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The Florida alligator

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Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

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Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

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Full Text
Official Publication
of
The University of Florida

VOL. XX. No. 2.

Complete Registration
Figures Show Big Gain

Total of 2105 in Various
Colleges Is Margin
Over Past Year
FROSHTOP LIST
Sophs Believed to Have
Record for Second
Year Men
From the final report of the
registrar, Prof. H. W. Chandler,
it was learned Friday that all pre previous
vious previous registrations for the Uni University
versity University had been surpassed by the
1028 figures.
A total of 2105 students have
been enrolled for the present year,
which is a goodly margin over
list years figures as well as
those of any previous year. In view
of the great number which have
clamored for entrance in the past
three years, and the unsettled eco economic
nomic economic condition of the state, this
is indeed a remarkable record.
As in the past the College of
Arts and Sciences maintains a
plurality among the various col colleges
leges colleges on the campus. A total of
580 students have thus far enroll enrolled
ed enrolled for the liberal arts. It is to be
noted that the Freshmen show a
preference for the B. S. course,
whereas, the upper classmen, par particularly
ticularly particularly the second year men, fa favor
vor favor the A. B. curriculum.
The College of Commerce and
Journalism, which up to the last
two years was but a division of
the Arts and Sciences college,
Stepped up into second place
among the colleges, with a total
membership of 367. Os this num number,
ber, number, approximately 90 per cent are
taking commerce while the re remainder
mainder remainder are headed for the ranks
of the "Fourth Estate, except for
**+ .sprtubHng of future socletors.
That the newest college on the
§ campus should attain such dimen-
I sions, indeed speaks well for it.
The Engineering and Architec Architecture
ture Architecture college closely follows the
I College of Commerce, with an en enrollment
rollment enrollment of 339; almost 20 per cent
are in the architecture division.
, Teachers college with 306, and
the College of Law with 233, come
next on the list, while the remain remainder
der remainder are enrolled in the College of
Agriculture with 146; Pharmacy
college with 62, and the Graduate
school of 76.
Additional light is thrown upon
the Snrollment figures by the
count of men in the various
classes. The freshmen with 773
| (Continued on page Two)
Students and
Faculty Aid
Relief Fund
WRUF Operating on Special
Permit, Appeals
For Help
Students and officials of the
University of Florida are doing
their bit towards giving aid to
those sections of the state recent recently
ly recently devastated by the hurricane.
Under the direction of their
president, Clay Lewis, young state
legislator, the student body has
started an active campaign and
several hundred dollars have al already
ready already been raised. Although 90
per cent of the Gator students
earn part of their way through
college and an even larger per percentage
centage percentage are going to school on
very limited bank accounts, the
response has been gratifying. Do Donations
nations Donations from these boys are a di direct
rect direct result of a real sacrifice,
even if it is relatively small.
Under a special license from the
Federal Radio Commission, the
new State and University station,
WRUF, has been on the air all
this week asking for relief funds.
Dr. John J. Tigert, president of
the University and former United
States Commissioner of Educa Education,
tion, Education, has been one of the speak speakers
ers speakers whose voice has been carried
to the unseen audience throughout
the eastern half of the nation,
t While WRUF is now doing its
| best to bring direct aid to the
$L storm wrecked sections, its great great(jest
(jest great(jest contribution will come when
v the planned programs go on the
,air after October 1 and a message
Wot progress and reconstruction is
carried back to other parts of the
country which have responded
generously to appeals for relief
money.

STUDENT BODY LEADERS ARE
GUESTS OF CITY EXECUTIVES
AT BANQUET FRIDAY NIGHT

ARTISTS MAY
BE INCLUDED
ONPROGRAMS
Gene Austin and Paul
Whiteman Approached
By Council
Gene Austin, Paul Whitemans
orchestra and other well known
artists are being approached by
the Lyceum council in reference
to the early programs of the year.
At present two programs have
been definitely arranged and sev several
eral several more are under the consider consideration
ation consideration of the council.
The Criterion Male quartet has,
been engaged for a program in
February. This quartet is most
widely known for its Victor and
Brunswick records.
Louise Stallings, lyric mezzo so soprano,
prano, soprano, will be engaged for the
March program. Her unusual pro programs
grams programs often include songs in five
languages, and her repertoire dis displays
plays displays a varied talent.
The programs as a whole will
be similar to those of last year,
but more widely known artists i 3
anticipated, according to members
of the council.
CALL FOR TRACK
WILL BE OCT. 1
Coach Nash Higgins makes his
first call for track candidates on
October 1. Throughout the winter
season Higgins will have his men
working out two or three times a
week. During November and De December
cember December cross country runs will be
taken up to harden the runners
and develop their endurance. At
the beginning of the second semes semester
ter semester the grind of daily training will
set in and continue throughout the
season.
Fiordas varsity this year should
be a formiable array df trackstcrs.
Dick Trogden, veteran quarter and
half miler, is at the helm of the
29 squad. Gus Click and Sawyer
letter men of last year are back
to again* reel off the distances.
From Uie Frosh ranks of last year
are Rice, Presley and Hazeldine
who arc ail good distance men. B.
Newcome, McEwen, Miller and
Davis are striving for a varsity
berth at tue quarter mile job. The
sprints are well taken cab# of by
Knight, Goodbread, Bryson, Arnow,
McEwen and Bethea. In the field
events Wills, Chittendon, Somper Somperyac,
yac, Somperyac, Robb, Perrine, Johnson, Green
and Sauls have all returned.
Managers Appointed
For Dormitory Men
For the purpose of facilitating
the participation of dormitory men 1
in inter-mural athletics, the follow following
ing following men have been appointed man managers
agers managers for the various sections in
the two dormitories:
Thomas HallA. D .King, sec section
tion section A; li. S. Rains, and M. A.
Cole, section B; "Red Evans, sec section
tion section C; David Lanier, section D;
John Marsaiiles, section E; Fred
L. Petray, section F
Buchman Hall.T. R. Webb, sec section
tion section A; Leon Jones, section B; J.
L. Saunders, section C; Owen Rice,
section D.
Chemistry Classes
Show Big Increase
The largest class in chemistry in
the history of the department is
enrolled this year, according to a
statement issued from the office of
Dean T. R. Leigh of the College of
Pharmacy. There are about 750
students in the department this
year, showing an increase of more
than 100 over last year.
A greater interest in advanced
work in cnemestry is also being
shown. There arc 94 students en enrolled
rolled enrolled for third year work as com compared
pared compared with 75 students in this
course last year.

A OREATER^^RIDA

Good Will Event Held at
White House
Hotel
SUPPORT PLEDGED
Mayor Commissioner Gra Graham
ham Graham States City Posi Position
tion Position Towards Boys
Cooperation, its giving and re receiving,
ceiving, receiving, was the principal theme of
the good-will banquet given at the
White House hotel Friday night by
the executive departments of the
city in honor of the student body
leaders at the University. Some
90 students, citizens, and city of officials
ficials officials attended.
Declaring that the meeting was
arranged by the city officials in
order that they might become ac acquainted
quainted acquainted with the University stu student
dent student leaders and associate them themselves
selves themselves with their problems, Mayor-
Commissioner Lee Graham sound sounded
ed sounded the keynote of the meeting in
pledging support of the city of officials
ficials officials to any activity which the
students might inaugurate.
We are asking your assistance
in securing the good-will and co cooperation
operation cooperation of the student body of
the University in preserving the
law, preventing damage to proper property
ty property and in increasing the safety of
the public, Mr. Graham said.
Everything that is said here is
.a measure which hash been Under Undertaken
taken Undertaken with a view to bringing
about the most cordial relations
between all city officials and the
student body, he asserted.
Desire to Help Students
It is the desire of the citizens
of Gainesville that each student,
after he has completed his course
at the University and has gone
forth into the world, may have a
friendly feeling for the city where
his University is located; that he
may feel that tho-,citizens took a
most friendly interest in him dur during
ing during his stay here and that their
best wishes accompany him in his
journey through life. We are ask asking
ing asking you as leaders to help us in
bringing about such a feeling
among the students, he continu continued.
ed. continued.
There have been incidents in
the past which we all very sin sincerely
cerely sincerely regret and I have no doubt
that many of those who partici participated
pated participated in such incidents have, af af(Continued
(Continued af(Continued on Page Six)
PROF. TESELLE
JOINS FACULTY
A valuable addition to the facul faculty
ty faculty of the College of Law has been
added in the person of Professor
Clarence J. TeSelle, who fills the
vacancy created by Professor W.
A. Hunters resignation to accept
a professorship at George Wash Washington
ington Washington University.
Professor TeSelle received bis
[A. B. and L. L. B. degrees from
the University of Wisconsin v in
1911. He has been engaged in ac active
tive active practive from the time of his
graduation until the present. His
advancement as a lawyer is little
short of spectacular. Scarcely had
he received his degree, when he was
appointed state attorney and told
to clean up corruption from the
city of Antigo, Wisconsin. That he
did this well is proved by the fact
that he served three terms in this
capacity. He was later city attor attorney
ney attorney for Antigo for three terms.
For the past six years he has been
Circuit Court commissioner in that
city. With such a background,
Professor TeSelle is well fitted for
his work here which will include
the of supervisor of the practice
court.
FRESHMAjT ELECTION
By, and under authority of Sec Section
tion Section Three of Article Four of the
Constitution of the Student Body
of the University of Florida, I
hereby call the election for officers
of the Freshman class for Tues Tuesday,
day, Tuesday, October 2, 1928, at the hour
of 10 a. m. in the Auditorium. All
freshman be present and assist in
the election of your officers.
(Signed) CLAY LEWIS,
President of the Student Body.

GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA, SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 1928.

Promising Sophomore Ball-Carrier
*--!- i
i? a m
I m m tsiT ;; "' y
Leroy Bethea, the galloping red-head" of the Florida Gator
backfield. This former prep school star was captain of the -fresh -freshman
man -freshman eleven last year and is expected to cut a wide Bwath in South Southern
ern Southern Conference circles this year. He is especially talented at broken brokenfield
field brokenfield running and can get off a good pass and punt when needed.

SEVERAL HUNDRED FRESHMEN
AND NEW GffiLS ARE PLEDGES
OF TALLAHASSEE SORORITIES

Varsity Team Is
Approaching Top
Knotch in Form
Team Shows Improvement
During Past Few
Practices
SCRIMMAGE HELD
Men Are Still Receiving
Practice In Game
Fundamentals
With the fourth week of varsity
football practice at an end, the
Florida aggregation is fast ap approaching
proaching approaching top-notch form. Though
the first part of the past week was
marked by numerous fumbles, the
latter days showed a marked im improvement
provement improvement in handling the ball.
The plays, largely because of the
persistent efforts of the coaches
and the keen competition for
berths, have been mastered by
most of th aspirant candidates.
This improvement, according to
Coach Bachman, is due in a large
measure to the nightly skull prac practices
tices practices which have been conducted in
the new gymnasium.
On Monday afternoon the Gator
squad was given extensive practice
in punting and passing. FoUowing
this, the squad was run through
the stride boxes, then was given a
series of calisthenics. The dummy
and the charging machine were
then given due attention. The re remainder
mainder remainder of the afternoon was spent
in dummy scrimmage and signal
practice.
Tuesday the usual routine of
passing, kicking, taking the stride
boxes and hitting the dummy was
cut down in order that more time
might be given to scrimmage. The
afternoons scrimmage was mark marked
ed marked by much fumbling on the part
of the backs.
On Wednesday afternoon, for the
first time, each of the four teams
on the squad was given practice in
receiving and kicking off. Stanley,
Clark and McEwen showed up to
be more consistent in distance and
placement than any others who
were used during the afternoon.
F"or the benefit of the students a
scrimmage under the direction of
(Continued on Page Four)

Florida State College For
Women Inaugurates
New System
PLEDGE DAY
New Method Was Advocated
By National Pan-
Hellenic
Several hundred freshmen and
new girls were extended bids at the
annual Pledge Day held on the F.
S. C. campus Monday afternoon.
A new method of handling bids,
which was advocated by National
Panhellenic, was used this year by
the local association. Each per person
son person to receive a bid was notified
of this fact Sunday and was told
to report tothe little theatre Mon Monday
day Monday afternoon between 4 and 4:30
o'clock. The bids were distributed
in the presence of a lawyer, ac according
cording according to the choice indicated.
The following is a list of the
girls pledged by each sorority:
Kappa Alpha chapter of Kappa
Delta announces the pledging of
Leery Warren and Alice Miller,
Tampa; Frances Pringle and Nan
Amerine, Tallahassee: Dot Robin Robinson
son Robinson and Elizabeth Clutho and Vir Virginia
ginia Virginia Miller, JacksonviUe; Cleman Clemanthine
thine Clemanthine Newman and Ashley Fra Fraleigh,
leigh, Fraleigh, Madison; Janis Knight, And Andalusia,
alusia, Andalusia, Ala.; Jem Haile, Ocala;
Edith Holman, Elizabeth Andress
and Mary Frances Barnett, Dothan,
Ala.; Margaret Hine, Dot Yale,
Haines City; Eleanor McClearen,
Thomasville, Ga.; Kate Carlton.
Eufala. Ala.; Dorothy Newman, Ft.
Myers; Julia Dickinson, Lakeland;
Elizabeth Turnbull, Sanford; Mil Mildred
dred Mildred Early, Geneva, Ala.; Cynthia
Brasenhom, Pensacola.
Chi Omega anounces the pledg pledging
ing pledging of Marie Daughtrie, Marianna;
Carolyn Thomas, Bradenton; Lyra
Burwell, Miami; Betty Brownlow,
Jacksonville; Elizabeth Ramsey,
Tampa; Jane Graham, Gainesville;
Mary Lou Tutewiler, Jacksonville;
Catherine Lawson, Orlando; Mary
Frances Whiteside, Apalachicola;
Mary Kennedy, Quincy; Isabel Ber Berry,
ry, Berry, Jacksonville; Dorothy Tucker,
Gainesville; Carita Look, Panama
City; Caroline Cockrell, Gaines Gainesville;
ville; Gainesville; Virginia Lannigan, Char Charlottesville,
lottesville, Charlottesville, Va.; Elizabeth Camp Campbell,
bell, Campbell, Bradenton; Margaret Gaillard,
Jacksonville; Grace Gannon,
Tampa; Mary Downey. Jackson Jacksonville;
ville; Jacksonville; Mary Hale. Gainesville;
Marie Conboy, Quincy; Harriet
Heiter, Mobile, Ala,; Evelyn Hor Hor(Continued
(Continued Hor(Continued on Page Six).

Varsity Wins Benefit
Game From Freshmen

GATOR SONGSTERS MAKING
FAST PROGRESS; MORE THAN
HUNDRED HAVE TRIED OUT

Large Number
Working Hard
For Band Places
Many Trips Planned For
Year Offer Big
Inducement
Something over a hundred men
are now out for the University
band," R. DeWitt Brown, director,
states, "and this number will
eventually be cut down to about
75. Mr. Brown believes that the
band is in unusually good trim for
this time of the season and is con confident
fident confident that Florida will have a
band this year of which she may
well be proud.
The first public appearance of
the band in uniform will be at the
Southern game in Gainesville on
October 6. At that time 75 eager
Florida musicians, garbed in their
natty band uniforms, will send
the stirring tunes of the Orange
and Blue across the gridiron to
cheer the Florida team on to vic victory.
tory. victory.
Plans are almost certain that
the band will go to Savannah for
the Florida-Ceorgia game. The
University will contribute a part
of the necessary money. It will
be recalled that the band accom accompanied
panied accompanied the Gator team (o' Athens
two years ago at the beginning of
the present series of Georgia-
Florida game, was in Jacksonville
last fall when the teams met again
and will, of course, go to Savan Savannah
nah Savannah this year. Perhaps it will be
the faithful support of the band
that will help Florida to cast off
its two year jinx and throw Geor Georgia
gia Georgia down in defeat this fall.
The many trips made by the
band are a constant encourage encouragement
ment encouragement for the University boys to
do their best to make the organi organization.
zation. organization. From present appear appearances,
ances, appearances, every rat who ever had a
musical instrument of any sort in
his hand, is out there trying to
make the band. They are making
up in spirit what some of them
might possibly lack in musical
ability, and some of them are go going
ing going to make that band just be because
cause because of their enthusiasm. Not
that we dont have real musical
talent in the band, or that enthu enthusiasm
siasm enthusiasm alone will make the grade,
but the combination of the two is
irresistible.
George H. Smith, captain of the
band last year, having graduated
from the ranks of the R. O. T. C.,
is manager this year. We all re remember
member remember the precision with which
the band drilled last fall, and if
that is any indication of the new
managers ability, the band is sure
to be an overwhelming success.
Freddie Baetzman was elected as assistant
sistant assistant manager, but it is not cer cercertain
certain cercertain whether he will return to
school. Sid Herlong, last years
top sergeant, is at present acting
as captain, and will, in all prob probability,
ability, probability, receive that place when
appointments are made.
Matherly Addresses
Teachers In Tampa
Dean Walter J M.atherly of the
College of Commerce and Journal Journalism
ism Journalism will address the Florida West
Coast Teachers association in
Tampa on October 5. His subject
will be Some Foundations of
Public Education.
On Wednesday, September 26,
Dean Matherly addressed the
Brooksville Kiwanis club. He spoke
on Private Roads to Public Ser Service.
vice. Service.
Dean Matherly appeared on the
same program with Mr. F. P. Cone,
President of the Florida Bankers
Association, at the banquet of the
American Institute of Banking
held in Jacksonville Friday night,
September 28. His subject on this
occasion was Employer and Emv
ployee Relationships. During the
banquet diplomas were presented
to the members of the class in
banking, which Dean Matherly has
been conducting in Jacksonville
during the past year.

All Florida Men
For a
Bigger and Better Florida

Club Will Have Regular
And Alternate
Sections
2 TRIPS PLANNED
Plans Are Now Underway
For Annual Home
Concert
Rapid progress is being made
by the University of Florida Glee
club under the leadership of Dir Director
ector Director John W. Dcruyn. Over one
hundred men have tried out for
the organization so far and of this
number 60 have been selected.
Thirty men compose the regular
section and the other 30 are alter alternates.
nates. alternates. As the Glee club is manag managed
ed managed strictly by merit, the alternate
always has the opportunity of re replacing
placing replacing the regular singer.
The club is planning two trips
for this year. The first will be a
trip to such places throughout the
state as will afford the university
the greatest amount of publicity
and profit. The second trip will
carry the Glee club out of the
state to several of the outstanding
womens colleges of the south, in including
cluding including Wesleyan, Agnes Scott,
Brenau. Womans College of Ala Alabama,
bama, Alabama, Florida State College for
Women and others.
There are possibly some men in
school who have not yet tired out
fo* tie Gle4 chib: ThcWe will be
given a tryout if they report im immediately
mediately immediately to Professor Deruyn
at the studio. The Glee club is an
organization f(| men interested in
music and who have the talent re required
quired required for admission to such a
group. AH students who are inter interested
ested interested are urged to arrange for a
try out immediately.
Plans for the annual nome con concert
cert concert are now under way. The club
promises as versatile and interest interesting
ing interesting a program as they are capable
of producing.
Officers for this year are:
PresidentBilly Matthews.
Vice-President Aubrey Dun Dunscome.
scome. Dunscome.
Advertising Manager Robert
Filson.
LibrarianPete Hatfield.
AuditorRobert Yeats.
Business Manager A. A. Mur Murphree,
phree, Murphree, Jr.
Those who compose the regular
section of the Glee Club are:
First tenorsBilly Matthews, B.
D. Cox, A. B. Cox, Dean C. Don Donaldson,
aldson, Donaldson, J. M. McEwen, L. B.
Hjermstad, Joe Carter, paired
with A. Johnson, Q. Edward Prit Pritchard,
chard, Pritchard, A. E. Wilson.
First bassesR. S. Yeats, A. 8.
Dunscome, Pete Hatfield, Bobby
Andreas, R. H. McCaughan, H. E.
Newcombe, paired with Joe Wilen Wilensky,
sky, Wilensky, Robert B. Bennett, Jack Mil Miller,
ler, Miller, and W. Everett Robinson.
Second tenorsA. A. Murphree,
Jr., Wm. W. Duose, David Eu Eugene
gene Eugene Moomaw, Bill Lathrop, pair paired
ed paired with T. Neff, Manley A. Cole,
paired with N. MacFarlan, N. W.
Knowles, Warren Connor.
Second bassesArchibald Clay Clayton,
ton, Clayton, Ole L. Sands, R. L. Filson, G.
T. Smith, T. R. Webb, Gerald
Strum.
Pianists Claude Murphree,
Freddie Geehan, Barclay Roser,
Kenneth Morgan, Thomas H.
Buckley, and F. P. Langbehn.
Professor E. T. Ingle
Succeeds Armstrong
Edward T. Ingle has succeeded
Professor O, K. Armstrong as as assistant
sistant assistant professor of journalism ac according
cording according to announcement of Dean
Matherly of the College of Com Commerce
merce Commerce and Journalism.
Mr. Ingle is a graduate of the
University of Michigan and ha 3
taken postgraduate work at the
University of Wisconsin. He has
had several years of practical
newspaper work on the Indiana Indianapolis
polis Indianapolis Star and the Cleveland Plain
Dealer.
Before coming here. Professor
Ingle was head of the department
of journalism at Ohio Wesleyan
University and was named head
of the journalism department for
the proposed collegiate tour
abroad.

$1.50 PER YEAR

Gators Play Hard During
First Half; Slow
Up in Last
RATS FIGHT HARD
Over Six Thousand Watch
Tilt Staged for
Aid Fund
The varsity or Coach Charlie
Bachman ran rough shod over the
less experienced rat eleven in the
game at Jacksonville yesterday.
The varsity had things entirely
their own way during the first
half and piled up a score of 32
points over the freshman squad. It
was only in the latter part of the
tilt that the freshman made any
appreciable progress against the
attack of the varsity, but even
then were not able to penetrate the
line of Bachmans eleven Suffi Sufficiently
ciently Sufficiently to score.
More than 6,000 people turned
out for the tilt, which was played
for the benefit of the storm relief
fund. They were well rewarded,
for although the contest was only
an exhibition game the plucky
fight put up by the out-classed rat
team, was worth going to see.
The game was featured by two
spectacular runs, one when Red
Bethea tore through the rat line
and ran down the field 73 yards
for a touchdown, soon after the
game started. Jimmy Nolan made
another fine run for the vaftity
when he intercepted a pass of the
frosh and ranced 70 yards for
another counter.
Crabtree, Brumbaugh, Owens,
and Vansickle all penetrated the
defensive of Coach Cowell's eleven
for touchdowns, Vansickle making
two trips down to the rat goal with
the ball. On the points after
touchdown Dutch Stanley was
responsible for two, while Captain
Goof Bowyer contributed another.
The game was interspersed by
numerous substitutions by coaches
of both elevens, who evidently were
making of the game a trial under
fire for as many of their charges
as possible, and the teams should
be benefited by the tilt wnich will
enable the respective mentors to
remedy the weak points in both of offense
fense offense and defence.
The freshman have reason to be
(Continued on page Five)
Need Exists For
Student Jobs Os
Part Time Work
Available Positions Are At a
Minimum at Present
Figures Show
With the number of students in
need of part time work larger this
year than at any other time during
the past, and with the number of
available jobs at a minimum, Dr.
J. E. Turlingon, chairman of the
faculty committee on self help, is issued
sued issued a request this week that all
persons in the university or in
Gainesville who can possibly u&e
student help, communicate imme immediately
diately immediately with R. C. Beatty at the
college Y. M. C. A.
One hundred twenty-five appli applications
cations applications for employment were re received
ceived received by Mr. Beatty before the
opening of school, and 75 addition additional
al additional applications have since been re received.
ceived. received. The Gainesville Chamber of
Commerce has given its aid in the
situation by sending circular let letters
ters letters to ail business men in Gaines Gainesville.
ville. Gainesville. explaining the situation to
them, and requesting that all op opportunities
portunities opportunities for odd jobs be turned
over to students to fill them.
Mr. Beatty emphasized the fact
that he could fill practically any
form of employment as he has a
large list of students to draw from.
So far this semester, the Y. M. C,
A. has filled requests for office
workers, mechanics, chauffeurs,
laundry assistants and gardeners.
Although accurate figures are
not as yet available, said Dr. Turl Turlington,
ington, Turlington, it is certain that there is
a larger proportion of the class of
1932 depending on earning a part
of their expenses v?hjle in school
than in any other entering class
during the last five years." The
majority of positions available
around the campus have been
taken by returning upperclassmen,
and only a small number were left
open to members of the freshman
class.



PAGE TWO

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR
Official Student Publication of the University of Florida
Editor-In-Chief Broward Culpepper
Managing Editor W. Layton Dinning
Business Manager : Bob Mathis
Published every Sunday morning during football season, every
Saturday morning during the remainder of the collegiate year by the
FLORIDA ALLIGATOR, at the Pepper Printing Company, Gainesville
Florida.
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA, GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA
SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 1928.
Entered as second class matter at the Post Office at Gainesville,
Florida, under the act of March 3, 1889.
Subscription rates, mail or carrier delivered, $1.50 per year.
*
OFFICE:-Student Body Offices, Language Hall, University of
Florida, Gainesville, Florida.
TELEPHONE
Editor-In-Chief 483-W Managing Editor ~.800
Business Manager 584-W.
THE STUDENT FORUM
For years it has been the oolicy of the Alligator to
conduct a student forum for the purpose of giving the
students a place to express their opinions. However, for
the past two years this policy has not been followed. This
year the Staff wishes to revive and continue the forum.
Contributions to this department will always be wel welcomed
comed welcomed so long as they do not contain anything of a libel libelous
ous libelous nature or advocate policies that would bring harm to
the University.
The Staff is very anxious to have the students make
use of this feature so that the Alligator may truly reflect
student opinion. In bull sessions we have often heard
opinions boldly stated and loudly defended but the aver average
age average man seems somewhat loath to present them in writ writing.
ing. writing. If you have views on some subject relating to stu student
dent student or University affairs that you believe are right and
would benefit the Alligator readers why not hand them
in for publication ?
Though the Alligator may not always agree with
the articles turned in for publication we will be glad to
print them. However, in order that we may protect our ourselvet,
selvet, ourselvet, it will be necessary for the students contributing
to the forum to either sign their names to their articles or
to turn their names in to one of the members of the Staff.
o
THE Y. M. C. A.
- Most of the freshmen have already come in contact
with the Y. since their arrival at the University. Some
of-them through aid in locating rooms, more of them by
the socials that have been given for their entertainment
during the last two weeks. Certainly they have found
th&t the secretaries are their best friends during the storm
pefio(j of early school. The secretaries are on the watch
at all times to see what they may do for the students
that will make their stay at the University as pleasant
as possible. Not only is this true during the first year
at college but it is ti-ue all through college life, j i
The University of Florida is very fortunate in hav having
ing having one of tiie best secretarial staffs in the country. J. E.
Johnson is one of the most capable of Y. men, popular and
having the capacity to inspire men and cause them to do
the things that will benefit them most. R. C. Beatty, his
assistant, has had considerable experience in Y. work and
before coming to the University of Florida was secretary
at the Georgia Tech Y. And in addition to these is Miss
Sue Hill who comes to us this year. Though having been
here but a very short time, she has already won a place
in the heart of every student who has come in contact with
her.
If you have not met this group of earnest workers
you are missing a very enjoyable part of college life. If
you are not acquainted with them go over to the Y. today
and meet them. They will be glad to see you. The Y. has
a large reading room equipped with magazines and for
those that prefer music there is an Edison and the piano.
You will enjoy staying there during your spare time.

THEFORUM
SKULLS AND BONES
Freshman: How are you enjoy enjoying
ing enjoying rat courts by now?
Sophomores: How are you en enjoying
joying enjoying swaggering by now?
Rest of you: How do you like
being wit of drill by novf ?
We notice several athletes minus
rat cape. WHAT?
Now that all the possible fresh freshmen
men freshmen are pledged, school will start.
The Vigilance committee seems
to be divided on what should be
done with the Hasing pledge. Bet Better
ter Better sit together, fellows.
The school has nothing whatso whatsoever
ever whatsoever to do with fraternity ratting,
says the Vigilance committee. Well
well, are fraemities a part of the
University?
Dr. Tigeft says the University
belongs to the boys. I wonder if
the boys made the rule that there
would be no card playing in the
dormitory.
Well, now that the Independent
party is dead, the Liberals and
Democrats can resume their friend friendly
ly friendly war. But, gentlemen, is it dead?
What it this Coffee club, any*
way?
Pag* M. psragraph S, 7 BOOK!
Read the contradiction in the F
book. Learn to be a lawyer and
explain how the first sentence can
be true If the second sentence is
also true.
Page the president of the sqpbo-

more class! K. D. Colson proposes
to turn all "pledges who violate
rat rules over to the respective
fraternity. Yet the V. C. (a ma majority
jority majority of which is composed of
fraternity men) is to continue beat beating
ing beating the lower-caste, or in other
words the non-frat man. However,
thats all right. No man should be
tried by his inferiors!
HINTS TO FRESHMEN
Dont drift into bad habits be because
cause because the other fellows do.
It is sometimes safe not to fol follow
low follow the crowd.
Profanity shows lack of culture.
It is lowindulge not.
Be loyal to yourself, your class,
your college and all who are wor worthy.
thy. worthy.
Hard study is one of the most
helpful handmaidens of sound
character.
Glass, china, and a reputation
are easily cracked and never well
mended.
"He who has lost confidence can
lose nothing more.
Human improvement is from
within outward.
Be useful not useless.
Remember to write home.
(Ga. Tech T" Book).
WRITE TO YOUR MOTHER
Oh; write to your mother, my boy,
while you can,
Too soon shall you live as a moth motherless
erless motherless man,
Too soon shall the letters youll
write be too late,
For mothers not always may
anxioualy wait.
She is eager today for a word you
can write, ....
Dont wait for tomorrowbut do
. it tonight.
(Gd. Tech. T Rook).

