Citation
The Independent Florida alligator

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Title:
The Independent Florida alligator
Portion of title:
Florida allgator
Portion of title:
Alligator
Alternate Title:
University digest
Alternate Title:
University of Florida digest
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, FL
Publisher:
Campus Communications, Inc.
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2005
Frequency:
Daily (except Saturdays, Sundays, holidays and exam periods, Aug.-Apr.); semiweekly (May-July)
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. (some col.) ; 36 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
Online databases.
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Online databases ( lcsh )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.651781 x -82.336258

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Additional Physical Form:
Also available online.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 65, no. 75 (Feb. 1, 1973)-
General Note:
"Not officially associated with the University of Florida."
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries.

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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator.Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non - profit research and educational purposes.Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000470760 ( ALEPH )
13827512 ( OCLC )
ACN5549 ( NOTIS )
sn 86010448 ( LCCN )
0889-2423 ( ISSN )

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volume 77, no. 47

Escaped rapist linked to local crime

Bv SCOTT La POINT
Alligator Staff Writer -TV
A suspected rapist who escaped from North Carolina
police three weeks ago is back in Gainesville and may have
had sexual intentions during the recent burglary of a
Gainesville womans home, police said Wednesday.
Because John Gregory Farrow, who was charged with
seven counts of bursary and rape in Alachua County, is
believed to be in the area, police have begun canvassing
local motels, which police consider likely targets of
Farrows.
Farrow is linked to a local burglary in which the victim
identified the assailant through a police picture, Gainesville
police Lt. Larry Gabbard said Wednesday. Gabbard refused
to release any details about the burglary.



Administrator calls cops to halt feared protest

By TOM BUTUM
Alligator Staff Writer
UF police were called to Johnson Hall Wednesday at the
request of a UF administrator who feared that a woman he
fired was going to disrupt the offices during lunch hour.
Joseph Hough. Finance and Accounting Division director,
requested the police. On Tuesday, Hough fired Pam Rijos
and said he feared she would invite members of the media to
Johnson Hall.
"The director of it (Finance and Accounting) had received
information that she invited the news media into the
building, UF police Lt. Gene Watson said. Watson and two
other plainclothes officers had been dispatched to the
Finance and Accounting offices next to the Rathskeller in
Johnson Hall.
We were there to make sure there was no disruption of
the workplace, Watson explained.
Instead of a disturbance, Watson he and the
Rijos was given a letter from Hough that said shewas fired
Rijos claims her application was Tampered and that she is

Gabbard said the man identified as Farrow may have
had sexual intentions, but she screamed and he left.
This incident led police to notify motel owners about the
escaped prisoner, known for raping women in their apart apartments.
ments. apartments.
Farrow, serving two 25-year sentences in a North
Carolina state prision, escaped while on his way to Seminole
County when he jumped out of a plane as it was taxiing
before takeoff.
According to police records, the 34-year-old escapee had
strong ties to Alachua County and was expected to return.
A desk clerk at a local motel, said police came by the
motel asking him if hes seen Farrow and notified him that
he may be frequenting local motels.
They came by and said they were looking for him, the
clerk, who wished to remain anonymous, said Wednesday

being harassed for speaking with the press earlier this year.
But UF officials refuse to talk about her firing.
"The reason for it is a personnel reason, UF spokesman
Hugh Cunningham said. The University of Florida does not
discuss personnel situations.
Asked about a possible disruption of the Johnson Hall
offices, Cunningham said the decision to send UF police was
made with the best available information .which was from
Hough.
As an example of why police went on a moments notice,
Cunningham said, if UF police had reacted quickly last May
4, former library employee Daivd Shelley could have been
stopped from shooting and wounding UF Libraries Director
Gus Harrer. Shelley pleaded guilty to the shootings Monday.
There was nothing that caused the police to be there that
involved public safety, Cunningham added. But police are
used for other things than threats to public safety.
In addition to being an account clerk, Rijos also is the
chief steward for the American Federation of State, County
and Municipal Employees (AFSCME) Local 3171.
Rijos said she has been harassed on the job since she spoke
to an Alligator reporter about the working conditions of UF
Rijos said. tp Skizm : *%;.

UF radio club members
tune to student in Grenada

See related story, page nine.
By TOM BUTLfR
Alligator Staff Writer
Mark Van Buskirk leaned forward and
adjusted the radio transceiver as an echoing
voice cut through the static on the 14-
megahertz band.
Are they on the beach? the calling
station asked. Can you see any soldiers at
this time?
Negative, a faint voice answered from
Grenada.
Van Buskirk, who hopes to study electrical
engineering at UF, is one of a dozen
members of the UF Amateur Radio Club
who have been monitoring the Caribbean
airwaves since U.S. Marines landed on the
island of Grenada Tuesday.
The radio amateurs, or hams, have been
passing messages for relatives worried about
American students on the island and
monitoring the confused military situation as
Marines and paratroopers closed in on a
Cuban-built airfield.
The UF amateur radio operators have
continuously monitored the station on the
11th floor erf Shands Teaching Hospital since
3 p.m. Tuesday. Their sole contact on the
island is an American student known on the
airwaves as KA2 ORK J 3.
Hes the only contact our State Depart Department
ment Department has down there, club President Art
Stauf said. He reached for a copy of Amateur
Radio Callbook and thumbed through the
pages until he found the call sign.
KA2 ORK J 3 is Mark Barettella, a medical
student from New Jersey who is attending the
St. Georges Medical School in Grenada. By
listening to the reports as they came in,
Stauf, Van Buskirk and other listeners could
tell that Barettella was transmitting from the

aoivotnv/xNvaang aor

UF ham radio operator Mark Van Buskirk and other operators have been monitoring
the airwaves of Grenada since the conflict began and have been relaying
messages from concerned relatives to medical students on the island.

thursday, October 27, 1983

night. They said theyre checking from motel to motel,
saying he may be a transient.
However, such efforts have not always proved effective. In
the past, a man resembling Farrow has b?en brought many
times to the station. Officer Janet Presley last week said
numerous people have mistaken this man for Farrow.
Gabbard said he could not release the mans name because
he has never been charged with a crime.
Arrested last September in North Carolina while driving a
car stolen from Gainesville, Farrow is 5 feet 11 inches tall
and weighs about 155 pounds. He has blue eyes, blond
medium-length hair and a fair complexion.
According to a police report, Farrow once got the name
and address of one of his victims by looking at her check checkbook
book checkbook in a supermarket.

second floor of a dormitory near the Pearls
Airport on Grenada.
Stauf, a Navy ROTC student, said the
Gator station had already passed along two
messages from local residents asking about
relatives on the embattled island. Steven
Sass, an architecture student from Tampa,
grabbed the opportunity to send a message
asking about His cousin in St. Georges.
My cousin was down there and I wanted
to see if he was OK, Sass said. They said
none of the students had been hurt.
Sass said his cousin had graduated from
UF in 1980 with a degree in psychology and
began attending the St. Georges school on
Grenada six months ago. Sass said he had
been worried that perhaps his cousin hadnt
heard the warnings broadcast by American
radio stations, warning civilians to take
cover as the invasion landed.
In normal times, a telephone customer can
reach Grenada by starting with an "809
area code. But when U.S. troops invaded the
island six days after a sudden revolution,
phone service was cut off and remained cut
off as of Wednesday night.
In its place, the Federal Communications
Commission (FCC) designated frequencies
that Barettella and stateside stations could
use for news and for family information.
Certain stations were designated as net
control stations, regulating calls-
The radio traffic Wednesday afternoon
showed that Barettella may be ready to shut
down his station. The first planeload of
Americans had been evacuated to Puerto
Rico, and Barettella confirmed that he was
the only resident left on the second floor of
his building.
'U nm >
n a in
page nine

Rijos said two UF police officers also appeared at her
husbands workplace in Shands Teaching Hospital during
the same lunch hour Wednesday.
Lt. Watson said the officers who went to Shands also were
told that a disgruntled employee would try to disrupt the
workplace.
The Finance and Accounting office attached a pair of two twosided
sided twosided photocopies of Rijos employment application to her
letter of dismissal. The dismissal letter said Rijos submitted
an updated application 14 months after she started work at
UF. On the updated version, Rijos cited working at Southern
Copy Products at a time when she formerly had listed herself
as a housewife. On the application, Rijos said she left the job
for her current one at UF.
Information has been received that you were terminated
for cause' from Southern Copy Products, the dismissal
letter said. The letter did not say what the cause was.
But Rijos questions the authenticity of parts of the ap application.
plication. application.
Rijos pointed out several spots on the photocopies ap application
plication application form attached to her dismissal letter where hand,
wriiing appeared amiasi ner diock priming, i ne Time during
With a pen heavier than the surrounding writing.



!, atjiggtoyimrsday, October 27. 1983

2

Senators refuse money for UFLAGS

By JOSHUA L. WEINSTEIN
Alligator Staff Writer
UF student senators spent more than $46,000 Tuesday on
items like a Xerox typewriter and a campus arts festival, but
they denied the University of Florida Lesbian and Gay
Society (UFLAGS) $512 for a speaker.
Just a portion of the $46,000 went for a $3,360 typewriter
for the Student Honor Court and $28,705 for Omnicron
Delta Kappa s (ODK) Celebration this coming spring.
Senators said the 39-member (UFLAGS) was too small and
didn't affect their particular constituencies. Besides, Student
Government has already given UFLAGS money for
speakers, according to Sen. David Lawrence.
They voted 31-9 against the allocation after a lengthy
debate in which they cut the request to S4OO, and finally
denied it.
In addition. Sen. Fred Morales a vocal opponent of the
group said he doesnt think students want to fund
UFLAGS anyway. Morales called UFLAGS a chicken-shit
organization and said that anybody who voted for the
allocation will be committing political delinquency.
Several UFLAGS members left the senate meeting
disturbed at the senators actions.
1 just have never been this upset, said Melissa, a
member who asked that her last name not be used. From
what 1 saw in there (the Student Senate meeting), even
though they didnt say it.. they are prejudiced.
The speaker, Virginia Apuzzo, is director of the National
Gay Task Force and a former nun, UFLAGS Director
Joanna Weinberger said Tuesday.
Apuzzo said she would speak free. The money would pay

Local science teacher receives state award

By SUN IT A RAMAYYA
Alligator Writer
A local instructor has been recognized as the outstanding
science teacher in the state.
Nancy Griffin, a science teacher at UFs P.K. Yonge
Laboratory School for 16 years, was recognized earlier this
month for her efforts.
Grifin was nominated for the award, competed with
teachers form around the state and won on the basis of
recommendations and evaluations from teachers throughout
the state.
A lot of people knew of my work, Griffin said, although
she said she was surprised of hearing about the award.
In addition to her work as a teacher, Griffin also was
recognized for her work in high school science activities,
participation in workshops and writing in science journals.
Griffin said her goal is to get students as much involved

si Come celebrate
Gator Days
Listening Party
Saturday,
Participating Butler Plaza Merchants:
American Coin and Stamp Hair Plus _-e
Ashleys Pub Greshams Drugs n W vQI.
Balloons and Bows The Hairbenders /.D'V
Carvel Ritz Arcade 7 r\. \ 1
Cinema and Drafthouse Kings Krafts (?Oj L \\ V
Chestnuts Petpourri \\ V
The Coffee Mill Phone Center f \\ \
Computer System Plant Parlour a \\ \
Resources Publix O \\
Copys Uniform Shop Saveway # CO' 0 \\
Fabric King Shoe Box and Boutique \\
Cathay lea House \ \

her air fareto Gainesville.
But despite senators lack of support, Weinberger is un undaunted,
daunted, undaunted, saying she will find away to bring the speaker to
UF.
The event will occur at 8 p.m. on Dec. 8 in the University
Auditorium, she said confidently after the request was
denied.
The only thing Weinberger said she was upset about is that
senators who supported the project in committee before
the larger meeting did not vote for it during Tuesday
nights meeting.
Senators did, however, approve some requests.
Omnicron Delta Kappas celebration got $28,705.94,
almost $ 10,000 more than they received last year.
Celebration is a weekdong festival of the arts that ODK
sponsors yearly. This year, however, ODK representatives
have to report to senators each month, filling senators in on
Celebrations progress.
This is the first time a group has had to report monthly to
senators, but since the event is planned about six months in
advance, senators said they want to be kept informed.
Another $3,360 was given to the Honor Court to buy a
new typewriter.
The machine, a Xerox with word-processing abilities, will
save time and increase confidentiality of Honor Court
records. Honor Court Chancellor Todd Bass told senators.
In other business, senators voted to give:
M, 150 to the Peer Counseling Program;
" initial approval of $3,500 for the Billy Mitchell Drill
Team;
" initial approval of S7BO for the UF Chess Club.

as possible in body involvements and lab experiments.
Body involvements include an exercise where students
calculate their body and mass volume.
There is a certain amount of satisfaction and pleasure of
having received the award, Griffin said.
I have had old students come up to me and tell me that
theyre in science because of the excitement I generated in
them, or say that its because of what Ive done that theyre
going into a certain field.
Todays forecast: generally fair and cool with highs in the
low to mid 705(21-23C) and lows in the 40s(7C). No rain
predicted.

1620 W. Univ. Ave r UF Plaza
373-1195 373-7000
$35.00 Perm Special
Haircut Included (long hair slightly more)
Oct. 27-Nov. 5
Home of the $9 Style Cut for Men
59/an's Gubana
1712 W. Univ. & 1717 N.W. Ist Ave.
LUNCH SHOAL (M .m.-i p.m.( In 4inle room only
1 Half Sandwich w/F.F.
or Onion Rings $1.95
! 2.SmallChaasoPizza $1.75
3. Chas Salad $2.25
4. Chick an & Swiss Quiche $1.95
5. Wings or Nuggest A Fries $3.10
Our new location al 1717 N. W. Ist Are. (next to Hagrlanil) is
now open. Specials good at both locations.
I j 10% OFF '^|
HI Offer Good Thru 12/12/83 nfl
Isl LAKES UNIFORMS
pi 702 W. University
pfull line of professional wear & accessories for o*l
| men & women. One coupon per purchase. I
Any other discounts excluded JfA
LIUS GARDEN
/ j A Sample of the Food
' b J Good Prices
V. / Hospitality of China
" FRIED WONTON (2) W/LUNCH
EGG ROLL (1) FREE W/AAAIN DISH
Open Alton.-Thor*. 11am-9pm
Fri. 1 lam-10pm Ml lo<
Sat. & Sun. 4pm-10pm



Tractor pull
causing dirt,
sparks to fly
By JOSHUA L. WEINSTEIN
Alligator Staff Writer
The dirt will fly in the OConnell Center this weekend
when the floor is covered with more than a foot and a half of
earth to accommodate a tractor pull.
But some student leaders question whether UF should be
sponsoring such an event. In a tractor pull, especially
modified trucks and tractors pull weighted sleds down a dirt
track.
This is not the type of event that a student activity center
should promote, Student Body Treasurer Mark Fisher said.
I think it's highly inappropriate for the OConnell Center to
be promoting non-student activities.
Student Government Productions (SGP) Chairman Jeff
Sandler agreed.
I find it hard to believe the administration thinks a
tractor pull is an appropriate event in the OConnell Cen Center,
ter, Center, Sandler said. Student Body President Charlotte Mather
called the pull ridiculous.
I dont see any students going to a tractor pull when we
havent had any contemporary music in there, Mather said.
The student leaders say OConnell Center Director Jim
Dalrymple is responsible for the event. Dalrymple did not
return a reporters phone calls this week, but did speak at a
Sept. 29 OConnell Center Board of Managers meeting.
The tractors run on butane fuel, Dalrymple said, so you
will get a little smoke, but with the exhaust system in the
building, itll just suck it mit.
The director, who said hed love to bring in the mud
wrestlers during intermission, called tractor pulls
probably the fastest growing indoor sport in the country.
Dalrymple also said during a slide presentation on tractor
pulls at the September meeting that he thinks our students

Growl injuries lead officials to seek Safer fireworks

By SCOTT LaPOINT
Alligator Staff Writer
Following last Friday night's Gator Growl
in which 13 people reported being injured
when debris from fireworks drifted into
Florida Field, UF administrators are in investigating
vestigating investigating ways to provide a safer fireworks
display at future Growls.
UF spokesman Hugh Cunningham said UF
police and officials from both the Physical
Plant and Environmental Health and Safety
departments are going to look into these
matters.
Meanwhile, Gene Hawkins, U.S. Sen-
Paula Hawkins' husband, may find himself
buying a new jacket.
Hawkins clothing was singed by the
falling debris and sparks burned his jacket,
the senators aide, Peter Breslin said Wed Wednesday.
nesday. Wednesday.

UF senior Gretchen
Gauler and her fiancee,
Marine It. Ed Cawthon,
were the subjects of an
erroneous announcement
by Bob Hope during Gator
Growl.
JIM VIRGA/ALLIGATOR

Hope had right man, wrong base

By CLAY CAMPBELL
Alligator Writer
Luckily, UF senior Gretchen Gawler
wasnt one of 76,000 people at Gator
Growl to hear comedian Bob Hope read a
love letter from her fiancee, Marine Lt.
Ed. Cawthon.
Hope announced to the crowd that
sent his love from Beirut. Beirut
was the site Sunday of a massacre, which,
at last count, has left 219 Americans
dead.
Grawler missed Growl, and her
message, because that same night she was
busy picking someone up at the Orlando
airport.
Gtfwler was meeting her fiancee. And
he wasn't returning from Lebanon, but
from Okinawa, Japan.
"I would have been real upset, Gawler
said, if she had been at Growl to hear
Hopes announcement. "1 would have
had no way of knowing he wasnt in
Lebanon.

Hawkins was one of an unknown number
of spectators who did not report the effects of
the fireworks show, which officials from the
fireworks firm blamed on strong winds.
UF spokeswoman Linda Gray was another
observer hurt by the fireworks but not one of
the 13 to file a report with police.
A piece of debris hit me in the face,
Gray said. I had something hit me on the
cheek and it hurt.
It scared the you-know-what out of me,
Gray said.
Cunningham said Wednesday no lawsuits
had been filed against Zambelli In International
ternational International Fireworks, a Newcastle, Pa., firm
that performs the fireworks show and is
responsible for any injuries.
But even if there were any lawsuits,
Cunningham added, we wouldnt
acknowledge (them) because we dont discuss
any court actions.

I r M

Hopes message came from a letter the
Marine mailed to the entertainer in care
of UF President Robert Marston.
Cawthon said Wednesday that he had
no idea how Hope made the mistake.
Cawthon said he. wrote Hope that he was
stationed in Okinawa.
Ironically, the Marines in Okinawa are
likely replacements for those in Beirut,
Cawthon said,
Okinawa is the ready force, but
theres no way of knowing (if the marines
there will be sent to Beirut next), because
thats classified information, he said.
Cawthon did not express concern about
the possibility of being sent to Beirut,
however. Its my job. Whatever the
president wants, Ill do, he said.
The Marine got the idea to send the
letter to Hope after reading a UF events
calendar that Gawler sent him. Cawthon
said he was afraid that the letter wouldnt
reach Hope, but, I know if (Bob Hope)
got the letter, hed read it. Hes a ser serviceman."
viceman." serviceman."

I fillip
A'
JAY MALUN/ ALLIGATOR

will get involved in this, even though this weekends event
conflicts with Sundays SGP Halloween Festival.
Everybody knows we have a program (Sunday), Sandler
said, adding he doesn't think any of his audience will be at
the pull instead of the festival.
What I dont understand is that the building is going to
be out of commission for two days before and two days after
(cleaning up the dirt), he said, continuing he thinks there is

According to UF police, 13 people
reported bums on their bodies or ashes in
their eyes when several fireworks called
spinners failed to fully explode, dropping
debris and five balls of fire into the northwest
stands of the stadium.
George Zambelli, president of Zambelli
International, brushed aside the reported
injuries as nothing to worry about.
Oh, what do you mean injuries,
Zambelli said Wednesday. When I talked to
the paramedics after the show, they said
there was nothing serious.
Zambelli, who said his family has been in
the fireworks business for more than 90
years, said his company provided $5 million
worth of insurance coverage in case of such
accidents. He said UF required his company
to provide insurance.
This is not the first time people have been
injured by falling fireworks at Gator Growl.

x
SGP under fire for funding
Sinkhole Tapes promotion

Bv K. ALYCIA ALLEN
Alligator Staff Writer
Student Government officials and a UF
administrator are meeting today to deter determine
mine determine if Student Government Productions
(SGP) will honor a verbal contract to back a
local recording venture.
Student Services Dean James Scott charges
that SGP Chairman Jeff Sandler is misusing
student money by committing $8,500 in
activity and service fee money to help
produce The Sinkhole Tapes, a recording
of local bands.
And UF Student Body Treasurer Mark
Fisher said Sandler did not have the right to
make a verbal contract to help promote the
album. Fisher said only he and Student Body
President Charlotte Mather have that
authority.
But Sandler said the money is coming from
SGP concert profits not student money,
which he said he would not spend before
consulting with Mather or Fisher. Activity
and service fees come from a $4.04 tax on
each credit hour paid by students.
Sandler also said he frequently enters into
verbal agreements.
From a legal standpoint I guess Mark and
Charlotte are the only ones who can sign a
contract, Sandler said. "But from a reality
standpoint, I have the leeway to make a
verbal contract every time 1 bid on a band."
SGP already invested about $3,000 in a
free concert Oct. 9 to promote the recording.
Scott said he wants to limit further SGP

alligator, thursday, October 27, 1983,

a double standard going on. The pull begins Friday and ends
Sunday.
I want to know why whats acceptable for him
(Dalrymple) is not acceptable for me.
But Dalrymple, as of September, was happy with the pull,
which will cost $4 per ticket, $8 trackside.
These arent your normal garden tractors, Dalrymple
said. Those things could fly an airplane if they had to.

In 1981, more than 10 people sustained
minor injuries when debris landed on
spectators in the stadium, said Ken Lambert,
Gator Growl producer.
Zambelli International, which has pier pierformed
formed pierformed the fireworks show four other times
in the past 10 to 15 years, did not produce
the show in 1981, but was signed on this year
because of the companys safety record, the
number of firework shells provided,
references from other customers and price,
Lambert said.
Cunningham quipped, We want to
arrange next year for the wind to blow from
the south.
Lambert said, I wouldnt say hes
(Zambelli) been scarred. He probably
produced the best show in years. But we
certainly dont want that to happen again.

contribution to $3,000 to pay the 10 groups
on the album for a January concert at The
Islands.
But Bob McPeek, owner of Mirror Image
Recording Studio and co-owner of Hyde and
Zeke Record Exchange, said he is counting
on the full amount Sandler promised him to
produce the album.
They're trying to shaft me for $2,500,
McPeek said. For them to yank it away
after the fact is at least inappropriate, if not
illegal.
McPeek said the controversy has set the
project two weeks Jjehind schedule.
Fisher said he thought those at the meeting
would agree to honor the verbal com commitment,
mitment, commitment, even though no contract has been
signed.
In the uncontracted agreement, McPeeks
two businesses would receive 67 pier cent of
the profits and SGP would get 33 pjercent,
although SGP invested eight times as much
as McPeek did.
McPeek, however, argued that his studio
time, promotions and manptower is worth
$ 18,470. McPeek said he has invested
$ 1,000 cash and expiects the project to cost
about $ 12,000 to produce.
He saijl he plans to print 1,000 albums and
200 cassettes, but doesnt expect the venture
to pay for itself.
1 would be happy if the project grossed
$4,000 or $5,000, McPeek said.
Alligator staff writer Bill McLean con contributed
tributed contributed to this report.

3



4

I, alligator, thursday, October 27, 1983

Bush in Beirut to boost morale

BEIRUT V'ict President George Bush, in flak jacket
and helmet, pinned Purple Hearts on Marines at their
Immbed-out base Wednesday and vowed the cowards
who killed at least 219 American never will alter U.S.
policy.
"I had not expected this much destruction," said Bush
"bile watching soldiers remove debris from the Sunday
suicide bombing that devastated the four-story nerve
center of the U.S. peacekeeping force at Beirut airport.
"We've given up hope anybody is alive, said Cpl. Ran
d> Barefoot. 21. of Kenly, N.C. "All the floors are pressed
down, and everything was squished. There is no hope.
The Marines remained on maximum alert before, dur during
ing during and after Bush's three-hour, morale-boosting trip for
fear of a new attack.
About two hours before he arrived. Marines fired mor mortars
tars mortars to suppress gun and rocket-propelled grenade fire
from slums to the east of the base.
SEARCH FOR ADAM
FORT PIERCE Searchers sloshed through a large
swampy area near the Florida Turnpike Wednesday hunting
the remains of 6-year-old Adam Walsh where a drifter said
he buried the boys body after the 1981 kidnap-murder.
The search began Tuesday and police would not speculate
Wednesday how long it would last.
"Because of the size of the area, theres a lot of time in involved,
volved, involved, said Steve Davis, the Hollywood police captain
who is leading the search.
More than two dozen officers searched the privately own owned
ed owned area in St. Johns River Marsh just east of the turnpike
near mile marker 126 west of Fort Pierce.
It is about .6 miles from where two fishermen found the
boy's head two weeks after the abduction, which launched
one of the most intensive manhunts in state history.
Ottis Elwood Toole, 36, a drifter from Jacksonville, con confessed
fessed confessed to the murder of Adam, who was kidnapped from a
Hollywood shopping center in July 1981.
UNNECESSARY HEART SURGERY
WASHINGTON The most comprehensive study yet in indicates
dicates indicates 25,000 Americans undergo unnecessary coronary
artery bypass surgery each year, adding SSOO million to the
nation's annual health bill, doctors reported Wednesday.
Leaders of the 10-year, federally supported study said

miMfZ UNION NEWS!

RILEY
Dance Repertory
November 9,1983
ML Students $5,
.jMt Senior Citizens $7,
1 General Public $9
| ALVIN AILEY brings talented young dancers and
""W&t i choreographers into the limelight, acting os o
showcase today for the dance tomorrow.
*3NkT Tickets available at University Box Office,

CTfights in
MEXICO!
Cancun or Cozumel
Hotal (Double Occupancy) and Round
Trip Air Fare from Miami
tjnrp s2l
till Oacwbar IS
FOR DETAILS AND RESERVATIONS CALL:
University City Travel or Uni varsity Travel
West Unlvuralty Avu. Rultx Union, UF Campus
377-42 M 342-7350

outside

There was no firing during Bushs stay, but after he left,
Moslem gunmen were spotted setting up gun posts in an
abandoned house on the northeast perimeter of the air airport.
port. airport.
Marines with M-16 automatic rifles stood guard every
two yards from the aiport runway to the amphibious unit
headquarters as Bush arrived on a helicopter from the
USS Iwo Jima.
Marines said their morale was raised by the visit of
Bush and Marine Commandant Paul X. Kelley on Tues Tuesday,
day, Tuesday, although Bush spent less than an hour on the
ground.
- Yeah, we're mad," said a 25-year-old corporal. Id
like to take this place out, turn it into the biggest parking
lot in the Middle East, he said.
"Just seeing the commandant, he came up and said
'good going guys' and saluted. Yeah, thats motivating,
said Lance Cpl. James Stephens, 21, of Cincinnati.
their findings suggest people with mild to moderate symp symptoms
toms symptoms of hardening of the arteries would pay no penalty in
ultimate survival for postponing surgery and receiving drug
treatment instead.
Perhaps on the basis of these data, for a significant
population, the surgical measures can be safely postponed,
said Dr. Thomas Killip of Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit.
In fact, Killip said such patients would probably come out
ahead in the long run, in terms of health as well as financial financially,
ly, financially, because they can have bypass surgery later if their symp symptoms
toms symptoms worsen. Such surgery does not slow the basic artery
disease and a second bypass operation is much more difficult
and hazardous.
Its a question of having your one good operation at the
best possible time, said Dr. Eugene Passamani, associate
director of cardiology at the National Heart, Lung and
Blood Institute.
If the findings of the coronary artery surgery study were
accepted and generally applied, it is conservatively
estimated that there will be 25,000 fewer coronary bypasses
performed in this country each year," the report said.
SOVIETS THREATEN WALKOUT
MOSCOW President Yuri Andropov Wednesday said
the Soviet Union will walk out of the Geneva arms nib if
NATO deployment of U.S. cruise and Pershing-2 missiles
begins.
At the same time, he outlined new Soviet proposals at the
talks.
The appearance of new American missiles in Western
Europe will make a continuation of the present talks in
Geneva impossible, Andropov said in an article to appear
in the Communist Party newspaper Pravda today.
Compiled from United Press International

Mike McElwee
guitarist
FRIDAY & SATURDAY
Oct. 28-291 n the
ORANGE & BREW
Relax to the music ofHogtown's
own! Sponsored by Reitz Union
Food Service and SGP.

lobe athirst Rite THE FOUR MUSKETEERS
Friday 11/2 7.9:N Midnight Sunday 11/M 7:00 & 9:39
See Drocu/o go disc o in this vampire s poof! George Eleaant u- l.
Hamilton plays the lovesick Count. $l,OOl no-holds-borred catfights, and]
A out for revenge) Only $ 1.00!

