Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Creation Date:
April 7, 1948
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non - profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text



Student Owned

Student Controlled

Dedicated To Student

Interest


$.llnuto


National Billiards

Tournamehta Here Tomorrow

For RtC0 AflSorts

SSeP e4)oP
pq\e 1? .0


*wn..Cr...rnC Fin falflr.Ar-......


UNIVERSITY Fr ra.nwIDA WAINESVILLL, FLORIDA


Student Forum


Will Be New


WGGG Program

Student Participated;
Sponsored By Univ.
Speech Department

By Margaret Jennings
"The Student Forum of the
Air," a new University of Florida
radio series sponsored by the ra-
dio section of the speech depart-
ment, will present its first pro-
gram April 15 at 9:30 p. m. over
Station WGGG.
"Should the United States Adopt
Universal Military Training and
Selective Service at the Present
Time?" will be the question on
hand for the first program. Stu-
dents participating are:
Pro: Bill Scruggs, member of
Campus American Legion Post,
and Doyle Rogers, secretary of
International Relations Club.
Con: Herb Stallworth, member
Florida Blue Key, former Honor
Court chancellor, and Gerald Gor-
don, Phi Beta Kappa, member de-
bate team.
This will be one of the first ra-
dio discussion programs in the his-
tory of the University that will be
done completely by students. Mr.
William Steis of the Florida fac-
ulty, is the technical advisor for
the series.
The "Student Forum of the
Air" will broadcast as a pub-
lic service feature of Station
WGGG. Broadcasts will come
from the Speech Department ra-
dio studios in buildings on the
campus.
A half hour show, the program
will come on the air waves at
9:30 each Thursday evening. A
survey, conducted after the sec-
ond program, will determine the
number of campus listeners.
If the total listener appeal is
hign enough, the program will be
moved to the Florida Union Audi-
torium so that all interested stu-
dents may attend and participate.
"The Student Forum of the
Air" will continue for the remain-
der of the semester, and if it
proves popular enough, will be-
come a permanent show.
Milt Oshins, WGGG announcer,
is the moderator for the program.
Four students will take part in
the program each week. The se-
lection of participants will be
based on their abilities to discuss
the topic in question and on their
standing in campus activities.
The. questions will be selected
by Oshins and Marty Lubov, di-
rector and producer of the pro-
gram, and all students are asked
to send in questions on the topics
that are to be presented. The
topic titles will be announced in
advance in the ALLIGATOR.


Modern Furniture

Exhibition Opens In

Peabod0 Hall Today
The Museum of Modern Art's
Unit Furniture Exhibition, which
traces the development of stand-
ard furniture ,units for the home
from the early Globe-Wernecke
book cases produced during the
nineties to the modern productions
designed by Charles Eames, was
opened to the public at Peabody
Hall today, Director William T.
Arnett announced.
In tracing the history of unit
furniture it is shown that more
than half a century has elapsed
between the early beginnings and
the Storagewall introduced by Ar-
chitects George Nelson and Henry
Wright in 1946. German and Eng-
lish essays bridge the gap bethreen
early American interest and its
resumption in the late thirties. The
exhibition concludes with an eye
toward the future in presenting
the "Packaged Building System,"
a prefabricated house in which all
of the parts are composed of
standard units.
The Exhibition, circulated by the
Museum of Modern Art, and pre-
sented by the School of Architec-
ture and Allied Arts will remain
on view through April 23.


New Co-op Addition


Ready to help serve its student members is the new addition to the
Co-op grocery. It's a meat counter, complete with meat and all.

SAVINGS AVAILABLE TO MEMBERS


Co-op Grocery Great Help

To Wives With Limited $ $

Co-Operation Has Proved It's Worth To
Flavet Men and Women In More Than One Way


By Peggy Clayton
Any student who is having
trouble with the high cost of
groceries can, by paying a $15.50
deposit, become a member of the
student coop grocery venture and
obtain his groceries at lower
prices.
This coop organization, begun in
August, 1946 is not just for those
living min Flavet villages or just for
veterans or just for married stu-
dents. It is 'for any registered stu-
dent. All he has to do to join is to
come into the store which is located
in Flavet 1, and pay his member-
ship fee. Only 50c of this money is
retained by the organization, the
other $15 being refunded to the
student on leaving school.
In November, 1946 the store of-
ficially opened with a capital of
$3,500.
Manager Chris Bracewell now
estimates the value of the concern
at $13,000. In its year and a half of
operation, the coop has lowered its
prices from higher than the chain
stores to as low or lower. This
store has the added inducement of
having sales at which all merchan-
dise is offered at a 10% discount
to pay off dividends.
The coop grocery, a non-profit
organization, is not connected with
the University. It operates on a
charter from the state of Florida.
The building -was made.-available
by te state also. It is estimated to
be worth $7,000, and the coop pays
only $1 a year rent.
A board of directors which
meets once a month draws up all
the policies of the organization,
and a meeting of the entire mem-
bership is held twice a year to
elect directors and discuss store
operation. The present board of di-
rectors is composed of: Ben Hig-
gins, president; David Bryant,
vice president; E. B. Griffis, secre-
tary; E. R. Lampp, treasurer;
Gould Sadler; W. K. Davis; Bob
Mills; Phil Dreifus; Don Storms;
and Bill Marker.
There are six full time employ-
ees working in the store at the
present time. The store is pat-
ronized by practically all of the
married students living in the Fla-
vet villages and many others be-
sides. Manager Bracewell states


SDX And Jaycees

Plan Follies Show
Florida students have an un-
usual treat' in store for them
starting about midnight, May 22.
That's when Florida Follies, big
student variety show, will hit the
boards at the Florida Theatre.
Sponsored by the Gainesville Ju-
nior Chamber of Commerce and
Sigma Delta Chi, professional
journalistic fraternity, the show
will feature top-notch student per-
formers.
Raul Reyes, Sigma Delta Chi
member, is in charge of the va-
riety program and he says several
professional-calibre acts have al-
ready been lined up.
Watch for Florida Follies.


"FLORIDA STANDS READY .


Main Issue In Higher

Education, Money Miller

University President Spoke Before
Florida Bankers Association Yesterday


"The fundamental issue in high-
er education today is money,"
University President J. Hillis Mill-
er told members of the Florida
Bankers Association meeting in
St. Petersburg yesterday.
Dr. Miller said that the educa-
tional demands of veterans, gradu-
ates of high school, and a rising
consciousness of higher education
Were forcing institutions of higher
learning; throughout the country to
expand the field of education, and
that the issue is "whether or not
the people are going to be wise
enough to supply these funds."
He said the issue is no longer
Whether or not there will be sub-
stantial increases in the number of
regular students seeking higher
education after the veterans have
graduated. He quoted census fig-
ures to show the demand for edu-
cation in terms of future trends.
Terming education the greatest
economic investment on earth, Dr.
illler said the issue is no longer
Whether or not an investment in
higher education ti a good invest-
Went.
"Recent surveys have determin-
ed that the college trained man
e;rns an average life total of from
,lPo = to OO s W
9"t~ foiM *6640 100WILfc


or $72,000 more than the high
school graduate's earning of $88,-
000."
Relating the issues to Florida,
he said that "the issue in Florida
is not whether or not the Univer-
sity of Florida knows where it is
going, it is downright sure of the
place it wants to fill in this grow-
ing progressive state."
"Rockbottom needs for expan-
sion I have outlined as costing be-,
tween 17 and 20 million dollars,"
he said in pointing to the several
building needs.
He listed these as a final addi-
tion to the Library, four units for
engineering, five for agriculture,
administrative an d classroom
building, a building for architec-
ture and fine arts, wing to Florida
Union, addition to law college, and
several buildings for education,
sciences and physics, and business
administration, respectively.
Concluding, he said, "The Uni-
versity of Florida stands ready to
carry the torch for orderly de-
velopment of a sound economy in
Florida . it stands ready to
handle the people's investment in
higher education, and guarantees
higher dividends than have even
been earned by any other enter-
prise o the free people of this


that at the opening of the venture,
a markup of 20% was charged and
that increased volume of business
has made it possible to bring this
down to 7%.
d The nine original stockholders
of the organization were: Ben H.
Mayberry, Jr., Frank M. Wilson,
Jr., E. Wesley Myers, George W.
Kates, Harold S. Smith, Frank C.
Stanley. Jr., Kenneth L. Jones,
Walter B. Timberlake, Jr., and
Morton C. Freedman.


Frolics Plans


Nearly Complete


Says Turnbull
Plans for Gatorland's biggest
social weekend, Spring Frolics,
May 7 and 8, are nearly complete,
Bill Turnbull, Inter Fraternity
Conference President announced
this week.
Starring the smooth and hot
music of Tex Beneke and his record
breaking 36-piece musical aggre-
gation, the two day festivities will
feature two dances and a two-hour
concert.
Friday night, Glenn Miller's
proetge will sweet-note the gala
weekend off to a musical start at
a formal dance in the "new" gym
from 9 to 1. Saturday afternoon,
Beneke will make music in the
University Auditorium in a gala
two-hour concert and show.
Saturday evening, the man with
the sax-appeal will play at another
formal affair from 8:30 till 12.
Negotiations are underway to
broadcast the dances on a network
hookup.
Taking the vocal honors with
the Beneke group will be songbird
Claire Chatwin, songster Ronnie
Deauville, and the "Moonlight
Serenaders." Drummer-man Jack
Sperling and trumpeter Pete Can-
doli share the instrumental spot-
light. Candoli is a winner of the
coveted "Esquire' award.
One of the few top name orch-
estras to be composed completely
of ex-servicemen, the big Texan's
combination includes 33 ex-army
vets and two ex-gobs, Beneke and
Jack Sperling. The Tex Beneke
outfit also is one of the few swing
groups in the country to have a
complete string section.

3,966 Students

Use Fla. Union
A seven days' total for the
greatest week in the history of
the Florida Union, University of
Florida "home away from home"
for its students, shows a total
of 3,966 students participated in
events held in the Union.
These 3,966 were in addition
to the 6,000 plus who informally
use the facilities of the Union
daily and were drawn there by
special events sponsored direct-
ly by the Florida Union or other
organizations.
The events bringing these stu-
dents to the Union included such
activities as dances, a bridge
tournament, and an intercollegi-
ate telephonic billiards tourna-
ment.

Radio Auditions Held;
More Tryouts Slated
Radio Guild auditions were
held yesterday under the direc-
tion of W. B. Steis, instructor
of speech, in Building E 126.
Anyone interested in radio
work, who was not able to at-
tend yesterday's auditions, is
asked to contact Mr. Steis in his
office in G-180 after spring re-
cess.


I



















t
f
C
p


t

a
t]


















t




a
1












I



t
E


I



n
s









e
t










a
t
s
rP

ea
th
r(



an
t


U.S. Has To Feed


Germany, Newman


Informs Engineers

"Until France and Great Britain abandon selfish in-
terests in the reparation of German industrial plants, the
United States is going to have to continue feeding Ger-
many," Dr. Albert B. Newman, former representative on
the quatripartite commission for the 'liquidation of Ger-
man war potential, told student
S chemical society delegates meeting
Monday.
Southern Reg-Ion oDr. Newman, professor of
chemical engineering, School of
Technology, City College, New
York, addressed some 75 stu-
A hE M eet "dents representing nine south-
ern universities at a regional
Simeeting of the student branch
of the American Institute of
Dr. Newman described the self-
ish interests in German industry
StudentBySandessorfGe chey Ge-on the part of France and Great
Students and professors of che Britain as a desire on the part of
ical Engineers, student chapters, at these countries not- to allow the
rthe University of Florida Monday re-establishment of any German
morning. industry that might compete with
Seventy-one students and facul- their own industries in world
ty members were registered at the trade. os wo
opening session and registratio Dr. Newman, who spent 14
continued throughout the day., months in Germany as a member
Dr. John S. Allen, vice-president of the quatripartite commission,
of the University; Dean Joseph said that reparations in Germany
Weil; and W. L. Bryan, president were based on the Potsdam agree-,
of the Florida Chapter of the ment whereby Russia got all of
AIChE, were speakers at the the reparations in her zone and
opening session with Dr. Ralph 25 per cent in the American or
A. Morgen, director of the Flori- Western zone.
da Engineering and Industrial Ex- "Germany," he said, "has the
periment Station, giving the prin- same food deficient ratio, and
cipal address at Monday morn- likewise will have to build
ing's session. industry to export enough to
Principal 'afternoon speaker was make up for her food defiei-
Dr. Albert B. Newman, president ency."
of the AIChE, national chapters. He pointed out, however, that
Six students presented technical Great Britain and France, with
papers during the afternoon, their present ideas on the liqui-
Delegates were guests Monday nation of German industry, were
night at a banquet and dance at practically excluding her as an
the Club 400 at which Col. Ever- export nation.
ett M. Yon, Gainesville, was toast- He pointed out that France came
master. Sessions continued through through the war in good shape,
Tuesday. that she was little damaged by the
Highlight o' Tuesday's program war and was not food deficient.
was election of officers and Her industries he said are 100 per
awarding of prizes for the best cent of pre-war averages and con-
studen. papers read at the con- tinuing to expand.
vention yesterday. Officers elect- He said that 20 per cent of
ed were: President, William Bry- the equipment Britain plans to
an, University of Florida; Vice- use in post war industrial ex-
President, Ralph Golladay, V. P. pension, she expects to get out
I.; Secretary, William Boyd, Au- of Germany.
burn; Treasurer, John Malloxy, He concluded that unless France
Florida. and Great Britain can be persuad-
Prizes were won by the follow- ed to change their idea of indus-
ing: First place, "Adsorption of trial reparations, German econo-
Water Vapor and Nitrogen Dioxide my will suffer for years to come,
on Silican Gel" by J. A. Brabe and the United States may well
and H. P. Gidean of the Univer- look to continue supporting her,
sity of -Tennessee; second place,
"Tobacco Seed Oil" by W. B. Wat-
kins of V.P.I.
Tuesday afternoon the conven- Modern Language
tion split up into groups for
sightseeing and field trips. The Hall Building Gives
field trip group inspected the ll d v s
plant of the Cabot Carbon Comn- Hi g ve
pany of Gainesville and the elec-
tronics and aeronautical facilities Example Of Future
at the University. Sightseers had
their choice of Silver Springs, Ma-
rine Studios, or Daytona Beach. Underground Sprinkler
Wednesday the field trips con- System To Be Laid In
tinue in Jacksonville with visits
to plants of the Rutile, Ilmenite Plaza Of The Americas
and Zircon Division, Humphrey By Jack Shoemaker
Gold Corporation, and the Con- By Jack Shoemaker
trainer Corporation of America. In another ten days, the beau-
tification program will exhibit a
n ik !new remodeled college hall when
ew Skating Rink Language Hall will be complete-
ly refurnished with an eye toward
W ill Apen Friday! modernistic details.
Will Open Friday This building will be an ex-
ample of how all the other build-
Nilhl F r lu enls ings on the campus will look in
Nigh For Sudents the near future. It is contemplated
Se that Peabody Hall will be the
One of the major "lack of en- ext on the list, and then will
;ertainment" problems that Uni- come Benton Hall.
versity students find themselves The business manager's office
faced with will be solved this also announced that plans have
coming Friday with the announce- been completed for the laying of
ment of the opening of the Play- an underground sprinkler system
house Roller Rink, located on in the Plaza of the Americas. Aft-
the Glen Springs Road just op- er this is done, the area will
posite the new driving range. undergo a complete facelifting,
The new rink is being construct- with the planting of trees and
ed by Lester C. Hodges, who for shrubbery. It will become one of
he past nine years has operated the major beauty spots of the
successful rink in Newberry. campus.
Hodges, recognizing the need for After the utility contractors
first class rink in Gainesville, have finished their work-filling
aas built one of the finest rinks in all the various ditches-exten-
n this part of the country. sive work will begin on the re-
The Playhouse Rink is con- topping of roads and the laying of
tructed of concrete block and has sidewalks. This is one project that
plenty of floor space, the measure- has been started and will be go-
ments covering 128 ft. in length ing along until all the campus
.nd 72 ft. in width. Along the east roads and paths are brought up
ide of the building, highly var- to their standards.
wished seats have been built for The area north of Flavet III
he convenience of spectators, and will also be beautified. This in-
he entrance of the building is volves getting rid of the dump,
constructed with the glassed-in burning all the trash and stumps,
woundedd corners, trimmed with turning over the dirt, and resod-
ieat window equipment. c ing the whole area.
The huge floor is of maple con-
truction and will offer the best
mn skating comfort and smooth Progress Test Slated
Hodges is catering to the Uni- For 7:00 P.M. April 13
'ersity students largely, and shows Ms 106 progress test will be
evidence of this fact inasmuch as given Tuesday night, April 13,
ce is hiring University students at 7 p.. m., in the University
o run the rink. His floor man- Auditorium. All Ms 106 students
,ger is T. A. Larkin, a student, are expected to take this test,
The hours of the new skating and each student must bring his
ink are: 8:00-11:00 every night own pencil containing electro-
xcept Sunday, and on Wednesday graphic lead. Students will be
nd Saturday afternoon from 3:30 required to use their University
o 5:00. student numbers.


OF INTEREST TO STUDENTS

New Rent Regulations

Announced By Director

1948 Housing And kent Law
Went Into Effect April 1


New rent regulations are being
issued to conform with the hous-
ing and rent act of 1948 which is
in effect April 1, 1948, Carl Win-
ter, area rent director, announced
yesterday.
The new law under administra-
tion of the housing expediter
makes no automatic change in
rent ceilings and the maximum
rents under the new law for most
tenants are the same as those
which were in effect on June 30,
1947, with the following excep-


350 Scholarship


Vacancies Left


For Students

By Lynn West
.Approximately 350 va):ancies
are still left in the total number
of scholarships offered by the
Lewis, House, and Senatorial
funds, it was reeled thls week.
These vacancies are t., l e filled
by residents of Florida 4y June
14 and or September 1, through
competitive examinations.
The examinations qualifying per-
sons to fill the numerable vacan-
cies will be given during Spring
vacations-which begins tomor-'
row-and students may arrange
to take the tests in their home
counties or senatorial districts.
Those -desirous of additional in-
formation as to the particulars
of the scholarships and the quali-
fication details are urged to con-
tact Robert 0. Stripling, direc-
tor of the Teacher Placement Bu-
reau, in Room 126 P. K. Yonge.
Those persons who participate in
the scholarship program are ob-
ligated (as. required by the Lewis
and House Scholarships) to pur-
sue a course of study which would
prepare them for a teaching posi-
tion in Florida, and must teach,
subsequent to graduation, in a
Florida I'ubllc School for at
least the number of years that
the scholarship is held.
Those who are accepted by the
Senatorial scholarship plan must
agree to serve, after graduation
and study in their appropriate
field, in one of the following types
of work in the state of Florida:
Public school teaching, social wel-
fare work, public health work, or
employment in a technical or pro-
fessional capacity with municipal,
county, or state public-supported
organizations.


English Speaks

To Young Demos

On Candidacy
Colin English, candidate for gov-
ernor, spoke in behalf of his candi-
dacy recently at a luncheon meet-
ing of the Young Democrats Club.
English covered High points
in his platform for the benefit of
the club members. He emphasized
points on education, taxation, wat-
er control, conservation, agricul-
ture, and revision of the state con-
stitution,
Colin English has been State
Superintendent of Public Instruc-
tion under three governors. Before
that he held administrative and
te a c h i n g positions in various
schools throughout the state, in-
cluding the University of Florida.
A native of Florida, Colin English
received his education at Emory
University and abroad. He is a vet-
eran of World War 1.


Phi Beta Kappa Initiates Thirteen


Thirteen University of Florida
undergraduates and two alumni
were initiated into Phi Beta Kappa
here last night at the annual
spring initiation meeting. During
the evening, the group heard John
C. Cooper, noted authority on air-
power.
The undergraduates initiated as
members-in-course included:
Robert C. Nodine, Clearwater;
Theodore S. Benjamin, Herbert J.
Doherty, Jacksonville; H. Eugene
Dovis, Kissimmee; Robert A. Boy-
er, Tampa; Richard L. Crago, Ro-
bin H. Ferguson, William J. Husa,
Jr., Gainesvilie; Corlis J. Driggers,
Ft. Lauderdale; Hugh 0. DuBose,
Pensacola; Gerald L. Gordon, Alan


F. Westin, Miami Beach; and Will-
iam E. Nexsen, Jr., West Palm
Beach.
Alumni initiated by the Beta
chapter were Dr. George John
Miller, who graduated from Flori-
da in 1930, now a professor in the
College of Law, and Louis L. Mc-
Quitty, Florida, class of 1933, now
associate professor of psychology
at the University of Illinois.
Cooper said in his address that
airpower is the total ability of a
nation to fly. The true impact of
airpower on world affairs that
must never be forgotten is that
airpower provides transportation
in airspace and because airspace is
"boundless" there is no place on


earth immune to airpower.
"It has become one boundless
highway," Coper said, "for war or
peace, for destruction or com-
merce."
"Properly used, airpower can be
the means for better understand-
ing among the peoples of the
world," he continued, "improper-
ly used it can be a threat of the
general security even in time of
peace."
The installation of George G.
Fox, head professor of Philosophy,
as president ot the local chapter,
proceeded the initiation ceremony.
Other newly elected officers to
be installed with Fox include Pro-
fessor Elmer D. Hinckley, vice-


president, Professor Charles E.
Mounts, Secretary, Professor Har-
old L. Knowles, Treasurer, and
Professor Arthur L. Funk, His-
torian. Professor E. Ruffin Jones
and Professor Manning J. Dauer,
who were chosen as a membership
committee to serve for a three
year term will also be installed.
Following the installation cere-
mony, which was restricted to
members of Phi Beta Kappa, a
banquet was held in honor of the
initiates and their guests. R. C.
Wiliiamson, head of the depart-
ment of physics at the University
of Florida gave the Phi Beta Kap-
pa charge to the initiates, with
Ferguson giving the response for
the new members.


tions: (1) Where a landlord and
tenant had voluntarily entered
into a written lease increasingg
the rent up to 15 per cent; (2)
where the local rent office had is-
sued an Individual adjustment or-
der changing the rent; (3) where
the housing expediter had ap-
proved a general increase in the
rent level in an area in response
to a recommendation of a local
rent advisory board.
Under a new provision of the
1948 law no tenant need surren-
der a housing accommodation un-
til at least 60 days after he has
received a written eviction notice
from his landlord, unless the ten-
ant has not paid his rent, is vio-
lating the obligation of his ten-
ancy, or is creating a nuisance.
In those cases the time limit be-
fore eviction is governed by local
law.
The 'law also specifies that a
tenant may be evicted for the fol-
lowing reasons: (1) If a landlord,
member of his immediate family,
or a purchaser wishes to occupy
the quarters; (2) if the landlord
wishes to demolish or to alter the
structure substantially; (3) if he
seeks to withdraw the place from
the rental market; (4) if housing
accommodations -have been ac-
quired by a state for public im-
provement and are rented tempor-
arily before the construction of
such improvement, and (5) if the
landlord is exempt from taxation
under Section 101(6) of the In-
ternal revenue code (non-profit,
religious, charitable and educa-
tional institutions) and wishes the
premises for the purpose of hous-
ing staff members.
The tenant in an apartment
structure may not be evicted from
a cooperative unless at least 65
per cent of the dwelling units in
the structure are occupied by
stockholder-tenants.


WSSF Drive To

Open Tuesday
The World Student Service
Fund's annual drive which opens
on this campus next Tuesday will
last for one week, Tracy Riddle
and Jack Humphries, co-chairmen
of the drive, announced Monday.
A goal of $2,000,000 has been
set for this year's drive, an in-
crease of $1,500,000 over last
year's total of $500,000.
Refugee students in Europe and
Asia have been supplied with
much needed food, clothing, medi-
cal supplies and books by WSSF.
The needs are greater this year
than last year, and the WSSF
must raise four times the amount
it raised last year in order to meet
the demands.
The sponsors of WSSF are Na-
tional Intercollegiate Christian
Council, University Commission
of the Council of Church Boards
of Education, the Interseminary
Movement, the Student Volunteer
Movement, Provisional Committee
ot the International Student Serv-
ice, USA, and B'nai B'rith Hillel
Foundations at American, Univer-
sities. The national president is
Dr. George N. Shuster, president
of Hunter College in New York
City.


