Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

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This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
AH Amuu.

Vol. 61, No. 1 70

1009 Pall
Preview
Edition

War and Peace
War and peace. Ferment and serenity. Hysteria and
placidity. A people united, a people divided Together and
alone.
Life in America. 1 969.
Under the pine and palm on campmrthe same forces of
unitv and divisiveness; the campus is a microcosm of
Life in America. 1969.
Brother against brother, separated by their own
incapacities to love, to understand, to help each other. But,
with knowledge, with faith, we are learning. We will find the
path to peace
Welcome, new ones. Join the cause. Learn. Understand.
Believe. But be ready to yield, to seek a greater spirit of
unit v\_
II I

The
Florida Alligator

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University of Florida, Gainesville

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Friday, August 22, 1969



WELCOME
TO ALL NEW FLORIDA GATORS:
The citizens of Florida, and a series of dedicated, interested
and deeply loyal faculty, staff, students, and alumni have spent
more than sixty busy years in building the University of Florida
on this campus. They built well.
You are the beneficiaries, as well as the trustees for those
who will follow you, of our campus traditions, the lively Gator
spirit, the excellent buildings and equipment (old and new), the
magnificent libraries, a campus the beauty of which is equalled
by few others, and academic standards which demand respect
but are not unreasonable.
The University has been waiting a long time for you. We are
glad you have chosen to join us. Unfortunately, we cannot
accept all who apply. You can take prL in the fact that you
are among the chosen.
In accepting the privilege of being a Florida Gator, you have
assumed an obligation, one that can be discharged only by doing
your best in academic matters, anything less will be too little;
by treating this campus and everything on it as if it were your
own home, which it will be for awhile; by developing and
exhibiting a deep sense of pride in your University; by
recognizing and boosting its strong points while trying
constructively to correct its faults; by helping to preserve and
strengthen our traditions, and vigorously supporting all our
many student activities, including our excellent Fighting Gator
athletic teams, the Honor System, Student Government, and the
many other activities and organizations that exist for your
benefit.
I urge that in your stay here you make it your personal goal
to improve both yourself and your University. All of us here
will help you do both.
[ Sincerely,
z' // Stephen C. O'Connell
U President

Student Guides Race Plane

A UF law student, Don
Miller, will be navigating an
airplane a year older than he is
in an air race Saturday.
Miller, ILW, and W. D.
Thompson will participate in the
Rebels 600 navigator proficiency
race from Atlanta to Santee,
S.C., flying a 1946 vintage
Earcoup single engine plane. The
plane, owned by Thompson, is a
low wing, 85 horse power model
with an open cockpit, and has
been redecorated by the two
men.
In addition to carpeting the
floor, the flyers have
re-upholstered the seats and
revamped the instrument panel.
The race begins Saturday

SALES-SERVICE-RENTALS
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ADD OFFICE EQUIPMENT
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THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekely except during
June, July and August when it is published semi-weekly, and during
student holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official
opinions of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator,
Reitz Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601.
The Alligator is entered as second class matter at the United States Post
Office at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year or S3.SO per quarter.
The Florida'Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which it
considers objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will pot consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the Advertising Manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
more than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
several times. Notices for correction must be given before the next
insertion.

morning when the pilots and
navigators will be briefed on
weather conditions. At that time
they will be informed of the
route they must take to Santee.
They will have to fly to some
point about 250 miles from
Atlanta, land, re-fuel-and then
head to Santee.
The object of the race is not
speed. It is to judge the
competence of the navigator in
determining the amount of fuel
consuemed and the time spent.
Because of the age of their
craft, Miller and Thompson
decided to dress for the
occasion, with long scarfs and
rebel hats. In additon, they plan
to hoist a confederate flag when
they land.

Todays Paoer An Introduclion

This welcome edition of The Florida
Alligator, the largest ever with 112 pages, is
dedicated to freshmen and transfer students
who are entering the University of Florida
for the first time in September.
The paper is divided into four sections,
each describing a different aspect of student
life. The first section contains current news
and editorials, information about several
representative organizations and activities,
and some news stories and commentary
columns from the past year.
The second section is a panorama of the
1968-69 school year in review, containing
the news and Stories about the people who
made the news.
The third section portrays aspects of
campus life, from tears to tubing, from

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OFFERS YOU TWO MEAL PLANS
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, The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 22, igg*

Page 2

smiles to studying, me tost sec,ion views the
world of UF sports during the past year
with a peek at the possible future of oud
athletic heroes.
All together, this edition is designed to
provide an insight into the myriad of activity
and motion that makes up this action
community of more than 30,000 people.
As a start, the picture below preludes the
life to come. University officials and student
leaders have initiated a drive to reinstitute
the defunct freshman beanie to give frosh a
greater sense of identity and cohesion.
Here, Student Body President Charles
Shepherd presents frosh coed Susana Ogilvie
with her beanie, which she will be required
to wear throughout her first quarter here, or
until Florida beats Georgia.



looted.
AlLAwtJum

VoL 61, No. 170

HALE SAYS
New Code
Is Delayed

By HAROLD ALDRICH
Alligator Executive Editor
In an attempt to allow more
time for discussion of several
points of contention, a revised
Code of Student Conduct will
not be placed on the September
agenda of the University Senate.
Vice President for Student
Affairs Lester L. Hale
announced the decision Monday,
apparently anticipating adverse
student reaction to the bid to
place the changes before the
senate as soon as possible.
Hale said the revised code
would not be sent to the senate
until the Oct. 29 meeting, at the
earliest, and then only if the
Student Affairs Committee has
completed its revisions of the
present code.
The committee has been at
work for several months drafting
changes in the current code, as
requested by UF President
Stephen C. OConnell.
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LESTER HALE
stops rush attempt

&KO:M:w?AMASWiWAVAV-rt
Honor Court Seeks 'Clear Channels

(EDITORS NOTE: This is the last of
a three part series about legal
representation for students by Student
Government and other student groups.)
By LEE HINNANT
Alligator Staff Writer
While representation for
students in off-campus courts remains a
disputed subject in Student Government,
the Honor Court hopes to establish clear
and formal channels for students in
Intrjr-university cases.
Jack Klausner, head of the newly
formed Honor Court Legal Aid Clinic,
hopes the clinic will provide formal
channels next, quarter by which students

The
Florida Alligator
THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE NEWSPAPER

Hales action reversed a
statement by committee
chairman Ernest Bartley in a
memo to committee members.
Bartley asked the members to
read the proposed code and
recommend any additional
changes by Aug. 22 so that the
item could be placed on the
agenda of the senates first
meeting in the fall.
Several student leaders,
including Student Body
President Charles Shepherd,
were alarmed by the apparent
rush to get the new code passed
before the student body could
return to school and have an
opportunity to review the
proposed changes.
M arc H. Click, a student
member of the committee and
one of the leaders who asked
4- that the new code not be placed
on the first senate agenda,
expressed pleasure with Hales
decision.
I can appreciate the time
that has gone into these
proposed revisions, Glick said.
But 1 agree with Dr. Hale that
we must take as much time as
necessary to insure that we
create the best code possible.
Glick, who is also majority
floor leader pf the Student
Senate, said he thinks the
proposed code should be
reviewed and commented on by
the Student Senate before it
goes to the University Senate.
An Alligator editorial in
Tuesdays edition condemned
the hurry tactics of the
Student Affairs Committee to
place the new code before the
universitys policy-making body
only seven days after students
returned to school for the fall
term.

can have representation before the
Student Conduct Committee.
The Student Conduct Committee is a
permanent committee appointed by UF
President Stephen C. OConnell to judge
students accused of violating the student
code of conduct.
Thropgh the clinic I hope students
can have the counsel of law students in
any campus dispute, Klausner said.
Klausner said there had not been much
happening this summer. Only four or
five students have come to me with
university problems, he said.
He added that he could not recall any
meeting of the Student Conduct
Committee this summer. But he

University of Florida, Gainesville

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WORKING FOR FRIENDSHIP DOUGCASE

Saying they are tired of waiting for UF's
Friendship Walk to finish itself, these industrious
students got to work completing the walk reserved
only for those who smile and say Hello!" to
everyone they meet on the walkway.

NO MAJOR VIOLATIONS NOTED
Full-Time UF Students
Exempt From Rent Tax

By JOHN SUGG
Alligator Associate Editor
Students enrolled full-time at UF arc not
required to pay sales tax on rented apartments,
according to the State Revenue Commission.
There has, in the past, been some complaint from
students that they were being charged the tax.
John F. McCoy, president of the Gainesville
Apartment Owners Association, said he knew of no
major violations of the law.
We have found, in the past, some people have
been charged the tax who were legally exempt.
However, this is mainly due to ignorance on the part
of the landlords and students.
There are probably sonic people out to gyp
students, he added.
McCoy said there had been some vagueness in the
law that had recently been clarified.
For example, he said, full-time students at

anticipated more action next fall, with
the committee meeting several times to
try students.
The Honor Court Legal Aid Clinic can
also advise students in their appearances
before dorm judiciary councils and can
provide representation if necessary,
Klausner said.
Honor Court Chancellor Craig
Lawrence hopes to formalize routes of
appeal from the dorm judiciary councils.
He mentioned a proposal to Vice
President for Student Affairs Lester L.
Hale that OConnell appoint three law
professors as a permanent committee for
(SEE 'COURT' PAGE 4)

Friday, Auguat 22, 1969, Tha Florida Alligator,

From left are Cheryl Liles, Karen Hosty, Arlene
Pasetti, Marcia Knapp and John Hooker. John is an
AGR and the girls are all Sigma Kappas.
If you'd like to help, call John at 392 1610.

state endowed universities are the only students
exempt under the law.
"Also, there is question of tax for an apartment
where only, one, two or three of the four residents
arc UF students. It was decided that an appropriate
per cent of the rent would be tax exempt for each
student.
McCoy said the policy for determining tax
exemption that most large apartment owners use is
having each tenant sign a notice that they are
full-time students at a state endowed university.
He also said the tax exemption applied to
residents who have lived in an apartment for more
than one year.
The Alligator contacted several students in the
SW 16th Ave. apartment complexes about tax
exemption. However, only one knew anything
about the exemption and that was from signing the
(SEE 'NO' PAGE 4)

I

Friday, jAugust 22, 1969



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CRAIG LAWRENCE
l ... formal appeal routes
.V.v.v.v.v.-.v.v.v.v.v.v.v.v.v.v.v.r.y.% # >

Page 3



Page 4

i. The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 22, 1969

AFTER 17 YEA PS OF PIANNING i.
UF Dnv Care Center Nearina Reality

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M -11 : 1 1 I* -- CHARLES SHEPHERD
.. offers $4,000 to help
v
Court Seeks
Clear Lines
For Appeal
g^TT^I
appeals from decisions of the
dorm judicial councils.
The present routes of appeal
from these councils are not
uniform and are not well
known." Lawrence said.
He said students could appeal
to the law professors either the
severity of the sentence or the
decision itself of the dorm
council.
Lawrence and Klausncr both
stressed that the jurisdiction of
law students is limited to purely
university cases.
Klausncr said several students
had come to him this summer
asking for legal advice in
disputes with landlords. But
law students cant give advice
relating to off-campus cases, he
said.
The SG ombudsman and the
student rights committee of the
Student Senate also are aimed at
protecting the rights of students.
But neither the student rights
committee nor the ombudsman
have any formal power,
according to Bill Armstrong,
chairman of the student rights
committee.
His committee makes
proposals before the senate.
After a resolution is passed
in the senate, we can go to the
administration and tell them of
the resolution, Armstrong said.
We dont really have any
power. We have to bargain with
the administration. But they will
listen to strong resolutions.
This is the way all curfews
except those for freshman
women were abolished last
year, Armstrong added.
The ombudsman acts as a
mediator in disputes, such as
disagreements between student
and landlord, said Student Body
Vice President Charles Harris.
The ombudsman can only try to
persuade both parties to come to
an agreement.
Florida Quarterly
HERE NOW!
at bookstores.

By DON YOKEL
Alligator Staff Writer
A day care center for
pre-school-age married students
children, is almost a reality after
17 years of planning. All thats
needed is the student senate's
approval this fall.
Tcntively scheduled to
open Oct. 1. the center recently
rccievcd the support of Student
Body President Charles
Shepherd who said he would
recommend that 54.000 be
taken from the SO-3 fund an
executive fund and be
directed toward funding this
project.
Support for the center has
also been offered by United
University Methodist Church,
whose directors say they will

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furnish the building space,
janitorial service, utilities,
equipment, and insurance for
the center.
The student senate meets
Sept. 23, at which time, senators
will be asked by Shepherd and
Jerry Yakatan, chairman of the
mayors council for on campus
married student housing, to
okay a line item change which
would fund the project.

No Rent Tax Violations Cited

form given him by his landlord.
Students did express several complaints, mostly
concerning excessive security deposits, which they
feel the owners invest at a profit.
Residents also felt they were charged excessively
for normal wear and tear damage. One student

Yakatan has headed efforts in
recent weeks to bring the day
care center to the UF campus.
* k We would like to operate
this project from profits irom
fees charged parents tor keeping
their children in the center.
The estimated cost tor
keeping a child in the center is
S3O a month, for Monday
through Friday, from 7:45 a.m.
to 5:1 5 pan.

claimed he had been charged $8 for SI drain stopper
he had lost and another said he was charged S 5 for
each smudge mark on the wall.
One student said, It's curious how the damage
they charge us seems to equal our security deposit.
McCoy said there were two sides to the issue.
He said that state law' requires that security
deposits over SIOO be kept in a separate account
which no one can use.

Starting on a limited basis,
only 25 to 30 children will be
allowed to attend the center
which may some day have as
many as 200 children, Yakatan
said.
Admission to the school will
be based on need.
For example, if the father is
in school and the mother is
working, then the family will be
given priority in selection.



'INCREDIBLE PLASTIC MACHINE*
Our Age In A Capsule

By DARCY MEEKER
Campus Living Editor
The Incredible Plastic Machine, opening
tonight at the Center Theater, is a surfing
documentary.
Narration, by an adolescent voice, is very
surfer-slangy and competent, though not
compelling. The same may be said of the content
and photography, though all in all, the films
purpose is achieved a sense of the surfer is
conveyed.
But the real meat of the movie comes at its end,
when the story holding the documentary together
has ended. The best camera work, the best narration
(you forget the voice is adolescent and nasal), the
best film editing all come here which indicates,
that this is the part of the movie its makers
considered the most important.
It is important. It is our age in a capsule. The
whole age, not just the surfers, but the older
generation too: politicians and intellectuals alike.
This strong stuff comes when one of the great
surfers in the sky, who is above contests and such,
is portrayed.
He waits redly beside his board and his dog,
gazing out at the red sea and sky, waiting for The
Wave. His own voice speaks from the sound track.

1,429 Reach End Os Road

Formal commencement
exercises will be held Aug. 30
for 1,429 candidates for degrees
at the end of the summer
quarter.
Dr. Robert Spiro, president
of Jacksonville University, will
be the main speaker for the
ceremonies scheduled for 7 p.m.
at Florida Field. The academic
processional begins at 6:40 p.m.
Candidates include 820 for
bachelors degrees, 381 for
masters degrees and 121 for
doctorates. The juris doctor

Dont Forget Car Title
Oh, the agonies of standing in line just to be turned back because
you dont have that little piece of paper that says you own your car.
And this is what about half of the people who are trying to register
their cars and get their parking decals are experiencing.
Lee Burrows, coordinator of traffic and parking reminded all
faculty and staff members, with the exception of J. Hillis Miller
Health Center employes, that they must show either the current title
or motor vehicle registration certificate to their cars and University
staff identification cards when they register.

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506 EAST UNIVERSITY

degrees has 53 candidates from
the College of Law and 54
expect to receive the specialist
degree in the College of
Education.
During the ceremonies an
honorary doctor of science
degree will be presented to 1968
Nobel Prize winner Dr. Marshall
Nirenberg. Distinguished alumni
citations will be awarded Florida
Supreme Court Justices Richard
Ervin and Campbell Thornal.
Nirenberg, chief of the
Laboratory of Biochemical

The main rule lie lives by, he says, is Never think.
He just loses himself in board and wave and his
body will follow this is not a rule for surfing he
proposes, but a rule for life.
Never think.
Thats all very well in theory, but... Thats too
abstract. Thinking just makes everything all
complicated. In your heart you know hes right. Its
not content of speech that counts, but manner. As a
principle of policy, reason doesnt work; force
works, the exercise of power.
Never think.
Youve got to have faith. The cold hand of logic.
If you understand something, your ideas are
simplistic. Theory just isnt relevant. Just do what
comes naturally, youll be all right.
Never think.
Philosophy is a dilapitated boat that philosophers
keep afloat with bailing buckets. Nobodys
consistent. There are no absolutes.
Never think.
And if ideas dont work (please note that all those
sayings were expressed theories about life and
therefore exhibit the fallacy of self-exclusion),
whats left? Viscera, animal force Delivered by
those who ..
Never think.

Genetics, National Heart
Institute, Bethesda, Md.,
received his bachelors and
masters degrees from UF. Ervin
and Thornal also are Florida
graduates.
UF President Stephen C.
OConnell will preside at the
exercises. Lt. Gov. Ray Osborne
will represent the Florida
Cabinet and Dr. Clarence Menser
the Board of Regents.
President and Mrs. OConnell
will host a reception at their
home for graduates and their
families from 2:30 to 4:40 p.m.
Aug. 30.
The ceremonies are the first
scheduled under the universitys
quarterly commencement policy
setting formal campus-wide
convocations at the end of each
academic period.
In case of inclement weather,
ceremonies will be transferred to
Florida Gymnasium.

Time For A Movie
Center I Fantastic Plastic Machine. Surfing documentary.
1,3:08,5:16,7:24,9:32.
Center II Romeo and Juliet. Derives its value, says
professor, from tension between sentimentality of story, and
bawdiness of puns. 2:03,4:32,7:01,9:40.
Florida Whatever Happened to Aunt Alice, with Geraldine
Page, Ruth Gordon, and Rosemary Forsythe.
Gainesville True Grit, with John Wayne and Kim Darby.
Most rewarding movie of the summer. 8:42 and 12:40. A Man
Called Dagger, with Ken Murray. 11:10.
Plaza I The Great Bank Robbery, with Clint Walker and
Kim Novae. 1:56,3:55,5:54, 7:56,9:58.
Plaza II Run Wild, Run Free, with Mark (Oliver) Lester,
Sylvia Simmons, Bernard Mills.
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Friday, August 22, 1969, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 5



Page 6

i. The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 22,1969

Your Student Activity Fee

Out of your $l5O registration fee, $32.50 goes to Student
Government as a Student Activity Fee to be distributed for student
services and specified group activities which affect the entire student
body.
From this $32.50, which is taken out each quarter, the 80-member
Student Senate works out the budget for the school vear, usually
during the summer term.
Out of the $32.50, the senate is allocated $4.97 with which to use
for Student Government-sponsored projects and groups. The
remainder of the $32.50 goes to already pre-specified allocations such
as health services, althletics, publications, Reitz Union and others
listed below.

$32.50 PER STUDENT
EACH QUARTER
- ;
STUDENT GOVERNMENT $4.97
1 Redistributes this money to funded
MinLti ltd SJ./9 nrnlects
Football and basketball tickets p OJ
Minor sports attendance
ft*' Student Participation in overall
X intercollegiate program Accent7o Intramurals
S HEALTH SERVICES $13.00 .................... Association Women Students Mayors Council
:y lnfirmary services and general Public Functions
X student health care *: milv Mitchell Samson
ft.;.;. REITZ UNION $9.00 __ ft; Camous lmo ovements Speakers Bureau
S-1 All union .cTlvltles r Special Fund ....v.v.-.vj
X ft Course & Teacher Eval. Special Requests ...
X; FEE RESERVE $.20 *X Engineer Fair Spring Arts X
ft; PUBLICATIONS $1 58 A sinking fund for student ID :XftXftX:ft Florida Players Student Govt. Productions
: ft Alligator cards X Gator Band v
ft*.*. Seminole *X Gator Guard Student Senate
X Florida Quarterly Gator Loan Fund Symphony Orchestra v
;X y>:Xft¥:¥:.ft¥:¥:¥:¥:¥ftyft¥:yft*ft*ftft*ft*ft*ft*XvC : Homecoming University Comb. Singing Groups
ft.' Interhall University Religious Assoc.
I I 1

SG: No Games, Just Student Politics

By DON YOKEL
Alligator Staff Writer
Student Government at UF has been
described as being massive, inept,
inefficient, un-representative of the
student, and horrors of horrors
unwanted.
Probably the only word of truth in
the above discretion is the word
massive, for SG will spend more than
$290,000 this coming year on items
ranging from thumbtacks to handball
and tennis courts.
Even though some students believe
they could live without it, the almost
19,000 depend on it for services which
no other group could manage as
efficiently.
SG furnishes the funds and personnel
to bring in outside entertainment to the
campus, arranges the bloc seating plan
for football games and prosecutes those
persons caught cheating, to mention a
few of its services.
*
Without SG, many clubs on campus
would disapear because of a lack of
funds, and in some cases, the lack of a
source to draw leadership from.
The Student Senate, which serves as
the major law making and funding body
in SG, has 80 senators during the regular
school year, who represent then thenconstituents
constituents thenconstituents in academic, residence, and
off-campus areas of the university
By. |
ifgp
MARCH GLICK
... prime mover

community.
Often meeting more than once a
week, the senate is presided over by a
president, who functions in about the
same capacity as the Vice President of
the United States does over the U.S.
Senate.
Senators are elected twice a year to
serve for the entire school year,
however, a senator who cannot be here
during the summer months has an
appointitive replacement for that
period.
The executive branch of SG, has an
elected president, vice president, and
treasurer who serve terms
following the general elections in the
spring.
The student body executive, just as
the executive on the national level,
encourages legislation, formulates
programs, and acts as a catalyst for
organizing campus programs.
< JB-V I
tJHJBHf
JIM ROLL
Student Body Treasurer
Serving under the executive, are
secretaries of minority affairs, interior,
athletics, consumer affairs, academic
affairs, student services, health and
insurance, married student affairs,
organizations, legislative affairs, finance,
and public functions.
Under these offices, help goes out to
Gainesvilles ghettos and the
impoverished in the form of student
teachers. And one office advises the
student of his rights on campus and

Where It Goes, What It Does
Thp hudzet for Student Government for 1969-70 amounts to about
$293,000, B based on the income from the $4.97 per student each
quarter.
Anticipated total expenditures for the 1969-70 school year
amounts about $2 million, wihch is based on the $32.50 from each
Students registration fee. And another $2 million is generated by this
money and is rechannelled into the SG coffers for expanded benefits.
Student Government, then, Is a going concern taking in about $4
million to work with. This money is handled entirely by SG officers
and staffers. No faculty or administrators are involved.
Below are the activities funded with this money.

under the Selective Service System.
The major responsibility of the
judicial branch of SG, is to administer
Honor Court, a student administered
court where cases of cheating and
student conduct are investigated and
adjudicated.
Teams of investigators are sent out
from the Honor Court office to report
back to the court the results of their
findings whenever an impropriety in the
WALT MORGAN
.... Vice President
conduct of a student is reported by
fellow students or faculty.
The court has the power to
recommend suspension of a student
from school for an offense. Often times,
the court in pursuit of witnesses and the
defendent, has combed the state for
testimony from persons who are no
longer enrolled at the university or
residing in the Gainesville area.
Senate committees consist of a
judiciary, student rights, charters,
budget and finance, academic affairs,
charters, excuse, information and
investigation.
Presently there are two major parties
on campus: First Party, which is the
majority party in the senate and the
executive; and Focus Party the
minority party in the senate.
Both parties have a minority and
majority floor leader in the senate
servtng as the partys legislative whip
In recent years, student activists h,

i'jhHl ii
CHARLES SHEPHERD
.... Student Body President
made serious attempts to win elected
seats in the senate and the executive
branch.
Students for a Democratic Society
have led the field to get representation
for affecting more strident rights for the
black and minority group students on
campus.
SDS activities have taken shape in
the Plaza of the Americas, which serves
as a central meeting place for all student
groups on campus.
At the beginning of the summer
quarter, a new organization was formed
which is supposed to take over the
prominent position which SDS has held
for the campus activist the Young
Socialist Club.
Whether this new organization will
try to win a representative position in
SG this year, is yet to be seen.
The organization of minority student
groups into effective political units on
campus has been predicted by campus
leaders as a continuing trend in the
future of student politics at UF.
In the past, the fraternity bloc has
played a major role in choosing the
presidential candidate and vying
senators in SG for elective office, thus
giving the fraternity and sorority
members a bigger voice in SG affairs.
The fraternity bloc will probably
continue to dominate the campus
f>/\l ^ n 11 m a a A



j'
/7m
//ms 7£ *) h) V
OA/ CAMPUs/ / AETJ\
K V K
B B H '**** \i-^J 1 1
2?
" ,

Friday, August 22,1969, Thu Florida Alligator,

Page 7



Page 8

I, The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 22,1969

FORGOTTEN MAN?
Steen Tackles
New Position
One of the best, yet least noticed, Honda
football players the past two seasons has been
Mac Steen.
Coaches have noticed him, however, and his
move from offensive guard to tackle is regarded
as a key to the Gator offensive line hopes for
1969.
Steen responded by coming back from last
falls knee surgery to turn in an outstanding
spring.
The other tackle slot will be manned by another
two-year veteran, Wayne Griffith of Miami, who
turned in the best spring of his career. He is
closely followed by junior letterman Jim Kiley of
Brandon.
Steens replacement is sophomore Dale
Hutcherson of Eau Gallie, smallish at 6-foot-l,
196 pounds, but very quick and tough.
The switch does leave a hole at guard which

A I Hk
K mr l
MAC STEEN
... most underrated?
DAVE HUTCHERSON
... quick and tough

jjfjpfefev & 'M? llji
Century Tower and
pants.
tEtonigatt b 1123 WEST UNIVERSITY AVENUE GAINESVILLE, FLORID^

WAYNE GRIFFITH
.. two-year veteran
£ v
JIM KILEY
... junior letterman

(EDITOR'S NOTE: The football story on this
page is the third in a series on the Gator football
prospects for 1969. The fourth thru ninth parts
can be found on pages 9,19, and 11. See section
'C' for the school year '6B-'69 sports wrap-up.)
might require more changes to fill. Going into
the September practice grid, Gator coaches
believe Donny Williams of Lake City, a converted
linebacker, will be one of the Southeastern
Conferences most outstanding offensive
linemen. He lines up at left guard.
Non-letterman Randy Warbritton of
Jacksonville ranked first at right guard following
spring drills. There is a chance that veteran Skip
Amelung of Fort Lauderdale will be moved from
tight end to this spot, however.
Jacksons Out
Willie Jackson, one of the two Negro
athletes signed to football scholarships this
year, has been declared ineligable to
continue under an athletic scholarship
because of his failure to met SEC
requirements.
Coach Ray Graves said Wednesday,
doesnt qualify for an SEC
scholarship because he didnt make a 17 on
the ACT test. He has decided to remain at
the University and will do so under an EOG
'grant.
The Educational Opportunity Grant
(EOG) is a federally sponsored education
grant.
Jackson and Leonard George are the first
Negroes athletes to sign football scholarships
at Florida, and both are maintaining a 2.0
average in summer school.
Jackson can still become eligible for
Gator football, but he now must wait out his
freshman year before attempting to qualify.

rCorvettesG^n
? Bo Laws of Orlando, has entered two Corvettes in Saturday S
>; nights round robin street elimator at Gainesville Dragway. 5
S [' s cur rently holds the C and D sports natronal marks at 5
S n 34 and 11 55 respectively. Fred Kinney will wheel the 1967 $
S Corvette that carried Laws to his Springnational victory last %
'
; Laws will drive a brand new Corvette Stingray in hopes of :
ji ear nine portions of the $650 purse. Rounding out the Corvette J
:j entrants will be Bob Dance in Professor Fate and Harris
:j Brothers in The Cheater.
Chip Hurlbert will attempt to upset the Corvette threat in his : :
: Chevey powered 4O Ford. Gary Nordstrom teams with Hurlbert ?
: by wheeling a 6l Ford, Tired Iron. More than thirty Sports
: Cars, Gassers and Modified production entrants will compete j
J: during three rounds of wheel-to-wheel racing.
* * '*'* M I
* ,* -****** * *-- * -. *
OUTCAST
If you and your boss are mutual irri irriin
in irriin America youre free to find a
congenial one. We have thou thousands
sands thousands of non-government employers.
But when all industry is nationalized,
/\ri A there's just one employer.
A Inevitahlv, Big Brother assigns you to a
job. a location, even to housing. And if
H P'W vou dont like it, theres no place to go.
Government regulation of industry is
one thing. Government operation of
Wf industry is another. Another step closer
to Big Brother. Already 202 of U.S.
mm electric power is produced by Federal-
F ized systems. Some want to replace or
duplicate the facilities of investor investorowned
owned investorowned utility companies with Federal Federalized
ized Federalized systems. The reasons are obscure.
The reason for opposing any enlarge-
ment of Federalized electric power is
clear to anyone who wants more than
one place to go for a job.
*
Florida's Electric Companies Taxpaying, Investor owned
FLORIDA POWER & LIGHT COMPANY GULF POWER COMPANY
FLORIDA POWER CORPORATION TAMPA ELECTRIC COMPANY



JIM HADLEY
... towering tackle

The interior of Floridas defensive line in 1969 may well resemble
the Mutt and Jeff cartoon strip with the tackles being 6-foot-6 Jim
Hadley and 5-9 Robbie Rebol.
Hadley, a pre-season all-conference pick, is heading toward what
should be an outstanding senior season. The Tampa giant has played
some truly outstanding football for the Gators the past two seasons,
but has been plagued with a series of injuries which have limited his
playing time.

Inferior Line
Looks Like
Hull & Jeff

Head Coach Ray Graves said. There are many boys involved in
providing this cushion against injury, foremost of these being
Valdosta, Ga. sophomore Danny Williams.
Hollywood senior Gunnar Paulson, a non-letterman who made a
major comeback in the spring, backs Rebol. He, too, is but 5-9 and
207, and this former state prep wrestling champion is also quick and
difficult to block.
Alan Cole of Decatur, Ga., another veteran, figures in the picture
and will likely see extensive playing time if healthy.
Another possibility at defensive tackle is sophomore Robert Harrell
of Jacksonville, who worked at tackle and end in the spring. Harrell
starts the fall at end because Gator coaches believe he.is most needed
there, but could quickly switch to tackle should the need arise.

The Whopper
has a new home
at 8 N.W. 16th Ave.
The burgers are bigger at Burger King?
Home of theWhopper.' :

ROBBIE REBOL
... a 5-9 fighter

Rebol is a fighter, who was
alomst good enough to pay at
fullback and asked to be moved
to the line where he believed he
could battle into the lineup. This
the Fort Lauderdale senior has
done. He weighs 209 and is
extremely quick.
Depth in the defensive
interior is questionable, Gator

Punjab is gone but Gator
grid Ray Graves hopes he has a
sequel in Charlie Brown.
Florida fans know the Gators
version of comic strip character
Punjab was 6-foot-7,
255-pound Jim Yarbrough, who
is now playing offensive tackle
for the Detroit Lions.
The Charlie Brown
nickname was long ago stuck on
Guy McTheny of Sarasota.
McTheny played split end last
year and led Florida in pass
receptions with 34 for 347
yards. He played baseball last
.a*.*
I Neely Named f
i: All-American l
%
_


j: Florida tennis ace, Armi :
> Neely, has been selected to
: the 1969 All-American tennis
: team by the All-American :
Board of National Collegiate
:j Tennis Coaches Association, j:
: Director of Athletics Ray j:
: Graves said Wednesday. j:

-

Neely, a Tampa native, :j
made the select squad for the :
second straight year. Neely :
$ was also chosen by his team :
>: as the most valuable player
for the 1969 season as the ji
recipient of the Herman j:
Schnell Memorial trophy :
symbolic of this honor. :
Neely is the first >
$ All-American tennis player at
j: Florida. Neely will attend the :
% UF Law School this fall. : :
:
v.v.**.v.v.

spring and led the team in
hitting to earn all-conference
honors.
The two-year letterman
missed spring training while
playing centerfield and hitting
.323.
Constant film viewing since
the conclusion of spring drills
have just about convinced Gator
coaches that McTheny would
make a better tight end.

Good Grief! Here
Comes Charlie Brown

First-string operator at the
spot is big Skip Amelung of Fort
Lauderdale, but he may be
moved to offensive guard in the
new Gator plans.
This would leave only
sophomore Bill Dowdy of West
Palm Beach ready to play.
Florida coaches dont believe
this provides enough manpower

WHEN A MAN BUYS
A SPORTSCAR
HE BUYS A MANS
SPORTSCAR
..
Jfli;,; n V&jHfa mm
Test drive a real sports car. .. at your Datsun Dealer!
K
BA£m NEWS
DATSUNS FIRST IN C, D, F
Topton, Pa. August 10:
Ray Demerjain of Allentown, Pa. scooted up the Topton
Hillclimb in his C Production Datsun 2000 to capture his
fourth victory in five events entered.
Taking first in D Production in another Datsun 2000 was
Ray Heisey of Harrisburg, Pa. Capturing first in F Production
behind the wheel of a Datsun 1600 was Bill Grabowski of New
York City. The course covered 1.5 miles and varied 530 vt. in
elevation from top to bottom.
SHARP CLINCHES DIVISIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP
IN D PRODUCTION DATSUN 2000
Watkins Glen, New York August 10:
For the sixth time this year, Bob Sharp of Wilton, Conn,
scored an impressive victory to take the checkered flag in a
national champoinship sports car event.
Piloting a Datsun 2000 in the combined C and D
Production race, Shapr outdrove more than a dozen other
Triumphs, Lotuses and Alfas over the rain-drenched 2.5 mile
Watkins Glen Grand Prix Race Course to clinch the Northeast
Division's D Production Championship. He is now assured of a
starting position at the American Road Race of Champions
(ARRC) in November at Daytona Beach, Fla.
Another D Production Datsun 2000 driven by Bob
, Henderson of Rochester N.Y. placed third.
GODDING & CLARK
DOWNTOWN BY THE POST OFFICE
2nd AVE. & 2nd ST. SI.
OPEN TIL 8 PM MON THRU SAT
"HOME OF THE NEW LEADER"

Friday, August 22,1969, Tha Florida Alligator,

for the position.
Dowdy caught eight passes
for 120 yards and scored three
touchdowns for the Baby Gators
last year. He was second-highest
scorer on the team.
Dowdy is a fine young
prospect and should see a lot of
action this fall, Graves said. I
think we are going to need
McTheny at tight end, even if
Amelung stays there.

McTheny brings experience
to the position and one other
important ingredient. While his
4.9 speed in the 40-yard-dash is
better suited for a tight end.
The way defenses are
covering now days you need to
throw more to the tight end and
you need a boy with speed,
Graves said.

Page 9



Page 10

), The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 22, 1969

CENTER HAS STARTED 20 STRAIGHT
Helton Came To Play

While more heavily publicized teammates have come and gone,
Florida center Kim Helton has started 20 consecutive games these past
two seasons, turning in consistently sound football virtually every
time.
Its ironic that one of the most important positions on the team,
center, is perhaps the least noticed by fans or writers, Gator Head
Coach Ray Graves said. They notice when the center misses a block
or makes a bad snap and thats about it.
And many times what appears to be a missed block by the center
actually is somebody elses responsibility.
This is a fate accepted by Helton and centers everywhere. However
the Gainesville senior is philosophical about it.
Ive always wanted to play football, he said. I cant play in the
backfield or end or some place where its more glamorous, but l can
play at center. It beats sitting on the bench or in the stands.
You just have to do the best you can and take pride in knowing
your block helped spring a back on a long run or kept people away
from the quarterback while he completed a pass.
Helton is 6-foot-2, 213 and, barring injury, is a solid first-team
starter at his position, as he has been since he replaced the graduate
All-American Bill Carr two seasons ago. r
BehindVHelton is 6-2, 212-pound Nick Sinardi of Tampa, a
non-letterman veteran who turned in a good spring and is capable of
playing guard or tackle if an emergency should arise.
Sophomore Richard Kensler, Son of Gator offensive line coach Hd
Kensler, waits in the wings and has enough talent to make his presence
felt.

LBs Play Rough

Last season Florida came
close to flat running out of
linebackers. At a position which
badly deeds depth fora 10-game
grind the Gators have not been
able to count on enough able
athletes.
This will be a problem again
this year unless some
sophomores come along to fill in
behind the more experienced.
At least two of the first three
string linebackers are set.
Cocaptain Tom Abdelnour of
Miami will open in the middle
and senior David Ghesquiere of
Pensacola, a standout these past
two years, is on one side.
Junior Mike Kelley of Orlando
opens as top man on the other
side but could wind up with plen plenty
ty plenty of competition early in Sep September.
tember. September.
Coach Ray Graves and his
defensive staff are strongly
considering a possible switch of

SPORTS CARS! GASSERS!
MODIFIED PRODUCTIONS
Round Robin Style
3 Rounds of Hub to Hub
Wheel Standing, gear shifting Action
CORVETTES ROADSTERS
* 40 FORDS * CHEVY GASSERS
2 Rounds of STOCKERS
2 Rounds of SUPER STOCKERS
TIME TRIALS 5-BPM RACES 8:30
drib#
3% Miles north of Municipal Airport on State 225

senior Mike Palahach of
Hollywood from middle
linebacker to Kelley's spot.
I thought Palahach had an
excellent spring, Graves said.
He belongs in the lineup this
fall and wq will likely work him
at outside linebacker.
Graves firmly believes that
with the three-linebacker system
you need at least six linebackers
or five with one man capable of
swinging, playing two positions.
Linebackers are a key to
defense, Graves said. They are
in on more tackles, have much
contact and do a lot of running
on pass coverage and pursuit.
This takes its toll.
Graves thinks four are set and
hopes that junior Brad Powell of
West Palm Beach and
sophomores Gary Kadric of
Bradenton and Eric Taggart of
Decatur, Georgia will be able to
produce the other pair.

KIM HELTON
...least noticed Gator?
Miller-Brown
ONE MILE
NORTH OF
THE MALL 'O'
376-4552
Open til 7 p.m. nightly

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ALL 4 BACKS RETURNING

Secondary Looks Good

In a year of Gator pessimism the only area which
appears encouraging to Head Coach Ray Graves is
the defensive secondary.
The reasons for cheer are self-evident.
In Graves* opinion, the one area in which
experience and know-how is vital is the secondary.
A mistake here can be six points instead of a
few yards, he has often said.
This is an area where teamwork and
understanding are crucial. Fortunately, the
four-deep alignment is the same as last season and
three of the four have played together for two
years.
Keying the secondary is pre-season All-American
Steve Tannen, an exceptionally talented athlete who
can run and jump with the best of them at
comerback. His senior counterpart at comerback is

Larry Smiths Loss Hurts

It is difficult to be cheerful,
Florida Coach Ray Graves notes,
when you have lost the finest
running back in the history of
your school and the number
four rusher in your league.
Thats what happened to the
Gators, when All-American
fulback Larry Smith moved on
to the Los Angeles Rams and
tailback Tom Christian to the
Cincinnati Bengals.
We need proven first team
backs and we need proven
depth, Graves said. You cant
work on much more than that.
When the dust settled after
spring training the new fulback
was junior Garry Walker of
Winter Haven and the tailback
was sophomore Tommy
Durrance of Daytona Beach,
who was spelling the injured
Jerry Vinesett, a junior from
Savannah, Ga.
Behind these three are a maze
of question marks.
Senior Brian Hippos
Gainesville is a capable, often
dangerous runner who has had a
history of chronic injuries and,
as a result, has seen limited duty
for two years.
Mike Rich, a 204-pound
TURN
OFF
SUMMER
auto air conditioning
FlST*..and still Bftt
cost* less than factory air
GODDING & CLARK
MOTORS
2nd AVE. & 2nd St. S.E.
378-2311

sophomore from Dublin, Ga.,
turned in a good spring and is
being counted on for 1969
action, the amount being
determined by continued
progress in the fall. Charles
Hood of Palatka and Harvin
Clark of N?w Smyrna Beach are
also rated good prospects and
should see action.
Clark, who can play several

I taco rancho 1
the "Sandwich Shaped Like a Smile"
I MEXICAN FOODS 1
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the "Sandwich Shaped like a Smile" (r)
OLE! I
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DONKEY UQJ| IS COMING SOON JuSt P St Sm C,ty
.N/.x/.T, vvsr.v 'V V y.n/V .h/

Mark Ely of Tampa, a 4.6 sprinter.
Skip Albury, another senior veteran, is a 4.7 man
at safety and has played the position for two years.
He is a good pass defense man and a rugged,
seldom-miss tackier.
Junior Jack Bums of Tampa had a fine
sophomore year at safety and can fly at 4.7 in the
40. He had a good spring and even at that almost
was beated out by a sophomore Doug Sorenson
of Eau Gallie who came very fast and figures
heavily in plans for the fall.
Adequate depth exists for the first time in years
in John Faix of Miami, Bruce Gunter of Satellite
Beach and Jimmy Barr of Panama City. Faix is a
junior letterman, the other two are sophomores.
We honestly have problems everywhere on
offense and defense, but not in the secondary,
Graves said. This could be our best secondary.

spots, will run at tailback when
not performing at split end or
flanker.
Statistically, Vinesett is the
top returning varsity ground
gainer with 53 rushes for 194
yards and a 3.7 average. Walker
carried 20 times for 63 yards.
Durrance led freshmen ground
gainers with 71 carries for 321
yards and eight TDs.

I _ UF*S REPRESENTATIVES |
-/ Jim Bartlett John Potocki
SffnoeVl aSlCl L George Corl Skip Lujack
I Dan Sapp Arlie Watkinson I
1 Fidelity Union Life Insurance Co. 1636 w. Univ. Ave. 1
I NO WAR CLAUSE 376-1208
MONTESSORI
IS NOW BEING TAUGHT AT
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INSTRUCTORS IN BOTH 2 & 3 YEAR
OLD AGE GROUP AND KINDERGARTEN
REGISTER YOUR CHILD NOW IN
Gainesvilles MOST PROGRESSIVE
PRE-SCHOOL NURSERY &
KINDERGARTEN
SCHOOL HOURS &ML
7:3OAM 6:OOPM
BELLES & BEAUX *
1124 N.W. 39th Ave. 378-5925

Friday, August 22, 1869, The Florida Alligator,

Page 11



Page 12

!, The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 22, 1969

The Florida Alligator
The price of freedom is the exercise of responsibility
\ Dave Reddick Dave Osier
Editor-In-Chief Managing Editor
Harold Aldrich
rvfltcp y\[( ./Wciiffttf Executive Editor

Look Inside, UF Coeds

MR. EDITOR:
Dear Coed,
You were called a whore I
have not seen everything but
from your letter it seems it was a
most underserved title. Yet let
us compare your experiences
with my own, lest we forget that
the Florida Coed is not always a
pure and perfect thing who
innocently becomes involved in
a mans snare of lines and cool,
taken advantage of by his lies.
You were taken for what you

No Emotions At All?

MR. EDITOR:
Then again as another
married student and father I like
to say that Mr. Krakauer from
the department of zoology can
have his future children
according to rational processes. I
just wonder if his wife really
seals the same.
I can see how Krakauer could
get wrapped up in rational
process concepts working in a

Alligator Staff
Mary Toomey u 99
Editorial Assistant Associate Editor
Gayle McElroy Darcy Meeker
Copy Editor Campus Living Editor
Published by students of the University of Florida under the
auspices of the Board of Student Publications.
Editorial, Business, Advertising offices in Room 330, Reitz
Union. Phone 392-1681, or 392-1683.
Opinions expressed in the Florida Alligator are those of the editors
or of the writer of the article and not those of the University of Florida.

The Best Os Don Wright

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could give, then dropped. This
has happened to me many times,
as well as to some of my friends
who are unfortunate enough to
feel as I do. Let me generalize.
The greater majority of the
coeds mainly the best looking
ones, but this is not always the
case, fall for the frat men, the
jocks, and/or the cool studs with
a line more involved than I could
go into in this whole paper. I
have never had a line; I cannot
see perpetrating an involved lie
to a girl. So every time I have

scientific field. But to ask us
believe that human behavior and
family existence is a rational
processes is as ignorant as he
claims we are with children. Id
like to ask him how much reason
he used during the time he dated
his then wife to be. Im sure the
emotional among other things
came into being. Krakauer,
maybe your reasoning isnt
rational after all but just selfish.
HANS-DIETER KIRSTEN, 4BA

lost lost to someone who
does.
He will go out with others on
the side, lie, get everything he
can get for himself, and then
when tired of the game* will
drop the girl. She knows this is
happening, she must, but she is
always there. She enjoys being
treated like dirt, obviously. I
once asked a friend of mines
sister, a Florida Coed, why this
was so. Her answer? You would
have to be a girl to understand.
I have no objection to a girl
who has been taken before if she
will love me, please me, and be
true to me. I would gladly
reciprocate. But no girl will. I
am no stud, no frat man, no
athlete just a run of the mill,
basically honest, hence loveless
Florida Man.
What am I asking? Why is the
coed so worried about these
people? Why wont she give a
sincere person a chance rather
than one date, or worse yet
refuse the date when she finds
out he is not in a fraternity?
Why wont she give him a chance
after dating him for some time,
rather than take his love for
granted and throw him over for
the loveless but exciting sex
world? Or is this what she
wants? Are 99% of all Flroida
Coeds an Emma Bovary? Before
you knock this deduction please
realise that this has happened to
me as well as my friends several
times.
To return to you, my dear
coed, do not cry and blame the
Florida Male. Instead, look into
a mirror and see your own faults
in choosing the one you will
love. We are here in our own
sincere way- you can find us if
you wish. I doubt you will as
few of you with sincere qualities
exist.
ANOTHER FLORIDA MALE

editorial
A Long Road
The road the class of 73 has chosen
to walk is a long one. It is a road strewn
with pebbles of questioning and
boulders of doubt. It is a road hedged
with bigotry. Yet, it is a road paved
with knowledge.
It is a road which will seem at times
endless, but all too quickly will merge
with the thoroughfare of life. At that
point the traveller will realize for the
first time that the road he had been
treading upon was not merely a
side-road, but a threshold, a portion of
his life.
The class of 73, just as the class of
72, the class of 71, and every college
class, must dare to cross the threshold,
and accept the challenge the university
offers.
The challenge is to first find
themselves, then to find others, and
finally, and probably most difficult, to
find their place with them.
During their searching, the class of
* 73 will take part in the eternal magic
that is the University of Florida: Orange
and blue pompoms, Century Tower
chimes, Saturday afternoon football
games, the many parties after, the walks
down shaded paths, visits to Alberts
wire home, screaming loudly at
heart-stopping basketball games,
studying into the early hours of the
morning, those terrible early Monday
classes and those frivolously free Friday
afternoons.
. 'r
All these and much more will be
embedded into the minds of the class of
73.
Welcome to the UF.



FORUM:-^^
C jAiiitt mi 'Oiittit J)
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(EDITORS NOTE: Pages 12 and 13 are the last two pages of the
current news in todays Alligator. The subsequent pages consist of a
recap of the years events.)
' l / \. v

"Speaking Out
Bye, Bye Straight
By Jessica Everingham

This is just to say goodby to
former Alligator Fifth Columnist
Jason Straight and to mourn the
passing of a personality, a point
of view, that is rarely
represented with such defmation
and style.
Jim Holmes, variously Jason
Straight and Peter Sweet (the
latter name covered his
journalist efforts in the ill-fated
University Report) was a
multi-sided figure of
considerable depth.
A stylish dresser kicking a
white Healy betwixt bar and golf
course. Ruddy-faced Beef n
Bourbon man.
Flamboyant, a devils
advocate grating on the cast-ironr
sensitivities of conservative law
school colleagues (Holmes
doesnt belong here, they used
to say. He belongs in
psychology or something) with
infuriating arrogance.

*** 4.^)9^BJJ*
_.- y-w

The Masses Gathered At Woodstock

Shameless promoter,
medicine man. Charlatan,
hypnotist, clown, pulling
everybody into his act.
Act was the word he liked
It wasnt just the column or
myriad productions like the 6B
Gator Growl. Everything was a
running act.
Not everybody bought his
act. Lacks integrity someone
would mumble. Well he didnt
expect them to. When a top SG
politico reffered to him as
pseudo-man Jason laughed his
head off. He had a uniform for
his every cause and inclination
but he wasnt a hypocrite.
He could see himself with
prejudice, act without
self-righteousness. The lack of
self-righteousness made me buy
his act.
Self-righteousness. That
horrible wild-eyed beast that

By HARRY TEA
Alligator Correspondent
*
From the flames the phoenix
rose, amidst the mud, sweat, and
tears. There was much more as
the Woodstock Music and Art
Fair than music and art; what
was there began slowly and built
into a very solid atmosphere of
man helping his brother and
sister to enjoy the freedoms they
as individuals sought.
The masses began to arrive
late Thursday evening and did
not cease coming until Sunday
evening. The majority were from
the New England area, but there
were groups from everywhere in
the States and I talked to people
from England, Canada, and
France. They came and filled the
camping grounds, the roadside,
the countryside; every possible
place one might be able to place
a blanket or sleeping bag was
taken up with people streaming
in to enjoy the three days of

cries out for blood and
repression. It plagues the
political spectrum from left to
right, disintegrating the softer
shades until everything is spelled
out in black and white.
Its hard to get away from
because its taught in the schools
and preached from the pulpit,
sung in the anthem.
But it cramped Jasons style
because he didnt want to get
up-tight.
So, throughout his act, he
teased the prudes and cracked
on the power-hungry politicians.
But mainly he parodied himself,
his peers, his time of life, his
state of being.
An occasional glimpse of
sincerity hurried past but you
had to be quick to catch it
because the next minute Jason
would be pretending that it had
never been there.

_ 11-11 " ii- 'p -]
, a J --- j i
i
it will be your job, Mr. Nixon, to end
the war even though the enemy is stepping
up the fight and refuses to negotiate
honestly. Should you or your iron force fail,
we will deny all knowledge of your existence
in 1972. ...
*

peace and music. By Friday
morning all roads leading into
the area were jammed, They
stayed this way until late
Monday afternoon.
The Exposition started off as
a profit making idea, with the
normal procedure of the selling
and taking up of tickets; but by
11:30 Friday morning the gates
were flung open and it was open
house to all who came. This was
not from a great love of the
masses of humanity that were
flowing into the grounds, but
because the fences around the
listening areas were not up in
time. When dawn broke Friday
morning there were some 15,000
people gathered in the area and
there just wasnt time or enough
staff members available to start
collecting tickets or even think
about clearing the area.
It was a miracle of some size
that the Exposition got off to
any kind of start at all. The
organization did not start
building the ground structures
until just three weeks prior to
the Friday upon which it was all
supposed to start. It was because
of this time limitation that many
of the featured side attractions
were not ready until much later
in the exposition; but amazingly
enough it all came off in its own
raggedy-andy way and by
Sunday the Woodstock Music
and Art Fair, an Aquairian
Exposition was complete.
There has been quite a bit of
adverse press coverage as to the
drug scene, and there have been
rumors of all sorts traveling
wildfire fast as to the vast
discomfort and harsh famine
suffered by all. I stayed for the
entire festival, and I was so
caught up in the brotherhood
and hel pi ng-one-another
atmosphere that 1 took the bad
rain, bad organization, bad
over-crowding, bad hunger, bad
thirst, and all the other bads that
the nation heard about as part of
what we have to go through to
reach the new world we are
seeking.
People came, from
surrounding cities and townships
volunteer medical assistants and
doctors came to offer help, from
Taos, New Mexico, the Hog
Farm commune came with
supplies and personnel, and even
the Army came to the rescue
with aid in the form of medical

Friday, August 22, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

iw
Eastern 502, Runway One, Then
National 301 AFTER Pan Am 103 Which
Follows The Piper, Then United ...

supplies and doctors, not with
guns and bullets.
This was truly a time for
miracles. The New York State
Police were so beautiful it was
very hard to believe they were
state policemen. The
policeman's duty is to keep law
and order, and this they did with
such understanding that only the
uniform kept them distinct from
the immense crowds of young
people that teemed around
them. They were not turning
their heads to what was
happening around them, they
were just trying to keep the
massive waves of humanity that
kept sweeping by them in some
semblence of order. I am sure
there were many policemen who
wanted to do violence, but I feel
it was due to the vast numbers
of people, adverse weather
conditions, and the long hours
these men had to work.
The official estimate of an
attendance of some 300,000 was
a bit off; I talked with both
police and sheriff officials and
they all gave an estimate of
500,000 people, going, coming,
and staying during the three-day
period between Friday and
Sunday. Another miracle was
the fact that only two deaths
were reported during the period
and only one was attributed to
the Exposition. One person was
killed in an accident on the
festival grounds and another
died of appendicitis on the way
to a nearby hospital.
What happened at Woodstock
was like placing the inhabitants
of Tampa into a small area that
is geared to supply the needs for
the residents of a town the size
of Starke. With this in mind I
think the Woodstock Music and
Art Fair could be considered
somewhat of a sucess rather than
a disaster. It gave several
hundreds of thousands of young
people a chance to experience
what it means to be hungry,
thirsty, and discomforted; and
then have a complete stranger
give them part of what little he
has to share. From the flames
the phoenix rose, amidst the
mud, sweat, and tears, there
rekindled a brotherhood that
given the chance will live and
spread from a small town in
upstate New York across our
nation. There was much more at
Woodstock than music and art.

Page 13



Page 14

I, The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 22,1969

University Dames Tea
Scheduled For Sept. 24

The University Dames is an organization made up
of wives of students attending the university. The
university organization is broken down into eleven
individual groups representing the various colleges.
The Dames are sponsored by the University
Womens Gub, which is made up of faculty wives.
Dames promote a spirit of friendliness and social
activities for student wives.
Each individual group offers programs for its
members and General Dames provides a wide
selection of activities covering the academic year.
Charitable activities, such as dressing dolls for
distribution by the Salvation Army to needy
children at Christmas are one function of the
Dames.
Other activities include fashion shows, Easter egg

Women Student Group
Provides Coed Activities

Beginning with a junior
transfer student tea Sept. 21, in
the Towers Commons area
theres a busy year ahead for the
Association of Women Students
(AWS).
Every fall term, AWS holds a
workshop where all interested
coeds can meet and brainstorm
ideas of things they would like
to do. Among ideas for this
years activities is a bridal fair.
More planning will be required
to make it a reality, says Kathy
Waldman, AWS president.
In addition, AWS will host
the regional AWS convention in
early April. More than 500

EASTERN A {)Y)fr
music wwm'
CONTEST
/...worth of musical 1
I equipment to bel Jr
\ awarded the J
VXd The Greatest Battle of the Bands ever to I
/ Sept. \ assemble in the Southeast. Featuring famous
( \ top name bands from throughout the cournty.
I 20, 26, 27 1 The Royal Guardsmen, with their latest hits,
I I The Tropics, We The People, the Nation
1 Oct. I Rocking Shadows, the Split Ends, and many
\ 3 410 11 J many more. Representatives from RCA
V ' y MERCURY, LIBERTY, APPLE, DECCA, and
other record companies will be on hand to judge
the contest.
J. WAYNE REITZ UNION

women students and 60 deans
from all over the United States
will participate in a four-day
conclave on the role of women
in the campus state and nation.
Women students are urged to
consider working with AWS. It is
the only organization
representing all the women
students on the UF campus.
Volunteers are sought for the
many projects which AWS
sponsors.
We on the executive board
want to serve the women on this
campus to the best of our
ability, giving them the programs
they want when they want

hunts for children of students, banquets for
members at the time of their husbands graduation,
and formal and informal dances. In addition, there
are various interest groups, such as bridge, arts and
crafts, physical fitness, and cookery.
The initial kick-off for Dame activities for the
1969-70 year is the welcoming tea at the home of
UF President and Mrs. Stephen C. OConnell Sept.
24. The tea is to welcome the wives of new students
to the university and acquaint them with the
members, activities, and interest groups in which
they may participate during the upcoming year.
All student wives are invited to the tea.

them, Miss Waldman noted.
However, this is virtually
impossible with no feedback
from the student body. We ask
all women students to freely
submit suggestions and ideas on
how we can better our position
on campus and theirs.
As a further service, AWS will
try to place any interested
women student in a position in
student government or any of its
agencies and committees.
The AWS office is located on
the third floor of Reitz Union. A
representative will hold office
hours every day from 3 5 p.m.

Magazine To Debut
The University of Florida Magazine will make its first
appearance September 20. The new quarterly magazine,
published by the UF Alumni Association, replaces the
Florida lumnus Magazine which was mailed to the 10,118
contributors to the Alumni Association.
The new publication will begin its life with a circulation of
60,000, including all alumni, parents of students, students
through housing unit distribution, faculty and administrative
staff, elected and appointed state officials, media
representatives, and others.
Its editorial content will be different as well. The first issue
contains a photoessay on the J. Hillis Miller Health Center
house staff, a profile on a Twin Towers coed, a feature on the
skin-diving researchers of the Communications Sciences
Laboratory, a profile on alumnus Lucius Battle, former
Ambassador to the United Arab Republic and an article by Arts
& Sciences Dean Harry Sisler.
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Action at the annual Sigma Chi Derby is usually
funny but always fun for Sigs and sorority girls alike.
IS^k,:^
Georgia Tech Alumni John Young, a veteran of many
United States space flights including the Apollo 9 Moon
orbiter.

THE SIGMA CHI FRATERNITY

/f /?as been said that Sigma Chi is more
than a college fraternity but a life time
proposition. Thousands of active alumni
are proud to say "I am a Sigma Chi!
Sigma Chi at the University of Florida
is one of the most outstanding chapters of
an outstanding fraternity. Sigs are active
in all phases of campus life; as campus
leaders, in athletics, in service, in
scholarship and in social life.
Come by Number 8 Fraternity Row
and find out why Sigma Chi is such an
outstanding organization. Meet the
brothers, look at the beautiful home of
Sigma Chi and learn why we are so proud
of what we feel we can offer you as a
college man.

- iy '** \v w i Mfa < J.M
Sigma Chi's Homecoming yard decoration last fall took three first place trophies.

-tfwt. 1 9
mk |H fk
Tennessee alumni Tommy Bartlett
has compiled a 55-24 record as Head
Basketball Coach at UF, his team last
year went to the N.I.T.

Gamma Theta Chapter of The Sigma Chi Fraternity
Number 8 Fraternity Row, Phone 372-9260

Friday, August 22,1969, Tha Florida Alligator, I

2h
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Gamma Theta Brother John
McPhail was recently designated the
outstanding undergraduate Sigma Chi
in the world when he was named the
winner of the H.G. Balfour Award by
the national fraternity.

mm f
fjsg IBS
'< i f ySj'VVi $ i;-.
Past University of Florida President
J. Wayne Reitz was a Sigma Chi
alumni from Colorado

Page 15



Page 16

I, The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 22,1969

FOR ORIENTATION
Up, Up And. Away
Theme For Women

By MAGGIE COE
Alligator Staff Writer
Up, up and away ... women students, theres
space for you on the UF campus.
As part of a more personal approach to
orientation, there will be a Campus Life Conference
for Women Students, Sept. 16 at 4 p.m. The space
program provides the Up, up and away theme of the
conference.
In the Reitz Union Ballroom, various women
leaders will deliver short speeches. Included in the
list of speakers are: student chairman of the
conference Linda Mogge, Miss UF Jo Lynn Pijot,
president of Mortar Board Joan Dowd, president of
Savant-UF Jan Dickens, president of Alpha Lambda
Delta Ellen Corenswet, president of Panhellenic
Council Dianne Baron, and coordinator of Womens
Cheerleaders Debbie Moschell. f
Dean of Women Betty Cosby and Assistant
Deans Phyllis Meek and Loyce Katz will speak in
behalf of the administration. Representing the
Housing Office will be Phillis Mable, assistant
director.
Susan Johnson, the first women president of
Interhall Council and Kathy Waldman, president of
AWS are the guest speakers from student
government.
An additional speech will be given by Kathy White,
secretary of the Gator Band.
The special guest of the Conference will be Mrs.
Stephen C. OConnell.
A Gator Pep Band will also be on the program to
help get up spirit for the following Saturdays
Houston game.
Following the Conference students may visit the

ITS A RESTAURANT
ITS A DRIVE-IN
ITS A COFFEE SHOP
ITS A CARRY-OUT
TfS A GOOD TrilNdu
Frisch's is a good thing for breakfast, lunch, dinner and anytime snacks.
But, mainly, its the place where you get your Good Thing" button. Free!
North of the campus at 2035 N.W. 13th Street in Gainesville

booths of all the womens organizations to get
information on the groups that interest them. These
booths will be on the second floor of the Union.
The various stations will feature information
about every college and organizations from the
College of Engineering to the College of Agriculture;
professional and honorary sororities, the Florida
Players and the Cicerones.
At each booth a member of the organization will
be on hand to explain the groups work and
qualifications for membership. Interested women
students may sign up for some groups right on the
spot.
The purpose for these displays as well as the
entire conference Miss Katz said, is to make the
new women students feel welcome and acquaint
them with the opportunities present at UF. I feel
that last years conference was a real success.
The Campus Life Conference for Women
Students in its modern version has evolved from the
defunct Womens Conclave. Much of the credit for
the progress of the conference belongs to Miss Katz
and her steering committee: Linda Mogge, Lynn
Barger, Mary Goodwin, Lois Gordon, Patsy Howell,
Renee Millard, Pat Nichols, Jenny Scrivner,
Prudence Smith, Mary Tunstall, Kathy White and
Annette Wilder.
Using the theme Up, Up and Away, the
Committee and Miss Katz designed the Conference
after the space program. Upon recieving clearance
from Houston they drew up a program using
nomenclature of the program, i.e. ground control,
Mercury, Gemini, Apollo, etc. To make the
Conference authentic Miss Katz journeyed to
Houston to collect official NASA material.

The
THE MEN OF
PI KAPPA PHI
FRATERNITY
CORDIALLY INVITE
YOU TO STOP
BY OUR HOUSE
DURING RUSH
SEPTEMBER 16-21
No. 11 FRATERNITY ROW



Math At Yale
In View For
This Freshman

Z m Z m ZK 9 Z m Z*Z*Z m Z*Z m Z m Z*Z m Z*Z m Z m Z m m 9 m m Z*Z 9 Z*Z*Z*Z 9 Z m Z*Z 9 m m Z m m*m m m m Z m mK!*. 9 .*Z*l m Z m Z!*m*Z 9 m* m m 9^^
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Get the whole family some, by the box, barrel, bucket, or peck, at these new locations in your town:
704 S.W. 2nd Ave./201 S.W. 16th Ave./1021 S.E. 4th Ave.
copyright 1968. AM rights reserved Service mark of Atlontic Company 2 36 g

By DARCY MEEKER
Campus Living Editor
Kiki Gordon started college
two years ago, when she was a
junior at P.K. Yonge High
School. This fall she enters Yale
as a freshman, ready to enter
Yales early concentration
program in Math.
The hours she took (for
example, 11 hours spring
quarter, just before her high
school graduation) do not count
as college credit.
The university lets P.K.
Yonge know we finish the work
in a course, and we get As for
high school work, no matter
how we did in the courses.

Thats all right I guess; it
encourages students to take
advantage of the program, but it
seems to me if you do very well,
you ought to get more credit,
said the green-eyed blonde.
Her speciality has been math
courses, including one graduate
seminar which, she says, was
over her head, but it was fun.
I didnt understand a lot of
it, but it put me in contact with
the ideas and gave me a certain
familiarity with them.
Working at the computer
center this summer, she has been
directing programing for
computer aided education.
Consequently, she is known as
the computer girl.
Im not as good with the

computer as I am in math, but
its very interesting.
Also interested in medicine
(her father is Dr. Richard
Gordon, associate professor of
psychiatry), she is thinking of
combining her three major
interests in the one field of
computer medicine. The field
uses computers to diagnose
ailments.
Doctors cant remember
everything they learned in Med
school, and theres too much
knowledge in specialities, even,
for one man to know it all. The
computer is fed symptoms,
results of tests, and so forth,
then indicates diagnoses or
further tests necessary to really
deciding.

Friday, August 22,1969, The Florida Alligator,

There is experimental work
on this going on now, and
computers are being used to
teach diagnostics to medical
students. I think this work will
really go far.
Os serious countenance and*
truly concerned with finding out
all she can about what shes
doing, Kiki says the most
improtant thing she could tell
freshmen is get to know your
professors. Thats one of the
most valuable experiences
college has to offer.
Did she learn anything from
her older brothers going away
to school at Florida Presbyterian
College? The main thing I
learned is that my family wont
fall apart when I leave.

Page 17



Page 18

I, The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 22, 1969

Florida Quarterly: A Book For All Seasons

Its 90 or more pages of short
stories, poetry, reviews, graphic
and photographic art. Its put
together by a staff of harried
students who work, as yet,
without pay. Salaries, allotted in
an upcoming budget, will
average out to 90 cents per staff
member per week.
But the Quarterly is coming
along.
The more or less laissez
faire student magazine is
published under the auspices of,
but not particularly dominated
by, the University of Florida. Its
contributors range from well
known authors such as Maijorie
Kinnan Rawlings and Ray
Bradbury to unknown students
just starting out in
literary-artistic fields. None are
paid.
UF has had a literary
magazine since the turn of the

FLORIDA

Orientation Week plays I
I GAMES DANCES
MOV,ES frhprliilp off Fvpnft concerts
bowling jcneuuie oi cvenrc billiards
I PING PONG September 10-17 PEP pally
I HOT DOUGHNUTS JAM SESSIONS
t '* ~ ~~ *- . a /'
I GAMES AREA SCHEDULE I WEDNESDAY I THURSDAY I FRIDAY I SATURDAY |
September 10-5:00 PM 11:30 P.M. 10 11 12 13
September 11-5:00 P.M. 11:30 PM.
September 12 -5:00 P.M. -11:30 PM. p.T p. m ?o7 pi."*£TtS
September 13 9:00 AM. 1:00 AM. 4.30 p.m. yoo p.m. on a merry go p.m. "counter- p.m. robin and
I September 14-9:00 AM. -1:00 AM. Movie Terr.ce ,:oo POINT the seven hoods
I September 15 -9:00 AM. -1:00 A.M. THE RIVER ACROSS Game a /^ea SPe<: al ~ p.m"- mJoST 9:00 p.m" MiJn'ghT 9:00
I September 16 -9:00 AM. -1:00 AM. B.lHards Specia, BiiH.rd. Spec.,. Bowling Spec...
September 17 9:00 A.M. 1:00 A.M. Games Area Games Area ? Games Ajea ?
SUNDAY MONDAY TUESDAY
I 14 15 16 17
I Food Special French Hot Doughnuts and Hot Doughnuts and Hot Doughnuts and Open House Potir
I Cuisine Cafeteria 11:00 Coffee The Colonnade Coffee The Colonnade Coffee The Colonnade Union 7-on Band Concert
I a.m. 2:00 p.m. and 8:30 a.m. 11:30 a.m. 8:30 a.m. 11:00 a.m. 8:30 a.m. 11 :00 a.m. 10:00 n m P m Terrace 9:30 p.m.
I 4:30 p.m. 7:00 p.m. P- 10:00 p.m.
I Food Special Latin Food Special Middle Picnic Camp
, Movie Terrace 9:00 American Food East Dinner Cafeteria Wauburg 1:00 p.m. Pe P Rally Terrace
§ p.m. ARABESQUE Cafeteria 4:30 p.m. 4:30 p.m. -7:00 p.m. 6:00 p.m. .. 10:00 p.m. 10:30
I 7:00p.m. Me ? t \ he Brass P-m.
I Bowling Special The Generation Gap: Potter's Wheel nm- "i o"* 7: Yoil
I Games Area The Generation Gap: Part II Terrace 7:30 Demonstration Arts 10 00 p.m. Dance Terrace 10:30
I Part I The Ballroom p.m. 9:00 p.m. and Crafts Center 2:30 pm 12:30
I 7:30 p.m. -9:00 p.m. p.m. and 8:00 p.m. r r . w Tkprpl
I Plain Folk Florida ee Glub Concert Multi-Media Show *>
1 Movie Terrace 9:00 Players Theatre 8:00 Food Special Italian Gran I p.m. FAHRENHEIT P m Food Cafeteria 4:30 pm 10; 00 p.m. P-m. 12:30
I 451 7:00 p.ifi. <4
I Movie Terrace 9:00 P a n ~ Florida Billiards Special
I Billiards Special P- m BLINDFOLD Movie Auditorium ayers Theatre 8:00 Games Area
fj Games Area 7:00 p.m. and 9:00 P m
I Billiards Special pm. GRANDPRIX Bowling Special
1 Games Area Games Area
I J. WAYNE REITZ UNION

During the first
three years,
only three issues
were published
Even then, sales
were terrible.
century, but the Quarterly itself
was begun in the Summer of
1967. The title was at first a
misnomer. In its first three years
the Quarterly found its way to
the stands only four times. Even
then the sales were terrible.
When the present editor,
Jessica Everingham, took over
responsibility for sales, she
found that out of five stores
where the Quarterly was
distributed, only 10 copies had

#4 m \ - h / yip

been sold. Store owners didnt
want them restocked.
So I lied, she says. Instead
of asking them if they wanted
the new issue, I simply told
them that I had come to deliver
the Quarterlies that theyd

ordered. It worked.
Since that time, a year ago,
two more issues have hit the
stands and a third is on the way.
Sales shot way up.
The Quarterly is a departure
from the traditional college
literary magazine. It has made
increasingly greater use of
drawings and photographs. The
past two issues were heavy in art
contest and a portfolio of
photographic art, coming up this
We feel that
photography
is finally coming
into its own.
We want to pay
tribute to it

rail, accounts tor forty of the
magazines pages
approximately half.
We feel that photography is
finally coming into its own and
we want to pay tribute to it,
says Dave Matthews, Quarterly
Art Editor. Until fairly
recently, the photographer was
considered a second class artist.
Now he is taking his place in the
world of art.
The photographs in the
portfolio will be primarily the
work of UF students.
The poetry and prose sections
have also been opened up to
undergraduates.
* The magazine is not a
receptacle for the work of any
writing class nor is it a vehicle
for professors theses. We thrive
on newness, says Miss
Everingham. We want to be
(CONTINUED PAGE 19)



Mag
Taking Hold

PAGE 18^|
read or we wouldnt try to
print.
Some of the Quarterlys
contributors are artists of
considerable prominence.
Among them are William S.
Burroughs, author of Naked
Lunch; James Leo Herlihy, who
wrote Midnight Cowboy, now a
major motion picture; Lawrence
Ferlinghetti, author of A Coney
Island of the Mind; Ray
Bradbury, author of Fahrenheit
451 and Illustrated Man; and
Maijorie Kinnan Rawlings, who
wrote Cross Creek and The
Yearling.
Rod Taylor, a poet who
recently won the Stanford
Writers Fellowship, was featured
in last Winters Quarterly. He
will appear again in October.
John Morefield, who was
once an undergraduate at UF,
won publication in Best College
Fiction in 1964. His story Irises
appeared in the last Quarterly.
Wendell Berry is a nationally
known poet who was collected
in the anthology used for the
American Poetry survey at UF.
He has appeared in the Quarterly
before and will appear in a
poets portfolio this Fall.
Thus far, the Quarterly has
been remarkably free from
universit* censorship. During the
controversy last year over the
publication of a four-letter word
in Florida State Universitys
magazine, the same word went
on sale with the Quarterly
without comment from UF
administrators. The Quarterly
has three independent advisors
who pass on its content.
LIVE
ENTERTAINMENT
CHUCK CONLEY
GUITAR
MON WED
9 0N...
RICHARD PARKER
PIANO
THUR SAT
,ON -^
Alibi
LOUNGE
34th & W. UNIV.
Florida Quarterly
HERE NOW!
at bookstores.

While controversy
raged at FSU over
publication of a
four-letter-word,
the same word
passed in the
Quarterly without
comment
The biggest threat that the
Quarterly faces is lack of money.
The budget is sparse and, due to
sketchy and poorly coordinated
operating techniques of the past,
trust in the Quarterly is only
now beginning to appear.
It has decided to take
tasteful advertising and is
pleading for subscribers, patrons,
donors, and sponsors.
The Quarterly came into
being here to fill a need. Its part
of the responsibility of a center
of learning to its people, says
Miss Everingham.
And apparently its hundreds
of readers agree.

" Alpha pi]t (mega J
J. Wayne Reitz Union University of Florida Gainesville, Florida 32601
To All Freshmen. Men and Women :
/ r
WELCOME!!
" i -A" ' g
From
ALPHA PHI OMEGA
x The National Service Fraternity
If you enjoy working in the service of your fellow students, your school, and your
community, APO needs you!
If you seek fellowship with other service-minded students and opportunities to
contribute your share to the improvement of your academic community, you
need APO!
JOIN THE NATIONAL SERVICE FRATERNITY.
For further information, contact Lou Tally, Box 13173, University Station,
Gainesville, Fla. 32601, telephone no. 392-6029.
.1

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"WE PROPOSE TO BRING YOU THE FINEST IN CAMPUS ART AND LITERATURE"
...Editor Jessica Everingham and Managing Editor Dave Mathews pose for advertisement

Friday, August 22,1969, Tha. Florida Alligator,

Page 19



Page 20

l. The Florida Alligator, Friday/August 22,1969

Floats, Skits, Fireworks
Planned For Homecoming

By ED CROWELL
Alligator Staff Writer
Bawdy skits, fireworks, pretty girls, floats and
football are just a few of the components of
Homecoming 1969. UFs 43rd Homecoming
weekend, beginning with the suspension of classes
Friday, October 17, will climax with the game
against North Carolina.
Homecoming, the biggest event of the fall
quarter for students and alumni, will be centered on
this years slogan, Gators Cheer A Historic Year.
The moon landing is expected to be reflected in
many UF decorations.
The festivities begin with a parade starting at
noon Friday. Over 100 entries including floats,
beauty contestants, and bands are expected to
participate. The parade begins at the ROTC drill
field and continued down W. University Avenue to
Main Street. Estimated crowds of over 70,000 are
expected to line the streets.
Floats are entered by students from various
organizations, dormitories, fraternities and
sororities. It is possible this years parade will be
locally televised.
US. Senator Joseph Tydings will be the key
speaker at Friday evenings FBK banquet. The
senator from Maryland has been an avocate of strict
gun control legislation and has been active in the
ABM controversy. The banquet in the gym will be
attended by 1350 invited alumni, students, faculty
and administrators.
Gator Growl begins at 8:15 Friday night. This
student-produced show has been labled the largest

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UFS 1969 FESTIVITIES

of its kind in the world. Skits traditionally roast
prominent politicos and controversial campus
events. The best four or five skits are chosen by
judges at an often-risque public tryout two weeks
prior to the Growl. Last years skits lampooned
Governor Claude Kirk and UF students
extra-curricular activities.
A fireworks display follows Gator Growl at
Florida Field. An increased fireworks budget this
year promises a better and larger exhibition.
During Gator Growl the 1969 Homecoming
Sweetheart will be crowned. The deadline for
entries is September 25 and the contest will be held
October 5.
Prizes for the sweetheart include a SSOO
scholarship, a Bahamas cruise and a portrait. The
three finalists will also go on a promotional tour
throughout the state.
Alumni events will begin the morning of the
game. An alumni reunion is scheduled for 8 to
10:30 a.m. on the Unions north terrace.
The 1969 Florida Showcase will he held on
the Unions colonnade throughout homecoming
weekend. Each college is expected to present a
display exhibit. There will be several displays
featuring various aspects of student life.
Florida politics will get a thorough lambasting at
the John Marshall Bar Association skits 10:15
Saturday morning.
Students and alumni can eat before the game at a
barbeque held in Florida Gym. The barbeque, from
11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m., costs $2.50 per person.
The big game pitches the Florida Gators against
the University of North Carolina Tar Heels. Game
time is 2 p.m. Saturday October 18.

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BAWDY SKITS, FLOATS, FOOTBALL, FIREWORKS
... and a couple of pretty florida women in action.
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OMEGA
5 e^c nte oil new
students to the
University of Florida



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Last Years
Homecoming
Again Political
Nov. 1,1968
By KATHIE KEIM
Alligator Staff Writer
Bands, floats, skits, pretty
girls, football with Auburn, a
Homecoming Sweetheart,
alumni, more pretty girls ... all
are part of the sights, sounds,
and festivities making up
Homecoming Weekend.
Classes are cancelled
beginning at 12:05 pjn. today,
in time for the Homecoming
Parade to begin at 1 pm.
The UF and Florida A&M
Marching Bands, plus
twenty-four high school bands,
will privide the music for
marchers and onlookers, while
fraternity and sorority floats,
humor entries, and special units
provide color, laughter, and
pre-game spirit.
U.S. Sen. Spessard Holland,
D-Fla., will be the featured
speaker for the annual Florida
Blue Key Homecoming Banquet
at 4:45 p.m. on the main floor
of the Florida Gym.
U.S. Sen. George Smathers,
retiring from the Senate this
year after serving three terms,
will be honored at the banquet.
Both Holland and Smathers
are graduates of the UF and are
former student body presidents.
Mortor Board leadership
honorary for women, will
welcome about 250 women
leaders and guests at its
reception and banquet beginning
at 4:30 p.m. in the Reitz Union.
Mrs. Stephen C. OConnell,
wife of the UF president, will be
an honored guest.
IMPORTS
Factory Trained Mechanics
Largest stock of parts in
North Central Florida
Crane Imports
506 East University 372-4373
Gainesville

Wm m
HERE COME THE GATORS
... ready for football action

/l/facw 3/iet/ieto
,, _i
non-stop color layer upon layer
from hip to toe of smash fashion
Sleek streaks of color that fit like a second Wool pleated skirt in burgundy or navy plaid,
skin. Vanilon opaque pantyhose come on in 5-13. sl6. Dog-ear collared shirt of Dacron- 1
a dozen different shades white, black, char- polyester Avril rayon; gold, brass or navy,
brown, navy, hunter, vintage, camel, char- 5-13, sll. Super-long cable stitch wool
coal, gold, ,ivy, caramel, flame. One size fits sweater, burgundy or navy, 34-40, $lB. All
all, $3 the pair, in Maas Hosiery. from Garlands 69 Campus Collection in
Maas Junior Sportswear.

-'UP : .' Wrg § J&U
*JB| (pp' Jmhl
i i£fc jS9Mik*L*w
WVWIMWIMVWWWIMWWIfMnMMMMMMMAnnAMARMWt
: THE AQUARIUM SOCIETY i
OF GAINESVILLE
JP-^^JT^j:
CORDIALLY INVITES ALL TROPICAL AND MARINE
FISH HOBBYISTS TO ATTEND OUR MEETINGS HELD ON
! THE THIRD MONDAY OF EACH MONTH AT THE |
| UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST FELLOWSHIP ON NW 43RD
| STREET AT 7:30 P.M.
For information call 378-7303 or 372-5767 J
WVWWWWWWWWWWWIfWWVUWWWIMWWW i

Friday, August 22,1969, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 21



!, The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 22,1969

Page 22

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GATOR GROWL FEATURES TALENT
... like this singing duo

I Dames
j H7?//e /f /s frtye f/?af there is a place for everyone in the fraternity system, Kappa Alpha Order has something
I special to offer. The Brothers and Pledges of Beta Zeta Chapter send you a cordial invitation to investigate
j our way of life.
B § ..*. .
|| murphree area
II UNIVERSITY AVENUE
l| QJ C. I. CATHOLIC Ui
1 rr STuoofi Ui
1 f_ UNION Qr
During the construction of our new >-L__l_ 1
j mansion of Fraternity Row, our 1
j temporary home is located at 18 N.W.
|| 17th. Street

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GROWL ALSO INCLUDES SKITS
... some even get pie in the face
I HI INSURED
CLASS
? RINGS
AGAINST
Loss of ring by
theft, robbery,
burglary, or fire
i Loss of stone from
setting
Accidental breakage
'ZjC) Zales Gustonz Charge
&\K) Convenient Terms Available
I ZALES 9
JIWILBRS
Were nothing without your love.
GAINESVILLE MALL



i rvf | nujf**** 1 f w
FROM CBW TO NSA
$ Capsule Look At Summer Events

By ED CROWELL
Alligator Staff Writer
UFs nine weeks of summer
are over.
The 8,392 students enrolled
this quarter have braved the hot
sun on their way to air
conditioned dasses for the last
times. Now the campus is due
for three weeks of quiet before
the influx of more than 21,000
students.
There are 1,492 degree
candidates for this quarter.
Men have walked on the
moon since the beginning of this
quarter. The Student Senate has
been on an economy rampage. A
sl7 million activities center is
planned. And UF is ranked
number one in sexual
permissiveness.
A capsule look at this
summers headlines begins with

Shuttle Bus System
Ready For Fall Start
The shuttle bus system, designed to relieve the traffic congestion
around campus, will start operation Sept. 1, reports Lee Burrows,
traffic and parking coordinator.
The system will provide three different routes, or loops, running to
the lawcomplex, health center, and the main campus. The buses will
run at intervals of five minutes, with routes originating at the parking
lot behind Hume Hall.
Burrows said that the system is designed to get the student and
faculty within primary walking distance of their classes, rather than
transport them from class to class. ..
Because of the system, 40 to 50 parking spaces will be eliminated
around campus to provide space for bus stops.
The Hume lot will have parking space for 900 cars, and will have a
shelter for weather protection.

