Citation
Lake City reporter

Material Information

Title:
Lake City reporter
Creator:
Lake City reporter
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2007
Language:
English

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates:
30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Community Newspapers Inc., Todd Wilson - Publisher. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
LTUF ( ABZ6316 )
OCLC ( 33283560 )
AlephBibNum ( 000358016 )

Full Text






WEATHER


Inside 2A


Hi: 55 -v
Low: 33 c
Partly Sunny


L" I


Eight-Month "
Battle Ends
Derby winner
Barbaro euthanized.
Sports. I B Im i


-- -- -. -


ri
FiJ


ip -Z


32611


. Swinging At
Life's Curveball . .
Kids learn to cope with -
mother's terminal illness.
Health, 8A






Reporter


Tuesday, January 30, 2007


www.lakecityreporter.com


Vol. 133, No. 10 50 cents


JALA HARRIS/Lake City Reporter
Keith Hatcher, principal
of Fort White High
School, explains the
steps the school is
taking to insure the
safety of the students
and faculty.


Teen's

death

remains

unsolved

Live Oak youth was
killed by hit-and-run
driver on Jan. 13.
By RACHEL GOMEZ
rgomez@lakecityreporter.com
WELLBORN - No new leads
have emerged in the hit-and-run
death of a Live Oak teen, who was
struck while walking along
County Road 137 on the morning
of Jan. 13.
"We are still asking people with
any information to contact us,"
said Lt. Mike Burroughs of the
Florida Highway Patrol. "We don't
want it to turn into a cold case.
Even the smallest tid-bit of infor-
mation that someone may assume
we already know may lead us to
major information that may solve
the case."
David Jeffrey Nelson, 16, of
Live Oak was struck by a vehicle
while walking along the north-
bound lane of County Road 137 in
the early morning hours of Jan.
13. Burroughs said some of the
injuries the teenager received lead
officials to believe a large pick-up
or large truck struck the teenager.
Paint chips are being examined in
a lab while officials continue to
gather evidence.
';. Burroughs said officials under-
- stand the ambient conditions the
night of the accident, and their
highest priority is being able to
bring closure to the victim's family.
"We want to stress that we
know it was a foggy night and
there were poor lighting condi-
tions," Burroughs said. "We
understand that the person who
struck the teenager thought they
may have struck an animal. We
ask that anyone who thought they
hit an animal or heard a thud to
come forward. It's important for
the family to receive closure."


Water main break
over the weekend
necessitated action.
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
FORT WHITE - The town of
Fort White is under a three- to four-
'day boiled water notice after a water
main broke over the weekend.
Edmund Hudson, Town of
Fort White Public Works direc-
tor, said the water main break
.occurred Saturday evening.
'There was an unexpected


break on the charcoal filter sys-
tem," he said. "It blew out our
four-inch line, the pumps kicked
on and literally just dumped the
water out of the tanks."
As a result of the water main
break, Fort White and its resi-
dents are under a boiled water
notice.
"We're under the boiled water
notice because that's the require-
ment of the Department of
Environmental Protection
(DEP)," Hudson said. "... Anytime
there is major interruption of the
WATER continued on 10A


KASAK NAMED BUSINESS PERSON OF THE YEAR


JALA HARRISILake City Reporter
John Kasak, of John Kasak State Farm Insurance, makes his way through the crowd to accept Lake City-Columbia
County Chamber of Commerce's 2006 Business Person of the Year award during its annual meeting and dinner Monday
night at Lake City Community College.


Chamber of Commerce holds

annual dinner and meeting


Hackney, Williams
awarded for dedication
to the community.
By LINDSAY DOWNEY
Idowney@lakecityreporter. corn
John Kasak, of John Kasak State
Farm Insurance, was named the Lake
City-Columbia County Chamber of
Commerce's 2006 Business Person of
the Year during its annual meeting
and dinner Monday night at Lake


City Community College's Howard
Gymnasium.
Kasak was honored for the way
he runs his business and for serving
the community. Kasak is an active
leader in the Chamber and in sever-
al other community organizations,
including United Way of Suwannee
Valley, Inc., Kiwanis Club of Lake
City and Columbia County Senior
Services, Inc.
Kasak said he was honored as he
accepted the award from 2006
Chamber President and LCCC


President Dr. Chuck Hall. The busi-
ness leader thanked his wife, his son
and his employees for their support.
"I always have to thank my staff
because they do such a good job
when I'm out of the office," Kasak said.
Local leaders Louis Williams and
TA Hackney also received awards
for their dedication to the community.
"I think they are very good exam-
ples of what we would like to be,"
Chamber Executive Director Jim
CHAMBER continued on 7A


Fort White under boiled-water notice


CARACAS,
Hugo Chavez
everything a
president
could want:


Venezuela -
has just about


popular sup-
port, a mar-
ginalized
opposition,
congress
f i r m yChavez
on his side and a booming
economy as he starts his new
six-year term.
Now, he's about to become
even more powerful - the all-
Chavista National Assembly is
poised to approve a "mother
law" as early as Wednesday
enabling him to remake
CHAVEZ continued on 7A


Springs working group schedules first meeting of 2007
Update on wastewater Ichetucknee Springs Basin Working The six-mile long Ichetucknee wastewater treatment, which would scheduled to include a present
management will be Group meeting at the Columbia River is fed by Ichetucknee Springs, reduce the nitrates to 3 milligrams from a Department
management wl l be County Emergency Operations Center, which has its headspring in the per liter, which is very good." Environmental Protection repre
focus on Wednesday. 263 Lake City Ave., local officials and Ichetucknee Springs State Park. In addition to the presentation on tative, Greg Lee, who will discu
,- i - t irdt i i d-ritLr I i11 P1t-f-.nI- I t i+ ; d I. , �LUi ciVf lit iI I - l -d inf . oa -f --- f - 1 -


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Waste Water manage-
ment program is expected to have a
huge impact on the future of Columbia
County and Ichetucknee Springs.
As part of the 9 a.m. Wednesday


se1 eiU i LC nteres CU nll pULrotect UIng
Ichetucknee Springs will learn how the
project will impact the area.
Jim Stevenson, Ichetucknee
Springs Basin Working group coordi-
nator, said he believes one of the main
topics for the meeting will be the Lake
City Wastewater Management Update
by Scott Reynolds.


ast stuLIIes nave sownI maLt water
from Lake City often ends up the
springs.
"He's going to tell us the plans that
the regional utility authority has for
wastewater management," he said.
'The idea is to reduce the nitrates
flowing to Ichetucknee Springs and
they've proposed to go to advanced


MUe wastewater management project,
Stevenson also singled out a scheduled
presentation by Columbia County
Commissioner, Dewey Weaver, as
another meeting high point
"He's going to give a talk about his
perspective on protecting the
Ichetucknee," Stevenson said.
In addition the meeting is also


ition
of
esen-
.ss a


hypoteutical chemical spill scenario
in the basin.
"He's going to talk about how DEP
and the county would take care of it,"
Stevenson said. "It's a real diverse
agenda with lots of subjects and
we're going to learn a lot."
SPRINGS continued on 10A


-SWI� -i-,�H � 45M�oB� ..- ."*, -. . .
IICALLUS: INSIDE
(386) 752-1293 IS
business
SUBSCRIBE TO Bnss
THE REPORTER: CIaissified
Voice: 755-5445 Comics
1 .... . I1 Fax: 752-9400 Local & State


Obituaries
Opinon
PuJzzles
School


TODAY IN
BUSINESS
.'" :r. -1,- ' . ' I-. - _.ITe il


COMING
WEDNESDAY


Man

dies in

vehicle

wreck

Victim was ejected
and landed on
homeowner's lawn.

By RACHEL GOMEZ
rgomez@lakecityreporter.com
A local homeowner along
State Road 10 discovered a
man dead in his front yard
Sunday morning, the result of
a fatal one-car wreck late
Saturday night.
"My brother-in-law (who
lives across the street) had
called me and told me there
was a car in the front yard,"
said Edgar Clauser, the resi-
dent who discovered the driv-
er and the crash. "I thought
somebody had just had car
trouble .and stopped for the
night, but about halfway down
the drive way I saw the man.
He had been ejected from the
vehicle."
WRECK continued on 10A


Chavez

plans to

remake

society

Venezuela president
about to begin new
six-year term.

By IAN JAMES
Associated Press


W-M










LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING TUESDAY, JANUARY 30, 2007


Sunday:
3-4-16-21-36


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS


Smith honored for his work


SANTA BARBARA, Calif. - Will
Smith was honored with the Modern
Master Award - an honor that says he
is a master of his craft - at the Santa
Barbara International Film Festival.
Smith is nominated for a best-actor
Oscar for his performance in 'The
Pursuit of Happyness" as a struggling
single father in San Francisco who
beats the odds and goes from rags to
riches.
Asked what it takes to be a good


Taylor's suit claims
she was slandered


LOS ANGELES - Niki
Taylor filed a federal slander
lawsuit against E!
Entertainment for alleged
intentional infliction of
emotional distress with its
profile of the model in the
new series "Blvd. of Broken
Dreams."
The U.S. District Court
suit, filed Friday, also alleged
fraud, breach of contract and
invasion of privacy claiming
E! Entertainment
representatives falsely
claimed the show would
focus on Taylor's current
life.


Taylor


father, Smith said patience, compassion
and commitment. He's the father of
three in real life, including 7-year-old
Jaden, who co-stars in the movie.
"You've got to really want to be a
good father," he told reporters on the
red carpet outside the Arlington
Theatre on Saturday night.
Tom Cruise presented the festival's
Modern Master Award to Smith.
Smith said he was pleased with the
film's success.


The
cable
network all
egedly told
Taylor and
manager
Lou Taylor,
no
relation, the


show would feature current
professional endeavors,
including her signature
fragrance, clothing line,
upcoming cosmetics line and
charitable foundation, the
suit said.
Instead, the suit said,
defendants E! Entertainment
Television Inc., E! Networks
Productions Inc. and a
producer focused on Taylor's
past hardships and


Celebrity Birthdays


* Comedian Dick Martin is
85.
* Actress Dorothy Malone
is 82.
* Producer-director Harold
Prince is 79.
* Actor Gene Hackman is
77.
* Actress Tammy Grimes is
73.
* Actress Vanessa
Redgrave is 70.
* Country-singer Jeanne
Pruett is 70.
*-Country singer Norma -


Will Smith


characterized her as a
celebrity "who risked
everything ... and lost."
The E! synopsis of the
show on its Web site
describes "Blvd. of Broken
Dreams" as, "In a place
between heaven and
Hollywood, dreams turn
tragic and fame goes sour
fast."
"My life is far from a
'boulevard of broken
dreams,"' Taylor said in a
statement.
Last week's premiere
episode of "Blvd. of Broken
Dreams" was repeatedly
shown on the cable network
despite demands from
Taylor's lawyers that it be
pulled from the lineup,


Taylor attorney Caroline H.
Mankey said.
'They neglected their
journalistic obligations to
report truthfully and
accurately; they violated
express promises they made
to the plaintiff, supermodel
Niki Taylor; and they
demonstrated a
reprehensible disregard for
the substantial harm their
actions would cause to Ms.
Taylor," the complaint said.
Telephone voicemail and
e-mail messages to E! '
Entertainment spokeswoman
Sarah Goldstein weren't
immediately returned.
* Associated Press


Thought for Today


Jean is 69.
* Vice President Dick
Cheney is 66.
* Rock singer Marty Balin
is 65.
* lhythm-and-blues
musician William King (The
Commodores) is 58.
* Singer Phil Collins is 56.
* Actor Charles S. Dutton is
56.
* Actress-comedian Brett
Butler is 49.
* Singer Jody Watley is 48.
.- Actor Christian Bale is 33.


"It is the tragedy of the world that
no one knows what he doesn't
know - and the less a man knows,
the more sure ihe is that he knows
everything."

- Joyce Cary,
English author (1888-1957)


Highway Patrol urges

Brandy be charged


By JEREMIAH MARQUEZ
Associated Press
LOS ANGELES - The
California Highway Patrol rec-
ommended Monday that
actress-singer Brandy be
charged with misdemeanor
vehicular manslaughter in a
freeway crash that killed a
woman motorist last month, a
city attorney's spokesman told
The Associated Press.
The CHP referred the mat-
ter to the city attorney's office
for review, said spokesman
Nick Velasquez.
'"The office is currently
reviewing the case and deter-
mining whether the evidence
warrants the filing of a misde-
meanor charge of vehicular
manslaughter," Velasquez said.
A message seeking


comment

Brandy's
publicist,
Courtney
Barnes, was
not immedi-
Brandy a t e 1 y
returned.
Brandy, whose real name is
Brandy Norwood, has publicly
expressed condolences to the
victim's family, Barnes said last
week. Barnes also has said
Brandy wasn't under the influ-
ence of drugs or alcohol at the
time of the crash.
Brandy, 27, was driving a
Land Rover on Interstate 405
on Dec. 30 when traffic slowed
and her vehicle struck the
back of Honda driven by
Awatef Aboudihaj, 38, accord-
ing to a CHP report.


Lake City Reporter


HOW TO REACH US
Main number ..........(386) 752-1293
Fax number ................752-9400
Circulation .................755-5445
Online ...... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is published
Tuesday through Sunday at 180 E. Duval St.,
Lake City, Fla. 32055. Periodical postage paid
at Lake City, Fla. Member Audit Bureau of
Circulation and The Associated Press. ,
All material herein is property of the Lake City
Reporter. Reproduction in whole or in part is
forbidden without the permission of the pub-
lisher. U.S. Postal Service No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to
Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City,
Fa. 32056.
Publisher Michael Leonard ....754-0418
(mleonard@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
If you have a news tip, call any member of the
news staff or 752-5295.
Editor Todd Wilson ..........754-0428
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Jim Kennedy ........754-0417
(ads@lakecityreporter.com)


CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.
BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon .......754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m. Tuesday
through Saturday, and by 7:30 a.m. on
Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any prob-
lems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should call
before 10:30 a.m. to report a service error for
same day re-delivery. After 10:30 a.m., next
day re-delivery or service related credits will
be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery is
available, next day re-delivery or service relat-
ed credits will be issued.
Director A. Russell Waters ... .754-0407
(rwaters@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
13 Weeks ..................... $23.54
26 Weeks .....................$42.80
52 Weeks .....................$83.46
Rates include 7% sales tax.
Mail rates
13 Weeks .................... $44.85
26 Weeks ..................... $89.70
52 Weeks .................... $179.40


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news items.
If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please call the
executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run in this
space. And thanks for reading. .


Falling chunk of ice
smashes Tampa car
TAMPA - Raymond
Rodriguez was changing a
tire when an 18-inch chunk of
ice plummeted from the sky
with a piercing whistle, then
a metallic crunch.
The ice chunk crushed the
roof of a nearby Ford
Mustang on Sunday morning.
No one was hurt.
"I was-scared," Rodriguez
said, who was only feet away.
"It's crazy, man."
The Federal Aviation
Administration is reviewing
flight schedules to see if the
ice fell off a plane. The ice
did not have a blue tint that
would indicate it came from a
plane's lavatory. The National
Weather Service said
conditions in Tampa were not
favorable for the formation of
large balls of ice, known as
megacryometeors.
"It's not an act of God,"
said Carlos Javage, whose
son's car was wrecked by the
mystery ice. "This came off
an airplane."

Help filling out
forms offered
TALLAHASSEE -
Education officials said
Monday they hope to double
last year's turnout of students
seeking help to fill out
financial aid forms during
Florida's second annual
College Goal Sunday on
Feb. 25.
The national effort is
designed to help minority,
low-income and first-
generation college prospects
obtain financial assistance.
Florida participated for the
first time last year, drawing
more than 1,000 people.
They included Emanuel
Torres, then a high school
senior. He now attends
Valencia Community College
in Orlando with a financial aid
package he obtained as a
result of help he received last
year.
"I've always dreamed of


going to college, but for me
it's just not a dream - it's for
my family," Torres said at a
capital city news conference.
Torres also won a $500
scholarship through a
drawing among participants.
Similar drawings will be held
this year at 48 sites serving
44 of Florida's 67 counties.

Stranded dolphin
to be released
SARASOTA - A pregnant
bottlenose dolphin found
stranded at Vero Beach in
November has recovered and
will be released back into the
ocean, officials said Monday.
The 10-foot dolphin will be
released today near Fort
Pierce, the Mote Marine
Laboratory in Sarasota said.
The dolphin, named
Castaway, has been
rehabilitating at the marine
laboratory since beachgoers
found her and contacted the
Harbor Branch
Oceanographic Institution's
marine mammal stranding
team.
Scientists will continue to
track Castaway after she is
released through a VHF radio
transmitter affixed to her
dorsal fin.

Arraignment for
couple delayed
MIAMI - A judge has
delayed arraignment until
next month for the founders
of a prominent Brazilian
evangelical church who are
accused of attempting to
smuggle more than $56,000
into the United States.
U.S. Magistrate Judge
Andrea Simonton agreed to
the postponement until Feb. 6
at the request of federal
prosecutors and attorneys for
the couple, Estevam
Hernandes-Filho and Sonia
Haddad Moraes Hernandes.
The arraignment hearing had
been scheduled for Monday.
The couple, who founded
Brazil's Reborn in Christ
Church, is accused of


THEWEATHER


attempting to smuggle
$56,467 into the United States
when they arrived at Miami
International Airport on
Jan. 8 from Sao Paulo, Brazil.
They declared to customs
officials they were carrying
less than $10,000.
Inspectors said they found
money stashed inside a Bible,
a CD case, a suit jacket
pocket in suitcase and in a
backpack carried aboard the
plane by the couple's son.
Brazilian authorities have
also issued arrest warrants
for the couple on fraud and
other charges, contending
that they took money from
church parishioners to buy
millions of dollars in real
estate and other assets. Brazil
is seeking extradition of the
couple from the United States
to face those charges in
Brazil.

Barber retires from
student newspaper
GAINESVILLE - Ed
Barber is retiring after 30
years as the general manager
of the Independent Florida
Alligator, the autonomous
student newspaper at the
University of Florida.
Barber has been diagnosed
with cancer and resigned this
month largely because of
health concerns. His wife and
high school sweetheart,
Judith Margaret Tuck, died
in 2004.
Barber, 67, began his
career at the Alligator as a
student reporter and took
over as general manager in
1976. Patricia Carey, who was
the paper's assistant general
manager, has been appointed
to replace him.
Even as a child, Barber
was thinking differently than
his friends. At the age of 9,
he started a neighborhood
newsletter and filled it with.
stories.
"I guess I caught the
(journalism) bug at that time,
but it only lasted two issues,"
he said.
* Associated Press


Pensacola
56/38


Talahassee
52/36 a
Panama City.
- 58/41-"


*Valdosta Jacksc
53/33 56,
Lake City,
55/33
"\ Gainesville * Dayton
. 56/34 61
"-/ Ocalas
- 58/33
i rla
62/


Tampa a
61. 42.

Ft. Myers,
68/44


Key Wes
71/6(


TEMPERATURES
High Monday
Low Monday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
*Monday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


49
30
67
43
85 in 1950
21 in 1940


0.00"
3.88"
3.88"
3.27"
3.27"


Tuesday Wednesday








""-'Forecasted temperature "Fed like" tee


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise tom.
Sunset tornm.


onville
34


City Wednesday
Cape Canaveral 64/ 56/ pu,


Daytona Beach
Beach Ft. Lauderdale
1/37 Fort Myers
tape Canaveral Gainesville
* 63/43 Jacksonville
ndo Key West
'39 Lake City
Miami
\ Naples
West Palm Beach ocala
69/47 e Orlando
Ft. Lauderdale Panama City
70/54 Pensacola
Naples 4 Tallahassee
8/,47 Miami Tampa
71/55 Valdosta
st .\ W. Palm Beach
0 ..


7:22 ,a.m.
6:06 p.m.
7:22 a.m.
6:06 p.m.


MOD
45m
Toc


MOON ult
Moonrise today 3:37 p.m. rac
Moonset today 5:36 a.m. for
Moonrise tom. 4:41 p.m. a s
Moonset tom. 6:26 a.m.


Feb. Feb. Feb. Feb.
2 10 17 24
Full Last New First



6a On this date in
1989, The tempera-
ture at McGrath,
Alaska dipped to 62
degrees below zero,
and Fairbanks report-
ed a reading of 51
degrees below zero,
with unofficial read-
ings in the area as
cold as 75 degrees
below zero.
iperature


4

mtes to bum
day's
ra-violet
jiation risk
r the area on
scale from 0
10+.


61/52/pc
73/63/pc
72/56/pc
56/44/pc
54/41/pc
75/66/pc
54/41/pc
74/64/pc
71/58/pc
59/45/pc
63/51/pc
52/51/pc
50/49/sh
50/45/pc
65/56/pc
49/46/sh
72/61/pc


Thursday
74/ 65 / pc
76/63/pc
81/71/pc
80/67/pc
72/56/c
69/53/c
79/67/pc
69/53/sh
81/71/pc
77/68/pc
74/57/pc
78/62/pc
67/56/t
62/50/t
67/55/sh
76/66/pc
69/55/sh
81/70/pc


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.



weather.com


S.- Forecasts, data and graphics
S- � 2007 Weather Central,
- , Inc., Madison, Wis.
www.weatherpublisher.com

|-


-3

Monday:
7-2-4


* 4 '7
Monday:
4-0-2-7


AROUND FLORIDA


PARTLY - PARTLY .. CHANCE
SUNNY | SUNNY OWNERS


HI 55 LO 33 H154L041 lI69LO53


~NcE


kmm . -1 -- mmmmm"o


Ar
P16


Page Editor: Chris Bednar, 754-0404


9=0 �,- --









LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE TUESDAY, JANUARY 30, 2007


Crist seeks $21.8M for Anti-Murder Act


By RON WORD
Associated Press
JACKSONVILLE - Gov.
Charlie Crist Monday said he
wants the Legislature to pass
his Anti-Murder Act to help
reduce violent crimes and
Internet child pornography
by forcing judges to keep vio-
lent criminals in jail pending
trial if they are accused of
violating probation.
Crist said he will ask the
Legislature to allocate $21.8
million to implement the act,
which has failed twice before.
An additional 1,352 offenders
will be imprisoned under the
act at a cost of $161.8 million
over the next three years, he
said.
"Florida has already lost too
many people, too early in their
lives," Crist said. "We cannot
permit violent felony
offenders to walk the streets if
they violate the terms of their
probation."
Crist said many of violent
crimes against children have
been committed by people
who have violated their proba-
tion. He mentioned the slay-
ings of Carlie Brucia, Jessica
Lunsford, Sarah Lunde and
the six young people slain in
Deltona in 2004 over an Xbox
video game system.
Crist, joined by Attorney
General Bill McCollum,
Mayor John Peyton and
Jacksonville Sheriff John
Rutherford, selected a high


BRIEFS

Winter chill sweeps
across state
MIAMI - Forecasters predict
a sudden drop in the mercury
overnight as freezing
temperatures are expected
across the state, stretching
from as far south as Broward
County and up the coast to
Putnam County.
Temperatures will fall into the
low 30s with gusty winds that
could feel like the 20s, said
Matt Zibura, a meteorologist
with the National Weather
Service.
A hard freeze warning is in
effect starting Sunday night for
the northwest Florida
Panhandle, except for coastal
sections. A hard freeze means
temperatures are expected to
fall below 26 degrees for at
least five hours.
A freeze warning is in effect
for all the northeast counties,
except for Flagler County, from
5 a.m. to 8 a.m. Monday
morning. A freeze watch is in
effect in those areas through
Tuesday morning, according to
the National Weather Service.
A freeze watch is also in
effect in Glades and Hendry
counties and eastern Collier
County and western Broward
County.
Freeze warnings mean
subfreezing temperatures for at
least two hours, which could kill
plants and other vegetation.
Forecasters encouraged
residents to bring pets indoors
and cover up exposed pipes.
Monday night could be the
coldest night of the year with
temperatures dropping rapidly
after the sun goes down. A hard
freeze is expected for all of
northeast Florida.

Detective kills
elderly man
JACKSONVILLE - An
elderly man was shot and
killed in an exchange of
gunfire with undercover
narcotics detectives during a
neighborhood drug sweep,
authorities said.
Police declined to released
the name of the dead man
Sunday. Neighbors described
him as an elderly man who
may have mistaken the
officers for drug dealers.
"He didn't do nothing wrong,
but they shot him," neighbor
Vanessa Johnson said. "He
was just trying to protect his
yard, and now he's dead."
The undercover detectives
were posing as drug dealers in
a reverse sting operation
when the man confronted
them with a gun, Jacksonville
Sheriff's Office Chief of
Investigations Dwain Senterfitt
said. It is unclear who fired
first. The man was
pronounced dead at a local
hospital.
"You don't expect people to
come point a gun at you,"
Senterfitt said. "At that point, it
became about officer safety."
* Associated Press


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Florida Gov. Charlie Crist (left) admires the flowers on the porch of
resident Elvener Bailey (center) during his walk through the
neighborhood, Monday, with Jacksonville Mayor John Peyton, and
Jacksonville Sheriff John Rutherford (right). Crist was in
Jacksonville, to announce his budget recommendations to
implement the Anti-Murder Act and increase cyber crime
investigations and prevent Internet crimes against children.


crime area of Jacksonville to
discuss the act, which he first
visited when he was attorney
general. While campaigning
for governor, Crist said
passing the act was his first
priority.
Jacksonville had about 110
murders and 140 homicides in
2006 and local authorities
have been working to try to
reduce the murder and vio-
lence rate. Between 1999 and
2005, Jacksonville was the


murder capital in Florida,
based on its population. Final
figures are not yet available
for 2006.
"My proposed budget
reflects a comprehensive plan
to help ensure the safety of all
Floridiafs and keep criminals
off the streets and away from.
our children," Crist said.
Sen. Paula Dockery,
R-Lakeland, said she would
again sponsor the legislation
(SB146) and work to have it


ready by the opening of the
Legislature on March 6.
'"This is the year," Dockery
said.
Crist said the 2005 Jessica
Lunsford Act was an impor-
tant first step toward protect-
ing Florida's children, but the
legislation would make chil-
dren even safer from sex
offenders and predators.
The Anti-Murder Act failed
in 2004 its first attempt when
lawmakers questioned the
cost of keeping thousands of
additional suspects in county
jails awaiting trial. During last
year's legislative session, the
bill was unanimously
approved in the House, but
never made it out of the
Senate.
The measure covers defen-
dants who are accused of vio-
lating probation for prior
offenses, including murder,
attempted murder, kidnap-
ping, sexual battery, robbery,
burglary, lewd or lascivious
battery and computer
pornography.
Crist also announced he
wants to spend $3.7 million to
increase the staff of Florida's
Child Predator and
CyberCrime Unit from 10 to
50 people. This will increase
the number of sexual preda-
tors arrested and prosecuted
from 30 per year to more than
200 per year, he said.
Details of Crist's budget
will be released Friday.


Miami planning Orange Bowl

party after Castro's death


Associated Press


MIAMI - With Fidel
Castro seriously ill, the city of
Miami is making plans to
throw a party at the Orange
Bowl when the Cuban
president dies.
The city commission earlier
this month appointed a com-
mittee - whose official job is
to "Discuss an event at the
Orange Bowl in case expected
events occur in Cuba" - to
plan the party.Such a.gather-.
ing has long been part of the
city's Castro death plan, but
firming up the specifics has
become more urgent since
Castro became ill last summer.
and turned over power to his
brother, Raul.
City Commissioner Tomas
Regalado, a Cuban American,
came up with the idea of using
the venue for an event timed to
Castro's demise. The Orange
Bowl was the site of a speech
by President Kennedy in 1961
promising a free Cuba and in
the 1980s it served as a camp
for refugees from the Mariel
boatlift.
"(Castro) represents every-
thing bad that has happened to
the people of Cuba for 48


"(Castro)
represents
everything bad
that has
happened to the
people of Cuba
for 48 years."