4


rinal u Tbulation


Shows Greatest


University Vote

Law School Has Highest
Percentage Of Votes;
Education Has Lowest

Final tabulations of election re-
sults show that the largest num-
ber of students in the history of
Student Government at the Uni-
versity took part in the elections.
Secretary of the Interior Bill
O'Neil gave the figures on the
number of votes cast this week-
end. "Thanks are extended to all
those students who helped at the
polls, particularly Jimme Rush,
Grover Baker (who acted as As-
sistant Secretary of State) and
Bill Moor," said O'Neill. "Thanks
also go to the Alpha Phi Omega
fraternity and all the parties partic-
pating in the elections."
The official number of students
voting was the highest in the Ufni-
versity's history, both in number
and percentage. In the breakdown
of number of students in the dif-
ferent schools on campus, the Law
School topped the list with 87.2
per cent of students enrolled and
eligible voting. Next oame the
Forestry school with 705, follow
ed by Bus. Ad. with 75.1, and at
the very bottom of the list came
the Education school with 40.9 per
cent, which was still above pre-%
vious years averages. .
SIn the presidential raoe, 4,765
students voted, with Bob bhiotto
polling 2,640, and C. J. Hardee
getting 2,125.
The final breakdown by schools.
School voted Erol p'cts
Agric. 224 306 73.2
Pharmacy 91 129 65.8
Phys. Ed. 19 30 66.2
Education 113 276 40.9
Archit, & AR 138 173 73.9
Forestry 70 88 79.5
Law 443 508 87.2
Engr. 235 400 58.8
Arts & Sc. 343 514 66.7
Bus Ad. 407 529 75.1
Freshmn. 989 1769 55.8
Soph. 1714 3105 55.2


Tryouts For One-Act

Plays Scheduled

For April 14, 15

Eight To Be Given
During May

Tryouts for a series of eight one-
act plays to be given in May were
announced yesterday by Dr. D.
B. Dusen-bury, director of the Flor-
ida Players. The plays, which will
be produced by members of the
direction class of the speech' de-
partment, go into rehearsal immedi-
ately after tryouts are completed.
General tryouts for all eight
plays will be held in Building E-
126, Wednesday, April 14, from
4:30 to 6:00 p.m., and Thursday,
April 15, from 3:30 to 5:30 p.m.
Directors may have individual try-
outs after the general tryouts pe-
riod. Al students on the campus
are invited to tryout. Points to-
ward Florida Players member-
ship will be awarded for partici-
pation.
Production dates are Tuesday,
May 11, and Thursday, May 13, in ;
the P. K. Yonge auditorium. Sche-
duled for Tuesday are "The Glit-
tering Gate," by Lord Dunsany,
directed by Herman Shonbrun,
needing 2 males; "Fumed Oak" by
Noel Coward, directed by Elihu
Edelson, 1 male, 3 females; "An
Original Play," by Barton Johns,
directed by Barton Johns, 2 males,
3 females; "Box and Cox or the
Boor" by Chekov, directed by Low
Fields, Jr., 2 males, 1 females.
Scheduled for Thursday are
"Merry Death" by Evrienov, di-
rected by Jayne Crane, 4 males,
1 female; "Tickless Time" by Glas-
pell and Cook, directed by Larri
Rodman, 1 males, 4 females; "An
Original Play" by Clay Fields, di-
rected by Clray Fields, 5 men;
"The Ping Pong Game" by Wil-
liam Saroyan, directed by Russ
Foland, 1 male, 2 females.


HIGHLIGHTED BY SPORTS

Plans For Engineers Field

Day, May 1, In Full Swing

Annual Event Sponsored By
Benton Engineering Society


Plans continued to move for-
ward for the Annual Engineers
Field Day with announcement of
pairings of engineering divisions
for four of the major sports to be
engaged in during the outing.
Sponsored by Benton Engineer-
ing Society, Field Day is scheduled
for May 1.
In announcing pairings for soft-
ball, volleyball, touch football, and
horse shoe. Chris Holtz, chairman
of athletic events for the Day,
said, "All matches, with the excep-
tion of finals, will be played be-
fore May 1. A schedule of time for
the various matches is posted in
Engineering Building."
Pairings for the events are as
follows:
Softball: Mechanicals vs. Civils;
Industrials bye; Electricals -
bye; Aeronauticals vs. Chemicals.
Touch Football: Mechanicals vs.
Chemicals; Industrials bye;
Civils-bye; Electricals vs. Aero-
nauticals.
Volleyball: Mechanicals bye;


Chemicals vs. Civils; Industrials-
bye; Aeronauticals vs. Electricals.
Horseshoe: (Faculty) In du s-
trials -- bye; Aeronauticals vs.
Chemicals; Electricals vs. Civils,
Mechanicals.
Tommy Keeter, ticket chairman,
announced that tickets will be
available for all students on April
3. Sale of tickets will continue
through April, he stated.

Blue Key Applications
Due Noon, April 15
Raymer MaGuire, president of
Florida Blue Key, announced
this week that all candidates for
nomination to FBK must have
their applications in to the desk
at Florida Union by 12 o'clock
noon, April 15. Applicants are
reminded that requirements for
the honorary fraternity call for
participation In one major and
two minor fields of campus ac-
tivities.


VAL 39 NO. 3


VOL. 5 V FiN- I


I










Dan McCarty


Stresses Plank

Emphasizes Personal
and Vital Interest In
Agriculture, Soils

Dan McCarty, graduate of the
College of Agriculture, cattleman,
citrus grower, and candidate for
governor, emphasized his personall
and vital interest" in agriculture,
soil conservation, and water con-
trol in a speech to the people of
Gainesville in the Court House
square and over radio station
WGGG, last Wednesday night.
He tied those planks of his plat-
form together by declaring that
soil conservation is the foundation
for "Florida's leading industry",
agriculture, and that water control
is an integral part of all conserva-
tion,
McCarty stated that he is for re-
vision of the State Constitution.
He emphasized the fact that the
present Constitution has become
so burdened with amendments that
some of them contradict each oth-
er. He stated that a modern state
could not npert-l under a coisti-
tution that had not been revised
since 1885.
McCarty pointed to the fact
that he is the father of two chil-
dren and "could under no circum-
stances use the schools as a_ poli-
tical football. In his speedh he
stated that he could never repay
the University and Gainesville for
the good Uhat attending the Uni-
versity did for him. "I shall co-
operate fully in seeing that our
schools are second to none and to
promote the expansion and de-
velopment of Flnrida's institutions
Of higher learning." he declakdd.

AVC Begins Short
Periodical Paper
April 1 maiked the beginning
of the "AdVanCer," a short pe-
riodical newspaper published by
the American Veterans Commit-
tUe.
Most Of the neWs in the ."Ad-
VanCer"' is for indiembers of the
AVC, but other newswortl.y notes
are also included. The editors are
In bopes that the paper will make
rapid advancements from its hum-
ble beginning.

At Florida

PAT

TOFT

Smokes

Chesterfields

Pat says: .
"With me Chesterfields ore al-
ways tops; tops in flavor i6d 6 fps
in mildness."
Voted TOPS!-Cheisftrftid is the
largest selling cigarette in Amer-
ica's colleges (by nation-wide sur-
vey.)


LEGGETT BROS.
GLASS CO.
2180 W6 Uaiv. Ave.
IPhone 1955
'"Glass For Any
Purpose"
ALL WORK GUARtNTEE
Table and Dest Taps
Cut To Order


Vidal Drug Co.
204 E. Univ. Ave.
Phone 239
"Prescription*
Our
Specialty"
Motorcycle Delivery


~W4~


S
ii U


DIVERSITYY OF FLORIDA ALLIGATOR, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 7, 1948 .:-


Campus Italian Movie

Activities Here Tuesday
CAVALIER4 "
Cavaliere Dance Society will in-
stall its new chapter at the Uni- "Open City" Slates
versity of Miami Saturday eve-
ning. Many Florida members will One-Da Run At
travel to Marmn for the installa- State Theater
tion and dance following.
SBy Gerald Clarke .
CYCLO-TOURIST 'Open City," the first major
r During the Spring rtcess the Cl- film to be pro.lured in post-war
clo-Touriatl will take a long dis- Italy, v.il. play for a sLmgle day '
tance bicycle journey to St. Au- at the State Theatre next Tues-
gustine And vicinity, day. The film, which has been hail- ..,i. .' '
Starting this afternoon the ed as everything from "the War's
group will travel to St. Augu!tie greatest motion picture" to "a
dtama of love and lust," has en-
via Green iCcl'e -rnghns Tbe re- joyed unparalleled po:pularaty in i '
turn will be through Patia' a4 w this country. .
For further siformation cortet tory of wartimB Italy is i-:4d
David Gilchrist, General Deli'ery. with brutal frankness' Roman
University Station. fAmily life under the harro ming
influences of the State itpoce ar.d
IRc the German gestab-o, is depicted
Voting on the revision of the with a realism seld-min achieved in .
constitution will highlight th slick Ho,!vy.ood film products. .'-A ,
meeting of the International R-ls- "Open Citr" was made in 1944-
tions Club meeting to be held April 45 in Rome, using lack market ....
19 in Rkotm 210 of Building I. film. The Roman sluins serve as Unveiling a portrait of Mrs. Georgia Seagle Holland, at detlcdati
All members are -irged to at- an authentic background for a Georgia Seagle Chri-tian Cooperative, a student organization which
tend. story v. ich involves all kinds of ton Springfield, counsellor for the Cooperative and Dr. Shuler Peel
unusual relationships betweefe its district. of the Methodist Church. (Photo By Trent Roger's.i
SC s B ll characters-unusuial not so much
COW college DUii because of real ur.commoniness. as
kuge Dois tio picte screen. on the m ClarificationOn On ram nn' naI
E--.g1;h titles quickly straighten
The bull of the cow college was g c1 ti qiky r ag N U
the same this week asin all col- ou e art Cf'sul Ualce L go me .
the same this week a~s in all col-might have with the plot, which Sigit U Na e Usei
leges 'Well, How did you like is quite simple despite the tangled
"the electats how I ... pickedthem"ne relationships between its charac- Wanted By Beasley Site0 April
t"Thats how I picked them"' ers. An alliance is made between
"Carpet taggers on the rampage an Italiai Communist leader and
"Foul pav' .."I had a d- an unknowing Catholic priest. In a letter to the Al)gt..r. I
exam all Oda." '"What elec- They go to their deaths holding Harry H. SBeSley stated that he
tions?" the same secret. Wished to clear Lip the idea that he
The future agriculturists made had used the name of the campus
a good showing About 10 of post of the American Legion with- Spring planning retreat for tap
the boys will be serving the stu- out proper authority for election-
dent body next year Earl Not A hppendale tist Student Union officers an
Faircloth probably owes a few e ti' "h-''e been a member of the members will be held at Cam
votes to the fact that he was once J t American Legion post in Sanford, O'Lena on the weekend of Apr
state president of the FFA Fla., and I f,.I this to be a qualifi- 16-18 with regtr;irqo..- beginning
Charlie Anderson said thanks to w' cation," said Beasley, "but if the at 3:30 p.m. Apil 16,. Torm Steel,
all the brtos who .supp.)n-l hisTo BrianN idea was put forth that I was a
(andidacv for the Honor Court B member of the campus post, it was Gainesville, B.S.U. pro,-mouion d
Amie of' the AGRs are ready to Back stage at tne U.ni.rily a mistake and not intended." rector, announced Monday.
push Sandy Johnson for Presi- Auditoriium, in the lhttl- ant.r..w.: ea'-ey then said that he was The -et-eat is rinranci a plie
dent of the Studeil Body in '50 outside Professor D-Br.n' active min organizing the campus ning conference f.:.r B F. U. of
after his very successful race for face, is a chair. post, after meeting with men from ficers lnr..uJ.'.ut the state. tver
Editor of the F Book. It's not a Chippendale chair. different pais of the state to dis- campus in Florida will be repre
The $64 question remains to be, It's just an old wooden chair cus- the possibilities of a post on sented.
'will there be a Rodeo this year?' that's been around for a long th campus, but in no way did he An extensive aspnat'io.al an
An open letter has been sent time. If this chair could talk, :r.inti,-nal% mean that he was instrutie r a has been plan
to Dr. Miller and members of the h,,.'ev-rd. it wouldd say, "Look at'aff'raiu 'ith the campus post. ied i.cudlig several speakers c
Animal Inl-:usstry Dept ... It states &:; :hfe i'.no.s' signatures I have A letter that stated his using statewide and iat ionwide acclaim
the B&B clubs reasons for con- -Jimmy Dorsey, James Meltorn. the name oli the campus post was as youth leaders. Pr'::ctle at peak
ducting the Rodeo and redudiates John Charles Th,:.imas, Gad,'s handed out during the recent elec- rrs atre: Mrs. e J. O \:.l:iir.. Wel
the charges niade against the Swarthout, and Max Reiter t.r- ion. beastey recently elected to known uth 0 eader of Na.h.:!
Rodeo Dr. Miller has asrer- ductor of the San Antonio S'.nr- Bae rtyouthleade'
to take .. the issue before hae aei phor of te San Atonyo SyOrchestra)n- the Executive Council for the Col- Tenn.; Dr. James Stewart, Welch
lege of Education, said that he man, who arrived recently andi
of Control for final approval .. Each time a famous celebrity honed the letter was not distri- on^ seCtin, as pastor of the Riv
By the way, each stunde- pays a:,pears in the University Atudi- buted for political reasons. "I hope r--,r-ie atis: Church of Jackson
3 cents for this Rodeo. t.,:iu mri that person is asked to that this is true as I wish tosee ville; and Dr. Earl Eddingtoir
K6w Koilege Klubs: Newell En- write his or her name on the chair the honor o the American Legion and1 iste
tomological Society, getter known f k f e h r t A cn e State RS. U.a.aorlan i e
Sone of the embers of the Glee kept as much as any member of of the First B 5tr tmt Church o
as toe N.E.S., is the oni.-. student Club. ths fi rgniai" S e "
nrganiati:n in the U. S. that is It isn't easy to find room for ths fihe organization.' St. Petersburg.
affiliated 'h e American As- signatures now, since many Glee av U s Fac t M e
s6diation of Eno,:ni.ij FEntomolo- Club members, both past and
gists "The ?NES- publishes the present, have placed their names Leave U 9 Face t, M en 6
emi-an.eual j.ourr.al khown as the on the wooden relic. T h i
NES Ne-s.. Since 1936. NES If Fearless Fosdick wouldn't Look Is
h-is spro'.:sored tu-.e Florida En- mistake it for a Chippendale! ,w L
tor.molo:.a; ,:..,fer:nce, This chair,' he iight be allowed to sign
ytar the FEC will be held April iit. The new look has found a firm bargain basement buy from th
22-24 at the University h tu- place on the U. of F. campus this latest Dior mohstrosityv.
dents in the CUieg of Agricul- .u year. Skirts are no longer above, ebak fo te ,90S,
daine interested in entomology are tuden sTo ee at, or even a little below the knee. th oi so m G tr h gy, gs
accepted for membership on in -o After due research, we have found the Gibson Girl'style. I s tithi
ccdu-.t.d n of a member and a 2-3 armacy Plant that the most popular skirt !ing l n this year. ile -mosi popu-
r noftaemembersprasend t AmongascorePhfeduca for Susie -Coed is from 12 to 15 tiar adaptation is a leint lieeved
vo of the members present at i Among a score of educational inches from the ground. Take our white blode with loth of t ce,
the meeting Initiation cere- field trips scheduled for University word for it, or if you donhi ou wor within a blakh skirt of sortie
movies are conducted each semes- students during the Spring hbli- might go out and find out fore sty lk.1 iiterlal Ada to
ter at the humoous 'Feast of the days this week is a trip for phar- yourself this a lace ptetticoat whith
Larvae' Initiation fee is $8.50 macy students to th-, p.hrm,."oui- The gals ha ve found all kitdas coes ani litlst 'k two below the
and semester dues are 50 cents .. cal mr!- .::1:t..ig lairt c: E L:- of as to make ast ear's skirt hem and yU liave tb G-
Walter H. Thames is incumbent ly : ..,in .. ; in Indianapoli, i looklikethis ear'sle son Girl look.
President and W.hi.m Neel Jr. is lad. I6t th kere's ths ykear pe one ok.
the J::or of the NES Iews Some 42 students in the School of' ateraor abut pi.e oinew.f anyone ho tar.s t
Jr. J. T. deishlr.. head of the of Pharmacy will make the trip inches wide aieri at the top i a. wa. and do a littlU
n-t :s .,..:t advisor .by chatere b- l1-a'inm the Uni- iheof wkidet inrd tih t m oa en..ewda ,,oeri aafind d in Gho
rat 3 pn. in Ag 308 on ers:v o Ti i' returning may not be of matching ma eri- deye L 4- P,-,k or saiY' .lnia
te second and fourth Thursdays. 'oiI Saturday everinot T:-s wili be al. It doesn't have to match be- !tn-.:.0 B B.ir' Es'q -rish k in
accompanied v. Dr. L. G. Gram- cause most sweaters come down .C'.-.rm.. Imgazine of the last cen
1BILL'S SHOE SHOP lihn. assistant professoi- of phar- to cover it anyway. ;.: .: which c.,el,." resemble
maceutical heninistr,,. Second, ohn the etris' date dress- many fo the latest (*! "cur.-r the
students will tnsp"1- the Lilly es, the have put two or thi-ee in-.. only real reason for All of it is
Gainesville's Best Sheb plants, laboratories and farm serts of lace, satin, or what-have- that the poor fashion designer,
REPAIR SHOP where vayccks and serums are you into the <.',-r. or A ruffle and manufacturers have 0 go: '"
.REPAIR SHOP Q'.,iro, dui. The,.-' ",II be guests of around thie r- ., n to achieve' the make money just like everybody
118 SO. GARDEN te pharrni.i,:,'-i:.l company dur- desired l-nthr. \'.Y., a little skill else. Some people feel that they
Around The C-ner From Lovett's ing the two-day stay in Indianan and inten':n'y 'ic. it's practical- are overdoing it just a little nbow
S ...... ly ip-.. ible n tel ast year's though.

VoeI tI I n AIA D0ICl Ex-Presidents Of Student


Fr rULLERl BilVB aR l


All Florida's Candidate For

GOVERNOR


An Able Man for A Big Job
VETERAN-
LAWYER LEGISLATOR


Foittfcai sav. Ym-N 1or by rniens o i ruler Wuri


SHOES

REBUILT

THE

FACTORY

WAY


We Dye All Kinds
Of
Shoes & Leather
Goods

FOR BEST IN SHOE RtPAIR,
QUALITY MATERIALS AND
REASONABLE PRICES--
TRY THE

Modern Shoe

Shop
Phone 897
1?4 W. Main St. N.
Opposite F rtt
NiSonal baa


Body Report Successes
kiy artha Hicks State Bar ASsociatidn, in Pensa-
Contrary to popular jokes re- cola; W. A. He-iin 9.K'2-.'*l,.3.,
garding the u '.-inu,,-'.J.Sned posi- 1M.P. in. 7:!rles E. clei.-~ =19iS3-
tions secured by college gradu- 19.. J,.n'ln'.,!e. J. B Bsutler
ates, information issued by Dean i '1,35.1-'96. Miami; Ste 0 Cn-
R. C. Beaty on the present activ- r-il .l1 8-1919'. Ft. L iWderda!e,
ities of former presidents of the Ed Rood I .19'f-194r, Tampa:
student body reVeals hot a single Pierce; L:i h Saft.r i.941-19441,
peanut vendor or soda jerk in the ar. I,.son, i;.e. and Hairr. P-il:imn
lot. 1946-19471. liami.
The najnrint of these ex-stu- Seotie the former student
dclnt lodi presldeits have gain- bhi-d presidents, i t content
ed prmiminr-n.- in the tield of iil; gaining sticcets in the i6-
law, whille most of the others gal profsion, have gohe Initt
are equally successful in other thb field C-f pntitls, some at-
pri.(e'.i-inal and bilsinBes fields. tainlrig national prtmlnienlt
This ni.te.ritus hire of the law therelii. Arioiig these perhaps
is mad'- apparent by the fact the most notable s U. S. Sena-
that. fi the 24 former student for Spessati L. H6ll11Ad who
body rpiesidenits on iibm t Infor- was president of the Florida
malins ttas saailanhbl 15 wr re nudent body tl 1915-1910. W.
foutid to b b practiring attoir- %. Herns, mentioned above aa
neys. a lawyer, Is at present a cahdi-
T. W. Bryant, who was presi- date for Coigress. George
ident of the student body in 1911- Smathers Ipresident lit 1987-
1912, is hot only a laWyer in 1988), is now it congressman
Lakelanda but is a member of the from the southern district of
Board of dontriol. F. Maguire, Florida, In shingt,.n, D. C.
presid'nl; in 1914-15. is a former J. D. Butler. Miami attorney
:heiin.an of their Ba-ai.. of Control, mentioned previoUsly, is also ai
and is now prai'iihIng :aw in Or- city official
lando. The 1917-lt191 student The non-conriformiste upon this
body pierider.'. E. D. Beggs, now scene in which the lega. eagles
in Pensacola, is also an attorney. r red-:.'-ina.e are those formner- s:u-
Other former student bod:,- .ient ho-N) presidents who have
presidents who have turned their s.iug'h success in other fields.
talents toward the lucrative field F-..r stancec, L. Tenne',, Ipres-
of law are: M. L. Yeats (1924- ident 1913-1914), is no' tax as-
1925), now in Tr.mp. E. R. Mec- s.tss,'. for Putnami County. The
Gill (1925-1926), New York; Hen- 1922-1923 student body president,
son Markham ([1926-1927), Jack- J. A Winfield, is a State Road
-,'nville also a member of the rDe..artrner.i official. B. F. Atize.i.
Board of Cl.hl B. E.C. LAwis 11'"7-laP2i. s i ll-kno'. r. locally
(1928-1929), Port St. Joe; W. D. as a prominent Ca.res-,ill busi-
ckl"'ill (1929-1930), L,--",s-alie newsman. Charles Sherman (1941-
K.' E. Dixie elc? I11 i""-31.*, 1942), iS at present a pr."':-e:n 6n
who is also p es -er." of the the Pacific Coast.


SBgP VYDEE SERVICE

PHONE

The Diaper Service

The Hospitals Use


2108


on services held Friday AfterheoBn fir
h sMe fiad ptussihle, are ptieft "heax-
e, silperinitnideat for the Gatnvltile


Hardin Addresses
Spring Dinner Of
Real Estate Club


SELECTED FROM FIELD OF 12

Acting Class To Present

Three Ten-Minute Scenes
Three 10-minute scenes from Mrs. R. L. Johns is Chae
famous full length plays Will be of the program ifo tht Twe.ti
presented by the members of the Century Club.
acting and directing classes of the
speech department at the Twen-
tieth Cent.ry Club, April 12, at Adelphos Society
3:30 p.m.
"On Bbrrowed Time. iVy P'aul 0 Have rPinic
Osborne is the first directed by "
JateA P. Dee, St. Petersburg, the The Adelphoi Soeiety, e-t
cast includes: Jam.es Dee, Frank masonic group, hAve plianni
MacDonid., Clearwster; StAeven R. picnic to be held at Camp. Wu
Sands, Tampna berg on Saturday, April 1i it,
The next plav. "'Saint Joan," by p.m.
George Bernard Shaw, is directed At the last meeting of several
by Barton Johits, Tampa. In the delegates were appointed to repre.
cast tre Louis@e Livengood. Kia- sent the Society at Grand Lodge,
Sitmmee; Larry Redman, Pomp- under which the society operates
toin Plains, N J.; Austin Calla- Stetson University at DeLan-
*ay, Virginia.- da Tamp UTniv-ersiv hive both
"Our Town." by Thornt6i Wild- inquired into the Aichph.os organ.
er is directeb by Hermah Shoh- alahn hre, which is tht only
brits, Ta&iapa. In the cait are Russ campus masonic society in Flori,
Solfand. .lacksonv'lle, Rosemary da.
Flanagan, Gainesville Robert H. OpranMg rsiner the GrandMa.
Murdoc, Cocb tar of Mlaons in Florida, the local,
ulrdobk, ^Coebi. organizator, finslhes offlclall,l a,
These scenes Were selected from .ear of atiitr and Ptti n
a field of i2 olas- which Were ,* Grand Lodge :t .ttfl r ,
presented in Building k-186 last another years life. The ociet-,
Tiesday antid Thursday evelinhgs, haS invited all campus masoen
complete With hake-up, costuhies, both student and fa.u.iitv to jo
lighting and scenery. them at Camp "a,berg A smai
bDavid W. Hooks, technical di- fee wl1 be charged tnose Attin
rector of the speech department, ing, thi picnic eimmittee in'
is in chargee of the production., As- nouihtd.
sitting him are: Pete Host, stage -
manager; Charles Reed, .r'hur g.
anad lene Crane, Gatiesvll, e6- ome b B
tumes and- properties. ft Atl Alp


