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The Florida alligator

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Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

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Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

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Full Text
Vol. 63, No. 117

67 blacks jailed
Disturbance flares on campus

By RON SACHS
Alligator Staff Writer
and
ken mckinnon
Alligator Managing Editor
An afternoon of
demonstration, arrests and
emotionalism charged the air at
UF Thursday following the
arrest and suspension of a
reported 67 black students for
occupying the office of UF
President Stephen C. OConnell.
The blacks had been to
OConnells office three times
Thursday morning to present a
list of demands. Each time they
were given three minutes to
leave before they would be
suspended and arrested.
After their third trip to the
office, they were informed that
they were suspended after
remaining past the three minute
mark. Subsequently, campus
police arrested the students and
transferred them in a bus to the
Alachua County Jail.
At 6:15 p jn. Thursday, Judge
John Connell allowed the
students to be released on their
own recognizance if they could
offer proper identification.
The black students will be
prosecuted at a later date for
trespassing.
A rally hdd in the Plaza of
the Americas at 2 p jn. attracted
several hundred students who
were told, by Student Body
President Steve Uhlfelder, Its
about time we start to realize
that the problems of this campus
are not being solved by die
existing power structure and

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Police eject student from Tigrt Hall
... in action aimed a. clearing ttuden* from the buiWing

The
Florida Alligator

m Jk lb
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Pres. Stephen C. O'Connell
... addresses students
the reason stems from President
OConnell.
Uhlfelder announced that a
petition would be circulated
calling for the immediate
resignation of OConnell.
By 2:30 p.m., the crowd had
significantly increased in size as
SG Secretary of Minority Affairs
Kip Smith told the gathered
students what had transpired at
Tigert.
The demands we presented
have been through every possible
committee on this campus and
the problems still remain, he
said.
Smith said the demands
presented OConnell have been
presented in the past and
stressed for over 18 months.
Shortly before 3 p.m. the
crowd marched to Tigert Hall to
demand release of the 67 as they
filled the corridors outside the

University of Florida, Gainesville

already locked doors of
OConnells office.
Campus police officers stood
in front of the door to
OConnells office while students
chanted, OConneHs got to
go.
Uhlfelder entered OConnells
office and emerged minutes later
to inform students that if they
did not clear the building, the
President would not speak to
them and they would be
suspended and arrested.
The students did not leave.
Father Michael Gannon and
Uhlfelder spoke with OConnell
again and later urged students to
leave the building to avoid a
violent confrontation.
At 4 p.m., the majority of the
students moved to the front
steps of Tigert as OConnell
came out to make a statement.
To you in the building, if
you dont move out youre going
to be suspended and arrested
youve had your warning, he
told the crowd.
OConnell insured the
students that he would not drop
charges filed against the arrested
students and that their
suspensions will continue.
OConnell said he had
telephoned Judge John Connell
to consider releasing the
students on their own
recognizance.
But since hes heard of this
demonstration, he might have
changed his mind, he said.
Some of the demands

(See 'Morepage 2)

BSU demands
Members of the Black Student Union (BSU) presented UF
President Stephen C. OConnell with a list of proposals for
consideration by the university before they were arrested for refusing
to leave Tigert Hall yesterday.
The BSU proposal list included:
There shall be a commitment on the part of the university to
recruit and admit 500 black students out of the quota of 2,800
freshmen and a continuance of the critical year freshman program.
Establishment of a department of Minority Affairs under the
direction of a full Vice President, and the immediate elevation of Mr.
Roy Mitchell to this Vice Presidency.
Hire a black administer in Academic Affairs with the advise and
recommendation of department of Minority Affairs to coordinate the
recruitment of black faculty.
The hiring of a black assistant manager in personnel.
Intensification of recruitment and hiring of black faculty so as to
reflect the ratio of black students admitted under the proposal in
number 1.
The fair and equal treatment of our blade brothers and sisters,
who are employed by this university.
Thus far; even though we have pleaded, begged, and worked
diligently with the administration, our cries have been ignored. This
university has consistently denied us these basic needs we deem
necessary. We are the voice of the black student, the black worker,
and the entire black community. And for our full participation as
students, employees, and citizens of this state, these needs must be
met.
OConnell issues
late tv statement

By JAN GODOWN
Alligator Staff Writer
At a Thursday evening press
conference on WUFT-TV, UF
President Stephen C. OConnell
and Vice-President for Academic
Affairs Harry Sisler claimed the
administration has moved to
meet some black demands of
those issued last summer.
Noting that we certainly
recognize that there is a great
deal remains to be done, Sisler
mentioned some action that has
been initiated by the
administration:
Nl
A blade assistant dean for
academic affairs whom Sisler
identified as Dean Cole from a
college in Texas has been hired
beginning January 1.
The College of Arts and
Sciences has recruited a new
black assistant dean to give
them specific scholarly
assistance.
An Upward Bound
program to encourage

Friday, April 16, 1971

disadvantaged high school
students to attend college will be
started this summer, if
government funds come
through.
Studies have been
undertaken pertaining to a Mack-
Cultural Center, particularly
physical requirements for such a
center.
OConnell read a statement he
had released late that afternoon,
reaffirming his position taken
during the demonstration that
the University will initiate
proceedings to suspend all
students who violated the rules
of the university, pending
identification of students.
According to OConnell,
video-films made of students
who participated in disturbance
will be used to identify the
students.
The University will continue
its operation, without those
suspended. O'Connell added,
Classy will not be dismissed.



Page 2

The Florida Alligator, Friday, April 16, 1971

JT^mpage^^JJ
presented by the blacks have
already been acted upon,
OConnell said. But this is not
the way for me to make any
decision not under these
circumstances.
In a statement released early
Thursday evening OConnell
expressed regret for the incident
but charged, I should not and
will not negotiate demands with
any individual or group.
Through an appointment, he
said, I would be glad to meet
with a group of reasonable size.
Alachua County Sheriffs
Office officers and Gainesville
policemen helped to reinforce
the campus security force while
two campus buses were parked
behind Tigert to transport
students arrested at the
demonstration. At that point, no
arrests other than those in die
morning took place.
Students massed around the
buses and let the air out of the
tires of the vehicles.
When a sheriffs deputy
attempted to arrest one student
for a similar action, he hesitated
and then released the
unidentified students before the
onlooking crowd.
Willie Holden, president of
the Santa Fe Afro-American
Student Union, was arrested
along with two others minutes
later.
At 4:30 p.m. police used a
megaphone to tell students to
disperse or be arrested.
The police lining up in
horizontal rows approached the
crowd in an effort to break it
up. As students were pushed
back, many offered slight
resistance. Skirmishes took place
as general mayhem dominated
the scene.
Tear gas cannisters were
thrown indiscriminately into the
crowd, and students and police
sought refuge from the fumes.
Coughing students with inflamed
throats were led to safety by
others.
The crowd spread out
following the tear gas, but did
not leave the vicinity of the
administration parking lot.
Some nine students were
arrested during the encounter
between police and students.
Two officers were reportedly
injured. The Health Center and
infirmary reported no injured
students had come to them.
At a meeting at 8 p.m.
Thursday, Kip Smith in behalf
of the Black Student Union
called for a massive general
strike. Strikers were told to
meet in front of Tigert at 8 a.m.
today to show OConnell and
the rest that were not through.
A rally scheduled for noon
today in the Plaza will determine
what course of action the
strikers will follow, according to
Smith.

/More rallies set for today

Steve Uhlfelder
... urges Tigert withdrawal
The mood of the time will
decide, he said.
OConnell told Hie Alligator
staff at a luncheon Thursday
that he would consider any
demonstration at his home a
trespass and those participating
would be arrested.
OConnell emphasized that
classes would not be dismissed,
despite efforts on the part of
what he called a minority.
Suspension of all students in
violation of university
regulations will take place as the
individuals are identified, he
said.
University Police filmed
Thursdays demonstrations with
new camera equipment from
Building E.
Earl Wilcox, administrator of
information for BSU, said at
Tigert, There is a mad dog
loose in the administration
building. All the black brothers
and sisters are going to join
hands and were going to march
on OConnells house.
As the crowd marched to

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OConnells house, it went
through Tolbert and Graham
Areas and Hume Hall some
entering the dormitories to
recruit students while others
stood outside shouting for them
to join the march.
The crowd then proceeded
down Fraternity Row, but the
recruitment there was small
compared to that in the dorm
area.
Speaking in front of
OConnells house, Steve
Waterhouse, of the Union of
Florida Students (UFS) said,
This is a coalition of UFS, BSU
and SG. We are here to protest
the 78 black students arrested
this morning and the 10 white
students arrested this afternoon.
There will be a mass meeting at
12:30 on the Plaza and we are
calling for OConnells
resignation.

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KEVIN MORAN
Black students prepare to enter Tigert Hall
... in Thursday morning's encounter with UF President Stephen C. O'Connell

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Kip Smith
... "problems still remain"
Another speaker, David Hoke
added, OConnell said he
wanted to meet with a small
group of concerned citizens in
front of his house. Well, were a
large group of concemedcitizens

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during
June, July and August when Its published seml*weekly, and during student
holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions
of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz
Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The
Alligator Is entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office
at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year and $3.50 per Quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy it considers
objectionable.
F,or,da Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous Insertion unless
n tic ,s S?* ven to the advertising manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
more than one incorrect Insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
several times. Notices for correction must be given before the next
Insertion.

and weve come to help him
pack.
OConnell and his wife
returned from his television
appearance at approximately
9:45 p.m., entering from the
back.
About 9:50 p.m. he came out
of his house and said, Welcome
to our lawn. I am certain you all
understand were not going to
accomplish anything here
tonight. There is nothing you or
I are going to accomplish
tonight. There is no point in
attempting to accomplish
something -1 ask you to leave.
OConnell was asked if a
referendum asking for his
resignation was passed at the
spring election, would he resign.
OConnell replied, no.
OConnell and his family left
with a suitcase in a police car
about 10:20 pjn.



Senate defeats nursury construction

By CARLOS J. LICE A
Alligator Staff Writar
A second reading of a bill
giving $50,000 for the
construction of a new Baby
Gator Nursery was defeated
Tuesday night in the Student
Senate by a dose 21-20 vote.
While amendments to
Change the bill into a fee for an
architect to draw plans for the
construction faded, some
senators did not want to put
SMC planning
D.C. excursion
By ELLI MOSS
Alligator Staff Writer
Anyone wishing to partidpate
in the anti-war action in
Washington D.C. on the
weekend of April 24 can go with
a group sponsored by the
Student Mobilization Committee
(SMC).
SMC is planning to take five
or six vans or a bus if they can
get the money from the Student
Senate. They will leave April 23
at about 10 a.m.
The roundtrip costs $lB and
the money must be in by April
18 or can be paid at the next
SMC meeting which will be this
Sunday at 7 p.m. in room 349
Reitz Union.
For more information about
the trip SMC will set up tables
outside Little Hall Wednesdays
and Thursdays for the next two
weeks. Money for the trip will
also be collected there.
When they get to Washington,
the SMC group plans to
participate in the march and
hear the speeches. If some
people want to keep a van in DC
all week and stay for the May
Day activities, they will be able
to.
For the people who wont be
able to make it to Washington
for May Day, SMC is planning to
have some antiwar activities
here, said Rick Replogle, SMC
treasurer.
Some of the proposals SMC is
considering include picketing the
Military Ball on May 1 and
having a counter drill on the
ROTC drill field on Wednesday
May 5 which will coindde with
the Kent State memorial.
For more information contact
Rick Replogle at 378-3998 or
Harris Freeman at 392-8369.
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money into a project they
considered beneficial only a
small segment of the student
population.
Spokesman for the married
students, Jerry Yakatan said the
nursery was going to benefit
more than just married students
with children, because the
nursery could be used for other
functions when the children
were not there.
However, the Senate reversed
its decision of last week and
defeated the bill.
The bill which last week
passed with the one for the
nursery, a $74,000 expenditure
to construct a new Camp
Wauburg passed a second
reading.
Senate President Rick Horder
told senators that while UF

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| Baby Gator Nursery |
| Camp Wauburg
| Kent State Day
§ Delegates to Congress
| March on yVashington |
| Student Deferments
| BSU Allocation
S Awards
\v.xx.x*x.xx*x*x-x*x*x*x*x*x*xfe :
President Stephen C. OConnell
agreed with the expenditure of
$74,000 for the outdoor
recreation facility, all the money
in the student government
reserve fund destined for
Wauburg had to be used.
The particular account
OConnell referred to was the
Wauburg Reserve Account, No.
8921w06, which has $24,000,
With one difference coming
from another reserve account.
Sen. Stu Hershey proposed an

amendment so that only
SIO,OOO from this account be
used for Wauburg. The
remaining $14,000 going to
Student Government reserves.
The amendment was approved.
The Senate also passed a
resolution which sets aside May
4,1971 as a day of remorse for
the Kent State incident of last
year.
A bill also cleared the senate
which gave S6OO for Senate
delegates to go the U.S. Congress
to discuss the War in Indochina
with members of Congress.
The trip will be made by
senate representatives to
Washington toward the end of
April.
Another trip expense voted
was S4OO to be used for students
to attend the March on
Washington May 1.
The other bill which the

Friday, April 16,1971,1 2 !* Florida Alligator,

Senate defeated was a resolution
which condemned the ending of
student deferments.
The senate also allocated
$1,700 to the Black Student
Union for the costs of bringing
Muhammed Ali to the campus
later on this quarter.
A Steven Joel Uhlfdder
Appreciation resolution** was
passed unanimously by the
senators.
Senators gave the Paul Clark
Award to past chairman of the
powerful Senate Budget and
Finance committee Ellen
Corenswet. This is given to the
most distinguished committee
chairman. Miss Corenswet is
currently student body
treasurer. Horder was voted
the Michael Straten Award for
being the oustanding senator for
this year.

Page 3



i, The Florida Alligator, Friday, April 16,1971

Page 4

The disturbance: a chronology

The day of trouble at UF
Thursday began at
approximately 10 a.m when
more than 70 black students
entered the office of UF
President Stephen C. OConnell
to present a list of demands. A
chronological account of events
with approximate times is listed
below:
10:15 a.m. OConnell tells
black students that he will not
consider any demands as long as

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Black student
... among the first arrested in Thursday's turbulent action

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his office is disrupted. He
informs the blacks they have
three minutes to leave the office
before they are suspended.
10:18 a.m. Black students
leave Tigert and meet outside.
10:40 a.m. Blacks decide to
attempt again to present
demands to OConnell.
10:50 a.m. OConnell warns
blacks again that they have three
minutes to leave before they are
suspended and that only when

ah appointment is made through
proper channels will he listen
to the black grievances.
10:53 a.m. Blacks, still
occupying the office, are
informed that they have been
suspended. They then leave. Sam
Taylor, former Black Student
Union chairman arranges an
appointment with OConnell for
11:30 a.m.
11:30 a.m. Taylor meets
with OConnell for
approximately 15 minutes.
Commenting later on the short
discussion, Taylor said, He
didnt really say anything he
said we were making irrational
demands and that we were
insincere nothing was
accomplished.
11:55 a.m. Blacks enter
OConnells office for the third
time. They are informed that in
three minutes if they are not
gone they will be suspended and
placed under arrest for
trespassing after warning.
12:15 p.m. Blacks passively
submit to arrest and are taken to
Alachua County Jail.
2 p.m Students gather in
Plaza to discuss morning events.
Steve Uhlfelder and Kip Smith,
Student Government secretary
of minority affairs, inform
students of events and attempt
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to raise bail money for arrested
blacks.
2:55 p.m. Students march
to Tigert and fill the building
and front steps approximately
1,100 students total. By 3:30
p.m more than 1,500 students
had gathered.
3:15 p.m Uhlfelder is
admitted to OConnells office
and is told that the president
will speak to students only when
the building has been cleared.
The building was not cleared.
4:05 p.m OConnell
emerges from office to speak to
students on front steps of Tigert.
He explains that the students
still in the building must
... move out or youre going
to be suspended and arrested.
OConnell informs students that
the charges against the arrested
blacks will not be dropped and
the suspensions will continue.
Two university buses were
parked behind Tigert for the
purpose of taking any one
arrested to jail. Students mass
around the buses and let air out
of the tires of the buses.
4:30 pan. Police warn
students to disperse or arrests
will be made. Students do not
disperse. Police attempt to move
the crowd back in horizontal
procession. Skirmishes begin.

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Tear gas is thrown into the
crowd. Crowd spreads out, but
remains in general vicinity of
administration parking lot
4:45 pan. Several
unidentified students arrested.
Events begin to calm Students
sit down in paiking lot to await
results of attempts to get
arrested blacks released.
6:15 pm, Release of
arrested blacks by Judge John
Connell begins upon issuance of
UF identification card or SIOO
bond.
8 p.m. Mass meeting of
students in front of Tigert.
8:30 pm OConnell press
conference on WUFT
8:45 9 pan. Students
march to OConnells home,
stopping in front of Tolbert,
Graham, and Hume to recruit
members.
9:32 p.m. OConnells press
conference ends.
9:32 pm Students,
approximately 1,000, converge
on OConnells lawn, speakers
criticize OConnells policies,
call for resignation.
9:45 pm OConnell arrives
at home.
9:50 pm. OConnell
confronts students.
10:20 pm OConnell
leaves in UPD car.



AFT against proposed 12 Hour Bill

By JANE CATO
Alligator Staff Writer
Opposition to the proposed
12 Hour Bill, which is presently
before the Florida Senate has
been voiced by the American
Federation of Teachers (AFT)
Local Chapter 1880 in
Gainesville.
Introduced by Sen. Robert
Haverfield, D-Miami, the 12
Hour Bill would require 12
hours of classroom contact for
university professors and 15
hours for professors in junior
colleges.
A position paper which states
the AFT stand on the legislation
has been distributed to UF
faculty members and mailed to
every Florida legislator,
according to Hunt Davis, a local
AFT spokesman.
Davis is the chairman of the
legislative committee of the local
chapter of the AFT. He believes
the university faculty should
speak for themselves and work
directly with the legislature on
legislation that affects their
interests.
The rationale behind the bill,
is that students are dissatisfied
with their lack of contact with
faculty members, and faculty
members do not work hard
enough.
The AFT position paper
states, according to a recent
self-study questionnaire given to
1421 UF students, that there
was general satisfaction with
their faculty contact. 79 per
cent said professors were
available when help was needed
with course work.
In response to the allegation
that professors dont work hard
enough, the AFT points out, for
example, a survey of the UF
Arts and Sciences faculty whose
average work week is 60 hours.
Os these 60 hours, 60 per cent
of their time is spent in teaching
and general class preparation,
and another 30 per cent in
research, professional meetings
and professional duties.
Four effects on the
educational system would occur
if the 12 Hour Bill is enacted,
according to the AFT.
First, the legislation would
actually lessen individual
students* contact with their
teachers, thus furthering student
alienation with the
impersonality of the university.
Second, the big names** who
arent in the classroom now,
perform services that are
invaluable to the university, and
would still have to be employed
by the university as before.
The operations of the
university would become more
difficult in that there would be a
lack of flexibility in deciding

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who will teach and who will
fulfill other necessary duties
such as administration,
committee work, counseling and
research.
Finally, research would be
reduced sharply by the passage
of the 12 Hour Bill, which
would consequently weaken
their national stature.
The AFT thinks passage of
the bill in question, which in the
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first place is based upon dubious
premises and in the second place
would have a wide-ranging
impact, would be contrary to
the best interests of Floridians
and their universities.
Local representatives of AFT
have been in contact with AFT
lobbyists in Tallahassee, and
have personally spoken with
local legislators, Representatives
Ralph Turlington and William
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Andrews and Senator Robert
Saunders.
Presently, the bill has passed
the State Senate University and
Community Colleges Committee
with Chairman Haverfield. The
committee strongly favors the
bill, as does State Senate
President Jerry Thomas.
In conclusion, Davis said,
The AFT feels this piece of
legislation is indicative of a

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Friday, April W. 1971, The FlerWe AHijrtor,

general disenchantment with and
misunderstanding of the
universities which has been
growing within the legislature.
To prevent enactment of this
and similar pieces of punitive
legislation, faculty members
must not rely solely on the
efforts of the Administration
and Regents. We must speak and
act on our own behalf, and this
is what the AFT is doing in
regard to the 12 Hour Bill.*

Page 5



Page 6

i'. The Florid* Alligator. Friday. April 16/1971

Class attendance rule
i ? r
alleged broken by faculty

By CARLOS J. LICE A
Alligator Staff Writer
Senate Student Rights
Committee Chairman Owen
Beitsch charged Wednesday that
some UF professors do not
follow university regulations
concerning attendance to
classroom.

ACP gives Alligator
All-American rating
The Florida Alligator has been awarded the All-American rating by
the Associated Collegiate Press (ACP). Approximately 500 campus
newspapers from around the United States were evaluated in the 84th
All-American Critical Service. v ~
The Alligator also received a Mark of Distinction for superior
accomplishments in the five categories judged: coverage and content,
writing and editing, editorial leadership, physical appearance and
photography.
In critiquing the newspaper, the judges said, Your writers show
talent and training. Readers of The Florida Alligator are bound to be
well informed.
The Alligator which also was the recipient of the 1968 Pacemaker
Award is a perennial winner of the All-American rating.
Rating of First Class (excellent), Second Class (very good) and
Third Class (good) are given on the basis of total numerical scores
achieved in the five classificaitons. To achieve All-American rating, a
paper must receive both First Class rating and a Mark of Distinction
for unusually high quality.
Covering the college campus and relating to national events offers
an increasing challenge to the newspaper staff working with limited
time and funds, Otto W. Quale, ACP executive director stated.

; .' V *; >"'*
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Beitsch indicated he had
received complaints from
students on the personal level,
about teachers who do not
follow in regards to mandatory
attendance for students other
than lUC.
UF regulations, as stated in
the course catalog, say:
Attendance in class is optional

with students after sucessful
completion of the freshman year
(42 quarter hours), nevertheless,
students themselves remain fully
responsible for satisfying the
entire range of academic
objectives as they are defined by
the instructor in any course.
As the committee interprets
this regulation, attendance
cannot be directly considered in
computing a students course
grade, Beitsch said.
Beitsch directed his complaint
at teachers who do take
attendance as consideration of
the grades they give students in
courses.
Should an instructor tell you
that three absences mean the
loss of a letter grade, or your
final average, this is a violation
of your rights.
Beitsch said the complaints he
heard came mostly from the
school of journalism, from
which he is a senator. He said at
least four teachers at that school
use attendance as a criterion for
grading.
But I dont know how
widespread this is in other
colleges.
If any students feel that his
rights under this regulation have
been, or are being abridged, call
the student senate office,
392-1665 or 392-2384, Beitsch
said.

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Graduate school
suffering-Hanson

By DARRELL HARTMAN
Alligator Writer
Harold P. Hanson, dean of the
graduate school, said the
graduate program has been
rapidly increasing but it is now
being very abruptly stopped by
the Board of Regents tentative
and non-official graduate
limitation proposals.
Speaking at the
Administrative Council Meeting
Wednesday afternoon, Hanson
said the problem has been
compounded by a financial
dodge to increase funds two
years ago that put the law school
Young Democrats
hold registration
The Young Democrats will be
holding a bi-partisan registration
drive April 21-23 from 10 til 4
daily. The registration will be
coordinated by Alma Bethea,
supervisor for elections in
Alachua County.
Several tables will be set up in
front of the Graduate Library in
order that the registrars may
accomodate all who wish to
register.
Any student who is 18 years
of age, is eligible for registration
providing he can prove his age
and that he resides in the state
of Florida. A license or birth
certificate is all one will need for
identification purposes.

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in the same category as the
graduate school.
Law school enrollment
comprises 35 per cent of the
graduate programs affected by
the tentative cut-backs (the
College of Health Related
Professions and the College of
Agriculture are not included),
said Hanson.
Enrollment in other graduate
programs would consequently be
35 per cent less than if the law
school were in a separate
category Hanson said that
changing the status of the law
school to be the same as the
College of Health Related
Professions and the College of
Agriculture would be the
indicated thing to do.
The limits tentatively
proposed by the Board of
Regents are 2,584 for beginning
graduate students and 1,381 for
advanced grads for 1971-72, said
Hanson.
Commenting on the financial
crises in education, President
Stephen C. O'Connell said,
education seems to be the
whipping boy this year.
Govenor Askews modest
proposal for a 12.5 per cent
increase over last years budget is
completely dependant on his tax
proposal, said OConnell.
We've had bad years before
but were not going to throw our
hands up in despair. After all,
the things that count most are
not measured in dollars.

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Friday, April 16 r 1971, The Florida Alligator,

Page 7



Page 8

v The Horida Alligator, Friday, April 16,1971

Editorial
A small spark
spread ....
It seemed like such a small spark, but before the day was
over, the whole university was engulfed in the flames.
Early yesterday, approximately 65 black students entered
President OConnells office and presented him with a list of
six demands.
A small spark, but one which led to approximately 75
arrests, three injured policemen, several hundred gassed
students and a great deal of damaged property.
But the greatest harm is the huge breach which was
created from what had already been a wide chasm.
True, it would be more than an understatement to say
that President OConnell has little rapport with black
students. But aft cr yesterday, it will be even more difficult
for any communication, with white cr black, to exist.
And here is where the problem lies. Communication.
Maybe yesterdays events will make more people aware of
this problem. And hopefully, we can go from here.
The time has come when we must start to communicate,
rather than just talk. For, from communication comes
understanding and then positive action.
Positive action is what is needed here. Arrests and
potential violence are not the answer. They will not solve
our problem.
And it is OUR problem. It is not a black problem, nor a
white one. It is ours, and we must all accept it, and then
deal with it.
President OConnell, you said you were unwilling to
negotiate demands with any individual or group.
Okay. Then lets call them requests or recommendations
or proposals, as the blacks did on their prepared list. And
please review them.
We must now sit down and try to cool the flames. Its
going to be difficult. Our emotions are involved.
We all have fnends who were.there. Some have close
friends who were gassed or jailed.
But we must divorce ourselves from all that. We must
look at the situation and analyze the issues. And then we
must decide on positive action.
When all the smoke clears, we only hope the students
black and white have not lost something.
VBi J[ Ip ufi I
w fv
jgiyF Bfe Tj
I I j I
I J /Ilf MVI
1 / \ / nbL
This is an unlawful assembly,
Audie Shuler

The
Florida
Alligator

Its a classical gas

By MARIAN JEDRUSIAK
Alligator Assignments Editor
My baby got gassed yesterday.
Along with a lot of other people
I know and love. Along with a
lot of other people whom I
dont know, but if I did, I might
easily love.
Its probably recorded
somewhere nicely on videotape,
like a home movie. When I am
old and shriveled up 1 can at
least have the morbid
satisfaction of looking back in
my minds eye on the golden
days of my youth. You know
the ones the milk-commercial milk-commercial-Pepsi-Cola-running-through
-Pepsi-Cola-running-through milk-commercial-Pepsi-Cola-running-through
-open fields-with-arms fields-with-armsoutstretched.
outstretched. fields-with-armsoutstretched. The days when my
baby got gassed.
Pardon me but IVe got the
dry heaves right now. Pardon me
but I feel like vomitting, and
theres nothing left. Empty. I
have a faint recollection of
having heard this song before.
But not tinged with the faint
perfume of tear gas in the air to
set the mood.
Somehow Im not feeling up
to plucking daisies and worrying
about capturing a husband.

r Alligator Staff

Copy Editors Gary PaskabDebbi Smith*Vickie Rich*Linda Miklowitz
Published by students of the University of Florida under the
auqiicos of the Board of Student Publications.
Editorial Businass. Advertising offices in Student Publications Suite,
third floor, Reitz Union.
Editorial Office phones: 392-1686,87,88 or 89.
Opinions expressed in the Florida Alligator are those of the editors or
V of the writer of the article and not those of the University of Florida.

Marian Jedrusiak
Assignments Editor

Phyllis Gallub
Editor-In-Chief

Gary Grunder
News Editor

1 Bk
;
Forgive me. I am bitter in a gut
level way. I dont really have any
burning desire to be a traitor to
my sex. Twenty lashes with an
eyebrow brush and I wont feel
so guilty.
There is no way you can get
- me to believe that the world is
wrapped in cotton candy. Oh
no. There is an iceberg festering
underneath this university. And
the iceberg has chinks in it with
angry black eyes peering up
from the bottomless festering
sore.
And I have no honey or
unguents to heal the gash. Not
even for my baby.

Steve Strang
Wire Editor

Ken McKinnon
Managing Editor

Sometimes the icicles set in
when you sit up here in the
middle of the Reitz Union
carnival. The airconditioning is
just a shade too artificial to fake
a warm, summer breeze.
One day when you come in
from the roaring din at Tigert
Hall, when you come in from
the madd mg crowd and sit at
your typewriter waiting for news
of the madness outside you look
up and all of a sudden you see
very red faces. And these are the
people you work with day in
and day out. The people you
wear like a second skin and the
shade of red their faces are
doesnt come from a sunburn.
Its an ill wind that blows the
tear gas in. It's an 31 wind that
sucks the real tears up before
they have a chance to start. You
Bre hollow.
After the assorted eyes and
faces are flushed with water,
after the eyes can see despite the
lingering sting you piece
together bits of a macabre tale.
And you cant believe it. But
unfortunately you do. And my
baby got gassed.
Thats all.