- Tomas Regalado,
City Commissioner
years," Regalado said. "There
is something to celebrate,
regardless of what happens
next....We get rid of the guy."
At the committee's first
meeting last week, former
state Rep. Luis Morse stressed
the need for an uplifting theme
for the party - one not preoc-
cupied with a human being's
passing. The committee dis-
cussed including such a theme
on T-shirts that would be
made by private vendors for
the event.
Several questions have to be
decided. What musicians
would perform? The city
hopes entertainers will donate
their services. How long will
the event last? Hours? Days?
And how much will it cost?


The plans have been criti-
cized on Spanish language
radio locally as the city dictat-
ing where people should party
- many would prefer to cele-
brate on the streets of Little
Havana. The city says the
Orange Bowl celebration
would not preclude that.
'"fThis is not a mandatory
site," Regalado said of the
Orange Bowl. "Just a place for
people to gather."
Ramon Saul Sanchez, leader,
of the Miami-based
Democracy Movement organi-
zation, worries about how a
party to celebrate a man's
death would be perceived by
those outside the Cuban exile
community. He also pointed
out that even when Castro
dies, his communist govern-
ment will still be in place.
'"The notion of a big party, I
think, should be removed
from all this," Sanchez said.
"Although everybody will be
very happy that the dictator
cannot continue to oppress us
himself, I think everybody is
still very sad because there
are still prisons full of prison-
ers, many people executed,
and families divided."


Newspaper: Felons exploit loopholes

in Florida concealed weapons law


Associated Press
FORT LAUDERDALE - A
pizza driver wanted for fatally
shooting a teen customer over
stolen chicken wings and a
man convicted of choking and
slapping his 4-year-old
nephew for playing with a
light switch are among those
licensed by the state of Florida
to carry concealed guns, a
newspaper reported Sunday.
A South Florida Sun-
Sentinel analysis of state
records found loopholes,
errors and miscommunication
gave hundreds of criminals
access to concealed weapons


permits.
Among the roughly 410,000
Floridians licensed to carry a
hidden gun: 1,400 people who
pleaded guilty or no contest to
felonies, 216 people with out-
standing warrants, 128 people
with active domestic violence
injunctions and six registered
sex offenders, the newspaper
reported.
"I had no idea," said Baker
County Sheriff Joey Dobson,
who sits on an advisory panel
for the state Division of
Licensing, which issues con-
cealed weapon permits. "I
think the system, somewhere
down the line, is broken. I


guarantee you the ordinary
person doesn't know (that) ...
and I'd venture to guess that
160 legislators in Florida don't
know that, either."
The newspaper obtained
names of those on the state's
concealed weapon's permit
list shortly before state law-
makers sealed it from public
scrutiny on July 1.
Marion Hammer, a
Tallahassee lobbyist for the
National Rifle Association,
blamed law enforcement gaps,
"bleeding-heart, criminal-cod-
dling judges and prosecutors"
for missteps that put guns in
the hands of criminals.


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POLICE REPORTS


Arrest Log
The following information
was provided by local law
enforcement agencies. The
following people have been
arrested but not convicted. All
people are presumed innocent
unless proven guilty.
Friday, Jan. 26
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
* Alicia A. Lehman, 19, 177
SE Sears Court, dealing in
stolen property, grand theft,
theft and cheating.
* Allen Bernard Cobb, 19,


1376 NW Lake Jeffery Road,
warrant: Grand theft and
violation of probation on original
charges of possession of
marijuana and drug
paraphernalia.
Saturday, Jan. 27
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
* Silas Paul Bocanegra,
18,129 SE Aaron Glen,
discharge of a firearm in public.
* Wilbur A. Webb, 23, 983
NW Moore Rd., grand theft and
criminal mischief.
* James Edward Schofield,
28, 232 SW Possum Glen,
Fort White, warrant: Burglary
of a dwelling, petit theft, battery


and resisting arrest without
violence.
* From staff reports



a minute e ,

Our customers receive
a Complimentary
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Lake City Reporter
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Page Editor: Chris Bednar, 754-0404













OPINION


Tuesday, January 30, 2007


www.lakecityreporter.com


EDITORIAL


Chamber


continues


to prosper

The Lake City-Columbia
County Chamber of
Commerce had another
banner year in 2006 and
that year was celebrated
Monday night with a banquet at Lake
City Community College.
Under the leadership of President
Chuck Hall, the Chamber flourished
throughout the county, as the group
worked to bring new businesses on
board and help others who utilize their
Chamber memberships.
New businesses continue to open
and expand in Columbia County and
2007 looks to be off to a good start as
the Chamber membership continues
to grow.
Keith Brown, chief financial officer
for S&S Food Stores, now takes the
helm of the Chamber as its 2007
president. Challenges always face
businesses, but the Chamber and
its growing membership form an
organization of support that assists
businesses in their efforts to thrive.
The Chamber also provides a strong
network to help link business members
with others in the community, as well as
to resources necessary for success.
It's a good organization with a
positive outlook toward a prosperous
year in business in Columbia County.

HIGHLIGHTS
IN HISTORY
Today is Tuesday, Jan. 30, the 30th
day of 2007. There are 335 days left in
the year.
* In 1883, James Ritty and John Birch
received a U.S. patent for the first cash
register.
K In 1933, Adolf Hitler became
chancellor of Germany. -
* In 1933, the first episode of the "Lone
Ranger" radio program was broadcast on
station WXYZ in Detroit.
* In 1948, Indian political and spiritual
leader Mahatma Gandhi was murdered by
a Hindu extremist.
* In 1962, two members of "The Flying
Wallendas" high-wire act were killed when
their seven-person pyramid collapsed
during a performance in Detroit.
* In 1968, during the Vietnam War, the
Tet Offensive began as Communist forces
launched surprise attacks against South
Vietnamese provincial capitals.
* In 1972, 13 Roman Catholic civil
rights marchers were shot to death by
British soldiers in Northern Ireland on what
became known as "Bloody Sunday."
* In 1981, an estimated 2 million
New Yorkers turned out for a ticker-tape
parade honoring the freed American
hostages from Iran.

Lake City Reporter
serving Columbia County since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is published with
pride for residents of Columbia and
surrounding counties by Community
Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities - "Newspapers get
things done!"
Our primary goal is to publish
distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard work.
Michael Leonard, publisher
Todd Wilson, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
. Tom Wood, chairman

OUR POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be typed or
neatly written and double spaced. Letters
should not exceed 400 words and will be edited
for length and libel. Letters must be signed and
include the writer's name, address and
telephone number for verification. Writers can
have two letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of the
writers and not necessarily that of the Lake City


Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City,
FL 32056; or drop off at 180 E. Duval St.
downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL: news@lakecityreporter.com


COMMENTARY


Diversity can pave the road


toward energy security

ou don't have to be . can run on electricity, a source
a military strategist of energy not dependent on
on the order of petroleum. A commuter
Sun Tzu or Carl ' traveling less than about 40
von Clausewitz to miles a day would plug in his
understand this: It is a bad idea a.. w car at night and go months
to fund your enemy's war effort. without re-filling his tank -
But every time we fill the and when he did it could be
tanks of our cars with gasoline Cliff May with an alternative fuel.
we put money in the pockets of What might those fuels be?
terrorists intent on killing bipartisan support - to get In Brazil, an increasing number
Americans. both moving down the road: of cars run on ethanol made
When will our elected The DRIVE Act (for from sugar, a crop that grows
officials finally grapple with this Dependence Reduction easily in tropical climates.
problem? Maybe now. In his through Innovation in Vehicles Currently, the American tariff
State of the Union Speech last and Energy) is based on an on such fuel is 54 cents a gallon
week, President Bush sounded energy security blueprint - compared to zero cents a
serious about "diversifying" drafted by Set America Free gallon for Middle Eastern oil. I
America's energy supply, about (www.setamericafree.org), would hope we could find a few
developing an energy policy which former CIA director politicians courageous enough
that does not leave Americans Jim Woolsey calls "a coalition to stand up to the lobbyists
interminably at the mercy of of tree huggers, do-gooders, who favor discriminating
such regimes as those in sodbusters, cheap hawks and against poor South American
Tehran and Caracas. And in evangelicals." (Full disclosure: farmers while subsidizing
Congress, legislation already Both Woolsey and I are among Saudi billionaires and
* has been introduced that could its members.) fire-breathing Iranian mullahs.
at least begin to reduce the If passed into law, your next Other ideas that Congress
economic, political and military new car could be a Flexible Fuel should consider: The tar sands
power of Middle Eastern oil. Vehicle (FFV): It would be able of Alberta contain as much
More on that in a moment, to utilize not just gasoline but energy as the deserts of
First, lefs be clear: Oil is also a variety of non-petroleum Arabia. The Canadian Coalition
different from other products. If liquid fuels. That would provide for Democracies is pushing for
the French offend me, I can buy an incentive to the private sector a U.S.-Canadian partnership
wine from Australia instead. If to produce those fuels and that would exploit the tar sands
the price of beef goes up, I can make them widely available. for the benefit of both countries
dine on lamb. But oil enjoys a Imagine if you could pull up to a on a long-term basis.
kind of monopoly: If you drive a pump and choose between Let's be clear: Oil will be a
car, you have no choice but to conventional gas and similarly valuable resource for decades to
buy fuels refined from priced alternative fuels guaran- come and American will not be
petroleum, a resource most teed not to fund terrorists. "energy independent" any time
abundant in countries where Which would you choose? soon. But we'd hand over less
hostility toward Americans runs How much more will such money to terrorist masters if we
high. Currently, we spend about cars cost? Less than $150 - a put an end to oil's monopoly,
$150 million a day on oil from small sacrifice for the war and diminished the dominance
the Persian Gulf and more than effort. And you'd actually of oil controlled by despots who
$70 million a day on oil from pay less than that once tax conspire to destroy us.
Venezuela. incentives were included in the We have the scientific,
Two obvious solutions: deal. Also think of the FFV as a technological and
First, develop liquid fuels from safety feature, akin to seatbelts entrepreneurial abilities.
other resources and, secondly, and airbags, except that in this What's most needed now is
develop vehicles that can run case you'll be buying national the political will.
on something other than security rather than protection U Cliff May, a former New York
liquid fuels. in the event of a collision. Times f orerespondent,
In fact, such alternative fuels In addition, DRIVE would is the president of the
and vehicles already exist. A provide .incentives for both Foundation for Defense of
bill has been introduced in manufacturers and purchasers Democracies, a policy institute
Congress - with broad of "plug-in hybrids," cars that focusing on terrorism.
OTHER VIEWS

Iran's aggressiveness put on notice


The White House
has authorized
U.S. forces to take
aggressive action
against Iranian
agents Who are a threat to
them or anybody else in Iraq.
The announcement comes
pursuant to President Bush's
declaration in his "surge"
speech that the United States
would pursue more
aggressively Iranian and Syrian
meddling in Iraq.
The new policy, it was
stressed, does not authorize
cross-border operations,
although the announcement
surely must raise that
possibility in the minds of the
people in Tehran and
Damascus. The National
Security Council says it has


evidence that Iran has been
training Iraqi insurgents and
supplying them with
remote-controlled explosives,
which, if it could be
incontestably tied to the deaths
of U.S. troops, would seem to
call for reprisals.
The issue of semi-overt
Iranian involvement in Iraq
comes at a delicate time for
U.S.-Iranian relations because
Iranian President Mahmoud
Ahmadinejad seems determined
to see how far he can go in
goading the United States before
he provokes a response. If there
is a positive in any of this, it is
that Ahmadinejad's belligerence
isn't sitting well with many of his
countrymen and he is even
making some of the ruling
clerics nervous.


The most aggressive U.S.
action came just over two weeks
ago when U.S. troops raided an
Iranian liaison office in Kurdish
Iraq and arrested five Iranian
officials. Although the five were
not diplomats nor the office a
consulate, Tehran claimed
immunity for them and
demanded that they be released
and compensation paid.
Iran might want to carefully
consider its use of diplomatic
missions in Iraq. Given the fact
that Iranian "students" held 52
American diplomats hostage
for 444 days, Tehran is in no
great position to invoke
international laws governing
diplomatic immunity nor does
the United States have any
great incentive to respect them.
M Scripps Howard News Service


Q~~JLTH TRTI'eS-PICAYUNE
Cc (D 10 o7


For one of several good models of what to
do, look to Boston, and for an incentive to act,
look in and around almost any American city
you choose.
* Jay Ambrose is a columnist living in Colorado.


rGOV. BLANCO BROKE
NAIL THIS MORNING,
AND WILL NOW EXPLAIN
WHY ITIS BUSH'S :AULT..
2'----- - -


COMMENTARY



Battling


the war


on gangs

t's about 2 a.m. at a Denver nightclub on
the first day of the year. There's some
kind of argument as people leave, and if
you feel you or a friend were insulted and
you are a street gang member insistent
on respect at all costs, you know what to do.
You are armed - you are always armed,
right? - and you are either practiced in or well
aware of a killing technique known as the
drive-by shooting.
And so the driver of your car, a 1998 white
Chevy Tahoe, pulls alongside the driver's side
of a Hummer
limo carrying
some of those
whose words in four others, putting still more
you disliked ed,...
and when the metal doors.
vehicles are
parallel, you
start finotg, Jay Ambrose
blowing out one Spektohe limousincoe.
window, putting
bullet holes in four others, putteople, lodging still more
bullets in the metal doors.
Whether they were the ones who offended
you or not, you would apparently be happy to
murder everyone in the limousine.
You, in fact, wound two people, lodging a
bullet in the head of one, a woman, and you kill
Darrent Williams with a shot through the neck.
A young, talented, likeable second-year football
player for the Denver Broncos, he was
promising far beyond his 5-foot, 8-inch size,
and before too long on Jan. 1, 2007, virtually
everyone in this football-crazy town knows
what has happened. A celebrity's death saddens
people, angers them, focuses needed attention
on the atrocities of gangs, and reminds us that
gangs should be getting our attention for still
more reasons.
They should be getting our attention because
they vastly extend our society's violence, killing
14-year-old and 9-year old children, as in Los
Angeles recently; because their traffic in drugs
is among the ways they defile communities;
because they wreck the lives of those who join
and because they have been growing by leaps
and bounds over the past three decades.
In the 1970s they were in half the states;
now they are in all of them. Once they were a
strictly urban phenomenon; now they are in the
suburbs as well. The total number of gangs?
Maybe 30,000. The total number of gang
members? Close to 800,000.
Is it absolutely sure that the Darrent Williams
murder was committed by a gang member? No
court has yet established as much or other
details, but police seem to have arrived at this
conclusion, and there's the suggestive story of
the white Tahoe, which also happens to be a
suggestive story about the viciousness of gangs.
The car used in the crime belongs to a man
who is in jail and could not have participated in
the shooting. He is himself a gang member who
faces charges of attempted murder. The woman
he was accused of trying to kill was going to
testify in the case but was shot to death in front
of her home a week before the trial.
The consequent understanding of some is
that you must harbor a death wish if you
volunteer as a witness against gang members
even in this enlightened, prosperous, modern
city 20 minutes from my home.
Some think that even if Denver police are
able to arrest the suspected shooter and people
abetting him, getting a conviction could be
difficult to the point of impossibility. The
Broncos have put up a $100,000 reward for
information leading to a conviction in the case,
but $100,000 doesn't do slain informants much
good, and the amount is not overwhelming
relative to- the cash gangs swim in these days.
Denver's Rocky Mountain News reports more
than $1 million was seized in a single raid on a
Colorado gang.
The state and city must nevertheless
fight back with renewed vigor against the
conscienceless thugs who belong to gangs.
America must fight back, and thanks to solid
citizens and dedicated officials, is doing that
very thing.
The U.S. Justice Department works with
communities ready to apply themselves, and
few have done as well as Boston, which began
in the 1990s to enforce the law with a
vengeance but also to become intimately
involved in the lives of young people who are in
or have been in gangs or might be prone to
joining them. Intense and carefully planned,
this communal effort has been statistically
validated with significant decreases in
homicides and illustrates that communities that
care keenly, work fiercely and think deeply can
diminish even their most horrific afflictions.


4A












LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS TUESDAY, JANUARY 30, 2007


BRIEFS

HealthSouth

selling rehab clinic
BIRMINGHAM, Ala. -
HealthSouth Corp. said Monday
it will sell about 600 outpatient
rehabilitation centers in 35 states
to Select Medical Corp. for about
$245 million as it proceeds to
focus solely on post-acute care
while it recovers from a massive
fraud.
HealthSouth is shedding a
division that once formed the
most visible part of its business
and helped make it the nation's
largest rehabilitation chain.
Chief executive Jay Grinney
said HealthSouth was selling its
outpatient rehabilitation division
to reduce its long-term debt.
Based in Mechanicsburg, Pa.,
the privately held Select Medical
purchased the rehabilitation
centers at auction.
'The signing of this definitive
agreement is an important step
in HealthSouth's deleveraging
plan," Grinney said in a
statement. "By reducing our
long-term debt, we will be able to
focus our resources on
enhancing our pre-eminent
position as the nation's leader in
inpatient rehabilitative care."


Citrus growers

brace for freeze
ORLANDO - Citrus and fruit
growers on Monday braced for
overnight frost and freezing
temperatures expected from '
Florida's Panhandle to the
southern tip, which could
damage crops and plants.
An overnight freeze warning
was in effect for parts of Florida's
top five citrus-producing counties
- DeSoto, Hardee, Hendry,
Highlands and Polk. All are
located in Florida's interior,
between Orlando and Miami and
closer to the Gulf Coast than the
Atlantic.
'The biggest thing we're
concerned about is the wind
dying down, then the frost will
form," said Rusty Wiygul,
director of Florida Citrus Mutual's
grower division. "We're not
worrying about fruit damages
this year, we're worried about
damage for next year."
The National Weather Service
in Jacksonville issued a freeze
warning for the 12-hour period
beginning at 9 p.m. Monday from
most of northeastern Florida.
The Melbourne office put central
Florida's Volusia, Lake, Orange,
Seminole and Brevard counties
on the same warning from 1 a.m.
to 8 a.m. Tuesday.
* Associated Press


Gates contends new Windows system, MARKET REPORT


has 'wows all over the product'


By JESSICA MINTZ
AP Business Writer

NEW YORK - Acrobatics,
blaring music and plenty of
hype accompanied Microsoft
Corp.'s long-delayed debut of
its new Windows Vista operat-
ing system.
Hours before the software
went on sale in New York,
dancers clad in Microsoft col-
ors dangled from ropes high
above street level and
unfurled flags to form the red,
green, blue and yellow
Windows logo against a build-
ing wall. At a swank midtown
eatery, speakers pumped out
a hit from hip-hop hotshot
Snoop Dogg before Steve
Ballmer, Microsoft's chief
executive officer, took to
stage.
"Vista is the center, the
launching point for the next
generation of connected
entertainment in the home,"
Ballmer said.
Vista was set to go, on sale
around the globe Tuesday,
along with new versions of
Microsoft Exchange e-mail
software and the flagship
Office business suite, which
includes Word, Excel and
PowerPoint. Several retailers
had even scheduled midnight
openings.
But unlike the recent
launches of next-generation
game machines like Sony
Corp.'s PlayStation 3, cus-
tomers haven't been camping
out for days.
"When I look at Windows
Vista, I see a technology that
is interesting, that is relevant,
but to some extent is evolu-
tionary," said Al Gillen, an
analyst at the technology
research group IDC. "I do not
believe it will create a lot of
motivation for people to rush
out and get a new operating
system."
In an interview, Microsoft
chairman Bill Gates said the
company actually wasn't push-
ing midnight sales events -
after all, the software will be
available as a download over
the Web' for the first time.
Even that route will be rela-
tively rarely taken - Ballmer
acknowledged that, as in the
past, most consumers will
switch to Vista only when
they buy new computers.
More than five years in the
making, Vista was released


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Dancers scale the wall of a New York building to promote the
launch of the long-awaited Vista operating system from Microsoft
on Monday in New York. The software goes on sale Tuesday. Vista
launches for consumers at midnight Monday as Microsoft hosts a
series of events around the country.


for businesses Nov. 30, but
the unveiling for consumers
of the latest edition of
Windows - which runs more
than 90 percent of the world's
PCs - only came Tuesday.
Vista retails for $100 to $400,
depending on the version and
whether the user is upgrading
from Windows XP.
The Redmond, Wash.-
based software maker con-
tends that Vista is such a huge
improvement over previous
computing platforms that
users inevitably say "Wow"
when they see it.
Gates ticked off some
examples, such as how Vista
presents a slick 3-D graphical
user interface and document
icons that give at-a-glance pre-
views. Gates said the next
wow comes when people start
using a system-wide search
program that Microsoft's
engineers built into both the
operating system and new
versions of Office.
Vista comes as. changing
dynamics of computing -
notably the rise of open-
source software and Web-
based services that replicate
what traditionally could be
done only on a desktop com-,
puter - are threatening
Microsoft's dominance in the
industry.
But Gates contended that
the operating system has a
higher profile than ever
before, as the PC has mor-
phed from a souped-up type-
writer to a networked enter-
tainment center, personal


media library and gateway to
the Internet.
"When people think about
their PC, they think about
Windows even more than
who the manufacturer is.
That determines how it
looks, how you navigate,
what the applications are that
are available," Gates told The
Associated Press. And in this
case, Vista has folded in pro-
grams that users once
bought separately - includ-
ing automated backup
systems and some spyware
protections.
Microsoft built Vista so
that different layers could be
upgraded separately, so it's
possible that this is the last
massive, all-in-one update for
Windows. No matter how
Microsoft chooses to roll out
Vista's successor, Ballmer
said there's still work to be
done.
'There's so many areas in
which we need innovation.
Developers need a richer
platform if we're going to get
speech, voice, natural lan-
guage, and more rich 3-D-
type graphics into the user
interface," Ballmer said.
Plus, the technologies
around the PC - chips, stor-
age, high-definition DVD will
all evolve, he said. 'The oper-
ating system will need to
evolve with them."
"Frankly, we've got a very
long list of stuff our engi-
neers want to do, a long list of
stuff that the companies here
want us to do," he said.


DAILY Dow JONES

Jan. 29, 2007 13,000

Dow Jones - 12,500

industrials r 12,000

11,500
+3.76
11,000
12,490.78 OCT NOV DEC JAN
Pct. change High Low Record high close: 12,621.77
from previous: +0.03 12,542.70 12,481.49 Jan. 24,2007

STOCK MARKET INDEXES
52-Week YTD 12-mo
High Low Name Last Chg %Chg %Chg %Chg
12,623.45 10,666.35 Dow Industrials 12,490.78. +3.76 +.03 +.22 +14.60
5,013.67 4,123.17 Dow Transportation 4,763.82 +50.81 +1.08 +4.47 +9.40
462.88 380.97 Dow Ulilifies 451.20 -.50 -.11 -1.22 +9.06
9,268.74 7,708.11 NYSE Composite 9,139.55 -14.55 -.16 +.01 +12.76
2,096.43 1,770.48 Amex Market Value 2,104.61 +17.25 +.83 +2.34 +14.45
2,508.93 2,012.78 Nasdaq Composite 2,441.09 +5.60 +.23 +1.07 +5.82
1,440.69 1,219.29 S&P 500 1,420.62 -1.56 -.11 +.16 +10.54
826.95 710.53 S&P MidCap 822.73 +3.45 +.42 +2.28 +5.95
801.01 668.58 Russell 2000 793.10 +4.96 +.63 +.69 +8.51
14,523.36 12,249.90 Wilshire5000 14,359.45 +4.55 +.03 +71 +10.63

STOCK EXCHANGE HIGHLIGHTS

3 NYSE A AMEX A NASDAQ
9,139.55 -14.55 5 2,104.61 +17.25 2,441.09 +5.60


GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)
Name Last Chg %Chg
FstRepBk 53.63+15.33 +40.0
Abitibi g 3.33 +.69 +26.1
Bowatr 27.44 +5.29 +23.9
ParPhrmlf 27.01 +2.77 +11.4
CF Inds 31.48 +2.78 +9.7
FtBcpPR If 10.42 +.89 +9.3
TrinaSoln 29.41 +2.11 +7.7
ChinSAir 24.05 +1.61 +7.2
TerraNitro 38.99 +2.47 +6.8
FTDGrp 18.57 +1.16 +6.7

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)
Name Last Chg %Chg
Ampco 28.57 -1.84 -6.1
LLE Ry 2.50 -.16 -6.0
FMCG 55.09 -3.40 -5.8
Sysco 34.02 -2.08 -5.8
KT Corp 22.92 -1.33 -5.5
USG 52.60 -2.90 -5.2
LaBrnch 9.27 -.46 -4.7
OilDris 15.46 -.77 -4.7
DeutTel 17.54 -.84 -4.6
LSI Log 9.29 -.45 -4.6

MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)
Name Vol (0O) Last Chg
Motorola 399101 18.31 -.07
FordM 345471 8.37 -.05
BrMySq 340754 27.43 +1.22
Pfizer 314068 26.06 -.23
AMD 298371 15.95 -.27
EMC Cp 258730 13.96 +.22
GenElec 247641 36.19 +.12
QwestCm 235973 8.14 -.21
BkofAm 221455 51.46 -.58
Texlnst 214297 30.94 -.04

DIARY
Advanced 1,816
Declined 1,493
Unchanged 138
Total issues 3,447
New Highs 168
New Lows 11
Volume 2,689,990,440


GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)
Name Last Chg %Chg
AMCON hlf 33.75 +11.25 +50.0
Nephros 2.15 +.40 +22.9
IntigSysh 4.45 +.40 +9.9
Jinpan 24.84 +2.04 +8.9
TiensBio 6.78 +.53 +8.5
ScolrPh 4.05 +.30 +8.0
OverhillF 5.21 +.36 +7.4
AdcareHltn 2.44 +.16 +7.0
PRBEgyh 3.90 +.25 +6.8
CapAllilT h 9.02 +.57 +6.7

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)
Name Last Chg %Chg
MovieStr 2.25 -.27 -10.7
ChaseCp 30.24 -2.83 -8.6
TmsLx 6.70 -.55 -7.6
GoldRsvg 3.46 -.26 -7.0
ArizLd 7.59 -.51 -6.3
MGTCap 3.55 -.23 -6.1
CitiVLOO8n 8.19 -.50 -5.8
Crystallxg 2.81 -.17 -5.7
Darwin nya 23.21 -1.31 -5.3
SulphCo 3.31 -.18 -5.2

MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
SPDR 612830 142.05 -.11
iShR2K nya591350 78.75 +.68
SP Engy 199299 56.58 -.27
SemiHTr 128263 33.75 -.06
SP FncI 100766 36.64 -.18
iShEmMkt 93882 111.69 -1.50
OilSvHT 86891131.71 -.79
DJIA Diam'60010 124.82 +.05
iSh EAFE 57700 73.46 +.08
PrUShQQQ n5583653.72 -.02

DIARY
Advanced 550
Declined 526
Unchanged 110
Total issues 1,186
New Highs 41
New Lows 13
Volume 333,924,135


GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)
Name Last Chg %Chg
PremCmty 33.18+12.98 +64.3
MolecDev 35.07+11.19 +46.9
SilcLtd 14.17 +4.17 +41.7
Synagro 5.72 +1.24 +27.7
M-Wavers 4.22 +.77 +22.3
Alfiris 32.55 +5.41 +19.9
Majesco 2.05 +.28 +15.9
GrillCon 5.50 +.75 +15.8
INX Incwt 2.01 +.26 +14.9
FuelCell 6.88 +.88 +14.7

