Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non - profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
030512316 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text


Ambitious Fraternities Pledge OverH E F LOEA O

225 Incoming Students 1ge- g LIf AT-

Frat Men Active AU, E /t IIIf S
As Enrollment Rises College Night
I I 0 U -i0 rI afLV A AlI n D ,-, r-AVVII CI,,,,- .. .. .. .....


The University began its '45
fall semester in grand style last
week with the fraternities car-
rying on an extensive rush pro-
gram, The pledging deadline, 9:00
p.m. Saturday, found more than
225 boys pledged. The following
are the names of most of the
pledges:
ALPHA GAMMA RHO
James Chapin, Vernon Culver-
house, John Fowler, Bernard
Dowling, James Faulk, Neil
Faulk, Joe Pate, Jerry "Bishop,
Burnette Pape, Billy Fentworth,
Walter Woochard.
ALPHA TAU OMEGA
Billy Bently, Earl Patterson,
John Reints, Bill Womble, Earl
Bland, Bill Bond, Henry Evans,
Clay Fields, John Fountain, Bill
Holt Terry Lanier, Gus King,
John Lee, Ralph Mabie, Dickie
Mead, Lloyd Morgan, George Nel-
son, Ed O'Connell, Bill Rogers,
J. N. Royal, George Starkes, Jim-
my Thurnan, George Todd, Jack
Cannon, Jimmy Coughlin.
BETA THETA PI
Ray Winstead, Stanley Poole,
Jack Spann, Jack Brooksbank,
Charlie Albritton, John Wilcox,
Howard Rutledge, John Thomp-
son.
DELTA TAtU DELTA
Claude Appenzeller, James At-
water, Ronald Berry, Millard
Boothby, Charles Drake, William
Hart, John Hively, Lloyd Hull,
Aubrey Janet, Ralph Morgan,
Herbert Mullis, Doyle Ogle, Jo-
seph Sincore, William Walker,
Perry Watson, Bruce Westberry.
KAPPA SIGMA
Elmer Hill, Bill Pace, Jim Cog-
gins, Allan De Loach, David How-
ard, Foster Jennings, Curtis
Weaver, Bob Rhingdhal, David
Hedick.
PHI DELTA THETA
Fred Hampton, Bobby Wright,
George Croy, Hugh Harris, Ed
Pynchon, Barry Smith, Jim Camp,
Dai. '-Brayton, John Hill, Bill Mc-
Coy, Robert McGowan, Bill Trip-
lett, Jack Nooney, Bill Bryant,
Dave Budd, Earl Mallard, Roy
Diggans, Francis Brown, Byron
Goss, Byron Pell, Hugh Cobb,
John Dowling, Jimmy Lester,
Buddy Savory.
PHI GAMMA DELTA
Bill Curry, Wilson Smith, Jim
Montgomery, Dale Warner, Mike
Byrnes, George Peacock, Bob Hud-
son, Bob McVay, Harry MacDou-
gal, Jack Admire, Luis Guerra,
Carlos Casteblanco.
PHI KAPPA TAU
Bob Butler, Duane Savelle, Doz-
ier Laird, Jimmy Echols, Tony
Pullara, Phil McCloud, Lloyd Jen-
nings, Donald Harrington, John
Farmer, Donald Padgett, Eddie
Hill, Fred Brett, Oswaldo George,
Tommy Guiccardo, Joe Treadwell,
Jack Gautier, Lawrence King.
PI KAPPA ALPHA
Al Albrinson, Bill Boyd, Wil-
son Boozer, Claude Campbell, Don
French, Bob Hallock, Lloyd Hen-
Continued on Page Three


Gen.

Pays


'"The human element-the kind
I gained at the University of
Florida-was the biggest factor
in winning the war," Major Gen-
eral James A. Van Fleet, com.
mander of the Third Corps, has
disclosed in a recent letter to
President John J. Tigert.
A former head coach at the
University in 1923 and 1924, and
professor of military science and
tatics,. General Van Fleet has
been in contact with the Univer-
sity and -his former associates
since he left.
In a recent letter to Dr. Ti-
gert, General Van Fleet said of
the war and the University in
part: "Throughout this war, as
in every war, the biggest factor
in winning is the human element.
The most of what I know of it
was gained at the University of
Florida, dealing ever and ever
with the student body and in par-
ticular with ROTC cadets and
Gator athletes.


TH eLOIDA ALLIGATOR GAINESVILLE, FLA-,SET-2L,14


Freshmen To Meet
Dr. Tigert In Union

The traditional "College Night"
ceremonies and President's Re-
ception for Freshmen, sponsored
by Florida Union, are slated to
be held tonight at 7:30 in the
University auditorium.
Activities of the evening in-
clude a pep rally at "College
Night" and, the introduction of
Coach Tom Lieb and the football
team to the freshmen, to be fol-
lowed by the President's Recep-
tion in Florida Union where first
year men will meet University
President John J. Tigert and the
deans of the various colleges.
Refreshments will be served.


Murphree Recital

Marks 20 Years

Musical Service
Claude L. Murphree, associate
professor of music, will observe
his twentieth anniversary as Uni-
versity Organist, in a special re-
cital in the University audi-
torium Sunday at 4 p.m. The
program, including works by
Bach, Vierne, Yon and several
American composers, will be a
repetition of the first program
ever played by Murphree in the
auditorium, in September 1925,
the beginning of his sophomore
year at the University.
He obtained his A.B. degree
here in 1928, and became a Fel-
low in the American Guild of Or-
ganists in 1934, following a year
of study in New York City. He
has given about 475 Sunday after-
noon programs in the auditorium,
in addition to many more in Flor-
ida and throughout the South-
east.
For the last ten years Murphree
has had charge of the music sec-
tion of the C-5 course.



Gator Escapes

From Cage
The Florida Alligator is on the
loose again.
After a summer in hiberna-
tion, the campus wekely news-
paper this morning swung its tail
and came to the top for a breath
of air under the guidance of
Johnny Walker, editor in chief,
and Joe Pero, business manager.
Publication was charted Mon-
day night when 20 men and one
woman met under auspices of the
Board of Student Publications to
apply for staff positions. Besides
Walker the following emerged as
Continued on Page Three


President's We/come



/Message To frosh

TO ALL FLORIDA MEN, ESPECIALLY THOSE IN THE
FRESHMAN CLASS, GREETINGS:
There. has never been a time when I have had keener
satisfaction in seeing you come to the Campus. The war
years brought us trainees but they took our Florda boys
away from us. My hart beats anew as I see the Fresh- PRES/ENT /IT/7EgT
man caps appearing in numbers on the Canmpus.
Be assured that everything possible has been done to make your return to the U
versty pleasant and profitable. You have been acquainted with our organization a
our plans during orientation week. If there is any obstacle which stands in your we
please come in and let me try to help you remove it. Meantime, we again greet y
and welcome you into the circles of Florida men.
Sincerely yours,
John J. Tigert,
President


Glee Club Plans

Busy Semester

Attempts To Surpass
Past Attainments
The U. of F.'s most famed
musical organization has long
been known as its "Ambassadors
of Good Will." Since 1925, Flor-
ida has boasted one of the finest
vocal organizations in the coun-
try.
A testament of their quality was
their appearance in 1940 at the
N. Y. World's Fair, and their fre-
quent successful trips each sea-
son throughout Florida and to
other states.
But previous performance is
not going to be sufficient this
yearany more than it has been
in the past. The 1945 doings will
be the subject of student niterest.
Much will depend on the quan-
tity and quality of the fresh-
man turnout this month. A small
group of men remain from last
year's club and around them the
'45 Glee Club will be built.
Prof. J. W. DeBruyn, director
for many years, is planning to
teach the rapid recognition of
notes to speed the rate of learn-
ing new pieces. Students will
have the opportunity to judge the
success of his efforts at a Christ-
mas concert and at least one
other local event after that.
Interested men should contact
Prof. DeBruyn between 2 and 5
on weekdays at his office in the
Auditorium. The work, as he
puts it, is not easy, but the
profits are considerable.



Grid Opener Is


Tomorrow Nile

Gators Start Season
Against Blanding Team
When Florida's Fighting Gators
take the field Saturday at 8 p.m.
in the season's gridiron opener
against the. 63rd Infantry Regi-
ment of Camp BTanding, they will
be captained aby Kenneth Hamil-
ton, veteran guard and sophomore
from Daytona Beach.
This is the first meeting of the
two teams and little is known of
the strength of the Army eleven.
One sure fact is that they have
a great ball carrier and triple
threat in Kenneth McLain who
carried the pigskin for the Gators
last season.
The squad this year is made up
almost entirely of Florida boys
with 38 out of 49 candidates for
the team hailing from this state.
Other states represented are New
Jersey, New York, Minnesota,
Texas,. and California.
Head:. Coach Tom Lieb reports
that_ h has a better team this
year _ian last, which should in-
Continued on Page Four


FALL ELEUiILJUNS
Dean of Students R. C.
Beat announced yesterday
that student body elections
are scheduled Thursday from
2 to 6 p.m. The polls for all
balloting will be located in
the annex of Forida Union.
The deadline for submitting
names of candidates for of-
fice is 5 p. m. Monday.
Namesare to be left or sent
to the Florida Union desk.

