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The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

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Full Text
Vol. 64, No. 36

No competition:
Bookstores profit.students lose

mur ALLIGATOR SPECIAL REPORT 1

The
Florida Alligator

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Oligopoly.
Gently now, roll the five tight
syllables over the tongue.
Remember treat it with care.
Now spit it out.
Oligopoly.
It is the nine-letter child of
necessity. The situation that
arises when a group of
businesses, operating
independently, form die essence
of a monopoly. Whether it grips
an industry or a town, it is a
chilling concept.
Nevertheless, it is legal.
And it is the reason why you,
the student, cannot buy books
in a free and competive market
in Gainesville home of the
Campus Shop & Book Store.
And yet no one is guilty or
at least no one is very guilty.
The Campus Shop & Book

The University of Florida, Gainesville

Store, that sprawling collection
of college texts, paperbacks and
school supplies, shakes its four
branch stores awake at 8 each
weekday morning.
A result of the mandate and
purpose handed down by the UF
administration, the Campus
Shop and Book Store, along
with Malones and Florida Book
Stores on West University Ave.,
form the triad of Gainesvilles
own oligopoly.
It is the result of often
unavoidable, sometimes unique
and usually indifferent
circumstances.
It is the book that cost five
dollars in 1969, $5.75 in 1970,
and $6.50 in 1971.
It is where this investigation
begins.

Monday, November 8, 1971



Page 2

!, Th* Florida Alligator, Monday, Nov am bar 8,1971

State auditor questions AA methods

Handling of sports funds criticized

' By DEE DEE ESPOSITO
Alligator Staff Writar
The legality of UF allowing
the Athletic Association (AA) to
handle its sports activities has
been questioned by State
Auditor General Ernest Ellison.
I was shown no specific
authority for the university to
turn over public funds to a
private association or
corporation, Ellison said Friday

Fraternities must rejoin IFC
or lose charter says Adams

By JIM SEALE
Alligator Staff Writar
Sigma Nu and Delta Tau Delta
fraternities have been given 30
days by the university to rejoin
Inter-fraternity Council or they
will exist as unauthorized
organizations, according to IFC
President Mike Hawley.
Dean Frank Adams of the
Office of Student Affairs, in
charge of UFs 26 fraternities,
has indicated that under no
circumstances will the two
fraternities be chartered as
individual organizations. This
leaves Sigma Nu and Delta Tau
Delta without the privilege of
using UF facilities, including
intramurals, block seating,
meeting rooms and various other
services.
In addition, the two
fraternities will be liable for all
state and county property taxes,
noted Hawley.
Charges were traded between
Sigma Nu and Delt members
and members of the IFC at a
Thursday evening meeting at the
Sigma Nu house called by the
two fraternities to explain their
reasons for withdrawing.
Dan Olmetti, the Delta Tau
Delta president, reported several
gripes about the IFC, and
indicated that his fraternity,
which has been on campus for
46 years and has such
distinguished dtemnus as
Governor Reubin Askew, is in
serious danger of folding.
Olmettis major complaint
with the IFC was that it was not
helping solve tfoe fraternities
problem, in particular getting
men 4?|wlr INtibuses .<&
iL*c£*fliree hundred
and fifty men came through the
houses on the row the first night
o£ rnsh, jqly 80 rushed the

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THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR it the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during June, July
and August whan It's published semi-weekly, and during student holidays and
exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions of their authors.
Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz Union Building, University
of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The Alligator is entered as second class
matter at the United States Post Office at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year or $3.50 per Quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone of all
advertisements and to revise or turn away copy it considers objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless notice
is given to the edvertising manager within (1) one day after the advertisement
appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for more than one incorrect
insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run several times. Notices for
correction must be given before the next insertion.
,

in a report which criticized the
1969 and 1970 budgets of the
UF and Florida State University.
The AA, a private
corporation, handles UFs
athletic activities and is financed
by ticket sales receipts and a
$3.75 per student per quarter
allocation from the student
actitivites fee.
Ellison called the arrangement
contrary to the law governing

-S ft.
ii fe Hi
Dean Frank Adams
... frats can't exist individually
Olmetti. The Delts, which have
had several brothers move out of
the house this quarter, according
to IFC District President Fred
Leonhardt, only pledged 22 men
this quarter. The Sigma Nus
reportedly pledged even fewer.
Olmetti indicated that Delta Tau
Delta needs about 30-35 pledges
to keep going this quarter.
Right now were pouring
money into an organization that
is unsympathetic to our
demands, claimed Olmetti, who
until Wednesday was running for
IFC president. I might have
been able to make needed
changes in IFC structure but it
would have taken at least a year
and my fraternity doesnt have
that long.
We feel that by withdrawing
from the IFC we will escape the
fraternity stereotype, said the
Sigma Nu president.
IFC Rush Chairman Tom Dart
said he has spent much time
trying to get rushees on
Uariversity Avenue and that
many clinics and meetings were
held to solve the problem, which
were not usually attended by
Sigma Nu.
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the expenditures of public
funds and inconsistent with the
handling of such funds at other
state universities.
Ticket sales and student fees
are considered state funds and
are tyrefore subject to being
audited, according to Ellison.
UF law student John Parker
considers Ellisons report the
groundwork for a taxpayers
suit. Parker filed suit against

Femiany also claimed that the
IFC has outlived its usefulness
and anything the IFC can do
we can do.
Hawley pointed out, When
you have a campus with 26
fraternities you need some kind
of organization for coordination
and arranging interaction to
solve problems.
Hawley also enumerated
many other IFC programs which
he claimed has helped the Greek
system immeasurably. There is
the IFC Speakers Bureau, he
said, which sent people around
to the high schools to talk up
the Greek system.
The IFC also provides free
tutoring for all fraternity
members, and also assists in a
summer rush program, which
buses parents on a tour of the
campus and Greek system.
A five-dollar charge for each
pledge, pointed out Hawley, is
really the only charge the IFC
makes upon its members. The
IFC also brings top name
entertainment to campus
through Frolics, said Hawley.
Fraternity members get tickets
at a reduced rate and what profit
we make out of it we put into
our programs.
IFC President Hawley also
commented that it was ironical
that the Delts and Sigma Nus
accused the IFC of being
archaic, since it is these two
houses which have consistently
been unresponsive to change.
He further pointed out the
Sigma Nus destructive pledge
prank of a few weeks ago in
which two Sigma Nus were
burned, one seriously enough to
be hospitalized.
I think ,that allegations and
reasoning behind the decision
have been faulty, hypocritical,
based on little face, and spurred
by emotion rather ,|han reason,

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Athletic Director Ray Graves
last year after being fired as
student track assistant following
criticism of Graves and the AA
made by Parker in the Alligator.
The constitution of the state
of Florida specifically prohibits
the use of tax funds for
non-public uses, Parker said,
citing the housing of the AA on
the UF campus as a possible
violation.
UF President Stephen C.
OConnell spoke in defense of
the arrangements, saying that
former Attorney General Earl
Faircloth had claimed that the
allpcation of student fees for
such purposes appeared to be
legal.
The AA has been functioning
since 1929 and is sanctioned in
the Board of Regents nolicy
manual.
Graves, contacted at home
Sunday afternoon, had no
statement to make. We will
have to examine the accusations
and check the facts before
taking a stand, Graves said.

2,000 demonstrators
demand war pullout
By DENNIS ARNOLD
Alligator Staff Writer
A combined effort of about 2,000 demonstrators from various
antiwar organizations marched through downtown Tampa Saturday to
demand an immediate pullout from th6 Vietnam war.
Sponsored by the Student Mobilization Committee (SMC), Tampa
Area Peace Action Coalition and the Vietnam Veterans against the
War (WAW), the Tampa march was the only one held in Florida, and
was one of 17 rallies held nationwide.
Demonstrators, carrying flags and peace banners, marched from the
Tampa library to the Hillsborough County Courthouse and staged a
guerrilla theater presentation which represented a search and destroy
mission in Vietnam.
Scott Camil, UF student and regional coordinator of WAW, said
that the turnout at the demonstration could have been better and
that it seemed as if not enough people were interested.
Canul made a prepared speech at the parade and also played a
recorded message of an American prisoner of war who denounced
American involvement in Vietnam.
1 do feel, however, that the parade was successful since there was
good f&dio and television coverage, Camil said. Camil stated that
bombardment through the media strengthens the movement.
Camil said he didnt know why the demonstration was. in Tampa
and that the movement may have been better in Orlando, but we
probably wouldnt have gotten much marching done.
Speakers at the rally included Otha Favors, local black militant,
John Hobbs, University of South Florida SMC and featured speaker of
the afternoon, Ruth Colby, internationally known antiwar speaker.
Camil described the rally as peaceful and said a Veterans day march
*k planned in St. Petersburg on November tl the oricinai VeteAte
Day, he added.
A Thanksgiving Day fast is also being planned according to Camil
and another march to Washington, D. C., around January.
Camfl *>lewtagih*City U|i}il the

Ellison also leveled criticism
against FSUs numerous
violations of legal requirements
regarding travel expenditures.
He cited cases of double
reimbursements for athletic
department representatives while
on the road.
FSU spent $43,000 for
entertainment in 1969 and 1970
without any apparent legal
authority, according to Ellison,
and failed to file budgets for
University Intercollegiate
Athletic Funds as required by
the State Department of
Administration.
Ellisons specific accusations
against FSU included the failure
of the administration to explain
$17,327 in cash, checks and
other documents which
mysteriously disappeared
from the central cashiers office
early in 1970 and use of funds
collected from participators in
the overseas student center
located in Florence, Italy for
side trips by faculty members
and their wives.



Th Florida Alligator, Monday, Novambar 8, 1971,

Spessard L. Holland 1892-1971

Long-time friend of UF

BARTOW, Fla. UF
Alumnus Spessard L. Holland, a
Democratic senator from Florida
for 25 years until his retirement
last January, died of an apparent
heart attack at his home
Saturday. He was 79.
President Nixon issued a
statement Sunday mourning the
death of Holland. ... America
has lost another of the
distinguished public servants
who guided her destiny
following World War II
Gov. Reubin Askew ordered
all flags to be flown at half-staff.
Holland was a long-time
friend of UF. Since 1924 he was
an executive council member of
the UF Alumni Association. In
January 1969 Holland was
honored by the dedication of
the Spessard L. Holland Law
Center. He was recently a guest
at UF Homecoming 7l.
An examining physician at
Hollands home said Holland
apparently died in his sleep at 5
p.m. EST while resting before
going out to dinner.
Holland was born in Polk
County Community and
received his bachelors degree
magna cum laude from Emory
University in Atlanta in 1912
and his law degree from UF in
1916. He was UF student body
president from 1915-1916.
He served as a Polk County
prosecuting attorney in 1919
and was elected a county judge
the following year.
Holland served two terms as a
state senator, was governor from
1941-1946 and was elected to
the U.S. Senate in 1946,
Hollands first U.S. Senate
term was to have begun in
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January 1946, but he was sent
to Washington three months
early when Gov. Millard
Caldwell appointed him to fill
the unexpired term of Sen.
Charles Andrews, who died in
office.
Holland served four
consecutive terms before his
retirement and was a powerful
influence in shaping Floridas
Democratic party.
He was replaced in the Senate
by Democratic State Sen.
Lawton Chiles of nearby
Lakeland, who ran with
Hollands support.
Assessing Hollands place in
history, Dr. Merlin Cox, UF
professor of Florida history, said
Holland made a decided
contribution to Florida and the
South. He was an outstanding
governor and contributed to

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Floridas war effort, Cox said.
Former Gov. Leroy Collins
said Holland was a man who
had strong beliefs and fought for
them. He was a whole man he
was always on the right side.
Holland was a lifelong
Democrat but never hesitated to
criticize his party when he
thought it necessary. He aligned
himself with other southern
Democrats in Washington and
helped filibuster against civil
rights programs in 1949 and
1950.
Holland crusaded for 13 years
in the Senate to overturn the
congressional and presidential
poll tax. He eventually brought
the issue to the Senate floor, and
it became the 24th Amendment
to the U.S. Constitution. His
stand on the poll tax was
notable for a southern
politician, Cox said.

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Page 4

L The Florida Alligator, Monday, November 8,1971

Highway friends, foes trek on site

By LINDA MIKLOWITZ
Allieator Staff Writer
UF Administrators with
opponents and proponents of
the proposed cross-campus
highway took a nature walk
Friday morning.
They walked the site of the
northeast segment of the
controversial highway which
loops around Lake Alice. UF
President Stephen C. OConnell,
organizer of the walk, was there,
receiving arguments pro and con
as he and the group tramped
through under brush..
Ed Deellevue, chairman of
the Environmental Action
Group (EAG), and Law
Professor Joseph Little,
chairman of a faculty ad-hoc
committee against the road, told
die president the proposed
highway was not necessary to
campus needs; would be
detrimental to the campus by

jfl
Stephen C. O'Connell and Ed Deellevue (right)
walk route of Lake Alice highway.

Ford : Anti-pollution and safety cost more

DETROIT (UPI) The faster
the automobile industry
complies with governmental
safety and pollution control
standards, the more costly it will
be for car buyers, Ford Motor
Co. Board Chairman Henry Ford
II said Sunday.
In a rare television
appearance, Ford said
improvements in bumpers alone
will cost his conpany SIOO million
in each of the years
and add considerably to the
cost of the car. Were thinking
about aIOO or $108.
By 1975 and 1976, when the
auto industry has implemented
the various safety and emission
control standards set by the
government, a car will be S6OO
to SI,OOO more expensive, Ford
said.
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dividing it into five parts and
disturbing the ecology of the
lake; and did not meet the needs
of transportation for staff and
students.
Deellevue, a pre-med
student, promised OConnell his
group would present alternatives
to the president in a
presentation being readied for
next week.
Campus Planner William
Munson, carrying a photographic
map of campus almost as large as
the campus itself, navigated the
walk and answered EAG
objections to the road.
He said stop and yield signs,
subordinate roads deflecting
traffic flow such as one leading
from N.W. 25th Street to
University Avenue, and a speed
limit of 35-miles-an-hour or less
would keep the road from being
a throughway for the city. The
one-way loop around the lake,
he said, would also make the

Is the cleaning up of the air
that quickly that important to
every individual? Ford asked.
I think weve got
tremendous problems in the
inner city. Weve got tremendous
educational problems. Weve got

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highway an indirect means of
cross-city travel.
Deellevue countered later
that such changes were merely
cosmetic and likely to be
changed by the DOT.
Deellevue charged the DOT
was trying to make an intracity
road from the intracampus road
in spite of Munson.
The walk began from the
commuter parking lot behind
Hume Hall. EAG calls the
northeast part of the road the
most critical. It is the most
heavily-forested area and a
shelter for wildlife.
Planner Munson explained
how the loop road would run
parallel to Radio Road, 200 feet
behind Hume Hall, until merging
with Village Drive in order to
alleviate congestion on Radio
Road. Hume Hall would be
surrounded on both the north
and south by roads.
Little noted, as the group
entered the hardwood and pine
forest west of Hume, that 40 per
cent of birds seen anywhere have
been spotted in the Lake Alice
wildlife preserve. Little pointed
out a belted kingfisher, blue
heron and a red shouldered
hawk.
The party also walked
through two athletic fields and
past a handball court that would
be eliminated to make room for
the road.
Deellevue told OConnell of
plans to build an ecology
teaching resources center on the
southwest side of Lake Alice.
We would lose a major part of
this if we built the road, but we
cant ignore the transportation
problems, the EAG president
said.
Little called the road an
open invitation for the city and
county to tie in. The whole crux

tremendous health problems.
And I wonder whether we
havent got our priorities a little
bit screwed up.
I know its very important to
have clean air, Ford said, but I
dont know how dirty the air
is.

of our objections is not the
building of a road per se, but
involving the future
exploitation of the campus as a
highway interchange, he said.
Deellevue questioned the
need for the loop road as a traffic
solution for 30,000 students,
faculty and staff members.
He pointed out of 23,000
students, 7,000 live on campus
and are not permitted to have a

an at in the gator

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car. Border zone residents who
may not bring their cars to
campus during peak hours
number 5000. Os the remaining
11,000 students, only 4 ? ooo
have purchased parking stickers
We may be designing a
system of roads students cannot
afford to use and do not find
convenient and we are spending
$1.2 million doing it
Deellevue said.

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And one terrifying question to ask yourself:
Do you know an economy car when you see one?
The fact that a cor is small doesnt necessarily
mean its economical.
If it's-not carefully built and serviced, it could cost
you a considerable amount of money to run
So how do you find out which small cars are
really economy cars?
Ask questions that require specific answers.
Like these, for openers.
IHow much?
Brace yourself.
It's going to cost you several hundred
dollars more than you think.
Because on top of the inevitable sales taxes and
delivery charges, wait the inevitable optional
charges.
That's where you can really throw your money
around.
On an electric telescoping antenna, peek-a-boo
headlights, or a sports console.
Or on a bigger engine that'll do 110.
But where can you legallydo 110?
To say nothing of what all that useless power will
do to your gas mileage.
Even more bizarre is the new small car that offers
optional power equipment.
A small car is supposed to be easy to drive.
So vyhat's it doing with power steering and power
brakes? Instead of all that mechanical power, you'H
need a little will power.
To keep from being fast-talked into a lot of things
you don't need.
2 1s it a small car?
Or a big car made small?
io the rush to gel into the growing
small-car market, some car makers have made small
cars out of big cars.
So you may unwittingly buy a small car that's
really a big car. With a shortened wheelbase. A
snazzy restyled body.
And a lot of practical problems nobody bothered
to work out.
You may also buy a small car suffering from an
identity crisis.
It may not know what it is.
Because its engine may have been lifted from
another car. Its transmission borrowed from yet
another.
Or maybe its chassis plucked from still another
car. t.
And all cleverly camouflaged with some eye eyecatching
catching eyecatching bodywork.
Why not look for a small car wish just one goal
in life:
To be a small car.
3 What improvements were made this
year?
# If a car maker's serious about making
his car better each year, he'll make it better each
year.
With improvements that are meaningful. And not
just cosmetic.
Lots of flashy sheetmetal and fancy chrome wont
make a car run better. Or last longer.
But a more efficient engine and a smoother sus suspension
pension suspension system will.
Os course, if the car's a first edition, it wont have
any improvements.
In which case you should do some soul searching
before you buy it.
Because it takes a car maker years of improving
and refining to work the bugs out of a car.
You don't really want a car to work its bugs out
on you.
Do you?
4 How long does it take to replace a
fender?
# Depends on which small car you buy.
Buy one that changes its looks every year and it

8 terrifying questions
to ask a small-car salesman.

a BP Vr I

will probably take longer to repair the body.
Because dealers can't stock all the parts for cars
that get an annual face-lift.
It may also take longer for mechanics to service a
Car thats changed frequently.
Because a mechanic will have to relearn the inner
parts. Frequently.
. And heaven help you if you take your brand new
small car to a mechanic who's never seen the car
before.
i
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MOTORS, Inc.

The Florida Alligator, Monday, November 8,1971,1

The easiest way to reduce the,possibility of such
frustrations is to buy a small car thats sensibly de designed
signed designed to begin with.
And never changed for the sake of change.
5 Can I talk with the Service Manager?
Hardly anyone everasks this one.
# But why not?
You should know how good (or bad) the dealer's
service is.
Before you buy the car.
You might save yourself a lot of grief. And money.
So ask him what kind of service schedule he has
for your car.
What kind of diagnosis service.
What does it cost.
Some dealers have an elaborate array of elec electronic
tronic electronic diagnosis equipment. Which can spot little
problems beforp they become big problems.
And while you're at it, ask to see the service
department.
Is it well organized? Or sloppy, with tools and
equipment strewn all over?
How many repair stalls do they have?
When you huy a new car, don't let the showroom
in front dazzle you.
Better you be impressed by the showroom in back:
The service department.
6 How long is the warranty?
One of the best questions you can ask.
# You see, how long a car manufacturer's
willing to repair or replace major parts at his ex expense
pense expense tells you something about him:
How good he thinks his car is.
ii no ibC>j ii j jiwTuy uTiu iiv !! gwc
you a generous warranty.
Something better than the usual 12,000 miles/12
months.
But if he doesn't give you better than that (or
even that), ask another question:
"Why?
ZCan I take it for a test drive?
Curiously, a lot of people never test
drive a new small car before they buy it.
But obviously, you should.
To make sure you like the way it performs.
Do you feel comfortable driving it? Is the steering
precise?
Does the car seem well designed?
If you decide to buy the car, check it out meticu meticulously
lously meticulously when it's delivered.
Be sure everything's working perfectly before
you drive it away.
If you find anything wrong, tell the salesman. And
have it fixed.
After all, it's one thing to spend hundreds of dol dollars
lars dollars on a new small car.
But its another thing to spend hundreds of dollars
on a new small lemon.
~ C . _ ~
8 What can I sell it for?
Asking what you can get for if before
# you get it may seem like a dumb question.
But the resale value of a car is a tip-off on what
people think gbout it.
If the cars been a loser over the years, with
heavy repair bills, you'll probably take a beating
when you unload it.
If the car depreciates hundreds of dollars the
minute you buy if, you're losing money even before
you drive it home.
And if it has no resale value yet because its
brand new, who knows what you'll get for it when
you sell it.
So while you're thinking about buying low, think
about something else:
Selling high*
Good luck.


AUTHORIZED
OCALCR

Page 5



Page 6

I. Tha Florida Alligator, Monday, November 8, 1971

Gainesville-Alachya merger
p
discussed last Thursday

By DEE DEE ESPOSITO
Alligator Staff Writer
The proposal for merging
Gainesville City and Alachua
County Governments made by
the Government Study
Committee (GSC) in May of
1971 was discussed Thursday
night at a public hearing called
by Alachua County's legislative
delegation.
Thursday night's three-hour
discussion was the first in a
series of hearings planned by
Sen. Robert (Bob) Saunders and
Rep. William (Bill) Andrews,
Kenneth (Buddy) McKay and
Ralph Turlington.
Future meetings, which will
be devoted successively to
presentations by the County
Commission, the Gainesville City
Commission and the League of
Cities, are preliminary to
possible legislative proposals by
the state delegation.
State legislation appointing a
charter committee to study
Alachua County's local
government is the only action
which can unlock the legal
channels which will bring
government consolidation before
die people as a referendum.
Members of the GSC
attempted to summarize the
findings of three years of study.
Chairman Allan Sutherland,
quoting population growth
statistics, stated the present
government structure is not
equipped to handle the problems
now and will not be in the
future."
A question was raised
concerning the effect that the
proposed limited enrollment at
UF would have on the GSC's
projected propitiation figures.
In the city of Gainesville, we
are closely related to the
enrollment at UF," Sutherland
responded, but the effect it
might cause is anyone's crystal
ba."
Dr. Richard Buckner,
chairman of Task Force V,
which studied governmental
structure, explained the GSC's
final report.
We looked at every
conceivable piece of information
we could get our hands on and
ultimately came up with the
merger plan we felt was the best
possible way to deal with
Alachua Countys situation,"
Buckner said.
The GSC proposal involves a
mayor and eight-member
I
I WE DARE YOU to join
in this investigation
I You can buy quality NAME
BRANDS at WHOLESALE PRICES
DIAMONDS WATCHES
I RINGS FASHION JEWELRY
1 SMALL APPLIANCES
I ELECTRONICS
I Hundreds of Famous Nam* Brandt
Hii
I S. MAIN ST. AT S.W 13th ST.
(WHifcton Rd.) 376-7816

council, elected county-wide, a
chief administrative officer and
director of public utilities
appointed by the mayor and a
five-man public untility board
appointed by the elected
council.
Discussion from die floor was
initiated, and GSC members
responded to citizen's questions.
Issues of elected versus
appointed administrative
officers, of city residents paying
more than their fair share of
taxes on some services, of
annexation as an alternative plan
and of the desire of small
municipalities and independent
farmers to remain autonomous
were raised, many fringed with
resentment and emotionalism.
Perry McGriff Jr.,
representing Governmental
Improvement For Today

for bankings New
H Breed? B
'*- Theyre young. Our average new officer is 26. Theyre flexible.
SBjWIB The kind who rush out to meet change. They're self-starters. BU|BHB
IQBHHm Because they know stagnation is not our style.
We need managers. You need a job. Does this suggest anything HBHH
to you? Why not see C&S. the billion-dojlar bank at the gHIK
crossroads of the South? Where 80 out of the top 100
U.S. companies bank.
C&S Don Rochow will be on your
campus next week. Like to meet him? Bg||HH|
Check with your placement office now!
;B The Citizens and Southern Banks in Georgia ,

(GIFT), called for a charter
commission plan to be
structured and placed before the
people of Alachua County,
where it could live or die on its
own merits and not be clouded
by emotionalism.
McGriff offered the services
of 420 young men willing to
help inform the public once the
charter study is completed.
Though the divergent personal
interests of the rural and city
dwellers were evident in the
discussion, all agreed in
complimenting the members of
the GSC on the work they had
done.
Ron Carpenter, also with
GIFT, summed up the findings
of the night's forum. The GSC
has put forth ufiat they consider
the best possible plan; it is not
necessarily the workable one in
Alachua County,

Saunders

WATCH FOR
GAIL'S PLASTER
GALLERY

JHu "STEAK n SHAKE ""
fs7% STUDENT DOLLAR SPECIAL
| £ OUR REGULAR 1.10
STEAKBURGER LUNCH
ONE OF OUR DELICIOUS STEAKBURGERS ON
TOASTED BUN SERVED WITH LIBERAL ORDER
OF FRENCH FRIES AND YOUR CHOICE OF
BAKED BEANS OR LETTUCE TOMATO SALAD
, aY.O* WITH ANY DRINK WU.
>1 09 Y ONE DOLLAR (TAX PAIDI
*' WITH THIS COUPON
;;; w thvs STEAK n SHAKE

-
igBL igBL-IMBESk
-IMBESk igBL-IMBESk
f ML/
§11?
in
Turlington

CAMPUS PACS
ARE BACK

nH m
4L " 9
jfs
Andrews



Nip and puck: Florida Players
will present William
Shakespeares comic-fantasy, A
Midsummer Nights Dream
Nov. 8-13 at 8 p.m. in the
Constans Theatre. Tickets may
be purchased at the theatre box
office.
Togetherness: Bloc seating
chairmen are reminded to turn
in their requests today at Gate
14 in the stadium for the
UF-Kentucky game. This is the
family day game.
Puppy tales: Pound, directed
by Robert Downey, will be
shown tonight at 7 and 9:30 in
the Reitz Union Auditorium.
Admission is SO cents.
Whats up, doc?: (silly rabbit)
Pre-Medical Forum for all
pre-med and pre-dent students
will be held tonight at 8 in room
121 Little. The program will
feature assistant deans from the
colleges of Medicine, Dentistry
and Arts and Sciences.
67-94-21-hike!!: (you were
expecting measurements
maybe?!) Student Florida
Education Association is
sponsoring a drive to get
students to sign an alleged
violation report form (OEP No.
400) against the University
system for the raise in tuition. If
OEP investigates, there is a
possibility of a S4O refund. Sign
today.
Student rights: Student Rights
Committee of the Student
Senate will meet today at 3:30
in room 331 Union. All
interested persons are urged to
attend.
Water logs: Gator Ski Club will
meet tonight at 8 in room 362
Union. All members and those
wishing to join are welcome.

