Citation
Lake City reporter

Material Information

Title:
Lake City reporter
Creator:
Lake City reporter
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2007
Language:
English

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates:
30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Community Newspapers Inc., Todd Wilson - Publisher. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
LTUF ( ABZ6316 )
OCLC ( 33283560 )
AlephBibNum ( 000358016 )

Full Text




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000015 061607 ****3-DIGIT 32
LIBRARY OF FL HISTORY
PO BOX 117007
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-7007


Lake


Tuesday, March 20, 2007


City


*1


Liver Splitting
New technique allows
donors to share more life
with needy recipients.
Health, 8A


Reporter


www.lakecityreporter.com


Vol. 133, No. 52 E 50 cents


Feds quiet

about raid

on clinics
Three medical facilities in
the region were raided
on March 7.
By TROY ROBERTS
troberts@lakecityreporter.com
Federal investigators have yet to
release the details of an investigation
that resulted in a raid of two local clin-
ics and a hospital almost two weeks
ago.
On March 7, agents with the Federal
Bureau of Investigation, U.S. Attorney's
Office and Florida Department of Law.
Enforcement used a search warrant to
enter the Quality. First Care clinic on
West Duval Street in Lake City.
The facility is owned and operated by
HC Healthcare Inc.
Agents also raided Trinity
Community Hospital in Jasper, a HC
Healthcare Inc. operated facility, that
same day, and a clinic in Live Oak.
Alan Sprawles, spokesman for the
U.S. Attorney's Office, said the agency
had no comment about the raids.
On March 7, agents in uniform and
plain clothes entered the Quality First
Care clinic in Lake City, carrying in
cardboard boxes, as a dozen unmarked
vehicles with heavily tinted windows
filled the parking lot.
It was unclear if the agents removed
anything from the clinic or what they
were looking for.
A deputy with the Columbia County
Sheriff's Office was posted outside to
tell potential patients that the clinic was
closed for the day.
A hand-written sign posted outside
the door read "Closed."


AG Gonzales

hangs on to

job for now

Future rocky, uncertain
for Justice Department's
highest-ranking official.
By LAURIE KELLMAN
Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Attorney General
Alberto Gonzales' hold on his job grew
more uncertain
Monday as the
Senate debated
removing his authori-
ty to unilaterally
name U.S. attorneys
and the White House
said it merely hoped
he would survive the Gonzales
tumult.
Asked if Gonzales had contained the
AG continued on 7A


"The American
people have lost
confidence in
President Bush's
plan for war
without end'."
- Nancy Pelosi
Speaker of the House


WAR IN IRAQ:
FOUR-YEAR
ANNIVERSARY


"There will be
good days, and
there will be bad
days ahead as
the security
plan unfolds:'
- George W. Bush
President of the United States


Fighting at home


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Participants dressed up as political leaders march in an anti-war demonstration through downtown Seattle streets
on Monday. The protest marked the fourth anniversary of U.S. involvement in the war in Iraq.


Bush, Congress battle


as war marks four years


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Iraq War supporter Steve Primavera
holds his sign in response to Iraq
war protesters in Montgomery, Ala.,
Monday.


House is set to vote
this week on a war
spending bill.
By JENNIFER LOVEN
Associated Press
WASHINGTON - On the
fourth anniversary of the Iraq
war, President Bush and
Congress' Democratic leaders
clashed over whether lawmakers
should move to bring U.S. troops
home - and whether they can.
With the House set to vote this
week on a war spending bill that
would effectively withdraw U.S.
combat troops by next fall, Bush
made clear he doesn't think it's
lawmakers' place to challenge his
battle plan.
'They have a responsibility to


ensure that this bill provides the
funds and the flexibility that our
troops need to accomplish their
mission," the president said in
remarks televised from the White
House. '"They have a responsibili-
ty to pass a clean bill that does not
use funding for our troops as
leverage to get special interest
spending for their districts. And
they have a responsibility to get
this bill to my desk without
strings and without delay."
Democrats countered that vot-
ers had put them in control of
Congress to challenge Bush.
"The American people have lost
confidence in President Bush's
plan for a war without end in
Iraq," House Speaker Nancy
Pelosi said. "That failed approach
IRAQ continued on 7A


Storm

drainage

utility

pursued

City will look into
stormwater utility
rate study.
By JOHNNA PINHOLSTER
jpinholster@lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City City Council
authorized the Jones
Edmunds Company to begin
two phases of development of
a stormwater utility during its
regular meeting Monday
night.
The contract will allow
Jones Edmunds and Burton
and Associates, both of
Jacksonville, to begin develop-
ing an ordinance for Lake City
pertaining . to stormwater
development and begin con-
ducting a rate study.
City Manager David Kraus
said the city needs a stormwa-
ter utility.
'"The stormwater develop-
ment project is about pollution
prevention," Kraus said.
The rate study will be man-
aged by Mike Burton of
Burton and Associates.
Burton said the purpose of
the rate study is to identify
random residential and com-
.mercial lots that will be used
to set the rates for the rest of
the community. This property
Burton said, is known as an
equivalent residential unit, or
ERU.
James McLellan from Jones
Edmunds said developing the
ordinance can take up to 30
days and the rate study can
take 60 days, but can be done
simultaneously.
McLellan said the other
phases of the project will
include a capital improve-
ments plan and a community
outreach program. The capital
improvements plan is an
overview of the cost estimates
of the projects the council
might want to address within
the next 10 years.
The purpose of the commu-
nity outreach program,
McLellan said, is to make res-
idents aware of what they are
paying for before the bill
comes in the mail.
Burton said a monthly
stormwater utility fee can
range from $2 to $15 per
household.
The approved projects will
cost more than $50,000. The
money comes from previously
allotted funds for stormwater
projects in the City Council
CITY continued on 7A


Former New
York residents
who've moved
to Columbia
County enjoy
dessert at last
year's New
York Day. This
year's New
York Day will
take place from
12:30-4 p.m.
Saturday at
- Tucker's Fine
Dining.


COURTESY PHOTO


New York Day event planned


Fifth annual event set
for Saturday at Tucker's
in Lake City.
By TONY BRmTT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
Local residents who've migrated
south from the Empire State will get
to celebrate their New York roots
during the Fifth Annual New York
Day this weekend.
. The local New York Day celebra-


If You Go
* New York Day is planned for
12:30 p.m.-4 p.m., Saturday at
Tucker's Restaurant, Lake City.
*Tickets are $15 each.
tion will take place from 12:30-4 p.m.
Saturday at Tucker's Fine Dining,
212 N. Marion Ave. (Blanche Hotel).
The cost is $15 per person for
menu items, which includes tax, tip


and entertainment.
Vern Lloyd and his wife Maureen
Lloyd left New York in 1987 and
have been in Columbia County for
17 years. For the past five years,
they've played a lead role in organiz-
ing the event.
"It's a social event - a get togeth-
er for people who at one time lived
in New York or either they were a
native," he said. "It's basically a
social get together and there's going
NEW YORK continued on 7A


CALLUS: INSIDE
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LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING TUESDAY, MARCH 20, 2007


Sunday:
15-16-28-33-34


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS


Leavell donates easement to state


ATLANTA - Rolling Stones
keyboardist Chuck Leavell has donated
nearly 300 acres of his middle Georgia
hunting preserve to the state as a
conservation easement.
Leavell, a noted conservationist, is
among the first residents to take
advantage of a new land conservation tax
credit. He said he hoped others would
follow his lead to protect more of
Georgia's open space.
"We all know that Chinese proverb
that every journey begins with a single
step," he said Monday at a press


Burke feels
no pressure
NEW YORK - Cheryl
Burke, two-time champion
on ABC's "Dancing With
the Stars," says she doesn't
feel any pressure to bring
home another disco-ball
trophy as the fourth season
premiered Monday.
Burke, who won with
celebrity partners Drew
Lachey and Emmitt Smith,
tells People magazine's Web
site: "I don't think it's
pressure. Even after coming
in last season after winning
with Drew in the second
season, it wasn't about, 'Oh,


conference with Gov. Sonny Perdue. "We
are so fortunate in this state to have such
beautiful land."
Landowners who place a conservation
easement on their property give up the
right to develop the land.
Perdue signed a law last April
allowing private landowners and
corporations to get income tax credits
for preserving undeveloped property.
There are six applicants so far. Rules
governing the program were finalized
in December, so officials expect more
to apply.


I have to win again."'
"It's about who I'm
dancing with and making
my partner the best dancer
he can possibly be," the
22-year-old professional
dancer says.
Her new partner is
"Beverly Hills, 90210" star
Ian Ziering. Burke says
Ziering is a fast learner who
is quick with choreography,
but gets frustrated because
he's a perfectionist.
"He can be really hard on
himself," she says. "So I tell
him, 'Deep breath and let's
try again."'
Other celebrities
appearing on the show:
Apolo Anton Ohno, Laila Ali,


Celebrity Birthdays


* Actor Hal Linden is 76.
* Singer Jerry Reed is 70.
* Former Canadian prime
minister Brian Mulr6ney is 68.
* Country singer Don
Edwards is 68.
* TV producer Paul Junger
Witt is 64.
* Country singer-musician
Ranger Doug (Riders in the
Sky) is 61.
* Hockey Hall-of-Famer
Bobby Orr is 59.
* Blues singer-musician
Marcia Ball is 58.


Chuck Leavell


Clyde Drexler, John
Ratzenberger, Heather Mills,
Billy Ray Cyrus, Joey
Fatone, Shandi Finnessey,
Leeza Gibbons and Paulina
Porizkova.

Campbell begins
community service
NEW YORK - Naomi
Campbell is known for her
fashion poses on the
catwalk, not her cleaning
skills. But the supermodel
reported to a Department of
Sanitation garage Monday,
where she was expected to
push a broom or mop, as
she began her community


service for
throwing a
cell phone
at her maid
over a pair
of missing
jeans.
Campbell Unlike
singer Boy
George, who served a
similar community service
sentence in full view of TV
cameras, the sentencing
judge allowed Campbell, 36,
to be assigned to work
indoors. The judge also
granted Campbell's request
to delay her service until
after several fashion shows.

* Associated Press


Thought for Today


* Actor William Hurt is 57.
* Rock musician Jimmie
Vaughan is 56.
* Country musician Jimmy
Seales (Shenandoah) is 53.
* Movie director Spike Lee
is 50.
* Actress Theresa Russell
is 50.
* Actress Vanessa Bell
Calloway is 50.
* Actress Holly Hunter is
49.
U Rock singer Chester
'Bennington (Linkin Park) isSi..


"Spring has no language but a
cry."

- Thomas Wolfe,
American author (1900-1938)


AROUND FLORIDA


Plane crashes onto
highway, no injuries
LEESBURG - A
home-built experimental
aircraft crashed onto a
highway shortly after takeoff
and was hit by an oncoming
car Monday. Officials said no
one was injured.
The single-engine plane
took off from Leesburg
International Airport and
crashed onto U.S. Highway
441 about 11 a.m. After the
plane hit the ground, it was
struck by a car in the
southbound lane, authorities
reported.
Identifies of the pilots and
driver have not been
released, the Orlando
Sentinel reported.
Several men helped carry
the plane off the road. Traffic
on the heavily traveled road
was briefly stopped, but
reopened within a half-hour.

Student, police
clash on records
TAMPA - The college
student who was thrown in
jail after a reporting a rape is
clashing with police over
access to records, according
to a lawsuit.
In a lawsuit filed last week,
the 21-year-old woman said
police have stopped
investigating the rape
because they do not believe
her story. The woman has
requested access to the case
file, according to the St.
Petersburg Times.
Tampa police spokes-
woman Laura McElroy said
the case is not closed.
McElroy said the woman and
her attorney ended an
interview when a detective
asked about inconsistencies
in her story.
'We absolutely never
accused the victim of
fabricating the sexual
battery," McElroy said. "It's
discouraging to the
detectives because it
obviously makes this a more
difficult investigation without
the help of the victim."


The premed student said
she was raped while walking
alone in downtown Tampa on
Jan. 27. Officers investigating
the rape arrested her on an
outstanding warrant and held
in jail for two days, creating a
controversy that led to public
apologies from police and
Tampa Mayor Pam lorio.

Three men plead no
contest to hazing
TALLAHASSEE - Three
Florida A&M University
fraternity brothers pleaded
no contest Monday to lesser
charges after juries had been
unable to agree on a felony
hazing charge after they were
tried together twice.
The two juries were unable
to reach a verdict on whether
Brian Bowman, 23, of
Oakland, Calif., Cory.Gray,
23, of Montgomery, Ala., and
Marcus Hughes, 21, of Fort
Lauderdale, were guilty of
felony hazing in the beating
of a prospective member with
wooden canes. Circuit Judge
Kathleen Dekker sentenced
the three men to a year of
probation including 30 days
in the Leon County sheriff's
work camp after accepting
their pleas to misdemeanor
hazing.
Two other Kappa Alpha Psi
members were convicted in
December and each has been
sentenced to two years in
state prison. Both are
appealing.
A doctor performed
surgery on the buttocks of
the victim, Marcus Jones, 20,
of Decatur, Ga., after he had
been beaten with canes
during secret initiation rites
last year. Jones also was
punched in the head and
suffered a broken ear drum.

Elderly woman lives
after being shot
ORLANDO - An
88-year-old woman was
recovering in a hospital after
being shot five times
Monday morning while she


Jolie to get visa for her

adopted son, Pax Thien


Associated Press
HANOI, Vietnam -
Angelina Jolie arrived in
Hanoi on Monday to com-
plete the procedures
necessary to take her adopt-
ed son Pax Thien Jolie to his
new home in the United
States.
The- 31-year-old actress
dodged reporters on her way
from the airport after flying
from Ho Chi Minh City,
where she adopted the
newest member of her family
at an orphanage on the out-
skirts of the city last week.
Jolie was expected to meet
with U.S. Embassy officials
Tuesday to apply for a visa
for 3-year-old Pax. Once the
visa is issued, she can take


Lake City
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ..........(386) 752-1293
Fax number ..............752-9400
Circulation ..................755-5445
Online ...... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is published
Tuesday through Sunday at 180 E. Duval St.,
Lake City, Fla. 32055. Periodical postage paid
at Lake City, Ra. Member Audit Bureau of
Circulation and The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake City
Reporter. Reproduction in whole or in part is
forbidden without the permission of the pub-
lisher. U.S. Postal Service No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to
Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City,
Fla. 32056.
Publisher Michael Leonard ... .754-0418
(mleonard@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
If you have a news tip, call any member of the
news staff or 752-5295.
Editor Todd Wilson ..........754-0428
(twilson@ lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Jim Kennedy ........754-0417
(ads @ lakecityreporter.com)


him to the

States. She
was expect-
ed to leave
Hanoi on
EiWednesday.
Jolie Jolie' s
oldest
child, 5-year-old Maddox,
who was adopted from
Cambodia, came with her to
Vietnam. She also has two
daughters: Zahara, 2, who
was adopted from Ethiopia,
and 9-month-old, Shiloh, who
was born to Jolie and her
partner, Brad Pitt, in May.
Ever since she was young
she has wanted to adopt chil-
dren, Jolie said in an inter-
view published Friday in a
Vietnamese newspaper.


Reporter
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.
BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon .......754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m. Tuesday
through Saturday, and by 7:30 a.m. on
Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any prob-
lems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should call
before 10:30 a.m. to report a service error for
same day re-delivery. After 10:30 a.m., next
day re-delivery or service related credits will
be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery is
available, next day re-delivery or service relat-
ed credits will be issued.
Director A. Russell Waters ... .754-0407
(rwaters@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
13 Weeks .................... $23.54
26 Weeks ..................... $42.80
52 Weeks ..................... $83.46
Rates indude 7% sales tax.
Mail rates
13 Weeks .................... $44.85
26 Weeks ..................... $89.70
52 Weeks .................... $179.40


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news items.
If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please call the
executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run in this
space And banks for reading.


THE WEATHER


slept, authorities said.
The Orange County
Sheriff's Office was still
investigating why Yuki
Harris was targeted.
"We don't believe this is a
random shooting. We don't
know at this time," Cpl.
Susan Soto said.
Witnesses said they saw
three men leaving the scene,
according to the incident
report.
The shooting happened at
about 12:40 a.m., Soto said.
Deputies found several
bullet holes throughout the
house.
Harris' 58-year-old
daughter Michi Nogami,
who lives in the same house,
said she could smell smoke
from a shot that entered her
room just above her bed, the
report said.

Scientologists open
two new centers
PLANT CITY - The
Church of Scientology has
brought celebrity guests and
other entertainment to mark
the opening of two new
outreach centers in the
Tampa Bay area.
Actor John Travolta made
an appearance Monday at the
opening of the church's St.
Petersburg Life Improvement
Center.
The Plant City center held
its grand opening ceremony
Sunday. Actress Erika
Christensen, who starred in
the movies "Flightplan " and
"Traffic," was the guest
speaker.
"We've never had openings
back-to-back like this before,"
church spokeswoman Pat
Harney said. "It's exciting."
The centers feature
libraries, classrooms and
interactive displays. They will
offer information and
introductory courses on
Scientology and its programs.
The centers are models for
future expansion to six other
cities around the state,
Harney said.
* Associated Press


PARTLY PARTLY PARTLY
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TEMPERATURES
High Monday
Low Monday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Monday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


71
37
76
50
93 in 1934
32 in 1962


0.00"
1.62"
8.81"
2.66"
9.56"


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise tom.
Sunset tom.

MOON
Moonrise today
Moonset today
Moonrise tom.
Moonset tom.


C
March
25
First


7a tp 7p la 6a
Tuesday Wednesday








- Ftrecasd tmit pturte "Fe e" temperature


7:35 a.m.
7:42 p.m.
7:34 a.m.
7:42 p.m.

8:24 a.m.
9:48 p.m.
9:01 a.m.
11:01 p.m.


To
ull
rad
for
a
to


April April April
2 10 17
Full Last New


On this date in
1988, squalls in the
Great Lakes Region
left up to eight inch-
es of new snow on
the ground in time
for the official start
of spring.


IH:
miitesto Ixin
day's
tra-violet
diation risk
r the area on
scale from 0
10+.


Wednesday
?74, 64, I
76/60/pc
79/69/pc
79/60/pc
78/56/pc
73/55/pc
79/69/pc
78/53/pc
78/68/pc
79/63/pc
78/55/pc
78/58/pc
77/56/pc
75/57/pc
77/52/pc
79/60/pc
77/52/pc
78/69/pc


Thursday
77, 64,'s
78/63/pc
79/71/pc
82/62/s
80/56/pc
74/56/pc
79/70/pc
81/55/pc
80/68/sh
81/63/pc
79/55/pc
82/60/pc
78/56/pc
75/57/pc
79/52/pc
81/62/pc
79/53/pc
79/70/sh


rAn exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.



M,-------


- I Forecasts, data and graphics
'"; .' 0 2007 Weather Central,
c Inc., Madison, Wis.
S www.weatherpubllsher.com

I 11:E S


'Coinnd


(N1 3,
Monday:
5-0-4


Monday:
6-4-7-0


9 =-- - -


Page Editor: Chris Bednar, 754-0404


0=


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5 .,;' .:' ,"4 , .. ": ',.









Page Editor: Chris Bednar, 754-0404


LAKE CITY REPORTER


LOCAL & NATION


TUESDAY, MARCH 20, 2007


BRIEFS


Used car stolen
from dealership
Local authorities are
investigating a break-in at
Hopkins Motor Company
ovemight Friday.
According to reports,
someone broke into the
automobile dealership late Friday
night or early Saturday morning
by tossing something through the
glass doors at the dealership.
The suspects allegedly rifled
through desks and made away
with a used car, police said.
'They got a set of keys and
stole a 2007 Chevrolet Malibu
out of the back compound," said
Capt. Gary Laxton, public
information officer for the Lake
City Police Department. Laxton
said the car was driven through a
fence, which surrounded the rear
compound, and escaped.
He said the car had been
entered into a national database
that, if stopped by law
enforcement, would show up as
a stolen vehicle. It was unclear
what color the vehicle is.
LCPD hasn't developed a
suspect in the case.
Anyone with information is
encouraged to call the police
department at 752-4344.

Brush fire
threatens homes
FLORIDA CITY - More than
a dozen homeowners were
forced to evacuate Monday after
a 15-acre brush fire sent thick
black smoke throughout their
neighborhood.
Dozens of fire-rescue units
responded to battle the blaze
located in southwest
Miami-Dade County. Residents
hosed down their roofs with
water and rescue helicopters
dumped water on hot spots.
About 20 homes have been
evacuated, Miami-Dade County
Fire Lt. Eddy Ballester told The
Miami Herald.
"It's as close to a firestorm as
we get here," Ballester said.
"We're fortunate Miami-Dade has
the resources to fight this fire
aggressively."

Three children
drown in Georgia
JASPER, Ga. - Two small
children from North Carolina
drowned Monday in their
grandmother's swimming pool -
the second and third children to
drown in north Georgia during a
24-hour period.
Isaac Chaffin, who was almost
3, and his sister, Allyah, 20
months, of Hubert, N.C., had
arrived in Pickens County with
their mother and father for a visit
about 6 a.m. and fell into the
covered, above-ground pool in
Marblehill, about 45 miles north
of Atlanta, after the adults fell
asleep, Chief Deputy Allen
Wigington said.
They were found entangled in
the pool cover about five hours
later, and the mother's boyfriend,
Eddie Chaffin, tried to revive
them while emergency personnel
were called, Wigington said.
Paramedics continued CPR
and took the children to
Piedmont Mountainside Hospital,
where they were pronounced
dead, he said.

Soldier: He made
mistake in killings
FORT CAMPBELL, Ky. - A
soldier convicted of negligent
homicide in the deaths of three
Iraqi detainees was sentenced to
10 years in prison on Monday.
Staff Sgt. Ray Girouard, 24,
was found guilty late Friday of
three counts of negligent
homicide but not guilty of
premeditated murder. He avoided
life in prison.
A military panel also found
Girouard guilty of obstruction of
justice for lying to investigators,
of conspiracy for trying to
conceal the crime and of failure
to obey a general order.
Girouard was accused of
telling his soldiers to release
detainees they captured during
the May 9 raid near Samarra,
Iraq, and then shoot them as
they fled. He is the last and most
senior soldier from the 101st
Airborne Division to face trial in
the killings.

Worker dies from
fall off high-rise


FORT LAUDERDALE - A
worker died Monday after falling
from a high-rise building,
authorities said.
Ed Salvano, 57, was on the
14th floor of the Coral Ridge
Towers East when his harness
broke about 11 a.m., Fort
Lauderdale Detective Kathy
Collins said. Salvano died at the
scene.
* From staff and wire reports.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Rev. Al Sharpton (left) and Nicole Paultre Bell (center) arrive at Queens criminal court Monday for the
arraignment of New York City Police Detectives Michael Oliver, Gescard 'Isnora and Marc Cooper in
the Nov 2006 shooting death of Paultre Bell's fiance', Sean Bell.

Detectives involved in fatal


shooting appear bef


By TOM HAYS and PAT MILTON
Associated Press
NEW YORK - Three
police officers charged in a
50-bullet barrage that killed
an unarmed groom on his
wedding day appeared before
a judge Monday and had their
first encounter since the
shooting with the victims and
their families.
In a packed, tension-filled
courtroom, the three officers
stood with their hands
clasped during the 20-minute,
hearing as they pleaded not
guilty in the shooting that
killed 23-year-old Sean Bell
and wounded two of his
friends.
The officers fired 46 of the
50 shots. The judge set bail
for the two officers who fired
the most bullets and released
the other without bail.
Shooting survivors Joseph
Guzman, in a wheelchair, and
Trent Benefield, using a
crutch, attended with Nicole
Paultre Bell, who was
engaged- to - Bell stand legally


took his name after he died.
Queens District Attorney
Richard Brown on Monday
unsealed the indictment
charging Detectives Michael
Oliver, who fired 31 times,
and Gescard Isnora, a deco-
rated undercover officer who
fired 11 times, with first-
degree and second-degree
manslaughter.
If convicted of the most seri-
ous charges, the detectives
would receive mandatory
prison time - up to 25 years.
Oliver also was charged
with endangerment for a bul-
let that smashed through the
window of an occupied house.
And a third officer, Detective
Marc Cooper, was charged
with a misdemeanor for a bul-
let that struck a train station
across the street.
'This grand jury acted in
the most responsible and con-,
scientious fashion," Brown
said. "This was a case that
was, I'm sure, not easy for
them to resolve."
The case renewed allega-


ore judge
tions that the NYPD is too
quick on the trigger and
sparked protests by activists
who say the department is
too quick to judge black, men
harshly, a claim city officials
deny. Bell was black, as are
Guzman and Benefield.
Cooper, 39, and Isnora, 28,
are also black. Oliver, 35, is
white.
Bell's mother wore buttons
with photographs of her son
to the hearing. Before the
proceedings, she leaned for-
ward, bowed her head, closed
her eyes and placed her
hands together prayerfully.
Bell's father stared straight
ahead. The family's minister
dabbed his eyes with a tissue.
The officers showed little
emotion as they stood in the
300-seat courtroom, which
was filled to capacity.
"He is visibly upset and
shaken," Oliver's attorney,
Jim Culleton, said afterward.
'This is an indictment. It is
proof of absolutely nothing.
It's merely an accusation."


