Citation
Lake City reporter

Material Information

Title:
Lake City reporter
Creator:
Lake City reporter
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2007
Language:
English

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates:
30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Community Newspapers Inc., Todd Wilson - Publisher. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
LTUF ( ABZ6316 )
OCLC ( 33283560 )
AlephBibNum ( 000358016 )

Full Text





WEATHER
Inside 2A

Hi: 91
Low: 61
Mostly Sunny


Lake


Tuesday, May 1, 2007


Spring Fling


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L-IPP'-y3OF L HISTORY
PO BOX FL 32611-7007


City


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Scarless
Surgery
Doctors study operating
through body's openings.
Health, 8A


Reporter


www.lakecityreporter.com


Lundy guilty in murder-for-hire plot


Businessman had been
charged with solicitation
to commit murder.
By TROY ROBERTS
troberts@lakecityreporter.com
LIVE OAK - A live Oak man was
convicted Friday on charges of solici-
tation to murder a business competi-


INVESTIGATION


INVESTIGATION
CONTINUES

Fire

chief

remains

in limbo
Johnson also is
being investigated
at his former job.
By JOHNNA PINHOLSTER
jpinholster@lakecityreporter.com
Lake City City Fire Chief
Michael Johnson remains on
paid leave while an investiga-
tion into alleged policy viola-
tions continues.
In Clinton, Mich. the investi-
gation at Johnson's former
department, Clinton Area Fire
and Rescue, is wrapping up.
Michigan State Police
Detective Mark Tendergraph
said a criminal investigation
into alleged embezzlement
will be finished in a month.
Tendergraph said he took
over the investigation in
October 2006 after he was con-
tacted by board members from
Clinton Area Fire and Rescue.
CHIEF continued on 10A


Suspects

sought in

middle

school

break-in

Incident took place
one day before fight-
at Richardson.
By TONY BRIT'r
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
School officials are investi-
gating a recent break-in at
Richardson Middle School,
which took place one day
before a fight at the school.
Keith Couey, Richardson
Middle School Principal, said
the break-in took place at the
school's chorus room
Monday, April 23; the day
before a fracas ended in the
arrest of 11 students and two
high school-aged teenagers.
Couey said the burglars did
minimal damage to the school,
and he didn't have a dollar
figure on the damage.
BREAK-IN continued on 10A


tor in 2005. A jury handed down
the verdict after a weeklong trial in
Live Oak.
James Hudson Lundy, 63, was found
guilty in the Third Judicial Circuit Court
on charges that he attempted to hire a
man to murder a septic tank business
competitor, Donald Wainwright, in 2004.
Lundy owns Lundy's Septic in Live Oak.
Wainwright owns Don's'Septic and
Fill in Live Oak.


According to the state's case,
Lundy solicited local resident Richard
Earl Marler Sr., to murder
Wainwright in 2004. Marler later
notified authorities of the plot.
Wainwright was not harmed.
The jury was selected in the case on
April 23 and the trial began the follow-
ing day. The state, led by lead prosecu-
tor Willie Meggs of Tallahassee, and
Lundy's defense attorney, William


Sheppard of Jacksonville, gave their
closing statements Friday morning.
Meggs said it took the jury a little
more than three hours to return the
guilty verdict.
A sentencing date has not been set, as
Meggs said the court must find a time
that he, Sheppard, and Third Judicial
Court Chief Judge Julian Collins,
who presided over the case, would be
able to attend.


Thousands attend



firsftairshefw


in


Organizers called Lake
City Rotary Club event
a resounding success.
By TROY ROBERTS
troberts@lakecityreporter.com
The first Lake City airshow in three
years was a resounding success,
organizers said.
The Lake City Rotary Club's Airshow,
which took place Saturday and Sunday
and saw several world renowned
aerobatics pilots, took place at the Lake
City Municipal Airport where thousands
of spectators gathered to watch the
dives, spins and other maneuvers of
more than a dozen pilots.
"We think it was one of our better
shows, absolutely the best civilian show
we've ever had," said Mike Lee, Rotarian
and airshow committee member.
In years past, the airshow featured
military groups such as the Blue
Angels and Thunderbirds. This year,
the show saw groups of civilian stunt
pilots, including Lake City resident Jim
LeRoy and the Lima Lima Flight Team.
Third Judicial Circuit Court Judge E.
Vernon Douglas, who helped launch
the first Lake City airshows during the
1970s, concurred.
"In my 21 years of airshows, I've
never seen a crowd so entertained," he
said. "I think the change of pace was
good. With Jim LeRoy, it was rock-and-
roll aerobatics. With Lima Lima, it was
kind of like ballet in the sky. It was
AIRSHOW continued on 10A


years

JASON MATTHEW WALKERiLape Cr, Reponer


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/
Lake City Reporter
ABOVE: Judie Wells,
Doreen Hoffman, Sue
Rose and Morton
Woodworth take cover
from the hot sun under
the wing of a United
Airlines Airbus A-320
during Sunday's
performance of the
Lake City Rotary Club
Airshow. 'All we wanted
was the shade,' Wells
said.
LEFT: Daniel Brickerc,
21, used his finger to
test the cleanliness of
the underbelly of a
United Airlines Airbus
parked on the runway
during the weekend
airshow.


Man


killed


bycar

Local pedestrian hit
Sunday night while
crossing city street.
By TROY ROBERTS.
trobertsa@lakecityreporter.com
A Lake City man died
Sunday evening after he
attempted to cross the street
and was struck by a car,
according to reports.
After the collision, Cecil L.
Thompson, 49, was transported
to the Lake City Medical Center
where he died from injuries suf-
fered during the crash.
According to the Florida
Highway Patrol, Thompson was
walking south on Southwest
Siloam Street and began to
cross the roadway at
approximately 8:50 p.m. Sunday.
A 2000 Toyota two-door car,
driven by Christine J. Morris,
32, of Lake City, was traveling
east on the roadway and
struck Thompson as he
walked across the street.
Morris suffered minor
injuries as a result of the crash
and was taken to Shands Lake
Shore Hospital for treatment.
She was wearing a seat belt at
the time of the collision.
The FHP investigation is
ongoing and possible charges
are pending its outcome. Lt.
Mike Burroughs, public infor-
mation officer for Troop B of
FHP, said there was no light-
ing in the area which could
have contributed to the crash.
"We are also looking closely
at critical speed measure-
ments to determine an exact
speed at the time of the crash,"
he said.
According to preliminary
statistics, Thompson is the
12th person to be killed in an
automobile-related accident in
Columbia County this year,
compared to 11 through the
same day in 2006.


State to

shell out

bonuses
Pay raise would be
offset by $1,000 to
all state employees.
By BILL KACZOR
Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE - State
employees would each get
a $1,000 bonus instead of a
pay raise in a tight annual
state budget that emerged
from Senate-House negations
Monday.
Distribution of the 428-page
bill starts the clock running on
a 72-hour cooling-off period
required by the Florida
Constitution before the
Legislature can vote on it That
means the vote can come
Thursday, a day before the
60-day regular session is due to
BUDGET continued on 7A


IICALLUS: INSIDE
(386) 752-1293
SSUBSCRIBETO - Business . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 5A Obituaries .............. 6A
THE REPORTER: Classified ............... 6B Opinion ............... .4A
Voice: 755-5445 Comics ................ 4B Puzzles ................ .2B
1 84264 o20 1 Fax: 752-9400 Local & State ............ 3A School ................. 5B


TODAY IN COMING
BUSINESS WEDNESDAY
Vegan restaurant The latest outdoors news
truly goes meatless. from North Florida.


Vol. 133, No. 88 U 50 cents


_ .-, . 0I










LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING TUESDAY, MAY 1, 2007


Sunday:
10-14-15-17-26


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS


Army chief: Prince Harry will go to Iraq


LONDON - The head of
the British army said
Monday that he had
personally decided that
Prince Harry, the third in
line to the throne, will
serve with a combat unit in
Iraq.
Commanders reportedly
had reconsidered their
decision to allow the prince
to fight in Iraq for fear he
would become a target of


Hasselbeck says
she's pregnant
NEW YORK - Elisabeth
Hasselbeck, a co-host on
"The View," is pregnant
again. She announced the
news Monday on the
daytime ABC talk show.
Hasselbeck, 29, and her
husband, pro football player
Tim Hasselbeck, have a
2-year-old daughter, Grace.
"When you said you had
an announcement, my heart
sank!" joked Barbara
Walters, co-host and creator
of "The View."
Last week, Rosie


insurgents and his
presence could endanger
other soldiers. Harry's
regiment, the Blues and
Royals, is due to begin a
six-month tour of duty in
Iraq within weeks.
Over the past two weeks,
newspapers have reported
threats by Iraqi insurgents
to kill or kidnap the prince,
including claims his
photograph had been


O'Donnell
announced
she was
leaving the
show in
June
because
Hasselbeck she and
Hasselbeck ABC,
owned by The Walt Disney
Co., couldn't agree on a new
contract
"We're going to be lonely
without you, so Tim and I
thought we should get busy
and, you know, maybe make
a little co-host," Hasselbeck
said.
She said the baby is due in
November.


Celebrity Birthdays


* Former astronaut Scott
Carpenter is 82.
* Country singer Sonny
James is 78.
* Singer Judy Collins is 68.
* Actor Stephen Macht is
65.
* Singer Rita Coolidge is
62.
* Actor-director Douglas
Barr is 58.
* Actor Dann Florek is 56.
* Singer-songwriter Ray
Parker Jr. is 53.
* Hall of Fame jockey


widely circulated among
militants. Military chiefs
acknowledge that Harry
would be an attractive
target and that his presence
could lead to a surge in
attacks on British forces.
Gen. Sir Richard Dannatt
said the decision would be
kept under review, but he
hoped his statement would
end media speculation on
Harry's deployment.


Love plans to
auction belongings
NEW YORK - Courtney
Love, widow of Nirvana
singer Kurt Cobain, says she
plans to sell most of his
belongings.
"I'm going to have a
Christie's auction," Love, 42,
tells AOL music Web site
Spinner.com. "(My house) is
like a mausoleum."
Love and Cobain wed in
1992 and had a daughter,
Frances Bean, that year.
Cobain committed suicide in
1994.
"My daughter doesn't need


Prince Harry


Love


to inherit a
giant ... bag
full of
flannel...
shirts,"
says Love,
former
front-
woman of


the rock band Hole. "A
sweater, a guitar and the
lyrics to '(Smells Like) Teen
Spirit' - that's what my
daughter gets. And the rest
of it we'll just ... sell."
No date has been set for
the auction, AOL publicist
Kurt Patat told The
Associated Press on Monday.
* Associated Press


Thought for Today


Steve Cauthen is 47.
* Actress Maia
Morgenstern is 45.
* Country singer Wayne
Hancock is 42.
* Rock musician Johnny
Colt is 41.
* Actor Charlie Schlatter is
41.
* Country singer Tim
McGraw is 40.
* Rock musician D'Arcy is
39.
* Movie director Wes
Anderson is 38.


"Any man who has the brains to
think and the nerve to act for the
benefit of the people of the
country is considered a radical by
those who are content with
stagnation and willing to endure
disaster."
- William Randolph Hearst,
American newspaper publisher (1863-1951)


Cole, others pay tribute

to Fitzgerald at concert


By JANICE
RHOSHALLE UTrLEJOHN
Associated Press
LOS ANGELES - "You can
only be an innovator once ...
and I hate that," joked Patti
Austin backstage at a tribute
to Ella Fitzgerald.
Austin joined host Natalie
Cole, Wynonna Judd, Nancy
Wilson and other singers and
musicians covering tunes by
Fitzgerald at the '"We Love
Ella: A Tribute to the First
Lady of Song" on Sunday
night
The tribute, held at the
University of Southern
California's Galen Center,
marked what would have
been Fitzgerald's 90th birth-
day April 25. The singer died


Lake City
HOW TO REACH US
Main number .......... (386) 752-1293
Fax number ...............752-9400
Circulation ................755-5445
Online ...... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is published
Tuesday through Sunday at 180 E. Duval St.,
Lake City, RFla. 32055. Periodical postage paid
at Lake City, Fla. Member Audit Bureau of
Circulation and The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake City
Reporter. Reproduction in whole or in part is
forbidden without the permission of the pub-
lisher. U.S. Postal Service No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to
Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City,
Fla. 32056.
Publisher Michael Leonard ... .754-0418
(mleonard@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS ;
If you have a news tip, call any member ofthe
news staff or 752-5295.
Editor Todd Wilson ..........754-0428
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Jim Kennedy ........754-0417
(ads@lakecityreporter.com)


in 1996.
PBacked
by USC's
Thornton
Symphony
and Jazz
Orchestra,
Fitzgerald instrumen-
talists
George Duke, James Moody
and Jon Faddis covered
Fitzgerald's classic
1950s recording "Lady Be
Good." Newcomer Lizz
Wright cooed "Lullaby of
Birdland."
Saxman Dave Koz riffed
with "American Idol" Ruben
Studdard on "Do Nothing Til
You Hear From Me," and a
capella act Take 6 bopped to
an original tune inspired by
Fitzgerald's stylings.


Reporter
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.
BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon.......754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m. Tuesday
through Saturday, and by 7:30 a.m. on
Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any prob-
lems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should call
before 10:30 a.m. to report a service error for
same day re-delivery. After 10:30 a.m., next
day re-delivery or service related credits will
be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery is
available, next day re-delivery or service relat-
ed credits will be issued.
Director A. Russell Waters ... .754-0407
(rwaters@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
13 Weeks ................ .. $23.54
26 Weeks .................... $42.80
52 Weeks .................... $83.46
Rates indude 7% sales lax.
Mail rates
13 Weeks .................. $44.85
26 Weeks .....................$89.70
52 Weeks ....................$179.40


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news items.
If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please call the
executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run in this
space. And thanks for reading.


AROUND FLORIDA


THE WEATHER


Man accused of
shooting captured
TAMPA - A lawyer
helped negotiate the
surrender of an 18-year-old
man accused of shooting a
detective during an
undercover drug operation,
sheriffs officials said.
After the negotiations,
relatives drove DeAndre
Jamal Wallace to a
McDonald's parking lot
where he was arrested
Saturday night, the
Hillsborough County
Sheriff's Office said. He was
taken to a hospital to be
treated for a gunshot wound
and was moved to jail Sunday.
Wallace is accused of
shooting Detective
Christopher Baumann, 28,
during a drug bust Saturday
afternoon at an apartment
complex, the sheriff's office
said. Baumann, shot once in
the abdomen, was in critical
but stable condition Monday.
Wallace tussled with
detectives before firing at
least four times with a
.25-caliber handgun, sheriff's
spokesman J.D. Callaway
said. Another detective shot
back at least three times and
hit Wallace before he fled,
Callaway said.
Wallace is charged with
two counts of attempted
murder of a law enforcement
officer and various other
crimes. He was being held
Monday with no bond,
according to jail records. It
was not known if he had legal
representation.

Firefighters battling
massive brush fire
LEHIGH ACRES -
Firefighters battled a brush
fire in southwest Florida that
consumed almost 900 acres
and claimed two homes,.
officials said Monday.
The blaze burning east of
Fort Myers was about 60
percent contained by midday
Monday, Lehigh Acres Fire
Department spokesman


Patrick Comer said.
No other homes were in
immediate danger, but
firefighters were wary
because of variable winds
Monday, Comer said. About
125 firefighters from nine
departments were on scene.
The cause of the blaze,
which started Sunday
afternoon, is under
investigation, he said.

Man sentenced to
40 years in case
TAMPA - A former
Illinois man was sentenced to
40 years in prison Monday
for conspiring with another
man to drug, torture and
rape a young man they
picked up at a Tampa club.
A federal jury convicted
Scott Schweickert, 41, of
distributing the drug GHB to
a victim to commit a crime of
violence against Michael
Wachholtz. He was acquitted
on a drug distribution charge
that involved a second man,
Jason Galehouse.
U.S. District Judge Steven
Merryday called the crimes
"abominable, detestable and
predatory" at Monday's
sentencing. Merryday said
he was prevented by federal
sentencing guidelines from
giving Schweickert a life
sentence.
Prosecutors said
Schweickert, of Peru, ll., and
a Tampa man, Steven
Lorenzo -- whom they called
kindred spirits in a
sadomasochistic subculture
- drugged, tortured and
raped men they lured home
from bars in December 2003.
Galehouse and Wachholtz,
both 26, died.
Lorenzo was convicted of
the same federal charges in
November 2005 and
sentenced to 200 years in
prison.

Man finishes
stay aboard raft
MARATHON - A man
who lived aboard a raft for a


month to help raise money
for his fellow veterans
returned to shore Sunday.
Bill Sampsel's stint on the
raft netted about $7,000 in
contributions toward the
55-year-old Vietnam veteran's
lofty plan for a $6 million
facility in the Florida Keys.
The center would conduct
eight-week rehabilitation
programs for veterans after
they received necessary
medical treatments, though
with no substantial funding in
place it still remains only a
dream.
"I thought more people
would understand the need
for this facility and it
disappoints me more people
didn't come aboard," Sampsel
said. "I still don't think people
grasp there is a critical need
for facilities to take care of
veterans coming home from
Iraq and Afghanistan."
Sampsel's primary,
benefactor was Jimmy
Buffett'sMgaritaville, a
Key West-based cafe and
retail emporium, which gave
him $5,000. The remainder
came from individual
contributions.

Former 'Idol'
finalist arrested
TAMPA - A former
"American Idol" finalist was
arrested Sunday on felony
battery charges after she
allegedly hit a man on the
head with a heavy glass,
police said.
Jessica Sierra, 21, a top-10
contestant on the hit show in
2005, was booked in the
Hillsborough County Jail on
a charge of.aggravated
battery with a deadly
weapon.
She was also charged with
possession of cocaine and
introduction of contraband
into a correctional facility
after booking officers found
a "small amount of cocaine"
while searching her, Tampa
police spokeswoman Andrea
Davis said in a statement.
* Associated Press


Taamssee
88/59 S
Pensacola Panamia Ci
S82/64 83/65


eValiata JadcLs
90/59 6 88/
Lake City
91/61
Gainesvle * Dayton
89/59 84
Ocala0
89/58
87..'
Tampa
87/68


FL Myers.
89/66 '


Key Wes
86/74


TEMPERATURES
High Monday
Low Monday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Monday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


87
52
83
58
95 in 1906
45 in 1965


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise tom.
Sunset tornm.


MOON


. Moonrise today
Moonset today
0.00" Moonrise tom.
0.70" Moonset tom.


9.57"
2.86"
14.02"


PARTLY Ih~-'~KPARTLY1


� PARTLY s PARTLY
CLOUDY CLOUDY


HI 88 L0 61 HI 88 LO59


mile
60


City Wednesday
Cape Canaveral 83.'69'pc


Daytona Beach
la Beach Ft. Lauderdale
/63 Fort Myers
* Cape Canaveral Gainesville
Cape Ca81/64 Jacksonville
ndo Key West
64 Lake City
Miami
Naples
West Palm Beadch Ocala
83,/72* Orlando
FL Lauderdale Panama City
84/74 * Pensacola
Naples Tallahassee
38/66 Mw Tampa
t \ 85/72 Valdosta
. "0,- W. Palm Beach


6:48 a.m.
8:08 p.m.
6:47 a.m.
8:09 p.m.

7:46 p.m.
6.04 a.m.
8:43 p.m.
6:35 a.m.


9

15 vutestol[unm
Today's
ultra-violet


rac
for
as
to


May May May May
2 10 16 23 -
Full Last New First


_6a On this date in
S 1854, the
, Connecticut River
reached a level of
nearly twenty-nine
feet at Hartford. The
record height was
reached in the midst
of a great New
England flood.


liation risk
the area on
scale from 0
10+.
1(H.,
' . 4 , ^ "


84/63. pct
85/!73.'pc
89/ 68 pc
90/59'pc
89'62/s
86 74/sh
90 61..pc
85. 72/pc
86.67.. pc
89/60.. pc
88/66. pc
84/66,/s
82/66/pc
89/58/s
87/70/pc
89/60/pc
85/71/pc


Thursday
82,'66,pc
8J/65.. pc
85/73/pc
88/68.,pc
88/61/pc
86'63/pc
86.'74...pc
88. 61./pc
86/71I/pc
85/69 pc
88,/62.pc
87/67 pc
82/65."pc
81/66/pc
87/59/pc
85/70/pc
88/61/pc
84/71/pc


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.



weatrerncom


( - Forecasts, data and graphics
� 2007 Weather Central,
wwwweInc., Madison, Wls.
www.weatherpubllsher.com


CAM113.
Monday:
0-2-1


Play ,
Monday:
6-1-5-5


.J. L-,~.


Page Editor: Chris Bednar, 754-0404


EAMIR IV JHI-HOUR


I i
MOSTLY
SUNNY


HI 90 LO 611









LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE TUESDAY, MAY 1, 2007


Smoke can
cause problems
Hugh Giebeig, Columbia County Health Department
Administrator, said the local health department
hasn't issued any special warnings regarding a
recent cloud of wildfire smoke hanging over the city.
He did offer the following advice to citizens who may
be impacted by wildfire smoke.
Smoke is a respiratory irritant. It can cause
scratchy throat, irritated eyes, nose and worsens
conditions such as a asthma and other primary
respiratory conditions. People need to stay alert to
any air quality reports and health warnings related
to smoke.
The main thing is to use common sense, he said.
'If it's smoky outside, avoid prolonged outdoor
activities. 'This is especially important to children
and people with existing medical conditions.
Stay in doors and run the air conditioner and
for best results run the air conditioning with
re-circulated air."


Organizers add more security


By TONY BRITr
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
Columbia High School
prom organizers have taken a
stance against alcohol, drug
use, driving under the influ-
ence and fighting for this
year's prom at Southern Oaks
Golf Club with a bevy of new
security additions.
As part of the safety meas-
ures for Columbia High's
Prom, there will be four
School Resource Officers
(SRO) on site and students
will be administered a manda-
tory Breathalyzer test upon
entering the building to cur-
tail drinking and driving.
"We're just looking out for
the safety of the students
while they go to prom," said
Wendy Cousino, Columbia
High School junior class spon-
sor, who is working with prom
organizers. "In the (students)
are caught with alcohol or
drugs, or under the influence
of either, their parents will be
immediately called and the
Columbia County (Schools)
Student Conduct (guidelines)
will be enforced at the discre-
tion of the principal and
school board. The maximum
penalty is a 10-day suspen-


sion."
In addition, there will be
sheriff's office canine units on
site and once on site and in
the building, students will not
be allowed to leave and
re-enter.
"In the past, the students
have gone back outside to
their automobiles and hung
out in the parking lot and
done the things that are not
very conducive to safety,"
Cousino said.
Anthony Newton, a
Columbia High School junior,
said he was in favor of the new
security rules that have been
added for the prom.
"I think it's good," he said.
"I think it will bring our prom
up and make it a little bit more
of a classier event. People will
actually be able to remember
their prom night instead of
being wasted."
Newton, who is the school
student body vice president,
said many students are in
favor of the added security
measures.
"I think the students are
pretty much able to run with
it," he said. "A lot of people
thought attendance wouldn't
be up because of the new safe-


ty measures, but I believe that
attendance is higher this year
than last year. I think some of
the students are happy that
we've taken these security
measures and that they know
everyone will be safe and get
home safely."
Prom organizers are
expecting at least 625 people
to attend the prom. Cousino
said there will be approxi-
mately 25-40 faculty mem-
bers, 20 parents, school
resource officers and Florida
Highway Patrol troopers in
attendance at the event The
FHP troopers will be on site to
administer the Breathalyzer
tests and enforce any laws
that are broken.
'There will be people at all
entrances and exits at the
country club, so there will be
faculty members and parents
so the students won't be
allowed to leave," Cousino
said. '"The event will be chap-
eroned heavily. We're promot-
ing good behavior."
Columbia High School's
prom is scheduled to take
place Saturday night with a
theme title, "Hollywood." In
addition to the new security
rules, a dress code will also be


for prom
in effect for the event.
The dress code for males
will include a coat and tie
requirements. No information
was given for the female dress
code.
S"We're promoting highly
formal wear," Cousino said,
noting that Columbia High
School principal Terry
Huddleston made the neces-
sary calls to have the event at
the golf club. "The kids will
act more country club-like
with the event being at the
country club. He figures their
behavior will be more elegant
because it's a more elegant
place."
Cousino said this is the first
year that Columbia High
School has implemented the
new rules for prom behavior.
"We decided to do this
because of the severity of the
drinking and driving last
year," Cousino said.
She noted that in recent
years two students were killed
in a wreck associated with
alcohol use after graduation,
and last year there was a situ-
ation where an emergency
medical technician was called
to the prom to help two other
students.


County to discuss rec complex ownership


By JOHNNA PINHOLSTER
jpinholster@lakecityreporter.com
The transfer of ownership
of Southside Recreation
Complex from the City of
Lake City to Columbia
County will go before the
Columbia County Board of
Commissioners on Thursday.
County Manager Dale
Williams said the proposal
to transfer ownership of the
complex began with city and
county recreation committee
meetings more than a year
ago.


"For the overall recreation
picture, the county sees itself
as a facility provider and the
city as a program provider,"
Williams said. '"This lets the
county and city do the things
they are better equipped to
do."
In the meantime, the com-
plex has the potential to be a
revenue booster for both the
city and the county this fall.
Four slow-pitch softball tour-
naments have been tentative-
ly scheduled for the complex
from September through
December. USSSA (United


States Slow Pitch Softball
Association) will sponsor the
tournaments at the fields.
Harvey Campbell, execu-
tive director of tourist deirel-
opment for Columbia
County, said that a final equi-
table contract will be the last
step in finalizing the agree-
ment
"USSSA agreed to try four
tournaments this fall in Lake
City," Campbell said. "If this
probationary period goes
well we may host 10 to 11
tournaments a year."
The first tournament will


be Sept. 8-10, followed- by
Oct. 13-15, Nov. 17-19 and
Dec. 15-17.
Campbell said each tour-
nament weekend has the
potential to bring in more
than $120,000 in revenue to
the area according to an eco-
nomic impact study done by
the University of Florida.
A contract for three years
could bring in more than $3
million in revenue for the
area Campbell said, who
added that between 30-50
teams will participate in each
tournament.