.. .IS THE SYMBOL FORTAUREANS ( |
_ sign up now for
your YEARBOOK
HBHV PORTRAITS

What's Happening

How attractive: UF Womens
Track and Field club invites
those who are interested in
jogging and other field events to
come to practice every Tuesday
and Thursday at 5 p.m. on the
Florida track or call Miss
Thompson at the Womens Gym.
American women: (those arent
the Girl Scouts, either!) IFC
presents the Guess Who for
Fall Frolics, Nov. 22 at 8 p.m. in
the air conditioned Florida
Gym. Tickets are $3.25.
House hunters: Law Wives will
meet Tuesday night at 7:30 in
the Law School Auditorium.
The program will feature What
to Look for When Buying a
Home.
Sky is falling?!: The
Goodweather Puppeteer will
present Chicken Little (or the
end of the world), and King
Midas (or the bird of plenty)
and the Crankie Movie Machine
on the North Terrace of the
Union Wednesday from ll am.
2 pm. Admission is free!!
Auntie Em: Rose Community
Productions will feature Oz, a
hard rock band, in concert
Friday at 8 pm. in the
University Auditorium.
Admission is sl.

Donations 25<
INCLUDES:
ASPIRIN DEODORANT OTHER
SHAMPOO TOOTHPASTE SURPRISES
AT STUDENT SERVICES CENTER
TOMORROW THROUGH WEDNESDAY

Carol Brady
Alligator Staff Writer

Follow the leader: ... to the
Campus Crusade for Christ
Leadership training class
Tuesday night at 7 in room 355
Union.
Music makers: Cross Purpose
Players will hold a meeting
today at 4:30 in room 150A
Union for all musicians
interested in program music.
Rock musicians are welcome!!
Pied Piper et al: Experimental
Aircraft Association, dedicated
to sport aviation of all types,
will meet Wednesday night at 8
in room 303 Aerospace. Program
will feature a film of the Gemini
Space Flight.
Forest the eye can see: UF
Forestry Club. will meet
Wednesday night at 7:30 in
room 311 Rolfs Hall. Mr. Fred
Folley from Owens-Illinois Co.
will give a slide presentation on
Mechanized Forestry from
Planting to Harvest. Students,
faculty and wives invited.
LOOKING FOR SOMETHING?

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Gffieffc Lindsey
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/{i fv- $497
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SHOP ALL DEPTS. FOR OUR
ANNIVERSARY SPECIALS!

Tha Florida Alligator, Monday, Novambar 8, 1971,

Page 7



Page 8

I, Th* Florida Alligator, Monday, Nov am bar 8, 1971

Editorial
Unfair profit
As we write these words we are being laissez-faired to
death.
In eighth grade, before we knew it gone amock, laissez
faire was the simple answer to a complex problem. Let
business run business, we were told, and let the chips fall
where they may.
But two things have destroyed that concept: greed and
indifference.
Our monkey wrench is the latter; the words Property of
the UF, branded on its handle.
And when that concept is destroyed, we add two words
to the vocabulary: monopoly and its more subtle brother
oligopoly.
We are victims of the oligopoly between Malones,
Florida Book Store and the Campus Shop & Book Store.
The university administration has not created it just
allowed it to survive. UF President Stephen C. OConnell
says, We will not undersell the book merchants of this
town. It would be unfair to compete.
Why then do we:
undersell the merchant in the food we market;
compete in the J. Wayne Reitz Hotel?
undersell city housing in the dormitories we provide?
compete so heartily in the high markup of the
merchandise section of the book store?
OConnells reasoning has merit. The book store does not
pay rent, has a choice location and is not affected by
normal state taxes. Using these advantages to sink
commercial establishments would be unfair.
But using these advantages to allow the student to
purchase books in a free and competitive market is
something the administration must carefully consider.
Two purposes have been cited for the t*ook store:
convenience and service. But last year the book store cleared
$ 156,000 above its costs.
That speaks of another purpose: profit.
The money in the past has been used to:
support such groups as the Florida Press, WRUF, the
Florida Atlas and the laundry with over $387,000 in loans.
allocate $38,000 to put a new ceiling on the Florida
gym.
The Campus Shop & Book Store is often the students
last stop in the spiraling cost of education. Making it the last
straw, too, will only further restrict an education to the few
financially privileged.
There is thus a third mandate a moral one that the
university has ignored through indifference: providing the
student with a low-cost source of books.
This could be done:
through a series of discounts provided on textbooks,
giving the students a more direct benefit for their dollars.
through taking a larger loss on used books, providing
students a more direct return on the money they spent ten
weeks before.
through actively and financially aiding Student
Government in the development and operation of a book
store cooperative.
It is not the easiest way.
Continuing on a course of complacency; blaming the
skyrocketing book prices entirely on the publisher, is the
easiest way to excuse Gainesvilles own oligopoly.
It is the easiest way to avoid shaking up the Gainesville
merchant, by providing his patrons a little bit of a choice.
And finally, by avoiding distasteful competition, it is,
perhaps, the easiest way to make everyone well, once again,
except for the one group consistently hurt students.
a

Fred

Tin-
Florida
i
Alligator

l=3= FLUTED COLUMNS
Rehnquist: nope
yy u t j
By John Parker=£=^

After several days of
consultation with my Fluted
Columns legal staff, I have come
to a conclusion on one Supreme
Court nominee. The following
telegram has been dispatched to
Washington:
MR. PRESIDENT: REGRET
TO INFORM YOU HAVE
DECIDED AGAINST
REHNQUIST. AM STILL
CONSIDERING POWELL.
This rather harsh decision
does not flow directly from Mr.
Rehnquists rather atrocious
views on questions of civil rights
and individual liberties, but
rather from what those views
connote about his judicial skills.
Mr. Rehnquist has at one time
or another supported legalized
segregation, use of illegally
seized evidence, dismissal of
government employees who
excercise their constitutional
rights, and the mass arrests of
last May Day demontrations.
One is entitled to ones
opinions.
But one is not necessarily
entitled to sit upon the Supreme
Court of the United States.
The crux of the argument
against Rehnquist is not his
opinions, but the fact that if Mr.
Rehnquist holds such opinions,

Ron Sachs Gary Grunder
Editor-In-Chief Managing Editor
Linda Cole Chris Lane
News Editor Make-up Editor
Truth is our greatest weapon.
/ \

he is an extremely unpreceptive
man.
The situation is not unlike
Sen. Muskies bid for the
Democratic presidential
nomination. Until just recently,
the Senator was a hawk on
Vietnam. The fact that he
changed his mind is certainly to
his credit, but one must never
forget how long it took him to
realize the tragedy of Indochina
while other men had known it
for years. His sincerity may not
be questioned, but his
perception should.
Mr. Rehnquist, while perhaps
sincere all these years in
espousing the separate but
equal doctrine, cannot claim
to hide behind that sincerity
when it comes time to examine

his perception and intelligence.
After all, here is a man who in
1967 was still fighting the
segregation cause. If nothing
else, can it not be argued that his
mind is 13 years behind that of
the court that finally struck
down this blight to our national
integrity.
The same logic applies to his
other opinions. These are all
matters that the High Court has
ruled upon years ago and now
stand as axioms of law. Doesnt
it say something about the
mentality and perception of the
nominee who would have us
return to those thrilling days of
yesteryear when any evidence no
matter how illegally obtained,
could be used in a court of law?
Doesnt it say something
about the legal brilliance of a
man who cannot find
somewhere in our Bill of Rights
a prohibition against mass arrests
without probable cause? Doesnt
it say something about analytical
ability of a lawyer who could
not find in the constitution
language outlawing
discrimination in housing?
Im not saying the man is
corrupt or too conservative.
Im saying hes a dolt.



The bookstores
Where the students always pay

By RANDY BELLOWS
Alligator Special Projects Writer
Anti-trust law, despite its
clear objectives, is a morass of
gray and ambiguous fringes.
Industries can hide for years in
quiet suspicion.
There are three book stores in
the narrow geographic triangle
that caters to the UF students
needs. All are in competition but
none apparently compete.
The large textbook publishers,
the ones that virtually
standardize resale markups at 20
per cent, are responsible for
much of this. But a university
policy of non-competition or
non-active competition, tends to
exaggerate the rest.
Were not trying to compete
with anybody, Sam Getzen,
manager of the Campus Shop &
Book Store, said. Were just
following our avowed purpose.
Or, as UF President Stephen
C. OConnell put it, Were not
going to undersell the merchant
of this town ... not going to
unfairly compete.
One might be led to thinking
the step had already been taken
between fringe area and
violation. But wait and listen.
- Is: JiHI Mt
ap,
jjaamr
Vice-president Elmore
... bundle being made
The book store pays no rent.
It pays no occupational license.
No state taxes. It has the best
location, on the best piece of
soil, in the busiest part of town.
Thus, argues OConnell, any
competition would be unfair.
Fringe number one.
The Campus Shop & Book
Store, contrary to accepted
belief, made no money on text
book sales last year. It lost over
S4OO buying back used books.
These are the victims of the
20 per cent markup, which
despite appearances, is not
unduly inflated.
On trade and technical books,
however, the book store made,
as Vice President for
Administrative Affairs William
Elmore put it, a bundle.
Thus, along with paperbacks,
magazines and other
book-related supplies, where the
markup often approaches 40 per

Inf^r
1! I ..
I

ALLIGATOR SPECIAL REPORT

Students wait to pay for books
... prices are no lower on campus

cent, the book department of
the Campus Shop & Book Store,
recorded a $62,000 profit last
year.
Fringe number two- market
allocations. Typically, the three
Gainesville book stores will
deliver order blanks to all major
colleges of the university,
sometime before the start of a
quarter. Usually the college will
return the adoption form to
all three book stores, only
informing them what books will
be used in the following quarter.
It is then left up to tie book
stores discretion to decide how
many books to order.
The vicious cycle begins.
Typically the campus book store
will order one-third of the books
requested. If it ordered more
than a third, it takes the chance
of being left with costly and
unwanted inventory. But by
ordering one-third, it also insures
that both sales and money will
be evenly divided between the
three separate stores.
We cant afford to load up,
Getzen said. It would make our
inventory unbelievable...
and he added laughing, it
would get me fired.
Fringe number two.
Collusion and conspiracy are
ominous words in the
dollar-upon-dollar financial
industry.
But few little men scurry
around, spying and
counter-spying, in reality. And
in the book business, where
prices are usually standardized
from the start, a conspiracy
would seem to be almost
naturally excluded or at the
very least unnecessary.
Getzen, a kindly man,
apparently responsive to student
needs, says, We have little if no
communication with the other
book stores. We dont gather
information for them and they
dont gather it for jus.
But his own superior, Dick
Schiffli, who in the line of
command falls between Elmore
and Getzen said, We have a
close communication with
Malones ... none with the
Florida Book Store. We discuss
what fields were going to get
into ... what subjects theyre
going to get into. What were

doing what theyre
doing ~. how we re going to
handle a certain area.
Fringe number three.
While OConnell argued that
the university, because of its
unique advantages, would not
unfairly compete with the
merchants of Gainesville:
the book store netted a
$94,000 profit last year in
merchandise (cosmetics, pencils,
school supplies, college fad
items) and in interdepartmental
sales.
the university accepted the
Servomation food service
contract on a low bid basis, thus
creating an element of
competition between food
service on and off campus.
the university, through the
J. Wayne Reitz Union hotel, on
a temporary basis, and in
dormitory facilities on a more
permanent one, appears to be in
competition with off-campus
residence facilities.
Getzen dealt with the
competitive angle of the
merchandise section of the book
store saying, We only do it with
certain items; only the college
fads.
For instance, we wouldnt
stock klackers because we didnt
feel we should be in that
business. Also it helps to float
the rest of the store and the
money we lose in textbooks.
And OConnell continued,
Thats what you would call a
convenience part of the shop.
We leave it up to the student to
deckle whether he wants to pay
the extra nickel for an item, or
go off-campus.
The Campus Shop & Book
Store allocated $38,000 to put a
new ceiling on the Florida Gym
last year. It meant a bit less than
a nickel on every book you
bought.
While only $12,000
eventually went to receiling the
gym, the allocation raised the
question of guidelines for profits
in general.
The book store in the past ten
years has:
loaned the university
laundry $40,000.
loaned food services
$7,500.
loaned WRUF $61,000,

some of which is still unpaid.
supported the Florida Atlas
with a $114,000 loan.
loaned $45,000 to the
Florida Press.
helped build the cleaning
and laundry operation in the
physical plant area with a
$120,000 loan.
allocated $38,000 to put a
new ceiling on the Florida gym.
The two most fr> aently
asked questions are, Where did
this money come from? and
What guided its distribution?
Its a good deal easier to
respond to the former it came
from a yearly profit margin
between three to six per cent,
which last year meant $156,000.
It came from the sale of
textbooks, paperbacks,
merchandise and
interdepartmental sales.
But the second question goes
much deeper into the moral
question of, Where should the
money go?.
The Campus Shop & Book
Store is a state auxiliary, as are
many of the above recipients of
the loans.
We felt it was proper,
OConnell explained, since all
profits were really state funds
and could have gone right back
into the general fund.
And most of the money
loaned, to allow these facilities
to take their first step, has been
repaid.
The book store, despite its
auxiliary status, must support
itself. Thus, rather than being
subsidized by the state, breaking
even is a necessity.

JBl i %
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V|| 4 ;iflr
.|H
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.
' ...
f^g^i.-,-". <$ J^|
*--"' Hi /
mKKBKmmW VMHWHm^BHF:
PHOTOS BY TERRY WALTERS
UF student forks out money for books
... part of $156,000 profit last year

The Florida Alligator, Monday, Nov am bar 8, 1971,

In 1970-71 the book store
made a six per cent profit over
that break-even point.
Over SBO,OOO will go to such
projects as updating the cash
register equipment, expanding
the medical center book store,
the book division and central
warehouse, and into reserves for
an eventual new facility.
Another SBO,OOO will be set
aside for a projected increase in
inventory.
The profits. What if they were
thrown back into discounts
instead?
It wouldnt work, Getzen
says, Were in a dynamic not a
static situation ... weve got to
increase inventories each year.
We need funds for that.
OConnell himself answered
the ropery curtly. We have never
taken the position that we will
be a discount house.
What about a student co-op?
Administrators discount the
concepts feasibility, although
SG Office of Consumer Affairs is
actively pursuing the possibility
today.
Were not going to undersell
the people around us,
OConnelJ said. If the students
wished to, however, they could
go off-campus and organize and
operate a cooperative venture
themselves.
But I doubt very seriously if
it would survive.
Thus, that last dip into the
wallet before the quarter begins,
usually gives the student neither
a free nor a competitive choice.
And generally, he never
knows the difference.

Page 9



Page 10

I Th* Florida Alligator Mo"d*w Nownh*r S IQ7I

J I
Campus Shop
a
"d
o m
k i*(sL_
Advantages
jf It has never seriously been
contested whether the Campus
Shop and Bookstore provides
the students with a valuable
O service:
Os primary importance it
restrains the off-campus business
community from raising prices
r to a more exorbitant level.
It stocks its shelves with
several book-related items which
either because of their lack of
e volume or popularity would not
normally be sold for profit (such
I as special edition books used for
a particular course).
9 By its verv location it
provides students despite the
additional expense with a
convenient outlet to purchase
cosmetics, pens and pencils and
other college-related supplies.
It operates its used book
section at a loss however
minute. Thus books that will no
longer be used in a course are
purchased back at the
self-liquidating rate the same
price the book store will get
when it resells it to one of the
nations distribution houses.
It provides employment for
between 20 and 30 UF students.

----- -
p n cu
I viidn
si a
I Faculty Travel Expenses Student
I Budget Pay Day Loan Medical Center
I Installment Employees Loans
! s,nc / n i U P to
I 7945 Manon Finance Co. Inc. S6OO
I 123 S.W. 2nd Av*. 376-5333
I sfgr< Supervised And Reflated

PRICE COMPARISONS
(EDITORS NOTE: The following I* a random aample of book price*.)
Course Book and Author Malones Florida Book Campus Shop &
Store Book Store
Mgt 401 Business Law-Wyat 11 -95. lUJS
ES2OI Economics-Samuelson 10-50
ZY 201 Principles Zoology- 14.00 1400 14UU
Johnson
CEH College English- 9 95 9.95 9.95
-
ES Contemporary Economics- 10.50 10.50
Spencer
ASE 300 Aeroplane Aerodynamics 13.75 13.75 13.75
Dommasch..-
Art 380 A Potter's Book-Leach 8.75 :.Z2 sLZ2
CBS 261-3 Biological Science- 10.50 10.50 10.50
Keeton ___
ESM 304 Eng. Mechanics: A 10.00 7.95 7.95
Unified Treatment
Malv/om

Disadvantages
The disadvantages, despite
their subtlety, have a great
effect on the final price of the
books you purchase:
Partially because of UFs
policy of not actively competing
in the book business, the student
does not have the chance to
purchase textbooks in a free and
competitive market.
Because the Campus Shop
& Book Store, albeit out of
necessity, purchases only
one-third of most textbooks
required students often find
themselves unable to purchase a
book.
Also as a result of this
one-third policy, the three
bookstores are virtually assured
of spliting the sales three ways.
The Campus Shop and
Bookstore does not act as a
dealer to other universities in
used books. Thus the prices paid
to the students for books no
longer used in a course range
from fair to ridiculous,
admitted book store manager
Sam Getzen.
Students pay for the
convenience of having a store on
campus where they can purchase
non-textbook supplies. Price
markup is equal to or more than
most stores in town.
1 11:30 AM "READY 1
| FOR YOUR LUNCH |
I BENCH AND BAR f
SUNFLOWER HEALTH
FOODS
HOFFMAN & WtEDR PRODUCTS
VITAMINS GRAINS
W. UNIV. AVE. 378-8978

ORANGE-BLUE BASKETBALL GAME
SPONSORED BY:
GATOR LOAN FUND
TUES., NOV. 16, 7:45 PM.
ALL STUDENTS SI.OO DONATION
AT FLA. GYM

ROBBIES IS
* BACK
Meals &
TV & BILLIARDS^
I 1718 W University Are.
LjOnTheGddCoasf___
WE WANT TO SELL YOU
A STEAK...
SIRLOIN Off
STEAKS
N.Y. STRIP _y* t
STEAKS 98,
RLET 08
MlGNflll 70


GROUND
BEEF 59.
USDA GOVERNMENT INSPECTED
DELOACHS MEAT MARKETS
fj #2
3432 W. UNIVERSITY 1203 S.W. 16th AVE.
AVENUE NEAR BEHIND THE CIN
WEST GATE J CITY LOUNGE
STOCK YOUR FREEZER NOW...



W m&U
rr Mi
.f

Large crowd for Cowboy
at Rose Centers concert

By JEFFREY WHITE
Alligator Staff Writer
Dancing in the streets? Well maybe in the aisles,
as Rose Community Center presented Cowboy and
Mudcrutch in concert in the University Auditorium
Friday night.
Cowboy and Mudcrutch put on two shows, and a
large crowd was on hand for both performances, the
second show lasting until 3 a.m.
Cowboy is a group from North Florida, and they
have two albums out that are dynamite, a person
associated with Rose Community Center said. Their
most recent album, Five Will Get You Ten, on
the Capricorn label, was released two weeks ago.

Mclntosh art
now on oxhfcH
in RoHz Union ~
By LYNNE JACKSON
Alligator Staff Writer
A splashing array of color is
on exhibit on the second floor
of the Reitz Union. The
paintings of P.R. Mclntosh
project a shimmering world of
bright images created from
sheets of acrylics.
Although color is everything
in the 30 paintings on exhibit,
subjects do exist, and there is no
limit in their scope and vitality.
Faint images of Figures, a
mountain or an island project
clearly a personality evolved
from the creative process of such
an artist.
Mclntosh explains that these
works are created by layer on
layer of transparent as well as
opaque acrylics. Each painting
evolves from one discovery to
the next, until an ambient glow
emanates from a total entity -a
personality all its own.
Mclntosh, professor of Art,
received his BS degree from
Bradley University and his BFA
and MFA degrees from the Art
Institute of Chicago. Mclntosh
taught art at Ohio State
University, was director of the
Peoria Art Institute and director
of the Art School at Bradley
University. Later he joined the
Art Faculty of UF.
His paintings have been
exhibited abroad and in this
country he has shown in
numerous national and regional
exhibitions. The exhibit is a part
of the program sponsored by the
Union, which displays a new
exhibit each month.

WE HAVE
ALL
STEREO &
PHONOGRAPH
NEEDLES
Ml V rz&HfHfieM
'tu %1 PHONE J/6 233)

LIVELY ARTS

c )in(/ee i
DISCOUNT HOSIERY
ALL TYPES OF PANTY HOSE
79? -$1.49
Plus Discount Prices on Mens
and Childrens Socks
Next to Woolco Sunshine Sh. Center

ft MJ ii.lrwwM i

With the use of an occasional slide guitar and
fiddle, Cowboy gets some unique effects. The group
threw out tambourines to encourage audience
involvement in the music.
Rose Community Center is a community oriented
organization. They recently sponsored the
Halloween Ball in the Plaza, which was attended by
over 2,000 people. Money collected at the concerts
is used in a variety of ways, including helping the
needy and ghetto people around Gainesville.
This Friday Rose Community will present
another band, Oz, in the University Auditorium and
in two weeks, RGF; a group popular around
Gainesville, will return from a tour in the Boston
area to put on a concert for Rose Community
Center.

