Citation
Lake City reporter

Material Information

Title:
Lake City reporter
Creator:
Lake City reporter
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2007
Language:
English

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates:
30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Community Newspapers Inc., Todd Wilson - Publisher. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
LTUF ( ABZ6316 )
OCLC ( 33283560 )
AlephBibNum ( 000358016 )

Full Text




WEATHER Making The
Inside 2A Right Call

Hi: 67 ^o oy vo 7 3-D
Low: 47 PO OX 117007 HISTORY
L -w.- . �m" SVILLE, FL 32e, - _


Mostly Cloudy


Lake


Saturday, January 27, 2007


C-/0i07 |





City


www.lakecityreporter.com


Parents cautioned about



alcoholic energy drinks 'II


Law enforcement
officials report no
problems in area.
By TROY ROBERTS
troberts@lakecityreporter.com
Local authorities hope to


warn parents about new alco-
holic beverages that are mar-
keted as energy drinks at
many retailers.
While most people may rec-
ognize the names of popular
energy drinks such as Red
Bull, Rock Star and Sob6,
Adrenaline Rush, few may


recognize Charge or Sparks,
newer drinks that contain as
much, if not more, alcohol
than a normal beer.
Mark Moser, chairman for
the Safe and Drugfree
Schools Advisory Council,
said a typical beer is made up
of approximately 6.2 percent


alcohol. Sparks contains 6 per-
cent alcohol while Charge
contains 6.9 percent alcohol.
The problem isn't that the
drinks are being produced,
but the fact.of who the target
audience is, Moser said.
ENERGY continued on 7A


TROY ROBERTSILake City Reporter
Parents are urged to watch which energy drinks their children
consume, as some contain higher alcohol content than a can of beer.


Ramps

project

lifts off

today

Residents volunteer
to help construct
wheelchair ramp.
By TONY BRITr
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
As part of the Adopt-A-Ramp
4*-- program, several local volun-.
teers this weekend are build-
ing the first Columbia County
ramp for the Volunteer Florida
6 Days 6 Ramps project.
On Saturday, a group of vol-
unteers have pledged their
time to construct a ramp for a
local resident who has prob-
lems getting to and from. his
home because his home has
no wheelchair ramp.
"With the addition of a
ramp, the local citizen will be
able to access his home and be
able to leave his home easier
to make doctors' appoint-
ments," said Mary Lee Tanca,
Rural Ramp program coordi-
nator for the Center for
Independent Living of North
Central Florida, located in
Gainesville. "When it's a chal-
lenge to even leave your home
on a daily basis, a ramp helps
solve the problem."
The 6 Days 6 Ramps project
will introduce the first ramps
built in Columbia County in con-
junction with the Adopt-A-Ramp
program in Levy, Putnam and
Suwannee counties. The 6 Days
6 Ramps initiative is done once a
year by Volunteer Florida, a
commission appointed by the
governor.
Tanca said two groups of
local residents have volun-
teered to build the county's


RAMPS continued on 7A


CAMPAIGN KICKOFF AIDS ENRICHMENT CENTER

Luncheon raises awareness

of center's financial needs


More than $600,000 is
needed for first phase of
the center's construction.
By LINDSAY DOWNEY
Idowney@lakecityreporter.com
Lake City resident Mary Beaty was
so inspired during Columbia County
Senior Services, Inc.'s capital cam-
paign kickoff Friday, she pulled out
her checkbook and donated money
on the spot.
Beaty made a $3,000 commitment
to Senior Service's new Lifestyle
Enrichment Center during the after-
noon luncheon. The 85-year-old
woman took the microphone and
spoke to a packed room of more than
100 seniors and local leaders to chal-
lenge all Columbia County commis-
sioners to match her donation from
their discretionary funds.
The Columbia County Board of
County Commissioners recently voted
to give Senior Services up to $100,000
as part of a 2-1 challenge, which means
that for every $2 raised for the
Lifestyle Enrichment Center, the
county will match $1, up to a
maximum of $100,000.


JALA HARRIS/Lake City Reporter
ABOVE: Harry Wuest and his jazz ensemble
play at the Lifestyle Enrichment Center during
the luncheon Friday afternoon.
LEFT: Dr. Debbie Griffin (center), capital
campaign member for the Lifestyle Enrichment
Center in Lake City, along with Keith Leibfried
(left) and Mike McKee, speak during the
luncheon held at the center Friday afternoon.


ake City Reporter


Woman

attempts

to rebuild

her life

Recovery effort
continues following
Monday's blaze.
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Fire Department
is helping a 64-year old resident
recover, after .fire- gutted .her:
mobile home Molday afternoon.
, According to Lake City Fire
Department reports, June
Armstrong's single-wide mobile
home sustained 95 percent dam-
age as a result of the Monday
blaze, which occurred at 222 NE
Voss Road. The initial call report-
ing the fire came in to the fire
department at 4:18 p.m. and
emergency units spent more
than two hours at the scene.
Armstrong was not at home
when the mobile home caught
fire and there were no reports of
injuries as a result of the blaze.
FIRE continued on 7A


COURTESY PHOTO
June Armstrong stands among the
burned out remains of her mobile
home, which was almost totally
destroyed by fire on Monday.


S. Local attorney recounts friend's ordeal in book


RACHEL GOMEZ/Lake City Reporter
Pierce Kelley holds up a copy of his new book 'A Plenary
Indulgence,' which details events from a friend's real-life ordeal.


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


INSIDE
Business .. . ....
Classified . . . . .
Comics . . . . .
Faith & Values


Pierce Kelley's third
novel was released
three weeks ago.
By RACHEL GOMEZ
.rgomez@lakecityreporter.com
Pierce Kelley, a local attor-
ney in Lake City, released his
third novel entitled "A Plenary
Indulgence" three weeks ago.
"A Plenary Indulgence" is
based on a true story that
occurred in Tampa when a
restaurant owner, who ,was a
friend of Kelley, was robbed at


5A Local & Nation . . . . .... .. 3A
5B Obituaries 6A
4B Opinion . 4A
. . IOA Puzzles . 6B


gunpoint by a man, who then
chased the robber and shot
and killed him. After investi-
gating, the Hillsborough
County State's Attorney's
office charged the restaurant
owner with manslaughter.
"I met him when I was work-
ing at a large law firm in Tampa
and this man opened a Thai
restaurant a couple blocks
away from where I worked,"
Kelley said. "Every couple
weeks I went to his restaurant,
and that's how we became
friends. When I saw what hap-
pened to him, I called him at


the restaurant and we talked,
but I didn't want all the details
because then I could be called
as a witness."
Kelley said the man told
him many things that didn't
directly pertain to the crime.
For instance, Kelley's friend
told him after the incident, he
had had dreams that the rob-
ber would come back and try
to kill him . '
"He might not get him out
of his head for the rest of his
life," Kelley said. "Even after
he's been acquitted, he's still
not able to get this out of his


TODAY IN
BUSINESS
l -:.,0 1t : ?_,l,::.-t., l
r .'I'-, "l I,,i .r' I ii;e.j ;


mind. One of the last newspa-
per stories that was written in
the Tampa Tribune was titled,
'Restaurant Owner Acquitted,
His Life Sentence Begins.'"
Kelley talked to his friend
shortly after the incident
occuri-ed and kept in touch
with him through the duration
that the prosecution went on
- nearly two years.
To gather information for
the book, Kelley also talked
with John Fitzgibbons, the
defense lawyer on the case,
NOVEL continued on 7A

COMING
SUNDAY
Fi.-herrin ri n.r il r ' 'tr '.'ing
.�.lile r'-r- in rr n2 2r:-.jndJe j


Vol. 133, No. 8 !


50 cents


31T


I If - L, CIO i C


The Study Of
Spirituality
College performs study , 7 i
on what we believe.
Faith & Values, I OA





Reporter










LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING SATURDAY, JANUARY 27, 2007


Thursday:
8-14-15-22-31


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS


B.B. King hospitalized in Texas


GALVESTON, Texas - B.B. King
was hospitalized for a low-grade fever
following the flu but was in good
condition Friday, his management
agency said.
The 81-year-old bluesman was
expected to be discharged Saturday, a
hospital spokesman said. His agency
said he plans to perform Tuesday in
Fort Worth.
"He's doing great," Tina France, vice
president of Lieberman Management of
New York. "He's in good spirits and


Taylor donates to
Clinton campaign
LOS ANGELES -
Elizabeth Taylor says Sen.
Hillary Clinton's savvy and
smarts have won her
support.
The
actress
announced
Thursday
she'll give
$2,300, the
legal limit,
to the New Taylor
York sena-
tor's presidential campaign.
"I have contributed to Sen.
Hillary Clinton's presidential


cracking jokes."
King had been scheduled to perform
Thursday at the Grand Opera House
but was admitted to The University of
Texas Medical Branch at Galveston,
said Paul McCarthy, a nurse
administrator.
King, who has a history of diabetes,
was taking antibiotics for a 100-degree
fever, France said. The ailment in a
younger person wouldn't have required
hospitalization, but King is being
monitored because of his age, she said.


campaign because she has a
mind of her own and a very
strong one at that," Taylor
said in a statement issued by
spokesman Dick Guttman. "I
like the way she thinks. She
is very savvy and a smart
leader with years of
experience in government,
diplomacy and politics."
The announcement came
amid speculation about
whether Hollywood would
embrace the New York
senator as much as it did her
husband, former President
Bill Clinton.
DreamWorks movie studio
founders Steven Spielberg,
Jeffrey Katzenberg and
David Geffen are throwing a


Celebrity Birthdays


* Singer Bobby "Blue" Bland
is 77.
* Actor James Cromwell is
67.
* Actor John Witherspoon is
65.
* Rock musician Nick Mason
(Pink Floyd) is 62.
* Rhythm-and-blues singer
Nedra Talley (The Ronettes) is
61.
* Ballet star Mikhail
Baryshnikov is 59.
* John Roberts, chief justice
of the UnitedStates, is-52'.


B.B. King


fundraiser next month for a
Clinton rival, Sen. Barack
Obama, D-Ill.

Michael Jackson
Is back in the U.S.
TOKYO - Since Michael
Jackson forsook his
Neverland
Ranch, the
King of Pop
has popped
up in some
very
unexpected
places. Jackson
He's
taken up residence in the
Gulf state of Bahrain, in


France and even in a castle
in Ireland. He showed up in
Augusta, Ga., to give a
eulogy at James Brown's
funeral, and materialized in
London to accept an award
for his contributions to the
world of pop music. Lately
he's been spotted in Las
Vegas on his famed shopping
sprees.
So where is he now?
In a rare conference call,
the singer emerged with his
spokeswoman Friday to
confirm to The Associated
Press that he is back in the
United States.
* Associated Press


Thought for Today


* Country singer Cheryl
White is 52.
* Country singer-musician
Richard Young (The Kentucky
Headhunters) is 52.
* Actress Mimi Rogers is 51.
* Rock musician Janick
Gers (Iron Maiden) is 50.
* Rock singer Margo
Timmins (Cowboy Junkies) is
46.
* Rock musician Gillian
Gilbert is 46.
* Actress Bridget Fonda
is 43.-


"If we die, we want people to
accept it ...We are in a risky
business and we hope that if
anything happens to us, it will not
delay the program.The conquest
of space is worth the risk of life"'

- Virgil I. "Gus" Grissom,
(1926-1967)


Tamarac to use leftover

ice to water plants


Associated Press


TAMARAC - City officials
planned on Friday to use
about 40,000 pounds of ice
left over from hurricane
relief efforts to water plants,
bushes and grass on a 1.7-
acre patch of land.
Officials had initially want-
ed to give the ice to residents
to water their lawns, but the
plan was scrapped after it
was deemed to be too costly
for sheriff's deputies to man-
age the expected crowds.
The ice is costing the state
$90,000 a month to chill and
is being stored in Bartow and
Jacksonville.�
Tamarac officials asked for
the ice after the Florida


Lake City
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ......... (386) 752-1293
Fax number ...............752-9400
Circulation .................755-5445
Online ...... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is published
Tuesday through Sunday at 180 E. Duval St.,
Lake City, Fla. 32055. Periodical postage paid
at Lake City, Fla. Member Audit Bureau of
Circulation and The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake City
Reporter. Reproduction in whole or in part is
forbidden without the permission of the pub-
lisher. U.S. Postal Service No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to
Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City,
Ra. 32056.
Publisher Michael Leonard ... .754-0418
(mleonard@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
If you have a hews tip, call any member of the
news staff or 752-5295.
Editor Todd Wilson.........754-0428
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Jim Kennedy ........754-0417
(ads@lakecityreporter.com)


Division of Emergency
Management announced this
month it wanted to get rid of
it because it wouldn't last
until this year's hurricane
season, the South Florida
Sun-Sentinel reported.
The city's truckload will
cost the state $850 for gas
and other expenses, said
state emergency manage-
ment spokesman Mike
Stone.
"We have no problems
with the usage," Stone said.
"We made the offer to the
local governments to do it
and they are free to do with
the ice as they feel meets
their local needs.
"It is the ultimate recycling
project," Stone added.


Reporter
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.
BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon.......754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m. Tuesday
through Saturday, and by 7:30 a.m. on
Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any prob-
lems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should call
before 10:30 a.m. to report a service error for
same day re-delivery. After 10:30 am., next
day re-delivery or service related credits will
be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery is
available, next day re-delivery or service relat-
ed credits will be issued.
Director A. Russell Waters ... .754-0407
(rwaters@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
13 Weeks ....................$23.54
26 Weeks ..................... $42.80
52 Weeks ..................... $83.46
Rates include 7% sales tax.
Mall rates
13 Weeks ...................$44.85
26 Weeks .................... $89.70
52 Weeks .................... $179.40


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news items.
If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please call the
executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run in this
space. And thanks for reading.


AROUND FLORIDA


THE WEATHER


Cancer patient
raises $76,000
JACKSONVILLE - After
spending the final two years
of his life at Wolfson
Children's Hospital, a young
bone cancer patient's
fundraising efforts will
benefit parents, patients and
nursing students.
Before he died last fall at
age 18, A.J. Donahue, of
Brunswick, Ga., had spent a
lot of time in the hospital's
oncology ward and saw
several areas where he
wanted to make changes, The
Florida Times-Union
reported. So he began a
fundraising campaign on his
Web site.
Recently, Bill and Terrilyn
Donahue, A.J.'s parents,
talked with Wolfson
administrator Larry Freeman
about how to spend the boy's
$76,000 legacy.
AJ.'s highest priority was
buying reclining chairs for
parents who end up spending
long hours in the rooms. But
Freeman had already pledged
to pay for the recliners out of
his budget.
Some of the money raised
by the youth will be used for
CD players, DVD players and
portable video game systems
for patient rooms, but the
bulk of the money will
probably go to nursing
scholarships, Bill Donahue
said.
The Georgia boy was a
16-year-old student at
Brunwick's Glynn Academy
in October 2004, when he
was diagnosed with bone
cancer in his right arm.
Last year, A.J. launched a
fundraising campaign on his
Web site. For a $2 donation,
A.J. would send a sticker with
his logo. It was designed by
his flight instructor and was
the drawing of a biplane
being piloted by A.J., his
scarf blowing in the wind.
In six weeks, he reached
his $50,000 goal and died two
days later on Sept. 23. But
the donations still keep
pouring in.


Small plane
lands on highway
SUN CITY CENTER - A
small plane landed on a
highway Friday after it
experienced mechanical
problems, but no one was
hurt, authorities said.
Power failed aboard the
1976 twin-engine Piper plane
but it landed safely at
3:44 p.m. on Interstate 75 in
southern Hillsborough
County, Florida Highway
Patrol spokesman Larry
Coggins said. Only the pilot
and co-pilot were aboard.
The plane taxied on the
three-lane highway to the
median without affecting
traffic, Coggins said.
"He just found a safe area
in between traffic," he said.
Aviation officials
are investigating.

Man sentenced for
stealing turtle eggs
MIAMI - A man was
sentenced to five years in
prison and three years
supervised release for
stealing sea turtle eggs,
authorities said Friday.
Alvin G. Keel was
convicted in October for
unlawful possession and
transportation of loggerhead
sea turtle eggs. Authorities
said he dug up four nests of
freshly laid eggs on Juno
Beach in 2004. Authorities
later discovered two pillow
cases filled with 481 sea
turtle eggs in a vacant lot
near where Keel was
apprehended, the U.S
Attorney's Office said in a
statement.
Keel has three prior federal
convictions in Florida for
similar crimes and four other
state convictions involving
taking sea turtle eggs, the
U.S. Attorney's Office said.
It was not immediately
known if Keel had an
attorney. A telephone
message left at the U.S.
Attorney's Office was not
immediately returned.


Teacher guilty of
abusing student
SANFORD - A special
education teacher faces up to
five years in prison after
being convicted Friday of
physically abusing an autistic
student.
Kathleen Garrett, 50, was
originally charged with
abusing five students during
the first three months of the
2004-2005 school year.
Prosecutors dropped one
charge, a judge dismissed
two others and the jury
acquitted her of a fourth.
Jurors concluded Garrett
nearly crushed a 60-pound
student when she placed her
200-pound body on top of him
as he leaned across his desk.
She allegedly stayed there
until his. lips turned blue.
Defense attorney Tom
Egan said Garrett restrained
the boy, but did nothing
improper.

Agency: State to
blame for payments
TALLAHASSEE - More
than $4.5 million in
questionable payments to two
companies that run five
private, prisons resulted from
the state's contract
concessions, not overcharges
by the firms, a top state
official said Friday.
Department of
Management Services
Secretary Linda South
blamed the concessions on
the state's now-defunct
Correctional Privatization
Commission after a Florida
Senate leader asked for an
investigation of her agency's
settlement with one of the
companies.
The department, which
inherited the contracts from
the commission, disclosed
earlier this week that GEO
Group of Boca Raton would
pay the state $402,501.
* Associated Press


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Cape Canaveral
Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Jacksonville
Key West
Lake City
Miami
Naples
Ocala
Orlando
Panama City
Pensacola
Tallahassee
Tampa
Valdosta
W. Palm Beach


Sunday
72. 44 sr,
68/42/sh
81/53/t
75/46/t
67/33/pc
64/29/sh
78/67/t
64/30/pc
82/56/t
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58/24/sh
70/41/t
55/25/pc
80/53/t


r. LAK CITYALMNA


TEMPERATURES
High Friday
Low Friday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Friday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


59
34
67
43
85 in 1949
18 in 1905


0.00"
3.54"
3.54"
2.91"
2.91"


SUN
Sunrise today,
Sunset today
Sunnse torn.
Sunset torn.


7:24 a.m.
6:03 p.m.
7:23 a.m.
6:04 p.m.


6

3 nmus to li
Today's


Monday
61 42 s
63/38/pc
64/46/s
63/39/pc
56/27/pc
55/28/pc
77/64/s
49/23/pc
66/48/s
63/44/s
56/29/pc
58/34/pc
54/33/s
52/34/s
48/21/s
53/37/s
48/26/s
63/45/s


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by


MOON ultra-violet The Weather
Moonrise today 12:50 p.m. radiation risk Channel.
Moonset today 2:27 a.m. for the area on Channel.
Moonsetom. 1:40 p.m. a scale from 0
Moonrise tom. 1:40 pm to 10+.



Feb. Feb. Feb. Feb. Forecasts, data and graphics
2 10 17 24 >'j, - �2007 Weather Central,
Full Last New First Inc., Madison, Wis.
' ' www.weatherpubllsher.com


On this date in
1989, Tanana report-
ed a low of -76
degrees. Daily highs
of -66 degrees were
reported at
Chandalar Lake on
the 22nd, and at
Ambler on the 26th.


SPOSORED BY



conn".
'-"'lwo-


Friday:
8-6-7


Friday:
5-5-2-7


Page Editor: Christine Davenport, 754-0429


[29 MON


TUESIDAY


I WEATHER BY -THE-HOUR I









Page Editor: Christine Davenport, 754-0429


LAKE CITY REPORTER


LOCAL & NATION


SATURDAY, JANUARY 27, 2007


Students make cards for troops stationed in Iraq
The students at Kountry Kids Daycare recently participated in a project where they made Valentine's Day cards for American troops
stationed in Iraq. Carla Cowen, Kountry Kids Daycare co-owner, said about 45 students participated in the project. "Mrs. Bobbie Bennett
works with us and her son, Terry Bennett, is in Iraq and we just thought we would like to let the soldiers know that we're thinking about
them and that we appreciate what they do for our country," Cowen said. "We also wanted the troops to know that we are praying for
them." She said the cards will be mailed Monday and it will take approximately two weeks for the cards to reach the troops.
"The kids loved doing the project," Cowen said. "Some of them, at first didn't want to do it, but when they saw how everybody was
making theirs, that they looked good and when we told them how proud we were, everybody wanted to do one."


Pentagon chief: Congress' buildup


resolution 'emboldens the enemy'


By ROBERT BURNS
AP Military Writer

WASHINGTON - Defense
Secretary Robert Gates said
Friday an effort in Congress to
pass a resolution opposing
President Bush's troop buildup
undercuts U.S. commanders in
Iraq and "emboldens the
enemy."
At the same time, he said the
Pentagon is hoping to speed
the deployment of five addi-
tional Army brigades to
Baghdad to bolster security in
the capital. They had been
scheduled to arrive a brigade
per month through May, each
containing roughly 3,500
troops.
Gates' strong language,
along with Bush's own forceful
comments, underscored the
high stakes in a congressional
battle expected to start next
week over proposals from both
parties criticizing the presi-
dent's war strategy.
At the White House on
Friday, the president chal-
lenged lawmakers not to pre-
maturely condemn his buildup,
saying, "I'm the decision
maker" on troop levels. Vice
President Dick Cheney said
earlier this week that the
buildup would proceed
even if a nonbinding
resolution supported by
some Republicans as
well as Democrats wins


- - . -... -. -... . .. - . ASSOCIATED PRESS
Defense Secretary Robert Gates gestures during a media
roundtable at the Pentagon, Friday.
A. ti' ..& . , ,. A i -li'' jiji.&. '* -... ' : jfi iti -' 'i : **


Senate approval.
Bush spoke to reporters in
the Oval Office after meeting
with Gates and Lt. Gen. David
Petraeus. Petraeus won Senate
confirmation Friday to replace
Gen. George Casey as the top
U.S. commander in Iraq.
Stepping up what has
become a war of nerves with
Iran, the White House also said
Bush had authorized U.S.
forces in Iraq to take whatever
actions might be necessary to
counter Iranian agents who are
deemed a threat.
"It makes sense that if some-
body's trying to harm our
troops or stop us from achiev-


ing our goal or killing innocent
citizens in Iraq, that we will
stop them," Bush said. "It's an
obligation we all have ... to pro-
tect our folks and achieve our
goal."
With his showdown with
Congress drawing near, the
president challenged those
who favor a legislative rebuke
of the troop buildup to put for-
ward an alternative.
"I know there is skepticism
and pessimism and that some
are condemning a plan before
it's even had a chance to work,"
he said. "They have an obliga-
tion and a serious responsibili-
ty therefore to put up their own


plan as to what would work."
At a private retreat for
House Republicans on
Maryland's Eastern Shore,
Pash did not rule out support
for a proposal by the cham-
ber's GOP leaders calling for
l$behmarks to measure the
IF'aqci government's support for
tlfe U'.S: effort to' quell vio-
lence. Top ,House Republicans
are trying to balance a show of
support for Bush with; broad
s]kpticism among GOP. law-
n akers that his troop increase
will work.
Asked about the House res-
olution, Bush said he trusts
Republican leaders because he
knows they want to succeed
in Iraq, said a House GOP
official who spokehon conditin.
of anonymity ' s fe
meeting was not public.
House Republicans are also -
proposing an advisory commit-
tee to report regularly in the
progress of Bush's plan ,in an
effort to measure'how well it is
- or isn't --, 'working
to quell sectarian violence
in Iraq.
Democrats showed little
sign of backing . down.
Emphasizing Congress' inten-
tion to play a major role in Iraq,
House Speaker Nancy Pelosi,
D-Calif., led a group of
lawmakers there, where they
met with Iraqi Prime Minister
Nouri al-Maliki and senior
U.S. commanders..


Buyer of Used and Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans

Aluminum Wheels and Catalytic Converters
Cash paid on-the spot.
Flatbed Services Available
Illegally parked and abandoned vehicles towed free.
Call Charlie at 386-623-1943


Scalpers take Super

Bowl business online


By MATT SEDENSKY
Associated Press

, MIAMI - Jeff Block is
pensive about cashing in his
life insurance policy, wistful
about putting off his wedding
engagement,- fearful about,
making the big purchase.
One .thing the 31-year-old
,Chicago financial analyst is
sure of: If he comes up with
the cash to follow his beloved
Bears to the Super Bowl, he
.won't be buying tickets from
a. traditional scalper. His
attention is focused on one of
the many online ticket
resellers.
The secondhand ticket
market has grown up a lot in
the last decade, shifting from
a business largely conducted
by salesmen lurking outside
stadiums to one chiefly
online, both in simple
Craigslist postings and
more sophisticated Internet
databases.
'The street business has
really * died,", said -Don
Vaccaro, who has .been sell-
ing tickets since 1979 and is


the founder and chief execu-
tive of Vernon, Conn.-based
TicketLiquidator.com. "The
old-time brokers are saying,
'Look, you got a bunch of
geeks selling tickets now.' It's
really a lot more brains going
in now."
'There are about 70,000
seats at the Feb. 4 game, but
ticket distribution is tightly
controlled by the NFL:
25.2 percent to the league
itself, largely for sponsors,
licensees and the like;
17.5 percent each to the two
competing teams, the Bears
and Indianapolis Colts, with
some raffled off to season
ticket holders; 5 percent to
the host Miami Dolphins; and
1.2 percent to each of the
remaining 29 NFL teams.
Many of those lucky
enough to get tickets when
they're first sold. won't part
with them. Princeton
University economist Alan
Krueger studied the ticket
market during the 2001 Super
Bowl in Tampa and found
only about 20 percent of seats
were resold.


Police: Soldier, coach

had sex with students


By SEANNA ADCOX
Associated Press

GREENWOOD, S.C. - A
South Carolina National
Guardsman who recruited at a
high. school and a former
cheerleading coach each had
sex with students, authorities
said, and the principal is
charged with hindering the
investigation.
Former Ware Shoals High
School coach Jill Moore, 28,
took cheerleaders to a motel,
where they met guardsmen
for sex, according to
Greenwood County sheriff's
reports released late

S osteya m a#rtiM A ller'
tw6,-also is accused of having
sex with a male student on a
different occasion, according
to the report: L
Because ;all 'the students
involved were 16 or older,


Alice Burney Gibson
A.K.A Suga "Tit"

It'broke our hearts
to loose you, but
you did not go
alone. FOr part of us
went with you on
the ,day:God called
you home. You are
truly missed.

From your loving
mother and two loving
daughters and son.

Coetta Burney, Makesha
Hill, Phoebe Johnson,
Demetris Gaities


none of the adults will be
charged because the teens
were old enough to consent
under state law, according to
the sheriff's reports.
Moore, however, is charged
with supplying alcohol and
cigarettes to students and con-
tributing to the delinquency of
a minor. Moore, who also was
a guidance . counselor,
resigned earlier this month.
Principal Jane Blackwell
also is accused of telling
cheerleaders and a school
staff member not to talk about
the allegations against Moore,
authoritieseisaid&: She was
charged Monday with
obstruction.
" "i4 ftach and the principal
have denied the allegations.
If convicted of contributing
to the delinquency of a minor,
Moore could face up to a
$3,000 fine and three years
in prison.

To The Comb's Staff
We are truly grateful for your
Professional Services and
expression of sympathy for
the loss of our daughter and
sister "Missy" deeply
touched our hearts. Thank
you for demonstrating the
love and compassion of
Jesus during our time of
grief. How comforting it is to
know that our loss is
heaven's gain. Missy will
Truly be missed.
S We, the family will always
treasure your gift of profes-
sionalism and thank you
again so very much for your
compassion during this
agonizing and painful time.
With deepest gratitude
The Family of
Mary Hazel Reed
and sister, Dee George


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*Culverts *Driveways
*Bush Hogging
S. *All types of concrete, pole barns,
metal roofs
Free Estimates * Licensed and Insured
Call Charlie 386-623-1943.













OPINION


Saturday, January 27, 2007


www.lakecityreporter.com


EDITORIAL


Subic


deserves


council's


support

White Springs Police
Chief Joseph Subic Jr.,
has been designated a
punching bag recently
by several members of
the White Springs Town Council. Many
on the board want the long-time law
enforcement officer removed from office.
Subic's career in public service has
been a lightning rod at times, but as the
police chief of White Springs, his record
is exemplary. He has done his job in
fine fashion.
Subic and his staff have made many
arrests, including drug arrests and
arrests for various types of criminal
mischief. He also has made sure fewer
impaired drivers take to the streets in
White Springs.
His presence - both on the street
and in the community - has made a
positive impact on the people of White
Springs.
It seems that small-minded politics
among a few in power on the Town
Council has clouded what should be
good judgment with the people's best
interest in mind. It's too bad that
personal conflicts can't be put aside for
the betterment of the public.
As a community, White Springs
prides itself as a pristine community,
frozen.in time, one with nature and free
from the urban sprawl and all the evils
that come with it in modern Florida. As
Police Chief, Joseph Subic Jr. has
helped maintain the city's atmosphere,
preserved the way of life and helped
improve the overall quality of life.
It would be in the best interest of
the town to keep him in place as the
police chief.

