Citation
Lake City reporter

Material Information

Title:
Lake City reporter
Creator:
Lake City reporter
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2007
Language:
English

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates:
30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Community Newspapers Inc., Todd Wilson - Publisher. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
LTUF ( ABZ6316 )
OCLC ( 33283560 )
AlephBibNum ( 000358016 )

Full Text





WEATHER
Inside 2A

Hi: 80
Low: 59
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00015 061607 ****3-DIGIT 32
LIBRARY OF FL HISTORY
0 BOX 117007
AINESVILLE FL 32611-7007


Lake


Thursday, March 15, 2007


City


Staying Safe
Conference focuses
on domestic violence
in rural areas.
Local, 7A






Reporter


www.lakecityreporter.com


Vol. 133, No. 48 0 50 cents


LOAN OFFICER


PLEADS GUILTY



TO BANK FRAUD


Lake City woman
avoids 35 counts of
federal indictment.
By TROY ROBERTS
troberts@lakecityreporter. corn
A Lake City Mercantile Bank
loan officer entered a guilty
plea to one count of bank fraud
last week after she was arrest-
ed earlier this year on a
36-count federal indictment.
Teala Danielle Howard was
indicted on 36 counts of bank
fraud by the U.S. Attorney's
Office in January. Howard was
accused of opening 36 con-
sumer loan accounts using ficti-
tious identities, including
names, address and Social
Security numbers of non-exis-
tent bank customers. The
indictment also accused her of
using certificates of deposits of


existing bank customers as col-
lateral for the fictitious loans.
The U.S. Attorney's office
said the fictitious loans were
created between February
2004 and July 2006.
The indictment stated she
had loan amounts of almost
$300,000 in the names of Ken
Matthews, Kevin Stinson,
Kimberly Chandler and
Martha Griffis.
Howard entered a guilty
plea on March 8 in the U.S.
District Court Middle District
of Florida, Jacksonville
Division, to one count of bank
fraud. The guilty plea was to
Count 36 in the indictment -
a $10,135.70 loan amount to
the fictitious bank customer
Griffis, according to the
indictment paperwork. The
one count carries a maximum
FRAUD continued on 9A


Jury votes for death

penalty for Couey


Defense attorneys
asked for mercy for
killer of 9-year-old.
By CURT ANDERSON
Associated Press
MIAMI - A jury decided
Wednesday that a convicted
sex offender should get the
death penalty for the
kidnapping, rape and
murder of 9-year-old
Jessica Lunsford, who
was buried alive in
trash bags just yards
from her home.
The jury, on a 10-2 C
vote, brushed aside ouey
pleas for mercy and a life sen-
tence from defense lawyers
based on claims that John
Evander Couey, 48, is mentally
retarded and suffers from
chronic mental illness. Jurors
deliberated for about one hour.
The final decision on
Couey's fate will be made in
several weeks by Circuit
Judge Richard Howard, who is
not bound by the jury's rec-
ommendation but is required
to give it "great weight."
The Lunsford family
showed no emotion when the
decision was read, nor did
Couey. Outside the court-
house, Jessica's father, Mark
Lunsford, thanked the jury


with tears in his eyes.
"This is justice for Jessie, but
not just Jessie," Lunsford said.
"I'm sure there are other vic-
tims out there. If you crossed
paths with Couey and he hurt
you, this is justice for you."
Couey was convicted last
week of taking Jessica in
February 2005 from her bed-
room to his trailer about 150
yards away, where he
raped her. Despite an
intensive search, the
third-grader's body
wasn't found until
about three weeks
after she disappeared
- in a grave outside
Couey's home.
In closing statements, pros-
ecutor Ric Ridgway called the
crime "evil" and asked jurors
to remember how Jessica died
by suffocating in the hole
Couey dug, accompanied
inside the plastic bags only by
a toy dolphin.
"She was in pain. In the
dark. She was certainly terri-
fied," Ridgway said in his clos-
ing statement. "If this is not
the person who deserves the
death penalty, who does?"
Defense lawyers pleaded for
mercy, arguing that Couey
deserved no more than a life
sentence in prison because of
COUEY continued on 7A


Progress in Iraq


ASSOCIATED PRESS
The commander of the Baghdad security plan, Iraqi army Lt. Gen. Abboud Qanbar
speaks at a press conference in Baghdad, Iraq, Wednesday. Qanbar warned that all
terrorists and outlaws 'will be smashed with the foot of the Iraqi people' unless they
reconsider their 'position and return to logic before it's too late.'


Early signs of success seen
in Baghdad crackdown,
but outlook still mixed.
By ROBERT H. REID
Associated Press
BAGHDAD - Bomb deaths have
gone down 30 percent in Baghdad since
the U.S.-led security crackdown began a
month ago. Execution-style slaying are
down by nearly half.
The once frequent sound of weapons
has been reduced to episodic, and down-
town shoppers have returned to outdoor
markets - favored targets of car bombers.
There are signs of progress in the
campaign to restore order in Iraq, start-
ing with its capital city.
But while many Iraqis are encouraged,
they remain skeptical how long the rela-
tive calm will last. Each bombing renews
fears the horror is returning. Shiite mili-
tias and Sunni insurgents are still around,
perhaps just lying low or hiding outside
the city until the operation is over.
U.S. military officials, burned before by
overly optimistic forecasts, have been cau-
tious about declaring the operation a suc-
cess. Another reason it seems premature:
Only two of the five U.S. brigades ear-
marked for the mission are in the streets,
and the full complement of American rein-
forcements is not due until late May.
A Pentagon report released
Wednesday in Washington even used for
the first time the term "civil war" to
describe some of the violence here. But
it stressed that the term does not cap-
ture Iraq's complex situation, and its
assessment was based on the final three
months of 2006, which it said was the
most violent three-month period since
the U.S.-led invasion.
Key to success
U.S. officials say that key to the securi-
ty crackdown's long-term success is the
willingness of Iraq's sectarian and ethnic
political parties to strike a power- and
money-sharing deal. That remains elusive:
A proposal for governing the 'country's
main source of income - oil - is bogged
down in parliamentary squabbling.
Nevertheless, there are encouraging


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Pfc. Salvador Gutierrez, 21, from Oxnard,
Calif., ofAlpa Company, 1st Battalion,
325th Airborne Infantry Regiment of the
82nd Airborne stands guard after hearing
gunshots in the Hurriyah neighborhood of
Baghdad, Iraq, Wednesday. Though
violence continues in the nation's capital, it
has significantly waned in recent weeks.
signs.
Gone are the "illegal checkpoints,"
where Shiite and Sunni gunmen stopped
cars and hauled away members of the
rival sect - often to a gruesome torture
and death.
The rattle of automatic weapons fire or
the rumble of distant roadside bombs
comes less frequently. Traffic is beginning
to return to the city's once vacant streets.
"People are very optimistic because
they sense a development. The level of
sectarian violence in streets and areas
has decreased," said a 50-year-old Shiite,
who gave his name only as Abu Abbas,
or "father of Abbas." 'The activities of
the militias have also decreased. The car
bombs and the suicide attacks are the
only things left, while other kinds of
violence have decreased."


IRAQ continued on 9A


TWO MEN HELD
WITHOUT BOND

Armed

robbery

suspects

speak out

Tell law enforcement
authorities heist was
for a gang initiation.
By TROY ROBERTS
troberts@lakecityreporter.com
FORT WHITE - Two Fort
White men arrested and charged
with armed
robbery early
Wednesday
morning told
authorities the
robbery was a
part of a gang
initiation. Cook
J a s o n
Dawann Cook,
31, and Darrell
Paxton, 24,
both of Fort,
White, were
each charged
with armed
robbery and Paxton
booked into
the Columbia County Jail with-
out bond after attempting to rob
SUSPECTS continued on 7A


Countyto
address


addition of

auxiliary

Fire department eyes
plan that would.
implement new unit.

By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
The Columbia County Fire
Department hopes to start an aux-
iliary unit in the near future.
However, that decision will lie
with county officials who are
scheduled to discuss the proposal
during the board's next meeting.
The Columbia County Board
of County Commissioners is
scheduled to discuss the propos-
al during its 7 p.m. meeting
tonight at the Columbia School
Board Complex Auditorium, 372
W. Duval St.
The Columbia County Fire
Department would like to
COUNTY continued on 7A


I_____ Soldier's new home nears completion


JOHNNA PINHOLSTER/Lake City Reporter
Peter and Dianna Herrick
outside their new home. The
couple will host and open
house on Saturday.


Disabled Iraqi veteran
and his wife will host
open house Saturday.
By JOHNNA PINHOLSTER
jpinholster@lakectiyreporter.com
FORT WHITE - The Herrick
family is packing to move into a
new home - about 500 yards
from their old one.
Peter Herrick, a disabled Iraq
veteran and his family will hold an


open house from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.
this Saturday for friends and family.
"The good thing about the new
home being so close is when can
move one box at a time," Herrick
said.
A key ceremony will take place
at 1 p.m.
Peter Herrick joined the Navy
Reserve as a Seabee, two months
before the Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist
attacks. In 2004 his unit was acti-
vated and Herrick went to Iraq.
"The Seabees are the construc-


tion battalion for the Navy,"
Herrick said. '"The unit builds
things like army bases, schools or
airports."
During a routine escort mission
and awaiting a new assignment,
Herrick's unit, NM Seabee 14 out
of NAS Jacksonville, suffered a
mortar attack. The attack killed five
and wounded 33. Herrick was
struck with shrapnel, one fragment
breaking his neck and paralyzing


HERRICK continued on 7A


JOHNNA PINHOLSTERILake City Reporter
Pictured above is the outside of the new home of Peter
and Dianna Herrick.


CALL US: INSIDE
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TODAY IN COMING
BUSINESS FRIDAY
Mortgage market blamed Friends of Music
for Dow's gyrations, concert series continues.










LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2007


Wednesday:
8-1-2


Wednesday:
7-1-9-8


Tuesday:
2-16-31-43 3


Tuesday:
8-12-26-28-34


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS


Mills: Ready to compete on 'Stars'


NEW YORK - Heather Mills says
her decision to compete on ABC's
"Dancing With the Stars" is no publicity
stunt.
Mills, who is divorcing former Beatle
Paul McCartney, says she is appearing
on the show for charity, not to gain
public sympathy.
"I've been chased and hounded for 10
months and told I'm a publicity-seeker,
yet I've never gone out and done
anything," the activist and former
model says in an interview that was to
air Tuesday on the syndicated TV show


The Who ends
concert mid song
TAMPA - Fans of The
Who left a Tampa
amphitheater disappointed
after lead singer Roger
Daltrey walked off the stage
during the band's first song.
Several minutes after
Daltrey's departure, guitarist
Pete Townshend announced
that Tuesday night's show
had been canceled. He told
the crowd that Daltrey had
bronchitis.
"I just talked to Roger and
he can barely speak,"
Townshend said. "I tried to
get him to come out here,


"Access Hollywood."
Mills, who lost her leg below the
knee in a 1993 motorcycle accident, is
the first contestant with an artificial
limb to compete on the dance show.
"As much as everyone would love it
to go flying, I'm sure it's not going to
come off," Mills says. "It can, once it
gets hot, start to slide and come off, so
I've pulled a sleeve over the top, which
doesn't look as cosmetically good."
She adds: "I've got a secondary spare
leg just in case I overdo it on the foot
and it breaks or something."


but he's really, really sick."
The 9,000 people at the
show cheered when
Townshend told them the
concert would be
rescheduled for March 25.

Tori Spelling has
baby boy in LA
LOS ANGELES - Tori
Spelling gave birth to a boy
Tuesday, her publicist said.
The actress and her
husband, actor Dean
McDermott, welcomed
6-pound, 6-ounce Liam Aaron
McDermott at a Los Angeles
hospital, said spokeswoman
Meghan Prophet.


Celebrity Birthdays


* Country singer Carl Smith
is 80.
* Musician DJ Fontana is
76.
* Former astronaut Alan L.
Bean is 75.
* Supreme Court Justice
Ruth Bader Ginsburg is 74.
* Actor Judd Hirsch is 72.
* Rock musician Phil Lesh is
67.
* Singer Mike Love (The
Beach Boys) is 66.
* Rock singer-musician Sly
Stone is 64.


The baby is the first for
Spelling and the second for
McDermott, who has a son
from a previous marriage.
The couple wed in May
2006 and star in the reality
series 'Tori & Dean: Inn
Love," which premieres
March 20 on the Oxygen
network.

Holbrook honored
by Legislature
JACKSON, Miss. - Hal
Holbrook was honored by
the Mississippi Legislature
Monday, and the actor who
has spent a lifetime
impersonating Mark Twain


recalled his own travels
through the South.
Holbrook, 82, told
lawmakers that he began his
journeys from New York in
the late 1940s and continued
through the most turbulent
years of the civil rights
struggle.
"I was doing material that
I could never do as Hal
Holbrook. I was doing
material which directly
spoke to what was going on
and the troubles that people
were having," Holbrook said.
"Speaking as Mark Twain, I
was able to get away with it."
* Associated Press


Thought for Today


* Rock singer-musician
Howard Scott (War) is 61.
* Rock singer Ry Cooder is
60.
* Actor Craig Wasson is 53.
* Rock singer Dee Snider
(Twisted Sister) is 52.
* Actress Park Overall is 50.
* Movie director Renny
Harlin is 48.
* Model Fabio is 46.
* Rock singer Mark McGrath
(Sugar Ray) is 39.
* Rock musician Mark
Hoppus is 35.


"Sometimes it's worse to win a
fight than to lose."


- Billie Holiday,
American singer (1915-1959)


Fashion designer Marc

Jacobs enters rehab


Associated Press
NEW YORK - Fashion
designer Marc Jacobs has
entered rehab.
"Marc made the right deci-
sion," Jacobs' longtime busi-
ness partner Robert Duffy told
Women's Wear Daily, which
reported the story on its Web
site Monday.
Jacobs had previously
acknowledged in interviews
that he abused drugs and
alcohol.
"He'd been sober for seven
years. When he relapsed, he
wanted to deal with it right
away," Duffy said to the indus-
try newspaper. "According to
the experts, such a relapse isn't
uncommon. Thankfully, Marc
recognized the problem him-


Lake City
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ......... (386) 752-1293
Fax number ................752-9400
Circulation ... .......755-5445
Online ...... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is published
Tuesday through Sunday at 180 E. Duval St.,
Lake City, Fla. 32055. Periodical postage paid
at Lake City, Fla. Member Audit Bureau of
Circulation and The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake City
Reporter. Reproduction in whole or in part is
forbidden without the permission of the pub-
lisher. U.S. Postal Service No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to
Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City,
Fla. 32056.
Publisher Michael Leonard ... .754-0418
(mleonard@lakecityreporter.com),
NEWS
If you have a news tip, call any member of the
news staff or 752-5295.
Editor Todd Wilson ..........754-0428
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Jim Kennedy ........754-0417
(ads@lakecityreporter.com)


self and chose to deal with it
Obviously, our prayers are with
him."
The confirmation that
Jacobs was at a treatment facil-
ity came on the day that Jacobs
received two nominations from
the Council of Fashion
Designers of America for its
upcoming awards. He was
nominated in the womenswear
and accessories categories.
And those honors were on
the heels of three well-received
previews of fall collections -
one for his namesake brand in
New York, one for the younger
- and less expensive - Marc
by Marc Jacobs label in
London, and one in Paris for
Louis Vuitton, .owned by
LVMH Moet Hennessy Louis
Vuitton SA.


Reporter
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.
BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon.......754-0419
(sbrannon @lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m. Tuesday
through Saturday, and by 7:30 a.m. on
Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any prob-
lems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should call
before 10:30 am. to report a service error for
same day re-delivery. After 10:30 a.m., next
day re-delivery or service related credits will
be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery is
available, next day re-delivery or service relat-
ed credits will be issued.
Director A. Russell Waters ... .754-0407
(rwaters@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
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Rates include 7% sales tax.
Mail rates
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CORRECTION


The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news items.
If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please call the
executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run in this
space. And thanks for reading.



THE WEATHER


Police connect jailed
man to attacks
JACKSONVILLE - DNA
evidence connects a jailed
inmate to what detectives
believe was a six-year series
of sexual attacks on
prostitutes and homeless
women, police said.
Blood on a box cutter that
police seized from Tracy
Devon Newton's car during a
February traffic stop
matched the DNA of a
prostitute critically injured on
Jan. 12, after someone
slashed her throat, police
said.
Police re-arrested Newton,
29, at a Duval County jail
Tuesday, booking him on a
charge of aggravated battery
with a deadly weapon.
He has been in jail since
Feb. 13, when police charged
the convicted felon with
possession of the weapon
after finding the box cutter
beneath the floor mat of his
car. He told police he owned
the cutter,'but said he never
cut anyone with it.

Teacher charged
with child porn
LAKELAND - A high
school teacher was arrested
for possession of child
pornography after a student
found his portable memory
drive in a school computer
lab, authorities reported.
Mark James Mason, 47, of
Winter Haven, acknowledged
that he owned the thumb
drive and used it to download
images of naked boys,
according to a release from
the Polk County Sheriff's
Office. The boys appear to
range in age from 5 to 12
years old.
The sheriff's office began
its investigation after a
student found the drive in a
computer lab at Santa Fe
Catholic High School and
turned it over to the principal,
the sheriff's office reported.
Deputies executed a search
warrant of Mason's home on


Tuesday and seized other
computer equipment. More
charges could follow depend-
ing on the outcome of the
search.

Man sentenced
to life for fires
FORT PIERCE - A man
who admitted setting one
church on fire and burning
another to the ground to
strike back at God has been
sentenced to life in prison.
A jury convicted Henry
Drevermann in December of
15 counts related to three
church fires during the
2003-2004 holiday season.
Circuit Judge Gary Sweet
followed a prosecutor's
recommendation and
sentenced Drevermann to the
maximum sentence.
Drevermann's attorney
Rusty Akins said his client
suffers from severe mental
illness and asked the judge to
put the 40-year-old on
probation.
"Mr. Drevermann has had
a horrendous, horrific life,"
Akins argued. "We're asking
the court to give him a
chance with this, it's the only
chance he's gotten in his
entire life."
When Drevermann was a
child, he watched his older
brother kill their abusive
father and bury the body in
their basement in New York,
Akins said during the trial.
"This should be an
exception," Akins said. "This
isn't the 1880s where we take
people with mental health
issues and lock them up
forever."

Authorities: Man
posed as doctor
FORT LAUDERDALE - A
man was released from jail
Tuesday evening on charges
he posed as a doctor and
treated patients for sexual
problems, Broward County
authorities said.
Marc J. Goulet did not have
a medical license, but treated


patients at clinics in Pompano
Beach, Delray Beach, Palm
Beach Gardens, Miami, Fort
Myers and Sarasota, Broward
County officials said. Goulet
was arrested at his Pompano
Beach office Monday after a
nine-month investigation.
The 60-year-old would
examine patients, inject them
with testosterone and
prescribe creams to solve
sexual problems, sheriff
officials said. Goulet was
charged with unlicensed
practice of a health care
profession, operation of an
unlicensed clinic, practicing
medicine without a license and
scheming to defraud.

Video shows guard
manhandling teen
TAMPA - An enhanced
video released Wednesday
more clearly shows boot camp
guards manhandling a
teenager who later died,
including striking the limp boy
with closed fists on his
forearm.
The tape was among more
than 20,000 pages of evidence
released by prosecutors in the
manslaughter case against the
seven former juvenile boot
camp guards who were
videotaped manhandling
14-year-old Martin Lee
Anderson in January 2006 and
a nurse who observed it.
The 36-minute video is still
grainy and overexposed after a
NASA enhancement. It shows
guards repeatedly hauling the
boy to his feet and knees and
then pinning him face down
on the ground at the Bay
County sheriff's boot camp in
Panama City. They guards
haul him up against a pole and
apparently throw water in his
face.
They also appear to be
holding a white cloth to his
face. The nurse does not
appear to give Anderson a
close examination until about
27 minutes into the tape. At
that point, guards have
stopped hitting him.
* Associated Press


CHANCE
T-STORMS


HI 80 LO 59


PARTLY
' SUNNY


HI 70 L047
> -1m.1 m1"1".. a-�"' r


S.a l '.4' 15


TaHlahassee
75,62 5
Pensacola PanamaCity
S6961 *74., 63


eValdost
75/63
Lake C
80 5
Gai
7
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*a Ja

59


acksonville
78 61


nesville * Daytona Beach
9."63 7,162
Ocala * 'Cpe Canaveral
S79/61 O * 77/66
" . O7 ado06o
81/64
Tanipa
81/ 6 West Palm Beach
-\ 80/70
Ft Myeris..
85/66F 'I FtL Lauderdale
S . 81/68 0
SNaples �
'8."67 Miami
Key West 8,2/71
Q1 /7)


81/72L


I y Il AA I K


TEMPERATURES
High Wednesday
Low Wednesday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Wednesday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


81
54
75
50
89 in 1954
27 in 1926


0.00"
1.16"
8.35"
1.96"
8.86"


. ! I : I I "
7a Ip 7p la 6a
Thursday Friday







--Forecastedltenraturn "Fe Hike" tompeorre
v


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise tom.
Sunset tom.


7:41 a.m.
7:39 p.m.
7:40 a.m.
7:39 p.m.


City
Cape Canaveral
Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Jacksonville
Key West
Lake City
Miami
Naples
Ocala
Orlando
Panama City
Pensacola
Tallahassee
Tampa
Valdosta
W. Palm Beach


15 mtesbtolum
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.
,. , , ;. .


MOON
Moonrise today 5:25 a.m.
Moonset today 4:00 p.m.
Moonrise tom. . 6:06 a.m.
Moonset tom. 5:09 p.m.


March March April April
18 25 2 10
New First Full Last


On this date in
1988, more than
one hundred hours
of continuous snow
finally came to an
end at Marquette,
Mich, during which
time the city was
buried under 43 inch-
es of snow.


Friday
79 65 t
78 61 i
83 69.1
82.65,.1
77 59/1t
77/59/t
78/69/t
75/57/t
82/72/t
83/69/t
80/58/t
81/62/t
74/59/t
72/56/c
75/52/t
78/65/t
74/51/t
79/66/t


Saturday
76:.59.1
i5. 55 pc
84'62 Pc
83 58 pc
77/49/s
71/49/s
77/65/t
70/47/pc
85/64/t
81/59/pc
76/49/s
73/49/s
69/53/s
70/52/s
68/37/s
75/53/pc
75/39/s
82/58/t


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LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2007


BRIEFS


Worker hit by
vehicle, dies
MIRAMAR - A city worker
replacing a water pipe was
struck by a construction vehicle
and died Wednesday,
authorities said.
The 53-year-old man was
working with a city crew in front
of a home when he was struck
with the backhoe about
10:30 a.m., police spokesman
Bill Robertson said.
Authorities were
investigating.
Water use in the area was
interrupted until about 1 p.m.
A spokesman with the city
manager's office did not
immediately return a telephone
message.

Eighth motorcyclist
dies at Bike Week
DAYTONA BEACH - A
19-year-old college student
has died from injures
sustained in a crash this
weekend, making him the
eighth Bike Week death, police
said Wednesday.
Brandon K. Long died
Monday, a day after he
attempted to make a left turn
and his motorcycle collided
with a car, police said. The
driver of the car, Majorie
Hendrick, 72, South Daytona,
was not injured.
Long was a student at
Embry-Riddle Aeronautical
University.
The other deaths from Bike
Week were five people killed
in Volusia County and a St.
Petersburg couple who
crashed in Seminole County
on their way home from the
event.

Jury finds man
guilty in shooting
FORT PIERCE - A jury on
Wednesday found a man guilty
of first-degree murder in the
2005 fatal shooting of a
newspaper delivery man.
Steven Hayward , 38, was
convicted after three hours of
deliberation for the death of
Daniel DeStefano, 32. Hayward
also was found guilty on
charges of armed robbery,
armed burglary and possession
of a firearm by a convicted
felon.
* Associated Press


Gootee announces plans


for re-election in 2008


By TROY ROBERTS
troberts@lakecityreporter. corn
Despite almost two years
remaining on his first term as
Columbia County Sheriff, Bill
Gootee wants to assure citi-
zens of the county he will run
for sheriff when his term is up
in 2008.
Gootee * announced
Wednesday that he will seek
re-election for sheriff of
Columbia County in 2008.
"I went ahead and officially
filed to seek re-election as
sheriff of Columbia County in
2008," he said. "I'm not one to
put off until tomorrow what I
can do today."
Gootee said that he filed
early because some citizens
had asked if he planned on
running again and what his


future plans
would be for
the agency.
"I'm hum-
bled to
serve the
citizens of
Gootee C o 1 u m b ia
County and
my first term has been
exciting, challenging and
rewarding," he said.
Gootee said he considers
his first term as sheriff a suc-
cess so far and believes that
one of his biggest accomplish-
ments in his first two years as
sheriff is bring the agency
into the 21st century.
"When I took office, we did-
n't have e-mail, Internet
access, or an active Web site
to communicate to the pub-
lic," he said. He also noted


the start of the agency's sex
offender/predator unit, the
development of the
Operations Center on East
U.S. Highway 90 and the sher-
iff's office taking charge of
dispatching emergency units
in the county.
Gootee said he believes he
will continue to be the right
man for the job because of his
accessibility to the public, his
willingness to be involved in
the community and his grow-
ing experience as sheriff.
"I think the confidence that
the citizens have in the
Columbia County Sheriff's
Office now is at a higher level
than it has ever been," he
said. "I'd like to continue that
relationships that the people
have with our agency."


Senate takes slow approach to tax reform


By BILL KACZOR
Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE - Th6
first property tax reform pro-
posal in the Senate surfaced
Wednesday, but lawmakers
took no action in committee,
preferring a go-slow approach
to one of the hottest issues
facing the Legislature this
year.
The issue is on the fast
track in the House, where
Republican leaders have
offered a two-part plan,
including a proposed constitu-
tional amendment that would
abolish property tax on pri-
mary homes but increase the
statewide sales tax. House
Democrats unveiled their own
plan Wednesday.
"Our goal is to get it right,"
said Sen. Mike Haridopolos,
R-Indialantic, at a Community
Affairs Committee workshop.
"We don't want to move for-
ward without all the informa-
tion in front of us."
The proposal floated in that
committee would do away
with the criteria of assessing
property according to its


potential, known as "highest
and best" use, rather than
how it actually is used.
Highest and best use is one
of eight criteria set by state
law for appraising property.
The others are cash value,
location, size, cost, condition,
income and net proceeds
from sale.
Haridopolos, who chairs
the Senate Finance and Tax
Committee, said senators plan
to meet Friday with county
property appraisers about the
proposal. I
Democrats in the
Republican-controlled House,
meanwhile, proposed limiting
property tax increases to infla-
tion plus 3 percent annually.
Their proposal also includes
an increased exemption for
primary homes and adds new
exemptions for other residen-
tial and commercial property.
They estimate it would save
taxpayers $3.7 billion. The
House Republicans' proposal
would cut local taxes by near-
ly $5.8 billion.
The Republican plan,
scheduled f6r a vote Friday by
the House Policy and Budget


Council, includes a bill that
would roll back taxes to their
2001 level, except for schools,
but with allowances for infla-
tion and population growth.
The second part is the
amendment that would abol-
ish property tax on primary
homes, apply the rollback to
other real estate and raise the
sales tax from 6 percent to
8.5 percent.
A lobbyist for Palm Beach
County commissioners, Todd
Bonlarron, spoke in favor of
getting rid of the "highest and
best. use" assessment criteria
during a workshop session
held by the Senate
Community Affairs
Committee.
Waterfront properties, for
example, used for such pur-
poses as marinas or commer-
cial fishing docks have seen,
big tax increases because
high-priced condominiums
are being built nearby,
Bonlarron said.
'That working waterfront
all of a sudden assumes the
position that it could be a
condominium, as' well," "he.
said.


POLICE REPORTS


Arrest Log
The following information
was provided by local law
enforcement agencies. The
following people have been
arrested but not convicted. All
people are presumed innocent
unless proven guilty.
Thursday, March 8
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
* Linda Manning Cason,
47, 661 SE St. Johns St.,
warrant: failure to appear at
arraignment on charges of stop
payment with intent to defraud.
* Edward L. Greggs, 21,
8391 NW 5th Court, Miami,
warrant: violation of probation
on charges of burglary of an
unoccupied structure.
* Shannon Geiger, 30,
2367 US 441 N, warrant:
violation of probation on
charges of felony battery and
resisting an officer without
violence.
* Paul D. DeNyke, 44, 366
SW Ponce De Leon Ave. Apt.
101, warrant: violation of
probation on charges of
third-degree grand theft of
unspecified property.
Friday, March 9
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
* Laura Lee Norman, 34,
SE Corner of Voss Road and
Fryer Road, warrant: violation
of probation on charges of
possession of a controlled
substance, resisting an officer
without violence.
* Shelby Lynn Hill, 49,
14646 Alabama Hwy 157 N,
Molton, Ala., warrant: violation
of probation on charges of
battery on a law enforcement
officer.
* Vanis Randall Parsley,
45, 212 SE Scarlett Way,
grand theft.
* Mandy Lynn Yoder, 31,
Sands Motel Room 3, warrant:
embezzlement by an agent or
trustee and financial device
without consent.
Sunday, March 11
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
* Arlie A. Waldron, 38, 301
SW Villa Court, possession of


methamphetamine, possession
of drug paraphernalia,
habitually driving with a
suspended or revoked license,
tag attached not assigned,
introduction of contraband into
a correctional facility and
warrant: driving with suspended
or revoked license.
* Christopher James
Robinson, 23, 1682 SE Cline
Feagle Road, two counts of
domestic aggravated assault.
* Robert M. Herbert, 44,
424 SW Archie Glen, attempt-
ed carjacking and battery.
Monday, March 12
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
* Harelston Dewey Harry,
44, 2610 US 90 East, warrant:
violation of pre-trial supervision
on charges of possession of a
firearm by a felon and domestic
battery.
* Edward L. Seabrooks,
46, 1192 SW Coyote Circle,
Fort White, warrant: violation of
probation on charges of dealing
in stolen property and grand
theft.
* Shaquita Tawon Morrow,
26, 450 SE Camp St. 101,
warrant: two counts of forgery,
two counts of uttering a forgery
and two counts of petit theft
and unauthorized use of a
credit card.
* Sophie L. Keen, 32, 129
SE Anthony Loop, warrant:
violation of probation on
charges of burglary of a
dwelling and third-degree grand
theft of unspecified property.
* Terrance L. Tolbert, 21,
707 NW Virginia Terrace,
warrant: violation of probation
on charges of sale of cocaine,
possession of cocaine with
intent to sell, sale of cocaine
and possession of cocaine.
* Kenneth W. Miller, 44,
751 SW Newton Circle, Fort
White, warrant: grand theft auto
and grand theft.
Tuesday, March 13
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
* Tonilynn Graham, 25,
1500 Country Club Road,
warrant: violation of probation
on charges of DUI.
* From staff reports.