EAT TOGETHER
AT THE I
| BENCH AND BAR |

$1 OFF
Clip the IKJI
Pizza Inn
Buck
beiotv fora special treat!
Includes takeout or eat in our TV room
PIZZA INNROUGH NOTE I
|[A (I / Redeemable with thl/i\\ 1
111 11 /_ \purcha*e of any II 111 I
\\ 4>|n4f, 1 l*r l pizza or yj AJi\
I yQpy Imedium pizzas. // yj|l
1 Pizza lnn\ Ti/ j Th P* ll ,nn
Do "*' par f.mllyl I*> *^§3^
( QNE PIZZAINN BUCK mOj
Sorry, offer not valid for cheeae pizzas.
PATRONIZE GATOR ADVERTISERS

The Florida Alligator, Monday, November 8, 1971,1

Page 11



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

wmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm
FOR SA LE
CHECK WITH US BEFORE YOU
BUY DESK CHAIRS, FILES,
BOOKCASES NEW AND USED
DISCOUNT PRICES DESK FROM
$29.50 UP CHAIRS FROM $22.50
JR OFFICE FURNITURE 620 South
Main 376-1146(a-30t-9-p)
Ffrewood for sale, pine logs cut & split
to your specifications, sold In Vi cord
lots (64cu ft) free dellv. more Info
call 392-2233 nlte 378-0164
(-st-23-p)
Honda 305 Superhawk. Excellent
condition; custom seat, sport pipes, 2
helments with bubble shields. Call
378-4695 (a-3t-34-p)
17' cabin crusler, 110 hp mere.,
depth finder, cb radio, am radio,
trailer, exl. condition call John
376-4778 $2600 or best offer 1222
nw 39 ave. (a-st-34-p)
1 9 7 2 YAMAHAS 19 7 2
TRIUMPHS now In stock TRIUMPH
CITY us 441 Vi ml N of city limits
372-2197 (a-7t-34-p)
DIAMONDS two rings for tale
cheap one largish one smallish call
Carol 373-3915 after 5 pm
(a-3t-34-p)
J
U.S. Divers doubles 2 yrs old $75.00
Arbalete wood spear gun 35.00, Volt
Aluminum spear gun 20.00 call don
378-9408 (a-st-33-p)
Refrigerator, $39.95 & up. 30 day
warranty, free delivery. Brooks used
Appliance 2315 S.E. Hawthorne
Road 378-8935 Open Sundays 9-6
(a-10t-21-p)
1964 honda 55, two helmets, new tag
SIOO.OO 1960 sunbeam alpine, 4 new
tires, needs work, make offer-phone
378-4476 anytime. (a-st-33-p)
KEEP your carpets beautiful despite
constant footsteps of a busy family.
Get Blue Luster Rent Electric
Shampooer sl. Lowry Furniture Co.
(A-tfc)
Hasselblad 500 c; 50, 80, 250 lenses,
extra mag, ext tubes 21 & 55,
magnify, hood, sunshades, cut film
stuff & more SI6OO call S. Elbert
(eves) 376-8505 (a-3t-35-p)
Smith Corona all electric typewriter
$75.90, single bed SIO.OO,
combination tv stand-bookshelf
SIO.OO call 376-8610 after 5 pm
(a-st-35-p)
1970 kawasakl mach 111 500. only
6400 miles. Cost sll4 new must
tell only $750. perfect running
condition. 3 helmets Call Claude at
372-2231 (a-3t-34-p)

r -l
r Todays
more for your money meal
amoisons
CAFETERIA
r 1
. MONDAYS FEATURE
CHUCK WAGON STEAK j
1 AND HASH BROWN 1
.11 POTATOES .I?
\< 82 < li
§ 1 TUESDAYS FEATURE |
S l GOLDEN FRIED CHICKEN 1
I ALL YOU CAN EAT OO < I
I _J
LUNCH: 11 til 2 SUPPER:4:3O til 8 FREE PARKING
moisons
CfiFETERIfi ..beyond comparison!

illlllllltllltlllllUllllllllllllllllllllllllllllflllllllliiltlllllltl
FOR SALE
IIIIIUIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII
For sale: 10 speed triumph bike with
car carrier both in good condition
only 6 mos old SIOO.OO phone
468-1046 after 3:00 (a-3t-34-p)
schwlnn varsity 10 speed bike
generator lights luggage rack 27 inch
wheels big frame mens hardly ridden
SIOO call 373-3635 after 6:30 pm
(a-3t-34-p)
want your pet to talk back? 5 month
old mynah bird Including large cage
SSO, compare prices The cheapest
friend you could buy call 378-9555
(a-st-34-p)
1970 SUZUKI ts 250 trail bike 2600
miles excellent condition $575 or
best offer 372-4753 (a-4t-33-p)
Zenith "Circle of Sound stereo 80
watts. Cannot scratch records two
360 spks Excellent Condition
w/stand, dust cover $l6O 392-7124
(a-st-33-p)
1970 Skyline Mobile Home, 60 x 12,
front and rear bedrooms,
alr-conditloned, equity and take up
payments 372-4709 after 6 pm
(a-st-34-p)
for sale 1 bedroom 12' x 48' Trailer
Equity and assume payments of
79.77 a month phone 373-4216
(a-st-34-p)
Yamaha RB 5 350 $595 firm. Cost
SBB3 new, 1971 model w/only 3,025
ml Excellent condition, 1 helmet Call
Larry aft 3:30 'pm ph 373-3451
(a-st-34-p)
Yash lea -DBO mm w/case & lens cap
f-3.5 22, 1/500 CLEAN S3O PH
392-7352 (a-2t-35-p)
mens 10 speed bike 23 frame white
3 months old excellent condition S7O
373-2491 (a-3t-35-p)
SHOT GUN dbl barrel 12 gauge
excellent cond reflnlshed stock,
recoil pad, case, J C Hlggens model
S6O call Steve after 6 pm 373-5468
(a-st-35-p)
Blrddog puppies, 10 wks old,
had shots lemon-white, llver-whlte,
wormed. Mom not registered, dad Is.
call after 6 pm and on wk ends
495-2872 (a-st-35-p)
Must Sell Bell & Howell stereo tape
deck; Like new, only one yr. old.
Cost S2OO, asking $125. But lets
talk I Call 372-9828 after 6 pm.
(A-st-36-p)
1970 BSA 650 cc good cond. luggage
rack, helmet Included $875. TV 17
portable works $25. Call 372-5081.
(A-4t-36-p)
Doberman plncher for sale. Call
378-2812 after five evening. Price
S9O. (A-2t-36-p)
Kenmore washing machine like new.
Big load. Call Elda 373-1444. $75.
Gives you a bargain. (A-2t-36-p)

Page 12

!, The Florida Alligator, Monday, November 8,1971

IflllllllllltllUlllllllltlllllllimilllilllllllllllllllllllllllllK
FOR SALE
iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiuiitiiiiai
1964 honda superhawk 305 cc $175
old but good shape. Very reliable.
Needs very little. No tag or.
inspection sticker. 378-8562
(a-st-32-p)
Classical 8 track cartidges and open
reel recorded 1800, 2400 Sony and
American tapes for listening or
rerecording. Call 376-6823.
(a-st-32-p)
FOR RENT
Sublease: Brookwood Terrace Apt., 3
BR, 2Vi baths, pool, $325. mo.
Includes washer, dryer, dishwasher,
bullt-ln stove & refrig..
372-245 l.(b-st-32-p)
<*
Sublease 1 bedroom furnished apt.
Unlv Gardens 140 monthly carpet,
c/d available dec 1- real nice call andy
at 378-8485 after 5 pm (b-st-35-p)
Female Roommate wanted Apt. 96
Landmark $47.50 mo. 1/4 util.
Starting winter quarter. Call
378-3147 now. (B-st-36-p)
iiiiiiitiiiiiniiniiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii
wanted female roommate to live with
3 other girls In Village Park apt.
winter & spring qtr. SSO. mo. V util,
call 373-0091 after 6 pm urgent
(c-st-33-p)
1 or 2 female roomates to share new
3 bdrm mobile home own bdrm &
bath 60 + utl or share 40 each + V* utl
call 378-6885 ask for
Peggy(c-st-33-p)
Male roommate wanted for La Bonne
Vie apt. $55 per mo. V util, call
Barry 373-3359. after 6 (c-3t-34-p)
Ride to Newark NJ or around there.
Thanksgiving weekend, share expense
call evenings keep trying ask for craig
378-3408 (C-st-34-p)
DAMSEL In distress nd ride frm se
24th av to U dally mst arv 8 am &
dpt 5 pm wt shr gas ask fr Jan 392
1791 btwn 8 & 5. Stay happy!
(c-st-32-p)
Female roomate wanted senior or
grad student townhouse apt a/c &
pool Williamsburg $57.50 plus V* util
Call 376-9864 (c-st-32-p)
FEMALE ROOMMATES
DESPARATELY NEEDED AT THE
PLACE APTS. CALL 378-3384.
(C-st-36-p)
B C Il\iH nn A 1 AT* T*iffi
%ii9hiTin r\
JsESEHBK igb£9Bk
|g||
-mm
Boult
[SOUL
CINEMA 2 AT: 3:20
5:25

free rent & food for 1 or 2 females In
exchange for preparing meals, etc. for
under 30 bachelor, no other
obligations, applicants must be neat
in appearance & possess good
personality. 2 br apt. In apt.
complex, pool, etc. If Interested call
373-1077 or 376-4417 (c-st-34-p)
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
NOW 55 + V elec CALL 378-5290
ask for Judl (c-st-34-p)
LIBERAL ROOMMATES NEEDED
IMMEDIATELY. Come by
Gatortown No. 122 or call Donna
372-9716 NOW. (C-3t-36-p)
Wanted Male roommate as soon as
possible for La Bonne Vie
Apartments. Call 378-5274.
Townhouse apartment $55 per
month 1/4 utilities. (C-2t-36-p)
! TRY US, 1
; YOULL LIKE US! j
bench and bar I

At the Rat tonight
Shows at8:00, 9:30,11:00
Members
Jjf U U of F Faculty Club, Inc.
IWft|j[|| p|IT l A T w A I I j | ] I |i 11 j
'Atyffrv.- fmW WB/as '/ tcBBFtB?& /m.
f|B||B||H M \V jft-frjftfaf. £ '& ;
y -fy4M sfflfc W? vkor :: :^B
iilliill w ~ J|Jafe BHBHH
/ §&) ffi/P Y4V'/ .*&&% W/.
I
Msfr/. ittfifivi 1 tB
' I]B - : PvXv '&fcjj^L
; W\ bMl
h hIII Jk . Sr
aS§ .BBt^| : < : > HR£llS|t
#:'' / IflTiK
:;Y BB ll^ffgkx
B IBP K ?
/ jPfe Js& . Bv-%' silfliiilYt
Bia
V; '.''./AMBB&jr. -X%^H|h V'j3
J .. \ ,l b| p JSHp
ffc p |m
lB
: 1 1 'IKtfTtD BY JULIAN DOfTMAN
JBBK w mKM 1 HOM NEW UNE cinema
In the gruesome division, this is really very good
-LOS ANGELES TIMES
Special 3D glasses will be provided
Tuesday, November 9
Union Auditorium
6:00, 8:00, 10:00
SI.OO
t
Sponsored by the J. Wayne Reitz Union

DAYS
| AT -1:45 3:40 5:40 £
James Garner!
ISkin I
[Game I
rpr==l SUITABLE rOB MATUB* TIiNAOtB*.
IliJrl WITH PARENTAL GUIDANCE. J K
BUsSa^i""^^^
im>M MJhfot | A I
r iji mm 1 |
S 2:00 3:50 B
f 4:45 7:40 9:35 ', I
Joseph e levine presents 5
RJCHARDBENJAMjNI
AN AVCO EMBASSY RELEASE B
ig COLOR BY MOVIELAB £
B F3l ADULTS -NO ONE UNDER IT It
ADMITTED WITHOUT PARENT #
BBB



gator classifieds

WANTED
Getting married desperately need a
reasonable ($) apt. or house, winter
quarter. Please call If you can help.
Ph. 373-6342 or 378-6169.
(C-2t-36-p)
~f
Male roommate needed to share large
2 bdrm apt. Country Gardens $57.50
+ 1/4 elec. November rent paid. Call
Charlie 376-0354. (C-lt-36-p)
IHIUIIINIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIItIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIItII
Reliable man wanted for night duty
5:00 til morning at Duncan Bros.
Furneral Home In exchange for room
with TV & bath Time off can be
arranged. Call for Interview 376-2437
(e-st-35-p)
Guitar Teacher must be free to work
after three PM weekdays, for
Interview call 378-5550 Hlllls Music
Studios (e-st-35-p)
If you want to earn lots of money
and If you can talk to other people
about earning money, call 373-0030
after 1 pm and ask for Bob
(e-4t-34-p)
Law student desires coed cook 5
nltes/wk. must have own trans. free
meals, room avail. If desired at
minimal cost 373-5674 after 10:30
pm (e-st-33-p)
room and board $lO weekly night
duty with elderly couple plus shoplng
for groceries call 376-7502 after 6
pm (e-st-33-p)
MCP Corporation-Job openings
part-time & fulltime positions, mgrs.
& sales Fashion World comm & salary
up to 50% Sign up for group session
G-22 Reitz Union before Nov. 9-71.
For summer Jobs contact Ed Binder
6723 Beret Dr. Orlando. Fla. 32809
(e-Bt-31-p)
IIIIIIIIHUIUIIUIIIIIUIIIIIIIUIIHIIIIIUIMIUUUIIIIIIIIII
AUTOS
DUNE BUGGY orange glas top 500
ml on rebuilt eng, cost SI6OO 2
years to build will take SIOSO or best
offer. BIG tires 373-5663 (g-2t-34-p)
mach I 69 Cobra Jet 428 cu In. 4 sp.
radio stereo tape many other extras
over 4,200 Invested great shape must
sell 1,995 or best offer ph. 378-8580
(g-st-32-p)
>7l Porsche 9 11 T Coupe. Bahama
yellow 5 speed loaded 1200 miles
Firm price SBOOO Miller-Brown
376-4552 (g-lt-33-p)
66 VW Bug. Rebuilt engine, new
brakes & battery, radio, new tag &
Insp. Looks good & runs good. Yours
for $750. call 376-1889 aft 5
(g-st-33-p)
1957 chevy, fuH racing cam, Jahns
pistons, hurst competition plus
shifter, two new mickey 'thompsons,
4:56 rear, call 392-7233, ask for will
(g-st-35-p)
Chervrolet mallbu 2 dr hardtop, one
owner, 33000 miles, extra clean, two
tone gold and Ivory, full automatic
power steering, radio, air condition
excellent condition, $1,695 bargain,
372-5214 (g-st-34-p)
j 69 Triumph GT 6+ white am-fni
* new radlals exceptional body and
mech cond well-loved selling only
cause need Irge car S2IOO 392-6065
(g-10t-29-p)
I feraoM
|QrtGh |
I^UblurbSKdiriv^-iw^^^l
jACROSS FROM MALL PH 372-9523 i
1 PENTHOUSE 2 a"!

ES

The Florida Alligator, Monday, November 8,1971,

iiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuimiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiii
Pfr ¥
llllllllllllllltl!lllllllll!IIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIII llllllllllll
Mobil Home Oweners! are you tired
of : paying too much lot rent, park
restrictions, traveling 6 ml too
campus, snooping park attendants,
act? Why not form a student co-op
trailer park where you make your
own rulesl For Info call 378-9057
after 5 U-st-34-p)
Free, black & white female dog (8
months). Please call Shelley at
373-3153. (J-3t-34-p)
FENCERS will sell my 2 foils 2
masks, good cond. MARY 376-0102
(J-st-35-p)
Available girl: for work as writer,
editor, anything else Interesting,
(almost). MA (NYU) Varied
Background, no secretarial. 373-2929
(J-st-35-p)
llltlllillllllllllllllltlltllllllllllllllllllllllllllilllllllllllll
LOST FOUND
iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinniiiiiitiiiiiiiii
LOST: Tasco binoculars, 7 x 50. Lost
at Blood Sweat and Tears concert.
REWARD call 372-8737 after 4:00
PM. (L-st-36-p)
FOUND Charcoal gray female cat.
Medium-size, wearing brown flea collar
Call 373-3941 anytime (l-3t-34-nc)
Lost: girls gold l.d. bracelet engraved
with "Merry" and blrthdate. last seen
In ladles room In Yon hall after
maryland game, great sentimental
value. If found call Merry 392-9682
rm 354 broward hal. (l-st-32-p)
reward for ring lost at the mall 14kt
gold ring round shaped with rubies
and pearl In the center great
sentamental value call 372-1191
(l-st-34-p)
LOST Pair of glasses, brown frames,
lost at BST concert, double bridge In
nose piece, call 392-9908 or drop off
417 Yon Hall (l-4t-34-p)
FOUND a white German Shepard
near the Reitz Union on Thur. Call
after 3:30 to Identify 373-1367
(l-3t-35-nc)
Lost My lovable dog. Ten months
old Irish Setter, male Has
Colo-tags. I miss him. Lost around
Unlv. and 13th. Call 373-3044. Lynn.
(L-3t-36-p)
IIIIIIIIIIII^MMIIIMM^Hnim
Astrology Service Peter Legulllou
will erect your birth chart with 20
statements of character analysis.
Other observations, prognostications.
Call Marcle 392-9622. (N}-st-36-p)
POUND
directed by Robert Downey
Sunday, November 7
and Monday, November 8
7:00,9:30
Union Auditorium
50<
Pre-sale, Friday
from 12:30-4:30
J. Wayne Reitz Union

Page 13

miiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiuuiiiiimiiiiiimiHHUiuittiuiii
SERV ICES
Were wired for sight at University
Opticians. Drive your own waiting
room to 535 SW 4th Ave. 378-4480
(m-38t-16-p)
ROC RECORDS now has a complete
stereo 8 track tv repair service
with free estimates see us at 424
N.W. 13th STREET(m-30t-15-p)
TYPING fast accurate former ny
secretary college grad expd theses
dissertations term papers call imrs.rose
373-1984 9-6, 373-1429 aft 6* pm
(m-12t-29-p)
We will install any GM Ford Chrysler
or American Motor product new
rebuilt alternator for $24.95 Starter
repair or replacement service. Bank
an affiliated cred cards accepted. J&J
Auto Electric (Buckland Standard
Service) 2109 S.W. 13th St.
372-5804 (m-53t-l-p)
ILIVE JUGGUNGACT3J
STONY,THE VEGETABLE!
SWATCH JOHN FLUSH 1
I BENCH AND BAR j

ndbF
FORGET YOUR
ipi APPOINTMENT.
J*f / 392-1690
v fil 1-9 pm y
I PALL ISSUE .. I
'> T V l|i
I Available I\l ow At L oca I Bookstore? I
|||| Bl
nllltoKi. I
WS&, > >
I FLORIDA OUMTEHLY |

imtnmimnmninimniimiiiiimnmmmninnmii
Tv V7 T
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CAKES made to order: Home baked
and professionally decorated Will
deliver on campus and off. Call
B-A-P- Cakes 373-5232 (m-st-33-p)
TRIP TO INDIA In summer of 72,
cost from NY S6OO for Info send
return address and $2, India 72 1509
Flower Dr Sarasota Fla. (m-st-34-p)
Just what the professor ordered (for
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Coaxum 373-4363 (m-4t-34-p)



Page 14

l. Tha Florida Alligator, Monday, Nov am bar 8,1871

g^-^CamottglCner-^iF^
P IFC FROLICS j
K' Present 1
1 GUESS WHO I
'^p;S
B. ||
#
I
ft: in MONDAY NITE I
ft AIR COND. NOV. 22 I
> o> I
E*. FLA. GYM ADMISSION 3:25 I
9
B
. B
f Second annual family day I
ft* Student Government will sponsor the second annual family day for the Kentucky-Florida game November |
ft. 13. Married students can get their children into the game at SI.OO per ticket wjth the Spouse coupon I
ft books. Parents can get in at $7.00 per ticket, and of course the entire family will sit together. Ticket I
KV windows for this game will be open on November 8 and 9.
ft Also Bloc Seating chairmen are reminded to turn in their requests today at Gate 14.
I' SG tutors can help I
ft*. Student Gov't tutoring program is now in full swing. Tutor's are available in most subjects including all "C"
ft courses and many upper division courses. Examples of some of the areas covered are BIOLOGY, ft
£ CHEMISTRY, ENGLISH, FRENCH, GENETICS, GERMAN, HISTORY, HUMANITIES, JOURNALISM,
ft MATH, PHYSICS, POLITICAL SCIENCE, PROGRAMMING, AND ZOOLOGY. Contact with a tutor may
9 be made through SG at 392-1665 or 392-1667. M
1. SGP subscription series 1
ft Student Gov't Productions announces its 1971-1972 Subscription Series. The series will include many of I
ft. the greats on this years Liberal Arts Tour. For more information call 392-1618. fl
§ SG budget forms available I
ft* Budget forms for the year 1972-1973 are available in the Treasurer's Office Room 308 JWRU for any
ft* SG-chartered group desiring funds from Student Gov't for that school year. Please contact either Ellen
ft*' Corenswet or Geof Kirsch. If there are any questions call 392-1623. These forms are due December 1.
1 Hotline staff-emergency meeting I
ft' Your attendance is required at 7:30, Tues. Nov. 9 Student Gov't office. If you can't attend, call
m 392-1665 and leave a message with the secretary. ft
I SGP chairman and asst application available 1
K> |B
ft\ "All those interested in applying for Student Gov't Productions chairman or Ass't chairman please pick up ft
ft*. applications at the activities desk on the third floor of the JWRU. Elections will be held on Nov. 22 in ft
ft* Room 316 at 3:00. ft
| Pre-Medical forum I
ft* 9 Pre-Med Forum will be held tonight at 8 p.m in room 121, Little Hall. Come-Listen-ask questions! 1
Bee B
ft Florida Cicerones 1
ft* THE Florida Cicerones are available for conducting campus tours for visitors and guests of the university. ft
ftr For information, contact Mrs. Frances Parker at 392-1641. ft
ft Student Rights Committee I
S Student Rights Committee of the Student Senate meets today at 3:30 in Rm. 331 of the JWRU. All ft
ft] persons interested in the general field of student rights are encouraged to attend.
ft "DREAM" OPENS TONIGHT I
ft* The Florida Players Production of William Shakespeare's Comic 9
ft Fantasy, "A MIDSUMMER NIGHT'S DREAM" will open tonight ft
9* in the H.P. Constans Theatre. Tickets are available at the Reitz
B Union Box Office: 392-1653. 5
mph.
ROBERT HARRIS 1
DIRECTOR OF COMMUNICATIONS
STUDENT GOVERNMENT



Shakespeare's f Dream l opens

The Florida 7 Players
production of Shakespeare's
"A Midsummer Night's
Dream" opens tonight in UF's
Constans Theatre. There are
only a few tickets left for the
show's six-night run from
today through Saturday vtfiich
is expected to be sold out by

L |Hb r 's.l '-IV
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Theseus Claude Pinkston
Hippolyta Patricia Bauer
Egeus Robert Falzone
Philostrate ......... Chad Reed
LysanderT. Jerry Lucas
Hermia........ Debby Kondelik
Demetrius Richard Berard
Helena Susan Baum
Bottom Craig Hartley
Quince Bill Stradtmann
Flute Charles Boswell
Snout Dan Jesse
Snug Ron Durham
Starveling Keith Elrod
Oberon Gene Touchet
Tltania Janice Sizemore

Blimps are dying
but still profitable
SAN FRANCISCO (UPI)
Riding in a blimp is like floating
suspended under a big, fat
football which goes scudding
here and there, sometimes
poking its nose at skyscraper
windows, sometimes just
hanging motionless.
Press the right pedal, and
surely but slowly it turns right.
Pull a string and let some air or
gas out. Turn the wheel at the
side of the pilot's seat and the
blimp's vast, ponderous prow
goes up, or down.
The only blimps left, belong
to Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co.
It got into the blimp business in
1917, a time when German
dirigibles were dropping bombs
on the British.
One by one, the major
powers abandoned this form of
military might, and now
Goodyears three blimps are the
only airships known to be
flying in the modern world.
Goodyear believes it makes
money from its three blimps,
stationed in Miami, Houston and
Los Angeles, because of their
advertising value. The blimps
move about the country, each
followed on the ground by crews
of 22, to appear in over 80
major cities.
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Dramatis Personae

curtain time tonight at 8 p.m.
Dr. Richard L. Green is
directing the play in an early
Elizabethan style typical of
Shakespearean theatre. The set
design by graduate student
Terry McGovern is of
constructivist design making
maximum and presentational

Puck Jim Ford
Indian Boy James Smith
Peaseblossom .. .Kenneth Jopling
Cobweb Alvin Yanke
Moth (& A Fairy) Susan Diner
Mustardseed Harriet Fields
No. 1 Courtier .. .John Bartholdi
N 0.2 Courtier Richard Denning
No.l Lady Martha Lott
N 0.2 Lady Joan Bickerstaff
No.l Guard Joel Dobson
N 0.2 Guard Larry Winson
No. 1 Fairy Andrew Banker
N 0.2 Fairy James Purdy
N 0.3 Fairy Kay Summers
N 0.4 Fairy B. Janine Kelly

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use of the basic elements of
design: line, form and mass.
The 32-member cast will
adorn the stage in maginificent
costumes created by Assistant
Professor Lyn Carroll. Each
costume (with some characters
having several) stands out as an
elaborate jewel in itself, from
it's overall appearance to it's
smallest details. Tickets are 75
cents for students, and $1.50
for general admission. A 15
cent discount for students and
25 cent discount for general
admission is offered on blocks
of 10 or more tickets for
Monday, Tuesday or
Wednesday nights. They may
be purchased at the Reitz
Union Box office, 392-1653.
Curtain time is 8 p.m.