OATOSOUIDOORSKaULnONnOMAM""!
PMtK
CAMPING A CANOEING
LOCATION: KeKy Eerie, Orange County near
Orlando.
DATE: Noemnbnr U-M. mi
DEADLINE: NovmnWS. mi
COST: SIT-Studants. SM Nonstednnts
INCLUDED: Transportation. comping and
conoolnf equipment. fonts, slnnping bags
The trip will include overnight stays in the
Wilderness Camping area, canoeing and tubing
on the Rock Springs River and Wekiva River.
REGISTER NOW 392165 S

Will*-; m N r rnM
MIaCHIBOPMCIiI j
lj|

i
Fn adl W
uHlil ISAM Os
IBIRII

Y^bjaatesuUe
/fakaHtber qci.m
< ni'lrckcstm fa
in the Reitz Union Ballroom
PREMIER PERFORMANCE of Gainesville's new
community orchestral Treat yourself in o
classic way! Sponsored by J. Wayne Reitz
Union. man

Announcing Holiday Tradition..
JWabrtgal Burner*!
Novemlwr tO thmugh Docombor 1
UF Studont* lit. O.P. 117
Dine in the time of Queen Elizabeth on roast beef and plum pud
(be delightful entertoinement of the Renaissance Ensem
We and Madrigal Singersl Tickets available November 7 at the
University Box Office (393-1653).
for added convenience, organizations wishing to purchase a
minimum of 50 (idee* for the new Organization Night (Nov. 29)
may do so by contacting the University Box Office for details.



IWI E. Unlv. *, at WiUo 31D M.W. 13th (tract
M h -tMwy.441 3744 H.JZ'wZi
..**l3 NawlwTyVowJ'** I MM.
*"* HAPiydSft aso. dbinks.
Red, White ft Blue cja-5.99 o
Millar cjss- 8.89 ou.
Genesee 7.79.
Slog Beer KSL- W 6.35 a.
Blotx -as- 1.79 A
Ancient Age 86* Brh. 5.99 7
Beileyi Irish Cream 11.99 7
Seagrams 7 Blend 5.99 7
Ren Rice Ram jn s. 6.79
Gilbeys Gin 6.59 *.
Walkers Canadian 6.49
Schenley Vodka 5.79
Whitehall mu. 4.99 K
Scoresby 86* Scotch 12.99 S
Gilbeys Vodka 7 9.99 K
Heischmanns Gin 710.99 2
Lord Calvert ra- 7 12.79 2
Jim Beam Bourbon 711.79 2
Old Thompson Mmi 710.29 SI
Gallo Ksrt,t::gt, 3.99 £
Gold Peakuumi. :cr- 4.49 X
ABC Wine ssr 2.99 &
Inglenook sssita 6.29 X
Seven lip DM Swm Up 99* X
Gustafson Milk '"ZZT 1.69^
- MSI TOM. sn. Z1 TB
wvi hags IvnTOff^m
nmBHl vodka fW?M.m*Mf
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"licir oncPPBBF-" 1^
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MBMmUbh MATEUS

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\ i
CAN YOU BUY GOOD TASTE?

Yes! Now you can acquire good taste for a
couple of bucks. Just wear shirts and visors
that say Dos Equis.' After all, those

UF students, Marston blast CLAST

Bv MARK R. MILLER
Alligator Writer
UF President Robert Marston agrees with students he
doesnt like the College Level Academic Skills Test (CLAST)
Florida college students have to take their sophomore year.
I don t like the 12th grade test and I dont like this
(CLAST), Marston said. The 12th grade test Marston
referred to is the Functional Literacy test that high school
juniors take to test their skills to decide whether they can
graduate the next year.
About 30 student leaders met with Marston and other UF
administrators Tuesday night at a student-faculty dinner in
the Reitz Union. CLAST was the major topic of con conversation.
versation. conversation.
The CLAST is a test given to all college sophomores to
determine whether they can do upper-division work. It was
given twice during the 1982-83 school year for a trial run to
determine a passing score. But beginning January 1984,
students must pass the test to get an associate's degree or to
enter upper-division classes at a state university or com community
munity community college.
Students at the dinner said the sophomore test was
redundant because they were required to take and pass the
Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) or the American College Test
(ACT) their senior year in high school before they can go to
college.
Another gripe students have had was that CLAST
measures high school performance not college skills.

County to eye city's airport noise proposal

By MICHELLE FOWLER
Alligator Staff Writer
Alachua County commissioners decided to review a city
recommendation that would save the city from possible
lawsuits from residents, but could open the county for
lawsuits from developers.
The Gainesville City Commission fears possible noise
damage lawsuits from residents living near the Gainesville
Regional Airport. The commissioners asked the county
Wednesday to prohibit residential development in the area
that averages sound levels at 65 or more decibels. Residents
living in areas with 60 to 65 decibels would receive notices
warning the of danger of living in such a noisy area.
The county commissioners, meeting immediately after the
city commision, agreed to review the citys recom recommendations.
mendations. recommendations. But county commissioner Chairman John
Schroepfer commented after the meeting that county
commissioners would be telling developers they cannot build
residential housing on their own land.
They have the right to build residential development
there but if we say no they can take us to court,
Schroepfer said, adding that he wanted to discuss the matter
with the county attorney.
The county commission will review the citys recom recommendation
mendation recommendation for two weeks before making a decision.

. NOW HEAR THIS:
ATTENTION ORGANIZERS AND EVENTS PLANNERS FOR STUDENT AND
, COMMUNITY ORGANIZATIONS: The Fall Semester calendar section of The
Alligator's New Student Edition was such a success that there will be an encore for
Spring Semester. This is a chance to publicize your spring events in an attractive J&'
calendar that students will hold onto for reference throughout the spring. Send your
YL. events listings to: Alligator Spring Semester Calendar, Attn: Kathy Sumner, P. O. v. A
Box 14257, Gainesville, FL 32604. This is a free listing!

words and alligators have good taste..
So, order your kind of good taste in Dos
Equis sportswear today. And remember to
eat your peanut butter and jelly sand sandwiches
wiches sandwiches over the sink.

alligator, thursday, October 27, 1983,

I took it and was very insulted," one student told UF
Registrar Vernon Voyles at the dinner.
The tests biggest point of contention, however, is that
blacks scored lower on the average on last years trial exams
than any other minority group.
Elijah Smiley, president of the Florida Black Student
Association, has said that there is a 77 percent failure
estimate for blacks who take the test.
But while Marston agreed with all the students charges,
Voyles lauded the test as being away to determine whether
or not students have the tools to do upper-division work (in
college).
It is as much a test of the instutitons educational
program as it is for upper-class admission," he said. Voyles
added that the difference beween the SAT and the CLAST is
that the high shcool exam predicts college performance as a
whole, and the college test can tell if the student will do well
during his junior and senior years.
Another student said she was worried that the passing
score would be set lower based on the results of last years
test because students knew the test wouldnt count, and they
may not have tried as hard.
This is a common philosophy, but students did try,
Voyles said. We did not get the Christmas-tree effect that
you would normally see when students did not try.
The tests passing score will be se*by the state Department
of Education after reviewing cut-off proposals from the 38
representatives of Floridas state community colleges and
universities.

To comply with federal guidelines, the airport cannot
have people living within areas that exceed certain decibel
levels. If not in compliance with the guidelines. Has airport
would not be eligible for federal money.
For several months, city and county officials have had
heated discussions about the area surrounding the airport.
The city first proposed annexation to place the area in their
control and regulation. But procedure states the city must
first go to the county and request they make the necessary
changes instead, Schroepfer said.
The city would be liable for noise damage because the city
owns the airport even though most of the land is within the
county.
Schroepfer said if the county votes against the city's
recommendation, the city can move for annexation through
the Corporate City Limits Council. But county com commissioners
missioners commissioners who make up half of the council, are against the
proposed annexation that excludes a predominantly blade
section of the airport, Schroepfer said.
The annexation plan includes the predominantly white
section west of the airport and excludes the eastern black
subdivision, Schroepfer said. The noise is just as loud in the
black as in the white areas, he said.
In fact, most of the planes land at the airport from the
east, Schroepfer added.

Order by mail. Send to Dos Equis Offer P.O. Box 10102,
Portland, Oregon 97210. Send check or money order. Add 10% or
$1 minimum, whichever is greater, for postage and handling.
Yes, both my socks match, so rush me the following Your Kind of I
I
Allow four weeks for delivery.
T-Shirts $4.50 Tan Size Qty. j
Muscle Shirts $4.50 Black Size Qty.
Baseball Jersey $6.00 White/Red Size Qty.
Sun Visor $3.00 White/Red Size Qty.
Golf Hat $3.50 White/Red Size Qty j


i DOS EQUIS i
JMEUNOOMHOIWoRIj
B IWHnnwW>iw.U

5



6

i, alligator, thursday, October 27, 1983

Useless crusade
Is there a limit to a
s\ Ml / R W(kl time? When
v > should people stop
ef These would seem to
be questions that should
be left to the individual
questions that only
j. I can be answered ac according
cording according to individual
But that theory doesn't hold any water with at
least one Gainesville city commissioner, who is
trying to impose his arbitrary standards on those
around him by saying that the citys after-hours
bottle clubs should be closed.
According to Commissioner Mark Goldstein,
the clubs are a public nuisance.
He backs his argument by citing a report from
Gainesville police Chief Atkins Warren that says
crime is on the increase in the areas surrounding
the clubs.
He also cites a city ordinance that states there is
supposed to be no alcohol consumption in
Gainesville after 2 a.m. and before 7 a.m. in
places like bars or restaurants that are open
to the public.
Goldstein says the places are a hazard to
teenagers who are being influenced to drink when
they hang out at the clubs before the late night
partiers takeover.
The fact is, however, that none erf his
arguments are backed up by any solid evidence.
He would rather people go home and get a good
nights sleep and probably say their prayers
before they go to bed.
A pretty unrealistic point of view for a town
where half of the population is students who are
old enough to decide when they want to go home.
The facts are that no one has yet linked the
increase in downtown crime to bottle clubs. And
Commissioner Gary Gordon has an opposing
report from Warren that says more crime takes
place before 2:30 than after.
Goldstein also seems oblivious to the fact that
one of the clubs Music Express happens to
be the only place in town where black teenagers
can go to have fun. If the club were forced to shut
down its life-line the after hours partiers its
owners say they would have to close their entire
operation.
That would leave Gainesvilles young black
population with the feeling that the town offers
them nothing while catering only to the tem temporary
porary temporary college crowd. One parent also fears that
teenagers who will want to have a good time,
bottle clubs or not will hang out at the
recreation centers, which she calls drug
havens.
Gainesville police, who support closing the
clubs, say the main reason they don't like the
clubs is because of their current private status.
Being private means police officers cannot go into
the dens of iniquity" to check on the demons
that inhabit them after 2.
But, so far, the owners of the bottle clubs have
said they have no objection to police coming in
and have even offered to help pay for increased
patrols in the area.
Gordon has the right idea about how to solve
the problem when he says the clubs should be
regulated instead of being closed down.
By licensing the clubs, officers could enter and
make sure that minors do not get in and also be
sure that club owners follow the law in other
respects.
Currently, there are only three bottle clubs. On
Monday, commissioners slapped a 90-day
moratorium on any future clubs being set up.
With licensing, there should be no reason why the
moratorium couldnt be lifted.
Contrary to Goldsteins belief, the clubs do
serve a useful social function. In a pluralistic
society, there should be outlets for all sorts of
people not just those who go out for a drink
after work and are in bed by midnight.
sty leaving moral questions up to the ii v
dividual, while guaranteeing the public safety,
commissioners can serve all their constituents
and not waste their time on pointfemdrusade.

opinions

We must commit ourselves to peace

Uttor Words of condemnation drip from our lips.
Outrage burns in our minds, sympathy for our fallen
Americans is heavy in our hearts, and an endless desire to
know just who Americas enemies are pumps through our
veins.
Where does man care for his fellow man in this world?
Where is peace revered, and where not? Where are freedom,
democracy and liberty to be found in this world? And why
are those that would serve for peace, cut down?
An atrocity has been committed, and this time we must
feel it! America has been attacked in Lebanon, by assailants,
who have no name, who fade out of die woodwork to
destroy, and just as easily, fade back in to hide. These
assailants would have no peace in the Middle East. They
would have Lebanon torn in two, children cultivated with
hate and war, and they would have death emerge as a
neighbor, knocking on their opponents doors.
American government sources say that a terrorist group of
Iranians and Syrians perpetrated this suicidal attack on the
American Marines and the French peacekeeping forces. We
1

Bown and his ilk must be stopped

Mters I was introduced to the Oct. 17 cover story and
photo of Cary Bown in The Alligator when my roommate
threw the paper to the floor and ground his heel into Gary
Bown'j face. A symbolic gesture of disgust at best. I was only
sorry that he beat me to it (or was it that the heel was not
ground into Bown's face itself).
Bown and his cohort pleaded guilty to murdering Howard
Appledorf. In his own words, Bown described how he hit
Appledorf on the head with a frying pan and then suffocated
him instead of stabbing him to death because he couldnt
stand the sight of blood.
Now Bown, charged with first-degree murder and given a
paltry life sentence, wants his plea changed to second-degree
murder. Well, Bown, you lost control of your life ooe Labor
Day weekend a year ago. Murder is murder, whether bloody
or clean. Be happy with (as Sieve McGarrrtt of Hawaii Five
O would say) murder one. You were lucky that you

Consider the victims of murderers

Editor: Your article The Ultimate Penalty (Oct. 18)
appalled me. It was extremely one-sided. You made the
accused and convicted murderers sound like ideal citizens
that were being unjustly abused by our judicial system.
Henry Schuarzschikl, director cf the American Civil
Liberties Union, called the executions bloodbaths.
Vandiver contends that it is cruel for the state to execute
Spenketink because he had no time to redeem himself for his
crime. What about his victim? Tell me where they get the
nerve to say it is cruel to sentence these men to death.
Wasnt it cruel to kill an innocent person?
> Tell me why Schuarzschikl or Vandiver didnt question
the families of the dead woman that was slain behind the
childrens store, or the family of the dead gas station at attendant
tendant attendant or any other family that has a loved one unjustly
murdered. Why dont they go to the graves of those mur murdered
dered murdered and ask diem how they fed now that they have no
more life, how that they will never see a smile or hear
laughter again. They will never see their own children grow
into ycimg men m*Lwomen, because they are dead and will
by our judicial system? Remember the Bible that we founded
,*r country tin: an eye for an eye. What about a life for a
life? If they did not prolong the lives of these murderers, I

condemn these killers for what they are and for what they
have done. Our sympathy extends to those families and
loved ones of the slain and wounded soldiers. They died for
what the world would be denied i the terrorists had their
way. They died in the pursuit of peace, a commodity this
world has too little of. These young men who have fallen in
their graves, at the fanatical whim of a certain few, must be
remembered as heroes. They were not martyrs, they were
simply young men doing what they saw was their duty;
paving the road for peace.
America, though shaken, will overcome this tragedy. At
the same time, we must learn from it and reassert our
commitment to freedom, democracy, and peace. Lets not
forget these fallen warriors.

weren't given the death sentence, a problem that if left up to
me would be quickly rectified wth a plastic bag placed over
your head, just like you did to someone else. But then I
would be as guilty as you. You took a life, and the fact that
you are pissed off
because Miss Shane Kennedy got off makes no difference.
Im not a violent person. A friend calls me a pacrfist. But
reading Newsweeks account of a Texas guy named Autry,
who killed two people for $2.07, made me realize there are a
lot of kooks like you in the world who must be stopped. And
the photo of a 43-year-old woman with a bullet hole between
her eyes put there by Autry helped me confirm my theory.
Bown, now that you have some free time on your hands,
you might want to catch a few episodes cf Hawaii Five-O.
Youll learn crime doesnt pay.

believe it would cut down on murders.
alligator

t***: loti Johnson
Donoafc&o.
News Editor: Lao Bocksnm
News Editor Roaono Kopctmon
Adorn YooMon*
*"ldolddor BodiZkTuo
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v -HiIIDUS i_
P O Box 14257 University Station It J IM
University J~. MorK a 1 ,lE> w
Display
'>: 373-9936;

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*w*K*aSrlyWFl
W hod Sn Mom YHMn



American invasion of Grenada is a grossly immoral act

As a Barbadian in support of the
Grenadian people, I strongly protest the
invasion of the island of Grenada by U.S.
armed troops. It is a grossly immoral act that
places the lives of not only the 1,000
Americans there in danger, but also
jeopardizes those of our fellow 110,000 West
Indians who form the total population of
that island.
One U.S. White House spokesperson draws
parallels between the situation in Lebanon
and Grenada, stating that the United States
MARGARET D. GILL ~
use of force in the island is an attempt to
protect Americans from a possible repetition
of the attack on American soldiers, but this is
a snail island with an immature, modestly
equipped army. No comparison can be
drawn with a war situation involving highly
sophisticated weaponry and vastly different
situations of power between invaders and
local people.
It must be also made clear the kind of
blatant propaganda used by the American
government regarding the new airport being
built in the island with the help of Soviet
technology and Cuban workers. All Pen Pentagon
tagon Pentagon releases on the subject claim that the
new airport is a threat to peace in the region
and a real threat of Soviet attack on the

Is there anyone out there who liked Growl 'B3?

Bad Growl resulted from
too much posterior osculation
KrfHor: Many years ago, an old Laotian mystic namt
Dat Ben Wa bestowed upon me something Ive never
since forgotten.
After Fridays Growl, I thought I should share this little
bit of wisdom with Growl Director Ken Lambert and all
his Blue Key buddies.
Dat was an old man at the time, but his words are
timeless. He said unto me, If a man kisses too many
asses, he shall wind up with shit on his face.
Think about it, Ken. By the way, thanks for the
memories.
Timothy J. roman, 2UF
An absentee Growler grouses
EdHon I wasnt fortunate enough to attend this year's
Gator Growl, but I hated it anyway.
Eric Wishnia. AIM
Did Blue Key hire Hope;
or did he hire them?
MfOR If die UF administrations aim was to change
the content of Gator Growl because they thought it was
innappropriate, then this years "appropriate version
was a view shared only by a few, as most of the audience
was bored and utterly disappointed by the entire
program. This was due, by the mast part, to the choice of
performers for Growl.
While Bob Hope and Irene Cara were spectacular in
the way of not stepping on anyones toes, they lacked
sufficiently in the way of getting people to their toes. It
appeared there was a problem in establishing a good
rapport between performer and the student-alumni
audience. This gap seems inevitable, since these per performers
formers performers are used to passive audiences, and this audience
is accustomed to active performances. Personally, I was
insulted by the reenactment of Bob Hopes welcome. It
dhows that Mr. Hope was more concerned with his
television segment than with the crowds enthusiasm
toward their alma mater. This is also illustrated by his
remark, OK, weve heard that one ... We listened to
you, now you listen to us, in order to stifle the
traditional orange-blue challenge cheer. Did Florida Blue
Key hire him, or did he hire us?
Irene Cara is a talented performer, but a poor choice
for Growl. Unfortunately, she appeals to only a small
segment of society. Though I enjoy her music, a live
version of it did nothing to enhance my enthusiasm for
the Homecoming celebration. Her final remark, "You
have to sing louder next time, is a sobering one. She
knows, as well as the audience, that for her, there will
never be a next time.
The UF students of today are the UF alumni of
tomorrow. Is it really wise to disappoint 33,000 future
patrons with a Gator Growl that is a challenge to stay
I have heard students speak loudly about the new
daytime concept of the Halloween Ball, the Murphree
renovation, the graffiti wall and the censored, alumni-

United States because of its capability of
landing Soviet bombers.
Nowhere is it acknowledged that
Grenadians are building an airport because
they actually need one. The present airstrip
has the maximum landing capacity of a 48-
seater plane. In addition, this airstrip is
located at one end of the island, separated by
mountains from the only and capital city.
Tourist traffic or any other kind using
anything bigger than a 48-sea ter to get into
the island, or attempting to come from any
international country such as the United
States necessarily has to deplane through
Barbados or some island with a larger
runway capacity. Numerous problems arise
through handling in these other islands.
Bishops government then clearly had
overwhelming support for its insistence on
the economic rationale for the new airport. It
becomes significant, too, that no such at attempt
tempt attempt at supplying such an obvious
development needed to have been considered
by the earlier long standing Gairy regime,
which Bishops government overthrew.
Significant, too, is the fact that the United
States effectively refused such aid to the
Bishop government because it was a socialist
government which, it must be said em emphatically,
phatically, emphatically, had popular support.
Regarding the issue that the airport could
be used as a military transit point, so could
Barbados, as we now see in its use by the U.S.
nilitaiy. Barbados recently had its airstrip
capacity enlarged with the aid erf North

conscious Growl. For each issue the students had a voice,
but they had no choice. Many of the skits at Growl were
concerning the red tape that UF has to offer its students:
the parking hut women, drop/add lines, etc. Isnt it ironic
that the entire production of Gator Growl fell vicim to
the administrative runaround? Sadly, it seems fitting and
expected.
The student organizations involved with production
did as much as was in their power to represent the in interests
terests interests of the students. It is a shame that this years Gator
Growl was all they had to show for it.
Kally O'Brien, lUF
Fond wishes for the alumni. ..
Editor: I hope the alumni are happy.
John Hinoa. lUF
S C STRAWN
Sweetheart competition
is outdated and offensive
Editor: As outdated and boring as he was, Hope was
not the worst part of Growl. Theres one segment that has
over the years continued to be inappropriate and of offensive.
fensive. offensive. This Homecoming sweetheart stuff must stop.
Each year we honor" some sorority girl who likes nice
in an evening gown. What is the honor in this?. Honor an
athlete, scholar or anyone who has accomplished
something redeeming, but cut the chauvinistic beauty
queen crap. It only perpetuates the attitude that women
are to be valued for their vestal beauty (I realize
academics supposedly play a role in winning). Looks,
sweetness and greek affiliation are what really count.
Has there ever been an independent hard-science
sweetheart? I doubt it. Take this garbage out of growl and
put it either where it belongs (in the past) or at a Greek Greekonly
only Greekonly function.

opinions-

American technology and funds. The issue,
therefore, seems to be that since Grenadas
was a leftist government using Soviet and
Cuban aid, then the Reagan administration
feels justified in ignoring the countrys
economic imperatives in building its new
airport, and substituting ideological ones.
On the question of U.S. invitation by
Caribbean leaders to send in peacekeeping
troops to help select a government that
would be more in keeping with its own
notions of democracy, a serious breach of the
rights of a sovereign state has occurred.
When the Barbadian government demanded
that Maurice Bishop, the recently killed
revolutionary leader, hold elections after the
revolution, the Grenadian people resoun resoundingly
dingly resoundingly told government leaders to mind their
own business. The revolution, which deposed
a hallucinatory "political bandit, as
previous Prime Minister Gai r y was called by
the last Barbados Prime Minister, was
definitely a popular one.
For the Prime Minister of Dominica then
to claim that the Organization of Eastern
Caribbean States speaks for Grenada in
asking for this U.S. invasion to help them
choose a government likely to be composed
of previous Gairy ministers, is an outright
mangling of the facts, and an immoral
breach of Grenadian peoples rights to
decide their own fate. It is an unprecedented
move in the Caribbean that has no support
by any article in the Caribbean Community
Treaty or any other pact in the region.
Neither the OECS, Barbados, Jamaica, nor

alligator, thursday, October 27, 1983,

anyone else has the right to decide they know
whats best for a sovereign people and to
presume to make the decision for them.
Finally, the decision to invade by some
Caribbean leaders could not have been made
without the U.S.s help. The ease with which
the operation has proceeded and the fact that
the Caribbean force has only now gone in
after the invasion is in place by U.S. fighters,
suggests a longer planning period than the
recent apparent internal counter coup. That
ex-Prime Minister Gairy was allowed to
enter the island of Barbados only two weeks
before the arrest of Bishop, is extremely
disquieting.
The United States has the largest and final
responsibility for whatever bloodshed goes
on in that island. I hope to God the U.S.
forces can be persuaded by enough in international
ternational international and American pressure. But our
islands of the OECS, Jamaica and Barbados
have a graver accounting to make to the
whole region. The precedents set here en endangers
dangers endangers Dominica which has its own internal
political struggles to conquer; St. Lucia,
which only recently was waging a battle
between two government factions; Jamaica,
which is known for violence in its political
arena; and even Barbados. It becomes
significant why neither Trinidad nor
Guyana, countries that have the most to lose
immediately by the implications of such a
precedent, participated in the invasion.
Margaret Gill is a graduate student in
liberal arts.

