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The Florida alligator

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Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

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Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

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Full Text
Vol. 63, No. 168

By GARY GRUNDER
Alligator Managing Editor
President Nixons price, wage and rent
freeze has left the state in a questionable
position according to vice chancellor of
the Board of Regents Phillip Ashler.
Ashler pointed out that there are two
ways of viewing the situation. The first is
the idea that the Florida Legislature
passed its appropriations bill in July, a
budget that came to be before the
Presidents action.
The second view, according to Ashler,
is that any pay, rent or price increase to
come in the state budget is void because
of the Presidents statement.
Ashler said that his office was seeking
guidance from Treasury Secretary John
Connally.
President Nixons Sunday
announcement of a price, wage and rent
freeze for 90 days has led to some
confusion as to the status of the tuition

(EDITOR'S NOTE: Tills is an analysis of the President's new
economic policy by Department of Economics Chairman Irving
Goffinan)
This is a fantastic about face from a laissez-faire position based
upon some illusion that all was well to an acceptance of the general
principle of direct government controls numerous fronts. It is obvious
that the President now recognizes that his past economic policies
Nixonomics made no sense and have created the major factor
which could defeat him politically next year.
What he announced however, was either too little, too late or too
inconsistent. It is a very strange package when one tries to fight
unemployment providing tax relief for those with incomes and
subsidies to industry in order to stimulate consumption and
investment spending at the same time cutting federal spending and
federal employment.
Or to fight inflation by asking for wage-price freezes but at the
mi time imposing an import duty which will certainly mean higher
consumer prices for some goods. I suppose he expects a reduction in
foreign competition and therefore an increase in employment in
certain domestic industries say textiles and automobiles. But surely
it may be expected that foreign countries will retaliate either directly
or indirectly. If so, what will be the effect on American exporting
industries?
I am not sure I know what the ddlar-gold policy really is The
President did not choose to use the term devaluation, though it
appears to be that but I must wait and see what the reaction is abroad.
It seems to me that this package is only of political interest Having
successfully eliminated Vietnam and China as meaningful issues, the
President had to attack the one vulnerable area economics. The
country is in an economic mess. Inflation has not ceased and
unemployment has begun to resemble the late Eisenhower years. But I
think the President waited too long and appears to be too beholden to
the large interests. An economic policy which subsidizes Lockheed
but postpones welfare reform and cuts public spending is tantamount
to socialism for the rich and free enterprise for the poor. I simply do
not understand such a philosophy.
I see no obvious and direct effect upon students. I would think,
however, that there may be a considerable drop in real income of the
faculty and staff since they have not had salary increases for a year
now and may not receive even the petty salary raises recently
provided by the legislature.

The
Florida Alligator

Wage and price console,
what they mean to you

Nixons about face, an analysis

University of Florida, Gainesville

hike recently passed by the Florida
Legislature.
The question has arisen as to whether
the tuition increase was passed and
enacted in time for it to go into effect
legally before the Presidents price
controls were announced.
A decision on whether or not to charge
the additional rate is due soon, according
to Board of Regents Chancellor Robert
Mautzoffice.
According to Tony Kenzio, assistant
director of the Campus Shop
and Bookstore, the freeze will keep prices
the same on all goods sold by the
bookstore with the exception of books.
The price of books, Kendzio said on
Monday, is set by the publisher. You
will notice the price of paperbacks is
stamped on the cover.
T don't anticipate any rise in the cost
of books, however, Kendzio added.
Kendzio also said UF Vice President of
Administrative Affairs William Elmore will
have the final say on the price increase.
Elmore said, Ts the publisher doesnt
raise prices, then we won't. If the

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*

i
*Vlw economic policy which subsidizes Lockheed but
postpones welfare reform and cuts public spending in
tantamount to socialism for the rich and free enterprise for
the poor.
- Irving Goffman

Tuesday, August 17, 1971

publisher should raise prices, we would
be forced to.
Elmore said that it was too early to tell
what effect Nixons decision would
have on UF. Summing up tis position he
said, we are attempting to assess the
situation, but itH take time.

In accordance with the Presidents
guidelines, all rises in prices, wages or
rents that have been announced, but not
put into effect, are void.
Associate Director of Housing James
Hennessey said that dormitory rates will
remain at the same level they were last
year.
According to Hennnessey, dormitory
rates would not have risen even if the
President had not set a rent freeze.
Adjustments in dormitory rates will
probably have to be made for fall quarter
of 1972.
Gainesville Area Chamber of
Commerce President Henry Barber said,
as far as I'm concerned Nixon is playing
hands off with the economy.
When this reporter informed him of
the Presidents Sunday night speech,
Barber said that he was unaware and
could not comment.



Page 2

!, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, August 17, 1971

feiV
ip

/THE" FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during \
June, July and August when it's published semi-weekly, and during student
holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions
of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz
Union Building. University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The
Alliga'or is entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office
at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year or $3.50 per Quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy it qgnsiders
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the advertising manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
more than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run I
V several times. Notices for correction must be given befoie' the next t
insertion. J

It gave me more
confidence in myself. /
could come here to UF
and pass, even though
competing with more
than 20,000 students

- Clan

Some students in
high school dont know
what they want. . but
they still have the
potential (to attend
college). EEOP gives
them a chance to make
up for mistakes they
tnade in high school.
Edward Wilson

EEOP ... a chance

Previously students
were required to go to
reading clinic and
tutoring sessions, but
we re going to leave it up
to the individual if he
needs help, it will be
available. The assumption
is that if they dont do it
on their own, they
probably wont make it
through the University.
Phil Parsons

ha Carrigan

l*o LOVes Trie AUTOhoMoUs I
filing of eaTiNc a wHoppe; I
Burjer Kin).
8 N.W. 16TH AVE. I

By STEPHANIE SWERDLIN
Alligator Staff Writer
UF has incorporated two programs to compensate for
disadavantages, either social or academic, which might under normal
circumstances have kept an individual from going to college.
The programs, Expanded Educational Opportunity Program
(EEOP) and Special Services to Disadvantaged Students (SSDS), will
offer tutoring sessions, reading clinics, and partial financial aid to
approximately 150 students who otherwise would not be attending
UF.
EEOP, formerly known as Critical Freshman Year, is being directed
this summer by Phil Parsons, assistant professor of logic. Parsons
summarizes the EEOP objective We want to help these students
succeed academically."
Parsons feels that there is a correlation between low income and
low scores and qualifications, but with help we can overcome
deficiencies shown.
Some students in EEOP are enrolled in courses with modified
content. The students receive a variation in credit hours in certain
courses, for they often spend extra hours in class in order to receive
more exposure to their weaker academic areas.
Parsons emphasizes, however, that the curriculum under this
program is not remedial or sub-university.
EEOP offers reading clinics and tutoring to students enrolled in the
program.
Previously students were required to go to reading clinic and
tutoring sessions, Parsons said, but were going to leave it up to the
individual if he needs help, it will be available. The assumption is
that if they dont do it on their own, they probably wont make it
through the University.
1970-71 Critical Freshman Year Program director David Lee said
that after three quarters 75 per cent of the EEOP students had
(See topage 3)



to go to college

maintained a C grade average or better in spite of the fact that they
did not meet normal UF entrance requirements.
EEOP students are counseled by their own teachers who are able to
observe their performance in the classroom and offer aid in areas
where it can be the most beneficial.
Partial financial aid is available for students who qualify. A total of
$142,0CX) has been awarded students in the 1971-72 program. The
financial aid is in the form of Equal Opportunity Grants, National
Defense Loans, and work-study aids.
Students in the program come from all income brackets. Parsons
reports applications from students who live in areas ranging from
country chib estates to ghetto areas. Approximately half of the
EEOP students are Black. American Indians, Cubans and Puerto
Ricans are also included.
Last years denial of a $50,000 U.S. Office of Education grant,
which would have linked EEOP to their present partner program,
resulted primarily in reduction of some permanent staff positions,
reading lab equipment and a dorm-based library.
However, the Federal Government pulled through this year and
awarded EEOP the $50,000 grant to fund SSDS.
SSDS, directed by Randolph Bracy, will fund special counselors,
cultural events and other activities for disadvantaged students.
Bracy feels that the programs being implemented at UF indicate
that the university is now making a concentrated effort to meet the
needs of minority students.
EEOP students regard the program with a variety of thoughts: 1
like it in a sense, but theyre too protective; I dont understand it;
Weve been set aside like a bunch of guinea pigs; It got me into a
four year college. Otherwise, I would not have gotten here; My
parents arent financially able to send me to college without EEOP
and SSDS grants.

Correction
The quote appearing in
Thursdays Alligator as a side bar
in the story entitled New bike
routes and traffic surveys set for
early fall was incorrectly
attributed to Worth Crow. The
quote was that of Charles
Faulds, SG director of
transportation.
Five receive
Poynter awards
Five UF students have been
awarded Poynter Fund
Scholarships for the 1971-72
academic year. The awards are
made annually by the Poynter
fund, established by Nelson
Poynter, chairman of the Times
Publishing Co. which publishes
the St. Petersburg Times, in
memory of his father, the late
Paul Poynter. The scholarships
have been awarded since 1956 to
students of exceptional talent
devoted to careers in journalism.
UF recipients are: Randy
Bellows, Connie Daniel, Ted
Vodde, Carolyn Volte and Paula
Smith.
Complete Alteration Service
on clothing for
Men and Women
FAST SERVICE
FREE ESTIMATES
Pntittrsttg j&fop
UNIVERSITY PLAZA
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COINS
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(pay $2.00 for silvar dollars)
HUTCHESON ENTERPRISES
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In Florida National Bank BuHdlng
IIHMKSITY \\\w*
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Fraternity Jewelry' 5^
Now order It 6 days a week
Trophy & Plaque Dept.
Expert Engraving
Class rings
Watch repair
Jewelry repair
1802 West Univarsity Ave.
Across from Campus
2 blocks from Hub 373-1025

GOOD LUCK
ON YOUR FINAL EXAMS
FROM UNIVERSITY CITY BANK
COME SEE US IN THE FALL
THE ONLY BANK WITH DRIVE-IN SERVICE ON SATURDAYS
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Last year approximately 191 students entered UF as members of
the Critical Freshman Year Program. Without the program, more than
half probably would have been rejected for admission to the
university because of low scores on the Florida Senior Placement
examination, according to David Lee, who was faculty coordinator for
the program.
But what did the program do for students who were involved in it?
It gave me more confidence in myself, Clantha Carrigan said. 1
could come here to UF and pass, even though competing with more
than 20,000 students.
Clantha, who came to UF on a National Defense Loan, Educational
Opportunity Grant, and work-study aid, doesnt feel that students in
the program got any breaks , but We proved a lot the senior
placement test couldnt really determine how we would do in
college.
Clantha is currently counseling students who are enrolled at UF in
the Expanded Educational Opportunity Program (EEOP) which is an
extension of last years Critical Freshman Year Program. As a
counselor Clantha is trying to help EEOP students overcome any.
personal problems or difficulties that have cropped up in the program.
Also counseling EEOP students is Edward Wilson, a sophomore,
who, like Clantha, came to UF in the Critical Freshman Year Program.
It (the Critical Year Program) helped me to adjust to college life,
Wilson said. We got a lot of things that regular students didnt, like
reading clinics and counseling.
Wilson is enthusiastic about the program and said, I think Im
doing better than many students who got in on a regular basis.
Some students in high school dont know what they want... but
they still have the potential (to attend college). EEOP gives them a
chance to make up for mistakes they made in high school.

Tuesday, August 17, 1971, The Florida Alligator,

Page 3



Page 4

l, Th Florida Alligator, Tuesday, August 17, 1971

Flavet section
to remain
until 1974

*
Roc Rocords is ono of the
many discount record stores
in Gainesville. The people (
are friendly and the atmosphere
come on the waterbed,
or
talk awhile.
We have a nice selection of *
records very reasonable prices.
While over
our selection of pipes, candles,
books, magazines, and tapes. 1 J
Roc Records I^B
at the corner of sth Ave. & 13th St. K3||r
Hours lOAJi MIDNIGHT DAILY I
SUNDAY H AM. 9 PM. '"
UffJvJSB n / ImV' K|W VuW i\\\l jjHlmJ^iWk/1 e\ \

By DARRELL HARTMAN
Alligator Staff Writer
A large section of Flavet 111, the married housing complex on the
west end of campus, origionally due for demolition this spring, will
stay open for student use until 1974.
Associate Director of Housing James Hennessey said the decision
change was because of unanticipated delays in funding the new
married housing complexes, the critical shortage of off-campus
housing, and student complaints.
Many Flavet residents had been against the demolition of Flavets
because a move to the newer apartments would more than double
their rents. Many residents also felt the Flavets were being cleared to
make way for a new activities center on the site.
But Worth Crow, of the Physical Planning Department said last
week the activities center had outgrown the Flavets area and would be
built elsewhere.
Hennessey mailed letters to all Flavet residents last week explaining
in detail the effects the change would have on each section of Flavets.
One of the letter said Section 111 of Flavets will be vacated by
September Ist and those buildings will be demolished. The buildings
in Section HI are considered to be more of a fire hazard than
Sections I and 11. The reason Flavets were originally slated for
demofition was because the buildings, assembled at UF in 1947, and
originally scheduled for only five years use, were considered a fire
hazard.
Section 111 residents will have priority in moving into other parts of
Flavets.
The letter stated that residents of Sections I and II will not be
required to vacate their apartments until the completion of the last of
three married housing projects (January 1974) or when the occupancy
of a building is reduced to two families.
Those families who moved from the low rent Flavets to other
housing because they thought Flavets were to be demoihhed, can also
move back into Flavets if they so desire.
After families in Section 111 and families who have moved from
Flavets have been accomodated, applications for assignment in Flavets
will be accepted shortly to alleviate the long waiting list for married
housing.
Those at the top of waiting lists for Diamond, Corry and Schucht
Villages will have the option of moving to Flavets or waiting for an
opening in the village they applied for.
There are currently 450 families waiting for openings in Diamond,
Corry and Schucht Villages.
A new 220 unit married housing complex, University Village
Apartments, is scheduled for completion in March, 1972. A second
100 unit complex should be completed by June 1973, and a third in
approximately January 1974.
Flavets cost $26.75 and $29.50 a month plus utilities. Some
furniture is provided. Diamond, Corry and Schucht Villages cost S6O
and S7O a month, furnished, plus utilities. The new University Village
Apartments will cost SB7 and $lO7 a month, including utilities. These
apartments are unfurnished.

The Flavets once housed 420 families and about 270 units will
remain this fall.
Hennessey said Section 1 of Flavets will eventually be made into a
recreation field once the immediate housing shortage is alleviated.
Hennessey stressed that his office was open for student suggestions.
Hennessey said a student with complaints or suggestions should
investigate the situation, get all the facts, and then go ahead and
present his case.
I think the student is very, very powerful, he added.
Jfr
KINDERGARTEN! Ist GRADE
STARTING SEPTEMBER 7.
mJL ST ass >
NURSERY AND ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
- 372-5466
$1 OFF
Clip the
Pizza Inn (T[
JBucA;
below fora special treat!
/yff- PIZZAINN DOUGH NOTE V\ I
RatfamuMi with tf| 1
II 111 [ \purehase of any If 111 I
WiWnvlf;, j large He pizza or 1/7 JLjLA
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(sty f / __ONEPIZZAJNN_BUCK__3^P)
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STOCK REDUCTION
SALE
All jeans and boots
10-50% OFF
tCord, Denim, White,
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BELLS
as low as $2.97
Compare at $7.50
ood today and tomorrow.
" : ''v: ;
ainesvilles leader
for boots and jeans
Hi ii I
" Weekdays 9AM-9PM
Saturdays 9AM-6PM
4821 NW 6th St. 376-4595
f \ir *'Vv*'



UF groups
join lo aid
Bengal Relief

WINNING COMBINATION
burger chef
<4Hw*-
flnwt
Super
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burger
cfie f; We always treat you right.
Family Restaurants *
-

By STEPHANIE SWERDLIN
Alligator Staff Writer
Over seven million refugees
have fled from famine and
political repression in Easi
Pakistan. The influx of refugees
into India continues at the rate
of approximately 50,000 per
day. With them, the refugees
bring cholera, more famine and
chaos.
If India does not get enough
support from the international
community there is danger that
these refugees may start rioting
and create more problems, said
Bharat Jhunjhunwala of the UF
India Club.
Hie Indian government has
spent S7OO million in the past
two months to feed the refugees.
About $l5O million of these
funds was received in aid from
various countries.
The University Religious
Assn, has joined the India Club
to back a Bengal Relief Fund.
The two organizations are
sponsoring a display in the
Union colonnade this week to
collect contributions during the
lunch hour.
Each one dollar contributed
will feed seven people one meal.
Contributions may be sent to
the Bengal Relief Fund, c/o
India Club, Box 12929,
University Station, Gainesville;
or to World University Services,
c/o Religion office, Reitz Union.

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Jp ;fR dr \ 1. ,jiii|A| jF
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&jaH&Uras Mk
' -.'!, \1 r ~*f .#! * Hb -dfl
, 1 |j||. ''? y sg|| vltiS.;.'... r
< v
.. I V\ w |Bg
f ? v jg| K Ip fp*l|-
8, ir^JIJBp A d|
One dollar donated to Bengel Relief
... could feed these seven refugees

Carol Brady
I £ U Alligator Staff Writer
,
Blast off: Council of International Organizations is
sponsoring a trip to Cape Kennedy 8 a.m. Sunday.
Cost is $1 per person. All interested in going must
sign up at the International Center and leave a
deposit ahead of time.
Gay Lib: Gainesville Gay Liberation Front will meet
Wednesday night at 7:30 at 1628 NW 3rd Place, apt.
D. Everyone is welcome!
Text trade: Student Government is holding a book
exchange collection for the fall quarter sale August
24, 25, 26 in room 306 Reitz Union. Bring books
by between 1-5 p.m. There will be a 10 cent service

Tuesday. August 17, 1977, Tha Florida Alligator,

charge on each book brought in.
Apartment living: Carl Opp, director of off-campus
housing, Mrs. Eleanor Denny, counselor and
assistant director of off-campus housing, and Wayne
Mason, president of the Gainesville Apartment
Owners Association will discuss problems
concerning apartment living** tonight at 11:05
p.m. onWRUF.
Stolen Spokes: 'The Bicycle Thief,** directed by
Vittorio Da Sica, will be shown tonight and
Wednesday at 7 and 9:30 in the Union Auditorium.
Admission is 50 cents.

