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The Independent Florida alligator

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Title:
The Independent Florida alligator
Portion of title:
Florida allgator
Portion of title:
Alligator
Alternate Title:
University digest
Alternate Title:
University of Florida digest
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, FL
Publisher:
Campus Communications, Inc.
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2005
Frequency:
Daily (except Saturdays, Sundays, holidays and exam periods, Aug.-Apr.); semiweekly (May-July)
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. (some col.) ; 36 cm.

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Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
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Online databases.
newspaper ( sobekcm )
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Online databases ( lcsh )
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Coordinates:
29.651781 x -82.336258

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Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
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Also available online.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 65, no. 75 (Feb. 1, 1973)-
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"Not officially associated with the University of Florida."
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Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries.

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13827512 ( OCLC )
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sn 86010448 ( LCCN )
0889-2423 ( ISSN )

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Full Text
weather: partly cloudy high near 80

O'Connell
Center to be
open again
By SHARON KENNEDY
Alligator Writer

Students will be readmitted to the
Stephen C. OConnell Centers
weight room and to the Florida Pool
starting today, but the OConnell
Centers pool is off limits for recrea recreational
tional recreational uses, student senators decided
Tuesday night.
Passing 40-10 in a roll-call vote,
the Student Senate bowed to their
constituents and approved a $9,657
bill to keep the center open and
reopen the Florida Pool.
Student Sen. David Tucker, who
represents the Holland Law School,
said, My constituents want this
pool open and thats all there is to
it.
An ad hoc committee appointed
last week for the OConnell Center
came back to the senate with a
reduced money request and strict
guidelines for its future management.
The committee, chaired by Stu Student
dent Student Sen. Drew Olson, decided to
open the Florida Pool because SGs
intramurals sports organization is
taking control of the outdoor pool.
By not funding the OConnell
Center to extend its pool hours, the
bill will cost $9,657 instead of the
originally planned $12,936.
While the OConnell Center pool
will keep its reduced hours, the Flor Florida
ida Florida Pool will be open full time for
recreational use. The OConnell
Center weight room will also be
reopened for recreational hours.
Here are the guidelines the ad hoc
committee requested:
Unless an alternate source of
funding is sought first by OConnell
Center administrators, SCTwilf not
fund it in the future.
When the OConnell Center
makes a profit, a percentage must be
put into an account earmarked for
recreation. This account will serve
as an emergency fund when the
OConnell Center has a deficit.
The Activity and Service Fee
Advisory Committee will have a
line-item veto on all requests from
the OConnell Center.
An advisory board, including
one faculty member and a student
majority, will be formed. The board
will have no management power.
The question of who is financially
responsible has plagued the Student
Senate ever since OConnell Center
Director Lionel Dubay asked the
senate for $36,000 five weeks ago.
Senators refused to fund the re request,
quest, request, which Dubay said was needed
for salaries of life guards and weight
room attendants. Dubay returned
with a request of about $13,000.
The senate refused that request,
but decided to reconsider the bill
after and ad hoc committee reviewed
it.

Criser: Gramm-Rudman will clos&43josmcial aid offices

By MICHAEL PODOLSKY
Alligator Staff Writer


Financial aid officials fear the Gramm-Rudman budget ax
will chop away financial aid for more than 1,000 UF students
and UF President Marshall Criser is doing what he can to stop
it.
If the ax in the form of the Gramm-Rudman bill and
Reagans budget recommendations falls next year, UFs
financial aid office has determined that $ 16.4 million in aid to
UF students would be lost. The cuts would affect at least 7,373
students, or about 20 percent of the student body.
In a letter dated March 7, sent to Florida senators Paula
Hawkins and Lawton Chiles, and Rep. Buddy Mac Kay, Criser
said the worst effect of Reagans budget proposal would be

the independent florida

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The commission candidates react to news of the runoff, announcement. Coffey, right, with his 8-year-old daughter
Gordon and his wife, top, wave to supporters after the Melissa, prepares to give a telephone interview.

Coffey vs. Gordon: It's a runoff

Gordon 518 votes from victory

By BRAD BUCK and MARK BOSLET
Alligator Staff Writers
Mayor-Commissioner Gary Gordon
came within 518 votes of an outright
victory in Tuesdays City Commission
election, but when the votes were tal tallied,
lied, tallied, they showed he still must face
attorney David Coffey in a runoff
March 25.

Gordon won 4,052 votes, or 44.3
percent, of the 9,138 votes cast in the
at-large election. Coffey took 2,654
votes, 29 percent. Former Mayor-
Commissioner Gary Junior placed
third with 2,385 ballots, 26.1 percent.
The 27 percent voter turnout sur surprised
prised surprised City Clerk Mary Ann Frazer,
who had predicted about 21 percent of
Gainesvilles voters would cast ballots.
It was a nice surprise, Frazer said.
I dont know why (so many people
voted). The candidates getting out on
the streets and the good weather may
have had something to do with it.
Gordon needed 518 more votes to

city election

elimination of a program that pays the salaries of the people
who give out the aid. Without this program, Criser said, aid
could not be given out in a timely and effective manner. UF
would lose $315,000 if the program is eliminated.
Criser wrote that without the money, it would be extreme extremely
ly extremely difficult to deliver aid to students.
Federal student aid programs have been the majoT factor,
since 1958, in providing increased access to higher education.
Continued support for these student aid programs is vital to
this university and for the future of the state of Florida.
Gramm-Rudman-Hollings would take a big chunk out of
student-aid programs, including the Guaranteed Student Loan
program, Pell Grants, College Work Study Programs and
Student Educational Opportunity Grants.

gain the 50 percent plus one vote
majority necessary to win the election.
Some city officials think if Junior
had not entered the race, Gordon
would have won Tuesday.
A relieved Coffey predicted after
the results were announced: My
chances are excellent. This is my second
try, and Im not going to lose.
I did well in the precincts I expected
to do well in, he said.
Although Junior did not throw his
support behind Gordon or Coffey
Tuesday night, Coffey is confident
hell get Juniors backing.
Gordon said Tuesday night the
voters decided his record spoke for
itself.
This will give me two more weeks
to get my record out, Gordon said.
My opponents record and his prop proposals
osals proposals would be a step into the past, a
step into the direction of the cities to
the south of us.
I think the issue is clear. The issue
is whether we are going to take pride in
the kind of planning that has preserved
our environment and preserved our
neighborhoods.
Junior did not seem bitter after the
ballots were tallied.
We ran on the issues, and I think
the people spoke clearly on they
wanted, Junior said. Theije was no
mudslinging. It was a clean campaign;,
see Elections, riext page

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TheGuaranteedStudentLoan program alone would be cut in
half from $26 million this year to sl3 million in 1987-88.
The number of UF students eligible for the loan also will be
halved dropping from 10,450 to 5,127.
The Pell Grant, the nations largest student aid program, will
take a beating as well.
This year, 6,500 UF students received $8.6 million in Pell
Grants. If Gramm-Rudmann hits, Criser said the figures would
drop to 4,254 students receiving only $5.5 million.
The loss of these funds would have a serious negative
impact upon our lowest income students, Criser wrote.
S6O Financial Aid, next page

Wednesday, march 12, 1986



2

* alligator, Wednesday march 12, 1986

Gordon gets grilled

New Burger King doesn't like it the mayor's way

By JIM HAGY
Alligator Staff Writer
Hold the pickles, hold the lettuce,
Gary Gordon sure upsets us,
All we ask is that you let us grill him our way.
And for a while Tuesday, election day, local
Burger King officials did grill incumbent City
Commission candidate Gordon their way. Signs
such as Gary Gordon is anti-jobs were taped
on the windows of the West University Avenue
restaurant across from Library West. The Burger
King is scheduled to open tonight.
Mark Wright, Burger King operations direc director,
tor, director, said he put the signs up to remind the people
of what the City Commission under Gary Gor Gordons
dons Gordons leadership has done to ustheyve held
this store up a year.
Wright said the restaurant was scheduled to
open last March. But city commissionersby a
3-2 vote rejected the site plan that included a
drive-through window. Gordon, who voted
against the plan, says he and other commissioners
arent anti-business, but are anti drive-through.

Financial Aid
from page 1
Greg Farmer, Mac Kays press se secretary,
cretary, secretary, said Mac Kay is very sup supportive
portive supportive of what President Criser is
asking.
Education is an investment in
the future and any cuts are short shortsighted,
sighted, shortsighted, Farmer said.
Farmer said that even though
Mac Kay voted for Gramm-Rud Gramm-Rudman,

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volume 79 number 124
* lb* ia^pradrainwWa
alligator
Ntwi Room 376-4458
Edl,or Sallie Hughes Photo Editor Susan Gardner
Managing Editor Mark Southgate Opinions Editor Bonnie Glazer
News Editors Mickie Anderson Sports Editor Marlon Manuel
Greg Lamm. Susan Purtic An Director Scott Baker
Special Project Editors Features Editor Matt Holland
Mark Bridgwater. Mark Worth
Display Advertising 376-4482
Advertising Director Carey
Retail Advertising Manager Michele Browder
Advertising Secretary Debbie Moran
Sales Representatives
Cindy Arndt Paul Gianneschi Terry Rhein
Courtney Brown Kevin Hoffman Jody Schlesmger
Tracy Gashe Richard Ivey John Sherry
Laura Geigle Jeff Kremer Jeff Weibel
Classified Advertising 373-FIND
Classified Supervisor Javne Murphy
Operations 373-9926
Operation Manager Suzy Martjn
Production Manager Tay|or
Advertising Production Supervisor Monette Helgeson
Assistant Supervisor a Susan Payne
Editorial Production Supervisor Ellen Baislev
Assistant Supervisor F
Assistant Supervisor ..!!!!!!!!"! Steve Scott
Typesetting Supervisor Amy Wutka
Assistant Supervisor Barry Lupinacci
Circulation Manager Ronme Combs
Assistant Circulation Mgr Curbe|o
Business 376-4446
Controller Virginia Carroll
General Manager .V C E Barber
The Independent Florida Alligator is a student newspaper serving the University of
Florida, published by a non-profit 501 (c) (3) educational organization. Campus
Communications, Inc P 0 Box 14257. Gainesville. FL 32064 The Alligator is published
Monday through Friday mornings, except during holidays and exam periods. During UF
summer academic terms. The Alligator is published Tuesdays and Thursdays.
The Alligator is a member of the American Newspaper Publishers Association,
Associated Collegiate Press and Southern University Newspapers
Subscription Rates
One Semester (Fall or Spring) $ 15.00
Two Semesters (Fall & Spring) $29 00
Summer Semester / r $B qq
Full Year (All Semesters) $35.00
The Alligator offices are located at 1105 W. University Ave. Classified advertising can
be placed at that location from 8 e.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday, except for
holidays Classifieds can also be placed at the UF Campus Shops and Bookstores at the
HubJShands. Towers; at the cashier's office of the Reitz Union and off-campus at The
Smoker s Den. Briar Patch, and all Chesnut Office Equipment Co. locations in
Gainesville
All rights are reserved. No portion of The Alligator may be reproduced in any means
without the written consent of an officer of Campus Communications, Inc.

The extra traffic generated by a drive-through
window would cripple other pedestrian-orien pedestrian-oriented
ted pedestrian-oriented businesses in the area Gordon said, and lead
to more congestion on West University Avenue.
Wright said the restaurant will open tonight.
Although it doesnt have a true drive-through,
customers can drive to within five feet of a win window.
dow. window. Employees will shuttle the food out to the
customers, Wright said.
Wright said he did not know when he would
take down the anti-Gordon signs. But Gainesville
Codes Enforcement Manager George Congden
knew. ""
Congden said Wright violated a city ordinance
about sniping signs that attack people and
made him remove the signs. He said Wright had
also violated another city ordinance by not hav having
ing having a permit for the signs in the window.
Somebody, I dont know whether it was Gor Gordon
don Gordon or not, somebody called City Hall and cried
about it, Wright said.
Gordon said he did not know who complained
after Congden left.

man, Gramm-Rudman, he did so to force Congress to
come to a compromise before the
automatic across-the-board cuts be begin.
gin. begin.
He voted for it because he feels it
will force Congress to establish pri priorities,
orities, priorities, Farmer said. Congress Congressman
man Congressman Mac Kay believes in the stu student.
dent. student.
Farmer also said that few people
in Washington believe Reagans
budget proposals will pass unsca unscathed.
thed. unscathed.

Elections
from page 1
Gordon won 16 of the 22 precincts. Coffey won the
other six. Gordon and Coffey each won their home
precinct. Junior lost in his own precinct number 5,
J.J. Finley School to Gordon.
Gordon said his success at the polls was due to
raising issues that interested people. During this years
campaigning he spoke against raising utility rates and
forming a countywide planning board and for instal installing
ling installing an undeveloped greenbelt around Gainesville,
repaving old roads and preserving neighborhoods.
Peope dont ask about massive restructuring of
government, they ask about street lights and road roadways,
ways, roadways, he said while campaigning Tuesday.
Gordon said he favors a modest level of growth in
town, but growth should not be at the expense of the
quality of life.
The last thing you want to do is give away services

. "1010"' j Get Ahead with
f f f U Alligator Display
fl\t 111 l\l Advertising f

You're ambitious, you're educated, and you're ready to make an
important career decision Your first move could determine the
success of your entire career strategy
Therefore, you want to choose a solid company that offers the
right opportunities
K mart Apparel Corp. is seeking a large number of manage management
ment management trainees right now People like you who want to work as
apparel managers, a responsibility that can lead you to impor important
tant important buying, merchandising, or distribution positions in ladies',
men's and children's fashions People with diversified back backgrounds
grounds backgrounds who have the foresight and competence to make the
right moves

As a member of Kmart Apparel's management team,

-i ifijis bL sm ijjswF* ?
. K IW* o Bfc. B
mar-f apparel corp.
Employer

H i j ] H } }J( (M j I \'\ b\ \\\ || 1 I
li:|jll|< j 1 i | | V 1 l
SHAY ROUTH/ALUGATOR
The new Burger King on West University Ave. posts election-day signs
opposing incumbent Mayor-Commissioner Gary Gordon.

Ifs your move.
Above average salary and benefit program.
Please contact your placement center.

to attract growth, he said earlier in the campaign. By
giving away services as an incentive to attract growth, a
city loses the tax base that supports schools, libraries
and adds to things like the tree canopy, he said.
During the campaign, Coffey discuseed the nec
essity of stimulating economic growth in the city. But
as he emphasized at the League of Women Voters
January forum, the growth must lead to a more diverse
tax base.
Citing recommendations from the Visions 2000
meeting of more than 100 Alachua County residents
for 4 percent citywide growth as a good blueprint,
Coffey said he became motivated to run by the thought
of encouraging city-county cooperation to work for
this goal.
Referring to Plan Board experience in growth man management
agement management and law experience at UFs Center for
Governmental Responsibility, Coffey said that among
this years candidates he has the best handle on how to
manage growth.

move up as far as your skills can carry you we're firm believers in
the "promote-from-within" philosophy.
If yoO would like to play a part in the exciting world of fashion
apparel with a growth-oriented company write or phone us
at the K mart Apparel Corp. office nearest you listed below.
It's your move.
Recruiter Scott Limberger
Southern Region 2901 Clairmont Road NE
Atlanta, GA 30029



U F police records concealed

By MARK BRIDGWATER
Alligator Staff Writer
The president of a UF fraternity may
have used Mace against a non-fraternity
member who spit on him, struck him and
was verbally abusive to him early Satur Saturday
day Saturday morning.
But if you dont know his name, you
probably never will. And dont bother ask asking
ing asking UF police.
They and UF administrators, citing ef efforts
forts efforts to protect student confidentiality, are
withholding UF students names from
reports of crimes committed on campusa
practice that may violate the Florida Public
Records Law.
We dont release student names. That is
our policy and that is the universitys pol policy,
icy, policy, UF Capt. Everett Stevens said Tues Tuesday.
day. Tuesday.
We are not withholding information,
we are obeying the law, University Rela Relations
tions Relations Vice President A1 Alsobrook said.
Theres an exception to the Public Re Records
cords Records Law (concerning student records).
So, were not violating the Public Records
Law.
But a state media law expert says UFs
practice is wrong.

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T| _- .. SHAY ROUTH/ALUGATOR
The good earth
Yujin, 3, waters her father's vegetable plot near Lake Alice. Dad, Deok-
Su Jeon, a UF electrical engineering grad student, says Yujin often helps
him garden. The two are growing tomatoes, green onions and hot
peppers.

I think the universitys just being overly
protective of its students and employees,
Miami attorneyhnd media law expert Tom
Julin said. Ordinarily, police records just
arent student records. Julin is an attorney
who represents the Alligator.
According to the law that requires all
state, county and municipal records shall at
all times be open for a personal inspection
by any person, UF police are required to
release information concerning:
the time, date, location and nature of a
reported crime; and
the name, sex, age and address of a
person arrested or the victim of a crime,
provided they are not the victim of a sexual
assault or child abuse.
Gainesville police and the Alachua
County Sheriffs Office provide the names
of the victims and the location of a crime,
but they will withhold the names of sus suspects
pects suspects not yet charged with a crime.
UF police have withheld the names of
the victims, the location of an incident and
the names of uncharged suspects who are
turned over to the UF judicial system
administered by Student Services Assist-

ant Dean Mike Rollo.
Stevens referred to a July 1984 memo to
Administrative Affairs Associate Vice
President Gerald Schaffer from UF attor attorney
ney attorney Barbara Wingo that says students
names on UF police records are part of the
students educational records, which UF
administrators must keep confidential.
Police reports which refer to individual
students and are available to non (Univer (University
sity (University Police Department and) university
personnel, Wingo wrote, are patently
education ffecords and apply to the Buck Buckley
ley Buckley Amendment, a federal regulation charg charging
ing charging UF administrators with keeping educa education
tion education records confidential.
Wingo cited this example: should a
reporter heara rumor of a theft occurring on
campus and involving a student, the repor reporter
ter reporter cannot see copies of the police report
involving the student because a UPD
report is part of the disciplinary file of the
student.
Nonetheless, Wingo wrote, all refer references
ences references to students at the university must be
deleted from copies of such reports that are
releases.

5 more sentenced

12 of 13 defendants convicted in smuggling trial

By JIM DI POLA
Alligator Writer
When federal drug enforcement authorities
asked an accused ringleader of a multi-million
dollar international drug smuggling operation
what his profession was, he answered with
one word: drugs.
Small planes, shrimping boats and low-paid
offloaders in U.S. seaports were the tools of
his trade, an assistant U.S. attorney said.
Scott Warther, 30, of Batesburg, S.C., was
sentenced to 30 years in a federal prison for
organizing a criminal operation that lasted
two years, from 1982 to 1983. Warther and
11 others were sentenced Monday and Tues Tuesday
day Tuesday in Gainesville federal court to prison
terms ranging from 5 to 30 years.
Twelve of the thirteen people indicted on
drug smuggling and trafficking charges
pleaded guilty to charges during the past two
months. The remaining man will be taking his
case to trial.
According to court testimony,the smugglers
shipped in at least 50,000 pounds of mari marijuana
juana marijuana from Jamaica and dropped bales of
marijuana from small planes off the Bahamas
coast and then transported them to Gaines Gainesville,
ville, Gainesville, Tallahassee, Atlanta and South Caro Carolina.
lina. Carolina.
Federal Judge jMaurice Paul sentenced
accused mastermind Warther to 30 years in
prison without parole Monday. The other two

County OKs landfill plan

By JOSHUA L. WEINSTEIN
Alligator Staff Writer

The Alachua County Commission Tuesday
approved a $9 million plan to improve the
county landfill during the next six years, but
Commissioner Jim Notestein says the group
approved the plan without enough discussion.
Furthermore, Notestein said, the commis commission
sion commission doesnt have the money to pay for the
plan.
But Commissioner Leveda Brown said there
was plenty of discussion and that its normal
procedure to approve plans before the money
is allocated.
County Attorney Thomas Bustin agrees
with Brown on the money issue.
Notestein contends the plan, which would
provide a landfill cover, was railroaded

Women athletes get more $

By JOHN A. NAGY
Alligator Staff Writer

Fast fund raising by the UF Athletic Asso Association
ciation Association has enabled the UF Womens Athlet Athletics
ics Athletics program to receive an extra $90,000 in
grants from the State University System.
UF gained $ 140,000 for its womens athlet athletics
ics athletics program from the SUSs Womens Athlet Athletics
ics Athletics Challenge Grant the most of all nine
public universities.
That money is earmarked by Florida law
for either facility renovations or scholarship
endowments.
The grant, proposed by state Sen. George
Kirkpatrick, D-Gainesville, and passed into
law last year, gives each of the nine universi universities
ties universities $5,000 for every $7,500 raised in private
contributions. UF raised $245,000 in contri contributions
butions contributions for womens athletics.
This year, $450,000 550,000 per school
was available. Only four schools UF,
Florida State University, Florida Atlantic
University and University of West Florida

-

ringleaders, one a legendary drug pilot and
the other a UF law school graduate, were
sentenced Tuesday along with three others
Paul sentenced Paul Ernest Kersten 111, 40,
of Coral Springs, to 15 years in federal prison
and fined him $ 125,000 for conspiracy to pos possess
sess possess with intent to distribute more than 1,000
pounds of marijuana.
William Raymond Phillips, Sr,s, of Cara Carabelle,
belle, Carabelle, Fla., a graduate of UFs law school,
received a five-year term and SIO,OOO fine,
the maximum sentence, for traveling in for foreign
eign foreign commerce with intent to facilitate illegal
activity.
Phillips, who currently is serving an eight eightyear
year eightyear sentence for a previous drug conviction,
asked Paul for a concurrent sentence because
of his age.
Simpson argued that the 58-year-old Phil Phillips
lips Phillips should not be given any leniency because
he acted as one of the key organizers in the
smuggling operation. Paul sentenced Phillips
to five years in prison after he completes his
eight-year sentence.
Also sentenced Tuesday were Kevin Wood Woodward,
ward, Woodward, 32, of Aiken, S.C., and Edward LeGree,
32, of Frogmore, S.C. Each received five years
in prison on charges of conspiracy to import
marijuana.
Eddie Nimitz Johnson, 39, of Carabelle,
Fla., was convicted on traveling in foreign
commerce with intent to import into the Uni United
ted United States and was sentenced to eight years.

through before dollar figures had been dis discussed
cussed discussed thoroughly.
Brown says otherwise.
This is the same information that was
presented to us in a workshop held in Archer
two weeks ago, she said.
The plan would build a cover to keep water
from seeping into the landfill and, in turn, into
the aquifer. That would cost about $1.9 mil million.
lion. million. It also would provide an investigation of
soil at $50,000 and an investigation of
gas migration at $20,000. The remaining
$8 million will be used for a full landfill liner
and other landfill improvements.
Notestein said Tuesdays meeting brings up
serious questions about procedure.
Im alarmed, he said.
Brown said, Thats his paranoia, not
mine.

qualified for the initial $50,000 grants, leav leaving
ing leaving most of the remaining money on a first firstcome,
come, firstcome, first-served basis. UF asked first for the
money.
They always do, FSU Athletics con controller
troller controller Joe Labot said.
FSU was able to receive only $35,000 of
the first-come, first-served money because it
submitted its request after UF, UFs Athlet Athletics
ics Athletics Controller Denise Stevens said.
The pot was (almost) empty when FSU
turned in their request, she said. I 'under 'understand
stand 'understand that FSU turned in a request later in the
day.
Stevens said it has not been decided exactly
how to use the $1 40,000 in the $1.9 million
womens athletics budgets. Florida law states
that the funds must go either to facilities reno renovations
vations renovations or scholarship endowments.
The Athletic Assocations finance commit committee
tee committee will decide how to split the money up,
Stevens said. The money should arrive later
this month.

alligator, Wednesday march 12, 1986,

3



4

L alligator, Wednesday march 12, 1986

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NEW ASSOCIATE DEAN
A UF professor of counselor education is now
the associate dean of Graduate Studies and
Minority Programs. Rod McDavis took that
office in January. He served as the interim
assistant dean for Graduate Studies since 1985.
McDavis has been with UF since 1974, the
same year he received his doctorate in coun counselor
selor counselor education from the University of Toledo.
His new position involves recruiting black
graduate students and handling the financial
programs and admission, referrals for those
students. The job is linked to his research
interests; counseling ethnic minorities and
student personnel work. He is writing a book
on trans-cultural counseling called Trans Transcultural
cultural Transcultural Counseling, An Eclectic Approach.
l
\ local
SAVE A SMOKER
Warning: cigarettes can kill you. Thats the
message the local chapter of the American
Cancer Society is passing along in a stop stopsmoking
smoking stopsmoking clinic that began this week. The free
clinic, titled Fresh Start, offers a lot of
support from fellow smokers trying to kick the
habit, said a cancer society spokeswoman
Tuesday. The clinic is being held at the First
Christian Church, 800 SW Second Ave. It is
scheduled Mondays and Wednesdays from
5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. through March 26. For
more information, call 376-6866.
mm
INNOCENT UNTIL ...
TALLAHASSEE An appeals court refused
for the second time Tuesday to let social
workers shut down a Crestview child care
center whose owners husband was once ac accused
cused accused but never convicted of child abuse.
The Ist District Court of Appeals ruled
unanimously that it would probably,be un unconstitutional
constitutional unconstitutional to close Andersons Child Care
Center without proof that Charles N. An Anderson
derson Anderson has been found guilty of child abuse in a
civil or criminal court of law. Were we to
approve the construction urged by HRS, any
indicated report of child abuse in its registry
would disqualify an individual from em employment
ployment employment until that individual carried the
burden of disproving the reported abuse,
Judge E, Earle Zehmer wrote.
SUGGESTIVE GAMES
FORT LAUDERDALE The spring
break capital has left a maker of suggestive
board games somewhat miffed by rebuffing its
latest creation Body Tag. Baron-Scott
Enterprises Inc., the creator of Dirty Words
and Sexual Trivia, began manufacturing the
simple party game a few weeks ago. It was

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People rally for Vargas

QUITO, Ecuador (UPI) A general
who seized an air base after he was dismissed
for insubordination rejected President Leon
Febres Corderos order to surrender Monday,
calling instead for Ecuadorans to go into the
streets to fight tyranny.
Hours after Gen. Frank Vargas called for
the revolt, about 300 chanting students entered
the base in support of the rebellious general,
and the wives of radio technicians who were
holed up in the air base rallied to his cause in
the streets of Quito, the capital.
A Quito radio report said a group of officers
loyal to Vargas seized an air base near the
capital. It said the officers were arrested a few
minutes after taking over the air base. The
report could not be immediately confirmed.
Cordero had given Vargas until 7 p.m. EST
Monday to surrender, but no action was taken
when the deadline passed. Reporters at the air
base said eight planes circled the base, ap apparently
parently apparently looking for approaching forces.
Febres Cordero met with his top military
officials to discuss the rebellion in the seaport
city of Guayaquil, where the president had
spent the weekend. Details of the meeting
were not released.
The president said he would address the
nation by radio and TV to explain measures he
will take to end the rebellion if Vargas, who
was fired from his posts as chief of staff and air
force commander Friday, did not give up.

not the athletic-type game we were looking
for, said Ina Lee, task force spokeswoman.
GRAHAM DECREES DEATH
TALLAHASSEE Gov. Bob Graham signed
death warrants Tuesday for two death row
inmates, including Daniel Morris Thomas, a
member of the notorious Ski Mask Gang
that terrorized central Florida in the mid mid-19705.
-19705. mid-19705. Graham also signed a warrant for Ed
Clifford Thomas, who stabbed to death a
Broward County man one day and the
following day beat to death a witness to the
killing. Executions for both men have been
scheduled for 7 a.m. on Tuesday, April 15.
DM
FREE ON BUM BAIL
INDIANAPOLIS A woman accused of
writing more than SIOO,OOO in bad checks to
pay for luxury merchandise was freed when
she posted SI,OOO bail allegedly by writing
another rubber check, police said. The
suspect, Jerri Emberton, 26, who has no
permanent address, was being sought
Tuesday. She was charged Friday with five
counts of theft and released Saturday. Marion
County Sheriffs Sgt. Charles Denney said,
She posted her bond by writing a check.
STALKING HORROR
LOS ANGELES A woman who survived an
attack by the Night Stalker killer testified
Tuesday that the man accused of the murder
spree, Richard Ramirez, shot her at point pointblank
blank pointblank range and killed her roommate in a night
of terror. Maria Hernandez, 21, was the first to
survive an aitack by the Night Stalker and

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"Total Comnunicatlon" a varlaty show that
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the hearing and deaf worlds. It also includes
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Performance Times lumped by student government
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briefs

The standoff at Eloy Alfaro Air Base in
Manta, on Ecuadors Pacific coast 250 miles
west of Quito, was not considered a serious
threat to the government. Ecuador has been a
democracy since the last military regime left
power in 1979.
Vargas spent a fourth day holed up at the air
base, rejecting Febres Corderos call for his
surrender and demanding a military hearing to
present documents he said would detail
corruption in the top ranks of the nations
military.
If I am thrown out of here, I will go to the
mountains and fight with the peasants against
this tyranny, an emotional Vargas told a
Quito radio station. He called on Ecuadorans
to go into the streets and fight tyranny.
The Ecuadoran people should go out in the
streets with their guns if a dictatorship is
declared, Vargas said. I will leave here only
dead.
Vargas said he had 1,000 air force troops
and various warplanes on alert to resist an
attack. Observers earlier estimated 200 to 500
troops were at the base.
A journalist for Vision Radio at the Eloy Air
Force Base at Manta said he saw Vargas use a
car to block the takeoff of an airplane with
seven air force officers aboard. Vargas
reportedly then forced the seven to leave the
plane, took away their wallets and let them
walk off the base.

the first to testify against Ramirez, 26, at his
preliminary hearing to determine if there is
enough evidence to make him stand trial on 14
counts of murder and 54 other felonies.
MUDDY SACRILEGE
SANTA CLARA, Calif. lndians picketed
Santa Clara University for allowing mud
wrestling. But the protest wasnt against the
event it was for using sacred slime. The dirt
for a fraternity-sponsored mud wrestling
tournament at the Jesuit-run university March
1 came from a sacred Indian burial ground,
picketing tribal descendants charged Monday.
Its a spiritual issue for the Indian, said
Rosemary Camba, a member of Muwekma a
local group of native American descendants.
Fraternity leaders said they were surprised
their event has caused so much trouble. They
were accused last week of insulting women.
Fraternity Vice President Jim Manning said, I
think were also going to stay away from mud
wrestling for a little while.
STORM DAMAGE
Ohio Valley residents Tuesday began cleaning
up the splintered wreckage of homes and
towns demolished by tornadoes and 90 mph
winds that killed six people, injured dozens
and caused millions of dollars in damage. State
officials surveyed areas ravaged by at least 29
twisters. The twisters destroyed homes, flipped
cars and downed powerlines Monday in
Illinois, Indiana, Ohio and Kentucky. One
person was killed in Kentucky, three in Ohio
and two in Indiana including a man
crushed under a collapsed bam. Authorities
reported 45 storm-related injuries in Indiana
and at least three dozen in Kentucky. Elec Electricity
tricity Electricity still had not been restored Tuesday to
about 3,000 people in Kentucky, 400 in Ohio
and a handful in Indiana.
AMERICAN GUN CONTROL
WASHINGTON The House Judiciary

Committee Tuesday unanimously approved a
compromise measure to loosen federal gun
laws that would allow interstate sales of rifles
and shotugns but would keep current
restrictions on pistol sales. The measure would
be the first major change in the nations 18-
year-old Gun Control Act passed in the wake
of the 1968 assassinations of Martin Luther
King Jr. and Robert Kennedy. Recalling the
shooting of President Reagan in 1981, Rep.
Peter Rodino, D-N.J., said he was disap disappointed
pointed disappointed there was not enough support to
strengthen handgun laws by requiring a
waiting period allowing police time to check
the backgrounds of prospective pistol buyers.
'V J world
JAPANESE GUN CONTROL
TOKYO Police will visit Japans nearly
600,000 licensed gun owners as part of
elaborate security measures being mounted
before President Reagan and other leaders
arrive for the May economic summit,
authorities said Tuesday. Every year, police
conduct inspections of each of the countrys
593,951 registered owners of firearms. This
year, police will knock on their doors early so
all checks are completed before the summit.
During the inspection, a neighborhood police
officer checks both the firearms and the
licenses. They check to see that guns havent
been stolen or are otherwise in the wrong
hands, a National Police Agency Spokesman
said.
FRENCH RESOLVE
BEIRUT, Lebanon A French
troubleshooter drove into West Beiruts
suburbs Tuesday in a bid to contact a pro-
Iranian extremist group that said it killed a
French hostage and threatened the lives of
three others. Dr. Razeh Raad, a Lebanese Lebaneseborn
born Lebaneseborn cardiologist, was seen driving into the
citys Shiite Moslem militia-controlled suburbs
for a meeting with Islamic Jihad members,
Lebanese police sources said.
STUDIOUS SNAKES
HARARE, Zimbabwe Swarms of huge
snakes looking for mates and a place to nest
during Africas hot season have invaded a
schoolhouse, and teachers, tired of warding off
the invaders with torches, are looking for new
jobs. Some 50 snakes have been killed since the
school opened in January, Principal Em Emmanuel
manuel Emmanuel Musaruwa said. The already jumpy
staff had taken to spending nights around
campfires with burning torches. But the last
straw came when a 15-foot-long snake in interrupted
terrupted interrupted a meeting in Musaruwas office.
IN THE DARK
SANTIAGO, Chile Leftist rebels blew up
two electricity towers early Tuesday, knocking
out power supplies in Santiago on the fifth
anniversary of a constitution that extended the
term of the military government until 1989.
The communist-backed Manuel Rodriguez
Patriotic Front claimed responsibility for the
explosion and said the attack was the start of a
campaign of violence aimed at ousting Gen.
Augusto Pinochet, Chiles military president.
This page compiled by Sarah Duran from UPI
and staff reports.



Students
active in
campaign
Some faculty, students
try to increase turnout
By DEBBIE SALAMONE
Alligator Staff Writer
A love-hate relationship may stall work
Gainesvilles City Commission
and UF, but that hasnt stopped faculty and
students from hitting the campaign trail.
College-Young Democrats, a UF stu student
dent student political organization, endorsed City
Commission Candidate David Coffey in a
letter icThe Alligator Tuesday, saying they
supported Coffeys dedication to long-term
planning. Coffey said Florida Blue Key
President Rob Stern also worked for his
campaign.
The Democrats set up a table outside
Turlington Hall this week, talking to stu students
dents students and spreading the word, member
Lawrence Siry said. Every election we try
to get all the students out to vote. Despite
the endorsement Siry said some College-
Young Democrats were working for incum incumbent
bent incumbent Mayor-Commissioner Gary Gordon.
i English Society member Kimberly
OConnor said she stood around Gaines Gainesville
ville Gainesville Tuesday with a campaign sign sup supporting
porting supporting Gordon.
OConnor said she supported Gordons
stance on environmental issues. She also
said Gordon entertained the organizations
members this semester with tales about his
writing career.
UF faculty members were also divided
in their support of candidates, contributing
money to the Coffey, Gordon and candi candidate
date candidate Gary Junior campaigns.
UF English Professor Sidney Homan
said he spent any time he could gathering
faculty names to put in campaign adver advertisements
tisements advertisements and roaming through his neigh neighborhood
borhood neighborhood telling residents why they should
vote for Coffey.
Hes a very-level headed person, and I
like the idea of having a fresh face on the
commission, he said.
Faculty members contributed more than
$25 to the campaigns as follows:
CoffeyArchitecture Professor Eme Emeritus
ritus Emeritus Carl Feiss, SSO; Health center Dr.
David Challoner, SIOO.
Gordon UF pharmacist Robert M.
Atkins, SSO; Food and resource enconom enconomics
ics enconomics Professor Mac Langham, SSO; Agricul Agricultural
tural Agricultural engineering technician, James M.
Simpson, SSO; Religion Professor Richard
Hiers, S3O; retired education Professor
Robert Myers, SSO; Associate geography
Professor Grant Thrall, $35.
Junior Business service secretary Ber Bernice
nice Bernice Harrison and agricultural engineering
research Professor Dalton Harrison, SIOO.

History favors incumbent in city runoff

By BRAD BUCK and MARK BOSLET
Alligator Staff Writers
If history repeats itself, Mayor-
Commissioner Gary Gordon should be in a
good position to win the March 25 City
Commission election runoff against chal challenger
lenger challenger David Coffey.
Os the seven incumbent city commis commissioners
sioners commissioners who have run for re-election in the
past 10 years, five have kept their seats.
Last year, incumbent Jean Chalmers
defeated Coffey. In 1984, incumbent W.E.
Mac McEachern beat attorney Don Reid.
And going back to 1982, Commissioner
Courtland Collier defeated Gordon.
Gordon and Gary Junior each spent
more than $ 11,000 on this years campaign.
But money wont be the big factor in the

City Election Results

' Occuptkm: GainesvHte mayor I
fjjli aJfefe? married -jHH K3%
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Gordon
/ / Coffov L
Kfl| Occupation: Lawyer
/ ~7] stem*** L
f Occupation: Local business I
""" I/OaV
Statue: married I
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Junior
HI I
26% of all registered voters!
With all precints reporting only cast ballots in this city election, j |

Student voter turnout dismal

By JIM DI POLA
Alligator Writer
UF students again turned out in dismal numbers
for a Gainesville City Commission election, accord according
ing according to statistics from the Reitz Union, the citys
student-dominated precinct polling place.
Students there supported incumbent Gary Gor Gordon
don Gordon in larger numbers than his two challengersUF
Center for Governmental Responsibility Director
David Coffey and businessman Gary Junior.
Gordon and Coffey will face each other in a runoff
March 2,5.
At the Union, 56 students cast 33 votes for Gor Gordon,
don, Gordon, 20 for Coffey and three for Junior. Last year, 71

Gordon wins black vote; Coffey tryinq

By BRAD BUCK
Alligator Staff Writer
Mayor-Commissioner Gary Gordon won all
three predominantly black precincts in Tues Tuesdays
days Tuesdays City Commission election by a substan substantial
tial substantial margin. But his opponent for the March 25
runoff, David Coffey, thinks the black vote will
be one of his keys to victory.
The three precinctsnumbers 13, 16 and
28 cast 527 votes for Gordon, 79 for Coffey
and 124 for former Mayor-Commissioner Gary
Junior.
Gordon was not surprised by his high per perm

outcome of this election, former Mayor-
Commissioner and UF Professor Courtland
Collier said.
The (candidate) with the best organiza organization
tion organization will win, said Collier, who predicted
the race would come down to a runoff. It
wont necessarily be the one with the best
ads or the most money.
Coffey spent $5,232 or $ 1.97 per vote
in the campaign. Gordon doled out
$13,886 this campaign, which translates to
$3.43 for each vote. Junior forked out

> > : .

analysis

people, or 3.2 percent of the registered Union voters,
cast a ballot.
Another student-attended poll, P.K. Yonge Labor Laboratory
atory Laboratory School, turned in 235 votes for a 7.5 percent
turnout. Poll worker Janice DArinson said she esti estimated
mated estimated 35 of those voters were students.
The annual low student turnout frustrates student
activists.
Robert Capko, a College-Young Democrats
member who sat behind a table at the Union Tuesday
with information about the election, said the students
who passed him by didnt even seem to notice.
We have all this material out and no one even
seems interested enough to pick it up, he said. Im
really at a loss at what more we could have done.

m perm
centage of black votes.
I think thats a recognition of the work Ive
done on public works projects, such as road
resurfacing, he said.
I think people in the black community as
well as every community know I care about the
people.
Gordon also expressed thanks to the Ala Alachua
chua Alachua County Ministerial Alliance for its
support.
Those black ministers clearly said Mayor
Gordon has responded to the needs of the peo people.
ple. people. I fight for everyone, not just for the big
money and not just for the big developers.

$11,212 or $4.70 per vote.
Some observers saw this years campaign
as one that pitted those who want Gaines Gainesville
ville Gainesville to grow against those who want to
curtail rapid expansion. That assessment
came partially as an outgrowth of the
Visions 2000 policy statement issued in
January by a local group of more than 100
lay growth planners.
The statement said developers and entre entrepreneurs
preneurs entrepreneurs who want to move to Gainesville
see the city leaders as anti-growth. Cof Coffey
fey Coffey and Junior used that statement as a
weapon against Gordon during the
campaign.
But Collier doesnt see it as that big a
factor.
The issue is more like how do you man manage
age manage growth than whether the city is made

alligator, Wednesday march 12, 1986,

Election
donations
reported
/Editor's note: Due to space lim limitations,some
itations,some limitations,some of Mondays contri contribution
bution contribution story had to be edited. The
contribution information will now
apear in its entirety.
By MARK SOUTHGATE
Alligator Staff Writer
The incumbent Mayor-Commi Mayor-Commissioner
ssioner Mayor-Commissioner Gary Gordon reported con contributions
tributions contributions from the trade unions, the
Communications Workers of
America at $250 and the United
Brotherhood of Carpenters at S3OO.
Most of his reported contribu contributions
tions contributions were of the under SJO variety,
like the S3O that religion Professor
Richard Hiers gave or the 70 cents
that City Commissioner W.E. Mac
McEachern and his wife June con contributed.
tributed. contributed. One exception is the use of
anairplane--acontributibnworths4Bs
from Kenn-Air Aviation Corp., a
subsidiary owned by airport busi businessman
nessman businessman Bill Cousins.
Most of David Coffeys reported
contributions fell into the under unders3o
s3o unders3o category. Coffey also received
contributions from area developers,
such as S2OO from James Greene
and Robert Rowe. County Planning
Administrator York Phillips con contributed
tributed contributed $25, and Dr. David Chal Challoner,
loner, Challoner, vice president of health affairs
at the Miller Health Center, con contributed
tributed contributed SIOO.
Coffeys biggest expense was for
advertising 5745.58 to the Gai Gainesville
nesville Gainesville Sun, and $492 to WYKS
radio.
Gary Junior boasts the largest
individual contributions many
were more than SIOO. Mall busi businessman
nessman businessman Alan Squitieri contributed
S2OO and J.D. Stephenson of 5727
NW 54th Terrace gave S3OO. The
largest reported contribution was
from Sporter Printing for posters
and brochures worth $406.
Junior spent $7,612 for television
and newspaper advertising, making
him the biggest media spender.
'o
Not all contributions have been
reported. They are to be reported
within 60 days after the election.
Coffey, for example, has listed
$1,972 contributions while spend spending
ing spending $3,510.08, a difference of
$1,538.08.

M #
Coffey, on the other hand, saw the black
voters sending him a clear message.
I anticipate if there is a change in my stra strategy,
tegy, strategy, wellbe putting more effort into the black
areas of Gainesville, Coffey said. Obviously,
I havent gotten my message out. Black areas of
Gainesville need economic development badly.
Last year, the black vote was important but
not enough to elect candidate Earl Young. Pre Precincts
cincts Precincts 13, 16 and 28 contain 3,385 of Gaines Gainesvilles
villes Gainesvilles 5,700 black registered voters.
Young garnered 609 of the votes in those
precincts last year, but it was not enough to win
the election.

up of growth versus no-growth fac factions,
tions, factions, Collier said.
Gordon took 44.3 percent of the 9,138
ballots cast. Coffey received 2,654 votes, or
29 percent, in Tuesdays election. Junior
won 2,385 votes for 26.1 percent of the
total.
Gordon said he wants to continue pro projects
jects projects such as the Greenbelt Task Force,
which is supposed to come up with strate strategies
gies strategies to maintain Gainesvilles natural sur surroundings
roundings surroundings and prevent developers from
haphazardly building shopping centers and
neighborhoods around the city.
Coffey has proposed splitting the city
Plan Board, on which he used to serve. He
thinks one panel should review site plans to
determine their impact on existing neigh neighborhoods.
borhoods. neighborhoods. The other group would spend its
time determining how land should be zoned.

5



6

I, alligator, Wednesday march 12.1986

No pass, no play
UPs written 4 Athletic Philosophy and In Institutional
stitutional Institutional Purpose:
Academic success for the individual student studentathlete
athlete studentathlete must be given top priority ... It is also
necessary that athletes be recruited whose
character, background and/or previous academic
attainment would predict likely success as a
student (emphasis theirs) at the University of
Florida. Self Study of Intercollegiate Athletics;
The University of Florida; March, 1985.
Reality:
UF gave a $2,017 scholarship to a football
player in 1985 who received a Scholastic Aptitude
Test score of between 450 and 499, about 50
points more than a first grader could earn by
scratching his name on the test. SAT scores range
from 400 to 1600.
Only four of 32 Gator basketball players
receiving scholarships in years from 1978 to 1982
have received degrees. The graduation rate for all
students is about 70 percent.
UF football players were recruited with a 2.2
high school grade point average. Womens
basketball players had the lowest average GPA,
2.12. Women gymnasts and swimmers had a 2.8
average GPA, the highest of UPs athletic recruits.
All the scores were well below the campuswide 3.4
average GPA for entering freshmen.
UF athletic officials should be praised for at
least stating that they place academics before
athletics and for conducting the honest self ap appraisal
praisal appraisal requested by State University System
policy-makers, the Board of Regents. Florida State
University which had some equally alarming
statistics did not conduct nearly as complete an
evaluation.
But we believe the praise should stop there.
There has obviously been a large gap between
rhetoric and action. A gap that must be filled.
And a gap that can be filled.
Not all of the blame for recruiting athletes with
poor academic qualifications lies with universities.
As UF President Marshall Criser told the St.
Petersburg Times We can only deal with the
product that comes to our doorstep.
The gap can be filled by initiating the No Pass,
No Play legislation currently being considered by
the Florida Legislature. Patterned after a con controversial
troversial controversial Texas law, Floridas would require
students who cannot pass or complete any
academic course during a semester and who earn
less than a 1.5 overall GPA, be ineligible for
extracurricular activities the following semester.
Currently, Florida students must maintain a
minimum 1.5 GPA on a four-point scale and must
pass five subjects in a semester to maintain their
eligibility. The author of the bill, Rep. Larry
Hawkins, D-Perrine, said the standards need
beefing up because they allow athletes and others
to load up on crib courses while flunking core
subjects such as English, math and science.
Another reason, as two UF stats show, is that
theyre just not working.
It seems the best way to motivate young athletes
is by letting them know early where their priorities
must be. In Los Angeles, for example, where a
similar rule is in effect, the percentage of ineligible
high schoolers fell from nearly 21 percent in fall
1984 to 16 percent in spring 1985. In Seattle,
where nine football players were sidelined in 1984
for poor academic performance, five earned C
averages by spring and four returned with B s.
UF and FSU the states two public university
sports powerhouses should become the Florida
No Pass, No Play laws cheerleaders. The UF
self-study groups recommendation to solve the
problem extending scholarships an extra year to
give students extra time to graduate doesnt
attack the problem at its roots.
Follow up the rhetoric with some action. Its a
winning play.

alligator

Editor
SALLIE HUGHES

* Opinions Editor
BONNIE GLAZER
Lafters Policy
Letters to the editor should not exceed 200 words (about one 8-by-10 poge) They
must be typed, double spaced and signed They most include o typed name,
address and telephone number Names will be withheld if writers show just cause
If you have questions contact opinions editor, at 376-4458.

Managing Editor
MARK SOUTHGATE

-opinions -opinions

Deans to inform students on 80-hour rule

Okay, youve been at the University of Florida for 2Vt years
and you have never heard of the 80-hour rule. Either you have
been caught up with the hassles of everything else or you have
happily repressed this all too often neglected rule.
The rule states that any student who has not been accepted
into an upper-division college after attempting 80 hours of
course work can no longer be enrolled in the university. A
distinction must be made between hours attempted and hours
completed, as it has been a point of much confusion. Hours
attempted include hours in which a student received a failing
grade of either E or U as well as all hours of passed course
work. Therefore, a student who may have earned less than 80
hours may be ineligible for registration because he has carried
(attempted) over 80 hours. AP credit as well as CLEP is in included.
cluded. included.
There are many reasons why a student might not be in a
college after having attempted 80 hours. Some students dont
have the grade point average needed to get into the college
they want. Others lack the prerequisites to get into a particular
college, and some just have not made a decision yet. Whatever
the reason, these students find themselves unable to register
and continue at the university.
Most of the problems with the 80-hour rule arise in the case
of transfer students and students trying to get into the College
of Business Administration, which has a high GPA
requirement and many prerequisites.
Transfer students are informed of the 80-hour rule before
coming to the university in a letter sent to them by the
university. The rule is also explained at transfer student
orientation and in the university catalog; however, for
whatever reason, many come to UF unaware of the 80-hour
rule. These students often have over 64 hours, but still havent
taken either the general education or prerequisite courses they
need to get into an upper-division college.
One example would be a transfer student interested in the

Trend not obvious in
suppressive regimes
Editor: In response to your March 6
editorial See a trend?, unfortunately, I
have to say, No, I dont. While the
recent return to democracy in Haiti and
the Philippines does give cause of op optimism,
timism, optimism, you have neglected to mention
the type of dictatorships in both these
countries. The trend towards greater
freedom that you see might indeed occur
in nations with non-communist dic dictatorships.
tatorships. dictatorships. The opposite trend can be
seen in countries that have recently been
taken over by communist regimes.
What about Nicaragua, Angola,
Cambodia, Afghanistan, Poland and the
numerous other nations which have been
subjected to communist slavery for
decades? With the exception of
Grenada, no country has returned from
the nightmare of communism in recent
years. Yet it is the continuously
spreading totalitarianism of communist
regimes that is the biggest threat to
democracy today.
If you are really serious about the
promotion of democracy and freedom,
there is a golden opportunity right now
to turn this support into action. The
Nicaraguan freedom fighters are in great
need of our support in their struggle for a
free and democratic Nicaragua. In every
respect, the Sandinistas fit the

letters

description of a totalitarian regime. Yet
liberal Democrats in Congress are op opposing
posing opposing President Reagan in his deter determination
mination determination to support democracy in
Nicaragua.
The problem in overthrowing com communist
munist communist regimes is that their grip on
society is too tight to permit popular
revolts like the one in the Philippines or
Haiti. The enthusiasm of freedom
fighters everywhere for their ideals is not
enough to oppose the constant flow of
military hardware from Moscow and
Havana. They need our help.
If you want to support freedom and
democracy, call your congressman today
in support of the Nicaraguan freedom
fighters.
Andreas Nachyba
Gainasvilta
Gainesville needs
new music station
Editor: This letter is in response to the
proposed new music radio station at the
University of Florida, and I think its
about timel I for one have seen
numerous changes in Gainesvilles music
scene since arriving here in 1982. One
thing is obvious to me live music has
been dead for the last two years in
Gainesville. The reason is clear
economics. The increase of canned music
at most of the local bars and night clubs
has been the biggest cause of live musics
decline, and I think it stinks!! I definitely
would welcome the return of live music,
and thanks to clubs like the Vatican and
America, this hope is finally
materializing.
And as a young punk who

j 'Il r< I >: $ H

College of Business Administration. Such a student often lacks
the two calculus courses required for business among their
prerequisites. Since these two courses cannot be taken
simultaneously, the student is automatically behind before
even reaching the university.
Students need to be more aware of the 80-hour rule. Many
students claim to have received poor academic advisement,
which made their problem worse. Transfer students should be
advised before coming to UF. Junior colleges throughout the
state, as well as UF, should make sure these students know
about the rule and how it affects them before the damage is
done.
Once students are aware of the rule, they can then begin to
organize their schedules accordingly. To help alleviate any
confusion, the peer counselors are sponsoring an 80-hour rule
information session. This session will focus on the problems of
students approaching 80 hours and in particular, transfer
students and potential business majors having trouble with the
rule. Associate Dean Wayne Losano of the Liberal Arts and
Sciences and Associate Dean Wanda Denny of the business
college will be speaking and everyone with questions is en encouraged
couraged encouraged to attend.
The session will be held on Thursday, March 13, in Little
109 from 4-5:30.
Michelle D. Adelman is a staff member at the UF Counseling
Center.

grew gracefully younger with age once
said, long live rock, I need it every
day. Me too!!!!
Scott Allan
3BR/UF
Uninformed student
proves writers point
Editor: The Feb. 12 Alligator ran an
opinion column I wrote condemning the
news media for not informing the
American public of the U.S. directed air
war in El Salvador. A week later Paul
Thomas wrote a letter to the editor
calling my allegations of the bombing
sensationalistic journalism and
science fiction.
I respect Mr. Thomas critical reading
of my column, but I also have confidence
in my sources, and urge Mr. Thomas and
other skeptics to go to the library and do
some reading. The most coverage I have
found appeared in The Nation (June 1,
1985, p. 662), The Christian Science
Monitor (April 27, 1984, p.l; Sept 12,
1984, p.l), The New York Times (Sept.
12, 1984, pp.A9, A10; July 18, 1985,
p.AI) and The Washington Post (July
19, 1985, p.A27). For an account from
an earlier phase of the war, read Rep.
James Oberstars testimony to Congress
Congressional Record (May 26, 1983,
PP.H3419-H3425).
The air war in El Salvador is reality.
Reports of it have appeared, but ob obviously
viously obviously not enough to bring the situation
to many peoples attention. Mr. Thomas
proves the point: He is a second-year law
student who is ignorant of his govern governments
ments governments actions in Central America.
Russoll Snydar
7LS

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Bicycles
clutter
walkway
Business college
wants bike racks
By SHARON KENNEDY
Alligator Writer
Business students still are tripping
over bikes parked on the sidewalks
and locked to garbage cans in front
of Matherly Hall, and it may take a
while before the situation changes,
officials said.
Scott Distasio, president of the
business administration student
council, said he has been working
since last fall to get bike racks in the
business area but has only seen his
proposal volleyed between UF ad administration,
ministration, administration, Student Traffic Court
and Student Government.
The business college area, which
includes Bryan Hall, Matherly Hall
and the new Business Administra Administration
tion Administration Building, is offically off limits
to bicycles but on any given day is
littered with dozens of bicycles and
bicyclists in the central plaza.
Theres no reason bike racks
couldnt be installed by next fall but
Ive been told ASFAC doesnt want
to fund any more capital improve improvements,
ments, improvements, Distasio said.
ASFAC is the nine-member stu student
dent student committee that annually over oversees
sees oversees a $4 million budget made up of
students activity and service fees.
Distasio has gotten a guarantee
from newly elected Student Traffic
Court Justice Loreen Tressler to pay
for one of five bike rack projects.

Woman hospitalized after pileup

A four-car pile up left a Quincy woman in stable
condition Tuesday at Shands Hospital, after she was
thrown from the car she was driving, the Florida
Highway Patrol reported.
There were no other serious injuries reported in the
accident, FHP officers said.
Shortly after 2 p.m. Monday, Felischa Redding of
Quincy was driving a 1980 Pontiac south along
Southwest 34th Street when a Gainesville man, driving
a 1978 Chevrolet, attempted to make a left hand turn
onto 34th Street from Northwest 67th Place, reports
show.
August Argehio, 40, of 39-141 NW 39th Ave.,
struck the left rear of Reddings car, knocking her
Pontiac across the center line where she slid under the.

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mUmm* , f *-
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MICHAEL WILSON/ALUGATOR
The area around the business buildings is overrun with
bikes. The business administration student council is work working
ing working to get bike racks to ease the problem.

Tressler said Student Traffic
Court will give $7,087 to pay for a
concrete planter bike rack like those
near Library East.
But Distasio said one bike rack
will not even make a dent in the
problem and has sought out admin administration
istration administration and the Activity and Ser Service
vice Service Fee Advisory Committee
(ASFAC) to meet the other $ 19,000
needed.
ASFAC Coordinator Tad Dele Delegal
gal Delegal said he thought bike-racks are
something Student Traffic Court
should pay for.
Were going to bring it up at
Thursdays ASFAC meeting, Dele Delegal
gal Delegal said. But the problem is, weve
already spent a lot of money on cap capital

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rearaxlesof aFreightliner tractor-trailer, driven by a St.
Mary, Florida man, witnesses told officers.
Redding was ejected from her car and landed on the
east side of 34th Street. The right side of the trailer
Reddings car slid under then struck the left side of a
Dodge truck hauling a flatbed trailer, reports said. The
truck was driven by Bruce Strickland of 124 SE 39th
St. His passenger, Wilton Cobb, 49, of Lake City,
sustained minor injuries.
Reddings Pontiac was declared a total loss. Ar ge genio,
nio, genio, whose Chevrolet sustained S3OO in damage, was
charged with violating the right of way, FHP reported.
No further charges are expected, a patrol officer said
Tuesday.
NORMA WAGNER

alligator, Wednesday march 12, 1986,

ital capital improvements projects.
However Distasio said his prop proposal
osal proposal was submitted before all the
others that were funded. ASFAC
tabledthebill until after the election
of the new traffic court justice.
The business college will hold off
awarding any money to the project
until outgoing Dean Robert Lanzil Lanzillottis
lottis Lanzillottis replacement arrives, assistant
Dean Wanda Denny said.
Bikes were regularly impounded
by university police last semester,
Denny said, which cut down on the
number of bikes in the business
administration plaza.
But this year is the worst,
Denny said. Every time the park parking
ing parking problem gets bad, the bike prob problem
lem problem gets bad.

7



8

I, alligator, Wednesday march 12, 1986


Students rated these items less than satifactory:
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Students rated these items satisfactory: v.
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Students happy in dorms,
see need for improvement

By DEBBIE SALAMONE
Alligator Staff Writer
Dormitory (dorme-tor-e).. pi. -ies a building with
many rooms that provide sleeping and living accommo accommodations
dations accommodations for a number of people, as at a college.
According to the fall results of its residence hall
survey, UFs Division of Housing has discovered that
students dont know the definition of a dormitory.
Students say they like living there because they feel
like part of the UF community, but they cant study
there.
About 4,800 of the divisions more than 6,000 resi residents
dents residents answered the biennial questionnaire, which they
say reflects well on the residence halls.
When comparing the number of positive responses
to those that were marked negative, it seems that our
program appears to be on the right track, said James
Grimm, housing director.
More than 80 percent of the survey participants
rated as satisfactory their relationships with resident
assistants and roommates and the enforcement of dorm
rules.
Almost half of those same students said they had an
opportunity to study in their room, while 32 percent
rated floor noise as unacceptable.
Theres no studying in the evening or on wee weekends,
kends, weekends, said Liz Efstathion, a building construction
major who has lived in Hume Hall since August 1985.
Beginning, about Thursday night, you cant study.
Efstathion blamed noise for the lack of studying

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opportunities. The walls are paper-thin, she said.
You can hear what people are saying.
But since the housing division began its biennial
survey about seven years ago, Grimm said students
have complained less about noise.
However, Grimm said he wants to ask more ques questions
tions questions in his next survey about topics students rated as
unsatisfactory.
Fifty percent of the respondents rated their dorms
food quality as poor, 58 percent said they had little
interaction with faculty inside their dorms and 33 per percent
cent percent complained that unity within their dorms was
poor.
Jeff Dean, a freshman journalism major who has
lived in Fletcher Hall since August 1985, said his six sixperson
person sixperson suite separates him from other dorm rooms.
Were segregated, he said. Its hard to meet peo people
ple people down the hall.
But about 80 percent of the survey participants said
they had an opportunity to get involved in hall social
activities, and a majority said they were satisfied with
dorm maintenance, cleanliness and security.
Living in a dorm has been a learning experience,
Efstathion said. Its one of the best ways to initiate
yourself into the real world.
Grimm said he took the survey to get a better
assessment of dorm life. We felt it was part of our
responsibility to make those assessments, he said.
Amanda Martin, a freshman in journalism living in
East Hall, said the survey was a good indicator of
dorm conditions. If they use it, itll be helpful.

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UF chemical search continues

JOB CLUB JOKER BAMBU WHITE BUFFALO

By NORMA WAGNER
Alligator Staff Writer

Its been almost a month since 11 canisters of explo explosive
sive explosive ether were found in an underground storage
bunker at UF. Since then, UF police and environmen environmental
tal environmental health and safety workers have been keeping an eye
out for other campus hideaway spots housing dan dangerous
gerous dangerous chemicals.
When the police lock up (campus buildings) at
night, were going to be looking for those areas where
chemicals might be stored and forgotten, UF police
Capt. Everett Stevens said.
He said officers on campus night patrol also will
watch for outside storage facilities such as the small,
underground bunker where the ether was kept.
Were going to keep an eye out, but its really the
Environmental Health and Safety Divisions responsi responsibility
bility responsibility to capture these chemicals, Stevens said.
Bill Properzio, UFs environmental safety director,
said his department keeps a tight rein on the hazardous
materials used on campus. He said the 10-year-old
ether canisters found Feb. 13 were a unique
situation.

Smith will run for Senate
Health center official pledges to curb big business control

By JUDY OWENS
Alligator Writer
A member of the Miller Health
Center Board of Overseers has an announced
nounced announced her candidacy for the Flor Florida
ida Florida Senate, promising to help Gaines Gainesville
ville Gainesville control its growth through its
citizens instead of big government.
Jo Ann D. Smith is the third can candidate
didate candidate to vie for the senatorial seat,
currently occupied by Sen. George
Kirkpatrick, D-Gainesville, who is
up for re-election.
Smith, a member of the 28-mem 28-member
ber 28-member board charged with keeping the
health center financially and aca academically

Promises, promises: Democratic gubernatorial candidate
Joan Wollin will speak at the College Democrats meet meeting
ing meeting tonight at 6:30 in Reitz Union Room 347.
Sales: The American Marketing Association meets this
evening at 7:15 in Bryan Hall Room 120.
Sails: The UF Sail Club meets tonight at 7 in Reitz Union
Room 349 to discuss the upcoming Clearwater Regat Regatta.
ta. Regatta.

VINCE KALAHER

Contra Aid: Paul Doughty of the UF Department of
Anthropology will discuss Nicaragua and Contra Aid
tonight at 7 at the College of Law, Bruton-Geer Hall
Room 136.
Space Out There will be a video presentation, chanting
and meditation instruction tonight at the Siddha Medi Meditation
tation Meditation Center, 1000 SW Ninth St., at 7:45.
Wildlife: The Student African Studies Association meets
at 4 p.m. in Grinter Hall R00m427 for a slide presenta presentation
tion presentation on Wildlife in Kenya by M. Kinnaird, a graduate
student in Wildlife Ecology.
Rally: The Student Coalition Against Apartheid and
Racism meets tonight at 8 at the Institute of Black
Culture, 1510 W. University Ave. to plan for a rally at
Santa Fe Community College.
Food For Thought: The Center for African Studies pres presents
ents presents a lecture by K.F. Nwanze, Increasing Food Pro Production
duction Production in the West African Sahel: The ICRISAT
Approach today at 3 p.m. in McCarty Hall Room
1031.
Multilingual Guitarist David Broza, an Israeli singer and
guitar player performs tonight in the University Audito Auditorium
rium Auditorium at 7:30. Mr. Broza will perform in Spanish, English
and Hebrew.

whats happening

demically academically afloat, would not elabo elaborate
rate elaborate on specific plans for Gainesville
if she wins the Senate seat.
The purpose of (a press confer conference)
ence) conference) Monday was only an an announcement,
nouncement, announcement, she said. We will
get more specific further on in our
campaign.
Smith said Gainesville has untap untapped
ped untapped resources in agricultural and
business areas. Such resources are
available through the Gainesville
community and the university, she
said..
In her first senatorial bid, Smith
wants to represent District 6, which
includes Lafayette, Dixie, Putnam,
Levy, Gilchrist and part of Marion

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Address
Social Security Number
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Gainesville, FI 32604

Somebody stockpiled that stuff and just forgot
about it, he said.
UF officials still dont know why the 5-pound canis canisters
ters canisters were kept in a storage bunker on the south side of
Newell Hall or what the ether was used for. But when
the Gainesville Fire Department was made aware of
the ether, they responded with blaring sirens and tem temporarily
porarily temporarily evacuated six buildings.
Properzios 27-member safety staff, which runs
campus pest control operations, fire equipment checks,
lab and biological safety inspections as well as radia radiation
tion radiation control and industrial safety checks, are instructed
to report back on suspicious or unaccounted for
chemicals.
We collect on a routine basis these kinds of mate materials
rials materials all the time, Properzio said.
Professors dealing with such hazardous materials as
ether are instructed to buy small quantities and dispose
of them within a year, he said. Other dangerous chemi chemicals
cals chemicals housed on campus are on record, and the safety
departments collection program removes those from
campus.
Its very controlled, he said.

Taxed? Help is here
By DINA M. COBB
Alligator Writer
Those who dread the April 15 deadline for income
tax returns need agonize no longerhelp is here.
Volunteer Income Tax Assistance, a service pro provided
vided provided by the Internal Revenue Service, provides free
assistance with tax returns until April 15.
VITA volunteers will be at the downtown branch of
Santa Fe Regional Library and at the Oaks Mall.
Accounting School Chairman Hadley P. Schaefer
said some VITA volunteers include UF accounting
students, who were tested to determine their qualifi qualifications.
cations. qualifications.
Both return forms and instruction booklets can be
found at UFs Library East and Library West. They are
available also at City Hall, Alachua County Adminis Administration
tration Administration Building and Santa Fe Community College
Library.
Many students have their tax returns completed by
professional tax assistants, said Sybil Benefield, man manager
ager manager of H & R Blocks Sears office. Though the forms
are only one or two pageswithout the papers needed
to file for various deductions many people dont
know how to complete them, she said.
Its surprising that you can have a college graduate
who cant fill out the form, Benefield said. They just
dont understand it.
The minimum cost for a prepared tax return is about
sl4, Benefield said.
Hours for VITA services at the Oaks Mall are Sun Sundays,
days, Sundays, 12 noon to 5 p.m.; Mondays, 10 a.m. 1 p.m.
and 6 p.m. 9 p.m.; Tuesdays, 12 noon 4 p.m. and
6 p.m. 9 p.m.; Fridays, 6:30 p.m. 8:30 p.m. and
Saturdays, 10 a.m. 4 p.m.
At Santa Fe Regional Library, VITAs hours are
lp.m. 5 p.m. on Sundays and 6:30 p.m. 8:30 p.m.
on Mondays.

alligator, Wednesday march. 12, 1986,

county.
Another Gainesville resident,
Margaret C. Eppes, is also on the
Secretary of States list of District 6
candidates but says she has not
decided if she still will run for the
position. A Gainesville resident for
17 years, Eppes sells real estate and
makes educational films for build building
ing building construction.
Smith said, As a lifelong citizen
of this area, I believe I understand
many of its needs, problems and
opportunities that exist in each of
the areas made up of specific com communities.
munities. communities.
Elections are November.

9



10

I, alligator, Wednesday march 12, 1986

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alligator, Wednesday march 12, 1986,

11



12

!, alligator, Wednesday march 12, 1986

NCAA
from page 20

For 1986, the word is parity.
Quite a few outstanding teams
are among the final 64, and the
top seeds from each region
Kentucky (29-3), St. Johns (30-4),
Duke (32-2) and Kansas (31-3)
are legitimate favorites. But the
mammoth teams, those with
Goliaths like Patrick Ewing and
Akeem Olajuwon, are noticeably
absent.
No ones a shoo-in to make it to
the Final Four and with that in
mind, lets take a look at a few
dark horses.
Jacksonville (19-9): UFs
neighbors ended their season with
a championship victory against
Alabama-Birmingham in the Sun
Belt Conference Tournament.
Jacksonville native Otis Smith
leads the Dolphins in scoring
(15.4) and rebounding (8). But
the key for JU could be Ronnie
Murphy, one of the premier one oneon-one
on-one oneon-one players in the nation.
Murphy can shake and bake with
the best of them. Hes an over oversized
sized oversized Pearl Washington. Dont
underestimate the strength of the
Sun Belt, which placed four
teams in the NCAAs.
Navy (27-4): Center David
Robinson is one of the nations top
scorers (22.1) and rebounders
(13.2). This is the same team that
destroyed Louisiana State in the
first round of the tournament last

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2) served as an Assistant Supervisor*
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year before losing to Maryland in
a close game. The Midshipmen
have experience and chemistry.
VUlonova (22-13): Last years
long-shot winner is an even
longer one this season. The
Wildcats have surged since the
insertion of freshman point guard
Kenny Wilson into the starting
lineup. The Wildcats have
nothing to lose, so why not make
it two in a row? As usual, a very
smart team.
Maryland (19-13): Beat North
Carolina twice, lost to Georgia
Tech in the final seconds of the
Atlantic Coast Conference
Tournament. Played one of the
toughest schedules in the nation.
Forward Len Bias saves his best
'performances for pressure
situations.

Its more than a bit unfair, the
way the NCAA selection com committee
mittee committee doled out homecourt
advantages to certain teams in the
tournament. Like Syracuse,
which opens against Brown in the
Carrier Dome and plays there
again if it wins. Louisiana State
plays Purdue in Baton Rouge.
North Carolina must take on
Utah in Ogden. The final two
rounds of the Southeast Regional
are played in the Omni in Atlanta
Georgia Techs homecourt.
Guess whos playing in that
region? Yep, Georgia Tech.
Os course, money talks. And it
speaks loudly here. Tournament
sites with home teams capture
bigger revenues at the gate. But

GOLD
Bu\ Sell Trade
Expert Watch & Jenelrv Repair
BEST JEWELRY & LOAN
523 N\\ 3rd Ave. -4367

Village Park
I French Quarter
SPECIAL SUMMER
RATES
as low as S2OO/month
_ (Furn.) ;!'
3 Pools ; j
Located Close to Campus at i'
1001-999 S.W. 16th Avenue 1 1
weekdays 9-4:30 ;!
378-3771

the injustice here runs especially
deep considering that the
basketball finals are a single
elimination affair one loss and
you are gone.

Last year, Mike Moses and Rob
Harden went. This year, David
Visscher.
These are former Gator guards
who played under Norm Sloan
and then transferred from UF.
Moses went from the Gators to St.
Johns, Harden from the Gators
to Nevada-Reno. Both made it to
the NCAA tourney last year with
their respective second teams.
This year, Visscher has made it
with Brown, winner of the Ivy
League Conference.
A new recruiting pitch for
Gator basketball could go
something like this: Play at UF
for a year or two and make it to
the NCAAs at another school.

Thursday brings the ultimate
fix for college basketball junkies,
cable-TV permitting. ESPN
begins covering the tournament
at noon, then goes virtually non nonstop
stop nonstop into the weekend. Past
midnight, West Coast games and
tape-delay contests will be
shown.
And the ultimate college hoops
junkie Dick Vitale, who
commentates with a boundless
enthusiasm for the game will
oversee all the action. Forego
studies and sleep for the
weekend, and you can stay on top
of most of the action.

f KATHY l|
PERSON
READINGS FROM +
SATIRICAL
CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE
r'lh'lO m
March 12. ISsTj Lounge 123
7:30 pm j. Wayna
FREE! I Reitz Union I
Sponsored by the J. Wayne
Reitz Union <.
Mf* Co-sponsored by N.O.W. /Jljt
ljf U and Studsnt Govsrnmsnt II l/a

* (|| BASH RIPROCKS JL £
- 1222 W. University -*
* 4S 372-0044 1 J
! OPEN 7:00 AM s
- on J
{ St. Patrick's Day i
* 5$ Green Beer til 10:00 am
t 100 Green Beer 10 am to 12 noon j
J Plus more dazzling drink specials all day
*#***+*********++*************2

DAVID BROZA
TTITD TH
ISRAELI SINGER AND GUITARIST
7:30 WEDNESDAY, MARCH 12
UNIVERSITY AUDITORIUM
FREE
Annual Israel Cultural Festival
Reception at Hillel after Concert
J y Co-sponsored by Jewish
1 Hillel Foundations; SG

SAVE 30 50%
on Art Supplies at

Artlsta Powdered
Tempera
1 can 30% off
6 or more 40% off
Crayola Crayons
1 Box 25% off
12 or more 40% off
Liquitex Acrylic
Paints
1 tube 40% off
10 or more 50% off
Selected Grumbacher
Pads 70% off
very limited supply
Clip & Save until 3/22/86
Alligator

Arches Water Color
Blocks 50% off
Strathmore Pads
Buy 1 25%
6 or more 40% off
Construction Paper
9x12 or 12x18
20% Off
Speedball linoleum
blocks + Ink +
Silk Screen Inks
25% off
Alligator
Clip & Save until 3/22/86

Seme Kerns stocked Downtown only Downtown opoit 9-6 Mon-Sat
V Branch stores open 9-6 Mon-Frt, 9-6 Sat
(f Downtown, Butler Plaza
Market Place, Westgate & Ocala J

Grumbacher Coupon
Selected Grumbacher
pads 50% off
Oil & water color tubes
+ craft paints 40% off
Any Grumbacher Brush
$6.00 or more 50% off
others 40% off
Acrylic Medium Gloss
or Matte Polymer
Buy 1 40% off
6 or more 50% off
Easels 30% off
Pallete or Painting
Knives 40% off
Alligator
Clip & Save until 3/22/86

Cresent Matt Boards
20% off
Nielson Frame Kits
40% off
Pre cut Matts Buy 1
40% off
6 or more 50% off
Framed Prints
25% off
Fascia Picture Frames
40% off
Selected Portrait Frames
50% off
All others 25% off
Alligator
Clip & Save until 3/22/86



I TaUonize
Your Sports Cars
Performance
Engine balancing and blue printing
r ; Specialized Cylinder Headworic
mmr\ Custom suspension and styling kits
Complete fabrication and machine work
iTallon Autosports g?SB

SSlin^ K *f
GM cars like this
Chevrolet Chevette.
Weekend
Problem Solver

You pay for gas and return car to
renting location. Rate applies to car
shown or similar size car, is non nondiscountable
discountable nondiscountable and subject to change
without notice. Specific cars subject to
availability. Z-28s, Cadillacs, Caprices,
Chevy nine passenger wagons, and GM
12 passenger Vans available at
everyday discount rates.

MM National Car Rental*
You Deserve National Attention.
CALL NOW FOR RESERVATION' i
377-7005
GAINESVILLE REGIONAL AIRPORT
3400 NE 39th AVE.

1 \ aHU
111 p K 1
I I I & BJBFj BS a I
| S IP^' ' B:
I a |
TwmmKmk. m
I M
I m KB I I
|g''' B :,; | '- : B|p rat :fl
It '-''.fH 11
1 I BBf|| t A | I
I
1 I ft# I I
FLORIDA KARATE CENTER
Call: f B 1 308 West
375-8144 University Ave.
Celebrating 10 years of a Commitment to Excellencet

W GATORS ARE #1 WITH USI
DONT STAND IN LINE! /^\
DONT WAIT TO BE SEEN! 1 \ s')
North Florida DONT WASTE MONEY! 7^/
V DONT STAND FOR INFERIOR CARE!
DONT WAIT UNTIL MONDAY! V\
5.R.26 Newberry Rd. f }ZZ
r s" 1 'Or // ) tOx
Baargn McDomM*! / j I (\. Ay/ *
Oalu Mai Kla* / f t'''o7_A \
S Pk N Save /V XV / >^" t
r v <' )
| A ( / Pre ,, Addfc :
V V / 3WII S.W. 2nd Avc.
\ / 378-4357
- IN MARCH 1986 /
: EMERGENCY MEDICAL / 7 Daw A Wirk 1
l CENTER 6121 N W First Place H:UO A.M.-l 1:00 P.M.

Sl/J)5
PER DAY
Noon Thursday to
6:00 pm Monday
2 Day Minimum Rental
If* E*II artle* pcrdajr.
Extra tally I* X 4 or aatfar.

Salukis no match for UF netters

By LAWRENCE HOLLYFIELD
Alligator Writer
A saluki is an Egyptian dog.
The Southern Illinois Salukis
visited UF on Monday for a mens
tennis match.
The Gators quickly established
themselves as the master. Even with
No. 2 singles player Bo Johnson, No.
3 singles Art Heller and the No. 1
doubles tandem of Heller and Shawn
Taylor enjoying a day off, the UF
tennis team whipped the visitors 8-1.
Southern Illinois was in trouble
From the beginning. Its No. 1 player,
the defending Missouri Valley
Conference Champion in singles,
was thrashed by Taylor. The Gators
No. 1 player defeated Per Wadmark
6-0, 6-0 in only 38 minutes. Taylor
lost only 12 points in the match.

g.. ......
Si-y Til French Addiction
'.
Hi WM
{ A Vintage Clcthina
Sale Event


March 10-19 i
v 807 W.Univ. Ave. j
m-OjA redeem coupon for 10% off f J
5..;J....................J. 5 ...a
376-4511
The Alligators Pulseline
Use it.
This weeks question
Do you think Student Government should
spend $14,000 to keep the Stephen C. OConnell
Center and Florida Pool open for recreational use?
Call Wednesday after 8 p.m.

UPs Bob Cartwright defeated
Chris Visconti in straight sets, 6-3, 6-
4. He finished strongly to close both
sets. Each was tied at 3-3 before
Cartwright made a run.
In N 0.3 singles. UFs Richard Holt
defeated Jairo Aldana in the longest
match of the day, 7-6 (7-3), 6-7 (11-
9), 6-2. Aldana staged a comeback in
the second set to win. He was down
4-2 in games and 6-3 in the
tiebreaker. He ran off four straight
points to avoid the loss, but didnt
have enough left to capture the
match.
Richard wore his opponent down
mentally, UF head coach Steve
Beeland said. Aldana is hitting the
ball as well, hes just not winning the
points.
In N 0.4 singles, Lars Nilsson

Free 10pc I
chicken wings
ISM with every pitcher of beer on |
fc§gl Wednesday. MH
L, Happy Hours 11-710-Midnight 2 for 1 I I

alligator, Wednesday march 12, 1986,

defeated UPs Doug Dace in three
sets, 3-6, 6-4, 6-3. Dace, who was
15-10 in No. 3 singles last year, is
struggling this year.
Mike Coopers 6-0, 6-2 victory
against Juan Martinez in No. 5
singles was similar to the No. 1
match. Cooper lost just 17 points
during the 45 minutes of play.
Scott Mager, the Gators No. 6
seed, defeated Fabiano Ramos in
three sets. Mager lost the first set 6-
3. He lost only three games the rest
of the way, winning 6-4, 6-1.
UF swept the doubles matches,
with Cartwright, Cooper and Mager
claiming victories.
The next match for the men is
against Mississippi State at home
today.

WoVe Got
MONEY
Yoi*ve Got
ALBUMS
Let's Trade!
K
Hyde & Zeke fjv>]
Records
& Vide nSM*
IC2O >V. Univ. Ave.
The Yankees
are coming!
Don Mattingly
First Base
N.Y. Yankees
v.s.
Florida Gators
Saturday
March 15
2:3opm Perry Field
Tickets $6 on sale
Gator Ticket Office
sponsored by
TV 20 & Maris
Distributing Co

13



14

I, alligator, Wednesday march 12. 1986

VMHNM alligator classifieds ft**

FOR RENT:
FURNISHED
Southside Apartments 1 bedroom furnished
day-week-month or annual lease. $235 mo.,
S2OO security. 1406 SW 18 Place. 378-8547. 3-
13-15-1
Luxury this summer is yours at Brandywine for
only $l3O + 1/4 ut. Call 373-8329.
Aerobics,jocuzzi, weightroom & lots more.
Hurry! 3-12-5-1
$l2O/mo. Treehouse Village, w/d,micro.,
utensils, pool, bus to UF. Leaving town, for rent
A.S.A.P.!!! Please call 377-8416. 3-12-5-1
APPLY NOW FOR FALL
BRANDYWINE
2811 SW Archer Rd 375-1111
3-
2 Blks UF includes utilities, phone, use of
microwave & refrig offstreet parking $155 mo &
sec. Halls Rooming House 1840 N.W. 2nd Ave.
373-0354 3-14-5-1
JUST OPENED Lrg. 1 bdrm, 10 minute walk to
campus, off Street parking, enclosed patio
$215/mon. 1624 N.W. 4th Ave. 378-7056 3-13-
4-
SUBLET MAY-AUGUST Southfork Oaks Fur Furnished
nished Furnished washer and Dryer $130.00 mo. plus 1/3
util call Mike at 335-0598 3-19-5-1
Home! Share first floor of large home near
duck pond w/lady in nursing school, approx
SIBO/month incl. utilities. 338-0059. 3-12-2-1
$lO6-mo.! 4 spaces avail. Sublet 2 bdrm. May-
July: 10 min to class Mt. Vernon Apts.
pool, laundry, some space furn: call now 373-
7182. 3-17-5-1
Stoner idge 3br
Sublet for summer
Available for Fall
Call 375-2123 anytime.
3-
Cosy, quiet,newly remodeled 1 bd/rd apt,
$l5O, utilities included, 2 blk from campus.
Call 376-8026 eves. TV/bed included plus air
cond. 3-17-5-1
1 br/ba luxury apt; 3 blocks from campus; fully
furnished; lots of designer extras (must see);
2nd floor security w/a view of creek; Mar-Jul
ocup. (w/option for fall/spring) $295/m. Ph
375-6743. 3-18-5-1
5 NW 33rd Ave, 372-4694, partly furnished,
$220 month, no pets. Call evenings. 3-21 -8-1
5 BLOCKS TO U OF F. Big room for serious
student. Nonsmoker. Walk to U of F. All utilities
pd. Washer & phone. SIBO/mo 377-0020. 4-8-
15-1
Oxford Manor * Here's your chance!
Sublease a beautiful, 2 bdrm., furn. apt. from
May to Aug.! You choose your own room roommates!
mates! roommates! Perfect! Call 371-3382. 3-18-5-1
FOR RENT:
UNFURNISHED
INCREDIBLE
Efficiency Apts
Starting at $169/mo.
2 Bedroom Apts
Starting at $204/mo.
CAMBRIDGE VILLAGE
110 NW 39th Ave
378-3988
4-
CHEAP $l9O to $199 studio 4 blks to UF, water
paid, pool, University Apts. 411 NW 15 St. 371
0769, 375-6173, 376-7166. 3-18-10-2
Unfurnished 2 and 3 bedroom, dishwasher,
drapes, laundry room, pool, for mature
students, 6900 SW 21st Lane, 332-8875, 4-25-65-
2
2 WEEKS FREE!! Huge 1 bd walk-in closet, cent,
air, w/w carpets, pantry, spacious grounds,
magnificent oaks. Bel Air Apts 636 NW 26 Ave.
373-1459, 375-6173, 371-0769. 3-18-10-2
WALK TO UF, New Orleans style efficiency, 1 br
Or charming 2br apt all available now!
Prices range from S2OO $275/mo. Call 373-
0067 Contemporary Management Concepts,
Inc. 332-0311. 3-13-15-2
S.W. VILLAS, large 1 bd/1 bath apt. to sublet
thru July; avail, immed., $235/mo. Call 377-
3187 SW 20 Ave. 3-12-5-2
PLAN AHEAD! 1 br apt avail. May 1.1 '/i mi
from UF, pool, laurtd, free gas & water, no sec
dep. QUIET AREA. Rob 378 1720. 3-12-5-2
Sublease 2 br/2 bth apt. Fox Hollow. Call Jan
332-3199 in reference to #135, between 9 a.m.
6 6 p.m. 3-12-5-2
Nice 2 bd 1 bath quad apt. Dishwasher. Month
to month lease, $265. 3002 NW 6th St. Call 373-
7132. 3-19-10-2
******************
Walk to Santa Fe CC, 1 BR $245, 2 BR $295, $125
Sec. plus LMR. Pool, laundry, no pets, Santa Fe
Trace Apts. 378-1190. 4-25-72-2
******************
Oak Glade Apts, near UF & VA, quiet orea w/
crime watch neighborhood. 1 BR, 2 BR $215-
$325 plus Sec plus LMR 372-6422. 4-25-72-2
A block from UFI 1 br $240 2 br S3OO, new
stove/frig, cent h/a, trees laundry wood floors,
some util incl, flexible deposits 377-8127 4-4-
15-2

URGENT m/f rmmt needed own room/bath in 2
bdm apt.sl7s & Vi util. Regency Oaks
pool/sauna/close to UF. call Rick 371-9580 3-
14-5-2
Attractive 2 bedroom, 1 bath condo in
Tower Oaks. All oppliances, privacy fence,
w/d hookup, storage. Barry D. Baumstein,
373-7557. 4-1-10-2
OXFORD MANOR sublet master bdrm from May
5 Aug 15. S2OO mo/377-9612 (Eric). 3-14-3-2
2 br/1 bath, ref, cent, a/c, heat, dish/w,
fenced yard, carpet, self clean oven.
$260/mo year lease. Call 485-1325/378-
2202 leave message. 3-18-5-2
AVAIL MAY huge bdrm/bth, dshwshr, walk-in
closet, paddle fan, cent, a/c, 1 blk from UF,
call eves. 373-0579. Parkside Apt. 3-18-5-2
Convenient downtown location, 302 SE 4th
Street, great for students. 3br/lbth, $250/mo.
Call 372-6172. 13-32-0-2
WE ARE #1
Because we offer you the most
for your rental $.
1,2 & 3 Br. Apts. furn. or unfurn.
We'll help you find roommates
Tennis court, sauna, pool & gym
FREE classes by professionals
in Karate, Aerobics, Tennis &
Math Tutoring
Regency Oaks Apts.
3230 Archer Rd. 378-5766
Country Garden Apts.
2001 S.W. 16th St. 373-4500
4-25-43-2
2 WKS FREEH Nice quiet lbd $225, water pd.,
w/w carpets, cent, air, Villager West 800 NW
18 Ave, take 9 St north from 16 Av then right.
371-0769, 371-0251, 376-7166. 3-18-10-2
HUGE 2 bd 2 bth 1000 sq ft, dishwasher,
spacious grounds; magnificent oaks. $315.
Bel Air Apts 636 NW 26 Av. 371-0769 373-1459.
3-18-10-2
2 BR $250 near Campus,' central air/heat,
carpet. Water & sewer pd. Woodcrest Apts.
1615 SW 42nd St. 373-5816, 373-1099. 3-13-10-
2
WOWI! 3 bd 2 bth in quadraplex, cent, air,
skylight, woodsy lot, ONLY $345. 315 NW 19 Ln
(Just N of 16 Av, off of 6 St). 371-0769, 371-
0251,376-7166,3-18-10-2
SUMMER SUBLET Vi May freel bdrm spacious
apt. with all luxuries*pool*Picadilly opts $285
mo + deposit. 375-7732, leave msg. 3-18-10-2
Convenient to downtown Gainesville, 410 SE
4th Street, 2 br/1 bth, $295/mo. Call 372-6172.
13-32-0-2
AVAIL MAY 2 br/1 ba apt in Phoenix S2BO/mo,
laundry close to UF. Call 377-1693. 3-20-10-
2
Attractive, newly remodeled 1 bdrm, 3 blocks
to UF. Must sublet. $215 + dep. 375-3660, 373-
9941. Available April. 3-17-5-2
GATORS
1 br $2lO, 10 blks to campus, 2 br $275 Duck
Pond area. 375-0822, 373-4593. 3-17-5-2
ROOMMATES
Funloving female roommate, somewhat
studious, wanted own bedroom & bath in 2
bdrm condo must supply bedroom furn.
Wash/dryer/microwave. S2OO mo. 371-2653.
3-12-5-3
MARCH FREE Nonsm, female to share 2 br 2 bth
SW Apt $95/mo + Vi utilities, 10 min to
campus, pool all amenities. Call 377-2541.
3-17-4-3
2 nonsmoking rmmts. wanted M/F to share
large furn house in quiet SW area.
Washer/dryer, no lease, $l5O/mo + util +
deposit. 375-1286. 3-18-5-3
Male roommate to sublet room in Oxford
Manor. Private room & private bath. Rent $169
mo, Vi utilities from May 1- Aug 15. Call
Gregg 377-9612. 3-14-3-3
Male nonsmoker, professional or grad to share
3 br, 1 Vi bath in NE. $l4O mo 4- utilities. 373-
9435, leave message or 9-11 p.m. only. 3-14-2-
3
Male roommate needed. Own room furnished
with waterbed. SIBO/mo + Vi util. Call Eric at
375-0024. 3-18-5-3
Fall roommate wanted. Must be a serious, non nonsmoking
smoking nonsmoking student. Have own room in 2
bedroom/1 Vi bath townhouse at In the Pines
Apartments. Pay $205/month plus Vi utilities.
Call Jeff at 378-2202. 3-13-2-3
Luxury house*own roomwasher/dryer
friendly roommates*only $149/mo # yord front
& backno smokers*Games & extras* 373-5012
or 376-0542. 3-14-3-3
Room in a four bedroom house, 1 block from
campus behind Norman Hall, March free,
$l2O/mo, 914 SW 6 Ave, clean and quiet, 378-
1088. 3-18-5-3
Own room in 3 bdr house, ac, washer/dryer,
fireplace, microwave, trampoline, bike to UF.
Big yard. $130.00. 372-5298. 3-17-4-3
Own Room in furnished twnhouse, can move in
now. Pool, tennis, racquetball. $l3O/mo. 4- Vi
utilities. Call now 332-8935. 3-18-5-3

Fm nonsmk roommate, Mount Vernon, sllO
mo Vi util, pool, laund, sec dep. 376-6028
anytime. 3-17-5-3
Female, non-smoker roommate for own room
in 2 br 1 bath, semi-furn SW area apt. $l5O/mo
4- Vi util. Call 372-7203 please, leave msg. 3-
13-
* *Only $125 4- Vi util* Own rm for N/S F
in a 4 b 2 b twnhse. Avail May-? Many Extras.
Must See. Call Anytime 332-7828. 3-17-5-3
ALT FASTI Spacious two bedroom, 1 bath, have
own room, quiet, great value for only $135/mo
4- Vi util. 335-0461 eves. 3-17-5-3
Own room in 2-bedrm apt. 5 min bike ride to
campus. $l5O/mo 4- Vi util. Apt #2 1405 SW
10th Terrace, between 4-8 p.m. or call 372-
1313. 3-12-2-3
A private room in nice home. Walk to campus.
1430 NW 6th PI. No pets, $ 160/mo. 4- deposit
4- Vi utilities. 373-9941. 3-13-10-3
y, :
Private room in newly remodeled apt 3 blocks
to campus w/laundry, 103 NW 10th St. upstairs,
$l3O/mo 4- util. 4- deposit. 373-9941. 3-13-10-
3
ROOMMATE PROBLEM? Try 2 bedroom apt,
$l6O 4- Vi util. Move in now SW 28th Terr. No
pets, 373-8968 evenings. 3-12-4-3
Female Roommate OWN bedroom in nice,
large townhouse. 3 bed, 2'/i bath, ONLY sls7a
month. Call now!I 375-4555. 3-13-5-3
Own Room in Pinetree Gdns. apts. Pool, tennis,
etc. $l2O/mo 4- util. 335-1314. Leave
message. 3-12-4-3
Own room in NW House
Non-smoker, $l5O mo & 1/3 utilities, no lease
but deposit. 375-8295 after s.Days Pat 392-4918
3-14-5-3
REAL ESTATE
DOWNTOWN...
Be a part of it.
Prime retail space and prestigious office space
available in the new SUN CENTER. Cali 372-
6172. 13-32-0-4
GOVERNMENT HOMES from $1 (U repair). Also
delinquent tax property. Call 805-687-6000 Ext.
GH-9486 for information. 3-18-19-4
14 x 56 mobile home, excellent condition.
Central a/c, shed, awning, convienient student
location, make an offer. 378-1150 after 6 p.m.
3-13-5-4
BIVENS SOUTH. Three bedroom, two bath
condo, large glassed-in porch, near swimming
pool & lake, $76,500. By appt only. Tele 377-
3491. 3-13-5-4
Gaineswood Condo 3 br, 2 Vi baths, well built,
new drapes, carpets. Clubhouse, pool, tennis,
assume B'/a% mortgage, $87,000. By appt
0n1y376-3065. 3-13-5-4
Graduating student MUST SELL 1982 2/1 mobile
home. Great/inexpensive living. Asking
$10,900 includes furn. & tv. 332-5648, eves
& wknds. 3-17-5-4
FOR SALE
Since 1977 Car Stereo Specialists has been
selling top quality car stereos at low discount
prices. Come see us at 2201 NW 13 St. Or call
372-2070. Open M-F 10:00-7.00 and Sat. 10:00-
5:00. 4-25-75-5
AM-FM Cassette In-dash $29.95
AM-FM Digital In-Dash $99.55
100 Watt equilizer $29.95
Full warranty 373-3754 Audio Outlet. 4-25-70-5
100% IBM PC/XT compatible 256 K, 2 drives, 6
mo. warranty. Lowest prices in town. $943. Call
Candle Computers 374-6636. 3-18-10-5
HP 41C calculator 4 sale, SIOO, 371-8115
evenings. 3-14-3-5
Ross five sp. cruiser new, $175. Windsurfer
brand 12 ft. sail-board full rig/sail etc.
$475. Surfboards sl7s & down, 373-5927. 3-
14-
TI-66 programmable calculator over 500 lines
of memory, statistical and scientific functions
$39. Solitaire diamond engagement ring SSO.
371-6862. 3-13-2-5
IBM PC/XT compatible, Fountain Turbo XT
complete system $1199. 4.77 B MHZ speed.
Call 338-0378, Fountain Computer Services. 3-
14-3-5
BIKE FOR SALE, ultimate 10 speed urban asualt
cruiser. Made to take SE 2nd Ave train tracks!
$340 new, selling $250. 371-4808. 3-18-5-5
Moving out of town, must sell!! 'B4 Yamaha
Scooter. Exc. conditions, only 350 mil 8 mo.
warranty s7so, but can go down... s7s
dbl. bed, S6O desk call Ana 371-9617. 3-18-
5-
This is a notice of sale by public outcry of lost or
abandoned property recovered on U.F.
campus. The auction will be held in the
Colonnade area of the J. Wayne Reitz Union on
March 13, 1986, at 10:00 a.m. Included for
auction will be approximately 55 bicycles,
approximately 9 automobiles, 5 automobiles
(no litres available), 2 motorcycles, 1
motorcycle frame, assorted mopeds and
motorcycles for parts only, jewelry, books,
clothing, eyeglasses, etc. Property that has
been held for 30 days and not claimed by
rightful owner by 10:00 a.m. on March 13,
1986, will be sold at this public outcry. All
proceeds go to the Gator Loan Fund. 3-12-7-5

Buy My Business!
School just not enough? It wasn't for me either.
Be an entrepreneur. Own your own business
and finish school. Established student
owned/operated video game business. Priced
to sell, at 2 yrs net income $49,000. Call Roger
at 371-2030. 3-17-10-5
Lazyboy recliners 2 brown good cond.,
asking SSO each or best offer. 375-2975. 3-13-
5-5
Electric guitar played by Gainesville's best, you
could be next. Fire-red, flying-v style, ex.
condition, SIBO 080. 371-1573 or 371-7671. 3-
12-5-5
CONDO FOR SALE: 2 Bed/1 % bath. Bivins
Forest. $45,000, will finance. Call: 813-938-
7825 day/813-734-3501 at night. Ask for Tony.
4-3-14-5
Moving Must sell Kenmore dryer $95, single
waterbed w/frame $95, long couch $65, twin
bed $45, misc., '67 Ford Wagon $295 338-
0059. 3-12-2-5
Red 'BS Riva Scooter 1251 Great cond! Great
mileage! Perfect trans to school! Must see, call
Chris 371-2398. 3-17-5-5
MUST SELL s'-ll" twin-fin channel bottom
surfboard SBO, new blue earth cruiser sllO,
Rick or Frank 375-6444. 3-13-3-5
Casio CZ-1000 synthesizer NEW! Must sell!
Cords and.adaptor inc. $375 080. Call Rob 395-
7888. 3-17-5-5
SAILBOARD for sale. Mistral Maui, excellent
condition. Racks & cover inc. $750. 378-3323.
3-13-3-5
Apple Macintosh computer, Imagewriter wide
printer, extra drive. 378-1464 eves & wknds;
328-3461 office. 3-14-4-5
For sale AB Dick #530/mimeograph
mach./Ideal for churches, fraternities,
sororities, etc! Included with this is a supply of
paper & ink! 372-5315 M-F 8:30-5:00. 3-17-5-5
For sale: 1984 Suzuki GSIISOES, 2800 miles,
Kerker Jet Kit, Kerker KX racing exhaust
system, immaculate condition, awesome
performance. Invested $5500, will sacrifice for
$3600. 376-0712 eves & weekends. 3-14-4-5

[Me
\ clothes repair
L >7118*4 4

DAILY CROSSWORD PUZZLE
Edited by Trade Michel Jaffe
ACROSS 5 "Hamlet set 40 Watched the 52 Grump
1 Sigher's word 6 High note late show 53 Key product
5 Looked over, 7 Balin and Balan 41 Give-and-get 54 Conceit
for 8 1980 Tony- deal 55 Recipe direction
a "job" winning musical 43 Two-finger 57 Cold storage
10 Covenant 9 Exiled exercise 58 City on the
14 Fencing move- 10 Gaucho's turf 44 Item on aGI Tevere
ment 11 Plant of the menu 59 Slaughter of
15 Clear-headed amaryllis family 46 Threaten baseball
16 Jais follower 12 Singer Vikki 48 Gazed 62 St. Lo season
17 At all 13 Connections 50 Fight site
18 "Andy Capp," 21 Edges out ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
for one 23 Boat s rest li InlnlMTsMnniTilTM^lFlAll
19 Glutton's 25 Miscue : 1 B 1 B 1
demand 27 Major opening H" UhBnl&lflllB" A HjM
20 Cancel, literally 28 Subs cousin m l AMI BOInE NFA CE D
22 Plugs 29 Balanced, in a M A 111 B'i I ft I lIM
24 Rug feature way lEINIEIS|C|E|NIT M
26 "Turandot 30 Where the |G IAIL [ABO T H 6BT E. Al. J.
highlight Severn flows 1 1 || 111 Mill ft 1 1 RB 0 R
27 Whirlybirds 32 Closer to the |A | p TIT T
31 Examined mark II I I I hBIr I [MI Ml II I
35 Sharpens 33 Like some a I >i |7l "c" Y
36 Less usual seals Ic dlnlnlii
38 Author Santha 34 Vocal j- iiMinnn
Rama arrangements SII A \\N N I 188 A lljjll PITIEID
39 Like some 37 Mature H A M YNUDHp I E T Y
cheeses A V E RBS E N OME NATE
40 Three- IYIE INISBEIPIDIYBdIE ImluTrl
dimensional 0/19/ae
41 Guaranteed 3/12/86
42 Go astray HfppplS p[s p 112 113
43 Sharpener
44 Candy B^
45 Mohammed s
resting place B B
47 Actor George j 21 22 23
and kin
49 Plisetskaya of H^HBJHzT
ballet fame BBBB BL_ 888
51 Certain tide 29 33 34
52 c S a a ge e9 35 *
56 Dominion 55
60 Play polo
61 Turn aside 42 IHe 44
63 Image BB |BL
64 So be it *5 p BBST" 4
65 Fuse M _
66 Verne character 49 59 51
67 Necklace unit BB B B
68 Peeled
69 Mardi follower gjj iHi] ||H^
DOWN S Ke Im
1 Maintain
2 Marital bliss 99 9
3 Wilder, for one "i B-J- I I
wise* 1986 Lm Aagdes Tiwt Syatfcate 3/12/88

Macintosh 128 K system for sale. System in includes
cludes includes external disc drive, 300/1200 modem,
Imagewriter printer, macstation, and software.
Call Eric at 378-9818. Best offer takes the
system. 3-17-5-5
For sale: beige and chrome couch, good
condition $125 080. Call 371-2483. 3-14-4-5
MOTORCYCLES
Yamaha XSSOO excellent condition look and
runs great S6OO/b. offer. Best times to call are
morning and night. HP377-9954. 3-12-10-7
Kawasaki GPZ 1100, low miles, kept in a
garage, excellent shape. Kerker Mikuni Dunlop
Ferodo. Call after 6, S2OOO 080, Len 376-9637.
3-13-5-7
INTERCEPTOR 700, very good condition, cover,
helmet & locker, priced to be sold fast, $2300
080. Albert 371-4626 after 5 p.m. 3-12-4-7
1981 YAMAHA 400 SPECIAL, blue metallic, runs
great, under 6000 mi, covered storage, SBOO.
Call 371-6684 anytime. 3-17-5-7
AUTOS
1973 Dodge Dart, blue, for parts, slant-6
engine, new battery, good tires, S2OO. Call
Renee, 371-2369 until 1 a.m. 3-17-4-8
'Bl Mazda GLC $3200. '74 Honda Civic $llOO.
080 on either. Both look great, run great. 332-
0141. Keep trying. 3-18-5-8
1981 Honda Civic, new paint, AM-FM cassette,
Good interior, New clutch. $2,800 negotiable.
373-9528. 3-13-2-8
'B4 Ford Ranger, 4-spd, v-6, a/c, am/fm/cas,
cloth int, long bed w/liner, many extras. Call
373-4866, 377-4108, late night/early morning.
3-12-5-8
1980 CHEVY CAMARO, auto, power steering,
brakes & windows, air, 1 owner, excellent
condition. 332-8064. 3-12-5-8

CASH
lor
gold jewelry watches
BEST JEWELRY & LOAN
523 NW 3rd Ave. 371-4367



SB alligator classifieds

593-18-6032
'BO Ply Champ, 4 cyl, hatchback, automatic,
air, sunroof, am&fm, sharp, low miles, S2OOO
495-3175 local. 3-12-5-8
1978 Chevy Nova, 4 door, A/C, rebuilt engine,
6 cyl. $900.00 or best offer. Going into Peace
Corps, must sell. 372-6885 3-14-5-8
78 Toyota Celica 5 speed a/c drives great!
great mph blaupunct stereo good condition
asking 1500 call Mindi 376-9560 3-l.Vd-A
SERVICES
STEREO REPAIR
Meticulous repair on your beloved stereo.
We do it right the first timel
Sound Ideas 2201 NW 13th St. 378-0192.
4-25-17-9
BREAD & ROSES
Well Women Care
ABORTION
* Up to 22 weeks
Nitrous Oxide no extra charge
Free Pregnancy Tests
BIRTH CONTROL CLINIC
Female Practitioners
372-1664
Completely Confidential
Close to Campus
1233 NW 10th Avenue
Across from Center Theatre
2-
ADOPTION IS THE ANSWER. Local couple would
like to adopt your newborn. Pre-natal,
hospitalization and post-natal cost covered.
You will have your own attorney. Complete
confidentiality, call 372-0222. 3-12-5-9
Pregnant?
We offer*objective and confidential
counseling* pregnancy test* & more.
All Services Free
377-4947
Crisis Pregnancy Center
1204 NW 13th Street. Suite 23
Across from Civitan Blood Center
4-25-79-9
SLEEPY HOLLOW HORSES FARM
riding lessonsAhay ridesAtrail
rides A boarding sales rentals wooded tr trails.
ails. trails. 466-3224 4 375-8080. 4-25-75-9
MINI STORAGE
AAA STORAGE 377-1771.
Close to UF 4 convenient 4x4x4 $ 10/mo.,
4xx S2O/mo.
535 SW 2nd Ave.
3-
ABORTION
"Call us, we care"
FREE PREGNANCY TESTS
Women practitioners
Licensed 08-GYN
(with hospital privileges)
Gainesville Women's
Health Center
720 NW 23RD AVENUE
377-5055
We offer choices to you -a full
range of obstetric 4 gynecology
services. Serving Gainesville
for 11 years. Non profit.
3-3-40-9
SCHOLARSHIPS AVAILABLE
$135 million + in financial aid went unused
last year. Freshmen, Soph., ongoing graduate
students; for help cashing in on those funds,
call Academic Data Services toll free 1-800-
544-1574, ext. 639, or write P.O. Box 16483,
Chattanooga, TN 37416. 4-1-14-9
NOW THE ONLY FULL,
TIME STATION IN
NORTH CENTRAL
FLORIDA 24 HRS A DAY!
TV 69
3-12-10-9
THE BIGGER THE
BETTER! GRAB THE
BIGGEST ONE YOU
CAN FINDI TV 69 UHF
ANTENNAS NOW AT
ALL GAINESVILLE
ELECTRONIC STORES!
3-13-10-9
Publishing? Established Random House
illustrator available for technical, medical,
illustrative work. Star Scientific 375-2604. 3-18-
10-9

THE INSTITUTION by Steve Riehm
AMP3*n tiTtD.oJr v^iATMAHL A£T ARE
vSe.fiONTTIBVTtP l AI43W6ReD l tWS

Worried about pregnancy? Need to know
sooner? Available in March for $2.50 test
accurate at time of your missed period. Call
377-0881 Planned Parenthood of North Central
Florida. 3-14-6-9
$$ FINANCIAL AID $$
Don't wait any longer to apply for 'B6-'B7
financial aid. Money may run out before we
receive your application. Pick up an ap application
plication application at Anderson Hall. 3-20-10-9
Spring Break Special! Every 7th day free. While
you're away. Good Neighbor Sitting Service
feeds 4 cares for your pets in your home. Call
us 371-3703. 3-21-9-9
CAN'T WRITE?
Ex Professor can help I
Essays to dissertations 375-0822.
3-
TYPING SERVICES
For Quality Use A Professional
Professional Typing
917 NW 13th St. 373-9822
Recorded on diskettes or mag cards
dissertations theses manuscripts
4-
For the best professional typing and editing
Hogtown Typing, 375-8333. Specializing in
law, arch, theses, and dissertations. 4-25-68-
10.
WORD PROCESSING
Professional quality at student prices.
Quick turnaround.
Hours by appointment, 8 a.m.-8 p.m.
Call Debbie, 378-7128.
3-14-30-10
Typing, fast and accurate, reasonable rates,
minor editing, proofreading. Call Beverly at
372-6253. 4-25-75-10
Typing, fast and accurate papers, theses,
dissertations. Experienced. Proofreading.
Reasonable rates. Call Lata 378-6642. 4-25-59-
10
*Word Processing A Typing
Resumes* Reports* Letters
Theses, Applications Etc.
376-5465 We're close to campus
A Alachua Word Processing# .
3-12-30-10
Word Processing, Typing, Bkkping 4 Notary,
Grad school exp. Prof quality 14 yrs. exp.
spelling ckd NW section, Dawn 332-3913. 3-18-
30-10
Typing
Term papers, resumes, applications. 375-4536
before 6pm. 338-1139 after 6pm 4 weekends.
3-31-25-10
TYPING/from sl/pg. papers/theses/dissrt./15
ys. exper. in legal/medical/engr. terms as
former court rptr. Excel, spelling/proofing. Call
Jill. 377-9647. 4-25-58-10
For the right type, call Kathy, 376-9527. Expert
professional service. Reasonable rates. 4-3-20-
10
TYPINGS
sl. a page. 377-1335.
3-
WORD PROCESSING/TYPING
Resumes, reports, cover letters. 377-0460, M-
F/9-5 p.m. Gainesville Word Processing
Center. 4-23-30-10
TYPING: Legal, theses, dissertations, reports,
professional quality, dependable service.
Nancy, 372-2750. 4-4-30-10
TYPING: ALL KINDS, Term Papers, Theses,
Manuscripts, Letters, etc. Recorded on diskett.
371-6435. 3-21-9-10
TYPING 372-7856 AAARG
Sameday/overnite, spelling ckd, termpapers,
theses, resumes, letters, etc. 3436 NW 17th St.
4-
WANTED
GOLD 4 DIAMONDS
Top Cash or Trade
OZZIE'S JEWELRY
Appointment 373-9243
4-25-72-11
Cash for jerseys/sweats from any UF
men/women varsity team w/the number 25.
Call Greg 375-7056 after 6 p.m. Keep trying. 3-
12-4-11

Survival Games of Gainesville, Inc. is rapidly
growing 4 seeking add'l partners. If you are
interested in becoming part of this profitable 4
lucrative business, please contact Gory 375-
2087 or Mark 375-2133, 376-2070. 3-12-3-11
SHAPE-UP SALEMIIIIII Everything 20 to 60%
OFF. STARTS FRIDAY (1 week only). The Dance
Factory 1029 W. Univ. Ave. 3-13-5-11
ARTISTS and WRITERS needed for REACTOR
magazine. Call David, 371-0217 or Richard,
371-9497. 3-14-5-11
DIET TRICKSI What are yours? Researcher needs
info on unique, weird, wonderful ways to diet
and persevere. 335-1939. 3-12-2-11
Wanted: Healthy, non-obese men, (ages 50 to
75 years) on no medication, for laboratory and
psychological studies involving normal sexual
behavior. Appropriate volunteers will be paid.
Call Mark, 392-2612, 9a.m. to 5 p.m., Mon-Fri.
4-
HELP WANTED
Mature student wanted to run political cam campaign
paign campaign for State Senate Incumbent; political
knowledge,' local knowledge important. Apply
with resume to P.O. Box 916, Bradenton, FL
33506. 3-14-28-12
All Positions needed at an Easter Seal camp for
handicapped children and adults. Camp
Challenge, Rt 1 Box 350, Sorrento, FL 32776. 4-
18-35-12
Aerobics Exercise Instructor. Part-time mor mornings,
nings, mornings, afternoons and evenings available.
Eilane's Health 4 Figure Salon, 376-9133. 3-13-
5-
Full or part-time laborers needed. Earn up to
$15.00 an hour. No experience necessary. Call
(813)886-7151 ext. 12. 4-10-20-12
SADD EXTRA CASHS
THIS AD WORTH sl7
To New Donors on 2nd Visit or
who haven't donated in last 3 mos.
New Cash Schedule.
Free coffee 4 cookies daily.
Bi-monthly raffle for a T.V.
GAINESVILLE PLASMA 378-9431
238 SW 4th Ave. Mon/Wed/Fri 8-3
Tues/Thurs 10-7 Sat 10-2
4-10-40-12
Counselors Association Os Independent
Camps seeks qualified counselors for 75
residential children's private camps in Nor Northeast,
theast, Northeast, July 4 August. Contact: Association of
Independent Camps (FL), 60 Madison Av., St.
1012, New York, N.Y. 10010. (212) 679-3230.
3-14-5-12
TECHNICAL SUPPORT PERSON
Parttime position opening in April for
technical person to bo responsible for
preventive maintenance and repair of
computer and output equipment. Requires
experience in a similar field, ability to read
technical diagrams, mechanical ability and
basic understanding of electrical and com computer
puter computer systems. (Own tools a plus). Ap Applications
plications Applications available at the front desk of
Alligator offices. 1105 W. University Ave., M-
F, 9-4, NO PHONE CALLS I AA/EOE.
TYPESETTERS NEEDED
Typesetters position currently available for
classified and display advertising. Part time.
Day hours 15-20 hrs a week. Must be able type
45 + cwpm. Typesetting experience
preferred, especially Varityper. Applications
available at the front desk of the Independent
Florida Alligator, Security Building at 1105 W.
University Ave. No phone calls please.
AA/EOE.
Do you need money?
Sell Avon full or part time earn up to 50%
commission 375-8967. 3-14-40-12
GOVERNMENT JOBS. $16,040 $59,230/yr.
Now hiring. Call 805-687-6000 Ext. R-9486 for
current federal list. 4-25-42-12
TUTOR WANTED Graduate student that excels in
erbal and math skills. Prefer one who has
rored high on GRE and/or LSAT and/or GMAT.
-ood pay, part time, flexible hours. Call Marc
77-0012. 3-12-5-12
SUMMER JOBS IN ALASKA. Good money. Many
opportunities! Employer listings, 1986 Summer
Employment Guide. $5.95. Alasco, Box 30752,
Seattle, WA 98103. 3-14-10-12
BUS. or ENG majors-Summer Jobs. Avg.
$415/wk. 4 coll, credit. Send name, major 4
phone 4 to: Summer Work, PO Box 12455A,
Gainesville, FL 32604. SW co.
3-18-7-12

$ ADD EXTRA CASH $
FOR SPRING BREAK
THIS AD WORTH sl7
To new donors on 2nd Visit or
who haven't donated in last 3 mos.
New Cash Schedule.
Free coffee and cookies daily.
Bi-monthly raffle for a T.V.
GAINESVILLE PLASMA 378-9431
238 SW 4 Ave. Mon/Wed/Fri 8-3
Tues/Thurs 10-7 Sat 10-2
4-10-40-12
CRUISESHIPS: AIRLINES, HIRINGI Summer,
Career, Overseas! Call for Guide, Cassette,
Newsservice! (916)944-4444, ext.
3-12-3-12
COMPUTER OPERATOR
Dependable 4 flexible person needed to work
with an IBM sys/38. Part-time position: 1-2
evenings/week. Must be available on
weekends. Related exp. desired. Send resume
to:
Paul Bowers
Cox Cable University City
1115 NW 4th St.
Gainesville, FI 32601
EOE/M/F
3-
PERSONALS
SAVE ON RAYBANS
University Opticians
300 S.W. 4th Ave. 378-4480
4-
Unwanted Hair Removed Forever. 30 years
exp. Edmund Dwyer, Electrologist. 4040
Newberry Rd. Suite 1350, 372-8039. 4-25-75-13
GAY SWITCHBOARD
332-0700
Call About Tues. Night Activities
Something Different Every Week
4-25-75-13
Ladies make money
We buy 4 sell good used clothing. Call Second
Act, 373-8527 4-25-75-13
PASSPORT PHOTOS READY IN 60 SECONDS.
Media Image Photography 21 SE 2nd Place 375-
1911. 4-25-61-13
ULTIAAATE GAMES
War games hi-quality paint guns, come play.
Call 373-4518, 495-2357. 3-31-17-13
SAY IT WITH A FLAIRI Give your writing that
special touchl Calligraphy for poems, flyers,
certif's, announc. 373-1031. 3-17-5-13
"Men in the 80's" How are they different?
Campus Organized Against Rape presents
Wayne Griffin of the Presbyterian Student
Center on Wednesday, March 12, at 4:15 p.m.
in 122 4 123 of the Reitz Union. 3-12-2-13
LOOK YOUR BEST as you bake on the beaches.
$5 off a new "you" for spring break, ask for
Michelle at Reflections. Call 378-2780, in introductory
troductory introductory offer. 3-21-9-13
Phi Kappa Psl Mid-Semester Rush I Meet us at
the Union Colonnade Mar. 10-12 11:00-1:00 or
call 373-5371 Be a part of the future 3-14-5-13

A VERY IMPORTANT
ANNOUNCEMENT ABOUT
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TOMORROW IN THE ALLIGATOR
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HKD VIDEO
LEADER

alligator. Wednesday march 12,1966.

Flash Sivermoon LIVE Wed 9 p.m. at Heaven
(Gainesville's only women's bar 18 E Univ 376-
2226). The party starts at 5 p.m. It's clean-air
nite (no smoking please) plus there's a free
salad bar I $2 for women after 9, $5 for escorted
men 4 SSO for unescorted men. Be there as
Gainesville women rock to great music! 3-12-
2-13
Tired of Pizza? Call 374-8193 for great food
delivered Freell chicken wings, burgers,
salads, subs and morel Gourmet Express. 3-13-
7-13
Just in... French Army shorts. Sizes 25-
33, black, drab, khaki, turq 4 natural, only
$13,001 Hurry to Paradise, 819 W. Univ. Av.
376-4080. 3-12-5-13
PARENTAL DIVORCE
A support group is available to help meet the
needs of University of Florida students whose
parents are either divorced or divorcing. If you
are interested in participating please call
Student Health Service Health Education Office
at 392-1161, Ext. 281. 3-12-5-13
Omega Electrolysis
Soft, smooth skin forever...No more tweezing,
waxing, or shavingl Shortwave method. Call
Katie for a free consultation. 374-4307. 3-13-5-
13
LATE AID APPLICANTS
If you haven't applied for financial aid yet, you
are pushing It. We already have over 4000
applications 4 $ Is being used up quickly. Pick
up application at 111 Anderson. Student Fin.
AHairs. 3-20-10-13
Rhinestone jewelry, cheap pricesl Sell out
Defore sp/breok! Earrings, bracelets,
necklaces... Nows your chance/look
great/Mindi at 376-9560. 3-18-5-13
Horseback riding at TALL OAKS. $6.00 hr. 7 mi
W of 1-75 on 424 to S.W. 19 C. S. 1 mi. Free
lesson on Wed, Thurs 4 Fri as a bonus. 495-
3127. 3-14-3-13
SORRY SKIP. I've decided to check out the new
women's bar, HEAVEN, 18 E. Univ. Avenue.
Mussy. 3-12-1-13
FIRST INVESTOR'S CORP
A major Wall Street investment firm has im immediate
mediate immediate management training positions
available in all 180 offices coast to coast. We
are looking for aggressive, self-motivated
Individuals who want to "EARN" a high income
and be their own bosses in a fairly short period
of time. Interviews will be conducted Tues.
March 18. For further info contact the Career
Resource Center. OPEN TO ALL MAJORS. 3-18-
5-13
MARTIN LUTHER KING DIDN'T GO TO LAW SCH.
You don't need a law degree to change the
world. Earn $165-$220 a wk working to pass
legislation to stop polluters 4 consumer rip ripoffs.
offs. ripoffs. Full time, part time 4 career options
available. If a minister from Ala. can change
the world why can't you. Call 392-1602 for
interviews on 3/12, 3/13, 4 3/14. 3-12-1-13
Dear Debbie: thanks for the great time at
HEAVEN Fri nite. I'll see you Wed for the Flash
Silvermoon concert. Love, JC. 3-12-1-13
OUTLET PRICES
Nike, Adidas shoes and clothes always on sale.
Racquets strung 9.88. Sweats 20% off. Alhletic
Attic Outlet, Oaks Plaza. 378-2426. 3-17-6-13

15



16

i, alligator, Wednesday march 12, 1986

alligator
classifieds

INTERNATIONAL
CONSULTANTS
Multinational firm seeks professional/-
technical consultants for work abroad. While
initially part-time, some full time positions
may be available. Desire well-connected
individuals who can facilitate in'tl business in
the country of their citizenship. We will in interview
terview interview in Gainesville soon. All fees paid by
client company. Reply with resume to: R M
Kenwood, VP, PO Box 140424 Corol Gobles, FL
33114 3-21-10-13
Wanted: nice, bright, white smile! Bring this to
save $lO off the Simple cleaning (ADA 1110) or
the Periodontal cleaning (ADA 4910) Dentique,
Oaks Mall, evenings & Sat. Phone spells 37-
smile! Dr. Larrick 3-18-10-13
PICK YOUR AAAN
For the 1986-1987 Men of UF Calendar, today
thru Friday at GPA-40 to choose from! 3-14-5-
13
Where was God
For on Inspirational message message-378-3359
-378-3359 message-378-3359 3-14-5-14
QUALITY PHONES
At prices you can AFFORD From 13.95 up
PHONE Store 1506 N.W. 13th St. 373-1637 3-14-
3-13
SKYDIVE
Learn to skydive with the Williston Skydivers.
Jump course starts Sat. and Sun. at 10:00 a.m.,
376-1096. Group rates and weekday instruction
available by appointment. 4-10-50-13
Planning a trip? We have hostel passes,
passport carriers, great selection of conversion
packs. Brasington's Trail Shop 2331 NW 13th St.
(Albertson's). 3-21-15-13
Leotards, Legwarmers, Tights, Shoes, the latest
styles from Miami & L.A. The Dance Factory
1029 W. Univ. Ave. (2 blks from UF)//Spring
Sale! 3-13-5-13
Good Backpacks Cheap
Save 20% on all Jansport backpocks-Lifetime
Warranty-many styles and colors. Wilson packs
SB.BB Lloyd Clarke Sports 1504 NW 13 St. 372-
7836 3-14-5-13
Softball Sale!
Mizuno, Spotbilt, Mitre cleats plus Mizuno
gloves and Easton bats-all 10% off with
mention of this ad. Lloyd Clarke Sports 1504
NW 13 St. 372-7836 3-14-5-13
GOTCHA!
Trunks, jams, shorts, T-shirts by Gotcha, Jimmy
'Z and Catchit now in stock at Lloyd Clarke
Sports. Find the hottest stuff at 1504 NW 13 St.
372-7836 3-14-5-13
BUS. or ENG. majorsSummer Jobs. Avg.
$415/wk. & coll, credit. Send name, major &
phone # to: Summer Work, PO Box 12455A,
Gainesville, FL 32604 SW co.
*********** 3-14-5-13
CONNECTIONS
Hunky, friendly, bright*/ witty, attractive,
warm, sophisticated yet 1 down-to-earth (oc (occasionally
casionally (occasionally trashy) GWMs modestly seek others
with similar imaginative self-descriptions. Feel
free to read our beads. Box 14391-32604 3-14-
5-14
AMY C.
HAPPY BIRTHDAY
LOVE MIKE
3-12-1-14
RIDES
Miami S4O f/T $25 O/W WEEKLY. Leave
Friday/Return Sunday New 30-Passenger Bus.
Ride Cheap/Comfortably/Fast/Safe 332-6182
-(305)221-9281.3-18-40-15
FT. LAUDERDALE SPRING BREAK s4O R/T
$25 O/W Mini Bus 3O pass, capacity.
Hurry your reservations 332-6182. 3-18-40-15
LOST AND
FOUND
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17



18

, alligator, Wednesday march 12, 1986

Women's tennis team
beats Mississippi 8-1

By LAWRENCE HOLI YFIELD
Alligator Writer
The UF womens tennis team led
Mississippi 7-1 Tuesday as the No. 3
doubles pairs played in the third set.
Gators Cyndee Newton and
Siobhan Nicholson prepared to serve
to Lynn Hennessey and Laura
Nelson from Ole Miss. Just at the
service toss came the announcement:
Whoever owns the blue van with
Mississippi tags must move it im immediately
mediately immediately or it will be towed,
bellowed the UF policeman through
his cars PA system.
The Rebel coach trudged off the
court and searched his pockets for
the keys to his teams van. Ole Miss
didnt get a ticket. It didnt win the
match either.
UF rallied in that doubles match
and won 4-6, 6-3, 7-6 (8-6) for the
Gators final 8-1 victory. Newton-
Nicholson had trailed 4-5 in the
third.
UF lost only four games in the No.
1 and No. 2 doubles. The Gators
No. 1 team of Jill Hetherington and
Jan Martin defeated Liz Daly and
Jackie Ruppert 6-1, 6-0. The No. 2
tandem of Tammy Whittington and
Chris Garland won 6-2, 6-1 against

Comedian: SEC hoops too profane

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. (UPI) Cursing by coaches is
out of hand in the Southeastern Conference and
school presidents and league leaders should take steps to
solve the problem,fans and officials say.
Comedian Jerry Clower, a Mississippi State alumnus
and fan, said the language he heard from the sideline
during last weeks SEC tournament is ruining the image
of basketball as family entertainment.
I wish the presidents of the schools had guts enough
to make the coaches quit cussing and using all that
vulgarity on the sidelines, Clower told the Birmingham
Post-Herald. Its gone out of hand. It needs to be
stopped.
Its a real simple thing to do. If they dont think its
simple, then the president of that university that allows
his coach to do that is educated beyond his intelligence.
You just call him in and say, Hey, theres families
with little girls and little boys sitting behind you up
there and they hear you using the Lords name in vain
and holler vulgarity all the way across the court and you
aint to stay here if you dont stop it, Clower said.
John Guthrie, associate commissioner of the SEC in
charge of officials, agreed coach cursing is a problem.
He said coaches addressed the need to tone down their
language during the leagues spring meeting last year.
I think the problem has improved . but it still
leaves a lot to be desired, Guthrie said.
Veteran SEC official Reggie Copeland, who is
retiring after 24 years, said some officials have also

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Clara Arnold and Dawn Parkhurst.
The Gators lost only three sets of
singles, two of those coming in Ole
Miss only win.
No. 1 seed Whittington defeated
the Rebels Arnold 6-1, 6-4.
Hetherington, No. 2, dropped the
first set 4-6, but came back to take
the last two sets 6-3, 6-1 against
Daly.
I was upset after the way I
played in the first set, Hetherington
said. When I played like I had, I try
extra hard in the next sets.
Shelley Sniffen beat Ruppert in
the closest singles match, 7-6 (7-3),
7-5 at the No. 3 slot.
Nicholsons doubles victory
against Hennessey was her second of
the day. The No. 4 singles players
dueled for two sets, as Nicholson
prevailed 6-4, 6-3.
The Rebels only victory was in
No. 5 singles. Parkhurst defeated
Garland 7-6, 6-4.
Dana Fahey defeated Nelson 6-4,
6-2 at No. 6.
The victory raises the Gators
record to 10-4 overall. UF travels to
Knoxville this weekend for matches
against Tennessee on Saturday and
Vanderbilt on Sunday.

taken steps to curb the problem, but it still exists.
When I get the four-letter word out of the coach, its
an automatic technical, Copeland said. Coaches
know Ill give a T for that, yet the situation has not
improved.
Copeland said some officials, however, do not
penalize coaches for using foul language. Those officials
have been reprimanded, but many of the younger ones
still are intimidated by coaches, he said.
They fear that if theyre too tough on a coach, that
coach may not want them back, Copeland said.
Youve got to forget that. I tell young officials, Hey,
Ive been scratched by some of the best coaches in
America . and some of the worst. Youll always get
your schedule.
Copeland said more must be done to stop the problem
before it spreads.
Something has got to be done, because youve got to
make the officials realize that it flows over from the
coaches to the players and pretty soon youve got the
players doing it, he said. That has happened so many
timels lately.
Clower said the problem was not restricted to the
SEC. He said coaches can be seen and heard cursing
during games on television.
I ought not have to wonder if Im going to be em embarrassed
barrassed embarrassed in front of daughters because
some big-time coach is going to shout something youd
hear some sailor say in hall.

Gator tennis
No. 1 singles
T. Whittington UF d. C. Arnold Miss.,
6-1, 6-4
No. 2 singles
J.Hetherington UF d. L.Daly Miss., 4-6,
6-3, 6-1
No. 3 singles
S. Sniffen UF d. J. Ruppert Miss., 7-6(7-
4), 7-5
No. 4 singles
S. Nicholson UF d. L Hennessey Miss.,
6-4. 6-3
No. 5 singles
D. Parkhurst Miss. d. C. Garland UF, 7-6,
6-4
No. 6 singles
D. Fahey UF d. L Nelson Miss., 6-4, 6-2

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TOGA B6
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IN THE ALLIGATOR
NEW
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We have batteries for heavy duty equip equipment,
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Come see us today.
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Bth Ave. 378-7676

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7SBNDCHUS would like to extend their appre appreciation
ciation appreciation to the following businesses and
individuals that helped make Spring Fling a
great success!
Ytadeer
State Welding Balloons and Bows
Coca-Cola Ballonacy
Student Government Physical Plant and
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McDonalds Burger King
Mike De Leonardo Alfi Portela
Don Brinson Linda Rebman
BACCHUS Is funded by S G

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Gymnasts: Practice makes perfect

By ERNEST HOOPER
Alligator Staff Writer
UF gymnastic coach Ernestine
Weaver watches patiently as senior
Elsi Schlegel goes through the dance
movements o f her floor exercise
routine. When Schlegel finishes,
Weaver smiles but is quick to point
out some little things.
When youre going through that
move you want to do it like this,
Weaver said as she walked through
one of Schlegels dance steps.
While Weaver works with
Schlegel, freshman Leslie Gould
practices a dance step from her
routine in another corner of the
practice floor in the Stephen C.
OConnell Center. Some of the other
gymnasts wait to practice their
movements.
"We're concentrating
on finishing and pres presenting
enting presenting because every
tenth counts. The
judge remembers the
dismounts because
it's the last thing they
see, so if you stick it,
it's impressive."
Leslie Gould
Gator Gymnast
Working on the dancing for the
floor exercise is just one of many
steps the Gators gymnastics team is
taking, to, as Gould put it, polish
its routines with only three meets left
in the regular season.
Were concentrating on finishing
and presenting because every tenth
counts, Gould said. The judge
remembers the dismounts because
its the last thing they see, so if you
stick it, its impressive.
Impressive team scores will

qualify UF for the NCAA regionals,
and they may play a role in earning
the squad an at-large berth in the
NCAA championship. The two
highest home scores, the two highest
road scores and one other score will
be averaged to determine if the
Gators make the regionals.
This past weekend the team
posted its two highest road scores of
the season, 184.00 and 184.5, at two
meets in Arizona, but still failed to
take first place in either meet.
UF sophomore Tammy Smith said
Saturday nights loss to Arizona was
frustrating because the judging
seemed to be biased.
It was like Merry Christmas
University of Arizona, Smith said.
We got pretty fair scores even
though they could have been two or
three tenths higher, but if they
(Arizona) hit their beam routine
they got a 9.4 no matter what.
Along with polishing their
routines and working on finesse, the
gymnasts are also hoping to improve
their regional qualifying scores.
Smith looks optimistically toward
the rest of the season and a possible
regional confrontation with
Southeastern Conference Cham Champion
pion Champion Georgia.
We want to get a better away
score. We just read today where
Georgia got a 182 and 180 on the
road so it could really help , Smith
said. Were going to be psyched for
regionals because at the beginning of
the season it was Georgia, Georgia,
Georgia and now they seem to be
losing it. They lost to Penn State and
Cal-State Fullerton and we beat
both of those teams last week.
The Gators have been in the top
ten all season but have failed to
reach the lofty No. 1 position. But
Gould said the best team will be
determined in the meets, not in the
polls.
Nationally, most of the teams are
pretty even, Gould said. Its just a
matter of whos hitting that day.

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ALLIGATOR PHOTO
Tammy Smith and the other UF gymnasts work to polish
their routines for the three regular season meets left. The
Gators host the national championship in April.

f~ FREE LUNCH
j c^ji's
1 Bring a friend!! Purchase a sandwich, salad, or other
| entree (excluding Fahitas) at regular price and receive a
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alligator, Wednesday march 12, 1986,

leaching tests accompanied by
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be used at any of our tape centers.
Extensive home study notes on all
areas of basic science.
Materials constantly updated.
IS rPREPAfjEFOR^B
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19



20

I, alligator, Wednesday march 12,1986

Gator rally falls
short, Miami wins 6-5

By MIKE HODGE
Alligator Writer
One pitch. A high slider.
UF came that close to beating
Miami.
And its one pitch that losing
pitcher Scott Sanford would
probably want back.
joe Nelson doubled off Sanford
Tuesday in the eighth inning to
break a tie game and defeat UF 6-5
in front of a near capacity crowd at
Perry Field. Baseballs a tough
game, said Sanford (0-2), who
pitched four consecutive shutout
innings in relief of starter Daryl

- . 'l
More sports
" .
*
' ;MJ'5
- ==
* Men's tennis team beats South Southern
ern Southern Illinois, page 13.
tSCo median Jerry C/ower says
there is too much profanity at SEC
basketball games, page 18.
Ole Miss has parking, tennis prob problems
lems problems against Lady Gators, page 18
Gymnasts.-Practice makesperfect,
*
<
- ;

Boyd. One bad pitch with a guy on
second can lose a game.T got a slider
up and over the plate.
Despite the loss, UF coach Joe
Arnold praised Sanfords per performance
formance performance and said UF (8-10) will be
ready to go today. The teams play
again at 7 p.m.
We didnt kick the game away,

ARMS CONTROL
ANDTHE^^
8:00 PM WEDNESDApMARCH 12 REITZ UNION NO ADMISSION
Fundmd by UFSQ

Arnold said. They know theyve
been in a ballgame. Were going to
come out tomorrow (today) to win.
Will Vespe hit a single with one
out in the eighth and the score tied at
5. He scored and broke the tie on
Nelsons double off the left field
wall.
/ yVith Miami (15-3) up 5-4 in the
Gator Collin Luttringer
walked with two out, moved to
second on a sacrifice and scored on
Joey Fernandezs single to deep right
field jnst ahead of Vespes throw to
the plate.
Down 5-2, UF scored two runs off
reliever Rick Raether (4-0) on RBI
singles by Jose Alou and John
Woodward with two out. Wood Woodward
ward Woodward was called out at third on
Alous single.
Trailing 5-0 in the fourth, UPs
Rodney Brewer was hit by a pitch
and scored on Tim Toumas double
off Miami starter Dan Davies down
the third base-line. Scott Clemo
singled and scored on Ed Sheas
groundout to third.
Miami scored two in the second
when Vespe hit a two-run home run
off Boyd. A Mike Fiore grounder
then scored Nelson with two out to
make it 3-0.
UF loaded the bases in the first on
a single and two walks, but two
strike outs and a fly ball ended the
threat.
With one out in the first, Fiore
reached on an error, stole second,
moved to third on a bunt single and
scored on Chris Magnos grounder.

sports~

Musings
on NCAA
basketball
With the NCAA basketball
tournament starting tomorrow,
these musings .
This college hoops season has
been known as a year without big
front lines, but Georgia Tech
opens the NCAA tournament
against one of the biggest teams in
the nation: the Marist Red Foxes.
The Red Foxes imported five
players, including 7-foot-3 Rick
Smitts of Holland, 7-foot Rudy
Bourgarel of Mexico and 6-foot 6-foot-11
-11 6-foot-11 Miroslav Pecarski of
Yugoslavia. But at 19-11 and
seeded No. 15 in the Southeast
Region, Marist is not expected to

sportscene

JOE LYNCH

give the Yellow Jackets much of a
game.
Tech head coach Bobby
Cremins, who has seen countless
early-round upsets in past NCAA
tournaments, is taking nothing
for granted.
Thats how everybody was
talking when we opened last year
against Mercer, Cremins said.
You saw what happened (Tech
won 65-58). We almost looked
past Mercer and nearly got
burned. We cant afford to take
anybody lightly.
Hey, these people (Marist) lost
by only 13 points at St. Johns and
by 16 at Villanova. Theyre
starting guys 7-3 and 6-11, and
theyve got another 7-footer in
reserve.

HF v :Wm 1B
j> i

Jj
Ely
I >3'T^yW > > * ? Vi:*; >: ?* -V-;Cp ;'S: Sir: '?7- pi
apt
IB Bv
|B*
J* jifjlp
< tffijjffr 's/&&''' Jjfl l Bh§£&£ B v ,; >?({'' -,v*v *s'j'
SHAY ROUTH aBgATOR
Kentucky's Kenny Walker and his teammates open their
NCAA run against Davidson.

Height aside, Cremins is
probably more confident about
the prospect of playing Marist
than he outwardly appears to be.
But one thing he alluded to is
certain: Dont take anyone
lightly. The mighty often have

fallen in the early rounds because
of taking teams like Cleveland
State (27-3), Northeastern (26-4)
and Pepperdine (24-4) lightly.
GOO NCAA, page 12



Full Text

PAGE 1

[weather: partly cloudy high near 80 wednesday, march 12, 1986 the Independent florida PuOC shed by CampusICommunications, Inc., Gainesville, Fla Not officially associated with the University of Florida O'Connell Center to be open again By SHARON KENNEDY Alligator Writer Students will be readmitted to the Stephen C. O'Connell Center's weight room and to the Florida Pool starting today, but the O'Connell Center's pool is off limits for recreational uses, student senators decided Tuesday night. Passing 40-10 in a roll-call vote, the Student Senate bowed to their constituents and approved a $9,657 bill to keep the center open and reopen the Florida Pool. Student Sen. David Tucker, who represents the Holland Law School, said, "My constituents want this pool open and that's all there is to it.'' An ad hoc committee appointed last week for the O'Connell Center came back to the senate with a reduced money request and strict guidelines for its future management. The committee, chaired by Student Sen. Drew Olson, decided to open the Florida Pool because SG's intramurals sports organization is taking control of the outdoor pool. By not funding the O'Connell Center to extend its pool hours, the bill will cost $9,657 instead of the originally planned $12,936. While the O'Connell Center poo1 will keep its reduced hours, the Florida Pool will be open full time for recreational use. The O'Connell Center weight room will also be reopened for recreational hours. Here are the guidelines the ad hoc committee requested: 0 Unless an alternate source of funding is sought first by O'Connell Center administrators, SG wilf not fund it in the future. a When the O'Connell Center makes a profit, a percentage must be put into an account earmarked for recreation. This account will serve as an emergency fund when the O'Connell Center has a deficit. A The Activity and Service Fee Advisory Committee will have a line-item veto on all requests from the O'Connell Center. E An advisory board, including one faculty member and a student majority, will be formed. The board will have no management power. The question of who is financially responsible has plagued the Student Senate ever since O'Connell Center Director Lionel Dubay asked the senate for $36,000 five weeks ago. Senators refused to fund the request, which Dubay said was needed for salaries of life guards and weight room attendants. Dubay returned with a request of about $13,000. The senate refused that request, but decided to reconsider the bill after and ad hoc committee reviewed it. SUSAN GARDNER/ALLIGATOR The commission candidates react to news of the runoff. announcement. Coffey, right, with his 8-year-old daughter Gordon and his wife, top, wave to supporters after the Melissa, prepares to give a telephone interview. Coffey vs. Gordon: It's a runoff Gordon 518 votes from victory By BRAD BUCK and MARK BOSLET Alligator Staff Writers Mayor-Commissioner Gary Gordon came within 518 votes of an outright victory in Tuesday's City Commission election, but when the votes were tallied, they showed he still must face attorney David Coffey in a runoff March 25. city election Gordon won 4,052 votes, or 44.3 percent, of the 9,138 votes cast in the at-large election. Coffey took 2,654 votes, 29 percent. Former MayorCommissioner Gary Junior placed third with 2,385 ballots, 26.1 percent. The 27 percent voter turnout surprised City Clerk Mary Ann Frazer, who had predicted about 21 percent of Gainesville's voters would cast ballots. "It was a nice surprise," Frazer said. "I don't know why (so many people voted). The candidates getting out on the streets and the good weather may have had something to do with it." Gordon needed 518 more votes to gain the 50 percent plus one vote majority necessary to win the election. Some city officials think if Junior had not entered the race, Gordon would have won Tuesday. A relieved Coffey predicted after the results were announced: "My chances are excellent. This is my second try, and I'm not going to lose. "I did well in the precincts I expected to do well in," he said. Although Junior did not throw his support behind Gordon or Coffey Tuesday night, Coffey is confident he'll get Junior's backing. Gordon said Tuesday night the voters decided his record spoke for itself. "This will give me two more weeks to get my record out," Gordon said. "My opponent's record and his proposals would be a step into the past, a step into the direction of the cities to the south of us. "I think the issue is clear. The issue is whether we are going to take pride in the kind of planning that has preserved our environment and preserved our neighborhoods." Junior did not seem bitter after the ballots were tallied. "We ran on the issues, and I think the people spoke clearly on what they wanted," Junior said. "Therg was no mudslinging. It was a clean campaign." see Elections, ext page :-~ -I Criser: Gramm-Rudman will clos, M -1cial aid offices By MICHAEL PODOLSKY Alligator Staff Writer Financial aid officials fear the Gramm-Rudman budget ax will chop away financial aid for more than 1,000 UF students and UF President Marshall Criser is doing what he can to stop it. If the ax -in the form of the Gramm-Rudman bill and Reagan's budget recommendations -falls next year, UF's financial aid office has determined that $16.4 million in aid to UF students would be lost. The cuts would affect at least 7,373 students, or about 20 percent of the student body. In a letter dated March 7, sent to Florida senators Paula Hawkins and Lawton Chiles, and Rep. Buddy MacKay, Criser said the worst effect of Reagan's budget proposal would be elimination of a program that pays the salaries of the people who give out the aid. Without this program, Criser said, aid could not be given out in "a timely and effective manner." UF would lose $315,000 if the program is eliminated. Criser wrote that without the money, "it would be extremely difficult to deliver aid to students." "Federal student aid programs have been the major factor, since 1958, in providing increased access to higher education. Continued support for these student aid programs is vital to this university and for the future of the state of Florida." Gramm-Rudman-Hollings would take a big chunk out of student-aid programs, including the Guaranteed Student Loan program, Pell Grants, College Work Study Programs and Student Educational Opportunity Grants. TheGuaranteedStudent Loan program alone would be cut in half -from $26 million this year to $13 million in 1987-88. The number of UF students eligible for the loan also will be halved -dropping from 10,450 to 5,127. The Pell Grant, the nation's largest student aid program, will take a beating as well. This year, 6,500 UF students received $8.6 million in Pell Grants. If Gramm-Rudmann hits, Criser said the figures would drop to 4,254 students receiving only $5.5 million. "The loss of these funds w6uld have a serious negative impact upon our lowest income students," Criser wrote. see Financial Aid, next page

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2, alligator, wednesday march 12, 1986 Gordon gets grilled New Burger King doesn't like it the mayor's way By JIM HAGY Alligator Staff Writer Hold the pickles, hold the lettuce, Gary Gordon sure upsets us, All we ask is that you let us grill him our way. And for a while Tuesday, election day, local Burger King officials did grill incumbent City Commission candidate Gordon their way. Signs such as "Gary Gordon is anti-jobs" were taped on the windows of the West University Avenue restaurant across from Library West. The Burger K ing is scheduled to open tonight. Mark Wright, Burger King operations director, said he put the signs up "to remind the people of what the City Commission under Gary Gordon's leadership has done to us--they've held this store up a year." Wright said the restaurant was scheduled to open last March. But city commissioners--by a 3-2 vote -rejected the site plan that included a drive-through window. Gordon, who voted against the plan, says he and other commissioners aren't anti-business, but are anti drive-through. The extra traffic generated by a drive-through window would "cripple" other pedestrian-oriented businesses in the area Gordon said, and lead to more congestion on West University Avenue. Wright said the restaurant will open tonight. Although it doesn't have a true drive-through, customers can drive to within five feet of a window. Employees will shuttle the food out to the customers, Wright said. Wright said he did not know when he would take down the anti-Gordon signs. But Gainesville Codes Enforcement Manager George Congden knew. Congden said Wright violated a city ordinance about "sniping" signs that attack people and made him remove the signs. He said Wright had also violated another city ordinance by not having a permit for the signs in the window. "Somebody, I don't know whether it was Gordon or not, somebody called City Hall and cried about it," Wright said. Gordon said he did not know who complained after Congden left. SHAY ROUTH/ALUGATOR The new Burger King on West University Ave. posts election-day signs opposing incumbent Mayor-Commissioner Gary Gordon. Financial Aid man, he did so to force Congress to come to a compromise before the from page 1 automatic across-the-board cuts beMac~y's ressse-gin. Greg Farmer, MacKay's press se"He voted for it because he feels it cretary, said MacKay is "very supwill force Congress to establish priportive of what President Criser is orities," Farmer said. "Congressasking." man MacKay believes in the stu"Education is an investment in dent." the future and any cuts are shortFarmer also said that few people sighted," Farmer said. in Washington believe Reagan's Farmer said that even though budget proposals will pass unscaMacKay voted for Gramm-Rudthed. volume 79 number 124 News Room 376-4458 Editor ..Sallie Hughes Photo Editor .Susan Gardner Managing Editor .Mark Southgate Opinions Editor .Bonnie Glazer News Editors .Mickea Anderson Sports Editor .Marlon Manuel Greg Lamm. Susan Purtic ArtcDirector .Scott Baker Special Project Editors. ...Features Editor .Matt Holland Mark Bridgwater, Mark Worth Display Advertising 376-4482 A dvertising Dire ctor ..Tricia Carey Retail Advertising Manager ..Michele Browder Advertising Secretary ..Debbie M oran Salos Representatives Cindy Arndt Paul Gianneschi Terry Rhein Courtney Brown Kevin Hoffman Jody Schlesinger Tracy Gashe Richard Ivey John Sherry Laura Geigle Jeff Kremer Jeff Weibel Classified Advertising 373-FIND Classified Supervisor ..Jayne M murphy Operations 373-9926 O operation M manager ...Suzy M martin Production Manager ...........Bryce Taylor Advertising Production Supervisor ..Monette Helgeson Assistant Supervisor .....Susan Payne Editorial Production Supervisor. ...Ellen Barsley Assistant Supervisor ....Lyle Fried Assistant Supervisor ......Steve Scott Typesetting Supervisor ....Amy Wutka Assistant Supervisor ...Barry Lupinacci Circulation Manager ...Ronnie Combs Assistant Circulation Mgr .....Joe Curbelo Business 376-4446 Controller. ....Virginia Carroll General Manager. .......C E Barber The Independent Florida Alligator is a student newspaper serving the University of Florida, published by a non-profit 501 (c) (3) educational organization, Campus Communications, Inc P 0 Box 14257, Gainesville, FL32064 The Alligatoris published Monday through Fridaymornings, except during holidays and exam periods DuringUF summer academic terms, The Alligator is publiShed Tuesdays and Thursdays. The Alligator is a member of the American Newspaper Pubishers Association, Associated Collegiate Press and Southern University Newspapers Subscription Rates One Sem estert(Fall or Spring) .$15.00 Tw o Sem esters(Fall & Spring $. .$29.00 Sum mer Sem ester .r. 8 00 Full Year (All Semesters) ....$35.00 The Auigator offices are located at1t105W. UniversityAve. Classified advertising can be placed at that location from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday, except for holidays. Classdieds can also be placed at the UF Campus Shops and Bookstores at the Hub. Shands, Towers; at the cashier's office of the Reitz Union and off-campus at The Smalr's Den, Briar Patch, and all Chesnut Office Equipment Co. locations in Gaineille. All rights are reserved. No portion of The Aggiae may be reproduced in any means without the written consent of an officer of Campus Communications, Inc. Elections from page 1 Gordon won 16 of the 22 precincts. Coffey won the other six. Gordon and Coffey each won their home precinct. Junior lost in his own precinct -number 5, J.J. Finley School -to Gordon. Gordon said his success at the polls was due to raising issues that interested people. During this year's campaigning he spoke against raising utility rates and forming a countywide planning board and for installing an undeveloped greenbelt around Gainesville, repaving old roads and preserving neighborhoods. "Peope don't ask about massive restructuring of government, they ask about street lights and roadways," he said while campaigning Tuesday. Gordon said he favors a modest level of growth in town, but growth should not be at the expense of the quality of life. "The last thing you want to do is give away services to attract growth," he said earlier in the campaign. By giving away services as an incentive to attract growth, a city loses the tax base that supports schools, libraries and adds to things like the tree canopy, he said. During the campaign, Coffey discuseed the nec essity of stimulating economic growth in the city. But as he emphasized at the League of Women Voters January forum, the growth must lead to a more diverse tax base. Citing recommendations from the Visions 2000 meeting of more than 100 Alachua County residents for 4 percent citywide growth as a good blueprint, Coffey said he became motivated to run by the thought of encouraging city-county cooperation to work for this goal. Referring to Plan Board experience in growth management and law experience at UF's Center for Governmental Responsibility, Coffey said that among this year's candidates he has the best "handle on how to manage growth." F "It's your move." Above average salary and benefit program. Please contact your placement center. You re ambitious, you're educated. and you're ready to make cn move up as fcr as your skills can carry you -we're firm believers in important career decision Your first move could determine the the "promote-from-within"philosophy. success of your entire career strategy If yoo would like to play a part in the exciting world of fashion Therefore. you want to choose a solid company that offers the apparel -with a growth-oriented company -write or phone us nght opportunities at the K mart Apparel Corp office nearest you listed below K mart Apparel Corp. is seeking a large number of manageIt's your move. meant traineesrnghtanow People -ike you -who want to work as apparel managers, a responsibility that can lead you to impo Recruiter Scoff Limberger tant buying, merchandising. or distribution positions in ladies', means and children's fashions People with diversified backSouthern Region 2901 Clairmont Road NE grounds who have the foresight and competence to make the Atlanta, GA 30029 right moves As a member of K mart Apparel s management team you'll (404) 3202523 .......... >7
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alligator, wednesday march 12, 1986, 3 UF police records con BY MARKBRIDGWATER "I think the university's just being overly ant Alligator Staff Writer protective of its students and employees," The president of a UF fraternity may Miami attorney and media law expert Tom S have used Mace against a non-fraternity Julin said. "Ordinarily, police records just Ad member who spit on him, struck him and aren't student records." Julin is an attorney Pre was "verbally abusive" to him early Saturwho represents the Alligator. ney day morning. nar Bay gi s According to the law that requires "all stu But if you don't know his name, you state, county and municipal records shall at adr probably never will. And don't bother askall times be open for a personal inspection ing UF police. by any person," UF police are required to 6 They and UF administrators,citing efrelease information concerning: stuck forts to protect student confidentiality, are sity withholding UF students' names from Ethe time, date, location and nature of a per reports of crimes committed on campus-a reported crime; and edu practice that may violate the Florida Public Ethe name, sex, age and address of a ley, Records Law. person arrested or the victim of a crime, ing "We don't release student names. That is provided they are not the victim of a sexual in our policy and that is the university's polassault or child abuse. t icy;" UF Capt. Everett Stevens said TuesGainesville police and the Alachua V day. County Sheriff's Office provide the names rep "We are not withholding information, of the victims and the location of a crime, car we are obeying the law," University Relabut they will withhold the names of sus-ter tions Vice President Al Alsobrook said. inv "There's an exception to the Public R pects not yet charged with a crime. rep cords Law (concerning student records). UF police have withheld the names of stut So, we're not violating the Public Records the victims, the location of an incident and 6 Law." the names of uncharged suspects who are' enc But a state media law expert says UF's turned over to the UF judicial system del practice is wrong. administered by Student Services Assistrele I sealed Dean Mike Rollo. tevens referred to a July 1984 memo to ministrative Affairs Associate Vice sident Gerald Schaffer from UF attorBarbara Wingo that says students' nes on UF police records are part of the dents' educational records, which UF ministrators must keep confidential. Police reports which refer to individual dents and are available to non (UniverPolice Department and) university sonnel," Wingo wrote, "are patently cation records" and apply to the BuckAmendment, a federal regulation chargUF administrators with keeping educaa records confidential. Mingo cited this example: should a orter heara rumor of a theftoccurring on npus and involving a student, the reporcannot see copies of the police report olving the student because "a UPD crt is part of the disciplinary file" of the dent. Nonetheless," Wingo wrote, "all referes to students at the university must be eted from copies of such reports that are -ases." 5 more sentenced 12 of 13 defendants convicted in smuggling trial By JIM DI POLA ringleaders, one a "legendary" drug pilot and Alligator Writer the other a UF law school graduate, were sentenced Tuesday along with three other When federal drug enforcement authorities Paul sentenced Paul Ernest Kersten 111, 40, asked an accused ringleader of a multi-million ofCoral Springs, to 15 years in federal prison dollar international drug smuggling operation and fined him $g125,000 for conspiracyto poswhat his profession was, he answered with sess with intent to distribute more than 1 000 one word: drugs. pounds of marijuana. Small planes, shrimping boats and low-paid William Raymond Phillips, Sr58. ofCaraoffloaders in U.S. seaports were the tools of belle a Fla., a graduate of UF's law school, his trade, an assistant U.S. attorney said. rbeiveFa.,-ardtemfaUd s10,w0schine, Scot Wathe, 30 ofBatsbur, SC.,was received a five-year term and $10,000 fine, Scott Warther, 30, of Batesburg, S.C., was the maximum sentence, for traveling in forsentenced to 30 years in a federal prison for e mm e ntentfaligtinllerorganizing a criminal operation that lasted actvi commerce with intent to facilitate illegal two years, from 1982 to 1983. Warther and Phillips, who currently is serving an eight11 others were sentenced Monday and Tuesyear sentence for a previous drug conviction, day in Gainesville federal court to prison asked Paul for a concurrent sentence because terms ranging from 5 to 30 years. of his age. Twelve of the thirteen people indicted on Simpson argued that the 58-year-old Phildrug smuggling and trafficking charges lips should not be given any leniency because pleaded guilty to charges during the past two he acted as one of the key organizers in the months. The remaining man will be taking his smuggling operation. Paul sentenced Phillips case to trial. to five years in prison after he completes his According to court testimony,the smugglers eight-year sentence. shipped in at least 50,000 pounds of mariAlso sentenced Tuesday were Kevin Woodjuana from Jamaica and dropped bales of ward, 32, of Aiken, S.C., and Edward LeGree, marijuana from small planes off the Bahamas 32, of Frogmore, S.C. Each received five years coast and then transported them to Gainesin prison on charges of conspiracy to import ville, Tallahassee, Atlanta and South Caromarijuana. lina. Eddie Nimitz Johnson, 39, of Carabele, Federal Judge Maurice Paul sentenced Fla., was convicted on traveling in foreign accused mastermind Warther to 30 years in commerce with intent to import into the Uniprison without parole Monday. The other two ted States and was sentenced to eight years. County OlKs landfill plan By JOSHUA L WEINSTEIN through before dollar figures had been disAlligator Staff Writer cussed thoroughly. Brown says otherwise. The Alachua County Commission Tuesday "This is the same information that was approved a $9 million plan to improve the presented to us in a workshop held in Archer county landfill during the next six years, but two weeks ago," she said. Commissioner Jim Notestein says the group The plan would build a cover to keep water approved the plan without enough discussion. from seeping into the landfill and, in turn, into Furthermore, Notestein said, the commisthe aquifer. That would cost about $1.9 milsion doesn't have the money to pay for the lion. It also would provide an investigation of plan. soil at $50,000 -and an investigation of ButCommissioner Leveda Brown said there gas migration at $20,000. The remaining was plenty of discussion and that it's normal $8 million will be used for a full landfill liner procedure to approve plans before the money and other landfill improvements. is allocated. Notestein said Tuesday's meeting brings up County Attorney Thomas Bustin agrees serious questions about procedure. with Brown on the money issue. "I'm alarmed," he said. Notestein contends the plan, which would Brown said, "That's his paranoia, not provide a landfill cover, was railroaded mine." Women athletes get more $ By JOHN A. NAGY qualified for the initial $50,000 grants, leavAlligator Staff Writer ing most of the remaining money on a firstThe good earth ""~'" "'"'/'"U'I' Yujin, 3, waters her father's vegetable plot near Lake Alice. Dad, DeokSu Jeon, a UF electrical engineering grad student, says Yujin often helps him garden. The two are growing tomatoes, green onions and hot peppers. Fast fund raising by the UF Athletic Assocome, first-served basis. UF asked first for the ciation has enabled the UF Women's Athletmoney. ics program to receive an extra $90,000 in "They always do," FSU Athletics congrants from the State University System. FSU was able to receive only $35,000 of UF gained $140,000 for its women's athletFS abet eev nv$500o ics program from the SUS's Women's Athletthe first-come, first-served money because it ics Challngrem ra the sof al Aesubmitted its request after IF, UF's Athletics Challenge Grant -the most of all nine ics Controller Denise Stevens said. public universities. "The pot was (almost) empty when FSU That money is earmarked by Florida law epowa(lms)mty hnFU foith efa cilin y srenamarked scholarship turned in their request," she said. "I underfor either facility renovations or stand that FSU turned in a request later in the endowments. day The grant, proposed by state Sen. George day. s Kirkpatrick, D-Gainesville, and passed into Stevens said it has not been decided exactly law last year, gives each of the nine universihow to use the $1 40,000 in the $1.9 million ties $5,000 for every $7,500 raised in private women's athletics budgets. Florida law states contributions. UF raised $245,000 in contrithat the funds must go either to facilities renocuonibutionUF asetics.Dincotrvations or scholarship endowments. butis foar $40000athleti50,000 per school The Athletic Assocation's finance commit-was available. Only four schools -UF, tee will decide how to split the money up," Florida State University, Florida Atlantic Stevens said. The money should arrive later University and University of West Florida -this month.

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4, alligator, wednesday march 12, 1986 MIWA J% IA~z N NEW ASSOCIATE DEAN A UF professor of counselor education is now the associate dean of Graduate Studies and Minority Programs. Rod McDavis took that office in January. He served as the interim assistant dean for Graduate Studies since 1985. McDavis has been with UF since 1974, the same year he received his doctorate in counselor education from the University of Toledo. His new position involves recruiting black graduate students and handling the financial programs and admission, referrals for those students. The job is linked to his research interests; counseling ethnic minorities and student personnel work. He is writing a book on trans-cultural counseling called "Transcultura'Counseling, An Eclectic Approach." *SAVE A SMOKER Warning: cigarettes can kill you. That's the message the local chapter of the American Cancer Society is passing along in a stopsmoking clinic that began this week. The free clinic, titled "Fresh Start," offers "a lot of support" from fellow smokers trying to kick the habit, said a cancer society spokeswoman Tuesday. The clinic is being held at the First Christian Church, 800 SW Second Ave. It is scheduled Mondays and Wednesdays from 5:30 pm. to 6:30 p.m. through March 26. For more information, call 376-6866. stateiik People rally for Vargas QUITO, Ecuador (UPI) -A general The standoff at Eloy Alfaro Air Base in who seized an air base after he was dismissed Manta, on Ecuador's Pacific coast 250 miles for insubordination rejected President Leon west of Quito, was not considered a serious Febres Cordero's order to surrender Monday, threat to the government. Ecuador has been a calling instead for Ecuadorans to "go into the democracy since the last military regime left streets" to fight tyranny. power in 1979. Hours after Gen. Frank Vargas called for Vargas spent a fourth day holed up at the air the revolt, about 300 chanting students entered base, rejecting Febres Cordero's call for his the base in support of the rebellious general, surrender and demanding a military hearing to and the wives of radio technicians who were present documents he said would detail holed up in the air base rallied to his cause in corruption in the top ranks of the nation's the streets of Quito, the capital. military. A Quito radio report said a group of officers "If I am thrown out of here, I will go to the loyal to Vargas seized an air base near the mountains and fight with the peasants against capital. It said the officers were arrested a few this tyranny," an emotional Vargas told a minutes after taking over the air base. The Quito radio station. He called on Ecuadorans report could not be immediately confirmed. to "go into the streets and fight tyranny." Cordero had given Vargas until 7 p.m. EST "The Ecuadoran people should go out in the Monday to surrender, but no action was taken streets with their guns if a dictatorship is when the deadline passed. Reporters at the air declared," Vargas said. "I will leave here only base said eight planes circled the base, apdead." parently looking for approaching forces. Vargas said he had 1,000 air force troops Febres Cordero met with his top military and various warplanes on alert to resist an officials to discuss the rebellion in the seaport attack. Observers earlier estimated 200 to 500 city of Guayaquil, where the president had troops were at the base. spent the weekend. Details of the meeting A journalist for Vision Radio at the Eloy Air were not released. Force Base at Manta said he saw Vargas use a The president said he would address the car to block the takeoff of an airplane with nation by radio and TV to explain measures he seven air force officers aboard. Vargas will take to end the rebellion if Vargas, who reportedly then forced the seven to leave the was fired from his posts as chief of staff and air plane, took away their wallets and let them force commander Friday, did not give up. walk off the base. not the athletic-type game we were looking for," said Ina Lee, task force spokeswoman. N GRAHAM DECREES DEATH TALLAHASSEE -Gov. Bob Graham signed death warrants Tuesday for two death row inmates, including Daniel Morris Thomas, a member of the notorious "Ski Mask Gang" that terrorized central Florida in the mid1970s. Graham also signed a warrant for Ed Clifford Thomas, who stabbed to death a Broward County man one day and the following day beat to death a witness to the killing. Executions for both men have been scheduled for 7 a.m. on Tuesday, April 15. INNOCENT UNTIL .._-_ TALLAHASSEE -An appeals court refused for the second time Tuesday to let social workers shut down a Crestview child care center whose owner's husband was once accused -but never convicted of child abuse. The 1st District Court of Appeals ruled 0 FREE ON BUM BAIL unanimously that it would probably, be unINDIANAPOLIS -A woman accused of constitutional to close Anderson's Child Care writing more than $100,000 in bad checks to Center without proof that Charles N. Anpay for luxury merchandise was freed when derson has been found guilty of child abuse in a she posted $1,000 bail -allegedly by writing civil or criminal court of law. "Were we to another rubber check, police said. The approve the construction urged by HRS, any suspect, Jerri Emberton, 26, who has no indicated report of child abuse in its registry permanent address, was being sought would disqualify an individual from emTuesday. She was charged Friday with five ployment until that individual carried the counts of theft and released Saturday. Marion burden of disproving the reported abuse," County Sheriff's Sgt. Charles Denney said, Judge E. Earle Zehmer wrote. "She posted her bond by writing check." N SUGGESTIVE GAMES 0 STALKING HORROR FORT LAUDERDALE -The spring LOS ANGELES -A woman who survived an break capital has left a maker of suggestive attack by the "Night Stalker" killer testified board games somewhat miffed by rebuffing its Tuesday that the man accused of the murder latest creation -Body Tag. Baron-Scott spree, Richard Ramirez, shot her at pointEnterprises Inc., the creator of "Dirty Words" blank range and killed her roommate in a night and "Sexual Trivia," began manufacturing the of terror. Maria Hernandez, 21, was the first to simple party game a few weeks ago. "It was survive an attack by the "Night Stalker" and STUDENTS! $7.00 Haircuts Every Wednesday 373-4680 USA GOJU KARATE Learn Self-Defenw-Gain Self ( onf dence Mon-Thurs. 5:45-7:15/7:30-9:00 Sal. 11:00 am -2:00 p.m. Located in Gainesville Gym 203 NW 6 St. $2/mo4 2mo60/ 3mo discounts for: UF & SFCC Students l'rivate & Semi-Private classes group discounts available Sensei Keith Teller 40 For Info: 374-6590 the first to testify against Ramirez, 26, at his preliminary hearing to determine if there is enough evidence to make him stand trial on 14 counts of murder and 54 other felonies. E MUDDY SACRILEGE SANTA CLARA, Calif. -Indians picketed Santa Clara University for allowing mud wrestling. But the protest wasn't against the event -it was for using sacred slime. The dirt for a fraternity-sponsored mud wrestling tournament at the Jesuit-run university March 1 came from a sacred Indian burial ground, picketing tribal descendants charged Monday. "It's a spiritual issue for the Indian," said Rosemary Camba, a member of Muwekia a local group of native American descendants. Fraternity leaders said they were surprised their event has caused so much trouble. They were accused last week of insulting women. Fraternity Vice President Jim Manning said, "I think we're also going to stay away from mud wrestling for a little while." 0 STORM DAMAGE Ohio Valley residents Tuesday began cleaning up the splintered wreckage of homes and towns demolished by tornadoes and 90 mph winds that killed six people, injured dozens and caused millions of dollars in damage. State officials surveyed areas ravaged by at least 29 twisters. The twisters destroyed homes, flipped cars and downed powerlines Monday in Illinois, Indiana, Ohio and Kentucky. One person was killed in Kentucky, three in Ohio and two in Indiana -including a man crushed under a collapsed barn. Authorities reported 45 storm-related injuries in Indiana and at least three dozen in Kentucky. Electricity still had not been restored Tuesday to about 3,000 people in Kentucky, 400 in Ohio and a handful in Indiana. 0 AMERICAN GUN CONTROL WASHINGTON -The House Judiciary This page compiledbySarah Duran from UPI andstaffreports. r*ON.EW.UE N. disABILITY AWARENESS PROGRAMS '86 .UUU .U .EU U A Celebration of the Arts. 0 FAIRMOUNT THEATRE OF 0 THE DEAF presents "TOTAL COMMUNICATION" U "Total Comuncation" is a variety nhoa that incladensong and sign langaaga, poetry written by deaf and haarng pos arformed In sign language and voice, diverse mina techinques, and a comedy sketch which depicts the problems and opportunities for communication between the hearing and deaf worlds. It also Includes suggestions on how to break down cultural and linguistic barriers between hearing and deaf persons. Perf ormance T i m e s FUNDED BY STUDENT GOVERNMENT University of Flo.rida Santa Fe UThursday, March 13 Community College 7:0 0 p. m.Un U Friday, March 14 U n i v eersity Auditorium 10:00 a.m. Free Admission Stu. Dev. Area R01 Igggg U0. Committee Tuesday unanimously approved a compromise measure to loosen federal gun laws that would allow interstate sales of rifles and shotugns but would keep current restrictions on pistol sales. The measure would be the first major change in the nation's 18year-old Gun Control Act passed in the wake of the 1968 assassinations of Martin Luther King Jr. and Robert Kennedy. Recalling the shooting of President Reagan in 1981, Rep. Peter Rodino, D-N.J., said he was disappointed there was not enough support to strengthen handgun laws by requiring a waiting period allowing police time to check the backgrounds of prospective pistol buyers. JAPANESE GUN CONTROL TOKYO -Police will visit Japan's nearly 600,000 licensed gun owners as part of elaborate security measures being mounted before President Reagan and other leaders arrive for the May economic summit, authorities said Tuesday. Every year, police conduct inspections of each of the country's 593,951 registered owners of firearms. This year, police will knock on their doors early so all checks are completed before the summit. During the inspection, a neighborhood police officer checks both the firearms and the licenses. "They check to see that guns haven't been stolen or are otherwise in the wrong hands," a National Police Agency Spokesman said. N FRENCH RESOLVE BEIRUT, Lebanon -A French troubleshooter drove into West Beirut's suburbs Tuesday in a bid to contact a proIranian extremist group that said it killed a French hostage and threatened the lives of three others. Dr. Razeh Raad, a Lebaneseborn cardiologist, was seen driving into the city's Shiite Moslem militia-controlled suburbs for a meeting with Islamic Jihad members, Lebanese police sources said. N STUDIOUS SNAKES HARARE, Zimbabwe -Swarms of huge snakes looking for mates and a place to nest during Africa's hot season have invaded a schoolhouse, and teachers, tired of warding off the invaders with torches, are looking for new jobs. Some 50 snakes have been killed since the school opened in January, Principal Emmanuel Musaruwa said. The already jumpy staff had taken to spending nights around campfires with burning torches. But the last straw came when a 15-foot-long snake interrupted a meeting in Musaruwa's office. 0 IN THE DARK SANTIAGO, Chile -Leftist rebels blew up two electricity towers early Tuesday, knocking out power supplies in Santiago on the fifth anniversary of a constitution that extended the term of the military government until 1989. The communist-backed Manuel Rodriguez Patriotic Front claimed responsibility for the explosion and said the attack was the start of a campaign of violence aimed at ousting Gen. Augusto Pinochet, Chile's military president. I I

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Students active in campaign Some faculty, students try to increase turnout By DEBBIE SALAMONE Alligator Staff Writer A love-hate relationship may stall work between Gainesville's City Commission 'nd UF, but that hasn't stopped faculty and students from hitting the campaign trail. College-Young Democrats, a UF student political organization, endorsed City Commission Candidate David Coffey in a letter teThe Alligator Tuesday, saying they supported Coffey's dedication to long-term planning. Coffey said Florida Blue Key President Rob Stern also worked for his campaign. The Democrats set up a table outside Turlington Hall this week, talking to students and "spreading the word," member Lawrence Siry said. "Every election we try to get all the students out to vote." Despite the endorsement Siry said some CollegeYoung Democrats were working for incumbent Mayor-Commissioner Gary Gordon. English Society member Kimberly O'Connor said she stood around Gainesville Tuesday with a campaign sign supporting Gordon. O'Connor said she supported Gordon's stance on environmental issues. She also said Gordon entertained the organization's members this semester with tales about his writing career. UF faculty members were also divided in their support of candidates, contributing money to the Coffey, Gordon and candidate Gary Junior campaigns. UF English Professor Sidney Homan said he spent any time he could gathering faculty names to put in campaign advertisements and roaming through his neighborhood telling residents why they should vote for Coffey. "He's a very-level headed person, and I like the idea of having a fresh face on the commission," he said. Faculty members contributed more than $25 to the campaigns as follows: ECoffey-Architecture Professor Emeritus Carl Feis, $50; Health center Dr. David Challoner, $100. NGordon-UF pharmacist Robert M. Atkins, $50; Food and resource enconomics Professor Mac Langham, $50; Agricultural engineering technician, James M. Simpson, $50; Religion Professor Richard Hiers, $30; retired education Professor Robert Myers, $50; Associate geography Professor Grant Thrall, $35. WJunior-Business service secretary Bernice Harrison and agricultural engineering research Professor Dalton Harrison, $100. 12,664 4 Votes O "Otes Mimi M/ Pal Student voter turnout dismal By JIM DI POLA people, or 3.2 percent of the registered Union voters, Alligator Writer cast a ballot. .ad mAnother student-attended poll, P.K. Yonge LaborUF students again turned out in dismal numbers atory School, turned in 235 votes for a 7.5 percent for a Gainesville City Commission election, accordturnout. Poll worker Janice D'Arinson said she estiing to statistics from the Reitz Union, the city's mated 35 of those voters were students. student-dominated precinct polling place. Students there supported incumbent Gary GorThe annual low student turnout frustrates student don in larger numbers than his two challengers-UF activists. Center for Governmental Responsibility Director Robert Capko, a College-Young Democrats David Coffey and businessman Gary Junior. member who sat behind a table at the Union Tuesday with information about the election, said the students Gordon and Coffey will face each other in a runoff who passed him by didn't even seem to notice. March 25. "We have all this material out and no one even At the Union, 56 students cast 33 votes for Gorseems interested enough to pick it up," he said. "I'm don, 20 for Coffey and three for Junior. Last year, 71 really at a loss at what more we could have done." By MARK SOUTHGATE Alligator Staff Writer The incumbent Mayor-Commissioner Gary Gordon reported contributions from the trade unions, the Communications Workers of America at $250 and the United Brotherhood of Carpenters at $300. Most of his reported contributions were of the under $30 variety, like the $30 that religion Professor Richard Hiers gave or the 70 cents that City Commissioner W.E. "Mac" McEachern and his wife June contributed. One exception is the use of anairplane--acontribution worth$485 'from Kenn-Air Aviation Corp., a subsidiary owned by airport businessman Bill Cousins. Most of David Coffey's reported contributions fell into the under$30 category. Coffey also received contributions from area developers, such as $200 from James Greene and Robert Rowe. County Planning Administrator York Phillips contributed $25, and Dr. David Challoner, vice president of health affairs at the Miller Health Center, contributed $100. Coffey's biggest expense was for advertising -$745.58 to the Gainesville Sun, and $492 to WYKS radio. Gary Junior boasts the largest individual contributions -many were more than $100. Mall businessman Alan Squitieri contributed $200 and J.D. Stephenson of 5727 NW 54th Terrace gave $300. The largest reported contribution was from Sporter Printing for posters and brochures worth $406. Junior spent $7,612 for television and newspaper advertising, making him the biggest media spender. Not all contributions have been reported. They are to be reported within 60 days after the election. Coffey, for example, has listed $1,972 contributions while spending $3,510.08, a difference of $1.538.08. Gordon wins black vote; Coffey trying By BRAD BUCK Alligator Staff Writer Mayor-Commissioner Gary Gordon won all three predominantly black precincts in Tuesday's City Commission election by a substantial margin. But his opponent for the March 25 runoff, David Coffey, thinks the black vote will be one of his keys to victory. The three precincts-numbers 13, 16 and 28-cast 527 votes for Gordon, 79 for Coffey and 124 for former Mayor-Commissioner Gary Junior. Gordon was not surprised by his high percentage of black votes. "I think that's a recognition of the work I've done on public works projects, such as road resurfacing," he said. "I think people in the black community as well as every community know I care about the people." Gordon also expressed thanks to the Alachua County Ministerial Alliance for its support. "Those black ministers clearly said Mayor Gordon has responded to the needs of the people. I fight for everyone, not just for the big money and not just for the big developers." Coffey, on the other hand, saw the black voters sending him a clear message. "I anticipate if there is a change in my strategy, we'llbe putting more effort into the black areas of Gainesville," Coffey said. "Obviously, I haven't gotten my message out. Black areas of Gainesville need economic development badly." Last year, the black vote was important but not enough to elect candidate Earl Young. Precincts 13, 16 and 28 contain 3,385 of Gainesvilles 5,700 black registered voters. Young garnered 609 of the votes in those precincts last year, but it was not enough to win the election. History favors ncumbent in city By BRAD BUCKandMARKBOSLET $11,212 -or $4.70 per vote. Alligator Staff Writers Some observers saw this year's campaign as one that pitted those who want GainesIf history repeats itself, Mayor11ville to grow against those who want to Commissioner Gary Gordon should be in a curtail rapid expansion. That assessment good position to win the March 25 City came partially as an outgrowth of the Commission election runoff against chali Visions 2000 policy statement issued in longer David Coffey. outcome of this election, former MayorJanuary by a local group of more than 100 Of the seven incumbent city commisCommissioner and UF Professor Courtland lay growth planners. sioners who have run for re-election in the Collier said. The statement said developers and entrepast 10 years, five have kept their seats. "The (candidate) with the best organizapreneurs who want to move to Gainesville Last year, incumbent Jean Chalmers tion will win," said Collier, who predicted see the city leaders as "anti-growth." Cofdefeated Coffey. In 1984, incumbent W.E. the race would come down to a runoff. "It fey and Junior used that statement as a "Mac" McEachern beat attorney Don Reid. won't necessarily be the one with the best weapon against Gordon during the And going back to 1982, Commissioner ads or the most money." campaign. Courtland Collier defeated Gordon. Coffey spent $5,232 -or $1.97 per vote But Collier doesn't see it as that big a Gordon and Gary Junior each spent .in the campaign. Gordon doled out factor. more than $11,000 on this year's campaign. $13,886 this campaign, which translates to "The issue is more like how do you manBut money won't be the big factor in the $3.43 for each vote. Junior forked out age growth" than whether the city is made runoff up of "growth" versus "no-growth" factions, Collier said. Gordon took 44.3 percent of the 9,138 ballots cast. Coffey received 2,654 votes, or 29 percent, in Tuesday's election. Junior won 2,385 votes for 26.1 percent of the total. Gordon said he wants to continue projects -such as the Greenbelt Task Force, which is supposed to come up with strategies to maintain Gainesville's natural surroundings and prevent developers from haphazardly building shopping centers and neighborhoods around the city. Coffey has proposed splitting the city Plan Board, on which he used to serve. He thinks one panel should review site plans to determine their impact on existing neighborhoods. The other group would spend its time determining how land should be zoned. Election donations reported Editor's note: Due to space limvotes 'itations,some of Monday's contribution story had to be edited. The contribution information will now apear in its entirety. 11kI IIfla n aa UmUEIM I I -----------------

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F No pass, no play UF's written "Athletic Philosophy and Institutional Purpose:" "Academic success for the individual studentathlete must be given top priority .It is also necessary that athletes be recruited whose character, background and/or previous academic attainment would predict likely success as a student (emphasis theirs) at the University of Florida." -Self Study of Intercollegiate Athletics; The University of Florida; March, 1985. Reality: 0 UF gave a $2,017 scholarship to a football player in 1985 who received a Scholastic Aptitude Test score of between 450 and 499, about 50 points more than a first grader could earn by scratching his name on the test. SAT scores range from 400 to 1600. 0 Only four of 32 Gator basketball players receiving scholarships in years from 1978 to 1982 have received degrees. The graduation rate for all students is about 70 percent. 0 UF football players were recruited with a 2.2 high school grade point average. Women's basketball players had the lowest average GPA, 2.12. Women gymnasts and swimmers had a 2.8 average GPA, the highest of UFs athletic recruits. All the scores were well below the campuswide 3.4 average CPA for entering freshmen. UF athletic officials should be praised for at least stating that they place academics before athletics and for conducting the honest self appraisal requested by State University System policy-makers, the Board of Regents. Florida State University -which had some equally alarming statistics -did not conduct nearly as complete an evaluation. But we believe the praise should stop there. There has obviously been a large gap between rhetoric and action. A gap that must be filled. And a gap that can be filled. Not all of the blame for recruiting athletes with poor academic qualifications lies with universities. As UF President Marshall Criser told the St. Petersburg Times, "We can only deal with the product that comes to our doorstep." The gap can be filled by initiating the "No Pass, No Play" legislation currently being considered by the Florida Legislature. Patterned after a controversial Texas law, Florida's would require students who cannot pass or complete any academic course during a semester and who earn less than a 1.5 overall GPA, be ineligible for extracurricular activities the following semester. Currently, Florida students must maintain a minim um 1.5 CPA on a four-point scale and must pass five subjects in a semester to maintain their eligibility. The author of the bill, Rep. Larry Hawkins, D-Perrine, said the standards need beefing up because they allow athletes and others to load up on crib courses while flunking core subjects such as English, math and science. Another reason, as two UF stats show, is that they're just not working. It seems the best way to motivate young athletes is by letting them know early where their priorities must be. In Los Angeles, for example, where a similar rule is in effect, the percentage of ineligible high schoolers fell from nearly 21 percent in fall 1984 to 16 percent in spring 1985. In Seattle, where nine football players were sidelined in 1984 for poor academic performance, five earned C averages by spring and four returned with B s. UF and FSU -the state's two public university sports powerhouses -should become the Florida 'No Pass, No Play" law's cheerleaders. The UF self-study group's recommendation to solve the problem -extending scholarships an extra year to give students extra time to graduate -doesn't attack the problem at its roots. Follow up the rhetoric with some action. It's a winning play. aligiiI'r Editor Managing Editor SALLIE HUGHES MARK SOUTHGATE Opinions Editor BONNIE GLAZER Letters Policy Letters to the editor should not exceed 200 words (about one 8-by-10 age). They must be typed, double spaced and sigrod They must include atypedname, address and telephone number Names will be withheld of writers show just cause if you have questions contact opinions editor, at 376-4458. -AW L SUPPORT c N C E R T Deans to infor students on 80-hour rule Okay, you've been at the University of Florida for 21/s years and you have never heard of the 80-hour rule. Either you have been caught up with the hassles of everything else or you have happily repressed this all too often neglected rule. The rule states that any student who has not been accepted into an upper-division college after attempting 80 hours of course work can no longer be enrolled in the university. A distinction must be made between hours attempted and hours completed, as it has been a point of much confusion. Hours attempted include hours in which a student received a failing grade of either "E" or "U" as well as all hours of passed course work. Therefore, a student who may have earned less than 80 hours may be ineligible for registration because he has carried (attempted) over 80 hours. AP credit as well as CLEP is included. There are many reasons why a student might not be in a college after having attempted 80 hours. Some students don't have the grade point average needed to get into the college they want. Others lack the prerequisites to get into a particular college, and some just have not made a decision yet. Whatever the reason, these students find themselves unable to register and continue at the university. Most of the problems with the 80-hour rule arise in the case of transfer students and students trying to get into the College of Business Administration, which has a high GPA requirement and many prerequisites. Transfer students are informed of the 80-hour rule before coming to the university in a letter sent to them by the university. The rule is also explained at transfer student orientation and in the university catalog; however, for whatever reason, many come to UF unaware of the 80-hour rule. These students often have over 64 hours, but still haven't taken either the general education or prerequisite courses they need to get into an upper-division college. One example would be a transfer student interested in the letters Trend not obvious in suppressive regimes Editor: In response to your March 6 editorial "See a trend?," unfortunately, I have to say, "No, I don't." While the recent return to democracy in Haiti and the Philippines does give cause of optimism, you have neglected to mention the type of dictatorships in both these countries. The trend towards greater freedom that you see might indeed occur in nations with non-communist dictatorships. The opposite trend can be seen is countries that have recently been taken over by communist regimes. What about Nicaragua, Angola, Cambodia, Afghanistan, Poland and the numerous other nations which have been subjected to communist slavery for decades? With the exception of Grenada, no country has returned from the nightmare of communism in recent years. Yet it is the continuously spreading totalitarianism of communist regimes, that is the biggest threat to democracy today. If you are really serious about the promotion of democracy and freedom, there is a golden opportunity right now to turn this support into action. The Nicaraguan freedom fighters are in great need of our support in their struggle for a free and democratic Nicaragua. In every respect, the Sandinistas fit the, description of a total liberal Democrats in posing President Rea mination to suppo Nicaragua. The problem in o munist regimes is t society is too tight t revolts like the one in Haiti. The enthusi fighters everywhere f( enough to oppose th military hardware f Havana. They need oi If you want to sup democracy, call your in support of the Ni fighters. Gainesviler new music Editor: This letter is proposed'new music' University of Florid about time! I for numerous changes in1 scene since arrivingI thing is obvious to mr been dead for the1 Gainesville. The re economics. The incre at most of the local b has been the biggest, decline, and I think it would welcome the r and thanks to clubs li America, this h materializing. -And as a you coping College of Business Administration. Such a student often lacks the two calculus courses required for business among their prerequisites. Since these two courses cannot be taken simultaneously, the student is automatically behind before even reaching the university. Students need to be more aware of the 80-hour rule. Many students claim to have received poor academic advisement, which made their problem worse. Transfer students should be advised before coming to UF. Junior colleges throughout the state, as well as UF, should make sure these students know about the rule and how it affects them -before the damage is done. Once students are aware of the rule, they can then begin to organize their schedules accordingly. To help alleviate any confusion, the peer counselors are sponsoring an 80-hour rule information session. This session will focus on the problems of students approaching 80 hours and in particular, transfer students and potential business majors having trouble with the rule. Associate Dean Wayne Losano of the Liberal Arts and Sciences and Associate Dean Wanda Denny of the business college will be speaking and everyone with questions is encouraged to attend. The session will be held on Thursday, March 13, in Little 109 from 4-5:30. Michelle D. Adelman is a staff member at the UF Counseling Center. itarian regime. Yet Congress are opagan in his deterrt democracy in verthrowinar cgrew gracefully younger with age once said, "long live rock, I need it every day." Me tooll Scott Allen 3BR/UF hat their grip on lininformed student to permit popular the Philippines or proves writerS point asm of freedom or their ideals is not Editor: The Feb. 12 Alligator ran an e constant flow of opinion column I wrote condemning the rom Moscow and news media for not informing the ur help. American public of the U.S. directed air port freedom and war in El Salvador. A week later Paul congressman today Thomas wrote a letter to the editor caraguan freedom calling my allegations of the bombing "sensationalistic journalism" and "science fiction." Andrea, Nechyba I respect Mr. Thomas' critical reading GuineavItle of my column, but I also have confidence ned in my sources, and urge Mr. Thomas and other skeptics to go to the library and do some reading. The most coverage I have station found appeared in The Nation (June 1, 1985, p.662), The Christian Science in response to the Monitor (April 27, 1984, p.1; Sept 12, radio station at the 1984, p.1), The New York Times (Sept. a, and I think it's 12, 1984, pp.A9, A10; July 18, 1985, one have seen p.Al) and The Washington Post (July Gainesville's music 19, 1985, p.A27). For an account from here in 1982. One an earlier phase of the war, read Rep. ie -live music has James Oberstar's testimony to Congress last two years in Congressional Record, (May 26, 1983, .ason is clear -pp.H3419-H3425). ase of canned music The air war in El Salvador is reality. ars and night clubs Reports of it have appeared, but obcause of live music's viously not enough to bring the situation stinks!I I definitely to many people's attention. Mr. Thomas turn of live music, proves the point: He is a second-year law ike the Vatican and student who is ignorant of his governiope is finally ment's actions in Central America. ung punk who 7LS I --------------.i. 6. alligator, wednesday march 12, 1986 options m d i

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--------mm --mm -m Buy1, Get I freeE" | Purchase the first tanning session and get the second absolutely FREE. Aitie $f'ei. t.e., 371-"55 (sew customers only) mm1m mmmumlerPla mmexp39/ -HAM ON WRY The unflappable W.C. Fields -featured in some of his most infamous roles. Don't miss the bombastic boozer or the never-before-seen footage of him in rare form. TV WORTH WATCHING 9 : 0 0 T 0 N I G H T Permanently H Restaurant 1. Bring in any coupo Menu items and Gra the face value for it. 2. Any other coupon (expired included). Granny can keep he doesn'tspend thousa coupon books. Don't Just because you've g EAT AT GRANNY'S -. 136 NW 13th St. 374-8144 alligator, wednesday march 12, 1986, 7 Bicycles clutter walkway Business college wants bike racks By SHARON KENNEDY Alligator Writer Business students still are tripping over bikes parked on the sidewalks and locked to garbage cans in front of Matherly Hall, and it may take a while before the situation changes, officials said. Scott Distasio, president of the business administration student council, said he has been working since last fall to get bike racks in the business area but has only seen his proposal volleyed between UF administration, Student Traffic Court and Student Government. The business college area, which includes Bryan Hall, Matherly Hall and the new Business Administration Building, is offically off limits to bicycles but on any given day is littered with dozens of bicycles and bicyclists in the central plaza. "There's no reason bike racks couldn't be installed by next fall but I've been told ASFAC doesn't want to fund any more capital improvements," Distasio said. ASFAC is the nine-member student committee that annually oversees a $4 million budget made up of students' activity and service fees. Distasio has gotten a guarantee from newly elected Student Traffic Court Justice Loreen Tressler to pay for one of five bike rack projects. MICHAEL WILSON/ALUGATOR The area around the business buildings is overrun with bikes. The business administration student council is working to get bike racks to ease the problem. Tressler said Student Traffic Court will give $7,087 to pay for a concrete planter bike rack like those near Library East. But Distasio said one bike rack will not even make a dent in the problem and has sought out administration and the Activity and Service Fee Advisory Committee (ASFAC) to meet the other $19,000 needed. ASFAC Coordinator Tad Delegal said he thought bike racks are something Student Traffic Court should pay for. "We're going to bring it up at Thursday's ASFAC meeting," Delegal said. "But the problem is, we've already spent a lot of money on capital improvements projects." However Distasio said his proposal was submitted before all the others that were funded. ASFAC tabledthebill until after the election of the new traffic court justice. The business college will hold off awarding any money to the project until outgoing Dean Robert Lanzillotti's replacement arrives, assistant Dean Wanda Denny said. Bikes were regularly impounded by university police last semester, Denny said, which cut down on the number of bikes in the business administration plaza. "But this year is the worst," Denny said. "Every time the parking problem gets bad, the bike problem gets bad." Woman hospitalized after pileup A four-car pile up left a Quincy woman in stable condition Tuesday at Shands Hospital, after she was thrown from the car she was driving, the Florida Highway Patrol reported. There were no other serious injuries reported in the accident, FHP officers said. Shortly after 2 p.m. Monday, Felischa Redding of Quincy was driving a 1980 Pontiac south along Southwest 34th Street when a Gainesville man, driving a 1978 Chevrolet, attempted to make a left hand turn onto 34th Street from Northwest 67th Place, reports show. August Argehio, 40, of 39-141 NW 39th Ave., struck the left rear of Redding's car, knocking her Pontiac across the center line where she slid under the. honoring Any Coupons ns for comparable nny will give you is are worth .50C Wpices down cause aMe nds of dollar on thosefancy eat at a place you don't like lot a coupon. 5 WHERE THE CHOICE YOURS! NOW ACROSS FROM KMART 101 N.W. 23rd Ave. rearaxlesof aFreightliner tractor-trailer, driven by a St. Mary, Florida man, witnesses told officers. Redding was ejected from her car and landed on the east side of 34th Street. The right side of the trailer Redding's car slid under then struck the left side of a Dodge truck hauling a flat bed trailer, reports said. The truck was driven by Bruce Strickland of 124 SE 39th St. His passenger, Wilton Cobb, 49, of Lake City, sustained minor injuries. Redding's Pontiac was declared a total loss. Argenio, whose Chevrolet sustained $300 in damage, was charged with violating the right of way, FHP reported. No further charges are expected, a patrol officer said Tuesday. -NORMA WAGNER ROCK 104 WELCOMES 00, 60 0' 10 0lop 8pm AprIl13,1986 O'Connell Center Limited Seating Available All Seats Reserved On Sale at all Select-A-SeatOutlets_ a Is ki. 14

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8, alligator, wednesday march 12, 1986 W. b4r "Aife rated CDrine0anPa"e Studen.s.h.ppy.d.rms see need for ii By DEBBIE SALAMONE Alligator Staff Writer Dormitory (dor'me-tor-e). pl. -ies -abuilding with mantrroomsthat provide sleeping andliving accommodations for a number of people, as at a college. According to the fall results of its residence halt survey, UF's Division of Housing has discovered that students don't know the definition of a dormitory. Students say they like living there because they feel like part of the UF community, but they can't study there. About 4,800 of the division's more than 6,000 residents answered the biennial questionnaire, which they say reflects well on the residence halls. "When comparing the number of positive responses to those that were marked negative, it seems that our program appears to be on the right track," said James Grimm, housing director. More than 80 percent of the survey participants rated as satisfactory their relationships with resident assistants and roommates and the enforcement of dorm rules. Almost half of those same students said they had an opportunity to study in their room, while 32 percent rated floor noise as unacceptable. "There's no studying in the evening or on weekends," said Liz Efstathion, a building construction major who has lived in Hume Hall since August 1985. "Beginning about Thursday night, you can't study." Efstathion blamed noise for the lack of studying RLL NEW. $ It C WEDNESDRY Every Wednesday at Pizza Pronto get a large for the price of a small. (including Items) No Coupon necessary!!! Just ask order taker, and the deal is yours. mprovement opportunities. "The walls are paper-thin," she said. "You can hear what people are saying." But since the housing division began its biennial survey about seven years ago, Grimm said students have complained less about noise. However, Grimm said he wants to ask more questions in his next survey about topics students rated as unsatisfactory. Fifty percent of the respondents rated their dorm's food quality as poor, 58 percent said they had little interaction with faculty inside their dorms and 33 percent complained that unity within their dorms was poor. Jeff Dean, a freshman journalism major who has lived in Fletcher Hall since August 1985, said his sixperson suite separates him from other dorm rooms. "We're segregated," he said. "It's hard to meet people down the hall." But about 80 percent of the survey participants said they had an opportunity to get involved in hall social activities, and a majority said they were satisfied with dorm maintenance, cleanliness and security. Living in a dorm "has been a learning experience," Efstathion said. "It's one of the best ways to initiate yourself into the real world." Grimm said he took the survey to get a "better assessment" of dorm life. "We felt it was part of our responsibility to make those assessments," he said. Amanda Martin, a freshman in journalism living in East Hall, said the survey "was a good indicator" of dorm conditions. "If they use it, it'll be helpful." Campus & NW Area 373-3303 IF YOU HAVE THE RIGHT STUFF, THE U LMAF1G A M E IS FOR YOU. MAN AGAINST MAN -TEAM AGAINST TEAM Involves Strategy Skill Teamwork 0 Outdoor Fun Competition Excitement Quality Guns Provide Adult Realism "THE ULTIMATE ADVERSARY PROVIDES THE ULTIMATE GAME" 373-4518 495-235 The Ultimate Game of Gainesville, Inc. UIF VS. Southern Miss Thursday 7:30 p.m. O'Connell Center Tickets are $ and $6 at the Gator Ticket Office $4 student tickets have been reduced to $3 WIN A TRIP TO NEW YORK To see the Gators take on Rutgers in football next fall. Two people will win an all expense paid trip for two. DRAWING AT HALF TIME ITA FARTXT C II jfteE p. GALLt & BAt jS? Ann ivers ar] og. GT'earcter LIVE NAGP IP E,5i 35 EAESC0E cr e '43530 Sw -cbepad-3f:-;01 SW Area 20th & Tower Rd. 377-3337 ..............................

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alligator, wednesday march.12, 1986, 9 UF chemical search continues By NORMA WAGNER "Somebody stockpiled that stuff and just forgot Alligator Staff Writer about it," he said. It's been almost a month since 11 canisters of exploUF officials still don't know why the 5-pound canissive ether were found in an underground storage terms were kept in a storage bunker on the south side of odern A9.e Tobacco 2 bunker at UF. Since then, UF police and environmenNewell Hall or what the ether was used for. But when iefn S b ac o 4 tal health and safety workers have been keeping an eye the Gainesville Fire Department was made aware of DOP out for other campus "hideaway spots" housing danthe ether, they responded with blaring sirens and tem92 1 W. University gerous chemicals. porarily evacuated six buildings. *r"When the police lock up (campus buildings) at Properzio's 27-member safety staff, which runs 338-0746 e-night, we're going to be looking for those areas where campus pest control operations, fire equipment checks, ~ chemicals might be stored and forgotten," UF police lab and biological safety inspections as well as radiaCapt. Everett Stevens said. tion control and industrial safety checks, are instructed Wdad S leCInenS He said officers on campus night patrol also will to report back on suspicious or unaccounted for A u-95t *e nudatS watch for outside storage facilities such as the small, chemicals. Roiiin. P 2 for 956 underground bunker where the ether was kept. "We collect on a routine basis these kinds of mate"We're going to keep an eye out, but it's really the rials all the time," Properzio said. EHy sProfessors dealing with such hazardous materials as n & Lowest Prices Environmental Health and Safety Division's responsiehraeisrce obysalqatte n ips L~amL s ability to capture these chemicals," Stevens said. ether are instructed to buy small quantities and dispose north Florida Bill Properzio, UF's environmental safety director, of them within a year, he said. Other dangerous chemiOpen 10-10 Mon-Sat. said his department keeps a tight rein on the hazardous cals housed on campus are on record, and the safety 10Sn. materials used on campus. He said the 10-year-old department's collection program removes those from 12-7?Sether canisters found Feb. 13 were a "unique campus. situation." "It's very controlled," he said. smith will ruin forr Senta Health center off icic By JUDY OWENS Alligator Writer A member of the Miller Health Center Board of Overseers has announced her candidacy for the Florida Senate, promising to help Gainesville control its growth through its citizens instead of big government. Jo Ann D. Smith is the third candidate to vie for the senatorial seat, currently occupied by Sen. George Kirkpatrick, D-Gainesville, who is up for re-election. Smith, a member of the 28-memher board charged with keeping the health center financially and acaPromises, promises: Democratic guber Joan Wollin will speak at the College ing tonight at 6:30 in Reitz Union Ro Sales: The American Marketing Asso evening at 7:15 in Bryan Hall RoomI Sails: The UF Sail Club meets tonight .Room 349 to discuss the upcomingC ..ta what's hapi ~~ V CEKALAHE Contra Aid: Paul Doughty of the U Anthropology will discuss "Nicaragu tonight at 7 at the College of LawI Room 136. Space Out: There will be a video presi and meditation instruction tonight at THE HOLIEST OF CITIES i=tion Center, 1000 SW Ninth St., at Wildlife: The Student African Studies) at 4 p.m. in Grinter Hall Room 427 ft Explore with NatIonal Geographic the city where Jews, t"nnKWildlifeEnya by M. Ki Christians and Muslims live as neighbors -historic Jerusalem. R student colonAa The walls of this ancient city surround a rich texture of cultures Racism meets tonightoalt at the i and monuments to religious beliefs. Come Culture, 1510 W. University Ave. to inside the walls for a close-up look Santa Fe Community College. Food For Thought: The Center for Aft ents a lecture by K.F. Nwanze, "Inci duction in the West African Sahel TV W T WATCHrW r Approach" today at 3 p.m. in Mc( TV WYKIN WATCHING W TjE 1031. Muiilgual Guitarist David Ileoza, anI guitar player performs tonight in the U rium at 7:30. Mr. Broza will perform in and Hebrew. al pledges to curb big business control demically afloat, would not elabocounty. rate on specific plans for Gainesville Another Gainesville resident, if she wins the Senate seat. Margaret C. Eppes, is also on the "The purpose of (a press conferSecretary ofState's list of District 6 ence) Monday was only an ancandidates but says she has not nouncement," she said. "We will decided if she still will run for the get more specific further on in our position. A Gainesville resident for campaign." 17 years, Eppes sells real estate and Smith said Gainesville has untapmakes educational films for buildped resources in agricultural and ing construction. business areas. Such resources are ithnsin. available through the Gainesville Smith said, "As a lifelong citizen community and the university, she of this area, I believe I understand said. many of its needs, problems and In her first senatorial bid, Smith opportunities that exist in each of wants to represent District 6, which the areas made up of specific comincludes Lafayette, Dixie, Putnam, munities." Levy, Gilchrist and part of Marion Elections are November. atrial candidate Taxed? Help is here Democrats' meetom 347. By DINA M. COBB iation meets this Alligator Writer 20. Those who dread the April 15 deadline for income t 7 in Reitz Union tax returns need agonize no longer-help is here. learwater RegatVolunteer Income Tax Assistance, a service provided by the Internal Revenue Service, provides free assistancewith tax returnsuntil April 15. VITA volunteers will be at the downtown branch of Santa Fe Regional Library and at the Oaks Mall. Accounting School Chairman Hadley P. Schaefer said some VITA volunteers include UF accounting students, who were tested to determine their qualifications. Department of Both return forms and instruction booklets can be and Contra Aid" found at UF's Library East and Library West. They are ruton-Geer Hall available also at City Hall, Alachua County Administration Building and Santa Fe Community College station, chanting Library. he Siddha MediMany students have their tax returns completed by 7:45. professional tax assistants, said Sybil Benefield, man%ssociation meets ager of H & R Block's Sears office. Though the forms r a slide presentaare only one or two pages-without the papers needed naird, a graduate to file for various deductions-many people don't know how to complete them, she said. statute of Black "It's surprising that you can have a college graduate plan for a rally at who can't fill out the form," Benefield said. "They just don't understand it." can Studies presThe minimum cost for a prepared tax return is about can tudes pes$14, Benefield said. easing Food ProHours for VITA services at the Oaks Mall are SunThe ICRISAT arty Hall Room days, 12 noon to 5 p.m.; Mondays, 10 a.m.41 p.m. .artyHallRoom and 6 p.m. -9 p.m.; Tuesdays, 12 noon -4p.m. and sraelisingernds6 p.m. -9 p.m.; Fridays, 6:30 p.m. -8:30 p.m. and nIsreisingeado Saturdays, 10 a.m. -4 p.m. Spanish, English At Santa Fe Regional Library, VITA's hours are Sp.m.5 p.m. on Sundays and 6:30 p.m. -8:30 p.m. on Mondays. THURSDAY Thurs. March 13, lot 11:30 am -2:00 pm at M ARCH 13 the UF Plaza of the Americas. At Plaza of -, As part of the the Americas 10th Annual Rain locationIsrael Cultural Univ. Memorial Festival Auditorium FOR MORE INTERNATIONAL L. PTAgS AM .LAG INOAND STUOY BANNERS ISRAELI AiD IORE OPPORTUNITIES POsTERS CALL HITsIFLAEL ISRAELI VARIOUS HILLEL MICKEY sHU UEOyER 372-2900 rSMEs Co-sponsored by Israel Prograon Center Funded by SG "Class-A-Giveaway" CouponI Name Address Social Security Number Either take this form or mail to: Independent Florida Alligator 1105 W. University Avenue P.O. Box 14257 Gmnsv mmF32I J. L-MMMMaMMMM )c I at JF a d Bi ;e A or in r 1: Ci 8:00 TONIGHT

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R 029618. Albert Einstein: RELATIVITY. Straightforward layman's explanation-written by Einstein himselfof the epoch-making theory that ushered in the atomic age New, complete ed. Only $3.98 436191. MOTHER GOOSE: THE ORIGINAL VOLLAND EDITION. The classic Volland edition of Mother Goose makes a beautiful addition to any home library. Features more than 100 traditional rhymes, each accompanied by a full-page, full color illus. by Frederick Richardson. Only $5.98 EGL MAR !& 12 t4THR MAR I, 9: U ( IA ""won

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alligator. wednesday march 12. 1986. 11 .* ---A *y *s. --. ----"'; ? -E e '---*r *r -f~t.-. ,y -----r.4 ., -v -.g .-. /1. -1,% -{.'e -;.46: t'M. INS -2 CH H TH ouGH RCLI TH J

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12,.alligator, wednesday march 12, 1986 NCAA from page 20 0UN. For 1986, the word is parity. Quite a few outstanding teams are among the final 64, and the top seeds from each region Kentucky (29-3), St. Johns (30-4), Duke (32-2) and Kansas (31-3) are legitimate favorites. But the mammoth teams, those with Goliaths like Patrick Ewing and Akeem Olajuwon, are noticeably absent. No one's a shoo-in to make it to the Final Four and with that in mind, let's take a look at a few dark horses. Jacksonville (19-9): UF's neighbors ended their season with a championship victory against Alabama-Birmingham in the Sun Belt Conference Tournament. Jacksonville native Otis Smith leads the Dolphins in scoring (15.4) and rebounding (8). But the key for JU could be Ronnie Murphy, one of the premier oneon-one players in the nation. Murphy can shake and bake with the best of them. He's an oversized Pearl Washington. Don't underestimate the strength of the Sun Belt, which placed four teams in the NCAAs. Navy (27-4): Center David Robinson is one of the nation's top scorers (22.1) and rebounders (13.2). This is the same team that destroyed Louisiana State in the first round of the tournament last year before losing to Maryland in a close game. The Midshipmen have experience and chemistry. Villanova (22-13): Last year's long-shot winner is an even longer one this season. The Wildcats have surged since the insertion of freshman point guard Kenny Wilson into the starting lineup. The Wildcats have nothing to lose, so why not make it two in a row? As usual, a very smart team. Maryland (18-13): Beat North Carolina twice, lost to Georgia Tech in the final seconds of the Atlantic Coast Conference Tournament. Played one of the toughest schedules in the nation. Forward Len Bias saves his best performances for pressure situations. It's more than a bit unfair, the way the NCAA selection committee doled out homecourt advantages to certain teams in the tournament. Like Syracuse, which opens against Brown in the Carrier Dome and plays there again if it wins. Louisiana State plays Purdue in Baton Rouge. North Carolina must take on Utah in Ogden. The final two rounds of the Southeast Regional are played in the Omni in Atlanta -Georgia Tech's homecourt. Guess who's playing in that region? Yep, Georgia Tech. Of course, money talks. And it speaks loudly here. Tournament sites with home teams capture bigger revenues at the gate. But the injustice here runs especially deep considering that the basketball finals are a single elimination affair -one loss and you are gone. 0U.0 Last year, Mike Moses and Rob Harden went. This year, David Visscher. These are former Gator guards who played under Norm Sloan and then transferred from UF. Moses went from the Gators to St. John's, Harden from the Gators to Nevada-Reno. Both made It to the NCAA tourney last year with their respective second teams. This year, Visscher has made it with Brown, winner of the Ivy League Conference. 1R E A new recruiting pitch for ISRAE Gator basketball could go something like this: Play atit UF 7:30 for a year or two and make it to the NCAAs -at another school. U U-. 0 E 0 Thursday brings the ultimate fix for college basketball junkies, cable-TV permitting. ESPN A begins covering the tournament Re at noon, then goes virtually nonstop into the weekend. Past midnight, West Coast games and tape-delay contests will be shown. And the ultimate college hoops junkie -Dick Vitale, who commentates with a boundless enthusiasm for the game -will oversee all the action. Forego S studies and sleep for the weekend, and you can stay on top of most of the action. on Ar ~UL~ -. DAVID BRC Kt LI SINGER AND 4 WEDNESDAY,] NIVERSITY AUDIT FREE nnual Israel Culture Ception at Hillel aft )ZA GUITARIST MARCH 12 EORIUM al Festival ter Concert Ca-spannared by Jewish Student Union, Bnai'lirith Hillel Foundations; SG AVE 30 ="50% t Supplies at Being a blood donor gives you something to smile about! _&_ WIN TICKETS TO SEE THE FIRM THIS WEEK FROM WATCH FOR DETAILS ****0& *****17 4* Men ofUF * Calendar Today atG.P.A. 2P**$$$$$$$ -o$**** Village Park French Quar SPECIAL SUMMIT RATES as low as $200/mon (Furn.) 3 Pools Located Close to Campu 1001-999 S.W. 16th Ave weekdays 9-4:30 378-3771 regional blood center, inc. 1221 N.W. 13th Strat, Gainesville, Fl 377-6905 F rAT Y FREEPERS9N READINGS FROM SATIRICAL CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE ter ER March 12, 1986 Lounge 123 7:30 pm CJ Wne th FREE! Reitanion Sponred by te J. Wayne h~Rit Unizos" C-sponsoredbyNe. w. s at .ndSt-.ntGov. nmnt nue ..V,. Artista Powdered Tempera 1 can 30% off 6 or more 40% off Crayola Crayons 1 Box 25% off 12 or more 40% off Liquitex Acrylic Paints 1 tube 40% off 10 or more 50% off Selected Grumbacher Pads 70% off very limited supply Clip & Save until 3/22/86 Aligator Grumbacher Coupon Selected Grumbacher pads 50% off Oil & water color tubes + craft paints 40% off Any Grumbacher Brush $6.00 or more 50% off others 40% off Acrylic Medium Gloss or Matte Polymer Buy 140% off 6 or more 50% off Easels 30% off Pallete or Painting Knives 40% off Alligator Clip & Save until 3/22/86 ----------~--Arches WaterColor Blocks 50% off Strathmore Pads Buy 1 25% 6 or more 40% off Construction Paper 9 x 12 or 12 x 18 20% Off Speedball linoleum blocks + Ink + Silk Screen Inks 25% off Alligator Clp & Save until 3/22/O Cresent Matt Boards 20% off Nielson Frame Kits 40% off Pre cut Matts Buy 1 40% off 6 or more 50% off Framed Prints 2S% off Fascia Picture Frames 40% off Selected Portrait Frames 50% off All others 25% off AIlgator Cip & Save until 3/22/86 Downton e pn 9-4Men-Sat Branchstors op.94Msn.FK,94 StI Downtown, Butler Plaza Market Place, Westgote & Ocala UJQG Student Government is now accepting applications o Cabinet Directors and Staff For 1986-87 9 Supervisor of Elections: Qualifications: 1) Must have served on elections Comission; or 2) served as an Assistant Supervisor. Apply: Rm 305 JWRU Deadline: Friday, March 21 BASH RIPROCKS 1222 W. University 372-0044 OPEN 1:00 AM on St. Patrick's Day 450 Green Beer til 10:00 am 100 Green Beer 10 am to 12 noon 4Plus more dazzling drink specials all day 4. .-. sa f 00090*0*60A6 01 | I | | | | i El I Sense Items'stoced'D"wnto"n"'nl w w I j | I I | | I | | I i i

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Ta lionize Your Sports Car's Performance *Engne balancing and blue prnting *Specialzed Cylinder Headwark eCustom suspension and styling kits eComplete fabrication and machine work 378-9086 Tallon Autosports 436S.W.35i te. We feature Chevrolet Chevette Weekend Problem Solver You pay for gas and return car to% renting location. Rate applies to car shown or similar size car, is non1 discountable and subject to change without notice. Specific cars subject to PE DAY availability. Z-28s, Cadillacs, Caprices, Noon Thursday to Chevy nine passenger wagons, and GM 6:00 pm Monday 12 passenger Vans available at 2 Day Minimum Rent everyday discount rates. 150 FlU 15t p.'4. 6xr 3 da5y N 24orw f National Car Rental You Deserve National Attention. CALL NOW FOR RESERVATION! I 377-700 GAINESVILLE REGIONAL AIRPORT 3400 NE 39th AVE. at li. I I Salukis no match for UF netters By LAWRENCE HOLLYFIELD Alligator Writer A saluki is an Egyptian dog. The Southern Illinois Salukis visited UF on Monday for a men's tennis match. The Gators quickly established themselves as the master. Even with No. 2 singles player Bo Johnson, No. 3 singles Art Heller and the No. 1 doubles tandem of Heller and Shawn Taylor enjoying a day off, the UF tennisteam whipped the visitors 8-1. Southern Illinois was in trouble from the beginning. Its No. 1 player, the defending Missouri Valley Conference Champion in singles, was thrashed by Taylor. The Gators' No. 1 player defeated Per Wadmark 6-0, 6-0 in only 38 minutes. Taylor lost only 12 points in the match. UF's Bob Cartwright defeated Chris Visconti in straight sets, 6-3, 64. He finished strongly to close both sets. Each was tied at 3-3 before Cartwright made a run. In No.3 singles. UF's Richard Holt defeated Jairo Aldana in the longest match of the day, 7-6 (7-3), 6-7 (119), 6-2. Aldana staged a comeback in the second set to win. He was down 4-2 in games and 6-3 in the tiebreaker. He ran off four straight points to avoid the loss, but didn't have enough left to capture the match. "Richard wore his opponent down mentally," UF head coach Steve Beeland said. "Aldana is hitting the ball as well, he's just not winning the points." In No.4 singles, Lars Nilsson mm. mm.**m.m.mua pThe French Addiction -5 presents:* U U A Vintage Clothing sale Event March 10-19 807 W.Univ. Ave. redeem coupon for 10% off wE.o ..ENNON=NE = .f.MM -U defeated UF's Doug Dace in three sets, 3-6, 6-4, 6-3. Dace, who was 15-10 in No. 3 singles last year, is struggling this year. Mike Cooper's 6-0, 6-2 victory against Juan Martinez in No. 5 singles was similar to the No. 1 match. Cooper lost just 17 points during the 45 minutes of play. Scott Mager, the Gators' No. 6 seed, defeated Fabiano Ramos in three sets. Mager lost the first set 63. He lost only three games the rest of the way, winning 6-4, 6-1. UF swept the doubles matches, with Cartwright, Cooper and Mager claiming victories. The next match for the men is against Mississippi State at home today. We ve Got MONEY You've Got ALBUM S-Ii Let's Trade! Ilyde & Zeke Veccrds SVidec 10C2 W. Univ. Ave. The Yankees are coming! Th.ake Don Mattingly First Bose N.Y. Yankees vos. Florida Gators Saturday March 15 2:30pm Perry Field Tckets $6 on sale Gator Ticket Offjce sponsored by TV 20 & Mars Distributing Co Do you think Student Gov spend $14,000 to keep the St Center and Florida Pool open Call Wednesday F l FLORIDA KARATE CENTER Call: 308 West 375-8144 University Ave. "celebrating 10 ears of a Commitment to Excellence!" GATORS ARE #1 WITH US! DON'T STAND IN LINE! DON'T WAIT TO BE SEEN! DON'T WASTE MONEY! Red Hok" DON'T STAND FOR INFERIOR CARE! DON'T WAIT UNTIL MONDAY! S.R.26Newberry R& * ONk.MO K6 :1601 SAV. 2nd Mve. r.EMi TeWegr Sc6c1378-4357 Ha"*m.0Oaks4 IN MARCH 197 EMERGENCY MEDICAL CENTER 6121 N.W F tPlace INIA.A.-I11:00 P.M%. ernment should ephen C. O'Connell for recreational use? after 8 p.m. esday Nite Spe. Free 1 Opc 'o' chicken wings with every pitcher of beer on Wednesday. 376-4511 The Alligator's Pulseline Use it. This week's question alligator, wednesday march 12, 1986, 13 I I I I I

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14, alligator, wednesday march 12, 1986 aligator lassifleds w FOR RENT: FURNISHED Sothside Apartments 1 bedroom furnished doy-meek-month or annual lease. $235 mo., $200 sec-rly. 1406 SW 18 Place. 378-8547. 313-15-1 Luxury this summer tis yus at Brandywne foer only $130 + 1/4 it. Call 373-8329. Aerobics,lcu-, weghtroom & lots more. Htry 3-12 51 $120/mo Treehose Village, w/d,micro., utense/s,,pool, bus to UF.Leaving town, for ret A S.A.P.t!! Please coil 377-8416. 3-12-5-1 APPLY NOW FOR FALL ** *BRANDYWINE* * 2811 SWArche Rd 375-1111 3-31-32 1 2 Blks UF includes utilities, phone, use of microwave & refrig offstreet parking $155 mo & sec. Hall's Rooming House 1840 NW. 2nd Ave. 373-0354 3-14-5-1 JUST OPENED Ltrg. lbdrm, 10 misemal to com pus, off Steet prkig, ecosed poio $215/mon. 1624 N.W. 4th Ave. 378-7056 3-134-1 SUBLET MAY-AUGUST Southfork Oaks Furnished washer and Dryer $130.00 mo. plus 1/3 until call Mike ot 335-0598 3-19-5-1 Home! Shore first floor of large home near duck pond w/lady in nursing school. approx $180/month tcl. utiities. 338-0059. 3-12-2-1 $106-mo. 4 spaces avail. Sublet 2 bdrm. MoyJuly: 10 min to class -Mt. Vernon Apts. pool, laundry, some space feurn call now 3737182. 3-17-5-1 Stoneridge 3br Sublet for summer Available Ifr Fall Coll 375-223anytime 3-14-4-1 Cosy, quiet,newly remodeled 1 bd/rd apt, $150, utiities included, 2 bik from campus. Call 376-8026 eves. TV/bed included plus air cond. 3-17-5-1 1 br/ba luxury apt; 3 blocks from campus; fully furnished; lots of designer extras (must see); 2nd flooresecurityw/o view of creek; Mar-Jul ocup. (w/opio for fall/spring) $295/m. Ph 375-6743. 3-18-5-1 5 NW 33rd Ave, 372-4694, partly furnished, $220 month, no pets. Call evenings. 3-21-8-1 5 BLOCKS TO U O F. Big room for serious student. Nonsmoker. Walk to U of F. All utiities p. Washer & phone. $18/mo 377-0020. 4-8i5-i * OxfordManore*2Hee'syourchance Sbese obeaotifl, 2 bom., t. op. fot May to Aug.! You choose your own roommates! Perfect! Call 371-3382. 3-18-5-1 FOR RENT: UNFURNISHED INCREDIBLE Efficiency Apts Starting at $19/me 2 Bedroom Apts Starting at $204/me CAMBRIDGE VILLAGE 110 NW 39th Ave 378-3988 4-25-75-2 CHEAP $190 to $199 studo 4 blks to UF, water paid, pool, University Apts 411 NW 15St 3710769, 375-6173, 376-7166. 3-18-1U-2 Unfurnished 2 and 3 bedroom, dishwasher, drapes, laundry room, pool, for mature students, 6900 SW 21st Lane, 332-8875, 4-25-652 2 WEEKS FREDE! Huge 1 bdoalk-in closet, cent. air, w/w carpets, pantry, spacious grounds, magnificent oks. Bel Air Apts 636 NW 26Ave. 373-1459, 375-6173, 371-0769. 3-18-10-2 WALK TO UF, New Orleans style effctency, 1 rt Ut charming 2 br opt allci viblie now Prices range from $200 -$275/mo. Call 3730067 Contemporary Management Concepts, Inc. 332-0311. 3-13-15-2 S W. VILLAS, large 1 bd/ both apt. to sublet thru July; avail. immed. $235/mo. Call 3773187. SW20Ave. 3-12-5-2 PLAN AHEAD! I br opt vmli. May 1. 1m'A o from UF, pool, lound, free gas & water, no sec dep. QUIET AREA. Rob 378 1720. 3-12-5-2 Sublease 2 br/2 bth apt. Fox Hollow. Call Jon 332-3199 in reference to#135, between 9 a.m. & 6 p.m. 3-12-5-2 Nice 2 b 1 both quod apt. Dishwasher. Month to month loose, $265. 3002 NW 6th St. Call 3737132. 3-19-10-2 Walk to Santa Fe CC, 1 BR $245, 2 BR $295, $125 Sec. plus LMR. Pool, laundry, no pets, Santa Fe Trece Aps. 378-1190. 4-25-72-2 Oak Glade Apts. nooreUF & VA, quiet area w/ criffm watch neighborhood. 1 BR, 2 BR $215325 plus Sec plus LMR. 372-6422. 4-25-72-2 A block from Wi l Ib $240 2 br $300, new stove/frig, cent h/e, trees laundry wood floors, some util incl, flexible deposits 377-8127 4-415-2 URGENTm/f rmmttneeded own room/both in 2 bdm a pt.$175 & 'A cl.Regency Oos pool/souna/close to UF. call Rick 371-9580 314-5-2 Attractive 2 bedroom, 1 both condo -in Tower Ooks. All appliances, privacy fence, w/d hookup, storage. -Barry D. Baumstein, 373-7557. 4-1-10-2 OXFORD MANOR sublet master bdrm from Mayy 5 -Aug 15. $200 mo. 377-9612 (Eric). 3-14-3-2 2 br/ both, ref, cent. a/c, heat, dish/w, fenced yard, carpet, self clean oven. $260/mo -year lease. Call 485-1325/3782202 leave message. 3-18-5-2 AVAIL MAY huge bdrm/bth, dshwshr, walk-in closet, paddle fon, cent. a/c, I blk from UF, call eves. 373-0579. Parkside Apt. 3-18-5-2 Convenient downtown location, 302 SE 4th Street, great for students 3br/lbth, $250/mo. Call 372-6172. 13-32-0-2 WE ARE #1 Becausewe offertyouothemost for your rental $. *1, 2 & 3 Br. Apts. -furn. or onfurn. *We'll help youfind roommates *Tennis court, sauna, pool & gym FREE classes by professionals in Karate, Aerobics, Tennis& Moth Tutoring Regency Oaks Apts. 3230 Archer Rd. 378-5766 Country Garden Apts. 2001 S.W. 16th St. 373-4500 4-25-43-2 2 WKS FREEII Nice quiet Ibd $225, water pd., w/w carpets, cent. air, Villager West 800 NW 18 Ave, lake 9 S north from 16 A then right. 371-0769, 371-0251, 376-7166. 3-18-10-2 HUGE 2 bd 2 bth 1000 sq ft, dishwasher, spacious grounds; magnificent oaks. $315. BelAir Aps 636 NW 26 Av. 371-0769 373-1459. 3-18-10-2 2 BR $250 near Campus, central air/heat, carpet. Water & sewer pd. Woodcrest Apts. 1615 SW 42nd St. 373-5816, 373-1099. 3-13-102 WOW! 3 bd 2 bth in quadraplex, cent.air, skylight, woodsy lot, ONLY $345. 315 NW 19 L (Just N of 16 A, off of 6 St). 371-0769, 3710251, 376-7166., 3-18-10-2 SUMMER SUBLET '/ May freeel bdrm spacious apt. with all luxuriespool*Picadilly opts $285 mo + deposit. 375-7732, leave msg. 3-18-10-2 Convenient to downtown Gainesville, 410 SE 4th Street, 2 b/1 bth, $295/mo. Call 372-6172. 13-32-0-2 AVAIL MAY 2 br/ ba apt in Phoenix $280/mo, laundry -close to UF. Call 377-1693. 3-20-102 Attractive, newly remodeled 1 bdrm, 3 blocks to UF. Must sublet. $215 + dep. 375-3660, 3739941. Available April. 3-17-5-2 GATORS 1 b $210, 10 blks to campus, 2 br $275 Duck Pondarea 375-0822, 373-4593. 3-17-5-2 ROOMMATES Funloving female roommate, somewhat studious, wanted -own bedroom & both in 2 bdrm condo-omust supply bedroom furn. Wash/dryer/microwave. $200 mo. 371-2653. 3-12-5-3 MARCH FREE Nonsm, female to share 2 b 2 bth SW Apt $95/mo + '/, utilities, 10 min to campus, pool -all amenities. Call 377-2541. 3-17-4-3 2 nonsmoking rmmts. wanted M/F to shore large furn house in quiet SW area. Washer/dryer, no lease, $150/mo + ulli + deposit. 375-1286. 3-18-5-3 Male roommate to sublet room in Oxford Manor. Private room & private both. Rent $169 mo, V utilities from May 1 -Aug 15. Call Gregg 377-9612. 3-14-3-3 Male nonsmoker, professional or grad to shore 3 br, 1' both in NE. $140 mo + utilities. 3739435, leave message o 9-11 p.m. only. 3-14-23 Male roommate needed. Own room furnished with waterbed. $180/mo + 16 util. Call Eric at 375-0024. 3-18-5-3 Fall roommatewanted. Must bea serious, nonsmoking student. Have own room in 2 bedroom/l A both townhouse 0 In the Pines Apartments. Pay $205/month plus2 utilities. Call Jeff at 378-2202. 3-13-2-3 Luxury houseeown roomewashe/dryer -friendly roommateseoly$149/moeyrd front & backno smokersoGames & extrose 373-5012 or 376-0542. 3-14-3-3 Room in a four bedroom house, I block from campus behind Norman Hall, March free, $120/mo,914 SW 6 Ave, clean and quiet, 3781088. 3-18-5-3 Own room in 3 bdr house, ac, wosher/dryer, fireplace, microwave, trampoline, bike to UF. Big yard. $130.00. 372-5298. 3-17-4-3 Own Room In furnished twnhouse, can move in now. Pool, tennis, racquetball. $130/mo. + %t4 utilities. Call now 332-8935. 3-18-5-3 Fm nonsmk roommate, Mount Vernon, $110 mc 1, uil, pool, found, sec dep. 376-6028 anytime. 3-17-5-3 Female, non-smoker roommate for own room in 2 br 1 both, semi-furn SW area apt. $150/mo + '% util. Call 372-7203 please, leave msg. 313-3-3 *Only $125+ '/%uti** Own rm for N/S F 'n a 4 b 2 bmtwnhse. Avail May-? Many Extras. Must See. Call Anytime 332-7828. 3-17-5-3 ALT FAST Spacious two bedroom, 1 both, hove own room, quiet, great value for only $135/mo + /, utti. 335-0461 eves. 3-17-5-3 Own room in 2-bedrm apt. 5 min bike ride to campus. $150/mo + / utilI. Apt #2 -1405 SW 10th Terrace, between 4-8 p.m. or call 3721313. 3-12-2-3 A privateroom in nice home. Walkto campus. 1430 NW 6th P. No pets, $160/mo. + deposit + A utilities. 373-9941. 3-13-10-3 Private room in newly remodeled apt 3 blocks to campus w/loundry, 103 NW 10th St. upstairs, $130/mo + utl. + deposit. 373-9941. 3-13-103 ROOMMATE PROBLEM? Try 2 bedroom apt, $160 + '/ util. Move in now SW 28th Tert. No pets, 373-8968 evenings. 3-12-4-3 Female Roommate OWN bedroom in nice, logetomnhose. 3bd,2'A bath, ONLY $157a month. Col oml 375-4555. 3-13-5-3 Own Room in Pinetree Gdns. opts. Pool, tennis, etc. $120/mo + utl. 335-1314. Leave message. 3-12-4-3 Omnetoom ieNWfHose Nor-smoer, $150 mo & 1/3 utilities, no lease but deposit. 375-8295 after 5.Days Pot 392-4918 3-14-5-3 REAL ESTATE DOWNTOWNe. Be a part of it. Prime retail space and prestigious office space available in the new SUN CENTER. Call 3726172. 13-32-0-4 GOVERNMENT HOMES from $1 (U repair). Also delinquent tax property. Call 805-687-6000 Ext. GH-9486for informatio. 3-18-19-4 14 x 56 mobile home, excellent condition. Central a/c, shed, awimg, convieient student location, make an offer. 378-1150 after 6 p.m. 3-13-5-4 BIVENS SOUTH. Three bedroom, two both condo, large glossed-inporch, near swimming pool & lake, $76,500. By app only. Tele 3773491. 3-13-5-4 Goineswood Condo 3 br, 2/ baths, well built, new drapes, carpets. Clubhouse, pool, tennis, assume 8'% mortgage, $87,000. By app only37-3065. 3-13-5-4 Graduating student MUST SELL 1982 2/1 mobile home. Great/inexpensive living. Asking $10,900 -includes furn. & t. 332-5648, eves &mbeds 3-17-5-4 FOR SALE Since 1977 Car Stereo Specialists has been selling top quality car stereos at low discount prices. Come see us at 2201 NW 13St. Or call 372-2070. Open M-F 10:00-7:00 and Sat. 10:005:00. 4-25-75-5 AM-FM Cassette In-dash $29.95 AM-FM Digital In-Dosh $99.55 100 Watt equilizer $29.95 Ful warranty 373-3754 Audio Outlet. 4-25-70-5 100% IBM PC/XT compatible 256K, 2 drives, 6 mo. warranty. Lowest prices in town. $943. Call Candle Computers 374-6636. 3-18-10-5 HP 41C calculator 4 sole, $100, 371-8115 evenings. 3-14-3-5 Ross five sp. cruiser -new, $175. Windsurfer brand 12 ft. sai-botrd -full rig/soil etc. $475. Surfboards -$175 & down, 373-5927. 3. 14-3-5 TI-66 programmable calculator over 500 ines of memory, statistical and scientific functions $39. Solitoire diamond engagement ring $50. 371-6862. 3-13-2-5 IBM PC/XT compatible, Founain Turbo X1 complete system $1199. 4.77 U MHZ speed. Call 338-0378, Fountain Computer Soic.,. 314-3-5 BIKE FOR SALE, ultimate 10 speed urbon asuolt cruiser. Made to take SE 2nd Ave train trcksi $340 new, selling $250. 371-4808. 3-18-5-5 Moving out of town, must sellI '84 Yamaho Scooter. Exc. conditions, only 350 mil -8 mo. warranty ---$750, but can go down. -$75 dbl. bed, $60 desk -call Ana 371-9617. 3-185-5 This is o notice of sale by public outcry of lost o' abandoned property recovered on U.F. campus. The auction will be held in the Colonnade area of the J. Wayne Reitz Union on March 13, 1986, at 10:00 a.m. Included for auction will be approximately 55 bicycles, approximately 9 automobiles, 5 automobiles (no titles available), 2 motorcycles, 1 motorcycle frame, ossorted mopeds and motorcycles for parts only, jewelry, books, clothing, eyeglasses, etc. Property that hs been held for 30 days and not claimed by rightful owner by 10:00 a.m. on March 13, 1986, will be sold at this public outcry. All proceeds go to the Gotor Lon Fund. 3-12-7-5 Buy My Business! Schooljustnotenough?,twasntfomeeithe. Be an entrepreneur. Own your own business and finish school. Established student owned/operatedvideo game business. Priced to sell, at2 yrs net income $49,000. Call Roger .t371-2030. 3-17-10-5 Lazyboy recliners -2 brown -good cond., asking $50 each o best offer. 375-2975. 3-135-5 Electric guitar played by Gainesville's best, you could be next. Fire-red, flyingstyle, ex. condition, $180080. 371-1573 ort371-7671. 312-5-5 CONDO FOR SALE: 2 Bed/1 'A both. Bivins Forest. $45,000, will finance. Call: 813-9387825 day/813-734-3501 ot night. Ask for Tony. 4-3-14-5 Moving -Must sell Kenmore dryer $95, single woterbed w/frome $95, long couch $65,twin bed $45, MisC., '67 Ford Wagon $295 -3380059. 3-12-2-5 Red '85 Rivo Scooter 1251 Great cond Great mileagel Perfect trans to schooll Musttsee, call Chris 371-2398. 3-17-5-5 MUST SELL 5'-11" twin-fin channel bottom surfboard $80, new blue earth cruiser $110, Rick or Frank 375-6444. 3-13-3-5 Casio CZ-1000 synthesizer NEW Must seil Cords andcsdaptor inc. $375 0B0. Call Rob 3957888. 3-17-5-5 SAILBOARD for sale, Mistrol Moui, excellent condition. Rocks & cover inc. $750. 378-3323. 3-13-3-5 Apple Mocintosh computer, Imagewriter wide printer, extra drive. 378-1464 eves & wknds; 328-3461 office. 3-14-4-5 For sole AB Dick #530/mimeograph mach./Ideal for churches, froternities, sororities, etcl Included with this is a supply of paper & inkl 372-5315M-F 8:30-5:00. 3-17-5-5 For sale: 1984 Suzuki Gt50ES, 2800 miles, Kerker Jet Kit, Kerker KX racing exhaust system, immaculate condition, awesome performance. Invested $5500, will sacrifice for $3600. 376-0712 eves & weekends. 3-14-4-5 ItI DAILY CROSS Edited by Trud ACROSS 5 "Hamlet" set 1 Sigher's word 6 High note 5 Looked over, 7 Balmn and Balan for 8 1980 Tonya "job" winning musical 10 Covenant 9 Exiled 14 Fencing move10 Gaucho's turf meant 11 Plant of the 15 Clear-headed amaryllis family 16 Jai's follower 12 Singer Vikki 17 At all 13 Connections 18 "Andy Capp," 21 Edges out for one 23 Boat's rest 19 Glutton's 25 Miscue demand 27 Major opening 20 Cancel, literally 28 Sub's cousin 22 Plugs 29 Balanced, in a 24 Rug feature way 26 "Turandot" 30 Where the highlight Severn flows 1 27 Whirlybirds 32 Closer to the 31 Examined mark 35 Sharpens 33 Like some 36 Less usual seals 38 Author Santha 34 Vocal Rama arrangements 39 Like some 37 Mature cheeses 40 Threedimensional 41 Guaranteed 42 Go astray 1 43 Sharpener 44 Candy 45 Mohammed's resting place 47 Actor George and kin 49 Plisetskaya of ballet fame 51 Certain tide 52 San Diego cagers 56 Dominion -39 60 Play polo 61 Turn aside 2 63 Image 64 So be it 65 Fuse 66 Verne character 67 Necklace unit 68 Peeled 69 Mardi follower DOWN I Maintain 2 Marital bliss 3 WIlder, for one 4 Short, cash016L mnTi e186Is ngl6 i Mac'ntosh 128k system for sole. System includes external disc dtie, 300/1200 modem, Imagewriter printer, mocstation, and software. Call Eric at 378-9818. Best offer takes the system. 3-17-5-5 For sale: beige and chrome couch, good condition$125OBO. Call 371-2483. 3 14-4-5 MOTORCYCLES Yamaha XS500 excellent condition look and runs great $600/b. offer. Besttimes to callare morning and night. HP 377-9954. 3-12-10-7 Kawasaki GPZ 1100, low miles, kept in a garoge, excellent shape. Kerker Mikuni Dunlop Perodo. Call after 6, $20000BO, Len 376-9637. 3-13-5-7 INTERCEPTOR 700, very good condition, cover, helmet & locker, priced to be sold fast, $2300 OBO. Albertt371-4626after 5 p.m. 3-12-4-7 1981 YAMAHA 400 SPECIAL, blue metallic, runs great, under 6000 mi, covered storage,$800. Call 371-6684anytime. 3-17-5-7 AUTOS 1973 Dodge Dart, blue, for parts, slont-6 engine,3 oe wbttery, good tires, $200. Coll Renee, 371-2369 ontil 1 a.m. 3-17-4-8 '81 Mazda GLC $3200. '74 Honda Civic $1100. OBO on either. Both look great, run great. 3320141. Keep trying. 3-18-5-8 1981 Honda Civic, new point, AM-FM cassette, Good interior, New clutch. $2,800 negotiable. 373-9528. 3-13-2-8 '84 Ford Ranger, 4-spd, v-6, o/c, am/fm/cas, cloth int, long bed w/liner, many extras. Call 373-4866, 377-4108, late night/eorly morning. 3-12-5-8 1980 CHEVY CAMARO, auto, power steering, brakes & windows, oir,I owner, excellent condition. 332-8064. 3-12-5-8 NORD PUZZLE de Michel Jaffe 40 Watched the 52 Grump late show 53 Key product 41 Give-and-get 54 Conceit deal 55 Recipe direction 43 Two-finger 57 Cold storage exercise 58 City on the 44 Item on a GI Tevere menu 59 Slaughter of 46 Threaten baseball 48 Gazed 62 St. Lo season 50 Fight site ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE: L 00M F SS E A R A PIR R I HIA L 0 M I IAM NIFIA0CEE D P AIL R C A TH T GIA A T TEASE IL TA ARB R LIAP I ERE DI E T ILL LAC A A P 10 T REPR E H W EE A PTED H AA RYAD PI E T Y A V E R S ND NATE Y NIS EDDY EMUR 3/12/66 8 011 12 113 15 16 iI iF --n *a syaicewe 3/12/6 I