"A good future lies in store for .. ..
the young mail entering real as- Meirnberi of Nu P.Rho Psi a re still
tate who i Willing to work hard arguing About whether or not
and strive for success," Walter S. lit learning ran take place air,:r,,
Hardin, pr.ncL-al speaker at the paraer.nium A movie sh Ir,. L
annual spring banquet of the Real thi last greeting presented p'ctir.;
SEstate Club, stated at the banquet of paramecium making fl.s'; ,
held last Thursday evening in the a klass tube thit was too nitrrow
nd Primrose Grill. p II n ILICe fo0 turim. At first About eight
p Hardin. of Bradenton, predenti Il V I trials ere taken before the "t'
ri of the State Association of Real was mAde. During Unbsequekat at-
g Estate E-..ar-', has had 24 years A tempts, the amount of tiaiis Tr-s
e of experience in the real estate decreaied. Did learning takepla'e?
profession. xIB r wMay 1, at Rollins Collige. vil
i- After being introduced by Dr. be the time and jlac for the mee;-
James E. Chace, head of the real ing of the lotida Psych.x.:. a
i- estate ::-oartn.en., who was intro- Graduate students and begin- Asaociation. During the meet'.
f- duced by Larry Condict, president ners alike will be offered a wide faculty memberi-will read re.. ,
y of the Real Estate Club, Hardin range of Laina Amriecan and bapirs to the g-roup, and the U.
.- lauded the real estate courses of- SpaniSh coeurset inc:udig n eveal fairs of the F.P.A. will be c.r-
fered as a major in business ad- to be rugeh b .r A Cro-, na.- r.ec out School organizations
d ministration and outlined the pos- tionally recognized Latif Ameri- throughout the state will be giv,'
sibilities it offers for future real ca' au'blorit:. at the Uni-:ersity of time to discuss what their clubs
"t estate men. Florid" a 1948 Summer Pession have been doing in the fields of
n A piano concert by Ken Swan- A.n .'nc-r,-er.- that Crow. Lat. f psychology, etc.
_ son was another feature of the Ar'er: an E.itor r:" the En.-ylo- Nxttmee.ing f Nu RhbPsi 'll
II evening. Jean Boonet, chairman of pedia Animr.3anas 'c.-d ':'in the, take plice oi the Monday imime:i.
. the entertainerr: t: mrr.'iz.ee. ac- Spanisr s-'rt n.ert fEa.u!t, f.r ately following the apfitg va.i-
sisted by Jim r'Workmar.. Fra-.k the first Summer PSsiv t on. Line 14'tion. At this meeting br. Marti.
s Curran and Warren Tiller, arrang- to July 24, was made this -'eek of the pscrholog- depattinent nill
- ed for the concert and was in by the Ur.r.'-rsri-s Dr sironr o address th- groups ers.'
- charge of arrangements for the La '-uage and Literature, about induatna! p y v hle -:.
h, banquet. Author of "Epic of Latin Ameri- W'atc' '.he Orange & Blue for -
r "Guests for the .. n..- were: ca, and professor at the U r- r informAtion eoneerfting te
,f Mrs. Walter S. H- 'in. Mrs. sit; or. Calitornia, Crow will r,ffer metirng
Jamies Jimes E. 'Thee- Dr. and Fl.-i;d" students a ciouile in Latin
Mrs. John S. Allen, vice president American civilization aid :.ur.s
of the University; Dean and Mrs. in eleehtary r.anish. the formt -
Walter J. Matherly, Dr. and Mrs. er to adv'afired r.- the latte r to
Alfred A. Ring, Dr. Charles J. b.,inri.go students.
Guild, Mr. and Mrs. Stephen Me- the cous ,.fferLn ..ed in-
Cread And clu'- r re-mri w JIves .ode a stud of Nen _eenth Cen- t ..
Sand dates. tury Spanis drnam to be tauht
and datesby Dr. Francis HayeS, direetir of DIA O AfI I
*h- Spanish Summernk Scho(r'. and I AMO N D AI N C3
cSiourse in cortemporarv Spanish
Sigma Nu -ost American Lersture to be taugh'.
by Dr. Lrvirg Wersho"'. Latin
o Ca tmpus F ats American specialist. t -
Emphasis in all courses will be
Approximately 50 men firm on the spoken language with LAtin '
many campus fraternities ar.d. American students presiding over i
their dates were guests of the :.schi; conversation groups and
E.ciinn Beta. Chapter of Sigma Nu d:ning tables in order that stu-
antumi,'a- -'nreng at the White dents have an opportunity for na-
Star dance h'a:-1'sht r.f the Sig- tural conversation in Spaer.;.h.
insa Nu '-.;ke-,' =.I..C:t was held Volc. reco,'-ing machines for
in the P. K. Yo:nke Gymnansium. students practicing spoken Span-
S Also among 'r-' guests attend- ish wil' be used ex.en:--"vly. As-
e' ing the formal ball were Presi- rve'-.aly: for teachers wr.o *'.iish to
" dent and Mrs. J. Hillis M".i: in'mnova their pronunciation. Le-
r Dean and Mlrs. R. C. Beaty, Dean tures and Spanish motion pictur-
J. Ed Price and Victor P. Leaven- will also be a part of this um-
e .-'.d,- \mer's L.atin American studies pro-
e Al Crabtree Sigma Nt bom- gram.
e mender, termed the weekend a
Is "ireat success." and thanked the
'various frat'!nit' and sorority ,. O is a
members r.,.! r;eisa'. v a it aIIII:
t *ho accent- Sienim N' s invita- M i
Sthe first of its kind at the Uni-1
verst.- o i which all fra-ternities, Lois l L6ng Distance
r.-ait"'' arid members of the fac- ,
ilt-.' were inhvited. He said that From Or To A-. -e-e e invite you to i:- cir
1es'. vear's formal fance is al- In U S. g
ready being planned a* di that it is htir[i6fi c06Uctit of g-"
hoped more rceia. -" I! attend at STORAGE nine registeredd Keesp;-'.
that t'me. rBA-AIG Diamoad Rings. at nation-


Chi Phi Plans Party
For Alumni, April 23
Theta '-etia Ch.apt-i of Chi Phi
ai p.annie rnih alumni ni -.!:-4- to
.'->uinrrle tp !Ih the S :.r!:n Cariiival
April 27 '.d 24.
The purpose of this get-together
will be to arehn the bonds of
brotherhood and to discuss plans
fo- the '-i ,inc of a hne 'ha,'h r
hiuse.


%0rt f I1 I I u
SHIPPING

HEMBY
Steraje & Transfer Ca.
130 East Masonic St.
PHONE 2094
M. C. Allt"i, Mir.
Cabil J35


"Portraits

by


The Anderson Studio

338 W. Univ Ave.


Telephone 981


idly adrerrised prices. Ide
tiff Keepsake b'. the fame h
the rifg, and let compare' o
prove* that a Keepsake gi
Touhigherqupii-ena ~
aiiu within ati ordini, a
bf th* tunt price.

h i.ea ',


A; EVE 3iaig
Wedding Ring


12t 0


B, NASSAU Ting 00
Alte $200 to 97


LEWIS JEWtLRY CO.



Bring Us Your

Repairing


All W6rk Guaranteed


Watchmakers, Engratve
And Jewelry Work




LEWIS
Jewelry Co.

"Gainesvdle's Lead.9
Jewelers" ,


Elect

TOM

BAILEY
Fo
,-


Stite Superintendent -
Of ,' ., "
Public Instruction "

Florida Graduate


S mo


I


I









11 ftaimR tr -
fQftcil newspaper of tile University 6f Tlorida, in Gainesville, Florida,
published every WVednesday and Friday morning during the school
r. except holidays and examination periods. Entered as second class
il matter, March 8. 1948, at the pol. office at Gainesville, Florida, un-
r th at o onre o March 189. Subscription rate' $1.10 p se-
Ed' itrin -Cef . ............... Pen Gaines
Managing Editor .....................Ted Shurtleff
AiSiness Manager ..................... Ken Rithards
Editorial Board
Executive Eailor, Harold Herman; Features Editor. Marty Lubov; Newt
Fdilor( Elgin White: Assistant Sports Editor, John Clarkson; Clubs & Or-
gani ationB Editor, Bill Dunlap, Music Editor, Geralo Clarke; Associate
Editors, Morty Freedman, Jim Baxir .in. ah. 1: lBryan.
STAFF .%4I'T \T
Walter Apfelbaum, Bo) Banks, John Bonner, Robin Brown, Alvin Bnrt
Peggy Clayton. H. G. Davis, A. H. Doudney, N. E. Donhelly, John Ed-
l--ds, Charles Gear, Steve Grimes. Leland HaWer, IMartha Hicks, Charles
Holser, Dewey Huchins, Albion Hutchinson, J. LedouxD. R. Lewis, Rog-
Ar Long, Walter Martin, Bill "Turkey" Moor, Joyce Moore, James Me-
Eaddy. Charles McGrew, Bob Parks, Art Reich Sandy Schnlaer, E. W.
sharp. Jack Shoemaker, T. J Thompson, Scott Verner, Bob Weatherly,
Steve Weller, Fran White, and John Williford.
BUSINESS STAFF
Hughl Stum. Jr., oAsSistan Business Mana'r.t. Idvertisinig Manager,
td Wittner; John Coriell. Circulation l3Miner M.! Frumkes. Account-
ant; Ed Prange, Exchange Editor; Everett Haygood, Merchandising
M .R, t ,r r. 'i'i .A'- ; sai Circulation Manager.
,.1- .rlilP Rprul f n,-ti' il Herbert King, James Spencer, Hugh
AnCsl' I'' rg Hnlhrnr.,l Phil Harrell, Gradv BoR'rhn.
Art: Ed Flucker.

Continue On This Road
Along with the amazing figure of 62 per cent of the
student body voting in the elections last Thursday, even in
the rain, some other important figures on the number of
hours students voluntarily spent working at the po.Us and
in counting the votes, should not go by without comment.
Bill O'Neil, in charge of the election day, and Dibk
Broome, in charge of the vote counting, put in excellent
performances throughout the day, and e en into the early
parts of the morning.
These men, as well as all those who helped them, de-
serve much of the credit that Went with the successful
election day. The Burger House and the Nie Nac sent re-
freshments around to the vote counters, which shows the
cooperation of off-campus firms with the important elec-
tion day.
And, above all, the individual students indicated spirit
for student government and for the school by casting the
highest vote ever polled. The final results also indicated
that the voters were thinking before voting, because party
lines were crossed and almost all were split ballots.
Let's continue to develop more responsibility for good
student government.

The University Plays Host
The University of Florida's American Institute of
Chemical Engineers are playing host this week to the
Southern Regional Convention of student chapters.
Delegates from eight southern schools arrived Sunday
night to find a smooth-running convention about to start.
The program was planned and organized efficiently, and
it has been presented with ease on the part of the students
here.
Much of the success of this convention goes to William
Steed, Kissimmee, general chairman, and D. W. Spauld-
ing, Jacksonville, and J. M. Mallory, Miami. These, and
the remaining committee heads, should be commended on
a job well done.
This University is fast developing its campus, students
and rank among other schools to receive notice from all
over the country. The Alligator clearly sees how impbrt-
ant each organization, each individual is in continuing this
good work in building up our position among schools.

FLETCHER AUTO RENTALS

U-Drive-It Service

Late Model Cars
Phone 144 509 W. Univ. Ave.



SORRENTO'S RESTAURANT
1804 No. Alabama St.

Specializes in Homemade Ravioli
Real Spaghetti Italian Cooking

We Also Serve
Seafood, Steaks, and Chicken

Spaghetti and Ravioli to Take Out

CATERING TO
PRIVATE PARTIES
Phone 2564-W

IT'S NEW
IT'S DIFFERENT
IT'S THE

CHATTERBOX


Dining-Dancing-Refreshments

OPEN ALL WEEK
--- 9:0)0 A.M. 12 MIDNIGHT -
LOCATED 2 MILES OUT ON NORTH ALABAMA STft1ET

For Reservations Phone 2118-J
ENNIS & FRANK ARNHOLTER, Props.



SRooms for Men Students


S- -'- UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA ALLIi
Io views 0 4111g0

And Stuff J By Jin go

AvB Syu f Barton Johns
By Gerald Clarke ,By .J o h ns

Sometimes a columnist, at least --------- By arton Johns
this one, puts things off until .e / Thursday, April 1 Was it ant
it's jUst abotit too late. then thereA i o c h eo
cm.....coietosarfies April Fool trick that We had good
ticomng ichorc to sacrifice some- weather before and after election
thing else, or to violate the sacred but on the actual day, it rained
trust of the newspaper deadline. / arl all day Morl ikea n
ThI is the choice before the now try fair, the voting went on all day
as I sit in my Monday morning with a comneridable pr- ; n.
class. So, with hope that my pro- "loud fanfare, and more than one
fessor thinks I'm taking notes, I dirty look exchange between part-
offer a few thoughts about, and ies ... Because of many inquiries
reniemnbran ces of last weeks con- regarding the new increased sub-
certs by the Detroit Symphony. IM SO3 BUT 0U0 M WJ I 0 sistence regulations, the VA ahi-
First I'd like to clear up. theotificed that first checks at the
question which I have heard about n 1 tr "imi Lm E n voiced that first checks at the
question which I eard about ... new rate Will probably not be sent
the review of the afternoon pro- 0out until May A second in the
gram. Yes-I did beat around the -- series of scenes from well known
bush and I was a little sarcastic. E il To plays were presented by the Di-
When something is reasonably a ly d reaction class over in Building E.
pleasing to me, which at the same '- Personal triumphs vwere scoed by
time seems frothy anid ficonse- ,. Frank MacDofiald as Gramdps in
queritial, it's quit likely that I'll Returning to the columnizirg k ON BORROWED T I ME,' Iris
come out with the adjective de- business after a brief but educa- By Bishop as Miriam in DEiAR RUTH,
lightful and that's what I felt tional journey into the campus y Louise Livengood as Joan in
about Tuesday afternoon's pro- political world our lesson for to- SAINT JOAN, and Ross 0olaid as
gram. day has to do with f chapter in May y the stage manage r in OUR TOWN.
Now, this is not to condemn a sin- current history bound in intrigue Lubov Saturday, April 3 When the
gle piece which the orchestra play- and raking to high heaven. Biography of Clermont's C.M. Pool
ed. It was all gOod light muntsic, It might be entitled-"HoW to. is written it should tell the story
but the point which I refrained Win Friends And Influence Fas- of Florida wines. Today he has a
kroti stating, was that it wasn't cists"-or "the Death of Civiliz- plant sufficient to tirn oult 250,-
exatly what a college audience tion in Twenty Easy Lessons." 000 gal..n. of fermented wines -
hould expect. On that subject ubjectAmong the character in our little h6eld1wi-ydur-Buddy Week last? grapefruit, orange, starwberry,
Walter Pdole felt just about the story are a few assorted State As we write thih, the radio an- elderberry and peach. "Jello,
same as I did. Because of the DepartieniL carder-men, one or nounced that twelve war criminals, again"' ... You Will enjoy OPEN
program Which had been selected two sie ikhs will bathed, in oil, a members of the Krupp munitions CITY which is playing here the
by the local selection board, Mr. short, fat, blood-Stained Generel- combine, have been acquitted, week after the holidays. Its viol-
Poole Was confidently expecting isSimo anrd ou and I. What a horrible ring that word ence and plain secihess' steadily
an audience of children--es. he Ires, isn't it wonderful to know hasA Acquitted. project a feeling of desperate arind
was. that Franhcisco Franco is now on The depths of evil of these men .-langeri.us .struggle which Holly-
The jovial assistant conductor outir side? Ori that the Muftis and have not yet been touched. .Yet "*ioo,'i ?e|.ni, approaches. Anna
of the orchestra had all his notes Pashas of Arabia, Hitler's part- they have been released.. . Magrinai arid Aldo Fabrizi star in
prepared for the children' pro- ners in crime, are laughing behind cleared of their charges< this story filmed in Rome shortly
gram aaid when he found out that their back mhustacheS at the mud- It wea' Krupp that molded Hit- after the city's capture by the al-
the audience was to consist of uni- dle-headednes? of giant, foolish leri became the brains behind the lies. The Italian film opened in
versity students, he was qtite per- America. Nazi r,-gime was directly respon- New York in 1946 and has been
turbad. Of course, there wasn't H6ow the earth-covered bones of sibie f'" the recent war and indi- 1.:'.irg to a steady audience ever
much that could be done about Guiernica and Baredlona, Dachau rerliy responsible for millions Of since then ... Sigma Chi's sere-
the situation-the programs Were and Buchenwald, must ache and derth: bloodshed and torture. naded the different sorority houses
already printed. Just the saine tir wearily as reports, vell-nuf- Acquitted. late Satiutday night. This is the
he added the two movements of fled, filter tn6ough the tear-swept And who will acquit the so-call- and beaty to our hat g-dreamedofds
the Mendelssohn Italian Symphony ground telling of the treachery be- ed statesman of the responsibility coedicati on. r medof
to add weight to the program., ing plotted in the council halls of of humanity's future. When the
Orchestras and conductors don't the world. lait particle of radio-activity has Monday, April 5 Mustachioed
Want to play far Over the heads Mus'. we forever be led to the ifdlen and tne dust Slowly settles Robert P. Tristram Coffin came
of their audiences, but at the death, blindfolded by self-esteem- over the ruins who will be Back to the university for his 101st
Same time, they don't like to play ing propaganda, stumbling in the there to c-, ,.,t l lecture in a tour h e is how mal-
dowrt to them. The ev.-ning con- moras" of grasping greedy hands? For the suspense of eternity is The Maine author Won many
dert was by no r teans to be con- How long will our perpetual to- loring aid unklnowing. friends here last summer when he
sidred heavy; yet, it was com- taught a course in creative writ-
pletly acceptable and everyone ing. Hewas amazed at the change
that I have heard report ons it, C a ing. Hewas aniazd at the change
has giveri it a pretty high rating. that timeO ..- Miss Alice McNairy,
It wasl c. us a wor Letterhwhi To The Editor Who works at the Agriculture Lib-
Tschaiko event. Dr. Krueger gives the ly in- rary, was back from the pera
Tschaikovsky Sixth a highly in- in Atlanta. She and Miss Vivian
dividual treatmenrit-and at the Prince attended all four perform-
same time, one Which seems Party Leaders Commend Students dances. The Metropolitan Opeor
thoroughly valid. This, I know registered considerable embaress-
from the Sunday evening broad- Dear Pen, ment at the Thursday night open-
casts by the orchestra. The letter to the editor column is predominantly used to air the ing. CARMEN opened an hour and
Even though the "Pathetique" gripes and petty grievances of the student body, As such, it is effec- a half late with only a third of
is pathetically hackneyed by class- tive; but we would like to be different this one time, if you please, the company costumed. Kurt
ical disc jockeys. I'm sure it nid commend the student body for a job well done in the election last Baum canid marching on the stage
was Worthwhile to hear a differ- Thursday. in a sack suit to court Rise St
en interpretation. However, the Student Government and Campus Politics can well be proud of ens. Standout opera was LUCIA
afternoon concert i was pretty the splendid interest displayed at the polls in spite of inclement DI LAMMERMOOR with Lil,
"ch o'f a disappointment. Mr. weather. This one act should set an example to the State and the Na- Pons and James Melton. Most
Poole's job of conducting was not tion-that the largest number of qualified voters took advantage of thrilling performance was that of
to be challenged and after they their duty to vote, than any other election, Campus, Local or National. Jussi Bjoerling in LA BOHEME.
superbly. Just the Same, they had No party can claim victory in this election, for the real victory Miss McNairy also complimented
to play here almost ideny had lies with the independent men, who, for the first time in campus his- Jarmila Novotna, who sang the
the same nrogramt ticaly tory out numbered the fraternity men in the number of votes cast. tole of Octavian in DER ROSEN-
used for children's concerts inthe e extend our sincere appreciation to the Student Body for con- KAVALIER. Momentous news is
used for hildre's concerts inthe siding the candidates of the All-Student and Gator Parties, and we the fact that the Metropolitan is
their itiner ng, inesu bl would like to renew our pledge that the coming year will find Student contemplating a series to be pre-
are university ts, Govtnment breaking precedents in real servi-e to the students in- seted in Jacksonville next year.
ui est st d s It would be a threat for the entire
r a t -seS frustrate I Very sincerely, State.
"TIo tr ain s of thought mention oBil cruggs, Jr.. Chairman, All-Students Party -
o e-trains thought feting on aul Buchman, Chairman, Gator Party. File Thirteen


job?"hy did you leave your last TOPIC OF COMING ADDRESS The p,-npile who drive fastest
"llnes." past a school are the same ones
"Wht sort of illnessW?"hormrhge co n hrou
"My boss said he got sick of Freedom Through Speech' it. k so
me." -Unknown.
Tae: *" Not Emphasized Says Hale *
Teacher:"What is the future d Effy riti:ris:
tense of -'he drinks?" Expert: An ordinary citizen,
Stupid Student: "He is "Deny a man the right to self-i s oils of War, and must prop- away from home, gVivng adi-i.,
drunk." expression and the seeds of revolt erly Aexrclsbd to prevent their Sense of humor; iA quality
are sown; but give him the heri- restriction." ter at something that would tn-
"Good night," she purred at the tage of freedom of speech and he This is where the "Freedom furiate you if it happened to your-
door. "It was fun 'Noing' you." becomes figurEtively tongue-tied," through Speech" comes in, ac- self.
Sov nice game to says Dr. Lesten Hale, director of cording to Dr. Hale, who says, Marriage: A public confession
He: "Is love, a nice game to th S n i, n our leaders are striving desperate- of Strictly private intention.
play?' the Speech and Hearing Clic, in preserve peace by diplomatic *
She: "It's the only game I know explaining the need of "freedom most of us find it an or- Collg e vi int: It isnt
of that's never been postponed be-debate, most ot us find it an or- Collegiate vidWpoint: It isn't
of that's never been postponed be- through speechdeal, if not an impossibility to 6x- the girl that counts; it's what
cause of darkness." Thissubject -- "Fr ed m press ur views publicly, she stands for.
Through. Spech" Will b6 th pressure views publicly she stands for.
...... theme of the coming convention While it is the role of admin- NeW Mexico Ldbd.
of the Southetri Speecl Assoclt- istration to preer.e o" ,,' right to "How was the party last
tison, of whicli Dr. hale is presl- feeo, I T-f i ohigatin '., the it"
At Florida dent, when it sneets In Nashville, individuals to learn th culture of ni ht?"
Tenn., April 7, 8, and 9. free exr, rc..inn left a was ed n ice part, t." e
Dr. Hale thinks that too much He then positively states the ob- *
JIA has been said of '"Freedom oi ligation of the speech teacher in Poise: The o keep a con-
Speech' and too little about "Free- Sharpening speech; inspiring its ersation going mO thl while
do mn Thrcugh Speech," going practice by capable artisans; the other guy pays the check.
BAXLEY ahead to explain: teaching its use to all the trades, -Butler Collegiani
"We have had 'Freedom of and seeing that since freedom of *
Speech' since the founding of the speech is an accomplished fact, we "Why does a be buzz?"
nation, but the time has come to have freedom through speechi by a' "You'd buzz too, if somebody
Smokes express ourselves in a way which constant tuse of our heritage, took your honey anid nectar."
discharges the obligations com-
C eSterfields mensurate withh such a heritage."
h sThisri, e Thi according to Dr. Hale, is --::: .:; ::::::
Jim siys: Compuring the average citizen to -
"The mildness of chet&rflel8s a puppy who squirms when you I N L
is pleasant to my tste." are trying to hold him still, and C I LI
then promptly lies down and goeI
to sleep the minute you release Opposes a General
Voted TOPS!-Chesterfield is the him, Dr. Hale explains that we .....
largest selling cigarette in Amer- often forget Why we want to b S A L T A
ice's colleges (by nation-wide sur- free. 5 L J
vey.) "Our various freedoms are -
tools of tfeacei raf.:r thSAi the KB^B-tti.vS:ia^BS:^.:^;:^^


It's here! Come in and see it
THE NEW

ROYAL PORTABLE...
with FINGER FORM KEYS

designed to cradle y ur fnger-ips I


Business Equipment Co.
6 609 W. Ma0onic St.


Rent A Car-Rent A Truck-Rent A Trailer
REASONABLE RATES


Wilbur Sligh Motor Co,
U-Drive-It Service

Gainesville, Fla.


