Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Creation Date:
July 24, 1964
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non - profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

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:.:...:.:..:..:..:..:..:...:.:....:...::..::.:.:.:.:.:.:..::..::.:.:.:.:..:................ The Flo rid a ......... ....... .. ............ ............... litt. J'1II



ALLIGATOR Intercollegiate academic m;



Vol.56, No. 159 University of Florida/Gainesville Friday, July 24, 1964 Iii: contests in the works

:.::::::::::::::::::.:::::.:::::::.:.:::::.:.:..:.:..:..:.:.:.:. :. :.::.::.::.::.::.;:.:.:;:.;:.;:;:;:;:.;:.;:.;:.;:.;:.;:.::.::.;:.;:.;:.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.;:.::.::.::.::.::.,::.:.:.:,:..::.:..:.::..::..:.:.:.::.:::..::.:,.:::.:------.T.:::::::::::::;::::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::::;:;:::;:;:;:;:;:::::::::::::::::::::::::; .:.:.:.: X'X'XX: :<:
;:;:;:;:;:;:;:;:;:;:::::::;:::;:::::::::;::::::::;;::;;:;:: ;;::::::;;; ;; ;;;;; ;;;;;;; ;;;;; ;;; ; ; ; ;
mm: Inter-collegiate academic competition will be the ::1::1:

I ::::' subject of a state-wide meeting set for Saturday at ::1:
15,000 to enroll ? ::::::: Stetson University. Student Government'officials :::::::
::::::: will represent five of Florida's four-year universities :::::::

:.:.:.:.:.:..: -- Stetson, Miami, Florida State, South Florida .:..::1..:..:
UF officials expect a junior colleges In the state as year's fall enrollment. ::::::: and U F. :.:.:.:
record enrollment this fall one of the major causes of ::::::: The competition, initiated by'UF's Student Government :::::::
of over 15,000 students. But this unusual trend: decreas- Bryan explained that the ::1 ::1:1: Council for Higher Education, Is to consist of :::1::
the freshman class will not ing number of freshmen and Increase is reflected in ;::::::: a series of ten television shows broadcast from stations :::::::
be of record size, despite increasing number of upper- virtually every college, but ;::::::: in Miami, jacksonvlUe, ttaytona-Orlando, Tal- 1:::1:1:,
persistent rumors to that classmen. that Arts and Sciences, Engineering i::::::: lahassee and the Tampa Bay area. The object Is to ::::::::
effect. Last year's total enroll- and Education are :::::::: declare a state academic champion at the completion ::::::::
Assistant Registrar ment in September was the three colleges expectedto :::::::: of the series. :::::
Thomas A. Grahma Jr. explained 14,810, and this fall Is sure contribute most heavilyto ::::1:1:: "The series of shows will cost $20,000 and will 11::1::
that the freshman to see a considerable Increase the increase in graduate ::::::: serve to create a greater awareness of the role of ::::::
class will number about Graham predicted.Of enrollment.In 11 1 the state's facilities for higher education. The Council
3,000. This compares with this total enrollment, addition to higher enrollment ::::::: is a student government agency specifically designed *::::
last year's freshman enroll- an estimated 2,000 men and in the upper divi- ::::::: to publicize Florida's public and private edu- ::::::
ment of nearly 3,500. women will be registered as sion and the graduate school, ::::::: cational institutions and the facilities that are available ::::::
The big increases are graduate students. Assistant the professional schools are ::::::: through them. We think this program will do just ::: '
coming in other areas. Gra- Dean of the Graduate School also feeling the squeeze of ::::::: that," said John Hancock, chairman of the Council. :::::::
ham explained that there has Robert A. Bryan called thisa Florida's increasing student ::::::: "We have been making great progress toward solving :::::::
been a steady Increase in the "significant Increase"over population. Law School officials :;:::::' the problems we foresee -- several are still In doubt. :::::
number of students in upper last year's graduate enrollment are said to be hard at 1i The Stetson meeting is mainly for setting up rules 1111i
division colleges in recent of 1,838. Even that work already on recommendations :::::::: and to acquaint representatives of all the participating :::::::
years. He gave the Increas- number represented a 20 per of Increased and :::::::; schools with the results of conversations I have had ':::::::
ing number and popularity of cent jump over the previous enlarged plant and facilities :::::::: with television stations and each of the schools individually :::::

:::::;:;:;:;:;; ; :;;;@;; :;::::: :::1:1:1:1:11:::: ; mm 111111 :1111 11 11 11 1::m1:::1:1::::::::: 11 11 1 1 1 m; :::::::: ," Hancock said. :::::::
1 11 mm m1;;;;;; ::: :: :: ::ti% ;;;m;; ;;;;;;;; ;; ;;;;;;; 1 :;:; ; 1;;;; 1 ; ; ; :1:1:1l :1 1 :::::::: Hancock said he had travelled more than 3,000 miles ::::::::

:::::::: In Florida to set up the program and that he plans ::::::
:::::::: to do a great deal more before all the details are ::::::::
:::::::: worked out ::::::::

:.:.:.ii:. The program is scheduled to go on the air in mid- m: :;:'
:::: : :
:::::::; December, probably on a Sunday afternoon. The shows ::::
:::::::: will be video-taped probably on Saturday for shipment ::::::::
:::::::; to all participating stations to broadcast on Sunday ::::::::
Y f :::::: each week. Live state-wide broadcasts were said ::::::
r :::::::; to be financially Impractical. ::::::::
:::::::: Hancock said there would be sponsorship of the ;:::::::
:::::::: program by someone other than the universities, but 1::::::::
:C.4tl :::::::: that no negotiations had begun yet. :: ::
6 :::::::: The Stetson meeting marks the first public announcement 1::: :
S :::::::: of the Intended project. "We are now ::::::::
:::::::: positive that the series Is practical and that the five ::::::
:::::::: student governments cooperating with .a sponsor are ::::::::
::::::: capable of producing a highly professional and very ::::::::
::::::: worthwhile project. This Is why we are getting together ::::::::
::::::: to plan our next steps as a single group," ::'*::':
::::::: Hancock said. ;:::::::
::::::: When the show is sponsored and definite, UF will ::::::::
\ .:!r :::: transfer credit for the show to a committee made up ;:::::::
.' <
\"';' 1:::1: of representatives of all participating schools,with the ;1:::
'R'"II" "< ::::::: stipulation that the sponsor provide adequate recognition ::::::::
/ iii :::::::: to the committee. ::::::::
"--. yI'" # <'' ;::::::: It is hoped that the success of the series will :m::::::
r' .. ,, : ::::1:1: prompt the continuance of the show on an annual ::::
.' :::::::: basis and including all of Florida's four-year colleges. xJ:::::::

... itfl:::1:1:: ::: ::1 :::1: :::1: 1 ::1 1 1 1i1i1i 1H; 111m1 m m 11 1 1i1111 1mm;1; 1; mmmmmm;mmm; ;;;m;;

Architecture student Terry Hoffman, right, won a $900 first place awardin

a design contest sponsored by the American Iron and Steel Institute Leg gives Lyceum

and another $500 for the department of architecture. With him are JamesT.

Lendrum department head, and student Rafall C. Moreu, centerwhowon

honorable mention. Hoffman designed a prefabricated vacation cabin $5,000 for Fall show

for the contest.

1:1::::1:::::1:::::1:1: 1 1 ; 1 1 1:: :::::1: :: :::::1m: ::m11;;;;;;111m1;; ;;1ilimmm1; ;;;m1m ;1111;; ;;1111;; ; ; ;;;111; ;111;;;;1;;1m:1:1:1; ::::::1:1::::1:: :::1:1::::1:1:1:1:1:::::::1:1:1:1:::: ::1::::1: ::1:: By JIM WALDRON dental expenses such as

special police.

It could be a great museumEditor's Legislative$5,000 Council for Lyceum approved The seating arrangementfor

Council to bring the Chad the event is broken downto
Mitchell Trio to the cam- 75 per cent for students,
and 25 per cent for others.
( Note: This story appeared in Wednesday's verslty campus. Only a fraction of its valuabfe Nonstudents will also pay
Florida Times-Union. We thought it of special Interestto materials can be exhibited in the effectively utilized Lane to veto an admission price of $2 as
the and for that called the Times- which out for the
university, reason display areas are spread publicon
compared to $ L.30 for stu-
Union for permission to reprint, which was granted.) the first and second floors of the Seagle Bunding. --See page 3 dents.In .
Most of the remainder of the museum's possessionsare
By CAROLYN DART CARROLL either stuffed into cabinets crowded together
Times-Union Stiff Writer with only walking space at the Seagle Building or pus next Fall. This action other business, the
granted resting room in student-crowded classroomson was taken at the bi-weekly council completed the first
reading of the budget for
GAINESVILLE, July 20 -- Buried treasure lies the UF campus, where collection quarters includea meeting Tuesday night.
hidden behind locked doors in the dusty cornersat flame-vulnerable frame building.The $3,500 will be used strictly 1964-65. The Board of International -
the Florida State Museum here. famed Leigh M. Pearsall collection of Indian In payment to the Trio Activities was
In the basement and first three floors of the old artifacts, valued at more than half a million dollars, for their appearance. The
(See LEG Page 2))
Seagle Building, thousands of items wait to divulge when presented constituted the largest single gift remainder_. __ .__ ._ will_ __cover_ .__.._InclL _..-_. ..._-_._ ._._.. ,
their secrets to the practiced eyes of scientistsand ever made to the UF by an individual. It Is displayed : : : ::::: ::::: r: :::::::: :: ::
.1mm:$;:&:::&:&:.m#;#;.; .; : ; m;m;mm; ;;;;mm ;;;m m 1 1m
to whet the curoslty of the viewing public. Broken on the ground floor of a downtown bank
and dried bones hold clues to the characteristicsof building, for there's no room at the museum for it. I
Next-to-last
a youthful earth; Indian artifacts show living habitsof The lack of space and money places critical handi- issue
peoples long passed into history. caps on museum staff members whose research
The museum is officially a department of the Interests extend from Pleistocene-era bone fragmentsto Lots is the nexttolastissue The final edition will con-
University of Florida, created in 1917 by the state. live snakes. The museum receives only about of The Alligator this tain, In addition to a 24-page
Its staff includes specialists world famous for research $125,000 a year in state funds, according to officials, summer. The final edition section of regular news, two
and its collections encompass specimens to finance Its entire operation and pay salaries. will be Tuesday, July 28. Because other sections for entering
which rank with the nation's best. That's only a monetary drop in a huge bucket of of the unusual size of freshmen. The edition will /'
But the Florida State Museum's home consists of opportunity for scientific contribution and public the final ((64 pages), It will be mailed to each freshman.
woefully Inadequate quarters covering only a portionof service. be printed earlier than usual. The next Alligator will be
a building located nine blocks, a shopping center Deadline for stories, there- published during the first weekof
and a federal highway distant from Its parent uni- (See MUSEUM, Page 2)) fore, must be today at 5 p.m. the Fall trimester.

,
C



2 The Florida Alligator Friday, July 24, 1964 _



I Council committee reports on Lyceum I


-


REASONS FOR THE COMMITTEE: price differential between tickets the problems had bogged down and assume that the students, throughthe All Lyceum Council losses win
At the July 7 Legislative Coun- for students and nonstudents.The nothing would be accomplished on Legislative Council, will stand be paid from this fund and all
cil meeting the Lyceum Council Lyceum Council reported a the floor, a three man committeewas libel to cover losses on events Lyceum Council profits will be
to consider the prob- dependent upon student ticket sales deposited Into this fund.
was requested to have available $1,493.411055 on the orchestra attraction appointed
answers to several questions and that all tickets were lems. without any prior consultation. Details of this fund, its establishment -
forthcoming concerning the financIAl priced at $2.00. After the committee was formed, Therefore, the following procedureis use, and control, to be
loss and the lack of a When It appeared discussion of the Lyceum Council presented a recommended: recommended by the Budget and
special request to the Budget and For any event dependent upon Finance Committee, a Lyceum
Finance Committee for $1,700.00from student ticket sales, the Lyceum Council representative, and approved
student fees to cover losses Council shall present the possibility by the Legislative Council.
sustained by the Lyceum Council of a loss to the Legislative This committee realizes these
during the present Summer Tri- Council before the contract Is proposals represent only the beginning -
mester. made. Before the Legislative of a necessary long-range
LEG COUNCIL MEETING FINDINGS OF THE COMMITTEE: Council assumes the liability of program to study policies relatedto
Let it not be misunderstood.This any loss Incurred, ticket pricingfor functions involving both student
committee Is not anti-cul- the event must be agreed upon and non-student attendance and
tural, but merely wishes that the by both Lyceum Council and. the therefore recommends:
entire Lyceum Council program be Legislative Council, thus insuringa The establishment of a long-
WORKS ON FUNDS based on a firm financial policy. fair price differential. Having range study committee composed
The committee recognizes the. received approval of the Legisla- of representatives of both Uni-
fact that the Lyceum Council Is tive Council to stand libel for versity Administration and Student
a separate body of elected studentsand losses, the proposal will then be Government to consider overall
I (Continued From Page 1)) appointed faculty advisors and presented to the Public Functionsand policy effecting all ticketed enter-
that it is as jealous of its rightsas Lectures Committee for approval tainment functions.

granted an additional $500 passing of the budget before the Legislative Council is of of the charge.In The Administration's member-
for five new clubs that will the summer trimester ends. its powers but there Is an area the event that there arisesan ship of said committee to Include
become active in the Fall of common ground between the opportunity for the Lyceum members appointed by Dean Hale,
trimester. Lane charged that those two separate bodies--the area of Council to secure a special attraction including representatives of the
who wanted to wait until Fall finance.A but the contract must be Public Functions and Lectures

Representatives of the International for further consideration of meeting was held on July 17, made before the next Legislative Committee, the Lyceum Council,
Board stated that the budget were "thinking of 1964. In attendance were Dean Council meeting, a permanent Florida Players, and other organizations -
as of now, 900 foreign stu- their political futures first Lester L. Hale, the committee, committee should be established in concerned with ticketed
dents have been accepted for and student government and L. M. Blain, majority floor the Legislative Council consistingof events.
next fall. This Is an increase second." leader. The meeting was frank, the Rules and Calendar Com- The student government mem-
and will cause a rise cordial, and constructive. mittee, the Chairman and one bership on said committee to Include -
In membership of the For- Several members of the During the meeting it was pointed member of the Budget and Finance members appointed by the
eign Clubs. council expressed resent- out by Dean Hale that the Public Committee. This committee President of the Student Body, except -
ment of Lane's charge,call- Functions and Lectures Committee would in such emergency cases, that not more than 50% of
Ing "unfair and unethical." has the responsibility of determining speak for the entire Legislative those appointed by the Student
The council also approved
whether charges maybe Council to giVA approval to the Body president shall be outside the
$856 to send 10 delegates
made for functions. Lyceum Council proposal. This Legislative Council.
from the local chater of They said their reasons
The Public Functions and Lec- committee should be resorted to Said long-range committee to
the American Pharmaceutical for waiting was that most
tures Committee may approve a only in the event It Is Impossible, be established without delay and a
members of the council
Association to the were
national charge for tickets but it does not due to timing, to meet with the report of its establishment shouldbe
absent the
convention In New during summer,
have the position of determiningwhat entire Legislative Council.In .
at
announced the first Legis-
York. $70 was also approved and they had no "moral"right
that charge may be nor guar- regard to the present special lative Council meeting In Septem-
for Circle K for the pur- to act on the budget.
anteeing support for losses sustained request from the Lyceum Councilto ber 1964.
pose of Informing Incoming Final exams were also givenas
., cover the loss incurred by the The committee respectfully and
freshmen of their activities. a reason against calling
for a special meeting.In It was agreed that the Lyceum Philadelphia Orchestra presentation unanimously submits this report,
Council should live within Its bud- the committee recommends: and the attached approvals, with
decision
a large majority -
In letter to the council
a get once it was established. Fur-
the council decided to The present special request for the hope that its recommendationswill
SG Treasurer Fred Lane ,
ther, that a firm policy of pro- be
wait until September before $1,700.00 approved.The be used for constructive ends.
had called for a special
cedure covering any vent depen- establishment of a contin-
meeting In order to dispensewith further consideration on the
dent upon student ticket sales gency fund by pledging set amount
a
the second reading and budget. Bill Hester, Chairman
should be set and thereafter
up of money from the Legislative Skip Haviser
followed by all parties concerned. Council reserve funds. Virgil Scott
RECOMMENDATIONSOF

THE COMMITTEE: w
Tho.oow "J T.vroiim"'w"'" _Pnitnl1"' ''uw" .chnnlH.......... u"not.





