnfurnishedI
7J3 Home For Rent,
3/2 + bonus room, H/A, w/chair
assessable, close in. $775.
deposit required
386-755-0819
3/2 newer home, close to town.
2 car garage. References required.
$1000/mo, plus deposit.
386-965-2267.
3BR/IBA HOUSE. Newly
remodeled. New AC, carpet, paint,
windows. $580 mo. + $600 sec.
dep. w/6 mo lease. 386-697-9950
3BR/2BA BRICK Horhe
in town. $850/mo.
$500: security deposit.
S386-365-8721
3BR/2BA Brick w/2 car garage,
CH/A, at 101 SW Hummingbird
Glen. $900. mo. $1000 dep.
Call 386-365-8543
3BR/2BA on Little Rd.
Tile throughout. $700. mo
$400. security deposit.
Call Brandy @ 386-755-1586
. 3br/2ba. Quiet & secluded pine-
woods w/oaks, cedars & dog-
woods, on 25 fenced acres. Lovely
log home. All hardwood interior.
16X20 outside studio. $1,300. mo
w/references. 1st & last month.
Lease available. 20 min to Lake
City, 45 min to G'ville. Must see
to believe. Call 386-497-3536
A 4BR 2BA HUD Home!
ONLY $215/mo!!
5%dn 15yrs @ 8%apr for listings
800-366-9783 ext 7782
BEAUTIFUL 3BR/2BA Brick


home in Callaway. Spa tub, Ig
fenced yard. $1,200. mo + 1st &
last. 386-365-3865
Charming 3bd/2ba home near
downtown. No pets.
$850/mo.
864-517-0522.
For Sale/Rent 3 Rivers Estate,
home. 3 br/2 ba CB 1 ac across
Itchet River 32 X 30 barn-. $900,
mo. 1st, last, sec.386-961-5078
Forest Country S/D 2br/2ba
Brick, w/2 car garage. Lawn
service incl. Great school district.
Screened in patio. 1 Yr lease req'd.
No pets. $1,100 mo. 386-752-6082
LG 3BR/2BA on 1.3 ac. on the
Westside. Water, trash
& lawn maint.included. $875. mo
plus security. 386-719-9702


Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
IMMACULATE 2br/2ba Home
West side. Washer/Dryer, all new
kitchen appliances; screened in
porch; 2 car carport. Electric/wa-
ter, garbage & lawn maintenance
included. $750 mo. No pets. 1st,
last & security. Call 386-755-9598
NEWER HOME
3br/2ba. 2 car garage.
Great location.
386-755-2672
Quail Ridge. Nice, newer 3 beds 2
bath 1547 Ironwood Dr. Avail.
12/1 $650 a mo. 1-800-553-4287
4 pics: kdinboston(3vahoo.com
Rent Reduced! Lg 3br/2ba w/ga-
rage at Southern Oaks CC. Wash-
er/dryer avail. $1,100 mo. plus de-
posit.386-752-3991 or 397-4550
Rural beauty and privacy near,
I-10/US90 NW of Live Oak. 3BR,
2Ba, $725/mo. Optional pasture
available. (626) 512-5374


WOOD FRAME Home 2br/lba
All appliances. CH/A. 886 NE
Cherry Lane. $475.mo. & $200
sec. dep. 386-867-0849

75O Business &
50 Office Rentals
04535826
Office/Warehouse
Space for Rent
1000 Sqft. at $425/Mo. Located
behind Hwy Patrol, on
Arlington Blvd, going toward
middle school. 386-752-6806


04536366
Lease one or both! Two suites
available at Lake City Family
Denistry's new facility. High
traffic location in a fast growing
professional area.
Call BJ Federico Century 21
The Darby Rogers Co. at
386-365-5884

04536375
Village Square - Established
Center with Space For Lease.
Great Tenant Mix, Easy Access.
"Price Negotiable.'
'Scott Stewart 386-867-3498.
Westfield Realty Group.

04536376
Office/Retail/Medical Space
For Lease @ Marion Crossing.
Desirable location with w/
flexible space &Hwy frontage.
1118 - 2236sf. $13/sf.
Scott Stewart 386-867-3498.
Westfield Realty Group.


04536377
Office/Retail Space For Lease,
@ Branford Crossing. Great lo-
cation with Hwy frontage, 961sf
- 1325sf, can be combined.
Scott Stewart 386-867-3498.
Westfield Realty Group.

Office Space located at Oakhill
Plaza on Hwy 41. 900 sqft.
$650/mo. plus tax.
Call Tom 386-961-1086
Retail Space
Heavy traffic area
800 Sf. & 1600 Sqft.
Call for quotes 1-800-342-0135

770 Condos For Rent
3BR/2BA Excellent location, close
to town, pool, no pets. Ref. req'd
$1200 mo, $1200 dep.
386-752-9144 (daytime),
752-2803 or 397-3500 after 5pm
GOLF CONDO. Southern Oaks
Golf Club. 2br/2ba. Pool, tennis,
cable & water, included. $950. mo.
386-867-1948
St. Augustine Beach 3 Br 1600 sf.
Weekends/weekly/monthly
Nice, clean & affordable
Call 396-961-1961 or 758-7560

805 Lots for Sale
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
,to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
*18living with parents or legal
Custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810. Home for Sale
3/2 2000+sf on acree built 2007
many extras, stonehenge S/D,
privacy fence, sprink. sale/rent/
lease. $185k. 850-380-0275
4BR/2BA 2100 sq ft. Brick home
in Macclenny, on 2.82 ac. Tile, FP,
shutters, new roof, work shop.
904-237-0060 or 904-259-3963
FSBO Nice site built home near
Ft. White. 2br/2ba. CH/A, 2 car
gar., Ig screen room, culligan
water, more. $123,000. 497-2001
HURRY LAST CHANCE
$8000 FT.HB credit
New 3/2 Modular 1200 sf
1/2 acre upscale& close-in
loaded Decks Driveway A/C
well septic concrete foundation
$665 mo w/ 4K dn Owner finance
avail Gary (386) 758-9824 or
garyhamiltonhomes.com

820 Farms &
Acreage
10 acres. Owner Financed
Well, septic, power pole
Deas Bullard BKL Properties.
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com


820 Farms &
2 0Acreage

04536252
24.95 Acres - Mostly Pasture
with nice 3BR/2BA double wide
MH (2007), detached garage, 3
stall horse barn, fenced and x-
fenced. Wellborn area. Price re-
duced to $229,000.
Call Maston Crapps at
Daniel Crapps Agency, Inc.
(Realtor) 386-365-1444

920 Auto Parts
S & Supplies
TWO DIAMOND Plate
truck wheel well tool boxes.
4'LX10"D $50,00 for set.
386-867-1106

930 Motorcycles
2009 SUZUKI C50, 805cc,
4,500 mi, 6 saddlebags &
freeway bar. like new. $4,000.


j_sindlinger@hbtrail.com

S950 Cars for Sale

1991 HONDA Accord.
$2700. or trade for Goldwing.
Call Dan 386-752-2792

.n Recreational
951 Vehicles


09 ELITE 5th Wheel 3 Slides,
Fiberglass. Washer/dryer, dish
washer, fireplace. Loaded. Will de-
liver. $28,900. obo (863)838-3825

A9 Vans & Sport
S952 Util. Vehicles
2001 KIA Sportage 4 door,
white, auto. 100k iniles.
Clean car fax. Like new.
$3,500. (352)339-5158


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Bring the picture in or we will take it for you!
Advertise your car, truck, motorcycle, recreation vehicle or boat here for 10 consecutive days.
If your vehicle does not sell within those 10 days, for an additional $15 you can place your ad for
an additional 10 days. A picture will run everyday with a description of your vehicle. The price of
the vehicle must be listed in the ad. Your ad must be prepaid with cash, check or credit card. Just
include a snapshot or bring your vehicle by and we will take the picture for you. Private party only!
Price includes a 6 day/ 4 line classified ad of the same vehicle in print and online.
W_ I L.U M M - -&

11111W


2005 Ford F-150 XLT
Super Cab, 4 wheel drive,
26,000 miles, 1 owner,
excellent condition.
$19,500
Call
386-752-1364
386-965-4340
ui--Z,-w--'.w "- I


2009 Suzuki C50
805cc, 4500 mi., 6 saddle
bags & freeway bar,
like new.
$4,000

Ljsindlinger@hotmail.com


1992 Jayco Deluxe 1997 Lincoln W' MY
Fifth wheel, 28ft., one Town Car 2006 Polaris
slide, cent. air. 2006 108,345miles, AC, Sportsman 450
Toyota Corolla SE, oned. runs great. Excellent condition.
$15,000 for both $2,995 OBO www.cconuthotline.com
$15,000 for boh $4,500
CCall alCall
386-854-0480 386-752-4855 305-797-8609





In Print, Online




1 Low Price!


or oreDeail Cll ar


-Iak i


Classified Department: 755-5440











LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2009


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Story ideas?