Martinez: Fight in Iraq must continue


By PHIL DAVIS
Associated Press
TAMPA - Sen. Mel
Martinez said the U.S. must
press the fight in Iraq despite
the painful realities of war he
saw Monday while touring a
Veterans Administration
spinal cord injury unit that
treats some of the nation's
most seriously wounded sol-
diers.
Martinez, R-Fla., called his
tour of the James A. Haley
Veteran's Hospital "a stark
reminder of the heavy price
that we pay ... and the pain
that can be associated with
serving our nation." But he
said Americans must give
President Bush's ongoing
buildup of forces a chance to
stabilize Iraq.
"As difficult as it is to be
here, as hard as it is to see our
wounded warriors, in my
judgment at the current time
the new strategy that is being
employed is one that we need


to give a
chance ...




artinez times to see

Martinez's hospital visit
came on the fourth anniver-
sary of the U.S.-led. war in
Iraq. As of Monday morning,
the Department of Defense
said 2,592 Americans had
been killed in action and
24,042 wounded in the fight-
ing in Iraq.
Martinez asked to tour the
Tampa hospital because of a
growing scandal about the
treatment of war veterans at
Walter Reed Army Medical
Center in Washington. Three
top Army official have been
forced out after revelations
of shabby treatment of
wounded soldiers.
"I wanted to make sure in


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my own backyard we were
taking good care of our peo-
ple as best we could'under
difficult circumstances,"
Martinez said. "I am pleased
to say that what I've seen
today has been comforting,
has been reassuring, has
been the kind of quality care
that I would expect for our
wounded returning warriors
to receive."
Martinez was the latest in
a series of Florida politicians
to meet privately with VA
doctors and wounded veter-
ans at the Tampa hospital.
He said the fourth anniver-
sary of the war should
prompt Americans to "begin
every conversation by saying
thank you to those who have
served."
He said that four years ago
there were few in
Washington who anticipated
the rising insurgency and
sectarian violence that have
entangled U.S. troops in
Iraq.


Saturday, March 24,
9 A.M. - 6 P.M.


Sunday, March 25
10 A.M. - 5 P.M.
* Walk-through Butterfly House
* Live and silent auctions
* Children's activities
* Live entertainment
* Seminars


-- " -- - *. - . .




Admission: $5 per adult, '3 children 6-13, Under 6 free.
$1 discount for visitors wearing a Festival tee-shirt from previous years.
Kanapaha Botanical Gardens is located on S-24
(Archer Road) 6ne mile west of 1-75 in Gainesville
Presented by: Florida Nursery Growers and Landscape Association
and the Gainesville Garden Club. Sponsored by:
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Autopsy: Divers drowned


Associated Press
KEY LARGO - Three New
Jersey men drowned while
diving off a sunken military
ship off the Florida Keys,
according to a preliminary
autopsy report released
Monday.
Jonathan Walsweer, 38,
Scott Stanley, 55, both of
Westfield, N.J., and Kevin
Coughlin, 51, Chatham
Borough, N.J., died Friday
while exploring the USS
Spiegel Grove, which was
sunk as an artificial reef, the
Monroe County Medical
Examiner's Office said.
The bodies of Walsweer
and Stanley were recovered
inside the wreck Saturday.


Coughlin's body was found
Friday near an exit in the
wreck by divers from another
boat. He was pronounced
dead at a local hospital.
The divers did not take
enough tanks, did not have a
dive plan and did not have
dive reels with them to show
them the way out of the
wreck, a sheriff's press
release said. The men also
were in a section of the ship
that was supposed to be
sealed, unlike upper areas of
the wreck which has plenty of
visible exits, according to
authorities.
Detectives were still investi-
gating the circumstances
surrounding the deaths.


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OPINION


Tuesday, March 20, 2007


www.lakecityreporter.com


EDITORIAL



Tolerating


tyranny

Zimbabwe may be far and away
the worst-run country on the
planet. The economic
statistics alone would be a
joke if they were not so grim
for its impoverished people: 80 percent
unemployment; an inflation rate of over.
1,700 percent (if you were so foolish as
to make the exchange, you could get
17,500 Zimbabwe dollars for one U.S.)
and projected to reach 4,000 percent;
over one-fifth of the population
economic refugees in neighboring
countries.
And this was once one of the
wealthiest nations in Africa,
mineral-rich and the continent's
breadbasket. Its people survive today
on international food handouts.
This disaster is the handiwork of
Zimbabwe's president of 27 years,
Robert Mugabe, and these past weeks
he's demonstrated how he's managed to
stay in power so long.
After Mugabe banned political rallies,
the opposition held a public prayer
meeting that was savagely broken up by
the police and regime thugs. Opposition
leaders were jailed and beaten, and
those who tried to leave the country
were intercepted at the airport and
beaten there. The chief opposition
leader, Morgan Tsvangirai, is said to
have a fractured skull and broken arm.
Meanwhile, the foreign ministry
summoned Western diplomats and
threatened them with expulsion if they
tried to help the opposition, even by
such charitable gestures as providing
food, water and medicine.
* Scripps Howard News Service


HIGH LI GH TS S
IN H I STO RY
Today is Tuesday'MVIarch 20, the 79th
day of 2007. There are 286 days left in
the year. Spring arrives at 8:07 p.m.
* On March 20, 1815, Napoleon
Bonaparte returned to Paris after escaping
his exile on Elba, beginning his "Hundred
Days" rule.
* In 1413, England's King Henry IV
died; he was succeeded by Henry V.
* In 1727, physicist, mathematician
and astronomer Sir Isaac Newton died in
London.
* In 1828, poet-dramatist Henrik Ibsen
was born in Skien, Norway.
* In 1852, Harriet Beecher Stowe's
influential novel about slavery, "Uncle
Tom's Cabin," was first published.
* In 1956, union workers ended a 156-
day strike at Westinghouse Electric Corp.
* In 1969, John Lennon married Yoko
Ono in Gibraltar.
* In 1977, voters in Paris chose former
French Prime Minister Jacques Chirac to
be the French capital's first mayor in more
than a century.


Lake City Reporter
serving Columbia County since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is published with
pride for residents of Columbia and
surrounding counties by Community
Newspapers, Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities - "Newspapers get
things done!"
Our primary goal is to publish
distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard work.
Michael Leonard, publisher
Todd Wilson, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman

OUR POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be typed or
neatly written and double spaced. Letters
should not exceed 400 words and will be edited
for length and libel. Letters must be signed and
include the writer's name, address and
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and guest columns are the opinion of the
writers and not necessarily that of the Lake City
Reporter.


BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City,
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TAG~ TlASPC'Ur


MAYBT
WE
SHOULD
WORRY
LESS
ABOUT
FLAG
BURNING/

MYBE
ABOUT
PANTS
ON
PIRE,,,


COMMENTARY


Edwards plants flag



far out in left field


Madness - presi- ,M was John Kerry's
denial campaign- * vice-presidential running mate
ing, not basketball . in 2004? And how much of the
I have begun to shift is genuine and how much
tune out Hillary Rodham . of it is a political calculation?
Clinton and Barack Obama for It's hard to know.
the moment as I try to size up He voted to go to war in
the one Southern Democrat in Philip Gailey Iraq and defended that vote
the race, former U.S. Sen. goiley@sptimes.com throughout the
John Edwards of North 2004 campaign. Now he rarely
Carolina. misses a chance to say his
While most of the other sit with him at the 2004 vote was wrong and to
top-tier Democratic Democratic National express regret. Edwards.
contenders are staying close Convention. wants Congress to use the
to the political center, Gore was out front and power of the purse to force
Edwards has swerved to the resolute in opposing the Iraq the immediate withdrawal of
left. I find that interesting, war and has been one of 50,000 U.S. troops from Iraq,
because it occurred to me that President Bush's harshest with the remainder to follow
three of the most prominent critics on environmental and within 12 to 18 months. Unlike
liberal voices in the foreign-policy issues. He has Hillary, he has made peace
Democratic Party these days won international acclaim for with the party's anti-war wing.
are Southerners - former his activism on the threat of On the home front,
President Jimmy Carter, global warming and has been Edwards has proposed a
former Vice President Al Gore nominated for a Nobel Prize. universal health-care plan that
and now Edwards. Talk about Edwards is more would cost as much as $120
a New South. complicated. Making a second billion a year, paid for with tax
I use the word "liberal" bid for his party's presidential increases on the wealthiest
loosely and only to suggest nomination, the one-term Americans. According to The
that the three Southerners senator is campaigning, often Washington Post, he tells
have taken positions on issues in denim jeans, as an "us audiences that his plan could
that put them in favor with against them" populist who, as lead to a government-run,
their party's left wing, from president, would stand with single-payer health-care
anti-war activists to Wal-Mart ordinary people against system, a position no other
bashers. Of course, you don't powerful corporate interests. Democrat has taken so far.
have to be a liberal to hate the The one thing Edwards won't You won't hear Edwards
.Iraq war or to resent do is live like ordinary people promising to reduce the
corporate greed. who shop at Wal-Mart. The federal deficit, either. He says
Carter stands out as one of former personal-injury lawyer investing more in education,
the few leading Democrats lives on a 102-acre estate near alternative energy sources
willing to criticize Israel's Raleigh in a 28,000-square-foot and antipoverty programs is
treatment of the Palestinians. home with basketball and important.
He has a Nobel Peace Prize squash courts and a
for his work on human rights, swimming pool. Price tag: s Philip Gailey is editor of
and he even invited the leftist $4 million. editorimeals for the St. Petersburg
filmmaker Michael Moore to So, just how far to the left
OTHER VIEW

Could Al Gore be a hypocrite?


By JOHN M. CRISP
Scripps Howard News Service
f Al Gore is a hypocrite,
does it matter? No
sooner had "An
Inconvenient Truth"
won an Oscar for best
documentary feature than the
Tennessee Center for Policy
Research accused Gore, when
he's not flying around the '
world in a private jet to
preach self-righteous sermons
on excessive energy
consumption, of living in a
Nashville mansion that
consumes about 20 times as
much energy as the homes of
average Americans.
But the case isn't clear-cut.
The Tennessee Center for
Policy Research supports
principles on its Web site that
are rigorously conservative
and reflect a perspective that
we don't ordinarily associate
with concern over global
warming. Their figures about


Gore's energy consumption
are construed to make him
look as bad as possible. They
also appear to be more or less
accurate. Clearly, Gore,
champion of energy efficiency
and decreased consumption,
does consume an awful lot of
energy.
On the other hand, his
defenders argue that by
buying so-called "carbon
offsets," Gore manages to
compensate for his energy
use, effectively "zeroirgg out"
his impact on the
environment, which is what
he calls for in "An
Inconvenient Truth." Few of
us can make that claim. In
fact, if all of the world's
citizens were willing and able
to do that, global warming
wouldn't be an issue at all. Of
course, not everyone accepts
the "carbon offset" argument
and, frankly, it does seem like
a bit of a stretch.
It's important to remember


that serious global-warming
non-believers are likely to be
unmoved by Gore's message,
regardless of his personal
lifestyle. Even if Gore lived in
a log cabin powered entirely
by wind and solar and drove
an electric car, I suspect that
his critics would be more
likely to dismiss him to the
lunatic fringe than to be
persuaded by his message.
Because his message isn't
easy to listen to. If Gore is
right - or even half right -
the next four or five decades
are going to be difficult and
chaotic. Either we'll
experience a remarkable
alteration in our climate that
includes some version of the
catastrophes that Gore
portrays dramatically in his
film or we'll manage to
prevent those catastrophes by
extraordinary alterations to
the comfortable.
* John M. Crisp writes nationally
for Scripps Howard News.


COMMENTARY


Thompson


rallies GOP


movement

Thompson, then an obscure,
young country lawyer from
Tennessee, became a familiar face
to millions of Americans
engrossed in watching the historic drama of
the Senate Watergate hearings unfold on
television. The exposure he received as the
Republican counsel to the committee
investigating the scandal propelled him to a
lucrative law practice, a substantial movie
career in a
string of
popular, first
run films, then
the U.S. Senate
and finally a
return to acting
and private law
practice.
When he Dan K.Thomasson
first won
election to a seat once held by his longtime
mentor, Howard Baker, whose distinguished
career ranged from the Senate to chief of staff
of the White House to U.S. ambassador to
Japan, he was considered almost immediately
by many as a potential presidential nominee.
Possessing a rugged 6-foot-4-inch frame and a
voice as rich and smoky as the Tennessee
mountains surrounding his boyhood, he was,
and is, an imposing figure.
But he seemed reluctant then to pursue the
presidential prospect with any fervor and he
soon became bored and disillusioned with the
Senate, a condition not unusual among bright
people after a few frustrating years in the
world's champion debating club. He left that
aspect of politics, but despite star billing as
the chief district attorney in TV's popular
"Law and Order" series, he kept his political
ties and interests and a wide circle of friends,
most of whom regard him as'the same "good
old boy" he was when he first came to
Washington.
The other day, however, Thompson cranked
up the buzz about the 2008 Republican
presidential nomination more than a notch by
letting it be known that if the planets were
properly aligned this summer, he "might" be
interested in finally seeking the job his friends
hoped he would years ago. That this tentative
step could stir up such a sudden flash of
interest pretty much certifies the lack of
overall enthusiasm by GOP regulars for the
current, announced crop of hopefuls,
especially the three presumed frontrunners,
former New York Mayor Rudolph Giuliani,
Sen. John McCain of Arizona and former
Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney.
While Giuliani is leading in the early polls,
his damaging personal life, including his
disaffection from his children, has damaged
his image. He went through two divorces, the
last, while he was mayor. McCain's former
stature as the man to beat has slipped because
of his support for more troops in Iraq.
Romney's onetime socially liberal stances
have hurt him first with conservatives and
then with moderates when he disavowed
them. His Mormon religion also has
questionable resonance among both Catholic
and traditional Protestant voters despite his
election in Massachusetts.
Thompson's appearance on the scene
seemed to stimulate a sudden burst of
interest, particularly among the conservatives
who view him as acceptable and among the
moderates who point out that he has never
been reactionary. Also, Baker is leading the
Thompson draft, if that is what it can be called
at this stage. The former Senate Republican
leader's endorsement still carries a lot of
weight among party regulars.
Part of the equation may be the "Hagel
factor." Nebraska Sen. Charles Hagel, a
Vietnam veteran who is a hard nosed
opponent of the Iraq policy and often
mentioned as a potentially viable alternative
for Republican moderates opposed to the new
troop escalation, called a press conference
about the same time Thompson's name
surfaced to announce that he had really
nothing to say. He still hadn't made up his
mind.
Some who earn their living speculating
about politics saw Hagel's hesitancy as a
possible deference to Thompson. The two
were close friends in the Senate and Hagel
has shared Thompson's frustration with the
Byzantine operations of the Senate. The
speculation centered on whether Hagel might
be deciding against a presidential campaign in
favor of his former colleague.
Obviously Thompson's name recognition is
high enough because of his TV and movie
performances to make a late entry into the
campaign more plausible than it might be for


others. But he also has solid credentials as
well as a presidential demeanor. Additionally,
he has strong friendships in the press.
* Dan K. Thomasson writes nationally for Scripps
Howard News Service.


4A









LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS TUESDAY, MARCH 20, 2007


By TROY ROBERTS
troberts@lakecityreporter.com
After the death of her mother and hus-
band last year, Christine Cope decided
she wasn't going to wait around to start
the career she always wanted.
Last week, Cope opened up the pages,
ink bookstore in downtown Lake City.
Located at 226 N Marion Avenue,
pages, ink carries an assortment of new
books, including fiction, non-fiction, edu-
cational, fantasy, sci-fi, religious, psy-
chology and philosophy texts.
Cope, a mother of three and lifelong
Columbia County resident, has a love for
the- written word and has had a passion
to open a bookstore since her early 20s.
"I have over 2,000 books of my own,"
she said. "I'm a veracious reader. I'm
always picking up something and read-
ing it."
But it wasn't until the death of her
mother in March of last year and then
the accidental death of her husband in
May that she took a step back and re-
examined her life.
"Life is too short to not do what you
want to do," she said.
So, in the fall, Cope began work on
her downtown bookstore. Her goal? A
small-scale Barnes and Nobles-type
bookstore.
The store currently houses a sitting
room, which Cope said she wants to
turn into a children's reading area. In
the coming months, she wants to add a
place for people to come and drink cof-


fee. She said she wants to turn the store
into a place where people can come, be
themselves and read in quiet, if they
wish.
If they want to talk, that's fine too.
"I want a place where adults can come
and we can have a meeting of the
minds," she said.
While she admits her selection won't
be as complete as some of the larger
book stores you'd find in Gainesville or
Jacksonville, she has a wide assortment


of books by some of the top authors and
can have any book requested by a cus-
tomer in less than two days.
Cope said she wants to add text books
and supplemental texts for students in
the future, as well as newspapers and
magazines for customers. She plans on
having a mystery book sale in April
because her mother loved murder-mys-
tery novels.
"I just want to encourage people to
read," Cope said.


BRIEFS


Allstate backs off
homeowner policies
BATON ROUGE, La. -
Allstate Insurance Co. has
backed off the cancellation of
4,000 homeowner policies in
Hurricane Katrina-damaged
parishes, agreeing to reinstate
them if policyholders can prove
they are rebuilding or live in
their homes.
The company said Monday
that it would consider reinstating
those policies as part of, an,.......
agreement with state. Insurance. ,..
Commissioner Jim Donelon,
who had threatened-fines if
Allstate refused.
Donelon's office received
hundreds of complaints from
homeowners who said the
company canceled their
coverage after inspectors
wrongly concluded their
properties had been
abandoned. Donelon ordered
his workers to inspect some of
those properties and concluded
Allstate was using a flawed,
"drive-by" inspection process.
He ordered the company to
reinstate the policies.

Carnival reports
increased bookings
MIAMI - Carnival Cruise
Lines reported Monday a
company-record 28 percent
increase in reservations for a
six-week booking period, an
indication that lower prices have
helped the company spur
demand in the sluggish
Caribbean market.
The world's largest cruise
brand said net individual
reservations from Feb. 5 through
March 18 for its 22 ships were up
28 percent compared to a year
ago. Capacity increased 6
percent during the same period,
which also saw the highest


number of individual reservations
received in any other six-week
span in the cruise line's 35 years,
the company said.
Nineteen of Carnival's 22
ships operate in the Bahamas
and the Caribbean, where the
cruise industry has cut prices and
added incentives amid an overall
sluggishness in bookings.

Court rules against
video gambling
- .COLUMBIA; S.C. -:The
Gatawba Indian Nation's push to.
expand its gambling business
took -a hit Monday with the South
Carolina Supreme Court ruling
that a state ban on video poker
also applies to its only federally
recognized tribe.
The Catawbas argued their
1993 land deal with the state
allowed them to use the video
poker machines, which were
outlawed statewide in 2000, on
their reservation.
The state contends that the
land deal means the tribe's
reservation falls under state, not
federal, gambling laws. State
Attorney General Henry
McMaster, who appealed a lower
court's decision in favor of the
tribe, said the higher court made
"a sound decision."


Tribune Co. names
new publisher
BALTIMORE - Rondra J.
Matthews has resigned as
publisher and chief executive
officer of The (Baltimore) Sun
and will be succeeded by
Timothy Ryan, Tribune Co.
announced Monday.
Matthews, who took the job in
October, was stepping down for
personal reasons, the company
said.
* Associated Press


A major name brand hear-
ing aid provider wishes to
field test a remarkable new
hearing instrument in the
area. This offer is free of
charge and you. are under,
no obligation.


The revolutionary 100% Digital instruments
are the latest technology to comfortably and
almost invisibly help you hear more clearly.
This technology; solves the "stopped up ears,"
head in a barrel" sensation some people experi-
ence, and have been clinically demonstrated to
improve hearing in noisy environments.


If you wish to participate, you will be required to
have your hearing tested in our office FREE OF
CHARGE to determine candidacy. You will be
asked to report your results with the hearing
instruments each week, for a two week period.

At the end of this period, you may purchase the
instrument, if you so desire, at a significantly
reduced charge. Otherwise, there is no fee what-
soever for participating in this field test. Special
testing will be done to determine the increased
benefits of this technology.

Benefits of hearing aid vary by type and degree of
hearing loss, noise environment, accuracy of hear-
ing test, and proper fit. This is a wonderful
opportunity to determine if hearing help is
available for your hearing loss while you eval-
uate your performance with this technology!


CALL Now IF YOU WISH

TO BE INCLUDED

IN THIS FIELD TRIAL TEST

FIELD TRIAL IS AVAILABLE

Wednesday, Thursday & Friday


March 21st - 23rd


Field Test Available:

Beltone Hearing Aid Centers


LAKE CITY

132 SW Columbia Ave., Ste 101
(across from Brown-Vann behind Biellings Tire)




3867546711 I


Love of books leads local



woman to open bookstore


GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)
Name Last Chg %Chg
Todco 39.24 +6.46 +19.7
Braskem 15.01 +2.13 +16.5
Infraprce 29.83 +4.17 +16.3
ABNAmro 41.36 +5.12 +14.1
Svcmstr 15.15 +1.68 +12.5
Allilmag 7.96 +.74 +10.2
BuckTch 12.51 +.90 +7.8
Systemax 23.26 +1.66 +7.7
Gensco 42.60 +3.00 +7.6
VimpelCm 94.01 +5.99 +6.8

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)
Name Last Chg %Chg
Fremont 8.07 -.83 -9.3
RobbMyr 36.28 -3.51 -8.8
HomeBanc 2.57 -.24 -8.5
NovaStar 5.43 -.47 -8.0
Medifast 6.21 -.49 -7.3
CmtyHIt 34.78 -2.02 -5.5
ComfrtS 12.10 -.69 -5.4
Indymac 27.42 -1.43 -5.0
AcMtg pfA 19.54 -.96 -4.7
NYMIgTr 2.46 -.12 -4.7
MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
Svcmstr 650063 15.15 +1.68
FordM 439493 7.82 +.27
HostHotls 351238 26.88 +.58
GenElec 261806 34.67 +.31
Pfizer 257526 25.36 +.37
Motorola 234736 18.29 +.10
ExxonMbl 227692 71.10 +1.24
CVSCp 223903 33.14 +.20
QwestCm 218800 8.80 +.20
AT&T Inc 201709 37.58 +.60
DIARY
Advanced 2,510
Declined 790
Unchanged 140
Total issues 3,440
New Highs 98
New Lows . ..12
Volume; I"' 2,673,397,610


GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)
Name Last Chg %Chg
Arhyth 24.08 +3.46 +16.8
Metalline n 2.95 +.35 +13.5
LadThalFn 2.85 +.30 +11.8
Cardero g 2.33 +.23 +11.0
BirchMt g 2.89 +.25 +9.5
CortexPh 2.31 +.20 +9.5
PinnclDt 2.54 +.22 +9.5
Fdrischs 33.91 +2.76 +8.9
StarMarwt 2.05 +.15 +7.9
TiensBio 4.95 +.31 +6.7
LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)
Name Last Chg %Chg
TrnsmrEx 2.68 -.30 -10.1
Otelco un 18.05 -1.35 -7.0
Virco 7.04 -.50 -6.6
AdcareHltn 2.01 -.14 -6.5
PRB Egy h 3.36 -.21 -5.9
LazKap 8.29 -.51 -5.8
InvCapHld 5.43 -.31 -5.4
Natl RV 2.46 -.14 -5.4
HanovCap 4.28 -.22 -4.9
OrleansH 10.09 -.51 -4.8
MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
SPDR 843475 140.20 +1.67
iShR2K nya530402 78.25 +.88
SPEngy 214210 57.29 +.90
SP Fncl 159493 35.25 +.23
PrUShQQQ n12306754.90 -1.02
SemiHTr 115564 33.94 -.15
OilSvHT 88086142.44 +3.79
DJIADiam 66311 122.28 +1.23
On2Tech 49764 1.35 +.08
SP Matls -47566 37.65 +.55
DIARY
Advanced 740
Declined 389
Unchanged 90
Total issues 1,219
New Highs 24
New Lows , , 21.
Volume . 355,642,240


GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)
Name Last Chg %Chg
AcadiaPh 13.61 +6.92 +103.4
Conolg rs 2.81 +.41 +17.1
USGIobal 43.25 +5.62 +14.9
RschFmt 10.23 +1.31 +14.7
SigaTech h 5.15 +.63 +13.9
Evertast 20.19 +2.21 +12.3
RochMed s 20.54 +2.24 +12.2
WPCSIntl 10.71 +1.08 +11.2
Hill Intl wt 2.70 +.27 +11.1
CommBcp 49.40 +4.66 +10.4
LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)
Name Last Chg %Chg
AthrGnc 3.09 -4.74 -60.5
PeopleSup 11.26 -2.74 -19.6
AccHme 8.95 -1.95 -17.9
KellySB 26.05 -5.24 -16.7
Micromet n 2.76 -.49 -15.1
Voxware h 2.60 -.41 -13.6
ClevBioL n 8.82 -1.37 -13.5
Fieldlnv 3.60 -.50 -12.2
Novatel 32.01 -4.06 -11.3
HollisEden 2.92 -.33 -10.2
MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
Nasd100Tr861845 43.27 +.44
Intel 583315 19.11 -.04
Microsoft 447744 27.83 +.50
Cisco 357616 26.30 +.31
SunMicro 303806 6.22 -.02
Oracle 285278 17.18 +.48
Apple Inc 249945 91.13 +1.54
Qualcom 229154 42.91 -.77
SiriusS 228534 3.29 +.05
ApldMatI 213704 18.47 -.02
DIARY
Advanced 2,030
Declined 1,015
Unchanged 132
Total issues , 3,177
New Highs 71
New Lows 65
Volume 1,621,067,290


STOCK$.OF LPCALj-INT~EST


YTD
Name Ex Div YId PE Last Cha%Cha,


YTD
Name Ex Div YId PE Last Chg%Chg


Intel Nasd .45
Lowess NY .20
McDnlds NY 1.00
Microsoft Nasd .40
Motorola NY .20
NasdIOOTr Nasd .13
NY Times NY .70
NobltyH Nasd .50
OcciPets NY .88
Oracle Nasd
Penney NY .72
PepsiCo NY 1.20
Pfizer NY 1.16
Potash NY .60
Ryder NY .84
SearsHldgs Nasd
Svcmstr NY .48
SouthnCo NY 1.55
SPDR Amex 2.60
SunMicro Nasd
TimeWam NY .22
WalMart NY .88


22 19.11 -.04 -5.6
16 31.13 +.20 -.1
16 43.87 +.39 -1.0
24 27.83 +.50 -6.8
13 18.29 +.10-11.0
... 43.27 +.44 +.3
23.95 +.02 -1.7
17 23.13 -1.17 -13.0
10 46.32 +.57 -5.1
25 17.18 +.48 +.2
16 80.40 +.93 +3.9
19 62.64 +.27 +.5
9 25.36 +.37 -2.1
26 154.95 +1.40 +8.0
12 49.35 -.23 -3.3
18 176.42 +2.86 +5.1
23 15.15 +1.68 +15.6
17 35.82 +.43 -2.8
... 140.20 +1.67 -1.0
... 6.22 -.02 +14.8
13 19.64 +.16 -9.8
17 46.59 +.38 +.9


MONEY RATES CURRENCIES
Last Pvs Week Last Pvs Day
Prime Rate 8.25 8.25 Australia 1.2509 1.2563
Discount Rate 6.25 6.25 Britain 1.9443 1.9421
Federal Funds Rate � 5.25 5.25 Canada 1.1779 1.1757
Treasuries Euro .7518 .7513
3-month 4.93 4.965 Japan 117.59 116.74
6-month 4.91 4.92 Mexico 11.1372 11.1896
5-year 4.49 4. 50
10-year 4.56 4.55 Switzerind 1.2124 1.2074
a 4 British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All others show
30-year - 4.71- --4.69 dollar in foreign currency.