Deputy found guilty of falsifying records
Associated Press manor char es would a eal after sentenc- ears on each count Greit r


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MIAMI - .A Broward
County sheriff's deputy was
convicted Monday for his
role in falsifying records in a
crime statistics scandal.
A jury found Shane
Campbell guilty of two misde-


Campbell's attorney,
Howard Greitzer, said his
client faces up to two years in
prison on each count at a
sentencing scheduled for
May 10. Greitzer said he was
disappointed with the jury's
verdict but that his client


ing.
A judge on Thursday had
dismissed two felony counts
of official misconduct against
Campbell after concluding
prosecutors couldn't substan-
tiate the charges. The
felonies carried up to five


yJdL 5 VII VdUll L iUIt, LT V UJLZU
told The AssociatedPress.
At this point Campbell
remains suspended without
pay, sheriff's spokesman
Elliot Cohen told AP on
Monday. The jury's verdict
would "weigh heavily" on the
investigation, Cohen said.


POLICE REPORTS


Arrest Log
The following information
was provided by local law
enforcement agencies. The
following people have been
arrested but not convicted. All
people are presumed innocent
unless proven guilty.

Thursday, April 19
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
* Vaughn Peter Stewart,
19, 203 E Carter Road,
Lakeland, warrant: possession
of a controlled substance with
intent to sale or deliver,
possession of less than 20
grams of cannabis and
possession of drug
paraphernalia.
Tuesday, April 24
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
* Randy Ray England, 20,
1213 Monitor Ave., Orlando,
warrant: falsely impersonating
an officer and harassing phone
call.
* John W. Duran, 42, PO
Box 20 Chugwater Glen, Fort
White, interference with child
custody.


* Edmond Harry
Thompson, 30, 2945 NW
Moore Road, warrant: domestic
battery and violation of
injunction for domestic violence.
* Sherri L. Robertson, 42,
1600 E Duval St. Trailer #2,
possession of a controlled
substance and possession of
drug paraphernalia.
Wednesday, April 25
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
* Jeffery Ford Stephens,
40, 272 SE Dustin Terrace,
warrant: violation of probation
on charges of possession of
cocaine and possession of drug
paraphernalia.
Thursday, April 26
Columbia County ]
Sheriff's Office
* Robert Vincent
Chadwick, 18, 133 SE Pation
Glen #2, child abuse.
* Howey Leo Feagle Jr.,
40, 125 NW Selvin Glen,
warrant: felony DUI and failure
to appear at disposition on
charges of possession of a
controlled substance.
* Curtis L. Phillips, 33, 380
NW Canton Lane, warrant:
trafficking stolen property.


* James A. Clemons, 44,
1800 Kingskey Ave. #88,
Orange Park, warrant: failure to
appear on charges of
possession of cocaine and
resisting arrest without violence.
Lake City
Police Department
* Katreca Smith, 19, 1903
SW Judy Glen, employee
grand theft.
* Portia E. Everett, 19, 758
SE Dade St., employee grand
theft.
Friday, April 27
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
* Archie Hilory Davidson
Jr., 28, 20882 139th Drive,
O'Brien, seven counts of
driving with a suspended or
revoked license.
* Bradley Charles Blom,
41, 1044 Appalachee Terrace,
Fort White, warrant:
possession of cocaine.
Lake City
Police Department
* Richard Daniel Thomas,
32, 770 SW Symphony Loop
Bldg. 14 Apt. 307, warrant:
felony fleeing and eluding and
contempt of court.
M Timothy Eugene


Thompkins, 39, 591 NE
Denver St., possession of
cocaine with intent to sell,
cultivation of marijuana,
possession of drug
paraphernalia, possession of
less than 20 grams of
marijuana and possession of
cocaine within 1000 feet of a
church.
Saturday, April 28
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
* Rory Thomas Sherrouse,
29, 200 SW Starling Terrace,
felony domestic battery.
* Scott Lee Collins, 37,
1072 Racetrack Lane #2,
domestic aggravated assault
and domestic battery.
Sunday, April 29
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
* John H. Smith III, 54, 285
SW Kemp Court, aggravated
assault and resisting arrest
without violence.
Lake City
Police Department
* Tony H. Knighton, 37,
3973 US 90, eight counts of
driving with a suspended or
revoked license.
* From staff reports.


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Phone (386) 755-2660 Across St From School
Mon. - Sat. 7:30 am - 6 pm Phone (386) 497-1708
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Sunday 9-5


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OPINION


Tuesday, May 1, 2007


www.lakecityreporter.com


EDITORIAL


They're not

above the law

t turns out that New Jersey
officials were not telling the total
.truth about a car accident that
landed Gov. Jon Corzine in the
hospital. Authorities originally said
he was the victim of a hit-and-run
driver. But, according to new reports,
the other driver was trying to get out of
the way of the governor's SUV, which
was barreling along at the dangerous
clip of 91 miles an hour on the almost
always crowded Garden State Parkway,
well above the speed limit of 65.
The governor, who in defiance of
state law was not wearing a seat belt,
was racing to a photo opportunity
involving radio personality Don Imus's
apology to the Rutgers women's
basketball team.
While we feel badly for the governor
- his extensive injuries, though not
life-threatening, were painful and may
very well affect his quality of life - we
wish that powerful politicians would
refrain from placing themselves above
the law, recklessly endangering
themselves and others.
These leaders, including former
big-foot investment bankers like Jon
Corzine, spout rhetoric about how the
mass of Americans should act, be it
regarding the environment, civil rights
or other issues, while proceeding in
quite different directions when the
cameras aren't on them.
If politicians feel that they must be
part of a media circus such as the Imus
affair, they should set aside time for it,
instead of speeding. And it would be
nice if they tried to obey the laws that
they impose on less powerful citizens.
* Providence Journal

HIGHLIGHTS
IN HISTORY
Today is Tuesday, May 1, the 121st
day of 2007. There are 244 days left in
the year.
* On May 1, 1898, Commodore
George Dewey gave the command, "You
may fire when you are ready, Gridley," as
an American naval force destroyed a
Spanish fleet in Manila Bay during the
Spanish-American War.
* In 1707, the Kingdom of Great Britain
was created as a treaty merging England
and Scotland took effect.
* In 1786, Mozart's opera "The
Marriage of Figaro" premiered in Vienna,
Austria.
* In 1893, the World's Columbian
Exposition opened to the public in
Chicago.
* In 1907, singer Kate Smith was born
in Washington, D.C.
* In 1931, New York's 102-story
Empire State Building was dedicated.
* In 1945, a day after Adolf Hitler
committed suicide, Admiral Karl Doenitz
effectively became sole leader of the Third
Reich with the suicide of Hitler's
propaganda minister, Josef Goebbels.


Lake City Reporter
serving Columbia County since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is published with
pride for residents of Columbia and
surrounding counties by Community
Newspapers, Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong,communities - "Newspapers get
things done!"
Our primary goal is to publish
distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard work.
Michael Leonard, publisher
Todd Wilson, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


OUR POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be typed or
neatly written and double spaced. Letters
should not exceed 400 words and will be edited
for length and libel. Letters must be signed and
include the writer's name, address and
telephone number for verification. Writers can
have two letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of the


writers and not necessarily that of the Lake City
Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City,
FL 32056; or drop off at 180 E. Duval St.
downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL: news@lakecityreporter.com


COMMENTARY



Living in paradise


traveled to
Alabama to attend
the annual awards
ceremony of the
Alabama Media Professionals.
We met at Samford University
in Homewood, and I stayed at
a hotel in Tuscaloosa.
I was there only two days,
but that was long enough for
me to suffer a serious case of
what I call "landlocked
depression," a sense of being
smothered by land without
seeming end.
In Tuscaloosa, I walked
along the beautiful Black'
Warrior River, aware that it
was merely a river, a narrow
waterway with land on each
side. In fact, I could see
people moving in the homes
and businesses on the other
shore.
As a coal barge churned in
front of me, I realized again -
as I have done over the years
in other cities and towns -
that I, a Fort Lauderdale,
native, must live on or near
the ocean.
At such moments, I vow
never to take the ocean and its
gifts for granted.
In Fort Lauderdale, as a
child and as an adult, I could
walk to the Atlantic Ocean in
10 minutes. In Daytona Beach,
I lived in a Spanish-style beach
house on the Atlantic. White
sand was my front yard. In
Key West, I lived on the Gulf
of Mexico. "Cuba is right out


Bill Maxwell
maxwell@sptimes.com


there somewhere," my
neighbors and I used to joke.
On Virginia's Eastern Shore, I
could walk down to the
Chesapeake Bay and throw in
a fishing line.
And now in St Petersburg, I
live on the water, where my
neighbors and I watch the
sunrise each morning, and, at
night, moonlight glows-on the
water as far as the eye can
see. Whenever I wish, I can
walk to the water and put in
my kayak or fish for a big one.
From my porch and front
yard, I am spectator. Each day,
I have the pleasure of
watching sailboats tack
against the blue horizon. A
few times a week, when the
wind is just right, agile
windsurfers and kite-boarders
defy gravity with their
seemingly impossible
maneuvers. Families come to
get away from their crowded
neighborhoods, and, of
course, sweethearts often
spread their blankets.
I have lived in many places,
and I believe that


St Petersburg is a national
model for the accessible,
friendly downtown waterfront
I often drive to Fort De Soto
Park to watch the sunset
When the forces are aligned
in the sky, few natural events
are more awe-inspiring than a
sunset over the Gulf of
Mexico. Other times at Fort
De Soto, I put in my kayak
and paddle to one of the keys.
There, I either fish or simply
walk and enjoy the flora and
fauna.
Sometimes at Fort De Soto,
I look around and pity the
tourists who spend thousands
of dollars to visit paradise just
for a few days a year. When
you visit Fort De Soto, you
can see why it was rated
America's best beach in 2005.
Indeed, St Petersburg,
along with the rest of the
Suncoast, is paradise. And
paradise is my home.
We know the cliches -
"sun-drenched beaches,"
"sugar-white sand," "swaying
palms" and "plush foliage."
But the cliches do not begin to
reflect the satisfaction that we
natives and other permanent
residents experience each day
by living in the real thing.
As I write, I can see the sun
rising above the waterline. I
dare not take this experience
for granted.
* Bill Maxwell is an editorial
writer and columnist for the St.
Petersburg Times.


The president and
Congress agree
that the
minimum wage
should be raised,
and by rights it should have
been increased last year, if not
earlier. But our national
capital doesn't always work
the way the civics textbooks
say it should.
Last year, when the
Republicans controlled the
House, they passed an
increase but got a little too
politically cute and attached a
steep cut in the estate tax,
knowing that this was
unacceptable to Senate
Democrats.
The idea was to force the
Democrats into an
embarrassing vote, reneging
on one campaign promise to
make good on another, but
the Democrats simply bottled
it up and the bill died with the


old Congress.
You would think that the
Democrats would have
learned some lessons from
that about being in the
majority, but political logic is
not the same as textbook
logic.
The Democratic
leadership instead tied the
minimum-wage increase to an
Iraq-war funding bill.
- The Iraq bill is an
emergency supplemental
spending bill. The minimum
wage, while vital to workers at
the bottom of the wage
ladder, is hardly an
emergency.
President Bush has said all
along that he will veto the
Democrats' Iraq bill, and the
fact that the minimum wage is
tucked in there won't make
him change his mind.
Thus, a measure that would
be easily passed on its own


will now-be caught up in
feuding between the White
House and congressional
Democrats over Iraq
timetables, deadlines and
troop withdrawals.
The federal minimum wage
is currently $5.15 an hour.
This bill would raise it to
$7.25 an hour.
The increase is more
symbolic than economic
because of higher minimums
in most states and the
passage of time.
The federal minimum
was last increased 10 years
ago. 0
Congress can afford to play
politics with the minimum
wage because, unlike the
war-funding bill, there's no
great urgency to it - unless,
of course, you're the one
making $5.15 an hour.
* Scripps Howard News Service


C'O M M E N TARY



Richie



Rich in



overalls

John Edwards is right There are two
Americas, one for the rich and another
for everyone else. He lives in the
former and campaigns in the latter,
and sometimes he forgets where he is.
te "other" America, there is Edwards,
dressed in denim jeans and a work shirt,
announcing his second Democratic
presidential bid against the grim backdrop of
a New Orleans neighborhood devastated by
Katrina. Then he shows up in the "rich"
America, getting $400 haircuts and advising a
New York hedge fund for the kind of "wealthy
insiders" he
denounces on
the campaign
trail.
The haircuts
and the hedge
fund are
instructive, if
not definitive,
in trying to Philip Gailey
understand goiley@sptimes.com
Edwards'
political character - and judgment
Why would a presidential candidate who
joins union picket lines, beats up on Wal-Mart
and campaigns as a populist champion of
American workers indulge himself in
something as extravagant as a $400 haircut
and then bill it to his campaign donors, not all
of whom are rich trial lawyers and hedge-fund
managers? What was this son of a textile-mill
worker thinking?
. When the embarrassing story broke,
Edwards reimbursed his campaign for two
haircuts totaling $800, but not for the more
than $470 his campaign spent on makeup for
the candidate. That's the least he could do. He
certainly can afford it - he listed his net
worth at between $14 million and $45 million
in his 2003 Senate filing. But I wonder how
Edwards would explain to a Wal-Mart worker
that his $20 campaign donation had gone
toward a $400 haircut by Torrenueva Hair
Designs in Beverly Hills, Calif. It's beyond the
comprehension of working people for whom
$800 can be a month's rent
After leaving the Senate and starting his
second presidential bid, Edwards opened a
poverty think tank at the University of North
Carolina in Chapel Hill. He also built a
28,000-square-foot compound on 102 acres
valued at more than $5 million. No one should
begrudge Edwards his wealth or his dream
house. The Roosevelts and the Kennedys.
lived well, and so do the Bushes. But
commuting to a poverty center from a
mansion fit for a Saudi prince doesn't exactly
burnish his populist image. Appearances
matter in politics, although riot the kind
Edwards is concerned about
Edwards also did something else that
undercuts his populist message: About the
same time he was opening his poverty think
tank Edwards became a paid adviser to a New
York-based hedge fund, Fortress Investment
Group.
As The Washington Post reported last week,
it was "an unusual choice of employment for
Edwards, who for years has decried offshore
tax shelters as part of his broader campaign
to reduce inequality." While Fortress was
incorporated in Delaware, the Post said, "its
hedge funds were incorporated in the Cayman
Islands, enabling its partners and foreign
investors to defer or avoid paying U.S. taxes."
By the time Edwards left the hedge fund
last year, the Post reported, he had received
more than $167, 000 in donations from
Fortress employees and executives for his
2008 presidential campaign. In his speeches,
Edwards often decries the "two different
economies in this country: one for wealthy
insiders and then one for everybody else."
Again, what was Edwards thinking? He
didn't need the money, and surely he must
have known how it would look for a populist
presidential candidate to be involved with hedge
funds, a controversial segment of the investment
market that attracts wealthy insiders looking for
outsized returns and tax havens.
A campaign spokeswoman told the Post that
Edwards still believes offshore tax shelters
are wrong and that as president he would end
them.
The $400 haircuts probably have done more
damage to Edwards' political persona as the
champion of the poor than his business and
fund-raising relationship with a hedge fund, a


term that you will rarely hear on Main Street
A presidential candidate is in trouble when he
becomes grist for late-night television
comedians, who pounced on Edwards'
tonsorial gaffe.
* Philip Gailey is editor of editorials for the St.
Petersburg Times.


4A


OTHER VIEW


Teasing the lowest-wage


workers in America









Page Editor: Chris Bednar, 754-0404


LAKE CITY REPORTER


BUSINESS


TUESDAY, MAY 1, 2007


BRIEFS

FPL profits should
fall on high side
JUNO BEACH - Shares of
FPL Group Inc. hit a 52-week
high after the power utility
holding company said it expects
its full-year 2007 and 2008
profits to come in ahead of the
midpoints of its previous
guidance.
FPL said it still expects to
post an adjusted earnings per
share of $3.35 to $3.45 per
share in 2007, and $3.60 to
$3.80 per share in 2008.
Analysts polled by Thomson
Financial expect a profit of
$3.42 per share in 2007 and
$3.74 per share in 2008.
"Although we are not
changing our official earnings
expectations for 2007 and 2008
at this time, I am pleased with
the general trend of the first
quarter and optimistic that we
can achieve better than the
mid-points of the respective
ranges," Lew Hay, the
company's chairman and chief
executive, said in a statement.
FPL shares rose $1.45, or
2.3 percent, to $65.38 in
morning trading on the New
York Stock Exchange. Shares
of FPL have ranged in the last
12 months from $37.81 to
$64.97.

Court rules in
favor of Microsoft
WASHINGTON - The
Supreme Court sided with
Microsoft Corp. on Monday in a
case that restricts the reach of
U.S. patents overseas.
In a 7-1 decision, the court
found that Microsoft is not liable
in a patent dispute with AT&T.
The decision could impact
other lawsuits against Microsoft
and save the company billions
because of the global scope of
its operations.
AT&T had sued Microsoft,
alleging computers running the
Windows operating system
infringe on an AT&T technology
that compresses speech into
computer code.
AT&T said it is entitled to
damages for every Windows-
based computer manufactured
outside the United States,
which uses the digital speech
coder system.
Microsoft acknowledged
violations in the United States
regarding the AT&T patent,
while insisting the infringement
should not be extended
internationally.

U.S. targets 11
countries for piracy
WASHINGTON - China,
Russia and 10 other nations
were targeted by the Bush
administration for failing to
sufficiently protect American
producers of music, movies and
other copyrighted material from
widespread piracy.
The Bush administration on
Monday placed the 12 countries
on a "priority watch list" which
will subject them to extra
scrutiny and could eventually
lead to economic sanctions if
the administration decides to
bring trade cases before the -
World Trade Organization.
Another 31 countries were
placed on lower level
monitoring lists, indicating the
concerns about copyright
violations in those nations did
not warrant the highest level of
scrutiny.

Wolfowitz: He
acted in good faith
WASHINGTON - World
Bank President Paul Wolfowitz
on Monday
decried what h f
he called a
"smear
campaign"
against him
and told a
special bank
panel that he Wolfowitz
acted in
good faith in securing a
promotion and pay raise for his
girlfriend. He reiterated that he
had no plans to resign.
In a prepared statement to
the panel, Wolfowitz said the
institution's ethics committee
had access to all the details
surrounding the arrangement


involving bank employee Shaha
Riza, "if they wanted it."
Wolfowitz told- the panel that:
"I acted transparently, sought
and received guidance from the
bank's ethics committee and
conducted myself in good faith
in accordance with that
guidance."
The special bank panel is
investigating Wolfowitz'
handling of the 2005 promotion
of bank employee Riza, who
was scheduled to appear later
in the day.
* Associated Press


MARKET REPORT


ASSOCIATED PRESS
The fake meat at Sublime, the upscale vegan eatery in Fort Lauderdale, seen in this photo, does not
taste like mystery meat, it often taste like hearty meatloaf, pork tenderloin or chicken skewers.

Vegan restaurants attracting

foodies with caviar, meatless steak

By KELLI KENNEDY .
Associated Press m.A . -.-


FORT LAUDERDALE -
The fake meat at this upscale
vegan eatery doesn't taste
like mystery meat.
Depending on the night ifs
more like hearty meat loaf
with a mushroom sauce, pork
tenderloin or Mediterranean
grilled chicken skewers.
At Sublime, cascading
waterfalls trickle from 10-foot
windows in a low-lit dining
room filled with live palm
trees and customers sam-
pling $19 caviar - made of
seaweed, not fish eggs.
Once a network of grungy,
obscure cafes, the vegetarian
and vegan experience in
some cities has blossomed
on par with its carnivorous
counterparts, complete with
Zagat ratings and celebrity
clienteles.
There are between 1,000
and 1,200 vegetarian restau-
rants in the U.S., almost dou-
ble the number seven years
ago, according to Dennis
Bayomi, president of
VegDining.com, an online
guide to vegetarian restau-
rants. Besides Sublime, he
estimates there are more
than a dozen fine dining
vegan eateries nationwide,
though that number is hard-
er to track.
Part of the transformation
owes to advances in cooking
that allow chefs to prepare
proteins like tofu with a taste
and texture similar to meat.
They can do the same thing
with tempeh, which consists
of fermented soybeans with a
more grainy texture, and sei-


Bill grants

tax break
By BILL KACZOR
Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE -
Flashlights, gasoline cans,
weather radios and plastic
tarps are among the storm pre-
paredness items that will be
available tax-free as hurricane
season begins.
Gov. Charlie Crist on
Monday signed a bill into law
making certain hurricane and
severe weather preparedness
items tax-exempt from June 1
- the first day of hurricane
season - through June 12.
"The smart thing to do is
just be ready for it, go out and
make the kind of purchases
that make you more safe and
your family more safe, and so I
appreciate the sponsors' hard
work and the common sense
nature of this kind of legisla-
tion," Crist said. "It is just the
right thing to do."
Hardware store employees
wearing orange Home Depot
aprons and red Lowe's vests
joined representatives of the
Publix and Wminn Dixie gro-
ceries for the signing ceremo-
ny in the Capitol's Cabinet
room. The retailers are publi-
cizing the tax holiday.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
At Sublime, the upscale vegan eatery in Fort Lauderdale, patrons
can pay $19 for caviar made of seaweed, not fish eggs.


tan, a concentrated wheat
gluten.
Experts also credit the rise
to ian expanding global
pantry, where vegetarian
dishes are no longer relegat-
ed to the back of a menu,
but have become main-plate
specials.
"The door is wide open,"
said Eve Felder, associate
dean for culinary arts at the
Culinary Institute of America
in Hyde Park, N.Y. "It's been
going on in pockets for years,
but it's much more of a trend
across restaurants now."
New York-based Candle 79
has carved a profitable niche
among vegetable-loving food-
ies with New York Times
reviews, a popular cookbook
and takeout items sold at
Whole Foods Market. Paul,.
McCartney, Alicia.
Silverstone and Woody
Harrelson are all regulars,
said owner Bart Potenza.
One zealot flew two Candle


chefs to Arizona recently just
to cater his birthday bash.
"We've taken it to a whole
other level. It couldn't have
happened 5 or 10 years ago,"
Potenza said.
They've sold 3 million
vegan meals in the last 20
years and do about $3 million
in annual business, serving
up seitan picatta with lemon
caper sauce and ancho-
seared tempeh with roasted
sweet potato pure and
pomegranate reduction.
No matter how sumptuous
the stir fry, Potenza admits
vegan restaurants can have
more trouble becoming cash
cOWS.
"They say it's harder to
change people's food habits
than their religion or poli-
tics," he said.
It's also more expensive.
While the "meat" may be
cheaper, Potenza says it costs,
40 percent more to serve
organic products.