It could be a great museumContinued


AuthenticIvy


( from Page 1)) specimens, the tools and space which the museum

"With this amount of state support we would be In has been granted for analyzing Its treasures.
quite a fix U each staff member couldn't bring in his "Without question we are the largest and most
own research money," said Dr. J, C. Dickinson Jr., active scientific museum in the Southeast," said
museum director. "Each staff member holds a dual Dickinson. "Yet we know we are not doing the thingswe
appointment in the appropriate department on campus. could and should be doing. For example, workon
Outside support for their research usually must come the Florida barge canal Is turning up a tremendous
through the National Science Foundation the American amount of material which must be recovered now
Philosophical Society and such private organizations" or it will be lost. Yet we have only one veterbrate

Funds for research are vital for the museum to fulfill paleontologist who might be able to go over and look
its at that ditch from time to time.
dual role as both state university museum, .
Dr. Dickinson explained. Besides maintaining public "The state road construction program turns up
exhibits the museum concerns Itself with two main Indian mounds that we can't come even close to keepingup .

areas: anthropology, with major emphasis on ar- with. Once they're gone, that's it. We have triedto
chaelogy, and zoology, including seven fields of capitalize in our geographic location and emphasizethe
emphasis. Southeastern States and the Caribbean area,
"The public thinks of a museum as where stuff is which is to a Urge extent unworked. But we have a
accumulated as they go and look at things," he said. tremendous number of problems."
"They think a staff need only take care of exhibits and Most of the material now belonging to the museum
walk around saying See what we have here." That's must lie Idle for lack of adequate staff and space.A Fremacs' Dacromatic
about as far as you can get from our concept of a valuable mollusk collection estimated at 230,000 own slacks are
modern museum. Each staff member is engaged In specimens lies hidden In cabinet drawers in back tapered-tailored long and lean the way

research and taking care of the exhibits is only a room. No specialist has been available for yearsto you prefer. Great for those
minor fraction of our activity. take advantage of It. everyday or

"We are not dedicated to building collections of "There are some types of collections we couldn't dress-up occasions. Wash'n wear 65%

things for their own sake. Our collections grow as accept now If they were offered us," Dickinson Dacron 35% cotton. $7.98
the result of Important research by our staff mem- said. "We Just wouldn't have a place for them or
bers. In our research collections we are lookingfor anyone to work with them." "We Cater to Your Good Appearance'FREMACS

quality, not just quantity." The director is confident that the museum could .,. @1M1W lWl m m WmFn r
But the museum has quantity in collections without realize its potential best on the campus of the uni-
quantity In space to house them. The staff of about versity of which it is a department."It .
20 has utilized seemingly every square Inch of Is not sensible for us to be here in the Seagle : \\ \\\\

space, Including the storing of antique furniture between Building," he said. "We know what we need In termsof
cabinet tops and ceiling and the placing of a building to serve our entire function of public (
swollen Index files along hallways. In a basement education and research. It would cost about $1 ,, 11 j j[ j 1 ,
half-filled with cast-off UF desks and equipment are million, but part of the funds for research areas 112 w. vk West SWA- v wX %% located a vast assortment of fossils biological could come from the federal government." UniversityPage








..f_. .:z .- -



.. ., .. 'w,
--






Friday, July 24, 1964 The Florida Alligator Page, 3What .

.Lane says he'llvetol.SOcharge "' '" ,: ."II .jl"II :I-I'I""i"'i';;II I, :'i: IIi;'I' :I1r'":::'. -


I' Lanewrote to Council i : I IJuly


20, 1964 until only the second week in the committee (as under the old semester -
fall, let me say this is not de- program). Those who yell,
Fred Lane, student body treasurer, expressed MEMBERS OF LEGISLATIVE sireable. Under this pretense the "wait," are thinking of their political -
"shock" and "amazement" Wednesday on hearing COUNCIL: budgets were delayed last summer futures first and student
that Legislative Council approved a $1.50 chargefor and didn't pass the Council until government second.
students attending a special Lyceum-sponsored FIRST: Additional budget October. (4) In the fall as now, we could
appearance of the Chad Mitchell Trio during the fall material available tomorrow ((2) Granted that the Alligator not expect members to rubber
trimester. evening will be (1)) an adjusted (under the current procedure) has stamp deliberations. For good
Lane said it was his feeling that a $1 charge was Lyceum Council budget and (2)a to print the proposed allocation legislative control, we would have
sufficient to defray costs. corrected Intramurals budget. after first reading but this can to distribute the same folder of
"Although I am going to look Into the situation Also, there are a few extra folders be done. While a meeting next material, allow a period for study,
thoroughly, at this time I Intend to exercise the of material for those who were Monday or Tuesday might be a and then redellberate. To those
"The one dollar charge Is a long-standing policy." failed to pick them up during the you, it is Important that this be ask: Why are you doing ANY of
two weeks. done. Most organizations are this work now? Let me add again,
:, ,
'c''' ; : r '
: ::y. < '
; x-i
; :> ';:.i ;; 'f: financial
SECOND: May strongly recom- anslously awaiting final approvalof efficiency dictates that
mend and urge the Legislative budgets to sign contracts or we step FORWARD and PASS THE
Council to entertain both read- start other work. BUDGET THIS TRIMESTER. Thisis
Ings and final passage on these (3) THERE ARE THOSE WHO a major reason why the third
budgets before this trimester ends. SEEK POLITICAL EXPEDIENCY trimester Council was vested with
PATRONIZE GATOR ADVERTISERSEND My reasons for this include; INSTEAD OF FINANCIAL EFFI- full authority.
(1) Extreme difficulties will be CIENCY. In order that we sat- Dest wishes for an equitable de-
incurred if the budgets are not IsfactoraUy function under a tri- liberation.
passed. Money needs to be avail- mester system -- your Councilis
able beginning (and often before) obligated to use the authorizations Sincerely,
September. For those who claim granted to It as a full-time Fred Lane
1 second reading should be put off body and not a summer steering Student Body Treasurer

.. .

I i What Council members replied to Lane : I


you were present you would Earl M. Barker Jr.
seen these "politically mind- Minority Floor Leader
OF TERMCLEANUP representatives secure for the Gator Party

TIME -- of this University a guar-
AT YOUR HOUSE? of a price differential at Floyd Price
Council special attrac- VOTE Party
We feel this action, among

Moving away or intoa represents a conscientious Bill Hester
Council who places the Gator Party
new apartment? Body first.

Household goods and
your Information the second Andy Percival
furniture to be sold? of the budget will be held VOTE Party
Don't want to waste ; a fully represntatlve coun- I
September 15, regardless of John Baum
old TV ?
your antenna Gator
letter. Party
r Proper action was
Need quick action, to advance a percentage of
before the term ends? budget to those organizations Skip Haviser
will need It before September. VOTE Party
Use Gator Classifieds., 1'U



ACT NOW IS TODAY) DEADLINE j Lane said back: ,I\



: government's half-million dollar
( It Is my understanding business.
several members of the Coun
quite irked by the letter
my feelings remain (for "By their action, a majority of
U desired): the Council were neglectful toward
( their fiscal responsibilities la student -
) night's Legislative Coun- government's operation."
toward final
SM What's New is during the trimester passage Fred Lane

I a new low-point for student I Student Body Treasurer

-
The Browse Shop 50c Adults Service keysavailable

35c Children Cool It' At

PRESIDENT & CONGRESS. Binkley now

ENGLISH COMPOSITION. Howes
AMERICAN GOVERNMENT. .Crown MAGNESIA SPRINGSO Service keys for several cam-
pus organizations are on hand In
the Student Government trea
DEATH OF A SALESMAN. .Miller surer's office In room 307 of the
Florida Union.
ANDTHOU..Buber O
I Any student who can qualify as
ANTONY AND CLEOPATRA..TroyLOST U I Iw having served In one of the following -
_
organizations may purchase
his key for $3.00.Legislative .
WORLDS. Cottrell Council, Florida Alligator -
the Seminole, Traffic
iQ Court, Honor Court, Men's and
G
TECHNICAL & REFERENCE .S Women's Glee Clubs,Debate team,
Choir, Symphony Orchestra,Boardof
Student Publications, Lyceum
-- r n. $ Council, and Band.A .
letter or phone call to Stu.
QUANTUM CHEMISTRY. Kauzmann
dent Government from the faculty
UNIVERSITY CALCULUS. Taylor Coll David Reber: 481-9210 advisor will be sufficient quali
J.F.K. THE MAN AND THE MYTH..Lasky fication.

152-foot long SWIMMING POOL, supplied by a

constant flow of fresh mineral water Union FilmsThe

BROWSE SHOP Facilities Available For Private Parties Florida Union Films Committee -
will show "All Quiet On
FREE Picnic Areas .
The Western Front" tonight and
Campus Shop & Bookstore tomorrow night at 7 p.m. and at
10 miles east of Gainesville 1
; 1/2 miles off State 9 p.m. In the air conditioned Medical -

.Highway. 20; turn at Grove Park. Center Auditorium. Admission
will be 30 cents.



;




,


4 The Florida Alligator Friday, July 24, 1964
....._._h'I' _.. ._


[ :::":::::: ':: ':--'I': !!] 1. .I' '',!! .. S" w ,.. jj Il :





A
H1111:11111mm;;;:;;;;; m1m m m;; ;;;i;;ili1i;;; ii1it111; ii; ;11ii1;;;;;;i1i; mmmm; ; ;; 1;11m:1t111; : : ; .4 I S s \

1 m 1 AN EDITORIAL : r \'
:::::::
:::::::: :
::m 1 The Alligator's receptionist had her wallet stolen :|:j 1;

::::::; from her purse Monday. It was daytime, and the purse .;:X:::::
;::1:1:: was lying on her desk In the office. Her sister's :ft:::
::::::: purse was also pilfered of $15, and the Friday before :j::;:::::
::::::: that she had lost $3 more at a street dance, also ::jj:::::::

stolen. &
::::::: we are thinking of getting a campus cop stationed ;:::::|::::: '"
::::::: at the Florida Union. Meanwhile, a warning: Finals :::;;:::;::: '1 I
::::::::: time means increased tensions. People do things :'::::::;:::
;::::::: they wouldn't ordinarily. Don't leave money or :::|:::|;:::
;::::;:: other valuables unguarded, even for a few moments. ':::|::|:;::: a; .
;::::::; Keep your purse with you, lock your room when you :;:ji:::; } "
;::::::; step out, don't take money with you to dances. :$:::::
::; rationalize activities :|:::|:::::
::::; And, thieves -- you may your ; :',
:::::::; by supposing you need the money more than the person :::;.'::::::
.. :::::::; you stole It from. Chances are you're wrong. The :::::::: "We are unalterably opposed to man-eating sharks. .

:::::::; money you steal may be a week's meals for your :::jj::::::::: however, we don't want to single out any particular
: :::
:::::::: victim. ::::
::::::;: Perhaps as a public service, before the trlmster g:::::::; shark by name !I"

:::1:1i:; ends, students might send to The Alligator accounts :::1:j::;::::
:::
:::::::: of how they had money or valuables stolen. If we :::::::: ::::
:::::::; print the letters, maybe it will warn someone else gij:::::::: l ljl

::1:::: who might be making the same mistake. ::$::::: ... JAZZ CORNER
peeled and guard j::|::':::; ::::
::::1::; Meanwhile, keep your eyes your : .
::::::: up. You never know; your best friend may be working $:::::::
:.:::::: his way through college the easy way. W|;i:|:::;:;: i1l THE guitarist **

::::::: -- John Askins :::x'j:::::;::

!" ji'' II. By CHARLIE BUSH f i* ililt [J

@@l ifr: im::: f: f: ::::f $:m:f$; fm: m E 1 1 1 1 : ,
LETTER Take five beautiful melodies, add plenty of "soul, m
:::::::: mix Into smooth blend and you have "Am I Blue" :::::::
:::1:;1 (Blue Note Record ST-84139). 1:::1:

In defense of old men :::::::: Grant Green Is THE guitarist these days. "Am I :::::::
:::::::: Blue" will n you why. :::;:::
:::::;:: I bought this record after hearing 15 seconds of it. :::::::
;:;::::: Green is playing better these days. The last time I :::;:::
EDITOR each fessor would
: senting homecoming year for ask to be
anyone :;:::::: bought a record of his It took me 30 seconds. :::::::
mot's After statements reading Dr. William Wil- the students and alumni. apathetic about any government, :::::::: "Am I Blue" features Johnny Coles, trumpet; Joe :::::::
In the Alligator The most frightening aspect of even a student body government,
on July 21, I feel I must presentmy Dr. Wilmot's Interview is the :::::::: Henderson, tenor sax; John Patton, organ; Ben Dixon, :::::::
:::::::; drums; Grant Green, guitar. ::::
complete disagreement with apathy of Student Government he I would like to answer now .
wants from the older students.In questions I'm sure will be asked. : :::;: There are five tracks on the album: "Am I Blue," ::::::::
him.Dr. ;::::::: "Take These Chains From Heart "I Wanna Be ::::
Wilmot Is. not completely our free society, organizationsand I am 20 years old, a 2UC, and as My ::::
::1:1:1::: Loved "Sweet Slumber "For All We Know." ::::
,
familiar with Student Government. government are spending mil- a freshman I served as Secretaryof :;::
Throughout this organization there lions of dollars a year to get out Alumni Affairs on the Student :::::::: Patton's solos show the influence of Jimmy Smith, ::::::::
are many undergraduates holding voters and to Induce the public to Government cabinet until other :;::::::: but his chording is closer to Wild Bill Davis. "For ::::::::
various positions Some, of course, take an active part In government.It Interests and responsibilitiesforced :::::::: All We Know" is Patton's best track. He is largely ::::::::
are the lower ones where the Individual is hard to believe a person with me to leave the post. ::1:1::: responsible for the "gospel" flavor of "Take These :::;:::;
learns the processes of the respect of a university pro- Don Wayne Reid :;:::::: Chains From My Heart." ::::::::
running Student Government but :::::::; Coles has a style somewhat like Miles Davis. He ::::;:::
many are In higher positions. More The FloridaALLIGATOR :::::::: is heard best on "I Wanna Be Loved" and "For All ::::::::
than half the Legislative Council ;::::::: We Know." Unfortunately, both Coles and Henderson ::::::;:
members are undergraduates.Still ;:;::1: tend to sound mechanical on their solos. When they :::::::: .
there are many of the :::::::; have had a few more years of experience they will ::1::: L
older graduate and law studentsin '::::::: be terrific. :::::::
offices most :::1: ::1: This is really Green's record. He excells on all ;:::
campus holding Editor . . . . . . John Askins ::::::: five tracks. ; ,I:
positions of leadership. Why? Green's solos are not in short, chopy ::::::
Because they are mature, responsible ::::::: phrases like Coles' and Henderson's. They are long :::::::
Executive Editors :::;::: and free ;:::
people looked up to by flowing. Although he sticks fairly close to :::
'the student body. These are the Bob Thomas Benny Cason ::::::: the melody I don't think you could say that he adds ;::::::
students, who although they have Associate Editors ;:::::: embllshments. It would be more accurate to say that ::::::
earned a degree and are workingfor Jim Castello Ed Barber ::::::: he plays variations upon the theme. :::::::
another, feel moral responsibility Pat Hogan Eunice Tall ::::::: His solos are so very emotional they would Impress ;;:::::
to continue serving their ::::::: even the most insensitive person. Every song he ;:::::;
fellow students. These older stu- Sports Editor. . . . . . .Ernie Litz ::::::: touches becomes "blue." There are no tricks, frills :::::::

dents have more experience in AU photos by Carolyn Johnston unless otherwise noted. ::::::: or fancy stuff in his solos. They are simple, quiet, .::::::;
handling the complicated problemsof ataxx writers m11 honest statements of this man's feelings, and you will :111
John Hancock, Don Federman, Riva Goldberg VernonSwartsel
a student body of nearly 15,000 ::::::: be moved by them. :::::::
and they are on more of an equal Liz Brewer, Charlie Bush, Jim Carleto, Anne Richards, Jim' ::::::: * :::::::

footing with the administration and Waldroo and Patti PI!,;. 1111m If you get a chance, listen to "Feelln' The Spirit" .:;:
faculty than the under- ::::::: (Blue Note Record 4132). Grant Green with the aid ::::::::
younger Receptionist . ... . . . .Marsha G. Brown ,
graduates. Remember the gradu- :;::: of pianist Herbie Hancock, plays "Sometimes I Feel :::1::;

ates are also members of our Production Crew ::::::: Like A Motherless Child," "Go Down Moses," "Just ::::::1::
student body which elects its own Don Addis, Nelson Meyer, Dave Plebe, Jim Netf and Darlene ::::::: A Closer Walk With Thee," ."Joshua Fit De Battle ::::;::::
officers.No Pierce. ;;1111; Ob Jericho," and "Nobody Knows The Troubfe I've ;::
one can say that any under- ::::::: Seen." Nothing but "soul." ::::::::
::::::: ::::::
graduate interested enough to work '* ::
The Florida Alligator is the official student newspaper of the
::1:1::: Please don't :::1:1:
in Student Government is stopped University of Florida and is published five times weekly miss next week's "Jazz Corner.
from doing so. If the undergraduates except during the months of May, June and July, when it is :ft::*;: There are already big plans underway for "Jazz :::::1::
want more responsibility in published semi-weekly. The Florida Alligator is enteredas. :x-x:::: Corner" beginning in September. ';::::::
their government, let them ask second-class matter at the United States Post Office at :::::::: And big plans they are! :::::::

for do it a and good show job. their willingnessto Gainesville, Florida.... \ t: ::1:1:1:::::1:1:: ::1:1:::i:1:1:1i:1:1:1:::::: : W111; ; 1 1 1m1;; 1 111 1ii1i111ii1;;;;;;;;;;ii;;; m;;;im111 1 1 111:1:1:1:1:1:1:1:1:1:1:1:1:1N:::::::::::::: fi1ii!
- -
The argument that some students
0-i A can't fulfill his
seek offices with Blue Key in mindis w man
valid. But if they are to obtain -. basic needs living allPage
membership they must earn it alone Lionel !
by hard work and service to the
student body. Rather than finding rza
this attitude in the older students,
it is the younger student, who
received the citizenship award or
outstanding student medal in a high
school popularity poll, that sees
Blue Key as the college equivalent.
They don't realize it is a service
organization responsible for pre- pon Addis



.' .
j; ," ,
"






POLITICS jUpset: Friday, July 24, 1964 The Florida Alligator Page 5CINEMA -
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,


victory? OPIISrIOJSr

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",,>: '*" '\ >"L :' '\" +, '" .



By JACK HORAN March and April. South Floridians -
hate him because he is from
Most of Florida's political pun- North Florida and the darling of
dits fatalistically admit that Demo- the moneyed Interests and the
cratic gubernatorial nominee porkchoppers. Many Floridians British against the ZulusBy

Willie Haydon Burns, mayor of Just don't care for Burns because ,
Jacksonville, will be the state's he seems to be an extremist who .
next governor and probably will could tarnish the state's appear- ;' A

be re-elected in 1966. ance to attract new industry and i
r} As usual, they predict that the may increase the state bond debts. DON FEDERMANNow '
Republican candidate has a gooda Now toss in several hundred v'- ;
chance of winning In Novemberas thousand hungry Republicans,
the New York Mets have of some of whom are registered /

"t copping the National League pen- Democrats, and you have a potent playing at the State until Wednesday is a and end it all). If ever there were a movie which both
nant. The state has not developeda army of voters to oppose Burns. colorful, conceited, yet realistic British battle picture proclaimed the courage of men under fire and yet showed -
briskly competitive two-party "Zulu." Its plot is simple: 140 British soldiers the total meaningless of war,this movie is it. Imagine -
system as yet. Republicans snare On the GOP ticket, state Republicans withstand an attack of 4,000 well-disciplined Zulu all this slaughter takes place at a place with no .
elective poetq regularly only In selected Charles Holley warriors. The movie is billed as more than this, strategic Importance. The British defend It becauseit
Orange,' Pinellas, and Broward of St. Petersburg to bear the though. For one thing, the battle gives the viewerthe is their duty; the Zulus attack supposedly to claim
counties. party standards. Holley, a mem- chance to witness the different reactions of men territory that is theirs or perhaps it is their resent-
Last May, 450,000 Floridians ber of the Florida House and minority faced with immanent death. It also demonstratessome ment of British occupation. We are never really told,
voted for Miami Mayor Robert spokesman for his party, brilliant battle strategy on both sides. Further- and it really doesn't matter, especially when you see
King High and endorsed his liberaland is an extreme conservative. His more, in the beginning and end, there are some scenes like the final charge in which Zulus are
reform viewpoints on racial, main claim to fame is that he advocates noteworthy anthropological sequences concerning stacked up threedeep.It .

economic, and taxation Issues. adopting the Liberty marriage, sex and the concept of a warrior to the really is all so fascinating. .and morbid. Color
About 160,000 more Floridianswere Amendment, which If nailed on the Zulu. really has a place in war pictures -- it vivifies tha
determined to stop High and U. S. Constitution, would abolishthe horror.

the "Negro bloc vote" and showered federal Income tax. what You really can't say much more than this. For the There is ah Irony to this picture. The British in the
a record number of ballots on Holley would do to replace the most the battle end hold their but
part, the screen is dominated by position, no one wins. The Zulus
Burns him with his mar- money is not quite clear. ,
providing and the carnage. One is literally submerged in ceremoniously salute the valiant British. Such a
gin of victory. Holley's victory strategy would ; beautiful gesture at least the know
death: -- it becomes almost senseless after a while ; dying they were
There was deep ideological rift take two to take effect but
a years
,
(([one even hopes for both sides to wipe each other out appreciated.
between the supporters of Burns would pave the way for a new
and High. Each group believesthat slate of candidates in 1966. Sim-
the other's candidate would ply, Holley would be governor for
have ruined Florida If he got Into two years, then would fall to a
office. Burns people say High selge of Democrats while Burns TO BE SEEN *
would have been Indebted to the would die politically.A 1 I
NAACP and the singlemindedSouth
Florida Interests,while High Holley triumph is possibleif JULY 28, 1964 .
people charge that Burns would the disenchanted foes of Burns
have racial turmoil and become aware of their vast I
loaded sparked the consumer with new strength. A one-shot coalitionand .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. THE -.. .. .. .. ..-- .. .. .. .

taxes. a little sacrifice by dissident

Thus, the gap between these Democrats could keep Burns in .
two camps is wide enough to lay Jacksonville re-telling his Jack-
the groundwork for a Republican sonville Story.A BIGGEST ALLIGATOR

upset victory. in the general- elec-
tions. But let's go back a coupleof Goldwater sweep in Floridais
years to see why.In almost certain in November.
1960, State Sen. Doyle Carl- If Holley can identify himself with
ton and Gov. Farris Bryant were the Arizonian, stances are he can WORLD .
pitted against each other in the ride the crest of the Goldwater IJiifr IN THE
runoff. Neither man had extre- charm and popularity to victory.
mist viewpoints. Each was regarded Scott Kelly tried this undercut-
as a moderate on both racial ting technique immediately after

and economic Issues,although he was nudged out of the notified primary the IN COLOR IN COLOR IN COLOR IN COLOR IN COLOR
Bryant was more conservative of run-off by High. He
q the two. Carlton no r Bryant press that he was not endorsingany
3 specifically represented the pork- candidate, but "expected" his
I choppers, the Negroes, Dade supporters to vote for High. This
County, or any other special in- action is about the same as Barry dDI
terest. Goldwater favoring Bobby Kennedyover
Bryant disposed of his foe from Spessard Holland. Kelly
Wauchula and casually walked toward figured if High got into office, the
the general election, pre- Miamian would be easier to defeatin
paring to move to Tallahassee in 1966 than Bums.Traditionally ..+
January. His Republican opponent
for the governor's chair was a the incumbent
.w
political unknown in Florida, the edge when he faces his op- .
opnents. U Burns is elected, de
George C. Petersen. When they w.rte pp. "" .rsD
squared off on that first TuesdayIn chances are he'd sweep back into
November, neither expected the office for a four-year term.
results they saw in the Wednesday Burns wants to be reinstated
morning newspapers. in 1966. lie's not going to do
The dark, darkhorse candidate anything which will enrage his
Petersen grabbed more than 40 constituents. His organization will

per cent of the vote cast, runningup grow even stronger with patronage.On "V 1"O"' r o
a total of about 500,000 to the the other hand, Holley will w.
victor Bryant's 800,000. Petersenhad rub a lot of politicians raw if he's
tallied the highest number of governor, mainly because he's a'

votes of any Republican in historyin Republican. Two years from now .....
Florida. Holley would be a weak contenderfor
his own Job -- providing he
Apparently, a sizable number of
Carlton supporters were not happy hasn't turned it over to private NEVER BEFORE EXHIBITED ON THESE SHORES!!!
with the idea of ushering Farris enterprise.
would AGLUT with SO MANY PACES we trill have,,', attempted 'o COUNT THEM I Fotclnotlng and Awclntplrlng
Bryant to the capitol for the next U the anti-Burns forces NEWS of the Day, (lllu.rror.alllvttratcd, Illuttrotcd.' (Illuminating Fafur All''In rile English longuog toArou.
four years just because he was a rally behind Holley and are Willing I .. the 1",.,... and 'Inform the Mind. Motua of Monumental'nt.' r."r to Incoming Freshman Sludcntt art I
Democrat, and cast"protest"bal- to trade two years of harmless EXPLAINED' for the Edification! of All. Vital) Mcuogtt Communicated, Provoking Opinion Clvin Vole,
lots for Petersen. Two more rea- conservatism for six with Bruns, Stimulating Artwork Titillate he 'Inr.lUct and the Snt of Humor, ,In COLOR, In COLOR, In COLORI' -

sons for the large Petersen vote then Florida can start anew witha
were the Nixon win in the state Mathews, Kelly, or Karl in 1966. THE FALL PREVIEW EDITION OF !l1 1

and the steady influx of Republican -
voters from the North.
Here we are in 1964. The Demo- Fl ALLIGATOR I
crat's candidate for governor is Please sign all. letters. .. .
a man who has won special dislike Names will I I be withheld
from several factions. The
Negroes hate Burns because of upon request.
his get-tough policy in Jackson
ville's racial flare-ups during


..*..


j

-_'_ ,.J



" Page 6 The Florida Alligator: Friday, July 24, 1964 GATOR CLASSIFIEDS I



Exams Crowding You? r LJ'1 I FOR SALE -Baby bed and mattressIn Air Conditioners. 3/4 ton Mathis, 'Student assistant male, preferably
$60. 1 ton Frigidaire, $75. Both married, not entering freshman.In
Sharpen Cerebral Per- very good condition $25. Call
school at least 3
units 115 vols. Call 6-1108 or 2- more trimesters.
372-4875 after 5:30. (A-154-tf-nc).
ceptivity with 1963 Honda Motorbike, $!tu.!'l1One 7668. (A-l59-2t-c). Apply Mr. Langford, Alumni Ser-
Rackley at 28325. (A-158-3t-c). vices Office, University Auditorium. -
8' x 43' Hick's Trailer with 11' (E-157-3t-c).
DAICHOCHESNUT'S& x 30' cabana. Air-conditioned. I For RentWill I
I. Kardex visible files, $5 each Fenced yard. Archer Road Vil- Alert student for Advertising
MIKE'S 1 open file 26" high on casters, lage. Thomas G. Stewart. FR Salesman for the Student Publications -
$5 and 1 desk file 10" x 13", 6-7317. (A-153-tf-c). share lovely convenient efficiency Advertising Staff, Call-
$2.00. Call 376-1895.A-158-2t-c). with refined
apartment
Ext. 2832 or stop In Room 9,
HEELS put on in 5 minutes Alexander Hamilton Business Institute quiet young woman. Apply 321 S. Florida Union to make an inter-

SOLES put on in 15 minutes 8' x 40' Trailer with 8' x 20' complete course, assorted w. 13th St. (B-159-It-c). view appointment. (E-159-tf-nc).
..
-- cabana located In quiet park closeto books, heavy duty floor polisher
MODERN SHOE campus. Inquire Lot #21, Glyn-. and miscellaneous tools. Call CCB 2 bedroom house, furnished,
lot closeto
REPAIR SHOP wood Park after 5 p.m. Phone t 372-6474 or come by 1742 N. W. air conditioned. Shady month. I Lost & FoundLost I
across From lit national bonk 6-7876. (A-157-3t-c). 3rd Place. (A-159-lt-c). University. $100 per
Available for 1 year occupancy.
Call Ext. 2202, or after 5 p.m., One set of five keys. Reward -
FR 6-1798. (B-159-It-c). If found. Call Roy Snyder,
FR 2-9134, Evenings after 7:30.
STARTS TONITE I NE Room In private home for mature (L-159-2t-c).