Student Publications
Business Staff
To reach Advertising, Business
and Promotion Offices, Call:
392-1681,82.83 or 84
C. R. "Randy" Coleman
Business Manager
T. E. "Kent" Dwyer
Advertising manager
Jeanne Orfinik
Promotion Manager
To reach Circulation
Department, call: 392-1609

%



FLUTED COLUMNS'

Buck passing Gainesville style

So now everyone knows that
not only is Stephen C. OConnell
a kindly old racist, but he also
lacks a certain amount of tact
and good sense.
His racism is not much in
question. He sat on a Florida
Supreme Court that repeatedly
denied admission to UF law
school one black man named
Hawkins. This was AFTER the
Brown V. Board of Education
decision in the U.S. Supreme
Court. And this man talks to
you of the sanctity of the law.
Ask your corner claptrap
mammy nigger on her sagging
porch about the law and shell
be able to give you a more
realistic impression than Stephen
C. OConnell, despite his wall

/ saw the face of Death today

How Can I Ever Be The
Same? I Have Seen Death. I
Have Seen The Face That
Death Will Wear
By Ezekiel Jones
By EZEKIEL JONES
Alligator Columnist
We are travelers in an ark; and
the name of this ark is Earth;
And Earth is a Spaceship, filled
with treasures: rare birds, and
perfumes; exotic jungles, and
wild plains; mountains, deserts,
lagoons, and bayous; and people
of many beautiful colors. Our
Spaceship is laden with jewels:
diamonds, and emeralds; silver,
copper, tin and zinc. Wherever
we look there is Wonder.
Wherever we look the sky opens
like a flower, like an orchid
tended with warm hands. She is
a Princess, this planet upon
which we dwell; a blue diadem
in the Vastness of Space, a vault
of overflowing riches. She is the
real First Lady of the
Constellations; a coffer of Life, a
sparkle in the Child Gods
eyes...
I saw the face of Death today.
I saw the face that Death will
wear. I lay with Jamie and
Charlie in the hot sun, naked on
a branch overhanging the
Suwanee River. It was one of the
most beautiful days of my
lifetime. All the elements that I
love were present: friends, green
life, a waterway, a blue sky. The
sun felt good upon my body. It
was the first time in my life that
I had swum in the nude. I liked
the feej of the Water upon my
body. It was clear and cool, and
it washed me beautifully. I felt
clean and my heart was happy.
There were birds, and strange
animals. It was an April
afternoon in a young mans life.
I thought how wonderful it
would be to have a woman with
me- And I thought how things
can always be better than they
are. And this belief that they can
be better is what we call Hope.
And it is this belief which spins
the Wheel, which spins the
Wheel of Destiny.

full of honorary degrees and
gilt-edged back pats.
So now he is claiming that his
office cant really DO anything
about various demands made by
blacks to make this campus
more equitable.
In OConnells language, this
used to be known as passing
the buck.
Nowadays we call it bull.
The reason is that Stephen C.
OConnell really doesnt
particularly WANT to do
anything about the inequitable
black situation on campus.
What Stephen C. OConnell
wants to do is keep things nice
and quiet and try to build nice
large air-conditioned classrooms
and maybe move up a notch or
two on the old political

The branch I lay upon was
only an inch or so above the
water, and I felt my hair falling
down my back into the Water,
and felt my hair floating, and
tickling my neck with cool
fingers. And, as I was resting
above the Water, and, as I was
thinking heavy thoughts about
God, and about Destiny, and
about what Life is, I heard a
motor humming down the river
from me, making the noise of a
distant swarm of bees. And,
gradually, the humming became
louder, and I could descry a
motorboat with tiny, doll-like
people within it. As the
motorboat approached, I could
see that the man in that boat
was in his late thirties. And next
to this man was his woman. And
the woman, too, was in her late
thirties. And on the prow of this
boat there lay the son of this
man. And the son was my age,
or younger. But the son of this
man was not like me. He was not
friendly. There was coldness in
his eyes.
And the man called from the
boat, I just wanted to see if
you guys was for real. And
there was nothing kind within
his voice. It was a hollow voice.
It was the voice of the Void.
Then the man steered his
motorboat down the river; and
the boat made a long ellipse in
the Water, a wide, open arc; and
I heard the sputtering of the
motor, and saw the Water
breaking behind the boats bow.
Jamie looked at me and I looked
back at Jamie, into his eyes. And
I understood at that moment
that there is really only one real
question between human beings:
how much can you trust
someone else? Jamie and I were
in danger, and each of us were
attempting to know what the
other one would do. I trusted
Jamie. He trusted me.
The man in the motorboat
was about 20 feet away from us.
Jamie and I were both naked,
and we were in the Tree, and the
man in the boat said to get out
01 the lire, am* get 5U* cf the
place we were.
And we were upon property
which we were considering
buying. Property which might
have been our very own, which

By JOHN PARKER

mumbly-peg board before he
retires to Lauderdale and comfy
drawn-out death.
Confrontations like the one
we had yesterday do nothing to
enhance these stately ambitions.
For one thing, he has a rabid
group of legislators in
Tallahassee who already believe
.that OConnell is a slack-jawed
moOycoddler. This sordid crew
is one step out of a sanforized
bedsheet themselves.
But now he knows he has
another group that is just as
rabid at his front door.
And he is undoubtedly
kicking himself right now. Not
for his racism* but for
underestimating the enemy.
But OConnells fault is not
limited to poor judgement. He

/|sWKj|^
some man in a motorboat was
telling us to get off of. Can one
man really tell another man not
to sit naked upon his own
property? Can one man have
jurisdiction over another mans
right to exist as he wants to?
This was not what I had learned
in School. Hadnt they taught
me right then? Or had they lied
to me way back then when I had
been too stupid to think for
myself, when I had been a naif
willing and eager to swallow all
thier lies?
I saw the face that Death will
wear today. I saw the cold eyes
of the Void. I wanted to like
that man as my brother. But the
man in the motorboat told me
to get off of property which
might have been my own. And I
knew that my brother would not
tell me such a thing. I knew that
my brother would respect my
right to be as I am.
When Jamie and I did not get
out of the Tree, the man in the
motorboat took out a Pistol
and he pointed it at us. The
motor churned in the Water, the
red mud stirred on the
riverbottom.
The man in the motorboat
aimed that Pistol* at Jamie. And
then the Stranger aimed his
Pistol at me. And I thought that
that man might kill us. It would
not be hard for that man to kill
Jamie, and Charlie, and me. I
could not move from the Tree. I
did not want to move; and I
knew the man had no rieht
to make me move. But, I knew,
also, that there is no argument
with a Gun. The Man with the
Gun is Boss in America. And th
Man with the Gun is the lackey

has to be credited with
obtuseness and stubbomess that
borders on outright stupidity.
His first statement to assembled
students outside Tigert was that
everyone inside the building
would be arrested, and his
second statement was a flat
rejection of all suggestions
concerning the disposition of the
arrested black students. True,
there wasnt much O'Connell
could have said that would have
exactly pleased everyone, but his
statements didnt come from a
Norman Vincent Peak course,
either.
At least O'Connell has the
dubious distinction of being the
prime mover of the first campus
confrontation of this, until now,

of the Man who Controls the
Gun. And the Man who Controls
the Gun is the man with Money
And many, many thoughts
passed through my head in that
instant when a stranger pointed
a Pistol, first at Jamie, and then
at me. I thought that I did not
want to die, and that the day
had been so beautiful, and how
young I was, and about a
woman. And I thought how
absurd it must be in the
Ultimate Scheme of things for
this stranger to point a Gun at
me as though to kill me in
the middle of April, while I was
lounging naked upon a branch,
overhanging the Suwanee.
Then Jamie and Charik and I
slipped into the Water, and the
Water felt good upon us, dear
and clean, and beautiful. We had
forgotten how wonderful fresh
water can be. And I said, Lets
go back; you cant argue with a
man who wields a Gun. And the
man in the motorboat lingered
some 20 feet away from us whik
we swam back to shore. And, all
this time, he pointed the Pistol
at our backs. And all this time,
the motor sputtered in the
Water.-
I saw the face of Death today.
I saw the face that Death will
wear. And Death was a Stranger
to me, I did not know him. But
this Stranger would have robbed
me of my womans love, and this
Stranger would have taken the
blue-green Earth from me, and
all my friends, and everything I
cherish in Life. And I
understood that this Stranger
was my Enemy.
This Stranger did not kill us.
While I swam the few feet back
to shore, I was afraid that he
would shoot at the Water to
scare us. And I was afraid that
he might miss. But he did not do
this. He simply threatened our
Lives with a loaded Gun, and he
wanted us to believe that, if he
so desired, he could rob us of all
the Bliss we had ever hoped to
know.
And this man was my Enemy,
though I had never done him
any wrong. And the man who
was even more my Enemy, even
more my Enemy than the man
who held the Gun, was the man
who Controlled that Gun, and

Friday, April 16,1971,. Tha Florida Alligator, I
- v *, i, < i r t 1

quiet spring. And you can just
bet that being on Walter
Cronkite this evening at 6:30
p.m. isnt going to fill his heart
with joy.
But in the final analysis, this
is a richly deserved reward for a
man who has more than a few
times simply refused to listen.
And today as he comfortably
hmcheoned with members of the
student newspaper while blacks
sat in his office anteroom was
vaguely reminisent of another
scene we heard of in history.
Had to do with a Roman
fellow who played his violin
while his little town went up in
smoke.

had shaped and distorted the
other mans mind with Lies, and
with Fear. So that the Palladin
could not help but hate me, his
brother. Because I am different.
I do not want to kill anyone
ever in my Life. But it is a
Horror to have a Gun pointed at
one by a Stranger. It is a Honor
which inscribes the mind of the
man so pointed at with an
indelible mistrust. Because at the
moment that one contemplates
Death, one understands, too,
how beautiful Life can be.
And the man who Controls
the Gun is the Mad Captain of
our Spaceship Earth. He is the
man who makes People war
against People because he grows
wealthy from such Wars. He is
the man on the hill with the fine
house and the two Cadillacs, and
the motorboat, and all the
material riches of an Empire at
his disposal. The Enemy, the
Stranger, is David Rockefeller,
and his lackey, J. Edgar Hoover.
The Enemy, the Stranger, is H.L.
Hunt, and his running-dog,
Richard Milhous Nixon. The
Enemy, the Stranger, is Howard
Hughes, and his public image,
Johnny Carson. And all those
men who separate one human
being from another for their
own profits, are our Enemies.
All those Swine so greedy for
Power that they kill, and maim,
and butcher, are men whom the
People must oppose. Because
these men wield the Gun.
Because they are Godless War
Criminals who spread napalm
jelly like Vapo Rub upon
Children; who grow Wealthy
because other People die.
How can l ever be the same? I
have seen the face that Death
will wear. Death will wear a
facemask of proprity with which
to hide his cancerous, bleeding
sores. Death will be dressed in a
Business Mans suit, and his
body will be covered with
leeches bursting against his skin.
Death will be the neighbor down
the street* in his brand new
motorboat, out with his family
for a pleasure-cruise, with a
Pistol waiting to be aimed at
quiet souls who lounge upon a
branch overhanging the
Suwanee, naked in the middle of
April on a Sunday afternoon.

Page 9



Page 10

i, Th Florida Alligator, Friday, April 16, 1971

Carnegie Commission
reports education status

By BRUCE KUEHN
Alligator Staff Writer
Several findings and
recommendations of importance
to the higher education system
in Florida have been made by
the Carnegie Commission on
Higher Education in its recent
reports.
The Commission is holding a
meeting in Miami, today and
Saturday, to review their
conclusions with officials of the
Florida higher education system.
The Commissions most
recent report, The Capitol and
Campus, is concerned with the
relationship between the states
and their colleges and
universities.
In the report, the Commission

Womens Lib invades
Rat mini skirt contest
By DEBBY MERMELL
Alligator Writer
and
DEBBI SMITH
Alligator Copy Editor
With war paint, chants, drums and a message, the Gainesville
Womens Liberation Federation (WLF) invaded the mini skirt contest
at the Rathskeller, Wednesday night.
Mell Libby, manager of the Rathskeller, reported that about 12 or
13 women came into the Rathskeller at about 9:00 p.m. They were
carrying placards saying, Mini-skirts exploit women and
Mini-skirtists are sexists!
Libby stated, The girls protest was with good cause. Most
mini-skirt contests do exploit women. But that wasnt our purpose, at
all. When we explained this to the protesters they left. I think they
were just having fun more than anything.
Later in the evening, the contest was held. Only four girls
participated and only one girl had on anything that even resembled a
mini-skirt, Libby said.
Much to the chagrin of our customers, our contest wasnt
exploitive. After all, as part of the university system were not as free
to conduct contests as commercial places are. Libby said.
Although they were invited to enter the contest, WLF remained
only a short time, refusing to support the event.
We are not putting down the contestants, we are just opposed to
the concept that women should be objects on display, said Eunice, a
spokeswoman for the WLF.
The seven members of the local organization have no leaders. They
believe that all women are equally involved and there is no need for an
unequal distribution of power. Their chapter name is WITCH,
Womens International Terrorist Conspirators from Hell.
Gary Corseri, a freshman instructor of English at UF, supported the
movement and said, the war paint made the women look sexy.
Another male supporter carried a bongo drum and accompanied the
chanting.
The underground group did not announce their plans, saying only
that we will demonstrate when we feel there is a need to.
REMEMBER THE
CELEBRATION 71
FILM FESTIVAL
APKI^ 18APRR 24
JFRKMOVIESI April JBthJVthTyirt
FREE LECTURES! April 22nd at tha Union
by JONAS MEKAS Aud., 7:00A 9:30 PM

FREE AWARDS CEREMONY!
at tho Medical Sciences Auditorium
April 23rd, starting at 8:00 PM
CASH A MERCHANDISE AWARDS 1
OFFERED IN THE CONTEST!
YOU CAN STILL ENTER!

uses the percentage of per capita
income to measure the amount
spent by states on education.
Floridas effort was found to
have increased by 96 per cent
since 1953 which ranks Florida
29 among the states. Florida
currently spends .756 per cent
per capita income on education
which is the same as the
currently prevailing .7 per cent
nationally.
The Commission anticipates
the prevailing percentage will
have to increase to one percent
within ten years to accomodate
an expected three million more
students in the nations colleges
and universities.
The Commission also
measures a states effort by the
extent to which a state provides

higher education to its residents.
If over 15,000 college students
attend out-of-state institutions,
the Commission suggests the
state may have to make an
emergency support effort.
Florida is a net exporter of
students; about 27,711 students
left Florida, while about 4,134
less entered Floridas
institutions.
In another report by the
Commission, The Open-Door
Colleges, policies were
discussed for the development of
community colleges. The report,
published in June 1970,
indicated Florida ranks second
behind California in the
percentage of students enrolled
in these institutions.
The report recommended
there should be a community
college within commuting
distance of every potential
student except in sparsely
populated areas where
residential community colleges
should be developed. The
Commission recommends
between 150 and 200 new
community colleges by 1980,12
of which should be in Florida.
The Carnegie Commission on
Higher Education was
established in 1967 to develop
policy guidelines for the
development of higher
education. Dr. Clark Kerr,
former president of the
University of California, is its
chairman.


| The UF Board of Student Publications ]
I Urges All Students Who Feel Qualified j
, ApplvFo ED | T Q R
florida
quarterly
H
1 Applications may be picked
j P 'n room 330, Reitz Union.
I Applications must be returned
I prior to 5 p.m., April 23. Mail
I or bring to
| Prof- Frank Taylor
I 415 Little Hall

Bowl on the U of F
l|ly Intercollegiate Team
Persons* interested in bowling on the
intercollegiate bowling team for the U of F please
meet at the JWRU Games Area at 5 p.m. today.
For more intormation call 392-1637
*Men and women
Patronize Gator Advertisers
UWWWWW^'W^WWWWWWWWWWWWIft
Just in case you're hungry,
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WFTV to present 'Student Rights'

A program entitled Student
Rights -a Preface to a Changing
Society will be presented on
WFTV, Channel 9, Orlando on
Sunday, at 5 p.m., and can be
viewed on television in
Gainesville.
The program is produced by

Yale Club to have speaker
By BECKY LLOYD
Alligrtor Staff Writer
Professor James M. Gustafson, acting chairman of the department
of religious studies at Yale University, will speak on The University
as a Community of Moral Discourse on Sunday at 6:30 p.m. in room
400 of Reitz Union.
Gustafson will be the speaker at the spring banquet of the Yale
Club of Gainesville.
Before his appointment to the Yale faculty in 1955, Gustafson had
been a minister in the United Church of Christ.
In 1954-55, Gustafson was assistant director of a study sponsored
by the American Association of Theological Schools and the Carnegie
Corporation dealing with theological education in America. The
report was published as a book in 1957 with Professor Gustafson and
Richard Niebuhr as co-authors.
Gustafson is also the author of Treasures in Earthen Vessels: The
Church as a Human Community, Christ and Moral Life, and The
Church as Moral Decision Maker.
Gustafson graduated from Northwestern University, received his
BD. degree from the Chicago Theological Seminary and the
University of Chicago. He received his Ph.D. from Yale in 1955.

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Also stylus wear indicator, calibrated to
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Miracord 770 H, less base or cartridge $225.00

SALE

MtiNTZ .ST Eft EO

the Orange County Bar
Association and the Florida Civil
Liberties Union. Featured as
participants in the program are
Dean Joseph R. Julin of UF*s
Spessard L. Holland Law school,
James Markel, counsel for the
Orange County Board of Public
Instruction, Robert Petree, of

319 N.W. 13th ST mon.-sat.ioam-**. PHONE 378- 2331

the Florida Civil Liberties
Union, and Dr. Dudley Degroot,
a professor of sociology at
Florida Presbyterian College.
Julin will open the program,
which was taped last Monday,
with some remarks concerning
the jurisprudence in the area of
student's rights.
There was a time only a few
years ago, Julin said during the
taping, when the rights of a
minor did not weigh very heavily
on the scales of justice. There
was more legal truth than fiction
to the saying children should be
seen and not heard.
*
Julin illustrates the changing
position of a minor before the
law by citing two Supreme
Court Decisions.
The first decision, made in
1967, concerned a minor
charged with making obscene
phone calls, and the rather
informal procedures of the
Juvenile Court which tried him.
The Supreme Court decided that

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under our Constitution, the
condition of being a boy does
not justify a kangaroo court.
The second decision, in 1969,
reversed a decision by Des
Moines, lowa, school officials
prohibiting students from
wearing black armbands to
protest the Vietnam conflict.
Since the armband case,
continued Julin, there have been
many state and federal decisions
involving the activity of students
while in school. I suppose it is
not surprising in a time of
protest that many of these cases
involve acts of protest. Others
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Friday, April 16,1971, The Florida Alligator,

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involve students who assert a
right not to conform to
tradition.
Julin stated the purpose of
the program as an exploration of
how far the students rights
pendelum has swung how
clear or confusing the law really
is.
Julin also closed the taping. In
his closing remarks he warned
that one man's freedom is
another man's chains.'*
In a letter to the Alligator,
John F. Bolt, assistant professor
of law at UF stated the program
is likely to be of interest to
the students and citizens of
Gainesville.

CARNIGRAS
IS
HERE

Page 11



WHAIS HAPPENING

Write on!: Sigma Delta Chi will
hold a meeting Sunday night at
7:30 in the Reitz Union rooms
122-123. Following the meeting,
Robert Haiman, managing editor
of the St. Petersburg Times, will
speak.
Spine chilling: In Cold Blood
will be shown at the Union
Auditorium tonight and
Saturday at 5:30, 8:15 and 11.
Admission is 50 cents.
No house calls: Alpha Epsilon
Delta, national pre-med and
pre-dent honorary, is now
accepting applications for
membership. All qualified
students can pick up an
application at 102 Anderson or
128 MSB.

SG Consumer Affairs Service
organizing program like 888

By DENNIS ARNOLD
Alligrtor Staff Writer
If youre ever had any foul play with a Gainesville
merchant... dont call the Better Business Bureau.
Student Governments (SG) Consumer Affairs
Service is organizing a program fashioned after the
Better Business Bureau (BBB) in New York.
According to Mark Gilson, organizer of the
program, Gainesville doesnt have its own 888.
Gilson said Gainesvilles only source of
communication between dissatisfied customers and
merchants is through a consumer relations board
run by the citys Chamber of Commerce.
Gilson said, the board files customer complaints
and receives no further action by the board.
The files are not open to the public, Gilson said.
'Gainesville merchants run their own rating service

I. PAID POLITICAL AnvFPTi^PMFNT' i
I KAY ERNEST MAUREEN WENDY SHERRI I
PIERCE WARDS MCCULLOUGH SHAFTER ABBOT
I COLLEGE OF EDUCATION I
1 amAlt party candidates
I ARE COMMITTED TO EQUAL
I TREATMENT FOR MINORITY STUDENTS...
I | The REAL Solution is 1 I
I MINORITY AFFAIRS PLATFORM I
Enlist the University in full financial support for the
Expanded Educational Opportunity Program, (formerly the
Critical Frediman Year Program)
a Lobby for a Black Regent.
a Concentrate efforts to recruit minority professors and
students.
a Increase facilities and funds for foreign students,
a Establish advisory council of minority students to the
president.
n Vote lim&ir Party |
U Paid for by 4w REAL party. 1
kbsssssssssssspaid political advertisement bbsbbl

Home improvement plan: EAG
needs people to work during
Earth Week, April 18-24,
writing up fact sheets etc. If
youd like to help out, call
392-1635 or stop by the EAG
office, room 323 Union.
Mayday: Student Mobilization
Committee to End War will meet
Sunday, at 7 p.m. in room 349
Union. This will be the last
chance to sign up for the march
on Washington.
Thanksgiving: Together We
Give Thanks will be the theme
of a special service Sunday, at
11:15 a.m. at the University
United Methodist Church.
The Plaza rocks out: The Plaza
will be the scene of rock and roll

by merely joining the Chamber of Commerce, he
said.
Gilson plans to start a file in the SG office that
would list the names of merchants who are credible.
Gilson explained that a hot line is also planned
for students to phone in complaints.
We will be giving advise to students who want to
know where to get the best prices from trustworthy
merchants, he said.
A third service Gilson hopes to provide is a
student consume r guide.
The guide will allow small businesses to
advertise as a recommended service, Gilson said.
UF Student Body President Steve Uhlfelder said
the agency is being established, because of the
lack of cooperation by the city.
Were setting up our own program for students
to warn them of unfair businesses, Uhlfelder said.

music Saturday night from 11-2
a.m Celebration and other local
bands will be featured. The
get-together is sponsored by the
Rose Community Center.
New worship: A program of
modem dance and pantomime
will be held tonight at 8 p.m. in
the Center for United Ministries,
1402 West University Avenue.
College life: Campus Crusade for
Christ, International will hold
its College Life series Sunday
night at 9:15 in the Rawlings
Area rec room. Everyone is
invited.
Its a picnic: The International
Club is organizing a picnic on
April 24, at Ocala State Forest.
For more information call
373-4241 or 376-6810.

___Carol Brady -J
Arts Festival: A day of leisure
for the enjoyment of the arts is
what the first Tumblin Creek
Arts Festival at P.K. Yonge
Laboratory School on April 17
is all about. A variety of graphic
and performing arts will
highlight the 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
festival sponsored by the UF
College of Education Womens
Club and P.K. Yonge. School
grounds will be available for
picnic lunches and a concession
stand will serve beverages during
the festival.

Crazy Cassette Combination
during our
5 HOUR SALE
Buy one 60 min. Cassette
at the regular price of $2.00
get the second one for $1.75
get the third one for $1.50
get the fourth one for $1.25
get the fifth one for SI.OO
Limit 5 only at this special price
This offer good only during our
5 HOUR SALE
Friday April 16 5:00 PM to 10:00 PM
THE FIDELITY SHOP
420 NW 13th St. 378-8045
i
Beware the Body Shirt Snatcher!
You're fair game when you wear a
VAN HEUSEIST
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SaUV? female! Bu Y two Van Heusen 417 Body
rJir: sbe snatches one off your back, you wont
i? m k Jc, r r; no ? ier .i best fitting shirts on
campus. Check out the Body Shirts now at...
Lindsey
Gainesville Shopping Center
Open 10-9 pm

!, The Florida Alligator, Friday, April 16. 197!

Page 12

* GUNSGUNSgIjKIjT"*
* -k
* Inventory over 450. Buy
* Sell Trade Repair. Z
Reloading supplies. Custom I
* reloading. Harry Beckwith Z
*gun dealer, Micanopy
w 466-3340. ?
m
CAMPUS REP
808 STACY
MILLER-BROWN
4222 N W 13th ST.



Soprano Phyll is Curtin
to sing at UF auditorium

By BRUCE KUEHN
Alligator Staff Writer
The American opera star,
soprano Phyllis Curtin will
appear April 18 at the University
Auditorium at 4 p.m
Part of the program Sunday
evening will mclude a
Recitative and Gavottee from
Manon by Jules Massenet. Miss
Curtin sang this in Buenos Aires
a few years ago and the audience
stopped the program to give her
a five minute ovation.
Miss Curtin will also sing six
melodies of poems by Louise de
Vimorin and composed by
F rancis Poulnec in his
Fiancailles Pour Rire
(Engagements to Mock).
Curtins voice is a miracle; a
lyric soprano with dramatic

April Bike Follies battle will test
skills of pedal power participants

By CAROL BRADY
Alligator Staff Writer
Pedal power participants will have a chance to
display their skills Saturday as participants in the
April Bike Follies.
The event, sponsored by the Reitz Union
Program Office, will be held from 12-2 p.m. in the
Hume Commuter lot.
There will be two divisions in the competition,
one for men and one for women.
Bicycles will be divided into three classes:
clunkers (anything consisting of two wheels,
handlebars and a seat!), three speeds and ten speeds.
Featured competition for the cyclists will include
a rally encompassing the campus. Contenders will

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VANHEUSEN4I7 Body Shirt

Phillis Curtin
... lyric soprano
inpact. It is completely
equalized from top to
bottom... brilliant, warm, of
rare timbre, fantastic
breath-technique. This was more
than singing; this was creating,

receive a number and instructions to one of the four
routes planned around campus. Racers will stop at
checkpoints along the way to pick up further
information and to have their time recorded.
Winners will be chosen on the time taken to
complete the rally course.
Prizes for the victor include, ice cream gift
certificates, passes to the Union game room and
movie passes.
A gymkhana, or obstacle course, will be set up at
the parking lot. Relays, both single and team, will
be run through this skill challenging maze.
Truth will be featured on the Union terrace
from 2-6 p.m. giving the tired pedalers a chance to
rest and socialize.

wrote the Amsterdam
Handelsblad.
The London Vogue Writes,
Her voice is extraordinary, she
is beautiful, and her repertoire is
fantastic.
Miss Curtin was trained in the
United States instead of the
usual practice of being trained in
Europe. She has sung a great
deal of opera in the English
language because she considers it
the most effective way to
encourage interest in opera in
this country.
Miss Curtin is currently on a
tour that is taking her from
London to Honolulu.
Tickets are available at the
Reitz Union box office at SI.OO
and $2.00 for students and at
$1.50 and $2.50 for the general
public.

Beware the Body Shirt Snatcher!
ff rl rTt l?fT-ffiifft Ii^ 3 r \\ fH / w
You're fair game when you wear a
VAN HEUSEN
Body Shirt.
Don't be fooled by this roguish robber! Buy an extra
supply of Van Heusen 417 Body Shirts and you'll
always be wearing the best fitting shirt on campus!
Check out the Body Shirts now at...
DOWNTOWN ON THE SQUARE
Beware the Body Shirt Snatcher!
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Foil this foxy female! Buy two Van Heusen 417 Body
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lack for another of the best fitting shirts on
campus! Check out the Body Shirts now at...
fiATOP
shop ran
1710 W. Unlv. Ave.

Friday, April 16, 1971, The Florida Alligator^

Page 13



Page 14

, The Florida Alligator, Friday, April 16,1971

r
The UF Board of Student Publications
Urges All Students Who Feel Qualified to
Apply For the Following Positions .
Editor, Florida Alligator
Terms: Fall (Term I) 1971
Fall & Winter (Terms I & II) 1971-72
Winter (Term II) 1972
Managing Editor, Florida Alligator
Terms: Fall (Term I) 1971
Fall & Winter (Terms I & II) 1971-72
Winter (Term II) 1972
The Board of Student Publications shall choose
the term of office after full deliberation
upon applications received.
Previous experience with Student Publications is
desirable but not essential.
You do not have to be a journalism major.
General Instructions
. 9
All applications are to be picked up and
returned between 8 a.m. and 4 p.m. to Rm. #330, Reitz Union.
-- : "£y VJA v> 1.
Applicants must return the original plus two V
copies of the completed application prior to
. ''-"A.
4 p.m., Thursday, April 22.
jnr*r
i / ". : V; \ .* *'..
* For further information, call Mr. Alan Whiteleather,
392-1680
, *. I ;
, tt f
- L 1- l- -LJ.l* : i



Parking violations
carry point loss

By CHRISTY TILSON
Alligator Writer
Mrs. Nell Parker, secretary in
the Student Traffic Court (STC)
office said, a minor parking
violation carries a two point
value. Any moving violation
considered minor carries three
points, as does not having a
decal.
These points are cumulative
and a warning is issued for an
accumulated six points in one
academic year, according to
Bill Graham, associate justice.
A students driving privileges
for the quarter may be revoked
after seven points.
This is just one of the policies
that UF students may not be
aware of, according to Graham.
A student who lends his car

Hume Area Council plans
Parent Day for May 8
The Hume Area Council is planning Parent Day, May 8, for the
parents of Hume Area students.
The purpose of the Parent Day is to inform parents concerning
campus policies and how they affect students.
We began to realize the misunderstandings many parents have
about policies, such as open housing, said Linda Graf, chairman of
the event.
According to Miss Graf, there will be a panel discussion Saturday
morning following speeches by campus officials. The committee hopes
to have UF President Stephen C. OConnell speak and housing
officials explain current UF policy to the parents.
During the afternoon, parents will be served a chicken barbecue
prepared by Hume area students. There are tentative plans for a talent
show that evening.
Parents who will need accommodations can arrange to stay in a
dorm and should contact the Hume Area Council.

5 HOUR SUE
Friday April 16 5:00 PM to 10:00 PM yj OO U
Price $271 I 77 # #
SAVE $72.00 TODAY
*'~ [ jf
SL 408 /
British Industries Co. (y) PIQIVIFFn SA"SOO
with shur. MSSE state Integrated Stereo Amplifier Hon*t 40H1-18,000 Hz
El ipticol Stylus 3 8" long throw woofor
44wotts IHF 3 low percon is or ion Acoustic Super Suponsion
Extra Smooth Sound
£p SS H H V%
MUtLI I I snur

to a friend will be held
responsible for all violations of
university traffic rules, said
Graham.
Parking and traffic citations
should be reported in person
within 72 hours of issue to the
STC, room 308 JWRU. After
this period a summons will be
issued.
Mrs. Parker said, Students
dont know that they must have
a decal or a permit to park
anywhere within the boundaries
of the university during
restricted hours. After hours you
may park your car in any
legitimate parking place.
Graham further stated, the
same parking regulations are in
effect during that period. These
are 24 hour, seven days a week
regulations.

$25.00 buys the KNAP-PAK. 3-way con
vertibie zips from carry-on to tote to knap knapsack
sack knapsack Opens from 12 to 22 Beige, red or
yellow color canvas
, y \ .IB
$15.00 buys the 19 ROLL-PAKJ" Strapped
for shoulder sling, hand grip, or to carry at
me end. Also 22 size. $20.00. Both in beige.
See how KNAP-PAK goes over the back, over the qg Qf yellow canvas with white.
shoulder. Or for hand-carry (above right).
, TOTE-PAK also available $17.00
traveling light is our bag.
ATLANTIC is the canvas bag with get-up-and-go. Makes your trip a light fan fantastic.
tastic. fantastic. Its light, brightright on! Made in all the styles you need to tote, to stuff,
to strap on. ATLANTICS GOT IT. THE SLING-PAKS!
ATLANTIC*
ATLANTIC PRODUCES A Sul .1 * 'V!* *V.if SUNG-PAKS/ MA £L" OS
Advertise ~.
it s good business

Friday, April 16, 1971, The Florida Alligator,

Page 15



Page 16

i. The Florida Alligator, Friday, April 16, 1971

Notices for Page of Record must be
sent to Betty Coomes, Division of
Information Services, Building H. All
copy for Tuesday must be received
by 3 p.m. Friday. Friday deadline is
3 p.m. the previous Wednesday.

