Citation
The Jacksonville free press

Material Information

Title:
The Jacksonville free press
Running title:
Mrs. Perry's free press
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Publisher:
Rita Luffborough Perry
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
African American newspapers -- Florida ( lcsh )
African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates:
30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Additional Physical Form:
Also available on optical disc from Ethnic newswatch.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 4, no. 36 (June 28, 1990)-
General Note:
"Florida's First Coast only quality Black weekly."
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Jacksonville free press. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
002042477 ( ALEPH )
19095970 ( OCLC )
AKN0341 ( NOTIS )
sn 95007355 ( LCCN )
1081-3349 ( ISSN )

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Preceded by:
Jacksonville advocate-free press

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Full Text

Actor Boris

Kodjoe Lives

a Charmed

Life On and

Off Camera
Page 11




Sister 2 Sister Magazine Files for

Bankruptcy, Halts Print Production
According to the Maynard Institute's Journal-Isms column, Urban celebrity news magazine Sister 2 Sister has filed for bankruptcy protection and has put its print edition on hiatus as it focuses more on its online content
Sister 2 Sister publisher and sole owner, Jamie Foster Brown, confirmed the news while stating that she was preparing an official statement on the magazine's status.
'�The community does not want us to go away," Brown told Joumal-Isms' Richard Prince by telephone. "We wanted to teach people through celebrities," she said. "God comes through other people." Working with Johnson, she said, "I saw how much power the celebrities have."
The magazine celebrated 25 years in print last fall.
Sister 2 Sister's bankruptcy and online focus comes amid iconic urban magazine Jet's decision to shift to an entirely digital platform.

Former Band Member Found

Guilty In FAMU Hazing Case
A Florida jury found former Florida A&M University marching band member Dante Martin guilty of manslaughter for his role in the fatal hazing of drum major Robert Champion last week.Prosecutors said Martin was the ringleader of what they called a dark hazing tradition in which Champion was beaten to death. Martin was "president" of Bus C, the one Champion was riding. Martin's lawyer argued that the tradition of walking through a bus while getting beaten started way before Martin was in the band. Originally, 15 band members were charged for the role they played in Champion's death.
State Attorney JohnAshton told jurors that hazing may have been a deeply rooted tradition in the celebrated marching band, but that should not excuse those who beat drum major Robert Champion to death during a ritual on a bus in Orlando nearly three years ago.
Tradition didn't kill Robert Champion. Tradition isn't to blame for Robert Champion's death,' he said. You don't get to break the law because those who came before you did it. That may work when you're 10, but it doesn't work when you'rean adult-an adult who has the ability to say, "No ... I won't be part of this barbarous ritual anymore." He said.
The jury also returned a guilty verdict on a felony hazing charge. Martin is scheduled to be sentenced Jan. 9. The manslaughter charge can carry up to 15 years in prison.


UCLA Mandates Diversity Class

Requirement for Freshmen
The faculty of UCLA's largest academic unit have voted to require future undergraduates to take a course on ethnic, cultural, religious or gender diversity. The move came after three previous efforts had failed.
Officials announced that the faculty of the UCLA College of Letters and Science voted 332 to 303, with 24 blank ballots, to start the requirement for incoming freshmen in fall 2015 and new transfer students in 2017.
UCLA Chancellor Gene Block was a strong proponent of such diversity classes, saying they would help prepare students to live and work in a multicultural society. Most other UC campuses and the UCLA School of the Arts and Architecture already require such courses. The College of Letters and Science enrolls about 85% of UCLA's undergraduates.
Opponents said students were overburdened with other requirements and said the budget-strapped university could not afford extra classes. Additional questions were raised about whether these classes improve ethnic relations and whether they typically skew left politically.
Similar proposals were rejected by the faculty three times in the last two decades. In 2012, the measure lost 224-175 in a vote that attracted only about 30% of potential ballots. More than 46% of the college faculty cast the online ballots in the current weeklong vote after much lobbying and student activism, officials said.

New York Ends Stop and Frisk
The last realistic legal roadblock is gone and now the legal reforms bomne out of New York City's Stop and Frisk program can begin to take hold. The U.S. Second Circuit Court of Appeals, in a unanimous decision, threw out the appeals of the NYPD's police unions, who were attempting to block a settlement full of policing reforms recommended by a federal judge from taking effect. They can still appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court. Last year, Manhattan Federal Court Judge Shira Scheindlin ruled that the NYPD's Stop and Frisk policy was unconstitutional because it unfairly targeted Blacks and Latinos. Then-Mayor Michael Bloomberg and his administration almost immediately appealed, fighting the ruling in court. But current Mayor Bill de Blasio ran on an anti-Stop and Frisk platform, vowing to end the policy and institute reforms suggested by Scheindlin. The Second Circuit panel said that the people of New York made their feelings clear at the ballot box.
The Stop and Frisk program allowed NYPD officers to stop and search anyone for broad reasons, including "furtive movements"; the possibility the suspect could be."casing a location" or "acting as a lookout"; "wearing clothes commonly used in a crime" or "inappropriate attie for the season"; or even just the officer's knowledge of an indiIl111111 IllllIlIllll1111llidua's prior behavior.


But young Blacks and Latinos were disproportionately targeted under the policy: More than half of those stopped were Black-despite making up only a quarter of the population-and another 8 10499 02087 4 roughly one-third of those stopped were Latino.


More than 70 girls and women participated in a day-long Teen Dating Violence Forum, "Real Love Doesn't Hurt" at the Jacksonville Public Library. In commemoration of Domestic Violence Awareness Month, Pink Lady Charity, Inc. partnered with State Representative Mia L. Jones to host the event to educate and equip young women with the tools to build and sustain healthy relationships that will benefit them for a lifetime.
Community leaders were partnered as mentors with the young participants during the forum which addressed in a two-fold format - the topic of relationship violence and the value of sisterly relationships.
Rasheeda Bint-Yahya and Tayler Mack, relationship violence survivors, opened the day sharing their heart-wrenching, yet courageous


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Volume 28 No. 1 Jacksonville, Florida November 6-12, 2014


Real Love Doesn 't Hurt Seminar

Self Empowers Area Young Women


National Urban League President Marc Morial with
luncheon honorees Dr. Barbara Darby and Damien Haitsuka JUL Equal Opportunity

Luncheon Lauds and Enlightens


By Lynn Jones
The 41st Annual Urban League Equal Opportunity Luncheon celebrated community stewardship, dedication and engagement as the historic institution burned the mortgage on their state of the art downtown headquarters and honored community trustees. National Urban League President and CEO Marc H. Morial keynoted the address with his words of community motivation and dedication for the next generation with his "three Ds". "The first D is to defend the idea of democracy... the second D is to demand jobs and the last D is develop - meaning we need to develop humanitarian efforts in our


communities with after school programs and more jobs," said Morial. The highlight of the luncheon was the presentation of awards and recognitions. Red roses were presented to lifelong Jacksonville Urban League champion Ms. Linnie Finley for her tireless efforts in assisting the League with marketing and communication direction. The Clanzel T. Brown award was presented to Dr. Barbara A. Darby, President of Florida State College of Jacksonville and The Whitney M. Young National Leadership award to Damien Haitsuka, Senior Vice President/Community Bank President, Wells Fargo.


AKA Pays It Forward Empowering Students With College and Career


Shown at the event are organizers and presenters: (Seated) l-r : Siera Patrick, Lois Prime, Mary Davis, Rose Leger, and Vanessa Givens. (Standing): Garielle Josey, Betty Burney, Hal Gray, Assunta Bolden, Anquinette Calhoun, Lovely Sainsurin and Evelyn Tukes.


Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Incorporated's Gamma Rho Omega Chapter presented the 7th Beyond High School Seminar at Bethel Baptist Institutional Church's BEST Academy last weekend to over 150 Duval County middle and high school students. Attendees received answer to their questions about college during a round-table discussion with students from Edward Waters College, Florida State College at Jacksonville, Jacksonville University and University of North Florida.


Betty S. Burney, former DCPS board member served as the moderator for the day which included workshop sessions on financial aid, scholarships and information on careers and college alternatives. Presenters included Dale Bell, Gwen Flanders, LTC Vanessa Givens of the U.S. Navy and Ramona Cobb of First Community Credit Union.
The seminar was coordinated by the organization's Scholarship Committee chaired by Lois Peterson Prime.


stories of abuse and survival. BintYahya described her life filled with a seemingly unending pattern of love, rage and betrayal she endured at the hands of her abuser. She admitted that it had only been a year and four months ago that she was able to safely transition and remove herself from the relationship. Today, she enjoys a life that is healthy and violence-free.
Mentors and mentees received a different look at relationship violence from teen survivor Mack's story. At a mere 14-years- old, Mack endured the rage of her abuser when he violently attacked her and left her physically scared and emotionally torn. She shared her ability to overcome, prosper and grow from her experience and openly told her story in hopes of saving others.
Continued on page 3


Shown above is Bama Hales and Mary Bass cooking fish for the multitudes at the Northside Church of Christ annual Homecoming.

Northside Church-of Christ Feeds

Thousands at Annual Homecoming
The streets of Avenue B and Weaver Rd were filled to capacity for the Northside Church of Christ's 15th Annual Community Fish Fry, an activity of the church's annual Homecoming festivities. Thousands of people from the neighboring community, friends, and family, joined the congregation to eat "free" fish, grits and hotdogs. Also on the grounds, children and adults played board games, enjoyed cotton candy, face painting, a mega slide, basketball and a clothes giveaway. The annual signature event has awakened the community to become more involved while enabling NSCOC to promote community support and recognition. Festivities will continue this weekend in commemoration of the 60th Church Anniversary.


Paula Sardinas speaks with the young
ladies after Q&A about their fife experiences


Give

Yourself an Insurance Reality Check
Page 2


I








Page 2 - Ms. Perry's Free Press November 6-12, 2014


Give Yourself an Insurance Reality Check


By Jason Alder When it comes people face the Ge Am I buying too enough, or just How do you dete insurance levels don't waste mone' erage - or worse, exposed?
Here are a few c Everyone needs One serious accid wipe out your sa you into debt or 1 ered through youi fully compare all one with the lowi not be your best how other facto ductibles, copayn allowed benefits charges, medicati Also compare through your spou
If you're not cov options:
If recently lai COBRA contin through your form If under age 26 to enroll in a pa www.healthcare.g High-deductible comprehensive c


man strophic illnesses at much lower pre- nia, suggests: to insurance, many miums than comparable low-de- - Comparison shop oldilocks dilemma: ductible plans. iers. much coverage, not Most states provide high-risk in- - Increasing your d the right amount? surance for people who don't qualify $250 to $1,000 migh rmine your proper for private insurance. It's costly, but mium by 15 to 30 pc while ensuring you no one can be denied. Visit - Ask about discou y on unneeded cov- www.naschip.org for information. ers, age 5 ,leave your family Life insurance. If you're single homeowners/renters with no dependents, you may get by Stroup adds, "My considerations: with minimal or no life insurance, auto insurance is to medical insurance. But if family depends on your in- liability insurance re ent or illness could come, many experts recommend worth and income. I avings and plunge buying coverage worth at least five accident to wipe ot bankruptcy. If coy- to 10 times your salary. After your Transferring this risk ur employer, care- kids are grown you may be able to company is very plans offered. The lower your coverage; but carefully good drivers." vest premium may consider your spouse's retirement Homeowners in t option. Consider needs. home is probably yoi rs add up - de- Car insurance. Most states require ment, so don't risk' nents, allowed/dis- car insurance for good reason: It pro- contents through an s, out-of-network tects you financially should you aster, accident or ro tion charges, etc. cause an accident or be hit by an options available uninsured driver. Rates vary consid- Mayor use's job. erably depending on: coverage and Cr a vered, explore other deductible levels for liability, unin- Ct sured motorist and collision; age and With the goal of cr d off, ask about driving record; vehicle year and expanding business o uation coverage model; number of insured family reducing health and ner employer, members; and security features ties, Mayor AlvinBr , you may be able (alarm, airbags, secured parking, lished a CommunityN arent's plan. Visit etc.) Task Force to help ,ov for details. - To lower car insurance costs, innovative, commune e plans provide Ruth Stroup, a Farmers Insurance nomic development overage for cata- Group agent from Oakland, Califor- Office of Economic


Artist Carvel Watson


p with other cardeductibles from t lower your preercent.
ants for safe driv55+, linked insurance, etc. y biggest tip on make sure your plates to your net t only takes one at your savings. k to an insurance inexpensive for

lsurance. Your .ur largest investlosing it and its unforeseen disobbery. Renters


also need insurance: AAlthough the building Qy--./5, is insured by the owner, your contents are not. A few tips: 414E G*�
Review your coverage periodically to adjust for inflation, home improvements, new possessions, change in marital/family status, etc.
Compare your rate with other insurance carriers, but get "apples to apples" quotes, since policies may have varying provisions. Buy additional coverage on expensive items like jewelry, art and computers, which may have limited coverage.
Don't forego critical coverage to save a few bucks: It's not worth it in the long run.


eating new jobs, opportunities and wealth disparirown has estabWealth Building implement new nity-based ecostrategies. The c Development


(OED) will serve as staff to the task force.
"The neighborhoods of Northwest Jacksonville have long suffered from serious economic and health inequities," said Paul Tutwiler, executive director of the Northwest Jacksonville Community Development Corporation. "By helping Jacksonville create a more inclusive economy, the Community Wealth Building Initiative will address these inequities and improve both the lives and the livelihoods of people who reside in Northwest Jacksonville." The 14-member task force is created by executive order and will include 10 members appointed by the mayor to represent health care, finance, education, job training, philanthropy, nonprofits, small businesses, the faith-based sector and community organizations. The task force will also include four representatives appointed by City Council, Office of General Counsel, JTA and U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development.


MyRA Accounts May Alter

Your Retirement Plans

Financial Expert Shares 3 Factors to Consider When Planning for an IRA


Important changes are coming this fall for what's become one of the biggest concerns of the era: affording retirement.
Those who are saving for retirement and troubleshooting tax obstacles may want to restructure their plans. While members of Congress continue to battle over the budget, the Obama administration is preparing to roll out "myRA" savings accounts - IRA accounts - for those who do not have access to one.
When the "myRA" account reaches a certain amount, fledgling savers can roll it into a regular IRA account; different states will have their own guidelines. However, some of the benefits of existing savings options could be in peril, says financial advisor Jake Lowrey.
Those include some of the tax advantages of retirement accounts currently enjoyed by higher-income workers. Some Roth IRA owners may also lose their exemption from required minimum distributions, or RMDs, while IRAs totaling less than six figures could see RMDs disappear.
In just 15 years - 2030 - the last of the baby boomers will have reached 65. That means one of every five Americans will be of retirement age.
"Most people simply don't know how to plan for retirement, and that's made even more challenging with the changing government policies," says Lowrey. He offers guidance on choosing between a traditional IRA and a Roth IRA as a retirement savings vehicle.
. Traditional IRAs and Deductibility: For either traditional or Roth IRAs, it's all a matter of how one prefers to be taxed. Generally


speaking, the money you deposit in a traditional IRA isn't taxed that year, and whatever earnings you have on your contributions won't be taxed until you withdraw that money as a retiree. So, if you earn $40,000 in one year and put $3,000 of it in an IRA, your taxable income drops to $37,000. The deposit will grow tax-free through the years. If you withdraw any before age 59/2, you'll face a penalty. After that, you can withdraw and the money will be taxed as earned income.
- Roth IRAs, Exemptions and No RMDs: Roth IRA contributions are never deductible. You pay taxes on the money when you earn it, just like any other income. The benefit of a Roth is that when the owners decide to withdraw from it after age 591/2, they will not be faced with any taxes. The Roth offers tax-exempt rather than tax-deferred savings. Also, traditional IRA rules include required minimum distributions (RMDs). With a traditional IRA, you must begin to take RMDs by April 1 of the year following the year you reach age 70.5, but that isn't the case with a Roth IRA.
- Best of Both Worlds? Naturally, IRA owners want to chart a path in which they're penalized with taxes the least. It may be possible to cushion one's retirement savings against future tax increases by converting some of an IRA to a Roth and earn tax-free gains going forward.
"Converting to a Roth will make sense for many people, and if you're eligible to contribute to both types of IRAs, you may divide contributions between a Roth and traditional IRA," Lowrey says. "But the total contributions to both must' not surpass the limit for that tax' year."


Carvel Watson, creator/producer of the "Think" poster available online for just $10


Carvel Watson's new Red, Black, and Green "Think" Liberation poster represents a great positive message, "THINK". He is encouraging everyone to display this unique design and positive energy poster in their home, school, work place or any other creative environment where a constant dose of positive energy is needed. "Think" Black liberation; "Think" of your flag, or your glorious, beautiful, ancestral homeland and your inherited greatness; or just "Think" before you make an irrational or hasty decision.
Mr. Watson created this poster in 1972. Its value and glory is in it's artistic presentation and powerful one word statement, "Think". It


makes a striking reference to the powerful mental, once spoken messages of some of history's greats such as the Honorable Marcus Garvey, U.N.I.A., Malcolm X, The Reverend Dr. Martin L. King, and so many other great keynote speakers with a vision, a mind, and a voice.
The red, black, and green flag was originally designed by the U.N.I.A. in 1920 and the significance of the colors remain relevant over 100 years later. Red represents the blood that unites all people of Black African ancestry, and stand for liberation; Black represents Black people whose existence as a nation, though not a nation-state, is affirmed by the existence of the flag; and power and


Green represents the abundant natural wealth ofAfrica. The "Think Liberation Poster" reaffirms a "Rally Cry for Togetherness and Unity", neutralizing the negative stereotype projected by multimedia facilities daily. Africans and African-Americans should see the positive message on this poster daily. It is about us, our heritage, and our glorious ancient ancestral African homeland. The cost of each Think Poster (19x27) without frame is $10.00, plus $8.50 /S & H. Price includes a plastic cover and a safety shipping tube shipped via USPS. To order online, visit their secure website at www.thewebmasterwizard.com and click on the "buy now" button.


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Creates Task Force to Vealth for Northwest Jax


Wants You to THINK Black


November 6-12, 2014


Page 2 - Ms. Perry's Free Press










November 6-12, 2014 Ms. Perry's Free Press - Page 3


Mayor Brown interacts with the newly selected student leaders

Mayor Implements Student Leadership Program to Prepare the Next Generation


At the City of Jacksonville's 2014 Martin Luther King Day breakfast, Mayor Alvin Brown announced a youth initiative that would provide more positive opportunities for Jacksonville's next generation.
"If Jacksonville is going to continue to thrive and prosper in the years ahead, it will depend on whether our young people have the opportunities and support they need to succeed. It will depend on whether they have hope and faith


in their own future, and hope and faith in the future of our community," Mayor Brown said.
Throughout the spring and summer, Mayor Brown sought recommendations from local high school principals and community organizations for students with the potential to make a positive difference as young leaders. After a competitive interview process, the Young Leaders Advisory Council assembled for the first time at City Hall this September. Nearly 50 students


met with Mayor Brown to lay out a vision for the Council and its role in Jacksonville.
The Young Leaders will meet regularly with Mayor Brown and other officials to learn more about city government, the business community, and nonprofits. They also will tour sites throughout the city to gain a fuller appreciation for our community, and work together on public service projects to benefit other young people.


Teen Violence Forum Teaches Why "Real Love Doesn't Hurt"


Continued from front
Kim Ward, of One Love Foundation, shared vital resources for those in, or who know someone, in a violent relationship. Ward shared the history of the One Love Foundation and its hopeful impact on safeguarding women from relationship violence.
Created in 2010, the One Love Foundation was founded following the death of Yeardley Love, a University of Virginia senior who lost her life to relationship violence at the hands of her ex-boyfriend just two weeks shy of graduation. Originally created to honor "Yards" and draw attention to student athletes like her who contribute posi-


tively to their teams and communities, the organization now seeks to prevent future tragedies by raising awareness about the warning signs of relationship violence. The mission is to end relationship violence through education and technology. The "One Love My Plan" App is a tool recently developed to aid those who desire a plan for themselves or others they may know.
Part of a global movement, the forum ended with a chord of unity led by Sonia Jackson Myles of The Sister Accord. Mentees and mentors committed to supporting their sisters and building up each other for successful and healthy relationships. Part of the resolution is, "I


resolve to establish an agreement with ALL of my sisters, whether they are black, white, red, yellow or brown. Whether they are strong or weak, rich or poor, educated at Harvard or educated on 17th Street, working in the C-suite or cleaning it. Whether they are independent or leaning and depending, confident or lacking self-esteem, fighting back or being abused and misused. I will uphold this commitment to my sisters..."
For more information on the One Love Foundation can be found by visiting www.joineonelove.org and information on The Sister Accord at www.thesisteraccord.com


Lame Duck Congress Will Duck


Issues That Matter Most To Voters


by Mike McKauliff, HP
The top concerns voiced by voters in this election were the economy and the stagnating middle class.
So, freed from election concerns, what will Washington do to address those problems during the lame duck session in the weeks before the start of a new Congress? It appears very little.
The main reason is that before the elections, this Congress has been one of the least-productive in history, and it left numerous pieces of unfinished business that will need to be completed before the lame duck session ends just to keep government and key programs running.
There is certainly blame to go around. While the House insists it passed more than 40 bills that GOP leaders say create jobs, most of them are actually anti-regulation measures that would do little, and which a Democratic-controlled Senate would never approve. And the Senate has been its own special case. Republicans in the minority there have specialized in delay and obstruction, while Democrats have done their best to


freeze out GOP measures and avoid politically damaging votes.
The failures leave a heap of work that will need to get done.
Tops on that list is keeping the government open, after Congress couldn't agree on a spending plan for all of 2015, and passed a stopgap that runs out on Dec. 11. Another major agenda item is acting on President Obama's stalled nominations. Such approvals will get harder in the next Senate.


Another area that requires at least a temporary measure are expired tax breaks that the two chambers have not agreed on. Among them are breaks that the House has voted to make permanent, such as research and development credits and other business-focused items. Democrats in the Senate have offered temporary extensions of those, as well as loopholes that they like, such as the child tax credit and mortgage interest deductions.