Phi Eta Sigma Asks
Eligible Students To
Report For Interview
All students who think they are
eligible for membership in Phi
Eta Sigma are invited to report
to Room 3, Language Hall. Elgi-
bility requirements are: "On the
basis of his first 32 hours, or less,
the student must have earned at
least 112 honor points to ,be eligi-
ble for initiation into Phi Eta
Sigma."


Eminent Cuban

Speaks Tuesday

Collazo, Lion Pres.,
Will Visit Campus
Dr. Ramiro Collazo, newly elec.-
ed president of Lions Intern.
tional and one of the most pro.-
inent attorneys of Havana, Cu..
will visit Gainesville next wee,
Dr. Collazo will speak at
special assembly to be held in t.
University auditorium at 11 a..
on Tuesday. Classes will be d..
missed for the hour in order th
both students and faculty m
have an opportunity to hear th
distinguished Latin American. LI
Collazo attended the San Fra:
cisco Conference and no dou;
will discuss matters of interest
pertaining to international a: -
fairs.
Since the University for a num-
ber of years has maintained a cor
dial relationship with Latin Ame:
ican countries through the Inst:
tute of Inter-American Affairs
it seems appropriate to have o
visit from this distinguished citiz
zen of Cuba.


More The Merrier

University Gets Coeds The

Hard Way As Gals Filter In

Female Population Increases As
New Rulings Become Effective


By Jean Whitmore
Women-On this campus?
You're batty. The University
is non-co-euucautonai. xne
catalogue says so, the Legis-
lature says 'No wonien, thank
you,' and the Board of Con-
tral states it quite emphatic-
ally. But, there are ten women
in Law, six in Pharmacy, one
in Engineering and many
more, even some graduate stu-
dents wear ruffles and curls.
How can they be explained?
Do you know that a member
of the species actually appeared
at the Gator Veterans' meeting
last Tuesday night? All that is
known, is that she was a WAVE.
Her name, what she's registered
for, or if she is really registered
those are the mysteries of the
hour.
- Everything Is Legal
To set your minds. at rest, if
you will take a high-power micro-
scope and peruse the catalogue
diligently, you will find that wom-
en, real women, may come to this
bachelor intsitution without hav-
ing their throats 'cut completely.
/ There have been great con-
cessions made to them in the
last few years. First, they
were allowed in Pharmacy
and Graduate Schools. With
the onset of war, they were
permitted to enter the Law
School with only two years
of college credit. Last year
t e venerame iLegislature


Legislature broke down and
played 'Lady Bountiful" by
saying veterans' wives could
come, provided their husbands
were here first.
It was last year too, that a
place in the dorms was, made
for them. True it may be
tihe bleakest, most distant
outpost of Murphree, but
there are thirteen who main-
tain it well. Four flights are
good for the figure and, pack-
ing lunch so you can get to
class on time is economical,
or so they'll tell you in the
Director's office.
/ Bachelors Beware
For the benefit of hopeful
bachelors, the girls are all either
married to Gator veterans, or
they are career women. Did you
ever date a career woman? They
converse of dejury, defacto, and
de-lar; of pills, elixirs, or tur- .
.bey specials. They can compart
by the hour the best methods for
chasing ambulances, or how thin
you can slice the ham for sand-
wiches. The newest type of
diesel engines, or the application
of the laws of force can be made
most fascinating. If you enjoy,
it, more power to you boys, but
don't say you weren't warned.
Sometimes they, may feel
that cutting their hair and
wearing long pants would J
make them less conspicuous
but as time goes on the nmn3 1
Continued on Page ThbeQ


"Any success I may have
achieved as a combat leader I can
give due credit to that experience.
And I ought to particularly
thank you (Dr. Tigert) for your
good guidance and constant en-
couragement." ,
In replying to General Van
Fleet, Dr. Tigert wrote in part:
"You record in the war has been
extraordinary, but nothing be-
yond what I would have expect-
ed of you. I have always
been impressed with your military
qualities, but more so with your
character." /
General Van Fleet's part in the
war brings to mind that over 10,-
000 'Univesity alumni have serv-
ed in the war, with 313 of them
paying the supreme sacrifice. Fig-
ures compiled by the Alumni Of-
fice disclose that 66 ar still miss-
ing and 12 remain prisoners of
war. There are 116 faculty mem-
bers serving the armed forces.


Van Fleet, Ex Gator Coach,

Tribute To University Spirit







be floriddA ligjWLtE
-'En rped assecnhd-clasb 'matter at the 'post office .at
Gainesville, Florida, under the Act of AuLgust 24, 1912 a IL 5H $
Jiu'blisaie weekly during the academic year by the' Student Body By Donald Walker-
of ,the Uniiverfsitv of FloInriTda Gainesville


William Lowry, instructor in Journalism, Laboratory Coordinator.
J ran y W alker .......... ............ Editor-in-chief
Dave Sage ....... ................ anaging editorr
Jiie Pero ............ .......... ... Buasi.ess Ma"a.ger


Editorially Speaking: 'i

BLACK AND BLUE BULLETIN
A few days ago an unknown individual grnduatted
from the 'ranks of the petty pranksters into the "bg time"
when he produced and distributed a fictitious copy of the,
Oran'e and -Blue Bulletin.
The copy was entitled the 'Black and Blue Bulletin'
but this artistic touch seemed to escape detection. Any-1
"way, the thing appeared one morning on bitlletin bo'ard-i
all over the place, and was generally mistaken for the ,
Orange and Blue.
As a result, several hundred freshmen turned up at
the Infrmary to report for a Wasserman Test which had
been announced in the fictitious bulletin. Needless to
say. the spectacle of several hundred assorted freshmen
mnadly clamoring for asserlnan tests didn't leave the In-
firmary staff unaffected. A great deal of time and energy
-was wasted during the resulting confusion and the infirm-
ary staff, already severely overworked, was, to say the
least, njihappy about the matter.
'n tne interests of truth we must admit that the whole
fiasco has aspects of humor. At the present time, how-
ever, the entire University staff is working harder than
.ever before. The problems of reconversion are keeping
them after hours. Things like this little incident do not
make the job easier.
We have no quarrel with a general b,1lini i rin,,g of
Wasserman tests and we feel certain that the. infirmary
is not adverse ') giving an .occasional Wasserman. But
this is not the point. The point is that an already over-
burdened staff has been given more work-and we don't
think anyone should be overburdened with work.


WELCOME FRESHMEN


The movie week at the Florida
begins with Betty Hutton's por-
trayal of Texas Guinan in "Incen-
diary Blonde." It iS a Paramount
production in technicolor playing
today and tomorrow.
.Although it has been said that
the movie garnishes Texas Gui-
nan's career and endows her with
a better character than she ac-
tually had, little has been said
against :it's efnter'tainmeht Vralfie.
Miss Huftton lives up to such:
a title as the "Blitz Blonde" when
71-e -sings "Oh By Jingo", "Row,
Row, Row", "Ragtime Cowboy
Joe," and other songs. Included .
in the cast are Arturo de Cor-
dova ("Frefnchman's Cree"), Barry
Fiftzgerald ("Going 9 My Way'),
oharles RPu ,:-. and M1abel
kdamns, mother of Betty Hutton,
Who pldys an hysterical woman
'during a rodeo sequience in the
film.
Columnist Isn't Domestic
One of Hollywood's finest and
most versatile actresses, Barbara
S"t r,. -:k, co-stars with Dennis
Morgan in the Sunday-Monday.
feature "Christmas in Connecti-
cut". This is zt excellent War-
ner Bros. comedy, but it doesn't
give Miss Stanwyck much oppor-
unity to really "emote" as did
"Double Indemnity" or an older
one, "Stella Dallas.'
The story 'concerns a young
woman who writes a monthly
magazine feature "Diary of a
Housewifee. Seaman Jefferson
Jones (Dennis Morgan', after re-
covering from an 18-day diet of
nothing on a rubber raft in the
Pacific, arranges a visit with the
author of the feature through the
i, /i,-'- in order to try some of
Lhui iu nth-watering recipes meh-


d eoiti in the Diary.
We take this opportunity to pick up students only at here's a flaw, though. The
in the first issue of the 1945-1 1us Stops. It io dangerous columnist turns out to be unmar-
46 Alligator, to welcome' to thumb elsewhere. ried and inuch more at horde 'at
Another thin.i of import- a bar than at a kitchen stove..
new mel to the Universit aance is getting ij.,o the habit But this is only backgrouifnd for
campus. It is our hope that of reading the Orange and the movie, and Sidney Greenstret,
the freshmen will learn the: Blue bulletin every Monday, Reginald Gardner, S. Z. Sakall,
I -nyand Una O'Connor also take pasAt
-ways of the Florida campus Wednesday and F r i d a y in waat follows.
and that the class of '49 will Posted in all University They're All Here
be Florida's most outstand-1 buildings, the Orange and After exploiting 'to the nth de-
ng. Blue contains important all- gree the horror possibilities of
Inf order to make it 'easier nouncements and lost and 'the hnummy, the wolf-mah, D'rac-
for the new men to acquaint found information. ula, etc., a Hollywood comliaffy
themselves with college life, Fresimen, ofco s e, combined all of them to make
ewe are gwoit to pse on li, h eshmen, o1 cours e, ""House fo Frankenstein", show-
we are going to pass th a should remember the campus iikg Tflesday and Wednesday. The
few hactpeful suggestions that hellol" tradition that of movie is being shown as a regu-
will facilitate "learning th. speaking to everyone you lar feature, but it doesn't greatly
ropes. meet on the campus.. outdistance the other horror pic-
First, there is the rule that To the men, familiar with tures.
college students follow in college life, but new to our bracken ings
thumbing rides to anct from campus, we sincerely hope Paramount's "Out of This
o w n. For convenience, that ,, World" coming net Thursda


