Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

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Full Text
HOL. 29

|AnE/e
jloThc Presenl
By David A. Donslow
Hell WKEK
Following up last weeks prom- j
He. the Eye makes another stab
H hell week, that rat-beating tra
Htion which is gradually disap-
Haring but which needs to be
Hoved out completely, and at
Hce, so that even this year's crop
freshmen will think of it as a i
King of the past. i
Clifford Beasley, president of
He Inter-fraternity conference, ]
Hys the conference is taking ac-
H>n on the problem already, urg-
Hg all local chapters to do away
Hth hazing.
Speaking for himself he said,
Hfery definitely Im against any
Hing that permits beating fresh freshlen.
len. freshlen. And he added that all the
H-ge fraternities are getting
Hray from using the paddle. Na-
H>nal officers are insisting that
He chapters do away' with it, sub-
Htuting work around -the house,
the lawns, and similar con
Hmctive activities.
Htde.nt sentiment
Hcieve Hedrick answered, Hell
Htek? Never heard of it. Wo
had it in our fraternity >
for several years. Natu:-
John P. Cox thinks hell week
Hs its place if used with modera-
H>n. He feels that it provides j
of the iniation necessary to
Hre the freshman the feeling j
Hat he really "belongs, which
is haul to give in return
nothing but Urn payment of
Hmey.
Cardenas says. 1 don't
how people can get
|Hy pleasure out of other people's
displeasure. Os course an
Hntsing practical joke is good
Hough sport, but to actually in ina
a ina man you plan to call
it doesn't make sense.'!
them work, don't haze
m.
Leonard, editor of The Al- ;
H lol- shows his opinion by
editorial support to the
conference cam-
Hgn to get rid of hell week.
after talking to a few ]>eo-
The Eye feels quite op op
Florida will become known
the university where hazing is
practiced IN ANY FORM.
OKISTOIIE TICKETS
McGuire once asked. Why
W U 8t cafeteria' meal tickets, in
bookstore, which is also man-
b y the University? When
for Improvement pre-
the question to Business
K. H. Graham, Ire rc rc-1
-1 rc-1 to this effect:
The bookstore is a soda
not a lunchroom.
It cannot provide for the
w'bfr who might want to take
anitage of such a plan.
3) The cafeteria must have*
H ar S e volume of business if it
to operate to the student's ad aditage.
itage. aditage.
H 4 A college man cannot sub ;
on hamburgers aqd fruit sal sal
sal which The Eye says:
All right, quit, running a
H hro< m in the Bookstore, A j
H l fountain hs what we re look
H for
' 11 the Bookstore were
a soda fountain, the pres
H 1 u n c hro oin paraphernalia |
be taken out to make room j
soda fountain equip-
B U a,ul consequently it could i
tJle the increased patronage,
following paragraph two,
Cafeteria wouldnt suffer any
of trade if the Bookstore
not run in competition with
* But there are times when
t even a college mam has
work:; later than seven oclock,
a hamburger ariu iruit salad
taste mighty good. And i
are places where a man ]
H maintain a ticket that will
him to buy a hamburger |
fH fruit salad after seven oclock
cash outlay at the mom- j
Hf course, if the University
want our money. .
1
. H

The Florida Alliqafor
FOR A GREATER FLORIDA

YMCA Conference
Meets Here Today
And Tomorrow
\
Students From Rollins, Southern, FSCW
And University Hear Current Problems
Opening last night with an address by L. F. Chapman of the
State Prison at Raiford on "The Crime Situation in Florida. the
I second annual student conference sponsored by Florida YMCA and
; the Tallahassee YWCA is meeting here today and tomorrow.
' Purpose of the conference is to

give students an opportunity to i
discuss, under capable leadership,
problems of personal, state, na national,
tional, national, and international nature. \
The University is host today to
approximately 50 students repre representing
senting representing Rollips, Southern, Florida
State College for Women and the
University of Florida.
Dr. A. J. Kissling ,of the River Riverside
side Riverside Presbyterian church, Jack
sonvLlle, will open the meetmg
this morning with an address on
"Personal Spiritual Growth.
Held in Florida Union, each meet
ing will take up some problem
pertinent to today's younger gen generation.
eration. generation. Lawrence Smith, presi president
dent president of Florida YMCA, announced i
that all students on the campus
are invited to attend. The con conference
ference conference will close officially at
noon tomorrow.
Complete program for today
and tomorrow follows:
SATURDAY
9:30 a. m." Personal Spiritual
Growth, by Dr. Kissling.
' *10:15 a. m. "European Condi- 1
lions and Relationships: How
They Affect Us. by Dr. Manning
Dauer, Un i v ersity Political
Science department,
j 2:15 p. m. "Personal Spiritual
Growth," by Dr. Kissling.
3:00 p. m. "America Looks*
Toward -China and Japan: The
Present Conflict, by Prof. Buell
Trowbridge, professor of Religion
at Rollins.
7:30 p. m. Business meeting,
"The Oxford Conference, Oxford,
Ohio. Dec. 27-31. j
7:45 p. m. "Personal Spiritual
Growth," by Rev. Hamilton West,
Pastor Episcopal church, Gaines Gainesville.
ville. Gainesville.
8:15 p. m. "Internal Conflict:
What is Labor Trying To Do?"
by Prof. Angus Laird, Univers Universi
i Universi *ty Political Science department.
SUNDAY
930 a. m. The Students Re
J sponsibility, by Prof. Trowbridge,
i and summary of v the conference.
10:45 a. m. "Personal Spiritual;
j Growth," by Rev. West, followed,
by adjournment.
Cabin In Pines Latest
Work Os Foresters
Building a cabin in which
every act in the construction is
performed by its members is the
latest undertaking of the Fores Forestry
try Forestry club. They cut down the
trees, haul them to the saw mill,
convert them into lumber and
then use the lumber in the build buildi
i buildi ing of the cabin. The trees are ob obtained
tained obtained from the Austin Cary Me Memorial
morial Memorial forest, which is owned by i
|
the University of Florida. The ;
partially built cabin is located in j
the forest on the south shore of
Lake Mize, 13 miles northeast of
Gainesville.
At a meeting of the Forestry
club Tuesday it was decided to
work on the cabin more today.
There will 'be two shifts carrying
on the work, one from 8 until
noon and one from 1 until dark darkness.
ness. darkness.
Only F eu) Jax Game j
Tickets Remain
Tickets to the Florida-
Georgia gr id game to be play played
ed played in Jacksonville November
6 are selling fast, according
to the Athletic Department.
All $2.25 tickets have been
purchased, thereby filling up
seats from the 15-yard line to
the center on both ends of
-f the south side of the stadium.
Only a few $2.50 tickets are
left on that side, and there
remain only a few $2.50 tick tickets
ets tickets for the north side student
section.
All students wishing date
tickets are urged to get them
from the athletic office im-
mediately.

General Reunion
At Homecoming
New Feature J
New Type Meeting To
Replace Former
College Event
There will be no college re reunions
unions reunions during this years Home Homecoming,
coming, Homecoming, it was j decided at a re recent
cent recent meeting of the Blue Key
representatives, deans of the vari various
ous various colleges and the Faculty
Alumni committee.
This major change from past
years was announced after plans
had beep completed for a joint
meeting of all alumni, this part
of the celebration to be a feature
of the program this year.
The new general reunion will
be held in front of the Florida
Union building. According to those
in charge, a more democratic re reunion
union reunion can be realized by this
plan, the old type reunions re re,
, re, striding the affairs to individual
colleges; |
This feature of Homecoming;
will be of interest on Friday and \
Saturday, whereas in the past i
only Saturday morning was ai- j
loted to the affair.
i 1
U. ofF. Symphony
To Appear Soon
The first of a series of Sunday
; afternoon pop concerts to be giv given
en given soon in the University audi auditorium
torium auditorium by the University of Flor Florida
ida Florida Symphony Orchestra will of ofi
i ofi ficially open the season for that
, organization.
Music to be presented in these
concerts will be both semi-classi semi-classi
semi-classi cal and popular. Orchestra offi officers
cers officers urge students to submit re requests
quests requests for selections to any or orchestra
chestra orchestra member. Effort is being
made by Director R. DeWitt
Brown and the orchestra to make
thp new series popular with the
entire student body.
In addition to the pop concerts,
three formal evening concerts are
planned which will feature more
advanced compositions.
A series of road engagements I
beginning Dec. 12 will take or orchestra
chestra orchestra members to many of Flor Floridas
idas Floridas leading cities including Day Day!
! Day! tona Beach. Ft. Petersburg, St.
1 Augustine, Tallahassee and Sara Sarasota.
sota. Sarasota.
Prof. Brown issued invitations
this week to all campus musici musicians,
ans, musicians, especially players of string
instruments, to play with the or orchetra.
chetra. orchetra. Rehearsals are held Mon Monday
day Monday and Thursday night at 7
oclock ifi the auditorium.
Cheerleaders Plan
Rally Thursday
Another pep rally is plan planned
ned planned by cheerleaders for Thurs Thursday
day Thursday at 4:30 in front of the
new gym to cheer the fight fighting
ing fighting Gators on as they leave
to invade hostile College
Park, Maryland, for a game
with the University of Mary Marylands
lands Marylands Terrapins.
Downed by the Gators in a
thrilling 7-6 victory during
last Homecoming, the Mary Maryland
land Maryland hoys are out for blood
and the team needs all the
backing the student body can
give them.
Everyone who can be there
is urged to attend the rally
and prove to the team that
last weeks big sendoff w-as
voluntary even though stu students
dents students were in military ranks.

GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA. SATURDAY, OCTOBER 23, 1937.

Florida Review
Well Received
By Students ;
j .. T r j
. Large Supply Exhausted
After One Days
I Distribution
The Fall issue of the Florida
Review made its appearance on
the campus Wednesday morning,
and almost at once the supply of
copies was exhausted, so popular
; did the magazine prove with the
student body.
Exactly 3,000 copies of the Re Review
view Review were printed by the Rose
Printing Company, in Tallahas Tallahassee.
see. Tallahassee. The circulation staff supposed
this figure quite adequate, since
only a liLle more than 2,700 stu students
dents students are supposed to receive
j copies. Last year 3,200 copies cf
tne Review were printed for each
I issue, and each time after the de demand
mand demand was apparently completely
satisfied, a surplus of from 300
to 400 copie were left. This year,
with 3,000 coies, the Review staff
expected to lie well able to satisfy
j the campus demand.
Editor Bill McGuire stated that
the rapid exhaustion of the sup supply
ply supply of magazines was probably
due to the efficient system of dis distribution
tribution distribution worked out by Circula Circulation
tion Circulation Manager John Cox and his
staff. Last years surplus, Mc-
Guire was able to say after review reviewing
ing reviewing the situation, was prabably
due to faulty circulation. And this
year with nearly perfect distribu distribution,
tion, distribution, jmore copies were required
j than was expected.
Printing costs made it impos impossible
sible impossible to publish more copies of the
Review, said Business Manager
George Byrnes. So the demand for
j more Reviews must remain un unsatisfied.
satisfied. unsatisfied. When the Winter issue
appears in the midle of December,
1 enough copies will be printed to
.Cover the demand completely,-
Byrnes announced.
The contents of the Fall issue
| attracted the attention and praise
of many. Os special interest !was a
! double page feature dedicated to
the memory of Dean B. A. Tolbert, I
j whose death occurred during the j
past summer: a handsome photo photo!
! photo! graph of the Dean, and a sincere
poem written by Carl Opp.
The articles in the current Re-
i view are devoted to serious sub subjects
jects subjects -censorship of the college
; press, and the Sino-Japanese sit situation.
uation. situation. Evelyn Fisher, editor of
the FSCW Flambeau, is guest
contributor with a clever sketch,
They Also Laugh.
Following out an editorial plea
for regionalism, this type of writ writing
ing writing is represented by a story by
Editor McGuire, and a poem,
Gin House Lake, by Stetson :
Kennedy. Poetry and a story by |
Edwin Weissinger; an exciting
tale of war in Russia by Harry i
Edwards: vy.se by Clarence
j Hyrne, Tom Leonard, W: K.!
Fielding; literary sketches by
"Bjorn Bjornson and George
Bell, both pseudonyms round j
out the Fall issue. I

__ > --i - : j
Army Joins Civilians To See Team
Leave For Mississippi State
One ot the bifiest pep rallies in the history of the University
tqok place Thursday afternoon as authorities allow-ed military stu- i
dents to march down town and see the team off. It was estimated
that approximately 2,000 students were present as the train pulled I
away, carrying the team tej Mississippi where they meet Mississippi

State today.
The event was arranged by
Frank S. Wright, head of the
Universitys publicity department,
iwho secured permission of mili
j tary officials to put the affair
| over in a big way.
After forming in regular bat-
, tery formation, the squads march- i
ed to the train from the drill
field, with the band preceding
| them down town. The complete
column, constituting more than
1600 students dressed in uniform,
I was spread over approximately j
10 blocks of the street as it made
jits way to the A.C.L. depot,
The regular starting time of
the train was. held up for a few
minutes in order that the stu students
dents students might all be present and
in a few minutes the train was
i completely surrounded by boys in I
khaki uniforms.
. With the band playing, the
cheerleaders in action and the
crowd singing the Orange and
Blue, it was easily apparent that
the students are really behind the
team. After the crowd had sung j
the "March of the Fighting Gat- j

||Hh
Jm 3SV/
' Motto!
Jf
MAJOR POWELL
Major Gad amt Powell, director
of Radio Station WRUF, is chair chairman
man chairman of the Blue Key radio com committee
mittee committee and a member of the Blue >
Key Faculty Advisory committee, j
WRUF Completes
Three Publicity
Recordings
Transcriptions Feature
Homecoming Plans;
Six Scheduled
Publicity for Florida's 1937..
Homecoming from a new angle
took form Monday night when
15-minute electrical transerip- j
lions were made in the studios
of WRUF, preparatory for .distri .distribution
bution .distribution to radio stations through throughout
out throughout the state. Plans were an announced
nounced announced Major Garland Pow Powell.
ell. Powell. chairman of Blue Keys radio
committee, for making of six
popular program transcriptions j
which it was announced would be j
used in outlining the entire pro program
gram program for Homecoming festivities
this year.
Floridians I'lay
Three of the scheduled six
transcriptions were completed
' last Monday night with different j
arrangements and new speakers
on each transcription. Music for
| the recordings is being furnished j
| by Rabbit Robbins and his Flor- :
luians, Dell Gibbs having made j
special arrangements of Florida
j and Georgia Tech songs which
have added a great deal to the theentertainment
entertainment theentertainment value of the rec
ords. i
Included on each transcription l
is one five minute talk, these j
ueing delivered by Dr. Tigert, i
Josh Cody, Seldon Waldo, Ben
Krentzman, George Smathers, and
by special arrangement one talk |
by Coah Alexander of Georgia
Tech. Opening and closing
themes are rendered by a group j
j from the University of Florida
i Glee Club, with George Walsh, j
: popular WRUF sports announcer
i sevnng as master of ceremonies j
; on each transcription.
Start November First
The distribution of these trans- I
eriptions as outlined by Major j
j'
' Continued on Page Two

| ors and given the familiar three j
Fs, the train began to move along j
Main street. The strains of Flor- j
j idas fighting song, with the in- J
I terspersed cheers "Get em, Gat-1
I ors, and "Hold 'Miss down, j
were the last things the team i
heard as it began its trip.
At a scheduled send-off, slated
to begin at 3:45 at the athletic j
field, only a few students and
the band were gathered. As the
team came off the field, Coach
Josh Cody and the players re
ceived loud cheers from the as- j
sembled students. Stopping by
the sound car, Cody spoke briefly,
saying, "We have a hard game |
Saturday, especially as it is Mis-,,
sissippis Homecoming. But we
promise well give you the best
wtTfve got, and we apprecfite i
your turning out like this, Justj
as the gathering was about to
break up, Wright stepped to the j
car and announced that permis-
sion had been granted for mili-j
Continued on Page Two

Attack Fatal To
Green, Member
History Dept.
Had Been On Faculty
Here Since 1931;
Taught 30 Years
"
A. S. Green, assistant professor
in the department of history and
political science, succumbed yes yesterday
terday yesterday at 11:30 a. m. to a fatal
heart attack after a brief illness.
He was 50 years old. Having been
a teacher in public schools
| throughout the state for the past
| 30 years, Green had many friends
among the citizens of the state
; and students whom he has taught.
Born June 2, 1887, at Shady
Grove near Perry, Fla., he re received
ceived received his secondary education in
Taylor County and taught there
j for a number of years. He receiv receivj
j receivj ed his bachelor of arts in educa education
tion education from the University of Flor Flor
Flor ida in 1928. He was an instructor
during the summer sessions of
1928, '29 and 3l here.
Green received his master's de degree
gree degree in political science in 1931.
Since then he has been a member
of the faculty here with the ex exception
ception exception of one year, when he did
graduate work at the University
i of Illinois.
He was a member of Phi Kappa
Phi and Kappa Delta Pi. He
taught in Taylor county schools
and was formerly principal of
Lake Alfred high school. He had
also taught and acted as principal
!of several other schools in the
state.
Green is survived by his wife,
Mrs. Eleanor Kuhlman Green, four
sisters, Miss Eva Green of Perry,
Mrs. John Austin of Cortez,
Miss Lydia Green of Ellenton,
Mrs. Kate Pearson of Ft. Myers
! and one brother, Fillmore Green
i of Perry.
Funeral arrangements are in
| cAarge of Thomas Funeral Home,
afrid services will.be held tomor tomorrow
row tomorrow afternoon at three.
Boardman Orders
All New Photos,
Climaxing three weeks of con controversial
troversial controversial discussion about taking
new pictures throughout for the
1937-38 Seminole, Editor Boardman
; this week gave Allans Studio the
signal tb go ahead with the new
photographs.
Two weeks ago, when Boardman
took the matter to the Board of
Publications for their decision,
they shunted the responsibility on onto
to onto the students by asking for a
vote on the matter. They said
| that their answer would be decided
by the majority of student votes.
Only 126 students bothered to
1 vote. Os these, 72 voted against
the change. Because of the little
interest shown, the Board of Pub Publications
lications Publications did not exercise its ad advisory
visory advisory capacity in the matter.
This left the matter up to Board Boardman.
man. Boardman.
Boardman said that since only
three per cent of the student body
showed sufficient interest to come
out and -vote, he felt that he was
justified in carrying through his
plan for new pictures.
Although certain elements are
trying to organize the fraternities
;to oppose the new pictures, the
fraternities are responding favor favorably.
ably. favorably. Boardman told the ALLI ALLIGATOR
GATOR ALLIGATOR last night.
The studio is taking new pic pictures
tures pictures daily of the fraternity men
in their scheduled order, while op opponents
ponents opponents of the change threaten to
bring an injunction suit through
the Honor Court on the grounds
that Boardman must act in ac accordance
cordance accordance with the student vote.
Murphree To Present
All-Vierne Program
For his Sunday afternoon organ
recital to be given at 4 oclock, in
| the University auditorium, Claude
Murphree, University organist,
announces a special all-Vierne
program.
Louis Vierne, organist at famed
Notre Dame Cathedral, Paris, for
many years until his death last
June, has supplied the organ
world with some of its outstand outstanding
ing outstanding compositions, distinguished
both for graceful melody and rich
harmony. Tomorrows program
will include excerpts from Viernes
first and second organ sym symphonies,
phonies, symphonies, also from the 24 Pieces
Jin Free Style. All students are
, invited to attend.

Full Credit Is Given
Four Engineering
Courses Here
Tigert And Weil Announce Decision Os
Council That Investigated Last Year
President John J. Tigert and Dean Joseph Weil of the College
of Engineering, announced thus week that the Engineering College
has had four of its five curricula accredited by the Engineering
Council for Professional Development, national accrediting agency
for engineering' colleges. The lour departments that have been ac accredited
credited accredited are the Civil. Electrical, Mechanical and Industrial.

Poucher Elected
FFA Collegiate
Chapter Head
National Leader Was
Voted Outstanding
Ag Frosh In 36
Lester Poucher, recently elect- ]
' ed president of the sophomore j
class, was elected national presi presi*
* presi* dent of the collegiate chapter of |
r Future Farmers of America at the
annual convention of the organic |
L zation in Kansas City Thursday.
J Frank Williams;' state director of j
5 Smith-Hughes, a part? of the j
f states vocational agriculture set- j
1 up. wired Dean Beatys office of
1 the honor bestowed upon Poucher ]
; after the election, Thursday night, j
Poucher was voted the out- j
> standing college of agriculture ;
freshman in American colleges
and universities at last years
> | convention. He.comes from Largo,
Florida.
; Two Florida freshmen, Myron
1 C. Grenell and John R. Jones
were awarded Future Farmers of j
1 America degrees. The awards fol fol
fol lowed the contests and examina examinations
tions examinations held in conjunction with the
livestock show at the same time
, Poucher was elected to the presi presidency
dency presidency for the coming year.
Poucher left for Kansas City
more titan a week ago, immedi immediately
ately immediately after his election as presi president
dent president of his class. Poucher has
been outstanding in Floridas ag ag.
. ag. riculture clubs. He made the
r | deans list during his freshman
I year.
Camp Roosevelt Bill
Awaits Signature
Os President
The question of whether or not
1 Camp Roosevelt wvtuld perman perman|
| perman| ently close is still undecided, ac according
cording according to a statement made by j
' President Tigert yesterday. All
* officials and teachers are at a
loss for information concerning
' the situation.
After a lengthy meeting with
L. R. Alderman during his pro- j
longed stay in Gainesville, Dr. j
Tigert stated that there were no
new developments. He said that
the appropriation bill was now in
Washington waiting for Presi President
dent President Roosevelts approval.
Chemistry Frat Is
Willed Equipment
Willed valuable chemical equip equip.
. equip. ment by the late Dr. H. G. Shaw,
former professor at the Univer University
sity University of Florida, members of Gam Gami
i Gami ma Sigma Epsilon, honorary
- chemistry fraternity, met Mon Mon>
> Mon> day to dispose of their inheritance.
l The chemistry books were do- i
s nated to the chemistry library; the ( i
chemicals and laooratory appara apparatus
tus apparatus were given to the chemistry
stock room. Included in these
; chemicals were some rare Cerium 1
} compounds which were made by
' Dr. Shaw in research conducted
while on the campus.
Slow Motion
Personified i
i
; The Chi Phis who were at
the house when it caught on
l : fire a week ago Friday have
been laughing ever since at (
the way the negro house boy j
i told them about it.
It seems that the bell had I
I just rung for dinner when the
i : colored boy came out of the 1
i kitchen, ambled over to where
i the dining room manager was
standing and suggested that
, he call the fire department, i 1
>| as the whole rear end of the J
1 house was ablaze.

The ECPD is the official ac accrediting
crediting accrediting agency of engineering
curricula in the United States and
is the first engineering organiza organization
tion organization of its type. It is composed
of leading engineering organiza organiza|
| organiza| tions from all parts of the coun-
I try including the Society for the
i Promotion of Engineering Educa Educa|
| Educa| tion and the National Board of
j Engineering Examiners.
Importance
j The importance of their ap api
i api proval lies in the fact that a
; graduate of an accredited univers univers;
; univers; Ity is given credit for his work
j when he comes before a state
board of engineering examiners
j for his professional registration
Another benefit is that such
j schools are recognized by the
j Civil Service Commissioners,
j while-, a third advantage is that
|it assures prospective students
that they are to attend a first
class school.
The investigation committee
; visited the campus January 11
and 12 at which time the mem members
bers members inspected different phases of
I engineering and pre-engineering
i work. At that time they were
not authorized to say whether
or not Floridas curricula would
meet their standards but said
that they were favorably im impressed
pressed impressed with the relationship be beuween
uween beuween the General College and the
Engineering college.
Inis accrediting of the curri curricula
cula curricula is interpreted as a stamp of
approval of engineering authori authorities
ties authorities upon the new educational
methods employed by the Uni University
versity University of Florida.
The Library facilities, the
i Mathematics and English depart departj
j departj meats, together with every other
department available for pre-en pre-engineenng
gineenng pre-engineenng work was inspected
during the visit.
Affects University
Dean Wei! said that this marks
an important step in the history
of the. College of Engineering and
affects the University as a whole,
lie further stated that the com committee
mittee committee will frequently review the
; colleges and remove from the list
j ibose who do not maintain the
I proper standards. This means, he
explained, that with an ever
; changing subject such as engin-
I eering, laboratories must be kept
up to date and the instructional
| staff must keep informed of tech-
I meal progress.
Tht faculty of our college will
do everything they can so that
in the future we will not lose
the tribute which has been paid
us. Weil stated.
Lightnin Set Completed
The staging and scenery ar arrangements
rangements arrangements of the forthcoming
Florida Players production,
Lightnin, are near completion
and will be ready for the dress
rehearsal which is to be held early
next week. The cast which was
chosen last week will also be
ready for the dress rehearsal
and will be fully prepared for the
three performances to be given
on November 3,4, 5.
Student Notices
MANAGERSHIP OPEN
Persons desiring managerships
of the varsity sports; baseball,
track, tennis, swimming* please
make application to the student
athletic council, care of Miss Yon
at the athletic department.
Roy Echols, secretary,
Student Athletic Council.
SCOUTKKS
There will be a meeting of Al Alpha
pha Alpha Phi Omega in the Florida Un Union
ion Union at 7 oclock, on the third
floor. This is a very important
meeting and it is hoped that all
the regular members will be pres present.
ent. present. All visitors are welcomed as
usual.
Henry Howisou,
Secretary.

NO. 7.