Page 5



Page 6

i. The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, August 17, 1971

Editorial
Reconstruct
the rectangle
Tigert Hall is a rectangle. It only has four sides. But some
people will swear on a stack of Bibles it has five sides.
The Little Pentagon they call it.
The administration has often been accused, and rightly
so, of being unresponsive to student needs, being overly
secretive, of axing professors because of their political
beliefs.
But, as President Richard Nixon said in a campaign
speech about Vietnam, There is a ray of light at the end of
the tunnel.
We hope.
The administration dug the tunnel of doubt, secrecy and
unresponsiveness. Maybe it is still possible to expose the
tunnel for what it is and move out into the open daylight.
Associate Director of Housing James Hennessey has
decided to retain a large portion of the Flavets married
housing complex, in part, because of the critical housing
shortage in Gainesville and in response to students
complaining about the proposed demolition of Flavets.
The gears of the administration were set in motion. And
in response to student needs they stopped, and changed
directions.
We applaud Mr. Hennessey for being responsive to the
needs of the university community.
Other administration efforts seem hopeful.
After President Stephen C. OConnells disaster with the
black students last spring, a dozen black professors were
hired and the Critical Year Program was expanded.
And bicycles are slowly being accepted as a valid form of
transportation.
Hennessey suggested students with complaints or
suggestions should investigate the situation, get all the facts
and go ahead and present their case.
I think the student is very, very powerful, Hennessey
said.
We cant be quite as optimistic as Hennessey, but we laud
his efforts in keeping Flavets open.
Tigert Hall still has five sides from our perspective. And
that needless tunnel is still ill-lighted.
Its up to the administration to prove they understand
student problems in the university community.
Its up to the administration to dispense with the double
talk and start giving straight answers.
And its up to the administration to rid itself of the cloak
of secrecy and callous wheeler-dealer image they justly have
given themselves.
Lets reconstruct Tigert back into a rectangle.

f Alligator Staff
Reporters Sports Editor
Carol Brady Tom Cornelison
Linda Miklowitz Doug Case Bruce Marion
Stephanie Swerdlin Darrell Hartman Larry Brown
Published by students of the University of Florida under the
auspices of the Board of Student Publications.
Editorial Business, Advertising offices in Student Publications Suite,
third floor, Reitz Union.
Editorial Office phones: 392-1686,87, 88 or 89.
Opinions expressed in the Florida Alligator are those of the editors or
V of the writer of the article and not those of the University of Florida.

The
Florida
Alligator

\\ \ VjfarX aL f
pwk 1 1 v v
I
Bring us together, Dick

By DAVID MILLER
On Aug. 12 The New York
Times reported: The White
House warned yesterday that
government officials could lose
their jobs or be transferred if
they seek to impose widespread
busing as a means of
desegregating schools in the
urban South. Leon Panetta,
Robert Finch, John Knowles,
Wally Hickel and James Allen
have already been eased out of
government positions; Elliot
Richardson may be the next to
go-
President Nixon is violating
decisions of the Supreme Court;
he is violating the federalistic
concept of checks and
balances and is attempting to
impose a dictatorship upon U.S.
government officials.
Moreover, according to the
Times, The White House
expanded on the statement
yesterday, in response to
questions about a telegram from
Gov. George Wallace of
Alabama. I didn't know
Wallace had that much pull at
the White (no pun intended)
House. But Southern racists are
running the country, with Nixon

Student Publications^^
Business Staff
To reach Advertising, Business
and Promotion Offices, Call:
392-1681,82, 83 or 84
C. R. "Randy" Coleman
Business Manager
Steven M. Belcher
Advertising Manager
Jeanne Orfinik
Promotion Manager
To reach Circulation
Department, call: 392-1609

Phyllis Gallub
Editor-In-Chief

Lynn Parsons
Executive Editor

being the puppet of the
Thurmond Administration.
On Aug. 12 The Miami Herald
reviewed a book by Leon
Panetta and Peter Gall, Bring Us
Together: The Nixon Team and
the Civil Rights Retreat. I quote
from the review by F. Warren
OReilly: Much of it reads like
suspense fiction, but this is a
documented factual account of
how the Southern strategy of
the Nixon Administration
emerged to cheeky progress in
civil rights. It is an absorbing
study of the interaction between
politics and government
operations at the highest levels.
Leon E. Panetta and Peter
Gall left staff positions with
Republican senators for the
Nixon team, expecting that his
slogan, Bring Us Together,*
would become Administration
policy, despite pre-election
pledges to Sen. Thurmond.
Lawyer Panetta became director
of the Office of Civil Rights;
Gall, a former Wall Street
Journal reporter was Panettas
assistant. They provide a
day-by-day story of the battles
over school desegregation within
the government and in the
South.

Gary Grunder
Managing Editor

It is a revealing report of
intra-administrative intrigue:
HEW trying to get civil rights
laws and court orders enforced
effectively, against opposition
from the Justice Department
and the White House. There are
close calls, when only a timely
story from a persistently probing
and alert press corps staves off
the superior influence of
Southern politicos. The suspense
ends with the ouster of Panetta
early in 1970; Finchs head
rolled three weeks later.
The authors contend that
denial of equal rights to
minorities is the nations most
imperative moral crisis; they
regard school desegregation as
the first priority. This is a
devastating story of the triumph
of partisan political
considerations over principle, as
well as Republican Party
traditions. Since the buck stops
where Harry Truman said it did,
Bring Us Together is a disturbing
indictment of Richard Nixon as
a national leader. The authors
regard his retreat on civil rights
as a national calamity.
On Aug. 12, The Miami News
reported that The Justice
Department has dropped its
investigation of alleged
corruption in Alabama Gov.
George Wallaces
administration. That figures.
Atty. Gen. Mitchell is the fuhrer
of the Southern Strategy, and
Jerris Leonard is a member of a
Caucasians-only club in
Milwaukee.
Henry Kissinger, disciple of
Mettemich and Dr. Strangelove,
is deciding our foreign policy.
And George Wallace arid Strom
Thurmond are deciding oui
domestic policy.



READERS FORUM

Miller
Editor :
Kudos to Dave Miller on his
series about discipline in
athletics. As a former state
high-school mile champion and
athletic scholarship recipient,
allow me to unburden myself of
my own views on the subject.
Dave hinted at, but did not
elaborate upon, the crux of the
matter in his last article. The
question is not whether there
should be discipline in athletics:
most assuredly, there should be.
The flush of athletic victory is
immeasurably heightened by the
sweat, the toil, and the sacrifice
of easy pleasure which made the
final victory possible. The
victory, in life as well as sport, is
much sweeter for having been
dearly won and worked for. For
this, discipline is necessary.
The real question is the source
from which that discipline
arises: whether it is to be an
artificial imposition from
without, in the form of the
coach, or a genuine personal
commitment to excellence from
within, bom of pride in the
worth of the endeavor. Any
power-hungry coach can exercise
his authority as dispenser of the
grant-in-aid and impose
discipline-by-threat: Shave off
that hippie hair or Til cut your
scholarship!'* It takes no special
skill or talent of any sort to pull
this sort of maneuver. The real
test for any coach is his ability

By V. G. PATIL-KULKARNI
On the eve of the 24th
historic Indian Independence
Day, to be celebrated on Aug.
15,1971,1 offer my felicitations
through these columns of the
Florida Alligator" to all Indians
living in Gainesville in particular
and in the United States of
America in general, and wish
them all a continued prosperity,
progress and happiness, wherever
and in whatever profession they
are.
It is relevant to recall iiere
that India was liberated from the
shackles of the nearly 150 years
of foreign domination on Aug.
15, 1947, just about 160 years
after America was liberated.
India is thus today 24 years old
post-independence. lire high
aspirations and lofty ideals of
the founders of modem India
like Mahatma Gandhi and
Javaharlal Nehru have been put to
rigorous acid test during the last
24 years, in what is described as
the unique experiment in
functional democracy, that
started off with the weakest ever
economic base-line.
Pop u1 a tionwise and

Salute to Indo-American solidarity

to instill in the athlete a deep
sense of pride in the worth of
the athletic effort as an avenue
to self-improvement and
enrichment. Once the athlete
can justify, to himself, the
innate Worth of what he is
doing, the hair, moustaches, etc.,
are irrelevant because what
really counts is present: personal
commitment from pride. The
externals are revealed as being
just that: externals, unimportant
one way or the other.
Unfortunately, coaches
continue to cut their own
throats and give athletics in
general a black eye by neglecting
to help each man develop the
necessary personal commitment
and pride, choosing instead to
take the easy way out and
bludgeon the troops into
obedience with rigid petty rules'
on dress, hair and all manner of
personal matters. The
discipline born of dictatorship
is fleeting and transitory, an
unwelcome intruder upon a free
mans mind. The inner strength
which comes from true personal
commitment to a worthy goal
constitutes : the strength of
character of which great men are
made. Any coach who imparts
less than this, choosing rather to
make mountains out of molehills
and impose discipline thereupon,
is a joke and encourages not
respect, but well-deserved
cynicism toward both himself
and the tradition of individual
athletic excellence. It deserves
better.
- Jodie Lee Munden, 6AS

ideologically, India today is the
largest democracy in the world
but this carries little meaning if
the liberated people have
nothing to eat and live on.
Internal political strength and
self-reliant economic growth,"
declared Indira Gandhi, Prime
Minister of India, are the best
guarantees of stability and
sovereignity."
Looking bade a bit, the
performance of the popular
Central Government in India,
during the last 24 years is just
commendable. Right from the
beginning, it had to face an
and unwieldy
population explosion with
almost nothing to feed them, a
weak depleted economic
infrastructure, a vestige of
colonial vandalism, an
unproductive agricultural
system, illiteracy and ignorance
on the part of the majority of
people about modem ways of
life and technology, due to
century-old preconceptions and
orthodoxy and conservatism.
To build a great nation,
proclaimed Javaharlal

Alligator t
Editor:
The Alligator staff has been
put down several times this
quarter for their Summer feature
articles. While perhaps lacking in
literary excellence (by failing to
incite instant actions and raise
the level of this university to
previously unattainable heights)
they are, nevertheless, a valuable
record for me.
This is my last quarter here,
and the problems considered by
these (however lacking) articles
are much more relevant to the
attitudes at the end of my
college career than were those of
the highly lauded and grossly
over-rated Seminole.
So thank you Alligator for a
worthwhile summer and a good
four years (or five).
Thank you petitions
committees of both the College
of Business Administration and
the University of Florida for
having faith in someone who by
precedence didn't deserve it.
Thank you Joe Torchia
(wherever you are) and John
Parker, the only two really
imaginative and truly talented
writers this paper has employed
these four (or five) years. You
made me think in spite of
myself, and helped me leam to
think for myself...
And thank you students of
this university for completing
this process... helping me to
change my head before I burned
a cross or joined the Birchers.
- Thomas M. Robertson 4BA

yr ji./-*Cyr Mff V1

Nehm,every individual citizen
of that country must be made to
contribute his might and
towards this objective, our
planners should design the
nation-building programmes.
Strength of democracy lies in
making every citizen feel a sense
of participation in the mighty
and gigantic task of building the
country. A country built by a
few people will collapse sooner
or later." How accurate was his
analysis!! That is how exactly
America has been built up and
that is precisely why American
intelligentia was attracted
towards Nehrus concept of
democracy. Believe me, all the
billions of dollars spent during
the last three five-year plans
have been scrupulously spent,
keeping largely in view the above
Nehrus concept. The common
man is the basis of democracy
and if he is bypassed, then either
Communism or dictatorship or

Tuesday, August 17, 1971, Tha Florida Alligator,

Litttn must:
Be typed. signed, double-spaced
and not axcaad 300 words.
o Not bo signed with a
pseudonym.
e Have addresses and telephone
numbers of writers.

f FIRST WE SHIP -SO THAT WEST PAKTISTANCAN^
WEST PAKISTAN- PEOPLE IN EAST PAKISTANI
/'WE THEN SEND HUMANITARIAN^
( AID TO THE POOR SHOT-UP ( THAT'S WHAT WE CALL OUR ]
\ EAST PAKISTANIS. ) V'TWO PAKISTAN POLICY.' J

both are sure to take over.
We are proud that we have
checked Communism. We have
also checked dictatorship. We
have maintained friendship with
all countries except the
belligerent China and fanatic
Pakistan. Our relations with
America have reached the all
time high. More than 55% of the
total foreign economic aid
comes from the United States of I
America in the form of
food-grains, technical expertise,
scholarships, thermal plants,
atomic reactors and such other
things. Ambassadors Henderson,
John Galbraith, Sherman
Cooper, Bunker, Chester-Bowles
and the present ambassador
Kenneth Keating have rendered
yeoman service in patching up
differences and in building up a
strong, indivisible and
indestructible bridge of

LETTERS POLICY

Names will be withheld only if
writer shows just cause. The editor
reserves the right to edit all letters for
space.
Any writer interested in
submitting a regular column is sdred
to contact the editor and be prepared
to show samples of his work. Writers
may submit longer essays, columns or
letters to be considered for use as
guest columns.

friendship between our two
great countries. I am one of
those privileged persons who has
walked over this bridge to come
to this great country. 1 am sure
and I pray in God that this grand
alliance of friendship between
the two greatest democracies of
the world shall continue to grow
still faster to achieve die common
goal of mutual happiness and
world peace!!
On this auspicious day, while
saluting my own countrys
national flag, I also salute the
flag of Indo-American friendship
and co-operation, which alone
symbolizes the torch bearing
leadership of a free and
democratic world today and
which also symbolizes the
Indo-American solidarity and
firm determination to defend
the cause of world peace and
democracy.
Long Live India!! Long Live
America!!
Long Live Indo-American
Solidarity and Friendship!!

Page 7



\, The Florida Alligator, Tuaaday. August 17. 1971

Page 8

1
SILVERMANS
You'll surely make happy vibrations in brown embroidered
corduroy knickers and vest by Country Set. Darlene adds a
vanilla colored acryllic blouse to complete a fetching picture.
H SUSAN SCOTT
Wherever the happy happenings are. Sue will surely freeze out
any competition in this paisley printed romper with matching
blazer. Experience some of the looks for fall at Susan Scott.
W" ; w
p if-.:
kb Br f jBM
Bai- Tmjje -: ; : JHfl|fl|SHflhi^wjplHBflfiresSfl||i'' A .'-
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KgS.-i jJA&- >':*-:'*¥ l) |.--|ari£l^-" b
I FIGURE FAIR 11
Youll be as soft looking as a fluffy cluoud in a nylon tricot
peignoir set. The lined lace umpire top with puffy sleeves
renders the soft feminine look of a bride. The long gown of
nylon net over jersey has a fitted lace top with adjustable belt.
Modeled by Christy.
I MAAS SHOES 11
The Shoe of the Month at Maas means the suede softness of
Capezio. Your choice of colors in rust or brown.
I a Hn
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COLONY 111
How about this little dress by Pepe Junior? A flowered print in
purple, white, and black, romantically smocked at the waist.
Modeled by Carol
MAAS BROTHERS ||l
Couple a herringbone pleated skirt with a stuffed shirt and
match them with an elasticized skinny rib tank top for the 11 §
taylored, trim look of this fall. By Junior Sports Wear. || 8
111
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111
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* : ' f ,-.

Tuesday, August 17, 1971, The Florida AMltar.

Page 9



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

THE GROUP
THEY CALL...
LIFE
PLAYS A
DANCE/CONCERT
AUGUST 20,1971
9:00 PM-1:00 AM
ON THE
REITZ
UNION TERRACE
SPONSORED BY
J.W. REITZ UNION

ALLIGATOR CLASSIFIEDS
To place classifieds, use the form Below, and strictly adhere to the >
following instructions: Minimum charge is SI.OO for 4 lines. For each
additional line add 25 cents. Multiply the total by the number of days the
ad is to run, then subtract the discount. The discount below is applicable
ONLY if the ad is run in consecutive days. THERE ARE NO REFUNDSI
The acceptance of payment with advertising copy does not constitute a
binding agreement on the Florida Alligator to publish said copy. The
Florida Alligator reserves the right to act as sola judge of the suitability of
any or all advertising copy submitted for publication, and the right to edit,
revise, delay, or reject any advertising copy.
Mail the ad, with remittance (check preferred) to: Alligator Classifieds,
Room 330, Reitz Union, Gainesville, Florida, 32601.
Deadline *3:00 p.m. 2 days prior to starting day
DO NOT ORDER BY PHONE

CLASSIFICATION 1 DAYS TO RUN I
for sale for rant wanted I 1 day 3 days (10% discount)
help wanted autos personal | 2 days 4 days (10% discount)
lost & found services 5 days or over (20% discount)
NAME STUDENT NO
ADDRESS DATE
CITY STATE ZIP \ |
WORDING
Fill in the boxes allowing 1 box for each letter, space and punctuation mark. Count 2 boxes fcg capital letters.
Lflaaet n a I mm m mm mmmmmmm *_m m m a # .aaataaaai aaaaaaaa aaaaaa aaaat V "a * # * mmm 4
1 I : i | : S : i : i : i : i i i j : i i : : i i | i i i i i : i i
*...... ..a a...... A a. aaa aaa Amm aa* aaa aaaa* aaa aaaaaaa ... *.aa aa.a. aaa
7;T"Tr"r" :"T':
! a Z e i 1 s .1 e i
a aaa Saaa aaaaaaaa 'aaa.taaaaiaaa m aaa aaaa aaaapaaaiaaa Saaaa^aaa k aaa
a aaaaaaa .aaaaaaaat aaaaaaaa aaaa.iaaa.aaa *aaa taaafaaaa aaaaeaaa aaafaaaagiaaa| aaakaaauasaaaaaaaaaaaa -> *aaaa%aaaSaaa aaa a a.a aaa aaa uaaapaaafe
3 : . r : s : : f : : : s : r ; . t : : | s ; r :
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4: i s T t r :

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i. The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, August 17, 1971