GROUP I be
SHOTS LEFT OUT
NOVEMBER 12 IS FINAL DAY TO HAVE
GROUP AND ORGANIZATION PICTURES MADE
FOR THE "ALL NEW- 1972 UNIV. OF FLA.
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CALL QOO lAQI ASK FOR BUSINESS MANAGER
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602 S. Main

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ocy
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319 WEST UNIVERSITY AVENUE
GAINESVILLE. FLORIDA 32601
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Lenses Duplicated Frames

The Florida Alligator, Monday, November 8, 1971,

Rebel Stamp & Coin J*
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t

Page 15



Page 16

># The Florida Alligator, Monday, November 8,1971

Experts say nucleartest safe and sound

AMCHITKA, Alaska (UPI)
- Atomic experts, vindicated in
their prediction that no tidal
waves, earthquakes or leaking
radiation would result from the
United States biggest
underground hydrogen bomb
blast. Sunday scientists analyzed
data to see how well the Spartan
ABM warhead worked.
They said preliminary
readings indicated the
five-megaton bomb designed for
the anti-ballistic missile system
had functioned as predicted
when it exploded Saturday a

House vote: prayer in public schools?

WASHINGTON (UPI) A
proposed constitutional
amendment to permit prayer in
public schools comes up for a
House vote Monday with the
outcome still in doubt.
Its supporters considered
changing the word
nondenominational to
voluntary to pick up added
votes.
Opponents contended that a
nondenominational prayer
could only be directed to whom

British soldier shot
near Belfast limits

BELFAST, Northern Ireland
(UPI) Assailants in a speeding
car machine-gunned a British
soldier to death and wounded
another Sunday as they were
strolling through the town of
Lurgan, 20 miles south of
Belfast.
An amy spokesman said the
two soldiers were off duty and
wearing civilian clothes when
they were gunned down near the
towns hospital.
The slain soldier was the
122nd person and the 35th
British trooper to die in violence
in Northern Ireland this year.
The toll also includes 76
civilians, nine policemen and
two members to the part-time
Ulster Defense Regiment.
In another incident in the
Roman Catholic Bogside area of
Londonderry, British troops
shot a man who fired a short
burst from a machine gun at
them during a clash between
stone-throwing youths and
soldiers, the army said.
Troops said the gunmen in
Londonderry was hit in the
chest and was seen to fall, but a
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mile beneath this desolate island.
The blast caused the largest
earth tremor ever produced by
man, rocking the island with
heaving, buckling motion. But
fears it would set off disastrous
earthquakes and tidal waves
proved unfounded.
Atomic Energy Commission
officials said no radiation
whatsoever escaped from the
53-inch diameter test shaft
drilled more than a mile into
Amchitka Island, a bleak dot in
the Aleutians about 1,200 miles
southwest of Anchorage.

it may concern and would
dilute the amendment to the
point it would lose its intended
religious effect.
Rep. Chalmers P. Wylie,
R-Ohio, chief sponsor of the
amendment, worked with House
Republican Leader Gerald R.
Ford of Michigan on a possible
maneuver to substitute the word
voluntary.
The amendment is designed to
overturn 1962 and 1963 rulings
in which the Supreme Court,

search of the area revealed no
trace of the man or any signs of
blood.
The incidents marked the first
serious encounters between
troops and gunmen since the
armys roundup last week of
nearly 100 suspected members
of the outlawed Irish Republican
Army (IRA).
The IRA seeks the
reunification of the six counties
of Nothern Ireland with the
independent Irish Republic.

378-2646
CASSELS IN THE AIR

An AEC spokesman said
technicians and specialists flew
back to the island Sunday to
analyze data gathered from
sensitive measuring devices in
trailers parked 2,000 feet from
ground zero.
Expected seismic aftershocks
and formation of huge
dish-shaped crater 40 to 50
feet deep and 2,000 feet in
diameter had not started 20
hours after the explosion.
The minor earth movements
and sinking of the ground were
expected to occur as gases and

citing the Bill of Rights
guarantee of religious freedom
and prohibition of an established
religion, outlawed organized
prayer and Bible reading in
schools.
L
As presented to the House by
Wylie, the amendment would
affirm the right of persons
lawfully assembled in school and
other tax-supported public
buildings to participate in
nondenominational prayer.
The amendment will be taken
up under a House rule
permitting only one hour of
debate and barring any change
unless its sponsors agree. A
two-thirds vote is required for
approval, or 290 votes if all
members cast ballots.
Faced with a head count
showing that as many as 125
congressmen might vote against
it, Wylie and Ford left until
Monday a decision on whether
to substitute voluntary.
The amendment has prompted a
bitter fight in the House, as well
as among religious leaders.
House Democratic leaders and
top officials of all major
religious denominations have
opposed the amendment,
warning it could undermine the
Bill of Rights.

molten rock cooled in an
800-foot diameter underground
chamber melted out of solid
rock by temperatures equal to
those on the surface of the sun.
It may be a matter of days
or it may not even occur, said
AEC spokesmen David Jackson.
There will be settling and
caving in as the gases cool, but
its chimney effect and could
stop beneath the surface.
An aerial check of the blast
site revealed some surface cracks
in the earth, but no deep
fissures. Monitoring devices
showed no radiation had leaked
and Jackson said chances were
nil that any would.

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JML flAKHeiigl
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OPEN 11:00 AM to 9:00 PM -7 Days Weekly
Westgate Shopping Center PHONE 378-3320
LOOK! flO\
SIDEWALK
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NOV. 10,0,12 ; V ;
EI CAMPUS SHOP & BOAKSTORb/

Dave Ziegler
Wire Editor

The blast 250 times as
powerful as the bomb dropped
on Hiroshima during World War
II -tilted the trailers a half-mile
from the bomb shaft and caused
considerable damage to two
small buildings at ground zero.
Technicians removed film and
other data from the trailers but
did not venture into the ground
zero area.
The island earth movement
also caused damage to a service
road about a mile and a half
from the blast site and heavy
equipment was sent to the
scene Sunday to repair the
highway.



Crowd looks better than UF in 49-7 loss

By TOM CORNELISON
Alligator Sports Editor
Todays attendance, the
loudspeaker blared at Saturdays
Florida-Georgia football game in
Jacksonvilles Gator Bowl, is
67,383. ABC says you all look
good on television.
Not looking so good on
regional TV, perhaps, were the
Florida Gators who lost their
seventh game of the season,
49-7. A devastating ground
attack once again doomed the
Gators to defeat as Georgia
infantrymen logged 288 yards
for four touchdowns.
The rout was accentuated by
the absence of their first string
quarterback Andy Johnson.
Johnson had twisted his knee in

The Florida Alligator
[ Hi? IB TO J
:.,,m4 os ft.
, ijr c jg^'' ^mel||9|^
"SET"" ~**>
TOM KENNEDY
Georgia quarterback Jimmy Ray scores
... TD was a five yard run around left end during 3rd period

Florida Quarterly
HERE NOW!
at bookstores.

Georgias previous -game and
could have played Saturday, but
head coach Vince Dooley
decided to save him for the
game next week.
Georgia s back-up quarterback
Jimmy Ray responded to the
challenge by completing 7 out of
12 passes for 127 yards and one
touchdown while running for
additional 43 yards and another
touchdown.
Georgia didnt surprise us,
said Florida coach Doug Dickey
after the game, this loss was
like about four others we had.
The offense couldnt generate
anything and defense became
overworked.
We just dont make the big
play, Dickey added.
Florida was hampered by

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injuries, with flankerback Carlos
Alvarez slowed by his knees, and
guard Fred Abbott, cornerback
John Faix and safety Jimmy
Barr all out of action. Alvarez
failed to catch a single pass in
the game.
Gator running back Vince
Kendrick, however, returned to
action in the second half for his
first appearance since the
Mississippi State game on
September 18. Dickey said
Kendrick will have a real
chance to play in the next two
weeks.
Georgia scored first, with 59
seconds remaining in the first
period. Ray led his team 66
yards in 7 plays, the last four
plays and 26 yards accounted
for by Jimmy the Greek
Poulos, who scored from two
yards out. Kim Braswell added
the extra point.
In the second quarter Georgia
marched 73 yards in 10 plays
culminating with a two yard
plunge by tailback Ricky like,
Braswell again converted.
After the kickoff, Florida
quarterback Reaves hit Jim
Yancey for nine yards, handed
off to fullback Mike Rich for
three more yards, and threw an
interception to Bulldog defender
Mixon Robinson who galloped
38 yards for a TD.
Reaves brought the Gators
back, driving 80 yards in 11
plays, hitting Hollis Boardman
three times for 40 yards and
sending runningback Tommy
Durrance around right end for
19 more yards during the series.
The scoring play was a 9 yard
aerial hook up from Reaves to
Yancey followed by a PAT by
Richard Franco with 3:54 left in
the first half.
Georgia came on strong in the
third quarter, breaking the game
wide open with three
touchdowns. Ray scored the
first by running around left end
for 5 yards, followed by a two
point conversion on a pass from
Ray to flanker Jimmy Shirer,
who had earlier punted 58 yards
in the air. The second score
capped a 42 yard four play drive
after defensive back Buzzy
Rosenberg had returned a 39
yard punt 36 yards. The score
was a 38 yard pass from Ray to
Shirer. Lake added another 2
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| MEET, AND EAT |
| BENCH AND BAR j

yard TD with 16 seconds left in
the' third quarter and the PAT
made it 42-7.
Third string quarterback Steve
Watson accounted for the final
score with a 25 yard touchdown
0

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The Florida Alligator, Monday, Nov am bar 8. 1071.

ipf I
pass to substitute -flanker Bob
Burns, Braswell again added the
extra point.
Georgia, rated seventh in the
nation is still undefeated with a
9-0 record.

Page 17



Page 18

I, The Florida Alligator, Monday, Nov am bar 8, 1971

Robinson interception turning point

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Both Doug Dickey and quarterback John Reaves,
although differing in the way they said it thought
Mixon Robinson's (83) interception was the turning
point in Florida's 49-7 loss to Georgia in the Gator
Bowl.
In the first photo on the left above, Robinson

Would first down attempt
have helped out Gators?

JACKSONVILLE lt may be
easy to second guess now, this
two days after Florida lost
another one-sided game this
year, this one 49-7 to Georgia,
but a person has to wonder what
would have happened if two
plays were turned around.
The score was 28-7 with
Florida faced with a fourth and
about a half yard to go on its
own 29 yard line. Head coach
Doug Dickey, with 7:40
remaining in the third quarter,
decided to punt, giving Georgia
the ball. He was hoping his
defense would hold so that the
once potent Florida offense
could get the ball back.
It backfired as Georgia went
on to score in four plays.
The first series in the fourth
quarter, with Florida down 42-7,
Dickey decided to send in John
James once again when the
Gators were faced with a fourth
and two on its own 28 yard line.
Georgia didn't score on its next
series though.
The way things were going,
and have been going all year for
Florida, even if the first down
was obtained, I doubt that they
would have scored.
Those sophomores the
coaching staff was talking so
highly of last spring have only
shown some improvement with
the receivers still not being able
to hang on to a pass thrown to
them.
For a while on Saturday, the
capacity crowd were watching
next years Gator back field
perform.
Dickey pulled John Reaves
for the first time in the third
quarter this year and placed
scrambling Chan Gailey in there

Defensive Hijacking TERnv alters

I I MARTY dl
| PERLMUTTER
Jj | executive sports editor ~

to face the Bulldogs. Along with
Gailey, there was Vince
Kendrick at fullback (for the
first time since the Mississippi
State game) and Cary Geiger at
tailback. This offense got no nowhere
where nowhere either and Dickey went
back to Reaves on the next
series of plays.
Florida football in the next
year, and the remainder of this
year, has a long way to come
back. The Gators have been
unable to stop any kind of
rushing attack and when they
do, the opposition iust passes

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TERRY WALTERS
Jimmy Poulos (20) Roy Mallory
... sophomore ran for 75 yards and one touchdown
*

dutches Reaves' pass as Florida's Hollis Boardman,
the intended receiver, doses in. But, Robinson cuts
back, photo No. 2, above right, and just makes the
end zone (photo No. 3) to put Georgia ahead 20-0
in the first half.

over them (although in the FSU
game, the secondary performed
admirably).
And from the looks of the
way the freshman team played
against the Georgia freshman
Friday, opponents may decide
to snap the ball directly to a
running back and forget about
the passing attack.
Things are bleak in the Gator
football headquarters. Individual
performances must be
outstanding in the next two
games if Florida wants to win
four eames this year.

45,, wHP9| Wmw* ¥ JOB L*
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, TERRY WALTERS
9/ isjuf <&*>.
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TOM KENNEDY
Two pointplay eased
Dooleys breathing
By SANDY ROBINSON
Alligator Sports Writer
fe
JACKSONVILLE Chanting Were number one! an inebriated
throng of Georgia football fans gathered at a police barrier to await
the emergence of the nationally ranked, undefeated Bulldogs from
their locker room at Jacksonvilles Gator Bowl.
Georgia head coach Vince Dooley, glowing with confidence after
Saturdays regionally televised 49-7 massacre of the Florida Gators,
emerged first to meet reporters and say what everyone expected him
to say.
We played good. Florida played good, too, said Dooley, his voice
barely audible amid the Bulldog pandemonium. If there was a
turning point, Id have to say it was when we got the easy touchdown
on the interception.
Dooley was referring to a John Reaves pass picked off by defensive
end Mixon Robinson who raced 38 yards to the end zone and boosted
the Dog s lead to 20-0 in the second quarter.
But it was the two-point conversion following Georgias fourth TD
that allowed Dooley to breathe easier. I thought we were in good
position then.
Turning to the Gators 80-yard drive that landed them their only
score of the game, Dooley said, Florida was hitting us in the weak
spots. It looked like we let up on defense. Otherwise, our defense was
terrific.
He paid special tribute to the Bulldog secondary that effectively
contained the Gator passing game. I thought we played very well in
the secondary. It passed the Reaves test.
Dooley also had plenty of praise for second-string quarterback
James Ray who took over for sophomore starter Andy Johnson. Ray
did a terrific job, said Dooley, adding with a grin, Hes a pretty
good second-string quarterback. Johnson, who was sidelined with an
injury in last week s shutout of South Carolina, may have to fight for
his old position. We would have used him only if Ray got injured.
Cooley said Johnson may not start against Auburn next week.
r a Hn kC Ai ls hC C n Uld t detect a chan 8 e in one-time All-American flanker
nnf t V n reZ in D A < ? ey reP !! 6d Shaking head > You tell hes
just not the old Alvarez. Not anywhere near it. Ive seen enough of
, anyway. varez never caught a pass during his brief
performance against the Dogs. 8



Frosh comeback falls short as'pups win

By PAUL SHEA
Alligator Sports Writer
You cant take anything
away from Georgia. The breaks
went both ways during the
game, said 'Florida head
football coach, Don
Deal.
Deal watched a fourth quarter
Baby Gator comeback fall short
Friday as the Georgia Bullpups
defeated the UF Frosh, 33-26.
They have a terrific running
game, Deal said. One of the
best Ive seen. Their offensive
line got off the ball well.
Bullpup tailback, Horace
King, ran through the Baby

Parker ups claim by $50,000

V
By SANDY ROBINSON
Alligator Sports Writer
John Parker, outspoken critic
and former employee of the UF
Athletic Department, has tacked
a $50,000 punitive damages
amendment onto his original law
suit against Athletic Director
Ray Graves who fired Parker
from his post as student track
assistant last November.
Parker was the center of
controversy at that time when
he formed the Florida League of
Athletes to check the power of
the Athletic Department over
the lives of Gator athletes. Also
Parker wrote a series of articles

By RON SECRIST
Alligator Correspondent
Hot off the volleyball trail,
the fraternities will now have its
chance to toss the football
around as the Orange and Blue
Fraternity Football League gets
underway today and tomorrow.
Thirteen teams, divided into
three brackets will battle in each
division for the championships.
The Orange League will open
today at 4:30 with the
LXA-AEP, PKT-PDT and
SPE-PLP contests kicking off the
season.
Defending champions, Sigma
Nu will face the SAEs today at
5:30 p.m. The &Us, who
finished as runners-up in the
recent volleyball playoffs, head
bracket 11. They certainly are
not guaranteed the bracket
PI LAMS, ; ;
who kaW fhee|hftation as being
the bridesmaid and never the
bride, may put it all together
this year and break the

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SPECIAL ATTENTION TO INSURANCE CLAIMS
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Gators for 291 yards and four
touchdowns and fullback Mike
Robinson had 146 yards on the
ground scoring once.
The Florida frosh did just the
opposite of Georgia, scoring all
their TDs through the air. Split
end, Lee McGriff, caught three
touchdowns for the freshrren.
Quarterback David Bowden
completed 20 of 35 passes but
had two intercepted. The other
Florida frosh TD came on a pass
from Bowden to end, Ward
Eastman.
At the end of the third
quarter, the Baby Gators were

in The Alligator critical of
Graves and the Athletic
Department. These were pointed
out by Graves as reasons for
Parkers dismissal.
Parkers original complaint
was filed with the U.S.District
Court last May demanding
$11,500 compensation and
reinstatement to his former
position as a student assistant.
The amendment, to be filed with
the court today, asks for an
additional $50,000 in punitive
damages.
Ive become convinced in the
last few months that this type of
damage is warranted, said
Parker. Normally, it is included

INTRAMURALS

runners-up jinx that has plagued
them for the last couple of
seasons. The two will meet Nov.
16. 1
This years Swimming
Champions, SAE and neighbor
SPE, round out the bracket.
Volleyball Champs, Phi Kappa
Tau, share bracket 1 with PDT,
ATO, AEP and LXA.
Bracket 3 is highlighted by
last years Blue League
Champions, Delta Tau Delta,
who this season has switched to
the Orange division. TEP, known
for its football prominence in
the past, along with the Sigma
Chis and the Pikes, round out
the remainder of the bracket.
League Will open its
1971 season tomorrow at 4:30
p.m. with six games on tap.
Bracket 1 is full of Kappas
as Phi Kappa fsi, Phi Kappa*
t Thetagpad Pi mma
up three of
BETAS and Delta Chis account
for the other two teams in the
bracket. The DUs who always

behind 33-14. They scored with
10:36 left in the game on a pass
from backup quarterback Jerry
Miller to McGriff
When they field the ball for
those five minutes, it took
the life out of us, Deal said
Saturday, viewing the varsity
Bulldogs and Gators go at it in
the Gator Bowl. We needed
that time to score again.
The Baby Gators got the ball
back with 4:35 left but they
were intercepted on the first
play and didnt get the ball again
until only 2:14 was left. With 34

in the original complaint. I
didnt file for punitive damages
at first because I was trying to
be a nice guy. I dont feel like
being a nice guy anymore.
Parkers complaint cited that
Graves had violated his freedom
of speech and the case was
ordered to court by Judge David
L. Middlebrooks after* a hearing
last October when he denied a
request by Gravess attorney to
dismiss the case.
Parker, who is acting as his
own attorney, said the case
should be decided before the
end of this month despite a
request by Graves to delay until
mid-January.

come up with a hard-to-beat
team, join the Theta Chis,
AGRs and the TKEs in bracket
2.
Volleyball Champs, Chi Phi
and the FUls, who captured the
Swimming title, will battle for
the bracket 3 championship. The
KAs and Delta Sigs will also
challenge for the playoffs.
Fraternity Football will run
through Nov. 27, with the
round-robin playoffs getting
underway, Nov. 29.
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Call Simmons' today for
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seconds left, the freshmen
scored again on a pass from
Bowden to Eastman, before
Georgia ran out the clock.
Our defense could have done
better, Deal said But the
offense came out fighting in the

Family day is slated
Student Government, in cooperation with the Athletic
Association, is co-sponsoring the second annual family day at
Florida Field for the Kentucky game, Saturday, November
13th. Married students-with spouse coupon books will be able to
buy tickets for their children at SI.OO each. The parents of
spouse coupon book holders can buy tickets at the regular price
of $7.00. In addition all full time students can purchase tickets
for their parents at $7.00 each and for non student brothers and
sisters at SI.OO each if accompanied by a parent. The entire
family will be guaranteed adjacent seats. Tickets can be
purchased for this event at Gate 13, East stand, on Monday and
Tuesday, November 8 and 9, from 10:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m.
8 AMB:3O PM (IT CAT .jj
Mon.-sat. Tr-EAT out often at
12-6 Restaurant and Coffee Shop
Sundav^9M^|^
J&Z ACROSS
2601 N.W. 13th St. from THE
.pic __ mall
Serving
BREAKFAST LUNCH DINNER
For The Holidays
Walg eens Baked & Ready
10-12 lb. Tender to Serve
TURKEY $ 12 <*
Including 1 quart Giblet Gravy
Plus 2 quarts Delicious Dressing
$5 Deposit a Free Pumpkin Pie I
Tuesday Night Wodnosday Night
SPAGHETTI DINNER Ffj#d shrimp Ni#ht
SPECIAL
'All You Can Eat 'All You Can Eat
Meat Sauce
SSL'CL" 0 "' French Fries ee rrj
Child'* Portion 99 Hush puppy
"Just Ask e 11
For Mos," | | y "Jmt Aek For More"
THANK YOU FROM
RAPPS PIZZA TRAIN
1515 S.W. 13tfi St. u
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MONDAY, WEDNESDAY
Wp nov. s; *,*oth
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Buy A Medium or Large Pizza Get A Small Cheese Pizza
for
SI.OO
373-3377 j remember
or $ Always Free Delivery
376-3354 | &2 free cokes
This special good
on
ir ;
Premises & delivery & pick-up

The Florida Alligator, Monday, November 8, 1971,

fourth quarter-and thats a plus
factor.
The Baby Gators, now 1-3 for
the season meet the undefeated
LSU freshman next Saturday at
Florida Field following the
varsity game with Kentucky.