Savvy Shoppers Enlightened at "Women, Wine and Shoes"


Nearly 250 women shopped, laughed and sipped wine together at Big Brothers Big Sisters of Northeast Florida's recent inaugural Wine, Women & Shoes fundraising event at the Hyatt Regency Jacksonville Riverfront Hotel. The event featured a variety of exciting activities that included a designer fashion show, a fabulous "Wall of Wine" and even live and silent auctions. Also highlighted, was a Marketplace shopping experience containing local boutiques as well as vendors as far as New York and South Florida offering a variety of women's clothing and accessories. To add to the excitement, each attendee also walked away with swanky Tory Burch Swag Bags filled with a variety of items women love! Big Brothers Big


ELm
Sisters of Northeast Florida brought facing adversity with strong and the Wine Women & Shoes party to enduring, professionally supported town to raise awareness and funds. one-to-one relationships that Their mission is to provide children change their lives for the better.


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Florida Voters Reject Medical Marijuana
Nearly three months ago, Floridians appeared to overwhelmingly support legalizing medical marijuana. And while the majority of voters supported the measure on the ballot this week, it failed get the needed 60 percent to be added to the Florida constitution. Both sides were optimistic that they were going to come out on top as results began coming in Tuesday night, but with 82 percent reporting, the measure had only had 57 percent support. It needed 60 percent to be added to the Florida constitution.
Calvina Fay, director of Drug Free America, one of the largest opponents to Amendment 2, said medical marijuana would be bad news for the state of Florida.
"(The Amendment's wording) leaves it wide open for pretty much anybody to be able to access marijuana," Fay said. While most of our doctors are very good we know from the pill mill experience we've had here that we have some bad ones that can do a lot of damage."


November 6-12, 2014


Ms. Perry's Free Press - Page 3










Page 4 - Ms. Perry's Free Press November 6-12, 2014


Despite Major Accomplishments President


Obama Became a Liability to Some Democrats


Many may recall that towards the end of President George W. Bush's second term in office he became his party's biggest liability going into the 2008 elections.
No need for a history lesson everyone knows that Bush and his administration made several political missteps and the country was basically tired of him. That's certainly not exactly where we are with President Obama, but there are many challenges that the first African American president has faced.
Most Democrats remain loyal, but there is a left of moderate group or the liberal arm that has become local critics of President. There are some Dems who refuse to turn their backs on Obama, but in cases where Congressional or Senate seats could be lost, is it loyalty to a fault?
Going into these midterm elections, Republicans werehighly motivated and hell bent to send a message to the President on winning over the Senate, Congress, and as many Governors races as possible.
While President Obama has become a liability to many fighting for re-election, African American still remain his biggest supporters and for obvious reasons.
Many of Obama's supporters point out that the President has


accomplished great things; and in fact, has made lemonade out of lemons in many cases.
If you were to create a Presidential report card for Obama, it would have subjects like Health Care Reform, Immigration, Wall Street Reform, Foreign Affairs, Domestic Issues, etc.
Clearly he was been an honor student on several issues, and somewhat average on others, but contrary to what his critics would say - he would have a pretty solid GPA.
From his administration's aggressive support of incentives to lift up the auto industry to the affordable care act, which is now providing needed health care benefits to millions of Americans - the President has hit some home runs.
But then there is the other side of the coin. Obama's second term has been repeatedly peppered with a series of crises that critics would say the White House has not managed well. Even the most loyal Obama supporters have to admit that there have been some missteps. But there is no such thing as a perfect presidency -some of the President's issues are simply the nature of the beast.
Obama has unfortunately been the victim of bad timing in many cases. For example, the administration's signature policy initiative


stumbled out of the gate when the HealthCare.Gov website experienced many problems. Nobody wants to hear about long waits at Veterans Affairs hospitals.
I wrote about NSA and their invasion of privacy, and who could have foreseen the Edward Snowden's national security breach issue. One of the biggest challenges that the President faces is immigration reform; and having hundredsof foreign children piled up along the southern border only makes the matter more divisive.
The rise of Islamist terrorists (ISIS) in Syria and Iraq has been a major issue and how the administration has responded has been heavily criticized. The beheading of people including Americans has brought the ISIS issue to the mainstream media. I won't even start to talk about the Ebola virus!
So Obama has had many challenges since re-election, which means that his fellow Democrats are faced with the political reality of guilt by association.
But of course, the President and his supporters fight back with not only accomplishments, but also the fact that he had to deal with perhaps the most obstructive Congress in history.
We all remember the Republican-lead 16 day government shut down in 2013, which


cost some $2 billion in lost productivity, according to the White House and furloughs for 850,000 federal workers.
The GOP scorched earth strategy of winning the House and Senate by any means necessary has not only hurt Obama, but also the nation as a whole. Some feel that Republicans have deliberately ignored some problems and delayed taking action on others to make Obama look bad, which in turns helps build the GOP brand.
So whether it is fair or not, often times midterm elections hinge on which party controls the White House and how popular that president is nationwide. Democrats had an uphill battle this election cycle. The bad news for President Obama is that a Republican-controlled House and Senate make it impossible for him to be effective.
Maybe I am getting ahead of myself. Next week we will talk about the winners and losers this midterm election cycle.
To use one of my favorite Martin Luther King, Jr. quotes, "The ultimate measure of a man is not where he stands in moments of comfort and convenience, but where he stands at times of challenge and controversy."
Signing off from the Democratic Party Headquarters in Jacksonville, FL, Reggie Fullwood


Online Colleges Flunk Common Sense


By Julianne Malveaux
NNPA Columnist
The most common model of college attendance is that a young person who graduates from high school and heads directly to college, perhaps taking a year off in between to work, take a "13th class. While many students start off right after high school, some of them have breaks in their higher education, dropping out to save money to continue, or to deal with family matters.
The most common model is not the only model, however. Mature adults who did not attend or finish college through the most common model are referred to as "returning students" or "nontraditional students." Some get their degrees through online programs. A few colleges (Bay Path College in Massachusetts, is one example) have developed Saturday programs where women can earn a four-year degree by attending college only


on Saturdays.
Concerned by high unemployment rates and eager to enhance their employability, many mature college students turn to for-profit colleges (sometimes called "career colleges") for their education. Some of these students, barraged by television ads, are convinced that for-profit colleges, where they can attend during the evening or online, allow them the flexibility they need to manage work, family and education. And since federal funds, such as Pell grants and subsidized loans, are available to take care of costs, some students who attend for-profit colleges are pressured to take out these loans. If they drop out, they are still required to repay their loans, just as they would have to in any other college.
But all colleges are not created equal. About once a week, I get a call from a mature student whose time at a career college was unrewarding. One woman failed a math test but could not get feedback from her instructor on what she did wrong. Appeals to others in the chain of command went unanswered.
In another case, a young woman desperately needed counseling. She ended up getting it from a community organization, not from her career college. To cite just a few cases to make a point is casual empiricism, but my direct knowledge of some students' plight raises a few questions for me.


Many students get training, but not jobs. Many are saddled with loans they cannot ever afford to repay; and the costs of attending career colleges are high. The Department of Education estimates that it costs four times as much to attend a career college as to attend a community college.
Why are costs so high when services are so limited?
Partly because many career colleges are publicly traded and the pressure is on for them to make a profit to provide dividends for their shareholders. Another reason is that salaries for leaders are extremely high. At ITT Technical Institute, CEO Kevin Monday earned $8.76 million in 2012. DeVry University President Daniel Hamburger earned $6.4 million in 2012. The Apollo Group, which includes the University of Phoenix, paid Gregory Cappelli $4.54 million in 2013, and the Chairman Emeritus received nearly $7 million each year in 2012 and 2013. In contrast only four presidents at public universities earned more than a million dollars. Harvard's president earns about $900,000, but some of her benefits boost her salary to about 1.2 million.
These so-called career colleges are actually profit centers. The disproportionate enrollment of Black and brown students means that folks who are already poor and underpaid are creating profits for these publicly traded companies and their overpaid leaders. At ITT


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ITORS: Lynn Jones, Charles Griggs, Camilla Thompson, Reginald Fullwood, iinson, William Reed, Andre X, Brenda Burwell, Marsha Oliver, Marretta hyllis Mack, Tonya Austin, Carlottra Guyton, Brenda Burwell, Rhonda Silver, wn, Rahman Johnson, Headshots, William Jackson.


Technical Institute, the overwhelming majority of students (92 percent) were self-identified members of a racial and ethnic group. Nearly four in five took out a Pell grant. At DeVry about 45 percent were minority students. Meanwhile, students who enroll in these colleges and do not graduate (the majority) have nothing to show for their education but more debt.
That's why the Department of Education is limiting the amount of federal loans that students can take out, pegging loan amounts to ability to pay, based on students' current salaries and income. "Attendance at career colleges should be a gateway to the middle class," said Education Secretary Ame Duncan. Too often mobility is downward, not upward, when large student loans go unpaid. The new regulations are imperfect, but a step in the right direction. They might be more efficient, but the for-profit colleges have lobbied hard, and gone to court, to prevent cautionary regulations.
Students of color who consider these colleges need to make sure they know what they are getting. Otherwise, they are up for a big surprise when student loans bills come due. For-profit colleges are exactly that, for profit. Students are not necessarily being educated, instead being treated as a profit center.
Julianne Malveaux is an author and economist based in Washington, D. C


DISCLAIMER
The United State provides opportunities for free expression of ideas. The Jacksonville Free Press has its view, but others may differ. Therefore, the Free Press ownership reserves the right to publish views and opinions by syndicated and local columnist, professional writers and other writers' which are solely their own. Those views do not necessarily reflect the policies and positions of the staff and management of the Jacksonville Free Press. Readers, are encouraged to write letters to the editor commenting on current events as well as what they wouldlike to see included in the paper. All letters must be type written and signed and include a telephone number and address. Please address letters to the Editor, c/o JFP, P.O. Box 43580 Jacksonville, FL 32203. (No CALLS PLEASE)


When Does One


Become 'Black Enough?'

By Omar Tyree
NNPA Columnist
Seattle Seahawks Super Bowl-winning quarterback Russell Wilson, published a revealing article a month ago on ThePlayersTribune.com in which he discussed being a bully in grade school. Wilson evidently concluded that it would be beneficial to tarnish his squeaky-clean image so more fans and players could relate to him. But now it's been reported that unnamed sources" within the Seahawks locker room claim some players don't consider Wilson "Black enough."
It seems like just yesterday that Barack Obama, was questioned about not being "Black enough" while running for president in 2008. In fact, he showed up late for a speech to the National Association of Black Journalists and jokingly asked was that Black enough for them. Former Miami Dolphins lineman, Jonathan Martin was deemed not "Black enough" by his African-American teammates a year ago, when being bullied and called the N-word by Richie Incognito, a White teammate. A year earlier, Heisman Trophy winner Robert Griffin III, whose father boasted that he and his wife had reared their son to be colorblind, faced similar charges.
The ongoing and bitter history of African-Americans who mistrust, ostracize and bully one another into following certain stereotypical traits, beliefs and concerns of the community has been a long and conflicting battle.
On one hand, certain group decisions are still needed to benefit the race as a whole, in particular on issues of politics that may affect fair education, employment, housing, taxation and the fair practices of American law. But when it comes to individual beliefs, ideas, habits, likes, dislikes and behaviors, all bets are off. Each person has a God-given right and license to be who they are. There have been far too many disputes about how someone looks, walks, talks, dresses,-who they hang out with, what music they listen to, and who they marry.
Let's put it out there: Griffin's wife is White and Wilson's ex-wife is White and that's the source of some discontent among Blacks, especially women. Again, that's their business.
I participated in such race bullying in my college years, where certain small town kids were teased for being less than urban cool. When you're bom and reared in such big cities as Philadelphia, New York, Washington, Chicago, Detroit, you tend to set a higher bar of what Black is supposed to be. Everything else becomes "country," "corny," "backwards," "bama" and "not Black enough."
However, the most harmful type of Black-on-black bullying is when we accuse someone of "acting White," "talking White," "selling out" or being an "oreo." Without realizing the many societal implications involved, "acting White" becomes a label for African-Americans who have higher academic standards, speak correct English, read books, live in higher economic neighbors, have attained their goals, and are accepted and sociable with White American peers as well as African Americans.
Wow, that sounds like Russell Wilson. But the problem is, if all of that is "acting White" and not being "Black enough," then what is "acting Black" and being "real"--having low academic standards, speaking broken English, never reading anything, living in poverty, never reaching your goals, and not being accepted or sociable with White America?
Think about it. What exactly are we saying when we quantify the words "Black" and "White?" Because the last time I checked the dictionary, everything "white" is deemed fresh, clean, innocent, angelic, perfect, ideal, good, honest, bright, new, beginning, exact and unmarked. In contrast, "black" is labeled soiled, dark, evil, deadly, mysterious, deceptive, violent, secretive, demonic, tragic and the end of things.
Ironically, the color "black" is also identified with power and elegance, like Black Power, black-tie affairs and businesses finishing the year "in the black." However, that's not the identification of the word "black" that African-Americans are referring to when they claim that someone isn't "Black enough." I've never used it, because I understand that there are degrees to everything and one person's "not Black enough" may be someone else's "too Black."
Omar Tyree is a New York Times bestselling author, an NAACP Image Award winner for Outstanding Fiction and a professional journalist. Visit him at www.OmarTyree.com


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November 6-12. 2014 Ms. Perry's Free Press - Page 5
S I


Lawsuit Against Tax Credit Scholarships


Threatens the Dream of Equal Opportunity


On August 28, the Florida teachers union and asking the courts to shut down the Florida Tax


the Florida School Boards Association filed a lawsuit Credit Scholarship Program for low-income children.


This program empowers low-income parents to choose the best schools for their children. More than 30 percent of the 68,000 students in this program are African-American. They attend schools that are an essential part of our communities. If the lawsuit succeeds, these children will be evicted from their schools - and many of these schools will be forced to close.


A Message From


*0 Bishop Victor T. Curry
In his historic speech at the Lincoln Memorial, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. urged us to come together as diverse citizens to ensure that all of us - regardless of our station or status
- have the chance to enjoy the opportunities this country can offer.
So it seems an especially cruel irony that, on the anniversary of that speech, Aug. 28, a lawsuit was filed asking the courts to shut down the Florida Tax Credit Scholarship Program for low-income children. This scholarship program is one - and, I emphasize, just one - tool we must use to realize the dream described in Dr. King's speech.
It is hard to find anyone who would disagree that our poor and minority children are facing an educational crisis. Despite tremendous progress in the past decade, we are still seeing graduation rates for African-American students of less than 60 percent. Among boys, it's even lower.

I have the highest praise for our public school teachers and administrators. Their task is almost inconceivably difficult, and their results are truly heroic. In Miami-Dade, we have a student population of incredible diversity - more than 100 languages are spoken in our public schools - and an economic diversity of staggering proportions. Expecting all children to thrive in a school assigned to them by their ZIP code is just not realistic, even with the best teachers.

Some children will only thrive in a different environment. Children are not "uniform," to borrow a word used in a brittle manner in this lawsuit, and the way each one of them will learn best isn't either. Some kids will thrive at Miami Northwestern High School - and not just football players. We never hear about its award-winning choir, and we don't hear about how the school sends kids to theIvy League every year. But for some kids, their assigned school won't be a good fit.
We need magnets, charters, virtual schooling, dual enrollment with colleges - and, yes, some low-income children will need a private, even faith-based, school like the one my ministry runs.
The Dr. John A. McKinney Christian Academy (JAMCA) serves 120 children in the scholarship program - scholarships that are worth $5,272 and cover the cost of the student's tuition, books and even some school supplies such as T-shirts and planners. In turn, these scholarships allow our families to use their limited incomes to put food on the table and turn on the lights. At JAMCA, our focus is on educating and preparing these children for life, not just for a test.
The point is that different kinds of children respond to different kinds of schools. So we,- and the courts - should be seeking "uniformity" of opportunity, not "uniformity" of delivery.
This scholarship program serves those it was intended to serve. The average income of its families is only $24,000 for a household of four.


I I


More than two-thirds of the children are black or Hispanic. A majority are from single-parent homes.
The scholarship program is working. We know this because the children must take standardized tests approved by the state, and the results are sent to a state-selected researcher at Northwestern University each year. What the research shows is that these children are among the worst performers in their public schools when they leave for the program. Once in the program, they make learning gains equal to all children of all incomes, including wealthy ones. Best of all, the research found that the more a public school had kids use the scholarship program, the higher the learning gains for those children who remained at the public school.
The scholarship program is helping the poor children in the program and in public schools. In 2010, more than 5,500 people came to Tallahassee to support this program - and more than 1,000 of them slept on buses overnight to do so. I can imagine tens of thousands who would come to the steps of the state Supreme Court, should it be asked to evict 68,000 low-income children from schools chosen by their parents.
Wouldn't it be wonderful if, instead of that march, we had a different one - one where everyone who is concerned about the educational achievement of our low-income children converged on the Capitol to affirm our support for our public schools, but also affirm our support for this scholarship program? That's my dream.


Victor T Curry is a bishop who leads the New Birth Baptist Church in Miami, which includes the Dr. John A. McKinney Christian Academy.


a s s S


This ad paid for by the Black Alliance For Educational Options and the Black Ministers Parental Choice Alliance, a coalition of 60 ministers across Florida.


Why do the Florida teachers union and
the Florida School Boards Association want to evict 68,000 low-income Florida students
from their schools?

Students who once struggled to learn are now thriving at Florida schools, including:

Esprit de Corp Academy
Joshua Christian Academy
North Florida Educational Institute
Potters House Christian Academy


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Ms. Perry's Free Press - Page 5


November 6-12, 2014








November 6-12, 2014


I, 1


New Life Ministry Presents

"The School of Prayers"
New Life Outreach Ministry Center presents 'The School of Prayer," every Saturday at 5640 Timuquana Rd. Suite 6, 10:30 a.m. The topic is: The Danger of Prayerlessness. For more info call 778-7651.

St. Philip's Episcopal Church

"Salute to Our Veterans"
St. Philip's Episcopal Church will honor the veterans from its congregation and beyond, Sunday November 9th, at 10 a.m. The celebrant at the Eucharist will be Reverend Charles Keyser, retired Bishop of the Armed Forces and Assisting Bishop of the Diocese of Florida. Mr. Kenneth Johnson, Senior Policy Advisor for Military Affairs Office of the Mayor will deliver a special address as part of the tribute planned. The church is located at 321 West Union Street. For more info call 354-1053.

OneJax Thanksgiving Service
OneJax Institute presents a Thanksgiving Gratitude Service, Thursday, November 20th at St. John's Cathedral, 256 E. Church St. at 6 p.m. This event is free and open to the public. For more info visit http://www.unfedu/onejax.


NSCOC 37th Annual Homecoming

and 60th Annual Church Anniversary
The Northside Church of Christ's 37th Annual Homecoming and 60th Annual Church Anniversary will take place November 1 - 9. The theme for the occasion is: "Our Diamond Jubilee,". The celebration continues on Saturday, November 8th at 5 p.m. in Downtown Jacksonville at the Florida Theatre with NSCOC Annual Gospel Songfest presenting acapella music at its best. On Sunday, November 9th the NSCOC Annual Homecoming Day Celebration and all day celebration begins with NSCOC Annual Memorial Homecoming Breakfast/Program at 7 a.m. Early morning worship at 9 a.m. and 11 a.m. Immediately following worship is the Annual Homecoming Dinner at 1 p.m. The Annual 37th Homecoming will conclude with NSCOC Homecoming Program and more group singing at 2:45 p.m. For more info call the church office at 765-9830. The church is located at 4736 Avenue B.

2nd Missionary Baptist's 164th

Anniversary and Pastor's 28th
The 164th Anniversary Celebration of Second Missionary Baptist Church and 28th Anniversary of Dr. Odell Smith, Jr., Friday, November 7th and Sunday November 9th. The theme is "Preparing Christian Soldiers for the Challenge of a Modem World" from scripture Ephesians 6:10-18. Sunday services begin at 9 a.m., weeknight service at 7 p.m. Come and celebrate with Second Missionary Baptist Church and be blessed! Second Missionary Baptist Church is located at 954 Kings Rd. For more info call 354-8268.


West Union Baptist Annual Unity Day
The Reverend Leroy C. Kelly, Pastor of West Union Baptist Church and congregation will celebrate its Annual Unity Day, Sunday, November 9th, during the 11 a.m. service. The speaker is Sis. Mildred D. Parker; 1st Lady of New First Corinth Baptist Church. Sis. Lillian Smith is chairperson and Dea. Cornelius Williams is co-chairperson. Come out and enjoy the fellowship. West Union Baptist Church is located 1605 W Beaver St. For more info call 353-0681.


Please Donate Your Clothes Hangers
Jacksonville Local Organizing Committee of the Millions More Movement Inc.,a local non profit is soliciting solicit donation of clothes and hangers of all types and sizes. The hangers or any other donations can be dropped off at 916 N.Myrtle Avenue. JLOC/MMM is located between Kings Road and Beaver Street on Myrtle Avenue, Monday through Friday 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. or items be picked up items. For more info visit www.jacksonvilleloc.org or call 240-9133. Help JLOC/MMM as they work to end violence through a good, quality education and not more incarceration "


Faust Temple Celebrates

73rd Anniversary
The members of Faust Temple Church of God in Christ will celebrate their 73rd Church Anniversary Thursday, November 13th, 14th and 16th. On Thursday and Friday service begin at 7:30 p.m., followed by Sunday at 4:30 p.m. The church was founded by the late Elder W.F. Faust, Sr. in 1941. The church is located at 3328 Moncrief Rd. Dr. Clarence L. Jones, Sr. presently serves as Pastor. The community is invited to come and share with Faust Temple Church of God in Christ in praising "Our awesome God for the things he has done." For additional info call the church at 353-1418.

Come Celebrate Harvest Day

at Central on the Pearl
Come celebrate Harvest Day with Central Metropolitan CME Church, 4611 Pearl St., Sunday, November 16th, where the John D. Pasely, Jr. is Pastor. Sunday school starts at 9 a.m. and morning worship starts at 10:45 am. The morning guest preacher will be Rev. Quan D. Glover, from Young Zion Baptist Church in St. Mary's, Georgia. This year's theme is "Thanking God for the Harvest: A Season of Faith, Hope and Love" from scripture ASV-1 Corinthians 13:13 "And now abide faith, hope, love, these three: but the greatest of these is love". For more information call 354-7426.

Mighty Clouds of Joy Headline Paxon

Revival Center's 75th Anniversary
Paxon Revival Center Church will celebrate the 75th Anniversary with legendary gospel groups and artists. On the program are the Mighty Clouds of Joy, Jonathan Nelson, Anita Wilson, Roy and Revelation, Helen Miller, Maurice Griffin, Meachun Clark & True Purpose, Nu Testament, Lawrence Flowers and the Intercession, Saturday, November 8th at 6 p.m. at Paxon Revival Center Church, 5461 Commonwealth Avenue. For more info visit www.wcgl 1360.com.