GRE IS APRIL 24
The Graduate Record
Examination is to be given at
8:15 a.m on Saturday, April 24,
in Carlton Auditorium.
PRESIDENTIAL, senate
COMMITTEES NOMINEES
Members of the faculty
interested in serving on
University committees or in
recommending others for
vacancies ajre urged to send their
recommendations in writing to
Dr. James L. Wattenbarger at
Norman 'Hall. The Senate
Nominating Committee consists
of three presidential appointees:
Dr. Buford D. Thompson,
professor, (FAS vegetable crops,
and Dr. Wattenbarger: and four
members of the steering
committee, Dr. Billy G.
Dunavant, professor and director
of nuclear sciences; Dr. Ray
Fahien, professor of chemical
engineering; Dr. Thomas A.
Scott, professor of physics, and
Dr. John D. Butterworth,
professor and chairman of
marketing.
' The nominating committee
wishes to consider
recommendations from the
faculty prior to making its
report President O'Connell has
asked the committee to forward
to him two nominations for each
vacancy on committees for
which the members are elected
by the senate.
It is President O'ConneH's

TteetU..^
p KWM P
E A little less than
!
\ ''&>-**'< ...-. y ... j.
conventional...
' n
i
/
%
k, V
? IV . - v ; : ' .;' p*.
* SEMINOLE
Vi%ywwA*
Page of Record
Formerly Orange and Blue Bulletin. Produced every Tuesday & Friday
for the publication of official University notices and public events by
the Division of Information Services and the Public Functions Office.

desire to appoint as many
faculty as possible to
presidential committees. In
general, nominations should be
for persons not now serving on
committees. The nominating
committee in its recommenda recommendations
tions recommendations will not only consider the
interests and qualifications of
prospective members, but also
rank and college distribution and
special requirements as to
expertise.
A list of committees, with
persons currently serving on
them, is available in the office of
each dean and department
chairman. Each faculty member
now serving on a presidential or
senate committee also had a
copy of this list.
Letters forwarding
nominations should reach Dr.
Wattenbarger prior to May 1. A
brief statement of the interests
and qualifications of faculty
members, especially those with
recent appointments that you
recommend, will be appreciated.
EXPECTANT PARENTS'
CLASSES SET
The College of Nursing of the
University of Florida is offering
another series of Expectant
Parents' Classes beginning
Monday April 19 in Room
M 203. There is a charge of $5
per couple and consists of 6-8
Monday night sessions beginning
at 7:30 p.m Interested persons
should call 392-3514 for
registration.

Friday, April 16
Union Movie: "In Cold Blood",
Union Aud.
Baseball U of F vs. Kentucky
(2), Home Game
University Lutheran Church,
"Natural High" Rock
Musical, 8 p.m.
Gator Loan Fund: "Carnigras",
Upper Drill Field, 4:00 p.m.
h
Saturday, April 17
Union Bike Rally, 12 noon
UF Badmitton Club, Fla. Gym,
10 a.m.
Union Dance, Terrace, 2 p.m.
Baseball: U of F vs. Kentucky,
Home Game
Union Movie: "In Cold Blood",
Union Aud.
IFC Spring Frolics: Bill Cosby
Show & the Nitty Gritty Dirt
Band, Fla. Field, 8:30 p.m.
Gator Loan Fund: "Carnigras",
Upper Drill Field, 11:00 p.m.
Sunday, April 18
Union Movie. "Experimental
Film", Union Aud.
SGP: Phyllis Curtin, soprano;
Univ. Aud., 4 p.m
Engineering Fair Awards
Ceremony: Union Terrace

university calendar

Monday, April 19
Chess Club tournament, Union
118, 7:30 p.m.
Union Movie: "Monika", Union
Aud.
Tennis: U of F vs. Georgia,
Home Game
Tuesday, April 20
Pi Theta meeting, Union 150
D, 7:30 p.m.
UF Duplicate Bridge, Union 150
C, 7:30 p.m.
Cicerone Meeting, Union
Lounges, 7:30 p.m.
SGP: "Your Own Thing"
Concert, Plaza, 12 noon
Baseball: U of F vs. Rollins,
Home Game
Tennis: U of F vs. So. Fla.,
Home Game
SGP: "Your Own Thing",
University Aud., 8 p.m.

The University Calendar will be
published weekly listing only
events to open to the University
community. Private meeting
notices will be carried in "What's
Happening" on Mon., Wed., and
Fri. and should be submitted to
the Alligator office, 365 Union
or to Public Functions Office,
G-72 Union.

Wednesday, April 21
UF Badmintton Club, Norma
Gym, 8 p.m.
Circle K meeting, Union 361,
7:30 p.m.
Student Government Elections,
Plaza, All day
Union Movie: "Chaplin
Comedies", Union Aud.
Poetry Readings by Larry
Hetrick, Union Lounges, 4:30
p.m.
SGP: "Your Own Thing",
University Aud., 8 p.m.
Thursday, April 22
Young Republican meeting,
Union 349,7:30 p.m.
Zero Population Growth
meeting, Union 150 F&G,
7:30 p.m.
Friday, April 23
Union Movie: "The Loved One",
Union Aud.
REITZ UNION BOX OFFICE
SALES
IFC Spring Frolics: Bill Cosby
$3.25 GP, $3.00 Students
PhyHis Curtin $2.50 & $1.50
GP, $2.00 & SI.OO Students
SGP: "Your Own Thing"
$2.25 GP, $1.25 Students
Scabbard 8i Blade Military Ball
- $5.00 a couple



GATOR CLASSIFIET

FOR SALE
Brand new University sound
speakers, Vegas model. $l7O list, will
sell pair for $275. 5 year warranty.
372-7694 between 6 & 8 pm
(A-3t-116-p)
Remmington 700 BDL cal. 22-250
varmit barrel never fired $160; cal
.303 British lee-enfield 4X scope S6O;
Zenith Stereo $75; 378-9942
(A-4t-116-p)

ind Relaxer
SMav 1, 1971
\
N>
ght Show
'UNION .... I
i/ERSARY
BIRTHDAY J
r-v, party/
r Todays |
I more for your money meal I
I moisorrs I
I CPFETERIR I
I r FRIDAY S FEATURE "! I
I | PORK CUTLET | I
| 1 PARMESAN 1 ?
1Q: I 2 I
1 t I YELLOW RICE | £ |
|I | B 1
I j I
i LUNCH: 11 til 2-SUPPER:4:3O til 8-FREE PARKING 1
I moisons I
CPFETERIR beyond comparison!
2620 N.W. 13th Street in the Gainesville Mall I

PREsiwTDmKTFROM

Jf $? BEST MUSIC*L%
\L Sg NEW YORK %
J DRAMA CRITICS
AT CIRCLE AWARD 1968^
) lr \ \ mus ca
- 1 x -I i \\
Starring
vi inu ctcvcmc a in AINP PETRICOFF
jLwiLL JACOBS JUNE COMPTON

APDII 90 A9l 8:00 PM UNIVERSITY AUDITORIUM it
2 l TICKETS AVAILABLE REITZ UNION BOX OFFICE (392-1653)
n I IVfIVBI A A A A A a aaaaaaaaaaa a a aaaaaW

f or sale
ca^n^rt Ck / 6cyl Chevy pane,lecl and
Isgoils 1 ,??.) ca ea
SONY compact stereo system.
Turntable, amp, AM-FM, 2-way
speaker system. Excellent condition.
Marcia LaMancha No.l. 378-9064
(A-3t-115-p)

mmmm |
* %£'''^'lf||
M I - ,^'* 5 ** 1 1 * I I H I t ', Hi

Friday, April 16, 1971, The Florida Alligator,

FOR SALE
1970 YAMAHA RT 1-MX very good
condition I must sell this machine
call 378-6252 after spm (A-3t-116-p)
Yamaha 50 + helmet must sell best
offer. call Pam 373-3684
(A-2t-116-p)
TRIUMPH 650 semichop, custom
paint, seat, chrome, runs good, cut
price from SIOOO to $875. must sell
now! call Dave 378-8946, 7-noon.
(A-2t-116-p)
For Sale: Boys 2 speed Schwinn
Bicycle. $25. Light ash brown long
human hair fall-worn once $25 Call
Anne 373-3718 (A-st-116-p)
AUCTION Apr. 17 7:30 pm new,
used, antiques & misc. items, don't
miss this sale. col. Wylie Cobb
auctioneer cobb's auction house 41
south archer fla. (A-2t-116-p)
Need money fast! Am willing to sell
llke-new refrigerator for only $65. It
Is 3 ft. high and cost SIIO.OO new;
call Wm. at 376-0406 (A-st-116-p)
Martin D 12-35 12 string guitar
w/nardshell case, cost over $650 sell
for S4OO Also complete Sunn PA
system cost 1900 sell 600 372-3929
(A-st-117-p)
175 cc bultaco street cycle features
recently rebuilt engine, new paint, ez
start, 80 mpg, trail use, large seat,
198 lbs, low price $l5O 373-4383
(A-lt-117-p)
Bmc 948 and 4-speed for spridget,
morris. VW body parts. Complete
running gear for dune buggy or? 1
need 40hp engine, trans. 372-1039
(A-st-117-p)
BICYCLE 3 speed runs now but
cable Is broken sls also 1 med size
pair of handball gloves $5 call Joe
2-8790 dmg (A-2t-117-p)
honda 90 w helment slls sony
500-a tape recorder -$199 garrard
turntable slls pre-amp $5 9 reels
tape $29 372-5561 Art 10pm you'd
better hurry (A-st-117-p)
1969 honda 350 firm $525 fair price
considering $275 just spent on
complete overhaul, battery and tire,
have receipts call 372-4678 after 5
(A-6t-117-p)
'66 bmw-excellent mech cond, fairing
& many other extras, first S7OO gets
it. 378-0181 til 2 372-0507 after 2
(A4MI7-P)
In stock: 31b. nylon 2 man tents;
Red, white, blue basketballs; Masks,
fins, snorkels; Backpacking supplies.
B & B SPORTS CENTER 5320 N.W,
13th ST. 378-1461 (A-st-113-p)
1969 S-90 honda In good condition
$175 call 372-5254 ask for Jeff or
see at 805 E. University Ave.
(A-st-115-p)
ALL PHONO NEEDLES ARE
AVAILABLE AT MUNTZ STEREO
319 NW 13 ST (A-15t-107-p)
69 TRIUMPH 500 TIOOC
motorcycle expel, cond. extras inc.
$750 also 65 GTO $1250 call
392-9523 (A-st-115-p)
1970 TRIUMPH 650 Bonneville,
excellent condition fast, clean,
chrome fender, sissy bar, medium
high rise bars sllsO 378-3196
(A-3t-115-p)

Page 17

: : f
*pppj: .' JnMjf

FOR SALE
COMPARE BEFORE YOU BUY All
New Student Desk 29.50 2 dr. files
19.50 4 dr. files 29.50 USED arm
exec, swivel chair 19.95 JR Office
F. iture Co. 6205 S. Main St.
3/w a 146 (a-25t-103-p)
SUPER SALE Blank 8-track 80 min
tapes 6 for $9.95 MUNTZ STEREO
319 N.W. 13 St. (a-20t-89-p)
8 TRACK TAPES PRE-RECORDED
3.99' largest selection we also trade,
buy & sell, new & used tapes
TRADE-A-TAPE 14 nw 13 St.
(A-15t-107-p)
Stereo 8-Tr Cartridges Recorded
Premium Quality Lubricated Tape 1
or 2 albums on 40 or 80 min tapes
$2.50 or $4 including tape. Dont
accept cheap imitation. Get
Quality. John 378-5916
nights (A-st-113-p)
Heathkit Amature Band DX-60A
Transmitter and HR-10 Receiver With
SWR/power meter $l5O for Info eall
392-9031 (A-st-115-p)
1961 volvo-good running
condition-great for town &
trips-S3OO-376-8855. westinghouse
delux air conditioner-5000 btu-llttle
use-SBO 376-8855 (A-st-114-p)
Honda 150. 1965, good condition,
17,300 ml. $230, Includes 2 helmets.
Call 378-9534 after 5 (A-4t-114-p)
62 VALIANT Excellent condition,
only 30000 miles, S2OO call Stuart at
372-6772 from 7 to 11 pm
(A-5M15-p)
1968 Triumph Bonneville 650 cc low
mileage, carefully maintained. SBOO
call Dan at 372-7877 (A-st-116-p)
AKC Female silver minature Poodle,
must sale leaving for Germany, loves
cats, soon able to breed, 75$ or best
offer, Call 378-6247 (A-st-113-p)
Ham radio unit. Eico
transcelver/power supply like new.
Vlbroplex key Shure mike and
antenna included. Asking S2OO.
378-5430 evenings. (A-st-115-p)
120 watt SANSUI AU-555 solid-state
stereo control amplifier $140.00
phone 373-3023 Earl MUST SELL!!
(A-4t-115-p)
FOR RENT
Aprils rent free! Sublet furnished or
unfurnished apt., $l4O or $l3O,
Balcony bedroom, Shag carpet, 3
blocks from campus. Ph 378-2888.
(B-st-114-p)
New England style duplex-needs
female roomate, one block from
campus available now. 1007 S.W. 6th
Ave. call 372-6112 for Michele
(B-4t-114-p)
Married couple or serious grad to
sublease lbdr apt-no child or pets,
pool-lnqulre Coy Thomas 1406-32
sw lOter or call Alvarez 372-8468
(B-12t-116-p)
Sublet lbr apt no children no pets
quiet near campus married couples
only call 373-1183 (B-st-116-p)

r.V.r.v.X.v.;.:.;.:.;.;.:.;.;,; v ..
FOR r n
Iv/W'XvXwXvXvffivl:
sublet 2 bdr apt ac > <
pool available any V
call 376-0635 900 SVr
mo. fB-st-117-p)
3 bedrooms for rent
pool, S7O/person r --r
summer quarter on-; %<
373-4301 or 373-13££
Room for mature *'<*
Central heat, air conMt-
maid service, separate It. *?--
street parking. cr? 1
(B-2t-117-p)
1 bedroom 60 a month
nw 15th st apt 8 Aprt
blocks from campus {&>'%
... .,- *.^l
2 br apt to sublet for W4*
per mo summit house **
call 373-2187 after Sptv
2 female roommates *Mnt*
the place for fall qurft4 <
392-7842 or Brenda ?%
Information (C-3t-ll7*t*,
Sr. >
v.
Bum I a ~
| hJ| 750
TheStofe
O
m
0)
m
m

AT v
2:104:0
I
.1 yiikLii^ic
I VIII
It'
I
m^sj^auaam



ATOR CLASSIFIEDS

RENT
/c furnished triplex
3ble may 1. pets &
only sllO month!
r-f ri (B-st-115-p)
ummer qtr. close to
air-conditioned,
jtr. university apts.
e. apt. n, 376-8990
mm
-.vX w. vX*XvX-!X-v . .ijiiwifli m
l^ipp
TQttQOQQQQQQOOOOOOQmDOOOm
<4*4.. j

a a story of men among
men and the woman
whotriedtointerfere.
WARHOLS V3|
ONESOHE f 1
COWBOYS \ 1
IN EASTMAN COLOR |
lOYWARHOL'S'LONESBME COWBOYS'
Y BE A BIT TOO MUCH FOR MANY
iPK. BUT THAT'S THEIR PROBLEM.
Lonesome Cowboys is a
jWPdWj Jt magnificent and very
1 funny satire of the
\fjm American Western
# that is liberally
seasoned with our
favorite 4,8,10 and
1 Tm 12-letter words and a
H 'Mil m cornucopia cfntidity
um ant sexua lcarryings-on
that is-in combination
ML -perhaps unprecedented!
-2mMMMMm\ M S.f CHRONICLf

EOF* RENT
SINGLES: Swing into summer In a
luxurious A/C poolside apt. Private
bedroom. Walk to campus. S7O,
including utilities, and free color TV.
378-7224 La Mancha Apts.
(B-15t-116-p)
WA NTED
Listeners wanted! Will pay $2.00 for
one hour session. Must be native
English speaking and have normal
hearing. Please call LeVan between 8
and 5 for appointment. 392-2049
(C-112-tfc)
Truman Capotes
IN
COLD
BLOOD
Friday, April 16 & Saturday,
April 17 5:30, 8:15, 11:00
Union Aud. 50 cents buy
advance tickets Friday at 2nd
floor box office from
12:30-9:30 Sponsored by the
J. Wayne Reitz Union
Proceeds from Fridays
showings will go to the Gator
Loan Fund

Page 18

!, The Florida Alligator, Friday, April 16, 1971

WANTED
Two girls want apartment to sublease
fall quarter. Call Carin or Mary Anne
372- (C-st-l 13-p)
Need one male roommate badly for
nice apartment. SSO a month calf
376-4185 (C-st-116-p)
Coed to share luxurious air
conditioned poolside apt. Private
bedroom. Walk to campus. S7O
including utilities and free color TV.
378-7224 (C-15t-116-p)
2 roommates wanted large 4
bedroom house near mall cable tv
private or semi-private bedroom S4O
per month utilities Incl. 378-6810
{C-st-116-p)
Male roommate to share luxurious
a/c poolside apt. Private bedroom.
Walk to campus. S7O including
utilities + free color tv. 378-7224
(C-15t-116-p)
Senior coed desires 1 br efficiency
apt for summer qtr. ac close to
campus ph. 373-3355 (C-112-st-p)
Two female roommates wanted at
Landmark apt. N 0.32 for summer
quarter (C-st-113-p)
Keep an independent voice in the
senate, elect Gary Ruthledge to the
student senate from the College of
Education on April 24. pd. pol. adv.
(C-3t-117-p)
V ****/
H ELP VWY NTED
Part time chemistry lab technician
experience preferred Call 372-1500
(E-st-114-p)
AMBITIOUS COUPLE who need
more income. Unusual opportunity
for good earnings for both, work
together, part-time or full-time,
phone 373-1476 (E-st-109-p)
mm
a*
AUTOS

******* ***********%*******
Summer Comfort: 1966 Tempest, air
V-8, Air Shocks, Poly glass. Low
miles. Well maintained $875 or offer.
Call 372-1039 (G-st-117-p)
62 PORSCHE 3568 excellent cond.
SISOO ph 378-8270 (G-3t-117-p)
Fiat 850 Fastback Coupe 69,
Excellent condition, very
economical, great car for student, see
to appreciate. $llOO 392-8168
(G-st-117-p)
Jaguar KHE, *62 mag wheels,
detachable hard top, custom leather
interior, good condition Call
373- after 2:00 (G-st-117-p)
62 ford galaxle with air condition
radio good tires it runs S3OO call
392-3331 ask for Dr. Ayut
(G-4t-117-p)
1965 Mercury Monterey, Good
Condition. Graduating Senior In
desperate need of cash. $450 or best
offer. Call 376-0486 or 378-8070.
(G-3t-115-p)
VOLVO 544 excellent condition
SBOO or best offer can see at 3511
NW 13th st dally or call 378-6410
after 7:00 must sell tjhis week
(G-st-115-p)
65 Bonneville 4drht. extra clean.
68000 actual miles, good tires, one
owner. 895 or best cash offer.
372-5214 after 6pm (G-st-114-p)
NOW PLAYING!
AT: 2:10-4:40-7:10 & 9:40
PRODUCTIONS'
BAREFOOT Jfj
EXECUTIVE ]W\
Oil MUt Osrw P>oikrt NOW PLAYING!
AT: 2:104:05-6:00-7:55 &
9:50
I [ j kj

:-:-:-x-:-x-x-:-x-:-:-:v:-::::XxXx>:x>-:-x-x : : : :
AUTOS
***' v/*v*v*v. *.*.*.*.. .
67 v"w one owner low milage Must
sacrifice this week! MUST!! perfect
mech cond will sell cheep!! pay off
bank only 373-4035 after
S(G-st-116-p)
67 MGB -GT green w/black; radio;
abarth; wire wheels; 37,000 miles;
looks good and runs well, will
consider offers around $1350
Camelot Apts, apt. 110 (G-4t-116-p)
1965 FALCON-stick, radio, clean
and in good condition $425 call John
or Roxie 373-1436 night or
392-1521 day (G-2t-116-p)

jWOriU^^W^^^
I ACADEMY AWARD j
InOMINEE!gf I MADRON color!
La Pl us mmmmmwmammmmmwmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmM
I ikWHIH management
InvJSI! 1 !!! DOES NOT RECOMEND
Iff il SII COLOR FORCHILDR E N I
erosa
JML STEAK HOUSE i
FEATURING CHUCK WAGON STEAKS FROM 99c
OPEN 11:00 AM to 9:00 PM -7 Days Weekly
Westgate Shopping Center PHONE 378*3320
3321 W. University Ave. Gainesville, Florida
I MSSt lllllflF'.W. 13st. ACROSS FROM MAL !TIH

CARNIGRAS
IS
HERE



gator CLASSIFIEDS

Open Saturday 12-6 p.m. & after
the Bill Cosby Show till 2:00 a.m.
Discount coupons available at 12*6 p.m. 5 rides for $1 00
fairgrounds ticket booths.
The J. Wayne Reitz Union
I and
Celebration '7l
I present
Three Evenings of Free Films
j Sunday, April 18.... Experimental I
Lot in Sodom J
Reflections on Black j
Sirius Remembered J
Wedlock House: An Intercourse J
I Shadows I
Union Auditorium free 6:00 & 9:00 j
I Monday, April 19... Art I
Wed, April 21... Classic. J
Tok^^Break
' msm
. ... S
enjoy
The Florida Alligator

STUDENT GOVERNMENT PRODUCTIONS
AND CELEBRATION
Cff/At Ofor/mw- l
' j' I
Metropolitan Opera
Ki Mr **
arf w*,- .-_., '' -. 'I >'* -j ; '*£s;£
SUNDAY APRIL 15TH. UNIV. AUDITORIUM
I Miss Curtin TICKETS AVAILABLE REITZ UNION BOX OFFICE I
I (392-1653) il

Friday, April 16, 1971, The Florid. Alligator,

Page 19

AUTOS
1969 mgb excellent condition, low
mileage, fully synchro, wire wheels
radio, radials, tonneau, marriage
forces sale, call 373-1607 after 5:00
(G-st-113-p)
Camper step-van, self contained,
excellant condition, must be sold fast
to pay for school, contact Don or
Pat, 458 murphree c 392-7305
{G-4t-114-p)
66 Falcon Futura good mechanical
condition, radio, heater good tires
$685 call 378-7676 (G-st-113-p)
63 MGB, wire wheels, perllli tires,
tonneau. $550 call 373-1216
(G-4t-U5-p)
PERSONAL
YOUR vote counts!! this time, vote
BOBBY WILLIAMS for student
senate. will represent
you/independent/iuc pd. pol. adv.
(J-3M17-P)
GOING TO EUROPE? We Have
Charter Flights At People's Prices.
Call 372-6846 (J-st-117-p)
BUSINESS MAJORS interested in
expressing your views or just rapping
about the upcoming student
government elections, then, call your
senate candidate 808 ROSENBERG
378-3449 "pd. pol. adv."
(J-3t-117-p)
Imagination is more important than
knowledge Albert Einstein. Bob
Cammack proves It!! Vote for Bob
Cammack Engineering senate Ind.
Look For Sign of Red Cap Bob pd.
pol. adv. (J-3t-U7-p)
Babe, manhattan beach sounds good,
till our eighth be a senseless
sensational & sensual sixth with or
without my socks on. love three +
me. (J-lt-117-p)
Two things are better on a
WATERBED. One is sleep. From
Innerspace Environment at
reasonable prices. call Elliott,
373-3144 (J-15t-105-p)
Coed looking for female companions
to travel with this summer in europe.
leave from miaml. call Bobbi
373-2287 (J-st-113-p)
GOING TUBING Large Truck Tubes
For Rent $2.00 Per day Call
378-5931 or 372-1446 For
Arrangements (J-6t-116-p)
Help! 1962 Corvair stolen. White 4
door sedan, red seat cover, three
white walls, one black. License no.
16-D-7970. reward, call 373-3090.
(J-bt-114-p)
Studs, includ'.ig silver and gold stars,
all sizes, the widest selection of
patches + appliques anywhere,
GRAPEWINEPAPERS (even Spiro
Agnew papers), bluejeans, all sizes,
always In stock, SATIN HOT
PANTS, and all your Gainesville
Green supplies. Everythings at the
SUBTERRANEAN CIRCUS, 10 SW
7th St. Open 10 to 10 daily and 12
to 8 Sundays. (J-3t-110-p)

nma
MDNITDH
8 SUNDAY NIGHTS 10-12 WRUF RADIO 85 fi
JU. SPECIAL RATES FOR FLORIDA RESIDENTS
JfOllV On Th World Famous
GLASS BOTTOM BOATS at
Springs
LAST 7 DAYS! I
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GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

PERSONAL
No finer cats than we are! Three
beautiful Siamese kittens 9 wks. old.
These cats are perfect and, the going
price is S2O. 370-9282 put a little pup into your life we have
eleven of them all are very friendly
and full of puppy love free call
373-3723 anytime (J-st-115-p)
professional DRAFT COUNSELING
Medical-Legal-Psychologic open
weekends Tel: 891-3736 2135 Ixora
Road No. Miami, 33161 (j-46t-106-p)
One Candidate Cares. Make Student
Government Responsive. Elect Larry
Tropp. Senate Arts arid Sciences Ind.
Pd. pol. adv. (J-st-113-p)
Co-Eds Facial Hair removed forever,
fast, low-cost gentle hair removal.
Edmund Dwyer..
Electrologist... 102 N.W. 2nd Ave.
Call 372-8039 for appointment.
(j-44t-54-p)

ALLIGATOR CLASSIFIEDS
To order classifieds, use the form below. Fill in the boxes
allowing 1 box for each letter, space and punctuation mark.
Count 2 boxes for capital letters. Don't use hyphens at the end of
a line (which contains 35 characters). Use additional form if more
than 4 lines are required. Minimum charge is SI.OO for 4 lines.
For each additional line, add $.25. Multiply the total by the
number of days the ad is to run. Subtract the discount for
consecutive insertions (if applicable*). Mail the ad, with
remittance (check preferred) to. Alligator Classifieds, Room 330,
Reitz Union, Gainesville, Florida 32601. No refunds.
DvadKiw -M0 pun. 2 days prior to starting day
DO NOT ORDER BY PHONE
4k W to n
innn £
so§ w s 5 g | n
111 v r 2
o
__ MOO . y,
i 5 & g g- & o V)
gin****
S 2. _* _* I o

_ _ g A 2 c
i.|| 2
* ~ § §
-
TO
z £ 3 2
_ g o 5
m 5 71
A "4
_ >
_ _ m O
n r
bbbl r r

20

i. The Florida Alligator, Friday, April 16, 197 T

XXtiXri^XrXtXXxXXXrX^X::::*:*:*:
LOST dSt FOUND
Found: ladies watch in vicinity of
yulee area, call 376-8439 and
identify. (L-3t-117-p)
Lost black wallet near murphee area
tennis courts please return Ids no
questions 376-9895 John Kemp
(L-3t-l 16-p)
Lost white female poodle in the
vicinity of list NW 2 ave She is
wearing a flea collar and has brown
stains under eyes Reward 372-2912
(L-4t-115-p)
lost-gray-black tiger stripe cat, white
chest and legs, red flea collar, seen
around nw 1 ave 18 st and murphrey
call John 373-2516 reward
(1.-3t-115-p)
LOST Black wallet with ID's If found
call 392-7039 $5 reward (L-4t-117-p)

:X:*:*:W:-X;:Xx;::xxW>:X: ; :*:*:X:XX*:X.
SERV ICES
X:X:X::S:X:XX:X:XX:X:X:X:X:X:X:X:X*-
term papers, thesis, reports etc typed
to your specifications, accuracy and
neatness guaranteed. 50 cents per
page. call tola 373-1003
(M-lOt-110-p)
Save 25% or more on all auto parts.
Spark plugs 68 cents. Cash & Carry
Auto Parts, 1111 S. Main St.
378-7330. (M-113-tfc)
Alternators generators starters
electrical systems tested and repaired.
Auto-Eiectric Service, 1111 S. Main
378-7330. Now! BankAmericard adn
Master Charge, (m-tfc)^
Were wired for sight at the smallest
eyeglass office in town. Drive your
own waiting room to UNIVERSITY
OPTICIANS at 519 SW 4th Ave.,
across from Greyhound Bus Station,
378-4480. (m-tfc)
HORSES for any purpose. Horseback
riding, hay rides, western
parties-dance. floor. Cowboy's Riding
Stables. S.E. 22nd Ave. and 15th
Street phone 372-9134
(M-10t-103-p)
HORSES BOARDED finest care
spacious stalls lighted ring wooded
trails recretation activities for patrons
beautiful grounds 373-1059
(M-st-113-p)
Young legal secretary with 8 years
typing experience. Will type all you
require promptly and accurately at
50 cents a page. Call 378-6983 after
6:30 P.M. any evening. (M-5t'115-p)

Decadent, Depraved Music at the Rathskeller
L. FRIDAY 9PM-?? THE MUSK of RF6
H SATURDAY 9PM-?? IYNARD SKYNARD JM
|| ADMISSION FOR EACH EVENT wSA
sF FOR YOUNG AND OLD, MALE AND FEMALE
HR wL ALL AT GAINESVILLES DEN OF EVIL
Kjjpny THE RATHSKELLER
A Student Government Production mfl

I STENO- RECEPTIONIST I
If Permanent position statewide professional association. Modern S
jj offices and equipment. Salary competitive commensurate with
| qualifications. Five day week, fringe benefits. Qualifications must
include proficiency in typing, record keeping, filing, routine general
office duties. Opening immediately available. Reply Box 13455, H
University Station, Gainesville. I
I mm wtmwms w&m
I 8:30 PM
SATURDAY APRIL 17 FLORIDA FIELD
I STUDENTS G.P. AT THE GATE
5 AVAILABLE AT RECOROSVILLE-REBEL DISCOUNT




Economy restructured

Cuba gets Red technicians

By CARLOS J. LICEA
Alligator Staff Writer
U.S. State department
officials revealed Wednesday
Soviet technicians are being sent
to towns and cities all over Cuba
in an attempt to revitalize the
sagging economy.
The technicians, official
Washington sources speculate,
are being incorporated into low
level positions, with the
purpose of restructuring Cuban
economy.
The move by the Soviets and
the Cuban government began
taking a more active pace after
Cuban Prime Minister Fidel
Castro admitted last year the
economic policies of the
government had failed.
Although Castro got 8.5
million tons of sugar, the largest
crop ever for the island nation,
the effort took two years, plus a
great diversion of resources from
all other industries for the sugar
effort.
Since then, a bilateral
economic treaty was signed
between Havana and the
Kremlin which binds the two
countries closer than ever
economically.
The economic treaty is
effective from January of this
year to 1976.
According to the soviet news
agency, Tass, Cuban president
Osvaldo Dorticos met with
Soviet officials in Moscow
Wednesday.
The Soviet and Cuban
comrades had an exchange of
views and questions of the
further all-round development of
cooperation between the
Communist party of the Soviet
Union and the Cuban
Communist party, Tass was
quoted as saying.
Porticos was in Moscow to
attend the 24th Soviet
Communist Party Congress,
which ended last week.
HAITI
Speculation the Haitian
president-for-life Francois (Papa
Doc) Duvalier is ill and near
dead increased Wednesday when
the 64-year-old ruler failed to
show up for a birthday military
parade in Port-Au-Prince.
Duvaliers 19-year-old
playboy son, Jean Claude,
instead of the somber little

NOW GOING ONI r J
20% OFF ON ALL FAMOUS NAME BRAND DRESSES,
PANT SUITS, BLOUSES, AND A GROUP OF SPORTSWEAR.
NOW GOING ONI
NEW SUMMER WEAR NOW ARRIVING DAILY
v DOWNTOWN ON THE SQUARE
WE HONOR MASTERCHARGE A BANKAMERICARD

TfifVS
Alligator V.
Looks l at )
Latin \
America\
president, stood in the reviewing
balcony in the presidential place.
Foreign newsmen who were
expecting to meet with Papa
Doc were told the president
could not meet the
appointment, as had been
promised by government
officials.
Tourism and Public Relations
Director Gerard De Catalone
told newsmen Papa Doc was in
very good health but had been
told by his physicians that he
must rest.
De Catalone indicated
Duvalier was the one who
decided Jean Claude was to
appear at the parade.
Jean Claude Duvalier was
proclaimed successor-designate
by Papa Doc last Jan. 22, after
the rubber-stamp National
Assembly amended the Haitian
constitution lowering the
minimum age for eligiblity for
the presidency from 40 to 18.
This move was followed by a
referendum, which apparenty
approved the action by the
president.
However, no date has been set
for Jean Claudes takeover.
Duvalier has said his son would
succeed him When the time
comes, It is presumed the time
will be when the Haitian ruler
dies.
URUGUAY
Tupamaro guerrillas Tuesday
kidnaped Uruguayan
industrialist Ricardo Ferres,
making him the third political
prisoner in their peoples
prison.
Police officials in Montevideo
said Ferres was apparently taken
from his car shortly after he left
for work at 8:30 a.m.