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)
Name Last Chg %Chg
GigaTr 2.24 -.66 -22.8
OriginAg 8.82 -2.42 -21.5
OQltyDistr 9.67 -1.76 -15.4
PeopEduc 3.86 -.62 -13.8
Radware 12.84 -1.80 -12.3
Nextwave n 9.86 -1.37 -12.2
ForcePron 17.81 -2.33 -11.6
Local.com 4.09 -.53 -11.5
Sunesis 4.23 -.43 -9.2
Angeion 16.03 -1.58 -9.0

MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
Nasd100Tr986409 43.61 +.04
Intel 818586 20.89 +.36
SunMicro 587800 6.35 +.02
Microsoft 559602 30.53 -.07
Cisco 506621 26.21 -.14
Level3 341636 6.14 -.18
Oracle 332264 17.27 +.12
Apple Inc 314892 85.94 +.56
eBay 296008 32.00 +.35
ApldMatll 265763 17.61 -.17

DIARY
Advanced 1,783
Declined 1,256
Unchanged 139
Total issues 3,178
New Highs 153
New Lows 31
Volume 1,938,602,700


YTD
Name Ex Div YId PE Last Chg%Chg


Intel Nasd .45
Level3 Nasd ...
Lowes NY .20
McDnlds NY 1.00
Microsoft Nasd .40
Motorola NY .20
NasdI00Tr Nasd .13
NY Times NY .70
NobltyH Nasd .50
OcciPet s NY .88
Oracle Nasd ...
Penney NY .72
PepsiCo NY 1.20
Pfizer NY 1.16
Potash NY .60
Ryder NY .72
SearsHldgs Nasd
SouthnCo NY 1.55
SPDR Amex 2.45
SunMicro Nasd
TimeWam NY .22
WalMart NY .67


2.2 24 20.89 +.36 +3.2
... ... 6.14 -.18 +9.6
.6 16 32.67 +.09 +4.9
2.3 15 43.23 +.30 -2.5
1.3 26 30.53 -.07 +2.2
1.1 13 18.31 -.07 -10.9
.3 ... 43.61 +.04 +1.0
3.0 19 23.05 +.15 -5.4
2.2 15 23.01 -.19 -13.5
1.9 9 45.17 -.47 -7.5
... 25 17.27 +.12 +.8
.9 16 81.60 +.54 +5.5
1.9 22 64.60 +.15 +3.3
4.5 10 26.06 -.23 +.6
.4 26 154.71 +6.91 +7.8
1.3 14 54.02 +1.10 +5.8
.. 21 176.54 +1.38 +5.1
4.3 18 36.25 -.14 -1.7
1.7 .. 142.05 -.11 +.3
... ... 6.35 +.02 +17.2
1.0 15 21.78 -.04 0.0
1.4 18 47.63 -.04 +3.1


AT&T nc NY 1.42
Alltel NY .50
Apple Inc Nasd
AutoZone NY
BkoiAm NY 2.24
BobEvn Nasd .56
BrMySq NY 1.12
CNBFnPA Nasd .60
CSXs NY .40
ChmpE NY
Chevron NY 2.08
Cisco Nasd ...
CocaCI NY 1.24
ColBgp NY .75
Delhaize NY 1.54
DollarG NY .20
FPL Grp NY 1.50
FamDlr Il NY .46
FordM NY
3enElec NY 1.12
HomeDp NY .90
ShR2K nya Amex .84


19 36.51
20 61.29
31 85.94
16 124.52
11 51.46
20 33.48
34 27.43
14 14.74
12 35.17
4 8.05
9 71.53
28 26.21
21 47.71
14 24.49
... 81.94
30 16.85
17 56.13
25 31.88
... 8.37
18 36.19
14 39.91
.. 78.75


+.11 +2.1
-.08 +1.3
+.56 +1.3
-.23 +7.8
-.58 -3.6
+.10 -2.2
+1.22 +5.3
+.15 +3.9
-.14 +2.1
+.13 -14.0
+.03 -2.7
-.14 -4.1
-.12 -1.1
+.19 -4.9
-.50 -1.6
+.12 +5.6
+.13 +3.1
+.70 +8.7
-.05 +11.5
+.12 -2.7
-.03 -.6
+.68 +.9


ILOI



- 41 VJA. I L-'V
11, TL k)
-A- A ~'I\''


Rate 6.79% APR*



FIRST FEDERAL
i SAVINGS BANK of FLORIDA


MONEY RATES CURRENCIES
Last Pvs Week Last Pvs Day
Prime Rate 8.25 8.25 Australia 1.2963 1.2941
Discount Rate 6.25 6.25 Britain 1.9595 1.9588
Federal Funds Rate 5.25 5,25 Canada 1.1822 1.1805
Treasuries Euro .7718 .7746
3-month 5.01 5.00 Japan 121.94 121.58
6-month 4.98 4.97
6-month 4.8 47 Mexico 11.0836 11.0593
10-year 4.89 476 Switzerlnd 1.2531 1.2537
30-year 5.00 485 eBritish pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All others show
30-year 5.00 4.85 - dollar in foreign currency.

MUTUAL FUNDS
Total Assets Total Return/Rank PctMin Init
Name Ob] ($Mlns) NAV 4-wk 12-mo 5-year Load Invt
American Funds A: GwthA p XG 83,868 32.98 -0.1 +6.1/B +54.0/A 5.75 250
American Funds A: ICAA p LV 74,180 33.60 -0.1 +12.3/E +52.4/B 5.75 250
Vanguard Idx Fds: 500 SP 72,012 130.90 -0.4 +12.6/A +40.3/A NL 3,000
Fidelity Invost: Contra XG 68,565 65.85 +0.6 +7.3/A +79.0/A NL 2,500
American Funds A: WshA p LV 68,455 34.88 -0.5 +14.7/C +48.3/C 5.75 250
Dodge&Cox: Stock LV 66,185 154.33 0.0 +14.3/C +88.2/A NL 2,500
American Funds A: CaplBA p BL 63,189 61.01 +0.3 +18.5/A +86.0/A 5.75 250
American Funds A: CapWGA p GL 62,557 42.00 +0.3 +17.6/B +120.6/A 5.75 250
American Funds A: IncoA p BL 60,592 20.38 +0.3 +17.4/A +70.2/A 5.75 250
PIMCO Insl PIMS: TotRt IB 60,280 10.28 -0.8 +3.0/E +28.4/A NL 5,000,000
Amencan Funds A: EupacA p IL 56,108 46.50 +0.1 +15.4/D +109.8/C 5.75 250
Fidelity Invest: Divilntl IL 47,341 36.98 +0.2 +15.0/D +129.6/B NL 2,500
Vanguard Admiral: 500Adml SP 46,466 130.92 -0.3 . +12.7/A +40.8/A NL 100,000
Vanguard Insll Fds: Instidx SP 45,243 129.92 � -0.3 +12.8/A +41.2/A NL 5,000,000
Fidelity Invest: Magelln LG 44,962 90.93 +0.9 +4.1/C +25.5/B NL 2,500
American Funds A: N PerA p GL 43,568 31.72 -0.2 +14.0/C +80.8/B 5.75 250
Fidelity Invest: LowP r MV 39,339 43.63 -0.2 +11.0/D +106.8/A NL 2,500
Vanguard Idx Fds: TotSik XC 39,095 34.30 0.0 +12.2/B +49.2/C NL 3,000
American Funds A: BalA p BL 35,431 19.02 -0.4 +9.7/B +46.0/B 5.75 250
American Funds A: FdlnvA p LV 32,186 40.15 0.0 +12.6/E +73.5/A 5.75 250
Vanguard Fds: Wndsll LV 31,568 34.79 -0.5 +15.4/B +70.0/A NL 10,000
Dodge&Cox: IntlStk IL 30,899 43.98 +0.8 +21.5/A +165.8/A NL 2,500
Fidelity Invest: Eq Inc El 30,628 58.57 -0.6 +15.8/C +57.9/B NL 2,500
Fidelity Invest: Grolnc LC 30,213 31.03 -0.9 +7.6/E +25.5/D NL 2,500
Fidelity Invest: GroCo XG 30,069 70.20 +0.1 +5.2/C +40.5/B NL 2,500
Vanguard Fds: Welltn BL 29,675 32.31 -0.8 +11.5/A +55.1/A NL 10,000
FrankfTemp Frnk A: IncomA p BL 29,629 2.67 +0.5 +16.6/A +76.6/A 4.25 1,000
Dodge&Cox: Balanced BL 27,457 87.37 -0.1 +10.9/A +69.0/A NL 2,500
Frankfremp Temp A:GrwthAp GL 27,120 25.77 +0.2 +18.0/A +90.7/B 5.75 1,000
Davis Funds A: NYVen A LC 27,035 38.68 -0.3 +12.9/B +67.0/A 4.75 1,000
Vanguard Admiral: TStkAdm XC 26,852 34.31 0.0 . +12.3/A +49.8/B NL 100,000
Fidelity Invest: Puritn BL 25,809 19.97 -0.4 +12.1/A +50.8/A NL 2,500
Vanguard Idx Fds: TotBnd IB 23,769 9.91 -0.6 +3.9/B +23.6/C NL 3,000
Fidelity Invest: Balanc BL 22,439 19.53 +0.1 +8.0/C +64.2/A NL 2,500
Vanguard Fds: Prmcp r XC 22,371 69.79 +0.6 +8.2/D +56.5/B NL 25,000
Fidelity Spartan: Eqidxlnv SP 22,358 50.31 -0.3 +12.7/A +40.4/A NL 100,000
Price Funds: Eqlnc El 20,999 29.61 -0.4 +15.9/B +60.5/B NL 2,500
American Funds A: BondA p AB 20,670 13.25 -03 +5.1/A +34.5/A 3.75 250
Fidelity Invest: BlueChGr LG 20,649 44.61 +0.2 +3.6/C +13.9/D NL 2,500
Vanguard Insll Fds: InsPI SP 20,294 129.92 -0.3 +12.8/A +41.3/A NL200,000,000
Vanguard Idx Fds: Totllntl IL 20,069 17.70 0.0 +18.9/C +120.9/B NL 3,000
PIMCO Admin PIMS: TotRIAd IB 19,877 10.28 -0.9 +2.8/E +26.8/B NL 5,000,000
Vanguard Idx Fds: Europe EU 18,460 36.17 +0.1 +25.6/C +112.3/D NL 3,000
BL -Balanced, El -Equity Inc., EM -Emerging Mkts, GL -Global Stock, GM -Gen. Muni, IB -Intermd. Bond, IL -
Intemational Stock, LC -Large-Cap Core, LG -Large-Cap Growth, LV -Large-Cap Val., MP -Stock/Bond Blend, MT
-Mortgage, SB -Short-Term Bond, SP -S&P 500, SS -Single-State Muni, XC -Multi-Cap Core, XG -Multi-Cap
Growth, XV -Multi-Cap Val. Total Retum: Chg in NAV with dividends reinvested. Rank: How fund performed vs.
others with same objective: A is In top 20%, E in bottom 20%. Min Init Invt: Minimum $ needed to invest in fund.
NA = Not avail. NE = Data in question. NS = Fund not in existence. Source: Lipper, Inc.

Stock Footnotes: g = Dividends and earnings in Canadian dollars, h = Does not meet continued-listing standards.
If = Late filing with SEC. n = New In past 52 weeks. pf = Preferred. rs = Stock has undergone a reverse stock split of at least
50 percent within the past year. rt = Right to buy security at a specified price. s = Stock has split by at least 20 percent within
the last year. un = Units. vj = In bankruptcy or receivership. wd = When distributed, wi = When issued, wt = Warrants.
Mutual Fund Footnotes: x = Ex cash dividend. NL = No up-front sales charge. p = Fund assets used to pay distribution costs.
r = Redemption fee or contingent deferred sales load may apply. I = Both p and r.
Gainers and Losers must be worth at least $2 to be listed in tables at left. Most Actives must be worth at least $1. Volume in
hundreds of shares. Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.


STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST ,


YTD
Name Ex Div YId PE Last Chg%Chg


Page Editor: Chris Bednar, 754-0404









LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE TUESDAY, JANUARY 30, 2007


COMMUNITY CALEN


* To submit your
Community Calendar
item, contact ??? at
754-0??? or by email at
???@lake orr. co
lakecitvreporter. com.


Announcements


Violence and rape crisis
center offers support
Another Way, Inc. the local
domestic violence and rape
crisis center has a support
group for survivors of domestic
violence and their children from
5:30 to 7 p.m. every Thursday.
If interested call Susan at
Another Way, Inc. at 719-2700
for the location. Women and
children only.

Fashionistas wanted
for Currents magazine
Do your children raid your
closet to borrow clothes you
wore in the '70s? Do you know a
girl who wears leggings and mini
skirts similar to those Madonna
wore in the '80s? Currents
magazine, a publication of the
Lake City Reporter, is working on
a story about retro fashion and
how styles seem to
resurface. If you have an eye for
fashion or simply enjoy
discussing new and old trends,
call Lindsay Downey at
754-0423 or e-mail
Idowney@lakecityreporter.com.

Call for LCCC Memorabilia
to celebrate anniversary
Help celebrate LCCC's 60th
anniversary (1947-2007).
If you have any type of
memorabilia you would like to
donate: Photographs, yearbooks,
literary journals, graduation
programs, etc. contact
chairperson Sean McMahon,
LCCC history professor,
754-4293, e-mail
mcmahons@lakecitycc.edu.

Crossover Correction to.
CMS training offered
Lake City Community College
will offer training in the Crossover
Correction to CMS Law
Enforcement tentatively
beginning Feb. 12.
There will be a scheduled
meeting at 6 p.m. on Jan. 22 in
-he Lancaster Site Office - CR
341 across Irom the Lancaster
CQpegctional Work Camp in
Trenton.
Those interested in attending
this training must attend this
meeting to receive all the
information concerning cost,
scheduling, etc.
For more information call
(352) 463-4353 between 9 a.m.
and 1 p.m. Monday-Friday, after
hours leave a message.

Habitat for Humanity
seeks family for home
Habitat for Humanity is looking
for a family for its second home.


The applicant must live in
substandard housing in
Columbia County, have a
verifiable source of income,
appropriate credit to qualify for a
20 year, no interest loan and put
at least 300 hours of sweat
equity into the home building
process. To apply, pick up an
application at the Columbia
County Public Library downtown,
download an application from the
web site at www.hfhlakecity.org
or call 755-0014 and leave a
message as to when to be
contacted.

Singles meetings take
place every Friday
Live Oak singles meetings
take place from 7 to 10 p.m.
Friday at St. Luke's Church in
Live Oak, across from the.
Coliseum. For more information,
call Jim at 935-0422, Just at
362-4448 or Anna at 963-5774.

Pregnancy Crisis Center
now taking volunteers
The Pregnancy Crisis Center
is now accepting applications
for volunteers to donate four
hours (or more) of their time per
week at the Lake City location.
No experience is needed,
training is provided.
The center is located at 227
SW Columbia Ave., one block
West from the Greyhound Bus
Depot, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.Monday
through Friday, 755-0058.

Kids Club planned
for every Saturday
The Great Lake City
Community Development
Corporation, Inc., 363 NW
Bascom Norris Drive, Lake City
will have a Saturday Morning
Kids Club from 10 a.m. to noon
every Saturday.
'For more information, call
Calandra Wise at 752-9785.

Home education students
eligible for state testing
Home Education students are
eligible to take state mandated
assessment tests with the
Columbia'County School District
at no charge.
If interested in participating in
this administration, call the Home
Education office at 758-4935 on
or before Jan. 26.

Tae Kwan Do
classes continue
The Lake City-Columbia
County Parks and Recreation
Department continues to offer
classes in Tae Kwan Do.
These classes meet on
Monday and Wednesday nights
from 6:30 to 8 p.m. and are open
to anyone ages 8 and above.


The cost is $40 per month. For
more information, call Heyward
Christie at 758-5448.

Graduate candidates
list being developed
The Lake City Community
College public information office
is developing a list of LCCC
"family graduate candidates" for
publication in the 60th
Anniversary Catalog 2007-08
(similar to the 2006-07 catalogs).
Send any names of people you
know, including extended
families (i.e., grandmothers,
nieces, nephews,
husbands/wives, blended
families, etc.) that graduated at
any time from the college.
If you have phone numbers,
include them. Know that if your
submissions are not pictured in
this year's catalog, their names
will be saved for future issues.
Candidates are selected by a
college committee.
Call 754-4247 or 754-4248
(leave message); or e-mail
yarbroughs@lakecitycc.edu.

Thursday
Program registration
runs through Thursday
The Boys Club of Columbia
County is taking registrations for
the winter program which will run
through Feb. 1. All boys and girls
age 6-14 are eligible to attend.
Club hours are from 2 to 6 p.m.
Bus pickup from all schools
daily by Suwannee Valley Transit
for $75. Fees for the period are
$100. For more information, call
752-4184.

Coming Up
15th Annual Policemen's
Charity Ball to take place
The 15th Annual
Policemen's Charity Ball will
be held at 8 p.m. Feb. 10 at
Southern Oaks Golf Club. The
theme is "A 70s Celebration."
Reserved tables and individual
tickets are now on sale.
Sponsorship of the event,
which supports CARC and
Happy House, are also
available.
For information, call Carol or
Alice at CARC at 752-1880 or
Erin at the Lake City Police
Department at 758-5484.

Newcomers meeting
set for Feb. 14
The regular monthly
meeting of the Lake City
Newcomers Club will be at 11
a.m. Feb. 14. Luncheon cost is
$10. The meeting will be held at
* the Guangdong restaurant
located in the Lake City Mall.


The program will be presented
by the "Four Valentines" coral
group from Lake City Community
College. All members, guests
and friends are invited.
For more information, call
752-4552.

Program planned to help
adults with diabetes
Columbia County Extension is
now offering an educational
program to help adults with type
2 diabetes control their blood
sugar, to feel better and reduce
risk of health complications. The
program will include nine classes
taught by a team of qualified
educators and health
professionals and a personal
90-minute consolation with a
registered dietitian. Health
assessments (height, weight and
blood pressure measurements
are included). Classes will run
from 4 to 6 p.m. Thursday to
March 15.
The program is now
recruiting participants for this
program. People with type
2 Diabetes, are at least 21 years
oldd are interested in being a
part of this program, call the
Extension office at 752-5384 to
get more
information or to register.
Registration must be received
by Jan. 12. The $75 program fee
includes the educational classes,
nutrition consultation, program
materials and health
assessments.

Friendship luncheon
planned for Feb. 7
The February Friendship
Luncheon of the Lake City
Newcomers Club will be held
at 11:30 a.m. Feb. 7. It will be
held at Mikes Out To Lunch,
located at 426 SW Commerce
Blvd. All members, friends and
guests are welcome.
For more information,
please call 752-4552.

Science and Engineering
Fair set for Feb. 14-15
The Suwannee Valley
Regional Science and" ;
Engineering Fair will also be
held at Lake City Community
College Feb: 14-15:
Th~e region is comprised of
10 counties: Baker, Bradford,
Columbia, Dixie, Gilchrist,
Hamilton, Lafayette, Madison,
Suwannee, and Union.
Judging of the projects will
take place from 9 a.m. to
3 p.m. Feb. 14.
Open house for the
community will also take place
from 3 p.m.-6 p.m. Feb. 14.
The awards ceremony will
be at 10 a.m.Feb. 15 in the
Levy Performing Arts Center at'
LCCC.
The winners will advance to


Warden: Inmate showed no signs of pain


the State Science and
Engineering Fair held in Fort
Myers, at Florida Gulf Coast
University on April 11.
The 2007 Intel International
Science and Engineering Fair
will be held in Albuquerque,
N.M., May 13-19.

State-of-the-School visit
to take place Wednesday
As a part of the State-of-the
School visits, Columbia County
School Board members and
Superintendent Sam Markham
will visit Five Points Elementary
School at 10 a.m. on
Wednesday.

CHS class of '72
reunion to take place
Columbia High School's
Class of 1972 35-year reunion
will be June 30 at the Spirit of
Suwannee in Live Oak.
For more information, call
George H. Hudson Jr. at
755-0630.

15th Annual Policemen's
Charity Ball to take place
The 15th Annual
Policemen's Charity Ball will
be held at 8 p.m. Feb. 10 at
Southern Oaks Golf Club. The
theme is "A 70s Celebration."
Reserved tables and individual


tickets are now on sale.
Sponsorship of the event,
which supports CARC and
Happy House, are also
available.
For information, call Carol or
Alice at CARC at 752-1880 or
Erin at the Lake City Police
Dept. at 758-5484.

Positive Parenting
Program set for Feb. 8
The Columbia County
School System invites parents
in all stages of child rearing to
attend a Free Positive
Parenting Program, Feb. 8 at
the School Board.
Administrative Complex.
This program presented by,
"Mr. Happy" Jim Atkinson, will
focus on:
The Importance of Attitude,
Building Strong Self-Esteem,
The Power of Positive
Communication and Setting
and Reaching Desirable Goals
A morning presentation
will be offered from 10 am
to noon.
The evening presentation
will be from 6:30 to 8 pm.
Free Child care will be
provided for the evening
session only.
To register for evening
childcare, or for more
information contact the
schools or Tina Roberts
at 758-4872.


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By PHIL DAVIS
Associated Press
TAMPA - A convicted
killer whose execution was
botched last year was never in
any pain, the death row
prison's supervising warden
told a panel reviewing Florida's
lethal injection procedures
Monday.
But the man's lawyer said
his client was clearly hurting
from the incorrectly injected
deadly chemicals.
Angel Nieves Diaz appeared
to be straining to see a clock,
not grimacing in pain as other
witnesses have said, Florida
State Prison Warden Randall
Bryant told the 11-member
commission.
"He had the opportunity to
be able to scream, cry, yell and
that sort of thing and that did
not happen," said Bryant, who
stood about 2 feet from Diaz
during the Dec. 13 execution.
But it would have been diffi-


cult for Diaz to see the clock
because it was behind his
strapped-down head and a
guard would have blocked his
view.
"He was looking at a clock?
What, was he late for an
appointment? Come on, that's
ridiculous," said Diaz's attor-
ney Neal Dupree, who also wit-
nessed the execution and testi-
fied before the commission
Monday. "I certainly thought
he knew something was wrong
and he was looking to the
closest (Department of
Corrections) guy."
The procedure took 34 min-
utes - twice as long as usual
- and required a rare second
dose of lethal chemicals
because the needles were
incorrectly inserted through
his veins and into the flesh in
his arms, a medical examiner
reported. An autopsy found
chemical burns in both his
arms.


Then-Gov. Jeb Bush created
the commission to examine
whether improvements can be
made to the way lethal injec-
tions are administered - not
whether the system should be
scrapped. Executions in
Florida have been halted until
the commission releases its
report, due to new Gov. Charlie
Crist by March 1.
'The only thing that seemed
different was the length of
time," Bryant said of the Diaz
execution. It was the fourth
lethal injection execution he
has supervised on Florida's
death row.
Earlier Monday, Dupree told
the commission his client was
clearly in pain.
"He appeared to be grimac-
ing. It looked like he was in
pain to me," Dupree said. "He
almost appeared to be a fish
out of water. He was gasping.
And that went on for period of
about 10 to 12 minutes. You


OBITUARIES


Mrs. Merle W. Harding
Mrs. Merle W. Harding, 84 of Lake
City died Sunday afternoon, January
28, 2007 at Shands at the University
of Florida in Gainesville. She was
born in Philadelphia, PA to the late
Edward and Emily Raisner Wald-
man and had lived in Lake City for
the past twenty five years moving
here from Collingswood, NJ. She
was retired as an Executive Secreta-
ry for Campbell's Soup Company
after 36 years of service. Mrs. Har-
ding was an avid bridge player,
loved reading and growing plants
and was very devoted to her family.


She was a member of Mt. Carmel
Baptist Church.
Mrs. Harding is survived by one
son, Roy C. Haines (Nan), Lake
City; one step-son, Harry W. Har-
ding (Beverly), Danville, PA; one
grandson, Michael E. Haines (Jenni-
fer), Jacksonville; and two great-
grandchildren, Madelyn and Joshua
Haines, both of Jacksonville.
Private funeral services for family
and friends will be conducted at
1:00 P.M., Wednesday, January 31.
2007 at Gateway-Forest Lawn Fu-
neral Home Chapel with Reverend
Ronnie McKenzie, Pastor of Kernan
Road Baptist Church, Jacksonville,


officiating. Interment will follow at
Forest Lawn Memorial Gardens
Cemetery. Visitation with the fami-
ly will be held from 4:00-6:00 P.M.
Tuesday, January 30, 2006 at the
funeral home. Arrangements are un-
der the direction of GATEWAY-
FOREST LAWN FUNERAL
HOME, 3596 S. HWY 441. Lake
City. '(386) 752-1954. Please sign
the guest book at
www.gailewayforesllawn.com.
Obituaries are paid advertisements.
For details, call the Lake City
Reporter's classified department at
752-1293.


could see body movement. You
could see clutching and
unclutching."
Dupree also said Diaz also
appeared to be saying some-
thing. Bryant said he heard
only unintelligible muttering
from Diaz, which was not out
of the ordinary. Several people
on the prison's execution team
have said Diaz said "What's
happening?" twice during the
process.


A Celebration of Life!


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i hr,'ujt, rn..Ipannini;

VO 'ur life.


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Gateway-Forest Lawn Fumeral Home
Ted L. Guerry Sr., LED. & Brad Wheeler. L.D., Owners
3596 South Hw 441 * LakeCit.. Florida 32025 * (3861 752-1954


fe' fflwoma to ette, Jt(e /Jem!J

Debra P. Dees, LFD, Owner of Dees Family Funeral Home is
proud to announce the recent purchase of the
Sherrill-Guerry Funeral Home
at 458 S. Marion Ave., Lake City

Our facility at 768 W. Duval St. will soon be relocated to South
Marion & our new name will be






The new funeral home is wholly owned by Ms. Dees. Ms. Dees
and her staff will continue to serve the community with the
quality and compassion she has for the past 20 years.
Please don't hesitate to call with any questions or
concerns that you may have.

961-9500 * 752-2211 * 752-1234
"We treat your family as if they were our own."