HIGHLIGHTS
IN HISTORY
Today is Saturday, Jan. 27, the 27th
day of 2007. There are 338 days left in
the year.
* In 1943, some 50 bombers struck
Wilhelmshaven in the first all-American air
raid against Germany during World War II.
* In 1944, the Soviet Union announced
the complete end of the deadly German
siege of Leningrad, which had lasted for
more than two years.
* In 1945, Soviet troops liberated the
Nazi concentration camps Auschwitz and
Birkenau in Poland.
* In 1951, an era of atomic testing in
the Nevada desert began as an Air Force
plane dropped a one-kiloton bomb on
Frenchman Flats.

Lake City Reporter
serving Columbia County since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is published with
pride for residents of Columbia and .
surrounding counties by Community
Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities - "Newspapers get
things done!"
Our primary goal is to publish
distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard work.
Michael Leonard, publisher
Todd Wilson, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman

OUR POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be typed or
neatly written and double spaced. Letters
should not exceed 400 words and wM be edited
for length and libel. Letters mut be siged and
include the writer's name, addse and
telephone number for verification. MM-s cn
have two letters per month puts*ed. LaSers
and guest columns arm Se opinion of e
writers and not necessariy tal o Lae CiMy
Reporter.


BY MAN- Lefrn', P.O. Bkm17S, Ldw C4l
FL 32056; or dwpoN a 10 E.Du S
BY FAX: (386) 752-44M.
BY EUMA. n --iindW4leuwem


S AM I THE ONLY AMERICAN
LEFT THAT HASN'T SET UP A
PRESIDENTIAL EXPLORATORY
COMMITTEE ?


4A


THIS JUST IN...
BARNEY THE WHITE
HOUSE DOG ANNOUNCED
TODAY THAT HE IS SETTING
UP A PRESIDENTIAL
EXPLORATORY COMMITTEE.


COMMENTARY


'Just you and me'


Reach back to when
you were just 3
years old. I was the
youngest brother of
four and we had
four older sisters. Every
morning, long before dawn,
mother would be up beating
the dough and rolling it out for
biscuits. She would lay two
large pans full, leaving the
scraps for me to feature stars,
animals and funny-looking
creatures with the rest. These
biscuits would be our bread for
the day. We were poor and
could not afford sliced bread at
8 cents a loaf.
We lived in the outskirts of
Miami. Six sacks for lunch
were put side by side on the
screened-in porch by the door.
One by one my sisters and
brothers would be off to school
grabbing a lunch as they went.
We .stood and watched them
grab a lunch, kiss Mother and
disappear around the corner
grocery store. Miami Edison
school was 10 blocks away. I
remember turning with Mother
and saying in a rather
tongue-tied voice, "just you and
me, just you and me."
Every Monday was the
same. There'were nine stacks
of dirty clothes in a shed just
outside the back door. The old
black boiling pot had been
started by my older brother
Tom. The ancient two-tub
washer was filled and the work
began. Sometimes Mother's
hair would get caught in the
ringer, and she would butt it
and it would fall apart. She
would put it back together
again and start over. We had
eight lines to hang the clothes
on and would spread the rags
or heavy work pants over the
bushes. The last of the clothes
were hung just before dark. It
happened every Monday.
Tuesday was ironing day.
Mother would sprinkle the
shirts and pants with water and
roll them up for ironing. I
learned to fold underwear and
the rags. There was no such
thing as "wrinkle-free" shirts or
pants in the early '30s. Dad's
shirts and pants had to be
sprinkled in starch water


OTHER


Jack Exuml
Phone: (386) 755-9525
jhexum@netzero.net


before ironing. Dad was the
district manager of Life and
Casualty Insurance Company
of Nashville, Tenn:-He had to
look nice.
Wednesday was the day that
Mother put away the clothes.
Mother and Dad and seven
kids lived in a house on 57th
Street. My brother Fred and I
revisited the house long after
the family had moved. It had
been condemned by the city
and soon to be destroyed. The
house seemed awful small, less
than 1,000 square feet We four
boys had a room all to
ourselves that was 8x10. The
three girls lived in a bedroom
about as large, and mother and
dad lived in a room all their
own. All nine of us shared one
bathroom that was so small you
had to back out of the room to
change your mind.
Behind the bathroom door
was the miracle medical devise
of all ages. The red rubber bag
hung on a nail high up on the
door. Attached to the bottom
was a long black rubber tube
that ended in a bone-like shape
of hard substance. It took three
of us to operate on the afflicted.
One would stir the soapy water
in the bag. Another would
squeeze open the tube that had
melted together during the hot
summer days, while the third
was the one that supervised
the entire operation. He would
face the patient and say, "Got
enough, got enough?" It was
known to us as the "Friendly
Enema."
The miracle drug of the ages
was Caster Oil. Just one look at
the bottle and we would shout,
"I'm better, I'm better!" We
took things back then that
would be marked today "For
External Use Only." When we


were sick, miracle medicine
women would invade the house
shouting various ways of saving
the child. "Have him breathe in
a sack," one would shout
'Turn his liver over," another
would say. "Make a pot of
onion soup and have him smell
the vapors,"another would
advise. One man in the
neighborhood discovered a
cure for an unknown disease.
His wife caught the cure and
died. When anyone in the
neighborhood took a new '
medicine and recovered, others
would overdose on the stuff
and get sick.
During the summer, Dad
always wanted to go to bed
when we wanted to stay out of
it and he always wanted to get
out of it when we wanted to
stay in it. But he was good to
us and only required us to
work half day, and he didn't
care which 12 hours it was.
When we had a piece of gum
we would chew it for days and
each night stick it to the metal
bedpost. If you didn't wake up
*early, one of your bothers
might have it and be gone. We
could always track it down by
color; the flavor had departed
days before.
I'm looking at a page from
Mother's journal. The daily
listing of the various baked
goods Mother would make that
were sold to neighbors to help
dad meet the weekly bills that
were due.
The marvel of all that
Mother was and did was really
miraculous. You see, my
Mother was stone deaf all of
her adult life. She never heard
any of her children laugh or
cry or sing, or speak. Mother
was the wonder of the ages and
it all goes back in my memory
to the time when I would say in
a tongue-tied voice, "Just you
and me, just you and me."
* Jack Exum has two books
available free at the Lake City
Reporter office. They are "How
To Handle Your Parents (For
Kids)" and How To Raise Your
Kid Right." Exum is a minister
and motivational speaker. He is
an Amy-Award winning religious
writer and resides in Lake City.


VIEWS


Air travelers: Your 'papers, please


Incontestably requiring
passports of air travelers
coming from our closest
neighbors - Canada,
Mexico, Bermuda, the
Caribbean - is a step
backward for easy and
convenient travel for tourists
and business travelers.
Previously, a
government-issued photo
ID, typically a driver's license
or a birth certificate, was
sufficient, but the passport
requirement was added as part
of a 2004 antiterrorism law.
It went into effect Tuesday,
apparently with few problems,
but that was probably because


Americans arriving without a
passport were given a
warning and a passport
application and allowed back
into their country.
Americans needing a
passport should be prepared
to pay - $97 for a new one -
and wait - approximately six
weeks - unless they're
prepared to pay $60 extra for
expedited service, although
there have been press
accounts of delays in getting
expedited service.
Next year, travelers coming
into the United States by car
and cruise ship will need
passports to enter. Only about


27 percent of Americans have
valid passports, which means
the great majority of them
will be unable to make a
spur-of-the-moment trip to
Canada or Mexico, which
worries tourism officials in
both those countries.
The passport requirement
should be reviewed at some
point to see if it really does
have any terrorist deterrent.
While travel in Europe has
become more and more
document-free, the New
World has more than taken
up the slack in cross-border
paperwork.
* Scripps Howard News Service


of Iraq.
The president is correct 'The state of the
union here is good. But, like Johnson, he just
isn't going to get the credit he might otherwise.
* Dan K. Thomasson is former editor of the
Scripps Howard News Service.


COMMENTARY


Bush has


the look


of another


Texan

T he annual state of the union
message normally, and in fact
traditionally, is the most over
hyped, over reported, over analyzed
and least memorable of any address
delivered by a president.
It is a pundit's dream that is full of sound and
fury and of little or no significance, foisted off
as important by a host of overpaid television
commentators trying to prove the worth of
their multimillion-dollar salaries.
The latest from President Bush was no
exception, leaving Americans who braved it
with the empty feeling that absolutely nothing
is going to get done the next two years despite
all the lofty rhetoric and long-winded television
decoding followed by column after column of
analytic nonsense in the following day's
newspapers.,
The bottom
line of this .
year's version is
simple: The
only thing that'
really matters is
Iraq and none
of the Dan K.Thomasson
president's
domestic proposals are going anywhere in an
atmosphere where there are 20 candidates for
his job in both parties. Why should these
wannabes allow him to steal their thunder?
Besides there isn't one member of the new
Democratic-controlled CoAgress who can't read
the polls reflecting staggering presidential
unpopularity in both foreign and domestic
policy. He registers only 35 percent approval.
Fewer and fewer of those in his own party think
he is on the correct course. A number of
Republicans showed it during the address by
sitting on their hands.
So if Bush and his minions actually thought
they could repair his image and salvage his
presidency and his current plan to increase the
troop commitment with this appearance on the
bully pulpit they are more naive than imagined.
That might have been accomplished if he had
called off the so-called "surge" of new troops,
acknowledged what everyone knows already -
that America is caught in the middle of an
escalating civil war - and announced that U.S.
troops would begin immediately to turn the
fighting over to the Iraqi government in
preparation for withdrawal in six months.
But it is utterly unrealistic to expect this
president to take those steps anymore than it
would have been for Lyndon Johnson to end
the Vietnam War or, for that matter, Harry
Truman to end the Korean conflict
Listening to the president defend his
increased forces plan as necessary for victory, I
could think of nothing so much as Johnson's
light at the end of the tunnel with just a few
more troops appeals in the midst of Vietnam. I
recall being among a handful of reporters called
unexpectedly into the Oval Office to be lectured
by Johnson about speculation the troop level in
Vietnam would be increased to half a million. A
furious Johnson questioned the legitimacy of
our sources even though one of them was the
chairman of the Senate Armed Services
Committee, a member of his own party. And
Johnson accused us of irresponsibility. Then,
only a short time later, he officially verified
what we had reported.
The parallels between the two Texans, Bush
and Johnson, are obvious. In the end, Johnson
was unable to end the conflict that destroyed
his presidency and forced him into early
retirement any more than Bush seems to be
able to save himself from the immediate
historic judgment that he made an enormous
blunder in invading Iraq and compounded that
error with poor conduct of the war.
In his response to Bush, the newly elected
Democratic Sen. James Webb of Virginia
praised Republican Dwight Eisenhower for end-
ing the Korean War.
There is merit in the domestic hopes
outlined somberly by Bush. Providing health
care to those without it, solving the grming
immigration problems, increasing vi ace
in homeland security, dealing with cfnk
change, all are goals worthy of strou
bipartisan attention. But it may be too le fIr
this president to expect any success with wha
should have been his agenda bre the
of Sept. 11, 2001, completely warped h~s
perspective. Sadly, his crediblity with most
Americans and thus with their representatives
in Congress has disappeared in the smoke









LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS SATURDAY, JANUARY 27, 2007


BRIEFS

2006 Home sales
fall by large amount
WASHINGTON - New
home sales fell in 2006 by the
largest amount in 16 years, but
they were up for a second
straight month in December,
raising hopes that the worst of
the housing downturn is coming
to an end.
The Commerce Department
reported Friday that sales last
month rose by 4.8 percent,
following an even bigger
7.4 percent rise in November.
Those two increases,
however, were not enough to
salvage the entire year, with
total sales of 1.06 million units,
down 17.3 percent from 2005.
That marked the biggest
decline since a 17.8 percent
plunge in the housing downturn
of 1990.
In a separate report, the
Commerce Department said
that orders to U.S. factories for
big-ticket manufactured goods
rose in December by
3.1 percent, the largest gain
in three months.

Toyota's global
production surges
TOKYO - Toyota's global
production last year surged
10 percent to more than
9 million vehicles, narrowing
the gap with General Motors,
the world's No. 1 automaker.
Toyota Motor Corp., riding on
its reputation for fuel-efficient
cars like the Prius hybrid, said
Friday that it produced
9.018 million vehicles, including
its Japanese subsidiaries that
make trucks and smaller
models. It was its fifth straight
year of growth.
Detroit-based General
Motors Corp. and its group
automakers produced
9.18 million vehicles worldwide
in 2006 - about 162,000
vehicles more than its
Japanese rival.
That gap has narrowed from
about 819,000 vehicles at the
end of 2005, when Toyota and
its Japanese units made
8.232 million vehicles
worldwide and GM's production
totaled 9.051 million.

Judge refuses to
endorse settlement
NEW ORLEANS - A federal
judge in Mississippi on Friday
refused to endorse part of a
proposed settlement that calls
for insurance payments to
thousands of Mississippi
policyholders whose homes
were destroyed or damaged by
Hurricane Katrina.
U.S. District Judge L.T.
Senter Jr. would not sign off on
a deal between State Farm Fire
& Casualty Co. and Mississippi
Attorney General Jim Hood for
at least $5Qmillion in payments
to policyholders whose claims
were denied but didn't sue the
company.

Halliburton upbeat

despite decline
HOUSTON - Oil industry
services provider Halliburton
Co. was upbeat Friday despite
a 40 percent decline in
fourth-quarter profit, citing
heavy demand for its
oilfield equipment and
personnel and predicting more
of the same for 2007.
Earnings fell to $658 million,
or 64 cents per share,
compared with $1.1 billion, or
$1.04 per share, during the
same period a year ago. But
the prior-year results included
$540 million of income, or"
51 cents per share, that came
from a tax benefit.

Operating costs

trimmed 4Q growth
PEORIA, III. - Heavy
equipment maker Caterpillar
Inc. said Friday that higher
operating costs trimmed
fourth-quarter profit growth to
4 percent, but predicted strong
results for 2007 despite an
expected slowdown in U.S.
machine and engine sales.
The forecast sent the


company's shares up more
than 2 percent in trading on the
New York Stock Exchange,
even though it mirrored a
revised outlook issued three
months ago that predicted
Caterplar's four-year sales
surge would slow this year.
Net income for the fourth
quarter grew to $882 milon, or
$1.32 per share, up from
$S46 lion, or $1.20 per
shw, a ywr ago. But emning
Id ,hort of NtlI Stees
euig ms higher

6 Asnecield Pm


Goin' Postal celebrates opening

Chris Ward, Mike and Linda Green, owners of Goin' Postal of Lake City, cut the ribbon Friday
afternoon with the help of Lake City Mayor Stephen Witt along with other city and business
representatives.



Growing skepticism coming


from boards and shareholders


By RACHEL BECK
AP Business Writer

NEW YORK - There's a
new twist in the buyout boom
roiling corporate America: A
growing skepticism among
shareholders and the boards
that represent them over the
value of such deals.
Whether it's the directors
at Cablevision rejecting a
sweetened going-private offer
or Health Management
Associates' decision to do its
own recapitalization rather
than be bought by others,
there's a building backlash to
the record-setting pace of pri-
vate-equity and management-
led takeovers.
The driving issue'is money,
fueled by evidence that buy-
ers are reaping much larger
rewards than shareholders,
thanks to the ability of buyers
to quickly flip their acquisi-
tions at higher prices.
There were a record $409
billion worth of buyouts in
2006, nearly four times the.
total in ,2004, according to
Dealogic. Among the biggest:
a $21 billion deal to take hos-
pital chain HCA Inc. private
and a $15 billion buyout of
pipeline operator Kinder
Morgan Inc.
That dealmaking has got-
ten much attention on Wall
Street, helping to fuel the
market's big gains over the


last six months by pumping
up shares of stocks that could
be potential buyout targets.
But such deals might not
be as sweet as they look. Last
year, management-led buyers
paid investors on average
only 21.2 percent above the
stock price the day before
deals were announced, while
private-equity firms paid
about a 22.5 percent premi-
um. That was below the near-
ly 25 percent premium that
investors got through a.
strategic merger or acquisi-
tion, according to Dealogic.
Investors are also troubled
that some of the newly
acquired companies weren't
private for long. Instead, they
were quickly sold back to the
public, without undergoing
major restructuring or opera-
tional changes. And in the
process, the new buyers lav-
ished themselves with
tremendous payouts4,:..
The poster-child of such
tactics is Hertz, the car rental
company that was sold by
Ford Motor Co. to Clayton,
Dubilier & Rice Inc., The
Carlyle Group and Merrill
Lynch. They paid $2.3 billion
in cash, borrowed more than
$3 billion and assumed $10
billion in debt to acquire
Hertz in the fall of 2005.
Hertz took on more debt to
pay its new owners about $1
billion in dividends. Then, the


lists her


priorities

By BRENT KALLESTAD
Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE - Three
weeks into her new job as
Florida's chief financial offi-
cer - most of it focused on
the Legislature's special ses-
sion on homeowners insur-
ance rates - Alex Sink said
Friday she now wants to help
people understand the extra
risks they could face under
the new law. pm
Sink, 58, broke the
Republican lock on the exec-
utive branch with her victory
over former Senate
President Tom Lee in
November and joins Gov. LI
Charlie Crist and Attorney
General Bill McCollum as At State
the new members handling dedicate<
Cabinet issues along with for you a
holdover Agriculture of you, t,
Commissioner Charles
Bronson. Sink is the only
Democrat on the panel.
And with a new cast, Sink
believes Floridians will bene- "
fit from fresh leadership.
The former banking exec-
utive was one of the most
cautious officials during the Ken Cox
recent special session when 742 SE Baya D
lawmakers changed laws Lake City, FL
aimed at forcing lower insur- 386-752-7665
ance rates.
"A real balancing act (is) LIKE
going on," she said in an LIKE
interview with The
S latOf-ln Mutod Atonu l
Associated Press. "Providing ,MO, ?,
relief ... but not mortgaging
our future." O


proceeds from its November
IPO were used to pay that
debt off and to give the pri-
vate-equity owners another
-special dividend worth about
$400 million. They also own
216 million shares, which are
worth about $3.8 billion
today.
There is a growing resist-
ance to such deals.
"In light of several high-
profile 'quick flips,' public
shareholders can't help but
wonder whether they are
leaving money on the table,"
said Chris Young, who heads
merger and acquisition
research at the proxy adviso-
ry firm Institutional
Shareholder Services.
An independent committee
of directors at Cablevision
Systems Corp. rejected a $30
a share offer from the con-
trolling Dolan family to take
the New York cable TV opera-
tor private. The family -
which owns about 20 percent
of the company but controls
70 percent of the shareholder
voting power - had made a
previous bid of $27 a share in
October, and then raised its
offer on Jan. 12.
In a letter to the Dolans,
the directors said the new
stock offer valued at $8.9 bil-
lion wouldn't be in the best
interest of shareholders and
didn't reflect the fair value of
the company.


qf love alone could have saved you,
Sou never would have died.
, n life we loved you dearly.
GIn death we Cove you stiff.
qn our hearts you hold a place
Cqo one else can fill.
qt broke our hearts to lose you
But fyou didn't go alone.
57or part of us went with you.
9he day God took you home.

)our Loving Family,
NMargaret, Gran, Michel
& Sister Rosemarie


MARKET REPORT


13,000


Jan.26,2007

Dow Jones

industrials


W


-15.54


12,487.02


Pct. change High
from previous: -0.12 12,539.09


OCT NOV DEC JAN


Low
12,431.34


-12,500

-12,000


11,500

11,000


Record high close: 12,621.77
Jan.24, 2007


STOCK MARKET INDEXES
52-Week YTD 12-mo
High Low Name Last Chg %Chg %Chg %Chg
12,623.45 10,666.35 Dow Industrials 12,487.02 -15.54 -.12 +.19 +14.48
5,013.67 4,123.17 Dow Transportation 4,713.01 -41.85 -.88 +3.35 +9.36
462.88 380.97 Dow Utilities 451.70 +1.08 +.24 -1.11 +8.56
9,268.74 7,708.11 NYSE Composite 9,154.10 -.56 -.01 +.17 +13.07
2,096.43 1,770.48 , Amex Market Value 2,087.36 +12.06 +.58 +1.50 +14.42
2,508.93 2,012.78 Nasdaq Composite 2,435.49 +1.25 +.05 +.84 +5.70
1,440.69 1,219.29 S&P 500 1,422.18 -1.72 -.12 +.27 +10.79
826.95 710.53 S&P MidCap 819.28 +2.05 +.25 +1.85 +5.68
801.01 668.58 Russell 2000 788.14 +3.95 +.50 +.06 +7.64
14,523.36 12,249.90 Wilshire 5000 14,354.90 -3.77 -.03 +.68 +10.73

STOCK EXCHANGE HIGHLIGHTS

3 NYSE A AMEX ANASDAQ
9,154.10 -.56 2,087.36 +12.06 2,435.49 +1.25


GAINERS ($2 on MORE)
Name Last Chg %Chg
Novelis 37.30 +7.17 +23.8
MEMC 52.21 +8.59 +19.7
TrinaSoln 27.30 +3.90 +16.7
IntRect 42.37 +4.74 +12.6
Chemtura 11.15 +1.20 +12.1
TempurP 23.38 +2.29 +10.9
NBTY 51.35 +4.61 +9.9
MidwGm 6.82 +.57 +9.1
KindredH 28.58 +2.18 +8.3
LaBrnch 9.73 +.73 .+8.1

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)
Name Last Chg %Chg
Technitd 21.75 -4.16 -16.1
OcwenFn 14.26 -2.26 -13.7
CashAm 40.10 -4.04 -9.2
WDigitlIlf 19.11 -1.69 -8.1
Emulex 17.48 -1.30 -6.9
EmergBio n 15.84 -1.07 -6.3
Harman 95.90 -5.95 -5.8
Willbros 19.67 -1.16 -5.6
HuttigBId 5.43 -.29 -5.1
DoralFin 2.47 -.13 -5.0

MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)
Name Vol(00) Last Chg
FordM 534122 8.42 +20
Hallibtn s 375683 29.15 -.59
CntwdFn 368116 42.00 +1.71
Pfizer 293410 26.29 -.07
AMD 285573 16.22 +17
Motorola 278652 18.38 -.21
EMCCp 261024 13.74 -.23
GenElec 257546 36.07 -.27
AT&T Inc 242831 36.40 -.39
Texinst 236015 31.02 +.55
DIARY
Advanced 1,915
Declined 1,375
Unchanged 155
Total issues 3,445
New Highs 123
New Lows 22
Volume 2,678,463,400


Name Ex Div YId PE Last


AT&T Inc
Alltel
Apple Inc
AutoZone
BkofAm
BobEvn
CNBFnPA
CSXs
ChmpE
hevron
Cisco
DocaCI
ColBgp
Conexant
CntwdFn
Delhaize
DollarG
FPL Grp
amDir If
ordM
GenElec
lallibtn s


NY 1.42
NY .50
Nasd ..
NY
NY 2.24
Nasd .56
Nasd .60
NY .40
NY
Nasd ...
NY 1.24
NY .75
Nasd ...
NY .60
NY 1.54
NY .20
NY 1.50
NY .46
NY
NY 1.12
NY .30


GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)
Name Last Chg %Chg
Signalife 2.10 +.22 +11.7
IntrSrch n 2.65 +.25 +10.4
OverhillF 4.85 +.45 +10.2
TiensBio 6.25 +.54 +9.5
Polyairg 2.18 +.18 +9.0
Cormtegn 2.61 +.18 +7.4
VendingDh 2.18 +.15 +7.4
Memory 2.30 +.15 +7.0
IntegBioPh 7.17 +.43 +6.4
EvgmE nya 10.49 +.60 +6.1

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)
Name Last Chg %Chg
AmCareS n 2.06 -.27 -11.6
EnovaSys n 3.85 -.42 -9.8
GeoGlobal 5.62 -.45 -7.4
BirchMt g 2.37 -.16 -6.3
DebtResn 3.90 -.22 -5.3
CycleCtry 2.00 -.11 -5.2
Arhyth 28.85 -1.50 -4.9
HooperH 3.32 -.17 -4.9
Aspyra 2.01 -.10 -4.7
CKX Lands 13.25 -.65 4.7

MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)
Name Vol(00) Last Chg
SPDR 711289142.16 -.10
iShR2K nya479468 78.07 +.29
SemiHTr 175705 33.82 +.27
SPEnrgy 146441 56.85 +.14
iShEmMkt 98074113.19 +.69
DJIA Diam 96173124.77 -.20
SP Fncl 90896 36.82 +.07
OilSvHT 90389132.50 -.77
PrUShQQQ n6437253.74 +.52
iSh EAFE 60655 73.38 +.14
DIARY
Advanced f573
Declined 486
Unchanged 91
Total issues 1,150
New Highs 26
New Lows 19
Volume 348,857,345


36.40 -.39 +1.8
61.37 +.05 +1.5
65.38 -.87 +.6
124.75 +.31 +8.0
52.04 -.36 -2.5
33.38 +.18 -2.5
14.59 +.01 +2.9
35.31 -.65 +2.6
7.92 -.21 -15.4
71.50 -.02 -2.8
26.35 +.13 . -3.6
47.83 -.11 -.9
24.30 -.01 -5.6
1.80 -.21 -11.8
42.00 +1.71 -1.1
82.44 +.84 -1.0
16.73 +.06 +4.8
56.00 +.59 +2.9
31.18 -.12 +6.3
8.42 +.20 +12.1
36.07 -.27 -3.1
29.15 -.59 -6.1


GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)
Name Last Chg %Chg
Zanett 2.10 +.74 +54.4
Local.corm 4.62 +1.47 +46.7
Abaxis 20.57 +3.57 +21.0
CivitasBk n 9.60 +1.60 +20.0
CoastFin 8.32 +1.10 +15.2
VistaPrt 41.45 +5.14 +14.2
Newtek 2.25 +.25 +12.5
Expedia wtl 2.00 +.22 +12.4
CybrSrce 13.45 +1.45 +12.1
Urologix 3.18 +.33 +11.6

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)
Name Last Chg %Chg
LECG 14.13 -4.24 -23.1
LogicDev 2.14 -.47 -18.0
PLXTch 10.10 -1.53 -13.2
Synaptics 27.13 -3.52 -11.5
Aptimus 4.42 -.53 -10.7
MartenT 14.88 -1.72 -10.4
CDWCorp 64.58 -6.17 -8.7
PhNetDev 20.32 -1.74 -7.9
AvalonPh 3.75 -.32 -7.8
ApplRecyn 2.42 -.20 -7.6

MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)
Name Vol(00) Last Chg
Nasd100Tr141165943.57 -.16
Microsoft 934432 30.60 +.15
Cisco 641370 26.35 +.13
Intel 610041 20.53 -.07
Conexant 458928 1.80 -.21
Levet3 438384 6.32 +.15
SunMicro 423315 6.33 -.01
Oracle 358568 17.15 +17
Apple Inc 349550 85.38 -.87
eBay 311040 31.65 -.80
DIARY
Advanced 1,781
Declined 1,209
Unchanged 159
Total issues 3,149
New Highs 80
New Lows 43
Volume 2,036,696,919


YTD YTD
Chg%Chg Name Ex Div YId PE Last Chg%Chg


HomeDp NY .90
*iShR2K nya Amex .84
Intel Nasd .45
Level3 Nasd ...
Lowess NY .20
McDnlds NY 1.00
Microsoft Nasd .40
Nasd100Tr Nasd .13
NY Times NY .70
NobltyH Nasd .50
OcciPets NY .88
Oracle Nasd
Penney NY .72
PepsiCo NY 1.20
Potash NY .60
Ryder NY .72
SearsHIdgs Nasd
SouthnCo NY 1.55
SPDR Amex 2.45
SunMicro Nasd
TimeWam NY .22
WalMart NY .67


14 39.94
... 78.07
24 20.53
... 6.32
16 32.58
15 42.93
26 30.60
... 43.57
19 22.90
15 23.20
9 45.64
25 17.15
16 81.06
22 64.45
25 147.80
14 52.92
21 175.16
18 36.39
... 142.16
S 6.33
15 21.82
18 47.67


-.15 -.5
+.29 +.1
-.07 +1.4
+.15 +12.9
-.50 +4.6
-.07 -3.2
+.15 +2.5
-.16 +.9
-.04 -6.0
-.05 -12.7
+24 -6.5
+.17 +.1
-.81 +4.8
+.03 +3.0
+3.96 +3.0
-.44 +3.6
-.36 +4.3
-.36 -1.3
-.10 +.4
-.01 +16.8
-.22 +.2
-.48 +3.2


MONEY RATES CURRENCIES
Last Pvs Week Last Pvs Day
Prime Rate 8.25 8.25 Australia 1.2941 1.2927
Discount Rate 6.25 6.25 Britain 1.9588 1.9641
Federal Funds Rate 5.25 5.25 Canada 1.1805 1.1813
Treasuries 5.00 Euro .7746 .7735
3-month 5.00 5.0 Japan 121.58 121.11
6-month 5.00 497 Mexico 11.0593 11.0277
5-year 4.87 478
10-year 4.87 478 Switzerlnd 1.2537 1.2486
30-year 4.97 4.87 British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All others show
Dollar in foreign currency.