GATOR, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 7, 1948


Evergiad
Or Pass-the-Bill

CANTO II
CAST OF CHARACTERS
Everglades Eddie, Scourge of the
Swaips ........... Bill Hixon
Bunny Easter, the Wolf of the
Campus ... Levant DeWolf, Jr.
Smilingly, the Cross-Eyed Bear
.*.*........... PFrank Wacha
Sue, Queen of the Coeds (next
year) ....... Molly WilkersOfi
Pinball MacHines (titled by his
nurse When a baby)
.. Jack Maltby
Lenda Near (still at it)
............ IBara Middletoh
Fizzy Wateri, a Soda JERK
.... ... .. ... Bill Rtitledge
Mule-Mouth, a Cretin Mongoloid
.... .. Philip Marvin
Stray Geeks ... Pat OiNeal,
Harold Dillinger, C. J. Hardee,
Jack Doherty, Palmer Pursert
Ed Davis, Harold Herman, Gus
Smith
In Reserve (call Northside 777)
....................... A O P I's
Bunny and.Eddie are still shuf-
fling over to their frat house as
we pick up the thread of ouhr yarn
once mote. They both belong to a
large fraternity, Sigma Phying
Nothing, which has the very la-
te't t:.p of hose, five rooms and
a PATH. On the way in, they col-
lide with Pinball MacHines, aid
begin discussing the recent Alum-
ni Weekend, and the Orange-Blue
football game. Bunny remarked
that, at the game, scores of coeds
WERE TURNED DOWN FOR
SEATS, and Eddie said he won-
dered why ho one had thought of
that before. One alumnus had told
Pinball, that NEXT TO A BEAU-
TIFUL WOMAN, SLEEP WAS
THE MOST WONDERFUL
THING IN THE WORLD. An-
other old grad had beeri heard
complaining about having to help
his wife dye her hair. He said he
just didn't like giving the. old
HENNA RINSE. Buhnny described
one old fellow who'd put A si-
lencer on his shotgun because his
daughter wanted a QUIET WED-
DING. Just then a piece of Scott
paper fluttered by, and Pinball
picked it up.
"Listen to this, fellows," he said,
and began to read.
WHY I'LL NEVER JOIN A
SORORITY ,
1. I- want to think for myself
and not be led around by a bunch
of sisters.
2. I never Went in for wdimieh's
organizations at home.
3. I don't want a lot of frater-
nity boys calling me up.
4. I never danced with a. boy
in my life and don't want to. try
it.
5. I hate the thought of sleep-
ing in a sorority house with a
btihch of chattering girls every
night.
6. I don't 100k well in sheer
nightgowns. I
7. I AM A BOY, AND JUST
DON'T LIkE THE IDEA 'IHEY
P R 0 B A B L Y WOULDN'T LET
ME, ANYWAY).
Eddie looked at Btiiny, and no-
ticed that he had turned slightly
gr6dn. Tjr-,, on a closer look, he
saw that it was the reflection of
the Nihfith St. traffic light. Thlis
made hirh think of his pet peeve,
and he asked, -Bunn, why ih
hang does that trali' light al-
ways turn red just as we pull up
to this corner' "
"I don't know about that," re-
plied Bunny, "but I'll bet youl'd
turn red, too, if you had to STOP
and GO RIGHT IN THE MIDbLE
OF THE STREET like that."
"My uncle is champiph golfer
out at the Nudist Coloniy," chimed
in Pinball. "Yesterday he Wefit
around the whole course in NOTH-
ING."
Ten o'clock was struck by the


Students


Identity yourself at the box office,
before ticket is dispensed far
Students tickets
Saturday Only 30c


es Eddie
To Pass-A-Grille
hall clock at that moment, signi-
fying the beginning of visiting
hours for the coeds. Before it had
finished striking, Lenda Near
ruShed through the door. The
three zombies grabbed her and
took her back to the fraternity
bar. She was INSULTED when
somebody offered her a drink, but
being, a lady, she SWALLOWED
THIE INSULT. Bob Ghiotto join-
ed them there, looking under all
the bottles for Morty Freedman.
"Bob," asked Lenda, "Were you
Surprised When you got the Gator-
All Students nomination for presi-
dent?"
"Ill say," fumbled Bob, miy
acceptance speech almost fell out
of my hands."
Harold Dillinger walked in Li.e
door, and Bob called, "Hey, r.L -
old, did yoU get home an riigi
last hight ?"
"'ine, thanks," replied naiiou,
"except that as 1 was turning into
my street some idot stepped on
my fingers."
There was a scuffle at the door
as lam Tew (Joyce-one week
late) arid seven AOPi's fought
their way past the brothers on the
porch. They slunk right past a
large sign that said, "ADVICE
TO BOT-9ERS: WASH FACE
IN MORNING NECK AT
NIGHT.' Someone suggested a
game of foiUrhaided snag, and
there was a scramble for places.
Som6 of the boys WEREN'T
FEELING THEMSELVES. When
they were seated, it was discover-
ed that Pat O'Neal, Jack Doherty
and Palmer Purser were the only
ones with four hands. That made
three, and HarBld Herma shnake-
hipped in to make a fourth. Ed
Davis wanted to make a FIFTH,
but he saw Dean Leavenigood com-
ing across the laWh, and rai out
the back door takifig his mash
and portable still with him.
"Hey, Eddie," yelled one of the
gUests Who had been fnooping
around, 'this house has no bath-
rooms in it.'"
-"Yes, I khow," sighed Eddie,
"it's TNCANNY!" .
Suddenly the radid blared out
a special news flash: "Georgia
submarines believed d a i're y i n g
football taleht scouts, sighted in
Lake Wattburg. Caldwell orders
ROTC put bn alert. ROTC staff
ordered to work four days a week,
instead of two, at present. Cadet
Colonfels Manui el Gtarcia, Birdseye
Powell and Al Banks leave for
emergency conference."
What effect Willt this electrify-
ing news have on our college
youths at play? Will it shock
them? If the boys have to go into
the Navy, and the gals can't de-
cide which ones they love the
most, will they have to put out to
sea? Whalt'i the difference be-
tween a duck hNext week's in-
stallinxent will tell you, and put
hair on your chest. (It's hair-
raising.)




Today i0y
OAt O'nRIEN
i6i
Sand
"MiLLI.'l DAUGHTER"
Thursday-Friday
BOB HOPE

"W.ipE THERE'S LIFE"

Happy Holidays


Last Times Today
OD.lf.1lniMds MNA CE!


I-a

Thursday Thru Saturday

Look Outl CARY't or tte Loosel
Cary Loretta David
f GRANT YOUNG*NIVEN
S AMUEL GOLDWYN S


ae MONTY WOOLLEY
J.. ..J a.... Vis lancheste,
OGady. Cooper and The MiHthell Soyhoeir


HAPPY SPRING HOLIDAYS!

NOW PLAlN G
SPENCER TRACY, LANA TURNERS

"CASS TIMBERLANE"

COMING: TUES.-APRIL 13TH ONLY


Hunerwadel House, 512 N. Franklin Street. The
house is large, the entire upper floor will be for
students. There are lots of big windows, and in
addition, the house is fully insulated with thick
rock wool. It will be cool in summer and warm in
winter. Furniture is new, single beds, best steel coil
springs, and best felted mattresses. There is plen-
ty of big closet space, drawer space, and a separate
study table with drawer and chair, for each stu-
dent. The unusually large bath is very modern,
with shower, and fully tiled in black and white. An
electric hot water heater provides plenty of hot
water. We will have a telephone as soon as pos-
sible. We have room for fourteen men. As soon
as these get settled here, we will furnish a kitchen-
ette, if they so desire. The price will be $25.00 per
mo. per student.

Come and see for yourself this very desirable
place to live


Phone $l


1212 W. University Ave







4 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA ALLIGATOR, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 7, 1948



MURAL



MUSINGS


By Julian Clarkson i-


AS THE END of the year, and with it the end of the
intramural slate, draws ever nigh, any suggestions for
changes in the existing intramural program are in order,
although this column feels that the season just completed
has been the most successful yet. The intramural depart-
ment always welcomes comments by students on the ad-
visability of dropping certain sports from its agenda or
adding hew ones, and whenever a majority of those who
participate in the program express a desire to juggle the
slate of sports, a change usually follows in short order.
Only departure from the 1946-47 program made this
year was the elimination of boxing and the substitution in
its place of water basketball. This move has since been en-
dorsed 100 per cent by department officials, after seeing
the aquatic sport go over big in the Frat Leagues. Most
intramural fans have voiced their disappointment that
boxing, one of the more popular spectator sports, is no
longer included, but the great amount of conditioning re-
quired and the high degree of susceptibility to injury are
strong arguments against reintroducing that sport.
Many intramural teams have inquired about the feasi-
bility of inserting billiards into the program. But anytime
that question is raised, fraternity teams quickly pay their
respects to Leff Mabie, Delta Tau Delta, with a vociferous
"No!" Coach Cherry invariably brushes aside the question
by objecting that "everyone would be practicing the whole
year for that one sport."


NOBODY THOUGHT THEY could.do it when the
tournament started but the ATO nine has waded through
its first three softball contests without being beaten and
the boys from the "Hotel" now need only a win over the
Phi Delts to enter the Orange League finals from the bot-
tom bracket.
How they got this far undefeated, no one knows.
Against the bracket favorites, the Pikes, ATO hardly got
the ball out of the infield but bunted Pitcher Tommy Hill
to death and managed to scrape up three runs. Pike hit-
ters, in turn, sent line drives ricocheting off the ATO in-
field all afternoon only to have other infielders scoop up
the ball and throw to first on time again and again.
In their contest with the defending champion. DTD
nine, the ATOs were out-hit seven to four, and lost an
early three-run lead, but by some strange quirk of fate--
aided and abetted by the conversion of two line drives
ticketed for extra bases into double plays- they walked
home with a 4-3 win tucked away.
SPE, rated a weak sister, came next and actually out-
hit the favored team, five to three. Score ? ATO 4, SPE 3.
You're right, Charlie May and Co., that final score is
the only thing that counts.


THE BATTLE GOING ON in the Independent League
between the All Stars and Hell Cats is probably the most
colorful duel in the entire intramural program. Each
team likes nothing better than a win over the other and
the fur usually flies when they get together.
The Stars held a 532-501 bulge over the Cats at the
halfway mark, but it took the Cats practically no time
after the second session began to vault into first place by
virtue of their acquisition of the bowling title. By winning
softball, however, the Stars regained their foremost posi-
tion and at present they hold an 854-838 lead over their
rivals.
The lead could change hands again following the
volleyball finals provided the Cats can beat Seagle in the
semis and then top the Stars in the payoff round.


The Thomas Hotel Club
Gainesville, Florida
Open Monday Through Saturday
5 P.M. To Midnight

Dancing Every Evening

Larry Gibson, and his Orchestra
Every Saturday, 9 p.m. to Midnight

Cover Charge On Saturday Only

Tell Your Friends To Meet You
At

THE HOTEL CLUB


For Reservations Telephone
1040 or 1296, after 4 p.m.


Billiard


Gators Slated


C
C
t
5
t
I
a
.1
a
e
I

I
0
t
r
f
C
f



4



1.
I
e
C
1:
I
a
t


t



t


122 N. 9th Street s
a

"Just Good Food That's All"
A4
c
a
S


"FOR THE BEST"


Come and Visit Us

for your Dry Cleaning

and Laundry Needs

Student Drivers
Clarence W. Daniel

0 Eddie Hill
William McCowan



Gainesville Laundry
DRY CLEANING
720 W. University Ave. Phone 48


For 4 Contests


In Mississippi

By Forrest Taft
Taking to the road for the sec-
ond time this season, Florida's
baseball team headed westward
yesterday to Mississippi where
they will play Mississippi State
and Ole Miss in a four-game se-
ries.
Currently boasting a won and
lost record of two and two, the
Gators will be out to rise above
the .500 mark for the first time
this season. Bobby (Wrinkles)
Adams and Charlie Edwards,
Orange and Blue hurlers, teamed
up last Saturday at Cuscaden
Park in Tampa to handcuff the
University of Tampa Spartans,
4-3.
Ole Miss Skunked
Ole Miss, the Gators' foe on
Wednesday and Thursday, was'
shut out 6-0 recently on some
brilliant twirling by Graham Nix-
on of Auburn, who fanned 19
Mississippi batsmen in garnering
the win for the Plainsmen.
Those making the trip are: In-
fielders Bobby Forbes, Don Ford,
Bill Reynolds, Willis Whittington
and Bob Fielding; Pitchers Jim
Hurst, Fred Montsdeoca, Jack
Gaines, Bobby Adams, Charlie
Edwards and Andy Bracken; Out-
fielders Dick Stratton, Bill Poole
and Dick Berquist, and Catchers
Jewel Walker and Ted Ramsey-
er.


New Lineup
Coach Fuller announced the fol-
lowing probable line-up: ib, Bob-
by Forbes; 2b, Billy Reynolds; ss,
Don Ford; 3b, Willis Whitting-
ton; c, Jewel Walker; If, Bill
Poole; of, Dick Stratton, and rf,
Dick Berquist.
Jack Gaines will be on the
mound in the opener against Ole
Miss. Adams, Montsdeoca and
Hurst will probably draw start-
ing assignments in the remaining
three games while Bracken and
Edwards will be utilized-for relief
work.
The Gator nine will make the
long trip home next Sunday and
will spend the first of next week
preparing for games with the
strong Rollins College squad at
home on April 16 and 17.


Baby Gators Swamp

Mreen Cove Navy

In Opener, 13-4
Sparked by the heavy hitting of
catcher Roy Poole, Gainesville,
Florida's frosh baseball team ran
over the Green Cove Springs Navy
team ;13-4 Monday there in the
season opener for the Baby Ga-
tors.
Robbie Williams, Haines City,
pitched all the way and hurled
a neat five hitter and sent six Blue
rackets back to the plate after
swinging three times. Poole help-
ed his battery mate's cause by
pounding three singles and one
double for a perfect day at bat.
The McCachren coached fresh-
men scored seven times in the
opening frame and won easily as
the Navy infielders committed er-
rors at the wrong times and the
rosh hit at the right times.
The Baby Gators will play
Gainesville High on Fleming Field
next Tuesday afternoon for their
first home game.

Golf Team Tours

Georgia To Meet
Three Opponents
Fresh from a resounding tri-
umph over the Georgia Bulldogs,
Florida's determined golf team
will take to- the road this week-
end for a swing through Georgia,
meeting Mercer in Macon Thurs-
lay, the University of Georgia in
Athens Friday, and Georgia Tech
n Atlanta Saturday.
The Gator linksmen downed
Mercer 13-5 here two weeks ago
and crushed Georgia here Friday,
15%-2%. This will be the first
line the Saurians have met Tech
his season.
Dick Walker led Florida against
he Bulldogs with a 74, teaming
with Leon Sikes to down Logan
and King 8-1. Jack Vidal and Bud
Joit downed Spears and Pate to
ake the final foursome for Flor-
da 7%-1%.
Florida's season record now
stands at four wins, four losses
and a tie. >



L complete stock of glass watch
rystals for round, fancy shapes
nd waterproof watches. Prompt
Service.
50o-$1.00--$1.50


Coles Jewelers
423 W. University Ave.


Tourney


I....
1,,
'4


Bobby Ennis, hurdler and cap-
tain of the '48 Gator'cinder squad,
will lead the Beardmen into action
against Georgia here Saturday.

Jackets Top Gators

In Decisive Victory

As Fowlkes Stars


Led by Doug "Buddy" Fowlkes,
a powerful Georgia Tech track ag-
gregation administered a decisive
87 1-6 to 37 5-6 defeat to the
Orange and Blue cindermen Satur-
day. The Tech squad took 11 of the
first place positions.
Fowlkes, who was high point
man in last year's Southeastern
Conference meet, posted wins in
the 100, 220, 220 low hurdles, and
broad jump events. Jimmy Dykes,
another Yellow Jacket man, broke
his own pole vault record with a
12'4" leap but was tied by the
Gators' Billy Harper.
Hills of Florida won the shot-
put with a 477" heave, while Wil-
liams took the high jump for the
Gators' other win. The summaries:
Shot put Hills (F), Bergman
(T), Lupton (T). 47'7".
Mile run Corridan (T), Smith
(T), Willis (F). 4:34.1.
High jump Williams (F),
Harper (F), tie for third between
Green (T) and Commander (F).
6 feet.
440 yd. dash Stowers (T),
Hanskit (F), Lansing (T). 50.3.
100 yd. dash Fowlkes (T),
Bailey (T), Queen (T). 9.9.
120 yd. high hurdles Forward
(T), Peterson (T), Coons (T). 15.6.
Javelin Nolan (T), Atkinson
(F), Adams (F). 183'11".
880 yd. run Renshaw (T),
Ghormley (T), Earnest (F). 1:49.-
8.
220 yd. dash Fowlkes (T),
Bailey (T), Queen (T). 22.2.
Pole vault Harper (F) and
Dykes (T), tie for first; Legett
(T), Reiser (T), and Taylor (F),
tie for third. 12'4".
Two mile run Smith (T),
Bevis (F), Corridan (T), 10:12.9.
Broad jump Fowlkes (T),
Harper (F), Taylor (F). 22 feet.
220 yd. low hurdles Fowlkes
(T), Williams (F), Ennis (F).
24.9.
Discus Nolan (T), Bergman
(T), Hills (F). 135'4/".


ATOs Pace Loop
As Frat Softball
Nears Finish
Alpha Tau Omega moved one
step closer to the championship
of its bracket in the Orange
League intramural softball tour-
ney by nosing out SPE, 4-3, for
its third one-run victory in a row
Monday afternoon.
In the other bracket of the
Orange tourney the pace-setting
Sigma Nu nine was idle, but SAE
stayed in the running by pulling a
7-6 decision out of the fire against
luckless Kappa Sigma. SAE trail-
ed 6-3 as the last half of the fifth
rolled around, but counted four
times with the last tally coming in
on a wild throw to first from
shortstop with two out.
Upsets were the rule rather
than the exception over in the
Blue League as Delta Sigma up-
set favored Delta Chi, 7-6, and as
the Phi Gams pounded out a 10-2
triumph over Beta Theta Pi for
their initial success. In the other
contest AGR edged Theta Chi,
5-3.

Intramural

Results
Frat Softball
ATO 4, SPE 3; SAE 7, KS 6;
AGR 5, TX 3; PGD 10, BTP 2;
DS 7, DX 6.
Independent Volleyball
All Stars over Saints, 15-3, 15-1
(semi-finals); Saints over Mortar
and Pestle, 15-2, 15-6.


A little poem from the Griffin
at Canisius:
Last night I held a lovely hand,
A hand so soft and neat,
I thought my heart would burst
with joy,
So wildly did it beat.
No other hand unto my heart
Could greater solace bring;
For the hand I held last night
turned out-
Four aces and a king.


Varsity Netters


Boost Record


With Two Wins

By Sandy Schnier
Florida net men made a clean
sweep of victories last week-end,
toppling the Moccasins of Florida
Southern, 7-1, and the Stetson
University Hatters, 7-2, to give
the Gators a four won, one lost
record before mid-season.
In downing the Moccasins for
the second time, the Schnellmen
won every match but one. South-
ern's-Bryan Meharg downed Bob
Riggins, 6-2, 6-2 in the number
one singles. Co-captain Harry Ter-
rell (F) dropped the first set to
George Winchell (FS) 4-6, and
trailed, 2-5, in the second before
Winchell blew completely and Ter-
rell caught up to win eleven
straight games and cop the sets,
7-5, 6-0.
Borling Wins


George Hills, Gator shotput
artist and SEC titleholder, won
his specialty against Tech and will
be favored to lead the field in the
dual meet with Georgia.

Florida Nine Downs

Tampa Spartans 4-3

For Second Victory
Steady pitching, timely hitting
and air-tight fielding gave the
Florida Gators a hard-earned 4-3
win over the Tampa Spartans in
the Cigar City last Saturday for
their second win.
Bobby Adams, ace right-hander,
supplied the pitching as he doled
out six scattered hits to the Tam-
pans. Dick Stratton and Bobby
Forbes provided most of the of-
fensive punch with a homer and
triple respectively, while the whole
squad backed up Adams' hurling
with their first nine innings of er-
rorless ball.
The Gators jumped into the lead
in the second inning when they
notched a single tally and they
held a 1-0 lead until the last half
of the sixth when the Spartans
tied it up.
Florida pushed back into the
lead in their half of the seventh
with a two-run burst that was
featured by Stratton's four-base
clout, his second hit of the day.
Tampa came rightback with
another run in this same inning
and the Gators' lead was once
again cut to one slim run.
Bobby Forbes iced the game in
the eighth when, with Whitsel
Whittington on base, he walloped
a long three-bagger to right field.
The Spartans added another mark-
er in the bottom of. the eighth but
it wasn't quite enough.
Florida looked like a different
ball club than the one which boot-
ed that little round, white object
around so freely during the sea-
son's first three games.
Philadelphia Judge: "Have you
earned a dollar in your life?"
Prisoner: "Yes, your honor. I
voted for you in the last elec-
tion."
-Pelican.


MADE-TO-MEASURE
CLOTHES
For
SPRING & SUMMER
Also
Expert Alterations
At


BEER'S TAILOR'S
421 W. University Ave.


Starts


Tomorrow


Miami last Friduay night in 1 a well-
matched meet, 42-33.
With a host of promising fresh-
man swimmers and several ex-
pected transferees, the Floridians'
perennial reign over Dixie's swim-
ming circles was expected to
flourish with even greater hopes
next year.
Coach Frank Genovar, whose
reputation of turning out crack
swimming teams didn't exactly
dwindle any this year, will lose the
services of only one man-Bill
Harlan, Gator captain-and will,
from all indications, have an over-
abundant supply of water-seeking
candidates to strengthen his team
in the departments it was weak in
this year. Harlan, who led his
poolmates to a second place in the
Southeastern Conference and a la-
ter conquest of the conference
champions, will graduate this
spring.
Jorgenson Wins
In Friday night's meet, a strong
Miami team, overloaded with indi-
vidual standouts, held on to an
early lead picked up in the first
event and, taking five first places
out of a possible nine, went on to
outpoint their upper-state rivals
by nine markers.
Johnny Jorgenson, age-old ruler
of Southern pools, garnered firsts
in both the 220 and 440-yard
events to take high-scoring hon-
ors. Jorgenson out-touched Flor-
ida's Bill Pepper in both races,
making the Gainesville lad's third
defeat in 11 meets in the 440.
The 100-yard swim saw Flor-
ida's Lou Brown outswim Miami's
Shisbey by a decisive margin to
become the only undefeated Gator
swimmer in a single event this
season. A freshman this season,
Brown copped the SEC 100-yard
title, broke the Georgia Tech pool
record, and shattered the Florida
pool mark twice-the second time
bettering his own previously-
established record.
Billy Bracken, Florida's other
SEC titlist, took his eighth
straight victory on the spring-
board in eleven attempts. Brack-
en was followed by another Bill
-Florida's Bill Harlan-who saw
his last collegiate diving action
for the Orange and Blue in this
meet.


Champions Here
Referees for the tournament will
be Charles C. Peterson and Andrew
Ponzi, both of whom were once
world titleholders. Mr. Peterson is
now regarded as the greatest trick
shot artist in the world. Both
men will give exhibitions Satur-
day night at 8:15.
Defending champion in both the
pocket and three cushion divisions
is Florida's Leff Mabie, who has
dominated the national scene for
several years. Now a senior in
law school from Lakeland, Mabie
first copped the national pocket
billiards title in 1943, and after
spending several years in the air
corps, returned last spring to the
nationwide tourney and added the
three-cushion crown to his string,
New Record
Mabie cracked a 15-year-old
record recently in the telephonic
qualifying tourney by chalking up
a perfect score of 100x100 in poc-
ket competition. An early release
of the list of contestants for the
forthcoming tournament showed
the Florida star entered in only
the pocket division, but according
to reports, the tournament com-
mittee has placed Mabie in three
cushion play as well, allowing him
to defend both his titles.
Mabie's toughest opposition in
the pocket division is expected to
come from Jack Brown of the
University 'of Utah. Brown com-
piled a 99x100 score in the tele-
phonic tourney to finish on the
champ's heels.
Large 'Field
Contestants are also entered
from the University of Wisconsin,
Indiana, Kentucky, Minnesota, Cor-
nell, Indiana State, Ohio State,
Colorado State, Rhode Island State,
Idaho State, and the University of
Chicago.
Tourney participants will be
taken on a trip to Silver Springs
Saturday morning. Saturday night
the contestants will be feted at
a closed banquet at the Thomas
Hotel with winners to receive
awards at that time.


Jack Borling (F) scored a 6-3,
6-4 victory over Clem Hopp (FS),
in a hard-fought battle which re-
sulted in two tired young men,
for both played a fast slamming
brand of tennis. Reece Cooper (F)
had to go three sets to take Whiz
Tolle, (FS), 6-4, 5-7, 6-0.
Joe Dunayer (F) and Marshall
Feld (FS) supplied the comedy in
their 2 1-2 hour marathon match
of 35 games. Dunayer finally won,
7-9, 6-3, 6-4 by getting Feld ex-
hausted. The short Mr. Dunayer
would first attempt drop shots,
within the chunky Mr. Feld follow-
ing suit. Then they'd both break
out in series of long lofty lobs.
Both made several desperation
shots from the dirt where they
had slipped, but Dunayer capital-
ized on Feld's weaknesses and
won the match.
Frank Wood (F) defeated Sam
Gregg (FS), 6-3, 6-2 in a fine
performance by both men.
Lengthy Duel
Terrell and Bill Oughterson were
forced to go three sets before
beating Meharg and Hopp (FS)
8-6, 1-6, 11-9 in another long af-
fair. Dunayer and Borling downed
Feld and Gregg, 6-2, 6-2. The
Riggins-Wood vs. Winchell-Tolle
match was called because of
darkness with the score tied at
a set apiece and games tied at
five all.
The Gators had little trouble
with Stetson, losing but two
matches. Captain Bob Riggins
downed Stetson captain Dave Ca-
ton, 6-8, 6-2, 6-1 in a see-saw en-
counter.
Terrell Beaten
Harry Terrell (F) dropped his
match to Pinky Zipprer (S), 6-2,
6-2. Jack Borling (F) trounced
Cooper Kirk, 6-1, 6-0, hitting
where his opponent couldn't reach
them. Reece Cooper (F) launch-
ed a cool attack by staying in
back court and letting Stetson
player, Bob Harris make points
for him. Cooper won, 6-0, 6-2.
Joe Dunayer (F) won easily,
6-2, 6-0 over Bruce Perkins (S)
and Bill Oughterson outclassed
Boulding Matthews (S), 6-1, 6-4.
Caton and Zipprer (S) knocked
off Terrell and Oughterson (F)
6-8, 6-1, 8-6; Riggins-Wood (F) de-
feated Matthews-Kirk (S) 6-1, 6-
2; and Dunayer-Borling (F)
downed Myers-Harris (S) 6-1, 6-1.
The Gators play Georgia and
Georgia Tech out of town Friday
and Saturday.


Gardner's Jump
Wins In Relays
Henry "Hank" Gardner, SEC
high jump titleholder and captain
of the Gator track team last year,
soared 6'4" in Birmingham Satur-
day afternoon to take first money
in the bar-topping event at the
first annual Southern Relays invi-
tational meet. Gardner represent-
ed Tau Epsilon Phi fraternity.
The lanky high jump star
wound up his final year of eligi-
bility last season while leading
the first post-war Gator track
team. Gardner reached his peak
against Miami University last
year when he leaped 6'6%", good
enough for a Gator record.