Snapper Rear Engine Riding Mower

3011523BV
* Briggs & Stratton 11.5 hp
S30" single blade
SQuick response steering
S2 Year Warranty


1,1 4995


Family Owned & Operated Since 1978


MIKELL'S POWER EQUIPMENT, INC.
386-752-8098 * 1152 US Hwy 90 * Lake City, FL


April 30, 2007

Dow Jones

industrials

-58.03

13,062.91
Pct change
from previous: -0.44


2


JAN
High
13,162.06


- 13,200
.11 4n rum


I0,UnUU
12,800
12,600
12,400
12,200
12,000


FEB MAR APR
Low Record high close: 13,120.94
13,061.53 Apr. 27,2007


STOCK MARKET INDEXES
52-Week YTD 12-mo
High Low Name Last Chg %Chg %Chg %Chg
13,148.00 10,683.32 Dow Industrials 13,062.91 -58.03 -.44 +4.81 +15.16
5,254.90 4,134.72 Dow Transportation 5,037.35 -85.04 -1.66 +10.46 +7.87
532.03 389.30 Dow Utilities 519.25 -5.13 -.98 +13.68 +31.78
9,752.44 7,708.11 NYSE Composite 9,627.73 -77.63 -.80 +5.35 +13.78
2,242.47 1,800.65 Amex Market Value 2,195.28 -9.71 -.44 +6.75 +9.44
2,562.99 2,012.78 Nasdaq Composite 2,525.09 -32.12 -1.26 +4.55 +9.56
1,498.02 1,219.29 S&P500 1,482.37 -11.70 -.78 +4.52 +13.58
890.86 710.53 S&P MidCap 873.66 -12.77 -1.44 +8.61 +9.05
835.17 668.58 Russell 2000 814.57 -15.13 -1.82 +3.42 +7.02
15,139.85 12,249.90 Wilshire5000 14,952.35 -140.40 -.93 +4.87 +13.01

STOCK EXCHANGE HIGHUGHTS

NYSE 3 AMEX 3 NASDAQ
9,627.73 -77.63 2,195.28 -9.71 2,525.09 -32.12

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)
Name' Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg
ISE 66.69 +20.97 +45.9 NA Galv 10.49 +2.56 +32.3 ApplRecyc 5.55 +3.23 +139.2
EagleHosp 13.25 +1.35 +11.3 Aerocntry 13.65 +2.08 +18.0 Enpath 14.20 +3.07 +27.6
Chiquita 14.83 +1.09 +7.9 PeaceA g 2.85 +.27 +10.5 Datawatch 4.42 +.87 +24.5
Wrigley 58.88 +3.83 +7.0 FtlIsrI 21.15 +1.97 +10.3 lonatron 6.15 +1.06 +20.8
ParTech 10.05 +.64 +6.8 Anooraq g 2.39 +.22 +10.1 CeragonN 6.94 +.98 +16.4
BuckTch 12.67 +.71 +5.9 PhxFoot 3.58 +.23 +6.9 BstLfSci 2.94 +.38 +14.8
Culp Inch 9.00 +.50 +5.9 Think 2.31 +.14 +6.5 Cimatm 3.79 +.44 +13.3
Impac pfC 22.50 +1.25 +5.9 ArizLd 8.45 +.50 +6.3 Sequenm rs 3.69 +.40 +12.2
Fairchild if 2.00 +.10 +5.3 Comforce 2.78 +.15 +5.7 Intersectns 11.07 +1.09 +10.9
Head NV 4.64 +.23 +5.2 Uroplasty 5.00 +.27 +5.7 BNC 16.75 +1.59 +10.5
LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)
Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg
AREst 89.61-18.90 -17.4 JMG Ex nya 2.19 -.36 -14.1 SterlingF 16.65 -4.07 -19.6
Terra 17.64 -2.46 -12.2 RaserThya 5.75 -.81 -12.3 Accentia 2.50 -.53 -17.5
BldrG&IFd 13.24 -1.82 -12.1 NevGCas 2.71 -.32 -10.6 GTx Inc 19.51 -2.96 -13.2
OrmatTc 36.49 -4.75 -11.5 BFC Fncl 3'.59 -.41 -10.3 Depomed 3.44 -.52 -13.1
TrinaSol n 53.43 -6.36 -10.6 CabelTel 5.10 -.52 -9.2 SigmaDg If 23.43 -3.33 -12.4
Ducomun 28.52 -3.27 -10.3 Servotr 8.35 -.84 -9.1 Bsquare 5.18 -.59 -10.2
NamTai 12.96 -1.42 -9.9 Rewards 3.96 -.36 -8.3 Bioenvisn 3.33 -.37 -10.0
Schawk 18.03 -1.97 -9.9 EvgmE nya 6.03 -.47 -7.2 Conolg rs 2.15 -.24 -10.0
NwOriEd n 43.75 -4.15 -8.7 CVD Eqp 8.20 -.63 -7.1 NthfldLb 4.81 -.53 -9.9
ICICI Bk 40.92 -3.85 -8.6 On2Tech 2.24 -.17 -7.1 Orbcomm n 11.57 -1.23 -9.6
MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)
Name Vol(00) Last Chg Name Vol(00) Last Chg Name Vol(00) Last Chg
GenElec 459169 36.86 +.02 SPDR 928948148.29 -1.24 PwShs QQQ86900845.96 -.61
EMC Cp 369517 15.18 -.46 iShR2K nya812161 80.74 -1.74 Level3 664755 5.56 -.20
Pfizer 324574 26.46 -.15 SP Engy 174475 63.37 -.76 Microsoft 553047 29.94 -.18
JPMorgCh291664 52.10 -.45 OilSvHT 116329156.55 -3.51 SunMicro 511015 5.22 -.04
Hallibtns 288662 31.77 +.02 SPFncl 105699 37.01 -.29 Intel 480504 21.50 -.37
FordM 260653 8.04 -.01 PrUShQQQn10394848.95 +1.40 Cisco 469312 26.74 -.29
Citigrp 258647 53.62 +.25 SemiHTr 100732 36.61 -.46 SiriusS 381537 2.96 -.08
AT&T Inc 235275 38.72 +.08 DJIA Diam 89485130.67 -.56 Oracle 252214 18.80 -.30
Motorola 228310 17.33 -.24 RetailHT 61654103.33 -1.71 Comcast s247949 26.66 -.27
LSI Corp 217158 8.50 -.29 SP Util 47054 41.65 -.16 Amazon 230707 61.33 -1.27
DIARY DIARY DIARY
Advanced 909 Advanced 428 Advanced 921
Declined 2,403 Declined 714 Declined 2,151
Unchanged 125 Unchanged 100 Unchanged 123
Total issues 3,437 Total issues 1,242 Total issues 3,195
New Highs 237 New Highs 89 New Highs 118
New Lows 25 New Lows 19 New Lows 87
Volume 2,986,770,135 Volume 415,485,652 Volume 2,053,506,417

STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST
YTD YTD
Name Ex Div YId PE Last Chg%Chg Name Ex Div YId PE Last Chg%Chg
AT&T Inc NY 1.42 3.7 20 38.72 +.08 +8.3 Intel Nasd .45 2.1 24 21.50 -.37 +6.2
Alltel NY .50 .8 22 62.69 +.94 +3.7 JPMorgCh NY 1.52 2.9 12 52.10 -.45 +8.6
AutoZone NY ...... 17 133.04 -.15 +15.1 Level3 Nasd ......... 5.56 -20 -.7
BkofAm NY 2.24 4.4 11 50.90 +.13 -4.7 Lowess NY .20 .7 15 30.56 -29 -1.9
BobEvn Nasd, .56 1.5 20 36.0 -.42 +7.2 McDnds NY 1.00 2.1 17 46.28 -.67 +8.9
CNBFnPA Nasd .60 4.3 14 14.00 +.05 -1.3 Microsoft Nasd .40 1.3 25 29.94 -.18 +.3
CSXs NY .48 1.1 15 43.17 -.57 +2.4 NYimes NY .92 3.9 ... 23.40 -.08 -3.9
ChmpE NY . .. ... 6 10.28 -.54 +9.8 NobltyH Nasd .50 2.4 15 21.05 +.03 -20.8
Chevron NY 2.32 3.0 10 77.79 -29 +5.8 OcciPets NY .88 1.7 10 50.70 -.47 +3.8
Cisco Nasd ... 26 26.74 -.29 -2.2 Penney NY .80 1.0 16 79.09 -2.91 +2.2
CocaCI NY 1.36 2.6 23 52.19 +.13 +8.2 PepsiCo NY 1.20 1.8 19 66.09 -.20 +5.7
ColBgp NY .75 3.1 14 24.06 -.28 -6.5 Pfizer NY 1.16 4.4 10 26.46 -.15 +2.2
Delhaize NY 1.54 1.6 ... 96.35 -1.13 +15.7 Potash NY .60 .3 27 179.52 -6.50 +25.1
DollarG NY .20 .9 49 21.35 -.06 +33.8 PwShsQQQNasd .13 .3 ... 45.96 -.61 +6.5
EMCCp NY ... 26 15.18 -.46 +15.0 Ryder NY .84 1.6 13 52.64 -1.18 +3.1
FPLGrp NY 1.64 2.5 20 64.37 +.47 +18.3 . SearsHdgs Nad ... 20 190.91 -1.02 +13.7
FamilyDIr NY .46 1.4 33 31.64 -.02 +8.6 SinusS Nasd ......... 2.96 -.08 -16.4
FordM NY ......... 8.04 -.01 +7.1 SouthnCo NY 1.61 4.3 18 37.79 -.38 . +2.5
GenElec NY 1.12 3.0 18 36.86 +.02 -.9 SPDR Amex2.60 1.8 ... 148.29 -1.24 +4.7
Hallibtns NY .30 .9 14 31.77 +.02 +2.3 SunMicro Nasd ......... 5.22 -.04 -3.7
HomeDp NY .90 2.4 14 37.87 -.60 -5.7 TimeWam NY .22 1.1 13 20.63 +.02 -5.3
iShR2Knya Amex .82 1.0 ... 80.74 -1.74 +3.5 WalMart NY .88 1.8 18 47.92 -.42 +3.8

MONEY RATES CURRENCIES
Last Pvs Week Last Pvs Day
Prime Rate 8.25 8.25 Australia 1.2038 1.2045
Discount Rate 6.25 6.25 Britain 1.9991 1.9970
Federal Funds Rate 5.28 5.25 Canada 1.1093 1.1156
Treasuries Euro .7325 .7330
3-month 4.785 4.84 Japan 119.56 119.65
5-yearmont 451 4 Mexico 10.9300 10.9124
10-year 4.32 45 Switzerind 1.2077 1.2068
30-year 4.81 4.83 British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All others show
dollar in foreign currency.

MUTUAL FUNDS
Total Assets Total Return/Rank PctMn Init
Name Ob| ($Mlns) NAV 4-wk 12-mo 5-year Load Invt
American Funds GrowAmerA m LG 85,086 34.62 +3.9 +10.0/B 0.0/A 5.75 250
American Funds invCoAmA m LV 74,190 35.00 +3.9 +14.2/D 0.0/C 5.75 250
Vanguard500 t.B 70,352 136.61 +4.4 +15.1/B 0.0/B NL 3,000
Fidelity Contra LG 68,713 67.75 +3.5 +9.1/C 0.0/A NL 2,500
Dodge & Cox Stock LV 68,488 159.55 +3.4 +15.5/C 0.0/A NL 2,500
American Funds CaplncBuA m IH 68,387 64.04 +3.2 +19.8/A 0.0/B 5.75 250
American Funds WAMutlnvA m LV 68,272 36.55 +4.4 +16.9/B 0.0/D 5.75 250
American Funds CpWIdGrIA m WS 66,846 44.70 +4.6 +18.3/B 0.0/A 5.75 250
American Funds IncAmerA m MA 63,539 21.22 +3.3 +18.6/A 0.0/A 5.75 250
PIMCO TotRetlls Cl 62,602 10.41 +0.2 +6.5/D 0.0/A NL 5,000,000
American Funds EurPacGrA m FB 57,412 49.88 +4.1 +15.4/D 0.0/A 5.75 250
Fidelity DivrIntl FG 49,352 40.07 +5.2 +16.1/C 0.0/A NL 2,500
Vanguard 500Adml LB 47,898 136.62 +4.4 +15.2/A 0.0/B NL 100,000
Vanguard Instldx LB 45,355 135.59 +4.4 +15.2/A 0.0/B NL 5,000,000
American Funds NewPerspA m WS 44,059 33.79 +4.6 +15.6/C 0.0/B 5.75 250
Fidelity Magellan LG 43,379 95.72 +4.8 +6.1/D 0.0/B NL 2,500
Vanguard TotStldx LB 42,301 35.79 +4.0 +14.3/B 0.0/A NL 3,000
Fidelity LowPriStk MB 39,609 46.13 +3.3 +12.6/C 0.0/A NL 2,500
Dodge & Cox IntlStk FV 38,461 47.34 +3.2 +18.5/C 0.0/A NL 2,500
American Funds BalA m MA 35,696 19.59 +2.9 +11.8/B 0.0/B 5.75 250
American Funds FundminvA m LB 33,786 42.70 +4.5 +14.8/B 0.0/A 5.75 250
FrankTemp-Franklin Income A m CA 32,213 2.78 +3.0 +19.8/A 0.0/A 4.25 1,000
Vanguard Wndsrll LV 32,070 36.98 +4.7 +18.4/A 0.0/A NL 10,000
Fidelity Eqinc LV 31,309 60.63 +4.5 +17.2/B 0.0/B NL 2,500
Fidelity GrowCo LG 29,895 73.05 +5.1 +8.1/C 0.0/A NL 2,500
Vanguard Welltn MA 29,805 33.71 +3.4 +14.6/A 0.0/A NL 10,000
Fidelity Growlnc LB 28,447 32.32 +4.5 +9.3/E 0.0/E NL 2,500
DavisNYVentA m LB 28,334 40.48 +4.1 +15.2/A 0.0/A 4.75 1,000
Vanguard TotStlAdm LB 28,312 35.80 +4.0 +14.4/B 0.0/A NL 100,000
Dodge & Cox Bal MA 28,213 89.56 +2.5 +12.6/B 0.0/A NL 2,500
FrankTemp-Templeton Growth A m WS 27,702 27.00 +4.5 +17.3/8 0.0/8 5.75 1,000
Fidelity Puritan MA 25,784 20.71 +3.1 +13.9/A 0.0/A NL 2,500
Vanguard TotBdld Cl 25,741 10.02 +0.5 +7.4/B 0.0/C NL 3,000
Fidelity Bal MA 24,010 20.58 +3.2 +12.0/B 0.0/A NL 2,500
Fidelity Spartan USEqindxl LB 22,501 52.49 +4.4 +15.1/A 0.0/B NL 100,000
Vanguard Totlintl FB 22,363 19.07 +3.9 +18.8/A 0.0/A NL 3,000
Vanguard InstPlus LB 22,131 135.60 +4.4 +15.2/A 0.0/B NL200,000,000
American Funds BondA m Cl 22,064 13.43 +0.7 +7.9/A 0.0/A 3.75 250
Vanguard Prmcp LB 21,876 72.25 +4.6 +8.2/E 0.0/A NL 25,000
TRowe Price Eqtyinc LV 21,568 30.82 +4.7 +17.7/B 0.0/B NL 2,500
Fidelity Value MV 20,779 87.95 +4.1 +16.7/C 0.0/A NL 2,500
Vanguard Europeldx ES 20,692 39.67 +5.8 +26.3/A 0.0/C NL 3,000
PIMCOTotRelAdm b Cl 20,686 10.41 +02 +6.3/D 0.0/B NL 5,000,000
CA -Conservative Allocation, Cl -Intermediate-Term Bond, ES -Europe Stock, FB -Foreign Large Blend, FG -Foreign
LargeGrowth, FV -Foreign Large Value, IH -World Allocation, LB -Large Blend, LG -Large Growth, LV -Large Value,
MA -Moderate Allocation, MB -Mid-Cap Blend, MV - Mid-Cap Value, SH -Specialty-heath, WS -Worid Stock, Total
Retum: Chng in NAV with dividends reinvested. Rank: How fund performed vs. others with same objective: A is in top
20%, E in bottom 20%. Min Init Invt: Minimum $ needed to invest in fund. Source: Momingstar
Stock Footnotes: g = Dividends and eamings in Canadian dollars, h = Does not meet continued-listing standards.
if = Late filing with SEC. n = New in past 52 weeks. pf = Preferred. rs = Stock has undergone a inreverse stock split of at least
50 percent within the past year. rt = Right to buy security at a specified price, s = Stock has split by at least 20 percent with-
in the last year. un = Units. vj = In bankruptcy or receivership. wd = When distributed, wl = When issued, wt = Warrants.
Mutual Fund Footnotes: b = Fee covering market costs is paid from fund assets, d = Deferred sales charge, or redemp-
tion fee. f = front load (sales charges), m = Multiple fees are charged. NA = not available, p = previous day's net asset
*alu- . s runa] ,sh .h,.,E , ur.n, j rhre wI, x = lind *813 ct-tnilOn duflng I- wr, GainerI and Lowes .Tut re e,)rth
I litI-'l $2 h. D-. hi i. n 13DIeas Dl,' o MoActtvee miu be won a lftl l1 Volurre.,1 huua] r,11 are Source- Tre/
Associated Press. Sales figures are unoffsal.a


V-


T^









LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL TUESDAY, MAY 1, 2007


COMMUNITY CALEN


* To submit your
Community Calendar
item, contact Todd
Wilson at 754-0428 or
by email at twilson@
lakecityreporter.com.


Announcements


Farmers Market
open every Friday
The Marion Street Farmers
Market is open from 2 p.m. to
dusk every Friday and is
located on the corner of Marion
Avenue and Hamilton Street.

High Springs Farmers
Market events for May
High Springs Farmers Market
calendar of events for May:
N Saturday - 11a.m. to
3 p.m. - Seasonal Saturday
Market open with "Sink Hole
de Mayo" featuring a salsa
contest
* May 10 - 2 to 6 p.m. -
Buy Local Block Party
* May 12-- 11 a.m. to 3
p.m. - Seasonal Saturday
Market open with "Jazz in the
Park"
* May 19-- 11 a.m. to 3
p.m. - Seasonal Saturday
Market open with "Jazz in the
Park"
* May 24 - 2 to 6 p.m. -
School's (almost) Out
Celebration & Health Fair
* May 26 - 11 a.m. to 3
p.m. - Seasonal Saturday
Market open with Memorial
Day Party in the Park,
featuring "Crown Vix" blues
band.

Today
Driver safety program set
for today, Wednesday
Columbia County Senior
Services, Inc. will host a AARP
Driver Safety Program Class
from 1 to 5 p.m. today and
Wednesday at the Golden age
Senior Center, 480 S.E.
Clements Place behind the
D.O.T. on Marion Ave. The
trainer will be Ann George.
Walk ins are welcome.
For more information, call
Mrs- George at 752-9061.

Wednesday
Friendship Luncheon
planned for Wednesday
The May Friendship
Luncheon of the Lake City
Newcomers will take place on
Wednesday at Grace Manor in
Live Oak. Anyone needing
transportation should meet at
the Park N Ride across from
Arby's on Commerce
Boulevard at 10:15 a.m. and
we will car pool to Live Oak.
For more information, call
754-2695 or 961-9335, All
members, friends and guests
are welcome.

Friday
Pregnancy Crisis Center
plans yard sale for Friday
The Pregnancy Crisis Center
of Lake City will hold its annual
yard sale starting at 8 a.m.
Friday. Plan to arrive early for
the best selection of the many
items offered for sale. All
proceeds from the sale will
benefit pregnant women and
babies in crisis situations.
For more information call
755-0058.

Live Oak Singles meeting
, canceled for Friday
Live Oak Singles will not
have a meeting on Friday.
Meetings will resume from 7 to
10 p.m. May 18 at St. Lukes
Church in Live Oak. Meetings
are on the first and third Fridays
each month.
For more information, call
Anna at 963-5774.

Saturday
Classic car show, swap
meet planned for Saturday
A classic car show and swap


Juanita Mae Murphy
Mrs. Juanita Mae Murphy, 80, of
Lake City, died early Saturday
morning in the Lake City Medical
Center following an extended ill-
ness. A native and longtime resident
of Ohio, Mrs. Murphy had been a
resident of Lake City since 1983
having moved here from Ohio. She
had been a homemaker and was a
member of the First Presbyterian
Church.
She was a loving wife, mother and
grandmother. Her favorite time was
the time that she spent with her
grandchildren. Mrs. Murphy was
preceded in death by a son, Jeffery
Primmer; a brother, Mac Moore and


meet will be from 2 to 6 p.m.
Saturday at E.A. Wholesale
located on Highway 100 East
and Baya Ave. across from the
Hardees restaurant on Highway
100 East.
All cars will be judged and
there will be trophies.
Registration is $5 per car and car
related vendors 10x10 area is
$10 each. All proceeds to benefit
Habitat for Humanity.
For more information, call
Tommie Richardson at 755-0164
or E.A. Wholesale at 758-9303.

Lulu homecoming day
planned for Saturday
Lulu homecoming day will
begin at 10:30 a.m. Saturday, at
the Lulu Community Center.
There will be activities all day
long and bring a basket lunch for
everyone in your party. There will
be a handmade quilt raffle and
bring in a copy of any favorite
photos to add to the Lulu
Memory Photo Album.

Coming Up
Vendors needed
for June 2 festival
Vendors are wanted for arts
and crafts at the Welborn
Blueberry Festival June 2
(setup will be June 1).
For more information, call
Wendaell Snowden at 963-1157
or 590-0002 or e-mail
wendllsnowden @prodigy.net.

Special election
planned for June 5
The special primary election
for district 3 state senator, will
take place on June 5. The
books will be closed on
Tuesday. If you need to make
party changes to your
registration or need to register
to vote, do so before the book
closing date.
You can vote absentee.
Contact the elections office at
758-1026 ext. 105 or e-mail at
absentee@votecolumbia.com.
The election will only effect
these precincts: 2, 4, 10, 10X,
12, 15C, 20, 21, 21D, 21E, 24,
24X and 25.

Transpiortatin Board
volunteers needed
Are you interested in helping
improve public transportation
services? Volunteer positions
are currently available on the
Transportation Disadvantaged
Board.
For more information, call
Lynn Godfrey at The North
Central Florida Regional
Planning Council
1-800-226-0690, extension 110.

Girls Club registration
planned for May 9
The Girls Club summer
registration will be at 8 a.m. May
9 at the Girls Club. Cost for the
10 week summer program is
$225. The child must be at least
six-years-old and completed the
first grade.
For more information, call Terri
Phillips at 719-5840.

Lake City Medical Center
needs gift shop volunteer
The Lake City Medical Center
is looking for volunteers that
would be interested in working in
the Raintree Gift Shop at the
Lake City Medical Center.
For more information, call
Maureen Lloyd at 752-4885 or
Sarah Ford at 752-6435.

Hospice fundraiser
to benefit center
Planting a tree is a beautiful
way to memorialize a loved one.
By giving oxygen, fruit, beauty
and shade, a tree symbolizes
life. Now you can purchase a
tree to benefit the 16-bed
Suwannee Valley Hospice Care
Center, which opened in late
January. The new facility


OBITUARIES

a sister, Immogene Catherine.
Mrs. Murphy is survived by her
husband of thirty-seven years, Dan-
iel P. "Dan" Murphy of Lake City;
three daughters, Linda Willman
(Larry) Rock Creek, Ohio; Carol
Wright (Doug) Ashtabula, Ohio;
Kathy Milligan (Bobby) of Lake
City, Florida. Her grandchildren,;


Clae, Hunter, Lindsey, Heather,
Ricky, Diana, Timmy, Jimmy,
Doug, Michelle and Tyler and her
eleven great-grandchildren also
survive.
Funeral services for Mrs. Murphy
will be conducted at 3:00 P.M.,
Thursday, May 3, 2007, in the chap-
el of the Dees-Parrish Family Fu-


provides quality end-of-life care
to residents of Columbia,
Hamilton, Suwannee, Lafayette,
Baker, and Union counties.
Thanks to the generosity of
donors and volunteers,
Suwannee Valley staff are
offering a large variety of trees
for sale - a selection that
includes a large Bradford, pear,
many sizes of Crape myrtle,
maple, oak, and Golden
Raintree. The sale also includes
landscaping and flowering trees,
azaleas, boxwoods, red tips,
redbud, forsythia, English
dogwood, cypress and many
more. Trees are priced at $10
and under. Supplies are limited.
Sales will continue through the
end of April.
For more information about
purchasing trees, contact
Carolyn Long, Haven Hospice
volunteer specialist, at
752-9191, or after hours at
288-2262.

CHS class of '72
reunion to take place
Columbia High School's Class
of 1972 35-year reunion will be
June 30 at the Spirit of
Suwannee in Live Oak.
For more information, call
George H. Hudson Jr. at
, 755-0630.

Blueberry pageant
planned for May 19
Mr. & Miss Blueberry
Pageant is set for May 19 in
Wellbom. Children from 3 to 18
years old are eligible.
For more information and
entry forms call Denise Randolph
at 963-4535. Deadline is April 22.

Head Start now
taking applications
SV4C's Head Start a free
early childhood program for low
income families with children
birth to age 5 and children with
disabilities is now accepting
applications for the 2007-2008
school year. Bring proof of
income and proof of child's age
to register.
For more information, call
754-2222 ext. 101.

High Springs
Farmers Market
June
* June 2 - 12 to 3 p.m. -
Seasonal Saturday Market open.
* June 9 -12 to 3 p.m.-
Seasonal Saturday Market open.
SEJune 16 -12to 3 p.m.--
Seasonal Saturday.Market open.
* June 23 - 12 to 3 p.m. -
Seasonal Saturday Market open.
* June 28 -r- 2.to 6 p.m. -
e* Buy Local Block Party
celebrating our American
heritage
* June 30 - 12 to 3 p.m.
Seasonal Saturday Market's
Independence Day Celebration
(last day for Seasonal Saturday
Market)

'Sew Much Love'
Lake City Quilt Walk
In Historic Downtown Lake
City quilts will be on display in
merchant windows and stores on
May 11-12. A Mother's Day tea is
planned for May 12 at Tucker's
Restaurant in the Blanche Hotel.
The price for the tea is $15 per
person and is presneted by the
Downtown Action Corporation.
Proceeds from the tea will go to
the Columbia County Senior
Services.
For more information, visit the
Lake City Quilt Walk site at
www.LakeCityDowntown.com or
call 758-1312.


fully animated Dalmation and
fire truck robot; it moves,
speaks, listens, plays audio
cassette tapes, winks and
blinks all by remote control.
Patches and Pumper can be
used with great success in
school classrooms, assemblies,
station tours, mall exhibits and
the local fair and any other
settings where safety messages
are presented.
Any good teaching tool
comes with a price. Patches
and Pumper's complete setup
will cost just under $10,000.
Three fourths of the goal has
been met and the hope is that
the project will be in service
before the 2007-2008 school
year begins. Send donations to:
Lake City Fire Department
Attn: Patches and Pumper
225 NW Main Blvd. Suite 101
Lake City, Fl. 32055
Checks payable to: Fire
Prevention.
For more information, call
Don Wilson at 752-3312, cell at
623-4758.

CHS class of 1962
reunion in planning
The CHS class of 1962 is
planning its 45th class reunion.
Addresses are needed. Call
Linda Hurst Greene at
752-0561 to provide address and
contact information.


Monthly Newcomers
meeting set for May 9
The regular monthly meeting
of the Lake City Newcomers will
take place at 11 a.m. on May 9
at the Guang Dong Resturant in
the Lake City Mall. All members,
friends and guests are welcome
- Luncheon is $10 - The
program for the day will be the
Silent Auction.
For more information, call
754-2695 or 961-8643.

Civil Air Patrol
meets on Thursdays
The Civil Air Patrol meets
from 6:30 to 8:45 p.m. every
Thursday evening at the Lake
City Mall just outside JCPenney.
For more information, call
386-752-2896 or visit
www.cap.gov.

Vocational Rehab
program now available
Vocational Rehab is an
employment program that
provides services for eligible
people who have physical or
mental impairments that keep
them from working.
These services are
designed to enable people to
prepare for, to get, tokeep, or
regain employment.
Services can help with
medical or mental health


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treatment, job placement and
retraining, in Columbia and
Union counties
For more information, call
754-1675.

Master Goat Producer's
program May 14-18
Master Goat Producer's
certification program will take
place from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. May
14-18 at Florida A&M University.
For more information, call
Angela McKenzie-Jakes at
(850) 875-8557 or online at
www. famu. edu/goats.