PAGE TWO

Florida Universities Should Direct
Future Os Industry, Commerce
In State, Says Grassfield
General Manager of Florida Chamber of Commerce
Tells Delta Sigma Pi Industry Gaining In State
Ralph Gras-fleld, General Manager of the Moiiaa Chamber of
Commerce, stirred members of Delta Sigma Pi, international com commerce
merce commerce society, Monday night, with a prognostic speech on the
importance or coiitgea in u.icaiiig tne ikuun. ot .tiau:.ty ana com commerce,
merce, commerce, and the opportunities for Floiida man in the states vastly
underdeveloped industries.

r u.u,e mi ousmeso
and industry will be dependent on
scientific research to gude ano
direct it,* said Grassfield, and
this research can be provided for
only tm ough tne un.veiait.eo.
Merida mint lead with odier uni universities
versities universities in this new form ox e e---sea,._
--sea,._ e---sea,._ ior tne bctte.m.nt ox so social
cial social and eeonom-c c0..u.,
the Lmted States."
Says Vision Necessary
is not out 01 piace
in college scunoundiiig3. TiiDUgu
he has been working in the inter interest
est interest or me stare Oa ciO-.da w.
the lasi fifteen years, ne
foimerly a Professor of Journal Journalism
ism Journalism ar tne un.vv-isity oa
ana was instrumental m
a student un.on tneie. rtts
mary purpose m tne talk was ~0
call upon the younger generauuu
cf b lontia to develop itself into
leaders w.th vision and fmesignt,
aware of the potentialities of
Mot iua and striving to realize
them.
Vision, as well as knowledge,
will be a necessary attribute to
the future leaders .of tne state,
now in the universities and col colleges,
leges, colleges, said Grassfield. This
vision and foresight will be large largely
ly largely developed by the universities,
through academic work, and es especially
pecially especially through extia curricula
activities by which a student
makes use of his academic learn learning.
ing. learning. He goes to college to learn
three th,ng3: The amount of
knowledge in' existence; whefe to
find this knowledge: and how to
use it. When he leaves college
his relationship with the com community
munity community is changed: he will be
looked upo" es a leader and must
uec the knowledge and visual he
has gained in college as a basis
for his leadership.
Point* Out Opportunities
Grassfield emphasized the im importance
portance importance of Florida men making j
their life work in Florida, point pointing
ing pointing out many opportunities to be
found in the state today; social,
cultural, commercial, industrial:
a w.de field to cover every mans
.ocx. Lion. No other -state has
such a great variety; Florida is
tniiy thy cross roads of the Am Americas.
ericas. Americas.
Opportunities are springing up
in every field. Many think o*
Florida hb purely an agricultural
I"
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..mtc, but statu'uc- sum. Via: **:
collective income of agriculture
does not compare w.tu time ox
manufacture. Agncuicure p 1 t--
sents a Wide f.eld ior futu.e rlOt rlOtlda
lda rlOtlda leaders: xaxpans-Oti is al.-.oa al.-.oadnl.imted;
dnl.imted; al.-.oadnl.imted; wxtn omy f ( jt,Uv
times Ui land OUt 01 i, U
a;.'c(iiuauiOn, mid %.itn aie -*ghx
ciLuat.c and *,oa xonu.t.w^
ov Ct a jjai- ox it,
ia> toi.uans nave h-t.uiy otgu.i .<
utilize these resources. Florida
| cd.i ieeu tne na-mn,
'wo.do of the General munagm.
j lnuust.y too, ox-e,s its oppo*
tun.ties to the new geaeiauon.
At present, pap-r plan.s : iUun u
ranttmu city aie indnxiac,ui.n e
oOU tons of paper daily, tiy this
.me nt xt year new plants in
north Florida Will have me eased
the butput to 2,000 tons Bv.t
i still the industry will be in its
infancy and underdeveloped. The
sugar industry in the Lake Okee Okeei
i Okeei ehobee region exports t4,O00 ions
: of sugar yearly to Savannah to
be refined. Unfortunately the
total manufacture of sugar is re restricted
stricted restricted by the Federal goverh goverhttok
ttok goverhttok eepu p Mmodetaoidlnmyws
ment to k ee P u p trade relations.
State industry Gaining
A campaign has already been
started to remove these restric i
tions whereby the industry would
| expand enormously and 10,000
more men employed. Besides
those mentioned Florida has more
than 4 000 manufacturing plants
in every phase of industry, from
cigars to novelties. Moreover,
! the potentialities of some indus
| tries are hot fully understood.
Leather, he pointed out, is an
example of this. Our large amouht
of livestock, and the ease with
; which tannic acid can be extract extract|ed
|ed extract|ed from palmetto roots is espec especially
ially especially conducive to development
i along this line.
Mr. Grafesfield then touched on
; many other occupations, explain explaining
ing explaining their Condition today and
their potentialities in the future,
particularly the tourist industry.
He revealed its amazing advanee-
I mehl in recent years, and the,
keen competition that is begin begin|
| begin| ning to arise in other states.
Last year, twenty-two states ap appropriated
propriated appropriated any Where from $50,-
000 to $500,000 in an effort to
divert Florida tourist trade. It
is up to the new leaders not only
to advance but to protect Flor Floridas
idas Floridas interests in every field.
Other rising industries mention mentioned
ed mentioned were fishing, natural resources
(the second largest Fullers earth
mine in the world is located at
Quincy) and aeronautics. Ro
great is the field for development
in Florida, that not only can
all the graduates of our univers universities
ities universities be used, but citizens from
other states must be induced to
j help also.

t Ag Scholarship Plan
Discussed By Soars,
Roebuck Official
J. C. Haines, public rotations
representative of Sears, Roebuck
and Company of Atlanta, was the
p inci al speaker at a banquet
t honoring 23 of the 25 freshmen
1 i winners of agriculture scholar scholar-5
-5 scholar-5 lips, at the Primrose Grill re re
re j cently.
He announced that the 25 t>oys
! vould compete among themselves
for an aditional S2OO. The winner
of this would compete with win wins
s wins ners from sixteen other colleges
i for additional SSOO scholarship to
jbe used during the junior and
senior years.
These scholarships, it was said,
j are given under the condition
that the winners attend Agricul Agriculture
ture Agriculture College. They are based on
, scholarship, personality and all
j around achievement.
Among those present were:
Dean W. Newell of the Agricul-
I t.ure College, Dr. J. J. Tigert, Maj.
W. F. Floyd, Dean R. C. Beaty,
iR. W. Blalock and four other
I representatives of Sears, Roebuck
and Company.
! :
MILITARY STUDENTS
SEE GATORS OFF
Continued from Page One
tary students to march to the
train and show the team what
a real team sendoff is. As the
' team had already gone to the
gym to change to traveling
clothes, they missed this announc announcment,
ment, announcment, and thus the huge crowd
collected at the station was a
surprise to them.
I Dutchy Rtormes, head eheer eheeri
i eheeri leader, in commenting about the
i affairs stated that it was really
, gratifying to see so many stu stui
i stui debts present for the send-off.
i However, he continued, wo must
remember that for the most part
they had no alternative hut to
come. Would they have been
t present if it had been left up to
them to decide? That is what
[ we are concerned with. We will
see next week when the team
leaves to play Maryland. We cer certainly
tainly certainly hope every student is pres present
ent present for that.
L
l Delta Chi Elects, Officer*
With the resignation of John D.
Lewis as president, an i Meph'->
Spurr as Alumni secretary' nt
1 Delta Chi Fraternity ic-sday
the members elected tb new of of
of ficers. J. Mac Galbraith, Jr., was
elected president, and Robert
Erickson, Alumni secretary. Lyn
I Ccnlon was elected to the office
; of secretary vacated by Erickson.
WRUF COMPLETES
! THREE RECORDINGS
i 0
J Continued from Page One
. t
i I Powell will include the fifteen
rad,o stations over the state
i j ranging from Miami to Jacksoh Jacksoh>
> Jacksoh> I ville, and from Jacksonville to
Pensacola. The recordings will
appear in series arrangement the
1 first being broadcast Novembei
I x followed by tile rema.ning five
piogiams to be scheduled by the
individual stations up until tht.
lxomecoming activities on Novem November
ber November 10 and 20.
Major Powell stated that this
ls" the first'lime £pv
j Homecoming has undertaa-
en, and with the cooperation the various stations throughout
i the state more people would proo-
ably be reached through the medi medium
um medium of the recordings than would
be possible in any other way.
Hopkins Sees War
For United States
t Prof. A. A. Hopkins of the
speech department, speaking to
his lecture groups Monday startl startled
ed startled those present somewhat by
saying that the United States was
definitely headed for war. Ac According
cording According to Hopkins, the one bil billion
lion billion dollars spent for munitions
and armaments by the war de department
partment department in the last year is not
enough.
Security rests on intelligence intelligencet
t intelligencet not force. he said, but not
enough is being spent for war
preparation.. He stated that the
war of the future would be a war
to end wars.
| Prof. Hopkins pointed but that
the morality of nations has suf suffered
fered suffered a serious decline. Idealism
is repugnant to all nations at
| present. It has suffered a total
eclipse. he emphasized. As a re result
sult result the nations forget humani humanitarian
tarian humanitarian ideals.
The United States must be pre prepared
pared prepared for war. There is a greed
among a few national figuresa
greed for land, power, combined
with the lack of moral principles,
that is the primary cause of
war. he said.
1. Mr. Hopkins specifically men-

i a-0...1dA

Dauer Fears War
j To Be Result Os
Foreign Policy
i
Fourth Estats Speaker
Sees World Conflict
Intervention Result
| Maintaining that war is ihevit ihevitjable
jable ihevitjable and that the LTnited, States
! stands an excellent chance of get gett;ng
t;ng gett;ng into it, Dr. Manning J. Dauer
of the Political Science department
Mondav, gave his interpretation of
world conflicts to the Fourth Es Estate
tate Estate club at its initial banquet of
the year.
j Dr. Dauer, In explaiivng hs
stand, drew from his observations
in Europe during the past summer
and from the actions of States in relation to its foreign
policy as he sees it. Hd era sed
the neutrality, act and regretted
that the American foreign policy
is now abandoning it.
-* The present conflicts, hr? f-aid.
have gone too far to permit peaee peaeefu
fu peaeefu countries to do more than
adopt a policy of comniete non nonit:
it: nonit: tef vent I 'on. Anv Ster>3 to slop
(the Chino-Japanese undeclared war
:at this stage will lead on! c toward
drawing the intervening cdufitEv
; closer to the conflict, ho main maintained
tained maintained
! the policy of f ke ril riled
ed riled States, i the speaker illustrated
how it has been completely re re!versed
!versed re!versed since the recent outbreak
of hostilities. There has been a
great change in our foreign policy
in the last two weeks, Dr. Daur
said, and it is not generally un understood
derstood understood as yet.
I have a!wavs agreed with our
making an effort to curli
sive action which might load to
war. he said, But new it is
too late for that. The only way
we can keep out of the disputes
that are constantly nrismg is to
maintain a policy of minding our
own affairs and staving out of the
|way of trouble. This is contrary
,to + he nrbsent attitude of the
'United States.
If Ja.pani accents an invitation
to participate in the coming peace peace:
: peace: promotion convention, he declared,
she will proboblv walk out and re refuse
fuse refuse to cooperate in anv way. For
other countries to try to force her
then, would only lead to more
trouble and world hostilities. If
the United; states has a part in
( this, she will he in danger of being
i drawn in. Dr Dauer stated.
In his ohmion, this is exactly
what the United States is heading
for toda v.
Prof. E. U ajrtd Instructor
John Paul Jones of Che Journalism
fi. >a*'tm tlv Fourth; Estate Club success
and offering their services if
needed.
; l-i-i -'t -a
i
tioned munitions peoples as Insti Instigators
gators Instigators of war. However, he stress stressed
ed stressed the fact that dictators are
i arising. It is the thirst of these
men that cause naions to build
* large armies ami navies for their
I own protection.'
America has a false sense of
securitypeople do nothing .to
i prevent wars, Professor Hopkins
affirmed. To get rid of war
you've got to change human na nature,
ture, nature, he advised in his conclud concluding
ing concluding statement,
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Florida Theatre Block

PrfrMediCOS Hear
Dean Wilson
Members of Alpha Epsilon
belt a, pre-medical fraternity,
leard Deart W. H. Wilson talk on 1
he medical profession at their j
rst meeting this year Monday
Pat Watson spoke on the require-
ments of the fraternity.
Dick Rodgers and Chester Cas |
sell were awarded certificates of!
honor as outstanding pre-mediea'
"tudents. This award is maile
each year to students who nave
i scholastic averare and show
. e os medica' stude"ts.
Tentative plans of the group for j
the coming year include trips to
Chattahoochee and Alabama.
"dtion pictures on chld exami
*\"orr and pediatrics were shown ;
roeet'ng.
k __ : _L |
OPEN HOUSE* DISCONTINUED j
Director Matthew's announced J
that the opbn house programs
would be discontinued for the rest j
of this semester due to a chemis- j
try clrss being held in the annex |
of Florida Union. He intimated
that the programs would begin
again after the first of the year, j

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Sigma Delta Chi :
Pledges Seven
Seven journalism stucen:s were
i formally pledged by Sigma Delta |
: Chi, professional fraternity, at a
| regular meeting Tuesday night in
j lor da Union.
j Men pledged are Theodore Fin Fin!
! Fin! geiv Frederick Harford. George
! Marsh, Robert Smith, Kenneth
Horton, George Rood, and Levie
Vause, Jr. Initiation will take
Mace approximately one month
ftey kate of pledging.
With preliminary plans made
at this meeting, members and
j Pledges met at a special meeting
Thursday night to complete plans
for the fraternitys proposed trip
! to Talahassee to publish the Daily |
Democrat of that city. Roy.Benja Roy.Benja!
! Roy.Benja! nTn p esdent of the organization j
! a d annoucement would be made
next week of the staff for the
ec : al edition.
Also at the; Tuesday meeting
members discussed the possibility
of making a trip to Cuba during
the Christmas holidays. Sigma
t Delta Chi made such a trip sev several
eral several years ago and published one
issue cf the English edition of a
Cuban paper.

j Alumnus Addresses
\ Alpha Kappa Psi
At a special smoker given Tues-
I ay evening in Florida Union,
: Alpha Kappa Psi. professional
business fraternity, heard an en
ertaining talk by Ed Fue.se.
alumnus from the mother chapter j
it New York University. Fuesr
! old of the work of his chapter.
Joe Moran and Dav.d liprns
wo brothers from Emory Univer University
sity University who are now In the Law Col
ege here, were also present
Moran also spoke about his chap chapter
ter chapter of the fraternity.
W. W. Arnold, president of the
hapter, announced his resigna resigna'
' resigna' tion from office. A meeting to
; Meet a new president will be held
Tuesday, Oct. 26, in Florida
| Union.
Dean Matherly Speaks
To Lambda Chi Alpha
Walter J. Matherly, dean of the
College of Business Administra-
I tion, spoke to members and i
pledges of Lambda Chi Alpha
| Wednesday on the Purposes of a j
University Educ at i o n.> Dean j

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| Songs Att
I AWi Weli, So Far
Climax of the Learn the Schf/
Songr," program sponsored'fjy ti
j Glee club came Tuesday
( noon when a group of first-y*
| tudents sang several sciioq!
j over WRUF's University
Professor Deruyn, director of n,
..ee club, urges all new men j
ome out to all future publw n
hearsals. ,||
j The purpose of the program;
| o interest new men in Ftor: ;
i and to teach them
| words so that they can
he cheerleaders at footbi:
games.
Members of the Glee club.
j completely satisfied with the It
1 turnout, urged freshmen to ceg
out ih greater numbers sos ft
! next program.
I *
Matherly pointed out four dista
i purposes or aims of a college erf:
cation, namely; (1) prepatatii
for vocational adjustment; t;
i preparation for home and fam*
! life; <3i preparation for our civ
or social t lifc, and; (4) deveto
j men! of a personal philosophy.



TOM LEONARD *... EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
&BMAND BONN£TTE MANAGING EDITOB
. T- e '. k,y Published Bv the Students
oi ST.SO I^r V Year. f Klorlda a Subscription

wSeminole Pictures To Be
MJniform This Year
We commend the action of Editor
Igoardman of the Seminole in having
ew pictures taken throughout for the
Itnnual this year. After comparing a
9>anel of the new pictures with some of
Bast years panels, the improvement com comipells
ipells comipells us to uphold the decision of Board Boardnan.
nan. Boardnan.
I Naturally, the outlay of cash will
Bause some students who would other otherwise
wise otherwise use last years photographs to raise
howl of protest. But after looking over
he statistics of other years we see that
B great majority of the students have
Bictures taken each year, anyway. Not
Biany will suffer from the change. And
Bhe Seminole stands to gain.
I The new portraits are much more
Blear-cut and the background is uniform.
Bhese improvements are due to new
Bquipment. The background lighting is
Bniform and a mechanically controlled
Beveloping process makes the degree of
hade uniform throughout. Because of
Biese improvements the panels will bring
But the features of the subjects more
Bistinctly.
I Only about three per cent of the stu-
Bent body voted in the recent poll to
Betermine student opinion on the matter.
Bhis could hardly be considered as a
Representative vote. About three-fifths
Bf these were against the change. In
uch a small representation it could be
Bxpected that those against the change
could be in the majority, because the
Bhange necessitates planking down some
Boney.
I Since tF-* students reflected so little
Interest in the matter, it would seem that
hey are whiing to leave the decision
Bo the editor. We feel that Boardmari
Bcted in the best interests of the Sem Seminole
inole Seminole and, hence, for the good of the
Btudents in his final decision to make,
Bhe improved photographs uniform
hroughout.
\fazi Activities Constitute
mThreat To Internal Peace
I The German Nazi movement in Amer America
ica America is a rotten spot which spreads larger
Baily; and, while we see little possibility
Bf its general acceptance here, it bears
Bhe seeds of internal strife. We would
Bike to see it stamped out. It is totally
Bn-American in sentiment, whatever its
leaders might say to the contrary. They
lake their orders from Hitler and copy
Bis goose-stepping soldiers.
I There might be little harm in goose-
Itepping. There might be little harm
In playing German soldier. But. the
Buns they carry are jnot toys. Some of
Ihose arms M ere moved across j state
Borders contrary to Federal laM r
j This German-American Bund* goes
L little too far in its attempt to plant
Kerman customs in America. If those
fcermans want to live here they should
mccept our form of government. If they
B ant to change our form of government,
Ihey are going about it in an utterly
laetless manner.
We Americans M ould not expect Ger Gerinany
inany Gerinany to alloM' a group of our people to
let up military headquarters over there
Lnd try to indoctrinate Germans with
democratic principles. If any group
Iwere naive enough to try it, they M ould
doubtless meet with rude and peremp peremptory
tory peremptory opposition.
It goes againlst our grain to have
those German-phile troops goose-step goose-stepping
ping goose-stepping under the svastika on American
soil. We are a nation. But our nation
embodies peoples of various mother mothernationalities
nationalities mothernationalities and races. Our union, if it
is to mean anything, should bring these
carious peoples together, insofar as pos possible,
sible, possible, with common aims and common
culture. Naturally, as a nation M'hich
stands for freedom of opinion and of re religion,
ligion, religion, M*e do not interfere M'ith those
phases of culture.which do not material materially
ly materially affect or threaten the common wel welfare.
fare. welfare.
We believe that this German Bund
does constitute a definite threat to
American internal and international
peace. It should be squelched. Got
them get together and sing German
songs and play German games if thev
must. But when they start pledging al allegiance
legiance allegiance to Hitler and transporting arms
unlawfully, they go too far.

S? cond Class Matter at the PoStoffice.
ualqesTllle, Florida, under the Aet of Mafch 3, I 889!
Advertising rates. 40c per eoi u mn Inch. Discount
5 ,i y;*ct tor U'O column inches or more.
Other information furnished by JSarl flowers jusine^fl
Tf " n AMIO-lir

Is Hell Week Worth All The
Time And Danger Involved?
These same editoriah columns have
contained many exhortations in the in interest
terest interest of preserving our cherished tra tra;
; tra; ditions. Today we come not to praise a
tradition but to examine one and see
if it is Morth keeping alive.
Fraternity Hell Week seems to be the
most pertinacious tradition we have.
And while is seems very necessary
to keep lecturing to keep our other tra traditions
ditions traditions going, Hell Week has Mithstood
pressure from the individual national
chapters of our social fraternities and
the National Interfraternity Conference,
Mho seek to have it abolished. It still
flourishes here.
There are reasons for it. First, a sec second-year
ond-year second-year man thinks hes getting gypped
if he doesnt have a chance to perpetrate
the same misdeeds on pledges M'hich he
himself underwent. Second, the frater fraternities
nities fraternities actually vie Mith one another for
< the honor of inventing the most in--
genious sort of duties. Third, the misin misinformation
formation misinformation has got around that this sort
of activity brings publicity to the Uni University
versity University and to the individual fraternities.
Fourth, the Gay Nineties ideas of sport sporting,
ing, sporting, courageous, good-natured high highquality
quality highquality American youth, Mhooping it up
all in fun, is still in the air. But at the
end of Hell Week ask any near-dis near-dismembered
membered near-dismembered pledge how exhilirated he
feels after having his manhood tested.
Hell Week usually comes at a crucial
point of the year, upsetting the study
schedule of the initiates and the upper upperclassmen
classmen upperclassmen who engineer it. Professors
have a certain amount of patience, but
class-cuts and unprepared work during
Hell Week may be the last straw. And
the initiated brothers usually consider
initiation puppy-plaving more serious
than the most important of class assign assignments.
ments. assignments.
Some of the more sadistic practices of
Hell Week have disappeared, but occas occasionally
ionally occasionally a boy undergoes an experience
during the evening of make-a-man-out make-a-man-outta-vou
ta-vou make-a-man-outta-vou business that injures him ser seriously,
iously, seriously, or instils an attitude hard to get
over. There is nothing beneficial in a
triple-strength dose of epsom salts, no
matter hoM ludicrous a few of the situ situations
ations situations such treatment causes. Acute ap appendicitis,
pendicitis, appendicitis, for one example, might be
the outgrowth of this type of good
clean fun.
It is our hope that the University of
Florida wont M ait to abolish its frater fraternity
nity fraternity Hell Week until a serious accident
occurs bringing bad publicity to the col college,
lege, college, and much more unhappiness than
the sportsmanship-training of this
1890 practice is Morth. W. M.
Others Say
j
Students need courses in the most
fascinating subject in the world our ourselves,
selves, ourselves, in order to learn to cope with
individual problems.Los Angeles Col Collegian.
legian. Collegian.
It seems to us that we can best learn
about ourselves by studying others as
objectively as possible.
When students come to a co-ed in institution,
stitution, institution, homesickness is often forgot forgotten
ten forgotten because of the influence of neM ac acquaintances.Syracuse
quaintances.Syracuse acquaintances.Syracuse Daily Orange.
Have you noticed any decrease on
this campus since we have co-eds?
Maybe our one per cent doesnt count.
Because of the decrease of approxi approximately
mately approximately 30 per cent in N. Y. A. funds
this year we must rally to the cause of
help to our fellow students, believing
there is no greater need of the day than
aid to youth who strive for a higher
plane of living and usefulness.-Ala usefulness.-Alabamian.
bamian. usefulness.-Alabamian.
The National Student Federation of
America sounded the call to go to bat
for more student funds. The Alabamian
is one of mrfny student publications to
respond. We feel, however, that Roose Roosevelt
velt Roosevelt should spare N. Y. A. appropriations
along with other forms of relief. There
are still thousands of families who are
lacking the necessities of life. If they
are to be denied by Uncle! Sam we stu students
dents students certainly should take it standing

The Florida Alligator
EDITORIAL PAGE

> L 1 l< | ill,, ill. 11l- i 0 0 0 6 l
Executive Council For Jax Band
Trip; Old Bookstore System
October 21, 1937
The meeting was called to order by President Smathers. The
roll was called and the minutes of the last meeting were read and
approved. Budgets from the Debate club and Florida Players were

read and passed.
A committee of Adkins. Howi Howison,
son, Howison, and Shelley was appointed
to contact the Athletic Commit Committee
tee Committee and make an arrangement
to send the full band to Jack Jacksonville.
sonville. Jacksonville. There was no budget
for the Florida College Farmer,
so the requisition was withheld.
Gregory rej>orted that the tele telephone
phone telephone company had been Con Contacted
tacted Contacted relative to placing tele telephones
phones telephones in the dormitories. It
seems they are very expensive
and impractical but much need needed.
ed. needed. The committee is to meet
with Mr. Graham.
The key committee has not
placed a contract and the bids
ara still open. Opinion on the
B. A. Tolbert Memorial was even evenly
ly evenly divided, and President Smath Smathers
ers Smathers informed the council the loan
fund had been so named. Max
Baer presented a resolution in
behalf of the NY A in connection
with the reduction in the nation national
al national appropriation. Moved and
seconded to adopt the resolution.
It passed. Discussion relative to
requisition matters proved bene beneficial
ficial beneficial to the council.
Discussion concerning the Book
Store resulted in a motion to
have a committee consult Mr.
Graham in a spirit of cooperation
in an attempt to work out a suc succesful
cesful succesful working system to re-jes re-jestablish
tablish re-jestablish the former system cpn cpncerning
cerning cpncerning menus and prices in the
soda fountain, and to determine
most efficient management To
control it.
A letter containing the month monthly
ly monthly report of Florida Union from
Mr. Matthews was read. Greg Gregory
ory Gregory asked the position of the
council with regard to the situa situation
tion situation in the Seminole. President
Smathers explained the situation
and appointed a committee of
Gregory, Baber and Reams. The
following requisitions were
passed:
FLORIDA PLAYERS:
Max Factor's Studios, cosmet cosmetics,
ics, cosmetics, $7.25; Thomas Stein Com Company,
pany, Company, cosmetics, $1.05; Bennett
Drug Company, first aid kit,
$3.00; Longmans, Green and Com-

m
mgmjf
v 1
j ZwFs NOT aN 7-.. /
( *KORSEW\AKT )
i -| n | ; ll ll i in |
I.