Shown (l-r) at EWC College Day is Eric Daniel Johnson, President, EWC National Alumni; Wanda Willis, EWC VP of Institutional Development; Angela Spears, Special Assistant to Mayor Alvin Brown, Nathaniel "Nat" Glover, President, EWC; Carlottra Guyton, Program Chair, St. Philips Episcopal Church and Dr. Marvin Grant, EWC VP of Academic Affairs.
St. Philips Episcopal's Annual EWC

Day is an Investment for the Future
St. Philips Episcopal Church recently hosted their annual Edward Waters College Day featuring the Edward Waters College Concert Choir under the direction of Mrs. Barbara McNeely-Bouie. Father Hugh Chapman, Rector of St. Philips stated, "Our church family is proud and honored to support the college and the "investment" that St. Philips contribute towards transforming and providing an opportunity for young people to achieve a college education is truly an investment in our community's future!". He continued, "I admire and appreciate the opportunity Edward Waters College President Nathaniel Glover has afforded St. Philips to be a part of the great things happening at the college and look forward to playing a role in the college continued success."


Improved Quality of Medicare Plans and Steady Premiums Highlight Begining of

Open Enrollment Begins


By Marilyn Tavenner, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Administrator Fall is a wonderful time of year. Changing leaves. Cooler weather. It's also the season for people with Medicare to review their current Medicare coverage, as Medicare Open Enrollment begins. As we prepare for Medicare Open Enrollment, which began on October 15 and ends on December 7, Medicare wants everyone to know that quality continues to improve both in Medicare Advantage and in the Part D Prescription Drug Program. Each year, plan costs and coverage can change. During open enrollment, seniors and people with disabilities across the country have the opportunity to review their current Medicare coverage and see if they want to make any changes for the next year. It's important for people with Medicare to take the time to make sure their current situation still meets their health care needs best. To help people choose a plan, Medicare calculates plan "star ratings" for Medicare health and prescription drug plans. Each plan gets a number of stars on a scale of 1 to 5-with 5 being the bestbased on quality and performance. These ratings are designed to help people with Medicare, their families, and caregivers compare plans, in addition to information on their premiums and benefits. This year, people with Medicare who choose to enroll in a Medicare health or prescription drug plan will have access to more high-rated, four- and five-star plans than ever before. Approximately 60 percent of Medicare Advantage enrollees are in a Medicare Advantage Plan earning four or more stars in 2015, compared to an estimated 17 percent back in 2009. Likewise, about 53 percent of Part D enrollees are currently enrolled in stand-alone prescription drug


plans with four or more stars for 2015, compared to just 16 percent in 2009. Since the passage of the Affordable Care Act, enrollment in Medicare Advantage will increase to 42 percent to an alltime high of over 16 million and Medicare Advantage premiums will have decreased by 6 percent. For people with Medicare, this is good news in how they receive care. Plans that are higher rated deliver a high-level of care, such as improving the coordination of care, managing diabetes or other chronic conditions more efficiently, screening for and preventing illnesses, making sure people get much-needed prescription drugs, or getting appointments and care quickly. A high rating also means these plans give better customer service, with fewer complaints or long waits for care. If you have Medicare and need assistance, you can visit Medicare.gov, call 1-800MEDICARE (1-800-633-4227), or contact your State Health Insurance Assistance Program (SHIP). You should have received the 2015 "Medicare & You" Handbook and important notices from your current plan, Medicare, or Social Security about changes to your coverage. If you're satisfied with your current coverage, there's nothing you need to do.
Better quality in Medicare health and prescription drug plans isn't the only news for those with Medicare. For most seniors who have Original Medicare, the 2015 Part B premium will stay unchanged for a second consecutive year at $104.90. This means more of seniors' retirement income and any increase in Social Security benefits will stay in their pockets. The Part B deductible will stay the same as well. Medicare is working hard to make sure this good news continues so that seniors and people with disabilities will continue to get the health care coverage they deserve.


NOTICE: Church news is published free of charge. Information must be received in the Free Press offices no later than Monday, at 5 p.m. of the week you want it to run. Information received prior to the event date will be printed on a space available basis until the date. Fax e-mail to 765-3803 or email to JFreePress@aol.com.


18WetEg*. *g Avenue




Seeking the lost for Christ
- Matthew 28:19 - 20


Pastor Landon Williams


S:00 A.M. Early Morning Worship

9:30 a.m. Sunday School

11:00 a.m. Morning Worship Tuesday Evening - 7"p.m. Prayer Service
Wednesday - Bible Study 6:30 - 7"p.m.
Mid-Week Worship 7 p.m.
Radio Weekly Broadcast - WCGL 1360 AM Sunday 2 PM - 3 PM

**FREE TUTORING FOR YOUTH IN ENGLISH, SCIENCE,
HISTORY AND MATH EVERY TUESDAY 6:30 - 8 P.M.


Th door*of acednia re awaysopento yu an*you fml. Ifwe.ay-e.o-an.asistanc


Bethel Baptist Institutional Church

215 Bethel Baptist Street, Jacksonville, FL 32202 (904) 354-1464



Weekly Services

Sunday Morning Worship Midweek 8:00 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. 1 -4 .0


Bishop Rudolph McKissick, Jr. Senior Pastor


Church school
9:30 a.m. Bible Study
6:45 p.m.


Services
Wednesday Noon Service
"Miracle at Midday" 12 noon - 1:00 p.m.


Bishop Rudolph
McKissick, Sr.. Pastor Emeritus


Come share in Holy Communion on 1st Sunday at 7:40 and 10:40 a.m.


Grace and Peace
visit www.Bethelite.org Q1


Page 6 - Ms. Perry's Free Press


Worship with

us LIVE on the web visit

www.truth2powerministries.org


r-







November 6-12, 2014


flatg 7 -lUre prr 1cFroi-Pri-cc -Qj-.kI3 ~.


Pictured is RaShad after a recent performance surrounded by his models
Whitney Williams, Sateria Ponder, Precious White and Shawn Collins

Millenial Rashad Solomon on a Mission to

Show He's Not Handicapped but HandiABLE


RaShad "The Truth On Wheels" Solomon recently entertained Black Expo attendees with his Comfortable with Myself entourage of models, singers and family members. RaShad is the mastermind behind the entertainment ensemble, an organization that reaches out to the disabled and encourages them to live a quality life, regardless of their disability.
Rashad and his advocates meet every other Friday at the Northside home he shares with his mother, Cynthia Collins, and his 18 year old brother Javone, who also has cerebral palsy. Participation is not limited to those with disabilities.
When asked why did he start the organization, RaShad .irnmeiately


responded, "I want people to know that even though I am considered disabled, I have many goals and want to be strong for my brother. The problems I have had have made me stronger. Comfortable With Myself organization will is on target to gain national status." A 2007 graduate of Ed White High School Rashad's motivational spirit crept up on him as he was once depressed and wanted to end his life with a failed suicide attempt. After much therapy and an inspiring mother, Rashad is now applying his efforts in seeking employment. "I had a job but was laid off and have not found a job yet. Because of my wheelchair I am being turned away. I've applied


to various companies, but my goal has always been modeling. After my bouts of depression I turned to fashion and now I want to look my best at all times. I look good and feel good."
RaShad was recently the winner of the Beautiful Bodies Contest at the Landing, been featured in national magazines and publications and has met with local modeling agents to express his interest. A recent performance at the Black Expo was a highlight, "My performance at the Expo was all about diversity, it showcased what a model is in my eye which is being comfortable. I am a role model for others with disability. I have the ability, not a disability".


Jack & Jill

Seminars for

Young Men

The Jack & Jill Jacksonville Chapter will present a free series workshops for young men entitled "Pathway to Manhood" seminars for grades 9th -12th.
Seminar A is "Promote Leadership and Communication Skills," on Saturday, December 6th, 9 - 3 p.m. at the University of Florida, 1 UNF Drive. The purpose is to motivate and develope the leaders of today and the future. There will be interactive skills, self-confidence and critical thinking and team building.
Seminar B is "College Preparation," Sunday, December 7th at the Boys and Girls Club, 555 W. 25th St., 1 - 3 p.m. The seminar will focus on how to prepare for college admissions.
Registration deadline is November 10th. For more information, email neproprice@aol.com.


Snap Fitness Riverside is offering a challenge to those considered obese who would like to make a healthy change. Get Help, Give Help is a 12 week challenge focused on helping people change their habits. Winners will get 12 weeks of free personal training and nutritional advice. According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, there has been a dramatic increase in obesity in the United States over the past 20 years and the rates remain high. More than one-third of adults and about 17 percent of children and adolescents have obesity.
"After reading those statistics in a recent article, I realized as a gym owner I needed to do more," said owner Judy Peek. "I created this challenge for those who are ready


Blacks, Whites, Liberals and

Conservatives Politic in the Hood
"Urban
Politick'n" was recently held at Duke's Place Blues, Bar and Lounge on Forsythe Street. The event was a collaboration of Fredrick Wilson, host of the popular radio show, "Let's Talk Politics w/Fredrick Wilson" Pictured left to right are panelist Kemal Gasper, and Community Rhonda Peoples-Waters, Jovan Frinks and Organizer, Angie Fredrick Wilson responding to questions Nixon. The goal was to bring people of all walks of life together to discuss political issues that matter most to the community. The event was scheduled to last from 5:30 p.m. until 7:30 p.m., due to the enthusiasm of the conversation and questions from the audience, it easily extended past 8 p.m. "Although Angie and I are totally opposites when it comes to political philosophies, we share a love for people and both want the best for all", said Fredrick Wilson.
Both Wilson and Nixon promise to continue this type of forum and take the debate and develop it into a grass-roots action plan. If you would like to learn more about upcoming debates, contact Fredrick Wilson at fwilson@theinvitation.us.


to get healthy, but might not know where to start. I want to help them change their habits so they can eliminate the health risks that come along with obesity." The Get Help, Give Help Challenge is open to anyone with a body mass index (BMI) of 30 or greater. To find out BMI, go to www.nhlbi.nih.gov and plug in weight and height. Participants are asked to write an essay, 500 words or less, and explain why they are ready to make this commitment to a healthier life. Eight finalists will be chosen and invited for an interview with Peek, who will choose four winners. Each finalist will receive one free month of gym membership. The four winners must commit to working out at least three days a week for 12 weeks; two supervised work-


outs and one workout on their own. They are also required to keep a food diary during the entire 12 weeks. Following the 12 week challenge, winners will be asked to share what they have learned with someone else.
Winners will receive three months of free membership at Snap Fitness Riverside, which includes an access and entry 24 hours a day, seven days a week. They will get two days a week of free personal training for 12 weeks and advice on how to change eating habits and choices. Essays should be sent to jacksonvillefl@snapfitness.com with Get Help, Give Help in the subject line. Please include a name and a phone number. The deadline for submission is December 31.


yille, Florida 32


Fitness Challenge Offers New Hope


and Personal Training for Obese


rage / - ivirs. rerry-s rree ri-ess











Flipping Through The Free Press Files


A. Wellington Barlow and his wife Cassandra strategize


Armenia Green, Mary and Sollie Mitchell enjoying the holidays!


Roy Mitchell, Constance Hall and Ken Manuel


Father C. Watson and Ruby Myers


Jerald Mannefield presenting Award for Education to St. Clair
Evans, Academy Principle Gloriden J. Norris


Dr. Chester Aikens and Minister Louis Farrakhan


Judy Batson and Lydia Stewart


Camilla Thompson, guest Ronnie Favors (writing autographs)
and Hostess Pearl Mackey chat in the Mackey home


Dr. Landon Williams, Wylene Dennis,
Tony Nelson, Annie Brown and Gwendolyn Gibson


Rayford McKinnon recognizing Jax influential African Americans


Renee James and Priscilla Williams


Cleve Warren, wife Patricia and son Brian witnessing his acceptance of the District Service Medal award


Fire Chief Ray Alfred and Eric Green


Alton Yates and Jucoby Pittman receiving Diversity Awards


Brig General Emmett A. Litshaw, Jr. pins Lt. Colonel Felice Franklin Michael Blaylock, Clifton Coleman and Vince Cameron participte in the 100 Black Men's "Men Who Cook" at Gateway Mall t 4


Ms. Perry's Free Press - Page 8


November 6 - 12, 2014










November 6 - 12, 2014


Ms. Perry's Free Press - Page 9


FINISHING TOUCHES


Morgan State Sports photo SOPH SENSATION: MEAC
rushing leader, sophomore Herb Walker Jr. of Morgan State, leads the Bears into NC A&T for a first-place showdown.


DIVISION WINNERS, TITLE GAME MATCH-UPS
TO BE DECIDED; NATIONAL STAT LEADERS


1 C0LLEEF00 T BA LL (esuts, Stadns andWeely onos)C


CENTRAL INTERCOLLEGATE
ATHLETIC AsSOcIATION
DIV ALL
NORTH W L W L Virginia State 6 0 7 2 Virginia Union 5 1 7 2 Bowie State 4 2 4 5 Eliz. City State 3 3 4 5 Chowan 0 6 1 8 Lincoln 0 6 1 8 SOUTH
W-Salem State 6 0 8 1 Fayetteville State 5 1 5 4 Livingstone 2 4 5 4 Shaw 2 4 3 6 Saint Augustine's 2 4 2 7 J.C. Smith 1 5 2 7
PLAYERS OF THE WEEK DB Charles Davis, VUU - 12 tackles, 6 solos, a break-up, 1 CB huy vs. ECSU. DL Anthony McDaniel, BSU - 8 tackles, 6 solo, 6 for losses, 2 sacks (-16 yds.) vs. Lincoln, LB Stephen Williams, ECSU - 13 tackles, 9 solos,
2.5 tackles for loss, 2 interceptions vs. VUU. WR Chris Patterson, JCSU - 3 receptions for 68 yards includinggame-winning 27-yardervs. StAugs. SPECIAL Alejandro Suarez, PK, WSSU - Kicked
8 PATS and a 36-yard FG vs. Chowan. OB Maurice Lewis, RB, WSSU - 17 carries, 155 yards, 1 TO in win over Shaw. CB Rudy Johnson, Sr., WSSU- 15-21,251 yds.,
2 TDs vs. Shaw. Also ran for 29 yards and a TD. ROOKIE Earl Hughes, Fr., RB, VSU - 19 carries, 120 yards, 2 TDs, 1 22-yard catch vs. Chowan. COACH Damon Wilson, BSU - Beat N. Div. coleader Va. Union in OT.


MEAC MID EASTERN IVI ATHLETIC CONFERENCE
CONF ALL W L W L
SC State 4 1 6 3 NCA&TState 4 1 7 2 Bethune-Cookman 4 1 7 2 Morgan State 4 1 5 4 Norfolk State 4 1 4 5 N. Carolina Central 3 2 4 5 Delaware State 2 4 2 8 Hampton 1 4 2 7 Howard 1 5 2 7 # Florida A&M 2 3 2 7 # Savannah State 0 5 0 8 # Not eligible for title

PLAYERS OF THE WEEK OFFENSE Malcolm Bell, r-So., c, NCCU
- 23 of 32, 287 yards, 3 TDs, 72 rush yards, 18 carries, 2 TDs in win over Savannah State. DEFENSE Javon Hargrave, Jr., DL, SCSU
- 11 solo tackles, MEAC and FCS record six sacks, forced 2 fumbles in win over B-CU. ROOKIE Jerrell Antoine, Fr., QB, HAM - 13 of25for143 passingyards, ITD vs. DelState. SPECIAL TEAMS Antonio Hamilton, r-Jr., DB/KR, SCSU - Returned punt 91 yards for TD vs. Bethune-Cookman. OFF. LINEMAN Carl Jones, r-So.,C, NCCU 93% grade, 4 pancakes vs. Savannah State.


SlAC SOUTHERN INTERCOLLEGIATE
ATHLETIC CONCFERENCE


EAST
Albany State Fort Valley State Morehouse Benedict Clark Atlanta Paine WEST
Tuskegee
Miles Stillman Central State Kentucky State Lane


CONF
W L 6 0 4 2 4 3 2 4 1 5 0 5

6 0 5 1 3 3 2 4 2 4 1 5


PLAYERS OF THE WEEK OFFENSE MichaeiWilson, Sr., QB, CENTRAL STATE - 173 yards passing, 87 yards rushing and a TD in win over Stillman. DEFENSE LeronFurr, Sr., LB, FVSU- 14 tackles, 9solos, 3.5tackles forloss, 1 hurryvs. Paine. NEWCOMER Matthew Danlels, Fr., WR, CAU
- Rushed for 79 yards including 18- and 52-yard TD runs in loss to Albany State. SPECIAL TEAMS John Adams, Jr., PK, CENTRAL STATE - Converted FGs of 22 and 41 yards vs. Stillman, avgd 44 yards on punts. OFFENSIVE LINEMAN Matthew Reese, Sr., OL, TUSKEGEE -


SWAC ATHLETIC CONFERENCE


EAST
Alcorn State Alabama A&M Alabama State Jackson State Miss. Valley St. WEST
Grambling State Southern Texas Southern Prairie View A&M Ark. Pine Bluff


PLAYERS OF THE WEEK OFFENSE
John GibbsJr, QB, ALCORN STATE- 18of 27, career-high 362 yards, 4 TOs, rushed for 32 yards on 9 carries, 1 TD vs. PV. DEFENSE
Willie Duncan, LB, UAPB - 11 tackles, 10 solos, 1 sack, 2 tackles for loss vs. TSU. SPECIAL TEAMS Willie Quinn, WR/KR, SOUTHERN - 242 all-purpose yards, 81-yard punt return for TD, five receptions for 134 yards. NEWCOMER
ArronBaker, RB,ALCORN STATE-Careerhigh 149 yards on 15 carries with 3 TDs in win over Prairie View.


INDEPENDENTS
W L
Langston 5 3 Tennessee State 4 6 Edward Waters 4 6 W. Va. State 2 7 Cheyney 2 7 Lincoln (Mo.) 2 7 Concordia 1 7 Va.-Lynchburg 0 7 Texas College 0 8


PLAYERS OF THE WEEK OFFENSE
Mark Wright, So., CE, LANGSTON - Completed 10 of28 passes for 149 yards and TDs of 25 and 16 yards. Also ran 13 times for 48 yards and scored on a 15-yard run in win over Panhandle State. DEFENSE
Chase Green, Sr., CB, LANGSTON -Had 10 tackles, 7 solos, and one sack for -7 yards in win over Panhandle State. Sldtrell Grayson, So., DB, LANGSTON
- Ninetackles, six solos, and one interception in win over Panhandle State. SPECIAL TEAMS Darlon Hall, Sr., RB/KR, TENN. STATE
- Returned five kickoffs for 174 yards including a 100-yard return TD vs. EKU.


Morehouse 24, Fort Valley State 21 Kentucky State 47, Paine 14 Tuskegee 28, Central State 25 SWAC
Alabama A&M 25, Jackson State 14 Ark.-Pine Bluff 24, Miss. Valley State 14 Grambling State 35, Texas Southern 7 Southern 28, Alabama State 21 INDEPENDENTS
Ave Maria 30, Edward Waters 7 Alderson-Broaddus 62, Va.-Lynchb. 21 Central Wasington 17, Lincoln 14 E. Kentucky 56, Tenn. State 42 Langston 38, Panhandle State 17 Notre Dame 41, W. Va. State 10 Samford 55, Concordia-Selma 0 Wayland Baptist 34, Texas College 8 West Chester 58, Cheyney 0


STAT CORNER

WHO ARE THE BEST PERFORMERS IN BLACK COLLEGE SPORTS


BLACK COLLEGE STAT LEADERS
Thru games of November 1


RUSHING YARDS CYRUS, Malcolm, ALS WALKER, Herb, MSU SMALL, Jarvis, ALB COHEN, Tak, NCAT HENDERSON, Moris, LINM DAVENPORT, Rod, SAU LOCKETT, Jacquise, KSU HEBERT, Johnta, PV


YDS
1245 1049 989 956
947 1021 895 813


TDS AVGG 8 138.3 12 131.1 10 123.6 9 120.8
14 118.4 6 113.4 10 111.9 9 101.6


PASSING YARDS CL G COM-ATT-INT PCT YDS TDS AVGOG IVY, LOhjeii, JSU - SO'6.V207 324 10- 68.9 2473r,17 274.8


flINLJ~rVOJfl~, ~ ,Jnrsa ~.Jfl ,J


POWELL, Drew, LIV SR 9 156-284-14 LOVELOCKE, Jerry, PV SR 8 151-272-7 STOVER, Cameron, BEN SR 8 159-278-9 LEE, Jaymason, AAM JR 8 95-196-4 GIBBS, John Jr., ALC JR 9 130-225-5


RECEPTIONS CL
HENDRICKS, Jalen, LIV JR STAFFORD, Julian, MVS SR WILKINS, Adrian, NCCU JR WILLIAMS, Dan, JSU SO COLEMAN, Duke, LAN SR BROWN, Kendariss, BEN SR SMALLWOOD, Javon, VSU JR CAVER, Michael, WSSU JR


RECEIVING YARDS CL
HENDRICKS, Jal., LIV JR STAFFORD, Julian, MVS SR LEWIS, Claytin, SAU FR WILLIAMS, Dan, JSU SO GROSS, Danta, VUU FR SMITH, Mont., AA&M JR SMALLWOOD, J., VSU JR QUINN, Willie, SOU JR

TOTAL OFFENSE CL POWELL, Drew - LIV JR ANDERSON, Ben-APB JR IVY, Lamontez - JSU SO GIBBS, John Jr. -ALC JR McGHEE, Greg - HOW SR GERMAN, Michael - TNS SR LOVELOCKE, Jerry - PVA SR BELL, Malcolm - NCC SO

ALL PURPOSE CL
HEBERT, Johnta - PV JR CYRUS, Malcolm -ALS SR WASHINGTON, Jordan - HAM SR WALKER, Herb - MSU SO QUINN, Willie - SOU JR COHEN, Tarik - NCAT SO WILKINS, Adrian - NCC JR PURNELL, Dondre - STIL SR