Page Editor: Chris Bednar, 754-0404








LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & WORLD TUESDAY, JANUARY 30, 2007


CHAVEZ: New six-year term begins


Continued From Page 1A
society by presidential decree.
In its latest draft, the law would
allow Chavez to dictate meas-
ures for 18 months in 11 broad
areas, from the "economic and
social sphere" to the "transfor-
mation of state institutions."
Chavez calls it a new era of
"maximum revolution," setting
the tone for months of upheaval
as he plans to nationalize com-
panies, impose new taxes on
the rich and reorient schools to
teach socialist values. With
near-religious fervor and plenty
of oil wealth, Chavez is mobiliz-
ing millions of Venezuelans,
intent on creating a more
egalitarian society.
Already, profound changes
can be seen throughout
Venezuela. Those who felt left
out of the old system are
thrilled at the prospect of hav-
ing a voice in politics. Others
are horrified, predicting that
doors will close on their per-
sonal freedoms under one-
man rule, although exactly
what Chavez will do with his
power remains unclear.
Feeling empowered
On a floodlit playground,
neighbors meeting to discuss
the new mechanics of power
are feeling empowered by
Chavez. As participants in a
new Communal Council, they
will get a direct say in spend-
ing on projects from public
housing to better electricity to
fixing potholes - decisions
previously made by local
governments.
'"The country is headed for
transformation, linked directly
to all of us," Freddy Alvarez
says into the microphone,
describing the coming presi-
dential decrees as a crucial
step that will bring new "power
to communities."
Each local council will get
up to $56,000 in spending


money this year, for a total of
about $1.8 billion nationwide.
Not everyone in the crowd
is a Chavez supporter, and the
gathering in the working-class
mountain town of El Junquito
has the feel of a town hall
meeting. But Chavez has pub-
licly compared the councils to
the people's assemblies or
"soviets" formed during the
Russian revolution.
"All of the power to the
Communal Councils, power to
the people," Chavez said in a
recent speech. "It is the power
of the revolution."
Not all peachy
Outside the Spanish
Embassy, dozens line up with
documents in hand. Many plan
trips for tourism or study, but
Henry Krakower is thinking
darker thoughts. He wants a
passport for his 10-year-old
son in case they need to leave
for good.
"I don't really know what all
the coming changes are, but I
don't think it's the best idea to
give all the power to a single
person for him to decide on
my behalf," says Krakower,
the son of a Polish concentra-
tion camp survivor who found
a haven in Venezuela after
World War II.
Government officials insist
there will be total freedom of
religion and speech and that
private property will be safe,
but the Krakowers aren't so
sure. Listening for clues to
what lies ahead, they worry
about economic restrictions
and ideology in education. At
their son's private Jewish
school, some parents are talk-
ing about how and when to
leave the country.
"I think the president is
going to do what he wants to do,
because he will have all the
power to decide on all things,"


Krakower says. "I think we're
headed toward totalitarianism."
A revolution?
In newspapers, full-page
state ads list the five engines
driving Chavez's self-styled
revolution, from a "New
Geometry of Power" to
"Constitutional Reform" that
could include ending presiden-
tial term limits.
"Nothing stops the revolu-
tion!" reads the ad, a sobering
thought for the wealthy who
live in walled enclaves, belong
to exclusive golf clubs and
dine at the best restaurants.
Though Chavez insists he will
respect private property, he
plans a new "luxury" tax on
everything from second
homes to art collections, and
the rich will undoubtedly feel
the pinch.
For now, the economy is
flush with oil money and busi-,
ness is brisk at Caracas shop-
ping malls. But among whistle-
blowing anti-Chavez protesters,
middle-class retiree Teresa
Cifontes grimaces at what she
sees coming: '"Within one year,
complete communism."
Legislation by decree
Short of a drastic fall in glob-
al oil prices, there seems to be
little that can stop these
changes in Venezuela. The
Supreme Court's president,
Omar Mora Diaz, has wel-
comed Chavez's plan to legis-
late by decree. Street protests
have been small and scattered,
and the complaints of opposi-
tion politicians, left without a
vote since boycotting 2005
congressional elections, are
largely disregarded by the pro-
Chavez majority.
Those who re-elected Chavez
by a wide margin in December
say Venezuela's democracy is
healthier than ever.


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CHAMBER: Brown named new president


Continued From Page 1A
Poole said.
Williams is a U.S. Air Force
veteran who has served as a
member of the LCCC board of
trustees, the Mount Pisgah
Baptist Church board of
trustees and board of directors
for Lake Shore Hospital,
among other duties.
Hackney, who served dur-
ing World War II and became a
member of the Florida
National. Guard, has volun-
teered time to various organi-
zations, including the Lake
City Rotary Club, LifeSouth
Community Blood Center and
First Presbyterian Church of
Lake City.
During the dinner, Hall pre-
sented S&S Food Stores Chief
Financial Officer and 2007
Chamber President Keith
Brown with a one dollar bill to
symbolize the "passing of the
buck" from one president to
the next.
The gymnasium erupted
with raucous laughter
throughout the night as the
audience watched a humorous


JALA HARRIS/Lake City Reporter
Dr. Wayne Ates, a keynote speaker at Monday's Chamber of
Commerce dinner and meeting, stressed the importance of
effective communication.


"documentary" about the daily
tasks of a Chamber president
and listened to keynote speak-
er Dr. Wayne Ates.
Ates, a former Baptist minis-
ter and humorist, joked about
his life as a small-town


Southerner and stressed the
importance of effective com-
munication, a positive attitude
and of finding humor in life.
"You and I could fly higher
in life if we took ourselves a
little more lightly," Ates said.


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I.








LAKE CITY REPORTER HEALTH TUESDAY, JANUARY 30, 2007


Kids learn to cope with mother's terminal illness


By MARTHA IRVINE
AP National Writer

GRAYSLAKE, Ill. - Seven-
year-old Nicholas Chamernik
had rarely seen his parents
cry. So he felt a pang of worry
when he looked up one
evening to see his father
wiping away tears. ,
"Dad, what's wrong?" he
asked.
Jim Chamernik was too
choked up to respond. After
18 months of grasping for
answers, he and his wife,
Aimee, Lnally had an explana-
tion for symptoms Aimee had
been having - slurred
speech and weakness in her
right arm among them. The
diagnosis was Lou Gehrig's
disease, a degenerative condi-
tion of the nervous system,
also known as ALS.
There is no cure. But how
could they explain that to
their eldest son, the first in
the family to notice his mom's
slurring, when she read him
bedtime stories?
How, they wondered, do
you tell a child that his mom is
dying? .
It would be tempting for a
parent to shield a child as long
as possible from such a painful
reality. But the Chamerniks
have chosen a different path -
one of gentle honesty. Theirs is
the story of two parents doing
the best they can to help their
children understand and cope
with terminal illness.

When reality set in
The process began that night
more than two years ago with a
question from their son. It has
only kld to more questions -
and even on their toughest
Jays, the L. .mern '
attempted to answer.each on-.
"Dad, what's wrong?"
Aimee - seeing that Jim
was struggling - took a deep
breath and sat down in the
family room of their suburban
Chicago home. She pulled
Nicholas onto her knee and
put her arms around him.
"You know I'm having trouble
with my muscles, right?" Aimee
began, surprised at her own
composure. Her son nodded.
"Well," she said, slowly,
"Daddy's sad because the doc-
ror told me they're not going to
,ie able to help me get better."
Nicholas. sat there for a
moment, thinking about what
his mom had said and then
responded in his 7-year-old way.
"You know mom, when I grow
up, I'm going to be a paleontolo-
gist and a St. Louis Cardinals
baseball player and a zoologist
and a person who studies
plants," he said, breathlessly.
"Well, I'm also going to be a
doctor," he said. "So if you're
still alive, I can help them find
out how to make you better."
Four words from that con-
versation still echo in Aimee's
head - "if you're still alive."
They were the first indica
tion that, at some level,
Nicholas understood the grav-
ity of her slow decline. That
moment also marked the
beginning of a long goodbye
for a 37-year-old mother
whose oldest children will be
lucky to reach their teenage
years before she dies.
"I didn't think she'd be alive
as long as other people," says
Nicholas, now 9. "But I still
thought it'd be a long time."
Even Aimee's doctors don't
know exactly how long she
has. The average life
expectancy after an ALS diag-
nosis, they've told her, is two
to five years. It's been a little
more than two so far.

The early signs
Already, her children -
Nicholas, Emily, now 7, and 3-
year-old Zachary - have seen
her fall several times. She reluc-
tantly uses a cane in public
spaces and struggles with tasks
most people take for granted -


- J
',

159 SW Elizabeth
Lake City, FL 3202
Call for appolntmrr
(386) 755-7543
(386) 867-2856


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Jim Chamernik hugs his daughter, Emily, in the living room of their Grayslake, Ill., home last
September. Emily often tells her parents that she wishes there were a special telephone to heaven she
could use to talk with her mother, Aimee, after Aimee dies. Her mom was diagnosed with ALS , or Lou
Gehrig's disease, in 2004.


navigating stairs, opening a soda
can, unbuckling a car seat strap.
Even as her body weakens,
she constantly reminds her
children: "Mommy is still the
same person inside."
But knowing she will even-
tually lose her ability to move
and speak, there is a quiet
urgency in the Chamernik
household, to pack in as much
family time as possible and to
have the conversations they
can't have later on.
"Did you go to doctors?"
Emily asks one evening dur-
ing dinner.
It's a question she's asked
many times before, but Aimee
willingly responds again.
"Lots and lots of doctors,"
she says, telling Emily and
Nicholas about tests with nee-
dles stuck into her legs and
above her eyebrow.
'hat one hui. more than
anything," she says of the latter.

Inquisitive kids
Often, her kids ask why her
muscles aren't working.
At first, Nicholas thought,
"Why can't she just exercise
to be stronger and faster?"
Emily remembered her
mom talking about the impor-
tance of good nutrition and
wondered, "Did mom eat too
much dessert?"
Aimee tries to explain
what's happening to her body
in ways they'll understand:
She tells them how motor
neurons are like "mailmen" -
some that still deliver "letters"
from her brain to her muscles,
while others have quit and
headed to Florida for vacation.
No question is off limits.
And often, they come out of
nowhere.
One day, one of her chil-
dren asked, "How long will it
take for your skin to fall off
after you die?"
Aimee winced inside, but
replied in a matter-of-fact tone
that, while she wasn't sure how
long it would take, it wouldn't
matter because she wouldn't
need her body then anyway.
Often, Nicholas' queries are
fact-based. Because he's a
baseball fan, he's interested,
for instance, in Lou Gehrig's
fight with the illness. He
copes by focusing on possible
solutions, dreaming up inven-
tions that might help his mom
walk and even run again.
He also frets that a new
step-mom might throw away
his Pokemon cards, which he
calls "one of my most prized
possessions."
His sister's reactions are
often more emotional.
"Emily sometimes will run
up to me and throw her arms
around me so tight and say,
'Oh, Mommy, I just LOVE
you,' and say it with such
intensity and hug me with
such intensity that it takes my
breath away," Aimee says.
"My reaction in my head is,
'No, no, don't love me that
much, because if you love me
that much, it's going to really
hurt when I'm gone."'


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ASSOCIATED PRESS
Aimee Chamernik discusses
living with a terminal illness as
she drinks tea in her Grayslake,
III. home.
Sometimes, Emily fant:a-
sizes about a special tele-
phone to heaven she could
use to call her mom. But what
will she ,do, she wonders,
when she needs a hug from
her mom?

When she's gone
Aimee's eyes fill with tears at
the thought of not being there.
"There's no way to prepare
yourself for the heartbreak of a
child asking, 'What am I going
to do when you're not here?'"
she says. 'There's really no way
to answer those questions."
Still, she tries. - and
reminds Emily that her dad,
brothers and other family will
be there for her when she's
not. "And if you're really, real-
ly still and quiet, I think you'll
be able to think of what I
might say," she says.
Their worries about the kids,
coupled with their own grief,
can overwhehn Aimee and Jim.
So they meet regularly with a
social worker at the Les Turner
ALS Foundation in nearby
Skokie to help them work
through their concerns. The
social worker has encouraged
their honesty with the kids, but
also suggested that they
bring conversations back to the
present whenever possible.
"Right now, I'm here and
I'm able to do this," Aimee
often reminds her kids,
whether "this" is baking cook-
ies, taking Emily to a Clay
Aiken concert, or going last
fall to the World Series to see
her beloved Cardinals win.
"Do you worry about
Zachary not remembering
who you are?" Nicholas asks
his mom.
"I do," she says. "But you
and Emily will tell him about


things we did - special trips
to Mexico and Disney World
- and show him pictures."
It isn't always the idyllic
scene Aimee would like her
children to remember.
As all couples do, she and
Jim occasionally argue. And
the kids have their moments,
too.
Sometimes, they claim they
can't understand Aimee's
directions because of her
slurred words, when they
clearly do. So she calls them
over to repeat what she's said.
"Look me in the eye," she
tells them, pointing at her own
eyes. "Right here."

The daily routine
Sick or not, Aimee khows
disciplining is part of being a
parent. Still, she hopes her kids
will recall the happiest times.
Indeed, even with all they
are facing, the Chamernik's
two-story home remains the
family's haven, filled with
smiling photos and images of
Pooh and Tigger on the living
room walls. There often is
laughter, with Nicholas, Emily
and Zachary wrestling on the
floor, putting together puzzles
or organizing their many
Pokemon stuffed animals and
cards.
Nicholas is now in fourth\
grade. For a recent school
project, he described himself
as hyper, funny and brave -
brave, partly because he
stood in front of his class and
told them about his mom and
ALS, short for amyotrophic
lateral sclerosis.
It's one way he's become "a
little activist," as his parents
call him. For his last two birth-
day parties, he's asked friends
to bring donations for ALS
research instead of gifts -
and raised more than $350
last year.
"I just want my mom to be
healthy," he says.
Her mom describes Emily
as "a pirate at heart," most
comfortable in jeans and a T-
shirt and quick with a wide
grin that has become increas-
ingly toothless. Often hungry,
she's known for her love of
Mexican food, especially her
mom's "taquitos."
Like Nicholas, she's also
one of her mom's most faithful
helpers. They constantly
retrieve items for her, from
her laptop computer to books
to Matchbox cars for their lit-
tle brother.
When there are too many
toys on the living room floor,
without prompting, Emily will
say, "Mommy can't walk here


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- we need to clean up."
Learning to cope
Because mornings are
Aimee's most difficult time of
day, Emily and Nicholas also
are counted on to help get
themselves ready for school.
Jim races around the house
doing laundry, making break-
fast and bringing Aimee coffee
and the sports section before
he goes to one of his two jobs
as a law firm manager.
Aimee can't help but feel
guilty about all the Jim does
and about the extra responsi-
bility the kids take on.
"As children, they're asked
to do a lot of things," she says,
quietly. "Sometimes I wish
they could just be kids."
More than anything, Jim wor-
ries that, once Aimee's gone, he
won't be enough for their chil-
dren - even for little things,
such as doing Emily's hair.
"It's tough for me to talk
about a rosy future when
there isn't one because their
world revolves around their
mother," he says one evening
in the living room. "There's no
substitution for what they're
going to miss."


As he speaks, Emily sits on
his lap. Nicholas and Zachary
are upstairs getting ready for
bed, while Aimee works in the
kitchen.
The sweet aroma of cook-
ies, made earlier in the
evening, is slowly fading.
Just before her birthday, it
occurred to Nicholas that-his
mom would be the same age
that Lou Gehrig was when he
died.
"I just wondered," he said,
hesitantly because he didn't
want to hurt his mom's feel-
ings, "If he was 37 when he
died, maybe you would die
when you're 37, too."
His mom looked at him.
"I can't promise you I won't
die in the next year, because I
could be in a car accident or
something like that," she said.
"But I won't die from ALS in
the next year."
Immediately, she could
sense his relief.
"I hope I'm not misleading
him. It would be fairly shock-
ing for me to drop off in the
next six months," Aimee says.
"But a little part of me -
there's that reality that this is*
fatal and you can't know."


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LAKE CITY REPORTER HEALTH TUESDAY, JANUARY 30, 2007


Damage to spot in brain seems to erase urge to smoke


By LAURAN NEERGAARD
AP Medical Writer

WASHINGTON - Damage
to a silver dollar-sized spot
deep in the brain seems to
wipe out the urge to smoke, a
surprising discovery that may
shed important new light on
addiction.
The research was inspired by
a stroke survivor who claimed
he simply forgot his two-pack-a-
day addiction - no cravings,
no nicotine patches, not even a
conscious desire to quit.
"The quitting is like a light
switch that went off," said Dr.
Antoine Bechara of the
University of Southern
California, who scanned the
brains of 69 smokers and ex-
smokers to pinpoint the region
involved. '"This is very striking."
Clearly brain damage isn't a
treatment option for people
struggling to kick the habit.
But the finding, reported in
Friday's edition of the journal
Science, does point scientists
toward new ways to develop
anti-smoking aids by targeting
this. little-known brain region
called the insula. And it


sparked excitement among
addiction specialists who
expect the insula to play a key
role in other addictions, too.
"It's a fantastic paper, it's a
fantastic finding," said Dr.
Nora Volkow, director of the
National Institute on Drug
Abuse and a longtime investi-
gator of the brain's addiction
pathways.
"What this study shows
unequivocally is the insula is a
key structure in the brain for
perceiving the urges to take
the drug," urges that are "the
backbone of the addiction,"
Volkow added.
Why? The insula appears to
be where the brain turns phys-
ical reactions into feelings,
such as feeling anxious when
your heart speeds up. When
those reactions are caused by a
particular substance, the insula
may act like sort of a head-
quarters for cravings.
Some 44 million Americans
smoke, and the government
says more than 400,000 a year
die of smoking-related illness-
es. Declines in smoking have
slowed in recent years, mak-
ing it unlikely that the nation


Portion of brain
linked to addiction
A recent study found that smokers
with brain damage to the insula
were able to stop addictive urges.

' . "y,'" . 1,,,

Insula
I Patients who quit very easily,
addiction broken
MS Regular quitting
E1 Nonquitters
Insula normal Insula damaged

31 1

SOURCE: Science AP
will reach a public health goal
of reducing the rate to 12 per-
cent by 2010.
Nicotine is one of the most
addictive substances known,
and it's common for smokers
to suffer repeated relapses
when they try to quit.
So imagine Bechara's sur-


prise at hearing a patient he
code-named "Nathan" note
nonchalantly that "my body
forgot the urge to smoke"
right after his stroke.
At the time, Bechara was at
the University of Iowa study-
ing the effects of certain types
of brain damage after strokes
or other injury. While Nathan
was hospitalized, stroke spe-
cialists sent his information to
that brain registry. He was 38,
had smoked since 14, said he
enjoyed it and had had no
intention to quit. But his last
puff was the night before his
stroke. His surprised wife said
he never even asked for a
smoke while in the hospital.
It's not unusual for a health
scare to prompt an attempt at
quitting. "That's the quitting
that's not as interesting,"
Bechara said.
Instead, Nathan experienced
what Bechara calls a "disrup-
tion of smoking addiction," and
he wanted to know why.
Bechara and colleagues
culled their brain-damage reg-
istry for 69 patients who had
smoked regularly before their
injuries. Nineteen, including


Relief may be on horizon for insomniacs


By RANDOLPH E. SCHMID Pharmaceuticals, reasoned that
AP Science Writer they might be able to induce
sleep if they could block orexin.
WASHINGTON - They developed a drug that
Researchers studying a disease can block the receptors in the
that causes people to suddenly brain that respond to orexin-
drop off to sleep are trying to hypocretin. The researchers
turn what they have learned reported successful testing in
into a new way to help insomni- rodents, dogs and men.
acs get some shut-eye. The first tests were proof of
They found that blocking the concept and the drug is
brain receptors for orexin, a now being evaluated to estab-
blood peptide, promoted sleep lish the correct dosage, said
in rats, dogs and people, Roland Haefeli, an Actelion
according to a paper in spokesman. Researchers
Sunday's online issue of the hope to decide this year
journal Nature Medicine. whether to conduct a phase-
Orexin, also known as three study, a detailed assess-
hypocretin, is important in ment of the drug that would
maintaining wakefulness. It is be the final step before seek-
absent in the brains of people ing U.S. government approval
who suffer from narcolepsy, a for its use. Such studies can
chronic disorder in which take a few years.
people cannot regulate sleep- Narcolepsy victims often
wake cycles nornially.' ft -'is" 'af-o *experience cataplexy, a
estimated to affect more than condition -in,.which they lose
135,000 people in the United control of muscle tone for a few
States, according to the seconds to minutes. Jenck said
National Institutes of Health. in a telephone interview that
The research team, led by the drug tests did not prompt
Francois Jenck of the Swiss indications of cataplexy.
drug company Actelion Dr. Thomas Scammell, an


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assistant professor of neurolo-
gy at Harvard University, said
the work was "promising, with
a certain amount of caution."
"I think it may be the begin-
ning of something quite excit-
ing," said Scammell, who was
not part of the research team.
The drug works differently
from other sleep aids that are
available and the researchers
"provide this very broad per-
spective, all the way from
rodents to humans," he said in
a telephone interview.
Scammell said the drug
may work for people who do
not tolerate current sleeping
pills well. But he said there
are concerns that blocking
orexin could cause a problem
in the brain that is similar to
narcolepsy.
"Subsequent studies will be
important to make sure sleep
quality is good," he said. Also,


cataplexy is difficult to study
in the lab because it is often
triggered by strong emotions,
he said.
Luis de Lecea, an associate
professor of psychiatry and
behavioral sciences at
Stanford University, also sees
promise in the research.
'"This new compound may
give rise to a new family of
sleep aids," de Lecea said. The
advantage of targeting orexin-
hypocretin, he said, is that it
involves a relatively small num-
ber of neurons. Therefore, it
can be much more selective
than current sleep aid drugs.
But de Lecea, who was not
part of the research team, cau-
tioned that because of the way
study was done, it was impos-
sible to determine the sleep
quality.
Jenck's research was fund-
ed by Actelion.


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"It's a fantastic
paper, it's a
fantastic finding.:'

- Dr. Nora Volkow,
Director, National Institute
on Drug Abuse

Nathan, had damage to the
insula. Thirteen of the insula-
damaged patients had quit
smoking, 12 of them super-
easily: They quit within a day
of the brain injury, and report-
ed neither smoking nor even
feeling the urge since then.
Of the remaining 50
patients with damage in other
brain regions, 19 quit smok-
ing but only four met the bro-
ken-addiction criteria.
If Bechara's findings are val-
idated, they suggest that devel-
oping drugs that target the


insula might help smokers
quit. There are nicotine recep-
tors in the insula, meaning it
should be possible to create a
nicotine-specific drug, Bechara
said - albeit years from now.
More immediately, NIDA's
Volkow wants to try a differ-
ent experiment: Scientists can
temporarily alter function of
certain brain regions with
pulses of magnetic energy,
called "transcranial magnetic
stimulation." She wants to see
if it's possible to focus such
magnetic pulses on the insula,
and thus verify its role.
Other neurologic functions
are known to be involved with
addiction, too, such as the
brain's "reward" or pleasure
pathways. The insula discov-
ery doesn't contradict that
work, but adds another layer
to how addiction grips the
brain, Bechara said.


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LOCAL & NATION TUESDAY, JANUARY 30, 2007


JALA HARRIS/Lake City Reporter
The headspring of the Ichetucknee River is located inside Ichetucknee Springs State Park and feeds
the six-mile long river. Keeping pollutants from the river will be a topic of discussion during
Wednesday's Lake City Waste Water Management program.

SPRINGS: DEP plan will be addressed


Continued From Page 1A
Though it's the group's first
meeting of the year, Stevenson
said the primary focus of the
group remains the same as its
2006 primary focus.
"We're striving to protect
the waters flowing to the


Ichetucknee Springs," he said.
In other business, the group:
N Is scheduled to hear a
springs and river report from
Sherry McGowan and Sam
Cole of , the Ichetucknee
Springs State Park;


* Is scheduled to hear a
presentation on constructed
Wetlands by Bob Knight of
Wetlands Solutions, Inc.;
* Is scheduled to hear
reports detailing rashes at
Florida Springs.


Bush: No slight intended by gaffe


By BEN FELLER
Associated Press
WASHINGTON - This
one has gotten a little ic-ky for
the White House.
President Bush said Monday
he wasn't trying to disparage
the party now running
Congress by referring to it as
the "Democrat majority" - as
opposed to the "Democratic
majority" - in his State of the
Union speech.
'"That was an oversight,"
Bush said in an interview with
National Public Radio. "I mean,
I'm not trying to needle."
Bush's dropping of the "ic" at
the end of the word prompted


grumbling by Democrats that he
purposely got their name wrong.
This is not a new charge.
President Reagan used to refer
to the "Democrat Party."
Democratic leaders have long
considered it demeaning when
their suffix is omitted, and
some of them figured it was no
accident in a speech as highly
choreographed and rehearsed
as Bush's State of the Union.
Bush said he wasn't even
aware that he had done it.
"I meant to be saying, why
don't we show the American
,people we can actually v.ork
together?" Bush said.
The verbal shot came in tile
same breath as the president was


congratulating Democrats for
winning the House and Senate in:
the November election.
In the language the presi-
dent was supposed to read, the
reference was "Democratic,"
not "Democrat."
"We take him at his word
that it was an oversight," said
Brendan Daly, a spokesman
for House Speaker Nancy
Pelosi, D-Calif.
Bush said the theme of his
speech was about cooperating
with Democrats on big issues,
such as Social Security.
Yet, after another bitter
campaign season in 2006, that
talk of bipartisanship comes
with plenty of skepticism.


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WATER: Issue will take days to resolve


Continued From Page 1A
normal flow of the system."
Hudson was uncertain how
long it will take before the sys-
tem is back to normal and the
boiled water notice dropped.
"I'm expecting to have
someone here in the morning
(Tuesday) to look," Hudson
said. "I called but they couldn't
get here today and I'm expect-
ing them tomorrow (Tuesday)
to look at what's needed to
repair the filters. As for as the
system itself, it's back up and
running. We pulled samples
Sunday and Monday and
there's probably one or two
more days of samples if they're
cleared and then we'll be good
to go. We'll be off the boiled
water notice."
Hudson said the boiled
water notice came from
Twofold Water, the water plant
operator for the Town of Fort
White's water system.
Mark Lander, Columbia
County environmental health


director, said the DEP sets the
clearance standards for tested
water samples.
"Typically, the DEP sets the
guidelines for them in situa-
tions like this," he said. "It's
not uncommon to have water
lines break. They're checking
bacteriological analysis for
clearance of the system. The
city will be testing the water
for bacterial clearance."
Fort White High School
principal Keith Hatcher said
the boiled water notice affect-
ed the school's water supply
and daily operations.
As a result of the water main
break, the school has had to use
bottled water. Enough bottled
water was brought to the school
Monday to serve 85 classrooms.
"The school food service
has brought in some bottled
water for us; some of it in gal-
lon jugs and others of it in bot-
tles," he said. "We've taken the
gallon jugs and cups to each


one of the classrooms and
that's available to any of the
students who might otherwise
go to a water fountain."
In the school's cafeteria,
only milk and any other over-
the-counter bottled drinks
legally sold on campus served
as the students' only alterna-
tive to water fountains.
"We couldn't offer any tea,
couldn't offer any lemonade
because of the fact we had to
boil that water before we
served it and there just wasn't
time to do that," Hatcher said.
In addition, because of the
lack of fresh water, the
school's cafeteria was limited
to the items it could sell.
"It altered what students
would normally order, so we
ran out of stuff," Hatcher said.
"We ran out of French Fries and
.some other things that we
might otherwise have had. That
was an unforeseen outcome.
It was an interesting day."


WRECK: Victim was thrown from vehicle
Continued From Page 1A


According to police reports,
Dennis Edward Hart, Jr., 24,
was traveling westbound at
least 70 miles per hour on
State Road 10 (US 90), east of
SW Birley Avenue, two miles
west of Lake City when he
veered to the left and started
to spin, leaving the main travel
portion of the road and taking
down a mail box and paper box
with its right, front side. The
vehicle then began to overturn
on its right side and Hart, who
was unrestrained, was ejected
from the vehicle.
Lt. Mike Burroughs of the
Florida Highway Patrol said
the driver was ejected and
thrown at least 20 feet.
"It appears that the vehicle


left the main travel portion of
the roadway for unknown rea-
sons," Burroughs said.
"Preliminary investigations
reveal that this crash may be
vehicle speed and alcohol
related. Once the blood alco-
hol specimen analysis returns,
it may better explain why the
vehicle left the roadway for no
apparent reason."
After discovering the body,
Clauser called 911. He said it
was about 7 a.m. when he
found the body in his front
yard, and Burroughs said offi-
cials believe the crash hap-
pened shortly after midnight.
Officials are still waiting on
medical examiner's reports
and witnesses still are being


questioned on where Hart was
last seen.
"My dad always said noth-
ing good happens after mid-
night," Clauser said. "It's a
rude awakening on a Sunday
morning, on any morning. I
have two children around that
age, and I'm always warning
them to slow down."
There were no passengers
involved in the crash.
"The driver was ejected
because no seat belts were in
use when the vehicle began its
rollover action," Burroughs said.
"This is a crash that could've
been prevented and even more
sadly, a death could've been
prevented through the use of a
seat belt."