MUTUAL FUNDS
Total Assets Total Return/Rank PctMin Init
Name Obj ($Mlns) NAV 4-wk 12-mo 5-year Load Invt
American Funds A: GwthAp XG 83,868 33.02 +0.7 +7.1/B +51.2/A 5.75 250
American FundsA:ICAAp LV 74,180 33.61 +0.6 +13.1/E +49.3/B 5.75 250
Vanguard Idx Fds: 500 SP 72,012 131.04 +0.5 +13.6/A +36.4/A NL 3,000
RFidelity Invest: Contra XG 68,565 65.81 +1.3 +8.0/B +76.1/A NL 2,500
American Funds A:WshA p LV 68,455 34.88 +0.2 +15.5/C +44.5/C 5.75 250
Dodge&Cox:Stock LV 66,185 154.44 +0.7 +15.0/C +85.7/A NL 2,500
American Funds A:CaplBA p BL 63,189 60.91 +0.8 +18.8/A +84.1/A 5.75 250
American FundsA:CapWGAp GL 62,557 41.93 +1.2 +18.2/B +118.1/A 5.75 250
American Funds A: lncoA p BL 60,592 20.37 +0.7 +17.9/A +68.6/A 5.75 250
PIMCOInstilPIMS:TotRI IB 60,280 10.29 -1.1 +3.2/E +29.0/A NL 5,000,000
American Funds A: EupacAp IL 56,108 46.46 +1.1 +16.1/D +107.0/C 5.75 250
Fidelity Invest: Divintl IL 47,341 36.88 +1.0 +15.5/D +127.5/B NL 2,500
Vanguard Admiral: 500Adml SP 46,466 131.05 +0.5 +13.7/A +36.9/A NL 100,000
Vanguard Inst Fds: Instldx SP 45,243 130.05 +0.5 +13.8/A +37.3/A NL 5,000,000
Fidelity Invest: Magelln LG 44,962 91.11 +2.0 +5.3/C +21.7/B NL 2,500
American Funds A: N PerA p GL 43,568 31.66 +0.6 +14.6/C +77.9/C 5.75 250
Fidelity Invest: LowP r MV 39,339 43.56 +0.5 +11.5/D +105.4/A NL 2,500
Vanguard Idx Fds: TotStk XC 39,095 34.30 +0.7 +13.0/B +45.6/C NL 3,000
American Funds A: BalAp BL 35,431 19.02 +0.1 +10.2/B +44.3/B 5.75 250
American Funds A: FdinvAp LV 32,186 40.15 +0.8 +13.8/D +69.9/A 5.75 250
Vanguard Fds: Wndsll LV 31,568 34.78 +0.2 +16.2/B +64.7/A NL 10,000
DdeiCox:IntlUSk IL 30,899 43.99 +1.9 +22.4/A +161.5/A NL 2,500
Fidelity Invest: Eq Inc El 30,628 58.63 +0.3 +16.6/B +53.5/C NL 2,500
Fidelity Invest: GroInc LC 30,213 31.04 -0.2 +8.3/E +22.5/D NL 2,500
Fidelity Invest: GroCo XG 30,069 70.22 +0.8 +6.2/C +37.4/B NL 2,500
Vanguard Fds: Weltn BL 29,675 32.34 -0.2 +12.1/A +52.9/A NL 10,000
Frank/lemp FirrkA: IncomAp BL 29,629 2.67 +0.8 +17.5/A +76.6/A 4.25 1,000
Dodge&Cox: Balanced BL 27,457 87.41 +0.4 +11.5/A +67.7/A NL 2,500
Frank/Temp Temp A:GrwthAp GL 27,120 25.72 +0.8 +18.4/B +88.9/B 5.75 1,000
Davis Funds A:NYVenA LC 27,035 38.63 +0.2 +13.2/B +60.6/A 4.75 1,000
Vanguard Admiral: TStkAdm XC 26,852 34.30 +0.7 +13.1/B +46.1/B NL 100,000
Fidelity Invest: Puritn BL 25,809 19.99 +0.2 +12.7/A +48.6/A NL 2,500
Vanguard Idx Fds: TotBnd IB 23,769 9.91 -0.8 +3.9/C +24.1/C NL 3,000
Fidelity Invest: Balanc BL 22,439 19.54 +0.6 +8.6/C +62.2/A NL 2,500
Vanguard Fds: Prmcpr XC 22,371 69.64 +1.1 48.9/1) +53.8/B NL 25,000
Fidelity Spartan: Eqkldnx SP 22,358 50.36 +0.5 +13.7/A +36.5/A NL 100,000
Price Funds: EqInc El 2,999 29.63 +0.4 +16.5/B +57.5/B NL 2,500
American Funds A: BondAp AS 20,670 1326 -0.4 +52/A +35.6/A 3.75 250
Fidelity Invest: BlueChGr LG 20,649 44.56 +0.7 +4.5/C +10.8/0 NL 2,500
Vanguard Insu Fds: InsPI SP 20,294 130.05 +05 +13.8/A +37.4/A NL200,000,000
Vanguard kx Fds: Totni L 20,069 17.70 +0. +19.7/B +119.4B NL 3,000
PIMCOAdminPIMS:ToaRMd B 19,W77 10.29 -1.1 +3.0E +27.4/B NL 5,000,000
Vanguadikx Fds:Europe EU 18,4O 36.12 49 +25.7/C +110.00) NL 3,000
BL -Balanced, El -Equly lnc, -Em.rgj g ht, GL -G.U Sock, GM -Gun. Muni. B -int4nd. Bond, IL.
Intlumaonid S!xtk,. LC -wg Com LG .-gi Gm t^, LV -M. MP -StochBond Bleind, MT
-Modgage, S8 -Slord-Tim iOd. SP -SP s00, SS - S*b Muni. XC 4hC Core, XG -MuliCap
Growth,. XV 4&64Ca V4 L o HbR1 Chig NNA u &1 1ad0d Oin fkd. R How hknd peIonned vs.
offers wh mi ao w A is itop20%, E in bom 20%. Mn nr kit Miumn $ nwedudo invest in fud.
NA. No W nl. NEO . in qmlLon. NS Fuda not In e- eo. SeUce: Upper, Inc.



sMh"e4dIOiK eNeV maNtreI�IIII.��lbpluli�tdlls p-p.paFd su�m�rbu >pay dpitibulloncosts.
l I A OW .l*.m mustbe worthat leW$1.W".naIn.


STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST


I


-


,V =


Page Editor: Christine Davenport, 754-0429


e A









Page Editor: Christine Davenport, 754-0429


6A . LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE SATURDAY, JANUARY 27, 2007


COMMUNITY CALEN
.4 6. 46. I L E .4


* To submit your
Community Calendar
item, contact Christine
Davenport at 754-0429
or by email at cdaven-
port@
lakecity reporter, corn.


Announcements


Violence and rape crisis
center offers support
Another Way, Inc. the local
domestic violence and rape
crisis center has a support
group for survivors of domestic
violence and their children from
5:30 to 7 p.m. every Thursday.
If interested call Susan at
Another Way, Inc. at 719-2700
for the location. Women and
children only.

Fashionistas wanted
for Currents magazine
Do your children raid your
closet to borrow clothes you
wore in the '70s? Do you know a
girl who wears leggings and mini
skirts similar to those Madonna
wore in the '80s? Currents
magazine, a publication of the
Lake City Reporter, is working on
a story about retro fashion and
how styles seem to
resurface. If you have an eye for
fashion or simply enjoy
discussing new and old trends,
call Lindsay Downey at
754-0423 or e-mail
Idowney@lakecityreporter.com.


Getting the news
C CCLr ofl laC Memorabilia


to celebrate anniversary
Help celebrate LCCC's 60th
anniversary (1947-2007).
If you have any type of
mer�orabilia you would like to
donate: Photographs, yearbooks,
lit.-: ary journals, graduation
piegrams, etc. contact
i . irperson Sean McMahon,
. .CCC history professor,
754-4293, e-mail
mcmahons @lakecitycc. edu.

Crossover Correction to
CMS training offered
Lake City Community College
will offer training in the Crossover
Correction to CMS Law
Enforcement tentatively
beginning Feb. 12.
There will be a scheduled
meeting at 6 p.m. on Jan. 22 in
the' Lancaster Site Office - CR
341 across from the Lancaster
Correctional Work Camp iri
Trenton.
Those interested in attending
this training must attend this
meeting to receive all the
information concerning cost,
scheduling, etc.
For more information call
(352) 463-4353 between 9 a.m.
and 1 p.m. Monday-Friday, after
hours leave a message.

Habitat for Humanity
seeks family for home
Habitat for Humanity is looking
for a family for its second home.
The applicant must live in
substandard housing in
Columbia County, have a
verifiable source of income,
appropriate credit to qualify for a
20 year, no interest loan and put
at least 300 hours of sweat
equity into the home building
process. To apply, pick up an
application at the Columbia
County Public Library downtown,
download an application from the
web site at www.hfhlakecity.org
or call 755-0014 and leave a
message as to when to be
contacted.

Pregnancy Crisis Center
now taking volunteers
The Pregnancy Crisis Center
is now accepting applications
for volunteers to donate four
hours (or more) of their time per
week at the Lake City location.
No experience is needed,
training is provided.
The center is located at 227
SW Columbia Ave., one block
West from the Greyhound Bus
Depot, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.Monday
through Friday, 755-0058.

Singles meetings take
place every Friday
Live Oak singles meetings
take place from 7 to 10 p.m.
Friday at St. Luke's Church in
Live Oak, across from the
Coliseum. For more information,
call Jim at 935-0422, Just at 362-
4448 or Anna at 963-5774.

Kids Club planned
for every Saturday
The Great Lake City
Community Development
Corporation, Inc., 363 NW
Bascoi Norris Drive, Lake City
will ha"' a Saturday Morning
Kids Clihih from 10 a.m. to noon
every Saturday.
For more information, call
Calandra Wise at 752-9785.


Mikel Gray, 6, grabs a newspaper
Thursday afternoon.
Home education students
eligible for state testing
Home Education students are
eligible to take state mandated
assessment tests with the
Columbia County School District
at no charge.
If interested in participating in
this administration, call the Home
Education office at 758-4935 on
or before Jan. 26.

Tae Kwan Do
classes continue
The Lake City-Columbia
County Parks and Recreation
Department continues to offer
classes in Tae Kwan Do.
These classes meet on
Monday and Wednesday rights
from 6:30 to 8 p.m: and'are open
, to anyone, ages 8 and above.
The cost is $40 per month. For
more information, call Heyward
Christie at 758-5448.

Graduate candidates
list being developed
The LakeCity Ciommunity
College public information office
is developing a list of LCCC
"family graduate candidates" for
publication in the 60th
Anniversary Catalog 2007-08
(similar to the 2006-07 catalogs).
Send any names of people you
know, including extended
families (i.e., grandmothers,
nieces, nephews,
husbands/wives, blended
families, etc.) that graduated at
any time from the college.
If you have phone numbers,
include them. Know that if your
submissions are not pictured in
this year's catalog, their names
will be saved for future issues.
Candidates are selected by a
college committee.
Call 754-4247 or 754-4248
(leave message); or e-mail
yarbroughs@lakecitycc.edu.

Program registration
runs through Feb. 1
The Boys Club of Columbia
County is taking registrations for
the winter program which will run
through Feb. 1. All boys and girls
age 6-14 are eligible to attend.
Club hours are from 2 to 6 p.m.
Bus pickup from all schools
daily by Suwannee Valley Transit
for $75. Fees for the period are
$100. For more information, call
752-4184.

Today
Birchard to speak
every today
To enrich the experience of
visitors coming to the Lake
City-Columbia County
Historical Museum to see the
Turpentine Exhibit, Everett
Birchard will speak about it at
11 a.m. and 1 p.m. every
today through the end of
January.
For more
information, call 755-9096.

Riding Club banquet
set for today
Columbia County Riding
Club will have its second
annual banquet and
membership drive at 4 p.m.


out of the rack in front of the Lake City Reporter office in Lake City


today at the Mason City
Community Center.
R.S.V.P. to Mike Cox at
(386) 623-4218 or Tom
Handwood at 965-0410.
New members welcome.
Please bring a covered dish.

English language
workshop Saturday
The Literacy Program of the
Columbia County Public
Library is taking registration for
the English as a second
language tutor training
workshop on Saturday. The
workshop will be held at the
main library 308 NW Columbia
Ave. If you are
interested in helping
newcomers from around the
world develop their English
skills, call the literacy
coordinator at 758-2111 to
register for the tutor training.

Coming Up
15th Annual Policemen's
Charity Ball to take place
The 15th Annual
Policemen's Charity Ball will
be held at 8 p.m. Feb. 10 at
Southern' Oaks Golf Club. The
theme is "A 70s Celebration."
Reserved tables and individual
tickets are now on sale.
Sponsorship of the event,
which supports CARC and
Happy House, are also
available.
For information, call Carol or
Alice at CARC at 752-1880 or


Erin at the Lake City Police
Dept. at 758-5484.

Newcomers meeting
set for Feb. 14
The regular monthly
meeting of the Lake City
' Newcomers Club will be at 11
a.m. Feb. 14. Luncheon cost is
$10. The meeting will be held at
the Guangdong restaurant
located in the Lake City Mall.
The program will be presented
by the "Four Valentines" coral
group from Lake City Community
,College. All members, guests
and friends are invited.
For more information, call
752-4552.

Program planned to help
adults with diabetes
Columbia County Extension is
now offering an educational
program to help adults with type
2 diabetes control their blood
sugar, to feel better and reduce
risk of health complications. The
program will include nine classes
taught by a team of qualified
educators and health
professionals and a personal
90-minute consolation with a
registered dietitian. Health
assessments (height, weight and
blood pressure measurements
are included). Classes will run
from 4 to 6 p.m. Thursday to
March 15.
The program is now
recruiting participants for this
program. People with type
2 Diabetes, are at least 21 years


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HOME CARE


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the right answerforyou.
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MORTGAGE


Frank
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Reverse Mortgage
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old and are interested in being a
part of this program, call the
Extension office at 752-5384 to
get more
information or to register.
Registration must be received
by Jan. 12. The $75 program fee
includes the educational classes,
nutrition consultation, program
materials and health
assessments.
Friendship luncheon
planned for Feb. 7
The February Friendship
Luncheon of the Lake City
Newcomers Club will be held
on Feb. 7 at 11:30 a.m. It will
be held at Mikes Out To
Lunch, located at 426 SW
Commerce Blvd. All members,
friends and guests are
welcome.
For more information,
please call 752-4552.

Science and Engineering
Fair set for Feb. 14-15
The Suwannee Valley
Regional Science and
Engineering Fair will also be
held at Lake City Community
College Feb. 14-15.
The region is comprised of
10 counties: Baker, Bradford,
Columbia, Dixie, Gilchrist,
Hamilton, Lafayette, Madison,
Suwannee, and Union.
Judging of the projects will
take place from 9 a.m. to
3 p.m. Feb. 14.
Open house for the
community will also take place
from 3 p.m.-6 p.m. Feb. 14.
The awards ceremony will
be at 10 a.m.Feb. 15 in the
Levy Performing Arts Center at
LCCC.
The winners will advance to
the State Science and
Engineering Fair held in Fort
Myers, at Florida Gulf Coast
University on April 11.
The 2007 Intel International
Science and Engineering Fair


c6ympa, /-Y' 1d&


To Those I Love
When I an gone, release me, let me go
I have so many things to see and do
You mustn't tie yourself to me with tears
Be happy that we had so many years.
I gave you my love. You can only guess
How much you gave to me in happiness
I thank you for the love you have shown
But now it's time I traveled on alone.
So grieve awhile for me if grieve you must

We miss you, f
Anne, Laura, Patsy, Fr


will be held in Albuquerque,
N.M., May 13-19.

Positive Parenting
Program set for Feb. 8
The Columbia County
School System invites parents
in all stages of child rearing to
attend a Free Positive
Parenting Program, Feb. 8 at
the School Board
Administrative Complex.
This program presented by,
'Mr. Happy' Jim Atkinson, will
focus on:
The Importance of Attitude,
Building Strong Self-Esteem,
The Power of Positive
Communication and Setting
and Reaching Desirable Goals
A morning presentation
will be offered from 10 am
to noon.
The evening presentation
will be from 6:30 to 8 pm.
Free Child care will be
provided for the evening
session only.
To register for evening
childcare, or for more
information contact the
schools or Tina Roberts
at 758-4872.

State-of-the-School visit
to take place Wednesday
As a part of the State-of-the
School visits, Columbia County
School Board members and
Superintendent Sam Markham
will visit Five Points Elementary
School at 10 a.m. on
Wednesday.

CHS class of '75
reunion to take place
Columbia High School's
Class of 1972 35th Year
Reunion will be June 30 at the
Spirit of Suwannee in Live Oak.
For more information, call
George H. Hudson Jr. at
755-0630.


(d2i2ce'rsland/;ny


Then let your grief be comforted by trust
It's only for a while that we must part
So bless the memories with your heart.
I won't be far away, for life goes on
So if you need me, call and I will come
Though you can't see or touch me, I'll be near
And if you listen with your heart, you'll hear
All of my love around you soft and clear.
And then, when you must come this way alone
I'll greet ou with a smile, and welcome you home.
Anonymous
from your children:
Sannie, G.B., Richard &'Jim.


NOW OPEN

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SOysters -
Frog Legs
Quail

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Mon,-Sat. 10-8
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'p ,L
JALA HARRIS/Lake City Reporter
A& lai ** I I


We are here offering

comfort & assistance in

your time of grief. BrenWilson
SPre-Need Counselor
Gateway-Forest Lawn Funeral Home
Ted L. Guerry Sr., LFD. & Brad Wheeler., .F.D., Owners
3596 ,South Hvc, 441 * Lake Cir, Florida 32025* (386) 752-1i954


STONNJA MILLIGAN-TOMLIN
January 22. 1967-January 21, 2002
. CHS CLASS OF 1985


" A mother, wife, daughter, sister,
^ school teacher and angel.

S"To be absent in the body is to be
present with the Lord."


( ni/WovusWeiet y4
4w,. -u t


In Loving Memory of


ELLEN RYAN RYKARD








LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SATURDAY, JANUARY 27, 2007


LUNCHEON: Helps to kick off fundraiser campaign


Continued From Page 1A

Senior Services currently
needs to raise about $605,000
to complete phase one of the
center's construction, which
includes a kitchen, a dark-
room, a wood workshop, an art
classroom, an exercise room
and a small dementia day care.
Beaty said she is most excit-
ed about the Lifestyle
Enrichment Center's heated
pool for arthritic therapy and
general exercise, which is
scheduled to be built during the
third phase of construction.
"I hope I live long enough to
use the swimming pool," Beaty
said. "If I do, I'll be in it five
days a week."
Mary Francis Harrell, 91,
said she's thrilled the Lifestyle
Enrichment Center will offer
activities both she and younger
seniors can participate in.
"I think it's simply awesome,"


Harrell said as she ate lunch in
the sunlit, cultural and dining
hall. "Lake City is most fortu-
nate to have a center like this."
Howard Ellsperman, 88,
said he hopes to spend time in
the center's wood workshop
when it is completed.
Ellsperman, who moved from
Cape Coral to Lake City about
four months ago, said the
under-construction Lifestyle
Enrichment Center surpasses
the senior center in his previ-
ous city, which has a popula-
tion nearly 13 times that of
Lake City, according to the
2005 U.S. Census Bureau.
Constructing a state-of-the-
art senior center in Lake City
will entice more people to
move to Columbia County,
said capital campaign member
Dr. Debbie Griffin.
"This is a huge diamond to


attract people," Griffin said.
'To me, that's huge to keep
the community growing."
Even people who are not yet
old enough to utilize the cen-
ter, which will serve people 60
and older, will appreciate the
role it may play in their future,
Senior Services Executive
Director Debby Freeman said.
"If it's not our parents it's
going to be us," she said.
Several individuals and
organizations made
announcements of donations
to the center while people ate
lunch and listened to the
music of Harry Wuest and his
jazz ensemble.
Baya Pharmacy owners Carl
and Joan Allison, who donated
5.23 acres of land for the
Lifestyle Enrichment Center,
were recognized during the
event. Griffin, who owns


Hearing Solutions, Inc., was
honored for the Audio Loop
System she recently donated
to the center. The audio sys-
tem will allow anyone with a
hearing aid to hear through a
PA system when they're at the
senior center.
First Federal Savings Bank
of Florida President Keith
Leibfried urged people who
attended the kickoff to take
advantage of naming opportu-
nities for the Lifestyle
Enrichment Center.
"We all owe a responsibility
to these people," Leibfried said
of the seniors. '"They've pro-
vided us with a lot of wisdom
and they have a lot to offer.
"It's not all about money,
but money's what we need
right now," he said. "Let's hope
our hearts will open up our
pocketbooks."


FIRE: Nearly destroyed all of victim's mobile home
Continued From Page 1A


'The house is definitely
unlivable," said Don Wilson,
Lake City Fire Department
driver/engineer and public
education coordinator.
Wilson said Armstrong has
been living with relatives in
Columbia and Alachua coun-
ties as a result of the fire and
her medical needs.
The fire department is col-
lecting clothing and financial
donations for Armstrong as
she recovers from the fire.
Armstrong needs size 18
pants, extra-large blouses and
size 9 shoes.
"Right now we're asking for
financial donations and we're\
raising clothes for her," Wilson
said, as he noted personal
hygiene contributions were
also needed.
"Right now we're not taking
anything like household items
until she's gets a place to live,"
Wilson said.
In the meantime a group of
Columbia High School JROTC
cadets are pitching in to help
Armstrong.
"We have a group of approxi-
mately nine students coming
from the Columbia High School
JROTC department who will
come out today (Saturday) and
assist us in helping try to salvage
any belongings that are salvage-
able," Wilson said. "One of the


Nearly the entire structure of what once was June Armstrong's mobile home was destroyed by a fire
Monday afternoon.


home's front rooms has some
books and things like that and
we are going to try to get that
stuff out for her."
With the help of the stu-
dents, Wilson said the recov-
ery efforts should take about
two or three hours.


Wilson cautioned other local
residents to use extreme caution
while using space heaters dur-
ing this weekend's cold snap.
Financial donations can be
mailed to:
Lake City Fire Department,
Attn: Armstrong Family, 225


NW Main Blvd. Suite 101,
Lake City, FL 32055. The cloth-
ing donations can also be
taken to the Lake City Fire
Department's Station 1 at the
above location.
Armstrong can be contacted
at (352) 317-8135.


NOVEL: By local attorney deals with real-life incident


Continued From Page 1A
and Thomas Krauss, the
reporter covering the story for
the Tampa Tribune. Kelley,
however, said his book is a fic-
tionalized account of the inci-
dent. Not only did he use ficti-
tious names, but also changed
some facts slightly since he
had finished the novel before


the trial took place.
"I waited to submit the book
until after the case was conclud-
ed and included an epilogue to
let readers know what had hap-
pened in real life to the person
on whom the book was based,"
Kelley said. "I like to write
books on things that could actu-


ally happen to people - more
realistic, less sensational."
The title of the book is a term
of art coming from the Catholic
church. Kelley said in the middle
ages, - the plenary indulgences
were bought meaning people
would buy their way to heaven.
"I had to end the book with-


out knowing what the real end-
ing would be," Kelley said. "I
created an ending that I hope
readers would find interesting.
It's an unusual ending."
"A Plenary Indulgence" is
available at Goerings, and
Booklovers Club in Gainesville
or by calling (800) AUTHORS.


ENERGY: Parents urged to use caution with drinks


Continued From Page 1A
"These are being marketed
toward children," he said,
adding that adults usually turn
to coffee for their caffeine
kick, not energy drinks.
The Columbia County
Sheriff's Office and Lake City
Police Department both
reported no problems with the
new drinks and Special Agent
Betty Adazzio with the
Division of Alcoholic
Beverages and Tobacco said
surveys performed by her
agency haven't indicated any
real problems either.
Columbia County Sheriff
Bill Gootee said that agencies
in the area want to take a
proactive step against these
new beverages and feedback
from his school resource offi-
cers in county schools have
noted that students are aware
of the alcoholic energy drinks.
"We want parents to know
what their kids are drinking,"
Gootee said.
Selling alcohol to a minor is a
second-degree misdemeanor.
In most convenience stores,
normal energy drinks and
alcoholic energy drinks are
separated, with the alcoholic
ones being kept with canned
and bottled beers. The two dif-
ferent drinks come in similar
containers.
Some retailers have decided
to stop carrying the alcoholic


energy drinks altogether.
"We pulled them from
stores," said Keith Brown, chief
financial officer for S&S Food
stores. "We had one store
where we had a clerk that sold
one that didn't realize that it


\v


wasn't a regular energy drink."
Brown said S&S higher-ups
pulled samples of all of the
energy drinks, alcoholic and
non-alcoholic ones, and
attempted to compare the two
to see how distinguishable


they were.
'We decided that until the
manufacturers make it a little
clearer for the consumer, and
the clerks that are ringing
them up, we aren't going to
carry them," he said.


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RAMPS: Project under way
Continued From Page 1A

first ramp as part to the 6 Days and was started in September.
6 Ramps project. "This is through the 6 Days
"A group of men from 6 Ramps project through
Christian Heritage Church Volunteer Florida," she said.
and Parkview Baptist Church "I'm doing this in four counties
have volunteered their time and Saturday is Lake City's
and skills, and Albertsons is turn to have a ramp built."
providing the lunch," she said. The Volunteer Florida
In addition to the church Foundation is donating the
groups who have volunteered money for the material for the
the labor, a local contractor money for the materactors and
has also volunteered to help s and the contractors and
has also volunteered to help local citizens are volunteering
"Dave Mangrum of their time to build the ramps.
Mangrum Construction has The ramps will be wooden
volunteered his time to design and built to the standards of
and oversee the construction Chapter 11 of the Florida
of the ramp," Tanca said. Building Code.
Tanca is heading up a four- Anyone wishing to contribute
county Adopt-A-Ramp pro- toward additional ramps in
gram as a grassroots effort to Columbia County or to volun-
build residential wheelchair teer their time to help build
ramps for people in need. The a ramp, can call Tanca at (352)
Adopt-A-Ramp program is new 231-2766 or (800) 265-5724.

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LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE SATURDAY, JANUARY 27, 2007


Tuesday Wednesday


4.1-22


Acts
4.23-37


Thursday Friday
Luke Leviticus
10.25-37 19.1-18


Saturday
Deuteronomy
6.1-9


SC- -ese S ecrvea O'7 PO"c? A -"c -cr" S te A vSo. cry
Cop..riahi 2007 KnelierW\NII,a. rnJewvpaper Ser.'cpe: P 0 Box 8187 Chari.onei'.iile VA 229'16 r.*w kvrie.s; -..'n.