CHS class of 1977
reunion in planning
CHS Class of 1977 is looking
for classmates for its 30th Class
Reunion. Send your name,
e-mail, address & phone
number to:
Nola Hines Moon
nmoon@msn.com
1701 Shenandoah Road
Wimauma, FL. 33598
(813) 293-2718

IDA meeting
planned for May 9
The Columbia County
Industrial Development
Authority will meet at 8:30 a.m.
May 9 at the Chamber of
Commerce located at 162 S.
Marion Street.


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Fire Department seeks
help to buy teaching tool
The Lake City Fire
Department is trying to add a
new teaching tool to its fire
prevention program. Patches
* and Pumper is an exciting tool
for teaching fire safety. It's a


neral Home with Mr. James Mont-
gomery officiating. Interment will
follow in the Forest Lawn Memorial
Gardens.
The family will receive friends at
the funeral home from 6-8:00 Wed-
nesday evening.
Arrangements are under the direc-
tion of the DEES-PARRISH FAM-
ILY FUNERAL HOME, 458 S.
Marion Ave., Lake City. (752-1234
or 752-2211) Please sign our on-line
family guestbook at
www.deesfamilyfuneralhome.com.
Obituaries are paid advertisements.
For details, call the Lake City
Reporter's classified department at
752-1293.


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------------------------


Page Editor: Chris Bednar, 754-0404








Page Editor: Jerry Spaeder, 754-0424


LAKE CITY REPORTER


STATE & NATION


TUESDAY, MAY 1, 2007


BUDGET: Legislative session ends May 4
Continued From Page 1A


end. It is the only bill the
Legislature is required by the
constitution to pass every year.
The appropriations bill (SB
2800) would spend $71.9 bil-
lion during the budget year
beginning July 1. That
includes a $2 billion reserve
but is still $1.7 billion less than
the current budget.
Avoiding a pay raise for
more than 114,000 state
employees is a hedge in case
Florida's economy fails to
improve because the state is
not committed to a similar out-
lay in subsequent budget
years. A bonus also does not
increase outlay for pensions
and other benefits.
"Florida's state workers are
ranked 50th in pay - dead last
- and that's not going to
improve," said Doug Martin, a
lobbyist for the American
Federation of State, County and
Municipal Employees. But, he
added, "$1,000 is better than
nothing."
Sen. Al Lawson,
D-Tallahassee, who has thou-
sands of state workers in his
district, was also disappointed
"The only good thing about
it is lower-paid employees are
going to get $1,000," which is
more than they might get from
a low-percentage increase,
Lawson said. "It's a hard pill to
swallow."
House Policy and Budget
Council Chairman Ray
Sansom, R-Destin, said the
tight budget left lawmakers
few options.
"We hope next year the
finances are better, the economy
is better, that we can do a per-
centage increase," Sansom said.
The budget, though, still
includes a long list of local
spending items including storm
water and wastewater projects,
museums and other cultural
activities such as the World
Orchid Conference in Miami.
"Those always are in the eye
of the beholder," said House
Speaker Marco Rubio, R-West
Miami.
Lawmakers also rejected
some of Gov. Charlie Crist's


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Rep. Ray Sansonr, R-Destin (right) talks with Sen. Lisa Carlton,
R-Osprey, during A House session Monday in Tallahassee. Sansom
and Carlton are co-chairs of the budget conference committee. The
final budget plan was passed out to legislators Monday.


major budget recommenda-
tions. Crist had urged that com-
munity college and university
tuitions remain unchanged but
the budget includes a 5-percent
increase for both.
The governor wanted to dou-
ble the state's performance, or
merit, pay plan for teachers, but
budget negotiators decided to
keep spending at the current
$147.5 million level.
The bill would leave spend-
ing for the Florida Forever
environmental land-buying
program at its present level of
$300 million. Crist wanted it to
increase by $100 million.
The governor sought $35
million to stockpile antiviral
drugs, which would be pur-
chased at a discount price
through the federal govern-
ment, for a potential flu pan-
demic, but the budget includes
no money for that.
Crist, though, said he still
was pleased, based on what he
has heard about the budget
bill so far.
"I always talk about how
greedy do people need to be,"
Crist said. '"The governor
doesn't need to be greedy
either."


The bill would tap federal
grant money instead of state
dollars as Crist had requested
to replace touch screen voting
machines in 15 counties where
they are used with versions
that optically scan ballots and
leave a "paper trail." There are
questions, though, whether
the federal government will
permit spending the grant
money for that purpose.
Money that could have gone
into the merit pay plan instead
will be part of discretionary
funds school districts can use as
they see fit, including across-the-
board pay raises for teachers.
That's good news for the Florida
Education Association, the
statewide teachers union, which
had opposed merit pay on
grounds it is premature until
teachers get adequate base pay.
The FEA, though, agreed to sep-
arate compromise legislation
passed in March to replace a
merit pay plan enacted last year
with a more flexible version.
The budget would provide a
$455 per student increase, or
6.65 percent, over the current
year. It would bring total
spending for each student
to $7,306.


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Experts to investigate smaller wildfires


Associated Press

WAYCROSS, Ga. -
Firefighters on Monday asked
for arson experts to investi-
gate whether someone may
have set several small fires
that have broken out near a
huge 80,000-acre wildfire in
southeast Georgia.
The Georgia Forestry
Commission decided at least
three of the smaller spot fires
burning in Ware and Charlton
counties were suspicious
enough to warrant further
investigation, said Eric Mosley,
a forestry spokesman.
"We've had a couple of fires
in the past few days that have
seemed somewhat suspi-
cious," Mosley said. "We felt
like we needed to bring in
some people who work specif-


ically on arson investigations."
Officials are certain arson
did not cause the main fire
that has burned 125 square
miles of forest and swampland
over the past two weeks,
Mosley said. That fire started
when a tree fell across
live power lines April 16.
Officials say it has destroyed
22 homes.
Mosley said the Forestry
Commission suspects at least
three fires may have been set
by arsonists. One of them
ignited last week behind the
firefighters' command post on
U.S. 1 near the Okefenokee
Swamp Park.
Mosley said it could take
several days for arson investi-
gators to arrive. Because
the Georgia Forestry
Commission's own investiga-


tors are busy helping fight the
fires, the state is seeking help
from forest services in neigh-
boring states and from federal
agencies, he said.
Gov. Sonny Perdue plans to
take an aerial tour of the.fire-
stricken area Tuesday after-
noon, his office announced.
For several days, gusty
winds capable of carrying
burning embers a half-mile or
more have posed a threat of
starting smaller spot fires. But
Mosley said firefighters don't
think that caused the fire that
ignited near their command
post Saturday. -
"We felt it was a suspicious
fire because the ember
would've had to blow about
five miles in the opposite
direction of where the wind
was blowing," he said.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER


HEALTH


TUESDAY, MAY 1, 2007


Page Editor: Chris Bednar, 754-0404


Doctors study operating through body's own openings


By MALCOLM RITTER
AP Science Writer
PITISBURGH - A 4-year-
old boy lay on an operating
table here a few weeks ago
with a tumor that had eaten
into his brain and the base of
his skull. Standard surgery
would involve cutting open his
face, leaving an ugly scar and
hindering his facial growth as
he matured.
But doctors at the University
of Pittsburgh Medical Center
knew a way to avoid those dev-
astating consequences. They
removed much of the tumor
through the boy's nose.
Since then, doctors in New
York and in France have
announced they removed gall
bladders through the vaginas
of two women. And doctors in
India say they have performed
appendectomies through the
mouth.
It's a startling concept and a
little unpleasant to contem-
plate. But researchers are
exploring new ways to do sur-
gery using slender instru-
ments through the body's nat-
ural openings, avoiding cutting
through the skin and muscle.
Many questions remain
about that approach. But doc-
tors say it holds the promise of
providing a faster recovery
with less pain and no visible
scars. And in the brain, it can
avoid a need for manipulating
tissue that could disturb brain
and eye function.
For abdominal surgeries,
going through the mouth, vagi-
na or rectum would avoid the
need to cut through sensitive
tissues. And deep inside the
body, where tissue doesn't feel
lasting pain, the procedures


In this photo provided by the University of Pittsburgh Medical
Center, Dr. Carl Snyderman (right) uses an endoscope to view a
patient's brain while Dr. Amin Kassam removes a brain tumor
through the nose, using special instruments designed for this
surgery at the Pittsburgh hospital in September 2006.


themselves might be less
traumatic.
Some abdominal surgeries
like bowel operations can
require patients to spend a
week or more recovering at
home. With the natural-open-
ing surgery, the theoretical
hope is that "they really can go
back to work the next day,"
said Dr. David Rattner of
Massachusetts General


Children's health care on state agendas
Twenty-nine states and the District of Columbia have adopted or are
considering improvements in children s health care coverage.
SImplemented or recently Considering
adopted legislation significant
l . ..... . _ proposals

:. _ :'; -^-.-.-i ''".- ' / B


~-


Hospital.
"It would be like going to the
dentist and getting a root
canal," Rattner said. "It's not
trivial, but it also isn't
disabling."
Sometimes doctors even
pass up one.natural body open-
ing for another. On the same
day they treated the 4-year-old,
doctors in Pittsburgh operated
on neck vertebrae of an elderly


man through his nose. Usually,
this operation would have been
done through the mouth.
But going through the nose
meant the patient could start
eating right away rather than
waiting a few days. And he
avoided the risks of a feeding
tube and a surgical hole in his
throat to help him breathe, said
neurosurgeon Dr. Amin
Kassam.
Doctors at the medical cen-
ter first reached the spine
through the nose just two
years ago, he said.
They have even removed
brain tumors the size of base-
balls through the nose, nib-
bling at them and withdrawing
pieces the size of popcorn
kernels.
However, entry through the
nose isn't feasible for brain
tumors in some locations.
That's why doctors had to
remove the rest of the 4-year-
old's tumor another way, by
going through the side of his
skull. They used an incision
designed to hide behind his
hairline.
The key to operating
through body openings is spe-
cialized slender instruments
that can be inserted into the
natural channels, along with
devices that provide light and a
video camera lens at the site of
the surgery. Doctors watch
their progress on video
screens as they manipulate the
surgical instruments.
Sound familiar? It's much
like laparoscopic stirgery,
which revolutionized the oper-
ating room more than 15 years
ago. For many operations, long
incisions have been replaced
with three or four holes, each


maybe a quarter-inch to a half-
inch wide. That has, vastly
reduced pain and recovery
time.
The natural-opening
approach holds the promise
of going a step beyond that by
eliminating the need for those
punctures.
"Getting rid of them com-
pletely is going to be not an
evolutionary step, but a revo-
lutionary step," said Dr. Marc
Bessler of New York-
Pr e sb y t e r i a n
Hospital/Columbia
University Medical Center.
He led the surgery in New
York that detached and
removed a woman's gall blad-
der through her vagina. The
team also inserted laparo-
scopic instruments into two
small incisions in her
abdomen, using one
instrument to hold tissue out


of the way.
A week after that surgery
was announced, a French doc-
tor said his team had removed
a woman's gall bladder
through her vagina without'
any abdominal incisions.
Instead, the team pierced her
abdomen with a needle about
a tenth of an inch wide. The
needle was equipped with a
video camera system and also'
allowed doctors to inflate the
abdomen to create a working
space.
The surgery, performed
April 2 on a 30-year-old
woman at University Hospital
of Strasbourg, was led by Dr.
Jacques Marescaux of the
Institute for Research into
Cancer of the Digestive
System in Strasbourg. In a
written statement, Marescaux
said the procedure left no
abdominal scar.


s Chiropractic Center welcomes

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SOURCE: Center for Children and Families AP Shammi Bali, M.D.

More states expand Internal Medicine/Prim Carey Ca

health insurance rolls Internal Medicine Board Certified


By KEVIN FREKING
Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Many
states are making more chil-
dren eligible for government-
funded health insurance even
as President Bush's health
chief says families are relying
too much on public money for
the coverage.
The goal of the states is to
allow more middle-class fami-
lies to participate in the State
Children's Health Insurance
Program. The states are rais-
ing income limits so families
once shut out because of their
earnings now can qualify.
When the program began a
decade ago, states could offer
coverage to families whose
income was not more than
double the federal poverty
level. Today, for example, that
threshold is $41,300 for a fam-
ily of four. A few states use a
Medicaid-based formula that
lets them insure more chil-
dren than under the income
limit.
Already, 18 states exceed
the 200 percent level, with
federal permission. Five
more, plus the District of
Columbia, could join the list
this year, according to a sur-
vey by Georgetown
University's Center for
Children and Families.
New York lawmakers
recent set an income limit of
up to $82,600 for a family of
four. Eligible families get
some government help in
buying insurance. The poorer
they are, the greater the sub-
sidy.
Other states considering
significant expansions in eligi-
bility include California, Ohio
and Oklahoma. Florida and


Oregon are considering mod-
est expansions, the center
reported.
Health and Human
Services Secretary Mike
Leavitt said if other states fol-
lowed New York's proposal, it
would mean that 71 percent of
the nation's children would be
on "public assistance."
"SCHIP is being proposed
in the spirit of the expansion
of health coverage. But that
isn't the reality," Leavitt said
last week. "For every 10 peo-
ple that go on a publicly fund-
ed plan, six of them leave a
private plan."


/ '5
*


334 SW Commerce Dr. Suite 2
Lake City, FL
(Inside Senior United Building)

Accepting New Patients Ages 18 and
Over.
You Will Be Seen By Dr. Bali each visit

Accepting Medicare, Most Major Insurances
Taking care of adult medical needs.
Including: Respiratory, Cardiac, Preventive and Geriatric care.


For Appointment or More Information Call 386-755-1703


zw N ii
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Leading by Dr. Zhou, A Harvard-Trained Pain Specialist


Welcome
Dr. Yang, DOM, A Florida Licensed Acupuncturist
to join our practice:


Diplomate of Acupuncture (NCCAOM)

Former Professor and Clinical Director Florida
College of Integrative Medicine Orando, FL

Over 20 years Clinical and Research Experience
in Acupuncture

Trained at Yunan College of Traditional
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Phone: 386-719-9663 Fax: 386-719-9662


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LAKE CITY REPORTER HEALTH TUESDAY, MAY 1, 2007


Studies disagree in debate over shaken-baby syndrome


By ALLEN G. BREED
AP National Writer
When 7-month-old Natalie
Beard's body arrived in the
autopsy room, there were no
outward signs of physical
abuse. No broken bones,
bruises or abrasions.
But behind her pretty
brown eyes and beneath her
fine dark-brown hair, there
was chaos.
Both retinas were puck-
ered and clouded red. And
there was acute bleeding out--
side and beneath the brain's
outer membrane - the kind
of bleeding most often asso-
ciated with a burst
aneurysm.
To forensic experts, these
were classic signs that
Natalie was shaken to death.
The common wisdom in
such "shaken-baby" cases
was that the last person with
the child before symptoms
appeared was the guilty
party, and a Wisconsin jury
convicted baby sitter Audrey
Edmunds of first-degree
reckless homicide.
Edmunds is now 10 years
into her 18-year prison sen-
tence, and she's seeking a
new trial.
In the decade since her
conviction, her attorneys say,
many experts have studied
the physics and biomechan-
ics of shaken-baby syndrome
and have concluded that
shaking alone could not have
produced Natalie's injuries
without leaving other evi-
dence of abuse.
Among those now ques-
tioning the diagnosis is Dr.
Robert Huntington III,. the
forensic pathologist who
examined Natalie's body and
whose testimony helped put
Edmunds away.
If the trial were held today,
Huntington told The
Associated Press recently, "I'd
say she died of a head injury,
and I don't know when it hap-
pened ... There's room for
reasonable doubt."
Some judges in other
cases have broadly agreed.
Last year, a judge in
Manatee County, barred use


fIs~


.oil


id .


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Prisoner Audrey Edmunds holds a picture drawn by one of her
three daughters, as she poses at the John C. Burke Correctional
Center March 27, in Waupun, Wis. Edmunds is 10 years into her
18-year sentence, convicted of shaking a baby to death while she
was sitting for it.


of the term "shaken baby
syndrome" because of its
possible prejudicial influence
on jurors.
A Kentucky judge subject-
ed shaken-bablr to a
"Daubert" test - a kind of
mini-trial to determine the
validity and admissibility of
certain evidence. Circuit
Judge Lewis Nicholls decid-
ed he could not admit expert
testimony on a theory whose
foundation may amount to
"merely educated guesses"
about the cause of death.
"The best the Court can
conclude is that the theory of
SBS is currently being test-
ed, yet the theory has not
reached acceptance in the
scientific community,"
Nicholls ruled.
But the syndrome does not
lack official recognition.
"Shaken baby syndrome is
a serious and clearly defin-


able form of child abuse," the
American Academy of
Pediatrics declares on its
Web site.
According to the National
Institute of Neurological
Disorders and Stroke, SBS
bears a "classic triad" of
signs - brain hemorrhag-
ing, retinal hemorrhaging
and brain swelling. Because
of a baby's relatively heavy
head and weak neck mus-
cles, shaking "makes the
fragile brain bounce back
and forth inside the skull and
causes bruising, swelling,
and bleeding, which can lead
to permanent, severe brain
damage or death," the insti-
tute says.
An estimated 1,500 shak-
en-baby cases were reported
in the United States last year,
says Toni Blake, a San Diego
defense attorney who spe-
cializes in the cases.


They've worked

hard to accomplish

this goal. Let them

know you're

proud of them!


They will be published on:
May 20th, 2007
Deadline for entry:
3 p.m., May 11, 2007


Give Your Graduate to rO n

Something to ronlY$3
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You Can Mail or Bring Your Graduate's Info to:


Lake City Reporter
180 E. Duval St.
Lake City, FL


For More Information Contact
Mary or Elicia at:
386-755-5440


I otFre-orP oo


But 3/2 decades after the
term was first used, there
seems to be no middle
ground in the debate.
"It doesn't exist," contends
Dr. John Plunkett, a
Minnesota pathologist who
began openly questioning
shaken-baby following the
1997 involuntary manslaugh-
ter conviction of British
nanny Louise Woodward, the
case that put SBS on the
map. "You can't cause the
injuries said to be caused by
shaking, by shaking."
Many pediatricians
disagree.
"People confess to it. So .it
has to be possible," counters


Dr. Suzanne Starling, direc-
tor of forensic pediatrics at
Children's Hospital of The
King's Daughters in Norfolk,
Va.
She and her colleagues
analyzed 81 cases in which
an adult confessed to shak-
ing and/or battering a child.
In cases where only shaking
was admitted, the children
were 2.39 times more likely
to have retinal hemorrhages
than victims of impact alone,
they found, "suggesting that
shaking is more likely to
cause retinal hemorrhages
than impact." ,
Plunkett scoffs: "What is
the No. 2 cause of wrongful.


convictions? False confes-
sions. ... You don't base sci-
entific conclusions on what
people confess to."
Boston pediatrician Robert
Reece is on the international
advisory board of the
National Center on Shaken
Baby Syndrome, and yet he
avoids using the term in a
courtroom. "What goes on in
the courtroom is up or down,
and medicine doesn't work
that way usually," he says.
In testimony, he refers to
"abusive head trauma" or
"inflicted traumatic brain
injury" instead, though he
still believes shaking alone
can cause it.


.. f , :...^. 's.


A recent study shows that the latest miracle drug
isn't a drug at all.

For people with hearing loss, it seems that hearing aids offer some
truly therapeutic qualities. A recent study conducted by the National
Council on Aging revealed that people who were treated/fitted with hearing
aids reported significant improvements in their self-esteem, in their
relationships with family members, in their social lives, and in their
mental, emotional, and physical health.


May is Better Hearing Month

Free hearing tests are being this month offered in
Lake City, FL, on Wednesday, May 2, and Wednesday, May 9.

Factory trained Beltone Specialists (licensed by the State of Florida) will per-
form these free tests. These evaluations will be given at the Beltone Hearing
Care Center listed below. Appointments are preferred and can be made by call-
ing the office at 838-3000.
Everyone who has trouble hearing is welcome to have a test using the latest
electronic equipment to determine if they have a correctable hearing loss.
Everyone should have a hearing test at least once a year if there is any trouble
at all hearing clearly. Most hearing problems gradually get worse.An annual test
will help you to keep track of a progressive loss. No hearing problem of any con-
sequence should ever be ignored. We will also be giving service on all makes
and models of hearing aids.


During Better Hearing Month, Beltone wishes to field test a remarkable new hearing
instrument in the area. This offer is free of charge and you are under no obligation.

The revolutionary 100% Digital instruments
are the latest technology to comfortably and
l, almost invisibly help you hear more clearly.

This technology solves the "stopped up ears,"
"head in a barrel" sensation some people expe-
ST rience, and have been clinically demonstrated to
improve hearing in noisy environments.

Trade up to the new Beltone Digital with this Special Offer!During Better Hearing
Month, we'll give you up to 50% of the price you paid for your current hearing instru-
ment, regardless of brand or age, off the price of a Beltone Digital System. Up to $1,000
per aid.Call For An Appointment Today!If you wish to participate, you will be required to
have your hearing tested in our office FREE OF CHARGE to determine candidacy. You will
be asked to report your results with the hearing instruments each week, for a two week
period.At the end of this period, you may purchase the instrument, if you so desire, at a
significantly reduced charge. Otherwise, there is no fee whatsoever for participating in
this field test. Special testing will be done to determine the increased benefits of this
technology.

Trade up to the new Beltone Digital with this Special Offer!

During Better Hearing months, we'll give you up to 50% of the
price you paid for your current hearing instrument, regardless of
brand or age, off the price of a Beltone Digital System (including
the new hearing instrument which we are field testing). Up to
$1,000 per aid.

Call For An Appointment Today!



.*Beltone

The Most Trusted Name in Hearing Healthcare


386-754-6711
132 SW Columbia Ave., Ste 101
Lake City, Florida
Most Insurance Accepted


Page Editor: Chris Bednar, 754-0404









LAKE CITY REPORTER


LOCAL


TUESDAY, MAY 1, 2007


Page Editor: Jerry Spaeder, 754-0424


-1.A -: ----~.~ aca ~ In.wIkeclty~epo.-ter-on
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JASON MATTHEW WALKERILake City Reporter
Tristan Hope, 4, plays with a string-powered helicopter Sunday afternoon at the Lake City Rotary Club
Airshow at the Lake City Municipal Airport.

AIRSHOW: Thousands attend event
Continued From Page 1A


something for everybody."
The Lake City Rotary Club
hosted the event this year as a
fundraiser for Haven Hospice
to fulfill a $30,000 commitment
to the organization. Lee said
the money hasn't been totaled,
but the club expects to have
brought it around $25,000.
"Ifs rotary's best fundraiser
ever and we're pleased with
that," he said.
Saturday's event saw thou-
sands of spectators sitting on
the grounds on towels or lawn
chairs as they watched the
planes perform a variety of
stunts through the air.
Organizers said Sunday's
event saw a bit of a drop but
was still well attended.
"Usually we have about a 20
percent drop on Sunday, but I


'.~ '~.,


JASON MATTHEW WALKEFlLake City Reporter
Bill Burt - a four-year Timco
employee - gazes up during
Jim LeRoy's acrobatic
performance Sunday at the
Lake City Rotary Club Airshow.


"It's been years
since we had one
here - and
people were
responsive and
well pleased."
- E. Vernon Douglas,
early organizer of airshows
think we had maybe a 5 per-
cent drop - compared to the
Saturday crowd, this is one of
the biggest Sunday crowds
we've had," Douglas said.
"More importantly, people
received the show so well.
They appreciated it - it's been
years since we had one here
- and people were responsive
and well pleased."


CHIEF: Two investigations remain open


Continued From Page 1A
Johnson was the part-time
fire chief of the department for
more than four years before
being hired by Lake City in
June 2006.
The entire department
remains under investigation
Tendergraph said.
Johnson's suspension from
the Lake City Fire Department
on March 29, was prompted
when allegations of policy viola-


tions were brought to the city
through public complaints.
The administrative investi-
gation is.currently being con-
ducted by Lake City City
An orney Herbert Darby. Calls
to Darby's office Monday were
not returned.
Lake City City Manager
David Kraus first assigned the
investigation to the city's
human resource department


Due to the department's size,
two employees, the department
found an outside agency to con-
duct the investigation. Calls to
Kraus' office were not returned.
-'After the agency was select-
ed, Kraus said that an approval
from City Council for the
agency would take too long
and that the investigation
would be handled internally by
an unbiased party.


US 90 West (next to 84 Lumber) Lake City * 386-752-9303


BREAK-IN: Authorities working on case


Continued From Page 1A
"They just broke into the
room, but they actually couldn't
get anything," Couey said, not-
ing the classroom or school was-
n't vandalized or painted. "(The
teacher's) room has a class
divider, so the only thing that
was actually stolen was an iPod."
Couey said the only damage
to school property was the
broken glass from the door,


which is currently being
replaced with wood.
"We've put wood over the
door for now so they can't get
back in that way," Couey said.
School officials are just
beginning their investigation
into the break-in.
"We've started making
movement afterwards trying
to find somebody," Couey said.


"We've got some leads out
there, but nothing (indicating)
who it is yet"
The investigation is being
handled by school district offi-
cials, although Couey said law
enforcement officers have also
investigated the scene.
Last week's break-in is not
the first to occur at the school
during the current school year.


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Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@aokecityreportercom
Tuesday, May 1, 2007


SPORTS


www.lakecityreporter.com


BRIEFS

SWIMMING
Ufeguarding class
begins today
The Columbia County
School System and the
Columbia County
American Red Cross are
offering a second
lifeguarding class at the
Columbia Aquatic
Complex. Classes
(6-9 p.m.) begin today.
Candidates must be at
least 15 years old and
there are skill
prerequisites. Cost is $110,
due on the first day off
class.
For details, call Drew
Sloan at 755-8195.