Contact
Tom Mayer
Editor
754-0428
tmayer@akecityreporter.com

Sunday, December 6, 2009


GARDEN TALK


Lake City Reporter






LIFE



www.lakecityreporter.com


Nichelle Demorest
dndemorest@ufl.edu


SBMPs,

what are

they?


Management
.Practices, are
becoming a way
of life for any-
one involved in a profes-
sion that utilizes fertilizers,
pesticides, or irrigation
water. BMPs recommend
how and what fertilizers
should be used in particu-
lar situations. They offer
. information on how and
when to use pesticides
most effectively and with
the least negative envi-
ronmental impact BMPs
also provide insight into
minimum water require-
ments in all phases of plant
growth, weather, and soil
conditions. All of this infor-
mation is based on accu-
mulated scientific research
and data.
The state of Florida has
directed several govern-
ment departments to work
together to find ways to
reduce pollution in our
waters. Even though the
use of BMPs are not yet
mandatory, the coalition.
formed by the Department
of Environmental
Protection, the Department
of Agriculture and
Consumer Services,
and Water Management
Districts recognizes that
BMPs are our best means
of insuring clean water and
sustainability for the future.
There are specific BMPs
that have been developed
to assist in different crop
productions in all types
of growing conditions
throughout the state. But
agriculture is not the only
source of excess nitrogen
and phosphorus, two main
water contaminants. With
a continued influx of new
Florida residents, develop-
ment and housing will con-
tinue to expand. Along with
. this growth come more
contaminants from lawn
and landscape fertilizers,
pesticides and sediments.
* As homeowners, we have
the same responsibilitiess
as agriculture in managing
and protecting our resourc-
es. We also use fertilizers,
pesticides, and irrigation
water on our properties.
We should stop the selfish
practices of overwater-
ing, over fertilizing, and
overusing herbicides and
insecticides, and start pay-
ing attention to the needs
of the environment. BMPs
have been developed to
help us use these inputs in
a way that will provide us
with the results we want in
the landscape, but without
jeopardizing the natural
resources that we must
protect.
These are the nine
principles that have been
developed by UF Florida-
Friendly Landscaping as
BMP's for homeowners.
Plan your landscaping
around these principles and
protect our Florida waters.
1. Right plant, right
place. Select plants that are
suited for a particular site.
They will require minimal
water, fertilizers and pesti-
cides.
2. Water efficiently.
Irrigate only when the lawn

BMPs continued on 2D


Army sniper with local ties takes I


By TROY ROBERTS
troberts@lakecityreporter.com
FORT KNOX
hen Sgt
1st Class
Timothy
Johns
joined the
U.S. Army,'he was looking
for a challenge. As a mili-
tary sniper, he found it.
Johns and his sniper
team recently competed
and won first place in the
open competition-at the
9th Annual International
Sniper Competition in
Fort Benning, Ga. The
group, which includes
Johns and DeLand-native
Staff Sgt. Kevin Wildman,
placed second in the over-
all competition - out of
more than 35 teams from
the United States, Spain,
Canada, Ireland, Denmark
and Britain - and also
placed second in a recent
competition in Arkansas
held by the National Guard,
Marksman School.
Originally from
Bradford, Johns - the
son of Doug and Martha
Johns of Lake City and Jeff
and Pam Lindsey of Starke
- joined the military soon
after high school gradua-
tion.
"My dad was in the
military, so I just wanted to
continue the chain," Johns,
29, said on Wednesday. "I
wasn't really a college-fype
guy, and I was looking for a
little extra challenge."
Johns began basic
training, spent time in
California teaching infantry
tactics before heading to
Hawaii for reconnaissance
platoon tryouts. He was
successful there, and he
tried his hand at the week-
long sniper tryout.
'They say in the sniper
world only 10 percent is
shooting, and the other
90 percent is field craft
and knowledge of the land
and weather," Johns said.
"The training also involved
weapons marksmanship
and just making sure you
have the mindset for it."
Johns impressed those
running the course, and
was chosen to attend a
10-week program at the
U.S. Marine Corps sniper
school.
"There you learn every-
thing about being a sniper,"
he said. "Marksmanship,
reading the wind, long-
range marksmanship,
which is shooting at 1,600
meters or a mile. When
you're firing at that long
of a distance, everything
comes into effect - the
wind, the actual rotation
of the earth, you have to
factor that in. It's pretty
in-depth. There's a lot
to learn, a lot'of physics
involved, and there is a


Sgt. 1st Class Tim Johns (left) and Staff Sgt. Kevin Wildman (right) pose with their prize' rifles.
used during a recent sniper challenge, the 9th Annual International Sniper Competition at Fort
Benning, Ga. The duo placed second out of more than 35 teams to compete. The rifles are
handmade tactical 300 WM, designed by Ashbury International. Also pictured are
Gen. Hertling, TRADOC commander (second from left), CSM Beaver, 194th Command Sgt. '
Major (center), Col. Thompson, 194th Commander, (second from right) and Sgt. 1st Class


Johnson (kneeling).'

whole slew of things you
have to learn. The job title
of a sniper is basically to
deliver long-range preci-
sion fire, but also gather
intelligence and conduct
reconnaissance on targets.
You're not just shooting."
Johns' recon unit in
Hawaii was deployed twice,
once to Afghanistan, and
the other time to Iraq. His
duties change depending
on the mission.
"A lot of it depends
on how the leadership is
using you in what your
role is going to be," he
said. "While I was there,
the missions were plen-
tiful because it's a tar-
get-rich environment in
Afghanistan. It was pretty
hot when I went."
One of the types of mis-
sions Johns and his crew
were involved with was
recon missions, where they
were given clearance to
engage any hostile threat
toward U.S. Coalition
forces.
"Anyone we saw with a
gun or placing an explo-
sive device or people with
weapons that we had a
positive identification that
were going to attack some-
one else, we were clear to
fire on," he said. "Those


missions were a little more
low-key."
Often those
missions involved
hunkering down for the
long haul - Johns said the
longest he was stationed
in one position was for two
weeks.
"It depends on a number
of variables," he said. "If
you don't fire a round and
aren't compromised, you
could stay in that exact
spot for two weeks. As
soon as you fire a round,
you have to move. But I've
stayed in one spot for two
weeks, a subterranean hide
- a hole in the ground
- with overhead cover,
and you just watch a spe-
cific area."
During deployments,
Johns' company consists of
Wildman, more than 100
pounds of gear and his
M-24 sniper rifle. To fortify
their bunker, Johns said
they would place claymore
mines around the area, and
would only leave their hid-
ing place at night to stretch
their legs and get the blood
flowing.
But don't think they
were bored, Johns said.
"As far as what you do
when you get there, the
battlefield is always chang-


ing. There's constant wind
shifts, temperature chang-
es, barometric pressure
changes, and all of that
affects your shot when you
fire," he said. "It's constant.
You're always improving
your position, your cam-
ouflage, and the time defi-
nitely flies."
And when the time
comes to dispatch that tar-
get, Johns said he and his
fellow snipers know they're
doing the job they were
trained to do.
"For the most part,
speaking for me and the
guys that work for me, you
don't really think about
it," he said. "You're just
thinking about the shot -.
you're not thinking about
what you're
shooting at. For us, with all
the training, you don't see
it as a person, you see it as
a target. It'll have a
tendency to sneak back up
on you later - you may
have a vision of someone
you shot a long time ago
- but then you come to
the realization that that's
just the job."