COMMA
Robert F. Sikes

In the words of that great and
sage humorist, Bill Nye, Mr.
Webster through his Dictionary
has added a valuable work to the
shelf of American novels. However,
for an inexperienced reader, the
plot is somewhat difficult to fol follow.
low. follow.
Now should you follow the plot
to Comma you will find it de defined
fined defined more or less as a punctua punctuation
tion punctuation point, marking a pause.
So it is that Comma, the de despair
spair despair of all great and good pro professors
fessors professors of English, has come to
bead this column. We shall feel
indeed honored and notwithstand notwithstanding
ing notwithstanding lucky if we get you to pause.
Under "Comma" you shall find
many things, perhaps a few of
them good, the majority bad, and
some decidedly worsebut so are
we allhuman.
The motivating force of Com Comma
ma Comma derives itself from the same
force that motivates a worldthat
mingles pathos and laughter, mis misery
ery misery and happiness, success and
failure, life and death.
Producing tbusly a strange com composite
posite composite that may make life liveable
one day and unbearable the next
yet always passing fair if only
one has learned "Bull.
So out of the hurry and bustle,
the sweat and grind lets leave to
pause and bullthen perchance
for a space the frown shall be
gone and the heartache forgotten.
Bull, one of the component parts
of Cow, the basic part of a college
education, author of "Sweet Ade Adeline,
line, Adeline, and the binding tie whereer
good fellows meet.
So it is that we present to you,
for your edification (?), Bull.
Deal kindly we pray for we are
but one of youthe same hopes i
and the same misgivings are ours. I
Try to think of yourself as a fath- j
er who must of necessity be aj
mother to Bull, even as a calf. I
Then gentle reader you may begin
to realize our predicament.
After the mannor of all goodj
and enjoyable bull sessions we j
shall speak of womenthe Lord I
bless them. P. S.May he also
have mercy on we who are of the
gentler sex. We need it.
In the beginning, Peaceand
Harmonyand goodwill. Unknown
was the clash of sword, the harsh
chord of dispute. Even the pangs
of hunger, the shadow of pesti pestilence,
lence, pestilence, were as strangers, uninvited
and unwelcome.
V v ? r P 1 18 of ths earth
sauntered Adam I, newly created
monarch of all things terrestrial.
A good ruler and a wise one, be beloved
loved beloved of his subjects, acclaimed
and feasted, welcomed as none
had ever been before.
But somehow, deep down in the
heart of Adam, all was not well.
There was a feeling, not pain nor
hunger, perhaps emptiness, a new
feeling that would not be satisfied
that could not be denied. And
the smiles faded from the face Os
Adam, sore troubled were his sub subjects,
jects, subjects, and they hid themselves
from his sight.
For Adam had been too happy,
too carefree. He wanted trouble.
He got it.
For it came to pass that Adam
fell into a deep sleepa sleep
that lasted many hoursand when
he awoke all was distinctly not
well. In his side was an acheno
imaginary ache this time. A dull
throbbing ache that seemed to
rend his very soul in twain.
Cautiously and with many
groans he touched the spot be behold!
hold! behold! a rib was gone, gone, van vanishsed
ishsed vanishsed into thin air. A good, de dependable
pendable dependable rib it was, certainly not
the kind of rib to turn the traitor
it proved to be.
Then a vision unfolded itself be before
fore before himthe lost riblooking as
no rib should ever look. And in
time acting as no rib should ever
act.
So it was that peace on earth
became a myththat the clash of
sword, the harsh note of discord,
came into beingand with them
wars and rumors of wars.
Henceforth the days of Adam
were made miserableeven unto
the washing of dishes.
Then did his subjects lift up
their voices and weepthe de degradation
gradation degradation of man was begun, wo woman
man woman had come into the world.
So it is written that peace was

EDDIES CAFE
JUST OFF CAMPUS
Regular Meals and Board
STATIONERY SCHOOL SUPPLIES
WE DELIVER THE GOODS
Phone in Your Order-Call 9115
- : :
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J.W. McCOLLUM AND CO.
The Rexall Store South Side Square

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR

lost, even unto the days of Mr.
Kellogg.
Its a worthy tradition you have
here, this friendly hello among
the fellows.
Its a beautiful tradition to a
newcomersymbolic of the won wonderful
derful wonderful spirit of democracy which
made possible. this great institu institution.
tion. institution. Keep it thus, my friends friendskeep
keep friendskeep it near your heart, even
sacred.
For deep down we are all
brothers in spirita cheery nod,
and a smile never cost a man a
friendbut many a cloud has been
lifted and many a burden has been
made easier to bear by just hel hello.
lo. hello.
Youre missing a priceless side
of life if youre snobbyand may maybe
be maybe you're causing little stabs of
pain to someone who wants to be
friendlysomeone who is warm
and living and humanwho has
never harmed youjust wants to
live tradition with "hello.
And lets dont wait for the
other fellowmaybe he hasnt
learnedmaybe he is younger and
hesitantbut grin and hello
and when you see the flash of his,
smile, isnt it a wonderful fecjf fecjfing!
ing! fecjfing! M
Methinks it is an that
blows nobody faith
have you of late been down to the
flats ? Theres something new
there and it's vibrant and power powerful,
ful, powerful, a great, beautiful machine.
Its leashed force straining at its
bondsanxious to test the mettle
of its silken steel strength.
Its many years gone since you
have seen the like of it, the po potential
tential potential possibilities of it, this Ga Gator
tor Gator team, hard, clean and swift.
And the man at the helm is the \
man you would want to see guid-1
ing his mighty forcea part of
his team, himself hard and clean,
a fighter.
Together for the future of Flor- ]
idamay they sweep on and on,
ever crowned in glorious victory.
To the new President a feeble
effort at greetingwe say feeble
because the limited expressions of
which we as mortals are capable
can never hope to reveal the
boundless joy, the feeling of secur security
ity security and of trust, which comes to us
when we reflect upon the future
course of our University under his
guidance.
We are highly honored, yet we
are made to feel as,, .a lifelong
friend,! to look upon him aa- an
older brother. Truly it shall be
written of him: He has lived
worthily and well in all things.
Thus in greeting a pledge to live,
even as his example, a true man
of Florida.
Another week has passed the
season of the higira is at hand.
Northward and westward they
trek in twos and threes. Some Somewhere
where Somewhere ahead lies the goal, the
; promised land where milk and
honey and soft soap floweth free freely
ly- freely
In high hope and full of spirit
do they migratein every heart
much thought of love and boloney
and mush.
Ah, Tallahassee, what hast thou
done to our youth ? Must Adams
martyred life have been lived in
vain?
For the benefit of you men who
first find yourself deprived of the
sheltering cloister of the home,
of the protecting ties of the apron apronstring,
string, apronstring, and who are ascyet new
to the ways of the world, we would
like to suggest letter forms which
we are sure will be very appro appropriate:
priate: appropriate:
1. To be used in writing ones
fond and doting parents:
Dear Folks:-
I regret very much to inform
you that I am sinkingPlease
send me a shipat once.
Your dutiful son,
Horatio.
P-. S. You see I have to buy some
more books.
2. To be used in writing ac acquaintances:
quaintances: acquaintances:
Dear Mary:
I am enrolled in college, so as I
have nothing to do I will write
you a few lines. As I have noth nothing
ing nothing to say I will close.
Yrs. afftny
John.

Dean Matherly Is
Principal Speaker
At Rotary Luncheon
Walter J. Matherly, dean of the
College of Commerce and Jour Journalism
nalism Journalism at the University, was the
principal speaker at the Rotary
club luncheon Tuesday at the
White House hotel. Dean Math Matherly
erly Matherly spoke on the Golden Age of
the Ordinary Man.
Greece had its age of philoso philosophers,
phers, philosophers, Rome its age of emperors,
France its age of Napoleon, and
most every country its age of des despots,
pots, despots, but America now has its age
of the ordinary man, he said.
When Lincoln said all men are
created equal, he did not mean
morally equal, nor mentally equal,
but politically equal. Every man
is eligible to hold the highest of office
fice office in the land, he asserted.
Since then the ordinary man
has received tremendous atten attention.
tion. attention. Politicians cater to the vote
of the ordinary man. The ordinary
man is the center of American
literature. Novel writers cater to
him. In business the ordinary man
has received attention.
Fortunes have been made on
the commodities for the ordinary
man, he said. And the ordi-
man is now the center of
(American civilization. The age of
the ordinary man is an age of
great wealth.
America which has one-sixth
of the population of the world and
one-seventh of the landed area,
produces one-half of the coal, cop copper,,
per,, copper,, cotton and other products in
the world.
We would have more extra-or extra-ordinary
dinary extra-ordinary young men of independent
means enter the ministry and the
teaching profession. We should
have more enter politics, he as asserted.
serted. asserted. Wealth is a means, not
an endwe should learn that.
DUCKWALL HEADS LAPACHE
Bill Duckwall was elected presi president
dent president of the LApache Dance club
at a meeting held last Monday
night at the Pi K. A. house. The
other officers chosen were: Buck
Frederick, introducer, and Cyril
Pogue, secretary and treasurer. It
was the first regular meeting of
the club this year.
Curry Witt, the retiring presi president,
dent, president, presided during the election
of officers. According to the new
president the L'Apache club will
probably give one large dance and)
several breakfast dances .during
the coming year. It is likely that
the large dance will be given dur during
ing during the house-party week in
April, and that the breakfast
dances will come in February and
April.
The list of LApache pledges in include
clude include Bill Bond, Benny Edmonson,
Royal Untriener, Jimmy Nolan,
Johnny Nichols, Art Nichols,
Braxton Leddy, Larry Walrath,
Jack Williams, Perry Bryan, Jus
Clemons, Bob Mathis, Billy Wat Watson,
son, Watson, Tom Perry, J. P. Harlee, Bob
McWater, Herman Price, and Joe
Hill.
THE SUCCESS FAMILY
The father of success is WORK.
The mother of success is AMBI AMBITION.
TION. AMBITION. The oldest son is COM COMMON
MON COMMON SENSE, and some of the
other boys are STABILITY,
PRESERVERANCE, HONESTY,
THOROUGHNESS, FORESIGHT,
ENTHUSIASM, and CO-OPERA CO-OPERATION.
TION. CO-OPERATION. The oldest daughter vik
CHARACTER. Some of the sis sisters
ters sisters are CHEERFULNESS, LOY LOYALTY,
ALTY, LOYALTY, COURTESY, CARE,
ECONOMY, SINCERITY, and
HARMONY. The baby is OPPOR OPPORTUNITY.
TUNITY. OPPORTUNITY. Get acquainted with
the OLD MAN, and you will be
able to get along pretty well with
all the rest of the family.(Ga.
Tech. T Book).
University of Michigan football
players were presented with rings
upon graduation last year. These
were meant, no doubt, to supple supplement
ment supplement those under the eyes.
Lyric Theatre
Program Next Week
10c AND 25c
MONDAY
MARY PHILBEN
in
SURRENDER
TUESDAY TUESDAYTHE
THE TUESDAYTHE LEOPARD LADY
With
JACQUELINE LOGAN
WEDNESDAY WEDNESDAYLAST
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EMIL JANNINGS
THURSDAY THURSDAYHAROLD
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FRIDAY FRIDAYLEGION
LEGION FRIDAYLEGION OF THE
CONDEMNED
With
Fay Wray and Gary
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SATURDAY SATURDAYREX
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ir OWBOYKH>

COMPLETE REGISTRATION
FIGURES SHOW BIG GAIN
(Continued from page One)
top the list, while the second
year men with 536, set what is
believed to be a new record for
sophomore enrollment, this is prob probably
ably probably the smallest ratio which has
ever existed between first and sec second
ond second year men; it speaks well for
the school that so large a percent percentage
age percentage of last years men should re return.
turn. return. The junior class boasts 295
members while the most erudite
class brings up with 149. This
does not include the College of
Law. Os the students engaged in
studying for the learned profes profession,
sion, profession, 91 are in their first year,
80 are preparing for graduation,
while the junior class brings up at
the end with but 62. That the
junior class should be the small smallest
est smallest of the three is very unusual.
The graduates with 76 and spe special
cial special students for a count of 47,
make up the total of 2105.
The official report in regard to
the numbers in the respective
branches of their colleges, accord according
ing according to classes, is as follows:
College of Arts and Sciences:
Freshmen A. 8., 90; B. S., 144;
pre-medical, 69; sophomore A. 8.,
88; B. S., 49; pre medical, 47;,
junior A. 8., 28; B. S., 33; senior!
A. 8., 15; B. S., 16; special stu-!
dents, 1. Total: 5&).
College of Agriculture: Fresh-j
men, 55; sophomores, 36; juniors,
26, and seniors, 15; special stu students,
dents, students, 14. Total: 146.
College of Engineering and Ar Architecture:
chitecture: Architecture: (Engineering) fresh freshman,
man, freshman, 90; sophomore chemical en engineer,
gineer, engineer, 5; junior chemical engi engineer,
neer, engineer, 7; senior chemical engineer,
3; sophomore electrical engineer,
30; junior electrical engineer, 24;
senior electrical engineer, 9; soph sophomore
omore sophomore civil engineer, 33; junior
civil engineer, 22; senior civil en engineer,
gineer, engineer, 18; sophomore mechanical
engineer, 9; junior mechanical en engineer,
gineer, engineer, 12; senior mechanical en engineer,
gineer, engineer, 4; specials, 9. Total in en engineering
gineering engineering division: 275. (Architec (Architecture)
ture) (Architecture) freshman, 17; sophomore,
16; junior, 17; senior, 9; specials,
5. Total in architecture, 64; total
in college, 339.
College of Law: freshman, 91;
junior, 62; senior, 80.
Teachers College: freshman,
137; sophomore, 88; junior, 50;
senior, 25; specials, 6; total, 306.
College of Pharmacy: freshman,
28; sophomore, 23; junior, 9; seni senior,
or, senior, 2.
College of Commerce and Journ Journalism:
alism: Journalism: freshman business adminis administration,
tration, administration, 128; journalism, 14; spec-i
ial administration, 1; sophomore j
business administration, 101; jour-
nalism, 11; junior business admin-1

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Professor Jackson
Speaks For Leigh
Chemical Society
Dr. T. V. Jackson, associate
professor of chemistry, was the
principal speaker at the recent
! meeting of the Leigh Chemical
Society and gave a very interest interesting
ing interesting and instructive account of his
visit to the potash mines of Strass Strassfurt,
furt, Strassfurt, Germany. During the past
summer, Dr. Jackson made an ex extensive
tensive extensive tour of Europe visiting in institutions
stitutions institutions of higher learning,
chemical plants, and other places
of interest in England, Scotland,
Holland, France, Germany, Aus Austria,
tria, Austria, Switzerland and Italy.
1 The Strassfurt deposit is unique
in that it is one of the few sources
of potassium sals for use in agri agriculture
culture agriculture and for the manufacture
of other potassium compounds.
For many years the mines were
worked only for common salt,
while the potassium salts were dis discarded
carded discarded as worthless. Leibig, about
1840, called attention to the value
of potassium salts in fertilizers,
and this made potassium salts of
prime importance at Stassfurt,
while common salt is secondary.
Following the address the offi officers
cers officers for the present year were
elected. They are as follows:
President F. G. Bratley.
Vice PresidentWesley Pardue.
Secretary and Treasurer H. F.
Currie.
ReporterMack Humphrey.
George Washington University,
named for the Father of our coun country,
try, country, carries out the traditional
story told in connection with his
boyhood days in the naming of its
student publications. The student
newspaper is known as The Uni University
versity University Hatchet. and the year
book is called The Cherry Tree.
istration, 57; soc. administration,
1; journalism, 9; senior business
administration, 30; journalism, 3;
specials in journalism, 3; in busi business
ness business administration, 9. Total, 367.
Graduates, 76.
Total, less duplicates, 2105.

WE HANDLE
Hardware, Sporting Goods,
Fishing Tackle
THE THOMAS CO.
WEST SIDE SQUARE PHONE 22
- -- 1 |

SUNDAY. SEPTEMBER SO, 1928

PI D .E. TO RECEIVE PLEDGES
Initiation of pledges to Pi Delta
Epsilon will be held next Thursday
night, October 4, at 7:30 All ok*
men are -requested to be at the
meeting and be on time.
%
I
%
An old Chinese
proverb reads:
"One look is worth a
thousand words.
When we start to tell
you about our new
Fall Braeburns, we wewell,
well, wewell, theres the
proverb in plain
Chinese.
Silver Bines
Silver Browns
Many new dark
colorings
$35 $45
Burkhims
OF COURSE
I



SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 1028.

School To Get
New Infirmary
Says Weaver
Will be in Operation Next
Year if Board Passes
Plans
TO COS'T $7,500
Latest Innovations And
Equipment Features
Os Building
Preliminary plans are being
drawn for a new and modern in infirmary
firmary infirmary to be built on the campus
of the University of Florida, ac according
cording according to announcement today
from Rudolph Weaver, state archi architect
tect architect and director of the Universi Universitys
tys Universitys school of architecture. The
cost of the new building is esti-,
mated at 375,000.
Mr. Weaver expects to have the
plans ready for presentation to
the State Board of Control at its
November meeting in order that
the structure may be put into
operation by the time the 1929-30
session gets underway.
The present infirmary has long
been inadequate for the growing
institution, and the new building
will only be the first unit of a
project, the total cost of which
Will be 3125,000.
Os fire-proof construction and
two to three stories in height, the
infirmary will be of Tudor-Gothic
architecture, conforming to the
general type of building which
Mr. Weaver has already planned
on the campuses of the Universi University
ty University and the Florida State College
for Women.
! Exact specification and estima estimations
tions estimations of the capacity of the build building
ing building are not yet available. How However,
ever, However, it will embody the latest in innovations
novations innovations in this type of building
and, when completed, will furnish
the best possible protection to
the health of the students.
Dean Tolbert Must
Solve Many Knotty
Problems of Frosh
Dean. I have lost a five-dollar
bin.
This was the hurried expression
erf a somewhat rural looking fresh freshman
man freshman as he burst into Dean Tol Tolberts
berts Tolberts office last Thursday. His
excited maimer and the earnest earnestness
ness earnestness with which he told his story,
left the impression that his entire
capital was represented in that
lone five dollars. He told a touch touching
ing touching story of family sacrifices in
order that he might come to col collegeand
legeand collegeand now he had lost his sav savings.
ings. savings. The dean was effected deep deeply;
ly; deeply; he promised to do all in his
power to recover the money.
He ran a notice of the loss in
Fridays bulletin. Nothing more
was heard of it until Monday when
an employee in the auditor's office
notified Dean Tolbert that he had
found the five dollars, and sent it
over to him. The dean sent word
to the freshman. When the money
was handed to him he could "not
conceal his glad surprise; and with
fervent sincerity ne said that the
university was not such a bad
{dace to go to school after all.
This tale recalls a similar story
at Washington and Lee; it has
been tol dthere so long that now it
is one of the traditions of the
school. The boast that once a stu student
dent student lost a five-dollar bill in the
book store. A classmate saw the
bill on the floor, picked it up, and
put it on the counter, placing a
weight over it. Two days later the
boy who had lost the money came
back to the store. He found his five
dollars still on the counter.
Hops Phiel Editor
Humorous Magazine
Hops Phiel. past associate edi editor
tor editor of the Blue Gator, was ap appointed
pointed appointed editor-in-chief of the hu humorous
morous humorous publication for the com coming
ing coming year, according to informa information
tion information received yesterday. Durward
Hawkins also an associate editor
last year was selected managing
editor. Frank Harris of last years
business staff, is business mana manager.
ger. manager.
According to announcement by
Bill Duckwall, circulation mana manager,
ger, manager, a silver loving cup will be
give.i to the fraternity that has
the best percentage of men sub subscribing
scribing subscribing to the Blue Gator. An
extensive subscription campaign
will be started soon and the staff
is anxious that everyone sub subscribe.
scribe. subscribe.
The first number of the Blue
Gator will be published for the
Homecoming game, and will be
known as the Homecoming edition.
The staff has had several meet meetings
ings meetings and material for the coming
number is due anytime.
NOTICE
All men who live off campus
and wish to have the Alligator
mailed to them, turn in addresses
to Bob Mathis at the Sigma Nu
house. Men who have not been
getting the Gator and who do not
wish it mailed, do the same.

Alumni Note*
B. C. Thomal
Note: The following are brief
notes taken from the records of
the office of the secretary of the
Alumni association. At the pres present
ent present time there are some three
thousand persons eligible to call
themselves Florida alumni. No
doubt the following will be of in interest
terest interest to many members of the
student body:
f Frank B. Dowling, LL. B, 2B,
is now practicing law in Miami.
Frank has hung out his shingle,
and is anxious to become a life
member of the Alumni associa association.
tion. association.
Olin E. Watts, J. D., 2B, who
will be remembered as vice-presi vice-president
dent vice-president of the student body in 1925-
26, is now practicing law in Jack Jacksonville.
sonville. Jacksonville. Olin is anxious to keep
in close touch with his alma
mater.
Had a letter from Mell Wilson
the other day. Mell says he
hopes to be back for the Auburn
game were all looking for him.
Whod a thought that Bob
Hodges, LL. B, 27, would be mar married
ried married so soon. Bob has been prac practicing
ticing practicing law in Orlando since he
graduated, but he found time
enough to step off last summer,
and nobody knew a thing about it
until it was all over.
Austin Chadwick, LL. B, 23,
was on the campus last week.
Florida sent an engineer clear
out to Arizona. W. J. Farrell, B.
S. C. E., 27, is engineering on
the Coolidge dam, San Carlos,
Ariz.
G. M. Budd, LL. B, 27, is now
a practicing attorney of the Miami I
bar. Were looking for Garland
back this Homecoming Day. I
C. Y. Byrd, LL. B, 23, is living,
at Delray Beach, where he has
hung out his shingle.
Could go on ad infinitum, but
maybe wed better save some for
next w^eek.
Literary Society
Elects Officers
To Fill Vacancies
The election of Dixie Beggs as
president, and Bill Herin, vice vicepresident,
president, vicepresident, to fill vacancies of stu students
dents students not back this year, was the
main business conducted at the
meeting of the Farr Literary so society
ciety society last Monday.
Rats Johnny Houck and Art
Fowler rendered a couple of vocal
duets that proved them quite a
team of entertainers and the meet meeting
ing meeting then adjourned for refresh refreshments.
ments. refreshments.
If youll take the time to thumb
through the Seminole for 1912
you will find the first record of
Farr Lit. The organization was
founded on November 28, 1911, ini
honor of Dr. James M. Farr, vice-1
president of the University and
head of it's English department. I
There are many prominent names
on the roster of its members and;
the list of its officers for the years
gone by. Professor C. A. Robert-j
son was once a leading light in the'
society, and Captain Everett M. i
Yon was undoubtedly the best ser-,
geant-at-arms that the society j
ever had. Many others have help-J
ed to carry forward the aims of;
the organization, and its purposes!
today are not changed. To keep
in touch with the literary world,
to discuss every day social and
economic problems, to foster pub public
lic public speaking, these are the pur purposes
poses purposes of the Farr Literary society.
Membership is open to all arts and
science college men, and Fresh Freshmen
men Freshmen are especially invited to join.
Dr. Farr will be present at the
next meeting and is sure to have (
something of interest for the so society.
ciety. society.
NATURAL QUESTION
Little LucyAuntine, why do
you put powder on your face?
Aunt To make me pretty, dear.
LucyThen why doesnt it?
Sydney Bulletin.

MEET YOUR FRIENDS
-AT
Downtown Headquarters lor
College Men
GAINESVILLE FURNITURE CO.
y-- f
Victrolas and Records. New Records
Every Friday
PHONE 86

FROSH PHOTOS
ARE DUE SOON
t Many Students Trying Out
For Seminole
Staff
Members of the Freshman class
are to begin having their pictures
taken for the Seminole this week.
Each man will receive a card
telling him the date on which he
is to report to Marables studio,
the photographers for this years
Seminole. Upper classmen will
receive notifications later, accord according
ing according to announcements of last
week.
More contestants turned out
this year for the Seminole thats
ever before, says H. D. Aiken, ed editor-in-chief.
itor-in-chief. editor-in-chief. Mabry Carlton, man managing
aging managing editor and H. C. Farns Farnsworth,
worth, Farnsworth, business manager, have
closed the contract for printing
with the Record of St. Augustine.
.Tahn & Ollier of Chicago will do
the engraving.
If it is necessary prints for cuts
in this year's Seminole may be
made from negatives of the Semi Seminole
nole Seminole of last year. A definite day
will be announced later as to when
all write up must be in.
Marables studio is the official
photographer and all pictures
must be taken there.
THETA CHI FRATERNITY
TO GIVE DINNER DANCE
Tau Chapter of Theta Chi fra fraternity
ternity fraternity will give a dinner and
dance Friday, Oct. 5, in honor of
their new pledges. Supper will be
i served to the-freshmen and their
I guests at 8 oclock in the new din dinging
ging dinging room and following this, danc dancing
ing dancing will be enjoyed in the ball
i room of the Theta Chi house on
University avenue. The guest list
will be announced later.
COUNCIL ELECTS COLLIER
MEMBER OF CHEER SQUAD
Electing E. T. Buck Collier as a
fnember of the Varsity cheer lead leading
ing leading squad, the Executive Council
last Tuesday night at a special
meeting filled the vacancy caused
by the non-returning of one of the
cheer leaders elected last spring.
Mr. Collier is a graduate of
Wauchula High school, and is a
Senior in the Engineering College.
FROM THE FINALS
The following answers to ex examination
amination examination questions were collected
by the New York Mail:
Poise is the way a Dutchman
says boys.
Equinox is a wild animal that
lives in the Arctic.
King Arthurs Round Table was
written by the author of Ten
Nights in a Bar Room.
Copernicus invented the cornu cornucopia.
copia. cornucopia.
I Etiquette teaches us how to be
| polite without trying to remember
to be.
I In the stone age all men were
' ossified.
I The climax of a story is where
it says it is to be continued,
j Buttress is a butlers wife.
' A gulf is a dent in a continent.
I Conservation means doing with without
out without things we need.
If Ponce de Leon hadnt died be before
fore before he found the fountain of
youth, he wouldnt have died.
Chicago Mother: And now, my
dear, go in and shoot father good
night.Cumberland Collegian.
A total of 325,000,000 was earn earned
ed earned last year by students in 48
colleges and universities in the
United States. Os the entire en enrollment
rollment enrollment in the institutions thirty thirtynine
nine thirtynine per cent were partially or
wholly self-supporting. Os stu students
dents students in co-educational institu institutions,
tions, institutions, forty-four per cent are work working
ing working their way. A thifd of the stu students
dents students in mens colleges and a sixth
of the students in womens col colleges
leges colleges are earning at least a part
of their expenses. Os the 60 col colleges
leges colleges embraced in the survey only
twenty-seven reported no students
earnings during the school year.

BALLOT
American College Straw Vote conducted by all
college dailies and College Humor on two Presiden Presidential
tial Presidential Candidates. All college students regardless ot
age are eligible to vote. Returns on vote will be
published in The Alligator November Ist.
Mark this ballot and tear it out and drop it in
ballot boxes at Language Hall immediately.
Herbert Hoover
Republican candidate
A1 Smith
Democratic candidate
MARK X AFTER ONE ONLY
I
Mark this ballot at once. All votes will be col collected
lected collected and counted October 5, 1928.

Six Fraternities Os
University Announce
List of New Pledges
Owing to a mistake, part of the
list of fraternity pledge was lost
and were not printed in last weeks
Alligator. This list completes the
pledges as far as the staff has
been able to determine.
They are:
Iheta Chi Pledges: Pete Clyatt,
Lakeland; Charles Forum, Pensa Pensacola,
cola, Pensacola, Sam Wampler, Miami; Jack
Robinson, Blythesville, Arkansas;
Charles Powell, Ft. Myers, Jack
Parker, Sebring; Bill Bauer, Quin Quincy;
cy; Quincy; Felton Scott, Winter Haven;
Dick Warren, Gainesville; Bob
Filson, Sarasota; Harold Malborg,
Deland; Junior Peacock, Miami;
Sam Pendergrass, Macon. Ga.;
Ralph McCall, Jasper; Alger Fish Fisher,
er, Fisher, Tampa; Richard Van Brunt,
Tallahassee; Robert Bosuvick,
Jacksonville; Thomas Bostwick,
Jacksonville.
Kappa Sigma Pledges: Bob Get Getchell,
chell, Getchell, St. Augustine; Charles Mast Masters,
ers, Masters, St. Augustine; Robert Fokes,
Lake City; Charles Page, Tallahas Tallahassee;
see; Tallahassee; Bill Rhea, Umatilla; Bill Cobb,
West Palm Beach; I. L. Baker, Del Delray;
ray; Delray; Oscar Pt\son, Green Cove
Springs; Bascom Hobbs, Panama
City; Johnny Fiske, Cocoa; Marvin
Sheppard, Jacksonville; James
Lyon, Caribou, Maine; Gerald Mac
Cubrey, Caribou, Maine.
Phi Beta Delta pledges: Leo'
Beldner, Miami; Arthur Freehling,
Montgomery; William; Lipschftz,
Leesburg; Julian Weinstein, St.
Augustine; Eddie Cohen, Jackson Jacksonville;
ville; Jacksonville; Jeo Wernicoff, Jacksonville;
Harold Schwartz, Jacksonville;
George Mehltr|m, Jacksonville;
Abe Horovitz, Jacksonville; Leon
Schwartz, Tampa; Jud Fisher, New
York City; Ai Burger, New York
City; Harold Finkelstein, Flushing,
N. Y.; Simeon Heller, Flushing, N.
Y.; Leon Goldman, Ocala.
Pi Kappa Phi pledges: Ralph
Sanford, Quincy; Bob Highleyman,
Sanford; Marion Wagner, Sanford;
John Andrews, Jacksonville; Fred
Pearce, Tampa; Ray Renfroe,
Tampa; David Frye, Tampa; Gene
Permenter, Jacksonville; James
Schrigley, Lake Wales; Hal Price,

UNIVERSITY BOOK STORE
Headquarters (or Students
Text Books and Supplies
Candies, Cold Drinks
AGENTS FOR REMINGTON
TYPEWRITERS
Eversharp Pencils and Wahl Pens
Basement of Language Hall
OTTO F. STOCK
Tailoring-
Dry Cleaning and Dyeing
N. Side Square Phone 354
________

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR

Two Students Resign
On Account of Storm
Only two students have with withdrawn
drawn withdrawn from the universiay on ac account
count account of the recent hurricanne that
swept the state, according to an
announcement made by K. H. Gra Graham,
ham, Graham, business manager of the Uni University
versity University of Florida.
Mr. Graham stated tbat the
number of students who have bad
to leave was smaller than antici anticipated.
pated. anticipated. Both students were from
the Palm Beach district, where
hundreds were killed or injured,
and many left destitute of homes.
NO INITIATIONS BETWEEN
HALVES OF MERCER GAME
Ribbon Society initiations be between
tween between the halves of the Homecom Homecoming
ing Homecoming game will not he held here hereafter,
after, hereafter, it was decided at the initial
meeting of Blue Key society last
Thursday night. This comes as a
result of complaints made by some
of the spectators at last years ini initiation,
tiation, initiation, it was said.
Plans for the annual Homecom Homecoming
ing Homecoming celebration sponsored by Bhie
Key will soon be underway. An
interesting Homecoming day pro program
gram program is the aim qt the society
and a large attendance is antici anticipated.
pated. anticipated.
Dr. Tigert was present at the
first meeting of the 'society.
Gainesville, Rayford McCormick,
Gainesville; Harvey Filsberry, Win Winona;
ona; Winona; Henry Swoope, New Smyrna.
Phi Alpha Epsilon pledges: Fred
Rowan, Fort Pierce; Bill Dawkins,
Bradenton; Frank .Anderson,
Bradenton; Frank Frazier, West
Palm Beach; Horace Prinr, West
Palm Beach; Harry Dyey Stuart;
Richard Everts, Lake Worth.
Alpha Gamma Rho pledges: Carl
T. Price, Umatula; Bass Close.
Wauchula; Ed Collins, Bartow;
Orville Crozier, Ft. Pierce; Earl
Smith, Delray Beach; Bruce Al Albritton,
britton, Albritton, Mulberry; Paul Frierson,
New Port Richey; William Law Lawless,
less, Lawless, Lake Alfred; J. C. Cox. Jr.,
Lake Alfred; C. R. Watson. Chat Chattanooga,
tanooga, Chattanooga, Tennessee; R. L. Brooks,
Montreal, Canada; F. W. Pritchard,
Plant City; R. K. Wynn, Monte
Verde.