Page 10

IIIIIIIHIttlHIIIflRtllHtllllllllllllllllfniitlllllltl!llllllll
FOR SA LE
IIIIIIUIIIIIHIiIUUIIIIIIIUIIiiIIIHIIIIIIIiIIUiIHIHiIIiiniII
Save 25% or more on all auto parts.
Spark plugs*6B cents. Cash & Carry
Auto Parts, 1111 S. Main St.
378-7330 (A-ts-c)
Tame baby ferrets coons monkeys
bob cats ocelots skunks parrots
hawks snakes lizards turtles for sale
trade or buy Kongo Pet 475-2546
(local) (A-3t-ISO-p)
FOR better cleaning, to keep colors
gleaming, use Blue Lustre carpet
cleaner. Rent electric shampooer sl.
Electric upholstery shampooers also
available. Lowry Furniture Co.
(A-ts-c)
SCUBA EQUIPMENT tank and
regulator by Decor. Very New
100.00 Call Maryann 392-2814 til 5
and 378-5622 after 5:30 a-st-164-p
Puppies: Toy Italian Greyhound
Purebred-pedigree (AKC pending)
shots-wormed 2 females, 1 male S3O
ea. call 378-8803 anyday til 10 p.m.
a-6t-164-p
WATER BEDS!!! 6 sizes* student
prices $25 & up waterpillows too!
contact: Steve Gale (caesar) 14 frat
row 372-2667 or 372-9476
(a-st-164-p)
IF YOU'RE MAN ENOUGH.
Beautiful OSSA Stiletto 1970 250 cc
372-9527 It takes Leather!!
(a-st-164-p)
Irish Setter nippies, akc, champion
background, male and female, shots,
wormed, 7 weeks old. beautiful
puppies! SIOO.OO 373-3108
(a-st-165-p)

laNEMffTr!l!ls^so?s!2s-7!305!3^
I WHAT AN %i EGGstravqgqnia! I
I Mbit Disney m imtbt I
I (gain I
| CINEMA 2 AT: 1:40-3:45-5:50-7:55-10:001
I The runaway bestseller is on the screen.l
COLUMBIA nCTWESPrcserts
11@| Sean Connery I
I p The Anderson Tbpes I
P NOT FOR CHILDREN ras*ssss-- £|
A NEW FRISCHS GOOD THING!
STEAK AND EGGS
/ \ TENDER 4-oz. STEAK
S / TWO FARM-FRESH EGGS
\ \ COOKED TO YOUR ORDER
%40
k SERVED ANYTIME-GREAT FOR
M / "AFTER-THE-PARTY
BREAKFASTS
RESTAURANT
Fish. Fry
All you can eat, $1.39
Wednesday & Friday
2035 N. W. 13th Street, Gainesville 378-2304

Alternators generators starters
electrical systems tested and repaired.
Auto-Electric Service, 1111 S. Mein
378-7330. Now I Bank Americard and
Master Charge. (A-ts-c)
Trailer 10x45 New Moon $2600.00.
2 bedroom, air cond, cntrl heat,
furn., metal shed, awning, cable. I'm
graduating! 378-4228 beat rent
(a-st-165-p)
THE DIVE SHOP Skin and
Scubadiving Equipment Cair Gene
Melton 373-1058 after 5 PM
(a-4t-166-p)
IBM executive typewriter, Nyematlc
dictation system, Crown telephone
valet, mlsc. ofc. equip. A supplies.
Ca 11.372-6202 After 5.
FURNITURE Living 0 Dining,
Bedroom & Baby's. Moving overseas
Call 372-4750 Also Power Mower
(a-4t-166-p)
STANDARD POODLE black AKC
registered puppies, SIOO 378-7983
(a-4t-166-p)
Stereo garrard turntable; craig
pioneer tuner w/am-fm radio and
speakers excellent condition call
Steve 378-1132 going for $l3O
(a-4t-166-p)
aquarium-29 gal-stoallte-grolux lamp
heater-dynaflo filter-2 gang pump &
acces. S7O. heath 40 wt stereo-2 12"
spk $75. 378-3830 after 6 pm and
weekends (a-3t-167-p)
Honda 175, 1970, new knobby tire,
chain, excellent condition, $450. Call
Paul 392-6587 days or 629-2534
nights. (a-3t-167-p)

YAMAHA 175 CT-lb excellent cond
1465 yashlca 35mm f 1.8, 45mm tens,
flash $45 392-8019 or 376-0892
Mika ta-2t-167-p)
Sat of 4 Kaystona mags. Almost haw.
Tlras Includad. 'Locking lugs.
Baautlful shape. Everything SIOO
Call Aten at 378-3369 aftar 6:00 pm.
(a-3t-167-p)
Bulldog, fantastic cross batwaan
English & pitbull. 12 weeks. whlta
with a black eye. lovas avarybody call
Alan aftar 6 pm 378-3369
(a-2t-167-p)
WATER BED; Bag, pad and frama In
good shapa $35. Call Bob 376-6732
or 378-8697 ona only (a-2t-167-p)
Yamaha enduro DTI, trail extras,
low mileage, Ilka new, sacrifice!
378-2139 (a-lt-168-p)
Stereo System, Furniture, beds,
dressers, hair dryer, portable tv,
vacuum cleaner, curtains, desk,/w
chair great prices, call 378-9153
(a-2t-168-p)
GUITAR for sale SSO very good
condition also HIGH CHAIR $lO and
WALKER $4 call 392-0590 or after 6
372-6680 Wendy (a-2t-168-p)
1970 Yamaha 250 DS6 street bike.
Fast, dependable, with luggage rack,
new chain, sprocket. $450 372-6963
(a-2t-168-p)
PLCI! Marine Off. Uniforms, For
Sale, like new, large discount, call
378-8152 (a-2t-168-p)
*7l deluxe trailer, 2 bedroom, 2 bath,
air conditioned In free woods of
Windsor, 12 miles from campus
$6300 373-3896 378-9591
(a-2t-168-p)
Bike, girls 3 speed. Rides well, fair
condition $24. 328 NW 14 ST. Call
378-7434. Also records for sale.
(a-2t-168-p)
1970 Lamplighter 12x60 AC 3 brs
$950 equity & take over pmts $76
Call after 5 372-3138 (a-2t-168-p)
For Sale: size roll-a-way bed, S2O.
Desk, $lO, and Dresser $5. Come by
1140 NE 9th Ave. Corner of 9th and
NE 12th St. (a-2t-168-p)
DT-1 Yamaha 250 Enduro Gyt-klted
VERY FAST must sell quickly first
reasonable offer. Call 378-9741. keep
trying. (a-2t-168-p)
Outstanding 7 wks. Ger. Shepards.
A.K.C. Reg. Wormed and shots.
Males S6O, females $45. Excellent
pets and watchdogs, phone
376-0052. (a-2t-168-p)
iiiiiiiiiitintiiniitmiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiaiiiiuiiiiiiuiiiiiii
FOR RENT
Three offices available Immediately
From S7O to S9O per month Incl. all
utilities 2 blocks from campus Call
Mrs. Stiff 378-8743 (B-10t-159-p)
Sublet: Camelot apt 2 brs furn or
unfur limited to married & grad stud,
avail Sept 1 372-7369 after 3 pm
comp mgt quiet surroundings, pool,
sauna B-st-164-p
GAINESVILLE ROOMMATES LTD.
Looking to share house? apt?
Guaranteed results or no charge.
378-8021 24 hrs 7 days (b-4t-166-p)
THE PLACE roommates (male)
wanted must be U of F students,
21 or older, lease runs from 9-15-71
to 9-15-72 with sublet privileges call
Jim at 372-7820 (b-167-3t-p)
Roomate wanted for fall own
bedroom $52 mo. util, not Incl.
female or male, pref. freaky-type nice
person: calj 392-7754 (b-2t-167-p)
WNM IT I
FEATURES AT .
I 1:30 3:30 8:85
7:48 f:BS I
OS-MILLER I
ffT AOVIIS -NO OMfl UNOCH 17 11
AOMITTtO WITHOUT PARINT I I
'l
I FEATURES AT .
1:45 3:45 5:40 I
.7:40 9:35
COLUMBIA PtCTUHtS omtnts
jTfHm Kennedy
A JAMBS UEC BARRETT ANDREW V McLAGUN
PRODUCTION m
H fSI adults -no oncunoerit |fl
ISJ AOMITTIO WITHOUT OAMWT g



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiin
lllllltllltllHti!)Nilini()NMIIIIIIIItltll!llllltllllll!!lllllll
for RENT
IlllillillttllllllltlttlllllllliltUltlllilllUllllllllflitliilimn
2 bdrm 2 bath apt Williamsburg.
Need 2 girls by fall. $55 a month plus
utilities. Has dishwasher, ac call
Colleen, 372-7296 or 376-3654
(b-3t-167-p)
iiitIIIHIIUIItUIUIIUIiIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIUIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII
WANTED
iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuimiiitiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiii
HERBIE needs a home 3% yr mutt
med. size, shots, exc. watch dog,
doesn't like kids, needs acres to run.
call 376-4295 or 392-0148 anytime
(C-7t-163-p)
Need rider(s) to Seattle or any pts
west; going southern route; leave
around Sept. 8 from Pensacola; help
with gas new V.W. call Sheila
376-87QS
Female roommate needed Sept. 1.
Must be grad stu. Country house SW
Archer Rd. $45 + V* utilities. Call
373-1880. (c-3t-167-p)
WANTED: Large, inflatable raft.
Suitable for trip down Colorado
River. Call Ed at 372-5801, or Steve
at 376-1525 (c-2t-167-p)
Female roommate to share apartment
In Orlando Prefer a Disney World
employee Call 495-2373 (c-2t-167-p)
Teacher seeks position in N, K, or
Day Care. BA in Early childhood
education. I have 2Â¥i years teaching
experience. 378-2271 Jackie Searcy
(c-168-2t-p)
Female roommate to share apartment
In Orlando Prefer a Disney World
employee Call 495-2372 (c-2t-167-p)
Male law student needs place to live
starting fall qtr. would prefer own
room call Gerry 378-3375 any nite
after 6 (c-lt-168-p)
2 grad students need coed roommate
share apt 2 blocks from campus.
Grad or quiet undergrad wanted. Call
376-9829. (C-2t-168-p)
One male and one female 3-speed
bike in good condition and at
reasonable price, call 378-0842 best
time is before 9 am, after 6 pm.
(c-3t-168-p)
Moving Out Soon? let me know, if
the house is two brs and If I rent, you
get a nice reward call 378-8252
(c-2t-168-p)
Roommate wanted beginning Sept.
15 Gatortown Apts. 2 bedroom l/z
baths Call Kent 378-3480 before
Aug. 20 (c-2t-168-p)
Wanted: technicians: radio, stereo or
tv full or parttime minimum salary
$2.00 per hour open to discussion.
Call 373-1300 (e-2t-168-p)
tv
I SENIOR CITIZEN SPECIAL
I SI.OO AGE OS E OVER |
ALL DAY-LD.MEDICARD
> DR.LIC. Bargain Hr. Til 2:15
| Adults 75 #Men.-SaL |
LAST
1 ] 3 DAYS
SHOWS 1:30. 4
/ 3:30 5:25
a 7:20 9:15 %
m Where your nightmares |
end... i
'.WILLARD/
\ begins. SS
+ +
LAST
Ol 2 DAYS
r-
a u 2 n a I
I gewwiw owiiww 1
1 111 W. UlthftHr 4. 1 QP
*No 1:30 5:30 9:30*
RUSSIA 3:20 7:20 y
! ,4m SCAN I
2U9 WSS i
. RONOS *" D
|From Russia illi Lost.#
4 aml t>r. No. J
PLORIOA PRICES W
75 f AGE 10 A UNDER#
SI.OO AGE 17 A UP#
T ALL DAY#

Tuesday, August 17, 1971, The Florida Alligator,

llilllliliillllillllllllllllllllllllllllllllillllllllllllllllllllllllllllll
HELP WANTED
iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitniiiitiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii
Grad student will pay married
couples $5 to be in opinion study.
Need you for less than 1 hour, 1
session. Call 376-5852 after 5 p.m.
(e-2t- 167-p)
Listeners wanted! Will pay $2.00 lor
one hour session. Must be native
English speaking and have normal
hearing. Please call LeVan between 8
and 5 for an appointment. 392-2049
(E-10t-154-p)
Registered Nurse needed for Student
Health Infirmary on the University of
Florida campus. Stimulating,
interesting position. Permanent shift,
12 midnight to 8:00 A.M. Write or
call Personnel Department, 2nd floor
Hub, University of Florida,
Gainesville. Fla 392-1221
(e-2t-168-c)
Hurtin for coins? We can help you
make the extra money you need full
or part time Start now your own
hours your own town Call 373-2757
between 5 and 7 (e-2t-168-p)
WANTED senior MARKETING
major to manage sales of 1972
SEMINOLE. Salary plus commission.
Call 392-1681 or come by Room 330
J.W. Reitz Union, ask for Randy
Coleman (e-2t-168-nc)
Needs reliable person to babysit 2
boys 3 & 5 at my home hours can be
arranged own transportation Call
Mrs. Su 376-0287 after 5 (e-2t-168-p)
SALES ORIENTED students for fall
quarter. Also need Marketing
manager. Salary and Commission.
Call 3g2-1681 or come by Room 330
Reitz Union. Ask for Randy
Coleman. (e-2t-168-nc)
iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiniiiiiiiiifiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiittiiiiin
AUTOS
iiiiNiiimnttiiiiM^
1963 Valiant convertible slant 6
engine cheap transportation S2OO
Tel. 376-8192 after 4:00 (g-3t-166-p)
1967 Sprite, excellent condition,
AM-FM radio, four new tires, recent
tune-up 378-9249 or 392-3301
(g-st-165-p)
Rambler stationwagen 1960 great
condition, recent tune-up, good
breaks, automatic transmission $265
call 373-1676 (g-3t-167-p)
60 SPRITE BUGEYE good tyres,
new top, sidewindows; needs work
but runs, price $212 maybe, call
376-9335 ask for John Haldin
(g-3t-167-p)
65 TBird first SBOO cash buys it. See
at 536 NE 12th court call 392-1683
8 am to 4 pm or 378-6345 after 6
pm. ask for Jo Claire (a-3t-167-p)
1969 Mustang Fastback, VB, Air, ps,
Automatic in console, radio & stereo
tape, Jow mileage, new sticker $2050
or best offer Phone 378-4413
(g-2t-168-p)
Triumph TR 3 1960 completely
restored best possible appearance
perfect mechanically 378-4116 or
392-0584 (g-2t-168-p)
For Sale: 1964 MGB needs starter
ring gear $475 or best offer and 1956
Ford Panel Truck 72 inspect. $125 or
best offer. 378-4065 after 5
(g-167-3t-p)

T Todays
I more for your money meal
amoisons
I CfIFETERIfi
I l 1
I I TUESDAYS FEATURE |
I GOLDEN FRIED CHICKEN
1 ALL YOU CAN EAT
I si
I | WEDNESDAY FEATURE \i
5 ROAST TURKEY ,2
| with S
~ I MASHED POTATOES, A i I'
. dressing, |
I 1 CRANBERRY SAUCE
! J
j LUNCH 11 til 2 SUPPER 4:30 til 8 FREE PARKING
moisons
CfIFETERIfi beyond comparison' I
L 2620 N.W. 13th Street m the Gainesville Mall

llllllllltlllilllllllllllllllllllllllllUlltlllllllllllllHlllllllltllllll
lllllllltlllllllllllllltllllllllllltllllllllllllllllllllllltllllltll
autos
iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiitiiiiiiiiimiiiii
Drive off in your own VW sunroof
for $150.00 runs good and its
inspected go by 905 SW 6th Ave. Ask
for Tim (g-2t-168-p)
lllllillltltl!lllllli:illl!llllllllll!llllliltllllllllllll!ltlltlllH
REAL ESTATE
llllllllllllllllllilllllllllllllillllllllllllllHHlllllllllillllllll
For sale by owner 4br 2 bath house
in greenbriar subdivision, living
dining utility rms. large panelled
family rm with fireplace. 2-car
garage, large lot. in glen springs
school district, close to westwood
and westside park. 6 /z percent mort.
call 378-9808 (l-9t-161-p)
llllllllllllllllllHinHlllllltllllllllllllllllllllltllllllllll
PERSONAL
imillltllllllHlltllllllllllllllllllflllllllllllllllllllllllllllill
Co-Eds Facial Hair removed forever,
fast, low-cost gentle hair removal.
Edmund Dwyer,
Electrologist. .. .102 N.W. 2nd Ave.
Call 372-8039 for appointment
(J-14t-156-p)
GOING TUBING: Large truck tubes
for renL a SI.OO per day. Call
378-5931, 372-1446 or 376-3678,
(J-17t-153-p)
MEN WOMEN
need a place to stay this fail
GEORGIA SEAGLE HALL
$220/qciarter room & board, 24-hr.
open house co-ed, cooperative living
call 376-8941 j-6t-164-p
male grad student desires room with
bath prlvillges. prefer with galnesville
family, call 378-1114. also have
refrigerator for sale. (j-4t-165-p)
KITTENS moonchildren desire to
balance with good people vibrant
trusting. Can you help a friend? Call
Sandy at 392-2931 (j-3t-166-p)
.f you make things; anything, and
want to sell them, get ready for the
Union Print & Poster & Arts and
Crafts Sale, Sept. 22 & 23
(J-6t-163-ch)
Organic Seeds & Grains Vitamins
Books. Sunflower Health Foods 7 W.
Univ. Downtown 378-8978
(j-3t-167-p)
Craig Happy 2nd anniversary
cant wait for the fall when we will
never have to say goodbye again I
miss you I love you K.S.H.
(j-2t-167-p) __
Wanted: A good home for a cat and
five kittens. Must go together. Call
392-7645 FREE! (j-3t-167-p
Teacher seeks position in N, K, or
Day Care. BA in Early childhood
education. I have 2'/z years teaching
experience. 378-2271 Jackie Searcy
(j-16 8-2 t-p)
Married grad student wants mature,
quiet female roommate while
husband in boot camp, fall, winter.
$32.50 + */z util, a/c, 3 blocks from
campus, pets, quiet, shaded area.
372-6598 (j-lt-168-p)
2 people need ride to New York city
Sept. 1-3 will share food expenses &
driving please call Bobbi 378-4405
(j-2t-168-p)
10 week male labrador-irish setter
light orange or beige color more lab
than setter in appearance Call
372-1622 301 NW 2nd St. Ask for
Tom Reward (l-2t-168-p)

Page 11

Illlllltlltllllllllllllllllltlllllllllllilllllllllllllltitlllllllllllll
lltllllllllliltlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllilllll
LOST <&. FOUND
IllllJlIllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllillll!
Lost mens glasses in black case in the
vicinity of Tigert Hall parkihg lot
reward call 392-1261 before 5 p.m.
(l-2t-167-p)
LOST Powder gray kitten 12 weeks
old Missing in vicinity of Tolbert
area. Reward offered. Call 392-8145
afternoons or evenings (l-3t-167-p)
Lost Male Siamese, 8 mo old, area
behind Norman Hall SW 12th St.
No collar. Very friendly. Please
return. Call 373-1764 llllllllltllllllll'llllllllllMlllllllllilUlllillllllllllllllllllll
SERV ICES
lllllltllllllllilllilllllllllllllllllllitllllllllllillllllllllllllll
AIR-CONDITIONING SERVICE
Commercial and Household Licensed
Mechanic moon-lighting Reasonable
378-9240 (M-st-161-p)
Trail Rides 9,1, 5 every Sat. $4-2
hrs. Western riding lessons, riding by
appointment. Horses boarded.
Reasonable rates. 372-9437,
378-4293. (m-st-165-p)
Nursery school looking for creative 3
and 4 year olds, for information call
First Lutheran Church 376-2062
m-6t-164-p

>
ms&j* THE GROUP
THEY CALL ...
i.x r daimce/concert
AUGUST
, 9:00 PM-1:00 AM
m. REITZ
J&W. UNION TERRACE
wK?- FREEH
" SPONSORED BY
- J.W. REITZ UNION
i j m T
THE BICYCLE THIEF is the story of a poor married man, his
son, and the bicycle which provides their livelihood. Just when
the bicycle is needed for a long-sought job, it isstolen. The
film follows the desperate search through the streets of Rome
to find the treasured bicycle. Scene after scene reveals the
bitter irony of this lone man and his son, buffeted by an
indifferent world.
Tuesday, August 17 & Wednesday, August 18
7:00 A 9:30 Union Auditorium 50<
Sponsored by the J.W.R.U.