The popular sentiment,
very simply stated
Editor: Gator Growl sucked.
Christophor Bouton, 2UF
Gator Growl will go down
with Titanic and Pearl Harbor
Editor: I would like to express my complete and
irrevocable dissatisfaction with the 1983 Gator Growl. I
feel the responsibility for this past weekends fiasco can
be place solely upon the shoulders of members of Florida
Blue Key. I will admit that last years show, while being
thoroughly enjoyable, may have been too controversial
for a portion of the audience, and it may have been
possible to reach a compromise between the two ex extremes.
tremes. extremes. It was obvious from the reaction of the crowd
that such a compromise was not accomplished. While I
have the utmost respect for Bob Hope, I honestly feel that
he was not able to satisfactorily suit the needs of a
majority of the people who attended this year's Gator
Growl. A majority of his humor was not only directed
mainly to the alumni and television audience, but was
also poorly read from cue cards.
After being told that they were 98 percent sure of being
able to book the Beach Boys-to provide the musical en entertainment,
tertainment, entertainment, we then heard with barely any notice that
Irene Cara was going to replace them. She performed
only three songs, two of which have been played into the
ground, and she performed these songs to pre-recorded
music. Although, I think that if she had sung anymore,
she would have been booed off the stage.
Again, to show the degree to which Florida Blue Key
submitted to the whining of alumni, the most risque skit
this year was that of a student trying to get a professor to
sample her cookies. One of the skits was a direct take takeoff
off takeoff on a routine done by Monty Python.
Looking at Growl from a technical perspective, it will
go down in history with the sinking of the Titanic and the
bombing of Pearl Harbor. A large portion of the audience
could see almost nothing through the speakers, and, even
with such an elaborate sound system, the quality of the
sound was poor. The fireworks, while being thrilling,
were also very dangerous. Not only were several people
burned, but many more suffered irritation due to soot and
debris in the North End Zone.
Overall, this years Gator Growl was highly disap- I
pointing. Perhaps the two best things were the color I
guard and the end. j
Nathan J. Lewis, 3LS
, -.iw-" .v 1 -v -->
*3* SrE I

7



8

alligator, thursdoy, October 27, 1983

UF Senate To Act
On 1984-85 Calendar

The University Senate will meet to today
day today at 3:30 p.m. in McCarty Audito Auditorium
rium Auditorium to vote on a calendar for the
1984-85 academic year.
The two calendars up for considera consideration
tion consideration are identical except that Proposal
1 has the one-week spring break period
during the 10th week of classes in the
semester, March 11-15, and Proposal 2
and Pubftcotlona SantoM md paM for of
inuol odnrtMng rmtmm to cooMnunlcafa
offldol notteoo t Important Information to
atudanta, I acuity a ataff at dm Unfaoralty
Free Tutoring
Available In
Many Courses
The Office of Instructional
Resources Teaching Center in
Southwest Broward Hall offers free
tutoring to UF students in a variety of
subject areas. Students experiencing
difficulties in biology, chemistry,
physical sciences, physics, math, com computer
puter computer sciences, Spanish, political
science, geography, behavioral
sciences, German, history, physiology
and some engineering courses, can ob obtain
tain obtain tutoring assistance immediately.
Students needing help in other areas
should also contact the Center, which
will attempt to arrange for special
assistance.
Winnie Cooke, manager of the
Teaching Center, suggests that
students go for assistance now, rather
than wait till later in the semester
when it may be too late for tutoring
help to make a difference.
The Center, located in the basement
of Southwest Broward Hall, is open 9
a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday,
and from 7 to 9 p.m., Tuesday, Wednes- r
day and Thursday evenings. For infor information,
mation, information, call 392-2010 or 392-6769.
Pamela Bernard
Is New Associate
Attorney forUF
PAMELA
BERNARD 1
UF Law mk W
Graduate mjm
jHBI
Pamela J. Bernard has assumed
duties as an associate attorney in the
University Attorneys Office Ms. Ber Bernard,
nard, Bernard, who has served as an assistant to
the University Attorney since
September, 1982, is one of three
associate attorneys who aid Universi University
ty University Attorney Judith Waldman in advis advising
ing advising UF administrators on legal matters
and problems encountered in the
operation and functioning of the
University. Other associate attorneys
are Isis Carbajal-de-Garcia and
Donald Reisman.
Ms. Bernard, 28, has served as an in investment
vestment investment trustee since August, 1980,
performing securities transactions and
handling the business and financial af affairs
fairs affairs for a sizeable trust.
She received the juris doctor degree
from the University of Florida College
of Law in 1981, and the bachelor of arts
degree in from UF in 1977. She is a
member of the Florida Bar, the
American Bar Association and the
Eighth Judicial Circuit Bar
Association.
The University Attorneys Office is
responsible for drawing legal in instruments,
struments, instruments, reviewing contracts and
other legal instruments, interpreting
laws ana rules affecting the Universi-
S- of Florida and representing the
niversity in litigation.
Ms. Bernard is officed in 207 Tigert
Hall.

has the break one week later, March
18-22.
Both calendars have fall 1984 classes
beginning Aug. 20 and ending Dec. 7;
spring 1885 classes beginning Jan. 7
and ending April 25; and retain sum summer
mer summer terms A, B and C but do not have
final exam periods for any of the sum summer
mer summer sessions (just as this past sum summers
mers summers schedule had no exams). Both
calendars call for Homecoming week weekend
end weekend to be Oct. 19-20 and for Commence Commencements
ments Commencements to be Dec. 15, May 4 and Aug. 10.
In addition, the University Cur Curriculum
riculum Curriculum Committee, which unanimous unanimously
ly unanimously recommends adoption of Proposal 1,
recommends that the last two days of
classes for fall and spring semesters be
designated Review Days, during which
no new materials would be presented
in any of the classes, but would be us used
ed used solely for review of already
presented material. Labora Laboratory
tory Laboratory sessions and exams in lab sessions
would still be permissible during re review
view review days.
As information items, the Senate will
be presented a list of the current
members of the University Senate and
a list of University Committees. The
new secretary of the Senate, Wendy
Smallwood, Assistant Registrar, 29
Tigert, will be introduced.
Nominations For
Who's Who, Hall
Os Fame Solicited
The deadline to submit applications
or nominations of students to the UF
Hall of Fame and Whos Who Among
Students in American Colleges and
Universities is 5 p.m., Friday,
November 4. The forms should be sub submitted
mitted submitted to the Office for Student Ser Services,
vices, Services, 129 Tigert Hall.
Application forms are available at
the Student Activities Desk on the third
floor of the Reitz Union and at Tigert
Hall. Students may nominate
themselves, or they may be nominated
by deans, department chairpersons or
heads of any officially chartered UF
student organization.
Tb be nominated for Hall of Fame
and Whos Who an applicant must be
a senior or graduate or professional
student and must have been full-time
more than half of their attendance at
UF. Applicants must have a minimum
of 2.5 grade point average and must
have demonstrated two of the follow following
ing following : leadership qualities, service to UF,
participation in student activities or
academic honors. Tb be considered for
Hall of Fame, an applicant must be in
Whos Who for that year.
Students should submit two letters of
recommendation along with their ap application
plication application form.
For information or details, contact
Linda Horton, chairperson of the Af Affairs
fairs Affairs and Ethics Committee of the Stu Student
dent Student Senate. That committee has es established
tablished established the guidelines for the Hall of
Fame and Whos Who program.
Intramural Sign-Ups
Sign-up for intramural co corecreational
recreational corecreational volleyball, mens dor dormitory
mitory dormitory bowling and racquetball
doubles teams is now underway at the
Intramurals Office in 214 Florida
Gymnasium.
November 7 is deadline for co-rec
volleyball and mens dorm bowling
team sign-up, with competition begin beginning
ning beginning in mid-November for both events,
ana Nov. 14 is deadline for sign-up for
the racquetball doubles tournament to
be held Nov. 19-20.
([( LM*n to
j
UPDATE
Aired Weekdays
WRUF-Am-5,25 p.m.
puf>^

rhe University of Florida b an Equal Employment Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer

r£arlfiwr |
Si S H by Parking
Fines and Appeals
f Vatr\ I jbts+aoWly\
poking -hekol-y
\ semester! /
fjf tfeAVcr watch t.
/ f Two inons, and could lose/\
[ / vour Campus parknd pnVt'leqes \
111-for (oO That applies \
yV\+ostudejot& faculty and staffY
\ Think X'll wake,
(e-ffort to be a legal
QUESTIONS? call 392-6655

ms
[ THIS/NEXT WEEK
TODAY
CAMPUS COMMITTEE ON WELL WELLNESS
NESS WELLNESS MEETING will feature talk by
Dr. Ruth Alexander, UF professor of
physical education, and discussion of
current fitness programs and needs of
UF students at 11:45 a.m. in Room
150-C Reitz Union.
GREEK STUDIES PRESENTA PRESENTATION
TION PRESENTATION focuses on Kanzantzakis: The
Man and His Work, as Helen Kanzant Kanzantzakis,
zakis, Kanzantzakis, widow of the author and poet who
wrote Zorba The Greek and other
works, discusses his life and work with
Patroclos Stavrou, literary scholar and
former deputy minister of Cyprus, at
8 p.m. in Room 235 Reitz Union. A
reception immediately follows and au audience
dience audience members will have opportun opportunity
ity opportunity to talk with the speakers.
PHYSICS COLLOQUIUM presents
talk by Dr. Richard More of Lawrence
Livermore Laboratory at the Universi University
ty University of California on Spin-Polarized
Fuels for Laser Fusion at 3:30 p.m. in
Bless Auditorium of Williamson Hall.
ZOOLOGY SEMINAR features talk
by Dr. Jerold Lowenstein, chairman of
nuclear medicine at the Pacific
Medical Center in San Francisco, Cal.,
on Radioimmunoassay As a Key Tb
Unlocking The Puzzle of Human Evolu Evolution
tion Evolution at 4 p.m. in 211 Bartram Hall
East.
FRIDAY
ENGINEERING SCIENCES SEM SEMINAR
INAR SEMINAR on Target Tracking and Missile
Control, presents talk by Dr. Thomas
E. Bullock, UF electrical engineering
professor, at 3:30 p.m. in Room 303,
Aerospace Building.
UNIVERSITY CHOIR CONCERT
under direction of John Grigsby,
features religion-inspired music by
Mozart, Rutter and Copland, beginning
at 8:15 p.m. in University Auditorium.
Free.

FRIDAY, SATURDAY
& SUNDAY
TRACTOR PULL SHOWS, sponsored
by the OConnell Center, at 8 p.m., Fri Friday
day Friday and Saturday evenings and 2 p.m.
Sunday afternoon. Tickets $4 for UF
students, $8 for die public, are available
at the Reitz Union Box Office week weekdays.
days. weekdays.
SUNDAY
GAINESVILLE CHAMBER OR ORCHESTRA
CHESTRA ORCHESTRA performs at 8 p.m. in the
Reitz Union Ballroom in free concert
sponsored by the Union Program Of Office,
fice, Office, featuring works of Dvorak, Mozart
and Bloch.
SYMPHONIC BAND CONCERT,
under direction of Dr. Gerald Poe of the
UF music department, will include
Pineapple Poll, a spoof of Gilbert
and Sullivan operettas, among other
musical presentations, at free event
beginning at 4 p.m. in University
Auditorium.
SEASHELL DISCUSSION features
The Shell Answerman, Florida State
Museum Curator Kurt Auffenberg,
identifying shells and answering ques questions
tions questions about various specimens mom 2
to 4 p.m. in Museum Gallery.
MONDAY
MATERIALS SCIENCE AND ENGI ENGINEERING
NEERING ENGINEERING TALK by Dr. Joseph Sim Simmons,
mons, Simmons, senior research scientist and
program manager of the Vitreous
Laboratory and professor of physics at
Catholic University, Washington, D.C.,
on Engineering Materials Through
Porous Glass Processing at 10 a.m ui
337 Reitz Union.
TUESDAY
HOLIDAY PREVIEW SALE at
Florida State Museum offers unique
gifts and ornaments from the Mu Museums
seums Museums Collectors Shop, from 6 to 9 p.m.
WATER SCIENCE SEMINAR with
Dr. D. E. Canfield of UFs School of
Forest Resources and Conservation, on
Trophic State Classification of Lakes
tafflffi c I^ croph)te '' at9am
ZOOLOGY SEMINAR looks at A
Comparison of Island and Mainland
of the Zoology Department.



PI LAMBDA PHI
the Students,
Alumni, Faculty'
and Staff of the |H
University of
Florida to the nj Tv
32nd Annual m
NOSE BOWL %
to be held
Sunday, October 30
at Noon
at P.K. YongA Field

Costumes
Start with
DANSKINX
f leotards and tights
flB jH f a 'I
Create your own devilish costume withDanskirfleotards and tights...
and FREE FACEMASK!* Be a flower, a rock star, a firecracker.
Use your imagination or look for free costume ideas at your Danskin
display. And after the party, be dazzling in your Danskin leotards
and tights for exercise, dance or fashion wear.

6 Marines die in Grenada;
U.S. sends in more troops

BRIDGETOWN, Barbados (UPI) The
United States rushed reinforcements to crush
pockets of resistance Wednesday on Grenada
where Cuban and Loyalist troops holding
hostages battled against an invasion force.
Defense Secretary Caspar Weinberger told
reporters that at least six Americans were
killedyeTight were missing and 33 others were
jivoufided in fierce combat for control of the
island, 1,900 miles south of Miami.
We got a lot more resistance than we
expected, Gen. John Vessey, Chairman of
the Joint Chiefs of Staff, told reporters at a
Washington news briefing.
The Caribbean Broadcasting Corp.,
owned by the Barbados government, said 18
civilians died since Tuesdays invasion by a
joint force of U.S. troops and forces from six
Caribbean nations.
Weinberger said 20Cubans were wounded
in the fighting but gave no estimate on the
number of Cuban dead.
The defense chief said the U.S.-led invasion
force was holding about 600 Cuban
prisoners, including a colonel captured when
it overran a major Cuban military in installation.
stallation. installation.
A U.S. military transport flew a group of
69 Americans and two British Citizens to
Charleston, S.C., in the first evacuation of
U.S. citizens from the tiny island.
Most of Washington's staunchest allies
denounced the U.S.-led invasion of Grenada
Ham
continued
from page one
He's pausing before he talks, Stauf said.
Theres probably some officer there telling
him what to 0 do.
"Make sure the commander on the ground
lets you know how much weight you are
authorized plus the radio, a transmitter
addressing Barattella said, apparently
referring to transporting his radio equipment
out of the country.
Uh, roger, Barettella answered.
Stauf and Van Buskirk said the station
operators had listened at 11 p.m. Tuesday
while Barettella went out amid scattered

alligator, thursdoy, October 27, 1983,

Wednesday and joined in a nearly universal
call of the Reagan administration to with withdraw
draw withdraw U.S. forces from the Caribbean island
nation.
Angry Libyan demonstrators charged
President Reagan is the Hitler of modern
times.
In an emergency debate in Parliament, the
British government complained that the
United States failed to consult it sufficiently
before invading Grenada but refused to
condemn the American intervention
outright.
In Paris, President Francois Mitterrand
voiced strong opposition to the invasion at
the weekly meeting of his cabinet, said
government spokesman Andre Labarrere.
In Rome, Italian Prime Minister Bettino
Craxi told the Senate his government
received the news of the invasion with great
surprise.
Western German government spokesman
Peter Boenisch told reporters after a
cabinet meeting that Bonn would have
advised the United States against invading
Grenada if it had been consulted.
In Moscow, the Soviet news agency Tass
called the invasion an attempt to impose on
the Grenadian people by means of force a
system suiting Washington, to intimidate the
other freedom-loving peoples of Latin
America and not only them.
gunfire and anti-aircraft fire to refill his
electrical generator.
The UF Amateur Radio Club is advised by
electrical engineering Professor Leon Couch.
Until Monday, the next major project they
had to look forward to was trying to contact
the space shuttle Columbia after its next
launch in November.
Stauf said the radio club has a 50-year
history at UF, and competes in scrim scrimmages,
mages, scrimmages, in which stations try to exchange
messages with the largest number of other
stations within a time limit. Stauf pointed
out a congratulatory certificate sent to UF
from a Czechoslovakian station after one
such scrimmage.

REALMCNONLY!!^
Tired of the Same Old Boring Halloween Costume? Then take
a stand this year & get one of Rainbow Dancer's Mohawk Skin
Head Wigsl Available in many colors (pink, red, yellow, blue
& more.) This Halloween be e wrrioTnot o wlmpl
TTkLVlil IMI S.W. 2nd Ave.
, ; noNrcn cr#^.id*Moii
W ,S ££:Vsj? 3W.7W
The Patrons of the
University of Florida
Libraries
Announce
The SALE of books from the
Professor Tommy Ruth Waldo
Bequest
October 27-11 a.m. until4p.m.
and
October 28 -9a.m. until 4 p.m.
In the Directors Conference Room
2nd Floor, Library West. ]
Subjects: Humanities, with special strength in
Shakespeare, English Language and Literature, \
Music, Foreign Languages, Religion, and |
Reference materials.
All proceeds to the Professor Tommy Ruth Waldo
Book Endowment Fund.
L.........

9



10

I, olligotof, thursdoy, October 27, 1983

Groups push dean water proposal

y COLLEEN MASON
Alligator Writer
An amendment that guarantees the right to a healthful
environment will face voters next year if environmental
groups across the state can collect the required 300,000
petition signatures.
Clean up 'B4 is the collective name for a coalition of
environmental and conservation groups in Florida that have
organized to get the amendment on the November 1984
ballot.
Locally, the Clean Water Action Project' is organizing its
staff of eight full-time workers to canvass Gainesville and
inform people of the new amendment.
Basically we've organized ourselves in three areas:
identify the people who are concerned and informed about
the environment, educate the people who want more in information
formation information on these issues, and organize our efforts to get this
(the proposed amendment) on the ballot, said Clark
Sheldon, director of the Citizen Outreach Staff.
The proposed amendment classifies water and air as a
public trust. Flroida citizens, as beneficiaries of that trust,
would have the right to sue any person, corporation or state
agency that causes damage to the environment. Under the
amendment, a citizen no longer would have to prove
special injury" to file suit.
The amendment would give us some say in what happens
to our water, Sheldon said.
Sheldon cites the Floridan Aquifer the porous limestone
layers that contain over 90 percent of the states drinking
water as the main reason to get the amendment on the
ballot and then passed.
The aquifer is extremely fragile, Sheldon said.
Sheldon gave the Fairbanks water contamination case as
SUNITA RAMAYYA ~
wfiats
happening
The UF Chess Club meets tonight from 7to 11 in Room
365 of the Reitz Union. Elections will be held, followed by informal skits
and games.
ta* Isss VlsMt* The UF French Club meets at 7 tonight in the
Union. Room B-60.
Woman and livestock; A lecture on the role of women in livestock
development begins at 4 p.m. today in Room 427 of Crinter Hall.
UFUOSs meets tonight at 8 in Room 361 of the Union.
NOW: The National Organization for Women meets in B-10 of the
Union today at 6. Witchcraft and women's spirituality highlights the
meeting.
ChrioNon conciliation: Attorney Richard Bates will address members
of the Christian Legal Society tonight at 7 in the Holland Law Center.
Boom 297.
Speleologists: A meeting of the Florida Speleological Society will be
held tonight at 7:30 in the seminar room of Florida State Museum.
Insni Up: Delta Sigma Theta holds an annual step show featuring
area chapters, beginning at 9 p.m. Friday in the Union. For more in information,
formation, information, contact Sheila at 371-2509.
At tho mnsrfsr Students in African Studies Association and the Center
for African Studies present two movies in Room 427 of Crinter Hall
Friday beginning at 3:45 p.m. Both shows will feature youths and urban
problems and agricultural conflicts in Liberia.
Woman's meson The UF Women's Soccer Club is holding a soccer
match Saturday on Maguire Field at I p.m. The public is invited to attend
the game.
feature GM car*
like this Chevrolet Chevette
Weekend
Problem Solver
You pay tor gas and return
car to renting location. Rate M
applies to car shown or UJ
similiar-size car, is non- fjj JR i||;
discountable and subject to
change without notice.
Specific cars subject to ff| DAT
availability. Sports cars, UNLIMITED FREE MILEAGE
Cadillacs, and 9-passenger Noon Thursdoy to
station wagons avai table at 6:00 pm Monday
everyday discount rates. 2 Day Minimum Rental
You Dasarva National Attention.
CALL NOW FOR RESERVATIONS! 11
. 377-7005
GAINESVILLE REGIONAL AIRPORT

Your ad in
this space?

We can
do it!

'The amendment would give us some say in
what happens to our water.
Clark Sheldon
an example of how citizens rights are not protected now but
would be under the proposed amendment.
In January, Department of Transportation (DOT)officials
admitted to dumping 60,000 to 70,000 gallons of waste
chemicals from their central asphalt-testing lab on Waldo
Road in Gainesville, contaminating groundwater wells that
provided Fairbanks residents their drinking water.
DOT has been dumping the chemical for 30 years without
authorization.
Had the amendment been in effect at the time of the
Fairbanks outbreak, Sheldon said, private citizens would
have had the legal standing to sue DOT or the Department of
Environmental Regulation for failing to maintain water
quality.
"The amendment grants the opportunity to any person to
prove a violation of the right to a healthful environment,
Sheldon said.
It would cancel the current law which states a person
must prove special injury before a lawsuit can be brought
against another party.
Sheldon stressed the new amendment would not create any
new remedies to the pollution problems.
However, Sheldon said, It gives me and everyone else the
opportunity to make sure the state agencies responsible for
protecting my environment are doing their jc£>.
LwngMgw-aritwu tickanfc A language-culture exchange program
will be held Saturday from 1 to 4 p.m. in rooms B-60. B-65. B-70 and B B-71
-71 B-71 of (he Union. Two films and classes in English and Spanish will
highlight the program.
The Gainesville Cycling Club meets for weekend rides at
the Plaza of the Americas Saturday and Sunday at 9:30 a.m. Interested
persons are invited to join.
ttmmc Volunteers for International Students Association
holds an international costume party at the Holiday Inn University
Center Saturday from 9 p.m. to 2 a.m. Music, dancing and a costume
contert will be featured. The public is invited to attend.
UwMkotli shorn: Block and bridle present an international livestock
show Saturday at 2 p.m. on the Cecil Webb livestock pavilion. The show
will be followed by a dinner and square dance.
""4 RrMlac A regular meeting will be held Monday at 7
p.m. in Room 151 of the Animal Science Building.
CAM: The Cuban-American Student Association holds a meeting
tonight at 7:30 in the Union, Room 363. All are invited to attend.
Howor Court: Alpha Kappa Psi holds a meeting tonight for members
participating in honor court. Pledges meet at 5:4S in Room 201 of Bryan
Hall and brothers meet at 7 in Room 101 of Matherty Hall.
I jnilfrlana. The UF Equestrian dub meets tonight at 7 in Room C C-108
-108 C-108 of McCarty Hall. Guest speaker jean Claussen will address members
and others interested.
turf or a: The UF Surf dub meets tonight at 8 at Momma Donna's
restaurant. A guest speaker and slide show will highlight the evening's
agenda.
*4 *** a: Dean Dickson from the law school will speak on
entrance requirements to all interested persons, tonight at 6:30 p.m. in
Room 102 of the Business Administration Building.
Tmt tho pardon: The UF botany dub plans a field trip to Kanapaha
Botanical Cardens on Friday. Interested persons are requested to meet in
Room 418 of Bertram Hall West on Friday at 2 p.m.
Overweight hfsofcT: The Overeaten Anonymous meets Tuesday at
7:30 p.m. at the Alachua Urgent Care Center. No fee is required.
NOW OPEN!
Register now
Wardrobe
Giv 2
0 pj *******
Opens 10 a.m.

Call the
Alligator

376-4482

World Health
Organization Listed
Medical School
Spartan Health Sciences University is located on the island of- St.
ncia in the West Indies. Openings are still available for the Jan.'B4
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Marston to teach next year

UF President Robert Marston will change
hats next year when he begins a visiting
professorship in Virginia after stepping
down from his UF post in September 1984.
To begin his year-long sabbatical, Marston
will return to the rolling hills of his native
Virginia as an eminent scholar to teach
biological sciences, UF spokeswoman Linda
Gray said recently.

Man arrested in officer's attack

Gainesville police arrested a local man
and charged him with biting Gainesville
police Officer Steve Dean and attacking
him with a case cutter.
Robbie D. Pugh, 26, of 1126 NW
Seventh Ave. was charged with
aggravated battery, aggravated assault,
retail theft, resisting detainment and
resisting arrest with violence, police said.
According to police records. Dean was
off duty when he saw employees at Food 4
Less trying to detain a man inside the
store, located at 1423 NW 23rd Ave.
When Dean tried to apprehend Pugh,

Police slap on extra charge

An Alachua County jail prisoner, still
waiting trial for an attempted-murder
charge; was arrested again recently for
slapping a correctional officer,Gainesville
police records show.
Kenneth Whitehead, 23, threatened
officer Dee M. Wright Tuesday and then
slapped him. Whitehead was then
arrested and charged with battery of a
law enforcement officer, according to

Local woman arrested in theft

A 20-year-old Gainesville woman was
arrested Tuesday on charges of at attempting
tempting attempting to steal a carton erf cigarettes
and a bottle of perfume from a local store,
Gainesville police said.
Pamela L. Gant erf 3001 Hawthorne
Re>ad was arrested for petty theft on

Students get rude awakening

Two UF students were awakened early
Weelnesday morning by an unidentified
man who was touching their bodies and
fondling their buttocks in their Regency
Oaks apartment on Southwest Archer
Road, according to Alachua County

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alligator, thursday, October 27, 1983,

When he announced he was stepping
down last December he said he wanted to do
some retooling and get back into the
classroom, Gray said.
Marston will teach for one semester at the
Virginia Military Institute in Lexington,
where he earned his bachelor of science
degree. After that, he will become a tenured
professor teaching in the UF College of
Medicine.

SCOn LAPOINT ~
police said he bit Deans left index finger
and tried to cut him across the face with
the razor. Dean was treated at Alachua
General Hospital and later released.
Pugh, detained by employees who said
he attempted to shoplift three cartons of
cigarettes, was still in, the Alachua
County jail Wednesday night in lieu of
$6,000 bond.

police reports.
The new charge was added to at attempted
tempted attempted murder, car burglary and
trespassing charges he was arrested for
last May.
Whiteheads bond was increased by
$5,000 to $46,150 for the attack. He is
still waiting for his trial date to be set for
the original charges, a jail spokes spokesman
man spokesman said.

charges she tried to shoplift from the
Winn Dixie located at 2621 SE
Hawthorne Road.
Gant was booked into the Alachua
County jail Tuesday and released
Wednesday morning on her own
recognizance.

sheriffs records.
Officers said the man fled the womens
bedroom when one of them screamed,
waking the Other. The man was last seen
crouching between the students' double
beds before he left.