Ferres abandoned car was
found by Montevideo police
about five miles from the center
of the city with the engine
running.
Francisco Gonzales Sendig, an
official of the Uruguayan Police,
said Ferres was threatened last
October with kidnaping by the
Tupamaros.
He indicated three other
stolen cars were found
abandoned in different parts of
the city after Ferres car was
seen.
The Tupamaros are also
holding British Ambassador
Geoffrey Jackson and the
president of the Uruguayan
telephone company, Ulyses
Pereira Reverbal.
Uruguayan police Wednesday
detained the office manager of
the Cuban news agency Prensa
Latina in connection with the
kidnapings.
Police officials refused to
make any comments, but there is
speculation in Montevideo the
arrest was made after a Cuban
reporter allegedly interviewed
the kidnaped British
ambassador.
A story of the interview was
released by Prensa Latina and
given for world-wide
distribution.
ARGENTINA
A leader of the political party
which still supports ousted
dictator Juan Peron, met with
the ex-dictator Tuesday in
Madrid, allegedly to confer
about Perons return to
Argentina.
Peron has been living in Spain
for 11 years. He was ousted by
the military in 1955.
Current Argentine President
General Alegandro Lanusse
indicated Peron could return to
the country and talk over the
current political situation with
the military leaders now running
the country.
Lanusse legalized political
parties, which had been banned
by his two predecessors, Juan
Carlos Ongania and Roberto M.
Levingston. The new military
junta has expressed a desire to
turn Argentina over to a civilian
government by next year.

GAINESVILLE COURSE BEGINNING MONDAY
SELF HYPNOSIS
LECTUIi AND DEMONSTRATION (FIRST SESSION OF COURSE)-$2
MON. APRIL 19 8:00 PM HOLIDAY INN SOUTH
LEARN WHY SELF-HYPNOSIS IS THE MOST POWERFUL
AND EFFECTIVE TOOL AVAILABLE TODAY FOR SELF SELFIMPROVEMENT.
IMPROVEMENT. SELFIMPROVEMENT.
WRITE OR PHONE FOR FREE BROCHURE
MSTITUTi or APPLIED HYPNOSIS
5445 MARINER STREET. TAMPA. PH. 872-0698
DIAMOND /Ck
NEEDLES \7
V 2 OFF v
DURING OUR
5 HOUR SALE
TODAY
5:00 PM TO 10:00PM
THE FIDELITY SHOP
420 NW 13 St 378-8045
April 19 25 0 6L
Horsoshow Grounds
Waldo Road I
ALACHUA COUNTY FAIR
ADMISSION
1/2 PRICE
STUDENTS ONLY
Come on out and enjoy the fun at the Fair. Lots to do
and see with something to interest everyone. Wild rides,
special events and many interesting displays. Take
advantage of this special offer soon! Regular admission
50 cents.
1 ADMIT ONI I
|Sj Alachua County Fair
You must bring this coupon to receive the special savings.
T|* Only one coupon per parson.
Stt Laroy VanDylca and his 'Auctioneers'
Friday and Saturday Nights.

Friday. April 16,1971, The Florida Alligator,

Page 21



Page 22

Th#Florida Alligator, Friday, April 16,1971

Reitz Union planning
non-stop entertainment

By CAROL BRADY
Alligator Staff Writer
The J. Wayne Reitz Union
will celebrate its fourth
anniversary, May 1 with 25
hours of n o n-stop
entertainment.
According to Wesley A.
Royal, assistant director of
Union Program Activities, the
Union will not net any profit
that day. Food will be sold at
cost.
The activities are for the
benefit of the students
themselves, Royal said.
Tournaments will take place
throughout the day in the Union
games room. Competition in
billiards, foosball, checkers and
hearts will be held.
An arts and crafts display will
be set up in the courtyard
outside the barber shop.
The north terrace will be the
site of a flea market from 10
ajn. to 5:30 p.m. The market
will feature student goods
exclusively.
All outside activities will be
conducted by volunteers from

U.S. Army Corps civil engineer
to discuss environmental impact

By CAROL BRADY
Alligator Staff Writer
William K. Johnson, civil
engineer with the U.S. Army
Corps of Engineers Hydrologic
Engineering Center at Davis,
California, will be the featured
speaker of a seminar assessing
environmental impacts of
resource development Monday
at 1:30 pjn. in room 1151
McCarty Hall.
Johnson is part of a series of
seminars entitled Economics
and Decision making for
Environmental Quality,
sponsored by the Department of
Agricultural Economics.
Johnson graduated from the
University of California,

j RAPP'S PIZZA TRAIN j
j 373-3377 376-3354 j
FAST HOT DELIVERY j
2 FREE COKES WITH EACH j
PIZZA DELIVERED |
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I Pitcher Beer or Coke 99{ j
8 (on premises only) 8

Isii v* i mmi!
A -m i, ...
... safi:...
--war s JzSmA&Sr'X
J.W. Reitz Union
... having birthday celebration on 4th anniversary

the College of Physical
Education and Health. Events on
the Union grounds will include
relays and bicycle races. A pitch
and putt tournament will run all
day. Canoes and row boats will
be placed in the duck pond for
all frustrated sailors.
Rock bands will be featured
as part of the days activities.
Eroica will play on the
terrace, followed by a tape and
light show by the Super Sound
Circus. Southern Comfort

Berkeley with a B.S. in Civil
Engineering. He received his
M.S. from Sacramento State
College.
Johnson currently assists the
Corps Field Offices in the
application of hydrologic
engineering techniques.
Johnson has worked on
various projects in California,
including the planning and
design of the California
Aqueduct.
Other spencers in the seminar
scheduled to speak at later dates
include: Dr. Howard T. Odum,
UF department of
Environmental Engineering; Mr.
Henry Steele, Water Resources
Council, Washington D.C.; Mr.
Joseph W. Little, College of

will appear in the ballroom later
in the evening.
Besides the regularly
scheduled feature, Good-bye
Columbus, free films will be
shown on the north east comer
of the terrace. Viva Max,
Kellys Heroes, and 30
minutes of road runner cartoons
will be presented.
Prizes will be distributed to all
winners. A drawing with a grand
prize worth SSO will be held at 3
a.m.

Law; and Dr. William B. Lord,
University of Wisconsin Center
for Resource Policy Studies.

CARNIGRAS
IS
HERE

BIKE RALLY : ;.
Hume Commuter Lot
Ci h Cross Campus Rally
5-Man Team Relays
Skill Gymkanas
M Winners in 3 Classes
Clunkers
I PRIZES I- 3 5p,,d
Iji, I 10-Speeds
sponsored by the J. Wayne Reitz Union

T STCftK Slift K ~!
Student Special
I p' (With The Coupon) I
I VWmj Our e 9 u^ar 93< Steakburger j
Luncheon And Any 15< Drink
| SI.OB Value Only 90{ pu
i Steak n Shake 1
i 16105. W. 13th St. Gainesville^
%
I AkAn Volkswagen \
no P Repairs X |
Month s Special for V. W. Drivers V
/Lube, oil change, clean air & oil filter, and Just clip
X dutch and brake adjustment all for $3.95 $ at j_ \ a
/ Normal cost $11.50 a savings of $7.55 present it at \
1 1| Sebastians 535 S.W. 4th Ave. ant, Y| I
, take advantage of this special
PHONE D
|
FIRST WE OFFER TO SHIP
YOUR VOLVO HOME FREE
FROM THE FACTORY.
THEN WE MAKE IT WORTH
YOUR WHILE TO DECLINE
OUR GENEROUS/
If you take delivery on a Volvo in Europe and drop it off
at the Volvo factory in Sweden, well ship it to New York,
Baltimore or Portsmouth, Virginia for free.
This wonderful deal has just one drawbackyou have to
drive back to the Volvo factory to take advantage of it.
So we offer an alternative: Drop your Volvo off in
Amsterdam, Oslo, Bremerhaven, Antwerp, Helsinki,
Copenhagen, Hamburg, Bremen, Rotterdam or Stockholm
and well ship it back for just $l2O.
Which is about one-third of what yould have to pay if you
did it yourself.
Either way you ship your Volvo back, you save money on it.
And either way, you get a car that lasts a long time. We
cant guarantee how long, of course, but nine out of every
ten Volvos registered here in the last eleven years are still
on the road.
Which means that after three years, you can stop putting
your money into car payments. And start putting it into
other things.
Like more trips to Europe. (voLvo)
For a free copy of our Tourist Sales brochure, come in.
Ovolvo, me.. >t
Harfred Auto Imports
Your New Volvo Dealer
606 E. University Ave. Ph 3724373



The
Florida
Alligator j

Golfers surge
into tourney lead

By CHRIS LANE
Alligator Sports Editor
Gator golf captain Mike
Killian walked off the Houston
Altascocita Country Club course
after the second round of the
All-America Golf Tournament
Thursday and stepped into his
role of part-time fortune teller.
Tm sure the Gators will win
it, Texas will be second and I
hope Oklahoma State is third,**
he said.
That*s the way it stands after
two days of competition.
Gators Andy North, Gary
Koch, Jim McQuillian and
Killian combined to post a
second-day score of 291 to add
to their first-day tally of 284
and capture the top spot in the
All-America field.
Texas is second at 577 and
Oklahoma State registered a 579
for third place. Host Houston is
fourth, 14 strokes behind
Florida at 589.
North slammed a
three-under-par 69 Thursday to
add to his first-round 70 for a
139 total to trail the medalist
berth by one stroke. Texas*
George Machock is low with a
138.
Koch fired a two-under-par 70
to follow Norths pace with a
two-day tally of 142. Killian
posted a second-round 71 and
McQuillian added a two-over 74
in the Gator winning effort.
Weve all been playing real
good golf and nobody seems to
be making any mistakes, Killian
explained.
Assistant Athletic Director
Gene EOenson joined the Gators
Thursday to fill in for golf coach
Buster Bishop who had to return
to Gainesville due to a heart
attack suffered by his mother.
Killian, who started with the
host Cougars, wants to even the
Seybold top
SEC pitcher
Gator senior southpaw Tom
Seybold is joined by two
freshmen in leading
Southeastern Conference
pitchers with 4-0 records.
Barry Gaddis of Mississippi
and Ricky Rhode of Vanderbilt
both registered perfect records.
ATTENTION
GRADUATES
make reservations
early roil-
U-HAUL
TRUCKS AND TRAILERS
IRA'S GULF SERVICE
707 N.W. 13th St. 373-3541

GATOR SPORTS

score with Houston after they
demolished the Gators by 28
strokes in the recent Cape Coral
Invitational.
I hope they finish way
back,* he quipped. That would
be the best thing yet.

TH6 meezy somme ggar
is in
* jf # HR
| i M
<- \JfP *
S 1 I H
i ]
[ The clothes that will cool you off
1 have just arrived in time for the hot days ahead:
l' :
Ribbed, sheer, polyester knit blouses by SAHARA ONE
Corduroy hot pants by LIVE INS /
it Blue and white denim hot pants by, US MALE
it Ultra light mosaic print blouses and dresses by RAVI DAM
it Brand new "arrow shirts" by OUR THING 1
M
Dont wait! Our selection is large I
now, but these items are going fast. 1
j6Ans odlTd. 1345 mr*-
m __ . H

Captain Mike Killian
... predicts UF victory

BREAKFAST SPECIAL
PAI two FARM FRESH EGOS
ffe (Cooked the way you like them)
I*ll HOT buttered grits
Uvy GOLDEN TOAST
Jerry's North FRESHLY BREWED COFFEE i
(pm 24 hrs.) Jerry's South
1505 NW 13 St. 2310 SW 13 St. ;
Singles THESES DISSERTATIONS SinglST
4 4 REPORTS BOOKS NOTES
x THE Oopy Prof, IBM Typing X I
B 010001*5
E Reductions p
R Binders H Supplies n
oln 5 ENTER stu Y Colors TO GRAD SPECS X
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FREE PARKING IN REAR
3 4 1718 W. UNIV 376-9334 3 4

Frldey, AprA ifc, 1971, The Florida AJliftor;

Page 23



Page 24

The

Different fields for different players

By LEE DEAMLOW
AHi gator Sports Writer
By the time I arrived to my
first football practice, it had
been going on for about an hour.
The afternoon sun shone down
on the two well-manicured fields
with a pleasant April warmness.
Out on the fields were four
clusters of players and coaches,
offense in blue, defense in white.
John Reaves headed up one
offensive group, resplendent in
his white shoes and dazzlingly
clean uniform. He sprinted out,
dancing about in the backfield
flicking short hard passes to his
receivers.
Willie Jackson left a
three-point stance in a shot,
faked inside and then bolted
towards the sidelines. Feet

s S
i m

Wr i jTf. ; 1
il^n
First reaction to football practice confusing
... at season start, fans should be ready for scoring
mm: jSL* "* % ' v- -h: '
fit .
I IhKI
I We couldnt leave
I well enough alone
The world famous Shure V-15 Type II now has improved track track
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churning, he glanced back,
stretched out his hands and
snatched the ball from the air
just before he stepped out of
bounds.
Shouts of encouragement and
congratulations followed him as
he shuffled back to the huddle.
Attaway Willie! Attaway!
Shortly, one of the trainers
held a compressed air hom up in
the air and let loose a
foghorn-like blast, signaling a
break in practice. Slowly the
huddles and groups broke up
and headed for the sidelines, feet
dragging, heads bowed. Long
sweat-matted hair appeared on a
number of heads as helmets we're
pulled off.
-
The players trudged over to a
number of large plastic garbage

cans filled with ice and hiding
large quantities of cold Gatorade
in cans. Pop-tops were ripped off
and the contents quickly drained
in silence. A few moments rest
and the foghorn blew again.
This time the groups were
smaller. Offensive and defensive
linemen went off to one portion
of a field. On the shrill signal of
a coachs whistle they would
push off from their stances and
crash into one another, grunting
and groaning until the whistle
sounded again.
Over on the other field the
offensive backfield and receivers
were matched against the
defensive secondary and
linebackers. The ball would be
snapped and the receivers would
take off down the field,
defenders backing up quickly,
keeping one eye on the
quarterback and one on their
man.
When the ball was released,
the defensive coaches would
start screaming Ball, ball, ball!
As soon as they saw where it was
going, the whole secondary
would converge on that area,
trying to get to the receiver at
the same time as the ball.
Sideline conversations ended
and heads were turned as the
coaches called Chris, Chris! A
man was lying on his back and
the head trainer, Chris Patrick,
darted out to the cluster of

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coaches around the prostrate
player.
Who is it, who is it?,
somebody whispered. Buck,
someone answered. Richard
Buchanan, who had the wind
knocked out of him, was helped
to his feet and carried,

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fireman-style, over to the
sideline Action resumed with
someone else in his place.
About 5:45 p.m., the foghorn
sounded for the final time and
practice ended for the day. But
tomorrow would bring more of
he same.



UF baseball team
in tough SEC game
By SIM SMITH
In the first doubleheader of the season, the Florida Gators will
meet the Kentucky Wildcats this afternoon beginning at 1:30 on Perry
Field.
Tom Seybold, leading the Southeastern Conference with a perfect
4-0 record this season, will couple with Art Lee in the double-header
for the Gators.
Kentucky is led by Derek Bryant, who is hitting over .400 this
season.
The Gators will be attempting to stay close to the eastern division
lead in the SEC this weekend in the three game series with Kentucky.
The Wildcats are 12-7 on the season while Florida just reached over
the .500 mark this week at 12-11.
Kentucky plans to start Tom Bannon and Bill Lewis, a pair of
right-handed pitchers to hurl two of the three games. John Bowling, a
southpaw, will pitch on Saturday in the final game of the series.
%
Coach Dave Fuller hopes for a sweep this weekend to give the
Gators some kind of edge before meeting league leading Vanderbilt
May 7 and 8 in Nashville.

Os big three understanding

By FRED DOWN
UPI Sports Writer
Manager Earl Weaver and the
world champion Baltimore
Orioles three 20-game winners
have an understanding which
pays wonderful mutual benefits:
he takes care of them and
they take care of him.
The understanding is that
Dave McNally, Jim Palmer and
Mike Cuellar work on a four-day
rotation and it has two great
benefits. It means that 1) the
three pitchers figure to win 20
games a season and 2) the
Orioles probably will win a third
straight American League
pennant.
McNally has turned in two
route-going victories and Palmer
and Cuellar one each as the
Orioles have won five of their
first six games.
Boog Powells two-run homer
staked Cuellar to a 2-0 lead in
the third inning and a single by
Frank Robinson and a double by
Paul Blair produced the Orioles
third run in the sixth. Sam
McDowell, who yielded all three

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ROUNDUP

runs before departing for a
pinch-hitter, was the loser.
The Oakland Athletics
defeated the Minnesota Twins
6-1, the New York Yankees beat
the Detroit Tigers 8-4, the
Milwaukee Brewers topped the
Chicago White Sox 2-0, the
California Angels downed the
Kansas City Royals 4-1 and the
Washington Senators shaded the
Boston Red Sox 6-5 in other AL
iff
games.
Reggie Jackson hit two solo
homers and pitcher Diego Segui
added a three-run homer to pace
the Athletics victory over the
Twins. Segui, the ALs surprise
eamed-run-average leader last
season, allowed seven hits,
walked three and struck out
two. Tom Hall took the loss.

Prospects to visit camp

Basketball coach Tommy
Bartlett and his UF coaching
staff are in the midst of a busy
recruiting weekend as they will
entertain six high school
prospects here on the campus.
Troy Walker, a highly
recruited junior college player
from Olney Junior College in
Illinois, is the first recruit.
Walker averaged 23 points per
game and grabbed 17 rebounds a
game.
I consider Troy one of the
finest sophomores, in the
country, said assistant coach
Bill Henry, who has seen Walker
twice this season in action.
Craig Turner, a 6-foot-2 guard
from Michigan, scored over 400
points in his senior year last
year. Turner averaged over 25
points per game with 16
rebounds.
A. J. Johnson, 6-5 from

Fritz Peterson, aided by Jack
Akers ninth-inning relief,
chalked up his first victory of
the season with the help of a
homer by Felipe Alou which
paced a nine-hit New York
attack.

XjfPfcAY A f \ <
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Cage coaches to keep busy

Kentucky, averaged over 27
points per game with 14
rebounds in leading his team to a
31-4 record last year. He was
named to the first team on the
Kentucky State High School
team.
Two Indiana products axe also
here this weekend; Steve
McCabe and Gary McCooe.
McCabe, a 6-5 forward at Ft.

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Friday, April 16,1971, Tha Florida Alik

Wayne High School,
points and 12 rel
game.
McCooe could
forward in the Gato
he stands 6-8 and is s
We are pleased
fine young men are
campus. All of the
assets to our progra
said.



pril 16, 1971, Tha Florida Alligator

Page 26

1 wm
A >
x
Aj£K Aj£K
Aj£K f
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f cers, Stars in deadlock

i, Ind. (UPI)
- T m ) .ers and Utah
$U r? **& sV even as two
m

Hazz* *y purists claim
figk*, g a good thing
By MILTON RICHMAN
UPI Sports Writer

: -VCT Let em fight.
& r *£:*- .-'V' ?' used to do in the old Texas League and youd be
med.
f <,££B? a- ?re no more fights.
;: i athletes are about as belligerent as the Jail
Cfes > best fights they ever have are with their wives.
Ce-*. jne athlete picks a fight with another you can be
sings.
r i&. *: Jthing trivial and the guy starting the scrap will
> make sure theres somebody close by to break it
;.*p rnr. v
} no different.
f.tir* 'em because theyre identifying with the
tr v,* v ts down there on the ice. Watching a half-dozen
su ** sL-r ow haymakers and trying to pull each others
* : .HvsjjF leads is much more fun than getting involved in
*flr: ; tybe in Vietnam somewhere.
??. hv.r\> sts claim these fights are good things and serve as
< v- *:>;% i. They point out the players are competing in an
£ .g* i n cks and if there was no outlet for their emotions,
v *. list fight once in awhile, the sport could become
rvJ *n ftgers fine, productive left wing, was involved in
'E ; i. He was slapped with 22 minutes in penalties in
# h; % r:; ting case in point in that some people thought he
', jgh when he was with the Los Angeles Kings.
is**.?: -tanged.
t t himself. His first three years he averaged 37
i < penalty box but this year, purposely becoming
* '*'>*' Player, he served 135 minutes in penalties. Still,
i;: n mself belligerent.
i a reduction in the number of penalties in
~ between Toronto and New York, Boston and
*'*£ ; lis and Minnesota, but any such reduction will
- *[#>*':.#* w*i\ 4 the shots and you know what they say.

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Riley saves Laker shutout

INGLEWOOD, Calif. (UPI)
Playing as a regular in place of
the ailing Keith Erickson, Pat
Riley has helped the
injury-plagued Los Angeles
Lakers avert an expected
shutout in their NBA semifinal
playoff series with Lew Alcindor
and the Milwaukee Bucks.
The little-used former
Kentucky star scored 24
points-one short of his pro
career high and was the
Lakers catalyst in a pivotal third

The Pacers beat the Stars
120-107 Wednesday night to
deadlock their American
Basketball Association Western

quarter during the 118-107
victory over the powerful Bucks
Wednesday night.
Now down 2-1 in the
best-of-seven game series, Los
Angeles hosts Milwaukee Friday
night, with the semifinals
switching back to Wisconsin
Sunday for game No. 5.
Eleven of Rileys points came
in the third quarter, when the
Lakers outscored the Bucks
34-22 and moved into a 90-77
lead.
With 34-year-old Wilt

Division final playoff at one
game apiece.
During the regular season,
Indiana and Utah met 12 times
with each team winning six
games but the Pacers managed to
win the division title, beating
out the Stars on the final
weekend of play.
Indiana, which dropped the
opener of the best-of-seven series
Monday night, came back on
Billy Kellers 31-point effort to
square the series, which now
heads to Salt Lake City for the
third game Friday night.
The Eastern Division final
playoff between Virginia and
Kentucky gets underway tonight
at Virginia with game No. 2 in
the best-of-seven series set for
Saturday night.
Tired Dolphs
sign Farley
MIAMI (UPI) The Miami
Dolphins, apparently tired of
losing draft choices to the
Canadian Football League, have
signed West Virginia linebacker
and defensive end Dale Farley.
The third round draft choice
had been wooed by the Toronto
Argonauts, the same club that
signed fourth round draft choice
quarterback Joe Theismann of
Notre Dame out from under the
Dolphins.
Dolphin officials said they
plan to try the 6-3, 245-pound
Farley at defensive end.
The Dolphins also announced
they had signed 11th round
choice Vic Surma, an offensive
tackle from Penn State, and Bob
Richards, an offensive guard
from California.

Chamberlain outplaying
Alcindor decisively, Milwaukee
was never closer than nine points
in the final period.
Riley, who hit 11 of 18 shots,
also turned in an outstanding
defensive job on Oscar
Robertson, holding him to 11
points. He got his chance to start
Sunday after Erickson had an
attack of appendicitis.
Chamberlain outscored
Alcindor 24-20 and had an edge
in rebounds 24-19. In

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addition, he was the defensive
factor that his younger rival
wasnt.
Chamberlain and Riley had
scoring help from Gail Goodrich
and Happy Hairston, who put in
24 points apiece. Rookie Jim
McMillian, who got his chance to
start when Jerry West injured a
knee in the final month of the
regular season, added 18.
Bob Dandridge had 25 points
and Jon McGlocklin hit 22, 13
in the first quarter, for the
Bucks.



Red Machine clicking

By FRED McMANE
UPI Sports Writer
The Big Red Machine still
isnt in high gear, but its
beginning to click on one
cylinder, Johnny Bench.
Bench, the most vital part of
the Machines offensive
production, collected three hits,
including his fourth homer in
three games, to pace the
Cincinnati Reds to an 8-3
victory over the Atlanta Braves
Wednesday night.
It was the Reds' third
consecutive triumph after four
straight losses, and Bench
believes the defending National
League champions are on their
way.
Everybody's been swinging
the bat better, said Bench, who
had seven hits in 12 at bats and
drove in seven runs in the Reds
three-game sweep of the Braves.
Were going to be all right. We
Bob Prinz
2nd, 3rd in
karate meet
By LEE DEHMLOW
Alligator Sports Writer
Most poeple spent the Easter
weekend peacefully at the beach
or in church. Not Bob Prinz, a
sophomore and holder of a blue
belt in the Japanese self-defense
art, karate.
Prinz spent the weekend in
Jackson, Miss., at the Dixie
Nationals Karate Tournament
along with 600 other
competitors.
Competing in two divisions,
he placed third out of 52 in the
kata, or form division, and
second in kumiti or sparring.
Kata pits one man against a
multitude of assailants in a
simulated fight with the
competitor being graded on his
form and style.
Kumiti puts individuals of
relatively the same ability
together to fight it out, points
being awarded for punches
landed.
Trophies were given as well as
tournament points for the
United States Karate
Associations Grand National
tournaments to be held in
Anderson, Ind. in June, which
Prinz, along with a number of
other Gainesville karate
enthusiasts expect to attend.
There were a lot of people
betting that I wouldn't make it
to this one, Prinz said, I have
a history of disasters concerning
tournaments. One time I
fractured my wrist on the way,
but this time everything worked
out fine, he added.
VWOwners
Bob Davis, formerly
with BushVW, is now specializing
I Wyu __
service at
GATORTOWN
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never do roll over and play dead
for anybody.
In other NL games,
Philadelphia edged Pittsburgh
6-5, San Francisco nipped
Houston 2-1 in 11 innings, St.
Louis defeated Los Angeles 7-1,
Chicago at San Diego was
postponed because of rain and
New York at Montreal was
called off because of wet
grounds.
While Bench had a most
productive night, it was Hal
Mcae's two-run double during
a four-run third inning which
proved to be the decisive blow.
A throwing error by losing
pitcher Phil Niekro allowed the
first run of the inning to score
and Mcae greeted relief pitcher
Mice McQueen with his double
to chase home two runs. Mcae
later scored on a fielders choice.
The Reds' Tony Cloninger,

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who registered his first victory
of the season, was tagged for a
pair of homers by Hank Aaron,
his fourth and fifth of the
season.
Denny Doles third hit of the
game, a twokun single in the
eighth inning, drove in the
decisive runs as the Phillies
rallied from behind to defeat the
Pirates. Dick Selma choked off a
ninth inning Pittsburgh rally to
preserve the victory for Joe
Hoemer. Willie Montanez
home red for the Phillies and Bob
Robertson hit his third of the
season for the Pirates.
Tito Fuentes singled home
Frank Johnson in the 11th
inning to give the Giants their
sixth victory in eight games. The
run was set up when Houston
shortstop Roger Metzger threw
wildly past first base on an

KMSsmwm
V ROUNDUP /

attempted double play, allowing
Johnson to reach second. Bobby
Bonds homered for the Giants
and Bob Watson for the Astros.
Jim Beauchamp and Lou
Brock hit back-to-back homers

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Friday. April 16,1971, ThaFlorida Alligator,

in the fifth inning to spark the
Cardinals victory. Beauchamp
and Brock each collected three
hits as they helped left-hander
Jerry Reuss to his first victory of
the season.

Page 27



I, Friday, April 16,1971, Th* Florida Alligator

Page 28

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this past week.
Howard, a senior from Macon, Ga.,
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§ helped the Gators defeat LSU and Harvard in
I the meet.
I "It was a real good job turned in by
Howard in the meet," assistant track coach
Roy Benson said after the meet. "His victories
were real improtant to us in the outcome of
the meet."
| Runner up in the balloting was Nick
| DeVirgilis, whose game saving catch in the
eighth inning helped the baseball team defeat
Rollins 6-4 this past week.