SERV ICES
itiHiimiinimiiiinfiiiiiiiittffvmifiiiifiiimtmiiiiiiiiii!
PROFESSIONAL TYPING
SERVICE IBM Building, Room 206
Telephone 376-7160 Manuscripts,
Textbooks, Business Reports,
Dissertations (M-12t-158-p)
Tennis racquets restrung, machine
strung, low prices fast service pick-up
and delivery call 378-4019
(m-3t-167-p)
Save $ on repairs! I fix everything
stereos lamps bikes typewriters fans
hairdryers etc cheap! but experienced
free delivery Barry 376-3456
pHlrl
NEW fr USED
/ 'JfCj COMPLETE UME Or
/ :[ V5 -' / GUNS
/ RELOADING COMPONENTS
L zJ INVINTOIV OVtt SM GUNS
AMMUNITION
BUY-SELL-TRADE-REPAIR
\ 466-3340 M CANOPY J|
:: : ; A HARRY BECKWITH--GUN DEALER I: £
i o*"*r ill 11
PATRONIZE GATOR
ADVERTISERS



>, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, August 17, 1971

Page 12

Notices for I'aqc ol Rt-i <>rii must be
sent to Betty Coomes, Division of
Information Services, Building H. All
copy for Tuesday must be received
by 3 p.m. Friday.

FEE SCHEDULE REVISIONS
The following replaces material
published in the Undergraduate,
Graduate, Law and Medicine
catalogs and reflects fee changes
approved by the Florida
Legislature effective with the fall
quarter. The schedule was not
available at the time catalogs
were printed.
Fees are payable on the dates
listed in the University of
Florida Calendar or the dates
shown on statements sent those
participating in advance
registration. Registration
(including payment of fees)
must be completed on or before
the proper due date. Mail
payments must be RECEIVED
at Student Accounts, the Hub,
by this date. All payments
received on or after the due date
are subject to a $25 late fee.
Fees charged are based on the
classification of a student as
Florida or non-Florida, full-time
(nine hours or more) or
part-time (enrolled for eight
credit hours or less); graduate,
post-baccalaureate or
undergraduate.
The fees below are assessed
for each quarter the student is
enrolled. Unless otherwise noted
(part-time and GENESYS), the
fees include matriculation,
Student Health Services, student
activities and a general building
fee. Part-time and GENESYS
students are not entitled to
student activity or Infirmary
privileges.
UNDERGRADUATE
STUDENTS
(Includes freshmen, sophomores,
juniors, seniors, or students in a
fifth-year baccalaureate
program. This fee also is applied
to POST-BACCALAUREATE
students unless registered in the
Graduate School).
A FULL-TIME FLORIDA
student will pay a fee of
$ 190/quarter
A FULL-TIME
NON-FLORIDA student will
pay a fee of $540/quarter ($l9O
registration plus $350
non-Florida fee).
A PART-TIME FLORIDA
student will pay a fee of
sl6/credit hour
A PART-TIME
NON-FLORIDA student will
pay $43/credit hour (sl6 plus
$27 non-Florida fee).

w&en it won 't won& , we [|||
Gainesville Florida Campus Federal Credit Union -jC -jC-1200
-1200 -jC-1200 S.r. Fifth Avenue PfwneJ&2Q393^
Auto Loansfor UF Faculty 'and Staff

Page of Record
Formerly Orange and Blue Bulletin. Produced Tuesday & Friday
for the publication of official University notices and public events by
the Division of Information Services and the Public Functions Office

GRADUATE STUDENTS AND
COLLEGE OF LAW
FULL-TIME FLORIDA
students will pay a fee of
$240/quarter
FULL-TIME NON-FLORIDA
students will pay fees of
$590/quarter ($240 Registration
plus $350 non-Florida fee)
PART-TIME FLORIDA
students will pay a fee of
S2O/credit hour
PART-TIME NON-FLORIDA
students will pay fees of
$47/credit hour (S2O
Registration plus $27
non-Florida Fee.
MEDICINE AND DENTISTRY
Students enrolled in the M.D.
program of the College of
Medicine and the D.M.D.
program of the College of
Dentistry will be assessed annual
fees payable in equal
installments in September,
January and March.
A FLORIDA student will be
assessed a fee of $1,050, payable
in $350 installments,
A NON-FLORIDA student
will be assessed a fee of $2,250
payable in $750 installments.
GENESYS
A student enrolled in the
Graduate Engineering Education
System will pay a fee of
S6O/credit hour. Maximum fee
charged will be $375.
Students enrolled in
GENESYS are not entitled to
student activity or Infirmary
privileges.
University policififfconcerning
late fees also applyito GENESYS
except that the $25 late fee will
not be assessed during the first
week of classes.
STUDENT HEALTH SERVICE
SCHEDULE
During the break Student Health
Service will operate on a
modified schedule. The
Infirmary will be closed at
Midnight, Aug. 28 and will be
closed each Saturday and
Sunday through the break
period as well as Labor Day,
Sept. 6. Mon. through Fri. hours
will be from 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
only. Normal 24-hour operation
will resume at 8 a.m., Mon.,
Sept. 13.
The Health Center Emergency

Room will provide emergency
care to students during the
period the Infirmary is closed.
PROCESSING GRADES
Following current practices as
established by the Council of
Deans and the President, the
faculties of the various units
should approve candidates for
the August commencement
according to the schedule below.
1. Special grade sheets for
degree candidates will be
distributed by the Registrar's
Office to colleges and schools
during the ninth week of classes.
2. These grade sheets will be
completed and returned to the
Registrar's Office by noon,
Thursday, Aug. 26.
3. Grades for degree
candidates will be available from
the Registrar's Office by 9 a.m.,
Friday Aug. 27.
4. College faculty meetings to
pass on degree candidates should
be scheduled Friday, Aug. 27.
5. Final report of colleges on
candidates for degrees are due in
the Registrar's Office by 3 p.m.,
Friday, Aug. 27.
6. Colleges will post lists of
graduates by 8 a.m., Sat., Aug.
28. These lists should indicate
those graduating with honors or
high honors.
Where necessary, exceptions
may be made to University
policy in scheduling final
examinations for degree
candidates only.
FINAL EXAMINATIONS
All students for the tests below
must bring a No. 2 lead pencil
and will be required to use
Social Security Numbers.
CPS 121, CPS 12X
The CPS 121 and CPS 12X
exams will be given Sat., Aug.
21, at 1 p.m. in Carleton
Auditorium.
CPS 122
The CPS 122 exam will be given
Sat., Aug. 21, at 1 p.m. in Little
Hall, rooms 113,121.
CPS 123
The CPS 123 exam will be given
Sat., Aug. 21, at 1 p.m. in the
Music Building, rooms 142,143,
144, 145

CBS 261
The CBS 261 exam will be given
Sat., Aug. 21 at 7 p.m. in
Carleton Auditorium.
CMS 171, CMS 17X
(SECTION 0165 ONLY)
The CMS 171 and CMS 17X
exams will be given Mon., Aug.
23, at 10:30 a.m. in Carleton
Auditorium.
CSSIII
The CSS 111 exam will be given
Mon., Aug. 23, at 7 p.m. in
Carleton Auditorium.
CSS 112
The CSS 112 exam will be given
Mon., Aug. 23, at 7 p.m. in
Little Hall, rooms 113, 121.
CSS 113
The CSS 113 exam will be given
Mon., Aug. 23, at 7 p.m. in the
Music Building, rooms 142,143.
CSSIIX
The CSS 11X exam will be given
Mon., Aug. 23, at 7 p.m. in the
Music Building, rooms 144, 145.
CLC 142,143,144
The CLC 142, CLC 143 and
CLC 144 exams will be given
Tue., Aug. 24, at 7 p.m., in
Carleton Auditorium
CLC 14X
The CLC 14X exam will be given
o Tue., Aug. 24, at 7 p.m., in the
Music Building rooms 142, 143,
144,145.
CHN 251
The CHN 251 exam will be given
Wed., Aug. 25 at 7 p.m.
Students with last names
*
beginning with A-Q report to
Carleton Auditorium; those
beginning with R-Z report to
Little Hall rooms 113,121.
*, ;
CHN 253
The CHN 253 exam will be given
Wed., Aug. 25 at 7 p.m. in the
Music Building, rooms 142,143,
144,145.

The University Calendar will be
weekly listing only
events to pen to the University
community. Private meeting
notices will be carried in "What's
Happening" on Thursday and
should be submitted to the
Alligator office, 365 Union or to
Public Functions Office, G-72
Union.

university
calendar
TUESDAY, August 17
Union Movie: "The Bicycle
Thief, Union Aud.
University Summer Orchestra
Concert: Univ. Aud., 8:15
p.m.
U. of F. Duplicate Bridge, Union
150 C & D, 7:30 p.m.
WEDNESDAY, August 18
Union Movie: 'The Bicycle
Thief", Union Aud. /
CIRUNA: Public Discussion,
East Indian Pakistani Refugee
Problem, Union 346, 7:30
p.m.
FRIDAY, August 20
Union Movie: 'The Hill", Union
Aud.
Union Dance: LIFE, North
Terrace, 9:00 p.m. 1:00
a.m.
SATURDAY, August 21
Union Movie: 'The Hill", Union
Aud.
Rose Community Concert:
MUDCRUTCH, Univ. Aud,
9:00 p.m. -1:00 a.m.
Graham-Tolbert Dance: RED,
WHITE AND BLUE, Graham
Rec Room, 9:00 p.m. 1:00
a.m.
SUNDAY, August 22
Union Movie: "Destry Rides
Again", Union Aud.
WEDNESDAY, August 25
Union Dance: HOGTOWN
CREEK, South Side Constans
Theatre, 8:00 -10:00 p.m.
FRIDAY, August 27
Student Action Conference,
Univ. Aud., 8:00 p.m.
SATURDAY, August 28
Commencement: Florida Field,
7:00 P.M. (Univ. Aud. in case
of rain)



Federal Government
files suit to gain
Gatorade rights

'
I
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iM i I Ji

By CAROL BRADY
Alligitor Staff Writer
The third in a series of suits involving the
production rights to thirst quenching Gatorade was
filed by the Federal Government August 11 inU.S.
District court, Washington D.C.
According to a UPI release, the government seeks
to recover all the substantial profits and royalties
earned by Stokely Van Camp Inc. through Gatorade
sales.
The suit contends Gatorade was developed at UF
by Dr. Robert Cade, head of renal medicine, under
grants from the department of Health, Education
and Welfare (HEW).
Cade issued this statement Friday, Since the
invention and introduction on the market of
Gatorade there has been an unresolved conflict as to
the proprietorship of the product. The question was
and still is whether the rights belong to the U.S.
government, the Board of Regents, Stokely Van
Camp, Inc., or me and my associates. The Board of
Regents for and on behalf of the University of
Florida has asked for a judicial resolution. Therefore
it is up to the courts to render judgment in this
matter rather than to any of the involved parties.
While I have the right to my personal opinion, I
also respect the opinions and actions of others. I
wish to indicate that statements attributed to me
concerning this legal dispute regarding agencies and
officials were oversimplified and resulted in
inappropriate and unfortunate quotations. I do not
intend to offer any further opinion or statement on
this matter until a legal decision had been reached.
Cade reportedly commented on HEW charges, in
an article published Friday by the St Petersburg
Times, If thats what the Government says, then
the government is an ass...
He also stated the government's position as a
matter of contention.
Brady Greathouse, athletic trainer at UF at the
time of the discovery and member of the Gatorade
Trust, inflated Thursday, research on the drink was
done at no cost to the government or the university.
Greathouse said the drink was put together in
Dr. Cade's kitchen sink one evening.
As I recall, Dr. Cade spent $42 out of his own
pocket for the ingredients, Greathouse added.

IffiHiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiHwwiiiiiiafrk.
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SOUDS FANCIES fl
jl Reg. BJO TO 19.95
>iie>stiiissi oe iiistiiessstsi ne raaaa Li aa aA > ea a a a t a a
iiiiUiiii mi hh 111111 hi n iiiiiiiiii hiw4lhliii 11 in 111 i4y

Tuasday, August 17, 1971, Tha Florida Alligator,

Cade could not be reached to verify or deny these
statements.
The governments suit further charges Cade and
two others, (also recipients of HEW grants) Dr.
Dana Leroy Shires and Dr. Harry J. Free, illegally
formed a Gatorade trust in 1967 and subsequently
sold Stokely Van Camp, Inc. exclusive rights to the
drink.
Stokely, Cade and the Gatorade Trust refused to
recognize the govemipents ownership rights to the
Gatorade formula and have refused to transfer such
rights to the government, the suit charges.
Suits for production rights of Gatorade have also
been filed by the Gatorade trust and the Florida
Board of Regents. None of the suits have come to
trial as yet.

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Page 13



Page 14

i. The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, August 17, 1971

Neighborhood Youth Corps a chance to earn

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- flj /?W*m JP? M
IL jttk I
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imimmsm
, w *aik TERRY WALTERS
A Gainesville police officer
... works with kids
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TERRY WALTERS
Youth Corps worker turns on
... water to cool underprivileged kids

g WATCH 1
?*)& * :"' ||||
I The Dominos Finals Special announced I
I in Thursdays Alligator I
I
I Dominos Pizza 376-2487 I

By LINDA MIKLOWITZ
Alligator Staff Writer
From driving a police car to
filing papers, 300 Gainesville
13-to-18-year-olds are making
their summer pay.
They are members of the
Neighborhood Youth Corps,
now in its fourth summer in
Gainesville. They are earning
money for high school expenses.
The youth work 25 hours
weekly for local government
agencies and nonprofit
organizations. Their pay comes
from two overlapping grants
totaling $179,000 from the U.S.
Department of Labor.
A UF graduate student,
Laurence Bayer, is the new head
of the project after UF graduate
student in history, Bruce Doyle
resigned to finish his degree
requirements.
The summer office of the
Neighborhood Youth Corps is in
the Community Action Agency
headquarters on East University
Avenue.
Florida State Employment
Service finds jobs, then screens
and refers applicants to the
National Youth Corps.
Applicants must be enrolled in
high school and show financial
need.
The money they earn is
supposed to relieve their families
of such expenses as school
clothes. The jobs will also give
them something to do during the
RED PIN aX
NIGHT JV
8-10 PM A
WIN FREE GAMES
REITZ UNION
GAMES AREA

months when there is no school
and provide job experience when
they enter the job market.
Youngsters work as hospital
assistants, janitors and office
clerks. They report to the police
department and such offices as
blind services and social security.
The Gainesville police
department workers serve in the
" m
MILLER-BROWN

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Mainstream program of its
community services division.
They help organize fire hydrant
splash parties in underprivileged
neighborhoods.
(WERE TOPS)
Florida
Alligator



The
Florida
Alligator

Hog town lacrosse club

By GENE HARDY
Alligitor Corvwpoiutont
UFs new lacrosse team met
Thursday to organize for its first
(1971-71) season.
Plans for organizing the team
on the dub level were discussed,
said David Smith, 4AS, who
Scales 50 at once

Automatic scaler on market

A new gadget, just on the
market, allows you to scale up
to 50 fish at one time by simply
taking a short boat ride.
By towing the Rock-It
Automatic Fish Scaler behind
your boat a couple hundred yards
your catch is scaled without
breaking the skin or damaging
the meat of the fish in any way.
The scaler doubles as a handy
live fish basket as the catch is
scaled eliminating any handling
from hook to home.
The cylindrical Rock-It is
made of galvanized steel mesh,
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founded the team. Lacrosse
Aims were also shown.
By organizing on the club
level, we can keep
professionalism out, said
Smith.
Tom Chesley, 3JM, joined the
team for that reason.

~
MlMfe:
measuring 22 inches by 10
inches and weighs 4 pounds.
Slanted fins on the outside
rotate the scaler, and a special
lip on the cone-shaped nose
causes a rapid rocking motion.
As the fish tumble inside the
cylinder, they are scaled by
scraping against the expanded
steel mesh and shuffling against
each other. The water, jetting
through the nose inlets, washes
out the scales and slime leaving
only clean fish.

I b[srAdvertise
|g7_ o OU A W Y j

I dont have any experience
in playiqg lacrosse, he said. I
like sports, and everyone who
goes out will have a chance to
play.
Presently, the team has 15
members. Only four have
experience.
Wanting to play is the only
qualification for membership,
said Smith.
Smith played on the
undefeated 1969 Naval
Academy freshman team.
He hopes the meeting will
attract new members.
We have to show the
intramural department there is a
good deal of interest in lacrosse
before they will help us, he
said.
Dr. Paul Vames, chairman of
the department, said the team
needs at least 20 members to
qualify for support.
We have to make sure there
will be continuing support for
the program, that it will last for
more than one year, he said.
Vames said the intramural
department will pay for
equipment and provide a
practice field if enough interest
is shown.
Transportation to games will
probably be the responsibility of
the team, he added.
. Smith said scheduling for the
new spring sport should be no
problem.
Tennessee, Vanderbilt,
Georgia Tech and many Atlantic
Coast Conference schools have
teams, he said.
There are also plans to travel
to the northeast and play some
of the finest teams in the
nation, added Smith.