11



12

I, alligator, thursday, October 27, 1983

Cross Creek
holds memories
of a simpler past
By WADEKIMBRELL
Alligator Writer
"We need above all, l think, a certain remoteness
from urban confusion, and while this can be
found in other places. Cross Creek offers it with
such beauty and grace that once entangled ivith
it, no other place seems possible to us
Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings,
Cross Creek
Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings came to Cross Creek, a small
community in the southeast corner of Alachua County, from
Rochester, N.Y., in 1928. She was looking for a quiet place
to write, and she found it here, in a rambling wooden house
with cedar shingles and wide screened porches.
It was here, among the palmettos and pines and moss mossstrung
strung mossstrung oaks, that Rawlings discovered cracker Florida and
its hardy inhabitants the poor but self-sufficient settlers
who farmed and fished in rural Florida.
The untamed beauty of the creek and the lives of those
settlers formed the backdrop for her finest writing. In 1938,
her Pulitzer Prize-winning novel The Yearling, about a boy
and his pet fawn, made this place called Cross Creek famous
around the world.
Cross Creek was a bend in a country road, Rawlings
wrote in her 1943 autobiography Cross Creek. Today the
slapping out
country road is State Road 325, but Gainesvillians can still
travel it to reach the place where Rawlings got her in inspiration,
spiration, inspiration, the place she immortalized with her words.
Cross Creek has changed somewhat since Marj lived here.
The back woods around her home have been opened up by
roads, and the lifestyle changed by radio, telephones and
television.
Nonetheless, Cross Creek is little more than a sleepy
fishing camp community and its sense of remoteness remains
intact. Visitors can tour Rawlings home, picnic along the
Majorie Kinnan Rawlings outside her home
The
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' ERik LESSER/ALLIGATOR
Rawlings typewriter remains on her front porch where she would spend many quiet hours writing.

banks of Cross Creek, or dine at the award-winning Yearling
restaurant.
About a half mile down the winding highway from the
restaurant, behind a rickety wire fence, is the Rawlings
home, a state historical site.
The weather-beaten fence hasnt been replaced by a new
white picket fence because park ranger Sally Morrison said
thats the way Marj would want it.
In Cross Creek, Rawlings wrote:
The Creek shabbiness was never Apnt and
never will be. It is merely comfortable and
weather-beaten, meeting Time halfway. I am
sometimes tempted to put up a new fence across
the house yard I think of the pride I should
take in seeing white paint gleaming from around
the bend in the road ... But the real Objection is
that an elegant fence would bring In die Greek a
wanton orderliness that is out of place.
Morrison said she and the other rangers use Gross Creek to
guide them in keeping Marjs home the way Marj kept it.
They plant collard greens, turnips, beets and many other
vegetables in the back yard by hand, just as Marj did.
They raise mallard ducks and game cocks in a pen in the
backyard, just like Marj did. And they planted a chaoyote
vine so it would grow over the duck cage and provide shade,
just like Marj did.
Morrison sees her job at the Rawlings home as more than a
nine to five gig. She nurtures the spirit of Rawlings and the
spirit of life in cracker Florida.
The Florida cracker lifestyle is just perfectly natural,
given the territory. But its a style that is dying. Very few
people adhere to it these days, and in a few years, who
knows, perhaps no one will, Morrison said as she gazed in
the direction of several freshly planted orange trees.
Morrison still has much to do before she would be proud to
have Marj come back and visit. She wants to rebuild the
bam out by the road where the old one stood. She wants to
get a mule to tend the orange grove, and she wants to rebuild
the servants quarters but not get any servants.
Aside from hand-planting vegetables and seeking out
mules, Morrison also takes on the more typical duties of a
park ranger, including doing paper work and giving tours.
During the tour of the eight-room home, Morrison tells
interesting stories about Maijs life at Crass Greek.
After she (Marj) got the royalties from her first book, she
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decided to invest in some indoor plumbing. She had a party
to celebrate, she was so ecstatic over her indoor plumbing
that she put drinks on ice in the tub and a bouquet of roses in
the toilet and invited all the neighbors. It was quite a gala
social.
She also found a cottonmouth moccassin on the floor one
day. She bad a choice of killing it with a Sears Roebuck
m> im Bn 1
Kawiingi
page fourteen
EMC LESSER/ALLIGATOR
Park ranger Sally Morrison and Ol' Red take a break
on the Rawlings Porch.
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Local women pay price for protest

By DEBBIE DLOTT
Alligator Writer
It was about 5:30 in the morning in the icy darkness of the
South Carolina hills when two women began banging spoons
aginst pots the wake-up signal.
Inside their tents, about 80 women, including about 15
from Gainesville, stirred and then shivered as they lifted
themselves out of their sleeping bags and reached for their
sweaters and socks.
Within minutes the sounds of tents unzipping was heard
throughout the camp. Women stumbled over to the Coleman
stoves where hot water was heating for coffee. Nobody
attempted to relight, the campfire. Everyone knew there
wasnt time.
The women knew they had to leave their peace en encampment
campment encampment within the hour and drive to an intersection near
the Savannah River Plant where they planned a blockade to
prevent the plant employees form entering the plutonium plutoniumproducing
producing plutoniumproducing nuclear facility.
The encampment, divided into a womens camp and a
coed camp, was part of a worldwide peace demonstration
last weekend against the deployment of U.S. missiles
in Europe
Shortly after 6 a.m. the women headed toward the main
gathering area in the camp the same area where they had
undergone civil disobedience training the day before. They
entwined arms forming a circle and their voices swelled
with song.
"Listen to the Women. Listen to the Women, singing out
and bringing out the peace-loving people of the world.
Then they separated. Lets go, its getting late, one
woman called out.
The 80 women piled into trucks, cars and vans, and drove
down a bumpy road to the highway. As they approached
their destination they saw about 80 policemen and Special
Weapons and Tactics (SWAT) officers waiting for them.
Judy Keathley and Pam Smith, two erf the 15 Gainesville
women, were crouched in the back of a pickup truck. They
looked at each other and drew a deep breath.
The women formed a circle, blocking traffic to the
Savannah River Plant (SRP) in Aiken, S.C.,and began singing
again. They were there to protest the toxic wastes the plant
emits and the role it plays in the production of U.S. nuclear
weaponry, including the controversial Pershing II and cruise
missiles.
Then, some of the women moved out into the middle of the
intersection, formed another circle and sat down as one
woman weaved a ball of yam around them.
Within seconds, the state highway patrolmen and SWAT
crews ran over to the women. As the officers reached for
them, the women let their bodies go limp one of the non noncooperative
cooperative noncooperative tactics they had learned in their civil
disobedience training. But the policemen werent deterred as
they dragged the women to the side of the road.
The women were handcuffed, frisked,then shoved up the
stairs of a faded blue school bus. Shortly after, the bus
headed for the county jail in Aiken, S.C.
Six of the 15 Gainesville women who traveled to South
Carolina were among 78 arrested on Monday, Oct. 24.
The women: Pam Smith and Judy Keathley, Lynda Lou
Simmons, Kate, Corky, and Jean are still in jail. They refuse
to pay bail or give their names to police, another of their non
cooperation tactics. Kate, Corky and Jean asked that their
last names not be printed. All six women are members of the
Gainesville Feminist Action Group.
All 78 protesters will be tried for disobeying a police
.officer on Nov. 8, according to a county clerk in Judge Max
A. Meeks office in Aiken, S.C. The maximum penalty they
face is a $ 100 fine or 30 days in jail. If they are sentenced to
jail, the two weeks they will already have served will go
toward the 30 days.
v r ';
The weekend started peacefully enough for the Gainesville
women last Friday morning. As Gainesville readied

inside

itself for the Homecoming parade and related fesitivites, the
women packed their camping gear and quietly slipped out of
town.
They drove north past Jacksonville and through Georgia.
Their nine-hour sojourn ended when they reached a small
sign on which was scrawled peace encampment in a pine
forest just north of the nuclear plant in South Carolina.
Before and during the trip the women discussed their
reasons for wanting to participate in the peace camp.
Kate said the natural setting of the political action drew
her. She said she "wanted to examine that special feeling of
encampment. She said she didn't know if her protest by
participaton would have any significance, but even if it
doesnt make a difference, she said, its the sanest thing I
can do.
Lynda Lou said she hoped the weekend would provide her
with the opportunity to hone up on political activism and
enable her to tie in her goals of advocating feminism and
protesting nuclear weaponry.
Women who identify as feminist tie everything in, not
only the cruise and Pershing, she said.
Although the women planned for activism, many of them
werent sure how far they would take it.
Speaking from jail in South Carolina where she is known
as Jane Doe No. 4, Judy said Wednesday that she made up
her mind to blockade the plant and get arrested only the day
before it happened.
I had clearly been considering it for a while, she said. I
was 50-50 all the way through until the day before the
action.
Then, Judy said, everything just came together.
Something inside me really shifted (on Sunday). Just
hearing about other womens arrests, the focus on education,
the people whose lives we touch by politicizing through the
personal connection ... I realized I could make a big dif difference.
ference. difference.
*
Judy and all the other women in the peace encampment
spent most of their weekend in activities most people dont
associate with tents and campfires.
They attended workshops on such issues as racism,
repression and tax resistance. They attended lectures given
by other women on political situations in Nicaragua and
West Germany. They held informal discussions on issues
ranging from what time to have dinner to deciding whether
to post bond after their arrests. They attended a political
rally Saturday afternoon that drew about 400 people in all,
and listened to some of the same speakers that had lectured
at the womens encampment earlier in the day.
Kay Camp was one of these lecturers. Camp, a former
member of former President Jimmy Carters Committee for
Nuclear Disarmament and a 38-year political peace activist,

ippP
....
fc- Ija
Ejj|r

alligator, thursday, October 27, 1983,

I A9 h
ml I
PHOTOS BY DEBBIE DLOTT
Gainesville feminists, from left, Sandy Malone, Judy
Keathley, Ruth Segal, Pam Smith and Linda' Lou
Simmons show their banner at South Carolina peace
encampment (above left). Keathley, Smith and
Simmons were later arrested. A protester from the
encampment is dragged away by a police officer from
the intersection she blocked(above). Karin Scharinger
of Atlanta's Women Against Military Modness yells
"Stick to the issue" during peace rally (below).
spoke to both groups about the need for political change in
Washingtons dangerous atmosphere.
Later, during an interview, Camp said women make up 53
percent of the country's population. But, women make up
only 14 percent of all elected offices, so their voices are not
heard or regarded in Reagans pro-war administration, she
said.
So women in these days must be aggressive, she said. We
are literally forced to take actions that attract the attention
of the press, she said.
Its a time of great danger and conscientious people are
driven to the only channels they know, Camp said. Those
channels include nonviolent opposition to public policies,
she added.
Sm 'Protest'
page fourteen

13



14

I. otligotof, Thursday. October 27, 1983

Protest
from poge thirteen
A workshop teaching nonviolent
demonstration civil disnbedimre at attracted
tracted attracted most of the wonira Sunday morning.
Dania. an experienced civil disobedient,
directed the women as they played alter alternating
nating alternating roles of protester, policeman and
reporter in several scenarios.
After each one, Dania asked each par participant
ticipant participant how she felt. One protester said,
I was frightened of my arresting cop. The
"cop said, I was frightened of the
potential for violence that I felt.
Dania pointed to two more. The protester
said, I talked the whole time to my cop. and
I think it helped. Her arresting cop
replied, I didnt hear anything she said.
They formed their second-to-the-last circle
for the weekend and sang a few more songs
before they disappeared in the darkness and
headed for their tents.
Rawlings
from page twelve
catalogue or a copy of The Yearling die had.
And she decided The Yearling was heavier,
so she killed it with a copy of The Yearling.
And her hired help, little WiH said, well I
guess it comes in handy to write books.
Some of the stories Morrison and the other
rangers tell during tours are acted out in the
recently-released film version of Cross Creek.
The movie stars Mary Steenburgen as
Rawlings. It was filmed on location in Cross
Creek, Micanopy and Hollywood, Calif. A
facsimile of Rawlings house was constructed
near the real one for the filming.
But Morrison said she is disappointed in
the film because it doesnt portray Marj the
way Marj was.
She was such a vital and strong out outspoken
spoken outspoken woman. They play her as having a
few tantrums, but basically as very mild mildspoken
spoken mildspoken and quiet. Thats not my image of
Marjorie Rawlings.
People who knew Marj have said she
could out-drink and out-cuss half the men in
Cross Creek.
Morrison also is worried the film will
bring an overflow of visitors, meaning she
and the other rangers will have to devote
most of their time to giving.tours instead of

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Judy and the other five Gainesville women
plan to stay in jail until their trial on Nov. 8,
and they expect to serve two more weeks
after that.
But die said she thought the radical action
was successful. It gave the movement
visibility she said. We took up a lot of
time, energy and money. Judy said the
Atlanta Constitution reported that the group
caused the largest traffic jam in South
Carolina history. We fed thats a message
to the whole world.
Problems are so huge that the actions
have to be larger.
She said she is still unsure if the action was
worth it to her personally, now that she must
look at the situation from behind bars.
Im in a constant process -of re reevaluating,
evaluating, reevaluating, she said, not every day, but
every hour.
Im not into martyring myself, she said.
Ive got to fed this makes a difference, and I
do now, in my heart.
reviving Maijs home.
The way Marj liked it.
"Enchantment lies in different things for
each of us. For me, it is in this: to step out of
the bright sunlight into the shade of range
trees; to walk under the arched canopy of
their jadelike leaves;... to feel the mystery
of a seclusion that yet has shafts of light
striking_throogh *- Cross Creek

S 1 Halloween Bouquet
To Your Favorite i
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prorate courtyard, high coiling in Inring
room. Itey torilitim ua Con Contomporary
tomporary Contomporary Mgmt Broker 3756663 or 372-
0114 12-12-35-1
STUDENTS
Lhra 2 blocks from naaqne lor
sll VmortiK 2 parsons min.
CM 3774474 to rool
OLYMPIA APIS
UMSWMiAvr
11-3-10-1
Apt to sublet CoinMo Garten Apt
Ckne to U.F. 2 storm* am Un* poaL
$\7Q/mo+ l/4wtiL + dup. Far info AussM
1221 SW 2nd Ave #16132801. 10304-1
Fro Ml bdrm apt al 3600 SW 20 Am
Clean, carpel. A/CHna* big enul for 2.
Ca*y $195/mo m/ SIOO 4np 3737998 or
3744121. No peta. 11-34-1
Take ewer lease in leseweus In He fines
Apt emntor suite M of Oct froe cM Jell
3*17755 M/F most nrtnrn place ie
CrnNe. 1031-5-1
1 n 5 dn from 175 l CM 3714413 and
k sepcMmg. 1027-1-1
F ftciency apt far M in Itigh Spring*
f M far $l9O to $175 a man* jncteteng
actiic. GaM 454-3609 or 454-3366. 10243
1
f me Open The tpnrto.snt to funded
I tibtio* phone, cake coble IV. maid
t mice mdedadL Unai for lisitors to
euersily or Sbondk. 4401 SW 13ds$t 371-
: 31. 11-25-1
! CUD AKA. I m apt done to UF ft
< < $215 mo. 377 13J5 3759951. 11-1-sT
; HUBS FHBI 2bd $27% lbd $199. Cent
r r. umli to UF. FOOL tat cental, motor
I mi 411 NW 15 St 371-0789. 3788984
5 *54173 11-1-15-1
1 OWN Ms to UF. StoMo SM9. Id*
I ml control paid. 1839 M* 2 A*. 3701904
*54173 371-0989.3784314 11-1-101
< lone to UF 2 hr 1 l/2bn. rm nneuM
fenidmd. cent air. enrpat Mastery no.
loot peel. bund. s449me 4 dtp FVcedy
> p. Marta 3725474 11-1-5-1

alligator classifieds

Sueur large 2 Mm in SW complex. 1/2
Namsmbsi FK rent Beautiful view. CM
375-1121. 11-1-5-1
ToSURET: 1 bdrm/1 badtapt. suitable for 1
or 2 people. Goad neighborhood, quiet,
sal* FUtoO K. $220/mondi. CM 378-2657
11-1-4-1
Apt lor rent Brandy eirm 2 bdrm. 2 bto, o
elncL appl $l5O sne dsp free. CaM 376-2561
ensoonanpnmEls 57 pm. 11-2-51
6 BLOCKS K> U OF F Big room aorim*
nnnnmtdiing student M utilities pd.
slomo Realtor 377-0000 eve. 377-0040
11-251
Quiet 3 bdrm haem A/C padfe fans, pet
pointed, new ice box. car port,
waeher/ckyur hookup, good area, ready to
mote into S36Q/aso 3861 NW 19* St Realtor
377-00000r377-0040 1-2-51
ROOMMATES
3 BUCSI 70 UF $135 for 1/2 a 2 bd. motor
paid, cent air, carpett cM Univ. Apts. 411
NW 15 St 371-0349.3784390. 11-5252
Roommate Locators
Gal toady far spring is master. 1013 SW 2
Aw. 2ndfl. 15pm. 372-MATE. 10-275-2
Need feeude to share 2 bdrm apt n n---dwiduol
--dwiduol n---dwiduol must be tmal/sludmus. own rm
$12350 tends. + 1/2 utilities. CM Monica
3674720 10-2852
Year men room in 2 88 tawnhouao in 98
- C.JL. --J
wl rwy nmww ana wavienyw.
$l7O/nm CM 371-0854 Knap trying. 15
2852
srs. ratmta te l/2(2 bdrm
apt In ffnt Rush duu Doc $157/mo. Fur Furw'nhsdl
w'nhsdl Furw'nhsdl Oct hen. CM 371-1704 11-17-2
FRHEGA. Tix/coupon to person who sublets
our apt 2 bdrm Original occupants. Need
deposit Good location. 373-7604. 10-285-2
Roassesmto e anted. Serious student or
maturo person in my house, own room and
beds. S2OO monddy. Evenings Newberry
472-2504 11-1-10-2
Feeude Roommate iwontoil Need one
parson to share a bedroom with/wMhout a
bod. A bedroom. 1 1/2 bade. 1/4 utilities.
Root doee to U.F. $97 55 moo* CM after 3
pm 371-4000. 11-2-10-2
Female non smoker to share 3 bdrm. 2 1/2
faadi luxury condo in NMf with female med
stodant W.D + mare. $195 + 1/2. 375
5618 after 5 11-3-10-2
Om roam in 3 bdrm NMf house 1 mi from
campus. Storting data negotiable. $l3O
mondi -i- 1/3 utility. CM Foul 372-2765 or
NEAR LAW SCHOOL
Quiot reponsbls qrod student wonted own
ne in 3/2 $155 + 1/3 util, cen H/AC 371
0934 after 5 11-5152
Female to sublet own room in largo 4 br/3b
Fio*oo Gordons apt only sll4 mo 4- 1/4
utilities hurry! CaM 377 5207 altar 5 pm. 15
253-2
Big. dean 2 bdrm apt to share with med
stodant My offer: mastor BR w/ adjoining
quiet wolfed court $l3O mo 4- lari. Coll
Brian37sl9RL 11-14-2
rmmoSs new or for Jon 1. nice area off 20th
upper division or grad student. $19350 4
1/2 utiL Brand new apt Call 371-1000 after
4. 10-253-2
Faemla roommate wanted to share new
condo m NMtrun. 2 bdrm 1/2 bath, 1/2 ut.
ftatiy. 377-4774. 1031-4-2
Female to share 4 bdrm in Village Nov. rent
bee. $135 4 1/4 utilities. 3753255 Betsy.
11-1-52
Responsible, eiatore student to share 2
fadrae I bate opt in SW area $ 137/mo 4
1/2 utiL asaL now Call 37539933 eue. 11-
37-2
Noad 1 or 2 male rmmt to share 2 bdrm 1
bate apt in SW area $137/no 4- 1/2 util,
asai. now CM 3753933. 11-1-52
ROOMMATE LOCATORS
FasnaUa: Si. Trace $143 Gcoonloaf condo
$lB4 Gatartawn $133 near UF $1224150.
more 0r372 mate. 1531-3-2
Female Boommota(s) to share 2 bdrm 2 full
bate sll2 a monte in Brandywine Apts. CM
971-4999f0r more information. 11-2-52
Oak FwMtlloomiTut. wonted im im-2MB
2MB im-2MB o mondi plus 1/3 util. Gaft after 3 pm
3/1 1564 10.313.7
1/3 Os 2 > HOUSE $l4O. pescuk.. tenrad
Mar, nicoatea. doao in 819 NW 19 A*. 377-
7422.373-3019 II4M
Roommate Locators
Un. Mco apt 1 Mack Iran. UF, mm
ifpnslMlaitim dupfsn nrUFsl22. condo
SISOI French Quaxtor $l5O. CaNfor IMo 373-
MAX. 1031-3-2

REAL ESTATE
Quiet 3 bdrm home, A/C, paddle fora, just
pointed, new ice box, car port,
washer/dryer hookup. Good Area, ready to
move into $360 mo 3861 NW 19th St Realtor
377- 11-2-53
FOR SALE
NEW Vi PRICE BEDS
Twin (single) $59.50. FuH (double) $64.50
Queen $89.50, King $119.50
AFFORDABLE
BHXMNG 8 FURNITURE
1201 EAST University Avenue
3734900
1021-33-4
NR4A-S NOOK has drafting tables, computer
stands, desks A shelving, beds, stereo A
video cam unfinished A finished wood, A
quality used fumitore, 818 W. University
next to Toco BeN 377-6700. 12-12-77-4
Car Stereo Specialists is tee oldest, lowest
priced, most honest car stereo store. For
Jansen. Sony, Pioneer. Clarion. Krkket,
Sanyo, Visonte, Magnum and more, see
Kan for tee best deoL 2201 NW 13th St.
Phone 372-2070. 12-12-77-4
RECYCLED BICYCLES
Buy, sM trade used A now bicycles under
SIOO w/2 mo. warranty. 805 W. University
Ave. 372-4890. 12-12-77-4
STOP wasting hours waiting in line for a
computer terminal! Online Computing to
tee rescue! Own your own terminal! So
convenient use from your home A any
time you choose. Use with NERDC or VAX.
friced from $299. Online Computing 372-
1712. 2207 NW 13 St. Turn at the Avco sign.
114847-4
Typewriter
Brand new Silver Reed 8650 w/ correcting
key. Asking S3OO or bast offer. Cash only.
378- 3 between 6:00-9:30 p.m. 10-2525
4
For Sole* A Single bed with bed
frame. S6O neg. Coll mornings before 10 or
evenings after 7. 374-4641. 11-2-54
BUD'S V* PRICE BEDS
"New Beck For Less"
Twin $64.95, Full $69.95
Queen $99.95, King $129.95
34295 W Archer Rd. (between
Winn Dixie ACTs Oyster Bar)
378-3415
11-
USED OFFICE
FURNITURE
Desks, tables, choirs A much more.
Delivery available The Office Mart
690 NE 23rd Ave, 373-7516.
12-
FUTONS Japanese mattresses of pure cotton
6" thick, ony size. Also yoga mats, pillows &
more. Sleep A Dreom 377-1335. 11-5454
IBM-PC/XTUsers-Moote Case Expansion
cards. 64K RAM. seriol, parallel, joy-stkk
pom. Disk emulator, etc. $295. PO occepted
3753520. 1041-11-4
OLD PLAYER PIANO
ELECTRFCD in 1975 SI2OO firm. 375*125 or
3774062. 1041-HM
1978 K 2 1000 good cond., new shocks,
kerker header, stop down seat, call Bret
3752106 or 376-0533. 10-26-54
Zoom telephoto lens, Vivator w/ 2x
mult. =75410. Ranked best by modern
photography. Need $1 SSO or bast. 375
2678,9-1 lpm. 10-257-4
Brand new full mattress, boxspring, and
frame SIOO negot.CoM 377-5579. 10-26-54
78 Mobile Home in Windmeodows.
Washer/dryer, choin link fence, awning,
skirting A/C J 4500. 377-8123. 152554
12X64 mobile hm. lmi from UF, excel,
cond, central A/C A heat. $7200; Hondo 125
w/car rack. $190; 6*- 2~ castor surfbrd,
$110; 371-7342. 152554
CLARINET FOR SALE. Solmer, practically
now, only used one semester, asking $l3O.
CM 3753607. ate for Kim. 15255-4
Kryptonito locks $25. Adj-o-porter $25,
Pletscher book racks $6. book packs $5,
Recycled Bicycles 805 W.Univ. Ave. 372-
4890. 11-14-154
For sale Ikntite U/W housing fib m.nolto SLR
ram eras. Indudes Visitor Flash + housing
Like new $200.3756946 1527-54
B* BUsratil CM tot mm mm w 4 m
HMI7-4
H*. TS 1.1, Ml .l
sr.ssa?jss
1527-5-4
I l

Technics turntable w/ ctg S9O, JVC cost,
deck SIOO, both for $175. EP Comp X 2 water
ski, used twice $l4O. Eric 371-0912. 1531-5
4
For Sale 280zx bra reg S9O yourt for only
$65 hardly used. Call after 5 1-591-2787.
11-1-54
* Beautiful grey A white Persian kitten.
Free to a superior home (no students) must
meet him. CoH eves Lauren 3957264. 15
251-4
1960 Yamaha QT-50, seen better days, SSO
or b/o. Abo. FUZZ-BUSTER 111 RADAR
DETECTOR, works vary well, almost new,
SSO or b/o. 3714991. 11-1-54
Lambert 10 speed, Doro-Ace crank-set and
stem, cinelli bars excellent condition, 21
lbs. $575060371-4433. 11-1-54
Metal Halide Gro-tito 1000 c watts, ad adjustable
justable adjustable reflector. Remote ballast, excellent
condition. $l6O. 372-6137. 15252-4
1975 Yamaha DTI7S, looks good, runs
good, includes two helmets and xtra tire for
dirt. Must sell! $325, Coll Tom 377-6211. 15
31-3-4
* *Goroge Sole* this Sunday 30th, ex.
bike 3-spe*d, bike mirror, bed,
clothes...^cheapo37s7422 SW 30th Ook
Glode Apt #5509 om to 6 pm. 18252-4
Bicycles: Raleigh Record in excellent cond.
$120.00, men's, women's, and children's.
Guaranteed 30 days. 372-6099 (eves) 11-2-
5-4
Love seat and two choirs. Good condition.
$503753211. 11-4-4-4
AUTOS
mmammmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm
HURRICANE BATTERIES
alternators, generators, starters A batteries.
1111 S. Main. 3754440. 12-12-455
TRIKES VW based 3-wheel motorcycles w/
slippery fiber-glass bodies, strong runners,
diff. colors, now A used Call 1-528-2740.
152511-5
1963 Toyota Corollas A Terceb. Automotics
A 5 speeds. Air, radio roar defogger,
power steering, 2 yr. warranty. See of
National Cor Rental. G'ville Airport 377-
7005. 11-1-155
1981 Kawasaki 305, superbly maintained,
70 mpg, two helmets, adult driven, asking
$750. coll 371-0454. 1527-55
74 VW Bug. Decent tires, and a lot of
spunk. SI2OO Coll Lindy 372-4738. 1827-55
1979 Kawasaki KE2SO Enduro w/5-gallon
desert tank. Runs great on/off road. S9OO.
Call Jim 3752805. 1527-55
1975 Honda Civic 5 Speed Hotchbock
Michel in Radio Is, New Battery, New
Muffler $1250 373-5574. 152555
1978 VW SCIROCCO, 4 speed, air, stereo, 30
+ mpg, regular gas, Michelins, $3695, 454-
3485 or 454-1950. 11-1-55
69 MUSTANG 200 cid 6 cyl, auto maroon w/
white vinyl top, point and holly carb one yr
old $800,378-6946 11-1-55
AWESOME
1963 Honda V 65 Magna Fastest bike in
production, only 46 mile, 0 to 173 MPH in
11.6 sec. Too fast for me and need money
for school. S4BOO new, will take $3900 or
best offer. Must sell. 377-2468 or 374-0244
(beeper). Ate for Allen.
1980 Hondo CM 400 T motorcycle good
condition, 9,500 miles, includes luggoge
rock, helmet, crash bor, $950 Coll Fred 395
7272. 11-2-55
* WHAT A DEAL!
Chevy Nova 1972, auto irons; good miloge,
reg gos, runs well, S4OO or offer; coll Al 375
6795. 11-2-55

My kidney stopped working. Ill
have to go to the hospital so that a
machine can clean my blood. My
daddy says it costs a lot of money.
Im waiting for a transplant, but the
doctors say it'll be a long wait. There
just are not enough people leaving
their organs when they die. Thousands
of transplants are needed each year.
You cant save thousands of lives all
by yourself ...just one.