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Full Text

PAGE 1

University of Florida, Gainesville Friday, April 16, 1971 67 blacks jailed Disturbance flares on campus By RON SACHS Alligator Staff Writer and KEN McKINNON Alligator Managing Editor An afternoon of demonstration, arrests and emotionalism charged the air at UF Thursday following the arrest and suspension of a reported 67 black students for occupying the office of UF President Stephen C. O'Connell. The blacks had been to O'Conne's office three times Thursday morning to present a list of demands. Each time they were given three minutes to leave before they would be suspended and arrested. After their third trip to the office, they were informed that they were suspended after remaining put the three minute mask. Subsequently, campus police arrested the students and transferred them in a bus to the Alachua County Jail. At 6:15 p.m. Thursday, Judge John Connell allowed the students to be released on their own recognizance if they could offer proper identification. The black students will be prosecuted at a later date for trespassing. A rally held in the Plaza of the Anmericas at 2p.m. attracted several hundred students who wee told -by Student Body President Steve UhIfelder, "It's about time we start to realize that the problems of this campus are not being solved by the existing power structure -and Pres. Stephen C. O'Connell .addresses students the reason stems from President O'Connell." Uhlfelder announced that a petition would be circulated calling for the "immediate resignation" of O'Connell. By 2:30 p.m., the crowd had significantly increased in size as SG Secretary of Minority Affairs Kip Smith told the gathered students what had transpired at Tigert. "The demands we presented have been through every possible comnittee on this campus and the problems still remain," he said. Smith said the demands presented O'Connell have been presented in the past and stressed for over 18 months. Shortly before 3 p.m. the crowd marched to Tigert Hall to demand release of the 67 as they filled the corridors outside the already locked doors of O'Connell's office. Campus police officers stood in front of the door to O'Connell's office while students chanted, "O'Connell's got to Uhlfelder entered O'Connell's office and emerged minutes later to inform students that if they did not clear the building, the President would not speak to them and they would be suspended and arrested. The students did not leave. Father Michael Gannon and Uhlfelder spoke with O'Connell again and later urged students to leave the building to avoid a violent confrontation. At 4 p.m., the majority of the students moved to the front steps of Tigert as O'Connell came out to make a statement. "To you, in the building, if you don't move out you're going to be suspended and arrested you've had your warning," he told the crowd. O'Connell insured the students that he would not drop charges filed against the arrested students and that "their suspensions wit continue." O'Connell said he had telephoned Judge John Connei to consider releasing the students on their own recognizance. "But since he's heard of this demonstration, he might have changed his mind," he said. Some of the demands (See 'More' page 2) BSU demands Members of the Black Student Union (BSU) presented UF President Stephen C. O'Connell with a list of proposals for consideration by the university before they were arrested for refusing to leave Tigert Hall yesterday. The BSU proposal list included: There shall be a commitment on the part of the university to recruit and admit 500 black students out of the quota of 2,800 freshmen and a continuance of the critical year freshman program. Establishment of a department of Minority Affairs under the direction of a full Vice President, and the immediate elevation of Mr. Roy Mitchell to this Vice Presidency. Hire a black administer in Academic Affairs with the advise and recommendation of department of Minority Affairs to coordinate the recruitment of black faculty. The hiring of a black assistant manager in personnel. Intensification of recruitment and hiring of black faculty so as to reflect the ratio of black students admitted under the proposal in number 1. The fair and equal treatment of our black brothers and sisters, who are employed by this university. Thus far; even though we have pleaded, begged, and worked' diligently with the administration, our cries have been ignored. This university has consistently denied us these basic needs we deem necessary. We are the voice of the black student, the black worker, and the entire black community. And for our full participation as students, employees, and citizens of this state, these needs must be met. O'Connell issues late tv statement By JAN GODOWN Alligator Staff Writar At a Thursday evening press conference on WUFT-TV, UF President Stephen C. O'Connell and Vice-President for Academic Affairs Harry Sisler claimed the administration has moved to meet some black demands of those issued last summer. Noting that "we certainly recognize that there is a great deal remains to be done," Sisler mentioned some action that has been initiated by the administration: A black assistant dean for ae S affairs whom Sisler idente as "Dean Cole from a collge in Texas" has been hired beaning January 1. .Th CoDege of Arts and Adexw"-lint recnied a new black assistant dean "to give them specific scholarly assistance." An "Upward Bound" program to encourage disadvantaged high school students to attend college will be started this summer, if government funds come through. o Studies have been undertaken pertaining to a BlackN Cultural Center, particularly physical requirements for such a center. O'Connell read a statement he had released late that afternoon, reaffirming his position taken during the demonstration that the University will "initiate proceedings to suspend all students who violated the rules of the university," pending identification of students. According to O'Connell, video-filh made of students who participated in disturbance wl~he used to IdentjW *e students. its oesia tN f.P.V V.TAVVTA'A A # The lorida Alligator Vol. 63, No. 117 NOWs 0 M-pggrtHa

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Page 2, The Florida Alligator, Friday, April 16, 1971 More rallies set for today FROMPAEOE presented by the blacks "have already been acted upon," O'Connell said. "But this is not the way for me to make any decision -not under these circumstances." In a statement released early Thursday evening O'Connell expressed regret for the incident but charged, "I should not and will not negotiate demands with any individual or group. Through an appointment, he said, "I would be glad to meet with a group of reasonable size." Alachua County Sheriff's Office officers and Gainesville policemen helped to reinforce the campus security force while two campus buses were parked behind Tigert to transport students arrested at the demonstration. At that point, no arrests other than those in the morning took place. Students massed around the buses and let the air out of the tires of the vehicles. When a sheriff's deputy attempted to arrest one student for a similar action, he hesitated and t hen released the unidentified students before the onlooking crowd. Willie Holden, president of the Santa Fe Afro-American Student Union, was arrested along with two others minutes later. At 4:30 p.m. police used a megaphone to tell students to disperse or be arrested. The police lining up in horizontal rows approached the crowd in an effort to break it up. As students were pushed back, many offered slight resistance. Skirmishes took place as general mayhem dominated the scene. Tear gs cannisters were thrown Indscriminately into the crowd, and students and police sought refuge from the fumes. Coughing students with inflamed throats were led to safety by others. The crowd spread out following the tear gas, but did not leave the vicinity of the administration parking lot. Some nine students were arrested during the encounter between police and students. Two officers were reportedly injured. The Health Center and infirmary reported no injured students had come to them. At a meeting at 8 pm. Thursday, Kip Smith in behalf of the Black Student Union called for "a massive general strike." Strikers were told to meet in front of Tigert at 8 a.m. today to "show O'Conneil and the rest that we're not thouOgh." A rally scheduled for noon today in the Plaza will determine what course of action the strikers will follow, according to Smith. Steve UhIfelder urges Tigert withdrawal "The mood of the time will decide,"he said. O'Connell told The Alligator staff at a luncheon Thursday that he would consider any demonstration at his home a trespass and those participating would be arrested. O'Connell emphasized that classes would not be dismissed, despiteefforts on the part of what he called "a minority." Suspension of all students in violation o f university regulations will take place as the individuals are identified, he said. University Police filmed Thursday's demonstrations with new camera equipment from Building E. Earl Wilcox, administrator of information for BSU, said at Tigert, "There is a mad dog loose in the administration building. All the black brothers and sisters are going to join hands and we're going to march on O'Connell's house. As the crowd marched to O'Connell's house, it went through Tolbert and Graham Areas and Hume Hall -some entering the dormitories to recruit students while others stood outside shouting for them to join the march. The crowd then proceeded down Fraternity Row, but the recruitment there was small compared to that in the dorm area. Speaking in front of O'Connell's house, Steve Waterhouse, of the Union of Florida Students (UFS) said, "This is a coalition of UFS, BSU and SG. We are here to protest the 78 black students arrested this morning and the 10 white students arrested this afternoon. There will be a mass meeting at 12:30 on the Plaza and we are calling for O'Connell's resignation." Kip Smith "problems still remain" Another speaker, David Hoke added, "O'Connell said he wanted to meet with a small group of concerned citizens in front of his house. Well, we're a large group of concerned'izens and we've come to help him pack." O'Connell and his wife returned from his television appearance at approximately 9:45 p.m., entering from the back. .About 9:50 p.m. he came out of his house and said, "Welcome to our lawn. I am certain you all understand we're not going to accomplish anything here tonight. There is nothing you or I are going to accomplish tonight. There is no point in attempting to accomplish something -I ask you to leave." O'Connell was asked if a referendum asking for his resignation was passed at the spring election, would he resign. O'Connell replied, "no." O'Connell and his family left with a suitcase in a police car about 10:20 p.m. .Black students prepare to enter Tigert Hall .in Thursday morning's encounter with UF President Stephen C. O'Connell THE FIDELITY SHOP 420 NW 13 ST 378-8045 ;"v'w* ** 4-1 Miss Curtin .-'-F'S" IN CONCERT TIjE VOICE fIS SUPERSTF Miss Phyllis Curtain. Of the Metropolitan Opera. 4 The Vienna State Opera. A most gifted performer. Her instrument? The voice. That scalesthernusical* heights of opera as a soloist might disfinguish a symphony orchestra. Only more so. With feeling. 4 With emotion. And, most of oil, with true genius. The voice. As superstar. 4 4 Sunday, April 18th 4:00 PM, University Auditorium,* Tickets Available Reitz Union Box Office (392-1653) ** THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during June, July and August when it's published semi-weetly, and during student holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz Union 'Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The Alligator is entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office at Gainesville, Florida 32601. Subscription rate Is $10.00 ear year and $3.50 per Quarter. t The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy it considers objectionable. Jl The. Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless notice Is*iven to the advertising manager within (1) one day after the advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for more than one Incorrect Insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run several times. Notices for correction must be given before the nest Insertion. -W -uw -V-w-vw -w-V-w-w-WI, -w-w-, -w-r ww mv wir aw or or -4wW416TV W W j F -Iqw vwR -q-qI qw" F-V--qP" VIWR -)t.&AL x x xxxxlx

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Friday, Apr 16, 1971,be i'firIdAlIgorr. Pajga Senate defeats nursury construction By CARLOS J. LICEA Alligmtor Staff Writer A second reading of a bill giving $50,000 for the construction of a new Baby Gator Nursery was defeated Tuesday night in the Student Senate by a close 21-20 vote. While amendments to change the bill into a fee for an architect to draw plans for the construction failed, some senators did not want to put SMC planning D.C. excursion By ELLI MOSS Alligator Stuff Writaer Anyone wishing to participate in the anti-war action in Washington D.C. on the weekend of April 24 can go with a group sponsored by the Student Mobilization Committee (SMC). SMC is planning to take five or six vans or a bus if they can get the money from the Student Senate. They will leave April 23 at about 10 a.m. The roundtrip costs $18 and the money must be in by April 18 or can be paid at the next SMC meeting which wil be this Sunday at 7 p.n in room 349 Reitz Union. For more information about the trip SMC will set up tables outside Little Hall Wednesdays and Thursdays for the next two weeks. Money for the trip will also be collected there. When'they get to Washington, the SMC group plans to participate in the march and hear the speeches. If some people want to keep van in DC all week and stay for the May Day activities, they wll be able to. For the people who won't be able to make it to Wasington for May Day, SMC is planning to have some antiwar activities here, said Rick Replogle, SMC treasurer. Some of the proposals SMC is considering include picketing the Military Ball on May 1 and having a counter drill on the ROTC drill field on Wednesday May 5 which will coincide with the Kent State memorial. For more Information contact Rick Replogle at 378-3998 or Harris Freeman at 392-8369. Discover EUROPE .on a BIKE SLowevi-Ift fi Buy 2TAX-FREE mes pasddvmrd Lor se Sarnd rNeOW~ BSA, Hawk, Kcu, and Fan lmanpeau Air Frai111111s. basi to US. For Mere late, Write: EUR"o E, INC. *Ni70 81 0SSI t. NW Wd iass OXD. 2Vol F Awft ''sItool money into a project they considered beneficial only a small segment of the student population. Spokesman for the married students, Jerry Yakatan said the nursery was going to benefit more than just married students with children, because the. nursery could be used for other functions when the children were not there. However, the Senate reversed its decision of last week and defeated the bill. The bill which last week passed with the one for the nursery, a $74,000 expenditure to construct a new Camp Wauburg passed a second reading. Senate President Rick Horder told senators that whe UF e Baby Gator Nursery e Camp Wauburg N Kent State Day Delegates to Congress e March on ash*ngtonX e Student ments BSU Allocation e Awards President Stephen C. O'Connell agreed with the expenditure of $74,000 for the outdoor recreation facility, all the money in the student government reserve fund destined for Wauburg had to be used. The particular account O'Connell referred to was the Wauburg Reserve Account, No. 8921w06, which has $24,000, With one difference coming from another reserve account. Sen. Stu Hershey proposed an amendment so that only $10,000 from this account be used for Wauburg. The remaining $14,000 going to Student Government reserves. The amendment was approved. The Senate also passed a resolution which sets aside May 4, 1971 as a day of remorse for the Kent State incident of last year. A bill also cleared the senate which gave $600 for Senate delegates to go the U.S. Congress to discuss the War in Indochina with members of Congress. The trip will be made by senate representatives to Washington toward the end of April. Another trip expense voted was $400 to be used for students to attend the March on Washington May 1. The other bill which the Senate defeated was a resolution which condemned the ending of student deferments. The senate also allocated $1,700 to the Black Student Union for the costs of bringing Muhammed Ali to the campus later on this quarter. A "Steven Joel Uhlfelder Appreciation resolution" was passed unanimously by the senators. Senators gave the Paul Clark Aw ard to past chairman of the powerful Senate Budget and Finance committee Ellen Corenswet. This is given to the most distinguished committee chairman. Miss Corenswet is currently student body treasurer. Horder was voted the Michael Straten Award for being the oustanding senator for this year. NuN~ tvlreo* 19" PORTABLE TV ZENITH HANDCRAFTED The VENTURA -C2003J-Gracefully slim "Super Screen" Portable TV with molded cabinet in Medium Brown color. Deluxe Video Range Tuning System. 20,000 Volts of Picture Power. Zenith Quality 5" x 3" Speaker. "Gated-Beam" Sound System. Dipole Antenna. 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Pg 4, The Florida Alligator, FrIday April 16, 1971 Ihe disturbance,. a clhronology The day of trouble at UF Thursday began at approximately 10 a.m. when more than 70 black students entered the office of UF President Stephen C. O'Connell to present a list of demands. A chronological account of events with approximate times is listed below: 10:15 a.m. -O'Connell tells black students that he will not consider any demands as long as his office is disrupted. He informs the blacks they have three minutes to leave the office before they are suspended. 10:18 a.m. -Black students leave Tigert and meet outside. 10:40 a.m. -Blacks decide to attempt again to present demands to O'Connell. 10:50a.m. -O'Connell warns blacks again that they have three minutes to leave before they are suspended and that only when an appointment is made through "proper channels" will he listen to the black grievances. 10:53 a.m. -Blacks, still occupying the office, are informed that they have been suspended. They then leave. Sam Taylor, former Black Student Union chairman arranges an appointment with O'Connell for 11:30 a.m. 11:30 a.m. -Taylor meets with O'Connell f o r approximately 15 minutes. Commenting later on the short discussion, Taylor said, "He didn't really say anything -he said we were making irrational demands and that we were insincere -nothing was accomplished." 11:55 a.m. -Blacks enter O'Connell's office for the third time. They are informed that in three minutes if they are not gone they will be suspended and placed under -arrest for trespassing after warning. 12:15 p.m. -Blacks passively submit to arrest and are taken to Alachua County Jail. 2 p.m. -Students gather in Plaza to discuss morning events.' Steve Uhlfelder and Kip Smith, Student Government secretary of minority affairs, inform students of events and attempt MODERN SHOE REPAIR SHOPS 1620 W. UNIV. AVE. 376-0315 AND 101 N. MAIN ST. 376-5211 SOLES ATTACHED HEELS 15 mins 5 mins to raise bail money for arrested blacks. 2:55 p.m. -Students march to Tigert and fill the building and front steps -approximately 1,100 students total. By 3:30 p.m. more than 1,500 students had gathered. 3:15 p.m. -Uhifelder is admitted to O'Connell's office and is told that the president will speak to students only when the building has been cleared. The building was not cleared. 4:05 p.m. -O'Connell emerges from office to speak to students on front steps of Tigert. He explains that the students still in the building must .move out or you're going to be suspended and arrested." O'Connell informs students that the charges against the arrested blacks "will not be dropped and the suspensions will continue." Two university buses were parked behind Tigert for the purpose of taking any one arrested to jail. Students mass around the buses and let air out of the tires of the buses. 4:30 p.m. -Police wam students to disperse or arrests will be made. Students do not disperse. Police attempt to move the crowd back in horizontal procession. Skirmishes begin. Tear gas is thrown into the crowd. Crowd spreads out, but remains in general vicinity of administration parking lot. 4:45 p.m. -Several unidentified students arrested. Events begin to calm -Students sit down in parking lot to await results of attempts to get arrested blacks released. 6:15 p.m. -Release of arrested blacks by Judge John Connell begins upon issuance of UF identification card or $100 bond. 8 p.m. -Mass meeting of students in front of Tigert. 8:30 p.m. -O'Connell press conference on WUFT 8:45 -9 p.m. -Students march to O'Connell's home, stopping in front of Tolbert, Graham, and Hume to recruit members. 9:32 p.m. -O'Connell's press conference ends. 9:32 p.m. -Students, approximately 1,000, converge on O'Connell's lawn, speakers criticize O'Connell's policies, call for resignation. 9:45 p.m. -O'Connell arrives at home. 9:50 p.m. O'Connell confronts students. 10:20 p.m. -O'Connell leaves in UPD car. SPECIAL 5 HOUR SALE Friday April 16 5:00 PM Stereo Control Amplifier 10" -3 way Air Suspension SUPER SMOOTH Response 420 NW.13t St. 120 wattslow low Distortion Regular System Price 433.95 SPECIAL SYSTEM SALE Price 299.95 SAVE $134QQ Ph 384045 -~ 'UK Black student .among the first arrested in Thursday's turbulent action Bah'u'llih is the latest in the succesion of Divine Mesuengers sent by God snie the beginning of man's existence. He is the Promised One of all religions. His coming ushers in the Age of Fulfillment mentioned in all the prophecies of the past. Bahi'u'lih brings God's Plan for world peace, world justice and world unlty. Question and Anawer Seeaion on All Aspects of the Baha'i FaIth Tont 8 D.m Rm 361. Reitz Union 1.

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p.opoae agai n slr By JANE CATO Alligator Staff Writer Opposition to the proposed 12 Hour Bill, which is presently before the Florida Senate has been voiced by the American Federation of Teachers (AFT) Local Chapter 1880 in Gainesville. Introduced by Sen. Robert Haverfield, D-Miami, the 12 Hour Bill would require 12 hours of classroom contact for university professors and 15 hours for professors in junior colleges. A position paper which states the AFT stand on the legislation has been distributed to UF faculty members and mailed to every Florida legislator, according to Hunt Davis, a local AFT spokesman. Davis is the chairman of the legislative committee of the locad chapter of the AFT. He believes the university faculty should speak for themselves and work directly with the legislature on legislation that affects their interests. The rationale behind the bill, is that students are dissatisfied with their lack of contact with faculty members, and faculty members do not work hard enough. The AFT position paper states, according to a recent self-study questionnaire given to 1421 UF students, that there was general satisfaction with their faculty contact. 79 per cent said profesors were available when help was needed with course work. In response to the allegation that professors don't work hard enough, the AFT points out, for example, a survey of the UF Arts and Sciences faculty whose average work week is 60 hours. Of these 60 hours, 60 per cent of their time is spent in teaching and general class preparation, and another 30 per cent in research, professional meetings and professional duties. Four effects on the educational system would occur if the 12 Hour Bill is enacted, according to the AFr. First, the legislation would actually lessen individual students' contact with their teachers, thus furthering student alienation with the impersonality of the university. Second, the "big names" who aren't in the classroom now, perform services that are invaluable to the university, and would still have to be employed by the university as before. ihe operations of the university would become more difficult in that there would be a who will teach and who will fulfill other necessary duties such as administration, committee work, counseling and research. Finally, research would be reduced sharply by the passage of the 12 Hour Bill, which would consequently weaken their national stature. The AFT thinks "passage of the bill in question, which in the Ill $VESITV \\\W4 Fraternity Jewery Now order 'It days a week Trophy & Plaque Dept. Expert Engraving Class rings Watch repair Jewelry repair 02 West University Ave. Across from Campus 2 blocks from Hub 373-1025 first place is based upon dubious premises and in the second place would have a wide-ranging impact, would be contrary to the best interests of Floridians and their universities. Local representatives of AFT have been in contact with AFT lobbyists in Tallahaee, and have personally spoken with, local legislators, Representatives Ralph Turlington and William EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES CAUFO5IA-WMIoUA4M Pveh.eeeI/ss-es pn-nulle.c Ia .a. Fm ,Ia J. ..r.2 *. I"/r~Mma" W ia as. a am uearI Andrews and Senator Robert Saunders. Presently, the bill has passed the State Senate University and Community Colleges Committee with Chairman Haverfield. The committee strongly favors the bill, as does State Senate President Jerry Thomas. In conclusion, Davis said, "The AFT feels this piece of legislation is indicative of a general disenchantment with and misunderstanding of the universities which has been growing within the legislature. To prevent enactment of this and similar pieces of punitive legislation, faculty members must not rely solely on the efforts of the Administration and Regents. We must speak and act on our own behalf, and this is what the AFT is doing in regard to the 12 Hour Bill." PAID POLITICAL ADVERTISEMENTS SEN. HAROLD HUGHES IN '72 THE UNCOMMON COMMON MAN. HE ROSE FROM TRUCK DRIVER TO GOVERNOR OF IOWA TO U.S. SENATOR. NOW HE CHALLENGES RICHARD NIXON! CAMPAIGN MATERIALS AVAILABLE STUDENTS FOR HUGHES BOX 668 LOS ANGELES, CALIF. 90053 Paid for by Students for Hughes TOMORROW NIGHT! SATURDAY APRIL 17 8:30 PFJoLORID &F

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~S'2Th. FIade"AIi~ur FlIdy, Apr1 16. 1971 Class afendance rule alleged broken by faculty By CARLOS J. LICEA Alligitor Staff Wter Senate Student Rights Committee Chairman Owen Beitsch charged Wednesday that some UF professors do not follow university regulations concerning attendance to classroom. Beitsch indicated he had received complaints f-om students "on the personal level," about teachers who do not follow in regards to mandatory attendance for students other than lUC. UF regulations, as stated in the course catalog, say: "Attendance in class is optional ACP gives Alligator 0 0 All-American rating T&t Florida Alligator has been awarded the All-American rating by the Associated Collegiate Press (ACP). Approximately 500 campus newspapers from around the United States were evaluated in the 84th Al-American CriticaltService. 4 The Alligator also received a Mark of Distinction for superior accomplishments in the fre categories judged: coverage and content, writing and editing, editorial leadership, physical appearance and photography. In cdtiquing the newspaper, the judges said, "Your write. show talent and training. Readers of The Florida Alligator are bound to be we informed." The Alligator which also was the recipient of the 1968 Pacemaker Award is a perennial winner of the All-American rating. Rating of First Class (excellent), Second Class (very good) and Third Class (good) are given on the basis of total numerical scores achieved in the five classificaitons. To achieve All-American rating, a paper must receive both First Class rating and a Mark of Distinction for unusually high quality. "Covering the college campus and relating to national events offers an increasing challenge to the newspaper staff working with limited time and funds," Otto W. Quale, ACP executive director stated. with students after suceasful completion of the freshman year (42 quarter hours), nevertheless, students themselves remain fully responsible for satisfying the entire range of academic objectives as they are defined by the instructor in any course." "As the committee interprets this regulation, attendance cannot be directly considered in computing a student's course grade," Beitsch said. Beitsch directed his complaint at teachers who do take attendance as consideration of the grades they give students in courses. "Should an instructor tell you that three absences mean the loss of a letter grade, or your al average, this is a violation of your rights." Beitsch said the complaints he heard cane mostly from the school of journalism, from which he is a senator. He said at least four teachers at that school use attendance as a criterion for grading. "But I don't know how widespread this is in other colleges." "If any students feel that his rights under this regulation have been, or are being abridged, call the student senate office, 392-1665 or 392-2384," Beitsch said. IYOU CAN STILL ENTER the CELEBRATION '71 FILM FESTIVAL CASH & MERCHANDISE AWARDS OFFERED BY CELEBRATION A PURDUE MOTION PICTURE CO. The Nikko 701B.youl love it for what went in and what comes out. WU 3 NIKKO STA-701B NOws$212.50 AM/FM STEREO RECEIVER ONLY 2 FET's in the front end ..4 1.F. stage silicon transistor amplifier section ...3 IC's ...1.8 microvolts sensitivity ...a noise cancellation circuit .dual tone controls ...and many other features are what went in to the 701B. What comes out is 90 watts of magnificent sound. Sound that you control and balance to suit room acoustics and record or tape characteristics. Sound that is as dynamic and brilliant as it is resonant and deep. Drop by for a demonstration of the 701B today. You'll love it for what went in and what comes out. NIKKO 319N.W. 13thST. -00 0--'''" PHONE .375-2331 STEVE UHLFELDER CAREDDO YOU? THE BROTHERS OF TAU EPSILON PHI INVITE YOU TO A STEVE UHLFELDER APPRECI AT ION NIGHT *SATURDAY, APRIL 17 *TEP FRATERNITY HOUSE *IMMEDIATELY FOLLOWING FROLICS *FREE iLA bm STUaEMo m0, aCmm, N CONCERNED CITIZENS ARE' CORDIALLY INVITED. m

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p~7 Graduate school suffering-Hanson By DARRELL HARTMAN Alligator Writer Harold P. Hanson, dean of the graduate school, said the graduate program has been rapidly increasing "but it is now being very abruptly stopped by the Board of Regent's tentative and non-official graduate limitation proposals." Speaking a t t h e Administrative Council Meeting Wednesday afternoon, Hanson said the problem has been compounded by a "financial dodge to increase funds" two years ago that put the law school Young Democrats hold registration The Young Democrats will be holding a bi-partisan registration drive April 21-23 from 10 til 4 daily. The registration will be coordinated by Alma Bethea, supervisor for elections in Alachua County. Several tables will be set up in front of the Graduate Library in order that the registrars may accomodate all who wish to register. Any student who is 18 years of age, is eligible for registration providing he can prove his age and that he resides in the state of Florida. A license or birth certificate is all one will need for identification purposes. in the same category as the graduate school. Law school enrollment comprises 35 per cent of the graduate programs affected by the tentative cut-backs (the College of Health Related Professions and the College of Agriculture are not included), said Hanson. Enrollment in other graduate programs would consequently be 35 per cent less than if the law school were in a separate category Hanson said that changing the status of the law school to be the same as the College of Health Related Professions and the College of Agriculture would be "the indicated thing to do." The limits tentatively proposed by the Board of Regents are 2,584 for beginning graduate students and 1,381 for advanced grads for 1971-72, said Hanson. Commenting on the financial crises in education, President Stephen C. O'Connell said, "education seems to be the whipping boy this year. "Govenor Askew's modest proposal for a 12.5 per cent increase over last year's budget is completely dependent on his tax proposal," said O'Connell. "We've had bad years before but we're not going to throw our hands up in despair. After all, the things that count most are not measured in dollars." ERRORITETM CONNECTION ROBSON FOR ALL MACHINES HAVING RED/BLACK RIBBON SELECTION ERRORITETM is a quality nylon typewriter ribbon featuring a built-in error corrector. ERRORITETM eliminates the need to purchase ribbon and correction aids separately. ERRORITETM is always in position to make quick, clean corrections. no more fussing with separate paper or fluid correctors. Purchase ERRORITETM at your book, stationery, variety or drug store-or use coupon below. FILMON PROCESS CORP 653-659 ELEVENTH AVE., NEW YORK, N.Y. 10036 Gentlemen: Please send me ERRORITE at $2.98 each. Please send me FRRORITE at $3.98 each. $2981ae POSTPAID jAddress IBM Machi Iy ModeSCS & 0 State Zip $3.98 TC ID iteMake Becsuretoya. ynodCOd's sct alit aOf m I enclose o Check 0 Money Order. Sorry, n o s I I. I i

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Pe S, The Flids Alligator, Friday, April 16,.1971 The Editorial Florida Alligator A small spark Phyllis Gallub Editor-In-Chief I Gary Grunc News Edit Ken McKinnon Managing Editor der or srea.d.0 It seemed like such a small spark, but before the day was over, the whole university was engulfed in the flames. Early yesterday, approximately 65 black students entered President O'Connell's office and presented him with a list of six demands. A small spark, but one which led to approximately 75 arrests, three injured policemen, several hundred gassed students and a great deal of damaged property. But the greatest harm is the huge breach which was created from what had already been a wide chasm. True, it would be more than an understatement to say that President O'Connell has little rapport with black students. But af _r yesterday, it will be even more difficult for any common. cation, with whitc -black, to exist. And here is where the problem lies. Communication. Maybe yesterday's events will make more people aware of this problem. And hopefully, we can go from here. The time has come when we must start to communicate, rather than just talk. For, from communication comes understanding and then positive action. Positive action is what is needed here. Arrests and potentialeviolence are not the answer. They will not solve our problem. And it is OUR problem. It is not a black problem, nor a white one. It is ours, and we must all accept it, and then deal with it. President O'Connell, you said you were unwilling to "negotiate demands with any individual or group." Okay. Then let's call them requests or recommendations or proposals, as the blacks did on their prepared list. And please review them. We must now sit down and try to cool the flames. It's going to be difficult. Our emotions are involved. We all have -inds who were.there. Some have close friends who were gassed or jailed. But we must divorce ourselves from all that. We must look at the situation and analyze the issues. And then we must decide on positive action. When all the smoke clears, we only hope the students black and white -have not lost something. Audle Shukr By MARIAN JEDRUSIAK Alligator Assignments Editor My baby got gassed yesterday. Along with a lot of other people I know and love. Along with a lot of other people whom I don't know, but if I did, I might easily love. It's probably recorded somewhere nicely on videotape, like a home movie. When I am old and shriveled up I can at least have the morbid satisfaction of looking back in my mind's eye on the golden days of my youth. You know the ones -the milk-commercial-Pepsi-Cola-running-through -open fields-with-armsoutstretched. The days when my baby got gassed. Pardon me but I've got the dry heaves sight now. Pardon me but I feel like vomitting, and there's nothing left. Empty. I have a faint recollection of having heard this song before. But not tinged with the faint perfume of tear gas in the air to set the mood. Somehow I'm not feeling up to plucking daisies and worrying about capturing a husband. Forgive me. I am bitter in a gut level way. I don't really have any burning desire to be a traitor to my sex. Twenty lashes with an eyebrow brush and I won't feel so guilty. There is no way you can get mie to believe that the world is wrapped in cotton candy. Oh no. There is an iceberg festering underneath this university. And the iceberg has chinks in it with angry black eyes peering up from the bottomless festering sore. And I have no honey or unguents to heal the gash. Not even for my baby. Alligator Staff Marian Jedrusiak Assignments Editor Copy Editors Gary Paskal-Debbi Smith.Vickie Rich-Linda Miklowitz Published by students o the University of Florida under the auslpols of the Board of Student PublicatIons. Edhtorut Buslnes, Adviertisng offices in Student Publications Suite, third floor. Relta UnWon. EdItorial Office phone: 302-1686.87, 88 or 89. Ophdon eXpresu0d Ia the Florida Alligator are those of the editors or of the write of theareicle and not shoes of the University of Florida. Steve Strang Wire Editor Sometimes the icicles set in when you sit up here in the middle of the Reitz Union carnival. The airconditioning is just a shade too artificial to fake a warm, summer breeze. One day when you come in from the roaring din at Tigert Hall, when you come in from the madding crowd and sit at your typewriter waiting for news of the madness outside you look up and all of a sudden you see very red faces. And these are the people you work with day in and day out. The people you wear like a second skin and the shade of red their faces are doesn't come from a sunburn. It's an ill wind that blows the tear gas in. It's an i1 wind that sucks the real tears up before they have a chance to start. You are hollow. After the assorted eyes and faces are flushed with water, after the eyes can see despite the lingering sting you piece together bits of a macabre tale. And you can't believe it. But unfortunately you do. And my baby got gassed. That's all. Student Publications Business Staff To reach Advertising, Business and Promotion Offices, Call: 392-1681, 82, 83 or 84 C. R. "Randy" Coleman Business Manager T.IE. "Kent" Dwytr ptoveruting Manager Jeanne Orflnik Promotion Manager T o r e a c h Circulation Department, call: 392.1609 It's a classical gas I -A