Military
Bill Dunkle
The bringing of the artillery
corps to the University of Florida,
and the arrival of four new officers
are the most important topics of
conversation among R. O. T. C.
circles.
The four additions to the R. O.
T. C. staff are: Captains C. S.
Alexander, E. T. Barso, Gilmer M.
Bell and J. F. Hepner.
Captain Alexander, from Ft. Sill,
Oklahoma, is senior artillery of officer
ficer officer and will direct that part of
the military deparment.
Captain Barco, a graduate of the
University of Florida, was ordepjd
here from Organized Reserve duty
at Altoona, Penna., His work here
will be with the artillery corps.
Captain Bell comes here from Ft.
Moultrie, S. C. He will instruct
freshmen of the infantry division.
Captain Hepner, of the artillery
corps, has just completed Organiz Organized
ed Organized Reserves duty at Cleveland,
Ohio.
All of these men are capable of officers
ficers officers and instructors, and the
University Military department is
indeed fortunate in securing their
services.
Major A. C .Tipton announces
that plans are being made for the
erection of stables and gun sheds,
and that contracts for these build buildings
ings buildings will probably be let sometime
within a month. This work is
under the supervision of Captain
C. C. Alexander, director of the
artillery unit of the local R. O. T.
C. The end of the first semester
is set as the approximate date for
the completion of the structures.
Although the horses will not be
brought to the campus until some sometime
time sometime next summer, the guns will
arrive as soon as temporary shelter
can be secured. This will take
place in a month or six weeks.
The artillery batteries are re receiving
ceiving receiving instruction in dismounted
formations, pending the arrival of
the guns. The first year work
will consist of the selection of gun
crews and training in the use of
the guns in position. Instruction
with the horses and mounted for formations
mations formations will be a part of the
second year work. The artillery
unit is attracting a good deal of
interest and this should increase
as the work progresses.
Physical examinations for the
R. O. T. C. has been completed,
and uniforms and equipment are
being issued. The physical exam examinations
inations examinations were made In a thorough
manner with as much speed as
the large numbers would permit.
The entire battalion should be
fully furnished with all necessary

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equipment by the end of this week.
When these essentials have been
completed, the military department
will settle down to a regular
routine without delay.
According to Major A. C. Tipton
the University of Florida and Au Auburn
burn Auburn University are the only uni universities
versities universities id the South which have
artillery units connected with R. O.
T. C. battalions. This speaks well
for the standard of training at
Florida.
Captain J. M. Morris, infantry
instructor, has been compelled to
be absent, owing to the illness of
his father.
Major Tipton suggests that all
freshmen who have not completed
R. O. T. C. registration should do
so at once. To fail in this is to
have drill cuts checked against
you.
MISS CRAIG TO MANAGE
CATALOGUE DEPARTMENT
Owing to a leave of absence
granted to Miss Charlotte Newton
of the library staff, Miss Jane A.
Craig of the University of Illinois
will be in charge of the catalogue
department this year. Miss New Newton
ton Newton is studying for her masters
degree at the University of Illi Illinois.
nois. Illinois.

GOLDSMITH I
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PAGE THREE

F Book Due
By October 25
Directory -of Student Body
In Second Edition
Os Book
Work on the second number of
the F book for this year is well
under way, according to members
of the staff. Publication will
probably be made by the second
week in October.
It will be the aim of the staff
to be able to distribute copies of
the second number, which will be
a directory of the student Ixxiy
and faculty, in main, by Octo October
ber October 25.
Sealed bids are being received
for the publication of the next
number of the F book and the
contract wiil be let within a short
time.
Owing to an unavoidable delay
in the publciation work, copies
could not be had as soon as de desired,
sired, desired, but the distribution of this
edition is practically complete.
The staff of the "F book wishes
to thank the Student Body for
its cooperation in the distribu distribution
tion distribution of the first number.



PAGE FOUR

Finals Held in
Interfraternity
Swimming Events
Outstanding In Thursdays In Interfratemity
terfratemity Interfratemity finals was the versa versatile
tile versatile and powerful Ed Romph, S. A.
E. aquatic satilite, who took first
place in the 50 yard free stroke
and first place in the diving event
and was a bulwark in the S. A. E.
relay team which competed at
Glenn Springs.
The exceptional work of Carter,
A. T. O. merman, was rewarded
time after time by the crowd, in
the three events in which he took
part, for his recognized ability
that can be approached only by a
very few trained swimmers. His
astonishingly swift swimming in
the relay which brought the A. T.
O. team up from seventh place to
fourth place at the end made the
many spectators wonder what kind
of a god was in their midst.
Taking the first event of the
afternoon, the S. A. E, frat was
spurred to victories in the second,
sixth and seventh events, taking
second place in the fourth event,
and thereby carrying all before
them to cop the honors in the first
Intramural sport on the schedule
for this year. Their total number
of points for the day amounted to
the respectable figure of 25. Be Besides
sides Besides Romph, Judy took first in
the 50 yard breast stroke, and
Reeder third in the 50 yard back
stroke.
Williams placed first for the
Sigma Nus in the 50 yard back
stroke, and Frazier fourth in the
diving. French and Hamilton took
second and third in the 50 yard
breast stroke and the 100 yard free
stroke, respectively. The Sigma
Nu relay team was second, win winning
ning winning the honor of second berth in
the tournament. Their total score
was 17 points.
Next to Carter on the A. T. O.
team was Edsell who took first
in the 20 free stroke, the team
scoring third with 15 counters.
Fourth in the meet was the Del Delta
ta Delta Tau Delta fraternity and this
team showed a score of 14 points
at the fall of the curtain. Houri Hourihan
han Hourihan and Whiteside came out with
some very good form and they
were not ashamed to let people
know what good swimmers they
were for their records speak for
them when it is known that White Whiteside
side Whiteside took second in both the 50
yhrd breast stroke and the diving
events, and Hourihan placed sec second
ond second in the 100 yard free stroke.
Jordan came out well in the 220
yard free stroke when he snatched
third in the run off.
The S. P. E. fraternity came next
in the tourney with Brown and
Hall displaying qualities th.-t
would be hard to beat anywhere.
Brown was one of the leaders in
the 50 yard breast stroke and Hall
was an easy second for the 50 yard
back stroke, also placing in the
50 yard free stroke.
Mike Knight snatched off third
in the difficult diving competition
and was on the relay team with
his brother, both showing fast
work in this thrilling fray. Those
who saw the event went back to
the campus to tell their friends of
the dramatic fashion in which
Mike lost fourth place to Carter
by a bare quarter of a foot.
Laorin Sampayrac got a fourth
place in the 50 yard free stroke foi
the Phi Delta Theta fraternity with
Rice, Pepper and Houser filling in
for the days running.
The Alpha Deltas had Fenton
and Anderson to support their
cause, which was done with credit.
The Sigma Chi fraternity had
able representation by Ralph Ket Kettler
tler Kettler and Reynolds.
Manager Jack Hall made the
statement in the course of events
at Glenn Springs Thursday after afternoon
noon afternoon that the material that was
out for the interfraternity swim
would be equal if not some degree
better than any of the well-known
universities in other sections of
the country, namely, northern and
eastern sections. There was one
insurmountable difficulty in the
way of shaping a championship
team in the sport at Florida and
that was the lack of a pool for
regular and convenient training.
At the University of Maryland
this year there will be no captain
of the football team until after the
schedule is completed. The coach
will appoint a man as temporary
coach before each game, and at
the end of the season the team
will elect the captain purely as
an honor. This action was taken
on account of thevinfluence of fra fraternity
ternity fraternity politics. i

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THE SPORT
SCREEN
By DILLON GRAHAM
1 it
With the opening of the 192 S
grid season only a week hence it
seems the logical time to do a lit little
tle little plain and fancy prognosticating
and how! Coach Charley Bach Bachman,
man, Bachman, making his debut on the
Gator campus has had his gridders
stepping at a fast pace since early
September, and now at the close
of the fourth week of practice the
varsity is fast shaping into an out outfit
fit outfit of championship proportions.
The squad, boasting a wealth
of material as has never been
seen on the varsity here before,
must undergo a change from
the style of play they have
been accustomed to during the
past several years of Sebrlngs
regime. Bachmans attack
calls for a much faster timing
and co-operation than did that
employed by Sebring.
For the first time in the history
of the school, Florida will have re reserves
serves reserves who cam be counted on to
go into the breach and fill the first
string players post in a creditable
fashion. Bachman has two or
more candidates for each position
who are very nearly equal in abili ability,
ty, ability, and therefore the competition
is necessarily keen.
The fight for posts has done
much to bolster the spirit of
the team and a view of the
players at their work-outs will
impress upon the most casual
observer the fact that the Gat Gators
ors Gators have the old spiritthe
it that will carry them to
victory.
Some writers like to write in a
pessimistic vein even though they
personally feel optimistic, and
others vise versa. This writer, how however,
ever, however, feels optimistic and gets a
kick out of saying so. Neverthe Nevertheless
less Nevertheless although everything seems to
be of a rosy hue now, three weeks
hence the situation may be chaotic.
Players who look good in practice
may be of the flat-tire variety in
the regular game tilts.
The writer expounds the con conclusion
clusion conclusion that the Gators will
cop eight of their nine games.
This theory is made on the
condition that ineligibilities or
injuries do not rob Bachman
of his important machine cogs.
Minus even a few of his valu valuable
able valuable performers, Bachmans
outfit may degenerate from a
powerful eleven to only
a mediocre team
However, considering the seni seniors
ors seniors graduated last year, the num number
ber number of sophomores on the team, and
especially on the line, the season
should be counted a success it
Bachman wins six of his nine
games. A new coach cannot be
expected to jump into a school,
pounce upon grid candidates and
in a few short weeks whip them
into a title-winning aggregation,
especially when he has to wean
them from their former style of
play.
Georgia Is our pick jus the
squjid which may stop the
Gators. Notice that the word
"may is used. The Bulldogs
are favored to whip the Flori Floridians
dians Floridians but these scrapping
Saurluns may rouse up on
their haunches and bite that
ugly look off Georgias bull bulldog.
dog. bulldog.
Tennessee also has a break in
that the game is played in Knox Knoxville
ville Knoxville and in much different weather
than that which the Gators will be
accustomed to on the Florida grid gridirons.
irons. gridirons. There is only a slight possi possibility
bility possibility that a break in the game
might give the Generals, Wolfpack
or Wildcats a victory. In con conclusion,
clusion, conclusion, our admonistion to the con conference
ference conference teams is to keep a watch watchful
ful watchful optic on Georgia Tech, Vandy,
Georgia, Alabama, Tennessee and
Florida. These should be the big
six at, the close of the conference
season.
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Football Captains
To Receive Awards
The captains of both the Varsity
and Freshmen football teams this
year will receive beautiful tro trophies.
phies. trophies. These prizes are being
given by Louie Burkim of Burk Burkhims
hims Burkhims clothing store. For several
years Mr. Burkbim has made it a
point to always award the Varsity
captains with some token.
The trophy for the Varsity cap captain,
tain, captain, Goof Bowyer, is a large
orange and blue blanket With the
word captain in the center of
it. The Freshmen captain who is
elected at the close of each sea season,
son, season, will receive an orange and
blue pillow top with the words
Freshman captain on it.
Intra-Mural Sports
Tuesday afternoon at 2 p. m. at
Glenn Springs the Dormitory Sec Sections
tions Sections and the Boarding-houses will
be out for their annual water fro frolic
lic frolic which is expected to surpass
everything that has been put over
in this Intramural sport by the
Dormitory League. Those who saw
the interfraternity meet last Tues Tuesday
day Tuesday and Thursday have some idea
of what is coming this week but,
it will still be something of a dif different
ferent different nature from the fraternity
outing because of the exceptional
enthusiasm shown for swimming
by the dormitory men.
Jack Hall stated last night that
the fraternities not only demon demonstrated
strated demonstrated marked spirit arid fine ath athletes
letes athletes but that they broke fbeir last
years record for the number of
frats taking part in the events and
set up a new standard of 17
which is seldom surpassed in
similar events at other universi universities.
ties. universities.
It has been the practice of the
Intermural Department to urge all
Boarding-houses to organize as a
unit of the department by turning
in a name for their house along
with the names of those who are
affiliated with the unit whether
they do or do not live in the house
but who have not and are not go going
ing going to take part with another lea league
gue league in a particular sport. During
this last week there were two
units thus formed; namely the
Mizell House at 214 Washington
street and the Cobb House at 1720
W. University avenue, with E. N.
Edris and Perry Miller as the re respective
spective respective managers.
ENGLISH VOTED
CLUB PRESIDENT
FIRST SEMESTER
Bernard English, editor of last
years Alligator, was elected pres president
ident president of John Marshall Debating
society last Monday night at the
first meeting of the year. Other
officers elected are: vice-president,
A. K. Gillis; secretary-treasurer,
H. N. Casebier; debating council
representative, Ed Miller; reporter,
A. E. Summers, Jr.; sergearit-at sergearit-atarms,
arms, sergearit-atarms, Hank Baynard; critic, Mab Mabry
ry Mabry Carlton.
Dean Trusler addressed the so society
ciety society on the value of the club to
Freshmen lawyers. Following this
W. M. Pepper explained the pur purpose
pose purpose of legal fraternities and their
position on the campus.
The next .meeting will be held
Monday night October 11 at 7 p.
m. in the Law College.

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MONDAY AND TUESDAY
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VITAPHONE ACTS
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Bennett twins
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DRINKSCIGARS DRUGS

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR

Atwood Addresses
Commerce Students
At Initial Meeting
Professor R. S. Atwood, a new
member of the faculty of the Col College
lege College of Commerce and Journalism,
pledged his support to the Com Commerce
merce Commerce club at its first meeting
last Monday night. Professors
Dolbeare, Wilson, Hurst and My Myers
ers Myers expressed their interest in the
dub in short informal talks. Gen General
eral General plans for the future were dis discussed
cussed discussed in a sort of get-together
meeting following the talks.
The club expects to start the
new year with a constructive and
interesting program, said Presi President
dent President Rozear in summing up the
future of the club. Every man
registered in the College of Com Commerce
merce Commerce and Journalism is eligible
and urged to attend the next
meeting, Monday night at 7:15,
room 204, Law building, was the
wish expressed by the president in
concluding.
The officers for the ensuing year
include president, Rozear; vice vicepresident,
president, vicepresident, kelson Glass; secretary,
W. A. Wilder; treasurer, W. W.
Strum; Debating council represen representative.
tative. representative. Forest Asbmead.
VARSITY TEAM NEARING
TOP KNOTCH IN FORM
(Continued from page One)
Coach Bedenk was staged oil Flem Fleming
ing Fleming Field between the C and D
teams. During the same time
Coach Bachman gave the A and
Bs teams instruction on several
new plays. The improvement in
the work over Tuesdays practice
was agreeably outstanding.
Thursday afternoon was given
to the usual routine followed by a
scrimmage. The team worked
smooth in this practice.
Fridays practice was light, due
to the scheduled game between the
Freshmen and Varsity to be staged
in Jacksonville yesterday. Special
attention was given to kicking off
and receiving.
Cawthon, Brumbaugh and Bow Bowyer
yer Bowyer seem to be out distancing their
fellow backs in punting, though
Crabtree has been getting off some
good left footed kicks..
Ed Sauls, protege of Coach
Brady Cowells rat team of last
year made his appearance Monday
and is fast working into form.
The pivot position is being hotly j
contested bv Ben Clemons and
Clark. Clark was on the A line
up during the first days of the
week but was supplanted by Clem Clemons
ons Clemons during the latter part of the
week.
Reeves returned to the ranks af after
ter after being out on account of an in injury
jury injury for about ten days. Jimmie
Steele, husky Tampan, has been
doing outstanding work at leit
guard. As a sophomore, Steels
football future is brilliant.
Stanley has been running regu regularly
larly regularly at his flank position while De-
Hoff and Vansickle have been used
alternately at the other. Gus
Clemons and Hicks have been hold holding
ing holding the tackle positions.
Allen, Mcae, Perry,. Houser,
Nolan and Norfleet in the line have
been showing up well during the
past week of work. The powerful
drive of Bethea and Goodbread has
been the source of comment on the
backs. Others in the backfield who
have been showing up well are
Owens, Yancey and Bryson.

SPECIAL NOTICE
HOW AND WHEN TO USE YOUR STUDENT TICKETS
This book is for the student only ahd cannot be used
by any other person. In adopting this book every precau precaution
tion precaution was used to protect the students and if you comply
with all the rules and regulations that are published on
the back page of this book no confusion will arise. There
are 25 coupons in every book and there is one for every
athletic event that will take place on the campus and also
additional ones THAT MUST BE exchanged at the Ath Athletic
letic Athletic Office for any out of town dr state event or game
that is played by our te EVENTS AND COUPONS TO BE USED
Southern vs. FloridaOct. 6(Here) coupon No. 1
Auburn vs. FloridaOct. 13 (Here) coupon No. 2
Mercer vs. FloridaOct. 20,(Here) coupon No. 3
Ga. Rats vs. Fla. RatsOct. 26 (Jax.) coupon
No. 4 *.
N. C. S. vs. FloridaOct. 27(Jax.) coupon No. 5
Sewanee vs. FloridaNov. 3(Jax.) coupon No. 6*
Georgia vs. FloridaNov. 10(Savannah) coupon
No. 7*.
Clemson Rats vs. Fla. RatsNov. 12(Orlando)
coupon No. B*.
Clemson vs. FloridaNov. 17 (Tampa) coupon
No. 9*.
Miss. A. & M. Rats vs. Fla. Rats(Here) coupon
No. 10.
W. & L. vs. FloridaNov. 29(Jax.) coupon No. 11*.
Games marked with (*) are the coupons that must
be exchanged for other tickets before admittance will be
allowed. NO COUPONS WILL BE EXCHANGED ON
THJJ DAY OF THE GAMES SO BE SURE AND GET
YOURS EXCHANGED BEFORE THE DAY OF THE
GAME. DONT LOSE YOUR BOOK BECAUSE IT IS
GOOD FOR THE ENTIRE YEAR AND ONLY TO BE
USED AT ATHLETIC GAMES OR EVENTS.
GO GET EM GATORS LETS GO GATORS
ATHLETIC DEPARTMENT
University of Florida.

Giant Press Put in
For Engineer Dept.
The civil engineering department
of the university has installed a
giant electrically powered press for
instruction in the durabiliy and re resisting
sisting resisting qualities of constructon
materials. It was brought to the
university and set up in the east
wing of the engineering building,
shortly before the close of the sec secon
on secon semester last year, but was not
put into operation until last week.
On Friday of the past week a
group of experts from the state
road department demonstrated the
practical value of the machine by
using it to test the strength of
concrete blocks to go into construc construction
tion construction work. They found it very
satisfactory, and talked of advis advising
ing advising departmental heads to buy a
similar one for their work.
The press is set up on four up upright
right upright steel rods. The materials to
be tested are placed on a steel
block in the center of the rods. The
press then slowly descends until it

OLD GOLD bats 1000%
as Hornsby takes
the TSlin.dfold cigarette test j
i/
jmm i|| manager of the Boston Braves J*'"
iCTM ... captain of the 1927 New
§Wt k York Giants ... manager of
the 1926 St. Louis Cardinals,
wh WOn the World s Series.
( Old S. 6 not C Ugh in 8 Carl ad f this charm ?
But I can tell you theres a ko m ,run Hit in 1
bra^d of n^h Ot M- r^( g | a J ette f the f Ur leading 1 jfjSfe i
brands m the blindfold test, could compare with ground-leaves... for they are 1 lllj
Old Golds for pure pleasure to taste, tongue lackin & in aroma. Only the
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OGItD S n their*o,.w a Made front the Wf-inw
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SMOOTHER AND BETTER-- NOT A COUGH IN A CARLOAD"

crushes whatever may be beneath
it: It is capable of exerting a pres pressure
sure pressure of four hundred thousands
pounds.
The civil engineering department
is expecting the press to facilitate
their instruction in road and bridge
building.
Charles W. Bachman, new U.
of F. football coach, was recently
referred to by Knute Rockne as
one of the ten leading football
coaches in America today.
THE LETTER
SHOP
Public Stenographer
Multigraphing
Copy work
Special Rates to
Students.

1"
All set'J
to go! I
Looking right is the |
first step toward feeling
right. With an Alligator |
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plans no matter how Bad
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Drugs, Medicines, Chemicals, Etc.
AGENTS UNITED CIGAR STORES
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MRS. F. D. SHEPPARD
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SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 3


IWDAY, SEPTEMBER 50, 19J8.

hanks Gators
I Good Bet For
I Southern Title
L, $. V. Sanford, Head of
Southern Circle Makes
Statement
mpr. S. V. Sanford, president of
E Southern conference says:
Bible all the sports writers are
ling Georgia Tech, Georgia.
Sjxierbilt and Alabama as pos*
Be southern champions for this
|r, I dont see how they are for-
Sting the University of Florida.
eems to me that they will be
igerous contenders from the
tp of the flag." Fuzzy Woodruff
p that in looking over the
Itffaern conference schedules, it
Has that Florida has as good a
Mice as anybody to go through
i season undefeated, and the
tors do not have any soft scbed scbedi
i scbedi either. "The things seems to
made for them, he continued."
hey do not open their confer confer*
* confer* schedule until October 13
en they take on Auburn at Jack Jackivtile
ivtile Jackivtile and while I look for Au Aura
ra Aura to have a vastly improved
[animation under Coach Bohler,
will be a mighty hard matter for
nto bring them along far
augh in that brief time to do a
with any aggregation as for fordable
dable fordable aa Florida is bound to be.
Hi C. State defeated Florida in
mpa last year. But Woodruff
inks that they will not have a
jnce to stop Florida this year
r the Gators have a week of
it, for N. C. Ssate will be involv involvwitb
witb involvwitb their coming state clash
b North Carolina the following
ek.
The one real danger on Flor Floras
as Floras schedule comes on November
" he continues, when the Gators
>et Georgia. Dont get it into
ur head that this will be any set setfor
for setfor the Red and Black. Flor Flori
i Flori played the great Georgia team
last year to a standstill all
rough the first half, and Georgia
iyera declared after the game
it the Gators gave them the
ffest opposition that they had
countered up to that time.
Now I dont think that Georgia
1028 is going to be the Georgia
1027, and I do think that Flor Flori
i Flori of this year is going to be a
od bit better than they were last
ison, when they were far, far
>m bad.
"For the next three weeks, Flor Flort
t Flort takes on Clemson, Washington
d Lee and Tennessee, and unless
nave overestimated the Florida
tn the Gators should be returned
fcr in each of these fray 9, he
ikhed.

College Football
At Schenectady, N. Y.: Union
Manhattan 27.
At Pittsburgh: Pittsburgh 20;
del 0. \
At Brunswick, Maine: Bowdoin
; Massachussetts Aggies 0.
At New York: Columbia 20;
srmont 0.
At Eaton, Pa.: LaFayette 79;
bright 0.
At Amherst, Mass.: .Amherst
5 Middlebury 7.
At Syracuse: Syracuse 14; Ho Hort
rt Hort 6.
At Willamstown, Mass.: Wh Whims
ims Whims 20; Providence 13.
At Columbus: Capital 19; Bald-
In Wallace 0.
At Dataware, Ohio: Ohio Weste Western
rn Western 33; Marietta 0.
At Cincinnati: St. Xavier 19;
(ansylvania, Ky., 2.
At Athens, Ohio: Ohio 45; Rio
rande 7,
At Boston: Boston College 38;
ttholic University 6.
At Hamilton, N. Y.: Colgate 33;
. Lawrence 6.
At Fordham: Fordham 27; St.
snaventure 0.
At Dover, N. H.: Dartmouth 39;
jprwich 6.
At Chicago: Chicago 0; South
arolina 6.
At Springfield, Ohio: Wittenberg
1; Georgetown, Ky., 0.
At New Brunswick, N. J.: Rut Rutrs
rs Rutrs 12; St. Johns 0.
At Middletown, Conn.: Weale Wealem
m Wealem 14; Bates 0.
At Orono, Maine: Maine 20;
bode Island 6.
At Allentown, Pa.: Muhlenberg
; Drexel 6.
jfAt Philadelphia: Pennsylvania
; Ursinus 0.
At Georgetown, D. C.: George George>wn
>wn George>wn 31; Mount St. Mary 0.
At College Park, Md.: Maryland
i; Washington 0.
At MeadvUta, Pa.; Allegheny
Mount Union 0.
At Lewlsburg, Pa.: Bucknell 7;
chuyikiU 0.
At Clemson, S. C.; Ctamson 6;
avidson 0.
At Greenville, Tenn.: King 0;
usculum 6.
At Bethehem, Pa.; Lehigh 13;
t. Johns 0.
At Annapolis: Navy 0; Davis
Ikin 2.
At Washington, Pa.:
m and Jefferson 24; Bethany 0.
At Oxford, Ohio: Miami 42; De Deance
ance Deance 0.
At Detroit: University Detroit
Ita Paul (Chicago) 0.
At Jacksonville: Florida Var Varty
ty Varty 89; Florida Freshmen 0.

Returns To Form |
- -'
V ,J -5
k&T;**
.y] |
Elmer Irhig, plunging varsity
fullback of two seasons ago, who
has returned to the team this
year. Although late in reporting
for action, Elmer has been show showing
ing showing marked improvement in recent
work-outs and ere the season is
finished is expected to shine
brightly in Bachmans attack.
Intramural Board
Holds Regular Meet
Coach "Chigger rirowne in informed
formed informed the intramural board at
the regular meeting that equip equipment
ment equipment for the various sports has
been ordered and is due to be
here within the next few days so
that the intramural dormitory sec section
tion section managers, the unit managers
and the fraternity managers may
have it for their outfits from one
to two weeks before the first game
In the sport scheduled. By this
plan the unit managers will be able
to false the standard of play, in
all the sports sponsored by the in intramural
tramural intramural athletic department this
year, and by so doing attracting
other more passive students to take
part by being a contestant rather
a spectator.
Considering the great amount
of enthusiasm and interest that
the men on the campus had for
intramurals last year, nothing
much was said about the destruc destruction
tion destruction of equipment, such as balls
and bats and the loss of some of
the other donated articles. The
board this year requests the unit (
managers to give stern attention
from the very first to this, so that
there will always be a sufficient
supply to take care of the normal
wear and necessary replacements.
A list of dormitory section man managers
agers managers has been prepared and one
will be posted on the bulletin board
in each section of the dormitories,
the barracks and in Florida hall
for permanent reference of men'
in those sections. For the past
week regular bulletins issued from
the intramural department have j
been distributed over the campus
in the buildings, in the dormitories,
nearby stores and to every fra fraternity
ternity fraternity and the popular expresssion
indicates that a demand has de developed
veloped developed and is rapidly growing and
it may be necessary to increase
the number of issues each week
from two to three, or possibly
more as the intramural season de develops.
velops. develops.
During the lengthy and weighty
process of considering to finality
the many motions placed before
the meeting the members of the
board sidetracked their regular
work to vote in Albert Baker, frow
Jacksonville, to take the place of
Bill Bond, resigned, as track man manager.
ager. manager. The membership of the
board this year stands at 13.
Varsity Wins Benefit
Game From Freshmen
(Continued from page One)
proud of the fact that they made
more first downs during the game
than did the more experienced
varsity eleven.
The summary of the game is as
follows:
Varsity (39) Freshman (9)
Position
L. E.
Dehoff McMullen
L. T.
Norfleet Dedge
L. G.
Grandoff Silsby
C.
B. Clemons Haines
R. G.
Houser Forsyth
R. T.
Mcae PhitH
R. E.
Nolan Vickery
Q. B.
Bowyer ... v Adams
L. H.
Bethea Dorset!
R. H.
Owens Alvarez
F. B.
Sauls Proctor
Score by periods:
12 3 4
Varsity 6 26 0 730
Freshman .0 0 0 oo
Touchdowns: Bethea, Crabtree
(for Bowyer), Owens, Van Sickle
(for Dehoff) 2; Brumbaugh (for
Bethea).
Points after touchdown:
Stanley (for Nolan). 2, Bowyer.

W-R-U-F
5000 Watts 202.6 Meters-1460 ICC.
The University of Florida at Gainesville
Schedule October 1 to October 15, 1928.
October I, 1926:
10 :00 ajn. Homemakers hour and music.
10:30 a.m. Educational features, announcements and
music.
1:00 p.m. Noontime programl*4 hours.
Weather forecast, agricultural information,
announcements and music.
3:80 p.m. Tea Time Musicale.
4:00 p.m. University of the Airl hour.
6:00 p.m. Dinner musicl hour.
October 2, 1928
10:00 a.m. Homemakers hour and music.
10:30 a.m. Educational features, announcements, and
music.
1:00 p.m. Noontime programl*4 hours
Weather forecast, agricultural information,
announcements and music.
3:30 p.m. Tea Time Musicale.
4:00 p.m. University of the Airl hour.
6:00 p.m. Dinner musicl hour.
8:00 p.m. All Florida City programs2*4 hours.
October 3, 1928
10:00 a.m. Homemakers hour and music.
10:30 a.m. Educational features, announcements, and
music.
1:00 p.m. Noontime programl*4 hours
Weather forecast, agricultural information,
announcements and music.
3:30 p.m. Tea Time Musicale.
4:00 p.m. University of the Airl hour.
6 :00 p.m. Dinner musicl hour.
October 4, 1928
10:00 a.m. Homemakers hour and music.
10:30 a.m. Educational features, announcements, and
music.
1:00 p.m. Noontime programll 4 hours
Weather forecasts, agricultural information,
announcements and music.
3:30 p.m. Tea Time Musicale.
4:00 p.m. University of the Airl hour.
6:00 p.m. Dinner musicl hour.
8:00 p.m.All Florida City programs2*4 hours.
October 5, 1928
10:00 a.m. Homemakers hour and music.
10:30 a.m. Educational features and music.
1:00 p.m. Noontime programl*4 hours
Weather forecasts, agricultural information,
announcements and music.
3:30 p.m. Tea Time Musicale.
4 :00 p.m. University of the Airl hour.
6:00 p.m. Dinner musicl hour.
October 6, 1928
9:00 a.m. University of the Air-3 hours.
1:00 p.m. Noontime programl*4 hours
Weather forecasts, agricultural information,
announcements, and music.
3:30 p.m. Tea Time Musicale.
4:00 p.m. University of the Airl hour.
6:00 p.m. Dinner musicl hour.
8:00 p.m. K AII Florida city programs2*4 hours.
Midnight Popular variety request program2 hours.
s October 7, 1928
1:00 p.m. Claude Murphreeorgan recitall hour.
2:00 p.m. Vespers.
October 8, 1928
10:00 a.m. Homemakers hour and music. 4
10:30 a.m. Educational features and music.
1:00 p.m. Noontime programl *4 hours
3:80 p.m. Tea Time Musicale.
4:00 p.m. University of the Air.
6:00 p.m. Dinner musicl hour.
October 9, 1928
10 :00 a.m. Homemakers hour and music.
10:30 a.m. Educational features and music.
1:00 p.m. Noontime programl *4 hrours
3:30 p.m. Tea Time Musicale.
4:00 p.m. University of the Airl hour.
6:00 p.m. Dinner musicl hour.
8:00 p.m. All Florida city programs2*4 hours.
October 10, 1928
10:00 a.m. Homemaker's hour and music.
10:30 a.m. Educational features and music.
1:00 p.m. Noontime programll 4 hours
Weather forecast, agricultural information,
announcements and music.
3:30 p.m. Tea Time Musicale.
4:00 p.m. University of the Airl hour.
6:00 p.m. Dinner music---l hour.
October 11, 1928
10:00 a.m. Homemakers hour and music.
10:30 a.m. Educational features and music.
1:00 p.m. Noontime programl*4 hours
Weather forecast, agricultural information,
announcements and music.
3:30 p.m. Tea Time Musicale.
4:00 p.m. University of the Airl hour.
6:00 p.m. Dinner musicl hour.
8:00 p.m. All Florida city programs2*4 hours.
October 12, 1928
10:p0 a.m. Homemakers hour and music.
10:30 a.m. Educational features and music.
1:00 p.m. Noontime programl*4 hours
Weather forecast, agricultural inforroatilon,
announcements, and music.
3:30 p.m. Tea Time Musicale.
4:00 p.m. University of the Airl hour.
6:00 p.m. Dinner musicl hour.