SERVICES
For Quality un a Professional
Professional Typing
917 NW 13th St 373-9822
recorded on diskettes or mog cards
dissertations theses manuscripts
12-12-77-6
Word Aimralwg/Typtag/Copylag
Typsttb|/Prbfim/BMf
Sara# dey eorv. aval!/Mkrotertwt
438 NW 13 th $./375335S 3753613.
12-12-77-6
KKSUMBS/COVR LITERS
typ*eet prfcteid werd precew 4
438 NW 13th $./3758613 373-3353.
12-12-77-6
Tetes wow tidi ragerHJM
ted procoeeod/Micro-Print Sow.
438 NW 13th St./3753316 S7S-8613.
12-12-77-6
ABORTION
(poin modicotion included)
Free pregnancy tests
Gainesville
Women's Health
Center
805 SW 4th Ave (5 blocks from campus)
377-5055
community based in G'ville since
1974
Non-profit
Birth control
Herpes/VD/Infection
(Screening for men women.)
1531-49-6
Typing, Bookkeeping A Notary.
Professional quality 13 years oxp. IBM
Correct Sofectric 111 NW section DAWN 332
3913 after 5. 11-1-484
TRAIN TO BE A
TRAVEL AGENT
TOUR GUIDE
AIRLINE RESERV.
Start locally. Eastern's computers, financing
available. Full time/Part time Placement
assistance. Coll A.C.T. Travel School.
1-800-432-9004
11-1545*
ABORTION
Free Pregnancy Tests
Birth Control Clinic
Nitrous Oxide Available
Licensed Physician
Individual Counseling(some day)
Strictly Confidential
Pop smears, breast exom, VD screening
All Birth control methods
All Women's Health
Center of Gainesville, Inc.
378-9191
' Quality Cara. Family Planning"
Sarving Florida line- !975
IttKNWIMiSt.
Across from G H.S
For all otfwr areas, please call toll-free I I-800-282-tWO.
-800-282-tWO. I-800-282-tWO. 12-12-77-4
HYPNOSIS HELPS attain mental physical
goals: studying/momory/con studying/momory/cont-fence/sports
t-fence/sports studying/momory/cont-fence/sports DON PRATT, Director 373-
3059 12-12-77-6
HORSES Come ride at Sleepy Hallow
wooded trails-leasing t rentals. Instruction
Ham seat t dressage. Complete boarding
3754080. 466-3224. 12-12-77-6

Resume writing, editing and consultation
sendees. Professional writer with 13 years
experience Call 3714148 for appointment
12-12-774
***************
Typing services. Will type anything. Call
tytm 013784723 or 3951346.
***************
12-12-744
Typing -13 years legal exp .90 cwpm, term
poputs, manuscripts, etc.. IBM selecelc 111,
reasonable. 3784653 Nil 9 p.m. 10-27-424
Magic Fingers typing: have machine, ability
experience to handle your typing needs
at reasonable cost. Sharon 377-9766. 10-31
434
Typing Theses. Dissertations, law School
and Tarm Papers. Background
Secretory/English Teacher. 3784942. 9-5
11-
Typing. East and accurate, reasonable rales,
minor editing, proofreading. Coll Beverly at
3724253. 12-12484
Valuables Lost?
Target Metal-Detection Service can Help!
Jewelry, hays 375-4430 11-7-284
PREGNANT?
WORRIED?
WE CARE!
ALL SERVICES FREE
377-4947
CRISIS PREGNANCY
CENTER
12-
** TYPING From $1 /pg. **
Colt JIN (Speedy Gator). Excel, spalling,
proofing. 15 yrv oxp. Papers, theses, etc.
377-9447. 1841-334
TYPMG: legal. Nwses. dissertations,
reports, professional quality. IBM Seieclric
Nancy. 372-2750. 1841404
Typing/word processing from $2/poge. Top
quality printer. Work guaranteed. Call
Donna or Susan for appointment. 377-0460
114484
EMPLOYMENT
cover loners resumes at low pricasl
Oormo or Susan 377-0460.
11-3484
Reduce your seess, tension. pain.
Profaaiaixil relaxing massage Therapy for
woman, man. Idds. Whirlpool sauna.
Kristin Omar LM.T. 3739783 114-254
Typing. Fast and accurate. Papers, thesei.
dissertations. Experienced Reasonable
rates. COM Rita. 375-1484 12-12-484
Typing Grad. School approved exp. in
dn*-, theses, legal, etc. Former mere lory
IBM Cor. Sol. Barbara 377-2377. 1848-204
HORSES BOARDED
near Oaks Moll. Coll for info 373-2715 or
372-9547. 11-15356
HORSES TO LEASE
near Oaks Moll. English only. 3732715 or
372-9547. 11-14484
HORSE RRMNG lessons near Oaks Mall. Any
ago. beginning thru advanced English. Coll
332-1224.372-9547.3732715. 11-14-304
I WINGS \
f WINGS l
| WINGS \
iv^i
*
{ 2300 Archer Rd. {
Has J
{ Chicken Wings {
£ Introductory £
B Special
I 5 Pieces for |
9c i
Larger Quantities£
* Available. Phone£
£ Orders Accepted £
378-9163
£ Our customers ore £
£ describing our unique +
* Spicy Sour Cream Wing- +]
J dipping Sauce as great' £1
X and'fantastic.'



ABORTION
(up to 22 weeks)
* Individual, confidential counseling
p" Nitrous oxide! special pain medication
at no extra charge.
licenced Gynecologist wrih ten years
specialization in pfegnoncy
termination.
Free Pregnancy Tests
BIRTH CONTROL CLINIC
Female pracMonsn
All birth control methods
Personal caring to our specialty
BREAD & ROSES
Well Woman Care
372-1664
4001 Newberry M., Bldg. B Suite 4.
1031-21-6
ADOPTION SERVICES
Before you consider an abortion,
me v_niKjrons non* society or me Lnsciples-
Presbyterion Student Center, 1402 W.
University Avenue or phone 376-5186. No
guilt trip-no pressure fust help. Let's to*
(A United Way Agency). 12-12-47-6
AMITY LSAT/MCAT/GRE Seminars now in
Gainesville. Our guarantee. Score in tap
25% or take the next course free 806243-
4767. 12-12-466
TYPING 372-7866
AN kinds Resumes. Terms. Theses, Spell
ckd. Some day/ovemite. Nr. GviNe MaN.
12-12-466
LEARN TO FLY
WHh Gulf Adamic Airways
* We cater to Uni vanity students
* 10 aircraft available for ram
* We employ only FAA certificated
instructors 'The Professionals"
* Gomesvittos oldest most experienced
training facility 373-2426.11-3037-6
toTelling CoNtraT*, PO Box 292. Kstero
HUM. 1080106
RENT A WORD
PROCESSOR
i* i mr lyryimsnr
Call Gainsorids Wont Hncaraiii|| Cantor
far derail*. 377-0460
11-1-106
KEYPUNCHING AM) DATA ENTRY SERVICES
Ralafala and Accural* Data CoocSon
Fanrn Darign. Data Entry (Keying 5
Verification). Data dsliwrad on conk or
magnetic tapa- Oamighl taraaund
available. Coil Mr*. Rudi Booth 375-7624
(day) or 473-2413 (awning. holiday.).
12-12-344
PROFESSIONAL TYPMG
Reasonable rata. APA, taw, 3 grad school
*per. lasi adnata nrraptad. raaotrarinn
profaned. Call Coin 3753603. 11-1-56
QuaWano about VO, poignancy, bird,
control, raloliorahip.T CaM Ptannod
Pbranlhood at 3764000 (or confldowiol
counwl. 11-4-ID6
"Typing & Research"
Far paper, artido. ota. IBM Word
Procnmor from|l-9Q/pg
Expwrioncod339-1222(tocol) Say
1031-126
Intotostod in a medical mar? Thw
Rapiratoy Therapist program a. SFCC i>
accepting Wander ttodsnta for Jan. IBM. If
you haw modi and ch.mtaay cradW and
ora intanuid In a chadonging hnaM>
profession. you could bncomn a tpoctadtat
in respiratory com in I 1/2 yaard Contact
Barbara Wilson. 3754300 for infarmalian.
1027-14
Tutoring in Calculus I and H and in Physic* I
* 11, *IQ/hr Coll Staw at 3752356 1025
24

HTFTg*fTMt gICUU IT* Fig RdE,^*
Brainstorm MR. MOM
.. (kite .14*1 (sd*#4*
Q (M) IdMdl (PO)7ds 9MS
I T n £r # !£ c, ~ W &SSJ~
(po)7s*s*)*j e**t*
If you wear glasses
Read this this
this Spectrum Optical lowPr.cw t)) |T is not a chain d
Jody ami I ora
fl-tnr. IdMllstlMMlir I
rarmerueton V ... M I
We cut your Lettset dflit tieeeslreellT.ll I
here (tstOf next dmy) I
We tell the belt framet
We ere Freud of oer nerk
I <270 nn/,i I

a x/ J

WANTED
* I ".TM**. *. dd jnraehy. gmw.
** ""9*. danwd gold. One 3732343,
hnafaumby. 1515757
WAMSD HA4SA COUPONS. I MB) A
BUNCH SO GIVE ME A CAII 3730136 BSP
TRWNGI 11-1-147
Ftaadad ara gad capon toKantod^uZ
Florida game. Saud. and wane a 376-3067 day, or 3752M6 nigh*. 1035
57
* NK) 2 ISUlis-praiar coupon*, rmywhara
in stadram. CAU ASAP 3744982
Sun*** 1027-47
Nm) ha-auburn nans cau cecf srr
5674. 1027-47
nm-.. - r f
anydmn Bob 3750035 1031-57
NEEDED:
54 taka*. togwdwr. far Kontodry game.
Cad 3754003. 11-1-57
ROOMMATE M TAMPA M accouoSmg
stodeW to begin oak far Tampa CPA firm
1/2/54 needs Mor Froommata. 1027-57
Wontad HAGA coupon, or toko*. Cod
Joan 3774720aft0r 4pm 11-1-57
I nand 2 Ga.-R capon 1 r 1 cad 374-
dd anyma. 11-1-57
Need Auburn and Geargo caupam Cad
Mi a lai a 3351263 anyCnm Go
Gatorstll 11-1-57
Wound Georgia and rubit| coopara.
Cad 3774579 loawaaraoge. 102437
FLA-GATix
WiN hade34oyd Ime/row 9 far Merfem
coupons 177-3498. 162667
Need (2) Fig-Go tkkori tegsdier. Ga 376
1472. 11-667
NBF ME FICASB I need 5 fidrnts far Cm
tucky game. WefeedUy togedmr. Cal IM
371-4840. 11-667
Need 6-10 Kentucky Ikfcets-NofaM together"
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17



18

I. alligator, thursday, October 27, 1983

Pell
continued
from page twenty
will be determined by a field goal like it has
been the last two years?
A: Oh, sure. It could come down to anything.
There are usually five plays in any given
football game that make the difference. The
catch is that nobody knows when those five
plays are going to occur. But theyll be there.
It should be a close game.
Qi The Gators have played well on the road
so far this season, winning at Mississippi State
and Louisiana State and tying at Southern
California. But since World War 11, UF has
won just twice in 19 tries playing at Auburn.
Do you feel confident this team can buck that
tradition?
A: With this team, I dont think that
anything matters except 1983. Theyre not
looking at that statistic. Really, what matters
is the B3 Auburn team against the B3
Florida team. Thats enough. Those statistics
arent important, in my opinion. We believe
in this football team. We know how hard
they work. And theyre preparing very hard
to play Saturday. To win Saturday. Theyre
preparing for that. As a group, they really
believe that they can still improve, like they
can really get better each week. To me, thats
the difference in this football team. Thats
why they're winners.
Q: Last years team had emotional peaks and
valleys and lost two of its first seven games.
This years team has had peaks and valleys
but is undefeated after seven games. Why?
A: Every team is different. Every team has
different circumstances. Depth, injuries.
When you say peak weve had some units
that have peaked, played great football at
times. 1 guess at different times, each unit has
had spans of great play. But all units havent
reached that level of ability on the same
Saturday for four quarters yet. Thats a rare
time in teams sports. Thats what we all
work for.
Q: Already this season youve faced a
wishbone offense against Mississippi State
and a similar Option I offense against East
Carolina. How much will that help your
team prepare for Auburns wishbone?
A: We hope theres some carry over, but
Auburns wishbone is so much different. It is
a lot more explosive. More talented. No one

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is going to beat Auburn unless they stop Bo
Jackson, Lionel James, (Clayton) Beauford,
Woods, speedy wide receivers. Thats a
tough call for any team as weve already
seen.
Q: Youve seen the films from the Aubum-
Texas game (a 20-7 Texas victory). How did
Texas beat Auburn?
A: Texas had the ball early, they scored
early, they got some big plays early. Because
of that they were able to take the momentum
away from Auburn. The second 30 minutes
of that football game Auburn and Texas
played even. I think it was just the emotional
thing of getting behind early, and they had a
defensive back fall down which allowed a
touchdown. It was a much closer game than
the score indicates. And at the time they
played, people didnt realize Texas was so
strong. But Auburn played them toe-to-toe
for about 50 minutes of that game.
Q:What would winning the Southeastern
Conference title mean to Charley Pell?
A: You know what. Id like to be able to think
about that but preparing for Auburn takes
every bit of my time. If we do what were
supposed to be doing getting ready for
Auburn, we dont have that luxury. And lm
being honest with you when I say that. Our
concern is for Auburn, and we dont really
have enough time for that.
Q: Do you wish you had had an open date the
week before the Auburn game like you did
last year?
A: Yes. We had an open date last year,
played pretty well against a good Auburn
team, won the game, and then coach (Pat)
Dye comes out and says his team didnt play
well, the poorest theyve played all year. If
that was the poorest they played, and
knowing that theyre going to be playing
their best this week, thats something, thats
a big gap for us to try to make up for. This is
the most talented Auburn team since 1958
(when the Tigers won the national title).
Q: And you wont think about the Georgia
game until Saturday night?
A: Absolutely not. Os course, Im sure coach
(Vince) Dooley isnt thinking about us
because hes working so hard for Temple.
Thatll be a glorified scrimmage in front of
80,000 people, thats all hes gonna have
Saturday. But thats the way they set it up.
Its designed. It didnt happen by accident.
But, we cant worry about that either,
because we cant change it, yet.

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Hamstring slows DePeiza in 26-miler

CASH FOR ANY THING'

Alligator Writer
Last year. Caswell DePeiza ran the New York Marathon in
2 hours, 38 minutes. He was the 286th person to finish the
race quite a feat considering there were 3.800 runners
legally entered into the race and thousands of others joining
in at different times.
On Oct. 22. the 33-year-old Gainesville runner again
tested the 26-mile, 38S-foot course that begins on the
Verrazano Narrows Bridge in Staten Island, continues
through Brooklyn, the Bronx, Queens and Manhattan,
finally meting in Central Park. This time, DePeiza com completed
pleted completed the race in nine fewer minutes and 178th overall.
Ineleed. a noticeable improvement from last year.
But Gcsmefl DePeiza could not help being a little disap disappointed.
pointed. disappointed.
I improved some, but not to where 1 wanted to, DePeiza
said. "It's back to the drawing board."
DePeiza's nemesis was a muscle spasm that struck at
about the 3-mile mark. It is a nagging injury that has
plagued him since March, when he tore his hamstring
muscle while playing soccer. He reinjured it in June and
he has yet to fully recover.
I tore (the muscle) and didnt-take care of it, the
Trinidad native said. 'There is a lot of scar tissue in it. But in
all of my earlier races, 1 wouldnt feel it. It would be sore,
brit it wouldnt hurt like it did."
At that 3-mile mark, DePeiza slipped as a result of the
slick roads earned by the constant rain that fell throughout
the race. His right hamstring muscle suddenly tightened up,
and it was then that DePeiza knew he was probably going to
ran into problems later on.
That dvht deter DePeiza. however. He maintained his
consistent pace throughout the race, and his time of 1:07.00
at the halfway point was just three minutes behind the
I could stdl see the whole race in front of me at the
halfway point," said DePeiza. who attended UF on a track
and era cmmtry scholarship and graduated in 1975. I
Defense
group has played. Fred McCallister (team leader in tackles),
Mark Korff aad Alonzo Johnson have done as good a job as
the three Bays (Val Brown, Tom Weigmann, Fernando
Jackson) they took over for this season.
Then theres WBber Marshall. Not only has he been doing
an outstanding jab an the field (fifth leading tackier despite
uwong time with a broken hand and having teams run
away from him), bad hes also taken a leadership role this
year. Marshall is so good that scouts in UFs press box have
said he could be a starter right now for most NFI. teams.
Reserve outside linebacker Patrick Miller has.also been
doing a good job when hes been called on. If it werent for
the fact that the Gator already have Marshall and Johnson
on the oUbade. Miller woald be starting, and UF would not
be any worse her la w of i.
MWBVI DAOtV Here, too, was worry at the
beginning at the season. Certainly not at the safety positions
where Tony LBy and Randy Clark measure up well against
But the entnerhack pmitinn was supposedly to be a
problem. After Brace Vaughan went down last year with a
foot mfmy, opponents constantly attacked the area vacated
by Vaogkaa. And when the cornerback, Ivory Gurry,
graduated, the pnsflinn loohed Mae a weakness.
But UF got a break when Vaughan recovered from what
appeared to be a career-ending injury. He hasnt had any
trodble with Ok foot since. Opponents have tried to exploit
Vaurhan hu sue of the foot, but have consistently come up

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alligator, thursdoy, October 27, 1983,

was in control of what I was doing, f wasnt laboring or
breathing hard. I was in the top 30 at the halfway mark and
87th at the 22-mile mark..
That was when DePeizas decline began."
I got into Central Park (the 22-mile point) and I began to
walk. I walked three times in the park, DePeiza said,
concerning the injury. Overall, 1 felt I could have gone
more. But I had the cramp. Last year, I died a lot earlier.
This year, I died at the 22-mile mark. Once you start to
walk, you cant get your stride back.
Once DePeiza finished the race, he was greeted by
volunteers that assist the runners as they cross the finish line.
These volunteers, who were kept busy by the numerous
runners who were afflicted by cramps, feared DePeiza tore
his hamstring muslce a common ailment among runners.
What DePeiza has been suffering with since March is an
accumulation of scar tissue in his right hamstring. As a
result, it shortens his muscle, thus hindering his full range of
motion.
I knew what it was. f knew it wasnt a pull, he said. I
knew exactly what it was.
But despite the disappointment, DePeiza was nevertheless
pleased with his performance.
I ran what I wanted to, DePeiza said. I was pleased
with my personal effort and how I felt despite the injury.
Running 26 miles isnt fun. I dont care what anybody
says.
DePeizas next test will be in the Orange Bowl Marathon
in Miami on Jan. 7. And as usual, he will be shooting for the
goal that has kept him on the marathon circuit for four
years.
I want to run inside 2 hours, 15 minutes. Every time I
run, I try to get that goal.
With a healthy leg and a renewed attitude, he could very
well achieve that goal.
NOTES. Three other Gainesville runners competed in the
New York Marathon. Janet Wendle completed the course in
3 hours, 9 minutes. Ottila Torres-Garcia finished at 4 hours,
30 minutes, and Tom Goldstein, a visiting UF journalism
professor, ran the marathon in 3 hours, 28 minutes.
empty-handed.
*%
One the other side, a more confident Ricky Easmon has
done a fairly credible job. He has made some poor plays, but
unlike last season, he has also come up with some big plays.
Roger Sibbald and Curtis Stacey have given the Gators
some valuable depth as backups at safety and comerbacks
respectively.
Again, the only fault with the secondary is the fact they
are giving up more than 190 yards passing despite not
playing against any better than average throwing
quarterback.
GBAOCB
KICKING GAME: This may be UFs strongest area. In fall
practice, Pells most urgent problem was finding a place placekicker.
kicker. placekicker. Now he has two, Bobby Raymond and Chris Perkins,
and both have done their specific job nearly beyond
reproach.
Its hard to judge Ray Criswell and David Nardone
because they havent had to do much punting. But both have
done well when called on.
The coverage teams have been excellent. They've held
returners to 16 yards on kickoffs and six on punt returns.
The return teams have been fair at best. Kickoff returners for
UF have brought the ball back 17 yards, while the punt
returners have been quite dreadful (only four yards a return).
GRADE: A AGATOB
GATOB AGATOB BITS: Starting tailback Neal Anderson and of offensive
fensive offensive lineman Lomas Brown missed Wednesdays two twohour
hour twohour practice session. Anderson, the leading rusher in the
Southeastern Conference, has a cold and sore throat while
Brown is recovering from a back injury suffered in the East
Carolina game. Pell said he expects both to play Saturday
against Auburn.-

19



20

alligator, thursday, October 27, 1983

UF defensive unit a reliable 'tower of strenath'

When it comes to UF football there is one thing that a fan
can always take for granted: the Gators will not lose because
of their defense.
During the Charley Pell era, the UF offense has been
unpredictable. Up one week and down the next. But,
especially'in the last four seasons, the defense has been a
tower of strength. You could count on one hand the number
of poor performances by the defense during that time.
JORGE MILIAN
sportscene
There was the 44-0 loss last year against Georgia as well as
the Mississippi State and West Virginia games two years
ago. Even in those games, the offense could be held ac accountable.
countable. accountable. With the offense not being able to produce, the
defense had to remain on the field longer.
This year the defense is even better. Through UFs first
seven games, it has given up only 91 points (13 points a
game). Its given up more than 100 yards rushing in a game
only once and allowed the opposition only 2.9 yards a carry.
It has been impressive in crucial situations.
Opponents have converted only 37 percent of their third
down situations compared to the UF offenses 56 percent
conversion rate. About the only thing that can be said about
that the Gator defense hasnt been near perfect in, has been
the defense against the pass.
The UF secondary has given up more than 190 yards
passing per game, and the reason being concerns the Gator
defense against the run. Opponents must throw, once they
find out that their running game is being shut down.

WITH
CHARLEY
PELL
Editor's Not*: On Saturday, the fourth fourthranked
ranked fourthranked Gator football team plays the fifth fifthranked
ranked fifthranked Auburn Tigers in a game that could
determine who wins the 1983 Southeastern
Conference title. The game, the most im important
portant important in recent UF history, will strongly
'test the mettle of the Gators and Charley Pell
by the head coach's oum admission. On
Wednesday, Pell talked with Alligator staff

fllps
t_W GSfl I
INCONCERT!!! I
Thurs. Oct. 27, 1983 I
Tickets $12.10 ON SALE NOW
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"SILsPf Th* Islands 1
Keeer4Ber Clutpfr HI I
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With that, its time to grade the Gator defense.
DEFENSIVE LINE: With Greg Cleveland switching over
from offense, and with Roy Harris injury problems, there
was some doubt how strong the line would be.
It hasnt been a problem.
Through the East Carolina game, the Pirates gained only
41 first downs by running the ball because of course, of
the fine job the linebacking corp is doing. But in a 3-4
defense (three linemen and four linebackers) it's the job of
the linemen to clog up the line to allow the linebackers to
roam without being bothered by blockers.
In other words, the linemen have to sacrifice themselves in
order for the linebackers to do their job. The linemen have
done that almost perfectly.
Harris has played so well that many people are talking
him up for a spot on the All-Southeastern Conference team.
Nose guard Tim Newton slimmed down during the off offseason
season offseason and is becoming a dominating player in the middle of
the Gator defense.
Pell says he thinks Newton is going to become the best nose
tackle in the country by his senior year. Cleveland quit the
team last year but has come back, giving the Gators con consistent
sistent consistent play at defensive tackle.
About the only fault that can be raised about the line is its
lack of pressure on the opposing quarterback. With a 3-4
defense, you dont expect a lot of sacks but this line has had
trouble just pressuring the quarterback.
GRADE: B
LINEBACKERS: They lost three of their starters from last
years team, but you wouldnt have noticed by the way this
Sm Defense'
page nineteen

_' f IB
..

writer Scott Kline about the Auburn game
and the Gators preparation jor it. The
following are excerpts from that interview.
Alligator: Os course, you realize the SEC title
is on the line Saturday. Have you stressed
that fact to your players this week?
Pell: I m so confident that the players know
whats at stake, more than any other person

sports

ALLIGATOR PHOTO
or group of people. So confident. Thats so
obvious to me. We dont really feel any need
to mention it to them and we havent. Dont
plan to.
Q: Do you do anything different this week
than you would for East Carolina or Indiana
State?
A: Not really. We just hope that what we do
well do it better.

f Burgers & Beer j
Buy two y 2 lb. specialty burgers
| for $5.75
j /oAr>\ (Except kitchen sink burger)
Get two COORS drafts FREE
{ or two soft drinks FREE S
/ 1 Y Oood thruOc P JI. Isas
Enjoy our BIG screen T.V.
S PUBLIC WELCOME gj
Gainesville Civic Ballet
with Dance Alive!
presents
H wL Vi
auditorium
S S-haday. October 29 at 8 p

alligator photo
UF linebacker Wilber Marshall has 51 tackles to his
credit in the 1983 season.