MUTUAL FUNDS
Total Assets Total Return/Rank Pct Min nit
Name Obi ($Mlns) NAV 4-wk 12-mo 5-year Load Invt
American Funds rowAmerA m LG 83,868 32.82 -2.6 +6.8/A 0.0/A. .5.75 250
American Funds InvCoAmA m LV 73,616 33.30 -2.4 +10.2/D 0.0/C 5.75 250
Vanguard 500 LB 70,111 129.60 -3.5 +9.1/B 0.0/C NL 3,000
Fidelity Contra LG 68,134 64.58 -3.2 +7.1/A 0.0/A NL 2,500
American Funds WAMutlnvA m LV 67,815 34.67 -3.1 +11.2/C 0.0/D 5.75 250
Dodge & Cox Stock LV 67,561 154.55 -2.8 +12.5/B 0.0/A NL 2,500
American Funds CaplncBuA m IH 65,661 61.07 -1.8 +16.4/A 0.0/B 5.75 '250
American Funds CpWidGrIA m WS 64,473 41.64 -3.3 +15.0/A 0.0/A 5.75 250
PIMCOTotRetls Cl 62,265 10.45 +1.1 +5.4/C 0.0/A NL 5,000,000
American Funds IncAmerA m MA 61,807 20.30 -2.0 +14.6/A 0.0/A 5.75 250
American Funds EurPacGrA m FB 56,228 46.75 -3.1 +14.4/D 0.0/A 5.75 250
Fidelity Divrlnti FG 48,309 37.17 -3.0 +13.4/C 0.0/A NL 2,500
Vanguard 50OAdml LB 47,280 129.63 -3.5 +9.2/B 0.0/C NL 100,000
Vanguard Instldx LB 45,197 128.64 -3.5 +9.3/B 0.0/8 NL 5,000,000
Fidelity Magellan LG 43,812 90.23 -3.8 +2.8/C 0.0/C NL 2,500
American Funds NewPerspA m WS 43,296 31.58 -3.4 +13.4/B 0.0/C 5.75 250
Vanguard TotStldx LB 40,861 34.05 -3.4 +9.2/B 0.0/B NL 3,000
Fidelity LowPriStk MB 39,255 43.64 -3.2 +9.4/C 0.0/A NL 2,500
Dodge & Cox IntlStk FV 35,830 44.62 -2.7 +20.2/A 0.0/A NL 2,500
American Funds BalA m MA 35,399 18.90 -2.0 +7.9/C 0.0/B 5.75 250
American Funds FundmlnvA m LB 32,999 40.10 -2.8 +12.3/A 0.0/A 5.75 250
Vanguard Wndsrll LV 31,576 34.75 -2.9 +12.7/B 0.0/A NL 10,000
FrankTemp-Franklin Income Am CA 31,280 2.68 -0.7 +16.4/A 0.0/A 4.25 1,000
Fidelity Eqlnc LV 30,929 57.33 -3.5 +12.8/B 0.0/C NL 2,500
Fidelity GrowCo LG 29,724 68.76 -4.0 +1.7/D 0.0/A NL 2,500
Vanguard Welltn MA 29,501 32.41 -2.0 +10.6/A 0.0/A NL 10,000
Fidelity Growlnc LB 29,084 30.79 -3.7 +5.0/E 0.0/E NL 2,500
Dodge & Cox Bal MA 27,935 87.88 -1.8 +10.3/A 0.0/A NL 2,500
Vanguard TotStiAdm LB 27,814 34.06 -3.4 +9.3/B 0.0/A NL 100,000
Davis NYVentA m LB 27,758 38.28 -3.4 +9.9/A 0.0/A 4.75 1,000
FrankTemp-Templelon Growth A m WS 27,288 25.30 -4.0 +13.4/8 0.01B 5.75 1,000
Fidelity Puritan MA 25,683 20.02 -2.2 +10.8/A 0.0/A NL 2,500
Vanguard TotBdld Cl 25,405 10.04 +0.8 +5.9/B 0.0C NL 3,000
Fidelity Bal MA 23,501 19.84 -1.4 +9.5/A 0.0/A NL 2,500
Fidelity Spartan USEqlndxl LB 22,221 49.81 -3.5 +9.2/B 0.0/C NL 100,000
Vanguard Prmcp LB 22,038 68.77 -3.9 +4.4/E 0.0/A NL 25,000
American Funds BondA m Cl 21,591 13.41 +0.7 +6.9/A 0.0/A 3.75 250
Vanguard Totintl FB 21,454 17.92 -2.8 +17.9/A 0.0/A NL 3,000
T Rowe Price Eqtylnc LV 21,346 29.48 -3.2 +12.2/B 0.0/B NL 2,500
Vanguard InstPlus LB 21,257 128.65 -3.5 +9.3/B 0.0/B NL200,000,000
PIMCOTotRetAdm b Cl 20,404 10.45 +1.0 +5.1/D 0.0/B NL 5,000,000
Fidelity Value MV 20,169 83.55 -2.4 +12.4/C 0.0/A NL 2,500
Fidelity BIChGrow LG 20,066 43.80 -3.7 +1.4/D 0.0/D NL 2,500

CA -Conservative Allocation, Cl -Intermediate-Term Bond, ES -Europe Stock, FB -Foreign Large Blend, FG -Foreign
LargeGrowth, FV -Foreign Large Value, IH -World Allocation, LB -Large Blend, LG -Large Growth, LV -Large Value,
MA -Moderate Allocation, MB -Mid-Cap Blend, MV - Mid-Cap Value, SH -Specialty-heath, WS -World Stock, Total
Return: Chng in NAV with dividends reinvested. Rank: How fund performed vs. others with same objective: A is in top
20%, E in bottom 20%. Min Init Invt: Minimum $ needed to invest in fund. Source: Momingstar.
Stock Footnotese: g = Dividends and earnings in Canadian dollars. h = Does not meet continued-listing standards.
If = Late filing with SEC. n = New in past 52 weeks. pf = Preferred. s = Stock has undergone a reverse stock aplt of at least
50 percent within the past year. rt = Right to buy security at a specified price. s = Stock has split by a least 20 percent with-
in the last year. un = Units. v = In bankruptcy or receivership.wd = When distributed, wl = When Issued. wt = Warrants.
Mutual Fund Footnotes: b = Fee covering market costs is paid from fund assets, d = Deferred sales charge, or redemp-
tion fee. f = front load (sales charges). m = Multiple fees are charged. NA = not available, p = previous day's net asset
value. s = fund split shares during the week. x = fund paid a distribution during the week.Ganer and Lowers must be worth
at least $2 to be listed in tables above. Most Actives must be worth at least $1. Volume in hundreds of shares. Source: The
Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.


MARKET REPORT


March 19, 2007 _ _12,800

Dow Jones 12,600

industrials 12,400
12,200

+115.76 12,000
11,800
12,226.17 DEC JAN FEB MAR
Pct. change High Low Record high close: 12,786.64
from previous: +0.96 12,234.67 12,110.41 Feb.20,2007

STOCK MARKET INDEXES
52-Week YTD 12-mo
High Low Name Last Chg %Chg %Chg %Chg
12,795.93 10,683.32 Dow Industrials 12,226.17 +115.76 +.96 -1.90 +8.44
5,211.42 4,134.72 Dow Transportation 4,794.61 +12.98 +.27 +5.14 +4.51
501.99 380.97 Dow Utilities 484.40 +5.84 +1.22 +6.05 +20.07
9,463.62 7,708.11 NYSE Composite 9,090.96 +107.95 +1.20 -.53 +10.12
2,179.89 1,800.65 Amex Market Value 2,111.39 +13.07 +.62 +2.67 +9.69
2,531.42 2,012.78 Nasdaq Composite 2,394.41 +21.75 +.92 -.86 +3.47
1,461.57 1,219.29 S&P500 1,402.06 +15.11 +1.09 -1.14 +7.43
870.89 710.53 S&P MidCap 832.57 +8.68 +1.05 +3.51 +6.47
830.01 668.58 Russell 2000 787.05 +8.28 +1.06 -.08 +5.56
14,828.76 12,249.90 Wilshire 5000 14,209.13 +154.75 +1.10 -.34 +7.95

STOCK EXCHANGE HIGHLIGHTS

NYSE A AMEX NASDAQ
9,090.96 +107.95 5 2,111.39 +13.07 2,394.41 +21.75


TROY ROBERTS/Lake City Reporter
Christine Cope opened pages, ink bookstore in downtown Lake City last week. The store
carries a variety of new and used books.


AT&Tlnc NY 1.42
Alltel NY .50
Apple Inc Nasd ...
AutoZone NY ...
BkofAm NY 2.24
BobEvn Nasd .56
CNBFnPA Nasd .60
CSXs NY .48
ChmpE NY 0
Chevron NY 2.08
Cisco Nasd ...
CocaCl NY 1.36
ColBgp NY .75
Delhaize 'NY 1.54
DollarG NY .20
FPLGrp NY 1.64
FamDlrIf NY .46
FordM NY ...
GenElec NY 1.12
HomeDp NY .90
HostHotlls NY .80
iShR2Knya Amex .84


I i U=11-0!






r ARE YOU HARD
OF HEARING?


Page Editor: Chris Bednar, 754-0404


+.60 +5.1
+.46 +3.1
+1.54 +7.4
+.41 +8.2
+.75 -5.7
+.27 +7.2
+.05 +.l
-.16 +16.0
-.08 +.4
+1.30 -5.6
t.31 -3.8
+.12 -1.9
+.31 -1.6
-.16 +8.5
... +32.2
+.20 +9.9
+.31 -.3
+.27 Al
+.31 -6.8
+.21 -6.1
+.58 +9.5
+.88 +.3










LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL TUESDAY, MARCH 20, 2007


COMMUNITY CALEN


* To submit your
Community Calendar
item, contact Todd
Wilson at 754-0428 or
by email at twilson@
lakecityreporter.com.


Announcements


CHS Class of 1997
reunion being planned
The CHS Class of 1997 is
plannign a reunion for June 8-9.
On June 8 there will be a
Welcome Back happy hour at
Beef 'O'Brady's. June 9 will be
family day at Alligator Park from
11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Moe's will be
catering this event and the cost
is $5 per person or $15 per
family. At 7 p.m. is the main
event, dinner, cocktails, a DJ,
dancing, and more. Currently
ticket prices are $25 per
person.
Make checks payable to CHS
Class of 1997. Kelli (McCall)
Crews will be handling the
money and the tickets. Send
your checks to:
CHS Class of 1997 Reunion
Kelli Crews
P.O. Box 2268
Lake City, FI 32056
Include a note of how many
tickets you need for each event,
and how many members are in
your family if you are buying a
family ticket for the family day. If
you haven't e-mailed your
mailing address or phone
number yet, e-mail the
information to columbiahight-
iger@yahoo.com
. The reunion Myspace site is
http://www.myspace.com/chstiger
1997 For more information, call
Chad Cray at 752-8437.

Crossover Correction to
CMS training offered

Lake City Community
College will offer training in the
Crossover Correction to CMS
Law Enforcement tentatively
beginning Feb. 12.
There will be a scheduled
meeting at 6 p.m. on Jan. 22 in
the Lancaster Site Office - CR
341 across from the Lancaster
Correctional Work Camp in
Trenton.
Those interested in
attending this training must
attend this meeting to receive
all the information concerning .-
cost, scheduling, etc. ' .
For more information call .
(352) 463-4353 between
9 a.m. and 1 p.m. Monday-
Friday, after hours leave a
message.

Farmers Market
open every Friday
The Marion Street Farmers
Market is open from 2 p.m. to
dusk every Friday and is
located on the corner of Marion
Avenue and Hamilton Street.

Singles meetings take
place every Friday

Live Oak singles meetings
take place from 7 to 10 p.m.
Friday at St. Luke's Church in
Live Oak, across from the
Coliseum. For more information,
call Jim at 935-0422, Just at
362-4448 or Anna at 963-5774.

Assistance needed for
woman who lost home
The Lake City Fire
Department is requesting
assistance for June Armstrong,
64, who lost her home to a fire
on Jan. 22. Clothing as well as
cash donations are needed to
help her get back on her feet.


Cash/check donations can be
mailed or dropped off at:
The Lake city Fire
Department (across from the
post office)
Attn: Armstrong Fund
225 NW Main Blvd. Suite
101
Lake City, FL 32055.
Checks payable to Ms. June
Armstrong.
For donations of clothing,
etc.. contact Ms. Armstrong at
(cell) (352) 317-8135.
Clothing sizes: Pants: 18
Blouse: XL Shoes: 9
For more information and
pictures, visits www..Icfdfl.com
donation page.

Violence and rape crisis
center offers support
Another Way, Inc. the local
domestic violence and rape
crisis center has a support group
for survivors of domestic violence
and their children from 5:30 to
7 p.m. every Thursday. If
interested call Susan at Another
Way, Inc. at 719-2700 for the
location. Women and children
only.

Today

Retired Federal Employees
anniversary set for today
The Lake City branch of the
National Association of Retired
Federal Employees will
celebrate its 30th ,anniversary at
noon today at Quail Heights
with cake and member photos.
This lunch group is actively
involved in supporting
Alzheimer's research, so the
guest speaker for this special
anniversary meeting will be
discussing DNA's link to
Alzheimer's.

N.A.R.F.E monthly
meeting today
National Active and Retired
Federal Employees Associaion
will have its monthly meeting at
11:30 a.m. today at Quail
Heights Country Cub 161 Quail
leighs Terrace Lake City:. '
32025. The speakers Jim" "
Purvis and George Tuning.
For more irifortation,"dali
Jim Purvis at 752-8570 or
e-mail at purvislkety@aol.com
or Ralph Hurst at 752-65-93 or
e-mail at hurst714@alltal.net

Suwannee Valley Kennel
Club meeting today
Suwannee Valley Kennel
Club would like to invite you to
attend its monthly club meeting.
They meet at the Columbia
County Fairgrounds; hospitality
room at 7:30 p.m. today free
handling classes are from 7 to
7:30 p.m.
For more information, call
Brett Deutsch at 647-6344.

Wednesday

State-of-the-School visits
Summers Elementary
As a part of the State-of-the
School visits, Columbia
County School Board members
and Superintendent, Sam
Markham will visit Summers
Elementary School at 10 a.m.
Wednesday.
These visits are open to the
public.


IDA meeting
planned for Wednesday
There will be a IDA meeting
at noon Wednesday in the CHS
Auditorium.

Thursday

Relay for Life meeting
planned for Thursday
The American Cancer
Society Reay for Life teams are
nearly complete. Join the final
meeting at 5:30 p.m. Thursday
at Baya Pharmacy. The 2007
Relay featuring the Albany
Marine Band will be at CHS on
April 13 and 14 and will be a
circus theme.
For more information, call
Travis Henry at 758-6888,
Bruce Dicks at 365-3784 or
John Pierce at 344-2472.

Olustee Festival wrap
up meeting Thursday
The Blue Gray Army will hold
it's wrap up meeting of the
Olustee Festival at 5:30 p.m.
Thursday, at the downtown
library. Members are
encouraged to try and attend
this important meeting.-
For more information, call
755-1097.

Coming Up

Classic Car show
planned for March 31
Cruisin' For A Cure Classic
Car and Truck Show will be held
from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. March 31
at Olustee Park. All proceeds
benefit the American Cancer
Society. Awards at 3 p.m., Top
20, Best of Show, Best Ford,
GM, Mopar, and Orphan. There
will be entertainment.
For more information call Ann
Milligan at 386-961-9422,
Mandy at (386) 755-6567 or
Charlene at (386) 752-4024.

M.O.A.A. meeting
planned for March 22
'M 0 A A. (Military Officers
ASsociaiion of America) will
Smeet.at 6:30. p.m. March 22 at
the Elks Club. All former and
present military officers and
spouses are welcome. A film
entitled "Spirit of Ichetucknee"
will be presented by Patty Martin
of the Ichetucknee Springs Park
staff. Dinner is $15.
Call Dennis Tarkington at
719-7092 by March 12 for
reservations.

Quilting Guild monthly
meeting is March 28
The Lady of the Lake Quilting
Guild will hold its monthly
meeting at 10 a.m March 28. at
the Southside Recreation
Center, 901 St. Margaret Road.
Hospitality starts at 9:30 a.m.
The program for March will be
the presentation of the 2007
Challenge by Joan Allot and
Ann Opgenorth. Ann will also
include a presentation on the
importance of color and values
to consider while
constructing quilts.
The Guild is an organization
for anyone interested in quilts
and the art of quilting. The guild
makes and distributes over 100
quilts a year to various charities
and non-profit organizations. A
show-and-tell segment of the


meeting will showcase the
various quilters; handiwork.
For more information, call
Marcia Kazmierski, 752-2461 or
e-mail mrckaz@aol.com.

Pregnancy Crisis Center
now accepting donations
It's time to start cleaning out
your closets and get organized
for 2007. Or maybe you are just
redecorating? The Pregnancy
Crisis Center will now accept
your good quality, unwanted
household and furniture items for
its annual Yard Sale fundraiser
that is to be held on May 4 in
Lake City, and Friday May 11 in
Live Oak. This year no clothing
will be sold, so no clothing
donations. Freshly laundered
baby items are always welcome,
however. All proceeds go to help
pregnant women and their
babies in crisis situations.
Receipts for tax deductions
available upon request..
For more information,
call 755-0058.

Order of the Purple Heart
meets second Thursday
Lake City Chapter #772 of
the Military Order of the Purple
Heart, USA meets at 5 p.m.
every second Thursday. The
meeting will take place at the
home of Junior Vice
Commander Gary L. Lafaso. If
you or a next of kin has been
awarded the Purple Heart, -by
the President of the United
States, for being combat
wounded, you are invited to
join them in their endeaver to
continue serving this country
and its veterans and families.
If you wish to volunteer, they
welcome you with open arms.
For more information, call
Tony (386) 497-2475 or Gary
(386) 758-5629.

Art League of North
Florida to meet March 27
The Art League of North
Florida will hold its regular
monthly meeting at 7 p.m. March
27 in the conference roomof the.
main branch of the Columbia "
County Public Library. Guest
speaker will be Carolyn Long
from Haven Hospice. All
members are encouraged to
attend and all citizens interested
in helping promote the arts in
Columbia County are invited to
attend.
For more information, call
Mary Goff at 961-9529 ,Wally
Reichert at 758-7853 or John
Pierce at 344-2472.
Stephen Foster State Park
offers beading workshop
WHITE SPRINGS -
Stephen Foster Folk Culture
Center State Park is offering a
workshop on making beaded
jewelry from 1 to 2 p.m.
April 7.
Students can learn to make
customized jewelry using
beading techniques. The class
will be taught by Betty Cave,
an artist who demonstrates her
skills at the park's Craft
Square. Her work also is
available through the park's
gift shop.
The fee for the workshop
begins at $25 and varies
according to the size of the
stones used and the comply
exity of the design. Park
admission is included in the
class fee and advance


OBITUARIES


Alvin Copeland
Mr. Alvin Copeland, 39 of Lake
City died Saturday, March 17, 2007,
at St. Joseph Hospital in Tampa. He
was born in Thomasville, GA and
has been a resident of Lake City for
the past twelve years having moved
here from Thomasville, GA. Mr.
Copeland loved watching football,
fishing, NASCAR and playing golf
and was a member of Lake City
Church of God. He is preceded in
death by a sister, Shamethe John-.
son, brother Darryl Copeland and
one son, Jasper Copeland.
Mr. Copeland is survived by his
wife, Patty Bowen Copeland, of
Lake City, children, Alvin Rashad
Copeland, Jr., Tricia Gloella Cope-
land, both of Lake City, Shantavia
Copeland and Kierra Arnold both of
Thomasville, GA, his mother, Glo-
ria Johnson, Thomasville, GA, his
grandmother, Elfletta Allison, Phil-
adelphia, PA,, mother and father-in-
law, Ray and Della Bowen, Rich-
mond, KY, sister in law, Della Fran-
ces Morgan, (Chris), brothers, Ern-
est Copeland, Atlanta, GA, Mack
Copeland, Thomasville, GA, Harold
(Vira) Copeland, Houston, TX and
Cedric Copeland, San Diego, CA,
sisters, Rhonda Diggs and Pamela
Copeland, both of Thomasville,
GA. A host of nieces, nephews and
great nieces also survive.
Memorial services for Mr. Copeland
will be conducted Wednesday,


March 21, 2007 at 11:00 A.M. at
Lake City Church of God with Pas-
tor Carroll Lee and Minister Ray
Bowen officiating. Arrangements
are under the direction of GATE-


WAY-FOREST LAWN FUNER-
AL HOME, 3596 S. HWY 441,
Lake City. (386) 752-1954. Please
sign the guest book at www.gate-
wayforestlawn.com.


Obituaries are paid advertisements.
For details, call the Lake City
Reporter's classified department at
752-1293.


registration is required.
For more information, call
Craft Square at 397-1920, or
visit the web site at
www. StephenFosterCSO. org.
To learn more about activities
at the park year-round, visit
online at
www. FloridaStateParks. org/ste
phenfoster.

Empty Bowls project
planned for Oct. 16
Empty Bowls, an
international project to fight
hunger, is a fundraising event
to provide financial assistance
to an organization that feeds
the hungry. The main event
will be held in Columbia
County at Lake City
Community College (LCCC) on
Oct. 16, World Food Day. This
event will be sponsored by the
LCCC chapter of Florida
Association of Community
Colleges (FACC) and Lake
City Community College. If
your organization works to
"stamp out" hunger and would
like to be considered as a
recipient of funds collected,
please contact Judy Wilson,
Empty Bowls committee
chairperson at 754-4285 or
e-mail wilsonj@lakecitycc.edu
for an application and criteria.
Applications are due Feb. 22.

CHS class of '72
reunion to take place
Columbia High School's Class
of 1972 35-year reunion will be
June 30 at the Spirit of
Suwannee in Live Oak.
For more information, call
George H. Hudson Jr. at
755-0630.

Master Goat Producer's
certification program
Master Goat Producer's
certification program will take
place from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. May
14-18 at Florida A&M
University.
For more information, call
Angela McKenzie-Jakes at
(850) 875-8557 or online at
www.famu.edu/goats.

Yard sale, fundraiser
planned for March 31
A March of Dimes fundraiser
yard sale will take place from
8 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Marcfi 31 in
First Federal Savings Bank's
Financial Center parking lot on
the corner of Turner and U.S. 90.

Goat Field Day
planned for April 13
There will be a Goat Field Day
at 8:30 a.m. April 13 at Florida


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For more information, call Dr.
Ray Mobley or Tyrell Khan at
(850) 412-5252 or online at
www. famu. edu/herds.

United Way looking
for volunteers
United Way of Suwannee
Valley is seeking volunteers to
assist the tri-county emergency
management centers (EOC).
Needed are individuals with good
interpersonal and
communications skills who can
assist in answering the phones
for the Community Information
Centers (CIC) in the EOCs.
These volunteers serve as the
link between the county
emergency management offices
and the public when the EOCs
are activated for emergencies,
such as hurricanes.
If you are willing to serve in
this capacity when needed, call
Tracy Palmer, United Way Long
Term Recovery Coordinator, at
752-5604 or e-mail
unitedway@bellsouth.net for
more information or to add your
name to the list of volunteers:

Wine Pairing and dinner
planned for March 19
A Wine Pairing & Five Course
Dinner is planned for 6:30 p.m.
March 19 at Tucker's Fine
Dining.
The main course will be rib
eye steak with stuffed lobster tail.
Tickets are $75 per person. All
proceed benefit the Columbia
County Senior Service Lifestyle
Enrichment Center.
For more information, call
Karen Green at 365-1234, Jan
Turbeville at 755-0600 -
ext. 3176 or Brian Tucker at
Tucker's Fine Dining.

'Children's Day 2007'
set for March 23
Come and join the Early
Learning Coalition of Florida's
Gateway celebrate "Children's
Day 2007" from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
March 23 at the Westfield
Square parking lot near TCBY in
Lake City. There will be pony
rides, bounce houses, game
shows and other fun-filled
activities for children of all ages
to enjoy. Enjoy guest
appearances by Smokey the
Bear, UF's Albert and Alberta, the
Shoney's Bear, the Columbia
High School Tiger and "Jodini"
the Magician. Community and
social service agencies will be
displayed with parent educational
materials on hand. Free food,
fun and give ways for everyone.
For more information, call
LaShone T. Surrency at the Early
Learning Coalition of Florida's
Gateway at 866-752-9770.