Return stateside
After his deployments,
Johns and Wildman were


. both selected to serve as
drill sergeants and are
currently stationed at Fort
Knox, Kentucky, as part of
the 246 Infantry Battalion,
194th Armored Brigade.
But being stateside allows
them to take part in com-
petitions, such as the one
in Fort Benning where
they placed second.
"It's largely centered
around shooting - it's
what we call 'capability
of the weapon' shooting,"
Johns said. "The weap-
ons we fire are capable
of shooting a one-inch
groove at 100 meters.
With that, you should be
able to shoot a 10 inch
groove at 1,000 meters. At
500 meters, you're shoot-
ing a target the size of a
three-by-five card."
It also forces the sniper
to work hand-in-hand
with his spotter, as on the
battlefield. For example,
the sniper can shoot a
playing card at 500 meters,
but if the object is to shoot
all of a-cerfain type of
playing card - "our goal
was a royal flush," Johns
said - the spotter, with a
higher optical lens, must
direct the sniper to fire at
the correct targets.
' And that doesn't count
for the variables in the
shot.
"A three mph wind at
500 meters will throw your
round off about eight
inches, so you have to
compensate for that,"
Johns said.
Other challenges during
the competition involved
being dropped off in the
woods in the middle of
the night - with about.70
pounds of gear - and hav-
ing to move from point to
point for 21 miles. Another
mission, with a time-limit,
involved finding and iden-
tifying a target, getting
into position, and hitting
the target
On the battlefield Johns
was responsible for six or
seven other guys, but as
a drill sergeant, he is now
responsible for approxi-
mately 60.
"You're always a coach,
a leader, a mentor, but
now it's on a more grandi-
ose scale," he said. "Most
of these are civilians going
into the military, and we're
teaching them the very
basics, from how to stand
at attention ant how to
salute. And of course we
integrate how to fire a
weapons system and take
them into field training
exercises. It's pretty much
the same, but on a much
larger scale.
"Now I'm the person.
who gets rid of all of their
bad habits," Johns said.


ID


I t e V # v













Page Editor: Troy Roberts, 754-0427


2D LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2009


Phi Theta Kappa, the key advantage


hi Theta Kappa
S(PTK) is the
honor society
of the two-year
college. The
mission of PTK is to rec-
ognize and encourage the
academic achievement of
two-year college students
and to provide opportuni-
ties for individual growth
and development through
participation in honors,
leadership, service arid fel-
lowship, programming.
Each semester, the
Lake City Community
College Xi Phi chapter of
PTK invites a number of ,
students to join the honor
society based on academic
achievement.
PTK was started in 1918
and currently has more
than two million members
worldwide. More than
1,2,00 community col-
leges have an active PTK
chapter. Since 1959, Xi Phi
has inducted almost 2,500
LCCC students as mem-
bers into PTK
PTK recognizes students
who have already achieved
success at this level in their
college career. New mem-
bers receive a membership
pin, a membership certifi-
cate, a special seal on their
diploma and a notation on
their permanent college
transcript. The members
may also wear distinctive
graduation regalia with
their cap and gown for the
graduation ceremony.
This recognition not only
serves to highlight the
members' present accom-
plishments, but also to
encourage future academic
achievement.
PTK offers opportuni-
ties to gain experience in
academic writing, research
and publishing. The soci-
ety publishes "Note Bene,"


ENGAGEMENT


Sarah Smith and Sean Flanick.

Smith-Flanick
Pamela Morgan of Lake
City, Fla., announces the
engagement and approach-
ing marriage of her daugh-
ter, Sarah Smith of Lake
City, Fla., to Sean Flanick of
Trenton, Fla.
The wedding is planned
for 3 p.m. Saturday Jan. 9,
,2010, at Tabernacle Baptist


MarkYarick
LCCC professor of turf equipment
management

an annual collection of
writings submitted by
members, and distributes it
to more than 2,000 college
libraries. While only about
30 articles are chosen, writ-
ing for "Note Bene" gives
the student the experience
of writing and submitting
. an article to an academic
journal.
The society also puts
forth an Honors Study
Topic each year.-to facilitate
research, discussion and
awareness related to the
topic. This topic is coupled
with the ."USA Today Case
Study Challenge" where
students link USA Today
articles with the topic to
further encourage academ-
ic research.*
In addition to recogni-
tion and the encourage-
ment of academic achieve-
ment, PTK also offers
members a number of
scholarship opportunities.
Last year, more than $36
million dollars in schol-
arships was awarded to
PTK'members Members
can visit the eScholarship -
Directory at PTKorg to
search for scholarships
that match their education
and career goals. A $500
scholarship is awarded
randomly each month to'
a member just for visiting
the Web site!
New members are also
automatically enrolled in'


collegefish.org which is
used by colleges and uni-
versities to recruit PTK
members to transfer to
their institutions.
The Leaders of Promise
Scholarship Program
awards outstanding PTK
members pursuing associ-
ate degrees. Coca-Cola also
offers scholarships specifi-
cally for associate degree
programs. More than half
of the. Coca-Cola Two-
Year Scholarship Program
awards have gone to PTK
members.
The Guistwhite
Scholarship Program
awards members pursu-
ing baccalaureate degrees,
in addition the Jack Kent
Cooke Foundation awards
scholarships to members
planning an transferring to,
a baccalaureate program.
PTK partners with USA
Today each year for the
All-USA Academic Team
Scholarship Program, in
which community col-
lege students are nomi-
nated based on academic
achievement, leadership
and community involve-
ment. The finalists are
featured in USA Today.
The New Century Scholars
Award, funded by the
Coca-Cola Foundation,
recognizes the highest
scoring All-USA Academic
Team nominee from each
of the 50 states.
Last year 1,450 students
from 800 community col-
leges Were nominated for
the All-USA Academic
Team Scholarship
Program. Anna Elizabeth
Schubarth, an LCCC
student, was.chosen as
a finalist for this award.
Schubarth was also chosen
for the firstteam of the
Florida All-State Academic
Team and Tamariay


Kentrel Gordon, another
LCCC student, was chosen
for the third team of the
Florida All-State Academic
Team.
These prestigious schol-
arships are awarded to stu-
dents who demonstrate the
highest academic success,
leadership development
and community involve-
ment.
In addition to recogniz-
ing and encouraging aca-
demic success, PTK also
Offers opportunities for
leadership development
and community involve-
ment Each year, the Xi Phi
chapter of PTK at LCCC
elects new officers. Many
of these officers have
embraced their positions
as opportunities to develop
leadership skills that will
benefit them.throughout
their education and into
their careers. They have
led their chapters into the
community to volunteer
for.book drives, canned
food drives, animal shelter
drives, tutoring, mentoring
and a host of other initia-
tives.
The Xi Phi chapter has.
also committed to endow,
a PTK Scholarship with
the LCCC Foundation. The
society still has a few years
to go, but is committed
to 'paying it forward' for
students who will attend
LCCC in the future.
The motto of LCCC is:
"Your Hometown College."
The XI Phi chapter of,,
PTK is unique because
it embodies 'that North-
Florida "hometown" char-
acter, yet it appreciates the
connection with a: much,
greater, international fel-
lowship.
Contact Yarick at yar-
ickm@lakecitycc.edu or by
calling (386) 754-4343.


BIRTH

Ferger She weighed 8 pounds,
3 ounces and measured 21
Chris and Teisha Ferger inches. She joins Harrison,
of Festus, Mo., announce 9, Jackson, 6, and Emma, .
the birth of their daughter, 2. The grandparents
Eliza Claire Ferger, on are David and Emma
Oct. 29, 2009, at St. Johns Ellinwood; the late Becky
Mercy Medical Center in Ferger; and Ron and Joann
St. Louis, Mo. Ferger.