SCORING CL WALKER, Herb Jr - MSU SO BARRICK, Chris - PV SR CLARKE, Andre - NCC SR JONES, Cody - NCAT SO COHEN, Tarik - NCAT SO SMALL, Jarvis - ALB JR LOCKETR, Jacquise - KSU SR WYLIE, Trevor - TUS SO FREEMAN, Drelon - FVSU FR JORDAN, Anthony - BCU SR

SACKS CL
HARGRAVE, Javon - SCS JR ROBINSON, Chris - MSU JR SMITH, Marquis - SSU SO McMILLIAN, Artell - CSU SO JONES, Braysean - MIL JR BERRY, Demarcus-APB SR TERRY, Gabe -TNS JR MORGAN, Julian - TUS SO


INTERCEPTIONS CL PUMPHREY, Curtis - BSU JR DAVIS, Charles - VUU JR MATTOCKS, Donald - NCAT SR HARTLEY, Kerry - JCS SR HOLLINS, Tyree - GSU SR McRAE, Tony - NCAT JR LEE, Travis - MILES SR WALKER, Brian - FVS JR JONES, Michael - NCC SO


REC YDS 71 1070 53 880 46 520 52 778 23 133 52 603 47 713 36 496


REC YDS
71 1070 53 880
41 724 52 778 23 586 44 725 47 713 46 697

RUSH PASS 678 1767 440 1923 140 2473 580 1794 621 1697
-17 1988 159 1805 312 1702

Rush Rec 813 182 1248 274 735 308
1049 187
-9 697 966 220
-7 520 87 527


2A A


4 54.9 2046 25
55.5 1805 10 57.2 1759 15 48.5 1646 13 57.8 1794 13


TD YPC
12 15.1 9 16.6 3 11.3 8 15.0 0 5.8 7 11.6 5 15.2 5 14.2


TD YPC
12 15.1 9 16.6 5 17.7 8 15.0 6 25.5 5 16.5 5 15.2 4 15.2

PLAYS YDS
395 2566 378 2363 414 2613 314 2374 424 2318 322 1971 322 1964 327 2009


227.3 225.6 219.9 205.8 199.3


YDSIG
118.9 97.8 65.0
86.4 33.2 67.0 79.2 79.2


YDSIG
118.9 97.8 90.5
86.4 83.7 80.6 79.2 77.4

AVGIG
320.8
295.4 290.3 263.3 257.6
246.4 245.5 223.2


YDSIG
213.6 170.6 167.7
154.5 154.1 148.2 135.2 129.8


AVGIG 10.5
8.1 8.0 7.7 7.5 7.5 7.5 7.0 6.8 6.8


Division titles on the line


SCORES

NOVEMBER 1 ClAA
Bowie State 28, Lincoln 7 Fayetteville St. 31, Livingstone 28, 2OT J. C. Smith 14, St. Augustines 10 Virginia State 40, Chowan 7 Virginia Union 14, Eliz. City State 7 Winston-Salem State 61, Shaw 10 MEAC
Bethune-Cookman 34, N. C. Central 20 Howard 17, Delaware State 10 Morgan State 38, Hampton 35 Norfolk State 12, Florida A&M 10 SC State 59, Savannah State 7 SIAC
Albany State 40, Benedict 14 Clark Atlanta 34, Paine 0 Miles 26, Stillman 22


1. WINSTON-SALEM STATE (8-1) - Throttled Shaw, 61-10. THIS WEEK: At Fayetteville State for CIAA South title.
2. GRAMBLING STATE (6-3) - Handled Texas Southern, 35-7. THIS WEEK: At Miss. Valley State Thursday.
3. ALCORN STATE (7-2) - Idle. THIS WEEK: At Alabama A&M.
4. SOUTH CAROLINA STATE (6-3) - Defeated Savannah State, 59-7. THIS WEEK: At Florida A&M.
5. BETHUNE-COOKMAN (7-2) - Got by NC Central, 34-20. THIS WEEK: At BCSP No. 9 Norfolk State.
6. NORTH CAROLINA A&T (7-2) - Idle. THIS WEEK: Hosts Morgan State.
7. SOUTHERN (6-3) - Beat Alabama State, 28-21. THIS WEEK: Hosts Texas Southern.
8. VIRGINIA STATE (7-2) - Easily beat Chowan, 40-7. THIS WEEK: At Virginia Union playing for CIAA North crown.
9. NORFOLK STATE (4-5) - Survived Florida A&M, 12-10. THIS WEEK: Hosts BCSP No. 5 Bethune-Cookman.
10. TUSKEGEE (7-2) - Barely beat Central State, 28-25. THIS WEEK: At Miles for SIAC West crown.


NORTH SOUTHv. AolmI ional osn'=wEAST WEST


LUT WILLIAMS
BCSP Editor
It is hard to imagine more intrigue or better end-of-the-year scenarios than the situation this week in black college football.
There are two division title-clinching games in the CIAA, one in the SIAC, another possible one in the SWAC and two games that are sure to break a five-team first-place logjam in the MEAC.
It should make for an exciting, entertaining and revealing early November weekend.


CIAA
In the CIAA North, BCSP No. 8 Virginia State, at 6-0 in conference play, travels to traditional rival, 5-1 Virginia Union, in the winnertakes-the-division showdown in Richmond, Va. Saturday.
The 1:30 p.m. clash will be televised live on the CIAA TV Network and on Fox Sports and will be carried nationally on radio by the HSRN Sports Network.
VSU, under second-year head coach Latrell Scott, is the defending division champion and has won seven straight games since losing its first two games to open the season.
They have been led on offense by sophomore quarterback Tarian Ayres, who has passed for 1,785 yards (198.3 ypg.) with 11 TDs and nl'y three interceptions andalso rushed four six .i esJunior wideout a. mallwood (47 receptions, 713 yards, 2 TDs) is his top target.
The Trojans also feature a strong running game led by 5-10, 205-pound sophomore running back Kavon Bellamy (634 yards, 9 TDs) and 5-9, 160-pound freshman Earl Hughes (487 yards, 5 TDs). Senior linebacker Brandon Robinson is the team's top tackler (7.6 per game).
VSU dominated VUU in last year's battle, 46-3, but the Panthers are greatly improved under the leadership of new head coach Mark James.
The Panthers feature four Div. I transfers, eight MEAC transfers and two other transfers from FCS HBCU programs. Their only loss in CIAA play was in overtime at home to Bowie State (20-17) two weeks ago when they lost both starting QB Kenneth Graham and backup Shawheen Dowdy to injuries. Junior Dane James finished up that game and started last week's narrow 14-7 win over Elizabeth City State.
The Panthers top playmakers are 6-foot, 190 redshirt freshman speedster Donte Gross (23 rec., 586 yds., 6 TDs), 6-2, 190-pound junior Jussie York (38 rec., 614 yds., 7 TDs) and graduate Lenworth Lennon (34 rec., 489 yds., 4 TDs) who also doubles as a running back. Senior defensive back Charles Davis leads the Panther defense with 77 tackles and six interceptions.
BCSP No. 1 Winston-Salem State (8-1, 6-0 CIAA S) travels to Fayetteville State (5-4, 5-1 S) in the 1:30 p.m. South Division showdown Saturday.
WSSU, seeking its fourth straight division title and championship game berth and first under new head coach Kienus Boulware, has won seven straight games. The Rams have been alternating senior quarterbacks Rudy Johnson and Phillip Sims all season. They have put up similar numbers with Johnson throwing for 1,114 yards and 9 TDs and Sims 1,246 yards and 12 scores. Johnson has also rushed for 308 yards. Wideouts Brendan Felder, Marcel Cay-


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 6


ESPNU
Miss Valley State vs. Grambling State in Itta Bena, MS ESPNU - ESPN3
Norfolk State vs. Bethune-Cookman in Norfolk, VA
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 8 CIAA
Bowie State vs. Eliz. City State in Bowie, MD Chowan vs. Lincoln (PA) in Murfreesboro, NC J. C. Smith vs. Livingstone in Charlotte, NC Fayetteville State vs. W-Salem State in Fayetteville, NC St. Augustine's vs. Shaw in Raleigh, NC MEAC
North Carolina A&T vs. Morgan State in Greensboro, NC Florida A&M vs. South Carolina State in Tallahassee, FL Savannah State vs. Howard in Savannah, GA SIAC
Morehouse vs. Kentucky State in Atlanta, GA Paine vs. Benedict in Augusta, GA Miles vs. Tuskegee in Fairfield, AL SWAC
Southern vs. Texas Southern in Baton Rouge, LA Alabama A&M vs. Alcom State in Huntsville, AL Alabama State vs. Jackson State in M-gomery, AL INDEPENDENTS
Central State vs. Lane in Wilberforce, OH West Virginia State vs. Shepherd in Institute, WV Cheyney vs. Millersville in Cheyney, PA Delta State vs. Condordia-Selma in Cleveland, MS Langston vs. OK Panhandle State in Langston, OK Lincoln (MO) vs. McKendree in Jeff. City, MO Edward Waters vs. Warner in Jacksonville, FL Austin Peay vs. Tenn. State in Clarksville, TN Va.-Lynchburg vs. Kentucky Wesleyan in Lynchburg, VA HOMECOMINGS
Stillman vs. Clark Atlanta in Tuscaloosa, AL NC Central vs. Hampton in Durham, NC Arkansas-Pine Bluff vs. Prairie View in P. Bluff, AR TV I WEBCASTS
CIAA TV- Fox Sports - HSRN
Virginia Union vs. Virginia State in Richmond, VA 25th Fountain City Classic - HSRN
Albany State vs. Fort Valley State in Columbus, GA


lp lp
12n 2p 2p 2p 2p
4p 6p

lp 2p 2:30p


1:30p

2p


er and Eric Williams have combined for 100 catches and 17 TDs.
The Rams' running attack has been productive as well with senior Maurice Lewis (557 yards, 7 TDs) leading the way and sophomore Mustapha Greene (389 yards, 6 TDs) and junior Tyree Massey (301 yards, 5 TDs) coming on lately.
Linebacker Terry Ross (50 tackles) and lineman Mike Bloomfield (7.5 sacks) pace the defense.
FSU, under second-year head coach Lawrence Kershaw, brings a five-game winning streak into the showdown.
Junior QB Derek Bryant (1,540 yards, 11 TDs, 10 ints.) and junior RB Andre Montgomery (728 yards, 5 TDs) pace the offense. Senior free safety Michael Johnson (75 tackles, 3 ints.) is the top defender.
WSSU defeated FSU.28-14 tQ end the season a year ago. ,, -.. ' w ,' '"


SIAC
Morehouse's 24-21 win over Fort Valley State last week coupled with Albany State's win over Benedict gave the East Division title and a second straight spot in the Nov. 15 championship game, this year in Montgomery, Ala., to Albany State.
But after wins last week, Alabama rivals Tuskegee (7-2, 6-0 W) and Miles (6-3, 5-1 W) meet in Fairfield, Alabama Saturday (4 p.m.) for the West title and a spot opposite Albany State in the title game.
At the end of last season, Miles defeated Tuskegee 41-36 to win the West title before losing to Albany State in the title game.
Tuskegee head coach Willie Slater alternates sophomore QB Kevin Lacey (1,101 yards, 6 TDs) with senior Justin Nared (716 yards, 6 TDs) who both complete 55% of their passes. Sophomore Hoderick Lowe (544 yds., 8 TDs) and senior Michael J. Thornton (446 yards, 7 TDs) lead the rushing attack.
Senior linebacker El Malik Chinn (81 tackles) anchors the defense.
Miles head coach Reginald Ruffin has senior QB Demetric Price, who has thrown for 1,118 yards and 9 TDs, leading the Golden Bears' offense while redshirt sophomore Johnathan Clark (810 yards, 3 TDs) leads the ground attack. The Golden Bears also rely on senior wideout Antonio Pitts who has 461 receiving yards and 8 TDs on the season. Junior LB Rodrick Hollman and senior DB Michael Mitchell lead the defense.


SWAC
BCSP No. 3 Alcorn State (7-2, 5-1 SWAC E) has a two-game lead over second-place Alabama A&M (4-5, 3-3) as the two tangle in Huntsville Saturday at 1 p.m. An Alcorn win would give the Braves the division title and spot in the Dec. 13 SWAC Championship Game in Houston.


BCSP ProFile - NFL PLAYERS OF THE WEEK
For games of October 23 - 27, 2014


OFFENSE L
JACOBY JONES, WR/KR, Baltimore (6th year, LANE) - Returned four kickoffs for 188 yards, a 47-yards per return average, including a 108-yard fourth quarter T0 return. He also returned three punts for 32 yards, including a 25-yarder.
DEFENSE
- JUNIOR GALLETE, DE, New Orleans, (5th year, STILLMAN) - Three solo tackles, including two sacks, one a strip sack of Cam Newton that forced a fumble on the Carolina 1 that the Saints recovered. Also had and one assist in win over Carolina.


�AZEEZ Communications, Inc. Vol. XXI, No. 14


FOR THE WEEK OF NOVEMBER 4 - 10, 2014


SWAC West Division leader and BCSP No. 2 Grambling State (6-3, 6-0 W) tries to keep its conference record clean and its division lead playing Thursday (6:30 p.m.) at Mississippi Valley State. Southern (5-3), second at 5-1 in the West, hosts Texas Southern at 1 p.m.


MEAC
BCSP No. 4 South Carolina State, BCSP No. 5 Bethune-Cookman, BCSP No. 6 North Carolina A&T, BCSP No. 9 Norfolk State and Morgan State are tied for first in the MEAC with 4-1 records with three games left in the regular season.
Two games will match teams tied at the top. On Thursday night, Norfolk State hosts Bethune-Cookman at 7:30 p.m. in a game to be televised live on ESPNU and on-line at ESPN3. And on Saturday (1 p.m.), A&T hosts Morgan State in a game featuring the league's top two rushers, MSU's Herb Walker (131.1 ypg.) and A&T's Tarik Cohen (120.8 ypg.).
S. C. State plays at Florida A&M Saturday at 3 p.m.


-bZ.7--I9Z3 lb Z4U.4








November 6-12, 2014


Page 10 - Ms. Perry's Free Press


Amateur Night
at the Ritz
The Amateur Night at the Ritz "Step Up to the Mic" is Friday, November 7th at 7:30 p.m. This is your last chance to qualify for the Semi-Finals. If you are a poet, singer, rapper, dancer, musicians, we want you at Amateur Night! Bring your family and friends because this is the only show in Jacksonville where the audience decides the winner. For tickets and more info call 807-2010.

"Clybourne Park" the Stage Play
Limelight Theater, 11 Old Mission Avenue, St. Augustine, Florida presents the stage play "Clybourne Park" November 7th - 30th. Produced in conjunction with Lift Up Lincolnville, Clybourne Park is a play by Bruce Norris written in response to Lorraine Hansberry's play, A Raisin in the Sun. For more info call 825-1164.

100 Black
Men Fundraiser
100 Black Men Fundraising Reception is scheduled for Friday, November 7th, 7 - 10 p.m. at the Hyatt Regency Riverfront, 225 E. Coastline Dr. Suite 4104. Proceeds supporting scholarships for deserving students and J100 Program. For more info visit www. 1 00blackmenjax.org.

Family Coalition
Quarterly Training
The Family Support Service is presenting a Family Coalition Training session, Saturday, November 8th, 9 a.m. to 12 noon, 911 Edgewood Avenue S. Topics include finance news, healthcare update, and specialty training information. To pre register or for more info call 418-5811.

45th Northwest Classic,
Raines vs. Ribault
The William M. Raines High School Athletic Department will host the 45th Annual Northwest Classic, Raines vs. Ribault on Saturday, November 8th, at 2 p.m. in the Earl Kitchen Stadium located on the campus of Raines High School, 3663 Raines Avenue. The Annual Parade will take place at 10 a.m, at the Shoppes of Sherwood, 5045 Soutel Drive, routing to Raines High School. For more info contact Siottis Jackson at 894-3598.


Keepin 'It Real
Mother and
Daughter Conference
The Florida Department of Health, First Timothy Baptist Church, Empowerment Resources, Inc., and Girls Inc. presents the 5th annual Keepin' It Real 2014: Mother & Daughter Conference, Saturday, November 8th, 8:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. for ages 11 & Up. Sessions include self-esteem, healthy communications and reproductive and sexual health. There will be breakfast and lunch, free gift bags, mother and daughter photos too! The event location is First Timothy Baptist Church, 12103 Biscayne Boulevard. For more info visit www.empowermentresourcesinc.org.

Centre of the
Arts Fundraiser
The Jacksonville Centre of the Arts Fundraiser/Kick-off is set for Saturday, November 8th, 10 - 4 p.m. at the Historic Stanton Building, 521 W. Ashly St. Participate in raising funds and enjoy bouncey house, food trucks, vendors, local celebrity entertainment, line dancing, JCArts Dancers and more! Bring your lawn chair. For more info call 355-5551.

Living a Balanced
Life Seminar
The Duval County Extension office presents "Living a Balanced Life," lla.m. -12 p.m. at the Beaches Branch Library, 600 3rd St., Neptune Beach, November 8, 15, 22. To register visit http://www.jaxpubliclibrary.org/par enting

P.R.I.D.E. Book Club 21st Anniversary
People Reading for Inspiration, Discussion and Enjoyment Book Club will hold their 21st Anniversary meeting Saturday, November 8th, at 5 p.m. at the University Club, 1301 Riverplace Blvd. The book for review is: "Vere Pilgrim and the Ritual of the Dolphins by Bryant Rollins." Enjoy an evening with the author, dinner and jazz. For more info call Felice Franklin at 703-8264.

Marcus Stroud's Love, Live and Laugh Tour
The Love, Live and Laugh tour is coming to Jacksonville, Saturday, November 8th, at 8 p.m. Featuring Faith Evens, Ricky Smiley, Tamar


Braxton and Nephew Tommy. With performances by Special K and GudGud at the Veterans Memorial Arena. For VIP tickets and more info call 469-4465.

Leela James in Concert
You might recognize Leela James from the Hit TV show R&B divas! Leela James will be in concert Sunday, November 9th at 7 p.m. at the Ritz, 829 N. Davis St. for one show only! She will be debuting her current single "Say That", and giving you all the songs that made you fall in love with her. For tickets and more info call 807-2010.

COJ Veterans
Day Parade
Join the City of Jacksonville in honoring our nation's veterans, Tuesday, November 11th at 11:01 a.m. This patriotic parade features more than 4,00 participants including grand marshals, senior military officials, active-duty and retired military units, veterans groups, local high school marching bands, military organizations, JROTC and more! For more info call 630-3690.

Parenting Styles
Seminar
The Duval County Extension office will present "Be Informed: Parenting Styles That Lead to Success" on Wednesday, November 12th, 6:30-7:30 p.m. at the South Mandarin Branch Library, 12125 San Jose Blvd. To register visit http://www.jaxpubliclibrary.org/parenting.

Christian Hip-Hop artist Lecrae in Concert
American Christian hip hop artist Lecrae in concert at the Times Union Center for Performing Arts Moran Theater, 300 Water St., Thursday, November 13th at 7 p.m. For more info call 633-6110.

CoWork Jax Events
CoWork Jax's upcoming events include Wednesday, November 12th at 6 p.m. for Rotaract Downtown Jax; Thursday, November 13th at 6 p.m. for the One Spark Creator Academy: Creator Foundations; Monday, November 17th at 12 noon is the member luncheon and Monday, November 17th at 6 p.m.is the Jax UX meeting discussing 5 Day Design Sprint from Google Ventures. For more info visit www.coworkjax.com.


DHS Monthly Meeting
The Durkeville Historical Society Fall/Winter meeting is scheduled for Thursday, November 13th at 5:30 p.m., 1293 W. 19th Street. For more info visit www.durkeevillehistoricalsociety.org

Intensive Acting
Workshop
From November 14-16, Jax native and actress Angela Robinson of The White Robin Group and Tyler Perry's "Have and Have Not's" will present a 3-day, acting intensive workgroup at Stage Aurora Theater, 5164 Norwood Ave. For more info visit www.stageaurora.org.

Clarence Carter
at the Ritz
American blues and soul singer, musician, songwriter and record producer Clarence Carter will perform Friday, November 14th at the Ritz Theater. For more info visit www.allmusic.com or contact the Ritz Theater at 807-2010 or via www.ritzj acksonville.com.

Tribute to
Alfred "Al" Austin
The AnnieRuth Foundation presents a night to pay tribute to community legend, Alfred "Al" Austin, Saturday, November 15th, 5 - 7 p.m., at WJCT Studio A, 100 Festival Park. In his college years, Austin became a standout in track and field at FAMU. While there, he teamed up with "Bullet" Bob Hayes and together they broke records in the 440 relay. For tickets and more info call 200-7202.

16th Annual
Storytelling Festival
The 16th Annual "Bean Soup & Stories" Storytelling Festival, presented by The Northside Storytellers League takes place Saturday, November 15th, 11 a.m.
- 2 p.m., at Inman Memorial United Methodist Church, 5334 Old Kings Rd. N. Featured storytellers: Jim Mittelstadt and Yvette Thomas, with tellers from 3 NE FL Leagues. After stories, bean soup, combread, & cookies will be served! For more info call Mary Webster at 786-1949.

CWM "Pearls
& Cufflinks Gala"
It's that time of year again for the Clara White Mission "Pearls and Cufflinks Gala" The theme is "Black Tie/1920's Attire,"


Saturday, November 15th, 6 to 9 p.m. at Citi, 14000 Citicard Way. Join the CWM in celebrating the spirit of Clara White's legacy of giving back to her neighbors and the CWM mission and 110 year legacy to reduce and prevent homelessness and hunger through education and job training. For more info call Deborah Henry at 356-4162.

JASMYN 20th
Year Celebration
JASMYN, the Jacksonville Area Sexual Minority Youth Network is capping off its 20th anniversary year serving LGBTQ youth (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Questioning) with a celebration on Saturday, November 15th, at the Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens, 829 Riverside Ave from 7 p.m. to 11 p.m. For more info visit www.jasmyn.org.

Marco Bicego Trunk Show
The Marco Bicego Trunk Show and cocktail reception at Underwood Jewelers, 2044 San Marco Boulevard "Jewels for Schools" event to benefit Take Stock in Children, Tuesday, November 18th, 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. For more info call 398-9741.

Ritz Chamber
Players Concert
The Ritz Chamber Players will present a series of four concerts offering exciting and rich musical experiences. Held at the Times Union Center, the first is the Brahms Sonic Splendor, Wednesday, November 19th; In Remembrance of the Dream is scheduled for January 21, 2015 and Tragedy Towards Peace, February 18, 2015 and Spring Spectacular, Wednesday, May 6, 2015. For more info visit www.ritzchamberplayers.org.