PHlIE I'PE6i ..'_ '.7.7
LI, i M' i i- .'u-,.i "' A .,
O'NEAL
ROOFING COMPANY
ROOFING * INSULATION

GATEWAY FURNITURE SPECIALTIES
DBA Country Oak Wood Works
SPECIALIZING IN SOLID WOOD FOR:
'Custom Built Kitchen Cabinets
*Furniture for every room *Home Accessories
*Toys -Gifts .
Willie Knepp - Owner
* 181 NW Burk Avenue * Lake City, Florida 32055
Phone: 386-758-8005 * Cell: 386-984-6250

Ronsonet
Buick-GMC Truck Inc.
490 E. Duval St (U.S. 90 East)
Lake City, FL 32055
1-386-752-2180

The Plumber
For all your plumbing needs
Top Quality Plumbing at a price that can't be beat.
Commercial * Residential * Licensed * Insured
Lie. # RF11067338
Danny Thomas
Phone:(386)755-9789 * Cell:(386)867-9751



Supercenter
"LOW PRICES EVERYDAY"
US 90 WEST 755-2427 ,


GW Hunter, Inc.
.".e Chevron Oil
Jobber

6; :61~l


Scrappy Paper
Now Open
at
* Rim Rock Village *



FOOD STORES
Open 7 Days a Week
1036 E. Duval St., Lake City FL.
(386) 752-0067
Fresh Meat, Fresh Produce!
" can do all things through Christ which streengheneth me"
Philippin- 4:13

LAKE CITm
CHRISTIAN SUPPLY
216 S.W. Main Blvd.
Lake City, FL 32025
Phone: (386) 754-5775 � Fax: (386) 754-5773
Mon.-Fri. 10-6 / Sat. 10-5
Email: clristbkst@aol.com
. COLUMBIA
i~_-. s READY MIX
g4 O CONCRETE, INC.
COMMERCIAL INDUSTRIAL * RESIDENTIAL
LAKE CITY: 386-755-2458
LIVE OAK: 386-362-4422
www.crmconcrete.com


Illbsolute illness , Inc.
Taking care of your body is a m investment in yourself.
What you get in return is priceless!
Lake City's Only All Women's Complete Fitness Center
386-755-4800 Located in Downtown Lake City

JORDAN'S CONCRETE
Footers * House Floors * Driveways
Shops * Patios * Sidewalks * Additions
QUALITYY WORK AT A FAIR P CE"
4 386-755-4919 -'
Licensed & Insured * FREE ESTIMATES


CHRIST'S ANGLICAN CHURCH
323 :\v Count P;,nad7,,8
Columbia Counry
2i' mi 5uuth of Lake it1v
Sunday 10(101 M
38.-454-18,45
http:l/wwev anglican-fellowship org
Pistuor. Ret Claudia kalis

FAITH IN CHRIST ANGLICAN CHURCH
9117 90 Wes,it. 1ilest Weo[l i 75
8F,-754.2827
1 Sunday Hoty rnmjr iiurun i" 30 'til
1928' Prar Book
"A Trdinonal Episcopal Church'
Re Don Wilsonr


BEREA BAPTIST CHURCH
SR47 S 75509J00
Sunday School 9.]IJAM
Sunday Worship 10 45AM. '7PMM
Wednesday Ee. Semc'e 7PM
Past, r: Larr E. Seidi

FELLOWSHIP BAPTIST CHURCH
C242 We-[ or C251 West
Sunday SchonlI li) M
Sun. Worship I1AM &i 6PM
Wed. Night Service 7 PM
Nursry Available
Padlor Stephen shawi


FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
"The Place for New Beginningsl"
Pasior. Troy V.rrium
SUNDAY
Bible Study s 15SAM
Morning Worship ]i)0:30AM
Sunday Etening Vurship 6 (10 PM
WEDNESDAY
Famrily Supper ' 30 1)IM
Student M irisi Ni .1(1I PM
Prayer & Bible Srud h 15I PM
Children's Miinisu- i.:15 P1M
2 blocks Fast of IS 44I1 on Hwy 9l)
in Downtuwn LakeCirm *t386752-5422


Gateway Baptist Church
3252 SW SR247, Lake Ca'., FL L32024
3 miles S of HFl 9J on Si ire Ro,-ad 247
386 .755.4447
ugaewayLhurch@hellsutli ni'l
Sunday School 'JUAM
Sunday Morning Serm'k.e I) lOAM
Sunday t-entig Sernce 6 iLIuPMi
Wednesday Prayer Meeting 1i JuPM
Nursery provided [or sen ices
Children and South Prougams

Grace Covenant Baptist Church
4471 JS H sy90West
II mile wesi of'1-75
Sunday Sern ices
Sunday Schol I ItAMI
Worrshtp 0 31oAM
Awvanja ilOPMI
Bible Study 6:00PM
Wednesday Pryer 6:30PM
Pasror: Russell Tay lo
Church Phonr 752-1iib7


MOUNT OLRIE BAPTIST CHURCH
.,314 98'" lertace
14 miles North ,Il W 1ellborn)
3lii 963. 5i.Ut.
Sunday Schedule
Bible Study (all ages 9 451A
Worshiip 11:00A
Bible Drills & Thrills 6:00P1I
(forChildren)
Worship 6:00PI


"It will be worth the drive!"
www.mtolivebaptistchurch.com


4


/I
M


,I
OLIVET M1SSIONARM BAPTIST CHURCH
".41 N I'j F isSvicitee
t. 17:'..i - I'3'- i
Ronald V Wajler,, Paisior
Sunday) School 9:45AMI
Sunday Morning Worship II)00AM
Wed Mid-Wrek Worship 6 0iUPM
"In God s Word. Will & Way

PARKITEW BAPTIST CHURCH
hA NW Lake leffrey Rd * 752-.i681
[-ale Cior. FlondQ C2055

E[ai i \l ir-tup ii 'q
Bible Study 9 1, AJ\I
Morning Worship Ii 00 AM
Evening Worshlp 6 It.) PMi
hed. Etc Schedule
Family Suppefr Reservanorni 5 PM
Youth Worship 5:301 PM
Pra.er Mfeeiring 1 PMI
Pastor Michael A laiem

CELEBRATION COMMUNI I CHURCH
Huy 47 between HF. White & Columbia Cily
Sunday Sernices
Bible StudI' 'W
Wntship 10.1i AM
Wednesday\ EvEling scht dule
AWANA t.i.31l'M
Prayer and Bible StudI 7 PM
lartur. Dick short * 754-1144

HOPEFUL BAPTIST CHURCH
Pasior Rodney Baker
'The Caring Place"
I illo1 HS, letionh CH 25
to CR 245 Pnrce Cietki,
right on P5ire Creek 2 nile' 752-'41 i5
Worship Senv.re 8 11, 8.:451; II AM,
ChildrenL thurth 8 iti & II AM
Suindji,\ S:hri)i l 91 'i) 1
EIeningWoislip 7 PM
WXdneidav,]y :edllc
Fajill Supper i PMI
'i'oudti S .tl e 45 IM
I-itldrens Lhtir i):45 IM
Bible Stud, h 4 f'PM
Nursery Provided

SALENM PRIMIIRE BAPTIST
Sunday Sen ices u'.lii AiM
Paj:itr -lier H inijian Gri lri
"52.4I1

SOU INSIDE BAPTISt CHURCH
iuO E. Bva Avenue
Bible Studv 'J I iM
Sun Mhi' n. Worship lij:311AM
Surida', Ee b I.PI M
Wed 'raier Meereing 1 i. PM


TABERNACI E BAP1IST CHURCH
I[ndependinill BLptisti]
14 Mi .lonrrise hve * 752.r-.74
Sunday School Ii AM
Sun. Morn. Worship IH AM
Sunday Eve. ' . PI
Wed. Prayer Meeting 7 30 PMi
Pastor: Mike Norman


EPIPHANY CATHOLIC CHURCH
19})5SW Epiphani i outw - 7,.44711
aiuifdJay Vigil ij.s 5r UI PM
Sunday Mass 8:15AM, lii . *itM
5:00 PM (Spanish/Englishi '
Sunday School/Religious Edualiin-n
9:00 AM-10:15 AM


LAKE CITY CHRISTIAN CHU
Hwy 247 S. 755-9436
Sunday School 9:
Sun. Morn. Worship 10:
Wed. Prayer Meeting







M 1 l ib , ,c ed. ,
k- ,Mll,1 I[l'e[, L igell
CLA VIEW N CHURCH OF (H
S1iLn4 Inoul Marun SL in 7'i'-
Bible _\ud} lSunda '
Sunday EM ll-Ln
M,-Il Bi- k Bbl-'i iud\ Wed
ltI oiri, t McPeal' . U,,Dige

CENIIRAL CHURCH OF C H


Sun A'Bibl mbl udi
sun. F'rnM .Ahrnpl\
Wd-il Bible Clasiei
MIltr'let' Dr Mihi.ei Il ,si
ultn i liu ti ,l'i:.

LC]I ( 1' CHURCH OF CH
4. E Hwyn7'Sith * 7'52.63
Sun Bibl10 Slud











Pa wr carolitLee
Sill, Fr ir ig W rl-,i p




EAkNT GELC'HURCH OF G
167 trmintead Rd *7 75
Sunday Schoul q
Sun \\'aurshp l 3UIM. &



Wd. FSpiritual Enrichmen
'ed 'i-ith' Se t Ch rch
Pastor u rll R Haee

EVANG ELC(HIYRCH OG

Sud 46\ S Hool 441
Sunday\ Wni ship LU 51
.\d Sptrituil Ennchment
'Shuck South Chruch"
Bop, and Girls Clubs
Bible Srud.
Pastor iuhn R Haihawa
Nt, 1TH L\EE ,iTY LCHi iRCH I
174h N IJS Hiy 44l
L.ke CIr; FL 31155
75i.5547


sunday School 1
Sunday Worship 10:45AIM
Wed. Bible Study
Wed (budi Setmcr
blues. Pdaver Meeting
Pastor. Barney Hurst


Sl. IAMESFPI'SCOPALCHLI
Corner Mr IFarlne ie Bascrom
511 SW Malone
Lake Ciry. F. 32025.8878 * 75
p. mail stantinls'jidnatc.
Holv Eucharist Wed.-
Huhl EucharistiSun 8AM & 1
sunday School
'Siga Clases Mon. SPM W'
'upplh Priest Thl Rei Dr Dali
Deacon 1 he Rev lrieruo Hui
[iir'ct,-t[ oll Music Dr. Ai,:ons



BETHEL HEM LUTHER
II nuiles south on Hwy.
Sund\ iSt hol
Sun mitrrung gior:ihip
Pastor Wilbur Bock

OUR REDEEMER LUTHERAN i
LCMS
S 12, miles ia l1 7)uonSR
7 14299
Sunday) Ser vo:es
I Nursery Prosrded
Chi-driti Edtciiutt I ht
Fur all ages at li).45A1N
Pis r'1 Rec. Bruce Alktt
SPIRIT r OF CHRIST LUTHI
lihy' U. 15 mil e Wes ouf 1 7>5
Sutltda Witship 8 UIAM &1
Family Night lIi Wed. at
Fnlliowed b;' Healing seni
Handicap Accessible
Pastor lames Bezaire


LAKE CI 1 CHURCH OF THE N
serdte-
Sunda'y whunl
Sunday Worship 1J0.45AM
Wednesday
Adull, iouth Mtiiistr, Children
Dire- Fo-Car-e Mirnism
Nui-,ers Prodided
S'W sR 47 and Azaleja Pa.l


FIRST IJUNITED METHODIST C
97i S Marion Aver-
siindr.i ' .hi: I
Surnidj\ MirrningWor'h
Li ,rterrnpnr rt' Seric e
[i,r din:, rit, hertice 1
Piog unin opportiurite a0
n l rea loall ra, 101 all iges
I-,o a rrntiplete s.hedu
coriat I church office at 752
RItverend iellerv late


RCH

30 AM
:30AM
7 PM








RiMi

11 1AM
150iiJ

..30.1\M
7 UU'PM
list

RIST

.L'20
1.51 'AM

OlCe


RIS
)1AM
9 1AM
I
0 PM




;OD

. PM
7 PM


OD
51939
i:5 AMNI
J & 6.3ii
7PM



*y
OF " OF'



00(ttAM
1 & 6PM
7PM
PM
7PM



URCH
Norris5

72-2218
nei
5:30PMN
0:30AM
9:30AMI
ed &tAM
e Warner
srirnger
mo Le-v


AN
11
1110:C0AM



CHURCH
R47

9 30iAM

ur

re

JEW,
752.3807


ice



AZARENE

9.4 5AM
. h.30PM
6:in tPM
's Ministry


Place


CHURCH

9 45 AM
iup
> 30 1AM
1:0l1 AM
alable


WATERTOWN CONGREGATIONAL
METHODIST CHURCH'
U:S. 90 E. turn on Cortez (next to Quality
Ind.) right on Okinawa.
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Sun. Worship 11AM & 6PM
Wed. Night Service 7PM
Pastor, Randy Ogburn


FIRST PRESBBTERIAN
629 SW Bj�,A Dri.e v72. 017ii
Contemporrn srv ice 9.tU AM
Sunida) Schol 1000 AM
Iradinonal SeriLe I [.i0 4 W
Youth Piograms (in Wed
kindergarten thru Jr High
NilRsRi' PROVIDED
Pasior Dr Kuv A Marrin
As,,ocite Pator he lamce NI Clark
Direcitor Music Bill Poplin


FIRST FULL GOSPEL CHURCH
NI: Vdjno Wa\ & Nr Washmgton St.
Sund.iv School In liti AM
Morning Worship I 1.01AM
Evangelistic service 6:0u PM
South Senices � Wednersdad 7 Oul'hi
Mid week service - Wednesday. 00 PM
frit infi t :ll 7':v :.3inl* [ eryoni c Viumerie
Pasito Rev Stir Ellis
,'[I ] [I ' I' I- ]


W e look forward to the start of the weekend all week long.
Friday! Finally...some time to play or sleep late. We've
worked hard all week, so whatever the pleasure \ve deserve it!
God has been at work all week, too...keeping the universe
running in the right direction, making sure the sun rises every
morning, caring for all His creatures, not to mention answering a
multitude of prayers. God doesn't take a single day off...ever.
Do you really "Thank God It's Friday"? Then spend some time
with God on His day. Praise Him and tell Him of your love. Share
'our needs for the week ahead. God is waiting to welcome you to
His House. "Giv'e thanks to the Lord, for He is good; His love
endures forever." (Psalm 106:1)


let
2-4-188


WESLEY MEMORIAL UNITED
127'2 SW'MiFarlaiie 752-.5l3
-wvi5 \esli\mem corn
i.Adlacenit ti 'summers Schooll
Liunday SLhoul 9:45 AM
'rund.ai\'.i r-lhp 8 t10,M & .1 40A 1
',:,bh Sleetng 5 PM.
Pr isv .& S'otrhip i PM
.\JIt1f) fiPRWlDLU
Pil r Louie Mabrey


fut-
m


F Clay Electric Cooperative, Inc.
Competitive rates, non-profit,
right here in your community.
Lake City District 386-752-7447
clayelectric.com

/11111 W Hwy 90
KFC 752-1123
Stop In After Church and.See"
Our Newly Remodeled Store
and Try Our Delicious Buffet.


TIREMART OF LAKE CITY
Tires for every need.
US 90 West across from Wal-Mart
752-0054


Morrell's
Your Complete decorating and
home furnishings store
SW Deputy Jeff Davis Lane (formerly Pinemount Rd.)
752-3910 or 1-800-597-3526
Mon.-Sat. 8:00-5:30 * Closed Sunday

Patty Register ,.
386-961-9100
Northside Motors, Inc.
In God We Trust
1974 E. Duval St Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Lake City, FL 32055 Closed Wednesday

ANDERSON COLUMBIA CO.,INC.
ASPHALT PAVING
COMMERCIAL *INDUSTRIAL
Site Preparation . Road Building * Parking Lots
Grading & Drainage
752-7585
871 NW Guerdon St., Lake City

�, HARRY'S
' """ Heating & Air Conditioning Inc.
4_A Harry Mosley, President

Pronm 752-2308


Freedom Homes
Committed to Serving
Your needs
386-752-5355
www.freedomhomeslnc.com

I'THE MOVE Wide
CONNECTION
f Moving & storage' Long Distance-
:-rorfc3cirol S Cuorldtus P.Packing &'Cratin`
200 N. Chesnout r. :Lake Cift'32095
(386)7"5S-SS95*-TQ'( i S SZ589

The Adams Agency, Inc.
REAL ESTATE PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT SERVICES
326 SW Baya Drive
Lake City, Fl 32025
752-1444

MIKELLS POWER EQUIPMENT, INC.
Your Lawn & Garden Headquarters
MOWERS � CHAINSAWS * TRIMMERS
1152 US 90 WEST - LAKE CITY, FL.
386-752-8098
\vial


CHRIST CENTRAL MINISTRIES
Leadership Services 845AM
Sunday Morning 0I)OuAMI
Wednesday Bible Study 7.00PMh
DvalRd., front Hwy 90 tale
Ssiters Welcume Rd go., mrrles. South.
church on lef. * 755-2525
Sr Pastor Lorinie luhns
AssoCIlate Pastilr Mark lohns
"A Church ,n the Miie'

CHRISTIAN HERITAGE CHURCH
Corner SR. 47 . Hudson Circle
Sunday Celebratron 10:30AMI
Pastor Eddie laylur * 752-9119
"A Hospital ior the Hurting"

FAILING CREEK CHAPEL
Falling Creek Road *77.-i4580
First and Third Sundays 9 30 Ak M.
Second and Fourth Sundays 3.u P.M.
Pastor Rev. Cheryl R Pingel

KOL HFA MASHIACH
Messianic Israel Congregadon
Piriemount W to Birley then left
755-7922 or 755 181j8 lor info.
Saturday Sabbath Torah S c 3PM
'Tuesday Scripture Study 7PMI
Ist & 3rd Thuis ea. month
Dance as Worship Class 7PMI
Teaching the Hebre Roots ul the
Chrisnian Faith.
Come leirn with usi

MEADE MINISTRIES
Dir: Hwy 47 i Columbia City',
one mile Eait un CR 240
Sunday luAM and 7PMh
Thursday. . ... iPhI
N[ii Nursery Ai .alable
Spirit Filled Worship
Healing and Delverance


To List



Your



Church



on the



Church



Directory



Call



752-1293!


Available
nced
tion


a BRIAN MEEK .*:S
* Owner/Manager *S*


Helen Beaty, Ower
Desifger/Art Consuitant
o'ra1 r, - , /' i L rii' ,.7,,i1 1 1
S'i 1 i 'il I,- "j
''tiS I .iI:"


Commercial Real Estate with Regional Recognition
163 SW Midtown Plice, Suite 101, Lake City, FL 32025
www.seberassociates.com

HORIZON
INDUSTRIAL SUPPLIES
229 NW Wilks Lane
Lake City
386-7554330




LAKE CITY
1701 S. 1st Street 75 7050
m . Lc, .- . v.t 5 -70....-


BAYWAYjanitorial Services
FIRE & Water Restoration
Floor & Carpet Care
Resi(lential & Conmmercial
755-6142

BROWN-VANN
CARPET ONE
Carpet * Vinyl * Tile * Wallpaper

752-3420
Corner of US 90 & Marion

DOLLAR GRAZZ
New Items Arrive Weeklj
North Florida's Own Dollar Store.
Two Lake City Locations:
*Between Wal-Mart & Lowes
*N. Main across from Badcock


U-


Sipmr-ROOfI


lake city Group Rates /
Po With Advai
a kro Reservat
Phone 755-2206


Sunday
Acts
10.34-48


Monday
Acts
3.1-26


Personnel Services
110 MH It WU


1


qhe Framely




' I I--
41) f(D
10 IL









Page Editor: Jerry Spaeder, 754-0424



,, .jX


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE SATURDAY, JANUARY 27, 2007


S


I *~.'-


SAnyone Can Enter!

Entry Form for Bible Verse Search

You Can Be A Winner! ,|
On this page, each ad will have a designated verse with a clue telling within three chapters ihe
location of this verse. You must correctly and precisely locate THREE VERSES. Then write tie
name of the sponsor where the verse is written and the location of the scripture on the lines below.


Sponsor's Name

2.

Your name:
Address:
SS. Class or Group Name:
Mall


Location Scripture


Phone #


to: Bible Committee/Lake City Reporter
P.O. Box 1709 Lake City, FL 32056
En gum


In the ne\t 16 weeks . more than 480 Bibles
s ill be gisen awaa bN businesses and churches
' ' sponsor thi', page. To be considered for a Bi


s which
ble. \our


entry must be postmarked or delivered no later than
Wednesday midnight follow ing the date on this page.
wwp�^ Entries must specify the business of each %erse submitted. E\er\
Seek, a Bible recipient's name %\ill be printed in each of the advertisements.
To receive your Bible, take the ad under which your name
appears to that business or church
ATTENTION: SUNDAY SCHOOL CLASSES!
A large, family-size Bible will be given to the Sunday School class which sends in the most entries during
the 16 weeks of the campaign. Be sure to write your Church and Sunday School class name on each entry.
Judge s decisions are final. Thank you for participating.


� ' ., , . . . . = .. . .......... . . . . ... . . . . . . ...... .........


For I am not ashamed of the gospel of
Christ: for it is the power of God unto sal-
vation to every one that believeth; to the
Jew first, and also to the Greek. (Found
between Romans 1 and 3)


A morbil

Un united
Methodist
Church

8:10 & 10:40am; 6pmr
Sunday School 9:45am
752-3513
1272 SW McFarlane
Lake City, FL 32025
www. wesleymem.com


And though after my skin worms destroy
this body vet in my flesh shall I see God
(Found between JoD 17 and 211




Product is nature's
gift to a healthy life,
Jesus is God's gift
to eternal life.
KC'S PRODUCE
1149 SE Baya Dr.
752-1449
Mon.-Sat. 7:30-6:00


Therefore we are buried with him by bap-
tism into death: that like Christ was raised
up from the dead by the glory of the
Father, even so we also should walk in
newness 01 lie
(Found between Romans 3 and 7)




Your Complete Decorating
and Home Furnishing Store
The Place to Start...
The Place to Save
SR252(Pinemount Rd.)
752-3910
www.morrells.com



Therefore being justified by faith, we have
peace with God through our Lord Jesus
Christ
(Found between Romans 1 and 7)



GATEWAY &

MOSES
DRY CLEANING
"WE ARE YOUR CARE LABEL"
Call '55-0511
Gatena) Center
1949 U.S. 90 �esi
Moses Dr) Cleaning.
58- SW Main Bhld. Suite 100
Lake Cit). Florida 32025


They shall fall by the sword: they shall be a
portion for foxes.
(Found between Psalm 61 and 64)



We sell Land!
Owner Financing Available





672 East Duval St.
Lake City, FL 32055

386-752-4339
www.landnfl.com


Neither is there salvation in any other: for
there is none other name under heaven
given among men, whereby we must be
saved.
(Found between Acis 1 iad 5)


HARRY'S
HE -TING ,& .AIR
' C(-ONDITION-
".*A.... .*"... ING. INC
Harry Moseley, President
2813 SW Main Blvd.
Lake City, FL 32055
(386) 752-2308


I ~M&ii


But before faith came, we were kept
undei ine law snul up unlo ire lain
which should atierwarj, be revealed
(Found between Galalai 2 anid 5)

WAL * MART
SUPERCENTER
,AW(


Please pick up
Bible in
Customer SeLrvice
4 1 II I" irit '[ .'i .
And it cam to pass in those days, that
Jesus came from Nazareth of Galilee, and
was baptized of John in Jordan.
(Found between Mark 1 and 4)


aW&O4i1
cM4,
Cawie


Darrel T.
Mathis,
D.C.
David B.
Morse,
D.C.


279 SW Main Blvd.
Lake City, FL
32025-7050
(386)752-4313
(386)752-8356 fax


And the angel of the Lord appeared unto
him in a flame of fire out of the midst of a
bush: and he looked, and, behold, the bush
burned with fire, and the bush [was] not
consumed.
(Found Between Exodus 3 and 5)

,y PY HEAkTS




CHILD CARE CENTER
522 N. W. Turner Ave.
Lake City


Wherefore, as by one man sin entered into
the world, and death by sin; and so death
passed upon all men, for that all have
sinned.
(Found between Romans 4 and 6)


F RESONICS


663 SE Baya Ave. � 755-7522
Winners Pledge PICI uipo ,ur Bible a.11
Irn L.k e Cl.i Rnroninnr il8 F [iival Si


Wherefore, as by one man sin entered
into the world, and death by sin; and so
death passed upon all men, for that all
have sinned.
Found between Romanr 2 and �.i






4NAPAI


296 S. W. Nassau St.
Lake City
752-6433


Hast thou not know? Hast thou not
r.-.ard. Ihal Ine eveilaSlin iij d In Lord
irei i.r :lor ,rIl Ihe e'd', r.,Ire earj n
Ijimneth rnoi)T nel-ner . ajry Threre ,:
(,) sejicrIih 01 hihs undaerlandino
(Fourrd Detween Isaiar 38t and 411

Columbia


Ready-Mix
Sand-Cement-Mortar Mix-Steel

Waldo Street

755-2458


For the Son of man is come to seek and to
save that which was lost.
(Found between Luke 16 and 19)


Lonnie
Johns
Senior Pastor


Lake City, FL
Office 386-755-2525
Fax 386-755-2552
A Church On The Move
Bible awarded to church
office in the house adjacent
to church.


Who was delivered for our offences, and
was raised again for our justification.
(Found Between Romans 3 and 5)




SPIRES





EXPRESS
Hwy 90 & 100

752-2855

Ho, every one that thirsteth, come ye to
the waters, and he that hath no money;
come ye, buy, and eat; yea, come, buy
wine and milk without money and without
price.
(Found between Isaiah 53 and 56)




fFIN E DINING

Located in The Historic Blanche Center
In Downtown Lake City
Brian Tucker
221 N. Marion Ave.
Lake City, FL 32055
755-5150


OF LAKE CITY
US 90
(Across from Wal-Mart)
Lake City, Florida 32056
(386) 752-0054




Being justified freely by his grace through
ihe redirrpiIorn I 1 i s in r Chilt Jeiau
IFound berwee,- Romans I arind 5


BROWN-VANN
CARPET ONE
CARPET * VINYL
TILE * WALLPAPER

5 West Duval Street
Lake City

752-3420


That in the ages to come he might show
the exceeding riches of his grace in his
kindness toward us through Christ Jesus.
(Found between Ephesians 1 and 4)


SHarley
Forest Products,
L.L.C.

Owner: Joe Harley
Winners. Pick up your Bible ai
Lake Ciry Reporter office. 180 E.
Duval St
P.O. Box 1749
Lake City, FL 32056-1749
(3k6) 752-3376 Fax (386) 752-0379
, - * . ...-
Let not your heart be troubled: ye believe in
God, believe also in me.
(Found between John 12 and 15)



Chevron




Chevron Products Company
1130 US Hwy. 90 W.
P0 Box 958
Lake City, FL 32056
(386) 752-5890
Fax i386) 755-5510
Email. ihunler gvhunlernnc.com


Who only hath immortality, dwelling in the
light which no man can approach unto;
whom no man hath seen, nor can see: to
whom be honour and power everlasting.
Amen.
(Found between 1 Timothy 5 and 7)

SUNSHINE



HARDWARE
And
Commercial Supply
1420 SW Main Blvd.
755-2660


Surely he hath borne our griefs, and carried
our sorrows: yet we did esteem him strick-
en, smitten of God, and afflicted.
(Found between Isaiah 51 and 55)


,joaep + - -


CHRYSLER-JEEP-DODGE
U.S. 90 West
P.O. Box 2707
Lake City, FL 32056
(386) 755-3444

And as Moses lifted up the serpent in the
wilderness even so must the Son of man
be I dhl up
iFounad ,we niw n .i,:,rr 1 and 5l

i NORTH" FLORIDA
PHARMACY
3-7 S. Main Blvd.
Lake Cit * "58-6770


3 18
Lake City


uS 90 w
* 755-9300


Bibles may be picked up
at the 90 West location.


An IIU l me leter ul, Luiatcy iIyIIL
know thee the only true God, and Jesus
Christ, whom thou hast sent.
(Found between John 17 and 19)


"North Fla. Own Dollar Store"
TWO LOCATIONS


I write not these things to shame you, but
as my beloved sons I warn you.
(Found between 1 Corinthians 1 and 4)




lake city



Branford Hwy

755-2260


All scripture is given by inspiration of God,
and is profitable for doctrine, for reproof,
for correction, for instruction in righteous-
ness. That the man of God may be perfect,
thoroughly furnished unto all good works
SFound rbtween 2 Timorv 1 and 4i





Homes
4780 US Hwy 90 W.
Lake City, FL 32055
(386) 754-6737

h , e W. tNC


Go ye therefore, and teach all nations, bap-
tizing them in the name of the Father and of
ire 'n, and 01 Ihe HMly, Griv,.i
iFound tiervwer, Mannew '5 and 291


Commercial & Industrial
Asphalt Paving
*Site Preparation
*Road Buiiling
*Parking Lois
*Grading & Drainage - -
*Florida D.O T. Centied
8712 NW Guerdon St., Lake City
752-7585

All we like sheep have gone astray; we
have turned every one to his own way; and
the Lord hath laid on him the iniquity of us
all.
(Fourn betrwen S1313h 51 and 5i1


Brian's Sports
i19 Q)9 Ii . . . - .7 1 C" .1


5z25 NW Bascom Norris ur. 2.8 J i tetr 'U -l
L- �a(e City, FTL 32055
211 N.W. Franklin 386-755-0570
Bibles may be picked up at
211 N W Franklimn Location ITaV386-758-9064


Let your moderation be known unto all
men.
(Found between Philippians 4 and 6)







& SOUND COMPANY


Those things, which ye have both learned,
and received, and heard, and seen in me,
do: and the God of peace shall be with you.
(Found between Philippians 2 and 5)



The
Move
SConnection
196 N.E. Chestnut St.


And when he was come near, he beheld the
city, and wept over it,
(Found between Luke 15 and 20)


Save up to 40%
with
Everyday
.Buys
135 E. DUVAL ST.
LAKE CITY
755-0795


In whom we have redemption through his
blood, even the forgiveness of sins:
(Found between Colossians 1 and 3)


1034 S.W. Main Blvd. 386-755-5595
"Full Service Music Store" _
(386) 755-2060
fax (3861 755-2990 ST�VE S
T.dWd -W' bn


nmf . wr


.,'.L", . ..


9A


t















FAITH


Saturday, January 27, 2007


&


VALUES


vww.Iakecityreporter.com


BRIEFS

Tucson mosque
makes a change
TUCSON, Ariz. - For the
first time since Tucson's
largest mosque was
completed in 1990, women
there can regularly, pray in
view of the imam and other
leaders.
Following complaints by
women who said a full
partition was disrupting their
prayer life, the Islamic Center
of Tucson recently opened a
section of a rolling curtain
that separates the men from
the women. Women can now
be in full view of the imam, or
prayer leader, and other men.
But women can still be out of
view if they prefer it.
The worship community of
about 1,000 mostly Sunni
worshippers has long
separated men and women.
In the past, men used the
front door to the main
worship area, while women
entered a side door, using a
small room where they
listened to the prayer leader
via an audio system.