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Frl4.y, ApiS 116, 1971,Tbos ~f FLUTED COLUMNS--Buck passing Gainesville style By JOHN PARKERSo now everyone knows that not only is Stephen C. O'Connell a kindly old racist but he also lacks a certain amount of tact and good sense. His racism is not much in question. He sat on a Florida Supreme Court that repeatedly denied admission to UF law school one black man named Hawkins. This was AFTER the Brown V. Board of Education decision in the U.S. Supreme Court. And this man talks to you of the sanctity of the law. Ask your corner claptrap mammy nigger on her sagging porch about the "law" and she'll be able to give you a more realistic impression than Stephen C. O'Connell, despite his wall full of honorary degrees and gilt-edged back pats. So now he is claiming that his office can't really DO anything about various demands made by blacks to make this campus more equitable. In O'Connell's language, this used to be known as "passing the buck." Nowadays we call it bull. The reason is that Stephen C. O'Connell really doesn't particularly WANT to do anything about the inequitable black situation on campus. What Stephen C. O'Connell wants to do is keep things nice and quiet and try to build nice large air-conditioned classrooms and maybe move up a notch or two on the old political mumbly-peg board before he retires to Lauderdale and comfy drawn-out death. Confrontations like the one we had yesterday do nothing to enhance these stately ambitions. For one thing, he has a rabid group of legislators in Tallahassee who already believe .that O'Connell is a slack-jawed molycoddler. This sordid crew is one step out of a sanforized bedsheet themselves. But now he knows he has another group that is just as rabid at his front door. And he is undoubtedly kicking himself right now. Not for his racism, but for underestimating the enemy. But O'Connell's fault is not limited to poor judgement. He has to be credited with obtuseness and stubborness that borders on outright stupidity. His first statement to assembled students outside Tigert wasthat everyone inside the building would be arrested, and his second statement was a flat rejection of all suggestions concerning the disposition of the arrested black students. True, there wasn't much O'Connell could have said that Would have exactly pleased everyone, but his statements didn't come from a Norman Vincent Peale course, either. At least O'Connell has the dubious distinction of being the prime mover of the first campus confrontation of this, until now, quiet spring. And you can just bet that being on Wafter Cronkite this evening at 6:30 p.m. isn't going to fill his heart with joy. But in the final analysis, this is a richly deserved reward for a man who has more than a few times simply refused to listen. And today as he comfortably luncheoned with members of the student newspaper while blacks sat in his office anteroom was vaguely reminisent of another scene we heard of in history. Had to do with a Roman fellow who played his violin while his little town went up in smoke. I saw the face of Death today "How Can I Ever Be The Same? I Have Seen Death. I Have Seen The Face That Death Will Wear" -By EzekielJones By EZEKIEL JONES Nuipgtor Columnist We are travelers in an ark; and the name of this ark is Earth; And Earth is a Spaceship, filled with treasures: rare birds, and perfumes; exotic jungles, and wild plains; mountains, deserts, lagoons, and bayous; and people of many beautiful colors. Our Spaceship is laden with jewels: diamonds, and emeralds; silver, copper, tin and zinc. Wherever we look there is Wonder. Wherever we look the sky opens like a flower, like an orchid tended with warm hands. She is a Princess, this planet upon which we dwell; a blue diadem in the Vastness of Space, a vault of overflowing riches. She is the real First Lady of the Constellations; a coffer of Life, a sparkle in the Child God's eyes ... I saw the face of Death today. I saw the face that Death will wear. I lay with Jamie and Charlie in the hot sun, naked on a branch overhanging the Suwanee River. It was one of the most beautiful days of my lifetime. All the elements that I love were present: friends, green life, a waterway, a blue sky. The sun felt good upon my body. It was the first time in my life that I had swum in the nude. I liked the feel of the Water upon my body. It was clear and cool, and it washed me beautifully. I felt clean and my heart was happy. There were birds, and strange animals. It was an April afternoon in a young man's life. I thought how wonderful it would be to have a woman with im And I thought how things can always be better than they are. And this belief that they can be better is what we cal Hope. And it is this belief which spins the Wheel, which spins the Wel of Destiny. The branch I lay upon was only an inch or so above the water, and I felt my hair falling down my back into the Water, and felt my hair floating, and tickling my neck with cool fingers. And, as I was resting above the Water, and, as I was thinking heavy thoughts about God, and about Destiny, and about what iUfe is, I heard a motor humming down the river from me, making the noise of a distant swarm of bees. And, gradualy, the humming became louder, and I could descry a motorboat with tiny, doll-like people within it. As the motorboat approached, I could see that the man in that boat was in his late thirties. And next to this man was his woman. And the woman, too, was in her late thirties. And on the prow of this boat there lay the son of this man. And the son was my age, or younger. But the son of this man was not like me. He was not friendly. There was coldness in his eyes. And the man called from the boat, "I just wanted to see if you guys was for real." And there was nothing kind within his voice. It was a hollow voice. It was the voice of the Void. Then the man steered his motorboat down the river; and the boat made a long ellipse in the Water, a wide, open arc; and I heard the sputtering of the motor, and saw the Water breaking behind the boat's bow. Jamie looked at me and I looked back at Jamie, into his eyes. And I understood at that moment that there is really only one real question between human beings: how much can you trust someone else? Jamie and I were in danger, and each of us were attempting to know what the other one would do. I trusted Jamie. He trusted me. The man in the motorboat was about 20 feet away from us. Jamie and I were both naked, and we were in the Tree, and the man in the boat said to get out of ue sii e 3: place we were. And we were upon property which we were considering buying. Property which might have been our very own, which OF' HE\ WHEE some man in a motorboat was telling us to get off of. Can one man really tell another man not to sit naked upon his own property? Can one man have jurisdiction over another man's right to exist as he wants to? This was not what I had learned in School. Hadn't they taught me right then? Or had they lied to me way back then when I had been too stupid to think for myself, when I had been a naif willing and eager to swallow all thier lies? I saw the face that Death will wear today. I saw the cold eyes of the Void. I wanted to like that man as my brother. But the man in the motorboat told me to get off of property which might have been my own. And I knew that my brother would not tell me such a thing. I knew that my brother would respect my right to be as I am. When Jamie and I did not get out of the Tree, the man in the motorboat took out a Pistol and he pointed it at us. The motor churned in the Water, the red mud stirred on' the riverbottom. The man in the motorboat aimed that Pistol-at Jamie. And then the Stranger aimed his Pistol at me. And I thought that that man might kill us. It would not be hard for that man to kill Jamie, and Charlie, and me. I could not move from the Tree. I did not astit to move; and I, rn~hetshman had no riht, to make me move. But, I knew, also, that there is no argument with a Gun. The Man with the Gun is Boss in America. And th Man with the Gun is the lackey of the Man who Controls the Gun. And the Man who Controls the Gun is the man with Money. And many, many thoughts passed through my head in that instant when a stranger pointed a Pistol, first at Jamie, and then at me. I thought that I did not want to die, and that the day had been so beautiful, and how young I was, and about a woman. And I thought how absurd it must be in the Ultimate Scheme of things for this stranger to point a Gun at me as though to kill me in the middle of April, while I was lounging naked upon a branch, overhanging the Suwanee. Then Jamie and Charlie and I slipped into the Water, and the Water felt good upon us, clear and clean, and beautiful. We had forgotten how wonderful fresh water can be. And I said, Let's go back; you can't argue with a man who wields a Gun. Andthe man in the motorboat lingered some 20 feet away from us while we swam back to shore. And,all this time, he pointed the Pistol at our backs. And all this time, the motor sputtered in the Water.I saw the face of Death today. I saw the face that Death will wear. And Death was a Stranger to me, I did not know him. But this Stranger would have robbed me of my woman's love, and this Stranger would have taken the blue-green Earth from me, and all my friends, and everything I cherish in Life. And I understood that this Stranger was my Enemy. This Stranger did not kill us. While I swam the few feet back to shore, I was afraid that he would shoot at the Water to scare us. And I was afraid that he might miss. But he did not do this. He simply threatened our Lives with a loaded Gun, and he wanted us to believe that, if he so desired, he could rob us of all the Bliss we had ever hoped to know. And this sam was my Enemy, thoulai t 40P 4dhe him any wrong. And the man who was even more my Enemy, even more my Enemy than the an who held the Gun, was the man who Controled that Gun, and had shaped and distorted the other man's mind with Lies, and with Fear. So that the lhadin could not help but hate me, his brother. Because I am different. I do not want to kill anyone ever in my Life. But it is a Horror to have a Gun pointed at one by a Stranger. It is a Horror which inscribes the mind of the man so pointed at with an indelible mistrust. Because at the moment that one contemplates Death, one understands, too, how beautiful Life can be. And the man who Controls the Gun is the Mad Captain of our Spaceship Earth. He is the man who makes People war against People because he grows wealthy from such Wars. He is the man on the hill with the fine house and the two cadillacs, and the motorboat, and all the material riches of an Empire at his disposal. The Enemy, the Stranger, is David Rockefeller, and his lackey, J. Edgar Hoover. The Enemy, the Stranger, is H.L. Hunt, and his running-dog, Richard Milhous Nixon. The Enemy, the Stranger, is Howard Hughes, and his public image, Johnny Carson. And all those men who separate one human being from another for their own profits, are our Enemies. All those Swine so greedy for Power that they kif, and maim, and butcher, are men whom the People must oppose. Because these men wield the Gun. Because they are Godless War Criminals who spread napalm jelly like Vapo Rub upon Children; who grow Wealthy because other People die. How can I ever be the same? I have seen the face that Death will wear. Death will wear a facemask of property with which to hide his cancerous, bleeding sores. Death will be dressed in a Business Man's suit, and his body will be covered with leeches bursting against his skin. Death will be the neighbor down the street i his brand new moto e tAt, i* s family for 1 e u th a Pistol waiting to Ie aimee at quiet souls who lounge upon a branch overhanging the Suwanee, naked in the middle of April on a Sunday aftemoon.

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Pag 10, The Florida Alligator, Friday, April 16, 1971 Carnegie Commission reports education status By BRUCE KUEHN Alligtor Staff Writer Several findings and recommendations of importance to the higher education system in Florida have been made by the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education in its recent reports. The Commission is holding a meeting in Miami, today and Saturday, to review their conclusions with officials of the Florida higher education system. The Commission's most recent report, "Ie Capitol and Campus," is concerned with the relationship between the states and their colleges and universities. In the report, the Commission uses the percentage of per capita income to measure the amount spent by states on education. Florida's effort was found to have increased by 96 per cent since 1953 which ranks Florida 29 among the states. Florida currently spends .756 per cent per capita income on education which is the same as the currently prevailing .7 per cent nationally. The Commission anticipates the prevailing percentage will have to increase to one percent within ten years to accomodate an expected three million more students in the nation's colleges and universities. The Commission also measures a state's effort by the extent to which a state provides Women's Lib invades Rat mini skirt contest By DEBBY MERMELL Alligator Writer and DEBBI SMITH Alligator Copy Editor With war paint, chants, drums and a message, the Gainesville Women's Liberation Federation (WLF) invaded the mini skirt contest at the Rathskeller, Wednesday night. Mell Libby, manager of the Rathskeller, reported that about 12 or 13 women came into the Rathskeller at about 9:00 p.m. They were carrying placards saying, "Mini-skirts exploit women" and "Mini-skirtists are sexists!" Libby stated, "The girl's protest was with good cause. Most mni-akirt contests do exploit women. But that wasn't our purpose, at all. When we explained this to the protesters they left. I think they were just having fun more than anything." Later in the evening, the contest was held. Only four girls participated and "only one girl had on anything that even resembled a mini-skirt," Libby said. "Much to the chagrin of our customers, our contest wasn't exploitive. After all, as part of the university system we're not as free to conduct contests as commercial places are." Libby said. Although they were invited to enter the contest, WLF remained only a short tune, refusing to support the event. "We are not putting down the contestants, we are just opposed to the concept that women should be objects on display," said Eunice, a spokeswoman for the WLF. The seven members of the local organization have no leaders. They believe that all women are equally involved and there is no need for an unequal distribution of power. Their chapter name is WITCH, Women's Intemational Terrorist Conspirators from Hell. Gary Corseri, a freshman instructor of English at UF, supported the movement and said, "the war paint made the women look sexy." Another male supporter carried a bongo drum and accompanied the chanting. The underground group did not announce their plans, saying only that "we will demonstrate when we feel there is a need to." higher education to its residents. If over 15,000 college students attend out-of-state institutions, the Commission suggests the state may have to make an emergency support effort. Florida is a net exporter of students; about 27,711 students left Florida, while about 4,134 less entered Florida's institutions. In another report by the Commission, "The Open-Door Colleges", policies were discussed for the development of community colleges. The report, published in June 1970, indicated Florida ranks second behind California in the percentage of students enrolled in these institutions. The report recommended there should be a community college within commuting distance of every potential student except in sparsely populated areas where residential community colleges should be developed. The Commission recommends between 150 and 200 new community colleges by 1980, 12 of which should be in Florida. The Carnegie Commission on Higher Education was established in 1967 to develop policy guidelines for the development of higher education. Dr. Clark Kerr, former president of the University of California, is its chairman. -rn-rn--The UF Board of Student Publications Urges All Students Who Feel Qualified to Apply For EDITOR OF THEflrd Applications may be picked up in room 330, Reitz Union. Applications must be returned prior to 5 p.m., April 23. Mail or bring to Prof. Frank Taylor 415 Little Hall F, ~ ~ ------REMEMBER THECELEBRATION 71 FILM FErSTIVAL APRIL 18APRIL 24 FREE MOVIESI April 18th, 19th, 21st FREE LECTURES April 22nd at the Union by JONAS MEKAS Aud., 7-00& 9:30 PM FREE AWARDS CEREMONY! at the Medical Sciences Auditorium April 23rd, starting at 8:0 PM CASH & MERCHANDISE AWARDS OFFERED IN THE CONTEST! YOU CAN STILL ENTERI I I I Bowl on the U of F Imtercollegiute Team Persons interested in bowling on the intercollegiate bowling team for the U of F please meet at the JWRU Games Area at 5 p.m. today. For more information call 392-1637 *Men and women Patronize Gator Advertisers Just in case you re hun gry, FRANK'SUB BASE 2003 S.W. 13th ST. Features Free Delivery Call 372m7644 7 DAYS A WEEK SPECIALS (it's-a-spicy!) ATOMIC SUI-Provolone, Italian Ham Salami, Pepperoni.1.60 PERISCOPE -Italian ham, Italian Cheese Salami, Turkey, Frank's Dressing.2.9

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FrIday, April 16, 1971, The Florida Allipor, Pap 11 WFTV to present 'Student Rights' A program entitled "Student Rights -a Preface to a Changing society" will be presented on WFTV, Channel 9, Orlando on Sunday, at 5 p.m., and can be viewed on television in Gainesville. The program is produced by the Orange County Bar Association and the Florida Civil Liberties Union. Featured as participants in the program are Dean Joseph R. Julin of UF's Spessard L. Holland Law school, James Markel, counsel for the Orange County Board of Public Instruction, Robert Petree, of Yale Club to have speaker By BECKY LLOYD Alligator Staff Writer Professor James M. Gustafson, acting chairman of the department of religious studies at Yale University, will speak on "The University as a Community of Moral Discourse" on Sunday at 6:30 p.m. in room 400 of Reitz Union. Gustafson will be the speaker at the spring banquet of the Yale Club of Gainesville. Before his appointment to the Yale faculty in 1955, Gustafson had been a minister in the United Church of Christ. In 1954-55, Gustafson was assistant director of a study sponsored by the American Association of Theological Schools and the Carnegie Corporation dealing with theological education in America. The report was published as a book in 1957 with Professor Gustafson and Richard Niebuhr as co-authors. Gustafson is also the author of "Treasures in Earthen Vessels: The Church as a Human Community", "Christ and Moral Life", and "The Church as Moral Decision Maker". Gustafson graduated from Northwestern University, received his B.D. degree from the Chicago Theological Seminary and the University of Chicago. He received his Ph.D. from Yale in 1955. the Florida Civil Liberties Union, and Dr. Dudley Degroot, a professor of sociology at Florida Presbyterian College. Julin wil open the program, which was taped last Monday, with some remarks concerning the jurispndence in the area of student's rights. "There was a time only a few years ago," Julin said during the taping, "when the rights of a minor did not weigh very heavily on the scales of justice. There was more legal truth than fiction to the saying 'children should be seen and not heard."' Julin illustrates the changing position of a minor before the law by citing two Supreme Court Decisions. The first decision, made in 1967, concerned a minor charged with making obscene phone calls, and the "rather infonnal procedures" of the Juvenile Court which tried him. The Supreme Court decided that "under our Constitution, the condition of being a boy does not justify a kangaroo court." The second decision, in 1969, reversed a decision by Des Moines, Iowa, school officials prohibiting students from wearing black armbands to protest the Vietnam conflict. "Since the armband case," continued Julin, there have been many state and federal decisions involving the activity of students while in school. I suppose it is not surprising in a time of protest that many of these cases involve acts of protest. Others WEEKEND SPECIAL BOWLING 5 t 3 games $1.00 35 Sat.9am6pm Per game Sun. all day UNION GAMES AREA involve students who assert a right not to conform to tradition." Julin stated the purpose of the program.as an exploration of 'how far the students rights pendelum has swung -how clear or confusing the law sealiy 55." Julin also closed the taping. In his closing remarks he warned that "one man's freedom is another man's chains." In a letter to the Alligator, John F. Bolt, assistant professor of lawv at UF stated the program "is likely to be of interest" to the "students and citizens of Gainesville." BENJAMIN/MIRACORD AUTO/MANUAL TURNTABLES EXPECT THE UNEXPECTED NEW MIRACORD 770H Same top-rated design as 50H with Papst hysteresis-synchronous motor but with many additional features. Has variable speed control for pitch adjustment, plus built-in stroboscopic speed indicator with digital readout for 33/ or 45 rpm. Numbers stand still when turntable exactly on speed. Also stylus wear indicator, calibrated to show length of time needle has been in use. Remarkable new exclusive feature is the TRU/TRACK adjustable head for optimum vertical stylus angle. Sets for number of records on stack and maintains nearperfect angle (15") for minimal track-ing distortion. Includes all top quality features which made the 50H reputation. Miracord 770H, less base or cartridge $225.00 THE MIRACORD 630 All important features of rest of Miracord line world's lightest pushbuttons, cueing, anti-skate, auto/manual operation, 4 precise speeds, low wow, flutter of rumble, plus heavy diecast non-ferrous 10" turntable and Teflon bearing .less base or cartridge MIRACORD MODEL 620U Successor to famous Miracord 620, commended for quality and value by a leading independent testing laboratory and highly regarded by audio experts, restyled in chrome. The Miracord 620U offers quality unattainable in record playing instruments selling at $20-$30 more. It offers many of the same features as the rest of the Miracord. line -light touch pushbutton operation, precise cueing, effective anti-skate, plus balanced 4-pole heavy duty induction motor and dynamically balanced tone arm. The 620U has heavy, pressure-formed 10" turntable that provides smooth, steady motion, and it tracks records gently and faithfully, preserving the brilliance of their original performance for many plays. $12u. Miracord 620U, less base and cartridge $99.50 THE TOP RATED MIRACORD SOH Acknowledged by leading high fidelity editors, independent testing laboratories and audiophiles to,be the finest record playing instrument available today. Quality features include: Papst Hysteresis Synchronous Motor, type used in professional studio equipment with locked in speed accuracy regardless of line voltage; feather-touch pushbutton operation (exclusive feature); can play records manually or automatically with drop-in spindles; 4-speeds; up to 10 records can be stacked on auto spindle; external overhang adjustment on cartridge insert with built-in gauge for optimum tracking (exclusive feature); calibrated antiskate system; precision cueing; dynamically balanced tone arm; 12" die-cast dynamically balanced turntable, tracks down to -gram. Many other features. Miracord 51H, less base or cartridge $175.6W ADC 230XE CARTRIDGE 67.50 Value, BASE AND DUST' /COVER 30.OOValue sALL JUST 34 WITH PURCHASE OF MODEL 770H, 630, OR 50H .AT REG. PRICE. J19Y I I

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Write on!: Sigma Delta Chi will hold a meeting Sunday night at 7:30 in the Reitz Union rooms 122-123. Following the meeting, Robert Haiman, managing editor of the St. Petersburg Times, will speak. Spine chilling: "In Cold Blood" will be shown at the Union Auditorium tonight and Saturday at 5:30, 8:15 and 11. Admission is 50 cents. No house calls: Alpha Epsilon Delta, national pre-med and pre-dent honorary, is now, accepting applications for membership. All qualified students can pick up an application at 102 Anderson or 128 MSB. Home improvement plan: EAG needs people to work during "Earth Week," April 18-24, writing up fact sheets etc. If you'd like to help out, call 392-1635 or stop by the EAG office, room 323 Union. Mayday: Student Mobilization Committee to End War will meet Sunday, at 7 p.m. in room 349 Union. This will be the last chance to sign up for the march on Washington. Thanksgiving: "Together We Give Thanks" will be the theme of a special service Sunday, at 11:15 a.m. at the University U united Methodist Church. The Plaza rocks out: The Plaza will be the scene of rock and roll music Saturday night from 11-2 a.m. Celebration and other local bands will be featured. The get-together is sponsored by the Rose Community Center. New worship: A program of modem dance and pantomime will be held tonight at 8 p.m. in the Center for United Ministries, 1402 West University Avenue. College life: Campus Crusade for Christ, International will hold it's "College Life" series Sunday night at 9:15 in the Rawlings Area rec room. Everyone is invited. It's a picnic: The International Club is organizing a picnic on April 24, at Ocala State Forest. For more information call 373-4241 or 376-6810. SG Consumer Affairs Service organizing program like BBB By DENNIS ARNOLD Alligaor Staff Writer If you're ever had any foul play with a Gainesville merchant .don't call the Better Business Bureau. Student Governments (SG) Consumer Affairs Service is organizing a program fashioned after the Better Business Bureau (BBB) in New York. According to Mark Gilson, organizer of the program, Gainesville doesn't have its own BBB. Gilson said Gainesville's only source of communication between dissatisfied customers and merchants is through a consumer relations board run by the citys' Chamber of Commerce. Gilson said, "the board files customer complaints and receives no further action by the board." The fisare not open to the public, Gilson said. "Gainesville merchants run their own rating service by merely joining the Chamber of Commerce," he said. Gilson plans to start a file in the SG office that would list the names of merchants who are credible. Gilson explained that a hot line is also planned for students to phone in complaints. "We will be giving advise to students who want to know where to get the best prices from trustworthy merchants," he said. A third service Gilson hopes to provide is a student consumer guide. "The guide will allow small businesses to advertise as a recommended service," Gilson said. UF Student Body President Steve Uhlfelder said the agency is being established, because of the lack of cooperation by the city." "We're setting up our own program for students to warn them of unfair businesses," Uhlfelder said. PAAID POLITICAL ADVERTISEMENTS SENATE SENATE SENATE SENATE PIERCE WARDS MCCULLOUGH SHAFTER ABBOT COLLEGE OF EDUCATION PARTY CANDIDATES ARE COMMITTED TO EQUAL TREATMENT FOR MINORITY STUDENTS. The REAL Solution is MINORITY AFFAIRS PLATFORM Enlist the University in full financial support for the Expanded Eduestlenel Opportunity Progrm. (formerly the Critical Freshman Year Propam) e Lobby for a Blask Regent. Concentrate efforts to recruit minority professors and students. Increase faculties and funds for foreign student. Establish advisory council of minority students to the president. Na Vote i em.L Party Paidf r by dth REAL prty. PAID POLITCAIL ADVERTISEMENTU -C arol B Page 12, The Florida Alligator, Frida, April 16, 197 GUNS-GUNS-GUNsInventory over 450. Buy -4Sell -TradeRepair. reloading. Harry Beckwth Irady Readn supisCutm Arts Festival: A day of leisure for the enjoyment of the arts is what the first Tumblin' Creek Arts Festival at P.K. Yonge Laboratory School on April 17 is all about. A variety of graphic and performing arts will highlight the 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. festival sponsored by the UF College of Education Women's Club and P.K. Yonge. School grounds will be available for picnic lunches and a concession stand will serve beverages during the festival. CAMPUS REP BOB STACY 378-5222 ILLER-BROWN -1thS. Crazy Cassette Combination during our 5 HOUR SALE Buy one 60 min. Cassette at the regular price of $2.00 get the second one for $1.75 get the third one for$1.50 get the fourth one for $1.25 get the fifth one for $1.00 Limit 5 only at this special price This offer good only during our 5 Friday HOUR SALE April 16 5:00 PM to 10:OO PM THE FIDELITY SHOP 420 NW 13th St. 378-8045 Beware the Body Shirt Snatcher! You're fair game when youwoar a VAN HEUSEN Body Shirt. Foil this foxy female! Buy two Van Heusen 417 Body Shirts. If she snatches one off your back, you won't lack for another of the best fitting shirts on campus! Check out the Body Shirts now at Ef~efk Jniken Gainesvillen Opp Open 10.9 pmn WHATS A PIE ENG r mlmmlwmm mmmmwmm K K K K K K K K

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Friday, Apri 16, 1971, The Florida AllgmatrlPaga 13 Soprano Phyllis gCYrtin to sing at UF auditorium By BRUCE KUEHN Alligator Staff Writer The American opera star, soprano Phyllis Curtin will appear April 18 at the University Auditorium at 4 p.m. Part of the program Sunday evening will include a "Recitative and Gavottee from Manon" by Jules Massenet. Miss Curtin sang this in Buenos Aires d few years ago and the audience stopped the program to give her a five minute ovation. Miss Curtin will also sing six melodies of poems by Louise de Vimorin and composed by Francis Poulnec in his "Fiancailles Pour Rire" (Engagements to Mock). "Curtin's voice is a miracle; a lyric soprano with dramatic Phillis Curtin .lyric soprano impact. It is completely equalized from top to bottom .brilliant, warm, of r a r e timbre, fantastic breath-technique. This was more than singing; this was creating," w rote the Amsterdam Handelsblad. The London Vogue Writes, "Her voice is extraordinary, she is beautiful, and her repertoire is fantastic." Miss Curtin was trained in the United States instead of the usual practice of being trained in Europe. She has suing a great deal of opera in the English language because she considers it the most effective way to encourage interest in opera in this country. Miss Curtin is currently on a tour that is taking her from London to Honolulu. Tickets are available at the Reitz Union box office at $1.00 and $2.00 for students and at $1.50 and $2.50 for the general public. By CAROL BRADY Alligator Staff Writer Pedal power participants will have a chance to display their skills Saturday as participants in the April Bike Follies. The event, sponsored by the Reitz Union Program Office, will be held from 12-2 p.m. in the Hume Commuter lot. There will be two divisions in the competition, one formen and one for women. Bicycles will be divided into three classes: clunkers (anything consisting of two wheels, handlebars and a seat!), three speeds and ten speeds. Featured competition for the cyclists will include a rally encompassing the campus. Contenders will receive a number and instructions to one of the four routes planned around campus. Racers will stop at checkpoints along the way to pick up further information and to have their time recorded. Winners will be chosen on the thne taken to complete the rally course. Prizes for the victor include, ice cream gift certificates, passes to the Union game room and movie passes. A gymkhana, or obstacle course, will be set up at the parking lot. Relays, both single and team, will be run through this skill challenging maze. "Truth" will be featured on the Union terrace from 2-6 p.m. giving the tired pedalers a chance to rest and socialize. DOWNTOWN ON THE SQUARE Beware the Body Shirt Snatcher! You're fair game when you wear a VAN HEUSEN Body Shirt. Foil this foxy female! Buy two Van Heusen 417 Body Shirts. If she snatches one off your back, you won't lack for another of the best fitting shirts on campus! Check out the Body Shirts now at. 1710 W. Univ. Ave. .. Beware the Body Shirt Snatcher! You're fair game when you wear a VAN HEUSENI Body Shirt. Don't be fooled by this roguish robber! Buy an extra supply of Van Heusen 417 Body Shirts and you'll always be wearing the best fitting shirt on campus! Check out the Body Shirts now at ... April Bike Follies battle will test skills of pedal power participants Beware the Body Shirt Snatcher! NEW SPRING CONTEST! A FREE roundtrip flight to COPENHAGEN via SAS SCANDINAVIAN AIRLINES is the prize in our big drawing to be held May 15, 1971, and open to all regularly enrolled collegians. Send in yournaeBAPI3, 1ga4_I30, .it's the shir with perfect bod fit, long YorkNI Tib6Contest pointd collar, two-buttdn cuffs and the newest, void where prohibited smartest patterns. This is man's fashion, man, so by law. keep it out of her clutches! VAN HEUmEN r417BdyShr1

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-I Pg. 14, The Florida Alligator, Friday, AprN 16,1971 The UF Board of Student Publications Urges All Students Who Feel Qualified to Apply For the Following Positions. Editor, Florida Alligator Terms: Fall (Term 1) 1971 Fall & Winter (Terms I & II) 1971-72 Winter (Term II) 1972 Managing Editor, Florida Alligator Terms: Fall (Term 1) 1971 Fall & Winter (Terms I & II) 1971-72 Winter (Term II) 1972 The Board of Student Publications shall choose the term of office after full deliberation upon applications received. Previous experience with Student Publications is desirable but not essential. You do not have to be a journalism major. General Instructions All applications are to be picked up and returned between 8 a.m. and 4 p.m. to Rm. #330, Reitz Union. e Applicants must return the original plus two copies of the completed application prior to 4 p.m., Thursday, A il 22. For further information, call Mr. Alan Whiteleather, 392-1690

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Frlde, Apri 16, 1971, The Foridif A gar5 Parking violations carry point loss By CHRISTY TILSON Atigtor Writer Mrs. Nell Parker, secretary in the Student Traffic Court (STC) office said, "a minor parking violation carriesa two point value. Any moving violation considered minor carries three points, as does not having a decal." "These points are cumulative and a warning is issued for an accumulated six points in one academic year," according to Bill Graham, associate justice. "A student's driving privileges for the quarter may be revoked after seven points." This is just one of the policies that UF students may not be aware of, according to Graham. "A student who lends his car to a friend will be held responsible for all violations of university traffic rules," said Graham. Parking and traffic citations should be reported in person within 72 hours of issue to the STC, room 308 JWRU. After this period a summons will be issued. Mrs. Parker said, "Students don't know that they must have a decal or a permit to park anywhere within the boundaries of the university during restricted hours. After hours you may park your car in any legitimate parking place." Graham further stated, "the same parking regulations are in effect during that period. These are 24 hour, seven days a week regulations." Hume Area Council plans Parent Day for May 8 The Hume Area Council is planning Parent Day, May 8, for the parents of Hume Area students. "The purpose of the Parent Day is to inform parent's concerning campus policies and how they affect students. "We began to realize the misunderstandings many parents have about policies, such as open housing," said Linda Graf, chairman of the event. According to Miss Graf, there will be a panel discussion Saturday morning following speeches by campus officials. The committee hopes to have UF President Stephen C. O'Connell speak and housing officials explain current UF policy to the parents. During the afternoon, parents will be served a chicken barbecue prepared by Hume area students. There are tentative plans for a talent show that evening. Parents who will need accommodations can arrange to stay in a dorm and should contact the Hume Area Council. See how KNAP.PAKyM goes over the back.over the shoulder. Or tor hand-carry (above right). $15.00 buys the 19 ROLL.PAK.TM Strapped for shoulder sling. hand grip. or to carry at ene end. Also 22" size, $20.00. Both in beige. ed or yellow canvas with white. TOTE-PAK M also available S17.00 traveling light is our bag. ATLANTIC is the canvas bag with get-up-and-go. Makes your trip a light fantastic. It's light, bright-right on! Made in all the styles you need to tote, to stuff, to strap on. ATLANTIC'S GOT IT. THE SLING-PAKS!TM ATLANTIC PR i)DiC S s iP A -.iv 'ly C I' ce 'i -en 5Nj SUNG-PAKS'j MAAS BROS. GAINESVILLE it's good business F 5 HOUR SALE -riday April 16 5:00 PM to 10:00 PM Reg. Price $271.95 SAVE $72.00 TODAY SL 40B British Industries Co. with Shure M55E Eliptical Stylus @1tPIONEER" SA-500 Solid State Integrated Stereo Amplifier 44watts IHF low .5 percent Distortion Honest 4OHz-18,OOO Hz 8" long throw woofer 3V:"tweeter Acoustic Super Supension Extra Smooth Sound I;TheF lT z $2S00 buys the KNAP-PAK.rM 3.way c.n velible zips from carry-on to tote to knap-. sack. Opens from 12 to 22. Beige. red or yellow colov canvas ..