CST registration
is under way
Columbia Swim Team
registration is 4-5:30 p.m.,
Monday, Tuesdays and
Thursday, at the
Columbia Aquatic
Complex. A birth
certificate copy is required.
For details,.call Robb
Burns at 755-9619.

CHS FOOTBALL
Fishing tournament
set for June 16
The Columbia County
Quarterback Club will host
its third annual bass fishing
tournament June 16 at
Clay Landing. Entry fee is
$60 per boat with an
optional $10 big bass pot.
For details, call Jamie
Allbritton at 365-5026.

CHEERLEADING
Cheer-Starz tryouts
begin Thursday
Columbia County
Cheer-Starz competition
cheerleading tryouts are
scheduled for
Thursday-Saturday at the
Fancy Dancer Dance
Studio. Boys and girls ages
4-19 are eligible.
For details, call Rick
Harper at (386) 365-0886.


Registration open
for 4-wheel event
The 2nd Annual
4-Wheeling Excursion in
the Osceola National
Forest is June 16.
The event is sponsored
by Women in the Outdoors
(wunwwomenintheoutdoos.org)
and this year Interstate
Cycles is donating 20
ATVs and Redneck Pepper
is hosting the lunch and
dinner.
Registration is
limited and on a first
come/first serve basis.
Participants can use their
own 4-wheelers.

655-8698 or heather.
knight-bennett@hotmail. cornm.

Bassin' For Shands
Kids event May 12
S&S Food Stores and
Bienville Plantation
presents the 12th Annual
Bassin' For Shands Kids
Bass Tournament on May
12. Entry fee of $225 ($250
day of tournament)
includes big bass. First
place pays $3,000 and big
bass $700, based on 100
boats. The tournament
will be conducted by
Southern Shiners, Inc.
For details, call Pam
Edenfield at 752-7344.


* From staff reports I


Indians charge field


for spring practices


Offseason changes
bring new coaches,
players to FortWhite.
By CHRIS WHITE
cwhite@lakecityreporter.comrn
Temperatures should peak
at about 91 degrees today as
the Fort White High football
team begins its spring prac-
tice sessions, but even' the
heat likely will do little to turn
players away from the
practice fields.
Interest in the program is
strong right now, head coach
Demetric Jackson said.
"There are quite a lot of
kids that say they want to play


this year," he said. "A few have
kind of backed off a little, but
we've even got some older
guys who haven't played in a
while that want to play again.
"We'll just find out
(Tuesday) who really wants to
play."
'Pre-practice' begins at
3:45 p.m., where players will
go through passing and
one-on-one scenarios,
stretching begins 15
minutes later, and the drills
run through 6:15 p.m.
Fort White was 2-8 last year,
but finished strong with
victories against Stanton Prep
and Santa Fe High, but ihe
graduation of many of the
team's leaders and the


coaching rotations have
allowed the team to start with
an almost completely clean
slate.
"We're going to do some of
the same old things, but with a
twist," Jackson said. "(This
week) I'll be able to see what
we can do and what we can't
do, and work with that."
The spring practice will be a
day of nerves for more than
just the new players - much
of the coaching staff,
including Jackson, have
moved around since last
season.
Jackson moved up from
defensive coordinator and FILE PHOTO
Fort White head coach Demetric Jackson (left) talks with players
INDIANS continued on 3B during a timeout on Sept. 25, 2006 in Fort White.


FILE PHOTO
Columbia High's Earnest Claridy (74) and Brady Dicks (58) line up before a play against Buchholz High at CHS on Sept. 1, 2006.


Bach

Columbia High
football begins
spring practices.
By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com
Just as the NFL Draft
signals the beginning of the
2007 professional season,
spring practice is the start of
fall football for high schools.
Columbia High gets under


Morris

finishes


second

at state

Fort White track star
near top in shot put,
12th in discus.
From staff reports

Fort White High's Patrick
Morris placed second in the
shot put at the FHSAA Class
2A Finals at Winter Park on
Saturday.
Morris, who threw 55-111/4,
was hot on the heels of
champion Linval Joseph of
Santa Fe High, who won
with a 56-2. Morris placed
12th in the discus with
137-23/4.
Belen Jesuit Prep won the
boys state championship,
while Episcopal High won the
girls.
Columbia High had no
state qualifiers at the Region
1-3A meet last week at Chiles
High.
The 4x100 relay, team of
Charles Jenkins, Talin Jones,
Jon , Jenkins and Adrian
Williams placed seventh in
43.09.
Williams just missed the
100 meter final, placing ninth
in the preliminaries with 11.6.
Jon Jenkins was 14th with
11.9.
Sampson Genus was 10th
in the shot put with 42-2
and 11th in the discus with
123-8'1


way at 3:50 p.m., today, with
its first day of spring drills.
Varsity and junior varsity
players are to report to the
stadium when school is out.
"Our ninth-, 10th- and 11th
graders will all practice
together on the varsity field
and we are looking at 90-100,"
CHS head coach Danny
Green said Friday. "The
eighth-graders will strictly be
with the JV coaches. I
don't know with the


middle-schoolers. I visited
both middle schools and we
ended up with 82 signed up.
We anticipate about 70."
Columbia was 8-3 last year
and had classic wins over
Mosley High and Eastside
High in the spring and fall,
respectively. The Tigers
returned to the state playoffs
as a district runner-up, but
lost to Eastside in the first
round. The JV went 7-1.
Green has most of his


varsity staff returning - Billy
Hale, Ken Snider, Mitch
Shoup, Joey O'Neal, Quinton
Callum, Ian Ring and William
Murphy. Al Nelson is back as
JV head coach with his staff
of Roger Little, Tony Jones,
Timmy Jernigan and John
Woodley intact.
"I would like to have a
couple more coaches," Green
said. "I have been moving the
TIGERS continued on 3B


Cavs sweep Wizards


in opening round


Cleveland goes 4-0
in playoffs for first
time in team history.
By JOSEPH WHITE
Associated Press
WASHINGTON - It's
sweeps week in the NBA.
Even the Cleveland Cavaliers
got in on the act.
The Cavaliers completed a
playoff sweep for the first time
in franchise history Monday
night, beating the Washington
Wizards 97-90 with
yet another unconvincing
performance, doing just
enough to beat a depleted
team that nearly emptied its
bench in the first half.


LeBron James labored
through an 8-for-22 shooting
night, but he made 14 of 17
free throws to finish with 31
points for the Cavaliers. He
also had 11 rebounds and
seven assists,. including
back-to-back assists to
Zydrunas Ilgauskas in the
decisive final minute.
Ilgauskas finished with 20
points and 19 rebounds, and
he and Larry Hughes (19
points) scored 18 of
Cleveland's final 20 points.
The Cavaliers became the
third Eastern Conference
team in three days to finish a
first-round sweep. Detroit
dismissed Orlando on
Saturday, and Chicago ended
defending champion Miami's


season on Sunday.
The Cavaliers have won
only six playoff series in their
history, and this series was
the first time the franchise has
won consecutive road
playoff games. The Southeast
Division, meanwhile, went
0-12 in the playoffs.
The Cavaliers beat the
Wizards in the first round a
year ago - winning three
games by one point - but
Washington had Gilbert
Arenas and Caron Butler, who
both missed this year's series
with injuries. Washington had
its season end with a
playoff loss on its home court
for the third straight year,
PLAYOFFS continued on 3B


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Cleveland Cavaliers' LeBron James (left) shoots over Washington
Wizards' Antonio Daniels Monday in Washington.


Section B


on the prowl











LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS TUESDAY, MAY 1, 2007


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
NBA BASKETBALL
TimesTBA
TNT - Playoffs, first round, game 5s,
teams TBA (if necessary)
NHL HOCKEY
7 p.m.
VERSUS - Playoffs. Eastern Conference
semifinals, game 4, Buffalo at N.Y. Rangers
10 p.m.
VERSUS - Playoffs, Western Conference
semifinals, game 4,Anaheim at Vancouver
SOCCER
2:30 p.m.
ESPN2 - UEFA Champions League,
playoffs, semifinal, Liverpool FC vs. Chelsea
FC, at Liverpool, England
5 p.m.
ESPN CLASSIC - UEFA Champions
League, playoffs, semifinal, Liverpool FC vs.
Chelsea FC, at Liverpool, England (same-day
tape)

BASKETBALL

NBA playoffs

FIRST ROUND
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Detroit 4, Orlando 0
Detroit 100, Orlando 92
Detroit 98, Orlando 90
Detroit 93, Orlando 77
Detroit 97, Orlando 93

Cleveland vs.Washington
Cleveland 97,Washington 82
Cleveland 109,Washington 102
Cleveland 98, Washington 92, Cleveland
leads series 3-0
Monday
Cleveland 97, Washington 90, Cleveland
wins series 4-0

Toronto vs. New Jersey
New Jersey 96,Toronto 91
Toronto 89, New Jersey 83
New Jersey 102,Toronto 89
Sunday
New Jersey 102, Toronto 81, New Jersey
leads series 3-1
Today
New Jersey at Toronto, 7 p.m.

Miami vs. Chicago
Chicago 96, Miami 91
Chicago 107, Miami 89
Chicago 104, Miami 96
Sunday
Chicago 92, Miami 79, Chicago wins series
4-0

WESTERN CONFERENCE
Dallas vs. Golden State
Golden State 97, Dallas 85
Dallas 112, Golden State 99
Golden State 109, Dallas 91
Sunday
Golden State 103, Dallas 99, Golden State
leads series 3-1
Today
Golden State at Dallas, 9:30 p.m.

Phoenix vs. L.A. Lakers
Phoenix 95, LA. Lakers 87
Phoenix 126, LA. Lakers 98
LA. Lakers 95, Phoenix 89
Sunday
Phoenix 113, LA. Lakers 100, Phoenix
leads series 3-1
Wednesday
L.A. Lakers at Phoenix, 10:30 p.m.

San Antonio vs. Denver
Denver 95, San Antonio 89
San Antonio 97, Denver 88
Saturday
San Antonio 96, Denver 91, San Antonio
leads series 2-I
Monday
San Antonio at Denver (n)
Wednesday
Denver at San Antonio, 8 p.m.

Utah vs. Houston
Houston 84, Utah 75
Houston 98, Utah 90
Utah 81, Houston 67
Saturday
Utah 98, Houston 85, series tied 2-2
Monday
Utah at Houston (n)
Thursday
Houston at Utah, 8 or 9 p.m.

BASEBALL

AL standings

East Division
W L Pct GB
Boston 16 8 .667 -
Toronto 13 12 .520 3'%
Baltimore 12 13 .480 4/,
Tampa Bay II 14 .440 54
NewYork 9 14 .391 6'
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Cleveland 14 8 .636 -
Minnesota 14 II .560 I'A
Detroit 13 II .542 2
Chicago 12 II .522 2'
Kansas City 8 17 .320 7'h
West Division
W L Pet GB
LosAngeles 14 II .560 -
Seattle 10 10 .500 I'A
Oakland 12 13 .480 2
Texas 10 15 .400 4
Sunday's Games
Boston 7, N.Y.Yankees 4
Detroit 4, Minnesota 3
Cleveland 6, Baltimore I
Toronto 7,Texas 3
LA.Angels 5, Chicago White Sox 2
Seattle 5, Kansas City I
Tampa Bay 5, Oakland 3
Monday's Games
Toronto 6,Texas I
Baltimore at Detroit (n)
LA.Angels at Kansas City (n)


Today's Games
Oakland (Blanton 2-1) at Boston (Schilling
3-1), 7:05 p.m.
Baltimore (Loewen 2-0) at Detroit
(Durbin I-I), 7:05 p.m.
Toronto (Burnett 2-1) at Cleveland
(Sabathia 3-0), 7:05 p.m.
Minnesota (Ponson 1-3) at Tampa Bay
(Jackson 0-3), 7:10 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees (Hughes 0-1) at Texas (Loe
1-1), 8:05 p.m.
L.A. Angels (Colon 2-0) at Kansas City
(Greinke 1-2), 8:10 p.m.


Chicago White Sox (Vazquez 2-0) at
Seattle (Washburn 1-2), 10:05 p.m.
Wednesday's Games
Baltimore at Detroit, 1:05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox at Seattle, 3:35 p.m.
Oakland at Boston, 7:05 p.m.
Toronto at Cleveland, 7:05 p.m.
Minnesota atTampa Bay, 7:10 p.m.
N.Y.Yankees at Texas, 8:05 p.m.
L.A.Angels at Kansas City, 8:10 p.m.

NL standings

East Division
W L Pct GB
Atlanta 16 9 .640 -
NewYork 15 9 .625 'A
Florida 12 13 .480 4
Philadelphia II 14 .440 5
Washington 8 17 .320 8
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Milwaukee 16 9 .640 -
Pittsburgh 12 12 .500 3h
Cincinnati 12 13 .480 4
Chicago 10 14 .417 5,'
Houston 10 14 .417 5'A
St. Louis 10 14 .417 5S'
West Division
W L Pct GB
Los Angeles 15 10 .600 -
Arizona 15 II .577 'A
San Francisco 12 II .522 2
San Diego 13 -12 .520 2
Colorado 10 15 .400 5
Sunday's Games
Cincinnati 9, Pittsburgh 5
N.Y. Mets I,Washington 0
Philadelphia 6, Florida I
Milwaukee 3, Houston I
Colorado 9, Atlanta 7, 11 innings
LA. Dodgers 5, San Diego 4, 17 innings,
Arizona 5, San Francisco 4
Chicago Cubs at St. Louis, ppd.
Monday's Games
Atlanta 5, Philadelphia 2
Pittsburgh 3, Chicago Cubs 2
Milwaukee 7, St. Louis I
Florida 9. N.Y. Mets 6
Washington at San Diego (n)
Arizona at LA. Dodgers (n)
Colorado at San Francisco (n)
Today's Games
Chicago Cubs (Lilly 2-2) at Pittsburgh
(Armas 0-2), 7:05 p.m.
Florida (Nolasco 0-0) at N.Y. Mets (Pelfrey4
0-2), 7:10 p.m.
Philadelphia (Hamels 2-1) at Atlanta
(Redman 0-3), 7:35 p.m.
Cincinnati (Arroyo 0-2) at Houston
(Albers 0-0), 8:05 p.m.
St. Louis (Undecided) at Milwaukee
(Sheets 1-2), 8:05 p.m.
Washington (Hill 2-2) at San Diego (Young
2-2), 10:05 p.m.
Arizona (L.Hernandez 2-1) at L.A.
Dodgers (Penny 3-0), 10:10 p.m.
Colorado (Buchholz I-I) at San Francisco
(Ortiz 2-1), 10:15 p.m.
Wednesday's Games
Chicago Cubs at Pittsburgh, 12:35 p.m.
St. Louis at Milwaukee, 1:05 p.m.
Florida at N.Y. Mets, 1:10 p.m.
Arizona at LA. Dodgers, 3:10 p.m.
Philadelphia at Atlanta, 7:35 p.m.
Cincinnati at Houston, 8:05 p.m.
Washington at San Diego, 10:05 p.m.
Colorado at San Francisco, 10:15 p.m.

AUTO RACING


Aaron's 499


At Talladega Superspeedway
Talladega,Ala.
Sunday
(Start position in parentheses)
I. (I) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 192 laps,
154.167 mph., $355,51 .
2. (8) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 192,
$251,736.
3. (26) Kurt Busch, Dodge, 192, $212,483.
4. (2) David Gilliland, Ford, 192, $182,689.
5. (25) Jamie McMurray, Ford, 192,
$134,675.
6. (41) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 192,
$164,536.
7. (36) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 192,
$149,233.
8. (20) David Stremme, Dodge, 192,
$106,025.
9. (28) Ryan Newman, Dodge, 192,
$133,450.
10. (37) Martin Truex Jr., Chevrolet, 192,
$126,495.
11. (9) Scott Riggs, Dodge, 192, $107,050.
12. (30) Kasey' Kahne, Dodge, 192,
$138,891.
13. (34) Jeff Green, Chevrolet, 192,
$120,933.
14. (17) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 192, $137,64 1.
15. (39) Elliott Sadler, Dodge, 192,
$110,770.
16. (4) Sterling Marlin, Chevrolet, 192,
$107,983.
17. (10) David Ragan, Ford, 192, $127,100.
18. (23) Kyle Petty, Dodge, 192, $103,083.
19. (31) JJ.Yeley, Chevrolet, 192,$116,033.
20. (35) Bobby Labonte, Dodge, 192,
$127,11 1.
21. (3) Denny Hamlin, Chevrolet, 192,
$102,550.
22. (27) Tony Raines, Chevrolet, 192,
$96,425.
23. (18) Jeremy Mayfield, Toyota, 192,
$83,075.
24. (22) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 192,
$104,258.
25. (29) Reed Sorenson, Dodge, 192,
$101,947.
26. (6) Kenny Wallace, Chevrolet, 192,
$83,325.
27. (11) Boris Said, Ford, 191, $80,775.
28. (32) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, accident,
190, $127,761.
29. (12) Greg Biffle, Ford, accident, 190,
$97,025.
30. (21) Johnny Sauter, Chevrolet, accident,
190, $79,325.
31. (24) Juan Pablo Montoya, Dodge, 187,
$115,750.
32. (14) David Reutimann, Toyota, 184,
$78,525.
33. (5) Ricky Rudd, Ford, 155, $110,458.
34. (42) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 150,
$118,266.
35. (40) Clint Bowyer, Chevrolet, 146,
$86,125.
36. (15) Ward Burton, Chevrolet, engine,
144, $78,725.
37. (13) Kyle Busch, Chevrolet, accident,
130, $95,800.
38. (33) Joe Nemechek, Chevrolet,
accident, 130, $77,450.
39. (7) Casey Mears, Chevrolet, accident,
124, $85,250.
40. (43) Dale Jarrett, Toyota, engine. 38,
$77,000.
41. (38) Robby Gordon. Ford, engine, 33,
$76.800.


42. (16) Carl Edwards, Ford, engine, 27,
$84,630.
43. (19) Paul Menard. Chevrolet, engine,
22, $76,737.
Race Statistics
Time of Race: 3 hours, 18 minutes, 46
seconds.
Margin of Victory: Under caution.
Caution Flags: Eight for 32 laps.
Lead Changes: 42 among 20 drivers.
Lap Leaders: J.Gordon I; S.Marlin 2-5;
J.Gordon 6-12; S.Marlin 13-18; J.Johnson 19;
S.Marlin 20; J.Johnson 21-24; S.Marlin 25-28;
J.Johnson 29-30; S.Marlin 31 ; J.Johnson 32-33;
J.Green 34-36; TStewart 37-43;J.Gordon 44-
46; J.Burton 47-48; J.Gordon 49-63; D.Hamlin
64-67;J.Gordon 68-73; G.Biffle 74; M.Kenseth
75; J.Gordon 76-80; Ku.Busch 81-85;
D.Earnhardt Jr. 86-87; Ku.Busch 88-89;
J.Johnson 90-91; K.Kahne 92-93; J.Johnson 94;
K.Kahne 95-97; C.Mears 98-102; M.Kenseth
103; J.Gordon 104-118; D.Stremme 119;
J.Gordon 120-125; R.Smith 126; B.Said 127;
K.Wallace 128-129; J.Gordon 130-134;
E.Sadler 135-136; D.Ragan 137; M.Kenseth
138; D.Hamlin 139-182;J.McMurray 183-184;
J.Gordon 185-192.
Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Lead,
Laps Led): J.Gordon, 10 times for 71 laps;
D.Hamlin, 2 times for 48 laps; S.Marlin. 5 times
for 16 laps; J.Johnson, 6 times for 12 laps;
Ku.Busch, 2 times for 7 laps;T.Stewart, I time
for 7 laps; C.Mears, I time for 5 laps; K.Kahne,
2 times for 5 laps; J.Green, I time for 3 laps;
M.Kenseth, 3 times for 3 laps; E.Sadler, I time
for 2 laps; J.McMurray, I time for 2 laps;
J.Burton, I time for 2 laps; K.Wallace, I time
for 2 laps; D.Earnhardt Jr., I time for 2 laps;
D.Stremme, I time for I lap; D.Ragan, I time
for I lap; B.Said, I time for I lap; G.Biffle, I
time for I lap; R.Smith, I time for I lap.
Point Standings: I. J.Gordon, 1,521. 2.
J.Burton, 1,318. 3. M.Kenseth, 1,292. 4.
J.Johnson, 1,290. 5. D.Hamlin, 1,189. 6.
T.Stewart, 1,078. 7. J.McMurray, 1,059. 8.
Ky.Busch, 1,054. 9. K.Harvick, 1,052. 10.
Ku.Busch, 1,038.

Aaron's 312

AtTalladega Superspeedway
Talladega,Ala.
Saturday
(Start position in parentheses)
1. (34) Bobby Labonte, Chevrolet, 120 laps,
133.216 mph., $52,725.
2. (37) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 120,
$44,175.
3. (4) Casey Mears, Chevrolet, 120,
$33,775.
4. (7) David Ragan, Ford, 120, $29,075.
5. (23) Kyle Krisiloff, Ford, 120, $40,125.
6. (25) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 120,
$30,200.
7. (20) Juan Pablo Montoya, Dodge, 120,
$28,000.
.8. (5) Ward Burton, Ford, 120, $31,580.
9. (1) Brad Coleman, Chevrolet, 120,
$28,875.
10. (9) Carl Edwards, Ford, 120, $27,825.
I I. (8) Danny OQuinn, Ford, 120, $22,975.
12. (22) Bobby Hamilton Jr., Ford, 120,
$29,155.
13. (6) Clint Bowyer, Chevrolet, 120,
$26,750.
14. (31) Mike Bliss, Dodge, 120, $22,575.
15. (36) Shane Huffman, Chevrolet, 120,
$29,480.
16. (35) Brent Sherman, Chevrolet, 120,
$26,480.
17. (33) J.J.Yeley, Chevrolet, 120, $20,700.
18. (39) Eric McClure, Chevrolet, 120,
$26,;155.
19. (38) Robert Richardson, Chevrolet,
120, $21,925.
20. (19) Aric Almirola, Chevrolet, 120,
$28,275.
21. (24) Kasey Kahne, Dodge, 119,
$25,125.
22. (41) Justin Ashburn, Chevrolet, 118,
$21,775.
23. (II11) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 116,
$25,405.
.24. (I5) David Reutimann,Toyota, accident,
I 110, $24,905.
25. (32) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, accident,
109, $24,905.
26. (28) Steve Wallace, Dodge, accident,
109, $24,605.
27. (14) Reed Sorenson, Dodge, accident,
109, $18,775
28. (27) Stephen Leicht, Ford, accident,
109, $23,175.
29. (26) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet,
transmission, 94, $18,525.
30. (17) Greg Biffle, Ford, accident, 89,
$24,050.
31. (18) Jon Wood, Ford, accident, 89,
$22,975.
32. (2) Dave Blaney, Toyota, 87, $25,250.
33. (30) Mike Wallace, Chevrolet, engine,
74, $22,660.
34. (21) Scott Wimmer, Chevrolet, 71,
$28,125.
35. (3) Jason Leffler,Toyota, 71, $22,940.
36. (10) Jamie McMurray, Ford,
overheating, 59, $18,005.
37. (16) David Gilliland, Ford, accident, 55,
$17,970.
38. (42) Donhie Neuenberger, Ford,
overheating, 34, $19,935.
39. (12) Kyle Busch, Chevrolet, accident,
26, $17,900.
40. (29) Justin Diercks, Chevrolet,
overheating, 17, $19,840.
41. (13) Martin Truex Jr., Chevrolet,
accident, 9, $17,805.
42. (40) Morgan Shepherd, Chevrolet,
handling, 2, $19,770.
Race Statistics
Time of Race: 02 hours, 23 minutes, 46
seconds.
Margin of Victory: 0.052 seconds.
Caution Flags: Eight for 24 laps.
Lead Changes: 36 among 20 drivers.
Lap Leaders: B.Coleman 1-14; D.Ragan 15;
J.Montoya 16-18; C.Edwards 19-20; C.Mears
21-22; TStewart 23-24; C.Mears 25-27;
K.Kahne 28-32; D.Earnhardt Jr. 33; D.Gilliland
34; C.Bowyer 35-37; D.Reutimann 38-39;
C.Edwards 40-42; C.Bowyer 43-46; C.Mears
47; M.Wallace 48-52; C.Mears 53-56;
B.Hamilton Jr. 57; B.Labonte 58; C.Mears 59-
63; S.Wallace 64; C.Mears 65-67; G.Biffle 68;
C.Mears 69-74; D.EarnhardtJr. 75; C.Mears 76-
81;J.Montoya 82-83; C.Edwards 84; K.Harvick


85; A.Almirola 86-87; K.Harvick 88-90;
B.Sherman 91; E.McClure 92; K.Harvick 93-96;
C.Mears 97-118;T.Stewart 119; B.Labonte 120.
Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Lead,
Laps Led): C.Mears, 9 times for 52 laps;
B.Coleman, I time for 14 laps; K.Harvick, 3
times for 8 laps; C.Bowyer, 2 times for 7 laps;
C.Edwards, 3 times for 6 laps; M.Wallace, I
time for 5 laps;JPMontoya, 2 times for 5 laps;
K.Kahne, I time for 5 laps;T.Stewart, 2 times
for 3 laps; A.Almirola, I time for 2 laps;
D.Reutimann, I time for 2 laps; B.Labonte, 2
times for 2 laps; D.Earnhardt Jr., 2 times for 2
laps; D.Gilliland, I time for I lap; E.McClure. I


time for I lap; G.Biffle, I time for I lap;
B.Hamilton Jr., I time for I lap; B.Sherman, I
time for I lap; S.Wallace, I time for I lap;
D.Ragan, I time for I lap.
Point Standings: I. C.Edwards, 1,664. 2.
K.Harvick, 1,231. 3. D.Blaney, 1,168. 4.
D.Reutimann, 1, 130.5. B.Hamilton Jr., 1,052.6.
M.Kenseth, 1,048. 7. D.Ragan, 1,025. 8.
Ky.Busch, 1,016. 9. M.Ambrose, 1,009. 10.
M.Wallace, 994.