23 iS^X<
j JIGKiERi" OF TO) iXg^F-^|
1 THE DECLARATION Ml %&#&*££ f
OF INDEPENDENCE ' /
WERE COLLEGE %-W-i w-V-V
** MEN 'I ? ,w "- y*>
YSea --gL v

. .. _L.. . I
pany, royalties, $5.00; H. P. con const
st const ans, i 6 plays, $12.03; Baird
Hardware Comp an y, supplies,
$6.89; Samuel French, royalty,
$110.00;; D. Appleton Century
..Company, royalty, $5.00; Studenl
Book Company. 6 plays, $5.13;
University Book Store, notebooks,
$.50; University of Florida, lights,
$2.40; \V. F. Duke and Company,
lumber, $11.05; Photographic
Laboratory, pictures, $10.00;
Cleon Throckmorton, Inc., tree treeti
ti treeti unk, $20.00; Capitol Stage
Lighting Company, supplies,
$19.66; Bel son Manufacturing
Company, glass lens, SI.OO.
DEBATE CLUB
Noble and Noble, Inc., books,
$4.50; Whitehouse Hotel, room
and meal, $9.35; Harry W. Bower,
salary and supplies, $26.20; A. A.
Hopkins, English debate, $85.00;
Florida Review, Arthur MeNeely,
car rental, $2.50; T. H. Crawford,
Jr., car rental, $2.00; National
Scholastic Press Association, an annual
nual annual dues, $4.00; George C.
Byrnes, travel expenses, $2.15.
ALLIGATOR:
Western Union Telegraph,
cable, .25; Anderson and Ander Anderson,
son, Anderson, pictures, $9.50.
FLORIDA UNION:
Duplicating Department, sta
tionery, $11.38; David Kantor, or orchestra,
chestra, orchestra, $16.00; Shaw Walker
Company, furnitu re, $556.87;
Stringfellow Supply Company,
supplies, $34.57; De Department,
partment, Department, janitor supplies, $17.34;
Bell and Howell Company, films,
$15.00; Chess Review, subscrip subscription,
tion, subscription, $3.00; R. W. Clarke Mfg. Co.,
supplies, $2.00; Brunswick-Balke-
Collender Coflipan y, supplies,
$23.52; W. F. Lockwood, paint painting,
ing, painting, $10.00; D. R. Matthews, to
replenish petty cash* fund, $48.91;
University of Florida, expenses,
$72.80; Baker and Taylor Com Company,
pany, Company, book, $2.35.
SPECIAL FUND:
Requisitions, $9.00; Delphin-
Arduengo, electro n expenses,
$46.95; Duplicating Department,
envelopes, $3.50.
John M. McCarty
Secretary Treasurer

k -ECKSTEIN
jj*,
BL HAS' JIGNED ALL BUT
k 16 OF THE- DIPLOMAS
M GRANTED BY CAST
HR vSCHOOL OF APPLIED
W 1 vTCIENCE AND BEEN
R 1 PRETENT AT FIFTY
CT I COMMENCEMENTS'/
r/
f (seeing his first
TEN MONTHS A S
ATHLETIC DIRECTOR
AT WISCONSIN,COACH
HARRY STUHLDREHER
TRAVELED 25.000
MILES' AND MADE 175
PUBLIC ADDRESSES /

/ W fiS X -D \' er&£\
{ IS Six SP6ECHES \ X X,
\ IN ONt tAY.' I *
" J
t **%*;
' b*

VOLUME 29; No. 1
Member 193*
dissociated Golte&*ate Press
MEMBER OF THE FLORIDA INTERCOLLEGIATE
PRESS ASSOCIATION.

World News In
The Nude
By Mitchell Gale
Uncensored glimpse* into the
intinuite side of current events
THE GRAPES SOUR GATE
Alf Landon, one-time candidate
for the presidency of these United
States (remember?), recently
rose from the potato fields of
Maine and New Hampshire to
offer at last two-bits worth in
the way of fraternal advice to
the incumbent chief of our land.
His claim against the President is
that the Constitution has been
disregarded as a means of gov governing
erning governing the people under Roose Roosevelt'S
velt'S Roosevelt'S administration, ami because
the Constitution has been put out
of the picture, Roosevelt has
made himself a dictatorthere dictatortherefore
fore dictatortherefore we have the problems that
the country has to face today.
Funny about that man Landon.
Funny, too, perhaps, about that
i4an Roosevelt. The out is
bellyaching because F. D. has dis discarded
carded discarded the Constitution, while the
in has spent a good bit of his
time trying to point out to the
people of this country that the
Constitution has been holding
back social legislation.
Landon claims that this strip striptease
tease striptease of the highest law of the
land has already taken place. And
the President is still claiming
that we should have a more lib liberal
eral liberal interpretation of the Consti Constitution.
tution. Constitution. i.
This much we can be sure of
that when the President over oversteps
steps oversteps the duties given him in that
same Constitution, the Congress
of the country will find it in its
power to impeach him. And if
Congress should not and the Pee
pul think it should, it will be
within THEIR right to vote into
office the kind of Congress they
desire."
Perhaps Alf is trying to stir
up revolution among his consti constituents
tuents constituents in the potato country and
how he did lay it on about those
17 million votes.
In short, the -Kansas gent is
accusing Roosevelt of ruining Uie
country by attempting to pass
legislation of a social nature. It
stems the Landon grapes have
turned sour a bit late. In fact,
theyre almost In a state of fer ferment.
ment. ferment. Down by the Winneger
Woiks.
HOME FIRES BURNING
Home news was big news this
weeks as a couple of world powers
(especially Great Britain) played
hide-and-go seek with the new U.
S. foreign policy in a filibuster
move to sidestep concrete action
until this abrupt reversal of po position
sition position among our domestic big bigwig's
wig's bigwig's (including Wall Street**)
could be do coded and dia diagrammed
grammed diagrammed for London's financiers
and capeetaiists.
* Fool note: LAUGH OF THE
WEEK Stop Foreign Meddling:
America Wants Peace drools
Wall Street Journal in the
Streets most eloquent message
since the days following 1913
when American finance started
raking up Teutonic atrocities.
STILL BURNING
News briefs from Sunny Flor Florida"
ida" Florida" would include a reference
this week to the state's increas
mg inability to cope with lynchers
and armed mobsters. Lakeland
joins Tampa as an unsolved mur murder
der murder there similar to that of Jos Joseph
eph Joseph Shoemaker reaches the nation
via newspapers, and intentional
homecide in the Sunshine State
becomes tabloid news in northern
gangsterlands.
So it is that, as the first nip
of cold weather warns of an ap approaching
proaching approaching resort season, Floridas
border signs read "Welcome Tour Tourists
ists Tourists and the words Enter at
\ou Own Risk are barely dis discernible
cernible discernible through the legalistic
whitewash.
;y .
C ON VENTION EERING
Our delegates to the Associated
Collegiate Press get-together in
Chicago last week (Leonard. Bon Bonnett,
nett, Bonnett, McGuire I report big doings,
including roundtables led by the
countrys leading publications peo peopleOlson
pleOlson peopleOlson of Minnesota; Lund Lundgren,
gren, Lundgren, Esquires art director; Har Harris
ris Harris of Los Angeles, etc. and
some highelass Big City jooking.
But where the ACP convention
(attended by 500 collegians who
as publications editors are con conceivably
ceivably conceivably the pick of college peo people)
ple) people) might have hit the nail, they
put in a thumbtack instead. 1
Three big convocations were fea featured.
tured. featured. and instead of getting Big
Significant Men to speak, they
had: (1) an ex-Hearst, ex Sat Satevepost,
evepost, Satevepost, sensation -blatherer; (2)
a roly-poly fathead, a la Kiwknis-
Rotary; (3) a nice platitudinous
gentleman from Frank Knoxs
paper (Knox- remember? was
GOP vice-prex. nominee in 36).
Such choice of speakers when

Room For Improvement
.
Dedicaied to the proposition that nothing is perfect, imbued with the
hope that University of Florida men are keen enough to notice things here
that need improvement and spirited enough to be more than passive
in their desire to better the school and themselves, this column will listen
to suggestions by students for an improved University, in any and ail phases.
This column will approach the proper officials and not'fy them of the sug suggestions
gestions suggestions made. Finally, this column will bring before the student body a
report of the officials' attitude and a resume of the battle for betterment
as it progresses. You ire invited to bring the suggestions, complaints,
ideas, gripes, grievances and hopes that will lead to a better University
of Florida to this department, care of the Alligator ig Florida Union. All
material must be typed and must be addressed to ."Room for Improvement."
When you see a thing accomplished you usually find that someone
or some group had been Dehind it to give it a push toward its goal,
if a group, especially a large one. youre sure to discover that opinion
and pressure have been crystallized to the point of successful action.
Weve been getting letters in to * ;

this department at the rate of one
a day. The suggestions have been
good in nearly every case. Weve
fanned these letters out over the
campus and have had hearty co cooperation
operation cooperation from the officials weve
shown them to. Those include
Deans Matherly and Price, Coach
Cody, Billy Matthews, Librarian
Edie, Dr. Weil and others.
But most of the issues have
dealt with problems that effect
only the day. Now dont get the
idea that we're discouraging those
sort of suggestions. Right how
were, tracking down such varied
items as better soap for Florida
Union and library wash rooms,
more real news for the Alligator,
R. O. T. C. improvements, more
animated profs, and bad taste
shown at the Florida Theatre free
shows. Those and other items are
all worth looking into.
Far Off Objectives
But suppose, as well, we had a
long-range group of objectives at
which to aim. That is, why not, at
the same time, maintain deep deeprooted
rooted deeprooted goals at which we be begin
gin begin incessant hammering until
eventually some effect is ob obtained
tained obtained ? Thus, by continually put putting
ting putting the spotlight toward ambi ambitions
tions ambitions over the horizon we can soon
wrap up our opinion in a neat
package and present it to those
who know how to handle it.
R. F. 1., after the fashion of
F. D. R., would like to present a
10-point program for the Univer University.
sity. University. Most of the things involved
are ends for which students have

Ehrlich Opens Peace Meet Here
With Talk Favoring Quarantine
Jn a talk definitely favoring the new United States foreign
policy ot collective security and quarantine of aggressor nations.
Ray Ehrlich opened a peace council forum in Florida Union, Tues Tuesday
day Tuesday night.

While pointing to the apparent
good points of the isolationist
policy of neutrality which the
United States diplomatic forces
had favored foF the past decade
and a half, Ehrlich pointed out
that the new plan of collective se security
curity security and its attendant preserva preservation
tion preservation of the present peace pacts
was a superior weapon in the
bloodless war to keep internation international
al international peace.
"Present neutrality, said Ehr Ehrlich,
lich, Ehrlich, while it involves a cash
and carry plan in which nations
at war do their own transporting
of materials from the neutral na nation,
tion, nation, it at the same time directly
hurts defending nations and aids
the aggressors. In support of this
idea the speaker, showed that
whereas Spains fascist enemies
secure materials for rebel forces
through the loan of vends and
shipping credit to the rebel forces,
the loyalist government must send
abroad itself for materials. The
significance of the point becomes
c.ear when one realizes the in inability
ability inability ordinarily of the defending
nation to spare sufficient ships
or secure adequate credit for trade
with neutral nations, at present
holding the largest readily avail available
able available supply of manufactured war
goods.
Ehrlich pointed also to the fact
that in the United States dfesire
to side-step war. fascist aggress aggression
ion aggression in Europe must be stopped,
or one by one the smaller nations
wiT be gobbled up by the abso absolutist
lutist absolutist powers. Then the seriousness
of the situation for English and
American -possessions will force
these two powers to enter the
military conflict.
Why have the Briand-Kellogg
peace pact or the nine-power pact
if we do not expect to enforce
them? the speaker asked in sup support
port support of his belief that a collective
security program in Euprope and
the Far East would prove effec effective
tive effective to end aggression.
Pointing to the fact that Ameri American
can American and English middle-men have
already invoked a minor plan of
collective security against Japa Japanese
nese Japanese manufacturers, Mr. Ehrlich
told his audience that the people
of the United States cannot pre prevent
vent prevent aid to Japan in this way
there was a possibility of contro controversial
versial controversial subjects being in the & r
makes us raise eyebrows at ex exactly
actly exactly what the respectable ACP
might be, behind the big friendly
smile.

EARL POWERS ..... BUSINESS MANAGES
TOM FLEMING Circulation Manager
ED ROOD Assistant B.isinr*s Manager
DWIGHT ROGERS ..A Adv.~ti*,ng Manager
CANTRELL Astt. Advertising Manager

long striven -r- unsuccessfully.
They're meant only as a liegin lieginnmg
nmg lieginnmg for a long-range campaign
for improvement. by any
means, let up on topics of the
day We want to hear about them.
Ten Improvements
But heres the idea: somebody
worked long and hard for Floridu
Union, for the library, lor Florida
Field in fact for original con construction
struction construction of the whole University.
We can begin now in bearing
down with the pressure on those
things which must come sooner
or later. s
Heres the R. F. I. list;'
<1) More dormitory space.
(2) Co-education.
(3) Better class-room facilities.
(4 1 More tennis and handball
courts.
15 1 A completed auditorium
anti administration building.
(6) More money for library
books.
(7 i Better schoarship opportuni opportunities.
ties. opportunities.
(8) A new gym.
J9 l Closer alumni cooperation.
(10) Florida Field tinder arc
lights.
That's probably only the begin beginning.
ning. beginning. But you can be sure that
some day all of those things will
be realized on this campus. Just
how soon depends on us. Crystal Crystalizing
izing Crystalizing opinion with constant dis discussion
cussion discussion and reference to the
points and bringing pressure with
the proper arguments in their
favor will do the trick. Why not
make it soon?

t alone, that a boycott of Japan to
t be forceful must be government government;
; government; ordered, and that in this way
3 alone will Japanese military en encroachment
croachment encroachment on more and more
l Chinese territory be stopped.
i Calendar of Events
TODAY
Y. M. C. A. Conference: Florida
Union (see program, page 1)
i SUNDAY
! , YMCA Conference: Florida Un Un;
; Un; ion (see program, page 1)
9:30 a.m. University Bible
Class, WRUF
> 4:00- Organ Recital, Auditorium
; s:3oVesper Service, WRUF
MONDAY
f 4:lsGlee Club, Fla., Union
i 5:45 Orange Grove String JBand
I WRUF
7:15 FFF Club, Fla., Union
l Soph Y Club, Fla., Union
Junior Y Club, Ha. Union
7:3oDelta Sigma Pi, Fla. JUrv
ion.
Conch Club, Fla. Union
Alligator Staff Meeting, Fla.,
Union.
Gamma Sigma Epsilon, Fla. Un Union.
ion. Union.
Inter-Debate Society, Fla. Union.
7:4sFourth Estate Club, Fla.
Union.
B:lsEnglish Club Reception.
Brvan Lounge, Fla. Union.
TUESDAY
s:o2University Hour, WRUF.
7:ooAlpha Phi Omega, Fla.
Union.
7:3oSigma Delta Chi, Fla.
Union.
WEDNESDAY
s:3oCollegianna. WRUF.
THURSDAY
6:4sThree Billiard Ball In Instruction,
struction, Instruction, Game Room, Fla. Union.
7:00 . Interfraternity Debate,
Fla. Union Annex, Auditorium,
and Rooms 208 and 210, Fla.
Union.
7:30- Cavalliers. Fla. Union..
FRIDAY
4:4s_Florida Alligator, WRUF.
ALLIGATOR STAFF
Don Brow n ... Associate Editor
Walter Draughon, Assoc. Editor
John B. Turner, Editorial Board
Henry Cardenas, Editorial Board
Bill jibb News Editor
Frank Klein ...... Sports Editor
Bill McGuire Feature Editor
Boh Cody, Asst. Feature Editor
Frank Cowles Copy Editor
Sandy Swerdlin ..... News Staff
fat Emmanuel ..... News Staff



Gators Meet First Ot Sevan Tough Opponents i ociow

Ul/P/A/V
£ UAA/n
By Frank Klein f
. '#
A Florida man. F E, Keller, who sol his degree in '22 after
completing his coarse son < years earlier in the Ag college when it
whs located at Lake ( ity) travc-lleti down to Philadelphia two
ago to see Florida pi ay T* topic Little did he think that his aljna
mater would perform in such fashion that one to wtjlte
home aUiuf but as -everyone knows they did and Mr. Keller wrote
home. Here's part of the letter we received: j
"To the sports editor of tne Alligator.
Dear
Under the heading of "How it looks to an old grad, I might
tell you something about the football game between Florida aind
Temple at the Temple stadium, here in Philadelphia, last Friday night.
I went out to the stadium, only front a sense of loyalty, e\-,
peeling to see something like si 46-6 seore rolled up against
Florida. Why did I think so? Because Florida had not made
the headlines IwT:-; amt while there is a prejudice against gi\-
ing recognition to southern teams (not so much as it used to
le) they have to do it to. the papers would lose circulation; still
au extraordinary team will receive pletity ot space ami bu. Ll-up
in the papers, an was done to the liators in *2B, and to Missis Mississippi
sippi Mississippi and 1.. S. I, since tHen.,
Mr. Keller goes on to explain how Temple and the big schools
in and around Philadelphia are swamped with good material ami
how it naturally follows that the Owk should Is- strong from year
to year
Then,.. "As this was Hi. .eapn the Gators went up against, tjvar
I wiung in mecuafl t. iy xp. elh g them to lose heavily Moreover,- j
I hed gone u> Harvaru aroun-l 1930 a.td wen & well known Gkjfor
team subdued by the stands and the number of people in them, a
team that lost the gam before they started to play , So all. in
all, it Poked to me Ike Temple,, by a big score.
t watched pIH, after play, and saw a Florida team ihaj
was powerful, ,-Urrt, quick. to solve and oppose eucm\ trick
(days aud prevent au> gain from tke u; a Gator team in wtdeh
every man handled bi>elf like a football thoroughbred; and
whenever the team got j*o.vxesdim >f the baJ, could put on
a powerful oftensixe, ami with Mayberry carrying the ball, with
si|>c dative interference from his teammates, >r at .aid tines,
even wit trout it, tear off yardage enough to make a stone statu.'
coiue to life aud yet applauseunless it was a Temple statue,
TUe\ played like a w< il-trained and well-grountie.t fowiltall teani,
which, to my tuiiul, speaks well for Floridas coachto whom*
the showing was due. With him to phut aud direct, Florida can.
make a big comeback. t.ke they did in 2B.
"Now, mind you, all .his was being done against the Temple
team. In that first half, the Florida team looked to be better
trained and more capable than Pop Warners team and praise
can not go any higher than that ... 1 wish I could give you the
names of all the Florida m n and their individual deeds; hut 1
do not know them by sigh*, so can not. I know only two: May Mayberry,
berry, Mayberry, tbe demon tail back and Oxford, for the defense, lime aftci
time, a Temple back would tty to break through the line oqly
to be hurled back, and then the loud speaker would announce
Pappas stopped by Oxford. But had the team had' a single poor
or even average player ot. it, it could not have withstood Temple
as it did. A couple of plays and Temple would have known whiph
was the inefficient player, and thenceforth, would have attacked
through him and got past.
Imagine what it bit like to a Florida man to see. the
, Gators get possession ol tin* ball, put oil an offensive, and in
two plays, earry the ball to Temples two-foot line
up and with the consciousness of superior power, drive the hall
through Temples line for the first touchdown of the game,
ftie try for extra-point was handled poorly and tailed badly.
Put the score was 6 to o. in Floridas favor, and remained so
till the second half.
The first part of the second half, we know how- Temple dug
deep in her bag of VVaxnei wizardry and advanced the ball almost
at will to the Gator two yard line only to have the progress ended
on downs. The successful march, featuring Renzo,'looked like this
to Mv. Keller, amt can be! explained by his not knowing that it was
the umpire that wa mainly responsible for the Owls successful
scoring play. .
"Temple got one touchdown, but I can not figure it out at all.
The play occurred directly b-fore my seat in the stands. My seat
was. probably forty feet above the field, and afforded a good sight.
Temple had'the ball on Floridas thirty yard line. One of then
backs < Renzol broke through Floridas left tackle or left end, and
started for the goal line. The Florida left half back was, in per perfect
fect perfect position ami why he let the back pass him. I havent an idea:
r>ut he dkl '/HeW's wherelhe umpire got in the wayi. Both he anti
tt#fu*lba*k took after him. Both are better runners than the Temple
matf*lhcM?ained on him but they only peached and taOkled him as
he reached the goal line. . Temple made** vtt* neat and very quick
try for goal and made the extra point, makingtheseore 7-6 in Temples
All in all, Florida put up a far better showing than anyone
in this section expected. I didnt see the Tern,de- Mississippi
game but of course heard about it. The final score was 0-0.
luit I beard from on lookers that Mississippi was saved from
being sod red upon twice through luck and through the efforts
of Bruiser Kinard and other linesmen of about his build, when
Temple had them down on their own goal line. Florida put up
< ;l much better showing than the dreaded Mississippi team.
Fraternally,
E. K. Keller
F. 94
ot F. "Vi."
; *
Mr Alumni Chief Wright, hows that for the real something o
other in the way or Florida spirit? A little bit on the OK side, eh^
learntod a n c e
i Dancing, the art of rhythm, is older than Civilization Civilizationolder
older Civilizationolder than her sister arts, Painting, SculDture, Music
and Literature.
THE SHIRLEY DANCE STUDIO offers instruction
in Tango, Ballroom and Tap Dancing. All lessons
under personal suoervision of Shirley who is pre prepared
pared prepared to develop the talents of each pupil.
Moderate rates puts this luxury within everyones
reach!
CLASSES AT 7 P.M. ON MONDAY & THURSDAY
25c A LESSON
I F \RN TO DANCE THE CORRECT WAY AT
SHIRLEYS DANCE STUDIO
322 North Seventh Street

|| THE COLLEGE INN HI

The Florida Alligator
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 23, 1937.

i 1,1 v.
Intramural Boxing
Gets Under Way
Monday Night
Contestants in the intramural
boxing competition will step into >
the .squared circle for the first
, rounds Monday evening as the!
tourney gets under way.
Boxers why have been training
for the past three weeks have a
new goal to look forward to this
year as plans' of the intramural
board call for the crowning of all allcampus
campus allcampus champions at the final
bouts of Gator Growl during
Homecoming This 13 made pos possible
sible possible by. the fact that all compe competition
tition competition comes to an end at the
same time.
I Fraternities will not be placed
at a disadvantage. Manager Dick
King explained, as they will be
awarded points on the Same
basis as last year.
In order to provide for better
; fights in the finals the intramural
department has seeded last years (
champions who showed promise (
during training.
Last year men who are re- j
Sentering the tournament are: fromi
the fraternity league. Malcolm
; Glasson, runner up in 119 lb ;
Hpan, winner of 129; McLendon,
winner of 139 lb.; Swift, winner of
179 lb.
In the dormitory league, Carlisle, (
winner 119 lb.; Graham, winner
'129 ib.: Gawthon, winner 159 lb.:
In the independent league, Warren,
v inner of 169 who has moved up
to the 179 lb. class for this year.
Rounts scheduled for Monday
night are:
1 19 l bs.
Shave, KA. vs. Wells, SN
Skipper vs. Richard
129 I.lms.
Thomas vs. Harrell, DX
Stocker vs. McLendon. KA
139 Lbs.
Byrnes vs. Rogers
Carlton DX vs. Gray
119 I 1>.
Leaven good, ATO vs. Russell
r Honner vs. Mar-Lean, SN
> Wagner vs. Pennock
i r,9 r>
, O. Smith vs. Fry
, Cawthorn vs. Adams, SPC
SAE And SN Lead in
Preliminaries
Outstanding contestant in the
fraternity league swimming pre preliminaries
liminaries preliminaries Tuesday was SAE who
placed first in every event in its
f heat. Trailing close behind was
£ SN. placing first in all but one
I event in their heat, both fraterni fraternis
s fraternis ties nosing out PDT, last years
5 winner, for high honors.
, Winners in the three beats held
wore:
First heat Medley relayfirst,
ATO; second, PDT; 220 yd. free
style, first, ATO: second, PDS. 50
r yd. free style, first, PDT: second,
ATO. 100 yd. free style, first,
. TFP; second, PDT. 50 yd. back
stroke, first. PDT: second, ATO:
50 yd. breast stroke, first, ATO;
e second, PDT. 200 yd. free relay,
s first, ATO: second, PDT.
* iSccond heat Medley relay, fiSaik,
s second, SPE. 220 yd. free
style, first, SAE; second, CP. 50
yd. free style, first. SAE; second,
SPE. 100 yd. free style, first.
SAE; second, KS; 50 yd. back backstroke,
stroke, backstroke, first, SAE: second, CP.
50 yard breaststroke, first, SAE;
second, SPE. 200 yd. free relay,
- first, SAE: second, PKA.
Third heatMedley relay, first,
' SN; second, BTP. 220 yd free
style, first. SN: second, DX. 50
yd! free style, first, SN; second,

IFOR HIS DESK
Dad would like a photograph of you for his office. Although, he may &
not say much he is proud of his family. Surprise him with a new
portrait. Lets make an appointment today.
ANDERSONand ANDERSON
1868 West University Avenue Phone 981.
'' ; 1 I

sports
Independent League
Murals Advance
Slowly
Independent league horseshoe
! doubles and singles progressed li
ne during the last week, singles
advancing to only two contestants
in the semi-finals ?- with other
matches to he played as is in
doubles.
In singles H. Cohen downed M.
Stanke 23 21 to win a place in
semi-finals; L. Seitlin defeated H.
Greer 2U4 to be placed in semi semilinals.
linals. semilinals.
R. Wolfit, representing the Vio Violets.
lets. Violets. defeated F. Foster 21-13 in
tlie second round thus advancing
to quarter-finals. Manuel of the
Owls won over M. Bagard 21-1
t.< be placed in quarterfinals.
In first round matches J. Bed Bedsole
sole Bedsole defeated Granger of the Top
( notcheis.
Semi-finals in doubles has two
! teams in different brackets: Mil Mil|
| Mil| dee and Johnson, Topnotchers,
i who defeated Kague and Kamiya,
Violets, 21-2: ami Weaver and
Withers who nosed out Bourgeois
and Harliss, Larches, 21 20.
In quarterfinals in doubles are
Mac L>oual|d and Rakon, RaYnseys,
Kelley and Emanuel, and Mruz
and Wellman who are represent representing
ing representing Crane Hall.
Independent matches will be re
sumed Monday to bring independ independent
ent independent horseshoes to a close.
Fraternity League
Standings
These standings include through
horseshoe singles and doubles.
They do not include swimming
preliminaries held this week.
Krat ,ts. Frat Pis.
SAE j 120 TEC 70
DSP 110 TX 70
KA j 110 SX 60
PDT 110 PKP 60
PKT 100 PKA GO
DX 90 PDS 60
TKN 80 DTD 60
SN I 80 CP . . 60
LXA 80 BTP 60
KS 80 ATO 60
PHD 80 AGR Go
SPE . ... . . .. i . 50
Special SAL Rates Posted
I - r
i Officials qf the Seaboard Air
! Line, held back by previous
- agreements aginst cutting rates,
have done what they oar to pro proi
i proi vide special accommodations for
Florida students who wish to see
I the game in College Park. Special
schedules, posted on all bulletin
, boards, allow Gator followers to
1 PKT. 100 yd. free style, first, SN:
second, BTP. 50 yd. backstroke.
- first,DX; second, SN. 50 yd.
1 creast.stroke, first, SN; second,
: BTP. 200 yd. free relay., first, SN;
j second. BTP.