"So You Think You
Can Dance" Tour
"So You Think you can Dance," the 11-time Primetime Emmy� Award-winning show that sparked America's fascination with dance, is set to captivate audiences on tour in Jax, at the Jacksonville's TimesUnion Center's Moran Theater, 300 Water St., Thursday, November 20th, at 7:30 p.m. For one night only the top 10 finalists will perform! For tickets and more information call 442-2929.


NFC 5 Year Bash
Join the North Florida Chapter of the E3 Business Group, Inc. as they celebrate 5 years of building entrepreneurs and local communities. The celebration will be held Thursday, November 21st, from 6
- 9 p.m. at E3 HQ, 138 E. Duval Street. For more info and to RSVP email events@e3northflorida.org.

Comedian David Alan Grier in Jax
Actor and comedian David Alan Grier at the Comedy Zone, 3130 Hartley Rd, November 21 - 22. Grier is a veteran in theater, television, film and comedy and included in Comedy Central's list of the "100 Greatest Stand-Ups of All Time." For more info call 292-4242.

FAMU vs BCU Classic
The Florida Blue Classic featuring FAMU versus the BCU Wildcats is set for Saturday, November 23rd at 2 p.m. at Orlando Florida Citrus Bowl Stadium, 1 Citrus Bowl Place. Billed as the nation's largest HBCU rivalry, the game will be televised live on ESPN classic. For more info visit www.floridaclassic.org.

CISV Gala
Children's International Summer Villages Gala is set for Saturday, November 22nd at 7 p.m. at The Museum, 4160 Boulevard Center Drive. Come celebrate CISV's mission to build global friendships. Enjoy international cuisine, music, dancing silent auction and entertainment. For more information visit www.cisv.org.

Otis Clay in Concert
American R&B and soul singer Otis Clay who started in gospel music, in concert Saturday, November 22nd at 7 p.m. For more info visit www.otisclay.net or contact the Ritz Theater at 807-2010. The Ritz is located at 829 North Davis Street.

God's Trombones Play
Stage Aurora Theater presents the play "God's Trombones" by James Weldon Johnson December 5-7, at Stage Aurora Theater, 5164 Norwood Ave. The play details 7 Negro Sermons (The Creation, The Prodigal Son, The Crucifixion) and much more highlight this amazing evening of spirit through song, dance, and visual imagery. For more info visit www.stageaurora.org.


The Free Press





of Jacsonvile has









To our valued readers and customers, The Free Press of


Jacksonville will be located at


1122 West Edgewood


Avenue. Our new location is approximately two blocks from our former location. All phone and fax numbers remain the same. We look forward to you visiting us at our new offices.


NEW LOCATION


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S.AROUND TOWN



7_ What to do from social, volunteer, political and sports activities to self enrichment and the civic scene











New Book Delves into The


'Disintegration 'of Black Neigh orboods


by Tonya Pendleton
Boris Kodjoe woke up like this. The 41-year-old actor is one of the stars of The Real Husbands of Hollywood reality spoof show on BET and was also in Addicted, the movie version of the popular Zane book. Although he's well known for playing characters that use his gorgeous face and body to their full advantage, Kodjoe relished shaking up his image by turning to comedy. We caught up with him and asked him about Real Husbands, his career, his hot marriage to actress Nicole Ari Parker and why October is an important month for his family.
Q: Why made you decide to go on Real Husbands?
My best friend, Chris Spencer, is the creator of the show and he and Kevin [Hart] had called me and told me they were doing a spoof on reality TV. They referenced Curb Your Enthusiasm, which I'm a big fan of and I knew right away that this was something that I wanted to do. Chris knows us all intimately so I knew the writing was going to be on the nose and something that I would enjoy tremendously. I like making fun of myself and my friends and reality TV.
Q: Did you consider how doing the show might impact your sexy leading man image?
The sexy leading man status thing is not something I ever aspired to or wanted to build on. It's like a label that's put on you. Anything I can do to show people that I can be diverse and that I'm funny and can be physical it was a great opportunity to spread my wings and show people I can be multidimensional. Still to this day I don't care about those accolades. They're flattering but it's nothing I can take credit for. Growing up in Germany, it was never an issue. It was never made a big deal out of. I was called all kind of names growing up being the only Black boy and people trying to touch my hair and speaking in weird accents because they thought I couldn't understand them. I had a lot of other


concerns than my look growing up. I don't take myself seriously at all. I'm a husband, I'm a father and everything else is just icing on the cake.
Q: Your 9-year-old daughter, Sophie, (his son Nicholas, is 8) was born with spina bifida a birth defect that affects the normal development of the spine. October was Spinal Bifida Awareness month, but you want to let women know there's one easy way to ensure their children don't suffer from this serious birth defect.
The key is folic acid. All women of childbearing age should be taking folic acid. (Parker took pre-natal vitamins, but in some cases, the defect develops anyway.) You never know what your absorbency rate is, so better safe than sorry. Please Sophie's Voice because not only are we trying to eradicate it worldwide, we also support fortification, which is when governments pass laws forcing millers to add folic acid to flour and to rice. When they do that, women who ingest those products are automatically protected.
Q: You and Nicole have been together 13 years that's like 50 in Hollywood years. What makes it work?
A: There's many things, but I think a lot of people don't give people a chance to grow through adversity. They just jump off the horse and leave the building when the road gets bumpy. When you grow as a couple, there are three growth processes that go on. There's his growth, her growth and their growth together. You have to learn each other's dance steps and that's not easy.
Q: We're searching for a flaw, here Boris. We're looking for towels on the floor, you don't wash dishes, you leave socks outside the hamper, you don't take out the trash...
I do take out the trash. And I like washing dishes; its almost like meditation. I like doing that stuff.... sometimes. I'll think about it and when I figure out what my flaws are, I'll call you back. (Laughs).


Writer Eugene Robinson grew up in a segregated world. His hometown of Orangeburg, S.C., had a black side of town and a white side of town; a black high school and a white high school; and "two separate and unequal school systems," he tells NPR's Steve Inskeep.
But things are different now. Just look at the nation's capital -- home to the first black U.S. president, a large black middle class and many African-Americans who still live in extreme poverty.
Robinson details the splintering of African-American communities and neighborhoods in his new book, Disintegration: The Splintering of Black America.
His story starts in America's historically black neighborhoods, where segregation brought people of different economic classes together.
Robinson says that began to change during the civil rights era.
"People who had the means 4 and had the education started moving out of what had been the historic black neighborhoods," Robinson explains.
He cites Washington, D.C.'s Shaw neighborhood as a prime example of this because of how Shaw was home to a vibrant black community and a thriving entertainment scene in the 1930s through the 1950s. By the '70s, Shaw had become a desolate, drug-ridden area.
"In city after city, AfricanAmerican neighborhoods that ...once had been vibrant and in a sense whole -- disintegrated," Robinson says.
He attributes that change to African-Americans taking advantage of new opportunities, resulting in a more economically segregated community.
"There have always been class distinctions in the black community," Robinson says, "but what I believe we've seen is an increasing distance between two large groups, which I identify as the Mainstream and the Abandoned."


Robinson says that while a "fairly slim majority" of AfricanAmericans entered the middle class, a large portion of the community never climbed the ladder. It's getting harder and harder to catch up, he says, "because so many rungs of that ladder are now missing."
So as formerly segregated neighborhoods begin to gentrify; rents increase and longtime residents get
pushed out.
"What happens to this group that
I call the Abandoned is that they get shoved around -- increasingly out









DISINTE



GRATIO


The Splintering of

Black America







EUGENE ROBINS(
WINNER OF THE PULITZER PRIZE


into the inner suburbs -- and end up almost out of sight, out of mind," Robinson says.
Of course, that's not to say that life was better before the civil rights movement. Robinson says Americans can't forget what life was like before integration.
"Forty-five years ago, only two out of every 100 African-American households made the present day equivalent of $100,000 a year. Now it's eight or nine," he says. "No one would turn back the clock and go back'to those days."


But Robinson says opportunities for African-Americans to climb into' the middle class are quickly disappearing, putting black families that did manage to make it into the middle class in a difficult position that involves a certain amount of "survivor's guilt" and plenty of frustra-. tion that efforts to help -- haven't.
"I know very few middle-class black Americans who are not, involved in ... attempts to reach across the gap -- through the church, through mentoring programs, by spending time reading in"' the schools," Robinson says. "Yet,
you need something much R more holistic ... and purposeful if we're frankly ever going to have the kind, of impact that we need to
have on the people left
behind."
There's a good deal of
- friction between Africa.
American communitiesi
Robinson says, but it does7
n't get talked about very c
much. People living in g1
poverty "have the resentment and sourness that, comes with having beei left behind," he says, "the' feeling -that, 'Well, th ese Jqk people think so much
themselves, and the'v moved away to their Tfacy'
places.'" "
According to Robinso0]6,' ) N there's a word for that feel-'.
ing. "Sadity" is used t describe someone whojis i "stuck up" or who think e or she is better than everyone, else.
"It reflects this outsized importance that is given in poor black communities to this concept of) respect," Robinson says.
And if the black poor remain' mired where they are right'now, he, says, it will be bad for everyone that's what gives the cause a sense of urgency.
So while the changes the civil rights movement has inspired over the past 50 years have absolutely been for the good, there's still important work to do.


A Photographic Celebration of Black Greek Letter Organizations


AA chapter pledges of Phi Beta Sigma lined up on the campus of Winston Salem State University 1961
in L- M-2


Delta Rho Chapter of Delta Sigma Theta Albany State University 1953


Phi Beta Sigma pledges at Om( Virginia Union University 1950


Alpha chapter Pyramid Pledge Club of Delta Sigma Theta 1955


Ivy leaf Pledge Club of Alpha Kappa Sigma chapter of Zeta Phi Beta probate
Alpha at Texas College (1950s) Livingstone College Salisbury, NC 1953


The pledge club of the Xi Psi Chapter of
Omega Psi Phi about to eat in


Black Greek Letter Organizations (BLGO) have been a part of African American culture and life for over 100 years. Joining a fraternity or sorority remains a great way for students to get involved on campus and build relationships that last beyond your college experience. Involvement contributes to an individual's development through the encouragement of personal, professional and academic goals. Currently there are nine intemationally recognized Black Greek Letter fraternities and sororities each unique in tradition, values and reflect the diverse community found on campuses. Joining a fraternity and sorority community means a commit-


Sphinxmen of Alphi Phi Alpha marching campus while pledging


ment to the ideals of brotherhood/sisterhood, academic excellence, social development, community service and leadership. Dubbed the "Divine Nine," the National Pan-Hellenic Council member organizations - Alpha Phi Alpha, Alpha Kappa Alpha, Kappa Alpha Psi, Omega Psi Phi, Delta Sigma Theta, Phi Beta Sigma, Zeta Phi Beta, Sigma Gamma Rho and Iota Phi Theta - are some of the nation's oldest and most distinguished black service organizations. Historically, their membership rolls have included some of the American nation's most powerful and productive black citizens.


Scrollers of the Zeta Phi chapter of The apes of the Kappa Eta
Kappa Alpha Psi on a road trippping chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha posing with their big brothers during the 1980s in front of their chapter house


Throughout the years, specifically on the campus of HBCUs, students would look forward to the antics exhibited by pledges in the fall and spring. What happened behind closed doors remained a secret until more recent decades when students began dying and lawsuits emerged amidst allegations of hazing. As leadership of BLGOs and colleges and universities work to ensure no more lives are lost as they increase their membership with dignity and scholarship, we celebrate the rich legacy of bonding and kinship imparted by these young brothers and sisters as they connected to leave their mark on our world. Photos courtesy of watchthevard.com


November 6 - 12, 2014


Ms. Perry's Free Press - Page 11







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Volume 28 o. 1 ovember 6-12, 2014 Jacksonville,Florida PRSTSTD U.S. Postage PAID Jacksonville, FL Permit No. 662 50 Cents U U p p C C l l o o s s e e a a n n d d P P e e r r s s o o n n a a l lActor Boris Kodjoe Lives a Charmed Life On and Off CameraPage 11 Despite Major Accomplishments President Obama Became a Liability to Some Democrats This Election CyclePage 4Rashad Solomon on a Mission to Show Hes ot Handicapped but HandiABLEPage 7 Give Yourself an Insurance Reality CheckPage 2 50c RETUR SERVICE REQUESTED Sister 2 Sister Magazine Files for Bankruptcy, Halts Print ProductionAccording to the Maynard Institutes Journal-Isms column, Urban celebrity news magazine Sister 2 Sister has filed for bankruptcy protection and has put its print edition on hiatus as it focuses more on its online content. Sister 2 Sister publisher and sole owner, Jamie Foster Brown, confirmed the news while stating that she was preparing an official statement on the magazines status. The community does not want us to go away,Ž Brown told Journal-Isms Richard Prince by telephone. We wanted to teach people through celebrities,Ž she said. God comes through other people.Ž Working with Johnson, she said, I saw how much power the celebrities have.Ž The magazine celebrated 25 years in print last fall. Sister 2 Sisters bankruptcy and online focus comes amid iconic urban magazine Jets decision to shift to an entirely digital platform.Former Band Member Found Guilty In FAMU Hazing CaseA Florida jury found former Florida A&M University marching band member Dante Martin guilty of manslaughter for his role in the fatal hazing of drum major Robert Champion last week..Prosecutors said Martin was the ringleader of what they called a dark hazing tradition in which Champion was beaten to death. Martin was presidentŽ of Bus C, the one Champion was riding. Martin's lawyer argued that the tradition of walking through a bus while getting beaten started way before Martin was in the band. Originally, 15 band members were charged for the role they played in Champion's death. State Attorney John Ashton told jurors that hazing may have been a deeply rooted tradition in the celebrated marching band, but that should not excuse those who beat drum major Robert Champion to death during a ritual on a bus in Orlando nearly three years ago. 'Tradition didn't kill Robert Champion. Tradition isn't to blame for Robert Champion's death,' he said. 'You don't get to break the law because those who came before you did it. That may work when you're 10, but it doesn't work when you're an adult „ an adult who has the ability to say, "No ... I won't be part of this barbarous ritual anymore." He said. The jury also returned a guilty verdict on a felony hazing charge. Martin is scheduled to be sentenced Jan. 9. The manslaughter charge can carry up to 15 years in prison.UCLA Mandates Diversity Class Requirement for FreshmenThe faculty of UCLAs largest academic unit have voted to require future undergraduates to take a course on ethnic, cultural, religious or gender diversity. The move came after three previous efforts had failed. Officials announced that the faculty of the UCLA College of Letters and Science voted 332 to 303, with 24 blank ballots, to start the requirement for incoming freshmen in fall 2015 and new transfer students in 2017. UCLA Chancellor Gene Block was a strong proponent of such diversity classes, saying they would help prepare students to live and work in a multicultural society. Most other UC campuses and the UCLA School of the Arts and Architecture already require such courses. The College of Letters and Science enrolls about 85% of UCLAs undergraduates. Opponents said students were overburdened with other requirements and said the budget-strapped university could not afford extra classes. Additional questions were raised about whether these classes improve ethnic relations and whether they typically skew left politically. Similar proposals were rejected by the faculty three times in the last two decades. In 2012, the measure lost 224-175 in a vote that attracted only about 30% of potential ballots. More than 46% of the college faculty cast the online ballots in the current weeklong vote after much lobbying and student activism, officials said.ew York Ends Stop and FriskThe last realistic legal roadblock is gone and now the legal reforms borne out of New York Citys Stop and Frisk program can begin to take hold. The U.S. Second Circuit Court of Appeals, in a unanimous decision, threw out the appeals of the NYPDs police unions, who were attempting to block a settlement full of policing reforms recommended by a federal judge from taking effect. They can still appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court. Last year, Manhattan Federal Court Judge Shira Scheindlin ruled that the NYPDs Stop and Frisk policy was unconstitutional because it unfairly targeted Blacks and Latinos. Then-Mayor Michael Bloomberg and his administration almost immediately appealed, fighting the ruling in court. But current Mayor Bill de Blasio ran on an anti-Stop and Frisk platform, vowing to end the policy and institute reforms suggested by Scheindlin. The Second Circuit panel said that the people of New York made their feelings clear at the ballot box. The Stop and Frisk program allowed NYPD officers to stop and search anyone for broad reasons, including furtive movementsŽ; the possibility the suspect could be casing a locationŽ or acting as a lookoutŽ; wearing clothes commonly used in a crimeŽ or inappropriate attire for the seasonŽ; or even just the officers knowledge of an individuals prior behavior. But young Blacks and Latinos were disproportionately targeted under the policy: More than half of those stopped were Black„despite making up only a quarter of the population„and another roughly one-third of those stopped were Latino. Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Incorporateds Gamma Rho Omega Chapter presented the 7th Beyond High School Seminar at Bethel Baptist Institutional Churchs BEST Academy last weekend to over 150 Duval County middle and high school students. Attendees received answer to their questions about college during a round-table discussion with students from Edward Waters College, Florida State College at Jacksonville, Jacksonville University and University of North Florida. Betty S. Burney, former DCPS board member served as the moderator for the day which included workshop sessions on financial aid, scholarships and information on careers and college alternatives. Presenters included Dale Bell, Gwen Flanders, LTC Vanessa Givens of the U.S. Navy and Ramona Cobb of First Community Credit Union. The seminar was coordinated by the organizations Scholarship Committee chaired by Lois Peterson Prime. ational Urban League President Marc Morial with luncheon honorees Dr. Barbara Darby and Damien Haitsuka JUL Equal Opportunity Luncheon Lauds and Enlightens Shown at the event are organizers and presenters: (Seated) l-r : Siera Patrick, Lois Prime, Mary Davis, Rose Leger, and Vanessa Givens. (Standing): Garielle Josey, Betty Burney, Hal Gray, Assunta Bolden, Anquinette Calhoun, Lovely Sainsurin and Evelyn Tukes. AKAPays It Forward Empowering Students With College and Career Shown above is Bama Hales and Mary Bass cooking fish for the multitudes at the orthside Church of Christ annual Homecoming. By Lynn Jones The 41st Annual Urban League Equal Opportunity Luncheon celebrated community stewardship, dedication and engagement as the historic institution burned the mortgage on their state of the art downtown headquarters and honored community trustees. National Urban League President and CEO Marc H. Morial keynoted the address with his words of community motivation and dedication for the next generation with his three DsŽ. The first D is to defend the idea of democracy... the second D is to demand jobs and the last D is develop meaning we need to develop humanitarian efforts in our communities with after school programs and more jobs,Ž said Morial. The highlight of the luncheon was the presentation of awards and recognitions. Red roses were presented to lifelong Jacksonville Urban League champion Ms. Linnie Finley for her tireless efforts in assisting the League with marketing and communication direction. The Clanzel T. Brown award was presented to Dr. Barbara A. Darby, President of Florida State College of Jacksonville and The Whitney M. Young National Leadership award to Damien Haitsuka, Senior Vice President/Community Bank President, Wells Fargo. orthside Church of Christ Feeds Thousands at Annual HomecomingThe streets of Avenue B and Weaver Rd were filled to capacity for the Northside Church of Christs 15th Annual Community Fish Fry, an activity of the churchs annual Homecoming festivities. Thousands of people from the neighboring community, friends, and family, joined the congregation to eat freeŽ fish, grits and hotdogs. Also on the grounds, children and adults played board games, enjoyed cotton candy, face painting, a mega slide, basketball and a clothes giveaway. The annual signature event has awakened the community to become more involved while enabling NSCOC to promote community support and recognition. Festivities will continue this weekend in commemoration of the 60th Church Anniversary. More than 70 girls and women participated in a day-long Teen Dating Violence Forum, Real Love Doesnt HurtŽ at the Jacksonville Public Library. In commemoration of Domestic Violence Awareness Month, Pink Lady Charity, Inc. partnered with State Representative Mia L. Jones to host the event to educate and equip young women with the tools to build and sustain healthy relationships that will benefit them for a lifetime. Community leaders were partnered as mentors with the young participants during the forum which addressed in a two-fold format the topic of relationship violence and the value of sisterly relationships. Rasheeda Bint-Yahya and Tayler Mack, relationship violence survivors, opened the day sharing their heart-wrenching, yet courageous stories of abuse and survival. BintYahya described her life filled with a seemingly unending pattern of love, rage and betrayal she endured at the hands of her abuser. She admitted that it had only been a year and four months ago that she was able to safely transition and remove herself from the relationship. Today, she enjoys a life that is healthy and violence-free. Mentors and mentees received a different look at relationship violence from teen survivor Macks story. At a mere 14-yearsold, Mack endured the rage of her abuser when he violently attacked her and left her physically scared and emotionally torn. She shared her ability to overcome, prosper and grow from her experience and openly told her story in hopes of saving others. Continued on page 3 Real Love Doesnt Hurt Seminar Self Empowers Area Young Women Paula Sardinas speaks with the young ladies after Q&A about their life experiences cÜÉâwÄç fxÜä|Çz bâÜ VÉÅÅâÇ|àç