Judge: Program
can continue
FRANKFORT, Ky.-A
Christians-only health plan
that serves nearly 20,000
churchgoers nationwide can
continue operating in
Kentucky, a judge has ruled.
Franklin County Circuit
Judge Thomas D. Wingate
ruled Jan. 18 that the
Medi-Share program isn't
insurance and therefore
doesn't violate the state's
insurance laws.
The Kentucky Office of
Insurance had asked Wingate
to ban the program because
it is not subject to the same
laws and regulations that
govern conventional health
insurance companies.
Richard Masters, a.-
Louisville attorney
representing Medi-Share,
said the plan is simply a
cost-sharing program, not
insurance.
Medi-Share, which is
supported by contributions
from participating
churchgoers, is based on the
biblical belief that Christians
should take care of one
another's needs.
The program excludes
non-Christians because,
organizers say, their lifestyles
can result in unnecessary
medical care. Participants in
Medi-Share can't smoke, use
illegal drugs or abuse alcohol.

Ex- official takes
role at NAE
WASHINGTON, D.C. -A
*former national commander
of The Salvation Army has
been appointed executive
director of the National
Association of Evangelicals.
W. Todd Bassett will
oversee the group's
administrative operations and
communications, NAE
president Leith Anderson said
in a Jan. 16 statement.
The job of executive
director, once a part of the
NAE hierarchy, had been
dropped in recent years, but
the association's leaders
recently decided to recreate
the post.
Pope: Faithful

denounce violence
VATICAN CITY - Pope
Benedict XVI called on
followers of all faiths to
denounce violence and
promote mutual
understanding, in remarks to
the new Turkish ambassador
to the Vatican.
The pontiff stressed the
need for inter-religious
cooperation in a world
"where tensions seem to be
exacerbated."
"The faithful of the various
religions must make an effort
to work together for peace,
starting with denouncing
violence - which has been
used too often in the past
with the pretext of religious
motivations- and learning to
know and respect each other
better in order to build an


increasingly brotherly
society," the pope said
Jan. 19.
* Associated Press


New group at Penn studies



the science behind spirituality


By JOANN LOVIGLIO
Associated Press

PHILADELPHIA -
Religion and science can
combine to create some
thorny questions: Does God
exist outside the human
mind, or is God a creation of
our brains? Why do we have
faith in things that we cannot
prove, whether it's the
afterlife or UFOs? ,
The new Center for
Spirituality and the Mind at
the University of
Pennsylvania is using brain
imaging technology to exam-
ine such questions, and to
investigate how spiritual and
secular beliefs affect our
health and behavior.
"Very few are looking at
spirituality from a neurologi-
cal side, from the brain-mind
side," said Dr. Andrew
Newberg, director of the
center.
A doctor of nuclear medi-
cine and an assistant profes-
sor at Penn, Newberg also
has co-authored three books
on the science-spirituality
relationship.
The center is not a bricks-
and-mortar structure but a
multidisciplinary team of
Penn researchers exploring
the relationship between the
brain and spirituality from
biological, psychological,
social and ideological view-
points. Founded last April, it
is bringing together some 20
experts from fields including


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Dr. Andrew Newberg, director of Center for Spirituality and the
Mind, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, poses in a
chapel in the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania in
Philadelphia.


medicine, pastoral care, reli-
gious studies, social work
and bioethics.
"The brain is a believing
machine because it has to
be," Newberg said. "Beliefs
affect every part of our lives.
They make us who we are.
They are the essence of our
being."
Spirituality and belief don't
have to equate to religious
faith, Newberg said. The feel-
ings of enlightenment and
well-being some derive from
religion can come to others
through from artistic expres-
sion, nonreligious medita-


tion, watching a beautiful
sunset or listening to stirring
music.
"Atheists have belief sys-
tems, too," Newberg said.
How does the center test
the relationship between the
mind and spirituality?
In one study, Newberg and
colleagues used imaging
technology to look at the
brains of Pentecostal
Christians speaking in
tongues - known scientifi-
cally as glossolalia - then
looked at their brains when
they were singing gospel
music. They found that those


practicing glossolalia showed
decreased activity in the
brain's language center, com-
pared with the singing group.
The imaging results are
suggestive of people's
description that they do not
have control of their own
speech when speaking in
tongues. Newberg said scien-
tists believe that speech 'is
taken over by another part of
the brain during glossolalia,
but did not find it during the
study.
Other recent studies
looked at the brains of
Tibetan Buddhists in medita-
tion and Franciscan nuns in
prayer, then compared the
results to their baseline brain
activity levels.
Among other changes,
both groups showed
decreased activity in the
parts of the brain that have to
do with sense of self and spa-
tial orientation - which sug-
gests the description of one-
ness with God, of transcen-
dence sometimes experi-
enced in meditation or
prayer.
Prayer and meditation also
increase levels of dopamine,
often referred to as the brain's
pleasure-hormone.
'"The mind and the body are
the flip side of the same coin,"
said Dr. Daniel Monti, head of
Thomas Jefferson University
Hospital's integrated medi-
cine center. "Now we know
some of the mechanisms by
which that occurs, and it's


becoming better and better
understood."
The integrated medicine
center teaches patients with
cancer, chronic pain and other
ailments to work things like
meditation and proper diet
into their conventional thera-
py, Monti said. Such thinking
seemed "fringy" to many peo-
ple a decade ago, but it is
becoming widely accepted by
the medical community and
patients, he said.
"Now there's the recogni-
tion that a truly effective treat-
ment plan is not just giving a
pill," he said. "We need to look
at how to help a person adjust
to a different lifestyle in addi-
tion to taking a pill."
Not many imaging studies
have yet been done that look
at changes in the brain's
blood flow because technolo-
gy has only within the past
decade become sophisticated
enough to study the brain in
this way, Newberg said. An
increase in blood flow to cer-
tain parts of the brain means
increased activity in those
areas.
Newberg is currently
studying how the brains' of
novice yoga practitioners
change as they become more
adept, and whether medita-
tion can improve cognitive
impairment in people with
,mild dementia or early
Alzheimer's disease.
"The. sky's the limit as far
as the things we can study,"
he said.


Priest challenges mandatory celibacy in new book


By ANDREW WELSH-HUGGINS
Associated Press

UNIVERSITY HEIGHTS,
Ohio - The former seminary
president who sparked a
national debate on the impact
of gays entering the Roman
Catholic priesthood is now
tackling another sensitive
issue, adding his voice to
those advocating an end to
mandatory celibacy.
"Celibacy used to 'go with
priesthood as fish went with
Fridays" said the Rev. Donald
Cozzens. "Over the past 40 to
50 years, I would argue that
more and more Catholics are,
questioning the need to link
celibacy with priesthood."
In "Freeing Celibacy,"
Cozzens suggests there may
be a way through the problem
by allowing celibacy as an
option but dropping it as a
requirement.
Although he is taking on an
institution that measures
change over centuries,
Cozzens - a celibate priest
himself - thinks the time is
right for a rethinking of
celibacy.
He points to the brief stir
Brazilian Cardinal Claudio
Hummes created last year by
saying the Vatican should
reconsider its ban on allowing
priests to marry, and the cru-


AUSUSIATu I EU c
Prof. Donald Cozzens poses on the campus of John Carrol
University in Cleveland. The former seminary president who
sparked church-wide debate about the number of gay Roman
Catholic priests tackles mandatory celibacy in a neW book, calling
it a burdensome, unnecessary restriction.


sade to change the policy by
excommunicated - and mar-
ried - former Archbishop
Emmanuel Milingo of
Zambia.
'"There are a number of fac-
tors that are coming together
that really beg for this ques-
tion to be discussed or urge
us to review mandatory
celibacy," said Cozzens, inter-
viewed in his office at John
Carroll University in this
Cleveland suburb.
There were about 42,000


active priests nationwide in
2005, a 29 percent decline
from 1965, according to
Georgetown University's
Center for Applied Research
in the Apostolate. About 3,200
parishes were without a resi-
dent priest in 2005, compared
with 549 in 1965.
"Many, if not most, of the
inactive priests would be serv-
ing in our parishes if it were
not for the law of celibacy,"
Cozzens writes.
The church discounts


celibacy's responsibility for
the shortage, saying the
increasingly materialistic cul-
ture plays a far bigger role.
Pope John Paul II was
adamant that the church
would not change its celibacy
requirement. As recently as
November, a Vatican summit
led by Pope Benedict XVI
reaffirmed mandatory celiba-
cy for priests as a nonnego-
tiable job requirement for
showing devotion to God and
the people they serve.
Cozzens has been down
this road before, having writ-
ten four other books on issues
and problems of the priest-
hood. In his 2000 book, "The
Changing .Face of the
Priesthood," later translated
into six languages, he used
interviews and studies to con-
tend that the Roman Catholic
Church had a disproportion-
ately high percentage of gay
priests, nearly half of all semi-
narians and priests.
His previous writings made
a valuable contribution to the
debate over homosexuality by
raising the issue at a time
when many priests and bish-
ops were pretending it didn't
exist, said the Rev. Richard
John Neuhaus, editor of the
conservative journal First
Things, who upholds the
Catholic teaching that same-


sex attraction is disordered.
"It was that climate of, 'Let's
pretend that we don't know
about it,' that Cozzens blew
the whistle on in a construc-
tive way," Neuhaus said.
Cozzens distinguishes
between what he calls the
charism, or gift, of celibacy,
which he says is an approach
freely chosen by only a few
priests and nuns, and celibacy
as a requirement.
"I am trying to say to the
church, the charism of celiba-
cy needs to be celebrated, the
obligation of celibacy needs to
be reviewed," he said.
Cozzens teaches religious
studies at. John Carroll, a
Jesuit school. At the time of
his 2000 book he was presi-
dent of St. Mary Seminary in
Cleveland.
Celibacy as a universal
requirement took hold in the
12th century, but priests and
bishops were able to
marry during the previous
millennium.
The Vatican requires celiba-
cy of priests ordained under
the Latin rite, although mar-
ried men can become priests
in the Eastern Catholic rites,
such as the Byzantine rite of
the Catholic Church. The
Vatican has accepted some
married Anglican priests who
came over to the Catholic fold.


CHURCH NOTES


B.A.B.E. event
planned for Feb. 24
Bring your friends to this
event that Andrea and Team
B.A.B.E. have designed for teen
girls. You'll get the straight dish
on topics you deal with.
There'll be a lot of
giveaways, beach balls,
makeup samples, drama, a
fashion show, videos, food, fund
speakers and a concert all free
with your entrance wristband
($10 at the door).
Don't miss this chance to
become a more confident you,
ready to take on life as a
B.A.B.E.
For more information, visit
www.andreastephens.com and


attend the upcoming B.A.B.E.
event with other sixth to 12th'
grade girls from your area on
Feb. 24 at Hopeful Baptist
Church.
You can obtain a entrance
wristband by filling out a
registration card, stopping by
the office, e-mailing Kathy at
Kathy@hopefulbaptist.com or
by calling her at the church
office at 752-4135 and she will
mail one to you.

Gospel sing
planned for today
The Lumber River Quarter
from Lumberton N.C. will be at
the Lulu Advent Christian
Church at 7 p.m. today for a


gospel sing.

Exum, Denison
to speak Feb. 4
Jack Exum and Perryman
Denison will be guest speakers
at Central Church of Christ of
Lake City on Feb. 4. A dinner
will be served following the
morning services.
For directions and
information, 755-1320.

Camp meeting
begins Feb. 11
The Live Oak Church of God
will have its camp meeting 2007
at 10:45 a.m. and 6:30 p.m.


Feb. 11 and at 7:15 p.m. Feb.
12 - 15. There will be various
speakers during this event.

Prayer Breakfast
planned for Feb. 3
Union A.M.E. Church will
have a prayer breakfast at 8
a.m. Feb. 3.
The speaker will be Dekala
Bradley.
Tickets may be purchased at
the breakfast for $5.

Gospel sing
planned for today
New Beginning Church will
have a gospel sing at 7 p.m.


today featuring "Hee Haw's"
Lulu Roman with John Lanier,
Jeff Treece and Barry Wayne.
Barry Wayne will be ministering
in the 10 a.m. service on
Sunday.
The church is located on
Highway 242 east of Branford
Highway.
For more information, call
755-6292.

'Fanning the Fire of
Passion' Feb. 9
Newlife Christian Fellowship
presents "Fanning the Fire of
Passion" a worship experience
at 7 p.m. Feb. 9.
The church is located at 422
SW Baya Drive in Lake City.


IOA









Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?


Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com
Saturday, January 27, 2007


SPORTS


www.lakecityreporter.com


BRIEFS


FORT WHITE BASKETBALL
Varsity changed,
JV game canceled
The Fort White girls
varsity basketball team will
play at 5:30 p.m. today.
The junior varsity game
has been canceled.
FORT WHITE BASEBALL
Indians serving at
Phish Heads
Members of the Fort
White varsity and junior
varsity baseball teams will
be acting as servers at
Phish Heads at 145 SW.
Main Blvd. from 6 - 9 p.m
on Tuesday.
Proceeds from the
fundraiser will go to the
Fort White Dugout Club
and be used for the teams.

CHS WRESTLING
Fundraiser at
Moe's on Monday
Moe's Southwestern Grill
on U.S. 90 West will again
host a Columbia High
wrestling fundraiser on
Monday. A portion of all
sales from 5-8 p.m. will be
donated to the booster club.
For details, call coach Al
Nelson at 755-8080.
YOUTH SWIMING
Columbia Swim
seeks coaches
Columbia Swim Team is
seeking swim coaches for
its age group, seasonal and
year-aroufid team n
Coaches must be able to"
provide competitive stroke
coaching. American Red
Cross First Aid and CPR
Certifications Safety
Training for Swim Coaches
(STSC) is required. Salary
is negotiable.
Interested applicants
should call Robb at
754-7150 by Feb. 15.
YOUTH BASEBALL
Babe Ruth sign-up
is under way
Lake City/Columbia
County Youth Baseball's
Babe Ruth registration is
under way at the Southside
Baseball Complex.
Registration fee is $65 and a
copy of the player's birth
certificate is required.
Registration is 5:30-8 p.m.,
Friday, and 9 a.m.-2 p.m.,
today, and three weekends
of sign-ups remain.
. For details, call Sharrie
Keller at (386) 365-1032.

Sign-up continues
at Fort White
Fort White Youth
Baseball has registration for
its spring season from
10 a.m.-2 p.m., today, at the
Fort White Sports Complex
concession stand. A birth
certificate is required for
new players.
For details, call Tammy
Sharp at 867-3825.
* From staff reports.

GAMES


Today
* Columbia High girls
weightlifting at Episcopal High
sectional, noon
* LCCC baseball vs.
Chipola CC, I p.m.
* LCCC softball at Chipola
CC, 2 p.m.
* Fort White High boys
basketball at P.K. Yonge
School, 3 p.m. (JV- I)
* Fort White High girls
basketball vs. Branford High,
5:30 p.m.
* Columbia High boys
basketball vs. Lake Weir High,
7 p.m.


Layne makes


the call at VA


MLB umpire shares
tales with hospital
residents Friday.
By CHRIS WHITE
cwhite@lakecityreporter. corn
MLB umpire Jerry Layne
took a break from his
normal job of "baby-sitting
millionaires" on Tuesday to
entertain veterans at the Lake
City VA Medical Center.
Layne, who has more than
30 years of officiating
experience with nearly two
decades in the MLB, stopped
by as part of the Disabled
American Veterans Voluntary
Service Program and shared
an hour of his tales from
behind the plate and played
a short video highlighting
some outrageous on-field
arguments.
The VA auditorium was a
much different world than the
brightly lit ball fields Layne is
used to, and the 20-some


residents listening in gave
him a warm welcome -
something an umpire may not
see often. He was warmly
received and his personal
stories about meeting legends
like Ted Williams and a little
reminiscing about the glory
days of baseball brought
smiles worth more to Layne
than any five-year, $20 million
contract one of the pros may
sign.
"I do this as part of a
volunteer effort," Layne said.
"Every VA needs help from
volunteers. There just aren't
enough nurses and staff to go
around most places. It's really
important for people to see
this and try to give back to the
community."'
For nine years now Layne
has made his way across the
country in the off-season and
made VA visits a pre-game
ritual in every MLB city
except for Toronto, where
they don't exist.
"I go around in the


I , ,JALA HARRIS/Lake City Reporter
MLB umpire Jerry Layne signs autographs for residents of the Lake City VA Medical Center on Friday.


off-season, but I do a lot of
work in all the cities I stop in
during the season," he said.
"If we've got a night game, I
go in during the afternoon, or
if it's an afternoon game I'll
go by from 10 a.m. to noon."
Layne is not the MLB's
otily representative, either.
ii


Fellow umpire Larry Barnett
piqued Layne's interest in
the program almost a
decade ago, and umpire
Ed Montague and Detroit
Tigers starting pitcher Mike
Maroth are also regulars in
VA hospitals across the
country.


TIM KIRBY/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High head coach Danny Green (center) congratulates Most Valuable Player trophy winners Aaron
Randolph (left) and Tiger Powell (right) Friday at CHS.


A time for


Columbia football
celebrates season with
awards banquet
By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com
Columbia High football cele-
brated a season that saw the
Tigers return to prominence and
the playoffs with an awards
banquet Friday at the CHS gym.
With Rev. Isadore Williams
handling the master of
ceremonies duties, Columbia play-
ers, coaches, cheerleaders and
Tigerettes were introduced to the
crowd and awards were presented


to the football players.
The Columbia County
Quarterback Club gavel was
passed from Mike Peters to Lex
Carswell.
Jerome Carter, a former Tiger
who now plays for the St. Louis
Rams, was present and coach
Danny Green called him on stage
to say a few words.
"It means a lot to come back and
see guys who play the game the
way it is supposed to be played,"
Carter said. "Be your own person.
As long as you believe in yourself,
it doesn't matter what anybody
else says. Do what you do because
you want to do it, not because you
are following someone else."


Tigers

The player awards were
highlight by the Most Valuable
presentations, since they are voted
on by the players. There were two
for the varsity - Aaron Randolph
was Most Valuable Defense and
Tiger Powell was Most Valuable
Offense.
The dual awards symbolized
what Columbia football means.
Randolph is a senior who made
himself better every year through
hard work and dedication. Powell
is a freshman with talent to burn
and a huge upside.
"It is an honor," Randolph said.
"I wanted to have a good year, but
TIGERS continued on 3B


,Layne closed his own
thanks to the veterans by
mentioning that volunteers
like the ones around the
hospital do what they do
because they care, and
suggested paying them with a
smile and tipping them with
an extra "Thank you."


'Wolves shut

out ABAC in

season opener
Starter ik Tyson pitches five
Cers innaIgs to lead LCCC to
win over visitors from Georgia.
By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com
It took Lake City Community College's baseball
team a little time to get going, but once-rolling the
Timberwolves routed visiting Abraham Baldwin
Agricultural College, 11-0.
It was only a matter of when the offense kicked
in because starter Nick Tyson had the visitors well
in hand. Tyson pitched five shutout innings of two-
hit ball with one walk and four
strikeouts.
Patrick Clysdale followed with
two innings with two hits and
two strikeouts. Gary Kott fin-
ished up on the mound with
three hits and two strikeouts.
The 'Wolves scored single
runs in the third, fourth and fifth Tyson
innings and added three-spots in both the sixth
and seventh, before closing it out with two runs in
the eighth.
"It was a good opener for us," LCCC head coach
Tom Clark said. "A couple of our freshmen played
tight, but it was a chance for them to get the but-
terflies out. We have got to play a lot better (today)
against Chipola."
Lake City's first two runs were unearned. Sam
Testa walked with one out in the third inning and
came around to score as Jovan Rosa beat out an
infield hit and the third-baseman's throw went into
foul territory down the right-field line.
Mario Williams reached second on a dropped
pop-up in the fourth inning and scored on a two-
out single by Emmanuel Morales. It was the first of
three consecutive RBI-singles for Morales, who
stole two bases and scored a run in the stretch.
In the fifth inning, Rosa walked with two outs
and hustled to second on a pitch in the dirt.
Roberto Perez singled him home.
The sixth-inning rally began with a lead-off walk


'WOLVES continued on 3B


Columbia soccer takes second in District 4-5A


Fort White girls soccer
makes first-round
playoff exit against Bolles.
By CHRIS WHITE
cwhite@lakecityreporter.com
The Columbia High boys soccer
team took second place in the District
4-5A tournament in Ocala on Friday
after it couldn't shake a stingy
Eastside defense.
"The score wasn't indicative how we
played the game," Columbia head
coach Trevor Tyler said. "They were


just able to finish their chances and we
missed the ones we had."
Eastside created a 1-0 lead about
five minutes into, the game, and the
Tigers hung on until late in the second
half when Eastside scored two more
goals close together.
Down 3-0, the Tigers gave an all-out
offensive push, but could not
capitalize on the chances.
"Once they scored their third goal
we just put everybody up," Tyler
said. "We had three or four break-
aways but their keeper made some
great saves and we missed some
shots. .


"Their defense was really, really
good,, too. Their midfield is also
really good and their sweeper took
away some of our chances and won
the ball out."
While the players were let down by
the loss, the Tigers still have a playoff
berth in the cards and will face either
Williston High or Fleming Island High
on Thursday.
"After the initial disappointment
sets in they'll get over it once they get
to practice," Tyler said. "But you could
see it in their eyes tonight.
'They worked so hard all season
preparing for districts, and I'm proud


of them for that."
The Tigers enter the playoffs with a
record of 12-9-3 (6-4-2 District 4-5A).

Fort White girls soccer
The Fort White girls varsity soccer
team fell in the first round of the state
playoffs Thursday when The Bolles
School defeated the Indians 9-0.
The Indians earned their first-ever
playoff berth and finished 9-114 (2-1-2
District 3-3A), taking their spot in the
3A playoffs with a 1-0 win over
Newberry in the district tournament
last week.


Section B











LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SATURDAY, JANUARY 27, 2007


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
AUTO RACING
2:30 p.m.
SPEED - Rolex Sports Car Series, 24
Hours of Daytona, start of race, at Daytona
Beach
8 p.m.
SPEED - Rolex Sports Car Series, 24
Hours of Daytona, at Daytona Beach
BOXING
10:15 p.m.
HBO - Middleweights, Kelly Pavlik
(29-0-0) vs.Jose Luis Zertuche (19-3-2); super
featherweights, Jorge Arce (45-3-1) vs. Julio
Ler (23-1 -0), at Anaheim, Calif.
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
4 p.m.
NFL - Senior Bowl, Mobile,Ala.
EXTREME SPORTS
I p.m.
ABC -Winter X Games, at Aspen, Colo.
9 p.m.
ESPN -Winter X Games, atAspen, Colo.
2 a.m.
ESPN2 - Winter X Games, at Aspen,
Colo. (delayed tape)
FIGURE SKATING
4 p.m.
ABC - U.S. Championships, ladies' free
program, at Spokane,Wash.
II p.m.
ESPN2 - U.S. Championships, men's free
program, at Spokane,Wash.
GOLF
9:30 a.m.
TGC - European PGA Tour, Qatar
Masters, third round, at Doha, Qatar (same-
day tape)
3 p.m.
CBS - PGA Tour, Buick Invitational, third
round, at La Jolla, Calif.
7 p.m.
TGC - Champions Tour, Turtle Bay
Championship, second round, at Kahuku,
Hawaii .
HORSE RACING
4 p.m.
NBC - NTRA, Sunshine Millions, at
Hallandale and Arcadia, Calif.
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Noon
ESPN - Michigan at Indiana
ESPN2 - Dayton at Xavier
I p.m.
CBS - North Carolina at Arizona
2 p.m.
ESPN - Oklahoma at Texas A&M
ESPN2 - Wisconsin-Green Bay at
Wisconsin-Milwaukee
4 p.m.
ESPN -Villanova at Notre Dame
ESPN2 - W. Michigan at Akron
FSN - Oregon St. at Washington
6 p.m.
ESPN2 - Baylor at Texas
7 p.m.
ESPN - Syracuse at Louisville
9 p.m.
ESPN2 - Michigan St. at Ohio St.
NBA BASKETBALL
8:30 p.rh.
WGN,- Miami at Chicago ..
NLL LACROSSE
10 p.m.
VERSUS -Toronto at Philadelphia (same-
day tape)
RODEO
8 p.m.
VERSUS - PBR, Dale Jr. PBR Clash, at
Charlotte, N.C.
TENNIS
3:30 a.m.
ESPN2 - Australian Open, men's
championship match, at Melbourne,Australia
WOMEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Noon
FSN - Texas A&M at Oklahoma
2 p.m.
FSN - Stanford at Arizona St.
6 p.m.
FSN - California at Arizona

FOOTBALL

NFL playoffs

Wild Card
Indianapolis 23, Kansas City 8
Seattle 21 I, Dallas 20
New England 37, New York Jets 16
Philadelphia 23, New York Giants 20
Divisional Games
Indianapolis 15, Baltimore 6
New Orleans 27, Philadelphia 24
Chicago 27, Seattle 24, OT
New England 24, San Diego 21
Conference Championships
Chicago 39, New Orleans 14
Indianapolis 38, New England 34

Super Bowl
Sunday, Feb. 4
Miami
Chicago vs. Indianapolis, 6 p.m. (CBS)

College all-star games

Senior Bowl
Today
At MobileAla.
North vs. South, 4 p.m. (NFL)

BASKETBALL

NBA standings

EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division


W
Toronto 22
New Jersey 20
NewYork 19
Philadelphia 13
Boston 12
Southeast
W
Washington 25
Orlando 23
Miami 19
Atlanta 15
Charlotte 14


L Pcct
22 .500
23 .465
26 .422
31 .295
30 .286
Division
L Pct
17 .595
21 .523
24 .442
26 .366
27 .341


Central Division
W L Pct
Detroit 24 17 .585
Cleveland 25 18 .581
Chicago 25 19 .568
Indiana 22 20 .524
Milwaukee 17" 25 .405
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct
Dallas 35 9 .795
San Antonio 31 14 .689


Houston 26 16 .619 8
New Orleans 17 25 .405 17
Memphis II 33 .250 24
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
Utah 28 15 .651 -
Denver 22 17 .564 4
Minnesota 20 21 .488 7
Portland 18 25 .419 10
Seattle 16 26 .381 11'/2
Pacific Division
W L Pct GB
Phoenix 34 8 .810 -
LA. Lakers 27 15 .643 7
LA.Clippers 21 21 .500 13
Golden State 20 23 .465 14'h
Sacramento 17 24 .415 16'2
Thursday's Games
Chicago 96, Dallas 85
L.A. Clippers 102, New Jersey 101
Friday's Games
Atlanta 93, Orlando 90
Toronto 96, Boston 90
Cleveland 105, Philadelphia 97
New York 116, Miami 96
San Antonio 112, Memphis 96
New Orleans 88, Sacramento 84
Washington 99, Detroit 96
Phoenix at Milwaukee (n)
Portland at Houston (n)
Denver t Utah (n)
Minnesota at Seattle (n)
Charlotte at LA. Lakers (n)
Saturday's Games
Toronto at Indiana, 7 p.m.
Philadelphia at Atlanta, 7 p.m.
Utah vs. New Orleans at Oklahoma City,
8 p.m.
Portland at Memphis, 8 p.m.
Miami at Chicago, 8:30 p.m.
Sacramento at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
New Jersey at Denver, 9 p.m.
Charlotte at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.
Minnesota at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Phoenix at Cleveland, I p.m.
New York at Milwaukee, 3:30 p.m.
San Antonio at LA. Lakers, 3:30 p.m.
Washington at Boston, 6 p.m.
Indiana at Detroit, 6:30 p.m.
L.A. Clippers at Seattle, 10 p.m.