Canesville people ar'e asked


'RLLIG IOs
SACTIVITi1




S PRESBYTERIAN
Ech Friday night of this se-
mester, except when the Univer-
sity schedules a major event, the
Presbyterian Student Sessionh
:Hose At 1606 W. University Ave-
nufe will hold an upen House gath-
-ring from 7:30 to 10:30.
All University students interest-
,c iY? t-he youth group Are invited
'io drop in and bjecomie acquainted
Nwith "Fred" Widmer, student pas-
'or. Pirg pong, games, a victrola
ind large collection of records, a.
.olley ball court, and other con-
vennchees are available for the
',ise of students at all times. The
:obuse is open for use all day
:'very day' in the Week.
,Ahedule tor Siunday, Sept. 23
it the First Presbyterian hurch in
., ne-'.lle: Sunday School 9:45;
morningg worship, 11:00; youth
;"'. and supper, 6:30; evening
i 'e 8:00; Open House at the


>...... 'u "" '.U *0 U,- riday and Saturday will be
sidei- yourself a Florida man. found to be a somewhat above-
the-average musical coinedy. Some
Student House, 9-10:30 of its features are:
Religious Notices Eddie Bracken using Bing
All religious notices and church Crosby's Voice and Frank Si-
notes should be handed in at the natra's tie to make the bobby-
Florida Union desk, no later than soxers swoon.
12:00 noon, Wednesday. They Diana Lynn leading an all-girl'
should be type-written and dou- orchestra and taking care of the!
ble-spaced. biano too, including a specialty, I


N.W.LAUNbRY


bftY CLEANING


614 W. Univ. Ave.


Ph-Ihe 257


OUR BRANCH OFFICE

1910 W. UniverslIy Ave.

or

SEE HERBERT WILLIAMS

Owr University Driver


Sintftamu is "

Begin Soon

t.brsetohb6 Stn@tas
Start Tuesday
.Singles in the horseshoe com-
petition, slated to begin Tuesday,
will be the first sport in the IUni-
versity intramural program, ac-
cordring to Buck Lanier, st,'de.-nt.
intramural director.
The program will c6nsgst of a
league made Up of fraternities and
other independent (o iariizat,.n--
an the campus. Scheduled thi
yehr and listed in Order a rei
horseshoes, singlee and dot.ii'bi.
-",nrrnng. ib'oXing, basketball,.
r" ng pong, sifigles and m:ioil:.les,
touch football, aid h'afflebobad,
sifigiTes anid doubles.
tariier announced hIs staff a.
fllows: Abbevy Fink, assistant
student dir,e:'t.,r of publicity; Pete
Samdmnon, head official; Billy
Wynine, field judge; Dick Balmond,
office manager.
"The rules will be the same as
last year," said Lanier. There
was 64 percent student partici'pa-
tion in 1944 when the cup was
won by Phi Delt.

RATIONING
FATS, MEATS, etc.-Book four red
stamps. V2 through Z2 god through
Sept. 30; A1 through E1 good through
Oct. 31; F1 through K1 good through
Nov. 30; L1 through Q1 good through
Dec. 31.
SUGAR-Book four stamp 38 good
through Dec. 31.
SHOES Book three airplane
stamps 1, 2, 3, and 4 good indefinitely.
OPA says no plans to cancel any.
"-'ii:' r' "Minuet Waltz."
Veronica Lake using her busi-
ness sense to cash in on Eddie's
dough when he begins to i'ealize
something from his singing.
'Cass Daley bemoaning her fate
sings "All I Do Is Beat This
Gol-Darn Drum" and "A Sailori
With An Eight-Hour Pass."
The piano-maestros 'Carmeen
Cavallaro, Ted Fiorito, Henry
King, Ray Noble and Joe Reich-
man.


WATCH CRYSTAL
BROKEN?
We carry a complete stock of
round and odd shapes in glass
watch crystals in regular and du-
rex thickness.


50c


75c


$1.00


FOR PROMPT SERVICE
BRING YOUR WATCH TO

C 0 L E S
JEWELERS
423 W. University Ave.


ALLIGATOR TO 'MEXX
S MONDAY NVi(r' ?
There Wif bh ibn Alliga'tor
staff meeting Monday night
at 7:30 p. Min. in the bame'n*ent
of Florida Union. JPersons
interested in working on the
'staff are iivited to attend.


Welcome Freshmen'



Mat. '40c .'/e. 44c.'Serv. 30c Chil. 14c
rODAY & SATUR'DA' Sept. 21,22
BETTY HUTTON
"tlcew'diaiy Bih-de"

SUN., 'MON., Sept. 23, 24 /
AkBAARA 'STANWVCK'
DENNIS MORGAN
"CHRISTMAS IN
CO4NICTEICUT"
NES
TIES., WED., Sept. 25, 2. -,
BORIS KAALOFF
LON CHANEY
"HOiJSE OF
FRANIENSTEIK"ON"
VARIETY NEWS
TODAY & SATURDAY Sept. 21,22

DOUBLE FEATURE
CHARLES STARRETT
"RETURN OF THE
DURANGO KID"
JOHN LITELL
"Subm marine Base"
Raiders of 'Ghost City No. 2




Mat. Eve. Serve. Chil.
and S5c 9Cc 9c, .
SUN., MON. Sept. 23, 24
,DOUB-E FEATURE.
JINX FALKENBURG
"GAY SENORITA"
JUNE CXRLSON :
'rebiinquen't B'auhters
NEWS

TUESDAY ONLY, Sept. 25

WALLACE BERRY
"this Mn"'s Navy"
SPORT VARiETY
WED., THURS., Sejh. 26, 27
SONJA HENIE
"It's A Pleasure*"
(Technicolor)
U51RTS -- NEWS


WELCOME


feACK FELLOWS



When in need T drus arid toilet



articles, call on' th6 old reliable


.:,P s,,Ar
\fvyAv r n Bi ^ -<


ii'


VI204 ALW KU U ;3 UV



204 East University Ave.


I


:


I







Continued Vzrom rage One "
d person Dennis Henny, .Verd =Ho-
tan, Fred Kluis.s, F'red Ktishner,
John Ko s, Jack Peae, Charles
*Pappy, .ilbur Rollinis, M.- ion
Rabor~n, Ed. Royal, Neal Sandy,
David Sargent, 3T. L. Smith, John:
Schnreider, Al Smith, Bob Smfith,'
Max Scott, Toim ',Vaiglin.
iPI iLAaMiDA p i
B.i .lly 1 .l n,-. :l : Deutsch,
B11 ill ,. EBlI G-:dstein, ,]or-
niiji Ja,:,:,.P. etfIf4 K';vel, Bernie
,r.:i h,- n1i:CtE E"tE.1.'n "Leider,
P!rnt A M artol, D:',n Pealman,
:I1.r Sin ,ermn, B. lnte Shenk-
man, Ellict S ;,-fenifeM, Mel Turn-
er, Beryl Wienstein, Nathan
Weiss, Allen Westin, Harols Gold-:
berg, Benny Kleih, Jerry Linet,
Dick Pollock, L'6 Os)iheroff.
SIGMA .ALPLHA EPSILON
J'-r Lo{.rriti5, Jnrn BLIti, Ed Cor-
Tett. J-i.,:q MuellEr, Jolh'n Cornlell,
:Aohr. i;,rtrt, Joe Clentie, Kir-
by Siith; Lee 1'otle-y, Walter
Chandler,; Leon. Colemain, Larry
'Calwell, Fred Teinmple, Phil Hol-
stun, Buddy lRoe, kelvin Wil-,
a4ams, Benny MIabet ry, Frank,
Duckworth;--Bill Whiddon.
SIGMA cmi
Joe Mdmey, Joe Gamble, Mor-
ton Blalock, Marshal M'VcGregor,
Eddie Smith, Doyle Mickell, Rich-
ard Mills, Angus Dunlop, Malco1lm


Jones, Jackie Marsh, Gus Smith,.
Richard Woeble, Flip Atter, Jim-
my Henderson, Karl Hoff, Eugene
\\'h'rd, Billy Miller, Joe Oliver,
Painier Craig, Paul Young, Hugh
Johnson.
SrOWA PHI EPSkTJON
Emimet Owens, Jack Leigh, Al
Cady, Hunter McCluer, Fred
Ffo'ffinan, Eugene Sheffield, Bud-
dy Goksey, Clyde Smith, Bill
Nexseh, Robert Scott, Ricky Tyn-
dall, Wayne Sargent.
SIGMA' NU
Chuck Rambo, J. D. Hickey,
Herbert Williams, Ed Vinning,
Robert Walker, Carl Stoudemire,
Jim Kirby, Joe Huell.
THETA CaI
Allen Lovell, Willie Clements,
Jhon Clemmons.