PAGE 2

Carvel Watsons new Red, Black, and Green ThinkŽ Liberation poster represents a great positive message, THINKŽ. He is encouraging everyone to display this unique design and positive energy poster in their home, school, work place or any other creative environment where a constant dose of positive energy is needed. ThinkŽ Black liberation; ThinkŽ of your flag, or your glorious, beautiful, ancestral homeland and your inherited greatness; or just ThinkŽ before you make an irrational or hasty decision. Mr. Watson created this poster in 1972. Its value and glory is in its artistic presentation and powerful one word statement, ThinkŽ. It makes a striking reference to the powerful mental, once spoken messages of some of historys greats such as the Honorable Marcus Garvey, U.N.I.A., Malcolm X, The Reverend Dr. Martin L. King, and so many other great keynote speakers with a vision, a mind, and a voice. The red, black, and green flag was originally designed by the U.N.I.A. in 1920 and the significance of the colors remain relevant over 100 years later. Red represents the blood that unites all people of Black African ancestry, and stand for liberation; Black represents Black people whose existence as a nation, though not a nation-state, is affirmed by the existence of the flag; and power and Green represents the abundant natural wealth of Africa. The Think Liberation PosterŽ reaffirms a Rally Cry for Togetherness and UnityŽ, neutralizing the negative stereotype projected by multimedia facilities daily. Africans and African-Americans should see the positive message on this poster daily. It is about us, our heritage, and our glorious ancient ancestral African homeland. The cost of each Think Poster (19×27) without frame is $10.00, plus $8.50 /S & H. Price includes a plastic cover and a safety shipping tube shipped via USPS. To order online, visit their secure website at www.thewebmasterwizard.com and click on the buy nowŽ button. Page 2 Ms. Perrys Free Press ovember 6-12, 2014 DARRYL R. JACKSON, C.P.A., P.A. Enterprise Center 101 East Union Street, Suite 400 Jacksonville, FL32202 904-633-8099 www.drj-cpa.com Offering you a full range of quality services that includes a full range of accounting services (audits, reviews, compilations,and nontraditional engagements) for small businesses and tax services for individuals, corporations, partnerships, and estates and trusts. Darryl Jackson, CPA provides extensive professional experience with a wide variety of industries and clients Make sure youre talking to the right people. Speak with HUD-approved housing counselors, free of charge, at the Homeowners HOPE Hotline. IF YOURE FACING FORECLOSURE, TALK TO YOUR GRANDMA SECOND. CALL THE HOPE HOTLINE FIRST AT 888-995-HOPE. Important changes are coming this fall for whats become one of the biggest concerns of the era: affording retirement. Those who are saving for retirement and troubleshooting tax obstacles may want to restructure their plans. While members of Congress continue to battle over the budget, the Obama administration is preparing to roll out myRAŽ savings accounts … IRA accounts … for those who do not have access to one. When the myRAŽ account reaches a certain amount, fledgling savers can roll it into a regular IRA account; different states will have their own guidelines. However, some of the benefits of existing savings options could be in peril, says financial advisor Jake Lowrey. Those include some of the tax advantages of retirement accounts currently enjoyed by higher-income workers. Some Roth IRA owners may also lose their exemption from required minimum distributions, or RMDs, while IRAs totaling less than six figures could see RMDs disappear. In just 15 years … 2030 … the last of the baby boomers will have reached 65. That means one of every five Americans will be of retirement age. Most people simply dont know how to plan for retirement, and thats made even more challenging with the changing government policies,Ž says Lowrey. He offers guidance on choosing between a traditional IRA and a Roth IRA as a retirement savings vehicle. € Traditional IRAs and Deductibility: For either traditional or Roth IRAs, its all a matter of how one prefers to be taxed. Generally speaking, the money you deposit in a traditional IRA isn't taxed that year, and whatever earnings you have on your contributions won't be taxed until you withdraw that money as a retiree. So, if you earn $40,000 in one year and put $3,000 of it in an IRA, your taxable income drops to $37,000. The deposit will grow tax-free through the years. If you withdraw any before age 59½, youll face a penalty. After that, you can withdraw and the money will be taxed as earned income. € Roth IRAs, Exemptions and No RMDs: Roth IRA contributions are never deductible. You pay taxes on the money when you earn it, just like any other income. The benefit of a Roth is that when the owners decide to withdraw from it after age 59½, they will not be faced with any taxes. The Roth offers tax-exempt rather than tax-deferred savings. Also, traditional IRA rules include required minimum distributions (RMDs). With a traditional IRA, you must begin to take RMDs by April 1 of the year following the year you reach age 70.5, but that isnt the case with a Roth IRA. € Best of Both Worlds? Naturally, IRA owners want to chart a path in which theyre penalized with taxes the least. It may be possible to cushion ones retirement savings against future tax increases by converting some of an IRA to a Roth and earn tax-free gains going forward. Converting to a Roth will make sense for many people, and if youre eligible to contribute to both types of IRAs, you may divide contributions between a Roth and traditional IRA,Ž Lowrey says. But the total contributions to both must not surpass the limit for that tax year.Ž MyRA Accounts May Alter Your Retirement Plans Financial Expert Shares 3 Factors to Consider When Planning for an IRACarvel Watson, creator/producer of the ThinkŽ poster available online for just $10 By Jason Alderman When it comes to insurance, many people face the Goldilocks dilemma: Am I buying too much coverage, not enough, or just the right amount? How do you determine your proper insurance levels while ensuring you don't waste money on unneeded coverage … or worse, leave your family exposed? Here are a few considerations: Everyone needs medical insurance. One serious accident or illness could wipe out your savings and plunge you into debt or bankruptcy. If covered through your employer, carefully compare all plans offered. The one with the lowest premium may not be your best option. Consider how other factors add up … deductibles, copayments, allowed/disallowed benefits, out-of-network charges, medication charges, etc. Also compare options available through your spouse's job. If you're not covered, explore other options: If recently laid off, ask about COBRA continuation coverage through your former employer. If under age 26, you may be able to enroll in a parent's plan. Visit www.healthcare.gov for details. High-deductible plans provide comprehensive coverage for catastrophic illnesses at much lower premiums than comparable low-deductible plans. Most states provide high-risk insurance for people who don't qualify for private insurance. It's costly, but no one can be denied. Visit www.naschip.org for information. Life insurance. If you're single with no dependents, you may get by with minimal or no life insurance. But if family depends on your income, many experts recommend buying coverage worth at least five to 10 times your salary. After your kids are grown you may be able to lower your coverage; but carefully consider your spouse's retirement needs. Car insurance. Most states require car insurance for good reason: It protects you financially should you cause an accident or be hit by an uninsured driver. Rates vary considerably depending on: coverage and deductible levels for liability, uninsured motorist and collision; age and driving record; vehicle year and model; number of insured family members; and security features (alarm, airbags, secured parking, etc.) To lower car insurance costs, Ruth Stroup, a Farmers Insurance Group agent from Oakland, California, suggests: Comparison shop with other carriers. Increasing your deductibles from $250 to $1,000 might lower your premium by 15 to 30 percent. Ask about discounts for safe drivers, age 55+, linked homeowners/renters insurance, etc. Stroup adds, "My biggest tip on auto insurance is to make sure your liability insurance relates to your net worth and income. It only takes one accident to wipe out your savings. Transferring this risk to an insurance company is very inexpensive for good drivers." Homeowners insurance. Your home is probably your largest investment, so don't risk losing it and its contents through an unforeseen disaster, accident or robbery. Renters also need insurance: Although the building is insured by the owner, your contents are not. A few tips: Review your coverage periodically to adjust for inflation, home improvements, new possessions, change in marital/family status, etc. Compare your rate with other insurance carriers, but get "apples to apples" quotes, since policies may have varying provisions. Buy additional coverage on expensive items like jewelry, art and computers, which may have limited coverage. Don't forego critical coverage to save a few bucks: It's not worth it in the long run. Give Yourself an Insurance Reality CheckWith the goal of creating new jobs, expanding business opportunities and reducing health and wealth disparities, Mayor Alvin Brown has established a Community Wealth Building Task Force to help implement new innovative, community-based economic development strategies. The Office of Economic Development (OED) will serve as staff to the task force. The neighborhoods of Northwest Jacksonville have long suffered from serious economic and health inequities,Ž said Paul Tutwiler, executive director of the Northwest Jacksonville Community Development Corporation. By helping Jacksonville create a more inclusive economy, the Community Wealth Building Initiative will address these inequities and improve both the lives and the livelihoods of people who reside in Northwest Jacksonville.Ž The 14-member task force is created by executive order and will include 10 members appointed by the mayor to represent health care, finance, education, job training, philanthropy, nonprofits, small businesses, the faith-based sector and community organizations. The task force will also include four representatives appointed by City Council, Office of General Counsel, JTA and U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. Artist Carvel Watson Wants You to THIK BlackMayor Creates Task Force to Create Wealth for Northwest Jax

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At the City of Jacksonvilles 2014 Martin Luther King Day breakfast, Mayor Alvin Brown announced a youth initiative that would provide more positive opportunities for Jacksonvilles next generation. If Jacksonville is going to continue to thrive and prosper in the years ahead, it will depend on whether our young people have the opportunities and support they need to succeed. It will depend on whether they have hope and faith in their own future, and hope and faith in the future of our community,Ž Mayor Brown said. Throughout the spring and summer, Mayor Brown sought recommendations from local high school principals and community organizations for students with the potential to make a positive difference as young leaders. After a competitive interview process, the Young Leaders Advisory Council assembled for the first time at City Hall this September. Nearly 50 students met with Mayor Brown to lay out a vision for the Council and its role in Jacksonville. The Young Leaders will meet regularly with Mayor Brown and other officials to learn more about city government, the business community, and nonprofits. They also will tour sites throughout the city to gain a fuller appreciation for our community, and work together on public service projects to benefit other young people. Ms. Perrys Free Press Page 3 ovember 6-12, 2014 $50 minimum deposit to open a checking or savings account. Mobile Internet data and text message charges may apply. Please cont act your mobile service provider for details. Subject to Internet banking terms and conditions. Fifth Third Bank, Member FDIC. WE WERE CURIOUS, SHOULDNT YOUR CHECKING ACCOUNT CHECK IN WITH YOU? Open a checking account with Fifth Third Instant Alerts and get all your account activity messaged right to your phone. Its mobile banking that puts you in the know faster and helps stop account fraud faster. Visit 53.com/alerts for more. Nearly 250 women shopped, laughed and sipped wine together at Big Brothers Big Sisters of Northeast Floridas recent inaugural Wine, Women & Shoes fundraising event at the Hyatt Regency Jacksonville Riverfront Hotel. The event featured a variety of exciting activities that included a designer fashion show, a fabulous Wall of WineŽ and even live and silent auctions. Also highlighted, was a Marketplace shopping experience containing local boutiques as well as vendors as far as New York and South Florida offering a variety of womens clothing and accessories. To add to the excitement, each attendee also walked away with swanky Tory Burch Swag Bags filled with a variety of items women love! Big Brothers Big Sisters of Northeast Florida brought the Wine Women & Shoes party to town to raise awareness and funds. Their mission is to provide children facing adversity with strong and enduring, professionally supported one-to-one relationships that change their lives for the better. Savvy Shoppers Enlightened at Women, Wine and ShoesŽ Mayor Brown interacts with the newly selected student leadersMayor Implements Student Leadership Program to Prepare the ext Generation Continued from front Kim Ward, of One Love Foundation, shared vital resources for those in, or who know someone, in a violent relationship. Ward shared the history of the One Love Foundation and its hopeful impact on safeguarding women from relationship violence. Created in 2010, the One Love Foundation was founded following the death of Yeardley Love, a University of Virginia senior who lost her life to relationship violence at the hands of her ex-boyfriend just two weeks shy of graduation. Originally created to honor YardsŽ and draw attention to student athletes like her who contribute positively to their teams and communities, the organization now seeks to prevent future tragedies by raising awareness about the warning signs of relationship violence. The mission is to end relationship violence through education and technology. The One Love My PlanŽ App is a tool recently developed to aid those who desire a plan for themselves or others they may know. Part of a global movement, the forum ended with a chord of unity led by Sonia Jackson Myles of The Sister Accord. Mentees and mentors committed to supporting their sisters and building up each other for successful and healthy relationships. Part of the resolution is, I resolve to establish an agreement with ALL of my sisters, whether they are black, white, red, yellow or brown. Whether they are strong or weak, rich or poor, educated at Harvard or educated on 17th Street, working in the C-suite or cleaning it. Whether they are independent or leaning and depending, confident or lacking self-esteem, fighting back or being abused and misused. I will uphold this commitment to my sisters...Ž For more information on the One Love Foundation can be found by visiting www.joineonelove.org and information on The Sister Accord at www.thesisteraccord.com Teen Violence Forum Teaches Why Real Love Doesnt HurtŽ Lame Duck Congress Will Duck Issues That Matter Most To Voters by Mike McKauliff, HP The top concerns voiced by voters in this election were the economy and the stagnating middle class. So, freed from election concerns, what will Washington do to address those problems during the lame duck session in the weeks before the start of a new Congress? It appears very little. The main reason is that before the elections, this Congress has been one of the least-productive in history, and it left numerous pieces of unfinished business that will need to be completed before the lame duck session ends just to keep government and key programs running. There is certainly blame to go around. While the House insists it passed more than 40 bills that GOP leaders say create jobs, most of them are actually anti-regulation measures that would do little, and which a Democratic-controlled Senate would never approve. And the Senate has been its own special case. Republicans in the minority there have specialized in delay and obstruction, while Democrats have done their best to freeze out GOP measures and avoid politically damaging votes. The failures leave a heap of work that will need to get done. Tops on that list is keeping the government open, after Congress couldn't agree on a spending plan for all of 2015, and passed a stopgap that runs out on Dec. 11. Another major agenda item is acting on President Obama's stalled nominations. Such approvals will get harder in the next Senate. Another area that requires at least a temporary measure are expired tax breaks that the two chambers have not agreed on. Among them are breaks that the House has voted to make permanent, such as research and development credits and other business-focused items. Democrats in the Senate have offered temporary extensions of those, as well as loopholes that they like, such as the child tax credit and mortgage interest deductions. Florida Voters Reject Medical MarijuanaNearly three months ago, Floridians appeared to overwhelmingly support legalizing medical marijuana. And while the majority of voters supported the measure on the ballot this week, it failed get the needed 60 percent to be added to the Florida constitution. Both sides were optimistic that they were going to come out on top as results began coming in Tuesday night, but with 82 percent reporting, the measure had only had 57 percent support. It needed 60 percent to be added to the Florida constitution. Calvina Fay, director of Drug Free America, one of the largest opponents to Amendment 2, said medical marijuana would be bad news for the state of Florida. (The Amendment's wording) leaves it wide open for pretty much anybody to be able to access marijuana,Ž Fay said. While most of our doctors are very good we know from the pill mill experience we've had here that we have some bad ones that can do a lot of damage.Ž

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By Julianne Malveaux NNPA Columnist The most common model of college attendance is that a young person who graduates from high school and heads directly to college, perhaps taking a year off in between to work, take a 13th class. While many students start off right after high school, some of them have breaks in their higher education, dropping out to save money to continue, or to deal with family matters. The most common model is not the only model, however. Mature adults who did not attend or finish college through the most common model are referred to as returning studentsŽ or nontraditional students.Ž Some get their degrees through online programs. A few colleges (Bay Path College in Massachusetts, is one example) have developed Saturday programs where women can earn a four-year degree by attending college only on Saturdays. Concerned by high unemployment rates and eager to enhance their employability, many mature college students turn to for-profit colleges (sometimes called career collegesŽ) for their education. Some of these students, barraged by television ads, are convinced that for-profit colleges, where they can attend during the evening or online, allow them the flexibility they need to manage work, family and education. And since federal funds, such as Pell grants and subsidized loans, are available to take care of costs, some students who attend for-profit colleges are pressured to take out these loans. If they drop out, they are still required to repay their loans, just as they would have to in any other college. But all colleges are not created equal. About once a week, I get a call from a mature student whose time at a career college was unrewarding. One woman failed a math test but could not get feedback from her instructor on what she did wrong. Appeals to others in the chain of command went unanswered. In another case, a young woman desperately needed counseling. She ended up getting it from a community organization, not from her career college. To cite just a few cases to make a point is casual empiricism, but my direct knowledge of some students plight raises a few questions for me. Many students get training, but not jobs. Many are saddled with loans they cannot ever afford to repay; and the costs of attending career colleges are high. The Department of Education estimates that it costs four times as much to attend a career college as to attend a community college. Why are costs so high when services are so limited? Partly because many career colleges are publicly traded and the pressure is on for them to make a profit to provide dividends for their shareholders. Another reason is that salaries for leaders are extremely high. At ITT Technical Institute, CEO Kevin Monday earned $8.76 million in 2012. DeVry University President Daniel Hamburger earned $6.4 million in 2012. The Apollo Group, which includes the University of Phoenix, paid Gregory Cappelli $4.54 million in 2013, and the Chairman Emeritus received nearly $7 million each year in 2012 and 2013. In contrast only four presidents at public universities earned more than a million dollars. Harvards president earns about $900,000, but some of her benefits boost her salary to about 1.2 million. These so-called career colleges are actually profit centers. The disproportionate enrollment of Black and brown students means that folks who are already poor and underpaid are creating profits for these publicly traded companies and their overpaid leaders. At ITT Technical Institute, the overwhelming majority of students (92 percent) were self-identified members of a racial and ethnic group. Nearly four in five took out a Pell grant. At DeVry about 45 percent were minority students. Meanwhile, students who enroll in these colleges and do not graduate (the majority) have nothing to show for their education but more debt. Thats why the Department of Education is limiting the amount of federal loans that students can take out, pegging loan amounts to ability to pay, based on students current salaries and income. Attendance at career colleges should be a gateway to the middle class,Ž said Education Secretary Arne Duncan. Too often mobility is downward, not upward, when large student loans go unpaid. The new regulations are imperfect, but a step in the right direction. They might be more efficient, but the for-profit colleges have lobbied hard, and gone to court, to prevent cautionary regulations. Students of color who consider these colleges need to make sure they know what they are getting. Otherwise, they are up for a big surprise when student loans bills come due. For-profit colleges are exactly that, for profit. Students are not necessarily being educated, instead being treated as a profit center. Julianne Malveaux is an author and economist based in Washington, D.C Many may recall that towards the end of President George W. Bushs second term in office he became his partys biggest liability going into the 2008 elections. No need for a history lesson … everyone knows that Bush and his administration made several political missteps and the country was basically tired of him. Thats certainly not exactly where we are with President Obama, but there are many challenges that the first African American president has faced. Most Democrats remain loyal, but there is a left of moderate group or the liberal arm that has become local critics of President. There are some Dems who refuse to turn their backs on Obama, but in cases where Congressional or Senate seats could be lost, is it loyalty to a fault? Going into these midterm elections, Republicans werehighly motivated and hell bent to send a message to the President on winning over the Senate, Congress, and as many Governors races as possible. While President Obama has become a liability to many fighting for re-election, African American still remain his biggest supporters and for obvious reasons. Many of Obamas supporters point out that the President has accomplished great things; and in fact, has made lemonade out of lemons in many cases. If you were to create a Presidential report card for Obama, it would have subjects like Health Care Reform, Immigration, Wall Street Reform, Foreign Affairs, Domestic Issues, etc. Clearly he was been an honor student on several issues, and somewhat average on others, but contrary to what his critics would say … he would have a pretty solid GPA. From his administrations aggressive support of incentives to lift up the auto industry to the affordable care act, which is now providing needed health care benefits to millions of Americans … the President has hit some home runs. But then there is the other side of the coin. Obamas second term has been repeatedly peppered with a series of crises that critics would say the White House has not managed well. Even the most loyal Obama supporters have to admit that there have been some missteps. But there is no such thing as a perfect presidency …some of the Presidents issues are simply the nature of the beast. Obama has unfortunately been the victim of bad timing in many cases. For example, the administrations signature policy initiative stumbled out of the gate when the HealthCare.Gov website experienced many problems. Nobody wants to hear about long waits at Veterans Affairs hospitals. I wrote about NSA and their invasion of privacy, and who could have foreseen the Edward Snowdens national security breach issue. One of the biggest challenges that the President faces is immigration reform; and having hundredsof foreign children piled up along the southern border only makes the matter more divisive. The rise of Islamist terrorists (ISIS) in Syria and Iraq has been a major issue and how the administration has responded has been heavily criticized. The beheading of people including Americans has brought the ISIS issue to the mainstream media. I wont even start to talk about the Ebola virus! So Obama has had many challenges since re-election, which means that his fellow Democrats are faced with the political reality of guilt by association. But of course, the President and his supporters fight back with not only accomplishments, but also the fact that he had to deal with perhaps the most obstructive Congress in history. We all remember the Republican-lead 16 day government shut down in 2013, which cost some $2 billion in lost productivity, according to the White House and furloughs for 850,000 federal workers. The GOP scorched earth strategy of winning the House and Senate by any means necessary has not only hurt Obama, but also the nation as a whole. Some feel that Republicans have deliberately ignored some problems and delayed taking action on others to make Obama look bad, which in turns helps build the GOP brand. So whether it is fair or not, often times midterm elections hinge on which party controls the White House and how popular that president is nationwide. Democrats had an uphill battle this election cycle. The bad news for President Obama is that a Republican-controlled House and Senate make it impossible for him to be effective. Maybe I am getting ahead of myself. Next week we will talk about the winners and losers this midterm election cycle. To use one of my favorite Martin Luther King, Jr. quotes, The ultimate measure of a man is not where he stands in moments of comfort and convenience, but where he stands at times of challenge and controversy.Ž Signing off from the Democratic Party Headquarters in Jacksonville, FL, Reggie Fullwood Page 4 Ms.Perrys Free Press SUBSCRIBE TODAY SUBSCRIBE TODAY Yes, Id like to subscribe to the Jacksonville Free Press!Enclosed is my check __ money order __for $38.00 to cover my one year subscription.AME _________________________________________ ADDRESS_______________________________________ CITY____________________STATE____ZIP________ DISCLAIMERThe United State provides opportunities for free expression of ideas. The Jacksonville Free Press has its view, but others may differ. Therefore, the Free Press ownership reserves the right to publish views and opinions by syndicated and local columnist, professional writers and other writers which are solely their own. Those views do not necessarily reflect the policies and positions of the staff and management of the Jacksonville Free Press. Readers, are encouraged to write letters to the editor commenting on current events as well as what they wouldlike to see included in the paper. All letters must be type written and signed and include a telephone number and address. Please address letters to the Editor, c/o JFP, P.O. Box 43580 Jacksonville, FL 32203. (o CALLS PLEASE)MAILTO: JACKSONVILLE FREE PRESS P.O. BOX 43580, JACKSONVILLE, FL 32203 MAILING ADDRESS P.O. Box 43580 Jacksonville, FL 32203 PHYSICAL ADDRESS 903 W. Edgewood Ave. Jacksonville,FL32208Email: JfreePress@aol.com TELEPHONE (904) 634-1993 Fax (904) 765-3803 Sylvia PerryPUBLISHER Rita PerryPublisher Emeritus CONTRIBUTORS: Lynn Jones, Charles Griggs, Camilla Thompson, Reginald Fullwood, E.O.Huthchinson, WilliamReed, Andre X, Brenda Burwell, Marsha Oliver, Marretta Latimer, Phyllis Mack, Tonya Austin, Carlottra Guyton, Brenda Burwell, Rhonda Silver, Vickie Brown, Rahman Johnson, Headshots, William Jackson. City Chronicles Diatribes on life in the African-American Diaspora by Rep. Reggie Fullwood Despite Major Accomplishments President Obama Became a Liability to Some Democratsovember 6-12, 2014 When Does One Become ‘Black Enough?’By Omar Tyree NNPA Columnist Seattle Seahawks Super Bowl-winning quarterback Russell Wilson, published a revealing article a month ago on ThePlayersTribune.com in which he discussed being a bully in grade school. Wilson evidently concluded that it would be beneficial to tarnish his squeaky-clean image so more fans and players could relate to him. But now its been reported that unnamed sourcesŽ within the Seahawks locker room claim some players dont consider Wilson Black enough.Ž It seems like just yesterday that Barack Obama, was questioned about not being Black enoughŽ while running for president in 2008. In fact, he showed up late for a speech to the National Association of Black Journalists and jokingly asked was that Black enough for them. Former Miami Dolphins lineman, Jonathan Martin was deemed not Black enoughŽ by his African-American teammates a year ago, when being bullied and called the N-word by Richie Incognito, a White teammate. A year earlier, Heisman Trophy winner Robert Griffin III, whose father boasted that he and his wife had reared their son to be colorblind, faced similar charges. The ongoing and bitter history of African-Americans who mistrust, ostracize and bully one another into following certain stereotypical traits, beliefs and concerns of the community has been a long and conflicting battle. On one hand, certain group decisions are still needed to benefit the race as a whole, in particular on issues of politics that may affect fair education, employment, housing, taxation and the fair practices of American law. But when it comes to individual beliefs, ideas, habits, likes, dislikes and behaviors, all bets are off. Each person has a God-given right and license to be who they are. There have been far too many disputes about how someone looks, walks, talks, dresses, who they hang out with, what music they listen to, and who they marry. Lets put it out there: Griffins wife is White and Wilsons ex-wife is White and thats the source of some discontent among Blacks, especially women. Again, thats their business. I participated in such race bullying in my college years, where certain small town kids were teased for being less than urban cool. When youre born and reared in such big cities as Philadelphia, New York, Washington, Chicago, Detroit, you tend to set a higher bar of what Black is supposed to be. Everything else becomes country,Ž corny,Ž backwards,Ž bamaŽ and not Black enough.Ž However, the most harmful type of Black-on-black bullying is when we accuse someone of acting White,Ž talking White,Ž selling outŽ or being an oreo.Ž Without realizing the many societal implications involved, acting WhiteŽ becomes a label for African-Americans who have higher academic standards, speak correct English, read books, live in higher economic neighbors, have attained their goals, and are accepted and sociable with White American peers as well as African Americans. Wow, that sounds like Russell Wilson. But the problem is, if all of that is acting WhiteŽ and not being Black enough,Ž then what is acting BlackŽ and being realŽ„having low academic standards, speaking broken English, never reading anything, living in poverty, never reaching your goals, and not being accepted or sociable with White America? Think about it. What exactly are we saying when we quantify the words BlackŽ and White?Ž Because the last time I checked the dictionary, everything whiteŽ is deemed fresh, clean, innocent, angelic, perfect, ideal, good, honest, bright, new, beginning, exact and unmarked. In contrast, blackŽ is labeled soiled, dark, evil, deadly, mysterious, deceptive, violent, secretive, demonic, tragic and the end of things. Ironically, the color blackŽ is also identified with power and elegance, like Black Power, black-tie affairs and businesses finishing the year in the black.Ž However, thats not the identification of the word blackŽ that African-Americans are referring to when they claim that someone isnt Black enough.Ž Ive never used it, because I understand that there are degrees to everything and one persons not Black enoughŽ may be someone elses too Black.Ž Omar Tyree is a New York Times bestselling author, an NAACP Image Award winner for Outstanding Fiction and a professional journalist. Visit him at www.OmarTyree.com Online Colleges Flunk Common Sense by Omar Tyree