College scores

Thursday
EAST
Cent. Connecticut St. 69, St. Francis, NY 61
Maine 74, Stony Brook 66
Monmouth, N.J. 71, St. Francis, Pa. 66
Mount St. Mary's, Md. 80,Wagner 70
Quinnipiac 64, Fairleigh Dickinson 63
UMBC 45, New Hampshire 44
Vermont 76, Hartford 63
SOUTH
Austin Peay 73,Jacksonville St. 58
Campbell 54, North Florida 49
Duke 68, Clemson 66
ETSU 80, Belmont 70, OT
IUPUI 70, Centenary 68
Jacksonville 64, Gardner-Webb 59
Lipscomb 73, Kennesaw St. 62
New Orleans 77, Fla. International 67
Northwestern St. 98, Nicholls St. 88
Samford 71,Tenn.-Martin 66
South Alabama 64, Louisiana-Monroe 57
Tennessee St. 63, E. Kentucky 62
71roy 66, Denver 63
VMI 103, Radford 94
Winthrop 64, High Paoint 63
MIDWEST
Butler 70, Loyola of Chicago 66, OT
Detroit 91 ,Wis.-Milwaukee 84, OT
N. Dakota St. 88,Texas-Pan American 58
Saint Louis 76, Charlotte 63
Utah Valley St. 66, S. Dakota St. 54
Valparaiso 56, UMKC 52, OT
SOUTHWEST
Arkansas St. 76,W Kentucky 75
North Texas 66, Middle Tennessee 53
Oral Roberts 73, Oakland, Mich. 63
SE Louisiana 74, Cent.Arkansas 66
Stephen F.Austin 82,Texas St. 62
Texas-Arlington 78, Sam Houston St. 65
FAR WEST
Boise St. 65, Fresno St. 61
Cal St.-Fullerton 84, UC Davis 77
E.Washington 100, Sacramento St. 85
Hawaii 72, San Jose St. 52
Montana 74, N.Arizona 71
Montana St. 58, N. Colorado 57
Nevada 84, Louisiana Tech 67
Pacific 66, Cal Poly 43
S. Utah 68,W. Illinois 65
Stanford 65, Southern Cal 50
UC Irvine 88, Long Beach St. 84
UC Santa Barbara 67, CS Northridge 57
UCLA 62, California 46
Washington 89, Oregon 77
Washington St. 70, Oregon St. 55
Weber St.71, Idaho St.58

Top 25 schedule

Today's Games
No. I Florida at Auburn, 5 p.m.
No. 4 North Carolina at No. 17 Arizona,
I p.m.
No. 5 Ohio State vs. Michigan State, 9 p.m.
No. 6 Texas A&M vs. Oklahoma, 2 p.m.
No. 7 Oregon at No. 20 Washington State,
10p.m.
No. 8 Kansas vs. Colorado, 1:30 p.m.
No. 9 Pittsburgh vs. St. John's, 4 p.m.
No. II Memphis vs. Southern Mississippi,
I p.m.
No. 12 Alabama vs.Arkansas, 3 p.m.
No. 13 Oklahoma State vs. Iowa State,
6 p.m.
No. 14 Butler at Detroit, 4:05 p.m.
No. 16 Air Force at BYU, 6 p.m.
No. 18 Nevada vs. Utah State, 10:05 p.m.
No. 22 Notre Dame vs.Villanova, 4 p.m.
No. 23 Indiana vs. Michigan, Noon
No. 25 Southern California at California,
6 p.m.
Sunday's Games
No.2 Wisconsin at Iowa, 1:05 p.m.
No. 3 UCLA at Stanford, 8 p.m.
No. 10 Duke vs. Boston College, 5:30 p.m.
No. 15 Marquette at South Florida, 2 p.m.
No. 19 Clemson vs.Virginia, I p.m.
No. 21 LSU at Georgia, 3 p.m.
No. 24 Virginia Tech at Georgia Tech,
3:30 p.m.

TENNIS


Australian Open

At Melbourne Park
Melbourne, Australia
Friday
Singles
Men
Semifinals
Fernando Gonzalez (10), Chile, def.Tommy
Haas (12), Germany, 6-1,6-3,6-I1.
Doubles
Women


Championship
Cara Black, Zimbabwe, and Liezel Huber
(3), South Africa, def. Chan Yung-jan and
Chuang Chia-jung,Taiwan, 6-4,6-7 (4), 6-1.
Mixed
Semifinals
Max Mirnyi and Victoria Azarenka, Belarus,
def. Jonas Bjorkman, Sweden, and Francesca
Schiavone (4), Italy, 6-2,6-3.
Daniel Nestor, Canada, and Elena
Likhovtseva, Russia, def. Kevin Ullyett,
Zimbabwe, and Liezel Huber (7), South Africa,
6-2,7-5.
junior Singles
Boys
Semifinals
Brydan Klein, Australia, def. Ricardas
Berankis (10), Lithuania, 6-1, 6-4.
Jonathan Eysseric (2), France, def.Thomas
Fabbiano (8), Italy, 6-4, 6-1.
Girls
Semifinals
Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova (I), Russia, def.
Alize Cornet (6), France, 7-6 (6), 6- I.
Madison Brengle (16), United States, def.
Ksenia Milevskaya (3), Belarus, 6-4, 7-5.
junior Doubles
Boys
Championship
Graeme Dyce, Britain, and Harri
Heliovaara, Finland, def. Stephen Donald,
Australia, and Rupesh Roy (8), India, 6-2, 6-7
(4), 6-3.
Girls
Championship
Evgeniya Rodina and Arina Rodionova,
Russia, def. Julia Cohen, United States, and
Urszula Radwanska (I), Poland, 2-6, 6-3,6-1.
Wheelchair
Singles
Men
Semifinals
Shingo Kunieda (2),Japan,def.Satoshi Saida
(4), Japan, 6-2, 6-4.
Michael Jeremiasz (3), France, def. Robin
Ammerlaan (I), Netherlands, 6-1, 4-6, 6- I.
Women
Semifinals
Esther Vergeer (I), Netherlands, def.
Sharon Walraven (3), Netherlands, 6-3, 6-I1.
Florence Gravellier .(2), France, def. Jiske
Griffioen (4), Netherlands, 6-3, 6-2.
Doubles
Men
Championship
Robin Ammerlaan, Netherlands, and
Shingo Kunieda, Japan, def. Maikel Scheffers
and Ronald Vink, Netherlands, 6-2, 6-0.
. Women
Championship
Jiske Griffioen and Esther Vergeer,
Netherlands, def. Florence Gravellier, France,
and Korie Homan, Netherlands, 6-0,3-6, 10-6.

Head to head

Maria Sharapova vs. Serena Williams
2004 Key Biscayne, hard-outdoor, RI6,
Williams, 6-4,6-3.
2004 Wimbledon, grass-outdoor, F,
Sharapova, 6-1, 6-4.
2004 Tour Championship, hard-indoor,
Sharapova, 4-6,6-2,6-4.
2005 Australian Open, hard-outdoor, SF,
Williams, 2-6,7-5,8-6.

HOCKEY

NHL games

Thursday's Games
No games scheduled
Friday's Games
Columbus 3, Buffalo 2
Carolina 6,Washington 2
Atlanta 5, N.Y. Islanders 4, OT
St. Louis 2, Detroit I, OT
Minnesota 2, Calgary I, SO
New Jersey 2,Tampa Bay 0
Nashville at Chicago (n)
Pittsburgh at Dallas (n)
San Jose at Edmonton (n)
Phoenix at Colorado (n)
Los Angeles at Vancouver (n)
Today's Games
N.Y. Rangers at Philadelphia, I p.m.
Boston at Ottawa, 3 p.m.
Minnesota at Columbus, 7 p.m.
Buffalo at N.Y. Islanders, 7 p.m.
Montreal atToronto, 7 p.m.
Carolina atWashington, 7 p.m.
New Jersey at Florida, 7:30 p.m.
Nashville at St. Louis; 8 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Phoenix, 9 p.m.
Los Angeles at Edmonton, 10 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Calgary at Chicago, 3 p.m. ,
Dallas at Anaheim, 3:30 p.m.
Colorado at Detroit, 3:30 p.m.
Philadelphia at Atlanta, 3:30 p.m.
San Jose at Vancouver, 10 p.m.


BOWLING


League reports

Results from Lake City Bowl league
play follow.
SUNDAY NITE MERCHANTS
Team standings: 1. (tie) 4 For Fun,
Teaser's (52-28); 3. Average Joe's
(51.5-28.5); 4. Mudd Dawgs (49-31).
High scratch game: 1. Norma Yeingst
187; 2. Phyllis Benton 186; 3. Diane
Hodges 180. 1. Chris Schneiders 247;
2. Joe Cohrs 235; 3. (tie) Gene Drawdy,
Bill Duncan 226.
High scratch series: 1. Phyllis Benton
505; 2. Norma Yeingst 502; 3. Bobbie
Watts 491. 1. Chris Schneiders 644;
2. Bill Duncan 611; 3. Mark Schneiders
584.
High handicap game: 1. Diane
Hodges 250; 2. Amy Drawdy 245; 3. Kim
Tice 229. 1. Chris Schneiders 276;
2. Gene Drawdy 256; 3. Bobby Pafford
246.
High handicap series: 1. Diane
Hodges 701; 2. Amy Drawdy 673;
3. Donna Kenyon 636. 1. Chris
Schneiders 731; 2. Gene Drawdy 671;
3. Mark Schneiders 647.
High average: 1. Norma Yeingst 172;
2. Phyllis Benton 164; 3. Bobbie Watts
162. 1. Bill Duncan 202; 2. (tie) Joe
Cohrs, Robert Pond 190.
(results from Jan. 21)
GOLDEN ROLLERS
Team standings: 1. Jo's Crew (63-21);
2. So So (52.5-31.5); 3. Who Cares
(47.5-36.5).
High scratch game: 1. Susan Mears
190; 2. Betty Brown 188; 3. Gloria Varner
183. 1. Steve Madsen 255; 2. Dick
Meyers 217; 3. Dan Ritter 207.
High scratch series: 1. Phyllis Benton
509; 2. Maggie Battle 487; 3. (tie) Louise
Atwood, Elaine Groh 485. 1. Steve
Madsen 694; 2. Wayne Johns 528;
3. Dick Meyers 519.
High handicap garqe: 1. Elaine Groh
247; 2. Gloria Varner 246; 3. Susan
Mears 242. 1. Frank Aiello 271; 2. Lamont
Denton 270; 3. Steve Madsen 263.
High handicap series: 1. Elaine Groh
692; 2. Bertha Black 641; 3. Joanne
Denton 639. 1. Steve Madsen 718;
2. Frank Aiello 662; 2. Lamont Denton
259.
High average: 1. Maggie Battle 163.2;
2. Phyllis Benton 162.1; 3. Louise Atwood
156.46. 1. Steve Madsen 194.73; 2. Earl
Hayward 171.57; 3. George Mulligan
170.93
(results from Jan. 18)
SEXY SENIORS
Team standings: 1. Perky Pals
(100-76); 2. 4 Clovers (98-78); 3. Jo's
Crew (94-82).
High scratch game: 1. Phyllis Benton
195; 2. Gloria Varner 180; 3. Jeanne
Sireci 166. 1. Clarence Clements 201;
2. Art Joubert 200; 3. Johnnie Croft 192.
High scratch series: 1. Phyllis Benton
550; 2. Susan Mears 471; 3. Louise
Atwood 444. 1. Art Joubert 556; 2. (tie)
Johnnie Croft, Clarence Clements 522;
4. C.W. Reddick 509.
High handicap game: 1. Gloria Varner
235; 2. Phyllis Benton 225; 3. Jeanne
Sireci 222. 1. Clarence Clements 234;
2. Art Joubert 230; 3. Ross Meyers 221.
High handicap series: 1. Phyllis
Benton 640; 2. Myrl Schleisman 626;
3. Vy Ritter 617. 1. Art Joubert 646;
2. Clarence Clements 621; 3. Johnnie
Croft 603.
High average: 1. Phyllis Benton 167;'
2. Louise Atwood 156; 3. Susan Mears


SCOREBOARD


148. 1. C.W. Reddick 183; 2. Earl
Hayward 173; 3. Dan Ritter 171.
(results from Jan. 16)
WEDNESDAY NITE MIXED
High scratch game: 1. Wendy Perry
245; 2. Julia Myers 230; 3. Jackie Young
194. 1. David Adel 225; 2. (tie) John
McFeely III, Tim Young 223; 4. Ed Kirby
222.
High scratch series: 1. Wendy Perry
657; 2. Jackie Young 548; 3. Julia Myers
540. 1. John McFeely III 650; 2. Tim
Young 645; 3. David Adel 621.
High handicap game: 1. Wendy Perry
254; 2. Julia Myers 246; 3. Shirley Yates
242. 1. Ed Kirby 260; 2. John McFeely Ill
244; 3. Roger Snipes 243.
High handicap series: 1. Wendy Perry
684; 2. Diane Lominack 618; 3. Brenda
Crapps 606. 1. John McFeely III 713;
2. Bill Ballew 663; 3. Ed Kirby 660.
High average: 1. Wendy Perry 191.3;
2. Jackie Young 183.27. 1. Mike Preston
205.81; 2. David Adel 202.93.
(results from Jan. 10)
QUEEN'S CLASSIC
Team Standings: 1. Mambajambas;
2. Sandpipers; 3. Family Affair.
High handicap game: 1. Chris
Douglass 245; 2. Lynn Bemis 235;
3. Cindy Davis 224.
High handicap series: 1. Chris
Douglass 649; 2. Tiffany Presnell 635;
3. Lynn Bemis 630.
(results from Jan. 10)
THURSDAY NITE MIXED
Team standings: 1. 4 Aces
(52.5-27.5); 2. That's A Strike! (49-31);
3. Spare The Rest (45.5-34.5).
High scratch game: 1. Anna Veach
250; 2. Phyllis Benton 202; 3. Bobbie
Watts 199. 1. Eddie Veach 244; 2. Jack
Devries 224; 3. C.W. Reddick 201.
High scratch series: 1. Phyllis Benton
568; 2. Anna Veach 567; 3. Bobbie Watts
533. 1. Eddie Veach 628; 2. Jack Devries
603; 3. C.W. Reddick 565.
High handicap game: 1. Anna Veach
277; 2. Bobbie Watts 232; 3. Phyllis
Benton 230. 1. Eddie Veach 253; 2. Jack
Devries 240; 3. Harold Van Hoy Sr. 235.
High handicap series: 1. Phyllis
Benton 652; 2. Anna Veach 648;
3. Bobbie Watts 632. 1. Harold Van Hoy
Sr. 673; 2. Jack Devries 651; 3. Harold
Van Hoy 643.
High average: 1. Anna Veach 171;
2. Phyllis Benton 169; 3. Bobbie Watts
164. 1. Eddie Veach 191; 2. Jack Devries
183; 3. C.W. Reddick 182.
(results from Jan. 4)
HIT & MISS
High scratch game: 1. Karen Gardner
184; 2. Linda Hemdon 181; 3. Christien
Chatman 176.
High scratch series: 1. Karen Gardner
496; 2. Linda Hemdon 458; 3. Christien
Chatman 452.
High handicap game: 1. Sharon
Tuning 232; 2. Christien Chatman 228;
3. Betty Schneiders 225.
High handicap series: 1. Sharon
Tuning 627; 2. Karen Gardner 616;
3. Christien Chatman 608.
High average: 1. Linda Herndon
159.81; 2. Ruth Heims 158.67.
(results from Jan. 16)
DRIFTERS
Team standings: 1. Pin Busters;
2. (tie) Ball Busters, Unk's.
High scratch game: 1. Phyllis Bentorn
203; 2. Gloria Dennis 185; 3. (tie) Patti
Wethington, Amber Tompkins 180. 1. Bill
Dolly 242; 2. Tim Wethington 220;
3. Chris Sanders 213.
High scratch series: 1. Gloria Dennis


Nolan Ryan hospitalized


Associated Press


ROUND ROCK, Texas -
Hall of Fame pitcher Nolan
Ryan was hospitalized Friday
and in good condition with an
undisclosed ailment, his son
said.
The 59-year-old strikeout
king checked into Round
Rock Medical Center for
treatment of recurring
symptoms from a pre-existing
medical condition, Reid Ryan
said.
Reid Ryan declined to


specify the condition, but said
it was discovered when his
father had double-bypass
heart surgery in 2000.
'This is something I've
lived with for the last seven
years," Nolan Ryan said in a
statement.
His son said it was not an
emergency.
"He takes medication for
it," Reid Ryan said. "From
time to time, he has episodes
that require him to get
checked out when he hasfpain
or something. He's feeling


good. This is more about
taking precautions."
Ryan was to be transferred
to a Houston hospital for
further evaluation, said a
spokesman for the Round
Rock Express, one of the
minor league teams the
former pitcher owns.
Ryan struck out 5,714 and
pitched seven no-hitters -
both major league records -
in 27 years with the New York
Mets, the California Angels,
the Houston Astros and the
Texas Rangers.


Lake City Community College and TIMCO ''


PROUDLY ANNOUNCE THE NEW


AVIATION STRUCTURES


PROGRAM

at Lake City Community College


This 10 Week Course Begins


FEBRUARY 5,2007

ENROLLMENT FEE - $100 8/

Graduates of the course will be offered employment at TIMCO based on personnel needs.
Personnel being hired at TIMCO will be brought in at the 1 year experience level on TIMCO's payscale.


Registraion Dead lnei ensaJn 1-Dntms hscrehningopruity


CONTACt. Edwin McClanton

Lake City Community College

(386) 754-4462

7am-4pm


No previous aviation experience is required. You must be 18 years old for employment at any of the TIMCO facilities.


542; 2. Phyllis Benton 537; 3. Patti
Wethington 499. 1. Bill Dolly 620; 2. Tim
Wethington 577; 3. C.W. Reddick 572.
High handicap game: 1. Phyllis
Benton 226; 2. Amber Tompkins 220;
3. Shanna Moates 219. 1. Bill Dolly 254;
2. Albert Talley 240; 3. Mert Niewisch 236.
High handicap series: 1. Gloria Dennis
626; 2. (tie) Phyllis Benton, Kim Markham
606. 1. Bill Dolly 656; 2. Albert Talley 635;
3. Mert Niewisch 622.
High average: 1. Phyllis Benton 171;
2. Cythe Shiver 165. 1. Chris Sanders
200; 2. Tim Wethington 188.
(results from Jan. 16)
MONDAY LADIES
Team standings: 1. Man Haters;
2. Lake City Bowl; 3. L K Roofing.
High scratch game: 1. Liz King 242;
2. Julia Myers 220; 3. Wendy Perry 217.
High scratch series: 1. Phyllis Benton
616; 2. Wendy Perry 613; 3. Julia Myers
605.
High handicap game: 1. Liz King 261;
2. Dorothee Call 255; 3. Velma Poole
249.
High handicap series: 1. Phyllis
Benton 685; 2. Dorothee Call 675;
3. Velma Poole 657.
High average: 1. Julie Myers 188;
2. Liz King 179.
(results from Jan. 15)
TGIF
Team standings: 1. Ragtimes (55-21);
2. Nobody Knows (48-28); 3. Blue Lynx
Kats (47-29, 47,246 handicap pins); 4. A
Class Act (47-29, 46,936 handicap pins).
High handicap game: 1. Roberta Stem
294; 2. Ida Hollingsworth 271; 3. Pat
Gallegos 261. 1. Wally Howard 269;
2. Bill Coleman 263; 3. David Pauwels
259.
High handicap series: 1. Ida
Hollingsworth 788; 2. Roberta Stem 698;
3. Pat Gallegos 695. 1. Bill Coleman 727;
2. Peter Nadeau 718; 3. Jim Pauwels Sr.
677.
(results from Jan. 5)


Youth league

LAKE CITY MAJORS
High handicap game: 1. Megan
Brackin 262; 2. Sarah Wethington 258;
3. Lynn Douglas 232. 1. Donny Dohrn
285; 2. Cody Stuart 267; 3. Andrew Rich
252.
High handicap series: 1. Megan
Brackin 676; 2. Amber Brackin 663;
3. Ashlynn Mackey 659. 1. Donny Dohrn
743; 2. Cody Stuart 685; 3. Keith Harry
684.
LAKE CITY JUNIORS
High handicap game: 1. Victoria Wise
214; 2. Jordan Yarbrough 200;
3. Courtney Schmitt 199. 1. Matt Pringle
237; 2. (tie) Madison Stephens, Gary
Beames 212.
High handicap series: 1. Jordan
Yarbrough 580; 2. Victoria Wise 562;
3. Courtney Schmitt 554. 1. Matt Pringle
606; 2. Peter Maziliano 585; 3. Gary
Beames 569.
LAKE CITY BANTAMS
High handicap game: 1. Hunter
Phillips 226; 2. Angel Sellers 159;
3. Jasmine Williams 157. 1. Treven
Brackin 165; 2. Juan Perez 164; 3. Ben
Williams 159.
High handicap series: 1. Hunter
Phillips 544; 2. Angel Sellers 449;
3. Jasmine Williams 448. 1. Juan Perez
481; 2. Treven Brackin 434; 3. Ben
Williams 430.
(results from Jan. 13)


Tuv7cO
AVIAT~)N ~FRirnC~ JNC'









LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SATURDAY, JANUARY 27, 2007


Leak, Smith set to square



off again in Senior Bowl


By JOHN ZENOR
Associated Press

MOBILE, Ala. - Chris
Leak won the national
championship and Troy Smith
bagged the Heisman Trophy.
Now, they are vying for a
more lucrative prize: NFL
success.
The two quarterbacks who
faced off for a national title
nearly three weeks ago will
share the field again in
Saturday's Senior Bowl to cap
a weeklong NFL audition.
Florida's Leak and Ohio
State's Smith are all about
business, not one-upping each
other.
"I don't have anything to
prove," said Smith, who won
the Heisman Trophy but lost
the title game. "I have a lot to
gain and (can) better myself.
"I have to just be myself.
Hopefully that takes me a long
ways. It's taken me this far."
Leak and Smith are two of
college football's most
high-profile passers, but they
aren't the most coveted by the
NFL in part because both
measured in at almost exactly
6 foot this week. Notre
Dame's Brady Quinn visited
with NFL officials in Mobile
but won't play in the game
after sustaining a bursa sac
injury to his right knee.
LSU's JaMarcus Russell is a
junior and not eligible for the
game. Russell and Quinn are
considered candidates for the
No. 1 overall pick.
In fact, many of the top NFL
prospects - like Oklahoma's
Adrian Peterson, Southern
California's Dwayne Jarrett
and Georgia Tech's
Calvin Johnson - are
underclassmen. Wisconsin
offensive tackle Joe Thomas
- a projected Top-5 pick -
also bowed out of the game.
NFL teams and fans just
have to be 'coitent with IULk,
Smith & Co. ....
Michigan State's Drew
Stanton and Pittsburgh's
Tyler Palko join Smith at
quarterback on the North
team.
On the South, the
quarterbacks are Leak,
Conference USA's all-time
leading passer Kevin Kolb of
Houston and UTEP's Jordan
Palmer, brother of the
Cincinnati Bengals' Carson
Palmer.
The past three years, Philip
Rivers, Jason Campbell and


j JENNIFER CHASTEEN/Lake City Reporter
Florida quarterback Chris Leak hands the ball off to running back DeShawn Wynn in Gainesville on
Oct. 6.


Jay Cutler all helped secure
first-round selections with
strong performances during
Senior Bowl week.
"There's a little bit of a void
behind Russell and Brady
Quinn, and it seems like each
year someone has emerged at
the Senior Bowl," said NFL
Network draft analyst Mike
Mayoch. "I don't see a similar
story emerging from this
week's practices."
Smith, for instance, was
intercepted three times in one
practice, Mayoch said ....... '
.."I truly think Drew Stanton
probably had the best
all-around week of the
quarterbacks," he said.
Leak is used to being
doubted despite a career filled
with yards, touchdowns and
question marks. He even had
to platoon with a talented
freshman in fan favorite Tim
Tebow as a senior.
He said he won't let the
current doubters distract him.
"It's just like going into a
game," said Leak, Florida's
alltime passing leader and


MVP of the BCS
championship game. "You've
got to make sure you focus on
the right thing."
Besides, he never seemed to
let critics affect him on the field.
"He's been as criticized as
anybody in the country," said
South coach Jon Gruden of
the Tampa Bay Buccaneers.
Smith wasn't accustomed to
that kind of heat until after the
Bowl Championship Series
title game. He passed for just
35 yards, was held to mihnus-29
' yards' ruihii' a 0f',olIttn In
interception- and a fumble Iin
Ohio State's 41-14 loss to Leak
and the Gators.
"After the bowl loss, people
are scrutinizing that
performance and whether or
not he is as great as maybe he
was in the first (12) games,"
Gruden said. "That's the way
it is."
But like Leak, the
businesslike Smith isn't
dwelling on the terrible finale.
He did, after all, win the
Walter Camp player of the
year award and the Davey


O'Brien Award as the nation's
top quarterback, along with
tji Heisman. He threw 30
touchdown passes against just
sik interceptions, three of
them off deflections.
"I have an understanding
that all of my focus positively
.needs to be concentrated on
this week, on this new part of
my life," Smith said. "What's
done is done, and I can do
nothing about it."
,He could take some advice
from Leak, who likely won
over even his harshest critics
by finally � winning a
Southeastern Conference and
national title. He said he's not
paying any more heed to talk
about his draft stock than he
did his college critics.
"I really haven't been able
to sit back and listen to it,"
Leak said. "I've always been
the type person that focuses
on making sure that I'm
prepared for the game and my
teammates are prepared.
That's how I've done it the
entire season, and this is
game week."


Endurance race


has become


an all-star event


By MIKE HARRIS
Associated Press


DAYTONA BEACH -
NASCAR champion Jeff
Gordon? Check.
IRL champion Sam
Hornish Jr.? Check.
Former F1 driver Juan
Pablo Montoya? Check.
It's a who's who of auto
racing for Saturday's Rolex
24 at Daytona International
Speedway.
And there they were
Friday, millions of dollars'
worth of auto-racing talent,
sitting on a concrete wall -
NASCAR champions
Gordon, Jimmie Johnson
and Bobby Labonte,
alongside open-wheel stars
Hornish Jr., Helio
Castroneves, Paul Tracy,
Scott Dixon and Dan
Wheldon. Not to mention
Montoya, who's making the
big jump to NASCAR this
year.
They, plus a few other big
names - such as NASCAR's
Tony Stewart and Champ
Car's Jimmy Vasser -
neither of whom made the
all-star Victory Circle photo
op Friday - will take part in
the twice-around-the-clock
endurance battle, which


begins at 1:30 p.m. Saturday.
"Phew, this is some
company to be in," said Jorg
Bergmeister, one of the
road-racing stars rubbing
shoulders with the big-name
visitors in Victory Circle.
Last year, the German
driver became the only
driver to win championships
in both American sports cars
series - Grand Am and the
competing American Le
Mans Series.
It's the season-opener for
everyone, and the starting
lineup will include about 70
cars in two classes.
Montoya, whose previous
endurance experience
consists of some 12-hour
go-kart races and a couple of
six-hour events more than 10
years ago in his native
Colombia, is getting used to
trying new things.
He's about to begin his
first full season of stock-
car racing for his one-time
open-wheel boss Chip
Ganassi, who owns the
Lexus Riley Daytona
Prototype that Montoya
will share this weekend
with defending Grand
Am champion Scott Pruett
and Salvador Duran of
Mexico.


to Greg Blake. He took
second on a wild pitch and
scored on a single by
Williams. Morales and Testa
tacked on RBI-singles.
In the seventh inning,
walks to Chris Jones, Blake
and Williams loaded the
bases. Stephen Carr hit a
sacrifice fly and r;&r6s sin-
gled in a rutm i Williams
scored on a throwing error.


Testa walked to start off
the eight inning and Zachary
Prentice ran for him. Rosa
singled and Prentice scored
on a single by Blake. Rosa
scored on a wild pitch.
Manuel Garcia will start,
when- Lake, City hosts
Chipola. ,Community. College
at 1 p.m. today Chipola is
preseason ranked No: 5,
while Lake City is No. 7.


%am. rJi myIn t \ t I - It iI
Licensed & Insured Toll Free (866) 9LW-ROOF
Free EstimateRCC067442


TIGERS: Tad Anderson named JV MVP


Continued From Page 1B
I had to get used to playing
safety again. I wasn't really
expecting it."
A freshman starting for
Columbia is rare enough, but
to get votes from the veterans
of the system is even more
unusual.
"It feels good for my first
time out with the big boys,"
Powell said. "They pushed me
and worked me real hard.
Thank God for my family; they
kept me straight."
Other varsity award winners
were: Ren6 Perry, Most
Versatile; Matt Berry, Bad Cat;
Brady Dicks, Super Cat
Defense; Darrell Underwood,


" Training
S1' 11 wlilh Wionllnuu ongrtiiig
Management.
' mjn.ig mir.I| learn 10 assIsl yoU
in sale,,
I Sales Support..
F.icliiy a.;isfed Iraining ana
support, heavy media
advertising, extensive participa-
tion in owner loyalty groups and
camping clubs.
Compensation
Salary, commission, bonuses.
spills, and top rated compeini ve
employee benefits package.
S And More!


Best Defensive Back; Earnest
Claridy and Marquis Davis,
Best Defensive Lineman;
Chris Martinez, Best Tackler;
Jacquez Macon, Best
Offensive Back; Sampson
Genus, Best Offensive
Lineman; Willie Collins, Super
Cat Offense; Alex Carswell,
Best Receiver; Cason Bicknell
and Levi McFatter, Best
Blocker; Travis Peters,
Coaches Award; Cleveland
Hill, Unsung Hero; Talin
Jones, Eye of the Tiger; Brent
Knott, Bengal Award; Logan
Douglas, Special Teams
Award; Ryan Bell, Most
Improved Defense; Josh


Messer, Most Improved
Offense; John Beasley and
Brach Bessant,
Underclassman Award; Kyle
Townsend, Scholar Award.
Junior varsity awards
presented by head coach Al
Nelson and his staff were: Tad
Anderson, Most Valuable
Player; Cameron Sweat,
Coaches Award; Chris Dickey,
Most Valuable Defense;
Demarquis Williams, Most
Valuable Offense; Marquis
Morgan and Daniel Dohrn,
Bad Cat; Travis Tomlin and
Matt Knowles, Offensive
Lineman Award; Rex Cannon,
Scholar Award.