2 Blockbuster Hits male student or faculty member.
DRIVE-IN Private entrance, off street park- Found Camera lens. Owner may
both late as 9:45 THEATRE
see
I' maid service.
Ing. Linen and claim description and paying advertising -
at regular prices Available August 2nd. Call FR 6- cost. Call FR 6-4193
i'riii shown first i & last 2400 Hawthorne Rood Rt. 20 Phone FR 6-S011 5360. (B-159-It-c). evenings. (-159-2t-c). '

I ........... ...1..111111..1111111..1111111..1.11..11111.,1111.... ............................................. .11..1,
UNIVERSAL CITY I.iiuaaassssssn:1!::::::!::I/1//1/1/S/:!:.:::!:.$".:.:...::::..:11..11111.1..11 I.:...1.11111.......:.11111111.11.........1.111.11.11.11......:.::..:.:.::.:...11.1.1111.1..1.11.111....11.11.1..1.1.111111,11.....................lllsla..111111 11111111111, .11..1.111111.!!!!:,111111.1.:tttl:!ltttN..1111 1.11......1,1111.11..1.11......11111111..1.....:i Imm.11..1.:iii:i i:: I beds AIR-CONDITIONED private bath. Also apartment furnished, 2 I ServicesRiders I

STUDIOS Whowinds upKing I umm rooms for 2 boys or one. 105 N.W.
HH: In E.'m.n COLORiiii m::::: 7th Terrace. Call after 5 p.m. to FU Rucker, Ala., for
iiiiHi! oftheMountainmatch mum mum FR_2-0809. (B-157-3t-p). two week stay at summer camp,
I::: Aug. 9 through Aug. 22. Leaving

dr"r' I'f. when two ConMentMl .mmnI.I.I.U .... .. Motel-type 2 rooms furnished; no Aug. 9. Call 372-4875 after 5:30
: I kitchens. Also 2 bedroom well p.m. (M-158-tf-nc).
tricks... iliiiii! furnished large duplex. Mature .
FIRS\ ,II :immIII personnel required. Both near CUE STICK BILLIARDS 905
and their 'pigeon'tries 66494. (B-157-4t-c N. Main St. Located In the Food
campus. )
: I.:..::..::..:
:
..
... 1 S_ Fair Shopping Center adjacent to
i" to out-trick e CHA mmiliii Cookie's Restaurant. Brand new
nlf1 "G
NA\ lit tri/JION r[ J l billiard room that caters to young
Autos
p It. 1M* them both:? .!.Hiii....r.'U men and women and especially

iii!! / ',;. !<' ., 0 ..Him..... couples. .so bring your dates
"1 \ff\rf-: I:::::: 62 Chevrolet, ImpalaSuper Sports and come out! Bob Sullivan Is the
mil f"-' .. ?
m!: h <.: i' .imm..... Coupe, V-8. Automatic' transmis- owner and operator and will be glad
sion, air cond., WW, R & H. Gold to give some helpful pointers on
exterior and black Interior. Call shooting pool. (M-157-3t-c).
FR 28034. (G-158-3t-c).
,1111'i. IIIIIII IIIIIIIliii' NESTOR'S TV SERVICE was
I forced to Now located at
; i. 1961 VW Camper, Ideal for vaca- move.
tions, weekends. Will consider 232 S. E. 1st St., west of old Post
Office.
small car In trade. Phone FR Free esUm tes. Tubes

'.. Hiim....... 6-8314. G-156-tf-nc). checked free. Phone 372-7326.
:m!! mmilim We Invite all our old friends to
,: mmim' come and see us. (M-I53-9t-c).
l, 1955 MG TF1500, 3/4 Race engine -
: :::::::
!!! ( wire wheels, 1919N.
new paint.
1mm
.
(Continued on Next Page)
:,:,1: iiiiij E. 7th Terrace. Phone 376-
.fiW ::. 0178. G-159-2t-c). 1
i f..i:. ........ (
::::::
::
: :i e I::::: 1960 Rambler Wagon. New tires NOTICE
Yi I::::: I
1.1 i .mm..... battery, luggage rack. Very good
......!.. ...... I
mechanically, looks sharp. Vince
.Hi...! TiNiJ 11 Betz, 1426-B S. W. 18th Place. ((0- FINAL CLASSIFIED
UUI David mmI 159-2t-c).
i mm:1m
I:!!:

.:.. l mm............ 1963'
,. Karmann, white'with black DEADLINE TODAY
'hi: !.1. 'iiii....! top, 1200 miles. Excellent condi-
Brando Niven !::::' tion like
: ( 1964) $1900. Also 1962 Deadline for Classified
mi
.....,. iiii T-Blrd. Call Ext. 2202, or after
.....
11 11..11
::.. Advertising in the Tues-
i1 5 p.m. FR 6-1798. G-159-lt-c).

:I 001mm day, July 28 edition of

Shirley Jones um: I Help WantedNEEDED I the Alligator (final edition -

mm nm: of the summer term)

Ui....!.! ':m...,: is TODAY, Friday, July
: Receptionist Secretary
-
:m -
::it 111:::: Must be efficient In short- 24, at 5:00 pm.
:ii!! =1"1
hI!! hand and typing. Salary commen-
::::: 4tg I:::: surate
mnIm i with ability. Scruggs. Room 9, Florida Union
iim Carmichael, 3 S. E. 1st Ave.
FR
: :..mt... Extension 2832.
I.... 65242. (E-158-3t-c).

nm.... iiiii....1
: I::::
:: :
i
::mHUt.
!Hii: !. .. mnliiii I 1 /

!! :(mmm d.
Vj .

....::....:..:..::..: Sa J- ?!!cwrt i I.,:.:.mI ..:..:
11::
::::::1 !!!!J /
F .,,, 1..' 74.1

11111111 The Funniest stD ever put Between\ It covel'SI! : ii: \ 71f y' 7

:: tj I., ...'., .I..::..:
f..1 '--". iiiiOUR
;; .. '

2nd Color Hit at 9:45 r ;ik

NEXTATTRACTION IT SPEAKS TO YOU IN THE LANGUAGE OP LOVE. f b 1:" c
LAUGHTER AND TEARS! > dRx

.)' It is unlikely 'Jl,'.t':. i a F T
GREGORYTONYPECK U' that you will experience S

KM POM i IMUQ Mum mam" CURTIS In a 'lifetime all that you will see In..:





L BIEREIDS WRVEI'f' lU DICKINSON BOBBY, DARIN .N Tr s_a IBMHff MOT
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Friday, July 24, 1964 The Florida Alligator Page 7



1 t S COMfASS Gala band concert SaturdayThe j

-

-" ,..
Ipbl Delta Kappa, honorary edu- $9,708, plans to write a doctoral
tion fraternity, win hold Its an- dissertation on the characteristicsof Fifth Gatorland Clinic Band, The concert will open with a con- selection EL TORE HO

|al Initiation Banquet tonight at, Florida's fuel economy from 100 strong, will present its Gala cert march by Clinic Director Other program numbers Include
30 In the University Inn'sLor 1945 to 1959. He will use the Concert Saturday at 6:45 p.m. on Richard W. Bowles, UF Directorof the "Finale" of the Saint Saens
p.m.Room. S. Leonard Singer, doctoral fellowship at the Massa- the Plaza of the Americas.The Bands, entitled "Heat Light "Symphony In Eb," the title selection -

rector of Learning Resources chusetts Institute of Technology in concert will be the final ning." Overture for the eveningIs of Meredith Wlllson's lat-

I Florida Atlantic University,Bo- Cambridge. meeting for the clinic band mem- a new composition by MiamiBeach est musical comedy, "Here's

I Raton, will be the guest speaker.s bers, who represent 38 commu- composer Alfred Reed; the"1 Love," Charpentler's "Ballet of
I topic will be: "New Frontiers Research Corporations of New nities all over the state. The "Festive Overture." Pleasure," and selected marches.In .
I Teaching and Learning." York has granted $8,500 to two UF young bandsmen have spent a full Clinic staff member Jimmy the event of rain, the concert

I Intiation ceremonies will be held professors for basic studies in week on campus, where they have Finn, Band Director at Mainland will be played In Room 144, the i!

lorn 3 p.m. In the afternoon until physics and chemistry.Dr. received specialized instruction In High School In Daytona Beach,will Gator Band rehearsal room, In

mpletion, of that same date.The John A. Zoltewicz,assistant music from university personnel. then take the baton for a Latin the Music Building.The .

[>remonies will be held In Room professor In the department of

.112 of the Health Center. chemistry, was awarded $4,000 to
explore a new, more efficient way Leigh hall houses mass spectrograph I

I Students for Goldwater will meet for making molecules of potential -

night at 7:30 In room 324 of the medical and chemical interest. By BUNNY GOLDBERGStaff are and how they take palce). It ions, charged particles, are
Jlorida Union to develop a plan of With Thomas W.Sharpless, Coral Writer also determines Ions in the upper reflected on a detector and the

tion for the coming presidential Gables, a graduate student In atmosphere and the discharges in particles can be measured.In .

mpa1gn. Interested students are chemistry, he is preparing mole- Leigh Hall has a small, old flames. a niche in the machine Is r.

-ged to attend. cules related to a drug now being room overflowing with a tangled E. E. Muschlltz, UF professor, placed a small wooden statue ol
used in the treatment of leukemia. web of glass tubes leading from started building the machine here the physicist, Fritz. The quota-

Roy Nlemela, assistant profesr A second grant of $4,500 went to bottles and vacuum tubes to a eight years ago. It has been in tion on the base, "A physicist la
of marketing in the College ofLsiness Dr. Charles F. Hooper, Jr., assistant large metal machine. This giant operation only three years because a man who understands how un-

Administration, was professor In the departmentof maze of machinery is the mass It took five years to build.It understandable an atom is"de
med winner recently of a Ford physics to extend and Improve spectograph being used for research operates by determing the scribes the complexity of the work

joundatlon fellowship for graduateudy diagnostic techniques for plasma by graduate students in magnetic field of a particle and being done with the mass specto-
In business administration Investigations. These ultimately chemical physics. measuring how fast it is going. graph.
iid economics. would have application both to high Charles Harden, UF graduate

J The announcement, Issued by the temperature plasmas produced in student, has just completed his
lord Foundation, places Niemela the laboratory and plasmas exist- thesis on the reactions between

|mong 184 graduate fellowship win- ing in space. ions and neutral molecules of nitric Loans for staffersBy

ers from 47 universities and oxide and laughing gas. Using
lieges in the nation. UF was the The Florida Union Dance Com- the machine for one month he has
PHIL BROOKSTONEStaff
Inly university in the state with a mittee will sponsor the last street discovered, "There aren't any re- Writer

ellowshlp winner.Nominations dance of the summer tonight from actions. .apparently nothing
for the awards,de- 8 to 12 p.m. on' the south side of happens."
You think of a credit union as making loans on
igned to strengthen college and the Florida Union building. Ad- The mass spectograph Is usually
cars and other Items of necessity. But, not loanson
Iniverslty teaching In economicsnd mission will be free and students, used to determine purities In sub- "atomic cocktails."
administration and the In- stances for analytical purposes and
| business were faculty, public are
"It's only a small amount of radiation in liquid
[ubmitted by 114 institutions.N vited. Emcee will be Stu Bowersof to measure reactions between "
form for a thyroid gland condition, said Mrs.
Ie me la, whose grant totals WDVH radio. gaseous substances (what kind they
Louise Hinton of the Campus Federal Credit Union.

"But, we made the loan."
The Credit Union Is for full-time university staff
I CLASSIFIEDSJCar
GATOR members only and has approximately 5,000 accounts.

Founded in 1935, its assets 10 years ago were
$100,000. Today, the total $3 million. Their motto:
Large 3 BR 2 bath, CCB home,
,
WANTED Riders for single or
: "Not for Profit, Not for Charity, but Service."
] round trips to Phila., Camden, central heating, hardwood floors,
Rental '
A Credit Union booklet states, "Deposit of $5 for
Florida room, full appliances.Located -
Baltimore, Richmond, and other the purchase of one share, plus payment of a 25 cents
bus terminals for rides to the near Littlewood. Terms to
entrance fee entitles a qualified person to member-
CONO-CAR 7 day, 24 hour ser- World's Fair (and, oh yes, New suit buyer. Owners moving out ship."

Ice. Free pick-up. 1964 cars, York). Am leaving either the of state. Cull 372-3793. (1-151- Members pool their savings to provide loans to fellow :" '

ompletely equipped with auto- afternoon of the 5th or the morn- lIt-p). members at low interest rates. The maximum loaned

at ic transmission.Radio,heater, ing of the 6th of August. One out on one share Is $750. For a single account,
hlte-walls. Rates Include gas, way is only $15; save on the ADDIS' 5 ACRES IN tw-uioc, CCB $10,000 Is the largest.