IT ARCH'SUPPOTTS
MADE TO
PLASTIC ARCH SUPPORT SYSTEM
BOBS SHOE FACTORY
Gainesvilles Leading Shoe Repair Shop
131 West University Avenue Phone 966.

Baby Gators Whip
Auburn Frosh
By 132
Waiting until the last quarter
\a unleash their full alack. Mor-
idas ''Bab\ Gators scored, twice
in the fourth period to wiup Au Auburn's
burn's Auburn's freshmen 13 to 2 in a nigni
game last Friday in Selma. Ala.
The tilt officially opened the
1937 season for the freshmen Gat Gators.
ors. Gators.
Btdti'-widf inteveft-t wds
tracted by the Florida yearling
in their smart showing against
Auburn, and this interest ts ex expeeted
peeted expeeted to result m an Increased
attendance wle-n, the Baby .Gaors
plav their next, game with R.veJ R.veJsicH
sicH- R.veJsicH Military Academy Nov. 19.
Contrary to previous repot ts, it
was Pete Koziosky who scored
both Gator touchdowns. Line
plays of rilh teams were dominat dominated
ed dominated by a trio .of Floi ida flayers,
those aUemiing the g;une -aid.
jolui Pihmbo at left tackle, tMu'h
Battista at right guard and John
Smith at right end were tig- trio
giving Auburn all the trouble.
Ted Taylor tinned in the long longost
ost longost run, a 50 yard sprint. Bud
Walton, ace freshman parser, had
one of his bosses intercepted tor
the first in his football experi experience
ence experience during the game.
Coach Carlos Proi-ur, who was
well pleased with the Gators
showing against the Auburn team,
said Vlnny Zdanzukas game at
quarterback was one of the neat neatest
est neatest jobs-he has seen in some time, t
Mush Battista, who strips at
197 pounds and is probably the
fastest man on the squad, also j
came in for a share of praise
from Coach Proctor.
f- core by periods:
Florida ..... 0 0 9 13 13
Auburn 2 0 6 0 2
Florida scoring: Touchdowns.
Wozloskv i 2 i. Point after touch touchdown,
down, touchdown, Smith (placement>.
Auburn scoring: Safety (Spiv
ey i.
Dorm League
Standings
These standings include through
1 horseshoe singles and doubles:
i Dorm Sec. Points
i Buckmnn C 150
t Thomas C 126
ii. Buckman D I<>6
t! Thomas E 76
-I Thomas A 76
Buckman B . ...... 75
1 Thomas D 63
, (Thomas F 63
. New Dorm G 63
New Dorm J yi . v 50
New Dorm H 50
. New Dorm c .. 50
Thomas B ....... 50
I New Dorm A /. 38
{ New Dorm B 25
( Bur kman E 0
ariive in plenty of time to enjoy
: the Homecoming celebration be be.
. be. fore the game and to return on
the same train with the Orange
, and Blue squad. The rate as stat stat;.,ed
;.,ed stat;.,ed In the special announcement is
y 826.80 round trip.

Krejrier, Ramsey Bencbed With I
injuries For Mississippi Tilt <
Delta Staters Will Be Out For Blood After Defeat By
Xuburn Last Week; Game Marks Homecoming

Florida's- Fighting Gators go j
up against the first of seven <
straight tough opponents Missis-
sippi State's Sasse-coached Ma Maroons
roons Maroons a Southeastern Confer-
ence battle at Starkeville. Miss i
For State fans it will be the :
Homecoming battle of the 1937
season, a reciprocation of the 1
honor Florida tetwiered the Ma-
rooiis last year by inviting them
to the first "All-Universities Day"
battle, which the visitors carried :
off as a 7-0 victory.
A last-minute misfortune in thi
Gator camp cropped up Thursday
afternoon when Trainer Smokey
Harper annouced that Charlie
Krejcier, regular right tackle,
could not make the trip because
of the recurrence of an old knee
injury, the same kind that kept
Krejcier out during his junior
year. Burrell Hassett, 200-lb.
soph, will fill the gap.
Coach Codv carried 27 players
into the delta land. A new lineup,
minus Watson Ruinsey. rugg'-d
right wingman laid up with an
injured knee, and embracing Ed
Manning and Jack Blalock at left
half and quarterback, will be
pas t of CodyS strategy thus after afternoon.
noon. afternoon. For the first time this sea season,
son, season, Floridas opponent will not
be laying for the Florida ball
carrying phenomenon, Capt. Tiger
Mayberry but for a slippery little
mail man, in the person of Ed
Manning.
Mayberry, if Cody sticks to the
plans he has followed up to the
time of Thursday afternoon's de departure,
parture, departure, will bide his time until
i the time is ripe for him to work
as a c limax runner. Blalock won
the right to start with a sterling
j offensive and defensive exhibition
against Sewanee last week, scor scoring
ing scoring the first Fiolida touchdown on
receipt of a lengthy pass from
Manning.
The one sidedness of the beat beating
ing beating Auburn handed Mississippi
State last week makes the game
ail the more important in the
minds of the Florida coaching
staff. These men realize, as they
hope they have made the team
realize during the .week, that a
defeat by State would make them
1 look even worst than Sasse's
men looked after the whistle at
Birmingham.
At the start of the '37 season
football writers doped the Ma Maroons
roons Maroons to wind up at the very top
of the heap when all was said and
.done this season and there was
every reason for doing this. Ma Major
jor Major Sasse "had them" deep
enoughif not quite as deep as at
L. S. U. The center of his line
looked as big and powerful as
any in the country. At the center
is Dave Price, wholl still be right
in there at the time for picking
the all-American passer-b ack I
even if his team cannot return to
the form expected of -it which,
as a supposition, is a little too
unlikely. i
John Moak, guard, was listed
among the early Associated Press |

on. chapman j. mucins
WM J 2rJ3mjk>. A -? c Feb. 10, 1937
ff&yJl' S. M. Frank & Co., Inc.
New York, N. Y.
Gentlemen:-
About eighteen months ago I was forced
to quit smoking a pipe because the tarry
products in the heel kept me chronically
nauseated. Too bad, but it couldn't be
helped. No use feeling miserable every
time I fired up. So I stayed off tobacco
for over a year.
Then one day I. saw a few Frank's
Medicos in a druggist's showcase, and
half-heartedly decided to try one. So
many patented filter systems on the mar market.
ket. market. But I'd risk a dollar on one anyhow,
I ju3t in hopes ...
| **
! For six happy months, now I've been
I smoking that Frank's. This afternoon I
| bought my second one, and have it send-
I ing up incense as I write. I want to tell
jyou in case you don't already know it
I that you're one of the benefactors of so society.
ciety. society. lot the poor Indiant lot Sir *.
Walter Raleighl Lot everybody who died
JL before you brought out a filter that re-
I iiNHFfIRD nr VALUE ally workE I B telling ray friends by
UNHEARD OrVAIUE tne dozen, but not fast enough.
You may use my name if you care to,
+Z J1 and add that this letter is absolutely
JA&/7lf\. unsolicited on your part.
MEDICO
FILTER-COOLED -7

pickings .as one oi the Souths
outstanding bets to fill an aU
American guard post. Tackles O.
W. Pittman, who shone id the
Maroons 7-0 victory over Florida
last Doc. 5 here, and Bud Gray,
are the size of Florida s Goff.
There will be no Gelatkas,
Keenans. Walters or Redochx at
the State end posts but Sasse
had 18 men on hand working toi
the right to fill the shoes of tiie.se
men when the season slatted-
The replacements are reported as
being very capable.
Florida fans who witnessed the
Dec. 5 game last year remember
pee Wee" Armstrong as beinga
brilliant passer for he tired the
50-yard past# that ike Pickle took
in stride for the lone score? Ma
joi Sasse-says that Bernard Waid,
170-pounder, is better than Aim Aimstrong.
strong. Aimstrong. Ward will lie flinging them
besides giving the Gators trouble
as a speedy ball carrier.
The Gators have spent most of
their Offensive practice for to
days clash brushing up their
aerial game. By W ednesday night
the team ran plays until the
sun was almost out of sight
Cody got the kind of results lie
had been hoping for. The boys
were putting out in every one of
their assignments.
A natural" pretty well de describes
scribes describes the set-up for the game at
Starkeville. A new stadium will
have its formal dedication with
the game. State will have to be on
the way up if starting that can
ever do it any good. Coach Sasse
said his team can be expected to
play better bull against Florida
that he is satisfied his team
really deserves the nomination as
one of the best in the South.
position is similar in
many respects to that of State.
The Gator coach has pointed out
the fact that a defeat-at the hands
of State -or even a close victory
especially in the walg- ! the
crushing Auburn slapped on the
Maroons, may have a had psy psychological
chological psychological influence on his own
team- for the assignments that is
theirs the rest of this season.
Florida players making the
trip are ends, Walker, Penning Pennington,
ton, Pennington, M'a.ynar-', VVhiddon and How Howell:
ell: Howell: tackles, Goff, Hassett. Own
and Crabtree; guards, Kocsis
Gardner, Davis and Lightbown';
centers, Williams and. Oxford;
tailbacks. Mayberry, Manning and
Evans; halfbacks, Willis Delaney,
Dewell, Brock, Blalock and Bravv Bravvner;
ner; Bravvner; fullbacks. McGhee. Mullins
and Mulcahy.
Starting, left to right m the
line, are: Walker. Goff, Gardner.
Oxford, Koesis, Krejcier and Pen Pennington.
nington. Pennington. Manning will be at the
tail. Willis at left half, Blalock at
right half and McGhee at full or
up back.
The de luxe Japanese train
called Tsubame" (chimney swal swali
i swali low i will have air-conditioned
dining cars as a regular feature
iof irs Tokyo-K<>be service.

W ith r lorida s I
Opponents
fly Sid Ko>s j
That 33-7 rim-around ;hat a*
burn gave Missilc ipp: State
week speaks wJI fd, my Manx*
correspondent but it s- ra*
the one watching the
was a bit off on his cab 'axiom
If they snap out oj il tod Ay thgy
wll furnish pleiuv.oi fight for tb
Gjtlors. But with V\ ul mu Stead
man Injured to so me tb
Maroon offense and d- fens* 4
damaged considerably

As the week-# j b- the
chance for a KTorid-i vlctorj
nl Maryland get brighter sad
brighter. The two weak
games that the t's Lbie-i
pui up against \ 'iegin-a and
>\ estern Mar\laml puts tjiefti
iu a b*g bole with th-ir fate
tieing seabal or their bu t tine
made bv the tussle with Bvr Bvracuse
acuse Bvracuse this afterr ion.

fjeorgia has been placing accoi*
ing to Its well-established proced procedure
ure procedure so far tins scasotn.j Then- one-,
pdint loss to Holy Cr as was (f
the Florida-Temple var-etv. Tht
Gators again Catch the Bulldogs
alter the Tennessee game.
Clemson showed that they Lave
come into their own bv trouern?
the South Carolina te:m that had
held Duke and Georgia to close
scores bv the tune of St-7.''

evtrn noilits k' ;
from hiunt right in the *kp*
dieergia Te' h tree-fnr nil hnt
the Enifin i r'> Ifoveil that
they have just about every everything
thing everything to tie desired in a t all
eluh. The Tee>- \ iilturn nmw
in Atlanta. today shoo'd pro provide
vide provide just about a mam thrill*
as tlie Duke affair a< t shoo'd'
eitlier prove or revult of the An bur? Mississ Mississippi
ippi Mississippi .State frame week.
Auburn bv its bHl'ian' bmviof
leaves Kentucky as the only medi mediocre
ocre mediocre team 'eft on the Orange and
Blue schedule end we dont rceel
them until Decemhii-. TUo triune,
to be plaved iii Jacksonville, wiS
find the Plainsmen on the field
for their last contest of the rea reason.
son. reason. Kentucky, a< to past
performances, will appear even
more mediocre after the game with
Manhattan, conquerors of Mich Michigan
igan Michigan State, at Lexinerton this af afternoon.
ternoon. afternoon. The WiMea.ts just don't
Seem to have anything this season

|APPARE L|
Be sure te the new
things for Fall that the
better dressed University
Men are wearing.
>
Dunlap Ha's Homburg
style in G*eer>, Blue, Gray
and Brown
$5.50
j Dickey Bosom Shirts
Starched Bosom and Cuff*
in stripes and contrasting
body..
52.09
t Botany Ties Nothin'! to
compare with them
theyre Wrinkleoruf.
ALL
! SIJO
PACER Hose in new
clocks and patterns.' \ll
sizes, all colors.
59c
, i
Swank Dress A&se's
Swanky cuff links in cob
ors and Studs to go with
the new shirts.
$.50 & SI.OO
.1
Knothe Bet* *in pig*
skins Black & Brown i
regular and narrow
widths.
SI.OO-51.50
j. rr -;a|
For R-'a! Authentic Styfc
I
SEE
JIM LARCH!
i Correct Clothes
Made for You.*
1866 West University.
m



Hr+ftryw. ccToftgft m, ip3.

HEds May Use Swimming Pool,
hletic Council Head Says

r the first time in the history
Ke University of Florida. co-
Hvdertts will be allowed to use
Hwimming pool this year and
eipate in ini ram u rats. ac-
Hng to S. t. Yon. president rs
Athletic council, who spoke
H social meeting .of the Co-Ed
Thursday. The affair honored
Hew cowd students, who will
H>rmally pledged at the next
H n g of the club. Together
the regular members, the
Hln-ent of the gioup now
Hn said: "Before this year
H three state colleges were
Ho-educational, but now, due
He organization of the Co-Ed
and participation of girls in
activities, the University cf
da is called a co-educational
EL:. and is no longer included
His group of three.
long with this recognition of
versify as a co-educational
i, Florida has received a
H deal of publicity, and the
of co-eds on the campus
H)een greatly enhanced," Yon
s year, arrangements have
made by S. L. Yon with (he
council for the girls to
as independents'in such in-
as basketball, norse norseshuffleboard
shuffleboard norseshuffleboard and swim swim
swim Club Sees Movies
Plant Growth
reels of motion picture
growth, flowers at wo>'k
dispersal was the sea-
of the Agricultural Club
Monday.
were made for a debate
Beet an Agricultural College
e team, which will enter into
with other agricul agricul
agricul colleges throughout the
of Floridas cattle in inwas
was inwas presented over Radio
Hn WRUF on Friday by the
Sits of the College of Agri Agri
A men pledged
men were initiated by
f*li Wednesday. They
.Smith, .limmie White,
H DeVaut, Marvin Conway.
Marks.

iC % Honey In the bowl
Tt .* Yf Ho Btilr trt atmtntrrol honey in the bowl
gives this pipe a "well brokcn-in" taste immedi immediate-lv,
ate-lv, immediate-lv, AND impregnates the briarwood thoroughly
BS y nu fhnoko. -o its wonderful flavor is preserved a> na
/> Special auto- I (
condensor. I
| f YELLO-BOLE
Collar-Attached
I \y,'lp ; A French Cuffs
j-- \ For those men who prefer a col collar-attached
lar-attached collar-attached shirt, pint that little
extra touch of smartness afford afforded
ed afforded bv the French cuff, we offer
I U a wade selection of the new est
They have Arrows otlicr features
IHBA too. All are Mitoga-cut, and
93 T Sanfori*/. ed -Shrunk { Arrows
jjj I guarantee ot permanent fit>.
lj| j Shirt \a I tic galore at $2 Up
INUFF SED
Burnett THE Clothier

Andy Bass Elected
President 01
Rifle Club
Andy Bass was elected presi president
dent president of the -Florida Rifles Thurs Thursday.
day. Thursday. Elected to serve with Bass
vere Pam Pettyjohn, vice-presi vice-president:
dent: vice-president: C. D. Kime, treasurer; J. P.
.Smith, Secretary, and Clyde Ca Cason,
son, Cason, executive officer.
Florida Rifles is an Honorary
society for those men on the
j am pus taking part, in the activi activities
ties activities of the rifle- team. At the
meeting j Captain C. T. Davis, di dicctor
cctor dicctor of the team, stated that
the qualifications for membership
n the cjlub should ho changed to
better Til thp needs of the organ organization.
ization. organization. Major Roberts, recently
appointed infantry major for the
University's military staff, was
introduced and spoke briefly.
New Pledges
Announced
Social fraternities, Alpha Gam- i
ma Kho and Alpha Tau Omega,
announced that they have recent recently
ly recently added several new men to their j
pledge rolls.
The ATOs pledged Coakely
Taylor of .Jacksonville and the
i AGES pledged Paul Fisk, Orlan Orlando;
do; Orlando; Barry Mitchell. Fort Meade;
John R. Girardeau, Mcae, Ga.;
Walter Melton, Miami; and Alex Alexander
ander Alexander Coleda, Red Bank. N. J.
. Rev. Don A. Cook, Methodist
student pastor, gave the last of a
! series of talks to the pledges Os
AGR Wednesday evening.' He
spoke on the moral and religious
! side of life,,
Soph Y Hears Newins i
Tell Os Experiences
Sophomore Y clubbers heard i
Prof. H. S. Newins, School of
Forestry head, at their regular regularmeeting
meeting regularmeeting Monday.
Prof. Newins recalled some of
the experiences of his undergrad undergraduate
uate undergraduate days at Lafayette College in
Easton, Penna., as well- as some j
of those, of his career as a na national
tional national forest ranger and later as
a State college professor in Ore-

| ROT C ORDERED OUT TO Sfefe GATORS OFF TO MiSSiSSiPH
fig J Hu jSSPBEj :
-..rWb, i. yy, '.4 Mtkt r~ w
VHHflfwlL* s,jt *fi 1.7 .Ja t x w HThNRB vifc jmh 'CtH
tr &T jpVEw "* ~ m "*£ ***** WB
-ruSk*** &l lj W&mmSi
Lr 1 mr^
, a m |9fl jmi k
it : |f|P, jr -Vm MJpj&jmL jjjpy *so
it :&*' t & N @ js; Wi- W% j£ SRIv 1 1 **
When the Fighting- C.ators pulled out of Gainesville depot Thursday, en route to State College, Miss., they were Waved farewell by
the University of Florida KOTC Unit, ordered out en masse for the Occasion. Less than 50 civilian students attended the teams departure
of their own free will. Not appearing in the picture are the cheerleaders and about 1,500 more KOT( member*.

(Campbell Speaks To
Propellor Club
Dr. A. Stuart Campbell, au authority
thority authority on foreign trade and ship shipping.
ping. shipping. at the University, addressed
the Propellor club last week cn
his travels and experiences in
Europe during the past summer.
Di. Campbell discussed the quaint
i and age-bid' habits of the inhabit inhabitants
ants inhabitants of the countries which he
visited, including England. France,
Germany. Belgium, Holland, and
Switzerland.
The speaker gave a summary
of the current economics and so social
cial social conditions prevailing among
the European nations today, deal dealing
ing dealing extensively with those cf
Germany. He said that the Ger Geri
i Geri man government cares for the
training and development of a per per-1
-1 per-1 son from the age of six years
i until well into adulthood, as a
means of preparing the country
for whatever may come.
! The following were voted mem membership
bership membership in the club: Arthur John Johnson,
son, Johnson, Horace Drew, Marcus Cov Covington,
ington, Covington, Ed Rood, and Ben Mc-
Gahey. j
BUCK MAN < TAKES SINGLES
Buekrhan C defeated Thomas C
Monday afternoon to annex tiie
dormitory league horseshoe singles
championship by the score of 21-
6, 21-3. 21-7.
The winning team was compos composed
ed composed of E. Rood, G. Finley and H.
Graham. They will receive key?
as recognition of their victory.
gon. He also taught at Michigan
State ebllege and-at Penn State
before he came South, attracted
by the fact that the South has
three times aj? much timber area
as anv other section of the coun
try.

1 '<
For You Who Like
Good Coffee Coffee.
. Coffee. | > ..
Try Old South
Traditionally Good > I
1 SOLD EXCLUSIVELY AT
THE UNIVERSITY BOOKSTORE
DROP IN AND HAVE A CUP
r

TKfi ?Vcr*?A AIVSATOfc

: .!
Buckman C Takes
Swimming Title
!
Buckman C annexed swimming 1
by winning six out of eight events
yesterday afternoon. They placed
second and third in the events
they didnt win.
Winners were: medley relay. J.
Rood, H. Graham, Ed Rood; 220
yds., j. Rood; 50 yds., Ed Rood;
diving, B. Dean; 100 yds., Ed
Rood; 50 yds., backstroke, J.
11 Rood.
j
Delta Chi Celebrates
Nationals Founding
The Florida Chapter of the
Della Chi Fraternity celebrated
the 17th anniversary of the found founding
ing founding of the National Chapter last
Saturday. Delta Chi was founded
at Cornell on October 13, 185 N).
The main speaker of the eve-
nirig was Frank S. Wright,; pub- 1
licity director of the University, j
Other guests included Billy Mat Matthews.
thews. Matthews. Reverefid J. Roy Robinson, j
! Dean and Mrs. Beaty, Barton
Douglas, local lawyer, Charles
Cheatham, and Camel Jones; The!
banquet was held at the chapter;
house after the Sewanee game.
; During the evening formal jiledg- J
ing of this years class wets done
by Lyn Conlon, pledgemaster.
j BASSETT GETS ASSISTANT
COUNTY AGENT POST
Wilmer Bassett, bust years
editor of the Florida College
Farmer and now d&ing graduate
| work here, was named this week
assistant county agent for Lake
, county, and will assist County
Agent R. E. Norris in various
phases of county work.
Bassett has been active, in 4-H
club work, especially in camps
throughout Florida.

Slash Pine Discussed
At Chemical Meet
;
i ITse 1 of Florida slash pine- trees
for obtaining cellulose and cellu cellulose
lose cellulose products was described by B.
F. Williamson, Gainesville tung oil
promoter, at a meeting of the;
!
American Institute of Chemical j
Engineers Tuesday night.
* Canada was formerly the mainl
source of this countrys cellulose'
supply, he said, but now mills are
springing up all over th<- United
State. Floridas pine has the ad advantage
vantage advantage of maturing in about one
i fourth the time of other trees,
therefore assuring a ready sup supj
j supj piy-
How the tung oil industry is
rapidly'coming to the forefront
in Florida was also depicted by
the local promoter. The United
i States uses about 90 percent of
i the world's tung oil supply at
: present, he declared, and manu
: faeturers would use more if they
could get it.
Frank Ward and Wally Arm Arm;
; Arm; strong were elected to the Benton
Engineering Society 7 council at
the meeting.
Mechanical Engineers
j Hear Talk On Society
Meeting for the first time this
yt% l '- Ou-mbers of lhe American
Society or Mechanical Engineers
last week heard Ed Bonney give
a talk on The Life of.Prof. J. E.
Sweet, founder of A. S. M. F.
Ten new men were taken into
the society, and plans were made
or a trip to Vanderbilt for the re regional
gional regional convention of student
branches at the meeting.