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Page Editor: Chris Bednar, 754-0404













OPINION


Thursday, March 15, 2007


www.lakecityreporter.com


EDITORIAL


Keep 'public'

in context of

public records

'S ince Sept. 11, the National
Archives, the keeper of the
nation's records, has quietly
removed more than 1.1 million
pages of government
documents from public view.
According to the Associated Press,
which broke the story, "entire file boxes
were removed without significant
review," some of them containing
papers more than a century old,
because the Archives lacked the time to
do a thorough scrutiny.
Even the overly secretive Bush
administration has occasional
justification for secrecy, and at least
some of the records at the Archives are
a case in point - files on nuclear,
chemical and biological weapons
technology, intelligence gathering,
blueprints of critical facilities,
government contingency plans.
But 1.1 million pages worth? And
some of the stuff - maps, photos, even
60-year-old information on biological
weapons, current topics in the Mideast
- are very likely accessible on the
Internet. One of the reclassified
documents was a 1960 map of a
Tennessee reservoir; a motivated terrorist
could get more up to date information
from the local bait and tackle shop.
This would not be particularly
worrisome if the Archives had not been
caught earlier in a secret agreement to
allow the CIA and Pentagon to reclassify
documents that had already been made
public. An audit found that as many as 75
percent of those documents should never
have been reclassified.
To its credit, the Archives scrapped
that arrangement and pledged not to
enter any more secret classification
agreements and, according to the AP,
the number of files being removed from
public access has dramatically declined.
Researchers can still file Freedom of
Information requests for the sequestered
files but they need to know precisely
which documents have been removed.
One open government advocate
interviewed by the AP urged that the
Archives create a public registry of the
documents it has pulled from the
shelves, which seems reasonable.
Some care needs to be taken but the
Archives should be guided by the principle
of erring on the side of openness.
* Scripps Howard News Service

HIGHLIGHTS
IN HISTORY
Today is Thursday, March 15, the
74th day of 2007. There are 291 days left
in the year.
* In 1913, President Wilson held the first
open presidential news conference.
* In 1919, the American Legion was
founded, in Paris.


Lake City Reporter
serving Columbia County since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is published with
pride for residents of Columbia and
surrounding counties by Community
Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities - "Newspapers get
things done!"
Our primary goal is to publish
distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard work.
Michael Leonard, publisher
Todd Wilson, editor
Sue Brannon, controller

Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


OUR POLICY
Letters*to the Editor should be typed or
neatly written and double spaced. Letters
should not exceed 400 words and will be edited
for length and libel. Letters must be signed and
include the writer's name, address and
telephone number for verification. Writers can
have two letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of the


writers and not necessarily that of the Lake City
Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City,
FL 32056; or drop off at 180 E. Duval St.
downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL: news@lakecityreporter.com


COMMENTARY


Faced with a complex


battle over openness


hese are strange
times for people
who advocate for
open government.
On one hand,
technological changes appear
to make information about
government more easily
available than ever before. We
live in a radically changed
media environment, in which
news about government
misconduct seems to reach
our televisions instantaneously.
And if we look around the
world, we see an
extraordinary spread of laws
like the U.S. Freedom of
Information Act. Over 70
countries now have FOI laws,
most adopted in the last decade.
And yet we seem to be
more concerned with
government secrecy than ever
before. Indeed, some people
claim that secrecy today is the
worst in decades. How can
both of these stories be true?
It might help to recognize
that we are in the middle of an
intense, global battle over the
principle of governmental
openness. In the heat of battle,
there's a temptation to employ
overheated rhetoric. The
truth is that the idea of
transparency has gained a lot
of ground over the last 20
years. This is evident in the
spread of FOI laws, and the
number of citizens who say
that open government is an
important value.
Nonetheless, there are
serious challenges to
openness. One is executive
putshback - the determination
of political leaders to reverse
laws or policies that guarantee
openness. As pressure for
openness mounts, this
countervailing pressure also
intensifies. Of course, we've
seen a classic case of pushback
in United States, where the
Bush administration waged a
campaign against openness
even before the Sept. 11
attacks. The administration
tightened rules governing the
Freedom of Information Act
and policies on access to
presidential records, among
other measures.
However, pushback isn't
unique to the United States.
The British government led
by Tony Blair was elected on a
promise to introduce a
Freedom of Information Act in
1997, but took eight years to
put it into force. The new law
was in operation for little more
than a year when the Blair
government announced
substantial, fee hikes that


Alasdair Roberts

" > ' Sunshine Week
USING THE FREEDOM
S4 OF INFORMATION ACT
could gut the law. The Indian
government also adopted a
Freedom of Information law in
2005, but within months
senior officials were pushing
for restrictions. A wave of
protests - and hunger strikes
- deterred Indian leaders
from introducing new limits.
Such struggles will continue
in the years ahead. Some
advocates argue that FOI laws
eventually introduce a "culture
of openness" in government
- but the evidence tends to
support a more hardheaded
view. As a Canadian politician
once said, the struggle over
access to information is
ultimately a struggle for
political power. A
well-organized community of
stakeholders, including
journalists and public interest
groups, is essential to make
rules about openness stick in
the long run.
Executive pushback isn't the
only challenge. The very
structure of government is also
being transformed, often in
ways that undermine openness.
One obvious example is the
growing role of contractors in
performing government
functions. A 2006 study
estimated that almost 8 million
people work for federal
government contractors -
four times the size of the
regular government workforce.
As we've seen in Iraq,
contractors now perform
defense and intelligence tasks
that we once thought belonged
to government alone.
The problem? Most often,
contractors aren't affected by
FOI laws, so that internal
documents about the use of
money or power can't be
accessed. Indeed, it may be
difficult to obtain even the
contract itself, which explains
what contractors have
promised to do, and how
much they will be paid.
Around the world, battles for
access to government
contracts are commonplace.
The structure of
government is also being


changed in more subtle ways.
Since Sept. 11, we've all been
reminded of the need to make
difficult tradeoffs between
.security and openness. Less
easily seen are the changes in
the defense, intelligence and
policing sectors. Government
agencies in different states
(and different countries) are
linking together more tightly,
forming networks aimed at
improving collective security.
This is an admirable goal. But
governments often agree to
information-sharing
agreements that allow
inter-governmental
confidentiality to trump. FOI
laws. OK as long as the
network performs well - but
bad news when the network
fouls up, and journalists or
citizens try to find out why.
Another subtle but
important change: the
growing role of international
organizations. We live in a
globalized economy,
superintended by important
institutions such as the World
Trade Organization (which
referees trade disputes), the
International Monetary Fund
(which monitors
governments' economy
policies), or the lesser-known
ICANN (which rules the
internet). Decisions made by
organizations such as these
affect the well-being of
millions of citizens - but they
are not required to comply
with the transparency rules
that we've imposed on
national, state and local
governments.
Are we making headway on
governmental transparency?
Frankly, it's too early to tell.
The idea of transparency had
gained ground. But it's not yet
clear whether we will find
ways of tailoring openness
rules (like FOI laws) to fit new
structures of governance. And
we can expect political leaders
to continue pushing back,
especially as their capacity to
control the outflow of
government information is
challenged more directly.
It's a long road ahead. But
it's a road we must follow, if
we want to protect the ideal of
an open, vibrant democracy.
E Roberts is a professor of
public administration at the
Maxwell School of Syracuse
University. His 2006 book,
"Blacked Out: Government
Secrecy in the Information Age,"
recently won awards from the
National Academy of Public
Administration and the American
Society for Public Administration.
His Web site is www.aroberts.us.


1


budget for the Food and Drug
Administration's Office of Women's Health.
So, progress for women these past six
years? In the private sector, yes. Under the
Bush administration? No!
* Bonnie Erbe is a TV host and writes this
column for Scripps Howard News Service.


4A


TeFoUUU RaI RNC44 ef C-RNNC~r


COMMENTARY



How have


women


progressed


with Bush?

Women's History month is as
good a time as any to assess
women's advancement as
impacted by the Bush
administration. Here's my
assessment: What advancement?
There is one - at least one - group of
women whose careers have advanced or
status has improved lo' these past six years:
women employed by or married or related to
men employed by the Bush administration.
This exclusive coterie includes Condoleezza
Rice, Margaret Spellings, Elaine Chao, Laura
Bush, Jenna Bush, etc. But in so many ways,
most of the rest of us have either watched the
obstacle course become increasingly littered
with obstacles, or stood idly by as our
government chips away at laws designed to
help women gain parity.
For starters there's the administration's
slow bleed of
Title IX
protections for
girls and young -
,women in
sports. Shortly ..
after President
Bush took
office, he tried Bonnie Erbe
a frontal assault bonnieerbe@compuserve.com
on Title IX, the
law that requires colleges and universities
receiving federal funds to spend equally on
men's and women's sports. The law was.
passed in the early 1970s and single-handedly
changed the world of professional and
Olympic sports. The administration's honest
attempt to dismantle the law was met by such
an impenetrable mass of protests, e-mails and
letters of disapproval, the plan was scrapped.
The administration waited quietly for a few
years and then changed the law's reporting
requirements so, essentially, colleges and
universities no longer need to uphold it. We
still don't have data on the impact the new
reporting requirements have on women's
participation in sports. We'll probably find out
(and the news won't be good) as the Bushes
are leaving the White House in '09.
On government contracting with
women-owned small businesses, again the
administration's tenure has brought bad news
for women. The rate of growth of federal
contracts offered to this group has slowed
during this administration. In fairness,
Congress in 1994 set a target (not a law, but a
target) that 5 percent of all government contracts
should go to women-owned businesses. This
number slowly grew to only 3.3 percent last
year. But its rate of increase has decelerated
under this president. Why? The Small
Business Administration just doesn't see
women-owned businesses as an important
market. Yet President Bush campaigned for
office in 2000 saying the "W" in George W.
Bush "stood for women." And women
business owners tend to vote Republican in
greater numbers than other women. This is a
group the president owed big-time, and yet
has failed in this most important of ways.
Next, there's Family and Medical Leave.
When President Bill Clinton signed the law in
1996 giving many workers the right to 12
weeks of unpaid leave for a new baby or ill
family member, it was one of the most popular
acts of his presidency. Now the Bush
administration seems poised to limit benefits
women (still the primary family caregivers in
this nation) gained under the law. Let me say
for the record, I'm not a proponent of paid or
unpaid family leave. But the law has
undeniably helped mainly low-income women
keep jobs they otherwise might have lost
without the law's protections.
Last month the Bush Labor Department
closed a public comment period on the law in
preparation for undisclosed "changes or
clarifications" it will probably soon make. The
Sarasota Herald-Tribune recently reported
half the current beneficiaries will likely be
eliminated from the law's protection and
quoted a Florida labor lawyer as saying,
"They are eliminating the law without
eliminating the law .... The law will remain on
the books, but it won't apply to anyone
anymore." That is standard administration
procedure on laws designed to improve the
lives of American women.
My last example is the administration's
apparent move to cut almost half of this year's










LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2007


BRIEFS


Historic hotel may
be offered for sale
NEW ORLEANS - Work to
repair the hurricane-damaged
Fairmont New Orleans Hotel
was suspended Wednesday
and employees were laid off,
setting up the possibility of a
sale of the historic hotel.
The owner, New Orleans
Roosevelt Venture, has
engaged advisers "to explore
strategic alternatives in order to
complete the restoration of the
landmark hotel," Fairmont
Hotels & Resorts Inc., the
hotel's management company,
said in a news release.
The hotel has been closed
since Hurricane Katrina hit the
city on Aug. 29, 2005.
Current employees can
pursue jobs with other Fairmont
hotels, or take a severance
package and job placement
help, the company said. No
figure on the number of affected
employees was available, but it
was substantially fewer than the
hotel's pre-Katrina operating
staff, company spokeswoman
Lori Holland said.

Chiquita accused
of terrorism link
WASHINGTON - Banana
company Chiquita Brands
International was charged
Wednesday with doing business
with a terrorist organization.
Federal prosecutors said the
company and several unnamed
high-ranking corporate officers
did business with the United
Self-Defense Forces of
Colombia. The group is
described in court documents
as a violent right-wing
organization that the U.S. has
designated as, a terrorist
organization.
The company also did
business with the leftist
Revolutionary Armed Forces of
Colombia, or FARC, according
to prosecutors.
The payments were approved
by senior executives at the
Cincinnati-based company,
prosecutors wrote in court
documents. Corporate books
were kept to conceal the deals,
prosecutors said.

Auto industry
discusses climate
WASHINGTON - U.S.
automakers and a top union
official told Congress on
Wednesday that the industry
cannot deal alone with global
warming, and they warned that
proposed fuel efficiency
increases could cost jobs.
The leaders of General
Motors, Ford, Toyota and
Chrysler, along with the head of
the United Auto Workers union,
made a rare joint appearance
before a House subcommittee.
They noted that proposed
increases in gas mileage
standards for new vehicles
would be extremely expensive
and challenging.
UAW President Ron
Gettelfinger said raising fuel
economy standards could
"could lead to calamitous
results. This could include the
closing of additional facilities
and the loss of tens of thousand
of automotive jobs."
Congress was hearing from
the automakers at a time when
many lawmakers are concerned
about global warming and
seeking ways to require more
fuel efficiency in vehicles. The
White House is aiming for a 4
percent increase in fuel
economy requirements and
wants to change how the rules
are applied.

Trade deficit posts
record numbers
WASHINGTON - The deficit
in the broadest measure of
trade hit an all-time high in 2006
and for the first time the United
States even ran a deficit on
investment income.
The Commerce Department
reported that the imbalance in
the current account jumped by
8.2 percent to $856.7 billion,
representing a record
6.5 percent of the total
economy. It marked the fifth
straight year the current
account deficit set a record.
Investment flows turned
negative by $7.3 billion from a
surplus of $11.3 billion in 2005.


It was the first time investment
income has been negative on
records going back to 1929.
That means foreigners earned
more on their U.S. holdings
than Americans earned on their
overseas investments.
The U.S. has run deficits in
its trade in goods every year
since 1976, until last year it had
still been able to record a
surplus in investments.
* Associated Press


Mortgage market blamed MARKET REPORT


for Dow's ups and downs archw 1ons
Dow Jones


By TIM PARADISE
AP Business Writer

NEW YORK - Wall Street
gyrated and then steadied
itself Wednesday, closing with
a respectable advance
although the Dow Jones
industrials fell as much as 136
points and briefly dropped
below the 12,000 mark before
recovering.
Stocks bounced back and
forth a day after concerns
about faltering subprime mort-
gage lenders sparked a broad
selloff. H&R Block Inc. had
added to Wall Street's uneasi-
ness by announcing after the
closing bell Tuesday its fiscal
third-quarter losses would rise
because of a $29 million
writedown at its mortgage arm.
The anxiety over mortgage
lenders, particularly the sub-
prime lenders that make loans
to people with poor credit,
pushed the Dow down by more
than 240 points Tuesday, its
second-biggest drop in nearly
four years. Such concerns jos-
tfled stocks for much of
Wednesday's session.
"I think the market got
below 12,000 and buyers
came in," said Todd Leone,
managing director of equity
trading at Cowen & Co.
According to preliminary
calculations, the Dow Jones
industrial average rose 57.44,
or 0.48 percent, to 12,133.40.
The Dow first climbed
above the 12,000 level on Oct.
18, after a meandering, 7'/2
year journey from the 11,000


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Andrew Cerise (left) and a colleague watch the screens at their
post on the floor of the New York Stock-Exchange, Wednesday.
Wall Street fluctuated Wednesday, seeking a direction a day after
concerns about faltering subprime mortgage lenders sparked a
broad selloff in stocks.


mark. During that time, Wall
Street dealt with the dot-comn
bust, recession and the after-
math of the 2001 terror
attacks. Tuesday's drop
echoed a 416-point drop in the
Dow seen two weeks ago that
began in part after a nearly 9
percent drop in stocks in
Shanghai and amid concerns
about subprime mortgages.
Broader stock indicators
also rose Wednesday. The
Standard & Poor's 500 index
advanced 9.22, or 0.67 percent,
to 1,387.17, and the Nasdaq
composite index rose 21.17, or
0.90 percent, to 2,371.74.
Bonds fell as stocks
bandied about; the yield on
the benchmark 10-year
Treasury note rose to 4.52
percent from 4.50 percent late


Tuesday. Gold prices fell.
Light sweet crude settled
up 23 cents at $58.16 per bar-
rel on the New York
.Mercantile Exchange.
"I think people right now
don't know what to make of
this market," said Larry
Peruzzi, senior equity trader
at The Boston Company Asset
Management. "You look like a
hero right now if you bought
when the Dow was down 120
points and if you sold you look
like a goat."
Peruzzi said stocks recov-
ered after indexes neared tech-
nical levels and that the higher
close in crude prices lent a
boost to energy stocks. Exxon
Mobil Inc. rose $1.11 to $71.02,
while ConocoPhillips rose
$1.32, or 2 percent, to $67.91.


Court drops all charges against


Dunn in HP fraud litigation


By JORDAN ROBERTSON
AP Technology Writer

SAN JOSE, Calif. -A judge
dropped all charges against
former Hewlett-Packard Co.
board Chairwoman Patricia
Dunn, who was accused of
fraud in the boardroom spying
scheme that rocked one of
Silicon Valley's most respect-
ed companies.
Three other defendants in
the case also will avoid jail
time after their lawyers
entered no contest pleas
Wednesday to misdemeanor
charges of fraudulent wire
communications in Santa
Clara Superior Court.
Judge Ray E. Cunningham
did not immediately accept
the pleas by former HP ethics
chief Kevin Hunsaker, and pri-
vate investigators Ronald
DeLia and Matthew DePante,


GM reports

$950M in

earnings


By TOM KRISHER
AP Business Writer

DETROIT - General
Motors Corp. reported a prof-
it on Wednesday of $950 mil-
lion for the fourth quarter of
2006, a big turnaround from a
loss of $6.6 billion a year ago
due in part to cost cuts and
higher automotive revenues.
The world's . biggest
automaker, which is in the
midst of a massive overhaul
that includes shedding thou-
sands of jobs and closing
plants to become more com-
petitive with Asian automak-
ers like Toyota Motor Corp.,
wound up with a loss of $2 bil-
lion for all of 2006 compared
with a restated loss of $10.4
billion in 2005.
Its profit without special
items fell short of Wall Street
expectations, however, and its
shares slipped in morning
trading.
Chief Financial Officer Fritz
Henderson said despite the
fourth-quarter profit, no one
at GM is declaring victory
over the company's financial
woes.
He would say only that he
expects GM's year-over-year
performance to improve in
2007.


and said the charges against
them will also be dropped in
September after they com-
plete 96 hours of community
service and make restitution.
State prosecutors
announced earlier Wednesday
that Dunn and the three other
defendants had agreed to
plead guilty to reduced
charges and that Dunn would
be spared community service
because of her health. She
revealed last year that she was
being treated for advanced
ovarian cancer.
But the office of Attorney
General Jerry Brown later
said that release was incor-
rect. Lawyers for Dunn and
the other defendants said deal
with the state called for
Dunn's case to be dismissed.
'This is a vindication of
Patty Dunn in every sense of
the word," said her lawyer,


James Brosnahan. "It shows
what she's maintained
throughout: that she's inno-
cent of these charges."
The four were initially
charged in October with four
felony counts: use of false or
fraudulent pretenses to obtain
confidential information from
a public utility; unauthorized
access to computer data; id6n-
tity theft; and conspiracy to
commit each of those crimes.
Each of those charges car-
ried a fine of up to $10,000 and
three years in prison.
While the deal with state
prosecutors allows all four
defendants to escape jail time,
federal prosecutors have said
their investigation of the HP
leaks probe is ongoing.
"The guilty pleas offered
today will not prevent federal
prosecutors from filing crimi-
nal charges."


IF WE CAN'T WIN, NO ONE CAN!
-NO FEE Former Social Security
- Executives and
UNLESSAssociates
Even if you've been
YOUm turned down
before. Call Now!
Initial Claims, Reconsiderations, and Hearings

1-80-82-05


12,200
industrials , '

+57.44 12,000

12,133.40 DEC JAN FEB MAR
Pct.change High Low Record high close: 12,786.64
from previous: +0.48 12,142.94 11,939.61 Feb. 20,2007

STOCK MARKET INDEXES
52-Week YTD 12-mo
High Low Name Last Chg %Chg %Chg %Chg
12,795.93 10,683.32 Dow Industrials 12,133.40 +57.44 +.48 -2.65 +8.24
5,211.42 4,134.72 Dow Transportation 4,716.03 -10.53 -.22 +3.42 +2.71
501.99 380.97 Dow Utilities 476.60 +2.73 +.58 +4.34 +17.05
9,463.62 7,708.11 NYSE Composite 8,958.61 +31.73 +.36 -1.97 +8.76
2,179.89 1,800.65 Amex Market Value 2,063.37 -1.62 -.08 +34 +8.06
2,531.42 2,012.78 Nasdaq Composite 2,371.74 +21.17 +.90 -1.80 +2.59
1,461.57 1,219.29 S&P500 1,387.17 +9.22 +.67 -2.19 +6.46
870.89 710.53 S&P MidCap 822.81 +3.33 +.41 +2.29 +5.20
830.01 668.58 Russell 2000 775.68 +6.56 +.85 -1.52 +4.41
14,828.76 12,249.90 Wilshire5000 14,046.11 +80.10 +.57 -1.48 +6.97

STOCK EXCHANGE HIGHUGHTS

ANYSE 3 AMEX A NASDAQ
8,958.61 +31.73 2,063.37 -1.62 2,371.74 +21.17

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)
Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg
HomeBanc 2.70 +1.23 +83.7 Rentech 2.39 +39 +19.5 AscentSol 8.79 +4.14 +89.0
AcMtg pfA 14.36 +6.11 +74.1 GeoPetro n 5.75 +.75 +15.0 AscntSlIwtA 2.18 +.98 +81.7
HomeBS pfA 19.00 +5.30 +38.7 JavelinP n 6.89 +.86 +14.3 AccHme 6.04 +2.07 +52.1
NovaStar 4.18 +.75 +21.9 HanovCap 4.00 +.42 +11.7 Fieldlnv 3.47 +.75 +27.6
NtAustun 48.50 +7.00 +16.9 MCFCprs 4.80 +.50 +11.6 DayStar 5.31 +1.02 +23.8
Opteum 4.62 +.62 +15.5 HstnAEn 5.53 +.48 +9.5 CritclTher 2.19 +39 +21.7
ImpacpfB 15.84 +1.94 +14.0 WashSvgs 9.25 +.80 +9.5 21Cenwt07 7.24 +1.19 +19.7
ChmpE 9.40 +1.15 +13.9 Engex 9.00 +.69 +8.3 Thrmogn 3.13 +.44 +16.4
AmHmMtg 24.28 +2.92 +13.7 InterlknG 4.83 +.37 +8.3 WPTEnt 4.93 +.65 +15.2
ImpacMtg 5.03 +.58 +13.0 IderaPhrs 7.63 +.48 +6.7 OrigenFn 6.45 +.77 +13.6


LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)
Name Last Chg %Chg
Navioswt 2.31 -.38 -14.1
ExcelM 16.57 -1.42 -7.9
Valhiwi 13.00 -1.00 -7.1
99 Cents If 13.60 -1.03 -7.0
FresM pr 41.84 -2.46 '-5.6
BISYS If 11.57 -.63 -5.2
PopeTal 6.75 -.37 -5.2
Valhi 28.01 -1.50 -5.1
Katylnd h 2.00 -.10 -4.8
Navios 7.29 -.37 -4.8
MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)
Name Vol(00) Last Chg
FordM 557845 7.51 -.13
Pfizer 471811 24.86 -.08
GenElec 351664 34.31 +.22
CVS Cp 349678 32.31 +.41
EMCCp 307118 13.00 +.01
Citigrp 303854 49.08 +.33
ExxonMbl 299060 71.02 +1.11
CntwdFn 297273 34.39 +.90
iShJapan 292505 14.41 -.13
Altria 279813 83.90 -.14
DIARY
Advanced 2,024
Declined 1,294
UJnchanged 136
Total issues 3,454
New Highs 35
New Lows 88
Volume 3,719,620,510


LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)
Name Last Chg %Chg
WinlandEl 3.45 -.85 -19.8
Sifco 9.00 -1.49 -14.2
IncOpR 5.00 -.50 -9.1
OrleansH 10.79 -.99 -8.4
Microfncl 5.53 -.47 -7.8
Oilsandsgn 2.90 -.20 -6.5
MSxmsr07 n 6.11 -.42 -6.4
DeltaFncl 7.99 -.54 -6.3
Natl RV 2.56 -.14 -5.2
TiensBio 4.49 -.24 -5.1
MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)
Name Vol(00) Last Chg
SPDR 2189117 139.28 +1.03
iShR2K nya126151977.25 +.86
SP Fncl 404304 34.88 +.08
SP Engy 351890 57.20 +.65
PrUShQQQ n24753955.51 -1.72
DJIA Diam219997 121.66 +.64
SemiHTr 136572 34.27 -.07
OilSvHT 126579 139.26 +1.66
RetailHT 99235 99.10 +.05
SP Util 77964 38.25 +.19
DIARY
Advanced - 560
Declined . 563
Unchanged 88
Total issues 1,211
New Highs 18
New Lows 60
Volume 70 86I 8 441


LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)
Name Last Chg %Chg
Proxymed 3.00 -1.97 -39.6
DiamMgmt 11.17 -3.68 -24.8
AudCodes 7.44 -2.10 -22.0
FstConsult 9.46 -2.20 -18.9
SeaChng 7.85 -1.75 -18.2
Polydex 2.37 -.40 -14.4
CdnSolarn 9.33 -1.49 -13.8
Cyclacel pf 6.18 -.91 -12.8
USEnSys 4.38 -.62 -12.4
Golfsmithn 9.80 -1.24 -11.2
MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
Nasd100Tr185054542.99 +.62
SunMicro 835109 6.31 +.16
Microsoft 741986 27.40 +.68
Intel 692730 19.23 +.11
Cisco 526333 25.85 +.35
Qualcom 391637 43.21 +1.38
AccHme 383069 6.04 +2.07
SiriusS 354051 3.23 -.06
Dell Inc If 335360 22.32 +.53
Oracle 332150 16.88 +.23
DIARY
Advanced 1,647
Declined ' 1,366
Unchanged 151
Total issues 3,164
New Highs 24
New Lows 168
Volume 2,234,486,685


STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST
YTD Y'TD
Name Ex Div YId PE Last Chg%Chg Name Ex Div YId PE Last Chg%Chg
AT&Tlnc NY 1.42 3.8 20 37.21 -.05 +4.1 Lowess NY .20 .6 16 31.03 +.29 -.4
AcoHme Nasd ... 2 6.04 +2.07 -77.9 McDnds NY 1.00 2.3 15 43.65 +.17 -1.5
Alltel NY .50 .8 21 61.56 +.93 +1.8 Microsoft Nasd .40 1.5 23 27.40 +.68 -8.2
AutoZone NY ... ... 16 124.32 -1.26 +7.6 NasdlOOTr Nasd .13 .3 ... 42.99 +.62 -.4
BkofAm NY 2.24 4.5 11 49.77 +.31 -6.8 NY Times NY .70 2.9 ... 24.46 +.81 +.4
BobEvn Nasd .56 1.5 20 36.40 -.09 +6.4 NobltyH Nasd .50 2.1 17 23.31 +.67 -12.3
CNBFnPA Nasd .60 4.3 13 13.90 -.55 -2.0 OcciPets NY .88 1.9 10 46.36 +.84 -5.1
CSXs NY .48 1.3 13 36.74 -.36 +6.7 Penney NY .72 .9 16 78.50 -1.76 +1.5
ChmpE NY ... ... 5 9.40 +1.15 +.4 PepsiCo NY 1.20 1.9 19 62.69 +.53 +.2
Chevron NY 2.08 3.0 9 68.32 +48 -7.1 Pfizer NY 1.16 4.7 9 24.86 -.08 -4.0
Cisco Nasd ...... 25 25.85 +35 -5.4 Potash NY .60 .4 26 156.12 +.79 +8.8
CocaCI NY 1.36 9 22 47.04 -.02 -2.5 Qualcom Nasd .56 1.3 30 43.21 +1.38 +14.3
ColBgp NY .75 3.0 14 24.73 +.04 -3.9 Ryder NY .84 1.7 12 48.77 +.18 -4.5
Delhaize NY 1.54 1.8 ... 85.60 +1.05 +2.8 SearsHIdgs Nasd ... 18 174.08 -2.41 +3.7
DollarG NY .20 1.0 38 21.01 -.09 +31.6 SiriusS Nasd ......... 3.23 -.06 -8.8
FPLGrp NY 1.64 2.8 18 58.82 +.51 +8.1 SouthnCo NY 1.55 4.4 17 35.32 +.28 -4.2
FamDIrlf NY .46 1.6 23 28.77 -.76 -1.9 SPDR Amex2.45 1.8 ... 139.28 +1.03 -1.7
FordM NY .... ..... 7.51 -.13 0.0 SPEngy Amex .72 13 ... 57.20 +.65 -2.4
GenElec NY 1.12 3.3 17 34.31 +.22 -7.8 SPFnclI Amex .83 2.4 ... 34.88 +.08 -5.1
HomeDp NY .90 2.4 13 37.56 +.21 -6.5 SunMicro Nasd ...... ...6.31 +.16 +16.4
iShR2KnyaAmex .84 1.1 ... 77.25 +.86 -1.0 TimeWam NY .22 1.1 13 19.45 +.03-10.7
Intel Nasd .45 2.3 22 19.23 +.11 -5.0. WalMart NY .88 1.9 17 45.73 -.23 -1.0

MONEY RATES CURRENCIES
Last Pvs Week Last Pvs Day
Prime Rate 8.25 8.25 Australia 1.2744 1.2754
Discount Rate 6.25 6.25 Britain 1.9352 1.9303
Federal Funds Rate 5.25 5.25 Canada 1.1759 1.1732
Treasuries Euro .7560 .7578
3-month 4.92 4.96 Japan 116.73 116.52
6-month 4.89 4.87 Mexico 11.1587 11.1912
1O-year 4.51 4.50 witzerlnd 1.2150 1.2193
-year 4. 4. British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All others show
30-year 469 4.63 dollarinforeign currency.