Tuesday, August 17, 1971, The Floride Alligator,

Sebastians Shop Vollcswa9n Repairs
This Months Special for VW Drivers
v Tune Up
Points, plugs, condenser, compression
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Reg. sl6 SpesM price 9S
Sebastian's 535 SW 4th Ave. and
take advantage of this special phone 376-9381
ELRODS AUTO REPAIR
CORVAIR SPECIALISTS And
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1 AO/ Discount ON PARTS ONLY I
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Gainesvilles leader
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111
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e FREE PICK-UP AND DELIVERY
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GAINESVILLE SHOPPING CENTER: 282

Page 15



Page 16

i. The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, August 17, 1971

Phil Currin: a future
in professional racing

(EDITORS NOTE: This is
the third part in a series about
the future of racing}.
For Phil Currin, automotive
competition began as just
something interesting to do on a
Sunday afternoon. His Corvette
at that time was hardly an exotic
racer. Competitors were mainly
from the same sports car club
and the goal of the day was to
have a good time.
Gradually things have
changed. The car has become
more and more performance performanceoriented.
oriented. performanceoriented. Expenses have risen
drastically. Yet perhaps the most
important factor is Phil himself.
At 25 he is now looking to
career prospects. The masters
degree he is working toward will
insure him a good position in the
business world, but what about
racing?
There are many ways to break
into professional racing.
Unfortunately, none of them are
easy and all are expensive. As a
matter of fact, the cost of being
competitive makes it almost
impossible for an individual to
compete in a professional series
without outside monetary
support. This support usually
comes in the form of a team
sponsor. The sponsor is, in most
cases, a business firm interested
in usiqg racing as a means of

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HftRFREUIS THERE WITH REAL PEOPLE
umimi iw tU c ojv buiumi
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TEAM HARFRED HARFRED AUTO IMPORTS
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advertising. Phil has never
actively sought this kind of
support but now feels it is
essential. At this point a partial
sponsorship would amount to
SIOO per race with full
sponsorship being SSOO for
each event.
Aside from seeking financial
backing, Phil hopes to run the
24 Hours of Daytona race next
February and increase his
participation in SCCA racing.
Looking further into the future,
Phil would like to run in a
professional series such as the
Trans-American sedan

K m jh
y I
w&' 1 M
Racing action from Daytona

championship. The cost would
no doubt be greater but he feels
it to be necessary if only to see
if he is capable of driving on a
professional level.
Phil must come to a decision
soon. He has to find out if he is
capable enough to be a
professional driver. He must do
it soon, for in another year or so
the pressure of starting a
business career will force racing
to take a back seat. There can be
no back seat drivers in
professional racing,
unfortunately.

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Full Text

PAGE 1

7 By GARY GRUNDER Aigtor Managing Editor President Nixon's price, wage and rent freeze has left the state in a questionable position according to vice chancellor of the Board of Regents Phillip Ashler. Ashler pointed, out that there are two waysofeviewing the situation. The first is the idea that the Florida Legislature passed its appropriations bill in July, a budget that came to be before the President's action. The second view, according to Ashler, a that any pay, rent or price increase to come in the state budget is void because of the President's statement. Ashler said that his office was seeking guidance from Treasury Secretary John Connally. President Nixon's Sunday announcement of a price, wage and rent freeze for 90 days has led to some confusion as to the status of the tuition IN ixon's hike recently passed by the Florida Legislature. The question has arisen as to whether the tuition increase was passed and enacted in time for it to go into effect legally before the President's price controls were announced. -A decision on whether or not to charge the additional rate is due soon,according to Board of Regents Chancellor Robert Mautz' office. According to Tony Kenzio, assistant director of the Campus Shop andBo okstore, the freeze will keep prices the same on all goods sold by the bookstore with the exception of books. "The price of books," Kendzio said on Monday, "is set by the publisher. You will notice the price of paperbacks is stamped on the cover. "I don't anticipate any rise in the cost of books, however,"Kendzio added. Kendzio also said UF Vice President of Administrative AffairsWilliam Elmore will have the final say on the price increase. Elmore said, "If the publisher doesn't raise prices, then we won't." If the about face, an (EDITOR'S NOTE: This is an analysis of the President's new economic policy by Department of Economics Chairman Irving Goffman) This is a fantastic about face from a laissez-faire position based upon some illusion that all was weU to an acceptance of the general principle of direct government controls numerous fronts. It is obvious that the President now recognizes that his past economic policies "Nixonomics" -made no sense and have created the major factor which could defeat him political next year. What he announced however, was either too little, too late or too inconsistent. It is a very strange package when one tries to fight unemployment providing tax relief for those with incomes and subsidies to industry in order to stimulate consumption and investment spending at the same time cutting federal spending and federal employment. Or to fight hiflation by asking for wage-price freezes but at the same time imposing an import duty which will certainly mean hgher comer prices for som goods. I suppose he expect a reduction in foreign competition and therefore an Incremse in Oplwynt in certain domestic Industie -say text1es!ad automobles. But surely it may be expected that foreign countries wil retaliate eIther directly or indirect. If so, what will be the effect on American exporting I am not sure I know what the dollar-gold policy really is -The President did not choose to use the term devaluation, though it appears to be that but I must waitand see what the reaction is abroad. It seems to me that thispadap isaly of poisaliatet Having successfully eliminated Vietnam and China as meaningful issues, the President had to attack the one vulnerable area -economics. The country is in an economic men. Inflation has not ceased and unemployment has begun to resemble the late Eisenhower years. But I think the President waited too long and appears to be too beholden to the large interests. An econoaniic policy which subsidies Lockheed but postpones welfare reform and cuts public spending's tantamount to sociasn for the richand free enterprise forthe poor. I simply do not understand such a philosophy. I see no obvious and direct effect upon students. I would think, however, tbathere ina be a enadmable drop in reulinsosne of' se faculty asn sstrf incnot ha n had salary increao for a year now and ea;not W evt n the petty salary aises recently pro d by the g "An econoi postpones we tantamount to the poor. publisher should raise prices, "we would be forced to." Elmore said that it was too early to tell what effect Nixon's decision would have on UF. Sumning up Ws position he said, we are attempting to assess the situation, but it'll take time." In accordance with the President's guidelines, all rises in prices, wages or rents that have been announced, but not put into effect, are void. Associate Director of Housing James Hennessey said that dormitory rates will remain at the same level they were last year. According to Henney, "dormitory rates would not have risen even if the President had not set a rent freeze. Adjustments in dormitory rates will probably have to be made for fal quarter of 1972." Gainesville Area Chamber of Commerce President Henry Barber said, "as far as I'm concerned Nixon is playing hands off with the economy." When this reporter informed him of the President's Sunday night speech, Barber said that he was unaware and could not comment. a n a Iy sis E mic policy which subsidizes Lockheed but fare reform and cuts public spending in socialism for the rich and free enterprise for -Irving Goffman I IIMniuIf NuuIuNIIIsihIutuIhIII INNimN~gf U?" = The FloridaAlligator Vol. 63, No. 168 University of Florida, Gainesville Tuesday, August 17, 1971 WUap azd priC Conto1s, what.they mean to you J*

PAGE 2

Page 2, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, August 17, 1971 EEOP a chance Previously students were required to go to reading clinic and tutoring sessions, but we're going to leave it up to the individual -if he needs help, it will be available. The assumption is that if they don't do it on their own, they probably won't make it through the University. Phil Parsons "It gave me more confidence in myself I could come here to UF and pass, even though competing with more than 20,000 students." -Clantha Carrigan ''Some students in high school don't know what the" want ...but thev still have the potential (to attend college). EEOP gives them a chance to make up for mistakes they made in high school." -Edward Wilson By STEPHANIE SWERDLIN Alligator Staff Writer UF has incorporated two programs to compensate for disadavantages, either social or academic, which might under normal circumstances have kept an individual from going to college. The programs, Expanded Educational Opportunity Program (EEOP) and Special Services to Disadvantaged Students (SSDS), will offer tutoring sessions, reading clinics, and partial financial aid to approximately 150 students who otherwise would not be attending UF. EEOP, formerly known as Critical Freshman Year, is being directed this summer by Phil Parsons, assistant professor of logic. Parsons summarizes the EEOP objective "We want to help these students succeed academically." Parsons feels that there is a "correlation between low income and low scores and qualifications," but "with help we can overcome deficiencies shown." Some students in EEOP are enrolled in courses with modified content. The students receive a variation in credit hours in certain courses, for they often spend extra hours in class in order to receive more exposure to their weaker academic areas. Parsons emphasizes, however, that "the curriculum under this program is not remedial or sub-university." EEOP offers reading clinics and tutoring to students enrolled in the program. "Previously students were required to go to reading clinic and tutoring sessions," Parsons said, "but we're going to leave it up to the individual -if he needs help, it will be available. The assumption is that if they don't do it on their own, they probably won't make it through the University." 1970-71 Critical Freshman Year Program director David Lee said that after three quarters 75 per cent of the EEOP students had (See 'to'page 3) LeO LOVes Til AUTko~obs FOOLING F eaTING a WdOPPeR:s Buge Kn THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during June, July and August when it's published semi-weekly, and during student holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions of their authors. Address. correspondence to the Florida Alligator. Reitz Union Building. University of Florida, Gainesville. Florida 32601. The Alliga'or is entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office at Gainesville, Florida 32601. Subscription rate is $10.00 per year or $3.50 per Quarter. '64 Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone ta l advertisements anC to revise or turn away copy it considers objeCtionable. The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless notIce Is given to the advertising manager within (1) one day after the advertiaement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible fcr moe than one Incorrect Insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run gveral times. Notices .for .correction must be given before' the next Asertion. 0

PAGE 3

1 Tuesday, August 17, 1971, The Florida Alligator, Page 3 to college maintained a "C" grade average or better in spite of the fact that they did not meet normal UF entrance requirements. EEOP students are counseled by their own teachers who are able to observe their performance in the classroom and offer aid in areas where it can be the most beneficial. Partial financial aid is available for students who qualify. A total of $142,000 has been awarded students in the 1971-72 program. The financial aid is in the form of Equal Opportunity Grants, National Defense Loans, and work-study aids. Students in the program come from all income brackets. Parsons reports applications from students "who live in areas ranging from country club estates to ghetto areas." Approximately half of the EEOP students are Black. American Indians, Cubans and Puerto Ricans are also included. Last year's denial of a $50,000 U.S. Office of Education grant, which would have linked EEOP to their present partner program, resulted primarily in reduction of some permanent staff positions, reading lab equipment and a dorm-based library. However, the Federal Government pulled through this year and awarded EEOP the $50,000 grant to fund SSDS. SSDS, directed by Randolph Bracy, will fund special counselors, cultural events and other activities for disadvantaged students. Bracy feels that "the programs being implemented at UF indicate that the university is now making a concentrated effort to meet the needs of minority students." EEOP students regard the program with a variety of thoughts: "I like it in a sense, but they're too protective;" "I don't understand it;" "We've been set aside like a bunch of guinea pip;" "It got me into a four year college. Otherwise, I would not have gotten here;" "My parents aren't financially able to send me to college -without EEOP and SSDS grants." Correction The -quote appearing in Thursday's Alligator as a side bar in the story entitled "New bike routes and traffic surveys set for early fall" was incorrectly attributed to Worth Crow. The quote was that of Charles Faulds, SG director of transportation. Five rMm" Five UF students have been awarded Poynter Fund Scholarships for the 1971-72 academic year. The awards are made annually by the Poynter fund, established by Nelson Poynter, chairman of the Times Publishing Co. which publishes the St. Petersburg Times, in memory of his father, the late Paul Poynter. The scholarships have been awarded since 1956 to students of exceptional talent devoted to careers in journalism. UF recipients are: Randy Bellows, Connie Daniel, Ted Vodde, Carolyn Volte and Paula Smith. Complete Alteration Service on clothing for Men and Women FAST SERVICE FREE ESTIMATES -versfgP PROP "26 W. tIPUVAVE. Last year approximately 191 students entered UF as members of the Critical Freshman Year Program. Without the program, more than half probably would have been rejected for admission to the university because of low scores on the Florida Senior Placement examination, according to David Lee, who was faculty coordinator for the program. But what did the program do for students who were involved in it? "It gave me more confidence in myself," Clantha Carrigan said. "I could come here to UF and pass, even though competing with more than 20,000 students." Clantha, who came to UF on a National Defense Loan, Educational Opportunity Grant, and work-study aid, doesn't feel that students in the program "got any breaks ," but "We proveC a lot -the senior placement test couldn't really determine how we would do in college." Clantha is currently counseling students who are enrolled at UF in the Expanded Educational Opportunity Program (EEOP) which is an extension of last year's Critical Freshman Year Program. As a counselor Clantha is trying to help EEOP students overcome any personal problems or difficulties that have cropped up in the program. Also counseling EEOP students is Edward Wilson, a sophomore, who, like Clantha, came to UF in the Critical Freshman Year Program. "It (the Critical Year Program) helped me to adjust to college life," Wilson said. "We got a lot of things that regular students didn't, like reading clinics and counseling." Wilson is enthusiastic about the program and said, "I think I'm doing better than many students who got in on a regular basis. "Some students in high school don't know what they want ...but they still have the potential (to attend college). EEOP gives them a chance to make up for mistakes they made in high school." GOOD TUE-THUR ONLY 214NW.13th t.pie 114S.W. 34th St. 376-6472 B372-3649 JBOX 99Q 3 Pc. Chicken Reg. 1.25 Mashed Potatoes and Gravy Cole Slaw end BRING COUPON IRolls GOOD LUCK ON YOUR FINAL EXAMS FROM UNIVERSITY CITY BANK COME SEE US IN THE FALL THE ONLY BANK WITH DRIVE-IN. SERVICE ON SATURDAYS BANKING 9:00-2:00 FRI 9:00-6:00 WALK-UP MON-THuns 830-4:00 8:30.6:00 8:30-t2:30 MEMBER F*D*eC* to go. COINS BUY-SELL-TRADE (pay $2.00 for silver dollars) HUTCHESON ENTERPRISES COINS-ANTIQUES-GIFTS 9 NW 2nd St -378-9147 in Flerfda National Bank Bulldlng iE WEL ES Fraternity Jewelry Now order it days a week Trophy & Plaque Dept. Expert Engraving Class rings Watch repair Jewelry repair 1802 West University Ave. Across trom Campus 2 blocks from Hub 373-1025

PAGE 4

Page 4, The Floride Alligator, Tuesday, August 17, 1971 Flavet section to remain until 1914 I06 -I Roc Records is one of the many discount record stores in Gainesville. The people are friendly and the atmosphere is warm. Why don't you come in, lie on the waterbed, relax, listen, or just talk awhile. We have a nice selection of records at very reasonable prices. While you're in look over our selection of pipes, candles, book*, magazines, and tapes. By DARRELL HARTMAN Alligator Staff Writer A large section of Flavet ill, the married housing complex on the west end of campus, origionally due for demolition this spring, will stay open for student use until 1974. Associate Director of Housing James Hennessey said the decision change was because of unanticipated delays in funding the new married housing complexes, the critical shortage of off-campus housing, and student complaints. Many Flavet residents had been against the demolition of Flavets because a move to the newer apartments would more than double their rents. Many residents also felt the Flavets were being cleared to nake way for a new activities center on the site. But Worth Crow, of the Physical Planning Department said last week the activities center had outgrown the Flavets area and would be built elsewhere. Hennessey mailed letters to all Flavet residents last week explaining in detail the effects the change would have on each section of Flavets. One of the letter said Section HI of Flavets will be vacated by September Ist and those buildings will be demolished. The buildings in Section I are considered to be more of a fire hazard than Sections I and U. The reason Flavets were orinally dated for demolition was because the buildings, assembled at UF in 1947, and originally scheduled for only five years use, were considered a fire hazard. Section IH residents will have priority in moving into other parts of Flavets. The letter stated that residents of Sections I and U will not be required to vacate their apartments until the completion of the lest of three married housing projects(January 1974) or when the occupancy of a building is reduced to two families. Thee families who moved front the low rent Flae-s to other beesaus66y thAou Flaetsweretodbed ,canao meve linto flavets fthey so dedre. After lmliess dn Section Mi and families who have moved from lvets hae been accomodated, applications for assignment in Flavets will be accepted shortly to alleviate the long waiting list for married housing. Those at the top of waiting lists for Diamond, Corry and Schucht Villages will have the option of moving to Flavets or waiting for an opening in the village they applied for. There are currently 450 families waiting for openings in Diamond, Corry and Schucht Villages. A new 220 unit married housing complex, University Village Apartments, is scheduled for completion in March, 1972. A second 100 unit complex should be completed by June 1973, and a third in approximately January 1974. Flavets cost $26.75 and $29.50 a month plus utilities. Some furniture is provided. Diamond, Corry and Schucht Villages cost $60 and $70 a month, furnished, plus utilities. The new University Village Apartments will cost $87 and $107 a month, including utilities. These apartments are unfurnised. /\ ood today and tomorrow. Gainesviq'sleader for boots and j ans Weekdays 9 Saturday 9A The Flavets once housed 420 families and about 270 units will remain this fall. Hennessey said Section I of Flavets will eventually be made into a recreation field once the immediate housing shortage is alleviated. Hennessey stressed that his office was open for student suggestions. Hennessey said a student with complaints or suggestions should investigate the situation, get all the facts, and then go ahead and present his case. "I think the student is very, very powerful," he added. ANNOUNCING. KINDERGARTEN Ist GRADE STARTING SEPTEMBER 7. Experiened HOURLY Certified" r s ited DAILY Tahers Air WEEKLY RATES I Spised --Play V NURSERY AND ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 2706 S.W. 34th ST. -372-466 $1 OFF ~* Clip the Pizza Inn -"Buck below for a special treat! Aeemable with ram f say sem pla or at Limit I Pizza In hePiza Inn Delar per femsly s31 S.W.Its Aw August 17-19 ONE PIZZA IN N BUCK SO"r, affwr no vaid for cime pizz. STOCK REDUCTION SALE All jeans and boots 10-50% OFF' Cord, Denim, White, Solid, Striped BELLS Clow r as $2.97 Compare'at $7.50 ..........