Campus Pictobre
Appears In Journal
Featured on thi cover of "Bah-
ta's G eek Exchange" for July
was a picture of the University
campus. The jtht:,gr.aph was
supplied by Dean of Stutdents R.
C. Beaty.
Banta's Greek Exchange" is
an interfraterity _'Qurn'al issued
four timP' a vearW ,is pur.,![ih-ed .
in the irt,-eit. ,,tcolkge fraterni-
aties. --


Wind yoW watch fully when If the crystal breaks ocrotas,
you arise in the morning. immediately replace it with an-
Don't open the bock of the other. Don't let dust get on the dial.
case. The tiniest speck of dust Don't handle your watch
or motremayharmthenechanisrn.- i, roughly. The delicate pivots
, Remove watch from your wrist may bend; some of the.tiny jewels
when washing your hands. A may crack.
tiny drop of moisture entering the Have your watch cleaned and
case may rust the hair spring or old regularly every. n or
mther vita p5art twelve `mo-' -


Expert Watchmakers,


Jewelers and Engravers


440C No TAunuS eyr
By Ted Nelson
A year ago at this time, we
started. out as a very green col-
umnist under this head. The Al-
ligator was being reborn after a
year's lay-off, and things were
pretty confused for a while.
Both green and a freshman, wve
saw everything that was wrong
without inquiring into why every-
thing couldn't be right. Some-
times, probably by accident, we
accomplished a little by this hel-
ter-skelter method.
The purpose of this column was
to discuss controversial campus
problems. That is still its pur-
pose. But its meanfs are going
to be slightly altered.
We learned, for instance, that
the Tniverfsity has been kicking
around here for a long time-
longer than any of us. We learn-
ed that 3di.ui5-,n 'of some issues
is impossible at ,irtan times
because of 'existing conditions
which make it impractical.
'We learned that, invested with
bhe loyal if often critical trust of
an intelligent student body, the
University, in some manner or
other, can roll through almost any
emergency and crawl out only
slightly paler from its period of
hibernation.
We learned too, of the pri-
nary importance of cooperation
among individuals and groups oh
the campus. The Senate's con-
erted effort to gain co-education,
or example, failed temporarily
bit impressed the entire state by
he solid back of a united stu-
lent body.
Normal conditions seem only a
breath away. The lessons learn-
d in wartime, however, are hard-
y expendable. Cooperation, spirit,
he will and drive necessary to
uceed, the tradition that makes
Florida Man" a proud handle-
hese had a tough struggle to
weather the bad years. But
they're here and have never left
is-and they never will if we
member to keep a tight hold
n them.

Gator
continuedd From r'age One


tentative staff members in rec-
ommendations submitted to the
Board:
Dave Sage, managing editor;
Ted Nelson, executive editor;
Aristotle Rloumel, feature editor;
William E. Boyd, sports editor;
Tom Edwards, fraternity editor;
Herbert Guy, campus editor; Don
Walker, news and movie editor;
Miss Jean Whitemore, reporter.
Other appointments on the
reportorial staff are yet to be
made, Walker said, as applica-
tions come in.
Editorial staff meetings will be
held regularly at 7:30 Monday
nights in the Alligator news room,
basement of Florida Union.
Although recommendations for
specific posts on the business
staff, with the exception of Pero,
had not. been made a't press time,
Ed Davis, Charlie Vick, Liggett
Karney, Bud Cooksey, Bob Mc-
Godwa, John Iill, Billy McCoy,
Bob Johnson and Jack Nooney are
slated for jobs.
Both Walker hnd Pero held'
responsible positions' last year
with Walker s"rving a% Manag-
iing Editoi aad Pero is assistant
Business Manager. Sage, recom-
mended as Managing Editor, serv-
ed as assistant Managing Eidtor.
Other who were on the staff
last year are Nelson, Roumel,
Davis, Don Walker and Vick.

University
Continued From Page One
ber grows. Maybe some day
they will be able to look the
iRegistrar in .tihe ye when
they register. The quantity is
great enough to sport two
professional sororities now,
one Law and one Pharmacy.
But please boys, remember that
the girls a're just ordinary stu-.
dents, and hot stray inhabitants
of Mars, the Moon or Some other
far distant sphere. They do ap-
preciate being treated as stu-
dents.


THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR GAINESVILLE, FLA., SEPT. 21, 14, "'



WELCOME GATORS!


Terry Gift and Book Shop

Acvo'ss From Florida Theater
Rental Library Phone 1447
Rental Library Phone 1447




WELCOME STUDENTS.
COME TO

The Varsity Grill

URDER NEW MANAGEMENT :
We Serve Delicious
BREAkFAST -- LUNCH DINNER
COpi 7 a.m. to Midnight


VO TE


GATOR PARTY




"For a post-war campus even better

than the pre-war University of

Florida" ?



PAID POLITICAL ADVERTISEMENT


-I


WELCOME




New and Old




GATORS








THE


PIGGIE


See Us for Fast and Dependable S-rvite.



BOND JEWELRY CO.
"GAINESVILLE'S QUALITY JEWELERS"',

: 305 W. UNIVERSITY AVENUE -


ELECT BILL COLSON



P R E S ID E NT


OF THE


STUDENT BODY -


'The Qualified and Experienced Man"

S,-


GATOR PART


PAID POLITICAL ADVERTISEMENT
-. . ... .. ,... .. .' -.. ,


PARK


TRY OUR


40c DINNER


``"






THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR GAINESVILLE, FLA., SEPT. 21, 1945


Complete Football Roster

For 1945 Gator Squad


i6No. Name ]
L. Alfred B. Carter
2 Angus Williams
Buddy Carte
4. J. L. Smith
5 Fred Hogan
P Tom Vangelas
7 L. B. (Junior) Dupree
R Bill Gilmartin
P Don Davidson
10 Weldor.. Wright
-1 Earl Scarbrough
72 Richard Bracewell
J I Virgil Dingman
1!5 Claude Campbell
:i G Ziggy Sklodowski
17 John Gilbert
1, Jim Billings
19 Kenneth Hamilton
.20 Charles Anderson
21 Bruce Martin
22 W. R. Land
23- Horace Drew
2- Brady Hall
25 Frank Kristain
23 Joe Ohesser
27 Nick Testa
.2 John Kelly
29 Harold Goldberg
30 Ottis Mooney
J i. Georg8e Pharr
&2 Elmer Atkins
P? D. (Duck) Cawthon
S4 Quincy Lee
.5 Tony Occhiuzzi
,G Henry Brown
27 E. B. Sapp
S8 John Curry
S9 Fred Kuss
44l Sidney Vaughn
41 Glenn Odham
42 Scott Kelly
43 Paul Mortellaro
44 Jack White
4- M. C. Harden
46 Norman Ryerson
47 John Favata
41 Hugo Miller
i0O Ed Royal
P 1 Charles Ball


Grid Opener
Contlntued From Page One
, ;nate a ,successful season. Sat-
',."day's game promises to be a
r:at for the inexperienced squad
waid a win would send the Gator
gridders off to a flying start on
fie hardest schedule played by a
)Forida team in the last five
yc-ars.
The Saturday following the 63rd'
.I)fantry game, the Saurian squad
nteets the University of Missis-
,ippi at Jacksonville in their first
southeasternn Conference encount-


Age
17
17
18
29
17
17
17
20
17
17
21
18
28
19
17
17
18
21
17
18
19
18
22
17
18
17
21
17
21
17
17
19
17
18
17
21
17
17
17
21
17
21
21
17
17
20
23
21
19


Home
Miami
Tampa
Tampa
Gainesville
Daytona Beach
Paterson, N. J.
St. Petersburg
Newark, N. J.
Jacksonville
Tampa
Jacksonville
Jacksonville
Jacksonville
Fort Myers
Paterson, N. J.
Miami
Miami
Daytona Beach
Jacksonville
Gainesville
Milton
Jacksonville
Bradenton
Ruthford, N. J.
Quincy
Bronx, N. Y.
Minneapolis, Minn.
St. Petersburg
Winter Park
Jacksonville
Orlando
Gainesville
Wildwood
Paterson, N. J.
Clearwater
Gainesville
Buffalo, N. Y.
Minneapolis, Minn.
St. Petersburg
Sanford
Quincy
Tampa
Paris, Texas
Jacksonville
Los Angeles, Calif
Tampa
West Palm Beach
Sarasota
Hollywood


Yr
Fr.
Fr.
Soph.
Soph.
Fr.
Fr.
Fr.
Soph.
Fr.
Fr.
Fr.
Fr.
Fr.
Fr.
Fr.
Fr.
Fr.
Soph.
Fr.
Fr.
Fr.
Fr.
Soph.
Fr.
Soph.
Fr.
Fr
Fr.
Soph.
Fr.
Fr.
Fr.
Fr.
Fr.
Fr.
Soph.
Fr.
Fr.
Fr.
Soph.
Fr.
Soph.
Soph.
Fr.
Fr.
Fr.
Soph.
Fr.
Fr.