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3 PAg 16, The Florida Alligator, Friday, April 16, 1971 -_ The University Calendar will be published weekly listing only Notices for Page (if Record must be events to open to the University sent to Betty Coomes, Division of community. Private meeting Information Services, Building H. All P a geio f R e co rdInotices will be carried in "What's copy for Tuesday must be received Happening" on Mon., Wed., and by 3 p.m. Friday. Friday deadline is 3 p.m. the previous VVednesday. Formerly Orange and Blue Bulletin. Produced every Tuesday & Friday the Alligator office, 365 Union for the publication of official University notices and public events by or to Public Functions Office, the Division of Information Services and the Public Functions Office. G-72Union. GRE IS APRIL 24 desire to appoint as many The Graduate Record presidential committees. In Examination is to be given at general, nominations should be 8:15 a.rm on Saturday, April 24, for persons not now serving on Friday, April 16 Wednesday, April 21 in Carlton Auditorium. committees. The nominating committee in its recommendaUnion Movie: "in Cold Blood", UF Badmintton Club, Norma PRESIDNiTIAL, SENATE tions will not only consider the Union Aud. Gym, 8 p.m. COMMITTEES NOMINEES interests and qualifications of Baseball U of F vs. Kentucky Circle K meeting, Union 361, prospective members, but also (2), Home Game 7:30 p.m. Members of the faculty rank and college distribution and University Lutheran Church, Student Government Elections, interested in serving on special requirements as to "Natural High" -Rock Plaza, All day University committees or in expertise. Musical, 8 p.m. Union Movie: "Chaplin recommperipn others for A list of committees, with Gator Loan Fund: "Carnigras", Monday, April 19 Comedies", Union Aud. vcancies aeuiirged to send their persons currently serving on Upper Drill Field, 4:00 p.m. Poetry Readings by Larry recommendations in writing to them, is available in the office of Chess Club tournament, Union Hetrick, Union Lounges, 4:30 Dr. James'L. Wattenbarger at each dean and department 118, 7:30 p.m. p.m. Norman 'Hall. The Senate chairman. Each faculty member Union Movie: "Monika" Union SGP: "Your Own Thing", Nominating Committee consists now serving on a presidential or Saturday, April 17 Aud. University Aud., 8 p.m. of three presidential appointees: senate committee also had a Tennis: U of F vs. Georgia, Dr. Buford D. Thompson, copy of this list. Union Bike Rally, 12 noon Home Game Thursday, April 22 professor, IFAS vegetable crops, L e t t e r s forward i n g UF Badmitton Club, Fla. Gym, and Dr. Wattenbarger: and four nominations should reach Dr. 10 a.m. Young Republican meeting, members of the steering Wattenbarger prior to May 1. A Union Dance, Terrace, 2 p.m. Union 349, 7:30 p.m. committee, Dr. Billy G. brief statement of the interests Baseball: U of F vs. Kentucky, Zero Population Growth Dunavant, professor and director and qualifications of faculty Home Game meeting, Union 150 F&G, of nuclear sciences; Dr. Ray members, especially those with Union Movie: "In Cold Blood", 7:30 p.m. Fahien, professor of chemical recent appointments that you Union Aud. engineering; Dr. Thomas A. recommend, will be appreciated. IFC Spring Frolics: Bill Cosby Tuesday, April 20 Friday, April 23 Scott, professor of physics, and Show & the Nitty Gritty Dirt Dr. John D. Butterworth, EXPECTANT PARENTS' Band, Fla. Field, 8:30 p.m. Pi Theta meeting, Union 150 -Union Movie: "The Loved One", professor and chairman of CLASSES SET Gator Loan Fund: "Carnigras", D, 7:30 p.m. Union Aud. marketing. Upper Drill Field, 11:00 p.m. UF Duplicate Bridge, Union 150 The nominating committee The College of Nursing of the -C, 7:30 p.m. REITZ UNION BOX OFFICE w i s h e s to cons i d e r University of Florida is offering Cicerone Meeting, Union SALES recommendations from the another series of Expectant Lounges, 7:30 p.m. faculty prior to making its Parents' Classes beginning Sunday, April 18 SGP: "Your Own Thing" IFC Spring Frolics: Bill Cosby -report. President O'Connell has Monday April 19 in Room Concert, Plaza, 12 noon $3.25 GP, $3.00 Students asked the committee to forward M203. There Is a charge of $5 Union Movie. "Experimental Baseball: U of F vs. Rollins, Phyllis Curtin -$2.50 & $1.50 to him tw6 nominations for each per couple and consists of 6-8 Film", Union Aud. Home Game GP, $2.00 & $1.00 Students vacancy on committees for Monday night sessions beginning SGP: Phyllis Curtin, soprano; Tennis: U of F vs. So. Fla., SGP: "Your Own Thing" which the members are elected at 7:30 p.m Interested persons Univ. Aud., 4 p.m. Home Game $2.25 GP, $1.25 Students by the senate. should call 392-3514 for Engineering Fair Awards SGP: "Your Own Thing", Scabbard & Blade Military Ball It is President O'Connell's registration. Ceremony: Union Terrace University Aud., 8 p.m. -$5.00 a couple rFLORIDA CAEIALE6E11 i 392003900 ANl.ttl*les's than C~fV~ftiOna. mS -1E4 [C,

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CLm-ax]X Friday, April 16, 1971, The Florida Alligator, Page 17 IP40R SA I.JE Brand new University sound speakers, Vegas model. $170 list, will sell pair for $275. 5 year warranty. 372-7694 between 6 & 8 pm (A-3t-116-p) Remmington 700 BDL cal. 22-250 varmit barrel never fired $160; cal .303 British lee-enfield 4X scope $60; Zenith Stereo $75; 378-9942 (A-4t-1 16-p) Breadtruc carpeted double b4 410 nw $500 (ASONY Turntable speaker s) Marcia L (A-3t-115 BE A Wee LEST WE FORGET. TWENTY-FIVE HOURS OF. (3a/17 Childri Races es Game .0aces Good Music and. ( ) J. WAYNE RE 4th AN TodaY'. more for your mon atM ORRISC CFETERIA I FRIDAY'S FEATL I PORK CUTLET PARMESAN AND YELLOW RICE 99t LUNCH: 11 i t 2 -SUPPER4:30 til 8 CAFETERIA .beyond c 2620 N.W. 13th Street in the Gair kR SAL EIP40ISALE :/ scyl chevy panelled and 1970 YAMAHA RT 1-MX very good w/ gas oven & stove hinged condition i must sell this machine d shelves table etc see at call 378-6252 after 5pm (A-3t-116-p) 131h or call ed 378-9451 5t14-p)Yamaha 50 + helmet must sell best offer. call Pam 373-3684 compact stereo system. (A-2t-116-p) amp, AM-FM, 2-way ystem. Excellent condition. TRIUMPH 650 semichop. custom aMancha No.l. 378-9064. paint, seat, chrome. runs good. cut -p) price from $1000 to $875. must sell now! call Dave 378-8946, 7-noon. (A-2t-116-p) ken Reaxer For Sale: Boy's 2 speed Schwinn Bicycle. $25. Light ash brown long S1971 human hair fail-worn once $25 Call M 1 'f9 Anne 373-3718 (A-St-116-p) AUCTION Apr. 17 7:30 pm new, used, antiques & misc. Items. don't en S miss this sate. col. Wylie Cobb auctioneer cobb's auction house 41 south archer fia. (A-2t-116-p) Light Show Need money fast Am willing to sell like-new refrigerator for only $65. It F sba l is 3 ft. high and cost $110.00 new; ball call Wm. at 376-0406 (A-5t-116-p> ovtieS Martin D 12-35 12 string guitar w/nardshell case, cost over $650 sell ~ITZ NION .for $400 Also complete Suns PA ITZ UNION ....system cost 1900*sell 600 372-3929 'Z"U I ON(A-5t-117-p) INIVERSARY 175cc bultaco street cycle features BIRTHDAY recently rebuilt engine, new paint, ez PA RTY start, 80 mpg, trail use, large seat, 198lbs, low price $150 373-4383 S (A-It-117-p) Bmc 948 and 4-speed for spridget, morris. VW body parts. Complete running gear for dune buggy or? I need 40hp engine, trans. 372-1039 (A-5t-117-p) BICYCLE 3 speed runs now but cable is broken $15 also 1 med size pair of handball gloves $5 call Joe 2-8790 dmg (A-2t-117-p) honda 90 w helment $115 sony e meal500-a tape recorder -$199 garrard turntable $115 pre-amp $5 9 reels tape $29 372-5561 Art 10pm you'd n betterr hurryA-5t-I17-p) 1969 honda 350 firm $525 fair price considering $275 just spent on complete overhaul, battery and tire. have receipts call 372-4678 after 5 = -(A-6t-117-p) JRE 166 bmw-excellent mach cond, fairing & many other extras. first $700 gets It. 378-0181 til 2 372-0507 after 2 S(^-4t11 7-p) 3 In stock: 31b. nylon 2 man tents C: Red,twhite,3bluen bsketbailsi Masks, fins, snorkels; Backpacking supplies. B & B SPORTS CENTER 5320 N.W1 Z 13th ST. 378-1461 (A-5t-113-P) 1969 S-90 honda in good condition $175 call 372-5254 ask for Jeff or see at 805 E. University Ave. (A-It-115-p) ALL PHONO NEEDLES ARE -== -AVAILABLEE AT MUNTZ STEREO FREE PARKING 319 NW 13 ST (A-l5t-107-p) 69 TRIUMPH 500 T100C motorcycle excel. cond. extras Inc. $750 also 65 GTO $1250 call 392-9523 (A-5t-115-p) omparison! 1970 TRIUMPH 650 Bonneville. excellent condition fast, clean. nesville Mali chrome fender, sissy bar, medium high rise bars $1150 378-3196 (A-3t-115-p) COMPARE BEFORE YOU BUY All New Student Desk 29.50 2 dr. files 19.50 4 dr. files 29.50 USED arm. exec. swivel chair 19.95 JR Office F-ture Co. 6205 S. Main St. 3. 146 (a-25t-103-P) SUPER SALE Blank 8-track 80 min tapes 6 for $9.95 MUNTZ STEREO 319 N.W. 13 St. (a-20t-89-p) B TRACK TAPES PRE-RECORDED 3.99 largest selection we also trade, buy & sell, new & used tapes TRADE-A-TAPE 14 nw 13 st. tA-15t-107-p) Stereo 8-Tr Cartridges Recorded Premium Quality Lubricated Tape 1 or 2 albums on 40 or 80 min tapes $2.50 or $4 including tape. Don't accept cheap imitation. Get Guarantebd Quality. John 378-5916 nights (A-5t-113-p) Heathkit Amature Band DX-60A Transmitter and HR-20 Receiver With SWR/power meter $150 for info eall 392-9031 (A-5t-115-p) 1961 volvo-good ru n n Ing condition-great for town & tri ps-$300-376-8855. westinghouse delux air conditloner-5000 btu-Ilttle use-$80 376-8855 (A-5t-114-p) Honda 150. 1965, good condition, 17,300 mi. $230, includes 2 helmets. Call 378-9534 after 5 (A-4t-114-p) 62 VALIANT Excellent condition, only 30000 miles, $200 call Stuart at 372-6772 from 7 to 11 pm (A-St-115-p) 1968 Triumph Bonneville 650cc low mileage, carefully maintained. $800 call Dan at 372-7877 (A-5t-116-p) AKC Female silver minature Poodle, must sale leaving for Germany, loves cats, soon able to breed, 75$ or best offer, Call 378-6247 (A-5t-113-p) Ham radio unit. Elco transceiver/power supply like new. Vibroplex key Shure mike and antenna included. Asking $200. 378-5430 evenings. (A-5t-115-p) 120 watt SANSUI AU-555 solid-state stereo control amplifier $140.00 phone 373-3023 Earl MUST SELLII (A-4t-115-p) FOR R EJT April's rent freel Sublet furnished or unfurnished apt., $140 or $130, Balcony bedroom, Shag carpet, 3 blocks from campus. Ph 378-2888. (B-5t-114-p) New England style duplex-needs female roommate, one block from campus available now. 1007 S.W. 6th Ave. call 372-6112 for Michele (B-4t-114-p) Married couple or serious grad to sublease lbdr apt-no child or pets. pool-inquire Coy Thomas 1406-32 sw 10ter or call Alvarez 372-8468 (B-12t-116-p) Sublet 1br apt no children no pets quiet near campus married couples only call 373-1183 (B-5t-116-p) .AA A A A A A A A STUDENT GOVERNMENT AND CELEBRATION '71 PRESENT. DIRECT FROM NEW YORK BEST MUSICAL NEW YORK DRAMA CRITCS CIRCLE AWARD 1968 a 'ock musical starring a OEWWWsa VtAINE PETRICOFF L JACOBS e JUNE COMPTON APRIL 20 & 21STY AUDITRIUM TICKETS AVAILABLE REITZ UNIQK BOX OFFICE (3924653) A."ALA -************'. k "'* ** *** sublet 2 bdr apt ac A pool available any call 376-0635 900 vv 0 mo. (B-5t-117-p) 3 bedrooms for rent pool, $70/person summer quarter on-. 373-4301 or 373-13. Room for mature -,oi* Central heat, air co rfW maid service, 'separatstreet parking. --. (B-2t-117-p) I bedroom 60 a mont nw 15th st apt 8 Apvi,. blocks from campus (2 br apt to sublet for We'" per mo summit house call 373-2187 after Sp 2 female roommates se' the place for fall qutst4-392-7842 or Brenda 1 information (C-3t-117-f-, 40LAT 75 I The Stos--V-. *0 *I *t T F ~ w S p r w lw w w IK P% pq P% -pq Pl% Pit Pq P%, P% P% P% P% P% P% P% PIV4 P% P% P% P% -PF4

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AT(YCOR C~~I' ) Pagp 18. The Florida Alligtor Fndeay April 16, 1971 RENT /c furnished triplex ible may 1. pets & only $110 monthly n-fri (B-5t-115-p) ummer qtr. close to air-conditioned. tr. university apts. v. apt. n, 376-8990 POR RENT SINGLES: Swing into summer in a luxurious A/C poolside apt. Private bedroom. Walk to campus. $70, including utilities, and free color TV. 378-7224 La Mancha Apts. (B-15t-116-p) WA NTE 1 Usteners wanted! Will pay $2.00 for one hour session. Must be native English speaking and have normal hearing. Please call LeVan between 8 and 5 for appointment. 392-2049 (C-112-tfc) Truman Capote's IN, COLD BLOOD Friday April 16 & Saturday, April 17 5:30, 8:15, 11:00 Union Aud. 50 cents buy advance tickets Friday at 2nd floor box office from 12:30-9:30 Sponsored by the .Wayne Reitz Union Proceeds from Fridays showings will go to the Gator Loan Fund A a story-of men among men and the woman who triedtointerfere. WARIOL'S OUSOKE8 COfl!I! BUY 'S'WNESOME CO WHYS' WIB AIIIDEMCH FOR MANY NTS THE! l M. magnificent and very funny satire of the American Western -that is liberally seasoned with our favorite 4,8,10 and Af12-letter words and a that is-in combisation perhaps unwAsrdentedr" WANTE13 Two girls want apartment to sublease fall quarter. Call Carin or Mary Anne 372-6507 (C-5t-113-p) Need one male roommate badly for nice apartment. $50 a month call376-4185 (C-5t-116-p) Coed to share luxurious air conditioned poolside apt. Private bedroom. Walk to campus. $70 including utilities and free color TV. 378-7224 (C-15t-116-p) 2 roommates wanted large 4 bedroom house near mail cable tv private or semi-private bedroom $40 per month utilities Incl. 378-6810 (C-5t-116-p) Male roommate to share luxurious a/c poolside apt. Private bedroom. Walk to campus. $70 including utilities + free color tv. 378-7224 (C-15t-116-p) Senior coed desires 1 br efficiency apt for summer qtr. ac close to campus ph. 373-3355 (C-112-5t-p) Two female roommates wanted at Landmark apt. No.32 for summer quarter (C-5t-113-p) Keep an independent voice in the senate, elect Gary Ruthledge to the student senate from the College of Education on April 24. pd. pol. adv. (C-3t-117-p) 1ELP WA NTED1 Part time chemistry lab technician experience preferred Call 372-1500 (E-5t-114-p) AMBITIOUS COUPLE who need more income. Unusual opportunity for good earnings for both. work together. part-time or full-time. phone 373-1476 (E-5t-109-p) .A U ....... 67 v*w" one owner low milage Must sacrifice this week! MUSTII perfect mech cond will sell cheepil pay off bank only 373-4035 after 5(G-st-116-p) 67 MGB -GT green w/black; radio; abarth; wire wheels; 37,000 miles; looks good and runs well. will consider offers around $1350 Camelot Apts, apt. 110 (G-4t-116-p) 1965 FALCON-stick, radio, clean and in good condition $425 call John or Roxie -373-1436 night or 392-1521 day (G-2t-116-p) I INEE I M OLOR PLUS EWMMAN MANAGEMENT DOES NOT RECOMEND WUSA COLOR FOR CHILDREN DROSA f. STEAK CS FEATURING CHUCK WAGON STEAKS FROM 99c OPEN 11:00 AM to 9:00 PM -7 Days Weekly Westgate Shopping Center -PHONE 378-3320 3321 W. University Ave. -Gainesville, Florida I L T PRINT I -Row v m

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Rpm _, -!IM I ---.I -_ .__ -". 1 71 -71-.1 ; .__ I Friday, April 16, 1971, The Florida Alligator, Page 19 1969 mgb excellent condition. low -.mileage, fully synchro, wire wheels radio, radials, tonneau. marriage forces sale. call 373-1607 after 5:00 Open Saturday 12-6 p.m. & after (G-5t-113-p) the Bill Cosby Show 'till 2:00 a.m. Camper s-van, sel contained, excellant condition, must be sold fast to pay for school, contact Don or G T 01 R FR DO 8 Discount coupons available at 12-6 p.m. 5 rides for $1.00 15 murphree c 39730* SUNDAY NIGHTS 10-12 WRUF RADIO 85 fairgrounds tcket booths. n66 Falcon Futura good mechanical A___C____ R__ A__ TATE_ T__ EATRE ----condition, radio, heater good tires ra tm $685 call 378-7676 (G-5t-113-p) 0. Tha WorldFMosa TiesJ. ayn Retz nion63 OBwir w~stsperl I tiesSPECIAL, RATES FOR FLORIDA RESIDENTS 63onn auwirewhees, perii ties Ti aIy *R izU intonneau. $550 cl 37-216 GLASS BOTTOM BOATS at (G-4t-115-p) Celebration '71 E. I.'n mW.ink U. YOUR note counts!! this time, vote LAST e BOBBY WILLIAMS for student reeEve igso reeF imssenatewill represent SHOWS you/independent/luc pd. pol. adv. 1:30 (J-3t-117-p) 3:30 Sunday, April 18. Experimental 5:30 Henrietta. Lot in Sodom GOING TO EUROPE? We Have 925thel ugh rio Charter Flights At People's Prices. Reflections on Black Call 372-6846 (J-t-117-) o ffi year. Sirius Remembered G Wedlock House: An Intercourse BUSINESS -MAJORS interested in expressing your views or just rapping Shadows about the upcoming student government elections. then, call your senate candidate BOB ROSENBERG 378-3449 "pd. pol. adv." Union Auditorium free 6:00 & 9:00 (J-3t-117-p) Monday, April 19. .Art imagination is more important than Wed, Aprl21 ..Classic. knowledge -Albert Einstein. Bob Cammack proves itl Vote for Bob -~---: CammackEngineering senate Ind Look For Sign of Red Cap Bob pd. pol. adv. (J-3t-117-p) Babe, manhattan beach sounds good. till our eighth be a senseless tR sensational & sensual sixth with or NOWg .w i a. 1ED T without my socks on. love three + me. (J-1t-117-p) -SHO ASAD MY AWARDS Two things are better on a 130 WATERBED. One is sleep. From 3:30 innerspace Environment at 5:30 reasonable prices. call Elliott, 7:30 373-3144 (J-15t-105-p) 9:25 N LXM Coed looking for female companions to travel with this summer in europe. DMESEA IIS leave from miami. call Bobbi 373-2287 (J-t-113-p)The GOING TUBING Large Truck TubesWpe For Rent $2.00 Per day Call 378-5931 or 372-1446 For Arrangements (J-6t116p) Helpi 1962 Corvar stolen. White 4 .aa odmeelU. door sedan, red seat cover, three white walls, one black. License no. 16-D-7970. reward. call 373-3090. Mg W. A (J-bt114-p) Studs, incluii'ig silver and gold stars, all sizes, the widest selection of patches + appliques anywhere, SPECIAL UITED GRAPEWINEPAPERS (even Spiro SHOWS Agnew papers) bluejans, all sis, ci rIDA always In stock, SATIN HOT 13NGAGEMENTI PANTS, and all your Gainesville 3:30 Green supplies. Evorythngs at the 5:30 SBERANEAN CIRCUS. 0 SW 7:3 The Florida Alligator 7th St. Open g eoand toU9 Sunday. (J-3tN110-P) 9:50 IAIL STUDENT GOVERNMENT PRODUCTIONStw AND CELEBRATION PRESENT Metropolitan Opera Js Csars.Charltn Heto Vienna State Opera nsam." toow amoRobadsJsodn V*** **** * _Richard Johnson-RobrtVaughn MsCOWAIAmRIfloina Mss Curtn L^ -a __ --,_ -le:TqAVILBE REITZ UNION BOX OFFC drno1 (392-1653) I 40 .AE 16 &UNDER 1.00 STUDENTS 17 & UP 1.25 ADULTS ALL DAY

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Page 20, The Florida Alligator, Friday, April 16, 197 MM4%+%MMF/M+W4. -.-.-..-.*.-.-.*.:----------$$$$$%$$445S4 -.* 4%%%%-+PERSONA .L No finer cats than we arel Three beautiful Siamese kittens 9 wks. old. These cats are perfect and, the going price is $20. 378-9282 (J-5t-115-p) put a little pup into your life we have eleven of them all are very friendly and full of puppy love free call 373-3723 anytime (J-St-115-p) professional DRAFT COUNSELING Medical-Legal-Psychologic open weekends Tel: 891-3736 2135 xora Road No. Miami, 33161 (J-46t-106-p) One Candidate Cares. Make Student Government Responsive. Elect Larry bo. Tropp. Senate Arts ar)d Sciences Ind. pd. pol. adv. (J-St-113-p) Co-Eds Facial Hair removed forever, fast, low-cost gentle hair removal. E d m u n d 0 w y a r Electrologist .102 N.W. 2nd Ave. Call 372-8039 for appointment. (j-44t-54-p) LUST d& POUND Found: ladies watch in vicinity of yulee area. call 376-8439 and identify. (L-3t-117-p) Lost black wallet near murphee area tennis courts please return Id's no questions 376-9895 John Kemp (L-3t-1 16-p) Lost white female poodle in the vicinity of 11st NW 2 ave She is wearing a flea collar and has brown stains under eyes Reward 372-2912 IL-4t-115-p) lost-gray-black tiger stripe cat, white chest and legs. red flea collar. seen around nw 1 ave 18 st and murphrey call John 373-2516 reward 44-3t-115-p) LOST Black wallet with ID's If found call 392-7039 $5 reward (L-4t-117-p) ALLI R CLASSIFIED To order classfieds, use the form below. Fill in the boxes allowing 1 box for each letter, space and punctuation mark. Count 2 boxes fpr capital letters. Don't use hyphens at the end of a line (which 35 characters). Use additional form if more than 4 lines arereiquired. Minimum charge is $1.00 for 4 lines.' For each additional line, add $.25. Multiply the total by the number of days the ad is to run. Subtract the discount for consecutive insertions (if applicable*). Mail the ad, with remittance (check preferred) to. Alligator Classifieds, Room 330, Reitz Union, Gasville, Florida 32601. No refunds. Deadline -&00 p. 2 days prior to stating day DO NOT ORDER BY PHONE 0000 0000 r )p 00 0 r+ 0. 0 z 0 0000 U, o. w g.-a c0 0 F z -7 "4 term papers, thesis, reports etc typed to your specifications. accuracy and neatness guaranteed. 50 cents per page. call tola 373-1003 (M-lOt-110-p) Save 25% or more on all auto parts. Spark plugs 68 cents. Cash & Carry Auto Parts, 1111 S. Main St. 378-7330. (M-113-tfc) Alternators generators starters electrical systems tested and repaired. Auto-Electric Service, 1111 S. Main 378-7330. Now! BankAmericard adn Master Charge. (m-tfc),, We're wired for sight at the smallest eyeglass office In town. Drive your own waiting room to UNIVERSITY OPTICIANS at 519 SW 4th Ave., across from Greyhound Bus Station, 378-4480. (m-tfc) HORSES for any purpose. Horseback riding, hay rides, western parties-dance. floor. Cowboy's Riding Stables. S.E. 22nd Ave. and 15th Street p h o n e 372-9134 (M-10t-103-p) HORSES BOARDED finest care spacious stalls lighted ring wooded trails recretation activities for patrons bea-rtiful grounds 373-1059 (M-5t-113-p) Young legal secretary with 8 years typing experience. Will type all you require projnptly and accurately at 50 cents a page. Call 378-6983 after 6:30 P.M. any evening. (M-St-115-p) WITH 8:30 PM SATURDAY APRIL 17 FLORIDA FIELD TICKETS STUDENTS G.P. AT THE GATE $3.00 $325 $&~50 AVAILABLE AT RECORDSVILLE-REBEL DiSCOUNT RECORD BAR-JWRU ROX OFFICE -j U. M E E g -a STENORECEPTIONIST Permanent position statewide prdfaeoneal association. Mrn offices and equipment. Salary competitive coememsura'with qualifications. Five day week, fringe benefits. Qualifications must include proficiency in typing, record keeping, filing, routine general office duties. Opening immediately wiallable. Reply Box 13456, University Station, Gainesville. -y ----