Page 19



Page 20

I, The Florida Alligator, Monday, November 8,1971

g'' \
/:--/ ~ -;m
mi.: t /*
#V7 >J H
#'*'> - | M&
IB A

% §&£&&.
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I Congratulates the
Player of theWeek^B
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Choice of Vegetable Tues Baked Italian
Beef Lasagne
Bread and Oleo
Wed Roast Turkey
Iced Tea or Coffee with dressing
Thurs Braised Pepper Steak
S over White Rice
Bfl fIBI -Lg % Southern
WW Fried Chicken

Player of the Week
Lee McGriff
For the first time this season, the Player of the
Week award is being given to a freshman.
Frosh flanker back Lee McGriff is being given
recognition here for catching three touchdown passes
against the Bullpups of Georgia. McGriff, along with
quarterback David Bowden, led the Baby Gator rally
which brought the team backfrom a 33-7 deficit to a
near upset. The final score was 33-26.
Bowden was also given consideration, as were
varsity players Jim Getzen, Robert Harrel, Doug
Sorenson, Roy Mallory and Jim Yancey.
~v>
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MONDAY FRIDAY
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Graduation, a time to say goodbye to one
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For you, we have books to start a new
library, official class rings, and graduation
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Full Text

PAGE 1

The Florida Alligator Vol. 64, No. 36 The University of Florida. Gainesville Monday. November 8, 1971 No competit ion: Bookstores profit,students lose Oligopoly. Gently now, roll the five tight syllables over the tongue. Remember -treat it with care. Now spit it out. Oligopoly. It is the nine-letter child of 'necessity'. The situation that arises when a group of businesses, operating independently, form the essence of a monopoly. Whether it grips an industry or a town, it is a chilling concept. Nevertheless, it is legal. And it is the reason why you, the student, cannot buy books in a free and competive market in Gainesville -home of the Campus Shop & Book Store. And yet no one is guilty -or at least -no one is very guilty. The Campus Shop & Book Store, that sprawling collection of college texts, paperbacks and school supplies, shakes its four branch stores awake at 8 each weekday morning. A result of the mandate and purpose handed down by the UF administration, the Campus Shop and Book Store, along with Malone's and Florida Book Stores on West University Ave., form the triad of Gainesville's own oligopoly. It is the result of often unavoidable, sometimes unique and usually indifferent circumstances. It is the book that cost five dollars in 1969, $5.75 in 1970, and $6.50 in 1971. It is where this investigation begins. I ALLIGATOR SPECIAL REPORT See special pgs 9 & 10

PAGE 2

Page 2, The Florida Alligator, Monday, November 8, 1971 State auditor questions AA methods Handling of sports funds criticized By DEE DEE ESPOSITO Alligator Staff WrIter The legality of UF allowing the Athletic Association (AA) to handle its sports activities has been questioned by State Auditor General Ernest Ellison. "I was shown no specific authority for the university to turn over public funds to a private association or corporation," Ellison said Friday in a report which criticized the 1969 and 1970 budgets of the UF and Florida State University. The AA, a private corporation, handles UF's athletic activities and is framced by ticket sales receipts and a $3.75 per student per quarter allocation from the student actitivites fee. Ellison called the arrangement "contrary to the law governing By JIM SEALE Alligator Staff Writer Sigma Nu and Delta Tau Delta fraternities have been given 30 days by the university to rejoin Inter-fraternity Council or "they will exist as unauthorized organizations," according to IFC President Mike Hawley. Dean Frank Adams of the Office of Student Affairs, in charge of UFs 26 fraternities, has indicated that under no circumstances will the two fraternities be chartered as individual organizations. This Dwn Frank Adams leaves Sigma Nu and Delta Tau Delta without the privilege of .frats can't exist individually using UF facilities, including intramurals, block seating, Olmetti. The Delts, which have meeting rooms and various other had several brothers move out of services. the house this quarter, according In addition, the two to IFC District President Fred fraternities will be liable for all Leonhardt, only pledged 22 men state and county property taxes this quarter. The Sigma Nus noted Hawley. reportedly pledged even fewer. Olme tti indicated that Delta Tau Charges were traded between Delta needs about 30-35 pledges Sig=u Nu and Delt members to keep going this quarter. and members of the IFC at a "Right now we're pouring Thursday evening meeting at the money into an organization that Sigma Nu house called by the is unsympathetic to our two fraternities to explain th demands," claimed Olmetti, who reson for withdrawing. until Wednesday was running for Dan Olmetti, the Delta Tau IFC president. "I might have Delta president, reported several been able to make needed gripes about the IFC, and changes in IFC structure but it indicated that his fraternity, would have taken at least a year which has been on campus for and my fraternity doesn't have 46 years and has such that long." distinguished usmus as ."We feel that by withdrawing Governor Reubin Askew, is in from the IFC we will escape the serious danger -f folding. fraternity stereotype," said the Olmetti's major complaint Sigma Nu president. with theIFC was thatit was not IFC Rush Chairman Tom Dart helping solve tie fraternities said he has spent much time pgrob 1try ngtogetrushees on n.d Uatversty Avenue and that hundr many clinics and meetings were and fifty men came through the held to solve the problem, which o the row the first night were not usually attended by K'o p. te Siga u. 4Dhuir hee u. HUNGRY? 15 SPEED Bike Imported from Italy NEW MORNING WATERBEDS 114 S. Main a 373-0557 TTHE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the University of Flaride and is published five times weekly except during June, July ad Aiset wshen its published semi-weekly, and during student holidays and esame perldk. Editorials represent only the official opinions of their authors. Addregsaeorreepondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz Union Building, University a# FjgrldaGelesevllle, Florida 32601. The Alligator is entered as second class m1taret deUsited States Post Office at Gainesville, Florida 32601. gilleesaIe rate is $10.00 per year or $3.50 per Ouarter. -Tse FeriA Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone of all a*"rulesensenand to rises or turn away copy it considers objectionable. lThe Filrid Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any a s* e *n eat swelvng typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless notice #&,alo e a dvertiaing manager within (1) one day after the advertisement 1'b Florda Alligator will not be responsible for more than one incorrect Ie an advertisement scheduled to run several times. Notices for ajatplueensuet be given before the next insertion. the expenditures of public funds and inconsistent with the handling of such funds at other state universities." Ticket sales and student fees are considered state funds and are t~y'refore subject to being audited, according to Ellison. UF law student John Parker considers Ellison's report "the groundwork for a taxpayer's suit." Parker filed suit against Ferniany also claimed that "the IFC has outlived its usefulness" and "anything the IFC can do we can do." Hawley pointed out, "When you have a campus with 26 fraternities you need some kind of organization for coordination and arranging interaction to solve problems." Hawley also enumerated many other IFC programs which he claimed has helped the Greek system immeasurably. There is the IFC Speakers Bureau, he said, which sent people around to the high schools to talk up the Greek system. The IFC also provides free tutoring for all fraternity members, and also assists in a summer rush program, which buses 'parents on a tour of the campus and Greek system. A five-dollar charge for each pledge, pointed out Hawley, is really the only charge the IFC makes upon its members. "The IFC also brings top name entertainment to campus through Frolics," said Hawley. "Fraternity members get tickets at a reduced rate and what profit we make out of it we put into our progrsms.9 IFC President Hawley also commented that it was ironical that the Delts and Sigma Nus accused the IFC of being archaic, since "it is these two houses which have consistently been unresponsive to change." He further. pointed out the Sigma Nus destructive pledge prank of a few weeks ago in which two Sigma Nus were burned, one seriously enough to be hospitalized. "I think that allegations and reasoning behind the decision have been faulty, hypocritical, based on little face, and spurred OyyDtion rather Athletic Director Ray Graves last year after being fired as student track assi,'ant following criticism of Graves and the AA made by Parker in the Alligator. "The constitution of the state of Florida specifically prohibits the use of tax funds for non-public uses," Parker said, citing the housing of the AA on the UF campus as a possible violation. UF President Stephen C. O'Connell spoke in defense of the arrangements, saying that former Attorney General Earl Faircloth had claimed that the allpcation of student fees for such purposes appeared to be legal. The AA has been functioning since 1929 and is sanctioned in, the Board of Regents nolicy manual. Graves, contacted at home Sunday afternoon, had no statement to make. "We will have to examine the accusations and check the facts before taking a stand," Graves said. Ellison also leveled criticism against FSU's "numerous violations of legal requirements regarding travel expenditures." He cited cases of double reimbursements for athletic department representatives while on the road. FSU spent $43,000 for entertainment in 1969 and 1970 without any apparent legal authority, according to Ellison, and failed to file budgets for University Intercollegiate Athletic Funds as required by the State Department of Administration. Ellison's specific accusations against FSU included the failure of the administration to explain $17,327 in cash, checks and other documents which "mysteriously disappeared" from the central cashier's office early in 1970 and use of funds collected from participators in the overseas student center located in Florence, Italy for "side trips" by faculty members and their wives. 2,000 demonstrators demand war pullout By DENNIS ARNOLD Alligator Staff Writer A combined effort of about 2,000 demonstrators from various antiwar organizations marched through downtown Tampa Saturday to demand an immediate pullout from the'Vietnam war. Sponsored by the Student Mobilization Committee (SMC), Tampa Area Peace Action Coalition and the Vietnani Veterans against the War (VVAW), the Tampa march was the only one held in Florida, and was one of 17 rallies held nationwide. Demonstrators, carrying flags and peace banners, marched from the Tampa library to the Hillsborough County Courthouse and staged a guerrilla theater presentation which represented a search and destroy mission in Vietnam. Scott Camil, UF student and regional coordinator of VYAW, said that "the turnout at the demonstration could have been better" and that it seemed as if "not enough people were interested." Camil made a prepared speech at the parade and also played a recorded message of an American prisoner of war who denounced American involvement in Vietnam. "I do feel, however, that the parade was successful since there was good -radio and television coverage," Casnil said. Camil stated that "bombardment through the media strengthens the movement." Camil said he didn't know why the demonstrating wa& in Tampa and that the movement may have been better in Orlando, "but we probably wouldn't have gotten much marching done." Speakers at the rally included Otha Favors, local black militant, John Hobbs, University of South Florida SMC and featured speaker of the afternoon, Ruth Colby, internationally known antiwar speaker. Canil desqibed the rally as peaceful and said a Veterans 4ay march h planned in'St. Petersburg on November11, "the c i Vet Day," he added. A Thanksgiving Day fast is also being planned according to Camil and another march to Washington, D. C., around January. "AAnd thistim," Camil sad 're not 1 ang the "wte Ialgtect~Lh GOOD MON. -TUES. ~e'ivckvFiied Ckieke 214 N.W. 13th St. 'Iteg lar 76-6472 AND 14 S.W. 34th St. DIN N ER., 372-3649REGULAR DINNER BOX BO X Feeds one medium-size appetite: Three pieces of fingerlitkin' good Kentucky Fried Chicken, mashed potatoes, the Colonel's special gravy, hot-BRING COUPON rolls, cole slaw.B N O Ng. 1.25 Fraternities must rejoin IFC or lose charter says Adams

PAGE 3

The Floride Alligator, Monday, November 8,1971, Page 3 Spessard L. Hand 1892-1971 Long -time friend of UF E BARTOW, Fla. -UF Alurmus Spessard L. Holland, a Democratic senator from Florida for 25 years until his retirement last January, died of an apparent heart attack at his home Saturday. He was 79. President Nixon issued a statement Sunday mourning the death of Holland. ". ..America has lost another of the distinguished public servants who guided her destiny following World War II Gov. Reubin Askew ordered all flags to be flown at half-staff. Holland was a long-time friend of UF. Since 1924 he was an executive council member of the UF Alumni Association. In January 1969 Holland was honored by the dedication of the Spessard L. Holland Law Center. He was recently a guest at UF Homecoming '71. An examining physician at Holland's home said Holland apparently died in his sleep at 5 p.m. EST while resting before going out to dinner. Holland was born in Polk County Community and received his bachelors degree magna cum laude from Emory University in Atlanta in 1912 and his law degree from UF in 1916. He was UF student body president from 1915-1916. He served as a Polk County prosecuting attorney in 1919 and was elected a county judge the following year. Holland served two terms as a state senator, was governor from 1941-1946 and was elected to the U.S. Senate in 1946, Holland's first U.S. Senate term was to have begun in Men's Grey & Navy Sweat Pants Size S-M-L-XL Sale continues on Sweatshirts 2.50 GATOR 1710 I January 1946, but he was sent to Washington three months early when Gov. Millard Caldwell appointed him to fill the unexpired term of Sen. Charles Andrews, who died in office. Holland served four consecutive terms before his retirement and was a powerful influence in shaping Florida's Democratic party.He was replaced in the Senate by Democratic State Sen. Lawton Chiles of nearby Lakeland, who ran with Holland's support. Assessing Holland's place in history, Dr. Merlin Cox, UF professor of Florida history, said Holland made a decided contribution to Florida and the South. "He was an outstanding governor and contributed to Florida's war effort," Cox said. Former Gov. Leroy Collins said Holland was "a man who had strong beliefs and fought for them. He was a whole man -he was always on the right side." Holland was a lifelong Democrat but never hesitated.to criticize his party when he thought it necessary. He aligned himself with other southern Democrats in Washington and helped filibuster against civil rights programs in 1949 and 1950. Holland crusaded for 13 years in the Senate to overturn the congressional and presidential poll tax. He eventually brought the issue to the Senate floor, and it became the 24th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. "His stand on the poll tax was notable for a southern politician," Cox said. U ILodAS SXC 00A I]LoT OVER 2500 LP'S TO CHOOSE FROM AT GRAND OPENING SALE PRICES. A L $698 ALBUMS 499 ALL $598 ALBUMS $399 d%%ft V oven Johansti ALL $498 ALBUMS $ 99 ALL $698 TAPES $499 el CLASSICAL SELECTIONS BY: G Bach Haydn Verdi e Schubert Beethqven Monteverdi Wagner Bernstein Brahms 'Mozart Tchaikowski and many DeBussy Strauss e Stravinski more 319 N.W. 13th ST. V' PHONE 378-2331 MONSAT. 10OAM -9:30OPM -~ ~ ., --.-. --i

PAGE 4

Peg 4, The Feiim Aanser, tedasey, Na ber 5, 1971 Highway friends, foes trek on site By LINDA ILKLOWITZ AligeStor stf Writer UF Administrators with opponents and proponents of the proposed cross-campus highway took a nature walk Friday morning. They walked the site of the northeast segment of the controversial highway which loops around Lake Alice. UF President Stephen C. O'Connell, organizer of the walk, was there, receiving arguments pro and con as he and the group tramped through under brush. Ed DeBellevue, chairman of the Environmental Action Group (EAG), and Law Professor Joseph Little, chairman of a faculty ad-hoc conunittee against the road, told the president the proposed highway was not necessary to campus needs; wauld be detrimental to the campus by dividing it into five parts and disturbing the ecology of the lake; and did not net the needs of transportation for staff and students. DeBellevue, a pre-med student, promised O'Connell his group would present alternatives to the president in a presentation being readied for next week. Campus Planner William Munson, carrying a photographic map of campus almost as large as the campus itself, navigated the walk and answered EAG objections to the road. He said stop and yield signs, subordinate roads deflecting traffic flow such as one leading from N.W. 25th Street to University Avenue, and a speed limit of 35-miles-an-hour or less would keep the road from being a throughway for the city. The one-way loop around the lake, he said, would also make the Stephen C. O'Conmsil and Ed DeBdllavue (right) .welk route of Lake Alice highway. highway an indirect means of cross-city travel. DeBellevue countered later that such changes were merely "cosmetic" and likely to be changed by -jthe DOT. DeBelevue charged the DOT was trying to make an intracity road from the intracampus road in site of Munson. The walk began from the commuter parking lot behind Hune Hall. EAG calls the northeast part of the road the most critical. It is the most heavily-forested area and a shelter for wildlife. Planner Munson explained how the loop road would run parallel to Radio Road, 200 feet behind Hume Hall, until merging with Village Drive in order to alleviate congestion on Radio Road. Hume Hall would be surrounded on both the north and south by roads. Little noted, as the group enteredd the hardwood and pine forest west of Hume, that 40 per cent of birds seen anywhere have been spotted in the Lake Alice wildlife preserve. Little pointed out a belted kingfisher, blue heron and a red shouldered hawk. The party also walked through two athletic fields and past a handball court that would be eliminated to make room for the road. DeBelevue told O'Connell of plans to build an ecology teaching resources center on the southwest side of Lake Alice. "We would lose a major part of this if we built the road, but we can't ignore the transportation problems, the EAG president said. Little called the road "an open invitation for the city and county to tie in. The whole crux Ford : Anti-pollution and safety cost more DETROIT (UPI) -The faster the automobile industry complies with governmental safety and pollution control standards, the more costly it will be for car buyers, Ford Motor Co. Board Chairman Henry Ford II said Sunday. In a rare television appearance, Ford said Improvements in bumpers alone ""lCost'hismyw $100 million in each of the next9two years and "add considerably to the cost of the car. We're thinking about 4100 orS108.", By 1975 and 1976, when the auto Industry has implemented the various safety and emission control standards set by the government, a car will be $600 to $1,000 more expensive, Ford fCoyi&erl We Brought Low, Lowi prices to Gainesville UOus se .UNIV. 4 "Is the cleaning up of the air that quickly that important to every individual?" Ford asked. "I think we've got tremendous problems in the inner city. We've got tremendous educational problems. We've got tremendous health problems. And I wonder whether we haven't got our priorities a little bit screwed up. "I know it's very important to have clean air," Ford said, "but I don't know how dirty the air is." IMAGINE The finest home furnishings plus Ouality Waterbeds by Liquid Luxury water Beds Ualimited -u.ioeht reopens ders 25Wou. oFlor35 235 -W. ,UNIVo. 372-7591 of our objections is not the building of a road per se, but involving the future exploitation of the campus as a highway interchange," he said. DeBellevue questioned the need for the loop road as a traffic solution for 30,000 students, faculty and staff members. He pointed out of 23,000 students, 7,000 live on campus and are not permitted to have a car. Border zone residents who may not bring their cars to campus during peak hours number 5000. Of the reniaining 11,000 students, only 4,000 have purchased parking stickers. "We may be designing a system of roads students cannot afford to use and do not find convenient and we are spending $1.2 million doing it" DeBellevue said. THIS ISA TINY AID NIKKI EATS fore'tiny.tookhop with tiny prices all books half price all the time AT THE inside Demian's Leather BENCH AND BAR Shop --wil you discover us? A modem mobile home community OPEN NOW LEASING 450 spacious homesites Off-street parking Each lot includes large patio Underground utilities Fully equipped recreation building Two swimming pools Complete laundry facilities Trash-garbage service, lawn care Separate family and adult sections Superior management/set standards for information write or call 376-8981 P.O.Box 13442 University Sta. Gainesville, Fla.32601 AT BOY9S ANNOUNCES a New Location AT 3610 SW 13th -ST. (lust Down From Sin City) Real Pit Bar-B-Q for Lunch, dinner' or take-out Now at 2 Gainesville Locations Its. 2700 Waldo Road (378-6161) AND 3610 SW 13thS T.: (73-3339) 7

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F Th. Florid Allptor, Mondy, Novembw 8, 1971, PpS terrifying questions to ask a small-car salesman. And one terrifying question to ask yourself: Do you know on economy cor when you see one? The fact that a car is small doesn't necessarily mean it's economical. If it's-not carefully built and serviced, it could cost you a considerable amount of money to run So how do you find out which small cars are really economy cars? Ask questions that require specific onswers. Like these, for openers. How much? Brace yourself. 16 It's going to cost you several hundred dollars more than you think. Because on top of the inevitable sales taxes nd delivery charges, wait the inevitable optional charges. That's where you can really throw your money around. On an electric telescoping antenna, peek-a-boo headlights, or a sports console. Or ona bigger engine that'll do 110. Butwhere can you legollydo 110? To soy nothing of what oil that useless power w ll do to your gas mileage. Even more bizarre is the new small car that offers optional power equipment. A small car is supposed to be easy to drive. So what's it doing with power steering and power brakes? Instead of all that mechanical power, you'll need a little will power. To keep from being fast-talked into a lot of things you don't need. Is it a small car? Or a big car made small? *is the rush to get into the growin small-cor market, some car makers have made small cars out of big cars. So you may unwittingly buy a small car that's really a big car. With a shortened wheelbase. A snazzy restyled body, And a lot of practical problems nobody bothered to work out. You may also buy a small car suffering from an identity crisis. It may not know what it is. Because its engine may have been lifted from another car. Its transmission borrowed from yet another. Or maybe its chassis plucked from still another car. And oil cleverly camouflaged with some eyecatching bodywork. Why not look for a small car wifh just one goal in life: To be a small car. What improvements were made this year? 3 0 If a car maker's serious about making his car better each year, he'll make it better each year. With improvements that are meaningful. And not just cosmetic. Lots of flashy sheetmetal and fancy chrome won't make a car run better. Or last longer. But a more efficient engine and a smoother suspension system will. Of course, if the car's a first edition, it won't have any improvements. In which case you should do some soul searching before you buy it. Because it takes a car maker years of improving and refining to work the bugs out of a car. You don't really want a car to work its bugs out on you. Do you? How long does it take to replace a fender? *0Depends on which small car you buy. Buy one that changes its looks every year and it will probably take longer to repair the body. Because dealers can't stock all the ports for cars thatgetonannual foce-lift. It may also take longer for mechanics to service a car that's changed frequently. Because a mechanic will have to relearn the inner parts. Frequently. And heaven help you if you take your brand new small car to a mechanic who's never seen the car before. f The easiest way to reduce thepossibility of such frustrations is to buy a small car that's sensibly designed to begin with. And never changed for the sake of change. Can I talk with the Service Manager? Hardly anyone ever asks this one. 0 But why not? You should know how good (or bad) the dealer's service is. Before you buy the car. You might save yourself a lot of grief. And money. So ask him what kind of service schedule he has for your car. What kind of diagnosis service. What does it cost. Some dealers have an elaborate array of electronic diagnosis equipment. Which can spot little problems befup they become big problems. And while you're at it, ask to see the service department. Is it well organized? Or soppy, with tools and equipment strewn all over? How many repair stalls do they have? When you buy a new car, don't let the showroom in front dazzle you. Better you be impressed by the showroom in back: The service department. How long is the warranty? One of the best questions you can ask. '6 You see, how long a car manufacturer's willing to repair or replace major parts at his expense tells you something about him How good he thinks his car is. If !5e fe3s i's sturdy as d:co.Job, you a generous warranty. Something better than the usual 12,000 miles/12 months. But if he doesn't give you better than that (or even that),ask another question: "Why?" Can I take it for a test drive? Curiously, a lot of people never test 7 drive a new small car before they buy it. But obviously, you should. To make sure you like the way it performs. Do you feel comfortable driving it? Is the steering precise? Does the car seem well designed? If you decide to buy the car, check it out meticulouslywhen it's delivered. Be sure everything's working perfectly before you drive it away. If you find anything wrong, tell the salesman. And have it fixed. After all, it's one thing to spend hundreds of dollars on a new small car. But it's another thing to spend hundreds of dollars on a new small lemon. What can I sell it for? Asking what you can get for it before 0 you get it may seem like a dumb question. But the resole value of a car is a tip-off on what people think bout it. If the car's been a loser over the years, with heavy repair bills, you'll probably take a beating when you unload it. If the car depreciates hundreds of dollars the minute you buy it, you're losing money even before you drive it home. And if it has no resale value yet because it's brand new, who knows what you'll get for it when you sell it. So while you're thinking about buying low, think about something else: Selling high Good luck. MILLER-BROWN MOTORS, Inc. 4222 NW 13th St. e 376-4551 .1

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Page 6, The Florida Alligtor, Monday, November 8. 1971 Gainesville-Alachua merger discussed last Thursday By'DEE DEE ESPOSITO AlWIgStor Saff Wrr The proposal for merging Gainesville City and Alachua County Governments made by the Government Study Committee (GSC) in May of 1971 was discussed Thursday night at a public hearing called by Alachua County's legislative delegation. Thursday night's three-hour discussion was the first in a series of hearings planned by Sen. Robert (Bob) Saunders and Rep. William (Bill) Andrews, Kenneth (Buddy) McKay and Ralph Turlington. Future meetings, which will be devoted successively to presentations by the County Commission, the Gainesville City Commission and the League of Cities, are preliminary to possible legislative proposals by the state delegation. State legislation appointing a charter committee to study Alachua County's local government is the only action which can unlock the legal channels which will bring government consolidation before the people asa referenaumn Members of the GSC attempted to summarize the findings of three years of study. Chairman Alan Sutherland, quoting population growth statistics, stated "the present government structure is not equipped to handle the problems now and will not be in the future." A question was raised concerning the effect that the proposed limited enrollmnt at UF would have on the GSC's projected propulation figures. "In the city of GinesvbIe,we we closely reSted to the euomlsent at UF," Sutheland responded, "but the effect it ndght cause is anyone's crystal bal." Dr. Richard Buckner, chairman of Task Force V, which studied governmental structure, explained the GSC's final report. "We looked at every conceivable piece of information we could get our hands on and ultimately came up with the merger plan we felt was the best possible way to deal with Alachua County's situation," Buckner said. The GSC proposal involves a mayor and eight-member council, elected county-wide, a chief administrative officer and director of public utilities appointed by the mayor and a five-man public untility board appointed by the elected council. Discussion from the floor was initiated, and GSC members responded to citizen's questions. Issues of elected versus appointed administrative officers, of city residents paying more than their fair share of taxes on some services, of annexation san alternative plan and of the desire of small manicipalities and independent farMIrs to remain utonomous wese ranked, any fringed with resentment and emotionalism. Perry McGriff Jr., representing Governmental Improvement For Today (GIFT), called for a charter commission plan to be structured and placed before the people of Alachua County, where it could "live or die on its own merits and not be clouded by em tionalism." McGriff offered the services of 420 young men willing to help inform the public once the charter study is completed. Though the divergent personal interests of the rural and city dwellers were evident in the discussion, all agreed in complimenting the members of the GSC on the work they had done. Ron Carpenter, also with GIFT, summed up the findings of the night's forum. "The GSC has put forth what they consider the best possible plan; it is not necessarily the workable one in Alachua County," Saunders Turlington Andrews "STEAK n SHAKE" STUDENT DOLLAR SPECIAL OUR REGULAR 1.10 ST EAKBURGER LUNCH ONE OF OUR DELICIOUS STEAKBURGERS ON TOASTED BUN SERVED WITH LIBERAL OR DER OF FRENCH FRIES AND YOUR CHOICE OF BAKED BEANS OR LETTUCE TOMATO SALAD IgLg, WITH ANY 151 DRINK S1.2i ONEDOLLAR ITAX PAID) 001*1 90 1WITH THIS COUPON STEAK n SHAKE 1610 SW 13th St D 17',