COPY SPECIFICAT-5NS
All Alligator copy should be type-
written, double-spaced and should
be handed in at the Florida Union
Desk no later then 3:00 p.m. Wed-
nesday.


Beer's Tailors
421 W. Univ. Ave.
Alterations
Made To Measure Clothes


,.- .
























FLO R fI .^ A 6 A S ^

ORIDA GATMioS








63rd INFANTRY REGIMENT



SATURDAY NIGHT


WELCOME STUDENTS


City Drug Company

PRESCRIPTION SPECIALISTS

North Side Square
Phone 1336'






WELCOME


OLD AND NEW STUDENTS

Make our store your headquarters when you need
school supplies, stationery, and greeting cards
for all occasions.

And remember, we specialize in artist's, architec-
1 tural and engineering supplies.



Chesnut Office Equipment Co.

206-208 W. University Ave.

Phone 1086


8:00


University Florida iadiem


Box Seats .


Reserved


Seats


General Admission
% MU1 r U i .. j


o S S 0 *'~;'-.~*-. 0 0

* 0 5 0 0 -6- 0


. a


rublic cnhool Students .

Non-Com Servicemen In Uniforni .



Date . . .
O e O O e e r.-- n 11 r e


2.50

2.00


1.25




S.1 50c



1.25


Florida Students Will Be Admitted Free But they Must Have

Their Student Activity Books


Reserved and General AdimssiOn Tickets On

Sale At Athletic Deparntment


Students who want to go to the Mississippi game must exchange
the coupon in the student activity book for a reserved seat ticket.
No extra charge.
V:' : :"


I




Full Text
xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID EK41RNMM3_GVS3UM INGEST_TIME 2016-08-30T20:51:25Z PACKAGE UF00028291_00001
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES



PAGE 1

Ambitious Fraterni 225 Incoming Stu4 Frat Men Active As Enrollment Rises The University began its '45 fall semester in grand style last week with the fraternities carrying on an extensive rush program. The pledging deadline, 9:00 p.m. Saturday, found more than 225 boys pledged. The following arethe names of most of the pledges: ALPHA GAMMA RHO James Chapin, Vernon Culverhouse, John Fowler, Bernard Dowling, James Faulk, Neil Faulk, Joe Pate, Jerry Bishop, Burnette Pape, Billy Fentworth, Walter Woochard. ALPHA TAU OMEGA Billy Bently, Earl Patterson, John Reints, Bill Womble, Earl Bland, Bill Bond, Henry Evans, Clay Fields, John Fountain, Bill Holt Terry Lanier, Gus King, John Lee, Ralph Mahie, Dickie Mead, Lloyd Morgan,aGeorge Nelson, Ed O'Connell, Bill Rogers, J. N. Royal, George Starkes, Jimmy Thurnan, George Todd, Jack Cannon, Jimmy Coughlin. BETA THETA PI Ray Winstead, Stanley Poole, Jack Spann, Jack Brooksbank, Charlie Albritton, John Wilcox, Howard Rutledge, John Thompson. DELTA TA!U DELTA Claude Appenzeller, James Atwater, Ronald Berry, Millard Boothby, Charles Drake, William Hart, John Hively, Lloyd Hull, Aubrey Janet, Ralph Morgan, Herbert Mullis, Doyle Ogle, Joseph Sincore, William Walker, Perry Watson, Bruce Westberry. KAPPA SIGMA Elmer Hill, Bill Pace, Jim Coggins, Allan De Loach, David Howard, Foster Jennings, Curtis Weaver, Bob Rhingdhal, David Hedick. PHI DELTA THETA Fred Hampton, Bobby Wright, George Croy, Hugh Harris, Ed Pynchon, Barry Smith, Jim Camp, Dai -Brayton, John Hill, Bill McCoy, Robert McGowan, Bill Triplett, Jack Nooney, Bill Bryant, DaveBudd, Earl Mallard, Roy Diggans, Francis Brown, Byron Goss, Byron Pell, Hugh Cobb, John Dowling, Jimmy Lester, Buddy Savory. PHI GAMMA DELTA Bill Curry, Wilson Smith, Jim .Montgomery, Dale Warner, Mike Byrnes, George Peacock, Bob Hudson, Bob McVay, Harry MacDougal, Jack Admire, Luis Guerra, Carlos Casteblanco. PHI KAPPA TAU Bob Butler, Duane Savelle, Dozier Laird, Jimmy Echols, Tony Pullara, Phil McCloud, Lloyd Jennings, Donald Harrington, John Farmer, Donald Padgett, Eddie Hill, Fred Brett, Oswaldo George, Tommy Guiccardo, Joe Treadwell, Jack Gautier, Lawrence King. PI KAPPA ALPHA Al Albrinson, Bill Boyd, Wilson Boozer, Claude Campbell, Don French, Bob Hallock, Lloyd HenContinued on Page Three Gen. Pays "The human element-the kind I gained at the University of Florida-was the biggest factor in winning the war," Major General James A. Van Fleet, com. mander of the Third Corps, has disclosed in a recent letter to President John J. Tigert. A former head coach at the University in 1923 and 1924, and professor of military science and tatics,. General Van Fleet has been in contact with the University and -his former associates since he ,left. In a recent letter to Dr. Tigert, General Van Fleet said of the war and the University in part: "Throughout this war, as in every war, the biggest factor in winning is the human element. The most of what I know of it was gained at the University of Florida, dealing ever and ever with the student body and in particular with ROTC cadets and Gator athletes. cities Pledge Over dents II fIfL U .) College Night Held Ton~g it THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR -GAINESVILLE, FLA., SEPT. 21, 1945 Freshmen To Meet // Dr. Tigert In Union e Welcome The traditional "College Night" ceremonies and President's Reception for Freshmen, sponsored by Florida Union, are slated to be held tonight at 7:30 in the University auditorium. Activities of the evening include a pep rally at "College Night" andthe introduction of Coach Tom Lieb and the football team to the freshmen, to be followed by the President's Reception in Florida Union where first year men will meet University President John J. Tigert and the deans of the various colleges. Refreshments will be served. Murphree Recital Marks 20 Years musical Service Claude L. Murphree, associate professor of music, w'ill observe his twentieth anniversary as University Organist in a special recital in the University auditorium Sunday at 4 p.m. The program, including works by Bach, Vierne, Yon and several American composers, will be a repetition of the first program ever played by Murphree in the auditorium, in September 1925, the beginning of his sophomore year at the University. He obtained his A.B. degree here in 1928, and became a Fellow in the American Guild of Organists in 1934, following a year of study in New York City. He has given about 475 Sunday afternoon programs in the auditorium, in addition to many more in Florida and throughout the Southeast. For the last ten years Murphree has had charge of the music section of the C-5 course. Gator Escapes From Cage The Florida Alligator is on the loose again. After a summer in hibernation, the campus wekely newspaper this morning swung its tail and came to the top for a breath of air under the guidance of Johnny Walker, editor in chief, and Joe Pero, business manager. Publication was charted Monday night when 20 men and one woman met under auspices of the Board of Student Publications to apply for staff positions. Besides Walker the following emerged as Continued on Page Three Message To fos~h TO ALL FLORIDA MEN, ESPECIALLY THOSE IN THE FRESHMAN CLASS, GREETINGS: "Any success I may have achieved as a combat leader I can give due credit to that experience. And I ought to particularly thank you (Dr. Tigert) for your good guidance and constant encouragement." In replying to General Van Fleet, Dr. Tigert wrote in part: "You record in the war has been extraordinary, but nothing beyond what I would have expected of you. -, ..I have always been impressed with