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OUlllllllNlllNNMIlhaIMAVimamuauu UF groups a a e join to ai'd Bengal ReiIef I By STEPHANIE SWERDLIN Alligator Staff Writer Over seven million refugees have fled from famine and political repression in East Pakistan. The influx of refugees into India continues at the rate of approximately 50,000 per day. With them, the refugees bring cholera, more famine and chaos. "If India does not get enough support from the international community there is danger that these refugees may start rioting and create more problems," said Bharat Jhunjhunwala of the IF India Club. The Indian government has spent $700 million in the past two months to feed the refugees. About $150 million of these funds was received in aid from various countries. The University Religious Assn. has joined the India Club to back a Bengal Relief Fund. The two organizations are sponsoring a display in the Union colonnade this week to collect contributions during the lunch hour. Each one dollar contributed will feed seven people one meal. Contributions may be sent to the Bengal Relief Fund, c/o India Club, Box 12929, University Station, Gainesville; or to World University Services, c/o Religion office, Reitz Union. One dollar donated to Bengel Relief ...could feed these seven refugees Carol Brady Alligator Staff Writer .HeI~aleningN Blast off: Council of International Organizations is sponsoring a trip to Cape Kennedy 8 a.m. Sunday. Cost is $1 per person. All interested in going must sign up at the International Center and leave a deposit ahead of time. Gay Lib: Gainesville Gay Liberation Front will meet Wednesday night at 7:30 at 1628 NW 3rd Place, apt. D. Everyone is welcome! Text trade: Student Government is holding a book exchange collection for the fall quarter sale August 24, 25, 26 in room 306 Reitz Union. Bring books by between 1-5 p.m. There will be a 10 cent service charge on each book brought in. Apartment living: Carl Opp, director of off-campus housing, Mrs. Eleanor Denny, counselor and assistant director of off-campus housing, and Wayne Mason, president of the Gainesville Apartment Owners Association will discuss problems concerning "apartment living" tonight at 11:05 p.m. on WRUF. Stolen Spokes: "The Bicycle Thief," directed by Vittorio Da Sica, will be shown tonight and Wednesday at 7 and 9:30 in the Union Auditorium. Admission is 50 cents. WiNNING Fail Rsarn WOou Family Restaurants COMBINATION burger chef Mrnk Mes French Fries Super Shof, With Cheese 715 NW 13th St. 1412 N. Main St. ucys treat you right., JOEL 3offogorespr

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Page 6, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, August 17, 1971 EditorialReconstruct The Florida the rectangle Tigert Hall is a rectangle. It only has four sides. But some people will swear on a stack of Bibles it has five sides. The "Little Pentagon" they call it. The administration has often been accused, and rightly so, of being unresponsive to student needs, being overly secretive, of axing professors because of their political beliefs. But, as President Richard Nixon said in a campaign speech about Vietnam, "There is a ray of light at the end of the tunnel." IN~ ERI We hope. The administration dug the tunnel of doubt, secrecy and unresponsiveness. Maybe it is still possible to expose the tunnel for what it is and move out into the open daylight. Associate Director of Housing James Hennessey has decided to retain a large portion of the Flavets married housing complex, in part, because of the critical housing shortage in Gainesville and in response to students complaining about the proposed demolition of Flavets. The gears of the administration were set in motion. And in response to student needs they stopped, and changed directions. We applaud Mr. Hennessey for being responsive to the needs of the university community. Other administration efforts seem hopeful. After President Stephen C. O'Connell's disaster with the black students last spring, a dozen black professors were hired and the Critical Year Program was expanded. And bicycles are slowly being accepted as a valid form of transportation. Hennessey suggested students with complaints or suggestions should investigate the situation, get all the facts and go ahead and present their case. "I think the student is very, very powerful," Hennessey said. We can't be quite as optimistic as Hennessey, but we laud his efforts in keeping Flavets open. Tigert Hall still has five sides from our perspective. And that needless tunnel is still ill-lighted. It's up to the administration to prove they understand student problems in the university community. It's up to the administration to dispense with the double talk and start giving straight answers. And it's up to the administration to rid itself of the cloak of secrecy and callous wheeler-dealer image they justly have given themselves. Let's reconstruct Tigert back into a rectangle. Reporters Sports Editor By DAVID MILLER On Aug. 12 The New York Times reported: "The White House warned yesterday that government officials could lose their jobs or be transferred if they seek to impose widespread busing as a means of desegregating schools in the urban South." Leon Panetta, Robert Finch, John Knowles, Wally Hickel and James Allen have already been eased out of government positions; Elliot Richardson may be the next to go. President Nixon is violating decisions of the Supreme Court; he is violating the federalistic concept of "checks and balances" and is attempting to impose a dictatorship upon U.S. government officials. Moreover, according to the Times, "The White House expanded on the statement yesterday, in response to qesti about a telegm from Gov. George Wallace of Alabama." I didn't know Wallace had that much pull at the White (no pun intended) House. But Southern racists are running the country, with Nixon Student Publications Business Staff To reach Advertising, Business and Promotion Offiss, Call: 392-1681,.82, 83 or 84 C. R. "Randy" Coleman Business Manager Steven M. Belcher Advertising Manager Jeanne Orfinik Promotion Manager T o r e a c h Circulation Department, call: 392-16091 being the puppet of the Thurmond Administration. On Aug. 12 The Miami Herald reviewed a book by Leon Panetta and Peter Gall, Bring Us Together: The Nixon Team and the Civil Rights Retreat. I quote from the review by F. Warren O'Reilly: "Much of it reads like suspense fiction, but this is a documented factual account of how the 'Southern strategy' of the Nixon Administration emerged to check progress in civil rights. It is an absorbing study of the interaction between politics and government operations at the highest levels. "Leon E. Panetta and Peter Gall left staff positions with Republican senators for the Nixon team, expecting that his slogan, 'Bring Us Together,' would become Administration policy, despite pre-election pledges to Sen. Thurmond. Lawyer Panetta became director of the Office of Civil Rights; Gall, a former Wall Street Journal reporter ,was Panetta's assistant. They provide a day-by-day story of the battles over school desegregation within the government and in the South. "It is a revealing, report of intra-administrative intrigue: HEW trying to get civil rights laws and court orders enforced effectively, against opposition from the Justice Department and the White House. There are close calls, when only a timely story from a persistently probing and alert press corps staves off the superior influence of Southern politicos. The suspense ends with the ouster of Panetta early in 1970; Finch's head rolled three weeks later. "The authors contend that denial of equal rights to minorities is the nation's most imperative moral crisis; they regard school desegregation as the first priority. This is a devastating story of the triumph o f p a r t i s a n political considerations over principle, as well as Republican Party traditions. Since the buck stops where Harry Truman said it did, Bring Us Together is a disturbing indictment of Richard Nixon as a national leader. The authors regard his retreat on civil rights as a national calamity." On Aug. 12, The Miami News reported that "The Justice Department has dropped its investigation of alleged corruption in Alabama Gov. Ge orge W all I a c e s administration." That figures. Atty. Gen. Mitchel is the fuhrer of the Southern Strategy, and Jerris Leonard is a member of a Caucasians-only club in Milwaukee. Henry Kissinger, disciple of Mettemich and Dr. Strangelove, is deciding our foreign policy. And George Wallce and Strom Thurmond are deciding oul domestic policy. d9 a La Phyllis Gallub Ec tcr ~Ch>& Gary Grunder Editor Lynn Parsons Executive Editor Bring us together, Dick Carol Brady Tom Cornelison Linda Miklowitz Doug Case Bruce Marion S ieSwrdlin Darrell Hartman Larry Brown Published by students of the University of Florida under the auspices of the Board of Student Publications. Editorial Business. Advertising offices in Student Publications Suite, third floor, Reita Unioi. Editorial Office phones: 392-1686,.87, 88 or 89. Opinions expressed in the Florida Alligator are those of the editors or of the writer of the article and not those of the University of florida. ~' if .j,.# i'~; 1:-i,' ... mmoooll, I

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Tuesday, August 17, 1971, The Phoride Alipftr, page 7 Miller Editor : Kudos to Dave Miller on his series about discipline in athletics. As a former state high-school mile champion and athletic scholarship recipient, allow me to unburden myself of my own views on the subject. Dave hinted at, but did not elaborate upon, the crux of the matter in his last article. The question is not whether there should be discipline in athletics: most assuredly, there should be. The flush of athletic victory is immeasurably heightened by the sweat, the toil, and the sacrifice of easy pleasure which made the final victory possible. The victory, in life as well as sport, is much sweeter for having been dearly won and worked for. For this, discipline is necessary. The real question is the source from which that discipline arises: whether it is to be an artificial imposition from without, in the form of the coach, or a genuine personal commitment to excellence from within, born of pride in the worth of the endeavor. Any power-hungry coach can exercise his authority as dispenser of the grant-in-aid and impose discipline-by-threat: "Shave off that hippie hair or I'll cut your scholarship!" It takes no special skill or talent of any sort to pull this sort of maneuver. The real test for any coach is his ability to instill in the athlete a deep sense of pride in the worth of the athletic effort as an avenue to self-improvement and enrichment. Once the athlete can justify, to himself, the innate worth of what he is doing, the hair, moustaches, etc., are irrelevant because what really counts is present: personal commitment .from pride. The externals are revealed as being just that: extemals, unimportant one way or the other. Unfortunately, coaches continue to cut their own throats and give athletics in general a black eye by neglecting to help each man develop the necessary personal commitment and pride, choosing instead to take the easy way out and bludgeon the troops into obedience with rigid petty rules, on dress, hair and all manner of personal matters. The "discipline" born of dictatorship is fleeting and transitory, an unwelcome intruder upon a free man's mind. The inner strength which comes from true personal commitment to a worthy goal constitutes -the strength of character of which great men are made. Any coach who imparts less than this, choosing rather to make mountains out of molehills and impose discipline thereupon, is a joke and encourages not respect, but well-deserved cynicism toward both himself and the tradition of individual athletic excellence. It deserves better. -Jodie Lee Munden, 6AS Alligator Editor: The Alligator staff has been put down several times this quarter for their Summer feature articles. While perhaps lacking in literary excellence (by failing to incite instant actions and raise the level of this university to previously unattainable heights) they are, nevertheless, a valuable record for me. This is my last quarter here, and the problems considered by these (however lacking) articles are much more relevant to the attitudes at the end of my college career than were those of the highly lauded and grossly over-rated Seminole. So thank you Alligator for a worthwhile summer and a good four years (or five). Thank you petitions committees of both the College of Business Administration and the University of Florida for having faith in someone who by precedence didn't deserve it. Thank you Joe Torchia (wherever you are) and John Parker, the only two really imaginative and truly talented writers this paper has employed these four (or five) years. You made me think in spite of myself, and helped me learn to think for myself ... And thank you students of this university for completing this process .helping me to change my head before I burned a cross or joined the Birchers. -Thomas M. Robertson 4BA f LETTERS PC Letters nstit: e e type, signed, double-spaced and not exced s300words. eNot be signed with a pseudonymn. e Have addrssa and telephone numbers of writers. )LICY Names will be withheld only if writer showsuest en. The edlor reses the right to edt all lerettfor Any writer interested in abmitting a meier columnn is eded to contact the editor and be prepared to show samples of he. work. Writers may .ubmit lone.asays, columns or letters to be considered 'for. es a "w *col"n" Salute to Indo-American solidarity By V. G. PATIL-KULKARNI On the eve of the 24th historic Indian Independence Day, to be celebrated on Aug. 15, 1971, 1 offer my felicitations through these columns of the "Florida Alligator" to all Indians living in Gainesville in particular and in the United States of America in general, and wish them all a continued prosperity, progress and happiness, wherever and in whatever profession they are. It is relevant to recall here that India was liberated from the shackles of the nearly 150 years of foreign domination on Aug. 15, 1947, just about 160 years after America was liberated. India is thus today 24 years old post-independence. The high aspirations and lofty ideals of the founders of modern India like Mahatma Gandhi and Jaraharhi hru have been put to rigorous acid test during the last 24 years, in what is described as the unique experiment in functional democracy, that started off with the weakest ever economic bas e -i n e. Populatio nwiie and ideologically, India today is the largest democracy in the world but this carries little meaning if the liberated people have nothing to eat and live on. "Internal political strength and self-reliant economic growth," declared Indira Gandhi, Prime Minister of India, "are the best guarantees of stability and sovereignity." Looking back a bit, the performance of the popular Central Government in India, during the last 24 years is just commendable. Right from the beginning, it had to face an unsurmountable and unwieldy population explosion with almost nothing to feed them, a weak depleted economic infrastructure, a vestige of colonial vandalism, an unproductive agricultural system, illiteracy and ignorance on the part of the majority of people about modern ways of life and technology, due to century-old preconceptions and orthodoxy and conservatism. "To build a great nation," proclaimed Javah arlal Nehru,"every individual citizen of that country must be made to contribute his might and towards this objective, our planners should design the nation-building programmes. Strength of democracy lies in making every citizen feel a sense of participation in the mighty and gigantic task of building the country. A country built by a few people will collapse sooner or later." How accurate was his analysis!! That is how exactly America has been built up and that is precisely why American intelligentia was attracted towards Nehru's concept of democracy. Believe me, all the billions of dollars spent during the last three five-year plans have been scrupulously spent, keeping largely in view the above Nehru's concept. The common man is the basis of democracy and if he is bypassed, then either Communism or diet worship :or both are sure to take over. We are proud that we have checked Communism. We have also checked dictatorship. We have maintained friendship with all countries except the belligerent China and fanatic Pakistan. Our relations with America have reached the all time high. More than 55% of the total foreign economic aid comes from the United States of I America in the form of food-grains, technical expertise, scholarships, thermal plants, atomic reactors and such other things. Ambassadors Henderson, John Galbraith, Sherman Cooper, Bunker, Chester-Bowles and the present ambassador Kenneth Keating have rendered yeoman service in patching up differences and in building up a strong, -indivisible and indestructible bridge of friendship between our two great countries. I am one of those privileged persons who has walked over this bridge to come to this great country. I am sure and I pray in God that this grand alliance of friendship between the two greatest democracies of the world shall continue to grow still faster to achieve 1he common goal of mutual happiness and world peace!! On this auspicious day, while saluting my own country's national flag, I also salute the flag of Indo-American friendship and co-operation, which alone symbolizes the torch bearing leadership of a free and democratic world today and which also symbolizes the Indo-American solidarity and firm determination to defend the cause of world peace and democracy. Long Live India!! Long Live America!! Long Live In4o-. n SolbdarltyandF FIRST WE SHIP ARMS -SO THAT WEST PAKISTAN CAN TO WEST PAKISTANSHOOT PEOPLE IN EAST PAKISTAN Alky WE THEN SEND HUMANITARIAN AID TO THE POOR SHOT-U THATh WHAT WE CALL OUR EAST PAKISTANIS. 'TWO PAKISTAN POLICY' %bb.

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17-17 Lml n A Via SILVERMAN'S You'll surely make happy vibrations in brown embroidered corduroy knickers and vest by Country Set. Darlene adds a vanilla colored acryllic blouse to complete a fetching picture. SUSAN SCOTT Wherever the happy happenings are, Sue will surely freeze out any competition in this paisley printed romper with matching blazer. Experience some of the looks for fall at Susan Scott. FIGURE FAIR You'll be as soft looking as a fluffy cluoud in a nylon tricot peignoir set. The lined lace umpire top with puffy sleeves renders the soft feminine look of a bride. The long gown of nylon net over jersey has a fitted lace top with adjustable belt. Modeled by Christy. MAAS SHOES The Shoe of the Month at Man means the suede softness of Capezio. Your choice of colors in rust or brown. Photos by P14 I I 0 layout by 4 r 4 I

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fNlf l lllilliflll IUulnflilnlih hUllillnIIhU lUU hhll hhlhI llllIlUU hf ftlh hhU N THE GROUP THEY CALL LIFE PLAYS A DANCE/CONCERT AUGUST 20,1971 9:00 PM -1:00AM ON THE REITZ UNION TERRACE FR EM ..--XSPONSORED BY. J.W. REITZ UNION ALLIGATOR CLASSIFIED To place classifieds, use the form below, and strictly adhere to the following instructions: Minimum charge is $1.00 for 4 lines. For each additional line add 25 cents. Multiply the total by the number of days the ad is to run, then subtract the discount. The discount below is applicable ONLY if the ad is run in consecutive days. THERE ARE NO REFUNDSI The acceptance of payment with advertising copy dose not constitute a binding agreement on the Florida Alligator to publish said copy. The Florida Alligator reserves the right to act as sole judge of the suitability of any or all advertising copy submitted for publication, and the right to edit, revise, delay, or reject any advertising copy. Mail the ad, with ramittance (check preferred) to: Alligator Classifieds, Room 330, Reitz Union, Gainesville, Florida, 32601. Deadline -3:00 p.m. 2 days prior to starting day DO NOT ORDER BY PHONE .W K i.ag .rnm .... ..C -s .. ... 3 -1 00 Cz -. .u -.' .t -------Cigvvgnwgww ...........--------------------------CINEMA 2 AT:1:40-3:45-5:50-7:55-10:00 The runaway bestseller is on the screen. DAY! Sean ACoinuAmy NTh ACIrE,.TapeS NOT FOR CHILDREN Z.~s A NEW FRISCH'S GOOD THING! STEAK AND EGGS TENDER 4-oz. STEAK TWO FARM-FRESH EGGS COOKED TO YOUR ORDER ;140 SERVED ANYTIME -GREAT FOR "AFTER-THE-PARTY" BREAKFASTS BIG BOYRESTAURANT Fish Fry All you can eat, $1.39 Wednesday & Friday 2035 N. W. 13th Street, Gainesville a 378-2304 FIEATijRKS AT 1:45 3:45 8:40 7:40 5:35 A JAAS LEBARftrAEW ie wAesApGL CINEMA I AT: 1:15,20-5:25-7:30-9:35 WHAT AN EGGstravaganza I LAST DAY I I ii I Il~l UUi lfl~lillilllil~tltltt l Save 25% or more on all auto parts. Spark plugs68 cents. Cash & Carry Auto Parts, 1111 S. Main St. 378-7330 (A-tf-c) Tame baby ferrets coons monkeys bob cats ocelots skunks parrots hawks snakes lizards turtles for sale trade or buy Kongo Pet 475-2546 (local) (A-3t-150-p) FOR better cleaning, to keep colors gleaming, use Blue Lustre carpet cleaner. Rent electric shampooer $1. Electric upholstery shampooers also available. Lowry Furniture Co. (A-tf-c) SCUBA EQUIPMENT tank and regulator by Decor. Very New 100.00 Call Maryann 392-2814 til 5 and 378-5622 after 5:30 a-5t-164-p Puppies: "Toy" Italian Greyhound Purebred-pedigree (AKC pending) shots-wormed 2 females, 1 male $30 ea. call 378-8803 anyday til 10 p.m. a-6t-164-p WATERBEDSI!! 6 sizesstudent prices $25 & up waterpillows tool contact: Steve Gale (caesar) 14 frat row 372-2667 or 372-9476 (a-5t-164-p) IF YOU'RE MAN ENOUGH. Beautiful OSSA Stiletto 1970 250 cc 372-9527 It takes Leather!l (a-5t-164-p) Irish Setter Puppies, akc, champion background. male and female, shots, wormed, 7 weeks old. beautiful puppies $100.00 373-3108 (a-St-165-p) JFOR SA LJE Alternators -generators -starters electrical systems tested and repaired, Auto-Electric Service, 1111 S. Main 378-7330. Nowl Bank Americard and Master Charge. (A-sf-c) TraIler 10x45 Naw Moon $2600.00. 2 bedroom, air cond, cntri heat, furn., metal shed, awning, cable. I'm graduating 378-4228 beat rent (a-St-165-P) THE DIVE SHOP Skin and Scubadiving Equipment Call Gene Metton 373-1058 after 5 PM (a-4t-166-p) IBM executive typewriter, Nyamatic dictation system, Crown telephone valet, misc. ofc. equip. & supplIes. Call 372-6202 After 5. je-5t-165-p) FURNITURE Living', Dining, Bedroom & Babys. Moving overseas Call 372-4750 Also Power Mower (a-4t-166-p) STANDARD POODLE -black AKC registered puppies, $100 378-7983 (a-4t-166-p) Stereo -garrard turntable; craig pioneer tuner w/am-fm radio and speakers excellent condition call Steve 378-1132 going for $130 (a-4t-166-p) aquarium-29 gal-stoallte-grolux lamp heater-dynaflo fllter-2 gang pump & acces. $70. heath 40 wt stereo-2 12" spk $75. 378-3830 after 6 pm and weekends (a-3t-167-p) Honda 175, 1970, new knobby tire, chain, excellent condition, $450. Call Paul 392-6587 days or 629-2534 nights. (a-3t-167-p) I GAT()EICLSKFI Pa 10 The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, August 17, 1971 0 Ip1piR SAL -E ------------YAMAHA 175 CT-lb excellent cond $465 yashica 35mm fl.8, 45mmls, flash $45 392-8019 or376-0892 Mike (a-2t-167-p) Set of 4 Keystone mags. Almost new. Tires Included. 'Locking lugs. Beautiful shape. Everything $100 Call Alan at 378-3369 after 6:00 pm. (a-3t-167-p) Bulldog. fantastic cross between English & pitbull. 12 weeks. white with a black eye. loves everybody call Alan after 6 pm 378-3369 (a-2t-167-p) WATER BED; Bag, pad and frame In good shape $35. Call Bob 376-6732 or 378-8697 one only (a-2t-167-p) Yamaha enduro DT, trail extras, low mileage, like new, sacrificel 378-2139 (a-t-168-p) Stereo System, Furniture, beds, dressers, hair dryer, portable tv, vacuum cleaner, curtains, desk,/w chair great prices, call 378-9153 (a-2t-168-p) GUITAR for sale $50 very good condition also HIGH CHAIR $10 and WALKER $4 call 392-0590 or after 6 372-6680 Wendy (a-2t-168-p) 1970 Yamaha 250 D6 street bike. Fast, dependable, with luggage rack, new chain, sprocket. $450 372-6963 (a-2t-168-p) PLCII Marine Off. Uniforms, For Sale, like new, large discount, call 378-8152 (a-2t-168-p) '71 deluxe traler, 2 bedroom, 2 bath, air conditioned in free woods of windsor, 12 miles from campus $6300 3 7 3 -3 8 9 6 3 7 8-95 91 (a-2t-168-p) Bike, girls 3 speed. Rides well, fair condition $24. 328 NW 14 ST. Call 378-7434. Also records for sale. (a-2t-168-p) 1970 Lamplghter 12x60 AC 3 brs $950 equity & take over pnts $76 Call after 5 372-3138 (a-2t-168-p) For Sale: 4% size roll-a-way bed, $20. Desk, $10. and Dresser $5. Come by 1140 NE 9th Ave. Corner of 9th and NE 12th St. (a-2t-168-p) DT-1 Yamaha 250 Enduro Gyt-klted VERY FAST must sell quickly first reasonable offer. Call 378-9741. keep trying. (a-2t-168-p) Outstanding 7 wki Ge. Shpards. A.K.C. Reg Wormed and shot. Males $60, females $45. Excellent pets and watchdogs, phone 376-0052. (a-2t-168p) I4R RENT Three offices available Immdately From $70 to $90 per month Incl. all utilities 2 blocks from campus Call Mrs. Stiff 378-8743*(B10-'159p) Sublet: Camelot apt 2 brs furn or unfur limited to married & grad stud. al Sept 1 3727369 after 3 pm comp mt quiet surroundings, pool, sauna B-St-164-p GAINESVILLE ROOMMATES LTD. Looking to share house? apt? Guaranteed results or no charge. 378-8021 24 hrs 7 days (b4t-166-p) THE PLACE -roommates (male) wanted -must be U of F students, 21 or older. lease runs from 9-15-71 to 9-15-72 with sublet privileges call Jim at 372-7820 (b167-3t-p) Roomate wanted for fall own bedroom $52 mo. util. not Incl. female or male. pref. freakytype nice person: calI 392-7754 (b2t167-p) -T SAT. :0 30 S8:58 7: as18

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I [A e : GP No 1:30 -5:30 -9:30t RUSSIA 3:20 -7:20 sAN -80CONNE .'mlm u Wi ~th Lovse.1 ,PO~bal Qg4g4n Op -, 44P f R 1 Fl E N N r 2 bdrm 2 bath apt Williamsburg. Need 2 girls by fall. $55 a month plus utilities. Has dishwasher, ac call Colleen, 372-7296 or 376-3654 (b-3t-167-p) HERBIE needs a home 3/ yr mutt med. size, shots, exc. watch dog, doesn't like kids. needs acres to run. call 376-4295 or 392-0148 anytime (C-7t-163-0) Need riders) to Seattle or any pts west; going southern route; leave around Sept. 8 from Pensacola; help with gas -new V.W. call Sheila 176-879 lr-.1f17.-t-nt Female roommate needed Sept. 1. Must be grad stu. Country house SW Archer Rd. $45 + / utilities. Call 373-1880. (c-3t-167-p) WANTED: Large, Inflatable raft. Suitable for trip down Colorado River. Call Ed at 372-5801, or Steve at 376-1525 (c-2t-167-p) Female roommate to share apartment In Orlando Prefer a Disney World employee Call 495-2373 (c-2t-167-p) Teacher seeks position In N, K, or Day Care. BA In Early childhood education. I have 2 years teaching experience. 378-2271 Jackie Searcy (c-168-2t-P) Female roommate to share apartment In Orlando Prefer a Disney World employee Call 495-2372 (c-2t-167-p) Male law student needs place to live starting fall qtr. would prefer own room call Gerry 378-3375 any nte after 6 (c-lt-168-p) 2 grad students need coed roommate share apt 2 blocks from campus. Grad or quiet undergrad wanted. Call 376-9829. (c-2t-168-p) One male and one female 3-speed bike in good condition and at reasonable price. call 378-0842 best time Is before 9 am, after 6 pm. (c-3t-168-p) Moving Out Soon? let me know, if the house is two brs and If I rent, you get a nice reward call 378-8252 (c-2t-168-p) Roommate wanted beginning Sept. 15 Gatortown Apts. 2 bedroom 1 baths Call Kent 378-S480 before Aug. 20 (c-2t-168-p) Wanted: technicians: radio, stereo or tv full or parttme minimum salary $2.00 per hour -open to discussion. Call 373-1300 (e-2t-168-p) r SENIOR CITIZEN SPECIAL $1.0AGES&OVER ALL DAY-I.D.-MEDICARD *DR.LIC. Sargain Hr. 'Ti2:15 I Adults 76S-Mn.-Sat* m m mm mmo mmo mmo m LAST 1 3 DAYS L NfillN.W._fin__S'-. SHOWS -1:30. I 3:30 -8:257:20 -:15 "Where your nightmares j end. *4 begns.[ LAST t 2 DAYS SHOWS 1:30 Ila S3:31 5:30 7:30 N F 1K EL 3P WA N TGrad student wil pay married couples $5 to be in opinion study. Need you for less than I hour, 1 session. Call 376-5852 after 5 p.m. (e-2t-167-p) Listeners wanted! Will pay $2.00 .or one hour session. Must be naIove English speaking and have normal hearing. Please call LeVan between 8 and 5 for an appointment. 392-2049 (E-10t-154-p) Registered Nurse needed for Student Health Infirmary on the University of Florida campus. Stimulating, interesting position. Permanent shift, 12 midnight to 8:00 A.M. Write or call Personnel Department, 2nd floor Hub, University of Florida, Gainesville. Fla. .........392-1221 (e-2t-168-c) Hurtin' for coins? We can help you make the extra money you need full or part time Start now -your own hours your own town Call 373-2757 between 5 and 7 (e-2t-168-p) WANTED senior MARKETING majcr to manage sales of 1972 SEMINOLE. Salary plus commission. Call 392-1681 or come by Room 330 JI.W. Reitz Union, ask for Randy Coleman (e-2t-168-nc) Needs reliable person to babysit 2 boys 3 & 5 at my home hours can be arranged own transportation Call Mrs. Su 376-0287 after 5 (e-2t-168-p) SALES ORIENTED students for fall quarter. Also need Marketing manager. Salary and Commission. Call 392-1681 or come by Room 330 Reitz Union. Ask for Randy Coleman. (e-2t-168-nc) 1963 Valiant convertible slant 6 engine cheap transportation $200 Tel. 376-8192 after 4:00 (g-3t-166-p) 1967 Sprite, excellent condition, AM-FM radio, four new tires, recent tune-up 378-9249 or 392-3301 (g-5t-165-p) Rambler stationwagen 1960 great condition, recent tune-up, good breaks, automatic transmission $265 call 373-1676 (g-3t-167-p) 60 SPRITE BUGEYE good tyres, new top, sidewindows; needs work but runs. price $212 maybe. call 376-9335 ask for John Haldin (g-3t-167-p) 65 TBird first $800 cash buys it. See at 536 NE 12th court call 392-1683 8 am to 4 pm or 378-6345 after pm. ask for Jo Claire (9-3t-167-p) 1969 Mustang Fastback, V8, Air, ps, Automatic in console, radio & stereo tape, Jow mileage, new sticker $2050 or best offer Phone 378-4413 (g-2t-168-p) Triumph TR 3 1960 completely restored best possible appearance perfect mechanically 378-4116 or 392-0584 (g-2t168-p) For Sale: 1964 MGB needs starter ring gear $475 or best offer and 1956 Ford Panel Truck 72 inspect. $125 or best offer. 378-4065 after 5 (g-167-3t-p) Today's more for your money meal atmORRISOn'S CAFETERIA TUESDAY'S FEATURE GOLDEN FRIED CHICKEN ALL YOU CAN EAT 9fl WEDNESDAY FEATURE z0 ROAST TURKEY with MASHED POTATOES, DRESSING, 84 CRANBERRY SAUCE LUNCH 11 tI 2 -SUPPER 4:30 til 8 -FREE PARKING mOR ISfl'S C AFETERIA eyond comparson 21620 N.W. 13th Street tfl the Gainesville Mali ALU TCI S III)IIIIIiiiiIiiiiiiiiiiiiiigiitiIIIiiiiliiiitgigiiiiii urive off in your own VW sUnrooff for $150.00 runs good and its inspected go by 905 SV 6th Ave. Ask for Tim (g-2t-168-p) FR E AL ESTATE For sale by owner 4br 2 bath* house in greenbriar subdivision. living dining utility rms. large panelled family rm with fireplace. 2-car garage, large lot. in glen springs school district. close to westwood and westside park. 67/ percent mort. call 378-9808 (1-9t-161-p) IER %0MA Co-Eds Facial Hair removed forever, fast, low-cost gentle hair removal. E d m u n d D w y e r Electrologist. 102 N.W. 2nd Ave. Call 372-8039 for appointment (J-14t-156-p) GOING TUBING: Large truck tubes for rent. a $1.00 per day. Call 378-5931, 372-1446 or 376-3678, (J-17t-.53-p) MEN -WOMEN need a place to stay this fall GEORGIA SEAGLE HALL $220/quarter -room & board, 24-hr. open house co-ed, cooperative living call 376-8941 j-6t-164-p male grad student desires room with bath privileges. prefer with gainesville family. call 378-1114. also have refrigerator for sale. (j-4t-165-p) KITTENS moonchildren desire to balance with good people vibrant trusting. Can you help a friend? Call Sandy at 392-2931 (J-3t-166-p) .f you make things; anything, and want to sell them, get ready for the Union Print & Poster & Arts and Crafts Sale, Sept. 22 & 23 (J-6t-163-ch) Organic Seeds & Grains -Vitamins Books. Sunflower Health Foods 7 W. Univ. Downtown 378-8978 (j-3t-167-p) Craig -Happy 2nd anniversary can't wait for the fall when we will never have to say goodbye again -I miss you -I love you -K.S.H. (j-?t-167-p) vVanted: A good horne for a cat and five kittens. Must go together. Call 392-7645 FRE E! (j-3t-167-p Teacher seeks position in N, K, or Day Care. BA in Early childhood education. I have 21/a years teaching experience. 378-2271 Jackie Searcy (l-168-2t-p) IMarried grad student wants mature, quiet female roommate while husband in boot camp, fall, winter. $32.50 + 6: util, a/c, 3 blocks from campus, pets, quiet, shaded area. 372-6598 (j-lt-168-p) 2 people need ride to New York city Sept. 1-3 will share food expenses & driving please call Bobbi 378-4405 (j-2t-168-P) 10 week male labrador-irish setter light orange or beige color more lab than setter in appearance Call 372-1622 301 NW 2nd St. Ask for Tom Reward (1-2t-168-p) I yTHEGROUP THEY CALL PLAYS A DANCE/CONCERT AUGUST 20,1971 0:00 PM -1:00 AM ON THE REITZ UNION TERRACE FREE!! SPONSORED BY J.W. REITZ UNION [1. 3 it J THE BICYCLE THIEF is the story of a poor rrarried man, his son, and the bicycle which provides their livelihood. Just when the bicycle is needed for a long-sought job, it is stolen. The film follows the desperate search through the streets of Rome to find the treasured bicycle. Scene after scene reveals the bitter irony of this lone man and his son, buffeted by an indifferent world. Tuesday, August 17 & Wednesday, August 18 7:00 & 9:30 Union Auditorium 504 Sponsored by the J.W.R.U. IU~I4T ~Pg1NT .L Guesday Au 1,9,hFiEl Tuesday, August 17, 1971, The Florida Alligator, Page 11 F' 4 I 4 QrE1 1R Ar IE G PROFESSIONAL TYPING SERVICE IBM Building, Room 206 Telephone 376-7160 Manuscripts. Textbooks, Business reports Dissertations (M-12t-158-p) Tennis racquets restrung. machine strung. low prices fast service pick-up a nd d elIse ry call 379-4019 (m-3t-167-p) Save $ on repairs! I fix everything stereos lamps bikes typewriters fans nairdryers etc cheap! but experienced free delivery Barry 376-3456 (m-3t-167-p) NEW & USFD COMPLETE UNE Or RELOADING COMPONENTS BUT -SELL -TRADE -REPAIR 1466-3340 McAvn HARRY BECKwitH -GUN DEAtR 0. r PATRONIZE GATOR ADVERTISERS I Lost mens glasses in black case in the vicinity of Tigert Hall parking lot reward call 392-1261 before 5 p.m. (1-2t-167-p) LOST Powder gray kitten 12 weeks oid Missing in vicinity of Tolbert area. Reward offered. Call 392-8145 afternoons or evenings (1-3t-167-p) Lost Male siamese, 8 mo old, area behind Norman Hall -SW 12th St. No collar. Very friendly. Please return. Call 373-1764 (1-3t-167-p) E 1V ICES A I R-CONDITIONING SERVICE Commercial and Household Licensed Mechanic moon-lighting Reasonable 378-9240 (M-5t-161-p) Trail Rides 9, 1, 5 every Sat. $4-2 hrs. Western riding lessons, riding by appointment. Horses boarded. Reasonable rates. 372-9437, 378-4293. (m-5t-165-p) Nursery school looking for creative 3 and 4 year olds. for information call First Lutheran Church 376-2062 m-6t-164-p a; el,