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IH H e CarolBrady Nip and puck: Florida Players will present William Shakespeare's coic-fantasy, "A Midsummer Night's Dream" Nov. 8-13 at 8 p.m. in the Constans Theatre. Tickets may be purchased at the theatre box office. Togetherness: Bloc seating chairmen are reminded to turn in their requests today at Gate 14 in the stadium for the UF-Kentucky game. This is the family day game. Puppy tales: "Pound," directed by Robert Downey, will be ihown tonight at 7 and 9:30 in the Reitz Union Auditorium. Admission is 50 cents. What's up, doc?: (silly rabbit) 'Tre-Medical Forum" for all pre-med and pre-dent students will be held tonight at 8 in room 121 Little. The program will feature assistant deans from the colleges of Medicine, Dentistry and Arts and Sciences. 67-94-21-hike!!: (you were expecting measurements maybe?!) Student Florida Education Association is sponsoring a drive to get students to sign an alleged violation report form (OEP No. 400) against the University system for the raise in tuition. If OEP investigates, there is a possibility of a $40 refund. Sign today. Student rights: Student Rights Committee of the Student Senate will meet today at 3:30 in room 331 Union. All interested persons are urged to attend. Water logs: Gator Ski Club will meet tonight at 8 in room 362 Union. All members and those wishing to join are welcome. THE .IS THE SYMBOL FOR TAt 4 How attractive: UF Women's Track and Field club invites those who are interestedin jogging and other field events to come to practice every Tuesday and Thursday at 5 p.m. on the Florida track or call Miss Thompson at the Women's Gym. American women: (those aren't the Girl Scouts, either!) IFC presents the "Guess Who" for Fal Frolics, Nov. 22 at 8 p.m. in the air conditioned Florida Gym. Tickets are $3.25. House hunters: Law Wives will meet Tuesday night at 7:30 in the Law School Auditorium. The program will feature "What to Look for When Buying a Home." Sky is falling?!: The Goodweather Puppeteer will present "Chicken Little" (or the end of the world), and "King Midas" (or the bird of plenty) and the Crankie Movie Machine on the North Terrace of the Union Wednesday from 11 am. -2 pm. Admission is free!! Auntie Em: Rose Community Productions will feature "Oz," a hard rock band, in concert Friday at 8 p.m. in the University Auditorium. Admission is $1. Follow the leader: ..to the Campus Crusade for Christ Leadership training class Tuesday night at 7 in room 355 Union. Music makers: Cross Purpose Players will hold a meeting today at 4:30 in room 150A Union for all musicians interested in program music. Rock musicians are welcome!! Pied Piper et al: Experimental Aircraft Association, "dedicated to sport aviation of all types," will meet Wednesday night at 8 in room 303 Aerospace. Program will feature a film of the Gemini Space Flight. Forest the eye can see: UF Forestry Club will meet Wednesday night at 7:30 in room 311 Rolfs Hall. Mr. Fred Folley from Owens-Illinois Co. will give a slide presentation on "Mechanized Forestry from Planting to Harvest." Students, faculty and wives ge invited. LOOKING FOR SOMETHING? Watch Gator Donations-254 INCLUDES: ASPIRIN DEODORANT OTHER SHAMPOO TOOTHPASTE SURPRISES AT STUDENT SERVICES CENTER TOMORROW THROUGH WEDNESDAY UREANS .but this is no bull. All Classes Sign up now for your YEARBOOK PORTRAITS make your appointment now at 392-1690 1-9 PM The Florida Alligtor, Monday, Novebar 1971, Pag 7 ANNIVERSARY SALE NEW SHIPMENTS JUST ARRIVED .FAMOUS NAME DRESS FLARES 0 PERMANENT PRESS *TEXTURIZED DIAGONAL WEAVE *WIDE BELT LOOPS FASHION COLORS *SIZES 28-38 MANUFACTURER'S PRE-TICKET PRICE $10-14 NOW $ 597 FAMOUS NAME FLARESIN GEOMETRICS, STRIPES, PAISLE AND SOLIDS WIT CONTRASTING P POCKETS. THEY STYLED WITH SN FLYS AND BUTT FLYS. SIZES 28MANUFACTUR PRE-TICKET PRICE $9-$10 NOW $4 Y, H ATCH ARE MAP ON-THRU 38. ER'S K97 SHOP ALL DEPTS. FOR OUR ANNIVERSARY SPECIALS vie irk" /0001

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PageS, The Florida Aiilgator, Monday. November 8,1971 PagW 9, The Fleorid Allig"o, Monday, Novembw 8, 1971 Editorial Unfair profit As we write these words we are being "laissez-faired" to death. In eighth grade, before we knew it gone amock, laissez faire was the simple answer to a complex problem. "Let business run business," we were told, and let the chips fall where they may. But two things have destroyed that concept: greed and indifference. Our monkey wrench is the latter; the words "Property of the UF", branded on its handle. And when that concept is destroyed, we add two words to the vocabulary monopoly and its more subtle brother oligopoly. We are victims of the oligopoly between Malone's, Florida Book Store and the Campus Shop & Book Store. The university administration has not created it -just allowed it to survive. UF President Stephen C. O'Connell says, "We will not undersell the book merchants of this town. It would be unfair to compete." Why then do we: undersell the merchant in the food we market; compete in the J. Wayne Reitz Hotel? undersell city housing in the dormitories we provide? compete so heartily in the high markup of the merchandise section of the book store? O'Connell's reasoning has merit. The book store does not pay rent, has a choice location and is not affected by normal state taxes. Using these advantages to sink commercial establishments would be unfair. But using these advantages to allow the student to purchase books in a free and competitive market is something the administration must carefully consider. Two purposes have been cited for the bpok store: convenience and service. But last year the book store cleared $156,000 above its costs. That speaks of another purpose: profit. The money in the past has been used to: o support such groups as the Florida Press, WRUF, the Florida Atlas and the laundry with over $387,000 in loans. allocate $38,000 to put a new ceiling on the Florida gym. The Campus Shop & Book Store is often the student's last stop in the spiraling cost of education. Making it the last straw, too, will only further restrict an education to the few financially privileged. There is thus a third mandate -a moral one -that the university has ignored through indifference: providing the student with a low-cost source of books. This could be done: through a series of discounts provided on textbooks, giving the students a more direct benefit for their dollars. through taking a larger loss on used books, providing students a more direct return on the money they spent ten weeks before. e through actively -and financially -aiding Student Government in the development and operation of a book store cooperative. It is not the easiest way. Continuing on a course of complacency; blaming the skyrocketing book prices entirely on the publisher, is the easiest way to excuse Gainesville's own oligopoly. It is the easiest way to avoid shaking up the Gainesville merchant, by providing his patrons a little bit of a choice. And finally, by avoiding 'distasteful' competition, it is, perhaps, the easiest way to make everyone well, once again, except for the one group consistently hurt -students. TEdRoanhge arngrgdigor T cEditor-In-Chief Mnaigodio [ Iricla Linda Cole Chris Lane News Editor Make-up Editor Truth is our greatest weapon. R 2T JT T'TThnCfl0TT X4N R I Rehinq copyright Sunshine Syndicate After several days of consulatation with my Fluted Columns legal staff, I have come to a conclusion on one Supreme Court nominee. The following telegram has been dispatched to Washington: "MR. PRESIDENT: REGRET TO INFORM YOU HAVE DECIDED AGAINST REHNQUIST. AM STILL CONSIDERING POWELL." This rather harsh decision does not flow directly from Mr. Rehnquist's rather atrocious views on questions of civil rights and individual liberties, but rather from what those views connote about his judicial skills. Mr. Rehnquist has at one time or another supported legalized segregation, use of illegally seized evidence, dismissal of government employees who excercise their constitutional rights, and the mass arrests of last May Day demontrations. One is entitled to one's opinions. But one is not necessarily entitled to sit upon the Supreme Court of the United States. The crux of the argument against Rehnquisthis not his opinions, but the fact that if Mr. Rehnquist holds such opinions, ~'( 9 W i he is a man. The Sen. Demo normina the Se Vietnas change his cre forgetI realize while for yea be percept Mr.I sincere espousi equal" to hid( when i *on FIRM'4W .i'I emr-cas 04 uist: nope ~f By John Parker. his perception and intelligence. After all, here is a man who in 1967 was still fighting the segregation cause. If nothing else, can it not be argued that his mind is 13 years behind that of the court that finally struck down this blight to our national integrity. The same logic applies to his other "opinions". These are al matters that the High Court has ruled upon years ago and now n extremely unreceptive stand as axioms of law. Doesn't it say something about the situation is not unlike mentality and perception of the Muskie's bid for the nominee who would have us ocratic presidential return to those thrilling days of ition. Until just recently, yesteryear when any evidence no nator was a hawk on matter how illegally obtained, m. The fact that he could be used in a court of law? dhis mind is certainly to Doesn't it say something dit, but one must never about the legal brilliance of a how long it took him to man who cannot find the tragedy of Indochina somewhere in our Bill of Rights other men had known it a prohibition against mass arrests rs. His sincerity may not without probable cause? Doesn't questioned, but his it say something about analytical ion should. ability of a lawyer who could Rehnquist, while perhaps not find in the constitution all these years in language o u t l a w i n g ng the "separate but discrimination in housing? doctrine, cannot claim I'm not saying the man is e behind that sincerity corrupt or too conservative. t comes time to examine I'm saying he's a dolt. 4is I less

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The Florida Alligator, Monday, Novmbr 8, 1971. Pp 9 I' -ALLIGATOR SPECIAL REPORT The bookstores Where the students always pay By'RANDY BELLOWS Alligator Special Projects Writer Anti-trust law, despite its clear objectives, is a morass of gray and ambiguous fringes. Industries can hide for years in quiet suspicion. There are three book stores in the narrow geographic triangle that caters to the UF student's needs. All are in competition but none apparently compete. The large textbook publishers, the ones that virtually standardize resale markups at 20 per cent, are responsible for much of this. But a university policy of non-competition -or non-active competition, tends to exaggerate the rest. "We're not trying to compete with anybody," Sam Getzen, manager of the Campus Shop & Book Store, said. "We're just following our avowed purpose." Or, as UF President Stephen C. O'Connell put it, "We're not going to undersell the merchant of this town .not going to unfairly compete." One might be led to thinking the step had already been taken between fringe area and violation. But wait -and listen. Vice-preaadent Elmore ."bundle" being made The book store pays no rent. It pays no occupational license. No state taxes. It has the best location, on the best piece of soil, in the busiest part of town. Thus, argues O'Connell, any competition would be unfair. Fringe number one. The Campus Shop & Book Store, contrary to accepted belief, made no money on text book sales last year. It lost over $400 buying back used books. These are the victims of the 20 per cent markup, which despite appearances, is not unduly inflated. On trade and technical books, however, The book store made, as Vice President for Administrative Affairs William Elmore put it, a "bundle." Thus, along with paperbacks, magazines and other book-related supplies, where the markup often approaches 40 per Students wait to pay for books ..prices are no lower on campus cent, the book department of the Campus Shop & Book Store, recorded a $62,000 profit last year. Fringe number two -market allocations. Typically, the three Gainesville book stores will deliver order blanks to all major colleges of the university, sometime before the start of a quarter. Usually the college will return the "adoption" form to all three book stores, only informing them what books will be used in the following quarter. It is then left up to the book store's discretion to decide how many books to order. The vicious cycle begins. Typically the campus book store will order one-third of the books requested. If it ordered more than a third, it takes the chance of being left with costly and unwanted inventory. But by ordering one-third, it also insures that both sales and money will, be evenly divided between the three separate stores. "We can't afford to load up," Getzen said. "It would make our inventory unbelievable ..., and he added laughing, "it would get me fired." Fringe number two. Collusion and conspiracy are ominous words in the dollar-upon-dollar financial industry. But few little men scurry around, spying and counter-spying, in reality. And in the book business, where prices are usually standardized from the start, a conspiracy would seem to be almost naturally excluded -or at the very least unnecessary. Getzen, a kindly man, apparently responsive to student needs, says, "We have little if no communication with the other book stores. We don't gather information for them and they don't gather it for us." But his own superior, Dick Schiffli, who in the line of command falls between Elmore and Getzen said, "We have a close communication with Malone's .none with the Florida Book Store. We discuss what fields we're going to get into ...what subjects they're going to get into. What we're doing -what they're doing ...how we're going to handle a certain area." Fringe number three. While O'Connell argued that the university, because of its unique advantages, would not "unfairly compete" with the merchants of Gainesville: 9 the book store netted a $94,000 profit last year in merchandise (cosmetics, pencils, school supplies, college "fad" items) and in interdepartmental sales. the university accepted the Servomation food service contract on a low bid basis, thus creating an element of competition between food service on and off campus. 9 the university, through the J. Wayne Reitz Union hotel, on a temporary basis, and in dormitory facilities on a more permanent one, appears to be in competition with off-campus residence facilities. Getzen dealt with the competitive angle of the merchandise section of the book store saying, "We only do it with certain items; only the college fads. "For instance, we wouldn't stock klackers because we didn't feel we should be in that business. Also it helps to float the rest of the store and the money we lose in textbooks." And O'Connell continued, "That's what you would call a 'convenience' part of the shop. We leave it up to the student to decide whether he wants to pay the extra nickel for an item, or go off-campus." The Campus Shop & Book Store allocated $38,000 to put a new ceiling on the Florida Gym last year. It meant a bit less than a nickel on every book you bought. While only $12,000 eventually went to receiving the gym, the allocation raised the question of guidelines for profits in general. The book store in the past ten years has: loaned the university laundry $40,000. o loaned food services $7,500. loaned WRUF S61,000, some of which is still unpaid. a supported the Florida Atlas with a $114,000 loan. loaned $45,000 to the Florida Press. helped build the cleaning and laundry operation in the physical plant area with a $120,000 loan. allocated $38,000 to put a new ceiling on the Florida gym. The two most fr -ently asked questions are, "Where did this money come from?" and "What guided its distribution?" It's a good deal easier to respond to the former -it came from a yearly profit margin between three to six per cent, which last year meant $156,000. It came from the sale of textbooks, paperbacks, m e r c h a n d i s e a n d interdepartmental sales. But the second question goes much deeper into the moral question of, "Where should the money go?". The Campus Shop & Book Store is a state auxiliary, as are many of the above recipients of the loans. "We felt it was proper," O'Connell explained, "since all profits were really state funds and could have gone right back into the general fund." And most of the money loaned, to allow these facilities to take their first step, has been repaid. The book store, despite its auxiliary status, must support itself. Thus, rather than being subsidized by the state, breaking even is a necessity. In 1970-71 the book store made a six per cent profit over that break-even point. Over $80,000 will go to such projects as updating the cash register equipment, expanding the medical center book store, the book division and central warehouse, and into reserves for an eventual new facility. Another $80,000 will be set aside for a projected increase in inventory. The profits. What if they were thrown back into discounts instead'? "It wouldn't work," Getzen says, "We're in a dynamic not a static situation ...we've got to increase inventories each year. We need funds for that." O'Connell himself answered the qgery curtly. "We have never taken the position that we will be a discount house." What about a student co-op? Administrators discount the concept's feasibility, although SG Office of Consumer Affairs is actively pursuing the possibility today. 'We're not going to undersell the people around us," O'Connel said. "if the students wished to, however, they could go off-campus and organize and operate a cooperative venture themselves." "But I doubt very seriously if it would survive." Thus, that last dip into the wallet before the quarter begins, usually gives the student neither a free nor a competitive choice. And generally, he never knows the difference. U F student forks out money for books .part of $156,000 profit last year

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Pog 10. The Pieeld. AMpeor Mondav Mowanhoi 1071 Campus Shop a n d B .0 0 k s Advantages It has never seriously been t contested whether the Campus Shop and Bookstore provides the students with a valuable 0 9sferimainry importance it restrains the off-campus business community from raising prices to a more exorbitant level. r It stocks its shelves with several book-related items which either because of their lack of volume or popularity would not normally be sold for profit (such as special edition books used for a particular course). a By its ver location it provides students -despite the additional expense -with a convenient outlet to purchase cosmetics, pens and pencils and other college-related supplies. e It operates its used book section at a loss -however minute. Thus books that will no longer be used in a course are purchased back at the self-liquidating rate -the same price the book store will get when it resells it tone of the nation's distribution houses. It provides employment for between 20 and 30 UF students. PRICE COMPARISONS (EDITOR'S NOTE: The following is a random sample of book prices.) Course Book and Author Malones Florida Book Campus Shop & Store Book Store Mgt 401 Business Law-Wyat 11.95 11.95 11.95 ES201 Economics-Samuelson 10.50 10.50 10.50 ZY 201 Principles Zoology14.00 14.001.00 Johnson 99 .599 CEH College Engish9.95 5th Edition ES Contemporary Economics-10.50 10.50 Spencer ASE 300 Aeroplane Aerodynamics13.75 13.75 13.75 Dommasch Art 380 A Potter's Book-Leach 8.75 8.75 8.75 CBS 261-3 Biological Science10.50 10.50 10.50 Keeton 10.00 7.95 7.95 ESM 304 Eng. Mechanics: A Unified TreatmentMalvem Diudva.es The disadvantages, despite their subtlety, have a great effect on the final price of the books you purchase: Partially because of UF's policy of not actively competing in the book business, the student does not have the chance to purchase textbooks in a free and competitive market. o Because the Campus Shop & Book Store, albeit out of necessity, purchases only one-third of most textbooks required students often find themselves unable to purchase a book. o Also as a result of this 0 one-third policy, the three bookstores are virtually assured of splitting the sales three ways The Campus Shop and Bookstore does not act as a dealer to other universities in used books. Thus the prices paid to the students for books no longer used in a course range from "fair to ridiculous," admitted bookstore manager Sam Getzen. o Students pay for the convenience of having a store on campus where they can purchase non-textbook supplies. Price markup is equal to or more than most stores in town. 11:30 A.M. READY FOR YOUR LUNCH BENCH AND BAR SUNFLOWER HEALTH FOO DS I HOFFM AMWEER PROMCTM VITAMINS -GRAINS 7 W. UNIV. AVE. 378-8978 GROUND BEEF USDA GOVERNMNT INSPECTED DELOACH'S MEAT MARKETS #1 #2 3432 W. UNIVERSITY 1203 S.W. 16th AVE. AVENUE NEAR BEHIND THE CIN WESTGATE CITY LOUNGE STOCIKY0IJRFR EEERNG J BACK 1. w leals& sa iches COLOR TV & BILLIARDS 1718 W University Ave. On The Gold Coast' WE WANT TO SELL YOU A STEAK IRLOIN 98. %TEAKS I.Y. STRIP iTEAKS 1O0Z. 98:., :FILET MIGNON lOOz. 98Ea CA SH Faculty o Travel Expenses o Student Budget o Pay Day Loan Medical Center Installment 0 Employees Loans $inco up to 1945 Marion Finance Co. I1C. ,C $600 123 S.W. 2nd Ave. 376-5333 Started Supen-ised A ad R e'ulated 59 Lb 4

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The Florida Alligator, Monday, November 8. 1971, Page 11 Large crowd for Cowboy at Rose Center's concert By JEFFREY WHITE With the use of an occasional slide guitar and Alligator Staff Writer fiddle, Cowboy gets some unique effects. The group threw out tambourines to encourage audience Dancing in the streets? Well maybe in the aisles, involvement in the music. as Rose Community Center presented Cowboy and Rose Community Center is a community oriented Mudcrutch in concert in the University Auditorium organization. They recently sponsored the Friday nightHalloween Ball in the Plaza, which was attended by Cowboy and Mudcrutch put on two shows, and a over 2,000 people. Money collected at the concerts large crowd was on hand for both performances, the is used in a variety of ways, including helping the second show lasting until 3 a.m. needy and ghetto people around Gainesville. This Friday Rose Community will present Cowboy is a group from North Florida, and they another band, Oz, in the University Auditorium and have two albums out "that are dynamite," a person in two weeks, RGF, a group popular around associated with Rose Community Center said. Their Gainesville, will return from a tour in the Boston most recent album, "Five Will Get You Ten," on area to put on a concert for Rose Community the Capricorn label, was released two weeks ago. Center. Winded -COME, AND Mcintosh ari DISCOuNT HOSIERY EAT TOGETHER ALL TYPES OF PANTY HOSE Pl 9fs-$1.49AT THE Plus Discount Prices on Men's mow on ext"and"Children's Socks BENCH AND BAR Next to Woolco Sunshine Sh. Center $1 OFF Clip the Pizza Inn. ~"Buck" below for a special treat! Includes takeout or eat in our TV room PIZZA INN UGH NOTE RedoemaSbS with th rg sepizza or at imit I Pizza In he Pizza Inn Dollar per ftmily316 Ss.W. 16th Me. "off tr good 376-4521 Nov. a -I1I ONE PIZZA INN BUCK Sorry, offer not valid for cheese pizzas. PATRONIZE GATOR ADVERTISERS In Reitz Union By LYNNE JACKSON Alligator Staff Writer A splashing array of color is on exhibit on the second floor of the Reitz Union. The paintings of P.R. McIntosh project a shimmering world of bright images created from sheets of acrylics. Although color is everything in the 30 paintings on exhibit, subjects do exist, and there is no limit in their scope and vitality. Faint images of figures, a mountain or an island project clearly a "personality" evolved from the creative process of such an artist. McIntosh explains that these works are created by layer on layer of transparent as well as opaque acrylics. Each painting evolves from one discovery to the next, until an ambient glow emanates from a total entity -a personality all its own. McIntosh, professor of Art, received his BS degree from Bradley University and his BFA and MFA degrees from the Art Institute of Chicago. McIntosh taught art at Ohio State University, was director of the Peoria Art Institute and director of the Art School at Bradley University. Later he joined the Art Faculty of UF. His paintings have been exhibited abroad and in this country he has shown in numerous national and regional exhibitions. The exhibit is a part of the program sponsored by the Union, which displays a new exhibit each month. PROCRASTINATORS -YOUR TIME [lAS COME V%1-1 -v .4 .mmvpamml I