Eadie
Steve and Ashley Eadie
of Lincoln, Ca., announce
the birth of their son,
Weston Michael-Bozeman
Eadie, on Oct. 26, 2009,,
at Sutter Med Center in
Roseville, Ca. -.
He Weighed 8 pounds, 4
ounces, and measured 20.
inches.


He joins Cameron, 19,
Amanda, 17, Hanna, 11,
Ben, 5, and Oliva, 3. The
grandparents are Kenny
and Debbie Eadie, Connie
and Gerald Cook, Dewey'
and Linda Cribbs, and
Mike and Elaine Land. The
great grandparents are
Vonda Dicks, Theda Eadie,
Rhea M. Stokes and Erma
Owens.


ANNIVERSARY


Peggy Ann Redish Douglas and Francis Turner Lewis.


Lewis
PeggyAnn Redish
Douglas of Lake City, and
Francis Turner Lewis of,
Alabama,, were' united in '
marriage on Dec. 7, 1984,
in Lake City. They will cel-
ebrate their 25th anniver-
sary with family.
The couple has 4 chil-
dren - Priscilla Jaime,
Frankie Lewis, Alyssa
Tiller and Eric Lewis. They
have 5 grandchildren.'The


bride is the office manager
at Gentiva Home Care, and
. the groom is a math teach-
er at Richardson Middle
School.
The couple lives in Lake
City.
They both attend
Southside Baptist Church
and are loving parents,
grandparents, and daugh-
ter and son-in-law to Edgar
and Ann Redish. They are-
active boaters and love to
fish.


BMPs: What to watch for


Continued From Page 1D
lawn needs water. Learn
the signs.
3. Fertilize
appropriately. Learn recom-
mended amounts for lawn
and ornamentals. Plants
can't use nutrients that
have moved below the root
zone. '
. 4.' Mulch. A 3-inch layer
helps retain moisture and
keeps weeds down.
5. Attract wildlife.
Wildlife is attracted to
plants that provide food
and shelter in your yard.
6. Manage yard pests
responsibly. Be informed
about the pest and pesti-
cide before, spraying.
7. Recycle. Leave grass
clippings on the lawn.
Leaves can be used as
mulch.
8. Reduce stormwa-


Church, Lake City.
Sarah is" employed by
Columbia County 911
Emergency Services as a
dispatcher. She is also a full-
time mother to 2-year-old
Jaci Rayne Smith.
Sean is former military
and is currently enrolled
at Santa Fe College. He is
pursuing a career in law
enforcement.


Party crashing a

growing phenomenon


By JOCELYN NOVECK
AP National Writer
NEW YORK - There
was a list at the door, but
the beautifully dressed
guest in the chic, red-soled
Christian Louboutin shoes
wasn't on it. Still, she
insisted she was a friend
of the host. Not wanting to
offend, the staffer at the
door waved her in.
And when the woman'
proceeded to drink herself
silly at the jewelry-store
party on Rodeo Drive in
Beverly Hills a few weeks
ago, resting her body on
glass cases and telling a
cute male waiter she want-


ed to bear his children,
it soon became clear she
wasn't a beautifully dressed
guest, but a beautifully
dressed party'crasher.
"She was wearing
Louboutins!" marveled the
embarrassed staffer at the
door. As she'd just learned
the hard way, party crash-
ing is all about looking the
part.
Michaele and Tareq
Salahi maintain they
weren't crashing when
they found their way into
the White House state din-
ner last week, he in a tux,
she in a fetching red sari.
The White House begs to
differ.


ter runoff. Slow down
the movement of water
so it can soak into the
ground.
9. Protect the waterfront.
Minimize the chance of
pollutant runoff into water
bodies.
Several links to superb
guidebooks can be found
at the website http://flori-
dayards.org. A well written
guide'that is worth your
time is "What You Need
to know About Fertilizing
and Watering Your Lawn
and Landscape to Protect
Florida's Springs." A rather
wordy title for such a good
how-to publication. The
Master Gardeners are
available to help you with
gardening questions.
Give them a call at 752-
5384.













China, Crystal,
Flatware and Gifts
Couples registered:

Lea Schenck
Wil Posey,
December 19, 2009

Lindsey Morton
George Pridgeon
February 20, 2010

Carlee Wilson
Trey Beauchamp
March 6, 2010

Aimee Ronsonet
Brent Williams
March 20, 2010


We know exactly
what they want in
a wedding or shower
gift. We update
their list as gifts are
purchased, and
gift wrap.

WARD'S
-JEWELRY & GIFTS
156 N. Marion Ave.
Lake City
752-5470


LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2009


2D


















SPOTLIGHT


Sunday, December 6, 2009


www.lakecityreporter.com


Troy Roberts
Phone:(386) 754-0427
troberts@akecityreportercom

Gleeks,

scrubs

and a

racy kiss

Since there is a bit
on my mind this
week, I'm going
to jump around
and touch on a
few different topics rather
than just having a primary
focus on one. Hqpe you can
follow.
* If you haven't
watched Fox's "Glee" this
season, you're missing
out. I'm not ashamed to.
say the musical comedy,
currently in its first sea-
son, is one of my must-
watch television shows
every week because of
its comedy, quality and
musical genius. Sure, the
storylines may be hard to
swallow (the fake preg-
nancy reeks of a bad soap
opera storyline and has '
carried on twice as long),
but the musical numbers
definitely make up for it
if you have any interest
in Broadway or musicals
in general. The cast is
solid - from an acting
and performing perspec-
tive - and the show is
fun to watch. It'll take a
winter break following
this week's episode, but
should be back early in
the spring to wrap up its
first season.
* "Scrubs" returned
Tuesday night in a new
format, one that will be
interesting to see as the
season progresses. With
the eighth season finale
last year, the show was
scheduled to ride off into
the sunset, but higher-
than-expected numbers
*brought it back for a ninth
season. Problem is, most
of the actors - leading
man Zach Braff included
- planned to make last
season their last. So, Braff,
Donald Faison and oth-
ers have signed on for a
handful of episodes this
season while a slew of new
characters are introduced.
Will it work? The first two
episodes, largely centered
on Braff, were funny, but
his absence could lead to
a shortened season if the
new characters don't catch
on.
* So it appears former
"American Idol" contes-
tant Adam Lambert is
under fire for a kiss dur-
ing the American Music
Awards a few weeks ago.
Lambert, who has openly
expressed his homosexu-
ality, has had a number
of scheduled appearances
canceled following his
racy performance, and
the FCC has turned up
the heat, making this a
full-blown controversy not
seen since the infamous
Janet Jackson Super Bowl
incident.
Now, I'm not in sup-
port or against Lambert's
act on stage, but - and
correct me if I'm wrong
- when Madonna and
Britney Spears kissed
on stage a few years
ago during a live per-
formance, it was aired
for weeks on the major
networks, and wasn't
necessarily portrayed in
a negative light.
Just an observation.
* Troy Roberts is the
assistant editor of the
Lake City Reporter.


President Spock?