MUTUAL FUNDS
Total Assets Total Return/Rank PctMIn Init
Name Obi ($Mlns) NAV 4-wk 12-mo 5-year Load Invt
American Funds GrowAmerA m LG 83,868 32.46 -3.6 +6.1/A 0.0/A 5.75 250
American Funds InvCoAmA m LV 73,616 32.98 -3.4 +9.9/D 0.0/C 5.75 250
Vanguard500 LB 70,111 128.23 -4.5 +48/B 0.0/C NL 3,000
Fidelity Contra LG 68,134 63.76 -4.3 +6.5/A 0.0/A NL 2,500
American Funds WAMutlnvA m LV 67,815 34.35 -4.1 +11.0/C 0.0/D 5.75 250
Dodge & Cox Stock LV 67,561 152.59 -4.1 +12.3/B 0.0/A NL 2,500
American Funds CaplncBuA m IH 65,661 60.29 -3.1 +15.8/A 0.0/B 5.75 250
American Funds CpWIdGrIA m WS 64,473 41.01 -5.2 +13.7/B 0.0/A 5.75 250
PIMCO TotRetls Cl 62,265 10.49 +1.6 +6.1/ 0.0/A NL 5,000,000
American Funds IncAmerA m MA 61,807 20.09 -3.1 +14.2/A 0.0/A 5.75 250
American Funds EurPacGrA m FB 56,228 45.74 -4.9 +13.1/C 0.0/A 5.75 250
Fidelity Divrlnit FG 48,309 36.34 -5.0 +12.4/C 0.0/A NL 2,500
Vanguard 500AdmI LB 47,280 128.25 -4.5 +8.9/B 0.0/B NL 100,000
Vanguard Instldx LB 45,197 127.28 -4.5 +8.9/B 0.0/B NL 5,000,000
Fidelity Magellan LG 43,812 88.96 -4.9 +2.0/C 0.0/C NL 2,500
American Funds NewPerspA m WS 43,296 31.03 -4.9 +12.1/C 0.0/C 5.75 250
Vanguard TotStldx LB 40,861 33.66 -4.4 +8.9/B 0.0/B NL 3,000
Fidelity LowPriStk MB 39,255 43.05 -4.2 +9.0/C 0.0/A NL 2,500
Dodge & Cox IntlStk FV 35,830 43.65 -4.6 +19.2/A 0.0/A NL 2,500
American Funds BalA m MA 35,399 18.79 -2.5 +7.8/B 0.0/B 5.75 250
American Funds FundmInvA m LB 32,999 39.53 -4.1 +11.6/A 0.0/A 5.75 250
Vanguard Wndsrll LV 31,576 34.27 -4.3 +11.9/B 0.0/A NL 10,000
FrankTemp-Franklin Income A m CA 31,280 2.66 -1.1 +16.5/A 0.0/A 4.25 .000
Fidelity Eqlnc LV 30,929 56.73 -4.5 +12.6/B 0.0/C NL 2,500
Fidelity GrowCo LG 29,724 68.01 -4.6 +1.5/D 0.0/A NL 2,500
Vanguard Welln MA 29,501 32.20 -2.6 +10.5/A 0.0/A NL 10,000
Fidelity Growlnc LB 29,084 30.49 -4.6 +4.8/E 0.0/E NL 2,500
Dodge & Cox Bal MA 27,935 87.16 -2.6 +10.2/A 0.0/A NL 2,500
Vanguard TotStlAdm LB 27,814 33.67 -4.4 +9.0/B 0.0/A NL 100,000
Davis NYVentA m LB 27,758 37.78 -4.5 +9.4/A 0.0/A 4.75 1,000
FrankTemp-Templeton Growth A m WS 27,288 24.95 -5.1 +12.9/B 0.0/B 5.75 1,000
Fidelity Puritan MA 25,685 19.90 -2.7 +10.8/A 0.0/A NL 2,500
Vanguard TotBdId Cl 25,405 10.06 +1,1 +6.4/B 0.0/C NL 3,000
Fidelity Bal MA 23,501 19.68 -2.0 +9.2/A 0.0/A NL 2,500
Fidelity Spartan USEqlndxl LB 22,221 49.28 -4.5 +8.9/B 0.0/C NL 100,000
Vanguard Prmcp LB 22,038 68.33 -4.4 +4.6/E 0.0/A NL 25,000
American Funds BondA m Cl 21,591 13.43 +1.0 +7.2/A 0.0/A 3.75 250
Vanguard Totlnll FB 21,454 17.51 -4.8 +16.4/A 0.0/A NL 3,000
TRowe Price Eqtylnc LV 21,346 29.20 -4.0 +12.1B 0.0/B NL 2,500
Vanguard InslPlus LB , 21,257 127.29 -4.5 +9.0/B 0.0/B NL200,000,000
PIMCOTotRetAdm b Cl 20,404 10.49 +1.6 +5.9/C 0.0/B NL 5,000,000
Fidelity Value MV 20,169 82.82 -3.1 +12.2/C 0.0/A NL 2,500
Fidelity BlChGrow LG 20,066 43.34 -4.6 +0.8/D 0.0/0 NL 2,500
CA -Conservative Allocation, CI -Intermediate-Term Bond, ES -Europe Stock, FB -Foreign Large Blend, FG -Foreign
LargeGrowth, FV -Foreign Large Value, IH -Wodd Allocation, LB -Large Blend, LG -Large Growth, LV -Large Value,
MA -Moderate Allocation, MB -Mid-Cap Blend, MV - Mid-Cap Value, SH -Specialty-heath, WS -World Stock, Total
Return: Chng in NAV with dividends reinvested. Rank: How fund performed vs. others with same objective: A is in top
20%, E in bottom 20%. Min Init Invt: Minimum $ needed to invest in fund. Source: Momingstar.
Stock Footnotes: g = Dividends and earnings in Canadian dollars. h = Does not meet continued-listing standards.
If = Late filing with SEC. n = New in past 52 weeks. pf = Preferred. rs = Stock has undergone a reverse stock split of atl least
50 percent within the past year. rt = Right to buy security at a specified price. s = Stock has spit by at least 20 percent with-
in the last year. un = Units. vj = Inbankruptcy or receivership. wd = When distributed, wi = Whenissued, wt = Warrants.
Mutual Fund Footnotes: b = Fee covering market costs is paid from fund assets. d = Deferred sales charge, or redemp-
tion fee. f = front load (sales charges). m = Multiple fees are charged. NA = not available. p = previous day's net asset
value. s = fund split shares during the weeK. x = fund paid a distribution during the week.Gainere and Losers must be worth
at least $2 to be listed in tables above. Most Actives must be worth at least $1. Volume in hundreds of shares. Source: The
Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.


12,800
12,600
4^n^^~


Page Editor: Laila McGuffey, 754-0429










Page Editor: Chris Bednar, 754-0404


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2007


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


M To submit your
Community Calendar
item, contact Todd
Wilson at 754-0428 or
by email at twilson@
lakecityreporter., com.


Announcements


CHS Class of 1997
reunion being planned
The CHS Class of 1997 is
plannign a reunion for June 8-9.
On June 8 there will be a
Welcome Back happy hour at
Beef 'O'Brady's. June 9 will be
family day at Alligator Park from
11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Moe's will be
catering this event and the cost
is $5 per person or $15 per
family. At 7 p.m. is the main
event, dinner, cocktails, a DJ,
dancing, and more. Currently
ticket prices are $25 per
person.
Make checks payable to CHS
Class of 1997. Kelli (McCall)
Crews will be handling the
money and the tickets. Send
your checks to:
CHS Class of 1997 Reunion
Kelli Crews
P.O. Box 2268
Lake City, FI 32056
Include a note of how many
tickets you need for each event,
and how many members are in
your family if you are buying a
family ticket for the family day. If
you haven't e-mailed your
mailing address or phone
number yet, e-mail the
information to columbiahight-
iger@yahoo.com
The reunion Myspace site is
http://www.myspace.com/chstiger
1997 For more information, call
Chad Cray at 752-8437.

Habitat for Humanity
seeks family for home
Habitat for Humanity is
looking for a family for its second
home.
The applicant must live in
substandard housing in
Columbia County, have a
verifiable source of income,
appropriate credit to qualify for a
20 year, no interest loan and put
at least 300 hours of sweat
equity into the home building
process. To apply, pick up an
application at the Columbia
County Public Library downtown,
download an application from
the web site at
www.hfhlakecity.org or call
755-0014 and leave a message
as to when to be contacted.


Lake City Community
College will offer training in the
Crossover Correction to CMS
Law Enforcement tentatively
beginning Feb. 12.
There will be a scheduled
meeting at 6 p.m. on Jan. 22 in
the Lancaster Site Office - CR
341 across from the Lancaster
Correctional Work Camp in
Trenton.
Those interested in
attending this training must


attend this meeting to receive
all the information concerning
cost, scheduling, etc.
For more information call
(352) 463-4353 between
9 a.m. and 1 p.m. Monday-
Friday, after hours leave a
message.

Singles meetings take
place every Friday

Live Oak singles meetings
take place from 7 to 10 p.m.
Friday at St. Luke's Church in
Live Oak, across from the
Coliseum. For more information,
call Jim at 935-0422, Just at
362-4448 or Anna at 963-5774.

Assistance needed for
woman who lost home
The Lake City Fire
Department is requesting
assistance for June Armstrong,
64, who lost her home to a fire
on Jan. 22. Clothing as well as
cash donations are needed to
help her get back on her feet.
Cash/check donations can be
mailed or dropped off at:
The Lake city Fire
Department (across from the
post office)
Attn: Armstrong Fund
225 NW Main Blvd. Suite
101
Lake City, FL 32055.
Checks payable to Ms. June
Armstrong.
For donations of clothing,
etc.. contact Ms. Armstrong at
(cell) (352) 317-8135.
Clothing sizes: Pants: 18
Blouse: XL Shoes: 9
For more information and
pictures, visits www..Icfdfl.com
donation page.

Violence and rape crisis
center offers support
Another Way, Inc. the local
domestic violence and rape
crisis center has a support group
for survivors of domestic violence
and their children from 5:30 to
'7 p.m. every Thursday. If
interested call Susan at Another
Way, Inc. at 719-2700 for the
location. Women and children
only.

Today


The Branford Camera Club
will meet at 7:30 p.m. today at
the Branford Public Library. This
month's meeting will be an
open forum for sharing recent
photo experiences and planning
Spring field trips. They will also
be discussing digital sheet
paper and any other topics
brought to the forum.
Sean Dowie will be the guest
speaker at the April 19 meeting.
Sean is a local landscape,


nature, and fine arts
photographer.
The Branford Camera Club
meets at the Branford Public
Library on the third Thursday of
each month, with two
exceptions. We have no
meeting in August, and our
December meeting is held on
the second Thursday to
accommodate the busy Holiday
season.
For more information, call
one of the following: Carolyn
Hogue, program chair, 935-
2044, Dick Bryant, technical
consultant, 935-1977 or Dick
Madden, technical consultant,
935-0296

CHS Senior Parents
meeting today
The Columbia High Senior
Parents will have a meeting at
6:30 p.m. today in the Senior
Picnic area at Columbia High
School. Important upcoming
senior events will be discussed.
They will also be planning
Baccalaureate and the after
graduation party.
For more information, call
Laurie at 623-6068.

Saturday

CARC Bowl-A-Thon
planned for Saturday
The 14th Annual CARC
Bowl-A-Thon will be held
Saturday at Lake City Bowl.
Teams are needed to support .
CARC while having fun bowling.
Get together with friends,
co-workers and others and help
our local citizens with disabilities.
Team registration fee is $50.
Bowling times will be 1 p.m. and
3 p.m.
To register or for more
information, call CARC at
752-1880.

Railroad conference
set for Friday
Celebrate the heritage of the
GF&S Railroad from 6:30 to 9:30
p.m. Friday and from 8:30 to
11:30 a.m. Saturday at the Lake
City-Columbia County Historical
Museum, 157 SE Hemando St.
in downtown Lake City. Full
registration for the entire
conference is $10 or just drop by
for part of the conference at no
charge. Feel free to bring photos,
artifacts or memories of Lake
City's railroad days.
For more information, contact
Dr. Sean McMahon at
mcmahons@lakecitycc.edu or at
754-4293.

Tuesday

Retired Federal Employees
anniversary set for Tuesday
The Lake City branch of the


National Association of Retired
Federal Employees will
celebrate its 30th anniversary at
noon Tuesday at Quail Heights
with cake and member photos.
This lunch group is actively
involved in supporting
Alzheimer's research, so the
guest speaker for this special
anniversary meeting will be
discussing DNA's link to
Alzheimer's

Wednesday

State-of-the-School visits
Summers Elementary
As a part of the State-of-the
School visits, Columbia
County School Board members
and Superintendent, Sam
Markham will visit Summers
Elementary School at 10 a.m.
Wednesday.
These visits are open to the
public.

IDA meeting
planned for Wednesday
There will be a IDA meeting
at noon Wednesday in the CHS
Auditorium.

Coming Up

Classic Car show
planned for March 31
Cruisin' For A Cure Classic
Car and Truck Show will be held
from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. March 31
at Olustee Park. All proceeds
benefit the American Cancer
Society. Awards at 3 p.m., Top
20, Best of Show, Best Ford,
GM, Mopar, and Orphan. There
will be entertainment.
For more information call Ann
Milligan at 386-961-9422,
Mandy at (386) 755-6567 or
Charlene at (386) 752-4024.

M.O.A.A. meeting
planned for March 22
M.O.A.A. (Military Officers
Association of America) will
meet at 6:30 p.m. March 22 at
the Elks Club. All former and
present military officers and
spouses are welcome. A film
entitled "Spirit of Ichetucknee"
will be presented by Patty Martin
of the Ichetucknee Springs Park
staff. Dinner is $15.
Call Dennis Tarkington at
719-7092 by March 12 for
reservations.

Quilting Guild monthly
meeting March 28
The Lady of the Lake Quilting
Guild will hold its monthly
meeting at 10 a.m March 28. at
the Southside Recreation
Center, 901 St. Margaret Road.
Hospitality starts at 9:30 a.m.
The program for March will be
the presentation of the 2007


Challenge by Joan Allot and
Ann Opgenorth. Ann will also
include a presentation on the
importance of color and values
to consider while
constructing quilts.
The Guild is an organization
for anyone interested in quilts
and the art of quilting. The guild
makes and distributes over 100
quilts a year to various charities
and non-profit organizations. A
show-and-tell segment of the
meeting will showcase the
various quilters; handiwork.
For more information, call
Marcia Kazmierski, 752-2461 or
e-mail mrckaz@aol.com.

Pregnancy Crisis Center
now accepting donations
It's time to start cleaning out
your closets and get organized
for 2007. Or maybe you are just
redecorating? The Pregnancy
Crisis Center will now accept
your good quality, unwanted
household and furniture items for
its annual Yard Sale fundraiser
that is to be held on May 4 in
Lake City, and Friday May 11 in
Live Oak. This year no clothing
will be sold, so no clothing
donations. Freshly laundered
baby items are always welcome,
however. All proceeds go to help
pregnant women and their
babies in crisis situations.
Receipts for tax deductions
available upon request.
For more information,
call 755-0058.

Gateway Pro Rodeo
Pageant March 18
The third annual Miss Florida
Gateway Pro Rodeo Pageant will
take place on March 18 at the
13th Annual Florida Gateway Pro
Rodeo. Applications are available
at Smitty's Western St6re, The
Money Man, The Fair Office and
at your local school office or call
(386)-752-8822.
Applications are also online at
www.columbiacountyfair.org.

Stephen Foster State Park
to offer gardening class
The public is invited to
Stephen Foster Folk Culture
Center State Park to learn the art
of building a garden trough from
park volunteer Dorothy Price.
Attendees will learn how to'
combine cement, peat moss,
perlite and fiber mesh, mold it
into a trough, and decorate with
a motif of choice. Participants
should wear old clothing and
bring a heavy duty apron. The
$15 fee includes all supplies and
admission to the park. Troughs
must cure at the park for two
weeks upon completion.
Advance registration is
required and space is limited.
For more information, call Craft
Square at (386) 397-1920, or
visit the web site at


www.StephenFosterCSO.org.

Order of the Purple Heart
meets second Thursday
Lake City Chapter #772 of
the Military Order of the Purple
Heart, USA meets at 5 p.m.
every second Thursday. The
meeting will take place at the
home of Junior Vice
Commander Gary L. Lafaso. If
you or a next of kin has been
awarded the Purple Heart, by
the President of the United
States, for being combat
wounded, you are invited to join
them in their endeaver to
continue serving this country
and its veterans and families. If
you wish to volunteer, they
welcome.you with open arms.
For more information, call
Tony (386) 497-2475 or Gary
(386) 758-5629.

Art League of North
Florida to meet March 27
The Art League of North
Florida will hold its regular
monthly meeting at 7 p.m.
March 27 in the conference
room of the main branch of the
Columbia County Public Library.
Guest speaker will be Carolyn
Long from Haven Hospice. All
members are encouraged to
attend and all citizens
interested in helping promote
the arts in Columbia County are
invited to attend.
For more information, call
Mary Goff at 961-9529 ,Wally
Reichert at 758-7853 or John
Pierce at 344-2472.

Stephen Foster State Park
offers beading workshop
WHITE SPRINGS -
Stephen Foster Folk Culture
Center State Park is offering a
workshop on making beaded
jewelry from 1 to 2 p.m.
April 7.
Students can learn to make
customized jewelry using
beading techniques. The class
will be taught by Betty Cave,
an artist who demonstrates her
skills at the park's Craft
Square. Her work also is
available through the park's
gift shop.
The fee for the workshop
begins at $25 and varies
according to the size of the
stones used and the
complexity of the design. Park
admission is included in the
class fee and advance
registration is required.
For more information, call
Craft Square at 397-1920, or
visit the web site at
www. StephenFosterCSO. org.
To learn more about activities
at the park year-round, visit
onlind at
www.FloridaStateParks.org/ste
phenfoster.


OBITUARIES


Ponce De Leon Reed
PFC Ponce De Leon Reed was born
on October 12, 1940, in Lake City,
Florida. He was the
first child born to
Mary Lee reed and
John Henry Reed, Sr.
(deceased)
He was born and
raised south of
Lake City, Florida, where he re-
ceived his elementary education at
St. James School. He graduated
from A.L. Mebane in Alachua, Flor-
ida. He attended Bethune Cookman
College, Daytona Beach, Florida,
where he was a member of the
marching band. He later joined the
U.S. Army, where he served his
Country faithfully. Upon being dis-
charged from the military he moved
to New York City, where he was
employed by the Manhattan State
Bank. He later moved to Las Vegas,
NV, until his health failed, relocat-
ing back to Lake City to be with his
family. He was a watch-care mem-
ber of New Bethel Missionary Bap-
tist Church under the pastorate of
Rev. Alvin J. Baker.
Loving and beautiful memories re-
main in the lives of his caring moth-
er Mary Reed and special friend
Earl Jones of Lake City. His daugh-
ter Sharon Reed, devoted brother
Jimmie J.R. (Cynthia) Reed, Jack-
sonville, Florida and Brother Elbert
(Zonya) Reed, Gainesville, Florida;
god-brother, Reverend Alvin (Caro-
lyn) Baker, Lake City, Florida. De-
voted sister, DeAnna George and
deceased husband Leroy George, of
Lake City, Florida; sisters Peggy
(Sidney Sr.) Gassett, Tampa, Flori-
da, Helen Easley and friend Stanley,
High Springs, Florida, Carolyn
Reed, Gainesville, Florida and
Brenda Arnold, Troy, Alabama. Un-
cles, James (Hattie) Watts and
James (Janie) Reed, both of Lake
City. Aunts Mary Frances "Mutt"
(Nathaniel) Delesile, and Emily (de-
ceased husband Thomas) Johnson;
A host of loving nieces, nephews,
cousins, and friends.
Funeral Services for Mr. Ponce De
Leon Reed will be held on Saturday


March 17, 2007 at ll:00a.m. at
New Bethel Missionary Baptist
Church, Lake City, Florida. Visita-
tion with the family will be Friday
March 16, 2007, from 6:00 p.m. to
7:00 p.m. at COMBS FUNERAL
HOME CHAPEL. Arrangements
entrusted to Combs Funeral Home,
292 NE Washington street, Lake
City, Florida (386)752-4366. Marq
Combs-Turner, LFD

William C. "Bill" Anderson
Mr. William C. "Bill" Anderson,
90, of Lake City died early Wednes-
day morning in the Shands at Lake
Shore Hospital following a lengthy
illness. A native of Hopkinsville,
Kentucky, Mr. Anderson had been a
resident of Lake City since 1962
having moved here from Marianna,
Florida. Mr. Anderson was em-
ployed with Aero Corporation as an
aircraft mechanic for twenty-three
years prior to retiring. In his spare
time, Mr. Anderson enjoyed fishing,
wood working and he loved his cats
and dogs. He was a member of the
Christian Heritage Church of Lake
City. Mr. Anderson was preceded in
death by his wife of fifty-seven
years, Sarah Julia Anderson.
Mr. Anderson is survived by a
daughter, Sarah Ellen Julia Cum-
mings of Lake City and a son, Wil-
liam C. "Andy" Anderson ( Moni-.
ka) of Tampa, Florida. Nine grand-
children and three great-grandchil-
dren also survive.
Funeral services for Mr. Anderson
will be conducted at 1:00 P.M., Fri-
day, March 16, 2007 in the chapel
of the Dees- Parrish Family Funeral
Home with Pastor Eddie Taylor
and Pastor Chris Jones officiating.
Interment will follow in Forest
Lawn Memorial Gardens. The fami-
ly will receive friends from 6-8:00
Thursday evening at the funeral
home. Arrangements are under the
direction of the DEES-PARRISH
FAMILY FUNERAL HOME, 458
S. Marion Ave., Lake City. (752-
1234 or 752-2211) Please sign our
on-line family guestbook at
www.deesfamilyfuneralhome.com


Catharine Mae Gaul
Mrs. Catharine Mae Gaul, 101, of
Lake City, passed away peacefully,
Monday evening at her residence
following an extended illness. A na-
tive and longtime resident of Read-
ing, Pennsylvania, Mrs. Gaul had
been a resident of Lake City for sev-
eral years. The daughter of the late
Henry & Sally Zuber Phillips, Mrs.
Gaul worked for the Luden's candy
packaging plant and the David
Crystal dress manufacturing plant in
Reading, Pennsylvania, prior to re-
tiring. She enjoyed watching chil-
dren, playing bingo and she loved to
cook and clean. Mrs. Gaul was a
member of the St. Luke's Lutheran
Church in Reading, Pennsylvania
and Lake City, Florida.
Mrs. Gaul is survived by two
daughters, Ruth Huntsberger of
Lake City, Florida and Elaine Shan-
non of Reading, Pennsylvania. Sev-
en grandsons, sixteen great-grand-
children and seven great-great
grandchildren also survive.
Funeral services for Mrs. Gaul will
be conducted at 10:00 A.M., Friday,
March 16, 2007 in the chapel of the
Dees-Parrish Family Funeral Home
with Rev. James Bezaire officiating.
Funeral services in Reading, Penn-
sylvania will be held on Monday,
March 19, 2007 in the chapel of the
Saunders Funeral Home with Rev.
Bruce Osterhut officiating. Inter-
ment will follow these services in
the Forest Hills Cemetery in Read-


ing, Pennsylvania. The family will
receive friends for one hour prior to
the service in Lake City. They will
receive friends from 7-9:00 Sunday
evening, March 18, 2007 in the Sa,
under Funeral Home in Reading,
Pennsylvania. Arrangements are un-
der the direction of the DEES-
PARRISH FAMILY FUNERAL
HOME, 458 S. Marion Ave., Lake
City.(formerly Sherrill-Guerry)
(752-1234 or 752-2211) Please sign
our on-line family guestbook at
www.deesfamilyfuneralhome.com

Ronald H. "Ron" Trogdon, Jr.
Ronald H. "Ron" Trogdon, Jr., 50,
passed away Monday March 12,
2007, in Gainesville, Florida.
Mr. Trogdon was born April 20,
1956 in West Palm Beach, Fl., and
moved to the Ft. White, Fl. area 14
years ago from West Palm Beach,
Fl. He was employed with Lewis
Site Prep Company of Gainesville,
Fl. as a Heavy Equipment Operator,
and a member of Lebanon Baptist
Church in Branford, Fl.
He is survived by his wife, Kathy
Trogdon of Ft. White, Fl., a daugh-
ter, Roni Ann Ackerman & Brandon
of Sundance, Wyoming, one broth-.
er, David Franklin Trogdon & Beth
of West Palm Beach, Fl., 2 Grand-
children, Bailee Sue and Bryce Ac-
kerman and Nephew, Luke Trog-
don.
Funeral services will be conducted
Friday March 16, 2007 at 2:00 PM


S DincTy & RespeCT


fT 7 ,

The passing of a loved one is the
most emotionally demanding time
in your life. We will be there to help Lto R: Steven Khachigan, Milner Osborne, Bobby
lighten your burden. Tompkins, Jimmy Sparks, Bill Wheeler, & Bob Breyel
Gateway-Forest Lawn Funeral Home
Ted L Guerry Sr., LED. & Brad Wheeler, LED., Owners
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in Lebanon Baptist Church with
Rev. Joe Dunn and Rev. Clarence
Pender, officiating. Interment will
follow in the Church Cemetery.
DANIELS FUNERAL HOME
AND CREMATORY, INC.
BRANFORD in charge of arrange-
ments.

George Davis
Mr. George Davis transitioned from
life to eternal rest on March 13,
2007 at the V.A. Medical Center of
Lake City, Florida.
Arrangements are incomplete at this
time and are entrusted to the care of
COMBS FUNERAL HOME, 292
NE Washington Street, Lake City,
Florida 32055. (386)752-4366 Marq
Combs-turner. LFD

Orville J. Shipley
Orville J. Shipley, departed this life
on March 5, 2007, at the age of 87
years. Born in Carmi
Illinois, in 1920. His
family moved to
West Palm Beach
when he was two.
Mr. Shipley served as a Marine in
World War II, in the South Pacific,


J ~
,t~- -~


(~)
-J ~-,


was wounded in action and was
awarded the Purple Heart.
Mr. Shipley is survived by his wife,
Dorothy Shipley, and four children,
Nancy Perego and husband Bill,
Donna Joselyn and husband Alan,
Debie Shipley of the family home,
Lucretia Bush. Mr. Shipley is also
survived by, grandchildren, nieces,
nephews, and many friends.
Mr. Shipley was preceded in death
by his son James.
Mr. Shipley had lived in Lake City
for 11 years.

Annie Phemial Brown
Ms. Annie Phemial Brown was
called to be with her Heavenly Fa-
ther on March 14, 2007, at Kindred
Hospital of Green Cove Springs,
Florida.
Arrangements are incomplete at this
time and are entrusted to the care of
COMBS FUNERAL HOME, 292
NE Washington Street, Lake City,
Florida. 32055 (386)752-4366 Marq
Combs-Turner, LFD
Obituaries are paid advertisements.
For details, call the Lake City
Reporter's classified department at
752-1293.


The Caring Professionafs



292 N.E. Washington St. *


Lto R front: Helen Davis,
Carolyn Aaron, Brenda
Combs, & Claretha Bradley.
L to R back: Butch Weston,
Rosevelt Lake,
Marq Combs-Turner, LFD,
Anthony Williams,
Tarace Givens,
Mel Combs-Turner.
Not pictured:
Bernard Weston, Tre Orr,
and
Markhaela Combs-Johnson






752-4366


Crossover Correction to Branford Camera
CMS training offered Club meets today


We provide affordable prices with excellence
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LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2007


Conference focuses on rural domestic violence


By LINDSAY DOWNEY
Idowney@lakecityreporter. corn

Domestic violence is a com-
plicated problem but the
issues surrounding it some-
times become even more
complex in rural communi-
ties, Dr. Neil Websdale said
during a conference
Wednesday morning at Lake
City Community College.
Websdale, a domestic vio-
lence expert and professor of
criminal justice at Northern
Arizona University, spoke to a
large crowd inside the Alfonso
Levy Performing Arts Center
during the second day of the
Florida Coalition of Domestic
Violence's three-day rural
conference, Behind Closed
Doors, which has been hosted
in Lake City for the past four
years.
People often imagine rural
communities to be peaceful,
but because they typically are
small and isolated their domes-
tic violence may be more hid-
den, said Websdale, author of
the book "Rural Woman
Battering and the Justice
System: An Ethnography."
Battered women who live in
rural areas may be scared to
walk into shelters and other
agencies because people often
know each other in small
towns and women may be
worried others may find out
about the places they visited.


TROY ROBERTS/Lake City Reporter
Dr. Neil .Websdale speaks at the Lake City Community College
Wednesday morning to discuss domestic violence in rural areas. This
was part of the three-day rural conference, Behind Closed Doors.


"Privacy in some ways in
these rural communities is
very much an illusion yet
these women are very much
alone," Websdale said.
Stereotypical gender rela-
tions and patriarchies are
more common in rural towns
and some rural women may
have few friends and may be
less involved in outside
careers, Websdale said.
"We see women much more
connected to unpaid work in
rural communities than we do
in urban areas," he said.
In addition, people some-
times are more suspicious of
government in rural areas and
so-called "old boys' networks"


may exist - meaning people
who are in positions of power
know each other and may be
less likely to speak out against
one another.
Websdale addressed other
issues, such as how to under-
stand and assist battered
women, why they sometimes
make decisions that seem odd
and why people sometimes shy
away from battered women
during the conference.
"What is it that we think we
can catch from battered
women?" Websdale asked.
"What do they have that we
don't want to get?"
Batterers are most often
men who had attachment


HERRICK: New home ready for veteran


Continued From Page 1A
him from the neck down.
Three weeks in Iraq and
Herrick was bound for home.
Herrick said after he
returned home his wife Diana
went to a convention hosted by
the Coalition to Salute
America's Heroes. The coali-
tion helps severely wounded
and disabled Operation
Enduring Freedom. and
Operation Iraqi Freedom vets
when they return home. After
hearing Herrick's story the
coalition donated money to
help Herrick and his family
adjust to a new way of life.
The Herricks decided to use
the money to build a new
home. Their current home
was too small to hold all the
medical equipment Herrick
needs, and the doorways were
too small for Herrick to go
through in his wheelchair.
When the family's church,
Our Redeemer Lutheran
Church, learned about the
Herricks' desire to build a
home, church members decid-
ed to hold a fundraiser at the


Lake City Fairgrounds.
Herrick said they raised
over $76,000.
With the money from the
church, the Coalition and some
money donated by the VA the
Herricks hired contractor
Tommy Waters from Tommy
Waters Custom Homes. Before
going to Iraq Herrick had work-
er with Waters for eight years
as a carpenter.
The new home is still under
construction but Herrick said
they hope to move in by the
end of March. The house has
more open spaces, higher
countertops and tables and
three foot wide doors, Herrick
said.
"There is also a lift system'
attached to the ceiling that will
help me get into and out of the
shower and bed easier,"
Herrick said.
Herrick said some of the
installations are required by
the VA for them to receive
funding for the house even
though he is not able to use it,
like handle bars on the sides of


the bath tub.
The installations, according
to Herrick, will not go unused.
"Some of my friends are dis-
abled also, so when they come
over they will be able to use it,
too," Herrick said.
The home has three bed-
rooms and two and a half
baths. Herrick is most happy
about the abundance of wood
all over the house.
"Being a carpenter I really
wanted a lot of wood in the
home," he said.
Herrick has been medically
retired and was awarded a
Purple Heart and the Navy and
Marine Achievement Medal
with Valor. Herrick and Diana
have two children, Shayla and
Drew.
Herrick said that he was
reluctant to have a open
house, but changed his mind
when he found out about some
particular guests.
"Some of the guys from my
old unit are coming by,"
Herrick said. "So I went ahead
and got some beer."