At Florida

BEVERLY

NELSON

Smokes

Chesterfields

Beverly says:
"I prefer Chesterfields over any
other cigarettes because they're
soothing to the throat."
Voted TOPS---Chesterfield is the
largest selling cigarette in Amer-
ica's colleges (by nation-wide sur-
vey.)


9 BIG DAYS






OF STOREWIDE SAVINGSf














Starts Thursday April 8th, 9 a.m. Sharp



0W.ARManySt. Phone s8 "me Me anesgy Fa
130 W. Main St. Phone 2580 Gainesville, Fla.


Former World Champions,

Top Collegians To Perform
By Julian Clarkson
Two former world's billiard champions and the 16
top collegiate cuestick artists in the nation, representing
13 colleges and universities, will assemble on the Univer.
sity of Florida campus for three days beginning tomorrow
as the Charles C. Peterson Invitational Collegiate Billiard
Tournament gets under way.
Jointly sponsored by the Billiard Association of
America and the National Association of College Unions
the tourney will begin at 1:30 p
m. tomorrow and will continue
STthrough Saturday afternoon. All
matches will be played in Bryan
Gao r I ann ILounge at the Florida Union.
Participants in the national
It meet, including four coeds who
will compete for the feminine
D p La t M e title, were invited on the basis
of scores posted in the recent na-
By John Williford tional telephonic tournaments,
Climaxing their 1948 season Each of the 12 male contestants
with prospects of being one of the wil take reen pocket, straight
top tank teams in the South next rail or three cushion compete.
year, the Gator swimmers were tlon, depending on which of the
nosed out by the University of three categories each man quali.
i .. f . ..- i .-._ ,_.. 11 fied for.


GENUINE



MoPar

Parts And Accessories
Maintain Pride Of Ownership

Brooking Motor Co., Inc.
231 E. Union St. Phone 1424
DODGE PLYMOUTH
Serving University Students
"SINCE 1926"




Full Text
xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID ENAODQSJP_YJ0UZN INGEST_TIME 2016-09-12T14:47:21Z PACKAGE UF00028291_00086
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES



PAGE 1

Student Owned Student Controlled Dedicated To Student Interest VOL 3; NO. 31 Student Forum Will Be New WGGG Program Student Participated; Sponsored By Univ. Speech Department By Margaret Jenningso 'The Student Forum of the Air, a new University of Florida radio series sponsored by the radio section of the speech department, will present its first prograo April o5 at 9:30 p. m. over Station WGGG. "Should the United States Adopt universal Military Training and Selective Service at the Present Te?" will be the question on hand for the first program. Students participating are: Pro Bill Scruggs, member of Campus American Legion Post, and Doyle Rogers, secretary of international Rlatio Cl. Cos :Herh Stallworth, member Florida Blue Key, former Honor Court chancellor, and Gerald Gordon, Phi Beta Kappa, member debaertetam. Thio teill shone of the first r dio dicssin programso i the his story of the University that will be done completely by students. Mr. William Stei of the Florida facity, is the technical advisor for the series. The "Student Forsn of the Aire" wilheebroadcast0as0a pt lic serie fatre of Statio WGGG Broadcasts will come from theS peece opartmenothe dio studios in buildings on the campus. A half hour show, the programs will come on the air waves at0 9:ol each Thursday evening. A survey, conducted after the seeend program, will determine the number of campus listeners. If the total listener appeal is hign enough, the program will be moved to the Florida Union Auditorium so that all interested students may attend and participate. "The Student Forum of the Air" will continue for the remainder of the semester, and if it proves popular enough, will become a permanent show. Milt oshs, WGGG announcer, is the moderator for the program. Four students will take part t the program each wtee. Theselection of participants will be bMed on their abilities to discuss the topic in question and on their standing in campus activities. The questions will be selected by Coins and Marty Lubev, director and producer of the preogram, and all students are ask e to seed in questions on the topie that are to be presented. The topic titles will be announced t advanced n the ALLIGATOR. Modern Furniture Exhibition Opens In Peabodv Hall Today The Museum of Modern Art's Unit Furniture Exhihition, which traces the development of standaed furniture Units for the home fros the early Globe-Werneckh book cases produced during the nineties to the modern productions designed by Charles Eames, was opened to the public at Peabody Hall today, Director William T. Arnett announced. In tracing the history of Unit furniture it is shown that more than half a century has elapsed between the early beginntugs and the Stragewall introduced by Architects George Nelson and Henry Wright in 1946. German and Eng-. lh eooays bridge the gap bet'eeno early American interest and its resumption in the late thirties. The exhiitiocoeincludes with an eye toward the future in presenting the "Packaged Building System,' a prefabricated house in which all of the parts are composed of standardlunits. The Exhibition, circulated by the R.seom of Modern Art, ad presented by thc School of Architecure and Allied Arts will remain On view through April 23. 'FLORIDA STANDS READ Main Issue In Education, Mo University President Spok Florida Bankers Associat "The fundamental issue in high00 education today is money," university President J. Hillis Miller told members of the Florida Bankers Association meeting in St. Petersbrg yesterday. Dr. Miller said that the educOtoal Oemands ofveterans,graduI t.e i high school, and a rising 'Onscousness of higher education 1ere forcing institutions of higher earning; throughout the country toI expandIthfield of education, and I that tee issue is "whether or not I the People are going to be wise eOgh to supply these funds." t le said the issue is no longer Ohthoror not there will be subitlctiil increasesoin the number of regular students seeking higher edcation after the veterans have graduated He qotedcenoot figs reeS to show the dmand fored cation tems of fute tend. Terwing edustion the gresatt iconomiclinvestment on earth, Dr. Iiterlid the issue is no longer Igelbr ror not -n investment mI lisedtucationso a good invet. I "'eent surveys have determin0 that the college trained man ;0 an average life total o from 00 t *M%" Ow bft e I Alliato National Billiards Tournament-Here Tomorrow For R pt Y" Afl,, Srts Sp4 e4 I C El J~ 1 A tV 'N, .S I#--. --L t ,1941 New Cn-nn Addit;an, Ready to helptserve Its student Co-op grocery. It's a meat counte SAVINGS AVAILABLE T Co-op Grocer To Wives Wi Co-Operation Has Prove Flavet Men and Women By Peggy Clayton Any tuoent who is having trouble with the high cost of geocere 0can, by paying a $15.50 deposit. become a member of the student coop grocery venture and obtain his groceries at lower pri ces. This coop organization, begun in August, 1916 is not just for those livingiFlevet villages or just for veterans or just for married students. It is for any registered student. All he has to do to join is to come ito the store which is located in Flavet 1, and pay his membership fee. Only 50c of this money is retained by the organization, the other $15 hie funded to the student on levin school In November, 1946 the store officially opened with a capital of $3,500. Manager Chris Bracewell now estimatesthe value of the concern at $13,000. In its year and a half of operation, the coop has lowered its prices from higher than the cha stores to as low or lower. This store has the added inducement of having sales at which all merchdise is offered at a 10% discount to pay off dividends. The coop grocery, a non-profit organization, is not connected with the University. It operates on a charter from the state of Florida. The building oe modeavailable by tho otat galso. It 1d estimated to be worth $7,000, and the coop pays only $1a y-ar rent. A board of directors which meetsonceaomonth draws up all the poicies of the organization, and a meeting of the entire membership is held twice a year to elect directors and discuss store operation. The present board of directors is composed of: Bn Higgins, president; David Bryant, vice president; E. B. Griffis, secretary; E. R. Lmpp, treasurer; Gould Sadler; W. K. Davis; Bob Miub; Phil Dreifus; Don Storms; and Bill Marker. There are six full time employees working in the storesat the present time. The store is patronized by practically all of the marries students living in the Flos% villages and many others besides. Manager Bracewell states SDX And Jaycees Plan Follies Show Florida students have an unusual treat in store for them starting about midnight, May 22. That's when Florida Follies, big student variety show, will hit the boards at the Florid Theatre. Sponsored by the Gainesville Junior Chamber of Commere and Sigm Delta Chi, professional journalistic fraterity, the show will feature top-notch student peeformers Raul Reyes, Sigma Delta Chi member, is in charge of the ariety program and he says several profesoional-calibre sets hsae already been lined up Watch for Florida Follies. Higher ney-Miller e Before ion Yesterday or $72,000 moeoths the high soho gradutes hearing of $88,000.' ? Relating the issues to Florida, he said that "the issue in Florida io not whether or not the Giversity of Florida knows where Itis going, it is downright sure of the place it wants to fill in this growing progressive state.' Rockbottom needs for expanaon I have outlined as costing between 17 and 20 million dollars," be said in pointing to the several building needs. He listed these so a final addition to the Library, four units for engineering five for agriculture, administrative -d .clsroom building, a building for architeeture and fine arts, wing to Florida Union, addition to law college, and several buildings for education, sciences and physics, and business administration, respectively. Concluding, he said, "The Univeroity of Florid tnds ready to carry the torch fr orderlydevelopment of a sound economy in Florida .--..It stands ready to handle the people's investment is higher education, and guarantees higher dividends than have even been earned by my other enrpre tthe free people of this members is the new addition to the r, complete with meat and all. 0 MEMBERS y Great Help th Limited $ $ d It's Worth To n More Than One Way that at the opening of the venture, a markupof 20% was chargedoand that increased volume of business hhas made it possible to bring this down to 7%. The nine original stockholders of the organization were: Ben H. Mayberry, Jr., Frank M. Wilson, Jr., E. Wesley Myers, George W. Kates, Harold S. Smith, Frank C. Stanley. Jr., Kenneth L. Jones, Walter B. Timberlake, Jr., and Morton C. Freedman. Frolics Plans Nearly Complete Says Turnbull Plans for Gatorland's biggest social weekend, Spring Frolics, May 7 and 8, are nearly complete, Bill Turnbull, Inter -Fraternity Conference President announced this week. Starring the smooth and hot music of TexBeneke and his record breaking 36-piece musical aggregation, the two day festivities will feature twodances and a two-hour concert. Friday night, Glenn Miller's "Tobacco Seed Oil" by W. B. WatCounting Election Ballots U.S. Has To Feed Germany, Newman Informs Engineers "Until France and Great Britain abandon selfish interests in the reparation of German industrial plants, the United States is going to have to continue feeding Germany," Dr. Albert B. Newman, former representative on the quatripartite commission for the liquidation of German war potential, told student chemical society delegates meeting Monday. Southern Re ion Dr. Newman, professor of y chemical engineering, School of Technology, City College, New York, addressed some "75 stuA hE M eet dents representing nine southern universities at a regional meeting of the student branch of the American Institute of 0W IR 5510H Chemical Engineering. Now In Session r. Newman described the selfish interests in German industry Byanotdyeoer onthe part of France and Great Sdetsandprofesorsofche-Britain as a desire on the part of ical Enoginesestudent chapters, at thseo ntresnot, to allow h theotnivesity ofpFloridaModay re-stablitiment of soy Gemao morn industry that might compete with Seemtymones students 1nd at-cu their own industries in world tymembersowereregisteredoatthetrade. openingessionmandrrstrtion rDr. Newman, who spent 14 eontinelthroughot the day., montsin Germanyoas aoemober Dr. John S. Allen, vice-president ofthe quatripartit commission, of the University; Dean Joseph saidthat reparations in Germany Weil; ml W. L. Bryan, president were based on the Potsdam agree-, of the Forid sapter of the meant whereby Russia got all of AIChE, stere openhers 00 the the reparations in her zone and opening session with Dr. Ralph 25 per cent in the Amerie'an or A. Morgen, director of the FloriWesternzone. 5. da Engineering and Industrial Ex"Germany," he said, "has the pertentdStationgioingthe prin same food deficient ratio, and ipal ddesso at MondayBoonlikewise will have to build I logstessio .industry to export enough to I Pricipal afternoonspeaker was make up for her food deficiDr. Albert B. Newman, president ency." of the AIChE, national chapters. He pointed out, however, that Six students presented teohncal Great Britain and France, with papers during the afternoon. their present Ideas on the quiDelegates were gests Monday dation of German industry, were sight at a banquet and dance at practically excluding her as an the Club 400 at which Col. Everexpot nation. ett M. Yon, Gainesville, was toastHe pointed out that France came master. Sessions continued through through the war in good shape, Tuesday. that she was little damaged by the Highlight o' Tuesday's program war and was not food deficient. was election of officers and Her industries he said are 100 per awarding of prizes for the best cent of pre-waroaverages and constuden, papers read at the continuing to expand. mention yesterday. Officers electHe said that 20 per cent of ed were: President, William Brythe equipment Britain plans to an, University of Florida; Viceuse In post war Industrial exPresident, Ralph Golladay, V. P. pension, she expects to get out I.; Secretary, William Boyd, Auof Germany. burn; Treasurer, John Malloxy, He concluded that unless France Florida. and Great Britain can be persuade_ Prizes were won by the followed to change their idea of indusing: First place, "Adsorption of trial reparations, German econoWater Vapor and Nitrogen Dioxide my will suffer for years to come on Silicon Gel" by J. A. Brabe and the United States may weli and H. P. Gidean of the Univerlookto continue supporting her. sity of -Tennessee; second place, wlweet-noehscla0 too eins of V.P.I. 1 and or September 1, through weeen of o msialstrtat Tuesday afternoon the convencompetative examinations. weefkndoff tamsiclstrlt 1o00rn Language os~ieoioio.lgpe a formal dance in the "new" gym tion split up into groups for The examinations qualifying perfrom 9 to 1. Saturday afternoon sightseeing and field trips. The U sons to fill the numerable vacanBeneke will make music in the 'field trip group inspected the Hall Bu iing Gives cies will be given during Spring University Auditorium in a gala plant of the Cabot Carbon Coolvacations--which begins tomortwo-hour concertandoshow. pany of Gainesville and the elecr ow-and students may arrange Saturday evening, the man with tronics and aeronautical facilities LaUIIIOI F tue to take the tests in their home the sax-appeal will play at another at the University. Sightseers had counties or senatorial districts. formal affair from 8:30 till 12 their choice of Silver Springs, MaThose esirous of additional inNegotiations are underway to rine Studios, or Daytona Beach. Underground Sprinkler formation as to the particulars broadcast the dances on a network Wednesday the field trips conSystem To Be Laid In of the scholarships and the qualihookup. tinue in Jacksonville with visits fiction details are urged to conTaking the vocal honors with to plants of the Rutile, Ilmenite Plaza Of The Americas tact Robert o. Stripling, directhe Benekeogroup wilm be songbird and Zircon Division, Humphrey By Jack Shoemaker tor of the Teacher Placement BuClaireChatwin, songster Ronnie Gold Corporation, and the Conreau, in Room 126 P. K. Yonge. Deauville, and the "Moonight ainer Corporation of America. In another ten days, the beauThose persons whoparticipate in Serenaders." Drummer-man Jack tificationprogramwill exhibit a the scholarship program are obSperling and trumpeter Pete CanS new remodeled college hall when'ligated (as required by the Lewis doli share the instrumental spotNew Ska ing Rink Language Hall will be completeand House Scholarships) to purlight. Candol is a winner of the ly refurnished with an eye toward osue a course of study which would coveted "Esquire' award.m d sodernistic details, prepare them for a teaching posiOne of the few top. name orchWillO riday This building will be an extion in Florida, and must teach, extras to be composed completely ample of how all the other buildsubsequent to graduation, in a of ex-servicemen, the big Texan's Eor ns wings on the campus will look i Florida ub School for at combination incides 33 ex-army igN u s thonear ture.It is conemlat d least the number of years that vets and two ex-gobs, Beneke and One of the major "lack of en-net 000Phoy iadi th the scholship is held t Jack Sperling. TheoTex Beneke entertainment" problems that UnicomeBenth n 1 then ill Thosetho aro aceptlbyth outfit also is one of the few swing versity students find themselves The buns ae S to eri choafrghippaousto groupsin the country to have a faced with will be solved this also a ouneod 0a0 plas hove a studyior their appopiato complete string section coming Friday with the announcebeen c pted for the laying ofaeld, so noneofy thefollowing type meant of theopening of the Playan underground sprinklerosystem ofwohkino fthefeonypida: 3t houseRoller Rink, aicated on in the Plaza of the Americas. AftPublic school teochiog, socFelr the Glen Springs Road just oper this is done, the area will foes work, public g s00a1 work, on positethe new driving range. undergo a complete facelifting, epopytpe hnic altorpor Use Fla. Union The new rink is being constructwith the planting of trees and fempioyntcapactewih niciorpra-, A seven days' total for the ed by Lester C. Hodges, who for shrubbery. It will become one of ossntyo onpaaty wii-ppoled greatest week Inthe historyof the past nine years has operated the major beauty spots of the ogniosa the Florida Union, University of a successful rink in Newberry. campus. Florida "home away from home" Hodges, recognizing the need for After the utility contractors for its students, shows a total a first class rink in Gainesville, have finished their work-filling .gi of 3,966 students participated In has built one of the finest rinks in all the various ditches-extenEnglsh Speaks events held in the Union. in this part of the country. sive work will begin on the reThese 3,966 were In addition The Playhouse Rink is contopping of roads and the lying of To Young Demos to the 6,000 plus who informally structed of concrete block and has sidewalks. This is one project that use the facilities of the Union plenty of floor space, the measurehas been started and will be goOn Candidacy daily and were drawn there by ments covering 128 ft. in length ing along until all the campus special events sponsored directand 72 ft. in width. Along the east roads and paths are brought up C ly by the Florida Union or other side of the building, highly varto their standards. Cobbn Eoglih, cadidato fur gov.organizations. nished seats have been built for The area north of Flavet DI frn, spoke m behalf of Ott csodiThe events bringing these stuthe convenience of spectators, and will also be beautified. This indacy recently at a luncheon meetdents to the Union included such the entrance of the building is volves getting rid of the dump, log of the Young Democrats Club, activities as dances, a bridge constructed with the giassed-in burning allthe trash and Stumps, English covered high points tournament, and an Intercollegirounded corners, trimmed with turning over the dirt, and resodin his platform for the benefit of ate telephonic billiards tournaneat window equipment ing the whole area.pohs e ucb eo ners. Ho Oamphao sze ment. The huge floor is of staple con --orn onol, dconet nation, agtiulstruction and will offer the bestte, antrevsonetagriconRadio Auditions Held; r diskating comfort and smooth Progress Test Slated sietin relsion of the slts nonRadio Auditios Held; ride.For 7:00 P.M. April 13 ttColin Egisoa.ee tt More Tryouts Slatedb dodges is catering to the Uni-Supoerintendent ofPouble InsteoRadio Guild auditions were versity students largely, and shows Ms 106 progress test Will be t rioouuode-heeogoveonors.Before held yesterday under the direcevidence of this fact inasmuch as given Tuesday night, AprI 13, tat hedr thldadminisrativeoand tion of W. B. Steis, instructor he is hiring University students at 7 p. m., in the Universityeteeanchi t n a of speech, in Building E,126. to run the rink. His floor manAuditorium. All Ms 106 students schools throughout the statarin-s Anyone Interested in radio ager is T. A. Larkis, a student. are expected to take this test, clouding the University of Floria work, who was not able to atThe hours of the new skating and each student must bring his Anai t oGFlori y ofnFlidh tend yesterday's auditions, is rink are: 8:-11:00 every night own pencil containing electroA oiv of Florida, Con Eogi h asked to contact Mr. Steis in his except Sunday, and on Wednesday graphic lead. Students will be eooive his edunotioo ot Emory office in G-180 after spring reand Saturday afternoon from 3:30 required to use their University diversity and abroad. He Is a vetcess. to 5:00. student numbers. eran of World War 0. P Ihi Beta Kappa Initiates Thirteen Thirteen University of Florida F. Westin, Miami Beach; and Willearth immune to airpower. president, Professor Charles E. tibergeodutioe. and two ludiatoE. NoooenJr,West Pa1w "110ha becoo e o undIes Mounts, Secretary,ProfessorHarn d nhmE t ishas Co ld, "for war or old L. Knowles, Treasurer, and were initiated into Phi Beta Kappa Beach. hghwm-"Professor Arthur L. Funk, Hisere last night at the annual Alumni initiate(I by the Beta peace, for destruction or torian. Professor E. Ruffin Jones spring initiation meeting. During chapter weee Dr. George John merce. and Professor Manning J. Dauer, theeening,thgeoupheard John Miller, who graduated fromFlori"Properly used, airpower can be who were chosen as a membership C.e Coper, t ag0,go ithe the means for better understandcommittee to serve for a three c. Cooper, noted authority on airdai g 1930, now a professor i ing among the peoples of the year term wi also be installed. power.College ofLaoando ouisy, Fod oof world," he continued, "improperFoibowbng tho instollatlon ceThe undergraduates initiated as Quitty, Florida, class of 1933, now Wyue Fa b tra h olln g whinssltriocerttootbosb-oo~tficbnlbs associateofessor oh psych'ology by used it coo ho a threat of the monoy, Whichts orestriceod to members-in-course included: asoitprfsr fpyhlg general security even in time of members of Phi Beta Kappa, a Robert C. Nodine, Clearwater; at the Uoversity of Illinois. peace" ban uet was held in honor of the Theodore S. Benjamin, Herbert J. Coopersaidihis addressithat The installation of George G initiates and their guests. R. C. Dohety, Jaoksonville; H. Eugene ainpowor is theOstotl aility of a h otlaioo eno0 llstssdto eto .C Dos, Kisimsoe;Rort A. BOY. atio to fly. The tot eimpa t of Fox, head professor of Philosophy, Wiliamson, head of the departervopaRichord;L.Cergo Bo-airpeteon world raffainscthat as president o the local chapter, meant of physics at the University e H. Fergusod, Willio J. Hso,ost never b forgotten is that proceeded the initiation ceremony. of Florida gave the Phi Beta KapJr., Gio onsil,; Corlis J. Driggers, airpower provides transportation Other newly elected officers to pa charge to the initiates, with Pt. Loderdqie; Hugh Ii DuBose, in airspace and because airspace is be installed with Fox iclude ProFerguson giving the response for ona ola; Getald L Gordon, Alan "boundless" there is no oPlao ndfeoor mer D. Hinckleyv, icethe new members. OF INTEREST TO STUDE New Rent Re Announced B 1948 Housing And ken Went Into Effect April New rent regulations are being issued to conform with the house ing and rent act of 1948 which 1 in effect April 1, 1948, Carl Win ter, area rent director, announce yesterday. The new law under administra tion of the housing expedite makes no automatic change i rent ceilings and the maximum rents under the new law for mos tenants are the same as those which were in effect on June 31 1947, with the following excep 350 Scholarship Vacancies Left For Students By Lynn West ,Approxieately 350 vsancie are still left in the total number of scholarships offered by tho Lewis, House, and Senatoria funds, it was revealed this week These vacancies are to be filled by residents of Florida by Jun hi si aN HIGHLIGHTED BY SPORTS Plans For Engineers Field Day, May 1, In Full Swing Annual Event Sponsored By Benton Engineering Society Plans continued to move forChemicals vs. Civils; Industrialsward for the Annual Engineers bye; Aeronauticals vs. Electricals. Field Day with announcement of Horseshoe: (Faculty) In d u spairings of engineering divisions trials-bye; Aeronauticals vs. for four of the major sports to be Chemicals; Electricals vs. Civil, engaged in during the outing. Mechanicals. Sponsored by Benton EngineerTommy Keeter, ticket chairman, ing Society, Field Day is scheduled announced that tickets will bE for May 1. available for all students on April In announcing pairings for soft3. Sale of tickets will continue ball, volleyball, touch football, and through April, he stated. horse shoe. Chris Holtz, chairman of athletic events for the Day, said, 'All matches, with the exoepBlue Key Applications tion of finals, will be played beDue Noon, April 15 fore May 1. A schedule of time for the various matches is posted in Raymer MaGuire, president of Engineering Building." Florida Blue Key, announced Pairings for the events are as this week that all candidates for follows: nomination to FBK must have Softball: Mechanicals vs. Civils; their applicationsI n to the desk Industrials --bye; Electricals -at Florida Union by 12 o'clock bye; Aeronauticals vs. Chemicals. noon, April 15. Applicants are Touch Football: Mechanicals vs. reminded that requirements for Chemicals; Industrials -bye; the honorary frateritycall for Civil-bye; Electricals vs. Aeroparticpationin onemajor od nauticals. tomhor fields of s.0pon Volleyball: Mechanicals -bye; tivities. IIMIVCDCI'rV At 91 nPMA e-'Albjccfll I UNIVRSIT OFFLORV~l AINSVILLE, FLORIDA: '4 A EJDRIL 7, 1941 4 ENTS gulations y Director mt Law g tions: (1) Where a landlord and -tenant had voluntarily entered s into a written lease Increasing d the rent up to 15 per cent; (2) where the local rent office had issue 000o individual adjustment oe-L_ dchanging the rend t (3)here Sthe housing expediter had pm proved general increase in the t rent level in an area i response e to a recommendation of a local 0, rent advisory board. -Under a new provision of the 1948 law no tenant need surrender a housing accommodation until at least 60 days after he has reeeived a written evictionnotie from his landlord, unless the tenant has not paid his rent, is violating the obligation of his tenancy, or is creating a nuisance. In those cases the time limit before eviction is governed by local law. The law also specifies that a tenant may he evicted for the following reasons: (1) If a landlord, member of his immediate family, or a purchaser wishes to occupy the quarters; (2) if the landlord s wishes to demolish or to alter the r structure substantially; (3) if he e seeks to withdraw the place from 1 the rental market; (4) if housing .accommodations -have been acd quiredL by a, state for public ime provement and are rented temporSarily before the construction of such improvement, and (5) if the landlord is exempt from taxation under Section 101i(6) of the internal revenue code (non-profit, religious, charitable and educational institutions) and wishes the premises forethe purpose of housing staff members. The tenant in an apartment structure may not be evicted from a cooperativeiUnless at least65 per cent of the dwelling uts in the structure are occupied by stockholder-tenants. WSSF Drive To Open Tuesday The World Student Service Fund's annual drive which opens on this campus next Tuesday will last for one week, Tracy Riddle and Jack Humphries, co-chairmen of the drive, announced Monday. A goal of $2,000,000 has been set for this year's drive, an increase of $1,500,000 over last year's total of $500,000. Refugee students in Europe and Asia have been supplied with much needed food, clothing, medical supplies and books by WSSF. The needs are greater this year than last year, and the WSSF musttraisefour times theamount it raised last year in order to meet the demands. The sponsors of WSSF are Nationa Intercollegiate Christian Council, University Commission of the Council of Church Boards of Education, the Interseminary Movement, the Student Volunteer Movement, Provisional Committee of the International Student Service, USA, and B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundations at American Universities. The national president is Dr. George N. Shuster, president of Hunter College in New York City. Fiji: Tabulation Shows Greatest University Vote Law School Has Highest Percentage Of Votes; Education Has Lowest Final tabulations of election results show that the largest number of students ic the history of Student Government at the University took part in the elections. Secretary of the Interior Bill O'Neil gave the figures on the number of votes east this weekend. "Thanks are extended to all those students who helped at the polls, particularly Jimme Rush, Grover Baker (who acted as Assistant Secretary of State) and Bill Moor," said O'Neil. "Thanks also go to the Alpha Phi Omega fraterity and all the parieooparticpating in the elections." The office number of students voting was the highest in the olvrsity's history, both in mber and percentage. In the breakdown of number of students it the different schools on campus, the Law School topped the bSt with 0h2 per cent of student soenr~od and eligible voting. Next came the Forestry school with 70., omowed by Bus. Ad. with 75.1, and at the very bottom of the list o me the Education school with 4,9 per 1 cent, which was sil above pr-e vios Years averages. In the presidential race 4,765 students voted, with Bob 6hblott polling 2,640, and C. J. ardes 3 getting 2,125. The final breakdown by tchooss. School voted Eros pet Agric. 221 306 73.2 Pharmacy 91 129 65. Phys. Ed. 19 30 66.2 Education 113 276 40.0 Archit, & AR 138 173 73.9 Forestry 70 88 79.5 t Law 43 508 87.2 Engr. 235 400 58.8 Arts & Se. 343 514 66.7 Bus Ad. 407 529 75.1 Freshman. 989 1769 55.8 Soph. 1714 3100 55.2 Tryouts For One-Ad Plays Scheduled For April 14, 15 Eight To Be Given During May Tryouts for a series of eight oneact plays to be given in May were announced yesterday by Dr. D. B. Dusenoury, director of the Florida Playst. The plays, which will be produced by members of the direction class of the speech department, go into rehersal immeditely saftr tryostareocompleted. General tryouts for as eight plop, will ho held In OBuiding 0112, Wedosday, April 14, from Isle to600 yp.m., d Thunday, Api 115, from 30 to 5:30 p.m. Directors mo have individual tryouts after the general t tryouts peiod. All students on the cmps sa invited to tryout. Poinst t ward Florido Players membership will be awarded for particOpation. Proluction dates are Tuesday May 11, and Thursday, May 13, in the P. K. Yonge auditorium. Sche. duled for Tuesday are "The Glittering Gate," by Lord Dunstny, directed by Herman Shonbrun, needing 2 males; "Fumed Oak"by Noel Coward, directed by Eliho Edelson, 1 mal, 3 females; "An Original Play," by Barton Johns, directed by Barton Johns, 2 males, 3 females; "Box and Cox mr the Boor" by Chekov, directedlby Lo Fields, Jr., 2 males, 1 females. Scheduled for Thursday are "Moey Death" by Erieov, directed by Jayne Crane, 4 males, 1 female; "Tickless Timeh" by Glaspell and Cook, directed by Larri Rod-an, 1 males, 4 females; "An Original Play" by Clay Fields, directed by Clray Fields, 5 men; "The Ping Pog Game" by William Saroyan, directed by Russ Foland, I male, 2 females. Maw Abm Flo