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR

October 13, 1928
9:00 a.m. University of the Air3 hours.
1:00 p.m. Noontime programll 4 hours
3:30 p.m. Tea Time Musicale.
4:00 p.m. University of the Airl hour.
6:00 p.m. D inner musicl hour.
8:00 p.m. All Florida city programs2*4 hours.
Midnight Popular variety request program2 hours.
October 14, 1928
1:00 p.m. Claude Murphreeorgan recitall hour.
2:00 p.m. Vespers.
---

PRIZE ESSAY
CONTEST ON
Two Prizes of SI,OOO For
Best Student Theme
On Smith
NEW YORK, September 28
(Special)Mrs. James W. Gerard,
wife of the former ambassador to
Germany, has offered two prizes
of SIOOO each for the best essays
written by college students, or re recent
cent recent graduates! on the subject,
"Why Alfred E. Smith Should Be
Elected President of the United
States.
Announcement of the contest
was made yesterday by Frank L.
Polk, president of the College
League for Alfred E. Smith, to
whom Mrs. Gerard made the offer.
She specified that one prize is to
be for men and the other for wo women.
men. women. Students and graduates of
not more than two years standing
are eligible to compete under the
terms of Mrs. Gerards gift. It
will close on October 20.
Mr. Polk announced that the
New York World, Buffalo Times,
Trenton Times, Raleigh News Ob Observer,
server, Observer, Richmond Times-Leader,
Arkansas Gazette, Gainesville, Fla.
Sun, Columbia, S. C., Record,
Nashville Tennessean, Lexington
Herald, Nevada State Journal and
Atlanta Georgian would cooperate
with the College League in the
conduct of the contest.
Mrs. Gerard suggested that the
essays be limited to 500 words
and left the details of the compe competition
tition competition to Mr. Polk, who is now
drawing up the rules that will
govern the contest,
"I am so interested in the work
being done by the College League
for Alfred E. Smith that I wish to
offer $2,000 to be used by your
organization as prizes for the best
essays written by college students
and graduates of not more than
two years standing, on the sub subject,
ject, subject, Why Alfred E. Smith Should
Be Elected President of the United
States, Mrs. Gerard wrote.
Os this sum, SI,OOO is for the
best essay written by a man, with
a like amount for the best essay
written by a woman. I would sug suggest
gest suggest that the essays be limited to
500 words. However, I will leave
that and the other details and
rules of the contest to your judg judgment.
ment. judgment.
"Governor Smith makes an ap appeal
peal appeal to college men and women by
reason of a career that is one of
the romances of the American life,
a record as an executive that
proves he has character, ability,
industry, courage and the rare
gift of leadership,, and because
they see in him a man who is as
admirably trained for the duties of
the presidency as Lincoln, Cleve Cleveland,
land, Cleveland, Roosevelt or Wilson.
"I believe that they are so in interested
terested interested in the present campaign
that they will welcome the op opportunity
portunity opportunity to put their views and
appreciation of a great man on
paper. I believe the contest will
result in bringing out the college
viewpoint of Governor Smith and
be helpful to students in connec connection
tion connection with their courses in English
and politics.
DRUG JOURNAL
PRAISES LEIGH
The work of Dean T. R. Leigh of
the College of Pharmacy is great greatly
ly greatly commended in the August issue
of the Southeastern Drug Journal.
The article discusses the eariy
life of Dean Leigh, his preparation
for his work in chemistry, his edu educational
cational educational career, and his war-time
service. Dean Leigh was highly
praised for his aid to the govern government
ment government during the war by training
college men, and for the invention
of the Leigh Fog-Screen, used for
protection of vessels against sub submarines.
marines. submarines.
NOTICE
All men who were awarded keys
last year by the Alligator staff
may order them now. Orders must
be given to Layton Dinning some sometime
time sometime next week.
Signed,
W. L. Dinning,
Managing Editor
Alligator.

THE PHIFER STATE BANK
Appreciates Your Business

| Florida Theatre
Oct. 1-2-3.
1
dot sort }ft "The dazi Sinter"
Jf Warner Bros Proa-uction
New Educational
Scheme Adopted
A new democracy of education
has been made possible to the
people of Florida.
The University of Florida yester yesterday
day yesterday announced formulation of
plans for conducting a University
of the Air, which will have a po potential
tential potential student body of every radio
listener In this state and in states
close enough to get clear reception
of radio waves from WRUF, the
5,000 watt state and university
station here.
The entire staff of the General
Extension Division and many pro professors
fessors professors from other departments of
the state institution will compro compromise
mise compromise the faculty of the University
of the Air.
College credit will be given for
these courses which will be broad broadcast
cast broadcast daily from 4 to 5 p. m. and on
Saturdays from 9 to 12 a. ni. A
comprehensive curriculum is being
mapped out by Dean B. C. Riley,
of the Extension Division.
Arrangements for enrolling in
these courses and request for addi additional
tional additional information will be handled
by the General Extension Divi Division
sion Division or by WRUF.
WRUF is the iargest radio broad broadcasting
casting broadcasting station in the south and is
believed to be one of the largest
educational stations in the United
States. In view of this announce announcement,
ment, announcement, the scope of the University
of Floridas influence has been in increased
creased increased many times.
More Funds Raised
By Radio Appeals!
About SIOO was raised for the
storm sufferers last night through
appeals over radio station WRUF
at the University, which will swell
the total amount accounted for by
this manner to around the S7OO
mark.
The station will he on the air
again tonight and will endeavor to
close their weeks program of ap appeals
peals appeals with the largest amount
raised to date.
A. P. Spencer, of the agricul agricultural
tural agricultural experiment station at the
University, who has recently re returned
turned returned from an inspection tour
throughout the storm area, made a
talk over the local station, giving
graphic description of the situa situation
tion situation and the immediate need of
funds and clothing.
Dr. W. A. Myers, pastor of the
First Methodist church, Dr. Miller
Leake of the University faculty,
and Judge Larkin Carter also
spoke. The High Speed Colored
quartet rendered several selections
in addition to the regular musical
program.
It is reported that the Floating
University was almost wrecked in
the sea of matrimony on its last
cruise. The authorities are dis discouraging
couraging discouraging such disastrous relation relationships
ships relationships on their 1928-cruise.
At Hickory, N. C.: Lenoir Rhyne
6; Newberry 12.
At Cleveland: Case 3; Wilming Wilmington
ton Wilmington 0.

CUQIgKES
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH
! Rev. A. R. Batchelor, Acting Pastor
Services for Sunday, September
30, 1928:
Bible school at 9:40 a. m.
There are classes for all ages.
The University Students class,
under the leadership of Reverend
Batchelor, will be held in the Sun Sunday
day Sunday school room. A cordial in invitation
vitation invitation is extended to students to
attend.
Public worsmp at 11 a. m. The
morning sermon subject is The
Law. Mr. Wm. Dubose will sing.
Evening worship at 8 oclock.
Pastors sermon theme Playing
The Fool.
Mid-week prayer meeting at 7:30
p m. Wednesday.
Strangers are welcome to all
services.
ADVENT CHRISTIAN CHURCH
Rev. J. T. Johnson, Pastor
Residence 227 W. Church street
Junior Society of Loyal Work Workers,
ers, Workers, 9:30 a. m.
Sunday school 10. a. m. A. J.
Harvey, superintendent.
Preaching at 11 a. m. Subject
The Blood of Christ.
Young Peoples Society of Loyal
Workers at 7 p. m. Miss Mary
McMillan, leader.
Preaching Bp. m. Subject Are
We Entering The Great Tribula Tribulation?
tion? Tribulation?
The Womans Home and Foreign
Mission Society, with their circles,
have their monthly meeting at the
church Tuesday at 3 p. m.
Cottage prayer meeting at the
parsonage, 227 West Church street,
Wednesday night at 8 oclock.
Regular prayer meeting Friday
night at the church at 7:30. This
will be followed by choir practice.
Mr. Bowers, the leader, invites all
who will to remain and take part.
The public is cordially invited to
all services. Special invitation to
strangers. You will be a stranger
but once.
Special meeting at the jail Sun Sunday
day Sunday afternoon at 3 oclock.
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
Rev. W. A. Myres, Pastor
September 30, 1928:
Sunday school at 9:45 a. m. E.
A. Clayton, superintendent.
Business Mens Bible class at
9:45 a. m. Rev. E. C. McVoy,
teacher. Dr. Donald Morrison, pres president.
ident. president.
Morning worship at 11 a. m.
Sermon by the pastor. Subject
"Abraham and Lot, Gen. 19-12.
A sermon on the family.
Evening worship at 8 oclock.
Sermon by the pastor. Seubject
What of the 18th Amendment.'
A world temperance sermon.
Junior Epworth Society at 2:30
p. m.
Senior Epworth League at 7:00
p. m. Miss Trixie Hill will lead.
The topic will deal with What
becomes of the money we Epworth
Leaguers give to missions?
The regular monthly business
meeting of the Epworth League
will be in Epworth Hall Tues Tuesday
day Tuesday night, October 2, 1928, at 7
oclock.
*
SAINT PATRICKS CHURCH
Rev. L. Lehman, Pastor
Sunday, September 30:
Mass Gainesville at 9:00 a. m.
Benediction after mass.
No mass during the week.
Friday, October 4, bridge party
rectory, benefit of St Pa.tricks
tennis club.
A total of $Bl was collected and
dispatched to the chancery office
of the diocese, by the parishoners
of St. Patricks parish last Sunday
for the relief of storm sufferers.
Father Lehman wishes to thank
his parishoners for their quick and
generous response to the appeal.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
SERVICES
Community Hall, Dixie Highway,
North Gainesville
Sunday morning service, 11:00
oclock. Subject Christian Sci Science.
ence. Science.
Sunday school, 9:45 a. m.
Wednesday evening meeting, S
oclock.
All are welcome.

ANNOUNCING NEW LOCATION
OF
The New York Hatters
IN
The New Florida Theatre Bldg.
Hats cleaned and blocked. Ladies and Gents Shoe
Shine. Service 7:30 to 11:0() P. M., weekly. Sunday
Shoe Shine Service 8:00 A. M. to 2-:00 P. M.
Goods Called for and Delivered
PHONE 523 M. BLIZIOTES, PROP.
FLORIDA BARBER SHOP
Guaranteed Service and Courtesy
Is Our Motto
West Side Square J. C. Prevatt, Prop.

PAGE FIVE

FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH
William George Oram, Pastor
Services at the First Christian
church Sunday, September 30, as
follows:
Bible school will assemble at
9:45 a. m. Lesson topic Paul, the
Missionary.
Morning worship, 11 oclock.
Pastors sermon the m e The
Church Active Under the Commis Commission.
sion. Commission.
Evening preaching service 8:00
oclock. Sermon subject Founda Foundations.
tions. Foundations.
Christian Endeavor meeting 7
p. m. Topic Goals for our So Society.
ciety. Society.
The public is most cordially in invited
vited invited to all services of this church.
CHURCH OF CHRIST
D. E. Mason, Minister
Bible study at 10 a. m. Classes
for all ages.
Preaching by, minister at 11 a.
m. Sermon subject Why I Ought
to go to Church.
Communion of the Lords Sup Supper.
per. Supper.
Congregational singing.
Young Peoples Bible class at
7:15.
Preaching at 7:45.
Ladies Bible class Tuesday after afternoon
noon afternoon at 3 oclock.
Prayer meeting Wednesday at
7:45.
You are invited to attend these
services.
HOLY TRINITY CHURCH
William S. Stoney, Rector
Sunday, September' 30:
7:30, Holy communion.
9:45, Sunday school.
11:00, Morning service, special
music with solo by Miss Ella
Robertson.
7:00, Y. P. S. L.
8:00, Evening prayer, special
music with solo by Henry Clay
Evans.
All welcome.
WEED HALL
(Episcopal Student Center)
1744 West University Avenue
Open at all times to all students.
Weekly schedule.
Every Sunday, Holy communion,
8:15 a. m.
Bible class, 9:30 a. m.
Every Wednesday, song service,
7:15 p. m.
Brotherhood of St. Andrew, 7:30
p. m.
Parson Johnson, Chaplin.
Alabama Has Most
Conference Games
In looking over the Southern
conference schedule for this year
it is found that Alabama has more
conference games than any other
team in this circle. Eight of. the
nine games that Wades team
plays are conference games. This
is prdbably the hardest schedule in
the circle fro it includes: Missis Mississippi
sippi Mississippi Aggies Tennessee, Georgia
Tech, Georgia, Kentucky, Sewanee
and L. S. U.
Auburn, Florida, Tennessee and
Tulane come next, with seven con conference
ference conference tilts. Georgia Tech in ad addition
dition addition to these takes on Notre
Dame and Virginia and Washing Washington
ton Washington and Lee have added Princeton.
North Carolina has six with
Harvard for good measure. Clem Clemson,
son, Clemson, V. M. I. and Ole Miss, have
six fights within the southern cir circle.
cle. circle. Georgia takes on Yale in ad addition
dition addition to her six. Colgate has
been added to the Vanderbilt
schedule.
N. C. State, L. S. U. and Missis Mississippi
sippi Mississippi Aggies all have five games
each. Kentucky plays Northwest Northwestern,
ern, Northwestern, Maryland plays Yale, South
Carolina plays Chicago, and V. P.
I. tackles Colgate, in addition to
their five game program.
Florida does not open her con conference
ference conference schedule until October 13
when she plays Auburn in Gaines Gainesville.
ville. Gainesville.
NOTICE
There will be a regular Alligator
staff meeting in the Student Body
office Monday night at 7 p. m. All
men interested in literary lines
and who wish to work on the
Homecoming edition come at same
time.
Signed,
Managing Editor.



PAGE SIX

Dr. 0. H. Enwall
Is Speaker at
Kiwanis Meet
"It is the genera: opinion in
Europe that the Dawes plan will
fail, since Germany will be unable
to pay its war debts, declared Dr.
O. H. Enwall, head of the depart department
ment department of Philosophy and Psychology
to the university, in an address
Wednesday.
Dr. Enwall has recently returned
from a trip to Europe, during
which he visited in England, Scot Scotland,
land, Scotland, Denmark and his old home in
Sweden.
"The economic conditions of the
continent are the main discussions
Over there, he said, "and the peo people
ple people dont see how yie Dawes plan
can be a success. Germany cant
pay her debts as they are due to
be paid according to the Dawes
plan. Germany has been stalling
until the Fthinelahd is exhausted.
She has borrowed money to pay
her debts but this money will-have
to be paid back, so in reality she
hasnt paid any of her debts.
"Germany is borrowing from
the United States to pay France,
and England, who in turn use the
money to pay their war debts to
Us. The whole situation resolves
itself into a circle.
Europe wants peace. It is a
deeply rooted desire. Den Denmark
mark Denmark has completely abolished her
standing army, while Sweden and
other countries have materially re reduced
duced reduced the sizes of theirs. The
smaller countries are not able to
stand up under the taxation neces necessary
sary necessary to the maintenance of an
army.
The European people dont take
the Kellogg treaty seriously. It
is fundamental of these people to
believe that peace is not guaran guaranteed
teed guaranteed except by, force sufficient to
enforce it.
The Russian menace is great.
Communists have their agents in
almost every country. It is not in influential
fluential influential in numbers, but the mem members
bers members are continually hammering
away their principles.
The destinies of the world are
how in the school rooms and in
the attitude of the men who teach.
Germany changed the whole mind
of its people in 60 years largely
through teachings in the schools.
Forensic Activities 1
Will Have Busy Year
On U. of F. Campus
With many new men up from
the Freshmen class, the majority
of the Varsity debate squad of last
year again enrolled, and a some somewhat
what somewhat larger sum with which to
promote forensic activities, Flori Florida
da Florida Is looking forward to an even
more successful year than last
y?ar proved to be.
In the past year Florida eclipsed
every other school in the south southeast
east southeast in point of number of debates
and distance traveled by debating
teams. Forty varsity meetings
Were arranged including contests
with every other large university
and college in the south. One
team was sent to Washington, D.
C on a two weeks tour; another
to and through Texas, of like du duration;
ration; duration; while a third went to Ken Kentucky
tucky Kentucky and Tennessee. A shorter
trip, on which four men went,
was one through South Florida.
However, although the majority
of Florida's debaters are again
with us, several of her outstand outstanding
ing outstanding spaekers arc conscipuous by
their absence. The entire Texas
team, comprised of O. S. Thacker,
Ray Watson, and Monte are
among the missing; the first two
are now practising law, while En Engel
gel Engel is a student at Illinois. G. S.
Milam, who had established a rec record
ord record as one of the most fluent
speakers in the south before com coming
ing coming to Florida and who last year
maintained his reputation on the
Washington tour, also is among
the missing.
L. L. Garrett, president of the
Debating council, and a prominent
varsity man, Foster Shi Smith
(now city attorney of Hawthorne),
and Carl Widen, all failed to re return;
turn; return; their absence mostly due to
a safely accomplished graduation,
and admission to the bar.
The varsity men from last year
are: Dixy Beggs, Jerome Connor.
Parks Carmichael, George Foster,
Alva Gillis, Ed Miller. Ben Per Perloff,
loff, Perloff, Nat Roberts, Ben Thornal,
Harold Wahl, and Joe Wilensky.
Other members on the squad are:
Lynn McArthur, Donald McGov McGovern,
ern, McGovern, Harold Munger, George
Smith, Kenneth Williams, and Bill
Bashaw. Prunty, Arnow, Strum,
Lybass, and several other men who
demonstrated their ability, will
come up from last years fresh freshmen
men freshmen teams.
Before many weeks the inter intersociety
society intersociety debates will be in full
swing; as yet the Debate council
has not met to decide upon any
definite subjects for discussion, or
any dates for the debates. How However.
ever. However. the council will meet any
day and the debate tryouts will
be announced immediately follow following.
ing. following.
Although the carsity schedule
has not been made out as yet. it
is believed that one team will
head toward Chicago, another
through the states south of the
Ohio, and east of the Mississippi,

SOCIETY and CLUBS
BILL BROWN

K. A. POP DANCE
The K. As will hold a pop
dance at their house directly after
the Florida-Southern game on Sat Saturday,
urday, Saturday, October 6.
SERPENTS ELECT OFFICERS
At a meeting of the Serpent
Ribbon Dance society held Mon Monday
day Monday night in the Law College the
following officers were elected:
President, Cyril Pogue; vice vicepresident,
president, vicepresident, Herman Price; chair chairman
man chairman dance committee, Jack Simp Simpson;
son; Simpson; secretary, Stewart; treasurer,
Hayes Lewis.
MANY ENGINEERS
ATTEND MEETING
Over 175 prospective engineers
and members of the faculty of the
College of Engineering and Archi Architecture
tecture Architecture gathered at the Y. M. C.
A. last Monday evening for the
first meeting of the Benton Engi Engineering
neering Engineering society for this year. The
meeting was of the nature of a
get-together and get-acquainted
meeting and according to the lead-,
ers of the society, was one of the
most successful meetings held in
recent years. Dean John R. Ben Benton,
ton, Benton, of the College of Engineering, 1
spoke on the aims and purpose of
the society, and representatives of
the student organizations of the
college spoke of the work on these
special societies. President John
J. Tigert was to have spoken, but
according to C. Howell Jones, pres president
ident president of the B. E. S., he was un unable
able unable to attend on account of an another
other another engagement.
Dr. Benton, in speaking of the
purpose of the society, stated that
it not only afforded opportunities
for technical discussion and lec lectures,
tures, lectures, but also opportunities to
acquire those social qualities which
engineers are so often accused of
lacking. The work of student
branches of national engiheering
societies was brought before the
society by A. W. Payne, who rep represented
resented represented the American Institution
of Electrical Engineers, and C. W.
Mines, the American Society of
Mechanical Engineers. C. F.
Trainor spoke of the American
Society of Civil Engineers. Each
of the speakers outlined the pur purposes
poses purposes of their organization, the
national work and the advantages
of membership.
Robert H. Brown spoke briefly
of the beginnings and idea of the
Gargoyle club of the school of ar architecture.
chitecture. architecture. He was followed by
Ivan H. Smith, president of the
Upsilon chapter of Sigma Tau,
the honorary engineering fraterni fraternity.
ty. fraternity. Mr. Smith stressed the three
requisites for election to member membershipscholarship,
shipscholarship, membershipscholarship, sociability, and
practicability.
A social get-together followed
the speaking program. Refresh Refreshments
ments Refreshments consisting of cocoanut cake
and neapolitan "polar bears were
served in large quantities, follow followed
ed followed by smokes.
University Would
Be Benefited By
Educational Fund
If the state would provide a
fund of about $20,000 to help needy ]
students who deserve aid, this uni university
versity university would turn out more dis distinguished
tinguished distinguished graduates than any
school in the country, declared B.
A. Tolbert, newly appointed Dean
of Men, when interviewed.
Dean Tolbert pointed out that in
his capacity as Dean of Men, a
position created for the guidance
of university students, he is au authorized
thorized authorized to give no practical or
material aid to boys with nothing
but ambition with which to get an
education.
As the writer walked into the
deans office, Mr. Tolbert was
then telling an impecunious stu student
dent student of his inability to do anything
but give advice. Dean Tolbert told
the student of a place where he
might obtain a job, and cautioned
him not to leave school until he ab absolutely
solutely absolutely had to.
Although Dean Tolbert said
there is little probability that a
state fund for students aid can be
expected within the near future, he
hopes that before many years have
passed he will be in a position to
help students who need and deserve
financial assistance.
hundred per cent
IS PREFERRED
Cleveland Press: Wife (in a tel telegram
egram telegram from a spa)ln four weeks
I have reduced my weight by half.
How long shall I stay?
Husband (wiring back) An Another
other Another four weeks.
while a number of shorter trips to
Jacksonville and other cities in
the state will be made.

THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK
Established 1888

S. A. E. POP DANCE
An interesting event of Satur Saturday,
day, Saturday, October 6, will be a pop dance
at the S. A. E. house, immediately
following the Florida-Southern
game.
F CLUB DANCE
The regular F club dance will
be pulled off Saturday, October 6
at the new gym. J. J. McCranie
will furnish the music and the Tri
Sigmas will furnish the company.
Will it be a real hop? And how!
Begins at 9 and quits at ?? ? Ad Admission
mission Admission SI.OO.
FOUR YEAR COURSE
IN COACHING GIVEN
Coaching, as a course, has been
added to the University curriculum
this year. This new degree is B.
S. in Education given at comple completion
tion completion of four years of studying
the Coaching course. The course
is well filled with subjects of suf sufficient
ficient sufficient variety as to make its
graduates well rounded in learn learning.
ing. learning. Os course, the chief topics
are the various kinds of physical
education, but also there are sci sciences,
ences, sciences, history, English, newspaper
work and a smattering of phychol phychology.
ogy. phychology.
The first year is devoted to an
ordinary study of the B. S. course.
The second year is similar to a
teachers course. The last two
years are almost entirely studies
of the ways and means of en encouraging
couraging encouraging and developing sport.
The idea seems to be one of ar arranging
ranging arranging places and ways for all
children to start and keep up ex exercise
ercise exercise with special attention being
paid to those who have athletic
ability. Health education is also
included.
The course instructs its students
in the art of coaching and of di directing
recting directing others in the various forms
of athletics and physical educa education.
tion. education. It is arranged so that the
present students may study their
sports at the time they occur dur during
ing during the year at school.
To date there are over 30 en enrolled
rolled enrolled in this department. Only
Freshmen and Sophomores are in included
cluded included because it is a new field of
study and the men further along
in college do not care to start
over again as Freshmen. The
course does not appear in the
1928-1929 catalogue because it was
not arranged until after the latest
catalog had already been printed.
Football is the first subject to be
studied and the class is full.
Alligator To Hold
Student Straw Vote
Because of the high interest in
the November election of the Pres President,
ident, President, College Humor and all the
American college newspapers have
planned a nation-wide straw vote
to determine the voting preference
on the two candidates.
All college students, regardless
of age, are asked to vote. The
complete student opinion is of
much more interest than just the
votes of those students who are of
voting age, because we can then
tell what the college world thinks
of our two candidates.
Herbert Hoover, the Republican
candidate, was borrn in West
Branch, lowa. He received his de degree
gree degree in engineering at Leland
Stanford University in 1895 and
has since been honored by 27 other
Universities. He held the position
of Food Conservator during Pres President
ident President Wilsons term.
Alfred E. Smith, the Democratic
nominee, w'as born in New York
City. He started his varied and
successful career as newsboy and
became one of New Yorks lead leading
ing leading men. He has been elected
governor of New York State four
times, and has a personality that
is rare.
The ballot will be found on page
3 of the issue of September 30 of
The Alligator and it is hoped all
students will register their vote.
All votes will be cleared through
College Humor and the returns
from the American Colleges, with
pictures, will be run in The Alli Alligator
gator Alligator about November 1.
Heywood Broun, nationally fa famous
mous famous magazine and newspaper
contributor, was recently inter interviewed
viewed interviewed by the New York Univer University
sity University Daily News. When asked
what he thought about co-educa co-education,
tion, co-education, he said: Im strong for the
co-ed and heartily believe in co coeducation.
education. coeducation. Its preferable for the
college man to have association
with women in the college rather
than otuside it.. When there is
no opportunity within the college,
the men will go outside and as associate
sociate associate with women on a lower in intellectual
tellectual intellectual and social standing, and
they often show a preference for
waitresses.
The monastic idea, of purely
mens colleges, is all wrong! I
cant see them at all.

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR

Florida Rotary
Loan Fund Now
Is Being Pushed
A committee from the Gaines-'
vi lie Rotary club consisting of
Rotarian Barney Colson, Arthur!
C. Tipton and Everett Yon went!
to Palatka Tuesday on invitation
of the Rotary club of that city, and
presented the Florida Rotary
Educational Loan proposition to
the members of that club.
The messages were received
with much interest, and it is ex expected
pected expected that several subscriptions
will be made soon by members of
the Palatka club.
Florida Rotary is squarely be behind
hind behind this great work of securing
funds to assist worthy Florida
young men through the University,
and has up to date helped nearly
two hundred young men in their
struggle for a higher education.
There is at this time great need
for funds and a special drive is
being made in the state to obtain
sufficient means to help all pos possible.
sible. possible.
Subscriptions are not confined
to Rotarians only, but, all who will
take some of this non-profit shar sharing
ing sharing stock, par value one hundred
dollars per share, payable one onefourth
fourth onefourth each year until, paid, are in ininvited
invited ininvited to participate in this great
work. The corporation has an au authorized
thorized authorized capitalization of one
hundred thousand dollars.
i m
Sidelines
Red
Muddy Waters, who has been on
the sick list the last few days, is
back on the squad fighting it out
for a tackle post. Waters has
taken on some weight this past
summer and is showing up well at
his tackle job.
Reeves and DeHoff have also
returned to the ranks. Reeves be being
ing being out over two weeks with a
bad leg, while DeHoff suffered a
fractured nose.
Clemons and Clark are putting
up a nice tussle for the pivot,po pivot,position.
sition. pivot,position. One day finds Clemmons
playing first string and the next
day Clark is at the job.
Floridas punting assignment
will probably be handled by Caw Cawthon
thon Cawthon this year. The crashing full fullback
back fullback sticks a hefty foot in the
ball and is also very consistent.
Brumbaugh and Bowyer arc
also in the running for punting
honors. We well remember how
Brumbaugh in the slush and rain
of the Maryland game last season
got off some of the finest punts
of the season.
Florida is gifted with quite a
few fleet backs this year. Mc-
Ewen, Goodbread and Bryson all
run the hundred around ten flat,
while Owens, Bowyer, James, and
Bethea are all big, fast men
Hicks and Steels are both hold holding
ing holding down first string positions
now. It is going to be a mighty
hard job to hold these ex-rats
down.
Adams, a shifty prep man from
Indiana, is looking mighty good
at quarter on Cowells rat squad.
In scrimmage last Saturday be between
tween between the varsity and rats, Al Alverez,
verez, Alverez, hard hitting halfback for
rats, was out tackling them all.
The boy was in every play and
nearly always got his man.
. i
Pheil and Presstman are two
rat linemen who are showing up
well for such an early date in the
season.
|
Procter and Dorsett are two big,
fast backs who should do quite a
bit of ground gaining for the frosh
this year.