Matthews Speaks On
Art Os Living
Billy Matthews, director of
Florida Union spoke to the Junior
Y clubbers on the "Art of Living
at the organization's meeting
! Monday night.
; Setting forth as steps in the
j art, mind training, proper selec selec!
! selec! tion of a career, and proper de de(velopment
(velopment de(velopment of character, Matthews
went on to show how theye things
are well worth striving for all
your life.
I "Ignorance is not bliss. said
the speaker. "The man .who knows
nothing can appreciate nothing.
He contended that that should he
j considered in selecting the proper
career, as well as possibilities for
! financial profit and mental
1 growth.
WANTED
Student to sell stroking pipes in in;
; in; laid with silver letters of school
sr cl fi at.entity. La ge jrommtesibns.
R. M. LYNCH,
729 San?*em Street
Philadelphia Pennsylvania
ATTEND THE
; I. YRIC YRICTHIS
THIS YRICTHIS WEEK AND SEE
m
TODAY ONLY
Double Feature Action
PROGRAM
NO. ?
PAT OBRIEN
IN INSAN
SAN INSAN QUENTIN
ALSO ALSODick
Dick ALSODick Tracy No. 15
Wild West Days No. 1
SUNDAY MONDAY
NO 1
l A GREAT PRODUCTION
RE-ISSUED BY REQUEST
-NO 7
FIRST RUN in Gainesville
BRUCE CABOT
in inLOVE
LOVE inLOVE TAKES FLIGHT
Matinee Only Tuesday
Al 1 Day Wednesday
EHEnEOH
THE LIFE OF- X
EMILE ZOU^
Thursday
Back bv Popular/ Djfcanc]
LOST
witjft
RONALD JCOLEMAN
j JANEJ^/YATT

i Life Os Emile Zola Otaris Off
Show Week AI Florida Theatre

Paul Muni, depicting The Life i
cf Emile Zola in Warner Bros,
'great movie production, comes to
the Florida Theater Sunday anti
-Monday. Tlie supporting east in includes
cludes includes such stars as Hale Son
dergard. Gloria Holden, Joseph f
Schildkr aut, Diekie Moore, Donat u
, Crisp, and Grant Mitchell
Mttni, winner ol tile 193 i
Acaitciny Award tor his. "Louis
Pasteur." portrays another great
Frenchmen and crusader tittle
Lon dergard, winner of the 1936
Academy Award for the best per perfotmancc
fotmancc perfotmancc In a supporting role, ap appeal's
peal's appeal's as Madame Dreyfus
Zola, the rebel genius that life
never tamed, si rides across the i
screen to betome an immortal
cl.aractci in the motion picture
Gallery of the Great. . His
magic words those of a great
joinhallsi t ransfortned the
naniv. Dreyfus," into a chapter
of mankind's history; His pen
victories wot- where Mimic;; had
failed.
Pictures for the rest of the
Week are: Today "Charlie Chan
on Broadway" with Warner Ota ml
ar.d' .1 RdWaid Bromberg Kcyc
Li.He, Joan Mareli Louise Henry
I and 1 larokl.
i As the Ha.lirin loom. death
f:t ri 1,.e. ami Cliiin invades
the night clubs . Seeking tha
| killer whose double murder casts
a shallow of terror over Man Manhattans
hattans Manhattans gayest spots,
r Tuesday "Over the Goal, |
Starring Johnnie Davis, June j
Travis, VVdlntm Hopper. Mabel
Todd. William Harrigan, Kay-
I mono Hatton, and Eric Stanley.
Hit this game that has the thrills of
a dozen Hose Bowls rolled into
one. . Shes a honey with an
All-American line. . He's the
' All American laugh back .re
member him in "Varsity Show?
WEDNESDAY "The Perfect
Specimen,* featuring Errol Flynn
and Joan Blundell,. with Hugh
Herbert, Edward Everett Horton. :
Dick For an, Beverly Roberts. May
Robson and Allen Jenkins
When a perfect specimen meets
a perfect nuisance its perfect!
entertainment. . And with Eddie]

Program I FLORIDA 1 Oct' n 23rd |
TODAY ONLY (Saturday)
, jPf% WARNER OLAND
Student's FREE Show Tonight 11 P.M.
Jean Parker in Life Begins with Love
g an
SUNDAY and MONDAY
II AN IMMORTAL TRIUMPH!
hbt wssz

TUESDAY
BANK NIGHT
fflSh First Font bait
wotur*

IHURSDAY and FRIDAY
SPECIALTY NOVELTY
Dancing THE BIG APPLE Sensation

PAGE FIVE

! Horton as a lazy secretary and
Hugh Herbert as a mad poet,
things just go frori oa erse.
Herald Beresfor! Wfehis i Flynn i
could fight like a .hemp, cook
like ct > hes, s.: a .. i-heck for
: sJfl,ooi.ik*A.oo ,l.u; -hi .aldn't
make flow yvto t >. i J .till
he "met Joe,"i i' i in love
He fdi ih< :o !: he gives
tin til You'll lo e ;..fn
THI KH'V mid I til'-AY
Life :Beglm. h; !!( p 'st ring
[the lift:: Brothers, Tefy' Martin
and ] Gloria i-tumi; featuring
Fred Stone. Dixie Dunbar Joan
Davis, Joan M: rsh and] Ed Thor Thorgrrfoii.
grrfoii. Thorgrrfoii.
j The Hits: Ru.thn tike the.
gridiron apar( ... t D-pkgskin cin cinefna.
efna. cinefna. j Songs, gags apd pretty
femmes cum ihe college theme
along] at a sir if t na.ee!. Tuneful
.Tony and glorious tjlmj arc ro
manll i.t I rmYonf,
I \ |
" | i
| 1
WE cawTTI
i REPAIR., j
IT 1
Th t smashed. broken,,
dirty or gummed vah h j
i j made a dependable. j
excellent time piece here
at a very reasonable j
. cost frv us.
* 307WUMlVEkSITYXVr'GaINESVILIXFia
| BUY FROM US AWD SAVE
i ii

WEDNESDAY
PLAY SCREENO
Wild Comedy and
Heavy Laughs!
-IN -INPERFECT
PERFECT -INPERFECT
SPECIMEN
With
Errol Flynn
Joan Blondell"
Hugh Herbert
Edward Everett Horton
May Robson



PAGE SIX

Tally Crashes Whos Who With
Nineteen Listed; Skating Starts
As Neu) Play Night Attraction
Investiture Ceremony Saddened By Absence of Four
Members of Class; Two Killed In Car Wreck
By Elizabeth t urner
Investiture ceremony Tuesday night was without the happiness it j
is support! to embody due to the absence of four members of the
class, two of whom were killed last Saturday, and two of whom
were unable to attend due to injuries received in the same accident. ;

Nineteen girls from this cam campus
pus campus are listed in this years Whos
Who Among Students in Amer.
can Colleges and Universities, a
compilation of outstanding stu students
dents students published by the Un.vet jiiy
of Alabama.
The girls selected are Phil
Asher, chairman of the social
committee; Becky Ashton, junior
representative to judiciary; Kath Katherine
erine Katherine Autrey, junior represent a- <
tive to judiciary; Viola Brooks,
president of the athletic associa association;
tion; association; Mickey Conn, senior repre representative
sentative representative to judiciary; Winifred
Ewart, first vice-president of C.
G. A.; Evelyn Fisher, editor of
the Flambeau;. Louise Gehan.
chairman of judiciary; Bett>
Hatch, second vice-president of
A.;- Martha Letter, presi
dent of Y. W. C. A.; Francos
Lewis, treasurer of C. G. A.; Lou Louise
ise Louise Lingo, chairman of residence
halls committee; Betty Ost'und,
president of C. G. A.; Kathryn
Pratt, president of senior class;
Marjorie Raulerson, freshman ad advisor;
visor; advisor; Eileen Robinson, editor of
Flastacowo; Carah Sealey, editor
of Distaff; Pearl Shepard, co-edi co-editor
tor co-editor of the Flambeau; and Hilda
Spradlin, senior representative to
judiciary.
SEARCH FOR IDEAL
Phi Alpha Theta, national his history
tory history honorary held initiation
Thursday night for Esther Good Goodwin
win Goodwin and Ruth Prather.
A Flambeau reporter has been
prying around among a number
of students trying to find out
what the average girl on our
campus wants in a husband to-be
and the answers so far have been
so varied she has not been able
to draw any conclusions as to
the average ideal man. In fact,
she knows there are none to be
found that would measure up to
some of the requirements. Here
are a few typical responses.
All I ask for is a Harvard
man, said one young thing with
shining eyes. Dark, tall and
handsome. And oh, he must have
hair on his chest!
.Some preferred the heel click clicking
ing clicking play boy for a husband. He

ECONOMY CAB
Our cabs have used University Tags for five years.
We also brought the 10c rate to Gainesville.
Patronize us and help to keep this 10c rate in
our city.
DAY and NIGHT SERVICE
Phone 506 or 507

I ALWAYS WELCOME!
I ALWAYS SATISFIED!
jg| WHEN YOU COMF TO THE
I GATOR RESTAURANT
REGULAR MEALS
FOUNTAIN SERVICE
SANDWICHES
SHORT ORDERS
If SCHOOL SUPPLIES
BS \ '
I ENGRAVINGS j
! In One or More Colors
:v
| MADE BY
j The Tampa Times Engraving Plant
TAMPA, FLORIDA
PRINT BETTER LOOK BETTER
' 1
j W E MAKE A SPECIALTY OF SCHOOL
, AND COLLEGE ANNUALS j.
i I ;
| Engravers for the Seminole and Florida Alligator

;
must have polished manners, j
sophistication, and be a good
dancer, and a good mixer.
Probably the brightest girl
states the following as her re-
I qnirement. She says she is look looki
i looki ing out for a husband about ten \
years older than herself so that
he may have as much sense as
she has. |
One innocent freshman meekly
1 hoped that htj would be pure
but was immediately squelched |
by her older" and more worldly*;
sisters with cries of lmpossible, i
where would you find him?
And the lollypop goes to the j
one who expressed the desire for )
a rich husband i with one foot in )
the grave and the other on a
banana peel.
SKATING NEW FAD
A new attraction offered at j
play night is skating. Fifteen
new pairs of skates have been
added to the equipment for play'
night and are available to those
wishing to indulge in that sport.
The Flambeau reports an In Interesting
teresting Interesting episode. There was a
birthday party in the dining hall
last Sunday, and the news value
of this party was the fact that
it was in honor of a male visitor.
The gentleman, an architect
student at the University, blushed i
and stammered while his date en-
joyed his discomfort hugely.
Matthews To Speak
To Soph T Club
D. R. Billy Matthews, direc-
tor of Florida Union, will be the
guest speaker before the Soph
club at its meeting Monday
night at 7:15 oclock.
The Art of Living is to be
the theme of Matthews talk. He
will attempt to present the bene- i
fits to be received from living a
; well-rounded life. Judging by
Matthews splendid work at Flor- ;
ida Union, he is well qualified to
I speak upon the problems facing a
l young man during his university
life.

Warren Discusses
Bridge Building
Advantages of a bridge having
cement based timber pilings over
the advantages of an all-cement
bridge w'ere discussed by Sam
j Warren, engineering student, be be!
! be! fore the American Society of
i Civil Engineers, Tuesday.
Warren based his discussion on
a letter recently received from
Bill Dean, University graduate,
who is now assistant bridge en engineer
gineer engineer of the Florida State Road
i department.
The discussion dealt with the
| bridge now under construction be between
tween between Miami and Key West. It
was said that the bridge when'
finished will be the longest of its
I kind in the world.
Prof. P. L. Reed introduced Mr.
Gillis, graduate of the class of
I 23. who attended the meeting as
a guest. Mr. Gillis for the past
! ten years has worked on construc construc!
! construc! tion jobs in New' Jersey, and told
, of his experiences in construction
j building.
! Kappa Sig Pledges
Given Supper
j Pledges of Kappa Sigma fra fraternity
ternity fraternity w'ere entertained Tues Tues-1
-1 Tues-1 day night at a buffet supper
given in their honor by wives of
the Gainesville alumni. The sup supper,
per, supper, an annual affair, was held at
the fraternity house and was serv served
ed served in the newly inaugurated din dining
ing dining room.
Later in the evening, following
the formal introduction of pledges
and brief talks by George Means,
president of the chapter, and Pat
Ford, president of the pledge class
there was a musical program.
Among those present were Mrs.
! John J. Tigert, Dean and Mrs. Wil Wil!
! Wil! mon New'ell, Miss Mary Jane Tig Tig{ert,
{ert, Tig{ert, Mrs. J. S. Means, Dean and
Mrs. Beaty, Dr. and Mrs. Arthur
L. Shealy, Dr. and Mrs. Simpson,
Mr. and Mrs. J. L. Neill, Mr. and

j
[ ...,
i- .
W/icits your pick
for the ALL-STAR.. Eddie %

With smokers in
every part of the country
Chesterfields stand ace high.
Its a cinch theyve got what sinok sinokr
r sinokr I
ers like. Youll find them milder ...
i L
you 11 enjoy that Chesterfield taste

esterfieluS^ljj^
v Ace of them all 'P^
\ /> MILDNESS and TASTE
B Cwnrist* IW7, a. Wvot, Icjalco l

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR

Presbyterian Group
Plans For House
Members of the Presbyterian
student session once more have
taken up the fight for a student
house, and at their meeting Tues Tuesday
day Tuesday they voted to concentrate
their efforts throughout the year
on this objective.
Ever since the student session
i was established on the campus in
| 1934, its greatest need has oeen a
building which Presbyterian stu students
dents students could use as a center for
j their activities.
In these four years since a
small sum has been collected by
the group, and within the last
two "years co-operation from the
Synod of Florida has been solicit solicited
ed solicited and obtained to the amount of
two percent of the synods budget.
In order to speed up things this
yeftr, the Presbyterian young
j people of the state voted last
summer at their conference to
contact every member of the
church in this state and solicit his
contribution for the house. The
Mrs. J. M. Scott, Mr. and Mrs.
Ralph Stoutamire, Mr. and Mrs.
Jim Larche, Mr. and Mrs. Burt
Ames, Miss Marion Morris, Mr.
William Carleton, and Professor
Angus Laird.

I SEE!
I 1938 CHEVROLET
I ON DISPLAY TODAY
j! THIGPEN CHEVROLET CO.

Song Os China
Wins Approval
The Song of China, a sound
film w'ritten, acted and produced
in China by Chinese, was present presented
ed presented in Florida Union Tuesday
night as the first in a series of
foreign films to be brought Here
through the efforts of the Univer University
sity University film committee.
1 Reactions of four generations of
I a typical Chinese family when
! Western culture and ideas began
|to undermine ancient customs
j was portrayed on the screen by
| the Chinese actors.
Recent shots of the Sino-Japa- t
nese war were shown in another j
film on the program. Included in
j this feature were the first pic pictures
tures pictures taken from Japanese air airplanes
planes airplanes during an air raid. Chinese
; citizens w'ere shown fleeing from
Shanghai as colmuns of troops
! moved up to the front.
Film committee members said
they were well pleased w'ith the
[ attendance at the show'. Announce Announcej
j Announcej ment of the second film on the
j program will be made shortly, it
j was stated.
. j 1
| goal is one dollar for each Presby Presby|
| Presby| terian, a total of $20,000.

ct your last minute ) /
S>Xy \ from Kdd,e Dooley Y
\tlxx \ w th Paul Douglas J /
\ Thursdays and Saturdays /

Buckman C Takes
Shoes Doubles
.. I
Buckman C and Thomas C |
again featured in horseshoes when j
Buckman C defeated its opponent
Wednesday afternoon to annex
the horseshoe doubles champion- j
ship with the score 21 14, s 6-21, j
21-9.
Team A of Buckman C was i
composed of O. Smith and M. J
Wadsworth; team B, S. Rood and:
W. Sigman; team C, W. Grimes
and O. Reeder. For Thomas C
the players were: Team A, A.
Spider and C. Powers; team B.
j L. Kimble and J. Gossman; team

Blankets *1
SINGLE or DOUBLE
ALL COTTON or WOOL MIXED
This Ad And
i.
V
RUDDYS DEPARTMENT STORE
South Side Square Gainesville

.;i" ;
I ;
That's a cinch Paul
.. Im 100% right
on this one
My 1J
I W w*
M j. \
ir\ 7
>*l y

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 23, 1937.

C. J. Lamb and B. Vam.
Immediately previous to their,
defeat Thomas C had downed;
New* Dorm H in the semi-finals
! With the scores 21-16, 21-16, 21-5.|

jj TIP TOP ICE CREAM
ICE CREAM ALL FLAVORS
FROZEN MALTED MILK
CANDY CIGARETTES
i j ; Jj

Weather observers
I gust of wind blew 231
; hour at the top of
! ington, N. H., at 1:2l p
j 12, 1934.