PAGE 2

2 DIVERSITY OF FLORIDA ALLIGATOR, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 7, 1948 SELECTED FROM FIELD OF 12 Dan MCady Campus Italian Movie Acting Class To Present Three Ten-Minute Scenes Stresses Plank Here Iuesday hThreee mtes pftr o M A. t.hhn. is pa CAVALIER famous full lengthps i hefte pogai fr the cavaerm ace Society will inpresented by temmber"f Ith. century Club. E h P sa t e hpe tteui "Open City" Slates acting And directing elasse f the Emphasizes Personal ~ ~ "penCitsSaesritchapterul Apa12 tAhel Soiet p szs esn ety of Mainu Saturday eleec dpamt at the Tenand Vital Interest In tmig. Many Floridat Sttemteawll One-Day Run At tePtu C i at A p travel to MuIn for th. InstallState Theater tet Cntr: Cub Ari pl ho S c.t Agriculture, Soils tin nd I? M i i t4ii l3:SateTheterm. Dt tC gedtl t ~ tt i~on n udne, -B wcg'r "n orrow toTimee, by Paul To By tGeraitdClark teiOboei is the first dieted by DC McCarty, gdute f the CYCLO-t URIST en tt dte iJamesp. Dee, St. Petersburg, the The Adelpib etiety eg t l d During the Sprigthe Cfil to be produced p t-wlde ee R i e c-ilr g erp h atitpnt p Iel-Tourists will take a long dsItaly, wit, play for a single dy' MacDonald, Clearwater; Steve Rpicnic to b held at gvitanter psit ac utu tance bicycle journey to St. Auat the State Theatre next TuesfHands,'ampa. berg dn Saturday, April it ,i itd ed t gh gsti t iAnd vicinity. day. The film, which has been hal-ihe next play, "Staint'oan," by p. soilA inse ttttercndrn h trtdtAsAeverythingfromi ite At e Gaolins ein tecourt Huegroup will travel to St Augusiegetstmto itre to'a b arton JLh ap.Intedlg t h ereapctet O p r by Kin uT I rie p tititieto itte ftGG ttgst beney enigt. tit rn 'dlill trught Palt, jibe ittaraleited pou it sm e;Lry Rd nP p-ndrwihh acit ere thiteitti t t t e o p leo i t ti n t s ttit ith i s o t i o It l iti t lt ei t. J w; A s t e a s U tgerbdybyHehIrthS ltnitiit h e d ,l il oiC tinterv iti isteilndtn Univityptiti n' fiitt amsolyeund useteh-n h t T," tthe m d d yn tCntFnir teL tyHemi te l -po tdgi i ett a ICre ,and i er i othit t br ntr ll iett ri P l t h i td ra ie po dp ity edp eg t n i bre t, n pI e tit diF ts fn atgral par f se v -en t gh W.etr ev n f gits li e dla nd, J l;nia pit g p t tihtnb Ft, tu Ctoner illeo gea t lik pttA y ito d i ipr dta .FyIto l ar f cd e v let b t h .T f ts Uinvt e rirh a tlan tttt He.pteit lanks11 hsitiitntpthiI for tiyt tedttfhia 't e i t r iti te i s'tetInteratil Re r"it en C iti e d te t N am e usS4ngyDTnner O ndW C e Horittegn -' io etd Atr by mpi 0Lenru ssAd rsnestkr-tt kine w t ip tte itr, t legr pif ti Bitsd soilmp.s.z idtheis t h tho the in itrsi ty titdigf a ilmi tie int ttfilehrroin iitTngdi d b, G gite eal E tayterb ryGa d tio for -Frid a e adi ndg ntitndustrt"ryinf uences nof lt e s ae P ic nd f laprnteactner o t e C op r tve a d rTite P e e fpun;nen o tGin s e T e da IdTsd y e en n ,ti n i e adaa .e So t s i dete it diti, h E hdit CA( yorilmgr) Apmitdlthetittiteittinft _th__uentnd___ littr e apidethdatpiernate MhrGer -n s t apo I -tI lighneting ad p I teny 5tUnder Atee r A tutontht hd otbee rvied otingirporraan thhem rHevdisiorns es of theth pec dpslinnhlig le icic .m ine I.I nera ato llcnlra wt elsmsloulnaaGievil;Rbr H e fMiSpO tlii t tityo 'dse Eugeels ttit u wn pcte -iI uredt.tnollygtwltodfridmiotpA ohnlfinifhesce .A iit a McCarty p tedet t he if at Th 'l nt erptieio" -tlitplt ieiEnliCheit"wsutoky tentstt t tng '1mhare:ihikp Htlidltiug vision ___ptheittaterConiton.-tonsame t i p eei t lA ingb la-c k a re thch we i l tt d maeaeer hie s es t tla 'i r d d r gs ., d y i ewep tat gm orda ip to n e and lne lGth "ili jtne s h sh osa o ighe ci om .2.1 Justf ine" .fi. he on ds. msbt e t r a -n ig d B B.t o Mr. e oriaSaglr-A, tdeictineee a tica, Christiann Ciopspectihe,"ThatohowoI prgknizatio"n.o. .tershAnMade P-e i'rmade etween "A grd duture ofeFlnoridreZ11 1JtCrophaszt he ct etrh a y ",C Arp7 em bgers o h amaarnItla o mitlaerurged theaty .,ng m ar nee ax fel d oft 12N Ao siar ButseAtNoteditution haftact :x, uthenticfbakgrounp fo thC U ipegseyted inort trr.6p ..tI it n A u stwng Cth c Fiet little hite t tAlfi 11 tW t ti ip t at wh is ittng ti arteei CI itg Ibuti iIiwthieti tobute d itha 'endmentpthatn-erol.pday"whi.h. "votvs l no Tego tn teireiel, g r asls fted theCoprti a r th i n tstriefor thessW lleTusdngAnan take placg ah Paeioditecal P a ier c ittUusaeltonhisbewen it it 'it ptfileM toit Churchti (Phlto ByiTftt p-i i ttiStg e ~ i t edd Cu d ua e tehiy d i o r h m .c o m p l e t e w its? "hhe s a m bre -k a -uptcl a r p h e d e t h t h H r d i rfni p s e a e r t t e a r a llm .A nca m p huwsa .eate Oy FT tamde-g tater TE itre agitltita Cade hit Is itth aeth t Petanntt-putatfCciiit pring anqte tit f tRea lit h _me _pr__t__ e_ p res Scmoolkee eAteond a n g sC og .l.g.Bul l becau esa Le te Usra L It M en -er fr pEttClAlutitgtntdteet tytthe mept m theLgAp teiotathotbd ent year .ttid .o i itrt e gis.utenttcrsa riGrtao.hm .riW Hrs t.nAdfert a a f i he r e8 g"5,de -d F i Elu prob b yo s ton icure sceen C afi batin O nm e f h e b rs wl e hed a a p H ardin, f BA dd n o res e n't o h p ec e at e t ra-f w re tic nic fo,'Aith Chepoitefies S thoft th' e w .nI sii Ait dl t hanC pe eW L oo I He en I s AincharAeofttir' e odtion.es-C d.D nlt stati Eilntf the FFAp t it--0FsS rn D e If dit ts tdbe P quetittit-,Stgith ritrati CitnlitaeB rshadayertemm_ t ta t ibe is thofti Cr tdeek ilatotmActKLeion aBe seaee ak P itdiC itAtdColdPnder ai it I Cewog tsptit Stu ent To Seeltkeisttd t lip1 esifbtktheepioi, wteeie hSi a Nu Q thyit iLe'eleelihthiCg; tndiy stt e H iayt 'Alnme it t fpt t w ines i tle U p tt i -e i t e D ApH aredte einin om o hqAusirteey o Baksmpge attn I Rst itk n o itne. tr non ed ody al Est hcat o teClub n o te 'dBiPshlg tetsiel shPharmaPol-getton'htt in' t sner a .pdT C am s FrCatsd rs Ali dL bperiet te AmeriitnheiteeasCldti -it, itth mePla tom i l tet e itate.tiiery t A e L fotal. In hs.p ec e diThtsr of th pik temF"tk. 's o t hp dchhiidfeet at ftesaet i-c m usi lrd ilb er-lu ed tera saecuss o-Sp ns ote nldn eea fia o h .wl ec itstabhhieetp"Ad -.4sna, Is tieiitiditatteeBeiea sley dlor dlfuuri s thater" l ouleeri or te' ttepbyRg thi syt that'sdt een i t t if lot thttcampus, btt 3ti t didtp he i te enu staitin ill utind t ta it teye i zei ti Ai ht s At ,ut the hywere ae p hi ti gt it pe oett hef'as e AU til omt u nis itttdra t i ten ti t ttdnmat w a trieititl Ae sbit ittp e rutt treal ei hiy t tUe tme s Rhs attil r tD Pilrand e ber o t w it ol Catd hsoelicSriet. ilettt-ja llit t e m s tr Atlii tpoIstswillingt ta t o w illn. lt d tir Iti t i n nit inhpe ht h pprwilnik ia ndsryDp .Itv t esaltefm intrsIhv etrthtsae i sn ttwd n imielacstrA ivenf ccess" by lKer S .Anu ret htCo, l a rni n aehgyeC .a, good dvacee ts r t -,the B&B .7,-clubs :'reasn fa dn-Jiy o hrse Jaths holdineg ae Harrmyspstwa s oth ed.s ricia Bk-sesssaoterfatreo t"AIliand ato heEcy it andetigofN no a vl dip'y filet."I t 1 lftt tiittRetreattiitfipaurametcium.ltteieAttemovitte -t t a rg a e g int the swat o t a xe secret er isi-dton.B ea) r eP t y eetd t no n uhaeride thaNheH ardi t ntpr iniam aen r mm t t ea -p ns d p r m nt a uty f r te flo ng h pin n oe At6 uly o id keings =beo W idBae hoy r eRa>angefE cO f si ta h mn wh'arivdreetr nd Curr n wrr piresaeantedJly2 smaeths veko te schhgyd ,aiet i Thftre agoricmltuprsts m Ectie ades eeriyhand tet r a o ithe warvnns ato h ived uo srite ngcqett hend Rwalnbytethee lys Diiio f ars t h gr p: sek Byhoolsaeasecondenop iyonp rtt o Ad d itit l no. It h pride i tt ihrlan Jgirettettf tfetiorBrth Lcal-tegu 0 Ln Di tat e.inrth$banqu KLEGGETTegtKBRO:SaLegonEn-IrltelstsTursdyrenaIC h I L g O B S.tU d i t itsft h e t O rt te e r a i G L A SSt C O.h eoe F Uan siy ,ant e r knew no yywl Lnes e r vi n getheRs R pE er a ut h o ri txr ye f mu e e r e n-L s t e F t BU t n c h r m r os e rr ll .nf ar.t usn ., A t firnt, r o w w i o f7 e g aforlted oSuccessesititrutteiteneidt ear alN tts ,ipn iatleee-.Purp.slesn, hei Sit, anishto drses SGlass F or Any -Renort tetheiti ttttppttittCtiuiiMttilttiiy r d r r d a d ittllhltti'r t of hgherlearing" he eclaeunual j pobablhywes 11theben rmeen ofththe wovIIbe I a dmeHrdnno Baenon rei.n h va, e E Fsdkwu t rmLeio os I Gull~lO'M.a te eeed f p idtttt eAdittng.ite lwaithade. Durigdsugsesetdt ,i Seiltotitge iaSiAtc1tp t eA N otedtagn nt ryecreas C AI NG e e i i tIug yWORKh FEGwiABb hed AriEit -Theiteg ltdikliipiifid firm i bar ati timt bu etoCth KnaepiebkeritancseHyeteircto e T he says 22-e a te Uevrsiye ..itu-tittcettn t-etU I f tF.i~ ca pust-ei111et iP mutoIe; dh Bitnsh Fmnrr Alumnid A April 23G ystp; sn rC sititerestdientpo gA reareeItthletbeiiitli i 6 -tCil rgisrai o e dgi liEs; te etartt "a pLad t t mSl a LterBytreo etla etilh n BgidnsiS ortt-dpttre erip -Attdin"tseii a Paslpyt"putDr.u Lreige&T s.eh, Lrtaltn ViChalrug oEmEr"AN -P ria c a1 t t, etutmitl11tT miStet,ep iotfteis ylir. hee eit i it opit C p s get-i AmttotiPHNsE 2094e 04Ed UnP serfih A s ha. it ltht ifitor ittuitiMe -Ca edleftor hate Miaei s r on ldneo bMhe erg stest titIg tit HeldA-tiettr r seeittgCnaoteretit. nce sfrIth eC gr o s. ta uIt -I Cmtit e e it p tthe'esgy f-leit sir-, reute ittIta dtoiBite-euttpeeotUeversity dy skrt tt itn Apey .1 maerkdetddch smet dn, u in he S rig ho -r i t sg tnd C fInded.'' f or r mouny si Moy day.erariesdd, Chany c eheas fr t he r e aln datean students apr e gin -atovD rigehri of the 'Ad~a~er,' a shpettttiptshiandydJohn.-taritttttdAuitoriitiInthetlietlepeieateee'se Oureasl Fethtentd hidkt attert wtshe T th ri A etitg ai pthe terdate n w as oftthe sp ik e I g r .newsIpeialt she' bydenteothptbnyttoheni i50 mtsde ntrofssorheph a acti Teinrga nizin k ind h et Co ii e ltnchf orli U .of-the Epsolb eyL rCatct Eeisi ar d ngmember willreade etlht th m rcn V trn o m t f er his v Try sucessful race f no C mpr firdepls, iosloklieths east s o Gr lo. tr ace igs a f h Sg trchair.tininS ans tee.J. .s h s h ee ts N ron o tthe e"ste, Eery ofthteieithitated of LaingAmericaneandpper*ttolifeted LAiedhebf M r eorotocyce .pt NE wi e te etd t n h aqe, titrt i x ea eCluy net.Aayn i nt g ai. e d a me r d th a a ippendakecha rir dif eeetoItieser ttate a p mut ibrFl ori d t itleAe --lIa esttaend-pishtte b cudx ngivelyfMotohenwEEhAe$4ti oneauy isEo byhIt'I4ge Um-ust atskoldtoondnwhhairmay orhe ibtiRofaPo to ki it teed htt eite'Afatorafloe reallyfogrtleLatine thiihoo van ee i fr m mbrsOfth 'wllth cbea dothiTsday.' th at deven ongd Thr wilnbe a it d s u n'it.e didh e li ekt. iein siratioas d min israinAnd s.ou .t y, D a r. t oriatd pnthemotU n i ctr ---lettrh been entt mpIfntid Drll G.ul ia -tit' iiltert y dtflimt Ifastit matazine w tthe cltbe-bt BIL'S HOESHO lig asisantproessr phrt iC'iti ittanyway pi t ury iste whitig -l l reemle D A I mrsLai meiansurV r m aV Cutbu tl o th er rywsw ortd ,y n o tesgirl'I d t r s -m n a t e l t s .O o rs h l C a t e i m u t m r m SHOES i ,m b ot det woli n iitte it Ill ta t lr th'ewint uy re p eonrdaes Sbe t 51 -:d t rm ee llal rEEBRUoLncruded.nThen s iti t it iti s it F rle nd I anIuutpitfticitt1teSmmttSlit, ertet e iletelet e r s Frte y LEWndI EWtyeld C inrhdas tad.teTpeyr wll mke Aimgluestt, firuntd l th e Cm pu osaheethe aeincldnev erlst l vrbdy mmeaantnvrit aut Dept ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ S ..GAR tat Allthe pharmaltial Apnyduetered nth.tWstha tle isrsigsae.wimde nd e feeio that they ino ccert byga Ke nviaAnuemn htCoLtnpyhlge rapidAt~vn~em is fom Is ra Mlo.ti ieB curi .,Th C omer from o .-imm th e dystaymI na ad ngn th ued, ritus prast "'a -aeyout easPr incng i p ta ltseak no an o therWhfeatr neh ei nEfo fteEcco etietn fN h We egnnng dctngth Rde ad eddite Jlm Clta To mas. ly imposbl e tn o 9tee t Clast 01,r' aregh hlJ.0 11a.w ell, fve ig.Jen of i ts k in an f he Um.wul .i hetkepac n h M nayin LEGGETT od.I, in BcsBReenl eete oknw $uh ede fe t Iran:irretComitrteemias, I oua department ifacut o tl olwn h pigv," Rodeo Dr. Mlle,"L'a'gizvia te E.-tivCounclsferthr tiTll,,d Dr.eamberSteart metin Dr.-hi7t GA F o. t aete!m eoete11 .hn -ft )"lg fE -P aionside tsha t uh a, h rl reenIn d s urrty and are n iler. H aid tan-to ul Fr,-Pma t hin w e fterpsyc h y d oep ofCnto frfiaextov .E c tm a fmoscr'riyhoe telttr va crrna'evig spat, f teRan' d 'fe ocetan asi b he U ivri-' ivsono a Us he rrnm J By thWe Uay,.eAch strdedy paysngappenndindtheat it is htyrivird c In _,m os of a t ne19p oy Rlepaun. I o peSuccse BptCuc fcs on ie. re gem*en Ifr l "the" a a a iea ture.AGEabou induster ee cents fyorartha HRad otato BarAsfirst pnsan Penaeme.ut-_ for 3d Aiygs, Itt0 t11 Purpose A ege Klubs Nwel n I rte hs rhe npe CohnCatr t altr o u I lr j ink allrf co a d .a rl Ed1932-t1i In33), f EicofLainAy i atc t e rcilee & rBlue. er AcaLlgi WOociKy gtUA kownbN.Ti EDte gmbrsdfineGle e t he und stanynuihedpofM h imi; a tis ett 19Church of! A'tS PPN -Ke ak y henme Tls the NDP.S.,G O V ER N O R ""t ". H,,dic' Mr. "ity Of Calif I", Crew w-ll"offer tAeaAialt. Cut TOrrganizationormtnothes.eITy.DS. that is i)nM, Oi Smefor n-s, a n ,cpkuH E in Y Latin -----o-p affiliCtBe tyithttheprmerincan A.sl (1938-1-' -F .' rd s.e; hne A llvie .a Ch pte o Ciet nhi pro ivibtsttn And cpsr ---aies of for m er reside ts of h e E d RCdlub9mem b4erTsm p f; tshpla n ilng s ity alt n a kn d trs. in Sp Tan s, te ta Smoke r gst ..ISCblsesth ot c Le a ve U s Facr e (''in t Mni ean a y a t r J.2 ad 2 Dr an Ms.er o n an ndtheldte t S 9 ~ T e R E G pAT rsnhre lcddhi a es t d rsdnshv an od rsdns e otn srt '' D r .n Chares Jp bea n nin.g c Aat en Phonu L-aYal iraineneknowne asethe, onthtgen wgoden rs fn th l foredhe, uilingo e hpe la NES N w Sice 196, N S If earl a Fic~i ",o l aw, while m, M,, andAth. Steprn Me~ upr, Ce.s. n. have gonlistedoin "PreisgcrlpCoferenc rhis hair, e mightbe allwedntosignrfraft'fied dubnumpllra., eies met TrIroAnssdate,,andrb Spassisheddams, to benataunht pr minenc P. says: Year the IMCwill be held April it.The nyerlokhs freodf ir ba hrain.bamengthesuy er her tnisH ys ieco f II 22p4 t te nieryty. .ir a e a t en of F. e act this aly, eidsv.s.sea-El c .a, h 4 fom rsue t a tr'Spanshardni. H Schoid, wh I A eM diNg i C h~g y I e l id d a e 61 -t A d .to b r n e of F ll r w a r no p e en lit le n w hl, n e t Ds ri n ta co u se th e F.rrS p a is Wit deis n te C llge f A~iI~, it s av oimab ce,1 above, sCome bcdylean t1e1gy9 0's, 1.ystups f~os inflavr an top tur int restd in ento ologtare S tgdntsto S e-I A. Her fl a, eS i m a Nnelo t Am rica .Lt NAtre AUbeRiugh Idnes. Ater e e s earh,,a l awyeyDr. LepresenWer hnd-Latin T.W. Bryrnd, who waofprememder for Ca igress. Georg V. Ir TOPS-Ch.~rfiikl -t~of te plebe denttrsfrithe s uden 2 b ody in 11 a[te apedn t T o C a pu F19s Am ri A tselag i Ort e ., hemeig i mrEE An g ascre n ducti nal I Emphasis i alnc .sea will.b .a itmaLsak-it 1 lr d or t. i f yo m e o h f_ t e s ut e n ,ttr o fE IS J W E R REBU r Bord ft I" aLR. .ip uireo, r-d, n casino, president in 1914-15, is a 6 ,i teiJ .D. Butler, teiaeei a tterey State Superintndet THET Ptchair ean of the Board of C trl, netii ed prettitsly, t.1. and is re, pratmiuig Is," in OreIty fficilm.O land. The 1917-1918 student The nn-nf mit upn hs FAICTti non-tl iieii itiitt-onformttzie pontis hO F tee ibody president E. D. Beggs, net ilne n which the legal egles i Pensacola, is aAttone. predomAte are thoformer stu Pubinstrucio Bring Us WAY \ Other fimer student ti ttdydeit bdy presidents wh have preidett who have turned their uigt suless. ithe fildst Florida Graduate Repairing taents toward the lucrative field For stanc, L. .Tenney, ( preofI l -re: M L Yteite t124iiit 191t-lt i i tio tax as01925, now in Tampa E. .M :-;ssr rP "" mC-uty. T h e We Dye All Kinds Gi ti 1925-1926), New York; HEitttll-t9ll tudtt body pesideit, a n Markham (1926-1927), JackJ. A. Wnfield,oi s.a Stt. Road All Wrk Gtaratted OfSnvlle, also .member of the Dprtent "ff""L .F Me Shoes & Leather tBard of ontrl.i; E C.tPt1 i e; i 1 t927-1t9i), .ii eei-k. w% tcy Ged t0(8-1929 Port St. Joe; W11 D s t prinent G Minevhilebuso s Goods c S ~~~~Dukwa 12-13MLuivle esa.Chale Sherma. 0941 ),k OKy.; EF. Dixie Beggs i(130-31,!1942 s t reent a phyiin ona m a w wh is alIo pesideit of t e the Patitfi CtaLfi FOR BEST IN SHOE REPAIR, tochakrsE--be QUALITY MATERIALS AND v e co_ _ _ __ IIAnd Jewelry Week REASONABLE PRICESBelmt 0", L W I TRY H o to\0 W. -I--E151Anderson" Modern Shoe* 1 e PHCNE Shop O T YS The Diaper ServiceLE I SOh p rThe Anderson Studio Jewelry Co. Phone 897 The Hospitals UsL 14 W Ma. St N. Un1't1Ah H"GiinisvtP's Leadv Opie r t2108 Telephone 981 Jeweleri