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Page Editor: Jerry Spaeder, 754-0424


LAKE CITY REPORTER


........... .......


,Tm









Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?


Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lakecityreportercom
Tuesday, January 30, 2007


SPORTS


www.lakecityreporter.com


BRIEFS

FORT WHITE BASEBALL
Fundraiser today
at Phish Heads
Members of the Fort
White High varsity and
junior varsity baseball
teams will be acting as
servers at Phish Heads
restaurant at 1445 S.W.
Main Blvd. from 6-9 p.m.
today.
Proceeds from the
fundraiser will go to the
Fort White Dugout Club
and be used for the teams.

GIRLS SOFTBALL
Sign-up continues
at Fort White
The Fort White Girls
Softball Association has
registration for its spring
season from 4-7 p.m., today,
and 3-7 p.m., Thursday, at
the Fort White Sports
Complex concession stand.
Cost is $40 and a birth
certificate is required for
new players.
For details, call Becky
Binge at (386) 719-7273.

YOUTH BASEBALL
Sign-up at Fort
White continues
,Fort White Youth
Baseball has registration for
its spring season from
4-7 p.m., today, and
3-7 p.m., Thursday, at the
Fort White Sports Complex
concession stand. A birth
certificate is required for
new players.
For details, call Tammy
Sharp at 867-3825 or
755-1519.


Local club's first
event is Feb. 10
The Columbia County
Riding Club has its first ride
scheduled for 6 p.m. on
Feb. 10. New members are
welcome to come join and
ride.
For details, call Mike Cox
at 623-4218.

* From staff reports.

GAMES

Today
* Columbia High girls
basketball vs. Gainesville High
in District 4-5A tournament
atVanguard High, 4 p.m.
* Lake City Christian
Academy basketball vs. Aucilla
Christian Academy, 7 p.m.
* Fort White High boys
basketball vs. Trenton High,
7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
Wednesday
* LCCC baseball at
Manatee CC, 3 p.m.
Thursday
* Lake City Christian
Academy basketball at
Cornerstone Academy, 6 p.m.
* Fort White High boys
soccer at Episcopal High in
Region I-3A quarterfinals,
7 p.m.
* Columbia High boys
soccer at Fleming Island High
in Region I-5A quarterfinals,
7 p.m.
* Columbia High boys
basketball at Suwannee High,
7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
Friday
* LCCC softball vs.
Abraham Baldwin, 2 p.m.
* LCCC baseball vs. South
Georgia College, 2:30 p.m.
* Lake City Christian
Academy basketball at Aucilla
Christian Academy, 7 p.m.
Saturday
* Columbia High wrestling
hosts District 2-2A
championship, II a.m.
* LCCC baseball at Polk
CC, I p.m.
Sunday
* LCCC baseball vs.


Abraham Baldwin, I p.m.


McFatter lives up to


family expectations


Columbia High all-state
tackle commits to play
at Charleston Southern.
By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com
When Columbia High's Levi
McFatter agreed to a scholarship
with Charleston Southern University,
it made his mom, Wendy, proud and
his dad, Roy, a prophet.
Roy began his predictions when
Levi started playing football in the
third grade.
"All I heard from my dad is going
to the next level," McFatter said. "I
know he is happy now."


As for himself, McFatter starting
thinking seriously about the next
level just this season.
'There were colleges looking and I
saw scouts here and heard Coach
(Danny) Green had put my name
out," McFatter said. "Reality kicked
in and I kept on working hard."
Columbia offensive line coach
Mitch Shoup verified that McFatter's
senior year made the difference.
"He worked hard and definitely
showed improvement from his junior
to senior year," Shoup said. "He was
playing with more confidence
because of his increased strength
and it showed on film. The coaches


LEVI continued on 3B


TIM KIRBY/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Levi McFatter (left) is congratulated by offensive line coach Mitch
Shoup for his scholarship to Charleston Southern University.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Barbaro, ridden by jockey Edgar Prado, wins the Kentucky Derby at Churchill Downs in Louisville, Ky., on May 6. Barbaro was euthanized
Monday after complications from his breakdown at the Preakness last May.




Barbaro loses battle


Kentucky Derby
winner euthanized'
after eight months.
By DAN GELSTON
Associated Press
KENNETT SQUARE, Pa.
- Kentucky Derby winner
Barbaro was euthanized
Monday after complications
from his gruesome break-
down at last year's Preakness,
ending an eight-month ordeal


that prompted an outpouring
of support across the country.
A series of ailments -_
including laminitis in the left
rear hoof, an abscess in the
right rear hoof, as well as new
laminitis in both front feet -
proved too much for the
gallant colt. The horse was put
down at 10:30 a.m.
"Certainly, grief is the price
we all pay for love," said
co-owner Gretchen Jackson at
a news conference.
Barbaro battled in his ICU


stall for eight months. The
4-year-old colt underwent
several procedures and was
fitted with fiberglass casts. He
spent time in a sling to ease
pressure on his legs, had pins
inserted and was fitted at the
end with an external brace.
These were all extraordinary
measures for a horse with
such injuries.
"Clearly, this was a difficult
decision to make," chief sur-
geon Dr. Dean Richardson. "It
hinged on what we said all


along, whether or not we
thought his quality of life was
acceptable. The probable
outcome was just so poor."
' Richardson, fighting back
tears, added: "Barbaro had
. many, many good days."
Roy and Gretchen Jackson
were with Barbaro on
Monday morning, with the
owners making the decision
in consultation with
Richardson.
BARBARO continued on 3B


LCCC


falls to


St. Pete

Lady Wolves lose
to Chipola College
in season-opener.
From staff reports

After starting 3-0, Lake
City Community College's
baseball team lost its first
game. St. Petersburg
College came to town on
Monday and beat the
Timberwolves, 11-3.
Lake City won, 20-15,
over Abraham Baldwin
Agricultural College in
Tifton, Ga., on Sunday.
The Wolves scored two
runs in the first inning with
no hits against St. Pete, but
only added one more run in
the fifth when Roberto
Perez walked and Chris
Jones doubled him hoite.
Greg Blake had two hits,
with one each from Jovan
Rosa, Emmanuel Morales
and Perez. Mario Williams
and Rosa had RBIs on
ground outs.
Patrick Clysdale took the
loss with two hits and six
runs (four earned) in 3%
innings. Chris Nardini was
touched for four runs in 21
innings. Jesus Cebollero
gave up one run in 1%
innings and Matt Small
pitched a hitless ninth
inning.
In the ABAC game, Sam
Testa was 4-for-6 with a
home run, double and five
RBIs. Rosa (double, two
RBIs), Williams (RBI) and
Morales (double, two RBIs)
had two hits apiece. Greg
Blake (double), Stephen
Carr and Zachary Prentice
each had a hit and two RBIs.
Marquise Zachary and
Perez (RBI) had hits.
Brandon Davis got the
win with five hits, two
earned runs. and five
strikeouts in four innings.
The Wolves built an 18-3
LCCC continued on 3B


Six Lady Tiger lifters qualify for state


Columbia High girls
basketball team
begins district play.
From staff reports

Six Lady Tigers qualified
for state weightlifting at the
sectional meet hosted by
Episcopal High on Saturday.
Columbia High won four-
weight classes at the
competition that featured
lifters from 24 schools. The


top three lifters in each class
advanced to state.
Columbia had four winners
at the sectional meet and
three will be making a return
trip to state. Oja Rollins won
the unlimited class, while
Alisa Ring won the 199-pound
class and Jolene Hill won at
169 pounds.
Rollins had a 240 bench
press and 170 clean and jerk
for a 410 total. Ring's lifts were
150-170-320 and Hill's were
150-145-295.


Columbia's other winner
was Celeste Gomez in the
183-pound class and she will
be joined at state by fellow
freshman Tara Stephens and
sophomore Jessica Bullock,
who placed third at 199 pounds
and 139 pounds, respectively.
Gomez had lifts of 160-155
for a 315 total. Stephens' lifts
were 110-130-240, which
matched the second-place
total. Bullock's lifts were
125-130-255.
Jennifer Kondrach finished


fourth with a 230 total in the
119-pound class.
Fort White High's Kali
Hunter qualified for state with
a 155-145-300, which was good
for third place in the
154-pound class.
"Our top winners have a
chance of placing at state and
the top six get medals," coach
Mitch Shoup said. "We have
to show some gains in the
next two weeks. It will be a
whole different level when we
get there and we have to be


much more hungrier."
The FHSAA Finals are
Feb. 10 at River Ridge High in
New Port Richey.

Lady Tigers basketball
Columbia's girls basketball
team goes against Gainesville
High in today's opening round
of the District 4-5A tourna-
ment. Vanguard High is
hosting the tournament and
TIGERS continued on 3B


Section B











Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421


2B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS TUESDAY, JANUARY 30, 2007


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN - Mississippi St. at Mississippi
ESPN2 -Wichita St. at N. Iowa
9 p.m.
ESPN - Michigan St. at Illinois
NHL
8 p.m.
VERSUS - Nashville at Colorado

FOOTBALL

Super Bowl facts, figures

AT STAKE - National Football League
Championship for the Vince Lombardi Trophy.
PARTICIPANTS - Chicago Bears (NFC)
and Indianapolis Colts (AFC). This is the
second appearance for Chicago and the third
appearance for the Colts.
SITE - Dolphins Stadium, Miami. This is
the ninth played in Southern Florida and the
fourth to be played at Dolphins Stadium.
SEATING CAPACITY - 70,000.
DATE - Feb. 4,2007.
KICKOFF - 6:25 p.m.
NETWORK COVERAGE - By CBS-TV
to more than 200 stations throughout the
United States plus Bermuda and Guam.
By CBS RadiolWestwood One to 500
stations within the United States. The Armed
Forces Television will also provide broadcast
to 180 countries throughout the world.
The game will be distributed internationally
by the NFL and NFL International to 230
countries.
PLAYERS SHARE -Winners: $73,000 per
man. Losers: $38,000 per man.
PLAYER UNIFORMS - Chicago will be
the home team and use the South bench.The
Bears have their choice of wearing its colored
or white jersey.
SUDDEN DEATH - If the game is tied at
regulation time 60 minutes, it will continue in
sudden death overtime.The team scoring first
(by safety, field goal, or touchdown) will win.
At the end of regulation playing time, the
referee will immediately toss a coin at the
center of the field, in accordance with rules
pertaining to the usual pre-game toss. The
captain of NFC team (the visiting team) will
call the toss. Following a three-minute
intermission after the end of the regular
game, play will continue by 15-minute periods
with a two-minute intermission between each
such overtime period with no halftime
intermission. The teams will change goals
between each period, there will be a two-
minute warning at the end of each period.
OFFICIAL TIME -The scoreboard clock
will be official.
OFFICIALS -There will be seven officials
and two alternates appointed by the
Commissioner's office.
TROPHY - The winning team receives
permanent possession of the Vince Lombardi
Trophy, a sterling silver trophy created by
Tiffany & Company and presented annually to
the winner of the. Super Bowl.The trophywas
named after the late coach Vince Lombardi of
the two-time Super Bowl champion Green Bay
Packers prior to the 1971 Super Bowl. The
trophy is a regulation silver football mounted
in a kicking position on a pyramid-like stand of
three concave sides. The trophy stands 20'A
inches tall, weighs 6.7 pounds and is valued
more than $25,000. The words "Vince
Lombardi" and "Super Bowl XLI" are engraved
on the base along with the NFL shield.
RINGS - The NFL pays for up to 150
rings at $5,000 per ring (plus adjustments for
increases in gold and diamonds). The league
also pays for 150 pieces of jewelry for the
losing team, which may not cost more than
one-half the price set for the Super Bowl ring.
ATTENDANCE -To date, 3,698,356 have
attended Super Bowl games. The largest
crowd was 103,985 at the 14th Super Bowl at
the Rose Bowl in Pasadena, Calif.

BASKETBALL

NBA standings

EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
Toronto 22 23 .489 -
New Jersey 21 23 .477 'A
New York 19 27 .413 3'/
Philadelphia 14 31 .311 8
Boston 12 31 .279 9
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
Washington 26 17 .605 -
Orlando 23 21 .523 3'/
Miami 19 25 .432 7h
Atlanta 15 27 .357 10',
Charlotte 15 28 .349 II
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Detroit 25 17 .595 -
Chicago 26 19 .578 'A
Cleveland 25 19 .568 I
Indiana 23 21 .523 , 3
Milwaukee 18 26 .409 8
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division


W
Dallas 36
San Antonio 32
Houston 27
New Orleans 18
Memphis I I
Northwest
W
Utah 29
Denver 22
Minnesota 21
Portland 19
Seattle 17


L Pct
9 .800
14 .696
16 .628
25 .419
34 .244
Division
L Pct
16 .644
19 .537
22 .488
26 .422
27 .386


Pacific Division
W L Pct
Phoenix 36 8 .818
L.A. Lakers 27 17 .614
L.A. Clippers 22 22 .500
Golden State 21 23 .477
Sacramento 17 25 .405
Sunday's Games
Phoenix 115, Cleveland 100
Milwaukee 107, New York 105
San Antonio 96, L.A. Lakers 94, OT
Washington 105, Boston 91
Detroit 95, Indiana 87
L.A. Clippers 98, Seattle 76
Monday's Games
Orlando at Atlanta (n)
Sacramento at Memphis (n)
Phoenix at Minnesota (n)
Portland vs. New Orleans (n)
Philadelphia at Houston (n)
Charlotte at Denver (n)
New Jersey at Utah (n)


Today's Games
Boston at Indiana, 7 p.m.
Detroit at Washington, 7 p.m.
Golden State at Cleveland, 7 p.m.
Milwaukee at Miami, 7:30 p.m.
L.A. Lakers at New York, 7:30 p.m.
Seattle at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Wednesday's Games
Milwaukee at Orlando, 7 p.m.
Golden State at Atlanta, 7 p.m.
Washington atToronto, 7 p.m.
NewYork at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
L.A. Lakers at Boston, 7:30 p.m.
Detroit at New Jersey, 7:30 p.m.
Dallas at Memphis, 8 p.m.
Philadelphia vs. New Orleans at Oklahoma
City, 8 p.m.
Seattle at Houston, 8:30 p.m.
San Antonio at Utah, 9 p.m.
Sacramento at Minnesota, 9 p.m.
Denver at Portland, 10 p.m.
Chicago at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m.

College scores

Sunday
EAST
Vermont 7 1, Stony Brook 61
WestVirginia 64, DePaul 52
SOUTH
Duke 75, Boston College 61
Georgia 57, LSU 54
Kentucky 76,Tennessee 57
Longwood 69, High Point 64
Marquette 70, South Florida 68
Massachusetts 66, Charlotte 61
McNeese St. 68, Lamar 60
South Alabama 90, North Texas 89, OT
Virginia 64, Clemson 63
Virginia Tech 73, Georgia Tech 65
MIDWEST
Ball St. 69, Ohio 57
E. Michigan 89, Buffalo 76
Wisconsin 57, Iowa 46
FAR WEST
Stanford 75, UCLA 68

AP Top 25

The top 25 teams in The Associated Press'
college basketball poll, with first-place votes in
parentheses, records through Jan. 28, total
points based on 25 points for a first-place
vote through one point for a 25th-place vote
and last week's ranking:
Record Pts Pvs
I. Florida (45) 19-2 1,773 I
2.Wisconsin (24) 21-1 1,734 2
3. North Carolina (3) 19-2 1,672 4
4. Ohio St. 18-3 1,545 5
5. UCLA 18-2 1,482 3
6. Kansas 18-3 1,414 8
7. Pittsburgh 19-3 1,330 9
8. Duke 18-3 1,211 10
9. Oregon 19-2 1,209 7
IO.TexasA&M 17-3 1,197 6
S1. Memphis 17-3 1,086 II
12. Oklahoma St. 18-3 1,023 13
13. Butler 19-2 933 14
14. Marquette 19-4 903 15
15. Nevada 19-2 766 18
16.Virginia Tech 16-5 608 24
17.Air Force 19-3 506 16
18.Washington St. 17-4 483 20
.19.Alabama . . . . 15-5 305 12
20. Arizona 14-6 282 17
21. Notre Dame 17-4 236 22
22.Texas 15-5 209 -
23. Stanford 14-5 208 -
24.Vanderbilt 15-6 200 -
25. Clemson 18-4 188 19
Others receiving votes: Indiana 141,
Kentucky 106,Georgetown 105,S. Illinois 101,
Va. Commonwealth 92, Southern Cal 67,
UNLV 47, Michigan St. 40, Texas Tech 37,
Tennessee 21, George Washington 20, West
Virginia 20, LSU 16, Maryland 14, New Mexico
St. 12, Georgia I I, Virginia II, Creighton 8,
Villanova 8, Louisville 7, Arkansas 6, Akron 5,
N. Iowa 2.

.Top 25 results

I. Florida (19-2) beat Mississippi
State 70-67; beat Auburn 91-66.
2. Wisconsin (21-1) beat Michigan 71-58;
beat Iowa 57-46.
3. UCLA (18-2) beat California 62-46; lost
to Stanford 75-68.
4. North Carolina (19-2) beatWake Forest
88-60; beat No. 17 Arizona 92-64.
5. Ohio State (18-3) beat Northwestern
59-50; beat Michigan State 66-64.
6. Texas A&M (17-3) lost to Texas Tech
70-68; beat Oklahoma 70-61.
7. Oregon (19-2) lost to Washington
89-77; beat No. 20 Washington State 77-74,
OT.
8. Kansas (18-3) beat Baylor 82-56; beat
Colorado 97-74.
9. Pittsburgh (19-3) beat Cincinnati 67-51;
beat St.John's 72-46.
10. Duke (18-3) beat No. 19 Clemson
68-66; beat Boston College 75-61.
II. Memphis (17-3) beat Tulsa 72-59; beat
Southern Mississippi 67-64.
12. Alabama (15-5) lost to Auburn 81-57;
lost to Arkansas 63-57.
13. Oklahoma State (18-3) beat Oklahoma
66-61; beat Iowa State 62-50.
14. Butler (19-2) beat Loyola of Chicago
70-66, OT; beat Detroit 68-58.
15. Marquette (19-4) beat Seton Hall
89-76; beat South Florida 70-68.
16.Air Force (19-3) beat TCU 72-39; lost
to BYU 61-52.
17. Arizona (14-6) beat Arizona State
71-47; lost to No.4 North Carolina 92-64.
18. Nevada (1 9-2) beat Louisiana Tech
84-67; beat Utah State 79-62.
19. Clemson (18-4) lost to No. 10 Duke
68-66; lost to Virginia 64-63.
20. Washington State (17-4) beat Oregon
State 70-55; lost to No.7 Oregon 77-74, OT.
21. LSU (13-7) lost to Vanderbilt 64-53;
lost to Georgia 57-54.
22. Notre Dame (17-4) lost to St. John's
71-68; beat Villanova 66-63.
23. Indiana (15-5) lost to Illinois 51-43;
beat Michigan 76-6 1.
24.Virginia Tech (16-5) beat Miami 92-85;
beat Georgia Tech 73-65.
25. Southern California (16-6) lost to
Stanford 65-50; beat California 76-73.

USA Today/ESPN Top 25


The top 25 teams in the USA Today-ESPN
men's college basketball poll, with first-place
votes in parentheses, records through Jan. 28,
points based on 25 points for a first-place
vote through one point for a 25th-place vote
and last week's ranking:
Record Pts Pvs
1. Florida (26) 19-2 767 I
2.Wisconsin (4) 21-1 733 3
3. North Carolina (1) 19-2 724 4
4. Ohio State 18-3 668 5
5, UCLA 18-2 648 2


6. Kansas
7. Pittsburgh
8. Texas A&M
9. Oregon
10. Duke
II. Butler
12. Memphis
13. Nevada
14. Oklahoma State
15. Marquette
16.Air Force
17.Washington State
18.Virginia Tech
19. Notre Dame
20.Alabama
21. Clemson
22.Arizona
23.Texas
24. Kentucky
25. Indiana
25. UNLV
Others receiving


votes:Southern Illinois


54;Virginia Commonwealth 42;Vanderbilt 32;
Georgetown 31; Stanford 28; Southern
California 23; Michigan State 20;WestVirginia
20; Boston College 12; Winthrop 10; New
Mexico State 9; LSU 7; Brigham Young 6;
George Washington 6; Texas Tech 4; Villanova
4; Maryland 3; Northern Iowa 2.

Top 25 schedule

Today's Game
No. 21. Notre Dame at Syracuse, 7 p.m.
Wednesday's Games
No. I Florida vs. No. 24 Vanderbilt,
7 p.m.
No. 2Wisconsin at Indiana, 7 p.m.
No. 3 North Carolina vs. Miami, 7 p.m.
No. 4 Ohio State at Purdue, 7 p.m.
No. 10 Texas A&M vs. Iowa State, 7:30 p.m.
No. 11 Memphis at UCF, 7 p.m.
No. 13 Butler at Youngstown State,
7:05 p.m.
No. 15 Nevada at Louisiana Tech, 8 p.m.
No. 16 Virginia Tech vs. N.C. State, 9 p.m.
No. 19 Alabama at LSU. 9 p.m.
No. 22 Texas at Texas Tech, 9 p.m.
No. 23 Stanford vs. Gonzaga, II p.m.
Thursday's Games
No. 5 UCLA vs. No. 9 Oregon, 10:30 p.m.
No. 8 Duke at Virginia, 9 p.m.
No. 18 Washington State at No. 20
Arizona, 8:30 p.m.
Saturday's Games
No. I Florida vs.Tennessee, 3 p.m.
No. 2 Wisconsin vs. Northwestern, 2 p.m.
No. 3 North Carolina at N.C. State,
3:30 p.m.
No. 4 Ohio State at Michigan State, 4 p.m.
No. 5 UCLA vs. Oregon State, 5:30 p.m.
No. 6 Kansas vs. No. 10 Texas A&M, 9 p.m.
No. 9 Oregon at Southern California,
3:30 p.m.
No. II Memphis vs. SMU, Noon
No. 12 Oklahoma State at Colorado,
4 p.m.
No. 13 Butler vs. Wisconsin-Milwaukee,
2 p.m.
No. 14 Marquette vs. Providence, 2 p.m.
No. 15 Nevada vs. Hawaii, 8:05 p.m.
No. 16 Virginia Tech at Boston College,
I p.m.
No. 17 Air Force vs.Wyoming, 3 p.m.
No. 18 Washington State at Arizona State,
7:30 p.m.
No. 19 Alabama vs. South Carolina, 3 p.m.
No. 20 Arizona vs.Washington, 1:30 p.m.
No. 21 Notre Dame at South Florida,
8 p.m.
No. 22 Texas vs. Kansas State, 3:30 p.m.
No. 23 Stanford at California, 9:30 p.m.
No. 24 Vanderbilt vs. Georgia, 7 p.m.
No. 25 Clemson at Georgia Tech, I p.m.
Sunday's Game
No. 8 Duke vs. Florida State, 2 p.m.

BASEBALL

College scores

Sunday
CS Northridge 9, UNLV 4
Nevada 6, St. Mary's, Calif. I
San Diego 4, Cal Poly I
Santa Clara 3, Hawaii 2

TENNIS

Australian Open champs

Men's Singles - Roger Federer (I),
Switzerland
Women's Singles - Serena Williams,
United States
Men's Doubles - Bob and Mike Bryan (I),
United States
Women's Doubles - Cara' Black,
Zimbabwe, and Liezel Huber (3), South Africa
Mixed Doubles - Daniel Nestor, Canada,
and Elena Likhovtseva, Russia
Boy's Singles - Brydan KleinAustralia
Girl's Singles - Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova
(I), Russia
Boy's Doubles - Graeme Dyce, Britain,
and Harri Heliovaara, Finland
Girl's Doubles - Evgeniya Rodina and
Arina Rodionova, Russia
Men's Wheelchair Singles - Shingo
Kuneida (2), Japan
Women's Wheelchair Singles - Esther
Vergeer (I), Netherlands
Men's Wheelchair Doubles - Robin
Ammerlaan, Netherlands, and Shingo Kunieda,
Japan
Women's Wheelchair Doubles - Jiske
Griffioen and EstherVergeer, Netherlands

HOCKEY

NHL games

Sunday's Games
Chicago 4, Calgary 3.OT
Anaheim 4, Dallas I
Detroit 3, Colorado I
Philadelphia 2,Atlanta I
Vancouver 3,San Jose I
Monday's Games
N.Y. Rangers at Boston (n)
Ottawa at Montreal (n)
Today's Games
Boston at Buffalo, 7 p.m.
Toronto at Carolina, 7 p.m.
New Jersey at Atlanta, 7 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Florida at Pittsburgh, 7:30 p.m.
Washington at Ottawa, 7:30 p.m.
Detroit at N.Y. Islanders, 7:30 p.m.
Minnesota at St. Louis.8 p.m.
Nashville at Colorado, 8 p.m.
Los Angeles at Calgary, 9 p.m.
Columbus atVancouver, 10 p.m.-
Dallas at San Jose, 10:30 p.m.
Wednesday's Games
Toronto at N.Y. Rangers, 7:30 p.m.
Columbus at Edmonton,9 p.m.
Phoenix at Anaheim, 10 p.m.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS TUESDAY, JANUARY 30, 2007


LCCC
Continued From Page 1B

lead and Scott Mancauskas
(seven hits, eight runs in 2'1.
innings), Tommy Ulmer three
hits, three runs in 1i, innings)
and Gary Kott (two hits, one
run in 1' innings) struggled to
hold on to it.
Lake City (3-1) plays at
Manatee Community College
at 3 p.m. Wednesday.

Lady Timberwolves softball
Lake City's softball team
dropped it season-opening
doubleheader to Chipola
College, falling 11-3, 7-1 in
Marianna on Saturday.
Briana Durden led the Lady
"Wolves in hitting. In game one
she was 2-for-4 with a two-run
home run. In game two she
had a pair of doubles and
drove in the one run.
Amanda Bichard (RBI),
Kristy Witten and Brittany
Maroney had hits in the
opening game and Jane
Gordon had a hit in game two.
Courtney Mauldin (10 hits,
six runs, two strikeouts) and
Witten (six hits, five runs, four
strikeouts) split the pitching
duties in game one with each
going three innings. Shelly
Law pitched a complete
second game with six hits, four
earned runs and two
strikeouts.
"Chipola is very good,"
coach Donna Howard said.
"The first time out we started
with one of the best. It was an
eye-opener. We got a taste of
what it takes at this level. We
definitely have room to
improve."
Lake City opens at home at
2 p.m., Friday against
Abraham Baldwin. It is Spirit
Day for the Lady Wolves.



TIGERS
Continued From Page 1B
CHS plays at 4 p.m.
The Lady Tigers were 5-7 in
district play to earn the No. 4
seed. Columbia swept the sea-
son series against Gainesville.
The winner 'of the
CHS/Gainesville game has to
face No. 1-seed Leesburg
High, which is ranked second
in the state.
In other games today.
Eastside High plays Forest
High at 6 p.m. and Lake Weir
High plays Vanguard at 8 p.m.

Columbia wrestling
Columbia's wrestlers posted
a 4-1 team record at the Bobcat
Invitational at Buchholz High
on Saturday.
The Tigers beat Buchholz,
West Port, Lake Weir and
Bradford high schools, then
tied Gainesville High, 39-39.
However, Gainesville won
the match on tiebreakers,
called criteria.
"We lost on the sixth out of
eight criteria," coach Al
Nelson said.
Wrestling for CHS at the
meet were Jason Harrison
(103-pound weight class),
Ashley Crumitie (112), Ivan
Arevelo (119), Josh Hook
(130), Matt Bohannon (135),
Jeff Kennedy (140), Ronnie
Frost (145), Lance Drawdy
(152), Zach McKissock (160),
Steven Coody (171), Cody
Wheeler (189), Brady Dicks
(215) and Josh Messer (255).
Columbia hosts the District
2-2A championship at 11 a.m.
Saturday.