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Page Editor: Todd Wiison, 754-0428 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & NATION TUESDAY, MARCH 20, 2007


IRAQ:.War's fourth anniversary marked


Continued From Page 1A
has been rejected by the vot-
ers in our nation and it will be
rejected by the Congress."
With the war lumbering into
its fifth year, it has claimed the
lives of more than 3,200 mem-
bers of the U.S. military.
Predictions about the cost and
length of the war have been
far surpassed. The public over-
whelmingly opposes the war,
and Bush's approval rating
stands near his all-time low.
Trying to halt spiraling sectar-
ian bloodshed, Bush has
ordered nearly 30,000 addi-
tional combat and support
troops to Iraq, mostly to stabi-
lize Baghdad.
The president pleaded for
patience to give his strategy
more time to work.
'The new strategy will need
more time to take effect," he
said. "Until Baghdad's citizens
feel secure in their own homes
and neighborhoods, it will be
difficult for Iraqis to make fur-
ther progress toward political
reconciliation or economic


rebuilding, steps necessary
for Iraq to build a democratic
society."
From Capitol Hill,
Democrats said patience has
run out.
House Democratic Whip
James Clyburn said
Democrats were intent on
"ending the blank check for
the president's war and setting
a timeline for the phased rede-
ployment of our U.S. military."
Added Clyburn, D-S.C., "By
August 2008 at the latest, U.S.
combat troops will be rede-
ployed from Iraq."
A new poll reflected the
stress and hopelessness that
are the result of the unrelent-
ing violence and uncertain
political situation. The poll, by
ABC News, USA Today, the
BBC and ARD German TV,
found only 18 percent of Iraqis
have confidence in U.S. and
coalition troops; 86 percent
are concerned that someone
in their household will be a
victim of violence; and 51 per-


cent say violence against
American forces is acceptable.
The joint security crack-
down by an influx of U.S. and
Iraqi forces to Baghdad and
the troubled Anbar Province
began Feb. 14. Bush said,
"Success will take months, not
days or weeks" - in part
because less than half of the
U.S. troop reinforcements
have yet arrived in the capital.
"There will be good days,
and there will be bad days
ahead as the security plan
unfolds," the president
said.
Still, he reported positive
news, some that had been
delivered during a briefing
on the war with his National
Security Council and a later
videoconference call with
Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri
al-Maliki from Baghdad.
Bush credited Iraqis with
now deploying 10 army
brigades and nine national
police brigades to the capital
city.


CITY: Studies stormwater utility costs


Continued From Page 1A
budget.
Burton said existing com-
mercial properties could be
given a credit if they have
existing stormwater struc-
tures.
Kraus said in 2005 a list was
made of 15 stormwater proj-
ects that needed to be
addressed throughout the city.
McLellan said these proj-.
ects may remain at the top of
the list when work actually
begins, but the cost of the proj-
ects will have to be reassessed
before proceeding.
The total project, including
the capital improvement plan
and community outreach pro-
gram, will cost just less than
$107,000, Kraus said.
* The council also
approved Police Chief David
Allbritton's request to apply
for a DOT traffic grant. The
grant "would consist of
$134,910 to purchase two fully
equipped cars and fund two
salaries with benefits ;for offi-
cers whose primary duties
would be working traffic,
mostly on U.S. 90, Allbritton
said.
The. grant would pay 100
percent of the officer's salaries
the first year and then 50 per-
cent the second year and 25
percent the third year.
If the grant is approved,
Allbritton will have to bring it
back before the council to ask
permission to accept it.
N The council approved the
resolution to amend the Fiscal
Year 2000 Florida Small Cities


Community Development
Block Grant Housing
Rehabilitation Project that
reduces the housing projects
in Lake City from 26 to 22.
Martha Orthoefer, principal
planner, North Central Florida
Regional Planning Council,
brought the resolution before
the council.
Dwellings were taken off
the list either from voluntary
withdrawals from the program
or because people did not fully
own their homes, Orthoefer
said.
She also presented informa-
tion on grants for which the
-city can apply during the 2007
fiscal year.
* The council approved the
increase for Jet A Fuel to $3.37
per gallon, which was effective
March 7, and increases the
rate 6 cents.
* The request by the
March of Dimes to hold its
WalkAmerica event was
approved. The fundraiser is
scheduled from 6 a.m.-12:30
p.m., on April 14.
* Leonard O'Neal's request
to use the Richardson Gym for
the Richardson High Scho6ol
Alumni Picnic and'to have the
fees waived were approved.
The event is scheduled for
July 27, 28 and 29.
* The council approved an
ordinance that amends the
city's General Employment
Retirement Plan to be handled
by a Board of Trustees, with
two members being general
employees.


* Property located off
Commerce Drive and U.S. 90
West was approved for annex-
ation into the city.
* The Publix property off
U.S. 90 West also was
approved to move forward
with the process of friendly
annexation into the city.
* The council also
approved termination of a
lease with Columbia County
Resources, Inc. Termination
of the lease allows the county
and city to build an extension
of Real Road on property
leased by Columbia County
Resources. Columbia County
Resources will allow the con-
struction after the termination
of the lease.
* A utility easement for
Florida Power and Light was
granted by the city at the air-
port. This allows FPL to pro-
vide utility services to Great,
South Timber and Lumber,
Inc.
* The city approved a
licensing agreement with
Georgia Southern and Florida
Railway Company in the
amount of $10,700.
This is for the installation of
a water pipe line under and
across railway company land.
* A contract was approved
by the council for T B
Landmark Construction,,Inc.
of Jacksonville, for pipeline
installations under Price
Creek Road at Andrews
Drive .at. the cost of
$28,391.40.


AG: Gonzales criticized on the job
Continued From Page 1A


political damage from the fir-
ing of eight federal prosecu-
tors, White House spokesman
Tony Snow said, "I don't
know."
Snow declined to predict
how long Gonzales would stay
in his job but reiterated
President Bush's support of
him.
"No one's prophetic enough
to know what the next 21
months hold," Snow said. "We
hope he stays."
The Justice Department
also turned over to the House
and Senate Judiciary
Committees some 3,000 pages
of new documents related to
the firings.
White House counselor Dan
Bartlett said that Bush had full
confidence in Gonzales and
that the attorney general had


not offered to resign.
The good news for Gonzales
late Monday was that the two
most senior Republicans on
the Senate Judiciary
Committee, Arlen Specter of
Pennsylvania and Orrin Hatch
of Utah, both former chair-
men, had not called for a new
attorney general. But neither
were they endorsing the
embattled Justice chief.
Specter said he will reserve
judgment until he gets all the
facts; Hatch has not given
interviews on the subject, his
spokesman said.
Either way, Gonzales faces a
tough week. The Senate was
devoting Monday and
Tuesday to debating and vot-
ing on rescinding his authority
to appoint replacement U.S.
attorneys without Senate con-


firmation.
'"We need to close the loop-
hole exploited by the White
House and the Department of
Justice that facilitated this
abuse," Senate Judiciary
Committee Chairman Patrick
Leahy, D-Vt., said opening the
debate.
With Gonzales under fire,
speculation turned to who
might succeed him. Possible
candidates include White
House homeland security
adviser Frances Fragos
Townsend, Homeland
Security Secretary Michael
Chertoff, former Solicitor
General Ted Olson, Assistant
Attorney General Kenneth
Wainstein, federal appeals
judge Laurence Silberman and
PepsiCo attorney Larry
Thompson.


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NEW YORK: Special gathering is set


Continued From Page 1A
to be food. We are trying to
represent foods that are popu-
lar in New York City and the
upstate area. We're having
appetizers, a full meal and a
dessert."
One of the traditional high-
lights of the event has been
the New York home-styled
food, so attendees can get a
"taste of home." This year's
menu will have an Italian and
Polish theme.
Happy Hour items include:
Italian cheeses with crackers,
New York apple slices and
grapes, Pierogis, a New York
City deli item, apple juice
punch and New York wine
punch.
The main course meal con-
sists of minestrone soup,
tossed salad, marinated veg-
etables, lasagna, stuffed cab-
bage and Italian Bread. (A veg-
etarian entree will be available
upon request.)
Dessert items include
spumoni ice cream, celestial
crust (Polish dessert) and
New York party cake. There
will also be a cash bar at the
event.
Event organizers plan to
seat the New York state trans-
plants by the areas where
they're from, so there will be a
chance for attendees to meet
people from their old home-
town.
"It's a diverse state and we


are trying to get people from
all over the state," Lloyd said.
"We'll get a DJ to play some
songs with New York themes
and we might have a trivia con-
test as well."
For additional information
about the annual celebra-
tion, contact any member of
the 2007 New York
Committee; Vern and
Maureen Lloyd at 752-4885
or 397-3113 or e-mail at
gom@isgroup.net; Shirley
Bellows at 758-9760 or Ed
Pettie at 752-8520.
The New York Day contest
started five years ago as a cel-


ebration of the Empire State
by local residents and has
become a local tradition that
seems to be increasing in
popularity.
"It's just a social get
together that was started by
us and Rick Bacon, the for-
mer Lake City Reporter pub-
lisher and so we just kept it
going because it proved to be
enjoyable to people," Lloyd
said.
"We just kept it going. I
think we'll have at least 100
people.
"Last year we had about that
same amount."


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Page Editor: Todd Wilson, 754-0428


I


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LAKE CITY . REPORTER LOCAL & NATION TUESDAY, MARCH 20,2007








LAKE CITY REPORTER HEALTH TUESDAY, MARCH 20, 2007


Transplant lets college student, baby split liver


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Twenty one-year-old Maggie Catherwood, of Sterling, Va., holds
eight-month-old Allison Brown, of Waldorf, Md., as the two recover
from their recent liver transplant, recently, at Georgetown Hospital
in Washington.,


FDA warns


sometimes
By LAURAN NEERGAARD
AP Medical Writer "We r
WASHINGTON - All pre- third
scription sleeping pills may beha
sometimes cause sleep-driv- exte
ihg, federal health officialgsl' ..,..t.
warned Wednesday, almost a , .,
year after the bizarre side
effect first made headlines
When Rep. Patrick Kennedy
crashed his car after taking series of
Ambien. Wednesday.
It's a more complicated ver- First, th,
sion of sleepwalking, but sleep drugs
behind the wheel: getting up wings on their
in the middle of the night and rare but ser
going for a drive - with no - sleep-c
memory of doing so. other less
The Food and Drug plex sleep-r
Administration wouldn't say -- like ma]
exactly how many cases of fixing and
sleep-driving it had linked to having sex
insomnia drugs, but neurolo- - and
gy chief Dr. Russell Katz said allergic rea
the agency uncovered more severe facia
than a dozen reports - and is which can
worried that more are going first time th
uncounted. or anytime t
Given the millions of pre- Next, do
scriptions for insomnia will begin g
drugs, Katz called the prob- fying them
lem rare, and said he was ings.
unaware of any deaths. But Later this
because sleep-driving is so tion sleeping
dangerous - and there are coming
precautions that patients can brochures c
take - the FDA ordered a Guides" th


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By LAURAN NEERGAARD
AP Medical Writer
WASHINGTON - The
transplant surgeon had good
news: A donated liver was on
the way for critically ill
Maggie Catherwood. Then he
asked: Would she let doctors
cut off part of her new liver to
share with an equally sick
baby?
"I can't imagine anyone say-
ing no," the 21-year-old col-
lege student said last week as,
teary-eyed, she met 8-month-
old Allison Brown, carefully
cuddling the wide-eyed baby
so as not to bump each other's
healing incisions.
Actually, few ever get the
choice - something the
nation's transplant network
soon may change. There's a
push to increase liver-splitting
that could have many more
people who are awaiting
transplants being asked to
share a piece of their new
organ.
If the proposed changes are
enacted, "I think it's safe to
say we could nearly eliminate
death on the pediatric liver
waiting list," said Allison's
surgeon, Dr. Thomas
Fishbein of Georgetown
University Hospital.
A liver is unlike any other
organ: A piece of a healthy
one can grow into a whole
organ in. about a month.
That's, why some people
receive liver transplants from
living donors who have just a
portion of their organ cut out
and given away.
Split-liver donation is differ-
ent. It divides an organ donat-


"The fact that someone else was
willing to give up part of that liver they
need is amazing to me."

- Terri Brown
mother of Allison Brown


ed when someone dies, to try
to save two lives with one
donation.
It doesn't happen very
often, accounting for between
2 and 3 percent of the more
than 6,000 liver transplants
annually. Just 123 split-liver
transplants were performed
in the U.S. last year, according
to the United Network for
Organ Sharing, which runs
the transplant system.
Particularly rare, says
Fishbein, is an adult agreeing
to share a liver that the wait-
ing-list rules deem completely
his or hers. Usually when a
liver is split, an organ too
large for a baby or small child
had to be cut to fit anyway -
and pediatric surgeons who
don't want to waste the rest
offer it to the next candidate
on the waiting list.
"I didn't even know it was
possible" to split a liver, said
Catherwood. But she said
yes, and her first question
upon waking up from surgery
was, "How's the baby?"
"The fact that someone else
was willing to give up part of
that liver they need is amaz-
ing to me," said Terri Brown,
Allison's mother, in an emo-
tional meeting with
Catherwood 12 days after the
transplants.
"Oh, she's adorable, oh my


sleeping pills can


cause 'sleep-driving'
take any prescription insom-
ally want people to know these nia drug along with alcohol
gs can occur, and these sleep or any other sedating drug.
,iors can be perhaps to a large Also, don't take higher-than-
iors can be perhaps to a large recommended doses of the
nt mitigated by behaviors the pills.
patients can control." "We really want people to
know these things can occur,
- Dr. Russell Katz and these sleep behaviors
neurology chief can be perhaps to a large
extent mitigated by behav-
rict new steps risks for patients in easy-to- iors the patients can con-
understand language. trol," he said.
.makers of 13 Sleep-driving made head- Some of the insomnia
must put warn- lines last May when Kennedy, drugs may be riskier than
labels about two D-R.I., crashed his car into others, so FDA also recom-
)us side effects: security barrier outside the mended that manufacturers
giving, along with U.S: Capitol after taking conduct clinical trials to fig-
angerous "com- Ambien and a second drug, ure that out.
lated behaviors" Phenergan, an anti-nausea The drugs are: Ambien;
ing phone calls, pill that also acts as a seda- Butisol sodium; Carbrital;
ating food, and tive. Kennedy has said he had Dalmane; Doral; Halcion;
while still asleep. no memory of the event. He Lunesta; Placidyl; Prosom;
life-threatening pleaded guilty to driving Restoril; Rozerem; Seconal;
ions, as well as under the influence of Sonata..
swelling, both of prescription drugs, and was Fewer than one in 1,000
)ccur either the sentenced to court-ordered patients in studies of Ambien
e pills are taken drug treatment and a year's reported somnambulism -a
hereafter. probation., scientific term that includes
tors this week Ambien isn't the only the sleep behaviors flagged
tting letters noti- insomnia drug that can by the FDA - said Lisa
f the new warn- cause sleep-driving - any of Kennedy, a spokeswoman for
the class known as "sedative- manufacturer Sanofi-Aventis
rear, all prescrip- hypnotics" can, FDA's Katz SA, who is not related to the
pills will begin stressed Wednesday. congressman. The side
with special To lower the risk of a effect has remained similarly
lled "Medication sleep-driving episode, he rare since widespread sales
t spell out the advised patients to never began, she said.


gosh!" exclaimed
Catherwood from her wheel-
chair as Allison's father,
Brian, handed her the baby,
tiny white dog slippers peek-
ing from beneath her blanket.
Not every transplant center
has the expertise or incentive
to split livers, especially those
that treat only adults. It's a
more technically challenging
operation. It poses a slightly
higher risk of post-surgery
complications, such as main-
taining the good blood flow
necessary for the organ to
survive.
Nor is every donated liver
splittable. It must be a very
healthy organ, not the mar-
ginal ones often transplanted;
typically, the donor was a


young adult who died from an
accident.
But a rough estimate from
the United Network for Organ
Sharing is that more than
1,000 livers donated a year
might qualify for splitting.
Fishbein is part of a the net-
work committee charged with
spurring those transplants, in
hopes of improving child sur-
vival. Between 10 percent and
13 percent of young children
on the liver waiting list die
there.
Pending proposals would
mandate that all transplant
centers be notified when a
potentially splittable liver is
donated, and that the search
for a matching recipient iden-
tify those willing to accept a.
partial organ."
'This is a really important
topic," said Dr. George
Mazariegos, transplant chief
at Children's Hospital of
Philadelphia, who says liver-
splitting today is too depend-
ent on individual surgeons.


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Obesity surgery patients should watch for rare o 3 offices o - i

complication caused by lack of vitamin B I Lake City* Live Oak
By MARGARET LILLARD Forest University School of days and weeks after surgery, of the journal Neurology. The Dowling Park


Associated Press
RALEIGH, N.C. - Doctors
warn that a few obesity sur-
gery patients have developed
a serious neurological condi-
tion, with symptoms of confu-
sion and poor coordination,
linked to a lack of vitamin Bl.
Wernicke encephalopathy,
which is caused by a thiamine
deficiency, is normally associ-
ated with severe alcoholism
or chronic malnutrition.
However, researchers say it
can also occur within a few
months of obesity surgery if
patients stop taking pre-
scribed vitamin supplements
or if they vomit frequently,
preventing vitamins from
being absorbed.
Patients who show symp-
toms "need to seek help
immediately and get injec-
tions of thiamine as early as
possible," said study author
Sonal Singh, an instructor in
internal medicine at Wake


Medicine. "For doctors, the
message is that they should
keep this in their minds when
they see these patients."
Singh said cases of
Wernicke encephalopathy
may increase as the number
of bariatric surgeries per-
formed in the United States
continues to grow. About
170,000 obesity surgeries
were done in 2005, up from
120,000 the year before and
16,000 in 1992.
Philip Schauer, the presi-
dent of the American Society
for Bariatric Surgery, said
that while Wernicke
encephalopathy isn't unique
to obesity surgery or a com-
mon outcome after such pro-
cedures, he agrees it's some-
thing doctors should watch
for.
"A mild degree of nausea
after surgery and rare,
episodic vomiting is really
common in the first several


If it's an isolated thing, one or
two episodes and that's it, it's
not a problem," said Schauer,
who is also director of
bariatric surgery at the
Cleveland Clinic in Ohio.
More severe symptoms
should be addressed
immediately, he said.
"The surgeon and the
health care team ... must be
aware of somebody having
very severe nausea and vomit-
ing," Schauer said. "That per-
son, if they're calling from
home, should be brought in to
see the doctor or to the
emergency room."
Singh and co-author Abhay
Kumar of the University of
Iowa searched obesity sur-
gery case histories, dating
back to the 1980s, locating 32
cases of Wernicke
encephalopathy. They looked
at symptoms and risk factors.
Their findings are pub-
lished in the this week's issue


researchers called for more
study to determine how often
the condition affects bariatric
patients and to determine the
best treatment for it.
The study found that cases
occurred from four to 12
weeks after the surgery,
though one occurred 18
months later. Twenty-seven
victims were female, but that
may be because 75 percent of
the surgeries involved
women.
The patients suffered from
confusion, a lack of coordina-
tion and rapid rhythmic eye
movement, classic symptoms
of Wernicke encephalopathy.
Several also had problems
with weakness, seizures, deaf-
ness and limb numbness.
Most recovered completely
after getting thiamine intra-
venously, though a few contin-
ued to have problems with
memory, coordination and
vision.


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House faces final vote on overriding


governor's order for cancer vaccine


By APRIL CASTRO
Associated Press .---.


AUSTIN, Texas - Texas
lawmakers are fighting to
block the governor's order
requiring that sixth-grade
girls be vaccinated against the
virus that causes cervical can-
cer, with the House giving
final approval to a bill to make
the shots strictly voluntary.
Gov. Rick Perry's executive
order has inflamed conserva-
tives who say it contradicts
Texas' abstinence-only sexual
education policies and
intrudes into family lives.
Some critics also have ques-
tioned whether the vaccine
has been proven safe.
The House voted 118-23 on
Wednesday to approve a bill
that would keep the vaccine
off the list of required shots
for school attendance. The
measure now heads to the
state Senate, where more than
half the members are co-spon-
soring an identical bill.
The 118 votes for the bill
Wednesday would be more
than enough to override a
veto by the governor.
The vaccine protects girls
against some strains of human
papillomavirus, or HPV, a sex-
ually transmitted virus that
causes most cases of cervical
cancer. A February report by
the federal Centers for
Disease Control and
Prevention estimated that one
in four U.S. women ages 14 to
59 is infected with the virus.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
One dose of the vaccine Gardasil, developed by Merck & Co., is
displayed in this Feb. 2, in Austin, Texas. While proponents say
requiring the vaccine would get it to the most people, critics have
complained that the HPV vaccine would give teens a false sense of
security and undermine abstinence-only education and parental
autonomy.


Perry's order directed
Health and Human Services
Executive Commissioner
Albert Hawkins to adopt rules
to vaccinate all girls entering
the sixth grade as of
September 2008. Parents
could have refused the shots
for their daughters.
Lawmakers said the gover-
nor circumvented the legisla-
tive process.


The House bill "will not
take away the option for a sin-
gle girl or a single family in
this state to choose to vacci-
nate a child," said Republican
Rep. Dennis Bonnen of
Angleton, the lead author of
the bill. "It simply says a fami-
ly must make that choice, not
a state government."
The governor's office has
estimated that only 25 percent


of young women in Texas
would get the vaccine if it is
not mandatory.
Critics also have argued
that the vaccine, called
Gardasil, was too new and its
effects needed to be further
studied before mandating it
for Texas schoolgirls. The
Food and Drug
Administration approved
Gardasil last year.
Elsewhere, a New Mexico
bill that requiring the shots
for sixth-grade girls is expect-
ed to be signed by the end of
this week by Gov. Bill
Richardson, spokesman
Gilbert Gallegos said. And
Virginia Gov. Timothy M.
Kaine has said he would sign
a similar bill passed by his
'state's Legislature.
Although the Wyoming
Legislature recently rejected a
request for $4 million specifi-
cally to fund HPV vaccination,
the state's Department of
Health intends to continue
offering the vaccine to eligible
girls with existing funding
until the money run out.
In other states,
Massachusetts Gov. Deval
Patrick's budget proposal,
unveiled in February, pro-
posed offering free shots in a
voluntary program to all girls
ages 9 to 18. A California
Assembly committee on
Tuesday put off voting on a
bill that would require girls
entering the seventh grade to
be vaccinated against HPV.


Study finds that weekend heart attack

patients are slightly more likely to die


By UNDA A. JOHNSON .
Associated Press Weekend worries


TRENTON, N.J. - Heart attack
patients have a slightly higher risk of
death if they go to the hospital on the
weekend, when they are more likely to
miss or wait longer for crucial treat-
ments, one of the largest studies of the
issue finds.
Although the increased risk of death
is small, about 1 in 100 patients each
year, it can mean potentially thousands
more deaths in the United States annu-
ally. The study indicated that weekend
patients waited longer for angioplasty
and other procedures, likely because of
reduced staffing.
Even so, doctors say you shouldn't
avoid a weekend hospital visit if you
think you are having a heart attack or
stroke. A delay of even an hour or two
raises chances of death or serious heart
or brain damage.
The new study of nearly a quarter-
million patients in New Jersey reflects
what smaller previous studies have
shown about weekend medical care.
Recently published Canadian research
also showed stroke patients hospital-
ized on weekends had a higher chance
of dying than those admitted on a
weekday.
In the latest study, published in
Thursday's New England Journal of
Medicine, researchers at Robert Wood
Johnson Medical School in Piscataway,
N.J., used a huge statewide database.
They tracked 231,164 patients admitted
for a first heart attack from 1987-2002.
They looked at trends over four-year
periods, partly because of major
advances in heart attack treatment over
that time, including new clot-busting
drugs, artery-clearing angioplasty and
tiny devices called stents that prop open
cleared-out arteries.


Heart attack patients admitted to
a hospital on a weekend had a
slightly higher risk of death than
those admitted on a weekday.
Percentage of deaths based on
day of hospital admission; .
1999-2002


8 percent
7
6
5
4 1.3oo
3
2
1 .. ..
0 i--
Day 2
admitted


Weekend


6.60o


Weekday


1


1%


I I I I,
3 4 5 6
Days past admission


SOURCE: New England AP
Journal of Medicine
In the most recent four-year period,
when care was much the same as today,
patients admitted on a weekend were
about 7.5 percent more likely to die with-
in a month than those admitted on a
weekday. After adjusting for factors such
as age and other medical problems, the
death rate was 5 percent higher for those
admitted on weekends, said the lead
researcher, medical student William J.
Kostis.
He said the difference in outcomes
was obvious by the day after admission.
"We lose this patient early. It's after the
first day or two," Kostis said, adding that
the weekend patients were at least one-
third less likely to get angioplasty or


bypass surgery promptly, compared with
weekdays. "It seems very likely to be a
factor."
At many hospitals, the catheterization
lab where those procedures are per-
formed is closed or has limited service
hours on weekends.
In the most recent four-year span,
almost 13 percent of heart attack patients
admitted on weekends died within a
month, compared with 12 percent admit-
ted on weekdays. That could mean thou-
sands of excess deaths, since about
700,000 Americans have a first heart
attack each year.
The weekend death rates were similar-
ly higher in most of the previous time
periods, too.
Dr. Kirk Garratt, director of the coro-
nary care unit at Lenox Hill Hospital in
New York, noted that when the
researchers adjusted for whether
patients got angioplasty or other invasive
treatment, the difference in death rates
fell.
'That's a pretty powerful way of saying
that the underuse of angioplasty on
weekends had a direct effect on patient
survival," as other researchers have
speculated, Garratt said.
He said that as cardiac care generally
improved over the study's 16 years,
fewer patients had really severe heart
attacks, and that the difference in week-
end and weekday death rates in .this
study appears to mainly reflect whether
the mild heart attack patients got
angioplasty. '
In an editorial in the journal, Drs.
Donald A. Redelmeier and Chaim M.
Bell of the University of Toronto wrote
that research has shown surges in
patient complications on weekends.
"If the patient dies on the weekend, no
heroics on Monday will suffice," they
wrote.