PAGE 3

'fill 1 ppl. Ith 11-a l C i n t, d ;1.secndOs, trthiUlvrsto lvlordnGnsville, Florida n tioo bltob Mr S. 1940, at tho post tfice t, 0o Gansvttt, Floroda thOhAtsOf oC gress O 00"0001, 187. Substott)too sr $1.10pe o Editor-n-Chief ..Pen Gane Managing Editor---. ..Ted Shurtlef Business Manager ...Ken Richard Editorial Board H Ptotttooo ,lwhite:A,1Mottotbbt&o Id rPo ~ er ~ rt s Elt, onC a r t y lu o;n tElgt ry rhdit. nB l t lnos yOttEito tr'ot tOatClarke; Associ t polge, Dloweyo Hu. .hDnt, b Hutttdnso, J. lttot .R is, o E s lono Wattr Frotin, B Ot "Trboy" Moot OteMoto J mos Mc Eaddy, Chootr lt totr. bob Pars, Art Retot,, Sondy stttn.er, 0.w NAW_ S T ooto oStsttst nst h o ass anr ; loot sEOS Sr, Exhago Edto r; Etvtere tOtto HAydett hnds tns A log~ orheoooaig firel If 5n 2 Jneper, ttIutl d t Ed lcer. .u stdelt bldy voting 1 the elections last lhoroday, etei tno to rain, somo e othor iotportaot figtus 00 the onomber ol tois students voluttariry opeot working at the pollS 0nd1 jo cotinting the votes, should noot go hy trithout commttot Bill O'Neil, in charge f the election doy, ond DielS Brohite, in charge If tile vole cottntiog, pot in exoelleni perforntancto throoghoot the dot, oaod eveo to the early paris of the morning. Theoe moo, as oell ao all thooe wonheoelped tbeo, d sert e stock sf the credit that Besnt with the socceosfol electiott day. The B urger Hose and the Nie Nac aent refreohoteoto arosusd to thte vote counoters, which showrs the cosperatiln of off-campu firmn s -ith thg important electiln day. Aod, asbve all, the individual stadentsndioated spirit for student government aod fOr tho school y casting the tighoest vote ever palled. The fioal cesuSlts abso indicated tCtat the voters weOre thoking before voting, becaooe party lise were crossed and almost Il were split ballot. Let't contino e to develop more responsibility for good student government. Th Universit Ply H ost Tie University of Floridato Amerleian nstitote ot heromical Esogineero are playing hoot this week to the toothern Regional Convention of student chapters. Delegates from eight southern schools arrived Sunday oight to find a smooth-rtoning convention aboot to start. The program woo planned and organloed efficiently, and i has beenseted with ease on the port of the students bere,. Much of the auccedt of this convention goes to Willian Steed, Kissimmee, general chairmnoo, anod D. W. Spaoldelg, Jacksonville, and J. M. Mallory, Miami. These, and the remaining committee heads, should be comnoended on o job Moell done. This University is fast developing its campus, students anod rank among other schools is receive notice from all over the country, The Alligator clearly sees hso ipbrtost each organization, each individual is in continuing this good owoork in bsiiding up oc position mong scsols. F LETCH ER A UTO R ENTA LS s U-Drive-It Service I ~ Late Model Cars I hone 1t 509 W. Uiv. Ave. $ORRENTO'S RESTAURANT 1804 No. Alabama St. SpeCializes in Homemade Ravioih Real Spaghetti -Italian Cooking We Also Serve Seafood, Steaso and Chickend Spaghetti and Ravioli to Take Outr CA TERI T NG T Phone 2564-W IT'S NEW IT'S DIFFE RENT IT'S THE it ha en S 0 prsne it aeolthlato tesuet Diih -acigRfeehnei OPEN A LL WE EK -90AM. -02 MIDNIGHT -. a LOCATES 2%s MILES OOT ON NORTH ALAaAMA STRtEET For Reservations Phone 2118-J ENNt5 & FRANK ARNHOLTER, Props. Rooms for Men Students Hunerwadel House, 512 N. Franklin Street. The house is large, the entire upper floor will be for students. There are lots of big windows, and in addition, the house is fully insulated with thick rock wool. It will be cool in summer and warm in winter. Furniture is new, single beds, best steel coil springs, and best felted mattresses. There is plenty of big closet space, drawer space, and a separate study table with drawer and chair, for each student. The unusually large bath is very modern, with shower, and fully tiled in black and white An electric hot water heater provides plenty of hot water. We will have a telephone as soon as possible. We have room for fourteen men. As soon as these get settled here, we will furnish a kitchenette, if they so desire. The price will be $25.00 per Mo. per student. Come and see for yourself this very desirable place to live R e v ie w s -0 iUNIER$TY OF FLORIDA ALLIGATO, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 7, 1940 And Stuff By ,,.,I ivJigo EvergadsEdi yG dCrOr Passthe-Bill To Pas-A-Grille By Gerald Clarke B y J o h n sATO II hall clock at that moment, signometmstacioumnist, at lst -____.~By Barton Johns 0CA OF CHARACTERS hours forthe fgedsi Beforeithioing this e.e, puts things off UntilThr prin v ladeshdddie, r striking, Lend Neo r -osla bu oolt.Te hr eY Tusdy, Aprlii -Was it Earo sd S cl~oueo thtekhos itoh b oe.Tt Ssi ajusta sttnoiatc.Ths othcoc 0April Fool trik thatwe had good s ..ilixon b8e othro ughth bbed o ad C. hoio-to osarifie sooeSap .., hrezoie rbe e n thing else, or to violate the sacred w athertb heoetanddtterielact at Bunny Easter, the Wlf of the took her back o the fraternity trust of the newspaper deadline. e akpes .Levant DeWolf, Jr. bar. She was INSULTED when S the choice before me now ry ar otio et o s da smilingly, the ctoss-Eyed Bear Somebody offered her a drink, but as I. iOn my Monday morning 0 th a o mmendav le prtcnig on-t--nl .l.d.gFa W bh a a lady, she SWALLOW D -ls.Swith hope that my proodfnae ndmr hnoe TH INSUT bGhttjon fess, tS ks to toiog notos, I od dmoethn oneSue, Queen of the Coeds (next ed themthere, looking under all .Ofes t ffs thoughts ai out, od dirty look exchange between partyear) .Molly Wilkerson the bottles for Morty Freedman reembrh ns ofst weeks eunr. Ieoause ofmanin es Pinball MacHes (titled by his "ob," sed Lend, were you cetsb te erot yphny $ssteotce regulatons, the VA tonursc obso a baby) surprised whsn you got the c Ga05r ie b ihrInc e o lrs np tf una ced tt irst oheks at the ....Jaok thy Ae todeots Oominatio fop pesig h t pat eewil peiohl n It he seot Lends Nee (stlil at itl d B reot t in hp. .n y A second wn the, b d B cram Yes-laid beat arod Ohs -pies of stenesofromorell knson---.lNiaraMddston toeptanteopeobh aloostfele ot hcntsh sod Iosa littesa It. lnaplays trt preseoteu by the DiFzyW -,a Oda JERK 0 yh adi." 1 fnBereosytonsWthtVA aco When something is roadtnabiy 11 rece tion olass over in Bouidioig E. ------...~ liii Rutisugo 5iaod uiilaiger oalkod 1nSt pFssg tme, rhish at o the 0saeStu Peoson tiompbs seesoeredhy M e -iC Mongoloid dooandBnomiaid,"doy,e.0000f"em0 fs0h1y and 1incosbFronk n ntDonaid r s Gramptsin .Philip Maoin old, did you get home aeu ng quenwiahi its mte ihey Slat 511 Rothrlol to ths con N BORROWED TOM E I teay Gees. sP O'Nea, st ligbt? hef nut rillhi the adletive debusiness ofter a hrist hut edoanisbop as Mirial in DoeAR nUTH, Ha rod Ollange it, C. J. ardey, "Fle, tih mks eplied o o gighttI sod theat aou 5 d t tioou l Myue into Ohse anin Lohese Livengood 0s J n.n Jeek Doheely, Palmer P pse, acceptt tan t s 1 0a 0t10 l o abuhat Tuesday eas t os Pplaitroal oted out essu Oe t s INTJOAN,dRosPolodas my sreet seine dot stsppei On gem day hao to do Bith a chapter iBi Mntyhe stage tanert in O UR TOWN. m itmyd lingrs." Noth, this is not to tndemi t sin -'uesn histiy hound So ntergoi Lubov stuer, April -es the In Resero (1a Nort olide 701 my Trag s a ale "He d tie pleos whhich the sochsstra pitytnd reeking tto high leaven. bocrapby of Clttmont's U.N. Pool --....ADs -Thoo...a.s. .ti.s. .t.tAo doer -d. It oeasit god h eight mossie, It might be entitlsd-"Hw to srtotn it soud toll the sory-( q thi pOhs nt ohith I pe0rained Wv o Frilods and Iofsane Fos--f Ploid whinies. 'Teday hobs a Bunsiy an Eddi ate sti shuite way so th ro es fought ro i stating tos thoi it hasot tists"-r 1e DeathotCliitplaotoseulicontto turo ot5u,g 0e10 tttheir f t hose p h.her y itpastthb th amtb etiy Ofhts s oliegs andienoon 11 Twenoty Easy Lessons.''h 0 Ogalons of e-mentedo-ioes -oemeh Theettadsooer0 p0n0th.g snThtsaight pADtIa merehey oth Beshogpo ossasisiIthat said, ADiC shonid opeot. On that sui dbt Amoong the caters is our ittle hs -mS-mo-tuddy week 1 stgrapeOruit, 00inge, stARwbeer y, ia hog TO .BOTHERSWASH PACE Walter Pnols Osit lost nb05 the st-ry re s few assorted Otats As oe rt e thi, thc odio neideleery and peso a ."Jells, Noarg ihth e e m Pyi IN 0 aN I N G0 -NECKo AT -saint ass did. Stoasise ot the Departmsot eareec-ten, onen o oinces-that welvesworeorimioaS, agi" .oYoutleoisy OpEN tc toths, bhictSoftetm dey NIGI" unmenne soiggestoda proogr 10 whi th had be o selected 1wo s ikhs wilnlathed c So li, a s essOi the Krnpp muukitros CITY w:i is p1tying hern the a P TH Onng n -y the loalseetn b eidMo. shot,Oft, bosd-staned Gsnroiooloie, haveho enacqoittod. wccl Otrtbeoblidy.It iolide i-i thea'i~ y i e dther e s a tserhmids sag, dics Poole oas tooideoty exipetpg osim asd ot o d .h at a horriblong that ord eoe an d ploan seotlesssteadily i P1d 1isussrng atHerman Aud s oms utse ys hieE 'Ton fg a di. odofohldeoheshe too witht.os ChapNtr Il00 Mbetystdistuge magateeinestRstAlum ye 5 i h hy EE so autne fcidrn-es oeYs, hs' twudeflt nw as, Aoqtitted. project Ocfeliog of d speite to nd oi Wooeekd ld Ob og-l eELINO THEMOELVEI. Wthsn was. that Fraisedo u F nd is no e o Th deptht of ehil oO Ohese eu dasgerous struggit whiob Holly. 'I otba eg er Elyoy m d they ower scoted, it tos discoeroThe jovai assistant soiditotor OuS sidOD thstlh Mstissand hahe sot yet han todhed. At o3-desnldom ppretes. Ann Ohat atthegamesoaessoftcds dthtPtON eJakDhehdoty og the cochste had o l his oots Pa a s ot Arhig Hitle's par0thsy hse 'eo ieCrd.05s. .o .i d AldsP F. aai ste 10n WERE TURNED DOWN FOR and Paimer Puseso wes w the eniy prepoaed for the hiidrens pr. ersi hruie,aet g ughinghehid ieeeofthei ags i hisstOeyn ilm d tlRlme si orty EATS ndEddeas tidlbe -otones Oh fSe andOs. Thtmd gra and wheohefs onutthat ttohtoboack mstahsaitthemidIt u Ketppthat mtidedllt-ftetbttctyot cptut'eby toal deredtwhyioooebhd thogbteof three,oond Hroildf Hoan sak the a odiente was to tosirt f ran din-herdedsnof giant, foolish lerheorme tho rains hehiod the itts. The Italiao flm opened So Oha0 bceo e. OsS 10umnus bad tod Sipped in tu mole a fourth. Ed rsity stsdenbs, le was quite peAmeri0. Nai ine ws diectiy responlew Ysrk in 01d6 sod has been Pinoth that REX t TO A BEAJDoays 'nted to moke a FiFTH, turb d. 00 cse, there wasn't How the th-oveod h oots o sihie 0rthe reent wr and indiplay ig to a toedy udionoc eve p TIPUL WOMAN, LEEP A btt.he sw oDen Leuo good omuch thatACldbe do e abou toueeninTendyEa esos"0ha rlltonspssile emmllionsedwsinneethe .gm C'S F Te'HE MOST WONDERFUL ing eSintheiws ,ad in ut O hs situltiso-the programs were ond lothenwoaid, must ashe a10 steaths hbioodsbed and tortute. saded the difdetebt Olotity houses THING IN THE W5ORLD. Asthe batk doop, takmsg-his mash aleody printed. Jtsl the saime sttc wearily as repsI's, t-eli-motfAcqoutt d. I to ratoedcy nigbt. Tblt 5s tbo otber Told grd b d bees ietr d n portable still with him. he dded xhe to mo em nts of flu,. fite oi ugh the ts er-swept An who hill tquit the so-tallk i td hl au goty t r i ade ma d hirs m indg ho hing He tA h giHc y, Eddh yh d oe sioiFACE the Msndeissohn Italion Symphusy ground teillitg 10 the treathery heed sOttesm0nr the lespolsihility nd u t ttoo r luteol dis dt her ir.og H si d gusdg this ho has solath to Pdd weight to the program. So plotted an the sson tei halds of or humanity's future. When the edc anjustdn't l g e ORN ING -uECs AT Oeohetrsod onudutposdon't theoorid. lost pstio if eadis-tiity has Monday, Aprill-ushied ENNA RINOE.Buny descihd rtomineIt." tranO to play far nse the heads Nut w strever ho lost to the flto and toe dust soly settles Rert P. Trlstcm Cofnl a in "me onY old fewluwjwho'd pst 0 sPN T"s, I 1 ne," sughgd Eddie, of tbeir a udicos, btt st the dtoh, hbindwilded by sef-esteems er theru ns .h ho Kr m i e a C to tbe l ite ersity ri his 1100 iece of his shotguos her use h g ''it'o UNCANNY! cme time, they don't itho to ploy tog propagood, stimobling 1n she thte toeD craut. leturo 10 torehe io o m .-do ughter wasted a Q IET W -Soddenly the p odi hlaesd out doth to them. The eeionog POtM ort, of gat osineggreedyrhandst? Sop tho ous isf eternity i .The t M i t hdok bom dny DNe fJuttidbyu acnd let tt speciasos fash. Geog ,tetro~hey ; yea l 100Hott tonsgsrilour pepotuol tolninhoand uhioSng. fields herelstsummerotwhentbe picked itup. submo mes behlievedlO ryla g PilesdyaCo yeetwor dnC 000 t-ght a opourse in eive writListeo to this, Ielows, hi said, foaotb 00uoWf t eubt sighWe d ers that Ihe hserd repot on it, Cg.ha1,Ac uiwts mzedro the hpus s ndl WHYa ILL EVER JOINd RO'TC put to oler0. ROTC staff has gi s it a prne tty high ratiog. Wyesh Ytht t rnf Misslloth mutiny SORRIT LanteERO l A ottoged to tf pysesot. netk wsol s otos y Dr.rK u wgn gItwes ihn Letters To The Editor e a o idstge whic 0 1 tda n eoith yarktehf wer sea twd, atrwas d eTihdu ovl s ixtnthood 0 togh e n-y,twas boa fromc the ope a psatbe le resbyf cds eii antdAltsoan J eakefor Ttikou c stra thdlanhig te1 Avtatt hedndAdoa Miss tiil Of sisteE rwE, t in for n's e mernycneree" some time, one hilnih oeems Party oeareg mmend Students s toroed ItRomoeita elee SEATiaton atm.htiSai0oue osoeeoty wfoni soth,,me L eCrrs hend.hsInnow mtgistered'casidebly easou. I don'that hot ofoftering nshae so our olsge fem the sunday oeensisog hroadDero P er, Oet a0 the Ttursday oig t O pen .ity boys a11ng1a 0 up. youths 0 piay? 0i00 t shook os ts by h e teboste p ,, Th etoito tb edtor PumN az is prdomnasdty sed t 0a to iNg.iCARkN openEdan hoas n i 4. IttE dated wTOth a hiy them? I ftheb o hthea to go I n isaeetitheughckhe Pda~hstiqus gripes anod petty gtrincsto t hs student 10d7 Ae suth, it is e00000 holt lte with oo1y 5 thied ofism my lifo and don't oant to. try tl io yo his alshelu tde y by tbe; hut o roud like to hr different this oss time, It yO please, the ompany tootumed. Kort -ob he h ey t Sil dist oreys. I'm sue t sod to nd the stideot body for lub le l doter is the lecti lost EBbSa 0 a meadhng 0n the st ge .0I hate the NhougLt so sitepmost, oll they hoe to ou o thes wo iorthiis to hero a dferThu es nay. ln a nsoh suit to e otr riss ntwsIN IN a soroity bose -t h a ebt? Whats O hs diftoeresk soet anterprettion .Howeher. the s tudent Govenooet and Compus PolittC s an oll he piaud of 01s. Stndaot open 0as LUCIA bOth of o htteer g gosb e ey tveor a duel Nee t weeks hfadtuoo oncert wo s petty o he splendid Snt rest displayed at Oho polls to spite of inlo]ment DI LAMMERNOOR with Lily night. stolent will teol you,t so ut tmehe a disopoalnSm p o esthe.ThisofrietrshOrdbsetsnx m fpe otofhelStntonddnthtyNtPon aod Jmoroo netn. Most 0. idon't 0or e ai she e huir hoyordehest. I's o( pFtoslobad eightof thdepogra00 sotn -that Ohs largest oumher of quhl iflso d o otes teek odotige of threilling performatet as t hit 00 udgOtg ni got ttaeAadethed oohes ter I thoe duty to vote, Ohan ooy other election, Climpus, Lcel sor No Ols. Ju05i Soorling in LA BOHEME. 0. 'T A A BOY AND JUSTsrceraJstahconmutrspdo't No p a n clsim victory So thiseletio, f sotr lony ta y 11 0 s5 mpliometb DH NARBSAB u LE THY IDEiTHEY watto p yherealoste t euea wlies fith the depndeet mnes, oho, foe the first l o mopus hisJormila NoouT hrCo sag nLeTfl vo uDNilET t heirm 00 mos titth al t y 0u0btnombedb the feitero -ty oee to the unsmer of totes cost. Pole 100 Octaign 1n DIR ROSENT). sae fime oh ra mm' ctocry they ct.tid 00 siocei approittion 00 tho Ibbot Sody ftor donKAVALIER, Mouoohontous n soos Ed kd bt Bu y, and to10t-se o tedldr g' oicestoointh sidpiog tho ooodidatss of Obs AS-Studont lnd 0000r Psrties, lob we thso fact thut tbe Netroopsiitanui tibed that ho lhad turned slightly o tonshec.ednould loks to eotn opu pledge thet Oh goog yer tydillnd Stuidnt tontJptatiLg bereb to 00001c-ttr .Thn, 01 a ne osol,, be Today y ar uniersty stude tspe un, con-y ooto mon reakin g pr ecednts io real sr o to th students in hotd isbJlksiootellre ieut yoar. she Nilth St tpoffoight e Tio cetwsben enst eco-Hwlst. Iurpreua o onadunnwn.TeotoMaine ,athtoer Oswontay pael lttrdb, n ibalt 'Mdrodhavy;usyet, oti t s 71 yCloree-s ae e t ,um e mnhn betice ithiso hs etpe ot ball taT s tsighedi pletely acceptabBlteScoag sdJevC aryono AllKOtodoatcourtye__ in_ creative___wr it "s ton t oisie lEwo ."y heohy is, L k ab r .C l wl r e i ets todboghtmneeting on Foul nsohman, ChairP0 GaOtor oaty. Fi Thirteen hoo te isl OlH iht1 R~ AT" IthatIhaveboardreportoing,__ _amazedat ith tor'o kehow out poll rs-dasgvn tS pet hg if t C m u riinsi perneo htapssn" WYIL EE OARe up put"mOLle'rt.OHTCa"f o o ~ t m o ~ _ _ _ __ _ _ ___a_ _ __ _ _ __ _gple o t ' os l e o d er d t h uo ory-Friday k dodayou evl e ou lstTOPIC OF COMING ADDRESS Tht poe who drte ast t torob, ty ,0 byto ub t STTOaypr a asoto ess 'Freedom Through Speech' thotuash 5og tobng Ohrough Td STE lik BtB HPE "MyhohosolbheagotheofN ol Uk -i ut at the Nest Clo" himed D.Kug So ** th Peiotle 1. T Istoryay he to-Co WORE THERE'S LIFE" Teahoter:SWhat is 0hy0m-e aywat ckros: the u o dothbelwoedlcorse lo NOTHthPrin'rntpe dt A l fourinry eot, 1N."neverw oo t n Su d e pn s s so w-rsand moot pr-optayoer mthoiue ,givoghdoie. Tenbo'cllk 010 sttuk by t ue -tpay? Willit hoc cabt bxptesionltd thetsedtolf rcolst rely lxrrpisodto presenE e sahie tha esioodar th qubyshavehgointo *aemyston;bdtdgon'thiwthetrestrctis tratomettii t oul dd gsin'tde"Gooonight." she pupred at the tage of fre tdo r of isee sh sod he This is theie s hs 'FreedmoI fur late you if it hoppn d tor of leSloventh t n' g y heelos fgigttiyy dtogue-tied,'' 'holgh Sphech" comcs 1n, Obtell DN__ M__ NA_ CE_ Hot 'sloscieto says Do. Lssto, Hae, deetor of erdng tO Do. Hato, to-ho sobs. M rriag: A piblie contoession yorsel 5 soh bs ffi, RO O N E NA pey Ieo Opoocboot heatagiiT y.oitr idsaks ace strisogrdesperatesfu ttly'privatci Vstentie, bfoSaikeitdtspessdsf 0e pay?'ert tio og veroo thepSt e ohs eend efng "C, nd 1-lto ptescorv e p01e by diplomOtic *0*0* Sstdesns siskesx fhe: "io's n hhont gam e tyn teplei teredisp"ayedom emte, most 1of ulin it ob orDolieiutc iOOtoit: It toit'p of that's neveR heso postponed hs-. thrtotgh speelo del if noot 00 impossihbility to oxuthe gti that outs; i's wtri Saturday Only 30c of darkbtss.''. This siret -"Fre eedach -ss.rp yhtarr Pooe'jbo"Cndct th is acsshousetioa 'While t l the I e bf admi ona Nde Meulon Loo n o tho Sosttherg 5sea Assofa. istrfti o to pIgseme oue heights to "Htoo as te pa tyat tsoC whlel D.Hsle Is proslOeeedol", it Ohe* obligotis" of the night?" ~ b I~s At Forida doss, whro ii meeti in NashviIle, loiditoiduass to ieorn the eultue o 'b t? ___s___________party,_________ Tess., Apr1 7, sod .free xpeassion. bit tod whot partment. Thursday Thru Satud Dr. Halo thino s that too uoh He thosn ptositivtly stitos tho ohrI (y JIbics ne la sld of 'redom 00 lign lcti of th speech tetorer oi Poise: The.a thomee d ope th' 10 tob little oot Frew sho thepfiog speh; oin spirng its tesatiOn gtoino monthly h R0BAB L OLDNTLET booty, Throrg Spetih," gotng praati hy copahe ortisaos; thbosthergoy puyslthefheok.AY. gBA mXi ch ahao d to expialn: teohhisa its use 0o 10t mhe ttaboo, -Bu1vr Coisegoaoaneo CorP *ti0 Dod "We het hd 'Freedom of andesciing thetocent eoor of GRANT -U-NVE 1pech sin e the n oidang of the speeS h u 1 en an tomplised fact, toeote W y doot t hoe t" natldik,t thetimehsme g to hae ee adomthroughspeechny "oeld bzzoo m i somebody $Aoa Elo LDhTNOn Si sokes xopresssrAirseaiesngawayswhich coeta t usetofotrheitge. tooksyoohtoiey a ndoetr. dlsthaegos She hblgotioos 0om-0 Chesterfields nolnsutaa o ,thhsithS.thecithgT. s, o ro ,ig to D o. H 1 Is think ofh.s.e.peeve, t M O N T W O O LLEY I Tiot0m ftogtiti nBl cugJ .haran llSudns5aty."04kfF FreedohmThrCmghnCpePrh. .t ..0han.os t.t.raficnigh Al mcr i s is d Ctompo rtg the ivseedge eittzea to s_ _e_ pullupndody C n d Th 50 y "Thes mIdness of chsestrfsFs a puppy oho squirms 01en you Ctto _L_ _h GE s ldsnlateoyyst.' aretryingtoholdhim still, astdCOLuINaE theo psoptly lies downo and gins t ohd To,,fChesS,,iad s to aseeph miste eGOels s Opposes a General HAPPY SPRING HOLIDAYS! lag~es sling sios o is Aes. often fohgt tlhy 00 wgt to hg "e' coeges tbf siss-wdo ssr0r. atth ColNOW PLAvINGh v0fyO "Olse ssrloas Oreeosos arm SPENCER TRACY, LANA TURNER1 drunk.' __ ___ ___ ___ tsson pa sedthec fr ss eU ol x rild t rvn hi es f b fe : t e q aiyb it's here! Come in dnd see it THE NEW ROYAL PORTABLE. with FINGER FORM KEYS designed to cradle your finger-tips! Business Equipment Co. 609 W. Masonic St. Rent A Car-Rent A Truck-Rent A Trailer REASONABLE RATES Wilbur Sligh Motor Co. U-Drive-It Service Gainesviile, Fla. Phone boit 1212 W. University Ave Becase a general holes tax is a nuisance to the business which a."'e'*laes tax pla).cfes 'ur"'en*of raiingsteevenu"u'on"t"e ohoudes sO ,sooe I,, sab lto cay it, Coltn English is opposed to a ,eptea ,oles ,ax. After eleven continuous years' experience, as a member of the oeutvf* department o f h Stott of Florida, and of the Sfott Budgt CoMmksin, Colin English is convinced that. with the sound, economical tomeaete aoi~exissiesoaored btsoursaeovernmnt.~soos And,"oiho"ins OEgloish*asyou*e" t gove"*'r,' "eo oshoceti, ofsond ad oomiclgoenena oeaio n .because ts~o~oshts tohe kind administration ht promises you He has proved his ability ason ,i,,ad.a st,esmanand a leader. He has gained a thorough s-oedgeofsa oveGoorne throughelevenyears osucesmesoei a s semerofothOes soeror's Csbiset and asoa semberofit sher *;ortatstate'o'a*frd ndcommssonsdrng eadnistatonsof theegoverosiClinEgiseith ilwitss wththe Na~ttioofeenceof Gosto sscurs on agreemn-wf *lobthfesl egovenmet hy shi stk U tsdid Statswill abasnd o crtinls o tottss. eavesos+6si 16t the revenue of te stats Colin Englisoh asalreasdy dso 0re0tthinsgsfo Flostidasod,m yourGoernorhewl o t inueo sodo sitof thos ehns thatf wil meoveOth bestiterests of off FloridaoRead his 3J0point platform, then, vote for and ELECT S C 0 L IN E N G L I S H od",W-* GOVERNOR ~ mo e May A ,e apimeries Cmotprogamfor reate orida. Paid 6or by *.e iuinds of Co~aLn 4gsh 'CASS TIMBERLANE" COMING: TUES.-APRIL 13TH ONLY seldom approached by Hollywood!" 11 1