SUITS FIT FOR A KING, BUT NOT
AT ROYALTY PRICES:
Fall Suits
$25.00 to $50.00
Burnett THE Clothier
* NUFFSED

Several Hundred Freshmen
And New Girls are Pledges
Os Tallahassee Sororities
(Continued from page One)
ton, Madison; Betty Taylor, Jack Jacksonville;
sonville; Jacksonville; Leah Adamson, Jackson Jacksonville;
ville; Jacksonville; Cornelia Mitchell, Jackson Jacksonville;
ville; Jacksonville; Christine Hauserman, Bar Bartow;
tow; Bartow; Margaret Campbell, West
Palm Beach; Aline Reis, Tampa.
lota chapter of Alpha Delta Pi
announces the pledging of Eleanor
Whitfield, Dorothy Hathaway,
Frankie Allen, Barbara Aines Ainesworth.
worth. Ainesworth. Tallahassee; Phyllis Grif Griffin,
fin, Griffin, Evelyn Robins, Louise Bullard,
Tampa; Syd Knight, Sarasota;
Mildred Burke, Margaret Irwin,
Dorothy Mills, Jacksonville; Elea Eleanor
nor Eleanor Owen; Doltan, Ala.; Eloise
Gaillard, Bartow; Mary Celia
Davidson, Quincy; Rachel Hack Hackney,
ney, Hackney, Lake City; Louisa Trellis,
New Orleans, La.; Louise Grove Groveland,
land, Groveland, Miami; Harriet McCormick,
Live Oak; Mary Scott Clancy, Al Albany,
bany, Albany, Ga.; Becky Wooten, Shell Shellman,
man, Shellman, Ga.; Meta Johnson, Savan Savannah,
nah, Savannah, Ga.; Martha Cooley, Sanders Sandersville,
ville, Sandersville, Ga.
Alpha Eta chapter of Delta
Delta Delta announces the pledg pledging
ing pledging of Theresa Robinson, Jacque Jacqueline
line Jacqueline Prewitt and Ollie Autrey, Or Orlando;
lando; Orlando; Mary Troxler and Frances
Clark, Ocala: Evelyn Ingram,
Opelika, Ala.; Lucile Davis Yonge,
Pensacola; Winifred Metcalfe,
Gainesville; Rebecca Waldrop,
Winter Haven; Marian Reid, Cuth Cuthbert,.
bert,. Cuthbert,. Ga.; Norma Seward, Arcadia.
Rho chapter of Sigma Sigma
Sigma announces the pledging of
Paul Clyatt. Chiefland; Virginia
Geislin, Orlando; Thelma Hannon,
Gainesville; Mildred Fellow's, Cot Cottondale;
tondale; Cottondale; Rita Nelson, Jacksonville;
Anne Linning, Jacksonville; Mary
Lou Reetraw, La Grange, Ga.;
Nell Wiley, Tallahassee; Ruth
Weeks, Brooksville; Rosina Merri Merriwether,
wether, Merriwether, Catherine Wayg, Lake Lakeland;
land; Lakeland; Ruby Mayo.
Omega chapter of Sigma Kappa
announces the pledging of the fol following:
lowing: following: Charlotte Baldwin, Helen
Clarkson, Elizabeth Daniel, Penso Pensocola;
cola; Pensocola; Maisie Blacksure, Mobile,
Ala.; Ella Gordon, Mobile, Ala.;
Mary Lou Methvin, Eufala, Ala.;
Helen Caldwell, Bradenton; Doro Dorothy
thy Dorothy Cawthon, DeFuniak; Jean
Hancock, Nell Hendrix, Miami;
Floie Howell, Panama City; Anna
Lou Smith, Eunice Trawick, Talla Tallahassee;
hassee; Tallahassee; Mabel Teague, Apalachi Apalachicola.
cola. Apalachicola.
Florida Bet chapter of Pi Beta
Phi announces the pledging of
Jane Allison and Dorothy Estes,
Orlando; Dorothy Blackwell and
Dorothy Dennis, Miami; Margaret
Anderson and Claudia Clewis,
Monegomery, Ala.; Margaret Dean
annd Lita McNutt, Louise Wilson,
St. Petersburg; Adeline Clough,
Jacksonville; Katherine Winslett,
Tuscaloosa, Ala.; Kathleen Scott,
Birmingham, Ala.; Gervais Pren Prentiss,
tiss, Prentiss, Indiana; Phylis Kowven-
Haven, Melbourne; Annie Mae
Henderson, Bagdad; Rosalind Wil Wilson,
son, Wilson, Lakeland; Catherine Hodges,
Tallahassee.
Alpha Sigma chapter of Delta
Zeta announces the pledging of
Amelia Toombs, Marian Gardner,
Virginia F. Miller, Ruth Jennings,
Jacksonville; Florence Lorsner,
Lake City; Katherine Consigny,
Mary Ann Hestor, Lesburg; Mary
Ellen Bailey, Quincy; Gertrude
Sands, Mary Willis Johnson, Ocala;
Elizabeth Jendevin, Peggy Mur Murphree,
phree, Murphree, Pensacola; Margaret Rob Roberts,
erts, Roberts, Tallahassee; Caroline Car Carmichael,
michael, Carmichael, Monticello; Carolyn
Bower, Bainbridge, Ga.; Lillian
Hampton, Coral Gabler; Lydia
Hickey, Morriston, Tenn.
Beta Nu chapter of Kappa Alpha
Theta announces the pledging of
'eggy Jones, Margaret Roudell,
Addie Kate Martin, Margaret Par Parrot,
rot, Parrot, Miami; Jane Anderson, Eliza Elizabeth
beth Elizabeth Drane, Gainesville; Mary
Catherine Lagsdon, Indianapolis,
Ind.; Susan Whalton, Key West.
Beta Gamma chapter of Zeta
Tau Alpha announces the pledging
of Mary Connell, Inverness; Helen
Crosley, Citra; Evelyn Stone, Pana Panama
ma Panama City; Kathryn Gibson, Thomas Thomasville,
ville, Thomasville, Ga.; Helen Shackelford, At Atlanta,
lanta, Atlanta, Ga.; Sally Lawton. Wheel Wheeling,
ing, Wheeling, W. Va.; Tommy Osborne, West
Palm Beach; Felicia Williams,
Winchester, Tenn.; Armee Bunk Bunkley,

ley, Bunkley, Tampa; Elizabeth Anne
Sharpe, Tampa; Erin Gorfrey,
Chiplcy; Marie Webster, Winter
Haven; Betty Horn backer, St.
Petersburg.
Gamma Beta chapter of Alpha
Gamma Delta announces the
pledging of Rose Jones, Jackson Jacksonville;
ville; Jacksonville; Roberta Moore, Jeanne Sim Simmons,
mons, Simmons, Virginia Burford, Dorothy
Ward, Tampa; Helen Moyer, Alice
Kays, West Palm Beach; Helen
Overton, Dot Austin, Kittie Eu Eubanks,
banks, Eubanks, Eudeka Sparkman, Plant
City; Elizabeth Croom, Valdosta.
Ga.; Beryl Wing, Dot Hefner,
Bradenton; Claire Wadsworth,
Madison; Frances Gary, Ocala;
Virginia Chitty, Gainesville; Vel Velma
ma Velma Ausin, Umatilla; Mary Eliza Elizabeth
beth Elizabeth Treadwell, Arcadia; Celeste
Fort Meade; Elizabeth
Blue, Lake Wales.
Lamba chapter "iheta Upsil Upsilon
on Upsilon announces the pledging of
Leona Ellenwood, Beatrice Mar Marshall,
shall, Marshall, Evelyn Kelly, Olive Slaten,
Daytona Beach; Mary Sue Curri Curriton,
ton, Curriton, Mary Haskins, Kathleen
Crocker, Margaret Cruise, Miami;
Elizabeth Johnston, Jacksonville;
Inez Gray, Panama City; Lillian
Fitch, Tampa; Mary Katherine
Parker, Eustis; Peyton Raney,
Jacksonville; Helen Flewelling,
Ocoee.
ma anonunces the pledging of
Upsilon chapter of Pi Kappa Sig-
Dorothy Hagan, Mary Elizabeth
Josey, Wauchula; Elizabeth Nye,
Portsmouth, Ohio; Margaret York,
West Palm Beach; Alice Lewis,
Tallahassee; Abby Sweeney, Day Daytona
tona Daytona Beacn; Helen Hamn, Pensa Pensacola;
cola; Pensacola; Mildred Finch, Century.
lota chaper of Delta Phi Epsilon
announces the pledging of Ruth
Glosser and Bessie Grechecky,
West Palm Beach; Malvine Klep Klepper,
per, Klepper, Jacksonville; Theresa Ruff,
Tampa; Helen Ruth Sloat, Jack Jacksonville.
sonville. Jacksonville.
Alpha Pi chapter of Alpha
Omicron Pi announces the pledging
of Celeste Johnson, Miami; Irene
Shoun, Tampa; Margaret Green,
Baskerville; June Fulmer, Minne Minnesota;
sota; Minnesota; Beatrice Ober, St. Peters Petersburg;
burg; Petersburg; Jeanette Littig, Tallahassee.
Delta Phi, petitioning Alpha Chi
Omega, announces the pleding of
Marie Register, Dorothy Webb,
Evelyn Ives, Mary Bryan, Jack Jacksonville.
sonville. Jacksonville.
Alpha Epsilon, petitioning Phi
Mu, anounces the pledging of Jane
Bayler, Vero Beach; March and
Jean Griffith, Ft. Lauderdale;
Daisybel Clement, Ocala; Caroline
Battle, Sarasota; Dorothy Brown,
Jacksonville; Frances Hildreth,
New Smyrna; Gertrude Gilliam,
Live Oak.
Beta Tau, pe*itioning Alpha Xi
Delta, announces the pleding of
Estelle Long, Mildred Ferrell,
Dorothy Bowlin, Laetta Burns,
Jacksonville; Mary Persons, Punta
Gorda; Pauling Sowers, Vera
Davis, Miami; Dorothy Hicks,
Tampa; Frances Hunter, Jasper;
'Elsie Gleason, Gust on. La.; Alice
jTeaehy, Jonanna Keif, Wauchulu;
Lillian Brown, Lucille Brown,
Montgomery, Ga.
; George Perrinc, of Miami, cap captain-elect
tain-elect captain-elect of the varsity basketball
team, is making his first bid for a
varsity football letter. Perrine
played freshman football last year,
and well.

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a new-shade
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|§y v lrgEjai Youll do the same among pens at this
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Student Body Heads Guests
City Executives at Banquet
(Continued from page one)
terwards, been the most sorry of
us all. These incidents sometimes
happen not only where a large
student body has assembled but
would probably as likely have hap happened
pened happened had the same number of
men assembled, and it is at such
times that good leadership can
accomplish the most. You stu studens
dens studens leaders can be of very ma material
terial material assistance to the city in co cooperating
operating cooperating with its officers in
maintaining such order as may re reflect
flect reflect credit on the city and upon
the University," he stated.
The business men of Gaines Gainesville
ville Gainesville are behind you in all your
endeavors," Sam Mixson said. We
are interested in your fun. we
want you to have your parades
and initiations up town and we
are sure that you will have regard
for property while you are stag staging
ing staging such affairs.
Dr. Myers Gives Invocation
Dr. W. A. Myres, who gave the
invocation, spoke of the coopera cooperation
tion cooperation between the churches of the
city and the University students
saying that every church in the
city was trying in every way to
associate itself with the students
and help them with their prob problems.
lems. problems.
E. D. Vestel, police chief, who
conceived the idea of the good goodwill
will goodwill meeting, spoke briefly, saying
the best way to handle boys is to
get down with them and be a boy;
too. He invited the students to
hold their pep meetings up town
and offered to rope off a block in
which they might gather for their
song;s and cheers. His only ad admonition
monition admonition was that the students
not forget and destroy personal
property.
Clay Lewis, president of the

q
FELLOWS
Call around and see our Scliloss Bros, clothes beau-f
tiful, and Silverstrype. Stylish suits,
moderately priced
* See those Collegian Shoes in
black and tan that the boys
are buying, known as
Scotch grain. Hard heels.
DAVIDS
ON THE CORNER
WEST MAIN AND UNIVERSITY AVENUE
f

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, H

student body, thanked the
ficials for their banquet and
pressed the appreciation of
University students. He
his support and that of the |§
leaders in fostering the com
tion program between the
dents and the city.
Dr. Tigert Is Speaker
Dr. J. J. Tigert, president tfj
state school, spoke at length, )
ing that he regarded the gg|
ing as a gesture of good-w#
the part of the city officials," |
pledged the return of coopog
from the University students
have no fear that the students;
do anything that will damage
property of the citizens and I
sure that they will further (j
movement of friendship." jgj
He stated that this was the 5
meeting of its kind between U
versity students and city offfcj
that he had ever heard of j
complimented the officials on %
novel and unique method of
curing the cooperation of the i
dents.
City Manager W. A. Ford i
Dick Troxler of the Univeri
made talks in which they
phasized the value of
between a city and the Univen
students within its boundaries.
Music for the occasion wsa ff
nished by the Florida orchejf
and by the High Speed coki
quartet.
Larkin Carter, municipal jud
acted as toastmaster and gigi
the meeting along in ship-shi
fashion.
ei I _J!JL l .?>g- 1 1 LJ-HJBII
Mother, Dad or Sweetheart taj
home will appreciate nothing
ter than your photograph, |
kind made at the Vansickel fl
dio, South side of the square. 1
dak finishing by experts. 1



Full Text

PAGE 1

AT F+ R FLO) ;Ai D A E~lASEPTEMBER 30, 1928. $1.50 PER YEAR -I. Year IWIT -h~w oHav y~4f ew, ond* wverr ashi tb potale. **cord, A tot. ftr ex nt in U hthe phtsIv divisio... : n. 4t, tb whil hiremaixsU14 Is", of :Pharmacy With62, and the Graduate lI t ron upon *geAby -the *amthevarious ,'Jb f~mat~with 'T73 *?Cnmttnled on p Te~wo' up0msat, ppeaw For Help UEAE R1iM7 AT FRIDAY NIGHT I~y Good Will Event Held ati ARTJ$TSMAWhite House E wCLIJDED Hotel -ONPROGAMS1urPLED_-._ Mayor -ConmiaimaGraGne Auatin and Paul ham State. City Posi. Whiteman Approached tion Towards Boys By Council I HO Cooperation, its giving and re*Ve Gene AUstin, Paul Whiteman's ceving. was the'principal theme of .mtra and other well known the good-will banquet given at the 4"' i are being approached by White Hose5 hotel Friday night by -the Lycem council in reference the executive departments of the to the early programs of the yea. city in honor of the student body At present two programs have leaders at the University. Some tt dmfttely arranged and sey90 students, citizens, and city ofow more are under the considerficials attended. W atim of the council. Declaring that the meeting was Ibe Crittrion Male quartet has arranged by'the city officials In been engaged for a program in order that they might become ac]p* M&Ury. This quartet is most quainted with the University stu"l ely known for its Victor and dent leaders and associate them* records. selves with their problems,, Mayor'ouis" Stoaigs, lyric mezzogo.ICommissioner Lee Graham sounda., v engaged for the ed the keynote of the meeting in' oadgram. Her unusual propledging support of the city ofo include songs in five facials to any activity which the es9, And her repertoire disstudents might Inaugurate. NO* varied talent. "We are asking your assistance Tb~e-prorams as a whole will in securing the good-will mad'coW e..mAs to these of la# year operation of the student body of ut moreird •y known artists, ithe University in preserving the ,tm law, preventing damse to proper-totdacorin to.. ... .ty sad in wreaw thesaety of -t-p-blic-" -. (low.Ara, said WIJRl Dr, II Coach Nash Higgins makes his first call for track candidates on October 1. Throughout the minter season Higgins will have his men working out. two or three times a week. During November and Vecember cross country runs will be taken up tO harden the runners and develop their endurance. At the beginning of the second semester the grind of daily training will st In and continue throughout the season. Florda's varsity this year shotid be a formable array of tracksters. Dick Trogden, veteran quarter and hal miler, is at the helm of the '29 squad. Gus Click and Sawyer letter men of last year are back to agaln% reel off the distances. From the Frosh ranks of last year are Rice, Presley and Hazeldine who are all good distance men. B. Newcome, McEwen, Miller and Davis are striving for a varsity berth at te quarter mile job. The sprints ae well taken cal. of by Knight, Goodbread, Bryson. Arnow, MeEwen and Bethea. In the field events Wis, Chittendon, Somperyac, Robb, Perrine, Johnson. Green -et adofcand Sauls have all returned. ::,_9hi nts and officials of the. Vivirslty of Florida are doing their bit towards giving aid to Managers Appointed thos. Sectosof-the state recentMen ly devasatd by the hurricane. For Dormitory : pdr the direction of their **Meat,'Clay' Lewis, young state For the purpose of facilitating ibMsto the stOdent body has the participation of dormitory men **-an anlve campaign and In inter-mural athletics, the followNaellhund dollars have al' Ing men have been appointed manI 1** 4 besursed Although 90 agers for the various sections in pf cent of the 4kaor students the two dormitories: "aMa pVrt of their way through Thomas Hall-A. D XKing, secedgead an even larger pertion A; 11. S. Rains, and M. A. ta re a going to school on Cole, action B; "Red" Evans, seevery limited beak accoMts, the tion C: David Lanier, section D; "00Mha bee s gftlf)1g. DoJohn Marsailles, section E; Fred M010" fom thee b"Sare a diL. Petray, section F "Wet Mut of,, a ree "crifice, 'Buchman Hall-T. R. Webb, seceve, if it is relatively small. tion A; Leon Jones, section 1 3;J. Under a special license from the L. Saunders, section C; Owen Rice, SFe d AdoOismmissien, the section D. ndw State and University statlpn WRUP, has been on the air all th* week asking for relief funds, 1MwU555Wse, Dr. Jja J. Tigert, president of oW B I the University and former United 1tato Owmmissioner of Educaties, hii been one of the speakThe largest class in chemistry in eft Whos voice has been carried the history of the department is to the Unasea aUnce throughout enrolled this year, according to a the easterni half of the ntiton, statement issued from the office of SWthil WRMI U now-doing its Dean T. R. Leigh of the College of best t bfg direct aid to the PharmacyThere are about 750 sterus eWphe sections, its greatstudents in' the department this eI 11ald r will comew*ons yat ,.showing an increase of more vp& pgms" m go on: thaeMn 1OO over last year. 41W e M October I 1 4A 0A gratqr interest in advanced of g o work in chemistry Is also being eVl buck to other per tsoftj sbewn There are 94 students eucoatyO whic have rMpojded ,rolled for third year work as eOmIMMUMt07 to a for relie pa rd with 75 students in this mosey. course lat year. traeien wits a view to bringing about the most cotdla rlatons between all city offibil ,and the student body; he smted. Desire to Help !$Adent "It Is the desire of,,the citizens of Gainesville that e" student, after he has conplete4 his course at the University and has gone Iforth Into the world, aWy have a friendly feeling for the city where his University is 1¢Wted* i that he may feel that tho it t6ok a most friendly interest in him during his stay here and that their best wishes accompany him in his Journey through life. We'are asking you as lea to help us in bringing about !%_-h a feeling among the students," he continued. "There have been incidents in the past which we all very sincerely regret 4d I hava no doubt that many of thow. who participated In such incidents have, af(Continued dn Pix) PROF. TESELLE JOINS FACULTY A valuable additftn to the faculty of the College of Law has been added in the person of Professor Clarence J. TeSelle, who filis the vacancy created by Professor W. A. Hunter's resignation to accept a professorship at George Washington University. Professor TeSelle received his A. B. and L. L. B. degrees from the University of Wisconsin in 1911. He has been engaged in ctive practive from the time of his graduation until the present. His advancement as a lawyer is little short of spectacular. Scarcely had he received his degree, when he waS appointed state attorney and told to clean up corruption from the city of Antigo. Wiscifln. That he did this well Is proved by the fact that he served three terms in this capacity. He was later city attorney for Antigo for three terms. For the past six years he has been Circuit Court commissioner In that city. With such a background, Professor TeSelle is well fitted for his work here which will include the of supervisor of the practice court. By, and under authority of Section Three of Article Four of the Constitution of the Student Body of the University of Florida, I hereby call the election for officers of the Freshman cis# for tu-. 'day, October 2, 1921, at the hour of 10 a. m. in the Auditorhum. All freshman be present and assist in the election of your olfcers. (Signed) CLAY EWI S -President of the Stulot Body. Leroy Bethea, the "galloping," tad of theF Gator backfield. This former prep school ste. was captain of the ,freshman eleven last year and is expectAd to-:cut a wide swath in Southern Conference circles this year. He is specially talented at brokenCield running and can get off a pasa and. punt whben neded. V T ]k Florida State College For IWomen Inaugurates arsit s"'New System Appoahig op PLEDGE DAY Knotch in Form New Method Was Advocated By National PanTeam Shows Improvement Hellenic During Past Few Several hundred freshmen and Practices new girls were extended bids at the annual Pledge Day held on the F. SCRIMMAGE HELD s. C. campus Monday afternoon. A new method of handling bids, which was advocated by National Men Are Still Receiving Panhellenic, was used this year by Practice In Game the local association. Each perF son to receive a bid was notified Fundamentals of this fact Sunday and was told -to report tothe little theatre Mon. With the fourth week of varsity day afternoon between 4 and 4:30 football practice at an end, the o'clock. The bids were distributed Florida aggregation is fast apin the presence of 'a lawyer, acproaching top-notch form. Though cording to the choice indicated. the first part of the past week was The following is a list of the marked by numerous fumbles, the girls pledged by each sorority: latter days showed a marked imjKappa Alpha chapter of Kappa provement in handling the ball. Delta announces the pledging of The plays, largely because of the Leery Warren and Alice. Miller, persistent efforts of the coaches Tampa; Frances Pringle and Nan and the keen competition for Amerine, Tallahassee; Dot Robinberths, have been mastered by son and Elizabeth Clutho and Virmost of th aspirant candidates. ginia Miller, Jacksonville; ClemanThis improvement, according to thine Newman and Ashley FraCoach Bachman, is due in a large leigh, Madison; Janis Knight, Andmeasure to the nightly skull pracalusia, Ala.; Jem Halle, Ocala; tices which have been conducted in Edith Holman. Elizabeth Andress the new gymnasium. and Mary Frances Barnett, Dothan, On Monday afternoon the Gator Ala.; Margaret Hine, Dot Yale, squad was given extensive practice Haines City. Eleanor McClearen; in punting and passing. Following Thomasville, Ga.; Kate Carlton, this, the squad was run through Eufla, Ala.; Dorothy Newman, Ft. the stride boxes, then was given a Myerst Julia Dickinson. Lakeland; series of calisthenics. The dummy Elisabeth Turnbull, Sanford; Mil. and the charging machine were dred Early, Geneva, Ala.; Cynthia then given due attention. The reBrasenhom, Pensacola. mainder of the afternoon was spent Chi Omega anounces the pledg. in dummy scrimmage and signal ling of Marie Daughtrie, Marianna; practice. I Carolyn Thomas, Bradenton; Lyra Tuesday the usual routine of Burwell, Miami; Betty Brownlow, passing, kicking,+ taking the stride Jacksonville; Elizabeth Ramsey, boxes and hitting the dummy was Tampa; Jane Graham, Gainesville; cut down in order that more time Mary Lou Tutewiler. Jacksonville; might be given to scrimmage. The Catherine Lawson, Orlando; Mary Ai ernoon's scrimmage was markFrances Whlteslhe, Apalachicola; ed by much fumbling on the part Mary Kennedy, Quincy; Isabel Berof the backs. ry, Jacksonville; Dorothy Tucker, On Wednesday afternoon, for the Gainesville; Carita Look, Panama first time, each of the four teams City; Caroline Cockrell, Gaineson tle squad was given practice In ville; Virginia Lannigan, Charreceiving and kicking off. Stanley, lottesvile, Vs.; Elisabeth CampClark and McEwen showed up to bell, Badenton; Margaret Gaiad, be more consistent in distance and Jaccmonvlle; Grace GOanon, placement than iy others who Tampa Mary' Downey, Jacioawere used during the afternoon. Ville; Mary Hale, Gainesville; For the benefit of the students a Marie Canboy, Quincy; Hrriet scrimligeunder the direction of 1He~er, Mobile, Ala.; Ev elyn Hor(ontinUed on P Oir). J (Cotne on Page Slx):Varsity Wins Benefit Game From Freshmen f -.---r GATOR SONGSTERS MAKING FAST PROGRESS; MORE THAN HUNDRED HAVE TRIED OUT Large Number Working Hard For Band Plaas Many Trips Planned Year Offer Big Inducement For "Something over a hundred men are now out for the University band," R. DeWitt Brown, director, states, "and this number will eventually be cut down to about 75." Mr. Brown believes that the band is in unusually good trim for this time of the season and is confident that Florida will have a band this year of which she may well be proud. The first public appearance of the band in uniform will be at the Southern game in Gainesville on October 6. At that time 75 eager Florida musicians, garbed in their natty band uniforms, will send the stirring tunes of the "Orange and Blue" across the gridiron to cheer the Florida team on to victory. Plans are almost certain that the band will go to Savannah -for the Florlda-4eorgia game. The University will contribute a part of the necessary money. It will ~~llI#* eind two years ago at the beginning of the present series of GeorgiaFlorida game, was In Jacksonville last fall when the teams met again and will, of course, go to Savannai this year. Perhaps it will be the faithful support of the band that will help Florida to cast off its two year jinx and throw Georgia down in defeat this fall. The many trips made by the band are a constant encouragement for the University boys to do their best to make the organization. From present appearances, every rat who ever had a musical instrument of any 'sort in his hand, is out there trying to make the band. They are making up in spirit what some of them might possibly lack in musical ability, and some of them are going to make that band just because of their enthusiasm. Not that we don't have real musical talent in the band, or that enthusiasm alone will make the grade, but the combination of the two is Irresistible. George H. Smith, captain of the band last year, having graduated from the ranks of the R. 0. T. C., is manager this year. We all remember the precision with which the band drilled last fall, and if that is any indication of the new manager's ability, the band is sure to be an overwhelming success. Freddie Baetzman was elected assistant manager, but it is not cercertain whether he will return to school. Sid Herlong, last year's top sergeant, is at present acting as captain, and will, in all probability, receive that place when appointments are made. Matherly Addresses Teachers In Tampa Dean Walter J M.atherly of the College of Commerce and Journalism will addresar.the Florida West Coast Teachers association in Tampa on October 5. His subject will be "Some Foundations of Public Education." On Wednesday, September 26, Dean Matherly .addressed the Brooksville Kiwanis club. He spoke on "Private Roads to Public Service." Dean Matherly appeared on the same program with Mr. F. P. Cone, President of the Florida Bankers Association, at the banquet of the American Instiut of Banking held in Jacksonville Friday night, September 28. His subject on this ocain was "Emipoyer and Eni", ployse Relationsips." During the banquet diplomas were presented to the members of the class in banking, which Dean Mathery has+ been conducting In Jacksonville during the pas year. Club Will Have And Alternate Sections Regular 2 TRIPS PLANNED Plans Are Now Underway For Annual Home Concert Rapid progress is being made by the University of Florida Glee. club under the leadership of Dir-1 ector John W. DeBruyn. Over one hundred men have tried out for the organization so far and of this number 60 have been selected. Thirty men compose the regular section and the other 30 are alternates. As the Glee club is managed strictly by merit, the alternate always has the opportunity of replacing the regular singer. The club is planning two trips for this year. The first will be a trip to such places throughout the state as will afford the university the greatest amount of publicity and profit. The second trip will carry the Glee club out of the state to several of the outstanding women's colleges of the south, including Wesleyan, Agnes Scott, Brenau, Woman's College of Alabama, Florida State College for Women and others. There are possibly some men in Laceo wi av not yet tired out given a tryout if they report im.mediately to Professor DeBruyn at the studio. The Glee club is an organization ftj, men interested in music and who have the talent required for admission to such a group. All students who are interested are urged to arrange for a try out immediately. Plans for the annual nome concert are now under way. The club promises as versatile and Interesting a program as they are capable of producing. Officers for this year are: President-Billy Matthews. Vice-President -Aubrey Dunscome. Advertising Manager -Robert Filson. Librarian-Pete Hatfield. Auditor-Robert Yeats. Business Manager-A. A. Murphree, Jr. Those who compose the regular section of the Glee Club are: First tenors-Billy Matthews, B. D. Cox, A. B. Cox, Dean C. Donaldson, J. M. McEwen, L. B. Hjermstad, Joe Carter, paired with A. Johnson, G. Edward Pritchard, A. E. Wilson. First basses-R. S. Yeats, A. S. Dunscome, Pete Hatfield, Bobby Andreas, R. H. McCaughan, H. E. Newcombe, paired with Joe Wilensky, Robert B. Bennett, Jack Miller, and W. Everett Robinson. Second tenors-A. A. Murphree, Jr., Wm. W. DuBose, David Eugene Moomaw, Bill Lathrop, paired with T. Neff, Manley A. Cole, paired with N. MacFarlan, N. W. Knowles, Warren Connor. Second basses--Archibald Clayton, Ole L. Sands, R. L. Filson, G. T. Smith, T. R. Webb, Gerald Strum. Pianists -Claude Murphree, Freddie Geehan, Barclay Roser, I Kenneth Morgan, Thomas H. Buckley, and F. P. Langbehn. Professor E. T. Ingle Succeeds Armstrong Edward T. Ingle has succeeded Professor 0. KC. Armstrong as assistant professor of Journalism according to announcement of Dean Matherly of the College of Commerce and Journalism. Mr. Ingle is a graduate of the University of Michigan and has taken postgraduate work at the University of Wisconsin. He has had several years of practical newspaper work on the Indianapolis Star and the Cleveland Plain Dealer. Before coming here. Professor Ingle was head of the department of journalism at Ohio Wesleyan University and was named head of the journalim department for the proposed collegiate tour abroad. GUIESIO. ington, "it is certain that there s a larger proportion of the etase f 1932 depending on earning A. part of their expenses Wle In school than In any other eAhring during the last five ye&= s" 'The majority of positions avaibabl around the campus have been taken by returninguea k and only a 1n31) number weren't' open to members of the fresh of Thtk1 All Florida Men For a Bigger and Better Florida arner C), IR $1.50 PER YEAR Gators Play Hard During First Half; Slow Up in Last RATS FIGHT HARD Over Six Thousand Watch Tilt Staged for Aid Fund The varsity of Coach Charlie Bachman ran rough shod over the. less experienced rat eleven in the game at Jacksonville yesterday. The varsity had things entirely their own way during the first half and piled up a score of 32 points over the freshman squad. It was only in the latter part of the tilt that the freshman made any appreciable progress against the attack of the varsity, but' even then were not able to penetrate the line of Bachman's eleven hufficiently to score. More than 6,000 people turned out for the tilt, which was played for the benefit of the storm relief fund. They were well rewardecL for although the contest was only an exhibition gane the plucky fight put up by the out-clased rat team, was worth going to see. The game was featured by two spectacular runs, oup when Red Bethea tore through the rat line and ran down the field 73 yards for a touchdown, soon after the game started. Jimmy Nolan made another fine run for the Vift when he intercepted a pass of the frosh and ranced 70 yards for another counter, Crabtree, -Brumbaugh, Owens, and Vansickle all peetrated the# defensive of Coah weIlie'4seve (for tiuchdiwm, V okle aulno two trips down to the rat goal wi The game was lntsnr numerous substitutlOn by coac" of both eleveus, who evidetly we making of the game a trial under fire for as 'many of their charges as possible, and the teams should be benefitted by the tilt wa*i-hWill enable the respective mentors to remedy the weak points in both offense and defence. The freshman have reason to be (Continued on page Five) Need Exists For Student Jobs Of Part Time Work Available Positins Ar At a Minimum at Present Figvres Show With the number of students in need of part time work larger this year than at any other time during the past, and with the number of available jobs at a minimum, Dr. J. E. Turlingon, chairman of the faculty committee on Self help, issued a request this week that all persons in the university or in Gainesville who can possibly 4jhe student help, communicate imlediately with R. C. Beatty at the college Y. M. C. A. One hundred twenty-five applications for employment were received by Mr. Beatty before the opening of school, and 75 ad~ilonal applications have Since been received. The Gainsville Coamber of Commerce has given It. a14 in the situation by sending circuar letters to all business men inGaes ville, explaining the situation to them, and requesting that all opportunities for odd job.'he turned over to students to ff1 iltemi. Mr. Reatty emphasisd the fact. that he could fill practically any form of employment as .he has a large list of students to draw fromn. So far this semester, the +Y M (, A. has filled requests for office workers, mechanics, chauffeurs, laundry assistants and garees "Although acurt fiue are not as yet avalabe," said Dr. 'ri