SOCCER

MLS games

Saturday's Games
Kansas City I,Toronto FC 0
Columbus I, D.C. United 0
Los Angeles 3, CD Chivas USA I
Sunday's Games
New England I, FC Dallas 0
Chicago I, Houston 0'
Monday's Game
Colorado at Real Salt Lake (n)
Thursday's Game
New England at D.C. United, 7,p.m.
Saturday, May 5
Columbus at Kansas City. I p.m.
New York at Real Salt Lake, 9 p.m.
Houston at Colorado, 9:30 p.m.

HOCKEY

NHL playoffs

CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Buffalo vs. NewYork Rangers
Buffalo 5, N.Y. Rangers 2
Buffalo 3, N.Y. Rangers 2
Sunday
N.Y. Rangers 2, Buffalo I, 20T, Buffalo
leads,series 2-1
Today
Buffalo at N.Y. Rangers, 7 p.m.
Friday
N.Y. Rangers at Buffalo, 7 p.m.

New Jersey vs. Ottawa
Ottawa 5, New Jersey 4
New Jersey 3, Ottawa 2,20T
Monday
Ottawa 2, New Jersey 0, Ottawa leads
series 2-1
Wednesday
New Jersey at Ottawa, 7 p.m.
Saturday
Ottawa at New Jersey, 8 p.m.

WESTERN CONFERENCE
Detroit vs. San Jose
San Jose 2, Detroit 0
Detroit 3, San Jose 2, series tied I-I
Monday
Detroit at San Jose (n)
Wednesday
Detroit at San Jose, 10 p.m.
Saturday
San Jose at Detroit, 2 p.m.

. Anaheim vs.Vancouver
Anaheim 5,Vancouver I
Vancouver 2, Anaheim I, 20T
Sunday
Anaheim 3, Vancouver 2, Anaheim leads
series 2-1
Today
Anaheim at Vancouver, 10 p.m.
Thursday
Vancouver at Anaheim, 9 p.m.


ACROSS 36 Ex
37 Ch
1 "Titanic" 39 Uk


message
4 Drum,
as fingers
7 Thin fog
11 Caribou kin
12 Ostrich
relatives
14 Even once
15 "The Greatest"
16 Poet's
adverb
17 Authentic
18 Evening gown
fabrics
20 Apollo's priestess
22 Put down, slangily
23 TV knob
24 Heaps
27 Like moccasins
30 Opera tune
31 Use a
blowtorch
32 Roofer's gunk
34 Daisy
- Yokum
35 Nozzles


con
Cr
Lot
Ink
Ru
Ra
Vei
Ma
gra
Fal
Str
NO
Ch
Ho
Pil


Spurs' Duncan and


Bowen highlight


All-Defensive team


Associated Press


NEW YORK - Tim
Duncan made his 10th
straight NBA All-Defensive
first team Monday, and San
Antonio teammate Bruce
Bowen was the top
vote-getter in being selected
for the seventh time.
Completing the team were:
Denver Nuggets center
Marcus Camby and guards
Kobe Bryant of the Los
Angeles Lakers and Raja Bell
of the Phoenix Suns.
Bowen, a forward, received
42 votes, six more than
Duncan. Camby, the
Defensive Player of the Year,
was chosen for the first time.
"Honestly, besides winning
a championship, that was the
only other goal I had," said
Camby, who had made the
All-Defensive second team
the last two seasons.
Bryant earned his seventh
selection and Bell his first. -
Duncan is tied with former





Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

I HECKT I


SIBULY


www.jumble.com

TESSMY/
II


Chicago Bull Scottie Pippen
for the 'second most All-
Defensive team selections,
Kareem Abdul-Jabbar is first
with 11.
Bowen and Duncan helped
the Spurs hold opponents to
90.1 points (first in the NBA)
and .433 shooting from the
field (third). San Antonio has
finished in the top five in both
categories in each of
Duncan's 10 seasons.
Camby led the NBA in
blocks per game (3.30) and
was tied for fourth in rebounds
(11.7). Bryant ranked 17th in
steals (1.44). Bell often match-
es up against the opposition's
best offensive player.
The second team was:
Chicago's Ben Wallace and
Kirk Hinrich, New Jersey's
Jason Kidd, Detroit's
Tayshaun Prince and
Minnesota's Kevin Garnett.
Voting was done by the
league's 30 head coaches,
who were not allowed to vote
for their own players.


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Henri Arnold and Mike Argirion


Now arrange the ckicled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


A: HIS TO


Yesterday's I A




otic island
ess pieces
e some
mmunities
ayola choice
uvre hanging
shooters
mples
ucous
rb preceder
ike lace like
inny
rm unit
wrong wind
MW cause
erished
me tel.
ot a ferry

DOWN


1 Vast L


(Answers tomorrow)
fumbles: SHAKY AXIOM BRUTAL NUTRIA
answer: When he was named "watchmaker of the year,"
he became the - MAN OF THE "HOUR"



Answer to Previous Puzzle


RANC ID WHALE

A*NY BlEE^
B|LA REDE EARNED
EARIS PANS 0P1E

GTA B U TEEEIR





AG E ECTIONAL
BU N TRE|E NUDIE
SAT SEED SAD


expanses
2 Mexican pot 8 With, to
3 Mini-play monsieur
4 Racquet game 9 Strong
5 Not quite right fervor
6 Jowly dog 10 Gardner
7 Usher in of mystery


GET MORE in the new "Just Right Crossword Puzzles"
series from Quill Driver. Call 800-605-7176.


13 Clears snow
19 Thought
21 Interstate
24 Tillis or
Dawber
25 Syria
neighbor
26 Place
27 Gambles
28 Coup d'-
29 Broad
valley
31 Making one's
way
33 Disencumber
35 All-terrain
vehicle
36 Night flyers
38 Washed away
39 Oinks
41 Divert
42 Norwegian
monarch
43 Chanel's
nickname
44 Revolve
46 Make
a move
47 Scruggs.of
bluegrass
48 Command to a
dog
51 Royal
pronoun


� 2004 by NEA, Inc.


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421


LIEISEGIAISI


ClE








LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS TUESDAY, MAY 1, 2007


PLAYOFFS* Wizards drop 8 straight at home


Continued From Page 1B
but this one will be
remembered with an asterisk
because of the two missing
All-Stars.
Once again, Antawn
Jamison carried the Wizards,
and once again his team
came close to pulling the
upset
Washington trailed by one


point with less than two
minutes to play, but two doses
of the James-to-Ilgauskas
combination essentially
settled the game. In between
those two baskets, Jamison
had the hard-luck moment of
the series when he
committed a turnover by
dribbling the ball off his left


foot.
Jamison finished with 31
points. Darius Songaila scored
12 of his 16 in the fourth
quarter, and Antonio Daniels
had 13 points and 12 assists for
the Wizards, who lost their last
eight home games - six in the
regular season and two in the
playoffs.


INDIANS: Host Dixie County on May 19


Continued From Page 1B
took over the program in
January when former coach
Mike Hunter stepped down,
and said he quickly gained a
whole new appreciation for the
off-field work that comes with
'the position.
"I'm a stickler for being
prepared and getting things
done well," he said. "And there's
a lot more you have to prepare
for. Ifs the little things like mak-
ing sure players have physical,
that they have equipment You
don't have to worry about those
things as a position coach."
Many of the assistants will


also have new roles to fulfill.
Athletic Director John Wilson
will be the offensive backs
coach; Isiah Phillips will bring
up the wide receivers corps;
Ken Burt will head up the
offensive and defensive lines;
John Griffin moved up from
the junior varsity staff to help
out with the defensive line;
Steve Ward will lead' the
linebackers and act as
defensive coordinator; and
Shea Showers, a former
Gators and Arena Football
League player, will round out
the defensive staff.


Overall, the lineup presents
an interesting mix of age and
experience.
"What I like about the
coaching staff is that we have
some older guys and some
younger guys," Jackson said.
"The older guys have a lot of
experience and the younger
guys bring a lot of energy and
want to learn."
The Indians' intrasquad
Red & Black game is
scheduled for May 11, and
Fort White hosts Dixie County
High on May 19 at 6 p.m. to
wrap up spring practices.


TIGERS: Not slowed by shortened spring


Continued From Page 1B
staff around and asking them
to coach positions they did not
coach last year. We have got
some volunteer-type guys
coming out to help."
Spring begins with the
state-mandated three days in
shorts, then it will be full pads '
on Friday. Columbia's first
scrimmage is scheduled for
May. 8.
The Purple & Gold game is
7 p.m., May 11, preceded by a
scrimmage of the
eighth-graders at 5 p.m. That
will end spring practice for the
middle-school players.
"When the JV coaches finish
with the eighth-graders, we
will assign them positions and


they will work with our
sophomores (to be) who won't
be on the varsity," Green said.
Green said he plans to go
back to dividing into two teams
for the Purple & Gold game.
Another scrimmage is
planned for May 15 and the
spring ends with the classic
game at home against Baker
County High at 7:30 p.m. on
May 18.
Practice for Richardson
Middle School and Lake City
Middle School also begins
today. The two teams, along
with Baker County Middle
School, will play in a spring
jamboree at Tiger Stadium
prior to the varsity classic.


'The big thing in the spring
is can you put a staff together
and can you keep the kids
focused," Green- said. "There
are a lot of activities going on
and you have to be here every
day. Sometimes younger kids
don't understand that."
The streamlined spring,
caused when school started
ending earlier, is plenty of time,
to get the Tigers started in 2007.
"Having only 13 days is not a
major problem" Green said. "I
am glad spring is getting start-
ed. I am ready to get it done
and focus on our summer
situation. It has been a long
five months for me and not a
good offseason situation."


Cardinals try to honor


Hancock by moving on


By CHRIS JENKINS
Associated Press
MILWAUKEE - A day
after the death of Josh
Hancock, the St. Louis
Cardinals tried to move on.
They had a game to play.
But for Scott Spiezio, it was
too much to handle. He told
manager Tony La Russa to
pull him from the starting
lineup Monday night
With Hancock's jersey
hanging in the bullpen and
Milwaukee fans observing a
moment of silence, the
Cardinals went back to work,
trying to focus on the task at
hand.
"It's just one more thing
that we have to deal with that
people don't want to," center
fielder Jim Edmonds said.
"But this really doesn't make
any sense."
The Cardinals will wear
patches with Hancock's
No. 32 on their sleeves for the
rest of the season. Pitcher
Tyler Johnson held one of
Hancock's jerseys during the
national anthem and
outfielder Preston Wilson
draped his arm around
teammate So Taguchi's shoul-
der in the dugout
La Russa did not open the
Cardinals' clubhouse to the
media before the game
against the Brewers. He
warned his players to be
wary of the "insincerity" of
media members who "have
their own agendas."
"The first time I hear
insincerity, man, I'm going to
start swinging this fungo," he
told reporters, resting on a
practice bat
The 29-year-old" Hancock


Hancock
t


Tragic ending for Cards' hurler
Baseball mourns the passing of St. Louis reliever Josh
Hancock, who was killed Sunday in a car accident.
CAREER TOTALS (Red Sox; Phillies; Reds; Cardinals)
2002-2007 W L ERA G IP BB SO
9 7 4.20 102 177.2 59 110
HIGHLIGHTS
>j Member of 2006 World 2003 NLDS against San
Series champion roster Diego
>, Tossed 1 2/3 scoreless > Led all Cardinals relievers
innings in Game 3 of the with 77 innings in 2006


was killed shortly after
midnight Sunday when his
SUV struck the rear of a
flatbed tow truck on a
St. Louis highway. The
Cardinals' scheduled home
game against Chicago on
Sunday night was postponed.
Around the majors,
Hancock was remembered.
Atlanta Braves ace Tim
Hudson pitched Monday night
with the letters "JH" ironed
onto the left chest of his jersey
- Hancock was his former
college teammate at Auburn.
The Marlins and Mets also
held a moment of silence
before their game in New York.
"Obviously, everybody's
grieving and sad about the
loss that we have," Cardinals
pitcher, Chris Carpenter said.
"Josh was a great player, a
great teammate, a great guy
in the clubhouse."
Edmonds and a few others
in the Cardinals' clubhouse
have experience playing
under such difficult circum-
stances. Nearly five years ago,
St Louis pitcher Darryl Kile
was found dead in his Chicago
hotel room. Kile died at 33 of a
coronary artery blockage.
"Those of us who were
here in '02 remember how
difficult it was," La Russa
said. "But I think the best
approach is: There are a lot


of people who aren't in
professional baseball that
suffer family, friends that are
lost, have died or hurt
seriously in an accident That
kind of suffering and sadness
is part of life."
Jeff Suppan, who helped
pitch the Cardinals to the
World 'Series championship
last year, started for the
Brewers. After Spiezio asked
out of the lineup, Skip
Schumaker started in right
field.
Cardinals pitching coach
Dave Duncan said dealing
with Kile's death did not
make it any easier to handle
Hancock's loss.
"I don't think it helps me,"
Duncan said. "Maybe
understanding you will get
through it, it will pass in time.
But it never goes away."
Hancock, who previously
had pitched for Boston and
Philadelphia, joined the
Cardinals in spring training
last season. Cincinnati had
, released him for violating a
weight clause in his contract
"He was trying to prove to
everybody that he could get
back into shape and be a
contributor to this team,"
Edmonds said. "And he
worked really hard, and I
give him a lot of credit for the
things he went through."


C ONGRATUFATEr

.A. 1 aso nf 2007


WALK-I


BATH


Take this opportunity to salute the

Senior Class in this Graduation

Special Section.


Publication Date: Sunday, May 20, 2007


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*Full page *Quarter page

*Half page *Banner ad


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IsIDo'tDeay Dadlie sa ay 1,20


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account executive
today to reserve
your space!


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LAKE CITY REPORTER


ADVICE & COMICS


TUESDAY, MAY 1, 2007


Page Editor: Chris Bednar, 754-0404


ZITS


I


BABY BLUES


BLONDE


FOR BETTER OR WORSE


FRANK & ERNEST


BEETLE BAILEY B.C.


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


GARFIELD


SNUFFY SMITH


CLASSIC PEANUTS


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-April
19): The travel bug may be
biting you. Give in. You
deserve a break, so put some
plans in motion. Love looks
promising so, if you are single,
get out and meet new people
and, if you aren't, make special
plans for two. ***
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): Look at your financial sit-
uation and draw up a plan.
Spend a little on yourself and
you will feel rejuvenated and
ready to conquer the world.
Your relaxed attitude will
attract an interesting
proposal. ***
GEMINI (May 21-June
20): Someone you least
expect will take you by sur-
prise. Don't give in to bullying
or pressure to donate more
than you can afford. Stick to
the things you know and do
well. ***
CANCER (June 21-July
22): You are on top of your
game today and will be able to
manipulate situations to suit
your needs. A unique approach
to something you do well will
attract .interest Don't be afraid
to show your emotions.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Word
Someone is likely to get you all
worked up today. Keep your
distance and refuse to give in
to what everyone else is doing.
Focus on whatever it will take
to get your own ideas off the
ground, not someone else's.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Communication will keep
you in the game today. Use
every trick you know to close
"deals or get what you want
Travel to see someone who
can help you out A face-to-face
conversation will be the selling
feature. ****
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Get in the game and show
everyone how capable you are.
Laziness will not bring results
but taking a new approach will
raise people's interest in what
you are trying to do. There is
money to be made with hard
work, originality and good
business sense. ***
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.
21): Let your feelings be
known. The sooner you lay
your cards on the table, the
quicker you will get results.
Your creative talent will enable


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
CelebOnty Cipher rypjoagrams or, creatd from quotarlors by ornouspeople, past and present,
Each blaT in theo cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: W equals G
"P XSEU JRDESEP DAI. EUZZ KU
LXSE NDR BADL." - "CN AUTUIIPEN,
CN OYDTZPMPEN, SAV CN VUZPWXE,
LU SZZ JRDEU." - YSZOX L.
UK U YI DA
PREVIOUS SOLU IION - "You're gonna lose some baJIgames and you're
gonna win some ballgames and that's about it." - Manager Sparky Anderson
(c) 2007 by NEA, Inc. 5-1


you to grab the attention of
someone who can help you
move forward. Wait to react to
an emotional situation at home.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-
Dec. 21): Someone is watch-
ing over you today, but don't
push your luck. This person
can only do so much to help
you and after that you will be
on your own. Anger will not
become you and taking drastic
measures will work against
you. ***
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. 19): Don't be too quick to
dismiss the possibility of a new
job, direction or even working
for yourself. An opportunity is
apparent and, if you are willing
to do the legwork, you will find
yourself in a very interesting
position. ****
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
18): You can't trust what
someone tells you. Find out for
yourself before you make a
decision regarding your future.
Love is in the stars but you
don't have to spend a lot to
impress someone. *****
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): Put your time and effort
into your surroundings. The
physical and emotional
changes you make at home
will help you move in a positive
direction. Rid yourself of the
people, things and situations
that have caused you grief in
the past ***
Birthday Baby: You are
stubborn, determined and
strong-willed. You are creative,
outgoing and a bit of a risk
taker. You will challenge any-
one who stands in your way
and will help those who offer
the same in return.


DEAR ABBY


Mother-in-law's helpful hands

bring blessings in disguise


DEAR ABBY: I just read
the letter from "Dirty Family
Laundry" (Feb. 24), who
asked you how to stop her
mother-in-law from doing her
laundry. Would you please
ask her to send her mother-
in-law to my house? She'd be
greatly appreciated.
I used to be picky about
how laundry got done and
where the dishes were put
away. But now that I live
1,000 miles from all 'family,
and have a baby and a 3-year-
old to take care of AND
unending chores to do, I
would love the help. -
TIRED IN ILLINOIS
DEAR TIRED: Your sen-
timents were echoed in the
majority of the responses I
received from readers about
that letter. Most of them felt
she should stop "sweating
the small stuff' and be grate-
ful to have a mother-in-law
who is willing to help out any
way she can. Read on:
DEAR ABBY: Not only is
-the writer of that letter "par-
ticular," but also ungrateful.
Life is too short to look for
things to complain about. Let
it go, dear. So what if she
doesn't do the laundry just
right? It can all be replaced,
and sooner or later you will
find whatever item she has
misplaced. It really isn't
worth getting upset about. I
am truly grateful that my
daughter-in-law overlooks
my mistakes and loves me in


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearobby.com
spite of them. - LINDA IN
TEXAS
DEAR ABBY: My moth-
er-in-law used to come to our
house for weekend visits. My
husband and I would work
and come home to a "clean"
kitchen. The only problem
was she couldn't see very
well, and all of the dishes
were still dirty and put in the
wrong cupboards. The stove
and countertops were also
covered with an inch of soap
film. Everything had to be
washed all over again.
After about six of her vis-
its, and grumbling under our
breath after she left, my hus-
band and I decided that this
would become the ritual and
turned it into a treasure hunt
to recapture our kitchen.
My mother-in-law has
since had a stroke that has
left her paralyzed, so she
doesn't visit anymore. What
we wouldn't do to have her
whole again. - WHAT'S
TWO DAYS EVERY NOW
AND THEN?
DEAR ABBY: I have lived
with the same problem for 16


years. My suggestion? Stop
regarding her helpfulness as
criticism.
I used to think it was my
mother-in-law's way of telling
me I wasn't doing my job
properly. Maybe it was.
Maybe it was a control issue.
Or perhaps she only wants to
be helpful. Who cares? Hide
any clothes that need special
attention someplace where
she won't find them. Then
write 100 times on a piece of
paper, "She did the laundry
so I don't have to. Yay!" So
what if her son's Batman
underwear are in his sock
drawer? She'll find them ...
eventually! - TINA IN VIR-
GINIA BEACH
DEAR ABBY: Years ago,
my mother would come to
visit our young, busy family.
She would drag out the iron-
ing board and tackle my
overflowing laundry baskets.
At first I was embarrassed,
then upset. It wasn't until I
realized that Mom felt this
was her contribution to our
family that I got smart and
became thankful. I would
leave a small basket for her
to work on and hide the rest.
Now, whenever I'm stand-
ing over that same ironing
board, I can feel my mom
smiling down and saying,
"Do you want help with
that?" - MISSING MAMA
IN MILFORD, MASS.
N Write Dear Abby at P.O. Box
69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.


DILBERT


3: Uf55IT'S -164/-A---I
-JUST tHAW A HARDP
Trimt TNiNKiN6 14
OF YOUR a..
~ // mANU5CgIPT As >
IN~f ,Lf TYU'
PRjOvF5M
















Bulletin Board


STUDENT PROFILE


CUURKI-tY PHUlU
Victoria Wise
Name: Victoria Wise
School: Columbia City
Elementary
Parents: Jim and
Rebecca Wise
Age: 11
.Grade: 5
Principal: Lana Boone

Clubs and/or
organizations, both in and
out of school, to which
you belong: Broadcast
team, Think Sharp team,
bowling league, softball.


Columbia
High School
* Columbia High School.is
hosting its Senior Awards
Night at 7 p.m. today in the
CHS auditorium. The public is
invited to attend. If any club -or
organization plans to present
an award or scholarship to a
senior, call Pam Green at


What would you like to
do when you complete
your education? "I would
like to be a journalist."

Achievements: Third
place in Tropicana Speech
Contest, honor roll all
through elementary school,
Think Sharp team.

What do you like best
about school? "The thing I
like best about school is
math because it is
challenging yet fun."

Teacher's comments
about student: "Victoria is a
pleasure to have in my
class. Her input into class
discussions always shows
her enthusiasm for learning."

Principal's comments
concerning student:
"Victoria is a very warm and
caring student. She is
extremely conscientious and
dependable - a great role
model for others. We are
very proud to say she
attends CCE."

Student's comment on
being selected for
"Student Focus": "It's an
honor to be chosen to
represent Columbia City
Elementary."


755-8107 to be placed in the
program.
For more information, call
the office of student activities
at 755-8096.
* Columbia High School will
have its academic signing day
at 10 a.m. Wednesday in the
CHS auditorium. The public is
invited to attend. Students who
have earned acceptance for
advanced studies at a college


Fort White FFA has enjoyed a busy year


CuuuKiTaY InuI

Breast Cancer awareness week
Fort White FFA members recenlty participated in 'Breast Cancer
Awareness Week.'


Land evaluation
team competes
The Fort White land
evaluation teams traveled to
Bartow on March 30 to compete
in the state FFA competition.
The members had to determine
soil texture, permeability,
erosion, slope and soil classes.
They also had to apply both
vegetative and mechanical
practices to the respective soil
classes.
The middle school team of
Richard Brown, Justin
Carmichael, Taylor Price and
Stephanie Fisher placed fifth in
the state. The sepior team of
Liz Absher, Whitney Pellerito,
Matt Thomas and Jonathan
Norris placed seventh.
Congratulations to these FFA
members.

'Breast Cancer
Awareness Week'
The Fort White FFA chapters
recently had a "Breast Cancer
Awareness Week" in
conjunction with the Florida
Gateway Pro Rodeo. The
members planned various
activities for the week to
impress upon students at Fort
White the impact this cancer
can have on people.
A special T-shirt was
designed to wear throughout
the week and a walk-a-thon
took place on Friday. Proceeds
from the walk-a-thon and a
picnic table giveaway netted the
chapter $1,250 to be


or university will be honored
for their achievement with a
signing ceremony similar to
athletic signing.
For more information, call
the CHS career center at
755-8107 or the office of
student activities at 755-8096.
* Columbia High School will
have its underclassman
awards night at 7 p.m.
Thursday in the CHS


donated to the breast cancer
awareness campaign.

Fort White FFA
beautifies ballpark
The Fort White Senior FFA
recently planted 15 trees
around the ballfield at Fort
White High School. They chose
trees that were not as common
as winged elms, water
hickories, southern magnolias
and red buds. The trees will
provide shade and color for
baseball seasons to come.

FFA vice president
visits FWHS
On Feb. 24 and 25, Jamie
Spivey, Area II State FFA Vice
President, visited the Fort White
FFA chapter. While there she
spoke with sixth through 12th
grade FFA members about
leadership, goal setting and
making first impressions count.
She stressed to the members to
take advantage of opportunities
afforded them and to set goals,
both long term and short term.
All of the members enjoyed her
program and gained much from
it.

FFA participates in
florida State Fair
Five Fort White FFA
members recently competed in
three livestock shows at the
Florida State Fair. Each of


auditorium. The public is
invited to attend. If any club or
organization plans to present
an award or scholarship to a
underclassman, contact the
office of student activities at
755-8096 to be placed in the
program.
For more information, call
the office of student activities
at 755-8096.


SCHOOL CALENDAR


Today
* Free preschool screening
at Columbia County
Administrative Complex,
Building 2, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.
* Secondary Principals -
Meeting at CCSB Administrative
Complex, Room 207, 10 a.m.
* LCMS -Progress reports
go home.
* Five Points Elementary -
Parent workshop "Building
Better Readers," 7:30 p.m.

* Third grade to Aquatic
Complex.
* Math CIT - Meeting at
CCSB Administrative Complex,
Room 207, 3:30 to 4:45 p.m.
* CCE - Fourth grade field
day, 8:45 to 11 a.m.
* First grade six weeks
awards.
* Niblack Elementary -
Book Bunch Lunch during


students' lunch.

Wednesday
* Free preschool screening
at Columbia County
Administrative Complex,
Building 2, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.
* Elementary Principals -
Meeting at CCSB Administrative
Complex, Room 207, 8:30 a.m.
* LCMS - Team leader
meeting in office conference
room, 8 a.m.
* Summers Elementary -
Team leaders meeting,
2:30 p.m.
* First and second grades
end-of-the-year AR goal party at
Lake City Bowl.
* Niblack Elementary -
Team leaders meeting in media
center.
* Book Bunch Lunch during
students' lunch.
* Five Points Elementary


We are proud of our
School Partners Program

1 Columbia Bank
Banking on a finst name basis
4 LOCATIONS TO SERVE YOU
www.columbiabankflorida.com


VITAL at the VA Medical Center,
10 a.m.
* Retention committee
meetings begin.
* Eastside Elementary -
Grade level meetings, 2:30 p.m.
* CCE - Second grade field
day, 8:45 to 11 a.m.
* Second and third grade six
weeks awards.