COUNTY: To hear about auxiliary unit


Continued From Page 1A
implement an auxiliary unit
that would be classified as a
non-profit organization to sup-
port the fire department.
"The unit would be made up
of local residents of the county
and their basic mission -
goals and objectives - would
be to assist the residents of
Columbia County who have
been having difficulty, either
through the devastation of a
fire or other type of loss," said
Lisa Roberts, assistant county
manager. "They are request-
ing the board of county com-
missioners authorize the cre-
ation of this auxiliary unit."
The fire department lists
that it wants to lend support to
families in times of loss such
as supply basic necessities like
food and clothing, work along
with other agencies to supply


COUEY:
Continued From Page 1A
mental retardation and mental ill-
ness, neglect as a child and the
effects of alcohol and drug abuse.
Mentally retarded people
cannot be executed under
both Florida law and a 2002
U.S. Supreme Court decision.
Ridgway scoffed at defense
claims of extreme mental
problems, noting that Couey
carefully planned the crime
and repeatedly lied to police in
an attempt to escape blame.
Earlier Wednesday, psychol-
ogist Harry McClaren testi-
fied that Couey is able to adapt
to day-to-day life despite any
mental challenges.


housing and/or transportation
and offer Christmas gifts when
no, other option is available to
the family. Special emphasis
will be placed on the needs of
families with children.
The fire department also
plans for the auxiliary unit to
conduct fundraising activities,
as well as take donations.
"It would be the auxiliary
unit's discretion as to how they
disbursed the funds," Roberts
said. "They'll also come up
with procedures and rules and
regulations as to how they
would disburse it and to
whom."
She said the rules and regu-
lations governing the auxiliary
would most likely be made by
the auxiliary and then come
before the county board of
commissioners for approval.


Roberts said if approved,
this would be the county's first
auxiliary unit of its kind.
"I think this is a very worthy
thing to do as for as the county
is concerned because it has an
impact on assisting the resi-
dents in the county that have
sustained a loss of any nature,
due to a fire, disaster or any
other loss," she said.
In other business, the com-
mission:
* Is scheduled to discuss
small scale land use amend-
ments and zoning amend-
ments;
* Discuss the County Fire
Department budget; and
* Is scheduled to hear a
proposal from Stew Lilker
regarding a Gateway Regional
Utility Authority.


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issues early in life, but most
men who grew up in violent
families don't repeat that
behavior, Websdale said.
In 2005, 176 people in Florida
were killed due to domestic vio-
lence, according to the Florida
Department of Law
Enforcement's Web site.'2006
statistics are not yet reported.
There was one reported
criminal homicide, nine
forcible rapes, one forcible
fondling, 108 aggravated
assaults, 427 simple assaults
and three threats related to
domestic violence in
Columbia County in 2005,
according to FDLE.
Educators, law enforcement
representatives, medical pro-
fessionals and officials from
local agencies, including
Another Way, Inc., attended
the Behind Closed Doors con-
ference to learn ways to better
assist battered women.
Another Way is a 38-bed
Lake City shelter for women
and children. It counsels
women and men in Columbia,
Hamilton, Dixie, Gilchrist,
Lafayette and Levy counties
who have survived domestic
violence and also works to
support them in court.


SUSPECTS: Claim robbery


was for gang
Continued From Page 1A
a man near the B&B Food
Store at U.S. Highway 27 in
Fort White.
According to the Columbia
County Sheriff's Office, the
victim has pulled off the road-
way on U.S. Highway 27 and
went into the B&B Food Store.
As he returned to his truck
and opened the driver's side,
the two suspects opened the
passenger's side door of the
victim's truck, pointed a gun at
him and demanded money.
The man exited his truck, ran
into the convenience store and
called authorities.
Columbia County Sheriff's
deputies responded to the
scene and spoke with the vic-
tim and witnesses to the
crime. They also 'reviewed
security tape which helped
them make an identification on
the suspects involved in the
incident.
The victim and witnesses
provided the deputies with
descriptions of the suspects
and some witnesses provided
information on the possible
identities of the suspects,


initiation


which included names and
addresses.
Investigators later located
the men at their homes and
transported them to the sher-
iff's Operations Center where,
according to reports, they con-
fessed to taking part in the
crime.
"The deputies did an out-
standing job in pursuing the
leads and making the arrests,"
said Columbia County Sheriff
Bill Gootee.
Cook and Paxton later told
deputies that they attempted
to rob the man as part of a
gang initiation. Gootee said an
investigator with. the sheriff's
office tracks gang activity said
it fits closely with one of the
gangs in the county.
"It is a legitimate gang and it
is one of their initiation
processes - robbery, home
invasion, stealing a car," he
said. "It is a part of the
process, but we can't substan-
tiate that it is true other than
what the suspects are telling
us."


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LAKE CITY REPORTER NATION THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2007


Pumps installed in New Orleans


after Katrina were defective


By CAIN BUREAU
Associated Press
NEW ORLEANS - The Army Corps of
Engineers, rushing to meet President
Bush's promise to protect New Orleans by
the start of the 2006 hurricane season,
installed defective flood-control pumps last
year despite warnings from its own expert
that the equipment would fail during a
storm, according to documents obtained
by The Associated Press.
The 2006 hurricane season turned out
to be mild, and the new pumps were never
pressed into action. But the Corps and the
politically connected manufacturer of the
equipment are still struggling to get the 34
heavy-duty pumps working properly.
The pumps are now being pulled out
and overhauled because of excessive
vibration, Corps officials said. Other prob-
lems have included overheated engines,
broken hoses and blown gaskets, accord-
ing to the documents obtained by the AP
Col. Jeffrey Bedey, who is overseeing
levee reconstruction, insisted the pumps
would have worked last year and the city
was never in danger. Bedey gave assur-
ances that the pumps should be ready for
the coming hurricane season, which
begins June 1.
The Corps said it decided to press
ahead with installation, and then fix the
machinery while it was in place, on the the-
ory that some pumping capacity was bet-
ter than none. And it defended the manu-
facturer, which was under time pressure.
"Let me give you the scenario: You have
four months to build something that
nobody has ever built before, and if you


BRIEFS

Court rules against
dying woman


SAN FRANCISCO -A
California woman whose doctor
says marijuana is the only
medicine keeping-her alive is not
immune from federal prosecution
on drug charges, a federal
appeals court ruled Wednesday.
The case was brought by
Angel Raich, an Oakland
mother of two who suffers from
scoliosis, a brain tumor, chronic
nausea and other ailments. On
her doctor's advice, she eats or
smokes marijuana every couple
of hours to ease her pain and
bolster a nonexistent appetite as
conventional drugs did not work.
The Supreme Court ruled
against Raich two years ago,
saying that medical marijuana
users and their suppliers could
. be prosecuted for breaching
federal drug laws even if they
lived in a state such as California
where medical pot is legal.

Father of victims
allowed to return
NEW YORK - The man
whose wife and four children
killed in a fire in the Bronx won
special permission Wednesday
to return to the United States
after taking their bodies to his
African homeland for burial.
Mamadou Soumare had faced
the possibility of not being able to
accompany his family's remains
for fear he wouldn't be allowed to
return to New York.
A spade heater was blamed
for the fire last week in the
building that Soumare's family
shared with Moussa Magassa,
the father of five other children
who died in the blaze.

Prosecutors: DNA
makes the case
KANSAS CITY, Mo. - A
suspected serial killer is in
extricably linked to the deaths of
seven women through DNA
evidence, prosecutors said in
closing arguments Tuesday.
Lorenzo Gilyard, 56, was
charged with seven counts of
first-degree murder in the killings,
which took place in Kansas City.
in 1986 and 1987. He was
suspected in a total of 13 deaths,
but prosecutors dropped six
charges because they believed
the remaining cases were
stronger.
* Associated Press


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Pumps put in place by the Army Corps of Engineers pump water from New Orleans' 17th
Street Canal to Lake Pontchartra in New Orleans, recently.


don't, the city floods and the Corps, which
already has a black eye, could basically be
dissolved. How many people would put up
with a second flooding?" said Randy
Persica, the Corps' resident engineer for
New Orleans' three major drainage canals.
The 34 pumps - installed in the
drainage canals that take water from this
bowl-shaped, below-sea-level city and
deposit it in Lake Pontchartrain - repre-
sented a new ring of protection that was
added to New Orleans' flood defenses after
Katrina. The city also relies on miles of
levees and hundreds of other pumps in
various locations.


The drainage-canal pumps were cus-
tom-designed and built under a $26.6 mil-
lion contract awarded after competitive
bidding to Moving Water Industries Corp.
of Deerfield Beach, Fla. It was founded in
1926 and supplies flood-control and irriga-
tion pumps all over the world.
MWI is owned by J. David Eller and his
sons. Eller was once a business partner of
former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush in a venture
called Bush-El that marketed MWI pumps.
And Eller has donated about $128,000 to
politicians, the vast majority of it to the
Republican Party, since 1996, according to
the Center for Responsive Politics.


Judge finds Sudan responsible

for bombing of USS Cole


By SONJA BARISIC
Associated Press
NORFOLK, Va. -A federal
judge said Wednesday that
Sudan is responsible for the
bombing of the USS Cole but
he needs more time to deter-
mine damages for the families
of the 17 sailors killed when
terrorists bombed the ship in
2000.
'"There is substantial evi-
dence in this case presented
by the expert testimony that
the .government of Sudan
induced the particular bomb-
ing of the Cole by virtue of
prior actions of the govern-
ment of Sudan," U.S. District
Judge Robert G. Doumar
said. ,
The civil trial started
Tuesday in which the victims'
relatives tried to prove the ter-
rorist attack couldn't have
happened without Sudan's
support.


Doumar said that he would
issue a written opinion later to
fully explain his ruling. He
requested additional paper-
work, including tax returns of
the sailors killed, to deter-
mine the appropriate dam-
ages.
"Words can't express the
loss my family has gone
through," Shalala
Swenchonis-Wood, whose
brother died, testified
Wednesday. "It's not financial,
it's not material, it's always
the things, the little things
you don't see."
Four experts on terrorism,
including R. James Woolsey,
CIA director from early 1993
to early 1995, also testified in
person or by deposition
Tuesday to support the fami-
lies' position that al-Qaida
needed the African nation's
help to carry out the attack.
"It would not have been as


easy - it might have been
possible - but it would not
have been as easy," Woolsey
said in a videotaped deposi-
tion, without Sudan providing
economic support, places to
train and false documents.
The experts testified that
Sudan has given safe haven to
Osama bin Laden's al-Qaida
terrorist network since 1991
- long before Yemeni opera-
tives attacked the Cole.
They cited testimony from
other trials, a declassified
Canadian intelligence report,
U.S. State Department
reports and their own studies
as they testified that Sudan let
terrorist training camps oper-
ate within its borders and
gave al-Qaida members diplo-
matic passports so they could
travel without scrutiny and
diplomatic pouches to ship
explosives and weapons with-
out being searched.


Third convicted soldier testifies

against sergeant charged in deaths


By KRISTIN M. HALL
Associated Press
FORT CAMPBELL, Ky. -
A staff sergeant gave sol-
diers the option of taking
part in the shooting of three
Iraqi detainees before the
killings took place, a soldier
testified Wednesday.
Staff Sgt. Ray Girouard,
24, called members of his
squad into a meeting near
Samarra, Iraq, in May and
said the three men were
going to be shot after they
were freed, Pfc. Juston
Graber testified. Girouard
said Spc. William Husaker
and Pfc. Corey Clagett were
going to shoot the men, but
other soldiers had the option
to take part or leave, Graber
said.
Girouard, 24, who is
charged with murder, is the
last and most senior soldier
from the 101st Airborne
Division to face trial for the
killings during a May 9 raid
on a suspected insurgent
camp. He is accused of
ordering soldiers in his
squad to kill the men and


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cover up their crime as
self-defense.
Graber pleaded guilty in
January to aggravated
assault for shooting one of
the three detainees who had
been wounded and was sen-
tenced to nine months in a
military jail.
Graber said that after the
detainees were shot, he
walked over to two of them
who appeared to still be
alive.
'There was one that was
puking up blood and had
agonizing breathing," Graber
said. "Sgt. Girouard said, 'Go
ahead and put him out of his
misery.' I felt it was the right
thing to do."
Graber pointed to a photo
of the detainee that he shot,
pointing out the entry wound
just below his left eye.
Graber said he aimed there
because he knew that would
cause immediate death.
Graber said although he
initially didn't tell investiga-
tors about the meeting and
his "mercy killing" of the
detainee, he confessed to


investigators in June.
"I wanted to get it off my
chest," Graber said.
Graber was expected to be
questioned by Girouard's
attorney later Wednesday.
Graber is the third soldier
charged in the killings to
testify against Girouard.
Husaker and Clagett testi-
fied Tuesday that Girouard
gave them the order to
release the three men and
shoot them as they fled.
They each have pleaded
guilty to murder and sen-
tenced to 18 years in military
prison.
"Sgt. Girouard said Clagett
and Hunsaker wanted to kill
the detainees," Graber
testified Wednesday.
Hunsaker said he and
Clagett took the three
detainees outside, away from
other soldiers. Hunsaker
said that he pulled down
their blindfolds and looked
them in the eyes and that
Clagett told them in Arabic
to run.


Teachers walk out;

classes canceled


By SHAYA TAYEFE MOHAJER
Associated Press
CHARLESTON, W.Va. -
Teachers demanding better
pay refused to show up for
work Wednesday and forced
the cancellation of classes in
at least 14 counties.
Some teachers were con-
vinced to join the walkout last-
minute when they discovered
peers from neighboring coun-
ties outside their schools
protesting.
"Our teachers wouldn't
cross the picket line," said
Lotus Bailes, the Raleigh
County superintendent's
secretary.
Lawmakers last week
approved a 3.5 percent pay
raise for the state's nearly
20,000 teachers, but the edu-
cators' union said it was not
enough to keep West Virginia
competitive with the rest of
the country.


West Virginia teachers'
salaries now rank 47th in the
nation, according to the West
Virginia Education
Association. State officials
said the average teacher
earned $41,388 last year and
has about 18 years of
experience.
"We have so much trouble
retaining and recruiting high-
ly qualified teachers as it is,"
local union president Gayle
Allen in Hampshire County.
"We have a real hard time get-
ting teachers to even apply
here."
Not all education advocates
supported the one-day
walkout.
"It's hard to think that
you're going to accomplish
something after the legislative
session is over," said Jackee
Long, president of the West
Virginia School Service
Personnel Association..


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LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & WORLD THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2007


IRAQ: Increased security force has brought down number of overall casualties


Continued From Page 1A
In the months before the
security operation began Feb.
14, police were finding dozens
of bodies each day in the capi-
tal - victims of Sunni and
Shiite death squads. Last
December, more than 200 bod-
ies were found each week -
with the figure spiking above
300 in some weeks, according
to police reports compiled by
The Associated Press.
Since the crackdown began,
weekly totals have dropped to
about 80 - hardly an accept-
able figure but clearly a sign
that death squads are no
longer as active as they were
in the final months of last year.
Bombings too have
decreased in the city, presum-
ably due to U.S. and Iraqi suc-
cess in finding weapons caches
and to more government check-
points in the streets that make it
tougher to deliver the bombs.

Death toll drops
In the 27 days leading up to
the operation, 528 people were
killed in bombings around the
capital, according to AP fig-
ures. In the first 27 days of the
operation, the bombing death
toll stood at 370 - a drop of


Body count drops
Weekly totals of bodies found in
and around Baghdad - primarily
victims of sectarian death squads
- has decreased since a security
blockade began in the city last
month.
Bodies found in Baghdad
per week
WEEK 0 100 200 300


Dec. 1-7
Dec. 8-14
Dec. 15-21
Dec. 22-28
Dec. 29-Jan. 4
Jan.5-11
Jan.12-18
Jan. 19-25
Jan. 26-Feb. 1
Feb. 2-8
Feb. 9-13"
Feb. 14-20
Feb. 21-26
Feb. 27-March 6
March 7-12"*


llI Pre-
'm : blockade
Blockade
ain i i i


*Five days * Six days
SOURCE: AP
about 30 percent.
U.S. military combat deaths
have also declined, according
to an AP count. Twenty-four
members of the military were
killed in Baghdad from Feb. 14
through March 14, compared
with 29 from Jan. 13 through
Feb. 13. Overall nationwide,


there were 68 U.S. military
deaths from Feb. 14 through
March 14, compared with 112
from Jan. 13 through Feb. 13.
Prime Minister Nouri al-
Maliki, a Shiite, made a show
of confidence Tuesday by trav-
eling out of Baghdad for meet-
ings with Sunni tribal leaders
and government officials in
Ramadi, a stronghold for
Sunni insurgents.

More to the story
Figures alone won't tell the
story. In Vietnam, generals kept
pointing to enemy body counts
to promote a picture of success
even when many U.S. soldiers
and civilian officials realized the
effort was doomed.
True success will be when
Iraqis themselves begin to feel
safe and gain confidence in
their government and security
forces. Only then can the
economy, long on its heels and
with unemployment estimated
between 25 and 40 percent,
rebound and start providing
jobs and a future for
Baghdad's people.
A long-term solution also
must deal with the militias that
sprang up after the ouster of


FRAUD: Lake City woman pleads guilty
Continued From Page 1A


sentence of 30 years in prison, a $1 million fine
and a five year term of supervised release.
In exchange for the guilty plea, the other 35
counts of bank fraud will be dismissed at the
upcoming sentencing, said Amy Hanly, a
spokesperson for the U.S. Attorney's Office in
Tampa. An exact sentencing date has not
been set.

Live Oak man indicted
In a separate bank-fraud investigation, a Live
Oak Mercantile Bank branch manager and loan
officer was indicted in January on 12 counts of


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bank fraud, according to the U.S. Attorney's
Office.
The indictment accuses Brian Metzger of
Live Oak of fraudulently withdrawing funds
from customers' line-of-credit accounts without
their knowledge or authorization by changing
their addresses listed to his home address. The
indictment states the amount taken was more
than $100,000.
According to the U.S. Attorney's Office,
Metzger has a status conference for his case on
April 12. He also has a trial date set to start on
May 7 in the U.S. District Court Middle District
of Florida, Jacksonville Division.


I TUB


Saddam Hussein.
Much of the relative calm
may be due to a decision by
Shiite cleric Muqtada al-Sadr
to remove his armed militia-
men, known as the Mahdi
Army, from the streets. Al-
Maliki warned the young cler-
ic that he could not protect
them from the Americans dur-
ing the offensive.
U.S. troops rolled into the
Mahdi stronghold of Sadr City
on March 4 without firing a
shot - a radical change from
street battles there in 2004.
Some Mahdi Army fighters
may have left-the city., But
Iraqis who live in Shiite neigh-
borhoods say many others are
still around, collecting protec-
tion money from shopkeepers
and keeping tabs on people -
albeit without their guns.
When American patrols pass
by, Mahdi members step into
shops or disappear into crowds
until the U.S. troops are gone.
Sunni militants remain in some
areas of the city too, although
last year's sectarian bloodlet-
ting drove many Sunnis from
their traditional neighbor-


hoods, depriving extremists of a ship of insurgent groups before
support network. they attempt to re-emerge.


Militants in hiding
Sunni militants, meanwhile,
are believed to have with-
drawn to surrounding areas
such as Diyala province where
they have safe haven. The U.S.
command sent an extra 700
soldiers Tuesday to protect
the highways leading into the
capital from there.
If militants from both sects
are indeed lying low, that sug-
gests they may have adopted a
strategy of waiting until the
security operation is over, then
re-emerging to fight each
other for control of the capital.
Conscious of that possibility,
new U.S. commander Gen.
David Petraeus and other sen-
ior generals avoid setting a
date for when the operation
would end. They insist the
extra troops will stay as long as
they are needed.
And they say the military will
continue to track down key mili-
tia and insurgent figures, in
hopes of crippling the leader-


Keeping up the guard
The No. 2 commander in
Iraq, Lt. Gen. Ray Odierno, has
recommended that the buildup
stretch longer, into the early
months of 2008 - if Congress
will provide the money.
But positive trends in Iraq
have proven hard to sustain.
Hopes for reconciliation are
quickly shattered. There have
been a series of failed security
initiatives.
With so many uncertainties,
public opinion appears mixed.
"We gain nothing from this
government. No change," said
Abu Zeinab, a Shiite father of
two in Baghdad's Hurriyah
district. 'Today is like yester-
day. What is the difference?"
In eastern Baghdad, one
homeowner whose house was
seized by the family of a Shiite
militiaman gained enough con-
fidence to tell them to leave or
he would turn them in to the
Americans - unthinkable
only a few weeks ago.


NOTICE OF PROPOSED ENACTMENT OF
ANNEXATION ORDINANCE
BY THE CITY OF LAKE CITY, FLORIDA
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, pursuant to Section 171.004, Florida Statutes, that the
proposed Ordinance, the title of which hereinafter appears, will be considered for enact-
ment on the 19th day of March, 2007 at the City Council meeting commencing at 7:00
p.m. in the City Council Meeting Room at the City .Hall Building located at 205 North
Marion Avenue, Lake City, Florida.
Ordinance No. 2007-1103 provides for annexation of a parcel of land contiguous to the
Northwest boundary of the City of Lake City, as shown in a location map which forms a
part of this notice. The complete legal description of the affected lands, by metes and
bounds, as well as a copy of Ordinance No. 2007-1103 can be obtained from the office of
the City Clerk, City Hall, 205 North Marion Avenue, Lake City, Florida.
At the aforementioned meeting all interested parties may appear and be heard with
respect to the proposed Ordinance.
NOTE: "Be advised that any person who decides to appeal any decision made by the
City Council, its Boards, Committees, Agencies or Authorities with respect to any matter
considered at such meeting (or hearing), you will need a record of the proceeding, and
that, for such purpose, you may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceeding
is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to
be based." (Reference: Section 286.0105, Florida Statutes).
ORDINANCE NO. 2007-1103
SECTION 35, TOWNSHIP 3 SOUTH - RANGE 16 EAST
COMMENCE at the Northeast corner of SE 1/4 of SW 1/4 of said Section and run S
6044'59" W, along the East line of said SE 1/4 of SW 1/4 a distance of 153.76 feet to a
point on the centerline of State Road No. 10 (U.S. Highway No. 90); thence Southwesterly
along said centerline and along a curve concave to the left and having a radius of 2864.79
feet and a total central angle of 14011', a distance of 121.91 feet to a point of tangency of
said curve; thence S 81007'41" W, still along said centerline 16.65 feet; thence N 8052'19"
W, 79.00 feet to the North right of way line of said State Road No. 10; thence N 06032'06"
E, 250.25 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING; thence N 11009'49" W, 273.24 feet, more
or less, to the Northeasterly most corner of Columbia County Parcel Number 02554-000;
thence N 03058'30" E, along the Westerly Right-of-Way line of NW Cali Cr, a distance of
265.68 feet, more or less, to a point on the Northerly Right-of-Way line of said NW Cali
Cr; thence S 83048'25" E, along the North Right-of-Way line of said NW Cali Cr, a dis-
tance of 60.85 feet, more or less, to the East Right-of-Way line of said NW Cali Cr; thence
S 03058'30" W, along the East Right-of-Way'line of said NW Cali Cr, a distance of 117.80
feet, more or less to the Northwest corner of Columbia County Parcel Number 02556-002;
thence S 83048'25" E, 178.82 feet to the West line of "Brookside" a recorded subdivision
recorded in Plat Book 3, page 45 of the public records of Columbia County, Florida;
thence S 6033'14" W, along said West line "Brookside" 380.18 feet; thence S 82023'44"
W, 159.93 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING


LOCATION MAP


I
~~1


Dated this c? 'day of Fbru., 2007


Audrey E tikes, City Clerk

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1 OA LAKE CITY REPORTER WORLD THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2007 Page Editor: Laila MoGuffey, 754-0429


BRIEFS


Opposition clashes
with riot police
HARARE, Zimbabwe - A
bloody weekend clash with riot
police has bolstered Zimbabwe's
fractured opposition, giving it a
new sense of unity and
strengthening determination to
make this year a turning point in
the drive to oust President
Robert Mugabe and his
authoritarian regime.
The main opposition leader,
Morgan Tsvangirai, suffered a
suspected skull fracture, brain
injury and internal bleeding in
the violence, doctors reported
Wednesday. Lawyers and other
activists said he was savagely
beaten in police custody.
Tsvangirai, 54, told British
Broadcasting Corp. in an
interview from his bed in a
Harare clinic that police beat him
on the head, knees and back
and broke his arm.

Suicide bomber kills
five, wounds 38
KABUL, Afghanistan -A
suicide bomber struck near a
police convoy in eastern
Afghanistan on Wednesday,
killing five people and wounding
38 in the latest in a growing
wave of Iraq-style attacks.
The attacker, described as a
young man wearing a Muslim
prayer cap, detonated his
explosives as the last in a
column of police vehicles
passed in front of a bank in
Khost, a city near the Pakistani
border, officials and witnesses
said.
Four civilians and a
policeman were killed,
according to Gul Mohammadin
Mohammadi, the provincial
health chief. Nine of the 38
wounded were policemen, he
said. Twelve of the injured were
in critical condition.
Suicide attacks have become
a key weapon for Taliban
insurgents who made 2006 the
bloodiest year in Afghanistan
since U.S. forces drove the
hard-line regime from power in
late 2001. The tactic has put
NATO and U.S. troops on edge,
resulting in a string of deadly
shootings of civilians.

Egypt names first
female judges
CAIRO, Egypt - Egypt's
judiciary chief has named the
country's first female judges
despite opposition from
conservative Muslims, according
to a decree published
Wednesday.
Mukbil Shakir, the head of the
Supreme Judicial Council,
appointed 31 women to judge or
chief judge positions in Egypt's
courts, the official Middle East
News Agency said, quoting
Shakir's decree.
The move is expected to give
a boost to President Hosni
Mubarak's political and social
reforms that have been widely
criticized as too restricted. But
others said the announcement
still falls short of providing
women equal opportunities.
The decree said the women,
who previously were state
prosecutors, passed a special
test before being named to their
new posts, fearing angry
reaction.
* Associated Press


A^UA I CIU T rKES
U.S. President George W. Bush makes remarks during a press
conference with Mexican President Felipe Calderon (not shown)
Wednesday in Merida, Mexico.

Bush optimistic on


immigration laws


By TOM RAUM
Associated Press

MERIDA, Mexico -
President Bush pledged
Wednesday to intensify his
push for languishing immigra-
tion legislation, standing
alongside Mexican President
Felipe Calderon who acknowl-
edged he has relatives picking
vegetables in the U.S.
Calderon said the family
members pay taxes in the
United States and "probably
handle that which you eat, the
lettuce, etc." But he avoided
saying whether they were
there legally.
The joint news conference
with Calderon was Bush's last
appearance in a weeklong
Latin America tour that includ-
ed stops in Brazil, Uruguay,
Colombia and Guatemala. The
trip was designed to emphasize
U.S. aid for the region and
counter- criticism that the
United States has neglected
Latin America.
The president was general-
ly warmly received through-
out his travels, and streets
were packed with curious


onlookers. Still, there were
protests at nearly every stop,
and Bush was shadowed from
afar by Venezuela's fiery left-
ist president, Hugo Chavez,
who conducted his own tour
of Latin America and taunted
the president nearly daily.
U.S. immigration laws were
a prime topic for Bush. The
president said his most impor-
tant ally in getting Congress to
overhaul immigration rules
may be a longtime nemesis of
Republicans, Sen. Edward M.
Kennedy, D-Mass. Once
Republicans put aside differ-
ences and settle on a course,
Bush said, Kennedy may be
the one to lead the charge in
the now-Democratic Congress
because of his vast legislative
experience.
"My mood is optimistic
because the mood in Congress
seems like it's changed," Bush
said. Bush and Calderon also
pledged to step up the fight
against illegal drugs.
Calderon has complained
U.S. immigration laws are too
harsh and has criticized U.S.
plans to add up to 700 miles of
new fencing along the border.


North Korea offers

nuclear alternative


By ALEXA OLESEN
Associated Press

BEIJING - North Korea is
committed to closing its main
nuclear reactor within a
month as long as Washington
meets a promise to drop finan-
cial sanctions, the chief U.N.
nuclear inspector said
Wednesday after a one-day
trip to Pyongyang.
International Atomic
Energy Agency head
Mohamed ElBaradei offered
an encouraging assessment of
the month-old nuclear disar-
mament pact, saying North
Korean officials told him they
were "fully committed" to
implementing the deal to shut
the reactor and welcome back
U.N. inspectors.


The officials said they were
"ready to work with the
agency to make sure that we
monitor and verify the shut-
down of the Yongbyon"
nuclear reactor, ElBaradei
told reporters after the first
IAEA visit to North Korea
since its inspectors were
kicked out four years ago.
He added, however, that the
deal between the U.S., North
Korea and four other coun-
tries was still "fragile."
The Yongbyon reactor is
believed to have produced plu-
tonium for North Korea's
nuclear test blast on Oct. 9.
North Korean officials told
ElBaradei they were waiting
for the United States to drop
financial sanctions that
include a freeze on assets.


Britain to upgrade submarine fleet


By JENNIFER QUINN
Associated Press

LONDON - Prime
Minister Tony Blair survived
a rebellion by lawmakers in
his own party Wednesday
when Parliament approved
his program to replace
Britain's fleet of four nuclear-
armed submarines.
Blair's proposal survived a
rebellion by 95 lawmakers in
his own party, making it the


biggest revolt among his
ranks since the Iraq war.
Overwhelming. support
from Conservatives assured
approval of Blair's plan
Wednesday, with the motion
passing by a vote of 409-161.
His Labour Party has a major-
ity of 67 seats in the House of
Commons.
Critics said the $40 billion
program could harm efforts
to stem the weapons ambi-
tions of Iran and other coun-


tries. But
Blair told
Commons


before the vote,
the House of
that the sub-


marines - due to be phased
out starting in 2022 - should
be replaced to meet possible
future threats from rogue
regimes and state-sponsored
terrorists.
"I think it's right we take
the decision now to begin
work on replacing the Trident
submarines, I think it's essen-
tial for security."