your military qualities, but more so with your character." General Van Fleet's part in the war brings to mind that over 10,000 Univesity alumni have served in the war, with 313 of them paying the supreme sacrifice. Figures compiled by the Alumni Office disclose that 66 ar still missing and 12 remain prisoners of war. There are 116faculty members serving the armed forces. V ~ There has never been a time when I have had keener satisfaction in seeing you come to the Campus. The war years brought us trainees but they took our Florda boys away from us. My hart beats anew as I see the FreshPREJ/OdWT1i/A/CI./ r7/ERT man caps appearing in numbers on the Canapus. Be assured that everything possible has been done to make your return to the U versty pleasant and profitable. You have been acquainted with our organization our plans during orientation week. If there is any obstacle which stands in your wA please come in and let me try to help you remove it. Meantime, we again greet y and welcome you into the circles of Florida men. Sincerely yours, John J. Tigert, President Glee Club Plans Busy Semester Attempts To Surpass Past Attainments The U. of F.'s most famed musical organization has long been known as its "Ambassadors of Good Will." Since 1925, Florida has boasted one of the finest vocal organizations in the country. A testament of their quality was their appearance in 1940 at the N. Y. World's Fair, and their frequent successful trips each season throughout Florida and to other states. But previous performance is not going to be sufficient this yearany more than it has been in the past. The 1945 doings will he the subject of student interest. Much will depend on the quantity and quality of the freshman turnout this month. A small group of men remain from last year's club and around them the '45 Glee Club will be built. Prof. J. W. Denrnyn, director for many years, is planning to teach the rapid recognition of notes to speed the rate of learning new pieces. Students will have the opportunity to judge the success of his efforts at a Christmas concert and at least one other local event after that. Interested men should contact Prof. DeBruyn between 2 and 5 on weekdays at his office in the Auditorium. The work, as he puts it, is not easy, but the profits are considerable. Grid Opener Is Tomorrow Nile Gators Start Season Against Blanding Team When Florida's Fighting Gators take the field Saturday at 8 p.m. in the season's gridiron opener against the. 63rd Infantry Regiment of Camp Branding, they will be captained iby Kenneth Hamilton, veteran guard and sophomore from Daytona Beach. This 'is the first meeting of the two teams and little is known of the strength of the Army eleven. One sure fact is that they have a great ball carrier and triple threat in Kenneth McLain who carried the pigskin for the Gators last season. The squad this year is made up almost entirely of Florida boys with 38 out of 49 candidates for the team hailing from this state. Other states represented are New Jersey, New York, Minnesota, Texas,, and California. Head Coach Tom Lieb reports that h& has a better team this year than last, which should inContinued on Page Four "ALL ELEU'IOS Dean of Students R. C. peaty announced yesterday that student body elections are scheduled Thursday from 2 to 6 p.m. The polls for all balloting will be located in the annex of Forida Union. The deadline for submitting names of candidates for office is 5 p. m. Monday. Namesare to be left or sent to the Florida Union desk. Phi Eta Sigma Asks Eligible Students To Report For Interview All students who think they are eligible for membership in Phi Eta Sigma are invited to report to Room 3, Language Hall. Elgibility requirements are: "On the basis of his first 32 hours, or less, the student must have earned at least 112 honor points to be eligible for initiation into Phi Eta Sigma." Eminent Cuban Speaks Tuesday Collazo, Lion Pres., Will Visit Campus Dr. Ramiro Collazo, newly edec ed president of Lions Intern tional and one of the most pro. inent attorneys of Havana, Cu will visit Gainesville next wee, Dr. Collazo will speak at special assembly to be held in t University auditorium at 11 a. on Tuesday. Classes will be d. missed for the hour in order th both students and faculty m have an opportunity to hear th distinguished Latin American. i Collazo attended the San Fra:. cisco Conference and no dou: will discuss matters of inteiespertaining to international a: f airs. Since the University for a nun:-. her of years has maintained a codial relationship with Latin Ame: ican countries through the InsLtute of Inter-American Affairz it seems appropriate to have a visit from this distinguished citi zen of Cuba. More The Merrier University Gets Coeds The Hard Way As GaIs Filter In Female Population increases As New Rulings Become Effective By Jean Whitmore Women-On this campus? You're batty. The University is non-co-euucauonai. *ine "catalogue says so, the Legislature says 'No wonien, thank you,' and the Board of Contral states it quite emphatically. But, there are ten women in Law, six in Pharmacy, one in Engineering and many more, even some graduate students wear ruffles and curls. How can they be explained? Do you know that a member of the species actually appeared at the Gator Veterans' meeting last Tuesday night? All that isi known, is that she was a WAVE. Her name, what show's registered for, or if she is really registered those are the mysteries of the hour. Everything Is Legal To set your minds at rest, if you will take a high-power microscope and peruse the catalogue diligently, you will find that women, real women, may come to this bachelor intsitution without having their throats 'cut competely. ,/ There have been great concessions made to them in the last few years. First, they were allowed in Pharmacy and Graduate Schools. With the onset of war, they were permitted to enter the Law School with only two years of college credit. Last year a a e veneranse Legislature Legislature broke down and played 'Lady Bountiful" by saying veterans' wives could come, provided their husbands were here first. It was last year too, that a place in the dorms was made for them. True it may be t bleakest, most distant outpost of Murphree, but there are thirteen who maintam it well. Four flights are good for the figure and, packing lunch so you can get to class on time is economical, or so they'll tell you in the Director's office. Bachelors Beware For the benefit of hopeful bachelors, the girls are all either married to Gator veterans, or they are career women. Did you ever date a career woman? They converse of dejury, defacto, and de-lar; of pills, elixirs, or tux.ey specials. They can compart by the hour the best methods for chasing ambulances, or how thin you can slice the ham for sandwiches. The newest type of diesel engines, or the application of the laws of force can be made most fascinating. If you enjoy it, more power to you boys, but don't say you weren't warned. Sometimes they may feel that cutting their hair and wearing long pants would J make them less conspicuous 1 but as time goes on the num, 1 Continued on Page ibid Van Fleet, Ex Gator Coach, Tribute To University Spirit -I