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Page 12, The Fiorld Aligeter, Mndriy, Novenber 6, 7 7 -----------r-r-r------F R SA L. E CHECK WITH US BEFORE YOU BUY DESK CHAIRS, FILES, BOOKCASES NEW AND USED DISCOUNT PRICES -DESK FROM $29.50 UP CHAIRS FROM $22.50 JR OFFICE FURNITURE 620 South Main 376-1146(a-30t-9-p) Femwood for sale. pine logs cut & spilt to your specifications. sold in Vs cord lots (64cu ft) free deliv. more info call 392-2233 nite 378-0164 (a-5t-23-p) Honda 305 Superhawk. Excellent condition; custom seat, sport pipes, 2 heiments with bubble shields. Call 378-4695 (a-3t-34-p) 17 cabin cruselr, 110 hp marc., depth finder, cb radio, am radio, trailer, exi. condition call John 376-4778 $2600 or best offer 1222 nw 39 ave. (a-St-34-p) 1 9 7 2 YAMAHAS 1 9 7 2 TRIUMPHS now in stock TRIUMPH CITY us 441 V2 ml N of city limits 372-2197 (a-7t-34-p) DIAMONDS two rings for sale cheap one largish one smallish call Carol-373-3915 after 5 pm ia.3t-34-P) U.S. Divers doubles 2 yrs old $75.00 Arbalete wood spear gun 35.00, Volt Aluminum spear gun 20.00 call don 378-9408 (a-5t-33-p) Refrigerator, $39.95 & up. 30 day warranty, free delivery. Brooks used Appliance 2315 S.E. Hawthorne Road 378-8935 Open Sundays 9-6 (a-10t-21-p) 1964 honda 55, two helmets, new tag $100.00 1960 sunbeam alpine, 4 new tires, needs work, make offer-phone 378-4476 anytime. (a-5t-33-p) KEEP your carpets beautiful despite constant footsteps of a busy family. Get Blue Luster Rent Electric Shampooer $1. Lowry Furniture Co. (A-tfc) Hasselblad 500c; 50, 80, 250 lenses, extra mag, ext tubes 21 & 55, magnify. hood, sunshades, cut film stuff & more $1600 call S. Elbert (eves) 376-8505 (a-3t-35-p) Smith Corona all electric typewriter $75.00, single bed $10.00, combination tv stand-bookshelf $10.00 call 376-8610 after 5 pm (a-5t-35-p) 1970 kawasaki mach i1 500. only 6400 miles. Cost $1184 new must sell only $750. perfect running condition. 3 helmets Call Claude at 372-2231 (a-3t-34-p) NIlUUIU umi Im lllIthiIHIIii hIttIIilfltIn For sale: 10 speed triumph bike with car carrier both in good condition only 6 mos old $100.00 phone 468-1046 after 3:00 (a-3t-34-p) schwinn varsity 10 speed bike generator lights luggage rack 27 inch wheels big frame means hardly ridden $100 call 373-3635 after 6:30 pm (a-3t-34-p) want your pet to talk back? 5 month old mynah bird ind6udIng large cage $50. compare prices -The cheapest friend you could buy call 378-9555 (a-St-34-p) 1970 SUZUKI ts 250 trail bike 2600 miles excellent condition $575 or best offer 372-4753 (a-4t-33-p) Zenith "Circle of Sound" stereo 80 watts, Cannot scratch records two 360 spks Excellent Condition w/stand, dust cover $160 392-7124 (a-5t-33-p) 1970 Skyline Mobile Home, 60 x 12, front and rear bedrooms, air-conditioned, equity and take up payments 372-4709 after 6 pm (a-St-34-p) for sale 1 bedroom 12' x 48' Trailer Equity and assume payments of 79.77 a month phone 373-4216 (a-St-34-p) Yamaha RB 5 350 $595 firm. Cost $883 new, 1971 model w/only 3,025 ml Excellent condition, 1 helmet Call Larry aft 3:30 'pm ph 373-3451 (a-St-34-p) Yashica -D 80 mm w/case & lens cap f-3.5 -22, 1/500 CLEAN -$30 PH 392-7352 (a-2t-35-p) mens 10 speed bike 23" frame white 3 months old excellent condition $70 373-2491 (a-3t-35-p) SHOT GUN dbl barrel 12 gauge excellent cond refinished stock, recoil pad, case, J C Higgens model $60 call steve after 6 pm 373-5468 (a-st-35-p) Birddog puppies, 10 wks old, had shots lemon-white, liver-white, wormed. Mom not registered, dad is. call after 6 pm and 00 wit sods 495-2872 (a-St-35-p) Must Sell Bell & Howell stereo tape deck; Like new, only one yr. old. Cost $200, asking $125. But let's talki Call 372-9828 after 6 pm. (A-5t-36-p) 1970 BSA 650cc good cond. luggage rack, helmet included $875. TV 17"1 portable works $25. Call 372-5081. (A-4t-36-p) Doberman pincher for sale. Call 378-2812 after five evening. Price $90. (A-2t-36-p) Kenmore washing machine like new. Big load. Call Elda 373-1444. $75. Gives you a bargain. (A-2t-36-p) 1964 honda superhawk 305cc $175 old but good shape. Very reliable. Needs very little. No tag or. Inspection sticker. 378-8562 (a-5t-32-p) Classleal 8 track cartidges and open reel recorded 1800, 2400 Sony and American tapes for listening or rerecording. Call 376-6823. (a-5t-32-p) FORR E 'qr Sublease: Brookwood Terrace Apt., 3 BR, 2Y2 baths, pool, $325. mo. Includes washer, dryer, dishwasher, built-in stove & refrig. 372-2451.(b-5t-32-p) Sublease 1 bedroom furnished apt. Univ Gardens 140 monthly carpet, c/d available dec 1real nice call andy at 378-8485 after 5 pm (b-5t-35-p) Female Roommate wanted Apt. 96 Landmark $47.50 mo. 1/4 util. Starting winter quarter. Call 378-3147 now. (B-St-36-p) WA N T r E 13 wanted female roommate to live with 3 other girls In Village Park apt. winter & spring qtr. $50. mo. Vs util. call 373-0091 after 6 pm urgent (c-5t-33-p) 1 or 2 female roomates to share noew 3 bdrm mobile home own bdrm & beth 60 + uti or share 40 each t Vs uti call 378-6885 ask for Peggy(c-5t-33-p) Male roommate wanted for La Boone Vie apt. $55 per mo. V4 util. call Barry 373-3359. after 6 (c-3t-34-p) Ride to Newark NJ or around there. Thanksgiving weekend. share expense call evenings keep trying ask for craig 378.3408 ic-5t-34-pi DAMSEL In distress I nd ride frm se 24th av to U daily -mst arv 8 am & dpt 5 pm -wi shr gaS -ask f r Jan 362 1791 btwn 8 & 5. Stay happy (c-5t-32-p) Female roomate wanted senior or grad student townhouse apt a/c & pool Williamsburg $57.50 plus Vs util Call 376-6864 ic-5t-32-p) FEMALE ROOMMATES DESPARATELY NEEDED AT THE PLACE APTS. CALL 378-3384. (C-5t-36-p) rN-u A:3:0 ---------N M free rent & food for 1 or 2 females In exchange for preparing meals, etc. for under 30 bachelor. no other obligations. applicants must be neat in appearance & possess good personality. 2 br apt. In apt. complex, pool, etc. If Interested call 373-1077 or 376-4417 (c-5t-34-p) FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED NOW 55 + V4 elec CALL 378-5290 ask for judi (c-5t-34-p) LIBERAL ROOMMATES NEEDED IMMEDIATELY. Come by Gatortown No. 122 or call Donna 372-9716 NOW. (C-3t-36-p) Wanted Male roommate as soon as possible for La Bonne Vie Apartments. Call 378-5274. Townhouse apartment $55 per month 1/4 utilities. (C-2t-36-p) H YOU'LL UKE US! [B:AND BAR 2LAST2 'DAYS AT 1:45 3:40 5:40 7:40 9:45 James Garner --UIVA&LEFOR MATURtETEENAGE". FGP y WTHpApEO"AL GUDANCE. -m m= AT-'R~"'" 2:00 3:50 I 4:45 7:40 9:35 JOSEPH E LEVINE PRESENTS' RICHARD BENJAMIN AN AVCO EMBASSY RELEASE COLOR BY MOVIELAB *DU O Today's more for your money meal at mORRISOn'S CAFETERIA MONDAY'S FEATURE CHUCK WAGON STEAK AND HASH BROWN POTATOES S82t i 3 TUESDAY'S FEATURE GOLDEN FRIED CHICKEN I ALL YOU CANEAT 99 1 LUNCH: 11 til 2 -SUPPER:4:30il 8FA PARKING OR R S FETER beyond son! 2620 N.W. 13th Street in the Gainesvitle Mall "In thegruesomedivisionthis is really very good." OS ANGELESTIMES Special 3D glasses will be provided Tuesday, November 9 Union Auditorium 6:00, 8:00,10:00 $1.00 Sponsored by the J. Wayne Reitz Union ---------------------An'

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.--------------------4 -GATMR CLSASIF'XEXPs The Florida Alilgutor, Mondey, Novusier a, 1971, Pape 13 -in, Getting married -deSparately need a reasonable ($) apt. or house. Winter quarter. Please call if you can help. Ph. 373-6342 or 378-6169. (C-2t-36-p) Male roommate needed to share large 2 bdrm apt. Country Gardens $57.50 + 1/4 elec. November rent paid. Call Charlie 376-0354. (C-lt-36p) iW EIL.P WVA IjTE" 1111f ff11 ll ff111 lfffffn ffffnffffl~ili Reliable man wanted for night duty 5:00 il morning at Duncan Bros. Furneral Home in exchange for room with TV & bath Time off can be arranged. Call for interview 376-2437 (e-5t-35-p) Guitar Teacher must be free to work after three PM weekdays, for Interview call 378-5550 Hills Music Studios (e-5t-35-p) If you want to earn lots of money and If you can talk to other people about earning money, call 373-0030 after 1 pm and ask for Bob (e-4t-34-p) Law student desires coed cook 5 nites/wk. must have own trans. free meals. room avail. If desired at minimal cost 373-5674 after 10:30 pm (e-5t-33-p) room and board $10 weekly night duty with elderly couple plus hoping for groceries call 376-7502 after 6 pm (-5t-33-p) 'MCP Corporation-Job openings part-time& fultima positions. mgrs. & sales Fashion World comm & salary up to 50% Sign up for group session G-22 Reitz Union before Nov. 9-71. For summer jobs contact Ed Binder 6723 Beret Dr. Orlando,Fla. 32809 (e-t-31-p) iiIMMUININK 11111 DUNE BUGGY orange glass top 500 ml on rebuilt eng, cost $1600 + 2 years to build will take $1050 or best offer. BIG tires 373-5663 (g-2t-34-p) mach I 69 Cobra jet 428 cu in. 4 sp. radio stereo tape many other extras over 4,200 invested great shape must sail 1,995 or best offer ph. 378-8580 (g-5t-32-p '71 Porsche 9 11 T Coupe. Bahama yellow 5 speed loaded 1200 miles Firm price $8000 Miller-Brown 3764552 (g-lt-33-p) 66 VW Bug. Rebuilt engine, new brakes & battery, radio, new tag & insp. Looks good & runs good. Yours for $750. call 376-1889 aft 5 (g-5t-33-p) 1957 chevy, full racing cam, jahns pistons, hurst competition plus shifter, two new mickey thompsons, 4:56 rear. call 392-7233, ask for will (g-5t-35-p) Chervroet malibu 2 dr hardtop, one owner, 33000 miles, extra clean, two tone gold and Ivory, full automatic power steering, radio, air condition excellent condition, $1,695 bargain, 372-5214 (g-5t-34-p) .69 Triumph GT 6+ white am-f ni 4 new radials exceptional body and mech cond well-loved selling only cause need Irge car $2100 392-6065 (9-10t-29-p) -r m-rn 63 VW CONVERTIBLE yellow with black top mechanically excellent $550.378-1128( t-3-34-p 1968 Flat 124 Sport Coupe Excellent Condition, Tape Deck 373-4527 Evenings (-5t-35-p) Mustang 165 3-speed 289 good tires. Must sell, $550 or best offer. Call 376-5870. (G-2t-36-p)i PERS4OXA L GOING TO TEXAS -Nov. 5 approx. will take rider and/or deliver luggage-household goods to houston-san antonio area or points in between. call don 376-1271 ext. 200-9t-27-p) Co-ads Facial Hair removed forever fast, low-cost gentle hair removal. E D M U N O 0 WrYER, Electrologist .102 N.W. 2nd Ave. Call 372-8039 for appointment. (J-53t-2-p) Good home needed for loveable young long-haired, medium sized female dog; already spayed. $10. 372-2735 wkends or btw 7-10 pm wkdays. -5t-32-p) 75 delivery boys pooled their tips for this month and barely bought this ad. We just wrote to say THANK OUI (J-1t-36-p) FREE -2 solid black male kittens, 6 wks old. Call 392-1978 between and 5. (J-3t-36-p) Discount prices on strings, guitars harps. Instructions for playing the 5 string banjo, guitar 108 nw 7th st The Folk Shopcome in and' pick S-5t-32-p) Recycled Clothes: flannel shirts$2 corduroy shirts -$ 3used jeans$3.50 -denim skirts $5-$6fur coats $20full-length winter coats $10leather flight jackets -$15Leather Shop at Tuesday Momning 1122 W. University Ave. (-10t-31-p) FLIPPING OUT? Whatever your problem, Jesus Christ is the answer. For help, call 372-7911 any time. Smile, God loves youl(j-34t-20-p) ORGANAVAN, has fresh juice organic goodies, free smiles. open 6 day wk. sometimes mon. Veg supper sun, wed, fri. 424 nw 13th st.UJ-5t-34-p) Parking available, 1 bik from campus monthly rate $10. Newberry's Texaco 1206 W. Univ. 372-0928. 0-5t-35-P) AC 5FLOR osASTATE HATE SENOR CIIZEN SPECLt $11 A oA.GE65 A o VR A DA Y -I.D. -MEWIC A D g DR. IC.ie ,.eTn8: 7 11 0 0 A047-04. .a liede C6k LST 4 DAYS e ~ e 0 -Sh 1490 a 3:32 --5:34 a a 7:36-t38 a 'Billy Jatk" Iwil makeayou anry. :even make ynaefuros.or, if5 eyoo ma woman : break your heart 0 Tom Laughlin LAST 3 gD ; gf gasDAYs 231 W. nao. e THE MAN THAT'S NEVER BEEN a e BEAT AT POOL Also Steve McQueen a in e THE e CINCINNATTI KID e e Fla-Prices e 754 -AGE1 6&N 1.00 -AGE 17 & UPee bg PE RSo1NA LI inunuim n fhfmifitfufiMittifllllI Mobil Home Owenersi are you tired of : paying too much lot rent, park restrictions, traveling 6 ml too campus, snooping park attendants, act? Why not form a student co-op trailer park where you make your own ruleal For Info call_ 378-9057 after 5 (-5t-34-p) Free, black & white female dog (8 months). Please call Shelley at 373-3153. (J-3t-34-p) FENCERS -will sell my 2 foils 2 masks, good cond. MARY -376-0102 (J-5t-35-p) Available girl: for work as writer, editor, anything else interesting, (almost). MA (NYU) Varied Background. no sacretaria.373-2929 (J-5t-35-p) I I I fff I I 11ffill I ll ill f11 ffl ffffflil fffi iffffHI ifI LOST: Tasco binoculars, 7 x 50. Lost at Blood Sweat and Tears concert. REWARD call 372-8737 after 4:00 PM. (L-St-36-p) FOUND -Charcoal gray female cat. Medium-size, welrg brown flee olar Call 373-3941 anytime (1-3t-34-nc) Lost: girls gold i.d. bracelet engraved with "Merry" and birthdate. last seen in ladies room in Yon hall after maryland game. great sentimental value. If found call Merry 392-9682 rm 354 broward hal. (1-5t-32-p) reward for ring lost at the mallr4kt gold ring round shaped with rubes and pearl in the center great sentamental value call 372-1191 (-5t-34-p) LOST Pair of glasses, brown frames, lost at BST concert, double bridge in nose piece, call 392-9908 or drop off 417 Yon Hall (1-4-34-p) FOUND a white German Shepard near the Reitz Union on Thur. Call after 3:30 to identify 373-1367 I -3t-35-nc Lost -My lovable dog. Ten months old Irish Setter, male -Has Colo-tags. I miss him. Lost around Univ. and 13th. Call 373-3044. Lynn. (L-3t-36-p) Astrology Service -Peter Leguillou will erect your birth chart with 20 statements of character analysis. Other observations, prognostications. Call Marcie 392-9622. (M-5t-36-p) POUND directed by Robert Downey Sunday, November 7 and Monday, November 8 7:00, 9:30 Union Auditorium 5NC Pre-sale, Friday from 12:30 -4:30 J. Wayne Reitz Union S ERV ICEs We're wired for sight at University Opticians. Drive your own waiting room to 535 SW 4th Ave. 378-4480 (m-38t-16-p) ROC RECORDS now has a complete stereo -8 track -tv repair service with free estimates see us at 424 N.W. 13th STREEi'm-30t-15-p) TYPING fast accurate former ny secretary college grad expd theses diue tfons term papers calims rose 373-1984 9-6, 373-1429 aft 6 pm (m-12t-29-pI We will install any GM Ford Chrysler or American Motor product new rebuilt alternator for $24.95 Starter repair or replacement service. Bank an affiliated cred cards accepted. J&J Auto Electric (Buckland Standard Service) 2109 S.W. 13th St. 372-5804 (m-53t-1-p) LIVE JUGGLING ACTS TONY rHE VEGETABLE WATCH JOHN FLUSH BENCH AND BAR BULLY FOR YOU.IF YOU REMEMBERED. BUT FOR THOSE WHO TEND TO FORGET DATES. A REIM -------------r -n -SE RV IC ES DATING SERVICES Meet more members of the opposite sex In Gainesvnlie. For details, write Box 77346, Atlanta, Ga. 30309 (m-10t-30-p) CAKES made to order: Home baked and professionally decorated Will deliver on campus and off. Call B-A-PCakes 373-5232 (m-5t-33-p) TRIP TO INDIA in summer of 72, cost from NY $600 for info send return address and $2, India 72 1509 Flower Dr Sarasota Fla. (m-5t-34-p) Just what the professor ordered (for termpapers that Is). accurate typist available full time. Call Joyce 373-2905 typing 50cnts & up (m-4t-34-p) Former NY secy at your service. termpapers, theses, dissertations, etc 50 cnts per page & up. Barbara Coaxum 373-4363 (m-4t-34-p) INDER ..NOT TO FORGET YOUR YEARBOOK PHOTO APPOINTMENT. 392-1690 1M9 Pm P--ALL ISUQ AVG llaIO N ow At LocalI Bookrtorev FLORA J'UARTEkLY K m 0

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* I NOV. 22 AIR COND. FLA. GYM ADMISSION 3:25 8 P.M. Second annual family day Student Government will sponsor the second annual family day for the Kentucky-Florida game November 13. Married students can get their children into the game at $1.00 per ticket with the Spouse coupon books. Parents can get in at $7.00 per ticket, and of course the entire family will sit together. Ticket windows for this game will be open on November 8 and 9. Also Bloc Seating chairmen are reminded to turn in their requests today at Gate 14. SG tutors can help Student Gov't tutoring program is now in full swing. Tutor's are available in most subjects including all "C" courses and many upper division courses. Examples of some of the areas covered are BIOLOGY, CHEMISTRY, ENGLISH, FRENCH, GENETICS, GERMAN, HISTORY, HUMANITIES, JOURNALISM, MATH, PHYSICS, POLITICAL SCIENCE, PROGRAMMING, AND ZOOLOGY. Contact with a tutor may be made through SG at 392-1665 or 392-1667. SGP subscription series Student Gov't Productions announces its 1971-1972 Subscription Series. The series will include many of the greats on this years Liberal Arts Tour. For more information call 392-1618. SG budget forms available Budget forms for the year 1972-1973 are available in the Treasurer's Office Room 308 JWRU for any SG-chartered group desiring funds from Student Gov't for that school year. Please contact either Ellen Corensmt or Geof Kirsch. If there are any questions call 392-1623. These forms are due December 1. Hotline staff-emergency meeting Your attendance is required at 7:30, Tues. Nov. 9 -Student Gov't office. If you can't attend, call 392-1665 and leave a message with the secretary. SGP chairman and ass't -application available "All those interested in applying for Student Gov't Productions chairman or Ass't chairman please pick up applications at the activities desk on the third floor of the JAR U. Elections will be held on Nov. 22 in Room 316 at 3:00. Pre-Medical forum Pre-Med Forum will be held tonight at 8 p.m in room 121, Little Hall. Come-Listen-ask questions! Florida Cicerones THE Florida Cicerones are available for conducting campus tours for visitors and guests of the university. For information, contact Mrs. Frances Parker at 392-1641. Student Rights Committee Student Rights Committee of the Student Senate meets today at 3:30 in Rm. 331 of the JWRU. All persons interested in the general field of student rights are encouraged to attend. "DREAM" OPENS TONIGHT The Florida Players Production of William Shakespeare's Comic Fantasy, "A MIDSUMMER NIGHT'S DREAM" will open tonight in the H.P. Constans Theatre. Tickets are available at the Reitz Union Box Office: 392-1653. ROBERT HARRIS DIRECTOR OF COMMUNICATIONS STUDENT GOVERNMENT as., Mondy, November 3,1971 -no I? ----anpu% qrer IFC FROLICS Psent GUESS WHO IN MONDAY NITE Pop$.1

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A The Florida Alligator, Monday. November 8, 1971, Page 15 Shakespeare's 'Dream' opens Thte Florida Players production of Shakespeare's "A Midsummer Night's Dream" opens tonight in UF's Constans Theatre. There are only a few tickets left for the show's six-night run from today through Saturday which is expected to be sold out by curtain tine tonight at 8 p.m. Dr. Richard L. Green is directing the play in an early Elizabethan style typical of Shakespearean theatre. The set design by graduate student Terry McGovern is of constructivist design making maximum and presentational Dramatis Personae Theseus .Claude Pinkton Puck .Jim Ford Hippolyta .Patricia Bauer Indian Boy .James Smith Egeus .Robert Fazone Peaseblossom .Kenneth Jopling Philostrate .Chad Reed Cobweb .Alvin Yank Lysander .Jerry Lucas Moth (& A Fairy) ..Susan Diner Hermia .Debby Kondelik Mustrdseed .Harriet Fields Demetrius .Richard Berard No.1 Courtier ..John Bartholdi Helena .Susan Baum No.2 Courtier .Richard Denning Bottom .Craig Hartley No.1 Lady .Martha Lott Quince .Bill Stradtmann No.2 Lady ....Joan Bickerstaff Flute .Charles Boswell No.1 Guard .Joel Dobson Snout .Dan Jesse No.2 Guard .Larry Winson Snug.Ron Durham No.1 Fairy .Andrew Banker Starveling .Keith Elrod No.2 Fairy .James Purdy Oberon .Gene Touchet No.3 Fairy .Kay Summers Titania .Janice Sizemore No.4 Fairy .B. Janine Kelly Blimps are dying $4 9 U but still profitable $2.99 SAN FRANCISCO PI) Riding in a blhnp is like floating 8 A L B UM S suspended under a big, fat football which goes scudding$ 99 here and there, sometimes poking its nose at skyscraper windows, sonstimes just Ny hanging motionless. Press the right pedal, andI surely but slowly it turns right. Pull a string and let some air or gas out. Turn the wheel at the side of the pilot's seat and the blimp's vast, ponderous prow goes up, or down. The only blimps left, belong to Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co. It got into the blimp business in 1917, a time when German dirigibles were dropping bombs on the British. One by one, the major powers abandoned this form of rd litary might, and now Goodyear's three blimps are the only airships known to be flying in the modem world. Goodyear believes it makes money from its three blimps, stationed in Mimi, Houston and Los Angeles, because of their advertising value. The blimps move about the country, each followed on the ground by crews of 22, to appear in over 80 major cities. MODERN SHOE REPAIR SHOPS 1620 W. UNIV. AVE. 376-0315 AND 101 N. MAIN ST. 376-5211 SOLES AND HEELS ATTACHED WHILE YOU WAIT use of the basic elements of design: line, form and mass. The 32-member cast will adorn the stage in maginificent costumes created by Assistant Professor Lyn Carroll. Each costume (with some characters having several) stands out as an elaborate jewel in itself, from it's overall appearance to it's smallest details. Tickets are 75 cents for students, and $1.50 for general admission. A 15 cent discount for students and 25 cent discount for general admission is offered on blocks of 10 or more tickets for Monday, Tuesday or Wednesday nights. They may be purchased at the Reitz Union Box office, 392-1653. Curtain time is 8 p.m. WE MAY NOT BE FANCY, BUT WE TASTE GOOD BEKH AND BAR COX WAREHOUSE FURNITURE Discount & Used 602 S. Main R RebelStamp & Coin 11 W. Unveraty * ** * WANT WANT TO TO BUY BUY U.S. & STAMP FOREIGN COLLECCOINS TONS *Ph .372-3943** Gainesville, Fla. "Person5 Opticalvice" 27uf/wood'.4Optician.4 319 WEST UNIVERSITY AVENUE GAINESVILLE. FLORIDA 32601 PHONE 378-6060 AARON A. FULLWOOD REGISTERED OPTICIAN Owner Rx Glasses .Contacts .Repairs -Supplies GRtP DON'T BE SHOTS LEFT OUT NOVEMBER 12IS FINAL DAY TO HAVE GROUP AND ORGANIZATION PICTURES MADE FOR THE "ALL NEW"1972 UNIV. OF FLA. YEARBOOK. THE COST IS REASONABLE! CALL ASK FOR BUSINESS MANAGER NOW "" OR YEARBOOK OFFICE Ul