Thursday
* Free preschool screening
at Fort White Elementary
School, 3 to 6 p.m.
* FWHS - Department
meetings in conference room,
7:45 a.m.
* FFA banquet in cafeteria.
* CCSB Technology Center,
Powerpoint training, 8:30 to
11:30 a.m.
* CCE - First grade field
day, 8:45 to 11 a.m.


Fourth grade field trip to Lake
City Bowl and Young's Park,
9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
* Fifth grade six weeks
awards.
* Summers Elementary -
Amy Stanton's fifth grade
walking field trip to Farmers
Furniture to practice math by
shopping.
* "Is Your Child Ready for
First Grade?" will be presented
at 6:30 p.m.

* Niblack Elementary -
Book Bunch Lunch during
students' lunch.
* LCMS - Sixth grade
orientation.

Friday
* FWHS - HOSA banquet
at Camp Kulaqua.
* Junior class meets
photographers regarding senior
portraits in cafeteria, 9:15 a.m.


I NORTH FLORIDA

'PHARMACY


347 SW Main Blvd.
Lake City
758-6770


3718 US 90 W
Lake City
755-9300


101 SW Hwy 27
Branford
935-6905


ALSO LOCATED IN MAYO & CHIEFLAND


COURTESY PHOTO

State Fair Live Stock Show
Fort White FFA members (from left) Heath Huesman, Matt
Thomas, Ashley Bishop and Tyler Sistrunk recently participated in
the Florida State Fair Live Stock Show.


these members had to
participate in several activities
throughout the time spent at the
fair. These activities were
keeping an accurate record
book, designing an educational
poster, presenting an illustrated-
talk, participating in a skillathon
and also working in the Ask Me
Booth. These activities were
centered around the topic of
nutrition for livestock.
Allan Fischer participated in
the swine show, while Ashley
Bishop, Heath Huesman, Tyler
Sistrunk and Matthew Thomas
participated in the steer show.
Heath Huesman placed second
overall in steer showmanship
out of 69 total participants.
Each FFA member did an
excellent job while at the fair
and learned many new skills,
while making lifelong friends.

Fort White Middle
FFA recognized
Allen Fischer and Kyle Pillars
along with FFA advisor Jill
Juesman, recently attended a
meeting with the cabinet in
Tallahassee. While in
attendance they were honored
for their FFA chapter, "Fort .
White Middle FFA" as-being:
named top middle school
chapter in the nation for 2006.
This was the third time the Fort
White Middle FFA has earned


this honor.

FFA competes in
district events
The Fort White Middle and
Senior FFA chapters recently
attended the District III FFA
events on Jan. 18 at Hopeful
Baptist Church.
Members from both chapters
participated in parliamentary
procedure and public speaking.
Caitlin Jones participated in
prepared public speaking and
placed second. The middle
school parliamentary procedure
team of Clint Crenshaw, Megan
English, J.C. Peace, Holly
Polhill, Sarah Conners and
Shelby Barton placed first in the
parliamentary procedure
contest. They will compete in
the state contest at the state
FFA convention in Orlando in
June.
The senior chapter team of
Ashley Bishop, Matthew
Thomas, Heath Huesman,
Megan Burleson, Jordan Abbott
and Whitney Pellerito placed
third in the parliamentary
procedure contest.
These FFA members not only
participated in these contests
they also hosted these x . i
contests. There were more than
250 FFA members from around
the area participating in the day
of FFA events.


Count on CAMPUS for
Best-of-Marketlrates

I Call 754-2215 or visit us at
- i 183 SW Bascom Norris Dr.
in Lake City today!

| Li'Cre ' JppfJ., r...^p.I.iD , eql.3p : u F inllor. Lr.. -1a.3 u11 r i r. i.. . a t.. i q. '



SF Florida

wACredit Union
It's where the smart money goes.

583 W Duval St. 386.755.4141 www.flcu.org

FL #EC CCC #EN 211858
E ELECTRIC
OF LAKE CITY, INC.


DAVID CHEATHAM
PRESIDENT
OFFICE: (386) 752-5488 566 SW Arlington Blvd., Ste. 103
FAX: (386) 752-3737 LAKE CITY, FL 32025

MARY T. SLAY
EXCLUSIVE AGENT
Allstate Insurance Company
SLife * Health * Flood
Homes & Mobile Homes
757 W. DUVAL ST., LAKE CITY
(386) 755-6801 * (888) 755-6803







Hwy 90 West Lake City Hwy 19 N.* Chiefland, FL
386-752-0054 352-493-0013
MV 04618 MV 32611



SLAKCE CITY
COMMUNITY COLLEGE

"Your Hometown College"
386.752.1822
www.lakecitycc.edu


LAKE CITY REPORTER SCHOOLS TUESDAY, MAY 1, 2007


Page Editor: Chris Bednar, 754-0404










LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED TUESDAY, MAY 1, 2007

Lake City Reporter




CLASSIFIED


C�M�


offlnubol-


maw


Classified Department: 755-5440


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


C, I


4 lines * 6 days One tunper ad
Rate applies to private individuals selling I
Each additional personal merchandise totalling $500 or
less. Each item must include a price. This is
line $1.00 a non-refundable rate.


4 line minimum'2.55 per line
Add an additional $1.00 per ad for each Wednesday
insertion.


I u


Number of Insertions


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4 lines * 6 days one am nper ad
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personal merchandise totalling $2,500 or I
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Add an additional $1.00 per ad for each
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Wednesday insertion.


Ad is to Appear:
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These deadlines are'subject to change without notice.


You can call us at 755-5440, Monday through Friday
from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their classified ads in per-
son, and some ad categories will require prepayment.
Our office is located at 180 East Duval Street.
You can also fax or email your ad copy to the Reporter.

FAX: 386-752-9400 Please direct your copy to the
Classified Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityreporter.com



Ad Errors- Please read your ad on the first day of
publication. We accept responsibility for only the first
incorrect insertion, and only the charge for the ad
space in error. Please call 755-5440 immediately for
prompt correction and billing adjustments.

Cancellations- Normal advertising deadlines apply for
cancellation.

Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440. Should further informa-
tion be required regarding payments or credit limits, your
call will be transferred to the accounting department.



Advertising copy is subject to approval by the Publisher
who reserves the right to edit, reject, or classify all adver-
tisements under appropriate headings. Copy should be
checked for errors by the advertiser on the first day
of publication. Credit for published errors will be allowed
for the first insertion for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the Publisher shall not be
liable for any omission of advertisements ordered to be
published, nor for any general, special or consequential
damages. Advertising language must comply with
Federal, State or local laws regarding the prohibition of
discrimination in employment, housing and public accom-
modations. Standard abbreviations are acceptable; how-
ever, the first word of each ad may not be abbreviated.


Fiberglass Repair, Transoms,
Floors, Gel Coat & carpets, Motor
service & repair, trailer repair. 17
,yrs. exp. 386-755-0770 or 864-4511

Concrete Work

PARRISH'S CONCRETE
Free Estimates. License & Insured.
Quality Work @ Reasonable prices.
Call 386-752-8223

Painting Service

04514450
Painting Consultant Services
All phases of painting from start
to finish. Over 35 years
experience. Residential,
Commercial, Industrial.
$$ Making Sure The Job Is
Done The Right Way $$

MAHLSTADT PAINTING
& Home Repair
Int & Ext Painting Tile, Drywall,
Fencing, Porches, & Decks
Carpentry work.Wood Replace
Military Discounts
Call Terry
229-415-0126 or 386-755-6928

Home Improvements

General Repairs & Maintenance.
Mobile & Structural Homes.
Personal Quality Service. Insured.
30 yrs exp.Richard 386-961-9030
S&A CARPETS $ CHEAP $
FLOORING INSTALLATION &
REPAIRS 20 YEARS EXP. LIC
AND CERTIFIED 386-344 2859


04514552
K.J. Kelly's Pool Plastering, Inc
& Pool Solutions
* New Pool & Spa Constructions
* Existing Pool/Spa Renovations
* Pebble Finishes
* Patio's & More
386-754-2357
License & Insured

SOUTHLAND REMODELING
Mold Remd. Kitchen/Bath Repairs.
Decks & Screen Rooms. & MORE
Please Call 386-697-3134

Lawn & Landscape Service

Custom Cuts Lawn & Landscape.
Customized lawn care, sod, trim-
. ming, design. Com. & Resd. Lic. &
insured. Call 386-496-2820 Iv msg.
LAWN MAINTENANCE
Full Service, Low Cost. Flexible
hours. Free Estimates. 30 yrs. Exp.
386-344-4508 or 754-8850
TIME TO MULCH
Cypress mulch 5 yard minimum
Delivered & spread or just
delivered. 386-935-6595

Services

FREE CLEANUP.
Pick up of unwanted metals,
tin, scrap vehicles.
386-755-0133 We Recycle.
WE BUY WRECKED OR
JUNK CARS.
WE'LL PICK UP FOR FREE.
CALL 386-344-4727


Its your money. Use it your way.
Are you receiving monthly
payments? Would you prefer
lump sum cash? I can help.
Call Jerry at 386-754-2122

LET ME PHOTOGRAPH, your
next Event or Private Party. With
Nikon Digital Camara, will put
all your pictures on desk for $10
plus gas expense. 386-288-2600

Land Services

04514319
Bulldozer Work! Tractor svc.,
root raking, bush hogging, back
hoe loader, seeding, sodding,
disking, site prep, lawn work &
fill dirt Free Estimate!
Call 755-3890 or (386) 623-3200


Tree Service

HAZARDOUS Tree Trimming,
removal & stump grinding. Senior
discount. 24 hr emergency service
386-590-7798 or 386-963-3360

WE
BUY
TIMBER
386-867-1586 OR 386-623-4393

Electrical Work

NEED ELECTRICAL Repairs?
Make sure it's done right!
Immediateavailability.Free
estimates. Call Russ 386-288-4313


Legal

Dear Customers,
The 2006 Annual Drinking Water Quali-
ty Report for Consolidated Water Works
Inc. Is available for review or pick up at
CWW office @ 207 Se Baxter Lane,
Lake City, FL. This report applies to
Shady Oaks, Azalea Park, 242 Village
and Suwannee Valley water customers.
If you need a copy sent to you
Call: 386-752-6729
Sincerely,
Consolidated Water Works Inc.
04514494
May 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 2007
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CO-
LUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
IN RE: ESTATE OF
EVERETT L. TAYLOR A/K/A
EVERETT L. TAYLOR, JR. A/K/A
EVERETT K. TAYLOR, JR.
Deceased.
FILE NO. 07-79-CP
DIVISION PROBATE
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Ever-
ett L. Taylor a/k/a Everett L. Taylor, Jr.
a/k/a Everett K. Taylor, Jr., deceased,
whose date of death was March 13,
2007, is pending in the Circuit Court for
Columbia County, Florida, Probate Divi-
sion, the addresses of which is PO Box
2069, Lake City, Florida 32055. The
names and address of the personal repre-
sentative and the personal representati-
ve's attorney are set forth below. All
creditors of the decedent and other per-
sons having claims or demands against
decedent's estate on whom a copy of this
notice is required to be served must file
their claims with this court WITHIN
THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER
THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF
A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM. All other creditors of the dece-
dent and other persons having claims or
demands against decedent's estate must
file their claims with this court WITHIN
3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED
WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE
FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITH-
STANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED
TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER
THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this no-
tice is April 24, 2007.
Attorney for Personal Representative:
By:-s- JOHN J. KENDRON
Attorney for A. E. Harris
Robinson, Kennon, & Kendron, P.A.
PO Box 1178
Lake City, FL 32056-1178
Telephone: (386) 755-1334
Personal Representative:
By:-s- A.E. HARRIS
6209 NW 50th Terrace
Bell, Florida 32619
05515523
April 24, 2007
May 1, 2007
PUBLIC AUCTION
1998 FORD ESCORT
VIN# 1FAFP13P6WW288185
in Columbia County
on May 1, 2007 at 12:00 pm
at Joe's Car Lot
1663 E. Duval St.
Lake City, Florida
04514561
May 1, 2006

REPORTER Classifieds

In Print and On Line

www.Ilakecityreporter.com


020 Lost & Found
LOST YORKSHIRE Terrier.
Blonde/gray. Older dog needs meds.
Area of 41 & Scarborough. Missing
Sat. 4/28/07. 386-719-9505
100 Job
100 Opportunities

04 13223
Jameson Inn
Now Hiring
Front desk & maintanence.
Must be dependable, flexible &
friendly. Must pass background
check. Apply in person at
285 SW Commerce Blvd
between 8am - 4pm No calls.

04513561
Mechanic Needed: Large
manufacturing plant looking for an
individual who is experienced in
gas and diesel motors (Caterpillar
and Cummings engines) as well as
hydraulics. Some welding req.
Must have own tools. Experience
in repairing fork lifts a plus. Only
exp. need apply. Competitive
salary. Vacation and Holiday pay
after 6 months. 401k after 1 year.
Apply direct@ Corbitt Manufac-
turing, 854 NW Guerdon Street,
Lake City, Florida 32055 DFW

04514206


SUBSTITUTE & OR
INDEPENDENT CARRIERS
NEEDED
Earn extra income during the,
early morning hours delivering
the Lake City Reporter.
You can be your own boss!
Call: (386)754-0408
If you prefer, Stop by the Lake
City Reporter and fill out a carrier
inquiry form at the front desk.

04514315



NOW HIRING
All Positions
Apply in person at
Cracker Barrel

04514362
Maintenance Technician
for animal feed manufacturing
plant. Position requires electrical,
mechanical and sheet metal
skills. Must be available for shift
work. Available benefits include
medical and dental insurance,
401K, paid vacations, holidays,
pension program and more. Land
O'Lakes Purina Feed LLC is an
Equal Opportunity, Affirmative
Action Employer and enforces a
drug free workforce. Applica-
tions may be obtained at 637 NW
Lake Jeffrey Road, Lake City,
fax resume to 386 755-9357,
e-mail erstewart@landolakes.com

(04514498
Warehouse Assistant - We need
ambitious and responsible
individuals to stock & pull orders,
heavy lifting up to 75 lbs.
Hrs: Noon-6:30 p.m. M-F.
Call 386-269-4409 or
fax resume to 813-283-9127.


100 Opportunities

04514443 !
HAIR STYLIST
Creative Images Hair Salon has
an immediate opening! We offer a
location in the Lake City Mall,
High Walk in Traffic,
Comm. Base Pay, Flexible Days
& Hours, If you have two yrs
min. exp, a strong sense of
professionalism and very strong
social skills call Marina
365-1139 or 758-6850

04514453
REST AREA Attendant P/T posi-
tion available ALL shifts. Apply
in PERSON at CARC, 512 SW
Sisters Welcome Road, lake City.

04514459
NOW HIRING
* Project Manager
* Estimator
* Accounting
* Sales
* Webmaster
Call 386-719-2240
EOE, Drug free Workplace.

04514468


CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
The Lake City Reporter has an
opportunity for an enthusiastic
professional to join our
Advertising Team!
You'll make outbound sales calls
and assist customers. Previous
sales experience helpful. Strong
communication skills and the
ability to thrive in a fast paced
team environment a must.
We'll reward your efforts with
competitive compensation,
excellent benefits and
outstanding opportunities.
Apply to:
Lake City Reporter,
Attn: Advertising Director,
P.O. Box 1709
Lake City, FL 32056
or email
jkennedy@lakecityreporter.com

04514503
CARPENTERS/
PRODUCTION JOBS
We need your work experience.
Business growth opens new jobs.
Proficiency required as a
Trim/Finish Carpenter. Stable
work history. Benefits include:
paid holidays, paid vacations,
family health insurance,
and a 401-K plan.
Some hand tools required.
Please apply in person at:
Hunter Marine on Highway 441
in Alachua, FL.,

04514528
HELP WANTED; Prep cook;
experienced only; Apply in
person. Christian Environment;
Camp Weed and the
Cerveny Conf. Center; 11057
Camp Weed Place,
Live Oak, FL 32060

CDL DRIVER WANTED
Clean Driving record, 2 years
experience driving dump truck
Drug Free 386-497-3131


nnected


Marine/Repairs Home Improvements Services


5 25 , 41ines*6days Otle'llt-perad
private lndivid�als sellingIs...
Each additional Personal merchandise td.tellipil 11. 000 ,.a.._
Rate applies to �D
Each am must Inch, r cc Thl:rs.
line $1.05 non-refundable rate.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED TUESDAY, MAY 1, 2007


100 Job
100 Opportunities
04514582
STYLIST & BABERS
ESTABLISHED SALON
looking for Motivated Stylists &
Barbers. No clients needed Top
guaranteed pay. Commissions &
Bonuses. Immediate openings
Call today at 386-623-7920
Johnsonrl@se.rr.com
(Located in Lake City)

05515520
WAL-STAF PERSONNEL
Now hiring for Clerical &
Industrial positions. Drug screen
& backgrounds req'd for the Lake
City area. 386-755-1991 for appt.

05515566
NOW HIRING
Speedysigns has immediate
job openings and is accepting
applications for multiple positions
Include:
O Graphics Personnel
O Customer Service/Accounting
O Production Personnel
If your looking for a fast
paced fun job with a fast
growing company
Please email your resume to
info@speedysigns.com
Or apply in person at
162 SW Spencer Ct.,
Lake City, FL386-755-2006

05515578
PROJECT MGR. For repair/
remodeling projects.Prior
experience/construction
background.Perm/full time
position. Competitive salary/
incentive/benefits. Lake City
office. Fax resume or apply in
person in our Gainesville office
at 224 NW 8th Ave. or Fax
352-373-0341, ATTN:
Scott Ambrose EOE/DFWP

05515605
FOREMEN to lead utility
contract crews. Outdoor physical
work, many entry-level positions,
$15.50/hr paid training, $20/hr
plus performance bonuses after
promotion, company truck and
benefits. must have strong
leadership skills, a good driving
history and be able to travel
throughout Florida. Email resume
to Recruiter3@(osmose.com
or fax (800) 519-3526.
www.OsmoseUtilities.com
EOE M/F/D/V

A/C SERVICE Tech & Installer
Full time with benefits.
Please call 386-454-4767

Another Way, Inc., seeking
advocates to work in domestic
violence shelter. Starting @ $9-10
p/h FT /PT excellent benefits fax re-
sume: 386-719-2758 no calls please
BLUE JEAN JOB $ CASH $
Seeking sharp go getters, Able to
TRAVEL USA. Demo chemical
products. Good people skills &
enjoy working in a Rock in Roll
evir. Call Kelly 1-800-201-3293.
9-6. Must start immed.
CAREER OPPORTUNITY!
Become a HVAC/Refridgeration
Tech in 30 days. EPA and OSHA
Certifications. Fincial Aid and Job
Placement Assist. available.
CALL 888-510-0015
DRIVER NEEDED
Class A CDL, Clean driving record
with dump trailer exp. Must pass
drug test. 386-719-9482 office.
DUE TO expanded
Service & growth
Yellow Cab Comapny Now hiring
drivers Full and Part Time.
Friendly and Outgoing personality.
Background check and clean MVR.
Call 386-867-1573
ENGINEERING TECHNICIAN
5-10 years experience.
Land development and CAD a plus.
Fax resume to 758-4290
FABULOUS COACH LINES
HIGHLY MOTIVATED
PROFESSIONAL ATTITUDE
FRIENDLY PEOPLE
CDL required. Pax End a plus,
Good driving record Necessary.
Dealing with fun groups on Charter
Trips to Exciting Destinations.
PT/FT $125-$185/day
FabulousCoach.com
Or Call 1-866-352-7295
FLAT BED Drivers
Atlantic Truck Lines
Class A, FL only & home every
night. $700+/wk. Yearly $1,000
safety bonus. 3 yrs. T/T exp., with
f/b exp. Paid vacation. Health/
dental. Call 1-800-577-4723
Monday-Friday
LEAD CARPENTERS & Helpers
' Commercial & Residential
Must have valid D.L. &
transportation. 352-284-8918
386-752-9096


100 iOOpportunities
FT/PT OFFICE POSITION
Must have working knowledge of
gen. acctg and office procedures.
Bondable w/good work ethics.
Apply in person 9 am-noon.
A Bar Sales, Inc, 2128 SW Main
Ste 103 Lake City, FL
Full Time & Part Time Teachers
needed at Green Acres Child Care.
Exp. preferred. Apply in person at
1126 SW Main Blvd
FULL-TIME HELP
Kitchen Cabinet designer, must
have experience with 20/20 design.
Morrells 386-752-3910 ,
Hardworking Individuals Very
busy deli. Apply in Person between
2pm -4pm M- F Skip's Deli South
Main Blvd NO PHONE CALLS
HELP WANTED PT/FT Building
Storage Sheds, Construction exp.
helpful but not necessary Must have
Transportation 758-5525
I need a Flatbed Truck to
haul merchandise from
Lake City to Baldwin.
386-588-4084
INSIDE SALES
Do you have a positive and
energetic demeanor on phone,
excellent listening/writing
skills, and comfortable with
technology? Then Hub Industrial
needs you, please call us today at
386-269-4409.
Johnson & Johnson Transport,
Inc - Fuel delivery driver needed.
Class A CDL required, Tanker
Sun-Thurs. Benefits include: 401K,
Insurance, Uniforms, Vacation,
Home every night. Truck is based
in Lake City. Call after 3:00
1-800-226-5454.
Local Collision Parts Co. seeks
Warehouse person. Exp. preferred.
M-F. Apply in person only,
No Phone Calls Please. 385 SW
Arlington Blvd, Lake City, FL.
Behind Rountree Toyota.
LOCAL COMPANY seeking Ex-
perienced Industrial/Commercial
Electricians 3-5 years experience
preferred, Top Pay & Benefits
Available, Please call
(386) 752-5488 or fax resume to
(386) 752-3737, EEO
Employer/Drug Free Workplace.
Local Mortgage Company
Looking for dependable employee
for entry level office duties. Mon-
Fri, opportunities for advancement.
Willing to train the right individual.
Please fax resume with references to
866-399-0611
LOCAL MORTGAGE LENDER
Looking for Loan Processor for a
fast paced Office. Must have
experience in Loan origination &
Closing. Please fax resume
w/references to 866-399-0611
Local Parts warehouse seeks FT
Collision Part Sales Person. Must
be able to handle a high volume of
calls, make outbound sales calls &
work retail counter. Fast paced envi-
ronment. Auto. exp.a plus. Apply in
person only at 385 SW Arlington
. Blvd. Behind Rountree Toyota.
MACHINE OPERATOR. Copy
finishing, bindery, customer svc.,
PT avail. Fax resume: 755-7373
PRINT-O-MATIC, LC
NEED IMMEDIATELY Full or
part time Accounting assistant with
background in GL Account
Reconciliation. Audit background a
plus. Job cost accounting. Call for
an appt. 386-462-2047 EEOE
NOW HIRING Route drivers
w/exp. Must have a clean driving
record. Local routes. Apply in Per-
son only at 385 SW Arlington Blvd.
Behind Rountree Toyota.
PART-TIME CLIENT Assistant
& Part Time Housekeeper/Dietary
Asst. The plantation Assisted Living
Facility Drug Screen Req. Some
weekend hours. Apply in person:
147 SW Summers Ln. Lake City, FL
DRIVERS & 0/0's - CDL - A:
Top Pay, Excellent Hometime &
Benefits! Must Have 2 yrs.
Recent car hauling exp!
Centurion Auto Transport
800-889-8139
Third Judicial Circuit
COURT ADMINISTRATION
DRUG COURT MANAGER
Salary: $45,303.72/annually
Closing Date: Wednesday,
May 9, 2007
For further information:
www.jud3.flcourts.org
VENDORS WANTED
FOR NEW ANTIQUE MALL.
DOWNTOWN LAKE CITY.
386-466-1979
WELDERS, MACHINIST,
Laborer Grizzly Mfg-
Blue building across from airport on
U.S. 90 East Lake City Drug Free


CORREMCTIONS CORPORATION OfAMERICA
Lake City Correctional Facility is accepting applications for
* ARNP (PT)
* Correctional Officers (FL certified)
* Non-Certified Correctional Officers (must have
passed the Florida Basic Aptitude Test)
* LPN (FT & PT)
* RN (FT & PT)
* Vocational Instructor (Tile Setter)
* Addictions Treatment Counselor
* Maintenance Worker

Apply online at www.correctionscorp.com or in person at:
Lake City Correctional Facility
7906 E. US Hwy 90
Lake City, FL 32055
(386) 755-3379 * (386) 752-7202 (Fax)
EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER M/F/V/D
DRUG FREE WORKPLACE


11 Sales
110 SEmployment

AVON
Only $10 for KIT, Free gift w/ sign
up. Earn 50%! Call: 1-800-275-
9945 pin # 4242(Ind. SalesRep)


120 Medical
Employment

04514335
REGISTERED NURSE
Avalon Health Care Center is
currently accepting applications
for a unit manager.

Competitive Salary and Excellent
benefit package. Interested
applicants please apply in person
or fax resume to attention of
Human Resources:

Avalon Health Care Center
1270 SW Main Blvd.
Lake City, Florida 32025
(386) 752-7900
(386)752-8556 (fax)
EOE

04514343
BAYA POINTE Nursing &
Rehabilitation Center
has the following openings:
Director of Nursing
Dedicated RN needed with at
least three years experience
including management/
supervisory responsibilities in a
skilled nursing environment.
CNA, must have at least
six months experience
Fax resume to 386-752-7337
EOE/DFWP

04514439
Certified Nursing Assistant
Avalon Health Care Center has
the following positions available:

3p.m. - llp.m.
llp.m. - 7a.m.
Applicant must be experienced in
SNF Setting. Competitive,Salary
and Excellent benefit package. In-.
terested applicant please apply in
person or fax resume to attention
of Human Resources:

Avalon Health Care Center
1270 SW Main Blvd.
Lake City, Florida 32025

(386) 752-7900
(386)752-8556 (fax)
EOE


120t Medical
120 Employment

O15515299
C.N.A. NEEDED
Full Time with Benefits
3pm - 11 pm
Call Angela Akins
At 386-362-7860
Or apply at
Suwannee Health Care Center
1620 E Helvenston Street
Live Oak, FL 32064
EOE/D/V/M/F

05515416
CERTIFIED NURSING
ASSISTANTS (CNA)
Northeast Florida State Hospital
(NEFSH), a Governor's Sterling
Award Recipient, in conjunction
with Baker County, is recruiting
Certified Nursing Assistants to
staff a 20-bed, forensic unit for
individuals requiring skilled care.
These are County positions with
County benefits and salary will be
commensurate with experience.
You may apply in person at
NEFSH in Human Resources,
Administration Building #1, at
7487 South State Road 121,
Macclenny, Florida 32063.
Contact Jenelle Holt at
(904) 259-6211 ext 1157.