PAGE 2

as seCond-class matter at the st office at Gainesville, Florida, under the Act of Auigust 24, 1912 Published weekly during the academic year by the Student Body By Donald Walkeror the University of Florida, Gainesville. Wi am Lowry, instructor in Journalism, Laboratory Coordinator. e ove e id Ibekino xx th Rettv 'Hutton's norJohnny Walker ..Editor-in-chief Dava Sage ..M anaging Editor Jae Pero .Busiasess Manager tditria/y Seaking:o BLACK AND BLUE BULLETIN A few days ago an unknown individual graduated from the ranks of the petty pranksters into the "bg time" wvhen he produced and distributed a fictitious copy of the Orange and tlue Bulletin. The copy was entitled the 'Black and Blue Bulletin' but this artistic touch seemed to escape detection. Anyway, the thing appeared one morning on bnll-etin boards all over the place, and was generally mistaken for the Orange and Blue. As a result, several hundred freshmen turned up 'at the Infrmary to report for a Wasserman Test which had been announced in the fictitious bulletin. Needless to say. the spectacle of several hundred assorted freshmen trayal of Texas Guinan in "Incendiary Blohde." It is a Par'amount production in technicolor playing today and tomorrow. Although it has been said that the movie garnishes Texas Guinan's care and endows her with a better character than she actually had, little has been said against 'it's entertainment 'value. Miss Hutton lives up-to such a title as the "Blitz Blonde" when. she 'sings "Oh By Jingo", "Row, Row, Row", "Ragtime Cowboy Joe,"and other songs. Included. in the cast 'are Arturo de Cor-' dova ("Frenchman's Cree"),-Barry Fitzgerald ("Going My Way'), Charles Ruggles, and Mabel kdains, mother of Betty ilutton, who plays an hysterical woman during a rodeo sequence in the film. Columnist Isn't Domestic madly clamoring for assermian tests didn't leave the InOne of Hollywood's finest and fiimary staff unaffected. A great deal of time and energy most versatile actresses, Barbara was wasted during the resulting confusion and the Infirm-Stanwyck, co-stars 'With Dennis ary staff, already severely overworked, was, to 'say the Morgan in the Sunday-Monda'y least, i';1ihappy about the matter. feature "Christmas in Connectibi tne interests of truth we must admit that the whole cut". This is t excellent Warner Bros. comedy, but it doesn't fiasco has aspects of humor. At the present time, howgive Miss Stanwyck much opporever, the entire University staff is working harder than unity to really -"emote" as did .ever before. The problems of reconversion are keeping "Double Indemnity" or an older tiem after hours. Things like this little incident do not one, "Stena Dallas.' make the job easier. The story. 'concerns a young We have no quarrel with a general administering of woman who writes a monthly Wasserlan tests and we feel certain that the infirmary magazine feature "Diary of a is not adverse gving an occasional Wasserman. But tiousewife". Seaman Jefferson t'0is is not the point. The point is that an already overJones (Dennis Morgan', after reburdened staff has been given more work-and we don't nothing on a rubber raft intthe think anyone should be overburdened with work. .Pacific, arranges a visit with the author of the feature through the magazine in order to try some of WELCOME FRESHMEN the mouth-watering recipes menWe take this opportunity to pick up students only 't t hetioned' the "Diary." T in the first issue of the 1945uIs >!OPs. It lo dangerous columnist turns'out to be unnar46 Alligator, to welcome to thumb elsewhere. ried and inuch more at home 'at Another thin. of importa bar than at a kitchen stdve. stance is getting iii o the habit But this is ohiy background for campus. It is our hope that of reading the Orange and the movie, and Sidney Greenstret, the freshmen will learn the Blu-e tulletin every Monday, Reginald Gardner, S. Z. Sakall, AT'and Uine O'Connor also take part ways of the Florida campus Wednesday and F r i d a y in what follows. and that the class of '49 will Posted in all University They're All Here be Florida's most outstand-' buildngs, the Orange and After expling to the nth deng. Blue contains important angree the horror possibilities of '10 order to make it 'easier' nouncements and lost and the 'mummy, the 'wolf-man, Dracfor the new men to acquaint found information. ula, 'etc., a Hollywood company themselves with college life, F. r -'combined all of them to make themselesgigt olpasseolifes, -esitmieni, of 0 u r s e, "'House fo Frankenstein", show-I :ve are going to esion h a should remember the campus iig Taesday and Wednesday. The few hopeful suggestions that "hello" tradition -that of movie is being shoWn as a regu,will facilitate "learning th speakingr to everyone yoti lar feature, but it doesn't greatly roles' meett on th campus. outdistance the other horror picFirst, there is the rtle that To the men, familiar with tures. college students follow i college life, btlt new to 01 bracken Sings thumbing rides to anc 'from campus, we sincerely hope Paramont's "Out of This thumbingWorld" coming next Thursday, t o w ii. For convenience, that yo wil cone to conFrd" an Sat TWill Canesv-ille people are asked sider yourself a Florida mall Friday and Saturday aill be --(2faFlrdamn found to be S. somewhat abovethe-average musical comedy. Some Student House, 9-10:30 of its features are: Religious Notices Eddie Bracken using Bing All religious notices and church Crosby's Voice and Frank Sinotes should be handed in at the natra's tie to make the bobbyFlorida Union desk, no later than soxers swoon. A(TIV TI 0 2 0 noon, Wednesday. They Diana Lynn leading an all-girl -should be type-written and douorchestra and taking care 6f the. ble-spaced. piano too, including a specialty,; PRESBYTERIAN Rfch Friday night of this semester, except when the Univer3ity schedules a major event, the Presbytei-ian Student S e s s i o n etouse at 1606 W. Umversity Xvemie will hold an upen douse gath'ring from 7:30 to 10:30. All University students interest-Ii the youth group are Invited o drop in and econie acquainted 'n th "Fred' Widmer, student pasor. Pirg pong, games, a vintrola "nd large collection of records, a oey ball court, and other con'esnehees are available for the 'ie of students at all times. The -ouse is open for use all 'day 't'ry day in the wNeek. i.hedule or SdiidAy, Sept. 23 it the First Presbyterian hurch in 'j; nesville: Sunday School 9:45; morningg 'worship, 11:00; youth and supper, 6:30; evening n.8:00; Open Hlouse ~at the N. W.LAUNRY DRtY CLEANING 614 W. Uniy. Aye. Phoe 257 OUR BRANCH OFFICE 910 W. Universe Aye. or SEE HERBERT WILLIAMS Our University Driver Begin Soon Hbrsestoe Singles St *t Tuesday Singles in the horseshoe competition, slated to begin Tuesday, will be the first sport in the University intramural program, according to Buck Lanier, student intramural director. The program will constst of a league made up of fraternities and other fridependent organizations on the campus. Scheduled this year, and listed in order are, horseshoes, 'singles and doubles, swimnmi .ng, ibokin, basketball, ping pong, singles and -douTble, touch football, and shuffleboard, sintles and doubles. taher anounced hIs Staff as' followsv: Abbey Fink, assistant student director of publicity; Pete Sfmmon, head officials BiIly Wynne, field judge; Dick f almond, office manager. "The rules wil be the same as last year," said Lanier. There was 64 percent student participation in 1944 when the cup was won by Phi Delt. RATIONING FATS, MEATS, etc.-Book four red stamps V9 through Z2 god through Sept. 30; Al through El good through Nct. 3; 1 through K1 good'through Nov. 30; Li through Q1 good through Dec. 31. SuGARK-ook four stamp 38 good through 'Dee. 31. SHOES .Book three airplane stamps 1, 2, 3, and 4 goad indefinitely., OPA says2no plans to cancel any. Chopin's "Minuet Waltz." Veronica Lake using her business sense to cash in on Eddie's dough when he begins to realize something from his singing. 'Cass Daley bemoaning her fate' sings "All I Do Is Beat This 'Gol-Darn Drum" and "A Sailor With An Eight-Hour Pass.", The piano-mnaestros Carmen Cavallaro, Ted Fiorito, Henry in, Ray Noble and Joe Reichman. WATCH CRYSTAL BR'OKEN? We carry a complete stock of round and odd shapes in glass watch crystals in regular and durex thickness. 50c 75c $1.00 FOR PROMPT SERVICE% BRING YOUR WATCH TO C 0 L E S JEWELERS 423 W. University Aye. ALLIGATOR TO MED't Thdire 6i th n Alftitor staff meeting Monday night at 7:30 .in. in the basemnent of Florida Union. Persons interested in working on the staff are invited to atend. Welcome Freshmen Mat.46c Ev'e. 44c 'Se-rv. 30c Chil. 14c rODAY b SATURDAY Sept. 21,22 BETTY HUTTON "hiceb'dia.'y B~ SUN., MON., Sept. 23, 24', bARBARA STANWYCK D[IENNIS MORGAN "CHRISTMAS IN COf4N'EtTlcurT NEWS TuES, WED., Sept. 25, 2 BORIS KAALOFF LON CHAN*EY "fHOUASE Of FRANKENSTEiN" VARIETY -NEWS TODAY & SATURDAY Sept. 21,22 DOUBLE FEATURE CHARLES STARRETT TURNN OF THE DURANGO KID" JOHN LITELL "Submarine Base" Raiders of Ghost City No 2 mat. Eve. SerV. Chit. and 35c 8eC So SUN., MON. Sept. 23, 24 DOUBLE FEATURE JINX FALKENBURG "GAY SENORITA" JUNE CARLSON Delinquent DaU ltters' NEWS, TUESDAY ONLY, Sept. 25 WALLACE BERRY "this Min''s NAVyI. SPyORT -VARIETY WED., THURS., 'Se. 26, 27 SONJA HENIE "It's A Pleasure" (Technicolor) SUORfT -NEWS IL W WELCOME BACK FELLOWS When in need of drugs arid toilet articles, callIontholUndvrIiAbIe VIDAL DUGCO, 204 East University Ave.