PAGE 2

SUNDAY. SEPTEMfP. WtAIILThA AliT T(~ATOR .......mper .........W wton i"~s ... .. ... .. .. ... ... .. ... .. ..Bob a 17 -Sa* mwibg dung footballbsaaeey 4eS4ICiI*inatter at, the Poit Office at Gatuos"il*, w4% mail or 0511*9? delkverad, $.0per. year.. UW Managing HU~e ftnaer, 584-W, Editor.......800 It hMua # the nolley of the AIJigator to *,A tentforum for the 'purpose of giving the $ to e preu their opinions. However, for 1fe this policy has not been followed. This w$4 Rs to revive and continue the forum. to this department will always be wel;IOAXOth eY do not contain anything of a libel8 ate policies that would bring harm to I yery anxious to have the students make atrso that the Alligator may truly reflect In "bull sessions" we have often heard O tate And loudly defended but the averso mewhat loath to present them in writhave.views on some subject relating to stu* U1h~rttyraffairs that you believe are right and Allgta r readers why not hand them 6o, Alligator may not always agree with tured in for publication we will be glad to however, in orderthat we may protect our4*wp for the students contributing o Ithet aign their names to their articles or hesint6 one of the members of the Staff. ftC. A. -*Ot Of freshnn have already come in contact 4 n their arrival at the University. Some id In loecsa rooms, more of them by S e been given for their entertainment two weeks. Certainly they have found 4e are their beat friends during the storm ,Thd secretaries are on the watch see wht they may do for the students M y at the University as pleasant -'O Iyis thistrue doirnthe Arat year 4. Althrough CoI 00 ~ 4)f Jwita 1 is yfzt uainhayl41ae*ti$aItaffs In the country. J. E. "0*aM* able of Y. men, popular and to iesplre~men and cause them to do botitthem most R. C. Beatty, his a4 pong4rable experience in Y. work and 'to tJe Uiversity of Florida was secretary meh Y. And in addition to these is Miss -ow ed to us this year. Though having been ACVt7 abort time, she has alreadywon a place otivery student who has come in contact with If "hav not met this group of earnest workers A vey ejaryable part of college life. If 319t qpointed with them go over to the Y. today !q Nwill be glad to see you. The Y. has -WIM equipped with magazines and for mudc there is an Edison and the piano. There during your spAre time. morp cl U. K. D., Colson ptopms to tu P al "les" who violate iat rles over to the repective frternty. Yet the V. C. (a ma: Jority of which is composed of J *4r' £ p] fraternity men) is to continue beat. •ygU lnjoy. ing the lower-caste, or in other ,9 10 0,it words the non-fat man. However, • am YOU Inthat's all right. No man should be '-i 10111t-b tried by his inferiors! tt -SWft you like yaom 19N"TSTO FRISUMN WO *tWmras.Jathletes minus Don't drift into bad habits bew p l cause the other fellows do. 00 pofbletfresh. I is sometimes sate not to foiam O If,-shooil will stat, low the crowd. Profanity shows lack of culture. I $ : Imtttte, semsit is low-lndug not. | mt he beIBe loyal to yourself, your clas, i] your college and all who are wor--: 4 n, thy. Ll M~m "Hard study 1s 0o1e of the most ~ ~' ~~ini helpfu handmsjdens of sound stof the "G;las, china sad a roputalo :i::are" are y cracked and never weIll : m lty "He who has lost confdec can • Be umefu Dot USeless. ...... iRemember to writs bore. ~a~t$~d-WumT TOMVRMOTO=E 6oltod? Oh; wite to your mother, my boy, while you ca, aiu.s)FTq en shalyou Uve as a =ohoom Iinshlltho lteW onYUl I F li wit be too late, a t 5a wite#-Dt lay ea mw 1"'s er ty ~rawn is oauWtt Dwt rw-butdo 'al ih ,o. -l(ATich, #'V' Sook. C F .-I. latbw OI* thagIat eU4 1084 evoo sag hueoist ~I ~'n"~ ~~ unto. the. days of -Wowee thmugtb l Dii~' has a4 avaloblo work to -the It's a worty tradition you have shelf of American novel. Oovor, here, this friendly "hello" among for an neperieneed reader, the the fellows. plao is e adifficult to totI It's a beautiful t~d ltion to a low." newcoMe-sy of the wouNow shold you 1oow UWth plot ,r fl spirt of democracy which to dComma" you will find It deade pomsQsl this great lnstituned more or ) m ",a puntua" tuV. Keep it thus, my friendsion poit awoftei t beep i near your heart, even So it 19s 00fw~a" the doasacred. spalr of all great ,,as good pro. For deep down we -are all for of ish,has come to brothers in spirit-a cheery nod Vn We shall feel and a smile never cost a man a eed ~b~eo nothwlthstandfriend-but many a cloud has been ing lucky if we get you to pa;W. fted and many a burden has been Under "Clomamia yo shall find made easier to bear by just "helmany th s pehapsaa"few Oflo." them god. 400majority bad, and 'You're missing a priceless side some decidedly worse-but so are of life if you're snobby-and maywe all-ftman. be you're causing little stabs of The MsUv~ting force of "Compain to someone who wants to be ma" derives itself from the same friendly-someone who is warm force that motvates a world-ithat and living and hunwAm-who has mingles pathos #d laughter, misnever harmed you-Just wants to ery and happfias, success and live tradition with 1l0o." failure, life and death. And let's don't wait for the Producing thusly a strange conother fellow-maybe he hasn't posite that may make life liveaabe learned-maybe he is younger and one day and unbearable the next hesitWat-but' grin mpd "hello" -yet always passing fair if only and when you see the flash of h one has learned "Bull." smile, isn't it a wonderful f So out of the hurry and bustle, ing! of b the.sweat and grind let's leave to .. pause and bull-then perchance Methinks it is an ii d that for a space the frown shall be blows nobody go ad faith gone and the heartache forgotten. have, you of late -en down to the flats ? There's something new Bull, one of the component parts there and it's vibrant and powerQf Cow, the basic part of a college ful, a great, beautiful machine. education, author of "Sweet AdeIt'a .leashed force straining at Its /Mne," and the binding tie wliere'er bonds-anxious to test the mettle good fellows meet. of Its silken steel strength. I So it Is thai we present to you, It's many. years gone since you fr your edification (?), "Bull." have seen the like of it, the poDeal kindly we pray for we are tential possibilities of it, this Gabut one of you-the same hopes tor team, hard, clean and swift. and the same misgivings are ours. And the man at the helm is the Try to think of yoi-self as a fathmanyou would want 'to see guider who must of necessity be a ing his mighty force-a part of mother to "Bull," even as a calf. his team, himself hard and clean, Then gentle reader you may begin a fighter. to realize our predicament. Together for the future of Florida-nay they sweep on and on, After the manner of all good ever crowned in glorious victory. and ePjoyable bull sessions we shll speak of womn-tLe Lord I bless them. P. S.-May he a have mercy on we who are of the gentler sex. We need it. "In the beginning, Peace-and Harmony-and goodwill. Unknown Was the clash of sword, the harsh chord of dispute. Even the pangs of hunger, the shadow ofpestilence, were as strangers, 'uninvited and unwelcome. anl feasted, we*9med: as none had ever been Im eore. But someb deep down in the heart of Mamn, all W nt well. Thr a a feein, not pan nor buter, ptaps emptiness, .a new feeling that would not be sa isd -that could not be denied. A-sd the smiles faded from the face Adam, sore troubled were his subJects, and they hid themselves from his sight. For Ad#An had been too happy, too carefree. He wanted trouble. Wo got it. For it came to pass that Adam fell into a deep sleep-a sleep that lasted many howi-and when he awoke all was distizctly not well. In hi iside was an ache-no Iwainary he this time. A dull throbing ache that seemed .to rad his very soul in twain. Cautiously and with many groans he touched the spotbehold! a rib was gone, gone, vanisabsed into thin air. A good, depenable xib it was, certainly not the kind of rib to turn the traitor it proved to be. Then a vision unfolded itself before him--the lost rib-looking as no rib should ever look. And in time acting as no rib should ever act. So it was that peace on earth became a myth-that the clash of sword, the harsh note of discord, came into being-and with them wars and rumors of wars. Bencetorth the days of Adam were made miserable--even unto the washing of dishes. Then did his subjects lift up their voices aid weep-the degradation of man was begun, woman bad come in o the world. 80 it Is written that peace was To the new Preside4t-a feeble effort at greeting-we say feeble because the limited expressions of which we as mortals are capable can never hope to reveal the boundless joy, the feeling of security and of trust, which comes to us when we. reflect upon the future course of our University under his guidance. We are highly hbomred, yet we are uae to. feel ap IAlifebqn .friendA to, look.upo him sUa" an oldor brother.. Truly it s tal'be 'written o,hlm: "He has lived worthUy and well in all thinp." Thus in greeting a pledge tolive, even ae his example, a true man of Florida. Another week has passed -the *eason of the higift 1t at hand. Northward and westward they trek in twos and threes. Somewhere ahead lies the goal, the promised land where milk and honey and soft soap floweth freely. In high hope and full of spirit do they migrate-In every heart much thought of love and boloney and mush. Ah, Tallahassee, what hast thou done to our youth?-'Must Adam's martyred life have been lived in vain ? For the benefit 9f you men who first find yourself deprived of the sheltering cloister' oVU the home, of the protecting ties of the apronstring, and who are ascyet new to the ways of the world, we would like to suggest letter,9orms which we are sure will be very appropriate: 1. To be used'in writing one's fond and doting patients: Dear Folks:I regret very much to inform you that I am sinking-Please send me a ship-at once. Your dutiful son, Horatio. P.. S. You see I have to buy some more books. 2. To be used in ,writing acquaintances: Dear Mary:I am enrolled in college, so as I have nothing to do I will write you a few lines. As I have nothing to say I will close. Yrs. afftny_ ebn. b EDDIE'S CFE JUST OF CAMPUS Regular Meals and JBo"r STATWONEY SaMI WE DELIVER TME GOODS Pbone in Yoi OrdrCalli 911t I -~ .' JW.McCOLLUMANDO. The & Realstore ouhSide Sur j DeMn Matherly Is RESTRATION Pr nor Jackson noGuRn"SHOW IoGAIN sr ako r (Continued from page One) For At Rotary LuncheontwChemical Society ttL nh o p teChemihiecheseon year men, with 586, set what is Walter J. Matherly, dean of the believed to be a new record for Dr. T. V. Jackson, associate College of Commerce and Joursophomore enrollment, this is probprofessor of chemistry, was 'the nalism at the University, was the ably the smallest ratio which has principal speaker at the recent principal speaker at the Rotaryl ever existed between first and seci club luncheon Tuesday at the ond year men; it speaks well for, m White House hotel. Dean Maththe school that so large a percent-ISociety and gave a very interesterly spokeon the "Golden Age of age of last year's men should re-Iing and instructive account of his Ir isttotepoahoieso Srm the Ordinary Man." turn. The junior class boasts 295 visit to the potash mines of Stress"Greece had, its age of philosomembers while the most eruditeIfurt, Germany. During the past phers, Rome Is age of emperors, class brings up with 149. This summer, Dr. Jackson made an ex1France its age of'Napoleon, and does not include the College of tensive tour of Europe visiting inmot every country its age of desLaw. Of the students engaged in situations of higher learning, pots, but America now has its age studying for the "learned profeschemical plants, and other places of the ordinary man" he said. sion," 91 are' in their first year, of interest in England, Scotland, "When Lincoln said all men are 80 are preparing for graduation, Holland, France, Germany, Auscreated equal, he did not mean while the junior class brings up at tria, Switzerland and Italy. morally equal, nor mentally equal, the end with but 62. That the The Strassfurt deposit is unique but politically equal. Every man junior class should be the smallin that it is one of the-few sources is eligible to hold the highest ofest of the three is very unusual. of potassium sals for use in agrifice in the land," he asserted. .The graduates with 76 and speculture and for the manufacture "Since then the ordinary man cial students for a count of 47, of other potassium compounds. has received tremendous attenmake up the total of 2105. For many years the mines were tion. Politicians cater to the vote The official report in regard to worked only for common salt, of the ordinary man. The ordinary the numbers in the respective while the potassium salts were disman is the center of American branches of their colleges, accordcarded as worthless. Lelbig. about literature. Novel writers-cater to ing to classes, is as follows: 1840, called attention to the value him. In business the ordinary man College of Arts and Sciences: of potassium salts in fertilizers, has received attention. Freshmen A. B., 90; B. S., 144; and this made potassium salts of "Fortunes have been made o pre-medical, 69; sophomore A. B., prime importance at Stassfurt,' the commodities for the ordinary 88; B. S., 49; pre medical, 47; while common salt is secondary. man," he said. "And the ordijunior A. B., 28; B. S., 33; senior Following the address the offiman is now the center of A. B., 15; B. S., 16; special stucers for the present year were nercan civilization. The age of de-1ts, 1. Total: 5. elected. They are as follows: the ordinary man is an age of Cen oa lteePresident-F. G. Bratley. great wealth. .College of Agriculture: FreshVice President-Wesley Pardue. "America which has one-sixth men, 55; sophomores, 36; juniors, Secretary and Treasurer -H. F. of the population of the world and26, and1seniors,15;1special stuCurrie. one-seventh of the landed area, Repod4er--MackHumphrey. George Washington University, named for the Father of our country, carries out the traditional story told in connection with his boyhood days in the naming of its student publications. The student newspaper is known as "The University Hatchet." and the year book is called "The Cherry Tree." istration, 57; soc. administration, 1; journalism, 9; senior business administration, 30; journalism, 3; specials in journalism, 3; In business administration, 9. Total, 367.1 Graduates, 76. Total, less duplicates, 2105. U p r o d u c e s o n e -h a l o f th e c a l, c u p --. .... % .......& .... per,. cotton and other products in chitecture: (Engineering) fresh-I the world. man, 90; sophomore chemical en-" "We would have more extra-orgineer, 5; junior chemical engidinary young men of independent means enter the ministry and the Pneer, 7 senior chemical engineer, teaching profession. We should 3; sophomore electrical engineer, have more enter politics," he as30; junior eectrical engineer, 24; serted. "Wealth is a means, not senior electrical engineer, 9; soph-I an end-we should learn that." more civil engineer, 33; juniorI civil engineer, 22; senior civil engineer, 18; sophomore mechanical Bill Duckwall was elected presiengineer, 9; junior mechanical engineer, 12; senior mechanical endent of the L'Apache Dance club gineer, 4; specials, 9. Total in en-' at a meeting held last Monday gineering division: 275. (Architec-1 night at the Pi K. A. house. The ture) freshman, 17; sophomore, other officers chosen were: Buck 16; junior, 17; senior, 9; specials, otheroficeinrsucserndere C 5. Total in architecture, 64; total Frederick, introducer, and Cyril Pogue, secretary and treasurer. It in college, 339. was the first regular meeting of College of Law: freshman, 91; the club this year. junior, 62; senior, 80. Curry Witt, the retiring presiTeachers College: freshman, dent, presided during the election of officers. According to the new president the L'Apache club will probably give one large dance andJ several breakfast dances .during' the coming year. It is likely that1 the large dance will be given during the house-party, week in April, and that the breakfast Dances will come jn Febr uary And April. The list of L'Apache pledges include Bill Bond, Benny Edmonson, Royal Untriener, Jimmy Nolan, Johnny Nichols, Art Nichols, Braxton Leddy, Larry Walrath, Jack Williams, Perry Bryan, Jun Clemons, Bob Mathis, Billy Watson, Tom Perry, J. P. Harlee, Bob McWater, Herman Price, and Joe Hill. THE SUCCESS FAMILY The father of success is WORK. The mother of success is AMBITION. The oldest son is COMMON SENSE, and some of the oth e r boys are STABILITY, PRESERVERANCE, HONESTY, THOROUGHNESS, FORESIGHT, ENTHUSIASM, and CO-OPERATION. The oldest daughter \is, CHARACTER. Some of the sisters are CHEERFULNESS, LOYaLTY, COURTESY, C A R E, ECONOMY, SINCERITY, a n d HARMONYY. 'The babyis OPPORTUNITY. Get acquainted with the "OLD MAN," and you will be able to get along pretty well with all the rest of the 'family.-(Ga. Tech. '"I" Book). University of Michigan football players were presented with rings upon graduation last year. These were meant, no doubt, to supplement those under the eyes. Lyric Theatre Program Next Week lOc AND 26c -MONDAYMARY V HILBEN in SURRENDER" -TUESDAT-"THE LEOPARD LADY" With JACQUELINE LO(AN Eu-WEDWMSAT"LAST COMMAND" With EMIL JANNINGS HARWUOVD in isP D" -FRIDAY"LEGION OF THE CONDEMNED" With Fay Wray Ad Gary --SAT... YREX 3BL. 14 "1" '~ 14-1 sonmoe 3s U[IUil, 0 jur, wu; senior, 25; specials, 6; total, 306. College of Pharmacy: freshman, 28; sophomore, 23; junior, 9; senior, 2. College of Commerce and Journalism: freshman business administration, 128; journalism, 14; special administration, 1; sophomore business administration, 101; journalism, 11; Junior business admin-I New student desk set with metal boa. pia and clip tray and pencil Sto'o. walnut olomd Pon with am sture nib What do you want in a fountain pen? Here's what you get in the Wahl-Eversharp at five dollars: Writing Quality-The smoothest and sweetest writing pen that ever glided over paper. $7.50 StR dyto go the inst mt the point touches paper-no shaking'or priming. IMk Capacity-More than you'll need and much more than you'd expect in a fountain pen. Sturdinms--Built for last ing service and guaranteed to give complete satisfaction. Beauty-Beauty of color. beauty of line, beauty of finish found in no other pen. I! P .E. TO REIEiVE PI, Initiation of pledges to PiDeQ Epsilon will be held next 'rhurft* night, OctOber 4, at 7:30 AllO men are .requested to he at tht meeting and be on time. proverb reads: "'One look is worth a thousand words." When we start to tell you about our new All Draeburns,wewelU, there's the proverb in plain Chinese. ol4hns Silver Blues Silver Browns Many new dark colorings $35 -$45 Burkhim's OF COURSE -WE HANDLEHardware, Sporting Goods, SFishing Tackle THE THOMAS CO. WEST SIDE SQUARE WALLY SEZ: Eac of Napoleon'.o. dim mad to caff 8 M i baton inlhis my uppee -WALLY. dw EvevdwpKi -And the greatest of these is writing qUality, .at the high point of perfection in Wahl-Everharp Pen.There are fourteen graduated points, select the one that writes like you. Eversharp pencilsto match. You favQri store will be glad to show you the complete line. THE WAHL COMPANY 1800 Roscoe Street V A handaomneuurdy woodcloi Youpick the point that ife your wri et"roke $5 To match the Rosewood p en. itheamou. E vorthp pencil, with rifled ti. 50chly |u$3.50 Chicao Stre6alne cap Ev40,ai scto blaca or "mrfoit$3.50 A* ovudae Weld or may choice of $5 Geaula.Evonimap ld.d~a 15c PENS D PENCILS 4: N t$ -----PHONE 22 '091 All that you ask for-plus i .. .... ... i I ..... ..-... .. .. ...... OA ao Ir,ai lw-tor,,, -FtOliMA AUWkTOFt An

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PAGE TMtA $Sil Oo *t PlW" And V#WwmrYpliae [are being to ra new, admodem into be built oh" the campus $he Unvety of Flnoria ic-* to announcement today *aw dretor o, the Untversi*eid of 'architecture. Te ogthe newbuilding is eiat $75,000. eaver eects to have the Bt Doard "of Control at its iers-wtlag in order that amy be put into by tha ti* the 1929-30 gets underwayphm t infirmary has long Sfor the growing ad the new 'bug lbethe frstunit of a the total coot of which -c~W onsr~otion and to thre stories inheight, the .willbe otfTudor-Gothic :nfOWrivlin to the type of building which hAslready Planned [,thOsaxpumes of the Univerpithe Florida State, College and enea. Cahe eSpacity of the buildnos at yet-available. now.I will embowy the latest, in. in this type of, building whn eomplaiwM .furnish possible protection to of the students. 1 a I have lost a fivedollar 11-0 Was the hurried expression wm esewbat rural looking fresh0 a he burst into Dean Tel-1 0*t. office leat ursafy. Ills it4 mur an the earnest-. w" which e tld his story, .Pested in that five dollars. le told a touch, A yo family sacrifices in t I A*ght come to ola-4nd Rowhe had lost his sav7 Th% deam was effected deep~"heWounsedto do all in his1 Ir t recavr the money. anI 1.RDou of the loss in NAwl othing Moro: of It until Moanday when : the auditors office kiw6 en Tolbert that he bad *d the five dollars, and sent It *Iiio him. The dean sent word hkos hehman. When the money "0 handedto him be couldn't S iglad surprise; and with OM I sibety he said that the was not such a bad tiigo to school after all. t recalls a similar story PA tOn and Lee; it has t so long that now it the traditions of the I bost that once a stua five-dollar bill In the A Classmate saw the C4.06 floor, picked It up, and 0 i, 04'00ecounter, placing a Not pvr V t Two days later tK by' wl~i bAdlost the money came &ck tO the storele found his five 51151. tillon the counter. op bepast associate cdlis'a .,heBle Gator, was ap-j si Oi' d tn-chiief of the huI'o p. tato for the comW, acwa 15 to informaha eie yetedy. LDurward laiah also .eseoiate editor lii yea-. was seeted managing diq.. Frank Halris of last year's IIs.staff, is business mansAOM*Ag to announcement by %11 Uokwall, circulation manaf, .a silver loving cup will be xIbMAIo the fraternity that has th 64 Percentage of men sub9CM0%, to the Blue Gator. An tI -subscription campaign wi UAtared son and the staff 5 .dalu that everyone sub. Tefirst number of the Blue Gater *A be published for the -sIggame, and will be baowasii.the Homecoming edition. The Aff has had several meet. A-terialfor the coming basft Isdue anyUme. NOTICE All men who live off campus w0ht0 have the AMaor to tem, turn to address 1"i k At the 84.rml Men who have not befn gettn g the Gator and whodo not W10:4 tmaile, do the same. note taksn from the records of the *Mee of the secretary ofthe Alumnd i odatlron. At the present thai there, are some three thoqwad "Persons eligible to call themselves lorida alumnL NO doubt the lling will be of Interest to many members of the student body: Pran Vowliug, LL. B, 28, snowpraetielng law in Miami. a has hung out his shingle, and is anxious to become a life member of the Alumni association. Olin E. Watts, 3. D., '28, who will be remembered as vice-president of the student body in 192r,isnow practicing law in Jack.V.. Olin is anxious to keep In Close touch with his alma mater. Had a letter from Mell Wilson the other day. Mell says he hopes to be back for the Auburp game we're all looking for him. Who'd a thought that Bob Hodges, LL. B, '27, would be married so soon. Bob has been prac. timing law in Orlando since he graduated, but he found time enough to step off last summer, and nobody knew a thing about it until it ws allover. GAINESVILLE FURNITURE CO. Victrolas and Records. New Records Every Friday PHONE86 RALLOT Many Studo"Trying For Seminole Staff out Members of the Freshman clan are to begin having their pictures taken for the Seminole this week. Each man will receive a card telling him the date on which he is to report to Marable's studio, the photographers for this year's Seminole. Upper clasamen will receive notifications later, according to announcements of last week. "More contestants turned out this year for the Seminole thad ever before," says H. D..Aiken, ed itor-in-chfef. Mabry Carlton, managing editor and H. C. Farnsworth, business manager, have closed the contract for printing with the Record of St. Augustine. Jahn & Oilier of Chicago will do the engraving. If it is necessary prints for cuts in this year's Seminole may be made from negatives of the Seminole of last year. A definite day will be announced later as to when all write up must be in. Marable's studio is the official ft."A........... photographer and all pictures Austin Chadwick, LL. B, '23, must be taken there. was on the campus last week. Florida sent an" engineer clear THETA CHI FRATERNITY out to Arizona. W. 3. Farrell, B. TO GIVE DINNER DANCE S. C. E., '27, is "engineering" on Tau Chapter of Theta Chi frathe Coolidge dam, San Carlos, ternity will give-a dinner and Ariz. dance Friday, Oct. 5, in honor of G. M. Budd, LL. B, '27, Is now their new pledges. Supper will be a practicing attorney of the Miami served to the -freshmen and their bar. We're looking for GarlandIguests at 8 o'clock in the new din. belk this Homecoming Day. i.ing room and following this, dancC. Y. Byrd, 11 .B, '23, is living ing will be enjoyed in the ball at Delray, Beach, where he has room of the Theta Chi house on hu out is shingle. University avenue. The guest list Could go on ad infinitum, but will be announced later. maybe we'd better save some for COUNCIL ELECTS COLLIER next A~ek. next ... .,MEMBER OF CHEEK SQUAD LeA *tty LElecting E. T. "Buck" Collier as a fnember of the Varsity cheer leading squad, the Executive Council last Tuesday night at a special To niv a meeting filled the vacancy caused by the non-returning of one of the -cheer leaders elected last spring. The election of Dixie Beggs as Mr. Collier is a graduate of president and Bill Herin, viceWauchula High school, and is a president, to fill vacancies of stuSenior in the Engineering College. dents not back this year, was the O TH mnain business conducted t the FROM THE "FINALS" meeting of the Farr Literary soThe following answers to exciety last Monday. amination questions were collected "Pat&" Johnny Houck and Art by the New York Mall: Fowler rendered a couple of vocal Poise is the way a Dutchman duets that proved them quite a says boys. team of entertainers and the meet-1 Equinox is a wild animal that ling then adjourned for refreshlives in the Arctic. meats. King Arthur's Round Table was If you'll take the time to thumb written by the author of "Ten through the "Seminole" for 1012 Nights in a Bar Room." Oi l find the first record of Copernicus invented the cornu"Farr Lit' The organization was copia. founded on November 28, 1911, in Etiquette teaches us how to be honor of Dr. James M. Farr, vice-i polite without trying to remember president of the University and to be. head of its English department.j In the stone age all men were There are many prominent names ossified. on the roster of its members and The climax of a story is where the list of Its officers for the years it says it is to be continued. gone by. Professor C. A. RobertButtress is a butler's wife. son was once a leading light in the1 A gulf is a dent in a continent. society, and Captain Everett M., Conservation means doing withYon was undoubtedly the best sere out things we need. geant-at-arms that the society, If Ponce de Leon hadn't died beever had. Many others have help-, fore he found the fountain of ed to carry forward the aims of youth, he wouldn't have died. the organization, and its purposes Chicago Mother: "And now, my today are not changed. To keep dear, go in and shoot father good in touch with the literary world, night."-CumberlandCollegian. to discuss every day social and economic problems, to foster pubA total of $25,000,000 was earnlie speaking, these ara the j#ured last year by students in 48 poses of the'Farr Literary society. colleges and universities in the Membershipto open to all arts andUnited States. Of the entire enscience college men, and Freshrollment in the institutions thirtymen are especially invited to join. nine per cent were partially or Dr. Fan will be present at the wholly self-supporting. Of stunext meeting and is sure to have dents in co-educational institusomething of interest for the sotons, forty-four per cent are workciety. ing their way. A third of the students in men's colleges and a sixth NATURAL QUESTION of the students in women's colLittle Lucy-Auntine, why do leges are earning at least a part you put powder on your face? of their expenses. Of the 60 colAunt-To make me pretty, dear. leges embraced in the survey only Lucy-Then why doesn't it? -twenty-seven reported no student's SydneyBulletin.earnings during the school year. ME "YOUR FRIENDS I IFME -ATi American College Straw Vote conducted by all college dailies and College Humor on two Presidential Candidates. All college students regardless of age are eligible to vote. Returns on vote will be published in The Alligator November 1st. Mark this ballot and tear it out and drop it in ballot boxes at Language Hall immediately. Herbert Hoover Republican candidate Al Smith Democratic candidate MARK X AFTER ONE ONLY Mark this ballot at once. All votes will be collected and counted October 5, 1928. Six Fraternities Of University uce List of New Pledges Owing to a mistake, part of the list of fraternity pledge was lost and were not printed in last week's Alligator. This list completes the pledges as far as the staff has been able to determine. They are: Iheta Chi Pledges: Pete Clyatt, Lakeland; Charles Forum, Pensacola, Sam Wampler, Miami; Jack Robinson, Blythesville, Arkan-w.%; Charles Powell, Ft. Myers, Jack Parker, Sebring; Bill Bauer, Quincy; Felton Scott, Winter Haven; Dick Warren, Gainesville; Bob Filson. Sarasota; Harold Malborg. Deland; Junior Peacock, Miami; Sam Pendergrass, Macon, Ga.; Ralph McCall, Jasper; Alger Fisher, Tampa; Richard Van Brunt, Tallahassee; Robert Bostuwck, Jacksonville; Thomas Bostwick, Jacksonville. IKappa Sigma Pledges: Bob Getchell, St. Augustine; Charles Mast, ers, St. Augustine; Robert Fokes, Lake City; Charles Page, Tallahassee; Bill Rhea, Umatilla; Bill Cobb, West Palm Beach; I. L. Baker, Delray; Oscar PEson, Green Cove Springs; Bascom Hobbs, Panama City; Johnny Fiske, Cocoa; Marvin Sheppard, Jacksonville; James Lyon, Caribou, Maine; Gerald Mac Cubrey, Caribou, Maine. Phi Beta Delta pledges: Leo Beidner, Miami; Arthur Freehling, Montgomery; WilmlmaI Llpscjtz; Leesburg; Julian Weinstein, St. Augustine; Eddie Cohen, Jackson. ville; Jeo Wernicoff, Jacksonville; Harold Schwartz, Jacksonville; George Mehhr in, Jacksonville; Abe Horovitz, Jacksonville; Leon Schwartz, Tampa; Jud Fisher, New York City; Al Burger, New York City; Harold Finkelstein, Flushing, N. Y.; Simeon Heller, Flushing, N. Y.; Leon Goldman, Ocal& Pi Kappa Phi pledges: Ralph Sanford, Quincy; Bob Highleyman, Sanford; Marion Wagner, Sanford; John Andrews, Jacksonville; Fred Pearce, Tampa; Ray Renfroe, Tampa; David Frye, Tampa; Gene Permenter, Jacksonville; James Schrigley, Lake Wales; Hal Price, Two Students Resign On Account of Storm Only two students have withdrawn from the universiay on account of the recent hurricanne that swept the state, according to an announcement made by K. H. Graham, business manager of the University of Florida. Mr. Graham stated that the number of students who have bad to leave was smaller than anticfpated. Both students were from the Palm Beach district, where hundreds were killed or injured, nd many left destitute of homes. NO INITIATIONS BETWEEN HALVES OF MERCER GAME Ribbon Society initiations between the halves of the Homecoming game will not be held hereafter, it was decided at the initial meeting of Blue Key society last Thursday night. This comes as a result of complaints made by some of the spectators at last year's initiation, It was said. Plans for the annual Homecoming celebration sponsored by Bhve Key will soon be underway. An interesting Homecoming day program Is the aim 9f the society and a large attendance is anticipated. Dr. Tigert was present at the first meeting of the 'oclety. Gainesville, Rayford McCormick, Gainesville; Harvey Filaberry, WinqA;: Henry Swoope, New Smyrna. Phi Alpha Epsilon pledges: Fred Rowan; Fort Pierce; Bill Dawkins, Bradenton; Frank -Anderson, Bradenon; Frank Fraz r, West Palm Beach; Horace Prilr, West Palm Beach; Harry Dye( Stuart; Richard Everts, Lake Worth. Alpha Gamma Rho pledges: Carl T. Price, Umatifla; Bass Close. Wauchula; Ed Collins, Bartow; Orville Crozier, Ft. Pierce; Earl Smith, Delray Beach; Bruce Albritton, Mulberry; Paul Frierson, New Port Richey; William Law. less, Lake Alfred; J. C. Cox. Jr., Lake Alfred; C. R. Watson. Chattanooga, Tennessee; R. L. Brooks, Montreal, Canada: F. W. Pritchard, Plant City; R. K. Wynn, Monte Verde. Bill Dunkle The bringing of the artillery corps to the University of Florida. and the arrival of four new officers are the most important topics of conversation among R. 0. T. C. circles. The four additions to the R. 0. T. C. staff are: Captains C. S. Alexander, E. T. Barso, Gilmer M. Bell and J. F. Hepner. Captain Alexander, from Ft. Sill, Oklahoma, is senior artillery officer and will direct that part of the military deparment. Captain Barco, a graduate of the University of Florida, was orde pd here from Organized Reserve duty at Altoona, Penna., His work here will be with the artillery corps. Captain Bell comes here from Ft. Moultrie, S. C. He will instruct freshmen of the infantry division. Captain Hepner, of the artillery corps, has just completed Organized Reserves duty at Cleveland, Ohio. All of these men are capable officers and instructors, and the University Military department is indeed fortunate in securing their q!' services. Major A. C .Tipton announces that plans are being made for the erection of stables and gun sheds, and that contracts for these buildIngs will probably be let sometime within a month. This work is under the supervision of Captain FIRST-E C. C. Alexander, director of the artillery unit of the local R. 0. T. FOOT B C. The end of the first semester is set as the approximate date for TE the completion of the structures. Although the horses will not be LET US brought to the campus until sometime next summer, thi guns will arrive as soon as temporary shelter can be secured. This will take place in a month or six weeks. The artillery batteries are receiving instruction in dismounted On The Square formations, pending the arrival of the guns. The first year work will consist of the selection of gun crews and training in the use of the guns in position. Instruction with the horses and mounted formations will be a part of the second year work. The artillery I HNSW unit is attracting a good deal of interest and this should increase, as the work progresses. Physical examinations for the R. O. T. C. has been completed,, and uniforms and equipment are The Beat F being issued. The physical examI nations were made In a thorough_ manner with as much speed as the large numbers would permit. Across rroE The entire battalion should be fully furnished with all necessary )LDSMITH BECAUSE THEY LAST IALLS-BASKET BALLS ENNIS RAQUETS S EQUIP YOUR TEAM HARDWARE CO. Phone 7 N DRUG COMPANY ek Delivery Service" PHONE 152 o tanService in the City mi the Florida Theatre' UNIVERSITY BOOK STORE Headquarters for Students Text Books and Supplies Candies, Cold Drinks AGENTS FOR REMINGTON TYPEWRITERS Eversharp Pencils and Wahl Pens Basement of Language Hall I. OTTO F. STOCK Tailoring-. Dry Cleaning aud Dyein N. Side Square JEWELERS Phone 364 :-: OPTICIANS Downtown Headquarters for College Men C. H. COLES & SONS Local Dealers Established 1908 :-:. SILVERSMITHS GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA I'B ALLIGATJLOM equipment bV the end of this week. J I B o Du When these essentials have been PF Book Due completed, the military department will settle down to a regular By October 25 routine without delay. According to Major A. C. Tipton the Unive'rsity of Florida and AuDirectory--o( Student Body burn Unive~dity are the only uniIn Seco"d Edition verities i' the South which have Of Book artillery ukits connected with R. 0. T. C. battalions. This speaks well Work on the second number of for the standard of training at the "F" book for this year is well Florida. under way, according to members Captain J. M. Morris, infantry of the staff. Publication will instructor, has been compelled to probably be made by the second be absent, owing to the illness of week in October. his father. I It will be the aim of the staff --Major Tipton suggests that all to be able to distribute copies of freshmen who have not completed the second number, which will be R. 0. T. C. registration should do a directory of the student body so at once. To fail in this is to and faculty, in main, by Octohave drill "cuts" checked against ber 25. you. Sealed bids are being received for the publication of the next MISS CRAIG TO MANAGE number of the "F" book and the CATALOGUE DEPARTMENT contract will be let within a short time. Owing to a leave of absence Owing to an unavoidable delay granted to Miss Charlotte Newton in the publication work. copies of the library staff, Miss Jane A. could not be had as soon aos deCraig of the University of Illinis sired, but the distribution of this will be in charge of the catalogue edition is practically complete. department this year. Miss NewThe staff of the "F" book wishes ton is studying for her masters to thank the Student Body for degree at the University of Illiits cooperation in the distribunois. tion of the first number. !i

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-_LMDAY, SEPTEISMER Ry Om *tph. S. A. living event~ It o Varer. ts rews d 4 took I 00",I abilty1 d eitiy' by a. ~i"Onflg iR A the A, 'T. #,t p~setoi 4 made the T rhat kind Ofthe M, fret Was In thle$Is "'AtahI. fl~mrof 25,Be .trdyte Tard. ba0 %M Pwho fl'tok. rthe x s in the 50tyedback w e ia, the i Hamwton took Aid thd .i total ore *ie WWarte on0thea.d t,0. 0opt o ftoke. he team lkr their "es ,i ior *.bo pof 6000"bert lius to~ Catr on the 2T2 0 60 AobWOleswho tsnatchirs 2 mrkthe t eamoff 4rat~ljp~waee iom 4kht iIn-the Jated off' third : " lq tea wich wthe n went ba4k to 1* to tell their frienidsof O = tl fashion In w hich -fourth place to Carter qoter of a foot. wgot a fourth 14 d f0~eestroke for IThe A fa fetas adWuton fb* t4 0s Mtsing .ad Anderodh to ~pettheir ,one with credit. b P" by Ralph Ket)faM4* te Mi l & made the wtateaht t i thecourse of evts *At Gbm ftrtNft Thursday after. DOM* that the uzsters thiat WasI out fee, the lntefatmrny swim WOWsl b aitI .f t e degree etter thsal=1Y, of the 'well-known uoVnltes I01 n Oetlar actions of .the ea'uutry WOai am*oternand eJ~te "dumb, h6re was oneI S dfflty li the way of *ba~ua chamonehip temlinthe sport at ':loa and thst vMt lack ofta pbl for reulr m c enet-trainn. At the Uaioverslty of Maryland this yfr there wll be nO ebptsii oft the A4otbaoteam until after the mcb"*tocompleed. The1coac Will & IGnta ma= as temporary teO a betf each pme, and at the.l O f othe eason the team wit eleu th captain purely as ,*A b r. ,b action was taken4 OftspMU4 f t'lnlluence of fra-1 With the. oliag of the 1928 'grid bd olil a *tek hence it se[ms th tick1 tike tO d A littie plain and fancy prognosticating --a.d how: Coach Chaey BachmVAan" his debut on their m has had his grinders topping at a fast'pace siWe early i.p iber, and aow at the cloe ot fourth, wee ofpracticethe va2itty is fast shi png into an outfit of chempon'sip lpo s. Tb*Me r,,boast a wethb of material as ha never been seen on the .ars~ty berebefore, bee tomu to during the 1044 6 ev YI eat~s Olter~i' sad wi-e stiait tai d that For tht. first tiih in the history of the school, lIotidi w have reservis Who cs be. cOunted on to go into the breach and fill the first stiltiyeo ja o "tin a creditable more candidates for each position who #e very nearly equal in ability, &n4 therefore the competition ~, y keen. The fight for posts has done much to bolster 'the spirit of te teens a"i& i iew of the yert at their work-outs wil AqniM6 i joit6a most casal observer the fact that the Oatrse Ave, the old spirit-the ",'t"that will carry them to Some writers like to write in a "p~sI*tic' ve1O even though they 4",nalsvfeel optimistic, and others vibe versa. This writer, however, feels optimistic and gets a kick out of saying so. N'erertheless although everything seems to be of a rosy hue now, three weeks *0nctle eltaaM4Ienty be chfibtic. Players who look good in practice .be..of the flat-ire variety in. the regular game tilts. ~'.writerOVaOU04s the con6 4 ,, A 4 wil ep eglt f i games. Thistbeoto is made on the toidto that Ineligibilities or bkaules do not rob Baehman of bi Important machine cogs. Mnum even a few of his valu" performer, Bachmana's outfit may degenerate from a #owerfui eleven to onI y A.4 me dle team However, considering the seniors graduated last year, the number of sophomores on the team, and especially on the line, the season sod be counted a success I' ma n wu six of his nine .new coach cannot be expected to jump into a school, pounce upon grid, candidates and in a few short weeks whip them into a title-winning aggregation, eseially when he has to wean them frum their former style of piay. Georgia is our pick asthe .squad which may stop the Gtrs. 1Vttb ha the word "marIa sed Th Ihfldgs An100 for .wh~p the fuorlithnd btetat *, look oft iGeorgia's buldog. Teibiessee also has a break in that te gai s payeds wt4xyile and in much different weather than that which the dators will be accustomed to on thxe I'lorida gridirons. There. Is only a slight possibiit that a break in the game ihigh give the Generas. Wolrpac Or 'leatsa victory. In concluu n our admoniatlon to the conferenc team is to keep a watchfiioptic on Georgia Tech, Vandy, Georgia, Alabama. Tennessee and Florida. These should be the big six at, the close of the conference season. Your Hair Cut to FooA ll AtwoodAddretm SPECIAL t4OTCt1 TORc eAwards Commerce tuden ow AND WHEN TO USE YOUR STUDENT TICKETS -t "This book is for the stu~ient only ad cAnnot be used and Fresh t ts A by any other person. In adopting this book every precauand, P rfshmen footbatll te~ the thisy year willreceive beautiful tro-I Professor Xa .Atwopd, a new ton Was used to protect the students and if you comply plbes. These prizes are b member of the faculty of the Colwit all the rules and regulations that are published on given bytie ukim of Burk-,1lege of Comerce and Journalism, the'back page of this book no confusion will arise. There him's clothing tore. For severalpedged his support to thCe Colnare 25 coupons in every book and there is one for every years Mr. Burkhim has made it a merce club at its first meeting point to always award the Varsity, last Monday night. Professors athletic event that will take place on the campus and also captains with some token. Dolbeare Wilson, Hurst and My-1 additional ones THAT MUST BE exchanged at the' AthThe trophy for the Varsity cap-]ers expressed their interest in he, reric Office for any outof town or state event or game tain, "Goof" Bowyer, is a large club in short Informal talks GenO orange and blue blanket With the' eral plans for the future were disthat is played by our tetirs. word captainn" in the ceniteiof cussed in a sort of get-together EVENTS AND COUPONS TO BE USED it. The Freshmen captain who iS meeting following the talks. Southern vs. Florida-Oct. 6-(Here)-coupon No. 1 elected at the close of each sea-1 "The club expects to start thelubrvsFoid-c.1-H e-opo N.2 son, willareceive an orange eandnew yearwitha constructive andAuburn vs. Florida-Oct. 13(Here)-coupon No. 2 blue pillow top with the Words interesting program," said PresiMercer vs. Florida-Oct. 20--(Here)--coupon No. 3 "Freshman captain" on It. dent Rozear In summing up the Ga. "Rats" vs. Fla. "Rats"-Oct. 26(Jax.) -coupol future of the club. "Every man No. 4-* S registered in the College of CoinN.4 ferce and Journalism is eligible N. C. S. vs. Florida-Oct. 27(Jax.) -coupon No. 5i and urged to attend the next Sewanee vs. Florida-Nov. 3-(Jax.)-cupon No. 6-* Tuesday afternoon' L meeting, Monday night at 7:15, Georgia vs. Florida-Nov. 10-(Savannah)-coupon Tuesday afternoon at 2 p. m. at room 204, Law building," was the Glenn SpringS the Dormitory Secwish expressed by the president In No. 7-*. tons and the Boarding-houses will be out for their annual water frolic which is expected to surpass everything that has been put over in this Intramural sport by the Dormitory League. Those who saw the interfraternity meet last Tuesday and Thursday have some idea of what is coming this week but it will still be something of a different nature from the fraternity outing because of the exceptional enthusiasm shown for swimming by the dormitory men. Jack Hall stated last night that the fraternities not only demonstrated marked spirit and fine athletes but that they broke ifeir last year's record for the number of frats taking part in the events and set up a new standard of 17 which is seldom surpassed In similar events at other universities. It has been the practice of the Intermural Department to urge all Boarding-houses to organize as a unit of the department by turning in a name for their house alon% with the names of those who are affiliated with the unit whether they do or do not live in the house but who have not and are not going to take part with another league in a particular sport. During this last week there were two units thus formed; namely the Mizell House at 214 Washington street and the Cobb House at 1720 W. University avenue, with E. N. Edris and Perry Miller as the respective managers. CLUB PREWIDKT Bernard English, editor of last year's Alligator, was elected president of John 'Marshall Debatilng society last Monday night at the first meeting of the year. Other officers elected are: vice-president, A. K. Gillis; secretary-treasurer, H. N. Casebier; debating councIl representative, Ed Miller; reporter, A. E. Summers, Jr.; sergeat-atarms, Hank Baynard; critic, Mabry Carlton. Dean Trusler addressed the society on the value of the clft to Freshmen lawyers. Following this W. M. Pepper explained -the purpose of legal fraternities and their position on the campus. The next -meeting will be held Monday night October 11 at 7 p. m. in the Law College. concluding. The officers for the ensuing year include president, Rozear; vicepresident, $eson Glass; secretary, W. A. Wilder; treasurer, W. W. StrUm;. bizagcounc l representative. Forest Asbmead. VARSITY TEAM NEARING TOP K.MOTCH IN FORM (Continued from page One) Coach Bedenk was staged on Fleming Field between the "C" and "D" teams. During the same time Coach Bachman gave the "A" and "B'f teams instruction on several ne.v plays. The improvement in the Work over Tuesday's practice was agreeably outstanding. Thursday afternoon was given to the usual routine followed by a scrimmage. The team worked smooth in this practice. Friday's practice was light, due to the scheduled game between the Freshmen and Varsity to be staged in Jacksonville yesterday. Special attention was given to kicking off and receiving. Cawthon, Brumbaugh and Bowyer seem to be out distancing their fellow backs in punting, though Ctabtree has been getting off some good left footed kicks.. Ed Sauls, protege of Coach Brady Cowell's rat team of last year made his appearance Monday and is fast working into form. The pivot position is being hotly contested by Ben Clemons and Clark. Clark was on the "A" lipe up during the first days of the week but was supplanted by Clemons during the latter part of the week. Reeves returned to the ranks after being out on account of an injury for about ten days. Jimmie Steele, husky Tampan, has been doing outstanding work at leit guard. As a sophomore, Steel's football future is brilliant. Stanley has been running regularly at his flank position While DeHoff and Vansickle have been used 'alternately at the other. Gus Clemons and Hicks have been holding the tackle positions. Allen, McRae, Perry,. House, Nolan and Norfleet in the line have been showing up well during the past week of work. The powerful drive of Bethea and Goodbread has been the source of comment on the backs. Others in the backfield who have been showing up well are Owens, Yancey and Bryson. "Home of the Vitaphone" MONDAY AND TUESDAY The Sweetest Story Ever Told Al Jolson !B .C. Mtey, H. .1 0. D. Moore, Prop. G; .Fox Movietone News gig i'I 'The Jazz Singe' WITH 4 DE LUXE VITAPHONE ACTS VISION OP SPAIN LEO CARRILLO 9EN£ETT TW'iNS YACHT CLUB BOYS Mat., Oc-Nite, 60c TOUCHTON DIUIGJ9 COMPANY COMPLETE NUNNALL CtANDY DEPARTMENT DRINKS.-CI D II Clemson "Rats" vs. Fla. "Rats"-Nov. 12-(Orlando)coupon No. 8-*. Clemson vs. Florida-Nov. No. 9-* Miss. A. & M. "Rats" vs. Fla. "Rats"-(Here)-coupon No. 10. W. & L. vs. Florida-Nov. 29-(Jax.) coupon No. 11-*. Games marked with (*) are the coupons that must be exchanged for other tickets before admittance will be allowed. NO COUPONS WILL BE EXCHANGED ON TV, DAY OF THE GAMES SO BE SURE AND GET YOURS EXCHANGED BEFORE THE DAY OF THE GAME. DON'T LOSE YOUR BOOK BECAUSE IT IS GOOD FOR THE ENTIRE YEAR AND ONLY TO BE USED AT ATHLETIC GAMES OR EVENTS. "GO GET 'EM GATORS" "LETS GO GATORS" ATHLETIC DEPARTMENT University of Florida. Giant Press Put in For Eigineer Dept. The civil engineering department of the university has installed a giant electrically powered press for instruction in the durabiliy and resisting qualities of constructon materials. It was brought to the university and set up in the east wing of the engineering building, shortly before the close of the secon semester last year, but was not put into operation until last week. On Friday of the past week a group of experts from the state road department demonstrated the practical value of the machine by using it to test the strength of concrete blocks to go into constrrction work. They found it very satisfactory, and talked of adiising departmental heads to buy a similar one for their work. The press is set up on four uprlht steel rods. The materials to be tested are placed on a steel block in the center of the rods. The press then slowly descends until it OLD crushes whatever may be beneath it: It is capable of exerting a pressure of four hundred thousands pounds. The civil engineering department is expecting the press to facilitate their Instruction in road and bridge building. Charles W. Bachman, new U. of F. football coach, was recently referred to by Knute Rockne as one of the ten leading football coaches in America today. THE LETTER SHOP Public Stenographer MUitigraohing Copywork, Special Rates to Students. All set Looking right is d first ste toward feeig smart, swagger OW abolutely waterp -you can always'! through with your plans no matter =ow a break you get on the weather. Tko,, look at the smart Alligator models. AhlUZa Balloon Cloth Coats-Alligator Coleta Sliekers -Alligator Jap Silk Coats. ._-: tors are sold only-at the best stores andread from $7.50 to $25.00. See the new Aviation model at $10.00. The Alligatee Company, St. Louis, Mo. ALLI GATOR TrAD-MARK REG. U. S. PAT. OFF. JI S. Bodiford & Company Drugs, Medicines, Chemicals, Etc. AGENTS UNITED CIGAR STORES THE ART & GIFT SHOP MRS. F. D. SHEPPARD 206 E. University Avenue Greeting Cards -Party Favor. Dennison Crepe All. 14I Anything in the Drug Line I VIDAL DRUG COMPANY I., GOLD as flornsby the Blindfold bats 1000 II t K: r takes ciga rette test Romsns HORNSBY.,. capable manager of the Boston Braves ... captain of the 1927 New York Giants ...manager of the 1926 St. Louis Cirdinals, who won the World's Series. 9'They say 'there's OLD GoLDS. not A cough in a carload' of can tell you there's a kome-rux hit in ever46o1 -mouthtul. "Fot -other cigarette, of the four leading brands in the blindfold tet, could compare with OLD GoLDs for pure pleaure to tame, t6gue and throat." Ms. tfolsny was asked to smoke each of the four leading brands, clearing his taste with coffee between smokes. Only one quesnon was asked • "Which one do you like bet?" What gives OLD GOLD this winning charm? Here is the answer, in three words...heart.leaftobacco. No coarse,heavy top-leaves of the tobacco plant...for they irritate the throat. No withered giround-leaves... for they are lacking in aroma. Only the cool and fritgraiatheart-laws -.. golden ripe... can give L L theirhonev-lik# smoothness. That's why you eaft tell them in the dark. CQGARElIS Made from the aro of the tebacoe jl A SHOES SLeather MADE BY ENKICOrT JOHNSON 3.95 fL & L MENSSHOP WOoLWOTH biN I MOOTRBR AND BETTER-"NOT A COUGH IN A CARLOAt I 1i O N ... ........, ......... .. i 17 -(Tampa) -couponI m Iiw

PAGE 5

200.8 Mters-1460 KC 4wlii VOsVmfity of Floiwa at AG'aineeville j~ ~~~~~ I#ad Otbr1to: October 15, 1923. October 1, 1928 100 as. Homemaker's hour and music. FWd1oaotionar feattores, announcements and musie. 1:00 p.m. Noontime program-1/?. hours. Weather forecast, agricultural information, announcements and music. 3:80 p.m. "Tea Time Musicale". 4:00 pm. "University of the Air"-i hoar. A:00 p.m. Dinner music--1 hour. vqoi~y -aru' bring them alovgOw, .'A tbS(a~t bWtiae to do a w aggropkim A It. asFlord* Is to be. k MaWdefeated Florda in last year. Baxt W~e*WY Ktbt they will not have a that this will be any set. i the Reu nd Black. Florthe grea (es ga t '$rto. a tdeila the first ha, and ergia ~ after :the gsmn It opposition that'they had a'I don't think that (leorl"s ~is going to be. the iosstr Zand 1 do thinli that FW~tils Year Is goig to be a it bette than they wm, laJt 11 when they were far, far re woosi~, FWostdthe wlo#I these 0rays," li ,i aa ,N.Y.: -Unal i Pittatrh IS; VOW, st 0nPa. Lafayette 70; 'Aatbrt. Ms.: ,Anpt Srus:Syracuse 14; Ho-' bus:Capial29; Bal8l: t Xavler 19; Ky,2. Foedham: ros) SVat;It venture 0. t N..H.: Dartmouth 39; Gcgo: .lcao 0; soa; At f0 Wittenbers. x.; 0. At ife*-.spwlwk p:N. J.: ;utt.Conn.: Wo.14; Bat At Oronao, Mpi: gains 20; At 'AilestOWrn, Pa.: Mabecoee 1t~h~dl~a pennsylvastal At GeOMgtown, D. C.:; GeorgeAt oleg Prk-Md.: via~pe UOOO*: 1&0.Allegbeny At lAwlIOagM Pa.: Buoba"l1;, tUYhilIm 0. AtkMmes, S. C.: Cie.... 4; ~vdoa0. AtGrenileTena: Kfng0; -A IahaPa.: Lehis 1; .4.b" 0." Aminapolis: Navy 0; Davis rsna 0. tha th e t o mtory sei MO*in,.uW04O nfrSmnt twowes -efore the mrs gam nished it epecteddto By tIe s mager wian bequle CAll "fpotsw umwoedby heintf, andhe ding o"barA t rot tor the vaouss ports has been ordered aid isdue to be boem *11km ta* next few days so that the Intramural dormitory sect'" Muap theunt rmaters S Ythe gataersmny have it for their cuts ta from one to two weeks before the firstrgame il the sport scheduled. By this n*Ut~e Unlt managers will be able ;M theW. standard of play, In AL the sports sponsored by the intramural a le department this I8 0 bygOPeoter attesting Other more passivestudents totake p4t byt. lagba contestant rather a spectator. Cdss-sng the great amount Of enthusiasm and interest that the posmen on the campus had for j ta!.auwas last year, nothing was said about the destruction of equipment, such as balls and adnt lose of some of t etdonted articles. The .b"d is trirtrequests the unit m a n ds to give ster attention f ithe bnVery frst to this, so that tbae a rtll always be a sufficient m .CAM to take e th normal WeW Andnecessary replacements. A list-of dormitory section manse s t been prepared ande'on will be posted on the bulletin board In each section of the donitores the barrack. and in Florida hadl -oM& nent reference of men in tO6 sections. For the pa week reffu o bulletins issued from U AWMU Aturldepartment havq bern distributed over the campus fA*W biMlls,, In the dormitories, neary' stores and to every teterity and the popular expreasslo l .s"that a omstae gra doI and I Mi t tPMdy growingand .410 e.1amry 1011111 toiacnseae the number of issues each week from, two to three, orw y Asheintramural seasolaOo biWM the lengthy and weighty ?rVOesss'of considering to finality the smY, m.tion.placed bef '$he iambers of t*e 400,44 ed COdleir reguilt' wPork to vote in Albert Baker, fsmsa Jaeizsois h take the places 0C :06 Oi$Mpe, as track~~.....*..bership ofhe Lat is VarstyWins.B. fit GnFrom Fresblmwu (Oaiudfrom page Ones) proud of the fact that they dms w As first downs during the jp than 4d the more expntaoo *atuity eleven. Uhes unmmy of the ga"ntoi as EH. Gr&off................ by CL. O.wCens ............. Av R. G. sMe ,.................Prto H. yL sou.ka c"JtMe ..... ft. oweu, Vanooeles .; Rumaugh (for Stanley (for N 2.n) Zowypr October 2, 1928 1t1:00 a.m. Homemaker's hour and music, 10:80 a.m. Educational features, announcements, 1:0.0 3:30 4:00 6:00 8:00 and music. p.m. Noontime program-I 2 hours Weather forecast, agricultural information, p.m. p.m. p.m. p.m. announcements and music. "Tea Time Musicale". "University of the. Air"-1 hour. Dinner music-i hour. "All Florida" City programs--21/2 hours. October 3, 1928 10:00 a.m. Homemaker's hour and music. 10:30 a.m. Educational features, announcements, music. 1:00 p.m. Noontime program-i 1/ hours Weather forecast, agricultural 3:30 p.m. 4:00 p.m. 6:00 p.m. announcements and music. "Tea Time Musicale". "University of the Air"-i hour. Dinner music-1 hour. October 4, 1928 and information, 10:00 a.m. Homemaker's hour and music. 10:80 a.m. Educational features, announcements, music. 1 :00 3:30 4:00 6:00 8:00 10:00 10:30 1:00 and p.m. Noontime 'program-i1V2 hours Weather forecasts, agricultural information, announcements and music. p.m. "Tea Time Musicale". p.m. "University of the Air"-I hour. p.Ym. Dinner music-1 hour. p.m."All Florida" City programs--2 1/ hours. October 5, 1928 a.m. Homemaker's hour and music. a.m. Educational features and music. p.m. Noontime program-1 V-. hours, Weather forecasts, agricultural information, ..announcements and 'music. 3:30 p.m. "Tea Time Musicale". 4:00 p.m. 6:00 p.m. 9:00 a.m. "University of the Air"-i hour. Dinner music-i hour. October 6, 1928 "University of the Air"-3 hours. 1:00 p.m. Noontime program-il/2 hours Weather forecasts, agricultural information, announcements, and music. 3:30 p.m. "Tea Time Musicale". 4:00 p.m. 6:00 p.m. 8:00 p.m. Midnight "University of the Air"-I hour. Dinner music-i hour. 'All Florida" city programs-2 /,2 hours. Popular variety request program-2 hours. October 7, 1928 1:00 p.m. Claude Murphree-organ recital-i hour. 2:00 pm. Vespers. Otobr 8, 1928 10:00 a.m. [oweamker's hour and music. 1.0:50 a.M. Educational features and music. 1:90 $:80 4:00 6:00 pm. p.m. p.m. Noontine program-i hours "Tea Time Musicale". "University of the Air". Dinner music-i hour. October 9, 1928 10:00 a.m. Homemaker's hour and music. 10:80 a.m. Educational features and music. 1:00 3:30 4:00 '6:00 8:00 p.m. p.m. p.m. 10:)0 a.m, 10:80 am. Noontime progam-11 / hours "Tea Time Musicale". "University of the Air"-1 hour. Dinner music-i hour. "All Florida" city programs-21/2 hours. October 10, 1928 Homemaker's hour and music. Educational features and music. 1:00 p.m. Noontime progran-11i2 hours Weather forecast, agricultural information, 3:30 4"00 6:00 p.m. p.m. p.m. announcements and music. "Tea Time Musicale". "University of the Air"-i hour. Dinner music-r-1 hour. Octobp11, 1928 l, O) a.m. Homemalerw hour and music. 10:80 a.in. Educational features and music. 1:00 pm. Noontime proram-l1/2 hours Weather forecast, agricultural information, announcements and music. 8:30 p.m. "Tea Time Mimicale". 4:00 p.m. "Univesity of the Air"-1 hour. 6:00 p.m. Dinner mu --1 hour. 8:00 p.m. "All Florida" city programs--2i hours. October 12, 1928 ,. 10po 10:30 1:00 a.m. p.m. Homemaker's haour and music. Educational A sttres and music. Noontime ppq m-i --lhours Weather f~ecist, agricultural informnatilon,. annowicjaspowi*au mautsiz. 3:30 p.m. "Tel Muicale". 4:00 p.m. "UoivWq of thi--Air"-1 hour. 6:00 p.n. 4b 9:00 ia.m. 1 :00 .fl. 3:80 p.m. 14:-00... "6. 0 p~m. 8:00 p.m. Midnight 1:00 p.m. 2:00 P.m. Octor "University of th Noontime program "Tea Time Musi "University of t a inner musicAll Florida" cit Popular variety October Claude Vespers. Murph re PRIZE ESSAY CONTEST ON Two Prizes of $1,000 For Best Student Theme On Smith NEW YORK, September 28 (Steeial)-Mrs. James W. Gerard, wife of the former ambassador to Germany, has offered two prizes of 0000 each for the best essays written by college students, or recent graduates, on the subject, "Why Alfred E. Smith Should Be Elected President of the United States."~ Announcement of the contest was made yesterday by Frank L. PoWl, president of the College League for Alfred E. Smith, to whom Mrs. Gerard made the offer. She specified that one prize is to be for men and the other for women. Students and graduates of not more than two years standing are eligible to compete under the terms of Mrs. Gerard's gift. It will close on October 20. Mr. Polk announced that the New York World, Buffalo Times, Trenton Times, Raleigh News Observer, Richmond Times-Leader, I Arkansas Gazette, Gainesville, Fla. Sun, Columbia, S. C., Record, I Nashville Tennessean, Lexington Herld, Nevada State Journal and Atlanta Georgian would cooperate with the College League in the conduct of the contest. Mrs. Gerard suggested that the essays be limited to 500 words and left the details of the competition to Mr. Polk, who is now drawing up the rules that will govern the contest, "I am so interested in the work being done by the College League for Alfred E. Smith that I wish to offer $2,000 to be used by your organization as prizes for the best essays written by college students and graduates of not more than two years standing, on the subject, 'Why Alfred E. Smith Should Be Elected President of the United States," Mrs. Gerard wrote. -.4Of this sum, $1,000 is for the best essay written by a man, with a like amount for the best essay written by a woman. I would suggest that the essays be limited to 500 words. However, I will leave that and the other details and rules of the contest to your judgment. "Governor Smith makes an appeal to college men and women by reason of a career that is one of the romances of the American life, a record as an executive that proves he has character, ability, industry, courage and the rare gift of leadership,, and because they see in him a man who is as admirably trained for the duties of the presidency as Lincoln, Cleveland, Roosevelt or Wilson. "I believe that they are so interested In the present cah'paign that they will welcome the opportunity to put their views and appreciation of a great man on paper. I believe the contest will result in bringing out the college viewpoint of Governor Smith and be helpful to students in connection with their courses in English and poHtics." DRUG JOURNAL PRAISES IGH The work of Dean T. R. Leigh of the College of Pharmacy is greatly commended in the August issue of the Southeastern Drug Journal. The article discusses the early life of Dean Leigh, his preparation for his work in chemistry, his educational career, and his war-time service. Dean Leigh was highly praised for his ald to the government during the war by training college men, and for the invention of the Leigh Fog-Screen, used for protection of vessels against submarines. -NOTICE All men who were awarded keys last year by the Alligator staff may order them now. Orders must be given 'to Layton Dinning sometime next week. Signed, W. L. Dinning, Managing Editor Alligator. i WOO Wat~s tion and the immediate need of Wednesday evening meeting, 8!time. funds and clothing.,Io'clock. Signed, Dr. W. A. Myers, pastor of the All are welcome. Managing Editor. First Methodist cnurcn, Dr. Miler1 Leake of the University faculty, and Judge Larkin Carter also 'Wpolt. 'The High Speed Colored quartet rendered several selections in addition to the regular musical program. It is reported that the Floating University was almost wrecked in the sea of matrimony on its last cruise. The authorities are discouraging such disastrous relationships on their 1928-cruise. At Hickory, N. C.: Lenoir Rhyne 6; Newberry 12. At Cleveland: Case 3; Wilmington 0. U .-. U THE PHIFER STATE BANK Awpedates Your Busines ANNOUNCING NEW LOCATION OF The New York Hatters IN The New Florida Theatre Bldg. Hats cleaned and blocked. Ladies' and Gent's Shoe Shine. Service 7:30 to 11:00 P. M., weekly. Sunday Shoe Shine Service 8:00 A. M. to 2:00 P. M. Goods Called for and Delivered PHONE 523 M. BLIZIOTES, PROP. *1 FLOIA BARBER SHOP Guaranteed Service and Courtesy Is Our Motto We Side Square_ J.C.reva r W~AuUJ ii r the next ti keg on cle e ard Ta 16'overestim w"Emm-mrI I I I 11 I 13, 1928 F1S CHRISTIAN ('WTRCH ie Air"-3 hours. %Uiam Gorge Oram. Pastor Services at the First Christian am-1',' hours church Sunday, September 30, as icale". follows: he Air"-1 hour. FIRST PRESBYTERIAN Bible school will assemble at CHURCH 9:45 a. m. Lesson topic 1,Paul, the -1 hour. Rev. A. R. Bahtchlor, Acting Pastor Missionary." ty programs-2i-, hours. Services for Sunday, September Morning worship, 11 o'clock. hours. 30, 1928: Pastor's sermon t h e r e "The request progran-2ho Bible school at 9:40 a.m. lChurch Active Under the (7oimmis14, 1928 There are classes for all ages. sion." e-organ recital-i hour. The University Student's class, Evening preaching service 8:00 :under the leadership of Reverend o'clock. Sermon subject "FoundaBatchelor, will be held in the Suntonss" .day school room. A cordial inchristian Fndeavor meeting 7 Florida Theatre vitation is extended to students to p. M. Topic "Goals for our Soattend. ciety." Oct. 1-2-3. Public worsmip at 11 a. in. The The public is most cordially inmorning sermon subject is "The vited to all services of this church. Law." Mr. Win. Dubose will sing. Evening worship at 8 o'clock. (HUR(H OF CHRIST Pastor's sermon theme "Playing D. E. Mason, Minister Bible study at 10 a.min. Classes Mid-week prayer meeting at 7:304) for all ages. p in. Wednesday. Preaching by. minister at 11 a. Strangers are welcome to all m. Sermon subject "Why I Ought services. _to go to Church." serviper. ADVENT CHRISTIAN CHURCH per. Rev. J. T. Johmson, Pastor Congregational singing. Residence 27W. Church street Young People's Bible class at Junior Society of Loyal Work7:15. ers, 9:30 a. in. Preaching at 7:45. Sunday school 10 a. in. A.J. Ladies Bible class Tuesday afterHarvey, superintendent. noon at 3 o'clock. PrF0aching at 11 a. M. Subject Prayer meeting Wednesday at "The Blood of Christ." 7:45. Young People's Society of Loyal You are invited to attend these Workers at 7 p. in. Miss Mary ,services. McMillan, leader. Preaching 8 p. in. Subject "Are We Entering The Great Tribulation?" William S. Stoney, Rector The Woman's Home and Foreign Sunday, September 30: Mission Society, with their circles, 7:30, Holy communion. 'A W~ewer8ro Pr& cltoi, have their monthly meeting at the 9:45 Sunday school. church Tuesday at 3 p. m. 11:00. Morning service, special music with solo by Miss Ella Cottage prayer meeting at the Robertson. Na rucauonag 227 West Church street, 7:00, Y. P. S. L. ewWednesdaynight at 8 o'clock.i Regular prayer meeting Friday 8:00, Evening prayer, special night at the church at 7:30. This music with solo by Henry Clay Swill be followed by choir practice. Evans. Mr. Bowers, the leader, invites all Al welcome. A new democracy of education who will to remain and take part. has been made possible to the The public is cordially invited to WEED HALL people of Florida. all services. Special invitation to (Episcopal Student Center) The University of Florida yesterstrangers. You will be a stranger 1744 West University Avenue day announced formulation of but once. Open at all times to all students. plans for conducting a "University Special meeting at the jail SunWeekly schedule. of the Air," which will have a POday afternoon at 3 o'clock. Every Sunday, Holy communion tential student body of every radio 8:15 a. i. Ilstenet in this state and in states Bible class, 9:30 a. in. p io ST METHODIST CHURCH Every Wednesday, song service, of radio waves from WRUF, the! Rev. W. A. Myres, Pastor 7:15 p. m. 5,00 att sae and unRsty September 30, 1928: Brotherhood of St. Andrew, 7:30 5,000 watt state and university Sunday school at 9:45 a. in. E. p. in. station here. A. Clayton, superintendent. Parson Johnson, Chaplin. The entire staff of the General Business Men's Bible class at Extension Division and many pro9:45 a. in. Rev. E. C. McVoy, Alabaiu Has M-s" fessors from other departments of teacher. Dr. Donald Morrison, pres-a the state institution will comproident. concern Games raise the faculty of the "Jniversity Morning worship at 11 a. in.nce of the Air." Sermon by the pastor. Subject College credit will be given for "Abraham and Lot," Gen. 19-12. In looking over the Southern these courses which will be broadA sermon on the family, conference schedule for this year cast daily from 4 to 5 p. in. and on Evening worship at 8 o'clock. it is found that Alabama has more Saturdays from 9 to 12 a. ii. A Sermon by the pastor. Seubject conference games than any other comprehensive'curriculum is being ."What of the 18th Amendment.' team in this circle. Eight of. the mapped out by Dean B. C. RileyI A world temperance sermon, nine games that Wade's team of the Extension Division. Junior Epworth Society at 2:30 plays are conference games. This Arrangements for enrolling in p.min. is probably the hardest schedule ia these courses and request for addiSenior Epworth League at 7:00 the circle fin it includes: Missis. tional information will be handled p. in. Miss Trixie Hill will lead. sippi Aggies Tennessee, Georgia by the General Extension DiviThe topic will deal with "What Tech, Georgia, Kentucky, Sewanee sion or by WRUF. becomes of the money we Epworth and L. S. U. WRUF Is the largest radio broadLeaguers give to missions?" Auburn, Florida, Tennessee and casting station in the south and is. The regular monthly business Tulane come next, with seven conbelieved to be one of the largest meeting of the Epworth League ference tilts. Georgia Tech in ad. educational stations in the United will be in Epworth Hall Tuesdition to these takes on Notre States. In view of this announceday night, October 2, 1928, at 7 'Dame and Virginia and Washingment, the. scope of the University I o'clock. ton and Lee have added Princeton. of Florida's influence has been inNorth Carolina has six with creased many times. SAINT PATRICK'S CHURCH Harvard for good measure. Clem, F -:-a--uds bRe.v. L. Lehman, Pastor so,. V. M. I. and Ole Miss, have Mor Fud asd Sunday, September 30: six fights within the southern cr oreMass Galnesville at 9:00 a. mn. cle. Georgia takes on Yale in adByRadio A Ipp bBenediction after mass. dition to her six. Colgate has y 0 Pea .No mass during the week. been added to the Vanderbilt Friday, October 4, bridge party schedule. About $100 was raised for the rectory, benefit of St Pa.trick's N.CSteLS.UanMisstr ufrr atngttruhtennis club. sippi Aggies all have five games appeals over radio station WRUF1 A total of $81 was collected and 'each. Kentucky plays Northwestat the University, which will swellI dispatched to the chancery office em, Maryland plays Yale, South the total amount accounted for by tof the diocese, by the parishoners Carolina plays Chicago, and V. P. this manner to around the' $700' of St. Patrick's parish last Sunday I. tackles Colgate, in addition to mark. for the relief of storm sufferers., their five game program. The station wil ie on the air Father Lehman wishes to thank Florida does not open her conagain tonight and will endeavor to1 his parishoners for their quick and ference schedule until October 13 close their week's program of apIgenerous response to the appeal. we h ly uunI ans peals with the largest amount vlehnhpasAuunnGans raised to date. agiuCHRISTIAN SCIENCE yule A. P. Spencer, of the agiu-SERVICES NOTICE tura experiment station at the, Community Hall, Dixie Highway,' There will be a regular Alligator University, who has recently re-I North Ganeville staff meeting in the Student Body turned from an inspection tour! Sunday morning service, 11:00 office Monday night at 7 p. in. AUl throughout the storm area, made a, o'clock. Subject "Christian Sciimen interested in literary lines talk over the local station, giving lence." Iand who wish to work on the graphic description of the situa-i Sunday school, 9:45 a.mi. j Homecoming edition come at same I