Scientists seek more options for pain sufferers


By LAURAN NEERGAARD
AP Medical Writer
WASHINGTON -
Scientists are hunting new
ways to help millions of pain
sufferers - from addiction-
resistant narcotics to using
brain scanners for biofeed-
back - amid a worrisome
rise in abuse of today's top
prescription painkillers.
The good news: Only a
tiny fraction of patients who
are appropriately prescribed
the most powerful
painkillers - drugs known
as opioids, including mor-
phine, Vicodin, fentanyl and
Oxycontin - ever will
become dependent on them.
And scientists told the
National Institutes of Health
last week that those few who
are vulnerable tend also to
suffer such psychiatric dis-


orders as depression and
anxiety, giving doctors a clue
about which patients need
closer monitoring.
Opioids "are not danger-
ous if you know how to use
them properly," stressed Dr.
Nora Volkow, chief of NIH's
National Institute on Drug
Abuse. "We need to develop
the knowledge that maxi-
mizes our ability to use them
properly."
Amid fears that rising
painkiller abuse will spark a
backlash against pain suffer-
ers, Volkow organized a two-
day meeting involving sever-
al hundred scientists and pri-
mary care physicians, to
bring the latest science on
pain and addiction to doctors
struggling to balance the
drugs' clear benefits and
potential harm.
Some form of chronic pain


affects one of every three or
four adults worldwide. The
government says one in 10
Americans suffers pain that
lasts a year or more. For mil-
lions, pain is severe enough
to be disabling; up to 6 mil-
lion patients are on long-
term opioid therapy. It's not
just a question of suffering'
Serious pain can actually
worsen recovery from
various ailments.
How many need opioids
but don't get them? Those
numbers are hard to come
by, but "pain is really under-
treated in our society," opi-
oid specialist Dr.
Christopher Evans of the
University of California, Los
Angeles, told the NIH
meeting.
By some estimates, as
many as 40 percent of cancer
patients and the terminally


ill don't even get those
medications.
At the same time, pre-
scription drug abuse, partic-
ularly of opioid painkillers, is
on the rise. One in 10 high
school seniors admits to pop-
ping Vicodin for nonmedical
purposes, and recent studies
suggest about 2.2 million
people age 12 and older first
abused painkillers in the
past year, outpacing new
marijuana users. Some
415,000 people received
treatment for painkiller
abuse last year, Evans said.
So the hunt is on for pain
relief that minimizes the
abuse risk - not just for the
2 percent of pain patients
who might become depend-
ent, but to discourage theft
or other diversion of the
drugs.


HPV most prevalent in younger women
The human papillomavirus (HPV) is most common among U.S. women
aged 20-24, but it is relatively lower for those under 20.


2003-04 percentage by...
RACE MARITAL STATUS
39. 41.2461


White Mexican
American


ned e Separated I
Never Living with
married partner


44.8


NOTE: White and black are
non-Hispanic; separated
Includes widowed and
divorced


20-24 30-39 50-59


SOURCE: Journal of the American Medical Association AP

Sexually transmitted

HPV remains a mystery


By MARTHA IRVINE
AP National Writer
Nearly every working day,
Dr. Elizabeth Poynor encoun-
ters anxious young women
who come to her New York
City office with an HPV diag-
nosis.
The human papillomavirus
is the most prevalent sexually
transmitted diseases -- so
common that researchers esti-
mate most people will have
some form of it in their life-
time. Young adults are espe-
cially at risk because they tend
to be the most sexually active
group.
And yet Poynor finds that
most of her young patients -
even if they've heard of a new
vaccine aimed at preventing
the worst kinds of HPV -
know little about the virus and
the harm it can do.
Many women find them-
selves scrambling to under-
stand HPV after a routine Pap
smear determines they have it.
And that, Poynor and others
say, creates angst that could be
avoided with more education.
'This is a very common
problem, period," Poynor, a
gynecological oncologist in pri-
vate practice, says of HPV.


"That's the first thing I try to
tell my patients, to put their
minds at ease and to potential-
ly take away some of the stig-
ma that a sexually transmitted
disease might carry."
The reasons that HPV is so
little known are many. Poynor
thinks it's been overshadowed
by higher-profile STDs, such
as HIV and herpes. Others
note that, when marketing its
vaccine, pharmaceutical com-
pany Merck & Co. has chosen
to focus on the potential for
cervical cancer rather than the
virus itself, which also can
cause genital warts.
And then there's the gender
divide. Both men and women
can have high-risk HPV and
low-risk types. But, doctors
say, high-risk strains pose
more problems for women,
potentially leading not only to
cervical cancer but also to
infertility.
Frequently, men are seen as
the silent carriers who can
unknowingly spread HPV to
their sexual partners. And
even when people know they
have HPV, they often think
condoms offer 100 percent pro-
tection, when research has
shown that they don't.


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1 OA LAKE CITY REPORTER NATION & WORLD TUESDAY, MARCH 20, 2007 Page Editor: Chris Bednar, 754-0404


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Groves can harbor weapons
Soldiers with Company B, 5th Battalion, 20th Infantry Regiment, secure a palm grove in Baqouba,
Iraq, 35 miles northeast of Baghdad, recently. Soldiers of the unit, part of 3rd Stryker Brigade Combat
Team, 2nd Infantry Division, from Fort Lewis, Wash., spent three days clearing the palm groves in the
neighborhood of Buhriz to deny insurgents access to the terrain, which can be used to hide weapons
and to launch attacks on coalition forces.

Suspect pleads not guilty in

blaze that killed five firefighters


By GILLIAN FLACCUS
Associated Press
RIVERSIDE, Calif. - An
auto mechanic accused of set-
ting a raging wildfire that
killed five firefighters was
back in court Monday to face
additional arson charges as
the first detailed evidence on
the blazes was presented.
In all, Raymond Lee Oyler
is charged with five counts of
first-degree murder, 17 counts
of using an incendiary device
and 23 counts of arson, includ-
ing the deadly fire.
He pleaded not guilty to
additional arson charges
before the start of a prelimi-
nary hearing to determine
whether there is enough evi-
dence against him for a trial.
Oyler was arrested Oct. 31,
soon after a wind-whipped fire
raced through the foothills


Oyler


n e a r
Ban ni'n g,
about 90
miles east
of Los
Angeles,
overrun-
ning fire-
fighters as


they attempted to protect a
house.
A state fire investigator,
Capt. Charlie Dehart, testified
during the preliminary hear-
ing that Oyler, 36, likely
experimented with different
arson methods as early as five
months before the fatal fire.
Dehart, of the California
Department of Fire and
Protection, said he found
remains of cigarette-and-
match devices at fires in the


area as early as May 1b,
Dehart testified that hE
called to investigate nine


pected arson fires in the
Banning area between May 16
and July 9. He said that at
some of the fires, he found a
cigarette-and-match device
that contained red-tipped
wooden matches, called "safe-
ty matches," bundled around
a Marlboro Light cigarette
with a rubber band or duct
tape.
At others, he said, there
were just a few matches, or
matches placed perpendicular
to the cigarette, with their tips
resting on the cigarette.
"There are similarities in
the placement of the devices,
as far as they're all on the
right-hand side of the road,
they're all in wide spots iri the
road, the matches are all simi-


Hussein's former
deputy hanged
BAGHDAD - Saddam
Hussein's former deputy was
hanged before dawn Tuesday for
the killings of 148 Shiites, an
official with the prime minister's
office said.
Taha Yassin Ramadan, who
was Saddam's vice president
when the regime was ousted four
years ago, was the fourth man to
be executed in the killings of 148
Shiites following a 1982
assassination attempt against the
former leader in the city of Dujail.
The official, who witnessed the
hanging but spoke on condition
of anonymity because an official
announcement had not been
made, said precautions had been
taken to prevent a repeat of what
happened to Saddam's half
brother Barzan Ibrahim, who was
decapitated on the gallows.
Ramadan was weighed before
the hanging and the length of the
rope was chosen accordingly, the
official said.

Reporter witnesses
attack on convoy
KABUL, Afghanistan - The
three armored Chevrolet
Suburbans from the U.S.
Embassy caught my eye
Monday morning alongside the
donkey carts and rundown
Toyotas that compete for space
on the muddy, bumpy highway
that heads east out of
Afghanistan's capital.
"You should never get too
close to those vehicles," I
cautioned my driver as we
waited at an intersection to let
them pass while on our way to


BRIEFS
run errands.
Moments later, a fireball
ripped through the convoy,
wounding five U.S. Embassy
security guards and killing a
15-year-old Afghan bystander
- the first Taliban suicide
bombing in Kabul this year.
Taliban and other militants
are increasingly resorting to
Iraq-style tactics of suicide and
roadside bombings in their
campaign against foreign troops
and President Hamid Karzai's
shaky government.
Last year saw an explosion
of violence in Afghanistan,
including 139 suicide attacks,
mostly in the south and east.
Maj. William Mitchell, a U.S.
military spokesman, said there
have been 28 suicide attacks in
2007, including one last month
that killed 23 people outside the
big U.S. base at Bagram during
a visit by Vice President Dick
Cheney.

Man pleads guilty
in fatal crash
PITTSBURGH - A man
pleaded guilty Monday to
manslaughter for failing to
properly hitch a wood-chipper to
his truck in an accident that
killed a man and two of his
young triplets.
Bradley Demitras was
scheduled to stand trial Monday
but struck a deal with
prosecutors instead. He
pleaded guilty to three counts of
involuntary manslaughter and
one count of reckless
endangerment.
"He's had a very hard time
with this case, as I have, as
everyone involved has," said his
attorney, Patrick Thomassey.


"We wanted to spare the family
and everyone involved from the
rigors of a trial."

Search continues
for Boy Scout
MCGRADY, N.C. - Warmer
weather raised rescuers' hopes
Monday as they searched for a
third day for a 12-year-old Boy
Scout who disappeared while
camping with his troop in the
rugged mountains of western
North Carolina. Michael Auberry
vanished in the heavily wooded
terrain after lunch Saturday with
the other Scouts and troop
leaders. Searchers found his
mess kit.late Saturday within a
mile of the camp site, but no
other sign of him, authorities
said.
Temperatures fell to the 20s
before dawn Monday, but sunny
skies and temperatures in the
50s prevailed during the day.
Overnight temperatures were
expected to be milder, with lows
in the 40s, but there was a
chance of rain Tuesday.
'The temperatures definitely
play a factor. It has been very
cold at night, but this young man
was very well dressed. He had a
fleece jacket on and another
jacket," National Park Service
spokeswoman Tina White said.
"We've had people who have
been out a week or longer and
survived."
About 70 people aided by
dogs and a helicopter searched
the area's logging roads and
trails and scoured off-road
regions. Searchers planned to
stick to the trails at night to
avoid losing anyone else.
* Associated Press


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LAKE CITY REPORTER NATION & WORLD TUESDAY, MARCH 20,2007









Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?


Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lakecityreportercom
Tuesday, March 20, 2007


SPORTS


w~ww.Iakecityreporter.com


BRIEFS


SOFTBALL
Adult registration
ends Friday
Registration for Lake
City/Columbia County
Parks and Recreation
Department Church and
commercial adult league
softball is under way at
Teen Town Recreation
Center, weekdays from
8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Cost is
$345 per team and fees
and rosters are due at
registration. Deadline is
Friday. A coaches meeting
is 6:30 p.m., today, at
Southside Recreation
Center.
For details, call Mario
Coppock or Connie Holt at
754-3607.

GOLF
Benefit at
Southern Oaks
The Friends of Drug
Treatment Courts, Inc. is
sponsoring a charity golf
tournament Friday at
Southern Oaks Golf Club.
Format is four-person
scramble, with
registration at 8:45 a.m.
and a shotgun start at
10 a.m. Three sponsorship
levels are available and
contributions are tax
deductible.
For details, call Mike
Burroughs at 758-0519 or
Chase Moses at 365-2908.

Cattle pinron's ,;
tournament set
The 5th Annual Cattle
Baron's Golf Tournament is
May 4 at Southern Oaks
Golf Club. Format is
four-person scramble with
registration at 11:30 a.m.
and tee time at 1 p.m.
Proceeds go to the
American Cancer Society
High Five Unit.
Sponsorships and player
packages are available.
For details, call Vern
Lloyd at 7524885, Howard
Whitaker at 752-1419 or
Bobby Simmons at
755-0144.

YOUTH WRESTUNG
Open competition
under way at CHS
Columbia High has open
mat wrestling for ages
5 and older planned for
3:45-5 p.m. on Tuesdays
and Thursdays.
For details, call Al
Nelson at 755-8080.

TIGERETTES
Dance team
tryouts April 12-14
Tryouts for the CHS
Tigerettes dance team are
April 12-14. Applications
are in the front offices at
Columbia High and
Richardson and Lake City
middle schools. They must
be completed and returned
by April 5. A current
physical also is required for
participation.
For details, call Kay
Dekle at 755-8101.

GAMES


Today
* Fort White High
weightlifting hosts sectional,
II a.m.
* LCCC baseball vs. FCCJ,
3 p.m.
* Columbia High girls
tennis at Buchholz High,
3:30 p.m.
* Columbia High
weightlifting in sectional meet
at Palatka High, 4 p.m.


Gators thriving behind


second-half surges


Florida relies on late
runs for first two
tournament wins.
By MARK LONG
Associated Press
GAINESVILLE - Maybe
the Florida Gators make good
adjustments. Maybe they
wear down opponents. Maybe
they can turn it on when they
need it most.
Or maybe they're just a sec-
ond-half team.
The defending national
champions certainly have
been in the NCAA
tournament, outscoring
Jackson State and Purdue
116-70 in the final 20 minutes
of their first two games to
advance to the round of 16.
"It's not how you start, it's


how you finish," center Al
Horford said Monday. "It's
good when you get a good
start, but it's not going to
make the difference in the
game."'
At least maybe not for
Florida (31-5).
The Gators used key
second-half runs to win both
games last week. They
outscored 16th-seeded
Jackson State 24-8 in the first
five minutes of the second half
and finished with a
school-record 71 points after
the break.
They trailed Purdue by
seven points in the first half
and were down 33-29 early in
the second. But they put
together a 7-0 run, followed
four minutes later by a 10-2
spurt to seize control for
good.


'"We go in at halftime and
make a lot of adjustments,"
forward Chris Richard said.
"We realize how people are
playing us, what they're giving
up on defense and how we
need to stop teams. It's helped
us a lot.
"But we'd rather find a way
to pick it up so we're not this
second-half team. Because if a
team gets too far ahead of us,
then we might not be able to
catch up. We have to turn it up
a notch."
The top-seeded Gators
would like to play better from
the start, beginning Friday
against fifth-seeded Butler in
the Midwest Regional in
St. Louis.
Coach Billy Donovan said
several factors may have
GATORS continued on 2B


Indians trounce


FortWhite earns
12-2 victory over
Trenton High.
By CHRIS WHITE
cwhite@lakecityreporter.com
FORT WHITE - Kali
Hunter hit a home run over
the center field wall and Julie
.. Cole wg S.-for-4 with. two.
triples, four i-uns and a pair of
-RBIs to lead the Fort White
High varsity softball team
over Trenton High 12-2 on
Monday.
Every Fort White batter
had at least one hit or an RBI
in one of the team's strongest
all-around showings of the
season.
"We were hitting the ball
good all over and up and
down the lineup," Fort White
head coach Frank Howell
said. "And it was an error-free
game, so defense was on,
too."
Alexi Hodson's first-inning
triple to right field brought in
Cole and Alison Wrench to
open the scoring for the
Indians (12-5, 0-2 District
5-3A), and Hunter's sacrifice
fly brought in Hodson to end
the inning up 3-0.
In the second inning, a pair
of overthrows turned into an
RBI and an infield home run
for Cole to put the Indians up
5-0.
A solo home run from


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Florida's Joakim Noah dunks against Purdue in the NCAA Midwest
Regional in New Orleans on Sunday.


Tigers


CHRIS WHITE/Lake City Reporter
Fort White's Kali Hunter (right) jumps onto home plate after hitting a home run against Trenton High
on Monday in Fort White.


Hunter and a sacrifice RBI by
Rachel Register gave the
Indians a seven-point lead
before the Tigers could get
on the board.
Trenton's Amanda
Sweiterman came in on a bad
pitch and Jamie Sly's triple
brought in Tarah Vick in the
top of the fourth inning.


Hodson brought another
runner in on a sacrifice and
Taylor Douglass batted in
another in the bottom of the
fourth. Register's second RBI
came in the bottom of the
fifth, putting the Indians
within two runs of ending the
game early.
Cole stole home on a bad


pitch in the sixth and Hunter
batted in Wrench to end the
game.
Howell said he credited
much of the Indians'
offensive output to Cole's
position in the lineup.
"That's what you have to do

INDIANS continued on 2B


'Wolves

go ahead

early for

victory

Cohlunbia girls
tennis falls 4-3 to
Gainesville High.


From Statf re pcri�


The Lake City Community
College baseball team
defeated Florida Community
College 4-3 in Jacksonville to
improve to 28-11-1 (5-4
Mid-Florida Conference).
The Timberwolves scored
three runs in the first inning
on a single hit. scored one in
the second and brought in two
in the eighth.
Sam Testa was 1-for-4 with
two RBIs and a double: Jovan
Rosa was 1-for-3 with an RBI:
Stephen Carr was 2-for-4 with
a triple and two RBIs;
Mario Williams had one run
and an RBI; Roberto Perez
had two hits and an RBI;
Emmanuel Morales had two
hits, one run and a stolen
base; Chris Jones had one hit;
and Fred Freeman had a
double.
Nick Tyson earned the win
with 7'V innings, giving up six
hits, one double and a walk

ROUNDUP continued on 2B


National champs
honored Monday
at White House.
By BEN FELLER
Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Any
time he honors a champi-
onship team, President Bush
looks for a chance td bring up
the underdog theme.
If he can link it to his own
presidency, that's even better.
So welcome to the White
House, Florida Gators. You fit
right in.
Bush lauded the University
of Florida's football team on
Monday for its 2006
championship season. The
Gators routed Ohio State,
41-14, in January despite being
given little chance to win by
oddsmakers and millions of
college football fans.


"Like you might remember,
all the pre-game polls said you
couldn't win," Bush told the
team. "So much for polls."
Florida became the first
school in NCAA history to
hold national titles 'in basket-
ball and football in the same
season. These are heady
times in Gainesville; the
basketball team is the midst of
defending its title and has
already won twice in this
month's NCAA tournament.
"It's amazing, isn't it?" Bush
said. "The basketball team,
and now the football team.
What are you doing down
there?"
Under coach Urban
Meyer's game plan, Florida
won by using two quarter-
backs - senior Chris Leak
and freshman Tim Tebow.
Leak stood next to Meyer at
the ceremony, directly behind
the president. Tebow, the


hulking underclassman, was a
row behind them.
Turning to find them both,
Bush said: "That's what we
call teammates, people
playing together for the com-
mon good."
Florida played plenty of
defense, too. In one memo-
rable play in the champi-
onship game, linebacker Earl
Everett lost his helmet but
kept running and chased
down Ohio State quarterback
Troy Smith for a tackle.
"I've seen that face before,"
Bush told a smiling Everett.
"So has the whole country. You
might remember, Everett lost
his headgear. He didn't lose
his head, but he lost his head-
gear and he went on to make a
great tackle in a key moment.
That's called tough defense."
The players filled up a plat-
form behind Bush, with oth-
ers lining both staircases


ASSOCIATED PRESS
President Bush (center), flanked by University of Florida
quarterback Chris Leak (left) and head coach Urban Meyer (right),
poses with the 2006 NCAA Champion Gators on Monday on the
South Lawn of the White House in Washington.


under the South Portico.
Bush thanked players for
being community volunteers.
He went on to praise just about
everyone he could, from the
coaches to the people who sell
the team's tickets to "those
who pick up the towels and
make the program run."
Meyer gave Bush an
orange-and-blue Gator jersey,


emblazoned with the number
43, marking Bush's place in
the presidential lineage. Leak
gave Bush a championship
football. In a crowd of
hundreds of Florida fans,
someone occasionally
shouted, "Go Gators."
"This is the day," he said,
"we turned the White House
into the Swamp."


Section B


Bush lauds Gators for


toughness, teamwork


"^f .r










Page Editor: Chris White, 754-0420


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS TUESDAY, MARCH 20, 2007


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN - NIT, quarterfinals, Mississippi at
Clemson
9 p.m.
ESPN - NIT, quarterfinals. DePaul at
Kansas State
NBA BASKETBALL
7:15 p.m.
TNT - Denver at New Jersey
9:30 p.m.
TNT - Indiana at Houston
NHL HOCKEY
8 p.m.
VERSUS - Phoenix at Minnesota
WOMEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
5 p.m.
ESPN2 - NCAA Division I tournament,
second round, Temple vs. Duke, at Raleigh,
N.C.
7 p.m.
ESPN2 -Whip-around coverage, NCAA
Division I tournament, second round,
Mississippi vs. Maryland, at Hartford, Conn.;
Michigan vs. Rutgers, at East Lansing, Mich.;
Pittsburgh vs. Tennessee, at Pittsburgh; and
Baylor vs. N.C. State, at Raleigh, N.C.
9 p.m.
ESPN2 - Whip-around coverage, NCAA
Division I tournament, second round,
Wisconsin-Green Bay vs. Connecticut, at
Hartford, Conn.; Bowling Green vs.Vanderbilt,
at East Lansing, Mich.; and Notre Dame vs.
North Carolina, at Pittsburgh

BASKETBALL

NBA standings


EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct
Toronto 36 31 .537
New Jersey 31 36 .463
New York 30 36 .455
Philadelphia 26 41 .388
Boston 20 47 .299
Southeast Division
. W L Pet
Washington 36 28 .563
Miami 36 30 .545
Orlando 31 37 .456
Atlanta 27 41 .397
Charlotte 24 43 .358
Central Division
W L Pct
Detroit 42 23 .646
Cleveland 41 25 .621
Chicago 39 29 .574
Indiana 30 35 .462
Milwaukee 25 41 .379
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct
x-Dallas 54 II .831
San Antonio 46 20 .697
Houston 42 25 .627
New Orleans 30 37 .448
Memphis 17 50 .254
- -Northwest Division ' -'
W L Pct
Utah 43 23 .652
Denver 33 31 .516
Minnesota 28 37 .431
Portland 26 40 .394
Seattle 26 40 .394


x-F
L.
Gc
L.
Sa


Pacific Division
W L Pct
Phoenix 50 16 .758
A. Lakers 35 32 .522
olden State 32 36 .471
A. Clippers 30 36 .455
cramento 29 38 .433
Sunday's Games
NewYork 92,Toronto 74
Dallas 92, Detroit 88
Orlando 97, Miami 83
Houston 124, Philadelphia 74
New Jersey 101, L.A. Clippers 95'
L.A. Lakers 109, Minnesota 102
Seattle 95, Portland 77
Monday's Games
Atlanta 99, Sacramento 76
New Orleans 106, Boston 88
Tuesday's Games
Denver at New Jersey, 7 p.m.
Cleveland at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
Dallas at New York, 7:30 p.m.
Philadelphia at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
New Orleans at Memphis, 8 p.m.
L.A. Clippers at Chicago, 8:30 p.m.
Golden State at Utah, 9 p.m.
Indiana at Houston, 9:30 p.m.
Minnesota at Phoenix, 10 p.m.
Washington at Portland, 10 p.m.
Wednesday's Games
Miami at Atlanta, 7 p.m.
Orlando at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Charlotte at Boston, 7:30 p.m.
Indiana at San Antonio, 8 p.m.
Dallas at Cleveland, 8 p.m.
LA. Clippers at Milwaukee, 8 p.m.
Washington at Seattle, 10 p.m.
Minnesota at Sacramento, 10 p.m.