PAGE 3

Jones, Jackie Marsh, Gus Smith, Richard Woehle, Flip Atter, JimlOntsied ?rom rage One my Henderson, Karl Hoff, Eugene derson, Denns Iy, ed -'ad, Billy Miller, Joe Oliver, ran, Fred Niiks, red Kushner, Palmer Craig, Paul Young, Hug john Koss, Jack Pease, 'Charles Johnson. Pappy, Wibur Rollins, Marion SIGIA Pil EPSMION Rabofn, Ed,Riyal, Neal Sandy, Emmet Owens, Jack Leigh, Al David Sargent, J. L. Smith, John Cady, Hunter McCluer, Fred Schneider, -Al Smith, Bob Smhth, Ffoffman, Eugene Sheffield, BudMax Scott,,Tom Vaughn. dy Cdoksey, Clyde Smith, Bill PI LAl',IDA PHI Nexsen, Robert Scott, Ricky TynBilly Cohen-, Leonard Deutsch, dall, Wayne Sargent. Bill Golderg, Bill Goldstein, gorSIGMX NU man Jacoss, ,BIIrMKivel, Bernie Chuck Rambo, J. D. Hickey, Bennie hnIa -d, Don Pealman' Herbert Williams, Ed Vinning, Bernie" ShenkCarl Stoudemire, Mai'in herahJim Kirby, Joe Huell. man, Elliet Schienfeld, Mel TurnTHA er, Beryl Wienstein, Nathan THETA CHI Weiss, Allen Westin, Harols GoldAllen Lovell, Willie Clements, berg, Benny Klein, Jerry Linet, Jhon Clemmons. Dick Pollock, Le Osheroff. SIGMI* ALPHA EPSMN Jim Lopisjim Buie, Ed CotCmu ~~ ITett, Jacq,31ieter, John Cornell,Ape'sh Jir I john Gillet, Joe Clementie, Kirby Smith Lee Worley, Walter Featured on 04 &cover of "BanChandler, Leon. Coleman, Larry ta's Gfeek Exchange" for July 'Calwell, Fred Temple Phil Holwas a picture of the University stun, Buddy I6oie, Melvin Wilcampus. The iotqgraph was Nams, Benny Mayberry, Frank supplied by Dean of Students R. Duckworth;-'-Bill Whiddon. C. Beaty. SIGMA CHI "Banta's Greek elichange" is Joe Mamley, Joe Gamble, Moran interfraterity .ournal issued ton Blalock, Marshal McGregor, four times a yea Yis published Eddie Smith, Doyle Mickeil, Richin the interest of 'ollege fraterniard Mills, Angus Dunlop, Ma-leolmties. Wind your watch fully when you arise m the morning. B Don't open the bock of the case. The tiniest speck of dust or moisture may harm the mechanisn, Remove.watch from your wrist when washing your hands. A tiny drop of moisture entering the case 'may rust the hair spring 'or Pther vital Part -M If the crystal breaks olcrc immediately replace it with another. Don't let dust get on the diaL Don't handle your watch roughly. The deliebte pivots may bend; some of theiiny jewels may cradk.A Have your watch cleaned and oiled regularly ev&y1 tn of twelve m--. ExpertWatchmakers, Jewelers and Engravers See Us for Fast and Dependable Srvice BOND JEWELRY CO. "GAINESViLLE'S QUALITY JEWELERS" 305 W. UNIVERSITY AVENUE I -ELECT BILL CO LSO-, PRESIDENT OF THE STUDENT BODY"'The Qualified and Experienced Man" GATOR PRTvY PAID POLITICAL ADVERTISEMENT tentative staff members in recommaendations submitted to the Board: Dave Sage, managing editor; Ted Nelson, executive editor; Aristotle Roumel, feature editor; William E. Boyd, sports editor; Tom Edwards, fraternity editor; Herbert Guy, campus editor; Don Walker, news and movie editor; Miss Jean Whitemore, reporter. Other appointments on the reportorial staff are yet to be made, Walker Said, as applications come in. Editorial staff meetings will be held regularly at 7:30 Monday nights in the Alligator news room, basement of Florida Union. Although recommendations for specific posts on the business staff, with the exception of Pero, had not, been made At press time,. Ed Davis, Charlie Vick, Liggett Karney, Bud Cooksey, Bob McGowan, John Hill, Billy McCoy, Bob Johnson and Jack Nooney are slated for j6bs. B6th Walker and Pero held responsible positions last year with Walker 'serving aA Managiit 'dittiaid PVero'as assistant Business Manager. Sage, recommended as Managing Editor, served as assistant Managing Eidtor. Other who were on the staff last year are Nelson, Roumel, Davis, Don Walker and Vick. University Continued From Page One ber grows. Maybe some day they will be able to look the Registrar in the eye when they register. The quantity is great enough to sport two professional sororities now, one Law and one Pharmacy. But please boys, remember that the grls are just ordinary studdnt ah not stray inhabitants of Mars, the Moon or Some other far distant sphere. They do appreciate being treated as students. 4+OC N0t4 TAUUS Er By Ted Nelson A year ago at tnis time, we started. out as a very green columnist under this head. The Alligator was being reborn after a year's lay-off, and things were pretty confused for a while. Both green and a freshman, we saw everything that was wronIg without inquiring into why everything couldn't be right. Sometimes, probably by accident, we accomplished a little by this helter-skelter method. The purpose of this column was to discuss controversial campus problems. That is still its purpose. But its r isa re going to be -sl ghtly altered. We learned, for instance, that the Ufniversity has be'en kicking around here for a long timelonger than any of us. We learned that discussion of, some issues is impossible 'at cc rtain times because of existing conditions which make it impractical. We learned that, invested with the loyal if often critical trust of an intelligent student body, the University, in some manger or other, can roll through almost any emergency and crawl out only slightly paler from its period of hibernation. We learned tot, of the prinary importance of cooperation among individuals and groups on he campus. The Senate's conerted effort to gain co-education, or example, failed temporarily 'it impressed the entire state by he solid back of a united stuent body. Normal conditions seem only a >reath away. The lessons learnd in wartime, however, are hardy expendable. Cooperation, spirit, he will and drive necessary to oceed, the tradition that makes Florida Man" a proud handlehese had a tough struggle to weather the bad years. But they're here and have never left s-and they never will if we member to keep a tight hold on them. Gator bontined From ka'ge One Rental Lib Rental Li AcrossS From Florida Theater brary Phone 1447 brary Phone 1447 WELCOME STUDENTS! COME TO The Varsity Grill UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT We Seve DeliciouS BREAKFAST -LUNCH -DINNER Ope'n 7 a.m.foMidnight VOTE GATOR PARTY "For a post-war campus even better than the pre-war University of Florida" PAID POLITICAL ADVEfZTISEMENT WELCOME New and Old GATORS. THE P1GG1E PAR K TRY OUR 40c DINNER THE A ALLIGATOR -GAINESVILLE, FLA., SEPT. 21, 1 WE LCOME GATORS. Terry Gift and Book Shop

PAGE 4

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR -GAINESVILLE, FLA., SEPT. 21, 1945 Complete Football Roster For 1945 Gator Squad No. Name pos. L Alfred B. Carter B 2 Angus Williams B 7 Buddy Carte B 4. J. L. Smith B 5 Fred Hogan B 7 Tom Vangelas B 7 L. B. (Junior) Dupree B S Bill Gilmartin B 7 Don Davidson B .0 Weldor Wright B oIt Earl Scarbrough B -2 Richard Bracewell B Virgil Dingman B 5 Claude Campbell B .Ziggy Sklodowski B 7 John Gilbert C 1'Jim Billings C 19 Kenneth Hamilton C '0 Charles Anderson B Bruce Martin (I P2 W. R. Land C 2> Horace Drew G : Brady Hall E 25 Frank Kristain G 23 Joe Oheaser E 27 Nick Testa B 28 John Kelly T '9 Harold Goldberg T 30 Ottis Mooney E di. eorge Pharr 4G i2 Elmer Atkins B 4M D. (Duck) Cawthon B n"Quincy Lee T .5 Tony Occhiuzzi B .13 Henry Brown T 27 E. B. Sapp T 18 John Curry B 3S9 Fred Kuss E 40 Sidney Vaughn E 41 Glenn Odham G 42 Scott Kelly T 47 Paul Mortellaro T 44 Jack White T 4 M. C. Harden E 4G Norman Ryerson E 47 John Favata T 47 Hugo Miller T J0 Ed Royal G 4 Charles Ball C rrid Opener @olitinued From Page One -3:ate a successful season. sday's game promises to tot .for the inexperienced fnd a win would send the wt. 16.0 150 170 165 175 170 165 165 171 170 160 175 160 152 165 175 165 190 150 185 207 180 165 170 4190 170 206 200 19.0 165 175 163 200 165 185 236 170 175 170 192 195 220 200 162 180 210 195 185 195 Satbe a squad Gator bidderss off to a flying start on he hardest schedule played by a Slorida team in the last five 9 oars. The Saturday following the 63rd Infantry game, the Saurian squad noets the University of Mississppi at Jacksonville inetheir first ;Southeastern Conference encountAge 17 17 1i 29 17 17 17 20 17 17 21 18 28 19 17 17 18 21 17 18 19 18 22 17 18 17 21 17 21 17 17 19 17 18 17 21 17 17 17 21 17 21 21 17 17 20 23 21 19 Home Yr Miami Fr. Tampa Fr. Tampa Soph. Gainesville Soph. Daytona Beach Fr. Paterson, N. J. Fr. St. Petersburg Fr. Newark, N. J. Soph. Jacksonville Fr. Tampa Fr. Jacksonville Fr. Jacksonville Fr. Jacksonville Fr. Fort Myers Fr. Paterson, N. J. Fr. Miami Fr. Miami Fr. Daytona B6ach Soph. Jacksonville Fr. Gainesville Fr. Milton Fr. Jacksonville Fr. Bradenton Soph. Ruthford, N. J. Fr. Quincy Soph. Bronx, N. Y. Fr. Minneapolis, Minn. Fr St. Petersburg Fr. Winter Park Soph. Jacksonville Fr. Orlando Fr. Gainesvill Fr. Wildwood Fr. Paterson, N. J. Fr. Clearwater Fr. Gainesville Soph. Buffalo, N. Y. Fr. Minneapolis, Minn. Fr. St. Petersburg Fr. Sanford Soph. Quincy Fr. Tampa Soph. Paris, Texas Soph. Jacksonville Fr. Los Angeles, Calif Fr. Tampa Fr. West Palm Beach Soph. Sarasota Fr. Hollywood Fr. COPY SPECIFICATONS All Alligator copy should be typewritten, double-spaced and should be handed in at the Florida Union Desk no later then 3:00 p.m. Wednesday. Beer's Tailors 421 W. Univ. Ave. Alterations Made To Measure Clothes WELCOME STUDENTS City Drug Company PRESCRIPTION SPECIALISTS North Side Square Phone 1336 WELCOME OLD AND NEW STUDENTS Make our store your headquarters when you need school supplies, stationery, and greeting cards for all occasions. And remember, we specialize in artist's, architectural and engineering supplies. Chesnut Office Equipment Co. 206-208 W. University Ave. Phone 1086 FLORDA GTO'R 63rd I S A TU R DAY N IG HT 8:00 university Florida adim Box Seats. ...2 Reserved Seats General Admission Public School Student 0 -0'' ....o s ...6 Non-Corn Servicemen In Unifornn Date ....... .50 ..2.00 1.25 ...c ...50c ..0 .. 1.25 Florida Students Will Be Admitted Free But they.Must Have Their Student Activity Bcoks. Reserved and General Adimssiih Tickets On Sale At Athletic Departnient Students who want to go to the Mississippi game must exchange the coupon in the student activity book for al reserved seat ticket. No extra charge. 0.,. -2 .0 N~o-ANTR REGME-