Full Text

PAGE 1

0 I I FOR A GREATER FLORIDA nt 9 GAINESVILLEFLORD 7A-SATURDAY TFR 217 ~~~~~*'44 A X7 A /If'A f I IVI' z-ioneren An Eye;Meets Here Today otkc Pre And Tomorrow By Daiihd A. Denslom ii. WEEK Following up last week's proni the Eve makes another" stab hell week, that rat-beating tra ion which is gradually lisa pring but which needs Io he ved out itoipltltely, ant at ce, so that even this yea'; cio",1 freshmen wil tilnk of it :' 'L ng of thie past. Clifford Beis'iev, peils iel of Intel-fratrenit v Co'ifercie ys the conference. is taking acn on the problem alrevtdy,. igall local chapters to (io away th hazing. peaking for hmisclf lit saad ery definitely I'm against any g that permiLs beating freshn." And he alded t haIt all the ge fraternities are getting aV from uISilg' th paddle. Naal officers iire insisting that chapters do away 'with it, subtuting work aroutndthte hiluse'. the lawns. and similar con Active activities. UDENT %'.NTIMNIVI Cleve J-Ic ie k anisw ettd. I 11 k ? Never h.aid of it. %\, en't ha'i it in our fa 'ti ll ". TO) for several yen k s. N it im a1-hl1-t it." hn 11. cox tni.;js h1 1 k its place if ustd w\l ithl 14144 It .Hc fedls that it prI)i e of the iniation necessaliry to e the freshin t lhe feeling t he really belongss," V.li.h ig UiS hard to .1ivo il rt'iini nothing but thwe y n1 >I emyi Cardlnas say. I d erstand lltiv% 14it'41' ita 11 pleasure out ft hr pe nful displeasut t'. 01 com.e an using practicalI jtokkis g o0 I ugh spiprt. lint t,) ArttllyJI Illa mian N11 tti to en the t h it d i tik' ke thv'ia %N ( rk Ot l 'havk ml i~diter' of Thi A tor, sho,,% I4 his 44i 1* Ii, 41 I y misin et t >jtI 5Ii141441t t I w er-fratei'in y corifetr (Ill", gI to get I : 1('11 0 aft r tlllkj24" to i ;, tt .vlh 'teels quite (q) F rIt %,' 1 w that I his r F1 1 hil fI ~'iie~l kto',t'i: the univ'rsi h li ": USc (altt' t n I t''ktts in 1o04,kst4l 4, J 1 i k ) lm U by Il.' I I ',tl ted the question t4 .isn',. nager K. It. I to tiii: -(I, Jltaiii tor it 21 It < n 1 1144' N i )f,4 jil j %% 11 14'1 ,1.,~'I iIr t liti t) ,In l UtJ, :41 11 144 U Cber wh o mah ll t )11\k nta4 1o a I 3i The iit' 1 11 t14 I l ~ 4 I 444' P "'41~~~~ 4"11 c.41 4 a 214t 4' a I, 1 w414 t t hat w .' o y a hO tI II IWI41 ~ I ( y at thflt miit 'lit 44, i'the t'iiversity I Students From Rollins, Southern, FSCW And University Hear Current Problems ( )pt ang lad I llt L' I t t'ss ly I. .Ch('aplian I of t he State Prison at RaIl4rd n '-The (ri n, Situation Florida." the setIntd a1uII1 s iatt d ''t :: ('tn, 4 t I O'Florida YMCA and tht Tallahassee YW'A i., i't' ng lher' tt ay ad tomorrow. Pur11p04skof the co1:ft1It!n.c*IS to give students an oppoi tunity to discuss. unut capable leadrshp proti~t d (41' 14o5f lsonal. sLt .t n,1114tional, ani international niatr 1. The University i ; ohwst t4ooit to appixliatly 544 studezlts rtpr'stliting Rollis. S4utl1'. F14lmid 1 State (4lle e for Wom-p an riIth U t(t'~y of Florid. Dr. A. J. Kisslimg .f tne Iiivi sitit Presbyterian church, J.1aik sonitle, will opte the mleting this i'orning with an adh'ess on -Persoa at Spiriitual Gzu o wtIlI, i-hi I n Fltii,-a I' 4t1I eah 1114'4't p u tot tdi4s >v4114 JI 4" 1.1c ration La rn,, fl4 4 S.IIt 1, 1 si(lent ,o F'loi ia YM( 'A, an1ountCed that ill sludvnts on thl, kamlpis ate invit d to attend il Th ucon tertlite w" dl clos, 4)1 til~y at 4oo4 l mn i ('oitiph tt' pro.grIitm1 1 '4o y4 li\ '411d t .01(i'tOw ,follo -ons m t upm 'n Sclem.f 4 .a.f itirt1eln1t .i 2::1.> p. m T, uIN 4SoiI'Spiritual r;cwt ii. Lv Dr. Kiss.ng. A ,'A1 Looks To.41 I1 '111111-and .1a141il liThe lit 1, to\. T i it)'1 )A p.Iii.d I4 1 h14 ~ ltit (;r'Oxr pi scopal ct'x. f rki lt1.1 \tll t. villa t. \, :I -1 .rl1 A ll toI r ';1 I b I 'I(41 AjiguIl 144 I' '4I t y Pohn l [.:I SCI, e ~ r e UNI) 9 :"0 a. m. "T t 1S14'I 44lils'1t1 o sponwwnihlit," byProf, Tuh g. GT 44w Ii,'' b' l V. \\ '". fTile,',t Cabin In Pines Latest Work Of Foresters General Reunion At Homecoming New Feature New Type Meeting To Replace Former 'College' Event Thlt' w.x.ill 14' 14 ao .olige ir'ivnif r ( i this yeat 's 1 riu'.''' '1111git was decidt'd at a r'c m t I t 11 t.t i 11;4 f t ht UI IIt K 4 repesntaivsd4-ans of the Nit[ I ons c l< ges :4V1 tt '1,4t1lt Alumni tonuttte. Tis nilajl 4t' t ili g't' 1144441 lit ykar; as u t mll oICd after pla(n1 mIt'etitg o4 f al lailhillni. th is paI rt of the .c cl-'t' wl at it be i ta atute t it He a 1 11 111,Y5 -'ar. i'l' lt5' i it a I 111nit 41 m L l i4-'li ill titott f tiht 1 4l11il I'mn b4 ldi g.'\cr -O ing to those ii charg a itmort et iiocratic r~ uni('n call be realized by this plan. ilie old ty 1 'retlnions re.strictintg the affairs to individual colleges wil i"i. (tonIIIriday mid wh4 4 's il the 1)ast Il1(I.IinrIng was aj U. of F. Symphony To Appear Soon' T h' liIIst I. 1 ""of S111ii ;tt end i I I 'op i t' t os )' g 'ii >441 in the Universitv altitnt1m1111 by' tivth Ittnversity of F'HotIda Symphn Orchestra will off1 il1 t1,-l i. t'! 54 ;51 Io1 (I o 11t1t orgamrlzattion MuIIsic it w b 11prsclntfd in tht-s", concer, s will ht b th' ,s-;ImSicl-classi cal and1 f)(Oula i'. r'hest ra ttf'iccrs lirge td n to S1u1111t rcqu'sts f' t ions to any "or' ttSt 41 il'iln-?. Elf tnrt i itin l h bvt L t i 1t'r R. Dt Wi tt a I ti B v4 T ; 'e h 1 .n ild t -01rchest ra to m ake 1Th4 tt I tw'sres popular vw'111ttht ev~my M in the mmstntbtdy.i a l~t u in i t F!rIn addition to thr pip concerts, th!,Ic f)rMal ev('mng coniclrts are ret's. hail nt 144 '4 .Jiit wh -h I1l feature mor'' .m lvalw'd (44411Iposit ('('nl\'t'rt thtCI 1mII44 ltFI rt LI anid I the 11t' ~lt 11lI1It'i 11 th buld.\)etl c' .of 12 114 1 t'n a k'ie Iig Q1tilt' 1. 'lu n t uare o I 1 i t chestrta imemIrs to many of Flr 't1imed fr'am the Austin (''arty leI id ali'g cities including Day1114'rial f4o4 st. xx 1w1h1 is 4'xwx i' y'S. 'rl m D1tx'ht i 1 itl4t Fbiy If lr t I'll, A ig t alk"' Tailahass.-t'and SaraI)ll C aly b i t hm l I,-;loe t ei ill I, 1. t(4 I'I 'st I !441)I tt' t4111 sl"n ) -1. 441it L;tko Mize. 13 v"1)1s ntirtheast Iof T al I m s. l114441'kx tf 414 t' Onily Fcwt aux G a T1C TicncI.s Recmail 0 lilt AhaW I a' 4 A',1.2.20 i U'k1 s ha 'een thert'by' intI upl 4atfrom tht 15-yal It1t. t' the center o both eitds of tilt' solith side ()f' the stadiImil. <)nl a few $2.50 tickets are l-ft o that .s;le. anti t h're remain only a1 f-w $2. Lotickt'ts fttr tlhe twit Lbsid' studnt Al!soe dm da s it h41. from the athletic office iimmediately. tf. L tir ln lSnvit, 141 t ifollS %v t wtt'k > all a lI.-s 4MUSICti'ils,. eSI-t'cially playt'rs if strm it inst 1 niilit'llts. to play wvith the orch't ra. Rehcars.Js are hed MorIti 14(4 TIhursday 1ight at 7 !r the audfitorium Cheerleaders Plan RAY Thursday I il t' t 1I 'a ( t u l. I -i". L, v I :4I n:(11tront of t"4'A l 1ichr1 the fghtI, ,tt'rs 441 ats they leave 4 14n 4 it' h tst ile C!>llcgt' xxith Ithe4 U ni'er'sity of Mat'yhaul's Ter1rapmis. Dt'wn'itd by the Gators in1 a tilrillino7-6 victory during 11ast flomecomling, the Maryland 'boys are "out for blood" anld thle team needs all the backing the student body can tI them.I Eo.i y't"Unie who cave lst thi-i're IS edby to attend th rally' and ptre ti the tesam that ias t.,k a tt end the ra v(ltuntary even though students were in military ranks. ce Florida Review Well Received By Students Large Supply Exhausted After One Day's Distribution The Fall issue of the Florida Itview mad its appearance oil the campus Wednesday .morning, and allmo .t at once the supply of copies was exhausted, so popular did the magazine prove with the student boly. ExactI 3,it 44c4qies of th Review weere priinted by the Rose Printiiig ('ompany, in TallahasThe cirulation staff suppos( d this I igliir t iUit( adequat'. sie, only yi litA 110than 27'o studIlits ilt' 5s ppoSed t 1 I t l_;t' .I ti y ar' 3,2mit 4p it I 1511u-, it ich time aftcr the demaA %was apparently completyt'I musista surjllus (of fr()m 300 to 4i 'op wtre left. This ytar., 'i tt :'~ 4ons, Ll 4vt'xe 5t;1i 1.1, d t.a cll '04k. t(,ttmsY F h r Il"111 ~ ir stated tha't thar1,od14 exhaustion of th >upply tO I'magazines was probais du, thi e'fficilent system of i 5' Piibutotn worked out by Circula1LirIl MaIna1g4Ji4h4 Cox a11d4 Ii I. tsttt. Liast veilil's .ur I lus e(Gulr-' was alt' tosay afttr review' title to faulty cirtulatin. And this y',ar with nleally pwlfect dsr~tD11 .r114441C' (' Io; s wv r e il'II' than ", i xt-td. I'nll'tiig t OStI1 S uil tte it uImf o44Ssil) tI 4 publish l 11 1 '(' .fi's 4f tlt' Review, saiatBusiness Manager G'41ge I3yne s. So the denand for ml1ore Reviews must renlain uinsatisfitd. When the Winter issue appears in the midle of December, enough copies will be printed to ('t-44'tr it' ( d i and conplt Iy, Bvri 1iiannounccdl. Th tcotents of tiw I all issue attracted te attention and piUise (f m any. Of special intertst was a iouwt p~'Iage f-ature dt'd icat'' to) tilt' memory of Dean 1B. A. Tole'rt, whose death otrt't r't'dUHtl lth last suninier: a liandsome filiotograph of the Dean, and a Sincert poem written y Carl Opp. Thi' articles in ti' crren Ittviox art devt 4tl to 4'riouIs Sij.cts censorship (of tiht'ec4llege pries, and the Sino-Japant'st' situationt. l-velyni Fisher, editor t f the FSCW Flambeau, is guest conitriitor witii a clever sketchi. "Th'y Also Laugh." Folltoxing tilt an t'ditotrial plea for regionalism, this type of writIm. 1'prestntei by a story by E rMcGuir-, and a p)owm, '',im House Lakt'.'' by son Ken tw*'dy. Pot'tr'y and a story by Kdwii tWissing'r: an exit ing tale of war in Russia by IHarry K, iwards: v.sc by Clart-nco H 'rft. Tom Leoart. W. K. '1'mg; lit' rary sketches byj i ijin 1Jornson" and ( "G rge 441l,"toth pseudonyms rfun (out the Fall issut. MAJOR POWELL M'jti (autn itIwel director o Ko li, Station WI 'AI", is chairlan w' the i t' e K 1ey adio coinI IIIt tt in'a nIII itwI teor of the Blue Kv t -'Vt ulty Aitvisory c(,mmaittec. WRUF Completes Three Publicity Recordings Transcriptions Feature Homecoming Plans; Six Scheduled 41i yv 144 I''144 i 414 l U .44.' 1 1m 1441) .4 44. angle 1)444k 144 II M 4)11 i logit wxhen in mchai lloticl ialiscr-il Pt 1111 : w e 1:i c II the .tilt' os 4,, \, v, ir'441y f r dislriItli 11 tlto r:4o4 4tatilni5 thltoigh11ut th ta!'.)''i I 11w4 re allti1, 41 1n 4 radio 44 I ittt, t m k i ng o f six pplr poram trantscriptions Attack Fatal To Green, Member History Dept. I-lad Been On Faculty Here Since 1931; Taught -30 Years A. S. Green, assistant professor in the department of history and political science, succumled yesterday at 11:30 a. in. to a fatal heart attack after a brief illness. He was 50 years old. Having been a teacher in public schools throughout the state for the past 30 years, Green had many' frit'nls among the citizens of the stat.' and students whom he has taught. Born June 2, 1887. at Sliadv Grove near Perry, Fla .lie rt'ceived his SeCktntIarv 4u1(ti1 ill Taylor County and taught Itber for a number of year's. i i" ed his bachelor of airts il, edu tion from the Uiniversity of Florida in 1928. He was lit mtlst rIctt4r during the siminier .,cssiofis ol 1928, '29 and '31 hert. Green received his llasters tingree ill political scivice 1 11 1931. Since then he has beoni a iiic b' 1' of the faculty here with tht' ,(ception of one vearl wh ifn lIe t Ii graduate work at the Universit y of Illinois. He was a nieibr of 'li IKappa Phi aid Kappa Delta Pi. HfiI' taught in Taylor cointy44' schools and was formerly primieipal of Lake Alfred high school. fie ad also taught anti acte f as principal of several other schools in tht state. Greon is survived by' his wi'tfe, Mis. Eleanor Kuhiman (Gret'n, four sisters, Miss Eva Green (if Perry,. Mirs. John Austin of Cortez. Miss Lydia Green of Ellenton, Mrs. Kate Pearson of Ft. Mylrs and one brother, Fillmore Green xwhieh it was aiiwunced would be of Perry. used in outlining the entire proFuneral arrangements ar-4' in grm ft lotritImtc't 1n",n fcstivitiem ciarge of Thomas Funeral Homn' .I ,d services will hi.' held ton1I,'loridi)4 is i rla")w afternoon at tIhrev. Thrf". fof ti h six a railipT: "In('ntswa nt nw sperkte WI em(l hir g ill Music fo r ,L g i 1in .I'inisedAll Ne Phatas Ix I t 1141 I "o IIt)I Is 111 I I 111 4145. Dell G'ibbhs having spt-c al arrang lnl'its Of I Tech 544ug5 have a' 4 ed a grt I hal a,4141',.t (08 entrt mn n 1 uo (of t h 11#l tri n uch t ra nsc itS 41' f vt inutt talk, t'llg m1 (,lI'I by D r. .)t 1t y, St iIon Wald hr mn n ;+i go mt he sp4. 41a4 1 1 intg't1m0'nt or' -n A ( 4A l.txm 4114! i t 1' r ' i titi by a ft o rtIs al11 I4+1t. 0a mi st' of cerk t a r Not 4 me. 1.t -r 1 Vi rs T i,,distribtion ( f these (r'1f44ons as oiIiIncd by ( ,,,I tItIIIt 11 1 ';1 P 4gf. T w Army Joins Civilians To See Tear Leave For Mississippi Statet> hI th i .I m I ir s n 1 II 44ory of tht' Urt Plo k i '. Thun 54Is. y alt 'lrit'lon as aut I,'t iti lt's a 'itl i milltaI ) n is tm til 1 1 11 1 tzn t'n s tilt' 1t 11m off. It was est that ipproximlately 2.'11 1 1 1t wx'tsri' present as the train ax I. 41r 'yinga t' te 1 11 MIssissipoi xx'ht rt th' -y m et Mis: State 141y The eveit wxa-; 1A41r.1-4 t'ti Uy I'l Ilk a'. \Vn''glt. l-a-I it the I l''m5rty'5 flub] lity 44 ftili'Lmint. 1444t i' iii A1Ibgt t liy ~\'.'' 14 fii l I It t 4i1t )t111 I' ; t44 r lit' pt rli tlss l I nn l 4 i t I I.y 4 tt I l tlo g1t itl af f; ir It' V 10 Us t hen. theo' 14m it 1a1, :I-j tT 4,t' : fil Itartllg t t il 11jl It11 t he Ih ; l', .".to mll 11' ttn~ v,'hI th) 141 i t'; -Itsitt1 t Itthe t dt'f -. might al e pre talo I fit st it i t s r dl m II i -, L::ifOrm .I .sp, "ad er aplo pox::stely lot h t'ks ot" t th e et is it ilm as i a v to tiltA.C.L. iiepot Til-i regularr starting x timj4S 11j thti the ao' hip ay)I1.1for It.' m!1. i ',,S ioii 11tt ha at tile stud4-nls miglit all be present and(] i 1 ;I f nuntts the train was o-it'. -tely silr. u11id,'ed by oytst tial W I't h A It baI e4 .a I .tin <," n !rlader's Iml atlion anld th I e'ed ingngtile "Orangk anrd iie M arch orfra the Fighti ltea M. Afterthe crowd had sn the "Mar-ch of the Fi-ghting Gat. 41 n, 1' gitn tl lamilia F's. the trn g: nto ov M stn tti't. ITllstraills ol ais fihtilg 54ig, with I 'S. 11111 I in"d Misst wx.!r. 1.jas thiing~s the lits FlorA JLA5 A IuVo Vy A %YLF Florida Climaxing three weeks of conwhich troversial discussion about taking to the' new pictures throughout for tht' h' ree 1937-38 Seminole, Editor 1oa'rdman this week gave Allan's Studio th 'ription signal t6 go ahead with the new these photographs. Tigert, Two weeks ago, when Boar'tnan o, Ben took the matter to the Board of is, and Publications for their decision, te talk they shunted the responsibility on;t4origia to the students by askinfr for a os i 11 g vote on the matter. They said giroUp that their answer would be decided Florida by the majority of student vttes. Walsh, Only 126 students bothered to touncer vote. Of these, 72 valei Iagainst the change. Because of the little interest shown, the Boar of Publications did not exercise its adtransvisory capacity in the matter. Major This left the matter up to Boardman. U Boardman said that since oniv three per cent of the student b-s4dv showed sufficient interest to coic (ut and vote, he felt that he w-as fl justified in carrying through his plan for new pictures. "Although certain elements aire trying to organize the fraternities to oppose the new pictures, the [Ve'sity fraternities are responding favorry stu -ably." Boardman told the ALLIilated GATOR last night. pulled The studio is taking fnew pit".' sissippi tures daily of the fraternity nen in their scheduled order. while op---ponents of the change threaten to r three bring an injunction suit throtueh e along the Honor Court on the rounds f Florthat Boardman must act in acthe i_ cordance with the student vote. 1, Gatdown, teaMurphree To Present -it-al its-til l. At a hl Stf slatt -LVierne Program Sat 3:1 at the athletic fit'!' 41N I stilients anti For his Sunday afternoon organ P 11" 1 w111'1 We gat'ret1. As the recital to be given at 4 o'clock. iii to c I f thet field, Coach the University auditorium, Claude jtoh ( 'l and t' players re Murphree, University organist, Itt ts frt'm the asannounces a special all-Vierue 5em11 Stulients. Stopping by program. th, Stili 'ar. ('.[odvspok' briefly, Louis Vierne, organist at famed savg. "We have a hard gami Notre Dame Cathedral, Paris, for Saturday, especially as it is Mis-1 many years until his death last sissippi's Homecoming. But we 'June, has supplied the organ p1ronlnse we'll give you the best world with some of its outstand'Vtx e got. and we apprec'ftte ing compositions, distinguished your til n'ig out like this," Just both for graceful melody and rich as the gathering was about to harmony. Tomorrow's program break upt. Wright Stplptd to the will include excerpts from Vierne's tar wnt:' ilainioulnlc'ed that permisfirst and second organ syisit n oad 1 _t n granted for miliphonies, also from tle "24 1 'i'e'S in Free Style.' All students are Continued on Page Two invited to attend. Is Given Full Credit Four Courses Here Tigert And Weil Announce Decision Of Council That Investigated Last Year 1. J 11: n J. T ig 'rt ai Dean Jseph Weil of the College at i n :n'-.'11. a mi this week that the Engineering College has han 1 .l e it ts t). curiicula accredited by the Engineering ( a 18 1 r'ess .441n11 lt development. national accrediting agency 1 r H .i h4 The tIu 1' department that have been ac4t ', 1 4 '4' 'ix k I I c:A .M echanical and Industrial. Poucher Elected FFA Collegiate Chapter Head National Leader Was Voted Outstanding Ag Frosh In '36 ht1.4 4 t' 41 t I' St, 1 I l t -4' e lIt I4I, -4;' li t lptm r It' dem I o ll at ('1 itp te r of FItt u I i ill I:4 5 A ('It .\ ii'sat the t-:,[ T m e :I of t he m rganiFra1kI \I1 11uis, ;tato' director of Slilith-I-lught's. : .partof the tt 44 1I( )Ill agi'icultur it0 set.I-,. .44.41 ,I1-ty 's l(ftice (f ty.hwiwlixd pm n locher af t -I 4. ut'n, ''husday night. PWurnt was atl, the utStan, i g .lit' 4' (if agriculture frt-sI I i 11 :: A iet'i t an colleges an1d i.sIt's at lastv year's V4'tlI I. ( wilt's fiom Largo, Twvo V]hwii a fi tshm t nn, Myvron Gi'enki 11anl .Jhn 11It. Jones were awartied Future Farmers of Arneiica degrees. The awards follttwed the contests an] examinainns h'ii ;m conjunction with the ilez s ;2 at the san time Pmtucht'i' w :is lt-0te<1 to the presi,t'114w' r the, cmin year. Potuchler left ftoi' Kansas City I14I '14 111111 :t wi'tk ago. inimeli14tI','141 a ti' Ills lection a-s prt'si44141 ifis tlPs.1ot('hftr has I-ten 4)11 st liIii ng inl Floid a's ag1iculturt.t t'Iilhs. It' made the dear's list iuriiig his fieshnan V C"11'. Camp Roosevelt Bill Awaits Signature Of President Th qut "ii of whether tr not Caip lb a'velt yV4ld p'rmanently v clse is still undecided, ac('iir'tling to a statement made by President Tigert yesterday. All officials ani t('achtrs' are at a ) for information concerning th4 situation. After a lengthy meeting with 11"I. AU Iet'man11ilthi n his ptlringtld stay in Gainesville, Dr. Tig-'rt SiIt ('41 that there were no new developments. He said that t ap prop riation hill wa.s rio.' in Wv ash intgton waiting for Presi4 ent Roosevelt's approval. The ECPD is the official accrediting agency of engineering ( 1irticiutla in the United Stateti and is tht first engineering organization) f its type. It is comi-K'sed 4f4' leading engineering orgamizati1ns fro1 iall parts of the couiitv including the Society for the I'iomot ion t(f Engineering Education and the National Boarti of Enontn~ Exeaminers. importance I'l itmiportance of their ap p 0111lies in the fact that a g'ad11tif an accredited universitv is given credit for his work w 'ht'n ho 1com11's before a state 44ard of 'engineering examiners for his professionall registration. Anot her betiefit. is that such s'hool6 are recognized by the Civil S e r v i c e Commissioners, vhilea third advantage is that At assumes prospective students that they are to attend a first class school. The investigation committee ILsited the campus January 11 and 12 at which time the mem o't inspected different phases of -n_ ilieerilig and pre-engineering wt)ork. At that time they were not authorized to say whether or not Florida's curricula would meet their standards but said Lhat they were favurably impIressed with the relationship beLween the General College and the izngineering college. Tnis accrediting of the currieula is iIteipreted as a stamp of approval of engineering authori.IvS upon -the new educational methods employed by the Unicersity of Iforida. The Library f a c iIit iecs, the I tiathematics and English departents, together wit every other Iipartme t available for pre-engirueertrig work was inspected 'our ingthe visit. Afft-cs 1,1ett Dean lWeil said that this marks an important step in the history of the Coiltge of Engineering and liffeclsthe University as a whole. ite furher stated that the committee will frequently review the colleges and reitiove from the list ,hose who do not maintain the proper standards. This means, he cXpla1ned, that with an ever cnanginfg subject such as enginncig, laboratories' must be kept up to date and the instructional staff must keep informed of techii.tal ti'ogress. "Tht faculty of our college will do evetiything they can so that in the future we will not lose the tribute which has been paid us." Weil stated. Chemistry Frat Is'Lightnin' Set Completed The staging and scenery arWrilled Equipment rangements of the forthcoming Florida Paye r s production, Wilei xvaluahle chemical equip"Lightnin'," are near completion ni(nt I)v the late Dr. H. G. Shaw, and will be ready for the dress former professor at the Univerrehearsal which is to be held early sity of Florida, members of Gamnext week. The caat which was mna Signa Epsilon, honorary chosen last week will also be chemistry frptternity. met Monready for the dress rehearsal day to 4'ispose of their inheritance. and will be fully prepared for the The chemnistry books were doI three performances to be given nated to the (chemistry library: the on November 3, 4, 5. chemicals antd laooratory apparatus were given to 'the chemistry room.Included in these Student Notices chtmicalsiwei'e some rare Cerium compounds hich were made by Dr. Shaw in research conducted LMANAGERI'HP OPEN while on the campus. Persons desiring managerships .___~~_ of the varsity sports; baseball, Slow Motion track. tennis, swimminA please .make application to the student Personified -athletic council, care of Miss Yon at the athletic department. T1* Chi Phis who were at Roy Echols, secretary, ,1house when it caught on Student Athletic Council. fire a week ago Friday have be.'n laughing ever since at the way the negro house boy CTer told them about it. There will be a meeting of Alit seems that the bell had pha Phi Omega i the Florida Unjust rung for dinner when the ion at 7 o'clock,, on the third colored boy caine out of the floor. This is a very important Ritcher. ambled over to where meeting and it is hoped that all the diing room manager was the regular members will be pres.standing and suggested that ent. All visitors are welcomed us Jie call the fire department. I1usual. as tile whole realr end of the er tary. house wxas ablaze. SeCretary. F4' 'DL. SI NO. 7. Engineering I ACV i 71 1

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it Florida Universities Should Direct Ag Scholarship Pi Dauer Fears War Future Of Industry. Commerce DAcussed By To Be Result Of In State, Says Grassfield Ro. Ck Offical Foreign Policy J C Ha~ineR pubile rtatlona General Manager of Florida Chamber of Commerce Tells De!ta Sigma Pi Industry Gaining in State Ralin Gras.Leld, Genezal managerer of the -oi.iua Chamber of 0 ee, stirred members of Delta Sigma Pi, international comsoiewty. Monday n.ght. with a prognostic speech on the a re 01 coIeb in u Lnig t e uLnA u, .n--. v anu Caat the opportunities foi Flolida in mn iit ht! state-s vastly .moerdeveloped industries. i u.stry wXdi be dcpe.ae t o.n ,. ......-. rnwt neearc to gu.de ari; collective Coe ag Aculture it," said Grassfield, "and 'oes oto -t.> rch can be provided for ianuf'mm' .1 )agh te I I. A.L.en sV--a a t I. tead ivith o-ner (121AZ lead I's III t his IItn A I ,1 o 0 t sCUI'oundigi. TLoug" iht-s been working in the inteile uei a Proe s ro-da (aine tfitteen y'eais .5e 1 I erly a Professor of JournalS. a tile un y .L"G i si';u0101 iet'.I a S u I: .ui tneti talk w (Ii ljoni the younger gtnnae.,. L > ()develop !self Int" 'h vision and foiesignt, ,he poten' iali ties (A a1.1 sti o, ng to real zi nai well as knowledge, a n-cessary attribute to ljIE'rs 'of tfle SLate, IL!" un.versitieS and cl j i I Grassfield. "This I :?,-. od foresight will be laige eveloped by the universities, wivh cademic work, ani es.nliy through extia curricula i's by which a student ik-s ,se ,f his academic learn" 1 He goes to college to learn e t nai-e: The amotunt of pledgeedge in' existence; where to I: I fhis knowledge: and how to '' .Xhen he leaves college II,4 rIltienship with the com'0.tt'Y is changed; he Vl !13 a upo" Ps a leader and InusL the knc wledge and visid! he gained in college as .ha hu, leadership." Points Out Opportimiti"e a nsfield emphasized the ima I vie of Florida men making 1tot Itlfe work in Florida, pointj wit many opportunities to he n the state today: "Social, ai d commerciala, industrial; ield to cover every man'5 other .tate ha teat variety; Florida is lcoSs roads of the Am)i pJi unit ies are springing up 4verv field. Many think o o rMa as purely an gricultitral For Prompt and Expert JEW1ELRV REPAIRIN WATCH REPAIRIN(; OPTICAL REPAIRS ENG RAVi N(i C. H. Coles & Sons NORTH SIDE SQUARE I L -t I I-S n .' utilize these resources. Florida -o. da ut tile e. -i 'g, iin st. y. t N ( .c .ti -w Lun-ties '0t it' IiUV, gO-I aiL. At pres, nt, papi r p1.2s .Osn f"Inamalii CI', a. e 2Ailn.at UI.nOit 1oloiA pi't'1 i v. o -ns tll' inti xt yeai 1 c,'. plants in I,) th Florida x'11 lIi h e -eb sOli the outiit to 21o0 to!,. B't still th iniidustr will w i its .ita ccv and under develope i. The sugar industry in the Lake Okeeclobiv region expi ti a> t ons of su-ar yeaml 'o S avinmah to J. %. aa W representative of Sears, Roebuck and Company of Atlanta, was the iwi al speaker at a banquet honoring 23 of the 25 freshmen .'nners of ag Iiculture scholar.ps, at the Primrose Grill recently. He announced that the 25 toys -i'd compete among themselves for an aditional $200. The winner f this would compete with winnkers from sixteen other colleges for additional $500 scholarship to be used during the junior an( senior years. These scholarships, it was said. are given tinder the condition thj'at the rinners attend Agriculture C'llege. They are based on scholarship, personality and all around achievement. Among those present were: Dean W. Newell of the Agriculture College, Dr. J. J. Tigert, Maj. W. F. Floyd, Dean R. C. Beaty, R. W. Blalock and four other representatives of Sears, Roebuck and Company. MILITARY STUDENTS SEE GATORS OFF Continued from Pae One tary students to march to the ot. inefmn' .I at ely tht" train and show the earn what total m nnufatmt 'ait4 smgar is r'a reAl tranm sendoff is.' As the stri ted by the F'' emrkl governteRn had already gone to the t lok eli p Mmnpo. let 0011tdin my's gym to change to traveling inat ii kep (p tillin ttus(lothes. they missed this announeState Induutry Gaining ment anl thus the huge (rIowd A cailpaign has ready been collected at the station was a plartt to remove thes restrie -surprise to then tions xwhereby the inl:stry would Dutchy Sormes, hread cheerexpand andorna21'v n 1.00 leader, in commenting a lout the more men c mi p 1 i i 1,pesides affairs state Ihat t was 'really thoa rnentaned F'lrida has mmor gratifying to see s mary stm-. than 4 00) manut a icturing lant dehts pt oslt fr the e ni-off. in every phase of mdutry, from However," he coiltinr ti ms' gnrm to n ivn s. Mifoeovo, Iremember hat fir th moist part !he notentIisidties if sn o i5ndu they had no alteRnat -e I tut,, 'si are n ft IX'ult ide'rstodL. come. Wou11d tWhey nhnvo iw" Leather, he pitte ouN, i Nan present if it haRt be:e i f t I, to oxanple of this.(i. I a irgt atiou t .them to "iliI 'T h' lwha of IdvestOhsk andr th -t with wAe are concerned A.'ith. W w. which tannic acid canI be extractI see next week 'hen tPt--am ed from palnetto rooi i s j-specleaves to play Mayla;I. N' em-ially (0d.ivt '0 i viopmnlt tainly hope -vory sth n Aon., this, line cnt for that.' m on g i111 Mr. G'lslietl 1 teiotN-hi"l mI many other occiiupa:ttins, explain.rg' tllel' ('iottt-nm to'V alld their pohIt''.I 1 t11 mit :f ,a tiw il v l tito m is' m ti'str' fle levf-al.! it,,, w a va ment in rece!',4 ,' anoI the keen comp1tit n that heginmlnog to21 nir1e t 0her states. Last year. tw--iw' v-i xciistates appropria t'1 an em '(1 .50, W(I to .1'1;0:) (41n('fIc t to i.9 lpp to titn' i ott 's not only to a v ali 1 ho ti pr(' it Florida's tit tot-s-ts In cxci y m.I td -wre tis' 'n2 tatual resources Itie second lar eti tulli''s earth nine ill t he w\'ii'i ; lo-ated at QiinvcX Fd -? ae n'ies. So -reat Is thm'fieI( fi t elipm nt inl l' o';'m-i. Iltht Iwt (nI (-an a 1 i ""t' (, I "11)1 i iti'-s btlisd. -d1ut ( it -from other state hs mus! ho-i md f-ilto help also. -.YOUR LAUNDRY'S '''< BACK". Delta Chi Elects Off With the r-signat < LeAl ias presiet i Spur as Alumi1i St-i Delta ('hi Fratirnity t fit niexnht's .](,leott-e! fwcrs. J. mao ;altrai .t elected presid(-nt, antd iRo'er Erickson, Alumni scre-iary. Lvn (inlon was elected to the 'iffx'i' of secretary vacated Iby F1ib ksem: WRUF COMPLETES THREE RECORDINGS (,,ntinuei ,om Powell wilt irti'lit'.' T fiet, ifti''? radio sta t ions iX'itlte tt i' ,anging tim M i to Jaes:X ihI', amrni flt1 t11 .t c('l OiT 'I !e t I'ensacola. Thii 14' a ihm"i-gs %%'i appear In s ie -art a1igt:1t-irtnt th' i-st being lhl'2tici'2lt Nov' n: n-i A followed b% tilte ro ::!a A-ngi ftVe I og, amis to be scheduled I-y thil .nclividual stations iii)1) nul Atit, homecoming activities on NoveAher 14 and 20. Major Powell stated that this is thefirs4P tihel 'pitictdtha y ois liomecommn,has blen untiertaden, and with the cooperation o. the various stations throughout the state more people wouio pronably be reached through the med, um of the recordings than would oe possible in any other way. Hopkins Sees War For United States Prof. A. A. Hopkins nf the speech department, speaking to his lecture groups Monday start!ed those present somewhat by saying that the United States was definitely headed for war. According to Hopkins. the one billion dollars spent fot munitions and armaments by the war department in thlast year is not enough. "Security rests on intelligence not force." he said. -"hut not enough is being sptnt for% war preparation." He stated that the war of the future would be a war to end wars. Prof. Hopkins pointed out that 'he morality of nations has suffered a serious decline. "Idealism is repligrant to all n ait ions n* present. It has suffered a total eclipse." he emphasized. "As a restilt the nations forget humanitain ideals. "The United States must be prepared for war. There is a greed among a few national figures-a greed for land, power, combined with the lack of moral principles. that Is the primary cause of war." he said. L Mr. Hopkins specifically menI' ii' '~t,-i'-t -' ' '1 'I r. it it'.':'. lix'-'.'' -ho sIt ''-a -' a' 'it IA''''" -ars ''' I 'dl I 1' 1 To *t I ( )f if r 'O 11X % t ) hI' I I human na 1 te. h .hi O a i1L stntemet I FREE Merchandise GUESS FOOTBALL SCORES AND RECEIVE ... Crosby Square Jayson Shirts Ambassador Ties No Purchase Necessary to participate -just come to our store and fill out blank MEN'S SHOP Florida Theatre Block SPORT SHIRTS Polo Stvle, Long Sleeves, Shirred Back. Velvets, Corduroy and Gabardine. 2.95 -4 v* b-A ddlese.--Are Wi 1-liz ~ VI LI t~i U Pre-Medios Hear Dean Wilson Members 6f Alpha Epsilon e I t a, pre-medical fraternity, 7 ard Dpan WV. 1. IWilson talk ony sc. Thiali dsSion at theim 11t metijug this year Mon 1ev Pat Wa tson sp(tket n th rm e !itnth i4pthepfraternity I c oder n (h"t (' ('l. -ell were awarded roemtificates of !tm as tia n re-xnodica' SThis award is iao vc rear to cte1ns houhAce h "'rt5, t rc -e I? IdJ S: I" th, a' programs. S'b. thi\te:lr nldude ti 'ts t ''a been hel A' an a. TflrId i U :ttnI. He it mats d 17.rector -Mattht-ovs announced,' that tile open house progr.amls -(uld be discontinlued for thle reSt this selijester' due to a ('he'nistx el '53 eing hield in the annex (of Florida Union. He Intimated that the prograins would begin aoain after the first (if the year. Fourth Estate Speaker Sees World Conflict intervention Result Maintaining t-At wamis inevitable and that the United States stands an excellent chance of getting into it, Dr. Manning J. Dauer of the Political Science department : rI lav., ave his in e''i ation of world conflicts to the F',urth Etate club at its initial bArquet of the year. Dr. Dauefr, in explan-ng h's stand, drew from his observntiens in Europe d mrin' the past suminer '-d froti' -n ms of the I ;il ail States in el-t ion to its fon-On Ilolicv as he e-s it. He ra'se the neutrality act and regrAtte-1 that the American fioein pciP v is now abandoning it. The present conflicts, h said fa ve rone too mr to permit peacefil' countries to do mJr'. th.i' adopt a policy of comnlete nonii'tervention. Anv stens to ,isirv. i e China-Japanese underla "ed war .this stable wiil lead Pn' towAr'( 'lr'A'inO the i'tE'rXin c oun'r (t 1,Ito thcon lict, !r. mair,A5'alii2 e Ph "''l1 .'v of '.''O cI Sthates. Ihfe st ahk lmiiln t ate]d hoXw it has ben completclX' reversedi c l(in hi en-clt itbreak (f h's iie ". 'There as heen n reat 'O'ti in o fi-eien !'olicv in t te a si I 'x wee kg." Dr. Doior l "'nd';11 it l: n-it general 1v understo-l'i s vt. i' have oalx"s v re 'it) mnkaintt an effort t ourh aT 'X a' I : ail x'hh-h migh' h a 1to ear '' i Il ''Pitt it is w 'wi the .a iat t i 't' 'm v ;' rnlx am '-t fnt : ; I IA : V a I nT1I tit of the 1:k" ofiak-Th!", ;1 (01 tra*:r 'If :ti .'s an invitation tO tam t'i,e n i 11,. in'I pt'ateitI' i al otti 'mItd reI i n '' P -I If4_ t4I w tw n am wa .it t hi f I n itI>5. I, DASHINE -SnapBrim of lightweight felt in blue, brown, grey and green. Anniversary Price $3.451 Sweaters An opportune time f,'r sweater sa!e. Fine brush wools in button uns, zin ups and slipovers. CHECKS, PLAIDS, SOLIDS Smartly Designed Sport Backs Others At $3.99 and-$4.95. ONE SPECIAL LOT OF Sleeveless Sweaters $ 149 Limted Quantity --~ SHIRTS At unbelievably low prices. Patterns that .are smartness personified. 3 FOR $4.25 Checks, stripes and plaids. Button down, regular and tab collars. A Hint -It will pay you to buy a quantity of these Ahirts and lay them away for Christmas gifts. NOTE .ONE SPECIAL LOT OF Don't let this opportunity s i p away -buy now for !ater. / 3 for $3.45 All guaranteed fast color, full cut. New patterns. Sizes 14 to 17NECK WEAR Fall Shades Pnd Patterns. Wools and siks. Handmade resilent construction. 55C 2 FOR'.J,6 Fine Lisles, Ravon and Lisle Mixed. New Patterns. 29c ('11 P"$1.00 IS THE WORD FOR OUR "TROUSERS. -HARD FINISH WORSTED AND STRIPES, BROWNS, $495 -I PAJ4MAS Fast Col9r, Full Cut,' Neil Styles, Russians, Notch and Jap Necks 4.AI~tAK4010C. SLACKS PATTERNS THAT WILL CLICK WITH THAT WILL HOLD THAT CREASE. GREENS, GREYS AND BLUES .. YOUR ODD COAT CHECKS, PLAIDS, 0 Sigma Delta Ch Pledges Seven Seven journaiisin atucenzis we!t form~ally pledgeI by SipmaI iV( lf professional ", 'atiml'.t \ I 122I 'ittg 'a sll'a 1 Horton, ;eorge oi ndL i 'au-i' .1 litatiri '. 21 a 'ace iipriximiatt 1Y on' ilOi'1 r'ate of pledging. ft tI' r at:1ni t Y 's 'n tnL 1 -t 1 1et ,Th 1. h oc;'iPt t vf i n t TI t I () i th l it c y. l{"I HI m i f11"k.!I tl za 11d I tt a I I te (''inst:imnl holidlay-s.n w 5 n I )oltaChin madt such a trip fos.oral k'tt --0o an 1 1A ,UlAiSith-t i'2ar tie .1211sh fditioiint it Cf bam paper. I I -.-. jrimaI (fI he c VItk c'I i' It hcq1f l i f a l f u The p urpost-> progt a im-rest rwx : nn 1n s an to tf'i h ii ther'm wirll :'O that the ran fitf o 0 biC f "I Alpta kappa .l i a a er givn Teseveingin FlOridaIR Union, Al IohS IKappa P1s5. roq" nc S'it b-are nowv in thIe Law Col ?'-It' V*. Xxore also p resent iZl spoke rUout '.s h(pi' ':temtt \ pr eniof thc .I o Dean Matherly Speaks To Lambda Chi Aipha 0 -, .NIa o Pi. -t ;n of tI, ''to Sike ti immers and f-; s ofl rbi 'o Alpha n y~ ioni the tfiu!poes o a t OX' .'i1 y .ii I It I o n. Dean M'''m.1~'ms ot to (. i' club, ui mnpletel, satf' h.th he tuitlut. ulgeid freshTm.-n to dt it iOre!iSr" n 'm f S f n#eX\ 1 11-'rialll MatherlY poirteI t f"url plrmnl(Siui IiI Iee~ ('at On, mnami .X I P pepas foiv atj~i l a ajuIS! tent; pri'pm action for Itit anti fal litei :i preparato ii t in our or social life. ati itd muin] of a personal philosopbf.t lid! ~ nn c r i -if 1%2-mm