SALES CONSULTANT

At Travel Country RV Center we are on the move! With the hottest
products on the market and as the fastest growing dealership in the
region, we're adding sales professionals to help expand our market and
to help maintain our extremely loyal customer base.

We're not looking for career sales people who change jobs every 6
months. We're looking for hard working, honest people who enjoy
talking to people, enjoy the great outdoors, and want to join an industry
where the average salesperson earns $50,000 per year, with profes-
sionals earning $75,000 per year and where the super stars are earning
$100,000 + each and every year. All you need is appearance, and the
"gift of gab", and we'll teach you everything you need to know to be
successful.

If you're ready for a serious career opportunity email your employment
history for the last 3 years (with earnings) tor
sales@travelcountryrv.com, or Call An, @ 752-3723 to schedule an'
appointment. All inquiries will be kept in strict confidence.


A 11OM ON-I' 11111111 In


'WOLVES: Garcia to start
Continued From Page 1B


Florida


Credit Union


7;. .
~~...


a��a


Free Checking


a Auto Loans


SBusiness Loans


f Real Estate Loans


B Home Equity Loans


Investments


Lake City Office:
583 West Duval Street (386) 755-4141 www.flcu.org El [1


Page Editor: Chris White, 754-0420









LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS SATURDAY, JANUARY 27, 2007


ZITS


DILBERT
II


BABY BLUES


FOR BETTER OR WORSE


BLONDIE FRANK & ERNEST


BEETLE BAILEY B.C.


HOW GWE~fr.
WHAT MOT'IVATre:
ON THAT-?


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE GARFIELD


SNUFFY SMITH CLASSIC PEANUTS


YE5 = Rt R ,II AIN WA6
REALL F ,NC6NT915lI ORNIN&!
NO M AIGOI MCA, -rEACM
05ALL R006TOS GLO


L/27/07


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-April
19): Money can be made if
you invest wisely. A chance to
travel or pick up information
about the way other people live
will give you ideas that will
help you economize a
little better yourself. -k**
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): Don't get all stressed out
because someone doesn't
agree with you. Make a choice
to either go it alone or bend a
little. A child or older person in
your life is likely to need your
help. **
GEMINI (May 21-June
20): You can make some
major moves today that will
ensure your future security. An
opportunity will come from
someone you knew in the past.
An idea you have to do things
a little differently will be
accepted by all the right peo-
ple. ***
CANCER (June 21-July
22): You should probably
make a couple of changes that
will help you secure your posi-
tion or land a job that will satis-
fy your financial needs. A
surge of energy will help you
complete what you've left


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Word

undone. Someone may tell you
a fib. ***
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
Partnerships will be in your
favor and will help you get
what you want to do off the
ground. You are in the mood
for love, so do something nice
for the one you love. If single,
get out and play the game.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Be very careful whom
you trust with your personal
information. Someone will use
emotional blackmail to try to
encourage you to do things for
him or her. Say no before you
find yourself at a point of no
return. **
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): No matter what you do,
you will have an edge today.
Someone is likely to try to dis-
mantle you but it will only
make him or her look bad.
Keep things simple and you
will get the most in the end.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrlly Cipher cryptoqrars are created from quolatlons by famous people, past mind present.
E1(,h ifelle in I h cipher , tends foranother.
Today's due. C equals V
"Y VLP Y P V SPVIX FTIR UWZ E TWZ
EWFOB XMFOBN XWYWZZWU; TWZ
XMVX NIZPRA FN V BZPVX VOE
SRPN NPE FOCPOX F WO . BPW Z B P S.

PREVIOUS SOLUTION - "My advice to most any man in this business is,
don't marry an actress, and I know whereof I speak." - Henry Fonda
(c) 2007 by NEA, Inc. 1-27


21): Don't give in to anyone
trying to take advantage of
you. Be straightforward if you
don't want to end up doing
things that you don't want to
do and that you don't have the
time to do. Practice saying no.
**
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-
Dec. 21): You can settle into
anything nicely today. Start
something new, take a course
or look for information that
will help you excel. Change
may seem daunting but
it is just a necessary
transformation. ***
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. 19): Stay calm: Now is
the time to listen, observe and
decide who is on your side.
Don't waste your time trying
to convince someone who is
not willing to move. Save your
energy for what really matters
to you. -*****-
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
18): Network all you can. Get
involved in groups that will
bring you in contact with pres-
tigious people who can help
you get ahead. Think positive-
ly and progressively and some-
one will be impressed enough
to take a chance on you. **
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): Nothing will be out in the
open for you to see. You will
have to guess at what needs to
be done or wait until you
receive more information. A
problem while driving or a
miscommunication will cause
you grief. ****
Birthday Baby: You are
creative - totally out of the
ordinary in the way you view
things. You are inventive, a
humanitarian and a seeker of
truth, justice and fair play.


DEAR ABBY


Merry prankster comes across


as menacing to his friends


DEAR ABBY: My hus-
band and I are in our early 30s
and we spend a lot of time
with three other couples. A
few months ago, we went on a
picnic at a local park to play
ball and have lunch. One man
(I'll call him Bill) thought it
was funny to pour what was
left of a soft drink on one of
the wives' head. She and her
husband had to leave. It was
obvious she couldn't stay with
sticky hair and clothing. Bill
called them "party-poopers."
Three weeks ago, Bill
yanked the cloth off a table
that had been set with another
of the wives' good dishes.
Broken china lay everywhere.
That wife was also a "party-
pooper" because she didn't
think it was funny.
Last weekend there was a
pool party. I didn't want to go
because I'm not comfortable
with the water. My husband
promised he'd stay right with
me, which he did. However,
Bill swam under the water,
grabbed both my ankles and
yanked me under. I was terri-
fied. I told Bill I never wanted
to see him again, and I meant
it.
Now his wife, "Nicki," is
upset because she found out I
had a dinner at my home and
didn't invite them. I told her
she could come, but I would
no longer let her husband
near me. I think he needs pro-
fessional help.
Nicki and I work in the


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearobby.com

same building, and I see her
almost every day. We eat in
the building cafeteria, and
she's spreading the word that
I have caused trouble with
their group of friends. She's
saying I made a play for her
husband and he rejected me,
and I'm angry about it. I have
not said anything to defend
myself. I don't feel the need.
But my husband says I should
tell the real reason. What do
you think? - THE VICTIM,
NOT THE PERP
DEAR VICTIM: I agree
with your husband. You have
an obligation to protect your
reputation, and you should by
all means tell the truth - the
whole truth. Bill appears to be
a real handful; whatever his
problem is, I'll bet this isn't
the first time this has hap-
pened to that couple. You are
wise to avoid them. They both
appear to be troubled.,
DEAR ABBY: I am in my
mid-50s and in a relationship
with "Josh," who is 40. We
have been seeing each other
for three years. We care about
each other, but we're both
insecure.
Josh looks through my cell


phone every chance he gets,
even if it's in my purse. This
bothers me because I have
male friends, but he erased
their phone numbers and for-
bade them to call me.
Occasionally, I ask to see his
cell phone. Sometimes he'll
agree, other times he refuses.
A text message I sent to a
friend caused Josh to question
my loyalty. In retaliation, I
went through some things at
his house and questioned his.
I have begged him to stop
going through my cell phone,
but it falls on deaf ears. I feel
like I'm walking on eggshells.
What should I do? -
TREADING LIGHTLY IN
DETROIT
DEAR TREADING
LIGHTLY: See if Josh cares
enough about you to go with
you for relationship counsel-
ing. You and he appear to feed
off each other's insecurity,
and that's not healthy for
either of you. Don't you real-
ize that you cannot - nor can
he - compel fidelity? The
decision to forgo romantic
involvements with others
must come from within.
On the one hand, you could
dump him and end the frus-
tration. On the other hand,
because you and Josh have
starred in this soap opera for
so long, it's possible you are
meant for each other.

* Write Dear Abby at P.O. Box
69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.


ASOK, YOUR ASSIGN-
MENT IS TO BUY A
DISPLAY CASE FOR
OUR AWARDS.


o THEN GO TO THE
AWARDS STORE AND
BUY A BUNCH OF
AWARDS BECAUSE
WE DON'T HAVE ANY.


THE NEXT ONE IS
FOR "BEST UNETHICAL
FILLING OF AN
AWARDS SHOWCASE."
iSi
E


-rODA'Y'15
6AToizoAy!


Page Editor: Chris Bednar, 754-0404











Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SATURDAY, JANUARY 27, 2007

Lake City Reporter




CLASSIFIED


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Ad is to Appear: Call by: Fax/Email by:
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Wednesday
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You can call us at 755-5440, Monday through Friday
from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their classified ads in per-
son, and some ad categories will require prepayment.
Our office is located at 180 East Duval Street.
You can also fax or email your ad copy to the Reporter.

FAX: 386-752-9400 Please direct your copy to the
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Ad Errors- Please read your ad on the first day of
publication. We accept responsibility for only the first
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space in error. Please call 755-5440 immediately for
prompt correction and billing adjustments.

Cancellations- Normal advertising deadlines apply for
cancellation.

Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440. Should further informa-
tion be required regarding payments or credit limits, your
call will be transferred to the accounting department.



Advertising copy is subject to approval by the Publisher
who reserves the right to edit, reject, or classify all adver-
tisements under appropriate headings. Copy should be
checked for errors by the advertiser on the first day
of publication. Credit for published errors will be allowed
for the first insertion for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the Publisher shall not be
liable for any omission of advertisements ordered to be
published, nor .for any general, special or consequential
damages. Advertising language must comply with
Federal, State or local laws regarding the prohibition of
discrimination in employment, housing and public accom-
modations. Standard abbreviations are acceptable; how-
ever, the first word of each ad may not be abbreviated.


REPORTER Classifieds


In Print and On Line

www.lakecityreporter.com


Land Clearing Home Improvements Drywall Services


DAVIS LAND CLEARING
Dirt Sales: Fill - Top Soil -
Limerock. Bobcat & Buckhoe
Rentals Call 386-867-2141 Jesse

Concrete Work
J.C. CONCRETE Driveways,
carport slabs, patios, & etc. Most
jobs $1.00sqft + cost of concrete.
Free Estimates. 386-344-8573

Trenching
TRENCHING WORK- by the foot
or the job. Gateway Multi-Services
Commercial Mowing. Licensed &
Insured. Call Brian 386-867-1173

Painting Service
NN PAINTING
Free Estimates
Call 386-344-5897 or
386-719-2166

Home Improvements
, John Thomas
Home Repairs Guaranteed
Specializing in Handicap baths &
ramps. Vinyl Siding, Skirling,
Screened rooms, Decks.
386-758-7676
SJohn Thomas
Home Repairs Guaranteed
Specializing inl Handicap baths &
ramps. Vinyl Siding, Skirting,
Screened rooms, Decks.
386-758-7676
AFFORDABLE
SPool Renovations,
Wood Decks & More.
KJ Kelley's 386-754-2357


AMERICAN HOME
IMPROVEMENTS, INC.
We do Decks, Porches, Drywall,
Siding, Skirting, Metal roofs.
and MUCH MORE!!!
Please Call (386)209-1073
CARPENTRY, PAINTING,
fans, electrical, plumbing, tile,
laminate floor, and much more!
30 years experience in Florida.
All work by an hourly wage
386-752-5491
KITCHEN & BATH Renovations.
Fences, decks, windows, doors,
tile, painting & drywall. General
home maintenance & repair.
Jenkins Contracting
Lic# CGC 1507486 386-719-2240

Lawn & Landscape Service
Custom Cuts Lawn & Landscape.
Customized lawn care, sod, trim-
ming, design. Com. & Resd. Lic. &
insured. Call 386-496-2820 Iv msg.
TIME TO MULCH
Cypress mulch 5 yard minimum
Delivered & spread or just
delivered. 386-935-6595

Services
FREE CLEANUP.
Pick up of unwanted metals,
tin, scrap vehicles.
386-755-0133 We Recycle.
General Repairs & Maintenance.
Mobile & Structural Homes.
Personal Quality Service. Insured.
30 yrs exp.Richard 386-961-9030
PARRISH'S CONCRETE
Free Estimates. License & Insured.
Quality Work @ Reasonable prices.
Call 386-752-8223


DRYWALL Hang, Finish;
Textures; Plaster & Stucco Repairs;
Interior & Exterior Painting.
386-752-2412

Land Services

GREG'S LAWN-SERVICE.
All your lawn needs.
Low low prices!!!!!!
Please call (386)758-9300

Tree Service

CHARTER OAK
TREE SERVICE
Tree Trimming, Tree Removal,
Fully Insured!!
30 years experience
963-2140 or 365-0743

HAZARDOUS Tree Trimming
removal & stump grinding. Senior
discount. 24 hr emergency service
386-590-7798 or 386-963-3360

Carpet Cleaning

CARPET CLEANING
2 rooms & a hall $39.95.
5 rooms & a hall $89.95. Also Tile
& Grout Cleaning. 386-755-9200

Electrical Work

Need Electrical Repairs? Make
sure it's done right! Immediate
availability. Free estimates.
Call Russ 386-288-4313


- Ziles/" page or.//fi the mord to see on i7 r/i , 14.

Love Line Rates Are As Follows:

15 WORDS PLUS ART & RED COLOR *10.50
10 words for 18.00. Each additional word 100 each.
DEADLINE IS FEBRUARY 9, 2007

#1#
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do #6

##5 #8


Print your message here:





'Your Name:
Phone: Art#
Address:
City/State/Zip:

Mail to: Lake City Reporter, Classified Department
PO Box 1709, Lake City, Fl 32056 - 755-5440
ALL ADS MUST BE PAID AT TIME OF PLACEMENT.


ug 13W


Lake Clity Reporter











LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SATURDAY, JANUARY 27, 2007


010 Announcements


ALL ABOUT FACES
This Month Special: Free Eyebrow
or Lip Waxing with Pampering
Facial. 60 min/$45.00.
By Appointment only, Evening
appointments avail. 386-754-2128


020 Lost & Found

DOG MISSING: Black Male
Bulldog. Ears clipped, long tail.
Missing from Moore Rd & Lake .
Jeffrey area. Very much loved
& missed. Any information,
please call 752-7541

REWARD FOR MISSING DOG.
Solid black female,
mixed lab/chow, 60/701bs.
Please call 362-1283.


030 Personals

Divorce, Deeds, Resumes,
Bankruptcies, Re Closings,
Assist w/Court Forms.
Call Patricia 386-961-5896


060 Services

GOT WATKINS?
Call (386)719-2269
or go to
www.watkinsonline.com/creel

100 Job
Opportunities

04506495


is currently looking for an
.independent newspaper carrier
for the Columbia City area.
Deliver the Reporter in the
early morning hours
Tuesday - Sunday.
No delivery on Monday's.
Carrier must have dependable
transportation. Stop by the
Reporter today to fill out a
contractor's inquirers form.
No phone calls please!

04511080(1


SAVAGE

DRIVERS WANTED
Savage Services is seeking
professional drivers for the
evening shift for local hauls in the
Lake City Area. Class A CDL
With Hazmat and Tanker
endorsements required.
* Competitive Pay
* Complete Benefit Package,
Including 401K
* Home everyday ,..
* Paid Holidays and Vacations
6 Quarterly Incentive Bonus
Only serious applicants need.
apply. Call 386-755-9097 -
Lake City

04511550


is currently looking for an
independent newspaper carrier
for the Fort White area.
Deliver the Reporter in the
early morning hours
Tuesday - Sunday.
No delivery on Monday's.
Carrier must have dependable
transportation. Stop by the
Reporter today to fill out a
contractor's inquirers form.
No phone calls please!

04511623
Customer Service/Inside Sales
We are looking for happy
high-energy people to
join our team. Interested?
Please call 386-269-4409.

04511630





ASST. MANAGERS
AND MANAGERS
For The "Nations Largest
BBQ Chain"
Competitive Wages,
Advancement Opportunities
Complete Training Package
Health & Dental Benefits
DFWP EOE
Please Send"Resume to:


04511753
PRESS BREAK OPERATOR
NEEDED. BASIC
GEOMETRY SKILLS
REQUIRED. DEPENDABLE.
EXP. PREFERRED,
BUT WILL TRAIN.
CONTACT AMP CO. AT
386-754-9367 EOE.

04511895
CASHIERS & FRUIT
BAGGERS: Now hiring for
High Springs fruit & gift stores.
Apply in Person at Florida
Citrus Center 18625 CR 236,
High Springs (exit 404 & 1-75)
or call Judy Dunn
@352-266-3800

045120111
ACCOUNTANT
Large company based in
Lake City seeking an
experienced accountant for fast
paced industry. Construction
background and management
experience preferred. Bachelor
degree or higher required. Salary
commensurate with experience.
Competitive benefits pkg. EEO
Employer. Please send resumes to
Human Resources PO Box 1829
Lake City FL 32056.


100 Job
100 Opportunities

IW1512-144
AVIATION DISTRIBUTION
Company seeks inside
Salesperson for Lake City
Branch. Duties include shipping,
receiving, purchasing and paint
mixing. Aero Performance is an
Equal Opportunity Employer with
a great benefits package. Fax
resume to 386-755-6935 or e-mail
jherring@aeroperform.com

045121149
ASSEMBLY/
PRODUCTION JOBS
We need your work experience
of 6 months or more. Skills
needed include experience
Carpentry, furniture assembly,
mechanical installers, and
fiberglass technicians. Proficiency
with power tools, drill. screwgun.
Jigsaw, and DA sander. Benefits
include: paid holidays, paid
vacations, family health
insurance, and a 401-K plan.
Some hand tools required. Please
apply in person at Hunter Marine
on Highway 441 in Alachua, FL.

145120152
Legal Secretary for busy law
firm. Real Estate background a
plus. Proficient typing and
organizational skills required.
Proficiency in Word and Word
Perfect is necessary. Salary
commensurate with experience.
Mail cover letter and resume to
Post Office Box 1707, Lake City,
FL 32055 or fax to 386-755-4569.

(14512175
Pinefitters and Pipe Welders
Cimco Refrigeration, Inc. of
Mobile, AL hiring pipefitters and
pipe (stick) welders for 7-month
project in Lake City, FL. $20.25
per hour plus overtime & benefits.
50-hour work week. Must pass
carbon steel coupon weld test and
must pass drug screen. Contact
Jim Hartley @ (251)471-2425.
If you have resume, fax to Cimco
c/o Jim Hartley @ 251-476-7337.

04512124
CLEANING COMPANY
need Janitors in Lake City area
from 6:00pm to 10:00pm.
Please call 800-936-0885

04512143
F/T SERVICE MANAGER,
CARC- Oversee all Client
services. Prefer BA with 2 years
of experience with the
developmentally disabled or in
related fields. Must have caring
positive attitude, be self
motivated, detailed oriented, team
player. Computer-knowledge
of word/excel. APPLY IN
PERSON AT CARC- 512 SW
SISTERS WELCOME ROAD.
Closing date 2/7/07

ALUMINUM INSTALLERS!
(Screen Room, etc.)
Have own tools & transportation.
Clean Drivers Lic. 1-800-447-2526


i10 Job
100 Opportunities

11-512147
Gilman Building Products
Company is accepting
applications for Security Guard at
the Sawmill located in Lake
Butler. A high school diploma or
equivalent is required. Computer
knowledge is required. We have
competitive rates & 401K, dental
& health insurance, paid vacation
& holidays & promotional
opportunities. Interested
applicants should apply in person
Monday through.Friday from
8:00 AM until 3:30 PM
at the front office.

04512150
Jameson Inn
Now Hiring
Full Time Housekeeping
Must be flexible & dependable.
Must pass background check.
Apply in person at
285 SW Commerce Blvd
No phone calls.

115514185
Scaff's Market
Lake City & Branford
Now accepting applications
for the following positions:
Meat Cutters and Wrappers.
Apply at either location or at the
S & S Food Stores office.
Competitive wages-
Full-Time Benefits
Drug Free Workplace

15514197
SWIM COACH Columbia swim
team is seeking swim coaches for
its age group. seasonal &
year round teams. Coaches must
be able to provide competitive
stroke coaching. Salary neg.
Interested applicants should
contact Robb at 386-754-7150
By February 15,2007.

PT Teacher/Teachers Aide
(EHS Lake City 0-3 yrs) -
HS Diploma/GED, 40 hour
intro child care training or
must enroll within 90 days of
employment and complete within 1
year and must complete CDA/Infant
Toddler Endorsement
within 1 year of hire or
minimum of 2 yr degree in early
childhood education or child
development; 3 yrs of classroom
experience working with young
children preferred. Bilingual
(Spanish/ English) preferred,
5 Hour Literacy Course as required
by DCF, Must pass physical
and DCF background screening
requirements, Current First
Aid/ CPR preferred. Excellent
Benefits-Paid Holidays,
Sick/ Annual Leave. Apply in.
'person to 236 SW Columbia Ave
(754-2222) or mail resume to
PO Box 2637, Lake City, FL
32056-2637 Fax (386) 754-2220.
EOE


Sunbelt Chrysler Jeep Dodge

Now Hiring Sales Consultants to work with
aggressive dealership. We provide Salary + Commision,
401 K, Health Insurance & Paid Vacations.
Apply in person at Hwy 90 West
ask for Randy Sears or John Waschek.


Sunbelt Chrysler Jeep Dodge
Now Hiring: Service Consultants & Service
Technicians (Must have own tools)
We provide:
401K, Health Insurance & Paid Vacations
Apply in Person at Hwy 90 West,
ask for Dwight Wilson or Dennis Conway


Services From

Multi-Billion $ Companies

NO SALES
Make Money From Services You Already Use

755-6712


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Henri Arnold and Mike Argirion


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

I CEDID


TUFITO0


' ' / / 1
L / L /\ /


7


www.jumble.com . . | l- I F--N,' llN I (.
I ------- - IA - -
SLOIPH LL
I 7 Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.

A:

(Answers Monday)
Yesterday's Jumbles: TEMPO VALET CASHEW PLENTY
I Answer: What the shoplifter got when he took the
fancy calendar - TWELVE MONTHS


100 job
Opportunities


01551-1200
Irrigation Lab Member
The Suwannee River Resource
Conservation and Development
Council, Inc. is seeking
applicants for a position with its
Mobile Irrigation Laboratory
(MIL). Applicants should have
experience with field data
collection and have basic
computer skills, knowledge of
agricultural practices and/or
irrigation is preferable. This entry
level MIL position involves
providing services to a broad
range of agricultural producers
and requires considerable
fieldwork. a high school diploma
s required. Salary is dependent on
level of qualifications and
experience, the closing data for
this position is February 12th,
2007 at 5:00 pm. You should send
a resume, along with names and
telephone numbers of three
references to : Suwannee River
RC&D, 234 Court Street SE, Live
Oak, 32064. You may also
contact the office at
(386)364-4278
for further information.
The Suwannee River RC&D is an
Equal Opportunity Employer
and a Drug Free Work Place.
EEO/AA/V/D


05514203
RESTAURANT
MANAGEMENT
Due to increased sales
McDonald's of Alachua is
seeking experienced applicants.
For Management positions Salary
range w/ bonus & insurance
20-50k based on qualifications.
Excellent growth potential. Fax
resume to 386-755-2435
or call 386-755-2475.
You can also apply online at
mcflorida.com/alachua


05514210
FULL-TIME BOOKKEEPER
Busy CPA firm looking for
full-time experienced bookkeeper
with payroll background.
Experience with computerized
office applications and procedures
helpful. Must have previous
bookkeeping experience or
equivalent education. Send
resumes and references to:
Odom, Moses, & Company, LLP,
4424 NW American Lane,
Suite 101,Lake City, FL 32055.


05501217
PROJECT MGR. F.
repair/ remodeling proji
Prior experience/ constru
background. Perm/full I
position. Competitive
salary/ incentive/ benef
Lake City office. Fax resu
apply in person in our Gain
office at 224 NW 8th Av
Fax 352-732-8950, AT
Scott Ambrose EOE/DF

ACROSS

1 Circus arena
5 Bunkhouse
items
9 Pacino and
Unser
12 General vicinity
13 Marie's pal
14 Python
15 Mock at
16 Wanders
18 Firedog
20 Triangle parts
21 To be, to Brutus
22 Ryan or Tilly
23 Split
26 Troubles, to
Hamlet
30 Enjoy a fine
brandy
33 Fixed the table
34 Captured
35 Racetrack
shape
37 Glowing ember
39 Playfully shy
40 Computer term
41 Ms. Barkin of


100 Job
100 Opportunities
CASE MANAGER
Wanted. Dealing with at risk
youths. BA degree required. Related
MH/Criminology, Organizational
skills, and experience a must. Fax
resume to (386)755-1486


CLERKS NEEDED Full time,
available 24 hrs-7days. Apply *
Johnson & Johnson. 1-10 & 41 N.
Previous applicants need not apply.
Drug Free Company
CURB SYSTEMS of N.E. FL,
a specialty concrete contractor is
now hiring for exp. Machine
Operators, Foremen, Formsetters
& Finishers for the NE FL area.
EEO/DFWP call 904-829-3455
CUSTODIAL HELP wanted
part time. Senior Citizens welcome
to apply. Call (352)372-8753
for more information.
CUSTOMER SERVICE REP.
WANTED energetic people, who
really want to work. Fast paced
customer service office; Data
processing experience a plus.
Bilingual a plus. Send resume to
Customer Service Rep.
PO box 3116 Lake City, FL 32056
Immediate Openings Avail.
EXPERIENCED WELDERS
Apply in Person Quality Fab.
Across from Airport US 90 East
Lake City Drug Free
FLAT BED DRIVERS
Atlantic Truck Lines
$600 Sign-on Bonus
Class A, in state & home every
night. $600-$750/wk. Yearly $1,000
safety bonus. 3 yrs. exp. Paid
vacation. Health/dental. Call
1-800-577-4723 Monday-Friday
Hiring STYLISTS or BARBERS
Booth Rental or
Commission Available.
For more info call 386-466-0878
JANITORIAL SUPERVISOR
Seeking PT lead janitor for large
retail store, early morning hours.
Cleaning exp. is a plus, but not
req.Please call 1-800-860-8057
Job reference # 8876
JENKINS CONTRACTING has
openings in the following areas:
Estimator, Project Manager,
Marketing Coordinator. Experience
required. Excellent pay & benefits.
386-719-2240 EOE/DFWP
Lake City Christian-Academy
is looking for Teachers
with a BA degree
Call 386-758-0055
Local company seeking applicants.
We have immediate positions
available in maintenance &
processing. We offer competitive
pay with benefits. Hillandale, LLC
is a drug free & EOE workplace.
For more information call:
386-397-2641
'Looking for Experiepced Driver
CDL A'. Refer. e\p'crie e at
least 2 yrs. Long haul.
Call 05-798-6116


e. or | NEED OF LAB
FN: Paid by ex
WP | Please
386-755-7498 o

films
43 Wander about
45 Atom
fragments
48 Spring month
51 Pyramid builder
54 In a proper man-
ner
56 Marathon unit
57 NFL player
58 Cattail
59 Stratford's river
60 Movie-lot
locale
61 Neatened the
bed
62 What you pay at
sales

DOWN

1 Hindu prince


OR & MASON,
experience
e call
r 386-623-6975

Answ


100 Job
1 JbOpportunities

OTR DRIVERS NEEDED
Heavy Haul,Class A CDL,
2 week turnaround,good pay,
Call Southern Specialized,LLC
386-752-9754

Parts Checker/Warehouse
Local Auto Parts Distributor seeks
Part Checker. Must be detail '
oriented. Warehouse experience
required. Must pass Drug Test.
Apply in person only at
385 SW Arlington Blvd
Lake City, FL 32025

SALES
MODULAR/MANUFACTER
Home dealer looking for
professional sales help.
Experienced required.
Great income. Fax resume to
Better Bilt Homes 386-758-9135

SALES PERSON Needed
For Wholesale and Retail Collision
Parts and Accessories.
Salary, Plus- M-F- Collision
experience helpful. Must be able to
handle a high volume of calls, and
must be motivated to make a
minimum of 30 sales calls per day.
-Apply in person only
385 SW Arlington"Blvd
Lake City, FL 32025

STONE FABRICATOR Wanted.
Exp in templates, fabrication,
installation. Benefits. Resume to
Operations, Sherer Studio,
PO Box 1507,
High Springs, FL 32655.
Or fax 386-454-3773 tel
800-533-4292 ext 16

SUBSTANCE ABUSE group
counselor; experience necessary.
Send resume with contact
information to: 352-332-9962

TOURIST INFO Center
seeking sales help, full or part time.
NO experience needed.
$7.50 plus commission. Apply at
18625 NW CR 236 exit 404 apply
at the ticket counter inside Florida
Citrus Center in High Springs.
386-462-0922 or 904-540-2313

no Sales
SEmployment

05514143
TERRITORY SALES-
Earn up to $100K plus with
area's leading forklift
dealership. Excellent
benefits including 401K plan.
College degree + 2 yrs. sales
experience preferred. Qualified
candidate will sell our full line of
material handling and allied
equipment in a protected area
including Lake City, Tallahassee,
and Gainesville area.
Fax resume to (904)265-0510

AVON
Earn 50%! Only $10 for KIT
Call: 1-800-275-9945
pin # 4242(IndSalesRep)


er to Previous Puzzle


ROMS BAD FOP
HAILS ERR OBI
OFTEN EMOT TN
DART OW LET
DISCO APE
DOM KURD ARFS
ERA STEM KILO
JGS IBsICA
ASEA NARO HIE
RU E EASEL
ELGIN ISLE
ROASTER EPCOT
MOM I DIODE
ANY LOS A WED


rop singer -
Cara 8 Have a
Must-haves premonition
Loud and flashy 9 Still snoozing
Hunter's garb 10 Folk wisdom
Shaman's quest 11 Get fresh
Aunt, in Madrid 17 1 or 2


GET MORE in the new "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" !
series from Quill Driver. Call 800-605-7176.