GB

5
5W
10
16

GB

I
7
II
13'/

GB

4%
12
17%


GB

81W
13
25
38

GB

9
14'%
17
17

GB

15'h
19
20
21%


NCAA Tournament

Opening Round
Niagara 77, Florida A&M 69

EAST REGIONAL
First Round
Boston College 84,Texas Tech 75
Georgetown 80, Belmont 55
Michigan State 61, Marquette 49
North Carolina 86, Eastern Kentucky 65
Washington State 70, Oral Roberts 54
Vanderbilt 77, George Washington 44
Texas 79, New Mexico State 67
Southern California 77,Arkansas 60
Second Round
Georgetown 62, Boston College 55
North Carolina 81, Michigan State 67
Vanderbilt 78,Washington State 74, 20T
Southern California 87,Texas 68
Regional Semifinals
Friday
Georgetown vs.Vanderbilt, 7:27 p.m.
North Carolina vs. Southern California, 30
minutes after first game
Regional Championship
Sunday
Semifinal winners

SOUTH REGIONAL
First Round
Louisville 78, Stanford 58
Texas A&M 68, Pennsylvania 52
Ohio State 78, Central Connecticut St. 57
Xavier 79, Brigham Young 77
Virginia 84,Albany, N.Y. 57
Tennessee 121, Long Beach State 86
Memphis 73, North Texas 58


Nevada 77, Creighton 71, OT
Second Round
Ohio State 78, Xavier 71, OT
Texas A&M 72, Louisville 69
Tennessee 77,Virginia 74
Memphis 78, Nevada 62
Regional Semifinals
Thursday
Texas A&M vs. Memphis, 7:27 p.m.
Ohio State vs.Tennessee, 30 minutes after
first game
Regional Championship
Saturday
Semifinal winners

MIDWEST REGIONAL
First Round
Maryland 82, Davidson 70
Butler 57, Old Dominion 46
UNLV 67, Georgia Tech 63
Wisconsin 76,Texas A&M-C.C. 63
Winthrop 74, Notre Dame 64
Oregon 58, Miami (Ohio) 56
Purdue 72,Arizona 63
Florida 112, Jackson State 69
Second Round
'Butler 62, Maryland 59
UNLV 74,Wisconsin 68
Oregon 75,Winthrop 61
Florida 74, Purdue 67
Regional Semifinals
Friday
Butler vs. Florida, 7:10 p.m.
UNLV vs. Oregon, 30 minutes after first
game
Regional Championship
Sunday
Semifinal winners

WEST REGIONAL
First Round
Virginia Commonwealth 79, Duke 77
Pittsburgh 79,Wright State 58
UCLA 70,Weber State 42
Indiana 70, Gonzaga 57
Kansas 107, Niagara 67
Kentucky 67,Villanova 58
Virginia Tech 54, Illinois 52
Southern Illinois 61, Holy Cross 51
Second Round
Pittsburgh 84,Virginia Commonwealth 79,
OT
UCLA 54, Indiana 49
Southern Illinois 63,Virginia Tech 48
Kansas 88, Kentucky 76
Regional Semifinals
Thursday
Kansas vs. Southern Illinois, 7:10 p.m.
Pittsburgh vs. UCLA, 30 minutes after first
game
Regional Championship
Saturday
Semifinal winners

FINAL FOUR
National Semifinals
March 31
East champion vs. South champion
Midwest champion vs.West champion
National Championship
April 2
Semifinal winners

NIT

Second Round
"':. * 'NORTH
Florida State 87, Michigan 66
Mississippi State 101, Bradley 72
Today
Florida State (22-12) vs. Mississippi State
(20-13),
EAST
West Virginia 90, Massachusetts 77
N.C. State 69, Marist 62
Today
N.C. State (20-15) at West Virginia (24-9),
TBA
WEST
Monday
Georgia atAir Force (n)
DePaul at Kansas State (n)
SOUTH
Monday
Mississippi at Clemson (n)
San Diego State at Syracuse (n)

BASEBALL

Spring training

Sunday's Games
Houston 4,Toronto 3
Florida 3,Washington I
St. Louis 5, N.Y. Mets 4
Boston 2, Baltimore I
Atlanta (ss) 6, Cincinnati 5
Cleveland 5, L.A. Dodgers 0
Atlanta (ss) 4, Detroit (ss) 3
Minnesota 4, Philadelphia (ss) 3
Detroit (ss) 6,Tampa Bay (ss) 0
Tampa Bay (ss) 5, Philadelphia (ss) 4
N.Y.Yankees 8, Pittsburgh I
Texas 12, Colorado 8
Seattle 9, Milwaukee 5
Oakland (ss) 7,Arizona 5
Chicago'White Sox 14, San Diego 7
LA.Angels (ss) 4, Chicago Cubs 0
Oakland (ss) 6, L.A.Angels (ss) 5
San Francisco 6, Kansas City 5
Monday's Games
Houston 4, Florida 2
Toronto 9, N.Y.Yankees I
Atlanta 6, Cleveland 0
Detroit 6, Cincinnati 2
Washington 9, LA. Dodgers I
Pittsburgh 5, Philadelphia I
San Diego I I, Oakland 4
Seattle (ss) 8, Arizona 5
Chicago Cubs (ss) II, Milwaukee 7
Chicago Cubs (ss) 16, Seattle (ss) 4
Kansas City 4, Chicago White Sox 3
Tuesday's Games
Washington vs. Florida, 1:05 p.m.
Detroit vs. Pittsburgh, 1:05 p.m.
Cleveland vs.Tampa Bay, 1:05 p.m.
Seattle vs.Arizona, 4:05 p.m.
Chicago Cubs vs. Colorado, 4:05 p.m.
San Francisco vs.Texas, 4:05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox vs. Oakland, 4:05 p.m.
Minnesota vs. Boston, 7:05 p.m.
St. Louis vs: LA. Dodgers, 7:05 p.m.
Baltimore vs. N.Y. Mets, 7:10 p.m.
Philadelphia vs. N.Y.Yankees, 7:15 p.m.
L.A.Angels vs. San Diego, 10:05 p.m.
Wednesday's Games
Cincinnati vs. Minnesota, 1:05 p.m.


Boston vs. Pittsburgh, 1:05 p.m.
Baltimore vs. St. Louis, 1:05 p.m.
San Francisco vs. ChicagoWhite Sox,4:05 p.m.
Seattle vs. Colorado, 4:05 p.m.
Arizona vs. L.A. Angels, 4:05 p.m.
Texas vs. Chicago Cubs, 4:05 p.m.
Milwaukee vs. San Diego, 4:05 p.m.
Atlanta vs.Washington 7:05 p.m.
Philadelphia vs.Toronto, 7:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay vs. Houston, 7:05 p.m.
N.Y. Mets vs. LA. Dodgers, Fla., 7:10 p.m.
Oakland vs. Kansas City, 10:05 p.m.


AUTO RACING

Busch-Nicorette 300
Saturday
(Start position in parentheses)
1. (8) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 195 laps,
127.201 mph., $56,425.
2. (12) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 195,
$42,800.
3. (I) Kyle Busch, Chevrolet, 195, $31,400.
4. (3) Carl Edwards, Ford, 195, $31,050.
5. (9) Casey Mears, Chevrolet, 195,
$21,575.
6. (21) Clint Bowyer, Chevrolet, 195,
$19,350.
7. (2) Kasey Kahne, Dodge, 195, $24,760.
8. (10) Juan Pablo Montoya, Dodge, 195,
$26,720.
9. (6) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 195, $23,300.
10. '(4) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 195,
$24,500.
11II. (7) David Stremme, Dodge, 195,
$16,550.
12. (24) Robby Gordon, Ford, 195,
$18,175.
13. (15) David Reutimann, Toyota, 195,
$30,990.
14. (25) Jamie McMurray, Ford, 195,
$14,825.
15. (5) Sam Hornish Jr., Dodge, 195,
$15,775.
16.(16) Dave Blaney,Toyota, 195,$15,750.
17. (40) Mike Wallace, Chevrolet, 195,
$29,520.
18. (26) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 194,
$23,620.
19. (29) Shane Huffman, Chevrolet, 194,
$16,325.
20. (18) David Ragan, Ford, 194, $17,000.
21. (32) Ward Burton, Ford, 194, $16,350.
22. (20) J.J.Yeley, Chevrolet, 194, $14,375.
23. (37) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 194,
$20,595.
24. (34) Bobby Hamilton Jr., Ford, 194,
$15,925.
25. (33) Brad Keselowski, Chevrolet, 193,
$16,025.
26. (35) Brent Sherman, Chevrolet, 193,
$15,825.
27. (38) Aric Almirola, Chevrolet, 192,
$15,775.
28. (28) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 192,
$15,725.
29. (13) Stephen Leicht, Ford, 191, $20,895.
30. (41) Johnny Sauter, Chevrolet, 190,
$19,295.
31. (19) David Gilliland, Ford, 189, $15,570.
32. (43) Ron Young, Chevrolet, 189,
$15,535.
33. (14) Todd Kluever, Ford; 164, accident,
$26,220.
34. (36) Tony Raines, Chevrolet, 152, acci-
dent, $18,965.
35. (22) Steve Wallace, Dodge, 139, acci-
dent, $15,435.
36. (II) Jon Wood, Ford, 139, accident,
$20,620.
37. (42) Eric McClure, Chevrolet, 107, rear
end, $15,365.
38. (31) Kyle Krisiloff, Ford, 80, accident,
$15,310.
39. (30) Reed Sorenson, Dodge, 63, acci-
dent, $13,260.
40. (39) Greg Biffle, Ford, 63, engine,
$13,200.
41. (27) Jason Leffler, Toyota, 62, accident,
$20,360.
42. (17) Bobby Labonte, Chevrolet, 33,
engine, $13,100.
43. (23) Michael Waltrip, Toyota, 16, acci-
dent, $20,245.

HOCKEY

NHL games

EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L OT Pts GF GA
NewJersey 43 21 8 94 191 179
Pittsburgh 41 22 10 92 251 225
N.Y Rangers 36 28 9 81 210 196
N.Y. Islanders 34 27 10 78 214 208
Philadelphia 20 41 II 51 190 267
Northeast Division
W LOT Pts GF GA
x-Buffalo 46 19 7 99 271 214
Ottawa 42 23 8 92 252 201
Toronto 34 28 10 78 222 235
Montreal 36 31 6 78 214 231
Boston 34 32 5 73 202 251
Southeast Division
W LOT Pts GF GA
Atlanta 39 25 10 88 227 225
Tampa Bay 39 30 4 82 226 229
Carolina 36 29 8 80 215 217
Florida 30 29 13 73 213 230
Washington 26 34 13 65 218 257
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
W LOT Pts GF GA
Nashville 47 20 6 100 249 192
Detroit 45 18 9 99 228 181
St. Louis 30 29 12 72 188 217
Chicago 27 35 9 63 179 225
Columbus 28 37 7 63 177 224
Northwest Division
W LOT Pts GF GA
Vancouver 43 23 6 92 195 179
Minnesota 42 24 7 91 209 179
Calgary 37 25 10 84 231 200
Colorado 37 29 6 80 238 224
Edmonton 30 35 7 67 180 215
Pacific Division
WL OTPts GF GA
Anaheim 43 18 12 98 236 190
San Jose 44 25 4 92 222 177
Dallas 43 24 5 91 194 175
LosAngeles 25 34 14 64 210 252
Phoenix 28 40 4 60 194 251
x-clinched playoff spot
Sunday's Games
Washington 7,Tampa Bay I
Atlanta 4, Buffalo 3, OT
Pittsburgh 4, Ottawa 3, SO
Los Angeles 5,Anaheim 3
Colorado 4, San Jose 3, OT
Dallas 5, Phoenix 4, OT
Monday's Games
N.Y. Rangers 2, Pittsburgh I
Vancouver at Edmonton (n)
Tuesday's Games
Boston at Montreal, 7 p.m.
Chicago at Columbus, 7 p.m.


Florida at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
New Jersey at Toronto, 7:30 p.m.
N.Y. Islanders at Tampa Bay, 7:30 p.m.
Ottawa at St. Louis, 8 p.m.
Phoenix at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Detroit at Calgary, 9 p.m.
Wednesday's Games
Washington at Buffalo, 7 p.m.
Philadelphia at N.Y. Rangers, 7:30 p.m.
San Jose at Chicago, 8:30 p.m.
Colorado at Edmonton, 9 p.m.
Nashville at Vancouver, 10 p.m.
Dallas at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m.


ROUNDUP. CHS boys tennis plays today

Continued From Page 1B


with seven strikeouts.
Greg Cott came in for 2/3
an inning, and pitched LCCC
out of a two-on situation in the
eighth. Matt Small gave up
one run on one hit with one
strikeout in the ninth.
The Timberwolves host
FCC on Wednesday at 3 p.m.


Columbia tennis

The Columbia girls tennis
team fell 4-3 to Gainesville
High in Gainesville on
Tuesday, with its only
victories coming in forfeits.
Leandra Neal lost 8-6;
Samantha Turner fell 8-1;


Katherine Witt fell 8-1; and the
doubles team of Neal and
Turner fell 8-3.
Lindsey Rich, Haley
Lipthrott won their singles,
match and the second doubles
match with forfeits.
The boys tennis squad plays
at GHS today at 3:30 p.m.


GATORS: Faced similar situations in '06

Continued From Page 1B


contributed to Florida's
second-half surges.
It could be halftime
changes. It could be his
team's propensity to wear
down opponents with their
up-tempo offense, pressing
defense, perimeter shooting
and considerable size
advantage in the post. It could
be timely shooting.
It also could be an
unfamiliarity with tournament
opponents - a definite
change from the Southeastern
Conference schedule.
"When you see two and a
half, three months of the same
people over and over and over,




INDIANS:

Continued From Page- 1B

as the lead-off batter," he
said. "You have to create
havoc out there and score
some runs and she was doing
that all night."
Rachel Register had two
RBIs on sacrifice bunts,
Jordan Spires was 2-for-3 with
two doubles; Jones was 1-for-
3; Wrench was 1-for-1 with
three walks and three runs;
and Douglass was 1-for-4.
Fort White hosts Bronson
today, and looks to get
revenge for a 13-1 loss suf-
fered on the road against
Chiefland when it hosts the
district opponent on
Thursday.
"Hopefully we can get
somer . rest and" still get a win
(against Bronson)," Howell
said. "Right now we just want
to get ready for Chiefland
again."


ACROSS

1 Ride the waves
5 Big bankroll
8 Put on
11 Ovid's route
12 Tint
13 Car rental name
15 Reach a plateau
(2 wds.)
17 City transport
18 Fish domain
19 "--and Rockin'"'
21 Japanese
appetizer
24 UPS truck
25 Get the drift
26 Ode inspire
27 Disturb
30 Archeologist's
find
32 - take
forever!
33 Duds
37 Skimpy top
38 Peace
gesture
39 Paste
40 Pottery frag-


you know how tall, you know
how quick, you get a much
better feel," Donovan said. "In
this tournament, there is no
familiarity. This is the first
time you're going on the floor
and seeing them."
So it takes time to adjust.
The Gators experienced
similar situations in the Final
Four last year. Behind the
3-point shooting of Lee
Humphrey, they turned
games against George Mason
and UCLA into routes early in
the second halves.
Humphrey hit two 3s
during a 20-6 run against the
Patriots coming out of the




Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

EUQUE I


www.jumble.com

FRAGEOl


A:


Yesterd


Jay's


ments'
43. Baseball's Mel

44 Physics
workplace
47 Hirt and Gore
.48 Game of
strategy
50 Rich pastry
52 A Stooge
53 Bloke's
streetcar
54 Restaurant
freebie (2 wds.)
59 Fries or slaw
60 Untold
centuries
61 Valley
62 Hibernate
63 Install a lawn
64 Scissors sound

DOWN

1 Part of RSVP
2 Navajo foe
3 Step
on the gas
4 Just made


locker room, then sparked :
13-4 spurt to start the second
against the Bruins with two
more shots from behind the
arc.
"I don't know exactly what it
could be - halftime adjust-
ments or just getting hot at the
right time," Humphrey said.
Either way, it has become a
trend.
Not only has Florida started
NCAA tournament games
slow, then turned it on after
the break, the team has done
the same much of the season.
The Gators have scored
more points in the second half
25 times in 36 games.


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Henri Arnold and Mike Argirion


Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


IT
(Answers tomorrow)
Jumbles: JUICE ADAGE UPKEEP PACKET
Answer: What Dad looked forward to when Junior
finished piano practice - PIECE PEACE




Answer to Previous Puzzle

TEAL AHS VET
ORCA LATH YEA
OAHU GLEE IRK














UPS 101N GEESI


FEE MAO SKIT


5 Cowboy's shout
6-
Wiedersehen
7 Swindled
8 Sticky fruit
9 Jellybean


GET MORE in the new "Just Right Crossword Puzzles"
series from Quill Driver. Call 800-605-7176.


shapes
10 Undeliverable
mail
14 Trig
function
16 "Star Wars"
princess
20 Annapolis
grad
21 Satisfy
22 Pakistan's
language
23 Snooty one
24 Electors
28 Competitions
29 Chick-to-be
31 Paris article
34 Medicinal
plant
35 Habits
36 Gambles
41 Yes, in Tokyo
42 Barge
44 Authorizes
45 Bitter
46 Cutting edge
49 Body parts
51 Famous last
word
52 Heal
55 Sweet murmur
56 Light brown
57 Cotton gin
name
58 Account exec


� 2007 by NEA, Inc.


SCOREBOARD









LAKE CITY REPORTER SCHOOLS TUESDAY, MARCH 20, 2007


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ityrepu .... OnorS choir at LCC-
Eementr honor
Geentrney2


7.m., today. d grade teachers
ers um Eementary d
I summer

STUDENT PROFILE


Justin Dean


Name: Justin Dean
School: Westside
Elementary
Parents: Alan and
Shannon Dean
Age: 10
Grade: 4
Principal: Hazel Truluck

Clubs and/or
organizations, both in and
out of school, to which
you belong: Student
Council, Christ Central
Ministries, Brian Sports
Baseball, Upward
Basketball, Math Bee Team.

Fort White
Elementary
N The third grade team had a
pizza party to celebrate the
completion of the FCAT. The
children were excited to be
done.


What would you like to
do when you complete
your education? Athlete.

Achievements: "A" honor
roll, Westside Writes winner,
WesMart volunteer.

What do you like best
about school? "Math is my
favorite subject and I like to
get the answer first."

Teacher's comments
about student: "Justin is a
model student. He works
hard every day and always
represents himself as an
outstanding individual. It is a
pleasure to teach him."

Principal's comments
concerning student: "Justin
is an outstanding student.
He sets a wonderful
example for all of our
students. We are proud that
he is a part of our Westside
Elementary family."

Student's comment on
being selected for
"Student Focus": "I feel
excited. This will be my first
opportunity to be in the
paper."
* The second and third
grade classes cooperated to
present a patriotic program to
the parents who attended the
March 8 PTO meeting. The
third grade sang patriotic songs
and the second grade students
spoke about women in
American history.


Bulletin Board


NE SABOU OU SCOOL


Columbia
High School
* Columbia High School's
Jessica Stanton and Katie
Reichert walked away with "Best
in Fair" awards, $1,000 cash and
the opportunity to compete at the
International Science and
Engineering Fair in May in
Phoenix, Ariz. Other winners
included: Behavioral and Social
Sciences: Astin Sibbernsen,
second, and Nax Joye, third;
Botany: Nicki Baez, second and
Amanda Trippensee, third;
Chemistry: Mandy O'Connell
first, and Best in Fair; Jessica
Hiner, second, and Liz Jones,
third; Math and Computers:
Justin Simmons, second; Earth
and Space Science: Jordan
Stanton, first; Engineering: Katie
Reichert, first; Environmental:
Caris Tramel, second; Medicine
and Health: Ashley Witt, third;
Zoology: Molly Reichert, third.
Those receiving special awards
were: Katie Reichert, Jessica
Stanton, Jordan Stanton, Justin
Simmons and Liz Jones.
Students selected to advance to
State Competition were: Katie
Reichert, Jessica Stanton, Nicki
Baez, Mandy O'Connell, Liz
Jones, Justin Simmons, Jordan
Stanton, Caris Tramel and
Jessica Hiner. Jessica Hiner
said, "It's a great feeling to know
your project is good enough to
go (to State)" while Katie
Reichert agreed that it was
indeed a "great honor to be
selected."

Summers
Elementary
* This year third and fourth
-graders participated in FCAT
Boot Bamp. They wore
camouflage while practicing all
the reading and math strategies
in order to be successful on the
test. Students earned military
men and prizes when caught
demonstrating their excellent
FCAT skills. After working so
hard getting ready for the test
they deserved to celebrate. They
had a FCAT Boot Camp party in
the'amphitheater.

Columbia City
Elementary
* This is the fourth year for
the Columbia County
Elementary Honors Choir. Top
chorus students were chosen
from each elementary school to
rehearse and perform together.
Columbia City Elementary
Honors Choir members are
Ashton Blanton, Wesley Boykin,
Kimmie Congi, Ashley D'Antonio,
Jessica Gleaton, Hannah Luthi,


Sean McIntosh, Jessica Pollard,
Brianna Selgas, Mikayla
Swisshelm and Mercedes
Walker. These students will
perform at Lake City Community
College today. The nationally
known guest conductor will be
Deborah DesForges, who
founded and directs the
Gainesville Youth Chorus.
* Columbia City Elementary
had its fourth grade math bee
on Feb. 22. All students
competed first in their
classrooms with the top
students advancing to the grade
level math bee. The contestants
were: Kimmie Congi, Angela
Putnel,-Alex Walker, Indera
Rentz, Caleb Carswell, Danielle
Duckwiler, J.T. Byrne, Jacob
Gleaton, Morgan Mclntosh,
Sam Donovan, Alexa Hatcher,
and Dalton Sweat. The top four
students, Kimmie Congi, Cle. ,.
Carswell, J.T. Byrne, and Alexa
Hatcher will make up the
Columbia City Elementary Math
Team that will compete against
other elementary schools at the
county math bee in April.
* Third grade raised the
highest amount at CCE. The top
three students to raise the most
money were: Kyle Service,
Ariana Rix, and Christian Cass.
These three students will get to
"slime" Coach Sibbernsen and
Coach Johnson on the morning
broadcast since the CCE
students met their $6,000 goal.
* The Lake City Mall Art


SCHOOL CALENDAR


Today
* Columbia County School
Board Teachnology Center -
Microsoft Word, beginning,
12:20 to 3:30 p.m.
* Social Studies CIT -
Meeting at CCSB Administrative
Complex, Room 207, 3:30 to
4:30 p.m.
* St. Leo University -
Reception for cooperating
teachers.
* CCSB Principals and St.
Leo Faculty at the Med-Teach
Building, Lake City Community
College, 4:30 p.m.
* Columbia Public Schools
Foundation - Board meeting at
CCSB Administrative Complex
Room 207, 5 p.m.

* CCE - Kindergarten
fourth six weeks awards.
* Honors choir festival,
9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
* Honor choir concert,
7 p.m.

* Niblack Elementary -
Training the Differential
Instruction/Multiple Intelligence
at Niblack Elementary, Room
22, noon to 2 p.m.
* Melrose Park Elementary


- Custodial meeting in the
media center, 10 a.m.
* Para meeting in the media
center, 2:30 p.m.
* LCMS - Seventh grade
all star volleyball in gym,
9:05 a.m.

Wednesday
* LCMS - School Advisory
Council Junior meeting, 8 a.m.
* Literacy lead team meeting
in the office conference room,
8 a.m.

* Summers Elementary -
State-of-the-School visit,
10a.m.

* Team leaders meeting,
2:30 p.m.

* Five Points Elementary -
Third grade narrative writing
workshop.
* FWHS - Impact leaders
meeting, 7:45 a.m.
M Weight meeting in the
gym.
* Band to Five Points
Elementary.
* Eastside Elementary -
Grade level/administrator
meeting during planning times.


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It's where the smart money goes.


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* Faculty meeting, 2:30 p.m.
* CCE - Second and third
fourth six weeks awards.

Thursday
* FWHS - Impact team
meeting, 7:45 a.m.
* Band/chorus to Fort White
Elementary.
* LCMS - School Advisory
Council meeting in media
center, 8 a.m.
* LCMS - Eighth grade all
star volleyball in gym, 9:05 a.m.
* Falcon softball vs. Baker,
4:15 p.m., home.
* CCE - Fourth grade
fourth six weeks awards.
* Melrose Park Elementary
- Honors choir to Lake City
Community College all day and
will perform at night.
* Summers Elementary -
Academic Olympics in
amphitheater, 9:30 to
10:30 a.m.
* Money machine in
cafeteria during lunch.

Friday


* Niblack Elementary -
STAR data ends.
* March of Dims
Walk-a-Mania at PE shelter.
* Eastside Elementary -
Fifth grade to skating rink,
10 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.
* PTO Walk-a-Thon.
* FWHS - Senior picnic at
Camp Kulaqua.
* LCMS - Falcon pride
band concert festival at
Branford County High, 10 a.m.
to 6 p.m.
* All star volleyball
championship, 9:05 to
9:50 a.m.
* PE department annual
spring break volleyball
assembly, 3:20 p.m.
* CCE - Fifth grade fourth
six weeks awards.
M Melrose Park Elementary
- Purple Pinkies.
* Summers Elementary -
Fifth grade Tropicana Speech
Contest in cafeteria, 9:15 a.m.
U Purple Pinkies.

Spring Break
March 26-30


Show recently concluded. We
hope everyone had a chance to .
stop by and be astonished by
the creative talents of our
Columbia City Elementary
students hard work in art class.
Other Columbia County schools
also participated in the joy of art
with their presentations.
* Columbia City Elementary
had over 150 students who had
perfect attendance for the fourth
six weeks. The names of all
students who had perfect
attendance were placed in a
basket for a special drawing.
Those whose names were
drawn each received a $10
Wal-Mart gift card. The winners


were: Sarah Griffin, Brian
McCubbins, and Shawn
McKinley. This drawing is held
every six weeks.

Melrose Park
Elementary
* Fourth grade students at
Melrose Park are so glad that the
FCAT is over. They are now
focusing on the Tropicana
Speech Contest. The students
have some truly interesting topics
and can't wait to start the
competition. The school-wide
winner will get to compete at the
county level on April 20.


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Tel (386) 752-3420 * Toll Free 1-800-729-8266
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We are proud of our
School Partners Program

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Banking on a first name basis
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Page Editor: Chris Bednar, 754-0404


COURTESY PHOTO

Young Writers of the Month
Melrose Park Elementary school's Young Writers of the Month for February are (front row, from left)
Roberts Russell, Spencer Gainey, Harrison Shubert, (back row, from left) Tanysha Shaw, Lauren
Shaw, Ryan Walker, Mix 94.3 program director.


/


. -f-









LAKE CITY REPORTER


ADVICE & COMICS


TUESDAY, MARCH 20, 2007


Page Editor: Chris Bednar, 754-0404


ZITS


FRANK & ERNEST


BEETLE BAILEY B.C.