Rival factions agree to unity government


By IBRAHIM BARZAK
Associated Press

GAZA CITY, Gaza Strip -
Political rivals Hamas and
Fatah reached a final agree-
ment on forming a unity gov-
ernment Wednesday, wrap-
ping up months of torturous
coalition negotiations aimed
at ending bloody internal
fighting and lifting interna-
tional sanctions against the


Palestinians.
Prime Minister Ismail
Haniyeh of Hamas said he
would present the new gov-
ernment to parliament this
weekend .for final approval.
"'Today is an occasion to cel-
ebrate. We have done every-
thing," he said after a late-
night meeting with President
Mahmoud Abbas of Fatah.
Both sides hope the alliance
will bring the Palestinians out


of international isolation after
a yearlong boycott of the
Hamas-led government. Israel
and Western countries have
reacted coolly to the deal, but
say they are waiting for final
details before deciding
whether to lift the embargo.
Haniyeh and Abbas agreed
to the power-sharing deal last
month in Saudi Arabia, but
had spent the past few weeks
ironing out the final details.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER WORLD THURSDAY, MARCH 15,2007


10A


Page Editor: Laila McGuffey, 754-0429


'IN j NN I% & 1: '11 Io 1111 a I c a c c


F









Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?


Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com
Thursday, March 15, 2007


SPORTS


www.lakecityreporter.com


BRIEFS

CHS BASKETBALL
Awards banquet
set for Tuesday
Columbia High boys
basketball has its awards
banquet planned for
6:30 p.m., Tuesday, at Lake
City Christian Church on
Branford Highway. Cost is
$8 for adults and $5 for
children 12 and younger.
For details, call coach
Trey Hosford at 755-8122.
YOUTH WRESTUNG
Open competition
planned at CHS
Columbia High has open
mat wrestling for ages
5 and older planned for
3:45-5 p.m. on Tuesdays
and Thursdays.
For details, call Al
Nelson at 755-8080.


Adult registration
is under way
Registration for Lake
City/Columbia County
Parks and Recreation
Department Church and
commercial adult league
softball is under way at
Teen Town Recreation
Center, weekdays from
8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Cost is
$345 per team and fees and
rosters are due at
registration. Deadline is
March 25.
For details, call Mario.
Coppock or Connie Holt at
,754-3607.
OUTDOORS
Turkey federation
banquet March 31
The National Wild
Turkey Federation has its
10th Annual Heritage
Banquet planned for 6 p.m.,
March 31, at the Columbia
County Fairgrounds.
For details, call Todd
Kennon at 755-1334 during
business hours.

Bassin' For Shands
Kids is May 12
The 12th Annual Bassin'
For Shands Kids Bass
Tournament is May 12.
Entry fee of $225 includes
big bass. For details, call
Pam Edenfield at 752-7344.
* From staff reports.

GAMES

Today
* Columbia High track at
Episcopla High Invitational,
I p.m.
* LCCC baseball vs. Glen
Oaks College, 2:30 p.m.
* Columbia High girls
tennis vs. Vanguard High,
3:30 p.m.
* LCCC softball at St.
Johns River CC, 4 p.m.
* Columbia High
weightlifting at Baker County
High, 4 p.m.
* Columbia High baseball
at Forest High, 6:30 p.m.
* Fort White High softball
at Chiefland High, 7 "p.m.
(jV-5)
Friday
* LCCC softball vs.
Owens CC, 2 p.m.
* LCCC baseball vs.
Seminole CC, 2:30 p.m.
* Columbia High tennis at
Baker County High, 3:30 p.m.
* Fort White High baseball
vs. P.K.Yonge School, 7 p.m.
* Columbia High softball
vs. Host Bell High at Lady
Bulldog Invitational, 8 p.m.
Saturday
* Columbia High baseball
vs.Vanguard High, I p.m.
* LCCC baseball at
Seminole CC, I p.m.
* Columbia High softball
at Bell tournament,TBA


Syracuse, Kansas State


advance to round 2 of NIT


Clemson earns win over
E. Tennessee State and
Georga passes Fresno St.
Associated Press

SYRACUSE, N.Y. - Eric Devendorf
scored a career-high 34 points and
Demetris Nichols added 15 to help
Syracuse rally for a 79-73 victory over
South Alabama in the first round of the
NIT on Wednesday night.
The Orange (23-10) trailed 59-50
with 11:23 to play, but scored 18
straight points to go up 68-59 with 4:59
to play. Daon Merritt broke the run
with a free throw at the 4:03 mark.
Nichols, the Big East's leading
scorer, gave Syracuse the lead for
good on a 3-pointer from the top of the
key with 8:05 left.
Syracuse will play either San Diego
State or Missouri State on Monday
night.


Kansas St. 59,
Vermont 57
MANHATTAN, Kan. - David
Hoskins drove for the go-ahead buck-
et with 33 seconds left, capping a
second-half comeback that carried
Kansas State past Vermont.
Vermont led 51-39 with about 10:30
left after trailing by as many as eight in
the first half. But the Catamounts
missed eight shots and had three
turnovers in the final 5:09, allowing
Kansas State to go on a 9-0 run.
The Wildcats advance to a
second-round game Monday against
DePaul, which beat Hofstra 83-71.

Clemson 64,
E. Tennessee St. 57
CLEMSON, S.C. - K.C. Rivers
finished with 17 points and 14
rebounds, and Trevor Booker had 11
points and 11 boards to lift Clemson


over East Tennessee State.
The South region's No. 1 seed will
host Mississippi in a second-round
matchup Monday night.

Mississippi 73,
Appalachian St. 59
OXFORD, Miss. -Todd Abernethy
scored 18 points and Mississippi held
Appalachian State scoreless for nearly
6 minutes in the second half to pull
away for the victory.
Clarence Sanders' steal and layup
with 10:15 remaining began a 19-2 run
that put the Rebels ahead to stay.
Fourth-seeded Mississippi (21-12)
got 14 points and eight rebounds from
Dwayne Curtis, and 13 points and 11
rebounds from Kenny Williams.

Georgia 88,
Fresno State 78
ATHENS, Ga. - Levi Stukes


Rodeo rides into town


Three days of pro
riding hit Lake City
this weekend.
By JOHNNA PINHOLSTER
jpinholster@lakecityreporter.com
Grab your cowboy hat and
head to the fairgrounds this
weekend. The PRCA Rodeo
circuit stops in Lake City this
Friday, Saturday and Sunday.
The 13th Annual Florida
Gateway Pro Rodeo is
organized by the Columbia
County Resources and
sponsored by local
businesses.
"It's food, fun and
entertainment from the get
go," Bob Smith, from Smitty's
Western Store said.
The rodeo will feature
barrel racing, bull riding,
team roping, tie-down calf
roping, bare-back bronc
busting, saddle-bronc riding
and steer wrestling.
Smith said that this event is
just one of many pro cowboys
and cowgirls have to win to
be able to compete in the
PRCA Finals at the end of the
year.
The winners of each event
will be announced on Sunday,
with different cowboys and
cowgirls competing each
night. The winners, Smith
said, receive prize money and
points that help them become
eligible for the finals in Las
Vegas.
On Saturday morning a
parade will start at
the Department of
Transportation office and


COURTESY PHOTO
The 13th Annual Florida Gateway Pro Rodeo comes to Lake City for three days of riding beginning
on Friday with participants, like the one above riding in last year's event, from across the country.


head down U.S. 90, ending at
the Columbia County Board
of Education Office.
Smith said the parade will
feature the One Armed
Bandit John Paine, the Lake
City Drill Team, a "Tough
Enough to Wear Pink" float
and horse enthusiasts from
Columbia County.
Saturday night's rodeo is
entitled "Pack the Stands
with Pink," where everyone
is encouraged to wear pink in
support of breast cancer
awareness Smith said.
The idea Smith said, came
from a trip to the National


Finals Rodeo in Las Vegas
last year, where all the
cowboys, cowgirls and
audience members were
encouraged to wear pink.
The specialty act this year,
Smith said, is an audience
favorite.
John Paine, the One
Armed Bandit, drives steers
and mustangs on top of a
horse trailer and, then, on
horseback, gets on top of the
trailer and
cracks a bull-whip, all with
one arm.
Paine is an eight-time
national champion for


specialty rodeo acts and will
perform all three days.
The Lake City Drill Team
will also perform this
weekend at the rodeo Smith
said. This will be the second
time performing at the rodeo
for the 2007 State of Florida
Drill Team Champions.
Proceeds from the 'Tough
Enough to Wear Pink" Golf
Tournament and Banquet will
be given to two charities on
Saturday night.
'"The money will be given
to Jeanie Blalock of First

RODEO continued on 3B


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Syracuse's Eric Devendorf shoots
against South Alabama's Carlos Smith
in Syracuse, N.Y., on Wednesday.
contributed to a deluge of 3-pointers,
finishing with a season-high 30 points
in Georgia's Victory over Fresno
State.
. The Bulldogs will play the winner
of Austin Peay-Air Force on Monday.


'Wolves

rally past

Santa Fe

in ninth

Fort White baseball
falls 10-8 in sixth
inning to Newberriy.
From staff reports

When things looked the
bleakest, the Timberwolves
were at their best
The Lake City Community
College baseball team scored
three runs in the bottom of the
ninth inning Wednesday against
Santa Fe to edge a 5-4 victory.
Trailing 4-2 going into the
ninth, Roberto Perez singled in
Mario Williams and Sam Testa
put one to right field to bring in
the game-winning runs.
Stephen Carr hit his fourth
home run of the season while
going 2-for-4 with a run and two
RBIs; Williams was 2-for-4 with
a run and a double; Testa was
1-for-5 with a pair of RBIs; Jovan
Rosa was 1-for4 with a run;
Fred Freeman was 1-for-4 with
a double; Chris Jones was
1-for-4 with a run; Perez was
1-for-4 with an RBI; and
Prentice had a run.
Nick Tyson pitched 82%
innings with three earned runs,
12 hits including two doubles
and a triple, five strikeouts, four
walks and one hit batter.
Matt Small came in for the
final 'A inning to earn the win

ROUNDUP continued on 3B


Rose confesses: 'I bet on


my team every night'


Legend comes
clean on gambling
in radio interview.
Associated Press

NEW YORK - Pete Rose
bet on the Cincinnati Reds
"every night" when he
managed them and, despite
his lifetime ban because of
gambling, would like another
chance in a major league
dugout.
"I bet on my team every
night. I didn't bet on my team
four nights a week," Rose said
Wednesday on "The Dan
Patrick Show" on ESPN
Radio.


"I bet on my team to win
every night because I love my
team, I believe in my team,"
he said. "I did everything in
my power every night to win
that game."
In a wide-ranging interview,
the banned Rose said he
thinks he should be reinstated
because "I believe I'm the best
ambassador baseball has." He
hopes a new exhibit in
Cincinnati is a sign baseball
will soften its stance toward
him.
If reinstated, the 65-year-old
Rose said he would like to
again manage in the majors.
The career hits leader also
said he supported Barry
Bonds and Mark McGwire,


who fell far short in his first
time on the Hall of Fame
ballot.
"Don't penalize McGwire
because you think other guys
are taking steroids," Rose
said.
Rose finished his career in
1986 with 4,256 lifetime hits.
He was managing the Reds in
1989 when he agreed to a
lifetime ban after an
investigation of his gambling.
The new Rose exhibit at
Great American Ball Park
includes more than 300 items
and will be up for nearly a
year. Major League Baseball
had to give permission for the
display.
"When you're in my


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Former Cincinnati Reds baseball player Pete Rose talks to
members of the media during a news conference at the opening of
an exhibit about him at the Cincinnati Reds Hall of Fame Museum
in Cincinnati on Tuesday.


position, you're happy with
anything," Rose said.
Rose, however, said he
would not be thrilled if a
future reinstatement did not
also include him becoming eli-


gible for the Hall of Fame.
Making it into Cooperstown,
he added, was no longer on
his mind.
"I quit worrying about it,"
he said.


Section B










LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2007


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
AUTO RACING
II p.m.
SPEED - Formula One, practice for
Australian Grand Prix, at Melbourne,Australia
GOLF
9:30 a.m.
TGC - European PGA Tour,TCL Classic,
first round, at Sanya, China (same-day tape)
3 p.m.
TGC - PGA Tour, Arnold Palmer
Invitational, first round, at Orlando
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Noon
CBS - Regional coverage, doubleheader,
NCAA Division I tournament, first round,
Maryland vs. Davidson and Butler vs. Old
Dominion at Buffalo, N.Y.; Boston College vs.
Texas Tech and Georgetown vs. Belmont, at
Winston-Salem, N.C.; Louisville vs. Stanford
and Texas A&M vs. Penn at Lexington, Ky.
2:40 p.m.
CBS - Regional coverage, doubleheader,
NCAA Division I tournament, first round,
Washington State vs. Oral Roberts and
Vanderbilt vs. George Washington at
Sacramento, Calif.
7 p.m.
CBS - Regional coverage, doubleheader,
NCAA Division I tournament, first round,
Duke vs. Virginia Commonwealth and
Pittsburgh vs. Wright State at Buffalo, N.Y.;
Ohio State vs. Central Connecticut State and
BYU vs.Xavier at Lexington, Ky.; Marquette vs.
Michigan State and North Carolina vs. Eastern
Kentucky at Winston-Salem, N.C.; UCLA vs.
Weber State and Indiana vs. Gonzaga at
Sacramento, Calif.
NBA BASKETBALL
8:15 p.m.
TNT - Miami at New Jersey
10:30 p.m.
TNT - LA. Lakers at Denver
TENNIS
2 p.m.
ESPN2 -ATP Masters Series/WTA Tour,
Pacific Life Open, round of 16, at Indian Wells,
Calif.
10 p.m.
ESPN2 - ATP Masters Series/WTA Tour,
Pacific Life Open, round of 16, at Indian Wells,
Calif.
2:30 a.m.
ESPN2 - ATP Masters Series/WTA Tour,
Pacific Life Open, quarterfinal, at Indian Wells,
Calif. (delayed tape)

BASKETBALL

NBA standings

EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
Toronto 36 29 .554 -
New Jersey 30 35 .462 6
NewYork 29 35 .453 6%
Philadelphia 25 40 .385 II
Boston 19 45 .297 16'/2
Southeast Division,
W L Pct GB
Washington 35 28 .556 -
Miami 34 29 .540 1
Orlando 30 36 .455 6%'
Atlanta 26 40 .394 10%'
Charlotte 24 41 .369 12
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Detroit 40 22 .645 -
Cleveland 39 25 .609 2
Chicago 39 28 .582 3%
Indiana 29 35 .453 12
Milwaukee 23 41 .359 18
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct ' GB
x-Dallas 52 10 .839 -
San Antonio 46 18 .719 7
Houston 39 25 .609 14
New Orleans 28 36 .438 25
Memphis 16 49 .246 37%'
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
Utah 43 21 .672 -
Denver 31 31 .500 II
Minnesota 28 35 .444 14%'
Portland 26 37 .413 16'2
Seattle 25 39 .391 18
Pacific Division
W L Pct GB
x-Phoenix 49 14 .778 -
LA. Lakers 33 31 .516 16%
L.A. Clippers 29 34 .460 .20
Golden State 30 36 .455 20%
Sacramento 28 36 .438 21%A
Tuesday's Games
Atlanta 104, Philadelphia 92
Cleveland 124, Sacramento 100
Miami 88, Utah 86
Minnesota 86, Indiana 81
New Jersey 112, New Orleans 108
San Antonio 93, L.A. Clippers 84
Chicago 95, Boston 87
Denver 107, Portland 99
Detroit 101, Seattle 97
Wednesday's Games
Orlando 101, Utah 90
Toronto 104, New York 94
Chicago 88, Philadelphia 87
Washington 112, Indiana 96
Charlotte II I, Sacramento 108
Boston 109,Atlanta 88
Cleveland at Memphis (n)
LA. Clippers at Houston (n)
Phoenix at Dallas (n)
Detroit at Pordand (n)
Thursday's Games
San Antonio at Milwaukee, 8 p.m.
Miami at New Jersey, 8 p.m.
LA. Lakers at Denver, 10:30 p.m.
Friday's Games
Utah at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Houston at Toronto, 7 p.m.
LA. Clippers at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
Sacramento at Miami, 7:30 p.m.
New Orleans at NewYork, 7:30 p.m.
Boston at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Detroit at Phoenix, 10 p.m.
Portland at LA. Lakers, 10:30 p.m.
Minnesota at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.


NCAA Tournament

OPENING ROUND
Tuesday
Niagara 77, Florida A&M 69
EAST REGIONAL
FIRST ROUND
Today
At Lawrence Joel Veterans Memorial
Coliseum
Winston-Salem, N.C.
Boston College (20-11) vs. Texas Tech
(21-12), 12:25 p.m.


Georgetown (26-6) vs. Belmont (23-9), 30
minutes after previous game.
Marquette (24-9) vs. Michigan State
(22-1I),7:20 p.m.
North Carolina (28-6) vs. Eastern
Kentucky (21-11I), 30 minutes after previous
game,
At ARCO Arena
Sacramento, Calif.
Washington State (25-7) vs. Oral Roberts
(23-10),2:30 p.m.
Vanderbilt (20-11) vs. George Washington
(23-8), 30 minutes after previous game.
Friday
At Spokane Memorial Arena
Spokane,Wash.
Texas (24-9) vs. New Mexico State (25-8),
7:25 p.m.
Southern California (23-11) vs. Arkansas
(21-13), 30 minutes after previous game.
SOUTH REGIONAL
FIRST ROUND
Today
At Rupp Arena
Lexington, Ky.
Louisville (23-9) vs. Stanford (18-12),
12:40 p.m.
Texas A&M (25-6) vs. Pennsylvania (22-8),
30 minutes after previous game.
Ohio State (30-3) vs. Central Connecticut
State (22-11), 7:10 p.m.
Brigham Young (25-8) vs. Xavier (24-8), 30
minutes after previous game.
Friday
At Nationwide Arena
Columbus, Ohio
Virginia (20-10) vs. Albany, N.Y. (23-9),
12:15 p.m.
Tennessee (22-10) vs. Long Beach State
(24-7), 30 minutes after previous game.
At New Orleans Arena
New Orleans
Memphis (30-3) vs. North Texas (23-10),
12:30 p.m.
Nevada (28-4) vs. Creighton (22-10), 30
minutes after previous game.
MIDWEST REGIONAL
FIRST ROUND
Today
At HSBC Arena
Buffalo, N.Y.
Maryland (24-8) vs. Davidson (29-4),
12:20 p.m.
Butler (27-6) vs. Old Dominion (24-8), 30
minutes after previous game.
Friday
At The United Center
Chicago
UNLV (28-6) vs. Georgia Tech (20-11),
12:25 p.m.
Wisconsin (29-5) vs. Texas A&M-Corpus
Christi (26-6), 30 minutes after previous
game.
At Spokane Memorial Arena
Spokane,Wash.
Notre Dame (24-7) vs. Winthrop (28-4),
2:35 p.m.
Oregon (26-7) vs. Miami (Ohio) (18-14),
30 minutes after previous game.
At New Orleans Arena
New Orleans
Arizona (20-10) vs. Purdue (21-11),
7:20 p.m.
Florida (29-5) vs. Jackson State
(21-13), 30 minutes after previous game.
WEST REGIONAL
FIRST ROUND
Today
At HSBC Arena
Buffalo, N.Y.
Duke (22-10) vs.Virginia Commonwealth
(27-6), 7:10 p.m.
Pittsburgh (27-7) vs. Wright State (23-9),
30 minutes after previous game.
At ARCO Arena
Sacramento, Calif.
UCLA (26-5) vs. Weber State (20-1 I),
7:25 p.m.
Indiana (20-10) vs. Gonzaga (23-10), 30
minutes after previous game.
Friday
At The United Center
Chicago
Kansas (30-4) vs. Florida A&M-Niagara
winner, 7:10 p.m.
Kentucky (21-11) vs.Villanova (22-10), 30
minutes after previous game.
At Nationwide Arena
Columbus, Ohio
Virginia Tech (21-1 I1) vs. Illinois (23-1 I1),
7:10 p.m.
Southern Illinois (27-6) vs. Holy Cross
(25-8), 30 minutes after previous game.

NIT

First Round
NORTH
Tuesday
Florida State 77,Toledo 61
Michigan 68, Utah State 58
Mississippi State 82, MVSU 63
Wednesday
Providence at Bradley (n)
EAST
Tuesday
. West Virginia 74, Delaware State 50
N.C. State 63, Drexel 56
Massachusetts 89,Alabama 87, OT
Marist 67, Oklahoma State 64
WEST
Wednesday
Georgia 88, Fresno State 78
Kansas State 59,Vermont 57
Hofstra at DePaul (n)
Austin Peay at Air Force (n)
SOUTH
Wednesday
Clemson 64, ETSU 57
Syracuse 79, South Alabama 73
Mississippi 73,Appalachian State 59
San Diego State at Missouri State (n)
Second Round
NORTH
Today
Michigan (22-12) at Florida State
(21-12), 7 p.m.
Saturday
Mississippi State (19-13) vs. Providence-
Bradley winner,TBA
EAST
Today
Massachusetts (24-8) at West Virginia
(23-9), 9 p.m.
Friday
N.C. State (19-15) vs. Marist (25-8),
9:30 p.m.


WEST
Monday
Austin Peay-Air Force winner vs. Fresno
State-Georgia winnerTBA
Hofstra-DePaul winner vs. Vermont-
Kansas State winner,TBA
SOUTH
Monday
ETSU-Clemson winner vs. Appalachian
State-Mississippi winner,TBA
San Diego State-Missouri State winner vs.
South Alabama-Syracuse winner,TBA


BASEBALL

Spring training

Late Tuesday
Cincinnati 6, N.Y.Yankees 3
Oakland 7, San Francisco 4
Wednesday's Games
Cleveland (ss) 8,Toronto (ss) I
Detroit 2, N.Y. Mets 0
Houston 4,Atlanta 2
Pittsburgh 3, Boston 2
Florida 5, Baltimore I
Washington 2, St. Louis 2, tie, 10 inn.
Cleveland (ss) 0,Toronto (ss) 0, tie, 10 inn.
Texas 9,San Diego 9, 10 inn.
Kansas City 6, Colorado 2
L.A.Angels 4, San Francisco 3
Chicago White Sox I I, Milwaukee 8
Cincinnati 2,Tampa Bay I
N.Y.Yankees 4, Minnesota I.
Today's Games
Florida vs. Houston at Kissimmee,
1:05 p.m.
Baltimore vs. Minnesota at Fort Myers,
1:05 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers vs. St. Louis at Jupiter,
1:05 p.m.
Cincinnati (ss) vs. Pittsburgh (ss) at
Bradenton, 1:05 p.m.
Texas vs.Arizona atTucson,Ariz., 4:05 p.m.
Oakland vs. Colorado at Tucson, Ariz.,
4:05 p.m.
L.A. Angels vs. Milwaukee at Phoenix,
4:05 p.m.
Seattle (ss) vs. Chicago Cubs at Mesa,Ariz.,
4:05 p.m.
San Francisco (ss) vs. Kansas City at
Surprise,Ariz., 4:05 p.m.
Toronto vs. Philadelphia at Clearwater,
7:05 p.m.
Detroit vs. Washington (ss) at Viera,
7:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay vs. Cleveland at Winter Haven,
7:05 p.m.
Pittsburgh (ss) vs. Cincinnati (ss) at
Sarasota, 7:05 p.m.
Washington (ss) vs. L.A. Dodgers (ss) at
Vero Beach, 7:05 p.m.
Boston vs. N.Y. Mets at Port St. Lucie,
7:10 p.m.
Atlanta vs. N.Y.Yankees atTampa,7:15 p.m.
San Francisco (ss) vs. Seattle (ss) at Peoria,
Ariz., 10:05 p.m.
Friday's Games
Washington vs. Cleveland at Winter
Haven, 12:35 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees vs. Houston at Kissimmee,
1:05 p.m.
Toronto vs. Cincinnati at Sarasota,
1:05 p.m.
Pittsburgh vs.Tampa Bay at St. Petersburg,
1:05 p.m.
Philadelphia vs. Detroit at Lakeland,
1:05 p.m.
Minnesota vs. Baltimore at Fort
Lauderdale, 1:05 p.m.
Boston vs. LA. Dodgers at Vero Beach,
1:10 p.m.
Kansas City vs. Seattle at Peoria, Ariz.,
4:05 p.m.
Colorado vs. San Francisco at Scottsdale,
Ariz., 4:05 p.m.
Milwaukee vs. L.A. Angels at Tempe, Ariz.,
4:05 p.m.
Chicago Cubs vs. Chicago White Sox at
Tucson,Ariz., 4:05 p.m.
N.Y. Mets vs.'Florida at Jupiter, 7:05 p.m.
St. Louis vs.Atlanta at Kissimmee, 7:05 p.m.
San Diego vs. Texas at Surprise, Ariz.,
10:05 p.m.
Arizona vs. Oakland at Phoenix, 10:05 p.m.

GOLF

Golf week

PGATOUR
Arnold Palmer Invitational
Site- Orlando
Schedule:Today-Sunday.
Course: Bay Hill Club and Lodge (7,137
yards, par 70).
Purse: $5.5 million. Winner's share:
$990,000.
Television: Golf Channel (Today-Sunday,
3-6 p.m., 8:30-'1:30 p.m.) and NBC (Saturday-
Sunday, 2:30-6 p.m.).
CHAMPIONS TOUR
AT&T Champions Classic
Site: Santa Clarita, Calif.
Schedule: Friday-Sunday.
Course: Valencia Country Club (6,973
yards, par 72).
Purse: $1.6 million. Winner's share:
$240,000.
Television: Golf Channel (Friday, 6:30-
8:30 p.m.; Saturday, 12:30-2:30 a.m., 6:30-
9 p.m.; Sunday, 1-3:30 a.m., 6:30-9 p.m.;
Monday, I-3:30 a.m.).
LPGATOUR
Next event: Safeway International, March
22-25, Superstition Mountain Golf and
Country Club, Superstition Mountain,Ariz.
Last week. Meaghan Francella won the
MasterCard Classic on Monday in Mexico in
her sixth career LPGATour start, beating two-
time defending champion Annika Sorenstam
with a birdie on the fourth hole of a playoff in
the rain-delayed tournament.
OTHERTOURNAMENTS
Women
FUTURES TOUR: Greater Tampa
Duramed Futures Classic, Friday-Sunday,
Summerfield Crossings Golf Club, Riverview.
On the Net http://wwwfuturestour.com

HOCKEY

NHL games

Tuesday's Games
Carolina 3, Florida I
Ottawa 3, N.Y. Rangers 2
Pittsburgh 5, Buffalo 4, SO
Montreal 5, N.Y. Islanders 3
Toronto 3,Tampa Bay 2
Detroit 5, Nashville 2
Dallas 3, Philadelphia 2
Minnesota 3,Vancouver 2, OT
San Jose 7, Chicago I
Wednesday's Games
Detroit 4, Nashville 2
Pittsburgh 3, New Jersey 0
Calgary at Colorado (n)


Columbus at Anaheim (n)
Today's Games
Washington at Boston, 7 p.m.
Atlanta at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
New Jersey at Carolina, 7:30 p.m.
Buffalo at Florida, 7:30 p.m.
N.Y. Islanders at Ottawa, 7:30 p.m.
Calgary at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Minnesota at Edmonton, 9 p.m.
San Jose at Phoenix, 10 p.m.
St. Louis at Vancouver, 10 p.m.
Chicago at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m.


PREP ROUNDUP



CHS tennis drops matches


From staff reports


Columbia High's boys
tennis team had its four-
match win streak snapped at
Eastside High on Tuesday.
The Rams (5-2) nipped the
Tigers, 4-3.
Mallory Leighty won the
No. 1 singles, rebounding
from a 6-7 (5-7) loss in the
first set to beat John Million
6-1 in the second set and 10-5
in the tiebreaker.
Kyle Townsend dominated
Miguel Asse at No. 4, winning
6-1, 6-3.
Eastside won the other
singles matches: Wendall
Stainsby defeated Tyler Neal
6-0, 6-2 at No. 2; Scott Arrighi
d. Zach Waters 4-6, 7-5, 10-6 at
No. 3; Jordan Goldberg d.
Pete King 6-0, 6-1 at No. 5.
Waters and Townsend won
the No. 2 doubles over Asse
and Goldberg, 8-1, but
Eastside's Million and
Stainsby held on to the match
with an 8-6 win over Leighty
and Neal at No. 1.
Columbia's boys (4-5)
played Buchholz High on
Wednesday and will join the
girls in a 3:30 p.m. match at
Baker County High on Friday.
Columbia's girls tennis


team lost 6-1 to Forest High in
Ocala on Monday.
Forest swept the singles
matches: No. 1 Terri Thomas
d. Leandra Neal 6-3, 6-3; No. 2
Landyn Scudder d. Samantha
Turner 6-2, 6-2; No. 3
Savannah Sapienza d.
Katherine Witt 6-0, 6-4; No. 4
Kelly Chambers d. Lindsey
Rich 6-1, 6-1; No. 5 Eve Lewis
d. Haley Lipthrott 6-1, 7-5.
Columbia's Neal and
Turner won the No. 1 doubles
over Thomas and Scudder,
8-2. Sapienza and Chambers
beat Witt and Rich in No. 2
doubles, 8-6.
The Lady Tigers (2-5) host
Vanguard High at 3:30 p.m.
today.

Columbia track

Columbia track athletes
participated in the Bolles
Bulldog Classic in
Jacksonville on Friday.
Tasheona Harris ran the
100 meter (13.58) and long
jumped 14-10. Natasha Allen
ran the 100 in 14.23.
Shannon Cheers (29.03)
and Doneze Ross (29.21) ran
the 200 meter. Ross (13-10)
also competed in the long
jump. Cassandra Smith


clocked a 1:04.14 in the 300
meter hurdle.
Cheers, Allen, Ross and
Harris ran the 4x100 relay in
54.53.
Tiffany Paris ran a 1:12.93
in the 400 meter and tripled
jumped 24-11. Phoebe
Johnson (2:40) and Pearla
Valdez (2:48) ran the 800
meter. The three were joined
by Hillary Leonard in the
4x400 (4:52.94) and 4x800
(11:07.26) relays.
Marquetta Anderson had a
28-9 in the shot put, while Liz
Coker had a 26-5.
For the boys, Talin Jones
(23.42) and Jon Jenkins
(24.41) ran the 200 meter and
were joined by Charles
Jenkins and Tiger Powell for
- a 45.88 in the 4x100.
Jordan Lehman ran a 57.55
400 meter and anchored the
4x400 (3:52.22) behind
Jermaine Gaddis, Ben Rigdon
and Josh Smith.
John Rolle high jumped 5-6
and Powell long jumped 19-5.
Joe Bradshaw threw the
discus 103-3. Sampson Genus
had a 42-8 in the shot and
James David had a 41-8.
The Tigers travel to the
Episcopal High Invitational at
1 p.m. today..