Comparisons focus on emotion, ears


By SETH BORENSTEIN
AP Science Writer
WASHINGTON - He shows
a fascination with science, an
all-too deliberate decision-mak-
ing demeanor, an adherence to
logic and some pretty, ahem,
prominent ears.
They all add up to a quite
logical conclusion, at least
for "Star Trek" fans: Barack
Obama is Washingtbn's Mr.
Spock, the chief science officer
for the ship of state.
"I guess it's somewhat
unusual for a politician to be so
precise, logical, in his thought
process," actor Leonard Nimoy,
who has portrayed Spock for
more than 40 years, told The
Associated Press in an e-mail
interview. "The comparison
to Spock is, in my opinion, a
compliment to him and to the
character."
Until now.
Obama's Spock-like quali-
ties have started to cause him
political problems in real world
Washington. Critics see him as
too technocratic, too delibera-
tive, too lacking in emotion.
Obama's protracted decision-
making on a new war strategy
in Afghanistan, for example,
prompted criticisms that he's
too deliberate. Former Vice
President Dick Cheney, former
vice presidential nominee Sarah
Palin and other conservatives
faulted Obama for "dithering."
While it's the slow decision
making that has conservatives
upset, especially when it comes
to national security, it's the sci-
ence content of the presidential
agenda that have the geeks
insisting he's gone where no
nerd has gone before.
Obama was a lawyer, organiz-
er .and author before he turned
politician. So his interest in sci-
ence wasn't as obvious until he
reached the White House. Now,
privately he's known to relish
the ability to call smart people,
especially scientists, to come to
the White House to talk about
their fields. The more obscure
and complicated the field, the
better to feed the inner science
geek.
Out in public, Obama turns
the Bunsen burner up a notch,
playing a combination of high


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Oct. 23 file photo, President Barpck Obama tours a research
laboratory with professor Alex Slocum at MIT in Cambridge, Mass.
'We're going to show young people how cool science can be,' the
president said on Nov. 23, and announced that the White House would
hold an annual science fair as part of a'$260 million private push to
improve math and science education.


school science teacher and
math team cheerleader.
Last week, for example, the
president announced that the
White House would hold an
annual science fair as part of
a $260 million private push to
improve math and science edu-
cation.
"We're going to show young
people how cool science can
be," Obama said. "Scientists
and engineers ought to stand
side by side with athletes and
entertainers as role models."
That was just the latest in
a science-heavy fall semester
at what sometimes seems to
double as the White House
Institute of Technology.


One October evening, 20
telescopes and an inflatable
dome with a three-dimensional
tour of the universe were set
up on the White House lawn.
The occasion was a star party
for 150 middle-schoolers that
also showcased moon rocks,
a couple of astronauts, several
astronomers and even two sci-
ence teachers dressed as Isaac
Newton and Galileo.
The president's science
adviser, John Holdren, said the
party showed that Obama "is
genuinely and intensely inter-
ested in science.and technology
in a way that goes beyond their
practical relevance to meeting
national goals."


Muppets fly high with Queen parody


By JAKE COYLE
AP Entertainment Writer
NEW YORK - Much like
the Muppets took Manhattan,
they have taken the Web.
Since debuting last week,
the Muppet parody of the clas-
sic music video of Queen's
"Bohemian Rhapsody" has
been viewed more than
8.6 million times on YouTube.
It's an exceptional hit for the first
video posted on a new YouTube
channel by the Muppets Studio,
the Walt Disney Company sub-
sidiary formed in 2004 after the
Jim Henson Company sold the
franchise.
A Twitter feed has also been
launched. (It's mostly promo-
tional; Kermit isn't blogging.)
And a Facebook page has been
started.
Muppets Studio general
manager Lylle Breier said the
online push for the Muppets
was designed to help reboot
the franchise and quickly get
new content to fans.
"When the Muppets came
into real popularity was the '70s.
What was popular in the '70s?
Variety shows - that's what
The Muppet Show' was," said
Breier. "What's the Web? It's a
giant variety show. That's why
the Muppets fit so perfectly.
Parody has always been at the
heart of what the Muppets do."
Breier said the Muppets
singing "Bohemian Rhapsody"
had long been an idea on the
back burner, but the project
only recently came together.
In it, just about every famous
Muppet character makes a


p
9%,


N- OW 4


In this photo provided by StarPix, Postmaster General John E..Potter
poses with Kermit the Frog and Fozzie Bear of the Muppets to' kick off
the holiday mailing season and the letters to Santa program in New
York, on Tuesday.


cameo: Gonzo and his chick-
ens appear in silhouette; Rowlf
plays piano; Beaker supplies
his normal "meep-meep-meep-
meep"; Dr. Teeth and the
Electric Mayhem rock out.
Animal bangs on the drums
and gets to channel Freddie
Mercury, singing "Mama!" He
repeats it instead of singing
the full, child-unfriendly line
"Mama just killed a man/ Put
a gun against his head/ Pulled
my trigger/ Now he's dead."
It's not the Muppets first
foray into online video. Several
videos were released last
year, most notably including
Beaker singing "Ode to Joy."
More than 7 million have since
watched Beaker's rendition.
Breier says more Web vid-
eos are on the way. A version
of "Carol of the Bells" will be
released for Christmas, and a
handful of other videos will fol-
low in 2010.


The purpose of the sudden
Muppet expansion is partly pro-
motional. The Muppets have
also recently made appear-
ances on ABC's "Dancing With
the Stars" and at the Macy's
Thanksgiving Day Parade.
Last year's holiday special, "A
Muppets Christmas: Letters
to Santa" has recently been
released on DVD and will air
again Friday on NBC.
What is more important, a
new, much-anticipated theatri-
cal film is in the works. Jason
Segel ("Forgetting Sarah
Marshall") and his writing
partner Nicholas Stoller have
been writing a new Muppets
film expected to return the
franchise to its more acclaimed
past.
"It's all part of a plan for new
creative content with online,
television, a new theatrical
movie," said Breier. "We're
bringing the Muppets back."


ASSOCIATED PRESS
An image released by Christie's shows
a copy of Edgar Allan Poe's first book,
'Tamerlane and Other Poems.'


Rare 1st Poe

book could

fetch $700K

By MARK PRATT
Associated Press
BOSTON - When a teenage Edgar
Allan Poe moved to Boston to find work in
1827, he was eager to launch his literary
career, re-establish his roots in the city.
of his birth and distance himself from his
foster father in Richmond, Va.
The result was his first book,
'Tamerlane and Other Poems," virtually
unnoticed when published but now one of
the world's rarest and most sought-after'.
texts.,
Experts at Christie's auction house
say it could sell for a record price for.
American literature.
"This is known as the black tulip of U.S.
literature," said Francis Wahlgren, head
of books and manuscripts at Christie's
in New York, which expects to get from
$500,000 to $700,000 for the book on
Friday. To the best of Wahlgren's recol-
lection, the record is $250,000 for a copy
of 'Tamerlane" sold at auction nearly two
decades ago.
No more than 40 or 50 copies of
'Tamerlane" were.printed, and only 12
remain. Poe's name doesn't even grace
the cover of the 40-page book, which is
credited to "a Bostonian."
The book being auctioned is stained
and frayed and has V-shaped notches on
the outer and lower margins.
"It's kind of. a beat-up copy," said
William Self, the former television execu-
tive who's selling it.
Still, "This is a rare opportunity, a once-
in-a-lifetime chance," Wahlgren said.
Poe, now canonized as an early master
of horror and mystery, was 18 and a com-
plete unknown when the book was print-
ed. He wanted to do anything he could to
repudiate his foster father, John Allan, a
wealthy Richmond merchant, Poe scholar
James Hutchisson said.
The pair had a mercurial relationship,
said Hutchisson, an English professor at
The Citadel in Charleston, S.C.



MOVIES

The top movies at U.S. and Canadian
theaters Friday through Sunday, followed by
distribution studio, gross, number of theater
locations, average receipts per location, total
gross and number of weeks in release, as
compiled Monday by Hollywood.com:
1. "The Twilight Saga: New Moon," Summit,
$42,870,031, 4,042 locations, $10,606 average,
$230,947,696, two weeks.
2. "The Blind Side," Warner Bros.,
$40,111,364, 3,140 locations, $12,774 average,
$100,238,841, two weeks.
3. "2012," Sony, $17,651,729, 3,444 locations,
$5,125 average, $138,451,427, three weeks
4. "Old Dogs," Disney, $16,894,511, 3,425
locations, $4,933 average, $24,228,546, one
week.
5. "Disney's a Christmas Carol," Disney,
$15,758,273, 3,013 locations, $5,230 average,
$104,927,816, four weeks.
6. "Ninja Assassin," Warner Bros.,
$13,316,158, 2,503 locations, $5,320 average,
$21,193,565, one week.
7. "Planet 51," Sony, $10,218,641, 3,035
locations? $3,367 average, $28,487,409, two
weeks.
8. "Precious: Based On the Novel 'Push' By
Sapphire," Lionsgate, $7,081,032, 663 locations
$10,680 average, $32,433,482, four weeks.
9. "Fantastic Mr. Fox," Fox, $6,965,267, 2,0'"
locations, $3,426 average, $10,024,072, threi
weeks.
* 10. "The Road," Weinstein Co., $1,502,23:
111 locations, $13,534 average, $1,977,453,
one week.
11. "The Men Who Stare at Goats," Overture,
$1,501,837, 1,119 locations, $1,342 average,
$30,521,930, four weeks.
12. "The Boondock Saints II: All Saints Day,"
Apparition, $1,301,197, 373 locations, $3,488
average, $5,722,723, five weeks.
* Associated Press


3D -"














Page Editor: Troy Roberts, 754-0427


LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2009


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* To submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Tom
Mayer at 754-0428 or by
e-mail at tmayer@
lakecityreporter.com.