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ovember 6-12, 2014 Ms. Perrys Free Press Page 5 A Message From Bishop Victor T. Curry SaveOurScholarships.com This ad paid for by the Black Alliance For Educational Options and the Black Ministers Parental Choice Alliance, a coalition of 60 ministers across Florida. Students who once struggled to learn are now thriving at Florida schools, including: Lawsuit A eatens the D r gain uit A Ag eatens the D ax C T Ta gainst eam of E r eatens the D edit Scholarships r ax C qual O eam of E edit Scholarships tunity ppor qual O edit Scholarships tunity ram empo g o pr his T udent he 68,000 st t of ies our communitugust 28, the F n A O asking the cour -income par w lo s er w ram empo ram ar g o pr his in t s udent uit he la . If l ori d a teac h e the F Fl wn the F ts to shut do asking the cour he bes e t o choos t s ent -income par e African-American. 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I can imagine tens of thousands t, should it be en in the scholarship pr 120 childr er the cost of the student's tuition, books and ev v $5,272 and co some school supplies such as w our families to use their limited incomes to put scholarships allo food on the table and turn on the lights. A eparing these childr educating and pr e point is that dier e … and the cour o w of schools. S , not " t unit y y, oppor ogram … scholarships that ar en in the scholarship pr er the cost of the student's tuition, books and ev ts and planners. I -shir T Tsome school supplies such as w our families to use their limited incomes to put t J A M and turn on the lights. A At en for life, not just for a test. eparing these childr espond to dier en r ent kinds of childr e point is that dier ts … should be seeking "uniformity" of e … and the cour . y y. er , not "uniformity" of deliv th e wor ogram … scholarships that ar en er the cost of the student's tuition, books and ev n turn, these ts and planners. 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ew Life Ministry Presents The School of PrayersŽNew Life Outreach Ministry Center presents The School of Prayer,Ž every Saturday at 5640 Timuquana Rd. Suite 6, 10:30 a.m. The topic is: The Danger of Prayerlessness. For more info call 778-7651.St. Philips Episcopal Church Salute to Our VeteransŽSt. Philips Episcopal Church will honor the veterans from its congregation and beyond, Sunday November 9th, at 10 a.m. The celebrant at the Eucharist will be Reverend Charles Keyser, retired Bishop of the Armed Forces and Assisting Bishop of the Diocese of Florida. Mr. Kenneth Johnson, Senior Policy Advisor for Military Affairs Office of the Mayor will deliver a special address as part of the tribute planned. The church is located at 321 West Union Street. For more info call 354-1053.OneJax Thanksgiving ServiceOneJax Institute presents a Thanksgiving Gratitude Service, Thursday, November 20th at St. Johns Cathedral, 256 E. Church St. at 6 p.m. This event is free and open to the public. For more info visit http://www.unf.edu/onejax.SCOC 37th Annual Homecoming and 60th Annual Church AnniversaryThe Northside Church of Christs 37th Annual Homecoming and 60th Annual Church Anniversary will take place November 1 9. The theme for the occasion is: "Our Diamond Jubilee,". The celebration continues on Saturday, November 8th at 5 p.m. in Downtown Jacksonville at the Florida Theatre with NSCOC Annual Gospel Songfest presenting acapella music at its best. On Sunday, November 9th the NSCOC Annual Homecoming Day Celebration and all day celebration begins with NSCOC Annual Memorial Homecoming Breakfast/Program at 7 a.m. Early morning worship at 9 a.m. and 11 a.m. Immediately following worship is the Annual Homecoming Dinner at 1 p.m. The Annual 37th Homecoming will conclude with NSCOC Homecoming Program and more group singing at 2:45 p.m. For more info call the church office at 765-9830. The church is located at 4736 Avenue B.2nd Missionary Baptists 164th Anniversary and Pastors 28th The 164th Anniversary Celebration of Second Missionary Baptist Church and 28th Anniversary of Dr. Odell Smith, Jr., Friday, November 7th and Sunday November 9th. The theme is Preparing Christian Soldiers for the Challenge of a Modern WorldŽ from scripture Ephesians 6:10-18. Sunday services begin at 9 a.m., weeknight service at 7 p.m. Come and celebrate with Second Missionary Baptist Church and be blessed! Second Missionary Baptist Church is located at 954 Kings Rd. For more info call 354-8268.West Union Baptist Annual Unity DayThe Reverend Leroy C. Kelly, Pastor of West Union Baptist Church and congregation will celebrate its Annual Unity Day, Sunday, November 9th, during the 11 a.m. service. The speaker is Sis. Mildred D. Parker; 1st Lady of New First Corinth Baptist Church. Sis. Lillian Smith is chairperson and Dea. Cornelius Williams is co-chairperson. Come out and enjoy the fellowship. West Union Baptist Church is located 1605 W Beaver St. For more info call 353-0681.Please Donate Your Clothes HangersJacksonville Local Organizing Committee of the Millions More Movement Inc.,a local non profit is soliciting solicit donation of clothes and hangers of all types and sizes. The hangers or any other donations can be dropped off at 916 N.Myrtle Avenue. JLOC/MMM is located between Kings Road and Beaver Street on Myrtle Avenue, Monday through Friday 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. or items be picked up items. For more info visit www.jacksonvilleloc.org or call 240-9133. Help JLOC/MMM as they work to end violence through a good, quality education and not more incarceration ".Faust Temple Celebrates 73rd AnniversaryThe members of Faust Temple Church of God in Christ will celebrate their 73rd Church Anniversary Thursday, November 13th, 14th and 16th. On Thursday and Friday service begin at 7:30 p.m., followed by Sunday at 4:30 p.m. The church was founded by the late Elder W.F. Faust, Sr. in 1941. The church is located at 3328 Moncrief Rd. Dr. Clarence L. Jones, Sr. presently serves as Pastor. The community is invited to come and share with Faust Temple Church of God in Christ in praising Our awesome God for the things he has done.Ž For additional info call the church at 353-1418. Come Celebrate Harvest Day at Central on the PearlCome celebrate Harvest Day with Central Metropolitan CME Church, 4611 Pearl St., Sunday, November 16th, where the John D. Pasely, Jr. is Pastor. Sunday school starts at 9 a.m. and morning worship starts at 10:45 am. The morning guest preacher will be Rev. Quan D. Glover, from Young Zion Baptist Church in St. Marys, Georgia. This years theme is Thanking God for the Harvest: A Season of Faith, Hope and LoveŽ from scripture ASV-1 Corinthians 13:13 And now abide faith, hope, love, these three: but the greatest of these is loveŽ. For more information call 354-7426. Page 6 Ms. Perrys Free Press ovember 6-12, 2014 Greater Macedonia Baptist Church1880 West Edgewood Avenue The doors of Macedonia are always open to you and your family. If we may be of any assistance to you in your spiritual walk, please contact us at 764-9257 or via email at GreaterMac@aol.com. Seeking the lost for ChristMatthew 28:19 20 Pastor Landon Williams 8:00 A.M. Early Morning Worship 9:30 a.m. Sunday School 11:00 a.m. Morning WorshipTuesday Evening 7 p.m. Prayer Service Wednesday Bible Study 6:30 7 p.m. Mid-Week Worship 7 p.m. Radio Weekly Broadcast WCGL 1360 AM Sunday 2 PM 3 PM **FREE TUTORIG FOR YOUTH I EGLISH, SCIECE, HISTORY AD MATH EVERY TUESDAY 6:30 8 P.M. Bethel Baptist Institutional Church215 Bethel Baptist Street, Jacksonville, FL 32202 (904) 354-1464 Bishop Rudolph McKissick, Jr. Senior Pastor Sunday Morning Worship 8:00 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. Church school 9:30 a.m. Bible Study 6:45 p.m.Midweek Services Wednesday oon Service Miracle at MiddayŽ 12 noon 1:00 p.m. Weekly Services Come share in Holy Communion on 1st Sunday at 7:40 and 10:40 a.m. Worship with us LIVE on the web visitwww.truth2powerministries.org Grace and Peacevisit www.Bethelite.org Bishop Rudolph McKissick, Sr.. Pastor Emeritus OTICE:Church news is published free of charge. Information must be received in the Free Press offices no later than Monday, at 5 p.m. of the week you want it to run. Information received prior to the event date will be printed on a space available basis until the date. Fax e-mail to 765-3803 or email to JFreePress@aol.com. Shown (l-r) at EWC College Day is Eric Daniel Johnson, President, EWC ational Alumni; Wanda Willis, EWC VP of Institutional Development; Angela Spears, Special Assistant to Mayor Alvin Brown, athaniel atŽ Glover, President, EWC; Carlottra Guyton, Program Chair, St. Philips Episcopal Church and Dr. Marvin Grant, EWC VP of Academic Affairs.St. Philips Episcopals Annual EWC Day is an Investment for the FutureSt. Philips Episcopal Church recently hosted their annual Edward Waters College Day featuring the Edward Waters College Concert Choir under the direction of Mrs. Barbara McNeely-Bouie. Father Hugh Chapman, Rector of St. Philips stated, Our church family is proud and honored to support the college and the investmentŽ that St. Philips contribute towards transforming and providing an opportunity for young people to achieve a college education is truly an investment in our communitys future!Ž. He continued, I admire and appreciate the opportunity Edward Waters College President Nathaniel Glover has afforded St. Philips to be a part of the great things happening at the college and look forward to playing a role in the college continued success.Ž By Marilyn Tavenner, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Administrator Fall is a wonderful time of year. Changing leaves. Cooler weather. Its also the season for people with Medicare to review their current Medicare coverage, as Medicare Open Enrollment begins. As we prepare for Medicare Open Enrollment, which began on October 15 and ends on December 7, Medicare wants everyone to know that quality continues to improve both in Medicare Advantage and in the Part D Prescription Drug Program. Each year, plan costs and coverage can change. During open enrollment, seniors and people with disabilities across the country have the opportunity to review their current Medicare coverage and see if they want to make any changes for the next year. Its important for people with Medicare to take the time to make sure their current situation still meets their health care needs best. To help people choose a plan, Medicare calculates plan star ratingsŽ for Medicare health and prescription drug plans. Each plan gets a number of stars on a scale of 1 to 5„with 5 being the best„ based on quality and performance. These ratings are designed to help people with Medicare, their families, and caregivers compare plans, in addition to information on their premiums and benefits. This year, people with Medicare who choose to enroll in a Medicare health or prescription drug plan will have access to more high-rated, fourand five-star plans than ever before. Approximately 60 percent of Medicare Advantage enrollees are in a Medicare Advantage Plan earning four or more stars in 2015, compared to an estimated 17 percent back in 2009. Likewise, about 53 percent of Part D enrollees are currently enrolled in stand-alone prescription drug plans with four or more stars for 2015, compared to just 16 percent in 2009. Since the passage of the Affordable Care Act, enrollment in Medicare Advantage will increase to 42 percent to an alltime high of over 16 million and Medicare Advantage premiums will have decreased by 6 percent. For people with Medicare, this is good news in how they receive care. Plans that are higher rated deliver a high-level of care, such as improving the coordination of care, managing diabetes or other chronic conditions more efficiently, screening for and preventing illnesses, making sure people get much-needed prescription drugs, or getting appointments and care quickly. A high rating also means these plans give better customer service, with fewer complaints or long waits for care. If you have Medicare and need assistance, you can visit Medicare.gov, call 1-800MEDICARE (1-800-633-4227), or contact your State Health Insurance Assistance Program (SHIP). You should have received the 2015 Medicare & YouŽ Handbook and important notices from your current plan, Medicare, or Social Security about changes to your coverage. If youre satisfied with your current coverage, theres nothing you need to do. Better quality in Medicare health and prescription drug plans isnt the only news for those with Medicare. For most seniors who have Original Medicare, the 2015 Part B premium will stay unchanged for a second consecutive year at $104.90. This means more of seniors retirement income and any increase in Social Security benefits will stay in their pockets. The Part B deductible will stay the same as well. Medicare is working hard to make sure this good news continues so that seniors and people with disabilities will continue to get the health care coverage they deserve. Improved Quality of Medicare Plans and Steady Premiums Highlight Begining of Open Enrollment Begins Mighty Clouds of Joy Headline Paxon Revival Centers 75th AnniversaryPaxon Revival Center Church will celebrate the 75th Anniversary with legendary gospel groups and artists. On the program are the Mighty Clouds of Joy, Jonathan Nelson, Anita Wilson, Roy and Revelation, Helen Miller, Maurice Griffin, Meachun Clark & True Purpose, Nu Testament, Lawrence Flowers and the Intercession, Saturday, November 8th at 6 p.m. at Paxon Revival Center Church, 5461 Commonwealth Avenue. For more info visit www.wcgl1360.com.

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ovember 6-12, 2014 Page 7 Mrs. Perrys Free Press Jack & Jill Seminars for Young MenThe Jack & Jill Jacksonville Chapter will present a free series workshops for young men entitled Pathway to ManhoodŽ seminars for grades 9th -12th. Seminar A is Promote Leadership and Communication Skills,Ž on Saturday, December 6th, 9 … 3 p.m. at the University of Florida, 1 UNF Drive. The purpose is to motivate and develope the leaders of today and the future. There will be interactive skills, self-confidence and critical thinking and team building. Seminar B is College Preparation,Ž Sunday, December 7th at the Boys and Girls Club, 555 W. 25th St., 1 … 3 p.m. The seminar will focus on how to prepare for college admissions. Registration deadline is November 10th. For more information, email neproprice@aol.com. Get your Free Press on the go!Seach for us on Facebook at The Jacksonville Free Press or visit us on the web at www.JacksonvilleFreePress.com P P H H O O T T O O S S | | N N E E W W S S | | C C O O M M M M E E N N T T A A R R Y Y Stop by our offices now located at Stop by our offices now located at 1122 West Edgewood Avenue 1122 West Edgewood Avenue Jacksonville, Florida 32208 Jacksonville, Florida 32208 Snap Fitness Riverside is offering a challenge to those considered obese who would like to make a healthy change. Get Help, Give Help is a 12 week challenge focused on helping people change their habits. Winners will get 12 weeks of free personal training and nutritional advice. According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, there has been a dramatic increase in obesity in the United States over the past 20 years and the rates remain high. More than one-third of adults and about 17 percent of children and adolescents have obesity. After reading those statistics in a recent article, I realized as a gym owner I needed to do more,Ž said owner Judy Peek. I created this challenge for those who are ready to get healthy, but might not know where to start. I want to help them change their habits so they can eliminate the health risks that come along with obesity.Ž The Get Help, Give Help Challenge is open to anyone with a body mass index (BMI) of 30 or greater. To find out BMI, go to www.nhlbi.nih.gov and plug in weight and height. Participants are asked to write an essay, 500 words or less, and explain why they are ready to make this commitment to a healthier life. Eight finalists will be chosen and invited for an interview with Peek, who will choose four winners. Each finalist will receive one free month of gym membership. The four winners must commit to working out at least three days a week for 12 weeks; two supervised workouts and one workout on their own. They are also required to keep a food diary during the entire 12 weeks. Following the 12 week challenge, winners will be asked to share what they have learned with someone else. Winners will receive three months of free membership at Snap Fitness Riverside, which includes an access and entry 24 hours a day, seven days a week. They will get two days a week of free personal training for 12 weeks and advice on how to change eating habits and choices. Essays should be sent to jacksonvillefl@snapfitness.com with Get Help, Give Help in the subject line. Please include a name and a phone number. The deadline for submission is December 31. Fitness Challenge Offers New Hope and Personal Training for Obese Pictured is RaShad after a recent performance surrounded by his models Whitney Williams, Sateria Ponder, Precious White and Shawn CollinsMillenial Rashad Solomon on a Mission to Show Hes ot Handicapped but HandiABLE RaShad The Truth On WheelsŽ Solomon recently entertained Black Expo attendees with his Comfortable with Myself entourage of models, singers and family members. RaShad is the mastermind behind the entertainment ensemble, an organization that reaches out to the disabled and encourages them to live a quality life, regardless of their disability. Rashad and his advocates meet every other Friday at the Northside home he shares with his mother, Cynthia Collins, and his 18 year old brother Javone, who also has cerebral palsy. Participation is not limited to those with disabilities. When asked why did he start the organization, RaShad immediately responded, I want people to know that even though I am considered disabled, I have many goals and want to be strong for my brother. The problems I have had have made me stronger. Comfortable With Myself organization will is on target to gain national status.Ž A 2007 graduate of Ed White High School Rashads motivational spirit crept up on him as he was once depressed and wanted to end his life with a failed suicide attempt. After much therapy and an inspiring mother, Rashad is now applying his efforts in seeking employment. I had a job but was laid off and have not found a job yet. Because of my wheelchair I am being turned away. Ive applied to various companies, but my goal has always been modeling. After my bouts of depression I turned to fashion and now I want to look my best at all times. I look good and feel good.Ž RaShad was recently the winner of the Beautiful Bodies Contest at the Landing, been featured in national magazines and publications and has met with local modeling agents to express his interest. A recent performance at the Black Expo was a highlight, My performance at the Expo was all about diversity, it showcased what a model is in my eye which is being comfortable. I am a role model for others with disability. I have the ability, not a disabilityŽ. Blacks, Whites, Liberals and Conservatives Politic in the Hood"Urban Politick'n" was recently held at Duke's Place Blues, Bar and Lounge on Forsythe Street. The event was a collaboration of Fredrick Wilson, host of the popular radio show, "Let's Talk Politics w/Fredrick Wilson" and Community Organizer, Angie Nixon. The goal was to bring people of all walks of life together to discuss political issues that matter most to the community. The event was scheduled to last from 5:30 p.m. until 7:30 p.m., due to the enthusiasm of the conversation and questions from the audience, it easily extended past 8 p.m. "Although Angie and I are totally opposites when it comes to political philosophies, we share a love for people and both want the best for all", said Fredrick Wilson. Both Wilson and Nixon promise to continue this type of forum and take the debate and develop it into a grass-roots action plan. If you would like to learn more about upcoming debates, contact Fredrick Wilson at fwilson@theinvitation.us. Pictured left to right are panelist Kemal Gasper, Rhonda Peoples-Waters, Jovan Frinks and Fredrick Wilson responding to questions

PAGE 8

ovember 6 12, 2014 Ms. Perrys Free Press Page 8 Flipping Through The Free Press Files A. Wellington Barlow and his wife Cassandra strategize Armenia Green, Mary and Sollie Mitchell enjoying the holidays! Roy Mitchell, Constance Hall and Ken Manuel Jerald Mannefield presenting Award for Education to St. Clair Evans, Academy Principle Gloriden J. orris Dr. Chester Aikens and Minister Louis Farrakhan Rayford McKinnon recognizing Jax influential African Americans Dr. Landon Williams, Wylene Dennis, Tony elson, Annie Brown and Gwendolyn Gibson Judy Batson and Lydia Stewart Cleve Warren, wife Patricia and son Brian witnessing his acceptance of the District Service Medal award Father C.Watson and Ruby Myers Brig General Emmett A. Litshaw, Jr. pins Lt. Colonel Felice Franklin Camilla Thompson, guest Ronnie Favors (writing autographs) and Hostess Pearl Mackey chat in the Mackey home Alton Yates and Jucoby Pittman receiving Diversity Awards Michael Blaylock, Clifton Coleman and Vince Cameron participte in the 100 Black Mens Men Who CookŽ at Gateway Mall Renee James and Priscilla Williams Fire Chief Ray Alfred and Eric Green