THE
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for the utmost care in your personal grooming the REITZ UNION BARBER SHOP sponsers many
visit the REITZ UNION BARBER SHOP, 8 student functions such as dances, pic-nics, etc.
well qualified barbers to serve you.
| GROUND FLOOR J. WAYNE REITZ UNION

UF s version of chemical and
biological warefare research
being denied. A national
magazine said UFs College of
Agriculture had been aiding
Elgin Air Force Bases CBW unit.
Agriculture Provost E.T. York,
Jr. denied the report.
On July 1, UF joined the
controversial U.S. National
Student Association by a vote of
the Student Senate. The
organizat was formerly
affiliated with the CIA and SDS.
A clamor resulted in which
conservatives pushed for a
campus-wide referendum on the
issue.
The Student Senate chopped
at the student body budget for
weeks before finally cutting to
zero the funding request of 17
organizations. Manv other
requests were cut substantially
as the senate directed $60,000

back to Student Government on
campus projects.
UFs dream of a huge
activities center and athletic
complex were put into motion
this summer. The proposed
indoor pool, performing arts
theatre, gym, indoor track and
amphitheatre may become a
reality in six years if funds are

The Brothers of
DELTA UPSILON
Welcome You To
The University of Florida
And Invite You
To Visit The
DU House
During Rush
1814 W. UNIVERSITY AVE.

acquired.
A state-wide furor erupted
when the Board of Regents
delayed the granting of tenure to
262 state university system
faculty members. There were
119 UF faculty affected by the
regents action.
The UFs Council of
Academic Deans is keeping their

Friday, August 22, 1969, Tha Plorfda AWigatdr,

meeting-door closed despite
requests to open the meetings to
the public. University Chancellor
Robert Mautz has expressed his
opinion that the meetings should
be open to the press.
And about 8,000 students
dont have as good a tan as they
might like. They spent the
summer in classrooms.

Page 23



Page 24

The Florida Alligator, Friday, Auguat 22, 1969

2 THE CA MPUS u
i \& Campus Crier §MM
£ \ Dv \\ Monday you wish it to appear.
# 1 jj SPONSORED BY STUDENT GOVERNMENT
r "" \
s 7r o r^ Bii>A y y\
\ y\ hp fixities £ u tion n 3 \
\ At 3 3XI This *_ h gr eater \ "If you see me
\ f P sel£' ed^ C tp I YO' 1 £ C an indivi dua h ori iver' \ on campus
\ tnore th a hich roust aSSO ciatt* / aU zing th* l
\ Pr t er into VOf e f eS OP//' r fiU \
\ ,o fioK" "nS.tn 5 1. \
\ sas-suss* ** \
\ au ; £ . ** M \J /n \
\ - \ STUDENT ACTIVITIES
WANT YOU!!

m
UNCLE ALBERT
"

STUDENT GOVERNMENT
Student Government at the University is the
oldest student tradition and is one of the most
dynamic institutions on the University of Florida
Campus.
Among the Activities it provides are the
Intramurals program, Student Government
Productions, which in the past has brought to
campus the Supremes, Fifth Dimension, and many
other performers. Student Government also
sponsors ACCENT, a symposium on vital issues
which has brought to campus such noted speakers as
Richard M. Nixon, Justice William 0. Douglas
Strom Thurmond, Wayne Morse and many others'
Student Government also funds and subsidizes
many of the Student Activities available for you to
participate in and enjoy. Among them are
Homecoming, Teacher Evaluation, the Gator Band
the Campus Singing Groups, Drill Teams
Rathskeller, Spring Arts Festival, Interhall Council
Association of Women Students, and numerous
campus improvement projects.
The Executive Branch of Student Government as
well as all the organizations listed above are
interested in participants and members from the
*

Freshman Class.
We in Student Government and Student
Activities have found these extra-curriculars to be
rewarding and enlightening experiences and we
invite your interest. For information please stop by
Student Government, Room 305, J.W.R. Union,
and ask for the Secretary of Interior.
FRESHMAN COUNCIL
Os particular interest to freshmen is the
Freshman Council.
The purpose of the Freshman Council is to
represent the Freshman Class of the University of
Florida.
Freshmen are elected by each dorm area council
according to the number of freshmen in each area.
Nominations to the dorm area council will be made
by each dorm section which has freshman residents.
The Freshman Council, and many of the
Freshman activities you will be introduced to during
c dentation week, are traditions of long standing at
the University of Florida. They have been continued
to help incoming freshmen achieve an identity on
this campus, and not lose his individuality at a
university of this size.



4
)riMuced by the >
Mjvemment. It
iJAlligator. Any 3
gfizatio wishing
JSKRIER should
i tloom 305, J.
Inflday before the V
I 4*
I

The Student Body would like to express its gratitude to
the following teachers (in this University of 1200 faculty)
who participated in the Teacher Evaluation Program. Every
instructor was invited to participate; these few did so. By so
doing, they have demonstrated an interest in quality
education and a true concern for students and their

Advertising
W.R. Glafke
Architecture
S.S. Korv.
S.
L.R. Grand
Agricultural Engineering
C. Baird
Animal Science
L. Arrington
D. Wakeman
Anthropology
T. Nunez
Agricultural Economics
A.A. Prato
J.E. Reynolds
J.R. Greenman
American Institutions
A. Wells
S. Conroy
S. Walker
P.L. Hanna
G. Osborn
D. Lee
R.C. Shepherd
Accounting
F.M. Cole
W.C. Stone
E. Wood
D. Corbett
D.D. Ray
A.P. I mmelman
Astronomy
F. West
Building Construction
D.A. Halperin
H. Holland
Bacteriology
O.E. Duggan
Botany
D. Anthony
J.S. Davis
Business Administration
J. Wallace
W.M. Fox
Biological Sciences
T. Walker
E. Gourley
Civil Engineering
C.A. Collier
W.H. Zimpfer
T.D. FUrman
R.H. Susag
Schmertmann
Sawyer
Chemical Engineering
A.W. Westerberg
K. Gubbins
M. Tyner

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thank you for caring

Comprehensive Logic
M.L. Bryant
Standley
F. Breeze
W.E. Moore
F.B. Branch
M. Dillon
D. Lee
J. Larsen
E. Holden
P.E. Pastore
T. Carter
F. Sciadini
M. Wolfson
Comprehensive Englfsh
S. Conroy
D. Stryker
J.A. Penrod
W.L. Frazer
B. Walker
W.C. Childers
P.E. Pastore
Chemistry
R. Bruns
J.W. Wiggins
J.A. Deyrup
S. Colgate
M. Vala
Tarrant
J.F. Baxter
Clinical Psychology
R. McGee
Education
C. Gardner
W.M. Alexander
C. Eggert
E. Ambrose
J. Tison
R.R. Sherman
J.M. Newell
R.E. Jester
M. Garber
W. Purkey
M. Cunningham
M.R. Schmidt
D. Lane
D. Stryker
J. Crews
Electrical Engineering
Sheng-San Li
K. Doty
L. Jones
Durling
Environmental Engineering
J.L. Fox
E. Pyatt
English
P. Lisca
J.B. Pickard
J.A. Penrod
S. Long
H.E. Spivey
E-H. Cox
M. New
A.A. Murphree
Childers
Beirne
Carnell

good!

Economics
D.B. Truit
D.T. Geithman
R.H. Blodgett
C. Tigadi
N.G. Keig
W.J. Frazer
F. Goddard
F.L. Connell
R.E. French
LeMoyne
Caravajal
Goffman
Engineering Science
R. Sierakowski
Engineering Graphics
R.E. Stockstill
Fundamental Mathematics
S.G. Sadler
Fruit Crops
W.J. Wiltbank
French
A.B. Marinetti
M.J. Wallace
L. Hodges
Finance
W.M. Fredricks
W.M. Howard
M. Tysseland
J.R. Vernon
J.C. Wassom
M.A. Klaben
F.L. Connell
J.E. Hipp
D. Scott
Food Sciences
H. Appledorf
Forestry
P.W. Frazer
V.D. Cunningham
German
J. Ibarguen
Geography
E. Hegen
C. Cross
R.B. Marcus
L.A. Paganini
Geology
R.A. Edwards
Humanities
T.A. Hart
R. Jaberg
H.E. Spivey
Beirne
C. Carnell
F. Taylor

opinions.
WE APPLAUD THIS.
Research has shown that the classroom experience can he
much more rewarding for the student when the instructor
has this type concern.

History
j.H. Mugar
G. Henry
Industrial Engineering
M. Aliet
M. Padron
J.F. Burns
Journalism
E.D. Yates
H. Davis
G. Butler
J.C. Chance
J. Rossenraad
J.E. Cough
Lindstrom
Latin American Studies
D. Geithman
Law
JiS. Morris
E. Hunt
R. Moffat
E.M. Jones
Library Science
L. Spears
F.S. Smith
McLendon
M. Paulus
Mechanical Engineering
W.L. Freeman
T.D. Neff
V. Roan
F. Schwartz
H.M. ingman
Medical Technology
R. Gould
Management
W. Hill
J. Wallace
W.M. Fox
T.E. Backmeyer
J.B. Ray
D.C. McAneny
W.W. Men ice
Marketing
G. Sims
S. Crossbart
P.B. Dimsdale
R.B. Cook
J. Faricy
Mathematics
E.N. Ferguson
K. Sigmon
D. Phelps
R.C.Jones
V. B. Hearsey
Seybold
A.W. Row
W. Morse

After a prolonged fight with the powers that be, the Gator Beanie,
Florida's oldest tradition, has prevailed. No Freshman should be
without one. Available during orientation at the book store and
information booth. For additional information call Student
Government 392-1665. Sponsored by the Gator Loan Fund.

Music
C. White
S. Teeters
W.R. Bodine
T. Small
Metallurgical Engineering
E.D. Verink
C.S. Hartley
Military Science
G.H. Fair (AF)
R.J. Torre (AF)
O. Butler (AF)
Nuclear Engineering
R. Englehart
Nursing
C. Hayes
D. Hymovich
Martin
E. Mitchell
Occupational Therapy
G. Leppelmeier
Political Science
W.A. Rosenbaum
S. Walker
J. Freels
Pharmaceutical Chemistry
R.H. Hammer
Physical Education
P. Varnes
C.W. Zauner
W.R. Williams
E.G. Crone
R. Allen
O.J. Holyoaf
C.A. Boyd
N.M. Leavitt
Pharmacy ___
R.H. Blythe
E. Voss
Philosophy
K. Megill
G. Standley
J.J. Zeman
Physics
S. Trickey
J.E. Purcell
J.B. Conklin
J.H. Stamper
H. Weller
R. Garrett
T. Bailey
Psychology
S. Margulis
C.M. Zevy
S.M. Jourard
R.V. Anderson
H.Van Deeit

Florida Alligator,

Physical Science
R.B. Marcus
C. Olsson
Pathology
D. Roberts
Real Estate
A.A. Ring
L. Gaitanis
Curtis
R. Boatright
Religion
A. Creel
S. Banks
T. Springfield
R.H. Hiers
C. Carnell
M. Gannon
Required Physical Education
E. Crone
A.C. Moore
I. Waglow
W. Welsch
Y. Thompson
J. Chinnici
Speech
D. Williams
A. Ramirez
Karns
Criddle
Soils
R.E. Caldwell
Statistics
J.T. McClave
R.J. Beaver
T.R. Hoffman
D. Hughes
C. Taylor
R.L. Ott
J. Cornell
P.V. Rao
Sociology
G.A. Watkins
J.S. Vandiver
G. Reiner
B. Gorman
G. Leslie
C. Robbins
J.C. Bridges
Vegetable Crops
B.D. Thompson
V.F. Nettles
Zoology
P.R. Elliott
E. Jones
J.H. Kaufmann

Page 25



Page 26

I, Ttw Florida Alligator, Friday, August 22,1969

Poll Shows
UF Sexiest,
t
Playboy Says

CAMPUS ACTION CHART
SCHOOL AVAILABILITY I ADMINISTRATION CAMPUS I CAMPUS [CAMPUS EXTRACURRICULUM
OF WOMEN AMBIENCE MALE FEMALE
on-campus-off
m/f ratio
1. 0 of Florida, 2-1 Fair Laisset faire; / \ En route to T ~f Action is off campus
Gainesville only (reshmen girls \ £ /V 9 ) the Mail Ave \ / in "sin city" apart
have curlew N, \/ ments; everyone goes
and its not strictly j popular fxJLs to Crescent Beach
enforced course is |f K{+ ] |WIF V ''>^
f Philosophy of \ |
j Uie Body ] jLSHJLJ](
2. Uof 5-3 Poor Permissive; A fj The Age ol Suburban rebel Liberated beyond the Michigan is proto-
Michigan, no social restrictions y\ // Aquarius in a battered wildest dreams of the typical of the changes
Ann Arbor (dorm hours, fryjA. a super MGB r~~Za girls at Bennington on campus trater trateretc.),
etc.), trateretc.), not even charged ijJiSt* and Sarah Lawrence nities are running ads
for frosh girls; J campus for pledges, while an
the house mothers \ \ experimental corn cornleft
left cornleft last year I munal college thrives
n --I -_p
3. San Jose 6-5 Fair Permissive: A loose, strife ( All- Beautiful San Jose is breaking
State College, no hours free campus V J \ American blonde yjHjKjJs out with coed dorms
California girls have IK aA\(\) W bov with ja st ride | and an experimental

Publications Offer 'Real Life Work

During the past years, the y
American Collegiate Press
Associations All-American
rating has become almost
automatic for the Alligator.
A member of the Florida
Collegiate Press Association, the
Alligator is serviced by the
United Press International
regional wire and sports wire.
Staffers of the Alligator have
placed first in the monthly
William Randolph Hearst writing
contest for collegiate journalists
several times since the contest
began eight years ago.
Dave Reddick, 1969 summer
editor, stressed the sense of
involvement that comes from
working on the Alligator.
Only through involvement
in the university can a student
get the most out of his
education, Reddick said, and
one of the best ways to do this is
to work for the Alligator.
Managing Editor David Osier
said that the most important
aspect of working for the
Alligator is what the individual
student learns.
We are here to learn, Osier
said, and what we learn will be
useful in our later careers.
Many Alligator editors and
Cocktail
Party
bOTf Evening
5 to 7
Doubles for
regular pricel
Dancing nightly
£nterlainment
Fri. & Sat.
1 NW 10th AVE.

By DAVE OSIER
Alligator Managing Editor
For all of this campus
seeming serenity and peaceful
piety, there apparently is
another side probably a
clandestine subculture
indulging in rampant hedonism.
Thats according to a
September Playboy magazine
campus action chart which rates
UF tops in the nation in sexual
permisiveness.
Screening 25 schools across
the country, the chart represents
every major demographic area
of the United States.

staffers have gone on to work
for large, respected urban dailies
such as the Washington Post, the
Miami Herald, St. Pete Times
and the Wall Street Journal.
The Se m inole UFs
award-winning yearbook, is
another learning laboratory.
This past year it received the
first-class rating by the
Associated Collegiate Press, and

Center Not On Campus

Gainesvilles suicide
prevention center will open this
fall as a community oriented
project. The center will not be
located in the J. Hillis Miller
Health Center as previously
reported.
Dr. Richard McGee, associate
professor of clinical psychology,
said the center will be a
community service with no
direct UF ties. However, he said,
collaboration will be sought with
several UF departments.

I FINAL CLEARANCE
ALL SUMMER
MATERNITY WEAR
5f1%
VxV N. layaway STOP IN AND SEE
\V\ an Sal. OUR NEW FALL ARRIVALS
M.rchandts. ALL SALES FINAL
\l ChuM l 6 w Univ A ve Charge I
\ Phone 372-3850 f cl n a,
Across From Sonta Fe Jr. ColUg* charge

The chart leads off a Sex In
Academe section of the mens
magazine, just arrived in the
mails Tuesday. The article is
billed as a tripartite takeout on
campus mating mores.
Playboy says the action is
off-campus and that everyone
goes to Crescent Beach to
practice their wanton skills in
courses such as Philosophy of
the Body.
The 25 schools are rated in
descending order of
permisiveness the charts
upper reaches being meccas for
the scholariy hedonist, its lower

is vying for the All-American
rating for this next year.
Among the nations best
college yearbooks, the
approximately 480-page
Seminole is issued every May,
and has been described by
managing editor Jim Okula as a
bridge of the communication
gap between the impersonal
vastness of the university and
the individual.

The center does not yet have
a phone number, but McGee said
when one is available it will be
announced and publicized. The
center will be listed in the
Gainesville telephone directory.
A community advisory board
composed of members of the
sheriffs and Police
departments, city and county
commissions, hospital personnel
and ministers will direct the
center.

depths monastaries for the
sexually meek.
The sexually meek? Last on
the list is Notre Dame whose
male students are described as
hale and homey,
The rating chart makes note
of UFs freshmen-women-only
curfew and points out this is not
strictly enforced. Under the
category of administration, the
policy is described as laissez
faire.
In the same issue the Playboy
sports department, headed by
writer Anson Mount, a visiting
speaker during UFs Accent 69

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last February, was not so kind to
the more athletic gators.
The Playboy sports have;
the Fightin Gators finishing last:
in the Southeastern Conference:
and going three and seven overall:
for the season. j
.
Back in the permisiveness;
arena, Playboy claims that itsE;
rating system is based on a:j
number of variables, some*:
tangible (dorm hoursj
availability of women on and offij
campus, etc.) and some:j
intangible (mood of
students, atmosphere generated?
by the faculty, etc.).



Frosh Orientation Centered In

By DON YOKEL
Alligator Staff Writer
Freshman orientation will
have to wait until next year to
have a tour guide type of format
to try and cater to the individual
student.
Bob Foyle, summer director
of the orientation program, said
Wednesday he will have about
50 students helping him with
orientation.
We had planned on having a
tour guide type of orientation
and registration but are not able
to do it this year. We just didnt
have the time to get all the
people together and trained for
this type of program.
However, there will be over
200 students helping in
orientation this fall, most will be
trained for their job, Don Mott,
assistant dean of men, said
Wednesday.
We want to eliminate the
problem of student
apprehension toward the large
university system.
Early registration has been
completed for freshmen who
i
Reitz Union
Plans Fetes
For Frosh
The Reitz Union is planning
an extensive fall orientation
HOgram for freshmen and
;ransfer students to let them
enow what we have to offer,
iayi Mrs. Pat ONeil of the
Linions student activities center.
The union will sponsor a
lospitality suite for parents
Sept. 10-17. Open from 8 a.m.
to 5 p.m., the suite will provide
refreshments for parents while
the students look around the
union and participate in other
activities.
Food service is planning
special international menus
during the week, including
Mexican, Latin American,
French and Mid-Eastern dishes.
Throughout the week, the
union will show free
movies on the terrace at night
and in the auditorium during the
day. The student activities
center will also sponsor two live
dances on the terrace during the
week.
The Florida Players will
perfonn Plain Folk, a one-act
play. Tickets are free but must
be picked up in advance at the
Constans Theater box office,
adjacent to the union.
Other activities for the week
include a judo-wrestling
demonstration, a day at Lake
Wauburg and a meet the brass
day in the unions Arredondo
Room. UF President Stephen C.
OConnell and Vice President for
Student Affairs Lester L. Hale
will be among the university
officials on hand to greet new
students.
The weeks activities will also
include Generation Gap, Parts I
and II. The first part will be a
faculty talent show, which the
second part will feature student
talent.

could be at the UF this summer.
Those freshmen who have not
registered for the fall, start
registration Sept. 10 or
thereafter depending on the
notice they receive from the
registrars office.
Following registration,
freshmen will meet twice a day
on Sept. 15 and 16 with advisors
in the residence halls for
orientation.
The student will be given an
orientation brochure which has
information on academic
advisement how to fill out the
advisement care and tips on
registration procedures.
But before orientation starts,
the annual presidents welcome
speech will be given at Florida
Field on Sept. 14 at 7 p.m.
Mott said that about 4,00 b
students will attend the event
which will feature speeches by
UF President Stephen C.
OConnell, Vice President for
Acadmeic Affairs Lester Hale,
and student Body President
Charles Shepherd.
The program will last until

(THE WORLD ffl
Let STUDENT GOVQtNMENT PRODUCTIONS
"iisF RT SEBIES Sjm
(Subscribers may choose one date only for the Boston Symphony.) K
College is more than just bdoks. College is an introduction to the
world of people and their cultures; the dances, musics, drama and Wflf'
thought of nations. Student Government Productions will expand your
college experience by presenting the great artists of the world to you.
SGP's Live Arts Series is a chance to save up to 60% on some of the
world's greatest cultural entertainment. Famous opera, ballet, V
Sy Only $8 reserves you special student seats for the six great
performances of the 1969-70 series. Order now and avoid the lines wl JBIMW!
during fall registration. Deadline is Sept 13 for mail orders, but tickets WLh
will be available at registrations lines. You may enclose a stamped, W
X self-addressed envelope with your order, or you may pick up your
\ tickets at the Reitz Union Box Office when you arrive on campus.. ....
\%f. LIVE ARTS SERIES UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA @|[| (
Jp* REITZ UNION BOX OFFICE GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA 32601 l
ENCLOSED IS $ for Subscription (s) at SB.OO each f
1 Social Security No.
\ T~l ENCLOSED IS STAMPED 1 I PLEASE HOLD MY TICKETS I
I [SELF-ADDRESSED ENVELOPE I I AT THE REITZ UNION BOX OFFICE |
SGP will also be presenting three pop shows this year. "Hair may be one
of the first. Some of the top rock groups of the country are also on the list.
We've already had the Fifth Dimension, The Supremes, Man of La Mancha.
What's next?

8:30 p.m., after which students
will be invited onto the field for
refreshments and the
opportunity to talk with
administrators, faculty and
student government leaders.
Following the presidents
welcome, the student religious
centers located at the fringe of
the campus will have open house
for all students.
Students who go through the
process of early registration
wont have to be back on

SG Sponsors Health Insurance

A Student Government-sponsored insurance
program is available to UF students at a special low
rate.
In its 13th year, the program has recently been
revised and updated to bring benefits in line with
rising medical and hospital costs. The result has
been sound medical coverage at very low premiums,
reports Jeff Warren, SGs insurance secretary.
He noted that this years policy, which begins in
September, will include optional coverage for major
medical expenses for a small additional fee.
The policy covers the student from September to
the end of the summer quarter next year. Student
wives and children can also receive coverage under

campus until Sept. 14 for
orientation, and to the
presidents welcome.
This means that students
who register early wont have to
wait around a couple of extra
days for their classmates to
finish registration, Mott said.
The number of freshman are
limited to 2,800 eaver year with
the number of transfer students
increasing and requiring larger
orientation effort every year.

Friday, August 22, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

the policy.
The normal policy provides up to $lO per day
for in-patient care in the student infirmary and up
to $24 per day for care in the university hospital.
Miscellaneous and out-patient expenses will be paid
up to $l5O each.
Also included in the policy are the following:
surgical, $333; consultation, $25; doctor visits, $5
per visit after third visit; anesthetist, S6O;
ambulance, $25; and dental due to injury, S2OO.
Major medical and maternity coverage are
available on an optional basis.
The basic premium for one student is 519.65 per
year.

Dorms

On Sept. 16, at 4 pjm. in the
Reitz Union Ball Room, a
meeting is planned for all
entering freshman coeds for an
information session on the types
of womens organizations on
campus and the services they
offer.
The Inte Fraternity Council
(IFC) will id a smoker and
forum in fn Rathskeller at 5
p.m. on Sept. 16, officially
opening fraternity rush.

Page 27



!, The Florida Alligrtor, Friday, August 22,1968

Page 28

P* thriftily!
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Spinach 2 # J2 29* lUCA NO* X See cool* Go to the movies and see the ice palace
liicodlt tl 2 *XL IS* > n Dr. Zhivago.,. a re-run of Nanook of the North ... or War and Peace, Part 11. p ;;; -?sS'o\ .t>
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- !!- IDEAS No. 3-999: Eat cool, drink cool and be merry! fr.
Tomato Paste . 4 t.V. 59* Refreshing, deliciously cool treats everywhere at Publix--from cold cuts Regular IOC Sheas
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Drape jelly *£ 49* IDEA No. 1000: Let Publix barbecue a chicken and bake beans I Sdlo!
Facial Tissue 2 9* 23* f r y u The Deli has dozens of kitchen-fresh, ready-to-go foods... happily priced. YOUR CHOICE!
Convenient So* HH
Towel **? l< ** r 49 IDEA No. 1001 : Shop cool In cool, pleasant Publix. Take you II ** I
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Drumsticks )b 69* Braunschweiger - 59*
Swift's Premium Tasty
_ t Rath's Black Hawk
Fryer Thighs 69* Sliced Bacon 79*
Swift's Premium Meaty 4
_ Swift s Premium Canned
Fryer Wings 39* Hostess Hams *4**
plus 200 Extra SAH Green Stamps with coupon)

r
PBBLIK \ / EfIABKiTT
Bfgflfig OeOWWPO \_ J /8 A
\Uv "' 1 ' v '('! [I *,j '' S 'V

i
Efil^GreenTtampsP^
With THIt COUtOM
ll <
i
i
Dow Bathroom Cleaner
17 oz. can
J. (lupin. W 4. ** **< J

PIS Btllffi \ / C2MKIIT

Swift's Premium Fully-Cookod Banoloss
Hostess Hams *l 49
Swift's Premium Tasty Slicad

Lunch Meats 49*
(Bologna, Pickle A Pimento. Olive A Pimento)
Kids Love 'Em
Tarnow Wieners VC 55*
Copeland Delicious Slicod
Cooked Ham VC $ 1 29
Cook-Quik Broadod
Veal Steaks *l
Armour's Star Tasty Meaty
Wieners £ 69*
Harmon's Ornngn Bond Roll
Pork Sausage 69*
Fresh Seafood Treat, Bod
Snapper Fillet tb *l 59
Fresh Seafood Treat, Testy
Lake Erie Smelts 33*^
/rs m

GAINESVILLE MALL
2630 N.W. 13th Street

|ill|^GreenStamp s p^
ILambrecht Pizza 1|
with Sausage B Cheese ||
14 oz. pkg. I!
9* (lupins WP *(. ay. ie*f)

pbibiieX /¥me¥F
WBflfiz SaePHB9 \ 1117 re a p&a&etwa

WESTGATE SHOPPING CENTER
W. University Avenue at 34th Street
Store hours 9-9 Mon. thru Fri. 9-7 Sat.

Prices are effective
Thursday Aug. 21, thru
Wednesday noon Aug. 27, 1969 r N
rs;
MO'I. UK <
We reserve
the right to
limit quantities

SWIFT S PREMIUM PROTEN GOVT
INSPECTED HEAVY WESTERN BEEF SALE
Swift'* Premium Boneless
Imperial Roast 99*
Swift's Premium Boneless English Cut
Beef Roast s l*
Swift's Premium Bono-ln
Pot Roast 89 c
Swift's Premium Beef
Short Ribs b 59*
iTI

|s|
IGourmay Coffee Filters 4
24 ct. pkg. |
10. Illyim WW. A. S 17. IM*I I
- j nnnnnnnfinnnnf>sesslV>ensftfir>fts>eesfts*i

Friday, August 22, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

HmsblM /Â¥mcmT
wwessemmes \__j. J n m nuzAsuas

PBBIISX /MASK ITT
wcsau mwhw \_ J ts A wm amaa

lOluU

IfTl EXTRA
["j
Iff Dairi-Fresh Cottage Cheese |
|| 3 lb. cup |
IS l1 m (iMflm W 4, *. it. I***) S
>r Hft w n n naeeeeeeefMMtf>VwMWM>ftftftefteeee**r

Page 29



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

I FOR SALE |
YAMAHA 250 CC. PERFECT: Street
model -4500 m. $450 or BEST offer.
Celt Mike (nights) 378-6431.
(A-st-165-p)
AKC poodles 3 males silver black and
silver beige. Must see to appreciate.
Stud service and poodle grooming.
Call Miss Wiley, 376-4614.
(A-3t-167-p)
1968, New Moon, 12x47, 2
bedroom, air condition, Early
American decor, electric range,
$3600, 372-9601. (A-3t-167-p)
1966 Honda 90cc. Excellent
condition 4000 mi. S2OO or best
offer. Call 378-4654 between 5 and 8
p.m. Helmet included. (A-169-2t-p)
VW-68 European model low
seatbacks 18000 mi. $1450 or besl
offer. Call 2-1433 or contact Village
Park 49. Absent Tue. Wed.
(A-169-2t-p)
WHY PAY RENT 3x40 trailer; with
Bxl6 bedroom addition (2
bedrooms) AC carpeted
clean-attractive $1595 furnished. Call
378-5781 NOW (A-st-165-p)
GunsGunsGunslnventory over
450. BuySellTradeRepair.
Reloading supplies, Custom,
reloading. Harry Beckwith, gun
dealer, Micanopy. 466-3340.
(A-163-ts-p)
SUPER stuff, sure nuff! Thats Blue
Lustre for cleaning rugs and
upholstery. Rent electric shampooer
sl. Lowry Furniture Co.
(A-lt-170-c)
REFRIGERATOR, 2 dr., Coldspot,
Coppertone, 10 yr. old. Great
condition, cross bottom freezer, 15
cu ft, $50.00. Call Mrs. Woodham
392-1689 weekdays, 372-1260 after
5.-30 weekdays and weekends.
(A-lt-170-p)
Going to California Abstract
paintings at material cost $125.00.
378-8595. Jeffery Dann 5:00 7:00.
(A-lt-170-p)
HONDA 160 SCRAMBLER.
Graduating senior must sell; Quick
dependable transportation; only
$250. Call 378-7728 after 2 p.m.
(A-lt-170-p)
For sale Philco console stereo S6O,
living rm. set S4O, dinette S2O,
bedroom set SBO, refrigerator $65,
hanging lamps $lO pr. rug $5, call
376-6744 5 p.m. (A-lt-170-p)
YAMAHA 60 c.c. 4400 mi. with
helmet $l6O . SELMER Bundy"
TRUMPET S9O. Call 376-0126.
(A-lt-170-p)
nn r
Two-bedroom duplex air-conditioned
apartment behind Norman Hall. $125
per month. 1117, 1119, 1125 S.W.
7th Ave. 376-5381, ext. 435.
(B-3t-167-p)
University Gardens Trace now with
two pools and new furniture . two
bedroom apts. from $l6O per month.
Models open daily 9 to 5 p.m.
(B-3t-167<)
Available Sept. (Ist) first, large
comfortable rooms in private home.
Mature students or faculty. See 202
NW 12th Terr. Call 376-5368.
(B-167-3t-p)
COLLEGE TERRACE 1225 SW 1
Ave., adjacent to Univ. Studio Apts
with balcony entrance. Elevator,
Pool, AC, ample parking. Lease now
for Fall, nine mo. min. $187.50 per
qtr. double or $345.00 per qtr. single
occupant. Phone 378-2221.
(B-ts-156-c)

r
johnnel
I GLEN CAMPBELL I
I KIM DARBY I
ir
l iM5
m m Suggested la GENERAL audiences TECHNICOLOR
STARRING
I TfRRY JAM SUEAME
FfItfMINUM MOORE HMf-LANGDON
WMaiWiWInMETBOCOLOHM ,i

| FOR RENT I
Privacy is the emphasis, but w/o the
expense. Gainesvilles newest
apartment idea is LA MANCHA,
nearing completion at SW Bth Ave. &
9th St. Renting for Sept, on
Tuesdays, Wednesdays, & Fridays,
3-5 pm at the site. Ph. 372-5346 or
372-2662. (B-3t-167-p)
UniversityAptsjustnorthof Research 1
Lib.2sizeseff.,2styleslbdrm.and2bdri
m .a lla.c.,swimmingpool,cablet.v.3qtr
. L ea s eQua rt erly ra tesy earl yaverage 75
- 120/m 0.3 76-8 9901536NW3rdave.
(B-12T-158-P)
Sacrifice must sublet Sept, only two
bedroom furnished airconditioned,
pool, luxury apartment $125.00. Call
372-0528 after 6 p.m. (B-2t-169-p)
3-room furn. apt. Available Sept. 15.
Married couples
plus utilities, years lease, no pets.
Call 372-0175, 1830 NW 2 Ave.
(B-169-2t-p)
Rooms for Graduate men & Senior
Men. A.C. & C.H. 2 blocks to
campus. SIBO.OO single; $270
double. Ph. 378-8122 or 376-6652.
(B-2M70-P)
Modern 2 br. Furn. Apt, Central air
and heat, Car port, $l5O/mo.,
Available Sept. 7th, 2014 NW 17th
Way. (B-lt-170-p)
ciiiPJ twowwswwwt;
| WANTED
WwcecwOT.n cc o 8 ca o a fto9's~BjQft x s a Q'C;?
Law student needs male roommate
SSO a mo. for 2 br. ac apt 2 blocks
from campus. Write Elliot Fassy
2528 SW 21st St. Miami, Fla.
(C-lt-170-p)
Camping to San Francisco Need rider
to share expenses Leaving August 30.
Call Dave 376-6087 after 6.
(C-lt-170-p)
Female roommate; s29mo. (inc.
some util.) A.C.; close to campus;
spac. 2 bedroom apt. Call Carol or
Paula 392-7688 or Elaine 392-7689.
(C-lt-170-p)
Coed for own bedroom in modern air
cond. apt. near sorority row. $75.
378-3303. (C-lt-170-p)
Mature graduate student (female)
wishes to rent room with kitchen
privileges or share apartment with
other graduate students. Walking
distance to campus. Willing to
provide Spanish conv. classes and
babysitting. Call 378-4244 after 6
p.m. or write to Maida Watson, Box
224, Balboa, Height, Canal Zone,
Panama. (C-lt-170-p)
ROOMMATE NEEDED f or fall
quarter. Townhouse Apt. at La
Bonne Vie. Available Sept. 15.
SSO/mo. + utilities. Call 376-5015.
(C-lt-170-p)
One female roommate to share Gator
Town apt. with 3 seniors. Rent $45 +
/4 util. Call Sally, 376-7129.
(C-3t-167-p)
Need 3 painters immediately, $1.65
per hour. See Paul Mattison, 708 SW
16th Ave. No calls. (C-3t-167<)
Need 2 coed roommates for fall
quarter. Two bedroom Tanglewood
townhouse, pool. Call Diane or
Teresa, 376-1015. (C-3t-167-p)
Two female roommates needed for
fall quarter in LaMancha. Located
two blocks from campus and have
your own bedroom. Call 3 92-7661.
(C-4t-166-p)
We buy, sell, trade used paperbacks,
magazines, Playboys. Laurents Book
Shop, 1634 W. Univ. Ave., 376-9755.
(C-3t-167-p)
One female roommate for fall quarter
at La Bonne Vie. Call Renee
392-7690. (C-169-2t-p)

Page 30

I, The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 22, 1969

COED roommate needed for one
bedroom Gatortown apt. starting fall
qtr. $l4O for qtr. Call Linda at
372-5246. (C-169-2t-p)
Enjoy the country air! One female
student to share 2 bedroom apt.
$42.50. Prefer grad or settled person.
7 min. from campus. Shirley
378-0367. (C-169-2t-p)
COED NEEDS APT. to share with 3
girls Landmark or French Qtr. for
next year starting fall qtr. Call: Susan
376-2129. (C-st-165-p)
Female Roommate Prefer someone
tidy. Only 3 blocks from campus,
A/c, own room, SSO per month. Call
378-4851. (C-169-2t-p)
Wanted one coed roommate starting
Sept, for apt. across from Tigert.
$45/mo. plus utilities. Call 372-4971
between 8 and 3. (C-169-2t-p)
| HELP WANTED*!
Wanted: Typist. No pay, work with
groovy people, learn the workings of
a magazine. We need your help
whenever you can give it. Pretty
exciting things happen in our office officebe
be officebe part of them. Exercise your
other talents, bring a friend, rap. No
job interview, no hassle. Roughly
10-5 we inhabit our office. Do
something real. Appear at the Fla.
Quarterly 336 Reitz Union.
(E-166-tf-nc)
NOW SHOWING
SATANS SADIST
STARRING:
RUSS TAMBLYN
PLUS
HELLS ANGELS
ON WHEELS
STARRING
ADAM ROARK

| AY O ear f? I
BP THE
ffITIMER GREAT BANK ROBBERY 1
{V£ e^ w h^ e hac k at the bP* TECHNICOLOR PANAVISION FROM WARNER BROS.SEVEN ARTS V3LI
Afc the crazy banditos were shooting at the brick wall, the Chinese l
A* laundrymenguardians of Law and Orderwere taking
turns digging tunnels and washing shirts, while J*
Sister Lyda was taking care of Texas Hanger F |
I Ben uick and the Reverend Pious Blue j* I
: \ had his eyes cast to the heavens... J*
I for a getaway. J*
............w.v.v.. ..
11
SiMhTodMt ,* Mffi -~ in 1 1
I Wldl yourhcartl
I H A. $ I
The brilliant young star oTQLI VER!" in a moving BRING I
human drama you become part of I 6 THE |
family

S£oi/e so/t Safe
OPENS SEPT. 2nd
WE WILL CARRY A COMPLETE LINE OF
* SALT WATER TROPICAL FISH
* FRESH WATER TROPICAL FISH
* FURRY LITTLE THINGS
* REPTILES
* Ripns
PLUS ALL SUPPLIES
Sfen/e jjo/t Safe
GAINESVILLE SHOPPING CENTER
V* Climb aboard #
yThe S.S. Winnjammer* /j
/ Meals served from 11:00 AM to ik
Midnight w)
J Bernie Sher //
f at the Organ on Thursday, Friday & Saturday II
J Oysters & clams on the half shell I*l
Michelob on draft
Steak & Seafoods our Specialty A
Cocktail Lounge til 2 AM Harry Lawton, Manager
Reservations Accepted 520 S.W. 2nd Ave.
Closed Sundays Ay



CLASSIFIEDS

Friday, August 22, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

HELP WANTED
Wanted: Managing Editor for Florida
Quarterly. Interviews now, until I
think Ive found the person. Trial
period of adjustment not only
allowed but demanded. Is literature
or art your thing? No particular
talent demanded but must have
to work hard, be
responsible. Will know everything the
Editor knows, run the staff. Must be
somewhat fluent, capable of poise,
able to organize. Mostly your own
boss. Pay per issue of magazine, if
you are the right one. Start now.
Quit talking about communicating
and put it in print. See Jessica
Everingham, Editor, Florida
Quarterly 336 Reitz Union 10-5.
(E-166-tf-nc)
University Apartments needs
assistant manager no children wife
not working. Call 376-8990.
(E-lt-170-p)
Student Assistant begin Aug. 25th
11:45 1:45. $1.50 per hr. + free
lunch. Work through fall quarter. Call
Mrs. Avery at 392-3701. (E-lt-170-c)
| AUTOS
57 Plymouth, white, clean,
everything works, fair tires. $l5O.
Dave Sheffield 933 S.W. 1 Ave.
(G-169-2t-p)
67 VW Karman Ghia 1495.00 Low
mileage. Local owner. Clean. 67 VW
Square Back 1695.00 Red. Local
owner. Clean. 66 Saab 2dr Special
350.00 Tan Excellent condition. 64
MG Midget 650.00 looks good, runs
good. 69 VW 3400 miles 1995.00
Sun-roof, radio, white, local owner.
68 850 Fiat Spyder 1695.00 Lace
hood, radio. Nice car. (G-lt-170-p)
1957 Austen Healy, 68 engine, new
exhaust system, July tuneup,
line-new tires, toneau, roof, windows.
Fine condition. 376-8416 or
376-5133. Chris. $450. (G-lt-170-p)
1963 Ford Galaxie $450 4 door
power steering + brakes, almost new
engine + tires, needs new radiator,
8-5 p.m. 392-2911, after 5 p.m.
378-5641. (G-lt-170-p)
| PERSONAL
Happening Saturday 9-5 the biggest
sale of the year tapes, records, car
tape player, tape recorder, surfboard,
pipes, countless other goodies. Come
by and have a look. Landmark apt.
62. Bring your bathing suit too.
(J-15-170-p)
Need one rider/driver to Seattle, San
Francisco, or Los Angeles. Only $25,
drive straight thru to LA. Leave Aug.
26 morning. Barb 376-8524.
(J-lt-170-p)
FREE! My owners are
leaving . beautiful, loveable,
spaded cat. Equipped with box and
litter; call evenings 378-8481.
(J-lt-170-p)
Female companion to Portland Org.
No expense. Call Bill 378-3735
before Thurs. 28. (J-lt-170-p)
If you missed Woodstock you dont
have to miss Dallas, Harry Tea Tours
is going to this most groovy of
gatherings, full ticket and tour info
now yours for the asking at the
Record Bar 923 W. Univ. Ave. or call
372-0976 antime. (J-lt-170-p)
Graduating male, moving to Atlanta.
Need roommate to share apartment
and expenses. Contact Bob, 1111-27
16th Ave., 378-8518. (J-3t-167-p)
TRUCK to MIAMI via TAMPA. Will
take your trunks, boxes, cycles, etc.
after finals. Door to Door. Very
reasonable. Call Jim, 378-8625
(J-3t-167-p)
SIRVICIK 1
RAYS Style and Barber Shop
Weekdays 9:00-6:00 and Saturdays
until 5. 1125 W. University Ave.
Phone 372-3678 for appointments.
(M-lst-156-p)
BOWLING
WEEK-END
SPECIAL
Sat. 9am-6pm
All day Sunday
3 *7 SI.OO
35c per game
REITZ UNION GAMES AREA

SERVICES 1
V
Tennis Racket restringing fr*a pickup
and delivery on and near campus.
Cat! 378-2489. (M-ts-155-p)
PET and GARDEN SHOPPE 4201
NW 16 Blvd. Tropical fish, reptiles,
Parrots Pet supplies and Indoor
Plants. (M-lt-170-p)
HORSEBACK RIDING
HAYRIDES PARTIES!!! S.E. 15th
St. Cowboy riding stables 372-8460.
(M-3t-166-p)
My office is small. My business Is
new. Parking is terrible but youll be
glad you came. Buy your next
eyeglasses at University Opticians
519*/2 SW 4th Ave. Next to
Greyhound Bus Station. (M-155-ts-c)
Alternators Generators Starters
Electrical systems tested repairs
Auto Electrical Service. 603 SE 2nd
St. 378-7330. (M-ts-157-c)
*ssssssssssssssssssss,
S II £
s M_ g
I4u£l
inPs
g gator S
3 ADVERTISERS £
$ FOR THE g
£ BEST BUYS! £
ssssssssssssssssssss£

TAKE THE 30 MINUTE DRIVE AND
SAVE!
I FLORIDA
"SOONER OR LA TER YOUR FA VORITE DEALER
HOURS
WEEKDAYS BAM 6PM
SATURDAY BAM IPM
GAINESVILLE PHONE 372-0103 ANYTIME BY APPOINTMENT
1 VV \ LUNCH & DINNER |§
Wk SPECIALS H
H MONBAKED MACARONI |§
H & MEAT SAUCE 79$ Ilf
H TUES-FRIED CHICKEN 99$ §§
Hi (ALL YOU CARE TO EAT) fgl
H WED-JUMBO CHOPPED j§
m STEAK 63 B§g WITH MUSHROOM GRAVY ||g
AND YELLOW RICE lgg
H THURS-ROAST TURKEY M
Hf DRESSING, CRANBERRY SAUCE, Q ||§
Us CHOICE OF POTATO /V |||
H fri-sauteed fish m
H ALMONDINE 68* W
H WITH TARTER SAUCE |§|
I MORRISON'S I
I CAFETERIAS |
II OAIN

Page 31

Union Events
June 5 Aug. 29
Graduate and Undergraduate
Student Works, Teaching
Gallery
Monday, August 25
Beginning Bridge, 118 Union,
7:00 p.m.
Tuesday, August 26
Duplicate Bridge, 150 C & D
Union, 7:30 p.m.
Wednesday, August 27
Gator Growl Band Clinic Talent
Show, Union Aud., 7:30 p.m.
University Newcomers Fashion
Show, Union Ballroom, 8:00
p.m.
Satudray, August 30
R.O.T.C. Commissioning
Exercises, Union Aud., 11:00
p.m.
Univ. of Fla. Graduation,
Florida Field, 7:00 p.m.
Dicr liOLME/
JtWIUCJ
LOCK, WATCH & JEWELRY
REPAIRS
TROPHIES ENGRAVING
1230 W. UNIVERSITY AVE.
JftBLOCKFROMCAMPUS

o .--V.'
FEATURING CHUCK WAGON STEAKS FROM 99c
OPEN 11:00 AM to 9:00 PM 7 Days Weekly
Westgate Shopping Center PHONE 378-3320
3321 W. University Ave. Gainesville, Florida
nr*""- -
held OVER I
DAZZLING! Once ou see it, you'll never again picture I
Romeo&Juliet' quite the way you did before!" -life |
PARAMOUNT PICTURES P rr-nu I
A BMC HLH 1
Franco Zeffirelli I
Production of I
Romeo I
JULIET |
I No ordinary love story....
BMP(U starts today
g:RY WAVE LIKE A SOUL BROTHER
' -The
r-DAY ¥ pwmr
iMENT Marine
STARTS TODAY I
What makes her garden grow... I
wouldnt you like to know! I
Jj? jj ' Wb ? S r
i
Wl'lm |X 1J J [ | ] Isj |
stortmg
Awordw noe Geraldine Page Ruth Gordon A vJd\Z*r
Rosemary Forsyth
CO-stornng Robert Fuller Mildred Dunnock scrnpioy by Theodore Apsiem I



Page 32

!, The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 22, 1969

FRESH FLA. All WHITE ||l|Pft
MEDIUM ASTOR ALL
Coflee CAN [
COOKIES DUNKIN STIX 29c
WIENER BUNS 2/39c PECAN TWIRLS 29c Quontity Rights Reserved Prices Good All Week Wed. Noon thru Wed. Noon, Aug. 20-27
* WINN-DIXIE STORES, INC. COPYRIGHT ISSS
Quart KRAFT SALAD DRESSING __ OA /.
MIRACLE WHIP 49<
Oil 69 Bread 2/49< /fIICED %
Quart DEEP SOUTH Salad Nj3 Con LIBBY'S CS or WK GOLD JB B B IS Ig*
Dressing 39 Limit One of Your Choice or more purchose excl. cigarettes
FRUIT COCKTAIL 19* ,^.9 A^ E p DETERGENT J| 111 ff
SLICED PEACHES aht #HBB£ J§F
UQT DETERGENT 49*
BABY FOOD 9* cJp CHEK soft box pVB
fii? drini:::.::::...3/89 jr |\|%| |||f £ ftKfthu.. .> ~ jr'
BEEF STEW 49* jp |lM|B|||V
PRELL SHAMPOO 99* >g #% 1 | B| %W '^ w HETWF'
TOOTHPASTE 69 *JF % CATSUP 3/si.
LIGHT BULBS 97* M M M "All J| PRUNE JUICE 3/sl.
tWi k II Flarorsjg bIIF HASH 3/sl.
Wmtfo ftL I Cl Ap facial tissue 4/si.
Harvest f| t.# PAPER TOWELS 4/sl.
jPy% White Bottles VJgP gNEAPPIE 3/sl.
M PINEAPPLE JUICE.. 3/sl.
B B JELL-O GELATIN 3/25*
jBBBIm IB^B J _J- "* 7 PEANUT BUTTER 39*
Iffr Jmylohsj sl.
Mm \ 9Bfc£, HARVEST FRESH GA. RED SWEET JUICY CALIFORNIA
4 (I J X PEACHES 6... sl. NECTARINES 3 sl.
% f*s TH Jpf POTATOES 10. 89* PLUMS 4 sl.
POTATOES 10.:79 TOMATOES 29*
8 oz. BRECK CREME | lljllT Ilia i IflliT TO?.valuTsSmm : |[mj Wp vaumTsSmps iKJ
ft 2 Chocolate Eclairs Onion Rings WmSl Venl'stealr* 1 DisinfMtalW "li"' *" LUC
Kin Se. OO ill-: |i
PINTS BREAKSTONE UNCLE BEN |S J t>l UNCL E B EN S 5i^ CK or REGULAR Lorge Small
Sour Cream Curry Rice 39£ Spanish Rice .... Quaker Oats 67tf 37^
I Fancy Comet Rice. .454- Saran Wrap 674 Lemon Juice .... 65*
1401 N. MAIN ST. 130 N.W. 6TH ST. 3421 WEST UNIVERSITY AVE. HIWAY 441, HIGH SPRINGS
Ir^^^BBHHMIBBBBHHIBIHBBBBHHBHH^BBB^ftPBBBfIHP^VF^V^ftIVBiBBHBBBBBiHB^^BPBBBBHi



-..STEAKS* if jf^iSllfcsl
*
19 LB. \| Cut To Your Specifications FREE!
WAtfMw9wli(fefaf/Quontity Rights Reserved- Prices Good All Week Wed. Noon thru Wed. Noon. Aug. 20-27
vW^siialV WINN O.Xie STORKS, INC. CORTRIGHT ....
'sXjSf*' w p. DD Akm A Chcice W D Brand Corn Fed CHUCK Quarter Smoked (S|jced For Chops) p QRK
Steak 79* Loin .99*
f ROAST 1 Roast 99 c Bacon 79*
y& t Beef 5 -2 Turkey...29*
\ KM fiMirnii ia CURED HAMS... 99
> 3Sj£ C UB w W-D BRAND OFF any 12-oz. Pkg. SUNNYLANO All MEAT
Ui9 USD A. CHOICE" -.how FRANKS 5Q<
cum II net ciL PIMA
r I TP Alf % £ OOKID HAM.. 5t
SSSSKHMSs 5i. 39 31 Ef\lo tTrkninrui to'
AMER. CHEESE * HI s SU.BOLOGNA 79
SWISS CHEESE 45* jgr
PiM. CHEESE 69
LONGHORN CHEESE >B9* LB ~M ."Re All Flavors CREAM >7^,
SLICED CHEESE 39 jW SwSp Nfett Jf Jf
PERCH FILLETS 49* ''ffmUfiT.. H9fl %
FISH CAKES 3/sl. Jf ! "iL
OCOMA CHICKEN. BE *-F OR TURKEY 10-oz ASTOR CUT CORN. PEAS 4 CARROTS. GREEN PEAS OR CHOPPED
MEAT DINNERS 39* BROCCOLI 5/sl. £A #
DINNERS 2/sl. FRY POTATOES 89* %. JT
6-oz. LIBBYS LIMEADE OR 5 oz. Pkg.BANQUET Chick. Ala King. Beef & Gvy. .Turkey & Gvy.. Solis. Steak or Meat Loaf mmL. orange juice .... 3/$i
LEMONADE 9/99* COOKINBAGS4/SI.
BISCUITS 3/SI. Diet Bars 2/SI.
BTOPVAIJTsSmM I |ljr j KJF TOP 1 1 VAUnTsSmW j l[jljj j
Glad Wrap ; Instant Coffee SR|&3F Nestle s Quick ; Turkey Ground Beef Ground Beef
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>

Friday, August 22, 1969, Thu Florida Alligator,

Page 33



Page 34

I, The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 22, 1969

CITY CLEANS UP BRANNAN S LOT
Bicycle Man Gone,
But Not Forgotten

April 8, 1969
(EDITORS NOTE: The Bicycle Man, Ray
Brannan, legendary personality at UF, has been
absent from Gainesville for more than a year. He
lived and ran a bicycle business in the two-story
white house on University Avenue for more than 20
years.
This is the first of a series on the man himself,
the legal conditions which have allowed the house
to exist in its substandard state and the legal battle
over ownership which is developing in circuit court.)
By ANNE FREEDMAN
Alligator Staff Writer
Walking past the Bicycle Mans house on West
University Avenue is like avoiding the blind
beggarman on a city street.
You glance briefly with disgust, with morbid I
wonder how it got that way curiosity. You reflect
on the sad conditions for a second, then walk on,
forgetting what you just saw.
You go to the closest store and buy some gum or
cigarettes.
But in the coming weeks, perhaps in the next few
days, you may be seeing a wrecking company
removing the building and junk.
The City of Gainesville has finally succeeded,
after more than a year of formal litigation, in
obtaining a decision from circuit court declaring the
Bicycle Mans property a public nuisance.
The court has given the owner (ownership is
currently being contested in a cross-claimant suit)
15 days from the date of the order March 26 to
meet the housing ordinances his property has
violated.
This means that after Wednesday, the city has
been authorized to enter and remove all buildings,
junk, weeds, etc. except the building facing NW Ist
Avenue.
But today you stop in front of the rotting,
run-down two story structure and stare. You
notice the paneless windows on the second floor,
the half-closed Venetian blinds, screens dangling,
hundreds of bike frames and charred bedsprings.
You kick away some of the litter of paper cups
at your feet. It might be your own. And you close
your eyes.
The house is quiet. But it wasnt always that
way.
Imagine.
It is 10 years ago or maybe 15. You open your
eyes, amazed because the house doesnt really look
much different. Its still covered with bikes and
parts and other things.
But its so noisy! The house is alive with the
barking of happy dogs you see at least six running
around. You hear the babbling of little kids and UF
students, the miews and purrs of stray but well-fed
cats. You see the nervous hide-and-seek of rabbits
and the excited chattering? and flapping of wings of
the sparrows overhead.
In the middle of this misplaced jungle an
unshaven, unwashed, tall friendly looking man is
fixing a broken tire frame and talking to a group of
students.

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FULL-TIME BARTENDER
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U of F Faculty Club, Inc.
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accepting applications for
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Rathskeller Office

He pats the head of the child whose bike he has
just repaired and sends him home. Smiling, he
watches the youngster ride off, down University
Avenue. He didnt ask for payment.
The man is Ray Brannan, fondly known as
Dirty Dan the Bicycle Man to generations of UF
students, Gainesville residents, and children.
Since 1946 Brannan, a former UF student and
tennis star, ran a bicycle business of such volume
and diversity that he acquired a national and even
international reputation.
For more than a year now, the Bicycle Man's
house, located between University Pla/a and
DemianV Leather Shop on West University Avenue,
has been scaled up and nobody has seen Dirty
Dan in all that time.
Neighbors and friends will, for the most part,
freely tell you stories of his kindness to animhls and
children, of his pure pot appearance, and of his
peculiar attitudes and ways.
| DEPTH REPORT |
| -y J
ISP
Some will confidentially discuss his apparent
mental condition while others will come right out
and tell you about his mental deterioration and
his fears that the town was closing in on him.
Two neighbors, both long-time Gainesville
residents, refused to discuss the Bicycle Man at all.
For the story is a tragic one, though Mr-
Brannan never asked anybody for anything,
recalled Mrs. Claudie Mae Hamilton, a maid witJWWF
for more than 20 years at Flint Hall, just across
from the Bicycle Mans house.
It wasnt that he was without money that he
was the way he was. He just wouldnt spend it on
himself, she said.
Neighbors and friends havent seen him in about
a year. Theyll tell you they heard Brannan is
visiting his sister in Tennessee.
But Alachua County Court records show that the
now legendary, varily called eccentric, unusual,
kind, withdrawn, friendly, intelligent, Ray
Brannan was committed to a mental institution in
Tennessee on April 16, 1968.

The house is quiet. But it wasnt always that way
Imagine. It is 10 years ago or maybe 15. Its still
covered with bikes and parts and other things. But it s
so noisy! The house is alive with the barking of happy
dogs. You hear the babbling of little kids tind UF
students, the meows and purrs of stray but well-fed
cats. The man in the midst of the apparent confusion is
Ray Brannan, fondly known as Dirty Dan the Bicycle
Man.
ATTENTION HOBBYISTS
Come Out and See Our Fine Collection of
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Plants.
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22 West University Ave., Gainesville, Fla. Phone 376-3516
UNIVERSITY JEWELERS
Expert Watch Repair
Trophies, plaques &. Gavels
C. J. BECK" BECHTOLD
The Complete Service Shop
across from campus
same block as College Inn
Phone 378-8585 jewelry repair engraving
'706 W. University Ave. ring sizing name plates
GA'NESVILLE. FLA. RIBBONS
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FROM THE COLONEL
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376-6472 372-3649



THE MEN OF DELTA SIGMA PHI 1
welcome all incoming freshmen
to the University of Florida
and
cordially invite you to
witness our new concept
in fraternity living
A GREEK AS AN INDIVIDUAL!

Friday, August 22, 1968, The Florida Alligator,

Page 35



Page 36

>, The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 22,1969

2 WHY JOIN A
FRATERNITY?
SCHOLARSHIP:
for achievement
lIINTERFRATERNITYI SERVICE: active aid,
IS] I mutual assistance
I TUp I
111 I BROTHERHOOD: the
INTERFRATERNITY n p
_ unique experience
I COUNCIL I social
§§ and growth; entertainment
v _J GO
[r council GEEK
?RUSH SCHEDULE
Florida's Fraternities invite you to Rush, 1969.
Tuesday, Sept. 16 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. IFC Smoker
and Forum at Rathskeller
7 p.m. to 12 a.m. Open House
at All Fraternities
Wednesday, Sept. 17 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. Open House
at All Fraternities
10 p.m. to 1:30 a.m. IFC IFCsponsored
sponsored IFCsponsored Dance and Pep Rally
Thursday, Sept. 18 8 p.m. to 12 a.m. Open House
at All Fraternities
Friday, Sept. 19 8 p.m. to 1 a.m. Open House
at All Fraternities
Saturday, Sept. 20 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. Fraternity
Parties and Open House
FRATERNITIES OF UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

ALPHA EPSILON PI
ALPHA GAMMA RHO
ALPHA TAU OMEGA
BETA THETA PI
CHI PHI
DELTA CHI
DELTA SIGMA PHI

DELTA TAU DELTA
DELTA UPSILON
KAPPA ALPHA
KAPPA SIGMA
LAMBDA CHI ALPHA
PHI DELTA THETA
PHI EPSILON PI

PHI GAMMA DELTA
PHI EPSILON PI
PHI KAPPA PSI
PHI KAPPA TAU
PI KAPPA ALPHA
PI KAPPA PHI
SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON

SIGMA CH!
SIGMA NU
SIGMA PHI EPSILON
TAU EPSILON PHI
TAU KAPPA EPSILON
THETA CHI



IFC Says WeCareto Community and Campus

f By ANGELA RACKLEY
Alligator Staff Writer
For Interfraternity Council, 1968-69 was a
school year that stressed a we care attitude in
services to the community, campus and members.
From participation in off-campus charity drives
to coming to the aid of burned out Sigma Nus,
to sponsorship of a drugs council to help students
kick the drug habit, IFC extended a helping hand.
IFC, in existence for 52 years, is now the official
arm of the 26 fraternities on campus, and serves in
the best interests of these fraternities, the
university, and the community.
Unique from most IFCs on other campuses, it
contains its own lawmaking and law enforcing
agencies which are respected by the administration.
Tuition scholarships, cash awards, and the short
term loan program, which lends over $20,000
annually to fraternity brothers are all provided for
under IFC.
The Executive Council of IFC consists of a
president, two vice presdients, a secretary, a
treasurer and four district presidents.
Also serving on the council are two faculty
advisors.
A Presidents Council, consisting of all the
fraternity presidents, has the final decision in all
< i > Ih HMKin HP 11K
... ./ i y
I*
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3-Day Rush
The Inter Fraternity Council rush for new
members begins Sept. 16. Every rushee is invited to
attend the activities and see the various frat houses
on and off campus.
Theis year rush has been extended three days,
reports Miles Wilkins, IFC treasurer. We feel that in
the past rush may have been too short. This way the
prospective pledges can look around and find out
what they want.
What can fraternity life offer a pledge?
The fraternities give the incoming freshman a
chance to make friends. He can have a small group
to identify with and find out that the university can
be a great place, says Dean Jay Stormer, IFC
sponsor.
When asked about the academic strain placed on
new pledges, Stromer replied that the boys
sometimes do better in their studies because they
have someone to depend on. However, you cannot
say that there is a correlation between pledging a
fraternity and making or not making grades.
Rush activities open with an IFC smoker at the
Rathskeller. Fraternities will hold open houses and
parties throughout rush.

Greeks Aid Fire Victims,
Help Fight Drug Habit
policy-making of IFC.
IFC Treasurer Miles Wilkin described benefits
and changes in fraternities.
Wilkin said scholarships, good study
environments and tutorine sessions have all added to
a different type of atmosphere in fraternity life in
the past five years.
Wilkin said two adjustments, elimination of
hazing and any discrimination based on race, color,
religion or creed, have already been made here.
Hazing is anything that would cause moral,
physical or scholastic harm to a fraternity pledge.
Wilkin said the social aspect is the reason most
men join fraternities.
In the social area, a fraternity helps a man to
develop his character, social ease, and good
judgment, Wilkin said.
Wilkin said the feeling of brotherhood, coming
out of a communal-type sharing, was the overall
result.
The university is a very tough place without
friends, Wilkin said. Because it is a very
impersonal place where you are just a number, the
fraternity offers a student friends for four years
and, in fact, for life.
Wilkin said fraternity life also built leadership
and provided many campus leaders.
Many constructive ideas became realities
through IFC this past year.
After 10 months of research and development,
the right of fraternities to set their own Open
Housing rules was approved by the administration.
Along with it went the responsibilities of the
individual fraternities to enforce their rules.
This major breakthrough for responsible student
leadership paved the way for more lenient open
'*'*** * '£* vav
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housing pohcies for dormitories.
The annual Gainesville Beautification Week saw
more than 300 fraternity representatives working to
clean up Gainesville over Easter Weekend.
They removed 800 cubic yards of trash from the
yards of thousands of homes in three economically
depressed neighborhoods, and painted four homes
owned by poor who could not afford to do so
themselves.
Fraternity men also cleared two playground areas
of unnecessary trees and underbrush, and more than
four miles of roadside of unsightly trash.
Awards were given to the fraternities for their
outstanding participation during this event.
IFC initiated funds for the proposed sl7 million
coliseum when it contributed money from its Beach
Boys Concert several years ago, and has contributed

Friday, August 22, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

M ** Pi
Ml / /fli^^H
Ri w^Ljt
funds with a continuing benefit concert series.
Profits from this years IFC Frolics featuring
such name stars as Jack Jones, The Four Seasons,
Vanilla Fudge and the Rascals were donated to the
UF Coliseum Fund.
UFs only fraternity sponsored magazine, The
Gator Greek, came back into publication during
the spring quarter. Its format is different from past
issues in that it is published monthly, and includes
feature articles, an editorial stand, and answers
questions submitted by independents.
The Sigma Nu house burned down during the
spring quarter, but Sigma Nu brothers were not left
stranded.
Even as the 45-year-old house burned,
fraternities were rounding up clothes, books and
lodging for 26 brothers left homeless by the blaze.
The tremendous offer of assistance by the other
fraternities was a strong example of the
brotherhood existing between the fraternities at UF.
First Annual Greek Week was celebrated by
fraternities and sororities during the spring quarter.
This was a six-day social activities and seminar
week capped by spring Frolics featuring the Four
Seasons.
It included seminars on topics including rush,
finance, and social service, and was highlighted by
free food, skits, singing, contests, games and fun.
Services such as aid to the Heart Fund, Easter
Seals, March of Dimes, Local boys clubs, food
drives, and the IFC annual blood drive were also
provided during the year.
New IFC officers were elected during the fall
term. Steve Zack was elected president; Gerry
Abascal, executive vice president; Bob Ziegler,
administrative vice president; Pete Marovich,
secretary; and Miles Wilkin, treasurer.
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Page 37



Page 38

I, The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 22, 1969

IT HAPPENED AT MURPHREE
The Broken Jaw Affair

Oct. 2,1968
By JOHN PARKER
Alligator Campus Life Editor
John Harris was not exactly a
mountain of a man.
As a matter of fact, at 5 ft. 2
in. and 135 lbs. he had trouble
performing such tasks as
operating the kick-stand on his
bicycle or closing the rings on
his loose leaf notebook.
To make matters worse, he
claimed he owed his tremendous
physique to Super Wate-On
tablets and a crash weight-lifting
program.
That is what makes the whole
thing so unbelievable. The saga
of John Harris has been a
closely-guarded secret for almost
a year, but now that he has
transferred, his story can be
told.
Harris used to tell all of his
friends that he wanted to be an
FBI agent. As a matter of fact,
this oft-expressed goal was close
to the only form of
entertainment enjoyed by his
close circle of friends during his
bleak freshman days.
Many was the time when
Harris bore the brunt of raucous
laughter for fingerprinting his
roommates while they slept or
placing hair brush bristles under
his dresser drawers.
They were still laughing one
fine autumn day last year when
someone crept stealthily into the
outer section of Harris
Murphree dorm room to partake
of the contents of his wallet.
Harris, who was studying in
the other room, claims that it
was his natural instinct for
sensing crime that caused him to
look up and spot the culprit in
the mirror.
Creeping quietly behind the
would-be thief, Harris twirled
him around and dealt a mighty
blow to the jaw.
It must have been the
leverage or something, said the
confused pugilist later, but that
guys jaw was shattered! I mean
it. Broken into little pieces.
He then gazed wondoursly at
his tiny balled-up fist.

IT
Wishbone
There s a new Wishbone Fried Chicken Take-Out Store at
704 S^y. ,2nd Avenue or 16th Ave at S Main Street


The
Florida
Alligator
At the time of the incident,
as even Harris will admit, his
G-man cool failed him. He never
rendered anyone helpless before.
He had never rendered anyone
anything before. And here was his
foe dazed and conquered, not
knowing what to do next.
He soon realized that certain
responsibilities go along with
being a wielder of instant death.
Half dragging, half carrying
his stunned victim, Harris made
it to the front door of the
infirmary. What Herculese didnt
know was that the hallowed
doors of the infirmary closed
each day at 5:30 p.m. sharp.
Harris peered through the
glass door. The only one inside
was the janitor who was busily
sweeping. Harris pounded on the
door.
The janitor looked up and
then quickly away, thinking that
if he didnt look directly at
Harris, he would go away.
Look, I got a guy out heres
dying, screamed Harris.
He was informed in a very
condescending manner that the
infirmary closed at 5:30 p.m.
and to please come back later.
After a few minutes of
pleading, attempted bribery and
thinly veiled threats, the janitor
was convinced that Harris
companion needed to see a doc doctor.
tor. doctor.
Wlven -the Kara pus Kops
screamed up on their motor
scooter, they told Harris that no
one would believe his story and
that unless he wanted to prefer

charges, they would list the
cause of the accident as a fall.
Since the doctors insisted
that a jaw could not be
mutilated to that extent with
anything smaller than a railroad
tie, Harris agreed. Besides,
justice had already been wrought
at his own sinewy hands.
Harris is now at FSU studying
how to overthrow the forces of
evil.
I think well have to chalk
the whole thing up, summed up
his bemused roommate, to one
of the most unusual flows of
adrenalin in medical history.

The Alligator Needs
People To Work On
j^Production
f STUDENT TYPISTS
PROOF READERS
PASTE UP ARTISTS
OPAQUERS
HEADLINE
MACHINE
OPERATORS
Hours can be arranged to fit your class
schedule Sunday through Thursday
nights. Apply Room 339-Reitz Union
See Mr. French Or Mr. Cook
5 K
| Training classes for new student workers will be held i
I on September 11 and 12-10:00 AM and 2:00 PM |

ROBBIES
For The Best In Steaks,
Meals & Jig
TV I 1718 W University Ave. I
| f On The Gold Coast |
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advertisers



Centrex Brings Fall Rings

Sept 23, 1968
UF dormitory students can
expect telephones in their rooms
to start ringing by Nov. 9, when
the campus Centrex system
begins, Cole A. Wagner,
communications consultant to
Southern Bell said.
All university housing areas,
with the exception of the
married students and Murphree
areas, will be connected on
Centrex. Those areas not
included are to continue their
use of the Gainesville telephone
system.
Using Centrex, students may

Staff Writings'

Pansy Prei>
In Chicago
*'
*'
*'

V S*
By COfOl SQH Q 6 X :
Nov. 20, 1968
Mayor Richard Daley had the newspapers of Chicago in his hip
pocket.
And he still does.
Bill Anderson, city editor of the Chicago Tribune, squirmed and
hedged and pleaded no knowledge every time the name Daley was
brought up Journalism Day, Monday Nov. 18.
The questions became obviously pointed on the coverage of the
convention and Daleys part in it. Andersons answers countered by
becoming even more evasive.
Anderson said, Mayor Daley was hardly involved ... a sweet old
itian who had special privileges just because he was the mayor of the
host city.
What was your papers opinion of the part Mayor Daley played in
the security of the convention?
I dont understand the question.
Sure Mr. Anderson. Sure you dont.
Okay then.
Was Mayor Daley in touch with your paper concerning coverage of
the convention in any way?
I dont know what you mean. I have his phone number and we
called him ... I think I read something into your question ...
Youre right Mr. Anderson.
There is something there. At least 10 people at your speech wanted
to know Mayor Daley.. why his people got into the
convention hall when even some delegates had trouble, why reporters
and cameramen were beaten in the name of security, why as you
yourself said, he didnt get the bad press in Chicago that he did
nationally.
But you wouldnt answer these questions, Mr. Anderson.
You hedged and avoided and on occasion refused to recognize a
questionnaire because I dont like your questions.
And still you could speak of the peoples right to know. About the
free press and its importance in America.
Its all communication, Mr. Anderson. Or lack of it.
You put reporters inside disident groups and said you planned
nine months in advance for coverage of the convention. But you
wouldnt tell us what you knew about Mayor Daley and the
convention security measures that caused countless injuries and
ill-feelings across the country.
We finally asked you if Mayor Daley had any vested interest in the
Chicago papers.
Perhaps that wasnt a fair question. It.put you on the spot. But you
answered No, and that Mayor Daley didnt like report. .*s.
That was really relevant.
It was like Big Brother was watching you. Perhaps he was. But
youll never tell, will you Mr. Anderson?

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We work on all makes and Models of cars.
10% discount to Students and FREE ESTIMATES
ELRODS AUTO REPAIR
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NEW CAMPUS PHONES

save money dailing their long
distance calls J ;ect, rather than
using an operator. Wagner added
operators will no longer break
into direct dial calls to ask for
the number where the call is
originating. Automatic toll
systems have been established to
identify the numbers.
The Centrex phones are to
have seven digits, replacing the
extension lines now in use.
Campus calls will go through by
dialing the last five digits. For an
off campus call, students must
dial 9, and then the local

number they want.
Quarterly housing rates have
included the charge for the local
conversations. Long distance
calls will be handled separately
and billed directly to the student.

A / II I
I His & Hers I
Datsun's his and hers Sports Car... it's a >
problem how they share it. Because with a 135
H.P. overhead cam engine and front disc brakes V
...plus deluxe vinyl upholstery and a transistor W | \
radio as standard equipment... it's a sports car for \
both street and track. We call it the 2000. Datsun
also makes another sports car.. .the 1 600. It has J A sSyr'
the same big list of no-cost extras and a little
less horsepower. That ought to please
just about everyone. Unless he wants
1 to go racing when she wants to go I
I DATS I
I GODDING & CLARK ZS HZ I
I Downtown by the Post Office I
I 2nd Ave. & 2nd St. S.E. I
g -cC HECK OUR OTHER ADS IN THIS ISSUE |

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Friday, August 22, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 39



I, Th* Florida Alligator, Friday, August 22,1969

Page 40

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LONELY FLORIDA FIELD

Equity and lonely now, barren beyond belief,
but not for long. In just one month UF's gridiron
monument, the graveyard of many football foes.

JOURNALISM SURVEY REVEALS

Ads Dont Cause Young Smokers

Advertising plays only a minor role in causing young people to
start smoking, according to a survey conducted recently in the UF
College of Journalism and Communications.
The influence of friends, the survey revealed, was the major cause.
Only four out of 150 students questioned blamed advertising for
causing them to begin smoking, while 71 said their friends led them to
take the first few puffs.
The survey, conducted by senior advertising students in the college
and under the supervision of Robert S. Boyd, journalism instructor,
consisted of a series of questions probing when and why most
students begin to smoke.
Students were asked to describe their smoking habits and indicate
to which advertising media they were most often exposed.
Boyd pointed out that the public, the press and politicians most
commonly blame radio and TV advertising for seducing young people
into the smoking habit.
Our study indicates something quite the contrary, Boyd said.
Apparantly tobacco advertising simply gets people to switch brands.
It does not create habits.
Concern for their health is the strongest motivation to make
young people stop smoking, Boyd said. Those who have already
f 5 -SHI!RTS-99< |
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TROPICAL CLEANERS
402 N.W. 13th St.
209 N.E. 16th Ave.

will come alive with screaming students and quiet
alumni to say "Go, you old Gators" when Ray
Graves and crew take on Houston, Sept. 20.

kicked the habit say they have done so out of fear of damaging their
health.
It is logical to assume, Boyd said, that continued emphasis on
the health hazards of smoking by the broadcast media will play an
effective role in keeping the nations youth free of the tobacco habit.
Most former student smokers who have kicked the habit, according
to the survey, are married. Students still smoking say they smoke to
calm themselves or to give their hands something to do.
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many other items reduced
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1620 W. UNIVERSITY AVE. UNIVERSITY PLAZA

House Denies Vote
On Student Loans

By Alligator Services
Failure of the U.S. House of
Representatives to pass a bill this
week reviving the federal insured
loan program may affect up to
1,000 returning and prospective
students at UF an offical said
Wednesday.
I. Doublas Turner, director of
student financial aid, stated,
No doubt this lack of
legislation will cause many
youths, particularly entering
freshman, to withdraw their
admissions here, throw up their
hands and say they just cant do
it.
On Tuesday the U.S. Senate
approved, 92-1, a bill reviving
the program, but no House
action is expected to take place
until Sept. 15 at the earliest,
after a four and one-half week
Congressional recess which
began Thursday. The delay is
expected to affect more than
200,000 students across the
country needing loans to enter
college this fall.

Under the program, tuition
funds and other educational
expenses are loaned to students
by their hometown banks, with
repayment guaranteed by the
federal government.
Interest on the loans has been
limited to seven per cent,
causing many banks to drop out
of thy insured program due to a
current prime interest rate of 814
per cent.
Deprived Colors
RADNOR, Pa. A network
research executive claims the
reason young people are wearing
wild colors today is because
during their informative years
they were watching
black-and-white television. This,
he said, caused color
deprivation.
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The UF, most diverse
institution of higher learning in
the states university system,
begins its 1969-70 academic year
with 20,600 students expected
to start classes Sept. 18.
On-campus residence halls
open Sept. 10 at 1 p.m., prior to
two-day periods of registration
and orientation scheduled Sept.
11-12 and Sept. 15-16.
Approximately 40 per cent of
the Universitys students live in
residence halls.
Orientation takes a more
personal turn this fall through a
series of small group meetings
with student discussion leaders
involving adjustment to the
campus supplanting the former
week-long endurance test of
walking the campus in guided
tours.
UF President Stephen C.
OConnell will welcome the new
students at a 7 p.m. convocation
Sept. 14 at Florida Field.
The 1969 freshman class,
limited to 2,800 by Board of
Regents policy, was selected to
fit the Universitys role as the
states land-grant institution. It
represents all geographic areas of
the state and includes a
percentage from other states and
foreign countries.
Beginning with an original
enrollment of 136 students
gathered in a single frame
building, the UF has become a
giant among universities where
the professional skills
rerpresented in various
departments are combined in
interdisciplinary work which
enlarges mankinds store of
knowledge. It is committed to
the triple purpose of teaching,
research and service.
Made up of 15 colleges and
two schools, the University
offers programs ranging from
general to highly specialized
education. There are some 120
areas of instruction
specialization for undergraduates
and 82 programs leading to
degrees. There are more than
1,400 professors at the UF who
teach 3,000 individual courses.
The University College enrolls
all freshmen and sophomores.
Comprehensive courses offered
by the college are aimed toward
improving communication skills,
acquainting the student with the
principal concepts of the
biological and physical sciences
and providing a knowledge of
the history and culture of
Western man.
Upper division units include
the Colleges of Agriculture,
Architectures and Fine Arts,
Arts and Sciences, Business
Administration, Education,
Engineering, Dentistry, Health
Related Professions, Journalism
and Communications, Law,
Medicine, Nursing, Pharmacy
and Physical Education and
Health, in addition to the School
of Forestry and the Graduate
School.
The cost of education at
Florida, as at other state-assisted
institutions, has gone up. A
legislative act sharply increased
tuition fees for all institutions in
the state system became law in
July. The fees went from $125
to $l5O per quarter for
undergraduates residing in
Florida and from $125 to $175
for resident graduate students.
For out-of-state
undergraduates the rate goes
from $325 to $450, and for
out-of-state graduates the cost

UF Presents The Facts As Its 113th Year Begins

rises from $325 to $475.
Room rent stays
approximately the same as last
year, ranging from $270-$475
for men and between $369-$465
for women. Womens rates
increased by $24 for rooms
where telephones were installed
for the first time.
Food service units at eight
locations over the campus
increase their cost by
approximately S2O. These units
include the cafeteria, snack bar
and more formal Arredondo
Room in the Reitz Union, Coed
Club in Broward Hall, Graham
Hall snack bar, Hume Hall
cafeteria and snack bar, Florida
Room in Norman Hall, Tolbert
Hall snack bar and the
Rathskeller.
Board is not mandatory at
the UF but several food plans
are available. These include a
13-week plan for the fall quarter
(a seven-day plan costing
$24133 and a five-day plan
costing $202.80). The 11-week
plan for winter and spring
quarters costs $204.20 for seven
days and $171.60 for five days.
University finances during the
1960 s show state support
decreasing significantly with
sources of funds from grants and
contracts, student fees and
auxiliary revenue (sales, services,
rentals) increasing and a slight
decrease in federal support.
The $101,196,555 budget
request to the Legislature for the
1969-70 fiscal year that begins
July 1 was cut to $86,568,624
and excludes any capital outlay
funds for construction.
Facilities currently under
construction include buildings
for the Florida State Museiim, a
Graduate and International
Studies Center and a Music
Building. Renovation to some
existing buildings are planned,
including air conditioning a
number of residence halls. Two
recreational swimming pools in
the housing areas will
supplement the single campus

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Rush Sign-Up: Room 315 Reitz Union
Saturday, September 13
Sunday, September 14
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main campus, often designated
among the countrys most
beautiful, is unique in that it
contains all of the colleges and
schools of the institution. More
than 600 buildings blend Gothic

Friday, August 22, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

and modem architecture over
grass-covered lawns where
approximately 1,100 individual
(SEE *UF', PAGE 42)

Page 41



Page 42

!, The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 22, 1969

UF Has Become A Giant Among Universities

trees of 153 species and varieties
have been mapped.
A long history of student self
government gives each student
participation in the University
community. In addition to their
own student government
organization, they serve on
University-wide committees and
in the fall will have additional
representatives on the University
Senate, Administrative Council,
Curriculum Committee and
Student Conduct Committee
broadening their responsibility
in conducting the affairs of the
University.
The Honor Code of the
student body makes each
student the keeper of his own
conscience during examinations
and on the campus until he
shows he does not deserve the
trust placed in him. The honor
system has been in effect at the
UF since 1914 and includes a
student Honor Court which
performs the combined function
of trial and supreme courts,
passing judgment on all
violations of the Honor Code.
A re-organized 30-member
Presidents Action Council,
composed equally of students,
faculty and administrators,
will meet in the fall to continue
the assignment given by
President OConnell last year to
recommend solutions to current
campus problems.
The University extends its
activities into the larger
is IK,
£g|>
m
CAMPUS SCENES
The campus has many
landmarks. The Century Tower
below was built in 1953
commemorating the university's
100 years of existence. The view
above taken from atop the tower
shows the part of the old
campus.

community with service projects
playing a role for both academic
and volunteer programs in most
colleges.
For example, occupational
therapy interns work with a day
care center, a school for
mentally retarded children and
other local facilities; pediatric
nursing students assist in
preparing Headstart Program
children for the experience of
physical exams; medical students
participate in Operation
Concern, surveying health needs
of the disadvantaged and
cooperate in the Headstart
Program with physical exams;
the Department of Music
cooperates with the Alachua
County Enrichment Center in
providing concerts for school
children regularly.
The Early Childhood
Laboratory develops teaching
techniques used in cooperation
with a neighborhood house and
a day care center and has a
language development program
for disadvantaged five-year-old
children; the Institute for
Development of Human
Resources works in parent
education; architecture students
have projects involving young
people in the ghetto; the
Bureau of Economic and
Business Research created a new
set of criteria for FHA low
income housing families; the
Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences trained
low-income families in nutrition
and purchasing, and the College
of Law operates legal aid and
public defender clinics.

THE J. WAYNE REITZ UNION
center for student activities
BOWLING BILLIARDS PING PONG
PLUS
Movies, a Listening Library, an Arts & Crafts Center, Barber Shop,
Gift Shop, TV Lounges, Snack Bar and Cafeteria, and Rooms
available for every sort of meeting. The J. Wayne Reitz Union is
the place to meet people and do things. Make the Reitz Union
your center of activity while at the University of Florida.
n

As an institution the
University is making several new
efforts in the area of the
disadvantaged student. A new
counselor for this group has
been appointed to aid with their
specific problems and
recruitment; funds from the
Alumni Association have been
earmarked for those needing
assistance and the College of
Agriculture has a special grant
from the Rockefeller
Foundation to find and recruit
Negro graduate students.
Administrators appointed
during the past year include Dr.
Edmund Achell, provost of J.
Hillis Miller Health Center; Dr.
-V 7

Best of Luck
FRESHMAN CLASS OF 1969-70
THE AEs> s
"Many Hearts, One Purpose

Charles B. Browning, dean for
resident instruction for the
institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences; Dr. Harry
Sisler, dean of arts and sciences;
Dr. Robert Lanzillotti, dean of
business administration; Dr. Jose
Medina, dean of dentistry; Dr.
Bert Sharp, dean of education;
Dr. Robert Uhrig, dean of
engineering; Dr. Harold Hanson,
dean of Graduate School; John
Paul Jones, dean of journalism
and communications; Dr.
Kenneth Finger, dean of
pharmacy; Fred Cantrell, dean
of University relations and
development; Dr. William Carter,
director of Center of Latin

American Studies; Charles Furr,
director of development services;
George Croker, director of
sponsored research, and Dr.
Gustav Harrer, director of
University libraries.
Positions remaining to be
filled are those of executive vice
president, dean of the College of
Physical Education and Health,
and a director of Shands
Teaching Hospital.
In addition to productions by
campus groups as the Florida
Players in November, there will
be performances by the U.S.
Army Field Band and a traveling
company with the opera La
Traviata.



1 ACCENT 70
'Tomorrow
In
Perspective
Tomorrow is Perspective is the theme of
Accent 7O.
Accent is a symposium on vital issues, says
Bob Martin, chairman of the Accent speakers
committee. We plan to bring about 15 speakers to
campus.
President Nixon is invited. He spoke at the first
Accent program in 1965. Former Secretary of
Interior Stuart Udall is another possible speaker.
The aim of this years symposium is more
student involvement. Thursday of Accent week has
been designated a day of involvement. All classes
will be cancelled. Each college will provide programs
about its individual academic area.
Industries and other groups have been invited to
set up exhibits and displays to acquaint students
with their work.
Accent speakers will tour the campus, sit-in on
classes and participate in seminars during the week.
Some of the changes from previous programs the
Accent 7O committee is planning include more
informal presentations in the Plaza of the Americas
and student union.
The Accent magazine will be expended,
containing interviews with speakers about the
symposiums theme. The magazine is slated for
publication in mid-January.
Accent also is planning to ask the City of
Gainesville to officially recognize Accents day of
involvement and to encourage community groups to
participate in Accemt activities.
Last years Accent program centered around
The Dimensions of Freedom and brought 16
nationally-known speakers to campus. Sens. Strom
Thurmond and Wayne Morse, Atheist Madalyn
Murray and Georgia Rep. Julian Bond.

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Art Competition At Gallery
The Florida Gallery, housed in the architecture and fine arts
building, will open the 1969-70 academic year with an exhibit of the
best works from the Florida State Fair competition.
Its the most exciting and significant exhibit of contemporary art
in the Southeast, said Roy Craven, the gallerys director.
Studying can be easier with
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Friday, August 22, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 43



Page 44

I, The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 22, 1969

FOLK MASSES ARE 'IN

'Canon Gannon 9 Leads
Catholic Student Center

One Sunday last spring the
Rathskeller, the campus beer
hall, suspended its own rules and
opened the hall on the one day
of the week it usually remains
closed.
The result was the largest
crowd ever assembled there,
with hundreds more being
turned away at the door when
the hall was filled to capacity.
The big event? A Catholic
Mass.
Not just any old Mass,
though. This was a folk Mass, led
by Father Michael Gannon and a
number of students in the
Catholic Student Parish.
Father Gannon (called Canon
Gannon by his students ever
since he introduced a Lutheran
chaplain as Pastor Castor),
besides being a pastor of the
Catholic Student Parish, is an
associate Professor in the
Department of Religion. His
classes, like his well-known folk
Masses, are among the most
popular on campus.
The St. Augustine Church is
filled to capacity every Sunday
morning for Mass. There are four
Masses each Sunday, at 9:30 and
11 in the morning and 5:15 and
7 in the evening. Father Gannon
reports that about 2500 students
attend the Sunday Masses, and
about 80 participate in the daily
Mass at 5:15 p.m.
Starting in the fall, the parish
will also have a daily Mass at
12:20 p.m. for students who
may have schedule conflicts.
Canon Gannon is considered
by UF students to be very close
to them in their ideals and
hopes. His approach to worship
is somewhat unorthodox, with
frequent laughter rippling
through the church during his
sermons.
He says he believes worship
should be done in the spirit of
joy and he likes working with
students because to my mind,
they are part of the finest
generation our nation has ever
produced.
The student parish which
Father Gannon leads is
student-run and student-finan-
UF's Musical
Show-Piece
The Gator Band is the UFs
musical show-piece. With a
membership of about 240
musicians, the band ranges from
being the nucleus of school spirit
during football season to
performing concert tours and
jazz cdncerts later in the year.
After football season the
band is divided up into many
other units that comprise the
family of Gator Bands. These
include the symphonic band,
concert band, two variety bands,
a basketball band, summer band,
and other smaller units.
The symphonic band is the
concert specialist of the Gator
Bands with ideal instrumenta instrumentation
tion instrumentation and a wide choice of music
materials.
The concert band perforins
an interesting repertoire of band
literature, generally lighter in
character than that of the
symponic band.

ced. It receives no outside
financial help. Student activities
are planned by an all-student
parish council.
The council directs the
parishes activities in community
service, liturgy, special events,
social events, married student
activities and publicity.
From time to time, the parish
provides special programs for
Mass. Last year it had folk
Masses led by a black

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priest-musician Clarence Rivers
and Episcopal Father lan
Mitchell and his wife Caroline.
Whether its during a regular
Sunday Mass, or at a
parish-sponsored tubing party,
or in the Rathskeller, UF
Catholic students say their
parish is where the action is.
Religion dead on college
campuses?
Youll never convince Father
Gannon or his parishoners
of that.

m&> w
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DAILY MASS AT UF CATHOLIC STUDENT CENTER
... parish operated and financed by students



Sept. 30,1968
Florida college students were
pven a greater voice in shaping
University policy revisions
ecommended by the Council of
Student Body Presidents.
The approved revisions, a
[type of Bill of Rights, gives
the students the freedom to
participate with administrators
in decision making, with final
authority still resting with
university presidents and the
board. However, student
governments have a clearly
defined means of helping
formulate and review
institutional policy affecting
academic and student affairs.
Two existing board policies
were eliminated.
A provision stating university
administrated financial aid
may be terminated if a student is
charged with misconduct, and
another giving the president the
right to declare any area or
establishment off limits were
deleted from the policies.
The revisions to the boards
operating manual were approved
in substance late Friday
afternoon after members of the
board and CSPB went over the
proposals paragraph by
paragraph.
Three members of the board
and the six student body
presidents met again Saturday
morning for an editing session.
FSUs Lyman Fletcher,
chairman of the CSBP, said the
main goal of the revisions was to
move the state university system

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away from the idea of serving as
parents for students.
I think we have achieved
this, and students will be

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exposed to a more academic
environment where they can
learn and develop in a more
responsible climate, he said.

Fletcher said the board
recognized students government
as a body the students speak
through.

Friday, August 22,1969, The Florida Alligator,

For the first time, we have
opened up respected and
meaningful channels of
communication.

Page 45



Page 46

The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 22, 1969

IN UF LIBRARY
Rare Books
Aid Research

By DIANA SUGG
Alligator Special Writer
The show-place of the
libraries may well be the special
collections located on the fifth
floor of the Graduate Research
Library.
Founded in 1959 as a center
for primary source material,
there are four main areas, rare
books, the university archives,
the university collection, and the
dance, music and theatre
archives.
The rare books area consists
of valuable books, manuscripts
and papers stored in a
climate-controlled room. The
oldest holding is the original
manuscript of a Latin Bible
dated about 1250. It is hand
printed in uniform Gothic letters
about one-sixteenth of an inch
high and illustrated in blue and
red fine pen drawings.
There is also a first edition of
Philosophiae Naturalis Principia
Mathematica by Sir Isaac
Do The Swim
Like This
Gator Does
The Florida Game and Fresh
Water Fish Commission, which
has as one of its functions the
protection of Florida alligators
from the poacher, has also
gathered some interesting facts
on the reptile.
For example, the last open
hunting season on the alligator
in Florida was in 1960, after
which, the commission took up
the responsibility of protecting
it.
When the alligator does the
hunting, it floats with the top of
its back, eyes and nostrils above
the water while valves keep
water out of its ears and nostrils.
In the U.S., the alligators
habitat includes the lowlands of
North Carolina to south Florida
and west to the Rio Grande
River in Texas.
Gainesville
Machine
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Newton and early editions
written by Galileo and Priestly.
Autographed books, manuscripts
and letter by Robert Frost,
William Faulkner, George
Bernard Shaw, and many other
literary greats are also in the
collection.
Ma rj orie Kinnan Rawlings,
author of many famous novels,
including the Yearling
Cross-Creek, bequested her
entire estate to UF. Original
manuscripts, her correspon correspondence,
dence, correspondence, first editions of her books
and various personal belongings
comprise a large segment of the
special collections.
The university archives
contain UFs historical records.
The papers of past presidents of
the university such as John
Tigert, and John Murphree, as
well as historic information from
various departments of the
university are in the archives.
The picture* file of the university
shows the newly-built university
auditorium in 1927 with a dirt

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road running in front of it, and
Anderson and Peabody Halls
when they first opened.
Complementing the material
pertaining to the universitys
history is the university
collection. Professors

SECTION OF SPECIAL COLLECTIONS DEPARTMENT IN LIBRARY
.. many rare books and original manuscripts assist researchers

publications and the original
copies of masters theses and
doctoral dissertations make up
about half of the section. In the
rest of the collection are
yearbooks, humor magazines,
and publications that date back

to the early 1900s. Copies of
the suede-bound Seminole of
1910 and issues of the Alligator
from 1915 are in the collection.
The special collections
department is open weekdays
from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.



Staff Writings

Jan. 6,1969
Reading over my handy dandy copy
of Rights In Conflict, the story of the
riots during the Democratic National
Convention, I realized something very
important; since newspapers arent
allowed to print certain words, it is
impossible to accurately report what
went on in the Windy City.
But, because the public doesnt like
to read or hear that word, newspapers
and television reporters were not able to
give the complete story of the
disturbance.
But the authors of the report felt
differently:
We have, they said in the
introduction, with considerable
reluctance, included the actual
obscenities used by the participants.

Ease Political, Athletic Dissent;
Replace O f Connell,Graves Today

Jan. 9,1969
MR. EDITOR:
Because of discontent and unhappiness with the
actions and personalities of our present political
leadership, the American electorate voted for a
change this year, to Richard Nixon and Ed Gurney.
I believe that we would do well to follow their lead,
and demand much-needed change on our own
campus.
We need change from selective law enforcement,
attempted violation of the doctor-patient
relationships, suggestions for harsh and repressive
measures against drug-users, while ignoring 99 per

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Write or Phone for More Information
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Use Numbers Instead Os Nasty Words

Extremely obscene language was a
contributing factor to the violence
described in this report, and its
frequency and intensity were such that
to omit it would inevitably understate
the effect it had, the report said.
So why shouldnt newspapers be able
to print that word?
Why shouldnt TV commentators be
allowed to use that word?
The answer, of course, is simple. Too
many children would be influenced by
hearing or reading the nasty words..
Therefore I propose a solution:
Catalogue all the nasties and assign
each of them a number. Print this book
of filthies every month or so with a
simple cover: DANGER This Book
Contains Words Which May Be
Hazardous To Your Mental Health.
Then, whenever a writer was faced

cent of the illegal alchohol-users, and attempted
coercion of student committees. What about Greek
rumbles, secret files, apathetic professors, and
stifling of academic freedom?
We also need a change from out-of-date, inept
coaching practices.
Yes, if we ever hope to achieve greatness, or see
The Year of the Gator, we must have change. We
should replace Stephen C. OConnell and Ray
Graves. The times they are achanging, so lets not
stay behind. We want the UF to someday achieve
greatness. MIK E HITTLEMAN, 2UC

with the problem of reporting the
screaming of an obscenity, he would
merely write the number corresponding
to the word and those who had the
catalogue could look it up and get their
kicks along with the true story of what
happened, while those who wished not
to have their ears singed would not have
to worry.
That, of course, would lead to such
as:
ANYTOWN Police Chief W.H.
5 Wilson, covered with 8 from head
to toe, charged outside agitators with
causing the riots which have hit his city
in the last two days.
Those 3-7 mother 9ers are trying to
burn the whole 3-7 city down, Wilson
said.
Those hippies and other 3-7 radicals
store up 8 and throw it on us, he said.

I Th'-TiMity. fifoof) 1
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Friday, August 22,1969, Tha Florida Alligator,

By Dave Reddick

/
And thats for 8.
When someone was bafeg interviewed
on TV he wouldnt say the number, he
would say the actual word. To impose a
beep over the sound would be
obnoxious, so it would be better to
isntruct them in how to curse without
being censored.
That way would be to speak in
numbers rather than words.
I can see it now.
The crowds would really be chanting
9 the fuzz, 6 no we wont go and
8 the pigs.
And the cops would answer Kill the
mother 9ers, Get the 3-7 hippies,
and Knock the 8 outa *em.
But then, pretty soon everyone
would know what the numbers stood
for, and they might be offended to hear
them.

Page 47



Page 48

I, The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 22,1969

girls
According to Playboy mag.s white-skinned,
Chicago-confined permissiveness experts, the action at this
Southern university is off-campus in Sin City where
sun-tanned sexniks abound. Well, we dont really know
about all that, but we dug around in our much-fingered file
of Gator Girls, worn and tom from stark stares of our male
staffers, and revived these bountious beauties for your
viewing pleasure. Why should we have all the fun?
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Section A

Year In Review

The balance was very precarious, not between
good and evil, it wasn't as simple as that, but
between a newfound solidarity within the ranks of
student leaders and sometimes serious clashes with
administrators, regents, legislators and others
outside the university.
It was a year of change and demand for greater
change. There are still issues unreconciled as well as
'wider and deeper channels of communication as
the old academic year sets the stage for the new.
Hi
; > y&'t K
i aSi .. 11 1 H m I
MB
. * >** v # t '; -
MMSlotl Flag Blazes Brightly At Nighttime SDS Rally

The
Florida Alligator
THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE NEWSPAPER

University of Florida, Gainesville

mmmmmmmm
:, On^sffe
> -uil <-C" 'vA'.'Vu. Cv C-siV .-<-.v .y ~.s ~ O^-w C-v
- VtO v A- 0:'; o|W. V- J 'i>^t';' V i I '' V*C ~V. >f| v V -^N:-r'H-' G
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V*'' '''''''S' t w-- c C-;>v C t^'Vv l^'
-htiAmseg-
Etch With Care
Welcome.
Etch deeply if you are a collector. The
door you- have entered you will not leave
as you came. You will not sing the same
songs or ride so easily the tides of
rhythms of your nature. You may later
laugh with gods that now terrify you or
genuflect more often at their alter.
Etch carefully. The door thru which
you now pass is mainly black and white.
It mirrors the unknown prejudices in your
eyes. That door is a door you bring with
you. It will more deeply repeat itself, or
rainbow.
Etch with care if you are a collector, so
(SEE COLLECTOR" PAGE 4)

Friday, August 22, 1969



Page 2-A

k. The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 22,1969

The PilhA'No PolicyPolicy At l/F

vXv!vXvXvXvXvXvXv!v!vlv)|Xj^^v*)v*'^
\v.v.v.v.v.v.v.%v.;.v.v.y.y.;/|^A^^^^A*2^vXH^^^^^^^VX s X*X"!'
Will UF
Let Coeds Decide
Nov. 6, 1968
The issues involved in prescribing and dispensing birth control pills
at the infirmary has placed Health Service physicians on a hot seat,
says Dr. Mary McCaulley, a UF psychologist.
Dr. McCaulley, an assistant professor of clinical psychology at the
J. Hillis Miller Health Center, said the different philosophies held by
university authorities on the issue comes back to the role of a
university.
Is the university in loco parentis or are teachers trying to teach
students to make their own decisions? she asked.
As in any major life decision, once a woman has had the chance
to come in contact with all considerations, what she does is uniquely
her own decision, she said.
She said a university is to help people assume more responsibility
to fulfill themselves and be better human beings, find solutions for
their goals and make better decisions.
It gets to be an issue because one rule affects so many students
who are at different stages of being responsible for themselves, she
said.
Dr. McCaulley said the decision to take birth control pills can
represent a responsible decision on the part of one individual and an
irresponsible act on the part of another. Identical behavior and
decisions can come from different motivations, she said.
There is no evidence that the availability of birth control pills has
any effect on the sex drive or promiscuity of women, Dr. McCaulley
said.
There are girls who are disturbed psychologically by their
premarital sexual relations, and while the pill is a factor, it is not the
factor determining any emotional reaction, she said.
Dr. McCaulley said she does not really approve of restrictive
measures.
L.S. Powers, Associate Dean of the Law School, agreed that there
is no need to restrict the prescribing of birth control pills to coeds
who are over 21, at least from the legal standpoint.
However, the university is placed in a precarious position when
contraceptive drugs are prescribed to minors, without parental
consent, he claimed.
The legal profession has long recognized the interest parents have
in the medical treatment of their minor children, he said.
I would say the parents of a minor who received birth control
pills would have strong grounds for bringing suit, Powers said.
Any legal action would be brought against the individual physician
prescribing the contraceptive, Powers said.
He also noted that the waiver on Student Health Service forms
giving infirmary physicians the prerogative to prescribe whatever they
deem necessary would not be considered parental permission to
prescribe birth control pills.
The legal issue becomes more complicated when the patient is
Catholic, he said.
If religious beliefs enter into the controversy, it would certainly
strengthen any case a parent might have, he contended.
&ShbCircle K
all new male students
'Join the LARGEST service club

(EDITORS NOTE: This was the first of a three
part series on birth control at the UF. The three
installments are reprinted on these two pages. Staff
Writer Sydney Frasca received a prescription for the
pill from an infirmary physician while on special
investigatory assignment for the Alligator. Ihe
paper later came under attack on charges of dubious
ethics, but was absolved by the Board of Student
Publications which found no violations of its
standards as revealed by the facts.)
Nov. 5, 1968
By SYDNEY FRASCA
Alligator Staff Writer
Under what infirmary officials call a no policy
policy, UF coeds have been issued prescriptions for
birth control pills from Student Health Service
physicians.
The practice has been termed a professional
decision by health service officials but UF
President Stephen G. OConnell asserts that the
prescribing of birth control pills is not the
responsibility of the university.
OConnell said in a recent interview he knew of
no policy on prescribing contraceptive drugs and
that the subject had never come up before.
Earlier this quarter, one infirmary official
reportedly told a journalism student during an
interview that the UF infirmary under no
circumstances issues birth control pills to unmarried
coeds for contraceptive purposes.
He subsequently denied making the statement.
Two UF coeds, one under 21, were sent to the
infirmary by the Alligator to test this policy and
each received prescriptions for the pills from two
different physicians.
Both girls were unmarried and specified that the
pills were needed for contraceptive purposes only.

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The doctors prescribing the pills warned the girls
against veneral disease, and talked to them about
their individual situations.
They were told how to use the contraceptive
what to expect in the way of side effects and after
effects, and were given prescriptions refillable for
one year.
Neither girl was given a pelvic examination. One
told the physician shrwould prefer not to have an
examination for medical reasons and was placed on
her honor by the doctor to return later for a
physical.
The other coed told the physician that she had
been examined in January.
Health Services Director Wilmer J. Coggins
aware of the fact that an Alligator reporter had
received a prescription without the examination,
declined to comment on the importance of the
pelvic examination because his comments would be
subject to misinterpretation by the reader.
Coggins said the decision to give a physical
examination is left up to the attending physician.
Physicians are bound by good medical practice
to make decisions as for whom they prescribe
contraceptive medication, Coggins said.
Coggins indicated that the only guidelines
followed at the infirmary on prescribing
contraceptives were the guidelines of good medical
practice and awareness of complications.
Physicians arc acutely aware of moral
implications of oral contraceptives and are involved
in counseling as well as prescribing, he said.
One significant problem in prescribing birth
control pills involves the coed under 21.
Physicians treating a minor in any area where a
question might be raised, such as prescribing birth
control pills, should be aware of the fact that
parental consent is necessary, Coggins said.
When asked if unmarried minors are prescribed
contraceptive medication without the parents'
consent, Coggins said it depended on individual
circumstances.



*<***..
. .^.. |M
sPSltfi*%£
RmT jk
DR. WILMER COGGINS
" ... it's a personal matter"
:s
\ $. JgF
DR. SAMUEL MARTIN
. . receives prexy policy
. W **
p '' hHM
PRESIDENT O'CONNELL
* ... opposed to the practice

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COUNTRY-WIDE DEBATE REACHES UF
Pill Philosophies Differ All Over

Nov. 7, 1968
By SYDNEY FRASCA
Alligator Staff Writer
UF coeds, under an individual casg philosophy, have received
birth control pills for contraceptive purposes from Student Health
Service physicians.
And UF President Stephen C. OConnell is opposed to the practice
because prescribing and dispensing contraceptive drugs should not be
a function of the Student Health Service.
OConnell contends that prescribing contraceptives could be
construed as university approval of premarital sexual intercourse,
which, he says, is against Florida law.
The treatment of student illnesses and medical problems is the
only reason for operating a student infirmary, OConnell said.
I dont see that contraception is encompassed within student
health, he added.
OConnell said the prescribing of contraceptives is not the proper
responsibility of the university.
Any policy at the infirmary on birth control would have to have
the approval of the president and the Board of Regents, he said.
Policy Gets Approval

Nov. 8, 1969
By CAROL SANGER
Alligator Assignments Editor
UF President Stephen C.
OConnell Thursday approved
the controversial Infirmary
.policy on the dispensing of birth
control pills to unmarried coeds.
In a memorandum to Dr. W.J.
Coggins, director of Student
Health, and Dr. Samuel P.
Martin, provost of the J. Hillis
Miller Health Center, OConnell
said the present University
policy Is a sound policy and is
approved for continued use.
The policy states:
The issuance of such a
prescription is a medical decision

made by the individual physician
in full accord with the ethics of
the medical profession;
i Such a prescription is
issued only for sound medical
reasons; and
Such a prescription is
issued to a minor only with
parental consent, or in
emergencies where consent
cannot be obtained immediately.
When asked to explain what
constitutes an emergency as
stated in the OConnell
memorandum, Coggins refused.
You make your own
interpretation, he said, We
cant discuss the naunces of
personal cases because they vary
from person to person. This is
what Ive been saying all along.

There would have to be some sound arguments from health
service physicians to justify the prescribing of such medication,
OConnell said.
Dr. Wilmer Coggins, director of the campus health service, defends
the pftctice of prescribing Birth control pills as a professional
decision and as a personal and private matter between physician
and patient.
The different philosophies expressed by Coggins and OConnell on
the subject of birth control for college coeds are indicative of a debate
going on throughout the country over the role of university health
services.
The Committee on Ethical and Professional Relationships of the
American College Health Association surveyed 323 members of the
association on birth control issue.
Os the participating institutions, 180 health services do not
prescribe the pill for contraceptive purposes regardless of marital
status and 143 health services prescribe the -pill at least to married
women.
Two hundred and forty six of the 323 colleges surveyed vtfill not
prescribe birth control pills to unmarried coeds.
Os those colleges offering contraceptive medication, 13 will
prescribe to unmarried coeds; 12 of these prescribe to unmarried
minors.
Os those colleges prescribing the birth control pill, only 13
prescribe it for contraceptive purposes to unmarried students over 21
years of age while 12 prescribe to minors.
Those health services which prescribe the pill for contraceptive
purposes supported Coggins assertion that contraceptive drugs are
like any other medication and that prescribing them is a matter of
individual judgment and responsibility between the patient and her
physician.
The UF infirmarys no policy policy was also indirectly
defended by results of the survey.
Some health services reported that a public policy was
undesirable and that all statements on the prescribing of birth
control pills should indicate it is a doctor-patient matter.
Os the 143 colleges prescribing birth contorl pills, only 19 reported
having a written policy regarding the pill.
One reason given for not making contraceptive drugs available at
student health services was that the long term use of the birth control
pill requires medical supervision by personal physicians.
The University of South Florida and Florida State University both
have official policies stating that birth control pills will not be
prescribed because of a lack of facilities and personnel.

Friday, August 22,1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 3-A



Page 4-A

l. The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 22, 1969

OConnell OKs Study
Os Quarter Troubles

May 29, 1969
UF President Stephen C.
OConnell has approved an
Action Conference proposal
calling for a re-evaluation of the
quarter system. He has
recommended that more
departments offer four and
five-hour courses so that
students could take fewer

If Youre A Collector...
*

page onTJ
you will, leaving, remember who and what and
how you were on entering. Between now and
then the two of you will do great battle. The
moral Milieu with which you come so
well-armed will have served its purpose or been
rendered anachronistic. Etch carefully, shadings
become important.
Thru that door lies the gang and vogues and
fashions up with which you must keep or keep
your measured distance from. Over there are
other doors. All elusive but easy to get at. Behind
each is joy and sorrow, a catalyst to learning or a
method of rote. Beware: that door over there is
alienation. Discovery is a launching door that you
might covet if you find it.
Inside many doors are experiences so
meaningful and real they will last you all the way
on your trip from here to your eternity. Taste
fully. Friendships come in rushes, or slowly,
hanging carelessly on the edge of a sentence you
almost held within you. Achievement is
here duck. So too is disappointment. It is
legion.
Doors change.
Etch with care. Love awaits you. The
changing seasons trip the senses, masking time in
invisible calendars. The doors of slow cure that.
They are subtle and harder to find. That is why
suddenly time does not move unless you push it
with the now-sharp, now-dull edge of your
sanity.
Thru those doors over there are easy laughs.
And over here is understanding, all-important but
elusive. Good hunting.

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courses for an average of 16
hours of credit.
The University Curriculum
Committee studied the proposal
and gave OConnell its
recommendation that:
Each department
re-examine its curricffliim and
organize it so that most course
offerings will provide a typical
student program of 3-4 courses
and 15-16 credit hours.

Doors change.
Etch with care. Those of you who have felt
the exhiliration and nausea of alcohol or the
liberation and disorientation of pot and acid or
the violence of fight or the violence and
tenderness and ecstacy of bed: you will find no
difficulty adjusting. There are those who have
been thru those doors, and, right now, while
you werent looking, they were looking at you
and saying silently, hmmmmmmmmm, yes, yes.
And there is a door: things as they arent what
they are. And there is a door serendipity, and a
door: arrogance. It fools you doesnt let you
know youve been thru it.
Look at that door. Education. Its enormous,
you say. Etch cautiously. Those who know
education is a panaces will leave thru a larger
door.
And there is a door, melancholy. It waits,
they say, with malice in its eyes, and, they say, in
the madness of the lonely that can creep into
your mind it will sometimes follow and cast
shadows that confuse. Etch broadly, in grand
strokes. Ahead lies laughter, gaiety. They are rich
and full, they say, and able to leap tall hurdles in
the lightning and thunder of a single smile.
And there is a door, the other guy. You are
the other guy.
And there is a door yes and a door no. How
will you see your world?
Etch carefully or the shadows of your mind
will cover over the soft and cool and secure
places you now know so well. But, then, maybe
its better that way. All the doors arc here,
potentially. Youve but to find them and step
inside.
May the fates smile upon you. Richard Thompson

Each college re-examine
and reduce its credit-hour
requirements for graduation if
possible.
The committee also said it
would not approve new courses
with less than four credit hours
irnless considerable
justification was provided or
the department already had
most courses with four or five
hours of credit.

Dorm Area Pools
Nearing Completion
April 9, 1969
By NEAL SANDERS
Alligator Staff Writer
UFs 6 000 dormitory residents are eight months or less from
taking a dip in their own swimming pools with a green light for
planning from Attorney General Earl Faircloth s office.
In an April 7 letter, Faircloth stated he was of the opinion that no
specific legislative authorization is required for pool construction.
Earlier the question of whether construction bonds could be
issued without approval of the state legislature caused Vice President
for Business Affairs William Elmore to ask for an opinion from the
attorney generals office.
The legal question arose over the interpretation of two Florida
statutes concerning revenue certificates.
One requires that construction of all university buildings must be
subject to the approval of the state legislature. The second exempted
dormitory facilities from this approval.
The question was resolved by including the recreational facilities
under dormitories, since the pools will be paid for in the same manner
as housing units are student rent receipts.
There will be no admission price to use the pools once they arc
completed, but 5150,000 has been set aside from housing fees to pay
for the pools. Also, the pools will be located within the confines of
land set aside for student housing purposes. 0
Total time between now and when the pools open ranges from
October to January, with the later estimate being given from both
UFs planning department and the Regents architects office.
The project is a joint venture between Student Government and
the Housing Division.
Tk
Qmlm
Mil
PUm
i
ALPHA
CHI
OMEGA
Welcome all new
students to the
U niversity' of Florida



AS 'ACiION CHAIRMAN
Investigation Prompts
Ramsey Resignation

Sept. 23,1968
By DAVE REDDICK
Assistant Exacuthfe Editor
Maj. Russell Ramsey, a UF ROTC instructor,
resigned last week as chairman of the UF Action
Conference following an Army investigation called
for by a U.S. Congressman.
The investigation was requested by Rep. Bob
Sikes (D-Fla.) after he reported receiving less than
20 letters calling the conference un-American
and hippy-oriented.
UF President Stephen C. OConnell, who set up
the conference in May has repudiated the charges
and contends the conference has acted in the best
American Tradition.
Members of the conference expressed surprise
and disdain at the charges.
In Washington D.C. Friday, Sikes said he had
received less than 20 letters, some from UF
students, questioning Ramseys chairmanship in an
organization which they felt had leftist leanings.
In an Aug. 27 letter to OConnell, Ramsey said
he was resigning because of a certain amount of
controversial publicity (which) has been associated
with the conference.

Cramer Bill To Combat
Disruptions On Campus

June 3,1969
By GINGER ANDREWS
Alligator Staff Writer
Florida Rep. William C.
Cramer wants to give students
opposing campus disruptions the
power to combat campus
militants.
Cramer has drafted a bill
which would permit
nondemonstrating students to
bring those causing a disruption
in campus activities into federal
court where they could be jailed
and fined.
This hardening view toward
student violence will probably
be reinforced by hearings,

the sisters of
DELTA PHI EPSILON
extend a warm welcome to
all new incoming students
We hope that your
college years will be
memorable for you
Love,
The Deephers

starting today before the House
Committee on Internal Security,
formerly the House
Un-American Activities
Committee. These hearings will
be studying the leading militant
student organization, Students
for a* Democratic Society.
Chairman Richard H. Ichord,
D-Mo., has had committee
investigators studying SDS and
its activities for several months.
Cramer says he has received
hundreds and hundreds of
letters from voters concerning
campus disorders. He said that
next to Vietnam this issue is
receiving the greatest part of the
voters concern.

Ramsey said the time necessary to initiate the
changeover to voluntary ROTC would restrict his
effectiveness as chairman. This also led to the
decision to quit, he said.
I made no recommendations, I made no charges
and I have brought no pressure to bear on Major
Ramsey, Sikes said.
I have always been a strong supporter of the
UF ... I know nothing about this organization (the
Action Conference), I have no interest in the
organization. I have said nothing about it in so far as
what it stands for. I simply turned the letters over
to the Army, he added.
Sikes is a Major General in the Army Reserve.
The conference is made up of 75 people, with
equal numbers of faculty, administration and
students.
During the summer, the conference made many
recommendations, including voluntary class
attendance, an end to Negro discrimination on
campus, and freedom of expression under the law.
Rather than be investigated by anyone,
OConnell said in a letter to Sikes, I take the
initiative and extend to you, and any other person
interested, an invitation to attend any of the
conference meetings.

Cramer said his bill is
designed to deal with campus
revolutionaries. It would give
non-demonstrating ; students the
right to file a complaint with the
Justice Department that they are
being denied free access to their
school.
In testimony before another
committe Atty. Gen. John H.
Mitchell said the FBI has
obtained evidence showing that
SDS is receiving financial help
from foreign sources in a
nationally concerted effort to
destroy U.S. universities.
The bill would also allow the
attorney general to bring action
without waiting for a complaint.

i$:§:j:§?!: : **' V X W : W&.
sss£ 7 toe always been a strong supporter of
the UF. . I know nothing of this : |s|§!
IH\ organization (Action Conference), I have no igijijij:
jijijxj:? interest in the organization, U.S. Rep. Bob
ss : s/to. wm
v%v.vvv*vvv%v.%v*vvavXvv.vavaw/.wXvlv.v.vvv#vvXv.vXwX*X !! # !*!!!*
a little philosophy
with every label
There's a well-known beer company that invites you to read its
philosophy printed on the back of every can.
Unlike the beer company, we at the University Shops can't print
our philosophy on the merchandise we sell, mainly because you'd
look kind of ridiculous walking around with our philosophy
printed on the back of your can.
But we would like to have you think about something every time
you see the University Shop label with those wild little lions and
that impressive-looking crest
It all started with the idea of providing you with quality
merchandise at reasonable prices all year long. So we decided to
cater exclusively to college students.
Then we started opening up our market. We extended our charge
account service so you could use it even after leaving the security
of the ivy-covered institution. And we started advertising in
national magazines.
The idea was catching on. We tried it out at a few more schools.
No matter where we went, students liked the idea of shopping at
a store where they could find their kind of clothes.
So we've opened more stores to give more students the chance to
take advantage of this little philosophy of ours. No, we don't
have a University Shop at every campus, but like the beer
company we're working on it.
......
We're The Nation's Largest Group Os Apparel Shops Catering
Exclusively To College Students.
University of Florida University of Georgia
West Virginia University Ohio University
Eastern Kentucky University Miami University
University of Cincinnati Ohio State University
University of Kentucky Purdue University
Bowling Green State University University of Alabama
FOR MEN AND WOMEN
Cf)t
Wnibersitp £S>Jjop
1620 W. UNIV. AVE. UNIVERSITY PLAZA
OPEN PLENTY OF
9-5:30 Jr FREE PARKING
ACROSS FROM CAMPUS

Friday, August 22,1969, The Florida Alligator, I

Page 5-A



Page 6-A

* ** ~ f r *t. ft -
k. The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 22, 1969

(Martyr Lavon Gentry: No Real Martyr

Jan. 15,1969
By JANIE GOULD
Alligator Staff Writer
Lavon Gentry, accused of
willfully and maliciously
injuring a building, was
acquitted in City Court Tuesday
on a technicality.
The technicality stemmed
from the wording of the charge
filed against him; it stated he
JH W
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Wsmt m ; m v m I
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r
LAVON GENTRY
... No Martyr
Pass-Fail Idea
Reality In Fall
May 23, 1969
By LORETTA TENNANT
Alligator Staff Writer
Ten of UF s 13
undergraduate schools and
colleges are definitely offering
the pass-fail, or satisfactory
unsatisfactory grade option as
it is officially called, beginning
in the fall quarter.
Students in participating
colleges may register for one
elective course each quarter
provided they are
undergraduates in good standing,
are not on any type of probation
and have the approval of proper
university officials, usually the
dean of their own college and
the college in which the course is
being offered.
Participation in the program
has varied widely, according to
spokesmen in the various
colleges. Although the
University Senate passed the
regulation earlier this year, and
the regulation is printed in the
new 1969-70 University Record
Undergraduate Catalog,
evidently many students and
advisers are unaware of its
existence or are confused about
its provisions.

injured the building.
There is no evidence that he
caused direct injury to the
building, said City Judge Wade
Hampton, in granting defense
attorney Richard Wilsons
motion for a directed verdict of
not guilty.
However, Hampton said
Gentry might not have been
acquitted if the charge had
been worded with a term such as
marred.
The verdict came as a surprise
to Gentry, who said he knew
nothing about the technicality.
While relieved at the verdict,
Gentry said the issue has not
been solved.
I won on a technicality, but
the same thing could happen
again, he said. Next time, the
administration will be smarter.
Gentry was arrested last

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PATSUN/2 OUR.* O
I Station Wagon £2 226* 1600 Sportswear 766* :
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P.O.E. plus tax, license, local freight, D & H. if
GODDING & CLARK j 3 jjj
Home of the New Leader Leader[2nd
[2nd Leader[2nd Ave. & 2nd St. S.E.

August for placing Bust the
Draft signs on campus
buildings, after being told to put
on bulletin boards only.
r he Gentry issue dragged
o through the fall when he
requested and was subsequently
denied a jury trial. His case
rapidly became a rallying-point
for such campus factions as the
Southern Students Organizing
Committee (SSOC), American
Civil Liberties Union (ACLU),
Student Government, the
Alligator, the College of Arts
and Sciences, and Tuesday, 19
members of the faculty of the
College of Business
Administration.
Gentry was greeted in court
Tuesday by applause from 100
spectators who packed the
courtroom for his trial. The
usually quiet traffic court, on

the second floor of the police
station exploded at various times
in laughter and snickers as two
hours of testimony dragged on.
Testifying in behalf of the
prosecution were five officers of
the University Police
Department, including Chief
Audie Shuler. None of them
could recall any other student
being arrested for putting up
posters on campus.
Neither did- they say why
Gentry was taken to the police
station just to be warned.
A squabble between Wilson
and city prosecutor Allison
Folds threatened to cause the
trials postponement. Whether
the UF campus is within the
corporate limits of Gainesville
and whether campus buildings
are state property were the
points in question. Hampton

finally ruled in the affirmative to
both questions.
Gentry, who looked at
various times bored and amused
did not testify. In fact, nobody
testified for the defense. After
the police officers spoke, the
city rested its case and Wilson
asked for a directed verdict of
not guilty.
The trial was preceded by a
rally at the Plaza of the
Americas, with Student Body
Vice-President Gary Goodrich,
Alligator editor Harold Aldrich,
and activist Ed Freeman
speaking.
Ive papered this plaza and
many of the buildings on this
campus during campaigns, and
have never been arrested,
Goodrich said.
Aldrich read portions of an
editorial supporting Gentry.




SEE US THIS
SEPTEMBER AT
2-
$
E
*' 4U *'(.'
.
. 5 FRAT ROW

FLORIDA ALPHA CHAPTER
of
SIGMA PHI EPSILON
WELCOMES THE CLASS OF 1973
TO MAKE COLLEGE A LITTLE
MORE THAN JUST STUDYING!
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Friday, August 22,1969, Th Florida Alligrtor, I

Page 7-A



Page 8-A

i, The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 22,1969

EDITOR'S NOTE: The page reproduced
below was the AUigator's front page when
UF President Stephen C. O'Connell denied

PHtiS
Pacemaker
All-American

Vol 61. No. 97

SSOC Charter Nixed, Backing Grows

By CAROL SANGER
Alligator Assignments Editor
UF President Stephen C.
OConnell Wednesday nixed the
SSOC bid for recognition on the UF
campus.
OConnells action came over the
protests of about 15 student leaders
called to meet with the president in
his office Wednesday afternoon.
The students met after their
session with OConnell to decide
possible courses of united action
against what they termed
OConnells and
irresponsible decision.
These student groups have called
for emergency meetings of their
organizations at 7 p.m. tonight.
In denying the request, OConnell
backed up a recommendation made
last week by Lester Hale, vice

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The reign of reason is dead.
One and a half years ago, Stephen OConnell
shed his supreme court robes and joined the ranks
of the scholars.
They called him leader.
And for good cause. He brought calm and
relative quiet to a troubled campus. The academy
had been rocked by Cason, Brewer, Dow, the names
of strife and discontent.
But Hi-Im-Steve-OConnell brought the peace of
reason, the solemnity of objectivity. He cooled
inflamed passions.
And they called him leader.
He went to work insuring judicial fairness. He
promised due process. He opened the channels of
communication, power and decision-making. He
created the Action Conference. He made progress.
And they called him leader.
But the veneer has cracked, the facade has
crumbled. This man is only part leader. For when
his followers asked the most of him, when they
requested he drag the university, kicking and

The
Florida Alligator

president for student affairs.
Hales recommendation had
opposed the majority opinion of the
student-faculty Committee of
Student Organizations, which voted
54 to allow SSOC on campus.
OConnell said that if the group
used this decision as an excuse to
demonstrate they would only be
proving the wiseness of the denial.
This decision denies SSOC the
privilege of: using University
facilities available; inviting speakers
to campus; seeking and receiving an
award of that part of registration
fees entrusted to Student
Government for student activities,
and; representing to the students on
this campus and to the public
generally that it and its purposes and
objectives are properly related to and
enjoy the approval of this
institution.
The decision does not deny an

EDITORIAL

the radical Students for a Democratic
Society the privilege of being recognized as
an official student organization. The

University of Florida, Gainesville

screaming if necessary, into the Twentieth Century
by granting campus freedom to SSOC, he bowed
out, ungraciously and foolishly.
.
For 17 months, while ferment brewed on
Anericas campuses, the University of Florida held
its breath and prayed. Slowly, painfully, hesitantly
it began again to find faith.
Only to have its newly-found hope cruelly,
thoughtlessly shattered on the rocks of blind
prejudice and sightless stupidity.
The University of Florida is likely now to witness
the concepts of judicial decency and meaningful
education devastated by one mans irresponsible
decision, his wrong choice.
The university community will know that Mark
Anthony spoke the truth:
The evil that men do lives after them, the good
is oft interred with their bones.
And the university certainly cannot be
comforted by the knowledge that John Champion
and Stanley Marshall are alive and well in Tigert
Hall.

organization existence, prevent
students from joining it, nor prevent
its members from exercising any
rights of expression or assembly
protected by Constitution or law,
OConnell said.
OConnell said his decision was
based on the fact that SSOC is not
a student organization.
However, SSOC said Monday
their list of membership submitted
along with the bid for charter last
fall consisted only of students.
But the president held that since
meetings of the organization were
open to non-students and the name
of SDS was on the original
application, and the SSOC group
shared some of the basic agreements
of the radical JOMO and SDS
groups, they should not be
recognized.
Neither of these groups would,
(SEE 'CHARTER', PAGE 2)

SSOC Holds Plaza Rally
SSOC will hold a rally in the Plaza of the Americas at 2 p.m. today
to protest the denial of charter by UF President Stephen C.
OConnell.
Florida State University leaders of SDS and Dr. Kenneth Megill will
speak.
Student Groups To Meet
The following groups will meet in special session tonight at the
places listed to discuss UF President Stephen C. o*CoimeUs decision
to deny official recognition and student group privileges to the
Gainesville chapter of Southern Student Organizing Committee.
All meetings are scheduled for 7 p.m.
Student Government SG Cabinet office
Student Senate Student Activities Center
Florida Blue Key Pi Kappa Phi house
Omicron Delta Kappa ODK office
Inter-fraternity Council (and Presidents) Alpha Epsilon Pi house
Interhall Council Interhall office
ACLU (campus and city) Friends Meeting House
w Students Civil Rights Research Council Friends Meeting House
Association of Women Students AWS office
John Marshall Bar Association JMBA Office
Alligator (staff and editors) Alligator office
The presidents, or their representatives, of all interested
organizations will meet in the Student Activities Center, third floor of
ei z nion, at 9 p.m. to plan and organize a definite course of
action, if any.
I B# I*LmJI

EL^nl

following pages contain some of the stories
published during days subsequent to
OVonnell's decision.

America's
Number 1
College
Daily

Thursday, March 6. 1969

fi:
saL jI!
STEPHEN C. O'CONNELL
... now must face the flak



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Our former Wolfies Restaurant
will be renamed
THE
FLAG
RESTAURANT
featuring finer food, better service
at popular prices.

I
West University at Main Entrance to University Campus Free parking for 250 cars
/ /

Our former Velvet Lounge will be
THE
FLAG
LOUNGE
featuring King Size Cocktails. Hot roast beef sandwiches
from 11:30 a. m. until 2:30 p. m. Cocktail Party 5 to 7 p. m.
with healthy discount on all drinks and free hot and cold
hors doeuvres. Nightly entertainment. Dancing nook.

Friday, August 22,1909. Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 9-A



i
i. The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 22, 1969

Page 10-A

March 7,1969

By DAVE REDDICK
Alligator Associate Editor
UF President Stephen C.
OConnell in a face-to-face
meeting with more than 150
SSOC members and

sympathizers Thursday said he
would uphold his decision to
deny the group a charter, and
pleaded with the group to take
no violent action.
Its (violent action) not
going to help you, he said. Its
not going to help the
institution.
The confrontation came
outside OConnells office on tjie
second floor of Tigert Hall, after
the group held a rally on the
Plaza of the Americas.
OConnell was grilled by
many of the students, who
questioned his denial of
recommendation by the
student-faculty Student
Organizations Committee which
said the group should be granted
a charter and recognized by the
university. The presidents
answer was simple.
I disagreed with it, he said.
Another student asked why,
after going through all the
technical channels of requesting
a charter, SSOC was not granted
one.
The mere going through
channels doesnt always mean
that youll get what you want,
he said.

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VOWS TO UPHOLD SSOC DECISION
O'Connell Urges Non-Violence

yfli

O'CONNELL: THE MERE GOING THROUGH CHANNELS DOESN'T ALWAYS MEAN THAT YOU'LL GET WHAT YOU WANT'
. . disagrees with recommendation by the Student Organizations Committee to recognize SSOC

One of the presidents reasons
for not recognizing the group
was that outside people may
take part in the groups
meetings.
Steve McGuire, a member of
the Young Democrats, said his
group often included
non-students, as did many other
campus groups.
OConnell then said there
may be a need to look into
other groups charters if it is
shown there are non-students
participating.
OConnell refused to argue
the merits of his decision, but
said there is probably a need for
some guidelines as deciding
which groups will use the

facilities of the union.
One SSOC member, Ray
Olesky, summed up the general
feeling of the gathering with a
final statement.
You are one who has
over-ruled the wishes of a
majority; that is not a
democracy, he said.
The rally, prior to the Tigert
sit-in, had been interrupted by
rain, and thfe group of more than
400 had moved under the
colonade in front of the
graduate library.
Dr. Robert R. Renner,
member of the American
Federation of Teachers (AFT),
said there was no reason for
OConnells decision, and said

f at eW I
k f fpH|:

the AFT felt SSOC should have
been granted a charter.
President OConnells
decision was unfortunate, he
said.
Renner said SSOC should
have been given a chance to
prove they would operate within
the law.
Let them be unlawful, he
said, and then deny their
charter.
Ed Freeman, SSOC member,
and past spokesman, told a story
of a young boy who after trying
for days to catch a squirrel
finally captured one and said he
was greatly aided by having a
dumb squirrel.
And thats what the

| *# **&' J8BB&
%3w jip

administration is, Freemai.
said, a bunch of dumb
squirrels.
And the dumbest squirrel is
the Vice President of Student
Affairs, our own Lester Hale,
he said.
Dr. David Kurtzman told the
group that a man keeps a
position of authority only as
long as he responsibly exercises
it.
He said OConnell had not
responsibly exercised his
authority.
Dr. Kenneth Megill, himself
the center of the recent Slade
letter controversy, said he
expected some good to come
from the student reaction.



ISO STUDENTS DWINDLE
Tigert Sit-In Lasts 3 Hours

Mar. 10,1969
By DAVE REDDICK
Alligator Anociats Editor
A planned sit-in in the hall in
front of UF President Stephen
C. OConnells office in Tigert
Hall was called off less than
three hours after it began late
Friday afternoon.
Steve Fahrer, chairman of the
Southern Students Organizing
Committee, and Dr. Kenneth
Megill urged the 50-75 students
to leave the building before the
7 p.m. closing time.
They said they expected
police to arrest everyone there
without warning.
We dont feel this is worth
getting arrested over, Fahrer
said.
The group filed out and
gathered on the front steps.
The abortive sit-in began after
a rally on the Plaza of the
Americas. The rally which began
about 3 p.m. was less than an
hour old when Margaret
Hortenstine stepped to the mike
and urged the 300 students
present to follow her to the
administration building.
Im tired of speeches, she
said. If we make any more I

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.y lisp
STEVE FAHRER
SSOC chairman
think OConnell should hear
them. Lets go to Tigert.
Once inside they found
OConnells administrative
assistant, Mel Sharpe, standing at
the door to the presidents
office.
OConnell was in Tampa at a
meeting of the Board of
Regents, but his office was still
open.
About 150 students went
into the hall, but the group
dwindled to less than 100 soon.
When asked admittance into the

office, the students were told by
Sharpe they couldnt be
accommodated.
Sharpe closed the office at
about 4:10, 50 minutes before
the regular closing time saying
we cant get any work done
like this.
Fahrer then announced the
groups intention to remain in
the building until Thursday
when D. Burke Kibler, Regents
chairman, plans to speak on
campus.
Earlier at the rally Charles
Fulwood, minister of
information for the Junta of
Military Organizations told of
far reaching plans to organize a
strike of university employes,
and told the basic goals of
JOMO, a black radical group
which attempts to educate
young blacks in their history.
Also speaking at the rally was
Student Body President Clyde
Taylor, who told them he and
Manny James, Blue Key
president, had met with Kibler
and Robert Mautz, chancellor of
the state university system.
Taylor said he had
recommended a new system of
recognizing student groups.
Taylor said the main problem
with the university system was
with the Regents, and not on the
individual campuses.

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OConnell Denial I
'Stupid Mistake
Mar. 6,1969
By RICHARD GLENN
Alligator Staff Writer J
UF President Stephen C. OConnell was accused of making a
stupid mistake Wednesday by SSOC spokesman Steve Fahrer.
Fahrer, chairman of the steering committee of Southern §
Students Organizing Committee, said OConnell erred in calling I
attention to the universitys obvious, blatant, oppressive acts.
Fahrer was referring to OConnells denial of a charter for
SSOC. I
Fahrers remarks were made during an interview Wednesday
night at which he announced SSOCs plans for a rally to be held I
today at 2:30 in the Plaza of the Americas.
Fahrer said the rally was in support of 1) the 56 Florida
State University students arrested at bayonet point Tuesday
night, 2) Dr. Kenneth Megills struggle for acadmeic freedom f
against bureaucratic harrassment. f
Fahrer said the rally was also to protest President
OConnells futile attempts to suppress dissenting elements of
the academic community. J
Fred Gordon, national secretary of the Students for a
Democratic Society from Chicago, had been invited to speak at
the rally in behalf of the FSU students but was unable to come, f
Fahrer said. }
Gordon was arrested Tuesday night along with 50 or more 1
FSU students.
Four leaders of SDS from FSU will be coming to Gainesville
to speak at the rally, Fahrer said. He did not know the names of j
the SDS leaders who were planning to speak. J
Fahrer said philosophy professor Kenneth Megill had also I
been invited to speak.
Megill said Wednesday night he would speak at the rally on
the current situation here and at FSU.

Friday, August 22,1969, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 11-A



Page 12-A

k, Th. Florida Alligator, Friday, August 22,1969

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Friday, August 22,1969, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 13-A



Page 14-A

i. The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 22,1969

SSOC Moves To Recognition
Charter Hearing Set Board OKs Bid

Jan. 22,1969
By DAVE OSIER
Alligator Staff Writer
For the first time in recent
history the Committee on
Student Organizations will hold
an open charter hearing tonight
for two student groups seeking
recognition.
Both the Southern Students
Organizing Committee and New
Party requested the hearing.
Both groqps are scheduled to
D. BURKE KIBLER
... opposed to SSOC
Kibler Not
In Favor
Os SSOC
Jan. 20, 1969
By RAUL RAMIREZ
Alligator Executive Editor
Board of Regents Chairman
D. Burke Kibler said Saturday he
would personally oppose
recognition of Students for a
Democratic Society (SDS) or
any similar organization at
any of Floridas state
universities.
It would be absolute
foolishness for anyone on any
campus to expect the chairman
of the Board of Regents to sit
idle and allow anyone to
recognize SDS, Kibler told the
Alligator.
But the newly-appointed
chairman emphasized the
Regents dont even
contemplate at this time
interfering with SDSs struggle
for recognition at Florida State
University.
I think the matter is being
handled properly on all
campuses at this point, he said.
A wave of controversy was
aroused at FSU last week when
the schools vice president for
student affairs turned down a
Faculty Senate recommendation
that SDS be chartered as a
student organization.
Kiblers statement apparently
will not affect the plans of the
UF Committee on Student
Organizations to consider
recognizing the Southern
Students Organizing
Committee Souths
counterpart to SDS.
SSOC leaders will present
their request to the committee
Wednesday at an open meeting
and a decision will be made in a
day or so, said committee
member William Cross.

attend. However, only three
representatives from each group
will be allowed to address the
committee.
The presidentially appointed
committee of five faculty
members and four students
makes recommendations to UF
President Stephen C. OConnell.
He has the final say on a group s
charter.
Something that must be
clear, said Agricultural
Engineering Prof. Rush Choate,
committee chairman, is that no
decision will be reached
tonight.
The meeting will adjourn
when the questioning is over,
he added. A decision will be
made in the next few days.
SSOCs charter has been
discussed on campus for some
time. The 72-member group
originally requested official
recognition last quarter when it
was still affiliated with Students
for a Democratic Society. SSOC
later dropped the SDS title.

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Feb. 7,1969
By KATHY MORSE
Alligator Staff Writer
The bid by the Southern
Students Organizing Committee
for recognition as a campus
organization is nearly a reality,
Rush E. Choate said Thursday.
The approval of UF President
Stephen C. OConnell is needed
In a report sent to OConnell
Tuesday, Choate, chairman of
the Student Organizations and
Social Affairs Committee,
reported that the application by
SSOC had been approved by a
5-4 majority decision.
Choate said recognition was
based on assurance by SSOC
that it would function within
the rules and regulations of the
University of Florida and refrain
from violence.
Choate said the organization
must function within the
established channels of
procedure at the university and

refrain from any disruption of
any university operation.
It must conduct its activities
free of violence and in a lawful
and peaceful manner, the
report said.
Recognition of an
organization can be withdrawn if
it does not follow these
guidelines in the future.
By gaining recognition, SSOC
is entitled to use university
facilities. This was the main
reason for seeking a charter,
Chairman Ed Freeman said in
October when application was
made.
A chartered organization
would be able to apply to
Student Government for money,
Freeman said. He also thought
more potential members would
be attracted to the group if it
were chartered.
SSOC had been affiliated
with Students for a Democratic
Society until last November
when SDS was dropped from the
name.

W . *&?
- aF**Sm§&&Jgssgp
<- Wr I'
RUSH CHOATE
"... SSOC would conform"
Freeman said at the time that
the SDS label had been used
for publicity.
Freeman has said SSOC
proudly accepts its label as a
radical group and names two of
its goals as ending racism and
attempting to completely
restructure the university.
The organization has offered
university students education
seminars of draft evasion and
supported California grape
pickers on strike.



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Friday, August 22,1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 15-A



Page 16-A

i, Tha Florida Alligator, Friday, August 22,1969

EDITORS NOTE: Reproduced below is
a portion of the front page of the Alligator

FIRE MEGILL SEN. SLADE DEMANDS

THE SENATOR...
. . if in fact Dr. Megill did make these statements
and that if this university would in fact like to operate
in the absence of legislative interference that a good
first beginning would be the immediate dismissal of Dr.
Megill..it is not my desire to tell you how to run this
university...
Sen. Tom Slade, Feb. 10, 1969

Jan 13, 1969
By DAVE OSIER
Alligator Staff Writer
In a surge of reaction to campus
dissenters Sen. Tom Slade, R-Jacksonville,
Wednesday released to the press an
ultimatum to UF President Stephen C.
OConnell calling for the immediate
dismissal of philosophy Prof. Kenneth
Megill.
As of Wednesday evening OConnell had
not received the ultimatum included in a
letter from Slade dated Feb. 10.
Slade cited Megills recent statements at
an Accent 69 dialogue as reasons for seeking
his release.

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when State Sen. Tom Slade demanded the
removal of UF Professor Kenneth Megill. On

At the dialogue Megill said, I feel the
only people who are talking in a relevant
way are the radicals.
He called black power the most
significant political development of the 20th
century. Today, people see unjustness and
they are not afraid to use radical means to
aid in change, he said.
Slade told OConnell that if Megill did
make these statements and that if UF
would in fact like to operate without
legislative interference a good first
beginning would be the immediate dismissal
of Megill.
If Megill is still a state employe when
the legislative session convenes Monday that
is going to be, in my considered and
concerned opinion, the last straw, he said
in the letter.

THE REGENT...
As long as lam chairman of the Board of Regents I
am going to stand up for the rights of the academic
community as I understand them. That entails not to
allow anyone to interfere with the internal affairs of
any university.
Dr. Burke Kibler, Feb. 12, 1969

the following pages are some other stories
concerning the controversy.

Slade told the Alligator Wednesday if
Megill is not gone by Monday, he will bring
the matter before the senate during the
speical session on suspensions.
If Megill is not happy at UF then he can
leave, he said. Maybe he can get peace of
mind somewhere else.
Referring to Wednesday nights
demonstration. Slade said if there has to be
a confrontation then we might as well go
ahead.
He said once the matter is on the senate
floor it will be sent to committee prob probably
ably probably the committee on higher education.
Upon hearing of Slades demands the
Action Conference Wednesday afternoon
unanimously passed a resolution telling
Slade in effect to keep his hands out of UF
business.



SPITFIRE Mk 3 El FIAT 124 SPYDER
PERFORMANCE PERFORMANCE
ECONOMY H .ECONOMY
STYLE H = .STYLE
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CRANE IMPORTS ,( K CRANE IMPORTS
506 EAST UNIVERSITY /1 N \ 506 EAST UNIVERSITY
7
MG n VOLVO SEDAN
PERFORMANCE H PERFORMANCE
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FUN (MU) U (volvo) *FUN
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CRANE IMPORTS B CRANE IMPORTS
506 EAST UNIVERSITY 506 EAST UNIVERSITY

M I' -
Friday, August 22,1969, The Florfah AHigtoc,

Page 17-A



Page 18-A

The Florida Alligator,.Friday, August. 22, 1969

COMPLAINT RULED INVALID
OConnell Denies Slade Demand

Mar. 11,1969
By JANIE GOULD
Alligator Staff Writer
Philosophy Professor Kenneth Megill is home
free the complaint issued against him by State
Sen. Tom Slade was ruled invalid by UF President
Stephen C. OConnell in a statement released to the
press Monday.
Megill was the target in February of an attack by
Slade, who demanded his dismissal because of
statements Megill made in an Accent 69 speech.
Megill called black power the only new idea in
this century; he said only radicals talk in a relevant
way; students must realize they are an oppressed
class in an oppressed country; and he called for a
radical student movement and strong teachers union
to take over the UF.
Slade urged OConnell to dismiss Megill
immediately and said statements like the above
have got to make the blood of every taxpayer in
the state boil.
OConnell based his decision not to bring charges
against Megill on an inquiry conducted within
Megills college (Arts and Sciences) and department
(philosophy). Dr. Harry Sisler, dean of the college,
and Dr. Thomas Hanna, chairman of the
department, agreed the complaint lacked substance.

Accent Speech Prompts
Megill Removal Demand

Feb. 4, 1969
By NEAL SANDERS
Alligator Staff Writer
Accent *69 began
Monday afternoon with
representatives of the far
left, far right and
middle-of-the-road speaking
on the role of youth in
politics.
An audience varying between
200 and 250 listened and
reacted to statements by such
diverse individuals as Jimmey
Bailey, leader of the Students
for Wallace movement on
campus, Dr. Manning J. Dauer,

New Students
>
r'
The Pi Lams welcome you

to the University of Florida
and wish you the best of
luck in your new endeavors.
If we can be of some
assistance to you at any time f
feel free to call on us.
Sincerely and with pride
The Men of
Pi Lambda Phi

Chairman of the Department of
Political Science, and Dr.
**
Kenneth Megill, assistant
professor of philosophy and an
advocator of student power.
The third speaker was Megill,
who refuted that the opening
meeting of Accent was even a
panel discussion.
Today, we are at a teach-in,
and I will treat my discussion as
such, Megill said. I feel that
the only people in this country
who are talking in a relevant way
are the radicals.
The radicals know where its
at, and Im not neccessarily
talking about the campus
radicals. Look at the strides in

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Bpi (Bpr' d*
KEN MEGILL TOM SLADE
Megills statement regarding a student takeover
apparently is what struck Slades nerves. According
to OConnell, Megill has since made it clear that he
does not advocate such a takeover by force and
violence.
As part of the inquiry, Megill interpreted what he
meant by a takeover. According to OConnell,
Megill used the term to mean all students, faculty
and local administration uniting to work for a more
efficient and practical use of state education
appropriations for the University.
If this is what he meant and means by takeover
and if he proposes to do it by legitimate means,
OConnell said, He had a perfect right to urge such
action and to set it as a goal to be sought.
However, OConnell felt the use of the word
takeover was unwise, because of instances of

politics. They havent come
from the universities, they have
come from the radical left in
politics.
Megill went on to call Black
Power the most significant
political development of the
20th century.
The Civil Rights movement
is dead, thank God, Megill said.
Today, people see unjustness
and they are not afraid to use
radical means to aid in change.
Os course, we cannot create
a utopian system overnight, but
at the same time, that doesnt
mean we must live within the
system which cages us, Megill
said.

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actual physical takeovers of buildings by students
on other campuses.
But an unwise statement in an isolated instance
is not case for administrative action, OConnell
said.
The inquiry showed Megill to be objective in his
classroom teaching. In fact, one of the criticisims
of him by his students is that he is overly
objective, OConnell said.
Another administrator, Henry A. Fenn, dean
emeritus of the law school, said any disciplinary
action conducted against Megill probably would be
interpreted by the American Association of
University Professors (AAUP) as a violation of his
academic freedom; and the courts most likely would
not sustain any such action.
OConnell presented the conclusions of the
inquiry to Slade Monday morning in Jacksonville.
Present at the conference were Florida State
President John E. Mathews, Speaker of the House
Fred Schultz, and other legislators, as well as Slade,
Hanna and Sisler.
OConnell, noting Board of Regents policy which
calls for an atmosphere of freedom and
confidence on campus, said, This atmosphere
cannot exist if on each occassion a student or
professor announces an unpopular thought there is a
demand that he be dismissed or an investigation is
merited.



What If The Gym Burned? \\

By MARC DUNN
/ Alligator Sports Editor
crowd
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a '~ *" INSIDE FLORIDA GYM

TOMORROW TOO LATE

and moved swiftly to get the crowd away
from the building and keep the people
moving out the exits.
Inside the gym a panic situation had
developed.
The inadequacy of the exits in handling
large numbers of people attempting to leave
suddenly had caused the panic. The steep
vomitory stairways, which could handle
only 90 people at a time, was the scene of
pushing, shoving and falling as several people
were trampled in the rush.
Hundreds of people in the crowd feeling
that they were trapped tried to get to the
windows on the second floor to escape the
flames. Others went to the basement to
crawl out the office windows and still others
tried to go through the locker room to the
exit to the pool.
Meanwhile the fire department had
sounded a general alarm and was on the
scene with all their engine companies, ladder
companies emergency rescue squads.
Firemen entered the building to rescue
stranded victims.
All available ambulances in the area had
been summoned and the Alachua General
and Med Center emergency rooms were
packed with burned and heat exposure
victims of the tragedy.
The roof and sides of the Florida Gym
had started caving in trapping some people
in the debris.
Hundreds of screaming students, faculty,
children and towns people were rescued
from the buring structure but many more
werent. ..
This tragedy hasnt taken place yet.
A report prepared by George Ryad Fisher, an
architect,states:

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Friday, August 22/1969, The FlomSTAlligator,

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Page 19-A



Page 20-A

The Florid* Alligator, Friday, August 22,1969

Megill: Freedom Nonexistent At UF

Feb. 14,1969
By RAUL RAMIREZ
Alligator Executive Editor
I came here because I was promised freedom
and because I could participate in building a
department, said the slim, brisk philosophy
professor. He smiled.
Dr. Kenneth Megill, the outspoken instructor
whose ouster has been demanded by State Sen. Tom
Slade, leaned back in his chair and glanced around
his rectangular office.
1 have found that freedom does not exist in this
university he said. Students in particular are
conditioned from the very beginning not to make
demands from the faculty.
He paused and puffed on his pipe. Then he spoke
about freedom:
Freedom for me means the possibility to work
with a group of poeple who are actively engaged as
professionals and as human beings in the world
around them, he said.
Freedom only exists in certain kinds of
communities, Megill said.
Ive found lots of friends most of whom are
radicals, he explains.
Megill was interrupted by a telephone call. He
listened for an instant and then asked for the
identity of the caller. He slammed down the

Tillman Reacts
To Megill Talk

Feb. 11,1969
By DAVE OSIER
Alligator Staff Writer
The symposium of dissent
ushered in by Accent 69 last
week was quick to produce
reaction in Florida legislative
halls.
After hearing of UF
philosophy Prof. Kenneth
Megills statements on radical
student revolution and of
student upheaval at Florida
State University, Rep. Jim K.
Tillman, R-Sarasota, an FSU
alumni, last Tuesday submitted a
bill to create a joint
House-Senate committee to
investigate causes of student
dissent and disturbances.
Tillman reportedly initiated
the bill after reading a Tampa
Tribune story about Megills
statements at Accents dialogue
last week on the Plaza of the
Americas.
I dont know what the
motivation was according to the
Tribune-story, -Megill said
Monday. The things I said on
the plaza are the same things I
teach in class.
Megill teaches courses on
Marxist and democratic political
theory.
Tillmans investigation has
already been labeled as a new
Johns committee which
instigated a so-called witch hunt
on state university campuses in
the late 1950 s and early 19605.
Johns is one-time Sen.
Charley Johns from Starke,
whose committee hit campuses
in a hunt for sexual perverts,
communists, atheists and
obscene literature.
But Tillman told the state
press his committee wont be
interested in the private lives of
students or faculty.
The apparent impetus for
Tillmans action, Megills
statements, went like this:
I feel the only people in this
country who are talking in a
relevant way are the radicals.
Megill called Black Power the

most significant political
development of the 20th
century.
The civil rights movement is
dead, thank God, he said.
Today people see unjustness
and they are not afraid to use
radical means to aid in change.
In submitting the committee
bill, Tillman said he took
opposition to things like
professors urging the takeover
of schools and urging students to
join radical student
movements.
This is not the purpose for
which they were hired, he said.
Theyre hired to prepare
students to go into the world
and earn a living.

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telephone.
It was the first call in a morning when the news
of Slades ultimatum to UF President Stephen C.
OConnell glared the readers of every state
newspaper.
It was someone who wanted to discuss the
meaning of treason with me, Megill explained.
But he wouldnt say his name.
He glanced past the bookshelves replete with
philosophy and political science books and looked
at a brightly colored poster depecting Josef Lenin
amid waving red banners.
The saddest thing which has happened to me is
to see so many of my good friends leave, he finally
said.
Marshall Jones, David Noble and others have
left because of the lack of freedom, he added.
Jones is the psychology professor who left the
UF last June after his appeal for tenure developed
into a full-scale controversy.
Noble headed the now-defunct Board of student
Investigation which last spring called for the
resignation of UF Vice-President for Student Affairs
Lester Hale. He has since transferred to a northern
school.
They were people who have taught me a lot
and now they have left, he said, all of them
subject to pressures from both inside and outside
the university.
1 knew of academic suppression before I arrived
here, Megill said, but I was promised freedom if I

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came to Florida.
The 29-year-old Megill, who obtained his BA. at
the University of Kansas and both his M.A. and
Ph.D. at Yale University, came to the UF in 1966 as
an assistant professor of philosophy. He teaches
social and political philosophy.
A 1961 Woodrow Wilson Fellow, Megill received
a National Endowment for Humanities Fellowship
in 1968 for research in Budapest, Hungary which he
completed last August.
His Ph.D. dissertation at Yale was on The
Community as a Democratic Principle in Marxs
Philosophy, and he is the author of numerous
treatises on Marxist philosophy.
As long as people whom I enjoy being around
are still here, he said, Im not going to leave.
It is fun to be at Florida, he aniled. There are
real issues to be brought forth and a certain kind of
community presence.
What I said on the Plaza of the Americas last
Monday is not new, he said. In class I talk about
the same problems and in my research I am
currently concerned with the possibility for
developing a democratic society where men can
control the institutions where they live and work.
I am saddened, but not surprised by the
continued political meddling in university affairs,
he declared.
And until everyone can participate, Megill
said, we will have neither a free university nor a
great university.



68-69 Academic Year Becomes History

June 6,1969
By CAROL SANGER
Alligator Executive Editor
and
DAVE REDDICK
Alligator Associate Editor
The year is over, and it is a
time for reflection.
The academic year started
with a bang, when Maj. Russell
Ramsey resigned as chairman of
the UFs young Action
Conference. His resignation was
sparked by an Army
investigation called for by Rep.
Bob Sikes (D-Fla.) who said he
had gotten letters calling the
group un-American, and
hippy-oriented.
The first week of classes also
saw the announcement that
tuition would be upped another
$25 to make it $l5O a term for
undergraduates from Florida.
The initial week was topped
off by the joining of about half
of the members of Forward
Party and all of United-First, the
main political parties on campus.
On Sept. 30, the UF chapter
of Students for a Democratic
Society (SDS) said they would
request a charter from the
university.
The group soon added the
name Southern Student
Organizing Committee (SSOC)
to their title, and then dropped
the SDS name.
On Oct. 7, Stephen C.
OConnell was officially
inaugurated as the sixth

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president of the university. The
new president became the first
UF grad to hold the office.
In his address, OConnell
pledged to make the university
first in the South and second to
none in the nation.
On Oct. 14, Union Board
President Roger Brown filed a
civil complaint in Honor Court
asking the court to issue an
injunction staying the election
for four posts.
The election went on though,
with Bob White winning by a 2-1
margin.
A week later, another
ingredient was added to
Gatorade, a drink invented by
Dr. Robert Cade, a UF
professor. The ingredient was
controversy. The federal
government, through the
Department of Health,
Education and Welfare, said it
had rights to the drink and
would demand the money.
Sometime during the
weekend of Oct. 26, about
$2,000 worth of stereo
equipment was taken from the
library by someone who hid in
the building after closing.
On Nov. 4, the Honor Court
overthrew the Union Board
election on the grounds that the
Student Senate overstepped its
bounds when it called for an
election.
On the next day, the
Alligator carried a story about
birth control pills being
dispensed at the infirmary. The
story, by Sydney Frasca, told
how she had been able to get a

prescription for the pills. The
story was to become one of the
most controversial in the history
of the paper, because of student
and administration reaction.
Nov. 5 was national election
day, and UF radicals planned an
apolitical rally for election night.
An unidentified man burned a
small American flag, and another
put to flames what appeared to
be a draft card.
On the night of Nov. 18, two
Alligator staffers hid in the
library, in the same place the
person had earlier hid before
stealing the stereo equipment.
The apparent gag was carried

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through to show that no
attempts had been made to
secure the building after the
theft.
The next day, Samuel F.
Martin resigned as provost of the
J. Hillis Miller Health Center,
saying our relations with
Tallahassee was one of the
reasons for his leaving.
The major story of the first
edition of the winter Alligator
was that Lester Hale, vice
president for student affairs, had
ordered an investigation of the
paper because of several stories
used in the Fall Quarter.
Hale contended that Miss

wercr mjoun vhhi =
Friday, August 22, 1969, Tha Florida Alligator,

Frasca had violated a doctors
tiust in writing her series on the
dispension of birth control pills.
On Tuesday of the first week.
Lavon Gentry was scheduled to
go on trial for injuring a
building by taping posters on it,
but the case was delayed a week.
When Gentry finally had his
day in court, on Jan. 14, after
two hours of testimony, Judge
Wade Hampton agreed with
Gentrys attorney that since the
charge read injuring the
building and not defacing it, the
charges against the sophomore
should be dropped.
(SEE 'REFLECTIONS' PAGE 23)

Page 21-A



*

Page 22-A

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Football weekend, the excitement and thrill of victory. The parties, the big
one at homecoming, then midterms come at you. Frolics next week, gotta
scramble for a date. God hovj / hate this physical science class! Hope there's a
letter from my girl today. Saw a bunch of hippies in the plaza this afternoon. Boy
did they get drunk Saturday night. Got a good registration date this time, plenty
early. Five first periods! Boy, is that Suzanne Rogers tough.
College is a total experience. You become what you will be in those four
years. The University of Florida is a living university in a living world, modern and
challenging.
The SEMINOLE captures those influences, the things that help to mold you
into what you wit! become. A national award winner and one of the elite
yearbooks in the southeast, the SEMINOLE is available to Florida students in
limited quantities. Reserve your 1970 SEMINOLE now by sending a check for $6
to the SEMINOLE office in the J. Wayne Retiz Union. It is a book that will be
read time and time again, no matter how old.

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Reflections Capture 69 Campus Year

Friday saw the opening of the
universitys beer hall, the
Rathskeller, with frauleins,
music and beer, beer, beer and
more beer.
The next week, on Jan 28,
the BSP met and agreed, after a
sub committee, not to press
charges against Miss Frasca for
her series on birth control pills
on the UF.
On Jan. 30, several student
senators and members of the
press were asked to leave a
meeting of the University
Senate, although OConnell had
said earlier in the day that he
had no objections to allowing
observers to attend the groups
meetings.
With the winds of February
came the storms of controversy
raging across the UF campus as
the legislative and the university
clashed in what many feared
would be the final step to
violence on this campus.
Sen. Tom Slade,
R- Jacksonville, demanded the
dismissal of Philosophy Prof.
Kenneth Megill. The demands
came on the heels of Megills call
for a strong teachers union to
join with students in the
take-over of the university.
The Board of Regents and the
university stood firm, and stood
with the students in deploring
legislative interference.
Megill stayed. But the
legislature was. not finished and
rumors of a Tallahassee
organized witch-hunt kept UF
on the brink of unleashed
tensions.
Accent 69 came to campus,
bringing with it such famous
names as Louis Harris, Julian
Bond, Wayne Morse, Strom
Thurmond, William 0. Douglas,
and Madalyn Murray.
The Rathskeller beer license
was given its final birthright in a
formal sanction of the State
Beverage Department.
The Action Conference
drafted a list of radical changes
->for Uniyjp&ity College and
introduced a proposal for a
tripartite governmental structure
of distinct student, faculty and
administrative bodies.
UF built a Friendship Walk to
encourage friendliness on
campus, but somebody stole the
first brick!
Fuel was added to the
campuss tension as Florida
State President John Champion
resigned because of disorders
there.
The Grade Appeals Board was
given a boost with the
acceptance of the the
College of Arts and Sciences, the
universitys largest.
While February didnt exactly
go out like a lamb at UF, March
came in like a raving lion and
threatened to take the campus
with it.
The SDS was denied charter
a* FSU, and violence broke
loose. Less than two weeks later,
the SSOC charter was denied
here, and violence threatened for
ays after as demonstrations in
'gert, sit-ins and rallies
reflected the shortened tempers
0 administrators and student
radicals.
Chairman of the Board of
egents D. Burke Kibler came to
and was faced with a
in the middle of his

speech by protesting SSOCers
and their sympathizers.
And then came the tranquility
of spring break, reversing the
seasons by making the campus
winds blow cooler in the spring
than the winter.
The student body presidential
campaign raged among five
candidates: Shepherd, John
Mica, Vic Ramey, Joan Warren
and Jim Devaney. To the victor
went the spoils... all but one
seat in the Student Senate in a
near-complete sweep of the
campus by First Party and
Shepherd.
Accent 69 came back to life
in a controversy revolving
around broken finance J4ws and
a budget possibly up-so $3,300
in excess. And the senate
demanded to know why. Final
solution of the matter is still an
event of the future.

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Accent 69 Chairman Larry
Berrin demanded that Alligator
Executive Editor Carol Sanger
be fired for her series on the
Accent financial troubles. On

HILLEL FOUNDATION
REOPENING, UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT
Rabbi Michael A. Monson, Director
16 N.W. 18th Street
Gainesville, Florida 32601
372-2900

June. 2, he demanded a Board of
Student Publications hearing.
Thoughts of caps and gowns
ended the year fittingly as the
University Senate proposed

i.rPi'Mif/ Au^vtg7W6#:Tfirft6rfcMianrtfliiA*;-

graduation from UF be made a
quarterly event.
And so another year becomes
history and memories for the
1968-69 UF student.

Page 23-A



Page 24-A

, Th* Florida Alligator, Friday, August 22, tM9

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The
Florida Alligator
THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE NEWSPAPER

University of Florida, Gainesville

Living

Friday, August 22, 1969



Page 2-B

, The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 22,1968

The Great
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<*n Invitation from Florida Players to /xprfjy
open house *~>N
I Monday, September 22,
at 7:30 pjn.
H.P. Constans Theatre
Tryouts for Production Meeting for
kThe Company of Wayward Saints The Company of Wayward Saints
Wednesday and Thursday, Tuesday, September 30,
September 24 and 25, 7:00 p.m. 7:30 pm
Add a new dimension to your college career. ]£)

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jeQUhHh imgli
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something
for
everyone
r/i e student's
extra-curriculars are at least
as varied as the curriculum
Interest in the avante garde
runs from fashion to
demonstration. Underwear
is getting as hard to hide as
political sentiment.
Meanwhile the sensitive and
poetic are drawn from the
impassioned mob to float
along the cool Ichatuckee
River, connoisseurs of the
brewer's art.

College Life
Os
UF Students

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Fwh and games often hold an exalted
rank among the UF student's priorities.
The above blonde, no loser in any sense, is
a common sight to poolroom buffs in the

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Friday. Augurt 22.1969. Tha Florida AMitor.

Reitz Union. The Florida gentleman, wary
of pool shark's expertise, takes his ease at
the gaming tables, biding his time til he
can get the shark in shallow water.

Page 3-B



I, The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 22, 1969

Page 4-B

Tubing:
Oasis
By PAM MARTIN
Alligator Special Writer
As you slowly float down the Ichatuckee River near Fort White on
Highway 27, you wonder how the hell you got there. You start to
daydream and realize that your six-pack of beer is coming undone
from its bounds of rope that hold it to your tube. This brings you
back to your senses, and you start giving some serious thought to the
matter.
You see yourself lazily floating down a cool, quiet river. Arent I
the lucky one? you say to yourself. Life couldnt be better. You
figure that blah life on the campus has been a bore all week long, and
now yourre ready for a break.
So you get some of your friends together, pump the tubes up, load
up the cars with plenty of beer and your tubes, and set out for your
ride.
You reach the starting point of your excursion at the rivers
boils or springhead, and youre ready to start your ride. Everyone
grabs a tube, and there you find yourself empty-handed. Finally you
find one, and slip easily into that wonderful 72 degree water. Even on
a cool day, thats very cold; on a hot day, its freezing.
Soon you find yourself deep in the confines of the river scenery,
and you pull out a beer. Without warning, you are suddenly tipped
over by one of your closest friends a good beer gone to waste.
Next thing you know, youve lost your tube and you swim with
all your might to catch it. Finally youre able to settle down on your
tube and pull out another beer. You wish someone else would be the
lucky receiver of your friends attention.
Four hours later, you find yourself at the bridge, the climax of
your voyage. Then its time to pull yourself out of the water and
begin the drive back to boredom that short trip home.
- JPSII
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. BJlf
A Hard Way To Go

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Kee Pmg pace with U. of mm^



PIAL-A-DOC
Med Center, A Chance To Share Problems

By RANDY BASSETT
Alligator Correspondent
I wish I had someone to talk to about this
problem, a student may say. I cant solve it by
myself.
I feel sorry for Jane X, shes so confused, another
student may say. But what can I do?
Any student who wants to discuss his problems,
whether slight or complicated, can find qualified help
through the Mental Health Service located at the UF
Infirmary.
A division of the Student Health Services, the
Mental Health Services is one of eleven services
provided by UF to help students.
We are dealing with a basically healthy
population, mental health nurse Sallie M. Jones is
quick to point out. We are here to help students with
problems that upset them.
A student may need to talk with someone older,
someone not involved in the situation, she continued.
Our role is preventive mental health, identifying
problems early.
Students who are diagnosed as mentally ill would be
referred to the J. HHlis Miller Health Center for
treatment.
Students come voluntarily to the Mental Health
Service. Last year 878 students were seen for
counseling.

Mononucleosis Ranking
For UF Not Accurate

The mononucleosis rate at
UF is not really higher than
on other campuses, according
to Dr. Wilmer J. Coggins,
director of student health
service.
Skill and interest in
diagnosing have simply
resulted in more cases of
mono being identified at UF
than anywhere else, Coggins
said.
A lot of attention is paid
to mono here, he explained.
Other health services dont
run as many lab studies. They
dont pick up many of the
milder cases as we do. You
cant identify mono just by
physical examination, he
said.
Infectious mononucleosis,
well-known as the kissing
disease, has sprouted many

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VryX*V*.*. X # .M. .*A # A , A A .VVVAV%V%
1 HOUSE OF TRAVEL 1
i INC. 8
I 1 I 1 I;;:
$ FREE TICKET DELIVERY
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1 , I 1 |
MEMBER DIAL. %
I 1 378-1601 I
g HOUSE OF TRAVEL l 1 %
i:|: OPEN MON.-FRI. g
$ GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA 8:30 A.M. 5:30 P.M. $
§ 1
ft westsioe ft
SHOPPING CENTER ft
I 1 i;i:
! 3415 W. UNIVERSITY AVE.

misconceptions which
Coggins wanted corrected:
There is no clear-cut
evidence to support the
theory that mono is
transmitted by kissing.
Sometimes this seems to be
the case, he said, but doctors
have arrived at no real
explanation for this
phenomena yet.
Mono does not
spread like respiratory
infections among members of
a family.
It is not a severe
illness in almost 99 per cent
of the cases.
Its really a very mild
disease. In fact, some people
get it and never know it,
Coggins said.
Freshmen across the
country get mono more

All cases receive individual attention from the
professional staff of physicians, nurses and counselors
in the fields of psychiatry, psychology and social work.
Thirteen permanent staff members are available under
the direction of Dr. E. Arthur Larson, director of the
Student Mental Health Program.
Individual conferences, group therapy and marital
counseling are available to students. Last year 76 per
cent of the cases involving therapy or continued
consulting improved. Approximately half of all cases
needed this therapy.
Students can come to the Mental Health Service
during its regular office hours. Staff members are also
available by telephone 24 hours a day, seven days a
week, if necessary.
Students can share a problem by telephone, Mrs.
Jones says, and then well decide if the student should
come in at another time.
There is no set way of handling the problems,
nurse Jones continued. It depends on what the
student says and how we evaluate the situation.
The Mental Health Service has handled cases
involving drug users, among other problems. According
to Mrs. Jones, who often conducts the initial visits,
confidentiality is always respected.
We discuss the pros and cons of marijuana, LSD,
for example. We encourage the student to stop and to
work with law enforcement agencies. But we do not
turn him in. The student must do this voluntarily.

frequently than
upperclassmen do, according
to all of the national studies
Coggins has seen.
When freshmen come
here, and they havent been
previously exposed to mono,
they are very susceptible.
Upperclassmen as a group are
relatively immune, Coggins
said.
Last year there were 270
cases of mono reported
between October, 1967 and
April 1968 by the UF health
service. This ranked UF first
in the nation, with 16.9 cases
per 1,000 students in a study
by the U.S. Public Health
Service Communicable
Disease Center in Atlanta.
UCLA reported 33 per
1,000, the lowest rate in the
nation.

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/ Cocoa^

Friday, August 22,1969, Tha Florida Alligator,

Only in cases of extreme danger to the student
himself or if he endangers the lives of others, does the
staff consider turning him over to the law. This
decision must be made by the director of the Mental
Health Program.
We have the option of putting students who are
under the influences of such drugs in the infirmary to
rest and receive special medical attention, Mrs. Jones
explained. We sometimes use drugs to counteract
these drugs or to counteract moods.
The use of drugs by a student is usually a minor
segment of the whole problem, according to Mrs.
Jones.
The majority of cases handled at the Mental Health
Service last year were of a different nature than the
problems of taking LSD or marijuana.
Problems concerning anxiety about school work,
roommate problems, dating and depression made up
the majority. The largest category concerned problems
in communicating to other people, such as parents and
friends.
The Mental Health staff also provides counseling to
organizations on campus; individuals, such as chaplains
and professors; and to the 10 other services set up to
help students.
Research programs dealing with the problems of
married students and student stresses are being
conducted also by the Student Mental Health Program.

Page 5-B



Page 6-B

I, Tha Florida Alligator, Friday, August 22,1969

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PVTzen jyow stady Tor party) late and have class early, o
ozfc/z owr rart where you find it. Meanwhile, you suffer.
You can ignore it fora while, but sometime, somewhere, its
bound to catch up with you.
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Morning Is No Time For Class

Sack Out I
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MBSgaagSftKaagft;-;-:: : .v:-: M- - ,1 ,' S B I j I I
ANY FLORIDA MAN CAN
DIRECT YOU TO MIKES
Mike's Pipe Shop & Book Store invites
all new students to the store with
the ideal atmosphere for browsing.
We're not just a textbook store, but
a complete bookstore with a complete
inventory of:
0 best sellers 0 reference
0 fiction & non-fiction 0 religion
0 children's books 0 instruction
t art prints cooking
opinion § music
0 humor
We have a Bonanza Book Section with
books at reduced prices all year round.
"The Book Store where informality
and friendliness pervade.
, ;..' ' A Smokers Haven
A Good place to browse while
selecting your favorite book pipe
or smoking tobacco.
AJIJ/CC PIPE SHOP &
#riMVC O BOOK STORE
SOUTHEAST FIRST ST. at SECOND AVE.

SS



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Buying books, not of his own
choosing, is no students idea of a good
time. Various texts and manuals can soak
him for as much as 50 bills. The heavy
volumes of educational lore leave little
time to enjoy the outside books and

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dorm after Friday s last
class is sometimes long, but
rarely unpleasant. The next
Sun may rise over a white,
sandy beach or a sparkling
pool and set on a bonfire or
a backyard barbeque.

welcome to g ville
welcome to the U of F
W yo mSMf welcome to Twig
introduce J wi & is COED HEADQUARTERS in gville
it be a kicky coat... a mini dress or
gmj m BJ loungewear for the dorm... or maybe
% j B MM j the right handbag for your outfit for
9 ffj/ the game. Whatever the occasion, you
i j can look your greatest with an
outfit from twig!
BRANDS, you ask? Heres just a few we
WHERE is Twig? Twig is sumptuously are sure y u know: Country Set, Mister
situated in two convenient locations Pants, Elli, Jeune Leigue, Joan Romain,
in gville... one block from campus Vassarette, College Town, Harburt, Tracy,
at 1131 W. University Ave. (toward town from Twins Petti Dave y> Bonse,ta Booth Ba y- Sk y r
the Flagler Inn) and in the Ma 11... on an on on
NW 13th St. (Highway 441 North). Youll recognize
us by our barn-like appearance, our cozy
atmosphere, and the friendly smiles on j^~'
our faces. < twist,, J
CcrUsifay cO&tflgsQy
We welcome STUDENT CHARGES... Fill in V Jf
the following and mail to us BEFORE /j /1 /I
you come so* your Account can be opened.
[NAME: AGE: | |N.^'
HOME ADDRESS: LIMIT: | 7~ ~' j
| REFERENCES: 1. | -\S~'Z r -~. ~ jj
| PARENT SIGNATURE: I 1131 W. UNIVERSITY... NEAR CAMPUS 2552 NW 13th ST.. .IN THE MALL
* "* -!f -

records available at occasional sidewalk
sales. All of which seems to indicate that
although the Florida man needs no
introduction, he oftentimes does need a
drink or two ... or..

A Florida Man
If
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Needs No Introduction

Friday, August 22,1969, The Florida Alligator, I

Page 7-B



Page 8-B

1. The Florida Alligator. Friday, August 22,1969

THREE PENNY OPERA
A joint venture of the
music department and
the Florida Players, three
fourths, or so, of the
staff of this production,
both acting and other
miscellany, were not
Florida Players. The
group also stages
experimental plays, and
other smaller projects
during each quarter.

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4 §jg|£ 1 fe- 4V %
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QIAN'S SIL VERMANS SIL VERMAN'S SIL VERMANS SIL VERM AN'S SIL VERMANS£
\ j|j WELCOME! A s
Traditional apparel for the College Man and Woman has been*"
part of the Silverman scene for many years. Co
You'll find nationally known brands of quality wearing apparel. Come
in .. explore our extensive collection of new styles. 5
£ Ask about our Student Charge Plan §
I SiSvetomM. \
§ 225 W. UNIVERSITY AVE.
Qc
S SERVING SONS AND DAUGHTERS OF FLORIDA FOR 35 YEARS I
S 05
oIL VERM AN'S SIL VERMAN'S SIL VERMAN'S SIL VERMAN'SSIL VERMANS SIL VERfr

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BEHIND THE SCENES
Here at work on the
scenery for The Birthday
Party, the summer
production. Florida
Players welcomes those
interested in acting,
production, construction,
costuming, lighting,
make-up, props, scene
shifting and scene
painting, as well as cuing
and so forth.

Welcome to the U of F and
to Gainesville
To get the most out of those
hours of studying, study to
background music of FM from
JjENITH I : M/AM table radio
from
model A424
Unbeatable quality in a modern design"
Couch's, northcentral Florida's
largest exclusive Zenith dealer
COUCHS
Ph. 376-7171 608 N. MAIN ST.
Serving the needs of Univ. of Fla. students,
faculty and staff for 35 years

Director's
Life: Theatre
By DARCY MEEKER
Campus Living Editor
Its hard to get actors to
feeling natural and relaxed doing
the things they have to do in a
Pinter play, says James
Lauricella, director of this
Florida Players production,
The Birthday Party. I do a
lot with improvisation, and we
often have frank open talk about
bodies.
Lauricella, 1 with a masters
degree and doctoral work in
theater behind him, describes his
personal essence as a theater
person. Everything I like to do,
except for the usual relaxation
things, is connected with the
theater. Even when I go fishing,
Im talking theater.
People ask me why I never
do anything like Barefoot in the
Park. Im not paid enough, for
one thing. If somebody paid me
lots of money to go through the
boredom of directing the
superficial characters, Id be glad
to. Since Im not paid very much
to do the work here, I want to
do something I can get deeper
into every day.
Then, too, since this is a
university I feel I have to put
real demands on the student
actors, to make the work
demanding for them.
Does he plan to stay in
universities? My plans arent
that definite. My only intention
is to stay working with theater,
whether in the university system
or not.
aJIL. KEEP IN
UPp step with
gator ads



Florida Players At Work On Summer Play

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STANLEY PLEADS
. . with McCann, to know why he's been hit

aii shapes and sizes
/
l director chairs $15.95
T? I \
~J> ~* * " -tfA -^S
l wind chimes .A
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yr I
til
V hammocks from ss^^^B

design shop
3448 W. UNIVERSITY AVE.
across from The Westgate shopping center
Phone: 378-5565 hours: 9:30 am -10 pm
'an adventure in shopping
L A. A J

& J
, india bedspreads
~ % t >
'
Hv
J*
L officers chair s2s J
r \ /v 4 "'*
4^|§|
incense . the best!

THE BIRTHDAY PARTY

By JOE BRADSHAW
Alligator Correspondent
UFs dramatic club, the
Florida Players, produced
Harold Pinters three-act play
The Birthday Party Aug. 6-9
in the Constans Theater.
The Birthday Party, the
first full-length play written by
Pinter, takes place in a worn-out
boarding house which is located
by the sea. The play is a
tragic-comedy.
The play is centered around
Stanley, a man in his late
thirties. Stanley is unexpectedly
called upon by two rather
mysterious strangers. The two
men put Stanley through a
merciless cross-examination,
throwing at him every kind of
accusation.
They conclude the
cross-examination by showing
up at Stanleys birthday party
and humiliating him to no end.
Stanley, denying that it is his
birthday party, finally collapses
from the strain.
Next morning, numb and
silent, Stanley is led to a waiting
car by the two mysterious men
and carried away to some
terrible punishment.
The Birthday Party has been
performed both on stage and

S*su 1
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poster prints
original art
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beaded curtains

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GOLD BERT FLIRTS
.. lv/r/z Lulu, exciting her for Climactic Scene

over television with great
success.
James Lauricella, speech
department assistant professor
directing the play, has previously
directed After the Rain and
Imaginary Invalid, here on
campus. According to Lauricella,
Stanley the piano player is
forceably thrust back to reality
by McCann and Goldberg. Thats
part of the meaning of the plays
title. Stanley has curled himself
up foetus-like, in a little world

\. - J , , *
contemporary lamps
modibles
fish kites
mexican glassware
straw flowers
/veed pots
chemex coffee
colorful baskets
m
mu9S rv y
L A

Friday, August 22,1969, Tha Florida Alligator,

indian and persian
print mini dresses
swing chairs
j
w£
. >
custom-made sandals
and leather goods 1

of his own making. He goes
through birth pains getting born
back into reality. Theres no
hope at the end of the play, that
he can accept himself, and go on
living.
Six people make up the cast.
Stanley is played by Stew
Solomon; Dan Jesse is McCann
and Rick Council is Goldberg.
Eileen Drillick portrays Lulu, a
girl in her twenties. Meg and
Petey, sixty year olds, are played
by Joan Mueller and Lou Tally.

Page 9-B



Page 10-B

> The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 22, 1969

HOW TO BE A
(big man on campus)
If youre new on
campus, theres a lot youre
going to have to learn.
Campus heroes are made,
not bom If youve been
here a while and still
havent made it, chances are
you never will. But if you re
just starting. .
v*
1. DO be seen around campus. Hang around where people
will see you on the way to class. Make a schedule of places
to be every day: third floor Reitz Union, Tigert Hall, the
Grad Library.
2. DO develop unforgettable facial expressions: A character
squint, a slope of the shoulder, set your head at a certain
angle and keep it there.
3. DO be seen and heard delivering speeches on the Plaza of
the Americas. Talk fast and loud.
DONT speak at the same function as the president or
one of his lackeys unless youre debating with him.
4. DO picket Tigert Hall and the Alachua Courthouse.
Make sure that your sign is bigger than anybody elses. If
you dont have the biggest sign, stand off to the side and
jeer.
5. DONT be seen with only one girl. If you have to be
faithful, do it on the side.
6. DO be seen with crowds of girls. Tell funny stories so
that if someone takes your picture, they ll all be smiling.
I. DONT ever come home before 2:00 A.M. even if you
nave to go to an all-night case and drink coffee.
DONT be seen there.
DO smile whenever someone mentions a girls name.
Then say that you re really only good friends.
8. DONT wear bermuda shorts. If you wear cut-offs, dont
wear socks.
9. DO wear strange outfits like clerical duds or Texaco
coveralls.
DONT wear underwear.
DO ride a motorcycle, but not under 300 ccs.
10. DONT wear anything tacky like a military uniform. If
you have to, make everybody think its a goof.
11. This is a college campus and youre supposed to be
smart. Be careful of the books you read. Alice in
Wonderland and Tolstoy are alright. Principles of Business
Organization and Mandingo are not. If you dont like the
right kind of books, carry them anyway. Place them on the
ground, title up, and go to sleep.

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WELCOME ALL NEW STUDENTS
TO THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
I sss. RMiAtaiiwioe I
for sidewall flexibility that
road shock
mggmkt \ B
I gives extra mileage WmMW great racial 1
I Extra Wide Tread Kjjjj/ }fY\ M PERFORMANCE! j
Lote ummer Special on Barbeque Pits 99< fSk
w town tire CO a
605 NW B,h Av *' Gainesville, Fla. ngF'
Ph 378-2333

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Let Your Mind
Dictate Dress
Do your own thing
philosophies of individualists are
more and more evident to
people watchers on and around
the UF campus.
Each class change brings a
display of the variety of campus
gear, 1969. Rages range from
antique Ivy League to
contemporary uniform to
authentic Army surplus.
Girl watchers shake their
heads over a trend in uni-sex.
Love beads, long-haired boys,
Nehru jackets and bell-bottom
pants make it hard to separate
the boys from the girls, they
complain.
Thank heaven for little girls
and shorter-than-ever skirts,
says one confused young man.
The mini-skirted coeds
struggle daily with skirts
too-short-to-be-seen-sitting-in.
Many find a partial solution in
pants-dresses of every length and
description.
This is the year of the trouser
on campus. Most popular for
both sexes is the expanded
bell-bottom trouser or elephant
pants, reminiscent of the *3os.
Problem is, I keep tripping
over the excess material,
complains one coed.
One myopic professor uses a
hair-ratio theory to solve the
identity crisis in classes.
Sideburns and mustaches are
still found almost exclusively on
males, he gloats.
On the other hand, below
shoulder length hair is usually
feminine in gender.
All that could change,
however. V'ig shops are doing a
booming business around
campus. Most girls come
equipped with at least a fall,
worn over or under the
still-popular long, straight hair of
the last several years.
Some shops do a clandestine
business in wigs for young men
who want chin-length hair only
occasionally. False sideburns and
mustaches are also
available though no girls are
reported as customers yet.
Short-curly hair is coming on
strong for coeds. Long bouncing
riglets are occasionally seen at
night. Or, when all else fails, a
brimless, back-tied sun bonnet
hides the ungroomed coed
coiffure.
The elimination of
compulsory ROTC with its rules
on haircuts and shaving is
credited with much of the hairy
situation now rampant on
campus males.
Patterned stockings are
seldom seen this year on leggy
lasses. Few boys wear socks at
all. The warm climate and casual
atmosphere lead to a surplus of
sandals on boys and girls. Some
go barefooted.
The neatly collegiate look of
days gone by is expected with
cooler weather. Upperclassmen
are already seen in conventional
attire.
Dress rules at the UF are
lenient, if not nonexistent,
explains a suited student leader.
He adds that The Florida
Coed, a magazine distributed to
all coeds, does suggest dress
appropriate for class.
That is apparently interpreted
as: Wash and wear,
permanently press (or not at all),
eye-catching, bright and most
of all casual and
comfortable.

The magic of a name! I
Thomas Campbell (1777-1844) §
Our good name is our most prized possession, I
but much of its magic we owe to many manufacturers I
and craftsmen who permit us the substantial right to I
represent them and their superlative merchandise in our I
city. I
For many years, these business associations I
have added luster to our name. For proof you need I
only glance at the following: I
V 8
Nottingham Norman Hilton and Hickey-Freeman suits I
Eagle, Sero and Troy Guild shirts I
Pendleton woolens I
London Fog and Gleneagles outerwear I
Pringle of Scotland I
Allen Solly, Ltd., Izod, Ltd. I
Corbin trousers
* ra|
We cordially invite you to look them over. I
r Hj
ssclt£
Mimber Six Main Street South J

Friday, August 22.1969. The Florida Alligator,

Page 11-B



Page 12-B

I, The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 22,1969

put yourself in the fc
HI BBif ... '; %§§r^M' till 5
- mm*
d- s
tvi
' *&* f & *\K
m l^M
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1
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Bssa
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~ IWWi



Kr' mm n
K*V TRACE
|jjftp9 rental apartments
iS|k Its the campus place just V 2 mile from the University. Nearly
B >4-/ Separate buildings for students, graduate students and non-students.
r One and two bedroom apartments from SILO a month. Owned and
managed by Kassuba, the nations #1 landlord. Kassuba got that big by
W being nice . non-stuffy (ya know what we mean).
I YOUR YARD
nearly
huge swimming pool
ijg; handball courts/private lake
I ftrMtfc barbecue and picnic facilities
1 special Gardens campus bus service
I 1, BSBBBB sun deck resident and guest parking
I k -k, private balconies or patios
ft
I '/ft&k' ~ commuter rating for student campus parking
K : jBBBB 8., B separate storage area for each apartment
H fnfffi SB conveniently located laundry rooms/all new equipment
.9B|W V; ft B inside corridor privacy all brick exteriors
P 1% ** 2-story garden-apartment architecture
ft JBfcj t v? 700 to 900 square-foot spaciousness
jJiir individually controlled central air conditioning and heating
I share with 1, 2 or 3 people
1 >JBBB^^S||^^^B^^BB wall-to-wall carpeting
sjT;BftSjr, oversize walk-in closets
dinettes with oak parquet floors
ftE&BBBftL : S^BF* fpample cabinets of formica in kitchens
hotpoint all electric kitchens with range/refrigerator-
I freezer, garbage disposal, exhaust fans
1 sliding glass doors to patios and balconies

I '*' 4 WI B Theres still time! Make your reservation today!
ft B Furnished models open daily 9 to 5/Sundays 12 to 5
M B B Telephone: 376-6720/700 S.W. 16th Avenue
I If SEND FOR FREE BROCHURE B B
B B Building Manager/University Gardens Trace
I am interested in a bedroom apartment in University Gardens Trace.
far Bp s B You can expect me to personally inspect the apartment >?
il i B Meanwhile, kindly rush your brochure to me. (date-time)
ft B ft I am .Student Graduate Student .Non-student.

Friday, August 22, 1969, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 13-B



Page 14-B

I. The Florida Alligator. Friday. August 22.1969

-- v XBHm. m
I JOBS
k §j|
:|lgjaf[ < % mwm" i&O*W
f i i*, biJb
..jjk
II jlp jafiralk
9k a 9
I y -'/'-i--!' ;Bi§f^|&fcy : : 9
Ffl// is r/ie season of winners and losers. The game is
football. You need a football and a field. You need
guys and their guys. And you need a couple of tickets.
Right?
Its not always easy to get them. The lines are long and
the sun is still a little hot. If you J re smooth enough you can
get your date to pick them up. But when it comes to
watching the game thats something you have to do
yourself. Win or lose rain or shine.

- >,

n IT
f&SBWKB l!' i IVr' ;1 i
Nine month minimum lease beginning with fall quarter. Luxury Off Campus Housing with On f'flJE
$187.50 per person per quarter, double occupancy Campus convenience. Near Restaurants and gS; fj
$345.00 per quarter, Single occupancy. College Dining Areas Churches Hospitals
Monthly, weekly and daily rates depending on availability. Theaters.
Contact Office at 1225 S.W. 1 Ave. or Phone 378-2221 for Vz Block walking distance to University
reservations. entrance. n
BALCONY W' S
g->- Featuring Ul 1 I LIBRARY I
architcctuk ____________
''' & FINE ARTS CLASSROOM R.
Elevated Pool w ioing ruuding a
/ |d| Recreation Room
\ 1 Confectionery .\ \ Q f *^ ON y jf A
9 Elevator Service \ \ n==l IT ;.s
V. rcdl Private Phone Available JII DING | sn .^r
IUPANCY Wgm Community Phone on Each Floor
Beautiful Landscaping jE-ij ~-i t r ri n. T-Ti r
U
iTV Central Antenna System || 5 co^Gf ? I BIOOS
WSrm Cable TV Available p I 0 J ; 0
* Storage & Luggage Facilities Ll E E 1
48jl 9 Inter-com System from Each L Z "iimm **
Apartments Include Ovens, Grills and Spits for Outdoor Cooking Inside
Rental Ut Ave.! iiiiiu

£ :lH > MMi
9 3
I | 9 mM
tub Wj "* w : aL jIS
jp JH wM > 9H9r^^.
iwa*' m ' *.' I
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it 399 V99H bb!^
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... vt!VNHHBB99999BI^I^I
Hr 1 BBBtM- ft T1 m
'J^/., egngaaHHa^n
BJ., / v IHIT.B
.; Hrt IMBB ....



UF facilities avail
themselves to the
fun-seeking student.
He comes, he sees, he
conquers, or is
ingloriously conquered
and more often than
not, drenched. Water
sports predominate at
such events as the
Lake Wa burg
Playday, a midsummer
cooler. The more
serious sun-worshipper
manages to stay high
and dry.

I ' ' X> Vs,. ' ; i
j" &

COLONIAL MANOR APARTMENTS

A . ... .....
§. |
| V P. .: ..
A 77 7 > f~7 TT~r
rrt / / j J J > y.-d.. jC-/. j ;
y S-\ $ '/.
/ /
/ TV > > iy '-V v D yy I, K y
; //.-7/9, .7.77.
KITCHEN
I pi
ii /
A.TKE./C /( 77V ,.
!j y f;
> CLOSET V
I! l J:
j| tZK-
fi' \

e 300 Ff. from main campus
e Directly on bus line
e Close to shopping center
e Near UF and hospitals
e Fireproof construction.

e Carpeted living rooms, hallways
e 5 Minutes to downtown area
e Supervised cleaning of halls, grounds
e Well managed by qualified mgr:
Beautiful second level pool

Sun And Water Find Friends

.yt Wff i '^ESISPfSMM
*rifr Js* -S' 4# m 9 t *. /-. * <' >: 'l-M, 3< i

"MODERN LIVING AT
REASONABLE PRICES"
ONE BEDROOM APTS.
(FURN.) sllO $l2O
This colonial styled modem apartment building
was located at its present site because of its
proximity to University of Florida, hospitals and
the downtown Gainesville commercial area and
office buildings.
These apartments are designed and decorated for
people of discrimination who like quality living at
reasonable prices.
The furnished apartments are beautifully
decorated with Danish furniture. The colors and
fabrics have been selected by a qualified interior
decorator.
These apartments are particularly well suited for
professors, assistant professors, upper class graduate
married students, young married couples, nurses and
business people.

Phone 372-7111
or come by our office
for information.
1216 SW 2nd Ave.
Gainesville, Fla.

Friday, August 22, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

w*sr i kfll
_ v ?*- *x- "fw
,-* v V
' ; :J&HE> ,"£ '-> v

W Ji K
* *\* r ilffii
- r rPLJ^Bpl
sS9E^^^SmE9SESSS9B|BSS
FEATURING
Air cond.
Roof terraces for sun bathing
e Garbage disposals in kitchen
sinks
e Sound-proof walls &corridors
e Large black top parking area
e Individual heating units
e Complete laundry facilities
e Apts, decorated in modern
danish
e TV antenna system (5 stations)

Page 15-B



Page 16-B

\. Th Florida Alligator, Friday, August 22,1969

People Swimming And Canoeing

l If I J| p^ljKr
Wak,

To water-loving Gator warriors, UFs
Lake Wauburg is a fitting field (?) of
honor. Nautical jousting is another facet
of the yearly Wauburg Playday. While
the canoe combatants accept a dunking as
part of the price of defeat, it brings
obvious pleasure to two bikinied coeds up

...And Chasing Ducks?
" ~ itfr v v < > 2afr
PP^ x x
y -. ->
CEJT^^ da**** **>,
ini jjnjagflflP!^'"* jr^ _~ ii l - vas
m '^a l limt.- ..? -r i "THilTiiimii r's ' -* l l C!7 ,<* 1 1'^ 1 rttejf
v nw-t-: 'll# #
: ,%s ~ $>-
s: - -rs lii>.' : '" v '*jJ** -
i 1 T v ... i
' #* Z&m, y^. v QIANS SIL VERMAN'S SIL VERMANS SIL VERMANS SIL VERM AN'S S/L VERMAN'S^
| WELCOME! A |
Traditional apparel for the College Man and Woman has beeii* Co
0/3 part of the Silverman scene for many years. ££
SO r-
You'll find nationally known brands of quality wearing apparel. Come S
§ in ... explore our extensive collection of new styles. 3)
£ Ask about our Student Charge Plan
1 SiSvehmarti- I
§ 225 W. UNIVERSITY AVE. 5
QC 5
Uj K
SERVING SONS AND DAUGHTERS OF FLORIDA FOR 35 YEARS
Co
VIL VERMAN'S SIL VERMAN'S SIL VERMAN'S SIL VERMAN'S SIL VERMAN'S SIL VERtil

to their necks in pool water. Water sports
do, however, tend to sap ones strength,
and since the Reitz Union Cafeteria rarely
features fare as sophisticated as roast
duck, it often behooves the hungry Gator
to rally his last wind and do a little
poaching on his own.

Mwmm
'*w : mmEm*
: > :^^ > .j§Bs&t? '/^v'
till |
; j. j^Mj^^^^Bp : ..^:>-C'
'" B mSm ~:
r'
* ji^|
9|
ft ir
v
UK
it"V j^f#iliS%:ll : 2 w
fl
':. '.. . . ' .;
"l#>' %I
,-..: s?x : : tfyyS-fr'&>'-' ' < ../ v j. /..v -.- -v:- \< ;/ iv,?}-*/:: . >X J /
' V ' <'* x -V -0 '\ : ?%$: **
*
A 120 min. cassette?
COUCHS
has it
[ScotcHl
273 MAGNETIC TAPE
If fnY cTlfn'ifrTf
gng n a I U )J
!./. ..\ jvy/ li <=\ uj
1 cassette!
H m
| EXCLUSIVE DYNABAMGE TAPE |
unsurpassed sound fidelity
lubricated, smooth running
high-impact case
2 hours total recording timel hour each side.
73MU2-M0
Also in 30, 60 and 90 min. lengths
If it's Tape we have it
See us for any of your
taping needs.
COUCHS 60 3
Northcentral Fla.s Largest selection



m ip.
- liKs?' v
*' V/
llllfe
.
If -ft;. : : ?% tf : : : sM^/:
1 '^^ > S£; / ms km?&k.&' < "->x. '** - x -> v
5?;. .§ "wS*' # S ; r
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jpjpij JKL> fe : ?- IP
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fliik AMT 1
Wj^3-?k j > v: Safe mv/w Hf
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.4fkg, t£ML
1 I'
nB
Like Father Like Son
77ze generation gap may be merely an illusion. Although
father and son find oral gratification in different wavs, t e
expressions are remarkably similar. The only difference is
that the American Cancer Society has not yet re ease any
damaging statistics on the long term ejjec s
milk-drinking.

A Lonely
Campus:
In all
seasons
clouds
block
your path

4 :"
What makes
Burger Chef
good enough to
leave home for ?
Is it our hamburgers cooked over
an open fire?
Our thin, crisp, tender french
fries?
Our thick shakes, so thick you
can eat them with a spoon?
Our fish sandwiches and our
hot apple turnovers?
Yes. It is.
DONT FORGET OUR
ZSgMMML ROAST BEEF SANDWICH
AVAILABLE AT BOTH
LOCATIONS HERE
Burger Chef
Food good enough to leave home for. \
715 N.W. 13th St. 'Ti r JT
1412 N. Main St. JilSfeL II

W&tWm OHKMP ..-. .'
EC*fl - ' " § t|v : **'P\
| jtf
: ; --S : . ?v -v>:-j- v ~<
: ' v'
.aieJfe :~'ft?Vv>. &&*%&'\£s : '. '4' . N y. < -, -.s^

Friday. August 22, 1960, Th* Florid* Alligator,

Page 17-B



Page 18-B

1, Th Florida Alligator, Friday, August 22,1968

, < vyi* ' IBlgk *s*;,
' BBp Mraj& fe.
I j| : ;' *. Bp fl fIH y. ttMgi IM '
A j* t ;v
if W 'Km 4 JH mtgm
' V'%? v^s ~,m s'~' y s f %1 i i*'y y' r% im tsisM&Ssk i
'Hr Ip t HKIL Yn tBH BB9Pu -* v
B|| f^Hl I^^^^^H|M : |

joist the; glee club
I ittttbw.. > ~ *** ' : ~ faliyHiif fr r -Ifff Ifffffff! jfi|^fflk'- v '-'" vo^|: :
I "swwtowi- --- M x 8 MMfPi -. MHw* 'A mm mssS&*,
lllyrjj EO "" w t^^^a^^BWPii aHH am D|k Ji
jggj% ,jjk <t^ k v:-. AHH fll \ \
-
Hr- VHH| " -J*!' 1 4
m B| | f %? jq^M ~ r
'*+
| T <. **
.a

It offers a constructive way to relieve some
of the tensions and pressures that are a part
of campus life at the University of Florida.
Actual participation in musical events on
campus brings one much closer to the cultural
side of campus life.
It provides a welcome relaxation in the
middle of a hard day of classes. Although
hard work is necessary, the enjoyment of
singing with others is more than worthwhile.
Students find glee club a welcome endeavor
away from the usual academic schedule of
study and preparing for tests. Tours harbor
experiences all their own; hard work, long
hours, but also travel, fun and more fun. The
balance is ideal, the experience unforgettable.

CONGRATULATIONS!
on selecting the University of
Florida, the best university in the
southeast. Now select the oldest
musical club on campus sing
with the MEN'S GLEE CLUB.
CONTACT:
John Grigsby, director
Building R, Room 122
no audition necessary

Entertainment
The Fifth Dimensions
4 >
#>
IP *f£S3s£
|pP' yP^
4^iJj
Dion
The Supremes

;>.. fIH

T
O
U
s
&
Credit



Lindsqj
WELCOMES
YOU TO fUniREMAKERS 4*l} I
jp i;
U. of F.
YOURE THE CREAM OF THE CROP... or V "-.- f/
you wouldnt be reading this. And
we here at Bette Lindsey are proud to < | s \
welcome you to Gainesville. You and your afipllftf jj '\s%-?A
families have probably shopped at Bettes \ j||||ll||l
in your home town... we hope you will
want to do the same here in Gainesville.
Youll find the same friendly service here
that youve come to expect. A charge account
from any Belk store is also good here,
and you will always be made welcome.
At Bette Lindsey the name of the game jmmmjK
is fashion, so think of us first when
you want fashion correctness at reasonable E&tSiffl/mlluL
. prices. These are a few of the names
in fashion that are available at Bettes:
THE m t Bobbie Brooks London Fog fS&gj&X&M
it m |-t \ ThermoJac Van Heusen
J\AMlj Junior House Creighton
of the jmm Henry Lee Hang Ten
Gm lm? Butti
f TIM f V
' BJ/l VLIII I t Misty Harbor H.IJS.
BI \ m| |ll || ll White Stag Botany l J If '*
ml If HHI fL & many others & many others Jfjj
Belk, Central, And Master Charge Plans 1320 N. Main St.
Convenient BRANCH POST OFFICE In the
1 Layaway & Free Gift Wrap Gainesville Shopping Center

Friday, August 22,1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 19-B



Page 20-B

l, The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 22, 1969

Sin City: Games Students Play
Wm i W
j B bI 1 iMMIB
o ..HR£ I
IHi llt.iilflDi?* 18
Bl | B Ijkl im Iflggi ; !<$M Shl I j**. §
8888 1 91 sfHiilSi MtSm 8 BBm | t
'- ji; -V.'.'-' .Bg.ji &Bfliltl §v

ff Come hungry...Go happy
/reK
, / BARN \
I COUNTRY DINNER CHICK N FRIESI
m BIG BARNEY 1
/ COKE HOUR DAILY \
ALL LARGE SOFT DRINKS 10 CENTS (2-4 P.M.)
HAMBURGER 20c MILK SHAKE
8 CHEESEBURGER 25( COFFEE 12 B F/SH SANDWICH 30< MILK 15( 8
U FRENCH FRIES )8< HOT CHOC. 15 SOFT DRINKS 15( I
2029 N.W. 13th STREET l
--firm ;



...Catching
Games Students Play in and around Gainesvilles
notorious Sin City apartment complexes include a
variation of aquatic football. The game calls for the
defensive line to span the 5 depth line while the center
hikes from poolside. The quarterback fades out to the
sundeck and the left end goes off the board for a long one.
The girls are impressed.
* v 4
4 iSfli ibi
.A vMiEilimywWg ' ; a9iwaiwfflHp 1-
M lilWlHffll Wmm3m M
SBBBBhLI* M 'm SI 3
Sbp& : _ wF r^ra
jrefr. ::>£ T' i># 9888
: 4 wmBMBKL miMUM.wm Bl p
e x/ £;
i- -> x&v T PFsF JRs
lltt B|
HKkS '
. ; ;- : \,v
j|i%- %l||. -; H Bfe^V
*jgsn|npF j s/^-- v 'S^^- r^^>< v
* /SgjJff 4EHfBP3IS

- .<---$|P
mBIM
BP''\\ jWT ll, *Mt
lu B
5 L 1 ^#'^WP^.
- : ''" ' %*&**>" '<*
...Caught
Later in the day, team captain and head cheerleader hold
a huddle in some deserted study lounge. Passes, blocks and
interceptions are also made. But unlike its poolside
counterpart, this game can be played in poor light and may
continue . very . very . .*late.
it } 4 n ||b n
fj| i|J 1 M
./ '?&.. 9 '>" i,iiii wit
. 1 4 B Jj^- c^rrriyW^
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t "IN ON CAMPUS :

J For All Your Footwear Needs
!^V^!
I ~ i
j
i Tflr.titcheir* I


4 Phone: 376-0444 1127 West University Avenue 4

Friday, August 22,1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 21-B



Page 22-B

I, The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 22,1969

UF Campus: Where The Old
.- V ~ . -i H£|L JHh& AL&iWmA
*: W V V -_f*> Mfc- / JfeJHMI.... v |2£u^e^^- : %v iKPL^W
" iiPlpl .. x ymmm:j4 *,., ,kv .-jJmmw^'
Tmfiraii nffiyr 13 jm j~Mw&y *&&*&&&% ...... PISBHPFM k = *.,,
v. p W7m M Bjjlf . j| Imt
^ < "' y : I I { ,'/ Y / T
,< | *. / K \M A 9
OP s { , r | jj I
*' #
#-< it ; I i j- I J mPm f |
iii jsSl

COUCHS offers you
rfD/p.
one f Florida's largest selections
new world of
WUUenSOfr of Wollensak tape recorders and
'SRNKUf
Scotch brand recording tapes.
"If Wollensak makes it we sell it.
.a C dc WOLLENSAK 3500
e Automatic Record
WOLLENSAK
4200 Cassette Recorder I
battery operated
o solid state
Dynamic microphone,
carrying case and tape
cassette included
only 69^
-No middleman profit
-Direct factory dealer
Northcentral Fla.'s headquarters for your taping needs.
COUCHS INC.
608 N. MAIN ST.
376-7171
Serving the needs of the U of F since 1933

Nestled modestly among palm, pine, and oak in the heart
of the UF campus, the old brick, gabled halls play host to
vines, pigeons and assorted lecture classes. Many of the
names pay tribute to men long dead. Silently they suffer the
abuses of time and disgrunted architecture students .
JBl
Timm, V' #
nn ,??r. S fvK fBIfIMMH r i. -r*-
M§MS fliPB SSL ,,f **s I 38g& -1 -5? 11l i 1 Ml l i'"i l ii l lii^ | ii |l i l *i"t4n7nmfeg.^fer.-
WBi3Km HW tggf i 4S lift ritft | ~: ; x
'illllly X 11 "- *y~ r "~~- - x~ a a : j <* >~4 *"* W&ys
99ff saw ajfff' -*wy t
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Wss&&:>' V* B| sj2Z>
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A WZ£!**& CS? l[ y. l|
so^S>mS? > v>'^s- ; ,^;
M|i|. 1 B*

g.%^ M' "B Jgw|B^9^B|^fcr



Meets The New
.. meanwhUe, on the campus perimeter, new complexes
spring up, neither modest nor necessarily ugly. They come
complete with both lecture and modem laboratory
facilities. What they lack in charm, they generally make up
in parking space.
wShM\
'trr* /' £* r£ A &+. ** S, ?
I. jHgJV r Jnj
BB V mm fflftr §
'tWI 4 WW V s b
I*l ft," jr *o* i - *
M rtu JL f> sSs gg&fmK
M < m[ BBHBf iiaM,
%Jr -ap ililly
,- - 1,,^ r V W
_iijif^ ,%? rV v^,^*
ii

wm mmm
I k<^mmMm
g \mm m
g ggHim s
i
* j
**j

fk WELCOME
- lirSl J NEW STUDENTS
'- : V : ;;;^B >*1 7=s== Try our deliciously
KFffm different
Roast Beef Sandwich
it's tender-sliced!
...Youll never
'vy jVj 1 ~mT[@~ with anything less!
-*C SWING 01/fR TO TO-1
1 TO-1 flrhv's
i $& ~9 CONSTANTLY GROWING £ J|| £ W |^
COAST TO COAST J
1405 SW 13th ST
* t) ...
JUST SOUTH OF THE UNDERPASS

- '. : V
\ f|:
**
i
>! n
***** i^
vv.'. *,.+&< r. w>wi -4k i>
OMAN'S S/L VERM AN'S S/L VERM AN'S S/L VERMAN'S S/L VERM AN'S S/L VERMAN'SJ
Qc
Uj
j j|y WELCOME! J|| I
Traditional apparel for the College Man and Woman has been r Co
part of the Silverman scene for many years. jj£
You'll find nationally known brands of quality wearing apparel. Come
in ... explore our extensive collection of new styles.
J Ask about our Student Charge Plan
1 Sifoetofuw&
QC g
£ SERVING SONS AND DAUGHTERS OF FLORIDA FOR 35 YEARS
*>j oo
oIL VERMAN'S S/L VERMAN'S S/L VERMAN'S S/L VERMAN'S S/L VERMAN'S S/L VERfc

Friday. August 22, 1960, Tha Florida Alligator.

Page 23-B



Page 24-B

I, The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 22,1969

A nwcDTiccucMT ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT y 0 F F. FACULTY CLUB INC.
ROTISJxSIi: £R
392-20971 NEWS 1392-2097"
A THE RATHSKELLER BEGINS ITS THIRD A.
WE REOPEN SEPTEMBER 18,11 AM.^ J

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PURPOSE )
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informal meeting place which caters to
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enjoy entertainment and refreshments. I
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PRETZEL
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Ours is from 2to 6 every Friday.

Membership Card?
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No membership CARD is ever
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service. Everybody can (and should)
eat breakfast, lunch and dinner at the
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member or guest of a member to get
bar service and to get in after 8:00
when the entertainment starts.
So dont listen to rumors
Eat lunch or just drop into
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the day no membership
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LOOKING FOR US?
We're directly behind the old Fla.
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beside Murphee, and across the road
from the Music Building.

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PHILOSOPHY
The philosophy of the Rathskeller
centers around the idea that students,
faculty and staff need to communicate
with each other. As our society grows
more complex and more automated
this need for personal communication
grows. The Rathskeller will provide the
place for this communication and our
activities and programs will encourage
it.

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THE GERMAN STYLE EATERY, LOCATED IN
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NEAR MURPHREE HALL, OFFERS BEER TO
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President and Mrs. STEPHEN
OCONNELL Enjoy Entertainment



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Sports: A Glance Back, A Look Ahead

The
Florida Alligator
THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE NEWSPAPER

University of Florida, Gainesville

Friday, August 22, 1969



Page 2-C

The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 22, 1969

m
...

Being of the opinion that All-American selections are a publicity
poll and pre-season predictions are impossible to make, it is with
extreme trepidation that I present my selections for the final
Southeastern Conference 1969 football standings.
I have decided to get on the bandwagon and give the title nod to
Ole Miss just to see how they handle the kiss of death.
Anyway in order of finish here goes:
MISSISSIPPI The Rebels return 27 lettermen and 16 starters to
the gridiron in the fall which should be enough to clinch the title.
Quarterback sensation Archie Manning will again be at the helm of the
6B Liberty Bowl champs. Coach Johnny Vaught has the only SEC
team with experience on both offense and defense.
AUBURN The offensive backfield must take shape quickly if the
Tigers are to pose a serious threat. Sophomore quarterback Pat
Sullivan will have to put life in the offensive unit. All the defensive
starters from 1968 will be returning along with 26 other lettermen.
GEORIGA The defending SEC champs will be hampered on
defense with the loss of All-American Bill Stanfill and Jake Scott. The
Bulldogs will return 37 lettermen including quarterback Mike Cavan,
the SECs leading rusher Bruce Kemp and receiver Dennis Hughes. It
will be tough to improve on the best record of a major college in the
South.
TENNESSEE Although the Volunteers lost their entire starting
backfield from 1968 but sophomore Bobby Scott is ready to take
over. Only four offensive and six defensive starters return in the fall.
The defense will have strong leadership with All-American Steve Kiner
returning at linebacker. The play of newcomers will determine the
fortune of the 1969 Vols.
ALABAMA Coach Bear Bryant will be devoting full time to the
football team in the fall now that he has stepped down as Athletic
Director. With more time for football Bryant will be building a team
that must recover from a humiliating 35-10 loss to Missouri in the
Gator Bowl. Three defensive starters will be back along with most of
the offensive team from 1968. Quarterback Scott Hunter will be
taking to the air again trying to make the Tide the threat it once was.
UF The Gators also face a rebuilding year, but the prospect of
having John Reaves at quarterback rates them the darkhorse candidate
of the SEC. The loss of All-Americans Larry Smith and Guy Dennis
plus Jim Yarbrough, Larry Rentz, Tom Christian, Bill Dorsey and
David Mann will hurt. But if Reaves clicks with his sophomore
receiver Carlos Alvarez the Gators will be unstoppable in the air. On
defense pre-season All-American Steve Tannen leads the list of
experienced returning lettermen.
LOUISIANA STATE The Tigers return only three starters to the
gridiron in 1969 but experience at quarterback should help. Mike Hill
will be calling the signals but unless his new crop of receivers come
through it could be a long season.
VANDERBILT An outstanding crop of freshmen which is the
result of subdued recruiting requirements could give the Commodores
an even better season than 1968. Vandy had their first winning season
since 1959 last year.
KENTUCKY Even with the hiring of John Ray, former Notre
Dame assistant coach, the Wildcats will not be a serious contender in
1969. The loss of Dick Lyons, an outstanding runner, will be the Cats
most serious setback.
MISSISSIPPI STATE The return of All-SEC passing conbination
Tommy Pharr and Sammy Milner will make the Bulldogs a threat in
any game but a weak defense and lack of a serious running game will
hurt. State can be scored on as easily as they can score and lack of
depth will prove disaster for the Bulldogs.
\ GRESHAMS W
m 16th DRUGS INC. M
1605 SW 13th ST. M
\ COSMETICS #
m XEROX COPIES \
m COMPLETE PRESCRIPTION DEPT. M

Gators
Darkhorse
In 69

By Marc Dunn

UF 6a. Tech
Plan Rematch
UF and Georgia Tech will
resume their football rivalry
with a four-game series
beginning, in 1978, Gator
Athletic Director Ray Graves has
said.
The two teams have not met
in a regularly scheduled game
since Tech shut out the Gators
in 1963, 9-0. The Gators did
play Tech in the Orange Bowl in
1967, grinding out a 27-12
victory in the nationally
televised encounter. This was the
last game super-stars Steve
Spurrier and Larry Smith played
together. Smith had one of the
best performances of his career
that evening.
The home-and-home series
will begin Oct. 28, 1978, in
Atlanta, and will return to
Gainesville in 1979.
The Gators and the Rambling
Wreck have met 34 times with
the Gators winning seven,
loosing 22 and tying five times.

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A SEASONED VET OR A NEWCOMER? /
Who Will Lead 69 Gator Gridders?

By JOHN SHIRLEY
Alligator Sports Writer
Considering all the facts of
past experience and the current
situation being what it is the
Gators must come up with a
firm choice for quarterback in
1969.
Its going to be very hard to
tell either guy to go play in the
street. For the senior Jackie
Eckdahl. a real victim of hard
%
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JOHN REAVES
... Challenger

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luck with injuries in his UF
career, theres no tomorrow.
This season is his last.
For several reasons, this
observer picks John Reaves. Ill
be brief.
Once upon a time, when John
was a strong-armed lad of three,
his dad bought him a little
football suit and a J.M. Fields
football and ...
Actually, the two main
contentions seem to be style and
experience.
Reaves is pro-style, drop-back
passer. He prefers to stay in the
pocket when rushed hard. His
blockers know where he is. At
6-foot-3, hes tall enough to wait
for his secondary, or alternate,
receivers to break open if his
primary receiver is covered.
He can throw over hands
prior to getting dumped. Also,
thanks to his straight-overhand
delivery, Reaves doesnt have to
duck away or eat the ball
until the split-second before the
onrushing defenders actually hit
him.
On the other hand, Eckdahls
6-foot-1 height and three-quarter
sidearm delivery require him to
throw earlier than Reaves under
the same rush. An extra second
can allow the pass-pattern to
develop in the defenders
backfield.
Offensive Coach Fred
Pancoast affirmed last week
what coaches have been trying
to get across all along ... that
most Gator pass plays will
depend on a drop-back QB.
Some roll-out pass patterns and
pass-run options will be used,
but not nearly with the
frequency of the running
quarterback years.
According to Pancoast,
Eckdahl is only slightly more
adept than Reaves at making the
running pass.
From the other angle,
experience, Pancoast said, I
cant understand why people
keep emphasizing this
sophomore bit when discussing
Reaves.
Reaves has shown a lot of
poise, has improved steadily
against some pretty tough
competition, has displayed
maturity in being critical of his
own play and is big enough to
take punishment, Pancoast
added.
At 205 pounds, Reaves

outweighs Eckdahl by 25
pounds.
Pointing to the great spring
blocking performances of junior
fullback Garry Walker, Pancoast
revealed that with more work
the Gators should develop the
kind of blocking needed to
adequately protect a drop-back
quarterback.
Much hinges on the situation
at tailback.
Jerry Vinesett, out all spring
with a badly-sprained ankle, is
the best blocker. Soph Tommy
Durrance ran like he owned the
position all spring, but needs
work in blocking according to
Pancoast. Pancoast says he
foresees an interesting battle
between the two for the starting
job.
Whether the job goes to the
best runner or the best blocker
could affect the Reaves-Eckdahl
situation.
The UF staff is committed to
the philosophy that the Gators
must throw the ball to win.
If we cant command
respect for the pass, well be in a
lot of trouble, boss Ray Graves
noted after viewing the Orange
and Blue spring finale two weeks
ago.
Reaves wont be ignored
because the Gators' are in the
throes of a rebuilding
campaign and want to get him
ready for title-seeking seasons in
his final two years.
Said Pancoast: Were
thinking only about a winning
ballclub this year.
Reaves is the better passer.
Said Steve Spurrier, who as a
Gator sophomore in 1964
replaced veteran Tom Shannon
permanently at the QB post:
Reaves gets rid of the ball in a
natural way that is impossible to
teach.
Throwing on target, bullets
and bombs, Reaves completed
26 of 44 passes in the two
intrasquad games this spring. In
blitzing the airways for 306
passing yards, the lanky Tampan
helped engineer squads to an
87-point output in the two
games.
Reaves will convene with his
own personal cadre of
receivers in August. Carlos
Alverez, the fast sophomore
flanker to whom Graves has
already conceded first-team
status, is Reaves seemingly

telepathic running-mate. They
teamed-up for several bombs for
last falls high-scoring freshmen
team.
Mostly from Reaves, Alverez
outfoxed a variety of secondary
defensive combinations with his
moves and speed, hauling down
14 passes for 161 yards and 2
TDs in the two spring games.
Other Reaves targets off the
freshmen team are flanker Andy
Cheney and tight end Bill
Dowdy.
When all factors are weighed,
one specific question probably
will swing the coaching staff
closer to Reaves side. Thats the
question, who can best come up
with the big play?
In their underdog role this
fall, the Gators will need to solve
a lot of 3rd down and five
yards-to-go situations. Theyll
surely face situations where a
losing or close game caHs for the
long pass against an unrelenting
pass-rush.
Finally, I believe precedent
will dictate the Gator QB choice.
There've been several big-play
sophomores, besides Spurrier,
who have cooly guided their
teams to victory. Look back.
Soph Rex Kern led Ohio State
to the national championship
last fall.
Closer to Gainesville, George
Mira threw darts for Miamis
Hurricanes as a sophomore, and
at Florida State Steve Tensi
played big-play with Fred
Biletnikoff in leading the
Seminoles to a smear of
Oklahoma in the Gator Bowl, in
the early 6os.
Using the National Football
League as a yardstick, I think
the Reaves-Eckdahl study could
be concluded if the coaches
would ask themselves who
theyd rather have throwing for
them: Broadway Joe Namath or
the NY Giantss scrambler, Fran
Tarkenton.

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Friday, August 22,1969, The Florida Alligator,

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lIiJPIIP^THr
JACK ECKDAHL
... Returning

Page 3-C



f F t
V. The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 22, 1960

Page 4-C

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DO NOT CARRY LARGE AMOUNTS OF CASH WITH YOU ADDRESS
PUT IT WHERE IT'S SAFE! 1
(if known)
, HOME TOWN
WHEN YOU ARRIVE IN GAINESVILLE, REMEMBER ADDRESS
THERE WILL BE SEVERAL THOUSAND MORE "GETTING |
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Full Text

PAGE 1

The Florida Alligator THE SOUTHEAST'S LEADING COLLEGE NEWSPAPER Vol. 61, No. 170 University of Florida, Gainesville Friday, August 22, 1969 loco rail Pre view E dit ion War and Peace War and peace. Ferment and serenity. Hysteria and placidity. A people united. a people divided Together and alone. Lift, in America. 199. Under the pine and palm on campus,-tho same forces of initv and divisiveness; the campus is a microcosm of Life in America, /99. Brother against brother, separated by their own incapacities to love, to understand, to help each other. But. with knowledge, with faith, we are learning. We will find the path to peace. Welcome, new ones. Join the cause. Learn. Understand. Believe. But be ready to yield, to seek a greater spirit of unitv.

PAGE 2

Student Guides Race Plane A UF law student, Don morning when the pilots Miller, will be navigating an navigators will be briefed airplane a year older than he is weather conditions. At that t in an air race Saturday. they will be informed of Miller, 1 LW, and W. D. route they must take to San Thompson will participate in the They will have to fly to s Rebels 600 navigator proficiency point about 250 miles ft race from Atlanta to Santee, Atlanta, land, re-fuel-and t S.C., flying a 1946 vintage head to Santee. Earcoup single engine plane. The The object of the race is plane, owned by Thompson,is a speed. It is to judge low wing, 85 horse power model competence of the navigato with an open cockpit, and has determining the amount ofI been redecorated by the two consuemed and the time sp men. Because of the age of t In addition to carpeting the floor, the flyers have re-upholstered the seats and revamped the instrument panel. The race begins Saturday and on ime the tee. ome rom hen not the r in fuel ent. heir craft, Miller and Thompson decided to dress for the occasion, with long scarfs and rebel hats. In additon, they plan to hoist a confederate flag when they land. SALES-SERVICE-RENTALS "Authorized '"Authorized Adler Dealer" Smit'Corona Dealer" ADD OFFICE EQUIPMENT FORMERLY Hancock Office Equipment 582 N. Main St. 376-5551 THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the University of Florida and is published five times weekely except during June, July and August when it is published semi-weekly, and during student holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The Alligator is entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office at Gainesville, Florida 32601. Subscription rate is $10.00 per year or $3.50 per quarter. The Florida' Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which it considers objectionable. The Florida Alligator will pot consider adjustments of payments for any advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless notice is given to the Advertising Manager within (1) one dayr after the advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run several times. Notices for correction must be given before the next Inserion. WELCOME UF President Stephen C. O'Connell TO ALL NEW FLORIDA GATORS: The citizens of Florida, and a series of dedicated, interested and deeply loyal faculty, staff, students, and alumni have spent more than sixty busy years in building the University of Florida on this campus. They built well.You are the beneficiaries, as well as the trustees for those who will follow you, of our campus traditions, the lively Gator spirit, the excellent buildings and equipment (old and new), the magnificent libraries, a campus the beauty of which is equalled by few others, and academic standards which demand respect but are not unreasonable. The University has been waiting a long time for you. We are glad you have chosen to join us. Unfortunately, we cannot accept all who apply. You can take pri.a. in the fact that you are among the chosen. In accepting the privilege of being a Florida Gator, you have assumed an obligation, one that can be discharged only by doing your best in academic matters, anything less will be too little; by treating this campus and everything on it as if it were your own home, which it will be for awhile; by developing and exhibiting a deep sense of pride in your University; by recognizing and boosting its strong points while trying constructively to correct its faults; by helping to preserve and strengthen our traditions, and vigorously supporting all our many student activities, including our excellent Fighting Gator athletic teams, the Honor System, Student Government, and the many other activities and organizations that exist for your benefit. I urge that in your stay here you make it your personal goal to improve both yourself and your University. All of us here will help you do both. Sincerely, /4 Stephen C. O'Connell (I President HUME HALL FLORIDA ROOM o CO-ED CLUB Today's Paper This welcome edition of The Florida Alligator, the largest ever with 112 pages, is dedicated to freshmen and transfer students who are entering the University of Florida for the first time in September. The paper is divided into four sections, each describing a different aspect of student life. The first section contains current news and editorials, information about several representative organizations and activities, and some news stories and commentary columns from the past year. The second section is a panorama of the 1968-69 school year in review, con taming the news and stories about the people who made the news. The third section portrays aspects of campus life, from tears to tubing, from RATHSKELLER REITZ UNION *GRAHAM AREA $ TOLBERT JENNINGS peee 2, The Florida Alligptwr, FrIay, Augu 22, 19% An Introduction, sietostudyinlg. The last section views the world of UF sports during the kist year, with a peek at the possible future of o athletic heroes. All together, this edition is designed to provide an insight into the myriad of activity and motion that makes up this action community of more than 30,000 people. As a start, the picture below preludes the life to come. University officials and student leaders have initiated a drive to reinstitute the defunct freshman beanie to give frosh a greater sense of identity and cohesion. Here, Student Body President Charles Shepherd presents frosh coed Susana Ogilvie with her beanie, which she will be required to wear throughout her first quarter here, or until Florida beats Georgia. ATTENTION STUDENTS! S SRVOMATION UNIVERSITY FOOD SERVICE OFFERS YOU TWO MEAL PLANS (.)A 7-Day, 21 Meals Per Week Plan At a 32% Savings (2A 5-Day, 15 Meals Per Week Plan At a 20% Savings (Mon.-Fri.) FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, WRITE Meal Plan Food Service, Main Cafeteria University of Florida Gainesville 32601 CHECK THESE LOCATIONS J III -I no OWN-now

PAGE 3

By HAROLD ALDRICM Alligator Executive Editor In an attempt to allow more time for discussion of several points of contention, a revised Code of Student Conduct will not be placed on the September agenda of the University Senate. Vice President for Student Affairs Lester L. Hale announced the decision Monday, apparently anticipating adverse student reaction to the bid to place the changes before the senate as soon as possible. Hale said the revised code would not be sent to the senate until the Oct. 29 meeting, at the earliest, and then only if the Student Affairs Committee has completed its revisions of the present code. The committee has been at work for several months drafting changestin the current code, as requested by UF President Stephen C. O'Connell. LESTER HALE .stops rush attempt Hale's action reversed a statement by committee chairman Ernest Bartley in a memo to committee members. Bartley asked the members to read the proposed code and recommend any additional changes by Aug. 22 so that the item could be placed on the agenda of the senate's first meeting in the fall. Several student leaders, including Student Body President Charles Shepherd, were alarmed by the apparent rush to get the new code passed before the student body could return to school and have an opportunity to review the proposed changes. Marc H. Glick, a student member of the committee and one of the leaders who asked that the new code not begplaced on Ite first senate agenda, expressed pleasure with Hale's decision. "I can appreciate the time that s gonse1in to these proposed revisions," Glick said. "But I agree with Dr. Hale that we must take as much time as necessary to insure that we create the best code possible.' Glick, who is also majority floor leader of the Student Senate, said he thinks the proposed code should be reviewed and commented on by the Student Senate before it goes to the University Senate. An Alligator editorial in Tuesday's edition condemned the "hurry" tactics of the Student Affairs Committee to place the new code before the university's policy-making body only seven days after students returned to school for the fall term, 41 WORKING FOR FRIENDSHIP DOUG CASE Saying they are tired of waiting for UF's From left are Cheryl Liles, Karen Hosty, Arlene Friendship Walk to finish itself, these 'industrious Pasetti, Marcia Knapp and John Hooker. John is an students got to work completing the walk reserved AGR and the girls are all Sigma Kappas. only for those who smile and say "Hello!" to If you'd like to help, call John at 392-1610. everyone they meet on the walkway. NO MAJOR VIOLATIONS NOTED Full-Time UF Students Exempt From Rent Tax By JOHN SUGG Alligator Associate Editor Students enrolled full-tinme at LU are not required to pay sales tax on rented apartiients. according to the State Revenue Comiissiont. There has, in the past, been some coiplaimt trom students that they were being charged the tax. John F. McCoy, president of ttIre Gainesvilk. Apartment Owner's Association, said ie kne o io rnajor violations of the law. "We have found, in the past, soiIe people have been charged the tax who were legally exempt. However, this is mainly due to ignorance on the part of the landlords and students. "There are probably soie peOple irLIt to gyp students," he added. McCoy said there had been soie vagueness in the law that had recently beeti clarified. "For example," he said, "full-time students at state endowed universities are the only students exempt under the law." 'Also, tIere is qcuestiOn of tax for an apari men! wherc on ly .one, two or three of the four residents arc UF students. It was decided that ail appropriate pe cent of the rent woUld be tax exempt for each stUdent. McCoy said the policy for determining ax xemilptioi that most large apartment iwircis Ise is raving each tenant sign a notice that they ate tiull-tire students at a state endowed tilliversity. He also said the tax exemption applied to residents who have lived in an apartment for more than one year. The Alligator contacted several stUdents iii the SW lith Ave. apartment complexes about tax exemptiti. However, only one knew anything about the exemption and tihat was from signing the (SEE 'NO' PAGE 4) Honor Court Seeks 'Clear Channe ls (EDITOR'S NOTE: This is the last of can have representation before the anticipated more "action" next fall, with a three part series about legal Student Conduct Committee. the consittee meeting several tises so representation for students by Student The Student Conduct Committee is a try students. Government and other student groups.) permanent committee appointed by UF The Honor Court Legal Aid Clinic can Presden StehenC. OConell o jdge also advise students in their appearances President Stephen C. O'Connell to judge bfr omjdcaycucl n a By LEE HINNANT students accused of violating the student before dor n judiciary councils and can Alligator Staff Writer code of conduct. provide representation if necessary, Klausner said. While representation for "Through the clinic I hope students stdet i ofcapu outsrmansa can have the counsel of law students in Honor Court Chaiscellor Craig --students in off-campus courts remains a cahveheons flwsudtsn Lawrence hopes to formalize routes of disputed subject in Student Government, any campus dispute," Klausner said. ape ope dornijudieiroues o. the Honor Court hopes to establish clear Klausner said there had not been much He mentioned a proposal to Vice and formal channels for students in happening this summer. "Only four or Hesentionedea propos trVi. President for Student Affairs Lester L. "Intra'--university" cases. five students have come to me with Hale that O'Connell appoint three law Jack Klausner, head of the newly university problems," he said. professors as a permanent committee for formed Honor Court Legal Aid Clinic, He added that he could not recall any hopes the clinic will provide formal meeting of the Student Conduct 1i channels next quarter by which students Committee this summer. But he (SEE 'COURT' PAGE 4) CRAIG LAWRENCE .fonal appeal routes Friday, August 22,1969, The Florida Allgator, Pg 3 The Florida Alligator THE SOUTHEAST'S LEADING COLLEGE NEWSPAPER Vol. 61, No. 170 University of Florida, Gainesville Friday ugust 22, 1969 HALE SAYS New Code Is Delayed S

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P A 4 Th o Firids AinatorF ri., A.299 ragM6 MALES SHEPHERD .offers $4,000 to help Court Seeks Clear Lines For Appeal FROM PAGE THREE appeas froiim decisions o lie dorm judicial councils. "The pesewt routes it aaoppeal Ii m tliese coiicils ire tiiit IIIiiimii t and ar not well known~l.Lawenlce ild. He said students could appeal to the law professors either the severity of the sentence or the decision itself of the dorm colincil. iawirince and Klausner bioth iiseed that tie jurisdiction of Ian aiudents is limited to puriely mnversitv cases. KIJa iiier said several students had ci imiie toutum1this suitIer asking or legal advice in disputes with landlords. "Bit las atiUdeiNts can't give advi e citll tip uofl-camtitpus Cases,' ihe aaid. The SG ombudsman and the student rights committee of the Student Senate also are aimed at protecting the rights of students. But neither the student rights committee nor the ombudsman have any fomal power, according to Bill Armstrong, chairman of the student rights committee. His committee takes proposals before the senate. "After a resolution is passed in the senate, we can go to the administration and tell theim of the resolution," Armstrong said. "We don't really have any power. We have to bargain with Iteadministrasion. But they will listen to strong resolutions. "This is the way all curfews except those for freshman women were abolished last year," Aemstrong added. The ombudsman acts as a "mediator" in disputes, such as disagreements between student and landlord, said Student Body Vice President Charles Harris. T te o budstmn ar s ol try tr persuade both parties to coleeirs an agreement. Floida Quaterly HERENOW! at bookstores. recieved the support Of Student Bodv P re si dt t Ch arles Shieptierd who said lie Writld recoti tend thait S4,000 be taken hrintm the SO-3 titnd an executive fund and be directed toward funding this project. Support for lie center has also been offered by United University Methodist Church, whose directors sav they will No Rent Tax Violations Cited AFROMPAGE THREE lorm given litt lay his landlord. Students did express several comiiplaiitts, miostl) concerning excessive security deposits, which thely feel the owners invest at a profit. Residents also felt they were charged excessively for normall wear and tear" damage. One student claimed he had been charged S8 for S I drain stolper he had lost and another said he was charged S5 for each smudge mark on the wall. One student said, "It's curious how the damage liey charge us sents to equal ot security deposit." McCoN said there were two sides to tic issue. lieI said that state law requires that security deposits ove S100 he kepittm a separate accopi which i1O O101 CC31 1SC. WORTH WAITING FOR Tomorrow's L iving yoday VILLA RAV-INE ()f ;IIer I i li i a ads a i (0tages ol \lt('m 'ioter \t'a 't s i tI -sIi coinpJ eh undergrotm a. Here, ) ou will discos er a life of quiet elegance, privacy a md security arid life without suburban responsibilities -one, two and three bedroom apartments. MODEL APARTMENTS OPEN NEXT WEEK a Call For. YOUR N"' A ainesville -UTILITIES Electricity is your best buy .by far! An Appointment Ernest Tew &Associates, Inc. 376-6461 AFTER 17 YEARS OF PLANNING UF Da Care Center Nearing Reality SBy DON YOKEL furnish the building space, Yakatai lois headed efforts in Starting on a limited basis, By DN YKELfurishthebuidin spce, Yaktanhash a theday only 25 to 30 children will be AlligatorStaff Writer janitorial service, utilities, recent weeks to bring ttts.d allowed to attend the center eqitipmeint. and insuraitce for cite' center to the U[ cart1is alwdt tedtecne Aedaypcaretcenter forrttecenter.ri center like to operate which may some day have as day careceerfr hecnr.W n s rm ay as 200 children, Yakatan pre-school-age married student's The student senate meets this proteCt trom pt o said children, is almost a reality after Sept. 23, at which time, senators C ed aet keepie Adisson to the school will 17 years of planning. All that's will be asked by Shepherd and their children III I the centi Adfribisid o es needed is the student senate's Jerry Yakatan, chairman of the Ti estii it Icotr o eFor example, if the father approval this fat1. mayors council for on campus seepi' i i the MeldiC Fo ate ftter married student housing, to 'a (I nii4 a t working, then the family will e Tent ivey setiedrled to okay a line item change wlich I I h 1 ridtv -.t. open Oct. 1. the center recently would fund the project. ll p givet priority in selection. I.' O NlNrl \ r l 16111 i

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'INCREDIBLE PLASTIC MACHINE' Our Age In By DARCY MEEKER Campus Living Editor "The Incredible Plastic Machine," opening b tonight at the Center Theater, is a surfing documentary. Narration, by an adolescent voice, is very surfer-slangy and competent, though not a compelling. The same may be said of the content c and photography, though all in all, the film's n purpose is achieved -a sense of the surfer is p conveyed. M But the real meat of the movie comes at its end, when the story holding the documentary together has ended. The best camera work, the best narration (you forget the voice is adolescent and nasal), the s best film editing all come here -which indicates, c that this is the part of the movie its makers considered the most important.k It is important. It is our age in a capsule. The whole age, not just the surfers, but the older c generation too: politicians and intellectuals alike. This strong stuff comes when one of the great surfer's in the sky, who is above contests and such, S is portrayed. t He waits redly beside his board and his dog, V gazing out at the red sea and sky, waiting for The t Wave. His own voice speaks from the sound track. 1,429 Reach F Formal commencement degrees has 53 candidates from exercises will be held Aug. 30 the College of Law and 54 for 1,429 candidates for degrees expect to receive the specialist at the end of the summer degree in the College of quarter. Education. Dr. Robert Spiro, president During the ceremonies an of Jacksonville University, will honorary doctor of science be the main speaker for the degree will be presented to 1968 ceremonies scheduled for 7 p.m. Nobel Prize winner Dr. Marshall at Florida Field. The academic Nirenberg. Distinguished alumni processional begins at 6:40 p.m. citations will be awarded Florida Candidates include 820 for Supreme Court Justices Richard bachelor's degrees, 381 for Ervin and Campbell Thornal. master's degrees and 121 for Nirenberg, chief of the doctorates. The juris doctor Laboratory of Biochemical Don't Forget Car Title Oh, the agonies of standing in line just to be turned back because you don't have that little piece of paper that says you own your car. And this is what about half of the people who are trying to register their cars and get their parking decals are experiencing. Lee Burrows, coordinator of traffic and parking reminded all faculty and staff members, with the exception of J. Hillis Miller Health Center employes, that they must show either the current title or motor vehicle registration certificate to their cars and University staff identification cards when they register. A Capsule The main rule lie lives by, he says, is "Never think." He just loses himself in board and wave and his ody will follow -this is not a rule for surfing he proposes, but a rule for life. "Never think." That's all very well in theory, but .That's too abstract. Thinking just makes everything all omplicated. In your heart you know he's right. It's ot content of speech that counts, but manner. As a rinciple of policy, reason doesn't work; force works, the exercise of power. "Never think." You've got to have faith. The cold hand of logic. f you understand something, your ideas are implistic. Theory just isn't relevant. Just do what homes naturally, you'll be all right. "Never think." Philosophy is a dilapitated boat that philosophers keep afloat with bailing buckets. Nobody's onsistent. There are no absolutes. "Never think." And if ideas don't work (please note that all those ayings were expressed theories about life and herefore exhibit the fallacy of self-exclusion), what's left? Viscera, animal force -Delivered by hose who "Never think." =nd Of Road Genetics, National Heart Institute, Bethesda, Md., received his bachelor's and master's degrees from UF. Ervin and Thornal also are Florida graduates. UF President Stephen C. O'Connell will preside at the exercises. Lt. Gov. Ray Osborne will represent the Florida Cabinet and Dr. Clarence Menser the Board of Regents. President and Mrs. O'Connell will host a reception at their home for graduates and their families from 2:30 to 4:40 p.m. Aug. 30. The ceremonies are the first scheduled under the university's quarterly commencement pohcy setting formal campus-wide convocations at the end of each academic period. In case of inclement weather, ceremonies will be transferred to Florida Gymnasium. FrIday, August 22,1969, The Florid. Alligator, Pap5 WELCOME ALL U of F PERSONNEL 1116 W. UNIVERSITY AVE THE CLOSEST FULL SERVICE BANK TO CAMPUS Look elegant in your lounge-culotte with a built-in bra, of nylon tricote leopard print with a black nylon, sheer robe. Wonderful for travel and entertaining. In sizes 10, 12, and 14, price is about $20. Modeled by Bev. BRA/GIRDLES/ LINGERIE GAINESVILLE MALL ) 0 0 4 ex p s* A. 6 \\ ec cal-o-~ wl oi 6 c-cj( CRANE IMPORTS 506 EAST UNIVERSITY EMMMMINN Time For A Movie Center I -Fantastic Plastic Machine. Surfing documentary. 1,3:08, 5:16, 7:24,9:32. Center II -Romeo and Juliet. Derives its value, says professor, from tension between sentimentality of story, and bawdiness of puns. 2:03,4:32, 7:01,9:40. Florida -Whatever Happened to Aunt Alice, with Geraldine Page, Ruth Gordon, and Rosemary Forsythe. Gainesville -True Grit, with John Wayne and Kim Darby. Most rewarding movie of the summer. 8:42 and 12:40. A Man Called Dagger, with Ken Murray. 11:10. Plaza I -The Great Bank Robbery, with Clint Walker and Kim Novac. 1:56, 3:55, 5:54, 7:56, 9:58. Plaza II -Run Wild, Run Free, with Mark (Oliver) Lester, Sylvia Simmons. Bernard Mills.

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p The budget for Student Governmentfor 1969-70 amounts to about $293,000, based on the income from the $4.97 per student each quarter. Anticipated total expenditures for the 1969-70 school year amounts to about $2 million, wihch is based on the $32.50 from each students registration fee. And another $2 million is generated by this money and is rechannelled into the SG coffers for expanded benefits. Student Government, then, is a going concern, taking in about $4 million to work with. This money is handled entirely by SG officers and staffers. No faculty or administrators are involved. Below are the activities funded with this money: Out of your $150 registration fee, $32.50 goes to Student Government as a Student Activity Fee to be distributed for student services and specified group activities which affect the entire student body. From this $32.50, which is taken out each quarter, the 80-member Student Senate works out the budget for the school vear, usually during the summer term. Out of the $32.50, the senate is allocated $4.97 with which to use for Student Government-sponsored projects and groups. The remainder of the $32.50 goes to already pre-specified allocations such as health services, althletics, publications, Reitz Union and others listed below. $32.50 PER STUDENT EACH QUARTER ATHLETICS $3.75 Football and basketball tickets Minor sports attendance .Student Participation in overall intercollegiate program HEALTH SERVICES $13.00 Infirmary services and general student health care J. REITZ UNION $9.00 All union activities FEE RESERVE $.20 PUBLICATIONS $ A sinking fund for student ID Alligator cards Seminole Florida Quarterly .-----. -o ----.------.STUDENT GOVERNMENT $4.97 Redistributes this money to funded projects Accent '70 Intramurals Association Women Students Mayors Council Befrienders Public Functions Billy Mitchell Sa mson Campus Improvements Speaker's Bureau Cheerleaders Special Fund Course & Teacher Eval. Special Requests Engineer Fair Spring Arts Florida Players Student Govt. Productions Gator Band Student Salaries Gator Guard Student Senate Gator Loan Fund Symphony Orchestra Homecoming University Comb. Singing Groups Interhall University Religious Assoc. .-.SG: No Games, Just Student Politics By DON YOKEL Alligator Staff Writer Student Government at UF has been described as being massive, inept, inefficient, un-representative of the student, and horrors of horrors unwanted. Probably the only word of truth in the above discription is the word massive, for SG will spend more than $290,000 this coming year on items ranging from thumbtacks to handball and tennis courts. Even though some students believe they could live without it, the almost 19,000 depend on it for services which no other group could manage as efficiently. SG furnishes the funds and personnel to bring in outside entertainment to the campus, arranges the bloc seating plan for football games and prosecutes those persons caught cheating, to mention a few of its services. Without SG, many clubs on campus would disapear because of a lack of funds, and in some cases, the lack of a source to draw leadership from. The Student Senate, which serves as the major law making and funding body in SG, has 80 senators during the regular school year, who represent their constituents in academic, residence, and off-campus areas of the university community. Often meeting more than once a week, the senate is presided over by a president, who functions in about the same capacity as the Vice President of the United States does over the U.S. Senate. Senators are elected twice a year to serve for the entire school year, however, a senator who cannot be here during the summer months has an appointitive replacement for that period. The executive branch of SG, has an elected president, vice president, and treasurer who serve one-year terms following the general elections in the spring. The student body executive, just as the executive on the national level, encourages legislation, formulates programs, and acts as a catalyst for organizing campus programs. ..Student Body Treasurer Serving under the executive, are secretaries of minority affairs, interior, athletics, consumer affairs, academic affairs, student services, health and insurance, married student affairs, organizations, legislative affairs, finance, and public functions. Under these offices, help goes out to Gainesville's ghettos and the impoverished in the form of student teachers. And one office advises the student of his rights on campus and under the Selective Service System. The major responsibility of the judicial branch of SG, is to administer Honor Court, a student administered court where cases of cheating and student conduct are investigated and adjudicated. Teams of investigators are sent out from the Honor Court office to report back to the court the results of their findings whenever an impropriety in the WALT MORGAN .Vice President conduct of a student is reported by fellow students or faculty. The court has the power to recommend suspension of a student from school for an offense. Often times, the court in pursuit of witnesses and the defendent, has combed the state for testimony from persons who are no longer enrolled at the university or residing in the Gainesville area. Senate committees consist of a judiciary, student rights, charters, budget and finance, academic affairs, charters, excuse, information and investigation. Presently there are two major parties on campus: First Party, which is the majority party in the senate and the executive; and Focus Party, the minority party in the senate. Both parties have a minority and majority floor leader in the senate serving as the party's legislative whip. In recent years, student activists have CHARILES SHEPHERD .Student Body President made serious attempts to win elected seats in the senate and the executive branch. Students for a Democratic Society have led the field to get representation for affecting more sthent rights for the black and minority group students on campus. SDS activities have taken shape in the Plaza of the Americas, which serves as a central meeting place for all student groups on campus. At the beginning of the summer quarter, a new organization was formed which is supposed to take over the prominent position which SDS has held for the campus activist -the Young Socialist Club. Whether this new organization will try to win a representative position in SG this year, is yet to be seen. The organization of minority student groups into effective political units on campus has been predicted by campus leaders as a continuing trend in the future of student politics at UF. In the past, the fraternity bloc has played a major role in choosing the presidential candidate and vying senators in SG for elective office, thus giving the fraternity and sorority members a bigger voice in SG affairs. The fraternity bloc will probably continue to dominate the campus political climate for some time to come. .5 Peg 6, The Florida Allgator, FrIday, August 22,1969 MM I Im -Mi MARC H GLICK .prime mover Your Student Activity Fee ...Where It Goes, What It Does

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Fridm. Auust 2Z 19, The F~arid Al Pws 7 4so 4//OS/ /Z,,OM/ EIL ,2 3 Ir| az 7 O/V CA 7\ I I

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MAC STEEN WAYNE GRIFFITH .most underrated? ...two-year veteran DAVE HUTCHERSON .quick and tough JIM 1LEY .junior letterman Pap 8, The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 22, 1969 FORGOTTEN MAN? Steen Tackles New Position One of the best, yet least noticed, Florida football players the past two seasons has been Mac Steen. Coaches have noticed him, however, and his move from offensive guard to tackle is regarded as a key to the Gator offensive line hopes for 1969. Steen responded by coming back from last fall's knee surgery to turn in an outstanding spring. The other tackle slot will be manned by another two-year veteran, Wayne Griffith of Miami, who turned in the best spring of his career. He is closely followed by junior letterman Jim Kiley of Brandon. Steen's replacement is sophomore Dale Hutcherson of Eau Gallie, smallish at 6-foot-1, 196 pounds, but very quick and tough. The switch does leave a hole at guard which might require more changes to fill. Going into the September practice grid, Gator coaches believe Donny Williams of Lake City, a converted linebacker, will be one of the Southeastern Conference's most outstanding offensive linemen. He lines up at left guard. Non-letterman Randy Warbritton of Jacksonville ranked first at right guard following spring drills. There is a chance that veteran Skip Amelung of Fort Lauderdale will be moved from tight end to this spot, however. Jackson's Out Willie Jackson, one of the two Negro athletes signed to football scholarships this year, has been declared ineligable to continue under an athletic scholarship because of his failure to met SEC requirements. Coach Ray Graves said Wednesday, "Jackson doesn't qualify for an SEC scholarship because he didn't make a 17 on the ACT test. "He has decided to remain at the University and will do so under an EOG grant." The Educational Opportunity Grant (EOG) is a federally sponsored education grant. Jackson and Leonard George are the first Negroes athletes to sign football scholarships at Florida, and both are maintaining a 2.0 average in summer school. Jackson can still become eligible for Gator football, but he now must wait out his freshman year before attempting to qualify. p m it sil and iir boss iriiutual irritiits, in Almerica you're free to find a 11r ]Le nial ole. We ae tlol. saiii s if non-governincit eiploiers. liilt wlii aill industry is nationalized, others just one employer. Inevita vhBigsBrotlier assignsy\'ou to a job. a location, even to housing. And if y11 don't like it, there's no place to ,o. Governmient regulation of industry is one thing. Government operation of industry is another. Another step closer to Big Brother. Already 2M of U.S. electric power is produced by Federalized svstemis. Sone want to replace or duplicate the facilities of investorowned utility companies with Federalized systems. The reasons are obscure. Tile reason for opposing any enlargeimnt of Federalized electric power is clear to anyone who wants more than one place to go for a job. Florida's Electric Companies -TaxpayingInvesto,-owned FLORIDA POWER & LIGHT COMPANY'e GULF POWER COMPANY FLORIDA POWER CORPORATION TAMPA ELECTRIC COMPANY NNW ....-. .-.--' Corvettes Get Set f Orlando, has entered two Corvettes in Saturday night s round robin street elinator at Gainesville Dragway. Laws currently holds the C and D sports national marks at 11 34 and 11.55 respectively. Fred Kinney will wheel the 1967 Corvette that carried Laws to his Springnational victory last year Laws will drive a brand new Corvette Stingray in hopes of earning portions of the $650 purse. Rounding out the Corvette entrants will be Bob Dance in Professor Fate and Harris Brothers in The Cheater. Chip Hurbert will attempt to upset the Corvette threat in his Chevey powered '40 Ford. Gary Nordstrom teams with Hurlbert by wheeling a '61 Ford, Tired Iron. More than thirty Sports Cars, Gassers and Modified production entrants will compete during three rounds of wheel-to-wheel racing. A S.T.-. OUTC*AS**T ** SDONIGANS Before you know it, you'll be groovin' across campus, past Century Tower and Albert, sitting in the 'bloc' at the football game-And there you'll be without a new wide tie or wide-leg pants. You'll rush to us, and what will we have left? Two shirts, a dress in the wrong size, and half a pair of knee socks. Hadn't you better plan ahead? Everyone else will. Stop in and see us. 3 1123 WEST UNIVERSITY AVENUE. GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA (EDITOR'S NOTE: The football story on this page is the third in a series on the Gator football prospects for 1969. The fourth thnu ninth parts can be found on pages 9, 19, and 11. See section 'C' for the school year '68-'69 sports wrap-up.) I

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Frkdu, August 22, 19, The Florid ANIpor, P g59 JIM HADLEY ROBBIE REBOL .towering tackle .a 5-9 fighter The interior of Florida's defensive line in 1969 may well resemble the Mutt and Jeff cartoon strip with the tackles being 6-foot-6 Jim Hadley and 5-9 Robbie Rebol. Hadley, a pre-season all-conference pick, is heading toward what should be an outstanding senior season. The Tampa giant has played some truly outstanding football for the Gators the past two seasons, but has been plagued with a series of injuries which have limited his l nin tim eU. Rebol is a fighter, who was 9 alomst good enough to pay at kn ferii Line fullback and asked to be moved to the line where he believed he could battle into the lineup. This Look 'Ikthe Fort Lauderdale senior has done. He weighs 209 and is extremely quick. Muff & Jeff Depth in the defensive interior is questionable, Gator Head Coach Ray Graves said. There are many boys involved in providing this cushion against injury, foremost of these being Valdosta, Ga. sophomore Danny Williams. Hollywood senior Gunnar Paulson, a non-letterman who made a major comeback in the spring, backs Rebol. He, too, is but 5-9 and 207, and this former state prep wrestling champion is also quick and difficult to block. Alan Cole of Decatur, Ga., another veteran, figures in the picture and will likely see extensive playing time if healthy. Another possibility at defensive tackle is sophomore Robert Harrell of Jacksonville, who worked at tackle and end in the spring. Harrell starts the fall at end because Gator coaches believe heis most needed there, but could quickly switch to tackle should the need arise. ."Punjab" is gone but Gator grid Ray Graves hopes he has a sequel in "Charlie Brown". Florida fans know the Gator's version of comic strip character "'.Punjab" was 6-foot-7, 255-pound Jim Yarbrough, who is now playing offensive tackle for the Detroit lions. The ''Charlie Brown" nickname was long ago stuck on Guy McTheny of Sarasota. McTheny played split end last year and led Florida in pass receptions with 34 for 347 yards. He played baseball last Neely Named* All American. Florida tennis ace, Armi Neely, has been selected to the 1969 All-American tennis team by the All-American Board of National Collegiate Tennis Coaches Association, Director of Athletics Ray Graves said Wednesday. Neely, a Tampa native made the select squad for th second straight year. Neely was also chosen by his team as the most valuable player for the 1969 season as the recipient of the Herman Schnell Memorial trophy symbolic of this honor. Neely is the f i r s t All-American tennis player at Florida. Neely will attend the UF Law School this fall. The Who per has a new ome at 8 N.W. 16th Ave. -The burgers are bigger at Burger King." Home of the Whopper.* spring and led the team in hitting to earn all-conference honors. The two-year letterman missed spring training while playing centerfield and hitting .323. Constant film viewing since the conclusion of spring drills have just about convinced Gator coaches that McTheny would make a better tight end. First-string operator at the spot is big Skip Amelung of Fort Lauderdale, but he may be moved to offensive guard in the new Gator plans. This would leave only sophomore Bill Dowdy of West Palm Beach ready to play. Florida coaches don't believe this provides enough manpower McTheny brings experience to the position and one other important ingredient. While his 4.9 speed in the 40-yard-dash is better suited for a tight end. "The way defenses are covering now days you need to throw more to the tight end and you need a boy with speed," Graves said. WHEN A MAN BUYS A SPORTSCAR HE BUYS A MAN'S SPORTSCAR Test drive a real/sports car.at your Datsun Dealer/ RACING NEWS DATSUNS FIRST IN C, D, F Topton, Pa. -August 10: Ray Demerjain of Allentown, Pa. scooted up the Topton Hillclimb in his C Production Datsun 2000 to capture his fourth victory in five events entered. Taking first in D Production in another Datsun 2000 was Ray Heisey of Harrisburg, Pa. Capturing first in F Production behind the wheel of a Datsun 1600 was Bill Grabowski of New York City. The course covered 1.5 miles and varied 530 vt. in elevation from top to bottom. SHARP CLINCHES DIVISIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP IN D PRODUCTION DATSUN 2000 Watkins Glen, New York -August 10: For the sixth time this year, Bob Sharp of Wilton, Conn. scored an impressive victory to take the checkered flag in a national champoinship sports car event. Piloting a Datsun 2000 in the combined C and D Production race, Shapr outdrove more than a dozen other Triumphs, Lotuses and Alfas over the rain-drenched 2.5 mile Watkins Glen Grand Prix Race Course to clinch the Northeast Division's D Production Championship. He is now assured of a starting position at the American Road Race of Champions (ARRC) in November at Daytona Beach, Fla. Another D Production Datsun 2000 driven by Bob Henderson of Rochester N.Y. placed third. GODDING & CLARK DOWNTOWN BY THE POST OFFICE 2nd AVE. & 2nd ST. S.E. OPEN TIL 8 PM MON THRU SAT "HOME OF THE NEW LEADER" Good Grief! Here Comes Charlie Brown I for the position. Dowdy caught eight passes for 120 yards and scored threc touchdowns for the Baby Gatos last year. He was second-highest scorer on the team. "Dowdy is a fine young prospect and should see a lot of action this fall," Graves said. "I think we are going to need McTheny at tight end, even if Amelung stays there."

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Pag 10, The Florida Alligator, Friday, Aupiat 22,1969 CENTER HAS STARTED 20 STRAIGHT He ton Came To Play While more heavily publicized teammates have come and gone, Florida center Kim Helton has started 20 consecutive games these past two seasons, turning in consistently sound football virtually every time. "It's ironic that one of the most important positions on the teaiii, center, is perhaps the least noticed by fans or writers," Gator Head Coach Ray Graves said. "They notice when the center niisses a block or makes a bad snap and that's about it. "And many times what appears to be a missed block by the center actually is somebody else's responsibility." This is a fate accepted by Helton and centers everywhere. However the Gainesville senior is philosophical about it. "I've always wanted to play football," lie said. "I can't play i the backfield or end or some place where it's more glamoirois, but I cali play at center. It beats sitting on the beiicli or in the stands. "You just have to do the best you caii and take pride i knowinii your block helped spring a back on a long rii or kept people awar from the quarterback while lie completed a pass." Helton is 6-foot-2, 213 and, barring injury, is a solid first-team starter at his position, as he has been since lie replaced the graduate All-American Bill Carr two seasons ago. Belhin&%Helton is 6-2. 21 -pound Nick Sinardi of Tampa, a non-letterian veteran wini tUriied in a good spring aiid is capable of playing guard or tackle if an eiiiergency should arise. Sophomore Richard Kensler, Son of Gator offensive hue coach 1d Kensler, waits iii the wiiigs aid has enough talent to make his presence felt. LB's Play Rough Last season Florida came close to flat running out of linebackers. At a position which badly deeds depth for a 10-gaiie grind the Gators have not been able to count oii enough able athletes. This will be a problem again t h i s y e a r unIles s s onie sophomores core along to fill in behind the more experienced. At least two of the first three string linebackers are set. Cocaptain Tom Abdelnour of Miami will open in the middle and senior David Ghesquiere of Pensacola, a standout these past two years, is on one side. Junior Mike Kelley of Orlando opens as top man on the other side but could wind up with plenty of competition early in September. Coach Ray Graves and his defensive staff are strongly considering a possible switch of s c n i o r I ike Pa lahach of Hollywood from iiddlc liInebacker to Kelley's spint. "I thought Pala hach had a n excellent spring," Graves said. "He belongs in the lineup this fall and we, will likely work limn at outside linebacker." Graves firmly believes that with the three-linebacker system you need at least six linebackers or five with one iman capable of swinging, playing two positions. "Linebackers are a key to defense," Graves said. "They are in on more tackles, have Much contact and do a lot off running on pass coverage and pursuit. This takes its toll." Graves thinks four are set and hopes that junior Brad Powell of W e s t P alIim Be ac h a n d sophomores Gary Kadric of Bradenton and Eric Taggart of Decatur, Georgia will be able to produce the other pair. SPORTS CARS! GASSERS! MODIFIED PRODUCTIONS Round Robin Style 3 Rounds of Hub to Hub Wheel Standing, gear shifting Action CORVETTES ** ROADSTERS '40 FORDS CHEVY GASSERS 2 Rounds of STOCKERS 2 Rounds of SUPER STOCKERS TIME TRIALS 5-8PM RACES 8:30 es o iA DRpoo S 3% Miles north of Municipal A irport on State 225 KIM HELTON .least noticed Gator? Miller-Brown ONE MILE NORTH OF THE MALL 376-4552 AUTHORIZED Open til 7 p.m.nig"ty A stincc Available | CALL 378-1615 OR SEND FOR INFORMATION TO COMPUTER MANAGEMENT CORPORATION I 1105 W. UNIV. AVE., GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA 32601 I NAME. ADDRESS PHONE. fAnd Potato salad too) It s the Wishbone chicken bucket special. Hottest picnic idea since the fourth of July. You get 15 piecestof plump, juicy chicken, crispy cole slaw, fresh hot aread and honey. We give you a pint of potato salad and a creamy, rich pie. Free. Check for the Wishbone Store nearest you. OFFER GOOD AUGUST 2?, 2) n ) 4 O AT THESE SIRHBONE STORES 704 S.W. Second Ave./i6th Ase, at S Main St /1021 SE. 4th Ave. 236 S. Temple (U.S. 301 at StarkeFla.E Wishbbone .,() I l r NOW: A Truckload of Paper for Practice Typing or Elementary Drawing. Only 751 for 500 shaos ALWAYS: The Best in Typewriter Service, Rentals & Olympia Sales. KISER'S Office Equip. 604 N.MAIN PREPARE U CF 5T A IN FOR JOBS IN COMPUTE RS AND ABOUT YOUL FUTi'iji. t)ATA PROCESSING D)ATA PROCESSING OFFERS 11g I Si Tin 'ivailible rosillow., taF exCeCd the I B I cv.J d I ii miirik i )Iquialitied prOlF ChlnigWork 1Enjoy security aiid status in the COMPUTER MANAGEMENT CORPORATION OFFERS lieh utility IacultS In v i dt i ly Pa ced Lariui Traiiied in as little "is 4 m1onthsl Irc ir Pr essIon aI ConunsCeliingi and Life-tine m

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ALL 4 BACKS RETURNiNG Secondary Looks Good In a year of Gator pessimism the only area which appears encouraging to Head Coach Ray Graves is the defensive secondary. The reasons for cheer are self-evident. In Graves' opinion, the one area in which experience and know-how is vital is the secondary. "A mistake here can be six points instead of a few yards," he has often said. This is an area where teamwork and understanding are crucial. Fortunately, the four-deep alignment is the same as last season and three of the four have played together for two years. Keying the secondary is pre-season All-American Steve Tannen, an exceptionally talented athlete who can run and jump with the best of them at cornerback. His senior counterpart at cornerback is Mark Ely of Tampa, a 4.6 sprinter. Skip Albury, another senior veteran, is a 4.7 man at safety and has played the position for two years. He is a good pass defense man and a rugged, seldom-miss tackler. Junior Jack Bums of Tampa had a fine sophomore year at safety and can fly at 4.7 in the 40. He had a good spring and even at that almost was heated out by a sophomore -Doug Sorenson of Eau Gallie -who came very fast and figures heavily in plans for the fall. Adequate depth exists for the first time in years in John Faix of Miami, Bruce Gunter of Satellite Beach and Jimmy Barr of Panama City. Faix is a junior letterman, the other two are sophomores. "We honestly have problems everywhere on offense and defense, but not in the secondary,' Graves said. "This could be our best secondary." Larry Smith's Loss Hurts It is difficult to be cheerful, sophomore from Dublin, Ga., spots, will run at tailback Florida Coach Ray Graves notes, turned in a good spring and is not performing at split er when you have lost the finest being counted on for 1969 flanker. running back in the history of action, the amount being Statistically, Vinesett i your school and the number determined by continued top returning varsity gi four rusher in your league. progress in the fall. Charles gainer with 53 rushes for That's what happened to the Hood of Palatka and Harvin yards and a 3.7 average. W Gators, when All-American Clark of New Smyrna Beach are carried 20 times for 63) fulback Larry Smith moved on also rated good prospects and Durrance led freshmen gr to the Los Angeles Rams and should see action. gainers with 71 carries fo tailback Tom Christian to the Clark, who can play several yards and eight TDs. Cincinnati Bengals. "We need proven first team backs and we need proven depth," Graves said. "You can't work on much more than that." When the dust settled after spring training the new fulback was junior Garry Walker of Winter Haven and the tailback was sophomore Tommy Durrance of Daytona Beach, who was spelling the injured Jerry Vinesett, a junior from Savannah, Ga. Behind these three are a maze of question marks. Senior Brian Hipp of Gainesville is a capable, often dangerous runner who has had a history of chronic injuries and, as a result, has seen limited duty for two years. Mike Rich, a 204-pound TURN OFF SUMMER auto air conditioning FIRST. and still Best costs less than factory air GODDING & CLARK MOTORS 2nd AVE. & 2nd St. S.E. 378-2311 when nd or s the round r 194 Walker yards. round r 321 ^"lday, Au"-"22",1969, T^Flor a Aligeo Pup II UF's REPRESENTATIVES Jim Bartlett John Potock George Cori Skip Lujack Dan Sapp Arlie Watkinson Mel Ward Fidelity Union Life Insurance Co. 1636 w. Univ. Ave. I NO WAR CLAUSE 376-1208 9 DEFERRED PREMIUM PAYMENTS MONTESSORI IS NOW BEING TAUGHT AT BELLES & BEAUX. MONTESSORI INSTRUCTORS IN BOTH 2 & 3 YEAR OLD AGE GROUP AND KINDERGARTEN REGISTER YOUR CHILD NOW IN GAINESVILLE'S MOST PROGRESSIVE PRE-SCHOOL NURSERY & KIN DERGARTEN SCHOOL HOURS 7:30AM -6:00PM BELLES & BEAUX 1124 N.W. 39th Ave. 378-4246 378-5925 0 the "Sandwich Shaped Like a Smile" MEXICAN FOODS Kiddie Burger *I * M"~ TAMALES *E E lCAN OSEDHIL JME-0 *,, VIVA!-% RANCHITOS %00 (RANCHO) the "Sandwich Shaped like a Smile" S1624 SW 13th St. 0O, J-.Just Past Sin City DONKEY IS COMING SOON Y HOTI I

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Page 12, The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 22,1969 The Florida Alligator The price of freedom is the exercise of responsibility Dave Reddick Dave Osier Editor-In-Chief Managing Editor Harold Aldrich Executive Editor Look Inside, UF EDITOR: could give, then dropped. This has happened to me many times, Coed, as well as to some of my friends who are unfortunate enough to You were called a whore-I have not seen everything but from your letter it seems it was a most underserved title. Yet let us compare your experiences with my own, lest we forget that the Florida Coed is not always a pure and perfect thing who innocently becomes involved in a man's snare of lines and cool, taken advantage of by his lies. You were taken for what you MR. EDITOR: Then again as another married student and father I like to say that Mr. Krakauer from the department of zoology can have his future children according to rational processes. I just wonder if his wife really feals the same. I can see how Krakauer could get wrapped up in rational process concepts working in a Alligator Staff Mary Toomey John Sugg Editorial Assistant Associate Editor Gayle McElroy Darcy Meeker Copy Editor Campus Living Editor Published by students of the University of Florida under the auspices of the Board of Student Publications. Editorial, Business, Advertising offices in Room 330, Reitz Union. Phone 392-1681, or 392-1683. Opinions expressed in the Florida Alligator are those of the editors or of the writer of the article and not those of the University of Florida." feel as I do. Let me generalize. The greater majority of the coeds -mainly the best looking ones, but this is not always the case, fall for the frat men, the jocks, and/or the cool studs with a line more involved than I could go into in this whole paper. I have never had a line; I cannot see perpetrating an involved lie to a girl. So -every time I have scientific field. But to ask us believe that human behavior and family existence is a rational processes is as ignorant as he claims we areswith children.I'd like to ask him how much reason he used during the time he dated his then wife to be. I'm sure the "emotional" among other things came into being. Krakauer, maybe your reasoning isn't rational after all but just selfish. HANS-DIETER KIRSTEN, 4BA MR. Dear Coeds lost -lost to someone who does. He will go out with others on the side, lie, get everything he can get for himself, and then when tired of the game, will drop the girl. She knows this is happening, she must, but she is always there. She enjoys being treated like dirt, obviously. I once asked a friend of mine's sister, aFlorida Coed, why this was so. Her answer? "You would have to be a girl to understand." I have no objection to a girl who has been taken before if she will love me, please me, and be true to me. I would gladly reciprocate. But no girl will. I am no stud, no frat man, no athlete -just a run of the mill, basically honest, hence loveless Florida Man. What am I asking? Why is the coed so worried aboutgthese people? Why won't she give a sincere person a chance rather than one date, or worse yet refuse the date when she finds out he is not in a fraternity? Why won't she give him a chance after dating him for some time, rather than take his love for granted and throw him over for the loveless but exciting sex world? Or is this what she wants? Are 99% of all Froida Coeds an Emma Bovary? Before you knock this deduction please realise that this has happened to me as well as my friends several times. To return to you, my dear coed, do not cry and blame the Florida Male. Instead, look intro a mirror and see your own faults in choosing the one you will love. We are here in our owir sincere way -you can find is if you wish. I doubt you will as few of you with sincere qualities exist. ANOTHER FLORIDA MALE PACT M/SS/L[3 PLANS .cts' ~ A4 ~ p~aLow, 2N fco4o N r thy t'~' N14 r, I pr "' 6-7 n ~ r No Emotions At All? The Best Of Don Wright if <~* /7 (/7" 4 / .7 "4 ~/Nf 'Pal A(f A&mm t EDITORIAL A Long Road The road the class of '73 has chosen to walk is a long one. It is a road strewn with pebbles of questioning and boulders of doubt. It is a road hedged with bigotry. Yet, it is a roaddpaved with knowledge. It is a road which will seem at times endless, but all too quickly will merge with the thoroughfare of life. At that point the traveller will realize for the first time that the road he had been treading upon was not merely a side-road, but a threshold, a portion of his life. The class of '73, just as the class of '72, the class of '71, and every college class, must dare to cross the threshold, and accept the challenge the university offe rs. The challenge is to first find themselves, then to find others, and finally, and probably most difficult, to find their place with them. During their searching, the class of '73 will take part in the eternal magic that is the University of Florida: Orange and blue porn poms, Century Tower chimes, Saturday afternoon football games, the many parties after, the walks down shaded paths, visits to Albert's wire home, screaming loudly at heart-stopping basketball games, studying into the early hours of the morning, those terrible early Monday classes and those frivolously free Friday afternoons. All these and much more will be embedded into the minds of the class of '73. Welcome to the UF. I

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FrIday, August 22, 1969, The Florida Alligator, Pap 13 The Masses Gathered At Woodstock OPEN FORUM: iso ho e for the corn lace" (EDITOR'S NOTE: Pages 12 and 13 are the last two pages of the current news in today's Alligator. The subsequent pages consist of a recap of the year's events.) By HARRY TEA Alligator Correspondent From the flames the phoenix rose, amidst the mud, sweat, and tears. There was much more af the Woodstock Music and Art Fair than music and art; what was there began slowly and built into a very solid atmosphere of man helping his brother and sister to enjoy the freedoms they as individuals sought. The masses began to arrive late Thursday evening and did not cease coming until Sunday evening. The majority were from the New England area, but there were groups from everywhere in the States and I talked to people from England. Canada. and France. They cameind filled the camping grounds. the roadside. the countrvsidc: every possible place one might be able to place a blanket or sleeping bag was taken up with people streamning in to enjoy the three days of SSpeaking Out Bye, Bye Straight This is just to say goody to former Alligator Fifth Columnist Jason Straight and to mourn the passing of a personality, a point of view, that is rarely represented with such defination and style. Jim Holmes, variously Jason Straight and Peter Sweet (the latter name covered his journalist efforts in the ill-fated University Report) was a mult.i-sided figure of considerable depth. A stylish dresser kicking a white Healy betwixt bar and golf course. Ruddy-faced Beef 'n Bourbon man. Flamboyant, a devil's advocate grating on the cast-iron sensitivities of conservative law school colleagues ("Holmes doesn't belong here," they used to say. "He belongs in psychology or something") with infuriating arrogance. Shameless medicine man. hypnotist, clow everybody into his a "Act" was the w( It wasn't just the myriad productions Gator Growl. Ever running act. Not everybody act. "Lacks integrity would mumble. Wc expect them to. Wh politico reffered "pseudo-man" Jasot head off. He had a his every cause an but he wasn't a hyps He could see h prejudice, act self-righteousness. I self-righteousness m his act. Self-righteoust horrible wild-eyed By Jessica Everingham.-J promoter, cries out for blood and Charlatan, repression. It plagues the n, pulling political spectrum from left to Ict. right, disintegrating the softer ord he lked .shades until everything is spelled column or out in black and white. like the '68 It's hard to get away from thing was a because it's taught in the schools and preached from the pulpit, bought his sung in the anthem. ty" someone But it cramped Jason's style tll he didn't because he didn't want to get ien a top SG up-tight. to him as So, throughout his act, he n laughed his teased the prudes and cracked uniform for on the power-hungry politicians. d inclination But mainly he parodied himself, ocrite. his peers, his time of life, his himself with state of being. without An occasional glimpse of [he lack of sincerity hurried past but you ade me buy had to be quick to catch it because the next Minute Jason ness. That would be pretending that it had beast that never been there. peace and music. By Friday morning all roads leading into the area were jammed, -they stayed this way until late Monday afternoon. The Exposition started off as a profit 'making idea, with the normal procedure of the selling and taking up of tickets; but by 11:30 Friday morning the gates were flung open and it was open house to all who came. This was not from a great love of the masses of humanity that were flowing into the grounds, but because the fences around the listening areas were not up in time. When dawn broke Friday morning there were somc 15,000 people gathered in the area and there just wasn't time or enough staff ncnbers available to start collecting tickets or even think about clearing the area. It was a miracle of some size that the Exposition got off to any kind of start at all. The organization did not start building the ground structures until just three weeks prior to the Friday upon which it was all supposed to start. It was because of this time limitation that many of the featured side attractions were not ready until much later in the exposition; but amazingly enough it all came off in its own raggedy-andy way and by Sunday the Woodstock Music and Art Fair, an Aquairian Exposition was complete. There has been quite a bit of adverse press coverage as to the drug scene, and there have been rumors of all sorts traveling wildfire fast as to the vast discomfort and harsh f mInine suffered by all. I stayed for the entire festival, and I was so caught up in the brotherhood an d h el pi n g -o n e-another atmosphere that I took the bad rain, bad organization, bad over-crowding, bad hunger, bad thirst, and all the other bads that the nation heard about as part of what we have to go through to reach the new world we are seeking. P e o p Ie c a m e, f r o m surrounding cities and townships volunteer medical assistants and doctors came to offer help, from Taos, New Mexico, the Hog Farm commune came with supplies and personnel, and even the Army came to the rescue with aid in the form of medical supplies and doctors, not with guns and bullets. This was truly a time for miracles. The New York State Police were so beautiful it was very hard to believe they were state policemen. The policeman's duty is to keep law and order, and this they did with such understanding that only the uniform kept them distinct from the immense crowds of young people that teemed around them. They were not "turning their heads" to what was happening around them, they were just trying to keep the massive waves of humanity that kept sweeping by them in some semblence of order. I am sure there were many policemen who wanted to do violence, but I feel it was due to the vast numbers of people, adverse weather conditions, and the long hours these men had to work. The official estimate of an attendance of some 300,000 was a bit off: I talked with both police and sheriff officials and they all save an estimate of 500,000 people. going, coming, and staying during the three-day period between Friday and Sunday. Another miracle was the fact that only two deaths were reported during the period and only one was attributed to the Exposition. One person was killed in an accident on the festival grounds and another died of appendicitis on the way to a nearby hospital. What happened at Woodstock was like placing the inhabitants of Tampa into a small area that is geared to supply the needs for the residents of a town the size of Starke. With this in mind I think the Woodstock Music and Art Fair could be considered somewhat of a sucess rather than a disaster. It gave several hundreds of thousands of young people a chance to experience what it means to be hungry, thirsty, and discomforted; and then have a complete stranger give them part of what little he has to share. From the flames the phoenix rose, amidst the mud, sweat, and tears, there rekindled a brotherhood that given the chance will live and spread from a small town in upstate New York across our nation. There was much more at Woodstock than music and art. "What I Want For Christmas Is Next Christmas" -it will be your job, Mr. Nixon, to end the war even though the enemy is stepping up the fight and refuses to negotiate honestly. Should you or your iron force fail, we will deny all knowledge of your existence in 1972. .." -'~-7 -Eastern 502, Runway One, Then National 301 AFTER Pan Am 103 Which Follows The Piper, Then United. .."

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Pug 14, The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 22,1969 University Dames' Tea Scheduled For Sept. 24 The University Dames is an organization made up hunts for children of students, ban( of wives of students attending the university. The members at the time of their husbands gr university organization is broken down into eleven and formal and informal dances. In addit individual groups representing the various colleges. are various interest groups, such as bridge The Dames are sponsored by the University crafts, physical fitness, and cookery. Women's Club, which is made up of faculty wives. Dames promote a spirit of friendliness and social The initial kick-off for Dame activitie activities for student wives. 1969-70 year is the welcoming tea at the Each individual group offers programs for its UF President and Mrs. Stephen C. O'Con members and General Dames provides a wide 24. The tea is to welcome the wives of new selection of activities covering the academic year. to the university and acquaint them Charitable activities, such as dressing dolls for members, activities, and interest groups distribution by the Salvation Army to needy they may participate during the upcoming children at Christmas are one function of the Dames. Other activities include fashion shows, Easter egg All student wives are invited to the tea. Women Student Group quets for aduation, ion, there arts and s for the home of nell Sept. students with the in which year. Provides Coed Activities Beginning with a junior transfer student tea Sept. 21, in the Towers Commons area there's a busy year ahead for the Association of Women Students (AWS). Every fall term, AWS holds a workshop where all interested coeds can meet and brainstorm ideas of things they would like to do. Among ideas for this year s activities is a bridal fair. More planning will be required to make it a reality, says Kathy Waldman, AWS president. In addition, AWS will host the regional AWS convention in early April. More than 500 SOUTH EASTERN MUSIC CONTEST $10 .worth of musical equipment to be awarded the winner 50 NAME Bands Sept. 20, 26, 27 Oct. 3, 4,10,11 women students and 60 deans from all over the United States will participate in a four-day conclave on the role of women in the campus state and nation. Women students are urged to consider working with AWS. It is t he o nlI y organization representing all the women students on the UF campus. Volunteers are sought for the many projects which AWS sponsors. "We on the executive board want to serve the women on this campus to the best of our ability, giving them the programs they want -when they want them," Miss Waldman noted. "However, this is virtually impossible with no feedback from the student body. We ask all women students to freely submit suggestions and ideas on how we can better our position on campus and theirs." As a further service, AWS will try to place any interested women student in a position in student government or any of its agencies and committees. The AWS office is located on the third floor of Reitz Union. A representative will hold office hours every day from 3 -5 p.m. Magazine To Debut The "University of Florida Magazine" will make its first appearance September 20. The new quarterly magazine, published by the UF Alumni Association, replaces the Floridalumnus Magazine which was mailed to the 10,118 contributors to the Alumni Association. The new publication will begin its life with a circulation of 60,000, including all alumni, parents of students, students through housing unit distribution, faculty and administrative staff, elected and appointed state officials, media representatives, and others. Its editorial content will be different as well. The first issue contains a photo essay on the J. Hillis Miller Health Center house staff, a prqiile on a Twin Towers coed, a feature on the skin-diving researchers of the Communications Sciences Laboratory, a profile on alumnus Lucius Battle, former Ambassador to the United Arab Republic and an article by Arts & Sciences Dean Harry Sisler. HEAD OF THE CLASS IN A Trans -World STATE'S LARGEST LONG LUXURIOUS FULL COLOR 7 RANGE 100% EUROPEAN TEXTURED HUMAN HAE 80 THE ALL NEW CURLY & SEMI STRAIGHT $29 VALUE 8 WI S 2 80 WIGS 1ALL COLORS HAND WASHABLE .NEVER NEEDS SETTING TTRANS-WORLD HAIRGOODS IMPORTERS CORNER UNIVERSITY & 13th ST. (across from CTFlagler Inn) GAINESVILLE OPEN 10-7 OTHER SHOWROOMS IN ORLANDO .JACKSONVILLE COCOA BEACH & DAYTONA BEACH The Greatest Battle of the Bands ever to assemble in the Southeast. Featuring famous top name bands from throughout the cournty. The Royal Guardsmen, with their latest hits, The Tropics, We The People, the Nation Rocking Shadows, the Split Ends, and many many more. Representatives from RCA, MERCURY, LIBERTY, APPLE, DECCA, and other record companies will be on hand to judge the contest. J. WAYNE REITZ UNION

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Friday, Auust 22,1969, The Florida Alligator, Pap 15 THE SIGMA CHI FRATERNITY It has been said that Sigma Chi is more than a college fraternity but a life time proposition. Thousands of active alumni are proud to say "I am a Sigma Chi!" Sigma Chi at the University of Florida is one of the most outstanding chapters of an outstanding fraternity. Sigs are active in all phases of campus life; as campus leaders, in athletics, in service, in scholarship and in social life. Come by Number 8 Fraternity Row and find out why Sigma Chi is such an outstanding organization. Meet the brothers, look at the beautiful home of Sigma Chi and learn why we are so proud of what we feel we can offer you as a college man. Action at the annual Sigma Chi Derby is usually funny but always fun for Sigs and sorority girls alike. Georgia Tech Alumni John Young, a veteran of many United States space flights including the Apollo 9 Moon orbiter. Gamma Theta Brother John McPhail was recently designated the outstanding undergraduate Sigma Chi in the world when he was named the winner of the H.G. Balfour Award by the national fraternity. Sigma Chi's Homecoming yard decoration last fall took three first place trophies. Tennessee alumni Tommy Bartlett Past University of Florida President has compiled a 55-24 record as Head J. Wayne Reitz was a Sigma Chi Basketball Coach at UF, his team last alumni from Colorado year went to the N.I.T. Gamma Theta Chapter of The Sigma Chi Fraternity Number 8 Fraternity Row, Phone 372-9260 I

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Pap 16, The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 22,1969 FOR ORIENTATION Up, Up And Away Theme For Women By MAGGIE COE Alligator Staff Writer Up, up and away .women students, there's space for you on the UF campus. As part of a more personal approach to orientation, there will be a Campus Life Conference for Women Students, Sept. 16 at 4 p.m. The space program provides the Up, up and away theme of the conference. In the Reitz Union Ballroom, various women leaders will deliver short speeches. Included in the list of speakers are: student chairman of the conference Linda Mogge, Miss UF Jo Lynn Pijot, president of Mortar Board Joan Dowd, president of Savant-UF Jan Dickens, president of Alpha Lambda Delta Ellen Corenswet, president of Panhellenic Council Dianne Baron, and coordinator of Women's Cheerleaders Debbie Moschell. Dean of Women Betty Cosby and Assistant Deans Phyllis Meek and Loyce Katz will speak in behalf of the administration. Representing the Housing Office will be Phillis Mable, assistant director. Susan Johnson, the first women president of Interhall Council and Kathy Waldman, president of AWS are the guest speakers from student government. An additional speech will be given by Kathy White, secretary of the Gator Band. The special guest of the Conference will be Mrs. Stephen C. O'Connell. A Gator Pep Band will also be on the program to help get up spirit for the following Saturday's Houston game. Following the Conference students may visit the booths of all the women's organizations to get information on the groups that interest them. These booths will be on the second floor of the Union. The various stations will feature information about every college and organizations from the College of Engineering to the College of Agriculture-, professional and honorary sororities, the Florida Players and the Cicerones. At each booth a member of the organization will be on hand to explain the group's work and qualifications for membership.Interested women students may sign up for some groups ight on the spot. The purpose for these displays as well as the entire conference Miss Katz said, "is to make the new women students feel welcome and acquaint them with the opportunities present at UF. I feel that last year's conference was a real success." The Campus Life Conference for Women Students in its modern version has evolved from the defunct Women's Conclave. Much of the credit for the progress of the conference belongs to Miss Katz and her steering committee: Linda Mogge, Lynn Barger, Mary Goodwin, Lois Gordon, Patsy Howell, Renee Millard, Pat Nichols, Jenny Scrivner, Prudence Smith, Mary Tunstall, Kathy White and Annette Wilder. Using the theme Up, Up and Away, the Committee and Miss Katz designed the Conference after the, space program. Upon recieving clearance from Houston they drew up a program using nomenclature of the program, i.e. ground control, Mercury, Gemini, Apollo, etc. To make the Conference authentic Miss Katz journeyed to Houston to collect official NASA material. IT'S A RESTAURANT IT'S A DRIVE-IN IT'S A COFFEE SHOP IT'S A CARRY-OUT IT'S A GOOD THING! Frisch's is a good thing for breakfast, lunch, dinner and anytime snacks. But, mainly, it's the place where you get your "Good Thing" button. Free! North of the campus at 2035 N.W. 13th Street in Gainesville. The Florida Alligator Campus Life Conference THE MEN OF PI KAPPA PHI FRATERNITY CORDIALLY INVITE YOU TO STOP BY OUR HOUSE DURING RUSH SEPTEMBER 16-21 No. 11 FRATERNITY ROW 4,K

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By DARCY MEEKER Campus Living Editor Math At Yale In View For This Freshman Kiki Gordon started college two years ago, when she was a junior at P.K. Yonge High School. This fall she enters Yale as a freshman, ready to enter Yale's early concentration program in Math. The hours she took (for example, 11 hours spring quarter, just before her high school graduation) do not count as college credit. "The university lets P.K. Yonge know we finish the work in a course, and we get A's for high school work, no matter how we did in the courses. "That's all right I guess; it encourages students to take advantage of the program, but it seems to me if you do very well, you ought to get more credit," said the green-eyed blonde. Her speciality has been math courses, including one graduate seminar which, she says, was over her head, but "it was fun. "I didn't understand a lot of it, but it put me in contact with the ideas and gave me a certain familiarity with them." Working at the computer center this summer, she has been directing programing for computer aided education. Consequently, she is known as "the computer girl." "I'm not as good with the computer as I am in math, but it's very interesting." Also interested in medicine (her father is Dr. Richard Gordon, associate professor of psychiatry), she is thinking of combining her three major interests in the one field of computer medicine. The field uses computers to diagnose ailments. "Doctors can't remember everything they learned in Med school, and there's too much knowledge in specialities, even, for one man to know it all. The computer is fed symptoms, results of tests, and so forth, then indicates diagnoses or further tests necessary to really deciding. "There is experimental woirke on this going on now, and computers are being used to teach diagnostics to medical students. I think this work will really go far." Of serious countenance and, truly concerned with finding out all she can about what she's doing, Kiki says the most improtant thing she could tell freshmen is "get to know your professors. That's one of the most valuable experiences college has to offer." Did she learn anything from her older brother's going away to school at Florida Presbyterian College? "The main thing I learned is that my family won't fall apart when I leave." The best fried chice in town ..us. .... ~8 '411 toNvil, 40,14 xy .46 The mighty Wishbone* cometh. With great crispy fried chicken like you've never carried out before. Get the whole family some, by the box, barrel, bucket, or peck, at these new locations in your town: 704 S.W. 2nd Ave./201 S.W. 16th Ave./1021 S.E. 4th Ave. Copyright & 1968. Al ghts reserved. 'SerUce mark of Atlantic COMPany 236 5. Temple (US 301) Starke Friday, August 22, 1969, The Florida Alligator, Pap 17

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Pp 18, The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 22, 1969 Florida Quarterly. A Book For All Seasons It's 90 or more pages of short stories, poetry, reviews, graphic and photographic art. It's put together by a staff of harried students who work, as yet, without pay. Salaries, allotted in an upcoming budget, will average out to 90 cents per staff member per week. But the Quarterly is coming along. The more or less "laissez faire" student magazine is published under the auspices of, but not particularly dominated by, the University of Florida. Its contributors range from well known authors such as Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings and Ray Bradbury to unknown students just starting out in literary-artistic fields. None are paid. UF has had a literary magazine since the turn of the SHOWS GAMES BOWLING PING PON HOT DOU During the first three years, only three issues were published. Even then, sales werte tenible. century, but the Quarterly itself was begun in the Summer of 1967. The title was at first a misnomer. In its first three years the Quarterly found its way to the stands only four times. Even then the sales were terrible. When the present editor, Jessica Everingham, took over responsibility for sales, she found that out of five stores where the Quarterly was distributed, only 10 copies had F L IDA Ct A R T ER LY .A lv le been sold. Store owners didn't orde want them restocked. S: "So I lied," she says. "Instead two of asking them if they wanted stance the new issue, I simply told Sales them that I had come to deliver T the Quarterlies that they'd fror literal incr, draw past con photo -S "V ph isI tii this 19 The photographs in the portfolio will be primarily the work of UF students. The poetry and prose sections have also been opened up to undergraduates. The magazine is not a receptacle for the work of any writing class nor is it a vehicle for professors' theses. "We thrive on newness," says Miss Everingham. "We want to be (CONTINUED PAGE 19) PLAYS DANCES CONCERTS B BILLIARDS PEP RALLY JAM SESSIONS GHNUTS GAMES AREA SCHEDULE September 10 -5:00 P.M. September 11 -5:00 P.M. September 12 -5:00 P.M. September 13 -9:00 A.M. September 14 -9:00 A.M. September 15 -9:00 A.M. September 16 -9:00 A.M. September 17 -9:00 A.M. SUNDAY 14 1 Food Special -French Cuisine Cafeteria 11:00 a.m. -2:00 p.m. and 4:30 p.m. -7:00 p.m. Movie -Terrace 9:00 p.m. "ARABESQUE" Bowling Special Games Area MONDAY -11:30 P.M. -11:30 P.M. -11:30 P.M. -1:00 A.M. -1:00 A.M. -1:00 A.M. -1:00 A.M. -1:00 A.M. v i -ego frI i I W*'%JL'* 'I 15 Hot Doughnuts and Coffee The Colonnade 8:30 a.m. -11:30 a.m. Food Special -Latin American Food Cafeteria 4:30 p.m. 7:00 P.M. The Generation Gap: Part I -The Ballroom 7:30 p.m. -9:00 p.m. Movie -Terrace 9:00 p.m. "FAHRENHEIT 451" Billiards Special Games Area ____________ a TUESDAY 16 Hot Doughnuts and Coffee The Colonnade 8:30 a.m. -11:00 a.m. Food Special -Middle East Dinner Cafeteria 4:30 p.m. -7:00 p.m. The Generation Gap: Part II -Terrace 7:30 p.m. -9:00 p.m. "Plain Folk" -Florida Players Theatre 8:00 P.m. Movie -Terrace 9:00 p.m. "BLINDFOLD" Billiards Special Games Area WEDNESDAY THURSDAY FRIDAY SATURDAY Food Special Mexican Food Cafelteria 4:30 p.m. -7:00 p.m. Movie -Terrace 9:00 p.m. "TEXAS ACROSS THE RIVER" Billiards Special Games Area I I Movie -Terrace 9:00 p.m. "DEAD HEAT ON A MERRY GO ROUND" Billiards Special Games Area 12 Movie -Auditorium 7:00 p.m. and 9:00 p.m. "COUNTERPOINT" 13 Movie -Auditorium 7:00 p.m. and 9:00 p.m. "ROBIN AND THE SEVEN HOODS" Dance -Terrace 9:00 Dance -Terrace 9:00 p.m. -Midnight I p.m. -Midnight Billiards Special Games Area Bowling Special Games Area 17 Hot Doughnuts and Open House -Entire Coffee The Colonnade Union 7:00 p.m. 8:30 a.m. -11:00 a.m. 10:00 p.m. Picnic -Camp wauburg 1:00 p.m. 6:00 p.m. P o t t e r s W h e e I Demonstration -Arts and Crafts Center 2:30 p.m. and 8:00 p.m. Food Special -Italian Food Cafeteria 4:30 7:00 p.m. Movie -Auditorium 7:00 p.m. and 9:00 p.m. "GRANDPRIX" "Meet the Brass" Arredondo Room 7:00 P.M. -10:00 p.m. Glee Club Concert Grand Staircase 7:00 p.m. -10:00 p.m. "Plain Folk" -Florida Players Theatre 8:00 p.m. Band Concert Terrace 9:30 p.m. 10:00 p.m. Pep Rally -Terrace 10:00 p.m. -10:30 p.m. Dance -Terrace 10:30 p.m. -12:30 Multi-Media Show The Ballroom 10:30 p.m. -12:30 Billiards Special Games Area Bowling Special Games Area See You There! J. WAYNE REITZ UNION Orientation Week Schedule of Events G September 10-17 I Fall, accounts for forty of the go, magazine 's pages the approximately half. ay. "We feel that photography is finally coming into its own and ure we want to pay tribute to it," ege says Dave Matthews, Quarterly ade Art Editor. "Until fairly of recently, the photographer was The considered a second class artist. art Now he is taking his place in the of world of art." red." It worked. ince that time, a year a more issues have hitt ds and a third is on the w s shot way up. he Quarterly is a depart m the traditional coll ary magazine. It has ma easingly greater use ings and photographs. T two issues were heavy in; test and a portfolio ographic art, coming up t Ve fel that otography to its own. e want to pay bute to it." I F

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rF ROM PA GE 18 read or we wouldn't try to print." Some of the Quarterly's contributors are artists of considerable prominence. Among them are William S. Burroughs, author of Naked Lunch; James Leo Herlihy, who wrote Midnight Cowboy, now a major motion picture; Lawrence Ferlinghetti, author of A Coney Island of the Mind; Ray Bradbury, author of Fahrenheit 451 and Illustrated Man; and Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings, who wrote Cross Creek and The Yearling. Rod Taylor, a poet who recently won the Stanford Writers Fellowship, was featured in last Winter's Quarterly. He will appear again in October. John Morefield, who was once an undergraduate at UF, won publication in Best College Fiction in 1964. His story Irises appeared in the last Quarterly. Wendell Berry is a nationally known poet who was collected in the anthology used for the American Poetry survey at UF. He has appeared in the Quarterly before and will appear in a poet's portfolio this Fall. Thus far, the Quarterly has been remarkably free from universit; censorship. During the controversy last year over the publication of a four-letter word in Florida State University's magazine, the same word went on sale with the Quarterly without comment from UF administrators. The Quarterly has three independent advisors who pass on its content. LIVE ENTERTAINMENT ChUCK CONLEY GUIT AR MON -WED 9 ON. RICHARD PARKER PIANO THUR -SAT 9 ON. Alibi LOUNGE 34th & W. UNIV. Florida Quarterly HERE NOW! -at bookstores. While controversy raged at FSU over publication of a four-letter--urd, the sane word passed in the Quarterly without comment The biggest threat that the Quarterly faces is lack of money. The budget is sparse and, due to sketchy and poorly coordinated operating techniques of the past, trust in the Quarterly is only now beginning to appear. It has decided to take "tasteful" advertising and is pleading for subscribers, patrons, donors, and sponsors. "The Quarterly came into being here to fill a need. It's part of the responsibility of a center of learning to its people," says Miss Everingham. And apparently its hundreds of readers agree. "WE PROPOSE TO BRING YOU THE FINEST IN CAMPUS ART AND LITERATURE" .Editor Jessica Everingham and Managing Editor Dave Mathews pose for advertisement J. Wayne Reitz Union 0 University of Florida 0 Gainesville, Florida 32601 To All Freshmen Men and Women: WELCOME!! From ALPHA PHI OMEGA The National Service Fraternity If you enjoy working in the service of your fellow students, your school, and your community, APO needs you! If you seek fellowship with other service-minded students and opportunities to contribute your share to the improvement of your academic community, you need APO! JOIN THE NATIONAL SERVICE FRATERNITY. For further information, contact Lou Tally, Box 13173, University Station, Gainesville, Fla. 32601, telephone no. 392-6029. I Art Mag Taking Hold FridV. Aimat 2Z 196S, The.Foridm Afligitor, Pop 19

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Pag. 20; Tbe Fibridt Alligator, Friday, Atgust 22, 1969 UPS 1969 FESTIVITIES Floats, Skits, fFireworks Planned For Homecoming By ED CROWELL Alligator Staff Writer Bawdy skits, fireworks, pretty girls, floats and football are just a few of the components of Homecoming 1969. UF's 43rd Homecoming weekend, beginning with the suspension of classes Friday, October 17, will climax with the game against North Carolina. Homecoming, the biggest event of the fall quarter for students and alumni, will be centered on this year's slogan, "Gators Cheer A Historic Year". The moon landing is expected to be reflected in many UF decorations. The festivities begin with a parade starting at noon Friday. Over 100 entries including floats, beauty contestants, and bands are expected to participate. The parade begins at the ROTC drill field and continued down W. University Avenue to Main Street. Estimated crowds of over 70,000 are expected to line the streets. Floats are entered by students from various organizations, dormitories, fraternities and sororities. It is possible this year's parade will be locally televised. U'S. Senator Joseph Tydings will be the key speaker at Friday evening's FBK banquet. The senator from Maryland has been an avocate ot strict gun control legislation and has been active in the ABM controversy. The banquet in the gym will be attended by 1,350 invited alumni, students, faculty and administrators. Gator Growl begins at 8:15 Friday night. This student-produced show has been labled the largest of its kind in the world. Skits traditionally roast prominent politicos and controversial campus events. The best four or five skits are chosen by judges at an often-risque public tryout two weeks prior to the Growl. Last year's skits lampooned Governor Claude Kirk and UF students' extra-curricular activities. A fireworks display follows Gator Growl at Florida Field. An increased fireworks budget this year promises a better and larger exhibition. During Gator Growl the 1969 Homecoming Sweetheart will be crowned. The deadline for entries is September 25 and the contest will be held October 5. Prizes for the sweetheart include a $500 scholarship, a Bahamas cruise and a portrait. The three finalists will also go on a promotional tour throughout the state. Alumni events will begin the morning of the game. An alumni reunion is scheduled for 8 to 10:30 a.m. on the Union's north terrace. The 1969 Florida Showcase will he held on the Union's colonnade throughout homecoming weekend. Each college is expected to present a display exhibit. There will be several displays featuring various aspects of student life. Florida politics will get a thorough lambasting at the John Marshall Bar Association skits 10:15 Saturday morning. Students and alumni can eat before the game at a barbeque held in Florida Gym. The barbeque, from 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m., costs $2.50 per person. The big game pitches the Florida Gators against the University of North Carolina Tar Heels. Game time is 2 p.m. Saturday October 18. Welcome to Gainesville A Perfect companion for apartment living is a space saving .compact .dependable .handcrafted all new 1 10 HANDCRAFTED for Unrivaled Dependability The 14" Portable Color TV with Big-Set Features -All New Zenith Handcrafted Portable Color TV Chx ar -Sunshine" Color Pi ture Tube -Full Rated Power Transformer -Advanced Zenith Color Dermodulator Cir itry -Exclusive Automatic ''Fringe-Lock" Circuit -Zenith Quality 5" x 3" Speaker -Super Video Range Tuning System -Exclusive Modular Sohd-State 3-Stage Video IF Amplifier -Automatic Color Claritier -with Magnetically Shielded Picture Tube -Advanced Zenith Nttdded High Voltage Sweep Transormer -21,500 Volts of Picture Power -Attractive, Durable Vinyl Clad Metal Cabinet 608 N MAIN St. 4" PORTABLE AG. 2SQ.IN. COLOR TV from COUCH'S ONLY 88 WITH 288TRADE ir own master ICE I T." BAWDY SKITS, FLOATS, FOOTBALL, FIREWORKS .and a couple of pretty florida women in action. GAtJ CH I OMEGA Welcome all new students to, the Ph 376-7171 jUniversity o Florida /L E ZENITH TWO-YEAR WARRANTY ON COLOR TV PICTURE TUBE COUCH'S where service is guaranteed by ou technicians. "IF WE SELL IT WE SER V COUCH'S "Serving the Univ. of Fla. Since 1933" ~i. I i~, ~ R Elm lNf

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HERE COME THE GATORS .ready for football action Last Year's Homecoming Again Political Nov. 1, 1968 By KATHIE KEIM Alligator Staff Writer Bands, floats, skits, pretty girls, football with Auburn, a Homecoming Sweetheart, alumni, more pretty girls ...all are part of the sights, sounds, and festivities making up Homecoming Weekend. Classes are cancelled beginning at 12:05 p.m. today, in time for the Homecoming Parade to begin at 1 p.m. The UF and Florida A&M Marching Bands, plus twenty-four high school bands, will privide the music for marchers and onlookers, while fraternity and sorority floats, humor entries, and special units provide color, laughter, and pre-game spirit. U.S. Sen. Spessard Holland, D-Fla., will be the featured speaker for the annual Florida Blue Key Homecoming Banquet at 4:45 p.m. on the main floor of the Florida Gym. U.S. Sen. George Smathers, retiring from the Senate this year after serving three terms, will be honored at the banquet. Both Holland and Smathers are graduates of the UF and are former student body presidents. Mortor Board leadership honorary for women, will welcome about 250 women leaders and guests at its reception and banquet beginning at 4:30 p.m. in the Reitz Union. Mrs. Stephen C. O'Connell, wife of the UF president, will be an honored guest. CRANE IMPORTS Factory Trained Mechanics Largest stock of parts in North Central Florida Crane Imports 506 East University 372-4373 Gainesville / non-stop color from hip to toe Sleek streaks of color that fit like a second skin. Vanilon opaque pantyhose come on in a dozen different shades -white, black, charbrown, navy, hunter, vintage, camel, charcoal, gold, ivy, caramel, flame. One size fits all, $3 the pair, in Maas Hosiery. THE AQUARIUM SOCIETY OF GAINESVILLE 7-7 CORDIALLY INVITES ALL TROPICAL AND MARINE FISH HOBBYISTS TO ATTEND OUR MEETINGS HELD ON THE THIRD MONDAY OF EACH MONTH AT THE UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST FELLOWSHIP ON NW 43RD STREET AT 7:30 P.M. For information call 378-7303 or 372-5767 kNEaa4bLAML GAINESVILLE MALL ( S V layer upon layer of smash fashion Wool pleated skirt in burgundy or uavy plaid. 5-13. $16. I)osz-ear collared shirt of Dacron polvester Avril rayon: gold, bras-s or navy, 5-1:3, $11. Supir-:nC cable stitch wool sweater, burgundy or navy, 34-40. $18. All from Garland's '69 Campus Collection in Maas Junior Sportsw ear. a I

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Pap 2The IQda Aligator, Friday, August 22, 1968 GROWL ALSO INCLUDES SKITS .some even get pie in the face GATOR GROWL FEATURES TALENT .like this singing duo INSURED CLASS RINGS AGAINST 9 Loss of ring by theft, robbery, burglary, or fire 0 Loss of stone from setting Accidental breakage of stone Zales Gustoni GIarge Convenient Terms Available ALES We're nothing without your GAINESVILLE MALL Jaappa tptj "Dieu Et Les Dames" While it is true that there is a place for everyone in the fraternity system, Kappa Alpha Order has something special to offer. The Brothers and Pledges of Beta Zeta Chapter send you a cordial invitation to investigate our way of life. MURPHREE AREA UNIVERSITY AVENUE -CL w lSTUDENTw ~UNLLJ During the construction of our new mansion of Fraternity Row, our temporary home is located at 18 N.W. 17th. Street 7-T-T-

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Frkby, A.gut 2, 9m"MTe FWk& AV401br';Psi* O' FROM CBW TO NSA 3 Capsule Look At Summer Events By ED CROWELL UF's version of chemical and back to Student Government on acquired. meeting-door closed despite Afligator Staff Writer biological warefare research campus projects. A state-wide furor erupted requests to open the meetings to being denied. A national UF's dream of a huge when the Board of Regents the public. University Chancellor UF's nine weeks of summer magazine said UF's College of activities center and athletic delayed the granting of tenure to Robert Mautz has expressed his are over. Agriculture had been aiding complex were put into motion 262 state university system opinion that the meetings should The 8,392 students enrolled Elgin Air Force Base's CBW unit. this summer. The proposed faculty members. There were be open to the press. this quarter have braved the hot Agriculture Provost E.T. York, indoor pool, performing arts 119 UF faculty affected by the And about 8,000 students sun on their way to air Jr. denied the report. theatre, gym, indoor track and regent's action. don't have as good a tan as they conditioned classes for the last On July 1, UF joined the amphitheatre may become a The UF's Council of might like. They spent the times. Now the campus is due controversial U.S. National reality in six years if funds are Academic Deans is keeping their summer in classrooms. for three weeks of quiet before Student Association by a vote of the influx of more than 21,000 the Student Senate. The students. organizat was formerly The Brothers of There are 1,492 degree affiliated with the CIA and SDS. candidates for this quarter. A clamor resulted in which Men have walked on the conservatives pushed for 'a moon since the beginning of this campus-wide referendum on the quarter. The Student Senate has issue. DELTA UPSILON been on an economy rampage. A The Student Senate chopped $17 million activities center is at the student body budget for planned. And UF is ranked weeks before finally cutting to number one in sexual zero the funding request of 17 permissiveness. organizations. Many other W elcom e rou To A capsule look at this requests were cut substantiallyFl rd summer's headlines begins with as the senate directed $60,000 The University of Florida Shuttle Bus System Ready For Fall Start The shuttle bus system, designed to relieve the traffic congestion To V isit The around campus, will start operation Sept. 1, reports Lee Burrows, traffic and parking coordinator. The system will provide three different routes, or loops, running to DUJ House the lawcomplex, health center, and the main campus. The buses will run at intervals of five minutes, with routes originating at the parking lot behind Hume Hall. During Rush Burrows said that the system is designed to "get the student and faculty within primary walking distance of their classes, rather than transport them from class to class. .." Because of the system, 40 to 50 parking spaces will be eliminated 181 W .U N IV ERS Y A. around campus to provide space for bus stops. The Hume lot will have parking space for 900 cars, and will have a shelter for weather protection. THE. REITZ UNION BARBER SHOP Aa 8 CHAIRS HAIR STYUNG HAIR STRAIGHTENING RAZOR CUTS SHOE SHINE MON -FRI *:8:00 -5:30 SAT 9:00 -4:00 for the utmost care in your personal grooming the REITZ UNION BARBER SHOP sponsers many visit the REITZ UNION BARBER SHOP, 8 student functions such as dances, pic-nics, etc. well qualified barbers to serve you. GROUND FLOOR J. WAYNE REITZ UNION s. ....M U

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Pug 24, The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 22, 1969 (amp us Irier SPONSORED BY STUDENT GOVERNMENT ,a, .~. Pxst 31969 Of r'IE Dear nterin9 vre bE Whatever tr r Ithi C~cocitytOnto reason -st for x, have'C e.ifYO pp3nte n* Wit,,h to be gClif a d ,en 0otai t t f e nd, e to obt hasnt sable and g whicO, one 3 is dred or so credits# c -of Fjlr -iverS ity facility tt the ties ana aThis oportu'1~ction. u ofelf-eduhael foCu f se t help t be all more h proc -into Y( pO sholjld enter litY sity atfre and in th r oagh mareading x' that %ost r education the St3.de On behalf comete FyoridC teUniversity Oinig the tat one for 3,-.l agree tion. -YO ~ 3 aned~Ct3n is to get "tne prepared 'an educationt 0ur 3n3by .is ean arch a a hun nvo ved reS years'1 a through fot Tr education reat effortF 1mitleSs ra in the pr o idaS to aid Y. u etro d inttitutionr intensity on with reate widi dual one. the Uiduer WIth that onl associate, realizin achiee eyes opent ill you f an strius -te -ginn3n )eri.enc of he i-ers ity nt5 0othI leS Shepherd Student hrSident 0f the 'If y on ca say, BC V-w\EB UNCL E A LBE RT STUDENT GOVERNMENT Student Government at the University is the oldest student tradition and is one of the most dynamic institutions on the University of Florida Campus. Among the Activities it provides are the Intramurals program, Student Government Productions, which in the past has brought to campus the Supremes, Fifth Dimension, and many other performers. Student Governnment also sponsors ACCENT, a symposium on vital issues, which has brought to campus such noted speakers as Richard M. Nixon, Justice William 0. Douglas, Strom Thurmond, Wayne Morse and many others. Student Government also funds and subsidizes many of the Student Activities available for you to participate in and enjoy. Among them are Homecoming, Teacher Evaluation, the Gator Band' the Campus Singing Groups, Drill Teams, Rathskeller, Spring Arts Festival, Interhall Council, Association of Women Students, and numerous campus improvement projects. The Executive Branch of Student Government as well as all the organizations listed above are interested in participants and members from the Freshman Class. We in Student Activities have found t rewarding and enlight invite your interest. Foi Student Government,I and ask for the Secretar FRESHM Of particular intc Freshman Council. The purpose of th represent the Freshman Florida. Freshmen are elected according to the numbe Nominations to the don by each dorm section w The Freshman Co Freshman activities you oientation week, are tr the University of Florida to help incoming fresh this campus, and not university of this size. Government and Student hese extra-curriculars to be ening experiences and we r information please stop by Room 305, J.W.R. Union, y of Interior. AN COUNCIL rest to freshmen is the e Freshman Council is to Class of the University of by each dorm area council r of freshmen in each area. m area council will be made hich has freshman residents. uncil, and many of the will be introduced to during aditions of long standing at .They have been continued nen achieve an identity on lose his individuality at a r= VW _Vrg kTf At ^ ^ --HA W-A A A A AW w w w W w "X -M 41P 4p 41P 41P 41P 4ko 4p 4p -4--4k-4 ,UNI.VIE THE CAMPUS CRIER University of Florida Studet appears every Monday in the F Student Government chartered o to place a notice in the CAJ~Ipi bring a typed copy of that floiceR Wayne Reitz Umion, by nlon Wed Monday you wish it to appear. ou see me campus Hello. IE U. S 3oC' O-uE fL STUDENT, ACT WANT y Um

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uced by the vernrment. It Alligator. Any ation wishing RIER should t Room 305, J. ay before the 4 -Florida ANIPWr, Page 25 good! After a prolonged fight with the powers that be, the Gator Beanie, Florida's oldest tradition, has prevailed. No Freshman should be without one. Available during orientation at the book store and information booth. For additional information call Student Government 392-1665. Sponsored by the Gator Loan Fund. thank you for caring 3 -tudent Body would like to express its gratitude to wing teachers (in this University of 1200 faculty) icipated in the Teacher Evaluation Program. Every r was invited to participate; these few did so. By so hey have demonstrated an interest in quality education and a true concern Comprehensive Logic M.L. Bryant Standley F. Breeze W.E. Moore F.B. Branch M. Dillon ngineering D. Lee J. Larsen E. Holden ce PE. Pastore T. Carter in F. Sciadini M. Wolfson Y Comprehensive English S. Conroy Economics D. Stryker J.A. Penrod s W.L. Frazer 3n B.H. Walker W.C. Chideft titutJono~s P.E. Pastore Chemistry R.E. Bruns J.W. Wiggins J.A. Deyrup S.O. Colgate M. Vala d Tarrant J.F. Baxter Clinical Psychology N. McGee Education C.H. Gardner an W.M. Alexander C.L. Eggert E. Ambrose J. Tison R.R. Sherman struction J.M. Newell n R.E. Jester M. Garber W. Purkey M. Cunningham M.R. Schmidt D. Lane D. Stryker J.W. Crews y -Electrical Engineering Sheng-San Li ministration K.L. Doty L.E. Jones Durling fences Environmental Engineering J.L. Fox E.E. Pyatt English ring P. Lisca ir J.B. Pickard J.A. Penrod S. Long nH'E. Spivey in E.H. Cox M. New gineering A.A. Murphree berg Childers is Beirne Carnell for students and Economics D.B. TruIt D.T. Gelthman R.H. Blodgett C.B. Tigadi N.G. Keig W.J. Frazer F. Goddard F.L. Connell R.E. French LeMoyne Caravajal Goffman Engineering Science R. Sierakowski Engineering Graphics R.E. Stockstill Fundamental Mathem S.G. Sadler Fruit Crops W.J. Wiltbank French A.B. Marinetti M.J. Wallace L.L. Hodges Finance W.M. Fredricks W.M. Howard M.S. Tysseland J.R. Vernon J.C. Wassom M.A. Klaben F.L. Connell J.E. Hipp D.F. Scott Food Sciences H. Appledorf Forestry P.W. Frazer V.D. Cunningham German J. ibarguen Geography E.E. Hegen C. Cross R.B. Marcus L.A. Paganini Geology R.A. Edwards Humanities T.A. Hart R. Jaberg H.E. Spivey Beirne C. Carnell F.H. Taylor their History J.H. Mugar G.D. Henry Industrial Engineering M. Allet M. Padron J.F. Burns Journalism E.D. Yates H.G. Davis G. Butler J.C. Chance J. Rossenraad J.E. Cough Lindstrom Latin American Studies aatici D.T. Geithman I.S. Morris E.L. Hunt R. Moffat E.M. Jones LibraryScienca L.W. Spears F.S. Smith McLendon M. Paulus Mechanical Engineering W.L. Freeman TOD. Neff V.P. Roan F.L. Schwartz H.M. Ingman Medical Technology R.W. Gould Management W. Hill J. Wallace W.M. Fox T.E. Backmeyer J.B. Ray D.C.McAneny W.W. Menice Marketing G.R. Sims 'L. Crossbart P.B. Dimsdale R.B. Cook J.H. Faricy Mathematics E.N. Ferguson K.N. Sigmon D. Phelps R.C. Jones V. B. Hearsey Seybold A.W. Row W.P. Morse Music C. White S. Teeters W.R. Bodine T.S. Small Metallurgical Engineering E.D. Verink C.S. Hartley Military Science 10 G.H. Fair (AF) R.J. Torre (AF) O.L. Butler (AF) Nuclear Engineering R.W. Englehart Nursing C.V. Hayes D. Hymovich Martin E. Mitchell Occupational Therapy G. Leppelmeier Political Science W.A. Rosenbaum S.G. Walker J.W. Freels Pharmaceutical Chemistry R.H. Hammer Physical Education P.R. Varnes C.W. Zauner W.R. Williams E.G. Crone R.E. Allen O.J. Holyoaf C.A. Boyd N.M. Leavitt Pharmacy R.H. Blythe E. Voss Philosophy K. Megill G. Standley J.J. Zeman Physics S.B. Trickey J.E. Purcell J.B. Conklin J.H. Stamper H.R. Weller R.E. Garrett T.L. Bailey Psychology S.T. Margulls C.M. Zevy S.M. Jourard R.V. Anderson H.Van DeRelt Physical Science R.B. Marcus C.N. Olsson Pathology D.A. Roberts Real Estate A.A. Ring L.A. Galtanis Curtis R.O. Boatright Ralllon A. Creel S. Banks T. Springfield R.H. Hiers C. Carnell M.V. Gannon Required Physical Education E.G. Crone A.C. Moore I-F. Waglow W. Welsch Y. Thompson J. ChinnicI Speech D.E. Williams A. Ramirez Karns Criddle Soils R.E. Caldwell Statistics J.T. McClave R.J. Beaver T.R. Hoffman D.T. Hughes C. Taylor R.L. Ott J. Cornell P.V. Rao Sociology G.A. Watkins J.S. Vandiver G. Reiner B. Gorman G. Leslie C. Robbins J.C. Bridges Vegetable Crops B.D. Thompson V.F. Nettles Zoology P.R. Elliott E.R. Jones J.H. Kaufmann WE APPLA UD THIS. Research has shown that the classroom experience can be much more rewarding for the student when the instructor has this type concern. m Advertising W.R. Glafke Architecture S.S. Korv. S.R L.R. Grand Agricultural E C.D. Baird Animal Scien L.R. Arringto D.L. Wakema Anthropolog T.A. Nunez Agricultural I A.A. Prato J E ReynoldS J R. Greenma American Insl A. Wells S. Conroy S.G. Walker P.L. Hanna G.C. Osborn D. Lee R.C. Shepherd Accounting F.M. Cole W.C. Stone E.A. Wood D. Corbett D.D. Ray A.P. I mmelm Astronomy F.R. West Building Con D.A. Halperi H.F. Holland Bacteriology D.E. Duggan Botany D.S. Anthon' J.S. Davis Business Adr J. Wallace W.M. Fox Biological Sc T.J. Walker E. Gourley Civil Enginee C.A. Collier WH.ZimpfeI TD. Furman R H Susag Schmertman Sawyer Chemical En A.W. Western K.E. Gubbin 0 M. Tyner 6 esn The S the follo who part instructo doing, t

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Pap 2 The FlorId. ARigator, FrIdmy, epukut 22,1969 Poll Sh UF Sx a o CA SCHOOL AVAIL AB ILIT) /f rato 1. U ofFlida, 2-i FFair 2. Uof 5-3 Poo Michign -3. Son Jose 65 Far By DAVE OSIER Aligator Managing EdItor For all of this campus' seeming serenity and peaceful OW S piety, there apparently is another side -probably a clandestine subculture indulging in rampant hedonism. That's according to a est September Playboy magazine campus action chart which rates UF tops in the nation in sexual Ys permisiveness. 5a Screening 25 schools across the country, the chart represents "every major demographic area of the United States." MPUS ACTION CHART ir Permissive. no soc al rstrictions the house mothers r IPermr)i ssi ve: Phitosophy ef (A H ASH Age Hf AypAHAI Hi HAP HOAHAHA 3 Suburban rebel Liberated beyond the n a battered wildest dreams of the ind Sarah L,)wrence TA.Hatu I Uat* Collegenohours r-H A u"Am eAri blond r u tH A thCoeddorms Publications Offer 'Real Life' Work The chart leads off a "Sex Ir Academe" section of the men'; magazine, just arrived in th mails Tuesday. The article i billed as a "tripartite takeout on campus mating mores." Playboy says the action is off-campus and that everyone goes to Crescent Beach to practice their wanton skills in courses such as "Philosophy of the Body." The 25 schools are rated "in descending order of permisiveness -the chart's upper reaches being meccas for the scholarly hedonist, its lower During the past years, the American Collegiate Press Association's All-American rating has become almost automatic for the Alligator. A member of the Florida Collegiate Press Association, the Alligator is serviced by the United Press International regional wire and sports wire. Staffers of the Alligator have placed first in the monthly William Randolph Hearst writing contest for collegiate journalists several times since the contest began eight years ago. Dave Reddick, 1969 summer editor, stressed the sense of involvement that comes from working on the Alligator. "Only through involvement in the university can a student get the most out of his education," Reddick said, "and one of the best ways to do this is to work for the Alligator." Managing Editor David Osier said that the most important aspect of working for the Alligator is what the individual student learn. "We are here to lear," Osier said, "and what we learn will be useful in our later careers." Many Alligator editors and Cocktail Party fy Evening 5 to 7 Doub for regular price Dancing nightly Entertainment Fri. & Sat. 1 NW 10th AVE. staffers have gone on to work for large, respected urban dailies such as the Washington Post, the Miami Herald, St. Pete Times and the Wall Street Joumal. The Seminole, UF's award-winning yearbook, is another "learning laboratory". This past year it received the first-class rating by the Associated Collegiate Press, and Center Not Gainesville's suicide prevention center will open this fall as a community oriented project. The center will not be located in the J. Hills Miller Health Center as previously reported. Dr. Richard McGee, associate professor of clinical psychology, said the center will be a community service with no direct UF ties. However, he said. collaboration will be sought with several UF departments. is vying for the All-American rating for this next year. Among the nation's best college yearbooks, the approximately 480-page Seminole is issued every May, and has been described by managing editor Jim Okula as a bridge of the communication gap between the impersonal vastness of the university and the individual. On Campus The center does not yet have a phone number, but McGee said when one is available it will be announced and publicized. The center will be listed in the Gainesville telephone directory. A community advisory board composed of members of the sheriff's and Police departments, city and county commissions, hospital personnel and ministers will direct the center. FINAL CLEARANCE ALL SUMMER MATERNITY WEAR No Loyaway STOP IN AND SEE .n Sala OUR NEW FALL ARRIVALS Merchandise ALL SALES FINAL ~ -Use Hour%0: Bank 9:3:05:30 Doly Americard Master 06 W.Univ.Ave. Charge Or e372-3850 Central Across FromSenta Fe Jr. Cole Charge LEARN JUST $5forour Special Introductory Flight Lesson TO.Discover why the swing's to wings. Try *u dctory" "teswstoings. Piper Cherokee. Come see us today. VETERANSI Your G.I. Bill pays for Commercial Pilot Training "an For full details, call: 378-2646 SCASSELS IN THE AIR, INC. SYOU can afford desserts alter a Dananza steak. DESSERT'S GREAT AFTER STEAK AT BONANZA SIEOIN PIT. 2445 &W. 13th STREET We think every family should have a steak place. Bonanza Sirloin Pit. -3 CAMPUS EXTRACURRICULUM Achunris off carrus rrents;everyone goes M, I fry 4 )ft ADMINISTRATiON CA ENCES CAMPUS Er route to teMdAe 17The Age of Arqua r A loos,. str ie MiChigan is proto typical ofthe chan ;es foraplegerunhileans mu a p olm re thries San Jose is breaking depths monastaries for the last February, was not so kind to. s sexually meek." the more "athletic" gators. e The sexually meek? Last on The Playboy "sports" have s the list is Notre Dame whose the Fightin' Gators finishing last male students are described as in the Southeastern Conference "hale and homey," and going three and seven overall The rating chart makes note for the season. of UF's freshmen-women-only Back in the permissiveness curfew and points out this is not arena, Playboy claims that itsi. strictly enforced. Under the rating system is based on a f category of administration, the "number of variables, some policy is described as "laissez tangible (dorm hours faire." availability of women on and o In the same issue the Playboy campus, etc.) and some sports department, headed by intangible (mood of the r writer Anson Mount, a visiting students, atmosphere generated speaker during UF's Accent '69 by the faculty, etc.)." ;x._.* x. :*:::-: WITH THIS COUPON $1.00 OFFC KNETHE PURCHASE OF COUPON GOOD TH RU AUG. -~3 1 F OR I N ST ORE FRIED CHICKEN 516 N.W. 13th ST RE ET 2205 N.W. 6th STREET Join the Swing to Wings

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Frosh Orientation Centered in Dorms By DON YOKEL Alligator Staff Writer Freshman orientation will have to wait until next year to have a tour guide type of format to try and cater to the individual student. Bob Foyle, summer director of the orientation program, said Wednesday he will have about 50 students helping him with orientation. "We had planned on having a tour guide type of orientation and registration but are not able to do it this year. We just didn't have the time to get all the people together and trained for this type of program." However, there will be over 200 students helping in orientation this fall, most will be trained for their job, Don Mott, assistant dean of men, said Wednesday. "We want to eliminate the p r o b l eim of s t u d e n t apprehension toward the large university system." Early registration has been completed for freshmen who Reitz Union Plans Fetes For Frosh The Reitz Union is planning n extensive fall orientation program for freshmen and ransfer students to let "them now what we have to offer," ays Mrs. Pat O'Neil of the nion's student activities center. The union will sponsor a ospitality suite for parents ept. 10-17. Open from 8 a.m. o 5 p.m., the suite will provide efreshments for parents while lhe students look around the union and participate in other ctivities. Food service is planning pecial international menus uring the week, including exican, Latin American, rench and Mid-Eastern dishes. Throughout the week, the nion will show free movies -on the terrace at night nd in the auditorium during the ay. The student activities enter will also sponsor two live dances on the terrace during the week. The Florida Players will perform "Plain Folk," a one-act play. Tickets are free but must be picked up in advance at the Constans Theater box office, adjacent to the union. Other activities for the week include a judo-wrestling demonstration, a day at Lake Wauburg and a "meet the brass" day in the union's Arredondo Room. UF President Stephen C. O'Connell and Vice President for Student Affairs Lester L. Hale will be among the university officials on hand to greet new students. The week's activities will also include "Generation Gap, Parts I and II." The first part will be a faculty talent show, which the second part will feature student talent. But before orientation starts, the annual president's welcome speech will be given at Florida Field on Sept. 14 at 7 p.m. -Mott said that about 4,000 students will attend the event which will feature speeches by UF President Stephen C. O'Connell, Vice President for Acadmeic Affairs Lester Hale, and student Body President Charles Shepherd. The program will last until I Sept. 14 for and to the ome. s that students ly won't have to couple of extra r classmates to n," Mott said. of freshman are 0 eaver year with transfer students requiring larger rt every year. On Sept. 16, at 4 p.m. in the Reitz Union Ball Room, a meeting is planned for all entering freshman coeds for an information session on the types of women's organizations on campus and the services they offer. The Intraternity Council (IFC) will d a smoker and forum in Rathskeller at 5 p.m. on S. pt. 16, officially opening fraternity rush. could be at the UF this summer. Those freshmen who have not registered for the fall, start registration Sept. 10 or thereafter depending on the notice they receive from the registrar's office. Following registration, freshmen will meet twice a day on Sept. 15 and 16 with advisors in the residence halls for orientation. "The student will be given an orientation brochure which has information on academic advisement -ahow to fill out the advisement care -and tips on registration procedures."' I Presenting: THE WORLD Let STUDENT GOVERNMENT PRODUCTIONS Make the introductions through it's LIVE ART SERIES SGP-LAS 1969-70 La Traviata Nov. 11 Danzas Venesuelas Jan 13 Florida Symphony Orchestra Spring 1970 Royal Winnipeg Ballet Feb 22 Houston Symphony Orchestra Apr.7 Boston Symphony Orchestra May 5-8 (Subscribers may choose one date only for the Boston Symphony.) College is more than just boks. College is an introduction to the world of people and their cultures; the dances, musics, drama and thought of nations. Student Government Productions will expand your college experience by presenting the great artists of the world to you. SGP's Live Arts Series is a chance to save up to 60% on some of the world's greatest cultural entertainment. Famous opera, ballet, symphonies, folk dances. Only $8 reserves you special student seats for the six great performances of the 1969-70 series. Order now and avoid the lines during fall registration. Deadline is Sept 13 for mail orders, but tickets will be available at registrations lines. You may enclose a stamped, self-addressed envelope with your order, or you may pick up your tickets at the Reitz Union Box Office when you arrive on campus. Student Government Productions LIVE A RTS SERIES UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA REITZ UNION BOX OFFICE GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA 32601 ENCLOSED IS $---for Subscription (s) at $8.00 each -.Name Street City __State Social Security No. ENCLOSED IS STAMPED PLEASE HOLD MY TICKETS -SELF-ADDRESSED ENVELOPE AT THE REITZ UNION BOX OFFICE & ..-.:.".q SGP will also be presenting three pop shows this year. "Hair" may be one of the first. Some of the top rock groups of the country are also on the list. We've already had the Fifth Dimension, The Supremes, Man of La Mancha. What's next? Friday. AugA IZ'i 960. Ithe Florid le atUMPqP 27. 8:3,0 p.m., after which students cam pus' until will be invited onto the field for o r i e n t a t i o n refreshments and the president's welc' opportunity to talk with "This means administrators, faculty and who register eat student government leaders. wait around a Following the president's days for thei welcome, the student religious finish registrati centers located at the fringe of the campus will have open house The number for all students. limited to 2,80C Students who go through the the number of process of early registration increasing and won't have to be back on orientation effoi SG Sponsors H A Student Government-sponsored insurance program is available to UF students at a special low rate. In its l3th year, the program has recently been revised and updated to bring benefits in line with rising medical and hospital costs. The result has been sound medical coverage at very low premiums, reports Jeff Warren, SG's insurance secretary. He noted that this year's policy, which begins in September, will include optional coverage for major medical expenses for a small additional fee. The policy covers the student from September to the end of the summer quarter next year. Student wives and children can also receive coverage under ealth Insurance the policy. The normal policy provid .,to $10 per day for in-patient care in the stssd infirmary and up to $24 per day for care in thl university hospital. Miscellaneous and out-patient expenses will be paid up to $150 each. Also included in the policy are the following: surgical, $333; consultation, S25; doctor visits, $5 per visit after third visit: anesthetist, $60; ambulance, $25; and dental due to injury, $200. Major medical and maternity coverage are available on an optional basis. The basic premium for one student is S19.65 per year.

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Ix-LruuLIAI 0 M A NKEM T S .a *% S ~ A -1 m IDI fallin TeetePes .' .tosm *rap11-, I-IDI Oh0.bds.2 ..23. for yc Towel older .h 49 IDI Nescae. 89 time. Nobi. St.k-P.k Ritz Crackers .W; 37* Espec OeaBoo2kies '29 BIG SAVINlGS ~ on SAFEGUARD Swet om3lex 859n p flbsze -birWWO O0 000ca o"ot ont l y IDEAS to beatthe heat thrifti U .tiI 1** I 'O 6 A ll EA No.1: Think cool. Imagine the temperature falling, g snow crystals drifting down, down. EA No. 2: See cool. Go to the movies and see the ice palace Zhivago.a re-run of Nanook of the North .or War and Peace, Part II. Napoleon's army struggling through blizzards. EAS No.3-999: Eat cOol, drink cool and be merryl shing, deliciously cool treats everywhere at Publix'-from cold cuts ;ooth sherbets. EA No. 1000: Let Publix barbecue a chicken and bake beans ou. The Deli has dozens of kitchen-fresh, ready-to-go foods. happily priced. EA No. 1001:. Shop cool. In cool, pleasant Publix. Take your Relax. Have a Coke. See how thrifty good taste can be. (Cooling thought.) :ially in August, shopping at Publix is a pleasure! I E 2OFFCra REGULAR PRICE 2 o2.L:""-r Po"i. C.0A ,4w 1 l Filler Paper ...1; 9 REGULAR33r S b. OEECUIGCGRTE MargarineB.u.o. 39 .s 1. 61 l,. 500.0 0.c ..2<--ff l'-l,-'e on'-e.---b.,,iller Paper 0.0 .0 0Pkg. 59 SnySoe eiiu -OR 10Margarine 1. lb 29 g .le .rPp. .,s.y A e nesici GOODFTOWARD aeleBtSfI4II Regular Binders. .*0 0eachRipe Peaches I PACKAGE OF !Margarine.00ct. 45c 0Ha1lfInh Rn Ba .a,.,we t-r-'t ,. Slicker B inder .-
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Friday, August 22, 1969, The Florida Ailigutor, Pog 29 of S Chse KingFroeS nBeef. Chop Suey .o.000.Chow King Chicken o. Chow Mein .p.:699 Try These Delicieo13o C Eggo Waffles .pg. 49 1 ssn on.'s trozen59 Corn Toastees .o32.oz Morton's Tasty Frozen Pound Cake0. 759* Birds Eye N.n-Dairy Cool Whip .'*e59e suthlandPly B1g Blackeye Peas.e.s.'49cs Pictsw*est todor P.ly Bag Green Peas .49 Birds Eye Froen Tendero. Cauliflower .-.29' B.th's Testy Krispy Fish Sticks.ig 39s Shrimp Cakes. ',;p. 59c Swi Treasure Isle Frozen Stuffed Flounder .O'39c Fl For Chopped Hamea. V159c wMacaroni Salad. 395 F Aamil.avorit. Carrot Salad .39 Fr Bar.B.Cue Fryers .a.79o Try our Tasty Hum A Chees* P4I?3eautiV4 a Oi.osogdw.oh.s .or* Miss Brack Roo., Unscented Super Hair Spray *. .'-49C Oral Antiseptic Listerine 0.0e. 89* Libby's Fruit Cocktail.4cas Libby's Sliced or Heoled Peaches.,2.' 29a Waldorf White or Assorted Colors Tissue .P. 39C Fr 0ick Energy, Stokhtly.s Gatorade .3 b $1 Hood's Pink Lotion Detergent.3. .3 2o L.W4 Sfteftbful P rune Juice 40-o4.*C .0-0-0-0-1-4-** b-t.4 Hunt's Tangy Rich Tomato Juice .'t 29 White House Tangy Flavored Apple Sauce ...29' KCn-L-Rotion Liver DogFood. 4can59 Mine Lives Tuna Cat Food .an .s* Sitw reiumtolly.Cowkst boneless Hostess Hams,. ..$149 S.i.ts Premium.tytSlic.d Lunch Meats.o. .R.k 49 c (Bolog.,Pikn&.Pimnntn.Oli.,.&Pi.e. Kids Lev* 'Em Tarnow Wieners. ..pg. 55C Cpeland Delicious Siced 1 a$ 2 Cooked Ham .0 $129 Cook-Guik gr dd Veal Steaks .0 0 0 pkt Armo.r's Star Teoty Mosty Wieners ..:690C Normn's.Oange Band Nol Pork Sausage .n.n. n.n ..69c SnapperFillet .nn.n.nn.e .e lb. $159 k Freshea.od.esty Lake Erie Smelts nn n~~ .33c N_~ ~ I~ Swift's Premium Tender-Grown Govt. Inspected whipped, D&D, Fresh Not Frozen Plant Grade A CUT-UP WHOLE 390t.3S;tL I b Ib ,t. Premium With is ryer Breasts ...69 The Kids, Fryer runmsticks ..69* Ft's Pre.'ium T-sty ,e ,nighs ..*. I69* yFt Premi s. .aty ryer wings SS e.lb. 39c We reserve BN the right to limit quantities SWIFT'S PREMIUM PROTEN GOV'T. INSPECTED HEAVY WESTERN BEEF SALE S IBEEF NEEDS LESS COOKING TIME! Swift's P,emiumBoneless Imperial Roast.SS ..lb. 99C Swift's Premium Boneless English Cut Beef Roast .0 lb. .1" Swifts Prenmium oonI Pot Roast. b. 89* Swift's Premium Beef Short Ribs .lb. 59C "WER Plustax dep sit FS50ORMOE EXCLUDING CIGARETES MARKETS GAINESVILLE SHOPPING CENTER GAINESVILLE MALL WESTGATE SHOPPING CENTER 1014 N. Main Street 2630 N.W. 13th Street W. University Avenue at 34th Street Store hours 9-9 Mon. thru Fri. -9-7 Sat. EXXRAm FA'T E 'EXTRAXTA MPS7 EXTRA JWre~tmsJwrestms WreStamps j I GreenStamp !. I JwGreen Stamps Dew Bathreom Lambrech? Pizza .Deiri-Fresh Cttege Cheese Liquid leanerDow Bathroom Cleaner with Sausage & Cheese Geurmey Ceffee Filters 2 lb. cup1 .I ~ ~ 1 .k.2 C.pg 1 wwn.n.r tt 16 oz. bot. 11 jwmpbnd. Weng.ug.t2Y.000) 7.5 mie W e dAv 2, 190 pr5 e Ag 7,161 9 gnie e.Ag.2,99 L 0r*Wd.Ao 716 I -Sh Swift's Premiuvm Testy Chunk Braunschweiger ..59' .,h's B.a.kHawk Sliced Bacon ..lb. 79* Swift's Premium Conned HostessHass.an 499 plus 200 Extra S5H Green Stamps with coupon) art .ff.ctive sday Aug. 21, thru nesday noon Aug.27, 1969 eN 1 .ftMM MAMESA

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VAMAHA 250cc. PERFEOT: itree model -4500m. $450 or BEST offer. Call Mike (nights) 378-6431. (A-t-165-p) AKC poodles 3 males silver black and silver beige. Must see to appreciate. Stud service and poodle grooming. Call Miss Wiley, 376-4614. (A-3t-167p) 1968, New Moon, 12x47, 2 bedroom, air condition, Early American decor, electric range, $3600, 372-9601. (A-3t-167p) 1966 Honda 90cc. Excellent condition 4000 mi. $200 or best offer. Call 378-4654 between 5 and 8 p.m. Helmet included. (A-169-2t-p) VW-68 European model low seatbacks 18000 mi. $1450 or best offer. Call 2-1433 or contact Village Park 49. Absent Tue. Wed. (A-169-2t-p) WHY PAY RENT 3x40 trailer with 8x16 bedroom addition (2 bedrooms) AC carpeted clean-attractive $1595 furnished. Call 378-5781 NOW (A-St165-p) Guns-Guns-Guns-Inventory over 450. Buy-Sell-Trade-Repair. Reloading supplies, Custom, reloading. Harry Beckwith, gun dealer, Micanopy. 466-3340. (A-163-tf-p) SUPER stuff, sure nuff! That's Blue Lustre for cleaning rugs and upholstery. Rent electric shampooer $ 1. Lowry Furniture Co. (A-1t-170c) REFRIGERATOR, 2 dr., Codspot, Coppertone, 10 yr. old, Great condition, cross bottom freezer, 15 cu ft, $50.00. Call Mrs. Woodham 392-1689 weekdays, 372-1260 after 5:30 weekdays and weekends. (A-lt-170-p) Going to California -Abstract paintings at material cost $125.00. 378-8595. Jeffery Dann 5:00 7:00. (A-t-170-p) HONDA 160 SCRAMBLER. Graduating senior must sell; Quick dependable transportation; only $250. Call 378-7728 after 2 p.m. (A-lt-170-p) For sale -Philco console stereo $60, living rm. set $40, dinette $20, bedroom set $80, refrigerator $65, hanging lamps $10 pr. rug $5, call 376-6744 5 p.m. (A-1t-170-p) YAMAHA 60 c.c. 4400 mi. with helmet $160 .SELMER "Bundy" TRUMPET $90. Call 376-0126. (A-lt-170-p) FOR RENT Two-bedroom duplex air-conditioned apartment behind Norman Hall. $125 per month. 1117, 1119, 1125 S.W. 7th Ave. 376-5381, ext. 435. (B-3t-167-p) University Gardens Trace now with two pools and new furniture. .two bedroom apts. from $160 per month. Models open daily 9 to 5 p.m. (B-3t-167-c) Available Sept. (1st) first, large comfortable rooms in private home. Mature students or faculty. See 202 NW 12th Terr. Call 376-5368. (B-67-3t-p) COLLEGE TERRACE 1225 SW 1 Ave., adjacent to Univ. Studio Apts with balcony entrance. Elevator, Pool, AC, ample parking. Lease now for Fall, nine mo. min. $187.50 per qtr. double or $345.00 per qtr. single occu pant. Phone 37-2221. rFOR RENT Privacy is the emphasis, but w/o the e x p ense. Gainesville's newest apartment idea is LA MANCHA, nearing completion at SW 9th Ave. & 9th St. Renting for Sept. on Tuesdays, Wednesdays, & Fridays, 3-5 pm at the site. Ph. 372-5346 or 372-2662. (B-3t-167-p) UniversityAptsjustnorthofResearcic L ib.2 szeseff.,2styleslbdrm.and2bdr m .a lac.,swimmingpoolcablet~v3qtr Lea seQuarterlyratesyearlyaverae75 -1 20/no.376-89901536NW3rdave. (B-12T-158-P) Sacrifice must sublet Sept. only two bedroom furnished airconditioned, pool, luxury apartment $125.00. Call 372-0528 after 6 p.m. (B-2t-169-p) 3-room furn. apt. Available Sept. 15. Married couples only 90.00 per mo. plus utilities, year's lease, no pets. Call 372-0175, 1830 NW 2 Ave. (B-169-2t-p) Rooms for Graduate men & Senior Men. A.C. & C.H. 2 blocks to campus. $180.00 single; $270 double. Ph. 378-8122 or 376-6652. (B-2t-170-P) Modern 2 br. Furn. Apt, Central air and heat, Car port, $150/mo., Available Sept. 7th, 2014 NW 17th Way. (B-it-170-p) WANTED Law student needs male roommate $50 a mo. for 2 br. ac apt 2 blocks from campus. Write Elliot Fassy 2528 SW 21st St. Miami, Fla. (C-t-170p) Camping to San Francisco Need rider to share expenses Leaving August 30. Call Dave 376-6087 after 6. (C-lt-170-p) Female roommate; $29mo. (inc. some Util.) A.C.; close to campus; spac. 2 bedroom apt. -Call Carol or Paula 392-7688 or Elaine 392-7689. (C-it-170-p) Coed for own bedroom in modern air cond. apt. near sorority row. $75. 378-3303. (C-lt-170-p) Mature graduate student (female) wishes to rent room with kitchen privileges or share apartment with other graduate students. Walking distance to campus. Willing to provide Spanish conv. classes and babysitting. Call 378-4244 after 6 p.m. or write to Maida Watson, Box 224, Balboa, Height, Canal Zone, Panama. (C-lt-170-p) ROOMMATE NEEDED for fall quarter. Townhouse Apt. at La Bonne Vie. Available Sept. 15. $50/mo. + utilities. Call 376-5015. (C-It-170-p) One female roommate to share Gator Town apt. with 3 seniors. Rent $45 + 1/n util. Call Sally, 376-7129, (C-3t-167-p) Need 3 painters immediately, $1.65 per hour. See Paul Mattison, 708 SW 16th Ave. No calls. (C-3t-167-c) Need 2 coed roommates for fall quarter. Two bedroom Tanglewood townhouse, pool. Call Diane or Teresa, 376-1015. (C-3t-167-p) Two female roommates needed for fall quarter in LaMancha. Located two blocks from campus and have your own bedroom. Call 392-7661. (C-4t-166-p) We buy, sell, trade used paperbacks, magazines, Playboys. Laurent's Book Shop, 1634 W. Univ. Ave., 376-9755. (C-3t-167-p) One female roommate for fall quarter at La Boone Vie. Call Renee 392-7690. (C-169-2t-p) CODroommate seeded lor one bedroom Gatortown apt. starting fall qtr. $140 for qtr. Call Linda at 372-5246. (C-169-2t-p) Enjoy the country air! One female student to share 2 bedroom apt. $42.50. Prefer grad or settled person. 7 min. from campus. Shirley 378-0367. (C-169-2t-p) COED NEEDS APT. to share with 3 girls Landmark or FrenchaQtr. for next year starting fall qtr. Call: Susan 376-2129. (C-5t-165-p) Female Roommate Prefer someone tidy. Only 3 blocks from campus, A/c, own room, $50 per month. Call 378-4851. (C-169-2t-p) Wanted one coed roommate starting Sept. for apt. across from Tigert. $45/mo. plus utilities. Call 372-4971 between 8 and 3. (C-169-2t-p) HELP WANTED Wanted: Typist. No pay, work with groovy people, learn the workings of a magazine. We need your help whenever you can give it. Pretty exciting things happen in our office -be part of them. Exercise your other talents, bring a friend, rap. No job interview, no hassle. Roughly 10-5 we inhabit our office. Do something real. Appear at the Fla. Quarterly 336 Reitz Union. (E-166-tf-nc) NOW SHOWING SATAN'S SADIST STARRING: RUSS TAMBLYN PLUS HELL'S ANGEL ON WHEELS STARRING ADAM ROARK Climb aboard The S.S. Winnjammer Meals served from 11:00 AM to Midnight (Bernie Slier at the Organ on Thursday, Friday & Saturday Oysters & clams on the half shell Michelob on draft Steak & Seafoods our Specialty Cocktail Lounge til 2 AM Harry Lawton, Manager Reservations Accepted 520 S.W. 2nd Ave. Closed Sundays NW The great ZEJ~O1O~TEL bunglers. 64S -.-. KIMNOAE aLINTWAJM~LT3NZ O3? the bo,' I TECHNICOLOR@ PANAVISION* FROM WARNER BROS.-SEVEN ARTS the crazy banditos were shooting at the brick wall, the Chinese laundrymen-guardians of Law and Order-were taking turns digging tunnels and washing shirts, while Sister Lyda was taking care of Texas Ranger Ben Quick and the Reverend Pious Blue had his eyes cast to the heavens. for a quick getaway. Columbia Pictures presents An Irving Allen production .W 3hSt. at 23rd RD. T,,rhone 378-2434 .a noyicthat will run away with your heart! ....E Technicolor j The bri iant young star of "OLIVER!'in a Moving BRING human drama you become part of! THE FAMILY kove tk qave OPENS SEPT. 2nd WE WILL CARRY A COMPLETE LINE OF SALT WATER TROPICAL FISH FRESH WATER TROPICAL FISH FURRY LITTLE THINGS REPTILES BIRDS PLUS ALL SUPPLIES GoA elo OPPGe GAINESVILLE SHOPPING CENTER 372-PETS i 4bAlQ% 9%mAlO *GATOR CLIA SSIFIEDS* Page 30 The Florida Alligator, Friday, Augut 22, 1969 ...... .----

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CLASS Friday, August 22, 1969, TI I FIEDS Union Events he Florida Alligator, Pap 31 June 5 -Aug. 29 .Graduate and Undergraduate SERVICES Student Works, Teaching Gallery Tennis Racket restringing free pickup and delivery on and near campus. Monday, August 25 Cal 378-2489. (M-tf-155-p) PET and GARDEN SHOPPE 4201 Beginning Bridge, 118 Union, NW 16 Blvd. Tropical fish, reptiles, 7:00 p.m. Plants.P(M-it-170-p) FEATURING CHUCK WAGON STEAKS FROM 99c HORSEBACK RIDING Tuesday, August 26 OPEN 11:00 AM to 9:00 PM -7 Days Weekly HAYRIDES -PARTIESII SE.G15th Westgate Shopping Center -PHONE 378-3320 St. Cowboy riding stables 372-8460. Duplicate Bridge, 150 C & D 3321 W. University Ave. -Gainesville, Florida tM-3t.166-pl ,I. 7-'2f nI --HELP WANTED Wanted: Managing Editor for Florida Quarterly. Interviews now, until I think I've found the person. Trial period of adjustment not only allowed but demanded. Is literature or art your hin? No particular talent demanded but must have capacity to work hard, be responsible, Will know everything the Editor knows, run the staff. Must be somewhat fluent .capaeb of poise, able to organize. Mostly your own bos. Pay per issue of magazine, if you are the right one. Start now. Quit talking about communicating and put it in print. See Jessica Everingham, Editor, Florida Quarterly 336 Reitz Union 10-5. (E-166-tf-nC) University Apartments needs assistant manager no children wife not working. Call 376-8990. (E-lt-170-p) Student Assistant begin Aug. 25th 11:45 -1:45. $1.50 per hr. + free lunch. Work through fall quarter. Call Mrs. Avery at 392-3701, E-lt-170-cl AUTOS F 57 Plymouth, white, clean, everything works, fair tires. $150. Dave Sheffield 933 SW. 1 Ave. (G-169-2t-p) 67 VW Karman Ghia 1495.00 Low mileage. Local owner. Clean. 67 VW Square Back 1695.00 Red. Local owner. Clean. 66 Saab 2dr Special 350.00 Tan Excellent condition. 64 MG Midget 650.00 looks good, runs good. 69 VW 3400 miles 1995.00 Sun-roof, radio, white, local owner. 68 850 Fiat Spyder 1695.00 Lace hood, radio. Nice car. (G-t-170-p) 1957 Austen Healy, 68 engine, new exhaust system, July tuneup, line-new tires, toneau, roof, windows. Fine condition. 376-8416 or 376-5133. Chris. $450. (G-lt-170-p) 1963 Ford Galaxie $450 4 door power steering + brakes, almost new engine + tires, needs new radiator, 8-5 p.m. 392291, after 5 p.m. 3785641. IG-t-170-pl PERSONAL 6 Happening -Saturday 9-5 the biggest sale of the year -tapes, records, car tape player, tape recorder, surfboard, pipes, countless other goodies. Come by and have a look. Landmark apt. 62. Bring your bathing suit too. (J-15-170-p) Need one rider/driver to Seattle, San Francisco, or Los Angeles. Only $25, drive straight thru to LA. Leave Aug. 26 morning. Barb 376-8524. (J-1t-170p) F R E E I My owners are leaving ...beautiful, loveable, spadedrcat, Equipped with box and litter; call evenings 3788481. (J-1t-170-p) Female companion to Portland Org. No expense. Call Bill 378-3735 before Thurs. 28. (J-lt-170-p) If you missed Woodstock you don't have to miss Dallas, Harry Tea Tours is going to this most groovy of gatherings, full ticket and tour info now yours for the asking at the Record Bar 923 W. Univ. Ave. or call 372-0976 antime. (J-1t170-p) Graduating male, moving to Atlanta. Need roommate to share apartment and expenses. Contact Bob, 1111-27 16th Ave., 378-8518. (J3t167p) TRUCK to MIAMI via TAMPA. Will take your trunks, boxes, cycles, etc. after finals. Door to Door. Very reasonable, Call Jim, 3784625 tJ-3t-167.p) SERVICES RAY'S Style and Barber Shop Weekdays 9:00-6:00 oand Saturdays until 5. 1125 W. University Ave. Phone 372-3678 for appontments. (M-15t156-p) union, 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, August 27 Gator Growl Band Clinic Talent Show, Union Aud., 7:30 p.m. University Newcomers Fashion Show, Union Ballroom, 8:00 p.m. Satudray, August 30 R.O.T.C. Commissioning Exercises, Union Aud., 11:00 p.m. Univ. of Fla. Graduation, Florida Field, 7:00 p.m. 378-5724 LOCK, WATCH & JEWELRY REPAIRS TROPHIES -ENGRAVING 1230 W. UNIVERSITY AVE. 11 BLOCK FROM CAMPUS TAKE THE 30 MINUTE DRIVE AND SAVE D A i n wi w I I -HOURS WEEKDAYS 8AM -6PM SATURDAY 8AM -1PM GAINESVILLE PHONE 372-0103 ANYTIME BY APPOINTMENT LUNCH & DINNER ~3 SPECIALS MON-BAKED MACARONI & MEAT SAUCE 794 (ALL YOU CARE TO EAT) TUES-FRIED CHICKEN 994 (ALL YOU CARE TO EAT) WED-JUMBO CHOPPED STEAK WITH MUSHROOM GRAVY AND YELLOW RICE THURS-ROAST TURKEY DRESSING, CRANBERRY SAUCE, CHOICE OF POTATO 794 FRI-SAUTEED FISH ALMONDINE 684 WITH TARTER SAUCE XMORRISON'S CAFETERIAS GAINESVILLE MALL Rock chair W1 015 N. W. :St.2 HLD OVER 'DAZZLING! once you see it, you'll never again picture 'Romeo&Juliet'-quite the way you did before!" -LIFE PARAMOUNT PICTURES presen FRANCO ZEFFIRELLI Production o( ROMEO ffJULIET My office is small. My business is new. Parking is terrible but you'll be glad you came. Buy your next eyegbsses at University Opticians 5191/a SW 4th Ave. Neat to Greyhound Bus Station. (M-155-tf-c) Alternators -Generators -Starters -Electrical systems tested repairs Auto Electrical Service. 603 SE 2nd St. 378-7330. (M-tf-157-c E b^$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$ 4011 '404 4a0 4 4^ FOR-THE *0V BEST BUYS! 4 RcigChair Twin1015 N W.13tSt.S STARTS TODAY. 'TREATS EVERY WAVE LIKE A SOUL BROTHER" PLAYBOY wCoWNi -TONsCmP SPECIAL 7-DAY ENGAGEMENT Fantastc jw :-f-f L ') I Downtown Ganosvillo 2nvrsityAe. STARTS TODAY What makcs hcrgadMcngow. wouldn't you like to know! Awad W,nGeraldine PageR uth GoroflAwd Wmw. Rosemary Forsyth veiv,.'gRobert Fuller Mildred Dunnock se,.mby.mTheodwe Apsieen BOWLING WEEK-END SPECIAL Sat. 9am-6pm All day Sunday 3-----$1.00 35c per game REITZ UNION GAMESAREA ------a %-#,%-v Y..-e --.-. ..0 0-.--i' 90, W lb 0 0 0 0 4b 0 44 b % I,*.-.4-0'4. o % 0 I I No ordinary love Story.

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FRESH FLA. ALL WHITE 00 Mw EDGU s ASTOR ALL GRINDS MEDIUM EGGS 2 1-LB. Lit I Cofee /$5 00 CAN 2o, Old Fshion 6Pk D 2D. .nr morepurhseH x. cig rtHTs COOKIES .4/$1. DUNKIN STIX -,.29 HO.k D,Dol Hoombu,r Pk D.Do~o 20 WIENER BUNS. 2/39 PECAN TWIRLS .29c ty Rights Reseved. Prices Good All Week Wd. Noon thru Wed. Noon, Aug. 20-27 C'NDII T. .c. -CO Y IT-' Quart KRAFT SALAD DRESSING MIRACLE WHIP .49 48-az ASTOR COOKING 24-oo DIXIE DARLING BUTTERMILK 011. 69 Bread 2I49,e Quart DEEP SOUTH Solad No. 303 Can LIBBY'S CS or WK GOLD Dressing 39 CoJn.5/1 E-Lb. GOOD LUCK (Ot.) ARROW No. 303 Co AST R RG RN FRUIT COCKTAIL.19' MARGARINEDETERGENT No AN Coo THRIFTY MAID HALVES ORstamps w/Coupon SLICED PEACHES.1B9aGA 22 .IVORY39 LIU .DETERGENT.49' 4Yo. J, BEECHNUT STRAINEDCGIANT BABY FOOD.'.9SBOX 46 TRITY MAID0FLA. FRUIT PUNCH o, ALL FLAVORS FRUIT DRINKS .3/89' BEEF STEW.49' PRELL SHAMPOO.99' F000y S. ULTRA BRITE TOOTHPASTE.692CATS3/$1. 4CP .G.E. WHITE 406075100 Ct3-ATS P .R/ 1 LIGHT BULBS.PRUNE JUICE.3/$1. Fa or 15 Y' ,CRNED BEEF HASH.3/$1.a 1400 KLEENEX BOUTIQUE FACIAL TISSUE.4/$1. Harvest JMOKENXBUIU rvesh PAPER TOWELS.4/$1. Fresh j28.oz. 2 .SWEET STREET SLICED White Seedles Bottles PINEAPPLEJ.3/$1. PINEAPPLE JUICE.3/$1. JELL-O GELATIN.3/25' 6-. DEEP SOUTH 5OOTH OR RUNCHY PEANUT BUTTER.39' REGULAR PLAIN OR SEAMLESS NYLONS 3 $1.d HACVETSFRSCA02REDELT51J5UCCLIORI PEACHES.6 LES $1. NECTARINES 3S.$1. LBS.P A OE 1 89,4LBS. POTAT ES10BAG PLUMS .1 LG RES TO/DOSNOWL UHITELHEADS CELERY.2/391 CAULIFLOWERa.391 BAG EUA MUT; RW V ECR)PE POTATOES 10LB. 79 TOMAiaES. 29 H-oz. BRECK CREME TP VLE S TOPVATL ST S TOP VL T S wO K ils n iT o P n OLDK PG. OO DK LU .Ve I Steas DsifetOtn agr W f-1 1.-, PINTS BREAKSTONE H6--. UNCLE HEN' S,-o. UNCLE BEN'S go UICK or EGULAR ag -Smooa-R Sour Cream Curry Rice. .39 Spanish Rice ....39 Quaker Oats 67 37 3 9L28-,.1 00-Foot JUMBO 32-oz. REALEMON Fancy Comet Rice. .450 Saran Wrap. .67 Lemon Juice ....65 1401 N. MAIN ST. 130 N.W. 6TH ST. 3421 WEST UNIVERSITY AVE. HIWAY 441, HIGH SPRINGS Pag 32, The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 22, 1969

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APP 1401 N. MAIN ST, 130 N.W. 6TH ST. 3421 WEST UNIVERSITY AVE. HIWAY 441, HIGH SPRINGS A A r W 4jet 61,14 Frida, August 22, 1969, The Flord ANigmeor, Pop 33 USDA "CHOICE" WHOLE NEW YORK W-D Brand U. S. CHOICE STRIPS STEAKS 202s OR 2 LB. AVERAGE LB.Cut To Your Specifications FREE! Quantity Rights Reserved Pries GOOd All Week W .Noo Wed.NoonAg 20-27 i j USDA Choice W-D Brand Corn Fed CHUCK Quarter Smoked (Sliced For Chops) PORK .W-D BRA ND 7 lff USDA "CHOICE" CHUCK, t. .7 -Loin. LB. USDA Choice W-D Brand Corn Fed CALIFORNIA Bob White Regular Sliced Roast. .LB999 Bacon. .79 W-D Brand Leon GROUND (3 lbs $1 79) Grade "A" Quick Frozen LEG QUARTERS of Beef 5 LBs. $289 Turkey. .299 TALMADGE FARMS HALF OR WHOLE COUNTRY 10%i CURED HAMS.LB.994 LBW-D B5 HANDOFF ANY 12o. Pg. SUNNYLAN ALL MEAT U.S.D A. "CHOICE" TAOW FRANK .59' SHOULDERPPLROSE SLICE COOKED HAM. 59' 12-o PFL0 TENDER SLICED PORK STEAKSLB79 COOKED HAM. $1.39 COELAND ALL EAT M. E ENSE .F95D SLI. BOLOGNALB.790 o SOERRAND SLICED NATURAL SWISS CHEESE.45 SUPERBRAND COTTAGE CHEESE.2 69 MM. CHEESE.69'MORTON LONGHORN CHEESEF89 LB. All Flavors CREAM SICED CHEESE.39 PERCH FILLETS.L,49' 12 -TASTE O' SEA FISH CAKES.3/$1. 91'jen lefdpecif14 OCOMA CHICKEN. BE'E OR TURKEY 10 CASTOR CUT CORN. PEAS CARROTS GREEN PEAS OR CHOPPED 4 MEAT DINNERS 39' BROCCOLI.5/$16 FOR TASTE 0 SEA SEAFOOD PLATTER 5 1b Bog FROZEN FRENCH DINNERS. 2/$1. FRY POTATOES 89' 2.SOR 6-o LIBBYS LUMEADE OR 5 EPk ANUET Ck A o eL E Fy TIky T & Sob. SI eoL-oo ORANGE JUICE .3/$1. LEMONADE.9/994 COOKIN BAGS 4/$1. DESSERT TOPPING.39 ID Fool COLONEL SANDERS 6 oo.k ESEIMO BISCUITS.3/$1. Diet Bars.2/S1. ....I TO P .......----. ... TOP VL LE SS TO T TO L S TOP VAL P TOP V MPS GldWrap Istani Coffee Neale QaickC* lee I GOD UT111 All,271011 T kGnAe :27#7G Gr2 B.lz '0 __11.-71J NABISCO RITZ Lr ie l4E. GEt Si"e Requir Size33c .Giant Size Snack Pack ...37< Ivory Snow Detergent 910 Spic & Span Cleaner 99 CONDENSED SUOS Giant Size 79c ..Jumbo Size $2.43 Super 71 -15 Size 39c ..28-oz. Size Dreft Detergent. .410 Dash Detergent ..4 Mr. Clean Cleaner. .69 3/I.

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Page 34, The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 22, 1969 CITY CLEANS UP BRANNAN'S LOT BIcycle Man Gone, But Not Forgotte~n April 8, 1969 (EDITOR'S NOTE: The Bicycle Man, Ray Brannan, legendary personality at UF, has been absent from Gainesville for more than a year. He lived and ran a bicycle business in the two-story white house on University Avenue for more than 20 years. This is the first of a series on the man himself, the legal conditions which have allowed the house to exist in its substandard state and the legal battle over ownership which is developing in circuit court.) By ANNE FREEDMAN Alligator Staff Writer Walking past the Bicycle Man's house on West University Avenue is like avoiding the blind beggarman on a city street. You glance briefis with disgust, with morbid "I wonder how it got that way" curiosity. You reflect on the sad conditions for a second, then walk on, forgetting what you just saw. You go to the closest store and buy some gutt or cigarettes. But in the coming weeks, perhaps in the next few days, you may be seeing a wrecking company removing the building and junk. The City of Gainesville has finally succeeded, after more than a year of formal litigation, in obtaining a decision from circuit court declaring the Bicycle Man's property a "public nuisance." The court has given the owner (ownership is currently being contested in a cross-claittant suit) 15 days from the date of the order -March 26 to meet the housing ordinances his property has violated. This means that after Wednesday, the city has been authorized to "enter and remove all buildings, junk, weeds, etc. except the building facing NW 1st Avenue." But today you stop in front of the rotting, run-down two story structure -and stare. You notice the paneless windows on the second floor, the half-closed Venetian blinds, screens dangling, hundreds of bike frames and charred bedsprings. You kick away some of the litter of paper cups at your feet. It might be your own. And you close your eyes. The house is quiet. But it wasn't always that way. Imagine. It is 10 years ago or maybe 15. You open your eyes, amazed because the house doesn't really look much different. It's still covered with bikes and parts and other things. But it's so noisy! The house is alive with the barking of happy dogs -you see at least six running around. You hear the babbling of little kids and UF students, the miews and purrs of stray but well-fed cats. You see the nervous hide-and-seek of rabbits and the excited chatterings and flapping of wings of the sparrows overhead. In the middle of this misplaced jungle an unshaven, unwashed, tall friendly looking man is fixing a broken tire frame and talking to a group of students. HaFULL -Your Generator r L OVERHAULED SDecia 6 50 NC.LAOR ALACHUA COUNTY GENERATOR SERVICE 508 NW 8th AVE. -GAINESVILLE Mon.-Fri. Bam-7 pm Sat. ti 5 pm 378-4011 Florida Quarterly ON SALE! He pats the head of the child whose bike he has just repaired and sends hin home. Smiling, he watches the youngster ride off, down University Avenue. He didn't ask for payment. The ian is Ray Briannn, fondly known as "Dirty Dan tire Bicycle Man" to genetionIls of SUI students, Gainesville residents, and children. Since 1946 Brannal., a formie r F studcwnt Ind tennis star. ran a hicycc hle ll si s 1 s h v11loII ) and diversity that reacquired a nacd tionI l nd v ,ii international reputaio). For mtlre ha1a \ yCar 1n11, .Bi C1lI MI house, located betwecns UnivTrsIt Pll/I SI Dernian's Leather Shop onIS Wst IflivI si AvcMW has beeri scaled up and Intlhl iIS cs il 1)DirI Dan" in all that tile. Neighbors and friends will, for the most part, freely tell you stories of his kindness to anitials and children, of his "pure pot appearance and of his "peculiar" attitudes and ways. DEPTH REPORT Sotie will confidentially discuss his apparents mental condition" while others will conte right out and tell you about his "mental deterioration" and his "fears that the town was closing in on hin." Two neighbors, both long-time Gainesville residents, refused to discuss the Bicycle Man at all. For the story is a tragic one, though "Mr. Brannan never asked anybody for anything," recalled Mrs. Claudie Mae Hamilton, a maid with ISF for more than 20 years at Flint Hall, just across from the Bicycle Man's house. "It wasn't that he was without money -that he was the way he was. He just wouldn't spend it on himself," she said. Neighbors and friends haven't' sehimltitt in about a year. They'll tell you they heard Brantan is visiting his sister in Tennessee. But Alachua County Court records show that the now legendary, varily called "eccentri, unusttal. kind, withdrawn, friendly, intelligent," Ray Brannan was committed to a mental institution int Tennessee on April 16, 1968. TIME BARTENDER The house is quiet. But it wasn't always that way. Imagine. It is 10 years ago or maybe 15. It's still covered with bikes and parts and other things. But it's so noisy! The house is alive with the barking of happy dogs. You hear the babbling of little kids and UF students, the meows and purrs of stray but well-fed cats. The man in the midst of the apparent confusion is Ray Brannan, fondly known as "Dirty Dan the Bicycle man." ATTENTION HOBBYISTS Come Out and See Our Fine Collection of Tropical Fish, Reptiles, Birds, and Indoor House Plants. PET AND GARDEN SHOPPE 4201 N.W. 16th Avenue EDIIPEOPLE WilD1ARE I W HJII Tatnslgin -BECKUM OPTICIANS 22 West University Ave., Gainesville, Fla. Phone 376-3516 UNIVERSITY JEWEERS EXPERT WATCH REPAIR TROPHIES. PLAQUES & GAVELS C. J. 'BECK' BECHTOLD The Complete Service Shop across from campus same block as College inn PHONE 378-8585 JEWELRY REPAIR ENGRAVING 1706 Vv 'NIVERSITY AVE. RING SIZING NAME PLATES GA'NESVILLE. FLA. RIBBONS LUNCH SPECIALS FROM THE COLONEL THE CHICKEN SNACK 214 N.W. 13th St. 37&-6472 114 N.W. 34th 9. 372-3649 POSITION OPEN U of F Faculty Club, Inc. The Rathskeller is now accepting applications for Bartender-and other salaried positions. Apply Rathskeller Office T HE FISH SNACK69 .. Ktntucky ried Ckickt 'W

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Fr day, August 22, 1969, The FlwMt Afipter, Pp 35 THE FLORIDA A CAMPUS I0 THE MEN OF DELTA SIGMA PHI welcome all incoming freshmen to the University of Florida and cordially invite you to witness our new concept in fraternity living A GREEK AS AN INDIVIDUAL

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I 0 F re A T F P 60 T Y mutual assistance BROTHERHOOD: the unique experience SOCIAL: development and growth; entertainment Florida's Fraternities invite you to Rush, 1969. ILI 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. -IFC Smoker and Forum at Rathskeller 7 p.m. to 12 a.m. -Open House at All Fraternities 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. -Open House at All Fraternities 10 p.m. to 1:30 a.m. -IFCsponsored Dance and Pep Rally 8 p.m. to 12 a.m. -Open House at All Fraternities 8 p.m. to I a.m. -Open House at All Fraternities 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. -Fraternity Parties and Open House FRATERNITIES OF UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA ALPHA EPSILON PI ALPHA GAMMA RHO ALPHA TAU OMEGA BETA THETA PI CHI PHI DELTA CHI DELTA SIGMA PHI DELTA TAU DELTA DELTA UPSILON KAPPA ALPHA KAPPA SIGMA LAMBDA CHI ALPHA PHI DELTA THETA PHI EPSILON PI PHI GAMMA DELTA PHI EPSILON PI PHI KAPPA PSI PHI KAPPA TAU P1 KAPPA ALPHA PI KAPPA PHI SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON SIGMA CHI SIGMA NU SIGMA PHI EPSILON TAU EPSILON PHI TAU KAPPA EPSILON THETA CHI I SERVICE: am Page 36, The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 22, 1969 active aid, SCHOLARSHIP: T F P Tuesday, Sept. 16 Wednesday, Sept. 17 Thursday, Sept. 18 Friday, Sept. 19 Saturday, Sept. 20 for achievement

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IFC Says'We By ANGELA RACKLEY Alligator Staff Writer For Interfraternity Council, 1968-69 was a school year that stressed a "we care" attitude in services to the community, campus and members. From participation in off-campus charity drives to coming to the aid of "burned out" Sigma Nu's, to sponsorship of a drugs council to help students kick the drug habit, IFC extended a helping hand. IFC, in existence for 52 years, is now the official arm of the 26 fraternities on campus, and serves in the best interests of these fraternities, the university, and the community. Unique from most IFC's on other campuses, it contains its own lawmaking and law enforcing agencies which are respected by the administration. Tuition scholarships, cash awards, and the short term loan program, which lends over $20,000 annually to fraternity brothers are all provided for under IFC. The Executive Council of IFC consists of a president, two vice presdients, a secretary, a treasurer and four district presidents. Also serving on the council are two faculty advisors. A President's Council, consisting of all the fraternity presidents, has the final decision in all Friday, August 22, 1969, The Florida Alligator, Pap 37 Care'to Community and Campus Greeks Aid Fire Victims, Help Fi ght Drug Habit policy-making of IFC. IFC Treasurer Miles Wilkin described benefits and changes in fraternities. Wilkin said scholarships, good study environments and tutoring sessions have all added to a different type of atmosphere in fraternity life in the past five years. Wilkin said two adjustments, elimination of hazing and any discrimination based on race, color, religion or creed, have already been made here. Hazing is anything that would cause moral, physical or scholastic harm to a fraternity pledge. Wilkin said the social aspect is the reason most men join fraternities. "In the social area, a fraternity helps a man to develop his character, social ease, and good judgment," Wilkin said. Wilkin said the feeling of brotherhood, coming out of a communal-type sharing, was the overall result. "The university is a very tough place without friends," Wilkin said. "Because it is a very impersonal place where you are just a number, the fraternity offers a student friends for four years and, in fact, for life." Wilkin said fraternity life also built leadership and provided many campus leaders. "Many constructive ideas became realities through IFC this past year." After 10 months of research and development, the right of fraternities to set their own Open Housing rules was approved by the administration. Along with it went the responsibilities of the individual fraternities to enforce their rules. This major breakthrough for responsible student leadership paved the way for more lenient open funds with a continuing benefit concert series. Profits from this year's IFC Frolics featuring such name stars as Jack Jones, The Four Seasons, Vanilla Fudge and the Rascals were donated to the UF Coliseum Fund. UF's only fraternity sponsored magazine, "The Gator Greek", came back into publication during the spring quarter. Its format is different from past issues in that it is published monthly, and includes feature articles, an editorial stand, and answers questions submitted by independents. The Sigma Nu house burned down during the spring quarter, but Sigma Nu brothers were not left stranded. Even as the 45-year-old house burned, fraternities were rounding up clothes, books and lodging for 26 brothers left homeless by the blaze. The tremendous offer of assistance by the other fraternities was a strong example of the brotherhood existing between the fraternities at UF. First Annual Greek Week was celebrated by fraternities and sororities during the spring quarter. This was a six-day social activities and seminar week capped by spring Frolics featuring the Four Seasons. It included seminars on topics including rush, finance, and social service, and was highlighted by free food, skits, singing, contests, games and fun. Services such as aid to the Heart Fund, Easter Seals, March of Dimes, Local boy's clubs, food drives, and the IFC annual blood drive were also provided during the year. New IFC officers were elected during the fall term. Steve Zack was elected president; Gerry Abascal, executive vice president; Bob Ziegler, administrative vice president; Pete Marovich, secretary; and Miles Wilkin, treasurer. 3-Day Rush The Inter Fraternity Council rush for new members begins Sept. 16. Every rushee is invited to attend the activities and see the various frat houses on and off campus. "Theis year rush has been extended three days," reports Miles Wilkins, IFC treasurer. "We feel that in tie past rush may have been too short. This way the prospective pledges can look around and find out what they want." What can fraternity life offer a pledge? "The fraternities give the incoming freshman a chance to make friends. He can have a small group to identify with and find out that the university can be a great place," says Dean Jay Stormer, IFC sponsor. When asked about the academic strain placed on new pledges, Stromer replied that the boys sometimes do better in their studies because they have someone to depend on. However, you cannot say that there is a correlation between pledging a fraternity and making or not making grades." Rush activities open with an IFC smoker at the Rathskeller. Fraternities will hold open houses and parties throughout rush. housing policies for dormitories. The annual Gainesville Beautification Week saw more than 300 fraternity representatives working to clean up Gainesville over Easter Weekend. They removed 800 cubic yards of trash from the yards of thousands of homes in three economically depressed neighborhoods, and painted four homes owned by poor who could not afford to do so themselves. Fraternity men also cleared two playground areas of unnecessary trees and underbrush, and more than four miles of roadside of unsightly trash. Awards were given to the fraternities for their outstanding participation during this event. IFC initiated, funds for the proposed $17 million coliseum when it contributed money from its Beach Boys Concert several years ago, and has contributed Ag .......... .. RON.,

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Page 38, The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 22, 1969 IT HAPPENED AT MURPHREE The Broken Jaw Affair Oct. 2, 1968 By JOHN PARKER Alligator Campus Life Editor John Harris was not exactly a mountain of a man. As a matter of fact, at 5 ft. 2 in. and 135 lbs.uhe had trouble performing such tasks as operating the kick-stand on his bicycle or closing the rings on his loose leaf notebook. To make matters worse, he claimed he owed his tremendous physique to "Super Wate-On" tablets and a crash weight-lifting program. That is what makes the whole thing so unbelievable. The saga of John Harris has been a closely-guarded secret for almost a year, but now that he has transferred, his story can be told. Harris used to tell all of his friends that he wanted to be an FBI agent. As a matter of fact, this oft-expressed goal was close to t he o nly f orm of entertainment enjoyed by his close circle of friends during his bleak freshman days. Many was the time when Harris bore the brunt of raucous laughter for fingerprinting his roommates while they slept or placing hair brush bristles under his dresser drawers. They were still laughing one fine autumn day last year when someone crept stealthily into the outer section of Harris' Murphree dorm room to partake of the contents of his wallet. Harris, who was studying in the other room, claims that it was his natural instinct for sensing crime that caused hin to look up and spot the culprit in the mirror. Creeping quietly behind the would-be thief, Harris twirled him around and dealt a mighty blow to the jaw. "It must have been the leverage or something," said the confused pugilist later, "but that guy's jaw was shattered! I mean it. Broken into little pieces." He then gazed wondoursly at his tiny balled-up fist. Florid a Al lig ato r At the time of the incident, as even Harris will admit, his G-man cool failed himi. He never rendered anyone helpless before. He had never rendered anyone anything before. And here was his foe dazed and conquered, not knowing what to do next. He soon realized that certain responsibilities go along with being a wielder of instant death. Half dragging, half carrying his stunned victim, Harris made it to the front door of the infirmary. What Herculese didn't know was that the hallowed doors of the infirmary closed each day at 5:30 p.m. sharp. Harris peered through the glass door. The only one inside was the janitor who was busily sweeping. Harris pounded on the door. The janitor looked up and then quickly away, thinking that if he didn't look directly at Harris, he would go away. "Look, I got a guy out here's dying," screamed Harris. He was informed in a very condescending manner that the infirmary closed at 5:30 p.m. and to please come back later. After a few minutes of pleading, attempted bribery and thinly veiled threats, the janitor was convinced that Harris' companion needed to see a doctor. When the Kampus Kops screamed up on their motor scooter, they told Harris that no one would believe his story and that unless he wanted to prefer charges, they would list the cause of the accident as a "fall". Since the doctors insisted that a jaw could not be mutilated to that extent with anything smaller than a railroad tie, Harris agreed. Besides, justice had already been wrought at his own sinewy hands. Harris is now at FSU studying how to overthrow the forces of evil. "I think we'll have to chalk the whole thing up," summed up his benused roommate, "to one of the most unusual flows of adrenalin in medical history." ROBBIE'S For The Best In Steaks, Meals & 8 Sandwiches .COLOR TV & BILLIARDS 1718 W University Ave. On The Gold Coast' TRY GATOR A DVE RTIS ERS The Alligator Needs People To Work On .P.roduction STUDENT TYPISTS PROOF READERS PASTE UP ARTISTS OPAQUERS HEADLINE MACHINE OPERATORS Hours can be arranged to fit your class schedule -Sunday through Thursday nights. Apply Room 339-Reitz Union See Mr. French Or Mr.Cook I U' I Try Capt. Wishbone's un-greasy fried chicken -today Finger licking is, after all, unsanitary There s anew Wishbone Fried Chicken Take-Out Store at 704 Sj 4.i Avenue or 16th Ave. at S. Main Street. Training classes for new student workers will be held on September 11 and 12-10:00 AM and 2:00 PM a I VVE-Towil wm -Wmw Flkmonp I I

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married students and Murphree The Centrex phones are to areas, will be connected on have seven digits, replacing the Centrex. Those areas not extension lines now in use. included are to continue their Campus calls will go through by use of the Gainesville telephone dialing the last five digits. For an system. off campus call, students Must Using Centrex, students may dial "9", and then the local .-Staff W riting gs" Pansy Prer, In Chicago .By Ca ro I Sang e r: Nov. 20, 1968 number they want. Quarterly housing rates have included the charge for the local conversations. Long distance calls will be handled separately and billed directly to the student. Wo 6 Mayor Richard Daley had the newspapers of Chicago in his hip pocket. And he still does. Bill Anderson, city editor of the Chicago Tribune, squirmed and hedged and pleaded "no knowledge" every time the name Daley was brought up Journalism Day, Monday Nov. 18. The questions became obviously pointed on the coverage of the convention and Daley's part in it. Anderson's answers countered by becoming even more evasive. Anderson said, Mayor Daley was hardly involved ...a sweet old man who had special privileges just because he was the mayor af the host city. "What was your paper's opinion of the part Mayor Daley played in the security of the convention?" "I don't understand the question." Sure Mr. Anderson. Sure you don't. Okay then. "Was Mayor Daley in touch with your paper concerning coverage of the convention in any way?" "I don't know what you mean. I have his phone number and we called him .I think I read something into your question You're right Mr. Anderson. There is something there. At least 10 people at your speech wanted to know about Mayor Daley .why his people got into the convention hall when even some delegates had trouble, why reporters and cameramen were beaten in the name of security, why as you yourself said, he didn't get the bad press in Chicago that he did nationally. But you wouldn't answer these questions, Mr. Anderson. You hedged and avoided and on occasion refused to recognize a questionnaire because "I don't like your questions." And still you could speak of the people's right to know. About the free press and its importance in America. It's all communication, Mr. Anderson. Or lack of it. You put reporters inside disident groups and said you planned "nine months in advance" for coverage of the convention. But you wouldn't tell us what you knew about Mayor Daley and the convention "security" measures that caused countless injuries and ill-feelings across the country. We finally asked you if Mayor Daley had any vested interest in the Chicago papers. Perhaps that wasn't a fair question. It.put you on the spot. But you answered "No", and that Mayor Daley didn't like report. :s. That was really relevant. It was like Big Brother was watching you. Perhaps lie was. But you'll never tell, will you Mr. Anderson? Datsun's his and hers Sports Car .it's a problem how they share it. Because with a 135 H.P. overhead cam engine and front disc brakes .plus deluxe vinyl upholstery and a transistor radio as standard equipment. it's a sports car for both street and track. We call it the 2000. Datsun also makes another sports car. ..the 1600. It has the same big list of no-cost extras and a little less horsepower. That ought to please just about everyone. Unless he wants to go racing when she wants to go shopping. In which case, they should each have their own Datsun. You, too! Make the sound move to OATIS PORTS CARS GODDING & CLARK ON til 8PM Downtown by the Post Office 2nd Ave. & 2nd St. S.E. -CHECK OUR OTHER ADS IN THIS ISSUEI NEW CAMPUS PHONES Centrex Brings Fall Rings Sept.23, 1968 UF dormitory students can expect telephones in their rooms to start ringing by Nov. 9, when the campus' Centrex system begins, Cole A. Wagner, communications consultant to Southern Bell said. All university housing areas, with the exception of the Friday, August 22, 1969, The Florida Alligator, Peg 39 I COMPLETE VOLKSWAGEN REPAIR$ '1 Facto trainedmechanics 0 Complete parts department I----Bring This Ad With You--1 Service Maintenance Only $ 795 376-4261 BUSH GAR GE 1311 N W. 5th Ave. save money dailing their long distance calls -:ect, rather than using an operator. Wagner added operators will no longer break into direct dial calls to ask for the number where the call is originating. Automatic toll systems have been established to identify the numbers.

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Pog 40, The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 22,1969 House Denies Vote On Student Loans LONELY FLORIDA FIELE Erpty and lonely now, barren beyond belief, will come alive M but not for long. In just one month UF's gridiron alumni to say" monument, the graveyard of many football foes, Graves and crew t JOURNALISM SURVEY REVEALS Ads Don't Caus4 Advertising plays only a minor role in causing young people to start smoking, according to a survey conducted recently in the UF College of Journalism and Communications. The influence of friends, the survey revealed, was the major cause. Only four out of 150 students questioned blamed advertising for causing them to begin smoking, while 71 said their friends led them to take the first few puffs. The survey, conducted by senior advertising students in the college and under the supervision of Robert S. Boyd, journalism instructor, consisted of a series of questions probing when and why most students begin to smoke. Students were asked to describe their smoking habits and indicate to which advertising media they were most often exposed. Boyd pointed out that the public, the press and politicians most commonly blame radio and TV advertising for seducing young people into the smoking habit. "Our study indicates something quite the contrary," Boyd said. "Apparantly tobacco advertising simply gets people to switch brands. It does not create habits." "Concem for their health is the strongest motivation to make young people stop smoking," Boyd said. "Those who have already DRY CLEANING -N -f 0 M 5-SHIRTS-99t (SAVE 514) PANTS-994 QUALITY IS OUR MAIN CONCERN **.********* *** ** ** *** : TROPICAL CLEANERS : INVITES ALL NEW : STUDENTS TO COME SAVE THE TROPICAL WAY!: .****.*.*.*.*.* ** TROPICAL CLEANERS 402 N.W. 13th St. 209 N.E. 16th Ave. By Alligator Services Failure of the U.S. House of Representatives to pass a bill this week reviving the federal insured loan program may affect up to 1,000 returning and prospective students at UF an offical said Wednesday. I. Doublas Turner, director of student financial aid, stated. "No doubt this lack of legislation will cause many youths, particularly entering freshman, to withdraw their admissions here, throw up their hands and say they just can't do On Tuesday the U.S. Senate approved, 92-1, a bill reviving the program, but no House action is expected to take place until Sept. 15 at the earliest, after a four and one-half week Congressional recess which vith screaming students and quiet began Thursday. The delay is 'Go, you old Gators" when Ray expected to affect more than ake on Houston, Sept. 20. 200,000 students across the country needing loans to enter college this fall. 9 Young Smokers kicked the habit say they have done so out of fear of damaging their health." "It is logical to assume," Boyd said, "that continued emphasis on the health hazards of smoking by the broadcast media will play an effective role in keeping the nation's youth free of the tobacco habit." Most former student smokers who have kicked the habit, according to the survey, are married. Students still smoking say they smoke to "calm themselves or to give their hands something to do." Walk Shorts Swim Suits Suits & Sport Coats Selection of Flares, Bells & Levi Jeans 5 pr. shoes ONLY Reg $19-$29 NOW $5.99 3 pr 8C--2 pr 82 All Casual Permanent Press Slacks 20% OFF many other items reduced 1620 W. UNIVERSITY AVE. UNIVERSITY PLAZA Under the program, tuition funds and other educational expenses are loaned to students by their hometown banks, with repayment guaranteed by the federal government. Interest on the loans has been limited to seven per cent, causing many banks to drop out of thy insured program due to a current prime interest rate of 8 per cent. Deprived Colors RADNOR, Pa. -A network research executive claims the reason young people are wearing wild colors today is because during their informative years they were watching black-and-white television. This, he said, caused ''color deprivation." 10( PRE -SEASON 3OFF ON ALL JACKETS bY at the caa4 and bookstore located in the HUB MF 8 -5/392-0194 _____ -p. I 11 mmmi

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institutions, has gone up. A legislative act sharply increased tuition fees for all institutions in the state system became law in July. The fees went from $125 to $150 per quarter for undergraduates residing in Florida and from $125 to $175 for resident graduate students. For out-of-state undergraduates the rate goes from $325 to $450, and for out-of-state graduates the cost The UF, most diverse institution of higher learning in the state's university system, begins its 1969-70 academic year with 20,600 students expected to start classes Sept. 18. On-campus residence halls open Sept. 10 at 1 p.m., prior to two-day periods of regitration and orientation scheduled Sept. 11-12 and Sept. 15-16. Approximately 40 per cent of the University's students live in residence halls. Orientation takes a more personal turn this fall through a series of small group meetings with student discussion leaders involving adjustment to the campus supplanting the former week-long endurance test of walking the campus in guided tours. UF President Stephen C. O'Connell will welcome the new students at a 7 p.m. convocation Sept. 14 at Florida Field. The 1969 freshman class, limited to 2,800 by Board of Regents policy, was selected to fit the University's role as the state's land-grant institution. It represents all geographic areas of the state and includes a percentage from other states and foreign countries. Beginning with an original enrollment of 136 students gathered in a single frame building, the UF has become a giant among universities where the professional skills rerpresented in various departments are combined in interdisciplinary work which enlarges mankind's store of knowledge. It is committed to the triple purpose of teaching, research and service. Made up of 15 colleges and two schools, the University offers programs ranging from general to highly specialized education. There are some 120 areas of instruction specialization for undergraduates and 82 programs leading to degrees. There are more than 1,400 professors at the UF who teach 3,000 individual courses. The University College enrolls all freshmen and sophomores. Comprehensive courses offered by the college are aimed toward improving communication skills, acquainting the student with the principal concepts of the biological and physical sciences and providing a knowledge of the history and culture of Western man. Upper division units include the Colleges of Agriculture, Architectures and Fine Arts, Arts and Sciences, Business Administration, Education, Engineering, Dentistry, Health Related Professions, Journalism and Communications, Law, Medicine, Nursing, Pharmacy and Physical Education and Health, in addition to the School of Forestry and the Graduate School. The cost of education at Florida, as at other state-assisted swimming facility which has served instructional, recreational and intercollegiate demands since 1928 when the student body numbered 2,200. The University's 2,000-acre main campus, often designated among the country's most beautiful, is unique in that it contains all of the colleges and schools of the institution. More than 600 buildings blend Gothic and modern architecture over grass-covered lawns where approximately 1,100 individual (SEE 'UF', PAGE 42) WNELCOME \7 CONSTANTLY GROWING COAST TO COAS' NEW STUDENTS Try our deliciously different Roast Beef Sandwich -it's tender-sliced! .You'll never be satisfied with anything less! SWING OVER TO. T Arby1s 1405 SW 13th ST JUST SOUTH OF THE UNDERPASS I rises from $325 to $475. Room rent stays approximately the same as last year, ranging from $270-$475 for men and between $369-$465 for women. Women's rates increased by $24 for rooms where telephones were installed for the first time. s Food service units at eight locations over the campus i ncrease their cost by approximately $20. These units include the cafeteria, snack bar and more formal Arredondo Room in the Reitz Union, Coed Club in Broward Hall, Graham Hall snack bar, Hume Hall cafeteria and snack bar, Florida Room in Norman Hall, Tolbert H all snack bar and the Rathskeller. Board is not mandatory at the UF but several food plans are available. These include a 13-week plan for the fall quarter (a seven-day plan costing $241.33 and a five-day plan costing $202.80). The 11-week plan for winter and spring quarters costs $204.20 for seven days and $171.60 for five days. University finances during the 1960s show state support decreasing significantly with sources of funds from grants and contracts, student fees and auxiliary revenue (sales, services, rentals) increasing and a slight decrease in federal support. The $101,196,555 budget request to the Legislature for the 1969-70 fiscal year that begins July 1 was cut to $86,568,624 and excludes any capital outlay funds for construction. Facilities currently under construction include builings for the Florida State MuseUm, a Graduate and Intemational Studies Center and a Music Building. Renovation to some existing buildings are planned, including air conditioning a number of residence halls. Two recreational swimming pools in the housing areas will supplement the single campus Ii r 19 Friday, Auguat 22, 1969, The Florida AllIgator, Paga 41 UF Presents The Facts As Its 113th Year Begins I Panhellenic Welcomes New Coeds GO GREEK! Alpha Chi Omega Delta Phi Epsilon Alpha Delta Pi Kappa Alpha Theta Alpha Epsilon Phi Kappa Delta Alpha Omicron Pi Phi Mu Chi Omega Phi Sigma Sigma Delta Delta Delta Pi Beta Phi Delta Gamma Sigma Kappa Zeta Tau Alpha Rush Sign-Up: Room 315 Reitz Union Saturday, September 13 Sunday, September 14 9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m.

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Page 42, The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 22, 1969 UF Has Become A Giant Among Universities FROM PAGE trees of 153 species and varieties have been mapped. A long history of student self government gives each student participation in the University community. In addition to their own student government organization, they serve on University-wide committees and in the fall will have additional representatives on the University Senate, Administrative Council, Curriculum Committee and Student Conduct Committee broadening their responsibility in conducting the affairs of the University. The Honor Code of the student body makes each student the keeper of his own conscience during examinations and on the campus until he shows he does not deserve the trust placed in him. The honor system has been in effect at the UF since 1914 and includes a student Honor Court which performs the combined function of trial and supreme courts, passing judgment on all violations of the Honor Code. A re-organized 30-member President's Action Council, composed equally of students, faculty and administrators, will meet in the fall to continue the assignment given by President O'Connell last year to recommend solutions to current campus problems. The University extends its activities into the larger CAMPUS SCENES The campus has many landmarks. The Century Tower below was built in 1953 commemorating the university's 100 years of existence. The view above taken from atop the tower shows the part of the old campus. community with service projects playing a role for both academic and volunteer programs in most colleges. For example, occupational therapy interns work with a day care center, a school for mentally retarded children and other local facilities; pediatric nursing students assist in preparing Headstart Program children for the experience of physical exams; medical students participate in Operation Concern, surveying health needs of the disadvantaged and cooperate in the Headstart Program with physical exams; the Department of Music cooperates with the Alachua County Enrichment Center in providing concerts for school children regularly. The Early Childhood Laboratory develops teaching techniques used in cooperation with a neighborhood house and a day care center and has a language development program for disadvantaged five-year-old children; the Institute for Development of Human Resources works in parent education; architecture students have projects involving young people in "the ghetto"; the Bureau of Economic and Business Research created a new set of criteria for FHA low income housing families; the Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences trained low-income families in nutrition and purchasing, and the College of Law operates legal aid and public defender clinics. BOWLING As an institution the University is making several new efforts in the area of the disadvantaged student. A new counselor for this group has been appointed to aid with their specific problems and recruitment; funds from the Alumni Association have been earmarked for those needing assistance and the College of Agriculture has a special grant from the Rockefeller Foundation to find and recruit Negro graduate students. Administrators appointed during the past year include Dr. Edmund Achell, provost of J. Hillis Miller Health Center; Dr. Charles B. Browning, dean for resident instruction for the i nstitute of Food and Agricultural Sciences; Dr. Harry Sisler, dean of arts and sciences; Dr. Robert Lanzillotti, dean of business administration; Dr. Jose Medina, dean of dentistry; Dr. Bert Sharp, dean of education; Dr. Robert Uhrig, dean of engineering; Dr. Harold Hanson, dean of Graduate School; John Paul Jones, dean of journalism and communications; Dr. Kenneth Finger, dean of pharmacy; Fred Cantrell, dean of University relations and development; Dr. William Carter, director of Center of Latin American Studies; Charles Furr, director of development services; George Croker, director of sponsored research, and Dr. Gustav Harrer, director of University libraries. Positions remaining to be filled are those of executive vice president, dean of the College of Physical Education and Health, and a director of Shands Teaching Hospital. In addition to productions by campus groups as the Florida Players in November, there will be performances by the U.S. Army Field Band and a traveling company with the opera "La Traviata." p p PING PONG PLUS Movies, a Listening Library, an Arts & Crafts Center, Barber Shop, Gift Shop, TV Lounges, Snack Bar and Cafeteria, and Rooms available for every sort of meeting. The J. Wayne Reitz Union is the place to meet people and do things. Make the Reitz Union your center of activity while at the University of Florida. Best of Luck FRESHMAN CLASS OF 1969-70 UNjA C S LA ADA -EMI AN -'$ I THE A E 1b 's ""Many Hearts, One Purpose" THE J. WAYNE REITZ UNION center for student activities BILLIARDS

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ACCENT 70 'Tomorrow In Perspective' "Tomorrow is Perspective" is the theme of Accent '70. "Accent is a symposium on vital issues," says Bob Martin, chairman of the Accent speakers committee. "We plan to bring about 15 speakers to campus." President Nixon is invited. He spoke at the first Accent program in 1965. Former Secretary of Interior Stuart Udall is another possible speaker. The aim of this year's symposium is more student involvement. Thursday of Accent week has been designated a "day of involvement." All classes will be cancelled. Each college will provide programs about its individual academic area. Industries and other groups have been invited to set up exhibits and displays to acquaint students with their work. Accent speakers will tour the campus, sit-in on classes and participate in seminars during the week. Some of the changes from previous programs the Accent '70 committee is planning include more informal presentations in the Plaza of the Americas and student union. The Accent magazine will be expended, containing interviews with speakers about the symposium's theme. The magazine is slated for publication in mid-January. Accent also is planning to ask the City of Gainesville to officially recognize Accent's day of involvement and to encourage community groups to participate in Accemt activities. Last year's Accent program centered around "The Dimensions of Freedom" and brought 16 nationally-known speakers to campus. Sens. Strom Thurmond and Wayne Morse, Atheist Madalyn Murray and Georgia Rep. Julian Bond. IA K -" K AAAAAj, AAAAAA Friday, August 22, 1969, The Florida Alligator, Page 43 Art Competition At Gallery The Florida Gallery, housed in the architecture and fine arts building, will open the 1969-70 academic year with an exhibit of.the best works from the Florida State Fair competition. "It's the most exciting and significant exhibit of contemporary art in the Southeast," said Roy Craven, the gallery's director. Studying can be easier with an AIWA taperecorderfrom COUCH'S TLit Model TP-710 on with these features 8 Dual track, capstem drive I AC-Dc 9 Dual Speed 3% 7 0 Dual Speed 3% & 17/8 9 AVC (automatic volume control) 6 Auxiliary input 0 Output jack nly $44.95 Accessories 9 Microphone I earphone I supply reel with tape 8 take up reel 0 batteries C AC cord Northcentral Florida's largest selection of tape recorders and tape recording needs. COUCH'S 608 N. MAIN St. Ph 376-7171 "Your tape recording headquarters." APARTMENT LIVING 24-HOUR AIR CONDITIONED STUDY LOUNGE PROGRESSIVE NATIONAL, 267 CHAPTERS MATURE PLEDGE PROGRAM ONE BLOCK FROM MAIN LIBRARY MOST SERVICE PER MAN, 1968-69 WANT MORE THAN THE AVERAGE FRATERNITY? TEKE HAS GOT IT! 1236 S.W. 1st AVE.

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Page 44, The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 22, 196 FOLK MASSES ARE 'IN' 'Canon Gannon' Leads Catholic Student Center One Sunday last spring the Rathskeller, the campus beer hall, suspended its own rules and opened the hall on the one day of the week it usually remains closed. The result was the largest crowd ever assembled there, with hundreds more being turned away at the door when the hall was filled to capacity. The big event? A Catholic Mass. Not just any old Mass, though. This was a folk Mass, led by Father Michael Gannon and a number of students in the Catholic Student Parish. Father Gannon (called Canon Gannon by his students ever since he introduced a Lutheran chaplain as Pastor Castor), besides being a pastor of the Catholic Student Parish, is an associate Professor in the Department of Religion. His classes, like his well-known folk Masses, are among the most popular on campus. The St. Augustine Church is filled to capacity every Sunday moving for Mass. There are four Masses each Sunday, at 9:30 and 11 in the morning and 5:15 and 7 in the evening. Father Gannon reports that about 2500 students attend the Sunday Masses, and about 80 participate in the daily Mass at 5:15 p.m. Starting in the fall, the parish will also have a daily Mass at 12:20 p.m. for students who may have schedule conflicts. Canon Gannon is considered by UF students to be very close to them in their ideals and hopes. His approach to worship is somewhat unorthodox, with frequent laughter rippling through the church during his sermons. He says he believes worship should be done in the spirit of joy and he likes working with students because "to my mind, they are part of the finest generation our nation has ever produced." The student parish which Father Gannon leads is student-run and student-finanUF's Musical Show-Piece The Gator Band is the UF's musical show-piece. With a membership of about 240 musicians, the band ranges from being the nucleus of school spirit during football season to performing concert tours and jazz cdncerts later in the year. After football season the band is divided up into many other units that comprise the family of Gator Bands. These include the symphonic band, concert band, two variety bands, a basketball band, summer band, and other smaller units. The symphonic band is the concert specialist of the Gator Bands with ideal instrumentation and a wide choice of music materials. The concert band performii2 an interesting repertoire of band literature, generally lighter in character than that of the symponic band. ced. It receives no outside financial help. Student activities are planned by an all-student parish council. The council directs the parishes activities in community service, liturgy, special events, social events, married student activities and publicity. From time to time, the parish provides special programs for Mass. Last year it had folk Masses led by a black priest-musician Clarence Rivers and Episcopal Father Ian Mitchell and his wife Caroline. Whether it's during a regular Sunday Mass, or at a parish-sponsored tubing party, or in the Rathskeller, UF Catholic students say their parish is where the action is. Religion dead on college campuses? You'll never convince Father Gannon -or his parishoners of that. DAILY MASS AT UF CATHOLIC STUDENT CENTER .parish operated and financed by students Designed Just For Students Here Is Gainesville's P$~U !I. Newest Apartment Idea PRIVATE bedrooms for each student allows you to do your own thing. 4 bedroom apartments allow luxur-y living and maximum privacy at minimum expense. LUXURIOUS Barcelona furnishings beautifully complement La Mancha's unique Spanish design. Every room is fully carpeted and tastefully appoin ted for lasting beauty. FUN areas include one of the few pools near campus and a patio-garden complete with gas grills. A central courtyard makes it easier to meet other students and enhances your social life. QUIET rooms face away from the courtyard so you can get away from it all. Thick concrete floors and double-ceil walls stop all outside noise from entering. ROOMY 1,055-square-foot apartments are among Gainesville's largest. ECONOMICAL. Cost is less than 2 students having a one-bedroom apartment. CONVENIENT location is within walking distance to class .away from heavy traffic .next to sorority row. CHOICE townhouse or single level apartments are beautifully unique in design, and most face the courtyard and pool. Nothing else like it in the nation! CUSTOM-MADE for student living., designed to meet students' needs. COMPLETE services include all utilities paid by the landlord ample laundry and storage facilities, and garbage disposals in every kitchen. Visit Us As Soon As You Arrive 4L 914 SW 8th Avenue NOW RENTING FOR SEPTEMBER 15 372-5346 or 372-2662

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F Sept.30, 1968 Florida college students were ven a greater voice in shaping university policy revisions ecommended by the Council of tudent Body Presidents. The approved revisions, a type of "Bill of Rights," gives the students the freedom to participate with administrators in decision making, with final authority still resting with university presidents and the board. However, student governments have a clearly defined means of helping formulate and review institutional policy affecting academic and student affairs. Two existing board policies were eliminated. A provision stating university administrated financial aid may be terminated if a student is charged with misconduct, and another giving the president the right to declare any "area or establishment" off limits were deleted from the policies. The revisions to the board's operating manual were approved "in substance" late Friday afternoon after members of the board and CSPB went over the proposals "paragraph by paragraph." Three members of the board and the six student body presidents met again Saturday morning for an editing session. FSU's Lyman Fletcher, chairman of the CSBP,nsaid the min goal of the revisions was to move the state university system Friday, August 22, 1960, The Florida Alligator, Pogs 46 regents OK Bill Of Rights aparen for tuidea of serving as exposed to a more academic Fletcher said the board "For the first time, we have "t tnts, environment where they can recognized students' government opened up respected and i think we have achieved learn and develop in a more as a body the students speak meaningful channels of and students will be responsible climate,"he said. through. communication." WELCOME STUDENTS we cordially invite you to join the UNIVERSITY CHOIR one of America's finest Collegiate Singing Organizations Concerts -Vocal training -Credit Room 132 Music building WHY DO STUDENTS LIVE AT C.L.O.? Because: It's CHEAP: $60 month Room & Board C.L.O. WHOLESALE STORE It's CLOSE -one block from campus It's CO-ED It's STUDENT OPERATED ACADEMIC ASSISTANCE Call, Write or Visit: Collegiate Living Organization 117 N.W. 15 STREET Gainesville Fla. 376-9440 C.L.O. Does Not Discriminate Against Any Applicant One of Five C.L.O. Houses Three Meals/Day-Six Day/Week =====------Three Meals/Day-SixDay/WeekI One" of Five C.L.O. Houses

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Pegs 46, The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 22, 1969 IN UF LIBRARY Rare Books Aid Research By DIANA SUGG Alligator Special Writer The show-place of the libraries may well be the special collections located on the fifth floor of the Graduate Research Library. Founded in 1959 as a center for primary source material, there are four main areas, rare books, the university archives, the university collection, and the dance, music and theatre archives. The rare books area consists of valuable books, manuscripts and papers stored in a climate-controlled room. The oldest holding is the original manuscript of a Latin Bible dated about 1250. It is hand printed in uniform Gothic letters about one-sixteenth of an inch high and illustrated in blue and red fine pen drawings. There is also a first edition of Philosophiae Naturalis Principia Mathematica by Sir Isaac Do The Swim Like This Gafor Does The Florida Game and Fresh Water Fish Commission, which has as one of its functions the protection of Florida alligators from the poacher, has also gathered some interesting facts on the reptile. For example, the last open hunting season on the alligator in Florida was in 1960, after which, the commission took up the responsibility of protecting it. When the alligator does the hunting, it floats with the top of its back, eyes and nostrils above the water while valves keep water out of its ears and nostrils. In the U.S., the alligator's habitat includes the lowlands of North Carolina to south Florida and west to the Rio Grande River in Texas. Gainesville Machine Shop Complete Volkswagen Parts and Service 1224 S. MAIN ST. Newton and early editions written by Galileo and Priestly. Autographed books, manuscripts and letter by Robert Frost, William Faulkner, George Bernard Shaw, and many other literary greats are also in the collection. Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings, author of many famous novels, including the Yearling Cross-Creek, bequested her entire estate to UF. Original manuscripts, her correspondence, first editions of her books and various personal belongings comprise a large segment of the special collections. The university archives contain UF's historical records. The papers of past presidents of the university such as John Tigert, and John Murphree, as well as historic information from various departments of the university are in the archives. The picture file of the university shows the newly-built university auditorium in 1927 with a dirt road running in front of it, and Anderson and Peabody Halls when they first opened. Complementing the material pertaining to the university's history is the university c o l I e ction .Professors' publications and the original copies of masters' theses and doctoral dissertations make up about half of the section. In the rest of the collection are yearbooks, humor magazines, and publications that date back t Ph 376-7171 to the early 1900's. Copies of the suede-bound Seminole of 1910 and issues of the Alligator from 1915 are in the collection. The special collections department is open weekdays from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. COUCH'S the #1 Dealer with the #1 Brands! Serving North Central Florida and the University of Florida Since 1933 WOLLENSAK AIWVA LEA) Service guaranteed by our OWN master A10 l l If we sell it we service I 4'SOIAIO$COUCH' 608 N. MAIN St. Scotcil BR AN D OWIM Ios SECTION OF SPECIAL COLLECTIONS DEPARTMENT IN LIBRARY .many rare books and original manuscripts assist researchers :)BERTS R 4ET STEREO 8' er Technicia. LECTRONIC SERVICE rL0 fls.

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-Staff Writings Use Numbers Instead Of Nast Jan. 6, 1969 Reading over my handy dandy copy of Rights In Conflict, the story of the riots during the Democratic National Convention, I realized something very important; since newspapers aren't allowed to print certain words, it is impossible to accurately report what went on in the Windy City. But, because the public doesn't like to read or hear that word, newspapers and television reporters were not able to give the complete story of the disturbance. But the authors of the report felt differently: "We have," they said in the introduction, "with considerable reluctance, included the actual obscenities used by the participants." "Extremely obscene language was a contributing factor to the violence described in this report, and its frequency and intensity were such that to omit it would inevitably understate the effect it had," the report said. So why shouldn't newspapers be able to print that word? Why shouldn't TV commentators be allowed to use that word? The answer, of course, is simple. Too many children would be influenced by hearing or reading the nasty words. Therefore I propose a solution: Catalogue all the "nasties" and assign each of them a number. Print this book of 'filthies' every month or so with a simple cover: "DANGER This Book Contains Words Which May Be Hazardous To Your Mental Health." Then, whenever a writer was faced with the problem of reporting the screaming of an obscenity, he would merely write the number corresponding to the word and those who had the catalogue could look it up and get their kicks along with the true story of what happened, while those who wished not to have their ears singed would not have to worry. That, of course, would lead to such as: "ANYTOWN -Police Chief W.H. "5" Wilson, covered with 8 from head to toe, charged outside agitators with causing the riots which have hit his city in the last two days. "Those 3-7 mother 9'ers are trying to burn the whole 3-7 city down," Wilson said. "Those hippies and other 3-7 radicals store up 8 and throw it on us," he said. y, .UM22.1 6, ThO Finft AIHPW, rP g4/ yWords By Dave Reddick "And that's for 8." When someone was bhAg interviewed on TV he wouldn't say the number, he would say the actual word. To impose a beep over the sound would be obnoxious, so it would be better to isntruct them in how to curse without being censored. That way would be to speak in numbers rather than words. I can see it now. The crowds would realy be chanting "9 the fuzz," "6 no we won't go" and "8 the pigs." And the cops would answer "Kill the mother 9'ers," "Get the 3-7 hippies," and "Knock the 8 outa' 'em." But then, pretty soon everyone would know what the numbers stood for, and they might be offended to hear Ease Political, Athletic Dissent; Replace O'Connell,Graves Today MR. EDITOR: Because of discontent and unhappiness with the actions and personalities of our present political leadership, the American electorate voted for a change this year, to Richard Nixon and Ed Gurney. I believe that we would do well to follow their lead, and demand much-needed change on our own campus. We need change from selective law enforcement, attempted violation of the doctor-patient relationships, suggestions for harsh and repressive measures against drug-users, while ignoring 99 per cent of the illegal alchohol-users, and attempted coercion of student committees. What about Greek rumbles, secret files, apathetic professors, and stifling of academic freedom? We also need a change from out-of-date, inept coaching practices. Yes, if we ever hope to achieve greatness, or see "The Year of the Gator," we must have change. We should replace Stephen C. O'Connell and Ray Graves. The times they are a'changing, so let's not stay behind. We want the UF to someday achieve greatness. MIKE HITTLEMAN, 2UC COOPERATIVE LIVING IS GREAT! AT GEORGIA SEAGLE HALL 1002 W. University Ave. PLANNED SOCIAL ACTIVITIES By Students for Student Needs -House is operated entirely by students ECONOMICAL 20 Meals/week -prepared and planned by trained commisary Mgr and Cook $220 00 QUarter 20 meals per week, room utilities, activities, football seating, and more. GRAD STUDENTS & JR. COLLEGE TRANSFERS WELCOME Mostly upper division housewith a few frosh & soph., Good Study Conditions 0 REGULAR SIZE ROOMS 2/room, afew singles o LOCATED CLOSE TO CAMPUS ACTIVITIES 3 Blocks from Entrance, well within walking distance anywhere txcellent Study Atmosphere GEORGIA SEAGLE HALL-MEN'S COOPERATIVE Write or Phone for More Information 1002 W. University Ave. 372-9410 or 392-4341 (Resident Director) C.LI.-.&'" I" Mmm&m l~m&~ 7 MEN Recreational ActWities I Jan. 9, 1969

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Pog 48, The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 22,1969 GAT;R GIRLS According -to Playboy mag.'s white-skinned, Chicago-confined permissiveness experts, the action at this Southern university is off-campus in "Sin City" where "sun-tanned sexniks" abound. Well, we don't really know about all that, but we dug around in our much-fingered file of Gator Girls, worn and torn from stark stares of our male staffers, and revived these bountious beauties for your viewing pleasure. Why should we have all the fun? RAW-

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The PRU S Florida Alligator THE SOUTHEAST'S LEADING COLLEGE NEWSPAPER Section A University of Florida, Gainesville Friday, August 22, 1969 Ye a x Ini Re vIe w The balance was very precarious, not between good and evil, it wasn't as simple as that, but between a newfound solidarity within the ranks of student leaders and sometimes serious clashes with administrators, regents, legislators and others outside the university. It was a year of change and demand for greater change. There are still issues unreconciled as well as 'wider and deeper channels of communication as the old academic year sets the stage for the new. Etch With Care Welcome. Etch deeply if you are a door you.have entered you as you came. You will not songs or ride so easily collector. The will not leave sing the same the tides of rhythms of your nature. You may laugh with gods that now terrify you genuflect more often at their alter. later -or DimSUIN Flag B s Brihtly At Nihttime SDS Rdty Etch carefully. The door thru which you now pass is mainly black and white. It mirrors the unknown prejudices in your eyes. That door is a door you bring with you. It will more deeply repeat itself, or rainbow. Etch with care if you are a collector, so (SEE "COLLECTOR" PAGE 4)

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Jgs 2-A, The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 22, 1969 The PIII:A'No Policy' Policy At UF But Will UF Let Coeds Decide Nov. 6, 1968 The issues involved in prescribing and dispensing birth control pills at the infirmary has placed Health Service physicians on a "hot seat," says Dr. Mary McCaulley, a UF psychologist. Dr. McCaulley, an assistant professor of clinical psychology at the J. Hills Miller Health Center, said the different philosophies held by university authorities on the issue comes back to the role of a university. "Is the university "in loco parentis" or are teachers trying to teach students to make their own decisions?" she asked. "As in any major life decision, once a woman has had the chance to come in contact with all considerations, what she does is uniquely her own decision," she said. She said a university is to help people assume isore responsibility to fulfill themselves and be better hunsan beings, find solutions for their goals and make better decisions. "It gets to be an issue because one rule affects so many students who are at different stages of being responsible for themsselves," she said. Dr. McCaulley said the decision to take birth control pills can represent a responsible decision on the part of one individual and an irresponsible act on the part of another. "Identical behavior and decisions can come from different motivations," she said. "There is no evidence that the availability of birth control pills has any effect on the sex drive or promiscuity of woien," Dr. MeCaulley sai d. siThere are girls who are disturbed psychologically by their premarital sexual relations, and while the pill is a factor, it is not the factor determining any emotional reaction, she said. Dr. McCaulley said she does not "really approve of restrictive measures." LS. Powers, Associate Dean of the Law School, agreed that there is no need to restrict the prescribing of birth control pills to coeds who are over 21, at least from the legal standpoint. However, the university is placed in a precarious positions whet contraceptive drugs are prescribed to minors. without parental consent, he claimed. "The legal profession has long recognized the interest parents have in the medical treatment of their minor children," ie said. "I would say the parents of a minor who received birth control pills would have strong grounds for bringing suitt" Powers said. Any legal action would be brought against the individual physician prescribing the contraceptive, Powers said. He also noted that the waiver on Student Health Service forms giving infirmary physicians the prerogative to prescribe whatever they deem necessary would not be considered parental permission to prescribe birth control pills. The legal issue becomes more complicated when tle patient is Catholic, he said. "If religious beliefs enter into the controversy, it would cerainlsN strengthen any case a parent might have, he contended. CIRCLE K WE COMES all new male students "Join the LARGEST service club" (EDITOR'S NOTE: This was the first of a three part series on birth control at the UF. The three installments are reprinted on these two pages. Staff Writer Sydney Frasca received a prescription for the pill from an infirmary physician while on special investigatory assignment tor the Alligator. The paper later came under attack on charges of dubious ethics, but was absolved by the Board of Student Publications which found no violations of its standards as revealed by the facts.) Nov. 5, 1968 ByvSYDNEY FRASCA Alligator Staff Writer Under what infirmary officials call a "no policy" policy, UF coeds have been issued prescriptions for birth control pills from Student Health Service physicians. The practice has been termed a "professional decision" by health service officials but UF President Stephen C. O'Connell asserts that the prescribing of birth control pills "is not the responsibility of the university." O'Connell said in a recent interview he knew of no policy on prescribing contraceptive drugs and that the subject had never come up before. Earlier this quarter, one infirmary official reportedly told a journalism student during an interview that the UF infirmary under no circumstances issues birth control pills to unmarried coeds for contraceptive purposes. He subsequently denied making the statement. Two UF coeds, one under 21, were sent to th: infirmary by the Alligator to test this policy and each received prescriptions for the pills from two different physicians. Both girls were unmarried and specified that the pills were needed fpr contraceptive purposes only. The doctors prescribing the pills warned the girls against veneral disease, and talked to them about their individual situations. They were told how to use the contraceptive, what to expect in the way of side effects and after effects, and were given prescriptions refillable for one year. Neither girl was given a pelvic examination. One told the physician she-would prefer not to have an examination for medical reasons and was placed on her honor by the doctor to retum later for a physical. The other coed told the physician that she had been examined in January. Health Services Director Wilmer J. Coggins, aware of the fact that an Alligator reporter had received a prescription without the examination, declined to comment on the importance of the pelvic examination because his comments would be "subject to misinterpretation by the reader." Coggins said the decision to give a physical examination is left up to the attending physician. "Physicians are bound by good medical practice to make decisions as for whom they prescribe contraceptive medication," Coggins said. Coggins indicated that the only guidelines followed at the infirmary on prescribing contraceptives were the guidelines of "good medical practice and awareness of complications." "Physicians are acutely aware of moral implications of orml contraceptives and are involved in counseling as well as prescribing," he said. One significant problem in prescribing birth control pills involves the coed under 21. Physicians treating a minor in any area where a question might be raised, such as prescribing birth control pills, "should be aware of the fact that parental consent is necessary," Coggins said. When asked if unmarried minors are prescribed contraceptive medication without the parents' consent, Coggins said it depended on "individual circumstances." Welcome Student Wives If you have the following skill, we probably have a job for you during your residency in Gainesville: CLERK-TYPIST (45wpm) KEYPUNCH OPERATORS (experienced) LABORATORY TECHNICIANS (science graduate) REGISTERED NURSES SECRETARIAL (must take dictation) X-RAY TECHNICIANS (experienced) Good starting salaries and excellent fringe benefits including annual merit increase and free college courses. "EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER" Detach and mail this coupon for further information ~~CENTRAL EMPLOYMENT, UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA 32601 Please forward me an application for employee nt with the University of Florida and indicat e ciy approxi mate starting salary. I am a graduate of have and college/high school years experience as a numbe r ski lI NameStreet Address Telephone Number City/State Zip Code

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-riday, August 22,1969, The FloridasAlliptor,'Pa'3-A COUNTRY-WIDE DEBATE REACHES UF -. Pill Philosophies Nov. 7, 1968 By SYDNEY FRASCA Alligator Staff Writer U F coeds, under an "individual casf" philosophy, have received birth control pills for contraceptive purposes from Student Health Service physicians. And UF President Stephen C. O'Connell is opposed to the practice because "prescribing and dispensing contraceptive drugs should not be a function of the Student Health Service." O'Connell contends that prescribing contraceptives could be construed as university approval of premarital sexual intercourse, which, he says, is against Florida law. "The treatment of student illnesses and medical problems is the only reason for operating a student infirmary," O'Connell said. "I don't see that contraception is encompassed within student health," he added. O'Connell said the prescribing of contraceptives is not the proper responsibility of the university. Any policy at the infirmary on birth control would have to have the approval of the president and the Board of Regents, he said. Policy Gets Approval Nov. 8, 1969 DR. SAMUEL MARTIN .receives presIy policy PRESIDENT O'CONNELL ..opposed to the practice By CAROL SANGER Alligator Assignments Editor UF President Stephers C. O'Connell Thursday approved the controversial Infirmary .policy on the dispensing of birth control pills to unmarried coeds. In a memorandum to Dr. W.J. Coggins, director of Student Health, and Dr. Sanuel P. Martin, provost of tihe J. Hillis Miller Health Center, O'Connell said the present University policy "Is a sound policy and is approved for continued use." The policy states: I The issuance of such a prescription is a medical decision made by the Indiidual physicir r in full accord With tile ethics of tlrc medical prolessions O Srich a p rescription is issued orrly for sound medical reasons:and I Suclr a prescription is IssuelIC to a minor only with parental consent, or in ere rgen cies whe re consent cannot be obtained immediately. When asked to explain what constitutes an emergency as stated in the O'Connell memorandum, Coggins refused. ''You make your own interpretation," ie said, "We can's discuss the naunces of personal cases because they vary from person to person. This is what I've been saying all along." Differ All Over "There would have to be some sound arguments from health service physicians to justify the prescribing of such medication," O'Connell said. Dr. Wilmer Coggins, director of the campus health service, defends the pActice of prescribing Birth control pills as 1 "professional decision" and as a "personal and private matter between physician and patient." The different philosophies expressed by Coggins and O'Connell on the subject of birth control for college coeds are indicative of a debate going on throughout the country over the role of university health services. The Committee on Ethical and Professional Relationships of the American College Health Association surveyed 323 members of the association on birth control issue. Of the participating institutions, 180 health services do not prescribe the pill for contraceptive purposes -regardless of marital status and 143 health services prescribe the pill at least to married women. Two hundred and forty six of the 323 colleges surveyed will not prescribe birth control pills to unmarried coeds. Of those colleges offering contraceptive medication, 13 will prescribe to onnsarried coeds: 12 of these prescribe to unmarried moi nors. Of those colleges prescribing the birth control pill, only 13 prescribe it for contraceptive purposes to unmarried students over 21 years of age while 12 prescribe to minors. Those health services which prescribe the pill for contraceptive purposes supported Coggins' assertion that contraceptive drugs are like any other medication and that prescribing them is a matter of individual judgment and responsibility between the patient and her physician. The UF in firmary's "no policy" policy was also indirectly defended by results of tile survey. Some hrealtlh services reported that a public policy was "undesirable" and that all statements on the prescribing of birth control pills should indicate it is a doctor-patient matter. Of the 143 colleges prescribing birth contorl pills, only 19 reported having a written policy regarding the pill. One reason given for not making contraceptive drugs available at student health services was that the long term use of the birth control pill requires medical supervision by personal physicians. Tire University of SOL]uth Florida and Florida State University both have official policies stating that birth control pills will not be prescribed because of a lack of facilities and personnel. HONDA world's biggest seller! 6i~~ HONDA TOURING 175 (CA-175) Low-cost everyday transportation. Its OHC twin-cylinder engine is designed .to provide long-range, smooth performance. Features include directional signals. THE LITTLE HONDA (PC-50) Easy to ride as a bicycle. The Little Honda is popular with the ladies for cruising around the campus. Automatic clutch and you never have to change gears. Drop in and look at our large selection. 818 West University Avenue 376-2638 Convenient to Campus "'U.

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6P 4-A, The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 22, 1969 'Connell OK's Study Of Quarter Troubles May 29, 1969 UF President Stephen C. O'Connell has approved an A ction Conference proposal calling for a re-evaluation of the quarter system. He has recommended that more departments offer four and five-hour courses so that students could take fewer courses for an average of 16 hours of credit. The University Curriculum Committee studied the proposal and gave O'Connell its recommendation that: I E a c h d e p a r t m e n t re-examine its currictlum and organize it so that most course offerings will provide a typical student program of 3-4 courses and 15-16 credit hours. 0 Each college re-examine and reduce its credit-hour requirements for graduation if possible. The committee also said it would not approve new courses with less than four credit hours rn I e s s considerablee justification" was provided or the department already had most courses with four or five inurs 0I cre 1.' If You're ACletr. Doors change. FROM PAGE Etch with care. Those of you who have felt the exhiliration and nausea of alcohol or the you will, leaving, remember who and what and liberation and disorientation of pot and acid or how you were on entering. Between now and the violence of fight or the violence and then the two of you will do great battle. The tenderness and ecstacy of bed: you will find no moral Milieu with which you come so difficulty adjusting. There are those who have well-armed will have served its purpose or been been thru those doors, and, right now, while rendered anachronistic. Etch carefully, shadings you weren't looking, they were looking at you become important. and saying silently, hmmmmmmmmm, yes, yes. Thru that door lies the gang and vogues and And there is a door: things as they aren't what fashions up with which you must keep -or keep they are. And there is a door serendipity, and a your measured distance from. Over there are door: arrogance. It fools you doesn't let you other doors. All elusive but easy to get at. Behind know you've been thru it. each is joy and sorrow, a catalyst to learning or a Look at that door. Education. It's enormous, method of rote. Beware: that door over there is you say. Etch cautiously. Those who know X alienation. Discovery is a launching door that you education is a panaces will leave thru a larger might covet if you find it. door. Inside many doors are experiences so And there is a door, melancholy. It waits, meaningful and real they will last you all the way they say, with malice in its eyes, and, they say, in on your trip from here to your eternity. Taste the madness of the lonely that can creep into fully. Friendships come in rushes, or slowly, your mind it will sometimes follow and cast hanging carelessly on the edge of a sentence you shadows that confuse. Etch broadly, in grand almost held within you. Achievement is strokes. Ahead lies laughter, gaiety. They are rich here -duck. So too is disappointment. It is and full, they say, and able to leap tall hurdles in legion. the lightning and thunder of a single smile. Doors change. And there is a door, the other guy. You are Etch with care. Love awaits you. The the other guy. changing seasons trip the senses, masking time in And there is a door yes and a door no. How invisible calendars. The doors of slow cure that. will you see your world? They are subtle and harder to find. That is why Etch carefully or the shadows of your mind suddenly time does not move unless you push it will cover over the soft and cool and secure with the now-sharp, now-dull edge of your places you now know so well. But, then, maybe sanity. its better that way. All the doors are here, Thru those doors over there are easy laughs. potentially. You've but to find them and step And over here is understanding, all-important but inside. elusive. Good hunting. May the fates smile upon you.Richard Thompson AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSIONS REPAIRED.m ADJUSTED REBUILT EXCHANGED SPECIAL PRICES ON LEAKING TRANSMISSIONS "A&k About Our Unconditional Guarantee" FINANCING ARRANGED GATOR AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION SERVICE, INC. GAINESVILLE F 372-0372 Dorm Area Pools Nearing Completion April 9, 1969 By NEAL SANDERS Alligator Staff Writer UF's 6,000 dormitory residents are eight months or less from taking a dip in their own swimming pools with a green light for planning from Attorney General Earl Faircloth's office. In an April 7 letter, Faircloth stated he was "of the opinion that no specific legislative authorization is required" for pool construction. Earlier, the question of whether construction bonds could be issued without approval of the state legislature caused Vice President for Business Affairs William Elmore to ask for an opinion from the attorney general's office. The legal question arose over the interpretation of two Florida statutes concerning revenue certificates. One requires that construction of all university buildings must be subject to the approval of the state legislature. The second exempted dorintory facilities from this approval. The question was resolved by including the recreational facilities under dormitories, since the pools will be paid for in the same manner as housing units are -student rent receipts. There will be no admission price to use the pools once they arc completed, but S'50,000 has been set aside from housing fees to pay for the pools. Also, the pools will be located within the confines of land set aside for student housing purposes. Total time between now and when the pools open ranges from October to January, with the later estimate being given from both UF's planning department and the Regents architect's office. The project is a joint venture between Student Government and the Housing Division. A T77 ALPHA 2625 North Main'St. CHI OMEGA Welcome all new students to the. University of Florida I ---77 MM Ll

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Friday, Aagat 2, 9IN, Thu Florida Aligator, Pape 5AS ACTION' CHAIRMAN .Ws Investi nation Prom pts I have always been a strong supporter of *1the UF. ..I know nothing of this R ae .a .m Y GS organization (Action Conference), I have no interest in the organization," US. Rep. Bob Sikes Sept. 23,1968 By DAVE REDDICK Assistant Executive Editor Maj. Russell Ramsey, a UF ROTC instructor, resigned last week as chairman of the UF Action Conference following an Army investigation caled for by a U.S. Congressman. The investigation was requested by Rep. Bob Sikes (D-Fla.) after he reported receiving "less than 20 letters" calling the conference "un-American" and "hippy-oriented." UF President Stephen C. O'Connell, who set up the conference in May has repudiated the charges and contends the conference has acted in the "best American Tradition." Members of the conference expressed "surprise" and "disdain" at the charges. In Washington D.C. Friday, Sikes said he had received "less than 20 letters," some from UF students, questioning Ramsey's chairmanship in an organization which they felt had "leftist leanings." In an Aug. 27 letter to O'Connell, Ramsey said he was resigning because of "a certain amount of controversial publicity (which) has been associated with the conference." Cramer Bill T( Disrupfions 0 June 3, 1969 By GINGER ANDREWS Alligator Staff Writer Florida Rep. William C. Cramer wants to give students opposing campus disruptions the power to combat campus militants. Cramer has drafted a bill which would permit nondemonstrating students to bring those causing a disruption in campus activities into federal court where they could be jailed and fined. This hardening view toward student violence will probably be reinforced by hearings, Ramsey said the time necessary to initiate the changeover to voluntary ROTC would restrict his effectiveness as chairman. This also led to the decision to quit, he said. "I made no recommendations, I made no charges and I have brought no pressure to bear on Major Ransey," Sikes said. "I have always been a strong supporter of the UF .I know nothing about this organization (the Action Conference), I have no interest in the organization. I have said nothing about it in so far as what it stands for. I simply tumed the letters over to the Army," he added. Sikes is a Major General in the Army Reserve. The conference is made up of 75 people, with equal numbers of faculty, administration and students. During the summer, the conference made many recommendations, including voluntary class attendance, an end to Negro discrimination on campus, and freedom of expression under the law. "Rather than be investigated by anyone," O'Connell said in a letter to Sikes, "I take the initiative and extend to you, and any other person interested, an invitation to attend any of the conference meetings." : Combat n Campus starting today before the House Committee on Internal Security, formerly the House Un-American Activities Committee. These hearings will be studying the leading militant student organization, Students for *Democratic Society. Chairman Richard H. Ichord, D-Mo., has had committee investigators studying SDS and its activities for several months. Cramer says he has received "hundreds and hundreds" of letters from voters concerning campus disorders. He said that next to Vietnam this issue is receiving the greatest part of the voters' concern. Cramer said his bill is designed to deal with "campus revolutionaries." It would give non-demonstrating_ students the right to file a complaint with the Justice Department that they are being denied free access to their school. In testimony before another committe Atty. Gen. John H. Mitchell said the FBI has obtained evidence showing that SDS is receiving financial help from foreign sources in a nationally concerted effort to destroy U.S. universities. The bill would also allow the attorney general to bring action without waiting for a complaint. a little philosophy with every label There's a well-known beer company that invites you to read its philosophy printed on the back of every can. Unlike the beer company, we at the University Shops can't print our philosophy on the merchandise we sell, mainly because you'd look kind of ridiculous walking around with our philosophy printed on the back of your can. But we would like to have you think about something every time you see the University Shop label with those wild little lions and that impressive-looking crest. It all started with the idea of providing you with quality merchandise at reasonable prices all year long. So we decided to cater exclusively to college students. Then we started opening up our market. We extended our charge account service so you could use it even after leaving the security of the ivy-covered institution. And we started advertising in national magazines. The idea was catching on. We tried it out at a few more schools. No matter where we went, students liked the idea of shopping at a store where they could find their kind of clothes. So we've opened more stores to give more students the chance to take advantage of this little philosophy of ours. No, we don't have a University Shop at every campus, but -like the beer company-we're working on it. We're The Nation's Largest Group Exclusively To College Students. University of Florida -West Virginia University Eastern Kentucky University University of Cincinnatti University of Kentucky Of Apparel Shops Catering University of Georgia Ohio University e Miami University Ohio State University Purdue University Bowling Green State University University of Alabama FOR MENAND WOMEN Z1 UNibVE it Y PLjop 1620 W. UNIV. AVE. UNIVERSITY -PLAZA OPEN 9-5:30 PLENTY OF FREE PARKING ACROSS FROM CAMPUS fr4'~~ >a the sisters of DELTA PHI EPSILON extend a warm welcome to all new incoming students. We hope that your college years will be memorable for you. Love, The Deephers

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Pegs 6-A, The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 22, 1969 Martyr Lavon Gentr. Jan. 15, 1969 By JANIE GOULD Alligator Staff Writer Lavon Gentry, accused of "willfully and maliciously injuring a building," was acquitted in City Court Tuesday on a technicality. The technicality stemmed from the wording of the charge filed against him; it stated he "injured" the building. "There is no evidence that he caused direct injury to the building," said City Judge Wade Hampton, in granting defense attorney Richard Wilson's motion for a directed verdict of not guilty. However, Hampton said Gentry might not have been acquitted if thecharge had been worded with a term such as "marred." The verdict came as a surprise to Gentry, who said he knew nothing about the technicality. While relieved at the verdict, Gentry said the issue has not been solved. "I won on a technicality, but the same thing could happen again," he said. "Next time, the administration will be smarter." Gentry was arrested last the second floor of tie poice station exploded at various times in laughter and snickers as two hours of testimony dragged onl. Testifying in behalfof the prosecution were five officers of t h e Uni ve rsity Police Department, including Chief Audie Shuler. None of them could recall any other student being arrested for putting up posters on campus. Neither did they say why Gentry was taken to the police station just to be warned. A squabble between Wilson and city prosecutor Allison Folds threatened to cause the trial's postponement. Whether the UF campus is "within the corporate limits" of Gainesville and whether campus buildings are state property were the points in question. Hampton Marty finally ruled in the affirmative t1 both questions. Gentry, who looked at various times bored and amused, did not testify. In fact, nobody testified for the defense. After the police officers spoke, the city rested its case and Wilson asked for a directed verdict of not guilty. The trial was preceded by a rally at the Plaza of the Americas, with Student Body Vice-President Gary Goodrich, Alligator editor Harold Aldrich, and activist Ed Freeman speaking. "I've papered this plaza and many of the buildings on this campus during campaigns, and have never been arrested," Goodrich said. Aldrich read portions of an editorial supporting Gentry. LSVUN lGENTR Y .No Martyr Pass-Fail Idea Reality In FallMay 23, 1969 By LORETTA TENNANT Alligator Staff Writer T e n o f U F's 1 3 undergraduate schools and colleges are definitely offering the pass-fail, or "satisfactoryunsatisfactory grade option" as it is officially called, beginning in the fall quarter. Students in participating colleges may register for one elective course each quarter p r o v i d e d t h e y a r e undergraduates in good standing, are not on any type of probation and have the approval of proper university officials, usually the dean of their own college and the college in which the course is being offered. Participation in the program has varied widely, according to spokesmen in the various colleges. Although the University Senate passed the regulation earlier this year, and the regulation is printed in the new 1969-70 University Record LIndergraduate Catalog, evidently many students and advisers are unaware of its existence or are confused about its provisions. I WHEN YOU BUY YOUR DATSUN IN GAINESVILI ($1896*) DATSUN/2 Datsun/2 $11896* Station Wagon $2,226 1600 Sports C 2000 Sports Car $3,096 4-Door Sedan $1 996* ;ar $21766* LE YOU GET STU-DENT-A-CARE A LOWER SERVICE RATE SPECIAL TREATMENT ABOVE AND BEYOND THE WARRANTY FOR OUR CUSTOMERS ONLY. P.O.E. plus tax, license, local freight, D & H. GODDING & CLARK "Home of the New Leader-DATSU 2nd Ave. & 2nd St. S.E. _mtz-rz\l-, I August for placing "Bust the Draft'' signs on campus buildings, after being told to put 'nem on bulletin boards only. 'he "Gentry issue" dragged o through the fall when he requested and was subsequently denied a jury trial. His case rapidly became a rallying-point for such campus factions as the Southern Students Organizing Committee (SSOC), American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU), Student Government, the Alligator, the College of Arts and Sciences, and Tuesday, 19 members of the faculty of the C o lle ge o f B us i n e ss Administration. Gentry was greeted in court Tuesday by applause from 100 spectators who packed the courtroom for his trial. The usually quiet traffic court, on New -1 I

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Friday, Aupast 22,1969, The Florid. Aigpator, Page 7-A FLORIDA ALPHA CHAPTER of SIGMA PHI EPSILON WELCOMES THE CLASS OF 1973 TO MAKE COLLEGE A LITTLE MORE THAN JUST STUDYING! SEE US THIS SEPTEMBER AT E 9 5 FRAT ROW II E

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the radical Students for a Democratic Society the privilege of being recognized as following pages contain some of the stories published during days subsequent to O'Connell's decision. L/P 'rewena repriean. .Li. (u 5 c ruanza jc i (Jj5L u aentU( organ i5ULhU"n. America's AllgaorNumber 1 PacemakerF (r1da AllgC All-American Vol. 61. No. 97 University of Florida, Gainesville Thursday, March 6. 1969 SSOC Charter Nixed By CAROL SANGER AlligntorAaignmwnts Editor UF President Stephen C. O'Connell Wednesday nixed the SSOC bid for recognition on the UF campus. O'Connell's action came over the protests of about 15 student leaders called to meet with the president in his office Wednesday afternoon. The students met after their session with O'Connell to decide possible courses of united action against what they termed O'Connell's "arbitrary% and irresponsible decision." These student groups have called for emergency meetings of their organizations at 7 p.m. tonight. In denying the request, O'Connell backed up a recommendation made last week by Lester Hale, vice president for student affairs. Hale's recommendation had opposed the majority opinion of the student-faculty Committee of Student Organizations, which voted 5-4 to allow SSOC on campus. O'Connell said that if the group used this decision as an excuse to demonstrate they would only be proving the wiseness of the denial. This decision denies SSOC the privilege of: "using University facilities available; inviting speakers to campus; seeking and receiving an award of. that part of registration fees entrusted to Student Government for student activities, and; representing to the students on this campus and to the public generally that it and its purposes and objectives are properly related to and enjoy the approval of this institution." The decision does not deny an The reign of reason is dead. One and a half years ago, Stephen O'Connell shed his supreme court robes and joined the ranks of the scholars. They called him leader. And for good cause. He brought calm and relative quiet to a troubled campus. The academy had been rocked by Cason, Brewer, Dow, the names of strife and discontent. But Hi-I'm-Steve-O'Connell brought the peace of reason, the solemnity of objectivity. He cooled inflamed passions. And they called him leader. He went to work insuring judicial fairness. He promised due process. He opened the channels of communication, power and decision-making. He created the Action Conference. He made progress. And they called him leader. But the veneer has cracked, the facade has crumbled. This man is only part leader. For when his followers asked the most of him, when they requested he drag the university, kicking and screaming if necessary, into the Twentieth C by granting campus freedom to SSOC, he1 out, ungraciously and foolishly. For 17 months, while ferment brewed on Anerica's campuses, the University of Florida held its breath and prayed. Slowly, painfully, hesitantly it began again to find faith. Only to have its newly-found hope cruelly, thoughtlessly shattered on the rocks of blind prejudice and sightless stupidity. The University of Florida is likely now to witness the concepts of judicial decency and meaningful education devastated by one man's irresponsible decision, his wrong choice. The university community will know that Mark Anthony spoke the truth: "Ihe evil that men do lives after them, the good is oft interred with their bones." And the university certainly cannot be comforted by the knowledge that John Champion and Stanley Marshall are alive and well in Tigert Hall. ,Backing Grows organization existence, prevent students from joining it, nor prevent its members from exercising any rights of expression or assembly protected by Constitution or law, O'Connell said. O'Connell said his decision was based on the fact that "SSOC is not a student organization." However, SSOC said Monday their list of membership submitted along with the bid for charter last fall consisted only of students. But the president held that since meetings of the organization were open to non-students and the name of SDS was on the original application, and the SSOC group shared some of the basic agreements of the radical JOMO and SDS groups, they should not be recognized. "Neither of these groups would, STEPHEN C. O'CONNELL (SEE 'CHARTER', PAGE 2) .now must face the flak SSOC Holds Plaza Rally SSOC will hold a rally in the Plaza of the Americas at 2p.m. today to protest the denial of charter by UF President Stephen C. O'Connell. Florida State University leaders of SDS and Dr. Kenneth Megill will speak. Student Groups To Meet The following groups will meet in special session tonight at the places listed to discuss UF President Stephen C. O'Coael's decision to deny official recognition and student group privileges to the Gainesville chapter of Southern Student Organizing Committee. All meetings are scheduled for 7 p.m. Student Government SG Cabinet office Student SenateStdnAcitesCtr Florida Blue Key Pi Kappa Phi house Omicron Delta Kappa ODK office Inter-fraternity Council (and Presidents) Alpha Epsilon Pi house Interhall Council Interhali office ACLU (campus and city) Friends Meeting House Law Students Civil Rights Research Council Friends Meeting House Association of Women Students AWS office John Marshall Bar Association JMBA Office Alligator (saff and editors) Alligator office The presidents, or their representatives, of all Interested century organizations will meet in the Student Activities Center, third floor of bowed Reitz Union, at 9 p.m. to plan and organize a definite course of bowed n ifla ad adeinte o -EDITORIAL Pap 8-A, The Florida AiNgtor, Friday, August 22,1969 EDITOR'S NOTE: The page reproduced below was the Alligator's front page when i Aoddlik

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Friday, Aupua 22, IMI. The Floria Aflitor, Fags 9-A Our former Wolfie's Restaurant will be renamed THE FLAG RESTAU RANT featuring finer food, better service at popular prices. Our former Velvet Lounge will be THE FLAG LOUNGE featuring King Size Cocktails. Hot roast beef sandwiches from 11:30 a. m. until 2:30 p. m. Cocktail Party 5 to 7 p. m. with healthy discount on all drinks and free hot and cold hors d'oeuvres. Nightly entertainment. Dancing nook. West University at Main Entrance to University Campus .Free parking for 250 cars I

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Pr 10-A, The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 22, 1969 VOWS TO UPHQLD SSOC DECISION O'Connell Urges Non-Violence March 7, 1969 my bAVE REDDICK Alligator Associate Editor UF President Stephen C. O'Connell in a face-to-face meeting with more than 150 SSOC members and sympathizers Thursday said he would uphold his decision to deny the group a charter, and pleaded with the group to take no violent action. "It's (violent action) not going to help you," he said. "It's not going to help the institution." The confrontation came outside O'Connell's office on tbe second floor of Tigert Hall, after the group held a rally on the Plaza of the Americas. O'Connell was grilled by many of the students, who questioned his denial of recommendation by the student-faculty Student Organizations Committee which said the group should be granted a charter and recognized by the university. The president's answer was simple. "I disagreed with it," he said. Another student asked why, after going through all the technical channels of requesting a charter, SSOC was not granted one. "The mere going through channels doesn't always mean that you'll get what you want," he said. * O'CONI THE MERE GOING THROUGH CHANNELS DOESN'T ALWAYS MEAN THAT YOU'LL GET ..disagrees with recommendation by the Student Organizations Committee to recognize SSOC One of the president's reasons for not recognizing the group was that outside people may take part i n the group's meetings. Steve McGuire, a member of the Young Democrats, said his g r o u p o f t e n included non-students, as did many other campus groups. O'Connell then said there "may be a need to look into other group's charters if it is shown there are non-students participating." O'Connell refused to argue the merits of his decision, but said there is probably a need for "some guidelines as deciding which groups will use the facilities of the union." One SSOC member, Ray Olesky, summed up the general feeling of the gathering with a final statement. "You are one who has over-ruled the wishes of a majority; that is not a democracy," he said. The rally, prior to the Tigert sit-in, had been interrupted by rain, and tht group of more than 400 had moved under the colonade in front of the graduate library. Dr. Robert R. Renner, member of the American Federation of Teachers (AFT), said there was no reason for O'Connell's decision, and said the AFT felt SSOC should have been granted a charter. "President O'Connell's decision was unfortunate," he said. Rennek said SSOC should have been given a chance to prove they would operate within the law. "Let them be unlawful," he said, "and then deny their charter." Ed Freeman, SSOC member, and past spokesman, told a story of a young boy who after trying for days to catch a squirrel finally captured one and said he was greatly aided "by having a dumb squirrel." "And that's what the WANT' administration is," Freemai, said, "a bunch of dumb squirrels." "And the dumbest squirrel is the Vice President of Student Affairs, our own Lester Hale," he said. Dr. David Kurtzman told the group that a "man keeps a position of authority only as long as he responsibly exercises it." He said O'Connell had not responsibly exercised his authority. Dr. Kenneth Megill, himself the center of the recent Slade letter controversy, said he expected "some good" to come from the student reaction. STUDENTS SAVE YOUR RENT MONEY!! Luxury Living for Less than a Dollar a Day!!!! IMAGINE yourself living in a brand new home with all brand new appliances and furniture for less-much less-than a dollar a day. IMAGINE being able to choose the size and design of this beautiful home to suit your needs and personality. IMAGINE being able to place this home on inexpensive leased property-where you want it! ALL THIS for less than a dollar a day! IF.you're tired of paying $150 or more rent a month IF.you've despaired of ever being able to afford leaving campus IF.you're tired of existing in makeshift quarters at high rents IF.you don't believe us WE ARE A DIRECT FACTORY OUTLET -ONLY 15 MILES AWAY FOR REAL QUICK PERSONAL FACTORY SERVICE -NO MIDDLEMAN TO BOOST COSTS -24 HOUR DELIVERY AND SET UP FREE -FULL ONE YEAR GUARANTEE. SEE MR. ANTONY, SALES MANAGER AT: TARGET MOBILE HOMES OPEN DAILY 1-8-SUNDAY 1-6 1948 N. MAIN ST. GAINESVILLE, FLA. CY372-3913OR .U.NA COMESEE S BFOREYOUSIGNYOU~jjML&QjRA~S." m

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150 STUDENTS DWIND Tigert Sit-In Lasts Mar. 10, 1969 By DAVE REDDICK Alligator Asociate Editor A planned sit-in in the hall in front of UF President Stephen C. O'Connell's office in Tigert Hall was called off less than three hours after it began late Friday afternoon. Steve Fahrer, chairman of the Southern Students Organizing Committee, and Dr. Kenneth Megill urged the 50-75 students to leave the building before the 7 p.m. closing time. They said they expected police to arrest everyone there without warning. "We don't feel this is worth getting arrested over," Fahrer said. The group filed out and gathered on the front steps. The abortive sit-in began after a rally on the Plaza of the Americas. The rally which began about 3 p.m. was less than an hour old when Margaret Hortenstine stepped to the mike and urged the 300 students present to follow her to the administration building. "I'm tired of speeches," she said. "If we make any more I STEVE FAHRER .SSOC chairman think O'Connell should hear them. Let's go to Tigert." Once inside they found O'Connell's administrative assistant, Mel Sharpe, standing at the door to the president's office. O'Connell was in Tampa at a meeting of the Board of Regents, but his office was still open. About 150 students went into the hall, but the group dwindled to less than 100 soon. When asked admittance into the Unfinished Work Frklay, August 22,196, The Florida Alligator. Page 11 UE 3 Hours O'Connell Denial office, the students were told by 'S pM s k accommodated. Sharpe closed the office at Mar. 6,1969 about 4:10, 50 minutes before By RICHARD GLENN the regular closing time saying Alligto Staff Wrt like ts "is et any work one UF President Stephen C. O'Connell was accused of making a Fahrer then announced the stupid mistake Wednesday by SSOC spokesman Steve Fahrer. group's intention to remain in Fahrer, chairman of the steering committee of Southern the building until Thursday Students Organizing Committee, said O'Connell erred "in calling when D. Burke Kibler, Regents attention to the university's obvious, blatant, oppressive acts." chairman, plans to speak on Fahrer was referring to O'Connell's denial of a charter for campus.SSOC. Earlier at the rally Charles Fahrer's remarks were made during an interview Wednesday Fulmwood, minister of night at which he announced SSOC's plans for a rallyto be held information for the Junta of today at 2:30 in the Plaza of the Americas. Military Organizations told of Fahrer said the rally was "in support of 1) the 56 Florida far reaching plans to organize a State University students arrested at bayonet point Tuesday strike of university employes, night, 2) Dr. Kenneth Megill's struggle for acadmeic freedom and told the basic goals of against bureaucratic harrassment." JOMO, a black radical group Fahrer said the rally was also to protest "President which attempts to educate O'Connell's futile attempts to suppress dissenting elements of young blacks in their history. the academic community." Also speaking at the rally was Fred Gordon, national secretary of the Students for a Student Body President Clyde Democratic Society from Chicago, had been invited to speak at Taylor, who told them he and the rally in behalf of the FSU students but was unable to come, Manny James, Blue Key Fahrer said. president, had met with Kibler Gordon was arrested Tuesday night along with 50 or more and Robert Mautz, chancellor of FSU students. the state university system. Four leaders of SDS from FSU will be coming to Gainesville Taylor said he had to speak at the rally, Fahrer said. He did not know the names of recommended a new system of the SDS leaders who were planning to speak. recognizing student groups. Fahrer said philosophy professor Kenneth Megill had also Taylor said the main problem been invited to speak. with the university system was Megill said Wednesday night he would speak at the rally on with the Regents, and not on the "the current situation here and at FSU." individual campuses. QVAN'S SIL VERMAN'S SIL VERMAN'S SIL VERMAN'S SIL VERMAN'S SIL VERMAN'S WELCOME! r cc -.1 Traditional apparel for the College Man and Woman has been part of the Silverman scene for many years. You'll find nationally known brands of quality wearing apparel. Come in .explore our extensive collection of new styles. cc 4j Ask about our Student Charge Plan C,, 225 W. UNIVERSITY AVE. SERVING SONS AND DAUGHTERS OF FLORIDA FOR 35 YEARS Free parking on the huge lot at rear of store 0lL VERMAN'S SIL VERMAN'S SILVERMAN'S SIL VERMAN'S SIL VERMAN'S SIL VERk A WARM WELCOME First National extends a sincere greeting to its many friends returning to the faculty and student body at the University of Florida as well as those who will be arriving for the first time. We have had the privilege of serving the University since it first opened its doors tn 1905. At First National you'll find every banking facility along with maximum convenience, friendliness and a genuine desire to serve. Let us help you. 4 DRIVE IN WINDOWS WALK-UP WINDOW AMPLE FREE PARKING LATE HOURS Lu OF GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA ON FRIDAY 104 N. MAIN STREET ST. ESTABLISHED 1888 378-5341 MEMBER OF THE FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION-MEMBER OF FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM "COME IN AND SEE HOW PLEASANT AND FRIENDLY A BANK CAN BE!" master charge "HE N"IBO""KC"R

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Pas 12-A, The FlorIda ANigator, FrIday, August 22, 1969 rnm.jEL Here's proof you can't do better than I M Fields for all your BackOpen Mon Thru Sat 9-9 Sunday 12 Til 7 505 Sheets Filler Paper 770~ Comparable value 971 10%" X 8" Size Multi-Color Pole Lamp 6397 a 3-Shade lamp a Brown pole Orange, Turquoise -. r Pack Twin Legal 3 For Filled 3-Ring Binder 197 Comparable value $2.90 a All in one special & ______________________________ Pads $1 Comparable value $1.74 Easy on the-eye yellow paper I Solid Color Blanket with 3" Nylon Binding 297 72" X 90" size o Rayon-nylon o Machine washable Solid Color Shower Curtain 970 6' x 6' size Maize, pink, blue, white, clear Vinyl plastic Composition Theme Books 3 For$1 Comparable value $1.62 10" X 8" size Washable Fiberglass Drapes 397 48" X 63" 48" X 84" size 4.97 Wash, drip dry, no iron SFade resistant Round Embossed Waste Basket Special Purchase! "Conefoam" Bed Pillow -Plushi Pile 3 pc. Cotton s Bathmat Set Plastic Tray & Dish Drainer 490 Brass or black tones Old Inn and ship patterns Embossed metal "Cone Foam" shredded polyurethane Resilient, extra plump, washable Non-allergenic 18" X 30" Bathmat, Lid cover, and counter Color fast otton Pastel colors 0 3 Pc kitchen sink set o Dish drainer, tray and cup o Gold, green, blue 1 .. ... ..... .. .. ... .. ...... ..... ..... ..

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Page 14-A, The Florida Alligator, Friday, Auguat 22,19B69 SSOC Moves To Recognition Charter Hearing Set Board OK's Bid Jan. 22, 1969 By DAVE OSIER Alligator Stff Writer For the first time in recent history the Committee on Student Organizations will hold an open charter hearing tonight for two student groups seeking recognition. Both the Southern Students Organizing Committee and New Party requested the hearing. Both groups are scheduled to attend. However, only three representatives from each group will be allowed to address the committee. The presidentially appointed committee of five faculty members and four students makes recommendations to UF President Stephen C. O'Connell. He has the final say on a group-s charter. "Something that must be clear," said Agricultural Engineering Prof. Rush Choate, committee chairman, "is that no decision will be reached tonight." "The meeting will adjourn when the questioning is over," he added. "A decision will be made in the next few days." SSOC's charter has been discussed on campus for some time. The 72-member group originally requested official recognition last quarter when it was still affiliated with Students for a Democratic Society. SSOC later dropped the SDS title. Feb. 7, 1969 By KATHY MORSE Alligator Staff Writer The bid by the Southern Students Organizing Committee for recognition as a campus organization is nearly a reality, Rush E. Choate said Thursday. The approval of UF President Stephen C. O'Connell is needed In a report sent to O'Connell Tuesday, Choate, chairman of the Student Organizations and Social Affairs Committee, reported that the application by SSOC had been approved by a 5-4 majority decision. Choate said recognition was based on assurance by SSOC that it would "function within the rules and regulations of the University of Florida and refrain from violence." Choate said the organization must function within the established channels of procedure at the university and "refrain from any disruption of any university operation." It must conduct its activities "free of violence and in a lawful and peaceful manner," the report said. R recognition of an organization can be withdrawn if i t does not follow these guidelines in the future. By gaining recognition, SSOC is entitled to use university facilities. This was the main reason for seeking a charter, Chairman Ed Freeman said in October when application was made. A chartered organization would be able to apply to Student Government for money, Freeman said. He also thought more potential members would be attracted to the group if it were chartered. SSOC had been affiliated with Students for a Democratic Society until last November when SDS was dropped from the name. RUSH CHOATE SSOC would conform" Freeman said at the time that the SDS label had been used "for publicity." Freeman has said SSOC "proudly accepts" its label as a radical group and names two of its goals as ending racism and attempting to "completely restructure" the university. The organization has offered university students education seminars of draft evasion and supported California grape pickers on strike. D. BURKE KIBLER .opposed to SSOC Kibler Not In Favor Of SSOC Jan. 20, 1969 By RAUL RAMIREZ Alligator Executive Editor Board of Regents Chairman D. Burke Kibler said Saturday he would "personally oppose recognition of Students for a Democratic Society (SDS) or "any similar organization" at any of Florida's state universities. "It would be absolute foolishness for anyone on any campus to expect the chairman of the Board of Regents to sit idle and allow anyone to recognize SDS," Kibler told the Alligator. But the newly-appointed chairman emphasized the Regents "don't even contemplateatSthistime" interfering with SDS's struggle for recognition at Florida State University. "I think the matter is being handled properly on all campuses at this point," he said. A wave of controversy was aroused at FSU last week when the school's vice president for student affairs turned down a Faculty Senate recommendation that SDS be chartered as a student organization. Kibler's statement apparently will not affect the plans of the UF Committee on Student Organizations to consider recognizing the Southern Students Organizing Committee (SSOC),.the South's counterpart to SDS. SSOC leaders will present their request to the committee Wednesday at an open meeting and a decision "will be made in a day or so," said committee member William Cross. TELEPHONE 372-9405 luilaersitg of nlariba NO. 1 FRATERNITY ROW GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA August 22, 1969 The -Brothers of CHI PHI welcome all new students to the University of. Florida PastNation's Oldest Social Fraternity Present#1 in Blue League Athletics #1 in Overall Scholarship #1 in Brotherhood FutureToday's Chi Phi Is Tomorrow's Leader Rich Supinski President m 11-1--MMMMMOMME gi pi-vat

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Friday, August 22, 1969, The Florida Alligator, Pag 15-A A ten-minute walk from the campus and you're in a world of your own .your own apartment at The Village Park of The French Quarter .Gainesville's finest apartment complex. The apartment designed with the student in mind .Three swimming pools .One monitered study rooms .Recreation Building which includes Color TV .Pool Table .Large conversation area with large modern fireplace. All apartments include drapes and wall-to-wall carpeting .all have central air conditioning and heating. The Village Park is also "Sound Conditioned" .constructed for -quiet and privacy. The French Quarter is town house "apartments .no complaints from your neighbors when they're studying and you're not .especially when you study in either of the two study rooms. Parking is free, and so is use of any one of the three beautiful swimming pool areas. 0 Wall-to-Wal Carpeting 0 Walk-in Closets Central Heat and Air Conditioning Free Parking Adjacent to Garbage Disposals 0 Sound Conditioning to insure Privacy and Quiet 0 1 & 2 Bedrooms 0 Full time resident Manager 0 Two assistant managers 3 Swimming Pools 2 Story Recreation Building Color TV Pool Table Fireplace Two story monitored Study Room equipped with Desks and couches 3 Laundry Facility Areas 2 Fulltime Maids Available Free Central TV Antenna & Cable TV avaiable For information contact Resident Manager Phone 378-3771 e

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Pas 16-A, The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 22, 1969 EDITOR'S NOTE: Reproduced below is a portion of the front page of the Alligator when State Sen. Tom Slade demanded the removal of UF Professor Kenneth Megill. On the following pages are some other stories concerning the controversy. FIRE MEGILL, SEN. SLADE DEMANDS I THE SENATOR. if in fact Dr. Megill did make these statements and that if this university would in fact like to operate in the absence of legislative interference that a good first beginning would be the immediate dismissal of Dr. Megill.it is not my desire to tell you how to run this university." Sen. Tom Slade, Feb. 10, 1969 THE REGEI\ "As long asI am ch am going to stand up community as I unde allow anyone to intei any university." airman of the Board of Regents I for the rights of the academic rstand them. That entails not to rfere with the internal affairs of Dr. Burke Kibler, Feb. 12, 1969 U. Jan 13, 1969 By DAVE OSIER Alligator Staff Writer In a surge of reaction to campus dissenters Sen. Tom Slade, R-Jacksonville, Wednesday released to the press an ultimatum to UF President Stephen C. O'Connell calling for the immediate dismissal of philosophy Prof. Kenneth Megill. As of Wednesday evening O'Connell had not received the ultimatum included in a letter from Slade dated Feb. 10. Slade cited Megill's recent statements at an Accent '69 dialogue as reasons for seeking his release. At the dialogue Megill said, "I feel the only people who are talking in a relevant way are the radicals." Hfe called black power the most significant political development of the 20th century. "Today, people see unjustness and they are not afraid to use radical means to aid in change." he said. Slade told -O'Connell that if Megill did make these statements and "that if UF would in fact like to operate" without legislative interference "a good first beginning would be the immediate dismissal of Megill." "If Megill is still a state employe when the legislative session convenes Monday that is going to be, in my considered and concerned opinion, the last straw," he said in the letter. Slade told the Alligator Wednesday if Megill is not gone by Monday, he will bring the matter before the senate during the speical session on suspensions. "If Megill is not happy at UF then he can leave," he said. "Maybe he can get peace of mind somewhere else." Referring to Wednesday night's demonstration Slade said if "there has to be a confrontation then we might as well go ahead." He said once the matter is on the senate floor it will be sent to committee -probably the committee on higher education. Upon hearing of Slade's demands the Action Conference Wednesday afternoon unanimously passed a resolution telling Slade in effect to "keep his hands out of UF business." a -0 B I C Y C L E S Take a look at Gainesville's largest selection of bicycles for the college man and woman. -ENS COLLEGIATE LEFT: DELUX COLLEGIATE Fully equipped 5-speed tourist model with generator operated headlight and taillight. RIGHT: COLLEGIATE TOURIST Riding pleasure in a lightweight 5-speed tourist bike. The quick way to get around campus, and the economical means to get around town! LEFT: DELUX COLLEGIATE Easy handling, smooth riding lightweight tourist model. Just the thing for getting around campus. RIGHT: COLLEGIATE Trim, sleek and smooth riding for real get up and go. The "in" way to get outdoor exercise, and get to classes on time, also! The Finest in Professional Bicycles 818 West University Avenue 376-2638 Convenient to Campus III in

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COMPLAINT RULED 'INVALID' O'Connell Denies Slade Demand Mar. 11, 1969 By JANIE GOULD Alligator Staff Writer Philosophy Professor Kenneth Megill is home free -the complaint issued against him by State Sen. Tom Slade was ruled invalid by UF President Stephen C. O'Connell in a statement released to the press Monday. Megill was the target in February of an attack by Slade, who demanded his dismissal because of statements Megill made in an Accent '69 speech. Megill called black power "the only new idea in this century;" he said only radicals talk in a relevant way; students must realize they are an oppressed class in an oppressed country; and he called for a radical student movement and strong teachers union to take over the UF. Slade urged O'Connell to dismiss Megill "immediately" and said statements like the above "have got to make the blood of every taxpayer in the state boil." O'Connell based his decision not to bring charges against Megill on an inquiry conducted within Megill's college (Arts and Sciences) and department (philosophy). Dr. Harry Sisler, dean of the college, and Dr. Thomas Hanna, chairman of the department, agreed the complaint lacked substance. KEN MEGILL TOM SLADE Megill's statement regarding a student takeover apparently is what struck Slade's nerves. According to O'Connell, Megill has since made it clear "that he does not advocate such a takeover by force and violence." As part of the inquiry, Megill interpreted what he meant by a takeover. According to O'Connell, Megill used the term to mean "all students, faculty and local administration uniting to work for a more efficient and practical use of state education appropriations for the University." "If this is what he meant and means by takeover and if he proposes to do it by legitimate means," O'Connell said, "He had a perfect right to urge such action and to set it as a goal to be sought." However, O'Connell felt the use of the word "takeover" was unwise, because of instances of actual physical takeovers of buildings by students on other campuses. "But an unwise statement in an isolated instance is not case for administrative action," O'Connell said. The inquiry showed Megill to be objective in his classroom teaching. "In fact, one of the criticisims of him by his students is that he is overly objective," O'Connell said. Another administrator, Henry A. Fenn, dean emeritus of the law school, said any disciplinary action conducted against Megill probably would be interpreted by the American Association of University Professors (AAUP) as a violation of his academic freedom; and the courts most likely would not sustain any such action. O'Connell presented the conclusions of the inquiry to Slade Monday morning in Jacksonville. Present at the conference were Florida State President John E. Mathews, Speaker of the House Fred Schultz, and other legislators, as well as Slade, Hanna and Sisler. O'Connell, noting Board of Regents policy which calls for an "atmosphere of freedom and confidence" on campus, said, "This atmosphere cannot exist if on each occassion a student or professor announces an unpopular thought there is a demand that he be dismissed or an investigation is merited." Accent Speech Prompts Megill Removal Demand Feb. 4, 1969 By NEAL SANDERS Alligator Staff Writer Accent '69 began Monday afternoon with representatives of thewfar l e f t f a r right and middle-of-the-road speaking on the role of youth in politics. An audience varying between 200 and 250 listened and reacted to statements by such diverse individuals as Jimmey Bailey, leader of the Students for Wallace movement on campus, Dr. Manning J. Dauer, Chairman of the Department of Political Science, and Dr. Kenneth Megill, assistant professor of philosophy and an advocator of student power. The third speaker was Megill, who refuted that the opening meeting of Accent was even a panel discussion. "Today, we are at a teach-in, and I will treat my discussion as such," Megill said. "I feel that the only people in this country who are talking in a relevant way are the radicals." "The radicals know where it's at, and I'm not neccessarily talking about the campus radicals. Look at the strides in politics. They haven't come from the universities, they have come from the radical left in politics." Megill went on to call "Black Power" the most significant political development of the 20th century. "The Civil Rights movement is dead, thank God," Megill said. "Today, people see unjustness and they are not afraid to use radical means to aid in change." "Of course, we cannot create a utopian system overnight, but at the same time, that doesn't mean we must live within the system which cages us," Megill said. Gator PAWN SHOP *MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS 0 DIAMONDS o*GUNS BUY .SELL .TRADE "We specialize in Gator -Aid" 1334 E. UNIVERSITY 378-5575 COUCH'S RECORDING TAPE DEPT. One of Florida's Largest Selections of Recording TAPE Scotch MAGNETIC TAPJE IF IT'S TAPE Scoi couc' WE HAVE IT 150ft -3600ft from 60t -$11.95 th bst t e tch moneytcan buy 8 R A N D 'S 608 N. MAUN 376-7171 Keeping pace with the U of F since 1933 Pog. 18-A, The Florida Alligator,JFriday, Augug22. 1969 New Students, The Pi Lams welcome you to the University of Florida and wish you the best of luck in your new endeavors. If we can be of some assistance to you at any time, feel free to call on us. Sincerely and with pride, The Men of Pi Lambda Phi m -Mmwm

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Friday Augut 2 e I at If By M RC DUNN Alligator Sports Editor A crowd gathered at Florida Gym last plght. It was o of the biggest events ever ,held at the over 7,000 students and towns peop ttended. As the u ience watch intently a short circuit eve ped in t wiring under the gym or. e wire e eated and burned thro h the ighly o bustible gym floor which burst i tofla es. he crow qui kl oved towards the ma entranc t e a e the enveloping fla es. Someb d ac ed a phone and tel phoned the c p ice. 11 units of the niversity Police De rtment vgere di tc ed to the gym and the Gainest~lle Fi / Department was noti \The lice uits arriv. on the scene first The Gym E and moved swiftly to get the crowd away from the building and keep the people moving out the exits. Inside the gym a panic situation had developed. The inadequacy of the exits in handling large numbers of people attempting to leave suddenly had caused the panic. The steep vomitory stairways, which could handle only 90 people at a time, was the scene of pushing, shoving and falling as several people were trampled in the rush. Hundreds of people in the crowd feeling that they were trapped tried to get to the windows on the second floor to escape the flames. Others went to the basement to crawl out the office windows and still others tried to go through the locker room to the exit to the pool. Meanwhile the fire department had sounded a general alarm and was on the scene with all their engine companies, ladder companies emergency rescue squads. Firemen entered the building to rescue stranded victims. All available ambulances in the area had been summoned and the Alachua General and Med Center emergency rooms were packed with burned and heat exposure victims of the tragedy. The roof and sides of the Florida Gym had started caving in trapping some people in the debris. Hundreds of screaming students, faculty, children and towns people were rescued from the buring structure but many more: weren't. This tragedy hasn't taken place yet. A report prepared by George Ryad Fisher, an architect, states: Iurned?y\ \1~ ~1 / / A RANC "When d as a cckof mbly under t' conditions orida Gbii would pos a t to the liv o *ts occupants a fre o toth emercency mpt exit.' According to the r rt in an a itorium and arena seating event the e ts could dle 1,748 people in case f an emergency Frequen crowds of close to 7, have b npac dinto th UF Presiden tephen .O'C nell has r tested an appropriatio from e st e legisla re to renovate the gym. Tomorrow may b oo late \Ph tos By / ed TOMORROW TOO LATE ----------

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Page 20-A, The Florid! Alligutor, Friday, August 22, 1966 Megill: Free Feb. 14, 1969 By RAUL RAMIREZ Alligator Executive Editor "I came here because I was promised freedom and because I could participate in building a department," said the slim, brisk philosophy professor. He smiled. Dr. Kenneth Megill, the outspoken instructor whose ouster has been demanded by State Sen. Tom Slade, leaned back in his chair and glanced around his rectangular office. "I have found that freedom does not exist in this university," he said. "Students in particular are conditioned from the very beginning not to make demands from the faculty." He paused and puffed on his pipe. Then he spoke about "freedom": "Freedom for me means the possibility to work with a group of poeple who are actively engaged as professionals and as human beings in the world around them," he said. "Freedom only exists in certain kinds of communities," Megill said. "I've found lots of friends -most of whom are radicals," he explains. Megill was interrupted by a telephone call. He listened for an instant and then asked for the identity of the caller. He slammed down the Tillman Reacts To Me gill Talk Feb. 11, 1969 By DAVE OSIER Alligator Staff Writer The symposium of dissent ushered in by Accent '69 last week was quick to produce reaction in Florida legislative halls. After hearing of UF philosophy Prof. Kenneth Megill's statements on radical, student revolution and of student upheaval at Florida State University, Rep. Jim K. Tillman, R-Sarasota, an FSU alumni, last Tuesday submitted a b ill to create a joint House-Senate committee to investigate causes of student dissent and disturbances. Tillman reportedly initiated the bill after reading a Tampa Tribune story about Megill's statements at Accent's dialogue last week on the Plaza of the Americas. "I don't know what the motivation was according to the Trib'une-story," -Megill said Monday. "The things I said on the plaza are the same things I teach in class." Megill teaches courses on Marxist and democratic political theory. Tillman's investigation has already been labeled as a new Johns committee which instigated a so-called witch hunt on state university campuses in the late 1950s and early 1960s. Johns is one-time Sen. Charley Johns from Starke, whose committee hit campuses in a hunt for sexual perverts, communists, atheists and obscene literature. But Tillman told the state press his committee won't be interested in the private lives of students or faculty. The apparent impetus for Tillman's action, Megill's statements, went like this: "I feel the only people in this country who are talking in a relevant way are the radicals." Megiil called Black Power the most significant polio Development of the century. "The civil rights movers dead, thank God," he "Today peoplesee unju and they are not afraid radical means to aid in cha In submitting the comr bill, Tillman said he opposition to things professors "urging the tak of schools and urging stude join radical stud movements." "This is not the purpo: which they were hired," i "They're hired to pi students to go into the and earn a living." dom Nonexistent At UF telephone. came to Florida." It was the first call in a morning when the news The 29-year-old Megill, who obtained his B.A. at of Slade's ultimatum to UF President Stephen C. the University of Kansas and both his M.A. and O'Connell glared the readers of every state Ph.D. at Yale University, came to the UF in 1966 as newspaper. an assistant professor of philosophy. He teaches "It was someone who wanted to discuss the social and political philosophy. meaning of 'treason' with me," Megill explained. A 1961 Woodrow Wilson Fellow, Megill received "But he wouldn't say his name." a National Endowment for Humanities Fellowship He glanced past the bookshelves replete with in 1968 for research in Budapest, Hungary which he philosophy and political science books and looked completed last August. at a brightly colored poster depecting Josef Lenin His Ph.D. dissertation at Yale was on "The amid waving red banners. Community as a Democratic Principle in Marx's "The saddest thing which has happened to me is Philosophy," and he is the author of numerous to see so many of my good friends leave," he finally treatises on Marxist philosophy. said. "As long as people whom I enjoy being around "Marshall Jones, David Noble and others have are still here," he said, "I'm not going to leave." left because of the lack of freedom," he added. "It is fun to be at Florida," he smiled. "There are Jones is the psychology professor who left the real issues to be brought forth and a certain kind of UF last June after his appeal for tenure developed community presence." into a full-scale controversy. "What I said on the Plaza of the Americas last Noble headed the now-defunct Board of student Monday is not new," he said. "In class I talk about Investigation which last spring called for the the same problems and in my research I am resignation of UF Vice-President for Student Affairs currently concerned with the possibility for Lester Hale. He has since transferred to a northern developing a democratic society where men can school. control the institutions where they live and work." "They were people who have taught me a lot -"I am saddened, but not surprised by the and now they have left," he said, "all of them continued political meddling in university affairs," subject to pressures from both inside and outside he declared. the university." "And until everyone can participate," Megill "I knew of academic suppression before I arrived said, "we will have neither a free university nor a here," Megill said, "but I was promised freedom if I great university." Z47AN'S SIL VERMAN'S SIL VERMAN'S SIL VERMAN'S SIL VERMAN'S SIL VERMAN'S WELCOME! itical 20th LU ent is -Traditional apparel for the College Man and Woman has been said. i part of the Silverman scene for many years. stness f)I. o use Z You'll fini nationally known brands of quality wearing apparel. Come inge. Z in .explore our extensive collection of new styles. nittee cfAk or t-. took Akabout our Student Charge Plan like c3 cover (10 nts to '> C lent V 225 W. UNIVERSITY AVE. se for rce said. 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Friday. August 22, 1969, The Florida Aligato, Pag 21 -A 68-69 Academic Year Becomes History June 6, 1969 president of the university. The prescription for the pills. The through to show that no Frasca had violated a doctor's new president became the first story was to become one of the attempts had been made to trust in writing her series on the By CAROL SANGER UF grad to hold the office, most controversial in the history secure the building after the dispension of birth control pills. Alligator Executive Editor In his address, O'Connell of the paper, because of student theft. On Tuesday of the first week. pledged to make the university and administration reaction. The next day, Samuel F. Lavon Gentry was scheduled to and "first in the South and second to Nov. 5 was national election Martin resigned as provost of the go on trial for "injuring" a DAVE REDDICK none in the nation." day, and UF radicals planned an J. Hills Miller Health Center, building by taping posters on it, Alligator Associate Editor On Oct. 14, Union Board apolitical rally for election night. saying "our relations with but the case was delayed a week. President Roger Brown filed a An unidentified man burned a Tallahassee" was one of the When Gentry finally had his The year is over, and it is a civil complaint in Honor Court small American flag, and another reasons for his leaving. day in court, on Jan. 14, after time for reflection. asking the court to issue an put to flames what appeared to The major story of the first two hours of testimony, Judge The academic year started injunction staying the election be a draft card. edition of the winter Alligator Wade Hampton agreed with with a bang, when Maj. Russell for four posts. On the night of Nov. 18, two was that Lester Hale, vice Gentry's attorney that since the Ramsey resigned as chairman of The election went on though, Alligator staffers hid in the president for student affairs, had charge read "injuring" the the UF 's young Action with Bob White winning by a 2-1 library, in the same place the ordered an investigation of the building and not defacing it, the Conference. His resignation was margin. person had earlier hid before paper because of several stories charges against the sophomore sparked by an Army A week later, another stealing the stereo equipment. used in the Fall Quarter. should be dropped. investigation called for by Rep. ingredient was added to The apparent "gag" was carried Hale contended that Miss (SEE 'REFLECTIONS' PAGE 23) Bob Sikes (D-Fla.) who said he had gotten letters calling the group "un-American," and "hippy-oriented." The first week of classes also saw the announcement that tuition would be upped another $25 to make it $150 a term for undergraduates from Florida. The initial week was topped off by the joining of about half o f the members of Forward Party and all of United-First, the main political parties on campus. On Sept. 30, the UF chapter of Students for a Democratic Society (SDS) said they would request a charter from the university. The group soon added the name Southern Student Organizing Committee (SSOC) to their title, and then dropped the SDS name. On Oct. 7, Stephen C. O'Connell was officially inaugurated as the sixth Gatorade, a drink invented by Dr. Robert Cade, a UF professor. The ingredient was controversy. The federal government, through the Department of Health, Education and Welfare, said it had rights to the drink and would demand the money. Sometime during the weekend of Oct. 26, about $2,000 worth of stereo equipment was taken from the library by someone who hid in the building after closing. On Nov. 4, the Honor Court overthrew the Union Board election on the grounds that the Student Senate overstepped its bounds when it called for an election. On the next day, the Alligator carried a story about birth control pills being dispensed at the infirmary. The story, by Sydney Frasca, told how she had been able to get a -MAN'S SIL VERMAN'S SIL VERMAN'S SIL VERMAN'S SIL VERMAN'S SIL VERMAN'S ljji ne l oe.r 4 Traditional apparel for the College Man and Woman has been part of the Silverman scene for many years. C/) You'll find nationally known brands of quality wearing apparel. Come Sin ..explore our extensive collection of new styles. Z Ask about our Student Charge Plan -.C4 225W. UNIVERSITY AVE. U SERVING SONS AND DAUGHTERS OF FLORIDA FOR 35 YEARS cIL VERMAN'S SIL VERMAN'S SILVERMAN'S SILVERMAN'S SILVERMAN'SSIL VERP I 4/ the sisters of PHI MU welcome all new students to the University of Florida t~~"A ai~l~ at~.a'itA oN~.l4 s~tl A-ti? aus~ 1 .............. ..............

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.R me I wna~*e one at homecoming, then midterms come at you. Frolics next week, gotta scramble for a date. God how I hate this physical science class! Hope there's a W~ RFoollwe ekis tot e exe metadtriene.Yue orr whatyouy wilhe pis the four letter from my girl today. Saw a hunch of hippies in the plaza this afternoon. Boy did thuy get drunk Saturday nighbt. Got a good registration date this time, plenty early. Five first pciriods! Boy, is that Suzanne Rogers tough. ylearTe iesit of Fxporidansc liin Y univoeriyn w at iyiu wrld, mnoe andr challenging. The SEMINOL E captures those influences, the things that help to m old you I s ~into what you will become. A national award winner andf one of the elite yearbooks in the southeast, the SEMINOLE is available to Florida students in limited quantities. Reserve your 1970 SEMINO LE now by sending a check for $~6 to the SEMINO LE office in the J. Wayne Retiz Union. It is a book that will he read time and time again, no matter how old. *~ WWI *41* *o"L I

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Reactions Capture '69 Campus Year FROM PAG21 Friday saw the opening of the university's beer hall, the Rathskeller, with frauleins, music and beer, beer, beer and more beer. The next week, onJan 28, the BSP met and agreed, after a sub-committee, not to press charges against Miss Frasca for her series on birth control pills on the UF. On Jan. 30, several student senators and members of the press were asked to leave a meeting of the University Senate, although O'Connell had said earlier in the day that he had no objections to allowing observers to attend the group's meetings. With the winds of February came the storms of controversy raging across the UF campus as the legislate and the university clashed in what many feared would be the final step to violence on this campus. S e n. T om Sla de R-Jacksonville, demanded the dismissal of Philosophy Prof. Kenneth Megill. The demands came on the heels of Megill's call for a strong teacher's union to join with students in the "ake-over" of the university. The Board of Regents and the university stood firm, and stood with the students in deploring legislative interference. Megill stayed. But the legislature was not finished and rumors of a Tallahassee organized "witch-hunt" kept UF on the brink of unleashed tensions. Accent '69 came to campus, bringing with it such famous names as Louis Harris, Julian Bond, Wayne Morse, Strom Thurmond, William 0. Douglas, and Madalyn Murray. The Rathskeller beer license was given its final birthright in a foral sanction of the State Beverage Department. The Action Conference drafted a list of radical changes -or Univgfsity College and introduced a proposal for a tripartite governmental structure of distinct student, faculty and adMinistrative bodies. UF built a Friendship Walk to encourage friendliness on campus, but somebody stole the first brick! Fuel was added to the campus's tension as Florida State President John Champion resigned because of disorders there. The Grade Appeals Board was given a boost with the acceptance of the pla-.y the College of Arts and Scieiiies, the university's largest. While February didn't exactly go out like a lamb at UF, March cane in like a raving lion and threatened to take the campus with it. The SDS was denied charter at FSU, and violence broke ose. Less than two weeks later, the SSOC charter was denied here, and violence threatened for days after as demonstrations in Tigert, sit-ins and rallies reflected the shortened tempers of administrators and student radicals. Chairman of the Board of Regents D. Burke Kibler came to CF and was faced with a walk-out in the middle of his MODEL 770XTHE INCOMPARABLE CROSS F STANDARD ROBERTS MODEL 30WALNUT ENCLOSED 30-WATT FM/AM STEREO RECEIVER MODEL 50 -SAME AS MODEL 30 EXCEPT WITH 50 WATTS MUSIC POWER 608 N. MAIN ST. Accent '69 Chairman Larry Berrin demanded that Alligator Executive Editor Carol Sanger be fired for her series on the Accent financial troubles. On U June. 2, he demanded a Board of graduation from UF be made a Student Publications hearing. quarterly event. Thoughts of caps and gowns And so another year becomes ended the year fittingly as -the history and memories for the University Senate proposed 1968-69 UF student. speech by protesting SSOCers and their sympathizers. And then came the tranquility of spring break, reversing the seasons by making the campus winds blow cooler in the spring than the winter. The student body presidential campaign raged among five candidates: Shepherd, John Mica, Vic Ramey, Joan Warren and Jim Devaney. To the victor went the spoils ..all but one seat in the Student Senate in a near-complete sweep of the campus by First Party and Shepherd. Accent '69 came back to life in a controversy revolving around broken finance &ws and a budget possiblydup to $3,300 in excess. And the senate demanded to know why. Final solution of the matter is still an event of the future. YOUR CHOICE ROBERTS 770X OR 1725-8L ll 299 95 770X COMPARE E AT 359.95 1725-8L ll COMPA RE AT 339.95 SAVE UP TO MODEL 30 ROBERTS Receiver with pair of ROBERTS S-912 speakers Compare at receiver 179.95 95 speakers 49.95 229.90 16 MODEL 50 ROBERTS Receiver with pair of ROBERTS S912 speakers compare at Receiver 199.95 Speakers 49.95 149.90 189 95 Buy for same or LESS in Gainesville and get full service from COUCH'S own master technicians. "If we sell it we service it." "Use our No interest, 4 payment plan" COUCH'S "Keeping pace with the U of F since 1933". MODEL 1725-8 Make your own car stereo cartridges. Aniazing new ROOBERTS 1725-8L I1H plays and records both reel-to-reel and new 8-track tape cartridges. ROBERTS 450 3-head tape deck Perfect compliment for either stereo system 10 ROBERTS 450 TAPE DECK 17 95 / L III PH. 376-7171 COUCH'S Welcomes You To Gainesville With Real ROBERTS Value! A w HILLEL FOUNDATION REOPENING UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT Rabbi Michael A. Monson, Director 16 N.W. 18th Street Gainesville, Florida 32601 372-2900

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PoW24A. The FhWiilaww. FIdw. A~ust,"M WHY FLY? Other than the fact that flying an airplane by yourself is one of the most exciting and personally satisfying experiences you can ever have, what usefulness could being a pilot be to you? YOUR WORTH TO AN EMPLOYER automatically goes up when you have this ability added to your accumulated bag of tricks. YOU ARE PERSONALLY CAPABLE OF BEING MORE PLACES FASTER -at your convenience -which gives you an edge on a competitor. YOU BECOME A MEMBER OF ONE OF THE MOST ELITE AND SELECT GROUPS IN AMERICA -less than .4 of 1% of the nation's population can fly. And the most unbelievable and yet amazingly true fact is than in the course of a year, THE COST OF FLYING IS LESS THAN USING ANY FORM OF TRANSPORTATION to cover the same amount of miles and time consumed. AND BY FAR THE YOUR FIRST LESSON IS JUST $5 SAFEST -and this has been proved statistically. AS A UNIVERSITY STUDENT, YOU ARE IN AN IDEAL POSITION RIGHT NOW to budget time and money to take advantage of the most economical flying school opportunity available to you today. In a nutshell, THE MOST VALUABLE ASSET YOU HAVE IS TIME to use these college years to your advantage. PERHAPS LEARNING TO FLY IS ONE OF THE MOST IMPORTANT EDUCATIONAL ACCOMPLISHMENTS YOU COULD TAKE WITH YOU. These are just a few of the many reasons which may apply to your plans for your future. If you feel that these may be interesting to you, come out to the Gainesville Municipal Airport, ASK FOR OUR $5 INTRODUCTORY FLIGHT LESSON to see if you have the ability and interest to complete our program. TO INTRODUCE YOU TO FLYING COMPLETE FAA APPROVED PRIVATE LICENSE COURSE 40 Hours of planned, systematic flight training Specialized Ground School Course concurrent with your flight training -guaranteed assing grade on your FAA Written Examination All text books and materials you will need as a student and as a private pilot ALL THIS FOR JUST $760. When you learn to fly at a Piper Flite Center you're learn. ing the new modern Piper way.thoroughly.competently. You'll make quick, steady progress toward your .2 pilot's license following the standardized, professionally programmed Piper training system. You'll fly with one of our expert government-rated flight instructors in the sleek, comfortable Piper Cherokee with modern low wing for better stability and visibility; with extra power for performance plus, and quiet roomy cabin for extra comfort. Why not satisfy that urge to fly, now that it's so simple to learn at a Piper Flite Center? F SPECIALFfte Center SPECIAL INTRODUCTORYY FLIGHT LESSON / CAHfor yourself how Easy itis to fly.Wth an1 expert 31 E WA flight instructor by your side, L You'll See for yourself why s flying' such fast growing sport ., that's .so:1 practical for business travel, too. TASSELSS IN THE AIR GAINESVILLE MUNICIPAL AIRPORT WfALDO ROAD Mb VMS

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ryhe Florida Alligator THE SOUTHEAST'S LEADING COLLEGE NEWSPAPER 0 0 .' 0 p0 Section B University of Florida, Gainesville Friday, August 22, 1969 ---------9 'Cam PUS Living

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PaP 2-8, The Florida Ailigator, Friday, Auguat 22,106M The Great I something for everyone The student's extra-curriculars are at least as varied as the curriculum. Interest in the avante garde runs from fashion to demonstration. Underwear is getting as hard to hide as political sentiment. Meanwhile the sensitive and poetic are drawn from the impassioned mob to float along the cool Ichatuckee River, connoisseurs of the brewer's art. an Invitation M Tryouts for The Company of Wayw Wednesday and Th September 24 and 25, Add a nev from Florida Players to OPEN HOUSE monday, September 22, at 7:30 p.m. I.P. Constans Theatre Production Meeting for ard Saints The Company of Wayward Saints ursday, Tuesday, September 30, 7:00 p.m. 7:30 p.m. w dimension to your college career. I I KR 5 S College Life Of UF Students

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-sri Gals Who Fun and games often hold an exalted Reitz Union. The Florida gentleman, wary rank among the UF student's priorities. of pool shark's expertise, takes his ease at The above blonde, no loser in any sense, is the gaming tables, biding his time til he a common sight to poolroom buffs in the can get the shark in shallow water. Talk Back Get Dunked st~it~,& K gLeTcueut 'S1 tk4 itt t .r ._ i.".zU 4,

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Pags 4-B, The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 22,1969 Tubing: LSummer Oasis By PAM MARTIN Alligator Special Writer As you slowly float down the Ichatuckee River near Fort White on Highway 27, you wonder how the hell you got there. You start to daydream and realize that your six-pack of beer is coming undone from its bounds of rope that hold it to your tube. This brings you back to your senses, and you start giving some serious thought to the matter. You see yourself lazily floating down a cool, quiet river. "Aren't I the lucky one?" you say to yourself. "Life couldn't be better." You figure that blah life on the campus has been a bore all week long, and now your're ready for a "break." So you get some of your friends together, pump the tubes up, load up the cars with plenty of beer and your tubes, and set out for your ride. You reach the starting point of your excursion at the river's "boils" or springhead, and you're ready to start your ride. Everyone grabs a tube, and there you find yourself empty-handed. Finally you find one, and slip easily into that wonderful 72 degree water. Even on a cool day, that's very cold; on a hot day, it's freezing. Soon you find yourself deep in the confines of the river scenery, and you pull out a beer. Without warning, you are suddenly tipped over by one of your closest friends -a good beer gone to waste. Next thing you know, you've lost your tube and you swim with all your might to catch it. Finally you're able to settle down on your tube and pull out another beer. You wish someone else would be the lucky receiver of your friends' attention. Four hours later, you find yourself at the bridge, the climax of your voyage. Then it's time to pull yourself out of the water and begin the drive back to boredom -that short trip home. Two In A Tube A Hard Way To Go The "in Circle" of campus living enjoy a Circle of Sound from COUCH'S modlA564 Yes, the ever popular Zenith Circle of Sound Now As Low 16995 As The quality goes in before the name goes on Buy it in Gainesville from COUCH'S and get full guarantee and service from COUCH'S own award winning Zenith technicians. "Use our 90-day, no charge, no interest, 4-payment plan." member member COUCH'S CTNC Ph 376-7171 608 N. MAIN ST. kS' "" A "Keeping pace with U. of F. since 1938." I a9 t .a-6311 1, k J.r 1: 1 ')1 r ,'

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Friday, Auguat 22, 19689, The Florki Alligator, PagE 5-8 DIAL-A-DOC Med Center, A Chance To Share Problems By RANDY BASSETT Aligator Correspondent "I wish I had someone to talk to about this problem," a student may say. "I can't solve it by myself." "I feel sorry for Jane X, she's so confused," another student may say. "But what can I do?" Any student who wants to discuss his problems, whether slight or complicated, can find qualified help through the Mental Health Service located at the UF Infirmary. A division of the Student Health Services, the Mental Health Services is one of eleven services provided by UF to help students. "We are dealing with a basically healthy population," mental health nurse Sallie M. Jones is quick to point out. "We are here to help students with problems that upset them." "A student may need to talk with someone older, someone not involved in the situation," she continued. "Our role is preventive mental health, identifying problems early." Students who are diagnosed as mentally ill would be referred to the J. Hills Miller Health Center for treatment. Students come voluntarily to the Mental Health Service. Last year 878 students were seen for counseling. All cases receive individual attention from the professional staff of physicians, nurses and counselors in the fields of psychiatry, psychology and social work. Thirteen permanent staff members are available under the direction of Dr. E. Arthur Larson, director of the Student Mental Health Program. Individual conferences, group therapy and marital counseling are available to students. Last year 76 per cent of the cases involving therapy or continued consulting improved. Approximately half of all cases needed this therapy. Students can come to the Mental Health Service during its regular office hours. Staff members are also available by telephone 24 hours a day, seven days a week, if necessary. "Students can 'share a problem by telephone,"' Mrs. Jones says, "and then we'll decide if the student should come in at another time." "There is no set way of handling the problems," nurse Jones continued. "It depends on what the student says and how we evaluate the situation." The Mental Health Service has handled cases involving drug users, among other problems. According to Mrs. Jones, who often conducts the initial visits, confidentiality is always respected. "We discuss the pros and cons of marijuana, LSD, for example. We encourage the student to stop and to work with law enforcement agencies. But we do not turn him in.The student must do this voluntarily." Only in cases of extreme danger to the student himself or if he endangers the lives of others, does the staff consider turning him over to the law. This decision must be made by the director of the Mental Health Program. "We have the option of putting students who are under the influences of such drugs in the infirmary to rest and receive special medical attention," Mrs. Jones explained. "We sometimes use drugs to counteract these drugs or to counteract moods." The use of drugs by a student is usually a minor segment of the whole problem, according to Mrs. Jones. The majority of cases handled at the Mental Health Service last year were of a different nature than the problems of taking LSD or marijuana. Problems concerning anxiety about school work, roommate problems, dating and depression made up the majority. The largest category concerned problems in communicating to other people, such as parents and friends. The Mental Health staff also provides counseling to organizations on campus; individuals, such as chaplains and professors; and to the 10 other services set up to help students. Research programs dealing with the problems of married students and student stresses are being conducted also by the Student Mental Health Program. Mononucleosis Ranking For UF Not Accurate The mononucleosis rate at UF is not really higher than on other campuses, according to Dr. Wilmer J. Coggins, director of student health service. Skill and interest in diagnosing have simply resulted in more cases of mono being identified at UF than anywhere else, Coggins said. "A lot of attention is paid to mono here," he explained. "Other health services don't run as many lab studies. They don't pick up many of the milder cases as we do. You can't identify mono just by physical examination," he said. Infectious mononucleosis, well-known as the "kissing disease," has sprouted many misconceptions which Coggins wanted corrected: 0 There is no clear-cut evidence to support the theory that mono is transmitted by kissing. Sometimes this seems to be the case, he said, but doctors have arrived at no real explanation for this phenomena yet. 0 Mono does not "spread" like respiratory infections among members of a family. I It is not a "severe" illness in almost 99 per cent of the cases. "It's really a very mild disease. In fact, some people get it and never know it," Coggins said. Freshmen across the country get mono more f r e q u e n t l y t h a n upperclassmen do, according to all of the national studies Coggins has seen. "When freshmen come here, and they haven't been previously exposed to mono, they are very susceptible. Upperclassmen as a group are relatively immune," Coggins said. Last year there were 270 cases of mono reported between October, 1967 and April 1968 by the UF health service. This ranked UF first in the nation, with 16.9 cases per 1,000 students in a study by the U.S. Public Health Service Communicable Disease Center in Atlanta. UCLA reported 3.3 per 1,000, the lowest rate in the nation. HOUSE OF TRAVEL INC. complete travel services credit cards accepted specializing in cruises representing all major airlines [ no service charge FREE TICKET DELIVERY DIAL 378-1601] OPEN MON.-FRI 8:30 A.M. -5:30 P.M. AVE. -p~a~n~Va4 Cm oL, i/7 ueac4Q cL4~6l'a~ MEMBER HOUSE OF TRAVEL GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA WESTSIDE SHOPPING CENTER 3415 W. UNIVERSITY -M Ix -xe

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Pap 66. The Florid. Aliptor, Fridmy. Augpst 22. 1969 Sack Out When you study (or party) late and have class early, you catch your rest where you find it. Meanwhile, you suffer. You can ignore it for a while, but sometime, somewhere, it's bound to catch up with you. ANY FLORIDA MAN CAN DIRECT YOU TO MIKE'S Mike's Pipe Shop & Book Store invites all new students to the store with the ideal atmosphere for browsing. We're not just a textbook store, but a complete bookstore with a complete inventory of: 9 best sellers I fiction & non-fiction I children's books I art prints opinion 0 humor I reference religion I instruction I cooking I music We have a Bonanza Book Section with books at reduced prices all year round. "The Book Store where informality and friendliness pervade." A Smoker's Haven A Good place to browse while selecting your favorite book -pipe or smoking tobacco. MIK E'SPIPE SHOP & BOOK STORE SOUTHEAST FIRST ST. at SECOND AVE. W!77 Morning Is No Time For C

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Friday, August 22,1969, The Florida Alligator, Pog 7-B A Florida Man Buying books, not of his own records available at occasional sidewalk choosing, is no student's idea of a good sales. All of which seems to indicate that time. Various texts and manuals can soak although the Florida man "needs no him for as much as 50 bills. The heavy introduction," he oftentimes does need a volumes of educational lore leave little drink or two. ..or time to enjoy the "outside" books and Let us "' M / introduce you to .. WHERE is Twig? Twig is sumptuously situated in two convenient locations in g'ville. one block from campus at 1131 W. University Ave. (toward town from the Flagler Inn) and in the Mall. on NW 13th St. (Highway 441 North). You'll recognize us by our barn-like appearance, our cozy atmosphere, and the friendly smiles on our faces. We welcome STUDENT CHARGES. Fill in the following and mail to us BEFORE you come soyour Account can be opened. The walk back to the dorm after Friday's last class is sometimes long, but rarely unpleasant. The next Sun may rise over a white, sandy beach or a sparkling pool andrset on a bonfire or a backyard barbeque. NAME: .wig s AGE: HOME ADDRESS: LIMIT: REFERENCES: 1. PARENT SIGNATURE: Needs No Introduction welcome gals! welcome to g'ville welcome to the U of F welcome to Twig Twig is COED HEADQUARTERS in g'ville for all the latest fashions. .whether it be a kicky coat., a ini dress or skirt., the most in boots. .great loungewear for the dorm. or maybe the right handbag for your outfit for the game. Whatever the occasion, you can look your greatest with an outfit from twig! BRANDS, you ask? Here's just a few we are sure you know: Country Set, Mister Pants, Elli, Jeune Leigue, Joan Romain, Vassarette, College Town, Harburt, Tracy, Twins, Petti, Davey, Bonsetta, Booth Bay, Skyr, and on and on. 11131 W. UNIVERSITY. NEAR CAMPUS 2552 NW 13th ST. IN THE MALL up F mMOLmMM6mA 006

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Pog S-B, The Florida Aligator. Friday, Augus 22, 1960 THREE PENNY OPER A joint venture of the music department and the Florida Players, three fourths, or so, of the staff of this production, both acting and other miscellany, were not Florida Players. The group also stages experimental plays, and other smaller projects during each quarter. BEHIND THE SCENES Here at work on the scenery for The Birthday Party, the summer production. Florida Players welcomes those interested in acting, production, construction, costuming, lighting, make-up, props, scene shifting and scene painting, as well as cuing and so forth. D'irectorvs Life: Theatre By DARCY MEEKER Campus Living Editor "It's hard to get actors to feeling natural and relaxed doing the things they have to do in a Pinter play," says James Lauricella, director of this Florida Players' production, "The Birthday Party." "I do a lot with improvisation, and we often have frank open talk about bodies." Lauricella, with a master's degree and doctoral work in theater behind him, describes his personal essence as "a theater person. Everything I like to do, except for the usual relaxation things, is connected with the theater. Even when I go fishing, I'm talking theater. "People ask me why I never do anything like 'Barefoot in the Park.' I'm not paid enough, for one thing. If somebody paid me lots of money to go through the boredom of directing the superficial characters, I'd be glad to. Since I'm not paid very much to do the work here, I want to do something I can get deeper into every day. "Then, too, since this is a university I feel I have to put real demands on the student actors, to make the work demanding for them." Does he plan to stay in universities? "My plans aren't that definite. My only intention is to stay working with theater, whether in the university system nr not." KEEP IN STEP WITH GATOR ADS ,WAN'S SILVERMAN'S SIL VERMAN'S SIL VERMAN'S SIL VERMAN'S SIL VERMAN'S* CdC3 1iI WELCOME! Traditional apparel for the College Man and Woman has been GO part of the Silverman scene for many years. z You'll find nationally known brands of quality wearing apparel. Come in. ..explore our extensive collection of new styles. cc Ask about our Student Charge Plan 225 W. UNIVERSITY AVE. SERVING SONS AND DAUGHTERS OF FLORIDA FOR 35 YEARS OIL VERMAN'S SIL VERMAN'S SIL VERMAN'S SILVERMAN'S SIL VERMAN'S SIL VERX?, Welcome to the U of F and to Gainesville To get the most out of those hours of studying, study to background music of FM from a N FM/AM table radio from COUCH'S Circle of V Sound in a FM/AM table radio only4995 model A424 "Unbeatable quality in a modern design" Couch's, northcentral Florida's largest exclusive Zenith dealer COUCH'S Ph. 376-7171 "Serving the needs of Univ. of Fla. students, faculty and staff for 35 years" 608 N. MAIN ST.

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Friday, August 22, 1969, The Florida Alligator, Pap 9-B THE BIRTHDAY PARTY Florida Players At Work On Suimmer Play STANLEY PLEADS .s ith McCann, to know why he's been hit By JOE BRADSHAW Alligator C orrespondent UF's dramatic club, the Florida Players, produced Harold Pinter's three-act play "The Birthday Part"' Aug. 6-9 in the Constans Theater. "The Birthday Party", the first full-length play written by Pinter, takes place jn a worn-out boarding house which is located by the sea. The pia is a tragic-comedy. The play is centered around Stanley, a man in his late thirties. Stanley is unexpectedly called upon by two rather mysterious strangers. The two men put Stanley through a merciless cross-examination, throwing at him every kind of accusation. They conclude the cross-examination by showing up at Stanley's birthday party and humiliating him to no end. Stanley, denying that it is his birthday party, finally collapses from the strain. Next morning, numb and silent, Stanley is led to a waiting car by the two mysterious men and carried away to some terrible punishment. "The Birthday Party" has been performed both on stage and over television with great success. James Lauricella, speech department assistant professor directing the play, has previously directed "After the Rain" and "Imaginary Invalid," here on campus. According to Lauricella, "Stanley the piano player is forceably thrust back to reality by McCann and Goldberg. That's part of the meaning of the play's title. Stanley has curled himself up foetus-like, in a little world of his own making. He goes through birth pains getting born back into reality. There's no hope at the end of the play, that he can accept himself, and go on living." Six people make up the cast. Stanley is played by Stew Solomon; Dan Jesse is McCann and Rick Council is Goldberg. Eileen Drillick portrays Lulu, a girl in her twenties. Meg and Petey, sixty year olds, are played by Joan Mueller and Lou Tally. design shop 3448 W. UNIVERSITY AVE. across from The Westgate shopping center Phone: 378-5565 hours: 9:30 am -10 pm ran adventur, in shopping' director chairs $15.95 'ndia bedspreads all patterns. $3.50 up candles to burni contemporary lamps swing chairs modibles fish kites mexican glassware straw flowers NOWd Pots chemex coffee a I MTISEcolorfuIbaskets wind chimes officer's chair -$25orin butterfly chair -$12 mugs e 4 hammocks -from $5 licensee .the best' beaded curtains custom and lea i-made sandals either goods GOLDBERT FLIRTS .with Lulu, exciting her for Clinactic Scene al shapes and sizes of paper laterns indian and persian print mini dresses .Imp5 -.A

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Pap MOB, The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 22, 1969 HOW TO BE A (big man on campus) If you're new on campus, there's a lot you're going to have to learn. Campus heroes are made, not born. If you've been here a while and still haven't made it, chances are you never will. But if you're just starting. .. 1. DO be seen around campus. Hang around where people will see you on the way to class. Make a schedule of places to be every day: third floor Reitz Union, Tigert Hall, the Grad Library. 2. DO develop unforgettable facial expressions: A character squint, a slope of the shoulder, set your head at a certain angle and keep it there. 3. DO be seen and heard delivering speeches on the Plaza of the Americas. Talk fast and loud. DON'T speak at the same function as the president or one of his lackeys unless you're debating with him. 4. DO picket Tigert Hall and the Alachua Courthouse. Make sure that your sign is bigger than anybody elses. If you don't have the biggest sign. stand off to the side and jeer. 5. DON'T be seen with only one girl. If you have to be faithful, do it on the side. 6. DO be seen with crowds of girls. Tell funny stories so that if someone takes your picture, they' all be smiling. 7. DON'T ever come home before 2:00 A.M. even if you have to go to an all-night cafe and drink coffee. DON'T be seen there. DO smile whenever someone mentions a girl's name. Then say that you're really only good friends. 8. DON'T wear bermuda shorts. If you wear cut-offs, don't wear socks. 9. DO wear strange outfits like clerical duds or Texaco coveralls. DON'T wear underwear. DO ride a motorcycle, but not under 300 cc's. 10. DON'T wear anything tacky like a military uniform. If you have to, make everybody think it's a goof. 11. This is a college campus and you're supposed to be smart. Be careful of the books you read. Alice in Wonderland and Tolstoy are alright. Principles of Business Organization and Mandingo are not. If you don't like the right kind of books, carry them anyway. Place them on the ground, title up, and go to sleep. I WELCOME ALL NEW STUDENTS TO THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 'Goodrich I HE Radial Ply, Dynacor' Rayon Cord Construction for oidewalt tlexibity that ahqorbs road shock 4-Ply Dynacor' Rayon Cord Belt fights tead-wearing 1'squirt ", gives extra mileage Extra Wide Tread for increased traction 4AS LOW AS 95 $ 4Size E R 70 x 14 WIVE MOPA whitewa'l tubeless plus $2.'3Fed. Ex. a~x and EPO aS ogt BUtae-n r yucr M 4Late Summer S pecial on Barbeque Pits 99t R 605 NW 8th Ave., Gainesville, Fla. Ph 378-2333

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Let Your Mind Dictate Dress "Do your own thing" philosophies of individualists are more and more evident to people watchers on and around the UF campus. Each class change brings a display of the variety of campus gear, 1969. Rages range from antique Ivy League to contemporary "uniform" to authentic Army surplus. Girl watchers shake their heads over a trend in "uni-sex." Love beads, long-haired boys, Nehru jackets and bell-bottom pants make it hard to separate the boys from the girls, they complain. "Thank heaven for little girls and shorter-than-ever skirts," says one confused young man. The mini-skirted coeds struggle daily with skirts too-short-to-be-seen-sitting-in. Many find a partial solution in pants-dresses of every length and description. This is the year of the trouser on campus. Most popular for both sexes is the expanded bell-bottom trouser or "elephant pants," reminiscent of the '30s. "Problem is, I keep tripping over the excess material," complains one coed. One myopicprofessor uses a hair-ratio theory to solve the identity crisis in classes. "Sideburns and mustaches are still found almost exclusively on males,"he gloats. "On the other hand, below shoulder length hair is usually feminine in gender." All that could change, however. V'ig shops are doing a booming business around campus. Most girls come equipped with at least a fall, wom over or under the still-popular long, straight hair of the last several years. Some shops do a clandestine business in wigs for young men who want chin-length hair only occasionally. False sideburns and mustaches are also available -though no girls are reported as customers -yet. Short-curly hair is coming on strong for coeds. Long bouncing ringlets are occasionally seen at night. Or, when all else fails, a brimless, back-tied sun bonnet hides the ungroomed coed coiffure. The elimination of compulsory ROTC with its rules on haircuts and shaving is credited with much of the hairy situation now rampant on campus males. Patterned stockings are seldom seen this year on leggy lasses. Few boys wear socks at all. The warm climate and casual atmosphere lead to a surplus of sandals on boys and girls. Some go "barefooted." The neatly collegiate look of days gone by is expected with cooler weather. Upperclassmen are already seen in conventional attire. Dress rules at the UF are "lenient, if not nonexistent," explains a suited student leader. He adds that "The Florida Coed," a magazine distributed to all coeds, does suggest "dress appropriate for class." That is apparently interpreted as: "Wash and wvear, permanently press (or nor at all), eye-catching. bright -and nmt of all -casual a n d comfortable." Friday, August 22,1969, The Florida Alligator, Peg 11-8 The 'magic of a name!' Thomas Campbell (1777-1844) Our good name is our most prized possession, but much of its 'magic' we owe to many manufacturers and-craftsnen who permit us the substantial right to represent them and their superlative merchandise in our city. For many years, these business associations have added luster to our name. For proof you need only glance at the following: Nottingham Norman Hilton and Hickey-Freeman suits Eagle, Sero and Troy Guild shirts Pendleton woolens London Fog and Gleneagles outerwear Pringle of Scotland Allen Solly, Ltd., Izod, Ltd. Corbin trousers We cordially invite you to look them over. Number Six Main Street South I:i

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Page 12-B, The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 22, 1969 put yourself in the

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Friday, August 22, 1969, The "iida Alligator, Pop 13-B icture atU TRACE RENTAL APARTMENTS It's the "campus" place to live, just 12 mile from the University. Nearly 18 football fields worth of rolling lawns where you can do your thing. Separate buildings for students, graduate students and non-students. One and two bedroom apartments from $110 a month. Owned and managed by Kassuba, the nation's #1 landlord. Kassuba got that big by being nice ...non-stuffy (ya know what we mean). YOUR YARD nearly 18 football fields big huge swimming pool .handball courts/private lake barbecue and picnic facilities special "Gardens" campus bus service sun deck/resident and guest parking YOUR BUILDING private balconies or patios fire-proof construction 'sound conditioned commuter rating for student campus parking separate storage area for each apartment conveniently located laundry rooms/all new equipment inside corridor privacy/all brick exteriors 2-story garden-apartment architecture YOUR APARTMENT 700 to 900 square-foot spaciousness individually controlled central air conditioning and heating share with 1, 2 or 3 people wall-to-wall carpeting oversize walk-in closets dinettes with oak parquet floors ample cabinets of formica in kitchens hotpoint "all electric" kitchens with range 'refrigeratorfreezer, garbage disposal, exhaust fans sliding glass doors to patios and balconies tiled bathrooms master tv antenna There's still time! Make your reservation today! Furnished models open daily 9 to 5, Sundays 12 to 5 Telephone: 376-6720/700 S.W. 16th Avenue SEND FOR FREE BROCHURE Building Manager/ University Gardens Trace 700 S.W. 16th Avenue Gainesville, Florida Gentlemen: I am interested in a bedroom apartment in University Gardens Trace. You can expect me to personally inspect the apartment Meanwhile, kindly rush your brochure to me. (date-time) I am Student Graduate Student Non-student. NAME: ADDRESS: CITY: STATE:_ZIP:

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Fall is the season of winners and losers. The game is football. You need a football and a field. You need oqr guys and their guys. And you need a couple of tickets. Right? It's not always easy to get them. The lines are long and the sun is still a little hot. If you're smooth enough you can get your date to pick them up. But when it comes to watching the game -that's something you have to do yourself Win or lose, rain or shine. Nine month minimum lease beginning with fall quarter. $187.50 per person per quarter, double occupancy $345.00 per quarter, Single occupancy. Monthly, weekly and daily rates depending on availability. Contact Office at 1225 S.W. I Ave. or Phone 378-2221-for reservations. BALCONY I I rg U CUPANCY II cOrpet I r-r 1 4 .. fpst 00 f I 'i it L71rrranr STUDIO APTS. Luxury Off Campus Housing with On Campus convenience. Near Restaurants and College Dining Areas -Churches -Hospitals Theaters. V2 Block walking distance to University entrance. -Featuring 0 Elevated Pool I Recreation Room 0 Confectionery I Elevator Service Private Phone Available I Community Phone on Each Floor I Beautiful Landscaping I Air Conditioned Study Lounge I TV Central Antenna System0 I Cable TV AvailableH I Storage & Luggage Facilities I Inter-com System from Each Room to Central Office 9 Air Conditioned Rooms $ Thermostatically Controlled Heat I Fire Proof Construction 9 Kitchenettes I Wall-to-Wall Carpeting $ Decorator Lamps & Draperies 9 Coin Laundry Facilities Parking Areas -Some Covered N Ic~o~I LIRAY I' ARCHITECTS E YII ICII y & FO ARTS CLASUROOM AILDING TWALDIN N AT ---H. 1TH STEETI LOCK E ETHESEIKOE Apartments Include Ovens, Grills and Spits for Outdoor Cooking Inside Contact Rental Office at 1225 S.W. 1st Ave. Gainesville, Florida or Phone 378-2221 ,,,k I Ii I i I I I

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COLONIAL S> P! NG 300 Ft. from main campus Directly on bus line Close to shopping center Near UF and hospitals Fireproof construction. Carpeted living rooms, hallways 5 Minutes to downtown area Supervised cleaningof halls, ground Well managed by qualified mgr. Beautiful second level pool. MANOR "MODERN LIVING AT REASONABLE PRICES" ONE BEDROOM APTS. (FURN.) $110 -$120 This colonial styled modern apartment building was located at its present site because of its proximity to University of Florida, hospitals and the downtown Gainesville commercial area and office buildings. These apartments are designed and decorated for people of discrimination who like quality living at reasonable prices. The furnished apartments are beautifully decorated with Danish furniture. The colors and fabrics have been selected by a qualified interior decorator. These apartments are particularly well suited for professors, assistant professors, upper class graduate married students, young married couples, nurses and business people. Phone 372-7111 or come by our office is for information. 1216 SW 2nd Ave. Gainesville, Fla. APARTMENTS FEATURING Air cond. Roof terraces for sun bathing Garbage disposals in kitchen sinks Sound-proof walls &corridors S Large black top parking area Individual heating units Complete laundry facilities Apts. decorated in modern danish 9 TV antenna system (5 stations) Friday, August 22, 1969, The Florida Alligator, Pap 15-B Sun And W ater Find Friends UF facilities avail themselves to the '. fun-seeking student. He comes, he sees, he conquers, or is ingloriously conquered and more often than not, drenched. Water sports predominate at SUCh events as the L a k e Wauburg Playday, a midsummer cooler. The more serious sun-worshipper manages to stay high and dry. i-AT -e

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Pegs 16-B, The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 22,1969 People Swimming And Canoeing To water-loving Gator warriors, UF's to their necks in pool water. Water sports Lake Wauburg is a fitting field (?) of do, however, tend to sap one's strength, honor. Nautical jousting is another facet and since the Reitz Union Cafeteria rarely of the yearly Wauburg "Playday". While features fare as sophisticated as roast the canoe combatants accept a dunking as duck, it often behooves the hungry Gator part of the price of defeat, it brings to rally his last wind and do a little obvious pleasure to two bikinied coeds up poaching on his own. .And Chasing Ducks? A4AN'S SIL VERMAN'S SIL VERMAN'S SIL VERMAN'S SIL VERMAN'S SIL VERMAN'S ct WELCOME! Sn, I -4 Traditional apparel for the College Man and Woman has been C/3 C/)part of the Silverman scene for many years. Z, You'll find nationally known brands of quality wearing apparel. Come in .explore our extensive collection of new styles. cc Ask about our Student Charge Plan ~W W W WNUV U~ ~rr, 225 W. UNIVERSITY AVE. cc SERVING SONS AND DAUGHTERS OF FLORIDA FOR 35 YEARS cIL VERMAN'S SIL VERMAN'S SILVERMAN'S SIL VERMAN'S SIL VERMAN'S SILVER A 120 min. cassette? COUCH'S has it Scotch" B R A N D 273 MAGNETIC TAPE CASSETTE EXCLUSIVE DYNARANGE* TAPE unsurpassed sound fidelity lubricated, smooth running high-impact case 2 hours total recording time-1hour each side. Also in 30, 60 and 90 min. lengths If it's Tape -we have it See us for any of your taping needs. COUCH'S 608 N. MAIN COUCH 376-7171 "Northcentral Fla.'s Largest selection of tape recording reels." 1

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wI Like Father -Like Son The generation gap may be merely an illusion. Although father and son find oral gratification in different wavs, the expressions are remarkably similar. The only difference is that the American Cancer Society has not yet released any damaging statistics on the long term effects of milk-drinking. DON'T FORGET OUR NEW DELICIOUS ROAST BEEF SANDWICH AVAILABLE AT BOTH LOCATIONS HERE IN GAINESVILLE A Burger Chef Foodgood enough to leave home for. 715 N.W. 13th St. 1412 N. Main St. HM BU RG ERS A Lonely Campus: In all seasons clouds block your path What makes Burger Chef good enough to leave home for? Is it our hamburgers cooked over an open fire? Our thin, crisp, tender french fries? Our thick shakes, so thick you can eat them with a spoon? Our fish sandwiches and our hot apple turnovers? Yes. It is.

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Entertainment The Fifth Dimensions Dion The Supremes IlL

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eI ind that you've come to expect. A charge account from any Bek store is also good here, and you will always be made welcome. At Bek Lindsey the name of the game is fashion, so think of us first when you want fashion correctness at reasonable prices.These are a few of the names in fashion that are available at Be&'s: 0 Young Edwardian 0 Bobbie Brooks 0 Thermo Jac 0 Junior House 0 L'Aiglorn I Henry Lee 0 Kimberly 0 Butte Kni s I Puritan 6 Justin McC ty 0 Jantzen 0 Catalina 0 Carlye I Lilli Ann I Norman Wiatt I Sandi Monica 9 Misty Harbor 0 White Stag & many others 0 Levi S London Fog 0 Van Heusen 0 Creighton Arrow 0 Hang Ten 0 Gold Cup Clubman 0 Palm Beach 0 Arnold Palmer 4 Jantzen McGregor 0 Hickock 0 Jockey I Hanes 0 Haggar 0 HIS. 4 Botany & many others OPEN 10 AM-9 PM Mon. -Sat. Belk, Central, And Master Charge Plans Convenient BRANCH POST OFFICE Layaway & Free Gift Wrap 1320 N. Main St. In the Gainesville Shopping Center , g g THE NME O F THE GME Friday. August 22. 1969 The Florida Alliaaor Paa 1R WELCOMES YOU TO TIME T ECO LL G E B O U D i z THE U.oOf F. YOU'RE THE CREAM OF THE CROP. or you wouldn't be reading this. And we here at Bek Lindsey are proud to welcome you to Gainesville. You and your famies have probably shopped at Belks in your home town. we hope you will want to do the same here in Gainesville. You'll find the same friendly service here 0

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Page 20-B, The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 22, 1969 Sin City: Games Students Play Come hungry.Go happy" EARN COUNTRY DINNER CHICK 'N FRIES 1.15 694 BIG BARNEY 454 COKE HOUR DAILY ALL LARGE SOFT DRINKS 10 CENTS (2 -4 P.M.) HAMBURGER 20c MILK SHAKE 25c CHEESEBURGER 25 COFFEE 12 FISH SANDWICH 30c MILK 15C FRENCH FRIES I& HOT CHOC. 15C SOFT DRINKS 15C 2029 N.W. 13th STREET K I I I

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.Catching Games Students Play in and around Gainesville notorious "Sin City" apartment complexes include variation of aquatic football. The game calls for th defensive line to span the 5' depth line while the cent hikes from poolside. The quarterback fades out to th sundeck and the left end goes off the board for a long on The girls are impressed. .Caught Later in the day, team captain and head cheerleader hol a huddle in some deserted study lounge. Passes, blocks an interceptions are also made. But unlike its poolside counterpart, this game can be played in poor light and ma continue .very ..very. .late. 's a e er e e. Id d le ry qw, 1 -4 C011* C C2* lk I loe4p j us", Needs It0i, olr 70.tcke Phone: 376-0444 1127 West Univers sity Avenue Friday, August 22,1969, The Florida Alligator, Pagp 21-5 "IN ON CAMP For All Your 'ootwear I 11 MNNW!, f ftaw" wj #(fljpll

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Page 22-B, The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 22, 1969 UF Campus: Where The Old eiu nJw idrof walw1 sa C OUC H'S offers you one of Florida's largest selections of Wollensak tape recorders and Scotch brand recording tapes. "if Wollensak makes it we sell it." s AC -DC o Automatic Record Level Solid State 9 Foolproof to operate Only 89 9 WOLLENSAK 42M0 WOLLENSAK 3500 K;ol 9 Cassette Recorder e battery operated o solid state 9 Dynamic microphone, carrying case and tape cassette included only 69 9 -No middleman profit -Direct factory dealer Northcentral Fla.'s headquarters for your taping needs. COUCH'S INC. 608 N. MAIN ST. 376-7171 Serving the needs of the U of F since 1933 Nestled modestly among palm, pine, and oak in the heart of the UF campus, the old brick, gabled halls play host to vines, pigeons and assorted lecture classes. Many of the names pay tribute to men long dead. Silently they suffer the abuses of time and disgrunted architecture students I MitF

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Friday. Auvas 22,1960, The Florid. All~ftr. Paw 234 Meets The New ...meanwhile, on the campus perimeter, new complexes spring up, neither modest nor necessarily ugly. They come complete with both lecture and modern laboratory facilities. What they lack in charm, they generally make up in parking space. 4 !-AN'S SIL VERMAN'S SIL VERMAN'S SIL VERMAN'S SIL VERMAN'S SIL VERMAN'S cc WELCOME! Traditional apparel for the College Man and Woman has been Q/) part of the Silverman scene for many years. You'll find nationally known brands of quality wearing apparel. Come in. explore our extensive collection of new styles. Ask about our Student Charge Plan C4, 225 W. UNIVERSITY AVE. cc SERVING SONS AND DAUGH TERS OF FL ORIDA FOR 35 YEARS Z EA'E cjIL VERMAN'S SIL VERMAN'S SIL VERMAN'S SIL VERMAN'S SIL VERMAN'S SIL VERT)r ECONSTANTLY GROWING COAST TO COAST WELCOME NEW STUDENTS Try our deliciously different Roast Beef Sandwich -it's tender-sliced! .You'll never be satisfied with anything less! SWING OVER TO. Arby's 1405 SW 13th ST JUST SOUTH OF THE UNDERPASS A.1

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Pag 24-B, The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 22, 1969 A DVER T ISE MEN T U. OF F. FACULTY CLUB INCNEWS 392-2097 Membership Card? You Don't Need One To Enjoy The Rathskeller No membership CARD is ever required during the day except for bar service. Everybody can (and should) eat breakfast, lunch and dinner it the Rathskeller. You do have to be a member or guest of a member to get bar service and to get in after 8:00 when the entertainment starts. So don't listen to rumors. Eat lunch or just drop into the Rathskeller during the day -no membership required. A NIGHT OF ENTERTAINMENT _______________________ h .1 ______________________ Over 21? Under 21?? Makes no difference to us. All University of Fla. students, faculty and staff are welcome under or over 21. If you folks under 21 wonder what we offer you, just drop in LOOKING FOR US? We're directly behind the old Fla. Union, in the Main Cafeteria. Right beside Murphee, and across the road from the Music Building. PURPOSE The purpose of the University of Florida Rathskeller is to provide an informal meeting place which caters to the University community. The Rathskeller will furnish a traditional gathering place where one may meet others in a relaxed atmosphere and enjoy entertainment and refreshments. YES-YS PRETZEL BAGELS THE RATHSKELLER, UF'S ANSWER TO A MERRY GERMAN HOFBRAUHAUSOPENED LAST JANUARY WITH A BRACE OF ENTERTAINMENT AND VARIETY. THE GERMAN STYLE EATERY, LOCATED IN THE EAST WING OF THE MAIN CAFETERIA NEAR MURPHREE HALL, OFFERS BEER TO THOSE OVER 21AND ENTERTAINMENT IN THE FORM OF "DION" AND THE FABULOUS "GENE MIDDLETON TRIO". WAITRESSES OR "FRAULEINS" COMPLEMENT THE AUTHENTIC GERMAN ATMOSPHERE. BESIDES THE MAIN FEATURE, THERE ARE VARIETY ACTS, COMEDIANS, AND VOCAL ACTS. Breakfast Special 2 eggs, toast, grits, coffee 484 Dinner Time Great Food Specials Mon: Fried Chicken w/trimmings $1.05 Wed:Spaghetti w/salad & bread $.97 Sat: Steak 14oz T-bone w/trimmings $2.75 MEET ME AT THE RAT THEY'RE HAVING A BALL TGIF, happy hour, or whatever you want to call it. Oursisfrom 2to6 every Friday. DION WAS HERE PHILOSOPHY The philosophy of the Rathskeller centers around the idea that students, faculty and staff need to communicate with each other. As our society grows more complex and more automated this need for personal communication grows. The Rathskeller will provide the place for this communication and our activities and programs will encourage it. President and Mrs. STEPHEN O'CONNELL Enjoy EnIertainment 4 THE "RAT. TEWAY TO FUN AND FRLC 3 392-20'k97 I I a -j

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The 4S Florida Alligator JA ATHE SOUTHEAST'S LEADING COLLEGE NEWSPAPER Section C University of Florida, Gainesville Friday, August 22, 196 9 Sports: A Glance Back,A Look Ahead

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Page 2-C, The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 22. 1969 Gators Darkhorse By Marc Dunni Being of the opinion that All-American selections are a publicity poll and pre-season predictions are impossible to make, it is with extreme trepidation that I present my selections for the final Southeastern Conference 1969 football standings. I have decided to get on the bandwagon and give the title nod to Ole Miss just to see how they handle the kiss of death. Anyway in order of finish here goes: MISSISSIPPI -The Rebels return 27 lettermen and 16 starters to the gridiron in the fall which should be enough to clinch the title. Quarterback sensation Archie Manning will again be at the helm of the '68 Liberty Bowl champs. Coach Johnny Vaught has the only SEC team with experience on both offense and defense. AUBURN -The offensive backfield must take shape quickly if the Tigers are to pose a serious threat. Sophomore quarterback Pat Sullivan will have to put life in the offensive unit. All the defensive starters from 1968 will be returning along with 26 other lettermen. GEORIGA -The defending SEC champs will be hampered on defense with the loss of All-American Bill Stanfill and Jake Scott. The Bulldogs will return 37 lettermen including quarterback Mike Cavan, the SEC's leading rusher Bruce Kemp and receiver Dennis Hughes. It will be tough to improve on the best record of a major college in the South. TENNESSEE -Although the Volunteers lost their entire starting backfield from 1968 but sophomore Bobby Scott is ready to take over. Only four offensive and six defensive starters return in the fall. The defense will have strong leadership with All-American Steve Kiner returning at linebacker. The play of newcomers will determine the fortune of the 1969 Vols. ALABAMA -Coach Bear Bryant will be devoting full time to the football team in the fall now that he has stepped down as Athletic Director. With more time for football Bryant will be building a team that must recover from a humiliating 35-10 loss to Missouri in the Gator Bowl. Three defensive starters will be back along with most of the offensive team from 1968. Quarterback Scott Hunter will be taking to the air again trying to make the Tide the threat it once was. UF -The Gators also face a rebuilding year, but the prospect of having John Reaves at quarterback rates them the darkhorse candidate of the SEC. The loss of All-Americans Larry Smith and Guy Dennis plus Jim Yarbrough, Larry Rentz, Tom Christian, Bill Dorsey and David Mann will hurt. But if Reaves clicks with his sophomore receiver Carlos Alvarez the Gators will be unstoppable in the air. On defense pre-season All-American Steve Tannen leads the list of experienced returning lettermen. LOUISIANA STATE -The Tigers return only three starters to the gridiron in 1969 but experience at quarterback should help. Mike Hill will be calling the signals but unless his new crop of receivers come through it could be a long season. VANDERBILT -An outstanding crop of freshmen which is the result of subdued recruiting requirements could give the Commodores an even better season than 1968. Vandy had their first winning season since 1959 last year. KENTUCKY -Even with the hiring of John Ray, former Notre Dame assistant coach, the Wildcats will not be a serious contender in 1969. The loss of Dick Lyons, an outstanding runner, will be the Cats most serious setback. MISSISSIPPI STATE -The return of All-SEC passing conbination Tommy Pharr and Sammy Milner will make the Bulldogs a threat in any game but a weak defense and lack of a serious running game will hurt. State can be scored on as easily as they can score and lack of depth will prove disaster for the Bulldogs. GRESH A M'S 16th DR UG S IN C. 1605 SW 13th ST. UF -Ga. Tech Plan Rematch UF and Georgia Tech will resume their football rivalry with a four-game series beginning, in 1978, Gator Athletic Director Ray Graves has said. The two teams have not met in a regularly scheduled game since Tech shut out the Gators in 1963, 9-0. The Gators did play Tech in the Orange Bowl in 1967, grinding out a 27-12 victory in the nationally televised encounter. This was the last game super-stars Steve Spurrier and Larry Smith played together. Smith had one of the best performances of his career that evening. The home-and-home series will begin Oct. 28, 1978, in Atlanta, and will return to Gainesville in 1979. The Gators and the Rambling Wreck have met 34 times with the Gators winning seven, loosing 22 and tying five times. Don't be caught with DEAD batteries Insist uponc a m batteries from COUCH'S Fresh batteries Guaranteed EVERY Time For all your battery needs see Couch's your authorized Ir Distributor COUCH'S 608 N. Main 376-7171 Keeping Pace with the University for 35 years. KEEP ON TOP OF YOUR FAVORITE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA SPORT SUBSCRIBE TO THE Florida Alligator DAILY MAIL SUBSCRIPTION : FALL TERM $3.50 WINTER TERM $3.50, SPRING TERM $3.50 TWICE A WEEK: SUMMER TERM $1.50 ENTIRE YEAR: $10.00 Mail to: FLORIDA ALLIGATOR CIRCULATION DEPT. R M. 330, J. Wayne Reitz Union University of Florida Gainesville Fla. 32601 Please type or print NAME. ADDRESS. CITY .STATE .Zip Please enter MY subscription for I __Fall Tim ___ Spring TermFull year --Winter Term Summer Term For a total remittance of________ I (Mk hcspayable to The Florida Alligator Dn not snd current L n w -j l!1111 6 --Z ------------j COSMETICS GIFTS JEWELRY XEROX COPIES COMPLETEPRESCRIPTION DEPTH.

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FridevyAugust 22, 1969. The FIoride Aligator5 age3A SEASONED VET OR A NEWCOMER? Who Will Lead '69 Gator Gridders? By JOHN SHIRLEY Alligator Sports Writer Considering all the facts of past experience and the current situation being what it is the Gators must come up with a firm choice for quarterback in 1969. It's going to be very hard to tell either guy to "go play in the street." For the senior Jackie Eckdahl. a real victim of hard luck with injuries in his UF career, there's no tomorrow. This season is his last. For several reasons, this observer picks John Reaves. I'll be brief. Once upon a time, when John was a strong-armed lad of three, his dad bought him a little football suit and a J.M. Fields football and ... Actually, the two main contentions seem to be style and experience. Reaves is pro-style, drop-back passer. He prefers to stay in the "pocket" when rushed hard. His blockers know where he is. At 6-foot-3, he's tall enough to wait for his secondary, or alternate, receivers to break open if his primary receiver is covered. He can throw over hands prior to getting dumped. Also, thanks to his straight-overhand delivery, Reaves doesn't have to duck away or "eat" the ball until the split-second before the onrushing defenders actually hit him. On the other hand, Eckdahl's 6-foot-I height and three-quarter sidearm delivery require him to throw earlier than Reaves under the same rush. An extra second can allow the pass-pattern to develop in the defender's backfield. Offensive Coach Fred Pancoast affirmed last week what coaches have been trying to get across all along .that most Gator pass plays will depend on a drop-bac& QB. Some rol-out pass patterns and pass-run options will be used, but not nearly with the frequency of the "running quarterback" years. According to Pancoast, Eckdahl is only slightly more adept than Reaves at making the running pass. From the other angle, experience, Pancoast said, "I can't understand why people keep emphasizing this sophomore bit when discussing Reaves." "Reaves has shown a lot of poise, has improved steadily against some pretty tough competition, has displayed maturity in being critical of his own play and is big enough to take punishment," Pancoast added. At 205 pounds, Reaves ATTENTION STUDENTS RAY'S STYLE and BARBER SHOP 1125 West University Ave (Formerly Windy's Barber Shop) OPEN DAILY 8:30 AM -6:00 PM SATURDAYS 8:30 AM -5:00 PM HAIR STYLING BY MR.RAY. One of San Francisco's Top Stylists, Mr. Ray is now in Gainesville to serve you with many years experience in hair coloring, bleaching, straightening and styling of all types. AU types of Styling Accessories for Men 4 Barbers, no long waits Manicurist and receptionist pointmentsAvailableall 372-3678 vour reqest outweighs Eckdahl by 25 pounds. Pointing to the great spring blocking performances of junior fullback Garry Walker, Pancoast revealed that with more work the Gators should develop the kind of blocking needed to adequately protect a drop-back quarterback. Much hinges on the situation at tailback. Jerry Vinesett, out all spring with a badly-sprained ankle, is the best blocker. Soph Tommy Durrance ran like he owned the position all spring, but "needs work" in blocking according to Pancoast. Pancoast says he foresees an interesting battle between the two for the starting job. Whether the job goes to the best runner or the best blocker could affect the Reaves-Eckdahl situation. The UF staff is committed to the philosophy that the Gators must throw the ball to win. "If we can't command respect for the pass, we'll be in a lot of trouble," boss Ray Graves noted after viewing the Orange and Blue spring finale two weeks ago. Reaves won't be ignored because the Gators, are in the throes of a "rebuilding" campaign and want to get him ready for title-seeking seasons in his final two years. Said Pancoast: "We're thinking only about a winning ballclub this year" Reaves is the better passer. Said Steve Spurrier, who as a Gator sophomore in 1964 replaced veteran Tom Shannon permanently at the QB post: "Reaves gets rid of the ball in a natural way that is impossible to teach." Throwing on target, bullets and bombs, Reaves completed 26 of 44 passes in the two intrasquad games this spring. In blitzing the airways for 306 passing yards, the lanky Tampan helped engineer squads to an 87-point output in the two games. Reaves will convene with his own personal "cadre" of receivers in August. Carlos Alverez, the fast sophomore flanker to whom Graves has already conceded first-team status, is Reaves' seemingly telepathic running-mate. They teamed-up for several bombs for last fall's high-scoring freshmen team. Mostly from Reaves, Alverez outfoxed a variety of secondary defensive combinations with his moves and speed, hauling down 14 passes for 161 yards and 2 TD's in the two spring games. Other Reaves' targets off the freshmen team are flanker Andy Cheney and tight end Bill Dowdy. When all factors are weighed, one specific question probably will swing the coaching staff closer to Reaves' side. That's the question, who can best come up with the "big play?" In their underdog role this fall, the Gators will need to solve a lot of 3rd down and five yards-to-go situations. They'll surely face situations where a losing or close game calls for the long pass against an unrelenting pass-rush. Finally, I believe precedent will dictate the Gator QB choice. There've been several big-play sophomores, besides Spurrier, who have cooly guided their teams to victory. Look back. Soph Rex Kern led Ohio State to the national championship last fall. Closer to Gainesville, George Mira threw darts for Miami's Hurricanes as a sophomore, and at Florida State Steve Tensi played "big-play" with Fred Biletnikoff in leading the Seminoles to a smear of Oklahoma in the Gator Bowl, in the early '60's. Using the National Footbin League as a yardstick, I think the Reaves-Eckdahl study could be concluded if the coaches would ask themselves who they'd rather have throwing for them: Broadway Joe Namath or the NY Giants's scrambler, Fran Ta kafn JOHN REAVES ..Challenger JACK ECKDAHL .Retuming Jarenion. Make that after-th6ame traffic congestion a world of pleasure with a LEAR JET STEREO 8 Music System from COUCH'S Model A -259 -the original 8-treck Cartridge System See COUCH'S for FACTORY AUTHORIZED SALES & SERVICE 'ACjFEAR qJ G~7EREO CS 608 N. MAIN ST. SeringteU.37 .7 Serving the U. of F. since 1933 Ap At, y~ Tu I

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Pap 4-C, The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 22,1 KEEP YOUR 'EDUCATION' MONEY SAFE In Your Own Checking Account It's Easier To Budget Your Cash I Save Time EACH C CHECKc Nri Y VU ADVAN, DEDUCT COUNT COVE ,.es 50SERVIC MAIL! \ oo 0\ j0TO UNIVERSITY CTYA TOBANKER SI LLEB F SIAS DRAWER U, GAINESVILLE, Fl HECK BOOK (WITH 20 S) COSTS $2.50 IN CE WHICH WILL BE ACTED FROM YOUR ING DEPOSIT -IS ALL MONTHLY E CHARGES. -MAIL OUT LA. 32601 NAME (please print) DO NOT CARRY LARGE AMOUNTS OF CASH WITH YOU -PUT IT WHERE IT'S SAFE! WHEN YOU ARRIVE IN GAINESVILLE, REMEMBER THERE WILL BE SEVERAL THOUSAND MORE "GETTING SETTLED." TURMOIL WILL PREVAIL! SAVE TIME YOUR FINANCIAL ARRANGEMENTS CAN BE COMPLETED NOW -BEFORE YOU LEAVE HOME! YOUR MONTHLY CHECKS CAN BE FORWARDED DIRECTLY TO THE BANK FOR DEPOSIT TO YOUR ACCOUNT! Banking Hours MondayThursday .9:30Oto 1: 30 Drive Up Windows 'Til 4:00 New Walk-Up Window 'Til 4:00 Friday 9:30 to 6:00 PM All Departments LOCATED ONLY TWO BLOCKS rROM THE CAMPUS GAINESVILLE ADDRESS HOME TOWN ADDRESS STUDENT NUM (your social security OPENING DEPOT (if known) BER yno.) )SIT ENCLOSED $ I WILL PICK UP MY CHECKBOOK AT THF BANK ON SIGNATUREa .(as you will sign your checks) L--------CT Y BANK 1116 W. UNIVERSITY AVE. MEMBER FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION u AC BY m %ot .aw&Vox'% SAIJI'vo v ^ncal %I^lln

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FrulW. Anust 22,U. Ts M FIkAINparlPag pC Football: The Agony GATOR RUNNER LARRY SMITH .pulls muscle in ankle FSU QUARTERBACK .decked by Gartors WELCOME NEW STUDENTS CONSTANTLY GROWING COAST TO COAST Try our deliciously different Roast Beef Sandwich -it's tender-sliced! .You'll never be satisfied with anything less! ,SNING OVER T0.6 1405 SW 13th ST JUST SOUTH OF THE UNDERPASS ITOM CHRISTIAN .broken nose

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Page 6-C, The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 22, 1969 DISAPPOINTING SIXTH IN SEC 1968: Gator Grid Year That Never Was By CHUCK PARTUSCH Alligator Sports Writer The UF's 1968 football battle cry was "The Year of the Gator," but at the end of the season the wimper was "The Year That Never Was" as the Gators disappointingly finished 6-3-1 In the beginning the experts predicted that the UF would take t h e Southeastern Conference title and place high in the national polls. But the end result was a sixth place tie with Ole Miss in the SEC with a 3-2-1 record and no mention at' all among the nation's top twenty. In the Gators' opening game it was the UF over Air Force, 23-20, and a dent in the UF's hopes for a prominent national ranking. In the season's second game against bitter interstate rival Florida State University, the Gators defense socked it to the Seminoles 9-3. The third game saw the Gators offense finally get rolling in a 31-14 win over Mississippi State University. The Gators rolled up 450 yards rushing and passing against MSU. In the fourth game against Tuland University the Gators fourth quarter blitz rocked the Greenies 24-3, bringing the UF's record to 4-0. Things changed quickly for the UF as the skies opened up along with North Carolina's offense, which shattered the Gators 22-7 in a driving downpour. "We beat ourselves," was Head Football Coach Ray Graves' only comment after the loss. The next week's game saw the Gators still feeling wet as they were shocked by Vanderbilt's 14-14 tie, which many experts felt killed the Gators chances for their first-ever SEC title. With successive losses to North Carolina and Vanderbilt, "a tie is like kissing your sister" and with Auburn and Georgia coming, things didn't look good for the Gators. And they weren't as the Gators fell silent at the hands of Auburn's Tigers 24-13. Things got even worse as the Bulldogs from Georgia humiliated the Gators in their annual battle in the Gator Bowl 51-0. Nothing osore could be said about the Gators season after the Bulldogs scrap. All that remained was the salvation of the Gator. We win -the Gators squeak by Kentucky 16-14. The UF's football season came to end with a sudden ant Who said. "First Things First?" I 0K4L7 T') 434 We don't know but we agree with the idea. And one of the first things you should do while you're young is check into your life insurance. Now-bwhile you atre in ollege-yo quality lor the BENEFACTOR; the lit minsiial e xli y created or ollegs students. Som pay less beca use you ale a rIpreferred i isk. The BENEFACTOR iss completelyy adaptable to yoor individual needs, all throuugb your life. It was created by College Liite .the original and omily life insurame company sen ing solmle e ime only. Yom should take tile toW to listen to yotr College 1ife repesentative. / tout he/Ihe most impot ant ( ut oOmltion yo'll ncve have. VICTOR W. McKENZIE &ASSO CI ATES HUGH BROOKER ,A GEORGE HERZOG HANK WRIGHT The College Life Insurance Company of America lome office C'lg(: Square at Central Court South India polis lidislAt,1 a 114205 4115 N.W. 13th St. GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA unexpected 14-10 surprise upset victory over the Hurricanes from Miami. The year of frustration had finally come to an end for the Gators, who finished with a respectable record. Although the Gators didn't win the SEC, they did manage enough muster to claim themselves as the Florida State Champions for 1968. Not quite the same as an SEC title. Albhert L Predicts By Albert The Alligator For all my thousands of fans who have been wondering what's going to happen to poor 'ol Albert, this is just to let you know that I'm going to be back next year, with dirty jokes, morale-boosting messages for the Gators, and most important of all, plenty of predictions on the college football season. UF's boozingest gator also will have a new line of drinks for making victory parties a success. So, start looking for Albert's column in September, and help me in my fight to stay by Century Tower. Which brings me to a joke: Why is my cage the safest place on campus to stand by? (Get out the gatorade and grain) It's the only place on campus you can be sure you'll never get hit by falling bricks. Anyway, see you next year. SEC Gins All Gins W-L-T Pct. W-L-T .Georgia 5-0-1 .917 8-0-2 2. Tennessee 4-1-1 .750 8-1-1 3. Alabama 4-2-0 .667 8-2-0 3. L.S.U. 4-2-0 .667 7-3-0 3. Auburn 4-2-0 .667 6-4-0 6. Florida 3-2-1 .583 6-3-1 6. Ole Miss 3-2-1 .583 6-3-1 8. Vanderbilt 2-3-1 .417 5-4-1 9. Miss. State 0-4-2 .167 0-8-2 10. Kentucky 0-7-0 000 3-7-0 Confident Golf Team Blows It In The Wind The UF golfers, who went to the NCAA tournament confident of a repeat as national champions, returned, wind-swept and greatly humbled. The Gators, after leading the first and second rounds, fell to fifth place after battling high winds in the final round. "The winds and cloud cover over the high altitude created conditions that were impossible to play in," All-American John Darr said. "It was even hard to walk and very frustrating to see a good shot blown off the green by the winds. It took over six hours to play a round that should have taken four." Houston went on to win its 11th championship with 1,223 strokes. The Gators' combined total was 1,241, tied with the University of Georgia. The Gators gained a berth in the finals by winning nine out of ten matches and six out of eight tournaments, including the SEC championships, Georgia. FSU was the only team to defeat the Gators in match play. The UF and FSU split their home-and-home series with each team winning on their home course. Both the Bulldogs and the Seminoles have been invited to play in the 1969 NCAA tournament. In the SEC Championships in Athens, Ga., the Gators finished a disappointing second behind the Bulldogs. The Gators were favored to run-away with the title. In tournament play the Gators won the Senior Bowl, the Tampa Gasparilla, the Florida Intercollegiate, the Miami Invitational, the Gulf Americna Classic, and the big one against the nation's best college teams -the Pikes Peak Invitational. This year's Gator squad was led by All-American Steve Melnyk who is on his way to becoming a two time NCAA All-American. This year Melnyk tied a NCAA record by winning five consecutive major collegiate tournaments. He won the Senior Bowl, the Florida Intercollegiate, the Miami Invitational, the Gulf American and the Houston All-American. Melnyk also tied Houston's Hal Underwood's NCAA record of eight major career tournament victories. Playing behind Menyk and forming the nucleus of the golf team' richlytalented squad was fellow All-American Darr, seniors Richard Spears and John Sale, juniors Mike Estridge and Ron Mahood and freshmen Andy North and David Barnes. Barnes won the Tampa Gasparilla and was low me dalist with North in a triangular match victory over Rollins College, St. Leo College and University of South Florida. Iom i

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By CALDWELL TUMEC Alligator Sports Correspondent Track Coach Jimmy "Hawk" Carmes can look back on his most successful year at the UF with the close of the spring 1969 track season. UF's track season is only slowing up to a trot since it continues through the summer with the NCAA and AAU meets in June. His Gator thinclads finished second in Southeastern Conference outdoors, second in the SEC indoors and third in cross country. Carnes is quick to point out that finishing behind Tennessee is no disgrace. Altogether the track men were undefeated in dual and triangular meets and won the Jesuit Invitational, the Carolina State Record Relays, and the Gulf Coast Invitational. "People think that because we finish second in our own conference we aren't doing the job. It just isn't true. Tennessee is one of the top track powers in the country. Florida is right up there too, but we haven't been strong enough to overpower them in the SEC yet." Carnes has good reason for ranking his Gators with the best in the country. During the indoor season, UF's two-mile relay team consisting of Ken Burnsed, Eamonn O'Keeffe, John Parker, and Bob Lang, was rated fourth in the nation. Jerry Fannin was ranked seventh in the 440 yard dash and track club star Jack Bacheler led the country in the two and three mile runs. Ron Jourdan dominated the country s string of 11 victories at heights over seven feet. Jourdan won the National Collegiate Athletic Association indoor title at 7'4". Jourdan continued his seven-foot prowess outdoors, capturing, among other things, the SEC title. Bacheler did not suffer in the change from indoors to outdoors, either. At one time, he led all Americans in every event from the mile up. His 27:30.0 in the six mile at the Drake relays was the third fastest ever run by ad American. John Morton, UF's stalwart weightman, continued his winning ways during the year. He tossed the shot 54'6, and hurled the discus 189'4/2" for a school record. He added the SEC crown to his growing list of honors which includes All-American rating three years in a row. Roger Carson led the Gator sprint men with a 9.5 hundred and a 21.3 time in the 220. He was followed closely by Tom Brown with 9.6 and 21.4. Parker led the mile and 2-mile with 4:09.2 and 9:10.9 while freshman Jack Nason led the three mile with 14:29.0. Fannin is currently ranked second in the country in the intermediate hurdles with a 51.0 and also holds the UF record in the 440 with a 47.0 clocking. Fannin ran his record hurdle time in capturing the event at the SEC meet. Mike Burton concluded a successful track career with the Gators with his 24'6 winning long jump effort at SEC. His comrade in the triple jump, Ron Coleman, leaped 49'3 for a school record in that event. Woody Bozelle hurled the javelin 215' to lead all Gators in that department. Woody also long jumped 2310. The high hurdle relay team of Jim DeVenny, Joe Shiller, Paul Maliska and Bow Espy is ranked second in the nation behind Tennessee. DeVenny led all UF hurdlers with a 14.3. Lang's school record of 1:48.7 in the 880 was good for only third place in the SEC, even though it was almost a second better than his previous best. But O'Keefe, a freshman from Ireland, was only one tenth behind Lang for fourth place. His time ranks him as the top freshman half-miler in the country. It goes without saying that he holds the UF freshman record for the event. CC Runners Plan On Winning SEC Track Coach Jimmy Carnes' plans for next season include starting the year off by winning the Southeastern Conference cross country title. "We have a good group of freshmen coming in, including Mark Bir, a 9:04 two-miler from Indiana. And some of our older boys aren't too bad either," Carnes said. John Parker won the SEC indoor mile title this year. Jack Nason, a freshman, placed fifth in the SEC cross country meet, and Frank Betta, another first year man ran a freshman record for the mile in 4:12.4. Add to that list half miler Ken Burnsed, distance specialist Johnny Brown, senior miler Steve Atkinson, and Roy Benjamin, who showed promise with a 4:18 mile early in the season before injuring his foot. Carnes said he still retains the hope of signing 4:10 miler Del Ramers of Dunedin, who broke Nason's older record in the state meet to rank second among the country's high school milers. The track team will suffer somewhat from the loss of All-AmericansJohn Morton in the weights and Mike Burton in the long jump and javelin. The slack should be taken up by John Courtney, who has shown promise in the discus, and Ron Coleman, a freshman who captured the SEC indoor title in the long jump. according to Carnes. And the running events? Carnes has to smile when he thinks about it. Jerry Fannin (47.1 in the 440) and Bill Balliner (48.1) both return promising a strong mile relay. Bob Lang can go in either the mile or the two mile relay with a 47.6 quarter and a 1:48.7 880 to Ids credit. Tennis Team No.,1 Three Named AlI-SEC The UF tennis team, SEC champs for the second straight year, placed three members on the All-SEC team, as well as having itscoach repeat as conference coach of the year. Armi Neeley, Charlie Owens and Jamie Pressley, along with one player each from Louisiana State, Mississippi State and Georgia were named All-SEC. Coach Bill Potter, the man behind the UF's successful 18-1-1 record, was also honored by the conference for the second straight year. In the SEC tourney, the Gators garnered 35 points. Its closest opponent, Georgia, registered 27 points. Neeley, top-seeded in the singles play began the tourney romp by beating LSU's top player Steve Faulk, seeded No. 2 in the conference. The match, which went 4-6, 10-8, 6-3, lasted two hours. UF netmen came out on top in five of six singles matches, with Georgia's Mike Cmaylo beating UF's Paul Lunetta, 6-3, 5-7, 6-3. The University of Miami-UF meeting, the weekend after the SEC tourney, was the last for the Gators in the 1969 season, and the final collegiate match for Neeley and Pressley, who both graduated. Owens, a freshman, has three years left to aid the Gators. The '70 Gators' hopes will rest mainly on Owens, but Senior Greg Hilley and Junior Bruce Bartlett will play a big part in the Gators' attempt at a third-time SEC championship. Junior Paul Lunetta, and Seniors Lance Novak and Will Sherwood, will also be important. Welcome to the University of Florida And Gainesville Make COUCH'S Your T.V. Headquarters North Central Florida's Largest Delux compact 12" diag. Famous Zenith Handcrafted chassis K 3-Stage IF Amplifier Deluxe Video Range Tuning System .A Front Mounted The ROAMER -A1331 Speaker Oni' Couch's has a 12,000 Volts of S Selection Picture Power 0 Price -Gus P rPwmodel for i 0 Servie -we Buy it in Gainesville where .Terms -B you can get service for the 0 Quality -Z same or less. Performance quaranteed by Couch's own award winning Service Dept. "The Home No better at 608 N. Main St. -Ph. 376-7171 Serving the Needs of the University for 35 years ly $999 III largest in Gainesville aranteed lowest model do our own uy 6 ways Zenith handcrafted of Zenith" any Price Friday, August 22, 1969, The Florida Alfigtor, Page 7.C FIVE GATORS INVITED TO NCAA Cindermen Complete Successful Season

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SiOp KSTORE OF FLORIDA BOOKSTORE t Service Center rn ~ ~-*--.& I. ~ tUCE POLICY NEW BOOK PRICE BOOKS IN GOOD CONDITION -IF ND OF TERM. OK THAT HAS BEEN DISCONTINUED. Pr .Augut 22,"a.ITh0ordA680. ,.Se Branch Stores Medical Center, Broward, Graham Area & Jennings, Florida Union Shop, New Tower Shop Check Our List For Your Needs TEXTBOOKS -NEW AND USED ARCHITECTURAL EQUIPMENT AND SUPPUES ART SUPPLIES CRAFT SUPPLIES STUDY LAMPS GYM OUTFITS SWEATSHIRTS COLLEGE PETS e COLLEGE SEAL 0 MASCOT STATIONARY 9 FILM AND DEVELOPING SERVICE e CANDY, aGARETTES, PIPES, TOBACCO 0 FLORIDA RECORD ALBUMS e NORCROSS GREETING CARDS COLLEGE JEWELRY AND CLASS RINGS WRITING EQUIPMENT BY SCHAEFFER, PARKER, ESTERBROOK, NORMA, SCRIPTO & PAPERMATE PENNANTS AND DECALS COMPLETE UNE OF GENERAL SUPPLIES DRUGS AND SUNDRIES

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Pegs 10.C,The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 22, 1i96 Basketball '68-'69.Big Wins 2nd Half Makes Season HARDWORKING COACH TOMMY BARTLETT .Named 1969 Alligator Coach of the Year IT WAS UP AND DOWN FOR THE BASKETBALL GATORS ..but second half wins made the season WELCOME FRESHMEN from the /IT 171* W. UNIVERSITY AYE. May ON THE "GOLD COAST" Headquarters for Your Collegiate Needs PANTS by H.I.S. & LEVI SHIRTS by H.I.S. TIES BELTS SWEAT SHIRTS (U of FLA) TEN NIS SHOES (CONVERSE, U.S. KEDS) GYM SHORTS T-SHIRTS (U of FLA) LEVIS (Pants, Jeans & Corduroys) FRATERNITY LAVALIERS FRATERNITY LAPEL PINS HANDBALLS TENNIS BALLS HANDBALL GLOVES ATHLETIC SUPPORTERS, W E H A V E T H E REGULATION GYM CLOTHES FOR PHYSICAL EDUCATION NEEDS Shop at The Gator Shop -directly acr University Avenue from oe men's dorms, on The Gold Coat near The Collge Inn. We cater to .l your need., whether for gym or dress. Why fight downtown when we ae so convenient? Gators Stun #4 Kentucky THE GATORS GOT A REPUTATION ..for being a giant killer And Bartlett Named Gator Coach Of The Year In Poll WELCOME to GATORLAND ALWAYS BE ON TIME TO CLASS Use a CLOCK RADIO N.C. Florida's Largest Selection 0 Solid State 0 Touch'n Snooze control SSleep Switch 0 Sleep & Clock Dial Light 7 mf Z -275 dock radios from $17.95 F COUCH'S SELLS IT, COUCH'S SERVICES IT. COUCH'S 608 N. MAIN 376-7171 UF's Head Basketball Coach Tommy Bartlett was named the Alligator's Coach-of-the-Year, according to Alligator Sports Editor Marc Dunn. Coach Bartlett's 1968-69 team finished 18-9 on the season and received on the strength of their upset victories over National Collegiate Athletic Association bound Kentucky and National Invitational Tournament bound Tennessee, a first-er bid to the NIT. Voting for the award was done by UF's Sports Information Director Norm Carlson, Assistant Director Richard Giannini, Chairman of the Committee on Intercolegiate Athletics Mandell Glicksberg, former Alligator Assistant Sports Editor Bill Dunn and Alligator Sports Editor Marc Dunn. Due to Bartlett's three-year success of 55 victories against only 23 losses, UF Athletic Director Ray Graves announced an unprecedented four-year extension of Bartlett's contract. Bartlett's brand of basketball has brought standing-room-only crowds to Florida Gym this past season. His mixture of studied defensive strategy with a fast-breaking, high-scoring offensive to produce the kind of basketball action the fans love.

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By MARC DUNN AligatorSports Edito' UF's Gator cagers rebounded off a mediocre early season to come on strong enough for a National Invitational Tournament bid in March. Gator All-American Neal Walk consistently led the cage attack during the 1969-70 season averaging 24 points and 18 rebounds a game. Young Players To Grace Team The loss of an All-American and three senior starters from the 1968-69 Gator basketball team points to a rebuilding year for the next edition of the U cagers. Coach Tommy Bartlett has a very difficult task in finding a replacement for Neal Walk, who set every major UF basketball record and was the second round draft choice of both professional leagues. The only starter returning fronr the Gator National Invitational Tournament team i Captain Andy Owens. The six-foot-fIve 210-pound All-Southeastern Conference player averaged 16.1 points a game and 8.6 rebounds. Junior Ed Lukco returns to try for the right wing position but will have competition from Earl Finley, a 6-7 West Palm Beach Jr. College transfer. Another transfer Tom Purvis, also 6-7, will be pushing for one of the two wing positions. The two transtera will givethe Gators the height they will need. Freshman Cliff Cox, 6-6, has an excellent outside shot and wil be -in contention for the wing position. The biggest rebuilding spot for the Gators will be at the point guard. Leading the list of candidates will be Tony Duva, 6-0, and Jerry Hoover,-6-0 Duva was red-shirted this past season although he dressed-out for every game. Hoover was also red shirted this last season. Replacing Walk wil also be a tough job for Bartlett. Gary Waddell measures up to Walk in height, both are 6-10, but has not had a change to prove hi credentials in varsity competition yet. Ibs doubt that Waddle, who was the leading fresh score, will be another Wale but the Gator All-American was not Oxtstandingaa ft bumeuther. It looks-like UF will be off to another slow start until Bartlett is able to find the right combination of green cagers to play with Owens. One advantage the Gators will have over this years starters is height. If the starters are Owens, Pinley, Purvis, Waddell and Duva the average height will be 6-5, two inches more than this season. At best the Gators must be considered dark horse candidates 6F the SEC title. I led the team ins Of the start McGinnis had theI percentage, hitting of his shots. Towards the season talk began NIT berth even w third place fi Southeastern Cor conference rules w 1969 to allow tea the conference wi post-season tournma UF traveled toI two away games and Ole Miss. T home wounded b) Rebels by two p hopes were still all Before the last. Gators had t( Jacksonville for ALL-AMECAWKLEDWY 1969 Gators Earn F'irst q $11,799 What's the catch? There isn't any. $1,79+*is the suggested retail price at the port of entry for the VW sedan. The price includes the Federal excise tax and import duty. It also includes the built-in heater/defroster, windshield washer, electric windshield wipers, outside rearview mirror, padded dashboard, armrests and sunvisors, front seat headrests, and seat belts front and back. Not to mention the new electric rear-window defogger and the new ignition/steering lock. (When the key is removed, the steering wheel is locked in place.) It's the price of the real thing, not a strippeddown economy model. What else do you have to pay? The charge for transporting the car from the port of entry. The dealer delivery charge. And local sales tax. There is one optional that makes a lot of sense. The automatic stick shift. (It eliminates the clutch pedal.) Well, that's it. Unless, of course, you count the cost of gas and oil it takes you to get here in your present car. AUTHOR 9 FrMay, August 22, IM, The FlOrIda ANinter; Pop IIC NIT Bid mists with 129. West Virginia. UF won that one ing six Mike 75-57 playing in their practice best field goal jerseys due to a mix up in who g 52 per cent was to wear dark and who was to wear white. end of the A day before the season concerning the finale the NIT selection ith a second or committee invited the Gators to nish in the play in New York, UF inference. The celebrated by beating Alabama ere changed in 73-60. ms other than UF ran into Temple, the nner to play in eventual NIT champion, in the agents. first game and came out on the Mssssippi for short end, 82-66. against MSU It was an abrupt ending for rhey returned the high-flying Gators but they y a loss to the were outclassed by a superior oints but NIT Temple five. The Owls came on ve. strong after a slow first half to SEC game the sweep the Gators off the court o travel to with excellent shooting and a game with ball-handling. I MILLER-BROWN 4222 NW 13th STREET -376-4551 Wale was drafted second in enough to help revive the team. both the National and American Coach Tommy Bartlett's Basketball leagues. He signed cagers adopted a new more with Pheonix Suns of the NBA agressive personality in the for an estimated $300,O00. second half of the season, After the first 12 games UF wn 12of 14. was 6-6 suffering losses to In five days the Gators Jacsonvie, L ian State, knocked off nationally ranked Northwestern, Vanderbilt, Kentucky, Tennessee and LSU Kentucky and Tennessee. at home. Andy Owens came on Five of the six losses were on strong in these games averaging the road. The lone loss at home 18.8 points a game. was to Vanderbilt and the loss to Owens and Welsch led the the Volunteers was by one team from the free-throw line point averaging close to 80 per cent. The Gators were hampered Welsch tied Kentucky by by poor free throw and field sinking a toss from the free goal shooting during the first throw line in the closing minute half of the season plus the loss that enabled the Gators to beat of Todd Lalich, Skip Lewis and the number four ranked Mike McGinnis. Wildcats. Fortunately the play of Boyd Playmaker Mike Leatherwood Welsch and Ed Lukco was good directed the Gator attack and

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w. U Page 12-C, The Florida Alligator, Friday, A ugust 22, 1969 WIN SEC EAST. LOSE TO WEST Baseballers Repeat Last Year's Record By ED PAVELKA Alligator Sports Writer Almost. Again. Those two words are a concise summation of the 1969 baseball season for Coach Dave Fuller's Gator diamond nine. For the second straight year, the Gators charged to the Southeastern Conference's Eastern Division title and a berth in the three-game championship playoff against the Western winner. And, like in 1968, the Gators lost not only the SEC title but the accompanying bid to the District 3 NCAA playoffs in Gastonia, N.C. The booming bats of the University of Mississippi stopped the Gators as cold this season as Alabama's tight pitching did a year ago. The Rebels, behind five home runs, swept the UF in two games. They have since captured the Gastonia tournament to win a trip to the College World Series in Omaha, Neb. The Gators finished their SEC slate with a 13-6 record. Their 28-16 overall mark was built on a season of ups and downs and great performances by several key players. For m ;t he season. the Gators pllas u heir best bail when they hju' to in crucial SEC action. In ion-conference affairs, the UF could muster only a 15-10 record. Highlights of the non-SEC campaign were big wins over state rivals Miami and Florida State. On April 26, a long home run Changes In Sight For Next Season "We've been also-rans for two years with the same people. There will be some changes on next year's team." That's how Gator baseball coach Dave Fuller views this past season and looks to the future. The Gators have posted back-to-back Southeastern Conference Eastern Division titles but in each of the last two years they have been defeated for the overall SEC crown by the Western winner. Many of the same players now have helped compile 1968's 25 -13 record and this campaign's 28 -16 mark will return next season. But Fuller said they won't be starters next year because they've played in the past. "I'm hoping to go back to a scrappy style of play next year," Fuller said. "We left far too many runners stranded on base this year by swinging for home runs. I want to see more stress on running, bunting and squeeze plays." To find the unselfish, "team" players needed to institute a return to fundamental baseball, Fuller said he will go to his B-team rather than to drastic mass recruiting. Two B-teamers Fuller will be counting upon heavily are Fred Bretz and Larry Kieszek. Bretz was the B's leading hitter this past season with a .297 average. He and Jim Gruber, a .192 hitting utility man on the varsity, will vie for the first base position vacated by graduating Skip Lujack. Kieszek "can do the job for us as catcher" according to Fuller, who recently signed him to a scholarship. Although missing much of the B-team schedule due to an inured finger, Kieszek has .shown enough potential to take over for departing seniors Mike Ovca and Tom Eason. At other Gator positions, veterans will probably have the upper hand when next fall's six-week practice session opens. At second base, two-year letterman Leon Bloodworth will open ahead of red-shirt John Flad. Rod Wright, a 316 varsity hitter this season, is expected to have no opposition in retaining his third base position. Shortstop could be a real battle between veteran Tommy Blankenship and sophomore-to-be Rick Scarborough. Fuller credits Blankenship, who hit .313 in 22 games this year, with having a good season on offense and playing satisfactory defense, but he feels that Scarborough could develop into a great infielder. In the outfield, Fuller will have a proven crew of Tony Dobies, Guy McTheny and Will Harman retuming. Dobies is a two-year letterman, McTheny was the UF's leading hitter this year with a .320 average and Harman, who can also fill in behind the plate, hit a steady .302. Fuller will have a sound pitching staff returning in 1970, even though he will lose his ace, Jim Courier, through graduation. Top righthanders returning will be Glen Pickern who slumped to a 4-4 record this year after making All-SEC on a 10-3 mark as a sophomore. Aslo coming back is Wayne Rogers (3-2) and Bill Seagraves (1-0). Larry Sheffield and Tom Seybold will be counted on by Fuller to replace southpaws Courier and Mike Jacobs. Both will be juniors and they posted 2-2 and 0-1 records, respectively, this past season. Fuller does plan to sign at least one top junior college prospect and two high school players. The JC player is a shortstop who could also play second or third, according to Fuller. One of the prep starts is a righthanded pitcher and the other lefthanded hitting and throwing outfielder. Fuller said he hopes to have all three in the Gator fold by June 11. "If I sign anybody else, it will probably be a catcher," Fuller said in explaining that it would be possible for him to offer scholarships to four or five other players. by UF third baseman Rod Wright helped power the Gators past the Hurricanes. 7-3. The win broke a string of seven straight Miami victories over the UF, dating back to last year. Three days later, a wild top of the ninth in Tallahassee saw the Gators score five runs for a 9-4 victory that ended a 21-game FSU victory streak. That win also helped the UF to a 3-2 series advantage over the Seminoles this S ar. Individuallv s%.veral Gators had a standout season. Two, h owever enjoyed years bordering on the fantastic. Senior lefthander Jim Courier. recently voted the team's "most valuable player," bounced back from a year of tendonitis trouble to become the SEC's best pitcher. Seven complete games and two shutouts highlighted his 11-2 record and 1.89 earned run average. He fanned 65 batters in 95 innings whilk walking 16 and allowing 83 hits. Courier, who helped his own cause many times with timely hitting that built a .333 batting average, was an easy selection to the 1969 all-SEC team. Another Gator making the honor squad was sophomore centerfielder Guy McTheny, an all-around athlete who was the starting split end and leading pass receiver on the UF gridiron last fall. McTheny's .320 batting mark was the highest of any Gator regular and the leadoff hitter also paced the squad in six other plate categories: runs scored (35), doubles (10), home runs (4), total bases (74), stolen bases (13) and slugging percentage (.493). Skip Lulack, senior First baseman, kept McTheny from sweeping all of the offensive categories by leading in hits FINAL STANDINGS EASTERN SEC Gims UF 13-4 Tennessee 9-5 Georgia 9-8 Kentucky 7-9 Auburn 7-10 Vanderbilt 3-12 Pet. .765, .643 .sa9 .438 .412 .200 All Gms 26-13 19-15 15-19 17-15 19-18 WESTERN Ole Miss miss. St. Alabama L.S.U. st-s 11-7 8-9 4-13 .688 21-13 .611 20-10 .471 24-15 .235 11-24 a (49), triples (3) and runs batted _f in (35) while compiling a .310 average. Lujack also posted a .997 f i e I d i n ave rage, committing only one error mi 385 chances. Catcher Mike Ovca was the third Gator to make the all-SEC team this year and the only UF repeater off the 1968 team. The .264 hitter made only three errors in 40 games behind the Always be on the winning earm with a Portable Radio from COUCH'S Superb AM reception and O for after the ball game d r i f t-free FM/AFC reception The same ZENITH quality is built into this shirt-pocket model Let your hands go free ZENITH F'A COUCH'S always has a fresh supply of batteries Buy it in GAINESVILLE from COUCH'S for the same or LESS and get full guarantee and service. COUCH'S INC. 608 N. MAIN offering the students and faculty the best in products and service for 35 years. plate in building a .986 fielding average. The Gators' second leading hitter was junior Rod Wright, a sure-fielding third baseman who hit three home runs on his way to a .316 average. S h o r t s t o p Tommy Blankenship (.313) and rightfielders Will Harman and Dale Turlington (both .302) Were other UF regulars ending the season over .300. Turlington has ended his career, but Blankenship and Harman will be back for their senior years. As a team, the Gators compiled a .281 batting average. The pitching staff, led by graduating seniors Courier, David Kahn (3-4) and Mike Jacobs (4-1), hit at an unusually high .335 mark and hurled for a respectable 2.60 ERA. This season's action brought Fuller's 22-year record to 418-217, the best among all collegiate coaches in the South. m

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Friday, Asagmt 22, lOSS, The FlorideA liugo, Pop 13-C ~ator T-HE UNIVERSITY CITY'S FINEST LUXURY APARTMENTS e Colonial Design 0 1, 2 and 3 Bedrooms 0 Furnished 0 Two Large Pools Two Spacious Courtyards 0 Ample Parking e Private Patio or Balcony Nine or Twelve Months Lease Available Puppies Welcome APPLICATION I Yea, I would like a () 1, () 2, () 3 bedroom, () furniahed ( unuriahed apartment at Gator Town. I am enclosing the required $100 Security Deposit to reserve an apartment for --months, starting September 15, 1969. NAME MAILING ADDRESS (Number, Street, City, State, and ZIP) HOME TELEPHONE HInclude AreaCode) ACADEMIC CLASSIFICATION (Year and Major) SIGNATURE For further inf write 309 S.W. 16thAAvenue, Gainesvil L ~FoUrthe61 r nonna7&34n7 ----MM a -a" Master TV antenna (cable TV available) Large Walk-in Closets Laundry Facilities Central Heat Sound Conditioning Wall-to-Wall Carpeting All Electric Kitchens by HOTPOINT All Utilities Paid Except Electricity and Telephone PRICES (Furnished, 12 Month Lease) 1 BR $140 2 BR $170 3 BR $210 ----I I w I

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*'t .1 Page 14-C. The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 22, 1969 Those Long-Haired College Kids ...-.~. Four By MARC DUNN Alligator Sports Editor Four All-Star candidates are listed for 1969 in the Gator football prospectus. Junior guard Donnie Williams is the only candidate from the offensive squad. He is joined by cornerback Steve Tannen, tackle Jim Hadley and end Jack Youngblood on defense. The only position not having a starter is quarterback. The roster lists senior Jack Eckdahl and sophomore John Reaves. The starting positions could change before the regular season gets underway STEVE TANNEN .Senior cornerback Gators Possible All-Stars Sept. 20 against Houston. The final decisions will be made after the pre-season practice session in. September. Of the 22 starting positions 13 are held by seniors, seven by juniors and two by sophomores. The defense hasn't any sophomore starters, but sophs Tommy Durrance and Carlos Alvarez have earned offensive positions at tailback and flanker. Twelve starters are backed up by first year boys which emphasizes Head Coach Ray Graves' lack of experienced depth. Headlining the Gator returnees is Tannen, who led the team in punt returns, was second in interceptions and first in fumble recoveries and blocked punts. With the graduation of Larry Smith and Tom Christian the third and fifth place rushers from last season are the only offensive running backs returning. Jerry Vinesett, listed second team for 1969, rushed for 3.7 average in 1968 and Gary Walker, next season starting fulback, averaged 3.1 yards per carry. Quarterback Eckdahl was the third leading rusher with 174 yards. The key losses from the 6-3-1 1968 team include Smith, Christian, DONNIE WILLIAMS .Junior guard All-Americans Guy Dennis and Jim Yarbrough, quarterback Larry Rentz, tackle Bill Dorsey and linebacker David Mann. The remainder of the offensive starters are: Split end Paul Maliska, tackles Wayne Griffith and Mac Steen, center Kim Helton, guard Randy Warbritton and tight end Skip Amelung. Defensive starters: Tackle Robbie Rebol, end Bob Coleman, linebackers David Ghesquire, Tom Abdelnour and Mike Kelley, cornerback Mark Ely, and safeties Jack Burns and Skip Albury. JIM HADLEY .Senior tackle PLANNED BY HEAD CHEERLEADER 'A Little Spice In The Pep Rallies' By BETH GRAVES Alligator Feature Writer Organizing the squad, arranging alumni get-togethers at out-of-town games, planning away trips, and submitting a workable budget will all be a part of the new head cheerleader's job. Twenty years old and majoring in Industrial Engineering, Phil Johnson has cheered since he was a freshman when he was talked into going out by a fraternity brother and former head cheerleader, Roddy Grubbs. Among the technicalities involved in organizing the squad, one of the most important aspects is that of working out a feasible budget. "Our money comes from funds of the Student Government and the Athletic Department," Johnson said. "This year we requested a total of $4500 to cover uniforms, meals, transportation, and rooms for away games, and the summer clinic," he added. Last year the UF cheerleaders came back from the clinic with first place honors. Included in Johnson's responsibilities is the role of public relations man or liaison from the squad to the Athletic Department. "We have to work with the program as well as its alumni," the veteran cheerleader commented. On away games, the cheerleaders are the representatives of the whole student body to the alumni, and meeting, impressing and getting to know them is a routine job of the squad's. One of the biggest events is the Florida-Georgia Barbecue which thousands of UF alumni attend annually in JackonvilleWhen asked if he had any new ideas for pep rallies on the campus, or ways of getting crowd reaction throughout next year's season, Johnson seemed optimistic. "The students like to have a little spice in the pep rallies, and they should. It's asking alot for the student body to come out in the afternoon only to yell for themselves the majority of the time. They liked the idea of watching practice and cheering at the same time last fall, and if all works out the way we want it to, we'll follow through with the idea next year," he replied. -I

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Pos 16., The Florida Alligator,Friday, August 22. IMS STUDENT FOOTBALL INFORMATON-1969 HOW DO I OBTAIN A FOOTBALL TICKET? STUDENT SEATING STUDENT SEATING: Each student who pays the stydent activity fee is entitled to admission to each home football game. He must, however, obtain a reserved seat assignment for each game separately. These are issued at the Gate 13 ticket windows, east side, according to the following schedule: DATE TICKETS: Houston September 20 date tickets @ $3.00 FSU October 4 date tickets @ $3.00 No. Carolina October 18 date tickets @ $6.00 Vanderbilt October 29 date tickets @ $3.00 Kentucky November 15 date tickets @ $3.00 Student wives will have the opportunity to purchase season tickets for the five Gainesville home games for $18.00, limited to 1,500. Spouse tickets must be purchased at Gate 13 Sept. 17 -18 -19 -20, 1969 ONLY. Window and date schedule for each game is as follows: HOUSTON (September 20) F.S.U. (October 4) Six Windows Ten Windows Wednesday, September 17 2:30 p.m. -8:00 p.m. Monday, September 29 2:30 p.m. -8:00 p.m. Thursday, September 18 2:30 p.m. -8:00 p.m. Tuesday, September 30 1:00 p.m. -8:00 p.m. Friday, September 19 1:00 p.m. -5:00 p.m. Saturday, September 20 10:00 a.m. -2:00 p.m. Bloc Seating No bloc seating Fee cards in Monday, September 29 Gate 13 Tickets picked up Wednesday, October 1 Gate 13 NORTH CAROLINA (Homecoming) (October 18) Ten Windows Monday, October 13 2:30 p.m. -8:00 p.m. Tuesday, October 14 1:00 p.m. -8:00 p.m. Bloc seating Initial request Friday, October 3 Gate 13 Fee cards in Wednesday, October 8 Gate 13 Tickets picked up Friday, October 10 Gate 13 VANDERBILT (October 25) KENTUCKY (November 15) Six Windows Six Windows Monday, October 20 2:30 p.m. -8:00 p.m. Monday, November 10 2:30 p.m. -8:00 p.m. Tuesday, October 21 1:00 p.m. -5:00 p.m. Tuesday, November 11 1:00 p.m. -5:00 p.m. Bloc seating Bloc seating Fee cards in Monday, October 20 Gate 13 Fee cards in Monday, November 10 Gate 13 Tickets picked up Wednesday, Oct6ber 22 Gate 13 Tickets picked up Wednesday, November 12 Gate 13 Thereafter, all seats will be at the regular price of $6.00 for students and general public alike. The tickets will be thoroughly mixed and issued at random so that any seat location could be given out at anytime. There is no advantage to be gained by forming lines early. You MUST accept the ticket issued to you. You may not exchange it later for a better one nor refuse the ticket issued and go to the end of the line in hope of a better draw. Each student must bring his ID cards in person to get his ticket. Those wishing to sit together must come together. However, a student with a non-student date may buy a date ticket at the same window and receive two adjacent seat assignments. A student with a coed date may bring both cards for two tickets. Once your card is punched, you can not buy a date ticket at a later time. The reserved seat assignment is not good for admission; it merely gives the location of your stadium seat. For admission, you must have your picture ID card, validated fee receipt for the first quarter, and a reserved seat assignment. A date must have a date ticket, a seat assignment adjacent to the date's, and be accompanied by a student of the opposite sex. DATE TICKETS DATE TICKETS: Available date tickets may be purchased at the Gate 13 ticket windows at the same time your seat assignment is issued. Once your card is punched, a date ticket can not be obtained at a later time. GEORGIA GAME GEORGIA GAME: Each student who plans to attend the'Georgia game in Jacksonville must deposit $2.00. He will receive a receipt, which he will present at one of the east side ticket booths in Jacksonville for a full refund of his $2.00. Each student must claim his own deposit refund. Deposits will be made and seat assignments issued or, Oct. 27th & 28th on a first come first serve basis during the hours set in paragraph one. After Oct. 30th, ANY REMAINING TICKETS WILL BE PUT ON SALE TO THE GENERAL PUBLIC. Date tickets will be sold at the same time deposits are made and assignments picked up. They will not be sold in Jacksonville, nor will seat assignments be available. Date tickets for this game are $6.00. Georgia will not agree to a reduction. NON-HOME GAMES NON-HOME GAMES: Tickets may be purchased at the ticket office in the lobby of the star'iurri on the west side. You may buy one or more tickets, depending on supply, from the start of school until listed deadlines: SEPT. 27, MISSISSIPPI STA I NOV. 1, AUBURN OCT. 11, TULANE NOV. 29, MIAMI OCT. 11, TULANE NOV. 29, MIAMI