Monday
Christmas Parade is'
Monday
The 2009 Downtown
Action Corporation Christmas
Parade is at 7 p.m. Dec.
7. The parade begins at
Memorial Stadium, goes
down Washington Street,
turns south onto Marion
Avenue and ends at the
Florida Department of
Transportation. The parade's
theme this year is "Christmas
Memories" and will feature
about 100 entries.

Tuesday
Homeless Services of
Suwannee Valley meeting
The Homeless Services
Network of Suwannee
Valley's next meeting is at 4
p.m. Dec. 8, at the Columbia
County Public Library, down-
town Lake City branch. The
coalition includes Columbia,
Hamilton, Lafayette and
Suwannee counties. It meets
monthly on the second
Tuesday. Those who repre-
sent agencies which provide
services to the homeless as
well as business representa-
tives and private individuals
with an interest in serving
the homeless are invited to
attend.

UF Master Gardeners
are available
The University of Florida
Master Gardeners are at the
Columbia County Extension
Office from 9 a.m. to noon
every Tuesday, Thursday and
Friday. They answer garden-
ing questions and conduct
soil pH tests free of charge.
Call (386) 752-5384, or stop
at the.UF/IFAS Extension
Office at the Columbia
County fairgrounds for more
information.

Lake City Uons to meet
The Lake City Lions meet
at 7 p.m. each Tuesday, at,
the Guangdong restaurant, in


Trying to stay dry
Michael Lyons, 38,-of Macclenny, braves the wind and rain while walking along Sisters Welcome Road Wednesday afternoon.


the Lake City Mall. Call Truett
George at (386) 497-2050
or Marshall Barnard at (386)
.497-3536 for more informa-
tion.

Wednesday
Lake City Newcomers
monthly meeting
The regular monthly
meeting of the Lake City
Newcomers will be held
Wednesday December.
9, 2009 at Quail Heights
Country Club, Branford
Highway. Luncheon cost is
$10.00. Entertainment will
be by St. Nicholas, John


Pierce, Christmas Carols .
led by Norma Johnson and.
other Holiday fun and festivi-
ties. A $10 gift exchange will
take place for those wishing
to participate. Donations of
bags of candy for Christiaro
Service Center will be col-
lected. All members, guests
and friends are welcome to
help start the Holiday sea-
son. For more information
please call 935-1548 or 963-
2625.

Moose Lodge Bingo is
open for everyone
Bingo games at the Moose
Lodge, 624 NE Williams, are
open to everyone. Games


are at 3 p.m., 6:45 and 7
p.m. on every Wednesday
and Friday. There is free ice
tea and coffee. Food is avail-
able for purchase. Call (386)
755-3730.

SHINE assistance
available
SHINE, a volunteer
Program with the FL
Dept. of Elder Affairs, is
answering questions about
Medicare Part D's annual
enrollment period from
12:30 -5 p.m. Dec. 9 at the
Columbia County Public
Library. Assistance is free,
unbiased, and confidential.
Bring your Medicare Card,


your current Part D Plan
card and your prescription
drug bottles. There will be .a
worksheet to complete. Call
the Elder Helpline at 1-800-
262-2243.

Thursday
Holiday Shopping Night
at the Attic
"Kids' Holiday Shopping
Night at the Attic" is from
5 to 7 p.m. Dec. 10 at the
Haven Hospice Attic Resale
Store. Participating children
will each receive "Attic
Bucks" to shop for special-
ly-priced gifts. Festivities


will include gift wrapping,
photos with Santa, and
punch and cookies, all free
of charge, as well as door
prizes .and special draw-
ings. Adults need to accom-
pany children who will be
participating. For more
information please call 386-
752-0230.

Friday
Grief Support Group
hosts Friday meeting
Haven Hospice is hosting
"Surviving the Holidays" from
10 a.m. to noon Dec. 11. The
building is located at 6037
US Highway 90. Call
752-9191 for more
information.

CHS 1949-1953 class
reunion
A class reunion is at 11:30
a.m. Dec. 11 for Columbia
High School class of 1949-
1953, at the Mason City
Community Center. Bring
a covered dish. Call.Julia
Osburn at 752-7544 or Morris
Williams at 752-4710.

Saturday
Let it snow
Snow Day is from noon
to 5 p.m. Dec. 12 in the
parking lot across from the
Ichetucknee mural on Marion
Avenue. The event will fea-
ture snow-related activities
for children 12 and under.

8th Annual Dream
Machine Toy Ride
Registration begins at
10:30 a.m. for the event. The
ride starts at noon from Food
Lien parking lot. Lake City
police will escort to the mall
ending at Columbia County
Cycles. Live band Jimocracy
will perform. Bring a new
unwrapped toy or cash dona-
tion. All proceeds will benefit
local children. Call Cookie
at 362-6529 or Polly at 758-
9811. E-mail harleycookie@
windstream.net.


Lake Placid, a winter and summer playground


By JOHN KEKIS
Associated Press
LAKE PLACID, N.Y.
- Jim Shea paused for
more than a moment,
almost unable to imagine
the thought of Lake Placid
without the legacy of host-
ing two Winter Olympic
games, in 1932 and 1980.
"We'd just be a sleepy
little Adirondack town, just
a small little Adirondack
resort," said Shea, an
Olympic skier whose father
helped bring the games
back to Lake Placid for the
second time. "It certainly
would not have grown like
it's grown. We have built
our lives basically around
the five Olympic rings. It
kind of put us on the map."
Indeed.
Since Godfrey Dewey
brought the 1932 Winter
Games to Lake Placid and
Shea's father, Jack, became
the home-grown star, win-
ning two speedskating gold
medals, Lake Placid has
evolved into a travel desti-
nation like no other.
The village, nestled in
the High Peaks region of
the Adirondack Mountains,
was a pioneer American
resort in popularizing snow
and presenting winter
attractions to the public.
Yet unlike so many ski
areas, Lake Placid began
as a summer destination
and remains so, with two-
. thirds of its tourism com-
ing between Memorial Day
and Columbus Day.
But it was the 1932
Olympics that made Lake
Placid famous around the
world. And with the opening
of Whiteface Mountain Ski
Center in 1958, town leaders
began dreaming of another
taste of the Winter Games.
'"The town was getting a
little worn-out," said James
McKenna, president of the
Lake Placid Essex County
Visitors Bureau. "Getting
the Games again would be
the tool to get the venues


This photo taken Nov. 13 shows a man paddling a boat on Mirror Lake in Lake Placid, N.Y.