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algator, wednesday march 12. 1986, 15 alligator classifieds 593-18-602 '80 Ply Champ, 4 cy, hatchback, automatic, air, sunroof, oe&fm, sharp, law miles, $2000. 495-3175 local. 3-12-5-8 1978 Chevy Novo, 4 door, A/C, rebuilt engine, 6 cyl. $900.00 or best offer, Going into Peace Corps, mustsell. 372-6885 3-14-5-8 '78 Toyota Clico 5 speed a/c drives great! great mph bloupunct stereo good conditions asking SWOcall Midi 376-9560 3-1l-a-A SERVICES STEREO REPAIR Meticulous repair on your beloved stereo. We d it right the first tirel Sound Ideas 2201 NW 13th St. 378-0192. 4-25-17-9 BREAD & ROSES Well Women Care ABORTION 9 Up to 22 weeks Nitrous Oxide -no extra charge 9 Free Pregnancy Tests BIRTH CONTROL CLINIC 0 Female Practitioners 372-1664 Completely Confidential Close toaCampus 1233 NW 10th Avenue Acrossafrom Center Theatre 2-28-40-9 ADOPTION IS THE ANSWER. Local couple would like to adopt your newborn. Pre-notol, hospitalization and pst-notal cost covered. You will have your own attorney. Complete confidentiality, call 372-0222. 3-12-5-9 Pregnant? We offeraobjectie and confidential counselingepregnancy test more. All Services Free 377-4947 Crisis Pregnancy Center 1204 NW 1 3th Street. Suite 23 Across from Ciitan Blood Center 4-25-79-9 SLEEPY HOLLOW HORSES FARM *riding lessons*hay rides rail rides*boarding*soles*rentals*wooded troils. 466-3224&375-8080. 4-25-75-9 MINI STORAGE AAA STORAGE -377-1771. Close toaUF&conveniet4x4x4 $0/mo.' 4x8x8$20/mo. 535 SW 2nd Ace. 3-31-51-9 ABORTION "Call us, we care" FREE PREGNANCY TESTS 0*Women practitioners 0 Licensed OB-GYN (with hospital priileges) Gainesville Women's Health Center 720 NW 23RD AVENUE 377-5055 We offer choices to you -a full range of obstetric & gynecology services. Serving Gainesville for 11 years. Non profit. 3-3-40-9 SCHOLARSHIPS AVAILABLE $135 million + inafinancial aid went unused lost year. Freshmen, Sph., ongoing graduate students; far help cashing in on those funds, call Academic Data Services toll free 1400544-1574, ext. 639, or write P.O. Box 16483. Chattanooga, TN 37416. 4-1-14-9 NOW THE ONLY FULL TIME STATION IN NORTH CENTRAL FLORIDA 24 HRS A DAY -TV 693-12-10-9 THE BIGGER THE BETERI GRAB THE BIGGEST ONE YOU CAN FINDI TV 69 UHF ANTENNAS NOW AT ALL GAINESVILLE ELECTRONIC STORESI 3-13-10-9 Publishing? Established Rndom House illustrator available far technical, medical, illstrative work. Star Scientific 375-2604. 3-1810-9 Worried about pregnoecy? Need to know sooner? Available in March for $2.50-test accurate at time of your missed period. Call 377-0881 Plonned Parenthood of North Central Florida. 3-14-6-9 $$ FINANCIAL AID $$ Don't wait any longer to apply for '86-'87 financial aid. Money may run out before we receive your application. Pick up an application at Anderson Hall. 3-20-10-9 Spring Break Speciall Every 7th day free. While you're away, Good Neighbor Sitting Service feeds & cares for your pets in your home. Call us 371-3703. 3-21-9-9 CAN'T WRITE? Ex Professorcan helplI Essays to dissdeaflons 375-0822. 3-21-9-9 TYPING SERVICES For Quality Use A Professional Professional Typing 917 NW 13th St. 373-9822 Recorded on diskettes or mag cards dissertations theses manuscripts 4-25-75-10 For the best professional typing and editing Hogtown Typing, 375-8333. Specializing in law, arch, theses, and dissertations. 4-25-6810. *WORD PROCESSING* Professional quality at student prices. Quick turnaround. Hours by appointment, 8 a.m.-8 p.m. Call Debbie, 378-7128. 3-14-30-10 Typing, fast and accurate, reasonable rates, minor editing, proofreading. Call Beverly at 372-6253. 4-25-75-10 Typing, fast and accurate papers, theses, dissertations. Experienced. Proofreading. Reasonable rates. Call Lato 378-6642. 4-25-5910 * Word Processing * Typing * *Resumes* Reports* Letters 0 Theses,* Applications Etc. 376-5465* *We're close to campus ** Alachua Word Processing ** 3-12-30-10 Word Processing, Typing, Bkkping & Notary, Grad school exp. Prof quality 14 yrs. exp. spelling ckd NW section, Down 332-3913. 3-1830-10 Typing Term papers, resumes, applications. 375-4536 before 6pm. 338-1139 after 6pm & weekends. 3-31-25-10 TYPING/from $1/pg. papers/theses/dissrt./15 ys. exper. in legal/medical/engr. terms as former court rptr. Excel. spelling/proofing. Call Jill. 377-9647. 4-25-58-10 For the right type, call Kathy, 376-9527. Expert professional service. Reasonable rates. 4-3-2010 *TYPING** $1. a page. 377-1335. 3-14-1010 WORD PROCESSING/TYPING Resumes, reports, cover letters. 377-0460, MF/9-5 p.m. Gainesville Word Processing Center. 4-23-30-10 TYPING: Legal, theses, dissertations, reports, professional quality, dependable service. Nancy, 372-2750.4-4-30-10 TYPING: ALL KINDS, Term Papers, Theses, Manuscripts, Letters, etc. Recorded on diskett. 371-6435. 3-21-9-10 * * TYPING 372-7856 MARG**** Someday/overnite, spelling ckd, termpopers, theses, resumes, letters, etc. 3436 NW 17th St. 4-25-29-10 4-2! Cas mer Cal 12-4 THE INSTITUTION TUTOR WANTED Graduate student that excels in erbal and math skills. Prefer one who has W ANTED :ored high on GRE and/or LSAT and/or GMAT. 'ood pay, port time, flexible hours. Call Marc GOLD & DIAMONDS -7-0012. 3-12-5-12 Top Cash or Trade OZZIE'S JEWELRY SUMMER JOBS IN ALASKA. Good money. Many Appointment -373-9243 opportunitiesl Employer listings, 1986 Summer 5-72-11 Employment Guide. $5.95. Alasco, Box 30752, Seattle, WA 98103. 3-14-10-12 h for jerseys/sweats from any UF BUS. or ENG majors--Summer Jobs. Avg. n/women varsity team w/the number 25. $415/wk. & coll. credit. Send name, major & I Greg 375-7056 after 6 p.m. Keeptrying. 3phone # to: Summer Work, PO Box 12455A, 4-11 Gonesvil le, FL 32604. SW co. * * * * * 3-18-7-12 by Steve Riehm IIIAT6A T P1I5AGA WI M Rdtki-A &W -II.' 0%bM Survival Games of Gainesville, Inc. is rapidly growing & seeking add'I partners. If you are interested in becoming part of this profitable & lucrative business, please contact Gary 3752087 or Mark 375-2133, 376-2070. 3-12-3-11 SHAPE-UP SALEIIIIIIII Everything 20 to 60% OFF. STARTS FRIDAY (1 week only). The Dance Factory1029 W. Univ. Ave. 3-13-5-11 ARTISTS and WRITERS needed for REACTOR magazine. Call David, 371-0217 or Richard, 371-9497. 3-14-5-11 DIET TRICKSI What are yours? Researcher needs info on unique, weird, wonderful ways to diet and persevere. 335-1939. 3-12-2-11 Wanted: Healthy, non-obese men, (ages 50 to 75 years) on no medication, for laboratory and psychological studies involving normal sexual behavior. Appropriate volunteers will be paid. Coll Mark, 392-2612, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Mon-Fri. 4-25-26-11 HELP WANTED Mature student wanted to run political campaign for State Senate Incumbent; political knowledge; local knowledge important. Apply with resume to P.O. Box 916, Bradenton, FL 33506. 3-14-28-12 All Positions needed at an Easter Seal camp for handicapped children and adults. Camp Challenge, Rt I Box 350, Sorrento, FL 32776. 418-35-12 Aerobics Exercise Instructor. Part-time mornings, afternoons and evenings available. Eilone's Health & Figure Solon, 376-9133. 3-135-12 Full or part-time laborers needed. Earn up to $15.00 an hour. No experiencecnecessary. Call (813)886-7151 ext. 12. 4-10-20-12 $ADD EXTRA CASH$ THIS AD WORTH $17 To New Donors on 2nd Visit or whoahaven't donated in lost 3 mos. New Cash Schedule. Free coffee & cookies daily. Bi-monthly raffle for a T.V. GAINESVILLE PLASMA 378-9431 238 SW 4th Ave. Mon/Wed/Fri 8-3 Tues/Thurs 10-7Sat 10-2 4-10-40-12 Counselors -Association Of Independent Camps seeks qualified counselors for 75 residential children's private camps in Northeast, July & August. Contact: Association of Independent Camps (FL), 60 Madison Av., St. 1012, New York, N.Y. 10010. (212) 679-3230. 3-14-5-12 TECHNICAL SUPPORT PERSON Parttime position opening In April for technical person to be responsible for preventive maintenance and repair of computer and output equipment. Requires experience In a similar field, ability to read technical diagrams, mechanical ability and basic understanding of electrical ad compuer sstetms. (Own tools a pies). Applications available at the front desk of Alligator offices, 1105W. University Av., MF, 9-4, NO PHONE CALLSI AA/EOE. TYPESETTERS NEEDED Typesetters position currently available for classified and display advertising. Port time. Day hours 15-20 hrs a week. Must be able type 45 + cwpm. Typesetting experience preferred, especially Varityper. Applications available at the front desk of the Independent Florida Alligator, Security Building at 1105 W. University Ave. No phone calls please. AA/EOE. Do yOU need money? Sell Avon full or porttime -earn upto 50% commission 375-8967. 3-14-40-12 GOVERNMENT JOBS. $16,040 -$59,230/yr. Now hiring. Call 805-687-6000 Ext. R-9486 for currentfederal list. 4-25-42-12 $ ADD EXTRA CASH $ FOR SPRING BREAK THIS AD WORTH $ 17 To naw donors on 2nd Visit or who haven't donated in last 3 mos. New Cash Schedule. Free coffee and cookies daily. Bi-monthly raffle for a T.V. GAINESVILLE PLASMA 378-9431 238 SW 4 Ave. Mon/Wed/Fri 8-3 Tues/Thurs 10-7 Sat 10-2 4-10-40-12 CRUISESHIPS: AIRLINES, HIRING Summer, Career, Overseosl Call for Guide, Cassette, Nemsservicel (916)944-4444, ext. 3-12-312 COMPUTER OPERATOR Dependable & flexible person needed to work with an IBM sys/38. Part-time position: 1-2 evenings/week. Must be avoilabe on weekends. Related exp. desired. Send resume to: Paul Bomers Cox Cable University City 1115 NW 4th St. Gainesville, Fl32601 EOE/M/F 3-17-4-12 PERSONALS SAVE ON RAYBANS University Opticians 300 S.W. 4th Ave. 378-4480 4-25-75-13 Unwanted Hair Removed Forever. 30 years exp. Edmund Dwyer, Electrologist. 4040 Newberry Rd. Suite 1350, 372-8039. 4-25-75-13 GAY SWITCHBOARD 332-0700 Call About Tues. Night Activities Something Different Every Week 4-25-75-13 Ladies make money We buy & sell good used clothing. Call Second Act, 373-8527. 4-25-75-13 PASSPORT PHOTOS READY IN 60 SECONDS. Media Image Photography 21 SE 2nd Place 3751911. 4-25-61-13 ULTIMATE GAMES War games hi-quality point guns, come play. Call 373-4518,495-2357. 3-31-17-13 SAY IT WITH A FLAIRI Give your writing that special touch! Calligraphy for poems, flyers, certif's, announc. 373-1031. 3-17-5-13 'Men in the 80's' -How are they different? Campus Organized Against Rape presents Wayne Griffin of the Presbyterian Student Center on Wednesday, March 12, at 4:15 p.m. in 122 & 123oflthefReitz Union. 3-12-2-13 LOOK YOUR BEST as you bake on the beaches. $5 off a new "you" for spring break, ask for Michelle at Reflections. Call 378-2780, introductory offer. 3-21-9-13 Phi Kappa Psi MId-Semester RushtI Meet as at the Unton Colonnade Mar. 10-12 11:00-1-.00o calls373-5371i E.a part of thefutur.e3-14-5-13 A VERY IMPORTANT ANNOUNCEMENT ABOUT TOMORROW IN THE ALLIGATOR FLORIDA'S ROCK VIDEO LEADER Flash Sivermoean LIVE Wed 9 p.m. of Heaven (Gainesville's onlywomen's bar 18 E Univ 3762226). The party starts at 5 p.m. It's clean-air nite (no smoking please) plus there's a free salad bar $2 for women after 9, $5 for escorted men & $50 for unescorted men. Be there as Gainesville women rock to greatemusicl 3-122-13 Tired of Pizza? Call 374-8193 for great food delivered Freell chicken wings, burgers, salads, subsand morel Gourmet Express. 3-137-13 * *Just in.French Army shorts. Sizes 2533, black, drab, khaki, turq & natural, only $13.001 Hurry to Paradise, 819 W. Univ. Av. 376-4080. 3-12-5-13 PARENTAL DIVORCE A support group is available to help meet the needs of University of Florida students whose parents are either divorced or divorcing. If you are einteested in participating please call Student Health Service Health Education Office at 392-1161, Ext. 281. 3-12-5-13 Omega Electrolysis Soft, smooth skin forever.No more tweezing, waxing, or shovingl Shortwave method. Call Katie for a free consultation. 374-4307. 3-13-513 LATE AID APPLICANTS* If you haven't applied for financial aid yet, you are pushing It. We already have over 4000 applications I$Is being used up quickly. Pick up application at 111 Anderson. Student Fin. Affairs. 3-20-10-13 Rhinestotnejewelry, cheap prices! Sell out before sp/break! Earrings, bracelets, recklaces. Nows your chonce/Iook great/Mindi at 376-9560. 3-18-5-13 Horseback riding at TALL OAKS. $6.00 hr. 7 mi W of I-75 on #24 to S.W. 19 C. S. Imi. Free lesson on Wed, Thurs & Fri as a bonus. 4953127. 3-14-3-13 SORRY SKIP. I've decided to check out the nw women's bar, HEAVEN, 18 E. Univ. Avenue. Muffy. 3-12-1-13 FIRST INVESTOR'S CORP A major Wall Street investment firm has immediate management trainmig positions available in all 180 offices coast to coast. We are looking for aggressive, self-motivated individuals who want to 'EARN' a high income and be their own bosses in a fairly short period of time. Interviews will be conducted Tues. March 18. For further info contact the Career Resource Center. OPEN TO ALL MAJORS. 3-185-13 MARTIN LUTHER KING DIDN'T GO TO LAW SCH. You don't need a law degree to change the world. Earn $165-$220 a wk working to pass legislation to stop polluters & consumer ripoffs. Full time, part time & career options available. If a minister from Ala. can change the world why can't you. Call 392-1602 for interviews on 3/12, 3/13, & 3/14. 3-12-1-13 Dear Debbie: thanks for the great time at HEAVEN Fri nite. I'll see you Wed for the Flash Silvermoonrconcert. Love, JC. 3-12-1-13 OUTLET PRICES Nike, Adidas shoes and clothes always on sale. Racquets strung 9.88. Sweats 20% off. Aliletic Attic Outlet, Oaks Plaza. 378-2426. 3-17-6-13 I m. -.-.salm a

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16, alligator, wnssadsy march 12, 1986 alIgator classifieds INTERNATIONAL CONSULTANTS Multinational firm seeks professional/technical consultants for work obrood. While initially prt-time, some full time positions may be covoilokle. Desire well-connected individuals who con facilitate in'til business in the country of their citizenship. We will interview in Gainesville soon. All fees poid by client company. Reply with resume to: R M Kenwood, VP, PO Box 140424 Corol Gbles, FL 33114 3-21-10-13 Wonted: nice, bright, white smilel Bring this to save $10 off the Simple cleaning (ADA 1110) or the Periodontal cleaning (ADA 4910) Dentiqe, Oaks Mall, evenings & Sat. Phone spells 37smile!Dr. Larrick3-18-10-13 PICK YOUR MAN For the 1986-1987 Men of UF Colendar, today thru Friday ot GPA-40 to choose from 3-14-513 Where was God r -nInsprational message37-3359 3-14-5-14 QUALITY PHONES At prices you can AFFORD From 13.95 up PHONE Store 1506 N.W. 13th St. 373-1637 3-143-13 SKYDIVE Leor s to skydo with hWilliston Skyivers. Jumop corse strts St. and Sn. at 1000 a.m., 376-1096. Group rates and weekday instruction available by appointment. 4-10-50-13 Plnning o trip? We ho--ne hostl posses, pssportcarrirsgreatselectionofconversion packs. Brosington's Trail Shop 2331 NW 13th St. (Albertson's). 3-21-15-13 Leotards, Legwormers, Tights, Shoes, the latest styles from Miami & L.A. The Dance Factory 1029 W. Uni. Ae. (2 bilks trnt U)//Spring Slel 3-13-5-13 Good Backpacks Cheap Sve 20% 0n all Jonsport hcpocks-Ltettne Wrrotyntony styles nd ctors. Witon pcs $8.88 Lloyd Clarke Sports 1504 NW 13 St. 3727836 3-14-5-13 Softball Sale! Mizuno, Spotbilt, Mitre cleats plus Mizuno gloves and Easton bots-all 10% off with mention of this ad. Lloyd Clarke Sports 1504 NW 13St. 372-7836 3-14-5-13 GOTCHA! Trunks, jams, shorts, T-shirts by Gotcho, Jimmy 'Z nd Ctchit now in stock at Lloyd Clote Sports. Find the hottest stoff at 1504 NW 13 St. 372-7836 3-14-5-13 BUS. or ENG. majors--Snmer Jobs. Avg. $415/wk. & col. credit. Send name, major & phone tto: Summer Work, PO Box 12455A, Gainesville, FL 32604 SW co. * ** ** *** 3-14-5-13 CONNECTIONS Hnky, friendly, brght witty, attractive, warm, sophisticated yet down-to-earth (occasionally trashy) GWMs modestly seek others with similar imaginative self-descriptions. Feel free to read our beads. Box 14391-32604 3-145 14 AMY C. HAPPY BIRTHDAY LOVE MIKE 3-12-1-14 RIDES Mom, -$40 /T -$25 O/W -WEEKLY. Leave Friday/Return Sunday -New 30-Passenger Bus. Ride Cheop/Comforobly/Fst/Sofe -332-6182 -(305) 221-9281. 3-18-40-15 FT. LAUDERDALE SPRING BREAK -$40 R/ $250O/W MtBs -30 pass. cpcity. yurryyur rncntootlcs 332-6182. 3-18-0-15 LOST AND FOUND *Lostsweater & jacket withwalletatClub Lido Wed 2-26. Great sentimental value. Reward. lnorn. coil PFh~lp e 375-2644 oyir* 3-12204 -652897 Lost Mn's odd Nuggot Braclet. If fond pleate cail Mke ot 376-1013 Reoword! 3-14-3 17 Lost yuppy, fenatle, yllcw lchrodor. Lcsdna lw school Reward, if founa call 371-9006 3 17-4 17 Don't L~7i Fool Iund.e2!!,1US1 FADVERTISEI WE'IE YOUR PUBL C LERAJ %t l Donate blood. on the bloodmobile &Ian-., regional blood center, inc. TAKE ATEACHER TO LUNCH College of Educaion Student Cowncdl' TEACHER APPRECIATION DAY MARCH I2 Norman Hall Court Yard 2:00p M. GuesSpeakers: John Spindler Princpal of Un coin Middle School Refreshments and Entertainment Following THE BROTHER AND PLEDGES OF AMWISH TO THANKKA FOR HELPING RAISE OVER $2,500 IN THE FIRST ANNUAL "BOUNCE FOR BEATS" FOR THE AMERICAN HEART ASSOCIATION. SAVE 40% -MARVY ARTIST COLORS' 1300 series Medium Vinylon Point Unique I Vinylon points long lasting supply of color in each I marker. The vinylon tip allows a smooth flow of I true color. Metal boxes. set of suggeted with coupon I retail I 12 $7.20 $4.32 I I ARVy s18 810.80 $. __________ 24 S14.40 $86 36 $21.60 $12.96 I60 S36-00 $21.60 Coupon expires 3/22/80 Downtown, Butler Plaza Market Place, Westgate )iPn un for Israel W I un and One Mlle run Pun! SUNDAYiCome to SUNDAYHillel 9:00 AM 16 NW 18th March 161 to pick up T-shirtl at UF Commuter oEIE Lot EfEShMENTS N/S Drive A--Registration tables L at OPA and HIllel 7$ $5.00 advance entry fee Includes t-shIrt Prizes and awards sponsored by SO In all age groups. I DOMCOUNTY w NatWvup w W"U FMIV CtENrM WP r Pw~f'~,/ ~PS5 5M4 I66 %E15N'TPCO4StlY /1 6UA50P WW M ~ A AYE M1 ER. CAMW i1W61i. W'SA LWMY )SR HOW by DBe ke ath 6OW PAYA0W gwncfAa4Y. MM9, r -. -a fr */r

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18, alligator, wednesday march 12, 1986 Women's tennis team beats Mississippi By LAWRENCE HOLI YFIELD Clara Arnold and Dawn Parkhurst. Alligator Writer The Gators lost only three sets of The UF women's tennis team led singles, two of those coming in Ole Mississippi 7-1 Tuesday as the No. 3 Miss' only win. doubles pairs played in the third set. No.I seed Whittington defeated Gators Cyndee Newton and the Rebels' Arnold 6-1, 6-4. Siobhan Nicholson prepared to serve Hetherington, No. 2, dropped the to Lynn Hennessey and Laura first set 4-6, but came back to take Nelson from Ole Miss. just at the the last two sets 6-3, 6-1 against service toss came the announcement: Daly. "Whoever owns the blue van with "I was upset after the way I Mississippi tags must move it iplayed in the first set," Hetherington mediately or it will be towed," said. "When I played like I had, I try bellowed the UF policeman through extra hard in the next sets." his car's PA system. Shelley Sniffen beat Ruppert in The Rebel coach trudged off the the closest singles match, 7-6 (7-3), court and searched his pockets for 7-5 at the No. 3 slot. the keys to his team's van. Ole Miss Nicholson's doubles victory didn't get a ticket. It didn't win the against Hennessey was her second of match either. the day. The No. 4 singles players UF rallied in that doubles match dueled for two sets, as Nicholson and won 4-6, 6-3, 7-6 (8-6) for the prevailed 6-4, 6-3. Gators final 8-1 victory. NewtonThe Rebels only victory was in Nicholson had trailed 4-5 in the No. 5 singles. Parkhurst defeated third. Garland 7-6, 6-4. UF lost only four games in the No. Dana Fahey defeated Nelson 6-4, 1 and No. 2 doubles. The Gators' 6-2 at No. 6. No. 1 team of Jill Hetherington and The victory raises the Gators Jan Martin defeated Liz Daly and record to 10-4 overall. UF travels to Jackie Ruppert 6-1, 6-0. The No. 2 Knoxville this weekend for matches tandem of Tammy Whittington and against Tennessee on Saturday and Chris Garland won 6-2, 6-1 against Vanderbilt on Sunday. Comedian: SEC hoops too profane BIRMINGHAM, Ala. (UPI) -Cursing by coaches is "out of hand" in the Southeastern Conference and school presidents and league leaders should take steps to solve the problem,fans and officials say. Comedian Jerry Clower, a Mississippi State alumnus and fan, said the language he heard from the sideline during last week's SEC tournament is ruining the image of basketball as family entertainment. "I wish the presidents of the schools had guts enough to make the coaches quit cussing and using all that vulgarity on the sidelines," Clower told the Birmingham Post-Herald. "It's gone out of hand. It needs to be stopped. "It's a real simple thing to do. If they don't think it's simple, then the president of that university that allows his coach to do that is educated beyond his intelligence. "You just call him in and say, 'Hey, there's families with little girls and little boys sitting behind you up there and they hear you using the Lord's name in vain and holler vulgarity all the way across the court and you ain't to stay here if you don't stop it,"' Clower said. John Guthrie, associate commissioner of the SEC in charge of officials, agreed coach cursing is a problem. He said coaches addressed the need to tone down their language during the league's spring meeting last year. "I think the problem has improved ...but it still leaves a lot to be desired," Guthrie said. Veteran SEC official Reggie Copeland, who is retiring after 24 years, said some officials have also taken steps to curb the problem, but it still exists. "When I get the four-letter word out of the coach, it's an automatic technical," Copeland said. "Coaches know I'll give a 'T' for that, yet the situation has not improved." Copeland said some officials, however, do not penalize coaches for using foul language. Those officials have been reprimanded, but many of the younger ones still are intimidated by coaches, he said. "They fear that if they're too tough on a coach, that coach may not want them back," Copeland said. "You've got to forget that. I tell young officials, 'Hey, I've been scratched by some of the best coaches in America ...and some of the worst. You'll always get your schedule."' Copeland said more must be done to stop the problem before it spreads. "Something has got to be done, because you've got to make the officials realize that it flows over from the coaches to the players and pretty soon you've got the players doing it," he said. "That has happened so many times lately." Clower said the problem was not restricted to the SEC. He said coaches can be seen and heard cursing during games on television. "I ought not have to wonder if I'm going to be embarrassed in front of mr'teen-age daughters because some big-time coach is 'ing to shout something you'd hear some sailor say in pool hall." 8-1t No. I singles T. Whlnington UF d. C. Arnold Miss, 6-1, 64 No. 2 singles JHethenngton UF d. LJaly Miss., 4-6, 6-3, 6-1 No. 3 singles S. SniffenUFd.J.Ruppert Miss.,7-6(74),7-5 No.4 singles S. Nicholson UF d. L Hennessey Miss., 6-4.6-3 No.5 singles D. Parkhurst Miss.d. C. Garland UF, 7-6, 6-4 No.y singles D. Fah"y UF d. L Nelson Misa., 6-46-2 clipaligato savings LO everydaY C 0 I w -U minin.m.mmmmmu I B Fi N IU IF Sensi-Sandal Sport Sponge Wet Skins C l Down Under Wear "I'm going Scuba Diving for Spring Break" PadiThe leader in diving education classes starting now WATER WORLD DIVE CENTER 1518 NW 13th St. 37-SCUBA The latest in rental and class equipment =I] Get Happy in IM~ Discover and drafts Tonite & every Wednesday ANDW1T Ot'JL4 A AUL)OW DO 11r.E 'Do ef7 Thurs 3/13 G.A.C.N. benefit -$1.10 imports 1S N. Main St Call 376-3876 for detl ANY LARGE SANDWICH AND A MEDIUM SOFT DRINK 34th St. Plaza Exp. 3/26/86 378-2028 W. University Ave. 373-4026 Not valid with any other S.W. 13th St. coupon or 377-5637 special iIfm.: an WOMWOM ms 11 III mod 6 FREE GARLIC ROLLS I When you buy a slice and a medium drink I.una&cW3 PIZZA offer good with coupon only Monday through Thursday M&C ARMY SURPLUS 625 W. 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alligator, wednesday march 12, 1986, 19 nGaGymnasts: Practice makes perfect By ERNEST HOOPER qualify UF for the NCAA regionals, Alligator Staff Writer and they may play a role in earning Ap 4UF gymnastic coach Ernestine the squad an at-large berth in the Weaver watches patiently as senior NCAA championship. The two Elfi Schlegel goes through the dance highest home scores, the two highest movements of her floor exerciseroad scores and one other score will Z Z TO P mvmns fhrfoobxri e averake t e therin. th routine. When Schlegel finishes averaged to determine if the Weaver smiles but is quick to point This ast rendts. out "some little things." This past weekend the team "When you're going through that posted its two highest road scores of move you want to do it like this," the season, 184.00 and 184.5, at two Weaver said as she walked through meets in Arizona, but still failed tc one of Schlegel's dance steps. take first place in either meet. While Weaver works with UF sophomore Tammy Smith said -Schlegel, freshman Leslie Gould Saturday night's loss to Arizona way DETAILS THURSDAY practices a dance step from her frustrating because the judging routine in another corner of the seemed tobe biased. IN THE ALLIGATOR practice floor in the Stephen C. "It was like 'Merry Christmas O'Connell Center.Some of the other University of Arizona,"' Smith said. gymnasts wait to practice their "We got pretty fair scores even movements. though they could have been two or N EW_ three tenths higher, but if they BATTERY "Were concentrating (Arizonia)hit theirtbeamtroutine BATTE Y "w' thegota 9.4 no matter what." on finishing and presAlong with polishing their y routines and working on finesse, the SA LE ending because ever gymnasts are also hoping to improve tenth counts. The their regional qualifying scores. Smith looks optimistically toward judge remembers the the rest of the season and a possible dismounts because regional confrontation with it's the last thing they Southeastern Conference Chamts pion Georgia. see, so if you stick it, "We want to get a better away score. We just read today where -i rGeorgia got a 182 and 180 on the -Leslie Gould road so it could really help ," Smith Ga-LesliGmuls said. "We're going to be psyched for YGator Gymnast regionals because at the beginning of the season it was 'Georgia, Georgia, Working on the dancing for the Georgia' and now they seem to be floor exercise is just one of many losing it. They lost to Penn State and --steps the Gators gymnastics team is Cal-State Fullerton and we beat We have batteries for heavy duty equiptaking, to, as Gould put it, "polish" both of those teams last week." ment, form tractors, lown mowers boats its routines with only three meets left The Gators have been in the top end all cars. Come see us today. in the regular season. ten all season but have failed to -FM E UCTICM CK V "We're concentrating on finishing reach the lofty No. 1 position. But ALUGATOR PHC and presenting because every tenth Gould said the best team will be Q MAC counts," Gould said. "The judge determined in the meets, not in the Tammy Smith and the other UF gymnasts work to poll AUTO -_0thatremember the dismounts because polls. their routines for the three regular season meets left. T s0o NW Sat. s-11011m it's the last thing they see, so if you "Nationally, most of the teams are Whl Ave. 378-7676 stick it, it's impressive." pretty even," Gould said. "It's just a Gators host the national championship in April. Impressive team scores will matter of who's hitting that day." ish he OAK MALL 10 $100 DAILY TWI-LITE SHOW OAKS MALL 6309NEWBERRY ROOAD sW IM ECLDED OAKS 6 EAST OAKS 4 WEST 378-8818 mmEOAKS MALL 374-8118 OOAKSPLAZA THE TRIP TO BOUNTIFUL (PG) PRETTY IN PINK (PG-13) 2:00 ($2.00@ 5:00) 7:30, 9:55 2:00 ($2.00@ 5:00) 7:30, 9:55 HOUSE (R) JEWEL OF THE NILE (PG) 2:15($2.00@ 5:15)17:30, 9:55 2:15 ($2.00@ 5:15) 7:45, 9:55 COLOR PURPLE (PG-13) ODD JOBS (PG-13) 1:30, 4:15, 7:15,10:15 2:30 ($2.00@ 5:30) 8:00, 9:55 QUICKSILVER (PG) DOWN AND OUT 2:15 ($2.00@ 5:15)8:00, 10:15 IN BEVERLY HILLS (R) DELTA FORCE (R) 2:15 ($2.00@ 5:15) 7:30, 9:45 2-U :5($.00@ 5 :00) 7:4b, I1U: 1! THANK YOU .BNCCHUS would like to extend their appreciation to the following businesses and individuals that helped make Spring Fling a great success! TONI( GREI ALL F State Welding Balloons and Bows Coca-Cola Ballonacy Student Government Physical Plant and Dragon -Fly Building Services 114 N McDonalds Burger King GatorI Mike De Leonardo Af Portela Don Brinson Linda Rebmon Free BACCHUS is wounded by S G BEER SPECIALS :PREPAE FOR Gainesville ABC's only, Prices good thru Mar. 18Al 0 A MILLER GENESEE A 24-12 botis 6-12 oz cans S Room Room I u g Temp Temp. BUSCH MILLER LITE 24-12 oz cans 24-12 oz cans -' tests acrnpanied by wneinieteaching Waes to Room Room be used at any of our tapecenters. 7m9 Temp Temp -Extensive honestudy notes on all aranof basic science. -Mglals constantly updated. 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20, alligator, wednesday march 1Z 1986 Gator rally falls short, Miami wins 6-5 By MIKE HODGE Alligator Writer One pitch. A high slider. UF came that close to beating Miami. And it's one pitch that losing pitcher Scott Sanford would probably want back. Joe Nelson doubled off Sanford Tuesday in the eighth inning to break a tie game and defeat UF 6-5 in front of a near capacity crowd at Perry Field. "Baseball's a tough game," said Sanford (0-2), who. pitched four consecutive shutout innings in relief of starter Daryl More sports Ren't tennis team beisrSouth*nM/Ntnos, pe 13. IConmotil Jerry Cower says theru istoemuc/i proeiy aSEC Boyd. "One bad pitch with a guy on second can lose a gamegot a slider up and over the plate." Despite the loss, UF coach Joe Arnold praised Sanford's performance and said UF (-10) will be ready to go today. The teavt play again at 7 p.m. "We didn't kick the game away," Arnold said. "They know they've been in a ballgame. We're going to ~come out tomorrow (today) to win." Will Vespe hit a single with one out in the eighth and the score tied at 5. He scored and broke the tie on Nelson's double off the left field wall. With Miami (15-3) up 5-4 in the Ys.eventh, Gator Collin Luttringer walked with two out, moved to second on a sacrifice and scored on JoeyFernandez's single to deep right field just ahead of Vespe's throw to the plate. Down 5-2, UF scored two runs off reliever Rick Raether (4-0) on RBI singles by Jose Alou and John Woodward with two out. Woodward was called out at third on Alou's single. Trailing 5-0 in the fourth, UF's Rodney Brewer was hit by a pitch and scored on Tim Touma's double off Miami starter Dan Davies down the third base-line. Scott Clemo singled and scored on Ed Shea's groundout to third. Miami scored two in the second when Vespe hit a two-run home run off Boyd. A Mike Fiore grounder then scored Nelson with two out to make it 3-0. UF loaded the bases in the first on a single and two walks, but two strike outs and a fly ball ended the threat. With one out in the first, Fiore reached on an error, stole second, moved to third on a bunt single and scored on Chris Magno's grounder. Musings on NCAA basketball With the NCAA basketball tournament starting tomorrow, these musings This college hoops season has been known as a year without big front lines, but Georgia Tech opens the NCAA tournament against one of the biggest teams in the nation: the Marist Red Foxes. The Red Foxes imported five players, including 7-foot-3 Rick Smitts of Holland, 7-foot Rudy Bourgarel of Mexico and 6-foot11 Miroslav Pecarski of Yugoslavia. But at 19-11 and seeded No. 15 in the Southeast Region, Marist is not expected to spe tseene give the Yellow Jackets much of a game. Tech head coach Bobby Cremins, who has seen countless early-round upsets in past NCAA tournaments, is taking nothing for granted. "That's how everybody was talking when we opened last year against Mercer," Cremins said. "You saw what happened (Tech won 65-58). We almost looked past Mercer and nearly got burned. We can't afford to take anybody lightly. "Hey, these people (Marist) lost by only 13 points at St. John's and by 16 at Villanova. They're starting guys 7-3 and 6-11, and they've got another 7-footer in reserve. Kentucky's Kenny Walker and his teammates open their NCAA run against Davidson. Height aside, Cremins is fallen in the early rounds because probably more confident about of taking teams like Cleveland the prospect of playing Marist State (27-3), Northeastern (26-4) than he outwardly appears to be. and Pepperdine (24-4) lightly. But one thing he alluded to is certain: Don't take anyone lightly. The mighty often have see NCAA, page 12 REACH ARMS CONTROL AND THE BACHEV 5pITS BY PAUL W \RN Former Chief Negotiator SALT II Treaty Former Director US Arms Control & Disarmament Agency Former Secretary of Defense for International Security Affairs Current Director Committee for National Security 8:00 PM WEDNESDAY RCH 120 REITZ UNION BALLR N ADMISSION I U