Q: This week you and your team have been
bombarded by media requests for interviews,
not only by state papers, but also by national
magazines such as Sports Illustrated. How do
you and the team handle all the attention and
still keep a narrow-minded focus on the
Auburn game?
A: Thats just part of my job. I dont even
think about that. As far as the players are
concerned, I would imagine that theyre
finding it real hard to concentrate and not let
it affect them. The more mature they are, the
less effect it will have. They Work hard at it.
They have to. I will say that this years team
is more mature than last years was.
Q: Youve been looking at Auburn films all
week long. What do you see as the Tigers
strengths and weaknesses?
A: I think their strength is the overall balance
of their offense, defense and kicking game.
Their ability to rush the passer, their ability
to put pressure on. And on their offense, its
the big play capability. Their offensive
backfield (Lionel James, Bo Jackson, Randy
Campbell and their receivers (Ed West, Chris
Woods) are so explosive. Those are their
strong points. Their place kicker (Al Del
Greco) is great. They have no weaknesses as
far as 1 can tell.
Q: Do you think that the games outcome
See 'Pell'
page eighteen



Full Text

PAGE 1

,ERVE DISK5f l volume -77, no. 47 ,flia Puwho, u thursday, october 27, 1983 Escpodlrpist linked to local crime gotor Staff Writer A suspected rapist who escaped from N~orth Carolina poice three weeks ago is back in hainesville and may have .IWld xuAl intentions" during the recent burglary of a Gaibeoldliwoman's home, police said Wednesday. ~eaq~hsGregory Farrow, who was charged with se~,en of burglary and rape iu.Alachua County, as be si the area, police have begun canvassing 6ooob, which police consider lAely, targets of linked to a local bu glary in which the victim -ture la vesv lwe tbway abbard reftysed Gatbard said the.manidentified as Farrow "may have had sexual intentionsbut she screamed and he left." This incident led police to notify motel owners about the escaped prisoner, known for raping 'women in their apartments. Farrow, serving two 25-year sentences in a North Carolina state prision, escaped while on his way to Seminole County when he jumped out of a plane as it was taxiing befon takeoff. According to police records, the 34-year-old escapee had strongg ties toAlachua County" and was expected to return. A desk clerk at a local motel, said police came by the motel asking him if he's seen Farrow and notified him that hemy befrequeting local motels. "They cadeby and said tw5y were looking for him," the clerk, who wished to remain anonymous, said Wednesday night. "They said they're checking from motel to motel, saying he may be a transient." However, such efforts have not always proved effective. In the past, a man resembling Farrow has b-en brought many times to the station. Officer Janet Presley last week said numerous people have mistaken this man for Farrow. Gabbard said he could not release the man's name because he has never been charged with a crime. Arrested last September in North Carolina while driving a car stolen from Gainesville, Farrow is 5 feet 11 inches tall and weighs about 155 pounds. He has blue eyes, blond medium-length hair and a fair complexion. According to a police report, Farrow once got the name and address of one of his victims by looking at her checkbook in a supermarket. UF radio club members tune to student in Grenada See related story, page nine. *y TOM UREI Aigator StaffWriter Mark Van Buskirk leaned forward and adjusted the radio transceiver as an echoing voice cut through the static on the 14megahertz band. "Are they on the beach?" the calling station asked. "Can you see any soldiers at this time?" "Negative," a faint voice answered from Grenada. Van Buskirk, who hopes to study electrical leering at UF, is one of a dozen members of the UF Amateur Radio Club who have been monitoring the Caribbean airwaves since U.S. Marines landed on the island of Grenada Tuesday. Theradio mteurs, or "hams," have been passing messages for relatives worried about Americaf students on the island and nilitoinug the confused military situation as &M s and paratroopers closed in on a airfield. The UF amateur radio operators have continuously monitored the station on the 1 Ith floor of Shands Teaching Hospital since 3 p.m. Tuesday. Their sole contact on the island is an American student known on the airwaves as "KA2ORK J3." "He's the only contact our State Department has down there," club President Art Stauf said. He reached or a copy of Amateur radio Callbook astdthumbed through the pauntil hef dteAll sign. 'A2 ORK J"'ark arettella, a medical studnt foea~ersywli lse~sning the George's IaSchool in Gftnada. Dy W4 reports as thO cAme in ,Vpn .kI ejypt listdould le air Mausecond floor of a dormitory near the Pearls Airport on Grenada. Stauf, a Navy ROTC student, said the Gator station had already passed along two messages from local residents asking about relatives on the embattled island. Steven Saff, an architecture student from Tampa, grabbed the opportunity to send a message asking about his cousin in St. George's. "My cousin was down there and I wanted to see if he was OK," Saff said. "They said none of the students had been hurt." Saff said his cousin had graduated from UF in 1980 with a degree in psychology and began attending the St. George's school on Grenada six months ago. Saff said he had been worried that perhaps his cousin hadn't heard the warnings broadcast by American radio stations, warning civilians to take cover as the invasion landed. In normal times, a telephone customer can reach Grenada by starting with an "809" area code. But when U.S. troops invaded the island six days after a sudden revolution, phone service was cut off and remained cut off asof-Wednesday night. In its place, the Federal Communications Conatission (FCC) designated frequencies that barettella and stateside stations could use for news and for family information. Certain stations were designated as net control stations, regulating calls. The radio traffic Wednesday afternoon showed that Barettella may be ready to shut dow* his station. The first planeload of Amereans had been evacuated to Puerto Ric,'and Barettella confirmed that he was the euly resident -left on the second floor of s building. $e'Hom page nine 'inthoroperators have been monitoring Ambgn and have been relaying = fstdentson the island. A i Ml 4 90rs also appeared at'her n Teaching Hospital during ad went to Shands alsowe -oy weuld try to d aWrV 6 Fl .11s I .1.1-1

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2, igotoirsday, october 27, 1983 Se ators refuse m By JOSHUA L. WENSTEIN Alligotgr Staff Wrltes UF student senators spent more than $46,000 Tuesday on items like a Xerox typewriter and a campus arts festival, but theN denied the University of Florida Lesbian and Gay Society (UFLAGS) $512 for a speaker. just a portion of the $46,000 went for a $3,360 typewriter for the Student Honor Court and $28,705 for Omnicron Delta Kappa's (ODK) Celebration this coming spring. Senators said the 39-member (UFLAGS) wastoosmall and didn't affect their particular constituencies. Besides, Student Government has already given UFLAGS money for speakers, according to Sen. David Lawrence. They voted 31-9 against the allocation after a lengthy debate in which they cut the request to $400, and finally denied it. In addition, Sen. Fred Morales -a vocal opponent of the group -said he doesn't think students want to fund UFLAGS anyway. Morales called UFLAGS a "chicken-shit organization" and said that anybody who voted for the allocation "will be committing political delinquency." Several UFLAGS members left the senate meeting disturbed at the senators' actions. "I just have never been this upset," said Melissa, a member who asked that her last name not be used. "From what I saw in there (the Student Senate meeting), even though they didn't say it .they are prejudiced." The speaker, Virginia Apuzzo, is director of the National Gay Task Force and a former nun, UFLAGS Director Joanna Weinberger said Tuesday. Apuzzo said she would speak free. The money would pay Allig A scie N Lab mon G Local science teacher receives state award SUNITA RAMAYTA as possible in body involvements and lab experiments." gotor Writer Body involvements include an exercise where students calculate their body and mass volume. local instructor has been recognized as the outstanding "There is a certain amount of satisfaction and pleasure of nce teacher in the state, having received the award," Griffin said. ancy Griffin, a science teacher at UF's P.K. Yonge "I have had old students come up to me and tell me that oratory School for 16 years, was recognized earlier this they're in science because of the excitement I generated in sth for her efforts, them, or say that it's because of what I've done that they're rifin was nominated for the award, competed with going into a certainfield." teachers form around the state and won on the basis of recommendations and evaluations from teachers throughout the state. "A lot of people knew of my work," Griffin said, although she said she was surprised of hearing about the award. In addition to her work as a teacher, Griffin also was recognized for her work in high school science activities, participation in workshops and writing in science journals. Griff in said her goal is to "get students as much involved Iv weather Today's forecast: generally fair and cool with highs in the low to mid. 70s(21-23C) and lows in the 40s(7C). No rain predicted. oney for UFLAGS her air fareto Gainesville. But despite senators' lack of support, Weinberger is undaunted, saying she will find a way to bring the speaker to UF. "'1he event will occur at 8 p.m. on Dec. 8 in the University Auditorium." she said confidently after the request was denied. The only thing Weinberger said she was upset about is that senators who supported the project in committee -before the larger meeting -did not vote for it during Tuesday nights' meeting. Senators did, however, approve some requests. Omnicron Delta Kappa's celebration got $28,705.94, almost $10,000 more than they received last year. Celebration is a weeklong festival of the arts that ODK sponsors yearly. Tlhis year, however, ODK representatives have to report to senators each month, filling senators in on Celebration's progress. This is the first time a group has had to report monthly to senators, but since the event is planned about six months in advance, senators said they want to be kept informed. Another $3,360 was given to the Honor Court to buy a new typewriter. The machine, a Xerox with word-processing abilities, will save time and increase confidentiality of Honor Court records. Honor Court Chancellor Todd Bass told senators. In other business,senators voted to give: v $10,518.45 to the Student Injury Care Center; wo $4,150 to the Peer Counseling Program; w initial approval of $3,500 for the Billy Mitchell Drill Team;:ainitial approval of $780 for the UF Chess Club. S1712 W. Univ. & 1717 N.W. I st-Ave. umCH SPEAL j1W L.3 p.M.O IN 4bngfetn I Half Sandwich w/F.F. or Onion Rieog ........$1.95 2. Senll Cheese Phmun ...----. .$1.75 3. ChefSoled. ...........su 4. Chicken & SwlssQuiche.$1.95 5. Wings or Nugey--& Fries-.$3.10 Our se ilocation u 1717 N. W. IM Are. ("'% to Bageland) is .w ,.ortpi. Specials good et both ltkaiens. Offer Good Thnal.fl LAKE'SUNI 702 W. Unv > ull line of professlono wIgqAAo men & women. One A"yOthrdewn Hospital FRIED WONTON (2 EGG ROLL (1) FREE W/ Open Mor.-Thuw.1lam-9pm Fri. ilo"-Opm Sa. &Sun, dpm-iopm 372-4282 613MW 160 Come celeb Gator Da I t n iWrF0 Saturday, Participating Butler Plaza M*4~t merican Coin and Stamp H shley's Pub G1 0O 'S balloons and Bows arve4 o U 3'.,. ml -A A B C COSOf. um, W4& itol I Colen3's & Maneso 1620 W. Univ. Ave UF noaz 373-1195 373-7000$35. 00eriO Haircut E cue ong har ~ly more) Oct. 27 -New. S, Home of the $9 Mtk u en m I li

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allioatorr thursan r' 27.198. 3 The dirt will fly in the ,)'Connell Center this weekend when the floor is covered with more than a foot and a half of earth to acormniddate a-tractorpull. But some student leaders question whether UF should be sponsoring such an -event. In a tractor pull, especially modified trucks and tractors pull weighted sleds down a dirt track. "This is not the type of event that a student activity center should promote," Student Body Treasurer Mark Fisher said. "I think it's highly inappropriate for the O'Connell Center to be proi'noting non-student activities." Student Government Productions (SGP) Chairman Jeff Sandler agreed. "I find it hard to believe the administration thinks a tractor pull is an appropriate event in the O'Connell Center," Sandler said. Student Body President Chatlotte Mather called the pull "ridiculous," "I d s't see any students going to a tractor pull when we tha d y *Mpry music in ther," Mather said. H, drs O'Conn Cnter Director Jim DLk4ampe isrswai for the event. Dalympl did not s pbene c.Ilsftfs week, btit did speak at a Etoarli 4 Mps ea ting 4 s on bute fue, Dairymple said, so "you will get involved in this," even though this weekend's event' a little a lif; with the aust systeih in the conflicts with Sunday's SGP Halloween Festival. "Everybody knows we have program (Sunday)," Sandler et& *q be'd 1"ovf to bringin the mud said, adding he doesn't think any of his audience will be at sion, ca5ed ct pulls the pull instead of the festival. tothect ." "What I don't understand is that the building is going to ltr~tor be out of commission for two days before and two days after *dets (cleaning up the dirt)," he said, continuing he thinks there is 1 n s lead officials to seek -Hawkins was one of an unknown number According to UF police, -A of spectators who did not report the effects of reported burns on their bodie fireworks show, which officials from the F y t.GwCr* fireworks firm blamed on strong winds. U pokeswoman Linda Gray was another rver hurt by the fireworks but not one of tie13 to file a report with police. SA piece of debris hit me in the face," y said. "I had something hit me on the Seekiand ithurt." "V -It scared the you-know-what out of me," lent t d Grhgtid. Cunningham aid Wednesday no lawsuits -'r. had been filed against Zambelli Intedhi ,u awkSeU.S. .Sa. ternational Fireworks, a Newcastle, Pa., firm Nula Iawkbie'humband, may find himself that performs the fireworks show and is b nga new jacket.v espeonsile for any injuries. ak0 th Bt even If there were any lawsuits, Vallg debris nd Cuesin am added, "we wouldn't A6e 9enatl's aidleow tge (them) because wedon'Jdiscuss .any circt actions" Gauler and her their eyes when several fire "spinners" failed to fully explo debris and five balls of fire into t stands of the stadium. George Zambelli, president International, brushed aside injuries as "nothing to worry ab "Oh, what do you mes Zambelli said Wednesday. "Whi the paramedics after the sho there wasisothing serious." Zambelli, who said his famil the fireworks business for m years, said his company provid worth of insurance coverage in accidents. He said UF requiredI to provide insurance. This is not the first time peop injured by falling fireworks atC a double standard going on. The pull begins Friday and ends Sunday. "I want to know why what's acceptable for him (Dalrymple) is not acceptable for me." But Dalrymple, as of September, was happy with the pull, which will cost $4 per ticket, $8 trackside. "These aren't your normal garden tractors," Dalrymple said. "Those things could fly an airplane if they had to." safer fireworks 13 people In 1981, more than 10 people sustained s or ashes in minor injuries when debris landed on works called spectators in the stadium, said Ken Lambert, ide, dropping Gator Growl producer. the northwest Zambelli International, which has. perof Zambelli formed the fireworks show four other times the reported in the past 10 to 15 years, did not produce out." the show in 1981, but was signed on this year in injuries," because of the company's safety record, the en I talked to number of firework shells provided, w, they said references from other customers and price, Lambert said. y has been in Cunningham quipped, "We want to ore than 90 arrange next year for the wind to blow from ed $5 million the south." case of such his company Lambert said, "I wouldn't say he's (Zambelli) been scarred. He probably ple have been produced the best show in years. But we Gator Growl. certainly don't want that to happen again." C SGP under fire for funding Sinkhie Tapes promotion g1101t UFu y, UI M4 10-, 0 Tractor pu cauing drt, sparks to fly JOSHUA L. WUNSTIUN Alligator Staff Writer

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4. alligator, thursday, october 27 1983 N BEIRUT -Vice President George Bush, in flak jacket and heinwt. pimurd Purple Hearts on Marines at their boumued-out base Wednesday and vowed the "cowards" who killed at least 219 American never will alter U.S. polictI had not expected this much destruction," said Bush while watching soldiers remove debris from the Sunday suicidebombing that devastated the four-story nerve center of the U.S. peacekeeping force at Beirut airport. 'We'%e given up hope anybody is alive," said Cpl. Rand% Barefoot. 21.of Kenly,N.C. "All the floors are pressed down, and everything was squished.'There is no hope." The Marines remained on maximum alert before, dpring and after Bush's three-hour, morale-boosting trip for fear of a new attack. About two hours before he arrived, Marines fired mortars to suppress gun and rocket-propelled grenade fire from slums to the east of the base. I SEARCH FOR ADAM FOrT FIE1CE -Searchers damed through a large swampy area near the Plorias Turmphe Wedneday buying the remains of 6-year-old Adam Walsh where a drifter said he buried the boy's body after the 1981 kidnap-murder. The search began Tuesday and police would not speculate Wednesday how long it would last. "Because of the size of the area, there's a lot of time involved," said Steve Davis, the Hollywood police captain who is leading the search. More than two dozen officers searched the privately owned area in St. John's River Marsh just east of the turnpike near mile marker 126 west of Fort Pierce. It is about .6 miles from where two fishermen found the boy's head two weeks after the abduction, which launched one of the most intensive manhunts in state history. Ottis Elwood Toole, 36, a drifter from Jacksonville, confessed to the murder of Adam, who was kidnapped fmm a Hollywood shopping center in July 1981. wVorld 0 UNNECESSARY HEART SURGERY WASHINGTON -'The most comprehensive study yet indicates 25,000 Americans undergo unnecesary coronary artery bypass surgery each year, adding $500 million to the nation's annual health bill, doctors reported Wednesday. Leaders of the 10-year, federally supported study said There was no firing during Bush's stay, but after he left, Moslem gunmen were spotted setting up gun posts in an abandoned house on the northeast perimeter of the airport. Marines with M-16 automatic rifles stood guard every two yards from the aiport runway to the amphibious unit headquarters as Bush arrived on a helicopter from the USSIuWojnsa. Marines said their morale was raised by the visit of Bush and Marine Commandant Paul X. Kelley on Tuesday, although Bush spent less than an hour on the ground.v"aeh, we're mad," said a 25-year-old corporal. "I'd like to take this place out, turn it into the biggest parking lot in the Middle East," he said. "Just seeing the couandant, he came up and said 'good going guys' and saluted. Yeah, that's motivating," said Lance Cpl. James Stephens, 21, of Cincinnati. their findings suggest people with mild to moderate syissptoms of hardening of the arteries would pay no penalty in ultimate survival for postponing surgery and receiving drug treatment instead. "Perhaps on the basis of these data, for a significant population, the surgical measures can be safely postponed," said Dr. Thomas Killip of Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit. I In fact, Killip said such patients would probably come out ahead in the long run, in terms of health as well as financially, because they can have bypass surgery later if their symptoms worsen. Such surgery does not slow the basic artery disease and a second bypass operation is much more difficult and hazardous. "It's a question of having your one good operation at the best possible time," said Dr. Eugene Passamani, associate director of cardiology at the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute. "If the findings of the coronary artery surgery study were accepted and generally applied, it is conservatively estimated that there will be 25,000 fewer coronary bypasses performed in this country each year," the report said. 0 SOVIETS THREATEN WALKOUT MOSCOW -President Yuri Andropov Wednesday said the Soviet Union will walk out of the Geneva arms talk if NATO deployment of U.S. cruise and Pershing-2 missiles begins. At the same time, he outlined new Soviet proposals at the talks. "The appearance of new American missiles in Western Europe will make a continuation of the present talks in Geneva impossible," Andropov said in an article to appear in the Communist Party newspaper Pravda today. Compiled from United Press International Of' A m.Sw dl gwi -------'". *'W .*ea.'a. C.M., 1. -. m.eue. ,,s ,,,. .,,,,a .,. ...7 "'=0"**.owea CY-e-N Pt.e _~ --in -bp 3,. .e.eet ka : I .-C~ of c--r.--Ifwmof Harry Cewa~ I U )l UF Stud UNION NEWS! ILVIN INLEY Dance Repettay a November 9,1963 'KElYV PARK ,n,,,,,Ro, CAMPING & CANOEING a--rft n lents $5, WCaiSofKeKO. ..r cl'ss-oyt IpNowrU 0 -ift .Mq --oraf' Senior Citizens $1, General Public $9 ALVIN AllEY brings toleued young dancers and choreographers into lue limelight, acting as a showcase today for the dance of tomorrow. Tickets availabe at UniveRsity &ox Office, 392-16531 U Hotel (Double Occupancy) and Round Trip Air Fare front Mimni FROM $21800 FO0 DETAILS AND SWURVATiONSCAIU.: UulvdrdlyIty T*VW on U West tQmF Av*. *eltsU u I9"AML DAM thevends W29.urN SlAU--h -'.e--ne----S-COWt. U-Sugme. 5S48mStudem, S PmWime ?immperleOlm. ammpig ead -e I -p -sle pg bee The iwill include ovemight stays in the Widemm Camping area, canoe and tubing an theRock Springs liver ard ekivo liver, hiks and sun btihing. V,ISM rOW like'McElwee FRIDAY & SATURDAY Oct. S291n the. ORANGE & BMW Relax to the music of Hogtown's owul $pansored by Reitz Union Fo*dS**v"ce and S.W .11 -~Asu~sA~b~ outttae-IBush in Beirut to boost morale ~-w. U U U I U U I U I I ights in MEXICO! Concun or Cozumel Novenbor s dkn inl tom o uen b Sor added convenlo, "'innu" of" s d t'*fl, T saeGeorge .Nwmlm m --AA U-

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alligator, thursday, october 27, 1983, 5 '1 U HT-qMIl:e] Red, Whie& e N" 599 Mille r --8689 Gee.0 79 S Ngow 6*35 Blob1.79 Andemut Age "0 Bb. 5.99 Bailey's Iuish Cream.1199 seog 's 7 Bled 5.99 RON RR6 .79 695 Walker's Cma6, 049 59 79 Whiteal =own .4.99 Seerby Wsoetib 1299 01hey s fta 9.9 Lard Culvet iom 'm12.79 A*imp ewbem 1 11.79 014 "ihemuson mmw.d 10.t9 S4A9 ~ ~* *6V6 Vupwmowsovaup 99 lo Milk. W: 169 Lvm -h utsemn UF students, Marston blast CLAST **ArchwR& a t 36th Street*11s leaSh MaeimSt.at13th -6612 Newberryneed N.W.Shiesf23rdUl8d. --1m e 50 DUNKS Wy MARK R. MILL Alligator Writer UF President Robert Marston agrees with students -he doesn't like the College Level Academic Skills Test(CLAST) Florida college students have to take their sophomore year. "I don't like the 12th grade test and I don't like this (CLAST)," Marston said. The 12th grade test Marston referred to is the Functional Literacy test that high school juniors take to test their skills to decide whether they can graduate the next year. About 30 student leaders met with Marston and other UF administrators Tuesday night at a student-faculty dinner in the Reitz Union. CLAST was the major topic of conversation. The CLAST is a test given to all college sophomores to determine whether they can do upper-division work. It was given twice during the 1982-83 school year for a trial run to determine a passing score. But beginning January 1984, students must pass the test to get an associate's degree or to enter upper-division classes at a state university or community college. Students at the dinner said the sophomore test was redundant because they were required to take and pass the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) or the American College Test (ACT) their senior year in high school before they can go to college. Another gripe students have had was that CLAST measures high school performance -not college skills. cm cmss cmse '." m AL 7". 7. 13 AL AU.ML ALV. LIM AL L UL 1.75 L WL 1.75 UL '.75 'UL LIs L 3 UL UL 3 ML DyMICHEULLE FOWLER Aligator Staff Writer Alachua County commissioners decided to review a city recommendation that would save the city from possible lawsuits from residents, but could open the county for lawsuits from developers. The Gainesville City Commission fears possible noise damage lawsuits from residents living near the Gainesville Regional Airport. The commissioners asked the county Wednesday to prohibit residential development in the area that averages sound levels at 65 or more decibels. Residents living in areas with 60 to 65 decibels would receive notices warning the of danger of living in such a noisy area. The county commissioners, meeting immediately after the city commision, agreed to review the city's recommendations. But county commissioner Chairman John Schroepfer commented after the meeting that county commissioners would be telling developers they cannot build residential housing on their own land. "They have the right to build residential development there but if we say 'no' they can take us to court," Schroepfer said, adding that he wanted to discuss the matter with the county attorney. The county commission will review the city's recommendation for two weeks before making a decision. To comply with federal guidelines, the airport cannot have people living within areas that exceed certain decibel levels. If not in compliance with the guidelines, the airport would not be eligible for federal money. For several months, city and county officials have had heated discussions about the area surrounding the airport. The city first proposed annexation to place the area in their control and regulation. But procedure states the city must first go to the county and request they make the necessary changes instead, Schroepfer said. The city would be liable for noise damage because the city owns the airport even though most of the land is within the county. Schroepfer said if the county votes against the city's recommendation, the city can move for annexation through the Corporate City Limits Council. But county commissioners who make up half of the council, are against the proposed annexation that excludes a predominantly black section of the airport, Schroepfer said. The annexation plan includes the predominantly white section west of the airport and excludes the eastern black subdivision, Schroepfer said. "Thse noise is just as loud in the black as in the white areas," he said. In fact, most of the planes land at the airport from the east, Schroepfer added. NOW HEAR THIS: ATTENTION ORGANIZERS AND EVENTS PLANNERS FOR STUDENT AND COMMUNITY ORGANIZATIONS: The Fall Semester calendar section of The Alligator's New Student Edition was such a success that there will be an encore for Spring Semester. This is a chance to publicize your spring events in an attractive calendar that students will hold onto for reference throughout the spring. Send your events listings to: Alligator Spring Semester Calendar, Attn: Kathy Sumner, P. 0. Box 14257, Gainesville, FL 32604. This isoa free listing UHH 0000 cm 0 411=111I l6~ ~N___ "I took it and was very insulted," one student told UF Registrar Vernon Voyles at the dinner. The test's biggest point of contention, however, is that blacks scored lower on the average on last year's trial exams than any other minority group. Elijah Smiley, president of the Florida Black Student Association, has said that there is a 77 percent failure estimate for blacks who take the test. But while Marston agreed with all the students' charges, Voyles lauded the test as being a way to determine "whether or not students have the tools to do upper-division work (in college)." "It is as much a test of the instutiton's educational program as it is for upper-class admission," he said. Voyles added that the difference beween the SAT and the CLAST is that the high shcool exam predicts college performance as a whole, and the college test can tell if the student will do well during his junior and senior years. Another student said she was worried that the passing score would be set lower based on the results of last year's test because students knew the test wouldn't count, and they may not have tried as hard. "This is a common philosophy, but students did try," Voyles said. "We did not get the Christmas-tree effect that you would normally see when students did not try." The test's passing score will be seeby the state Department of Education after reviewing cut-off proposals from the 38 representatives of Florida's state community colleges and universities. County to eye city's airport noise proposal (

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6. alligator, thursday, october 27, 1963 0-0, SOpmWUBs Useless crusade Is there a limit to a good time? When should people stop partving? These would seem to be questions that should be left to the individual -questions that only can be answered according to individual standards. But that theory doesn't hold any water with at h adf one Gaines' ille city commissioner, who is t ing to impose his arbitrary standards on those ;iound him by saying that the city's after-hours b )t tle clubs should be closed. According to Commissioner Mark Goldstein, Ihe clubs are a public nuisance. He backs his argument by citing a report from Gainesville police Chief Atkins Warren that says crime is on the increase in the areas surrounding the clubs. He also cites a city ordinance that states there is supposed to be no alcohol consumption in Gainesville after 2 a.m. and before 7 a.m. in places -like bars or restaurants -that are open to the public. Goldstein says the places are a hazard to teenagers who are being influenced to drink when they hang out at the clubs before the late night partiers take over. The fact is, however, that none of his arguments are backed up by any solid evidence. He would rather people go home and get a good night's sleep and probably say their prayers before they go to bed. A pretty unrealistic point of view for a town where half of the population is students who are old enough to decide when they want to go home. The facts are that no one has yet linked the increase in downtown crime to bottle clubs. And Commissioner Gary Gordon has an opposing report from Warren that says more crime takes place before 2:30 than after. Goldstein also seems oblivious to the fact that one of the clubs -Music Express -happens to be the only place in town where black teenagers can go to have fun. If the club were forced to shut down its life-line -the after hours partiers -its owners say they would have to close their entire operation. That would leave Gainesville's young black population with the feeling that the town offers them nothing while catering only to the temporary college crowd. One parent also fears that teenagers -who will want to have a good time, bottle clubs or not -will hang out at the recreation centers,. which she calls "drug havens." Gainesville police, who support closing the clubs, say the main reason they don't like the clubs is because of their current private status. Being private means police officers cannot go into the "dens of iniquity" to check on the demons that inhabit them after 2. But, so far, the owners of the bottle clubs have said they have no objection to police coming in and have even offered to help pay for increased patrols in the area. Gordon has the right idea about how to solve the problem when he says the clubs should be regulated instead of being closed down. By licensing the clubs, officers could enter and make sure that minors do not get in and also be sure that club owners follow the law in other respects. Currently, there are only three bottle clubs. On Monday, -commissioners slapped a 90-day moratorium on any future clubs being set up. With licensing, there should be no reason why the moratorium couldn't be lifted. Contrary to Goldstein's belief, the clubs do serve a useful social function. In a plwOalistig society, there should b auta for all sorts c# people -not jut after work and a By leaving M dividual, wbile commissioners can ,srve and not waste theirtbne k A fe We must commit ourselves to peace Wam Words of condemnation drip from our lips. condemn these kiflen for what tne ad hr wtatmthey outragee burns in our minds, sympathy for our fallen have dm. Our sympathy .o lwand imericans is heavy in our hearts, and an endless desire to loved ones of the slain and wu. leds ild -d for now just who America's enemies are pumps through our what the world would be denied tsbe "eir eins. way. They died in the pursuit of pwee, a Where does man care for his fellow man in this world? world has ton little of. Tesmye vha inm Where is peace revered, and where not? Where are freedom, their graves, at the-fanaticalwhinme4a cwta*$Ms, mthe democracy and liberty to be found in this world? And why remembered as heroes. They wae mot aurty thy wre e those that would serve forpeace, cut down? simply young men doing what they eo o tis drly, An atrocity has been committed, and this time we must paving the road for peace. eel it# America has been attacked in Lebanon, by assailants, America, though shaken, will eeea bm pa@dy. At who have no name, who fade out of the woodwork to the snie tuio, we mn ean fm nio a t our destroy, and just as easily, fade back in to hde. These commitment to freedom., ncracy.-0 I-, lAsnot imailants would have no peace in the Middle East. They forget these fallenwauriors. wossld have lebanon torn in two, children cultivated with hate and war, and they would have death emerge as a neighbor,knocking on theirpponemts'doo.m American government sources say that a terrorist group of mrhi-cand Syrians apetrted hpas suicidal anack on the Amerian aMarinei and the French peace-ke ing forces. We Bown and his ilk must be s ad nen I was introduced to the Oct 17 cover story and weren't given the death. a p guJlup to photo of Gary bown inm The AUgaer when my roommate me would be qfieklyredFiedw a agmr aew the paper to the floor and ground his eel into Gary your head,j ustN "I pI & to I n I Bownsface. A symbolic gesture of disgust at best. I was only would be as gultyas yaw. Yu tee sorry that he beat me to it (or was it that the heel was not you are "pisedoffandemm grauid intoBloa's face itself .because -Man-Show tmeam*y Bown andliesr corIt pleaded guity to mudering Howard I'm not a violent pree. A 6-6 Appledorf. In his own words, Bown described how he hit reading Nesvoasee&'s ac c fa TUSW Rs Appledorf Ontheheadwith a frying pan and then suffocated whokilledtwopeoplefoSr-$.?madimae" .la.ifienrea his instead of ebbing him to death because he couldnt lot of kooks like you in theweldwheab a i. And 'stithesinf bioxd." the photocfia 43-year-ddwa mtl*n*le~t bhitwmn Now Bown, hdarpd wh lirst-degree murder and given a her eyes put theehyAAty"0se0a-ylipry. paltry lfe us-fseiswantshis piea changed to econddepre Bown, now that you base usiion fame t*a ym murder. W, Down, you lost control of your life one Labor you might want to caleb a ew .daeg s.p l'ee.o. Day w.ba-da a bir agoMurder ismsurderwhetherbloody You'll learn crime-doen'tp. or cleanmea With (as Seve Mc(arrett of Haseitive.0 would ay) "murder ome." You were hw ky tat you Consider the victim 6iu Yokigile'faUltimate Penalty"(Oct. 18) appealed me. It ezemly oU&ndd. You made the aceiaed and cokiftd aurderei a1nd he ideal citizens that were hep pby *r judicial system. ryAmerican Civil Libwsta~ vumi~ eabl ~ blsodaths." Vanioni~ihelli~"~~rfi* sateto execute kcamebno tine to mhime for hkis crise. W sbkaomt his victim? Tel me wbbe they get the nerve to my t is "cruel" to en Uhsmen to death. Wasm'tit"cnsel" tokian iWmacmtperson? Tell me why Schanmehid or Vandiver dW't question the famioes of the dead wm dlothwas tai behindr the chen'os stbre, or thw famdy of the dMA d o ttimn attendanf or n ld i murd sd. Wyat* a r del"; n and -~ sma~ di..aa. 3~n.,z .me. I In'.! I -~ I I '4 k~ ~TII I