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE GARFIELD


SNUFFY SMITH


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-April
19): Your emotions may take
over today. Try to keep things
in perspective and don't take
what people say to you the
wrong way. Focus on travel
plans or learning something
new and you will avoid some
pitfalls. ***
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): Don't feel bad if you or
someone else has a change of
heart. It's time to sort
through your personal feel-
ings. A little pampering will
help you feel good about your-
self and your chosen direc-
tion. ***
GEMINI (May 21-June
20): Invest, take on a second
job or collect old debts. You
will make a good impression if
you go for an interview or get
involved in a new project.
Don't make a donation or loan
today. ****
CANCER (June 21-July
22): Don't get too far ahead
of yourself. You have. to plan
everything out properly if you
want things to turn out. You
may be able to get the people
who know you well to join in.
Preparation will lead to suc-
cess. **-
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Word

Take a closer look at the peo-
ple who can influence your
future. It's what you do today
that will bring you the
rewards you are looking for
later on. Don't overspend or
you will appear frivolous.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Someone is likely to
charm you today. Don't be too
willing to give a donation or
lend money. This is a good
day to renovate, redecorate or
just rearrange your place so
it's more functional. ***
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Plan to have a little fun
today. A new look will make
you feel good and result in
compliments from someone
you are interested in.
Forming a partnership will
help you get a project off the
ground. ***
. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.
21): Don't be afraid to make
some changes at home. If
something isn't working for
you, do something about it.
Not everyone will agree with
your decisions but you have


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Today's clue: equals P
"WKCPC Y H DMW TI YISK RZ
J YZZCPCISC DCWUCCI WK C
SM HKYRICJ S KTEDCP TI J WK C
BTJ J CJ SCGG . " - X.O. SK C HWC PWR I

PREVIOUS SOLUTION - 'Interest your kids in bowling Get them oil the
streets and into the alleys" - Don Ricklos
(c) 2007 by NEA. Inc 3-20


to do what works for you. You
will be able to secure your
position. ***
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-
Dec. 21): You may not
please everyone today but, if
you follow your dream, you
should be able to get things
happening. A short trip will
bring results but be sure to
abide by the rules. Home
improvement projects will
bring you greater comfort.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. 19): Don't let your emo-
tions or personal worries
interfere with business. You
have to do what you must,
regardless of whether or not
family or close friends think
you should. Money can be
made if you are unique in
your approach. **
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Ask for help and
you will receive it. Volunteer
your time or services and you
will raise your popularity. Now
is the time to make a move
that will enable you to up your
earning potential and secure
your future. ****
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): Your unpredictable
nature will work in your favor.
Be careful with whom you
share your ideas. An old busi-
ness contact may not be as
reliable as you think. If some-
thing doesn't appear to be
right, take a pass. ***
Birthday Baby: You adjust
well to whatever is going on
around you and are always
ready to take on a challenge.
You are a wheeler-dealer and
the one to call the shots. You
rule the roost.


CLASSIC PEANUTS


WAT IN THE MY GAMMA IS GIVING ME gc O'M-.
(WORLDAREY TROUBLE AGAIN...SHE KEEPS So LAYING OUT
SDOING?6 HIDING MY BLANKET! DECOYS!I








DEAR ABBY


Stigma of illness presents


parents from seeking help


, DEAR ABBY: Your reply to
"Worried. Aunt in Florida"
(Feb. 9), whose nephew suf-
fers from OCD, hit the nail on
the head. Often parents don't
want their children's psychotic
behaviors made public by
seeking help. Nothing could be
so wrong! I know because a
close family member, who for
years required counseling and
analysis, was ignored by her
parents so they could avoid the
stigma of having a "crazy"
child.
The result? A failed suicide
attempt, resulting in perma-
nent physical impairment and
significant deterioration in the
mental state of that child. It's
my belief that every so-called
"odd behavior" is a warning
signal and should be
addressed before things get
out of hand. - STEVE IN
ONTARIO, CANADA
DEAR STEVE: I agree that
parents need to be vigilant and
proactive in protecting their
children, and not hide their
heads in the sand pretending
that problems don't exist. I
heard from a number of health
care professionals who were
also concerned about the
young man in the letter. Read
on:
DEAR ABBY: In the health
care world, there are such
things as "emancipated condi-
tions." These are certain
health conditions that can be
treated in minors without
parental consent or knowl-


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearabby.com
edge. (In some states the child
can be 12 or older; in others, 14
or older.) In the state of
Florida, this law applies.
If "Vincent" is concerned
about his obsessive-compul-
sive disorder and his parents
refuse to acknowledge the
problem, he may seek treat-
ment without them. The local
health department in that boy's
county can provide information
on clinics that provide these
services. Minors do have a
choice regarding their health
care when it comes to emanci-
pated conditions. - CERTI-
FIED PEDIATRIC NURSE
PRACTITIONER IN INDI-
ANA
DEAR ABBY: As a psychia-
trist, I must respond to
"Worried Aunt" about her
nephew's likely OCD. OCD
can be a horribly disabling con-
dition thought to be caused by
an imbalance of neurotransmil-
ters in a specific region of the
brain. Recent research has
linked its onset in children and
adolescents to an immune
response to streptococcal
infection. Bottom line: It's
nobody's "fault," and many
good treatments exist to


reduce its crippling effects.
I suspect the mother of this
child is not seeking care for
him in part because of worry
that she will be blamed for his
condition. Despite good ole
Oedipus, in this age, we in the
profession have learned it's not
(usually) Mom's fault! Please
refer families with loved ones
suffering from OCD to NAMI,
to the Web site of the National
Institute of Mental Health
(www.nimh. nih.gov), or to local
support groups where excel-
lent information on treatments
may be obtained. -THOMAS
HARDING, M.D., MIL-
WAUKEE
DEAR ABBY: OCD is a
very real disorder that could
lead to depression or suicide.
You can't "just stop" these
behaviors. Please inform
"Worried Aunt" about the
Obsessive Compulsive
Foundation. Reach it by calling
1-20:-.' 01-2070, or on the Web
at nu'(':,irfintndation.org. I did
not know until a therapist in
our area. specifically trained to
treat OC()(.), interviewed our
son that hle felt hopeless,
depressed and suicidal.
After a year of treatment he
is a different, happier person.
()OCI) is lifelong condition, but
thInrT' it-iools to deal with it so
ithat mntil tiait can lead a nor-
mal lile. - PARENT OF A
SON WITH OCD
N W\nl tDo,. Abbv at P.O. Box
S :' . . CA 90069.


DILBERT


BABY BLUES


BLONDIE










Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED TUESDAY, MARCH 20, 2007

Lake City Reporter




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�


Concrete Work Lawn & Landscape Service Drywall Services


CONCRETE CONSTRUCTION
FOOTERS-SLABS-DRIVES-
PATIOS. 26 years experience.
Please call 386-752-0743

Home Improvements

AFFORDABLE
PoQI Renovations,
Wood Decks & More.
KJ Kelley's 386-754-2357
CLEARVIEW WINDOW
Cleaning & Interior Painting
Your housekeeper doesn't do
windows I do! Also light Exterior
Painting. Call Tracy 386-454-8812
General Repairs & Maintenance.
Mobile & Structural Homes.
Personal Quality Service. Insured.
30 yrs exp.Richard 386-961-9030
MITCHELL VENTREC LLC
Kitchen & Bath Remodeling.
Carpentry, Painting, Plumbing &
Electrical repairs. 386-365-9909
North Florida Custom Carpentry
We help you make your home im-
provement easy from start to finish.
Including: 3D drawings, so you can
visualize your project before it
begins. Call 386-4J2-6815


Custom Cuts Lawn & Landscape.
Customized lawn care, sod, trim-
ming, design. Com. & Resd. Lic. &
insured. Call 386-496-2820 Iv msg.

TIME TO MULCH
Cypress mulch 5 yard minimum
Delivered & spread or just
delivered. 386-935-6595


Services

Do you need help w/grocery shop-
ping & preparing weekly meals?
Candy's Home Cooked Classic's.
Free consult: 867-2345 Perfect for
Seniors & busy families!

FREE CLEANUP.
Pick up of unwanted metals,
tin, scrap vehicles.
386-755-0133 We Recycle.

LYNN'S MOBILE Pet Grooming
Full Groom $25-$35
Van comes to your home.
32 years exp. 386-288-5966


DRYWALL Hang, Finish;
Textures; Plaster & Stucco Repairs;
Interior & Exterior Painting.
386-752-2412
DRYWALL Hang, Finish;
Textures; Plaster & Stucco Repairs;
Interior & Exterior Painting.
386-752-2412

Tree Service

HAZARDOUS Tree Trimming
removal & stump grinding. Senior
discount. 24 hr emergency service
386-590-7798 or 386-963-3360

Carpet Cleaning

CARPET CLEANING
2 rooms & a hall $39.95.
5 rooms & a hall $89.95. Also Tile
& Grout Cleaning. 386-755-9200

Electrical Work

NEED ELECTRICAL Repairs?
Make sure it's done right!
Immediate availability.Free
estimates. Call Russ 386-288-4313


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORI-
DA
SUMMER ACRES HOMEOWNER'S
ASSOCIATION, INC. A- FLORIDA
CORPORATION
Plaintiff
vs.
EDWIN M. ANTHONY AND
LURLINE J. ANTHONY
CASE NO 06-CC-1037
DIVISION:
Defendants)
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE is given that pursuant to the Fi-
nal Judgment of Foreclosure dated
2/28/07, in case number 06-CC-1037 of
the County Court of the Third Judicial
Circuit in and for Columbia County,
Florida, in which SUMMER ACRES
HOMEOWNER'S ASSOCIATION,
INC. A FLORIDA CORPORATION, is
the Plaintiff and EDWIN M. ANTHO-
NY AND LURLINE J. ANTHONY, are
the defendants, I will sell to the highest
and best bidder in Courthouse of the Co-
lumbia County Courthouse, 173 NE Her-
nando Ave, in Lake City, Florida at
11:00 a.. on 4/11/07, the following de-
scribed real property:
See Exhibit "A"
Dated this I day of March, 2007
EXHIBIT "A"
PARCEL 10
A PARCEL OF LAND IN SECTION
10, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 17
EAST, COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORI-
DA; BEING MORE PARTICULARLY
DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS:
COMMENCE AT A FOUND 4" X 4"
CONCRETE MONUMENT "SRD" AT
THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF
SAID SECTION 16, TOWNSHIP 7
SOUTH, RANGE 17 EAST AND RUN
THENCE SOUTH 00o15'48" EAST,
ALONG THE WEST LINE OF SAID
SECTION 16, 80.15 FEET TO A
FOUND 4" X4" CONCRETE MONU-
MENT 'SRD' ON THE SOUTH RIGHT
OF WAY LINE OF COUNTY ROAD
NO. 778 (80 FOOT RIGHT OF WAY);
THENCE NORTH 89055'25" EAST,
ALONG SAID SOUTH RIGHT OF
WAY LINE, 698.08 FEET TO A SET
1/2 REBAR & CAP 'PLS 4789';
THENCE SOUTH 00o15'48" EAST,
1956.04 FEET TO A SET 1/2 REBAR
& CAP 'PLS 4789'; AND TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE
CONTINUE SOUTH 00015'48" EAST,
652.11 FEET TOA SET 1/2 REBAR &
CAP 'PLS 4789'; THENCE SOUTH
89055'25" WEST, 698.08 FEET TO A
1/2 REBAR & CAP 'PLS 4789' ON
THE WEST LINE OF SAID SECTION
16; THENCE NORTH 00015'48"
WEST, ALONG SAID WEST LINE,
652.04 FEET TO A SET 1/2 REBAR &
CAP 'PLS 4789';; THENCE NORTH
89055'25" EAST, 689.08 FEET TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING
CONTAINING 10.45 ACRES, MORE
OR LESS
SUBJECT TO & TOGETHER WITH
AN EASEMENT FOR INGRESS ,
EGRESS, DRAINAGE AND PUBLIC
UTILITIES BEING MORE PARTICU-
LARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS:
COMMENCE AT A FOUND 4" X 4"
CONCRETE MONUMENT "SRD" AT
THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF
SAID SECTION 16, TOWNSHIP 7
SOUTH, RANGE 17 EAST AND RUN
THENCE SOUTH 00�15'48" EAST,
ALONG THE WEST LINE OF SAID
SECTION 16. 80.15 FEET TO A
FOUND 4" X4" CONCRETE MONU-
MENT 'SRD' ON THE SOUTH RIGHT
OF WAY LINE OF COUNTY ROAD
NO. 778 (80 FOOT RIGHT OF WAY);
THENCE NORTH 89055'25" EAST,
ALONG SAID SOUTH RIGHT OF
WAY LINE, 668.08 FEET TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING: THENCE
SOUTH 00�15'48" EAST, 3910.47
FEET TO THE SOUTH LINE OF THE
NORTH 1/2 OF TIlE SOUTHWEST
1N4 OF SAID SECTION 16: THENCE
NORTH


Legal

89038'29" EAST, ALONG SAID
SOUTH LINE, 60.00 FEET; THENCE
NORTH 01015'48" WEST, 3910.17
FEET TO THE SAID SOUTH RIGHT
OF WAY LINE OF COUNTY ROAD
NO. 778; THENCE SOUTH 89055'25"
WEST ALONG SAID SOUTH RIGHT
OF WAY LINE, 60.00 FEET TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING.
SUBJECT TO DRAINAGE EASE-
MENT AS SHOWN ON THE AMEND-
ED SITE PLAN PREPARED BY DA-
VID D. PARRISH LAND SURVEYOR,
INC., DATED JUNE 3, 2003, AND
FIRST AMENDED TO THE DECLA-
RATION OF COVENANTS, CONDI-
TIONS AND RESTRICTIONS OF
SUMMER ACRES, RECORDED IN
O.R. BOOK 986, PAGE 1943, OF THE
PUBLIC RECORDS OF COLUMBIA
COUNTY, FLORIDA.
P. Dewitt Cason
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
by:-s- S. Merrick
Deputy Clerk
Date of first publication of this Notice of
Sale is March 13, 2007
in the Lake City Reporter
04513252
March 13, 20, 2007



t Connected








010 Announcements

05514966
ANNOUNCING
Medical Practice Now Open
Dr. Guy Strauss D.O., F.A.C.O.I.
Board Certified in Iternal
Medicine and Critical Care
Please call 386-754-2433 for an
appointment Located in the
Southern Mediplex Builing
404 N.W. Hall of Fame Drive
Medicare Insurances accepted.


020 Lost & Found

LADIES RING Found at
Zaxby's Restaurant Saturday
3/10/07 around 1:30 in afternoon.
Please call 386-752-4532


060 Services

30 PEOPLE wanted to lose weight.
Up to 30 lbs/30 days.
FREE Sample & 1/1 private
coaching. 229-423-7320 or
www.jacweightloss.com

Adult Family Home Care
24 hr care, 3 meals a day plus snack,
transportation to Doctor, private
room. LIC. Call 386-397-2920

100 Job
Opportunities
(45110161
EXPERIENCED
CONCRETE FINISHERS
Please contact
Lake City Management
Group at 386-754-9367 EOE


100 Job
Opportunities

04513232
DRIVERS & 0/0's - CDL - A:
Top Pay, Excellent Hometime &
Benefits! Must Have 2 yrs.
* Recent car hati I
Centurion Auto Transport
800-889-8139

04513244
*MANAGER & ASSISTANT
MANAGER*
Now hiring for High Springs
fruit & gift store.
Email resume to
Brianhobbs7@aol.com
or fax to 352-748-5644

04513275
NOW HIRING!!!
Be home everyday,
While making excellent pay!
We are now hiring Dry Bulk
Cement & Chemicals.
* Excellent benefit package
after 90 days of cont.
employment.
All applicants must have:
* Class A CDL with X end.
* 1 yr. tractor-trailer
experience with a t/t school
cert or 2yrs tractor-trailer
experience without the cert.
* 25 yrs or older
Please call for more information
866-FLA-ROCK option 2 or
Apply online at
www.floridarockand
tanklines.com

04513299
CASHIERS & FRUIT
BAGGERS: Now hiringfor
High Springs fruit & gift stores.
Apply in Person at Florida
Citrus Center 18625 CR 236,
High Springs (exit. 404 & 1-75)
or call Beth 386-462-1501

04513352 R
RECRUITING
ADMINISTRATOR




Davis Express, Inc. a refrigerated
trucking company located in
Starke, FL is growing and has the
opportunity for a recruiting
administrator. The position
involves qualifying, processing,
and orienting new drivers into our
company. Good communication
and computer skills arc a must.
Previous trucking
experience is a plus.
Davis Express, Inc. offers
competitive compensation
and benefits.
BCBS Health Insurance
Free Dental Insurance
Paid Vacation
401K & Disability Available
All interested candidates can
e-mail resumes to
kayla(g@davis-express.com
Or fax to 904-964-5419
No Phone Calls Please
Equal Opportunity Employer. -
Drug Free Workplace


*1 . .. .
... � . . , " .* ,


P "1 5 25 4 1 Ines - 6 days One ttem per ad
Each additional person merchand totallin oress.
P Rat. applies to private Indlvld$�als seD11ing
t r9c 1000 or less.
Each 1 am must Iniset de a p e. This Is a
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You can call us at 755-5440, Monday through Friday
from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their classified ads in per-
son, and some ad categories will require prepayment.
Our office is located at 180 East Duval Street.
You can also fax or email your ad copy to the Reporter.'

FAX: 386-752-9400 Please direct your copy to the
Classified Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityreporter.com



Ad Errors- Please read your ad on the first day of
publication. We accept responsibility for only the first
incorrect insertion, and only the charge for the ad
space in error. Please call 755-5440 immediately for
prompt correction and billing adjustments.

Cancellations- Normal advertising deadlines apply for
cancellation.

Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440. Should further informa-
tion be required regarding payments or credit limits, your
call will be transferred to the accounting department.



Advertising copy is subject to approval by the Publisher
who reserves the right to edit, reject, or classify all adver-
tisements under appropriate headings. Copy should be
.checked for errors by the advertiser on the first day
of publication. Credit for published errors will be allowed
for the first insertion for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the Publisher shall not be
liable for any omission of advertisements ordered to be
published, nor for any general, special or consequential
damages. Advertising language must comply with
Federal, State or local laws regarding the prohibition of
discrimination in employment, housing and public accom-
modations. Standard abbreviations are acceptable; how-
ever, the first word of each ad may not be abbreviated.









LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED TUESDAY, MARCH 20,2007


100 Jb0
SOpportunities

(45 13376
Anderson Columbia Co., Inc. is
seeking an exp. Controller.
Construction background in
management & accounting pref.
Bachelor degree or higher req.
Salary commensurate w/ exp.,
competitive benefits pkg.
DFWP/EEO Employer.
Fax resume to 755-9132 or email:
hr@andersoncolumbia.com

(U513378
SECURITY needed for Large
Manufacturing Plant: Must be
able to work flex. hours. Previous
exp. a plus. Fax resume to
386-758-4523 or apply in person
@ Corbitt Mfg, Inc., Mon-Fri
between the hours of 2 and 4pm

04513379
Truck Driver needed for local
manufacturing plant. Individual
must possess a valid Class A CDL
license & a clean MVR. Exc. pay.
Benefits avail after 6 mnts of
employment. Apply in person at
Corbitt Mfg., Inc., 854 NW
Guerdon Street, Lake City,
between 9am-3pm Mon-Fri. DFW

(14513427
MANAGER TRAINEES
Join Aaron's, Lake City as we
add to our WINNING TEAM.
Paid training, benefits, bonus,
NO SUNDAYS!
Learn how to run a
Million Dollar Retail Store!
Over 21, clean MVR, drug free
APPLY IN PERSON
2658 SW Main Blvd.
aaronrents( msn.com

04513474


is currently looking for an
independent newspaper cArrier
for the Columbia City area.
Deliver the Reporter in the
early morning hours
Tuesday - Sunday.
No delivery on Monday's.
Carrier must have dependable
transportation. Stop by the
Reporter today to fill out a
contractor's inquirers form.
No phone calls please!


100n ob
SOpportunities

05514155


SAVAGE

DRIVERS WANTED
Savage Services is seeking
professional drivers for the
evening shift for local hauls in the
Lake City Area. Class A CDL
with Hazmat and Tanker
endorsements required.
* Competitive Pay
* Complete Benefit Package,
Including 401K
" Home everyday
H Paid Holidays and Vacations
* Quarterly Incentive Bonus
Only serious applicants need
apply. Call 386-755-9097 or
Apply at Florida Crowns
Career Center Located at
971 W HWY 90 Suite 101

(05515012
FIRE YOUR BOSS!
Retire Rich!
Taste the Good Life!
Mona Vie Tasting Party
Monday March 26 at
7:30 pm Call: 965-3325

05515018
OFFICE ASSISTANT needed
for growing company Qualified
candidates will posses extensive
computer skills. Must have
excellent oral and written
communication skills and be
comfortable functioning in a
fast-paced, professional work
environment. This position also
requires the ability to make
initial and follow-up phones call
relating to sales. To apply for this
position please fax resume to
888-867-2851.

A/C SERVICE Tech
Full time with benefits.
Please call 386-454-4767


AIRCRAFT EMPLOYMENT
Aircraft Mechanic
A&P required, IA desirable
For Full Time at growing
General Aviation Facility.
(386)330-0291


100 Jb0
0 Opportunities
AMI-FFT IS Seeking a case
Manger to work with at risk youths.
BA required. Salary negionable
flexible hours 755-1172 or
Fax 755-1486
ARTSY ABODE seeking Manager,
FT/PT sales associates needed for
new Vera Bradley store, in Lake
City Mall. Sales exp. Preferred.
email: shop@artsyabode.com, for
application. Opening in April
BLUE JEAN JOB
$ Money $
Seeking sharp go getters, Able to
TRAVEL USA. Demo chemical
products. Good people skills &
enjoy working in a Rock in Roll
evir. Call Kelly 1-800-201-3293.
9-6. Must start immed.
CDL TRUCK Driver Needed,
2 Years Exp. req., clean driving
record. Located in Branford, Fl.
area. Please contact Melissa or
Melanie at (386)935-2773

CHILD CARE Provider Wanted in
my home for two infants 4-5 days
per week. Columbia city area.
References and background check
required. Call to schedule interview
Students with online classes
welcome to apply. 386-867-2545
DRIVER NEEDED
Class A CDL, Clean driving record
with dump trailer exp. Must pass
drug test. 386-719-9482 office.
DUMP TRUCK Driver Needed
Must have asphalt experience, clean
driving record with 2 year CDL.
Call 386-497-3131
EARN UP TO $10.00 AN HOUR.
Hungry Howies is now hiring Pizza
Delivery Drivers.
Earn CASH DAILY 18 or older.
Apply in person Lake City Plaza
next to the Dollar General.
ELECTRICAL HELP WANTED
Must be dependable and have
electrical experience. Great pay.
Please call (386)
344-2029 or (386)758-6972
EXP FRONT Desk Clerk
needed for Howard Johnson Hotel.
Apply in person
386-755-5770
Exp. Front Desk Clerk & house-
keepers needed. Must apply in
person at America's Best Inn 339
SW Commerce Dr off of Hwy 90 W


100 Job
SOpportunities
Experience Sewing Machine
Operator. Good Hourly Rate.
for ability to sew our products.
Contact Hafners 386-755-6481
FLAT BED DRIVERS
Atlantic Truck Lines
$1,000 Sign-on Bonus
Class A, in state & home every
night. $600-$750/wk. Yearly $1,000
safety bonus. 3 yrs. exp. Paid
vacation. Health/dental. Call
1-800-577-4723 Monday-Friday
FOOTLONG WOODY'S
Restaurant now hiring experienced
pizza makers. Top pay.
Call John 386-590-4591
HELP WANTED Experienced
2 cycle & 4 cycle
small engine Mechanic.
Must have own tools. 752-8098
**Ranch Maintenance**
Experience to include Horses,
Lawn, Fences, Tractor and misc.
"Honey Do's". References req.
Smoke Free. Housing Provided.
386-963-1200 or 386-867-2910
HUDDLE HOUSE - Ellisville
Servers & Grill Operators
needed for 2nd & 3rd Shifts.
Apply Mon-Fri, 8am-2pm
Lake City Christian Academy
is looking for Teachers
with a BA degree
Call 386-758-0055
MECHANIC/WELDER
For heavy Truck &Trailer Repair
Facility. Call Southern Specialized
LLC US 41 North 386-752-9754
MUSGROVE CONSTRUCTION
has a FT opening for a mechanic,
must have own hand tools,
hydraulic exp. helpful.
Call 386-362-7048
Drug Free Work Place
MUSGROVE CONSTRUCTION
has immediate opening for an
experienced Auto-body painter.
Apply in person Hwy 90 East. Live
Oak or call 386-362-7048 DFWP
NOW HIRING Espresso servers.
P/T Saturdays a must.
Personality a plus.
Call (352)278-0425 ask Barbara
OIL CHANGE TECHNICIAN
Apply in Person
ROUNTREE-MOORE FORD
TOYOTA See Jimbo
PHISH HEADS Now hiring
Exp. cooks, AM-PM, FT-PT,
Apply in person M-TH 2-4PM
144 SW Main Blvd. Suite 170


L�in North Florida


'I ~
'I,


SPRINGS * RIVERS

AND FABULOUS OUTDOOR ADVENTURES


SUWANNEE VALLEY


Available throughout Columbia County

or call 386.752.1293 for additional information.