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Page 12, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, August 17, 1971 The University Calendar will be published-weekly listing only Notices for ett Cosne Od must be events to pen to the University sent to Betty Coomes, Division of community. Private meeting information Services, Building H. At notices will be carried in "What's copy for Tuesday must be received nis be carda atd by 3 p.m. Frday. Hppening" on Thursday and by 3p~m Friay.should be submitted to the Formerly Oranie nd Blue Buleri. Produced eery Tuesday & Firidy Aligator office, 365 Union or to for the publication of official University notices and public events by Alli o ffice, G-o 2 the Division of Information Services and the Pblic Fuctions Office Public Functions Office, G72 Union. FEE SCHEDULE REVISIONS GRADUATE STUDENTS AND COLLEGE OF LAW The following replaces material published in the Undergraduate, F U L LI Graduate, Law and Medicine students w catalogs and reflects fee changes $240/quarte approved by the F lorida FULL-TI Legislature effective with the fall students quarter. The schedule was not $590/quarte available at the time catalogs plus $350 n were printed. P A R T Fees are payable on the dates students w listed in the University of $20/credit h Florida Calendar or the dates PART-TI shown on statements sent those students participating in advance $47/cre registration. Registration R egistra (including payment of fees) non-Florida must be completed on or before the proper due date. Mail MEDICINE payments must be RECEIVED at Student Accounts, the Hub, Students ei by this date. All payments program o received on or after the due date Medicine are subject to a $25 late fee. program c Fees charged are based on the Dentistry w classification of a student as f ees pal Florida or non-Florida, full-time installmer (nine hours or more) or January and part-time (enrolled for eight A FLOR credit hours or less); graduate, assessed a f postbaccalaureate or in $350 ins undergraduate. A NON The fees below are assessed will be assc for each quarter the student is payable in enrolled. Unless otherwise noted (part-time and GENESYS), the GENESYS fees include matriculation, Student Health Services, student A studen activities and a general building Graduate E fee. Part-time and GENESYS System w students are not entitled to $60/credit student activity or Infirmary charged wil privileges. Studer U N D E R G R A D U A T E STUDENTS (includes freshmen, sophomores, juniors, seniors, or students in a f ifth-year baccalaureate program. This fee also is applied to POST-BACCALAUREATE students unless registered in the Graduate School). A FULL-TIME FLORIDA student will pay a fee of $190/quarter A F U L L -T I M E NON-FLORIDA student will pay a fee of $540/quarter ($190 registration plus $350 non-Florida fee). A PART-TIME FLORIDA student will pay a fee of $16/credit hour A P A R T -T I M E NON-FLORIDA student will pay $43/credit hour ($16 plus $27 non-Florida fee). GENESYS student a privileges. University late fees als except that not be ass week of cla STUDENT SCHEDULE TIME FLORIDA mill pay a fee of er ME NON-FLORIDA will pay fees of er (240 Registration on-F orida fee) TIME FLORIDA mill pay a fee of tour ME NON-FLORIDA will pay fees of dit hour ($20 tion plus $27 Fee. AND DENTISTRY enrolled in the M.D. of the College of and the D.M.D. of the College of till be assessed annual yable in equal nits in September, d March. IDA student will be ee of $1,050, payable tallments, -FLORIDA student essed a fee of $2,250 $750 installments. t enrolled in the ngineering Education 'ill pay a fee of hour. Maximum fee I be $375. nts enrolled in are not entitled to activity or Infirmary :y polici concerning o apply'tb GENESYS t the $25 late fee will essed during the first isses. T HEALTH SERVICE LE During the break Student Health Room will provide emergency care to students during the period the Infirmary is closed. PROCESSING GRADES Following current practices as established by the CoLncil of Deans and the President, the faculties of the various units should approve candidates for the August commencement according to the schedule below. 1. Special grade sheets for degree candidates will be distributed by the Registrar's Office to colleges and schools during the ninth week of classes. 2. These grade sheets will be completed and returned to the Registrar's Office by noon, Thursday, Aug. 26. 3. Grades for degree candidates will be available from the Registrar's Office by 9 a.m., Friday Aug. 27. 4. College faculty meetings to pass on degree candidates should be scheduled Friday, Aug. 27. 5. Final report of colleges on candidates for degrees are due in the Registrar's Office by 3 p.m., Friday, Aug. 27. 6. Colleges will post lists of graduates by 8 a.m., Sat., Aug. 28. These lists should indicate those graduating with honors or high honors. Where necessary, exceptions may be made to University policy in scheduling final exam nations for degree candidates only. FINAL EXAMINATIONS All students for the tests below must bring a No. 2 lead pencil and will be required to use Social Security Numbers. CPS 121, CPS 12X The CPS 121 and CPS 12X exams will be given Sat., Aug. 21, at 1 p.m. in Carleton Auditorium. Service will operate on a modified schedule. The CPS 122 Infirmary will be closed at Midnight, Aug. 28 and will be The CPS closed each Saturday and Sat., Aug Sunday through the break Hall, roor period as well as Labor Day, Sept. 6. Mon. through Fri. hours CPS 123 will be from 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m. only. Normal 24-hour operation The CPS will resume at 8 a.m., Mon., Sat., Au Sept. 13. Music Bu The Health Center Emergency 144, 145 122 exam will be given .21, at 1 p.m. in Little ms 113, 121. 123 exam will be given g. 21, at 1 p.m. in the building, rooms 142, 143, CBS 261 The CBS 261 exam will be given Sat., Aug. 21 at 7 p.m. in Carleton Auditorium. CMS 171, CMS 17X (SECTION 0165 ONLY) The CMS 171 and CMS 17X exams will be given Mon., Aug. 23, at 10:30 a.m. in Carleton Auditorium. CSSi111 The CSS 111 exam will be given Mon., Aug. 23, at 7 p.m. in Carleton Auditorium. CSS 112 The CSS 112 exam will be given Mon., Aug. 23, at 7 p.m. in Little Hall, rooms 113, 121. CSS 113 The CSS 113 exam will be given Mon., Aug. 23, at 7 p.m. in the Music Building, rooms 142, 143. CSS lix The CSS 11X exam will be given Mon., Aug. 23, at 7 p.m. in the Music Building, rooms 144, 145. CLC 142, 143, 144 The CLC 142, CLC 143 and CLC 144 exams will be given Tue., Aug. 24, at 7 p.m., in Carleton Auditorium CLC 14X The CLC 14X exam will be given ,Tue., Aug. 24, at 7 p.m., in the Music Building rooms 142, 143, 144, 145. CHN 251 The CHN 251 exam will be given Wed., Aug. 25 at 7 p.m. Students with last names beginning with A-Q report to Carleton Auditorium; those beginning with R-Z report to Little Hall rooms 113, 121. CHN 253 The CHN 253 exam will be given Wed., Aug. 25 at 7 p.m. in the Music Building, rooms 142, 143, 144, 145. a 0 univlersity 4 TUESDAY, August 17 Union ,ovie: "The Bicycle Thief", Jnion Aud. University Summer Orchestra Concert: Univ. Aud., 8:15 p.m. U. of F. Duplicate Bridge, Union 150 C & D, 7:30 p.m. WEDNESDAY, August 18 Union Movie: "The Bicycle Thief", Union Aud. Cl RUNA: Public Discussion, East Indian Pakistani Refugee Problem, Union 346, 7:30 p.m. FRIDAY, August 20 Union Movie: "The Hill", Union Aud. Union Dance: LIFE, North Terrace, 9:00 p.m. -1:00 a.m. SATURDAY, August 21 Union Movie: "The Hill", Union AUd. Rose Community Concert: MUDCRUTCH, Univ. Aud, 9:00 p.m.1:00 a.m. Graham-Tolbert Dance: RED, WHITE AND BLUE, Graham Rec Room, 9:00 p.m. -1:00 a.m. SUNDAY, August 22 Union Movie: "Destry Rides Again", Union Aud. WEDNESDAY, August 25 Union Dance: HOGTOWN CREEK, South Side Constans Theatre, 8:0010:00p. m. F R IDAY, August 27 Student Action Conference, _Univ. Aud., 8:00 p.m. SATURDAY, August 28 Commencement: Florida Field, 7:00 P.M. (Univ. Aud. in case of rain) Gainesville Florida Campus Federal Credit Union 1200 S.W. Fifth Avenue Phone 392-0393 Auto Loans for UF Faculty'and' Staff 9

PAGE 13

I I I Federal -Government files suit to gain Gatorade rights I :LOIDA QUARTI;RLY Loll, e Girls, We cc 1029 W ALSO a a A a AA. Tuesday, August 17, 1971, The Florida Alligator. Pap 13 Cade could not be reached to verify or deny these statements. The government's suit further charges Cade and two others, (also recipients of HEW grants) Dr. Dana Leroy Shires and Dr. Harry J. Free, illegally formed a Gatorade trust in 1967 and subsequently sold Stokely Van Camp, Inc. exclusive rights to the drink. "Stokely, Cade and fhe Gatorade Trust refused to recognize the govens went's ownership rights to the Gatorade formula and have refused to transfer such rights to the government," the suit charges. Suits for production rights of Gatorade have also been filed by the Gatorade trust and the Florida Board of Regents. None of the suits have come to trial as yet. By CAROL BRADY Alligator Staff Writer The third in a series of suits involving the production rights to thirst quenching Gatorade was filed by the Federal Government August 11 in U.S. District court, Washington D.C. According to a UPI release, the government seeks to recover all the "substantial profits" and royalties earned by Stokely Van Camp Inc. through Gatorade sales. The suit contends Gatorade was developed at UF by Dr. Robert Cade, head of renal medicine, under grants from the department of Health, Education and Welfare (HEW). Cade issued this statement Friday, "Since the invention and introduction on the market of Gatorade there has been an unresolved conflict as to the proprietorship of the product. The question was and still is whether the rights belong to the U.S. government, the Board of Regents, Stokely Van Camp, Inc., or me and my associates. The Board of Regents for and oi behalf of the University of Florida has asked for a judicial resolution. Therefore it is up to the courts to render judgment in this matter rather than to any of the involved parties. "While I have the right to my personal opinion, I also respect the opinions and actions of others. I wish to indicate that statements attributed to me concerning this legal dispute regarding agencies and officials were oversimplified and resulted in inappropriate and unfortunate quotations. I do not intend to offer any further opinion or statement on this matter until a legal decision hadhbeen reached." Cade reportedly commented on HEW chegs, in an article published Friday by the St. Petsaua Thes, "If that's what the Goveramst uays, then thegeemnent isanas. ." HE also stated the government's position as "a matter of contention." Brady Greathouse, athletic trainer at UP at the time of the discovery and member of the Gatorade Tiust, insisted Thursday, research onthe ddsa was done at na cost to the government or t =hksrsty. G msaid the dsh* wu "put tohein Dr. Cade'i tcmen Wsak one eiag." "As I recall, Dr. Cade spent $42 out of his own pocket for the ingredients," Greathouse added. CURB COUPON Cusl sarvbwiessy. 1430 S.W.13 SWeet Hamburierf latter and reg .gl 85 $1.10 vv 0w/cOupon Cheek for t 'S Treets Ssavlis eveegvsa leesat on fit your Caboose .UNIVERSITY AVE. IN TALLAHASSEE m FLARES 283.8 R.5OO1 PUTT PUTT GOLF OFF ONE GAME (WITH AD) MON.-SAT 12:00-12:00 SUN 2:00-12:00 3215 NW 13th ST. omue >it soine ---, i ROCRECORDS 424 WE 13 ST. I.

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Page 14, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, August 17, 1971 Neighborhood Youth Corps a chance to earn TERRY WALTERS A Gainesville police officer .works with kids TERRY WALTERS You* Corps worker turns on .water to cool underprivileged kids By LINDA MIKLOWITZ Alligator Staff Writer From driving a police car to filing papers, 300 Gainesville 13-to-18-year-olds are making their summer pay. They are members of the Neighborhood Youth Corps, now in its fourth summer in Gainesville. They are earning money for high school expenses. The youth work 25 hours weeldy for local government agencies and nonprofit organizations. Their pay comes from two overlapping grants totaling $179,000 from the U.S. Department of Labor. A UF graduate student, Laurence Bayer, is the new head of the project after UF graduate student in history, Bruce Doyle resigned to finish his degree requirements. The summer office of the Neighborhood Youth Corps is in the Community Action Agency headquarters on East University Avenue. Florida State Employment Service finds jobs, then screens and refers applicants to the National Youth Corps. Applicants must be enrolled in high school and show financial need. The money they earn is supposed to relieve their families of such expenses as school clothes. The jobs will also give them something to do during the RED PIN NIGHT 8-10PM WIN FREE GAMES REITZ UNION G AMES AREA lATCH FOR The Domino's Finals Special announced in Thursday's Alligator 'a [ 37 months when there is no school and provide job experience when they enter the job market. Youngsters work as hospital assistants, janitors and office clerks. They report to the police department and such offices as blind services and social security. The Gainesville police department workers serve in the Mainstream program of its community services division. They help organize fire hydrant splash parties in underprivileged neighborhoods. WE'RE TOPS Florida Alligator DEROSA FEATURING CHUCK WAGON STEAKS FROM 99c OPEN 11:00 AM to 9:00 PM -7 Days Weekly Westgate Shopping Center -PHONE 378-3320 3321 W. University Ave. -Gainesville, Florida Greiatona time to say goodbye to one type of life and gst a new one. Your relatives and friends will want to remember your collge lfe too. We here the novelties for gifts and we have Diplomas of Gratitude for thou who helped you throqp isoLoA For you, we have books to start a new library, official class rhi Os, and gruhation -ppeW. May we heip you dough thief last step to a new life? Come by todeyl MON. -FRI. I:M a.-7:30 p.m. lb op ItDOaIW MILLER-BROWN 4222 N W 13th ST.

PAGE 15

Hogtown lacrosse club By GENE HARDY Alliptor Corraqpondant UF's new lacrosse team met Thursday to organize for its first (1971-71) season. plan forog the team on the club level were discussed, said David Smith, 4AS, who founded the team. Lacrosse films were also shown. "By organizing on the club l e velIw e c an k ee p 'professionalism' out," said Smith. Tom Chesley, 3JM, joined the team for that reason. Scales 50 at once Automatic sealer on market A new gadget, just on the market, allows you to scale up to 50 fish at one time by simply taking a short boat ride. By towing the Rock-It Automatic Fish Scaler behind your boat a couple hundred yards your catch is scaled without breaking the skin or damaging the meat of the fish in any way. The scaler doubles as a handy live fish basket as the catch is scaled eliminating any handling from hook to home. The cylindrical Rock-it is made of galvanized steel mesh, measuring 22 inches by 10 inches and weighs 4 pounds. Slanted fins on the outside rotate the scaler, and a special lip on the cone-shaped nose causes a rapid rocking motion. As the fish tumble inside the cylinder, they are scaled by scraping against the expanded steel mesh and shuffling against each other. The water, jetting through the nose inlets, washes out the scales and slime leaving only clean fish. The Rock-It Automatic fish sealer "I don't have any experience in playing lacrosse," he said. "I like sports, and everyone who goes out will have a chance to play."9 Presently, the team has 15 members. Only four have experience. "Wanting to play is the only qualification for membership," said Smith. Smith played on the undefeated 1969 Naval Academy freshman team. He hopes the meeting will attract new members. "We have to show the intramural department there is a good deal of interest in lacrosse before they will help us," he said. Dr. Paul Varnes, chairman of the department, said the team needs at least 20 members to qualify-for support. "We have to make sure there will be continuing support for the program, that it will last for more than one year," he said. Varnes said the intramural department will pay for equipment and provide a practice field if enough interest is shown. Transportation to games will probably be the responsibility of the teamn, he added. Smith said scheduling for the new spring sport should be no problem. Tennessee, Vanderbilt, Georgia Tech and many Atlantic Coast Conference schools have teams, he said. "There are also plans to travel to the northeast and play some of the finest teams in the nation," added Smith. OUR WAY BANANA SPLIT SPECIAL PICK YOUR FAVORITE ICE CREAMS AND j TOPPINGS GOOD UNTIL THURS AUG. 19 Lg fiEAIPRl~lA MON-SAT 11 AM -2 AM SUNDAY 1 PM -'2 AM 1226 W. UNIVERSITY AVENUE ONLY, 373"3266 OFSebastian's 535 SW 4th Ave. and take advantage of this special phone 376-9381 ELROD'S AUTO REPAIR CORVAIR SPECIALISTS And General Repair on All Makes of Cars Discount ON PARTS ONLY 10% To Students ELECTRONIC TUNE UPS -GUARANTEED WORK Free Estimates Compare OUR Prices and Honesty That Makes Us The Students Friend 1031 SO. MAIN PHONE: 378-8532 STOCK REDUCTION SALE All boots and jeans 10-50% OFF Halter boots as low as $20.95 Compare at $30 Good today and tomorrow. Gainesville's leader for boots and jeans Weekdays 9AM-9PM Saturdays 9AM-6PM TV-STEREO REPAIRS e FREE PICK-UP AND DELIVERY NO MINIMUM e FREE ESTIMATES e 90 DAY GUARANTEE ON REPAIR PARTS CAR STEREO SALE SETICO Now 38.50 PANASONIC Now49 99 reg. 56,99 a 90 DAY GUARANTEE ON LABOR 180 DAY GUARANTEE ON ALL PARTS DISPLAY MODELS NOW REDUCED TO 30%I SPECTRUM sRECTRONIC 1208 NORTH MAIN STREE. ( Tuesday, August 17, 1971, The Fleride Afilstr, Page 15 Sebastian's Shop Volkswagen Repairs This Months Special for VW Drivers Tune Up Points, phap. condenser, compression teat adjust earburator, Reg. ''eial'pri' $9.95 The Florida Alligator 95 T (D) I

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Pog 16, The Florida Alligator, Tuenday, Aust 17, 1971 Phil Currin,: a future in professional racing (EDITOR'S NOTE: This is the third part in a series about the future of racing). For Phil Currin, automotive competition began as just something interesting to do on a Sunday afternoon. His Corvette at that time was hardly an exotic racer. Competitors were mainly from the same sports car club and the goal of the day was to have a good time. Gradually things have changed. The car has become more and more performanceoriented. Expenses have risen drastically. Yet perhaps the most important factor is Phil himself. At 25 he is now looking to career prospects. The masters degree he is working toward will insure him a good position in the business world, but what about racing? There are many ways to break into professional racing. Unfortunately, none of them are easy and all are expensive. As a matter of fact, the cost of being competitive makes it almost impossible for an individual to compete in a professional series without outside monetary support. Tis support usually comes in the form of a team sponsor. The sponsor is, in most cases, a business firm interested in using racing as a means of advertising. Phil has never actively sought this kind of support but now feels it is essential. At this point a partial sponsorship would amount to $100 per race with full sponsorship being $500 for each event. Aside from seeking financial backing, Phil hopes to run the 24 Hours of Daytona race next February and increase his participation in SCCA racing. Looking further into the future, Phil would like to run in a professional series such as the Trans-American sedan championship. The cost would no doubt be greater but he feels it to be necessary if only to see if he is capable of driving on a professional level. Phil must come to a decision soon. He has to find out if he is capable enough to be a professional driver. He must do it soon, for in another year or so the pressure of starting a business career will force racing to take a back seat. There can be no back seat drivers in p r o f e s s i o n a r a c i n g unfortunately. E C 0 T IARFRED IS THERE WITH REAL PEOPLE DON WILLIAMSON SALESMAN RICHARD WARD PARTS MANAGER JOE BELGRADE GENERAL MANAGER AL CLEMENTS SERVICE MANAGER An Experience In Rosil TEAM HARFUED JOHN WILLIAMSON SALES MANAGER HARFRED AUTO IMPORTS 506 E. UNIVERSITY AVE. 3724373 Racing action from Daytona -w ARE IN Today, the smart set is discovering Arthur Treacher's, the original fish & chips, for those post movie dates. Two big whitefish fillets coated with our exclusive golden batter. Chips cut thick (3/4 Inch) from the fInest Idaho potatoes, (enhanced with malt vinegar!) .and fried to perfection In nutritious PURE PEANUT OIL ARTHUR TREACHER'S ies9 NW 'I3th St "Sunehine Shoppinm Center" w.