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BARBARO: Shattered leg


Continued From Page 1B

"We just reached a point
where it was going to be
difficult for him to go on with-
out pain," Roy Jackson said.
"It was the right decision, it
was the right thing to do. We
said all along if there was a
situation where it would
become more difficult for
him then it would be time."
Richardson said he was
comfortable the right
decision was made and could
tell Barbaro was not his usual
self early Monday morning.
"He was just a different
horse," he said. "You could
see he was upset. That was
the difference. It was more
than we wanted to put him
through."
On May 20, Barbaro was
rushed to the New Bolton
Center, about 30 miles from
Philadelphia in Kennett
Square, hours after shattering
his right hind leg just a few
strides into the Preakness
Stakes. The .bay colt under-
went a five-hour operation
that fused two joints,
recovering from an injury
most horses never survive.


"It'd be nice if he's remem-
bered for winning the
Kentucky Derby, not for
breaking down in the
Preakness," said Peter Brette,
Barbaro's exercise rider.
Barbaro suffered a signifi-
cant setback over the
weekend, and surgery was
required to insert two steel
pins in a bone - one of three
shattered in the Preakness
but now healthy - to elimi-
nate all weight bearing on the
ailing right rear foot.
The leg was on the mend
until an abscess began caus-
ing discomfort last week.
Until then, the major concern
was Barbaro's left rear leg,
where 80 percent of the hoof
had been removed in July
when he developed laminitis.
'This horse was a hero,"
said David Switzer, executive
director of the Kentucky
Thoroughbred Association.
"His owners went above and
beyond the call of duty to
save this horse. It's an unfor-
tunate situation, but I think
they did the right thing in
putting him down."


LEVI: Hard work pays off


Continued From Page 1B
up there knew he had the size
and they made mention of
just how much improvement
they saw. They are looking
for good things."
Charleston Southern is
making noise as a member of
the Big South Conference.
The Buccaneers won their
first nine games last year and
finished the season 9-2. Along
with a 7-4 record in 2005 it
gave Charleston Southern its
first two winning seasons and
a streak of 14 straight wins.
Jay Mills is head coach.
McFatter dealt with running
backs coach Scott Browne
during recruiting and the
offensive line coach is Chuck
Kelly.
"Coach Green talked to
me and I saw they were inter-
ested," McFatter said. "We
sent some things up and I
took a visit. They offered me
and I took it. It is kind of a
Christian school and I liked
that, too. I thought it was the
way to go.
"The coaches seemed to be
involved with the players and
the players were real nice,
too. They showed me the
town a little bit."
McFatter was honorable.
mention all-state in Class 4A
and received a Best Blocker
award at the CHS football
banquet on Friday.
"They really liked my pass
blocking," McFatter said.
'They run sort of a spread


offense and I think that is
why they were interested in
me. I was kind of surprised
about all-state, but I was glad
to get it."
Both Green and Shoup'
talked about McFatter's pass
blocking.
"He worked hard to get
where he is going and that is
the next level," Shoup said.
'We are all proud of him."
The Lake City native
played Little League Football
and was on the first team at
Richardson Middle School,
where he played three years.
He also played three years on
the varsity, the last two under
Green.
"I really like playing for
Coach Green," McFatter said.
"He is an awesome coach.
Everywhere I go, people have
something good to say about
him. I really enjoyed the last
couple of years. It is not like
you have to play, it is a joy to
play."
McFatter's dedication
extends to the classroom and
he has perfect attendance
since kindergarten.
"I am looking forward to
college," McFatter said. "I
want to get away and meet
new people and see what is
out there for me.
"I want to thank all my
teachers and coaches for
pushing me and my mom for
pushing me and for us having
faith in God."


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28 TVs


Woods �

continues

win streak
Associated Press

SAN DIEGO - Tiger
Woods couldn't ignore the
comments from fans who
filled every inch of grass
lining every fairway at the
Buick Invitational.
"It seemed like everyone
was yelling out, 'Seven'" he
said. "It was a pretty
common theme out there
today, basically all week."
The buzz at the Buick
Invitational came from
Woods' pursuit of his
seventh straight PGA Tour
victory, which he accom-
plished by closing with a
6-under 66 to win by two
over Charles Howell III.
He now owns the second-
longest winning streak in
PGA Tour history, trailing
the 11 in a row that Byron
Nelson won in 1945.
"As far as how special
seven is, you're in elite com-
pany," Woods said. 'There's
only one person ahead of
you. He's one of the greatest
legends in the history of the
game. To be in company
like with Mr. Nelson ... it's
pretty special."
It was his third straight
title at Torrey Pines, this
one a combination of three
key holes and help from
three PGA Tour rookies.
Brandt Snedeker was so
nervous that he had trouble
eating breakfast and soon
fell out of a share of the
lead. Andrew Buckle of
Australia fell apart with a
double bogey on No. 12, and
Jeff Quinney took double
bogey from the bunker on
the 14th.
Woods joined the chase
with a 3-wood that soared
276 yards to within 25 feet
for eagle on No. 9. He took
his first lead with a 65-foot
eagle putt that curled
around the back of the cup
on the 13th and stopped
inches away. Antl when
Howell challenged him late,
Woods answered with a
9-iron into 2/2 feet for birdie
on No. 17 for a cushion.

ACROSS 41 Dia
Sin
1 Meditative sect 43 Lot
4 Bring to an end slip
8 Strive to win 47 Mr.
11 Future fish 49 Milt
12 Klutzes 50 Sig
13 Lantern part 53 Jab
14 Browses, these 55 Mai
days 56 Cat
16 Aspirin 57 Wh
target . (2 v
17 Registers for 58 Kin
18 Small fry sys
20 Chic 59 Sap
21 Ice floe dweller 60 Be
24 Soak
28 Cosmonaut's lab I
30 Nevada town
33 Forest 1 Reg
grazer 2 Mile
34 Nurse's 3 We
portion 4 Moi
35 Baking-powder 5 Res
ingredient roa
36 Firm up 6 Inc
37 Pitchers' stats 7 Lib
38 Cushion 8 Tay
39 Chopped down Dar


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Phone (386) 755-2660
Mon. - Sat. 7:30 am - 6 pm
Sunday 9-5




Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
RELEC


@2007 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
CARTTI



DORFIL

www.jumble.com
MYDIAS
7, T]
L / __ / _ _ _ _


Ans: THE

Yesterday's



imond or
non
unging
ppers
Gehrig
d
gn
)bered
ny years
tnap
eel buy
wds.)
nd of
stem
ppho's verse
able to

DOWN

gions
stone
Il-groomed
re tart
surfaces a
d
correct
rary sound
,back or
mone


Fort White
Sunshine True Value
of Ft. White Hwy 47 N
Across St From School
Phone (386) 497-1708
Mon. - Sat. 8 am - 5:30 pm
Sunday 9-5

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Henri Arnold and Mike Argirion


Hey, look at
This over here . -




WHERE THE TOUR
GROUP WENT TO
VIEW THE SEA
MAMMALS.

Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


(Answers tomorrow)
Jumbles: BIPED GULCH SUBMIT TURNIP
Answer: What the former artist did when he returned
to the easel - "BRUSHED" UP


Answer to Previous Puzzle

GLOB AHA MESA
NAME SAG I APED
URAL SNE AK ERS

EAN 1E BO FROI











U HU H GAS STUN


Freud, to himself
Mete (out)
Use hip boots
Not often
Volcanic dust
Bing Crosby tune


GET MORE in the new "Just Right Crossword Puzzles"
series from Quill Driver. Call 800-605-7176.


23 Actress -
Bonet
25 Trim
26 Playwright -
Coward
27 Biology topic
29 Second notes
30 Hip-hop music
31 Vitality
32 Pantyhose
color
34 Surmise
39 Ziegfeld
nickname
40 Chews the
scenery
42 Seine
moorages
44 Fragrant
shrub
45 Ms. Verdugo
46 Type of car
48 Elegant
coiffure
49 Bewilder
50 Decent grade
51 - cit. (foot-
note abbr.)
52 Famous
numero
54 Towel's place


� 2007 by NEA, Inc.


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421









LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS TUESDAY, JANUARY 30, 2007


DILBERT

I ANALYZED THE THE MOST QUALIFIED DILBERT, MtEET
DNA OF ALL OF YOUR APPLICANT WHO IS THE NEW GUY.
APPLICANTS TO FIND E WILLING TO WORK FOR i
THE BEST FIT FOR YOU HAS THREE EARS, A AND DO IT
THE 30B. SNOUT, AND A LIFE QUICKLY.
EXPECTANCY OF E
S THURSDAY.

/ A ^I \rf n"6 'l


BABY BLUES


FOR BETTER OR WORSE


BLONDIE FRANK & ERNEST


BEETLE BAILEY B.C.


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE GARFIELD


SNUFFY SMITH


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-April
19): You may have to juggle
things around to appease
someone you care about.
Emotional matters will esca-
late if you aren't willing to
back down or at least compro-
mise. Pick and choose your
battles wisely. **
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): Be careful today
because someone is likely to
call your bluff or ask you to
follow through. Have every-
thing in order before you
proclaim that you can do
things. Your timing must be
impeccable. ****
GEMINI (May 21-June
20): Someone may try to
make some underhanded
moves but, as long as you are
aware of it, you should be able
to keep things in order. Don't
overreact. Facts will be what
count. ***
CANCER (June 21-July
22): Aggression may not be
the way you handle matters
but, today, you will need to put
a little force behind your ideas
and actions. A problem with
someone you work with can
be worked out but not if you
back down. Change will be


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Word

necessary. ***
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
A business trip or meeting
will pay off. You will have the
upper hand and be able to put
a deal you've been working on
to rest. Don't fool yourself,
however, into thinking the
work is done. ***
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Diversify today if you
want things to pan out. Use
your imagination and you will
get far better results. A love
connection can be made or a
relationship taken to the next
level. A change in your status
is apparent. ****
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Don't let your emotions
cloud your vision, causing you
to make a poor decision that
will influence your future.
Prepare to take a rather
unusual approach to get to
where you want to go. It's the
element of surprise that will
count. **
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.
21): You'll do far better with
acquaintances than you will
with close friends and family.


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Todnys ckle. C equals F
"KWYIY FD ZABZMD SGY LSLYGK FG
HWFATWSST BWYG KWY TSSI SOYGD
ZGT AYKD KWY CRKRIY FG."
- EIZWZL EIYYGY
PREVIOUS SOLUTION - "Goals determine what you're going to he." - Julius
Erving
'You golta believe" -Tug McGraw
(c) 2007 by NEA, Inc. 1-23


Get out on the road and make
. your rounds. Present and pro-
mote today and you will pros-
per - but don't offer more
than you have to. *****
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-
Dec. 21): Talk is cheap but,
if done properly, it can get you
what you want. Use your
imagination and paint a sce-
nario that is attractive to oth-
ers and you will win a position
that will help you get ahead.
Change will come to you if
you have presented your case
well. ***
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. 19): You may feel pulled
in two different directions
emotionally. State your case
rather than letting your stress
levels increase. A romantic
relationship can turn into
something very special. ***
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Now is a good time
to take care of matters that
are affecting your work. So
much will depend on how you
present yourself to others
today. Be sure to stay within
the boundary set by society if
you want to excel. ***
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): Focus on someone you
want to spend more time with.
A chance to develop a creative
idea you have is possible.
Children can influence your
decision. Don't get angry with
someone who is trying to help
you. *****
Birthday Baby: You are
independent but sensitive to
the needs of others. You can
take advantage of any situa-
tion that arises. You are quick
and intelligent and have great
vision. You are charismatic
and popular.


CLASSIC PEANUTS


pop ,,iss ' I PAD TO 60 AND FORGET SHE WA5 REALLY ;'LL SHE AD A PIECE OF CHALK
OTMAR.. / THE EGG6 SHELLS AGAIN TODAY.. UPSET'MHUH. 2 SAYSI IN -iER HAND, AND (0NEN IT
S FOR A MINUTE I THOUGHT SHE S NAPPED, IT SOUNDED
I WAGA560(NG TO PA55 OUT! P LIKE A RIFLE SHOT!








DEAR ABBY


Second-guessing mother is


applauded for her first action


DEAR ABBY: I couldn't
believe my eyes when I read
your reply to "Second-
Guessing Myself in S.C."
(Dec. 18), who reported her
son and his friends for get-
ting high on campus. You
said she should have
informed the boys' parents so
they had the option of deal-
ing with the
matter themselves - and
she owed those parents an
apology.
As a drug prevention pro-
fessional, I know that
"Second-Guessing" was cor-
rect! Drug use is unlikely to
stop unless there is an inter-
vention. At the school where
I work, a suspension for sub-
stance abuse is followed by a
mandatory use assessment
and, if recommended, sub-
stance abuse education
and/or counseling. The
anger that the friends' par-
ents directed toward the
writer of that letter needs to
be seen for what it is -
enabling. If those boys were
caught high on a job, they'd
be fired.
Please let your readers
know that you made a mis-
take. Encourage parents to
take a stand, talk with their
children often about the dan-
gers of drugs, and let their
children know that if they use
drugs, they'll be held fully
accountable. - MIDDLE
SCHOOL DRUG PRE-
VENTION SPECIALIST,


Abigail Van Buren
www.deorobby.com
FAIRBANKS, ALASKA
DEAR DRUG PREVEN-
TION SPECIALIST:
Perhaps this column can be
used as a starting point for
that conversation. A lot of
folks were upset about my
response to that letter, in
which I told the writer I
thought she had jumped the
gun in reporting the problem
to the school administration,
and that she owed those par-
ents an apology for jumping
the gun. What I failed to take
into consideration was that
teachers are mandated by
law to report anything they
see that they know to be
against the law. Mea culpa!
Read on:
DEAR ABBY: Would you
have criticized that parent if
the students were driving
drunk? Shoplifting?
Committing acts of vandal-
ism? I think she should have
reported them to the police
as well as the school.
That the other parents
were upset because their
children were punished
administratively is one of the
reasons that so many kids get
into trouble today. Their par-


ents excuse the misdeed and
fault the person who does
take some positive action.
Certainly, I expect parents to
stand by their kids when
they're in trouble, but being
supportive does not mean
excusing or covering up ille-
gal behavior. Students need
to learn accountability for
their misdeeds, and not
expect parents to bail (no
pun intended) them out of
their wrongdoings. -
RETIRED STATE TROOP-
ER, ALLENTOWN, PA.
DEAR ABBY: The teach-
ing profession is ruled by a
strict ethical code. Failure to
report any illegal activity,
whether it involves your child
or the children of your
friends, and whether it
occurs at your school or not,
can result in the loss of your
teaching certificate and
expose you to liability.
As a high school teacher, I
all too often see children
destroyed by parents who
choose to "handle things
themselves," which typically
means they handle nothing at
all. Parents who "help" their
children by protecting them
from the consequences of
their actions in truth do them
harm. This world would be a
far better place if there were
more mothers like the writer
of that letter. - MEREDITH
IN THOMASTON, GA.
* Write Dear Abby at P.O. Box
69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.


ZITS


Page Editor: Chris Bednar, 754-0404
















Bulletin Board


STUDENT PROFILE


V41


COURTESY PHOTO
Lorrae Blalock
Name: Lorrae Blalock
School: Melrose Park
Elementary School
Parents: Eddie and
Julianne Blalock
Age: 10
Grade: 5
Principal: Donna
McAdams

. Clubs. and/or
organizations, both in and
out of school, to which
you belong: Softball,
soccer, piano, First
Presbyterian Church and
choir.

What would you like to
do when you complete
your education? "To be a
pediatrician."

Achievements: First
place in science fair at
Melrose 2005-2006 and


Fort White
Elementary
* Fort White Elementary
would like to congratulate
Allison Bucher and Matthew
Martin on placing first and
second in an essay contest
sponsored by the Rotary Club.
Fort White Elementary is very
proud of them.
* The third grade at Fort
White Elementary participated in


2006-2007, safety patrol
2005-2006,
student council
vice-president 2005-2006,
second place in county
science fair, received the
Mary Phillips award
2005-2006, sings solo in
church choir. A-B honor roll.

What do you like best
about school? "Doing
science and hanging out with
my friends."

Teacher's comments
about student: "Lorrae is
an outstanding student. She
is kind to everyone and
shows all the traits of a great
leader."

Principal's comments
concerning student:
"Lorrae is such a positive
role model for her peers.
She always has a smile on
her face and a "can do"
attitude. She'll certainly be
able to achieve any goal she
decides to pursue."

Student's comment on
being selected for
"Student Focus": "To have
a respect for others, like
your parents, grandparents,
family, friends, teachers, for
those who serve our country,
President of our country, by
respecting those around you,
you will be rewarded the
honor that life offers us all.
So to receive honor you
must show it yourself first."

a simulated FCAT test. The third
grade teachers felt that it was
important for the students to
experience how the test would
be administered. The teachers
hope that the simulation will
help ease the nervousness
some children feel when faced
with an important test. The
teachers will also use the data
collected to help gear instruction
as FCAT testing quickly
approaches.


SCHOOL CALENDAR


Today
* Niblack Elementary -
Book Bunch Lunch.
* CCSB Technology Center
- Microsoft Word, 8:30-
11:30 a.m.
* FWHS - Graduation
Committee Meeting, 7:45 a.m.
* Eastside Elementary -
Bone Zone presentation for
second grade.
* District Wide Safety
Committee - Meeting at CCSB
Administrative Complex, Room
227-2:30 p.m.
* Columbia City Elementary
- PTO Character Education
Assembly, Power Unlimited
Body Builders, 7 p.m.
Wednesday
* FWHS - Blood Drive.
* LCMS - Literacy Lead
Team meeting in office
conference room, 8 a.m.
* Five Points Elementary -
State-of-the-School visit,
10 a.m.
* Summers Elementary -


Leadership Team meeting.

. * Grade Level Chair
meeting, 2:30 p.m.
* Teacher of the Year -
Interviews at CCSB
Administrative Complex, room
207- 8 a.m.-4 p.m.
* Eastside Elementary -
Curriculum Meetings.
2:30 p.m.
* Niblack Elementary -
Book Bunch Lunch.

Thursday
* CCSB Technology Center
- iMovie printing, 8:30 a.m.-
3:30 p.m.
* Eastside Elementary -
School Advisory Council
meeting, 2:30 p.m.
* Niblack Elementary -
Book Bunch Lunch.

Friday
* FWHS - Hoops of Heats
fundraiser in gym.
* Columbia City Elementary
- Personality Portraits and
Classroom Group Photos.


I E S A B O U T O U R C H O OS I


Columbia
High School
* Columbia High School
Health Occupation Services of
America students walked away
with numerous awards at the
Regional HOSA competition.
The results are:
* First place Kaiser
Permante - Marilee Sherrod
* Third place Medical
Spelling - Marilee Sherrod
* First place Medical Math -
Shradda Patel
* First place Dental Assisting
- Kristina Carmichael
* First place Sports Medicine
- Michelle Robinson
* First place team CPR -
First Aid - Cameron Tolar and
Autum Denmark
* Second place team - EMT
- Kiersten Reiter and Shannon
Harden
* Second place team -
Health Career Display - Shelby
Wentworth and Kacey Pippins
* First place Outstanding
HOSA Chapter - Jessica
Masters
* Fourth place team -
Creative Problem Solving -
Chelsey Gay, Vicki
Waters, Vanessa Seadrow
* Fifth place - Nursing
Assistant - Tyronza Rentz
* Fourth place - Medical
Photography - Jacey Tomlinson
* Students advancing to
state competition are: Marilee
Sherrod, Shradda Patel,
Kristina Carmichael, Michelle
Robinson, Cameron Tolar,
Autum Denmark, Kiersten
Reiter, Channon Harden,
Shelby Wentworth, Kacey
Pippins, Jessica Masters,
Jenna Watson, Randi
Wainwright, Mary Mandy, and
Alisa Ring.
* Fifty Columbia High School
Science Fair participants were
treated to a congratulatory
luncheon on Jan. 8, in the Tiger
Diner, at CHS.
This is the first year school
fair winners have been treated
to a luncheon. The idea for the
luncheon came from CHS
principal Terry Huddleston.
According to Science
Department Chair, Charlene
Kelley, "It was his idea. I
coordinated the luncheon with
Ms. Cheryl Bender whose culi-
nary arts class catered the
affair. Mr. Huddleston picked up
the tab." The students enjoyed
the affair and appreciated being
recognized for their scientific
accomplishments.

Fort White
High School
* Congratulations to the
following Fort White High
School students for placing in
the Columbia County Science
Fair:

Junior Division
* First place Botany - Kyle
Padgett
* Third place Chemistry -
Chantal Soria and Brandon
Gonzalez (tied)
* Second place Engineering
- Tabitha Plunske
* Second place
Environmental - Alison Wrench
* First place Environmental
- Miranda Amaya
* Second place Medicine
and Health - Megan English
* Third place physics -
Taylor Douglass
* Second place physics and
Most Creative - Landon
Humphries
* First place zoology -
Aaron Swears

Senior Division
* Second place Earth
Science - Shadre Dent
* First place physics - Alex
Gilmer
* Have you ever heard of
Orienteering? The seventh
grade students at Fort White
High School learned what this
means...and more. Each class
was divided into two groups and
given a quick review on how to
use a compass. The students
then participated in a scavenger
hunt to find boxes hidden in the
woods.
Each box contained a
question that they had to
answer in order to help them
choose between two items to
take. At the end of their "trek"
through the woods, they used
the items they chose to build
their own compass (of course,
they had to choose the


needle--not paperclip and the
bowl-not plate) .
To make it even more fun, the
two groups competed against
each other to see who could
find their way back the fastest.


Everyone involved had a lot of
fun and learned how to find their
way around the park with a
compass and set of bearings.

Columbia County
School Board
* You are invited to attend a
free Positive Parenting Program
which will be Feb. 8 at the
School Board Administrative
Complex. Getting a "grip" on
your kids while holding onto
your sanity can be a challenge.
You will learn how to
understand the unique talents
and desires of your child while
providing positive leadership
and direction. This program will
focus on: The supreme
importance of attitude, building
strong self-esteem, utilizing the
power of positive
communications, setting and
reaching desirable goals and
discovering the zest for life.
* This program is free and
will be offered at two different
times, a morning presentation
will be held from 10 a.m. to
noon. The evening presentation
will be held from 6:30 to 8 p.m.
Free child care will be provided
for the evening session only. To
register your child for evening
child care, or for more
information call your child's
school or Tina Roberts at
758-4872.

Melrose Park
Elementary
* Third-grade is currently
working on a raid forest unit.
Classes have been exploring
the plants, animals and people
of this habitat with activate and
related classroom materials. We
will begin intensive preparation
for the FCAT next month.
* Second-grade is off to a
great start in the New Year
learning about the woodland
forest. Second-grade will then
make discoveries about
scientists and inventors that are
the creators of many things we
use today. Do you know who
created the Nike swoosh? Do
you know who the creators of
Crayola Crayons are and the
other things they invented? The
second-graders will be able to
tell you in just a few weeks.
* First- and second-graders
are invited to participate in a
math-a-thon fundraiser to
benefit St. Jude Children's
Research Hospital. In February,
students will be given
information about the program.
Those who return a completed
registration form will receive a
math fun book or CD-Rom
version with 250 problems to be
done at home. To raise money
for the hospital, students should
ask relatives and friends to
sponsor them. All funds raised
will be sent to help St. Jude in *
its fight against childhood
catastrophic diseases. In
addition, the math problems will
give students math practice.
Melrose is asking you to
support the students as they
participate in this worthwhile
program. Any person or
business that would like to make
a donation may call the school
at 755-8264.


Niblack Elementary
* In December, Niblack's
P.T.O. rewarded 27 students for
their hard work in a recent
fundraiser. The students were
treated to a limousine ride and
lunch at Texas Roadhouse.
Niblack would like to express a
special thanks to Coopers
Funeral Home for the donation
of the limousine for the trip and
to Myron Carter for being such a
good chauffeur. The students
had an exceptional time.
* Congratulations to the
science fair project winners:
Second grade: John Baker,
Caitlin Clemons and Demario
Merricks. Third grade: Darrell
Jones, DeShaun Lewis and
Breeana Marshall. Fourth
grade:Richard Williams, Jamie
Denson and Malachi Jean. Fifth
grade: Alexis Hill, Byron English
and Simeon Middleton.
* Niblack Elementary had its
spelling bee recently and the
winner was Mikesha Mixon.
Runner-up in the spelling bee
was Angelica Hendon.
Everyone who participated
deserves a pat on the back for
a job well done.
M The fourth- and fifth-grade
students took a field trip to
MOSH (Museum of Science and
History) in Jacksonville on Jan.
8. They really enjoyed their visit
and had lunch at the landing.
They saw a demonstration of
electricity called "Volts and Jolts"


SCHOOL PICTURES


Young Writers of the Month
Fort White Elementary School's Young Writers of the Month for
January are: Front row (From left) Zoey Love, Ryan Ray and Sara
Gartin; Back row (From left) Jarrod Faulkner, Thomas Hatch and
Ryan Walker; Mix 94.3 Program Director.


where they learned about
generators, static electricity,
friction and Broadway electricity.
They also visited the planetarium
and saw a video about the solar
system. They learned about the
characteristics of the planets and
also. about future plans
that NASA has for space
explorations.

Richardson
Middle School
* Wrestling coach Steve
McCray is very proud of the
outstanding wrestlers who
participated in the conference
championship. Sixth-graders
Jordan McCollum won first place,
eighth-grader Bobby Williams
won first place and was
undefeated all year, and
eighth-grader Jarred Ogburn also
won first place. Second place
winners were Blake Dicks and
Michael Creech who are


eighth-graders.
* Richardson Lady Wolves
won their place to play in the
conference championship.
Coach Sue Ebert said that the
girl's played their hearts out.
Both the softball team and the
baseball teams have been
chosen. Wade Burlingame is
the softball coach and David
Tompkins is the baseball coach.
* The Richardson students
did a great job in the county
science fair. First place winners
in their categories were Francis
Diaz, Bethany Estevez and
Aylse Raulerson. Third place
winners were Jordan Beilling,
Daniel Summers and Kari
Stokes. Michael Creech won
the Dr. Kazmerski award for
"Deserving Project that Didn't
Place." Bethany Estevez won
the Lake City Community
College best fair award. The
regional finalist is Bdthany
Estevez. The alternate is
Francis Diaz.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER SCHOOLS TUESDAY, JANUARY 30, 2007


Page Editor: Chris Bednar, 754-0404











LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED TUESDAY, JANUARY 30, 2007


Classified Department: 755-5440


1" 77 A


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4 lines * 6 days .tm a. -
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In Prinit anid On Linie


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
3RD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORI-
DA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVI-
SION CASE NO: 06-416CA
JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A., AS
TRUSTEE FOR IXIS REAL ESTATE
CAPITAL TRUST 2005-HE2 MORT-
GAGE PASS THROUGH CERTIFI-
CATED, SERIES 2005-HE2
PLAINTIFF
VS.
BRUCE EDWARD CARTER, JR.;
COLLEEN CARTER; ANY AND ALL
UNKNOWN PARTIED CLAIMING
BY, THROUGH, UNDER. AND
AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED IN-
DIVIDUAL DEFENDANTS) WHO
ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR
ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN
PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTER-
EST AS SPOUSES \ HEIRS, DEVI-
SEES, GRANTEES OR OTHER
CLAIMANTS; JOHN DOE AND JANE
DOE AS UNKNOWN TENANTS IN
POSSESSION
DEFENDANTS)
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant
to a Summary Final Judgment of Fore-
closuredated Jan. 16, 2007 entered in
Civil Case No. 06-416 CA of the Circuit
Court of the 3RD Judicial Circuit in and
for COLUMBIA County, LAKE CITY,
Florida, I will sell to the highest and best
bidder for cash at THE FRONT STEPS
at the COLUMBIA County Courthouse
located* at 145 N. HERNANDO
STREET in LAKE CITY, Florida at
11:00 a.m. on the 14th day of February,
2007 the following described as set forth
in said Summary Final Judgment, to-wit:
LOT 85, SPRINGFIELD ESTATES,
PHASE III, A SUBDIVISION AS RE-
CORDED IN PLAT BOOK 6, PAGES
48-48A, PUBLIC RECORDS OF CO-
LUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA.
Any person claiming an interest in the
surplus from the sale, if any. other than
the property owner as of the date of the
lis pendens, must file a claim within 60
days after the sale.
Dated this 17th day of Janudry, 2007
P.DEWITT CASON
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By:- s - J.MARKHAM
Deputy Clerk
THE LAW OFFICES OF DAVID J.
STERN PA, ATTORNEY FOR PLAIN-
TIFF
801 S. University Drive Suite 500
Plantation, FL 33324
(954)233-8000
06-6037 I(CWF)
IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE
AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES
ACT, persons with disabilities needing a
special accommodation should contact
COURT ADMINISTRATION, at the
COLUMBIA County Courthouse at, 1-
800-955-8771 (TDD) or 1-800-955-
8770, via Florida Relay Service.