PUBLISHED BY THE

Lake City Reporter


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CALL (386) 755-5445


100 J01
100 Opportunities
Part-time
CHILD CARE NEEDED! This
Person should be at least 18 years of
age, very enthusiastic and
dependable. Retirees welcome.
Please apply in person @ Southside
Baptist Church. 388 SE Baya Dr.
No Phone calls please.
PART-TIME ADMIN help for
busy office. Must be computer
literate and able to work under
pressure. Fax resume to
352-332-9962 or email to
ncastlen(dhsi.net
Parts Checker/Warehouse
Local Auto Parts Distributor seeks
Part Checker. Must be detail
oriented. Warehouse experience
required. Must pass Drug Test.
Apply in person only at
385 SW Arlington Blvd
Lake City, FL 32025
PLUMBERS &-HELPERS
Wanted. Career opportunities, with
fast growing business, Call
The Plumber 755-9789
PT Release Audit & Front desk
position. Apply in person
Mon-Fri, 9-4 at
QUALITY INN, Lake City. DFWP
SALES FINANCE Manager &
Experienced Sales Person needed.
See Robert Corbett at
1126 East Howard Street, Live Oak.
386-362-4061
Corbett's Mobile Home Center.
TOW TRUCK Driver Needed.
Clean MVR, Must pass background
check. Reside within Lake City.
Call 386-752-7799
TRAVEL U.S.A.
Publication Sales Co. hiring
18 sharp enthusiastic Individuals
to travel the U.S. Training, travel-
ing, lodging transportation provided
1-800-592-5752
TRI COUNTY Tree Service,
looking for Bucket Truck Operator.
Must have exp. in Tree Work. CDL
a plus, Excel pay. 386-963-5000
WANTED DUMP Truck Driver
Clean CDL Class B Lic. $10.50/hr,
local work. Call Charlie
386-623-4276
WAREHOUSE
Local Collision Parts Co. seeks
warehouse person. Exp. preferred.
M-F. Apply in person only,
No Phone Calls Please. 385 SW
Arlington Blvd, Lake City, FL.


i10 Sales
110 SEmployment

05515030
SALES CONSULTANT
At Travel Country RV Center we
are on the move! With the hottest
products on the market and as the
fastest growing dealership in the
region, we're adding sales
professionals to help expand our
market and to help maintain our
extremely loyal customer base.
We're not looking for career sales
people who change jobs every 6
months. We're looking for hard
working honest people who enjoy
the great outdoors, and want to
join an industry where an average
salesperson can earn $50,000 per
year, and the truly motivated and
hardworking salespeople can earn
$75,000 to $100,000 + each and
every year. All you need is
appearance, and the "gift of gab",
and we'll teach you everything
you need to be successful.
If you're ready for a serious
career opportunity email your
employment history for the last
3 years (with earnings) to
sales@travelcountryrv.com, or
Call Ann, @ 752-3723 to
schedule an appointment.
All inquiries will be
kept in strict confidence.


120 Medical
120 Employment

04508356
ATHLETIC TRAINER,
Exercise Physiologist or person
with exercise related background
needed for physical therapy clinic
PT Tuesday and Thursdays in
Lake City and FT, PT and PRN
positions available in Gainesville.
E-mail resume to
debbie(afitforlifept.com or fax to
attention Debbie (352)332-3812

04512677
BAYA POINTE NURSING &
REHAB CENTER is accepting
applications for CNA's.
All Shifts Available,
PT, FT & PRN. Excellent pay &
benefits. Please apply in person
at 587 SE Ermine Ave,
Lake City, FI 32025. EOE/
Drug Free Work Place


"Affordable .
Senior
Discount Quality


^/\z ^ % -^ We Work From
Start To Finish!
so"No Bull"

Family Owned & Operated

Commercial * Residential



Free 386-497-1419 Licensed * Bonded
Estimates License # RC0067442 Insured * Workers Comp





CORRECTIONS CORPORATION OFAMERICA
Lake City Correctional Facility is accepting applications for
* Academic Instructor
* Correctional Officers (FL certified)
* Non-Certified Correctional Officers (must have
passed the Florida Basic Aptitude Test)
* Educational Counselor
* LPN (FT & PT)
* RN-(FT & PT)
* Vocational Instructor (Janitorial)

Apply online at www.correctionscorp.com or in person at:
Lake City Correctional Facility
7906 E. US Hwy 90
Lake City, FL 32055
(386) 755-3379 * (386) 752-7202 (Fax)
EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER M/F/V/D
DRUG FREE WORKPLACE





Accounting



Clerk


The Lake City Reporter has a full-time
position available in our business office.
Bookkeeping, customer relations and
computer experience required.

Salary commensurate with experience.
No phone calls please.

Resumes may be delivered or mailed to the
Reporter office, attention Sue Brannon,
at 180 E. Duval St., Lake City, FL 32055
or email to:
sbrannon()1akecityreporter.com


Lake City Reporter


Classified Department: 755-5440


'*~;-w


l-vW-k,-A4m











TUESDAY, MARCH 20, 2007


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED


1 Medical
120 Employment

14512794
Fit For Life Physical Therapy
has positions available in
Lake City for persons experienced
in medical office front desk.
Part time, Tuesday and Thursday
8 am to 5 pin. Medical Manager
a plus. E-mail to
debbie6(Sfitforlifept.com or fax to
attention Debbie (352)332-3812.

(4512947
RNs and LPNs
Florida Department of
Corrections currently has
vacancies for RN Supervisor,
RN Specialists, RNs and LPNs
at the following institutions:
Columbia (Lake City)
Hamilton (Jasper)
RMC (Lake Butler)
FSP (Raiford)
Union (Raiford)
Exceptional Health Care
Insurance
v"
Vested Retirement after six years
Annual and sick leave accrual
V
Paid holidays
V
Career Service Rates
are based on experience
Or
Full-time non benefited
positions available.
Please visit:
Fldocjobs.com
Contact: Kathy Reed
(386) 496-6804
Reed.Kathym(amail.dc.state.fl.us
Or
Jennifer Dudley
(850)922-6645
Dudley.Jenniferfamail.dc.state.fl.
us

05514259
LPN or RN needed
7P - 7A
WITH BENEFITS!!!
Suwannee Health Care Center
1620 E. Helvenston St.
Live Oak, FL 32064
Please Contact Angela Akins
or Amelia Tompkins at
386-362-7860

MEDICAL OFFICE Receptionist
Experience preferred. FT/PT
Forward Resume To:
PO Box 1359 Lake City, Fl. 32056
Or Fax 386-719-4744


1 ^A Medical
120 Employment

15514444
C.N.A. needed
Full Time with Benefits
3pm - 11 pm
Call Angela Akins
At 386-362-7860
Or apply at
Suwannee Health Care Center
1620 E Helvenston Street
Live Oak. FL 32064
EOE/D/V/M/F

0551491805514918
Suwannee Medical Personnel
is now taking applications for
CNA's in the Lake Butler,
Starke and Lake City area.
Must be a Fl. certified CNA and
have I year experience.
If interested please call
(386) 755-1544, ask for Martha.

(05514968
RN/LPN
(2) Full Time positions 7p-7a
(1) Part Time position, every
other weekend Apply at
Macclenny Nursing & Rehab
755 South 5th Street;
Ask for Becky or Sharon

05514969
CERTIFIED NURSING
ASSISTANT'S
FULL-TIME
llp-7:30a, 3p-ll:30p
Must be dependable and ready to
work Apply in person to
Macclenny Nursing & Rehab
755 South 5th St/Hwy 228
Ask for Sharon/Melves
904-259-4873

Lincare, leading national respiratory
company seeks contract Healthcare
specialist for pm work. Responsibil-
ities: Disease management pro-
grams, clinical evaluations, equip-
ment set up and education. Be the
Dr's eyes in the home setting. CRT
or RRT licensed as applicable.
Great personalities with strong work
� ethic needed. Competitive pay
Drug-free workplace. EOE.
Fax resume to 386-754-2795

Lincare, leading national respiratory
company seeks results driven Sales
Representative. Create working re-
lationships with MD's, nurses, so-
cial workers and articulate our ex-
cellent patients care with attentive
listening skills. Competitive Base
+un-capped commission.
Drug-free workplace. EOE.
Fax resume to 352-335-4959


170 Business
Opportunities

FOR SALE Parking Lot sweeping
Business. Established Customers.
Positive cash flow.
386-776-1266


190 Mortgage Money


Classified Department: 755-5440


120 ^Medical
120 Employment

Lincare, leading national respiratory
company seeks caring Service
Representative. Service patients in
their home for oxygen and
equipment needs. warm personali-
ties, age 21+, who can lift up to 120
lbs should apply. CDL w/DOT a
plus or obtainable. Growth opportu-
nities are excellent.
Drug-free workplace. EOE.
Fax resume to 352-335-4959

Lincare, leading national respiratory
company seeks friendly, attentive
Customer Service Representative.
Phone skills that provide warm
customer interactions a must.
Maintain patient files, process
Doctors' orders, manage computer
data and filling. Growth
opportunities are excellent.
Drug-free workplace. EOE.
Fax resume to 352-335-4959

MEDICAL ASSISTANT
needed Full Time for busy Doctors
office. Experience helpful.
Fax resume to 386-758-5987

MEDICAL ASST.
For Busy ASC needed Full time
Please fax resume to
755-2169-

Medical Billing
For busy medical facility
Experience in medical insurance
billing required. Excellent salary.
Mail in confidence to
PO Box 3306
Lake City 32056.

Minesh Patel M.D. looking for
Medical Assistant/Receptionist
Busy doctors office. M-F for
Full Time. Experience only.
Fax resume to Attn Cheryl at
386-754-3657. Or mail to
861 NW Eadie St
Lake City Fl, 32055

QMRP Needed
BA/BS Human Service field
1 year experience in MR/DD
Lake City Cluster
673 NW ClusterDrive
386-755-2095
e-mail: jdisbrow@rescare.com
EEO/M/F/D/V


140 Work Wanted

EXPERIENCED CNA Smoke free
Will care for elderly in your home.
Meals, Light Housekeeping.
Good References. 386-755-2645


WANTED WHOLE Junk Cars.
$150 Each. Free Pick Up
Call 386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648


:~* ~


find your dream



home in the



Reporter Classifieds.






755-5440


440 Miscellaneous

05514947
15X24 OVAL Swimming Pool
All accessories included. $500
You must removed OBO
Call 386-935-0752

BARELY USED PRO FORM XP
tread Mill. Has alot of features and
programs. $500.00 cash
Call 719-2544
CINGULAR FLIP Phone,
Home charger, plus mobile charger.
Plus Extras. Excellent condition. ,
$40 386-961-9347
ELECTRIC WHEEL CHAIR
Lift for a van. $300.00.
Call for more information.
386-758-6052
FOR SALE
FULL LIQUOR LICENSE
SERIOUS INQUIRES ONLY
386-752-0594
HOT TUB - $1,795. LOADED!
Never used. Waterfall, therapy jets,
LED lights, cupholders, 110Ov
energy efficient. With warranty.
Can deliver 352-376-1600
PROM DRESS Teal & white,
brand new still in the box
One of a kind. Size extra small.
$100 OBO 386-362-4448
VICTORIAN VIBRATING
BASSETT, GOOD CONDITION,
$50 OBO (386)344-4503
LEAVE A MESSAGE

630 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
05514943
RARE AVAILABILITY
3BR/2BA Neat, clean, quiet Park.
NW Lake City. Senor discount
offered. $500 plus deposit.
No Pets. 941-524-4601


529
Private Investor
has cash for your
monthly payments.
Call Jerry 754-2122


Sunbelt Chrysler Jeep Dodge

Now Hiring Sales Consultants to work with
aggressive dealership. We provide Salary + Commision,
401K, Health Insurance & Paid Vacations.
Apply in person at Hwy 90 West
ask for Randy Sears or John Waschek.


Sunbelt Chrysler Jeep Dodge
Now Hiring: Service Consultants & Service
Technicians (Must have own tools)
We provide:
401K, Health Insurance & Paid Vacations
Apply in Person at Hwy 90 West,
ask for Dwight Wilson or Dennis Conway


Schools &
240 Education

Want to be a CNA? Don't want to
wait? Express Training Services of
Gainesville is now offering our
quality CNA exam Prep classes.
Day/Eve classes. Class for 1 week,
certification test the next week.
Class size is limited. Next class
03/19/07. Call 386-755-4401


310 Pets & Supplies

FEMALE AKC German Sheppard
puppy 9 weeks old. AKC papers&
Health Certificate. Ears are tattooed.
$700. 386-208-2510

MALE POMERANIAN Puppy
AKC 6 months, all shots, wormed,
vet check, light chocolate
$400 firm 386-755-2645
PUPPY FOR sale.
Dachshund, Chihuahua mix.
13 wks old. $99.
386-752-4458
RED NOSE/BLUE PIT PUPS
Beautiful colors, great mannered
Parents on Premises Call
Matt Jo or Spider 386-754 6105
Toy Poodle for sale Apricot,
Registered, First shots, Health cert.
Female 8 wks old. $400.00
Call 386-755-5086 after 6 pm


402 Appliances

LIKE NEW Refrigerator.
Frigidaire w/ Top Freezer
$400. OBO
386-288-3082

Window Unit air conditioner
w/remote control. Like new, whte
color. BRRRRRR cold
$99.00, 386-758-8654


L-


__^___^___^^^_^^_^_1


0551462


1


i


408 .Furniture
4 PC Bedroom set. Veneer
Cherry Wood. Brass
hardware, Good Condition.
$325.00. 386-758-6956
5pc Living room set. Tan leather
couch, loveseat & tables $1200
386-755-7015, Very good cond.
AMERICAN OAK Window Table.
$225.00
Top Condition
752-8351 evenings and weekends
BEAUTIFUL Maple Dining Room
table w/ 2 leaves. 4 regular chairs &
2 captain chairs. Like new Cond.
MOVING. 386-288-5954
CHERRY HUTCH
& DESK $250
755-7015
CHINA CABINET
White with gold accent, $99 OBO
Call after 5:00pm
386-758-3296
COFFEE TABLE
Golden Oak Stained wood
very sturdy & beautiful $99.00
Call 386-961-8812
Desk, Chair & File cabinet.
ALL $99.00.
Good Condition.
386-758-8654
DINING ROOM TABLE
Dark Col6r w/1 leaf & 4 chairs
(matching). very nice.
$99.00 386-758-3057
FENCH OAK Flat Top
Desk Louis XV style
$1400. 752-8351
evenings and weekends
FRENCH OAK 3 drawer
Chest Louis XV style
$500. 752-8351
evenings and weekends
FRENCH OAK Mirror
Louis XV style
$85.00 752-8351
evenings and weekends
Small Entertainment Center
Dark wood color, glass door,
shelving. $99.00
Call 386-961-8812
TODDLER Day Bed
light wood, custom designed,
Sturdy & beautiful.
$99.00 386-758-3057
TWO MATCHING light blue gray
recliners with center table. Good
condition. $49.00 for all
386-755-8960

416 Sporting Goods
POOL TABLE - Gorgeous Brand
new 8' wood table. Leather pockets,
Italian 1" slate, carved legs. Still in
Crate! Cost $4,500. Sell $1,350.
Can Deliver. 352-264-9799

420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
Payment in advance for standing
pine timber. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-454-1484 or 961-1961.


630 Mobile Homes
6 for Rent

2BR/2BA 14'X70' with large Front
Porch in the Country. $600 mo
w/lst & $600 Security. No Pets.
Call 386-755-1432
2BR/2BA DOULEWIDE,
No pets In the Country.
$600 mo w/lst & $600 Security.
Call 386-755-1432
IN PARK Mobile Homes for Rent
2BR/2BA, $550 mo, Ist, last, sec.
&Applications required.
386-719-2423

r640 Mobile Homes
640 for Sale
05514804


!!WOW!!
2007 3BR/2BA
Delivery & Set up included
$39,995.
PRESTIGE HOMES
3973 Hwy 90 West
Lake City, FL
386-752-7751
1-800-355-9385

05514980
$500.00 DOWN!
With your Land
2006 Clearance
And New 2007's
PRESTIGE HOMES
3973 Hwy 90 West
Lake City, FL
386-752-7751
1-800-355-9385

PALMS & JAKES move over.
Platimum outdoes them both.
Great Prices Too.
Hamilton Homes 758-6755
www.garyhamiltonhomes.com

650 fMobile Home
650 & Land
!!OWNER FINANCE!!
1989 DW 3BR/2BA on 0.4 acres.
798 Double Run Rd. $69,500.
Call 386-867-0048
3/2 DW A/C on 1.5 acre lot
Will sell or Lease
in Worthington Springs
Call 386-466-1104
OWNER FINANCING
1999 4BR/2BA on 2.5 acres. South
of Lake City, small down, $775/mo
386-590-0642

705 Rooms for Rent
Room/Bath for 1w/1 car garage,
W/D, screened porch, near
CR252/Hwy 41. CLEAN, QUIET,
Neighborhood. $425 mo. 1st & last
plus Dep. 1/2 cable & electric. No
Pets (352)361-7201

717 Unfurnished Apt.
7 For Rent
1BR/1BA. APT. Appliances Up-
stairs, convenient, in town location,
$500. mo. 1st, last & security.
Call 386-754-9293
2BR/1BA SPACIOUS Duplex
with garage. Available 4/1/07.
$600 mo Call after 5 pm
754-1764 or 352-514-2332
Immediate Openings 1 & 2 BR.
Convenient Location. Near VA
Hospital. Call for price and details.
386-755-2423
Townhouse Apt. 2BR/1.5BA.
Spacious 2 story townhouse on
McFarlane Ave. $750 mo,
plus $400 deposit.
Call 752-7781 or 397-5880
TWO-BR SPECIAL
$150 off first month's rent.
Windsong Apartments,
Come see us today! 758-8455

072 Furnished Apts.
For Rent
Completely Furnished, clean,
private, near city. 1BR. APT. Nice
neighborhood. Timco Welcome.
Quiet Call 386 961-9516

730 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
$278/MO! 4BR Hud!
5% down 20 years at 8%APR.
For listings
800-366-9783 ext F388
2BR/1BA. CH/A
on secluded 5 acres. Clean.
$700 mo. 1st, last & security FIRM.
Home has been rented
3BR/2BA BUICK view of
Lake Montgomery, very clean.
No pets $990/mo. First, last &
$100 security. 965-0763
3BR/2BA. HOME
Within City Limits.
$1200. per mo plus dep. No Pets.
386-623-6612
5 BR! Only $199/mo!
5% down. 20 years at 8% APR.
For listings call
800-366-9783 ext 5736









LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED TUESDAY, MARCH 20, 2007


73 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
STOP RENTING!
Buy 3BR only S14.500!
Foreclosure! For listing
800-366-9783 ext 7782

7 Furnished
74 Homes for Rent
GOLF COURSE HOME 3/2.5
Total Furn. Wkly/Mo, or
7-Mo Lease Avail.
386-754-7233 or 904-336-3776

075 Business &
Office Rentals
2 RETAIL Spaces for rent.
High traffic area.
Next to Winn Dixie. 780 sq ft or
900 sq ft. 800-342-0135
3ROOM OFFICE SUITE For rent.
across from the VA, on Baya.
with private entrance and shared
street sign. Common reception,
bath and kitchen. $689/mo
Please call Katie 386-754-6600
Ideal for Doctors & Accountants.
Between 900-1,000 sq ft.
$900 mo + tax.
Call 386-752-9626
OFFICE IN Oakbridge Complex
725 SE Baya Dr.
500 sq. ft., second floor unit.
Call 386-752-4820(
Office Space for Rent, In Live Oak
Approx. 1,300 SF. For further
information Call Poole Realty
386-209-1766
OFFICE- w/2,100 SF Located in
Live Oak For rent. For further
information Call Poole Realty
386-209-1766


760 Wanted to Rent
WANT TO RENT Mobile Home
or Camping Space w/ garden
space for $250/mo or less. w/cat. I
work for rent. 276-284-9101.

790 Vacation Rentals
Horseshoe Beach Gulf Front
2BR House very well decorated w/
Ig waterfront porch, dock, & fish
sink. Avail weekends. $395. or
weekly $895. (352)498-5986 or
386-235-3633

805 Lots for Sale
1 ACRE near Ft. White.
River access. $500 down,
owner financing. Small payments.
Call 386-497-3637
5 ACRES near Lake City.
5 miles to Wal-Mart.
Small down, owner financing.
Call 386-497-3637
NICE .73-ACRE
IN FOREST COUNTRY S/B
ASKING $68,000
386-752-9095

810 Home for Sale
$278/MO! 4BR'Hud!
5% down 20 years at 8%APR.
For listings
800-366-9783 ex' H411
5BR HOME!
Only $22,500!
Bank foreclosures available now,
for listings 800-366-9783 ext 9478


810 Home for Sale

(55146i 7(1
Brand New 1900 sqft site built
3BR/2BA Starting at $149K
0 down & $900 mo.
Slow credit no problem
386-755-2082

(15514803
Logged Homes
Starting at
$65,500.00
PRESTIGE HOMES
3973 Hwy 90 West
Lake City, FL
386-752-7751
1-800-355-9385

015514979

!!WOW!
2007 3BR/2BA
Delivery & Set up included
$39,995.
PRESTIGE HOMES
3973 Hwy 90 West
Lake City, FL
386-752-7751
1-800-355-9385

05514981
$500.00 DOWN!
With your Land
2006 Clearance
And New 2007's
PRESTIGE HOMES
3973 Hwy 90 West
Lake City, FL
386-752-7751
1-800-355-9385


810 Home for Sale

05515016
Located at 420 Rosewood St In
Eastside Retirement Village off
Baya Ave. Built in 1997 it has
2158 sq ft with 1665 Heated/air. 2
bedrooms with 2 full baths,
walk-in closets. LR, DR, kitchen
includes washer, dryer, stove,
refrigerator microwave. Two car
garage and an enclosed back
porch. Asking $160,000 as is or
$165,000 with up grades. House
sitting vacant for 6 months--needs
a new loving owner. For
appointment call Jean @
(904)693-9038 or mobile
(904)626-8542. No answer,
leave message. E-mail me @
UR2JEAN(aAOL.COM

BANK FORECLOSURE!
3BR/2BA! Only $14,500!
Must Sell, for listings
800-366-9783 ext 7921
FSBO: 3BR/2BA, 2746 sq ft.
Plantations Hwy 90 West.
$275,900. Call (352)669-8510
or 352-989-7034
Owner Finance!
2BR/IBA Mhome I Acre
Near College/Small Down
$600 mo/ 866-877-8661 Ext. 620

820 Farms &
Acreage

LAND FOR SALE; 15 ACRES
OFF HWY 247 & 248,
SOUTH OF LAKE CITY.
$190K 904-289-9218


820 Farms &
2( Acreage

155 14993
TIMBERLAND SALE
GA, NC, SC & VA
Rivers. Creeks
Rolling Hills.
Level, Bottom Land.
Hardwoods. Pine.
Excellent Hunting!
404-362-8244
St. Regis Paper Co.
www.stregispapaer.com

158 1/2 Ac., MOL 15 mi. N of Lake
City on US 441. well drained, with
frontage, hardwoods, pasture,
25 ac. planted pines. REDUCED
$5,365/AC. Terms possible.
386-466-5741/386-752-7694

250 ACRES $5000/acre.
High Springs Area-Fully Permitted
5acre subdivision. High and Dry
planted pines.Great investment
Please call 772-388-2255

ACREAGE. 4 to 20 acre lots.
Owner financing. Low down
payment. Deas Bullard/BKL
Properties. 386-752-4339.
www.landnfl.com


920 Auto Parts
92 & Supplies

4-LT 325/60R18 used
pick-up truck toyo tires
$400.00 only 29,000 miles ofuse.
Call 719-2544


930 Motorcycles
2006 SUZUKI 250.
Less than 500 miles,
garage kept. one owner.
'2,800. 386-719-3908

940 Trucks
1998 CHEVY 1500 longbed.
single cab. Automatic, one owner.
119k mi., v-6. showroom cond.
$5.900. (352)339-5158
1999 3-QUARTER ton truck Sav-
annah GMC. 8 ply excellent shape,
heat/ac. Great paint $8200 OBO
Call 352-538-7904

950 Cars for Sale
1998 NISSAN Altima,
4 door, Automatic, AM/FM/CD
one owner, 170k mi., like new.
$3,700. (352)339-5158
84 CORVETTE
NEEDS WORK, ENGINE RUNS
87,000 MILES $2000 OBO
352-283-1459 Leave a message.
CARS FROM $500.00!
Police Impounds available now,
for listings
800-366-9813 ext A760

"952 Vans & Sport
952 Util. Vehicles
1992 RANGE ROVER
Only $650/OBO!
Police Impounds,
for listings 800-366-9813 ext A834


Sawy home shoppers reach for the classified ads

before they hit the streets. The newspaper

classified section offers everything they need to

make an informed purchasing decision.,


Want to make a move?

Check the classified ads first.





classified







the first place to look for everything






Lake City Reporter


ADVERTISE IT HERE!

BRING THE PICTURE IN OR WE WILL TAKE IT FOR YOU!
Advertise your car, truck, motorcycle, recreation vehicle or boat here for
10 consecutive days. If your vehicle does not sell within those 10 days, for
an additional $10 you can place your ad for an additional 10 days. A picture
will run everyday with a description of your vehicle. The price of the vehicle
must be listed in the ad. Your ad must be prepaid with cash, check or credit
card. Just include a snapshot or bring your vehicle by the we will take the
picture for you. Private party only!



P&�;.10v DAYBSi FORONL $3


1992 Buick Riviera
$3,900
113K miles, runs great.
Like new. Must see!
New A/C, PW, CD player.
Call
386-752-1811


2004 18ft. Cobia
$15,500
115hp, 4 Stroke engine.
Call
386-719-7192
386-623-2608


2001 Forest River
Camper
s7,000 OBO
21' with foldouts on each end,
heat/ac, fridge, microwave,
stove, bathroom. Sleeps 6-7,
excellent shape.
Call
386-755-7914


1 l i-orou I- 1U
Triton
s4,400
AT, air, 3 door club cab,
bedliner, good tires, no rust.
Call
386-755-0377





2001 Chrysler
Town-n-Country LXI
s8,900
Fully loaded. Very good condi-
tion. Runs great! Power side
doors and life gate. Remote
keyless entry. Lots of extras.
Call
386-752-9679


SPACES

AVAILABLE NOW!


Connected
d-U . .. ..


www.lakecityreporter.com


North Florida .. .



A monthly real estate magazine " / r
- '--f ""^ ^**p **t^-""' * ' IF l ! : * " -,.


Lake CA jkvReporter


Classified Department: 755-5440




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