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VIM LU1QNA1VD -.'.-. =DTWR-KN4b ARMAN D ONNTT .MANAGING EDf A -f $ -l 'e r r Y.r rnt~lred a'9 Second Clas '.%atter at the polltoff ice. Gainesville. 1lorida, under the Act of March 3. 1989. AIvertisinr rates .40C ueteOnumn inch. Discount rat-3 oon cttracl for 120 ClUmn nclh.9or tmore. Otht r Informauiun urnamed by rarl Powers, nuslneqg Mritagor, The florida Alligator x*.,Univrrsty Sttili. ?The FlordCi Aliqtor VOLUME 29; No. 7 EDITORIAL AGE 937 Mem tr 1938 E ssocied I"e e Pr '1Em ER OF THE FLI DnA lNT ..I,. .rFML POWERS ..BSXNESS MANAGER TOM FLEMING ED ROOD DWIGHT ROGEFAS INTERCOLEGIATE RDCNRL PRESS ASSOCIATION. FREO CANTRELL r emIHMoI ACLUTs o B e niform This Year We commend the action of Editor rdman of the Seminole in having ew pictures taken throughout for the nnual this year. After comparing a anel of the new pictures with some of t year's panels, the improvement comells us to uphold the decision of Boardan. Naturally, the outlay of cash will ause some students who would otherrise use last year's photographs to raise howl of protest. But after looking over e statistics of other years we see that great majority of the students have ictures taken each year, anyway. Not any will suffer from the change. And dr e Seminole stands to gain. The new portraits are much more lear-cut and the background is uniform. hese improvements are due to new quipment. The background lighting is niform and a mechanically controlled eveloping process makes the degree of ade uniform throughout. Because of ese improvements the panels will bring ut the features of the subjects more istinctly. Only about three per cent of the stuent body voted in the recent poll to etermine student opinion on the matter. is could hardly be considered as a presentative vote. About three-fifths f these were against the change. In uch a small representation it could be xpected that those against the change 'ould be in the majority, because the change necessitates planking down some oney. Since tJ students reflected so little terest in the matter, it would seem that ey are willing to leave the decision the editor. We feel that Boardman eted in the best interests of the Semole and, hence, for the good of the udents in his final decision to make, he improved photographs uniform roughout. azi Activities Constitute threat To Internal Peace The German Nazi mo%.ement in Anera is a rotten spot which spreads larger aily; and, while we see little possibility f its general acceptance here, it bears e seeds of internal strife. We would *ke to see it stamped out. It is totally n-American in sentiment, whatever its eaders might say to the contr ary. They ke their orders from litler and copy is goose-stepping soldiers. There might be little harm in goosetepping. There might be little harn n playing German soldier. But the uns they carry are not toys. Sonie of hose arms were moved across state orders contrary to Federal law. This "German-American Bund" goes little too far in its attempt to plant erman customs in America. If those ermans want to live here they should accept our form of goVemt. if they vant to change our form of government. hey are going about it in an utterly actless manner. We Americans would not expect Geriany to allow a group of our people to et up military head]uarters over there lid try to indoctrinate Germalls with enocratic principles. If any group vere naive enough to try it, they would oubtless meet with rude ald perelmpory opposition. It goes against or grain to have hose German-phile t roops goose-stePing under te ,\wastika on American -oil. We are a nation. But our nation nWbodies peoples of varons motherationalities and race. Our union, if it s to meanl anything. -liould bring these 'arlious peOpk-s together. insofar as posible, with comlnliol alms and comm"o". -ulture. Naturally. .a nation which tands for freedom of opinion and of religion, we do not inttri'fre with those hases of culto re which do not materialIN affect or b reatc the common welare. ., We belie\ e that thi. ( German Bund d(o,: coibtitut, a deini e threat to American l ital aud international Peace. It 4 lOu i he squelched. Let tem get t ogether and sing German songs and play German games if they mut. BIut when they -1art pledging alflegianc e tO I it-r and transporting arlms unlawfully, they gO too far. nl P i T this campus since we have co-eds? Maybe our one per cent doesn't count. Because of the decrease of approximately 30 per cent in N. Y. A. fund,this year we "must rally to the cause of help to our fellow students, believing there is no greater need of the day than aid to youth who strive for a higher plane of living and usefulness."-Alabamian The National Student Federation of America sounded the call to go to bat for more student funds. The Alabamian is one of many student publications to respond. We feel, however, that Roosevelt should spare N. Y. A. appropriations along with other forms of relief. There are still thousands of families who are lacking the necessities of life. If they are to be denied by Uncle Sam we students certainly should take it standing 11 P.-1 M t _" U 600 ) ( / ~,-.4 -.' -X V 4c Is Hell Week Worth All The Time And Danger Involved? These same editorialcolumns have contained many exhortations in the interest of preserving our cherished traditions. Today we come not to praise a tradition but to examine one and see if it is worth keeping alive. Fraternity Hell Week seems to be the most pertinacious tradition we have. And while is seems very necessary to keep lecturing to keep our other traditions going, Hell Week has withstood pressure from the individual national chapters of our social fraternities and the National Interfraternity Conference, who seek to have it abolished. It still flourishes here. There are reasons for it. First, a seeond-year man thinks he's getting gypped if he doesn't have a chance to perpetrate the same misdeeds on pledges which he himself underwent. Second, the fraterniti'es actually vie with one another for the "honor" of inventing the most in-genious sort of duties. Third, the misinformation has got around that this sort of activity brings publicity to the University and to the individual fraternities. Fourth, the Gay Nineties ideas of sporting, courageous, good-natured highquality American youth, whooping it up all in fun, is still in the air. But at the end of Hell Week ask any near-dismembered pledge how exhilirated he feels after having his manhood tested. Hell Week usually comes at a crucial point of the year, upsetting the study schedule of the initiates and the upperclassmen who engineer it. Professors have a certain amount of patience, but class-cuts and unprepared work during Hell Week may be the last straw. And the initiated brothers usually consider initiation puppy-playing more serious than the most important of class assignm ents. Some of the more sadistic practices of Hell Week have disappeared, but occasionally a boy undergoes an experience (luring the evening of "make-a-man-Outta-you" business that injures hln sel,iously, or instils an attitude hard to get over. There is nothing beneficial in a triple-strength dose of epsom salts, no matter how ludicrous a few of the situations such treatment causes. Acute appendicitis, for one example, might be the outgrowth of this type of "good clean fun." it is our hope that the University of Florida won't wait to abolish its fraternity Hell Week until a serious accident occurs bringinK bad publicity to the college, and much more unhappiness than the "sPoltsmlanslship-training of this 1890 practice is worth.-W. M. Others Say Students need courses in "the most fascinating subject in the world -ourselves," in order to learn to cope with individual problems.-Los Angeles Collegian. it seems to us that we can best learn about ourselves by studYing others as objectively as possible. When students come to a co-ed institution, homesickness is "often forgotten because of the influence of new acquaintances."--Syracuse Daily Orange. have you noticed any decrease on roll was ij l a .1rov'de. reami ant jiass-a. A I p i i n Arduengo, e I e m t i i n expi-ses. $46.95; Dupilicatiuig I )epartmnutit enivvlopes. $3.50. John' M. Mi('ary secret(ryTea11r' -ECKSTE IN 14AS'SIGNED ALL BUT 16 OF T14E DIPLOMAw RAKMTED BYf' CASE%"'HJL OFAPPLIED f ~ .EC) 25I 0 pfYVLIEW' AN MD BEE PF-'EFENT AT FIFTY COMMENCEMENTS! DNG HIS FIRST TE-N MON-iHS AS ATHILEPC DiRECTOR HARRY SHLD _~ T RAVt R [)2 E X M7F" AD-'F 7 -.1 THE tDECLA.RATIONm ,'A'-OF GMES F WERE Co i --g" I.A .4 m -, 'I Ocio ber 21, 1(37 metIng was tail It i0 orfirbvlit by 1)resideti t Sm1ajtIe-s TIs e ca I led ani 4i theminutes l if' thlast niet-tin g wti tea an I Hi l(lge'ts from the Dilatoi m(i' lit li"1 lorid I(Plavi is werct N' 'it CON VENT1 ON y HING i Our dIt'gatiks to th.-sr0iiatedl 'ollegia te Itess gmt-to.etther i Chicago sht eetk Le'onari. Bonnett, McGuire, r ipout big ii dOingS, i ludin trotuudta i il' lyItiN' thct m' irtrs n l'ublirat i ts lpeo 1ilt' -0Oson mf Minnesrit : Ltudi'-, ESqI1itvt's at t ittt'(tmt'w: Har'ris ALos i' and stome hii hcluss sBig Cit y joking. But Nwhet-the A('ltimivijtioni (attended 1my 5-mooiolltgiais who as pumttlicatiuois editors are conceivably the pick of college people might have hit tlie nail, they put in a thumbtack instead, Three big convocations were featured. and instead of getting Big bignificant Men to speak, they had: Ii an ex-fiearst ex Satevetpost. sensation -latherer; (2o a roly-poly fathead, a la KiwhnusRtotary; 131 a nice platitudinous gentlemani from Frank Knox-s paper (Kiox rememx-waGOP vi e-prex. nominee in '364. Such choiu of spvna kers when C;rculat:on MiArniger Adve-tt% n Manart-r Asst. Adve:-tising ManagRoom For Improvement -dicat~ edto the prjpositionthat nothing i. pert"t. r-tiud .ithv hope that University of Flo-ida men are t'een eilough to notice thou% ICrp t liat need improvement and spirited enough to bt. more than Paisvy in their desire to better the -.chool and themselves. this coltimn will hten to suggestions by students for an in.oroved Univeysoty. in any and al1 pass. This column will approach the proper officials and notify them of toe stgoestions made. Finally, this column will bring before the student body -a report of the officials' attitude and a resume of the battle for betterment a s it progresses. You -ire invited to bring the suggestions. complaintt. ideas, gripes, yrievances and hopes that will lead to a better Univei sty of Florida to this department, care5 of the Alligator in Florida Union Ail "aterial must be typed and must be addressed to "Room for improvement." %hen vo" see a thing iio'nhllshed "y ouisuviy find Ithat someninme or sMimu' group had been behind it to give it a push i'toward its goal. It a grilip, esp t'cially a laige 011. yO iI sine to ,istiivtI' that ojilnuon al pressure ivi bt-e (rst :lizt to th* jilt :5 --Fourth Estate Club, Fla. Union. 8:15 --English Club Reception. -rvan Lounge, Fla. Union. TU ESDA Y :02University Hour, WRUF. 7:00 Alpha Phi Omega, Fla. Union. 7:30 -Sigma Delta Chi, 1. Union. WEDNESDAY 5:30---Coflegianna. WRUF. THURSDAY 6:45--Three Billiard Ball Instruction, Game Room, Fla. Union. ':00-. Interfraternity Debate, Fla. Union Annex. Auditorium, and Rooms 208 and 210, Fla. Union. 7:36V Cavalliers. Fla. Union. FRIDAY 4:4D -Florida Alligator. WRF'. ALLIGATOR STAFF Don Brown .Asmoiate Editor Walter Draughon, Assoc. Editor John B. Turner, Editorial Boar4 Henry Cardenas, EdItorial Board Bill Jibb ..News Editor Frank Klein .Sports Editor Bill McGuire .Feature Editor Bob Cody, Ast. Feature Editor Frank Cowies .Copy Editor Sandy Sweidilin. News Staff That inmantu-l. .News taff Ehrlich Opens Peace Meet Here With Talk Favoring Quarantine In a talk deiiiti IN favoring th ne United Stat's foreign pilwy ot collective sect'rity aind quarante tof aggressor nations. Ray Ehrih iopent-d a p(tace CouiCi I torwu in Florida Union, Tuesd"y "Iight. 0 We've been getting letters in to this department at the rate of one a day. The suggestions have been Crood i n arly ev'ry case. We've I ,ifltiisdthese i4tt r5 oult oierthle campus and have had hearty cooperation from the officiaLs we've shown them to. Those include Deans Matherly and Prive, Coach Cody, Billy Matthews. Librarian Edt' Dr. Wedl and others. But most of the issues have u-alt with problems that effect il the day. Now don't get the idea that we're discouraging those sIrt of suggest ions. Right now wt-'re tracking di mWn such varih i ittis a. better soap for Florida I niion and hlbrary wash roons, ntire real news for the Alligator. PI. (). T. .improvements, more ""iimated pro s and had taste shown at the Florida Theatre free shows. Those and other items are all worth looking into. Far Off Objeeti%-"ltut S ippos, as well, we had a Ii-illgt group of objectives at which to aim. That is, why not, at the saine time. maintain (l eiprootei~ goals at which we ,can begin incessanit hammering until eventually some effect is obtained ? Thus, by continually putting the spotlight toward ambitions over the horizon we can soon wrap up our opinion in a neat package and present it to those who know how to handle it. 1". F. L, after the fashion of '. D. R. would like to present a i-point program for the University. Most of the things involved ,ire ends for which students have I lolig S t Ir i v e I unIsuicmess1ulIy. Thev're meant onilv as a beginnigi fr a i ngt .aniaig -0"ll" *h"e' t. t v an means, Iet up o tiopies if tie flaN. We want to hear autt them. 'Ten Inprovements Hut ltt're's the idea: somelbidy worked long and hard for Florida I ni' in, for the ithba-ry I or Florida Vield in fact for original construction of the whole University. We can begin now in bearing down with the pressure on those things which must conim sooner or later. Here's the R. F. 1. Est. IN i More dornitory SPace. i 1Co-education. t otBetter class-roolnm taciltie.s. ( i I Moro tennis aid handnall courts. i .-i A colipleit t'd auditorium arid administration building. iOl More ml oney fit library hookS. 7 i Hitter schanrship opportlnities. i si A new gym. (9 Closer aluiI o('opjierationl. 110) Florida Field iinkm'r are lights. That's probably only the beginPing. But you can be sure that some day all of those things will be realized on this campus. Just how soon depends on us. Crystalizing opinion with constant discussion and reference to the points and bringing pressure with the proper arguments in their favor will do the trick. Why not make it soon" Ir sT Executive Council For fax Band Trip; Old Bookstore System

PAGE 4

Gators Meet i. ,-i (.114.7411.7 to 4Z ..-, --.4'. '.4like .1 .I i 1-1 -I.'.l i) IAlt, t. t, I IA, 4'' LI ''a 11f L IIIf4 4 in117i 54 4 47''' I 4.4.41 e-ht'd jla II tt, i. u id-I ,:1, a t ipi.A t e ps o ia.id ei elh rim l %fi a -1, a ak it i %~ tt w k e llWI loh. to 1b 1 1rl I M to ,t Cn o g t phet-Ip, m l f 014plal, a d it w4.13 111d Illfl ill} wa4:i p4)werul,. a.Lert, ;(434*[ Itl -.414 anid *ippi~e enem'0I Kriv piays awi pr.'4.rat atnt gain frciii thie'; a I ator 14'1IIL inl't whit'h e1or. tan hahlled ha ,elf likie a .'sto bal thoroaglibred ; :ue 1w0-n'' kier te t a '1! py' l q j .%.-. "I4%p, it the fa.tJ, 4'OUld d jit 4i l a power'fuA ottentit e, and wiit h Mlay wrry carrying tn'he al., '.itla uperml tive int frlerm toe IIm i tea rtli tA%(, i tr at dd I A he wiIoiht it, tinr ui .nkut oe' einio .gh to akta lt tAII' d aili'l. cPEi t l e a t. ,; ap lt s r-I de it wa IA Tand empie %i7l1 Th pdaye Aw u .L %a w1't 7.J411W. aid 4.' ti -aroumnde14' othisl tiii& whiht Il 1.4 I11 n11u, Mit~ik 4.'. ill ir a (448.4' li-t., w.4. 1. tIw wI''Owing d% (W. WithI himi to an ad di t.'t, ilor1Il ,o nmea lig 4'Onw1ia4wk. OkeLi they dlid iin M. ,all 1 .].I you, ai lhli i Nltw>e'. I -v 1' I a44,4 i4 T' )1 6ia1). n l t h (4 1f14 741t i, -4 () T i ) 1 4' l. 7 i. b' I 11 tri-ln poto m a h h n po ane-s tan ad 11an4' .4t t"171y hi144k 'h. *' -1 -.7 .1.Il 7 w hr-oii I'u 1174 11' 4 'aI' l le pl 4o, I ht I :11,44 I 7h 'r .441, 14 8 I 4.,v'rro. lf m 44 'a t 17. 4. 4 4x i 41r he \V4'S T 1 h 11Alm's .7 i z, '1 1 \!A I4I\I"4t'"5"I s biit aitr lt h a. it t*lt Y l i 1"Itr r ii u o an te ~:~si". i. lo474'.4h41& it h 11h,14' o~atk iIt 447 li i) I ht'% )"t 7411IlR en and .' it i Zt he r'4 ei 714'." 4 l 'a. il I h(a I'e 1 I 111td.'14 14'4\ A )ul -4410 4h.4' a dl.T t 4411I w a ahd 11""I hd" \ t ill I nk 1,t 1 l 1 :,'( Il. !) ~~ :-I' I Iilh I 1 n4 1: 1 7 < 4 .4 14" .' I "iI i j jIII ,, .TIma!, t tl ikde mt kA b \'4;&r it m in t v WitheIi 4ill. (4il',' 1 li .t 7,il'h4bfa tp' i 47t 7 1w. 1-f il 'inh1 11hN4.l' i tillc J,, 4 I. I 4 144 4\ ri4 r p44' r,11 1 71 11 o u t Aml o-r .liva tor thm i r 1 -'fll. f n oi t vg 0. he alf I[brdy r 4tra-pn41 111 .'1t ha t 1 %l 4,I -d -d .I 4.0 te r.j b od ha1al f."lt ro Eh it*efot ,if l'4"m11el Kim,4? k4 4 i4t44 othu(r4 lle. .41it 44 '14o1 11724i11 1' '''4w% .-I 444m.'7 n111 *4 et n th a i e u-A hi' M ',I, )I L E A R N TO DANCE Dancing, the art of rhythm, is older than Civilization. older than her sister art-, Painting, Sculpture, Music and Literature. "THE SHIRLEY DANCE STUDIO" offers instruction in Tange, Ballroom and Tap Dancine. A!l lessons under personal sunervision of "Shirley" who is prepared to develop the talents of each pupil. Moderate rates puts this luxury within everyones reach! CLASSES AT 7 P.M. ON MONDAY & THURSDAY 25c A LESSON 1'. \N TO A)-\NCK Till? UECT WAY Al SHIRLEY'S DANCE STUDIO 322 North Seventh Street First Of Seven Tough The Florida AllkIjao SATURDAY, OCTOBER 23, 1937. ~~c :'o 4 ntamural Boxing Baby GatorsbWhri Gets Under Way P8 Auburn Frosh IdA-l D11 -) Monday Night 1 7 1 1 4u' 1771.17111 4 1 r t igt ---It 1 It,' Ii 4< in A l l Sto t .4 7n n s el VI 2 -.t). .4 I t 11 K A t t 4 ~ n~ 1 1 f : \ .1.: 7 178' 4-.' 4''4 7. -'4-4.n r~>, 4.4811.4 t 4 4 4 b'4 '4. 4' r1i4. en. (1 -4 11714' 47 7, 4.7 '' i 14 1 ', I 4744 14'.'~~~~~~ 4,i447. 4i ',' 4 4 '7. 414 I I' I 4). .': 7-: 4 7. I4, rmI 0n .1.4 1 T ~~1 7 S --r-7.47. .7.7'!: 1. 4, 9 4 '844114:4 7-on P, independent League Murals Advance ;I9wly I, t .ti It'llI 1t -tg tie ,r ts .9 AA -4 a sngleS progr-ssesl ih (Imi o Lite last wt-ek, smnKIe 'lvi 1 1( 4 tWo contstt. ueemi In iLs with 4th1r tI '14ye is r. -s I,, ',,vn r: N. 1 Ii I 4 I4. (p ,i ll ;I414 .'.vr .I"!. miw Z3 -r1 lo wxiu a plac-t m i 11l:ufi:Als; L Seitlini 44 t 'l H. 21r --1 to be .11 i .1 -a l et'at d F .Ft).-ttI ': I';iri ic. S4 ItJ 1, 1 it~mtsf tif I l II uarter-finals -Minu-l w .the ,vun-o over .\Al. IaBiw;4nr '2-1 I ) I ;la.'Vd i (1 Ua f-rfi rin I 'llst ort" A .ina l -htI 1J l t #ate' (ca II r iflthe I j --nfilvdi n dolibles has 7Iv4 .4n40i t 'er-nt Imar e(-t N1: \I .n:I I f~mst r:. chtii4 .1 l -, 4Ileltet-d Koe anid katmm>n odct,4, 21-2: and Wveavrer -nd : It hers w 14t -tse*. otil t BI. tI Ir ''t'4 1, Harhs, Lat-he's. 21 20. '.ih ittit I m I471 k4l4t n .im a I ijn i .I ki. miWellman wilt,:irc reprfm -o 1 [mpern.h'1 matchfs xwill be umet Mhntig Illrng u(1""h4resh.s 14. -f1hi'Fraternity League Standings .,o '. 1 4 -.ill, 11 n1 1 1n).1 h p4111mriws hied this w,-k. I.rat .1'. Frat Pt. A F. 12-1 T[Li'I I4-' I() T'X T.I KI 10 SN I~ I)I ul I 'K P I )X'. 94) Il' TK N s0o T] D II ~ ~ s I "4'(A, 1 I A T Special SAL Rates Posted 4 1 8 -.1 th: Slh Olil A 4. i4 t 4 m. toi x'ht wish I' t tf'14 S i.I!4, ( ,I 4' 'Ii. A il -ij h i k V" F : i' 44 .v : '. sI f I m! , 8v. 1 1.14 1 .v kt .c ty4vs t :4 ':'. X:sV I N .v i \'i d-71 4le. first, SN :~-4 -fire. rt-layv, ii SN, r Bi. ITP. by I4 .4 '1~.4 4 1414.474' 14--'' 44j 74, I, 171 471' .1 4 II 7, 1 :4174-7 -7 41'''' 7.7)7'. -7. 7' ;'e14 '4.1.7:147. 4. 444,774. 7. 4.4 ,4,~, P4 :-lx.); 4,4,74~ 4' 4 I '~ '~ '444'. 4'. i 7-'.4 II 7 74.12,4,:t1-4' 7 .1 -.1,7441 '~48) ';4 IS.41 7 v-,o -1 '.14 .44 .44 .--. -.1. '-4 4 A1~ il 4 -.' T,4 ''' \'4 4 4 44 77' 7' 4 I'' 44 ~4 -444 >' 444'.----4.4.44.:.'-.4. Drm Legue Standing 11447-44 -27-4. 4'17 T.A. 71 4 I-I I 471 1 4 T4. 4 47 Opponents -I. -44'1 b 1047'.'1 '~ .,., li -t -4-4 44 7741 n -tt -.Is 4 I' th L. L R lit I ppll! t'I I I 1r", .7.4 7,4 .74-T4 'H -4.44 c:h-.'m, 11 .'a -44 --'-41 444. '.18.4 .41, .' .4p .a1 -A 't'''''' -4,441 l8A14,14.o N 1,u I~c,< he iia -\ hm '~a V tl 1 1? llt I Blk kil h (if it' Tht I n ha1' 1 AT tie stw Ilt.e 4 4' .11: --lsw :tpl2,4. iif r'ii4.r l, 4 '1 4,. 44 -u 74-.''--' 44 OER 5,000,000 :-~-2i -44U.;14l TpgT ARCH"SUPPORzTS MADF TO ORDPR PLASTIC ARCH SUPPORT SYSTEM BOB'S SHOE FACTORY Csainesvil!e's Leading Shoe Repair Shop 131 West University Avenue FOR HIS DESK Dad would like a photograph of you for his office. Although, he may not say much he is proud of his family. Surprise him with a new portrait. Let' make an appointment today. ANDERSON and ANDERSON 1868 West University Avenue Phne 981. -~ I SEFONEW SHAPES & CAN BLY IJNH!AND OF VALUE MEDICO FILTER-COOLED Krejcer, Ramsey Benched With injuries For Mississippi Tilt Delta Staters Will Be Out ror Blood After Deft-.it By Auhurn Last Week; Game Marks Homecomnm Mi V. c tTh 1.4xl *'.~ ~, u .l ,42' %, :em'1, ,.;.I 74 ;4 44 1. l.'4 44 41 -0 LI 1 -4':4t .' -7. L 1' Peli V ~t i1 t Tit, h it L m1 )1 By M mday light I'.711 I-1. It I K un hop nj v TP ft rt. put t rg 0)11! C r aA M It it( 11) 111 % I h Ivt its !"Y IIrma dc. w ac i 1,II wit 11 Ih hev me. Ktat1 e vl haves 1 m.117 1 1 T Ic 41. 7-4y up i ' :7' -r i' -I 1,! h Is .m (all h. (s wt c i i t ti I F::4 1 iling !'* ''I mn a!oll n ItI h oy t o, f) 1: 1' j >'1I 8 J.4I1144.k" h I W ,141 1 74 .4 .xli iat -11 -' -.20' a ~ ~ 1U W L 1""t lohha ma t wki ln:C % :it I!Ia 1, 4 74 44 w 4 k\.!I.4 1 -4'1 1' '!714 in he t i a y :e a 11. 1g _%I -ur 11 p d ji t 4lf 4.4,74I 1 U 7, 4 4c, r t j-1c!jl -th!I : I rI 1g'' -\ lt t\ a r ..' t .\Ih t; ig 7 'nd I;Pc 17(S 54 :. h 1 I 4) -11 KS144t7 cI.7.-1 7' 1' : e .4. ningtrm. MA. ningI.47 4-17 -14 ;' tit. righ ta l, \-ilis 1 I -ft )half. Blalock ;-t kinj ight 'half am t Sl& h -'at-fun n Wi lich T ,( .iI.li,\(n -tr.Ain 7
PAGE 5