PAGE 6

r om. ..ALL GATOR :$iker+ at Khvamas Meet it Is the gener.: opinion +*upe that Uh wDwes plan wl On. OsieneGermany wil be unable Topyiswar. debts, declared Dr. a, x Zawallo bmad of the departet of Pfi sophy ad Ps oogy to the univetity, in an address Dr. 3awall has recently returned ktsros trip to Europeuring hek be -e visited InEngland, Sootld,1enimark snd his old home in "The economic couditlon4 of the cesnent are the man discussions Woer there," he said, "and the PeoP don't see bow 0e Dawes plan *&a be a success. Germany can't )pay her ebts as they are due to 14 acordtat to & Dawes n. Grmaby has been stalling • tntmmthe Ilinel isexhausted. *be has borrowed money to pay 'erdebtshu.tthis money will.have to be paid back, so In reality she *Iint pstd any of her debts. 'Germany is borrowing from the lnted States to pay France, and England, who In turn use the fteny to Pay their war debts to is. The whole situation resolves Itself into t circle. Europe wants peace. It is a iincsrej-depy rooted desire. Dendasrk basaompletel$' abolished her standi army, while Sweden and countries have materially rethe sle0 of theirs. The miller countries are not able to *tud up under time taxation necesOftr to the maintenance of an eeniy, 'The European people don't take Us, Kelogg treaty seriously. It J& w.m eatal of these people to be pe that peace is not guaranaU esept by, force sufficient to -it. he Russian menace is great. 0 unilts hve their agents in $St every country. It is not Intidal In numbers, but the me=~~ame continually hammering iiiiy their principles. "te destini s of the world are i** In h school rooms and In the attitude the men who teach. chned the Whole mind+ pel oo5 years largely eselag Ii the schools." it Ulw5syYear With :n w iMMen, up from tb th aoe~sn Veoas.,the majorityy fthe Var -ebate Squadof last yeaain enrlled,and a mawe 1 srgeiOW with which t V reots foreaeeactivitis, thn*'Islkoking forward to an even successful Year than last a,,.prved1 to be., 1n the past epar Florida eclipsed Oery otber school In the southast In volut of number of debates ditancetrvlWe by debating teaibs. Forty ar ity meetings Vv" arraned ihdIng contests vry other larp university So ein the south. One team, we set'to Washirgton, D. 10. on a two weiks tour; another tou and ,through'Texas, of like duato whille a thrd want to KentuE*Y and++ Ttepee. A mm shorter tnirx On, which four men went, was one through South Florida. However although the majority of 1'hlas debter are again 'wth at, Neeral of her outstand-. lag spa~ers 9'e conscipuous .by beir abenc. The entire Texas .am comprised of 0. 5. Thacker, tagwalp ad Monte Enl are heon the missng; the first two jgel is a student at lltnois. G. s. Ifilana, who bad+ e.sblished a record as one of the most fluent Speakers in the south before cominhg to Florida and who last year maintained his reputation on the .Washington tour, als is among the missing. L. L Garrett, president of the Debating council, and a prominent Varsty man, Foster Shi Smitn (now city attorney of Hawthorne), and Carl Widell, all failed to return: their absence mostly due to sfely accomplished graduation, and admission to thebar. The varsity men from last year aft: Dixy Beggs, Jerome Con=, parks Carmichael, George Foster, Alva GUlls, Ed Miller. Ben Per"off, Nat Roberts, Ben Thornal, r{arold Wahi, and Joe Wilensky. Other members on the squad are: t'ynn McArthur, Donald McGov. er, Harold Munger. George #mIth, Kenneth Williams, and Bill liasbaw, Prunty, Arnow, Strum, LYbas. and several other men who demonstrated their ability, will oIne up from last year's freshmnen teams. Before many weeks the inter#Wety debates will be in full #iwn, as yet the Debate council g not met to decide upon any Aeimiesabjects for dicssion, or a#y dates for the debates. However, the council will meet any day and the debate tryouts will !ue nnoumaed immediately following. AlthouLg the carity schedule Ms not been made out as yet, it Is believed that one team will hsdd towad Vhca another through the stat o f the Ohio, apd east of theMississppi, ISOCIEcrYand CLUkBSIL A. POP DANCE The K. A's will bold a pop dance at their house directly after the Florlda-outhern game on Saturday, October 6. sERP S E C OFFICES At a meeting of the, Serpent Rtbbon Dance -society, held Monday night In the Law College the following officers were elected: President, Cyril Pogue: vicepresident, Herman Price; dhrUman dancu .W te Jack Simpm secretary, Stewart; treasurer, Hayes Lewis. S. A. K POP DANCE An interesting event of Saturday, October 6, will be a pop dance at the S. A. E. house, immediately following the Florida-Southern game. F CLUB DANCE The regular F club dance will be pulled off Saturday, October 6 at the new gym. J. J. McCranie will furnish the music and the Tri Sigmas will furnish the company. Will it be a real hop? And how! Begins at 9 and quits at ? ? ? Admission $1.00. ......NGI.E....FOUR YEAR COURSE ATFEN MTIG I!COACHIfNG GIVEN Over 175 prospective engineersl Coaching, as a course, has been and members of the faculty of the I added to the University curriculum College of Engineering and Archithis year. This new degree is BR tecture gathered at the Y. M. C.I S. in Education given at compleA. last Monday evening for the tion of four years of studying first meeting of the Benton gi-:the Coaching course. The course nearing society for this year. The is well filled with subjects of sufmeeting was of the nature of a ficient variety as to make its get-together and get.acquainted graduates well rounded in learnmeeting and according to the leadIng. Of course, the chief topics ers of the society, was one of the are the various kinds of physical most successful meetings held in!education, but also there are screcent years. Dean John R. Benences, history, English. newspaper ton, of the College of tngineering, work and a smattering of phycholspoke on the alms and purpose ofogy. the society, aud representatives of The first year is devoted to an the student organiations of the ordinarl study of the B. S. course. college spoke of the work on theseThe second year is similar to a special societies, President Johnteachers' course. The last two J. Tigert was to'have spoken, but years are almost entirely studies according to C. Howell Jones,'presof the ways and means of enIdent of the B. I. s., hewas uncouraging and developing sport. able to attend on account of anThe Idea seems to be one of arother engagement. ranging places and ways for all Dr. Benton, in speaking of the|children to start and keep up exPurpose of the society, stated that, ercise with special attention being it not only afforded opportunities paid to those who have athletic for technical discussion and lecability. Health education is also tures, but also opportunities to included. acquire those social qualities which The course instructs its students angers are so often accused of In the art of coating and of dllacking. The work of student recting others in the various forms branches of national englheering of athletics and physical educa-, societies was brought before the tion. It is. arranged so that the society by A. W. Payne, who reppresent students may study their resented the American Institution sports at the time they occur durof Electrical Enineers, and C. W. ing the year at school. Mines, the American Society of To date there are over 30 enMechanical Engineers. C. F. ro in this department. Only Trainor spoke of the American Freshmen and Sophomores are inSociety of Civil Engineers. Each eluded because it is a new field of of the speakers outlined the putstudy and the men further along poses of their organization, the in college do not care to start nai work and the advantages over again as Freshmen. The of membership, course does not appear in the 1928-1929 catalogue because it was Robert H. Brown spoke briefly not arranged until after the atest of the beginnings and idea of the n oaftyIe club of the school of the catalog had already been printed. i4t tubte. He was followed -Football is the first subject to be ~ ~~7, w studied and the class is full. Ivan H. Smith, president of the ..._ l peter of Sigma Tau, alligator To Hold tlw honorary engineering fraternity. Mr. Smithstressed the three requisites for election to member. Student Straw Vote W40h odl-harship, sociability, and Because of the high interest in practicability. the November election of the PresA social get-together followed the speaking program. Refreshments consisting of cocoanut cake and neapolitan "polar bears" were served in large qantitles, followed by smokes. UniveryWould Be Benefitted By Edu Ohnal Fund "If the state would provide a fund of about *20,000 to help needy students who deserve aid, this university would turn out more distinguished graduates than any school in the country," declared B. A. Tolbert, newly appointed Dean of Men, when interviewed. Dean Tolbert pointed out that in his capacity as Dean of Men, a position created for the guidance of university students, he is authorized to give no practical or material aid to boys with nothing but ambition with which to get an education. As the writer walled Into the dean's office, Mr. Tolbert was then telling an impecunious student of his inability to do anything but give advice. Dean Tolbert told the student of a place where he might obtain a job, and cautioned him not to leave school until he absolutely had to. Although Dean Tolbert said there is little probability that state fund for students aid can be expected within the near future, he hopes that before many years have passed he will be in a position to help students who need and deserve financial assistance. HUNDRED PER CENT 18 PrEFERRED Cleveland Press: Wife (in a telegram from a spa)-In four weeks I have reduced my weight by half. How long shall I stay? Husband (wiring back) -Another four weeks. while a number of shorter tripe to Jacksonville and other cities in the state will be made. THEFIRST NA V..." Ident, College Humor and all the I American college newspapers have planned a nation-wide straw vote to determine the voting preference on the two candidates. All college students, regardless of age, are asked to vote. The complete student opinion is of much more interest than just the votes of those students who are of voting age, because we can then tell what the college world thinks of our two candidates. Herbert Hoover, the Republican candidate, was borrn in West Branch, Iowa. He received his degree In engineering at Leland Stanford University in 1895 and has since been honored by 27 other Universities. He held the position of Food Conservator during President Wilson's term. Alfred E. Smith, the Democratic nominee, was born in New York City. He started his varied and successful car-eer as newsboy and became one of New York's leading men. He has been elected governor of New York State four times, and has a personality that is rare. The ballot will be found on page 3 of the issue of September 30 of The Alligator and it is hoped all students will register their vote. All votes will be cleared through College Humor and the returns from the American Colleges, with pictures, will be run in The Alligator about November 1. Heywood Broun, nationally famous magazine and newspaper contributor, was recently interviewed by the New York University Daily News. When asked what he thought about co-education, he said: "I'm strong for the co-ed and heartily believe in coeducation. It's preferable for the college man to have association with women In the college rather than otuside it., When there is no opportunity within the college, the men will gu outside and associate with women on a lower intellectual and social standing, and they often show a preference for waitresses. "The monastic idea, of purely men's colleges, is all wrong! I can't see them at all." TIONAL BANK S iNK_ j I t'!... k [Semeral Hundred Freshmen FII I And New Girls are Pledges Of Tallahassee Sororities Loau Fund Now1 (ontinued from page. One) IsBeington, Madison: Betty Taylor, Jacksonville; Leah Adamson, JacksonAfville; Cornelia Mitchell, JacksonA committee from the Gainesville; Christine Hauserman, Barville Rotary club consisting of tow; Margaret Campbell, West Rotarian Barney Colson, Arthur Palm Beach; Aline Reis, Tampa. C. Tipton and -Everett Yon went Iota chapter of Alpha Delta Pi to. Palatka Tuesday on invitation announces the pledging of Eleanor of the Rotary club of that city, and Whitfield, Dorothy Hathaway, presented the Florida Rotary Frankie Allen, Barbara AnesEducational Loan proposition to worth, Tallahassee; Phyllis Grifthe members of that club. fin, Evelyn Robins, Louise Bullard, The messages were received Tampa; Syd Knight, Sarasota; with much interest, andit is exf-Mildred Burke, Margaret Irwin, pected that several subscriptions Dorothy Mills, Jacksonville; Eleawill be made soon by members of nor Owef, Doltan, Ala.; Eloise the Paiatka club. 'Gaillard, Bartow; Mary Celia Florida Rotary is squarely beDavidson, Quincy; Rachel Hackind this great work of securing jney, Lake City; Louisa Trellis, funds to assist worthy Florida New Orleans, La.; Louise Groveyoung men through the University, land, Miami; Harriet McCormick. and has up to date helped nearly Live Oak; Mary Scott Clancy, Altwo hundred young men in -their bany, Ga.: Becky Wooten, Shellstruggle for a higher education., man, Ga.; Meta Johnson, SavanThere is at this time great need nab, Ga.; Martha Cooley, Sandersfor funds and a special drive is ville, Ga. being made An the state to obtain Alpha Eta chapter of Delta sufficient means to help all posDelta Delta announces the pledgsitle. ing of Theresa Robinson, JacqueSubscriptions are not confined line Prewitt and Ollie Autrey, Orto Rotarians only, but, all who will lando; Mary Troxler and Frances take some of thlq non-profit sharClark, Ocala; Evelyn Ingram, ing stock, par value one hundred Opelika, Ala.; Lucile Davis Yonge, dollars per share, payable onePensacola; Winifred Metcalfe, fourth each year uptil.paid, are inGainesville; Rebecca Waldrop, invited to participate in this great Winter Haven; Marian Reid, Cuthwork. The corporation has an aubert, Ga.; Norma Seward, Arcadia. thorized capitalization of o n e Rho chapter of Sigma Sigma hundred thousand dollars. Sigma announces the pledging of S Sidelines "Red"p Muddy Waters, who has been on the sick list the last few days, is back on the squad fighting it out for a tackle post. Waters has taken on some weight this past summer and is showing up well at his tackle job. Reeves and DeHoff have also returned to the ranks. Reeves being out over two weeks with a bad leg, while DeHoff suffered a fractured nose. Clemons and Clark are putting up a nice tussle for the pivot ,position. One day finds Clemmons playing first string and the nvxt day Clark is at the job. Florida's punting assignment will probably be handled by Cawthon this year. The crashing fullback sticks a hefty foot in the ball and is also very consistent. Brumbaugh and Bowyer are also in the running for punting honors. We well remember how Brumbaugh in the slush and rain of the Maryland game last season got off some of the finest punts of the season. Florida is gifted with quite a few fleet backs this year. McEwen, Goodbread and Bryson all run the hundred around ten flat, while Owens, Bowyer, James, and Bethea are all big, fast men Hicks and Steels are both holding down first string positions now. It is going to be a mighty hard job to hold these ex-rats down.' Adams, a shifty prep man from Indiana, is looking mighty good at quarter on Cowell's rat squad. In scrimmage last Saturday between the varsity and rats, Alverez, hard hitting halfback for rats, was out tackling them all. The boy was in every play and nearly always got his man. Pheil and Presstman are two rat linemen who are showing up well for such an early date in the season. Procter and Dorsett are two big. fast backs who should do quite a bit of ground gaining for the frosh this year. P-aul Clyatt. CLiefland; Virginia 'Geislin, Orlando; Thelma Hannon, Gainesville: Mildred Fellows, Cottondale; Rita Nelson, Jacksonville; Anne Linning, Jacksonville; Mary Lou Reetraw, La Grange, Ga.; Nell Wiley, Tallahassee; Ruth Weeks, Brooksville; Rosina Merriwether, Catherine Wayg, Lakeland; Ruby Mayo. Omega chapter of Sigma Kappa announces the pledging of the following: Charlotte Baldwin, Helen Clarkson, Elizabeth Daniel, Pensocola; Maisie Blacksure, Mobile, Ala.; Ella Gordon, Mobile, Ala.; Mary Lou Methvin, Eufala, Ala.; Helen Caldwell, Bradenton; Dorothy Cawthon, DeFuniak; Jean 1Iancock, Nell Hendrix, Miami; Floie Howell, Panama City; Anna Lou Smith, Eunice Trawick, Tallahassee; Mabel Teague, Apalachicola. Florida Bet chapter of P1 Beta Phi announces the pledging of Jane Allison and Dorothy Estes, Orlando; Dorothy Blackwelland Dorothy Dennis, iami; Margaret Anderson and Claudia Clewis, Monegomery, Ala.; Margaret Dean annd Lita McNutt, Louise Wilson, St. Petersburg; Adeline Clough, Jacksonville: Katherine Winslett, Tuscaloosa, Ala.; Kathleen Scott, Birmingham, Ala.; Gervais Prentiss, Indiana; Phylis KowvenHaven, Melbourne; Annie Mac Henderson, Bagdad; Rosalind Wilson, Lakeland; Catherine Hodges, Tallahassee. Alpha Sigma chapter of Delta Zeta announces the pledging of Amelia Toombs, Marian Gardner, Virginia F. Miller, Ruth Jennings, Jacksonville; Florence Lorsner, Lake City; Katherine Consigny, Mary Ann Hestor, Lesburg; Mary Ellen Bailey, Quincy; Gertrude Sands, Mary Willis Johnson, Ocala; Elizabeth Jendevin, Peggy Murphree, Pensacola; Margaret Roberts, Tallahassee; Caroline Carmichael, Monticello; Carolyn Bower, Bainbridge, Ga.; Lillis n Hampton, Coral Gabler; Lydia Hickey, Morriston, Tenn. Beta Nu chapter of Kappa Alpha Theta announces the pledging of !"eggy Jones, Margaret Roudell, Addle Kate Martin, Margaret Pacrot, Miami; Jane Anderson, Elizabeth Drane, Gainesville; Mary Catherine Lagsdon, Indianapolis, Ind.; Susan Whalton, Key West. Beta Gamma chapter of Zeta Tau Alpha announces the pledging of Mary Connell, Inverness; Helen Crosley, Citra; Evelyn Stone, Panama City; Kathryn Gibson, Thomasville, Ga.; Helen Shackelford, Atlanta, Ga.: Sally Lawton, Wheeling, W. Va.; Tommy Osborne, West Palm Beach: Felicia Williams, Winchester, Tenn.; Armee Bunkley, Tampa: Elizabeth Anne Sharpe, Tampa' Erin Gorfrey, Chipley; Marie Webster, Winter Haven; Betty Hornbacker, St. Petersburg. Gamma Beta chapter of Alpha Gamma Delta announces the pledging of Rose Jones, Jacksonville; Roberta Moore, Jeanne Simmons, Virginia Burford, Dorothy Ward, Tampa; Helen Moyer, Alice Kays, West Palm Beach; Helen Overton, Dot Austin, Kittie Eubanks, Eudeka Sparkman, Plant City; Elizabeth Croom, Vaidosta. Ga.; Beryl Wing, Dot Hefner, Bradenton; Claire Wadsworth, Madison; Frances Gary, Ocala; Virginia Chitty, Gainesville; Velma Ausin, Umatilla; Mary Elizabeth Treadwell, Arcadia; Celeste ,Edwards, Fort Meade; Elizabeth Blue, Lake Wales. Lamba chapter A' heta Upsilon announces the pledging of Leona Ellenwood, Beatrice Marshall, Evelyn Kelly, Olive Slaten, Daytona Beach; Mary Sue Curriton, Mary Haskins, Kathleen Crocker, Margaret Cruise, Miami; Elizabeth Johnston, Jacksonville; Inez Gray, Panama City; Lillian Fitch, Tampa; Mary Katherine Parker, Eustis; Peyton Raney, Jacksonville; Helen Flewelling, Ocoee. ma danonunces the pledging of Upsilon chapter of Pi Kappa SigDorothy Hagan, Mary Elizabeth Josey, Wauchula; Elizabeth Nye, Portsmouth, Ohio, Margaret York, West Palm Beach; Alice Lewis, Tallahassee; Abby Sweeney, Daytona Beacn; Helen Hamn, Pensacola; Mildred Finch, Century. Iota chaper of Delta Phi Epsilon announces the pledging of Ruth Glosser and Bessie Grechecky, West Palm Beach; Malvine Klep. per, Jacksonville; Theresa Ruff, Tampa; Helen Ruth Sloat, Jacksonville. Alpha Pi chapter of Alpha Omicron Pi announces the pledging of Celeste Johnson, Miami; Irene Shoun, Tampa; Margaret Green, Baskerville; June Fulmer, Minnesota, Beatrice Ober, St. Petersburg; Jeanette Littig, Tallahassee. Delta Phi, petitioning Alpha Chi Omega, announces the pleding of Marie Register, Dorothy Webb, Evelyn Ives, Mary Bryan, Jacksonville. Alpha Epsilon, petitioning Ph' Mu, anounces the pledging of Jane Bayler, Vero Beach; March and Jean Griffith, Ft. Lauderdale; Daisybel Clement, Ocala; Caroline Battle, Sarasota; Dorothy Brown, Jacksonville; Frances Hildreth, New Smyrna; Gertrude Gilliam, Live Oak. Beta Tau, petitioning Alpha Xi DICta, announces the pleding of Estelle Long, Mildred Ferrell, Dorothy dowlin, LaRetta Burns, JacksQnvine; Mary Persons, Punts Gorda; Pauline Sowers. Vera Davis, Miami; Dorothy Hicks, Tampa; Frances Hunter, Jasper; Elsie Gleason, Guston, La.; Alice frearhy, Jonanna Reif, Wauchulu; Lillian Brown, Lucille "Brown, 4ontgomery, Ca. George Perrine, of Miami, cap-. taln-elect of the varsity basketball team, is making his first bid for a varsity football letter. Perrine played freshman football last year, and well. raC SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER Student Body Heads Guests City Executives at Banquet (Continued from page one) terwards, been the most sorry of us all. These incidents sometimes happen not only where a large student lady has amsembled but would probably as likely have happened had the same number of men assembled, and it is at such times that good leadership can' accomplish the most-. You studens leaders can be of very material assistance to the city in cooperating with its officers in maintaining such order as may refleet credit on the city and upon the University," he stated. "The business men of Gainesville are behind you in all your endeavors," Sam Mixson said. "We are interested.in your fun, we want you to have your parades and initiation up town and we are sure that you will have regard for property while you are staging such affairs." Dr. Myers Gives Invocation Dr. W. A. Myres, who gave the invocation, spoke of the cooperation between the churches of the city and the University students saying that every church in the city was trying in every way to associate itself with the students and help them with their problems, E. D. Vestel, police chief, who conceived the idea of the goodwill meeting, spoke briefly, saying "the best way to handle boys is to get down with them and be a boyi too." He invited the students to hold their pep meetings up town and offered to rope off a block irt which they might gather for their songs and cheers. His only admonition was that the students not forget and destroy personal property. Clay Lewis, president of the .-Z "FELLOW'S" Call around and see our Schloss Bros'. "clothes bea tiful," and Silverstrype. Stylish suits, moderately priced See those Collegian Shoes in black and tan that the boys are buying, known as Scotch grain. Hard heels. DAVID'S ON THE CORNER WEST MAIN AND UNIVERSITY AVENUE anew-sI6Ad at $35 Non-Biw kl&Brrsin the Utam Mod Styl You have never held a sweeter penso light, so well balced, so responsive, so eey andeto sure inuAe. We showed scores of differentpens to hmidredsof pen~jse-rs ad askedWhich do you like best?" They picked this one. Youll do the same among pes at this price at any counter. A Modern Blue-and.White Of the latest modem design-trim, nest, beautiful in color-youIl want it for tslook. alone. And after your have written with it, it will be youfor life. And only $34%toof Try it at your nearest pen coter today. Tlft'au IM OoWAw. iimu.mma .,n -om AM wMaMamw Tm-s n -a AUAE" -DA"LL -N M&)ANU -low U SUITS FIT FOR A KING, BUT NOT AT ROYALTY PRICES:Fall Suits $25.00 to $50.00 Burnett THE Clothier ,.NUFF SED I student body, thanked t ficials for their banquet pressed the appreciate. j University students. H, his support and that of leaders in fostering the tion program between dents and the city. Wl Dr. Tigert Is Spea&r Dr. J. J. Tigert, pres state school, spoke at i ing that he regarded the ing as a "gesture of g the part of the city offil pledged the return of from the University st have no fear that the st do anything that will property of the citizens sure that they will fu movement of friendship." He stated that this was meeting of its kind betwq versity students and city that he had ever heard complimented the officials novel and unique method curing the cooperation of tb dents. City Manager W. A. Fe Dick Troxler of the Unf~ made talks in which the phasized the value of coop" between a city and theU"'i students within its boundaW Music for the occasion Wvn nished by the Florida o and by the High Speed 1 quartet. Larkin Carter, municipali acted as toastmaster and S the meeting along In shp. fashion. Mother, Dad or SweetheaAt home will appreciate noth* ter than your photogra kind made at the Vanslekd dio, South side of the aquA dak finishing by experts.


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Day
30
30
preceding
oclc 1388280
mods:titleInfo
mods:title Orange and blue
succeeding
issn 0889-2423
lccn 86010448
13827512
Independent Florida alligator
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mods:geographic Gainesville (Fla.)
Newspapers
SUBJ651_2
Alachua County (Fla.)
Newspapers
SUBJ662
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mods:county Alachua
mods:city Gainesville
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Florida alligator
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Summer school news
University of Florida summer gator
Summer gator
Other
Daily bulletin
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Orange and blue bulletin
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sobekcm:VID 03620
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sobekcm:Name the students of the University of Florida
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sobekcm:Source
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sobekcm:SortDate 697977
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2 9 September
3 30 30
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