PAGE 7

--~ American invasion of Grenada is a grossly immoral act alligator, thursday. october 27, 1983, 7 As a Barbadian in support of the Grenadian people, I strongly protest the invasion of the island of Grenada by U.S. armed troops. It is a grossly immoral act that places the lives of not only the 1,000 Anericans there in danger, but also jeopardizes those of our fellow I110,000 West Indiam who form the total population of that island. One U.S. White House spokesperson draws parallels between the situation in Lebanon and Grenada, stating that the United States' MARGyAMETD G peingou use of force in the island is an attempt to protect Americans from a possible repetition of the attack onAmericanoldiers, but this is a assll island with an immature, modestly equipped army. No comparison can be drawn with a war situation involving highly sophisticated weaponry and vastly different situations; of power between invaders and local people. It must be also made clear the kind of blatant propaganda used by the American government regarding the new airport being built in the island with the help of Soviet technology and Cuban workers. All Pentapon release on the subject claim that the new airport is a threat to peace in the region and a real threat of Soviet attack on the United States because of its capability of landing Soviet bombers. Nowhere is it acknowledged that Grenadians are building an airport because they actually need one. The present airstrip has the maximum landing capacity of a 48seater plane. In addition, this airstrip is located at one end of the island, separated by mountains (rom the only and capital city. Tourist traffic or any other kind using anything bigger than a 48-seater to get into the island, or attempting to come from any international country such as the United States necessarily has to deplane through Barbados or some island with a larger runway capacity. Numerous problems arise through handling in these other islands. Bishop's government then clearly had overwhelming support for its insistence on the economic rationale for the new airport. It becomes significant, too, that no such attempt at supplying such an obvious development needed to have been considered by the earlier long standing Gairy regime, which Bishop's government overthrew. Significant, too, is the fact that the United States effectively refused such aid to the Bishop government because it was a socialist government which, it must be said emphatically, had popular support. Regarding the issue that the airport could be used as a military transit point, so could Barbados, as we now see in its use by the U.S. military. Barbados recently had its airstrip capacity enlarged with the aid of North American technology and funds. The issue. therefore, seems to be that since Grenada's was a leftist government using Soviet and Cuban aid, then the Reagan administration feels justified in ignoring the country's economic imperatives in building its new airport, and substituting ideological ones. On the question of U.S. invitation by Caribbean leaders to send in "peacekeeping" troops to help select a government that would be more in keeping with its own notions of democracy, a serious breach of the rights of a sovereign state has occurred. When the Barbadian government demanded that Maurice Bishop, the recently killed revolutionary leader, hold elections after the revolution, the Grenadian people resoundingly told government leaders to mind their own business. The revolution, which deposed a hallucinatory "political bandit," as previous Prime Minister Gai'y was called by the last Barbados Prime Minister, was definitely a popular one. For the Prime Minister of Dominica then to claim that the Organization of Eastern Caribbean States speaks for Grenada in asking for this U.S. invasion to help them choose a government likely to be composed of previous Gairy ministers, is an outright mangling of the facts, and an immoral breach of Grenadian peoples' rights to decide their own fate. It is an unprecedented move in the Caribbean that has no support by any article in the Caribbean Community Treaty or any other pact in the region. Neither the OECS, Barbados, Jamaica, nor anyone else has the right to decide they know what's best for a sovereign people and to presume to make the decision for them. Finally, the decision to invade by some Caribbean leaders could not have been made without the U.S.'s help. The ease with which the operation has proceeded and the fact that the Caribbean force has only now gone in after the invasion is in place by U.S. fighters, suggests a longer planning period than the recent apparent internal counter coup. That ex-Prime Minister Gairy was allowed to enter the island of Barbados only two weeks before the arrest of Bishop, is extremely disquieting. The United States has the largest and final responsibility for whatever bloodshed goes on in that island. I hope to God the U.S. forces can be persuaded by enough international and American pressure. But our islands of the OECS, Jamaica and Barbados have a graver accounting to make to the whole region. The precedents set here endangers Dominica which has its own internal political struggles to conquer; St. Lucia, which only recently was waging a battle between two government factions; Jamaica. which is known for violence in its political arena; and even Barbados. It becomes significant why neither Trinidad nor Guyana, countries that have the most to lose immediately by the implications of such a precedent, participated in the invasion. Margaret Gill is a graduate student in liberal arts. Is there anyone out there who liked Growl '83? Bad Growl resulted from too much posterior osculati< 31Man Many years ago, an ol Laotian mystic nan Dat Ben Wa bestowed upon me something I've neg After Frklay's Growl, IthoughtI should share this lWff bit of wiudasa with Growl Director Ken I.Lmbert and a his BlueKey budds Dat mas an old man at the time, but his words a timeless. liesaid unio me, "If a man kisses too-man aisnmhe shall wind pwith shit on his face." Think about it, Ken. By the way, thanks for ti TIMsatyJ.be ,2U An absentee Growler groups Sasn't fowaate enough to attend this year GawGroved,but Ihatedit-ayway. -sle WII. 4 conscious Growl. For each issue the students had a voice, but they had no choice. Many of the skits at Growl were conicerning the red tape that UF has to offer its students: the parking hut women, drop/add lines, etc. Isn't it ironic that the entire production of Gator Growl fell vicim to the administrative runaround? Sadly, it seems fitting and expected. he student organizations involved with production did as much as was in their power to represent the interests of the students. It is a shame that this year's Gator Growiwas all they had to showv for it. Keily O'rleni 2UF Fond wishes for the alumni. Mom 9en1 hope the alufmi are happy.Jl la. U es ""obs 'M'"""'''% IUI.F, The popular sentiment, very simply stated Edltr: Gator Growl sucked. Christopher Uouton. 2UF ._w._ .. Gator Growl will go down with Titanic and Pearl Harbor Editors I would like to express my complete and irrevocable dissatisfaction with the 1983 Gator Growl. I feel the responsibility for this past weekend's fiasco can be place solely upon the shoulders of members of Florida Blue Key. I will admit that last year's show, while being thoroughly enjoyable, may have been too controversial for a portion of the audience, and it may have been possible to reach a compromise between the two extremes. It was obvious from the reaction of the crowd that such a compromise was not accomplished. While I have the ut most respect for Bob Hope, I honestly feel that he was not able to satisfactorily suit the needs of a majority of the people who attended this year's Gator Growl. A majority of his humor was not only directed mainly to the alumni and television audience, but was also poorly read from cue cards. After being told that they were 98 percent sure of being able to book the Beach Boys-to provide the musical entertainent, we then heard with barely any notice that Irene Cara was going to replace them. She performed only three songs, two of which have been played into the ground, and she performed these songs to prerecorded music. Although, I think that if she had sng anymore, she would have been booed off the stap,. Again, to show the degree to which FlorIda oe Key submitted to the whining of alumni, enoat rique skit this year was that of a student trying to gappefessorto ensple her cookies" "Oneof the ddta as dis tajw off ona routinee49ne by MootyPythu. Laii a Growl from asohnllalve go doon in histry withtlow oquft of bombfIt of Pa$ 4*1 p !"0, anelyboft% ---*

PAGE 8

8. alligator, thursday, october 27, 1983 pyicainensis nu cm puter sciences, Spanish, political science, geogra behavioral sciences, German, Pitry, physiology and some engineering courses, canob tain tutoring assistance immediately. Students needing help in other areas should also contact the Center, which will attempt to arrange for special assistance. Winnie Cooke, manager of the Teaching Center, suggests that students go for assistance now, rather than wait till later in the semester when it may be too late for tutoring help to make a difference. The Center, located in the basement of Southwest Broward Hall, is open 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, and from 7 to 9 p.m., Tuesday, Wednes-, day and Thursday evenings. For information, call 392-2010 or 392.769. Pamela Bernard Is New Associate Attorney for UF PAMELA BERNARD UF Law Graduate Pamela J. Bernard has assumed duties as an associate attorney in the University Attorney's Office. Ms. Bernard, who has served as an assistant to the University Attorney since September, 1982, is one of three associate attorneys who aid University Attorney Judith Waldman in advising UF administrators on legalmatters and problems encountered in the operation and functioning of the Other associate attorneys are Isis Carbajal-de-Garcia and Donald Reisman. Ms. Bernard, 2,has served as an investment trustee since August, 1980, performing securities transactions and the business and financial affairs foa sizeable trust. She received the juris doctor from the Universty of Florida Coee of Law in 1961, andthe bachelor of a degree in from UF in 1977. She is a member of the Florida Bar, the American Bar Association and the Eighth Judicial Circuit Bar Association. The Unkv ww Ofce is laws rahe *VVu of Florw olad th& In MA. a d MW Tigert Han. Nominations For Who's Who, Hal Of Fame Solicited The deadline to submit applications or nominations of Audents to te UF Hall of Fame and Who's Who Among Students in American Col en an Universities is 5 .m., rida November 4. The forms'should be sub emitted to the Office for Student Services, 129 Tigert Hail. Aplation forms are available at the ~ eant'*= iesDesk on the third floor of the Reitz Union and at Tigert Hall. Students may nominate themselves, or they maybe nominated by deans, department chairpersons or heads of any officially chartered UF studentorganization. lb be nominated for Hall of Fame and Whos Who an applicant must be a senior or graduate or professional student and must have been fuR-ime more than half of their attendance at UF. Applicants must have a minimum of 2.5 grade point average and must have demonstrated two of the following: Ieadershipqualities, service to UF, participation in student activities or academichonors.'lbbe considered for Hall of Fame, an aplicant must be in Who's Who for t Students should u= ,two letters of recommendation along with their application form. For information or details, contact Linda Horton, chairperson of the Affairs and Ethics Committee oftdStudent Senate. That counittebU s Mstablished the guidelanesfor the Hall of Fame and W 's Who program. intramural Sign-up for intramural corecreational volleyball, ae dormitory bowling and racquitali does teamisnouew at the btraralg'Office in 214 GymnasiumNovmber 7 is-deadrihelor cm Vofteba MAndMeW's d7 b-" team sn i ithco be bWl Nov. 1$.2& UN mme Cl THIS/NEXT WEEK__J FRE TRACWRn bthe O'Con days. TODAY CAMPUS COMMiTTEE ON WELLGAINESVI NESS MEETING will feature talk by CHESTRAp Dr. Ruth Alexander UF professor of Reitz Union physical education, and discussion f current fitness programs and needs of Ipaturi UF students at 11:45 a.m. in Room B2od2. 150-C Reit Union. GREEK STUDIES PRESENT&wnderlireot TION focuses on "Kanuantzakis: The UF pie Nian and His Work," as Helen Kanuknt-" zalds, widow ofthe authorandpoet who and Wrote "Urba The Greek" and other mniea l W works, xdmmavum um iliamd Worith Patroclos ibmM-r scholar and fmointer rus, at 8 p.m. In U235 Belt nion. A "The SUh reception Iaudiate folows and auMuseum C 404 q mbm w gil am oortn= presents to 4;pm In tark by Dr u ofU1 La4"0 othe dvi ty d aft"aft Felsn" IN4p.in"1 pin bEat 1wi 3nlub _d u maa ann I UF Senate To Act On 1984-85 Calendar The University Senate will meet tohas the break one week later, March day at 3:30 p.m. in McCarty Audito18-22. rium to vote on a calendar for the Both calendars have fall 1964 classes 1984-85 academic year. *:ebegi .20 a ndinDec. 7The two calendars up for consideraspring 1985 classes beginning Jan. 7 tion are identical except that Proposal and ending April 25; and retain sumlhas the one-week spring break period mer terms A, B and C but do not have during the 10th week of classes in the final exam periods for any of the sumsemester, March 11-15, and Proposal 2 mer sessions (just as this past summer's schedule had no exams). Both calendars call for Homecoming weekend to be Oct.19-20 and for Commencements to be Dec.15, May 4 and Aug.10. In addition, the University CurPraidmhe ,CrOW"haof hiaknt~oa riculum mitwhich n mus a.a a. ."| i ly recommendssadpton ofPrl 1, rcommends that the last two days of Osfhw~ classes for fall andprn semnesters be designated Review Dyduring which no new materials woul be presented in any of the classes, but would be usFree Tutoring ed solely for review of already Available In reiosla absessions Many Courses vwi be wm -i 9dreAin~atinitems,thSeaewl The Office of Instructional be presented a list of the current Resources' Teaching Center in members of the University Senate and Southwest Broward Hall offers free a list of University Committees. The tutoring to UF students in a variety of new secretary of the Senate, Wendy subject areas. Students expe S mal sisadegistar, 29 dif~ultes n bilog, cemistry, Tigert, wilg be introduced. pu3Oitaj l qwiLVc-P jJiJMmI.nlI, LVL b Porkln$ Fines rad Appe"as PaThrd 1 J4,q0A-0, 4-h* ** '(oul .3 t6 1'r~ priv~i .I., T'or (ooipi. That apliefm +c) 5tlod&W, fclC a nd St'ff Eo STIONS?0cl 3A92s5 QUESTIONS? call 392-6655 in mol for the P byr a wIC, BAND LnN

PAGE 9

fyu -i u, 100*IY 0 aligator, thursday, octob 9 PI LAMBDA PHI proudly invites. the Students, Alumni, Faculty' and Staff of the University of Florida to the 32nd Annual NOSE BOWL to be held Sunday, October 30 at Noon at P. K. Yong6 Field 6 Marines die in Grenada; U.S. sends in more troops BRIDGETOWN, Barbados (UPI) -The United States rushed reinforcements to crush pockets of resistance Wednesday on Grenada where Cuban and L.oyalist troops holding hostages battled against an invasion fore. Defe Secretary Caspar Weinberger told reporte s that at least six Americans were killed, eight were missing and 33 others were ded in fierce combat for control of the island, 1,900 miles south of Miami. "We got a lot more resistance than we expected," Gen. John Vessey, Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, told reporters at a Washington newsbriefing. The Caribbean Broadcasting Corp., owned by the Barbados government, said 18 civilians died since Tuesday's invasion by a joint force of U.S. troops and forces from six Caribbean nations. Weinberger said 20Cubans were wounded in the fighting but gave no estimate on the number of Cuban dead. The defense chief said the U.S.-led invasion force was holding about 600 Cuban prisoners, including a colonel captured when it overran a major Cuban military installation. A U.S. military transport flew a group of 69 Americans and two British Citizens to Charleston, S.C., in the first evacuation of U.S. citizens from the tiny island. Most of Washington's staunchest allies denounced the U.S"-led invasion of Grenada Ham continued fm pag one "He's pausing before he talks," Stauf said. "There's probably some officer there telling him what to do," "Make sure the commander on the ground lets you know how much weight you are authorized plus the radio," a transmitter addressing Barattella said, apparently referring to transporting his radio equipment out of the country. "Uh, roger," Barettella answered. Stauf and Van Buskirk said the station operators had listened at II p.m. Tuesday while Barettella went out amid scattered Wednesday and joined in a nearly universal call of the Reagan administration to withdraw U.S. forces from the Caribbean island nation. Angry Libyan demonstrators charged President Reagan is the "Hitler of modern times.' In an emergency debate in Parliament, the British government complained that the United States failed to consult it sufficiently before invading Grenada but refused to condemn the American intervention outright. In Paris, President Francois Mitterrand voiced strong opposition to the invasion at the weekly meeting of his cabinet, said government spokesman Andre Labarrere. In Rome, Italian Prime Minister Bettino Craxi told the Senate his government received the news of the invasion "with great surprise. Western German government spokesman Peter Boenisch told reporters after a cabinet meeting that Bonn would have advised the United States against invading Grenada if it had been consulted. In Moscow, the Soviet news agency Tass called the invasion "an attempt to impose on the Grenadian people by means of force a system suiting Washington, to intimidate the other freedom-loving peoples of Latin America and not only them." gunfire and anti-aircraft fire to refill his electrical generator. The UF Amateur Radio Club is advised by electrical engineering Professor Leon Couch. Until Monday, the next major project they had to look forward to was trying to contact the space shuttle Columbia after its next launch in November. Stauf said the radio club has a 50-year history at UF, and competes in "scrimmages," in which stations try to exchange messages with the largest number of other stations within a time limit. Stauf pointed out a congratulatory certificate sent to UF from a Czechoslovakian station after one such scrimmage. REAL MEN ONLYII Tired of the Some Old Boring Halloween Costume? Then take a stand this year & get one of Rainbow Dancer's Mohawk Skin Head Wigsl Available in many colors (pink, red, yellow, blue & more.) This Hlloween be a warrior-not a wipI

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10. alligator, thursday, october 27, 1983 By COU.EMN MASON Allbgotcr Writer An amendiwt t that guarantees the right to "a healthful en iroinment will face voters next year if environmental groups across the state cat collect the required 300,000 petition signatures. Clean up '84 is the collective name for a coalition of ens ironmental and conservation groups in Florida that have organized to get the amendment on the November 1984 ballot. LAocally, the Clean Water Action Project is organizing its staff of eight full-time workers to canvass Gainesville and inform people of the new amendment. "Basically we've organized ourselves in three areas: identify the people who are concerned and informed about the environment, educate the people who want more information on these issues, and organize our efforts to get this (the proposed amendment) on the ballot," said Clark Sheldon, director of the Citizen Outreach Staff The proposed amendment classifies water and air as a public trust. Firoida citizens, as beneficiaries of that trust, would have the right to sue any person, corporation or state agency that causes damage to the environment. Under the amendment, a citizen no longer would have to prove "special injury" to file suit. "The amendment would give us some say in what happens to our water," Sheldon said. Sheldon cites the Floridan Aquifer -the porous limestone layers that contain over 90 percent of the state's drinking water -as the main reason to get the amendment on the ballot and then passed. "The aquifer is extremely fragile," Sheldon said. Sheldon gave the Fairbanks water contamination case as SUNITA RAMAYYA happening C0ea eGaN Ie UF Chem Club meets tonight from 7 to Iin Room 365 of the Reitz Union. Elections will be held, followed by informal skits and games. Lee Be. VIet: The UF French Club meets at 7 tonight in the Union. Room B-60., We .e nd vestede A lecture on the role of women in livestock development begins at 4 p.m. today in Room 427 of Grinter Hall. UFLA@Gs meets tonight at 8 in Room 361 of the Union. OW: The National Organization for Women meets in B-10 of the Union today at 6. Witchcraft and women's spirituality highlights the meeting. Chreetlen eeadletts Attorney Richard Bates will address members of the Christian Legal Society tonight at 7 in the Holland Law Center. Room 297. Speleelegists A meeting of the Florida Speteological Society will be held tonight at 7:30 in the seminar room of Florida State Museum. Beued.4pJs Delta Sigma Theta holds an annual step show featuring area chapters. beginning at 9 p.m. Friday in the Union. For more information, contact Sheila at 371-2509. At te I e'Students in African Studies Association and the Center for African Studies present two movies in Room 427 of Grinter Hall Friday beginning at 3:45 p.m. Both shows will feature youths and urban problems and agricultural conflicts in Liberia. We.s' n e seer. The UF Women's Soccer Club is holding a soccer match Saturday on Maguire Field at I p.m. The public is invited to attend the game. 'The amendment would give us some say in what happens to our water.' -Clrk Sheld an example of how citizens' rights are not protected now but would be under the proposed amendment. In January, Department of Transportation (DOT)officials admitted to dumping 60.000 to 70,000 gallons of waste chemicals from their central asphalt-testing lab on Waldo Road in Gainesville, contaminating groundwater wells that provided Fairbanks residents their drinking water. DOT has been dumping the chemical for 30 years without authorization. Had the amendment been in effect at the time of the Fairbanks outbreak, Sheldon said, private citizens would have had the legal standing to sue DOT or the Department of Environmental Regulation for failing to maintain water quality. "The amendment grants the opportunity to any person to prove a violation of the right to a 'healthful environment'," Sheldon said. "It would cancel the current law which states a person must prove 'special injury' before a lawsuit can be brought against another party." Sheldon stressed the new amendment would not createany new remedies to the pollution problems. However, Sheldon said, "It gives me and everyone else the opportunity to make sure the state agencies responsible for protecting my environment are doing their j." Leege9ge 1 eneunnine A laguagecultureexchangeprogramn will be held Saturday tromi to 4p.m. in rooms 8-0, BM5, 8-70 and B71 of tse Union. Two films and claim in English and Spanish will higilit hde pram On bkbp The Gainesville Cycling Club meets for weekend rides at the Plaza of the Americas Saturday and Sunday at 9:30 a.m. Interested personsaminvited tojoin. Mumiuesnd. Mae Volmteers for International Students Association holds an international costume party at the Holiday Inn -University Center Saturday from 9 p.m. to 2 a.m. Music, dancing and a catume cote will be featured.'he pudMic is invited to attend, Liessedt dmeas Block amid bridle present an international livestock show Saturday at 2 p.m. on the Cecil Webb livestock pavilion. The show will be followedby a dinner and square dance. 1re. Sk& end bldet A regular meeting will be held Monday at 7 p.m. in Room 151 of the Animal Science Building. CASA 'The Cibman-American Student Association holds a meeting tonight at 7:30 in the Union. Room 363. All are invited to attend. 11e0W CAeor: Alpha Kappa Psi holds a weting tonight for members participating in honor court. Pledges meet at 5:45 in Room 201 of Bryan Hal and brothersmt at7 in Room 101 of Matherly Hall. Inee in The UF Equestrian Club meets tonight at 7 in Room G108 of McCarty Hall. Goot speaker Jean Clawson will address members and others interested. SueSer. The UF Strf Cub meets tonight at S at Momna Donna's restaurant. A gueS speaker and slide show wil highlight the evening's agenda. Legid matter Dean Dickson from the law school will speak on entrance requirements to all interested personal, tonight at 6-30 p.m. in Boom 102 of the BtuinssAdministrationBuilding. Tw te grdns 'ae UF botany club plans a field trip to Kanapaha Botanical Gardens on Friday. Interested persons am requested to met in Room 418 of Battrias Hall West on Friday at 2 p.m. Ovee e0it i.-ta? lThe Overeaters Anonymous meets Tuesday at 7:30 p.m. at the Alachua Urgent Care Center. No fee is required. World Health Organization Listed Medical School spartan Health Sciences University is located on the island of St. aeiain the west Indies. Openings are still available for the Jan.'84 class. OFFERING: 36 month M.D. degree program Instruction in English Clinical clerkships in the United States WHO-listed students eligible to take the ECFMG Graduates have been accepted into specialty training in U.S. hospitals School awards scholarships, loans and bursaries. SPARTAN HEALTHSCIENCES UNfVRSISV (Formerly known as St. LuciaHeafth SciencesUniversity U.S. OfFICE: P.O. Boa85E Paso, Nxas79941 Telephone: (915) 532-5890 Pleasesend me more inormtoon. Name Address city State Zp Phone( ) Thanks plete Face & Sprays, Wigs & Sequins, H Surprises to plote your Gainesville's MorelilAtNe I(ADQUARTE 375-7933 m s M-'se s*. to Rainbow Dancer's Hall&~seei Delight Coa Body Makeup in Shticking Colo .WItd t )* Sexy Mesh rights, lmnpaeledMac with Feathers Hair & Boards, Trick Blood Many Mace Goulish. make you look Just HorilMe for Halloween Corcostume with Colorful Leotard a tighi at Complete Dancewear Store .And a Whole Lot BOW. DANCER-YOUR ORIGINAL HAIOWEN MR I V4a^ $ We'l ieyov -Aolato try o6ne f* BEST dime.&t You pay for gas and return car to renting location. Rate applies to car shown or similiar-size car, is nondiscountable and subject to change without notice. Specific cars subject to avoilability. Sports cars, Cadillocs, and 9-possenger station wagons available at everyday discount rates, PE SAY UNLIMITD U SE MLA Noon Thursday to 6:00 pm Monday 2 Day Minimum Rental You ii" i'a68 entione CAUNOWWRESMVATfONSll. GAINESVUW GXOltALARPORT .MlhAVE NOW OPEN Register now for,$100 Wardrobe Gieaway 371.41i9 The Pimroee tIm theb beoinostylI n4w.abd in Gob' the~Weveh amo1~tW ~udea -~t~sadw mmusmmmmm.mm.inmmmm YourM this Wet. Groups push clean water proposal Weekend Problem Solver "rX I Lh V;y IL

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rirrrn~ MPUU; -AM Marston to teach next year UF President Robert Marston will change hats next year when he begins a visiting professorship in Virginia after stepping down from his UF post in September 1984. To begin his year-long sabbatical, Marston will return to the rolling hills of his native Virginia as an eminent scholar to teach biological sciences, UF spokeswoman Linda Gray said recently. "When he announced he was stepping down last December he said he wanted to do some retooling and get back into the classroom," Gray said. Marston will teach for one semester at the Virginia Military Institute in Lexington, where he earned his bachelor of science degree. After that, he will become a tenured professor teaching in the UF College of Medicine. Man arrested in officer's attack Gainesville police arrested a local man and charged him with biting Gainesville police Officer Steve Dean and attacking him with a case cutter. Robbie D. Pugh, 26, of 1126 NW Seventh Ave. was charged with aggravated battery, aggravated assault, retail theft, resisting detainment and resisting arrest with violence, police said. According to police records, Dean was off duty when he saw employees at Food 4 Less trying to detain a man inside the store, located at 1423 NW 23rd Ave. When Dean tried to apprehend Pugh, SCOTT LAPOINT 0police said he bit Dean's left index finger and tried to cut him across the face with the razor. Dean was treated at Alachua General Hospital and later released. Pugh, detained by employees who said he attempted to shoplift three cartons of cigarettes, was still in theAlachua County jail Wednesday night in lieu of $6,000 bond. Police slap on extra charge An Alachua County jail prisoner, still waiting trial for an attempted-murder charge; was arrested again recently for slapping a correctional officer,Gainesville police records show. Kenneth Whitehead, 23, threatened officer Dee M. Wright Tuesday and then slapped him. Whitehead was then arrested and charged with battery of a law 'enforcement officer, according to police reports. The new charge was added to attempted murder, car burglary and trespassing charges he was arrested for last May. Whitehead's bond was increased by $5,000 to $46,150 for the attack. He is still waiting for his trial date to be set for the original charges, a jail spokesman said. Local woman arrested in theft A 20-year-old'Gainesville woman was arrested Tuesday on charges of attempting to steal a carton of cigarettes and a bottle of perfume from a local store, Gainesville police said. Pamela L. Gant of 3001 Hawthorne Road was arrested for petty theft on charges she tried to shoplift from the Winn Dixie located at 2621 SE Hawthorne Road. Gant was booked into the Alachua County jail Tuesday and released Wednesday morning on her own recognizance. Students get rude awakening Two UF students were awakened early Wednesday morning by an unidentified man who was touching their bodies and fondling their buttocks in their Regency Oaks apartment on Southwest Archer Road, according to Alachua County sheriff's records. Officers said the man fled the women's bedroom when one of them screamed, waking the other. The man was last seen crouching between the students' double beds before he left. Heart Association WE'RE FIGHTING FOR YOUR LIFE qu & Untqu;es Drafting Tables All Solid Wood .00 Sujn 1.5 377670D .ow w o ( -V -) alligator, thursday, october 27, 1983, 11