11 and insurance. FR 6-3644. round trip -- only $25. Call house, 3 bedrooms, fireplace, Interest Is an important subject with the Credit

to-159-U-c). Don Federman at the UniversityEst. screen porch, modern plumbing, Union. On share loans -- Interest is charged at

2832 or late in the eveningsat big lawn, 6 outbuildings, great the rate of only 1/2 of 1 per cent per month of the
his home number, 2-7318. (C- shade trees, 3 acres tillable, closeto unpaid balance. For new car loans, Its only nine-
Wanted I 157-tf-nc). school, 30 four-lane minutes tenths of 1 per cent per month.

from campus. On state highway, Life insurance on the unpaid balance la providedon

Driver wanted for 1959 Ford from fenced all around, new electric all eligible loans at no additional cost to the

IALEAH -- All students who are Detroit to Gainesville, now toSep- well pump. $9,750. Terms.United borrower. Loans of up to $5,000 are Insured. If
ttending the UF (including incom- tember. Gas paid. Referencesand Farm Agency, Ocala 629-7284. (I- the debtor dies, the debt need not be paid.

k1g freshman) and have lived in deposit required. 376-2411 153-tf-c). Within two years, automation will handle the Credit

laleah, please contact Ed Barer (office). (C-157-3t-p). Union bookkeeping system. "It will do away with the
at University Ext. 2832. (C92tnc passbook," stressed Treasurer and General Manager

). ![ Real Estate J j PATRONIZE Hlnton Bond, "and coverage leave Is all$1 detail million.work to the back office."

anted rider to share expensesr GATOR Interest is compounded seml-annually on June 30
one-way trip to Colorado or FOR SALE BY OWNER 3 BR, and Dec. 31.
alifornia. Leaving Septembert 2 1/2 bath, living and family room, ADVERTISERS The board of directors and the credit committeeare

to 15th. Call after 6 p.m. dining room, all electric kitchen, composed of faculty volunteers from all walksof
''eekdays or weekends anytime. central heating, A/C, double gar- life. They include a purchasing assistant at the
6-4209. (C-159-2t-c). age, lots of storage. Near new THEY'RE A teaching hospital and a professor of law.

elementary schooJ. If interestedcall GOOD GROUP "They stay with us many years," Mrs. Hinton
INGLE student prefers furnished 2-8175, J. D. Gay, Sr. (I- emphasized, "because they believe strong/ in what

partment 159-2t-c). we're doing'
for fall residency any-
_____ .
tere in this town. The apart- -
Law professor selling spacious
ient hopefully will not exceed $50r :
3 bedroom home; 11/2 bath, attic
i>- month. Contact Don Federmanrom
fan, built-in drawers, vanity, and
9 9:30, 11:15 to 12, and month.
$80 per
much storage. :
:45 to 2:45 at 6-3261 Ext. 2832 .
br Many extras. Negotiate equity.FR aw.
call after 11 at 2-7318.
p.m. 6-2775. 1062 N. E. 14th Ave.
-157-tf-nc' ).
Use Gator
fI-153-tf-c),
-
WANTED TO BUY -- Good duplexes

triplexes, and multiple unit
Male roommate wanted to share
apartments In good neighborx> ds.
artment. FR 2-3748. (C-157- 372-7658 after 5
Dillon
John D. ,
t-c
). .
p.m. except weekends.(I-152-tf-c). ClassifiedsCAMP

... .
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TODAY! MAT. at 1:00 EVE at 6:45 & 9:10 pm 1d j

SATthru MON-4 SHOWS: 1 3:306:058:40 r'f ,

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Page 8 The Florida Alligator Friday, July 24, 1964 I Inside Gatorland. I




Bands hereFootball Be offensive: today.., it's defense I


What today's offense is most fense specialists. They would
By ERNIE LITZ remember that far back?) we discussed -
fans at the annual Sports EditorIn how the modern offensive geared for isthepass.Itmayseemincongruous rather have the ball on their own
North-South All-Star High School formation is the "T" formation. but it happens that in half of the field on defense than

Football Game in Florida Fieldon a sort of last minute attempt any given year that you look at visaversa.The .

August 1st will witness unique we will today present a What we really have today is the "Top Ten" football teams in basic premise behind this is

musical event: The world pre- transition from offensive to defensive what might be termed a "multi the nation you will find that the an old doctrine of former Okla-

mier of a new musical compositionby football and present the ple T" arrangement because of majority of them (if not all) are homa Univ. Coach Bud Wilkinson

the eminent American com- finale In our last Issue of the all the various different ways of primarily defenseoriented.Bear (now running for the United States

poser, Morton Gould. summer next week.In arranging the team both in the Bryant at Alabama;Darrel Senate). It Is his philosophy that

The music, which Is entitled describing offensive football backfield and In splits between Royal at Texas; Bobby Dodd at as the offensive team has the ball

"Formatios," was commissionedby last Hmo far Is It tft difficult tn linemen. Georgia Tech these men are de- for more plays,and drives towardsthe

the University of Florida Gator other team's goal, sooner or

Band expressly for this event. It later someone will miss a block;

will be performed by the ISO-mem : the ball will be.fumbled;there will

ber Florida All-Star High School r6. rr nyn r.'i4b be a mix-up in the handoff; a

Marching Band, representing doz- penalty will be called, etc.
ens of schools throughout the state. In other words the offense can-

Students making up the band have not continually move down field

been chosen by the Marching Clinic after many plays without something'

Committee of the Florida Bandmasters going wrong.

Association from recom- Another facet of this premiseis

mendations by individual school gear / W that as the offense moves for-
'
I band directors. 4 V j wards, the area to be defendedby

the defense becomes smaller.
Director of the Band will be
In the accompanying picture of
Jack Lee, Director of Bands at
a Gator practise last fall, the
the of Arizona. Mr. Lee
University quarterback is back in his pocket
Is the author of one of the standard
looking for a receiver on a pass
text books the "Modern
on subject,
pattern. Since this Is not a"live"
Marching Band Techniques," and play only the pass defenders are
has a number of published works : ;: In action.
for bands. ;
marching Look at the action taking place
with the musical
Working score line
beyond the of scrimmage. See
submitted Mr. Gould Lee will
by how the defensive men are movingto
fashion a half-time show designedto cover receivers.
present it most effectively,with
There are two ways to play pass
drills and pagenatry suggested by '
defense: Man-to-man, or havingthe
the music itself.
defensive
linebacker or half-
Morton Gould Is one of Ameri- back with
stay a specifically assigned -
ca's most prolific composers,with end
or flanked back; or
compositions running into the hundreds -
Secondly a zone arrangementwhere
lie Is equally at home writIng -
each man in the secondaryor
for the symphony orchestra,
backerup line covers a certain

the concert band, the theater orchestra Today's offense is most geared to the pass. How is the defense deploying ? area of the field.
and One
moving pictures.
Try to guess what type of defense -
of his best known works Is the
Is being deployed in the
"Pavanne from his American
,
picture. See you next Tuesday.
Symphonette No. 2.
.
I


I 1// Letter analyzes I IA

UF Miracle' told on statewide TV



Mr. Ernie Lltz: backs receive the glory,

Remember the Gators' vic- while good blocking and Miracle on 13th Street. in the filming, produced by the narrate the show.

tory over Alabama last year? tackling goes comparatively The "Miracle" of course Is the UF Alumni Association In coopera- "TV Receptions" will beheld by

There are many such Instancesof unrecognized.This University of Florida. tion with the motion picture pro- alumni clubs all over Florida,cor-

where the underdog rises up This Is the subject of a telecastto duction lab on campus. responding to the telecast in their
to the occasion and beats the Is not to say that the be view throughout Florida Aug. Journalism Professor John Paul areas, for Incoming UF freshmenand

supposedly vastly superior backs get more praise than 5 12 on stations from Miami to Jones wrote the script. upper-class transfers from
team. How can we account for they deserve, but only to Jacksonville to Pensacola. Justice Stephen C. O'Connell of junior colleges.

the much better than usual per- point out that others deserve Many UF students participated the Florida Supreme Court will
formance of the winning team In more recognition than they

such cases? have gotten in the past.Per- Vice President Harry Phllpott,
haps also we should recog- .. .p_,j!nIT l "r"',' yji'ir' "-'' 'r'" U't.' "1 Vice President Robert Mautz,Deanof

nize team effort of two or Women Martha Brady, Journa-

Surely confidepce, morale, more players as much as lism School Director Rae Weimer
teamwork, and motivation are we recognize Individual ef- and other noted university per-
variables involved. fort. sonnel will represent the UF at
the receptions. One of these

university officials will join pre-
All coaches are,or should be, 2. Support and Acceptance. sent UF students from a given locality -
Support our team not
concerned with promoting a in a panel discussion and
just our winning team. Accept
psychological atmosphere that question-answer session with the
will contribute to the best possi- Its Inevitable failures. incoming students after the film.
ble individual and team effort. Perhaps we need more em- '
phasis on playing well rather

I feel this area requires more than winning. Many a well "A Miracle on 13th Street" Is

attention -- not only on the played game has been lost. good entertainment, depicting the

part of the coaches, but also history, development and operation
perhaps more urgently on the If we emphasize the means of the University of Florida.
part of the student body. rather than the ends,the ends
will naturally follow.
If you can't make the receptionwhen

The following are just a few Emphasize the positive you're home, just tune and
of the things that could be done enloy the show.
rather than the negative.
which might prove consequential -
Criticism, unless' positively
and although football is
,
done in a positive manner, Is TELECASTS
used as an example the prin-
always ultimately damagingand
apply to other organized
ciples
only serves the critic Wednesday, Aug. 5
effort: who finds temporary relief WEAR-TV Channel 3, Pensacola

from the release of hos
1. Individual and Group
tittles and frustrations. Thursday, Aug. 6
Rewards. Recognize and
WJHG-TV Channel 7, Panama City
applaud Individual and team These are just a few of the WFTV-TV Channel 9, Orlando

efforts. Give awards, things that will engender con- WCKT-TV Channel 7, Miami
through the Alligator, to the fidence, morale, teamwork and

team member, or members motivation. More can be found, .. __ '111, Sunday, Aug. 9
responsible for the best pass and If those found: will be implemented WCTV-TV Channel, Tallhassee

play, best line blocking,best It will contribute to Justice Stephen C. O'Connell of the Florida Supreme
secondary blocking best Interception -
,
and pass defense team.better team effort and a winning Court will narrate "A Miracle on 13th Street, a TV Wednesday, Aug. 12

effort, best rushing effort, show to be seen at alumni club receptions around the. WJXT-TV Channel 4, Jacksonville
best line defensive and of- We have a winning team.Let's WTVT-TV Channel 13, Tampa
state for incoming UF freshmen. WINK-TV Channel 11 Ft. Myers
-t rislve-effort, etc. be srue we keep It that way. ,
All too often the offensive Arthur Wells WPTV-TV Channel 5, Palm Beach

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Full Text

PAGE 1

I' th 0 I> Itf wid r 1K) Ft ntercolleqiate contests n academic the works (tEIlL I Is Ogri t I rerILIt erollniil this. (Ii] cCf over 4C,00 stlulecits. lit ft .rshmi.*in 'I wils nurot bte % ltrt re i!Tr l N t, d Ilit i pesI'.t ct It moLS t tiit \ it ilt g't r nIli class wI! iIIITumbLri beui \0(X). ThIs compi ris w th list VI ''S tr,.shmra~nt.Cif7l]rnient of niL tV JO>1. Ihe h ig Ititmt,.5 irt < )Illurg it (lhii trids. Or hum explinrtdfthat thler,'his beI t Ste idy in cre'ase in the number of students in tlpper dIvi ion rol leget.Il in cent y/tars. Hit g iVp the lIhwrves1mg number and popularity of to e 'tis ImIUSI.I ii ns hual IF .lcrisliu4' LnumILIL r 'it ijj.r I aSt sv (I t l il tni till olent in j ti in' I iit tis ti:' 1 iitniu \y(}fll 'i tI ',0tlm Ini Iheir of thi* (Ilinlt. scol Hujbert AL. thinIl hL til' .' slgrifliat Tm II 8' ,vtr list yeir's K it ii ii r(Lllmient of 1,838. LIIe th It lmtiniber rip, >enteii 20 pcr cdttJUflpj over titi previous Onrolle I II t\ oLl li w i i n a r s I I 1 -I. lii A ill '"'I 4 9 I't i I il 'i IC! l ut n s h u rol IILilt II tli, ulper Lhi V li" in lIIh'h i i Si tehl, I lot Pli's iin iiiing stLIdenlt IIpla~tioni. I itw Sehout orfi I IR ilf,.' Sti wi rk tIre LuI ti[ t.1 [tLhL. I Lt L. .1hI!,'i [ C ae ,,I, ILLL itLI ,ff itit. S in Nsil len, J kslinam di, L t ito h i stl ilioli. Iii Iet tuh t it in tht' Iveo el Ill ile pthii s WI it In b hirdM (Un rICCoI ni i gill plait .miti ficilities Ii,, 1nd Stetsoil tPreu l't, tIer i' 'I inin ii. onk. .kinggr' resep II 'lhNes (It I its II ILtitusa ,tet tIL piI~ILt Il eit prtogi PS.,t Stvir l i i' mll in irj IS mrIlyhl tol ilt rep' *seiit'tlves Cf ti schools with the. results wih teltvlsioi slt tIlls of 11nd1 111Tvh tac .11 I tt t~ rult of l'ht ( (111n*f C Pr a wil lit, war still In tI 11.1rt ilIy Lth -I Do list 0111n LI. d (living III (kct. 4) rult's icipating rs a' 11s i it AVC had of till 5(ihOOlb ini--. . iii Florida t t up 4 thlt plogrilu ad Uhat he pitos lo do .1 4r11 delti tmord before ill the details are worked out. The progrTm IS schedled to go Onl Ill air IIn midlDecemiber, piotltbly on a Sunday afternsOin. 'The shows will be video-taped probably on Saturday for shipment to all particlp.tlng stations to broadcast on Sunday eal) week. live staite-wide broadcasts wnrt said to he financially ImpractIcal. Hlancock vaId there would be sponsoisltip of the program by hOmbeOIe other than the universities, but that no negotiatiolns had begun yet. The Stetson meeting marks the first public annowncement of the intended project. "We are now positive that the series is practical and that the five student governments cooperating with a sponsor are capable of producing a highly professional and very worthwhile project. This is why we are getting togetter to phl our next Ntiop), 5 I single group,' liwicock said. When the show Is sponsored and defInite, UFE will transfer credit for the show to a committee mad. Up of representatives of all purticip.tig schools, with the stipulation that the sponsor provide adequate recognition to the ronlmittee. I is hoped that the success of the series wail prompt the continuance of the show on an annual basis and including all of Flortda's tour-year colleges. Architecture student Terry Hoffman, in a design contest sponsored by the and another $500 for the deportment T. Lendrum, department head, and student Rafall C. Moreu, cen won honorable mention. Hoffman designed a prefabricated vacati for the contest. :-: 8:8.+::::::::1.+.++++::.:.:o-:-:: : ae:' xe could be a (Editor's Nate: This story appeared in Wednesday's Florida Times-Union. We thought it of special interest to the university, auidforthat reason calledthe TimesUnion for permission to reprint, which was granted.) by CAROLYN DART CARROLL Times-Union Still Writer GAINESVILLE, July 20 --Buried treasure lies hidden behind locked doors in the dusty corners .t the FlorIda State Museum here. In the basement and first three floors of the old Seagle Building, thousands of Items wait to divulge their secrets to the prActiced teyes of scientists and to whet the curosity of the viewing public. Broken and dried bones hold clues to the characteristics great versity iamp us. ter, who on cobin $5,000 es for Iy JIM 'VA IlDlR N museum Only Mitchell Trio to Lyeu Fall sho w lenltal e xpense s spetlal police. the camSfraction of its valuable materials can be exhibited in the effectively utilI,eet display areas which ire spread out for the public on the first and second flaors of the Seagle Htufldlng. Most of the remainder of lhe museum's possuIons are either stuffed into cabinets crowded together with only walking space it the Seagle Building or granted resting room in student-crowded classroom., on the UF campus, where collection quarters ilclule a flame-vulnerable frame building. Tbe tuned leigh M1. Pearsall collection of IlndlIrn artifacts, valued at more than half a million dollars, when Ipresentid constituted the largest single rift ever mi de to the U1 Fhy .an individual. It is di. played on the around floor of a downtown b,,rk building, for there's no room dt the mTu!,eum for it. L ane to veto --See pge 3 pus next FAll. This action was taken at the hi-weekly meeting Tuesday night. $3,500 will be used %trlctly iF payment to the Trio for their atpearaln p. The such The:sain rrnemn to 75 per cent for students, and 25 per cent for others. Nonstudents will also pay an ,dn.Is~lon price of $2 as compared to $65O tor fluIn othe r bjulness, the council completed the first reading of the budget for 1964-65. The Board of International Activities was remainder will (c)VI< inci(See LEG, Page 2) :. NIawlenInee sec.maa T II I C Nj I it right, won a $900 first place award American Iron and Steel Institute, of architecture. With him are James I t 8 8 8 8 8