PAGE 9

ovember 6 12, 2014 Ms. Perrys Free Press Page 8 Flipping Through The Free Press Files A. Wellington Barlow and his wife Cassandra campaign strategize Armenia Green, Mary and Sollie Mitchell enjoying the holidays! Roy Mitchell, Constance Hall and Ken Manuel Jerald Mannefield presenting Award for Education to St. Clair Evans, Academy Principle Gloriden J. orris Dr. Chester Aikens and Minister Louis Farrakhan Rayford McKinnon recognizing Jax influential African Americans Dr. Landon Williams, Wylene Dennis, Tony elson, Annie Brown and Gwendolyn Gibson Judy Batson and Lydia Stewart Cleve Warren, wife Patricia and son Brian witnessing his acceptance of the District Serivce Medal award Father C.Watson and Ruby Myers Brig General Emmett A. Litshaw, Jr. pins Lt. Colonel Felice Franklin Camilla Thompson, guest Ronnie Favors (writing autographs) and Hostess Pearl Mackey chat in the Mackey home Alton Yates and Jucoby Pittman receiving Diversity Awards Michael Blaylock, Clifton Coleman and Vince Cameron participte in the 100 Black Mens Men Who CookŽ at Gateway Mall Renee James and Priscilla Williams Fire Chief Ray Alfred and Eric Green

PAGE 10

Amateur ight at the RitzThe Amateur Night at the Ritz Step Up to the MicŽ is Friday, ovember 7th at 7:30 p.m. This is your last chance to qualify for the Semi-Finals. If you are a poet, singer, rapper, dancer, musicians, we want you at Amateur Night! Bring your family and friends because this is the only show in Jacksonville where the audience decides the winner. For tickets and more info call 807-2010.Clybourne ParkŽ the Stage PlayLimelight Theater, 11 Old Mission Avenue, St. Augustine, Florida presents the stage play Clybourne ParkŽ ovember 7th … 30th . Produced in conjunction with Lift Up Lincolnville, Clybourne Park is a play by Bruce Norris written in response to Lorraine Hansberry's play, A Raisin in the Sun. For more info call 825-1164.100 Black Men Fundraiser100 Black Men Fundraising Reception is scheduled for Friday, November 7th, 7 … 10 p.m. at the Hyatt Regency Riverfront, 225 E. Coastline Dr. Suite 4104. Proceeds supporting scholarships for deserving students and J100 Program. For more info visit www.100blackmenjax.org.Family Coalition Quarterly Training The Family Support Service is presenting a Family Coalition Training session, Saturday, ovember 8th, 9 a.m. to 12 noon, 911 Edgewood Avenue S. Topics include finance news, healthcare update, and specialty training information. To pre register or for more info call 418-5811.45th orthwest Classic, Raines vs. RibaultThe William M. Raines High School Athletic Department will host the 45th Annual Northwest Classic, Raines vs. Ribault on Saturday, November 8th, at 2 p.m. in the Earl Kitchen Stadium located on the campus of Raines High School, 3663 Raines Avenue. The Annual Parade will take place at 10 a.m, at the Shoppes of Sherwood, 5045 Soutel Drive, routing to Raines High School. For more info contact Siottis Jackson at 894-3598.KeepinIt Real Mother and Daughter ConferenceThe Florida Department of Health, First Timothy Baptist Church, Empowerment Resources, Inc., and Girls Inc. presents the 5th annual Keepin' It Real 2014: Mother & Daughter Conference, Saturday, ovember 8th, 8:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. for ages 11 & Up. Sessions include self-esteem, healthy communications and reproductive and sexual health. There will be breakfast and lunch, free gift bags, mother and daughter photos too! The event location is First Timothy Baptist Church, 12103 Biscayne Boulevard. For more info visitwww.empowermentresourcesinc.org. Centre of the Arts FundraiserThe Jacksonville Centre of the Arts Fundraiser/Kick-off is set for Saturday, ovember 8th , 10 … 4 p.m. at the Historic Stanton Building, 521 W. Ashly St. Participate in raising funds and enjoy bouncey house, food trucks, vendors, local celebrity entertainment, line dancing, JCArts Dancers and more! Bring your lawn chair. For more info call 355-5551.Living a Balanced Life SeminarThe Duval County Extension office presents Living a Balanced Life,Ž 11a.m. -12 p.m. at the Beaches Branch Library, 600 3rd St., Neptune Beach, ovember 8, 15, 22. To register visit http://www.jaxpubliclibrary.org/par entingP.R.I.D.E. Book Club 21st AnniversaryPeople Reading for Inspiration, Discussion and Enjoyment Book Club will hold their 21st Anniversary meeting Saturday, ovember 8th, at 5 p.m. at the University Club, 1301 Riverplace Blvd. The book for review is: Vere Pilgrim and the Ritual of the Dolphins by Bryant Rollins.Ž Enjoy an evening with the author, dinner and jazz. For more info call Felice Franklin at 703-8264.Marcus Strouds Love, Live and Laugh TourThe Love, Live and Laugh tour is coming to Jacksonville, Saturday, ovember 8th , at 8 p.m. Featuring Faith Evens, Ricky Smiley, Tamar Braxton and Nephew Tommy. With performances by Special K and GudGud at the Veterans Memorial Arena. For VIP tickets and more info call 469-4465.Leela James in ConcertYou might recognize Leela James from the Hit TV show R&B divas! Leela James will be in concert Sunday, ovember 9th at 7 p.m. at the Ritz, 829 N. Davis St. for one show only! She will be debuting her current single "Say That", and giving you all the songs that made you fall in love with her. For tickets and more info call 807-2010.COJ Veterans Day ParadeJoin the City of Jacksonville in honoring our nation's veterans, Tuesday, ovember 11th at 11:01 a.m. This patriotic parade features more than 4,00 participants including grand marshals, senior military officials, active-duty and retired military units, veterans groups, local high school marching bands, military organizations, JROTC and more! For more info call 630-3690.Parenting Styles SeminarThe Duval County Extension office will present Be Informed: Parenting Styles That Lead to SuccessŽ on Wednesday, ovember 12th, 6:30-7:30 p.m. at the South Mandarin Branch Library, 12125 San Jose Blvd. To register visit http://www.jaxpubliclibrary.org/parenting.Christian Hip-Hop artist Lecrae in ConcertAmerican Christian hip hop artist Lecrae in concert at the Times Union Center for Performing Arts Moran Theater, 300 Water St., Thursday, ovember 13th at 7 p.m. For more info call 633-6110.CoWork Jax EventsCoWork Jaxs upcoming events include Wednesday, ovember 12th at 6 p.m. for Rotaract Downtown Jax; Thursday, ovember 13th at 6 p.m. for the One Spark Creator Academy: Creator Foundations; Monday, ovember 17th at 12 noon is the member luncheon and Monday, ovember 17th at 6 p.m.is the Jax UX meeting discussing 5 Day Design Sprint from Google Ventures. For more info visit www.coworkjax.com.DHS Monthly MeetingThe Durkeville Historical Society Fall/Winter meeting is scheduled for Thursday, ovember 13th at 5:30 p.m., 1293 W. 19th Street. For more info visit www.durkeevillehistoricalsociety.orgIntensive Acting WorkshopFrom ovember 14-16, Jax native and actress Angela Robinson of The White Robin Group and Tyler Perrys Have and Have NotsŽ will present a 3-day, acting intensive workgroup at Stage Aurora Theater, 5164 Norwood Ave. For more info visit www.stageaurora.org.Clarence Carter at the RitzAmerican blues and soul singer, musician, songwriter and record producer Clarence Carter will perform Friday, ovember 14th at the Ritz Theater. For more info visit www.allmusic.com or contact the Ritz Theater at 807-2010 or via www.ritzjacksonville.com. Tribute to Alfred AlŽ AustinThe AnnieRuth Foundation presents a night to pay tribute to community legend, Alfred AlŽ Austin, Saturday, ovember 15th, 5 … 7 p.m., at WJCT Studio A, 100 Festival Park. In his college years, Austin became a standout in track and field at FAMU. While there, he teamed up with BulletŽ Bob Hayes and together they broke records in the 440 relay. For tickets and more info call 200-7202. 16th Annual Storytelling FestivalThe 16th Annual "Bean Soup & Stories" Storytelling Festival, presented by The Northside Storytellers League takes place Saturday, ovember 15th, 11 a.m. 2 p.m., at Inman Memorial United Methodist Church, 5334 Old Kings Rd. N. Featured storytellers: Jim Mittelstadt and Yvette Thomas, with tellers from 3 NE FL Leagues. After stories, bean soup, cornbread, & cookies will be served! For more info call Mary Webster at 786-1949.CWM Pearls & Cufflinks GalaŽ It's that time of year again for the Clara White Mission Pearls and Cufflinks GalaŽ The theme is Black Tie/1920s Attire,Ž Saturday, ovember 15th , 6 to 9 p.m. at Citi, 14000 Citicard Way. Join the CWM in celebrating the spirit of Clara White's legacy of giving back to her neighbors and the CWM mission and 110 year legacy to reduce and prevent homelessness and hunger through education and job training. For more info call Deborah Henry at 356-4162.JASMY 20th Year CelebrationJASMYN, the Jacksonville Area Sexual Minority Youth Network is capping off its 20th anniversary year serving LGBTQ youth (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Questioning) with a celebration on Saturday, November 15th, at the Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens, 829 Riverside Ave from 7 p.m. to 11 p.m. For more info visit www.jasmyn.org.Marco Bicego Trunk ShowThe Marco Bicego Trunk Show and cocktail reception at Underwood Jewelers, 2044 San Marco Boulevard Jewels for SchoolsŽ event to benefit Take Stock in Children, Tuesday, ovember 18th, 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. For more info call 398-9741.Ritz Chamber Players ConcertThe Ritz Chamber Players will present a series of four concerts offering exciting and rich musical experiences. Held at the Times Union Center, the first is the Brahms Sonic Splendor, Wednesday, ovember 19th; In Remembrance of the Dream is scheduled for January 21, 2015 and Tragedy Towards Peace, February 18, 2015 and Spring Spectacular, Wednesday, May 6, 2015. For more info visit www.ritzchamberplayers.org.So You Think You Can DanceŽ TourSo You Think you can Dance,Ž the 11-time Primetime Emmy® Award-winning show that sparked Americas fascination with dance, is set to captivate audiences on tour in Jax, at the Jacksonvilles TimesUnion Centers Moran Theater, 300 Water St., Thursday, ovember 20th, at 7:30 p.m. For one night only the top 10 finalists will perform! For tickets and more information call 442-2929.FC 5 Year Bash Join the North Florida Chapter of the E3 Business Group, Inc. as they celebrate 5 years of building entrepreneurs and local communities. The celebration will be held Thursday, ovember 21st, from 6 … 9 p.m. at E3 HQ, 138 E. Duval Street. For more info and to RSVP email events@e3northflorida.org.Comedian David Alan Grier in JaxActor and comedian David Alan Grier at the Comedy Zone, 3130 Hartley Rd, ovember 21 … 22. Grier is a veteran in theater, television, film and comedy and included in Comedy Central's list of the "100 Greatest Stand-Ups of All Time." For more info call 292-4242.FAMU vs BCU ClassicThe Florida Blue Classic featuring FAMU versus the BCU Wildcats is set for Saturday, ovember 23rd at 2 p.m. at Orlando Florida Citrus Bowl Stadium, 1 Citrus Bowl Place. Billed as the nations largest HBCU rivalry, the game will be televised live on ESPN classic. For more info visit www.floridaclassic.org.CISV GalaChildrens International Summer Villages Gala is set for Saturday, ovember 22nd at 7 p.m. at The Museum, 4160 Boulevard Center Drive. Come celebrate CISVs mission to build global friendships. Enjoy international cuisine, music, dancing silent auction and entertainment. For more information visit www.cisv.org.Otis Clay in ConcertAmerican R&B and soul singer Otis Clay who started in gospel music, in concert Saturday, ovember 22nd at 7 p.m. For more info visit www.otisclay.net or contact the Ritz Theater at 807-2010. The Ritz is located at 829 North Davis Street.Gods Trombones PlayStage Aurora Theater presents the play Gods TrombonesŽ by James Weldon Johnson December 5-7 , at Stage Aurora Theater, 5164 Norwood Ave. The play details 7 Negro Sermons (The Creation, The Prodigal Son, The Crucifixion) and much more highlight this amazing evening of spirit through song, dance, and visual imagery. For more info visit www.stageaurora.org. Page 10 Ms. Perrys Free Press What to do from social, volunteer, political and sports activities to self enrichment and the civic scene AROUND TOWN AROUND TOWN ovember 6-12, 2014 The Free Press of Jacksonville hasR R E E L L O O C C A A T T E E D DTo our valued readers and customers, The Free Press of Jacksonville will be located at 1122 WestEdgewood Avenue. Our new location is approximately two blocks from our former location. All phone and fax numbers remain the same. We look forward to you visiting us at our new offices.EW LOCATIO 1122 West Edgewood Avenue Jacksonville, Florida 32208

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ovember 6 12, 2014 Ms. Perrys Free Press Page 11ew Book Delves into The Disintegration of Black eighorboods AA chapter pledges of Phi Beta Sigma lined up on the campus of Winston Salem State University 1961 Bloody Mu Psi chapter of Omega Psi Phi's Lamp Club lined up on campus The apes of the Kappa Eta chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha posing in front of their chapter house Omega Psi Phi Lamp Club Displaying wood on the line The pledge club of the Xi Psi Chapter of Omega Psi Phi about to eat in Zeta Phi Beta pledges drinking kitty milk while on line Sphinxmen of Alphi Phi Alpha marching campus while pledging Ivy leaf Pledge Club of Alpha Kappa Alpha at Texas College (1950s) S crollers of the Zeta Phi chapter of Kappa Alpha Psi on a road trippping with their big brothers during the 1980s Sigma chapter of Zeta Phi Beta probate Livingstone College Salisbury, C 1953 Delta Rho Chapter of Delta Sigma Theta Albany State University 1953 Phi Beta Sigmas Crescents pledging in the 1970s Alpha chapter Pyramid Pledge Club of Delta Sigma Theta 1955 Phi Beta Sigma pledges at Virginia Union University 1950 Black Greek Letter Organizations (BLGO) have been a part of African American culture and life for over 100 years. Joining a fraternity or sorority remains a great way for students to get involved on campus and build relationships that last beyond your college experience. Involvement contributes to an individual's development through the encouragement of personal, professional and academic goals. Currently there are nine internationally recognized Black Greek Letter fraternities and sororities each unique in tradition, values and reflect the diverse community found on campuses. Joining a fraternity and sorority community means a commitment to the ideals of brotherhood/sisterhood, academic excellence, social development, community service and leadership. Dubbed the Divine Nine,Ž the National Pan-Hellenic Council member organizations Alpha Phi Alpha, Alpha Kappa Alpha, Kappa Alpha Psi, Omega Psi Phi, Delta Sigma Theta, Phi Beta Sigma, Zeta Phi Beta, Sigma Gamma Rho and Iota Phi Theta are some of the nations oldest and most distinguished black service organizations. Historically, their membership rolls have included some of the American nations most powerful and productive black citizens. Throughout the years, specifically on the campus of HBCUs, students would look forward to the antics exhibited by pledges in the fall and spring. What happened behind closed doors remained a secret until more recent decades when students began dying and lawsuits emerged amidst allegations of hazing. As leadership of BLGOs and colleges and universities work to ensure no more lives are lost as they increase their membership with dignity and scholarship, we celebrate the rich legacy of bonding and kinship imparted by these young brothers and sisters as they connected to leave their mark on our world. Photos courtesy of watchtheyard.com A Photographic Celebration of Black Greek Letter OrganizationsWriter Eugene Robinson grew up in a segregated world. His hometown of Orangeburg, S.C., had a black side of town and a white side of town; a black high school and a white high school; and "two separate and unequal school systems," he tells NPR's Steve Inskeep. But things are different now. Just look at the nation's capital -home to the first black U.S. president, a large black middle class and many African-Americans who still live in extreme poverty. Robinson details the splintering of African-American communities and neighborhoods in his new book, Disintegration: The Splintering of Black America. His story starts in America's historically black neighborhoods, where segregation brought people of different economic classes together. Robinson says that began to change during the civil rights era. "People who had the means and had the education started moving out of what had been the historic black neighborhoods," Robinson explains. He cites Washington, D.C.'s Shaw neighborhood as a prime example of this because of how Shaw was home to a vibrant black community and a thriving entertainment scene in the 1930s through the 1950s. By the '70s, Shaw had become a desolate, drug-ridden area. "In city after city, AfricanAmerican neighborhoods that ƒonce had been vibrant and in a sense whole -disintegrated," Robinson says. He attributes that change to African-Americans taking advantage of new opportunities, resulting in a more economically segregated community. "There have always been class distinctions in the black community," Robinson says, "but what I believe we've seen is an increasing distance between two large groups, which I identify as the Mainstream and the Abandoned." Robinson says that while a "fairly slim majority" of AfricanAmericans entered the middle class, a large portion of the community never climbed the ladder. It's getting harder and harder to catch up, he says, "because so many rungs of that ladder are now missing." So as formerly segregated neighborhoods begin to gentrify; rents increase and longtime residents get pushed out. "What happens to this group that I call the Abandoned is that they get shoved around -increasingly out into the inner suburbs -and end up almost out of sight, out of mind," Robinson says. Of course, that's not to say that life was better before the civil rights movement. Robinson says Americans can't forget what life was like before integration. "Forty-five years ago, only two out of every 100 African-American households made the present day equivalent of $100,000 a year. Now it's eight or nine," he says. "No one would turn back the clock and go back to those days." But Robinson says opportunities for African-Americans to climb into the middle class are quickly disappearing, putting black families that did manage to make it into the middle class in a difficult position that involves a certain amount of "survivor's guilt" and plenty of frustration that efforts to help -haven't. "I know very few middle-class black Americans who are not involved in ... attempts to reach across the gap -through the church, through mentoring programs, by spending time reading in the schools," Robinson says. "Yet, you need something much more holistic ... and purposeful if we're frankly ever going to have the kind of impact that we need to have on the people left behind." There's a good deal of friction between AfricanAmerican communities, Robinson says, but it doesn't get talked about very much. People living in poverty "have the resentment and sourness that comes with having been left behind," he says, "the feeling that, 'Well, these people think so much of themselves, and they've moved away to their fancy places.' " According to Robinson, there's a word for that feeling. "Sadity" is used to describe someone who is "stuck up" or who thinks he or she is better than everyone else. "It reflects this outsized importance that is given in poor black communities to this concept of respect," Robinson says. And if the black poor remain mired where they are right now, he says, it will be bad for everyone -that's what gives the cause a sense of urgency. So while the changes the civil rights movement has inspired over the past 50 years have absolutely been for the good, there's still important work to do. by Tonya Pendleton Boris Kodjoe woke up like this. The 41-year-old actor is one of the stars of The Real Husbands of Hollywood reality spoof show on BET and was also in Addicted, the movie version of the popular Zane book. Although hes well known for playing characters that use his gorgeous face and body to their full advantage, Kodjoe relished shaking up his image by turning to comedy. We caught up with him and asked him about Real Husbands, his career, his hot marriage to actress Nicole Ari Parker and why October is an important month for his family. Q: Why made you decide to go on Real Husbands? My best friend, Chris Spencer, is the creator of the show and he and Kevin [Hart] had called me and told me they were doing a spoof on reality TV. They referenced Curb Your Enthusiasm, which Im a big fan of and I knew right away that this was something that I wanted to do. Chris knows us all intimately so I knew the writing was going to be on the nose and something that I would enjoy tremendously. I like making fun of myself and my friends and reality TV. Q: Did you consider how doing the show might impact your sexy leading man image? The sexy leading man status thing is not something I ever aspired to or wanted to build on. Its like a label thats put on you. Anything I can do to show people that I can be diverse and that Im funny and can be physical it was a great opportunity to spread my wings and show people I can be multidimensional. Still to this day I dont care about those accolades. Theyre flattering but its nothing I can take credit for. Growing up in Germany, it was never an issue. It was never made a big deal out of. I was called all kind of names growing up being the only Black boy and people trying to touch my hair and speaking in weird accents because they thought I couldnt understand them. I had a lot of other concerns than my look growing up. I dont take myself seriously at all. Im a husband, Im a father and everything else is just icing on the cake. Q: Your 9-year-old daughter, Sophie, (his son icholas, is 8) was born with spina bifida a birth defect that affects the normal development of the spine. October was Spinal Bifida Awareness month, but you want to let women know theres one easy way to ensure their children dont suffer from this serious birth defect. The key is folic acid. All women of childbearing age should be taking folic acid. (Parker took pre-natal vitamins, but in some cases, the defect develops anyway.) You never know what your absorbency rate is, so better safe than sorry. Please Sophies Voice because not only are we trying to eradicate it worldwide, we also support fortification, which is when governments pass laws forcing millers to add folic acid to flour and to rice. When they do that, women who ingest those products are automatically protected. Q: You and icole have been together 13 years … thats like 50 in Hollywood years. What makes it work? A: Theres many things, but I think a lot of people dont give people a chance to grow through adversity. They just jump off the horse and leave the building when the road gets bumpy. When you grow as a couple, there are three growth processes that go on. Theres his growth, her growth and their growth together. You have to learn each others dance steps and thats not easy. Q: Were searching for a flaw, here Boris. Were looking for towels on the floor, you dont wash dishes, you leave socks outside the hamper, you dont take out the trashƒ I do take out the trash. And I like washing dishes; its almost like meditation. I like doing that stuffƒ. sometimes. Ill think about it and when I figure out what my flaws are, Ill call you back. (Laughs).F F L L A A W W L L E E S S S SBoris Kodjoe Lives a Charmed Life On and Off the Camera

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Page 12 Ms. Perrys Free Press ovember 6-12, 2014 Weekly ad in hand. Coupons in pocket. BOGO-vision on. Its time to save.publix.com/save F F r r e e e e P P r r e e s s s s 28 Years 28 Years


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