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12, alligator, thursday, october 27, 1983 0 0 Cross Creek holds memories of a simpler past By WADE KIMBRELL Alligator Writer "We need above all. I think, a certain remoteness from urban confusion, and while this can be found in other places, Cross Creek offers it with such beauty and grace that once entangled with it, no other place seems possible to us ..." Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings, Cross Creek Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings came to Cross Creek, a small community in the southeast corner of Alachua County, from Rochester, N.Y., in 1928. She was looking for a quiet place to write, and she found it here, in a rambling wooden house with cedar shingles and wide screened porches. It was here, among the palmettos and pines and mossstrung oaks, that Rawlings discovered cracker Florida and its hardy inhabitants -the poor but self-sufficient settlers who farmed and fished in rural Florida. The untamed beauty of the creek and the lives of those settlers formed the backdrop for her finest writing. In 1938, her Pulitzer Prize-winning novel The Yearling, about a boy and his pet fawn, made this place called Cross Creek famous around the world. Cross Creek was a "bend in a country road," Rawlings wrote in her 1943 autobiography Cross Creek. Today the SWIjMIjiingOut country road is State Road 325, but Gainesvillians can still travel it to reach the place where Rawlings got her inspiration, the place she immortalized with her words. Cross Creek has changed somewhat since Marj lived here. The back woods around her home have been opened up by roads, and the lifestyle changed by radio, telephones and television. Nonetheless, Cross Creek is little more than a sleepy fishing camp community and its sense of remoteness remains intact. Visitors can tour Rawling's home, picnic along the Majrie Kinnan Rowlings outside her home Rowlings typewriter remains on he front porch where she would spend ms & y Wi' ..Ij.W banks of Cross Creek. or dine at the awadi-waing Yearling restaurant. About a half mile down the winding higway frems the restaurant, behind a rickety wire Fene., is the Rawlinga home, a state historical site. The weather-beaten fence hase't been replaced by a new white picket fence because park ranger Saly Morris. said that's the way Marj would want it. In Cross Creek, Rawlings wrle "The Creek shabbiness was nesw elegant smd never will be. It is eedy mcolmtdile md weather-beaten, m voting Thee hfeway. I -N sometimes tempted to put up a new f mee s the house yard ..I thk of the pri I smdd take in seeing white paint glearnog frm aranaid the bend in the road .But the wal bjAl i is that an elegant fence would bring tothe Ceek a wanton orderliness that i itof plmee." Morrison said she and the other rangm= ame C s Cmae&st guide them in keeping Marj's homie the way Mai eispt it. They plant collard greens. turvips, beets andm any other vegetables in the back yard by hafd .jwtas MarjdiL They raise mallard ducks and gam crse in a pea if the backyard, just like Marj did. And they plelwled a cdmaysie vine so it would grow over the duck cage and psoide slue,. just like Marj did. Morrison sees her job at the Rawlings eune -as =we them a nine to five gig. She nurtures the spirit of PaDlings and the spirit of life in cracker Florida. "The Florida cracker lifestyle is just perfectly natuak given the territory. But its a style that is dying. Very few people adhere to it these days, and in a ew yena, who knows, perhaps no one will," Morrisa said ashe gaaid in the direction of several freshly plaenteorage teme. Morrison still has much todo befomesew hepremalto have Marj come back and visft. She was ht ID bmil the barn out by the road where the old aisepod. Sbewams to get a mule to tend the orange gverandsle wa sbrd slid the servant's quarters -but not gay Pielk Aside from hand-planting vegelables .seeking awt mules, Morrison also takes on the typicall duke of a park ranger, including doing paperwoekadgiving Irms. During the tour of the eigli-oesmn home, m11 in dtib interesting stories about Mar'slfVe atmQ mek. "After she (M j)got the urybkIemeas ksmt buiit, se. deiatoh inestt o soe ikor mni.She had a party to celebrate. sbe was e inverlr inen plinhiig thet she put arhs oein theta.d ahn tof es in the toilet and invled al the f twh'bom it wasiquite a gala sociaL -Shea famd a coa oumai mocconmm thefloor one day. She had a choice of 111k51 wb& a' Roebuck I The mII. RatbjokeUtr I

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1' 7 gte alligator, thursday, october 27, 1983, 13 Local women pay price for protest my DEEWOIg aT iligaot-writer It wafraboutS-:30lthe morning in the icy darkness of the Qaro gtlvwihes two women began bangingspoons Inside their tents, about 80 women, including bout 15 from Gainesvillestirred and then shivered as they lifted themseIes-(0t their sleeping bags and reached for their 1 h N, tinds Sf lists unzipping was heard thrhouthe caap. Women stumbled over to the Coleman stoves where hot water was heating for coffee. Nobody light tbpe campfire. Everyone knew there *w ey had to leavetheir peace ens W, 0 a ntersection near -a da ekade to t p e th aS niums camp *a sEuropo Shur**ft 'Main t area area had 7 .~oecivi dsbedvIene rinn the day before. They ei* d arms -,,, t cr thei vosn swelled 'Lsten to the Women. Listen %Iout a gingOi#, lov' '1eM ty'lawts'e one P* i rs and vane, and drove k h y. Asthey approached tl Aw a oo e and specia officers waiting for them. J Srith, twtvfthv WGaexeVille women, i sssbMI'in the back of a pick isA They Savannah River PatSiPmln Am S.C legansfiing again. They were theto emitsadtheole Itlays crows estonr Wo itself for the Homecoming parade and related fesitivites, the women packed their camping gear and quietly slipped out of town. They drove north past Jacksonville and through Georgia. Their nine-hour sojourn ended when they reached a small sign on which was scrawled "peace encampment" in a pine forest just north of the nuclear plant in South Carolina. Before and during the trip the women discussed their reasons for wanting to participate in the peace camp. Kate said thp natural setting of the political action drew her. She said she "wanted to examine that special feeling of encampment." She said she didn't know if her protest -by participaton -would have any significance, but "even if it doesn't make a difference," she said, "it's the sanest thing I cando." Lynda Lou said she hoped the weekend would provide her with the opportunity to "hone up on political activism" and enable her to tie in her goals ofadvocating feminism and protedtingnuclearweaponry. "Women wo identify as feminist tie everything in, not only the crulsnad Pershing," she said. Altbotgh tIe6Q*en planned for activism, many of them weren't sure how far they would take it. Speaking from jail in South Carolina where she is known as JaIeboe No. 4, Judy said Wednesday that she made up het mind to blockade the plant and get arrested only the day before thbappened. .I had learfy been considering it for a while," she said. "I was 54.50 Al the way through until the day before the action." Then, Judy said, everything just came together. "Something inside me reallyshifted (on Sunday). Just hearidgabont other women's arrests, the focus on education, the people whee lives we touch by politicizing through the personal connection. .I realized I could make a big diffetence.Gainesville feminists, from left, Sandy Malone, Judy Keothley, Ruth Segal, Pam Smith and Linda Lou Simmons show their banner at South Carolina peace encampment (above left). Keathley, Smith and Simmons were later arrested. A protester from the encampment is draggedaway by a police officer from the intersection she blocked(above). Karin Schoringer of Atlanta's Women Against Military Madness yells "Stick to the issue" during peace raoiy (below). spoke to both groups about the need for political change in Washington's "dangerous" atmosphere. a other women in the peace encampment Later, during an interview, Camp said women make up 53 wekend n Aetv 1 most people donit percent of the country's population. But, women make up I it6OWNS as racism, only 14 percent of all elected offices, so their voices are not attended o'kshops 4ssuesas racim, heard or regarded in Reagan's pro-war administration, she and tax resistaiiee. y atthIdectoonsgiven said. other women on politkal As In l Owagua and So women in these days -must be aggressive, she said. "We Gersay. They held inwrma discussion's on Issues are literally forced to take actions that attract the attention fom what time to-haoof thepress" she said. bod.after'theit's aitie ofgreat danger and conscientious people are Saziday reooe teiriven to the only channels they know," Camp said. Those t"ed 4oe f peae teced chadnels include nonviolent opposition to public policies, in theday, shedded. ne osri, Camp, a ~o unittse~i g5 'Pe.'ee

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14. olligator thursdsv 3oriobr 27,l93 Protet CeatIMued from page thirteen A workshop teaching nonviolent demonstration -civil disobedince -attracted most of the women Sunday morning-. Dania. an experienced civil disobedient, directed the women as they played alternating roles of protester. policemn and reporter in several scenarios. After each one, Dania asked each participant how she felt. One "protester" said, "I was frightened of my arresting cop." The "cop" said, "I was frightened of the potential for violence that I felt." Dania pointed to two more. The protester said, "I talked the whole time to my cop, and I think it helped." Her arresting "cop" replied,"I didn't hear anything shesaid." They formed their second-to-the-last 'irele for the weekend and sang a few more songs before they disappeared in the darkness and headed for their tents. Rawlings cemfirnued from page twelve catalogue or a copy of The Yearling she had. And she decided The Yearling was heavier, so she killed it with a copy of The Yearling. And her hired help, little Will said, 'well I guess it comes in handy to write books."' Some of the stories Morrison and the other rangers tell during tours are acted out in the recently-released film version of Cros Crek The movie stars Mary Steenburgen as Rawlings. It was filmed on location in Cro. Creek, Micanopy and Hollywood, Calif. A facsimile of Rawlings' home was constructed near the real one for the filming. But Morrison said she is disappointed in the film because it doesn't portray Marj the way Marj was. "She was such a vital and strong outspoken woman. They play her as having a few tantrums, but basically as very mildspoken and quiet. That's not my image of Marjorie Rawlings. "People who knew Marj have said she could out-drink and out-cuss half the men in Cross Creek." Morrison also is worried the film will bring an overflow of visitors, meaning she and the other rangers will have to devote most of their time to giving.tours instead of SEIKI Ox3 30%OFFW~ HUTCHESON'S FINE JEWELRY AND GIFTS 6 SW 1ST AVE 378464 37 we but buy or rent Arehe COSTYNSSPhA WITOV'S custom Cl~hu UW. tlii,. Ag Judy and the other five Gainesville women plan to stay in jail until their trial on Now. 8, and they expect to serve two more weeks after that. But she said she thought the radical action was muccesul. It gave the movement "visibility" she said. "We took up a lot of time, energy and money." Judy said the Ade Consaitiuan reported that the group caused the largest traffic jam in South Carolina history. "We feel that's a message to the whole world. "Problems are so huge that the actions have to be larger." She said she is still unsure if the action was worth it to her personally, now that she must look at the situation from behind bars. "I'm in a constant process -of reevaluating," she said, not every day, but "every hour." "I'm not into martyring myself," she said. "I've got to feel this makes a difference, and I do now, in my heart." reviving Mar's home. The way Marj liked it. "Enchantment lies in different things for each of uL. For me, it is in this: to step out of the bright sunlight into the shade of range tres, to walk under the arched canopy of their jadelike leave, ..to fedl the mystery of a secluion that yet has shafts of light mh .L.,,LG A i-'. 1.5. F ADIT7Aan4/~I' a 9real ~% JIom ecomiz 9 We e* The mhr of kappa Alpha 9 C C Thursday Nite is "Utmuntonnl NIt" * Russion Qualudes .* Cueurvo or Stoli Shooters 0 e CociqUe Rum Drinks * S Heineken Beer MAy Sl fl, Scud Our Spedal Halloween Bouquet To Your Fvorite Goblin! vof,% Doxs ez, I e Am 1 OpeFolland Coody 1 $9.1" DcUvered by Dracut& 984M or Ma. Draemda ler Pkm r Rd. -34&St. mne Orders ~ oae Tuesday -Friday See Bobby Griffin from 5:30 to 8:30 2 for 1 Drinks and Wednesday Mole Dance Revue Lodies Drink Saturday Aftemoon Come see the GATORS beat Auburn on.our GIAN WlO'reen and Draft beertpswols he SeconclAnt-" EE __ _ EATAMIMJ N"onryour bock windshield The "BEATNMUR Pep Roy. Thrndatat 7:30 PM, Percy mdTrack $25tI for-* Banner Contest (Best '"eat Aubur'Banner) *. Mr. TW*4o-o0k--AlIkeContWs Fre.PomtersoAf WhoEnter ON ~Wb~ wC it senOD -A w.Ssu cP'~ I r 111, W W A, fot % y, W % I I vim"

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otor, thursday, october 27, 1983, 15 p if LargetSeliem n Tow) PUMPKINS' a -b.anea arlot 15 s.an u -4 -89 PrcsGood Thmn Tues, Nov. I.Cucubers 6/4940 Caullower $11, or Romaine Broccoli 9Cboom Thoapsedss Grapes 59 I Dok-Choy or Napp 39*. zucc i. Squash 21P f enow Squash 3 Okw*ra a--a Ua1P Steak Cube Steak Stew Beef $1", Ruand Steak r 49 Grou"dChuft 79.f IuW PrALI I-U. 06~ I 99M Uwms Sa -Jr7 voil'Sy" ips meandm. Starimap I 2nd oef hts veil Grapefruit 9ois bm 07~ a-.'-W ii I 7 hi lb. 4 il da .4,4 E

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18, alligator, thursday, october 27, 1983 continued from page twenty will be determined by a field goal like it has been the last two years? A: Oh, sure. It could come down to anything. There are usually five plays in any given football game that make the difference. The catch is that nobody knows when those five plays are going to occur. But they'll be there. It should be a close game. Q The Gators have played well on the road so far this season, winning at Mississippi State and Louisiana State and tying at Southern California. But since World War 11, UF has won just twice in 19 tries playing at Auburn. Do you feel confident this team can buck that tradition? A: With this team, I don't think that anything matters except 1983. They're not looking at that statistic. Really, what matters is the '83 Auburn team against the '83 Florida team. That's enough. Those statistics aren't important, in my opinion. We believe in this football team. We know how hard they work. And they're preparing very hard to play Saturday. To win Saturday. They're preparing for that. As a group, they really believe that they can still improve, like they can really get better each week. To me, that's the difference in this football team. That's why they're winners. Q: Last year's team had emotional peaks and valleys and lost two of its first seven games. This year's team has had peaks and valleys but is undefeated after seven games. Why? A: Every team is different. Every team has different circumstances. Depth, injuries. p',,. When you say "peak" we've had some units that have peaked, played great football at times. I guess at different times, each unit has had spans of great play. But all units haven't reached that level of ability on the same Saturday for four quarters yet. That's a rare time in teams sports. That's what we all work for. Q: Already this season you've faced a wishbone offense against Mississippi State and a similar Option I offense against East Carolina. How much will that help your team prepare for Auburn's wishbone? A: We hope there's some carry over, but Auburn's wishbone is so much different. It is a lot more explosive. More talented. No one is going to beat Auburn unless they stop o Jackson, Lionel James, (Clayton) Beauford, Woods, speedy wide receivers. That's a tough call for any team as we've already seen. Q: You've seen the films from the AuburnTexas game (a 20-7 Texas victory). How did Texas beat Auburn? A: Texas had the ball early, they scored early, they got some big plays early. Because of that they were able to take the momentum away from Auburn. The second 30 minutes of that football game Auburn and Texas played even. I think it was just the emotional thing of getting behind early, and they had a defensive back fall down which allowed a touchdown. It was a much closer game than the score indicates. And at the time the% played, people didn't realize Texas was so1 strong. But Auburn played them toe-to-toe for about 50 minutes of that game. Q:What would winning the Southeastern Conference title mean to Charley Pell? A: You know what, I'd like to be able to think about that but preparing for Auburn takes every bit of my time. If we do what we're supposed to be doing getting ready for Auburn, we don't have that luxury. And I'm being honest with you when I say that. Our concern is for Auburn, and we don't really have enough time for that. Q: Do you wish you had had an open date the week before the Auburn game like you did last year? A: Yes. We had an open date last year, played pretty well against a good Auburn team, won the game, and then coach (Pat) Dye comes out and says his team didn't play well, the poorest they've played all year. If that was the poorest they played, and knowing that they're going to be playing their best this week, that's something, that's a big gap for us to try to make up for. This is the most talented Auburn team since 1958 (when the Tigers won the national title). Q: And you won't think about the Georgia game until Saturday night? A: Absolutely not. Of course, I'm sure coach (Vince) Dooley isn't thinking about us because he's working so hard for Temple. That'll be a glorified scrimmage in front of 80,000 people, that's all he's gonna have Saturday. But that's the way they set it up. It's designed. It didn't happen by accident. But ,we can't worry about that either, because we can't change it, yet. ?1~ii~ We Deliver After 8 p.m. 'An y Florida's Finest Pizza Pasta Dinner $3.79 includes dinner salad and Valid today garlic bread dining room only Valid with coupon only 114N.W. 13th St. In the Gatos Ploza 375.0004 BRANDYWINE' Apartments Where Iiving is a pIesr 0 Olympic size pool 9 Flexible Lease Terms S Recreational fociliq 9 Discounts for prompt payment SSpacious one and two bodrow"rps .eBeautifully furnished or unfu-I 2811 S.W. Archer WR JutWeit Of S911i"

PAGE 19

r'I Dr alligator, thursday, october 27, 1983,19 Hamstring slows DePeiza in 26-miler Last year. Cowell DeFPeiza ran the New York Marathon in 2 hours, 38 mioiuus. le was the 286th person to finish the race -quite a feat considering there were 3,800 runners legally ensiesed iitn the race and thousands of others joining in atieesit times. On Oct. 22, the 33-year-old Gainesville runner again tst.d the 264ile, 384oot course that begins on the Verrai.o Narsws Bridge in Staten Island, continues through BrookIyn, the Branx. Queens and Manhattan, fimaNy ennga CsCtral Park. Tis time, DePeiza compised the race in cine fewer .niuates and 178th overall. Indedl, a .niteehme improve ent from last year. Bi CwwA Deeira cod l inot help being a little disap"I imwedso e.a but not to where I wanted to," DePeiza said. t'sbacktothetdawgboard." Defties's immi.was a RassMle qa-n that struck at about the 3-m.ie mark. It is a naMgging injury that has plagued b in e Masc*, when he towe his hamstring nomele wle playing se-w. He reinjured it in June -and hehesyetsofflyemser. 'I &ore (he iniend d 'idnttake came of it," the Trigiad nivesaid. 'lime is a lot of scar time in it. But in al o fmy alier races, I wmdshs't feel it. It would be sore, but liwod&*'thmatlbefradkLAt that 3-m asmk, D za dipped as a result of the dick eds .cane by hf t -coaat rain that fell throughout the rne.I s ih sing m.eakisunly tightened up, and & was Rhamdt D dPeia knew he was probably going to omiiNW inlaP tera.That didn't deer DNme., however He maintained his emham pren d. SlIhdo race, and his time of 1:07.00 at dhe balway -imn just thRie m.m.es behind the -I ould sOima rhO wh o race in fret of me at the e*Eamy pooinksold DOmia, who aendd UF on a track m eftsy a.udnbip and graduaed in 1975. "1 gsOep lassPIIeI. Fmdia.ii (ewnu bmalr in tac.le) Mask EKmE and Iemmw Jimm os habw dome as good a job as to ow gaW (Val mam., Tam Weigomme, Fernando 'ehm &we uorkMas Nut only bashe hm do.g ANN; jb dw EIM ON& b tackespeite -Rio v&a bo d & oin laum run away fham L ,bmt he'ssas t a daip nole this yewMm E.E w s.dp tlatom-s inUs pha bo. have midheeiddeassti nfw ort=NFLem. Remw ambu hhmkear Palsick Miler w aso been m a Smi jobwa s e acbd on LNit weren't for the fict Rh& IhSC o awmdy hw Marshla and johason .athe.eU MiA w old he starting, and UF would not hmeaywnsehaemaeek. MC hem, oo, a =worry at the bdlbCmlayintthadtemey positions wumTsmy Lft d (3m& C mme up we against aayethefr mlb-ay. -lhe jotaap m a was iupposmly to be a pa .A ram Vm down lao year with a fad q ofy, et .atac-the area vacated by V .And wh l eadwemalck, Ivoy Curry, g ga.ihe.p.pmmhad maweahmnem was in control of what I was doing. I wasn't laboring or breathing hard. I was in the top 30 at the halfway mark and 87th at the 22-mile mark." That was when DePeiza's decline began: "I got into Central Park (the 22-mile point) and I began to walk. I walked three times in the park," DePeiza said, concerning the injury. "Overall, I felt I could have gone more. But I had the cramp. Last year, I died a lot earlier. This year, I died at the 22-mile mark. Once you start to walk, you can't get your stride back." Once DePeiza finished the race, he was greeted by volunteers that assist the runners as they cross the finish line. These volunteers, who were kept busy by the numerous runners who were afflicted by cramps, feared DePeiza tore his hamstring musice -a common ailment among runners. What DePeiza has been suffering with since March is an accumulation of scar tissue in his right hamstring. As a result, it shortens his muscle, thus hindering his full range of motion. "I knew what it was. I knew it wasn't a pull," he said. "I knew exactly what it was.' But despite the disappointment, DePeiza was nevertheless pleased with his performance. "I ran what I wanted to," DePeiza said. "I was pleased with my personal effort and how I felt despite the injury. "Running 26 miles isn't fun. I don't care what anybody says. DePeiza's next test will be in the Orange Bowl Marathon in Miami on Jan. 7. And as usual, he will be shooting for the goal that has kept him on the marathon circuit for four years. "I want to run inside 2 hours, 15 minutes. Every time I rnm, I try to get that goal." Witha healthy leg and a renewed attitude, he could very well achieve that goal. MOTMk 'Three other Gainesville runners competed in the New York Marathon. Janet Wendle completed the course in 3 hours, 9 minutes. Ottila Torres-Garcia finished at 4 hours, 30 minutes, and Tom Goldstein. a visiting UF journalism professor, ran the marathon in 3 hours, 28 minutes. empty-handed. One the other side, a more confident Ricky Easmon has done a fairly credible job. He has made some poor plays, but unlike last season, he has also come up with some big plays. Roger Sibbald and Curtis Stacey have given the Gators some valuable depth as backups at safety and cornerbacks respectively. Again, the only fault with the secondary is the fact they are giving up more than 190 yards passing -despite not playing against any better "than" average throwing quarterback. KK.N GAM: This may be UFs strongest area. In fall practice, Pell's most urgent problem was finding a placekicker. Now he has two, Bobby Raymond and Chris Perkins, and both have done their specific job nearly beyond reproach. It's hard to judge Ray Criswell and David Nardone because they haven't had to do much punting. But both have done well when called on. The coverage teams have been excellent. They've held returners to 16 yards on kickoffs and six on punt returns. The return teams have been fair at best. Kickoff returners for UF have brought the ball back 17 yards, while the punt returners have been quite dreadful (only four yards a return). GRA& AFe ba ut't ak wbanma recovered frm what So --s a -cm___ lejsy4le hant beed any k baW tried toeploit C I'.q Of wy n im-AwenImAG I a I I I II 'I 4 SI "AT'OR M Starting tailback Neal Anderson and ofnsive lineman Lesas Brown mimied Wednesday's twosor practice session. Anderson, the leading rusher in the Wudma es Conference, has a cold and sore throat while bxwn is recovering from a back injury suffered in the East aroline game. eM said he expects both to play Saturday gminst Auburn.I 4 I I

PAGE 20

20, alligator, thursday, october 27, 1983 UF defensive unit a reliable 'towrs o When it comes to UF football there is one thing that a fan can always take for granted: the Gators will not lose because of their defense. During the Charley Pell era, the UF offense has been unpredictable. Up one week and down the next. But, especialIy-in the last four seasons, the defense has been a tower of strength. You could count on one hand the number of poor performances by the defense during that time. JORGE MILIAN sportscene There was the 44-0 loss last year against Georgia as well as the Mississippi State and West Virginia games two years ago. Even in those games, the offense could be held accountable. With the offense not being able to produce, the defense had to remain on the field longer. r This year the defense is even better. Through UF's first seven games, it has given up only 91 points (13 points a game). It's given up more than 100 yards rushing in a game only once and allowed the opposition only 2.9 yards a carry. It has been impressive in crucial situations. Opponents have converted only 37 percent of their third down situations compared to the UF offense's 56 percent conversion rate. About the only thing that can be said about that the Gator defense hasn't been near perfect in, has been the defense against the pass. The UF secondary has given up more than 190 yards passing per game, and the reason being concerns the Gator defense against the run. Opponents must throw, once they find out that their running game is being shut down. WITH CHARLEY PELL EdItor's Note: On Saturday, the fourthranked Gator football team plays the fifthranked Auburn Tigers in a game that could determine who wins the 1983 Southeastern Conference title. The game, the most .important in recent UF history, will strongly 'test the mettle of the Gators and Charley Pell by the head coach's own admission. On Wednesday, Pell talked with Alligator staff With that, it's time to grade the Gator defense. DEFENSIVE LINE: With Greg Cleveland switching over from offense, and with Roy Harris' injury problems, there was some doubt how strong the line would be. It hasn't been a problem. Through the East Carolina game, the Pirates gained only 41 first downs by running the ball -because of course, of the fine job the linebacking corp is doing. But in a 3-4 defense (three linemen and four linebackers) it's the job of the linemen to clog up the line to allow the linebackers to roam without being bothered by blockers. In other words, the linemen have to sacrifice themselves in order for the linebackers to do their job. The linemen have done that almost perfectly. Harris has played so well that many people are talking him up for a spot on the All-Southeastern Conference team. Nose guard Tim Newton slimmed down during the offseason and is becoming a dominating player in the middle of the Gator defense. Pell says he thinks Newton is going to become the best nose tackle in the country by his senior year. Cleveland quit the team last year but has come back, giving the Gators consistent play at defensive tackle. About the only fault that can be raised about the line is its lack of pressure on the opposing quarterback. With a 3-4 defense, you don't expect a lot of sacks but this line has had trouble just pressuring the quarterback. GRADE: B LINEBACKERS: They lost three of their starters from last year's team, but you wouldn't have noticed by the way this S Dilewe U. hnsbackq, Wilber M l arc 1 page nineteen cr 1963 kt**you myew 0-0 writer Scott Kline about the Auburn game and the Gators' preparation ,for it. The following are excerpts from that interview. Alligator: Of course, you realize the SEC title is on the line Saturday. Have you stressed that fact to your players this week? Pell: I'm so confident that the players know what's at stake, more than any other person or group-of people. So confidenth'Thi s obvious to me. We don't really feet. to mention it to them and we plan to. Q: Do you do anything diffet* wea than you would for East Carolina er M State? A: Not really. We just hope that what wea we'll do it better. IN Thur @ t ....A. Burgers*/ Buy two %iib 3jp or $5 (Except k Get two CC I I Tho.lt even)k are in itreal a LdAnotlel ft them ey are, the hard at it. Year's team lbalance their ability su ofenseit's oehanaive Randy 4*t h is IDet 4A 4*Mas lk At T eone f indi