and get the town, not only
on the map, but to redo a lot
of the hospitality facilities."
McKenna said the
momentum to bid for
the 1980 Olympic Games
began in the late 1960s and
quickly reached high gear.
"I can remember put-
ting Lake Placid stickers
all over and telling people
the Olympics were com-
ing here, you'd better get
ready," he said.
And the village's favorite
son, Jack Shea, the patri-
arch of the only family in
Winter Olympic history
to have three generations
of competitors helped
deliver it. (Jim Shea com-
peted in skiiing in 1968
at Innsbruck, Austria and
his son, Jim Jr., won skel-
eton gold in 2002 at Salt
Lake City just weeks after
his grandfather died in
a car crash.) As supervi-
sor of the town of North
Elba, which includes Lake
Placid, Jack Shea was
instrumental in persuading
Olympic officials to award
the 1980 Winter Games to


his hometown.
It proved to be a bigger
boon than anyone could
have imagined for Lake
Placid, which along with
St. Moritz, Switzerland,
and Innsbruck are the only
places to twice host the
Winter Olympics. Squaw
Valley, Calif. (1960) and
Salt Lake City are the only,
other U.S. locales to host
the Games.
Up went a massive ski
jumping complex with a
sky deck for tourists, a new
refrigerated track for bob-
sled, luge and skeleton out-
side the village at Mount
Van Hoevenberg, and a
new ice arena adjacent to
the 1932 rink.
"It created a recognition,
a buzz about the village,"
said Ed Weibrecht, owner
9f the stately Mirror Lake
Inn at the north edge of
the village. "It put us back
into the international lime-
light. It was a tremendous
marketing boost for the
community.
"I think the one change
that probably came out of


it more than anything else,
though, was it became
better rather than bigger,"
Weibrecht said.
And the Olympiad
became one for the his-
tory books. Eric Heiden
won five speedskating
gold medals, all outdoors
in world-record time, and
the U.S. hockey team's
"Miracle on Ice" victory
over the Soviet Union is
considered a signature
moment in sports in the
20th century.
Today the town has
something for visitors
in every season - from
hiking to mountain bik-
ing to tobogganing onto
Mirror Lake to enjoying
fall foliage. Top winter
athletes train and compete
at its Olympic venues, so
there's often an ice show,
ski jumping, bobsled, or
luge to watch, and the
largest annual event is the
Ironman triathlon in July,
which attracts upward of
2,500 participants.
"We're a region that
appeals to singles, but I


think our biggest appeal
is the family because
there's so many other
things for people to do
- ride the bobsled, ride
the luge, watch skating
indoors, skate outdoors
on the Olympic oval,"
Weibrecht said. 'There's
cross-country skiing all
over the place, either
on the groomed trails
or anywhere you want.
Snowshoeing. You name it,
we have it."
Over the past decade,
Whiteface has invested
more than $20 million in
improvements; including
a new kids campus. The
mountain boasts 76 trails,
10 lifts and a vertical drop of
3,430 feet, highest of any ski
resort east of the Rockies,
and hosts World Cup events
every year. In an average
year, which usually begins
in early December, 200,000
people, many from metro-
politan New York City, will
ski there.
Although it has had
to endure its share of
criticism - icy conditions


earned it the nickname.
"Iceface" - snowmaking
technology has changed
the landscape and
Whiteface remains a signa-
ture destination for skiers.
Major improvements have
also been made to its on-
mountain restaurants and.
cafes, including the addi-
tion of a burrito bar in the
Cloudspin Lounge.
The Veterans Memorial
Highway, a Depression-era
public works project under
President Franklin Delano
Roosevelt that opened in
1935, also allows visitors
during the warm months to
drive to within 300 feet of
Whiteface's 4,867-foot sum-
mit and experience some
of the most breathtaking
panoramas in the East.
"What our research tells
us, the attraction to the
area is the Adirondacks,
and with the Olympics that
sort of allowed us to sepa-
rate ourselves from the
rest of the Adirondacks,"
McKenna said. "Without
those Olympic Games,
the hotels wouldn't have
been retooled, the facilities
wouldn't have been built.
That sort of makes us stick
out in the crowd. We're
one of the few places in
the Northeast that can now
talk about doing almost
year-round business.
"There's a lot more
excitement here about the
outdoor activities right now
than the Olympic activities
for the people that come
here," McKenna said. "But
without those venues being
built for 1980 and rebuilt,
we would definitely be a
different town, there's no
doubt about that. That's
sort of the legacy. We'd.
probably still have a lot of
the motels from the 50s
- mom-and-pop places."
Instead, hotels have
been upgraded, and the
town has a new Marriott
Courtyard, an expanded
Crowne Plaza and a new
conference center.















LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & CROSSWORD SUNDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2009


DEAR ABBY


Man ready to disconnect


girl who can't say goodbye


DEAR ABBY: I am 25
and dated a woman IlI call
"Brenda" for about five
years. She dumped me soon
after college graduation with'
no explanation. All she said
was she "needed to be alone
for a while," but she could
see herself marrying me and
having kids with me "eventu-
ally." I accepted it and tried
to move on.
Brenda has stayed in
touch for the last two years,
but we have not been togeth-
er or intiinate. She calls me
nearly every night before
she goes to bed. I never call
.her or go to her house.
I talk to her.because I
don't want to be rude, but
I'd prefer not to. I mean,
what's the point? When we
split, I told her I didn't want
contact, but she seemed so
devastated'when I said it that
I backed off:
Would it be wrong for me
to completely cut off com-
munication? How do I do it
nicely? I loved Brenda once,,
but her constant calls don't
allow me closure. Even if she
asked me now to get back
together, I wouldn't She _
hurt me when she broke it
off with no explanation, and
I no longer trust her. What
should I do? - NEEDS
CLOSURE IN PHILLY
DEAR NEEDS
CLOSURE: Forgive the
strong language, but Miss
Brenda appears to be some-;,.
what screwed up. You seem,
like a nice guy - too nice, in


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearabby.com
fact There comes a time in
life when we must draw the
line when someone hurts
us.
The next time Brenda
calls to say good night, tell
her it's not good night, it's
goodbye because you no lon-
ger want to dwell in the past
Believe me, you'll be doing
yourself a favor.
DEAR ABBY: In cities
large and small across the
globe, a sad reality occurs
year after year. Children die.
The causes vary - an auto
accident, suicide, drive-by
shooting, fire; illness, war
or something completely
different Families, friends
and entire towns mourn the
deaths of children who have
died before they could reach
their full potential.
For the past 13 yeats, The
Compassionate Friends, a
national self-help support
organization for families
grieving the death of a child,
'has sponsored a Worldwide.
Candle Lighting during the
difficult holidays to honor
the. memory of all children
7-- no matter their age
- who died too young.


Dear Abby readers,
whether or not they have
been personally touched by
such a tragedy, are invited
to remember all children
who have died by joining
in the Worldwide Candle
Lighting on Sunday, Dec. 13.
Although officially held for
one hour at 7 p.m. local time,
this has become an event
where hundreds of services
in memory of children are
held throughout the day
around the world.
In the U.S. this includes
services in all 50 states,
� and Washington, D.C.
Dozens of countries are
hosts to services. Anyone
who is unable to attend is
encouraged to light candles
in their home, whether
alone or with friends and
family. Please join us in
honoring these children
who are loved, missed
and always remembered.
- PATRICIA LODER,
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR,
THE. COMPASSIONATE
FRIENDS
DEAR PATRICIA: I am
pleased to help spread the
'word. Your organization is a
valuable resource for fami-
lies and friends of those who
have experienced the loss of
a child, and I commend you
for the work you do.
. Readers, you can locate
local services on The '
Compassionate Friends Web
site: www.compassionate-
friends.org or by calling (toll-
free) 877-969-0010.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-April
19): Interacting with others
will broaden your outlook
and help you realize you
are not alohe in the way
you feel or in the things you
want to pursue. You can
push forward with a project.