1 2 3 4 M5 6 17 18 9 10 11


19 Actual
22 Citation
24 Thrashed
25 Cello kin
27 Rapper Tone

28 Old card game
29 Atmosphere
30 Kind of
story
31 Dorm coverer
32 Greet furry
friends
36 On the up and
up
38 R2D2's owner
42 Regular
44 Watch feature
46 Gullible
47 Recital pieces
48 Venomous
snakes
49 Pristine
50 Rampage
51 Answered
a judge
52 London park
53 Egg layers
55 Ms. Arthur


or
ects.
action
time
e
fits.
ime or
nesville


Classified Department: 755-5440


I










LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED


120 Medical
120 Employment

(04511585


SPa acy
Now has openings in the
following areas:
* Pharmacist
* Pharmacy Technician
Excellent Pay, Benefits and
Working Conditions.
Send Resume to
780 SE Baya Dr.,
Lake City, FL 32025
Attn: Penny Williams

045121(X)
BAYA POINTE NURSING
AND REHABILITATION
is expanding and hiring for the
following positions;
CNA - PRN, All Shifts
Housekeeper,
PT with possible FT
Activities Assistant,
PT Weekends, with possible FT
Social Service Director,
FT, Experience Required
Please apply in person at
587 SE Ermine Ave,
Lake City, Fl 32025,
or fax resume to 386-752-7337
EOE/DFWP

04512145
DENTAL ASSISTANT
NEEDED
Full time Position
M-F 9:00am-5:00pm. Salary
Commensurate with experience.
Benefit pkg. Offered.
Please Fax Resume to:
386-752-3122

05514180
RADIOLOGY ASSOCIATES
OF TALLAHASSEE, P.A.
Diagnostic Assistant
Seeking a medical assistant to
work Full time hours at
Lake City Medical Center.
Applicant must
be comfortable interacting
closely with members of the
Medical staff. Prior
medical experience required.
(8Please fax resume to
(850)877-8485 or mail to:
Human Resources,
P.O. Box 12219, Tallahassee,
FL 32317-2219. EOE

05514182
HOUSE SUPERVISOR
FULL TIME
Must be RN with Manger Exp.
and good clinical skills. Please
contact Amelia Tompkins at
386-362-7860. Or apply in person
at Suwannee Health Care Center,
1620 E Helvenston St. Live Oak,
FL EOE/D/V/M/F

05514184
OUR OUTSTANDING
BENEFITS START
IMMEDIATELY
Registered Nurses
ICU
MED/SURG
PEDIATRICS
EMERGENCY DEPT.
PER DIEM POOL

Full Time, part-time, per diem
For more information contact
Human Resources
at 386-754-8147
Apply in person at
368 NE Franklin St,
Lake City, Florida 32055, or visit
our web site at www.shands.org.
EOE,M/F/D/V,
Drug Free Workplace.

SHANDS
LAKESHORE

05514227
CERTIFIED NURSING
ASSISTANTS
3p-ll:30p and llp-7:30a
Full-time/ Part-time and PRN
Great Work Environment
Must pass FDLE Background
Screening and be dependable
Macclenny Nursing & Rehab
755 South 5th St/Hwy 228
Apply in person or call
Sharon at 904-259-4873

EYE CENTER looking for
receptionist. Answer multi-phone
line system, checking patients in &
out, scheduling appointments.
Previous experience in medical field
and computers required. Bilingual
a plus. Fax resume to 755-7561

Insurance Verifier/ Front Office
Oncology office is looking for
experienced person in Medical
Manager/ Microsoft Word/Excel.
Applicant must be knowledgeable in
insurance verification and
authorization. Appointment
scheduling and front office
procedures. Fax Resume to
386-755-2330 attention Juanita.
Medical Billing Manager
For busy medical facility
Experience in medical insurance


billing required. Excellent salary.
Fax resume to (386)755-2169
Or mail in confidence to
PO Box 3306
Lake City 32056.

MEDICAL OB/GYN office
looking for a Front Desk Assistance
experience in checking in and out
patients, insurance & collections.
Send resume to:
Front Desk Assistant, PO Box 2757
Lake City, FL 32056-2757

NOW HIRING
Direct Care Staff. ICF/DD
Taking applications for all shifts.
Must have FL. Driver's License
High School diploma or GED.
Call 386-755-6104 EEO/M/F/D/V


120\ Medical
120 dEmployment

014512111
RADIOLOGY DIRECTOR
IF YOU ARE INTERESTED
IN WORKING IN A
FRIENDLY ATMOSPHERE
AND GREAT WORKING
CONDITIONS
"THIS IS FOR YOU"
A 25 bed Rural Acute Care
Hospital is seeking a full-time
Radiology Director.
Three years supervisory
experience, ARRT registered
and Florida Radiologic
Technologist License required.
The Director will supervise and
oversee all aspects of Radiology
and serves as a backup for all
Radiology personnel.
All Radiologic Technologist
are cross-trained in C.T.,
Radiology is covered 24/7.
Ed Fraser Memorial Hospital
159 N. 3rd St.
904-259-3151 ext 2210
Fax 904-259-3279

Receptionist - Medical Office
Fast Paced, Must be friendly,
dependable, accurate, computers,
multi-task, great with people.
Send resumes to: Administrator
P.O. Box 489, Lake City, FL 32056
RN Staff Nurse needed
7am - 7 pm day shift
Full Time with Benefits
Suwannee Health Care Center
1620 E. Helvenston Street
Live Oak, Florida 32064
Or call Angela at 386-362-7860
EOE/D/V/M/F

160 Investments

LOOK
Want Big Bucks?
Call 386-466-1104

190 Mortgage Money

I 05514130
Private Party has cash
for your trust deed.
Call 386-754-2122


240 Schools &
240 Education
Want to be a CNA? Don't want to
wait? Express Training Services of
Gainesville is now offering our
quality CNA exam Prep classes.
Day/Eve classes. Class for 1 week,
certification test the next week.
Class size is limited. Next class
02/26/07. Call 386-755-4401

310 Pets & Supplies
6 MONTH Old. female Puppy,
Lab Mix. Has all shots
Free to good home
386-365-5661
FREE KITTENS
To good hordme
Call 386-755-5416

FREE TO A good home,
Cocker Spaniel.
Not good with kids.
Please call (386)344-4573
GERMAN SHEPPARD Puppy.
Pure bred with health cert, shots &
wormed. Black & Tan. P.O.P.
$250.00 Call 386-961-8130
LARGE BROWN Female Dog;
Spayed, good with kids &
other animals. Call 386-935-0821

PET TAXI- Medium size.
For a small pet.
Only $10.00
Please Call 386-961-8701
YORKIE PUPPY AKC, 9wk old,
Male. Health Certificate,
Shots, Wormed. $750.00.
Call 386-752-3293 or 623-3450

402 Appliances
3.1 CUBIC Feet Freezer
$60.00
Call 386-288-8392

COUNTER TOP Refrigerator
White, small size. New.
$50.00
Call 386-566-0011

403 Auctions

05514171
SOUTHERN AUCTION
Marketing & Appraisals
Auction
January 29, 2007--7pm.
Sofa, china hutch, Washer &
Dryer, Liv. Rm set, pillow top
queen mattress, USA Navy dress
sword, glassware, coin, & jewelry.
Col. J. Kulcsar, AU1437--
AB2240, 10% BP, 15991
NE Hwy 27 Alt. Williston,
352-528-2950


404 Baby Items
EDDIE BAUER- Infant car seat.


ONLY $30 OBO
Please call
(386)755-6265
GRACO STROLLER
for triplets, like new, Navy Blue
Color. Large Rubber Wheels.
$100.00 Call 386-961-8812

408 Furniture
3 PC. Entertainment Center.
Excellent Condition.
$300.00
Call 386-365-5661
3/PIECES LEATHER
Sofa for $500.
3/pieces velour sofa bed $200
(386)758-9275


Classified Department: 755-5440


WANTED WHOLE Junk Cars.
$125 Each. Free Pick Up
Call 386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648


430 Garage Sales
E.A. Wholesale Liquidation Sale
Toys,PotsPans,&Lots.Used Furn
(NewAshley). Big BlueWarehouse
Hwy 100 @ Baya Across Hardees.
M-F 9-5p, Sat 8-Noon 758-9303
MOVING SALE Jan 27, 8am-2pm
743 SW Lake Montgomery Ave.
Household indoors & outdoors
items & children's items, monitor.

440 Miscellaneous
221 Singer Feather Wht Machine,
$250. 14' pace cargo trailer,
$2,500 OBO. 12' Avon Yacht
Tender $300. OBO. Glass & wood
display case $100. OBO. 719-6536


408 Furniture
COFFEE TABLE
golden oak color wood (sturdy)
$100.00
Call 386-961-8812
PATIO TABLE - 2 chairs
56 inch round beveled glass top
with wrought iron design. $75.00
Call 386-758-3057

410a Lawn & Garden
41 Equipment
PUSH MOWER
Used 2 times. Runs good.
$65.00
Call 386-288-8392
WEED EATER
Runs Good
$50.00
Call 386-288-8392

411 Machinery &
411 Tools
FOR SALE
Cabinet Sand Blaster $75
Please call
(386)961-9731
FOR SALE
Stihl Concrete saw,
$200 Please Call
(386)961-9731

420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
Payment in advance for standing
pine timber. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-454-1484 or 961-1961.


440 Miscellaneous
ACAPELLA SINGERS
needed at Local Church.
Please call Music Director at
386-752-1927
COMMERCIAL BUG Zapper
Electric (New in the box)
2ft x 3ft. $65.00
Call 386-566-0011
FOR SALE
Biodiesel Processor
85 gal. Per day $2000
Please call (386)961-9731
FOR SALE Canon Projector
s-2 Super 8/8 mm w/ screen $75
Please call
(386)961-9731
FOR SALE Iron Man watch, Full
size bed complete, 3 silver
necklaces, & yellow submarine
lighter. $400 Call (386)754-5170
GAZEBO EZ Set up. Green
Canopy with ground stakes
$65.00
386-758-3057
GREAT DANE PUPPIES
FOR SALE
3 MALES & 4 FEMALES
PLEASE CALL (386)623-6916
HOMEMADE UTILITY
TRAILER with spare tire $350.00.
Cell 352-978-0589
Ask for Les.
MATURNITY CLOTHES-
For Sale. ALL SIZES!!!!.
Prices ranges from $1 To $15!!!
Please call (386) 755-6265
RUBIK'S CUBE,
Learn to solve.
Please call
(386)209-1073

450 Good Things
5 to Eat
HARRY'S SEAFOOD
NOW OPEN
965-8612 or 965-8613 & 755-2642.
Special Live Blue Crabs,&
Red Mullet Roe

HARRY'S SEAFOOD
NOW OPEN
965-8612 or 965-8613 & 755-2642.
Special Live Blue Crabs,&
Red Mullet Roe

460 Firewood
FIREWOOD for Sale. Seasoned
Hardwood, $75 1/2 cord. $140 Cord
You pick up or I Will deliver.
386-365-0743 or 386-963-2140


630 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
Cannon Creek Mobile Home Park
Security deposit waived.
2Br SW starts @ $450.
3BR DW starts @ $625.
Requires first & last months rent
Call 386-752-6422 No Pets
DWMH 3BR/2BA on 1 acre. Peace
& quiet of the country, Storage
Shed. $850/mo.lst mo. & deposit.
Call386-752-2765 or 386-965-4198
EFFICIENCY & MOTORHOME
All utilities included plus satellite.
$145 week, $145 deposit.
Call 386-758-9455
FT.WHT.
2/2 on 5 acres fenced.
$650 mo.
386-288-3055
IN PARK Mobile Homes for Rent
2BR/2BA, $550 mo, 1st, last, sec.
&Applications required.
386-719-2423
MOBILE HOMES for Rent
Starting at $375.00 & up.
No Pets, No Washers & Dryers.
Call 386-755-5488 for more info.
RARE AVAILABILITY at this
neat, clean, quiet Mobile Home
Park. Conveniently located
NW Lake City. No Pets. '
Deposit required. Senior Discount.
941-524-4601'

640 Mobile Homes
Sfor Sale
0 DOWN Financing on Modular
Home & Land Packages.
Call for information
758-9133 or 866-755-9133
04511509

!!WOW!!
2007 3BR/2BA
Delivery & Set up included
$39,995.
PRESTIGE HOMES
3973 Hwy 90 West
Lake City, FL
386-752-7751
1-800-355-9385

04511511
$500.00 DOWN!
With your Land
2006 Clearance
And New 2007's
PRESTIGE HOMES
3973 Hwy 90 West
Lake City, FL
386-752-7751
1-800-355-9385


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CALL (386) 755-5445


SATURDAY, JANUARY 27,2007


640 Mobile Homes
640 for Sale

04511510
New Year, New Lower Prices!
2006 CLEARANCE!
Homes as low as $500.00 down
1749 Sq. Ft., 5BR/2BA
With Family Room
$67,500.00
2254 Sq. Ft., 4BR/3BA
With Family Room
$82,000.00
1830 Sq. Ft., Logged Home
3BR/2BA w/Gteat Room
$95,900.00
Delivery, Setup, Central Heat
And A/C, Skirting and Steps
ALWAYS included!
Many New 2007's to see!
PRESTIGE HOMES
3973 Hwy 90 West
Lake City, FL
386-752-7751
1-800-355-9385

4BR/2BA Mobile Home for Sale
1 Acre/Pecan trees & Grape Arbor
Close to Dowling Park and Prison
Owner finance/Small Down
$750 per month /
866-877-8661 Ext. 510
74 MH Good Cond.. 12x56.
Kit. & BA. For extra space or
storage. Reduced to $1,495. MAKE
ALFORD Call 386-752-1364

650 aMobile Home
650U &Land
!!OWNER FINANCE!!
1989 DW 3BR/2BA on 0.4 acres.
798 Double Run Rd. $69,500.
Call 386-867-0048

3/2 DW A/C on 1.5 acre lot
Will sell or Lease
in Worthington Springs
Call 386-466-1104
BRANFORD/OWNER FINANCE
2000 16x76 3BR/2BA on 1 acre.
4141 282nd Ter.
Call 386-867-0048
FSBO Custom Built DWMH
Split plan 4/2 1 acre, Matching
Utility House. Cul-de-sac
Blaine Estates 386-754-3770
OWNER FIANACE
'97 Grand Manor, 28x56 3BR/2BA
2.5 wooded ac. 247 S. to Mill Ln
to Jennifer Ct. 386-867-0048

705 Rooms for Rent
Roommate Wanted: Any age.
Share a 2BR Apt in Lake City.
You pay no utilities, sign no lease.
A way to save money. Smoker ok.
(386)961-0352


S41"
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LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SATURDAY, JANUARY 27, 2007


710 Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent
2 Bedrooms, 2 Bedrooms w/Loft
and 2 Bedrooms with garage,
$650-$725 mo.
Call Michelle 386-752-9626
Immediate Openings 1 & 2 BR.
Convenient Location. Near VA
Hospital. Call lor price and details.
386-755-2423
NEW YEAR'S SPECIAL
$1501 off Ist month's rent on
2BR Apts. Windsong Apartments.
Call Today! 386-758-8455
UNFURNISHED STUDIO
APARTMENTS
Starting @ $125.00 weekly.
Dep. & 1st week req.
Call The Lakes Apartments
@ 386-752-2741

720 Furnished Apts.
2 For Rent
Completely Furnished, clean,
private, near city. 1 BR. APT. Nice
neighborhood. Timco Welcome.
Quiet Call 386 961-9516
Eff. Apt Furn. $98/week,
$10/deposit. 41 S Lake City
Lee's MHP and Apt.
386-755-7369
730 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
$95/MO! 4BR Hud!
4% down 3(1 years at 8%APR.
For listings
800-366-9783 ext F388
05514231
EMERALD COVE
Brand New 3 & 4 Bedroom
Homes starting $1200-1250
GRANDVIEW
1754 Grand Street #102
(Duplex) 3/2 $895
1111 SW Yorkton Glen 4/2 $995
COUNTRYSIDE ESTATES
246 SE Gregory Glen 3/2
$925329 SE Gregory Glen. 4/2
$1100
Mark Busher & Associates
Management, Inc
904-317-4511 or 904-349-1302
www.markbusher.com

3BR/2BA House,,Garage., Fenced
yard. 490 SW Brandy Way, LC.
Asking $995 mo., 1st & deposit.
386-965-5560 or 386-961-9490
BRICK HOME on 10th fairway.
2400sf on 1.8 acres. 3BR/2BA,
storage building 16x40. $1200plus.
(386)755-0327 or (386)752-6062
FORT WHITE Lovely Country
Cottage, 2BR/1BA. CH/A, W/D,
Screened porch,.& deck. Beautiful
surroundings & very quiet.
$700 mo 386-497-2296
NICE 3BR/1BA close to town.
$605 month, plus security
deposit & application fee.
Call 963-4974 for information.
STOP RENTING!
Buy 3BR only $5,400!
Foreclosure! For listing
800-366-9783 ext 7782

740 Furnished
S Homes for Rent
3BR/3BA FURNISHED
Near Ft. White on Ichetucknee
River. 6 mo lease. $1,200 mo.
Call 386-497-3637
750 Business &
75 Office Rentals
04511801
OFFICE RENTALS
Newly renovated offices in
Gateway Shopping Center.
Ready to move in.
Busy traffic in the front and very
attractive location for business!
One office is 2,098 sq ft and
one office is 1,475 sq ft at less
than $10 a square foot.
For more information please
call Jackie @ 386-719-9663
Ideal for Doctors & Accountants.
Between 900-1,000 sq ft.
$900 mo + tax.
Call 386-752-9626
OFFICE FOR Lease, 1104 sq ft
Conviently located on
East Baya Ave. $900 mo.
Call 386-755-3456
Office Space for Rent, In Live Oak
Approx. 1,300 SF. For further
information Call Poole Realty
386-209-1766
OFFICE- w/2,100 SF Located in
Live Oak For rent. For further
information Call Poole Realty
386-209-1766
PROFESSIONAL OFFICE Space
inn Westfield Square, 1000 sq ft
Utilities & High speed included.
Call 386-623-2970

805 Lots for Sale
1 ACRE near Ft. White.
River access. $500 down,
owner financing. Small payments.
Call 386-497-3637
5 ACRES near Lake City.
5 miles to Wal-Mart.
Small down, owner financing.
Call 386-497-3637


5 ACRES Rolling Pasture Land.
Excellent horse farm.
$70,000 OBO.
Call 386-984-7759

810 Home for Sale
$95/MO! 4BR Hud!
4% down 30 years at 8%APR.
For listings
800-366-9783 ext 11411
0415113,142
Brand New 1900 sqft site built
3BR/2BA Starting at $149K
0 down & $900 mo.
Slow credit no problem
386-755-2082


810 Home for Sale
-151 1512
Logged Homes
Starting at
$65,500.00
PRESTIGE HOMES
3973 Hwy 90 West
Lake City, FL
386-752-7751
1-800-355-9385
3BR/2BA
CHA, Quail ridge 1996 Very Nice
$149,900 call for Appt.
(386)754-7220
3BR/2BA AZALEA Park Home.
Indoor laundry, new carpets/appl.,
large fenced lot, 2 storage sheds.
$105,900. Call 904-463-1961
4 Arecs 4BR/2BA, mud room, FP,
vaulted ceilings, Completely
Remodeled, CHA, Attached Garage.
$529,000. Call, (386)362-7131
5BR HOME!
Only $22,500!
Bank foreclosures available now,
for listings 800-366-9783 ext 7921
5BR/2BA
Rec Rm. Private Office, CH/A, heat
pump, 3 RV Spaces, 3 car garage.
$339,900 OBO 386-752-5226
BANK FORECLOSURE!
6BR/2BA! Only $56,000!
Must Sell, for listings
800-366-9783 ext 9478
CUSTOM MODULAR Homes
on your lot from 65 sq ft.
Call for Color Brochure
386-758-9133 or 1-866-755-9133
FSBO MUST Sell 3BR/1.5BA,
1 car garage, remodeled. 7 miles
North of Lake City. on I acre
$104,500. Bruce at 386-965-3470
FSBO: 4BR/2BA Block Home
1600 sqft, on 3/4 acre.
CH/A, 2 car garage. Please call
386-965-6032 or 904-509-4403
* $$ RENT TO OWN $$ *
NO BANK QUAL.
Payments from $850-$1150/mo.
Why rent, when you can own.
Call for more information.
386-758-7599/ 24 hour recorded in-
fo Toll Free: 888-347-3948 Ext: 116
Single story Townhouse 2/2
1018SF Brick, City water, sewer.
Deed restrictions. Owner financing.
$125K. 1045 SW Rossborough Ct.
386-755-0210 or 386- 697-6606

820 Farms &
2�. Acreage
05514173
40 ACRES/ SUBDIVIDABLE
Into 5 acres parcels. 15 acres of
pasture land plus, 25 acres of
cleared timber land.
Gorgeous location. On pave rd.
CR 240, Columbia County.
$572,400. Rhonda Cox/ Remax
(352)474-0074
158 1/2 Ac., MOL 15 mi. N of Lake
City on US 441, well drained, with
frontage, hardwoods, pasture,
25 ac. planted pines. $950,000
386-466-5741/386-752-7694
ACREAGE. 4 to 20 acre lots.
Owner financing. Low down
payment. Deas Bullard/BKL
Properties. 386-752-4339.
www.landnfl.com
FSBO: 5 acre wooded lot w/well &
septic. 3 miles East of Fort White.
$1,500 down, $725 a month.
Call 386-752-4597

830 Commercial
8 Property
05514150
WAREHOUSE SPACE
FOR LEASE
Great industrial locations with
several sizes to choose from,
1200sf- 4500sf. Call
Scott Stewart of Westfield Realty
for more information.
386-755-0757 or 386-867-3498


830 Commercial
O8 Property
MIDTOWN CENTER
Several brand new office suites
available, some furnished.
New warehouse space available
(multiple units)
Call Southeast Developers Group
386-755-2082

870 Real Estate
O7 I Wanted
Cash for your home
Close in 7 days.
Call 758-7599 or
24 hour recorded info
Toll Free 888-347-3948 ext 120
I BUY HOUSES
& Mobile Homes w/land. Save
your credit/take over payments.
Quick closings! 386-752-7951

930 Motorcycles'
2003 Harley Davidson Sportster.
100th Anniversary.
Only 1,600mi. $5,750.
-Call 386-754-2126 or 386-623-4534

940 Trucks
1990 DODGE Dakota w/topper.
Automatic, AC, V6,
Good work truck. $1,500
Call (352)339-5158

950 Cars for Sale
1990 HONDA Prelude 2 door,
5 speed, sun roof, white, AC.
Very nice. $1,850
Call (352)339-5158
1996 HONDA Accord!
Only $800!Police Impounds,
, for listings
800-366-9813 ext A834
1997 MITSUBISHI Eclipse
GS- T Spyder Convertible 2D.
Excellent Condition. $4,750.
Call 386-754-2126 or 386-623-4534
1999 FORD Escort XY2 Hatch-
back. 2 door, automatic, sunroof..
CD. Sporty. 80k miles. $3,300
(352)339-5158
CARS FROM $500.00!
Police Impounds available now,
for listings
800-366-9813 ext A760
9n1 Recreational
501 Vehicles
31 FT Bole Travel Trailer
with full bath.
Very good condition. $3,900
386-754-0403
Vans & Sport
952 Util. Vehicles
1990 E150 Van
62,000 mi., V8, Good Tires
$2,000 OBO
Call 386-965-6032
I .11


ADVERTISE YOUR
Job Opportunities in the
Lake City Reporter
Classifieds,
Enhance Your Ad with
Your Individual Logo
For just pennies a day.
Call today,
755-5440.


L-MkCit


3BR, 2 bath, 1518 sq. ft., large corner lot with shade
trees, garage, whirlpool tub, patio, carpet, ceramic tile,
vaulted ceilings and much more. Priced at $179,900.00


Contact Dale Dryden, (386)-288-Land(5263)
e-mail dale(5)naturecoastinc.com


C.ast


Nature Coast Incorporated
Real Estate Sales and Service
Office 850-584-LAND (5263)
A. Keilh Rowell, PLS-Licensed Real Estate Broker
www.naturecoastinc.comn


ADVERTISE IT HERE!

BRING THE PICTURE IN OR WE WILL TAKE IT FOR YOU!
Advertise your car, truck, motorcycle, recreation vehicle or boat here for
10 consecutive days. If your vehicle does not sell within those 10 days, for
an additional $10 you can place your ad for an additional 10 days. A picture
will run everyday with a description of your vehicle. The price of the vehicle
must be listed in the ad. Ydur ad must be prepaid with cash, check or credit
card. Just include a snapshot or bring your vehicle by the we will take the
picture for you. Private party only!

10 AYSFORONL 13


SPACES
AVAILABLE
NOW!


19 2' Ioyota uamry
$3,000 OBO
New motor & transmission,
48K miles, includes
CD player & 2-coustic,
12 speakers
Call Austin
352-538-9948


Snowbird Special
1996 Winnebago 34ft.
asking $29,900
ALL Options/Slide
This Unit and $300 month
solves your winter stay
Call
386-754-8505


1997 Wheelchair Van
$9,799 O.B.O.
Excellent Condition, 24K,
Everything Works
Call
386-752-8088


1999 Harley Davidson
Sportster $6,000
Garage kept, forward controls,
over $2,000 in chrome, custom
seat, sissy bar, raspberry color.
Looks like new
Call
386-758-1784
or 984-0954




2005 26' Aztec
Enclosed Trailer
$5,500
Cash or Certified/Cashier's Check
Clear Title
3 axle, 10K Ilb GVW, 6 floor
tiedowns, drop down drive up,
ramp in rear, will haul car
Call
386-755-9894
LEAVE A MESSAGE


SPACES
AVAILABLE
-NOW!


'05 Scion XB
$13,500
30K, auto, AC,PS, PB, PW,
PL, w/keyless remote,
CD/MP3, cruise, exc. cond.
Moving overseas, must sell!
Call 386-755-4580
* or 386-984-5042


1998 Venture Van
$8200
Great gas mileage,65K miles.
Comes with Victory 4-wheel
scooter & lift into van. Ideal
for elderly needing mobility.
Call
386-209-2385


BISHOP REALTY, INC.





SUNDAY
January 28th
2-4 pm
lilHOSTED BY:
Elaine K Tolar
386-755-6488
GREAT LOCATION! 265 SW Lucille Court. New in
MayFair III. 3BR/2BA, brick home w/covered back
porch & split plan
DIRECTIONS: SR 247 (Branford Hwy) R on MayFair Dr. continue
into S/D. R on Lucille Ct. House @ end of street.


JOB FAIR

Florida Crown Work Force - Hwy 90

January 25, 2007

1152 S Business Point Dr. * January 27, 2007

Call for more information.



You..

* Positive Attitude

� Dynamic Personality

* Customer Service Skills

* Computer Experience





- Various Schedules

* Bonus Opportunities

* Casual, Fun Work Environment



Let's Connect!


Apply in person today! Mon-Fri, 8:00 am - 7:00 pm

1152 SW Business Point Drive

Lake City, FL 32025

386-754-8600 / lakecityjobs@clientlogic.com




CLIENTIS G IC
LHIN I LC4 l

www.clientlogic.com

We are an equal opportunity employer


Classified Department: 755-5440




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UF00028308_00374.mets
METS:structMap STRUCT1 mixed
METS:div DMDID ORDER 0 main
D1 Main
P1 page Page
METS:fptr FILEID
P2
P3
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P5 5
P6 6
P7 7
P8 8
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P12 12
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P16 16
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METS:behaviorSec VIEWS Options available to the user for viewing this item
METS:behavior VIEW1 STRUCTID Default View
METS:mechanism Viewer zoomable JPEG2000s Procedure xlink:type simple xlink:title JP2_Viewer()
VIEW2 Alternate
JPEGs JPEG_Viewer()
VIEW3
Related image viewer shows thumbnails each Related_Image_Viewer()
INTERFACES Banners or interfaces which resource can appear under
INT1 Interface
UFDC_Interface_Loader


xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
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INGEST IEID E27R05EQI_1J1BBF INGEST_TIME 2011-10-19T18:52:51Z PACKAGE UF00028308_00374
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES