Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

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Full Text
the largest
all-american college
weekly in the
nation

46th YearNo. 19

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THE OLDEST PHOTOGRAPH believed ever taken at the University is shown above. Hie photo,
of preliminary construction of Thomas Hall, was taken in 1905 when building began on the present
campuc site. Thomas was the first dormitory unit built, while Sledd, Peabody and language Halls
came next. The pine woods in the background are probably the site of the present Florida Union,
Cafeteria and Chemistry buildings.
THOMAS AND BUCKMAN OLDEST BUILDINGS
Campus in 1906 Consisted
Os Wilderness, Two Foundations

By MARY ANN GREENE
Assistant Features Editor
In January, 1906, there was little
on the University of Florida cam campus
pus campus that would be familiar today.
Forty-nine years ago the campus
consisted of a tract of uncleared
land and the foundations for two
buildings. Work was just getting
under way to provide facilities for
the Universitys first session which
would begin in the fall.
The University was established
the year before when the Florida
Legislature passed the Buckman
Act consolidating four schools .nto
the University of Florida. A board
of Control was appointed to su supervise
pervise supervise this new institution.
The Board of Control had the
job of choosing a site for the new j
university. Together with the I
State Board of Education it final-
ly voted for Gainesville. It was j
agreed that the first season of the
new university would begin in Sep-
tember, 1906.
In the meantime, a campus was 1
to be built. By Board action a
firm of architects was appointed
to prepare a prospectus of the uni university
versity university grounds. Dormitories and
classrooms were to take prece precedence
dence precedence over other types of construc construction.
tion. construction. It was on the motion of P.K. ;
Yonge, a Board member, that the
Tudor-Gothic" style of architec architecture
ture architecture was chosen.
Thomas and Buckman were the
first two buildings completed, at
a combined cost of $75,250. Tho Thomas
mas Thomas Hall was named for W. R.
Thomas, mayor of Gainesville who
fought to get the university locat located
ed located in his city. The name Buckman
was chosen in honor of H. H. Buck Buckman.
man. Buckman. the legislator who introduc introduced
ed introduced the act creating the school <
The Universitys first two build- ;
ings had a variety of functions. In j
Thomas, the first floor of the lorth j
section contained administrative i
offices. The south first floor hous- 1
ed the offices and laboratory of the <
Agricultural Experiment Station.
Between these wings were the kit- 1
chen, dining room, and auditor- <

OUT OF 74 SIGNED UP
Forty Coeds Pledge
As Sorority Rush Ends

Forty coeds out of the 74 sign signed
ed signed up for rush pledged 12 sorori sororities
ties sororities Wednesday in the climax to
formal rush.
The pledges, by sororities areas
follows :
Alpha Chi Omega Donna Bat Batchelor,
chelor, Batchelor, Virginia Ann Johns, Be-
AOPi Plans
Open House
Sunday at 4
Gamma Omicron Chapter of Al Alpha
pha Alpha Omicron Pi sorority will hold
an open house Sunday afternoon
from 4 to 6 p.m. in their new
home at 819 W. Panhellenic Drive.
Lois Reid, chapter president, has
announced that the private dedica dedication
tion dedication ceremony will be at 3:30. pre preceding
ceding preceding the open house. Acting Presi
dent John S. Allen wlil speak at
this time.
The modified Georgian building
of red brick was build at a cost
of approximately $135,000, and
houses 38 girls.
Alumnae and friends of the so
rority are cordially invited to at attend
tend attend the open house.
*

the FLORIDA ALLIGATOR

ium. On the second floor were i Buckman* first floor contained
classrooms, laboratories, and a It- l a gymnasium and infirmary,
brary. The third floor was used j Classrooms were on the second
for a dormitory. (floor, with dormitory rooms above.
PART OF SPEAKERS" BUREAU PROGRAM
'University Story 7 Aired
Over Florida in April

Radio and TV stations through throughout
out throughout the slate will present "The Uni University
versity University of Florida Story April 18-
24, according to Florida Blue Key
Speakers Bureau Chairman Tom
Byrd, who yesterday announced
for speaking positions.
| The taped series of 15-minute
i broadcasts,, under the direction of
[Radio-TV chairman T. A. Shell,
will be aired during the Bureaus
UF week.
| The new medium of reaching the j
'people of the state will feature j
panel discussions, interviews, and j
actual voices of campus figures. 1
Over 70 stations in Florida will
have a chance to broadcast these
programs.
Academic leaders, administra administrative
tive administrative officials, and student person person-1
-1 person-1 nel all will figure in the broad broadcasts,
casts, broadcasts, Shell plans. Assisting him in
the public service series is pro-
Applications Due for ME,
Staff of Peninsula
Applications are being accepted
for the offices of managing edi editor
tor editor and business manager of Penin Peninsula.
sula.- Peninsula. Any student having a 2.0
average and at least sophomore
standing may apply. Applications
should be in the form of a letter
addressed to the Peninsula Govern Governing
ing Governing Board, Dr. C. E. Mounts, chair chairman.
man. chairman. and should be left eithei at
the Florida Union Desk or 317 An Anderson
derson Anderson Hall on later than 5 p.m., j
Tuesday. A personal Interview with 1
the Board i* required of all appli applicants.
cants. applicants.

verly Jean, Richardson, Carol To Tomelllm,
melllm, Tomelllm, and Lila Williams.
Alpha Delta Pi Katherine j
Burch, June Lenzen. Mary Me- i
Clamroch, Linda Gail Obert.
Alpha Epsilon Phi Cuna Re- |
becca Cohen, and Marlene Francis
Turner.
Alpha Omicron Pi Bettie-
Love Blackburn, Judith Duensing.
Francine Louise Ivers, Dorothy
Katherine Lawton, Judy Jean Lock Lockard,
ard, Lockard, 3ylvia Anne Mayer, Barbara
Mitchell, and Germaine Thomas.
Chi Omega Barbara Joan
Kennedy, Carole North, and Faye
Weathersby.
Delta Delta Delta Jacquelyn
Carter, Jo Anne Couse, and Jiuia
Ann Seibert.
Delta Gamma Lucy Fazi,
Georgia Fisher. Sherry OBarr,
Ginger Rose, and Helen White.
Delta Phi Nita Caplain, and
Sheila Lenore Makstein.
Kappa Delta Deedie Bohland,
Ann Brannan, and Judy Christen Christensen.
sen. Christensen.
Phi Mu Catherine Anne Boy Boyj
j Boyj er, Glenda Mae Martin, and Mar Marjory
jory Marjory Rogers.
Sigma Kappa Melba Jean
Hilton.
Zeta Tau Alpha Nancy Anne
Moorse.

gram director Ray Dantzler of
WRUF.
Speakers Bureau officials ap appeared
peared appeared elated this week at the
number of applications received
for speaking posts.
We are very pleased with the
student body response to our ap appeal
peal appeal for speakers," Byrd said. I
think we will be able to send at
least 25 well-rounded teams to in inform
form inform the people of the state about
|our University."
j From the 150 applications, about
75 speakers will be chosen Wed Wednesday
nesday Wednesday night, March 2, when the
Selection Committee meets. Their
names will be announced in next
week's Alligator.
Selection Committee memoers
include: Procurement Chairman
Larry Sands, Debator Henry F.
Byrd, Speech Graduate Stafford
North, and Blue Key President
Chubby Damsel.
Bus Ad Day Set
In March; Plans
Set for Event
Plans are now under way for the
sth annual Business Administra Administra;
; Administra; bion Day, to be staged March 23.
The slogan for this year is For
Your Future Make B Day Your
Day."
Prominent business men from
all over the state will be on hand
to discuss the problems of business
in Florida today. Topics will in include
clude include accounting, marketing, in- j
surance, management, real |
estate, banking and finance, trans- )
portation and foreign trade.
Speakers for the real estate pa- j
nel have been announced by real j
estate representative Lillian Jen- j
kins. Richard Bartee Sr., of Jack Jacksonville,
sonville, Jacksonville, member of the National
A*sn. of Real Estate Boards will 1
speak on Opportunities in Peal
j Estate as a Broker. Mrs. Betty
I Jane Boone, Daytona Beach, will
j speak on Women in Real Estate"
! and Richard Hamilton, Jackson Jacksonville
ville Jacksonville Beach, a member of the
American Institute of Appraisers,
will discuss "Real Estate Apprais Appraising
ing Appraising as a Career."
John W. Hoover Selected
For Boeing Program
John W. Hoover, associate pro professor
fessor professor of aeronautical engineering,
has been invited to. join the Boe Boeing
ing Boeing summer program in Seattle.
Every summer out of some 300
applicants the aircraft company
selects 50 to 70 engineers from
the nations university facilities to
take part in a two- month prac practice
tice practice program.
Better Get Car Plates
With 1954 Florida license plates
expiring last Sunday, the Campus
Police are warning drivers of
cars with old plates and reporting
I their tag numbers to the county
license office. As long as a car
with an old tag is parked, there is
no violation. jk

University of Florida, Gainesville

Board Agrees on New UF President

Member Says
Unofficial Choice
Made Last Week
A majority of the State Board
of Control has agreed on a single
candidate for the University presi presidency
dency presidency as a result of interviews
Saturday in Jacksonville, a Board
member said last night.
The Board member, who asked
that his name not be made public,
said also that the chances at the
educator would dfccept "look grim
if he is basing his decision on a
proposed $5,000 salary increase.
After Sen. Verle Pope, chairman
of the Senate Appropriations Com
mittee, publicly announced opposi opposition
tion opposition to the salary hike, no can candidate
didate candidate would accept the job with
expectations of making $20,000
yearly, the member said.
No official action has been taken
by the Board on their choice for
the job vacated by the late Dr. I
J. Hillis Miller, but Board Chair- I
man J. Lee Ballard said yesterday
that official selection would come
in the next week or 10 days.
"We are hopeful to have the mat mathad
had mathad already been made, but said.
Ballard denied that a selection
ter resolved prior to the next Board
meeting March 17, The announce announcement
ment announcement will be made public when the
nomination* ig formally placed be before
fore before the Board of Education.
The member refusedtor ev eal
the choice or the names of any
of the other four candidates under I
consideration whose interviews j
were concluded last week. A source
says three candidates are from out
of state and two from Florida.
"No representations were made
to any candidate that the salary
would be increased at all over the
$15,000 plug perquisites that Is now
given, Ballard stated.
"Everyone interviewed is an
educator," Ballard said. "Each of
the men has a background which
would lend itself to the South and j
Florida. All of the candidates are
familiar with -4he problems of> edu education
cation education in the South."
Gov. Leoy Collins said he is
silliig to recommend to the Legis Legislature
lature Legislature a $20,000 salary, but that
prospects for the position should
not be given any advance assur assurance
ance assurance the pay hike will be author authorized.
ized. authorized.
"I certainly hope the salary prob problem
lem problem will not prevent the Board of
Control from finding the proper
man and submitting a recommend recommendation
ation recommendation to the Board of Education
| as soon as possible,"; Gov. Collins
said. He declared no arrangement
which provided for private funds
to be paid to the president would
be approved.
"I dont want anybody to take j
the job and feel hes got any guar- j
antee of a higher salary," the Gov-
The Florida Times-Union said
ernor continued.
was not eliminated from the run runthat
that runthat Acting President John S. Allen
ning at the Board meeting last
week. Dr. Allen has several times
stated he is not a candidate for
the position.
The Board of Controls selection
must be approved by the Cabinet
Board of Education before a presi president
dent president can be appointed.
Over 200 Summer Jobs
Available for Students
Over 200 jobs in summer camps
and resorts are available to Flor Florida
ida Florida students according to Drane
Smith, Secretary of Labor. Infor Inforj
j Inforj mation concerning summer em em!
! em! ployment and a file of employers
! is available in the student govern government
ment government office, Room 311 Florida Un Un!
! Un! ion, from 3 to 5 p.m. Monday
j through Thursday.
Smiths says his office has writ writj
j writj ten about 500 employers, and ex expects
pects expects to hear from about 300 more. 1
For an eightweek period salaries
run from $75 to S3OO, depending'
on experience.

RECEIVED INTERNATIONAL OLYMPIC ACCLAIM
Noted Swedish Gymnists Here Tonight
For Benefit Show in Florida Gymnasium

By 808 ODARE
Gator Sports Writer
The finest group of amateur
gymnasts ever to appear ur&Vmer ur&Vmerica
ica ur&Vmerica will perform in the Florida
Gym tonight at 8 oclock. The world
renowned Swedish National Gymn Gymnastic
astic Gymnastic Teams will stage what prom promises
ises promises to be the most awe-inspiring
exhibition of physical strength and
coordination seen on the Florida
campus.
In each of their previous engage engagements,
ments, engagements, ticket sales were past all
expectations, and even the entire
West Point Military Academy ap ap|
| ap| plauded for fifteen minutes.
Besides an Olympic caliber per performance.
formance. performance. Rolf Lindeborg. who has
accompanied the teams throughout
their tour in the United States, win

SEN. POPE BELIEVES $20.000 FIGURE 'OUT OF LINE*
Legislative Battle Looms on Salary Request

By DAN HACKEL
Assistant State Editor
A major legislative battle loomed
this week as State Senator Verle
A. Pope, St. Augustine, split with
close friend Gov. Leoy Collins
over the proposed salary raise of
the University of Florida president
to $20,000.
Pope called the projected in increase
crease increase out-of-line" a day after the
Governor announced he was will willing
ing willing to recommend a $20,000 figure
to the Legislature, although no as assurances
surances assurances of its approval could be
j given.
Pope, chairman of the Senate Ap Appropriations
propriations Appropriations Committee, claimed
j the present pay was adequate and
that this hike could set up a chain
which would eventually cost the
state SIOO,OOO or more." He rea rea]
] rea] soned that the $5,000 increase here
would set off a rash of other such

Editor Cobb Told
To Stop Efforts
On '55 Seminole
Editor Bill Cobb was ordered to
| cease work on the 1955 Seminole
j yesterday after an intra-office feud
j prompted an investigation by Flo Florida
rida Florida Blue Key and a special Board
of Student Publications meeting.
Cobb was notified by Buddy Da Davis,
vis, Davis, secretary of the Board, that
all work must stop until a special
Board meeting is held Wednesday
to discuss the matter.
Florida Blue Key is currently
conducting an investigation of the
Seminole matter.
John Paul Jones, chairman of
the Board, ordered Davis to take
the action. Davis letter to Cobb,
delivered yesterday afternoon
while Cobb was at work in his
office, said ...suspend all edito editorial
rial editorial work on the 1955 Seminole
until such time as the Board can
resolve staff difficulties now exis existent."
tent." existent." ;
Several members of Cobbs staff
had threatened to resign if Cobb
did not step down as editor. Cobb
said yesterday the book is proceed proceeding
ing proceeding according to schedule and he
would not step out of the office
for any reason of staff difficulty.
After Cob received the letter
! from Davis, he turned a group of
workers out of the office and left.
He could not be reached for
further comment.
Board members will meet at 6:30
pm. Wednesday in the Board office
in the Florida Union. Reccomrnen Reccomrnendations
dations Reccomrnendations by Florida Blue Key will
be heard, and both Cobb and op opposing
posing opposing staff members will get a
chance to speak at the meeting.
The long-awaited 1954 Seminole
has at last gone to press and will
be delivered to the students dur during
ing during the early part of May accord according
ing according to editor Ann Richardson.
: Miss Richardson said that the
book was completely out of her
hands as all the work was alreadv
been sent out. The engraver will
have all the pictures completed
within the next two weeks and the
printers deadline is 100 days. The
printer has promised to try to
speed delivery if at all possible
but said that the latest delivery
time would be the early part of
May. %
Cultural Film Monday
Three films are scheduled to be
shown at the next program of tne
Cultural Film Series. The free
showing will be Monday at 8 p.m.
in Walker Auditorium.
One film will show Paris ana
bring out its twenty centuries of
prestige another will show Frencn
paintings and the third will be on,
the Abbey of Vezelay.

play Swedish folk songs. Also on
hand to furnish music for the pro program
gram program will be the Gator Variety
Band.
The program will also feature a
color guard formed by the Gator
Guard and the Billy Mitchell Drill
Team. Announcing the program
will be Otis Boggs, sports director
at WRUF, while Henry Constans.
head professor of speech, will maxe
the introductions.
Featuring the performances tnat
won for members of the teams
either Olympic or international
rankings, the program consists of
eleven events and is slated to last
two hours.
The strength required to execute
some of the difficult stunts is per perhaps
haps perhaps made undetectable by Uieir

moves, encompassing FSU presi president
dent president Doak Campbell and many
others in state institutions.
As the State Board of Control
neared an announcement of a oresi oresidential
dential oresidential choice, the controversial
pay boost appeared in for tough
sledding, despite the gubernatorial
recommendation.
"Pope is just speaking for him himself."
self." himself." State Senator W. A. (Bill)
Shands said here yesterday. Just
because a man holds the title of
chairman of a committee does not
necessarily mean he controls that
committee, the Gainesville solon
said.
The governors recommendation
carries a great deal of weight,"
said Shands. who could not indi indicate
cate indicate how the rest of the State
legislature would act on the issue.
Neither could State Representa Representa(Continued
(Continued Representa(Continued on Page TWO)

Stan Kenton Reneges
On Florida Concert

Stan Kenton will not leave the
West coast to tour this area witn
his orchestra, it was announced
this week.
Previously scheduled for this
spring, the Kenton aggregation's
failure to show leaves Lyceum
Council officials scrambling tor
their promised extra added pop popular
ular popular attraction.
While a Florida tour of the mod modern
ern modern orchestra had been planned,
no contract was ever agreed on,
and Kentons decision to adhere to
radio, TV, and recording commit commitments
ments commitments elsewhere forced the coun council
cil council to drop negotiations.
In the meantime, a concerted tal talent
ent talent search was under way, involv involving
ing involving some of the nation's top name
presentations.
Difficulttos with Agent
According to Lyceum president
Don Moore, the difficulties arose
over the booking agents failure to
name any exact date for a South Southern
ern Southern tour, as open dates for the
concert became increasingly more
scarce.
"You cant really blame tne
agent, because no contract was
signed," Moore said. "You cant
really blame us because we were
led astray, and you cant really
blame Kenton those one-nighters
are a drag.
"Any attraction as big as Stan
Kenton can pick and choose its
commitments over the bookers;
those boys dont have to make
tours, he acknowledged.
Other Attractions on Hook
The first indication that Kenton
was not coming was in December
of 1954 when we demanded a con contract
tract contract to hold our date, the Ly Lyceum
ceum Lyceum Council prexy said.
The Council then set to work lm-
Design Plans
Op Display In
Architecture
. An exhibition of photographs il illustrating
lustrating illustrating the principles of archi architecture
tecture architecture is now being shown by the
University of Florida College of
Architecture and Allied Arts.
Entitled Design This Day, the
exhibition was prepared by the
Philadelphia Museum of Art in col collaboration
laboration collaboration with Walter Darwin
! Teague, a pioneer industrial design designer.
er. designer.
The title and photographs are
| taken from Teagues book of the
same name. The exhibition is be being
ing being held in Building "E" on am amj
j amj pus and will continue through
!Sunday.

grace and ease of motion,
one.
Such heralded gymnasts as Ann-
Sofi Petterson, Swedens most suc successful
cessful successful woman gymnast who holds
two world championships, is a
member of the team.
One of Swedens all time great
gymnasts, Anders Lindh, will dem demonstrate
onstrate demonstrate his elegance in free calis calisthenics
thenics calisthenics and long horse vaulting.
The worpens team will lead off
the program with synchronized cal calisthenics,
isthenics, calisthenics, accompanied by Rolf
Lindeborg, playing Swedish font
music. They will follow througn
with tumbling and then individual
routines on the balance team and
uneven parallel bars.
Jumping and vaulting will be the
( Confined on Page SEVEN)

SEN. 811-L SHANDS

> mediately to give the students their
1 promised seventh popular attrac-
I tion.
Since then, every major booking I
i agent in New York and on the j
s West, Coast has been contacted by
i telegram and telephone, according
' to Lyceum officials.
Adding to the confusion was the
uncertain|y of any open date agree agree
agree ing with a Florida tour of an at at,
, at, traction, the conflicting appear appear,
, appear, ances of the Military Ball and
i Spring Frolics bands, and the will will
will wont attitude on the part of Ken Kenton.
ton. Kenton.
Since January, we have been
carrying on full-fledged negotia negotia
negotia tions in our effort to bring that
s extra added attraction, Moore
says.
Under active consideration now!
t are the following artists, who may
i be booked if circumstances work
> out right:
, Duke Ellington, Les Brown, Vm Vm,
, Vm, cent Ldpez, The Commanders,
Vaughn .i Monroe, Fred Waring,
, Woody Herman, and Percy Faith.
. Some of the groups whom tne j
t Lyceum Council tried to obtain,
, and whp were unavailable, include:
, Ray Anthony, Louis Armstrong,
, Gerry Mulligan, Stan Freberg and
Dave Brubeek.
i
mm
-/ h ru
11 v Wp
Mk ff
JOAN HALE is being sponsor sponsorj
j sponsorj ed by the Beta Eta Chapter of
1 Delta Sigma Pi to. compete in
the nation-wide Rose of Deltasig
contest. This brown-eyed, raven
haired coed Is majoring in sec secondary
ondary secondary education, lists marriage
and a family as the focal point
of her future plans. Among
Joans favorite hobbies are
swimming, dancing, and bridge;
her vital statistics read: 36-24-36.
UF Law Students Top
Florida State Bar Exams
University of Florida law school
graduates far surpassed other av averages
erages averages of students passing the Flor Florida
ida Florida State Bar Examination re recently
cently recently given.
The overall average of those j
taking the exam was 64.7 percent.
Gator graduates had an average of j
85.7 compared with other Florida j
law schools of 54.8 and an out of
state average of 66.7
Twenty-four of the 170 examined
were U of F students.
Plan Auto Sports Show
The Sports Car Club, under the
faculty sponsorship of Maj. For Forrest
rest Forrest Frye, is proceeding with plans
for another auto show of the type,
held on ampus las. year. The
show f to be held during University
Open House, will give students an j
opportunity to see the cars own- I
ed and made by members of the j
group. Foreign cars, American
models, and some put together in j
back yards will be on exhibition.

serving
10,000 students
in university
of florida

Friday, February 25, 1955

GOV. LEROY COLLINS

Gator Camera Barred
From Shooting Coeds
A Florida Alligator photographer
was barred thisg week from any
coverage of the formal bidding of
new sorority pledges. When the
photographer entered room 128 Ad Adj
j Adj ministration Bldg., he was imme immediately
diately immediately refered to Evelyn Sellers,
assistant dean of women.
-
Dean Sellers refused any pic pictures
tures pictures or publicity of any form, and
|to fjrove her point she produced
a copy of the National Panhelienic
jCode of Regulations which con condemned
demned condemned publicity of bidding pro procedures.
cedures. procedures.
Dean Sellers explained her ac action
tion action by expressing the belief that
any pictures of coeds experiencing
their happiest moment would prob probably
ably probably include a disappointed rushee
who didnt quite make it. She con concluded
cluded concluded by saying if the Alligator
insisted on covering the event, bid bidding
ding bidding would be moved to a com completely
pletely completely private location.
Member of Wedding
Slated Tonight
In Lab Theatre.
The Member of the Wedding,
the Donaldson Award and, New
York Drama Critics Prize winning
play, will be presented tonight at
8:15 by the Laboratory Theatre.
Mrs. Carson McCullers play ex expresses
presses expresses the extreme loneliness of
adolescence and the strange oond
between the Negro and the white
man in the American South.
In the cast for Member of the
Wedding are: Margaret Lips Lipscomb,
comb, Lipscomb, Janice Urankar, Gerald
Hodges, (young son of Dr. Hodges
of the English Dept.), Edmund
Brelsford, Pat Ackerman, Lewis
Kapner, James Patterson, and
Morton Left
Dave Davis Quits
Commission Race
David A. Davis, law school sen senior,
ior, senior, withdrew from the Gainesville
City Commission race Tuesday,
just one week after announcing his
candidacy. j
Davis said it was his understand understanding
ing understanding when entering the contest that
the only requirement for candidacy
was to be a qualified eleetor. He
t learned Tuesday, the last day for
; filing, that a candidate must also
:be a freeholder (property owner).
Davis regards the freeholder re requirement
quirement requirement as an outmoded regu regulation.
lation. regulation. found in most state and mu municipal
nicipal municipal codes, which should be done
away with completely.
Art Sale in Building X
Art work of architecture stu students
dents students will go on sale in the court
of Building X today at 3:30. The
works include moblies, stabiles,
j sculptures and sketches.
inside today
education: harvard
man looks at local
intellectual
growth page 2
editorial: the fate
of student
| government up to
leaders page 4
sports: fraternities
begin basketball
! play this week page 7
| music: gator band
* in first of season's
1 concerts
| tuesday P4£* 8



Page 2

Florida Alligator

Friday, February 25, 1955

Annual Spring
Open House Set
For March 11 -26
The University plays hosts to the
thousands of parents, alumni, and
friends March 11 through the 26,
during the annual University of
Florida Open House.
Presentations by the various
student organizations will make
the week a glimpse of the activi activities
ties activities an sity. University. Some 50 activities ranging
from the Agricultural Fair to the
Military Ball will be presented
AO thin the 15 day span.
Committees composed of stu students
dents students and faculty have been set up
to coordinate the Open House and
will follow through with the
theme: The University of Florida-
Symbol of the growth and progress
of the state.
Among some of the other activi activities
ties activities to be presented during this
period .are the Engineering Fair;
Greek Week, sponsored by the In Inter-Fraternity
ter-Fraternity Inter-Fraternity Council and Panhel Panhellenic;
lenic; Panhellenic; the High School Basketball
Tournament; the Florida AAU
Swim Meet; the Gators first >ase >aseball
ball >aseball game with Georgia; and the
Florida Players production of
Finians Rainbow.
Parents and alumni are being
invited to witness the numerous
expositions and events as are hun hundreds
dreds hundreds of high school students. It
will serve as an opportunity for
Floridians to see before them the
activities and the interests of their
University.
GAINESVILLES FAVORITE
FAMILY
FRIDAY, FEB. 25
THE WEAK AND
THE WICKED
GLYNIS JOHN'S
SIMONE SILVA
ALSO
THE DESPERADO
WAYNE MORRIS
BEVERLY GARLAND
SATURDAY, FEB. 26
JESSE JAMES # WOMEN
PEGGIE CASTLE
DONALD BARRY
ALSO
THE LONG WAIT
ANTHONY QUINN
CHARLES COBURN
SUNDAY A MONDAY
February 27 A 28
TONIGHT'S THE
NIGHT
DAVID NIVEN
YVONNE DE CARLO
BARRY FITZGERALD
ALSO
PORT OF HELL
DANE CLARK
CAROLE MATHEWS
WAYNE MORRIS
TUESDAY A WEDNESDAY
March 1 & 2
THE HIGH AND
THE MIGHTY
JOHN WAYNE
CLAIRE TREVOR
LARAINE DAY
ALSO
OKLAHOMA
OUTLAWS
A FEATURETTE
THURSDAY A FRIDAY
March 8 A 4
THERE'S NO
BUSINESS LIKE
SHOW BUSINESS
MARILYN MONROE
DONALD OCONNOR
JOHNNIE RAY
ALSO
THUNDERHEAD, SON
OF FLICKA
RODDY MAC DOW ALL
PRESTON FOSTER
RITA JOHNSON

FRIDAY
She Wore A Second
Yellow Ribbon CHANCE
JOHN WAYNE With
LINDA DARNELL ROBERT MIT CHUM
.
SUN., MON., TUES., & WED.
"While Christmas"
BING DANNY
CROSBY KAYE
MARCH 3 & 4
1 ;
mmm fess £2%
l

mm H
x
ft j "RmIIHg
Luk I m PK* WSBSIB vp^.
*.IW mJB Fi 11 S
THE COED CLUB, new campus coffee and dining headquarters, went into operation this week in Broward Hall. The club, with both
lunch and snack service set in a modern interior, contended with rush crowds this week as students abandoned old Campus Club and
Hub hangouts. The only coed complaint on their new service is th at now they cant wear shorts around the dormitory and must dress
even to play tennis on courts across the way. (see Editorial, Page 4).

Legislative Battle
(Continued from Page ONE)
tive Ralph Turlington, who saw the
controversy as an honest difference
of opinion between legislators, in
which the Board of Control must
show the existing need for this sal salary
ary salary increase.
Turlington said the issue "was
broader than the University ot
Florida, extending to other state
! officials and legislators. While this
raise was an entity separate from
others, Turlington said that a grant granting
ing granting of Floridas presidential salary
! increase would probably be accom accom!
! accom! panied by a similar action tor
FSU.
Pope has dissented from other \
legislators many times before, and
this may be traced on his voting
record. Both Shands and Turling Turlington
ton Turlington made an identical statement:
i There are 37 other senators. Leg Legislators
islators Legislators should act independently
on this issue, they said.
Each man will interpret the is is|
| is| sue according to his own convic convici
i convici tions, Turlington said. If it ap ap|
| ap| pears that a certain figure is nec necj
j necj essary. the House will probably
' grant it.
I
Your European
I Tour:
if 7 weeks beginning June 29
if Includes 8 Countries
if Is conducted by the famed
French Author Traveller
Dr # E. Bour D ousson
if New York New York via
plane
if Very reasonable for students
Phone 7631
Bill Joan P. Muth
1936 N.W. 2nd Ave.
\ RIDAY thru T I BDAK
§
Prince of Players
with
RICHARD BURTON
MAGGIE McNAMARA
JOHN DF.REK
RAYMOND MASSEY
CHARLES BICKFORD
ELIZABETH SELLERS
and EVA LeGALLIENNE
in
Cinemascope
WEDNESDAY A THURSDAY
Winslow Boy
The
with
ROBERT DONAT
and CEDRIC HARDWICKE
; FRIDAY A SAT., March 4 A 5
The Big Sleep
with
HUMPHREY BOGART and
LAUREN BACALL

Seniors: Here Are Jobs

This is the schedule of recruit- j
ment interviews on campus next'
week by representatives of busi business,
ness, business, industry and government.
For interviews in Matherly Hall,
sign up in Rm. 211, Matherly
Hall. For interviews in the E & I
Building, sign up in Rm. 300, the
E & I Bldg.
Today
Vitro Laboratories, Eglin AFB,
Florida; Math, Physics, EE, ME.
AE; Room 330, E & I Bldg., 8:40
a.m.-5 p.m.
Louisiana Dept, of Highways,
Bator Rouge; CE, Room 403. E &
I Bdlg., 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Monday and Tuesday
Shell Chemical Corp.. Houston,
Texas. ChE, ME and Chemistry;
Rm. 330, E &. I Bldg. Monday 9
to noon.
Shell Oil. Co.. Manufacturing
Dept., Houston, T ex ChE and
Chemistry; Rm. 330, E & I Bldg.;!
9 a.m. 5 p.m. Monday and 9 a.m. I
to noon Tuesday,
Southern Dairies, Inc., Jackson Jacksonville,
ville, Jacksonville, Fla.; For Sales Trainees j
Arts & Sciences, Agriculture, Busi-1
ness Administration; for Produc- j
tion Trainees Ag. Engineering,
Dairy Science, Chemistry, Bacteri Bacteriology;
ology; Bacteriology; Accounting, Transportation
and ME. Group meeting Monday
Rm. 209 Fla. Union. Interviews
Tues. 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Rm. 210
Fla. Union. Contact Univ. Place Placement
ment Placement Office Monday for individual
interview appointment.
Tuesday
Montgomery Ward, Chicago, 111.
Rm. 214, Matherly Hall, 10 a.m.
to 5 p.m; Arts & Science, Bus. Ad.
Rome Air Force Base Depot,

STUDENTS!
20% OFF on all shoe Repairs
with this ad
BRING THIS AD TO
MODERN SHOE REPAIR
(Next to First National Bank)
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^ j
TODAY & TOMORROW
.. STUDENTS 300 | J f*J | | J
All day Saturday WllA-fl
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CESAR ROMERO J? ._ r
SPORTCARTIOSIft NEWS *leCrni< :0,, -
PLUS PLUSt
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| Rome, N.Y.; EE, Physics & Math;
! sophomdres & jrs. in EE or Phys Phys|
| Phys| ics for summer work; Rm. 403,
E & I Bldg., 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
Wednesday
Crawford & Company. Atlanta,
Ga., Rm. 211 Matherly Hall; Bus.
Ad., Law. Arts & Sciences;
Dept. of State Foreign Service
Officer; contact Prof. Fred Hart Hartman,
man, Hartman, Dept, of Political Science.
Wednesday and Thursday
U. S. Naval Air Development;
Center, ..hnsville, Pa:; 9 a.m. to
5 p.m. Rm. 330 E & I Bldg., EE,
ME, AE and Physics.
Thursday
Olin Mathieson Chem. Corp.,
New York, N. Y.; Rm. 403, E & I
Bldg., 9 a.m. 5 p.m, ChE, ME
and IE.
Thursday and Friday
Tennessee Valley Autho rit y,
j Knoxville, Tenn.; Rm. 330 E & l
I Bldg., 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.; EE, ME,
ChE, Architecture & Bldg. Con Construction.
struction. Construction. EE and ME through
their junior years for summer em employment.
ployment. employment.

SG Begins Blood Drive
Monday To Refill Bank

A drive to replinish the dwin dwindling
dling dwindling stock of the student operated
blood bank wall begin Monday ac according
cording according to chairman Walt Fred Fredrickson.
rickson. Fredrickson.
Organized in the spring of 1951,
the student government blood bank
was the first of its kind in the
country to be student operated.
Since that time the drive to re refill

| Broward Hall
Opens Grill
Hotel Broward opened the
doors of its new additionBroward
cafeteria 7:00 a.m. Monday.
Thirty-nine student employees
help to keep things running Mon Monday
day Monday through Saturday from 7:00 to
10:30, with the 10:00 p.m. coffee
and cigarette hour gaining popu popularity
larity popularity rapidly. Although the caf cafeteria
eteria cafeteria is primarily patronized by
coeds, it shows signs of becoming
a favorite after-date spot.
Attractions ihcluding soft music,
comfortable chairs and a modern
atmosphere, accounts for the ever everincreasing
increasing everincreasing crowds returning each
day.
Featuring the Gatorburger, milk
shakes and hot fudge sundaes, the
cafeteria offers a wide selection
of food, with the grill in opera operation
tion operation full time.
The dual complaint voiced by
students concerns the service and
| aisles. Grill and sandwich service
is slow, coeds state, and the nar narrow
row narrow counter aisle creates a jam jammed
med jammed bottleneck during the break breakfast
fast breakfast and lunch hour rush.

fill refill the bank has become an an annual
nual annual affair.
The student blood bank is af affiliated
filiated affiliated with the Florida Associa Association
tion Association of Blood Banks and is de designed
signed designed to furnish students and their
immediate families with plasma
in case of emergency.
A student may draw up to five
pints of blood, any request over
that amount will have to be ap apj
j apj proved by the student committee
j running the bank.
The bank saves the students S2O
on the pint, as all the student has
to pay is the sll service charge.
The normal state fee is s3l.
A trophy will be presented to
the organization whose members
donate the largest percentage.
The acutal number of pints do donated
nated donated does not count; thus giving
the smaller organizations the same
chance as the larger ones. The
prize is open to fraternities, so sororities.
rorities. sororities. and all the other organi organizations,
zations, organizations, on or off campus.
The Army ROTC has promised
its co-operation by letting its stu students
dents students miss class in order to do donate
nate donate blood. The Air Force plans
to release its students fjom drill.
All students under the age of
21awi11 require a release Slip sign signed
ed signed oy the parents unless they ap appear
pear appear in their ROTC uniform. rT Tiese
slips can be obtained at the in information
formation information desk in the Florida Un Union.
ion. Union.
Blood will be taken at the Ala Alachua
chua Alachua General. Hospital Monday
through Friday between 8 and 11
a.m. and in the afternoon from 2
to 4 p.m. If unable to donate dur during
ing during the afternoon the bank will be
open Tuesday through Thursday at
night by appointment and Satur Saturday
day Saturday morning from 8 till 11 p.m.
The hospital advises donors to
observe a six hour fasting period
before giving blood. Fruit juices,
black coffee, and soft drinks are
permissable. Drink plenty of wa wa!
! wa! ter. No milk or milk products are
j permissable.

0^ yf/S* OPEN FRIDAYS TIL 9_ P-M.
E.O.M. CLEARANCE SALE
THOUSANDS OF MARK-DOWNS ALL
THROUGH THE STORE INCLUDING
3,771 BARGAINS at HALF PRICE
| FEBRUARY CHARGE BOOKS NOW CLOSED . CHARGES PAYABLE APRIL 10 |

CANDID REMARKS BY VISITING DR. BURKHARD
More Social Complacency Than Mental
llp ;: ; ' # r i.
Urge Here Says Harvard Scholar

By DAN HACKEL
Assistant State Editor
There fs more evidence here of 1
physical well-being and of social
omplacency than mental urge or
intellectual challenge according
!to Dr. Arthur Burkhard, scholar
and author who served as com- j
mander of the University Naval
Unit during World War I.
A Harvard Ph.D., translator of
classic plays, professor, and lec lecturer..
turer.. lecturer.. Burkhard returned to the
campus this weekend for a hurried
revisit and left behind a rash of
dry comments on the University
Instead of machine examina examinations
tions examinations which are not much improve improvement
ment improvement over peripheral intelligence 1
tests in daily newspapers, students
should be trained to think inde independently
pendently independently and formulate findings I
lin compact comprehensive style,'
he said. Otherwise our youth will J
shoot popl instead of shooting the f
stars.
Extra-curricular activities also
came in for an intellectual scoring.
Extra-curricular interests sap en- ?
(oediketle Staff
Named by WSA
i
Coedikette appointments for 1955
were announced in the regular i
; WSA meeting last Monday flight
in the Florida Union by President
1 Roz Wedlees.
Lallie Kain is the editor., Helen
. | Hilgendorf. assistant editor, and
' j Martha Webb, staff member. The
I art editor will be announced at
I the next meeting. These j
! ments were made on the basis of j
the applications submitted at the
1 end of last semester and personal
| interviews by the executive coun coun-1
-1 coun-1 Jcil. Coedikettee Will go to press
| March 12.
> j Hale Heads Faculty
Red Cross Drive
! 1
r | Dr. Lester Hale, Professor of
[ Speech, has been appointed chair chair!
! chair! | man for the University faculty
! drive of the American Red Cross,
by Acting President John S. Allen.
A member of the University
faculty since 1935, Hale holds a
BA degree from the University of
Wisconsin and MA and PhD de- i
grees from Louisiana State Uni- ;
versity. He began and developed I
the Speech and Hearing Clinic at j
the University in 1941 and is cur- |
rently in charge of the training
program for speech correction at
the University.
Pumphrey in Washington
Prof. Fred-H. Pumphrey of the
electrical engineering department
j is in Washington, D C., this week.
: As a member of the Engineering
Review Panel of the National Sci- j
ence Fellowship Awards, Prot
Pumphrey will review applications;
for graduate fellowships from en-1
gineering students throughout the
nation.
The six-member panel makes its
; recommendations to the Graduate
Board of NSFA, which makes the
final choice.
I Want to travel
I and study
I abroad?
V j Take a university-sponsored
H| tour via TWA this summer
and earn full college credit
while you travel
ga Visit the countries of your
gS choice .. study from 2 to 6
||j weeks at a foreign university.
f§| You ran do both on one trip
jg| when you arrange a university university*l
*l university*l sponsored tour via TWA. Itin-
gg eraries include countries in j
,-| Europe, the Middle East, Asia
m and Africa. Special study tours
§§ available. Low all-inclusive
g prices with TWAs economical |B§§
w Sky Tourist service.
i For information, write: John
H. Furbay, Ph. D., Director, |g
Air World Tours, Dept. CN, S
380 Madison Ave., New York g
17, N. YBe sure to mention |j
j countries you wish to visit.
TWA 1
T*AH$ WOOIO Attnsmt9 |

ergies which might be turned to
mental development, Dr. 3urk 3urkhard
hard 3urkhard commented.
Otherwise, the well-traveled pro professor
fessor professor found our campus a pleas-
Committees Named
For Engineer Fair
Committees have been set up tor
| the annual Engineers Fair which j
will be held March 18 and 19. Fait
chairmen this year are Lloyd Wil- 1
j liams and Jack Stone.
Chairmen of the committees are: j
E. P. Williamson, space commit committee;
tee; committee; Earl Blekking, industrial ex-
I hibits; George Tobi, newspaper
| publicity; Joe Stine, radio-TV; Dan
.Williams, local publicity; Lews
'Johnson, business manager; Gene
Lichtman. and Jack Garland, high
school contact; Phil Hart, printed
j material; and Wayne Heasley, sign
\ committee.
Fair chairmen for the engineer engineering
ing engineering societies are: John Searcy,
electrical; Stanley Cohen, civil; La
Barranger, industrial; Frank Leu Leute,
te, Leute, chemical; Ken Safko, mechan- 1
ical; and Barry Culp, aeronautical, j
Alpha Phi Omega Meets
There will be a special meeting
of all officers in Alpha Phi Ome Omega.
ga. Omega. national service fraternity, in
Room 200. Florida Union Monday
night at 7.

JON TYME TAILORING t
BETTER WORK LOWER PRICES
1600 N.W. 6th St.
PLENTY OF PARKING |
I THE PALMS
SOUTHERN EDGE OF OCALA ON U.S. 441

DANCE TO THE MUSIC OF
.
DON MOORE
AND HIS ALL U of F STUDENT ORCHESTRA
9-12 Friday, Feb. 25
kL
iii
CIGARETTES
# V
, SIZE.
TW -< |
FILTER TIP TAREYTON
PAVIMff MNOINO
An entirely new concept In cigarette filtration. A
filter tip of purified cellulose, incorporating Activated
Charcoal, a filtering cubstance world-famous as a
purifying agent, notably for air, water and beverage*.
' PRODUCT O*

ant place. After a lapse of 38
years. I was impressed by the ex expansion
pansion expansion in enrollment and Build Buildings,
ings, Buildings, the energy and eagerness of
the student body, and the friendly
relaxed atmosphere, he said
Although such bright spots es escaped
caped escaped Dr. Burkhards panning, the
colorful figure, currently on a tour
of Southern universities, bemoan bemoaned
ed bemoaned the lack of a Faculty Club
where contacts between profes professors
sors professors and intellectually minded
: people might be continued jn a
more intimate and urbane basis.
Dr. Burkhard says his varied
services at Harvard University,
j and more recently as visiting pro professor
fessor professor at Pennsylvania State and
the University of Texas, his ex extensive
tensive extensive lecture series in American
and European universities, and an
extended tour of duty in the Intel Intelj
j Intelj ligence Division of American Mili Military
tary Military Government in Germany con contribute
tribute contribute to his background for tnese
comparative summations.
In addition, he has engaged in
research projects the world over,
and done extensive work in 'ang 'anguages.
uages. 'anguages. These periods are culminat culminating
ing culminating in his present tasks: the trans translation
lation translation and publication of classical
plays.
Medea, Sappho. and the
i Golden Fleece' trilogy are a few
of his present works. Author of 40
articles and 10 books, Dr. Burk Burkhard
hard Burkhard is currently presenting in
New York his translation of Grill Grillparzers
parzers Grillparzers Golden Fleece in coop cooperation
eration cooperation with UNESCO and the U.S
Dept, of State.
Later in March, he will stage
other productions along the -sme
lines.



beta theta pi program closes drive
Polio Variety Nets SBOO

By ANN SPAULDING
Gator Staff Writer
Over SBOO was netted for the
March of Dimes at the variety oen oenfit
fit oenfit show which was presented and
produced by Beta Theta Pi, and
sponsored by the Lions. The rwo rwohour
hour rwohour variety benefit show was
staged at the Gainesville High
School Tuesday night.
Approximately 1000 people at attended
tended attended the production. The benefit

To really look your loveliest
Cuffed torso flower print in Cortley washable, crease-resistant
cotton.
Blue, pink, mint green.
Sizes 5 to 15 $10.95
ON THE SQUARE

I University Food Service I
MMMCK
.
I The Opening of I
"THE COED CLUB"
'
I Located in BROWARD HALL I
I near the recreation room 1
{
I
I Serving All Three Meals I
m
I Continuous Fountain and Grille Service I
I OPEN:-7 a.m. to 10:30 p.m. week days I
I Saturdays 7 a.m. to 2 p.m. I
m Closed Sundays 1
B £
I Open Saturday Mights for Special Occasions ft
I MEET YOUR DATE FOR DINNER I
I IN FOOD SERVICE'S NEWEST SERVICE UNIT I

show presented nine variety acts
and the GHS variety band, directed
by B. M. Donaldson
Master of ceremonies Garlon Da Davis
vis Davis opened the show with Durlene
Johnson, U. of F. majorette from
Clearwater, doing a baton act. Dur
lene is now the feature twirier with
the Gator Band and holds runner runnerup
up runnerup honors in the national Major Majorette
ette Majorette with the Most Beautiful Legs
i contest.

The Dream Weavers, popular duo
heard over WRUF, were the hit
of the show, and sang repeated
encores accompanied by Lee Tur Turner
ner Turner at the piano.
Dancers Molly Ardrey and Joan
Faye Brown did a modem dance
routine of "Shake, Rattle and Roll
before colored lights which were
designed to bring out the perfec perfection
tion perfection of the dance. Mollys sister,
Sally, who is Florida Citrus Queen
was originally scheduled to dance
with Molly, but she was unable
to come. Sally taught the dance to
Joan in one day, and after one
rehearsal she put on the show with
Molly.
The Co-Eds trio, Mary Carr, Sal
Sandbora, and Nancy Crump, Univ
coeds made their first appearance
here with their renditions of pop popular
ular popular ballads as did the Melodettes,
five Gainesville High School girl
and an accompanist.
Don Bouterse and Phyllis Edge,
co-stars of "Finians Rainbow,
soon to be presented by the Flor Florida
ida Florida players, sang the top duet from
the play Old Devil Moon.
A fairy-tale for hep-cats was
of pianist Todd, and they present presentpresented
presented presentpresented by Dave Todd. A jazz
combo followed under the direction >
ed several arrangements.
Lions club president Ted Van I
Antwerp, former Hollywood prod j
er, amazed the audience witn his ;
magic; Herb Finger assisted nim.
Harmonica player Gene Alvarez
demonstrated professional stylings
on the instrument by presenting an
array of musical selections. He uas
just recently returned from a USO
tour.
Ticket sales were conducted
throughout the city and at local
theaters with sororities vying for
the trophy for the most number
of tickets sold in the drive.
Zeta Tau Alpha won the first
place award with a total of .*42
tickets sold ($116), and Phi Mu
took the trophy for second place
selling 220 tickets. Both sororities
were ahead by a wide margin.
March of Dimes chairman, John
P. Jones, said, "I am as happy as
can be about it I thought it |
was a swell show, one of the finest
things Ive seen. Prof. Jones al u j
said that everyone is hoping that
the March of Dimes Drive next
year will begin with the variety
show.
Bacon Completes Staff
Appointments for F Book
Editor Don Bacon completed his
staff appointments for the F Book
early this week when he named
Dan Hackel, journalism major
from Jacksonville, to the managing
editors post.
Hackel, who is assistant state
editor on the Alligator, will begin
work immedia.ely organizing the
sections of the book so that major
work oan begin in April.

Florid* Alligator, Friday, February 25. 1955

AROUND THE SOCIAL CIRCUIT
Greeks Party Tempo Picks Up
As Fraternities Prepare
For Annual Social Weekends

By JANE HUNTER
Gator Society Editor
Greeks step up social pace as
rushing ends and weekends .
Sigma Chis to hold annual Sweet Sweetheart
heart Sweetheart weekend beginning Friday
. . party at the house last week
end for the sweetheart candidates
. . Col. Ralph Rhudy new ap appointed
pointed appointed chapter advisor... Lambda
Chis plan gambling party for Sat Saturday
urday Saturday night . fourteen pledges
to be initiated soon . Lambda
Chi Spe scholarship trophy went
to the Lambda Chis as chapter
rated seventh on campus .
Kappa Delta officers for the com coming
ing coming semester include Esther Tor Torres,
res, Torres, president; Dottie Culpepper,
vice president; Shirley Leach, sec secretary,
retary, secretary, Ann Davis, treasurer; Jane
Barlow, editor; and Joan Ambrose,
rush chairman . AEPhi otncers
I are Judy Myers, president; Lesley
Rehearsals
By Players
Underway
Rehearsals are underway for
"Finians Rainbow, the popular
Broadway musical which will be
presented by Florida Players
March 25 and 26.
Major roles in the production are
played by: Phyllis Edge as Sharon
McLonergan, Elizabeth Otto as Su Susan
san Susan Mahoney, Thomas Rahner as
Finian McLonergan, Donald Bou- j
terse as Woody Mahoney, and Ed
Amor as Og.
Phyllis, although a freshman, ap appeared
peared appeared this season in Snow
Queen. Elizabeth Otto is a gradu gradu!
! gradu! ating senior and she may be re
! membered for her roles in Bell.
Book and Candle, Kmckerdock
er Holiday, and for the choreog
raphy and costumes of "Snow |
Queen. Thomas Rahner is also aj
veteran of Florida Players produc-j
tions, having played in My Three
Angels and Snow Queen.
Donald Bouterse, a senior tn
Architecture, is a newcomer to the
Players and will appear for the
first time in Finians Rainbow.
Eld Amor is a graduating senior
and has appeared in many Florida
Players productions, inc 1 u d 1 n g
Bell, Book and Candle, and
Knickerbocker Hobday.
Finians Rainbow is being di directed
rected directed by Dr. Derwin B. Dusen Dusenbury.
bury. Dusenbury.


Lipp, vice president; Ellinor Gen Gendelman,
delman, Gendelman, corresponding secretary;
Sybil Barnett, recording secre secretary;
tary; secretary; and Gloria Backer, parlia parliamentarian
mentarian parliamentarian . chapter visited
Delt house for dessert Wednesday
evening . Congratulations to tne
Betas for a successful March of
Dimes variety show Tuesday nignt
. . chapter entertained the Sigma
Kappas Thursday . new sec secretary
retary secretary is Eld Johnson; pledge pledgemaster.
master. pledgemaster. Harmon Smith; ana social
co-chairmen, Jim Patterson and
Hugh Mclntyre . Glen Cunning Cunningham.
ham. Cunningham. former Olympic star and Phi
Gam alum visited the local chap chapter
ter chapter for lunch Tuesday . new
Zeta officers are Caroll Molt,
president, Sara Betty Smith, veep;
Carol Miller, secretary; Dorothy
Rothrock, treasurer; Adele Scholl,
historian; and Sophie Mavros, rit ritual
ual ritual chairman . chapter enter entertained
tained entertained the Pikes Thursday evening
. . TEP is celebrating its thir thirtieth
tieth thirtieth anniversary with Founder's
Day weekend . picnic is sched scheduled
uled scheduled for Saturday afternoon, at
Camp OLeno . New AOPi
officers are Lois Reid, president;
Beverly Balfe, vice president; Pat
McSwiggan, recording secretary;
Sena Hinnant, corresponding sec secretary;
retary; secretary; Ann Rusn, treasurer; Mar Martha
tha Martha Smith, rush chairman; Tanya
Naylor, social chairman; and
Grace Learon, historian .
Delta Chis French party last
weekend was big success .
ADPi officers are Annette Duggan,
' president; Margie Andress, veep;
I Shirley Mansman, secretary; Car Carolyn
olyn Carolyn Hiatt, treasurer; Rosemary
| Diettrich, rush chairman; and Pat
Zimmerman, social chairman .
sorority had dinner at Sigma Nu j
house in connection with Religion
week . Delts to hold annual
Founders Day banquet Saturday
night . among the alumni to j
pay a visit will be N. Ray Carrol |
l of Orlando who will present a
; trophy to an outstanding chapter
advisor from one of the northern
chapters . Rainbow weekend
schedule for next weekend .
new initiates are Ricky Becker,
George Cox, Russ Currin, Jim El Elwell,
well, Elwell, Bow Fowler, Dick Hamon,
Arlin Hawkins, Kent Innis, David
King, Ronnie Lea, Grant Morrison,
Tuffy Murray, Jack Nichols, Bill
Pafk, Charlie Pike Mark Robin Robinton,
ton, Robinton, Larry Shepherd, Trum a n
Skinner, Don Wilcox, Buddy Tay Taylor,
lor, Taylor, Tommy Valenti, and Wayne
Williams ... Phi Sigs now ex
tablished in new quarters on Uni University
versity University Avenue and extend invita invitation
tion invitation to everyone to drop in .
formal house warming is planned
. . Regional director J. Philip
Schaefer visited Wednesday night
. . DGs visited SAE house for
dinner Monday and went to Phi
Gam House for coffee Thursday
night . sorority entertained the
SPEs and the Kappa Sigs re re-1
-1 re-1 cently
'Law for Women'
Topic of Lecture
On Campus Tonight
The first in a series of eight
lectures titled Law for Women
will be held tonight at 7:30 p.m.
in the Law Auditorium,
j This lecture series, co-sponsored
i by the General Extension Division
! of Florida and the Florida Bar and
I Eighth Judiciary Circuit of the
Florida Bar, will continue for eight
weeks with a lecture each Friday
! night through April 22.
j The lectures will cover con contracts,
tracts, contracts, common business transac transactions,
tions, transactions, real estate sales and pur purchases,
chases, purchases, wills, and estate planning.
A question and answer session will
be conducted at the end of eacn
lecture.
I All interested women are invited
I to attend these lectures, egistra egistration
tion egistration will be held Friday night trom
7:00 7:30 at the Law Auditorium
and a registration fee of SI.UO will
cover the entire series. Anyone
unable to register Friday nignt
may be registered by sending
name and registration fee to the
General Extension Division.
,
Bf-: Jr Jg I
K Your college graduation U
ring, a recognized sym- £
V bolos your achievement, jg
S in 10 Kt gold Wide m
choice of stones. H
9 Plain Ring .. $23.00* ££
| Heacy wt. .. $25.00*
plus the fed. tax
4 Any War, Any Degree &
4 TO 6 WEEKS DELIVERY
ftoSeUbop
287 W. Lniv. Ave.

Page 3

BT\>T B SB Sf £ SI
' X -s^p
INTAGLIO PRINTS by noted artist Manricio Lasanky and some of his students are viewed by these
Florida students. On display at the Hub art gallery through Wednesday and sponsored hy depart department
ment department of art, the prints are from*the private collections of Eugene Gmsom and John Kacere, assistant
professors of art here and from students of Lasanky.

Campus Drive Campaign
Sets $5,000 as Goal

With $5,000 as their goal, the
Campus Chest will hold their an annual
nual annual drive the week of March l 12.
The drive is sponsored by Student
Government in cooperation with the
Administration.
The drive is to be held every
semester according to a Stu lent
Government law. The law states
that no charitable organizations
may ask for contributions on cam campus.
pus. campus.
The main purpose of the Campus
Chest ig to collect and distribute
the money collected during the
drive. This drive does away with
all the smaller drives so that stu students
dents students will not be appealed to all
j during the year.
j Plans are being made to ap ap!
! ap! proach all the organizations on
! campus and ask their support by
having them contribute at least
$.50 a member. Bob Miller, stu student
dent student head of the Chest remaiked,
We realize that by doing this
some students will be hit more
than once but we still feel that
this one drive is better than nu numerous
merous numerous smaller ones. ..
In addition to the money collect collected
ed collected from the organizations, plans
are being made to hold a three threehour
hour threehour radio show from the second
floor of the Hub and take addi
tional pledges for donations over
the telephone. Entertainment has
been arranged and a show will
be put on during the radio broad broadcast.
cast. broadcast. It is hoped that local citi-
I zens will hear the program and
call and pledge a donation for
the drive.
Money already pledged to the
Chest includes a portion of the -ate
from the Swedish Gym Team show
to be held tonight and the Cava Cavaliers
liers Cavaliers have promised the full pro pro*

n j
A Campus-to-Career Case History
B | |8|p8&:?. .. i : r<
H ij,i ji ||pt: .. I }
jK|j|L ... > >?.? s j||
Hi fl| .v Jbe : -£ |SmM| JHk J
lUt A BE i Mtjmt.mmr 4 e&~ flTl
Manager Ray New explains the importance of good service to one of his assistants
i |
His individual training paid off
When Ray NewBusiness Administration, Buffalo, sl J
started with New York Telephone Company, he never suspected ;
his work would face him with problems of this sort

My job as business office manager
is to see that the customer gets the best
possible service. One of my assignments
took me into a section of Manhattan that
had a large Puerto Rican population.
Frequently our people would get
somebody on the line who couldnt speak
a word of English. So I saw to it that
each of my representatives learned a few
standard Spanish phrasesenough to get
somebody to the telephone
speak English. \
There are no two days alike in this

Youll find these things true of college men, like Ray
New, who go into telephone work. Theyve been well f /Ik \
trained, they enjoy their present jobs, and theyre
headed for responsibilities and greater rewards. If jr
youd be interested in a similar opportunity with a Bell BELL
telephone operating company, or with Sandia Corpora- TELEPHONE
tion, Bell Telephone Laboratories or Western Electric, SYSTEM
see your Placement Officer for full details.
1

* pro* ceeds of a dance they plan to hold
next month.
Assisting Miller are Ed Williams,
!technical; Joe Block, show and en
tertainment; and Morty Letkoe,
publicity.
Faculty members include Dean
:H. K. McClelland, Dr. Freeman H.
Hart, and Clifton Oliver Jr. Their
job is to advise the student com committee
mittee committee running the drive and to
decide what percentage of the mon money
ey money collected will be distributed to
each charity.
Law Fraternities To Rush
Next week will be rush week lor
the three fraternities of the Col College
lege College of Law. The following dates
have been set for the rush par parties:
ties: parties: Theta Phi, Wednesday; Phi
Delta Phi, Fn.; Phi Alpha Delta,
Sat.

for those big
f Fraternity
Weekends
DRESSES
FRANKEL'S
2 EAST UNIVERSITY AVE.

1
work, with new problems coming up all
the time! The best part of it is that the
training program here is tailor-made to J
the job. First you get a general back background
ground background in the business, then you go into
what I call individual training. Thats
where your own special abilities are de developed
veloped developed and youre encouraged to think
out new ways to solve everyday prob problems
lems problems like the one I just described.
*" 1
Right now Im Business Manager
in charge of an office doing $250,000
worth of business a month.
1

Peninsula Reviews Stories
For Use in Next Issue
Peninsula, campus literary mag magazine.
azine. magazine. is now considering material
for the first issue of the spring
, semester, scheduled to appear the
first week in April. All forms at
literary work will be accepted, and
1 poetry and fiction are especially
- welcome.
Any university student may sub sub
sub mit, and C-3 students whose work
t is published will be excused from
their final writing laboratory exam examination
ination examination with a perfect paper. All
| manuscripts must be typewritten
r and must bear the writers name
and mailing address. They may be
* | left at the Florida Union desk or
j at 317 Anderson Hall. A prize will
tentatively be awarded for the best
I short story published.



Page 4

Edito rials Friday Fab. 25, 1955

m FLORIDA ALLIGATOR
' 1 I
All-American Honor Rating 1953-54
ti* fiorida SjJSSok^u 1 *!und "* mJESFSim ***** *****
Pmm Office at
aid matte haceneat H the Florida UMoa. VtAwmUr eampm.
Editor-In-Chief . Ait Smith
Managing Editor Al Quantel
Business Manager : -.r.'.-.-. Gene Brown
"- i .
I
* EDITORIA L RAFF
Doe Bacoa, Featares Editor; Alan SchiH. City Editor; Jane Huater, Society Editor; Becky Greer, News Editor; Douf Buck,
Neva Editor; Abb WMte, Mary Asm Green, Assistant Feature Editor* Mary Ana Braaaford, Assistant Society Editor;
Dm HacM, Assistant State Editor, Ray Ufchsr. Cartoonist.
!
REPORTERS
Gw Hancock, Dm Racket. Marty Lefltec, Marion F. Fait, Bill Mauyham. Mary Ann Kane, Earl Poucher. Joy Fuller, Bruce
KUoa. John Carcaba, Helen Puckett. Charles Walden, Ana Spaulding. Evelyn Bedner. Richard Welnert, Wally Sterling.
i
SPORTS STAFF
Bob Lynch, Sports Editor; Howie Crane, Intramural Sporta Editor; Sports Writer*. BUI Johnson, Pat Parrish, Charlie Jean,
Tanwli Hollander, Moriy Lefltoe, Bob O'Dare, Dick Laelie. Stu Slumber*, Sylvia Maxwell end Janice Hahn.
BUSINESS STAFF
Advertising: Jack Hctchinaen. Bob Nicbolsoo. Lorraine H ayes, Ray BUgtottL Don Chaiken, Joe Cobb. Bernal HainmiUer,
Harvey Kaplan. Jimmy Lee, Sue Reese. Office and Circulation: Dave Brandt, Jerry Browder. Dean Campbell, Lamar Cobb,
Martin Denis. Je Ann Hawsman. Norman Landman. Fred Leam Solomon, Leon Weingarten. Charles Ruffner, Bob McCormick,
son. Bev Moraer. Jim Nelson, Sunny Roberta. Arnold Shuman, gvin. Joe Merlin. Leon Mordob. Mary Jo Kogler. Tommy Morrt Morrt'
' Morrt' ~ f. *f 'j -] ' i
No Sign of SG Progress

"Inconsistency is a sign of progress
Owen McGovern in Executive Council meeting
If they will listen, leaders and followers
going to make any more plans for their
last-hour watfch in term this year, they'd
better get started in the next few minutes.
SG, still floundering and in need of new
blood in spite of former hopes of Renais Renaissance,
sance, Renaissance, is back in its old rut again.
This newspaper, watching the ups and
downs of the current administration with
a wary eye and with dreams of improve improvement,
ment, improvement, has almost decided that it may be
too late for any action on the part of
leaders now in office.
But eleven months ago, when the lead leaders
ers leaders were only candidates, things were dif different
ferent different and talk of vast political and gov governmental
ernmental governmental change was the campus word.
The Victory Party, a now-defunct group
that carried a big majority of its cnadi cnadidates
dates cnadidates to office, boasted in its platform that
this was the year to return SG to prestige
in the students eyes ... to advance the
standards of political reform ... to mod modernize
ernize modernize administrative procedures ... to
establish a veterans committee from all
Fla Vets
These, and other promises, were the
basic tenets through which men now jn
office were to work for progress and per perfection
fection perfection in an ailing government.
Some of the aims were accomplished.
The duties of the class officers were rede redefined,
fined, redefined, but the new definition was hazy.
The Honor Court was given a thorough
investigation and things were found to be
changed. Lyceum productions became
slightly more appealing, if not more apol apolling.
ling. apolling. v
But where does the story go from there ?
Most political observers, if caught in an
honest moment, will admit that Student
Government has not been what it should
this year. Many mistakes were made, er errors

Too Much State Interest in Gridirons

So the University of Florida and Florida
State University are going into mutual
sports competition.
Who cares?
Apparently state officals do, because
the State Board of Control this week went
into the sports scheduling business and
ordered the two schools to begin competi competition
tion competition if and when.
The Board of Control, putting aside
their serious discussion of a University of
Florida president, went on record to de demand
mand demand athletic competition between two
institutions that six years ago used to be
laboratories for future marital relations.
We dont mean to belittle efforts on the
part of sports enthusiasts to unite two
Olympic machines, but the tremor of
state interest in a inter-school matter is
distrubing indeed.
When matters of more importance are
to be debated in academic circles, the
question of a sporting event seems trivial.
But the press and the state seem determin determined
ed determined to bring such information to the eye of

In Broward, the Coeds Fret

Silence from the Broward Hall area
was too good to last.
First the coeds complained about the
thin walls between rooms. That was re remedied.
medied. remedied.
Now the Broward beauties are scream screaming
ing screaming that the new Coed Club in the dorm
basement has stolen their privacy. Heres
their grumble:
The recreation room is also in the base basement
ment basement and a glass partition separates it
from the cafeteria. Now, WSA rules say
that no coed may be seen in public wear wearing

Ann and Joan Did a Good Job

For the first time in many a campus
moon, coeds accomplished a needed pro project
ject project where men were apparently too weak
or too lazy to help.
The 1954 Seminole, as dated as its name
implies, was finally off to the printers this
week thanks to the service of Misses Ann
Richardson and Joan Williamson. The
pair, working without fanfare or triumph,
quietly but efficently put the book in or order
der order in a month and completed a job that
50 had tried all last yearbut couldnt.
Ann and Joan worked beyond the call

rors errors were not corrected, and men charged
with duty and responsibility did not do
their job.
The book Exchange did not function;
nor did the Campus Chest. There was no
attempt at political reform. An endow endowment
ment endowment fund created last year was not put
in operation until Decemberfour months
behind the schedule required by law.
There was a baby-sitting service and a
radio program, but these nominal services
stand alone against a long list of inactivi inactivity.
ty. inactivity.
Where, then, the student will ask, do we
stand at this point and where are we go going?
ing? going?
! In its eleventh hour, the cogs of the ad administrative
ministrative administrative machine now in power have
slowly started to move. Only a month is
left, but there has been a slight increase
in activity. Maybe this is only idle suf suffling
fling suffling around; maybe this is progress.
If they will isten, eaders and followers
in Student Government must face the fact
that it is almost too late to save the gov government
ernment government from near extinction. Its former
prestige, its activity, its conscious drive to
promote better things have almost been
extinguished by a blight of half-truths and
half-leaders. An era of poor leadership
and the disease of apathy has been on us
too' long.
We hope that the men now planning' the
candidates and campaigns for the coming
ejections will take these serious matters to
their smoke-filled rooms. We hope they
too can see the signs of danger and nomi nominate
nate nominate good men with high ideals to ward
off disaster.
If they do not, for they are the only
ones who can. The Florida Alligator may
have to report that Student Government
has diedkilled by those too concerned
with their own futures to save it.

! :
the public and project debates that have
no reason.
Athletic competition, like any other ex extra-curricular
tra-curricular extra-curricular activity, warrents no special
consideration from those whom we elect
to make and enforce state law and policy.
There should be no special sanction on
muscle, nor should we seek its prominence
in a college environment.
Football, like other sports, must main maintain
tain maintain their place in education. Actually,
their position is dubious, but if coaches
must dominate the academic scene, then
control is in order.
A contest between the University and
FSU is in no more order than an indian indianwrestling
wrestling indianwrestling contest to decide the UF presi president.
dent. president.
Certainly the latter should be more per pertinent
tinent pertinent at a time when so many important
issues are riding the brink of public opin opinion
ion opinion and officials are content to let things
wait in order to fill football stadiums
more quickly.

ing wearing shorts or the like, except while en engaged
gaged engaged in athletic activities. The girls have,
up until now, used the recreation room to
play ping-pong and as an exiting point
heading for the womens tennis courts.
So, in the most strict definition of the
WSA rule, the recreation room is public
because of the glass partition; therefore
off limits for shorts and dungarees.
But, because its a womans world,
heres betting the glass is soon removed
or covered. Got to keep the fair sex
happy.

of duty. It was not their original respon responsibility,
sibility, responsibility, but they accepted the job when
no one else was willing or able to help.
Jlundreds of coed-hours were required
in the annuals completion, and the pair
spent an evening slaving over format and
pictures while their contemporaries were
busy socializing.
In an era when student apathy in cam campus
pus campus affairs seem more and more trend, the
efforts of these two young ladies stands as
a challange to those who have yet to act actthose
those actthose who had rather ratlonlize their way
into a mediocre complacency.

M Hf*
is V r * -jl
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
Reader Wants True Story
Behind Politics on Campus

Editor:
I do not know where your staff
writer Earl Poucher gets his news,
but it is quite evident that his
view of the campus political set
up is quite different from my
view. He states: Neither of the
two opposing forces of one year
ago are in evidence today. Oh,
Ill admit we no longer have the
two parties in name, but I ask
you for the true story behind the
formation of the Florida Party Is
tse Florida Party divorced from
the political machine that is in of office
fice office now?
If the answer is no then the
Victory Party and the Florida
Party are now and the same
except for the course a switch of
a few fraternities. Lets take a real
look at the political set up. Stu Student
dent Student government has in my opin opinion
ion opinion fallen to the lowest ebb, that
I have witnessed since my entrance
to this campus in 1947. The Florida
Party which is basically made up
of these who are in power now
has a strong 400 block vote lead
over any possible formations of
parties.
Unless those independents and

Purity Above All, Peel
Must Change Its Tune

Editor:
With quiet pride in our Univer University
sity University we note the recent rash of
righteous indignation against the
Orange Peel. It is heartening to
know that on your staff and among
the student body there are those
Who are anxious to be counted
standing up in defense of purity
and decency.
So we hasten to jump on the
bandwagon by giving the back of
our hand to the Pornographic Peel.
We are looking forward to the
establishment of a sparkling va variety
riety variety magazine. We want to see
something filled with the high highminded
minded highminded and inspirational things
Vote in Local
Editor:
I have for the past two year
heard students moan over and
sneer at the juvenile confusion
comprising campus elections, and
I must admit of expressing simi similar
lar similar opinions myself.
But there is an election in this
city on March 15 which should
not be ignored with the usual de derogatory
rogatory derogatory predicates. I hope that

ACROSS THE COLLEGIATE NATION
Sewanee Students 'Suckers' for Belonging to National Fraternities

(From the Sewanee Purple,
University of the South)
The fraternity system, because
of the inevitable exclusiveness and
snobbery it causes, is an undeni undeniable
able undeniable evil. Unfortunately, though,
we cannot get rid of it; even if fra fraternities
ternities fraternities were abolished, other cli cliquish
quish cliquish organizations would .take
their place.
In addition to the evils inherent
in the system. Sewannee fraterni fraternities
ties fraternities have a great fault which can
easily be remedied: they are affili affiliated
ated affiliated with national fraternities.
This year approximately $9,290
will be sent from to na national
tional national fraternities offices. This
money, if spent wisely, could ob obviously
viously obviously finance a fabulous party.
Instead. Sewannee's young suckers
spend it on lifetime subscriptions
to magazines they never read, anc
the honor of having their names

fraternity men who are interested
in good student government take
a positive action immediately,
we will have a repeat performance
next year of what went on this
year. The stage is set and the cur curtain
tain curtain is about to go up. For those
of you that are in the Florida
Party now, look around and judge
for yourself. For those students
who arent interested in student
government ask yourself the follow following
ing following questions:
What really happened to my
Orange Peel that is paid for by my
dent activity fee?
What really happened to the Se Seminole
minole Seminole that is paid for by my stu student
dent student activity fee?
What is the real story behind our
new paper, The Student Shopping
Guide?
What realty heppened to the stu student
dent student book exchange? The biggest
question though is: What really
happened to our student govern government?
ment? government?
I ask every student to answer
these questions and then take a
positive action of some sort.
Maurice Dayon

students talk about. We are sick of
the obscenity and filth which ap appeals
peals appeals only to the tiny minority of
us whose sense of human is lech lecherous.
erous. lecherous. libidinous, and vulgar.
Catering to the depravity of such
untypical students must stop. As
one of our outstanding students
has said, The age of a campus
so-called humor magazine is end ended.
ed. ended.
This serious, purposeful campus
leader points us to the clear path
of duty: Student belly laughs be
damned! Give us a magazine that
will satisfy parents, the clergy, and
the legislature!
Harvey E. Ward
Election
by printing this letter you will
give me the opportunity to urge
all university students of voting
age to support the University of
Florida candidates in order to
rightfully make student influ influence
ence influence felt here in municipal
government. Only six months re residence
sidence residence is required for registra registration,
tion, registration, so lets get out and be repre represented.
sented. represented.
John L. Woodward

typed in ogjuplicate on pink, blue,
yellow, and beige cards which are
' filed away in dusty vaults many
miles away, never to be seen again.
' In addition to this marvelous bar bar-1
-1 bar-1 gain in waste paper, there are cer cer'
' cer' tain other arguments for being m
a national fraternity:
1. Brotherhood. The idea of being
united with hundreds of brothers
one has never even met, by the
' common knowledge of certain very
1 profound secrets, is a strong ad advantage
vantage advantage to being a member of a
national fraternity. Merely being
) fellow human beings, to say nothiljg
of having religious, cultural, ana
> national similarities, is apparent apparent
apparent ly not enough to create a bond ot
. brotherhood. The national brother brother-6
-6 brother-6 hood argument cuts way ways;
> most of those unknown pothers are
J probably uncongenial, and wner wneri
i wneri ever ones goes his nominal a*-

PARANOIA
Baker Tries His Hand at Sportswriting

By JOHN A. BAKER
Alligator Editor Emeritus
With the first balmy days of the
New Year upon us a mild epi epidemic
demic epidemic of spring fever was appar apparent
ent apparent on campus this week And
to go along with the springtime at atmosphere
mosphere atmosphere the golf, track and base baseball
ball baseball team news started appearing
in the papers.
But Florida Field surely didnt
look like springtime .. The f oot- f
ball team began their annual 20-
day session of knocking heads and
the Florida coaches were facing
their annual problem of looking for
a fullback.
Head Coach Bob Woodruff was
enduring a normal week however
. . The state press was full of
nightmares for Woodruff to mull
over . These included the prat prattlings
tlings prattlings of the Florida State Univer Univernot
not Univernot trying to reach any agreement
sity clique of money happy foot football
ball football fans who accused Woodruff of
on the mandatory Florida FSU
sports competition/
After a week of pro FSU stor stories,
ies, stories, the press finally carried the
University of Florida's side of the
controlrsy which centered around
the fact (which FSU officials ig ignored)
nored) ignored) that Woodruff had offered
to meet FSU in spring sports this
year . *The letter from the Uni University
versity University of Florida which detailed
this offer was conveniently lost
by FSU officials.
FSU seems to feel Florida should

BACON'S BEAT
Take Care of My Little Sorority Girl

By DON BACON
Gator Feature Editor
Take Care of My Little Girl,
the Hollywood version of modem
sorority life of a few years oack,
caused the female socials over the
nation to take an introspective
look at themselves and smear on
a little more makeup to cover the
flaws.
The film, being less subtle than
a nude in church, raked the sor sori
i sori ority coeds from the top of their
feathered hats down to the *aps
on their spiked shoes. It pictured
them as catty little rich girls with
i nothing better to do than to ook
beautiful and spend dad s money.
This, of course, isn't true, as
any sorority girl will tell you.
Quote one Florida lovely: I dont
know about the other houses, but
were not like that. We dont really
care if a girl has money or If
shes pretty. What were interested
in is the girl herself and if she
is likeable and ean make her
grades.
Sound familiar?
No one, except members them themselves,
selves, themselves, really knows what sort of
judgement ruler, or tapemeasure,
sororities use in picking their
pledges. With all the red tape and
heart break a prospective pledge
jias to go through to get a bid,
a sorority girl should be consider considered
ed considered something special.
Here at Florida she first must get
an invitation to visit a house, with
a maximum of five invitations the
first day, two the second and so

TWO CENTS WORTH
A Disc Jockey Pulls Local Boner

t
By DOUG BUCK
1 Assistant News Editor <
Discless Jockey is a term
coined by columnist John Lardner.
1 It describes the indibidual on the
s radio whose steady stream of
* chatter is only occasionally inter inters
s inters rupted by the playing of a record.
Discless jockies are not confined
to Lardner*s metropolitan scene.
* They broadcast locally mostly
1 around the whitching hour. Some
S are rather good, in spite of their
j discless condition. Others .
1 well, lets just say theyre inex inexperienced.
perienced. inexperienced.
In the latter category is one, a
student, who pulled the prize bone bonehead
head bonehead wisecrack of the year Sun Sunday
day Sunday morning. It went something
like this:
DJ (for discless jockey): Well
1 (ha-ha), this looks like a politi politit
t politit cal convention. Here were have
l four of the top men in Student
f Government.
i I see here SG (for the holder of
a truly dignified 'SG post). SG, 1
1 know you were on television (Sat (Sat
- (Sat urday) afternoon. Would you mind
telling us what the topic of that
* broadcast was?
SG: The topic was Morality at
the U. of F. (Background laugh laughter.)
ter.) laughter.)

aociation with them will tie him
down and hinder his finding a eir eir
eir cle of real kindred spirits. Were
Sewanees fraternities local, it
would be possivle for a student
. who transferred to or from anoth anoth,
, anoth, r school to join the fraternity ot
his choice insted of being limited to
a particularly fraternity or to
none at all, if there is not a chapter
| in both places.
2. Utility. A member of a Se Se.
. Se. wanee chapter of a national tra traternity,
ternity, traternity, if he is ever in a college
town where there is another chap chap
chap ter, can usually spent the night in
i the chapter house free, instead ot
paying $2.00 at the YMCA. The
money saved by this opportunity
. for free lodging may add up to as
much as SB.OO during a member s
. life.
3. Vanity. is the least con con
con scious but most powerful argu argument

give up contracted games with
Southeastern Conference teams,
traditional rivals such as Miami
or a lucrative non conference foe
like Rice to play FSU ... Os
course, FSU knows that the firet
game will give FSU more money
than any two games they could
possibly schedule with anyone elee
~. Personally, I want us to play
FSU also . This hogwash adoul
ug being chicken gripes my
soul.
But I think that at the present
time, I would rather see us play
SEC teams, Miami and other
make our mark hon honestly
estly honestly than break & contract with
another university for the saxe of
pouring money into the pockets of
the Seminoles ... I was one of
the first to hope FSU would get
a bid to the Sun Bowl and wish
them well and I know someday the
Florida FSU series will be an
important game of the year .
But lets not get everyone else
mad at us to save the FSU ath athletic
letic athletic slush fund.
Then the University of Miami
complained this year's
Florida Miami game was to be
played during daylight hours on a
Saturday ... It seems Tropical
Park is holding the opening day
races the same Saturday and the
Army Navy game will be tele televised
vised televised the same day . Maybe
they have a point, but we'll bet

on. Then the different sororities
run up to the Dean of Womens
office and place, or not place as
card in an envelope, telling the
the case may be, an engraved
rushee that they want her.
In the meantime, the rushee has
filled out a list with four choices
of sororities that she would like
to pledge. If her first choice sends
her a bid, fine. Even a bid from
the second pick isnt bad, but
should some girl not make the so social
cial social grade, she gets a card saying
"We regret to inform you . ."
That's the heartbreak. Ask any
girl how it feels to be turned down
if you can find one. Usually, and
with good reason, no girl will ad admit
mit admit not getting a bid.
And the. reason some girls arent
wanted by a sorority? Looks plays
an important part as does the
girls reputation, how she holds hei
cup of tea, etc. But there are often
times when a certain sorority
wants a particular girl but cant
give her a bid. This is true if ar.
alumnus who knows the girl cant
be found to sign a recommenda recommendation.
tion. recommendation.
The whole rushing business
sounds cruel, and maybe it is.
Even the members themselves
say they dont like it, but its
there and they abide by it, most
of the time.
NIGHT The bridge nabit
has caught on again in the Campug
Club, to bad . Still wearing
my Smile button the Florida Un Union
ion Union Social Board sent me, thanks

DJ: Well (ha-ha), tell me, SG,
do you really think youre qualified
to talk on that subject. Do you
really think youre qualified to talk
on Florida morality in view of the
fact that I can smell your breath
from here?
And there K was. It had been
said by the (as mentioned above)
inexperienced and apparently un unabashed
abashed unabashed announcer. And nothing
that could have been said by the
embarrassed 9G official could
gloss it over.
The understatement of the cam campus
pus campus year was the reply:
GS: Well, DJ, that wasnt a
very nice thing to say over the
radio, but . (and so on).
Student Government didnt de deserve
serve deserve such a blundering slap. The
University didnt deserve it. And,
most of all, the individual involv involved
ed involved didnt deserve it.
What good that was done pub public
lic public relations wise by the TV
broadcast could have been undone
by that one radio blooper.
No. Doubtless H wasnt done with
malicious intent. All the fluff con consisted
sisted consisted of was complete lack ot
forethought which perhaps
comes with experience.

ment argument of all. If Heeve Psi Mater Maternity
nity Maternity is known in other places, what
a thrill to sport that pin proor
of being a social lion. The girl
friend will swoon, and Uncle El Elmo
mo Elmo (who was a brother of 'O9 at
another university) will say, *X
knew the lad had it in him.
Balanced weightily against these
advantages of the nationals is
the ridiculously large sum whicn
members have to pay for them.
Not only does national membership
cost too much; it also entails the
needless subjection of a group to
unsympathetic, arbitrary rules.
A local club if it wants ,to can
have all the tiresome and compli complicated
cated complicated ritual it desires. But 1C it
prefers a simpler form of meeting
and initiating members, it is not
forced to go through a lot of rig rigmarole
marole rigmarole dreamed up and insisted
upon by strangers who have never
been to Sewanee.

that one of the largest crowds ever
to witness a football game in Flor Florida
ida Florida will be on hand . And it's
been a long time since we won a
major game at night, something
like 10 or IS years.
But to top all the other night nightmares,
mares, nightmares, Wally Butts was wailing
that Florida had intentionally left
an open date before the Georgia
game and although it was a game
on neutral ground in Jackson Jacksonville,
ville, Jacksonville, it was a Florida "home
game . Butts later apologised
when he found out that after this
year Florida has scheduled Auourh
for the week before the Georgia
game in 1956 and 1957 . The
Auburn Tigers, who went to two
bowl games in 1954, could not tie
considered "breathers for Florida
by even the ever-wailing Wally.
Which all boils down to the con conclusion
clusion conclusion that, with a state age .icy
ordering certain competition, rival
schools trying to control the sche scheduling
duling scheduling of games and alumni trying
to coach the team, its no wonder
the University has to pay a big
salary and bind itself to a seven sevenyear
year sevenyear contract In order to get a
coach.
And yet Woodruff was quoted the
other day as saying he hoped he
could remain at Florida from now
on and he wasn't interested in any
other coaching jobs . Maybe
the guy is just a glutton for pun punishment.
ishment. punishment.

. . Weather report: Poop sheet
snowfall coming soon followed by
hot air blasts in the dorms .
Know a girl who cant find any anything
thing anything better to do than mate vri vrigin
gin vrigin flies. .
Whats this rumor about Stan
Kenton not coming? .. Beta
President A1 Quentel all smiles
after the good turnout for the Ben Benefit,
efit, Benefit, sponsored by his frater fraternity
nity fraternity and the Gainesville Lions
Club . Club Rendesvous new
look is new . Orange Peel
Editor Fred Bell denies rumors
that he will seek that office again
this spring . Some guy named
Glenn Cunningham sure got his
poop sheets out early, but wnat's
he running for? . Still wonder wondering
ing wondering why nobody showed up for the
planning and policy committee
meeting yesterday, Bill? .
Hqre's what happened: The meet meeting
ing meeting had been scheduled for Tues Tuesday
day Tuesday and that afternoon you post postponed
poned postponed it until yesterday. However,
the committee, not knowing of any
postponement, came and, fin.ting
you not there, conducted the meet
Ing anyway. Its a cruel world,
isnt it .
Art (Sgt. Friday) Smith finally
found the culprit whos been pur purchasing
chasing purchasing commodities on his tao .
Arts roommate, Gil Stockton., is
burning the midnight alcohol. >re >reparing
paring >reparing his prosecution on a mock
trial in which a man is accused
of attempting murder for firing
three shots at a dummy . Beat
that .

The student official no doubt has
learned a bitter lesson. He now
knows to trust airways inter interviews
views interviews to the professionals only.
The student announcer, it is to
be hoped, has Jparned to jockey
fewer words and more discs.
PENNIES FOR THOUGHT: The
predicted shakeup in the Florida
Party came last week. But a
weakening of power didnt. Fac Factions
tions Factions outside the group had hoped
it would break up. Instead, still
another fraternity joined the fold.
It looks like a tough election for
the outs come March 29 .
And the campus once again will
be littered with poop sheets. Oh,
well , . Query: What needs
thinking about on this campus
Answer: Thinking."
PENNIES FROM HEAVEN: The
welfare work being done by fra fraternities
ternities fraternities . Veep McClure, who
did a good job at the Exec Council
meeting in the absence of Bill
Danier . Betty Haines, Student
Governments steno and secretary
its only salaried employe
who works hard and still is pati patient
ent patient with people and even repor reporters
ters reporters . Ann Richardson, Joan
Williamson and Joy Fuller, who
i toiled and sent someone else s Se Seminole
minole Seminole to press.

It can be just as snobbish and
exclusive as k wants to, but in
case it wants to initiate members
of various creeds and races, that
is its own business too, not the busi business
ness business of a few people in another
thing about the particular chapter,
part of the country who know no-
A national fraternity unaware of
Sewannees high standards is like likely
ly likely to set an inconveniently high fi figure
gure figure for the grade average requir required
ed required for initiation. Under a local
system, determination of' this fi figure
gure figure would be solely between the
University and the Sewannee chap chapters.
ters. chapters.
Because of the superfical ad advantages
vantages advantages of nationals in the eyes
of the bewildered rushees, going
local must be a concerted action
by all nine fraternities. Pen Hell
can take the initial steps. Oppress Oppressed
ed Oppressed masses, arise!



Dean Cites
Heavy State
Home Needs
The 1954-55 enrollment figures of
the Association of Collegiate
Schools of Architecture show that
Florida now has the second largest
school of architecture in the coun country,
try, country, Dean William T. Arnett re reported
ported reported this week. Its enrollment for
the current year of 388 students to
architecture and 254 in building
construction Is exceeded only by
the University of Illinois.
The tremendous need for
homes, schools, hospitals, and other
buildings in Florida and the South
is placing heavy demands on facu faculties
lties faculties at the University of Florida
for the education of architects,
builders, and other leaders for the
building industry," said the dean
of the College of Architecture and
Allied Arts.
John L. Grand, head of the
department of architecture, indi indicated
cated indicated that record enrollments to
architecture and in building con construction
struction construction are still not enough to
keep pace with the demand for
graduates. Architects and builders,
he added, have joined the mem
bers of several other professions
in the category of being too scarce.
Grand said that a recent survey
by The Florida Builder Magazine
disclosed that Florida had an all alltime
time alltime high building record last year.
Permits for construction, accord according
ing according to the survey, totalled nearly
$537 million, and surpassed tne
1953 total of $525 million. The sur survey
vey survey covered only buildings for
which permits were issued, and did
not include a large amount of fed
eral, state, and municipal construc construction.
tion. construction. It was the third straight year
in which a new building record
was set for Florida.
The College is the only one in j
the state, and one of few in the
South, to offer professional work
in architecture, building construc construction,
tion, construction, and related fields.
Florida Players Initiate
Florida Players initiated ten
new members and elected new of officers
ficers officers Sunday night at a formal
meeting. Liz Otto was elected
President, Terry Rogers, Vice
President, and Ed Amor, Secre Secretary
tary Secretary by the Players.
Ten students were initiated into
the group. They are Ron aid
Vaughn, Jan Urankar, Joan Wil Williamson,
liamson, Williamson, Mary Ann Sparkman,
Jean Stopke, Jim Patterson. Mar Marlon
lon Marlon Hunt, Jean Ellyson, Duane De
Mar, and Tom Rahner.

QnCtanpgfe&fc.
UAMtkorof "Barefoot Boy With CUA,"
DECEMBER AND MAT: ACT I
Os aH the creatures that inhabit the earth, none is so fair, so warm,
so toothsome, as a coed.
This is a simple fact, well-known to every campus male, and, to
most campus males, a source of rejoicing. But not to all. To some,
the creamy brows and twinkling limbs of coeds are a bane and a
burden. To whom? To professors, thats whom.
Professors, according to latest scientific advice, are human. Stick
them and they bleed, pinch them and they hurt, ring a dinner bell
and they salivate, comfront them with a round young coed and
their ears go back, even as yours and mine.
But, by and large, they contain themselves. After all, they are
men of high principle and decorum, and besides, the board of regents
has got stoolies all over. So, by and large, they contain themselves.
But not always. Every now and then a coed will come along who
is just too gorgeous to resist, and a professor his clutch worn out
from years of struggle will slip and fall. White though his hair,
multitudinous though his degrees, Phi Beta Kappa though his key,
be is as lovesick, moonstruck, and impaled as any freshmar.
But hes far worse off than any freshman. After all, a r reshman
can thump his leg, put on his linen duster, and take out lifter the
coed with mad abandon. But what can the poor smitten prof do?
How, in his position, can he go courting a young girl undergraduate?
In this column and the next one, I am going to deal with this
difficult question. I will relate to you, in the form of a two act play,
n account of a professors attempt to woo a coed.
The scene is a typical office in a typical liberal arts building on
m typical campus. In this shabby setting, we find two men, Professors
Twonkey and Phipps. They are lumpy and bent, in the mahner of
English lit professors.
PHIPPS: Twonkey, a terrible thing has happened to me. A terrible,
ghastly thing! Ive fallen in love with a coed.
Twonkey: Now, now, thats not so terrible.
Phipps: Oh, but it is. Miss McFetridgefor that is her nameis
a student, a girl of nineteen. How would her parents feel if they
knew I was gawking at her and refusing my food and writang her
name on frosty windowpanes with my fingernail?
Twonkey: Come now, Phipps, no need to carry on so. Youre not
the first teacher to cast warm eyes at a coed, you know. j
Phipps: You mean its happened to you too?
Twonkey: But pf course. Many times.
* Phipps: What did you do about it?
Twonkey : Looked at their knees. It never fails, Phipps. No matte*
how pretty a girl is, her knees are bound to be knobby and bony and
the least romantic of objects.
Phipps: Not Miss McFetridges-for that is her name. They are
aoft and round and dimpled. Also pink.
Twonkey: Really? Well, Ill tell you something, Phipps, If I
ever found a girl with pink knees, Id marry her.
Phipps: It is my fondest wish, but how can I, a professor cf fifty,
etart a courtship with.a girl of 19?
Twonkey: Very simple. Ask her to come to your office for a
conference late tomorrow afternoon. When she arrives, be urbane, be
charming. Ask her to sit down. Give her a cigarette.
Phipps: A Philip Morris.
Twonkey: But of course.
Phipps: I just wanted to be sure you mentioned the name. Theyre
paying for this column.
Twonkey : Give her a Philip Morris.
Phipps: Thats right.
Twonkey: Then light her Philip Morris and light one yourself.
Say some frightfully witty things about English lit. Be gay. Be
insouciant. Keep her laughing for an hour or so. Then look at your
vatch. Cry out in surprise that you had no idea it was this late.
Insist on driving her home.
Phipps: Yea, yes?
Twonkey: On the way home, drive past that movie house that
shows French films. Stop your car, as though on a sudden impulse.
Tell her that youve heard the movie was delightfully Gallic and
naughty. Ask her if shed like to see it.
Phipps: Yes, yes?
Twonkey : After the movie, say to her in a jocular, offhand way
that after such a fine French movie, the only logical thing would be
a fine French dinner. Take her to a funny little place you know,
with candles and checked tablecloths. Ply her with burgundy and
Philip MoiTis. Be witty. Be gay. Be Gallic . How can a nineteen
year old girl resist such blandishments?
Phipps: Twonkey, youre a genius! This will be like shooting fish
In a barrel... But I wonder if it isnt taking unfair advantage of
the poor little innocent
Twonkey: Nonsense, Phipps. All's fair in love and war.
PHIPPS: Youre right, by George. Ill do i
(So ends Act I. Next week, Act II)
Mu Shulmn, IMM
This eohumn is brought to you by the makers of PHILIP MORRIS
- who think you would enjoy their cigarette.

milism mm \ '1
UhIMPI
HERR IS WHAT HAPPENS to student cars when they make the fatal mistake of parking in Re Reserved
served Reserved Area 1, an exclusive lot for Administration Building personnel. Campus police have begun
hauling operations on ail cars without proper decals found in ie area. Above, a student auto is
being towed to a local garage on orders from police. The cars can be reclaimed after hauling
charges are paid. Below is the Area 1 limits, where empty parking spaces can be seen In contrast
to overcrowded areas In the background. The area has special assigned places for Deans and as
.sistants. (UF Photo).
lyA^g^fFajgr^ailw ll **y' Ts [

Christian Science Lecture
A Christian Science lecture en entitled
titled entitled The Healing Prayer ot
Christian Science, will be given
Thursday in the second floor au auditorium
ditorium auditorium of the Florida Union, at
8 p.m. The lecturer is Miss Lena
May Aultman, C.S., who is speak speaking
ing speaking under the auspices of the
Christian Science Organization on
campus.

Inter Dorm Dance Tonight
Keynoted by Informality

Informality is the keynote for
the Dixie Dorm Dance to be
held tonight from 8 till 12 in the
Broward Hall recreation room.
Sponsored jointly by MRHA and
the womens dorms, this dance will
feaure a variety of numbers. A
series of games is planned for in intermissions.
termissions. intermissions. Highlighting the dec decorations
orations decorations will be the Kappa Alpha
confederate flag.
Music for the dance will be pro provided
vided provided by Don Moore's orchestra. |
Foreign Service Men
Here Wednesday
Two representatives from the U.
S. Department of State will be on
campus Wednesday to talk to stu students
dents students and faculty about the career
opportunities in the Foreign Serv Service
ice Service of the United States.
George Toulmin, of the Bureau
of International Organization Af Affairs,
fairs, Affairs, and Olcott Deeming of the
Foreign Service will address an
open meeting which will be neld
at 3:30 p.m. in Room 209, Florida
Union. The two representatives of i
the State Department will also be
available for individual interviews.
Those wanting to make appoint appointment
ment appointment for an interview should con contact
tact contact the University Placement Of Office
fice Office in Building H.

ate
Y appointment purveyors of soap to tlw late King Georg* VI, Yardlay 4 Co., Ltd., London
.
11111 Pjh
fill
t. i ...V .^:J^i V '. : tt|i .. -Bp
Yardley brings you
months and months of Having luxury
London style
From London, the worlds center of fashions for men, comes
the Yardley Shaving Bowl. This distinguished soap im imported
ported imported from England and packaged in America should give
you up to six months of shaving luxury. The rich lather
wilts the beard, soothes the face and softens the skin in
wondrous fashion. At your campus store. 51.25. Makers and
distributors for U. S. A., Yardley of London, Inc., New York.

| Don will act as M.*C. for the floor
I show.
Leading the list of entertainers
for this show will be the Dream
Weavers. One of their numbers
will be the first performance of a
song written by a campus coed.
Several other acts are planned,
including a skit by the members
of the International Students Or Organization.
ganization. Organization.
Admission to the dance is free
I with student identification cards.
! Any dorm residents may invite
: dates. A blind date bureau has
been operating for the occasion
an dhas so far proved success successful
ful successful in arranging dates.
Plan Party for Coeds,
Men Living Off-Campus
The first party for men and wo women
men women living off campus will be held
Friday, March 11 in Broward rec recreation
reation recreation lounge from 8:30 p.m. to
midnight.
Johnny Edmondson and his band
! will play for dancing and enter entertainment
tainment entertainment will be featured. Don
jain is publicity chairman. Skip
Symons is in charge of entertain
ment, Mary McClamroch heads
the decoration committee, and Lu Luana
ana Luana Smith is refreshment chair chairman.
man. chairman.
1 Admission is 35 cents per person.

Florida Alligator, Friday, February 25, 1955

THE FLORIDA STUDENT SPEAKS
Century Tower Funds
Could Have Been
Put to Better Use

By BECKY GREER t
Gator New* Editor
Most Florida students think
that the money that is being spent
to construct the Century Tower
could be put to better use else elsewhere
where elsewhere on the campus.
There are many different opin opinions
ions opinions as to the value of the Tower
itself, but some students, while
considering the Tower an eyesore
in its present state, feel that it will
add to the beauty of the campus in
its completed form.
The question this week was: Do
you think that Century Tower is
an asset to the campus?
Libby White2lCGainesville
I think it will be an asset in
the future. The present students
dont realize what beauty the pres present
ent present eyesore will provide. The ca carillon
rillon carillon bells will be a thing of
beauty known over the entire
state.
Jim Jackson4ASBt. Peters PetersurkAt
urkAt PetersurkAt its present uncompleted
form, the Century Tower is a me menace
nace menace to the campus. We need
classrooms, salary raises, etc.,
far more than a Century Tower.
Dixie Lee MottllCMimi
Noits a waste of money. The
money could have been put into
16 Schools
Participate
In Debate
Two outstanding Florida deba debaters
ters debaters will join teams from 16
schools as they compete in the
Dartmouth College Invitational
Debate Tournament this weekend.
The two-day session, which will
be held in Hanover, New Hamp Hampj
j Hampj shire, has been termed this years
! major forensic event for colleges
and universities located in the
[ eastern part of the United States.
Representing the University will
be Henry Forer, a junior from
Coral Gables, and David Willing,
sophomore from Miami. Debate
Coadh Dr. Douglas Ehniger will
also attend the meet as a faculty
judge.
According to Fhniger ". . both
Forer and Willing have compiled
outstanding records in debate ac activities
tivities activities during the past two years.
Besides winning several tourna tournaments,
ments, tournaments, Forer was ranked as the
top speaker at a meet held last
November and Willing won an
excellent rating for his partici participation
pation participation in a discussion tournament
held recently in Alabama.

InMEiwHi >->> \n #$§ Atej -*> Jgg |m ra
What young people are doing at General electric I ll
1 I# 5 # 11

Young specialist in
community relations
makes friends in
101 plant cities
General Electric now has 131 plants in 101
cities, and one problem is common to all:
How can the company show people in every
community that it is a good neighbor?
This responsibility is shared by many and
stimulated by 32-year-old John T. McCarty.
His job: Consultant, Program Services in
Plant Community Relations.
McCarty's work is varied, exciting
McCartys assignment is to help each of the
General Electric plants tell its neighbors what
it is doing, what it hopes to do, and how it
fits into the community.
He must be ready to travel to 26 states.
He prepares community-relations manuals
for use in all 101 plant cities. He supervises
surveys of community sentiment, and tests
the local effects of the companys advertis advertising.
ing. advertising. And he helps plant management main maintain
tain maintain friendly contacts with civic, religious,
educational and other community leaders.
23,000 college graduates at General Electric
This is a sensitive and important job.
McCarty was readied for it in a careful step stepby-step
by-step stepby-step program of development. Like Mc-
Carty, each of the 23,000 college-gradyate
employees is given his chance to grow, to
find the work he does best, and to realize his
full potential. For General Electric has long
believed this: When fresh young minds are
given freedom to make progress, everybody
benefits the individual, the company, and
the country.

the library, gymnasium, or audi auditorium
torium auditorium or it could have been used
to replace all the raunchy tempo temporary
rary temporary buildings on the campus.
Gil StocktonSLW Jacksonville
I think that they could have
used the money for a more func functional
tional functional memorial. Furthermore, its
not an aesthetic edifice.
Jackie McClell an SAS
Gainesvillels it is ever complet completed,
ed, completed, it will be an asset, but as it
stands now it is an eyesore. I
think that the money could have
been used for more important
purposes.
Dick Calhoun 2UCMiami
Technically, the Century Tower
must be an asset, but actually it
serves no purpose other than to
enhance the beauty of the dam dampus.
pus. dampus. In future years it will also
serve to build up University tradi traditions.
tions. traditions.
Nancy Inman 4EDSarasota
Definitely not. With all the
buildings that are needed on this I
campus, they shouldnt waste j
money on a century tower. It is i
neither functional nor beautiful.
Joe ArnoldSASMiami Beach j
I dont really know if it is an j
asset or not. Its not particulary j
pretty, but as long as the alumni j
are paying for it, it doesn't make
much difference. If the alumni
are interested enough in a me memorial
morial memorial to build one, then that's
their affair.
Thousands of Spoons
Lost in Cafeteria
Thousands of spoons are being
j taken from the University Food
Service each year, according to B.
W. Graham, director.
Although we only lose a few i
dishes and sugar dispensers, the
Cafeteria, Hub, and Campus Club I
I report spoons missing by the
thousands each fall, Graham said.
The only reason Graham could
give for the loss of spoons rather
than other articles was that stu
, dents used the spoons when drink drinking
ing drinking coffee in their rooms.
Graham said the most unusual
example of vandalism of n'ood
Service property was observed
when a student seated at a cafe cafeteria
teria cafeteria table with a girl bent nine
knives.

Page 5

175 Participating In Speech Tourney

More than 175 students have en-
tered the intramural speech tourn tournament
ament tournament which is now in progress on
campus.
Twelve fraternity and sorority
group* and two independent teams
have been slated for competition
in debate, prose and poetry read read

Whrt Stag
control* ttia cftmate
V s Seems 20 cooler
inside these pretty
did this new 00l lection
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read mg, extemporaneous and public
speaking.
Certificates will be given for
the top three persons in each
event and the total points of each
team will determine the winner
of the sweepstexes trophy.



Page 6

-Florida Alligator, Friday February 25, 1955

Rhubarb 9M|
State Grid Contest F 29
Has Its Problems, W-
Schedules Reveal f
By 808 LYNCH
Alligator Sports Editor
ATHLETIC DIRECTOR 808 WOODRUFF must feel iike a clay
pigeon in a shooting gallery after the happenings of the past two
months, and, as the saying goes, he isnt out of the woods yet/
It all started when state bigwigs got the bright Idea that
Florida and FSU should stop playing tag and get down to brass
tacks on the football field. Now this had been hassled over many
times previously, but when the State Board of Control began
to wonder how it would be spending Saturday afternoons from
1958 to infinity, that made the two schools sit up and take notice.
Several people have asked us why Florida and FSU cant get
together in 1956, since this season's schedule is already made up.
If you 11 remember, one of Woodruffs conditions for such a game
was that it must be played at Florida Field on the third Saturday
in September. Rice Institute, a team which signed a four year con
tract with the Gators in 53, has a temporary lapse of a year be because
cause because of schedule difficulties this season, but the Owls wiJl be here
in '56, and Florida concludes the agreement in Houston in 57. Both
games are on the above mentioned third Saturday.
SCHEDULES SHOW WOODRUFFS RIGHT
IF YOU TOOK THE TROUBLE to notice Florida's Southeastern
Conference schedules for '56 and 57, which we printed two weeks
ago, you will see that there are four open dates on each Sept. 22.
Oct. 13, Nov. 17 and Nov. 24 in 1956, and Sept. 21, Oct. 12, Nov. 16 I
and Nov. 23 in 57.
Rice will occupy the September dates, and assuming that Florida
and Miami continue their rivalry, the latter November days will
be taken with the UM-UF meetings.
In 1956. Florida plays Kentucky here on Oct. 6 and LSU
here on the 20th. It hardly seems reasonable that Florida Field
would have three straight home games, and it does seem reaaon reaaonably
ably reaaonably certain that when the Gator-Seminole blood letting takes
place, It will be on that soil. Another problem which occurs is
whether the Gators will resume relations with Tennessee in '56.
If so, then the game will be in Knoxville on the 17th, thus elimi eliminating
nating eliminating all of the dates for that year.
*e 6
One detail which might crop up is the Jacksonville two-game
plan which gives the Gator Bowl the Georgia game and another
Florida tilt. If that set-up continues, then you can definitely eliminate
any hopes of a meeting between the schools before 1958.
A FLY IN THE OINTMENT
BUT THERES ONE CATCH. And this may make a Woodruff
critic speculate as to the Tennesseean's whereabouts when his con contract
tract contract runs out in 1956. The 1957 schedule has only two definite home
gamesGeorgia Tech, here on Sept. 28, and LSU, here on Oct. 26.
Woodruffs policy has always been to give the Florida Fie.d fans
the best in football. With this docket, it appears that something has
to give somewhere.
Either the Jacksonville pact must be cancelled to give a minimum
of four home contests, or if it continues, then the game will be played
on Oct. 12 in that city, and who plays here on Nov. 12? Your
guess is as good as ours.
The Florida mentor has repeatedly stated that he doesnt
feel two rivalriesMiami and FSUcould be carried on in the
same season. Therein lies another factorthe Miami contract
could be cancelled to make way for the Tallahassee Terrors,
but that would mean giving up a healthy cut of an Orange Bowl
gate every two years.
It all boils down to this. The Board of Control will have a Flor Florida-FSU
ida-FSU Florida-FSU football game come hell or high water. But the way things
look now, they wont get one unless someoneeither Jacksonville or
North Florida fans and studentsgets burned in the process. The
odd situation stems from the Tennessee angle. If the Vols dont re renew
new renew relations, then the third weekend in ISfovember is open for bids,
either from another SEC team or FSU. With only six league games
slated for 56 and 57, the Gators probably will add another; result,
the Seminoles here on Sept. 20, 1958. That could be changed, but if
it's earlier . we repeat, someone gets burned.
POWELL LEFT OFF SMALL AMERICA FIVE
THERE HAS BEEN SO MUCH PUBLICITY on Florida's fine
guard, Sonny Powell, in the last few- weeks, we figure a little more
icing on the cake wont hurt matters any. In fact, wed like to show
you w'ho beat out Powell 15-10) on the United Press Small America j
team, composed of players not exceeding the 5-10 mark.
Admittedly, Chet Forte of Columbia, with a 23.7 average in 17 j
games to gb with a 5-9 statui4, deserves to be on the team, but j
there the similarity ceases. Others on the team are Bill Ridley, Illinois
(5-9, 16.6 for 16), Dennis Blind, Purdue (5-10, 15 forlll,8 1, Pachin
Vicens, Kansas State (5-9, 10.8 for 17), and Joe Helms, Georgia
Tech (5-9, 14.6 for 22).
For the record, Powell has tallied 1,068 points over his four fouryear
year fouryear career; he has scored 314 this season, his second straight
over the 300-mark; he is as good on defense, if not better, than
on offense (if you doubt this, ask Auburns Bill Kirkpatrick,
Tulane's Hal Cervinl or Kentucky's Bill Evans), and, most im important
portant important of all, he has a 16.5 average through 19 games, a better
mark than three of the top five men.
Were going out on a limb when w'e say this, but Powell just
may show up Mr. Helms Monday night in Atlanta. That should make
a few small men" authorities eat crow.
BAMA ON SEC HOT SEAT
ITS SHOWDOWN TIME in the Southeastern Conference basket basketball
ball basketball rade with only two more weekends of action remaining. All
eyes will be watching Coach Johnny Dees talented Alabama club
when it invades Knoxville'to meet Tennessee tomorrow and moves
to Lexington for a do-or-die engagement with Adolph Rupp s Ken Kentuckians
tuckians Kentuckians Monday night. If Bama gets by the Vols, then it should be
primed for Kentucky. This one could go either way, but the Tide
looked mighty impressive here on Feb. 14; another outburst such
as that one w r ould be enough to down the Cats.
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-

Swimmers Seek
Second Victory
Against Georgia
By BILL JOHNSON
Gator Sports Writer
Florida's swimming team winds
up its dual meet season tonight
when it meets the Universit> of
Georgia in Athens. The Gators
swam against Georgia Tech In
Atlanta last night.
Also making the trip is the Flor Florida
ida Florida freshman squad, which s'ated
meets with first yeai teams from
both Tech and Georgia.
Earlier in the season, Florida
defeated Georgia here. 47-37.
The Gators finished aheajl of
! both Georgia Tech and the Bull Bulljdogs
jdogs Bulljdogs in the recent Southern 'inter*
! collegiate Meet at Atlanta.
Coach Jack Ryan planned to
take sprinters Don Read, \ndy
Sears, Phil Hacker and Bob Fish Fisher,
er, Fisher, breast strokers Joe Schaefer
and John Ridout; backstrokers
George Duganne and Dick Caro,
distance swimmer Tom Blake and
diver Craig White.
Freshmen slated to go on the
trip were A1 Carpenter, Jim
Warmingtoh, Don Musse 1m a n
Doug Creighton, Bill Morrison,
Bob Wolfe, Ray Lott, Bill Wenz
and Charles Richter,
j Coach Ryan appeared pleased
i with the showings of Schaefer and
i Duganne in the Vanderbilt and
: Miami meets last week.
Duganne, conference titlehiJder i
in the 100 and 200 yd. backstroke
events, set a new Florida pool re record
cord record in the 200 yd. race against
Miami with a time of 2:25 3.
; The Gators defeated Vandy, 52-
23, and lost to Miami, 33-51 Du Duganne
ganne Duganne and Floridas 300 yd. med med:
: med: ley relay team produced the inly
' double wins for the host squad.
Florida will defend its SEC j
crown beginning Thursday night in
i Nashville when the 1500 meter
freestyle event will open the t4th
annual conference meet. The Ga Gators
tors Gators will be seeking their taird
straight championship.
Freshmen Conclude
Season in Orlando,
Sanford This Week
j
Three road games this week
close out the 'schedule for Coach
Jim McCachrens freshman fiYe,
possessing a 14-2 record.
| Tonight the frosh play Pinecastle
Air Force Base in Orlando, and
tomorrow night, the Orlando Air
Force Base quintet will play host
to the Baby Gators.
On Wednesday the yearlings
travel to Sanford to close their j
season against Sanford Naval Air I
Station.
Ken Seymour and Ron Stokley,
members of the squad, may not
make the trip this weekend due
to football practice. Stokley, a j
starting forward, probably will be
replaced by Rufus Holloway, with
Jerry Henderson at the other for forward.
ward. forward.
Wayne Williams will open at cen center
ter center and Charlie Pike and Joe
Hobbs will start at guards.
Scoring through Monday:
PLAYER FG FT TP
Jerry Henderson 91 43 225
Joe Hobbs 9ft 32 212
Charlie Pike 67 33 167
Ron Stokley 54 38 146
Dick Hoban 43 13 129 ;
Wayne Williams 52 14 118 (
| Leo Saunders 41 13 95
Alton Sheffield 36 13 85
Bemie Parrish 23 16 62
Ken Seymour 23 15 61
Rufus Holloway 27 7 61
Gordon Achilles 25 7 57
Don Bennett 3 6 12
Bob Verlander Ift 2
576 280 1432
OPPONENTS 339 288 966

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COACH AND CAPTAIN talk things over before leaving for
a two-meet road trip earlier this week. Breast stroker Joe Schaef Schaefer,
er, Schaefer, captain of the Gators, and Coach Jack Ryan discuss the
strategy to use against Georgia when the two SEC powerhouses
meet tonight in Athens. Schaefer will be swimming against the
Bulldogs NCAA record-holder, Hal Stolz, in the 200-yd. breast
stroke race.
HIRES, HUTCHERSON LEAD TEAM
Gator Netters Open Home
Schedule in Three Weeks

Tennis Coach Bill Potter welcom welcomed
ed welcomed back six returning lettermen to
the Florida net squad recently as
practice began for a 19-meet sche schedule
dule schedule opening Mar. 18 against
Georgia here.
Co-captains John Hires, Coral Ga Gables,
bles, Gables, and Bill Hutcnerson, Lames
ville; Ed Kassatly, West Palm
Beach; Augie LeCann, Miami;
Frances Ingram. Clearwater, and
Joe Heyck, Tampa, head the iet iettermen
termen iettermen list.
Four other men Carl Wick Wickstrom,
strom, Wickstrom, Steve Marshall, Jerry Gar-
Here is 1955 schedule:
Mar. 18 Georgia here
Mar. 19 Auburn here
Mar. 21 Davidson here
Mar. 23 Ohio State here
Mar. 25 Georgia Tech here
Mar. 26 Jax Navy at Jack Jackviile
viile Jackviile
Mar. 29 Duke here
Apr. 2 Rollins here
Apr. 9 Miami at Miami
Apr. 11 , Florida Southern
at Lakeland
Apr. 12 Centre College here
Apr. 16 Stetson at DeLand
Apr. 25 Stetson here
Apr. 29 Georgia at Athens
Apr. 30 Georgia Tech at At Atlanta
lanta Atlanta
May 6 Jax Navy here
May 10 LSU at Baton Rouge
May 11 Tennessee at New'
Orleans
May 12-14 SEC Tournament
at New Orleans
cia and Bob George are also on
the varsity squad.
The Gator nezeers finished fourth
in the Southeastern Conference
Tournament behind Tulane, Louisi Louisiana
ana Louisiana State and Vanderbilt.
I hate to make any predic predictions
tions predictions yet, Potter said, We should
do pretty well this year in the
SEC, but well be a muen better
Everyone Meets
at
SAM'S
LOUNGE
University Ave. and 13th St.

match play team than a tourna tournament
ment tournament team."
Seven freshmen have reported to
Potter to try out for the first
year squad. The Florida mentor
expects to arrange six or seven
matches for the yearlings.
Five Florida Track
Stars to Participate
In Chaoe! Hill Meet
By MORTY LEFKOE
Gator Sports Writer
Five of Florida's top track stars
leave tonight for Chapel Hill, N.G.,
where the annual Southern Indoor
Games will be held tomorrow.
This meet, the first of the year
for the Florida cindermen, will be
divided into Atlantic Coast Confer Conference
ence Conference and Non-Conference divisions
All American Earl Poucher.
SEC champion in the pole vault
as well as the leading collegiate
vaulter in the country at the pres present
ent present time, is just one of the group's
top performers.
With a 14T0" leap in the recent
New York Athletic Club games,
Poucher will be a heavy favorite in
his event.
Other Gator trackmen making
the trip are sprinter sun-per Wat Watson
son Watson and hurdler Jim Smith, mem members
bers members of the '54 All-American fresh freshman
man freshman team, quater-miler Jim Cro Crosier
sier Crosier and team captain and mile
runner Bill Adams.
Smith won the 220 yd. low hurd hurdles
les hurdles in the SEC last year, Crosier
i the 440 and Adams the mile. Wat Watson
son Watson finished second in the 100 and
j third in the 220 yd. runs.


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For sheer fun out on the road,
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from the high-priced cars!
Up to this year, maybe there were reasons for wanting
one of the higher-priced cars. If you demanded some something
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Not any more! The Motoramic Chevrolet has changed
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J fc at

! Golf Squad
Entered in
GW Meet
1 Second pound play in the George
Washington Birthday Tournament j
| begins this morning in Tallahassee
! with three University of Florida
| golfers seeking to repeat their 1954
I efforts.
Last year, freshman Jim McCoy
carded a 63-hole total of 244 to
win the meet and edge teammates :
Doug Sanders (246), who finished
second, and third place Pat Sch Schwab
wab Schwab (2501.
These three Florida players,
along with Coach Andy Bracken,
Dave Ragan, Art Gleason, Jim
Cameron, Frank Cain, and fresta-
Iman Austin Jones, left Wednesday
jfor Tallahassee where the 72-hole
I tournament started yesterday.
I The opening round was to be de de|
| de| voted to qualifying, with the j 32 men being assigned to the cham championship
pionship championship flight.
The boys are hitting the oall
a lot better this year thap at a
corresponding time iast year,"
Coach Bracken commented. "I
just hope they can do as well in the
tournament."
Five members of the team were
averaging below par in pra -ice
rounds at the par 71 Gainesville
- Country Club course when the
team left. Sanders headed the list
with a 67.25 rating, followed by
Schwab (68.75), Ragan (69.12),
Jones (70.36; and Gleason <70.8i.
"I think well have a better four fourinament,
inament, fourinament, or medal play, team han
a match play team," Bracken said
I "The boys are all consistent golf golf
- golf ers."
Earlier this year, Schwab won
o | both the Palma Ceia and Henry |
it Camp Invitational Tournaments in
r' Tampa and Ocala. Ragan finished
n second in the Ocala event and Zan Zanders
ders Zanders was fourth.
Last season Coach Bracken's
linksmen finished third in the
Southeastern Conference tourna
ment behind Louisiana State and
Georgia, and in a tie for hird
with North Texas State in (he
! Southern Intercollegiate tourney.
\ Their season record was an im- j
pressive 7-2, and, in addition, the i
Gator golfers won the Florida In- |
s j tercollegiate title, capturing first, |
J second and fourth place In .earn
r competition.
This season's schedule:
r Mar. 12 Rollins here
Mar. 18 Davidson here
Mar. 21 Georgia here
Mar. 22 Georgia Tech here
Mar. 30 Miami at Miami
tlMar. 31 Apr. 2 Florida In In*
* In* tercollegiate Tournament in Mi Miami.
ami. Miami.
s Apr. 8 Kentucky here
Apr. 9 Georgia at Athens
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f EM RICK, POWELL SEEK RECORDS
Florida Meets Vandy,
Surprising Engineers
In Crucial Road Tilts
y
By CHARLIE JEAN
Gator Sports Writer
The Florida basketball Gators meet Vanderbilt at Nashville to to|
| to| morrow- night in the first of three Southeastern Conference games
on the road which close out the current season.

j Florida will be hard-pressed to
bring its conference record of five
wins and six defeats up to the
; .500 mark against Bob Polk's fast fastbreaking
breaking fastbreaking Commodores, who have
won seven and dropped five in
conference play.
Vandys wins this season inclnte
two decisions over strong Tenrns
see and a 21-point victory over na nationally
tionally nationally ranked Alabama.
The Cotpmodores offense ia
paced by sbphomore guard Al Ro Ro!
! Ro! ch'elle. who is averaging about 17
points per game. Other stackers
are expected to be forwar d s
George Nordhaus and Bobby
Thym, center Charlie Harrison a
! 1 .-. V.. i:
.
inr*
GATOR CENTER Lew Doss |
will match baskets with Vander Vanderbilts
bilts Vanderbilts Charlie Harrison tomorrow 1
| night in Nashville when the Ga Ga|
| Ga| ors meet the Commodores.
Doss currently is third in Florida
j scoring with a 13.5 average in 19
games. The 6-7 center has 262
rebounds -to his credit, In addi addition
tion addition to his 258 (mints.

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Come in and see how the Motoramic Chevrolet is
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motoramic

, (
: St. Pete product, and guard* Ro Ro*
* Ro* chelle and Baby Taylor.
Florida Coach John Mauer will
: probably counter with Sonny Pow Powell
ell Powell and Bob Nims at guards, Lew
Doss at center, and Bob Emrick
and either Ted Copeland or Burt
Touchberry at the forward posts.
On Monday the Gators will meet
(the fast-rising Yellow Jackets of
Georgia Tech. A weak sister in
past court campaigns, the Engir Engiri
i Engiri eers startled the basketball wjrld
i earlier this season, twice beating
the Kentucky Wildcats.
Their most recent outing was an
83-77 upset win over Tennessee for
the Techmen.
Florida snapped a four-game
losing streak Saturday by beating
Mississippi State. 77-66, and follow followed
ed followed it up Monday with a 78-72 de decision
cision decision over Mississippi and red-hot
Denver Brackeen.
The Rebel ace poured throjgh
39 points for a new Florida Gym
record, eclipsing the old standard
of 36 points held jointly by Flor Floridas
idas Floridas Doss and Emrick.
Powell and Mississippi Stale e
Jim Ashmore shared scoring don donors
ors donors Saturday with 25 points each.
Against Ole Miss, Powell again
led the way with 28 markers and
teamed with Emrick in a last naif
rally to overcome a four-point
Rebel lead for the win. Emrick
finished with 26 points. 20 of which
came in the second half.
The Ashland, Ky., sophomore
now needs only 22 points to break
the one season standard set by
Harry Hamilton four years ago.
Hamilton scored 365, while Em Emrick
rick Emrick has hit 344 with three games
remaining.
Powell, with his two good nights
against the Maroons and Rebels,
placed himself in position to be become
come become the second highest scorer in-,
| the schools history. With 35 points
n his final three contests, the
senior guard could pass the run runer-up,
er-up, runer-up, Hamilton, who accumu accumulated
lated accumulated 1102 in four seasons.
The Gators will play their final
game next Friday in Athe n a
against Georgia, a team they de defeated
feated defeated here, 81-68, earlier in the
season.



Florida Alligator, Friday, February 25, 1955-

Mural Sketches
' Murals Recruiting
Workers; Officials
Choose All-Campus PoL^j
By HOWIE CRANE
Intramural Editor
Bports for all and all for sports."
Well admit that sounds trite; but no words more adequately could
sum up the Intramurals program of the University of Florida. It is
indeed a program of sports for all. It has facilities for both group and
individual sporta of every conceivable type and it ie open to any
student, be he Greek or independent.
There are seven year-round leagues, five for "men and two for
women. There is also an All League, a Co-Recreational
League, a B League, and a Faculty-Employee League.
The five mens leagues are coordinated by Bill Wagner, Student
Director of Intramurals. The other leagues are under the leader leadership
ship leadership of the Student Director of Recreation, Stanley Kantor. These
are the two highest positions an undergraduate can reach in In Intramurals
tramurals Intramurals and they are the goals of all the students working in
the Intramurals Department.
The next highest position in Intramurals is Office Manager. This
spot is currently held by Dick Turkel. It is Dicks duty to take care
of the torrents of facts and figures that pour into the Intramurals
office every day and his job is somewhat that of a statistician s.
Directly beneath these are the directors of the individual rec recreation
reation recreation leagues. Below them are the individual sport managers,
thirteen in all. They work In connection with the fraternity,
dormitory and independent leagues and are In charge of their par particular
ticular particular sport only.
All of, the students mentioned above, plus the Publicity Director
and Assistant Publicity Director, comprise the Intramural* Board. A
position on the Intramurals Board is open to anyone who has accumu accumulated
lated accumulated 60 hours of work in the department.
MURALS NEED WORKERS
In such a large organization, it takes many students to keep the
wheels of the machine turning. Right now, the Intramurals depart department
ment department is recruiting workers. The work is by no means hard and should
prove very enjoyable to anyone who is interested in sports.
Dont let that 60-hour work total frighten you. If you put in a
mere five hours a week, you will have enough to be eligible for
the Intramural* Board by the end of the semester.
The most common duty is refereeing. This takes nothing more
than a passing knowledge of the sport you will officiate plus a will willingness
ingness willingness to learn the rules. As an added incentive, referees of all bas basketball
ketball basketball and touch football contests are paid $1.50 per game. Since few
g&mes last more than an hour, these wages are not to be sneezed at.
INDEPENDENT ALL-CAMPUS SELECTIONS
With Independent League touch football coming to a close this
week, the officials decided to put their heads together and select an In Independent
dependent Independent All-Campus touch football team. After much squabbling and
some very difficult decisions, these are the choices they came up with.
END .... Archie VickersCooperative Living Organisation
END .... Bruce ThompsonKadets
CENTER .... Ed McDonoughGamma Delta laitheran
WINGBACK .... Charlie CoeGamma Delta Lutheran
WTNGBACK .... Denny VaradyNewman Club
HALFBACK .... Richard DixonGamma Delta Lutheran
PASSING BACK .... Archie MartinAM Stars
'
9
As is the ease in any all-star selection, many fine players must
be left x off, but the selectors sincerely believe that the choices they
made are the fairest possible.

(lUCKV PROODI3ES!
WHATS THIS? For solution see paragraph below. I =Tpnn :
I WKT \ .y|k I >
\ V. / \ natives on safari carrying
# I % t SURPLUS ACROSS DEIP RIVIR
J y Martin S. Kahn
M V University of Pennsylvania
I f j I 1 **r£SV£L
\ M RIAR VIEW OR TINY RASSIT L M cf' /tUCKYi \
V B MUNCHING ON ENORMOUS CARROT yp fCK>' IsTRIKB I
# J J. Leighton Crutcher / Tj! J
I University of Louisville | wshrsn sws
ITS IASY TO SEE that the Droodle above is titled: i /~\ i \ wmm I
Tired anthropologist relaxing with better-tasting Lucky i m
behind freshly dug-up fossil. No bones about it, Luckies
taste better to all sorts of people. College smokers, [
for instance, prefer Luckies to all other brands, ac- said nun remind fence at sunrise
cording to the latest, greatest coast-to-coastest college UnfS^st^ouiege
survey. Again, the No. 1 reason for Luckies wide lead: 1
Luckies taste better. They taste better, f t eiftd I
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fine tobacco. Then, that tobacco is 1 arp curing in, where 1
m ckv Droodles* use. and fcsa,
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the famous Lucky Strike processtone to Lueitv Droodi.
up Luckies light, good-tasting tobacc* Box 1/
to make it taste even better... k 1 v
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Page 7

TEPs, Pi Kaps Capture Bowling Championships

Edge Delta Chi In Tense Match j
To Snare Blue League Crown
By STU BLUMBERG
Gator Sports Writer
Pi Kappa Phi became bowling champion of the Blue League
Tuesday afternoon by beating Delta Chi in a close match high highlighted
lighted highlighted by good shooting on both teams.

In the first set of the finals,
both teams played on an even
basis with the Delta Chis holding
an 11 pin advantage at the set s
conclusion. The score was 694-683.
In the second set it was a dif different
ferent different story as the Delta Chis
couldnt make enough marks while
the Pi Kaps were consistent on all
their shots. The Delta Chis could
only pull a 677 second set total
while the Pi Kaps had 789 to win
the championship by a total of
96 pins.
Leading the victors was Dick
Hill who had a two game total of
315 while the other four members
of the team had scores ranging
from 286-290. For the losers, A1
Recht had a total of "318 pins while
Bob Arpin had 289 pins to his cre credit.
dit. credit.
The Pi Kaps, who had advanc advanced
ed advanced through the tournament on tne
arm of Hill, drew a first round
bye and then beat Lambda Clu
Alpha in an upset, to move into the
semi-finals against the Blue Lea League
gue League leader, Beta Theta Pi.
Hill, with a two game total ot
278, and John Abbot with 300 pins
were the determining factors as the
Pi Kaps beat the Betas by 61 pins.
Ronnie Erbs with a 293 total an-
Bob Wiggens with 289 were the
high scorers for the losers.
Delta Chi had advanced into the
quarter-finals on a bye and met j
AEPi to determine the fourth'
semi-final berth.
,
In a fine exhibition of bowling, i
Bob Arpin with a 351 two-game
total and Tom Maroldy with 321
totals pins, led the Delta Chis to a |
smashing victory. Joel Aberbach j
had a 253 total to lead the AEFi
scorers.
The Delta Chis met the Zebes in
the semi-finals and with Arpin and
Maroldy again setting the pace,
they scored a resounding victory.
Maroldy had a 301 total and Arpin
wis close behind with 295 pins.
Ira Cohen of ZBT had the highest
number of pins in the match, a 342
total.
BASKETBALLS FOR BRUISERS
Basketball is sometimes called
a no-contact sport, where the
exact opposite is encouraged in
football. Yet, the University of Flo Floridas
ridas Floridas two best known fullbacks in
recent yearsRick Casares (53)
and Mai Hammack 's4) have
been members of the Gators bas basketball
ketball basketball teams. (

Newman Club Wins
Fociball Crown in
Independent Action
The Newman Club defeated Gam Gamma
ma Gamma Delta Lutheran this week to
annex the Independent League
touch football trophy.
The Newman gridders parlayed
seven first downs and five touch touchdowns
downs touchdowns into a 33-13 count. Though
making five first downs, the Gam Gamma
ma Gamma Deltas could score only twice.
By virtue of their victory, tne
Newman Club moved into fifth
place, a notch behind their football
victims, the Gamma Deltas. Co Cooperative
operative Cooperative Living Organization is
still on top of the loop with a 663
total. The runner-up spot is field
by the Kadets with Georgia Sea Seagle
gle Seagle Hall rounding out the top three.
The next sport on the Indepen Independent
dent Independent docket is table tennis, slated
to begin Monday.
SEC Standings
W L PCT.
Kentucky 2 .818 j
Alabama 9 2 .818
Tennessee 7 4 .636
Tulane 7 4 .636
j Vanderbilt 7 5 .583
| Auburn 6 5 .545
- (ia. Tech 6 6 .500
Florida 5 6 .455
Georgia 5 6 .455
Mississippi* 4 7 .364
! Louisiana St. 2 9 .182
j" Mississippi St. 0 11 .000
.
SCHEDULE
Tomorrow Alabama at Tennes-
see; Auburn at Kentucky; Florida
at Vanderbilt; Georgia at Georgia
Tech; Mississippi State at LSU;
Mississippi at Tulane.
Monday: Alabama at Kentucky;
Auburn at Tennessee; Florida at
Georgia Tech; Georgia at Van Vanderbilt;
derbilt; Vanderbilt; Mississippi at LSU; Mis Mississippi
sissippi Mississippi State at Tulane.
RESULTS
(Monday)
Alabama 71; LSU 61
Florida 78; Mississippi 72
FSU 102; Miss. St. 86
Ga. Tech 83; Tennessee 77
Kentucky 77; Vanderbilt 59
Tulane 90; Auburn 79.

Gymnasts
Perform
Tonight
(Continued from page ONE)
last event by the womens team
before intermission.
Following the intermission, the
men's team is scheduled for new
synchronized calisthenics, appara
tus gymnastics, individual free
standing exercises, and lightning
speed tumbling.
Team ball composition by the
womens team is slated for their
last event to be followed by high
table vaulting by the men, ending
the program.
Tickets will be available at the
door, but advance sales are being
handled at Florida Pharmacy and
the office of Director of Intramu Intramurals
rals Intramurals in the Gym. Children undei
school age will be admitted free,
while adult tickets are one dollar
Student price is 50 cents.
Spectators will be assured ot
seats, program officials announced,
becaused a limited number of tick tickets
ets tickets will be sold. When these are
sold, there will be no more, they j
said.

Dells, Kappa Alpha, Phi Delta Theta
Take Two Orange Loop Decisions

With the tightest Orange League
race in many a year now in pro progress,
gress, progress, basketball, second of the
four major sports, moved into the i
intramural spotlight Tuesday iven- J
ing.
With the cries of "Blue, Blue"
in the background, Phi Delta Theta
racked up its first win of the
season as it defeated Sigma Alpha
! Epsilon 33-24. The game, tied at
1 13 points apiece at half time, broke
open in the third quarter ,as the
phi Delts scored 12 points to five
points for SAE.
Leading the Blue and White
cause were Charlie Parish and
Tommy Alexander with ten and
nine points respectively. Pacing the
Lionmen, Jim Trezevant scored
nine points.
Tau Epsilon Phi led from start
to finish in pinning a 45 19 loss
on Phi Kappa Tau. The Tepmen
were led by Jery Burns, with
16 points, and Willie Ratliffe who
bucketed 10 markers.
League leading Sigma Nu kept
pace by trimming Kappa Sigma
51-32. High scoring laurels wer gar gar.
. gar. nered by Billy McMoore who scor scored
ed scored ten points. Jimmy Newman and
Andy Stephenson added nine points
apiece to the Snake cause.
Delta Tau Delta, displaying a
well-balanced attack, opened the
season in winning style by defeat defeating
ing defeating Sigma Chi 32-25. The Delts,
led by playmaker Ronnie Gonzales,

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* o
l utiirr,! ;ir. |iii n tru of tin- fmale members of the
Swedish National Gymnastics teams. They are shown performing
one of the many synchronized routines for which they are inter internationally
nationally internationally famous. The entire troupe will appear at the Florida
Gym tonight at 8 oclock.

had a 17-10 lead at half time. Gon Gonsalez
salez Gonsalez dunked 11 points for the vic victors.
tors. victors.
Sigma Chi's Gil Sears, however,
I took game scoring honors with a
12 point total.
Kappa Alpha, although outseor outseored
ed outseored 11*5 in the final quarter, dropp droppled
led droppled in a pair of foul shots in
the waning seconds of the game
to edge Pi Lambda Phi 27-24
Major factor in the contest seem seemed
ed seemed to be the Kappa Alpha accuracy
at the foul line. The KAs scored
*on seven of 11 free throws while
Pi Lambda Phi managed only
! one point in 11 attempts,
j Dick Allen, 13 points, spearhead spearheadj
j spearheadj ed the Kappa Alpha quintet while
Dick Turkel, 11 points, paced the
Pi Lam team.
In the closet game the tourney
has seen to date, Pi Kappa Alpha
utilized a last quarter ally to
eke out a 21-19 win over A'pha
; Tau Omega. The Pikes, behind
16-13 at the end of the third chap chapter,
ter, chapter, outscored ATO 8-3 in the final
six minutes to insure the victory.
. Frank Bunnell led the winners with
six points.
1 High man of the game was Ollie
; | Sorsnahl (ATO), who scored 11
points.
SAE evened its record at 1-1 as
it recorded a 36-29 win over Tau
Epsilon Phi. Jim Trezevant paced
the winners with 11 points.
Kappa Sigma registered its first

win of the season by whipping Phi
Kappa Tau 38-22. Bill Bailey (KS)
bucketed 11 points.
Kappa Alpha marked up Its sec second
ond second victory In two nights by over overcoming
coming overcoming Pi Kappa Alpha 37-29. High
man for the Pike cause was Oick
Allen with 18 points.
Delta Tau Delta upped its re record
cord record to 2-0 as it outscored Aloha
Tau Omega 46-21. Ron Gonsalez j
(DTD) swished the cords for 15
markers. Pi Lambda Phi. led by I
Dick Turkel and LeCann, j
defeated Sigma Chi 32-26.

~
Betas, PKP, CP, AGR, Win
In Blue League Basketball

Beta Theta Pi. Pi Kappa Phi,
Chi Phi, and Alpha Gamma Kno
stamped themselves as the teams
L to beat as basketball opened up
l Tuesday night.
i In the first bracket AGK won
1 its first two games from Zeta
ifeta Tau in a runaway, 39-15, ana
1 then beat Delta Chi 26-14 in a close
game. In their first game the
2 j AGRs scored 22 points in the
L | opening quarter and were never
headed from then on.
i
i | High scorer for the winners was
1 Clyde Brannon with 15 points
while Ronny. Cohen paced the los losi
i losi ers with nine points, more than
half his teams total. Brannon also
led his team in its victory against
the Delta Chis.
Delta Chi had won its first game
Tuesday night against Theta Chi,
29-21, with Harry Black scoring 11
points.
Theta Chi went- down to defeat
for the second time in a row,
against Blue League leader Beta
Theta Pi, 44-15. Sam Gappett was
high for the Betas with 11 points
while Cary Blackwell scored seven
pointp in a losing cause.
Pi Kappa Phi took the lead in

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Keglers Hit High
Total 01 Year;
Top Kappa Sig j
By LENNY HOLLANDER
Gator Sports Writer
Recording the highest two game
total registered in either league
this year, Tau Epsilon Phi cap captured
tured captured the Orange League bowling
crown and moved into third place
In the league standings.
The TEPs defeated the Kappa
Sigma bowlers by a score of 1581-
1353.
Each of the finalists marched
through three straight opponents
to earn their berth. Tau Epsilon
Phi whipped Kappa Alpha, Sigma
Alpha Epsilon, and Sigma Chi,
while Kappa Sigma took the mea measure
sure measure of Alpha Tau Omega, Sigma
Nu, and Pi Lambda Phi.
The first game of the TEP-KS
affair was very close. Until the
seventh frame, only ten pins se separated
parated separated the teams. Then in a sud sudden
den sudden surge, TEP had a series of
nine straight marks to pull into
the lead and cop the initial game
by 87 pins. The final first game
score was 793 to 706.
Highlight of the second game
was a three straight strike opening,
a turkey in bowling lingo by Kappa
Sig Loutzenheiser. How-

ever, a steady stream of TEP
strikes and spares kept the La Lavender
vender Lavender and White combo on *op.
The second game ended 788 to
647.
In the semi-finals, both finalists
had a very close shave. Tau Epsi Epsilon
lon Epsilon Phi defeated Sigma Chi and
Kappa Sigma edged Pi Lambda
Phi.
TEP, down 35 pins In the first
game against Sigma Chi, came
back to capture the second game
and finish on the long end of a
1426-1412 total. Sparking the five fivesome
some fivesome was Neil Chonin with games
of 190 and 174.
Kappa Sigma held a scant seven
pin advantage over the Pi Lams
jin the first game and then extend extended
ed extended their lead to 20 pins to 'lose
| out the match 1455-1435. Bob Mit Mit!
! Mit! chell rolled 170 and 141 to pace
'the Kappa Sig attack.

the second bracket with two vic victories
tories victories in a row over Sigma Pm
Epsilon, 41-36. and Phi Gamma
Delta, 29-23, in a close match.
In the first game both teams
matched each other basket for bas basket
ket basket in the firsi half but pulled
away in the third period and were
never headed Tom Kuhn was the
top scorer for the winning team
with 10 points while Lution Hill
' scored 12 points for the losers.
The £hi Gams also were beaten
by AEPi, 44-24, and were never in
contention. Alan Kornbluh led the
victors with 17 points while Jack
Arnold was high scorer for the
Phi Gams.
In their second game the AEPis
lost to SPE, 39-25, with Lution Hill
high scorer for the winners and
Mel Biberfeiled top man for tne
losers.
In the third bracket Chi Pi was
involved in the only overtime game
so far as it beat Lambda Chi Al Alpha,
pha, Alpha, 27-25, and then defeated Delta
Sfgma Phi, 28-14. In the opening
contest Lambda Chi was two
points behind at halftime but pul pulled
led pulled even in the last minute of
regular time.



Page 8

Florida Alligator

Friday, February 25, 1955
Committee of 67
Positions Open
I v* |
Although many students applied 1
for positions on the Committee of
67 last week, Bob Singletary,
chairman of the committee says
there are still positions open for I
qualified students.
Qualifications for posts on the
committee are a proven interest in j
the University and a wide range
of knowledge of the University.
Deadline for applications will be
March 3. Application blanks can
be found in the student govern government
ment government office on the third floor of
the Florida Union. The office is
open Monday thru Friday from 1
to 5 p.m.
Final selections will be made in
two weeks and those chosen on the
committee will be notified by
mail.
Weekiwachee
Tour Sunday
A jungle cruise and underwater
show will be the main attractions
of the Weekiwachee Springs out outing
ing outing Sunday, sponsored by the Flor Florida
ida Florida Union Social Board.
Busses for the trip will leave
from the front of Florida Union at
9 a.m. Sunday and will return
around 6 p.m.
Tickets for the outing can be
obtained in 'Room 107, Florida
Union for $3.00. This amount in includes
cludes includes transportation, the jungle
cruise, and the underwater show.
The deadline for signing up is 4:30
tomorrow afternoon.
Alligator Staff Appoints
Florida Alligator staff appoint appointments
ments appointments or this semester were an announced
nounced announced this week by Editor-in-
Chief Art Smith. New appoint appointments
ments appointments are: Alan Schiff, city edi editor;
tor; editor; Becky Greer, news editor;
Doug Buck, assistant news editor;
Mary Ann Green, assistant fea features
tures features editor; Dan Hackel, assis assistant
tant assistant state editor; and Ray Lifchez,
cartoonist.
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CONSTRUCTION on the J. Hillis Miller Health Center has been resumed with work being pushed
to complete the Medical Scrences Building in time for a scheduled opening of the school in Septem September
ber September of 1956. Shown here inspecting progress to date are several Health Center officials, consultants
and architects. Shown (left to right) are: Robert Bainbridge, architect with the Ellerbee Architectural
Firm, consultants, Dr. James W. Culbertson, professor of internal medicine, lowa State University,
a visitor on the campus, Dean George T. Harrell of the College of Medicine, Dr. Samuel P. Martin,
Duke University faculty member sreving as a consultant for the Center, and Guy Fulton, architect for
the Board of Control. Dr. Martin, a specialist in infectuous diseases and a member of the Duke Uni University
versity University Hospital Building Committee, is currently serving as a consultant on the design of the out outpatient
patient outpatient department.
r
BAD CHECK SPLURGE ENDS WITHOUT CHARGES
LeGette To Head Honor Court Evaluation Group

By RICHARD WEINERT <
Gator Staff Writer
Gene Legette was appointed this
week to head the honor system
evaluation committee. Legette, a
journalism junior and former fea feature
ture feature editor of the Alligator, was
appointed by Bill Frye, Honor
Court chancellor, to fill trfe vacan vacancy
cy vacancy caused bv the graduation of
Millard Roberts.
Preliminary work on the survey
| to determine the value of the honor
system has been completed and
the questionaires are ready. No
definite date has been set for the
distributing of the questionaires
or the completion of the survey,

except that it should be finished
sometime this semester.
Two new justices took their
places on the Honor Court this
week. John Yocum, an engineer engineering
ing engineering junior, was appointed to the
sophomore class vacancy by the
executive council and Gord o n
Hardman, a senior in bacteriology,
was named to fill the arts and
sciences position.
One case of cheating in the C-52
final was reported last week bring bringing
ing bringing the total for last semesters
finals to six cases.
Reports of cheating to the Hon Honor
or Honor Court have definitely fallen

Coed Comer

By LORRAINE HAYES
Exciting! New! Cotton dress sets
are now being shown at LIBBYEs
Here you will find an olive green
skirt and blouse set with dainty
white trim on the smartly styled
pockets and collar. The skirt, tuck tucked
ed tucked at the waist with soft pleats,
is accented with small mother-of mother-ofpearl
pearl mother-ofpearl buttons that are used on the
button-down Bodice. Incidentiauy,
this lovely summer cotton wad de designed
signed designed by Beacon Hill. Also at
Libbyes, you will find a wide
selection of summer cotton blouses
in various styles and pastels.
For fraternity weekends, youll
want to be seen in a spring
dress from FANKELS. Theres
a style to flatter your figure in tne
new princess fashion complete with
a fitted jacket. V-necklines. self selfcovered
covered selfcovered buttons, and crinolines are
added features. These cool sum summer
mer summer cottons are fashioned in
orange and avovado Another style

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off, Frye said, and it seems
more students are giving warn warn
warn ings when they see cheating. **
> Frye reported that the bad
- checks that have been reported are
i being made good at a rapid rate
; and that there are at the present
i time no violations before the court.
, In answer to many questions he
i has received from students, Frye
said that only guilty decrees are
> posted on the boards around cam cam
- cam pus. He said that these decrees
s must be posted according to tne
constitution and there are many
not guilty decrees that are never
t posted.

to fit any occasion is the sheath
dress in your favorite pastel.
GEIGERs is introducing their
sprisg line by emphasizing Carle
Original formals. Appliqued lea leaves
ves leaves accented by rhinestones ana
pearls give a very femine touch
to one of aqua silk organza. For
the Sigma Chi or Sig Ep week weekend
end weekend choose a ballerina length for formal
mal formal of rose and pink. The skirt
will attact attention with its many j
rows of ruffles. Soft layers of!
dark rose tulle add an extra
touch to the strapless bodice.
RUDDYS is featuring cotton
dresses inprints and solids from
$8.95 to $12.95. One of particular
interest had a low swoop neckline,
accented by a button up bodice.
The flowered material is compli complimented
mented complimented by the white trimmed slee sleeves
ves sleeves and neck. Its low waistline
and bell skirt will be fashion right
this season. Be sure to stop in
Ruddy's to see their complete line
of dresses and accessories.

Concert Band Program Tuesday

By WALLY STERLING
Gator Staff Writer
The University Concert Band will 1
present its annual formal concert
in the University Auditorium lues luesdav
dav luesdav night at 8:15.
The program will begin with
compositions -oy Bach, Mendel Mendelssohn,
ssohn, Mendelssohn, Rimsky-Korsakov and Ros Rossini.
sini. Rossini.
The progra m will being with
Prelude and Fugue in F Minor,
by Bach. This prelude and fugue
is from Eight Little Preludes and
Fugues* for the organ and the
transcription is by Robert Moehl Moehlmann.
mann. Moehlmann.
Still Giving Out Book
Exchange Leftovers
The Student Book Exchange is
undergoing spring cleaning opera operations.
tions. operations. Students who have left books
with the Exchange and who have
neither received payment nor norpicked
picked norpicked up their books are urged 1
to do so as soon as possible
Books may be picked up at the j
Book Exchange office, Room 303,
Florida Union from 1:30 to 5 u.m. J
Monday, Tuesday, and Thursday, j
Thursday is the deadline to
claim books which have been de deposited
posited deposited with the Exchange. B.x>ks
remaining after that date wiil be
sold and the proceeds will be
placed in Student Government
funds.

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, The Tsars Bride. an overture
Iby Rimsky-Korsakov will be _>ne
of the features selections on *he
program. An opera by the same
j name was produced in 1899. The
arrangement that the band will
play is by A. A. Harding. Director
Emeritus of the University of Illi Illinois
nois Illinois Bands.
Louis Stalnaker will be the saxo saxophone
phone saxophone soloist in the bands rendi rendition
tion rendition of "Concerto for Saxopnone,
Opus 26 by Paul Creston. Creston
is one of America's outstanding
j composers of serious music. The
transcription was made by Russell
Howland. Stalnaker is a in
| Arts and Sciences and has nre-
I sented many solos.during his four
| years at the university.
Polka and Fugue' from
Schwanda, the Bagpiper. by
'Weinberger is another one of the
fine musical selections on the pro program.
gram. program. The well-known Czech com composer
poser composer of this popular compo-rtion
now resides in St. Petersburg. The
i transcription is by Cliffe Bainum,
former director qf the Northwest Northwestern
ern Northwestern University Bands.
Three band members will be fea featured
tured featured in the bands presentation of
Haskells Rascals. A drum trio
i composed of Andrew Preston, Tom
Ritzi and Ed Barrow will play
; Paul Yoders percussive rhythms
; in this fast moving, rhythmic piece.
Harr is a percussion teacher and
author of percussion instruction
books.
The program will be concluded

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with Chorale and Alleluia. by
Hanson. The "Chorale and Alle Alleluia'
luia' Alleluia' was just recently completed
and is Hanson's first work for sym symphonic
phonic symphonic band. It was given its ore oremiere
miere oremiere at the American Bandmas Bandmasters
ters Bandmasters Association Convention at West
Point last February.
Other numbers on the program
j include Duke Ellington's Warm
Valley, Glenn Osser s "Begunie
for Band and An American Sa Salute
lute Salute by Morton Gould, base-l on
When Johnny Comes Marching
Home.
Director of the Concert Band is
Col. Harold Bachman. Reid Poole
is the Assistant Director.
I :

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New Scholarship
Open to Engineers
Sxz SSOO sonoiarships will be
available in September to seniors
in chemical engineering who will
take a one-year course in protec protective
tive protective an ddecorative coatings and
who have the required 2.5 average
in their upper division courses.
The scholarships, which are to
be paid in two installments of $250
per semester, are provided by the
Southern Paint and Varnish Pro Production
duction Production Club.
Applications are due on or be before
fore before April 15. Dr. W. H. Beisler,
head of the Department of cnemi cnemical
cal cnemical engineering announced.



Full Text

PAGE 1

the largest all-american college weekly in the nation 4Wh Year-No. 19 Fr ----I------a--.'o.----.-. a THE OWDEST "PHOTOGRAPH believed ever taken at the University Is shown above. 7be photo,, of preliminary construction of Thomas Hall, was taken in 1905 when building began on the present campue site. Thomas was the first dormitory unit built, while Sledd, Peabody and Language Halls came next. The pine woods in the background are probably the site of the present Florida Union, Cafeteria and Chemistry buildings. THOMAS AND BUCKMAN OLDEST BUILDINGS Campus in 1906 Consisted Q IWilderness, Two Foundations By MARY ANN GREENE itim. On the second floor were Assistant Features Editor classrooms, laboratories, and a 11In January, 1906, there was little brary. The third floor was used on the University of Florida camfor a dormitory. pus that would be familiar today. Forty-nine years ago the campus PART OF SPEAKERS' BUR consisted 'of a ti-act of uncleared land and the foundations for two g' * buildings. Work was just getting U university St under way to provide facilities for the University's first session which F o i would begin in the fall. O verFl oa i The University was established the year before when the Florida Radio and TV stations throughLegislature passed the Buckman out the state will present "Tho U$0Act consolidating four schools .nto versity of Florida Stor y" April 18the University of Florida. A bosrd 24, according to Florida Blue Key of Control was appointed to suSpeakers' Bureau Chairman Tom pervise this new institution. Byrd, who yesterday announced The Board of Control had the 'for speaking positions. job of choosing a site for the new The taped series of 15-minute university. Together with the broadcasts, under the direction of State Board of Education it finalRadio-TV chairman T. A. Shell, ly voted for Gainesville. It was will be aired during the Bureaus agreed that the first season of the UF week. new university would begin in September, 1906. The new medium of reaching the In the meantime, a campus was people of the state will feature no he menti me B ar campus was panel discussions, interviews, and to be built. By Board action a firm of architects was appointed actual voices of campus figures. to prepare a prospectus of the uni;ver 70 stations in Florida will versity grounds. Dormitories and have a chance to broadcast these programsm. classrooms were to take preceA ager dence over other types of construcAcademic leaders. administration. It was on the motion of p.K. :tive officials, and student persontion. aonel all will figure in the broado a -Cord member, tht casts, Shell plans. Asssting him in "Tudor-Gothic" style of architecthe public service series is proture was chosen. thepulisevieerissro Thomas and Buckman were the first two buildings completed, at a combined cost of $75,250. Thomas Hall was named for W. R. Thomas, mayor of Gainesville who fought to get the university located in his city. The name Buckman Applications Due for ME, Staff of Peninsula Applications are being accepted for the offices of managing editor and business manager of PeninBuckman's first floor contained a gymnasium and infirmary.I Classrooms were on the second, floor, with dormitory rooms above. REAU PROGRAM ory' Aired nApril gram director Ray Dantzler jWRUF. of Speaker's Bureau officials appeared elated this week at the number of applications received for speaking posts. "We are very pleased with the student body response to our appeal for speakers," Byrd said. "I think we will be able to send at least 25 well-rounded teams to inform the people of the state awout our University." From the 150 applications, about .75 speakers will be chosen Wednesday night, March 2, when the Selection Committee meets. Their names will be announced in next week's Alligator. Selection Committee members include: Procurement Chairman Larry Sands, Debator Henry F. Byrd. Spee'h Graduate Stafford North, and Blue Key President Chubby Damsel. Bus Ad Day Set was chosen in honor of H. H. Bucksula.Any student having a 2.0 I man, the legislator who introducaverage and at least sophomore ed the act creating the school standing may apply. Applications The University's first two build!should be in the form of a letter for ings had a variety of functions. In addressed to the Peninsula GovernThomas, the first floor of the iorth ing Board, Dr. C. E. Mounts. chairsection contained administrative iman, and should be left either at Plans are now under way for the offices. The south first floor housthe Florida Union Desk or 317 Anh bi na stned a r ed the offices and laboratory of the derson Hall on later than 5 p.m. Tg r Agricultural Experiment Station. Tuesday. A personal Interview with he slogan for this year is "For Between these wings were the kitthe Board is re ired of 11n a n Your Future Make B Day r chen, dining room, and auditor. OUT OF 74 SIGNED UP cants. Forty Coeds Pledge As Sorority Rush Ends Forty coeds out of the 74 signverly Jean, Richardson, Carol To ed up for rush pledged 12 sororimellini, and Lila Williams. ties Wednesday in the climax to Alpha Delta Pi -Katherin formal rush. Burch, June Lenzen. Mary Mc The pledges, by sororities areas Clamroch. Linda Gail Obert. follows: Alpha Epsilon Phi -Cuna Re Alpha Chi Omega -Donna liatbecca Cohen, and Marlene k'ranc chelor, Virginia Ann Johns, BeTurner. ---Alpha Omicron Pi -Bettie Love Blackburn, Judith Duensing AOPi Plans Francine Louise Ivers, Dorotn Katherine Lawton, Judy Jean Lock Open House ard, Sylvia Anne Mayer, Harbar Mitchell, and Cermaine Thomas Sunday at 4 Chi Omega -Barbara JoB. Kennedy, Carole North. and Fay Gamma Omicron Chapter of AlWeathersby. pha Omicron Pi sorority will hold Delta Delta Delta -Jacquelyr an open house Sunday afternoon Carter, Jo Anne Couse, and Jun Day."Prominent business men from all over the state will be on hand to discuss the problems of business in Florida today. Topics will include accounting, marketing, insurance, management, real 1 estate, banking and finance, trans-j portation and foreign trade. Speakers for the real estate panel have been announced by real estate representative Lillian Jenkins. Richard Bartee Sr., of Jacksonville, member of the National -Assn. of Real Estate Boards will speak on "Opportunities in Peal e Estate as a Broker." Mrs. Pretty c-i Jane Boone, Daytona Beach, will speak on "Women in Real Estate" 'and Richard Hamilton, Jackson18 ville Beach, a member of the IAmerican Institute of Appraisers, ewill discuss "Real Estate Appraisg.ing as a Career." yV! kra n e ia John W. Hoover Selected' For Boeing Program John W. Hoover, associate professor of aeronautical engineering, has been invited to, join the Boeing summer program in Seattle. Every summer out of onme 300 Board. Agrees on New UF Member Says Unofficial Choice Made Last Week A majority of the State Board of Control has agreed on a qlngle candidate for the University presidency as' a result of interviews serving 10,000 students in university _____of f lorida day Febray 2., 195 President SEN. POPE BELIEVES $20,000 FIGURE 'OUT OF LINE' Legislative Battle Looms, on Salary Request By DAN HACKEL Assistant State Editor A major legislative battle loomed this week as State Senator Verle A. Pope, St. Augustine, split with close friend Gov. LeRoy Cotlins over the proposed salary raise of the University of Florida president naturay in Jacksonville, a Board to $20,000. member said last night. Pope called the projected inTm ^A. -hreBoard meinber, who asked that his name not be made putlic,* said also that the chances at the educator would accept "look grim if he is basing his decision on a proposed $5,000 salary increase. After Sen. Verle Pope, chairman of the Senate Appropriations Committee, publicly announced opposition to the salary hike, no candidate would accept the job with expectations of making $20,000 yearly, the member said. No official action has been taken by the Board on their choice for the job vacated by the late Dr. J. Hillis Miller, but Board Chairman J. Lee Ballard said yesterday that official selection would come "in the next week or 10 days." "We are hopeful to have the mathad already been made, but said. Ballard denied that a selectionI "p ouiarinrnrff tkm"&+: crease "out-of-line' a day after the Governor announced he was willing to recommend a $20.000 figure to the Legislature, although no assurances of its approval could be given. Pope, chairman of the Senate Appropriations Committee, claimed the present pay was adequate and that this hike could set up a chain which would eventually ''cost the state $100,000 or more." He reasoned that the $5,000 increase here would set off a rash of other such Editor Cobb Told To Stop Efforts moves, encompassing FSU presi. dent Doak Campbell and many others in state institutions. As the State Board of Control neared an announcement of a oresidential choice, the controversial pay boost appeared in for tough sledding, despite the gubernatorial recommendation. "Pope is just speaking for imself." State Senator W. A. (Bill) Shands said here yesterday. Just because a man holds the title of chairman of a committee does not necessary mean he controls that committee," the Gainesville solon said. "The governor's recommendation carries a great deal of weight," said Shands. who could not inaieate how the rest of the State legislature would act on the issue Neither could State Representa(Continued on Page TWO) Sian Kenton Reneges On Florida (ontert Ler es~veaprio tJUle 1k IVne oard meeting March 17. The announcement will be made public when the Stan Kenton will not leave the nomination is formally placed -West coast to tour this area witn fore the Board of Education. his orchestra, it was announced The member refusedtor ev eal Editor Bill Cobb was ordered to this week. the choice or the names of any cease work on the 1955 Seminole Previously scheduled for this of the other four candidates under yesterday after an intra-office feud, consideration whose interviews prompted an investigation by Flospring, the Kenton aggregations, 4 failure to show leaves Lyceumn were concluded last week. A source rida Blue Key and a special Board Cuil of s scramslygumo says three candidates are from out of Student Publications meeting. IICouncil officials scrambing or of state and two from Florida. Cobb was notified by Buddy Datheir promised 'extra added pop"No representations were inade vis, secretary of the Board, that ular attraction." to any candidate that the salary all work must stop until a special While a Florida tour of the modwould be increased at all over the Board meeting is held Wednesdayr $15,000 plus perquisites that is now to discuss the matter. no contract was ever agreed on,I given," Ballard stated. Florida Blue Key is currently and Kenton's decision to adhere to "Everyone interviewed is an ducting an investigation of ths radio, TV, and recording commiteducator," Ballard said. "Each of Seminole matter. ments elsewhere forced the counthe men has a background which John Paul Jones. chairman of cil to drop negotiations. would lend itself to the South and 'the Board, ordered Davis to take In the meantime, a concerted talFlorida. All of the candidates are'the action. Davis' letter to Cobb, ent search was under way, involvfamiliar %th411* problems of, edudelivered yesterday afternoon ing some of the nation's top name cation in the South." while Cobb was at work in his presentations. Gov. LeRoy Collins said he is office, said ".suspend all editoDifficuties with Agent silliig to recommend to the Legisrial work on the 1955 Seminole According to Lyceum president lature a $20.000 salary, but that until such time as the Board can Don Moore, the difficulties arose prospects for the position should resolve staff difficulties now exisi over the booking agent's failure to not be given any advance assurtent. name any exact date for a Southance the pay hike will be authorSeveral members of Cobb's staff ern tour, as open dates for the ized. had threatened to resign if Cobb concert became increasingly more did not step down as editor. Cobb scarce. "I certainly hope the salary prob'said yesterday the book is proceed"You can't really blame tnel lem will not prevent the Board of ing according to schedule and he agent, because no contract was' Control from finding the proper would not step out of the office l'signed," Moore said. "You can't, man and submitting a recommendfor any reason of staff difficulty, really blame us because we were ation to the Board of Education After Cob received the letter led astray, and you can't really as soon as possible."Gov. Collins from Davis. he turned a group of blame Kenton -those one-nighters said. He declared no arrangement workers out of the office and left. are a drag." which provided for private funds He could not be reached for anatrac as to be paid to the president would further comment. K ny attraction as big aseStan Boad mmbes wll eetat :30Kenton ('an pick and choose itsl be approved. Board members will meet at 6:301 apprvedcommitments over the bookers; "I don't want anybody to take pm. Wednesday in the Board office 'those boys don't have to make the job and feel he's got any guarin the Florida Union. Reccomnentours," he acknowledged. antee of a higher salary," the ;ovdations by Florida Blue Key will Other Attractions on Hook The Florida Times-Union said be heard, and both Cobb and op"The first indication that Kenton ernor continued. posing staff members will get a was not coming was in December was not eliminated from the runchance to speak at the meeting. of 1954 when we demanded a conthat Acting President John S. Allen I tract to hold our date,'' the Lyhas at last gone to press and will kning at the Board meeting last be delivered to the students durceum Council prexy said. week. Dr. Allen has several timesTeCuclte e owr m stated he is not a candidate !or ing the early part of May accordThe Council then set to work imthe position. Ing to editor Ann Richardson. The Board of Control's selectrn Miss Richardson said that the __ C'n book was completely out of her must be approved by the Cabinet 'hnsa;l hewr a le D esign Plans Boad o Edcaton efoe aprei-hands as all the work was already Board of Education before a presibeen sent out. The engraver will have all the pictures completed N within the next two weeks and the Ov 0 ummerjbs printer's deadline is 100 days. The Available for Students printer has promised to try to speed delivery if at all possible An exhibition of photographs ilOver 200 jobs in summer camps but said that the latest delivery lstAng txhe pilsofrhiand resorts are available to Flortime would be the early part of texture is now being shown by the ida students according to Drane May. University of Florida College of Smith, Secretary of Labor. InforArchitecture and Allied Arts. -Cultural Film Monday Entitled "Design This Day," the ployment and a file of employersexhbitioa rprdb h is available in the student governThree films are scheduled to e Philadelphia Museum of Art in colment office, Room 311 Florida Unshown at the next program of tfe laboration with Walter Darwin ion, from 3 to 5 p.m. Monday Cultural Film Series. The free Teague, a pioneer industrial designthrough Thursday. showing will be Monday at 8 p.m. er. Smiths says his office has writin Walker Auditorium. The title and photographs are ten about 500 employers, and ex-. One film will show Paris ana taken from Teague's book of the pects to hear from about 300 more. bring out its twenty centuries of same name. The exhibition is beFor an eightweek period salariesI prestige another will show French ing held in Building -E" on -amrun from $75 to $300, depending paintings and the third will be on, pus and will continue through on experience. the Abbey of Vezelay. Sunday. RECEIVED INTERNATIONAL OLYMPIC ACCLAIM Noted Swedish Gymnis ts Here Tonight For Benefit Show in Florida Gymnasium By BOB O'DARE play Swedish folk songs. Also on grace and ease of motion. Gator Sports Writer hand to furnish music for the pro-' one. The finest group of amateur gram will be the Gator Variety Such heralded gymnasts as Anngymnasts ever to appear irr-merBand. Sofi Petterson, Sweden's most sucica will perform in the Florida The program will also feature a. cessful woman gymnast who nolas bwoo.wwE 0 Ga'or Camera Barred From Shooting Coeds A Florida Alligator photographer was barred thigq week fr'om anv mediately to give the students their new sorority pledges. When the promised seventh popular attracphotographer entered room 128 Adtion. ministration Bldg., he was immeSinc diatelv refered to Evelyn Sellers, Since then, every major hooking assistant dean of women. agent in New York and on thea West Coast has been contacted bv' Dean Sellers refused any pictelegram and telephone, according tures or publicity of any form, and to Lyceum officials. to prove her point she produced Adding to the confusion was the a copy of the National Panheliente uncertainty of any open date agree'Code of Regulations which coning with a Florida tour of an atdemned publicity of bidding protraction, the conflicting appearcedures. ances of the Military Ball and Spring Frolics bands, and the willDean Sellers explained her acwon't attitude on the part of Kention by expressing the belief that ion Ja nuaryn e ar e ben any pictures of coeds experiencing "Since January, we have been their happiest moment would probcarrying on full-fledged negotiaably include a disappointed rushee tions in our effort to bring that who didn't quite make it. She -ont rn i na od e f t t o bion," th a ec lu d e d b y sa y in g if th e A llig a to r says. insisted on covering the event. hidUnder active consideration now ding would be moved to a comUnde actve onsieraion ow pletely private location. are the following artists, who may ypr _va ___n. be booked if circumstances worX out right.Member Weleing Duke Ellington, Les Brown, Vincent Lopez, The Commanders, Vaughn Monroe, Fred Waring. Woody Herman, and Percy Faith. a T Some of the groups whom the Lyceum Council tried to obtainI at and who were unavailable, include: Ray Anthony, Louis Armstrongi "The Member of the Wedding", Gerry Mulligan, Stan Freberg ana the Donaldson Award and,' New Dave Brubeck. York Drama Critics' Prize winiing -_ play, will be presented tonight at ?8:15 by the Laboratory Theatre. Mrs. Carson MeCullers' play expresses the extreme loneliness of adolescence and the strange norid between the Negro and the white man in the American South. In the cast for "Member of the Wedding" are: Margaret Lipscomb, Janice Urankar, Gerald Hodges, young son of Dr. Hodg.es of the English Dept.), Edmund Brelsford, Pat Ackerman, Lewis Kapner, James Patterson, and Morton Left. JOAN HALE is being sponsored by the Beta Eta Chapter of Delta Igma Pi to, compete in the nation-wide Rose of Del~tasig contest. This brown-eyed, raven haired coed is majoring in secondary edw'ation, lists marriage and a family as the focal point of her future plans. Among Joan's favorite hobbies are swimming, dancing, and bridge; her vital statistics read: 36-24-36. UF Law Students Top Florida State Bar Exams University of Florida law school graduates far surpassed 'other averages of students passing the Florida State Bar Examination recently given. The overall average of those taking the exam was 64.7 percent. Gator graduates had an average of 85.7 compared with other Florida law schools of 54.8 and an out of state average of 66.7 Twenty-four of the 170 examined Dave Davis Quits Commission Race David A. Davis, law school senior, withdrew from the Gainesville City Commission race Tuesaay, just one week after announcing his candidacy. Davis said it was his understanding when entering the contest that the only requirement for candidate was to be a qualified elector. He learned Tuesday, the last day for filing, that a candidate must also be a freeholder (property owner). Davis regards the freeholder requirement as an outmoded regulation. found in most state and municipal codes, which should be done away with completely. Art Sale in Building X Art work of architecture stidents will go on sale in the court of Building X today at 3:30. The works include moblies, stabiles, sculptures and sketches. inside today education: harvard man looks at local intellectual -p I'll! University of Florida, Gainesville SEN'. BILL HANDS GOV. LEROY COIllNs Fri 5 1 I A

PAGE 2

oi the state. f i( C*=Ru n c UIt-t c tWIIIa -**mrri' .....''t Hub hangouts. Thu only coed complaint on their new service is that now they can't wear shorts around Among some of the other activieven to play tennis on courts across the way. (see Editorial, Page 4). ties to be presented during this period .are the Engineering Fair; Greek Week, sponsored by the InU ter-Fraternity Council and PanhelLegislaive Bafile Seniors. Here Are Jobs lenic; the High School Basketball Tournament; the Florida AAU (Continued from Page ONE) This is the schedule of recruitRome. N.Y.; EE, Physics & Math; Swim Meet; the Gator's first '>asetive Ralph Turlington, who saw the ment interviews on canipus next sophomores & jrs. in EE or Physball game with Georgia; and the controversy as an honest difference week by representatives of busiirs for summer work: Rm 403. Florida Player's production of of opinion between legislators, in. E & I Bldg. 9 a.n. to 1:30 p.m. "Finlan's Rainbow". which the Board of Control must! ness. industry and government. Wednesday show the existing need for this saiFot interviews in Matherl Ha II. Parents and alumni are being ar increase sign up in Rm. 211. Mather ly Crawford & Company Atlanta, invited to witness the numerous Hall. For interviews in the E & I (a .Rm 211 Matherly Hall: Bus, expositions and events as are hunbroader than the University ot Building, sign up in Rm. 300, tne Ad. Law. Arts & Sciences: dreds of high school students. t Florida." extending to other state E & I Bldg. Dept of State Forein Servwe Will serve as an opportunity for .1I Today Dci fSae1 rInSrye Flordians to see before them the officials and legislators. While this, TdOffer; contact Prof. Fred Hartactivities and the interests of their raise was an entity separate trom Vitro Laboratories Eglin AFB. man, Dept. of Political Science. University. others, Turlington said that a grantFlorida: Math, Physics. El, iP Wednesdav and Thursday ing of Florida's presidential salary A; Roo 330, E & I Bldg .: increase would probablyabe accofa.m.-5 P.M. U. S. Naval Air Development panned by a similar action tor Louisiana Dept. of Highways, Center, .hns3ille. Pa: 9 a Em. to FSU. o Bator Rouge; CE, Room 403. E & 5 pm. Rin. 330 E & I Bldg.HE,, Pope has dissented from oer Bdg 9 am to 5 p. ME, AE and hvsis. mr/ legislators many tines before. and Monday and Tuesday ir, --thismay be traced on his voting j Ohn Mathiesori Chem Corp., GAINESVILLE'S FAVORITE record. Both Shands and TurlingShell Chemical Corp. Houston. New York. N. Y.; Rm. 103. E & I FAMILY 'HEATRE ton made an identical statement: Texas. ChE. ME and Chemistry; Bldg., 9 a m -5 p.m. ChE, ML "There are 37 other senators." LegRm. 330, E & I Bldg. Monday 9 and IF FRIDAY, FEB. 25 deednl t on islators should act idependently to noon. Thursday and Friday THE WEAK AND on this issue, theyTense Shell Oil Co. Munutac tirimg Knnvil ValleyAuth "3 t x y THE WICKED "Each man will mterpret the is-Det Oil.on. TxmCEand Knoxville, Tenn ; Rm. 330 E & 1, GLYNIS JOHNS sue according to his own convicDept., Houston, Tex. ChE and&I d. lg .m. tr) 1_m.; EF.ME. GYI JONSChemistry: Rm. 3,30. F & I ihg Bldg.9ai.:o~. E E tos"Trigton said. ''if it ap-(hE. At hitec,,urje & Bldig. Con-' SIMONE SILVA tions," Turlin 9 a.m. -5 p.m. 'Monday and 9 a.m. -ALSO -pears that a certaiii figure is nec-rto noon Tuesday. struion. EE and ME through essay, the House will probably their junior years foi summer emTHE DESPERADO grant it." Southern Dairies, Inc. Jacksonployment. BE RY GARLAN I----ville, Fla.; For Sales Trainees AArts'&Sciences, Agriculture. Business Administration; for ProdGli SATURDAY, FEB. 26 Your European --Ag. Engineering SG Begins Blo JESSE JAMES' WOMEN. Dairy Science, Chemistry. BactenJSSEGIES W EN: ology: A(counting, Transportation M onday T o DONALD BARRY 7 weeks beginning June 2 and ME. Group meeting Monday -ALSO -* Includes 8 tountrl Rm. 209 Fla. Union. Interviews A drive to replinish the dwinTHE LONG WAIT Is conducted by the famed Tues. 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Rm. 210 (fling stock of the student operated ANTHONY QUINN French Author-Traveller Fla. Union. Contact Univ. Placeblood bank will begin Monday a"CHARLES COBURN Dr, E. IlourDousson ment Office Monday for individual( cording to chairman Walt Fred* New York -New York via interview appointment.i SUNDAY S MONDAY plane Tuesday .rickson. AY & Very reasonable for studentsOrganized in the spring of 1951. February 27 & 28 Montgomery Ward, Chicago. .student government blood bank TONIGHT'S THE Phone Rin. 214. Matherly Hall, 10 a.m. 1 was the first of its kind in the Bill Joan P. Muth to 5 p.m; Arts & Science, Bus. Ad. euntry to be student operated. DAVID NIVEN 1936 N.W. 2nd Ave. Rome Air Force Base Depot. S:ne that time the drive to reYVONNE DE CARLO --------BARRY FITZGERALD -ALSOPORT OF HELL DANE CLARK CAROLE MATHEWS WAYNE MORRIS TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY March I A 2 THE HIGH AND THE MIGHTY JOHN WAYNE CLAIRE TREVOR LARAINE DAY -ALSO OKLAHOMA' OUTLAWS A FEATURETTE THURSDAY & FRIDAY March 3 & 4 THERE'S NO BUSINESS LIKE SHOW BUSINESS MARILYN MONROE DONALD O'CONNOR JOHNNIE RAY -ALSO THUNDERHEAD SON OF FLICKA RODDY MAC DOWALL PRESTON FOSTER RITA JOHNSON J FRIDAY thru TUESDAY Prince of Players with RICHARD BURTON MAGGIE McNAMARA JOHN DEREK RAYMOND NASSEY CHARLES BICKFORD ELIZABETH SELLERS and EVA LeGALLIENNE in CinemaScope WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY Winslow Boy I The with ROBERT DONAT and CEDRIC HA RDWICKE FRIDAY & SAT., March 4 & 5 The Big Sleep with HUMPHREY BOGART and LAUREN BA CALL FRIDAY She Wore A Yellow Ribbon Second I I TODAY & TOMORROW STUDENTS 30 All day Saturday FL11I~ti 17k' U 9 TONY CURTIS GLORIA DE HAVEN GENE NELSON CORINNE CALVET PAUL GILBERT AU IVISAI INTERNATIONAL S-I'ARTS SUNDAY GARY BURT COOPER LANCASTER R1111MICLIOM % i IIp w s ti na n the dormitory and mu,%t dreo.% Broward Hall Opens Grill Hotel Broward opened the doors of its new addition Br oward cafeteria -7 :00 m. ni. Monday. Thirty-nine student employees help to keep things running Monli ,-1 ati-rd~tV fromi 7 WJOto with the 10:(W p.m .ic ffee and (iaette u1rgaining pop rit, a pidl v.Although the cafeteria is pri maily pationized by coeds. it shows signs of becoming a favorite. after-date spot. Attractions including soft music, comfortable -rhairs and a -modern atmosphere. accounts for the everincreasing crowds returning each day. Featuring the Gatorburger. mi lk shakes and hot fudge sundaes, the cafeteria offers a wide selection of food, with the grtill in opera!Ion full time. The dual (oimpliint voiced h.y students concerns the service and aisles Grill and sandwih serve e is slow, coeds state. and th., narlow counter aislei eates a jaimed hottlene. k liltingg the brIeakfast and lunch hour rush. CANDID REMARKS BY VISITING DR. BURKHARD More Social Complacency Than Mental Page 2-Florida Alligator Friday, february 25, 1955 Annual Spring Open House Set For March 11-w26 The University plays hosts to the thousands of parents, alumni, and friends March 11 through the 26, during the annual University of Florida Open House. Presentations by the various student organizations will make the week a glimpse of the activities and interests at the University. Some 50 activities ranging from the Agricultural Fair to the Military Ball will be presented Within the 15 day span. Committees composed of students and faculty have been set up to coordinate the Open House and will follow through with the theme: The University of FloridaSymbol of the growth and progress ^0 #& ea. Says Harvard Scholar By DAN HACKEL ergies which might be turned to ant place. "After a lapse of 38 Assistant State Editor mental development," Dr. Surkyears I was impressed by the exThere ls "more evidence hete of hard commented. pansion in enrollment and ouildphysical well-being and of sociall Otherwise, the well-traveled proings, the energy and eagerness of omplacency than mental urge or fessor found our campus a pleasthe student body, and the friendly intellectual challenge'' according ----relaxed atmosphere," he saic to Dr. Arthur Burkhard, scholar Although such bright spots esand author who served as com(Ammi 5 ma uI caped Dr. Burkhard's panning, the mander of the University Naval colorful figure, currently on a tour Unit during World War I ., 1of Southern universities, bemoanA Harvard Ph.D., translate of For Engineer Fair ed the lack of a Faculty (Aub classic plays. professor, and lecwhere "contacts between profes turner. Burkhard returned to the ,orsors and intellectually -minded empu ths w etend t thed Committees have been set up or people might be continued n i campus this weekend for a huirned the annual Engineers Fair which more intimate and urbane bais." revisit and left behind a i-ain of will be held March 18 and 1. Far Dmo retiaed uane bs arie.' dry comments on the Univer.itd Dr. Burkhard says his varied 'Instead of machine exaina-chairmen this year are Lloyd Wi services at Harvard University, Inst a o mche impraliams and Jack Stone. and more recently as visiting protions which are not much improvefso tPnslai tt n ment over peripheral intelligence Chairmen of the committees are: fessor at Pennsylvania State and tests in daily newspapers. students E. P. Williamson, space committhe University of Texas, his exshould be trained to think indetee; Earl Blekking, industrial extensive lecture series In Amercan pendently and formulate findings hibits: George Tobi. newspaper and European universities, and an in compact comprehensive style." publicity: Joe Stine, radio-TV: Dan extended tour of duty In the antelhe said. "Otherwise our youth will Williams local publicity: Lew's tary Government in Germany conshoot pool instead of shooting the Johnson. business manager; Gene try ohis grn fo stars.'' Lichtman. and Jack Garland. hign comparative summations. Extr a-curricular activities lso school contact; Phil Hart, printed In addition. he has engaged i came in for an intellectual scoring material and Wayne Heasley, sign r adhpoe. the world vr "Extra-curricular interests sap en; research projects the world over. Committee. and done extensive work in angFair chairmen for the engineeruages. These periods are culminating scietes ae: Jhn Sarcying in his present tasks: the trans. (oedikelle Staff an societies are: John Saas l electrical: Stanley Cohen civil; nation and publication of classical Barranger, industrial: Frank LeuPlays Named by WSA te. chemical; Ken Safko, mechanGlede ,"eSece'oa''>and athe ical an Bar Cu e tcalGolden Fleece' trilogy are a few Barry Culp, aeronautical. of his present works. Author of 40 Coedikette appointments for 1955_articles and 10 books, Dr. Rirkwere announced in the regular hard is currently presenting in WSA meeting last Mondayvtnght Alpha Phi Omega Meets New York his translation of Grillin the Florida Union sycPresimentn parzers "Golden Fleece" in coopThere will be a special meeting ration with UNESCO and the U S Lallio Kain is the e litoi. Helen of all officers in Alpha Phi OmeDept, of State. Hilgendoif, assistant editor. and ga, national service fraternity. in Later in March, he will stage N It !h;' Webb staff' e r the Room 200. Florida Union Monday other productions along the sqme art editor will be announced at night at 7. lines. 'I ed Drive efill Bank fill the bank has become an annual affair. nents were made on the basisof the a pplica tions submitted at the end of last semester and personal interviews by the executive council. Coedikettee will go to press March 12. Hale Heads Faculty Red Cross Drive II Dr. L.ster Hale. Professor of Speech, has been appointed chairman for the University faculty drive of the American Red Cross. by Acting President John S Allen. A member of the Unversity faculty since 1935. Hale holds a BA degree from the Universitv -)f Wisconsin and MA and PhD deg-es from Louisiana State University. He began and developed the Spee(h and Hearing Clinic at the University in 1941 and is currently in charge of the training program for speech correction at the University. 'The student blood bank is af-filiated with the Morida AssociaPumphrey in Washington tion of Blood Banks and is deProf. Fred H. Pumphrey of the signed to furnish students arid their immediate families with plasma in case of emergency. A student may draw up to five pints of blood, any request over, that amount will have to be app noedr bythe strident .nngittee running the bank. The batik save., the students $20 on the pint, as all the student has topay is the $t1 ser-vice charge. The nornial state fee is S31. A trophy will be presented to the organization whose members donate the largest percentage. The actital number of pints donated does not count: thus giving the smaller organizations the same chance as the larger ones. The prize is open to fraternities, sororities, and all the other organizations. on or off campus. The AriiROTC has promised its 'o-operawion by letting its students niiss class in order to donate blood. The Air Force plans to release its students from drill. All students under the age of .21 ill require a release slip signed ~y the parents unless they appear in their ROTC uniform. '"hese slips can he obtained at the information desk in the Florida Union. Blood will be taken at the Alachua General Hospital Monday through Friday between 8 and 11 a.m. and in the afternoon from 2 to 4 p.m. f unable to donate driring the afternoon the bank will be open Tuesday throtigh Thursday at night by appointment and Saturday morning from 8 till 11 p.m. The hospital advises donors to observe a six hour fasting period before giving blood. Fruit juices, black coffee, and soft drinks are permissable. Drink plenty of water. No milk or milk products are perm iss able electrical engineering department is in Washington. D C., this week. As a member of the Krngineering Review Panel of the National ScienPe Fellowship Awards, Prot Pumphrev )&ill rex-jew applications, or graduate fellowships from eng inee-ing students throughout the nat ion. The six-member panel makes its recommendat ions to the G;raduate Board of NSFA, which makes the final choice. I-Want't tra vel a dnd study abroad? Take a university-sponsored tour via TWA this summer and earn full college credit while you travel Visit the countries of your choice ...tijdv from 2 to 6 weeks at a foreign university. You can do both on one trip when you arrange a universitysponsored tour via TWA. Itineraries include countries in Europe, the Middle East, Asia and Africa. Special stud, tours available. Low all-inclu~ive prices with TWA' economical 5kv Tourist ser iie. For information, write: John H. Furbay, Ph.ID, Director, Air World Tours, Dept. (IN, 380 Madison Axe., New York 17, N. Y Be sure to mention countries you wish to visit. ------I JON TYME -TAILORING BETTER WORK -LOWER PRICES -ALTERATIONS-~ 1600 N.W. 6th St. ,o, MenRAWomen PLENTY OF PARKING THE PALMS SOU1THERN EDGE OF OCALA ON U.S.' 441 DANCE TO THE MUSIC Of' DON MOORE AND HIS ALL U of F STUDENT ORCHESTRA 9.12 Friday, Feb. 25 I C6ARET TES k* MODERN SIZE FILTER TIP TAREYTON PATINTS PINHNNG An entirely new Concept In cftarette Sltration. A filter tipof purified alluIow, Inrporatng AtiTtd C a 6huh bubstm C4 Wotd-famoUs 8as a vwmvror OPEN FRIDAYS 'TIL 9 P.M. CHANCE JOHN WAYNE LINDA DARNELL With ROBERT MIT clHUM SUN., MON., TUES., & VED. E.O.M. CLEARANCE SALE U U Urge Here THE COED CLUB, new campus coffee and dining headquarters, went into operation this week in Broward Hall. The club, with both Inni+ and .A n luervice set In a modern interior dnten ddwith rtish crowd% this N, ik as studt% abadoned .,l ., 111hind STU D'EN TS! 20% OFF on all shoe Repairs with this ad BRING THIS AD TO MODERN SHOE REPAIR Next to FirSt National Bank) PHONE 5211 34 NORTH MAIN STREET 'I --N, p v I i i

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BETA THETA PI PROGRAM CLOSES DRIVE Polio Variety By ANN SPAULDING Gator SUNO Writer Over $800 was netted for the March of Dimes at the variety oenSWit Show which was presented and produced by Beta Theta P1, and Sponsored by the Lions. The rwo hour variety benefit show was Staged at the Gainesville t-ligh School Tuesday night. Approximately 1000 people attended the production. The benefit' Nets $ show presented nine variety acts and the GHS variety band, directed by B. M. Donaldson. Master of ceremonies Garlon Davis opened the show with Durtiene Johnson, U. of F. majorette from Clearwater, doing a baton act. Dur lene Is now the feature twirler with the Gator Band and holds runner, up honors in the national "Majorette with the Most Beautiful Legs" contest. To really look your loveliest Cuffed torso flower print in Cortley washable, crease-resistant cotton. Blue, pink, mint green. Sizes 5to 15 .,. $10.95 ON THE SQUARE I .!J d Allmiw e F.j. F .b 2 195 IOI_ mru o a gawt r ay, r ruary A AROUND THE SOCIAL CIRCUIT The Dream Weavers, popular du Greeks Party Tempo heard over WRUF, were the hit of the show, and sang repeated encores accompanied by Lee Turner at the piano.An Dancers Molly Ardrey and Joan Faye Brown did a modern ance ForAnnual ocialW routine of "Shake, Rattle and Rol)" before colored lights which were designed to bring out the perfecBy JANE HUNTER Lipp, vice tion of the dance. Molly's sister, Gator Society Editor delman, co Sally, who is Florida Citrus Queen Greeks step up social pace as Sybil Bar was originally scheduled to dance rushing ends and weekends -..tary; and with Molly, but she was unable Sigma Chi's to hold annual Sweetmentarian to come. Sally taught the danoe to heart weekend beginning Friday Delt house Joan in one day, and after one ...party at the house last week evening .. rehearsal she put on the show with end for the sweetheart candidates Beta's for Molly. ...Col. Ralph Rhudy new apDimes varif The Co-Eds trio, Mary Carr, Sal pointed chapter advisor.Lambda ...chapter Sandborn, and Nancy Crump, Univ Chi's plan gambling party for SatKappa's Th coeds made their first appearance urday night ..fourteen pledges retary is here with their renditions of popto be initiated soon ...Lambda master. Ha ular ballads as did the Melodettes, Chi Spe scholarship trophy went co-chairmen five Gainesville High School girl to the Lambda Chi's as chapter Hugh McIn and an accompanist. rated seventh on campus -.-ham. forme co tarsBouterse and PhyRlb geKappa Delta officers for the comGam alum soon to be presented by the loring semester Include Esther Torter for lun ida players, sang the top duet from res, president; Dottie CuLpepper, Zeta offic the play "Old Devil Moon." vesa president Shirley Leach, secpresident, i Of pianist Todd, and they presentBarlow, editor; and Joan Ambrose, Rothrock, t presented by Dave Todd. A jazz rush chairman ...AEPhI officers historian; combo followed under the direction are Judy Myers, president; Lesley ual chairm ed several arrangements. tained the I Lion's club president Ted Van ...TEP Antwerp, former Hollywood prod 'R a rsal s tieth anniv er, amazed the audience witp his Day weeker magic; Herb Finger assisted -im. uled for S Harmonica player Gene Alvarez y Camp O'L demonstrated professional stylings officers are on the instrument by presenting an U ) ri r wr yvBeverly Ba array of musical selections. He aas McSwiggan just recently returned from a USO Rehearsals are underway for Sena Hinna tour. "Finian's Rainbow," the popular retary; Ann Ticket sales were conducted Broadway musical which Will be tha Smith, throughout the city and at iocal presented by Florida P 1 a y e r s Naylor, so theaters with sororities vying for March 25 and 26. Grace Lel the trophy for the most number Major roles in the production are Delta Chi' of tickets sold in the drive. played by: Phyllis Edge as Sharon weekend w Zeta Tau Alpha won the first McLonergan, Elizabeth Otto as SuADPi office place award with a total of _42 san Mahoney, Thomas Rahner as president; tickets sold ($116), and Phi Mu Finian McLonergan, Donald BOUShirley Ma took the trophy for second place terse as Woody Mahoney, and Ed olyn Hiatt. selling 220 tickets. Both sororities Amor as Og.-1 Diettrich, r were ahead by a wide margin. Phyllis, although a freshman, apZimmerman March of Dimes chairman, John peared this season in "Snow sorority ha P. Jones, said, "I am as happy as Queen." Elizabeth Otto is a graduhouse in c can be about it -I thougnt it ating senior and she may be re week ... was a swell show, one of the fines, membered for her roles in "Bell., Founder'sI things I've seen." Prof. Jones al > Book and Candle," "Knickerbock* night .. said that everyone is hoping hat er Holiday," and for the choreog Pay a visit the March of Dimes Drive next year will begin with the variety show. Bacon Completes Staff Appointments for F Book Editor Don Bacon completed his staff appointments for the F Book early this week when he named Dan Hackel, journalism major from Jacksonville, to the managing editor's post. Hackel, who is assistant state editor on the Alligator, will begin work immedia-ely organizing the sections of the book so that major work oan begin in April. Uni versity Food Service '4 The Opening of "THE COED raphy and costumes of 'Snow Queen." Thomas Rahner is also a veteran of Florida Players' produc-' tions, having played in "My Three Angels" and "Snow Queen." Donald Bouterse, a senior in Architecture, is a newcomer to the Players and will appear for the first time in "Finian's Rainbow. Ed Amor is a graduating senior and has appeared in many Florida Players' productions, inc 1 u d i n g "Bell, Book and Candle," anal "Knickerbocker Ho1day." "Finian's Rainbow" is being directed by Dr. Derwin B. Dusenbury. of Orlando trophy toa advisor fro chapters schedule f( new initiat George Cox well, Bow Arlin Hawk King, Ronn Tuffy Mur Park, Cha ton, Larry Skinner, D lor, Tomm Williams tablished in versity Av .2, i T pare Weekends president; Ellinor uenorresponding secretary: -nett, recording secreGloria Backer, parlia...chapter visited for dessert Wednesday .Congratulations to the a successful March of ety show Tuesday nignt r entertained the Sigma thursday ...new seeEd Johnson; pledge-I rmon Smith; ana socia n, Jim Patterson and tyre ...Glen cunninger Olympic star and Phi visited the local chap-, ch Tuesday ...new ers are Caroll Nott. Sara Betty Smith, veep;* r, secretary; Dorothy reasurer; Adele Scholl, and Sophie Mavros, ritan ...chapter enterPikes Thursday evening is celebrating its thirersary with Founder s nd ...picnic is schedCLUB Located in BROWARD HALL near the recreation room Serving All Three Meals -ANDContinuous Fountain and Gr~lle Service INTAGLIO PRINTS by noted artist Majiricio Lasanky and some of his students are viewed by these Florida students. On display at the Hub art gallery through Wednesday and sponsored by depart. ment of art, the prints are from 'the private collec tions of Eugene Grissom and John Kacere. assistant professors of art here and from students of Lasanky. Campus Drive Campaign Sets $5,000 as Goal aturday afternoon, at j With $5,000 as their goal, the eno ...New AOPi Campus Chest will hold their ane Lois Reid, president; nual drive the week of March i 12. lfe, vice president; Pat The drive is sponsored by Stuent recording secretary; Government in cooperation witu the ant. corresponding secAdministration. n Rusn, treasurer; MarThe drive is to be held every rush chairman; Tanya semester according to a Stu tont cial chairman; ana Government law. The law states Baron, historian ...that no charitable organize ions s French party last may ask for contributions on camwas big success .'. .pus. rs are Annette Duggan, The main purpose of the Campus Margie Andress, veep; 'Chest is to collect and distribute nsman, secretary; Carthe money collected during the treasurer; Rosemary drive. This drive does away with ush chairman; and Pat all the smaller drives so that stu n, social chairman ...dents will not be appealed to all d dinner at Sigma Nu during the year. connection with Religion: Plans are being made to ApDelts to hold annualI proach all the organizations on Day banquet Saturday campus and ask their support by among the alumni to having them contribute at wast will be N. Ray Carrol $.50 a member. Bob Miller, stuwho will present a dent head of the Chest remained. an outstanding chapter "We realize that by doing this m one of the northern some students will be hit 'nore .Rainbow weekend than once but we still feel that r next weekend .this one drive is better than nues are Ricky Becker, merous smaller ones." Russ Currin, Jim El1 In addition to the money collectFowler, Dick Hamon, ied from the organizations, plans kins, Kent Innis, Davi Iare being made to hold a tireeLhour radio show from the second ie Lea, Grant Morrison,, ray, Jack Nichols, Bill floor of the Hub and take addi rlie Pike Mark Robintional pledges for donations wver ePerd, Mar Roin the telephone. Entertainment has y ShepherTBuddy Taybeen arranged and a -show will on WilcoxBuddyWay-e be put on during the radio broady' Valenti. and Waynelcast. It is hoped that local citi.Phi Sigs now ex zens will hear the program and n new quarters on Unicall and pledge a donation for enue and extend invitathe drive. tion to everyone to drop in .Money already pledged to the formal house warming is planned Chest includes a portion of the ,ate ...Regional director J. Philip from the Swedish Gym Team show Schaefer visited Wednesday night to be held tonight and the Cava...DG's visited SAE house for liers have promised the full prodinner Monday and went to Phi -----. Gin House for coffee Thursday night .sorority entertained the SPE's and the Kappa Sig's recently Law for Women' Topic of Lecture On Campus Tonight The first in a series of eight lectures titled "Law for Women" will be held tonight at 7:30 p.m. in the Law Auditorium. This lecture series, co-sponsored by the General Extension Division of Florida and the Florida Bar and Eighth Judiciary Circuit of the Florida Bar, will continue for eight weeks with a lecture each Friday night through April 22. The lectures will cover contracts, common business transactions, real estate sales and purchases, wills, and estate planning. A question and answer session will be conducted at the end of eacf lecture. All interested women are invited to attend these lectures. egistration will be held Friday night trom 7:00 -7:30 at the Law Auditorium and a registration fee of $1.00 will cover the entire series. Anyone unable to register Friday night may be registered by sending name and registration fee to the General Extension Division. OPEN:-7 a.m. to 10:30 p.m. week days Saturdays 7 a.m. to 2 p.m. r leerA 4 ;iritn/c ceeds of a dance they plan to hold next month. Assisting Miller are Ed Williams. technical: Joe Block, show and en tertamment: and Mortv Letkoe. publicity. Faculty members include Dean H. K. McClelland. Dr. Freeman H. Hart. and Clifton Oliver Ji. their job is to advise the student committee running the drive and to Peninsula Reviews Stories For Use in Next Issue Peninsula. campus literary magazine. is now considering material for the first issue of the spring semester, scheduled to appear the first week in April. All forms of literary work will be accepted, and poetry and fiction are especially welcome. Any university student may subnut. and C-3 students whose work decide what percentage of the union is published will he excused trom rI ds p u b l i s h e d x v h eJ etx' t u dft eac cae isriue o their final writing laboratory examnation with a perfect paper. AU Law Fraternities To Rush 'manusripts must be typewritten Next week will he iush week tor and must bear the writer's name the three fraternites of the Coland mi ling address. They may be lege of Law The following datesleft at the Florida Union desR or have been set for the ru.lh parade lits. The' Fri. W i z1nesd;av: 'M at :17 Anderson Hall. A prize wiU elta1Phi, Fr Phi Alpha Delta, tentatively he awarded for the nest Sat short story published. for those big Fraternity Weekends -Spring and Summer FRAN KEL S 2 EAST UNIVERSITY AVE. r------------------------------------------------A Campus-to-Career Case History I X I I Manager Ray New explains the importance ol good service to one ol his assistants IWhen Ray New-Business Adminitration, Buffalo, '51started with New% York Telephone Company, he ne,,er suspected I, k.L-um ld F!i tkIthI) l P m f thir n t"Myj ob as business office manager is to see that the customer gets the best possible service. One of my assignments took me into a section of Manhattan that had a large Puerto Rican population. "Frequently our people would get somebody on the line who couldn't speak a word of English. So I saw to it that each of my representatives learned a few standard Spanish phrases-enough to get somebody to the telephone who could work, with new problems coming up all the time. The best part of it is that the training program here is tailor-made to the Job. First you get a general background in the business, then %ou go into i'hat I call 'individual training.' That's where %our own special abilities are developed and you're encouraged to think out new ways to solve everyday problems -like the one I just described. 'Right now I'm Business Manager W~tfA.if 0 i I I --, w e" his Awor woui tace nm %%anpromm iii ot 2 4* = ..

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Friday Feb. 25, 1955 fitLSIIDAALLIGATOL AWI-A00euIce Honor Rating 1953-54 us runa NSU A1MU tos a -t100 d w m se -powinS wee eag* Onw m eT*ae W fl"A AUJSATZS hb embeid as aesdidams mer at e Goaee nm At Wt9sa n s US esr. Omese ae located t o eems S. 10 and 3 is s basomme@ 1610 a l UeVWV i .f ..............:-. ....................Art Smith hta ngglitor **0 .*0* **-90$696906a.0-.so*** 06*. 06 Al Qientel Busi. Mana.r ...Gene Brown EDrTOZAL STAFF Des Dan. Fetores D46w. Alas SIE. City Edtr; Jam Hunter, Society Editer; Beeky Greer. News Editor: Doug Buck, Assistant News 3d1er; Am White. Mary Am Grees. Asiataaf t eture EdItors Mary An Bransford. Assistant Society editor. Den RacIm .Assistan Sat s Ew; Ray I-ch. Cartami.L BiFOgETDSE Ca Mamseo. Dan Xckm. Meety Lfies, Mario P. Felt. Bill Magha. Mary Asm Kane. arl Ptoucher. Joy Fuler. Bruce KMies Jdka Careabe. Heles Pcshe, Ches Walden. Aas Spailding. EvelyS Sedner. Richard Weinert, Wally Sterling. svoaT sta.FF-. sob ie. sports dter; Cewe Cram, Intaral sports ditor; Sports Writers. Si Johnson, Pat Parrish, Charlie Jean, 1Ammb Hollaner. Marty La&6e Sob O'Dre. Dick Lsle. Stu blumberg, sylvia Maxwell and Janice Hahn. BUSiNESS STAFF Adv stimangJack ea-mm 5gb o N sso .LArratmei layes, Ray SaSiot. Doe Chaikes, Joe Cobb, Bersal Heinmiler. Earvey Kaplan, Jmimy Le. Sue REese. Office and Circulatios: Dave Brandt, Jerry Browder. Dean Campbell, Lamar Cobb. Marif Dervei. Jo Am wsmao. Nean Landman. Fred Leam Solomon. Lees Weingarten. Charles Ruffner. Bob McCormick. me. Ues Morer., Jim Nelss, Sumw R bert, Asrmol bShumasn Svia,. Joe Marlin, Les Mordoh. Mary Jo Koger. Tommy MorriSG Incamstaacy Is a sgn o progress" -Owen McGovern in Executive Council meeting If they will listen, leaders and followers going to make any more plans for their last-hour wath in term this year, they'd better get started in the next few minutes. SG, still floundering and in need of new blood in spite of former hopes of Renaissance, is back in its old rut again. This newspaper, watching the ups and downs of the current administration with a wary eye and with dreams of improvement, has almost decided that it may be too late for any action on the part of leaders now in office. But eleven months ago, when the leaders were only candidates, things were different and talk of vast political and governmental change was the campus word. The Victory Party, a now-defunct group that carried a big majority of its cnadidates to office, boasted in its platform that this was the year "to return SG to prestige in the students eyes ...to advance the standards of political reform ...to modernize administrative procedures ...to establish a veteran's committee from all FlaVets .'" These, and other promises, were the basic tenets through which men now in office were to work for progress and perfection in an ailing government. Some of the aims were accomplished. The duties of the class officers were redefined, but the new definition was hazy. The Honor Court was given a thorough investigation and things were found to be changed. Lyceum productions b e c a m e slightly more appealing, if not more apolling. But where does the story go from there ? Most political observers, if caught in an honest moment, will admit that Student Government has not been what it should this year. Many mistakes were made, erToo Much State Inter So the University of Florida and Florida State University are going into mutual sports competition. Who cares? Apparently state officials do, because the State Board of Control this week went into the sports scheduling business and ordered the two schools to begin competition "if and when." The Board of Control, putting aside their serious discussion of a University of Florida president, went on record to demand athletic competition between two institutions that six years ago used to be laboratories for future marital relations. We don't mean to belittle efforts on the part of sports enthusiasts to unite two olympic machines, but the tremor of state interest in a inter-school matter is distrubing indeed. When matters of more importance are to be debated in academic circles, the question of a sporting event seems trivial. But the press and the state seem determined to bring such information to the eye of In Broward, the Coe& Silence from the Broward Hall a r e a was too good to last. First the coeds complained about the thin walls between rooms. That was remedied. Now the Broward beauties are screaming that the new Coed Club in the dorm basement has stolen their privacy. Here's their grumble: The recreation room is also in the basement and a glass partition separates it from the cafeteria. Now, WSA rules say that no coed may be seen in public wearAnn and Joan Did a Progress rors were not corrected, and men charged with duty and responsibility did not do their job. The book Exchange did not function; nor did the Campus Chest. There was no attempt at political reform. An endowment fund created last year was not put in operation until December-four months behind the schedule required by law. There was a baby-sitting service and a radio program, but these nominal services stand alone against a long list of inactivity. Where, then, the student will ask, do we stand at this point and where are we going? In its eleventh hour, the cogs of the administrative machine now in power have slowly started to move. Only a month is left, but there has been a slight increase in activity. Maybe this is only idle suffling around; maybe this is progress. If they will isten, eaders and followers in Student Government must face the fact that it is almost too late to save the government from near extinction. Its former prestige, its activity, its conscious drive to promote better things have almost been extinguished by a blight ofvhalf-truths and half-leaders. An era of poor leadership and the disease of apathy has been on us too long. We hope that the men now planning'the candidates and campaigns for the coming elections will take these serious matters to their smoke-filled rooms. We hope they too can see the signs of danger and nminate good men with high ideals to ward off disaster.If they do not, for they are the only ones who can. The Florida Alligator may have to report that Student Government has died-killed by those too concerned with their own futures to save it. est in Gridirons the public and project debates that have no reason. Athletic competition, like any other extra-curricular activity, warrents no special consideration from those whom we elect to make and enforce state law and policy. There should be no special sanction on muscle, nor should we seek its prominence in a college environment. Football, like other sports, must maintain their place in education. Actually, their position is dubious, but if coaches must dominate the academic scene, then control is in order. A contest between the University and FSU is in no more order than an indianwrestling contest to decide the UF president. Certainly the latter should be more pertinent at a time when so many important issues are riding the brink of public opinion and officials are content to let things wait in order to fill football stadiums more quickly. s Fret ing shorts or the like, except while engaged in athletic activities. The girls have, up until now. used the recreation room to play ping-pong and as an exiting point heading for the women's tennis courts. So, in the most strict definition of the WSA rule, the recreation room is public because of the glass partition; therefore off limits for shorts and dungarees. But, because it's a woman's world, here's betting the glass is soon removed or covered. Got to keep the fair sex happy. God Job PARANOIA Baker Tries His Hand at Sportswriting Page 4 e / 4. A rg Editor trials BACON'S BEAT Take Care of My Little Sorority Girl LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Reader Wants True Story Behind Politics on Campus Editor: I do not know where your staff writer Earl Poucher gets his news, but it is quite evident that his view of the campus political set up is quite different from my view. He states: "Neither of the two opposing forces of one year ago are in evidence today." Oh, I'll admit we no longer have the two parties in name, but I ask you for the true story behind the formation of the Florida Party Is tse Florida Party divorced from the political machine that is in office now? If the answer is no then the Victory Party and the Florida Party are now and the same except for the course a qvitch of a few fraternities. Let's take a real look at the political set up. Student government has in my opinion fallen to the lowest ebb, that I have witnessed since my entrance to this campus in 1947. The Florida Party which is basically made up of these who are in power now has a strong 400 block vote lead over any possible formations of parties. Unless those independents and fraternity men who are interested in good student government take a positive action immediately, we will have a repeat performance next year of what went on this year. The stage is set and the curtain is about to go up. For those of you that are in the Florida Party now, look around and judge for yourself. For those students who aren't interested in student government ask yourself the following questiol-s: What really happened to my Orange Peel that is paid for by my dent activity fee? What really happened to the Seminole that is paid for by my student activity fee? What is the real story behind our new paper, The Student shopping Guide? What really theppened to the student book exchange? The biggest question though is: What really happened to our student government? I ask every student to answer these questions and then take a positive action of some sort. Maurice Dayon Purity Above All, Peel Must Change Its Tune Editor: With quiet pride in our University we note the recent rash of righteous indignation against the Orange Peel. It is heartening to know that on your staff and among the student body there are those *ho are anxious to be counted standing up in defense of purity and decency. So we hasten to jump on the bandwagon by giving the back of our hand to the Pornographic Peel. We are looking forward to the establishment of a "sparkling variety magazine." We want to see something filled with the highminded and inspirational things students talk about. We are sick of the obscenity and filth which appeals only to the tiny minority of us whose sense of human is lecherous. libidinous, and vulgar. Catering to the depravity of such untypical students must stop. As one of our outstanding students has said, "The age of a campus so-called humor magazine is ended." This serious, purposeful campus leader points us to the clear patn of duty: Student belly laughs be damned' Give us a magazine that will satisfy parents, the clergy, and the legislature! Harvey E. Ward Vote in Local Election Editor: I have for the past two year heard students moan over and sneer at the juvenile confusion comprising campus elections, and I must admit of expressing similar opinions myself. But there is an election in this city on March 15 which should not be ignored with the usual derogatory predicates. I hope that by printing this letter you will give me the opportunity to urge all university students of voting age to support the University of Florida candidates in order to rightfully make student influence felt h e r e in municipal government. Only six months residence is required for registration, so let's get out and be represented. John L. Woodward By DON BACON Gator Feature Editor "Take Care of My Little Girl." the Hollywood version of modern sorority life of a few years uack. caused the female socials over the nation to take an introspective look at themselves and smear on a little more makeup to cover the flaws. The film, being less subtle than a nude in church, raked the sorority coeds from the top of their feathered hats down to the taps on their spiked shoes. It pictured them as catty little rich girls with nothing better to do than to took beautiful and spend dad's morley, This, of course, isn't true, as any sorority girl will tell you. Quote one Florida lovely: "I don't know about the other houses, but we're not like that. We don't really care if a girl has money or if she's pretty. What we're interested in is the girl herself and if she is likeable and can make her grades." Sound familiar? No one, except members themselves, really knows what sort of judgement ruler, or tapemeasure, sororities use in picking their pledges. With all the red tape and heart break a prospective pledge pas to go through to get a bid, a sorority girl should be considered something special. Here at Flonrda she first must get an invitation to visit a house, with a maximum of five invitations the first day, two the second and so on. Then the different sororities run up to the Dean of Women's office and place, or not place as card in an envelope, telling the the case may be. an engraved rushee that they want her. In the meantime, the rushee has filled out a list with four choices of sororities that she would like to pledge. If her first choice sends her a bid, fine. Even a bid erom the second pick isn't bad, but should some girl not make the social grade, she gets a card saying "We regret to inform you That's the heartbreak. Ask any girl how it feels to be turned down if you can find one. Usually, and with good reason, no girl will admit not getting a bid. And the reason some girls aren't wanted b a sorority" Looks plays an important part as does the girl's reputation, how she holds her cup of tea, etc. But there are often times when a certain sorority wants a particular girl but can't give her a bid. This is true if ar. alumnus who knows the girl can't be found to sign a recommendation. The whole rushing business sounds cruel, and maybe it is. Even the members themselves say they don't like it. but it's there and they abide by it, most of the time. NIGHT BLAT: The bridge nabit has caught on again in the Campus Club. to bad ...Still wearing my Smile button the Florida Union Social Board sent me, thanks ...Weather report: Poop sheet snowfall coming soon followed by hot air blasts in the dorms ... Know a girl who can't find anything better to do than mate vrigin flies. .. What's this rumor about Stan Kenton not coming? ...heta President Al Quentel all smiles after the good turnout for the Benefit. sponsored b his fraternity and the Gainesville Lions Club ...Club Rendesvous' new look is new ...Orange Peel' Editor Fred Bell denies rumors that he will seek that office again this spring ...Some guy named Glenn Cunningham sure got his poop sheets out early, but wriat's he running for? ...Still wondering why nobody showed up for the planning and policy committee meeting yester-day. Bill?. Here's what happened: The rneeting had been scheduled for Tuesday and that afternoon you postponed it until yesterday. However, the committee. not knowing of any postponement, came and. finating you not there, conducted the meet ing anyway. It's a cruel world, isn 't It .* Art (Sgt. Friday) Smith finally found the culprit who's been purchasing commodities on his tao .. Art's roommate, Gil Stockto.i_ is burning the midnight alcohol. >reparing his prosecution on a mock trial in which a man is accused of attempting murder for firing three shots at a dummy ...Beat that .. TWO CENTS WORTH A Disc Jockey Pulls Local Boner By DOUG BUCK Assistant News Editor "Discless Jockey" is a term coined by columnist John Lardner. It desc-ribes the indibidual on the radio whose steady stream of chatter is only occasionally interrupted by the playing of a record. Discless jockies are not confined to 'Lardner-s metropolitan scene. They broadcast locally -mostly around the whitching hour. Sojne are rather good, in spite of their discless condition. Others -.. well, let's just say they're inexperienced. In the latter category is one, a student, who pulled the prize bonehead wisecrack of the year Sunday morning. It went something like this: DJ (for discless jockey) : "Well (ha-ha), this looks like a political convention. Here wereshave four of the top men in Student Government. "I see here SG (for the holder of a truly dignified*-SG post). SG, I know you were on television (Saturday) afternoon. Would you mind telling us what the topic of that broadcast was?" SG: "The topic was 'Morality at the U. of F."' (Background laughter.) DJ: "Well fha-ha), tell me, 3G, do you really think you're qualified to talk on that subject. Do you really think you're qualified to talk on Florida morality in view of the fact that I can smell your breath from here?" And there X was. It had been said by the (as mentioned above) inexperienced and apparently unabashed announcer. And nothing that could have been said by the embarrassed SG official could gloss it over. The understatement of the campus year was the reply: GS: "Well, DJ, that wasn't a very nice thing to say over the radio. but ..(and so on)". Student Government didn't deserve such a blundering slap. T7he University didn't deserve it. And, most of all, the individual involved didn't deserve it. What good that was done -public relations -wise -by the TV broadcast could have been undone by that one radio blooper. No. Doubtless it wasn't done with malicious intent. All the fluff consisted of was complete lack of forethought -which perhaps comes with experience. The student official no doubt has learned a bitter lesson. He now knows to trust airways interviews to the professionals only. The student announcer, it is to be hoped, hai earned to jockey fewer words and more discs. PENNIES FOR THOUGHT: The predicted shakeup in the Florida Party came last week. But a weakening of power didn't. Fabtions outside the group had hoped it would break up. Instead, still another fraternity joined the fold. It looks like a tough election for the "outs" come March 29 ... And the campus once again wi be littered with poop sheets. Oh, well .-.Query: "What needs thinking about on this campus Answer: "Thinking." PENNIES FROM HEAVEN: The welfare work being done by fraternities ...Veep McClure, who did a good job at the Exec Council meeting in the absence of Bill Daniel ...Betty Haines, Student Government's steno and secretary -its only salaried employee who works hard and still is patient with people and even reporters ...Ann Richardson. Joan Williamson and Joy Fuller, who toiled and sent someone else B Seminole to press. ACROSS THE COLLEGIATE NATION Sewanee Students 'Suckers' for Belonging to National Fraternities (From the Sewanee Purple, University of the South) The fraternity system, because of the inevitable exclusiveness and snobbery it causes, is an undeniable evil. Unfortunately, though, we cannot get rid of it; even if fraternities were abolished, other cliquish organizations would ,take O -iV 72" typed in o"juplicate on pink, blue. yellow, and beige cards which are filed away in dusty vaults many miles away, never to be seen again. In addition to this marvelous bargain in waste paper. there are certain other arguments for being In a national fraternity: 1. Brotherhood. The idea of being location with them will tie him down and hinder his finding a circe of real kindred spirits. Were Sewanee's fraternities local, it would be possivle for a student who transferred to or from anoth-r school to join the fraternity ot his choice listed of being limited to a particularly fraternity -or to none at all. if there is not a chapter ment of all. If Heave Psi Fraternity is known in other places, what a thrill to sport that pin -proof of being a social lion. The girl friend will swoon. and Uncle klmo (who was a brother of '09 att another university) will say, "I knew the lad had it in him." Balanced weightily against these advantages of the nationals is +U _-_.,._,. ,. __ .,W,,e It can be just as snobbish and exclusive as it wants to, but in case it wants to initiate members of various creeds and races, that is its own business too, not the business of a few people in another thing about the particular chapter. part of the country who know noA national fraternity unaware of Sewa,,',np*k.ma4 .,,,Ais i lieBy JOHN A. BAKER Alligator Editor Emeritus With the first balmy days og the New Year upon us a mild epidemic of spring fever was apparent on campus this week ...And to go along with the springtime atmosphere the golf, track and baseball team news started appearing in the papers. But Florida Field surely didn't look like springtime ...The football team began their annual 20day session of knocking heads and the Florida coaches were facng their annual problem of looking for a fullback. Head Coach Bob Woodruff was enduring a normal week however ...The state press was full of nightmares for Woodruff to mull over ...These included the prattlings of the Florida State Univernot trying to reach any agreement sity clique of money -happy football fanswho accused Woodruff of on the mandatory Florida -FSU sports competitor After a week o pro -FSU %tories. the press finally carried the University of Florida's side of the contrro'rsy which centered around the fact (which FSU officials ignored) that Woodruff had of ered to meet FSU in spring sports this year ...ohe letter from the iJniversity of Florida which detailed this offer was conveniently "lost" by FSU officials. FSU seems to feel Florida should give up contracted games with Southeastern Conference teams, traditional rivals such as Miami or a lucrative non -conference foe like Rice to play FSU ...Of course, FSU knows that the first game will give FSU more money than any two games they could possibly schedule with anyone else ...Personally, I want us to play FSU also ...This hogwash aboul us being "chicken" gripes my soul. But I think that at the present time. I would rather see us pay SEC teams. Miami "nd other toughie nd make our mark nonestly than break a contract with another university for the saxe of pouring money into the pockets of the Seminoles ...I was one of the first to hope FSU would get a bid to the Sun Bowl and wish them well and I know someday the Florida -FSU series will be an important game of the year ... But let's not get everyone else mad at us to save the FSU athletic slush fund. Then the University of Miami complained ,because this year's Florida -Miami game was to be played during daylight hours on a Saturday It seems Tropical Park is holding the opening day races the same Saturday and the Army -Navy game will be televised the same day ...Maybe they have a point, but we'll bet A No Sign of J II' that one of the largest crowds ever to witness a football game in Florida will be on hand .And it's been a long time since we won a major game at night, something like 10 or 15 years. But to top all the other night. mares, Wally Butts was wailu g that Florida had Intentionally left an open date before the Georgia game and although It was a game on "neutral" ground in Jack-son. villa, it was a Florida "homue" game ..Butts later apologized when he found out that after +his year Florida has scheduled Aunurnj for the week before the Georgia game in 1956 and 1957 ..rhe Auburn Tigers, who went to two bowl games in 1954, could no' t-e considered "breathers" for Flurnda by even the ever-wailing Wally. Which all boils down to the :onclusion that, with a state age.'cy ordering certain competition, cival schools trying to control the scheduling of games and alumni trying to coach the team, it's no wonder the University has to pay a big salary and bind itself to a sevenyear contract in order to get a coach. And yet Woodruff was quoted the other day as saying he hoped he could remain at Florida from now on and he wasn't interested in any other coaching jobs ...Maybe the guy is just a glutton for punIshmeUL 7*

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Deon Cites Heavy State Home Needs' The 1954-55 enrollment figures of the Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture show that Mlr now has the second largest school of architecture in the country, Dean William T. Arnett reported this week. Its enrollment for the current year of 86 students in architecture and 254 in buildmg copstruction i exceeded only by the tniverslty of Illinois. "The tremendous need icr homes, schools, hospitals, and other buildings in Florida and the South is placing heavy demands on facilities at the University of Florida for the education of architects, builders, and other leaders for the building industry," said the clean of the College of Architecture and Allied Arts. John L. Grand, head of the department of architecture, Indicated that record enrollments in architecture and in building oonstruction are still not enough to keep pace with the demand tori graduates. Architects and builders,1 he added, have joined the mem. bers of several other professions in the category of being too scarce.! Grand said that a recent survey by The Florida Builder Magazine disclosed that Florida had an alltime high building record last year. Permits for construction, according to the survey, totalled nearly $3 million, and surpassed tne 1953 total of $525 million. The survey covered only buildings for which permits were issued, and did not include a large amount of fed eral, state, and municipal construction. It was the third straight year in which a new building record Was set for Florida. The College is the only one in the state, and one of few in the South, to offer professional work in architecture, building construction, and related fields. Florida Players Initiate Florida Players initiated ten new members and elected new officers Sunday night at a formal meeting. IZ Otto was elected President, Terry Rogers, Vice President, and E0d Amor, Secre-q tary by the Players. Ten students were initiated into the group. They are Ron a I d Vaughn, Jan Urankar, Joan Williamson, Mary Ann Sparkman, Jean Stopke, Jim Patterson, Marion Munt, Jean Ellyson, Duane De Mar, and Tom Rahner. HERE IS WHAT HAPPENS to student ears when they make the fatal mIstake of parking in Reserved Area 1, an exclusive lot for Administration Building personnel. Campus pollee have begun hauling operations on all cars without proper decals found in se area. Above, a student auto is being towed to a local garage on orders from pollee. The cars can be reclaimed after hauling charges are paid. Below Is the Area 1 limits, where empty parking spaces can be seen in contrast to overcrowded area in the' background. The area has special assigned places for Deas and asMisats. (UF ftoto). Christian Science Lecture A Christian Science lecture entitled "The Healing Prayer ot Christian Science", will be given Thursday in the second floor auditorium of the Florida Union, at 8 p.m. The lecturer is Miss Lena May Aultman, C.S., who is speaking under the auspices of the Christian Science Organization on: campus. Inter Dorm Dance Tonight Keynoted by Informality Informality is the keynote for Don will act as M. C. for the floor the "Dixie Dorm Dance" to be show. held tonight from 9 till 12 in the Leading the list of entertainers Broward Hall recreation room. for this show will be the Dream Sponsored jointly by MRHA and Weavers. One of their numbers the women's dorms, this dance will will be the first performance of a feaure a variety of numbers. A song written by a campus coed. series of games is planned for intermissions. Highlighting the decorations will be the Kappa Alpha confederate flag. Music for the dance will be provided by Don Moore's orchestra. ra~~~~ Aek", t U DECMBER AND MAY: ACT I Of aM the creatures that inhabit the earth, none is so fair, so warm, so toothsome, as a coed. This is a simple fact, well-known to every campus male, and, to most campus males, a source of rejoicing. But not to all. To some, the creamy brows and twinkling limbs of coeds are a bane and a burden. To whom? To professors, that's whom. Professors, according to latest scientific advice, are huwan. Stick them and they bleed, pinch them and they hurt, ring a dinner bell and they salivate, comfront them with a round young coed and their ears go back, even as yours and mine. But, by and large, they contain themselves. After all, they are =eof high principle and decorum, and besides, the board of regents S asgot stooges all over. So, by and large, they contain themselves. But not always. Every now and then a coed will come along who is just too gorgeous to resist, and a professor -his clutch worn out from years of struggle -will slip and fall. White though his hair, multitudinous though his degrees, Phi Beta Kappa thoug! his key, he is as lovesick, moonstruck, and impaled as any freshman. But he's far worse off than any freshman. After all, a freshman can thump his leg, put on his linen duster, and take out fter the toed with mad abandon. But what can the poor smitten prof do? How, in his position, can he go courting a young girl undergraduate? In this column and the next one, I am going to deal with this difieult question. I will relate to you, in the form of a two act play, an account of a professor's attempt to woo a coed. The scene is a typical office in a typical liberal arts building on a typical campus. In this shabby setting, we find two men, Professors Twonkey and Phipps. They are lumpy and bent, in the mtinner of English lit professors. PHIPPs: Twonkey a terrible thing has happened to me. A terrible, ghastly thing! I've &aUen in love with a coed. TWONKEY: Now, now, that's not so terrible. PHIPPs: Oh, but it is. Miss McFetridge-for that is her name-is a student, a girl of nineteen. How would her parents feel if they knew I was gawking at her and refusing my food and wring her name on frosty windowpanes with my fingernail? TWONKEY: Come now, Phipps, no need to carry on so. You're not the first teacher to cast warm eyes at a coed, you know. PHIPPs: You mean it's happened to you too? TWoNKEY: But of course. Many times. PHIPPS: What did you do about it? TWONKEY: Looked at their knees. It never fails, Phipps. No matter how pretty a girl is, her knees are bound to be knobby and bony and the least romantic of objects. PHIPPs: Not Miss AMcFetridge's-for that is her name. They are soft and round and dimpled. Also pink. TWONKEY: Really? Well, I'll tell you something, Phipps, If I ever found a girl with pink knees, I'd marry her. PHIPPs: It is my fondest wish, but how can I, a professor of fifty, start a courtship with girl of 19? TwoNKzY: Very simple. Ask her to come to your officfor & conference late tomorrow afternoon. When she arrives, be urbane, be charming. Ask her to sit down. Give her a cigarette. PHIPPs: A Philip Morris. TWONKEY: But of course. PHIS: I just wanted to be sure you mentioned the name. They're paying for this column. TWONKEY: Give her a Philip Morris. PHIPPS: That's right. TWONKEY: Then light her Philip Morris and light one yourself. Say some frightfully witty things about English lit. Be .Be insouciant. Keep her laughing for an hour or so. Then look at your watch. Cry out in surprise that you had no idea it was thiw late. Insist on driving her home. PHIPPS: Yes, yes? TWONKEY: On the way home, drive past that movie houO that shows French films. Stop your car, as though on a sudden inmpulse. Tell her that you've heard the movie was delightfully Gall's and naughty. Ask her if she'd like to see it. PHiPs: Yes, yes? TWONKEY: After the movie, say to her in a jocular, offhand way that after such a fine French movie, the only logical thing would be a fine French dinner. Take her to a funny little niace Von &now. Several other acts are planned, including a skit by the members of the International Students' Organization. Admission to the dance is free with student identification cards. Any dorm residents may invite 1; dates. A blind date bureau h ForeignServiceMe been operating for the occasic an dhas so far proved succes Here Wednesdayful in arranging dates. Two representatives from the U. S. Department of State will be on Plan Party for Coeds, campus Wednesday to talk to stuMen Living Off-Campus dents and faculty about the career opportunities in the Foreign ServTe iin first ayfmpswbe nd w ice of the United States. men living off campus will be >ie eogTi of the Bnitereauates.Friday, March 11 in Broward re Geno T the Burzau reation lounge from 8:30 p.m.t International Organization A-ht fairs, and Olcott Deeming of the Foreign Service will address an Johnny Edmondson and his ban open meeting which will be neld 'will play for dancing and ente at 3:30 p.m. in Room 209, Florida tainment will be featured. Do Union. The two representatives of Bain is publicity chairman. Sk the State Department will also be Symons is in charge of entertain available for individual interviews. ment. Mary McClamroch hea Those wanting to make appointthe decoration committee, and 1Li ment foraninterview should conana Smithis efreshmentchair tact the University Placement Of. man. fice in Building H. Admission is 35 cents per person BY appotneet prveyon of soap to the late King George VI, Yardley & Co., Ltd., London .r ias on 0oId Cto nd er,on ip n As i)n. Yardlev brines von Florida Alligator, Friday, February 25, 1955-Page 5 15 Participating In Speech Tourney THE FLORIDA STUDENT SPEAKS More than17.5 students have ening extemporaneous and public tered the intramural speech tourn niLury i uwor run Could Have Been Put toBetter Use By BECKY GI!RZ the library, gymnasium, or audiGator News Editor torium or it could have been used Most Florida students think to replace all the raunchy tempothat the money that is being spent rary buildings on the campus. to construct the Century Tower Gil Stockton-SLW -acksonvlle could be put to better use else-I think that they could have where on the campus. used the money for a more funcThere are many different opin-usdtemnyfra oefn Ther ar man diferet oin-tional memorial. Furthermore. its tons as to the value of the Tower itself, but some students, while not an aesthetic edifice. considering the Tower an eyesore Jackie M c C I e I I an -SASin its present state, feel that it will Gainesville--If it is ever completadd to the beauty of the campus in ed, it will be an asset, but as it its completed form. sad o ti neeoe The question this week was: Do stands now it is an eyesore. I you think that Century Tower is think that the money could have an asset to the campus? been used for more important Libby White-2UC--Gainesville purposes. -I think it will be an asset in Dick Calhoun -2UC-Miamlthe future. The present students don't realize what beauty the presTechnically, the Century Tower ent eyesore will provide. The camust be an asset, but actually it rillon bells will be a thing of serves no purpose other than to beauty known over the entire enhance the beauty of the camstate. imt a oee pus. In future years it will also Jim Jackjon--4AS--,St. Peters-sevtobidu nertyraDurk--At its present uncompleted serve to build up Umverity tradiform, the Century Tower is a metions. nace to the campus. We need Nancy Inman -4ED-Sarasota1 classrooms, salary raises, etc., -Definitely not. With all the farmore than antury Tower. buildings that are needed on this Dixie Lee Mott-] PC-Miamimoney could have been put into 16 Schools Participate In Debate Two outstanding Florida debators will join teams from 16 schools as they compete in the Dartmouth College Invitational Debate Tournament this weekend. The two-day session, which will be held in Hanover. New Hampshire. has been termed this year's major forensic event for colleges and universities located in the eastern part of the United States. Representing the University will be Henry Forer, a junior from Coral Gables, and David Willing. sophomore from Miami. Debate Coach Dr. Douglas Ehniger will also attend the meet as a faculty judge. According to Ehniger ". ..both Forer and Willing have compiled outstanding records in debate activities during the past two years." Besides winning several tournaments, Forer was ranked as the top speaker at a meet held last November and Willing won an "excellent" rating for his participation in a discussion tournament held recently in Alabama. campus. they shouldn't waste money on a century tower. It is neither functional nor beautiful. Joe Arnold-SAS--Miami Beach I don't really know if it is an asset or not. It's not particulary pretty, but as long as the alumni are paying for it, it doesn't maake much difference. If the alumni are interested enough in a meniorial to build one, then that's their affair. Thousands of Spoons Lost in (aeteria Thousands of spoons are being taken from the University Food Service each year, according to B. W. Graham, director. "Although we only lose a few dishes and sugar dispensers, the Cafeteria, Hub, and Campus 'Llub report spoons missing by the thousands each fall." Graham said. The only reason Graham could I give for the loss of spoons rather than other articles was that stu dents used the spoons when drinking coffee in their rooms. Graham said the most unusual example of vandalism of Wood Service property was observed 'when a student seated at a "afet eria table with a girl bent nine knives. amnent which is now in progress on campus. Certificates will be given for the top three persons in each Twelve fraternity and sorority groups andj two independent teams event and the total points of each have been slated for competition team will determine the winner It What young people are doing at General Electric Young specialist in community relations makes friends in 101 plant cities k General Electric now has 131 plants in cities, and one problem is common to 101 all: How can the company show people in every community that it is a good neighbor? This responsibility is shared by many and stimulated by 32-year-old John T. McCarty. His job: Consultant. Program Services in Plant Community Relations. McCarty's work is varied, exciting McCarty's assignment is to help each of the General Electric plants tell its neighbors what it is doing, what it hopes to do, and how it fits into the community. He must be ready to travel to 26 states. He prepares community-relations manuals for use in all 101plant cities. He supervises surveys of community sentiment, and tests the local effects of the company's advertising. And he helps plant management maintain friendly contacts with civic. religious, educational and other community leaders. 23,000 college graduates at General Electric This is a sensitive and important job. McCarty was readied for it in a careful stepby-step program of development. Like McCarty, each of the 23.000 college-graduate fdaa v-0 OvIeto" sow W White Stag controls the crfrnate with Excdusive With Us Sems 20' cook-r inide these pretty play clothes! For White Stag did dhia new collection In cooking. slimming Iced Poplin, with woven-in lustre, built-in practicelity, heaven-sent, washable oolors. See our complete new line. MeinlirnegJacket i. t -vr tooled seiming and nickel tront fasullees $6 99 h~~mmnig hideasww jiuppers oand adustable walstband. $4,95 From our new C8OCtIOe 18 E. University Ave. I I ~. & T m 0

PAGE 6

Page 6-Florida Alligator, Friday February 25, 1955 Rhubarb State Grid Contest Has Its Problems, Schedules Reveal By BOB LYNCH Alligator Sports Editor ATHLETIC DIRECTOR BOB WOODRUFF must feel like a clay pigeon in a shooting gallery after the happenings of the past two months, and, as the saying goes, "he isn't out of the woods yet:" It all started when state bigwigs got the bright Idea that Florida and FSU should stop playing tag and get down to brass tacks on the football field. Now this had been hassled over many times previously, but when the State Board of Control began to wonder how it would be spending Saturday afternoons from 1958 to infinity, that made the two schools sit up and take notice. Several people have asked us why Florida and FSU can't get together in 1956, since this season's schedule is already inade up. If you'll remember, one of Woodruff's conditions for such a game was that it must be played at Florida Field on the third Saturday in September. Rice Institute, a team which signed a four-year con tract with the Gators in '53, has a temporary lapse of a year because of schedule difficulties this season, but the Owls will be here in '56, and Florida concludes the agreement in Houston in '57. Both games are on the above mentioned third Saturday. SCHEDULES SHOW WOODRUFF'S RIGHT IF YOU TOOK THE TROUBLE to notice Florida's Southeastern Conference schedules for '56 and '57, which we printed two weeks ago, you will see that there are four open dates on each Sept. 22. Oct. 13, Nov. 17 and Nov. 24 in 1956, and Sept. 21, Oct. 12, Nov. 16 and Nov. 23 in '57. Rice will occupy the September dates, and assuming that Florida and Miami continue their rivalry, the latter November days will be taken with the UM-UF meetings. In 1956, Florka plays Kentucky here on Oct. 6 and LSU here on the 20th. It hardly seems reasonable that Florida Field would have three straight home games, and it does seem reasonably certain that when the Gator-Semninole blood-letting takes place, It will be on that soil. Another problem which occurs is whether the Gators will resume relations with Tennessee in '56. If so, then the game will be in Knoxville on the 17th, thus eliminating all of the dates for that year. One detail which might crop up is the Jacksonville two-game plan which gives the Gator Bowl the Georgia game and another Florida tilt. If that set-up continues, then you can definitely ebminate any hopes of a meeting between the schools before 1958. A FLY IN THE OINTMENT BUT THERE'S ONE CATCH. And this may make a Woodruff critic speculate as to the Tennesseean's whereabouts when his contract runs out in 1956. The 1957 schedule has only two definite home games-Georgia Tech, here on Sept. 28, and LSU, here on Oct. 26. Woodruff's policy has always been to 'give the Florida Fied fans the best in football. With this docket, it appears that something has i The Gators defeated Vandy. 5223. and lost to Miami. 33-51 Du:ganne and Florida's 300 yd. med. ley relay team produced the >nil\ double wins for the host squad.' Florida will defend its SEC crown beginning Thursday night in -Nashville when the 1500 meter freestyle event will open the nith annual conference meet. The Gators will be seeking their taird straight championship. Freshmen Conclude Season in Orlando, Sanford This Week tg s rThree road games this week to give somewhere. --close out the 'schedule for Coacn Either the Jacksonville pact must be cancelled to give a rnusimum Jim McCachren's freshman five, of four home contests, or if it continues, then the game will be played possessing a 14-2 record. on Oct. 12 in that city, and who plays here on Nov. 12? Your Tonight the frosh play Pinecastle guess is as good as ours. Air Force Base in Orlando, and ledtha hedoen't tomorrow night, the Orlando Air The Florida mentor has repeatedly stated that he doesn't Force Base quintet will play host feel two -rivalries-Miami and FSU-could be carried on in the to the Baby Gators. same season. Therein lies another factor-the Mriam contractI could be cancelled to make way for the Tallahassee Terrors, On Wednesday the yearlings but that would mean giving up a healthy cut of an Orange Bowl travel to Sanford to close their season against Sanford Naval Air gate every two years. Station. It all boils down to this. The Board of Control will have a FlorKen Seymour and Ron Stokley, ida-FSU football game come hell or high water. But the ,%ay things members of the squad, may not look now, they won't get one unless someone-either Jacksorr-:ille or make the trip this weekend due North Florida fans and students-gets burned in the process. The to football practice. Stokley, a odd situation stems from the Tennessee. angle. If the Vols don't restarting forward, probably will be new relations, then the third weekend in November is open for bids. replaced by Rufus Holloway. with either from another SEC team or FSU. With only six league games rr Henderson at the other forslated for '56 and '57, the Gators probably will add another; result,w the Seminoles here on Sept. 20, 1958. That could be changed, but if Wayne Williams will open at cenit's earlier we repeal., someone gets bui'ned.ter and Charlie Pike and Joe Hobbs will start at guards. Scoring through Monaay: POWELL LEFT OFF "SMALL AMERICA" FIVE MAYER FG FT TP Jerry Henderson 91 43 22iP THERE HAS BEEN SO MUCH PUBLICITY on Florida's fine guard, Sonny Powell, in the last few weeks, we figure a little more icing on the cake won't hurt matters any. In fact, we'd like to show you who beat out Powell i5-10) on the United Press "Small America" team, composed of players not exceeding the 5-10 mark. Admittedly, Chet Forte of Columbia, with a 23.7 aver-ige in 17 games to go with a 5-9 statur4, deserves to be on the team, but there the similarity ceases. Others on the team are Bill Ridley, Illinois (5-9, 16.6 for 16), Dennis Blind, Purdue 1540, 15 for 18', Pachin Vicens, Kansas State (5-9. 10.8 for 17), and Joe Helms, Georgia Tech (5-9, 14.6 for 22). For the record, Po%%ell has tallied 1,069 points over his four. year career; he has scored 314 this 'season, his second straight over the 300-mark; he is as good on defense, If not better, than on offense (if you doubt this, ask Auburn's Bill Kirkpatrick, Tulane's Hal Cervini or Kentucky's Bill Eans), and. most iimportant of' all. he has a 16.5 average through 19 games, a better mark than three of the top five men. We're going out on a limb when we say this, but Powell just may show up Mr. Helms Monday night in Atlanta. That should make a few "small men" authorities eat crow. 'BAMA ON SEC HOT SEAT IT'S SHOWDOWN TIME in the Southeastern Conference basketball rac-e with only two more weekends of action remaining. All eyes will be watching Coach Johnny Dee's talented Alabama club when it invades Knoxvillefto meet Tennessee tomorrow and moves to Lexington for a do-or-die engagement with Adolph Riipps Kentuckians Monday night. If 'Bama gets by the Vols, then it 4hld he primed for Kentucky. This one could go either way, but the Tide looked mighty impressive here on Feb. 14: another outbi-rst such as that one would be enough to down the 'Cats. 1 ISTREITS SV4A Ro-muAmChen Joe Hobbs Charlie Pike Ron Stokley Dick Hoban Wayne Williams Leo Saunders Alton SheffieLd Bernie Parrish Ken Seymour Rufus Holloway Gordon Achilles Don Bennett Bob Veriander 90 32 67 33 54 38 43 13 52 14 41 13 36 13 23 16 23 15 27 7 215 7 3 6 1 0 576 OPPONENTS 339 212 167 146 129 118 95 85 62 61 61 5"d 12 2 280 1432 288 966 I sA Swimmers Seek Second Victory Against Georgia By BILL JOHNSON Gator Sports Writer Florida's swimming team winds up its dual meet season toli"ht when it meets the Universit. of Georgia in Athens. The Gators swam against Georgia Tech in Atlanta last night. Also making the trip is the f4lorida freshman squad. which i'ated meets with first year teams from both Tech and Georgia. Earlier in the season. Florida Defeated Georgia here. 47-37. The Gators finished aheal of both Georgia Tech and the B~ulldogs in the recent Southern litercolegiate Meet at AtlantaCoat-h Jack Ryan planners to take sprinteTs Don Read. ndy Sears, Phil Hacker and Bob cisher. breast strokers Joe Schaefer and John Ridout; backstr-*ers George Duganne and Dick Caro, distance swimmer Tom Blake and diver Craig White. Freshmen slated to go on the trip were Al Carpenter, Jim Warmington, Don Musse I m a n Dou_, Creighton, Bill Morrison, Bob Wolfe, Ray Lott, Bill Wenz and Charles Richter. Coach Ryan appeared pleased with the showings of Schaefer and Duganne in the Vanderbilt and Miami meets last week. Duganne, conference titleholder in the 100 and 200 yd. backstroke events, set a new Florida pootrecord in the 200 yd. i-ace against 'Miami with a time of 2 :25 3. HIRES, HUTCHERSON LEAD TEAM Gator Netters Open Home Schedule in Three Weeks Tennis Coach Bill Potter welcomed back six returning lettermen to the Florida net squad recently asi practice began for a 19-meet schedule opening Mar. 18 against, Georgia here. Co-captains John Hires. Coral Gables, and Bill Huienerson. cianes ville; Ed Kassatly. West Palm Beach; Augie LeCann. Miami; Frances Ingram, Clearwater and Joe Hey termenI Four strom, S Here Ma r. Mar. Mar. Mar. Mar. Mar. Mar. Apr. Apr. Apr. at Lak Apr. Apr. Apr. Apr. Apr. lanta May May May match play team than a toutnament team' Seven freshmen have reported to Potter to try out for the tirsi year squad. The Florida mentor expects to arrange six or seven matches for the Yearlings. Five Florida Track EMRICK, POWELL SEEK RECORDS Golf Squad E Sq. Florida Meets Vandy, Araeru lI 6W Meet Second round play in the George Washington Birthday Tournament begins this morning in Tallata-see with three University of Fln-da golfers seeking to repeat their 1954 efforts. Last year, freshman Jim M, OtoY carded a 63-hole total of 241 to win the meet and ege tcaimiiates Doug Sanders (2461, who fmts'ied second and third plate i'ai Sch'wab A250i. These three Fl i ti'm pin v t, s. along with 7o'aaitl Ani.d 1t k ,th !Dave Ragan Art GPea a 1 a Came on, Frank Ca n, mid a i mani ATs i Jones l forTallahlassee when e at72 tiote tournancint stated tn The opening round wa1 tir nei) e voted to qutlityirg. witii ,te o-' 32 men being assigned to toe t-n pionship f11ght. '"The boys aie hittin the iall a lot better this \ear thali at a ti I e51)oniiiii Liiis111'1ti Coach Bracken crnicutett "I just hope thyi' .vai do as cl int i tournament.I Five members of the team 'were aVertagmig below par III prI -'iie rounds at the pal 71 (4aillusville CountriY Clihb corse wlien team left. Sanders headed the Swith a 6725 rating. bthivowed I' ( t. X" l k U .' ., 11 -ck Tampa. nead the letSars to Participate list. other men Carl Wic teve Marshall, Jerry GarIn C anel ilMeet -By MORTY LEFKOE is 1955 schedule: Gator Sports Writer 18 -Georgia here Five of Florida's topi track stars 19 -Auburn here leave tonight for Chapel Hill. C N.s1 21 -Davidson here where the annual Souithern Indoor 23 -Ohio State here Games will be held tomorrow. 25 -Georgia Tech here This meet, the first of the Year 26 -Jax Navy at Jackfor the Florida ( indernien, wiii Ub divided into Atlantic Coast Confer N 29 -Duke here ence and Non-Confereni e divisionsY 2 -Rollins here All -American Earl Poncher.% 9 -Miami at Miami SEC champion in the pole vault 11 -Florida Southern as well as the leading collegiate eland vaulter in the country at the pres 12 Centre College here ent time, is just one of the group's 16 -Stetson at Deland I top peitorniers. 25 -stetson here With a 1410'' leap in the recent 29 -Georgia at Athens New York Athleti (Club games. 30 -Georgia Tech at AtPoucher will be a heavy favorite in his event. 6 -Jax Navy here Other Gator tracknien making 10 -LS[ at Baton Rouge the trip are spiii e' nr wat11 -Tennessee at New son and OrleansEhers of t May 12-14SEC Tournament man tea at New Orleans sIer and cia and Bob George -are also on Stunner the varsity squad.it The Gator nezcers finished fourth I i 4i in the Southeastern Conterence shn 440 S nl finis Tournament behind Tulane, Louisithird in ana State and Vanderbilt. thirdi "I hate to make any predictions yet." Potter said, "We should do pretty well this year in the SEC. but we'll be a much better _m Everyone Meets at SAMIS LOUNGE University Ave. and 13th St. Treat Drive in Today I'hurdler Jim Snith. memthe '54 All-Arneri an rresnal. quater-miler Jim CroA Icani captain and mire Bill Adains. won the 220 vd. low hurdhe SEC last Year, Crosier and Adams the mile. wat-! shed second in the 100 and the 220 Yd. runs.I the list Schwah is751. Ragan 69 11 JonesO*ii ad ;I :k~ ,,I think we'll have a better 'o1r namentozI nelal phv tOIm ha n3 a rn al h playv teami'' ilac ken aid The noys are all consistent oltcrs, Earlier this ycai, Shu it' x un P th' 'al 1 i 'l 1111 I lint' Camp Invitationa; T'irntInf-, In Tampa and Ocala Ragan tinhed set (nd in the 0i ala event and Zandets was fourth. 1, i. t (j(''ii ( P I ' k inksmen finished thi I nIle southeasiern Cionfel en;e .!) 111 ment behind IoLIIsaIa i State d ni (;eorgia, and In a 1e wio haI vith North Texas State in he SouthIern Inter( llegialte ot '. Their season ecord was in im piessive 7-2, and. in mldii! on he Gator golfers Wi(n the lini, Ineicollciate Wt,, a tm m a second and fourth place in -eam competition, This season's schedule: Nla r. 12 -Rollin% here lar. 18 -David-ion here lar. '21 -Georgia here Mar. 22 -Georgia Tech here lar. 30 -Miami at Miami Alar. 31 -Apr. 2 -Florida Intercolltgiate Tournament in Mianml. Apr. 8 -Kentm-ky here Apr. 9 -Cieorgia ait Athens I WILL PANY( \-11 F'OR GOOD QUALITY SLIGHTLY USED LADII (R MEN'S CLOTHES' Jon Tymecthe -Tailor 1600 NV. 6th STREET Cor. NAV 6th 16th Ae tnmm m Surprising Engineers In Crucial Road TilIts By CHARLIE JEAN Gator Sports riter The Florida basketball Gators meet Vanderbilt at Nashville to. morrov night in the first of three Southeastern Conference games in rhe taoi 'xihih close out the current season. Florida will be hard-pressed to .hmng its conference record of i 'c wins and six defeats up to t-e hreaking Commodores. who ha-,'e 'Vi seven andi iropl-)ed five InI I, nf,,ell( e I a n'~lo In -II t s v,: -th~s season in 'I Ic t~roll; aned Albbra.*\%) o ,r slr n en r-.% s t'e 'i i in -yin .o ies Ni oer II i pi c by sophomore gnald Al Po(hel. a-u a ve a zin abut i7 piorOi'i game (te sta ''ers are11 \T'ettel 0'( I 'I:, f o! %k a ,d s G cit NorIdIa1Is anH 0 h h Thyni center Charle Harrison a 'N ( ATOR CENTER Lew Doss %%ill niath hiaskets with Vanderhi It's('ha rliit arrison tomorrow night in Nashville when the Gators meet the Commodores. Doss iurreitlyN is third in Florida %coring with a 13.5average In 19 games. The 6-7 center has 262 rebounds 'to his credit, In addilion to his 2.58 poin.1 St. Pelt product, and guards Ro. thelle andl Haby Taylor. Florida Coach John Mauer will ptohahl i-onter with Soiny PoW. eli and Bob Nims at guardis. Lew Poss Wciinter, and Boh En-Ick and either Ted Copeland or Burt vaththe forwad Polits. On NMonla y the Gators will rneet he t:Ist-ising Yellow Jzakets or gia Tech. A weak siste in p05' 'or! -amipaigns. the "in-iiee? sfai* tled the basketball wjrld (t11!en kh:s i tivice heating thle Nentuc kv Wildcats Their most recent outing was an 93-77 upset win over Tennessee for the Techmen. Florida snapped a four-game losing streak Saturday by beating Misissippi State, 77-66, and foil,)% ed if ii Monday with a 78-72 Icision txver Mississippi and red-hot Ilenn i Brackeen. The Rebel ace poured through :39 poiwis for a new Florida (GV.yk -eclipsing the old standard of it; points held jointly by Flora's Doss and Emrick. Powell and Mississippi Stale s Jimi Ashmore shared scoring qonors Sat .dav with 25 point.,a.nch. Against Ole Miss. Powell gain led the way with 29 markers -wid teamed with kmrick in a last tvilf rally to overcome a four-point Rebel lead for the win. Emnrick finished with 26 points. 20 of which came in the second half. The Ashland, KY. sophomore now needs only 22 points to break the one season standard set Ov Harry Hamilton four years ago. Hamilton scored 365, while Emiick has hit 344 with three games remaining. Powell, with his two good nights against the Maroons and Rebelr, placed himself in position to become the second highest scorer in the school's history. With 35 points n his final three contests, the senior guard could pass the runer-up. Hamilton, who aceuiu'ilated 1102 in four seasons. The Gators will play their final game next Friday in Athe n a against Georgia, a team they defeated here. 81-68, earlier in the season. ROYAL CLEANERS Cor. of 100 St. & N.W. 5th Ave. Phone 3131 1 DAY SERVICE AT NO EXTRA CHARGE In at 9. out at 5 CASH AND CARRY ONLY 5.~ 0 The beautiful Sel Air Sport Coupe with Body by Fishef For sheer fun out on the road, Chevrolet's stealing the thunder from the high-priced cars! Up to this year. maybe there were reasons for wanting 11 new 162-h.p. "Turbo-Fire V8" delivers? (For those who do, I80-h.p. is optional at extra cost in all V8 models.) Chevrolet also offers the two highest powered sixes in its field. Come in and see how the Motoramic Chevrolet is stealing the thunder from the high-priced cars! it I highway robbery!1 I I COACH AND CAPTAIN talk things over before leaving for a two-meet road trip earlier this week. Breast stroker Joe Schaefer, captain of the Gators, and Coach .lack Ryan discuss the strategy to use against Georgia when the tWo SEC po%%erhouses meet tonight in Athens. Schaefer will be swimming against the Bulldogs' NCAA record-holder, Hal Stolz, in the 200-yd. breast stroke race. I 00

PAGE 7

Florida Alligator, Friday, February 25, 1955-Page 7 Mural Sketches -i Murals Recruiting Workers; Officials Choose AII-Campus By HOWIE CRANE Intramural Editor "Sports for all and all for sports." We'll admit that sounds trite; but no words more adequately could SUm up the Intramurals program of the University of Florida. It is indeed a program of sports for all. It has facilities for both group and individual sports of every conceivable type and it is open to any student, be he Greek or independent. There are seven year-'round leagues, five for 'nien and two for women. .There is also an All-Campus, League, a Co-Recreational League, a "B" League, and a Faculty-Employee League. The five men's leagues are coordinated by Bill Wagner, Student Director of Intramurals. The other leagues are under the leadersblp of the Student Director of Recreation, Stanley Kantor. These are the two highest positions an undergraduate can reach in Intramurals and they are the goals of all the students working in the Intramurals Department. The next highest position in IntramuralE is Office Manager. This spot is currently held by Dick Turkel. It is Dick's duty to take care of the torrents of facts and figures that pour into the Intramurals office every day and his job is somewhat that or a statistician s. Directly beneath these are the directors of the individual recreation leagues. Below them are the Individual sport managers, thirteen In all. They work in connection with the fraternity, dormitory and independent leagues and are in charge of their particular sport only. All of the students mentioned above, plus the Publicity Director and Assistant Publicity Director, comprise the Intramurals Board. A position on the Intramurals Board is open to anyone who has accumulated 60 hours of work in the department. MURALS NEED WORKERS In such a large organization,it takes many students to keep the wheels of the machine turning. Right now, the Intramurals department is recruiting workers. The work is by no means hard and should prove very enjoyable to anyone who is interested in sports. Don't let that 60-hour work total frighten you. If you put in a mere five hours a week, you will have enough to be eligible for the Intramurals Board by ihe end of the semester. Edge Delta Chi In Tense Match To Snare Blue League Crown By STU BLUMBERG Gator Sports Writer Pi Kappa Phi became bowling champion Tuesday afternoon by beating Delta Chi in lighted by good shooting on both teams. In the first set of the finals,' both teams played on an even basis with the Delta Chis holding an 11 pin advantage at the set's! conclusion. The score was 694-683.j In the second set it was a different story as the Delta Chis couldn't make enough marks while the Pi Kaps were consistent on all their shots. The Delta Chis coula only pull a 677 second set total while the Pi Kaps had 789 to win the championship by a total ofk 96 pins.I of the Blue League a close match highNewman Club Wins Football Crown in Independent Action The Newman Club defeated Gamma Delta Lutheran this week to annex the Independent League touch football trophy. r~~~~~~h~~ rVad nov~acnnv1nv Leading the victors was Dick I Newman griciaUUs pariayea Hill who had a two game total of seven first downs and five touchf315 while the other four members downs into a 33-13 count. Though of the team had scores ranging making five first downs, the Gamfrom 286-290. For the losers, Al ma Deltas could score only twice. Recht had a total of 318 pins while By virtue of their victory. tne Bob Arpin had 289 pins to his creNewman Club moved into fifth dit. place. a notch behind their tootball victims, the Gamma Deltas. CoThe Pi Kaps, who had advancoperative Living Organization is ed through the tournament on Me still on top of the loop with a 663 arm of Hill, drew a first round total. The runner-up spot is nela bye and then beat Lambda t i by the Kadets with Georgia SeaAlpha in an upset, to move into the gle Hall rounding out the top tree. semi-finals against the Blue LeaThe next sport on the Indepengue leader. Beta Theta Pi. dent docket is table tennis. slated Hill, with a two game total ot to begin Monday. 278, and John Abbot with 300 pins -were the determining factors as the Pi Kaps beat the Betas by 61 pins. SEC Standings Ronnie Erbs with a 293 total an' Bob Wiggens with 289 were the W L PCT. high scorers for the losers. KentuCk' 9 2 .818 Alabama 9 2 .818 Delta Chi had advanced into the quarter-finals on a bye and met AEPi to determine the fourth' semi-final berth. In a fine exhibition of bowling,' Tennessee Ttilane Vanderbilt Auburn (ia. Tech 7 7 7 6 4 5 6 The most common duty is refereeing. This takes nothing more Bob Arpin with a 351 two-game Florida5 6 than a passing knowledge of the sport you will officiate plus a willtotal and Tom Maroldy with 321 Georgia 5 6 ingness to learn the rules. As an added incentive, referees of il1 bastotals pins. led the Delta Chis to a MississIppi4 ? ketball and touch football contests are paid $1.50 per game. 9irce few smashing victory. Joel Aberbach Louisiana St. 2 9 g&m3s last more than an hour, these wages are not to be sneezed at. had a 253 total to lead the ANPi Mississij)pi St. 0 11 INDEPENDENT ALL-CAMPUS SELECTIONS scorers. SCHEDULE The Delta Chis met the 4ebes in, With Independent League touch football coming to a close this the semi-finals and with Arpin and week, the officials decided to put their heads together and select an InMaroldy again setting the pace. Tomorrow: Alabama at dependent All-Campus touch football team. After much squabbling and theyod aai soseting tietpay. see: Auburn at Kentucky; some very difficult decisions, these are the choices they came up with. t y scored a resounding victoryI at Vanderbilt;Georgia at Maroldy had a 301 total and Agpint t at END.Areble Vie?rs-Cooperadive Living Organization END ....Bruce Thompson-Kadosf CENTER .Ed McDonough-Ganmna Delta Lntheran WINGBACK ....Charlie Coo-Oamma Delta Lutheran wis close behind with 295 pins. Ira Cohen of ZBT had the highest number of pins In the match, a 342 total. BASKETBALL'S FOR BRUISERS WINGBACK .Demny Varady-Neymnan Club Basketball is sometimes called a "no-contact' sport. where the HALFBACK ...Riehaid Dtxo.--Gamma Delta Letheran exact opposite is encouraged in PASSING BACK .Archie is~"-AR-.-Starfootball. Yet, the University of FloridaI's two best known fullbacks in recent years-Rick Casares '53, As is the rase in any all-star selection, many fine players must and Mal Hammack ''54) -have be left soff, but the selectors sincerely believe that the choices they been members of the Gators' hasmade are the fairest possible. ketball teams. IUCKY DOODLE.S!WEWVGOT lEMu IN aw WHAT!S THIS? For solution see paragraph below. IT'S EASY TO' SEE that the Droodle above is titled: 7rsd anthropologist relaxing with better-tasting Lucky behind freshly dug-up fossil. No bones about it, Luckies taste better to all sorts of people. College smokers, for instance, prefer Luckies to all other brands, according to the latest, greatest coast-to-coastest college survey. Again, the No. 1 reason for Luckies' wide lead: Luckies taste better. They taste better, first of all, because Lucky Strike means fini tobacco. Then, that tobacco is toasted to taste better. "It'sToasted"the famous Lucky Strike process-tone up Luckies' light, good-tasting tobacco to make it taste even better. .cleaned fresher, smoother. So, enjoy the better tasting cigarette .Lucky Strike. REAR VIEW OF TINY RABBIT MUNCHING ON ENORMOUS CARROT J. Leighton Crutcher University o Louisville SALD MAN BEHIND FENCE AT SUNRISE Dave Fairbanks IfLmW Beach State College .636 .65 .583 .545 .500 .455 .453 .364 .182 .000 Tennesllorida Georgia qt I-t.T' uecn Nlsspp !,ae aL_-u Mississippi at Tulane. Monday: Alabama at Kentucky; Auburn at Tennessee; Florida at G:'eor'gia Tech; Georgia at Vanderbilt: Mississippi at LSU: Mississippi State at Tulane. RESULTS (Monday) Alabama 71; LSU 51 Florida 78; Mississippi 72 FSU 102; Miss. St. 86 (;a. Tech 83: Tennessee 77 Kentucky 77; Vanderbilt 59 Tulane 90; Auburn 79. NATIVES ON SAFARI CARRYING SUPPLIES ACROSS DEEP RIVER Martin S. Kahn University of Pennsylvania I rECK befer C I G A R V T T IE S STUDENTS! EARN $250 Lucky yse So send ery are yOU we dony noodle with for !Dal broo41te in Y kyour odeP-. oesrigne title to Lucky DrOOd. Bx 67. New York 46 F"' rightgt i5 by Rorerprice A0K-TARD .D A -H "IORUSE IN SICYWRtINS Aname o jc Gymnasts Perform Tonight (Continued from page ONE) last event by the women's teai. before intermission. Following the intermission, the men's team is scheduled for new synchronized calisthenics. appara tus gymnastics, individual free standing exercises, and lightning speed tumbling. Team ball composition by Uli women's team is slated for their last event to be followed by higr table vaulting by the men, ending the program. Tickets will be available at the door. but advance sales are being handled at Florida Pharmacy and the office of Director of Intramurals in the Cym. Children uncler school age will be admitted fret' while adult tickets are one dollar Student price is 50 cents. Spectators will he assUiredr 0 seats. program officials annouinited. becaused a limited number of tickets will be sold. "When these ar'c sold, there will be no more," tney said. Take Two 01 With the tightest Orange Leaviue race in many a year now in progress, basketball. second of the four major sports. moved into 'he intramtural spotlight Tuesday !.ening. W ith it' verand finish on the long end of a 12 point total. coming Pi Kappa Alpha 37-29. [igh 1426-1412 total. Sparking the fiveKappa Alpha, although outscorman for the Pike cause was -)ick some was Neil Chonin with games ed l11.5n the final quarter. dropnAllen with 18 points. of 190 and 174. ci in a pair o foul shots in Delta Tau Delta tipped its reI Kappa Sigma held a scant seven the waning seconds of the game cord to 2-0 as it outscored Aloha pin advantage over the Pi Lams to edge Pi I ambda Phi 27-24 Tan Omega 46-21. Ron Gonsalez in the first game and then exendMajor factor in the contest seem(DTD swished the cords for 15 ed their lead to 20 pins to -lose el to be the iKpa Alpha accura. % markers. Pi Lambda Phi. led by out the match 1455-1435. Bob Mitat the foul line. The KAs scored Dick Turkel and Auguf LeCann, chell rolled 170 and 141 to pace on4eve 1 free thrs while defeated Sigma Chi 32-26. the Kappa Sig attack. Pi Lambda Phi rranaged only one point in it attempts. Dick Allen. 13 points. speaheadel the Kappa Alpha (jumlent %while Dick Turkel. 11 points, paced the Pi Lar team. In the closet garle the tourney! has seen to ha Tau Oniega. The Pikes, behind 16-13 at the end of the third chapter. outscored ATO 8-3 in the final six minutes to insure the vci >ry. Frank Bunnell led the winners with Six points High man of the game was Ollie 'or'nnhl t AT .who scored 11 points. SAE evened itb record at 1-1 as it recorded a 36-29 win over rau Epsilon Phi. Jim Trezevant paced the winners with 11 points. Kappa Sigma registered its first Betas, PKP, CP, AGR, Win In Blue League Basketball Beta Theta Pr. Pi Kappa Phi, the second bracket with two vieChi Phi. arid Alpha Gamma Kno tories in a row over Sigma I'hi stamped themselves as the teanis Epsilon, 41-36. and Phi Gamma to beat as basketball opened up Delta, 29-23, in a close match. Tuesday night. In the first game both teams In the first bracket AGH w('on matched each other basket for basits first two games from Zeta ket in the first half but pulled 4eta Tau in a runaway, 39-15, and away in the third period and were then beat Delta Chi 26-14 in a close never headed Tom Kuhn was the game. In their tirst game the top scorer for the winning team AGRs scored 22 points in the with 10 points while Lution Hill opening quarter and were never scored 12 points for the losers. headed from then on. The Phi Gams also overe beaten High scorer for' the winners was by AEPi, 44-24, and were never in Clyde Brannon with 15 points contention. Alan Kornbluh led the while Ronny Cohen paced the losers with nine points, more than half his team's total. Brannon also led his team in its victory against the Delta Chi's. victors with Arnold was Phi Gams. In their se lost to SPE, Delta Chi had won its first game high scorer Tuesday night against Theta Chi, Mel Biberfel 29-21. with Harry Black scoring 11 losers. Points. In the thir Theta C.hi went down to defeAt involved in tI for the second time in a row. so far as it against Blue League leader Beta pha, 27-25, ai Theta Pi. 14-15. Sam Gappett was Sfgma Phi, high for the Beta's with 11 points contest Lam whileCary Blackwell scored seven points behind points in a losing cause. led even in Pi Kappa Phi took the lead in regular time. 17 points while JacK high scorer for the cond game the AEPis 39-25, with Lution Hill for the winners and iled top man for tMe rd bracket Chi Pi was he only overtime game beat Lambda Chi Alnd then defeated Delta 28-14. In the opening mbda Chi was two d at' halftime but pulthe last minute of ThisisTOPS! SMALL SHRIMP FRY seI'ed with slaw, hushpuppies an(d French fries.45c FISH AND CHIPS served with slaw, hushpuppies and French fries .35c St A WV -rI 0 P TEPs, P1 Kaps Capture Bowl'ing Championships Dells, Kappa AlphaPhiDella Theta DDE. 4 .~ I I A MA < 4

PAGE 8

Page 8-Florida Alligator Friday, February 25, 1955 Committee of 61 Posions Open Although many students applied for positions on the Committee of '67 last week, Bob Singletary, chairman of the committee -avs there are still positions open for qualified students. Qualifications for posts on the committee are -, proven interest in the Unwersity and a wide range of knowledge of the University. Deadline for applications will be March 3. Application blanks can be found in the student go"ernment office on the third floor of the Florida Union. The office is open Monday thru Friday fain 1 to 5 p.m. Final selections will be made in two weeks and those chosen on the committee will be notified by mall. Weekiwachee Tour Sunday A jungle cruise and underwater show will be the main attractions of the Weekiwachee Springs outing Sunday, sponsored by the Florida Union Social Board. Busses for the trip will leave from the front of Florida Union at 9 a.m. Sunday and will return around 6 p.m. Tickets for the outing can be obtained in 'Room 107, Florida Union for $3.00. This amount includes transportation, the jungle cruise, and the underwater show. TI)e deadline for signing up is 4:30 tomorrow afternoon. Alligator Staff Appoints Florida Alligator staff appointments or this semester were announced this week by Editor-inChief Art Smith. New appointments are: Alan Schiff. city editor; Becky Greer, news editor;I Doug Buck, assistant news editor; Mary Ann Green, assistant features editor; Dan Hackel, assistant state editor; and Ray Lifchez, cartoonist. U U EXCELLENT ROOMS near campus $17.50 per month 1119 SAW. 4th AVE CONSTRUCTION on the J. Hills Miller Health Center has been resumed with work being pushed to complete the Medical Sc-ences Building in time for a scheduled opening of the school in September of 1956. Shown here Inspecting progress to date are several Health Center officials, consultants and architects. Shown (left to right) are: Robert Bainbridge, architect with the Ellerbee Architectural Firm, consultants, Dr. James W. Culbertson, prof ,ssor of internal medicine, Iowa State University-, a %isitor on the campus, Dean George T. Harrell of the College of Medicine, Dr. Samuel P. Martin, Duke University faculty member sreving as a consultant for the Center, and Guy Fulton, architect for the Board of Control. Dr. Martin, a specialist in Infectuous diseases and a member of the Duke University Hospital Building Committee, is currently serving as a consultant on the design of the outpatient department. BAD CHECK $PLURCE ENDS WITHOUT CHARGES LeGette To Head Honor Court Evaluation Group By RICHARD WEINERT except that it should be finished off," Frye said, "and it seems Gator Staff Writer sometime this semester, more studen-s are giving warnGene Legette was appointed this Two new justices took their ings when they see cheating." week to head the honor system places on the Honor Court this Frye reported that the bad evaluation committee. Legette, aI journalism junior and former feature editor of the Alligator, was appointed by Bill Frye, Honor Court chancenor, to fill tife vacancy caused by the graduation of Millard Roberts. Preliminary work on the survey to determine the value of the honor system has been completed and the questionaires are ready. No definite date has been set for the distributing of the questionaires or the completion of the survey, Now Open. MARY LEE'S BEAUTY SALON OVER FLORIDA BOOK STORE See Our Coiffure Artists for Your New-Season Cut. RAZOR CUTS SPECIALTY .$1.50 PHONE 2-2010 Hancock Typewriter Exchange Typewriter Repairs Sales and Rentals 431 NORTH MAIN STREET PHONE 5551 I / LEMON BLACK ,AJNTAN AQUA NAVY BEIGE HELIO I Iv week. John Yocum, an engineering junior, was appointed to the sophomore class vacancy by the executie council and Gord o nI Hardman, a senior in bacteriology, was named to fill the arts and sciences position. One case of cheating in the C-521 final was reported last week bring-I ing the total for last semester'sI finals to six cases. "Reports of cheating to the Honor Court have definitely fallen I LCoed I checks that have been reported are being made good at a rapid rate and that there are at the present time no violations before the court. In answer to many questions he has received from students, Frye said that only guilty decrees are posted on the boards around campus. He said that these decrees must be posted according to the constitution and there are many not guilty decrees that are never posted. Corner By LORRAINE HAYES to fit any occasion is the sheath Exciting! New! Cotton dress sets dress in your favorite pastel. are now being shown at LIBBY E's GEIGER's is introducing their H spring line by emphasizing Carle ere ou illfin anolie geenOriginal formals, Appliqued leasiand blouse set with dainty yes accented by rhinestones and white trim on the smartly styled pearls give a very femine touch pockets and collar. The skirt, tuckto one of aqua silk organza. For ed at the waist with soft pleats, the Sigma Chi or Sig Ep weekis accented with small mother-ofend choose a ballerina length tor-i pearl buttons that are used on te mal of rose and pink. The skirt button-down Bodice. Incidentially, will attact attention with its many this lovely summer cotton wad derows of ruffles. Soft layers of signed by Beacon Hill. Also at dark rose tulle add an extra Libbye's. you will find a wide touch to the st-apless bodice. selection of summer cotton blouses RUDDY'S is featuring cotton in various styles and pastels. dresses inprints and solids from For fraternity weekends, you'll $8.95 to $12.95. One of particular want to be seen in a spring interest had a low swoop neckline, dress from FANKEL'S. There's accented by a button -up bodice. a style to flatter your figure in tne The flowered material is complinew princess fashion complete with mented by the white trimmed sleea fitted jacket. V-necklines, sellves and neck. Its low waistline covered buttons, and crinolines are and bell skirt will be fashion right added features. These cool sumthis season. Be sure to stop in mer cottons are fashioned in Ruddy's to see their complete line orange and avovado Another style i of dresses and accessories. 0 50 million times a day at home, at u or on the wa) There's, I 4 work y I nothing like a ,.I V -1. PURE AND WHOLESOME. Nature's own flavors. 2. BRIGHT, EVER-FRESH SPARKLE. distinctive taste. 3. REFRESHES 60 QUICKLY with as few calories as balfin average, juicy grapefruit. By WALLY STERLING Gator Staff Writer The University Concert Band will present its annual formal concert in the University Auditorium 'Iuesday night at 8:15. The prograrn will begin with compositions y Bach, Mendelissohn, Rimsky-Korsakov and Rossini. The progra m will being with "Prelude and Fugue in F Mini',r," by Bach. This prelude and fugue is from "Eight Little Preludes and Fugues' for the organ and the transcription is by Robert M->ehlmann. Still Giving Exchange L The Student Boo undergoing spring tions. Students who with the Exchange neither received picked up their b to do so as soon Books may be pi Book Exchange off Florida Union from Monday, Tuesday, Thursday is t claim books which posited with the E 'remaining after th sold and the proc placed in Studen funds. The "Tsar's Bride." an overture by Rimskv-Korsakov will he rne of the features selections on he program. An opera by tleime name was produced in 1K. jThe arrangement that thp hand wijid play is by A. A. Harding Dlr;tor Emeritus of the Univers!*,y of liinois Bands. Louis Stainaker will he the s-ixophone soloist in the hanid's rend,. tion of "Conceto tor Saxopnre." Opus 26' by Paul Creston. (r!ton is one of Amerri a s mustauimn composers of serious muswc. The transcrotion was mad t h-c Ft Y Howland. Stalnaker 1. a tsenmw in Arts and Sciences and iis nrcsented many solos during his four years at the umiversi-y Polka and Fugue r o m efo er Schwanda i the Bagpiper hv eftovers 1' 0 k Exchange is fine musical selections on the irncleaning operagram. The well-known Czech coinhave left books poser of this popular coMnponn and who have now resides in St Peteisburg. The payment n o r transcription is by Cliffc Bainu:n. books are urged former director of the Northwkestas possible ern University Bands. kicked up at the Three band members wiil be fea:ice, Room 303. tured in the band's presentation of 1 :30 to 5 -m. Haskell's Rascals." A drum trio and Thursday. composed of Andrew Preston, Tom he deadline to Ritzi and Ed Barrow will play have been dePaul Yoder's percussive rhvIns xchange. Books in this fast moving. rhythm iece at date wiil be Harr is a percussion tea her and 'eeds wil! be author of percussion instruction t Government books. The program will be con( uded TELEPHONE 3516 cI c S Opticians REGISTERED OPTICIANS LENSES DUPLICATED QUICK REPAIRS 22 W. University Ave. Going on a trip? 4 with "Chorale and Alleluia." by Hanson. The "Chorale and Alleluia was just recently completed and is Hanson s first work for svnphonic band It was given it.remiere at the American Bandmas.ters Associvion Convention at Wes!, Point last Febriiay. Other nunmbes aont rne pro ga ri mclude Duke Elihr.ton s -Warm Valley. enn (OSset S '' R 0 ce Sor Band' and ''An Anier.can Sa. lu'e b .Morr'on o( i ah se on 'When Johnnv c'mes Marching Director of the Conrce:t Ba:Rn (l Hi rold Bathniin Reid Poole is the Assistant Director. ARTIFICIAL EYES Prescriptions Filled Promptly GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA Need a place to sleep? 0 ..../ w 0 WESTERN UNION AGENCY Gainesville, Fla. Tel. 3261 -Ext. 422 -'. .CH STER IEL. ~iy CH ESTE RFI ELD Today (oncert Band Program Tuesday BUS STATION LUN(HEONETTE 24 HOUR SERVICE Sandwiches Short Orders Complete Fountain Service Complete Line of Magazines 0 Breakfast Served Anytime FAST COURTEOUS SERVICE New and Modern (New Address) 516 SW 4th AVENUE PHONE 6561 Use,,WESTERN UNION Hotel Reservation Service! Next.time you have to travel-let Western Union find you a place to sleep. It's so easy. A call to Western Union's .Hotel Reservation Service. Then the .facts: where you're bound, how long and howmuch you want to pay. That's all. Western Union makes and confirins your reservation immediately. Get the full story on this handy service. Just call your Western Union office. ad SMWESTERN 0 r UNION CAMPUS -FLORIDA UNION Corner Buckman & Union Dr. I I I I New Scholarship Open to Engineers Siz S500 skfnolarships wvill be available III September to seniors in -heical engineering who wil take a one-vear course in protec.rve an. ddecorative coatog n And who h Ie the reqnred 2 average" in thir upper division 'urse. The scholarships. whi h are to ie pi in t\',u i0 m'allmnens of ;S pei semnestet are provided by 'he het;n Paint and Va msn Proiwon Club. Anln'ato nsa: due on or he. e Aprnd15 Dr. W. H. Benier, hool of the Departnient of cn-nii ,at engineering announced. ---------I I I I I I I x ---,x x: 7N