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Cuba gets Red technicians By CARLOS J. LICEA AlligitorStaff Writer U.S. State department officials revealed Wednesday Soviet technicians are being sent to towns and cities all over Cuba in an attempt to revitalize the sagging economy. The technicians, official Washington sources speculate, are being incorporated into "low level positions," with the purpose of restructuring Cuban economy. The move by the Soviets and the Cuban government began taking a more active pace after Cuban Prime Minister Fidel Castro admitted last year the economic policies of the government had failed. Although Castro got 8.5 million tons of sugar, the largest crop ever for the island nation, the effort took two years, plus a great diversion of resources from all other industries for the sugar effort. Since then, a bilateral economic treaty was signed between Havana and the Kremlin which binds the two countries closer than ever economically. The economic treaty is effective from January of this year to 1976. According to the soviet news agency, Tass, Cuban president Osvaldo Dorticos met with Soviet officials in Moscow Wednesday. "The Soviet and Cuban comrades had an exchange of views and questions of the further all-round development of cooperation between the Communist party of the Soviet Union and the Cuban Communist party," Tass was quoted as saying. Dorticos was in Moscow to attend the 24th Soviet Communist Party Congress, which ended last week. HAITI Speculation the Haitian president-for-life Francois (Papa Doc) Duvalier is ill and near dead increased Wednesday when the 64-year-old ruler failed to show up for a birthday military parade in Port-Au-Prince. Duvalier's 19-year-old playboy .son, Jean Claude, instead of the somber little The Alligator Looks 'at Latin America president, stood in the reviewing balcony in the presidential place. Foreign newsmen who were expecting to meet with Papa Doc were told the president could not meet the appointment, as had been promised by government officials. Tourism and Public Relations Director Gerard De Catalone told newsmen Papa Doc was in "very good health" but had been told by his physicians that he must rest. De Catalone indicated Duvalier was the one who decided Jean Claude was to appear at the parade. Jean Claude Duvalier was proclaimed successor-designate by Papa Doc last Jan. 22, after the rubber-stamp National Assembly amended the Haitian constitution lowering the minimum age for eligiblity for the presidency from 40 to 18. This rrove was followed by a referendum, which apparenty approved the action by the president. However, no date has been set for Jean Claude's takeover. Duvalier has said his son would succeed him "When the time comes," It is presumed the time will be when the Haitian ruler dies. URUGUAY Tupamaro guerrillas Tuesday kidnaped Uruguayan industrialist Ricardo Ferres, making him the third political prisoner in their "people's prison." Police officials in Montevideo said Ferres was apparently taken from his car shortly after he left for work at 8:30 a.m. Ferres' abandoned car was found by Montevideo police about five miles from the center of the city with the engine running. Francisco Gonzales Sendig, an official of the Uruguayan Police, said Ferres was threatened last October with kidnaping by the Tupamaros. He indicated three other stolen cars were found abandoned in different parts of the city after Ferres' car was seen. The Tupamaros are also holding British Ambassador Geoffrey Jackson and the president of the Uruguayan telephone company, Ulyses Pereira Reverbal. Uruguayan police Wednesday detained the office manager of the Cuban news agency Prensa Latina in connection with the kidnapings. Police officials refused to make any comments, but there is speculation in Montevideo the arrest was made after a Cuban reporter allegedly interviewed the kidnaped British ambassador. A story of the interview was released by Prensa Latina and given for world-wide distribution. ARGENTINA A leader of the political party which still supports ousted dictator Juan Peron, met with the ex-dictator Tuesday in Madrid, allegedly to confer about Peron's return to Argentina. Peron has been living in Spain for 11 years. He was ousted by the military in 1955. Current Argentine President General Alegandro Lanusse indicated Peron could return to the country and talk over the current political situation with the military leaders now running the country. Lanusse legalized political parties, which had been banned by his two predecessors, Juan Carlos Ongania and Roberto M. Levingston. The new military junta has expressed a desire to tum Argentina over to a civilian government by next year. Peliw. ApeS aU. snMI, s~rwh GAINESVILLE COURSE BEG MON. APRILI800 PM H Y UTH LEARN WHY SELF-HYPNOSIS IS THE MOST POWERFUL AND EFFECTIVE TOOL AVAILABLE TODAY FOR SELFIMPROVEMENT. WRITE OR PHONE FOR FREE BROPJRE INSTITUTE OF APPLIED NVPNOSIS 5445 MARINER STREET, TAMPA, PH. 872-0698 DIAMOND NEEDLES 1/2 OFF9 DURING OUR 5 HOUR SALE TODAY 5:00 PM TO 10:00PM THE FIDELITY SHOP 420 NW 13 St 378-8045 April 19 -25 Horseshow Grounds ALACHUA COUNT-Y FAIR ADMISSION 12 PR-ICE STUDENTS ONLY Come on out and enjoy the fun at the Fair. Lots to do and see with something to interest everyone. Wild rides, special events and many interesting displays. Take advantage of this special offer soon! Regular admission 50 cents. You must bring this coupon to receive the spech4 nasings. Onlyorne coupon per e. So. Leroy VanDyk. and his, Auctineers! Friday and Saturday Nlihts. 7 NOW GOING ONI 20% OFF ON ALL FAMOUS NAME BRAND DRESSES, PANT SUITS, BLOUSES, AND A GROUP OF SPORTSWEAR. NOW GOING ONI' AEW SUMMER WEAR NOW ARRIVING DAILY DOWNTOWN.ON THE SQUARE WE HONOR MASTERCHARGE & BANKAMERICARD 94 I

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Paps,2. The Flortda Alligator. Friday, April 16.1971 Reitz Union planning non-stop entertainment By CAROL BRADY Alligator Staff Writer The J. Wayne Reitz Union will celebrate its fourth anniversary, May 1 with 25 h o u r s of n o n -s t o p entertainment. According to Wesley A. Royal, assistant director of Union Program Activities, the Union will not net any profit that day. Food will be sold at cost. "Mue activities are for the benefit of the students themselves," Royal said. Tournaments will take place throughout the day in the Union games room. Competition in billiards, foosball, checkers and hearts will be held. An arts and crafts display will be set up in the courtyard outside the barber shop. The north terrace will be the site of a flea market from 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. The market will feature student goods exclusively. All outside activities will be conducted by volunteers from J.W. Reitz Union .having birthday celebration on 4th anniversary the College of Physical Education and Health. Events on the Union grounds will include relays and bicycle races. A pitch and putt tournament will run all day. Canoes and row boats will be placed in the duck pond for all frustrated sailors. Rock bands will be featured as part of the day's activities. "Eroica" will play on the terrace, followed by a tape and light show by the "Super Sound Circus." "Southern Comfort" will appear in the ballroom later in the evening. Besides the regularly scheduled feature, "Good-bye Columbus," free films will be shown on the north east corner of the terrace. "Viva Max," "Kelly's Heroes," and 30 minutes of road runner cartoons will be presented. Prizes will be distributed to all winners. A drawing with a grand prize worth $50 will be held at 3 a.m. U.S. Army Corps civil engineer to discuss environmental impact By CAROL BRADY Allgator Staff Writer William K. Johnson, civil engineer with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Hydrologic Engineering Center at Davis, California, will be the featured speaker of a seminar assessing environmental impacts of resource development Monday at 1:30 p.m. in room 1151 McCarty Hall. Johnson is part of a series of seminars entitled "Economics and Decision making for Environmental Quality," sponsored by the Department of Agricultural Economics. Johnson graduated from the University of California, Berkeley with a B.S. in Civil Engineering. He received his M.S. from Sacramento State College. Johnson currently assists the Corps Field Offices in the application of hydrologic engineering techniques. Johnson has worked on various projects in California, including the planning and design of the California Aqueduct. Other ers in the seminar' scheduled speak at later dates include: Dr. Howard T. Odum, U F department o f Environmental Engineering; Mr. Henry Steele, Water Resources Council, Washington D.C.; Mr. Joseph W. Little, College of RAPP'SPIZZA TRAIN 373-3377 376-3354 FAST HOT DELIVERY 2 FREE COKES WITH EACH PIZZA DELIVERED WITH PURCHASE OF MEDIUM OR LARGE PIZZA Pitcher Beer or Coke -99 on premises only) Law; and Dr. William B. Lord, University of Wisconsin Center for Resource Policy Studies. STAK 5SHA KE Student'Special I (With The Coupon) Our Regu ar 934 Steakburger Luncheon And Any 154 Drink S1.08 Value Only 90 plus tax Steak n' Shake L610 S.W. 13th St.-Gaines ville r-------Sebastian's ----r Volkswagen Repairs This Month's Special for V W. Drivers Lube, oil change, clean air & oil filter, and Just clip out dutch and brake adjustment -all for $3.95 this adNormal cost -$11.50 -a savings of $7.55 preetit at Sebastian's 535 S.W. 4th Ave. and take advantage of this special PHONE FIRST WE OFFER TO SHIP YOUR VOLVO HOME FREE FROM THE FACTORY. THEN WE MAKE IT WORTH YOUR WHILE TO DECLINE OUR GENEROUS OFFER. If you take delivery on aVolvo in Europe and drop it off at the Volvo factory in Sweden, we'll ship it to New York, Baltimore or Portsmouth Virginmia for free. This wonderful deal hajust one drawback-you have to drive back to the Volvo factory to take advantage of it. So we offer an alternative: Drop your Volvo off in Amsterdam, Oslo, Bremerhaven, Antwerp, Helsinki, Copenhagen, Hamburg,Bremen, Rotterdam or Stockholm and we'll ship it back for just $120. Which is about one-third of what youtl have to pay if you did it yourself. EitherwayyoushipyourVolvoback,yousavemoneyonit. And either way, you get a car that lasts a long time. We can't guarantee how long, of course, but nine out of every tenVolvos, registered here in the last eleven years are still on the, road. Which means that after three years, you can stop putting your money into car payments. And start putting it into other things. Like more trips to Europe. For afree copy of our Tourist Sales brochure, come in. Harfred Auto Imports Your New Volvo Dealer 506 E. University Ave. Ph 372-4373 BIKEApril 17' 12noon-2pm e Hume Commuter Lot. Cross Campus Rally 5-Man Team Relays Skill Gymkanas Winners in 3 Classes CIunkem 1O Sp S _7onsored by #9rj.-Wpm 3'9"NO~

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Florida Alligator Golfers surge into tourney lead By CHRIS LANE Alligamor Sports Editor Gator golf captain Mike Killian walked off the Houston Altascocita Country Club course after the second round of the All-America Golf Tournament Thursday and stepped into his role of part-time fortune teller. "rm sure the Gators will win it, Texas will be second and I hope Olahoma State is third," he said. That's the way it stands after two days of competition. Gators Andy North, Gary Koch, Jim McQuillian and Killian combined to post a second-day score of 291 to add to their first-day tally of 284 and capture the top spot in the All-America field. Texas is second at 577 and Oklahoma State registered a 579 for third place. Host Houston is fourth, 14 strokes behind Florida at 589. North slammed a three-under-par 69 Thiursday to add to his first-round 70 for a 139 total to trail the medalist berth by one stroke. Texas' George Machock is low with a 138. Koch fired a two-under-par 70 to follow North's pace with a two-day tally of 142. Killian posted a second-round 71 and McQullian added a two-over 74 in the Gator winning effort. "We've all been playing real good golf and nobody seems to be making any mistakes," Killian explained. Assistant Athletic Director Gene Elensos joined the Gators Thursday to filling for golf coach Buster Buihop who had to return to Gainesvife due to a heart attack suffered by his mother. Killian, who started with the host Cougars, wants to even the Seybold top SEC pitcher Gator senior southpaw Tom Seybold is joined by two freshmen in leading Southeastern Conference pitchers with 4-o records. Barry Gaddis of Mississippi and Ricky Rhode of Vanderbilt both registered perfect records. MAKE RISERVATIONS EARL U-5HAULI TRUCKS AND TRAILERS IRA'S GULF SERVICE 707 N.W. 13i 3.373-3541 TH~ REAKFAST SPECvwAL TWO FARM FUSO 54V (Cooked the way you like them) GOLDEN TOAST Jerry 's North. FRESHLY BREWED COFFEE *OPM 24 hm JerWy's Soth 1505 NW 13 St. 2310 SW 13 St. Singles THESES -DISSERTATIONS Singles 4d REPORTS -BOOKS LECTURE NOTES X TH E opy PW,.IB' Tv'i X -8ies to E E .Rd.e*c"t'o R R rnde n .S~pUPR 0 In 5 ENTER_. Study Notes 0 X Colos _TOGRAD SPECs X NEXT TO PASGUALES REST. FREE PARKING IN REAR 31 1718 W. UNIV 376-334 31 I3ReGiz" The clothes tI liE have just arrived in f Ribbed, sheer, poll Corduroy hot panti Blue and white de Ultra light mosaicI Brand.new "arrow Don't wait! now, but these hat will cool you off ime for the hot days ahead: jester knit blouses by SAHARA ONE s by LIVE INS nim hot pants by USAA print blovses and dresses by RAVI DAM shirts" by OUR THING' Our selection is large .items are going fast. ~312 e24 18GW? loamald

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.Oa.-.~ ~, By LEE DEAMLOW Aliptor 5pfor Wrise By the time I arrived to my first football practice, it had been going on for about an hour. The afternoon sun shone down on the two well-manicured fields with a pleasant April warmness. Out on the fields were four clusters of players and coaches, offense in blue, defense in white. John Reaves headed dupeone offensive group, resplendent in his white shoes and dazzlingly clean uniform. He sprinted out, dancing about in the backfield flicking short hard passes to his receivers. Willie Jackson left a three-point stance in a shot, faked inside and then bolted. churning, he glanced back, stretched out his hands and snatched the ball from the air just before he stepped out of bounds. Shouts of encouragement and congratulations followed him as he shuffled back to the huddle. "Attaway Willie! Attaway!" Shortly, one of the trainers held a compressed air horn up in the air and let loose a foghorn-like blast, signaling a break in practice. Slowly the huddles and groups broke up and headed for the sidelines, feet dragging, heads bowed. Long sweat-matted hair appeared on a number of heads as helmets were pulled off. The players trudged over to a cans filled with ice and hiding large quantities of cold Gatorade in cans. Pop-tops we ripped off and the contents quickly drained in silence. A few moments rest and the foghorn blewagain. This time the groups were smaller. Offensive and defensive linemen went off to one portion of a field. On the shrill signal of a coach's whistle they would push off from their stances and crash into one another, grunting and groaning until the whistle sounded again. Over on the other field the offensive backfield and receivers were matched against the defensive secondary and linebackers. The ball would be snapped and the receivers would take off down the field, defenders backing up quickly, keeping one eye on the quarterback and one on their man. When the ball was released, the defensive coaches would start screaming "Ball, ball, ball!" As soon as they saw where it was going, the. whole secondary would converge on that area, trying to get to the receiver at the same time as the ball. Sideline conversations ended and heads were turned as the coaches called "Chris, Chris!" A man was lying on his back and the head trainer, Chris Patrick, darted out to the cluster of coaches around the prorate player. "Who is it, who is it?," somebody whispered. "Buck," someone answered. Richard Buchanan, who had the wind knocked out of him, was helped to his feet and carried, fireman-style, over to the sidelineAction resumed with someone else in his place. About 5:45 p.m., the foghorn sounded for the final time and practice ended for the day. But tomorrow would bring more of ,ie sane. VOLVO: A THING OF BEAUTY THAT'S A JOY FOR MORE THAN 3 YEARS. Harfred Auto Imports 506 E. University Ave. Ph. 372-4373 Hear: playing a dance and concert performance on the South Terrace of Reitz Union immediately following the BICYCLE FOLLIES. Follies run from 12 noon to 2 PM and TRUTH follows from 2:00 PM to 6:00 PM, Saturday, April 17, 1971. Sponsored by the J. Wayne Reitz Union First reaction to football practdse confusing .at season start, fans should.b4raady for scoring Exce We couldn't leave well enough alone The world famous Shure V-15 Type I now has improved trackability in the bass and mid-range registers -with its same redoubtable treble. Result: where, in the past, you may have been required to increase tracking forces to track heavily modulated bass drum, tympani, organ pedal, bassoon, tuba, or piano passages ...you can now play these passages at minimum tracking force, without bass flutter or IM distortion ...and significantly increase record and stylus tip life. $67.50 -L~tin: always upward You can modify your present V-1S Type I1 S You may attain this higher bass and mid. range trackability by installing the IMPROVED VN15E stylus @ $27.00. V-15 TYPE II (IMPROVED) THE FIDELITY SHO 0LBM0N0 fofgsmols fIGm GfEAA$AL& AfthLr~ALro0jN (FORMERLY CAMPUS CONE) NEXT TO FLAGLER INN fANB 0 eNL.NQ SPGIAUtS! THURSDAY THRU SUNDAY: CONES -Any Flavor, Regular Dip -9 COKES -74 HOT DOGS -154 MINI HOT FUDGE SUNDAE -19C FEATURING CHAMPAGNE SHERBERT MADE WITH REAL CHAMPAGNE -WARNING YOU MUST BE 21 OR ACCOMPANIED BY A MINOR OVERFMVORAS VMSDiffe re nt fi elds for different players u

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UF baseball team in tough SEC game By SIM SMITH In the first doubleheader of the season, the Florida Gators will meet the Kentucky Wildcats this aftemoon beginning at 1:30 on Perry Field. Tom Seybold, leading the Southeastern Conference with a perfect 4-0 record this season, will couple with Art Lee in the double-header for the Gators. Kentucky is led by Derek Bryant, who is hitting over .400 this season. The Gators will be attempting to stay close to the eastern division lead in the SEC this weekend in the three game series with Kentucky. The Wildcats are 12-7 on the season while Florida just reached over the .500 mark this week at 12-11. Kentucky plans to start Tom Bannon and Bill Lewis, a pair of right-handed pitchers to hurl two of the three games. John Bowling, a southpaw, will pitch on Saturday in the final game of the series. Coach Dave Fuller hopes for a sweep this weekend to give the Gators some kind of edge before meeting league leading Vanderbilt May 7 and 8 in Nashville. Fridy, Apr 16,1971, Te Forida Al6k Cqge coaches to keep busy Prospects to visit camp Basketball coach Tommy Bartlett and his UF coaching staff are in the midst of a busy recruiting weekend as they will entertain six high school prospects here on the campus. Troy Walker, a highly recruited junior college player from Olney Junior College in Illinois, is the first recruit. Walker averaged 23 points per game and grabbed 17 rebounds a game. "I consider Troy one of the finest sophomores in the country," said assistant coach Bill Henry, who has seen Walker twice this season in action. Craig Turner, a 6-foot-2 guard from Michigan, scored over 400 points in his senior year last year. Turner averaged over 25 points per game with 16 rebounds. A. J. Johnson, 6-5 from O's big three understanding By FRED DOWN UPI Sports Writer Manager Earl Weaver and the world champion Baltimore Orioles' three 20-game winners have an understanding which pays wonderful mutual benefits: he "takes care" of them and they "take care" of hin. The understanding is that Dave McNally, Jim Palmer and Mike Cuellar work on a four-day rotation and it has two great benefits. It means that 1) the three pitchers figure to win 20 games a season and 2) the Orioles probably will wina third straight American League pennant. McNally has tumed in two route-going victories and Palmer and Cuellar one each as the Orioles have won five of their first six games. Boog Powell's two-run homer staked Cuellar to a 2-0 lead in the third inning and a single by Frank Robinson and a double by Paul Blair produced the Orioles' third run in the sixth. Sam McDowell, who yielded all three ROUNDUP runs before departing for a Fritz Peterson, aided by Jack pinch-hitter, was the loser. Aker's ninth-inning relief, The Oakland Athletics chalked up his first victory of defeated the Minnesota Twins the season with the help of a 6-1, the New York Yankees beat homer by Felipe Alou which the Detroit Tigers 8-4, the paced a nine-hit New York Milwaukee Brewers topped the attack. Chicago White Sox 2-0, the California Angels downed the Kansas City Royals 4-1 and the Washington Senators shaded the Boston Red Sox 6-5 in othpr AL games. Reggie Jackson hit two solo homers and pitcher Diego Segui added a three-run homer to pace the Athletics' victory over the Twins. Segui, the AL's surprise earned-run-average leader last season, allowed seven hits, walked three and struck out two. Tom Hall took the loss. Kentucky, averaged over 27 points per game with 14 rebounds in leading his team to a 31-4 record last year. He was named to the first team on the Kentucky State High School team. Two Indiana products are also here this weekend; Steve McCabe and Gary McCooe. McCabe, a 6-5 forward at Ft. Wayne High School, points and 12 rel game. McCooe could forward in the Gato: he stands 6-8 and is "We are pleased fine young men are campus. All of the assets-to our progra said. KING'S CURB COUPC ~ Curb service only 1430 SW. 13th Street Hamburger Platter NGan d r eq. Pe psi $1.10 value W/ Check for King's Royal Treats Big savings everyday -Both location LILLIANS MUSIC ST( Complete Line of Musit. Merchandise FREE Music Literatur 39 years Experience 112 S.E. 1st ST. I FLEETWOOD SKYLINE PEACHTREE HILLCREST MOBILE HOME-2 BEDROOM REG. PRICE $5,971.25 NOW $5,47700 450,5 13fh SfreetPhone 378-1377 CONTNENTALMOBILE HOMES 11

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pril 6, 1971, The Florida Alligator Riley saves Laker shutout -N -N quarter during the 118-107 victory over the powerful Bucks Wednesday night. Now down 2-1 in the best-of-seven game series, Los Angeles hosts Milwaukee Friday night, with the semifinals switching back to Wisconsin Sunday for game No.5. Eleven of Riley's points came in the third quarter, when the Lakers outscored the Bucks 34-22 and moved into a 90-77 lead. With 34-year-old Wilt Chamberlain outplaying Alcindor decisively, Milwaukee was never closer than nine points in the final period. Riley, who hit 11 of18 shots, also turned in an outstanding defensive job on Oscar Robertson, holding him to 11 points. He got his chance to start Sunday after Erickson had an attack of appendicitis. Chamberlain outscored Alcindor 24-20 and had an edge in rebounds -24-19. In addition, he was the defensive factor that his younger rival wasn't. Chamberlain and Riley had scoring help from Gail Goodrich and Happy Hairston, who put in 24 points apiece. Rookie Jim McMillian, who got his chance to start when Jerry West injured a knee in the final month of the regular season, added 18. Bob Dandridge had 25 points and Jon McGlocklin hit 22, 13 in the first quarter, for the Bucks. cers, Stars in deadlock nd. (UPI) ers and Utah even as two The Pacers beat the Stars 120 -107 Wednesday night to deadlock their American Basketball Association Western purists claim g a good thing By MILTON RICHMAN UPI Sports Writer -Let 'em fight. used to do in the old Texas League and you'd be 2ned. .re no more fights. athletes are about as belligerent as the Jall best fights they ever have are with their wives. Jne athlete picks a fight with another you can be 4ings. thing trivial and the guy starting the scrap will ) make sure there's somebody close by to break it no different. "em because they're identifying with the -rs down there on the ice. Watching a half-dozen .w haymakers and trying to pull each other's ieads is much more fun than getting involved in tybe in Vietnam somewhere. sts claim these fights are good things and serve as t. They point out the players are competing in an cks and if there was no outlet for their emotions, rist fight once in awhile, the sport could become agers' fine, productive left wing, was involved in .He was slapped with 22 minutes in penalties in ling case in point in that some people thought he igh when he was with the Los Angeles Kings. bangedd. himself. His first three years he averaged 37 penalty box but this year, purposely becoming player, he served 135 minutes in penalties. Still, self belligerent. a reduction in the number of penalties in ts between Toronto and New York, Boston and is and Minnesota, but any such reduction will 4the shots and you know what they say. Division final playoff at one game apiece. During the regular season, Indiana and Utah met 12 times with each team winning six games but the Pacers managed to win the division title, beating out the Stars on the final weekend of play. Indiana, which dropped the opener of the best-of-seven series Monday night, came back on Billy Keller's 31-point effort to square the series, which now heads to Salt Lake City for the third game Friday night. The Eastern Division final playoff between Virginia and Kentucky gets underway tonight at Virginia with game No. 2 in the best-of-seven series set for Saturday night. ired Dolphs sign Farley MIAMI (UPI) -The Miami Dolphins, apparently tired of losing draft choices to the Canadian Football League, have signed West Virginia linebacker and defensive end Dale Farley. The third round draft choice had been wooed by the Toronto Argonauts, the same club that signed fourth round draft choice quarterback Joe Theismann of Notre Dame out from under the Dolphins. Dolphin officials said they plan to try the 6.3, 245-pound Farley at defensive end. The Dolphins also announced they had signed 11th round choice Vic Surma, an offensive tackle from Penn State, and Bob Richards, an offensive guard from California. 1 14 I s ~ Keg 10.95 to 18.95 Q;.ae 9f2 IVY'S300 PAIR Reg 7.00 to 14.00 Sizes 28-33 only 41GUAS S 4ouq M11~l CARS TRUCKS BUSES SPECIAL ATTENTION TO INSURANCE LAIMS amms UWIOrNe. UU UIIMA.PU4 a iene 36mn2558 sauwayurwssv sm -MsMe aI I INGLEWOOD, Calif. (UPI) Playing as a regular in place of the ailing Keith Erickson, Pat Riley has helped the injury-plagued Los Angeles Lakers avert an expected shutout in their NBA semifinal playoff series with Lew Alcindor and the Milwaukee Bucks. The little-used former Kentucky star scored 24 points-one short of his pro career high -and was the Lakers' catalyst in a pivotal third *Gainesville Tallahassee W. UNIVERSITY AVE. 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By FRED MMANE UPI Sprts Wier The Big Red Machine still isn't in high gear, but it's beginning to click on one cylinder, Johnny Bench. Bench, the most vital part of the Machine's offensive production, collected three hits, including his fourth homer in three games, to pace the Cincinnati Reds to an 8-3 victory over the Atlanta Braves Wednesday night. It was the Reds' third consecutive triumph after four straight losses, and Bench believes the defending National League champions are on their way. "Everybody's been swinging the bat better," said Bench, who had seven hits in 12 at bats and drove in seven runs in the Reds' three-game sweep of the Braves. "We're going to be all right. We Bob Prinz 2nd, 3rd in karate meet By LEE DEHMLOW Afliptor Sports Writer Most poeple spent the Easter weekend peacefully at the beach or in church. Not Bob Prinz, a sophomore and holder of a blue belt in the Japanese self-defense art, karate. Prinz spent the weekend in Jackson, Miss., at the Dixie Nationals Karate Tournament along with 600 other competitors. Competing in two divisions, he plecd third out of 52 in the kata, or forn division, and second in kuniti orsparing. Kata pits one man against a multitude of assailants in a simulated fight with the competitor being graded on his form and style. Kumiti puts individuals of relatively the same ability together to fight it out, points being awarded for punches landed. Trophies were given as well as tournament points for the United States Karate Association's Grand National tournaments to be held in Anderson, Ind. in June, which Prinz, along with a number of other Gainesville karate enthusiasts expect to attend. "There were a lot of people betting that I wouldn't make it to this one," Prinz said, "I have a history of disasters concerning tournaments. One time I fractured my wrist on the way, but this time everything worked out fine," he added. VWOwners Bob Davis, formerly with BuisVW, is now specializing 1W 1 never do roll over and play dead for anybody." In other NL games, Philadelphiaeedged Pittsburgh 6-5, San Francisco nipped Houston 2-1 'in 11 innings, St. Louis defeated Los Angeles 7-1, Chicago at San Diego was postponed because of rain and New York at Montreal was called off because of wet grounds. While Bench had a most productive night, it was Hal McRae's two-run double during a four-run third inning which proved to be the decisive blow. A throwing error by losing pitcher Phil Niekro allowed the first run of the inning to score and McRae greeted relief pitcher Mike McQueen with his double to chase home two runs. McRae later scored on a fielder's choice. The Reds' Tony Cloninger, who registered his fsrst victory of the season, was tagged for a palr of homers by Hank Aaron, his fourth and fifth of the season. Denny Doyle's third hit of the game, a tw run single in the eighth inning, drove in the decisive runs as the Phillies rallied from behind to defeat the Pirates. Dick Selma choked off a ninth inning Pittsburgh rally to preserve the victory for Joe H oerner. Willie Montanez homered for the Phillies and Bob Robertson hit his third of the season for the Pirates. Tito Fuentes singled home Frank Johnson in the 11th inning to give the Giants their sixth victory insight games.Ihe run was set up when Houston shortstop Roger Metzger threw wildly past first base on an Do something nice for yourself., Treat yourself to the hottest new GT car to come down the road in many a year. It's the Datsun 240-Z.the Z-Car, for short. With adjustable bucket seats for attempted double play, allowing Johnson to reach second. Bobby Bonds homered for the Giants and Bob Watson for the Astros. Jim 'Beauchamp and Lou Brock hit back-to-back homers in the fifth inning to spark the Cardinals' victory. -Beauchamp and Brock each collected three hits as they helped left-hander Jerry Reuss to his first victory of the season. two, a giant luggage compartment at the rear, a 2.4 liter overhead cam stormer under the hood and the look of a racing thoroughbred, the Z-Car is something speciaL. Drive a Datsun.then decide. Red Machine clicking ELROD'S AUTO REPAIRS AND SALES 10 ~Discount 0% To Students All Makes And Models -Corvair Specialist Get a Fair Shee .See ELROD Fine Estimaes and Guaranteed Work 1031 SO. MAIN PHONE: 3784,532 t. Fridsi Ap iS, 1 /, 197 ROUNDUP

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fase 23, Frt*V. ApU 16, 1971. The Florkda AllIOWte 'THERE I 2445 Take Ou "Congratulates the Player of the Week Player C COMPLETE T.AKET MENU OPEN DAILY-FROM 11-9 PM S ONLY ONE' S.W. 13 ST. it 378-0946 HR' )f The W eek Your choice of juicy, tender Bonanza steaks, chicken, fish, and our famous 1b. Bonanzaburger -100% beef, French Fries, salad, pickle and chicklets Our steaks areserved with a steaming-hot, buttery baked potato, Texas toast, and a cool, crisp, green salad. Steak Sandwich -1.19 Bunkhouse Special -12 lb. 100% chopped beef Hamburger Rib Eye -6 oz., tender cut steak Steak Sandwich -1.o -.51 -1.19 Sirloin Strip -11 oz., savory, hearty meat, a big seller -2.09 Top Hand -a 15 oz. T-bone for a huge, rugged appetite PLUS OTHERS -a2e 41C It imitates Nature in actuality. Provides direct support to Body and Back. Liv. and Love on Liquid Luxury, an Experience you wil never forget. TIE dB*LIM ~. Ave. Grover Howard This week's Alligator player of the week goes to Grover Howard for his efforts in the triangular track meet in Baton Rouge, La., this past week. Howard, a senior from Macon, Ga., captured both the long and triple jumps and helped the Gators defeat LSU and Harvard in the meet. "It was a real good job turned in by Howard in the meet," assistant track coach Roy Benson said after the meet. "His victories were real improtant to us in the outcome of the meet." Runner up in the balloting was Nick OeVirgilis, whose game saving catch in the eighth inning helped the baseball team defeat Rollins 6-4 this past week. BED SC. ITED Graduation, a time to say goodbye to one type of life and start a new one. Your relatives and friends will went to remember your college life too. We have the novelties for gifts and we have Diplomas of Gratitude for those who helped you through school. For you, we have books to start a new library, official class rings, and graduation apparel. May we help you through this last step to a new life? Come by today MON.-FRI. 90. 9@O0J1L12:00 ~~~1 I 2-75W-