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I Page 1, The Florida Aligator, Monday, November 8, 1971 Dave Ziegler Wire Editor Experts say nuclear-test safe and sound AMCHITKA, Alaska (UPI) -Atomic experts, vindicated in their prediction that no tidal waves, earthquakes or leaking radiation would result from the United States' biggest underground hydrogen bomb blast. Sunday scientists analyzed data to see how well the Spartan ABM warhead worked. They said preliminary readings indicated the five-megaton bomb designed for the anti-ballistic missile system had functioned as predicted when it exploded Saturday a mile beneath this desolate island. The blast caused the largest earth tremor ever produced by man, rocking the island with heaving, budding motion. But fears it would set off disastrous earthquakes and tidal waves proved unfounded. Atomic Energy Commission officials said no radiation "whatsoever" escaped from the 53-inch diameter test shaft drilled more than a mile into Amchitka Island, a bleak dot in the Aleutians about 1,200 miles southwest of Anchorage. An AEC spokesman said technicians and specialists flew back to the island Sunday to analyze data gathered from sensitive measuring devices in trailers parked 2,000 feet from ground zero. Expected seismic aftershocks and formation of huge dish-shaped crater -40 to 50 feet deep and 2,000 feet in diameter -had not started 20 hours after the explosion. The minor earth movements and sinking of the ground were expected to occur as gases and molten rock cooled in an 800-foot diameter underground chamber melted out of solid rock by temperatures equal to those on the surface of the sun. "It may be a matter of days -or it may not even occur," said AEC spokesmen David Jackson. "There will be settling and caving in as the gases cool, but it's chimney effect and could stop beneath the surface." An aerial check of the blast site revealed some surface cracks in the earth, but no deep fissures. Monitoring devices showed no radiation had leaked and Jackson said chances were "nil" that any would. The blast -250 times as powerful as the bomb dropped on Hiroshima during World War H -tilted the trailers a half-mile from the bomb shaft and caused "considerable damage" to two small buildings at ground zero. Technicians rermved film and other data from the trailers but did not venture into the ground zero area. The island earth movement also caused damage to a service road about a mile and a half from the blast site and heavy equipment was sent to the scene Sunday to repair the highway. WASHINGTON (UPI) -A proposed constitutional amendment to permit prayer in public schools comes up for a House vote Monday with the outcome still in doubt. Its supporters considered changing the word "nondenominational" to "voluntary" to pick up added votes. Opponents contended that a nondenominational prayer could only be directed "towhom BELFAST, Northern Ireland (UPI) -Assailants in a speeding car machine-gunned a British soldier to death and wounded another Sunday as they were strolling through the town of Lurgan, 20 miles south of Belfast. An army spokesman said the two soldiers were off duty and wearing civilian clothes when they were gunned down near the town's hospital. The slain soldier was the 122nd person and the 35th Briih cooper to de in violence in Northern heland thIs year. The toU also includes 76 civilian, nine poliemen and two members to the part-tIme Ulster Defense Regiment. In another incident in the RomanCatholic Bogside area of Londonderry, British troops shot a man who fired a short burst from a machine gun at them during a clash between stone-throwing youths and soldiers, the army said. Troops said the gunmen in Londonderry was hit in the chest and was seen to fall, but a SILL'S SHOE SHOP We make sandals eMoccasins 0 Boots *Snakw Boots S .s repaired it may concern" and would dilute the amendment to the point it would lose its intended religious effect. Rep. Chalmers P. Wylie, R-Ohio, chief sponsor of the amendment, worked with House Republican Leader Gerald R. Ford of Michigan on a possible maneuver to substitute the word "voluntary." The amendment is designed to overturn 1962 and 1963 rulings in which the Supreme Court, search of the area revealed no trace of the man or any signs of blood. The incidents marked the first serious encounters between troops and gunmen n since the army's roundup last week of nearly 100 suspected members of the outlawed Irish Republican Arm (IRA)' The IRA seeks the reunification of the six counties of Nothern Ireland with the independent Irish Republic. citing the Bill of Rights guarantee of religious freedom and prohibition of an established religion, outlawed organized prayer and Bible reading in schools. As presented to the House by Wylie, the amendment would affirm the right of persons lawfully ambled in school ansi other tax-supported public buildings to participate in "nondenominational" prayer. The amendment will be taken up under a House rule permitting only one hour of debate and barring any change unless its sponsors agree. A two-thirds vote is required for approval, or 290 votes if all members cast ballots. Faced with a head count showing that as many as 125 congressmen might vote against it, Wylie and Ford left until Monday a decision on whether to substitute "voluntary." The amendment haspronptod a bitter fight in the House, as well as among religious leaders. House Democratic leaders and top officials of all major religious denominations have opposed the amendment, warning it could undermine the Bill of Right. FREE CAR WASH WITH FILLUP (whatever your car holds) SAVE 2C PER GALLON WITH THIS COUPON MONDAY TH RU THU RSDAY The BP Carweds across from Shopping Center on N. Main St. FEATURING CHUCK WAGON STEAKS FROM 99c OPEN 11:00 AM to 9:00 PM -7 Days Weekly Westgate Shopping Center -PHONE 378-3320 3321 W. University Ave. -Gainesville, Florida BOOKS and RKORDS NO.1,11 SHOP &BO .ocated i e Hub 7liebimilaa-IllJ VORLD WRAP-UP House vote: prayer in public schools? British soldier shot near Belfast limits C 3782646 TASSELS IN THE AIR I

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Crowd looks better than I By TOM CORNELISON Alligtor Sports Editor "Today's attendance," the loudspeaker blared at Saturday's Florida-Georgia football game in Jacksonville's Gator Bowl, "is 67,383. ABC says you all look good on television." Not looking so good on regional TV, perhaps, were the Florida Gators who lost their seventh game of the season, 49-7. A devastating ground attack once again doomed the Gators to defeat as Georgia infantrymen logged 288 yards for four touchdowns. The rout was accentuated by the absence of their firststring quarterback Andy Johnson. Johnson had twisted his knee in Georgia's previous gart could have played Saturd head coach Vince decided to save him f Auburn game next Georgia's back-up quar Jimmy Ray responded challenge by completing' 12 passes for 127 yards touchdown while runn additional 43 yards and touchdown. "Georgia didn't surpr said Florida coach Doug after the game, "this 1 like about four others% The offense couldn't anything and defense overworked. "We just don't make play," Dickey added. Florida was hampe The Florida Alligator Georgia quarterback Jimmy Ray scores TD was a five yard run around left end during 3rd period Florida Quarterly HERE NOW! at bookstores. DESKS se and injuries, with flankerback Carlos lay, but Alvarez slowed by his knees, and Dooley guard Fred Abbott, cornerback for the John Faix and safety Jimmy week. Barr all out of action. Alvarez terback failed to catch a single pass in to the the game. 7 out of Gator running back Vince nd one Kendrick, however, returned to ing for action in the second half for his another first appearance since the Mississippi State game on ise us," September 18. Dickey said Dickey Kendrick will have a "real oss was chance to play in the next two we had. weeks." generate Georgia scored first, with 59 became seconds remaining in the first period. Ray led his team 66 the big yards in 7 plays, the last four plays and 26 yards accounted red by for by Jimmy "the Greek" Poulos, who scored from two yards out. Kim Braswell added the extra point. In the second quarter Georgia marched 73 yards in 10 plays culminating with a two yard plunge by tailback Ricky Lake, Braswell again converted. After the kickoff, Florida quarterback Reaves hit Jim Yancey for nine yards, handed off to fullback Mike Rich for three more yards, and threw an interception to Bulldog defender Mixon Robinson who galloped 38 yards for a TD. Reaves brought the Gators back, driving 80 yards in 11 plays, hitting Hollis Boardman three times for 40 yards and sending runningback Tommy Durrance around right end for 19 more yards during the series. The scoring play was a 9 yard aerial hook up from Reaves to Yancey followed by a PAT by Richard Franco with 3:54 left in the first half. Georgia came on strong in the third quarter, breaking the game wide open with three touchdowns. Ray scored the first by running around left end for 5 yards, followed by a two point conversion on a pass from Ray to flanker Jimmy Shirer, who had earlier punted 58 yards in the air. The second score capped a 42 yard four play drive after defensive back Buzzy Rosenberg had returned a 39 yard punt 36 yards. The score was a 38 yard pass from Ray to Shirer. Lake added another 2 WHERE FOLKS NNEDY MEET, AND EAT BENCH AND BAR d ---_ BARS 372-1862 2832 NE 20th WAY The Florida Alligpbor, Monday, November 8, 1971, Pap 17 UF in 49-7 Ions yard TD with 16 seconds left in pass to substitute 'fLer ob th' third quarter and the PAT Burns, Braswell again added the made it 42-7. extra point. Third string quarterback Steve Georgia, rated seventh in the Watson accounted for the final nation is still undefeated with a score with a 25 yard touchdown 9-0 record. F .o '0 E "Our low prices are made possible by the contributions of various ountanding businesses Tonight Onlye Tonight Only HALF PRICE DRINKS* *(Sft driks dniv) 1802W LUNIV. -1430 SW 13th SL (Prices good for most American made cars. Bring these coupons in with you. Good thru Dec.) .---------------. TUNE UP :WHEEL BEARINGS $8.95 6 cylinder PACKED $12.95 8 cylinder Inner and outer $13.95 8 cylinderj $*79 (with this coupon) D wt hscupon) .-i~~g ~c~a~n>. ..-.). WHEEL BALANCING:jCOOLING SYSTEM High Speed Oil filter changed -Antifreeze (for Static -Dynamic Gainesville weather) Cooling System checked $2.99 each $9.99 (with this coupon) -(with this coupon) ---------------------------.--------------------TIRES TIRES TIRES Clip the ad from any regional paper and bring it to us. We meet or beat most all advertised prices. Complete Car Care Center 637 N.W. 13th ST. C WHOLESALE PRICES! SAVE UP TO 50% CUSTOM WATERBED FRAMES LARGEST & OLDEST MFGR. EAST OF THE MISSISSIPPI CUSTOM CABINETS BOOKSHELVES PANELING WE BUILD WITH THE STUDENT IN MIND FREE DELIVERY WOOD SPECIALTIES,INC. Ph. 376-6455 .-

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Defensive Hijacking TERRY WALTERS Both Doug Dickey and quarterback John Reaves, clutches Reaves' pass as Florida's Hollis Boardman, although differing in the way they said It thought the intended receiver, doses in. But, Robinson cuts Mixon Robinson's (83) interception was the turning back, photo No. 2, above right, and just makes the point in Florida's 49-7 loss to Georgia in the Gator end zone (photo No. 3) to put Georgia ahead 20-0 Bowl. in the first haff. In the first photo on the left above, Robinson Would first down attempt have helped out Gators? JACKSONVILLE -It may be easy to second guess now, this two days after Florida lost -another one-sided game this year, this one 49-7 to Georgia, but a person has to wonder what wnuld have happened if two plays were turned around. The score was 28-7 with Florida faced with a fourth and about a half yard to go on its own 29 yard line. Head coach Doug Dickey, with 7:40 remaining in the third quarter, decided to punt, giving Georgia the ball. He was hoping his defense would hold so that the once potent Florida offense could get the ball back. It backfired as Georgia went on to score in four plays. The first series in the fourth quarter, with Florida down 42-7, Dickey decided to send in John James once again when the Gators were faced with a fourth and two on its own 28 yard line. Georgia didn't score on its next series though. The way things were going, anm have been going al year for Floda, even 9 the hret down was obtained, I doubt that they would have scored. Those sophomores the coaching staff was talking so highly of last spring have only shown some lmprovenwnt with the receivers still not being able to hang on to a pass thrown to them. For a while on Saturday, the capacity crowd were watching next year's Gator backfield perform. y dJohn PA&ves sm-thwfirs tin kte hrd d placed ey in there MARTY TOM KENNEDY PE RLMUTTE R IW p n iy S executive sports editor to face the Bulldogs. Along with over them (although in the FSUDo o s breath Galley, there was Vince game, the secondary performed Kendrick at fullback (for the first time since the Mississippi State gane) and Cary Geiger at tailback. This offense got nowhere either and Dickey went back to Reaves on the next series of plays. Florida football in the next year, and the remainder of this year, has a long way to come back. The Gators have been unable to stop any kind of rushing attack and when they gin thp """"""'""n h"t* "a"w admi-rably). And from the looks of the way the freshman team played against the Georgia freshman Friday, opponents may decide to snap the ball directly to a running back and forget about the passing attack. Things are bleak in the Gator football headquarters. Individual performances must be outstanding in the next two games if Florida wants to win "o m*esthis "var TERRY WALTERS Jimm Paul= (20) s gitt-amru Roy Mallory .sohonore ran for 76 yards and one touchdown By SANDY ROBINSON Alligator Sports Writer JACKSONVILLE -Chanting "We're number one!" an inebriated throng of Georgia football fans gathered at a police barrier to await the emergence of the nationally ranked, undefeated Bulldogs from their locker room at Jacksonville's Gator Bowl. Georgia head coach Vince Dooley, glowing with confidence after Saturday's regionally televised 49-7 massacre of the Florida Gators, emerged first to meet reporters and say what everyone expected him to say. "We played good. Florida played good, too," said Dooley, his voice barely audible amid the Bulldog pandemonium. "If there was a turning point, I'd have to say it was when we got the easy touchdown on the interception." Dooley was referring to a John Reaves pass picked off by defensive end Mixon Robinson who raced 38 yards to the end zone and boosted the 'Dog's lead to 20-0 in the second quarter. But it was the two-point conversion following Georgia's fourth TD that allowed Dooley to breathe easier. "I thought we were in good position then." Turning to the Gators' 80-yard drive that landed them their only score of the game, Dooley said, "Florida was hitting us in the weak spots. It looked like we let up on defense. Otherwise, our defense was terrific." He paid special tribute to the Bulldog secondary that effectively contained the Gator passing game. "I thought we played very well in the secondary. It passed the Reaves test." Dooley also had plenty of praise for second-string quarterback James Ray who took over for sophomore starter Andy Johnson. "Ray did a terrific job," said Dooley, adding with a grin, "He's a pretty good second-string quarterback." Johnson, who was sidelined with an injury in last week's shutout of South Carolina, may have to fight for his old position. "We would have used him only if Ray got injured." 'Booley said Johnson may not start against Auburn next week. Asked if he could detect a change in one-time All-American flanker Carlos Alvarez, Dooley replied shaking his head, "You could tell he's just not the old Alvarez. Not anywhere near it. I've seen enough of him, anyway." Alvarez never caught a pass during his brief performance against the 'Dogs. ---........

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The Florida Alligator, Monday, November 8, 1971, Page 19 Frosh comeback falls short as'pups' win By PAUL SHEA Alligator Sports Writer "You can't take anything away from Georgia. The breaks went both ways during the game," said -Florida head gashman football coach, Don Deal. Deal watched a fourth quarter Baby Gator comeback fall short Friday as theUGeorgia Buipups defeated the UF Frosh, 33.26. "They have a terrific running game," Deal said. "One of the best I've seen. Their offensive line got off the ball well." Bulpup tailback, Horace King, ran through the Baby Gators for 291 yards and four touchdowns and fullback Mike Robinson had 146 yards on the ground scoring once. The Florida frosh did just the opposite of Georgia, scoring all their TDs through the air. Split end, Lee McGriff, caught three touchdowns for the freshmen. Quarterback David Bowden completed 20 of 35 passes but had two intercepted. The other Florida frosh TD came on a pass from Bowden to end, Ward Eastman. At the end of the third quarter, the Baby Gators were behind 33-14. They scored with 10:36 left in the game on a pass from backup quarterback Jerry Miller to McGriff "When they held the ball for those five minutes, it took the ieout of us," Deal said Saturday, viewing the vanity Bulldogs and Gators go at it in the Gator Bowl. "We needed that time to score again." The Baby Gators got the ball back with 4:35 left but they were intercepted on the first play and didn't get the ball again until only 2:14 was left. With 34 Parker ups claim by $50,000 By SANDY ROBINSON Alligator Sports Writer John Parker, outspoken critic and former employee of the UF Athletic Department, has tacked a $50,000 punitive damages amendment onto his original law suit against Athletic Director Ray Graves who fired Parker from his post as student track assistant last November. Parker was the center of controversy at that time when he formed the Florida League of Athletes to check the power of the Athletic Department over the lives of Gator athletes. Also Parker wrote a series of articles I~tI By RON SECRIST Alligator Correspondent Hot off the volleyball trail, the fraternities will now have its chance to toss the football around as the Orange and Blue Fraternity Football League gets underway today and tomorrow. Thirteen teams, divided into three brackets will battle in each division for the championships. The Orange League will open today at 4:30 with the LXA-AEP, PKT-PDT and SPE-PLP contests kicking off the season. Defending champions, Sigma Nu will face the SAF's today at $:30 p.m. 'T'he MU's, who finished as runners-up in the recent volleyball playoffs, head bracket I1. They certainly are not guaranteed the bracket Ch 9 g soJiePI LOSS who tion as beg the "bridesmaid and never the bride," may put it all together this year and break the in The Alligator critical of Graves and the Athletic Department. These were pointed out by Graves as reasons for Parker's dismissal. Parker's original complaint was filed with the U.S.District Court last May demanding $11,500 compensation and reinstatement to his former position as a student assistant. The amendment, to be filed with the court today, asks for an additional $50,000 in punitive damages. "I've become convinced in the last few months that this type of damage is warranted," said Parker. "Normally, it is included in the original complaint. I didn't file for punitive damages at first because I was trying to be a nice guy. I don't feel like being a nice guy anymore." Parker's complaint cited that Graves had violated his freedom of speech and the case was ordered to court by Judge David L. Middlebrooks after'a hearing last October when he denied a request by Graves's attorney to dismiss the case. Parker, who is acting as his own attorney, said the case should be decided before the end of this month despite a request by Graves to delay until midd-January. NTRAMURALSU runners-up jinx that has plagued them for the last couple of seasons. The two will meet Nov. 16. This year's Swimming Champions, SAE and neighbor SPE, round out the bracket. Volleyball Champs, Phi Kappa Tau, share bracket 1 with PDT, ATO, AEP and LXA. Bracket 3 is highlighted by last year's Blue League Champions, Delta Tau Delta, who this season has switched to the Orange division. TEP, known for its football prominence in the past, along with the Sigma Chi's and the Pikes, round out the remainder of tiwJbracket. Thq lue League will open its 1971 season tomorrow at 4:30 p.m. with six games on tap. Bracket 1 is full of "Kappa's" as Phi Kappa ?si, Phi, Kappa. Thets4dWPiRi up thiee oft tls The BETA's and Delta Chi's account for the other two teams in the bracket. The DU's who always 1 ""$OUR BUSIt4 CARS TRUCKS p BUSES SPECIALATTENTION TO INSURACLAIMS sMMSAT INTALATIora n F nt uM as ICKA MLy 5y 376-2558 I NO,ANs W CLL UIDIE, 0 .xE3NMi 323 W. 6ST., EAfi 5$19A"L.L 33T, P.O.OX 634 eAINISYIILLE come up with a hard-to-beat team, join the Theta Chi's, AGR's and the TKE's in bracket 2. Volleyball Champs, Chi Phi and the FIJ's, who captured the Swimming title, will battle for the bracket 3 championship. The KA's and Delta Sigs will also challenge for the playoffs. Fraternity Football will run tluough Nov. 27, with the round-robin playoffs getting underway, Nov. 29. 5-7 DAILY io EER 200 BENCH AND BAR cold weather Call Simmons' today for your oil heat, hardware, and car needs: Ask about our economical KEEP FULL SERVICE. SIMMONS' SERVICE 904 E University Ave Phone 376-3534 seconds left, the freslnn is scored again on a pass from Bowden to Eastman, before Georgia ran out the clock. "Our defense could have done better," Deal said "But the offense came out fighting in the 373-3377 or 376-3354 fourth quarterand that's a plus factor." The Baby Gators, now 1-3 for the season meet the undefeated LSU freshman next Saturday at Florida Field following the varsity game with Kentucky. Family day is slated Student Government, in cooperation with the Athletic Association, is co-sponsoring the second annual family day at Florida Field for the Kentucky game, Saturday, November 13th. Marriedstudents-with spouse coupon books will be able to buy tickets for their children at $1.00 each. The parents of spouse coupon book holders can buy tickets at the regular price of $7.00. In addition all full time students can purchase tickets for their parents at $7.00 each and for non student brothers and sisters at $1.00 each if accompanied by a parent. The entire family will be guaranteed adjacent seats. Tickets can be purchased for this event at Gate 13, East stand, on Monday and Tuesday, November 8 and 9, from 10:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. 8 AM -8:30 PM Mon. -Sat. "Tr-EAT out often at" 12-6 Restaurant and Coffee Shop Sunday ACROSS 2601 N.W. 13th St. FROM THE MALL Serving BREAKFAST LUNCH DINNER For The Holidays Walgreen's Baked & Ready 10-12 lb. Tender to Serve TURKEY$12 95 Including 1 quart Giblet Gravy Plus. 2 quarts Delicious Dressing $5 s Free Pumpkin Pie Tuesday Night SPAGHETTI DINNER SPECIAL 'All You Can Eat' Meat Sauce Tossed Saled Bowl Toasted Bread Child's Portion .994 "Just Ask For More" jJ401 Wednesday Night Fried Shrimp Night 'All You Can Eat' Frech Fre Col Sow 1 .5 9 Hush puppy "Just Ask For More" REMEMBER Always Free Delivery & 2 FREE COKES wwm Ip "RP --I THANK YOU FROM RAPPS PIZZA TRAIN 1515 S.W. 13th St. MQNPAY TUDY1 WE m~ov. g;,4"oui, Buy A Medium or Large Pizza -Get A Small Cheese Pizza for $1.00 I This special good on Premises & delivery & pick-up a lpp qqwpl lqlrp qw 'Addabb., -.ddbkl -Adbhl ldldbh -.ddbbl -.911kh, lddhh

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PIT Congratulates the Player of the Week OPEN DAILY-FROM 11-9 PM The C.'s Evening Meal? C Big Deal! AND IT IS 0Where Could You JeT DeTTer rood For Less L Try our Complete Evening Meal $1.29 Monday thru Friday 4:30 PM to 7:30 PM EIncludes: *Meat Item of the Nite Choice of Salad with dressing e Choice of Vegetable Bread and Oleo E iced Tea or Coffee HERE'S WHA T WE GOT! This Week's Meat Item of the Nite Mon -Roast Beef and dressing Tues -Baked Italian Beef Lasagne Wed -Roast Turkey with dressing Thurs -Braised Pepper Steak over White Rice Fri -Lg 34 Southern Fried Chicken Your choice of Tasty,Tender STEAKS, CHICKEN AND FISH HAMBURGER -1lb. .59 BONANZABURGER -1%1b. .84 French Fries, salad, pickle and chicklets STEAK SANDWICH with French fries 1.19 BUNKHOUSE SPECIAL -1/2 lb. chopped beef 1.39 Our steaks are served with a steaming -hot, buttery baked potato, Texas toast, and a cool, crisp, green salad. RIB EYE STEAK -6 oz. BONANZA STRIP -8 oz. SIRLOIN STRIP -111/2 OZ. T -BONE -l15 oz. 2445 S.W. 13th St. 1.69 1.99 2.9 299 Take Outs-378-0946 Graduation, a time to say goodbye to one type of life and start a new one. Your relatives and friends will want to remember your college life too. We have the novelties for gifts and we have Diplomas of Gratitude for those who helped you through school. For you, we have books to start a new library, official class rings, and graduation apparel. May we help you through this last step to a new life? Come by todayI MONDAY -FRIDAY Sam-7:30pn SATURDAY 9am -12noon CAMPUS SHOP& BOOKSTORE ....located in the Hub IPlayer of the Week Lee McGriff For the first time this season, the Player of the Week award is being given to a freshman. Frosh flanker back Lee McGriff is being given recognition here for catching three touchdown passes against the Bullpups of Georgia. McGriff, along with quarterback David Bowden, led the Baby Gator rally which brought the team backfrom a 33-7 deficit to a near upset. The final score was 33-26. Bowden was also given consideration, as were varsity players Jim Getzen, Robert Harrel, Doug Sorenson, Roy Mallory and Jim Yancey. "t I FM rou"Us Avvvvmuw, muw ww 0, jwl I Am 20The ,.aridAli&. M.b., Mb It 1271 I