TAURUS (April 20-May
20): Make your plans in
secret. The fewer people
who know what you are
up to, the less interference
you'll get and the more
likely you'll be to reach your
goals. Emotional issues at
home will leave you feeling
in need of a change. **
GEMINI (May 21-June
-20): Pull in all the help
you can get but make sure
you work just as hard as
everyone else. Taking part
in a neighborhood or com-
munity event will lead to the
possibility of a new romance
if you are single or a con-.
nection that is business-ori-
ented. ****
CANCER (June 21-July
22): Memories can be won-
derful things. You can find
your way to the right path
by relying on past experi-


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Word

ences. You can establish a
new set of rules that fit into
your lifestyle and will satisfy
the people you are interact-
ing with. ***
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
Ups and downs can leave.
you feeling confused. Take a
back seat until things settle
down and you have a better
idea what everyone else is.
doing. Going against the
current is tiring and often
leads nowhere. ***-
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): .Don't leave anything
undone. Year-end is fast
approaching. You may be
stretched for time but clear-
ing matters up now will be
valuable later on. Do the
things you enjoy instead of
only doing for others. ***
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Volunteering your
services or offering help to
your community will result
in new friendships that
can be very entertaining
and inspiring. Include your
family and friends and you


CELEBRITY CIPHER

CELEBRITY CIPHER
.. by Luis Campos
'.Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.,
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
. Today's clue: W equals P
" V VX . . . VL H G X IN X M'X N D. E J XX U HP CR
UX. XWI 1 C R VX U H , V H TI U J CA LX J
UNX HD HTJ EXXA ALCD INMX HD
HTJ FDXXR." - E.U. JHHRXMXIA
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "I don't plan to grow old gracefully; I plan to have
face-lifts till my ears meet." - Rita Rudner


can contribute as a leader.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21): More people are
counting on you than you
realize. Stop being so me-
oriented. Finish the paper-
work or chores, freeing up
your time. Make your pres-
ence felt. **
SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Idle time will
not bode well. Make sure
that you have enough to do.
Travel, love and enjoying
what life has to offer should
be part of your agenda.
What you share now will be
the beginning of a new life-
style. ***** ' . ' .
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. 19): Don't give in to
anyone testing your patience
,or questioning your beliefs.
Someone will try to get you
to take on responsibilities
thaidon't belong to you.
- Feeling guilty is not a good
reason to give in. ***
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Put someone you
like at ease by being upfront
about the way you feel and
what your intentions are.
Pay close attention to the
response you get. You can
make better choices if you
. clear.up unfinished busi-
ness. ***
PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): Nothing will
be clear-cut. You have to'
ask'questions and find out
what everyone around you
is thinking and doing if you
want to fit in and excel.
Don't leave anything to
chance. Make changes at
home that will please others.


SUNDAY CROSSWORD


CUED UP By Will Nediger / Edited by Will Shortz F|1 |2 |3 |4 M5 |7 18 |9 10 11 12 |13 gl4f5 |1516 17 |


Across
I Government pubs.,
say
5 Twine holder
10 Amateur
publication, for
short
14 What a migraine
might feel like
18 Moonfish
19 Primary
stratagem
20 Like much music
21 Old alpaca wool
. gatherer
22 Delighted
exclamation?
25 Cough cause
26 Sail extender
27 Inventive type
28 Bit of attire for a
carriage ride
29 Pitcher's feat
32 One all, say
33 Tame
34 "Tamerlane"
dramatist
Nicholas
35. V-chip target
36 Part of an Irish
playwright's
will?
38 Museum worker
40 Bank statement
entry
42 It came up from
Down Under
43 Tom of "The
Tomorrow Show"
45 Fish-and-chips
fish
46 Sultan's land
For any three answers,
call from a touch-tone
phone: 1-900-285-5656,
$1.49 each minute; or,
with a credit card, 1-800-'
814-5554.


49 Aquafina
competitor
54 Impertinent sort
56 TV character
often seen in a
Metallica T-shirt
58 Pipe attachment
59 Needle problem
62 Tests the water?
64 "Don't fight"
66 Game grp.
67 Many curves, in
math
68 Carsick
passenger? -
70 Bon mot .
71 Babylon's site,
today
72 Conventions
73 Starting point
74 Some pieces in
an
archaeological
museum
15 Bratislava's river
77 "Come on,
guys!"
79 "Jour de Fete"
star, director and
writer, 1949
'81 Neighbor of a
shift key
82 "Little Women"
woman
83 Iranian supreme
leader ___
Khamenei
85 New Zealand's
'discoverer
89 49-Across, e.g.
91 Red leader?
93 Spanish girl
94 Causing
uneasiness?
101 Not safe
103 Schools of
thought .


104 Drawers, e.g.
105 Plain and
simple
106 Darjeeling, e.g.
108 White as a sheet
109 Germane
111 Last stage of
insect
development
112 Believe
113 Carryin' on, in
olden times?
117 Gambling game
enjoyed by
Wyatt Earp
118 Paunch
119 Wake Island,
e.g.
120 Turn over
121 Irish ___
122 Put in stitches
123 Poet who wrote
"An' the Gobble-
uns 'at gits-you /
Ef you / Don't /
Watch / Out!"
124 Walked

Down
1 Bobs and such
2 Alphabetic trio
3 Florida Keys
connector
4 Anger at losing
one's flock?.
5 Gymnastic feat
6 Conspired
7 Unlikely ballet
dancer
8 Sign warning
people to be
quiet
9 Columbo's
employer, for
short
10 Whizzed along
11 Maraud


12 Tandoor-baked
bread
13 Head of lettuce?
14 Krishna is one of
his avatars
15 One surrounded
by cell walls
16 Looks sore
17 Bald baby?
20 Bring up the rear
23 N.L. West team,
on scoreboards
24 ___ four
28 "The Dark'
Knight," for one
29 Assns.
30 It may be
declined
31 Suit
33 Absolute beauty'
36 Call on a pitch
37 Nebraska senator
Nelson
39 Easy chair site
41 Narrator of "How
I Met Your
Mother"
44 Blue
46 Superior to
47 It may feature a
windmill
48 "Don't Be Cruel"
vis-a-vis "Hound
Dog"
50 Subjugation?
51 Bring about
52 Time's partner
53 Some tides
55 Name shared by
12 popes
57 Big gulf'
58 French
mathematician
who pioneered in
the theory of
probability
59 Water park
feature


60 Sura source
61 "Impossible!"
63 Positive thinking
proponent
65 Legal writ, in
brief
69 Clockmaker
Thomas
76 German city
where Beck's
beer is brewed
78 "Our "__
80 Certain X or 0


82 Programming
problem
84 Wood alternative
86 Get fogged up
87 Greatest
flowering
88 Astronaut's
insignia
90 Dolt
91 Like a
butterfingers
92 Within earshot
94 Hearty drafts


95 Prevent from
being reelected
96 Cleave
97 Try to avoid
detection
98 Chevy model
99 Forsooth
100 It may be
dramatic
102 Opportune
106 Matthew 26
question
107 Sound at a spa


109 "The Clan of
the Cave Bear"
author
110 Baseball G.M.
. Minaya
113 Montana and
others, for short
114 Helios'
counterpart
'1l5It may be said
before a kiss
116 ___ Lahd of
"Twenty
Thousand
Leagues Under
the Sea"


Answers to last week's Sunday Crossword.

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IL I AD ESSE N X IECIC 0 0 RS

ETI CKETAGENT SM0THOUT

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SNA S E HER ES
EVA ARABLE AGITATE


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SYSTEM FISH MIIS0USEA
PENNAME KENOBRI

GAT MARKETINGDIRRECTOR
EVAN EGOS ESTS THIS
RECORDKEEPER LAFF
BROWBEATS NOVELWRITER

LE STERSMR ATS 0 Y EAR S


4 1


5 1 9


6 2 4


8 6 2


7 2 1 5


9 3 3


5 6


8 3 9


2 7


9 6 8 9 L V 6 ZL


6 L L LS8 9 V


L 17 9 z 8 6 9 L _


L 9 V S 8 L 6 Z


891 6 Z96 9 L


S 6 S L 17 L 9 8 9


V 8 9 C 6 LZL 9


9 Z 6 V L 9 L C 8


C L L 8 9 Z V 9 6


Page Editor: Troy Roberts, 754-0427









Page Editor: Brandon Lockett, 754-0424


6D LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE SUNDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2009


Thank You to all the willing volunteers
who spend their time each week at
Meade Ministries keeping the Church
Property looking the way it does!

Service Times: 10 am Sunday
7 pm Sunday Youth Service - 8pm Thursday Bible Study
Located 1 mile West of Hwy 47, on CR 240


Brother & Sister Meade


2/


sr.


7th Annual North Florida


- ..7 * 1*

ii.
I

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Presented by


Rotary Club


mm'


of Lake City Downtown
rotarycluboflakecity-downtown.com


II


Columbia County Fairgrounds
. " U- . , - -


;~ .i~ �,A~,


To reserve your booth, or for more
information, please call
Connie Rollberg
386-344-7544


11> l,\I l t'RIAlP I NI'


Mfeade
Ministries


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LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE SUNDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2009


6DW


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