PAGE 2

Poge 2The FloridoAljahrr Council w4a.' r'equestod to have avilabIe answers to several questions forthcoming concerning the finatncIAI loss a,' the lak of a LG EL COUNCIL WORKS (Continued granted an additional $500 for five new clubs that will become active in the Fall trimester. Representatives of the In.ternational Board stated that as of now, 900 foreign students have been accepted for next fall. This is an in.crease, and will cause a rise in membership of the Foreign Clubs. The council also approved $856 to send 10 delegates from the local chater of the American Pharmnaceutical Association to the national convention in New York. $70 was also approved for Circle K for the purpose of informing incoming freshmen of their activities. In a letter to the council, SG Treasurer Fred lane had called for a spe ci al meeting In order to dispense with the second reading and could be Fridoj Jul 24 :64 committee $1,411.1! Ins, in thp or host, i at tr icion and~ that ll tIIckets Wee priced at $2.00. When It ajjp.,. r1 disrussIonr if MEETEING FNDS5 Page 1) ON Frm passing of the budget before the summer trimester ends. Lane charged that those who wanted to wait until Fall for further consideration or the budget were "thinking of their political futures first and student government second." Several members of the council expressed resentment of Lane's charge, calling it"unfair and unethical." They said their reasons for waiting was that most members of the council were absent during the summer, and they had no "moral" right to act on the budget. Final exams were alsogiven as a reason against calling for a special meeting. In a large majority decision, the councildecidedto wait until September before further consideration on the budget. a (Continued from Page 1) "With this amount of state support we would be in quite a fix If each staff member couldn't bring In his own research money," said Dr. J. C. Dickinson Jr., museum director. "Each staff member holds a dual appointment In the appropriate departnmentoncamnpus. Outside support for their research usually nmust come through the National Science Foundation, the American, Philosophiical Society and suchprlvateorganlzatlons.", Funds for research are vital for the museum to fbIfill Its dual role as both stile and university museum, Dr. Dickinson explained. Besides maintaining public *xhlbits the museum concerns Itself with two main areas: anthropology, with major emphasis on archa.,logy, and zoology, Including seven fields of em phas is. "The public thinks of a museum as where stuff is accumulated as they go and look at things," he said. "They think a staff need only take care of exhibits and walk around saying, Set' what we have here." That's about as far as you can get from our concept of a modern museum. Each staff member Is engaged In research and taking care of tht exhibits is only a minor fraction of our activity,. "We are not dedicated to building colleettons of things for their own sake. Our collections grow as the result of Important research by our staff memigreat s'* in i~PpSinlt+. U) to islle I Ipims. Atim C TiC nltth was formrin, spec( 1a request to the Bugt i F lnance (om mittee for $1,100.00 from student fee, to cover losses sustained by the Lyceum council during the present Sum mer Tr miester,. F INDINGS (iF 1 HF L OMMITTIA : Let It not be misunderstood. This committee Is not anti -cul tural, but merely wishes that the entire Lyceum Council program b1 based on a firm financial policy. The committee recognizes the. fact that the Lyceum Council is 4 separate body of elected students and appointed faculty advisors and that it Is as jealous of Its rights as the Legislative Council is Of Its powers, but thern Is an area of common ground between the two separate bodies-the area of finance. A meeting was held on July 17, 1964. in attendance were Dean Lester L. Hale, the committee, gnd 1. M. BLIain, majority floor leader. The meeting was frank, cordial, and constructive. During the meeting it was pointed out by Dean Hale that the Public Functions and Lectures Committee has the responsibility of determining whether charges may be made for functions. The Public Functions and Lectures Committee may approve a charge for tickets but It does not have the position of determining what that charge may be nor guaranteeing support for losses sustained. It was agreed that the lyceum Council should live within its budge once tit wa established. Furt, ta a frm policy ofprocedure covering any event dependent upon s t udent ticket sales should be set up and thereafter followed by all parties concerned. RECOMMENDA TIONS OF THE COMMITTEE: The lyceum Council should not museum specimens, the tools and space which the museum has been granted for analyzing its treasures. "Without question we are the largest and most active scientific museum in the Southeast,'' said Dickinson. ''Yet we know we are not doing the things we could and should he doing. For example, work on the Florida barge canal Is turning up a tremendous amount of material which must be recovered now or it will be lost. Yet we have only one veterbrate paleontologist who might be able to go over ahd look at that ditch from time to time, "The state road construction program turns up Indian mounds that we can't come even close to keeping up with. Once They're gone, that's it. We have tried to capitalize In our geographic location and emphasize the Southeastern States and the Caribbean area, which is to a Uarge extent wiworked. But we have tremendous number of problems." Most of the material now belonging to the museum must lie idle for lack of adequate staff and space. A valuable mollusk collection estimated at 230,000 specimens lies hidden in cabinet drawers in a back room. to take "*Te accept said. No specialist has been available for years advantage of It. re are some types of collections we couldn't now if they were offered us," Dickinson "We just wouldn't have a place for them or on wt'flut umy p r I i r -isltatlon. Ith.1eft,' th,' f ltP\wii L'1 ,durr Is re. i mnwYndleI. For .Iy event depvnlent upon studcerit ticket s.les, the Lyceum Council shall present the possibility of loss to the Legislative Council before the contract is made. Before the Legislative Sounicil assumes the liability of any loss Incurred, ticket pricing for the event must be igreedi upon by both Lyceum Council and the Legislative Council, thus Insuring a fair price dIfferential. Having recEived approval of the legislative Council to stand libel for losses, the proposal will then be presented to the Public Functions and lectures Committee for approval of the charge. in the event that there arises in opportunity for the Lyceum Council to secure a special ittraction but the cont, act must be made before the next Legislative Council meeting, a per m atent committee should be established in the L egislative ouncil consisting of the Rifles and Calendar Comnmnittee, the C ha ir m an and one member of the Budget and Finance Committee. This committee would in such emergency cases, speak for the entire Legislative Council to give approval to the Lyceum Council proposal. This committee should he resorted to only in the event it is impossible, due to timing, to meet with the entire legislative Council. In regard to the present special request from the Lyceum Council to cover the loss incurred by the Philadelphia Orchestra presentation, the committee recommends: The present special request for $1,700.00 be approved. The establishment of a contingency fund bypiedginga set amount of money from the Legislative Council reserve funds. Autlhcntic I v Lyceum Details of this fund, Vt. llshmient, use, mnd cOntrol 1 recommended by the 8urli, F Inatice Cornmittep, I I ij Council representative, ant proved by the Legislative (omurci This committee realizes these proposals represent only the he. ginning of a necessary long-rnge program to study policies related to functions involving both stuiderit and non-student attendanc* md therefore recommends: The establishment of .i lchgrange study committee comnp.>ed of representatives of both 1u-s versity Administration and Student Government to consider anoveranl policy effecting all ticketed enttrtainment functions. The Administration's rmembership of said committee to include members appointed by Dean I! Ice including representatives of the Public Functions and tAreturn~ Committee, the Lyceum toui Florida Players, and other orgaizations concerned with ticketed events. The student government minmbership on said committee to inelude members appointed by the President of the Student Body, except that not more than 5Q"% of those appointed by the Student Body president shall be outside the Legislative Council. Said long-range committee to he established without delay and a report of its establishment should be announced at the first Legislative Council meeting in Septemiber 1964. The committee respectfully mnd unanimously submits this report, and the attached approvals, with the hope that its recommendations will be used for constructive ends. Bill Hester, Chairman Skip Ilaviser Virgil Scott Fremocs' own Dacromotic slacks are tapered-tailored long and lean the way you prefe r. Great for everyday or those dress-up OCCasions. Wash'n wear 65% Dacron 35% cotton. $7.98 reports I t

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Lane vetol1 and I says he'll .5Ocharge u neu ad rate .iiia that I egislitlyv taaaui fyrova i. .0 tthargt fiot stipleit, attnitig t e at I iaim >nsrd Lppedr imir of the l had \!theli trio IurIm: Ilho if il trl mister. Lane sid it wcs his feeling thait a $1 ctaatr wis sufficient to lefray costs. "'Although I am going to look Intu thisitatoni thoroughly, at this tinie I intend to exercise th,, treasurer's veto power "'The one dollar charge END OF TERM 1 CLEAN-UP TIME A T YOUR H OUSE ? Moving away or into a new apartment ? Household goads and furniture to be sold? Don' t want to waste your ol d TV antenna ? Need quick action, before the Use Gator ACT NO IS WI TO PRESIDENT ENGLISH C AMERICAN DEAD DAY LINES & CONGRESS. .Sinkley OMPOSITION. Howes GOVERNMENT. .Crown DEATH OF A SALESMAN. .MiIler I AND THOU.Buber ANTONY AND CLEOPA TRA. .Troy LOST WORLDS. .Cottreli QUA NTUM CHEMISTRY. ..Kouzmann i this is long item," I anit ,.ill. I JuJ[V 24, 14 What Lane wrote 11[ u!}t[ ~ I ?ti I\ I a I re~ tiri mnt r A so, thiea, ire ers of mTaitei~ am! 'I'll., L t i t i g vIr ., e eI ii T i I i !t14*t id ttIhr -s t t Inol V rritri 11,11 the I I .ii ad u te oiiii Ils bwlget. Sfew extra [oldr! iho'* wI]wer mhseiat (com the List meeting 111(1 [tiled to pick then, up LIUI iiig the two weeks. Si(NV \ ty stronilyrecomnmindi .nd urge the ,iasgilve Sounall to entertain both readtugs and (intil passage on these budgets beforethis trimesterenids. My reasons for this include. (1) Extreme diffIculties will be incurred If the budgets are not passed. Money nerds to be available beginning (and often before) September. For those who claim second reading should be put off What Counci MRt. FREDERICK S. LANE: STUDENT BODY TREASURER We the .ndersigned members of the Legislative Council feel comnpelled to use this media to answer your open letter to the legislative Council dated July 20, 1964. Certain portions of this letter we feel were completely uncalled for and require an apology on your part to the active members of the Legislative C ouncil who spend their time onbehalf oftho students. Wben reqeusting the Legislative Council to push through your yearly budget system with a second reading at aspecialmeetinqheld during final e xamI week the following statements were in poor taste: THERE ARE THOSE WHOSEEK POLITICA L EXPEDIENCY INSTEAU OF FINANCIAL EFFICIENCY. In ordertbatwesatisfactorily function under a trlmester system -your Council is obligated to use the authorizalions granted to it as a fuiltime body and not a summer steering committee (as under the old semester program). Those who yell, "wait," are thinking of their political futures first and student government second. 50Aus 35 on rhe F~oriAlljator Page 3 to *un11 mAllinatt (Umlel the Alurrenit pri, edheihis Is print the propoed riloatiton after first ritinag, but this Ca be done. While meeting next Moand.y or tuesday nught Nw a sligni izncona.nitite to ,m few o( you, It Is rIr it that this be dole. Most o'I gaiai atl.,ns ire ajisiotisly twilting (fjnil ippruval of budgets to sign 01n11 acts or start other work. (3) TlE RE Aid. TIIOSE Wilt) SEE K POLUTItA I EXPEt1IF NCY INSTEAD) OE FINANCIAL, FFF1~CIE NCY. In order that we NatIsfictoraily function under atrimester system -your tountil Is obligated to use the auttorit~ations granted to It as i fall-time body ind not summer steering members Council: ''a t, s t kin AJ vi iit H rt i uturC5 rirst ind ,tiud*.It in t.fil a s now, we u nct exe I mlLmbetrs to rubtiwr ,t imp deliberitiojis. F or good legislative control, we wvuld have to distribute the same folder of mtilerlal, .allow a period for study, and then reliberate. ft those who feel we should wait, let me ask: Why art. you doing ANY of this work flow' let me add Again, f1ns IC I U 4 efiincy dictates that we step 'mOWAIU) and PASS THlE lB'l*.kTiTlls TRIMESTE R. 'This is a major reason why th, third trimester Counili was vested with (till authorityy. Best wishes for an equitable delitieration. replied If you were present you would have seen these "politIcally minded" representatives secure for the Students of thi8 University a guarantee of a price differential at Lyceum Council special attractions, We feel this action, among other., represents a conscIentious LegisLative Council who places the Student Body first. For your Infotmatlon the second reading of the budget will be held before a fully representative cowlcii on September 15, regardless of your letter. Progur action was taken to advance a percentage of the budget to those organIzations who will need it before September. What Lane EDI'WR: Although It Is my understanding that several members of the Cow,ci were quite irked by the letter below, my feelings remain (for publication, if desired): Last flight's Legislative Cow,ci! inaction toward final passage of budgets during the trimester Was a new low.point for student At '1. GNSI SRIG C 0 --. Sincerely, Fred Lane Student Body Treasurer to Lane: Earl M. Barker Jr. Minority Floor Leader Gater Party Floyd Price VOTE Party Bill Hester Gator Party Andy Percival VOTE Party John Baum Gator Party Skip Haviser VOTE Party government's half-millIon dollar business. "By their action, a majority of the Council were nsglecttuj toward their fiscal responsibilities inatudent government'. operation." Fred La.e Student Body Treasurer Service keys availa ble now Service keys for several campus organlusatlon. are On hand In the Student Government treasur r'. offc in room 307c lb Any student Who Can qualify as ang .rna in oie of the fSllowing organiizatiopa may purchase his key for $3.00. IngiSlatifl Council, Fiornd. Alligator, the Seminole, Traffic Court, Honor Court, Hen's and Women'. Gl. Clube, Debat. team, Choir, Symiphony Orchestra, Board of Student Publications, Lyceum Council, and Band. A letter or phone call to Student Government from the faculty K PA TRONIZE GATOR ADVERTISERS term ends? Classifieds. tool it' TECHNICAL & REFERE NCE ride Iimi l "shock" The Brewse Slue