By DOUG FERGUSON
Associated Press

ORLANDO - Bay Hill has
a new scorecard and a new
name for the tournament.
One change could lead to a
few complaints, the other
leaves little room for debate.
The Arnold Palmer
Invitational has a nice ring to it.
"My daughters are
responsible for: that," Palmer
said Wednesday. "While I was
playing, I would have never
allowed it. That was first
stipulation for not making any


name change. I liked the Bay
Hill Invitational logo. But
when I stopped playing, that
sort of opened the door for
the possible name change."
As for the scorecard, it
might take four days for
opinions to formulate.
Wanting to make Bay Hill
more of a challenge, Palmer
has changed par 5s at Nos. 4
and 16 into par 4s, making the
course play as a 70. The low
score still wins, but the 16th.
used to be the last spot
among the final five holes
where players could think


about making birdie.
"Now the party's over after
the 13th," Joey Sindelar said.
'That last hour will be torture."
That's not to suggest the
other holes will be a picnic.
Dean Wilsdn was stunned
to see a first cut of rough on
the tee box, with the teeing
grounds so narrow they are
shaped like capsules. The
rough is uniform and up to the
ankles, and the grass around
the bunker in front of the sec-
ond green is so thick that
from the tee, players have a
hard time seeing the sand.


GOLF REPORTS


Carter team is tough enough


The Tough Enough To
Wear Pink Golf Tournament
on Saturday had a field of 125.
The team of Todd Carter,
Nick Slay and Sue Ebert won
the top honors with a 52. The
team of Sylvie Dufour, Yves
and Lise Pelletier came in
second with a 53. The team of
Casey Clemons, Eric Scerbo
and Carl Moesching came in
third with a 54.
Kevin Huesman won the
Precision Drive contest, while
Jim Poole won Longest Putt
and Carl Moesching won
Closest to the Pin in 2.
We would like to thank the
Columbia County Resources
for letting us host their golf
tournament.
The Columbia Youth
Football Association St.
Patrick's Day Golf
Tournament is Saturday.
Format for the 27-hole
event is nine holes best ball,
nine holes scramble and nine
holes alternate shot. There
can be no more than a
10-stroke difference in handi-
cap on the two-person teams.


QUAIL HEIGHTS
Carl Ste-Marie
www.quoilheights.com


There will be a shotgun start
at 8:30 a.m.
Entry fee is $70 per person,
plus a $20 optional skins
game, with cash payouts and
prizes.
In regular weekly events,
there were 46 players in the
Men's Day Blitz on March 7.
Jeff Mowrey and Donnie
Thomas tied for top honors in
the A division with +7. Jerry
West came in third with +4.
Carl Ste-Marie came in fourth
with +3.
Rocky Ryals won top
honors in the B division with
+11. Steve Patterson came in
second with +9. Billy Ray
Smith came in third with +8.
Curtis Davis and Robert
Laplante tied for fourth with
+3.
Don Horn won top honors
in the C division with +11.
Bobby Williams came in sec-
ond with +10. Joe Herring


came in third with +8. Tim
Tortorice came in fourth with
+7.
Earl Strickland won top
honors in the D division with
+9. Vic Morales came in
second with +6. Chuck
Sanders came in third with
+3. Chuck White came in
fourth with +1.
The Pot Hole was Creeks
No. 3. There were four
birdies, so the $58 pot carries
over to today.
There were 21 players in
the Top-of-the-Hill Blitz on
March 5. Gary Croxton won
top honors in the A division
with +6. Jack Tuggle and Al
Cohoon tied for second with
+1.
Duane Rogers won top hon-
ors in the B division with +9.
Chuck White came in second
with +4. Glenn Sanders and
Charles Wilkinson tied for
third with +3.
Upcoming events:
. U Saturday, St. Patrick's
Day Tournament;
* March 24, Christ Central
Ministries.


Charity tourney on March 23


The Southern Oaks Men's
Blitz on Saturday was won by
the team of Lyons, West and
Peters, who came away with
the victory thanks to the
strong play of their captain
Terry Hunter.
Hunter also was a winner in
the Saturday skins with a
birdie on the intimidating
par-3 No. 5.
Bruce Gibson followed
with a nice birdie of his own
on the par-4 No. 8, but it was
Dennis Crawford who stole
the show with two gimme


SOUTHERN OAKS
Jarrod Sullivan
jsullivan8664@bellsouth.net


birdies on the final two
par 3s.
We would like to thank all
the participants from this past
weekend and would like to
invite everyone to join us
every Saturday and Sunday at
8 a.m.
The Friends of Drug
Treatment Courts, Inc. is
sponsoring a charity golf


tournament on March 23 at
Southern Oaks. Format is
four-person scramble, with
registration at 8:45 a.m. and a
shotgun start at 10 a.m. Three
sponsorship levels are
available and contributions
are tax deductible.
For details, call Mike
Burroughs at 758-0519 or
Chase Moses at 365-2908.
There are several other
tournaments coming up in
the months of March and
April. Please call the golf shop
at 752-2266 for details.


Palmer makes namesake



tournament a bit tougher


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421









LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2007


JV ROUNDUP



Tigers top Suwannee,


demolish Eastside


From staff reports

Columbia High's junior
varsity baseball team won a
nail-biter and a blowout in the
lead-up to the Bulldog Spring
Tournament in Live Oak. The
Tigers (6-1) play at 7 p.m.
today
The Tigers beat Suwannee
High, 2-1, at home on March 8
and demolished Eastside
High, 18-3, in Gainesville on
Friday.
Josh Hook started against
Suwannee and pitched two
scoreless innings with one hit,
one walk and four strikeouts.
Zach Dicks got the win with
six hits, one run and two
strikeouts in four innings.
Codey Blackwell struck out
two and walked one in one
inning to earn the save.
Columbia scored the
winning run in the sixth
inning. Blackwell was hit by a
pitch and Blake King singled
him to third base. Steven
Schneiders brought in the
ruin with a sacrifice fly.
Jeremy Dohrn had two hits
including a double and the
first RBI, scoring Calvin Lee.
Clint Spencer, Daniel
Guzman, Jameson Rossin,
Schneiders and King had hits.
Dohrn was the winning
pitcher against Eastside with
one hit and three strikeouts in
two innings. Schneiders
(three hits, one run, one
strikeout) and Zachary
Shubert (three hits, one walk,
two runs, one strikeout) each
pitched an inning.
Cameron Sweat (triple, four
RBI, run scored) and Rossin


(home run, double, three
RBIs, three runs scored) had
three hits each. Dohrn (triple,
RBI, two runs scored) had two
hits.
Guzman (triple, two RBIs,
run scored), Dicks (run
scored), Hook (two RBIs,
three runs scored) and
Blackwell (double, two RBIs,
run scored) had hits.
Both Brandon Scott and.
Lee had an RBI and scored a
run. Spencer scored two runs.
Corey Waller also scored.

Lady Tigers softball
Columbia's junior varsity
softball team beat Gainesville
High 3-2 on Friday. The Lady
Tigers fell to Fort White High
on Monday.
Katie Sweat pitched all five
innings with four walks and
six strikeouts. Sweat also
scored the winning run in the
third inning.
Amanda Roach and Shelby
Wentworth scored runs in the
second inning. Holly
Crumpton had two RBIs and
Wentworth had one.
Columbia (6-6-1) plays at
Santa Fe High at 6 p.m. today.

Fort White softball
The Fort White junior
varsity softball team recently
fell to Buchholz High and
Lafayette County High, but
improved to 6-2 on the
season.
The Indians' season has
been highlighted by two
consecutive victories over
county rival Columbia High,


and wins against Dixie County
High, Williston High,
Suwannee High and Hamilton
County High.
"We have continued to have
a strong defense," Fort White
coach David Nieland said.
'These Lady Indians came
back and defeated Buchholz,
Suwannee and Columbia in
five days of play, having
completed the sweep of
Columbia for the first time
ever in JV history."
Pitcher Alex Nieland has
led the Indians with an ERA of
.77, backed up by Starlett
Delaney, who has an .14 ERA
in 15 innings.
The Indians' bats have been
active, as well, with Nieland
batting .706 with five doubles
and a triple; Kayla Williams
batting .536 with two home
runs and only two strikeouts;
Brett Sealy batting .515 with
three doubles, two triples, two
home runs and six RBIs;
Danielle Gainey earning three
triples and a home run.
Bethany Cox, Meagan
Swanson, Tabitha Odom and
Lindsey Bigelow all have
doubles and Sarah Conner
has a triple.
Kirsten Bass and Kali
Montgomery and Jessica
Robinson have added hits and
put in solid defense for the
Indians, too.
"This, by far, has been the
best team I have ever
coached," Nieland said. "And
no matter what the future
brings, I am proud to have
been a part of a team that has
the heart and drive to do their
best every time out."


ROUNDUP: Indians fall at Newberry


Continued From Page 1B
with one strikeout and one walk.
Small is now 4-1 with five saves.
The Timberwolves (26-9-1,
4-2 Mid-Florida Conference)
host Glen Oaks Community
College today at 2:30 p.m.

Fort White baseball
The Fort White varsity
baseball team fell 10-8 to at-
Newberry High on
Wednesday after losing an
early lead and battling back to
a tie late in the game.
Brian Stalnaker hit a
two-run home run in the top of
the first inning to put Fort
White out in front, but the
Panthers responded with three
runs in the top of the third.
The Indians tied the game in
the bottom of the inning, but
Newberry took back the lead
with a run in the fourth and


another in the fifth and two in
the sixth.
Fort White put five more
runs on the board by the end
of the sixth to tie the game 8-8,
but Newberry pulled away
with two runs in the sixth.
"We played a lot better
(Wednesday) than we had the
day before," Fort White head
coach Mike Rizzi said.. 'They
battled back when we were
down 5-3 and tied the game.
I'm real proud of the way they
battled back like that."
Stalnaker was 1-for-4 with a
home run and two RBIs; Matt
Hatcher was 4-for-4 with one
run, two doubles and an RBI;
Dakota Carpenter was 3-for-4
with two runs and an RBI;
Cory Capallia was 2-for-4 with
a run, a double and two RBIs;
George Demko was 2-for-3
with a run; and Jared Gilmer


was 1-for-3 with a run.
Ben Douglass started on the
mound for the Indians and
Matt Hatcher was credited
with the loss.
It was the team's fourth.
straight loss after falling 12-2
in five innings to Union County
on Monday.
Stalnaker was 2-for-2; Heath
Huesman was 2-for-2; Thomas
Barnes was 1-for-2; and
Carpenter was 1-for-3.
Bryan Little started and
Douglass took the loss.
"We were leading going into
the bottom of the fifth and the
wheels just fell off," Rizzi said.
"We had six errors and gave
up 11 runs in the fifth and they
just rolled over us."
The Indians (3-9, 3-3 District
5-3A) look to go over .500 in the
district when they host RK.
Yonge School on Friday at 7 p.m.


RODEO: Miss Rodeo crowned Sunday


Continued From Page 1B
Coast News for the Buddy
Check 12 program and to the
American Cancer Society for
Breast Cancer Awareness,"
Lynda Dowling, Complex
Manager for Columbia County
Resources, said.
The Third Annual Miss
Florida Gateway Pro Rodeo
winner will be crowned on
Sunday during intermission
Dowling said.
'"There are 20 .contestants
ages five-21 competing for
scholarships, savings bonds,
belt buckles and tiaras,"
Dowling said.
The girls are judged during
speech, interviewing and
horsemanship competitions
respectively.
Smith encourages
residents of Lake City to show
the cowboys and
cowgirls some southern
hospitality.
"Many of these cowboys
and cowgirls fly in for this
event so if you see them at a
motel or out in Lake City
welcome them," Smith said.
Smith says this is a family
event with games and a
bounce house for kids and a
Shriner's rodeo on Sunday at
one o'clock for handicapped
children.


Tickets are $10 in advance
and $13 at the gate for adults.
Children ages six-12 are $5
and five and under are
free. Tickets can be
purchased at The Money Man
on Main Blvd., Smitty's


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
I POCUR I


www.jumble.com
[T[QUL~


Western Store on U.S. 90
West, Wilson Ace Hardware
on Baya Ave. and any S&S
Food Store.
The rodeo starts at 8 p.m. on
Friday and 'Saturday and
2 p.m. on Sunday.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Henri Arnold and Mike Argirion


Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


155
Answer:
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's I Jumbles: BEFOG ADMIT KILLER INDOOR
I Answer: What the sugar daddy did when she shopped 3-15
for shoes - "FOOTED" THE BILL


RECREATION ROUNDUP


COURTESY PHOTO

CYSA 11-12 champions
O'Neal Roofing Nailers are the Columbia Youth Soccer Association 11-12 league champions with a
record of 7-0. Team members (front row, from left) are Blair Yorke, Christian Faulkner, Carson Tilton,
Josh Thomas and Chris Richardson. Back row (from left) are Tyler 'Kenny' Bethea, Dylan Sessions,
Zach Horne, Ty Williams, Alexis Adams, Danielle Gonzalez, Falynn Foxx, Kaitlyn Daniels and coach
Skibo Home. Luke Soucinick, Alex Milton and Joey Klenk also are on the team.



Lake City U-14 team


takes tournament title


From staff reports

Lake City Volleyball's
14-and-under team won the
Gold Division Championship
in the first GJAC-Lake City
tournament played in Lake
City.
Lake City won all three
preliminary matches in two
games and won 25-17, 25-22
iri the championship.
Team captain Jessie Milton
and Laurie Kirby, both
setters, led the team in assists
and service points. Kirby total
18 service points and 15 aces
for the tournament, while.
Milton had 20 service points
and seven aces.
Haley dicks and Beth
Williams are outside hitters.
Dicks had 15 kills, three


ACROSS


1 Core
5 Selflessly
10 Ms. Fawcett
12 Illinois city
13 Pungent
14 Fix a shoe
15 Tijuana coin
16 Forest
creature
18 Expected any
time
19 Castle wall
23 Tarzan's nanny
26 Household
member
27 Tech
magazine
30 Foresight
32 Rub against
34 Obtain via
shakedown
35 String
instrument
36 Gape open
37 Type of stripe
38 Showed the way
39 Relieve


blocks, 10 service points and
five aces. Williams had eight
kills, five service points and
nine aces.
Arden Sibbernsen and
Taylor Messer are middle
hitters. Sibbernsen had 10
kills, 14 blocks, 10 service
points and four aces. Messer
had nine kills, 11 blocks, 13
service points and eight
aces.
Libero Donna Turman had
nine digs and four assists.
"We truly played as a
team," coach Teresa Sisco
said. "We stayed focused and
kept'- . communicating..
(Coach).l"DallIas'S-.p and I;
couldn't have been any
prouder of these girls. They
are the definition of
teamwork."


42 Overalls part
45 Diligent
insect
46 Hot tub
inlets
50 Depleted
(2 wds.)
53 Spotted
animal
55 Icy
downpours
56 Cookbook entry
57 Salon tint
58 Frat letters

DOWN


Glazier's unit
Lens
opening
Go crowding in
Leia's
rescuer
Born as
Cry
of delight
Multiplied
"Instead of"
word


Epiphany softball

Epiphany Catholic's soft-
ball team opened the season
with a 23-0 road win over
Holy Spirit Catholic School in
Jacksonville.
The performance by the
Lady Eagles may have
frightened Holy Rosary
of Jacksonville, which
forfeited tto Epiphany on
March 2.
Erin Anderson pitched a
three-inning one-hitter
against Holy Spirit. She
walked two and struck out
seven. Courtney Wood was
the catfhei.'"' -. ""
Kristin Sharp was 3-for-4 at
the plate and Dani Davis
and Kali Kitaif were both
2-for-3.


Answer to Previous Puzzle

REMAP FAUNA
ANALOG VERGED
PA J AMA E IGH TS
SET EGO
BAS LEARN JAB
RUT OAR YOGA
OPOSSUM OVAL
K A RO I T I TUITS
A I MS EAR AH A
WR Y VISTA LAM

POLICE VIOLET
ARENAS ENDIVE
LOSER GAPED


9 Type of lock
10 Vain fellow
11 Water source
12 Get ready
17 Nose-bag
morsel


20 Potential oaks
21 On the wane
22 Beginner
23 Livy's hello
24 Elf
25 Is, to Pedro
28 Lofty
29 McClurg of
sitcoms
31 Des Moines
locale
32 Crop duster
33 Wrap up
37 Groaner,
maybe
40 Drains, as
energy
41 Cockpit button
42 Wild
country
43 Castaway's
refuge
44 "- here
long?"
47 He directed
Marion
48 Exceeds
49 Sault - Marie
51 Study
52 Hagen of "The
Other"
54 Fair grade


� 2007 by NEA, Inc.


GET MORE in the new "Just Right Crossword Puzzles"
series from Quill Driver. Call 800-605-7176.


Page Editor: Chris White, 754-0420


. v










LAKE CITY REPORTER BASKETBALL THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2007


Both Tar Heels on top, but men edge women in academics


By TRAVIS REED
Associated Press

ORLANDO - North Carolina was
the only school to get No. 1 seeds in
both the NCAA men's and women's
basketball tournaments this year.
It was also one of the few places
where the men beat the women in
the classroom.
Women's basketball tournament
teams continued to outscore the
men's field across the board in


academics, according to a study
released Wednesday of four
freshman classes entering from
1996-2000.
Nearly all (97 percent) graduated
at least 60 percent of their players,
compared with 52 percent of the
men's teams, according to research
from Richard Lapchick, head of the
University of Central Florida's
Institute for Diversity and Ethics in
Sport.
But three of the 23 schools that


made both tournaments saw the
men's teams academically
outperform the women. Besides
North Carolina, that happened at
Michigan State and Xavier.
All but one of the four No. 1 seeds
in the women's NCAA basketball
tournament graduated at least
90 percent of their players, while only
one of the top four teams in the men's
tournament (Florida) hit that mark.
Ninety-one percent of women's
players at Duke and Connecticut


received degrees in the period
studied, along with 100 percent of
players at Tennessee. North
Carolina was worst among the
winningest women's teams with a
56 percent graduation rate.
Two of the men's No. 1 seeds -
Ohio State (38 percent) and Kansas
(45 percent) - were worse than that.
North Carolina men graduated
70 percent of the time, while all Florida
men's players received diplomas.
NCAA spokesman Chuck Wynne


said the women's high graduation
rates were encouraging, but "we
hope to improve on them even more
in the coming years."
The statistics allow each entering
class six years to graduate, and take
into account students who transfer
and get a diploma at another
institution.
Holy Cross was the only school
that made both tournaments and
graduated all men's and women's
players in the period studied.


NCAA Women
GREENSBORO REGIONAL
First Round
Saturday
AtThe Galen Center
Los Angeles
Louisville (26-7) vs. BYU (23-9), 8 p.m.
Arizona State (28-4) vs. UC Riverside
(21-10), 30 minutes after previous game
Sunday
At The Breslin Student Events Center
East Lansing, Mich.
Vanderbilt (27-5) vs. Delaware State
(20-12), Noon
Bowling Green (29-3) vs. Oklahoma State
(20-10), 30 minutes after previous game
Michigan State (23-8) vs. Delaware
(26-5), 7 p.m.
Rutgers (22-8) vs. East Carolina
(19-13), 30 minutes after previous game
At The RBC Center
Raleigh, N.C.
Duke (30-1) vs. Holy Cross (15-17),
7 p.m.
Temple (24-7) vs. Nebraska (22-9), 30
minutes after previous game
DAYTON REGIONAL
First Round
Saturday
At Frank Erwin Center
Austin,Texas
Oklahoma (26-4) vs. Southeast Missouri
State (24-7), Noon
Marquette (25-6) vs. Louisiana-Lafayette
(25-8), 30 minutes after previous game
At Maples Pavilion
Stanford, Calif.
Middle Tennessee (29-3) vs. Gonzaga
(24-9), 8 p.m.
Ohio State (28-3) vs. Marist (27-5), 30
minutes after previous game
Sunday
At The Hartford Civic Center
Hartford, Conn.
Mississippi (21-10) vs.TCU (21-10), Noon
Maryland (27-5) vs. Harvard (15- 2), 30
minutes after previous game
At The Petersen Events Center
Pittsburgh
Tennessee (28-3) vs. Drake (14-18),
7 p.m.
Pittsburgh (23-8) vs.James Madison (27-5),
30 minutes after previous game
DALLAS REGIONAL
First Round
Saturday
At Williams Arena
Minneapolis
Iowa State (25-8) vs. Washington
(18-12), Noon
Georgia (25-6) vs. Belmont (25-6), 30
minutes after previous game
Georgia Tech (20-11) vs. DePaul
(19-12),8 p.m.
Oral Roberts University (22-10) vs.
Purdue (28-5), 30 minutes after previous game
At The Galen Center
Los Angeles
Texas A&M (24-6) vs. Texas Arlington
(24-8), 2 p.m.
George Washington (26-3) vs. Boise State
(24-8), 30 minutes after previous game
Sunday
At The Petersen Events Center
Pittsburgh
California (23-8) vs. Notre Dame
(19-1 I), Noon
North Carolina (30-3) vs. Prairie View
(19-13), 30 minutes after previous game
FRESNO REGIONAL
First Round
Saturday
At Frank Erwin Center
Austin,Texas
Xavier (26-7) vs. West Virginia (20-10),
8 p.m.
LSU (26-7) vs. North Carolina-Asheville
(21 -11), 30 minutes after previous game
At Maples Pavilion
Stanford, Calif.
Old Dominion (24-8) vs. Florida State
(22-9), 2 p.m.
Stanford (28-4) vs. Idaho State (17-13), 30
minutes after previous game
Sunday
At The Hartford Civic Center
Hartford, Conn.
New Mexico (24-8) vs. Wisconsin-Green
Bay (28-3), 7 p.m.
Connecticut (29-3) vs. UMBC (16-16), 30
minutes after previous game
At The RBC Center
Raleigh, N.C.
North Carolina State (23-9) vs. Robert
Morris (24-7), Noon
Baylor (25-7) vs. Chattanooga (25-7), 30
minutes after previous game
FINAL FOUR
At Quicken Loans Arena
Cleveland
National Semifinals
Sunday,April I
Dallas champion vs. Dayton champion
Fresno champion vs. Greensboro champion
National Championship
Tuesday,April 3

Women's NIT
First Round
Wednesday
Jackson State atTulane (n)
Illinois-Chicago at Minnesota (n)
Montana at Utah (n)
Today
Bucknell at Hartford, 7 p.m.
Dartmouth at Seton Hall, 7 p.m.
High Point at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
Coppin State at St.Joseph's, 7 p.m.
Kentucky at Oakland (Mich.), 7 p.m.
ETSU at Western Carolina, 7 p.m.
Long Island U. at lona, 7:30 p.m.
Davidson at UAB, 8 p.m.
Murray at Arkansas State, 8:05 p.m.
Rice at Illinois State, 8:05 p.m.
Stephen F.Austin at So. Illinois, 8:05 p.m.
Nevada at Wyoming, 9 p.m.
UC Santa Barbara at San Diego, 10 p.m.


8$ 1088 Buy in bulk
88 4-1/2" pot g 18-pack and save


Assorted Annuals
*Choose from several popular varieties #60669


Let's Build Something Together


Landscaper Annuals
*Several varieties to choose from
#97779


$59810" pot
Annual
Hanging Baskets
*Choose from many
varieties .Instant color
for porch, patio or deck ,
#90639
10" Annual Premium
Hanging Baskets
#94004 $8.98


$298 $1198
6" pot . | | 10" pot


Heather Mexican
*Densely leaved evergreen blooms entire season
#95166


off


Discount taken as register. . i-- l
Offer valid 3/15,'07-3/18107. See store for details;


SPECIAL


$0 97 5,000 sq. ft.
Sta-Green� St. Augustine
Weed and Feed
#93244




YOUR HC_.E


New Guinea Impatiens Pre-Potted Planter
*Striking foliage with continuously blooming
flowers in a wide variety of colors #53038







in/

- .
'Discount iaken arreglster Offer valid /tS/07-a'8/07.
Excludes pre-p Ated plaiter, See "torafordetails.


I


now
$1297 5,000 sq. ft.
was $1444
Scotts� Starter Fertilizer
*Provides every grass seed the
same nutrition #71012


$6375 Ibs.
Bayer Advanced'"
2-in-1 Rose & Flower Care
*Feed and protects in one easy step
#67672


$3 921 cu. ft.
Sta-Green� Flower and Vegetable
Planting Mix
*High in organic matter to improve soil
texture #86633


SATURDAY, MARCH 17, 2007

*9am *lam .lpm *3pm
Prize drawing at the end of each clinic for the
completed container rl,99 See store for details,


$1997q nOW SnPECIA LVALUJE
$19 qua $f6498
Bayer Advanced'" $6498
Concentrate Tree & was $7998
Shrub Insect Control Lawn and Garden Cart
#1200 lb. loading capacity
*13" pneumatic wheels #129180


550 each
45mm Red/Charcoal Paver
*8"L x 4"W x 1-7/8"H #123114


For mth Lo w%-nearest yo, cai 14300-93I-4416 or visit us online at Lowescom
Prices may vary after 3/18/07 if there are market variations. "Was" prices in this advertisement were in effect on 3/08/07, and may vary based on Lowe's Everyday Low Price policy. See store for details regarding product warranties. We reserve the right to
limit quantities. CONTAINER GARDEN CLINIC: NO PURCHASE OR PAYMENT OF ANY KIND NECESSARY TO ENTER OR WIN. VOID WHERE PROHIBITED. Open only to legal residents of the United States who are 18 years of age or older at the time
of entry. To enter, fill out official entry form completely and submit in container provided at the Container Garden clinic held at select Lowe's stores from 3/1/07 - 5/6/07 Limit one (1) entry per person. One (1) prize will be awarded by a random drawing
at each Container Garden clinic. Entrant must be present to win. Prize is one (1) completed container garden created by the Lowe's instructor at the clinic (Approx. Retail Value $50). Odds of winning depend on number of eligible entries received.
Promotion Sponsor: Lowe's Companies, Inc., 1000 Lowe's Blvd, Mooresville, NC, 28117.02007 by Lowe's�. All rights reserved. Lowe's and the gable design are registered trademarks of LF, LLC. 070392-1
001/7039211021


SPECIALVALUE!

4 days only

GET 5

BAGS FOR






Red Colored Mulch
*2 cu. It. per bag #85281
D0 count taken at reg.ste, Offer valid
-1 03'1,0T38'0 Sea store lor aetails


now spmcmL

$398 each
was 4 $4'
Round Point Shovel
#83291, 99758
Garden Rake
#16215, 99756


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421


Amenat dfl








Classified Department: 755-5440

. , : ' , . .




U:-'t-.


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2007
Lake City Reporter



CLASSIFIED


- ADvantage


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


[peroa Merchandse


q












6m,0



6
US~


4 lines * 6 days One Item per ad
Rate applies to private individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $100 or less. I
Each Item must include a price. This is a /
non-refundable rate.


4 lines * 6 days OneItemper ad
Rate applies to private Individuals selling
Each additional personal merchandise totalling $500 or I
line $1.00 a non-refundable rate.

5 f4 lines * 6 days One nRn per adg
Rate applies to private Individuals selling I
Each additional personal merchandise totallln g $1000 or less.
achaditiol Each Item must Include a price. This Is a /
line $1.05 non-refundable rate. /


,0oo




$15


W22oo 4
Each additional
22 W line $1.35


S250
Each additional
P2'line $1.45


$ 50
2 8^ line $1.55


lines * 6 days One Item per ad
Rate applies to private Individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $2,500 or
less. Each Item must include a price.
This Is a non-refundable rate.

4 lines * 6 days One Hem per ad
Rate applies to private Individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $4000 or
less. Each item must Include a price.
This Is a non-refundable rate. /

4 lines � 6 days Oneo temper ad
Rate applies to private Individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $6000 or
ess. Each Item must include a price.
This Is a non-refundable rate.


Garai;-&Sae
I j . .1
160.1n -411ies 3day


In Print and On Line
www.lakecityreporter.com


4 line minimum'2.55 per line
Add an additional $1.00 per ad for each Wednesday
insertion.


Number of Insertions


Per line Rate


3 .......................... . . . . . 1.65
4-6 ..................... .......... 1.50
7-13 ................................ 1.45
14-23 . . . . ....................... . . .1.20
24 or more . . .... ................ . . . . . .990
Add an additional $1.00 per ad for each
Wednesday insertion.



Limited to service type advertising only.
4 lines, one month ................. . .75.00
$10.25 each additional line
Add an additional $1.00 per ad for each
Wednesday insertion.


Ad is to Appear: Call by:
Tuesday Mon., 10:00 a.m.
Wednesday Mon., 10:00 a.m.
Thursday Wed., 10:00 a.m.
Friday Thurs., 10:00 a.m.
Saturday Fri., 10:00 a.m.
Sunday Fri., 10:00 a.m.


Fax/Email by:
Mon., 9:00 a.m.
Mon., 9:00 a.m.
Wed., 9:00 a.m.
Thurs., 9:00 a.m.
Fri., 9:00 a.m.
Fri., 9:00 a.m.


These deadlines are subject to change without notice.


You can call us at 755-5440, Monday through Friday
from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their classified ads in per-
son, and some ad categories will require prepayment.
Our office is located at 180 East Duval Street.
You can also fax or email your ad copy to the Reporter.

FAX: 386-752-9400 Please direct your copy to the
Classified Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityreporter.com



Ad Errors- Please read your ad on the first day of
publication. We accept responsibility for only the first
incorrect insertion, and only the charge for the ad
space in error. Please call 755-5440 immediately for
prompt correction and billing adjustments.

Cancellations- Normal advertising deadlines apply for
cancellation.
Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440. Should further informa-
tion be required regarding payments or credit limits, your
call will be transferred to the accounting department.


.Advertising copy is subject to approval by the Publisher
who reserves the right to edit, reject, or classify all adver-
tisements under appropriate headings. Copy should be
checked for errors by the advertiser on the first day
of publication. Credit for published errors will be allowed
for the first insertion for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the Publisher shall not be
liable for any omission of advertisements ordered to be
published, nor for any general, special or consequential
damages. Advertising language must comply with
Federal, State or local laws regarding the prohibition of
discrimination in employment, housing and public accom-
modations. Standard abbreviations are acceptable; how-
ever, the first word of each ad may not be abbreviated.