05515476
C.N.A.'s /RN/LPN
All shifts, Full/Part time
Must be dependable
Great benefits and
work Environment
Call 904-259-4873 and
ask for Sharon or
apply in person to
Macclenny
Nursing and Rehab

05515556
PART TIME
RN for IV IGG infusions. Must
have excellent IV skills. Call
Suwannee Medical Personnel.
386-755-1544. Ask for Martha

05515557
SUWANNEE
MEDICAL PERSONNEL
Home Care is looking for a CNA
to work in the FT. White area.
Must be a Fl. certified CNA
and have 1 year experience.
If interested please call
(386)755-1544, ask for Martha.

LAKE CITY Medical Office is
looking for a CNA full time.
Monday - Friday 8am-5pm
Fax resume to : 386-754-1712


Classified Department: 755-5440


120A Medical
120 Employment

05515558
DIETARY AIDE-Part Time
Flexible Hours
Call Angela Akins
at 386-362-7860
Or apply at
Suwannee Health care Center
1620 E. Helvenston Street
Live Oak, FL 32060
EOE/D/V/M/F

05515560
u GREAT
OPPORTUNITY
RN -HOUSE SUPERVISOR
7P -7A
GREAT SCHEDULE
AND BENEFITS
Suwannee Health Care Center
1620 E. Helevenston St.
Live Oak, FL 32064
Please Contact
Amelia Tompkins/DON
at 386-362-7860

05515561
LPN or RN Needed
7P -7A
With Benefits
Suwannee Health Care Center
1620 E. helevenston St.
Live Oak, FL 32064
Contact Angela Akins or
Amelia Tompkins at
386-362-7860

05515562
LPN or RN Needed
7A -7P
With Benefits
Suwannee Health Care Center
1620 E. Helvenston St.
Live Oak, FL 32064
Contact Angela Akins or
Amelia Tompkins at
386-362-7860

LPN or RN 3PM-11PM
Lake City Cluster
ICF for Developmentally
Disabled Persons.
673 NW Cluster Drive,
386-755-6104
EEO/M/F/D/V

MEDICAL ASSISTANT
Needed Immediately for busy
Lake City Pediatric Office
Fax Resume to 352-331-2992
MEDICAL ASST. (Certified)
Needed for Medical Practice.
In Lake City, Full/Part Time.
Job consist of
Clerical & Medical Duties
Please fax resume to 352-377-0995


magazine

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Make sure you don't miss a single issue

of this exciting new magazine.

Published six times a year,

Currents brings you the best of writing

and photography depicting life in our

area of beautiful, natural North Florida.




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PUBLISHED BY THE


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Name:________________________

Mailing Address:___________________


Phone:


O Check D Credit Card Type:.


Cut here and mail to Currents magazine, c/o Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL 32056
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CALL (386) 755-5445


LET'S GET IT START


T


120t Medical
120 Employment

NOW HIRING
Direct Care Staff. ICF/DD
Taking applications for all shifts.
Must have FL. Driver's License
High School diploma or GED.
Call 386-755-6104 EEO/M/F/D/V

PART-TIME/FULL-TIME
Nurse Practitioner for Internal
Medicine for Rural Health Clinic
in Live Oak. Please send CV to
P 0 Box 38; Live Oak FL 32064 or
Fax: 386-362-6403
Wanted License Massage
Therapist for Chiropratic office.
Please fax resume & current license
to: 386-752-8356


140 Work Wanted

* BUTLER/ESTATE/
HOUSEHOLD MANAGER
24 YRS EXP, LIVE-IN/LIVE-OUT
JOE 386-719-6460 *

05515571
MATURE CHRISTIAN
Caregiver 20 yrs nursing
home exp. Will care for sick or
elderly or newborn day or night.
Call Olive 386-755-3878


190 Mortgage Money

12% RETURN ON
YOUR MONEY! GOOD
MORTGAGES FOR SALE. (NO
BROKERS PLEASE) 100% BUY-
BACK GUARANTEE
CALL STEVE @ 386-365-8549

240 Schools &
240 Education

Want to be a CNA? Don't want to
wait? Express Training Services of
Gainesville is now offering our
quality CNA exam Prep classes.
Day/Eve classes. Class for 1 week,
certification test the next week.
Class size is limited. Next class
05/07/07. Call 386-755-4401


310 Pets & Supplies

10WK OLD Mini Dachshund male,
wormed and shots, $300
386-590-0158

AKC BLACK Lab Puppies $500
Mother CH, FC, NFC, Bloodline
Father CH, Bloodline Blockhead
Ready May 28th Call 386-454-7202


.-, - - - - - - -










LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED TUESDAY, MAY 1, 2007


310 Pets & Supplies

0( 51-1569
AMERICAN PITBULL
TERRIERS
Born January 20, 2007
NKC registered, first shots
& health certificates.
- 3 females - black with white
markings, fawn with white mark-
ings.
-: 1 male - White with black
spots.
Sire is doubled registered
ADBA & NKC.
Call (386)697-4144 or email:
itismybusiness@my way.corn

BOXER PUPPY. 9 weeks old.
1st shots, wormed, tails cut.
AKC Mother on premises. $400.
386-758-3127
Chi-Poo - Pappillion puppies. shots
& papers. Taking deposits. Avail.
6/8/07. $250. ea w/papers. POP.
386-269-3117 Connie
COLLIE PUPS/ sable/white &
tri-color/ m/f / health cert. $400.00
386-208-4336

FREE PUPPY.
10 weeks old. Mixed.
Very nice & playful.
386-754-1791
LYNN'S MOBILE Pet Grooming
Full Groom $25-$35
Van comes to your home.
32 years exp. 386-288-5966
MALE 1 yr old Chihuahua
Blue & tan. CKC registered.
Accessories. $250.00
386-344-7927
RED HEALER puppy.
10 wks old. All shots.
$50 each.
(352)258-3904

401 Antiques
ANTIQUES WANTED
Furniture, China, Silver, Glassware
Collectibles, Costume Jewelry and
Collections. 35 years experience.
Cash Paid. Call Pete. 386-963-2621
"HUGE SALE" Old/damaged in-
ventory, antiques and estate items,
misc items, too much to mention.
Starts Monday 30th April. IMAGE,
behind Red Lobster in Lake City.
386-755-0120

402 Appliances
KITCHEN RANGE
$100.00
386-752-0892

WASHER.
Used, Great condition.
White heavy Duty. $100.00
386-961-8812
WINDOW AIR Conditioner
w/remote control. Like new..
White color. BRRRRR cold $100
386-758-3057

403 Auctions

04513858
Habitat for Humanity
Gainesville Auction AB2561
Starting at 6 p.m. Sat May 5th
Antiques, collectibles, Fine
Jewelry, Furniture & much more
at 1024 S. Main St.
. For consignments & info
call 352-378-8320
www.alachuahabitatauction.com
Barry Hamer AH2451

04514465
PUBLIC CONSIGNMENT
AUCTION:
Vehicles-Tools-Equip-Bldg.
Materials and more.
Sat. May 5, 2007 9:00 am @
4630 SR 238, "Providence"
Lake Butler, FL
Call David King - Auction
Manager@ 386-266-9963 for
rates and to consign your
equipment & vehicles now.
Atkinson Realty and Auction
AB-1141 -AU- 1608
800-756-4098
www.atkinsononline.com


404 Ba~by Items
TODDLER DAY Bed
New light wood, customized
Beautiful $100.00
Call 386-758-8654

408 Furniture
CHEST of Drawers. Dark wood.
Used, nice condition.
$75.00
386-961-8812
LOVE SEAT
Used, very nice condition.
Light color cloth material. $100.00
Call 386-758-3057

416 Sporting Goods
POOL TABLE - Gorgeous Brand
new 8' wood table. Leather pockets,
Italian 1" slate, carved legs. Still in
Crate! Cost $4,500. Sell $1,350:
Can Deliver. 352-264-9799


420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
Payment in advance for standing
pine timber. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-454-1484 or 961-1961.
Need 4 - 15" wheels to fit Jeep
Cherokee or 4-wheels with 2-5/8"
center to center 5 lug pattern.
386-497-3272
WANTED WHOLE Junk Cars.
$100 Each. Free Pick Up
Call 386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648

440 Miscellaneous
25 IBS KERR Mapai Tile
Grout Bags. 10 for $95.00
758-1358 am/
752-3491 8-11 pm
3 WHEEL Handy Cap Cart. Needs
batteries. Electrical work & charger,
in good condition. $50. For parts or
repair. (352)978-0589 ask for Les.
5' PICNIC TABLE
NEW 2X4's only
$40.00 Live Oak
352-978-0589 Ask for Les
BRAND NEW IPOD Shuffle
by apple $99.00
Call 386-758-1358
after 8p, 752-3491
HOT TUB - $1,795. LOADED!
Never used. Waterfall, therapy jets,
LED lights, cupholders, 11Ov
energy efficient. With warranty.
Can deliver 352-376-1600
MOTOR BRAND-NEW 10 HP.
electric 36330 rpm, 220 460 -
3 phrase$300 2006 4-Wheeler $500
386-623-6917
POOL (Sand-N-Sun)
E-Z'set up in Box $100.00
10x30 fills as you go!
386-758-8654
WOOD BLINDS, 4 inside
hinged (panel) wooden Blinds.
(34 1/2" by 8 ") each blind.
$40. 386-754-0691

630 Mobile Homes
6 for Rent
2BR/2BA 14'X70' with large Front
Porch in the Country. $600 mo
w/lst & $800 Security. No Pets.
Call 386-755-1432
IN PARK Mobile Homes for Rent
2BR/2BA, $550 mo, 1st, last, sec.
&Applications required.
386-719-2423
LATE MODEL MOBILE HOMES
Starting $450 month, Beautiful
Pond setting, w/trees. CH/A, Cable
avail. No pets. Call 386-961-0017


MOBILE HOME for Rent.
Kelly's RV Park White Springs.
2/1 $425. plus deposit.
386-397-2616


NEW 16X80 3BR/2BA Very
private 1 acre fenced. No pets, 12
miles S off Branford Hwy. $650/mo
& sec. 386-984-7478 or 935-3737

640 Mobile Homes
0 for Sale

05515368
$500.00 DOWN!
With your Land
2006 Clearance
And New 2007's
PRESTIGE HOMES
3973 Hwy 90 West
Lake City, FL
386-752-7751
1-800-355-9385

1996 HOME OF MERIT DW
1960 sq. ft. 3BR/2BA Large
Kitchen. Must be moved Price neg.
904-275-2925 leave a message
2007 Model Home Clearance.
Making room for 2008's.
Save "BIG" plus get a free
"Concrete Foundation System."
Hurry won't last long.
Gary Hamilton Homes. 758-6755
www.garyhamiltonhomes.com
3 BEDROOM 2 BATH
10% DOWN $595 MONTH
OWNER WILL CONSIDER
FINANCE 386-288-4560
CASH TALKS, I love cash deals,
and will give you the very best price
on New or Used MOBILE HOMES.
I really want your business
386-719-0044
FACTORY DIRECT PRICES
ON MOBILE AND MODULAR
HOMES CALL RICK
386-719-0044
FIRST TIME BUYERS
PROGRAM. $2,500.00 DOWN
AND $650. PER MONTH!
386-288-4560
HANDIMAN SPECIAL...
3 bedroom 2 bath in Deer creek on
huge lot 20% down and ONLY
$490.38 MONTH! SAVE $20,000!
386-365-4774
Own a new manufactured or
MODULAR home for
as littlt as $500 down
386-288-4560
OWNER FINANCE I only finance
people who can NOT GET BANK
FINANCING! example NEW 4
bedroom 2 bath DOUBLEWIDE
home using your paid land as
equity ZERO DOWN and
$789 per month 386-365-8549
WHY RENT? I can sell you a new
quad plex modular home, rent one
side out and LIVE FREE!
386-303-1557


640 Mobile Homes
640 for Sale
REDUCED FOR A LIMITED
TIME...2007 3 bedroom 2 bath
doublewde $500 down $396.58 per
month INCLUDES setup, skirting,
setup, and a/c 386-365-4774
SALE Sale SALE! New double-
wide 4 bedroom 2 bath $2,500
down and ONLY $493.77 per
month! includes SETUP, central a/c
STEPS skirting SALES TAX tag
TITLE and CLOSING COST!
386-365-4774

650 Mobile Home
650 &Land
!!OWNER FINANCE!!
1989 DW 3BR/2BA on 0.4 acres.
798 Double Run Rd. $69,500.
Call 386-867-0048
2BR/1BA EXCELLENT, NEW
APPLIANCES CONDITION.
WITH 1 ACRE. LAND. NEAR
FORT WHITE. 386-497-3637
3/2 DW A/C on 1.5 acre lot
Will sell or Lease
in Worthington Springs
Call 386-466-1104
$0 DOWN LAND HOME
PACKAGE. If you want a new
home and have ok credit 5.875%
FIXED RATE w.a.c. 386-303-1557
MOVE IN FAST!
New Modular 3 bedroom 2 bath
Home on land. 20% down and only
$836.51 month. 386-288-4560
4BR/2BA NEW-DW on 6.3 acres.
Convenient to Nashville & local
schools. Scenic view of nature and
Johnny Cash Old farm house. $185k
OBO MUST SEE erh40(@aol.com
Please call 931-670-5469
LIKE NEW 4/2 DWMH, South of
town on Tustenuggee. Sits on 1
acre. Please call 386-754-8436.
Owner financing available.

710 in Unfurnished Apt.
7 For Rent

! 2 AND 3 BR SPECIAL!
$150 OFF 1ST MONTH'S RENT.
WINDSONG APARTMENTS
386-758-8455
Immediate Openings 1 & 2 BR.
Convenient Location. Near VA
Hospital. Call for price and details.
386-755-2423
Townhouse Apt. 2BR/1.5BA.
Spacious 2 story townhouse on
McFarlane Ave. $750 mo,
plus $400 dep. 752-7781 /397-5880
X-CLEAN 2/1, Hardwood floors,
carport, utility room, off McFarlane.
$500 mo. 1st, Last, Dep..
386-961-9181


73n Unfurnished
7 . Home For Rent


$346/MO! 4BR Hud!
5% down 20 years at 8%APR.
For listings
800-366-9783 ext F388
2BR/1BA HOUSE.
NW Georiga Ave AC/HEAT
$400/mo. 1st, last & sec. deposit.
$1200 to move in. 954-804-4842
2BR/2BA REMODELED, New
applicances/carpet. $700/mo 1st,
last & damage. References. No pets
Private in country 386-497-3016
3BR/2BA BRICK on 6 acres in
Oakhaven S/D $1,500 per mo.
plus sec. w/ 1 yr. lease.
386-755-3155
3BR/2BA Like New Brick Home.
Close to town. $1200 per mo.
Reference & deposit required.
386-758-9275
5 BR! Only $199/mo!
,5% down. 20 years at 8% APR.
For listings call
800-366-9783 ext 9478
BEAUTIFUL LOG HOME
FOR RENT
CALL 386-397-5222


GOLF COURSE HOME Newly
Rem 3br/2.5ba, with den, garage.
Lease req. $1700/mo 1st, last & sec.
386-754-7233 or 904-339-3776
HOUSE FOR Rent 3BR/2BA full
LR, full DR, and Den. 2 Car garage.
$1200/mo Call after 4:30 Weekdays
anytime weekends 386-365-4755
LARGE COUNTRY 4BR/2BA,
CH/A fenced yard, storage
buildings, some pasture. Providence
area. $900/mo 386-496-2354
NEW 3-BEDRM, 2 bath home in
subdivision for rent; 1 acre
yard/modem suburban comfort
$925/mo. 352-363-0589 June 1
NICE 2BR/1BA HOME CH/A
Five miles South of Lake City,
NO PETS. $500 deposit $600/mo
Please call 386-867-1833

750 Business &
Office Rentals
2 RETAIL Spaces for rent.
High traffic area.
Next to Winn Dixie. 780 sq ft or
900 sq ft. 800-342-0135
FOR RENT: Commercial Office
1500sq. ft. Heated/cool. at 838 SW
Hwy 247. $1500/mo Call John at
386-752-7521 or 386-365-7870
Ideal for Doctors & Accountants.
Between 900-1,000 sq ft.
$750 mo + tax.
Call 386-752-9626


790 Vacation Rentals

Horseshoe Beach Gulf Front
2BR House very well decorated w/
Ig waterfront porch, dock, & fish
sink. Avail weekends. $395. or
weekly $895. (352)498-5986 or
386-235-3633


805 Lots for Sale

04513842
MOTIVATED SELLER
Asking $65,000 for .73 ac. in For-
est Country S/D. 386-752-9095
FORT WHITE
12+/- 12 acres Buildable lot.
Reduced to $95,000.
Motivated Seller (561)346-1472
SUBDIVISION FOR SALE.
32-1/2 acres sites. LLC, SRWMD,
Plat approved, and streets named.
2 miles from Wal-Greens
Appt only. 386-288-4193


810 Home for Sale

$346/MO! 4BR Hud!
5% down 20 years at 8%APR.
For listings
800-366-9783 ext H411

05515347
Logged Homes
Starting at
$65,500.00
PRESTIGE HOMES
3973 Hwy 90 West
Lake City, FL
386-752-7751
1-800-355-9385

05515366
$500.00 DOWN!
With your Land
2006 Clearance
And New 2007's
PRESTIGE HOMES
3973 Hwy 90 West
Lake City, FL
386-752-7751
1-800-355-9385

05515367

!!WOW!!
2007 3BR/2BA
Delivery & Set up included
$39,995.
PRESTIGE HOMES
3973 Hwy 90 West
Lake City, FL
386-752-7751
1-800-355-9385

3/2 Split plan. 1628 sq ft. or 2/2
w/efficiency apt. All remodeled.
One block from Lake $152,900.
559 Gwen Lake Ave. 386-961-8947
NEW CUSTOM BUILT HOMES
900 TO 4,000 SQUARE FEET
SINGLE OR 2 STORY
$2,500.00 DOWN! 386-303-1557
3BR/1.5BA HOUSE on 1 acre.
Totally remodeled. Nice neighbor-
hood. $109,900 Owner Financing
possible. Call Bruce 386-965-3470
3br/2ba Country Club S/D. Close
to school. Family rm w/ fireplace,
sprinkler system, tile/carpet. Storm
wdws. $140, 000.00. 386-965-9932


810 Home for Sale

3BR/3BA 2200 sq ft .5 acre
Excellent Cond. screened in-ground
pool. 2 car garage detached
workshop. $249K 352-359-6604

4BR/2BA BRICK-HOME
1600 sq ft Partially Remodeled, on
1 acre. Appraised at $141,000
asking $124,500 Owner Financing
Call Bruce 386-965-3470

5BR HOME!
Only $22,500!
Bank foreclosures available now,
for listings 800-366-9783 ext 5736
BANK FORECLOSURE!
3BR/2BA! Only $15,200!
Must Sell, for listings
800-366-9783 ext 7921

COTTAGE ON 1/2 acre Fenced on
3 sides. 1200 sq ft Heart Pine floors!
3/1 easily 3/2 w/o addition qualified
buyers only! $64,700 386-867-1571

82O Farms &
2O Acreage

05515586
Emanuel CO., GA
48 AC - $2,425/AC
Pond sites, hardwood
bottoms, mature
pine, fronts on two
Co. roads
404-362-8244
St. Regis Paper Co.
www.stregispaper.com

158 1/2 Ac., MOL 15 mi. N of Lake
City on US 441, well drained, with
frontage, hardwoods, pasture,
25 ac. planted pines. REDUCED
$5,365/AC. Terms possible.
386-466-5741/386-752-7694

ACREAGE. 4 to 20 acre lots.
Owner financing. Low down
payment. Deas Bullard/BKL
Properties. 386-752-4339.
.www.landnfl.comn

For Sale By Owner with Financing.
4 ac. with lots of trees. 10 miles
west of town. $55,000.
386-935-2301

North Florida
10-350 Acres, paved road
Starting @$6200 per acre
w/Owner financing
386-752-5035 Ext. 1510
A Bar Sales Inc. 7 days 7 - 7
Owner Financing 5 acres
Tustenuggee Hills Subdivision.
10 min. from Lake City.
Off Tustenuggee Rd. Dry, Cleared
& Fenced 386-454-7170


940 Trucks
1966 CHEVY Step side w/ spare
truck for parts. Frame restored many
extras 283,327,350 Everything goes
$3000 386-755-2261
1995 S-10 Chevrolet, 5 speed,
4 cyl., Red color, $1,500 OBO.
386-755-9897 if no
answer leave message.
CHEVROLET S-10. '02, Chrome,
Diamond Plate tool Box,
Clean! Clean! Clean! Asking.
$8,500. Call to SEE! (386)365-7433

950 Cars for Sale
1994 HONDA Civic,
4 door, 5 speed, A/C
Good cond. 120k mi.
$2,800 OBO. 386-344-1402
1995 CADILLAC Concourse.
Blue w/ new vinyl roof. 103K mi.
Excellent cond. Well maintained.
$5000. 386-755-4352 or 365-3583
97 HONDA Civic. $700.
Police Impounds/Repos!
For listings
1-800-366-9813 Ext. A834
CARS FROM $500.00!
Police Impounds available now,
for listings
800-366-9813 ext A760
� SUNBELT � SUNBELT �
H Come for the Savings H
0 Stay for the Service 0
N See JC. Presley, N
D Sunbelt Honda D
A 755-6500 A
1-877-619-2796 Main Blvd.
,.- SUNBELT � SUNBELT *
LOOKING TO REPAIR CREDIT
Get Financed! Get the
Car or Truck you DESERVE!
Call 386-365-RIDE
NEED A RIDE? Tired of
Bumming a RIDE from friends?
Want a RIDE of your own that you
can afford? Call 386-365-RIDE

951 Recreational
5 . Vehicles
34 FT Jayco Park Mobile Camper
27 ft Slide out/vinyl side
screen porch/new air $4500
Scan deliver 386-755-2261

952 Vans & Sport
SUtil. Vehicles
1968 VW Bus. New tires,'
carberator,fuel pump,drag link,
tie rods,brakes.$3,200 OBO.
386-965-1700
1988 FORD Aerostar Eddie Bauer
Runs Good new transmission.
$1050 OBO
386-755-2261


"Affordable Quality" Phone (386) 497-1419
Licensed & Insured Toll Free (866) 9LW-ROOF
Free Estimates CCO067442


ADVERTISE IT HERE!

Bring the picture in or we will take it for you!
Advertise your car, truck, motorcycle, recreation vehicle or boat here for 10 consecutive days.
If your vehicle does not sell within those 10 days, for an additional $10 you can place your ad for
an additional 10 days. A picture will run everyday with a description of your vehicle. The price of the
vehicle must be listed in the ad. Your ad must be prepaid with cash, check or credit card.
Just include a snapshot or bring your vehicle by and we will take the picture for you. Private party only!


1993 Dodge Dakota
Club Cab, Long Wheel Base
$2,500 OBo
145K, PR steering & brakes,
cold air, elec. door locks &
windows, bed liner, new front
tires, alloy wheels
Call
386-755-4580


1997-19ft.Wellcraft
s8,500 O.B.O.
115hp Johnson motor,
drive-on trailer, Bimini top,
depth finder, VHF radio,
exc. cond. Must see.
Call
386-755-3667






1986 Cadillac DeVille
S1,000
V8, new tires,
A/C
Call
386-752-1728


Advertise

Now

for only

$3o00


per day
(10 day minimum)






1998 25' Nomad Trailer
'8,875
Slideout extension, elect, brakes,
hitch levelers, rollout awning
w/full screen room, app.,
clean, sleeps 6.
Call
386-752-0168


For ou!�Cal. 75-50 Tdc0


iFor More Deta ~~ i F 91iiU~dFIis Call Mary or Iic
at38-75-440 r75-441


Classified Department: 755-5440




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UF00028308_00453.mets
METS:structMap STRUCT1 mixed
METS:div DMDID ORDER 0 main
D1 Main
P1 page Page
METS:fptr FILEID
P2
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P11 11
P12 12
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P18 18
METS:behaviorSec VIEWS Options available to the user for viewing this item
METS:behavior VIEW1 STRUCTID Default View
METS:mechanism Viewer zoomable JPEG2000s Procedure xlink:type simple xlink:title JP2_Viewer()
VIEW2 Alternate
JPEGs JPEG_Viewer()
VIEW3
Related image viewer shows thumbnails each Related_Image_Viewer()
INTERFACES Banners or interfaces which resource can appear under
INT1 Interface
UFDC_Interface_Loader