05514133
January 23, 30, 2007
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
3RD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR COLUMBIA
COUNTY
CASE NO. 07-07-CA
ACCREDITED HOME IFNDERS,
INC. A CALIFORNIA
CORPORATION
Plaintiff,
vs.
YVONNE MANNING, ET AL,
Defendant
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: YVONNE MANNING; UN-
KNOWN SPOUSE OF YVONNE
MANNING,
Last Known address- 319 SE AVALON
AVENUE, LAKE CITY, FL. 32025
If alive, and if dead, all parties claiming
interest by, through, under or against
YVONNE MANNING; UNKNOWN
SPOUSE OF YVONNE MANNING
and all parties having or claiming to
have any right, title or interest in the
property described herein.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for
Foreclosure of Mortgage on the follow-
ing described property:
A PORTION OF BLOCK 298, EAST-
ERN DIVISION, CITY OF LAKE
CITY, FLORIDA, MORE PARTICU-
LARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS:
COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHEAST
CORNER OF BLOCK 298, EASTERN
DIVISION, CITY OF LAKE CITY,
FLORIDA.
has been filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it, on Susan Yeong J.
Kang, Attorney for Plaintiff, whose ad-
dress is 2901 Stirling Road, Suite 300,
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33312 either
within 30 days after the first publication
of this notice, and file the original with
the Clerk of this Court either before
service on Plaintiff's attorney or imme-
diately thereafter; otherwise a default
will be entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of this
Court this 22nd dlay of January, 2(107.
P. DeWITT CASON
As Clerk of the Court
by: -s- J. MARKHIAM
As Deputy Clerk
A copy of Ihis Notice of Action, Com-
plaint and Lis Penlcns were sent to the
delendanl and address nailed above.
In accordance with Ihe Amlericans with
Disabilities Act, persons needing a rea-
sonable accommodation to participate in


Legal

this proceeding should, no later than sev-
en (7) days prior, contact the Clerk of
the Court's disability coordinator at 904-
958-2163, PO BOX 1569. LAKE CITY
FL, 32056. If hearing impaired, contact
(TDD) via Florida Relay System.
This is an attempt to collect a debt. Any
information obtained will be used for
that purpose.

04512103
January 30, 2007
February 6, 2007

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO. 97-186-CA
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, act-
ing through the United States Depart-
ment of Agriculture, Rural Develop-
ment, f/k/a Farmers Home Administra-
tion,
Plaintiff,
vs.
SANDRA L. CLAYTON, a single per-
son,
Defendant.
AMENDED NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pur-
suant to a Amended Summary Final
Judgment of Foreclosure entered on Jan-
uary 16, 2007, by the above entitled
Court in the above styled cause, the un-
dersigned Clerk of Court or any of his
duly authorized deputies, will sell the
property situated in Columbia County,
Florida, described as:
Lot 13, Block 3, WOODLAND
GROVE, Unit 2. a subdivision according
to the plat there of recorded in Plat Book
3, Page 73, public records of Columbia
County, Florida.
at public outcry to the highest and best
bidder for cash on February 21, 2007, at
11:00 .A.M., at the Columbia County
Courthouse, 173 NE Hernando Avenue,
Lake City, Florida, subject to all ad val-
orem taxes and assessments for 'the real
property described above.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN IN-
TEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM
THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN
THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE
DATE OFLTHE LIS PENDENS MUST.
FILE A CLAIM WITHIN SIXTY (60)
DAYS AFTER THE SALE.
IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE
AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES
ACT, PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES
NEEDING A SPECIAL ACCOMMO-
DATION TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS
PROCEEDING SHOULD CONTACT
FREDERICK J. MURPHY, JR., ES-
QUIRE, 245 SOUTH CENTRAL AVE-
NUE, BARTOW, FLORIDA 33830,
TELEPHONE (863)533-7117, WITHIN
TWO (2) WORKING DAYS OF YOUR
RECEIPT OF THIS NOTICE. IF
HEARING IMPAIRED, (TDD) 1-800-
955-8771, OR VOICE (V) 1-800-955-
8770, VIA FLORIDA RELAY SERV-
ICE.
DATED on January 17, 2007.
P. DEWITT CASON
Clerk of Circuit Court
Post Office Drawer 2069
Lake City, Florida 32056-2069
by: -s- J. MARKHAM
Deputy Clerk

Frederick J. Murphy, Jr., Esquire
Boswell & Dunlap LLP
Post Office Drawer 30
Bartow, FL 33831
Attorneys for Plaintiff
Telephone (863)533-7117
Fax (863)533-7412
SANDRA L. CLAYTON, a single per-
son
2103 Maple Drive
Lake City, FL 32025
Defendant
Andrew J. Decker, III. Esquire
320 White Ave.
P.O. Box 1288
Live Oak, FL 32064
Attorney for Debtor, Sandra L. Clayton

04511996
January 23, 30, 2007
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORI-
DA
CASE NO. 05-159-CA
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, RU-
RAL HOUSING SERVICE, USDA,
f/k/a FARMERS HOME ADMINIS-
TRATION
Plaintiff,
V.
GRACE R. GOFF;___
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF GRACE R.
GOFF; and all unknown parties claiming
by, through, under parties claiming by,
through, under or against the heirs
named Defendants, who are not known
to be dead or alive, whether said un-
known parties claim as heirs, devisees,
grantees, assignees, lienors, creditors,
trustee, spouses, or other claimants;
TENANT #1 and/or TENANT #2, the
parties intended to account for the per-
son or persons in possession; COLUM-
BIA COUNTY, A POLITICAL SUBDI-
VISION OF THE STATE OF FLORI-
DA
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to
the Amended Final Judgment of Fore-
closure dated January 22, 2007 in this
cause, I will sell the property situated in


Lake Cit' Reporter



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Wednesday Mon., 10:00 a.m. Mon., 9:00 a.m.
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These deadlines are subject to change without notice.


Legal

COLUMBIA County, Florida described
as:
LOT 3 BLOCK 8, OAK HILL ES-
TATES REPLAT, ADDITION NUM-
BER 1, ACCORDING TO MAP OR
PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN
PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 92, PUBLIC
RECORDS OF COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA.
a/k/a 267 SE arapahoe LN, LAKE CITY
FL 32025-6409 at public sale, to the
highest and best bidder, for cash, on the
front steps of the West door of the Co-
lumbia County Courthouse, 173 NW
Hemando Ave, Lake City, Florida, at
11:00 o'clock a.m., on March 14, 2007.
Any person claiming an interest in the
surplus from the sale, if any other than
the property owner as of the date of the
lis pendants must file a claim within 60
days after the sale.
Dated at Lake City, Florida this 25th day
of January, 2007.
P. Dewitt Cason ,
Clerk of the Circuit Court
by:-s- J.MARKHAM
Deputy Clerk
Invoice to Douglas C. Zahm, P.A.
18830 U.S. Hwy 19 N., #300
Clearwater, FL 33764
(727)536-4911 phone / (727) 539-1094
fax
NOTICE TO PERSONS WITH DISA-
BILITIES:
IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH A
DISABILITY WHO NEEDS ANY AC-
COMMODATION IN ORDER TO
PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEED-
ING, YOU ARE ENTITLED, AT NO
COST TO YOU, TO THE PROVISION
OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE. PLEASE
CONTACT NANCY NYDAM AT
ROOM 205, COLUMBIA COUNTY
COURTHOUSE, P.O. BOX 1569,
LAKE CITY, FL 32056, (904) 758-
2163; SUNCOM 839-2163, WITHIN 2
WORKING DAYS OF TOUR RE-
CEIPT OF THIS NOTICE, IF YOU
ARE HEARING OR VOICE IM-
PAIRED, CALL (904) 758-2139

05514211
January 30, 2007
February 6, 2007


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD JU-
DICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR CO-
LUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 06-237-CP
PROBATE DIVISION
IN RE: ESTATE OF:
RALPH ASHODIAN,
Deceased.

NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
RALPH ASHODIAN, deceased, whose
date of death was November 15, 2006, is
pending in the Circuit Court for Colum-
bia County, Florida, Probate Division;
File Number 06-237-CP; the address of
which is Columbia County Courthouse,
173 NE Hernando, Street, Post Office
Drawer 2049, Lake City, Florida. the
names and addresses of the personal rep-
resentative and the Personal Representa-
tives's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands
against decedents' estate on whom a
copy of this notice is required to be
served must file their claims with this
court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3
MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NO-
TICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE
DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and
other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate must file their
claims with this court WITHIN 3
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NO-
TICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN
THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN
SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA
PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREV-
ER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PE-
RIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY
CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS 0
MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS
DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
THE DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE IS JANUARY 30,
2007.
Attorney for Personal Representative:
NORRIS & FOREMAN, P.A.
by:-s- JOHN E. NORRIS
Florida Bar No. 058998
253 NW Main Blvd.
Post Office Drawer 2349
Lake City, Florida 32056-2349
(386)752-7240
(386) 752-1577 (facsimile)
Personal Representative:
by:-s- PRANA 0 ASHODIAN
17819 NW 32nd Avenue
Newberry, Florida 32669

05514214
January 30, 2007
February 6, 2007


010 Announcements

ALL ABOUT FACES
This Month Special: Free Eyebrow
or Lip Waxing with Pampering
Facial. 6(1 mrin/$45.00.
By Appointment only, Evening
appointments avail. 386-754-2128


'I'ke: ADvntgeiof the
Itporrter Clussifieds!
755-5440


You can call us at 755-5440, Monday through Friday
from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their classified ads in per-
son, and some ad categories will require prepayment.
Our office is located at 180 East Duval Street.
You can also fax or email your ad copy to the Reporter.
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please direct your copy to the
Classified Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityreporter,com


Ad Errors- Please read your ad onr the first day of
publication. We accept responsibility for only the first
incorrect insertion, and only the charge for the ad
space in error. Please call 755-5440 Immediately for
prompt correction and billing adjustments.
Cancellations- Normal advertising deadlines apply for
cancellation.
Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440. Should further informa-
tion be required regarding payments or credit limits, your
call will be transferred to the accounting department.
. , .. ' , * . . . " . '.,

Advertising copy is subject to approval by the Publisher
who reserves the right to edit, reject, or classify all adver-
tisements under appropriate headings, Copy should be
checked for errors by the advertiser on the first day
of publication. Credit for published errors will be allowed
for the first insertion for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the Publisher shall not be
liable for any omission of advertisements ordered to be
published, nor for any general, special or consequential
damages. Advertising language must comply with
Federal, State or local laws regarding the prohibition of
discrimination in employment, housing and public accom-
modations. Standard abbreviations are acceptable; how-
ever, the first word of each ad may not be abbreviated.


020 Lost & Found

DOG MISSING: Black Male
Bulldog. Ears clipped, long tail.
Missing from Moore Rd & Lake
Jeffrey area. Very much loved
& missed. Any information,
please call 752-7541


060 Services

GOT WATKINS?
Call (386)719-2269
or go to
www.watkinsonline.com/creel
100 Job
100 Opportunities

ALUMINUM INSTALLERS!
(Screen Room, etc.)
Have own tools & transportation.
Clean Drivers Lic. 1-800-447-2526

05514197
SWIM COACH Columbia swim
team is seeking swim coaches for
its age group. seasonal &
year round teams. Coaches must
be able to provide competitive
stroke coaching. Salary neg.
Interested applicants should
contact Robb at 386-754-7150
By February 15,2007.


Land Clearing Lawn & Landscape Service


* ADvantage


a'


4 lines - days O...


NOTICE OF SECOND PUBLIC HEARING AND

STATEMENT OF PROPOSED

COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT BLOCK GRANT

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT PROJECT

The City of Lake City is applying to the Florida Department of Community Affairs for a grant under
the Economic Development category in the amount of $750,000 under the Small Cities Community
Development Block Grant Program. At least 70% of the funds must be for activities that benefit low-
and moderate-income persons.
The cost and percentage of low- and moderate-income persons benefitting from each project
activity is as follows. The cost for the lift station and force main on U. S. Highway 441 North is
$333,300 with 51.0% low- and moderate-income persons benefitting from this activity. The cost for
the Road Improvements, which includes a right turn lane, landscaping and new curbing on U. S.
Highway 441 North is $280,000 with 51.0% low- and moderate-income persons benefitting from this
activity. The cost for Engineering is $76,700. The cost for the Administration activity is $60,000. The
total Community Development Block Grant cost for this project is $750,000 with at least 51.0% low-
and moderate-income persons benefitting from this project.
The plan to minimize displacement of persons as a.result of planned Community Development
Block Grant funded activities is to develop a Community Development Block Grant project which will
not cause displacement of persons. The proposed Fiscal Year 2006 Community Development Block
Grant project will not permanently displace any persons.
If for any reason persons are permanently displaced as a result of Community Development Block
Grant funded activities, assistance will be provided to displaced persons as required under 24 Code of
Federal Regulations 42, United States Department of Housing and Urban Development regulations that
implement the Uniform Relocation Assistance and Real Property Acquisition Policies Act of 1970.
A Statement of the proposed Fiscal Year 2006 Community Development Block Grant project
application is, as follows:
The Community Development Block Grant project is an Economic Development program. The
applying local government will undertake infrastructure improvements consisting of lift station, force
main, turn lane, landscaping and curbing improvements along U. S. Highway 441 North. The
improvements will enable Target Food Distribution Center, a private business, to locate its operation in
the City and to create 22 new jobs with 12 of the jobs being for low- to moderate-income persons.
The total cost of the project is estimated at $750,000 and 51.0% percent of the project beneficiaries
will be low- to moderate-income persons.
A public hearing to provide citizens an opportunity to comment on the application will be held in
the City Council Meeting Room, City Hall located at 205 North Marion Avenue, Lake City, Florida on
February 5, 2007 at 7:00 p.m., or as soon thereafter as the matter can be heard. A summary of the
application is available for review at City Hall located at 205 North Marion Avenue, Lake City, Florida,
telephone number (386) 752-2031.
The public hearing is being conducted in a handicapped accessible location. Any handicapped
person requiring an interpreter for the hearing impaired or the visually impaired should contact Scott
Reynolds at least five calendar days prior to the public hearing and an interpreter will be provided.
Any non English speaking person wishing to attend the public hearing should contact Scott Reynolds
at least five calendar days prior to the public hearing and a language interpreter will be provided. Any
handicapped person requiring special accommodation at this meeting should contact Scott Reynolds
at least five calendar days prior to the public hearing. To access a Telecommunication Device for Deaf
(TDD) please call (386) 752-2031.
The following disclosures have been made pursuant to Section 102 of the HUD Reform Act of 1989.
The disclosures are available at City Hall located at 205 North Marion Avenue, Lake City, Florida.
These disclosures will be available on and after February 5, 2007 and shall continue to be available
for a minimum period of five years.
1. Other government (federal, state, and local) assistance to the project in the form of a gift,
grant, loan, guarantee, insurance payment, rebate, subsidy, credit tax benefit, or any other form of
direct or indirect benefit by source and amount;
2. The identities and pecuniary interests of all developers, contractors, or consultants involved
in the application for assistance or in the planning or development of the project or activity;
3. The identities and pecuniary interests of any other persons with a pecuniary interest in the
project that can reasonably be expected to exceed $50,000 or 10% of the grant request (whichever is
lower);
4. For those developers, contractors, consultants, property owners, or others listed in two (2)
or three (3) above which are corporations, or other entities, the identification and pecuniary interests
by corporation or entity of each officer, director, principal stockholder, or other official of the entity;
5. The expected sources of all funds to be provided to the project by each of the providers of
those funds and the amount provided; and
6. The expected uses of all funds by activity and amount.

A FAIR HOUSING/EQUAL OPPORTUNITY/HANDICAP ACCESS JURISDICTION


r


DAVIS LAND CLEARING
Dirt Sales: Fill - Top Soil -
Limerock. Bobcat & Backhoe
Rentals Call 386-867-2141 Jesse

Concrete Work

J.C. CONCRETE Driveways,
carport slabs, patios, & etc. Most
jobs $1.00sqft + cost of concrete.
Free Estimates. 386-344-8573

Trenching

TRENCHING WORK- by the foot
or the job. Gateway Multi-Services
Commercial Mowing. Licensed &
Insured. Call Brian 386-867-1173

Painting Service

NN PAINTING
Free Estimates
Call 386-344-5897 or
386-719-2166

Home Improvements

'- John Thomas
Home Repairs Guaranteed
Specializing in Handicap baths &
ramps. Vinyl Siding, Skirting,
Screened rooms, Decks.
386-758-7676
.. John Thomas
Home Repairs Guaranteed
Specializing in Handicap baths &
ramps. Vinyl Siding, Skirting,
Screened rooms, Decks.
386-758-7676
AFFORDABLE
Pool Renovations,
Wood Decks & More.
KJ Kelley's 386-754-2357
AMERICAN HOME
IMPROVEMENTS, INC.
We do Decks, Porches, Drywall,
Siding, Skirting, Metal roofs.
and MUCH MORE!!!
Please Call (386)209-1073
HOME MAINTENANCE
Carpentry, painting, fans, electrical,
plumbing, tile, laminate floors and
more. 30 years experience in
Florida. All work by an hourly wage
386-752-5491
KITCHEN & BATH Renovations.
Fences, decks, windows, doors,
tile, painting & drywall. General
home maintenance & repair.
Jenkins Contracting
Lic# CGC1507486 386-719-2240
MITCHELL VENTREC LLC
Kitchen & Bath Remodeling.
Deck & Hot Tub, Interior repair
Paint & Trim Call 386-365-9909


Custom Cuts Lawn & Landscape.
Customized lawn care, sod, trim-
ming, design. Corn. & Resd. Lic. &
insured. Call 386-496-2820 Iv msg.
TIME TO MULCH
Cypress mulch 5 yard minimum
Delivered & spread or just
delivered. 386-935-6595

Services

FREE CLEANUP.
Pick up of unwanted metals,
tin, scrap vehicles.
386-755-0133 We Recycle.
General Repairs & Maintenance.
Mobile & Structural Homes.
Personal Quality Service. Insured.
30 yrs exp.Richard 386-961-9030
PARRISH'S CONCRETE
Free Estimates. License & Insured.
Quality Work @ Reasonable prices.
Call 386-752-8223

Drywall Services

DRYWALL Hang, Finish;
Textures; Plaster & Stucco Repairs;
Interior & Exterior Painting.
386-752-2412

Land Services

GREG'S LAWN-SERVICE.
All your lawn needs.
Low low prices!!!!!!
Please call (386)758-9300

Tree Service

CHARTER OAK
TREE SERVICE
Tree Trimming, Tree Removal,
Fully Insured!!
30 years experience
963-2140 or 365-0743
HAZARDOUS Tree Trimming
removal & stump grinding. Senior
discount. 24 hr emergency service
386-590-7798 or 386-963-3360

Carpet Cleaning

CARPET CLEANING
2 rooms & a hall $39.95.
5 rooms & a hall $89.95. Also Tile
& Grout Cleaning. 386-755-9200

Electrical Work

Need Electrical Repairs? Make
sure it's done right! Immediate
availability. Free estimates.
Call Russ.386-288-4313


GarageSale


161 O;r











LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED TUESDAY, JANUARY 30, 2007


100 Job
100 Opportunities




is currently looking for an
independent newspaper carrier
for the Columbia City area.
Deliver the Reporter in the
early morning hours
Tuesday - Sunday.
No delivery on Monday's.
Carrier must have dependable
transportation. Stop by the
Reporter today to fill out a
contractor's inquirers form.
No phone calls please!

(4511550


is currently looking for an
independent newspaper carrier
for the Fort White area.
Deliver the Reporter in the
early morning hours
Tuesday - Sunday.
No delivery on Monday's.
Carrier must have dependable
transportation. Stop by the
Reporter today to fill out a
contractor's inquirers form.
No phone calls please!

04511623
Customer Service/Inside Sales
We are looking for happy
high-energy people to
join our team. Interested?
Please call 386-269-4409.

04511630





ASST. MANAGERS
AND MANAGERS
For The "Nations Largest
BBQ Chain"
Competitive Wages,
Advancement Opportunities
Complete Training Package
Health & Dental Benefits
DFWP EOE
Please Send Resume to:
bbqm(aheritagemanagement.net


CASHIERS & FRUIT
BAGGERS: Now hiring for
High Springs fruit & gift stores.
IApply in Person at Florida
Citrus Center 18625 CR 236,
High Springs (exit 404 & 1-75)
or call Judy Dunn
@352-266-3800

04512011
ACCOUNTANT
Large company based in
Lake City seeking an
experienced accountant for fast
paced industry. Construction
background and management
experience preferred. Bachelor
degree or higher required. Salary
commensurate with experience.
Competitive benefits pkg. EEO
Employer. Please send resumes to
Human Resources PO Box 1829
Lake City FL 32056.

04512124
CLEANING COMPANY
need Janitors in Lake City area
from 6:00pm to 10:00pm.
Please call 800-936-0885

04512143
F/T SERVICE MANAGER,
CARC- Oversee all Client
services. Prefer BA with 2 years
of experience with the
developmentally disabled or in
related fields. Must have caring
positive attitude, be self
motivated, detailed oriented, team
player. Computer-knowledge
of word/excel. APPLY IN
PERSON AT CARC- 512 SW
SISTERS WELCOME ROAD.
Closing date 2/7/07

CURB SYSTEMS of N.E. FL,
a specialty concrete contractor is
now hiring for exp. Machine
Operators, Foremen, Formsetters
& Finishers for the NE FL area.
EEO/DFWP call 904-829-3455


100 Job
100 Opportunities
(4512147
Gilman Building Products
Company is accepting
applications for Security Guard at
the Sawmill located in Lake
Butler.A high school diploma or
equivalent is required. Computer
knowledge is required. We have
competitive rates & 401K, dental
& health insurance, paid vacation
& holidays & promotional
opportunities. Interested
applicants should apply in person
Monday through Friday from
8:00 AM until 3:30 PM
at the front office.

(4512150
Jameson Inn
Now Hiring
Full Time Housekeeping
Must be flexible & dependable.
Must pass background check.
Apply in person at
285 SW Commerce Blvd
No phone calls.

04512162
ASSEMBLY/
PRODUCTION JOBS
We need your work experience.
Business growth opens new jobs.
Skills needed include experience
Carpentry, furniture assembly,
mechanical installers, electrical
wiring, mig welding, and
fiberglass technicians. Proficiency
with hand held power tools.
Stable work history. Benefits
include: paid holidays, paid
vacations, family health
insurance, and a 40 1-K plan.
Some hand tools required. Please
apply in person at Hunter Marine
on Highway 441 in Alachua, FL.

04512169




RELIEF NIGHT AUDITOR
Applicant must be mature and
seeking long-term employment.
Must be self motivated and
possess the desire to offer
exceptional customer service.
Excellent work environment and
industry standard benefits.
Applicant must be flexible with
working hours. Position averages
30 hrs/week. Hotel experience
preferred but not required.
Apply in person at:
450 SW Florida Gateway Drive
U.S. 90 and 1-75, exit 427


05514155


SAVAGE

DRIVERS WANTED
Savage Services is seeking
professional drivers for the
evening shift for local hauls in the
Lake City Area. Class A CDL
with Hazmat and Tanker
endorsements required.
* Competitive Pay
* Complete Benefit Package,
Including 401K
* Home everyday
* Paid Holidays and Vacations
* Quarterly Incentive Bonus
Only serious applicants need
apply. Call 386-755-9097 -
Lake City

05514185
Scaff's Market
Lake City & Branford
Now accepting applications
for the following positions:
Meat Cutters and Wrappers.
Apply at either location or at the
S & S Food Stores office.
Competitive wages-
Full-Time Benefits
Drug Free Workplace

CLERKS NEEDED Full time,
available 24 hrs-7days. Apply
Johnson & Johnson. 1-10 & 41 N.
Previous applicants need not apply.
Drug Free Company


100 Job
100 Opportunities

05514200
Irrigation Lab Member
The Suwannee River Resource
Conservation and Development
Council, Inc. is seeking
applicants for a position with its
Mobile Irrigation Laboratory
(MIL). Applicants should have
experience with field data
collection and have basic
computer skills. knowledge of
agricultural practices and/or
irrigation is preferable. This entry
level MIL position involves
providing services to a broad
range of agricultural producers
and requires considerable
fieldwork. a high school diploma
s required. Salary is dependent on
level of qualifications and
experience. the closing data for
this position is February 12th,
2007 at 5:00 pm. You should send
a resume, along with names and
telephone numbers of three
references to : Suwannee River
RC&D, 234 Court Street SE, Live
Oak, 32064. You may also
contact the office at
(386)364-4278
for further information.
The Suwannee River RC&D is an
Equal Opportunity Employer
and a Drug Free Work Place.
EEO/AA/V/D

055142103
RESTAURANT
MANAGEMENT
Due to increased sales
McDonald's of Alachua is
seeking experienced applicants.
For Management positions Salary
range w/ bonus & insurance
20-50k based on qualifications.
Excellent growth potential. Fax
resume to 386-755-2435
or call 386-755-2475.
You can also apply online at
mcflorida.com/alachua

05514210
FULL-TIME BOOKKEEPER
Busy CPA firm looking for
full-time experienced bookkeeper
with payroll background.
Experience with computerized
office applications and procedures
* helpful. Must have previous
bookkeeping experience or
equivalent education. Send
resumes and references to:
Odom, Moses, & Company, LLP,
4424 NW American Lane,
Suite 101,Lake City, FL 32055.

05514217
PROJECT MGR. For
repair/ remodeling projects.
Prior experience/ construction
background. Perm/full time
position. Competitive
salary/ incentive/ benefits.
Lake City office. Fax resume or
apply in person in our Gainesville
office at 224 NW 8th Ave. or
Fax 352-732-8950, ATTN:
Scott Ambrose EOE/DFWP

CUSTODIAL HELP wanted -
part time. Senior Citizens welcome
to apply. Call (352)372-8753
for more information.