.___.__ . -YOUR LOCAL NEWSPAPER 7


Concrete Work Home Improvements


CONCRETE CONSTRUCTION
FOOTERS-SLABS-DRIVES-
PATIOS. 26 years experience.
Please call 386-752-0743
PARRISH'S CONCRETE
Free Estimates. License & Insured.
Quality Work @ Reasonable prices.
Call 386-752-8223

Home Improvements
- John Thomas
Home Repairs Guaranteed
Specializing in Handicap baths &
ramps. Vinyl Siding, Skirting,
Screened rooms, Decks.
386-758-7676
AFFORDABLE
Pool Renovations,
Wood Decks & More.
KJ Kelley's 386-754-2357
CLEARVIEW WINDOW
Cleaning & Interior Painting
Your housekeeper doesn't do
windows I do! Also light Exterior
Painting. Call Tracy 386-454-8812
General Repairs & Maintenance.
Mobile & Structural Homes.
Personal Quality Service. Insured.
30 yrs exp.Richard 386-961-9030
MITCHELL VENTREC LLC
Kitchen & Bath Remodeling.
Carpentry, Painting, Plumbing &
Electrical repairs. 386-365-9909


North Florida Custom Carpentry
We help you make, your home im-
provement easy from start to finish.
Including: 3D drawings, so you can
visualize your project before it
begins. Call 386-752-6815

Lawn & Landscape Service
Custom Cuts Lawn & Landscape.
Customized lawn care, sod, trim-
ming, design. Com. & Resd. Lic. &
insured. Call 386-496-2820 Iv msg.
TIME TO MULCH
Cypress mulch 5 yard minimum
Delivered & spread or just
delivered. 386-935-6595

Services
Do you need help w/grocery shop-
ping & preparing weekly meals?
Candy's Home Cooked Classic's.
Free consult: 867-2345 Perfect for
Seniors & busy families!

FREE CLEANUP.
Pick up of unwanted metals,
tin, scrap vehicles.
386-755-0133 We Recycle.
LYNN'S MOBILE Pet Grooming
Full Groom $25-$35
Van comes to your home.
32 years exp. 386-288-5966


Drywall Services
DRYWALL Hang, Finish;
Textures; Plaster & Stucco Repairs;
Interior & Exterior Painting.
386-752-2412

Land Services
ir Bulldozer Work! Tractor
work, root raking, bush hogging,
back hoe loader work, seeding,
sodding, disking, site prep &
landscape work & irrigation system.
Custom Lawn care. Free Estimate!
Call 755-3890 or (386) 623-3200
Tree Service
HAZARDOUS Tree Trimming
removal & stump grinding. Senior
discount. 24 hr emergency service
386-590-7798 or 386-963-3360

Carpet Cleaning
CARPET CLEANING
2 rooms & a hall $39.95.
5 rooms & a hall $89.95. Also Tile
& Grout Cleaning. 386-755-9200

Electrical Work
NEED ELECTRICAL Repairs?
Make sure it's done right!
Immediate availability.Free
estimates. Call Russ 386-288-4313


FREE


I Lake' C ity Reporter I









LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2007


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
CASE NO. 07-23-CP
IN RE: ESTATE OF
SYBIL PHILLIPS FARNELL
a/k/a MARY SYBIL FARNELL,
deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of SYB-
IL PHILLIPS FARNELL, deceased,
whose date of death was January 13,
2007, is pending in the Circuit Court for
Columbia County, Florida, Probate Divi-
sion, File No. 07-23-CP, the address of
which is Post Office Box 2069, Lake
City, Florida 32056-2069. The names
and addresses of the Personal Represen-
tative and the Personal Representative's
attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and. other
persons, who have claims or demands
against decedent's estate, including un-
matured, contingent or unliquidated
claims, and who have been served a
copy of this notice, must file their claims
with this Court WITHIN THE LATER
OF THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF
A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and
other persons who have claims or de-
mands against the decedent's estate, in-
cluding unmatured, contingent or unli-
quidated claims, must file their claims
with this court WITHIN THREE (3)
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NO-
TICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PE-
RIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY
CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR
MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S
DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
THE DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE IS MARCH 15,
2007.
Personal Representative
/s/ John R. Mason
JOHN R. MASON
2004 SW Famell Road
Lake City, Florida 32024
Attorney for Personal Representative
FEAGLE & FEAGLE, ATTORNEYS,
P.A.
By: /s/ Marlin M.Feagle
Marlin M. Feagle
Florida Bar No. 0173248
Attorney for Personal Representative
153 NE Madison Street
Post Office Box 1653
Lake City, Florida 32056-1653
386/752-7191
04513343
March 15, 22, 2007


PUBLIC NOTICE
Public notice is hereby given the
WHITE SPRINGS POLICE DEPART-
MENT will claim title to the following
unclaimed vehicle. 2000 PONTIAC,
VIN# 1G2WJ52J5YF266234.
05514983
March 15,25, 2007



010 Announcements

05514966
ANNOUNCING
Medical Practice Now Open
Dr. Guy Strauss D.O., F.A.C.O.I.
Board Certified in Itemal
Medicine and Critical Care
Please call 386-754-2433 for an
appointment Located in the
Southern Mediplex Builing
404 N.W. Hall of Fame Drive
Medicare Insurances accepted.


060 Services

30 PEOPLE wanted to lose weight.
Up to 30 lbs/30 days.
FREE Sample & 1/1 private
coaching. 229-423-7320 or
www.jacweightloss.com

Adult Family Home Care
24 hr care, 3 meals a day plus snack,
transportation to Doctor, private
room. LIC. Call 386-397-2920

100 Job
100 Opportunities

04505624
EDWARD JONES is a financial
service firm focused on meeting
the needs of individual investors.
Our Lake City, FL. branch has
an opening for an entry-level
administrative assistant. Excellent
organization, communication
skills, and the ability to work
independently are required to
work perform administrative,
marketing, and customer service
responsibilities. We offer
competitive benefits and a
comprehensive online training
program. To be considered for
this position, send resume and
salary requirements to:
Edward Jones
Human Resources
330 SW Main Blvd
Lake City, FL 32025
Fax: 877-428-7699
Attn: Travis Henry
travis.henry(v edwardjones.com
EOE

04506495


is currently looking for an
independent newspaper carrier
for the Columbia City area.
Deliver the Reporter in the
early morning hours
Tuesday - Sunday.
No delivery on Monday's.
Carrier must have dependable
transportation. Stop by the
Reporter today to fill out a
contractor's inquirers form.
No phone calls please!


100 Job
100 OOpportunities

04513078
Great employment opportunity!
Seeking qualified maintenance
person for full time position with
opportunity for advancement.
Applicant must be mature and
motivated to work in a Christian
retreat atmosphere. Require
basic knowledge in electrical,
plumbing, and carpentry, and
competency in operation of
various agriculture equipment.
Must be able to do physical
labor, involving lifting of 50+ lbs.
Competitive salary, great benefits
package and a chance to work in a
Christian environment!
Fax resume to 386-362-7557 or
mail to 11057 Camp Weed PI.
Live Oak, FL. 32060.

04513244
*MANAGER & ASSISTANT
MANAGER*
Now hiring for High Springs
fruit & gift store.
Email resume to
Brianhobbs7@aol.com
or fax to 352-748-5644

04513275
NOW HIRING!!!
Be home everyday,
While making excellent pay!
We are now hiring Dry Bulk
Cement & Chemicals.
* Excellent benefit package
after 90 days of cont.
employment.
All applicants must have:
* Class A CDL with X end.
* 1 yr. tractor-trailer
experience with a t/t school
cert or 2yrs tractor-trailer
experience without the cert.
* 25 yrs or older
Please call for more information
866-FLA-ROCK option 2 or
Apply online at
www.floridarockand
tanklines.com

04513299
CASHIERS & FRUIT
BAGGERS: Now hiring for
High Springs fruit & gift stores.
Apply in Person at Florida
Citrus Center 18625 CR 236,
High Springs (exit 404 & 1-75)
or call Beth 386-462-1501

04513352
RECRUITING
ADMINISTRATOR





Davis Express, Inc. a refrigerated
trucking company located in
Starke, FL is growing and has the
opportunity for a recruiting
administrator. The position
involves qualifying, processing,
and orienting new drivers into our
company. Good communication
and computer skills are a must.
Previous trucking
experience is a plus.
Davis Express, Inc. offers
competitive compensation
and benefits.
.BCBS Health Insurance
Free Dental Insurance
Paid Vacation
401K & Disability Available
All interested candidates can
e-mail resumes to
kavla@idavis-express.com
Or fax to 904-964-5419
No Phone Calls Please
Equal Opportunity Employer. -
Drug Free Workplace



04513376
Anderson Columbia Co., Inc. is
seeking an exp. Controller.
Construction background in
management & accounting pref.
Bachelor degree or higher req.
Salary commensurate w/ exp.,
competitive benefits pkg.
DFWP/EEO Employer.
Fax resume to 755-9132 or email:
hr@ andersoncolumbia.com

04513378
SECURITY needed for Large
Manufacturing Plant: Must be
able to work flex. hours. Previous
exp. a plus. Fax resume to
386-758-4523 or apply in person
@ Corbitt Mfg, Inc., Mon-Fri
between the hours of 2 and 4pm

04513379
Truck Driver needed for local
manufacturing plant. Individual
must possess a valid Class A CDL
license & a clean MVR. Exc. pay.
Benefits avail after 6 mnts of
employment. Apply in person at
Corbitt Mfg., Inc., 854 NW
Guerdon Street, Lake City,
between 9am-3pm Mon-Fri. DFW

05514592
Social Services Opening
Full Time with Benefits
Must have BS/BA
Sociology, Social Work
Or Heath Care Related Field.


Call Angela Akins at
386-362-7860. Or apply
Suwannee Health Care Center
1620 E. Helveston St.
Live Oak, FL 32064
EOE/D/V/M/F

05514776
CUSTOMER SERVICE REP/
DATA PROCESSOR
WANTED energetic people, who
really want to work. Fast paced
customer service office; Data
processing experience a plus.
Bilingual a plus. Send resume to
Customer Service Rep.
PO box 3116
Lake City, FL 32056
Immediate Openings Avail.


100 Jb0
100 Opportunities

05514.933





SUWANNEE VALLEY
ELECTRIC
COOPERATIVE, INC.
Service Center Clerk/
Dispatcher
Job requirements include
answering telephone and two way
radio communications with crews
in field. Consists of irregular
hours on a rotating shift.
Good oral and written
communication and map reading
skills are required.
Applications are available at the
office, 11340 100th St., Live Oak,
FL during regular
office hours (8 am - 4:30 pm).
Deadline for receiving
applications is March 21,2007
SVEC is an equal opportunity
employer.

05514941
RECEPTIONIST
Full-time position available.
Must possess professional
communication skills and friendly
demeanor. Multi-line phone,
filing, and computer experience
required. Must be able to
multi-task in a fast paced office
environment and be attentive to
detail. Drug-Free Workplace.
Starting pay $8.00 p/h with
benefits. Fax resume to
(386)961-8200, e-mail to
acct(Squest-aviation.com or mail
to 173 SE Newell Drive,
Lake City, Fl 32025.
NO PHONE CALL PLEASE

05514942
OFFICE ASSISTANT
Full-time position available at
aircraft parts distributor. Must
possess excellent verbal and
written communication skills and
friendly demeanor. Must be able
to multi-task in a fast paced office
environment, be attentive to
details and possess computer
skills. No aircraft parts experience
required, training will be
provided. Drug-Free Workplace.
Wage negotiable with benefits.
Fax resume to
(386) 961-8200, e-mail to
acct(5)quest-aviation.com
or mail to 173 SE Newell Drive,
Lake City, Fl 32025.
NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE.

05514956
PART-TIME BOOKKEEPER
Bus office looking for part-time
experienced bookkeeper
with A/P and payroll
background. Experience with
QuickBooks, computerized office
applications and procedures
necessary. Must have previous
bookkeeping experience or
equivalent education.
.Send resumes and references, to:
4424 NW American Lane,
Suite 101, Lake City, FL 32055

A/C SERVICE Tech
Full time with benefits.
Please call 386-454-4767

AMI-FFT IS Seeking a case
Manger to work with at risk youths.
BA required. Salary negionable
flexible hours 755-1172 or
Fax 755-1486
ARTSY ABODE seeking Manager,
FT/PT sales associates needed for
new Vera Bradley store, in Lake
City Mall. Sales exp. Preferred.
email: shop@artsyabode.com, for
application. Opening in April
BLUE JEAN JOB
$ Money $
Seeking sharp go getters, Able to
TRAVEL USA. Demo chemical
products. Good people skills &
enjoy working in a Rock in Roll
evir. Call Kelly 1-800-201-3293.
9-6. Must start immed.
CHILD CARE Provider Wanted in
my home for two infants 4-5 days
per week. Columbia city area.
References and background check
required. Call to schedule interview
Students with online classes
welcome to apply. 386-867-2545
CREAMER'S MOBILE HOME
SET UP -M/H installer needed No
exp. necessary. Drivers Lic. a must.
Call 386-623-9384/867-2396
CUSTODIANS NEEDED for
retail store in Lake City Mall.
AM/PM. Call 888-210-2308.
EOE/AAP Employer.
EARN UP TO $10.00 AN HOUR.
Hungry Howies is now hiring Pizza
Delivery Drivers.
Earn CASH DAILY 18 or older.
Apply in person Lake City Plaza
next to the Dollar General.
ELECTRICAL HELP WANTED
Must be dependable and have
electrical experience. Great pay.
Please call (386)
344-2029 or (386)758-6972
EMPLOYMENT SPECIALIST
Assist individuals in job develop-


ment. Seeking qualified individuals
in Baker and Columbia Counties to
fill six month, temporary, part time,
up to 25 hour position. Salary plus
bonus after training period. May
lead to permanent full time. BA de-
gree with major in business, nurs-
ing, education, behavioral or reha-
bilitative science. Direct related
work experience may be considered
on a year to year basis. For applica-
tion and additional information,
contact Comprehensive Community
Services at 386-362-7143
Experienced Tandem Dump Truck
Driver. Asphalt, Milling Exp.
Class B CDL & clean driving
record. Work local. PDOE.
(276)655-4275 or 386-590-0785


100 Job
100 ~'Opportunities
FABULOUS COACH LINES
HIGHLY MOTIVATED
PROFESSIONAL ATTITUDE
FRIENDLY PEOPLE
CDL required. Pax End a plus,
Good driving record Necessary.
Dealing with fun groups on Charter
Trips to Exciting Destinations.
PT/FT $125-$185/day
FabulousCoach.com
Or Call 1-866-352-7295
FLAT BED DRIVERS
Atlantic Truck Lines
$1,000 Sign-on Bonus
Class A, in state & home every
night. $600-$750/wk. Yearly $1,000
safety bonus. 3 yrs. exp. Paid
vacation. Health/dental. Call
1-800-577-4723 Monday-Friday
FT DESK CLERK &
House Keeper. Experienced only
need apply. Serious Inquires only.
Econo Lodge N. Hwy 90 & 1-75
HUDDLE HOUSE - Ellisville
Servers & Grill Operators
needed for 2nd & 3rd Shifts.
Apply Mon-Fri, 8am-2pm
IMAGE OF JULY MORNING
Int'l ad agency is hiring: Office
Mng; PR; Photographer; Video Edi-
tor; Visitor. Each 5 yrs exp.; 2 yrs in
area req. Apply in person 1-3pm
only. 231 NW BurkAve, Suite 101.

Lake City Christian Academy
is looking for Teachers
with'a BA degree
Call 386-758-0055
MARINE MECHANIC needed.
Tools and exp. required.
Please call for appointment.
386-755-9262
MECHANIC/WELDER
For heavy Truck &Trailer Repair
Facility. Call Southern Specialized
LLC US 41 North 386-752-9754
MUSGROVE CONSTRUCTION
has a FT opening for a mechanic,
must have own hand tools,
hydraulic exp. helpful.
Call 386-362-7048
Drug Free Work Place
MUSGROVE CONSTRUCTION
has immediate opening for an
experienced Auto-body painter.
Apply in person Hwy 90 East. Live
Oak or call 386-362-7048 DFWP
OWNER OPERATORS
Needed:Flatbed freight. Home
nights & weekends.Must have
class A CDL with good driving
record. Drug Free Workplace.
Call (850)971-7216
PART TIME
BARTENDER Needed.
American Legion
Call 386- 754-2337
Part-time
CHILD CARE NEEDED! This
Person should be at least 18 years of
age, very enthusiastic and
dependable. Retirees welcome.
Please apply in person @ Southside
Baptist Church. 388 SE Baya Dr.
No Phone calls please.
PART-TIME ADMIN help for
busy office. Must be computer
literate and able to work under
pressure. Fax resume to
352-332-9962 or email to
ncastlen(5dhsi.net
PART-TIME SUBSTANCE abuse
group counselor ? Must have
at least 2 years exepience.
Please Fax resume to 352-332-9962,
or email ncastlen(S)dhsi.net
Parts Checker/Warehouse
Local Auto Parts Distributor seeks
Part Checker. Must be detail
oriented. Warehouse experience
required. Must pass Drug Test.
Apply in person only at
385 SW Arlington Blvd
Lake City, FL 32025
PHISH HEADS Now hiring
Exp. cooks, AM-PM, FT-PT,
Apply in person M-TH 2-4PM
144 SW Main Blvd. Suite 170
PLUMBERS &-HELPERS
'Vanted. Career opportunities, with
fast growing business, Call
The Plumber 755-9789
PT Release Audit & Front desk
position. Apply in person
Mon-Fri, 9-4 at
QUALITY INN, Lake City. DFWP
SALES FINANCE Manager &
Experienced Sales Person needed.
See Robert Corbett at
1126 East Howard Street, Live Oak.
386-362-4061
Corbett's Mobile Home Center.
TEACHERS - Lake City
Early Head Start Birth-3 yrs /
S Head Start 3-5 yrs
HS Diploma/GED, Bilingual
(Spanish/English) preferred, 5 Hour
Literacy Course as required by
DCF, Must pass physical and DCF
background screening requirements,
Current First Aid/CPR preferred.
Early Head Start - 40 hr. child care
training, or enroll within 90 days of
employment and complete within 1
year AND must enroll in
Infant/Toddler CDA classes and
complete within one year of
employment OR minimum 2 yr
degree in early childhood
education or child development;
Head Start- 40 hr. child care
training and CDA preferred OR
minimum 2 yr degree in early
childhood education or child
development; Excellent Benefits,
Annual/Sick/Holiday pay, Teacher


w/CDA - $8.12/hr.; Teacher w/40
hrs. - $7.47/hr.; Teacher w/o 40 hrs.
$7.00/hr. Apply in person to 236
SW Columbia Avenue, Lake City
(386-754-2222) or mail resume to
PO Box 2637, Lake City, FL
32056-2637 or Fax (386) 754-2220.
EOE
TOW TRUCK Driver Needed.
Clean MVR, Must pass background
check. Reside within Lake City.
Call 386-752-7799
TRI COUNTY Tree Service,
looking for Bucket Truck Operator.
Must have exp. in Tree Work. CDL
a plus, Excel pay. 386-963-5000
Vet Tech Needed for busy
Veterinary clinic. FT position. No
weekends. No exp. needed. Fax one
page resume to 386-961-8802


1to Job
100 'Opportunities

WANTED DUMP Truck Driver
Clean CDL Class B Lic. $10.50/hr,
local work. Call Charlie
386-623-4276

WAREHOUSE
Local Collision Parts Co. seeks
warehouse person. Exp. preferred.
M-F. Apply in person only,
No Phone Calls Please. 385 SW
Arlington Blvd, Lake City, FL.


110 Sales
110 Employment

AVON
Earn 50%! Only $10 for KIT
Call: 1-800-275-9945
pin # 4242(IndSalesRep)

NO EXPERIENCE
REQUIRED
Sales Trainee
401k, Medical, Dental. Stock
Options, Paid Training! Monthly
and Quarterly Bonuses!
Apply in person.
PRESTIGE HOME
CENTERS
3973 US HWY 90 W
Lake City FL
752-7751


120n Medical
120 Employment

04512677
BAYA POINTE NURSING &
REHAB CENTER is accepting
applications for CNA's.
All Shifts Available,
PT, FT & PRN. Excellent pay &
benefits. Please apply in person
at 587 SE Ermine Ave,
Lake City, Fl 32025. EOE/
Drug Free Work Place

05514444
C.N.A. needed
Full Time with Benefits
3pm- llpm
Call Angela Akins
At 386-362-7860
Or apply at
Suwannee Health Care Center
1620 E Helvenston Street
Live Oak, FL 32064
EOE/D/V/M/F

05514969
CERTIFIED NURSING
ASSISTANT'S
FULL-TIME
llp-7:30a, 3p-ll:30p
Must be dependable and ready to
work Apply in person to
Macclenny Nursing & Rehab
755 South 5th St/Hwy 228
Ask for Sharon/Melves
904-259-4873


Sunbelt Chrysler Jeep Dodge

Now Hiring Sales Consultants to work with.
aggressive dealership. We provide Salary + Commision,
401K, Health Insurance & Paid Vacations.
Apply in person at Hwy 90 West
ask for Randy Sears or John Waschek.


Sunbelt Chrysler Jeep Dodge
Now Hiring: Service Consultants & Service
Technicians (Must have own tools)
We provide:
401K, Health Insurance & Paid Vacations
Apply in Person at Hwy 90 West,
ask for Dwight Wilson or Dennis Conway




Sunbelt Honda

Automotive Sales Positions
*$300-$500 week salary plus commission

*5 day work week
*100% training, no experience necessary
*Paid Vacations *401 K
*Full Medical Insurance
* Great work environment.

Looking or 5 honest hardworking, p, beat
people to join our team.
Apply in person at Sunbelt Honda, Main Blvd.
Ask for Ken Gendron or Jay Johnson





CORRECTIONS CORPORATION OFAMERICA
Lake City Correctional Facility is accepting applications for
* Academic Instructor
* Correctional Officers (FL certified)
* Non-Certified Correctional Officers (must have
passed the Florida Basic Aptitude.Test)
* Educational Counselor
* LPN (FT & PT)
* RN (FT & PT)
* Vocational Instructor (Janitorial)

Apply online at www.correctionscorp.com or in person at:
Lake City Correctional Facility
7906 E. US Hwy 90.
Lake City, FL 32055
(386) 755-3379 * (386) 752-7202 (Fax)
EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER M/F/V/D
DRUG FREE WORKPLACE



WAL*MART STORES, INC.

Transportation LLC, Position in Alachua
Join the Transportation Division of America's Largest &
Most Successful Retailer Technician 1, 2 and 3

TRACTOR/TRAILER MECHANIC


QUALIFICATIONS
* 1-5 years tractor/traller related experience
* Brake Cerlification In accordance with DOT
requirements
* Troubleshool, repair & perform preventive
maintenance on OTR Tractors & Trailers
* Perform Inbound trailer Inspection
* Fuel Wal-Mart Equipment
* Diagnostics including major components,
antilock brake systems, and OBC.
* Valid Driver's License
* Must provide one hand tools


WE OFFER:
* Excellent pay with progressive Increases
on regular schedule vacations, holidays,
personal days
* Major medical & dental plan
* Company paid life insurance
* 401(k) & proffi sharing plan
* Stock purchase plan


To receive full details on qualifications and procedures to apply contact:
Wal-Mart Transportation #7835
Attention: Jacci Dietz, Human Resources Manager
Alachua, FL 32615
386-418-5900
Wal-Mart will not tolerate discrimination in employment on the basis of race, color, sex,
sexual orientation, religion, disability, ethnicity, national origin, marital status, veteran
status, or any other legally-protected status.


Classified Department: 755-5440








LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2007


120 fMedical
120 Employment
04512941
RNs and LPNs
Florida Department of
Corrections currently has
vacancies for RN Supervisor,
RN Specialists, RNs and LPNs
at the following institutions:
Columbia (Lake City)
Hamilton (Jasper)
RMC (Lake Butler)
FSP (Raiford)
Union (Raiford)
Exceptional Health Care
Insurance
V
Vested Retirement after six years
V
Annual and sick leave accrual
V
Paid holidays
V
Career Service Rates
are based on experience
Or
Full-time non benefited
positions available.
Please visit:
Fldocjobs.com
Contact: Kathy Reed
(386) 496-6804
Reed.Kathym(a)mail.dc.state.fl.us
Or
Jennifer Dudley
(850)922-6645
Dudley.Jenniferi5mail.dc.state.fl.


05514259
LPN or RN needed
7P-7A
WITH BENEFITS!!!
Suwannee Health Care Center
1620 E. Helvenston St.
Live Oak, FL 32064
Please Contact Angela Akins
or Amelia Tompkins at
386-362-7860

0551491805514918
Suwannee Medical Personnel
is now taking applications for
CNA's in the Lake Butler,
Starke and Lake City area.
Must be. a Fl. certified CNA and
have 1 year experience.
If interested please call
(386) 755-1544, ask for Martha.

05514968
RN/LPN
(2) Full Time positions 7p-7a
(1) Part Time position, every
other weekend Apply at
Macclenny Nursing & Rehab
755 South 5th Street,
Ask for Becky or Sharon

Medical Assitant Full Time
M-F Busy doctors office.
Experience only. Fax resume to
Attn Cheryl at 386-754-3657.
MEDICAL ASST.
For Busy ASC needed Full time
Please fax resume to
755-2169
Medical Billiiig
For busy medical,facilit.\ .
Experience ih'minedicaf insurance
billing required. Excellent salary.
Mail in confidence to
PO Box 3306
Lake City 32056.
MEDICAL OFFICE Receptionist
Experience preferred. FT/PT
Forward Resume To:
PO Box 1359 Lake City, Fl. 32056
Or Fax 386-719-4744
NOW HIRING
Direct Care Staff. ICF/DD
Taking applications for all shifts.
Must have FL. Driver's License
High School diploma or GED.
Call 386-755-6104 EEO/M/F/D/V
OFFICE ASSISTANT
Excellent word processing skills re-
quired Medical office exp. helpful.
Fax resume to: 386-758-5987
PHLEBOTOMIST needed for
fast paced laboratory.
. Must have good typing skills.
Experienced Necessary
Fax resume to 386-752-9647
QMRP Needed
BA/BS Human Service field
1 year experience in MR/DD
Lake City Cluster
673 NW Cluster Drive
386-755-2095
e-mail: jdisbrow@rescare.com
EEO/M/F/D/V

170 Business
Opportunities
FOR SALE Parking Lot sweeping
Business. Established Customers.
.Positive cash flow.
386-776-1266
MOMS HELPING MOMS
Start their own business.
Join the mom team call
(912) 610-1879

190 Mortgage Money

05514629
Private Investor
has cash for your
monthly payments.
Call Jerry 754-2122

240 Schools &
Education
Want to be a CNA? Don't want to
wait? Express Training Services of
Gainesville is now offering our
quality CNA exam Prep classes.
Day/Eve classes. Class for 1 week,
certification test the next week.
Class size is limited. Next class
03/19/07. Call 386-755-4401

310 Pets & Supplies
FOR SALE Bull Dog puppy.
8 weeks old. Has 1st set of shots.
$200.00
Call 386-365-3977


310 Pets & Supplies
GREAT PYRENEES Dog 2 yrs
old I female. Great family dog.
Needs good home. $80. obo
386-755-6265
GREAT PYRENEES Dog 2 yrs
old I male. Great family dog.
Needs good home. $80. obo
386-755-6265
Toy breed puppies. Chihuahua
/Yorkie. 2 females Born 1/11. Home
raised. Health certificates. Sm. &
very friendly. $250. ea. 963-3832

330 Livestock &
330 Supplies
2-QH MARES 2 1/2 & 3 years old
bay color with white markers.
$750 EACH
(386)497-3790

402 Appliances
ALMOST NEW refrigerator.
Frigidaire w/ Top Freezer
Paid $900 selling $450.
386-288-3082
WASHER & DRYER
Like New
$300.00
Call 386-365-3977

408 Furniture
CHINA CABINET
White with gold accent, $99 OBO
Call after 5:00pm
386-758-3296


ENTERTAINMENT CENTER
Dark wood color, glass door,
-fits 27in TV. $100.00
Call 386-961-8812


subscribe to the


408 Furniture
TWO MATCHING light blue gray
recliners with center table. Good
condition. $49.00 for all
386-755-8960
VHS/DVD WOODLAND
Oak Media Storage cabinet w/ lock.
23w X 14d X 44h. Like new. $50.
call 386-754-1595

416 Sporting Goods
POOL TABLE - Gorgeous Brand
new 8' wood table. Leather pockets,
Italian 1" slate, carved legs. Still in
� Crate! Cost $4,500. Sell $1,350.
Can Deliver. 352-264-9799

420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
Payment in advance for standing
pine timber. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-454-1484 or 961-1961.
WANTED WHOLE Junk Cars.
$150 Each. Free Pick Up
Call 386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648

430 Garage Sales
2 FAMILY YARD SALE, Too
many items to list, Thur, Fri, & Sat
8am -4pm Between 47 and Sisters
welcome, On 242, SW Vernon
Way Look for signs.
E.A. WHOLESALE Rummage &
Estate sale. M-F 10a - 6p & Sat. 8a-
noon. Toys, fum., tools, pots, pan &
Dept. Store electronics, curtain rods.
Lay-A-Way. Hwy 100 @ Baya. c/c
taken 758-9303


Classified Department: 755-5440


430 Garage Sales
FRI &-SAT. 3/16-3/17 9am-5pm
Lots & lots of items. 41 S C 133
5th house on Right.
Look for signs.
GRADDADDY OF Estate Sales!
March 15-17. Early til Dark!!! SR
47 to King, Rt 1 1/2 miles to
Bishop, L 1 blk to Kingwood, L
OR Sisters Welcome/ Dyal to
King. L to Bishop- Rt to
Kingwood- left to dead-end.
CASH ONLY 755-6838
HUGE GARDENERS Delite Yard
Sale Plus Other NON garden items.
Pots, statuary, arbors, 2 old iron
wheels, decor fencing, futon, coffee
table, car ramps, Snapper riding
lawn mower like new.
422 SW Colgate Loop, Fort White
Fri 3/16 & Sat 3/17 7am-??
386-454-1465
SAT. 2 - family sale. 8 - ?. Comer
242 & Randall Ter. 124 Randall.
Walnut China Cabinet, hunting
clothes, many other things.