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I' ft 0 In. :1 0 n AN EDITORIAL Weii.e Iiikmr, of v'etuhin mpu[s4 Iire 'setl tenisi(on. I'e0Ihl Ii this Uhy wofuIhi,'t rlitalily. ho' eive Tnlle or either v luils urngijided, eve' fur i rew mnomne![I. Keep y4)Ir pU[ se with you, lu< k yuI loom whten vclI slip ,it, do' tik, mrouney with yu to l~cs And, thileves -you may ratltuialive your activities .by supposing you neid the rmoiey miore than the persoli you dole it !romr. glancee s ire your& wrr rg. EThc monly you steal Tidy be a week', meals for your Perhaps as a public service, before the trimtster endis, students might send to The Alligator irrounts of how they lid money or valuables stolen. If we print the lttrs, niaybe it will warn sorneofle else+ who might be making the stame mistake. Meanwhile, keep your eyes peeled anid your guard up. You never know; your best friend may be working his way through college the easy way. -John Askins "We are unal terably opposed however, we don t want to si shark by name. J AZZ COR NER TH E guitarist By CHARLIE BUSH EI)ITOt: After reading h~r. William WIImot's statements in the Alligatot on July 21, I feel I must piesenit mny ccomplcte IIs Ag r e TmIeit with i h1km. Dr. WI Imot Is ni t romnplet dy tam Iliar with Stud, it Gover nmlwnt. Th roughout this organzmitliinthene are many undergrauduates houldini various posit ins.*Som,i ,of coiu Sc, are the lower ones whit e the idividual learns the processes of running Student Uovernmnent but many are in higher posItiuis. Morp thamn hal the legislative (ounril members are undiergradluate,. Still there are many of the older graduate and law students In campus offices, most holding positions oI leadership. Why' Because they are mature, responsible people looked up to by the student body. These are the students, who although they have earned a degree and are working for another, feel a moral responsiWitity to continue serving their fellow students. These older stu dents hive more experiences in handling the complicated problems of a stwlent body of nearly 15,000 and they are on more of an equal footing with the administration and faculty than the younger wndergraduates. Remember the graduates are also members of our student body which elects Its own officers. No one can say that any undergradual. Interested enough to .ork in Student Government Is stopped from doiw so. If the undergraduates want more responsibility In their government, let them ask for It and show their willingness to do a good jcb. The argument that some studenbi seek offices with Blue Key In mind is valid. But if they are to oblain membership they must earn it by hard work and service to the -a U) C 0 of o ld seniting homecoming etch year for the students and alumni. The most frightening aspect of Dr. Wilmot's tnt.' rvle w Is the apathy of Student Government he wants from the older students. In our free society, organizations mnd government are spending millions of dollars a year to get out voters I id to Iinduc e the public to takb in active prt iin government, it Is hard to believe person with the respect of ,' university proA man can't ful fill his basic needs living all alone, Lionel! a a men fe sso r apathet even a would tsk anyone to be Ic about any government, student body government. I would lk. to answer now questions l'nm sure will be asked. I .im 20 years old, 2UC, and as a freshman I served as Secretary of Alumni Affairs wi the Student Government cabinet until other Interests and( responsibilities formI nme to leave the post. Don Wayne Held -The e Florida ALLIGATOR Edibor. .... 30b Tomas Jim Caitelo Pat Hogan .John Askins Benny Cason Ed Barber Enicw Tail Take five beautiful melodies, add plenty of "soul,' mix into smooth blend and you have ''Am I Blue'' (Blue Note Record ST-84139). Grant Gree is y TuEy guitarist these days. "Am I I bought this record after hearing IS seconds of it. Green Is playing better these days. The last time I bought a record of his It took me 30 seconds. "Am I Blue" features Johnny Coles, trumpet; Joe Henderson, tenor sax; John Patton, organ; Ben t)Ixori, drums; Grant Green, gvltar. There are five tracks on the album: "Am I Blue," "Take These Chains Prom My Heart, "I Wanna Be Loved," 'Sweet Slumber," ''For All We Know." Patton's solos show the influence of Jimmy Smdth, but his chording is (loser to Wild Bill D'avis. "%oC All We Know'' Is Patton's best track. lie is largely responsible for the 'gospel" flavor of "Take These Chains From My Heart." Coles his a style somewhat like Miles Davis. lie is beard best on "' Wanna Be Loved"' and "For All We Know." Unfortunately, both Coles and Henderson tend to sound mechanical on their solos. When they have had a few more years of experience they will be terrific. This Is really Green's record. He excells on all five tracks. Green's solos are not in short, chopy -phrases like Coles' and Henderson's. They are long mnd free flowing. Although he sticks fairly close to the melody I dofit think you could say that he adds emnblishments. It would be more accurate to say that he plays variations upon the theme. His solos are so very emotional they would Impress:even the most insensitive person. Every song be :touches becomes "blue." There are no tricks, frills or fancy stuff in his solos. They are simple, quiet, honest statements of this man's feelings, and you will be moved by them. If you get a chance, listen to "Feelin' The spirit' (Blue Note Record 4132). Grant Green, with the aid of pianist [fertie Hancock, plays "Sometimes I Feel Like A Motherless Child," "Goflownldoses," "Just A Closer Walkc wihThee," "Joshua Fit De Battle Oh Jericho," and "Nobody Knows The Trouble I've Seen." Nothing but "soul." Please don't miss next week's "Jazz Corner." USS There are already big plans underway for "Jazz Corner"' beginning in September. And big plans they are! I CA 5M $ -'.5 '3m 'Thin t a to man-eating sharKs. ngle out any pcrtickior II LET TER I n def eense Executive Editors Associ .ie Editor. Sports Editor. ......................E rnie Litz All photo, by Carolyu Johnston unless otherwise noted. atmi Wflters J0* Hancock, Don Fedeirnan, RivaGoldberg,Vernooswardsel, Liz Brevfl, Charlie Bush, Jim Carleto, Annq Richards, Jini waldras and Patti PItr.Re ceptiolisI. .....................Marsha G. Brown Production Crew Don Addi., Nelson Meyer, Dave Picbe, Jim Neff and Darlene Pierce. Th. Florida Alligator i the official student newspaper of the Ustver i Florida and I. published five times weekly except during the months of May, June and July, when it is pitlished seml-weekly. The Flottda Alligator Is entered as aecos-cm. matter at the United Stat. Pust Office at Gainesnie, Fioflda. 6

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POLITICS: UpX )set victory? 0 M I 0 J A Jj~~tOf '4 CINEM A the New York Mets have of hoping the National Leagule pentoPt. The state has not developed Briskly competitive two-party system as yet. Republicans snare elective poetq regularly only in r&age, Pinellas, and Broward counties. last May, 450,000 Floridians voted for Miami Mayor Robert King High and endorsed his liberal and reform viewpoints on racial, economic, and taxation Issues. About 180,000 mn a r e Floridians were determined to stop High and the "Negro bloc vote"'and showered a record number of ballots on Burns, providing him with his margin of victory. There was adeepideological rift between the supporters of Burns and High. Each group believes that the other's candidate would hive ruined Florida if he got Into office. Burns people say High would have been indebted to the NAACP and the sing le-m inded South Florida interests, while High people charge that Burns would hive sparked racial turmoil arid loaded the consumer with new taxs Thus, the gap between these tvo camps is wide enough to lay the groundwork for a Republican upset victory in the general edecions. But let's go back a couple of years to see why. In 1900, state Sen. Doyle Carlton and Gev. Farris Bryant were pitted against each other in~ the runoff. Neither man had extre-. mist viewpoints. Each was regated as a moderate on both racial and economic Issues, although Bryant was more conservative of the two. Canlton nor Bryant specifically represented the porkchoppers, the Negroes, Dade County, or any other special in-+is .gis iii IC Ztiltis SL .k IIJ ..NI I[, ro tii II liiSe ilm to b-e t .o coul t ai the t' ipto .ahe to itti actnew iiriy mhy ines t e itiliii itreUts. Now toss ini sever ii hdr ei thousand hungry i Repui bli 1.'s, some of whom noe rigistel ed lDemocrats, and you hive potentt ar-my of voters to OPL(SC ilurlis, On the GOP ticket, state iRepublicins selected ( barke> Holley of St. Petersburg to bear the party standards. Ilolley, .:member of the Florida House .and milnority spokesman for his party, is an extreme conservative. Hib main claim to fame is that he advocates adopt ing the Liberty Amendment, which if nailed on the U. S. Constitution, would abolish the federal income tax. What Holley would do to replace the money is not quite clear. Holley's victory strategy would take two years to take effect, but would pave the way for a new slate of candidates in 1906. simply, Holley would be governor for two years, then would fall to a seige of Democrats while Burns would die politically. A Holley triumph is possible if the disenchanted foes of Burns become aware of their vast strength. A one-shot coalition and a little sacrifice by dissident Democrats could keep Burns in Jacksonville re-telling his Jacksonville Story. A Goldwater sweep in Florida Is almost certain In November. If Holley can identify hinmself with the Arizonian, dances are he can ride the crest of the Goldwater charm and popularity to victory. Scott Kelly tried this undercuttinig technique immediately after he was nudged out of the primary run-off by High. He notified the press that he was not endorsing any candidate, but "expected" his supporters to vote for High. This action is about the same as Barry Goldwater favoring Bobby Kennedy over Spessard Holland. Kelly figured if High got into office, the Miamian would be easier to defeat In 1960 than Burns. Traditionally, the incumbenthas the edge when he faces his opopnents. If Burns is elected, chances are he'd sweep back into office for a four-year term. Burns wants to be rqLnstated in 1966. He's not going to do anything which will enrage his constituents. His organization will grow even stronger with patronage. On the other hand, Hoiley will rub a lot of politicians raw if he's governor, mainly because he's a Republican. Two years from now Holley would be a weak contender for his own job -providing be hasn't turned It over to private nte rp rise. oud If the anti-Burns forces wol rally behind Holley and are wdlliig to Irade two years of harmless conservatism for six with Brtms, then Florida can start anew with TO -uid tn.! it all). If evet there were a movie which both proclaimed the coui ai ofmnun wder fire andyet showp' the total meaningless of w .r, th is movie is it. lmqgIn.', il this slaughter t kit. place it a place with no stb lteglc impot taic. The British lefenil It because it is their dluty; Ih, /ulus .itt irk supposedly to cirtim territory that Is theirs or pe rIaps. it is their resentmenit of British occupation. We .rc never really told, and it reilly doesn't nitter, especially when you see s Ct ni like ti,. final ch,.rg. in which V ulus are stacked up thre.-deep. It r pill y Is all so fas cin.,t ing. ..and morbid. Color really has a place in wir pictures -it vivifles th? horror. There is h irony to this picture. The British in the end hold their position, but no one wins. The /.ulus ceremoniously salute the valiant British. Such a beautiful gesture; at least the dying know they were .ippreciited. -*SJULY 28, 1964 **** **-**4*** *** ** lit P412 TUE AL LIGA'POR WORLD S IN COLOR IN COLOR IN COLOR IN COLOR IN COLOR 0 ---'I'S.' t~ -* -NEVER BEFORE EXHIBITED ON THESE SHORES! ^0 "'LII 5it MANY PAGES w* Init 'Poven, otmpted So COUNT THEM! FO"fi'n ornd Awv.-inw.pm. NE wi of th. Doy, 'Ilustroted ,I utudd i .nPio sd lI ymmnn~ g r0,tu,. All in th. Entgli I toriguogs to A,,mn ik, nt,, en inlo w, hMn. Mo,,.,, f Mo,ni *nt,,, to inunn ,i1,,Su~t r EXRtAI NED 'o, *1h. Ed';cot.' of Al P Veso M.,wog., C,.mjrcot., Provoking Op'nion. G. an Voic., Strno'ng Artwor4 'o Ti,,ot. I,. lne.J and ik. Sn. & neo mCOLOR, COLOR, in COLOR' B; IV iN 1 F1UNT Now slaving it the >t.t.' until weinsti ,y is a colorful, corn it'd, yet realisticeliritisli b httl pie. tuz e, iiu.'' Its plot is sImple. 140 BrItish sol.' rs withlsthid sit ittark of 1,000 well -isisplined /iulii yin lors. The mrovi, Is killed as more Uiiin tii, though. For one thing, the battle gIves the viewer the (hance to witness the different relations of mcli faced with immiban nt death. It .Iso d* monst rates some brilliant battle strategy on both sides. Furthermiore, in the bigiunnIing rnd endi, lh ri ire some noteworthy anithrop.,logical seqJuences o n cc rn Ing b marriage, sex and the concept 0! a warrior to the Zulu. You really can't sty much more than this. For the most part, the screen is dominitid by the battle and the carnage. One is litertily submerged in death -it becomes almost senseless after while (one even hopes for both sides to wipe each other out SE EN!! BE

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Pa e 6 fhe Fijirido AIlb o Jr Friday Luwg 24, 964 If E > ly .oivenient *4refinedi *2 irlency iptriment withti hlit """ng wo """Appl W.-13thSt. (B-ISO-It-C). 'C" 2 bedoom house, furnished, air conditioned. Available for Call Ext. FR 6-1798. Shady lot close I yar occupancy. 2202, or after 5 p.m., (13-159 -It-c). Room in private bore for mature male student or faculty member. Private entrance, off street parklng. Linen and maid service. Available August 2nd. Call FR 65360. (B-l59-lt-c). AIR-CONDITIONED apartment, beds, private bath. Aisofurnished rooms for 2 boys or one. IOS N.w. 7th Terrace. FE 2-0609. Call after 5 p.m. (B-157-3t-p). Mer studerit for A dvt rtlfrng lt, Tm.uj ifo r thn student Pub Advertising Staff, C ill F d. 2832 or stop in Room 9, Florida Union to make in interview appointment. (E -159-i-nc). Lost & Fou nd~ Lost -One set of ruve keys. Reward If found. FR 2-9134, Call Roy Evenings Snyder, alter 7:30. (L--159--2t-c). Found -Camera lens. Owtmer may claim bydescription and paying advertising cost. evenings. Call FR 6-419$ (IL-59-Zt-c). Elders to FL. Ruckcer, Ala., for two week stay at summer camp, Aug. 9 through Moel-type 2 rooms furnished; no kitchens. Also 2 bedroom .Il furnished large duplex. Mature personnel required. BOth near campuw. 6-6494. (B-L5'7-4t-c). Aut osB '62 Chevrolet, ImpalaSuper Sports Coupe, V-B8. Automatic transrnissign, air cond., WW, R & H. Gold exterior and black interior. Call FR 2-8034. (G -I58-St-c). 1961 VW Camper, ideal for vacaWill consider Phone FR tions, weekends. small car in trade. 5-8314. (G-l56-tf-nc). 1955 MG TF -1500, 3/4 Race engine, wire wheels, new paint. 1919 Phone 376New tires, Very good N. E. 7th Terrace. 0178. (G -159-2t-c). 1960 Rambler Wagon. battery, luggage rack. mechanically, looks sharp. Vince Bet;, 1426 -B S. W. 18th Place. (G 159-Zt-c). 1963 Karman,. white with black top, 3200 mIles. Excellent condition (like T-Blrd. 1964) $1900. Also 1962 Call Ext. 2202, or after 5 p.m. FR 8-1798. (G-159-lt-o). NEEDED: Receptionist -Secretnry. Must be efficient In shortband and typing. surata with ability. Salary commen0--.0Sc Carmichael, S S. E. 1st 6-5242. (E-l58-St-.c). rI-a -. AUe. FR Aig. 22. Lflving Aug. 9. Call 372-4875 after 5:30 p.m. (3-158-tU-nc). CUE STICK BILLIARDS -905 N. Main St. Located in the Food Fair Shopping Center Cook ic-s Restaurant. adjacent to Brand we men nd n a'"despeciall*,y cowpfes. ...80 bring your dates ixd coins out! Bob Sullivan is the owner and operator and wtlltbe glad to give some helpful pointers on shooting pool. NESTOR'S (M-l57-St-c). TV SERVICE forced to move. No,, located at 232 S. E. itt St., nest of old Post Office. Free estimates. Tubes checked free. Phone 372-1326. We invite aii our old come and see us. friends to (Continue Lu" x 13",' Services Adveti sing the Alligator (final edition of the summer term) is TODAY, Friday, July 24, at 5:00 pm. Extension 2832. 2nd Color I -.-, -__________ stra" --""-lications, (M-153-9t-c).

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K 4 CAMPt~JS JLiv 24 COMPASS i964 th.' Florsdo Ab jotor PogeY Gal a band concert Saturday in the LniVt rstty Imp's .t1 l{oml. S. lkOfltd Singer, ti I of t learning Resuu re horda Atlantic U niversity, ho Hitoh, wilibe the guestspeaker. Topic will be: ''New Frontiers Teaching and Learning." IntiatiOn ceremonies willtbe held on] 3 p.m. In the afternoon until ,mpletiOnl, of that same date. The remomies will be held in Room Students for Glwater wll meet night at 7:30 in room 324 01 the ozrIda Union to develop a plan of tion for the coming presidential mpaign. Interested students ire ged to attend. floy Niemnela, assistant profes.of marketing in the College of isiness AdministratiOnl, was med winner recently of a Ford >undation fellowship for graduate tidy in business administration (I economics. The announcement, Issued by the >r1 Foundation, places Niemela mong 154 graduate fellowship wincrs from 47 universities and alleges in the nation. UF was the aly university in the state with a lIlowshlp winner. Nominations for the awards, deied to strengthen college and niversity teaching in economics nd business administration, were ubmitted by 114 institutions. Nle mela, whose grant totals AT OAR Car R ental CUNO-CAR -7 day, Ice. Free pick-up. mpletely equipped 24hbou 1964 with r sercars, autopatic transmission. Radio, heater, hite-walls. Rates include gas, II and Insurance. FR 6-3644. N-159-lt-e'i. Wanted IALEAH -All students who are ttending the UF (including incomtfreshman) and have lived In laleah, please contact Ed Bareat University Ext. 2832. (C39-2t-nc)anted rider to share expenses rone-way trip to Colorado or alifornia. Leaving September Sto 15th. Call after 6 p.m. eekdays or weekends anytime. B 6-4209. (C-159-2t-c). INGLE student prefers furnished apartment for tail residency anyhere in this town. The apartent hopefully will not exceed $50 r month. ContactDonrFedermlan rom 9 -9:30, 11:15 to 12, aMd .45 tO 2:45 at 6-3261 Ext. 2832 call aftr II p.m. at 2-7318. C-IS --nc) ~le roOmmate wanted to sharp Pfrtment. FR 2-3748. (C-IS>ist', toI i ectoTd Ie hwtts, Ins (husmbChis. Reseirs h York has gr titute wf ,t the 'I~.It' hrolcp' ni ( corporations (If New anted $8,500 to two professors for basic studies in physics and chemistry. Dr. John A. /oltewic,, assistant professor In the department of e o re a ne w more efici n a medical and chemical kntere,t. With Thomas W.Sharpless, (oral Gables, a g rad uate student In chemistry, he Is preparing molecules related to a drug now being used in the treatment of leukemia. A second grant of $4,500 went to Dr. Charles F. looper, Jr., assistant professorIn the department of physics to extend and improve diagnostic techniques for plasma investigations. These ultimately would have application both to high temperature plasmis produced in the laboratory and plasmas existing in space. The Florida Union Dance Con,mittee will sponsor the last street dance of the summer tonight from 8 to 12 p.m. on the south side of the Florida Union building. Admission will be free and students, faculty, and the public are invited. Emcee will be Stu Bowers of WDVH radio. I Li the AmT,* ils. nitit IIa over the stile, the ynung binisnmen have spentt .full week on IamJpuI, where they have rC'et eved sp I all redt mst urt ion In rmsic (romi umversltv persoe. Leigh ii> IBtNY Staff! hail CCI L)BEH( Writer Ilegh Ball has .t small, old room overflowing with a tangled web (if glass tube leading from bottles and vaicuum tubes to a large metal miachIne. This giant mare of machinery is the mass speltographi being used for research by gdat tetsI chemical physics. Charles H arden, 1. F graduate student, has just completed his thesis on the reactions between ions and neutral molecules of iitric oxide and laughing gas. Using the machine for one month he has discovered, ''There aren't any reactions. ..apparently nothing happens." The mass spectograph isusually used to determine puritles In sub-stances for analytical purposes and to measure reactions between gaseous substances (whatkindthey CLAL S SFESS WANTED: Riders for single or rond teripstPhila., Camden, bus terminals for rides to the World's Fair (and, oh yes, New York). Am leaving either the afternoon of the 5th or the morning of the 6th of August. One way is only $15; save ont the round trip .only $25. Call Don Pederman, at the University Est. 2832 or late In the evenings at his home number, 2-7318. (C157-tf-ne). Driver wanted for 1959 Ford from Detroit to Gainesville, now toseptevnher. Gas paid. References and deposit required. 316-2411 (office). (C-l57-3t-v). f ea.l Estate -OR SALE BY OWNER -3 BR, 2 1/2 bath, living and family room, dining room, all electric kitchen, central heating, A/C, double garage, lots of storage. slear new elementary school. If interested call 2-A175, J. D. Gay, Sr. (I159-2t-c). Law professor 8ellIng spacious 3 bedroom home; I 1/2 bath, attic fan, built-in drawers, vanity, and muc storage. $80 per month. Many extras. Negotiate equity. FR 6-2775. 1062 N. E. 14th Ave. (l-153-tt-ct WANTED TO BUY -Good duPlflfl, trlpltx@S, and multiple 'wit apartments In good neigtbwrioods. Joiu, D. DIllon, 372-7658 after 5 n.m. 0c6V weekerds.(152-tU-C). Large 3 BR, 2 bath, CCB home, Flria roomg fulappliaces. Located near Littlewood. Terms to suit buyer. Owners moving out of state. CaMl 372-3793. (1-151llt-p). ADDIS' 5 ACRES IN ,m~wcec, CCB house, 3 bedrooms, fireplace, screen porch, modern plumbing, big lawn, 6 outbuildings, great shade trees, 3 acres tillable, close to school, 30 four-lane minutes from campus. On state highway, fenced all around, new electric well pump. $9,750. Terms. United Farm Agency, Ocala 629-7284. (1153-Uf-c). iv 01 Hntis, 'iptitlel H it I ight lie. t, mijyier Aifr *it u.ei, the Cli;,It staff mnember J I i mfty Finn, Hanrd 1)1rector at MaInland HIIgh Schooul In LDaytonia Ileachi, will .ktn t I t th aon for .i Latin are and bow they take palce). It also determines lonts in the upper atmosphere and the discharges In II smes. It. E. Muschllt,., Lprofessor, started building the machine her. eight years ago. It has been in operation only three years because it took five years to build. it operates by deterring th mgetic field of a particle and nwasuring how fast It I. going. I, ". iriie'' of the samnt Sins smmpbhiny In pb," thle title se,ietion 4f Me' 11ith Willson's lat-test must, .init'mtty, 'He r e'S I ove," ha rpentler's "Billet of %laure," i nd selected marches. In the event of rain, the concert will be played in Room 144, the G dtr Iand rehearsal room, in the M uskii Ilding. The ions, charged particles, are reflected on detector and the particles can be measured. In a niche it the machine 18 placed a small woodn statue af the physicist, Fritz. The quot.tion on the base, "A physicist is a man who understands how unundterstandable an atom ls,"descrlbes the complexity of the work being done with the mass spectogr.,ph. By PHIL BROOKSTONE Staff Writer You think of a credit union as making loans on cars and other items of necessity. But, not loans on "atomic cocktails." "It's only a small amount of radiation in liquid form for a thyroid gland condition,'' said Mrs. louise Hinton of the Campus Federal Credit Union. 'But, we made the 1CMn." The Credit Union Is for full-time university staff members only and has approxImately 5,000 accounts. Founded In 1U35, its assets ID years ago were $100,000. Today, the total $3 million. Their motto: "Not for Profit, Not for Charity, but Service." A Credit Union booklet states, '"Deposit of $5 for the purchase of one share, plu. payment of a 25 cents entrance fwe entitles a qutlIfird person to mnembr,,i Members pool their savings toprovide loans tofellow members at low interest rates. The maximum loaned out on one share is $750. Kor single account, $10,000 is the largest. Interest is an Important subject with the Credit Union. On share loans -Interest is charged at the rate of' only 1/2 of I per cent per month of the unpaid balance. For new car loans, Its only ninetenths oil1 per cent per month. life insurance on the unpaid balance Is provided on all eligible loans at no additional cost to the borrower, Loans of up to $5,000 are insured. If the debtor dies, the debt need not be paid. Within two years, automditio will handle the Credit Union bookkeeping system. "It will do away with the passbook," stressed Treasurer and General Manager fintoiu,"and leave all detail work in the back office." Bond coverage s $1 miloon. Interest is compounded semi-annually on June 30 and Dec. 3a. The board of directors and the credit committee are composed of faculty volunteer. from all walks of life. They include a purchasing assistant at the teaching hospit.l and a professor of l.w. ""ey stay with us many years," "rs. "i"tot, emphasized, 'because they believ, strongly in what we're doing." Use Eta' Gator rlzcEa i a IPA TRONIZE GA TOR A DVER TISERS THEY'RE A GOOD GROUP ri M

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r .:n M pt trrro,, Bands I Il Be here inside Gatorland of fensi ve: toda yX it' s defense S t 'I ''I t i ] j r A i aI .i ci rri fi(}, it rIi r.i ijikrji Badil~ xjnt, toni ti r yi,. Itn Vihi | PJ fJamrdI briy II, u ljrimI jt' It'i, iii}I isitiiit30 h -hh{si-ji by mTA steriv As soj bimd dirz-e toi ,. 91 wk the I Is th I V, I nIvIIrs ni ,+ II .i I In des I last time h r fIl 1, 1 l ,I 4+ ek. (ii Is it to difficult to -"* --' i' [L''' ' hrlr r! i h i i % 1 IiikfihlI ,id n -,plit~s Tin em,-[. 'I betwein a 1. IItr .I~t,,.['LI'tI floyad it Texts, Bobby Isnld Lt Geornia Tech, these men ire dth4' \l ii hitn I iniC t I loruhl H diton friam 'tt urmIrndivui 'I Iisl ,r thn [$ird wiI be IDictor if biods it fty if A rizou,. Mr. Lee r of one of the stndird text lMx~ks on the subject t,"hltoiirii Mirchiu lu id Techniques,' anti has I nurrilw of pubjishil works for mi ri hing hbands. Working with Lb. nmusi. a! score subm itt. d by Mr. (iou 3d, Tin will fisinr a hull-time show designed ) pre Sen it ItmOSt efi F ti VPly with drills IIMI i.gteatry sutggusted by the music itself. Morton Gould is one of AnmeriCa's most prolific composers, with compositions running Into the hundreds. He is equally at home writIng for the symphony orchestra, the concertdband nthe thater r of his best known works is the "Pavaniw," from his American Symiphonette No. 2. Today's offense is most geared to the pass. How is the defense deploying ? i* t'i4 .,ft is~I tts 'i l h~s t e for flare uliys, in ritestr' iril th. bill will beflrritd;rjin1 i be i iip Ini ii t l LIhttrf, noilliti word, V ft not cortiinualls hhilvena fi, I. aftei maif play s withirut ,tI,,+.thu[ gotlig 'vtong. \nothr (It it tf tis preiu', is that La lh. offerise ruov,er -r wards, tIL* i to Ibe defwuni' I by the defeh>,e bet omles 52iill, c. In the LU onmpirylng plctUri of a GOtor practIse l.Id falI, qui rterback is back In his poukpt looking foz a receIver on a pass pattern. Since this is not a 'live"' play only the pass defender, ir, ini Ic ion. look it the action liking place beyond the line of scrimmage. See how the defensive men are moving to cover receivers. There are two ways to play pass defense: Man-to--man, or having the defensive linebacker or halfback stay with a specifically a.,signed end or flanked back; or Secondly a zone ar ra ng em e nt where each man in the secondary or backerup line covers a certain area of the field. Try to guess what type of defense is being deployed In the picture. See you next Tuesday. Letter analyzes UF : !Miracle told on statewide TV Mr. Ernie Litz: Remember the Gators' victory over Alabama last year? There are many such Instances of where the underdog rises tip to the occasIon and beats the supposedly vastly superior team. How can we account for the much bettor than usual performance of the winning leamn in such cases? Surely confldepice, morale, teamwork, and motivation are variables involved. All coaches ire, orshouldbe, concerned with p r omoting a psychological atmosphere that will contribute to the best possible Individual and team effort. I feel this area requires more attention -not only on the part of the coaches, but also perhaps more urgently on the part of the student body. The foljowlng are just few of the things that could be done which might prove consequential, and although football Is used as an example the principles apply to other organized I. Individual and Group backs receive the glory, while good blocking and tackling goes comparatively unrecognized. This is not to say that the backs get more praise than they deserve, but only to point out that others deserve more recognition than they have gotten In the past. Perhaps also we should recognize team effort of two or more players as much as we recognize individual effort. 2. Support and Acceptance. Support our team not just our winning team. Accept Its inevitable failures. Perhaps we need more emphasis on playing well rather than winning. Many a well played game has been lost. I we emphasize the means rather than the ends, the ends will naturally follow. Emphasize the po si t ive rather than the ne g a tive. Criticism, unless positively done In a positive manner, is always ultimately damaging and only serves the critic who finds temporary relief from the release of hos tilitles and frustrations. A Miracle on 13th Street. The dlMiracle'' of course Is the UnIversity of Florida. This is the subject of a telecast to be view throughout Florida Aug. 512 on stations from Miami to Jacksonville to Pensacola. Many UFE students participated in the filming, produced by the UF Alumni AssociationIn cooperation with the motion picture production lab on campus. Journalism Professor John Paul Jones wrote the script. Justice Stephen C. O'Connell of the Florida Supreme Court will narrate the show. "TV Receptions" will be held by alumni clubs all over Florida, corresponding to the telecast In their areas, for Incoming UF freshmen and upper-class transfers from junior colleges. Vice President Harry Pbilpott, Vice President Robert Mautz Dean of Women Martha Brady, Journalismi School Director Rae Weimner and other noted university personnel will represent the UP' at the receptions. One of these university officials will join present UF students from a given locality In a panel discussion and questioh-answer session with the Incoming students alter the film. "A Miracle on 13th Street"' is good entertainment, depicting the history, development and operation of the University of Florida. If you can't make the when you're home, just enloy the show. reception tune and TE LECASTh Wednesday, Aug. 5 WEAR-TV Channel 3, Pensacola Thursday, Aug. JING-TV Channel 7, 1 -; in-----. Pan ama City