EXPERIENCED WELDERS
Apply in Person Quality lab.
Across from Airport US 90 East
Lake City Drug Free


FLAT BED DRIVERS
Atlantic Truck Lines
$600 Sign-on Bonus
Class A, in state & home every
night. $600-$750/wk. Yearly $1,000
safety bonus. 3 yrs. exp. Paid
vacation. Health/dental. Call
1-800-577-4723 Monday-Friday
Ful Time food service
workers in corrections setting.
Pre-employment medical screen and
back ground clearance required.
Benefits available after 90 days.
Apply in person at
Lake City Correctional Facility
(386)755-3379

Hiring STYLISTS or BARBERS
Booth Rental or
Commission Available.
For more info call 386-466-0878


100n ob
100 Opportunities
JANITORIAL SUPERVISOR
Seeking PT lead janitor for large
retail store, early morning hours.
Cleaning exp. is a plus, but not
req.Please call 1-800-860-8057
Job reference # 8876 ,

Lake City Christian Academy
is looking for Teachers
with a BA degree
Call 386-758-0055
Local company seeking applicants.
We have immediate positions
available in maintenance &
processing. We offer competitive
pay with benefits. Hillandale, LLC
is a drug free & EOE workplace.
For more information call:
386-397-2641
Looking for Experienced Driver
CDL A. Refer. experience at
least 2 yrs. Long haul.
Call 305-798-6116
MECHANIC
for older equipment &
general maintenance.
Hafners 386-755-6481
NEED OF LABOR & MASON,
Paid by experience
Please call
386-755-7498 or 386-623-6975
OTR DRIVERS NEEDED
Heavy Haul,Class A CDL,
2 week turnaround,good pay,
Call Southern Specialized,LLC
386-752-9754
Parts Checker/Warehouse
Local Auto Parts Distributor seeks
Part Checker. Must be detail
oriented. Warehouse experience
required. Must pass Drug Test.
Apply in person only at
385 SW Arlington Blvd
Lake City, FL 32025
PT Teacher/Teachers Aide
(EHS Lake City 0-3 yrs) -
HS Diploma/GED, 40 hour
intro to child care training or
must enroll within 90 days of
employment and complete within 1
year and must complete CDA/Infant
Toddler Endorsement
within 1 year of hire or
minimum of 2 yr degree in early
childhood education or child
development; 3 yrs of classroom
experience working with young
children preferred. Bilingual
(Spanish/ English) preferred,
5 Hour Literacy Course as required
by DCF, Must pass physical
and DCF background screening
requirements, Current First
'Aid/ CPR preferred. Excellent
Benefits-Paid Holidays,
Sick/ Annual Leave. Apply in
person to 236 SW Columbia Ave
.(754-2222) or mail resume to
PO Box 2637, Lake City, FL
32056-2637 Fax (386) 754-2220.
EOE

SALES .. .
MODULAR/MANUFACTER
Home dealer looking for
professional sales help.
Experienced required.
Great income. Fax resume to
Better Bilt Homes 386-758-9135

SALES PERSON Needed
For Wholesale and Retail Collision
Parts and Accessories.
Salary, Plus- M-F- Collision
experience helpful. Must be able to
handle a high volume of calls, and
must be motivated to make a
minimum of 30 sales calls per day.
Apply in person only
385 SW Arlington Blvd
Lake City, FL 32025
SEWING MACHINE Operator,
Experienced, Hourly Wage.
Hafners
386-755-6481
STONE FABRICATOR Wanted.
Exp in templates, fabrication,
installation. Benefits. Resume to
Operations, Sherer Studio,
PO Box 1507,
High Springs, FL 32655.
Or fax 386-454-3773 tel
800-533-4292 ext 16
SUBSTANCE ABUSE group
counselor; experience necessary.
Send resume with contact
information to: 352-332-9962


Lake City Community College and TIMCO

PROUDLY ANNOUNCE THE NEW


AVIATION STRUCTURES

PROGRAM

at Lake City Community College


This 10 Week Course Begins

FEBRUARY 5, 2007

ENROLLMENT FEE - $100 --

Graduates of the course will be offered employment at TIMCO based on personnel needs.
Personnel being hired at TIMCO will be brought in at the 1 year experience level on TIMCO's payscale.


CONTACT: Edwin McClanton
Lake City Community College
(386) 754-4462
7am-4pm


No previous aviation experience is required. You must be 18 years old for employment at any of the TIMCO facilities.


Classified Department: 755-5440


1t 0 Job
100 Opportunities

TOURIST INFO Center
seeking sales help, full or part time.
NO experience needed.
$7.50 plus commission. Apply at
18625 NW CR 236 exit 404 apply
at the ticket counter inside Florida
Citrus Center in High Springs.
386-462-0922 or 904-540-2313

110n Sales
110 vEmployment

05514143
TERRITORY SALES-
Earn up to $100K plus with
area's leading forklift
dealership. Excellent
benefits including 401K plan.
College degree + 2 yrs. sales
experience preferred. Qualified
candidate will sell our full line of
material handling and allied
equipment in. a protected area
including Lake City, Tallahassee,
and Gainesville area.
Fax resume to (904)265-0510

05514248
HELP Wayne's Carpet Plus
Looking for experienced Floor
covering Sales Person draw,plus
Commission, 401(k) Retirement
& Health Insurance Availability.
Apply in person or send resume to
3325 S. U.S. Hwy 441
Lake City FL. 32025
Fax 386-719-4999

AVON
Earn 50%! Only $10 for KIT
Call: 1-800-275-9945
pin # 4242(IndSalesRep)

120 Medical
I2U0 Employment

04511585


B*aacy

Now has openings in the
following areas:
* Pharmacist
* Pharmacy Technician
Excellent Pay, Benefits and
Working Conditions.
Send Resume to
780 SE Baya Dr.,
Lake City, FL 32025
Attn: Penny Williams


Sunbelt Chrysler Jeep Dodge
Now Hiring: Service Consultants & Service
Technicians (Must have own tools)
We provide:
401K, Health Insurance & Paid Vacations
Apply in Person at Hwy 90 West,
ask for Dwight Wilson or Dennis Conway


Sunbelt Chrysler Jeep Dodge

Now Hiring Sales Consultants to work with
aggressive dealership. We. provide Salary + Commision,
401 K, Health Insurance & Paid Vacations.
Apply in person at Hwy 90 West
ask for Randy Sears or John Waschek.



LUCRATIVE BUSINESS


OPPORTUNITY!

Designed to create part/full time income
from services that we already use! Looking
for entrepreneurs! You work you own hours!

386.755.6712





WORK AT HOME!
Be a Medical Transcriptionist
Come to this free, no obligation, seminar to find out how - with
no previous experience - you can learn to work at home doing
medical transcription from audio tapes dictated by doctors!
High Demand! Doctors Need Transcriptionistsl
Find out how our experts make it fast and easy to be ready to
enter the rapidly growing medical field.
No Commuting. No Selling.
Train AT HOME to be ready to make More Money than in most office jobs!
This could be the greatest job opportunity of your life Join us at 7 PM!

SThis ad is your seminar ticket CLIP OUT & BRING 7 .
y ITO SEMINAR AT 7 PM 91 1
'il-' Lake City Holiday Inn
i At-Home 213 SW Commerce Dr. Blvd, Lake City, FL
S Professions- For Details About This Seminar Call 1-800-242-3604, Dept. LCRP27
2001 Lowe Street. Fort Collins. CO 80525 "with experience
----------------------




CORRECTIONS CORPORATION OF AMERICA
Lake City Correctional Facility is accepting applications for

* Correctional Offices (FL certified)
* Non-Certified Correctional Officers (must have
passed the Florida Basic Aptitude Test)
* LPN
* Registered Nurse

Apply online at www.correctionscorp.com or in person at:
Lake City Correctional Facility
7906 E. US Hwy 90
Lake City, FL 32055
(386) 755-3379 * (386) 752-7202 (Fax)
EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER M/F/V/D
DRUG'FREE WORKPLACE


AvArON ~OFR~.'I 'F'O INC


1 i~f Medical
120 dEmployment


(14512100
BAYA POINTE NURSING
AND REHABILITATION
is expanding and hiring for the
following positions;
CNA - PRN, All Shifts
Housekeeper,
PT with possible FT
Activities Assistant,
PT Weekends, with possible FT
Social Service Director,
FT, Experience Required
Please apply in person at
587 SE Ermine Ave,
Lake City, Fl 32025,
or fax resume to 386-752-7337
EOE/DFWP


04512145
DENTAL ASSISTANT
NEEDED
Full time Position
M-F 9:00am-5:00pm. Salary
Commensurate with experience.
Benefit pkg. Offered.
Please Fax Resume to:
386-752-3122


05514180
RADIOLOGY ASSOCIATES
OF TALLAHASSEE, P.A.
Diagnostic Assistant
Seeking a medical assistant to
work Full time hours at
Lake City Medical Center.
Applicant must
be comfortable interacting
closely with members of the
Medical staff. Prior
medical experience required.
Please fax resume to
(850)877-8485 or mail to:
Human Resources,
P.O. Box 12219, Tallahassee,
FL 32317-2219. EOE


05514182
HOUSE SUPERVISOR
FULL TIME
Must be RN with Manger Exp.
and good clinical skills. Please
contact Amelia Tompkins at
386-362-7860. Or apply in person
at Suwannee Health Care Center,
1620 E Helvenston St. Live Oak,
FLEOE/D/V/M/F










LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED TUESDAY, JANUARY 30, 2007


12 ^AMedical
120 Employment

OUR OUTSTANDING
BENEFITS START
IMMEDIATELY
Registered Nurses
ICU
MED/SURG
PEDIATRICS
EMERGENCY DEPT.
PER DIEM POOL

Full Time, part-time, per diem
For more information contact
Human Resources
at 386-754-8147
Apply in person at
368 NE Franklin St,
Lake City, Florida 32055, or visit
our web site at www.shands.org.
EOE,M/F/D/V,
Drug Free Workplace.

SHANDS

LAKESHORE

05514227
CERTIFIED NURSING
ASSISTANTS
3p-l l:30p and llp-7:30a
Full-time/ Part-time and PRN
Great Work Environment
Must pass FDLE Background
Screening and be dependable
Macclenny Nursing & Rehab
755 South 5th St/Hwy 228
Apply in person or call
Sharon at 904-259-4873

05514256
WE ARE Seeking
hardworking, motivated and
dependable staff to
join our team at
Nice & Clean
Medical Staffing
We are presently accepting
applications for RN's, LPN's.
Salary and work
locations are great!
If interested call
1-877-754-8889
For more information

EYE CENTER looking for
receptionist. Answer multi-phone
line system, checking patients in &
out, scheduling appointments.
Previous experience in medical field
and computers required. Bilingual
a plus. Fax resume to 755-7561
Medical Billing Manager
For busy medical facility
Experience in medical insurance
billing required. Excellent salary.
Fax resume to (386)755-2169
Or mail in confidence to
PO Box 3306
Lake City 32056.
MEDICAL OB/GYN office
looking for a Front Desk Assistance
experience in checking in and out
patients, insurance & collections.
Send resume to:
Front Desk Assistant, PO Box 2757
Lake City, FL 32056-2757
MEDICAL OFFICE is now
hiring Full Time Employee.
Send Resume to
763 SW Main Blvd,
Lake City, FL 32025
or Fax 386-755-1858
NOW HIRING
Direct Care Staff. ICF/DD
Taking applications for all shifts.
Must have FL. Driver's License
High School diploma or GED.
Call 386-755-6104 EEO/M/F/D/V

160 Investments

LOOK
Want Big Bucks?
Call 386-466-1104

190 Mortgage Money


240 Schools &
2 Education
Want to be a CNA? Don't want to
wait? Express Training Services of
Gainesville is now offering our
quality CNA exam Prep classes.
Day/Eve classes. Class for I week,
certification test the next week.
Class size is limited. Next class
02/26/07. Call 386-755-4401

310 Pets & Supplies
6 MONTH Old Female Puppy,
Lab Mix. Has all shots
Free to good home
386-365-5661
FREE TO A good home,
Cocker Spaniel.
Not good with kids.
Please call (386)344-4573
GERMAN SHEPPARD Puppy.
Pure bred with health cert, shots &
wormed. Black & Tan. P.O.P.
$250.00 Call 386-961-8130
LARGE BROWN Female Dog;
Spayed, good with kids &
other animals. Call 386-935-0821

PET TAXI- Medium size.
For a small pet.
Only $10.00
Please Call 386-961-8701
YORKIE PUPPY AKC, 9wk old,
Male. Health Certificate,
Shots, Wormed. $750.00.
Call 386-752-3293 or 623-3450

330 Livestock &
Supplies
FOR SALE 18 yrs old
Arabian Mare.
SWEET & LOVABLE.
Can be seen at Hala Arabian Farm.
$600 Firm. Serious inquiries only.
Please call 386-758-9290)


402 Appliances
COUNTER TOP Refrigerator
White, small size. New.
$50.00
Call 386-566-0011

404 Baby Items
EDDIE BAUER- Infant car seat.
ONLY $30 OBO
Please call
(386)755-6265
GRACO STROLLER
for triplets, like new, Navy Blue
Color. Large Rubber Wheels.
$100.00 Call 386-961-8812

408 Furniture
3/PIECES LEATHER
Sofa for $500.
3/pieces velour sofa bed $200
(386)758-9275
PATIO TABLE - 2 chairs
56 inch round beveled glass top
with wrought iron design. $75.00
Call 386-758-3057

411 Machinery &
411 Tools

FOR SALE
Cabinet Sand Blaster $75
Please call
(386)961-9731

420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
Payment in'advance for standing
pine timber. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-454-1484 or 961-1961.
WANTED WHOLE Junk Cars.
$125 Each. Free Pick Up
Call 386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648

430 Garage Sales
YARD SALE: Feb 1st - Feb 4th,
8am until ?. Hwy 27 next store to
Helen's Peanut Hut. Rain or shine.
Something for everyone.

440 Miscellaneous
221 Singer Feather Wht Machine,
$250. 14' pace cargo trailer,
$2,500 OBO. 12' Avon Yacht
Tender $300. OBO. Glass & wood
display case $100. OBO. 719-6536
BRAND NEW IPOD Shuffle
by apple $99.00
Call 386-758-1358
after 8p, 752-3491
BRAND NEW Norelco Water puri-
fying machine.
$85.00
Call 386-758-1358 after 8 752-3491
COMMERCIAL BUG Zapper
Electric (New in the box)
2ft x 3ft. $65.00
Call 386-566-0011
FOR SALE Canon Projector
s-2 Super 8/8 mm w/ screen $75
Please call
(386)961-9731
GAZEBO EZ Set up. Green
Canopy with ground stakes
$65.00
386-758-3057
GREAT DANE PUPPIES
FOR SALE
3 MALES & 4 FEMALES
PLEASE CALL (386)623-6916
GUNSHOW: Feb 3th & Feb 4th@
The Columbia County Fairgrounds,
Hwy 247 Lake City. Sat 9am - 4pm,
Sun 9am-3pm. Call 904-461-0273
HOMEMADE UTILITY
TRAILER with spare tire $350.00.
Cell 352-978-0589
Ask for Les.
INCOME TAX PREPARATION
Monthly bookkeeping, IFTA,
Income Tax, IRP, business
formation Bachelors Degree.
Give me a call: 352-283-8130
LADIES HAMPTON Cruiser,
26 inch, 7 speed bicycle.
Two years old. Sells new for
$190.00, sell for $75.00 755-6838
MATURNITY CLOTHES-
For Sale. ALL SIZES!!!!.
Prices ranges from $1 To $15!!!
Please call (386) 755-6265
MEN'S HAMPTON Cruiser,
26 inch, 7 speed bicycle.
Two years old. Sells new for
$190.00, sell for $75.00 755-6838

450 Good Things

HARRY'S SEAFOOD
NOW OPEN
965-8612 or 965-8613 & 755-2642.
Special Live Blue Crabs,&
Red Mullet Roe

460 Firewood
FIREWOOD for Sale. Seasoned
Hardwood. $75 1/2 cord. $140 Cord
You pick up or I Will deliver.
386-365-0743 or 386-963-2140

630 Mobile Homes
6J3 for Rent
Cannon Creek Mobile Home Park


Security deposit waived.
2Br SW starts @ $450.
3BR DW starts @ $625.
Requires first & last months rent
Call 386-752-6422 No Pets


630 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
DWMH 3BR/2BA on I acre. Peace
& quiet of the country, Storage
Shed. $850/mo. 1st mo. & deposit.
Call386-752-2765 or 386-965-4198
FOR RENT 2BR/2BA SWMH
Private Lot $600 Month.
$600 Security
386 623-5083
FT.WHT.
2/2 on 5 acres fenced.
$650 mo.
386-288-3055
IN PARK Mobile Homes for Rent
2BR/2BA, $550 mo, 1st, last, sec.
&Applications required.
386-719-2423
MOBILE HOMES for Rent
Starting at $375.00 & up.
No Pets, No Washers & Dryers.

Nice & Clean 2BR/1BA CH/A,
Washer & Dryer, Carpet,. Carport.
No Pets. Call 386-752-5520

/40 Mobile Homes
640 for Sale

1145115(19

!!WOW!!
2007 3BR/2BA
Delivery & Set up included
$39,995.
PRESTIGE HOMES
3973 Hwy 90 West
Lake City, FL
386-752-7751
1-800-355-9385

04511510
New Year, New Lower Prices!
2006 CLEARANCE!
Homes as low as $500.00 down
1749 Sq. Ft., 5BR/2BA
With Family Room
$67,500.00
2254 Sq. Ft., 4BR/3BA
With Family Room
$82,000.00
1830 Sq. Ft., Logged Home
3BR/2BA w/Great Room
$95,900.00
Delivery, Setup, Central Heat
And A/C, Skirting and Steps
ALWAYS included!
Many New 2007's to see!
PRESTIGE HOMES
3973 Hwy 90 West
Lake City, FL
386-752-7751
1-800-355-9385

04511511
$500.00 DOWN!
With your Land
2006 Clearance
And New 2007's
PRESTIGE HOMES
3973 Hwy 90 West
Lake City, FL.
386-752-7751
1-800-355-9385

4BR/2BA Mobile Home for Sale
I Acre/Pecan trees & Grape Arbor
Close to Dowling Park and Prison
Owner finance/Small Down
$750 per month /
866-877-8661 Ext. 510
74 MH Good Cond.. 12x56.
Kit. & BA. For extra space or
storage. Reduced to $1,495. MAKE
ALFORD Call 386-752-1364

650 Mobile Home
6 . & Land
!!OWNER FINANCE!!
1989 DW 3BR/2BA on 0.4 acres.
798 Double Run Rd. $69,500.
Call 386-867-0048
3/2 DW A/C on 1.5 acre lot
Will sell or Lease
in Worthington Springs
Call 386-466-1104
BRANFORD/OWNER FINANCE
2000 16x76 3BR/2BA on I acre.
4141 282nd Ter.
Call 386-867-0048
FSBO Custom Built DWMH
Split plan 4/2 1 acre, Matching
Utility House. Cul-de-sac
Blaine Estates 386-754-3770
OWNER FIANACE
'97 Grand Manor, 28x56 3BR/2BA
2.5 wooded ac. 247 S. to Mill Ln
to Jennifer Ct. 386-867-0048

705 Rooms for Rent
I Bedroom, Private Bath.
$250 month.
Everything furnished.
Call 386-755-8996
Roommate Wanted: Any age.
Share a 2BR Apt in Lake City.
You pay no utilities, sign no lease.
A way to save money. Smoker ok.
(386)961-0352

710 Unfurnished Apt.
/ For Rent
2 Bedrooms, 2 Bedrooms w/Loft
and 2 Bedrooms with garage,
$650-$725 mo.
Call Michelle 386-752-9626
Immediate Openings 1 & 2 BR.
Convenient Location. Near VA
Hospital. Call for price and details.
386-755-2423


NEW YEAR'S SPECIAL
$150 off 1st month's rent on
2BR Apts. Windsong Apartments.
Call Today! 386-758-8455


710 Unfurnished Apt.
7 For Rent

UNFURNISHED STUDIO
APARTMENTS
Starting @ $125.00 weekly.
Dep. & 1st week req:
Call The Lakes Apartments
@ 386-752-2741

720 Furnished Apts.
720 For Rent

Completely Furnished, clean,
private, near city. IBR. APT. Nice
neighborhood. Timco Welcome.
Quiet Call 386 961-9516

730 Unfurnished
730Home For Rent

$95/MO! 4BR Hud!
4% down 30 years at 8%APR.
For listings
800-366-9783 ext F388

05514231 '
EMERALD COVE
Brand New 3 & 4 Bedroom
Homes starting $1200-1250
GRANDVIEW
1754 Grand Street #102
(Duplex) 3/2 $895
1111 SW Yorkton Glen 4/2 $995
COUNTRYSIDE ESTATES
246 SE Gregory Glen 3/2
$925329 SE Gregory Glen. 4/2
$1100

Mark Busher & Associates
Management, Inc
904-317-4511 or 904-349-1302
www.markbusher.com

3BR/2BA House, Garage., Fenced
yard. 490 SW Brandy Way, LC.
Asking $995 mo., 1st & deposit.
386-965-5560 or 386-961-9490

NICE 3BR/1BA close to town.
$605 month, plus security
deposit & application fee.
Call 963-4974 for information.

STOP RENTING!
Buy 3BR only $5,400!
Foreclosure! For listing
800-366-9783 ext 7782

750 Business &
75 Office Rentals

04511801
OFFICE RENTALS
Newly renovated offices in
Gateway Shopping Center.
Ready to move in.
Busy traffic in the front and very
attractive location for business!
One office is 2,098 sq ft and
one office is 1,475 sq ft at less,
than $10 a square foot.
For more information please
call Jackie @ 386-719-9663

Ideal for Doctors & Accountants.
Between 900-1,000 sq ft.
$900 mo + tax.
Call 386-752-9626

OFFICE FOR Lease, 1104 sq ft
Conviently located on
East Baya Ave. $900 mo.
Call 386-755-3456
Office Space for Rent, In Live Oak
Approx. 1,300 SF. For further
information Call Poole Realty
386-209-1766
OFFICE- w/2,100 SF Located in
Live Oak For rent. For further
information Call Poole Realty
386-209-1766
PROFESSIONAL OFFICE Space
inn Westfield Square, 1000 sq ft
Utilities & High speed included.
Call 386-623-2970


805 Lots for Sale
5 ACRES Rolling Pasture Land.
Excellent horse farm.
$70,000 OBO.
Call 386-984-7759

810 Home for Sale
$95/MO! 4BR Hud!
4% down 30 years at 8%APR.
For listings
800-366-9783 ext H411
0(4511342
Brand New 1900 sqft site built
3BR/2BA Starting at $149K
0 down & $900 mo.
Slow credit no problem
386-755-208,2

104511512
Logged Homes
Starting at
$65,500.00
PRESTIGE HOMES
3973 Hwy 90 West
Lake City, FL
386-752-7751
1-800-355-9385

3BR/2BA
CHA, Quail ridge 1996 Very Nice
$149,900 call for Appt.
(386)754-7220
3BR/2BA AZALEA Park Home.
Indoor laundry, new carpets/appl.,
large fenced lot, 2 storage sheds.
$105,900. Call 904-463-1961
5BR HOME!
Only $22,500!
Bank foreclosures available now,
for listings 800-366-9783 ext 7921
5BR/2BA
Rec Rm. Private Office, CH/A, heat
pump, 3 RV Spaces, 3 car garage.
$339,900 OBO 386-752-5226
BANK FORECLOSURE!
6BR/2BA! Only $56,000!
Must Sell, for listings
800-366-9783 ext 9478
CUSTOM MODULAR Homes
on your lot from 65 sq ft.
Call for Color Brochure
386-758-9133 or 1-866-755-9133
Single story Townhouse 2/2
1018SF Brick, City water, sewer.
Deed restrictions. Owner financing.
$125K. 1045 SW Rossborough Ct.
386-755-0210 or 386- 697-6606

820 Farms &
SAcreage
158 1/2 Ac., MOL 15 mi. N of Lake
City on US 441, well drained, with
frontage, hardwoods, pasture,
25 ac. planted pines. $950,000
386-466-5741/386-752-7694
ACREAGE. 4 to 20 acre lots.
Owner financing. Low down
payment. Deas Bullard/BKL
Properties. 386-752-4339.
www.landnfl.com
FSBO: 5 acre wooded lot w/well,&
septic. 3 miles East of Fort White.
$1,500 down, $725 a month.
Call 386-752-4597

830 Commercial
3OJ Property
MIDTOWN CENTER
Several brand new office suites
available, some furnished.
New warehouse space available
(multiple units)
Call Southeast Developers Group
386-755-2082

870 Real Estate
SWanted
I BUY HOUSES
& Mobile Homes w/land. Save
your credit/take over payments.
Quick closings! 386-752-7951


1992Toyota Camry
$3,000 OBO
New motor & transmission,
48K miles, includes
CD player & 2-coustic,
12 speakers
Call Austin
352-538-9948


Snowbird Special
1996 Winnebago 34ft.
asking $29,900
ALL Options/Slide
This Unit and $300/month
solves your winter stay
Call
386-754-8505


Ainu uaui, wuuaiy -'noe 000 q*( 8 1-Iq I 4 I
Licensed & Insured Toll Free (866) 9LW-ROOF
Fre EstimatesRCC006742


'04 DeVille
Lists for $21,000
asking $17,500
35K miles, garage kept
Call Austin
352-538-9948


1999 Plymouth Neon
Best Offer. Loan is $4,500
Asking $3,550
Like New!


930 Motorcycles
2003 Harley Davidson Sportster.
100th Anniversary.
Only l,600mi. $5,750.
Call 386-754-2126 or 386-623-4534

940 Trucks
1990 DODGE Dakota w/topper.
Automatic, AC, V6,
Good work truck. $1,500
Call (352)339-5158

950 Cars for Sale
1990 HONDA Prelude 2 door,
5 speed, sun roof, white, AC.
Very nice. $1,850
Call (352)339-5158
1996 HONDA Accord!
Only $800!Police Impounds,
for listings
800-366-9813 ext A834
1997 MITSUBISHI Eclipse
GS- T Spyder Convertible 2D.
Excellent Condition. $4,750.
Call 386-754-2126 or 386-623-4534
1999 FORD Escort XY2 Hatch-
back. 2 door, automatic, sunroof.
CD. Sporty. 80k miles. $3,300
(352)339-5158
CARS FROM $500.00!
Police Impounds available now,
for listings
800-366-9813 ext A760

951 Recreational
951 Vehicles
2001 MONTANA 5th Wheel w/
2 slides.Granit throughout, Loaded,
w/ comforts of home. $25,000
(904)275-3411 or (904)622-7572

952 Vans & Sport
952 Util. Vehicles
1990 E150 Van
62,000 mi., V8, Good Tires
$2,000 OBO
Call 386-965-6032


I Lake ity R


For More [ Deta Ii i k.ls Ca~IHll FAman ]da or I [ici

I0a,36-55540 r 55541


10 DAYS FOR ONLY $30


----------- i


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Classified Department: 755-5440




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UF00028308_00376.mets
METS:structMap STRUCT1 mixed
METS:div DMDID ORDER 0 main
D1 Main
P1 page Page
METS:fptr FILEID
P2
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METS:behaviorSec VIEWS Options available to the user for viewing this item
METS:behavior VIEW1 STRUCTID Default View
METS:mechanism Viewer zoomable JPEG2000s Procedure xlink:type simple xlink:title JP2_Viewer()
VIEW2 Alternate
JPEGs JPEG_Viewer()
VIEW3
Related image viewer shows thumbnails each Related_Image_Viewer()
INTERFACES Banners or interfaces which resource can appear under
INT1 Interface
UFDC_Interface_Loader