440 Miscellaneous
05514947
15X24 OVAL Swimming Pool
All accessories included. $500
You must removed OBO
Call 386-935-0752

ELECTRIC WHEEL CHAIR
Lift for a van. $300.00.
Call for more information.
386-758-6052
HOT TUB - $1,795. LOADED!
Never used. Waterfall, therapy jets,
LED lights, cupholders, 110v
energy efficient. With warranty.
Can deliver 352-376-1600


TON


440 Miscellaneous
KILNS (2) one is a 110W and the
other is 220W, both in good
working condition. Reasonable
offers considered. 386-497-3025.

SUNBEAM MICROWAVE
FOR SALE, GOOD CONDITION,
ONLY $30.00,
PLEASE CALL (386) 259-3103

463Building
4U6 Materials
SCREENED DOOR.
New $120.00, never used
White Vinyl, 36" asking $50.00
386-755-0014

STORM DOOR,
New Still in box
36" $92.00.
386-755-0014

520 Boats for Sale
BOAT FOR SALE:
1985, 18' Excellent Cond.,.
Fresh clear coat. 150 Merc.
386-754-9351, $5,000. FIRM

630 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent

05514943
RARE AVAILABILITY
3BR/2BA Neat, clean, quiet Park.
NW Lake City. Senor discount
offered. $500 plus deposit.
No Pets. 941-524-4601
2BR/2BA 14'X70' with large Front
Porch in the Country. $600 mo
w/lst & $600 Security. No Pets.
Call 386-755-1432


a in North Florida


Kim,- -We
~g~~u -= tiZ
WNW"Fo,


is; lot.Moss.


VotA4


LET'S GET IT STARTED TODAY!


Lake City


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Available throughout Columbia County

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630 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent

2BR/2BA DOULEWIDE,
No pets In the Country.
$600 mo w/lst & $600 Security.
Call 386-755-1432

IN PARK Mobile Homes for Rent
2BR/2BA, $550 mo, 1st, last, sec.
&Applications required.
386-719-2423

MOBILE HOME Community
accepting applications for
2/1 and 3/2, Seniors Welcome
386-758-7602

640 Mobile Homes
640i for Sale

05514804

!!WOW!!
2007 3BR/2BA
Delivery & Set up included
$39,995.
PRESTIGE HOMES
3973 Hwy 90 West
Lake City, FL
386-752-7751
1-800-355-9385

05514980
$500.00 DOWN!
With your Land
2006 Clearance
And New 2007's
PRESTIGE HOMES
3973 Hwy 90 West
Lake City, FL
386-752-7751
1-800-355-9385


u









LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2007


640 Mobile Homes
6 for Sale
PALMS & JAKES move over.
Platimum outdoes them both.
Great Prices Too.
Hamilton Homes 758-6755
www.garyhamiltonhomes.com

650 Mobile Home
650 & Land
!!OWNER FINANCE!!
1989 DW 3BR/2BA on 0.4 acres.
798 Double Run Rd. $69,500.
Call 386-867-0048
3/2 DW A/C on 1.5 acre lot
Will sell or Lease
in Worthington Springs
Call 386-466-1104
3BR/2BA Double wide
on I acre of land.
3 car garage, fenced in yard.
Call 386-752-7541 or 386-365-3977
4 ACRES, Well, Septic,
1988 SWMH, 2BR/2BA,
White Springs Rd. $69,000
Call 386-623-1040
740sf FRAME STUDIO HOUSE
and nice 2/2 SW, both on acre lot
8 mi NW of VA. Cash only $69,000
386-961-9181
OWNER FINANCING
1999 4BR/2BA on 2.5 acres. South
of Lake City, small down, $775/mo
386-590-0642

705 Rooms for Rent
2br/2ba, w/2 car garage, W/D, for 1
near 252/41. CLEAN, QUIET,
Neighborhood. $425 mo. plus Dep.
+ 1/2 utilities (352)361-7201
FURNISHED, SMOKE Free
$100 deposit & $100 per week
250 statelite channels, phone, does
include ultitlies 754-6931

710 Unfurnished Apt.
7 For Rent
2BR/1BA SPACIOUS Duplex
with garage. Available 4/1/07.
$600 mo Call after 5 pm
754-1764 or,352-514-2332
Immediate Openings 1 & 2 BR.
Convenient Location. Near VA
Hospital. Call for price and details.
386-755-2423
Townhouse Apt. 2BR/1.5BA.
Spacious 2 story townhouse on
McFarlane Ave. $750 mo,
,plus $400 deposit.
Call 752-7781 or 397-5880

Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
$278/MO! 4BR Hud!
5% down 20 years at 8%APR.
For listings
800-366-9783 ext F388
2BR/1BA ALL appliances, Pets
okay close to VA, swimming pool
Ist, last & sec. $700/mo
615-943-2825
2BR/1BA. CH/A
on secluded 5 acres. Clean.
$700 mo. 1st, last & security FIRM.
Call 386-209-0319
5 BR! Only $199/mo!
5% down. 20 years at 8% APR.
For listings call
800-366-9783 ext 5736


730 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
STOP RENTING!
Buy 3BR only $14,500!
Foreclosure! For listing
800-366-9783 ext 7782

740 Furnished
SHomes for Rent
3BR/3BA FURNISHED
Near Ft. White on Ichetucknee
River. 6 mo lease. $1,200 mo.
Call 386-497-3637
GOLF COURSE HOME 3/2.5
Total Furn. Wkly/Mo, or
7-Mo Lease Avail.
386-754-7233 or 904-336-3776

750 Business &
SOffice Rentals
2 RETAIL Spaces for rent.
High traffic area.
Next to Winn Dixie. 780.sq ft or
900 sq ft. 800-342-0135
3ROOM OFFICE SUITE For rent.
across from the VA, on Baya.
with private entrance and shared
street sign. Common reception,
bath and kitchen. $689/mo
Please call Katie 386-754-6600
OFFICE BUILDING.
FOR LEASE.
JUST OFF US HWY 90 WEST
CALL 386-752-5866
OFFICE IN Oakbridge Complex
725 SE Baya Dr.
500 sq. ft., second floor unit.
Call 386-752-4820
Office Space for Rent, In Live Oak
Approx. 1,300 SF. For further
information Call Poole Realty
386-209-1766
OFFICE- w/2,100 SF Located in
Live Oak For rent. For further
information Call Poole Realty
386-209-1766

760 Wanted to Rent
WANT TO RENT Mobile Home
or Camping Space w/ garden
space for $250/mo or less. w/cat. I
work for rent. 276-284-9101.

790 Vacation Rentals
Horseshoe Beach Gulf Front
2BR House very well decorated w/
Ig waterfront porch, dock, & fish
sink. Avail weekends. $395. or
weekly $895. (352)498-5986 or
386-235-3633

805 Lots for Sale
1 ACRE near Ft. White.
River access. $500 down,
owner financing. Small payments.
Call 386-497-3637
5 ACRES near Lake City.
5 miles to Wal-Mart.
Small down, owner financing.
Call 386-497-3637
FORT WHITE
12+/- 12 acres Buildable lot.
Reduced to $99,900.
Motivated Seller (561)346-1472
NICE .73-ACRE
IN FOREST COUNTRY S/B
ASKING $68,000
386-752-9095


810 Home for Sale

$278/MO! 4BR Hud!
5% down 20 years at 8%APR.
For listings
800-366-9783 ext H411

0551467(1
Brand New 1900 sqft site built
3BR/2BA Starting at $149K
0 down & $900 mo.
Slow credit no problem
386-755-2082

05514803
Logged Homes
Starting at
$65,500.00
PRESTIGE HOMES
3973 Hwy 90 West
Lake City, FL
386-752-7751
1-800-355-9385

05514979

!!WOW!!
2007 3BR/2BA
Delivery & Set up included
$39,995.
PRESTIGE HOMES
3973 Hwy 90 West
Lake City, FL
386-752-7751
1-800-355-9385

05514981
$500.00 DOWN!
With your Land
2006 Clearance
And New 2007's
PRESTIGE HOMES
3973 Hwy 90 West
Lake City, FL
386-752-7751
1-800-355-9385

3BR/2BA 3Car Garage, 2.6 acres
fenced no restrictions. Best area,
Financing available-wac $272,500
OBO Call 386-752-5226

5BR HOME!
Only $22,500!
Bank foreclosures available now,
for listings 800-366-9783 ext 9478


BANK FORECLOSURE!
3BR/2BA! Only $14,500!
Must Sell, for listings
800-366-9783 ext 7921


FSBO: 3BR/2BA, 2746 sq ft.
Plantations Hwy 90 West.
$275,900. Call (352)669-8510
or 352-989-7034
Owner Finance!
2BR/lBA Mhome 1 Acre
Near College/Small Down
$600 mo/ 866-877-8661 Ext. 620

820 Farms &
20 Acreage

10-40 ACRES
Large Oaks. Northwest
of Lake City, Noegel Rd.
.C,dU. - .0-.s-6Jfi.55. :

158 1/2 Ac., MOL 15 mi. N of Lake
City on US 441, well drained, with
frontage, hardwoods, pasture,
25 ac. planted pines. REDUCED
$5,365/AC. Terms possible.
386-466-5741/386-752-7694


Connectedov k www.lakecityreporter.com









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82o Farms &
S Acreage
05514915
Jenkins Co., GA
87AC- $1,625/AC
Planted pine, hard-
wood bottom,
two roads,
exc. hunting.
Telfair Co., GA
131 AC - $1,925/AC
Private, great
hunting tract
creek, hardwood
bottom, planted
pine.
404-362-8244
St. Regis Paper Company
www.stregispaper.com


820 Farms &
2 Acreage

19.72 AC. High & Dry Pasture
Land w/well. 15 min. South of Lake
City, on a paved road. $279,000.
386-935-1863

250 ACRES $5000/acre.
High Springs Area-Fully Permitted
5acre subdivision. High and Dry
planted pines.Great investment
Please call 772-388-2255

5 ACRES ON WIGGINS,
SEPTIC TANK, ELECTRICITY
$65,000.
850-902-7600

LAND FOR SALE; 15 ACRES
OFF HWY 247 & 248,
SOUTH OF LAKE CITY.
$190K 904-289-9218


940 Trucks

1999 3-QUARTER ton truck Sav-
annah GMC. 8 ply excellent shape,
heat/ac. Great paint $8200 OBO
Call 352-538-7904


950 Cars for Sale

CARS FROM $500.00!
Police Impounds available now,'
for listings
800-366-9813 ext A760

952 Vans & Sport
952 Util. Vehicles
1992 RANGE ROVER
Only $650/OBO!
Police Impounds,
for listings 800-366-9813 ext A834


BRING THE PICTURE IN OR WE WILL TAKE IT FOR YOU!
Advertise your car, truck, motorcycle, recreation vehicle or boat here for
10 consecutive days. If your vehicle does not sell within those 10 days, for an additional $10 you can
place your ad for an additional 10 days. A picture will run everyday with a description of your vehicle.
The price of the vehicle must be listed in the ad. Your ad must be prepaid with cash, check or credit
card. Just include a snapshot or bring your vehicle by the we will take the picture for you. Private
party only!

10 DYSgiRgONY'3


2000 Roadtrek
$17,500 OBO
All amenities, exc. condition.
114,000 miles

Call
386-755-3633 or
904-759-9359


1996 20 ft. Whitecap
Palm Beach
$6,900 OBO
CC, 150hp Johnson ocean
runner. Brand new hamming
bird fish finder GPS. Tandem
axle trailer, surge breaks.
386-466-5730
After 12:00 noon
-^it" - - as





1998 Ford F150
Triton
.$4,400
AT, air, 2 door club cab,
bedliner, good tires, no rust.
Call
386-755-0377


2007 Nissan Versa
$16,500
Great buy, beautiful gator blue.
Loaded, top ratings on safety
& gas, 5 yr. warranty & gap
coverage trans.
Call
386-752-5267


2001 Forest River
.Camper
$7,000 OBO
21' with foldouts on each end,
heat/ac, fridge, microwave,
stove, bathroom. Sleeps 6-7,
excellent shape.
Call
386-755-7914


1993 Tlioga Montara 27'
*4&oo d12,300 O.B.O.

Must sell. Great shape, sleeps 8,
fully self-contained.
Call
386-867-0049


2002 Chevy S-10
S 7,500
Priced below Kelly Blue Book.
3-door, ext. cab, AT, CD player,
bedliner, tinted windows,
power doors/windows.
Call
386-752-4339


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Page Editor: Chris Bednar, 754-0404


DILBERT


LAKE CITY REPORTER


ADVICE & COMICS


THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2007


ZITS


BABY BLUES


FOR BETTER OR WORSE


roR UNG~ A. SISTEFA09
NOTr M N414W~TAEV?


FRANK & ERNEST


BEETLE BAILEY , B.C.


GARFIELD


CLASSIC PEANUTS

5/15/U
-------i
I'

ii v * /C a 5 - --_<.- -


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-April
19): Things are starting to.
happen for you. Set up inter-
views, appointments or visits
that can lead to positive
change. Travel or communi-
cate with the people who can
make the biggest impact on
your life and your future.

TAURUS (April 20-May
20): You may be caught in
the line of fire if you interfere.
Avoid controversy and stay
out of the way if someone is
looking for a fight. Be very
clear about what you know
and don't know. A relationship
may be restricted. **
GEMINI (May 21-June
20): Travel, learning and get-
ting ahead professionally are
all looking very positive. Talk
to as many people as possible
and don't rule out making a
move or hooking up with
someone with similar inter-
ests and motives. A partner-
ship is looking quite powerful.

CANCER (June 21-July
22): Something or someone
very unique will interest you
today. Research will help you
get a better understanding of


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Word

what the possibilities are. You
may not like to venture far
from home but today, exotic
destinations will beckon you.
Take a chance. ***
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
Put a little time aside for fun.
You will be in an entertaining,
creative and passionate mood.
Focus on love, the one you are
currently with or finding
someone who can complete
you. This is a great day to
socialize, network and create.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22):. Brace yourself.
Someone you are close to is
likely to be on the rampage or
will push buttons you don't
want pushed. This is not the
best day to initiate change at
home. ***
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): You can do anything you
want if you try hard enough.
Everyone will be watching
you and looking up to you
today, so promote, present
and network. A partnership
will turn out to be more


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity CphSr cryptograms are created Irom quotations by famous people past and present
Each letter in the cipher stands lor another.
Today's clue: B equals U
"FMV UVOHLHX CZ UP NCJE LW FMOF
LF LW LHIBWFJLOA; L F ' W NMOF OAA
FMV NCJAI NLAA WCCH GVRCUV."
* JCP ALRMFVHWFVLH
PREVIOUS SOLUTION -"The Youth of a Nation are the trustees of
Posterity." - B. Disraeli
"Only the young die good." - Oliver Herford
(c) 2007 by NEA, Inc. 3-15


important than you imagined.
*****
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.
21): You know what you can
do and what is required of you
but someone you count on
will let you down or criticize
you. Don't stick around peo-
ple who don't encourage you.
Creative input will be what
counts today. **
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-
Dec. 21): Take a different
approach to an old idea and
you will discover a new way to
make money or to live your
life. Ulterior motives have got-
ten you into hot water in the
past so be sure you are mak-
ing changes for the right rea-
son. ****
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. 19): Rely on the people
you feel are inventive, imagi-
native and able to take on proj-
ects that are a little out of the
ordinary. Don't be down on
loved ones if they don't under-
stand what you are trying to
accomplish. ***
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): You may find it dif-
ficult to control your emo-
tions. Put your best foot for-
ward and disallow yourself
the right to take on the poor-
me syndrome. Remember
your cup is half full, not half
empty. ***
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): Much will be going on
behind closed doors. Rely on
your own intuition but don't
act upon it just yet. Someone
may be trying to confuse you
or lead you astray. A personal
or professional change may
be exactly what you need.


YOU CUT
THAT C)
OUT!


DEAR ABBY


Name game gives pleasure


to those with ear for irony


DEAR ABBY: I have
enjoyed the columns you've
printed about people whose
names matched their profes-
sions, and wonder if you
would be interested in an inci-
dent that happened to my sis-
ter. Her name is Dragony, and
she works in a pharmacy
located in a medical building.
Her license plate reads
DRAGONY. Well, someone
went into the pharmacy and
asked the girl at the counter,
"Who is Dr. Agony?" I still
laugh when I think about it.
- KATHI IN CALIFOR-
NIA
DEAR KATHI: Funny!
Your sister's license plate
reminds me of one that
belongs to my neighbor, who
happens to be an anesthesiol-
ogist. Her license plate reads:
EPIDURL.
I am still hearing from
readers offering names -
and some of them are a hoot.
Read on:
DEAR ABBY: Years ago, I
was office manager for a
printing company that did
work for the American
Tobacco Co. in North
Carolina. The purchasing
agent's assistant there was a
woman by the name of Flicka
Ashe. Can you believe it! -
DOLORES IN SPARTAN-
BURG, S.C.
DEAR ABBY: I have sold
real estate for 18 years, and
no one ever forgets my name.
It's ... BETH NEWHOUSE,


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearobby.com
MAYVILLE, N.Y.
DEAR ABBY: My grand-
ma fell and broke her hip last
summer and had to have sur-
gery. Her surgeon? Dr. Mark
Cutright! - KATHY IN
TENNESSEE
DEAR ABBY: Shame on
you! How could you forget
your fellow member of the
Group for Advancement of
Psychiatry - Dr. John
Looney? - FRANCES
ROTON BELL, DALLAS
DEAR ABBY: Here's an
item that might qualify. It's
from the Jan. 16 edition of our
local newspaper: "Charles T.
Sprinkle, 27, of Sandpoint was
cited on a charge of urinating
in public at 11:52 p.m. in the
200 block of Main Street." -
LARRY S. IN IDAHO
DEAR ABBY: Would you
like more names that match?
My optician was named Ralph
Glance, my daughter's aller-
gist was Dr. Eitches, and my
children's dentist is Dr. Spitz.
- SUSAN K., HAYWARD,
CALIF.
DEAR ABBY: When I was
in high school, there was a
family with the last name
"Braa." Guess what the
mom's first name was?


"lona"! My initials are "B.S.,"
but this story is not. - B.S.,
FARIBAULT, MINN.
DEAR ABBY: When my
sister and I were' children,
we'd play a game called "I
Spy" during road trips from
Georgia to Alabama. On one
of them we spotted a septic
tank installation and mainte-
nance company named "Seth
Poole and Sons." - LARRY
IN DOERUN, GA.
DEAR ABBY: I used to
work with a young woman
named Linda Snow. She met
and married a wonderful
man. When she did, she
became Mrs. Snow-White! -
A FAN, SUN CITY, ARIZ.
DEAR ABBY: My sales-
man husband was dealing
with a particularly difficult
client who demanded to
speak to the boss. The reply:
"I'll be happy to transfer you
to him. His name is Robin
Hood; if he isn't in, you can
speak with his secretary -
Marian!" True story, real peo-
ple. - JENNIFER IN
HOUSTON
DEAR ABBY: This isn't
occupation-related, but I
thought you might get a kick
out of it anyway. I went to
school with twins Esther and
Lester Chester and their big
brother, Chester Chester Jr.
And no, I'm not kidding. - L.
LEGGETI, MAGNOLIA,
MISS.
* Write Dear Abby at P.O. Box
69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.


SORRI FOP
/"T


BLONDIE


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


SNUFFY SMITH








LAKE CITY REPORTER


NASCAR


THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2007


Atlanta Motor Speedway
Track length: 1.54 miles
Banking in corners: 24 degrees
Banking on straights: 5 degrees
Seating capacity: 124,000
Year completed: 1960


Classified Department: 755-5440


A LOOK AHEAD:
* Race: Kobalt Tools 500
* When: 1:30 p.m. ET Sunday
* Where: Atlanta Motor Speedway
* TV: Fox


For the Woods, racing is a ...





FAMILY MF


TRADITION


By RICK MINTER
Cox News Service
Atlanta
TTith his 29th-place run in the UAW-
jl DaimlerChrysler 400 at Las Vegas
Y Motor Speedway on Sunday, Jon
Wood wrote another chapter in the story
of the Wood Brothers racing team. Wood's
ride in the family's famous No. 21 Ford
was the first by a Wood family member
since his grandfather Glen Wood, the
team founder, raced at Starkey Speedway
in Roanoke, Va., on Aug. 23,1964. The
elder Wood started on the pole and fin-
ished third in his final ride in the Cup se-
ries.
Like the Petty family from Level Cross,
N.C., the Woods, from Stuart, Va., have
been a part of the sport of NASCAR, rac-
ing almost continually since its inception
in the late 1940s. The Woods have been
steady competitors since 1953, winning 96
races. The Pettys started in the Cup cir-
cuit in its inaugural season of 1949 and
have run cars every year since, winning
268 times.
But despite their successes on the track,
both the Petty and the Wood teams have
the feel of an everyday family business.
Young members of both families say that
if their grandfathers had been farmers,
they'd probably be milking cows or culti-
vating corn on the family farm instead of
racing.
The farm-family feel was evident last
week when a teleconference was held to


publicize Jon Wood's Cup debut. On the
call with him were his father, Eddie Wood,
and his grandfather, Glen Wood.
Jon's comments indicate that he looks
upon racing much like the older members
of his family and the Pettys.
"We're all so used to [racing] that it's
just a way of life," he said. "It's not some-
thing that you look at and consider it
glamorous. There is no heroism in being a
race-car driver or owning a race team. I
guess it's just pure luck, and we all realize
that.
"When we sit down for Christmas every
year at my grandma's house, at Grandma
Bernice's house, I don't think a race car
gets brought up one time. That's cool be-
cause that level of humility is what it
takes to have longevity in this sport."
It also helps that every family member
has a role they're comfortable in, so egos


Wood, in the No. 21 Ford, races
Kyle Petty in the No. 45 Dodge
during Sunday's race at Las Vegas
Motor Speedway.


Jon Wood started a new chapter in
the Wood Brothers' racing saga with
his Nextel Cup debut at Las Vegas
on Sunday. He finished 29th.
don't clash.
Jon's father, Eddie, and his uncle, Len,
have been happy all their lives working
behind the scenes on the cars. Neither
ever showed any great desire to take the
wheel.
'"A lot of people ask Len and me, 'Why
didn't you guys drive?'" Eddie Wood said.
"When we Were the age to drive ... during
the early '70s, when we were having so
much success with [David] Pearson, there
were only like four of us that worked on
that car full time, and there really wasn't
enough time for yourself to go racing.
Now that it's all said and done, where I'm
at and Len is where he is, I'll speak for
myself and say that I didn't have what it
took to do it. If I had, I would have done it.
You'd find a way. If you want to do some-
thing bad enough, you'll find a way."
But what he does want bad enough is to
be just what he is - an integral part of a
.successful team in NASCAR.
"We've been one race team since the be-
ginning, and we've been with Ford Motor 1
Co. the entire time, and we're really proud
of that," he said. "We're still here, and I'm
pretty proud of that."


HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE

A look at some of the people who shaped the sport


Nebraskan's career a great 'what if?' story


By RICK MINTER
Cox News Service
There have been several
drivers through the years who
have mastered Atlanta Motor
Speedway, site of this week's
Kobalt Tools 500. The late Dale
Earnhardt leads all drivers
with nine AMS victories.
Bobby Labonte tops the cur-
rent crop with six victories,
but none of the track's past
winners has a higher winning
percentage than the 1961
Atlanta 500 champion. He was
a newcomer to the track, a 24-
year-oldNebraskan named
Bob Burdick, who drove his fa-
ther's Pontiac to a convincing
win over Rex White.
But despite his success in
his first Atlanta run, Burdick
never came back, so his one-
for-one record is unmatched.
Burdick, now retired and
living in Millard, Neb., is one
of the big "what if?" stories in
NASCAR history
He came to NASCAR young,
handsome, talented and with a
fast car that he and his father,
Roy Burdick, prepared. In


Burdick's first
NASCAR start, he
won the pole at
Trenton, N.J. He
finished second to
Jim Reed in his
first try at treach-
erous Darlington
Raceway
Including his
victory at Atlanta,
Burdick recorded
two poles, three
top-five and nine
top-10 finishes in BU
just 15 career
starts.
White said Burdick had
what it took to be a superstar.
"If he'd stuck with it, he
could have cut the mustard,"
White said.
But Burdick said NASCAR
racing was just too tough at
the time for an independent
team based in faraway
Nebraska.
"You just couldn't make a
living doing it," he said. "It
cost a lot to build the cars and
get them across the country.
At that time, I could make
more money driving cars clos-


IRDICK


er to home." In
his entire
NASCAR career,
he earned
$29,900.
But during the
years, he has
come to realize
that his talents
could have car-
ried him a long
way in NASCAR.
\ "I sure wish
I'd stayed with
it," he said. "I
could have won a


lot of races."
The one he did win, at
Atlanta, sure didn't start that
way
His Pontiac was all but un-
driveable in the practices lead-
ing up to the 500. "We didn't
know what was wrong with
it," he said.
So he, his father and the
crew - made up of some
friends from home who had no
previous racing experience -
made wholesale changes to
the car's suspension.
Their guesses were dead-on
accurate.


"We never put any laps on it
before the race, but once the
race started, it just took off,"
Burdick said. Even losing po-
sitions on pit road because of
his crew's inexperience didn't
slow him for long. He took the
lead when Marvin Panch
broke an axle and he led the
final 43 laps.
Burdick said he felt he could
have won again, at Charlotte.
"We were just getting started,
and I got sick in the car," he
said. "That's the only time
that ever happened to me."
But just as his NASCAR ca-
reer appeared to be on the fast
track, it was over. He raced on
for several years on the short
tracks around Nebraska, then
began making a living in the
construction business.
Still, he has kept up with the
sport, attends races on occa-
sion and helped found the
Nebraska Auto Racing Hall of
Fame. And, he often gets
asked about his brief, but stel-
lar, career down South.
"I was a babe in the woods,"
he said. "But I had an awful lot
of fun."


Rick Minter's

OBSERVATIONS

Some key story lines as the Cup Series heads to Atlanta.
Finally, here comes a favorite
Each year, there are a series of firsts for the Nextel Cup cir-
cuit. The first race of the season at Daytona. The first race on
a track where restrictor plates aren't used, at California. And
this week, for many, the first race where drivers really get to
race like they want. The Kobalt Tools 500 at Atlanta Motor
Speedway takes the Cup circuit to a track where the asphalt
has worn to the point that there are multiple grooves and the
tire compound makes for interesting and varied chassis se-
tups.
"I love Atlanta,'"Jeff Gordon told reporters last week at Las
Vegas. "It is one of my very favorite tracks we go to right now.
I love the surface there, everything about it. It has multiple
grooves, and we have run really good there the last couple of
races. I am looking forward to going back there."
He said that unlike the Vegas race, held on a reconfigured
track with new asphalt and run with cars with hard-com-
pound tires and smaller fuel cells, Atlanta is a driver's dream,
a place where, as Gordon says, "We get to go back to the way
you wish we could be every weekend where you have a worn-
out surface.
"You have a tire that wears out but doesn't seem to blow out,
You have long runs, the regular fuel cell in the current car.
Everything I love about this sport is what is going to happen
(this) weekend at Atlanta."
Rough beginning for Toyota
Three races into its debut season in Nextel Cup, the Toyota
contingent has little to show for itself.
The Red Bull team of Brian Vickers and A.J. Allmendinger
has put a car in a race just once, when Vickers scored a 10th-


place finish at California Speedway
Michael Waltrip has failed to quali-
fy for two races and was docked 100
points for cheating in the Daytona
500, his only start. Dale Jarrett al-
ready has used three of the six past
champion's provisional starting spots
he's allowed this year. And Jeremy
Mayfield has yet to make a race.
Waltrip, who owns the Camry he
drives, as well as the ones driven by
Jarrett and David Reutimann, who
failed to make the field at Vegas after
qualifying for the first two races, told
reporters at Las Vegas that he plans
to hunker down and get his cars up to
speed.
"I'm really concerned about why
we aren't any better than we are, but
we are going to work," he said. "We
have to go to work. We have to figure
things out. We have to change some
things up. We have to rearrange some
people.
" "You cannot define the future by
what we are doing here today"


NEXTEL CUP
STANDINGS
1. Mark Martin
495; leader
2. Jeff Gordon
489; behind: -6
3. Jeff Burton
453; behind: -42
4. Jimmie Johnson
406; behind: -89
5. Matt Kenseth
397; behind: -98
6. Kevin Harvick
389; behind: -106
7. Kyle Busch
382; behind: -113
8. Denny Hamlin
374; behind: -121
9. J.J. Yeley
365; behind: -130
10. Elliott Sadler
342; behind: -153


Back-to-back titles?
Jimmie Johnson showed with his victory Sunday at Las
Vegas and his strong third-place run two weeks ago at
California that his team is good enough to win back-to-back
Nextel Cup championship' s, something that hasn't been done
since 1998, when Johnson's teammate, Jeff Gordon, won his
second straight championship.
Johnson's Vegas victory, his third straight at the track, came
despite a couple of setbacks on pit road, and overcoming set-
backs is one of the strong points of teams that typically win ti-
tles. The victory also moved him up 11 spots in points to
fourth, 89 points behind leader Mark Martin.
Also in Johnson's favor is that he was among the quickest
drivers in a recent test of the Car of Tomorrow, which will be
run in 16 races this season.
All of which adds up to another strong run at the title.
"I also look at it this year with all the changes and the Car of
Tomorrow as a good year for the No. 48," Johnson said earlier
this season. "Chad [Knaus, crew chief] and I do a good job of
learning things on a fast pace."
Top spot could prompt plan revision
It's looking more and more like Mark Martin might once
again back out on his plans to cut back to a part-time Nextel
Cup schedule. Martin was set to drop off the circuit in 2006,
but his previous car owner, Jack Roush, persuaded him to stay
on another year.
Then Martin switched to Ginn Racing, largely because the
plan was for him to alternate races with young Regan Smith,
beginning next week at Bristol.
But entering this week's race at Atlanta Motor Speedway,
Martin is the Nextel Cup points leader, a position that would
be extremely difficult to voluntarily surrender.
Although Martin won't say whether he'll extend his Cup
schedule, he did offer one clue - he tested his No. 01 Chevrolet
at Bristol Motor Speedway, site of the March 25 Food City 500,
the first race that Martin is scheduled to sit out.


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Full Text
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UF00028308_00413.mets
METS:structMap STRUCT1 mixed
METS:div DMDID ORDER 0 main
D1 Main
P1 page Page
METS:fptr FILEID
P2
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P15
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METS:behaviorSec VIEWS Options available to the user for viewing this item
METS:behavior VIEW1 STRUCTID Default View
METS:mechanism Viewer zoomable JPEG2000s Procedure xlink:type simple xlink:title JP2_Viewer()
VIEW2 Alternate
JPEGs JPEG_Viewer()
VIEW3
Related image viewer shows thumbnails each Related_Image_Viewer()
INTERFACES Banners or interfaces which resource can appear under
INT1 Interface
UFDC_Interface_Loader