PAGE 4

4 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA ALLIGATOR,WEDNESDAY, APRIL 71946 MURAL MUSINGS By Julian Clarkson AS THE END of the year, and with it the end of the intramural slate, draws ever nigh, any suggestions for changes in the existing intramural program are in order, although this column feels that the season just completed has been the most successful yet. The intramural department always welcomes comments by students on the adviaility of dropping certain sports from its agenda or adding hew ones, and whenever a majority of those who participate in the program express a desire to juggle the slate of sports, a change usually follows in short order. Only departure from the 1946-47 program made this year was the elimination of boxing and the substitution in its place of water basketball. This move has since been endorsed 100 per cent by department officials, after seeing the aquatic sport go over big in the Fra Leagues. Most intramural fans have voiced their disappointment that boxing, one of the more popular spectator sports, is no longer included, but the great amount of conditioning required and the high degree of susceptibility to injury are strong arguments against reintroducing that sport. Many intramural teams have inquired about the feasibility of inserting billiards into the program. But anytime that question is raised, fraternity teams quickly pay their respects to Leff Mabie, Delta Tau Delta, with a vociferous "No!" Coach Cherry invariably brushes aside the question by objecting that "everyone would be practicing the whole year for that one sport." NOBODY THOUGHT THEY coulddo it when the tournament started but the ATO nine has waded through its first three softball contests without being beaten and the boys from the "Hotel" now need only a win over the Phi Delts to enter the Orange League finals from the bottom bracket. How they got this far undefeated, no one knows. Against the bracket favorites, the Pikes, ATO hardly got the ball out of the infield but bunted Pitcher Tommy Hill to death and managed to scrape up three runs. Pike hitters, in turn, sent line drives ricocheting off the ATO infield all afternoon only to have other infielders scoop up the ball and throw to first on time again and again. In their contest with the defending champion. DTD nine, the ATOs were out-hit seven to four and lost an early three-run lead, but by some strange quirk of fateaided and abetted by the conversion of two line drives ticketed for extra bases into double playsthey walked home with a 4-3 win tucked away. SPE, rated a weak sister, came next and actually outhit the favored team, five to three. Score? ATO 4, SPE 3. You're right, Charlie May and Co. that final score is the only thing that counts. THE BATTLE GOING ON in the Independent Ieague between the All Stars and Hell Cats is probably the most colorful duel in the entire intramural program. Each team likes nothing better than a win over the other and the fur usually flies when they get together. The Stars held a 532-501 bulge over the Cats at the halfway mark, but it took the Cats practically no time after the second session began to vault into first place by virtue of their acquisition of the bowling title. By winning softball, however, the Stars regained their foremost position and at present they hold an 854-838 lead over their rivals. The lead could change hands again following the volleyball finals provided the Cats can beat Seagle in the semis and then top the Stars in the payoff round. The Thomas Hotel Club Gainesville, Florida Open Monday Through Saturday 5 P.M. To Midnight Dancing Every Evening Larry Gibson and his Orchestra Every Saturday, 9 p.M. toMidnight Cover Charge On Saturday Only Tell Your Friends To Meet You At THE HOTEL CLUB For Reservations Telephone 1040 or 1296, after 4 p.m. r illiard Gatfors Slated For 4 Contests In Mississippi By Forrest Taft Taking to the rood for the sec ond time this season, Florida' baseball team headed westwar yesterday to Mississippi where they wil play Mississippi Stat and Ole Miss in a four-game e ries. Currently boasting a won an lost record of two and two, the Gators will be out to rise avv, the .100 mark for the first times this season. Bobby (Wrikles) Adams and Charlie Ederds, ragn asf SBlue hurlers, tsamed up lardSaeturday ad Csaden Park Io Tampa to handcuff the University of Tampa Spartans, Ole Miss Skunked Ole Miss, the Gators' foeon wednesday and Thursday, was, shut out 6recently on.some brilliant twirling by Graham Nix.on of Auburn, who faned 1 Mississippi batsmen in garnering the win for the Plainsmen. Those soadog the trip are: Infielders Bobby Forbes, Don Ford, Bill Reynolds, willis whittington and Bob Fielding; Pitchers Jim Hurst, Fred Montsdeoc, Jack Gaines, Bobby Adamso, Charlie Edwrds ansfAsfy Brcoke;Otfielders Dick Stratton,1Sil iPl and Dick Berquist, and Catchers Jewel Walker and Ted Ramseyer, New Lneoup Coach Fuller announced the following probable line-up: 1b, Bobby Forbes; 2b, Billy Reynolds; s, Don Ford; 3b, Willis Whittiagton; c, Jewel Walker; If, ill Pole; f, Dick Strato, ad r, Dick Berquist. Jack Gaines will be on the mound in the opener against Ole Miss. Adams, Montdeoa and Hurst will probably draw starting assitmntsintoremsaining three games while Bracken and Edwards will be. utiizedf-r relief work. The Gator nine will make the long trip home next Sunday ndf w31 spend the first of next week preparing for games with the strong Rollins College squad at home on April 16 and 17. Baby Gators Swamp Green (eve Navy In Opener, 13-4 Sparked by the heavy hitting of Catcher Roy Poole, Gainesville, Florida's frsh baseball team rans over the Green Cove Springs Navyy team 13-4 Monday there in thes season opener for the Baby Gator. Robbie Williams, Haines City, pitched all the way and hurled aoeatdfivobittera see sixBlue Jackets oketdoTdoe plod,.e ader swinging thre imes. Pools deip. sd his battery mate's cause by ponsdg dre sgins nsfo double for a psefectoday ad bat. ThsdCadrso~lcoachdfldeshmen scored seven times in the opening frame and won easilyast the Navy infielders committed errors at the wrong times and the frosh hit at the right times. The Bay Gaore will play GaesvBleBHigh onF lemdg Field next Tuesday afternoon for their first home game. Golf Team Tours Georgia To Meet Three Opponents Fresh from a resounding triumph over the Georgia Bulldogs, Florida's determined golf team will take toe the road this weekend for a owing through Georgia, meeting Mercer in Macon Thursday, the University of Georgia in Athens Friday, and Georgia Tech in Atlauta Saturday. The Gator linksmen downed Mercer 13-5 here two weeks ago and crsehd Georgia here Friday --, --, 15%i-2%i. This will de time the Saurians hvs md Troh hisk weaod dFlordaaaoI Alf word's Cafeteria 122 N. 9th Street "Just Good Food That's All" ""FOR THE BEST"I Come and Visit Us for your Dry Cleaning and Laundry Needs Student Drivers Clarence W. Daniel Eddie Hill 0 William McCowan Gainesville Laundry DRY CLEANING 720 W. University Ave. Phone 48 Dck Walker led Florida against the Bulldogs with a 74, teaming with Leon Sikes to down Logan and King 8-1. Jack Vidal and Bud Colt downed Spears and Pate to take the final foursome for Florida 7%-. Florida's season record now stands at four wins, four losses and a tie. A complete stock of glass watch crystals for round, fancy shapes and waterproof watches. Prompt 'Service. O8 i-t551---.5 60c-$1.001.50 Coles Jewelers 42 W.UnivermsityA e. Jackets T In Decisih As Fow~kE Led by Doug a powerful Go gregation admi 87 1-6 to 37 Orange and Blu day. Th Tech s first place posit Fowie, we man in last Y Conference me the 100, 220, 22 broad jump eve mother Yellw his own pole vs 12'4" leap ot Gators' Bily H put with a 47' hams took the I Gaors' other w Shot put -H (T), Lupton (T Mile run -C (T), Willis (F). High jump Harper (F), tie Green (T) and 6 fee. 410 yd. dash Hanskit (F), L 100 yd. dasho Bailey (T), Que 120 yd. high h (T), Peterson ( Javelin -N (F), Adams (F 880 yd. run Ghormley (T), I 220 yd. dash Bailey (T), Qo Ple vaut u Dyes (TI, ie (TI, Risr (TI tie ;or tird. 12 Two mile run Bevis (F), Corro Broad jump Harper (F), To 220 yd. low h T), Williams 249. Discus -N1 (T), Hills (F). ATOs Pa As Frat S Nears Fi Alpha Tau o step closer to of its brake Loages drau ney by nosing its third one-ru Monday afterno Orane touraey Sigoa Nu nine stayed in the ru 7-6 decision out luckless Kappa sd 6-3 s the la rolled around, times with the 1 on a wild thr shortstop withe Upsets were than the except Blue League as set favored Dl the Phi Gams p triumph over B their initial su0 contest AGR 6-3. Intra Res Frt1 ATO 4, SPE AGR 5, TX 3; DS 7, DX 6. Jdepede All Stars oves (sami-flaals); 5 ad Pestle, 15-2 A little poem at Canisius: Last night I h A handsoo I thought my with joy, So wildly did No other hand Couldfgreater For the hand turned outFour aces an Tourney Varsity Netters Boost Record With Two Wins By Sandy Scher Florida net inmade a clean sweep of victories last weekend, I toppling the Moccasins of Florida Southern, 7-1, and the Stetson University Hatters, 7-2, to give the Gaors a four won, one lost record before mid-seson. In downing the Moccasins for the second time, the Schnellen won every match but one. Southihurdler and capern's Bryan Meharg downed Bob latsr'cloder squad, Rggins, 6-2, 6-2 in the number ardn n to ac r 0S ingles Co captain Hory Terhesre Sturday. rllt(F)droppddthfirsdetdto ____er __ t y George Winchell (FS) 4-0, and trailed, 1-, in the Second before OP IGaors Wischel blew completely and Tercll cagtd sp o wn eee SSaihtg mes and cp the sss, ve Victory 7_532600 Borling WIs ack Borling (F) scored .6-3, stars 6-4 victory over Clem Hopp (FS), in a hard-fought battle which r"Buddy" Fowlkes, sulted in two tired young mn,a rgia Tech track agfor bots played a fst slamming nistered a decisive brandofeis.Reee Cooper (F) i 5-6 defeat to the had to gothreesets to take Whiz e cindermen 5aurTolle, (FS), 6-4, 5-7, 6-0. quad took 11 of the Joe Duayer (F) and Marshall io0was icie pot Feld IFOISupplied de coedy is nar's oinesers heir 2 1.2 hour weton match e, postd sol s in of 35 games. Drnayer finally won, lostrdlis,nsd 7-9, 6-3, 6-4 by getting Feld xd. Jim mydys, barted. The short Mr. Duayir tsimmy Dykes an Jackemnieroke would first attempt drop shots, old ecord withd witin die "chunky Mr. Field followwas tied by thes c sitsThent doyd dod bres harper. deodt i series of losg lofty lobs.a ida wos -d Both made several desperations iheavw vhilei w-shots from the dirt where they hig jump for th dad slipped, but Duayer capitalt in. The summaries: sized on Fed's weaknesses sod ills (F), Bergmans Frah we i detested Oams ). 47'7". orridan (T), Smith Gregg (FS), 6-3, 6-2 in a fines0 4:34.1. performance by both men. -Willis (F), Lengthy Duel for third ietees Terrell and Bill Oughterson were Commander (F). forced to go three sets before a baicgdocarg ad iHopp (Fat -Showers (T), 86, 1-0, 11-9 in a other loig af), .nsieg (T). 50.3. fair. Dunayer and Sorling downed -Fowlkes (T), Feld and Gregg, 6-2, 6-2. Thesk en (T). 9.9 sRiggis-Wood ce. Winchell-Tolleu hurdles Forward match was clerd because ofh T), Coos (T. 15.6. darkness with the score tied atd In (T), Atkdiso a sed apiece and games tied atdt ). 183'11" five sl1. -Renshse (TI, Tie Gators had little trouble 1 carnst dF). 149.wioth Sttsos, losing but two" -Fowlks (T), machs. Captain Bob Riggis (T. dto, -8,-2sa-d asee-saw sHarper (F and counter for frs',Lesdda Iossd Taylor (F), Terrell Baten 4'y. Harry Terrell (F) dropped his -Smith (, mat i do Pioky Zipprer (S), 6-2,it ids (T), 1012. 0-2. Joba Borisng (F) trounedV -Fowlkes (T), Cooper Kirk, 6-1, 6-0, hitting a ylor (F). 22feet-. hereehissopponent couldn't reach urdlesForlkes thers. Rece Cooper (F) launch.(F), Ennis (F). da 1 cool attack by staying insI T back court and letting stetsso los (TI Bergman player, Bob Harris make points b 1354%" -for him. Cooper won, 6-0, 6-2. a Joe Dnayer (F) won easily Loop 2 0-0 u rc eriss(8101 ce Loop dil Gugtersonoutlasse Sossdg dadthws 15, 6-1, -4. a oftball Con nd pprer S01 hoced off Terrell sn dOughterson (F) nish 6-80, 6-1, 8-6; Riggins-Wood (F) det fated Matddews-Kirk () 6-1, 60 Deamvdoe2; ansf Gnayer-orlig (Fl tmega mood hp downed Myers-Haris (S) 6-1, 6-1 doe thampiosip The Gators play Georgia and ra softballor -Gord aTechyout of town Friday out SPE, 4-3 fora ad tuday n victory in a row ,on. r babe t doeGardners Jump thde poo-sedig was idle, but SAE W ins In Relays inning by pulling a Y of the fire against Henr "Hank" Gardner, SEC Sigma. SAE tra I7 st half of the difth high jump titleholder and captain hod coined four of the Gudor track team last year, bst daily coming foarrd 04" is Birmingham Saturow ta fired dro diay afternoon to take first money two out, d ithe bar-topping event at the the rele rather first annual Southern Relays invi?tion over in the national meet. Gardner representDelta Sigma uped Tau Epsilon Phi fraternity, ta Chi, 7-6, and as The lanky high jump star ounded out a 10-2 sound up his final year of eligileta Theta Pi for biliy ast season while leading Ocsso In the other the first post-war Gator track edged Theta Chi, team. Gardner reached his peak against Miami University last year when he leaped 66%", good m rural enough for a Gator record. ults At Florida Softball 3; SAE 7, KS 6; Y PD 10, BTP 2; t Volleyball r Saits, 15-3, 15-1 NELSOaints over Mortar ,15-. Smokes k Chesterfields from the Griffin eld a lovely hand, oevely says: ft and neat, heart wouldburst "I pferCheseerfildsover any ster cigarettes because they're Veft.for ~ -THE PEOPLES CHOICE" it beat. soothing to the throat." I unto my heart Voted TOPS5-Chssterfield is the solace bring; largest selling cigarette in AmerI held last night ica's colleges (by ntion-wide sura d vey.) d a king. Starts;, George Hills, Gator shotput mning circles was expected to artist and SEC titleholder, won flourishiwith even greater'dhope bis specialty against Tech and will next year. be favored to lead the field In the Coach Frank Genovar, whose dual meet with Georgia. reputation of turning out crack swimming teams didn't exactly dwndleauy"thi year, will doethd Florida Nine Downs src adooonly oane solo-ill Harlan, Gudor captain-ana will, from all indications, have an over dampa Spartans 4-3 ardant supply of water-seeking candidates to strenthen his team so thedepartments it was weak in For Second Victory this year. Harlan, who led h poolmates to a second place in the Steady pitchndg,timely hitting Southeastern Conference and a la afd air-tight dieldisog gave eter coaquest of thdsconferencef Florida Gators a har earned 4-3 c pions will gr t onethi win over the Tampa Spartans in spring he Cigar City last Saturday for .Jorgenson Wins heir second win .In Friday night'smee., a strong Boby Adems, ace right-hador, Miami team, overloaded with indispplied the pitehing as hesdoled vidual standouts, held on to an out sixscattered hits to the Tamearly lead picked up in the first pans. Dick Stratton and Bobby event and, taking five first places Forbes provided most of the ofout of a possible nine, went on to fesiepunchdwido adohocerandoopoddtheir upper-staterivels triple respectively, while the whole ninth se tarpersp quad backed up Adams' hurling JodannyJorgenson, age-old ruler with theirfirst nine innings of erof Southernpools, garneredfirsts eros hal, in both the 220 and 440-yard Tihe Gaorsd ampedin hes lead events to take high-scoring honnothedsseondinetgwnd they ors. Jorgenson out-touched Florohed a engeteally ad thay ida s Bill Pepper in both races, self a 1-0 ead when dthe lastalsmaking the Gainesville lad's third sf de silth whenotdosSpartans defeat 11 meets in the 440. tiedfitup. h 0-adsi a o Florida pushed back into the Tie Lo-yurd wim saw Flor ead in their half of the seventh Shisbey by a decisive margdo do with a two-run burst that was become the only undefeated Gato aturedhr Odrahto' tfour-base swimmer in a single event th s alout, hisaseond digdtfa0 efey. 1serason. A freshman this season, Tasopa eame ricdd dbcwido Brows coppeddoeSEOC 100-yard another run in this same inning title, broke the Georgia Tech pool and the Gators' lead was once record,andshattered the Florida gain00t do boneslim run.a pool mark 0 ce-the second ti Bobby Foen ed e he gamwe iinecttering his ow previouslyhe eighth when, with Whitsel established record. Whittington on base, he walloped Billy Bracken, Florida's other along three-bagger to right field. SEC titlist, took his eighth The Spartans added another mark.trolge ctory oa doe sprdogr in the bottom of. the eighth but boardd in eleen attempts. BrackIt wasn't quite enough. en was followed by another Bill Florida looked like a diffe rent -Florida's Bill Harlan-who saw all club than the one which boothis last collegiate diving action ethatlittlerouyndriteobje for the Orange and Blue in this onsfsofreelydmrinsgte sea-meet. eon'sdfirstdthreegames. Philadelphia Judge: "Have you earned a 0dollar ins yor life?" Prisoner: "Yes, yor honeor. noted for you in the last election." -Pelican. MADE-TO-MEASURE CLOTHES For SPRING & SUMMER Expert Alterations At BEER'S TAILOR'S 421 W. University Ave. 0worldf titleholders. Mr. Peterson is s now regarded as the greatest trick shot artist do the world. Both men will give exhibitions Satur. day night at 8:15. Defending champion in both the pecetdend threc"shiondns is Florida's Leff Mabis, who he, *dosminaded dienadiosnalscee for several years. Now a senior in law school from Lakeland, Mabie n first copped the national pocket n billiards ditlei o 1943, and after spending several years in the air e corps, returned lastsprianc dodte atdionwidedtourneymndaddedoth three-cushion crown to his string, New Record Mabie cracked a 15-year-old record recently in the telephonic qualifying tourney by chalking up a perfect score of 10flod o in pocsket competition. An early release of the list of contestants for the fordicomi ng surnamen showed die Florida star estdred anolp the pocket divisi onbut according to reports, the tournament comd mittee has placed Mabie in three cushion play as well, allowing him to defend both his titles. Mabie's toughest opposition in d the pocket division is expected to come from Jack Brown of the -University 'of Utah. Brown compiled a 99x1O score in the telep phonicto urney to finish on the 'rbcamseherds. Large 5'eld ) Contestants are also entered from the University of Wisconsin, eIdianKa, Koucky, Minnesota, Corell,dodimna Sdade, OQio Sat, Colorado State, Rhode Island State, Idaho State, and the University of Chicago. Tourney partipmt owill be take on a trip to Siler Springs Saturday morning. Saturday night sthe contestants will be feted at a closed banquet at the Thomas s Hotel with winners to receive awards at that time. 9 -BIG DAYS OF STOREWIDE SAVIN65! unusual va lues.tems you USO daytaogaye,.savings, on each Starts Thursday April 8th, 9 a.m. Sharp 130 W. Main St. Phone 2580 Gainesville, Fla. GENUINE MoPar Parts And Accessories Maintain Pride Of Ownership Brooking Motor Co., Inc. 231 E. Union St. Phone 1424 DODGE -PLYMOUTH Serving University Students "SINCE 1926" .1! e I k ).Tomorrow Former World Champions, Top Collegians To Perform By Julian Clarkson Two former world's billiard champions and the 16 top collegiate cuestick artists in the nation, representing 13 colleges and universities, will aosemble on the Univer. sity of Florida campus for three days beginning tomorrow as the Charles C. Peterson Invitational Collegiate Billiard Tournament gets under way. Jointly sponsored by the Billiard Association of America and the National Association of College Unions the tourney will begin at 1:30 m. tomorrow and will continue through Saturday afternoon. All matches will be played in 5ryan uaior iankmen Lounge at the Florida Union. Participants in the aio,l meet, including four coeds wh will compete for the femin'ld Drop Lat-M eet title, were invited on the basis of scores posted in the recent na. By John Williford tonal telephonic tournaments. Climaxing their 1948 season dElhlosth e 12 mule contestants with prospects of being one of the rail, dake part e pshoe, straight top tank teams i the South next i or dreeg chionhcopeti. year, dies Cor swismmers were in depending onwicsh of td, eased out y he University of three categories each man qualiMiami lastdFriday night in a wellfied for. matched meet, 42-33. Champions Here With a host of promising freshman swimmers and several exReferees for the tournamentwill pected transferees, the Floridians' be Charles C. Peterson and Andrew perennial reign over Dixie's swimPonzi, both of whom were once