Eds May Use Swimming P ,1 hletic Council Head Says' -. ~4fts A 4i ~ ~ jtiL ROTC GR.EtltD OUIT TO Att GATOR' OFf TO MIS5iS&iPPi Life Of Emi e Zolai Staris Of t Show Week AI Florida Theatre Stie first -.me in the ll h' e I -4 :'rit3 '4S. pt social ln Thur .3 .3' >rmaLy 3 ig ) the !''.'. 33n434 :' 3 Lcin.e t n sail three 43 b -educationa' ut now. .uv ae organizlt 3 3f he ('-i and 'parv' :1343n sz :.c* 4i : n. In Is c h", 3i. 33d 4.1 1 2 is grI It t 3! long x'a 1 '4 .4'. Fl k rI t I( mClu b See ove been co.(4. ras jall'~ .-shuitl II1.~ CbC SUees Movies lant Growth ree ree's c I mflur ii Int growth. 'r i 44 eed di8(30sal l Wqs 'he 1':of the Agriculti--v ('10' ng Monay.E ns were ma'e fri 'bii ect an Agr?-ulur I e tt'iam. %wh xidit:'':i' titiofl it hW (tI hor i' *4 (l' Cilcolleges through)! t the east. lory of l-'lc -id s' .3 ii y was pr.3nt 4d 'V. : 41 tn oh ,1 Fn ri,! hts of the ,I A,1-\1r ? IImPP V 1 t, 1,.i.33? 4 .j mle v ',ie \34 3' : ppa 'M 4 f1 \t mmloo 'harles 33 h ~1~~ '4 W"' -',4 Andy Bass Elected President Of Rifle Club S s Da s. a s aaic1pei th' '1-I3k ) to,1 !Ii ftI t'IhursS '3 -(,I to .v 3v with 1Pass S '3 ttyjvII. i 'pesi1). Kim .tasu rtr J. P. i secretary, mid Cly 1'(Ca3:4 ; iflic s an.1 ?11n(ra-v v for t hotS (men oil tlhe '' I i taking partt in the a(iivi34,; nf the rifitteam. At the (_ Captaijl C. T. Davis. diif t"hie t am, stated that .3 3fi -tions for3. remhership ho e11134 1313huhlie Changed to 1(I' 1i1 the nI'eds (f the 4iganM'jolo 1 brLs, c'nt ly .infantt iajor for the 'ki" 4 : fl'i: ii;t k tri) r I, fly u Pledge., S. 8 3'.i ~-;i es A 11p1h: 4 413r ):3I.1 4' A hI l 43 1 In 1 ( lu g -4 that th4v have re'nt1: .-x m 1,) their \ h,'TC' pp i.t I' ('oakeIV -: ofli Jacs('k i4il1*' anid 3314 \ 3 4le(et Pail Fisk, Orlanl :y 4.! 'v Mitchell. Fort M -ade 3 'r l3doa 3. McRae. Ia.: Melton. 1Miami: atnd34 Ahe' 33 I (t i-a, Rel B:nk. N. .1 D in A ('ok.Methotfi Ii03-1 pastor, gave the last of a .OfS ( 1:ks to thi pledtlg es ef \ 3 I -\\'ne f n il g. He 'j. 43 3>.' 3 3m'r .a 1 re 4 i S' 3.33h,"(t4o.t '3 111*3W1.3Is ht'a IPr 1. -.N in .School 114 144 .Is; -q : L 4 w! s3K ( m of hI nee s t Ia na I4 34. st3I a I a 14r t 4 I34 t1Ir' as Stia34 44 4134 3) p lfl in Or(s he bowl St4 -, Tnt-re4-) ] 4neyIIIl ie, 3 h %%howl 4 1' q 'ok#is-n't .! i.dL Ic trIarwood t th) oigi.l.' 3 4 4 j'fu l gv 4i s p i )m e r v t s4 a;$*7iiL ,3~44~44)44 ARJY.' '1 III/ IIL, an 3 n g4 ves (1) autoI 1 ,, '-I c "nd e n 9 I-" Collar-A S ren 4" $1 BOLE ALSO cARBURUOR ''STEMBITER" "IMPERIAL YE44O4-cOLES, $I 25 &$1.50 tt ached th hi Cuffs 4. 'I .\ \ \' 3. \/ 3 r red ir. -ho. th.t 3 h b ot 3' .,33*4 3. .! i r o n 3I .l .4 ''34' S-rts Arrow the13r ?01t lire% j \ .r' \ 1 C3 t, T -'il"t.'. '3J 44441.'\.rrow s '' 'In (43 r 4 3 444 3 44'hI.' :t.'h#3'4 it 33 ~A. I' .4 1 3t $2 up NUFF SED Burnett THE Clothier 1". A tu 1 ,Jlp he i fe o r,( -:b I ;i : U. (' m t Uh'.4 3 4.1. '11 1 1 f It Ior'x. f,3f I I k3)4Is 'i' ':V 43 It333A44I I.It' 34 h' 3 -31 1 4 d ( 3t +! ha it' s 3 3 I: antS of tli t c1 C IIt :ihs w lih ht: visited .including E'23. F3 ance, Germany'. IHei3m. 1i44l31a41 8n33 hVl t71'4 1] MI 4o! th11 4343t I44.I44,n,.4 t jI cmny. I ion n w i 43 v, 4.:I il, 4.3 '4 4 trommng and d pwttp so!) fromt thti*.'4'1\t' -;1, 4 111ti 33l in1'I. 1 3I foi whvatevci The fl win .\ '. 5443,114 -'a' I I':, .:' A i I I soHcract ,us (nwt I I 31 'C %N 11%4 iTi i{31 \\ ( T 4:43 4.I 14'3:. n2 C). 2 1 -3, 21 pill Ho alzi N1( hm 3 h#13 ., ;I i # h4!4ii ; M I a(I 1 13r! h. m ?. 514, 1KI.h, 313 44 4 'a2. i43' 3 41 3. 43 13 44' T~'~L liiu.lopilt tu "The Life -, .4 1 '.'. 4, ~ ~ ~ 411,n n ,4 V141 .' :.0 -'4 34.' Morton.144'.1 1. 4, I .I 33, 3 4 11.' 1'' 3 444' '~ 3 ''.4 I 4 43.? .4. 4' -3 44 'I '.4'' 4. 11' '.3 U.'. T'1 '4 ,:3 In I )31 :4 r14 11. 1T* 4.4 .3 b3 44 hi I u. 3' '3133 C 4 I? ii. 33 -'. I .' 3 '' 44 .', '. 44 44 4 When the ighitii-: (1;t orp IIIedIA out of I .ainew ilI depot Thurda. -if r lite to State College. Mi ., they were waved farewell I the I nimersity o t1. 1l1id:, I4( ,T I ,uit. ordered olit en iale for tlie Ea'ion. I thin 50 civilian student at tendld the team\ depart cure it their 4muif free xx iI,. Not appe:ringg I the pictlire are the cheerle:ser, and :iout 1,5(H) more IOT( menmberg. Buckman C Takes Swimming Title \\4 is4 31.4i4 .nwdh y r 41 ln 4. I I o. E 1 0: 224, S my 33. 3 4 :1 34 lix' .' .1.1 -t .I 4 .i l i '.1 H i3I: 2 4 I~ i, puid ,>ackiitroke, J. '4 Delta Chi Celebrates National's Founding 1 !w N:lti nln:l Chapter 134 1 -3 1. illspeaker 'I f th: 1 cv i nk S. Wright. pub3 04 i 1h. I 'lniversit y. !I wi AonllThc hbl t t I L I e cl ss wv s ; oI S VS' I S11:4 yaN,4T 3. I 1 4 I '333; 2 ,34 .4* i3 f. 4 31331 p1(1 I4> 4 .I I II I i s vo I Slash Pine Discussed IAt Chemical Meet for oklinling t ilos aa cl lose 3ri.i34'ts w44 th-scriiH! 3Y. H. 3'. \\ iliam11'3 43n ,31 G ?*'314'1114 tun133 4 1 p3 i3m3lt'3'. :3 14 nw11 in 33f3.h' 3 AmXi4r 11nstn3.3t' 4 ( 'l'In433'41 I'ii in31-''. t1rs 1 31' T33a ni 4ht Matthews Speaks On 'Art Of Living' tt I I I iI r I Iz tI t t I3 1 1 1 1 1 t11ht 3I3 I '3 43 tli.'b 's iln t he 'r\3 .4434 it i i, i ir-t t r 4 v. I 3I4),f I (3 en 3I 414 I 't I 334 ( t r. -:41 1 !44'), 334x 13443 03 3a ('41 38 4r,3433 41. er 4-I -. ,I 4 11,, 3wCana ", ;a foricliv thie m1 ain n mt;'tlshow .thing Source 441( ) this unry's celluosei adl wel w 3 4 ort34i' :411 t -38i.4 e4 1 33 44334.3 14. 3~4 3. 11 142044 lolrth3 3134 3:o f3*. ''I 4 r 3.' 3 3''' 4 N 's a4443r'333 34 3'q144 3 313i. 1 11 l u44333i34 n, ii' lt'. is'433 ill flt3 ida wa'; A(al.so d picted hy the oc4l promoter. The '3'te' State" uses algi 90 per 4n*8 of the vw tisi ti3n <)3 suil at piil'Se-nt l t, declar1.4( 1 ill, mi m3:33 illI f act 111-(.'i333olld I34s.o 134,34 i tIht, V coul L t t F~i' iik \33rd an'd \\aI I A 133r, iel I. -e& 'ii t44tillt nP(1 1 r i i iri ( I I Y u r Mechanical Engineers Hear Talk On Society 4 1 i3. for t he first tilm hll's "1'' lahe8 dlf. A' th Aerw(am Soe -tv o M eb nial lingim-f'r itst wock Ih (,ar1-4 1 P.o I 1 y L v, n talk I 'T1he Life of.IrE .3 1. Sweet," foidcr of A. S.NI 3I' Tin nW menI \w'' taklen'3 in33 the society. 3314 3mid pla wer '11141 (43' a t r to nV ft lel 1)1It 3I1 31I 1 g i( al ( on'olftioll 143 13ti43 ie'anche. at the ~eti34 For You Who Like Good CoffeeTry OId South "Traditionally Good" '-H I) 1 E\( I nI "v1 Ei \ T THE UNIVERSITY BOOKSTORE "DROP IN AND HAVE A CUP" -ar. 3('. l :, lalcia I wIn .3'333 s* 4434 '.x'1 4 3, : ' 444"4 Iii WANTED S-I 11 .33 3( '-* 114 3:44 nt 33: 14'.' 4. 3 5 4 4 3. T, M llI N1,:,N' 3 A I I Ia!l F, IN K141A N Thrt(, Tltfe' 3 p a* hed I d 3 k r-I h I IVd llr n i n-, r 4 1 Flynn M FOE. 3 ES1. .nh M P p 1.' ni' mT s .'07WIItVE1"YY E. ANESVILLE.FLA 34'? i n' 4 .~ptefeC BUY FROML US A{'fD SAVE Weekly Beginning Program FLORIDA Oct 23rd O r1m TODAY ONLY (Saturday) WARNER OLAND 2olb Centu.ry Picture Student's FREE Show -Tonight 11 P.M. Jean Parker in "Life Begins with Love"' SUNDAY nd MONDAY ATTEND THF4 AN4IMMORTAL 7Z2MPH! -LYRIC---THIS WEEK AND SEE A TODAY ONLY Double Feature Action PROGRAM iiir imar~ fW i i -. -NO. Critics, the Nation Over PAT O'BRIEN Praise it as One of This -INYear's "Ten Best" "SAN QUFNTIN" Yase -ALSO"Dick Tracy" No. 15 "Wild West Days" No. 1 TUESDAY WEDNESDAY BANK NIGHT PLAY SCREENO SUNDAY MONDAY OrDIRo ATOW Wild Comedy and -NO 1SA GREAT PRODUCTION THAT S Heavy Laughs! RE-ISSUED BY REQUEST PACKED -N "PERFECT SPECIMEN -NO.With FIRST RUN in Gainesville Errol Flynn BRUCF CABOT -. Joan Blondell "O.K FIH"Hugh Herbert "LOVE TAKES FLIGHT" irt ootbalt Edward Everett Horton Picture May Robson Matinee Only Tuesday Al' Day Wednesday THURSDAY and FRIDAY II THE LIFE OF A&$M26" INS" Thursday -Frida Back by Popular nd "LSTHO Zo ( Wit RONALD OLEMAN SPECIALTY NOVELTY JANE YATT IDancing THE BIG APPLE Sensation 33'.' t3~ 3*~ 3,-Ti' t it A on'Y4 The nv bigi Soph Y Hears Newins Campbell Speaks To Tell Of Experiences Propellor Club 4 WE CAN-RE PAIR. T--.T T It e ; m: r ed b ro: -,p 'x : 1 !" a t ht MEN lll.VD4;VT,) t ) I

PAGE 6

Tally Crashes 'Who's Who' With Warren Discusses Nineteen Listed; Skating Starts Bridge Building As New PlayNightAttraction !e of a bdgehavng the advantages of an all-cement Investiture Ceremony Saddened By Absence of Four bridge were discussed by Sam Members of Class; Two Killed In Car Wreck Warren, engineering student, bei fore the American Society of1 By Elizabeth Turner Civil Engineers, Tuesday. Imvestiture ceremony Tuesday night was without the happiness it Warren based his discussion on is supposf to embody due to the absence of four members of the a letter recently received from class, two of whom were killed last Saturday, and two of whom Bill Dean, University graduate, were unable to attend due to iijuries received in the same accident. who is now assistant bridge enNineteen girls from this cam-------------~ gineer of the Florida State Road pus are listed in this year's Who's u.4t have polished manners, department. Who Among Students in Amer. sophistication, and be a good The discussion dealt with the (-an Colleges and Uni'e'sitiS daicr, and a good mixer. bridge now under construction be-omiltioii of outikstanlding ,W 1Pibably the brightest girl tween Miami and Key West. It states the foilowrin as her rewas said that the bridge when' dents published by theI -e-It.qirement e says she is lookfinished will be the longest of its of Alabama. 1ng ort tfor a htisbanid about ten kind in the world. The girls sele-cted a r e I yars older thian herself so that Prof. P. L. Reed introduced Mr. Asher,chairma ofthhe may have as h sense as Gills, graduate of the class of committee; Becky Ashton. jurni representative to judiciary ; Kherine Autrey, jo-inor 1epre'sefntJ tive to judiciary; viola i >lresidem of the, athletic asso. ra tion; Mickey Conr, Senior Clpiesentative to judiciary;. Wiaifre i E~wart, first vice-president ee! C. G. A.: Evelyn Fisher, edt A' to tht Flambeau: Louise liii chairman of juiliciary; e'tt H eh, second vice-presidenit f f C. .A.:Martha Lester, pre-s ienit ol Y. W. C. A.: Fraitt ,s Lewvvis, treasurer of C. G. A.; Liise Lingo, chairman of resi ce halls committee: Betty Ost'ud, president of C. .A.; Kath .i Pratt, president of senior class Marjorie Raulerson. freshman ; visor; Eileen Robinson, editor of she hi. ~'23, who attended the meeting ,s One r iiocoterrt freshman meealy a guest. Mr. Gillis for the past h ei that 'heY' would be pure ten years has worked on construebut was immediately squelched tion jobs in New ,Jersey, and told by her oler arid more worlehy. ofhis experiences in Construction sisters with series of 'Impossible, building. where would you find him. And the Ilollypop goes to the one who expressed the desire for a rich husbari with Eine foot ill the g rave and the other oil a ban:iia p' SKATING 'MFADl A teitattiaction ofer'd at ley ni;.ght is skating. Fiftceurl new pairs of skates have beeln aide-l to the equieruenit feer play night aid are availaide to those wishing to indulge in that sport. The Flambeaui reports an iFlastacowo: Carah Sealey. editor interesting episode. There wa.9 a of Distatf; Pearl Shepard, co-c-c V birthday party in the dining hall tor of the Flambeau; anid Hilda last Sunday, anid the news value Spradlin, senior representativ eeof this party was the fact that judiciary. It was in honor of a male visitor. SEARCH'llFOR IDE:AL The gentlenian, ir architect Phi Alpha Theta, national history honorary held i n i t i a t i o n Thursday night for Esther Goodwin and Ruth Prather. A Flambeau reporter has been prying around among a mmiber of students trying to find out what the average girl on our caMptIs wants in a husband to-be SLtdent at the Univeirsity, blushed and stammered while his date enijoyce his discomfort hugely. Matthews To Speak To Soph TY Club and tht. answers so far have been V. it. 'Bly"' Matthews, drree54 varied she has not bccri able tir of Florida Union, will be the to draw aniv con clusioris is to 91uc st spevgker before the Srqwph the average ideal man. In fact, "Y" club at its meeting Monday she knows there are none to be night at 7:15 o'clock. found that would nicasur ie up to "The Art of Living" is to be some (if the requirements. Here the theme of Matthew.' talk. lie are a ff w t* typical responses. will atteinpt to present the ben "All I ask for is a Harvard fits to be received from living a mau," said one young thing with well-rounded life. Judging 1 shinliing ees D'ar-k, tall arid' Matthews' splendid work at Iion-hain sen. And oh, he must have ida Union, he is well qualified to hair on1 fhis chest", speak upon the problems facing a .S e c negei-n.ethe' heel CIa &k--,Ye 1mg enmallduriig his uiversit V jug play boy for' a husband. He life. ECONOMY CAB Our cabs have used University Tags for five years. We also brought the 10c rate to Gainesville. Patronize us and hela to keen this 10c rate in our city. DAY and NIGHT SERVICE Phone 506 or 507 F, U ., 0~ 0 ,. n.fl.~, ~0' e. .a .S ~0,--. 0,-n.e. B a ENGRAVINGS In One or More Colors p I I B I Kappa Sig Pledges Given Supber Pledges of Kappa Sigma fraternit y were entertained Tues day night at a buffet supper! given in their honor by wives of the (Gainesville alumni. The supper, an annual affair, was held at the fraternity house and was served in the newly inaugurated dining room. Later in the evening, following the formal introduction of pledges and brief talks by George Means, president of the chapter, and Pat Ford, president of the pledge class thore was a musical program. Among those present were Mrs. John .Tigert, Dean and Mrs. 'Nilmon Newell, Miss Mary Jane Tigert, Mrs. J. S. Means, Dean and Mrs. Beaty, Dr. and .Mrs. Arthur L. Shealy, Dr. and Mrs. Simpson, Mr. anid Mrs. J. L. Neill, Mr. an I -MADE BYThe Tampa Times Engraving Pfant TAMPA, FLORIDA PRINT BETTER -LOOK BETTER X\E MAKE A SPEC1LTY (IF SIIUUL ErNI COLLEGE ANNUALS Engravers for the "Seininole" and "Florida Alligator" n --AM 4w'i --i 'n ,n 'i. Presbyterian Group Plans For House 'Song Of China' Wins Approval Buckman C Shoes Doul Takes des Members of the Presbyterian --Buckman C d Thomas C student session once more have The "Song of China," a sound again featured in horseshoes when taken up the fight for a student film written, acted anC produced Buckmatn c dihfeated its opponent house, and at their meeting Tuesin China by Chinese, was presentWednesday afternoon to annex day they voted to concentrate ed in Florida Union Tuesday the horsesh e double championtheir efforts throughout the year night as the first in a series of ship with the scoie 21 11, 21. on this objective, foreign films to be brought here o Ever since the student session through the efforts of the UniverTern A of Buckian ( %as was established on the campus in sity film committee. Ci imposed of .Smith and M. 1934, its greatest need has oeen a Reactions of four generation-s o \Vad:. tnh; teani B, S. Rood and building which Presbyterian stua typical Chinese family when W. sigman: eamr -, W. Grimes dents could use as a center for Western culture and ideas began and 0. Reedc-. or Thomas C their activities. to undermine ancient customs the players w' re: Team A, A. In these four years since a was portrayed on the screen by Spillii and .IPowers; team B small sum has been collected hv the Chinese actors. L. Kimble and J. Gossnian; team the group, ari within the last Recent shots of the Sino-Japatwo years co-operation from the nesu war were shown in another Synoc of Florida has been solicitfilm on the progr am. Included in ed and obtained to the amount of this feature were the first p-ictwo percent of the synod's budget. tures taken from .Japanese airIn order to speed up things this planes during an air raid. Chinese year, the Presbyterian young citizens were shown fleeing from people of the state voted last Shaig hai as colmnuns of troops sunimer at their conference t moved u) to the front. contact every member of the ili committee members said church in this state and solicit his they were well pleased with the contribution for the house. The attendance at the show. Announce-----M.S--, radN-nient of the second film on the Mrs. J. M. Scott, M. and Mrs program will be made shortly, it Ralph Stoutamire. Mr and Mrs. was stated. Jim Larche, Mr. and Mrs. Burt ALL Ames, Miss Marion Morris, Mr. SWi iam Carleton, and Professor g(a is ome d hlar for each I'resbyAngus Laird. terian. a total of $20.000. SEE' 1938 CHEVROLET ON DISPLAY TODAY THIGPEN CHEVROLET Co. PACE SIX.ne arnkets $1 SINGLE or DOUBLE COTTON or WOOL MIXED This Ad And $1. RUDDY'S DEPARTMENT STORE )uth Side Square Gainesville 0 69 1Vhatsyour "pic .for the ALL ,-Sf/JAR. .Eddie' That.id 'a'& Il ihe s terfi a cinch Paul 0oo% right his one" Gct) your last m1inutc football predictions und scoruN frui DDIIDOOLEY Nill) P AL.DOULA S Thursday s and Saturda)s Columbia Network 9 .Ace of Am all Jor MILDNESS and TASzE kOrrC ',.I I! -tI,1 -,ILL. ., THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR SATURDAY, OCTOBER 23, 1937. C. J. Lamb and B. Varn. IWeather rtservers Immediately previous to their gust of Wind blew 21 defeat Thomas C had downed hour at the top uf New Dorm L H in the semi-finals ,lngton. N. 11., ~1:21 with the scores 21-16. 21-16, 21-5.,12. 1934. ITIP TOP ICE CREAM ICE CREAM -ALL FLAVORS FROZEN MALTED MILK CANDY -CIGARETTES 4 .V U, ALWAYS WELCOME! ALWAYS SATISFIED! WHFN YOU COMF TO THE GATOR RESTAURANT REGULAR MEALS FOUNTAIN SERVICE SANDWICHES SHORT ORDERS SCHOOL SUPPLIES It's a cinch tlcN* Ncoot what smokers like. You'll find them mider. you 'll enjoy that (hcsterfield taste. U I -a -S I