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The Independent Florida alligator

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Title:
The Independent Florida alligator
Portion of title:
Florida allgator
Portion of title:
Alligator
Alternate Title:
University digest
Alternate Title:
University of Florida digest
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, FL
Publisher:
Campus Communications, Inc.
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2005
Frequency:
Daily (except Saturdays, Sundays, holidays and exam periods, Aug.-Apr.); semiweekly (May-July)
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. (some col.) ; 36 cm.

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Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
Online databases.
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Online databases ( lcsh )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.651781 x -82.336258

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Additional Physical Form:
Also available online.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 65, no. 75 (Feb. 1, 1973)-
General Note:
"Not officially associated with the University of Florida."
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries.

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13827512 ( OCLC )
ACN5549 ( NOTIS )
sn 86010448 ( LCCN )
0889-2423 ( ISSN )

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Full Text
volume 75, no. 129

Southerland narrowly captures top SG spot

ft' u MKSmsm.
1
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barbara hansen
USA's Steve Southerland
. .winces as he toasts his student body presidential victory with a champagne bath
from fellow celebrants

No ifs ( artels,
or butts
Eleven Sigma Phi Epsilon
fraternity wisecrackers
bare their opinions
about the recent con controversy
troversy controversy over the
pending removal of the
UF Lesbian and Gay
Society from its Reitz
Union office. UFLAGS is
scheduled to be evicted
from its office today, but
members plan to appeal
to the Board of Regents.
al ferguson

Senate shreds UF construction budget

By Frank LoMonte
Alligator Staff Writer
UF President Robert Marston and other
UF officials are up in arms over the state
Senate budget that passed Thursday evening
saying the budget cuts building money for
UPs most prized building projects white
pampering the University of-South Florida.
The House of Representatives 1982-83
state budget which was passed Wednesday
also jarred UF officials when they
discovered that money for a chemistry lab
and a science library were cut.
In the Senate appropriations bill, UF lost a
total of $2,630,000, including $1,800,000
for a meat laboratory, $480,000 for a
science library and $350,000 for renovation

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ot Leigh Hall, the chemistry building.
While both the House and Senate members
are figuring on about S3O million for capital
outlay next year tor Floridas nine public
universities, UF lobbyist A1 Alsobrook said
the way senators distributed the money
makes the House members look generous by
comparison.
The Senate bill is much leaner, of
course, Alsobrook said. It doesnt hardly
have anything in there.
Thats because even though both House
and Senate members passed a one-cent sales
tax, only 25 percent of that money would go
back to state general revenue accounts in the
Senate plan, Alsobrook said. In the House
budget, 50 percent of that tax revenue would

By Lisa Back man
Alligator Staff Writer
Squeezing by with a 6 percent margin.
University Student Alliance party longshots
Steve Southerland and Charlotte Mather
swiped the UF student body presidency and
vice presidency Thursday night.
During the first round of balloting last
week, the tfuo finished second with 33 per percent
cent percent of the vote. But in Thursday nights
runoff race, Southerland and Mather won
with 53 percent of the vote. Students Unite
Now Party contenders Brian Ballard and
Ava Parker finished close behind with 47
percent.
During the two-day runoff election, 12 per percent
cent percent of the UF student body turned out to
sweep Southerland, Mather and USA student
body treasurer candidate Jim Fried into.of into.office.
fice. into.office. The results are to be validated today.
First, I cant believe it, said
Southerland, a 21-year-old history major
from Miami. And second, I think dedica dedication
tion dedication and hard work came through.
I sefe disabilities as a thing of the mind,
said Southerland, who lost his left leg to
cancer at the age of 14.
A teary-eyed Mather turned up nearly an

go into state revenue accounts, he said. In
both plans, local governments would get the
rest of the money. Much of that would be
givennout in property tax rebates.
UF Executive Vice President John Nattress
said UF officials think they e being short shortchanged
changed shortchanged in the Legislature.
Theres no planning money for anything
at Florida, Nattress said? "Its all in
engineering.
In the House plan, UF would get $7
million for the last phase of construction erf
the Shands Teaching Hospital patient ser services
vices services building. House members would also
Sm 'Building money 1
next page

friday, march 19, 1982

hour after the results were announced at 8
p.m., explaining her pet rabb.it had died
earlier in the evening.
But her victory and the dozens of hugs
and kisses she received from supporters
soon made the tears go away.
A jubilant Fried inched his way into the
treasurer spot with 50.6 percent of the vote,
narrowly defeating SUN candidate Linda
Garrett, who polled just more than 49 per percent
cent percent of the vote. Fried won by 42 votes.
An ecstatic Fried jumped from hug to
handshake.
The fat lady finally sang and she sang the
right tune, he said, taking a breather out outside
side outside the Orange and Brew.
I wont be bothering everybody tomor tomorrow,
row, tomorrow, he said. "Ill just go to class like
everybody else. I am an average student you
know.
In the Student Traffic Court chief justice
race, Deputy Chief Justice Jimmy Charles
picked up 54 percent of the vote, beating op opponent
ponent opponent Mike Trentalange, who garnered
47.6 percent.
Its so satisfying after three weeks of hard
Sm Winners'
page three

SPORTS page 16
UF's women swimmers take a big lead
in the first-ever NCAA women's
swimming championship
LOCAL page 2
Former O'Connell Center box office
manager Rick Cimmerman is charged
with two counts of grand theft and 38
counts of forgery and uttering a forgery
CAMPUS pages
A microbiology professor tells a UF
audience Christopher Columbus may
have been responsible for transporting
syphilis from the New World
to the Old World



iatlioo**, ftidtoy, march 17.'1982

2

Church officials defend soup
kitchen, blame city for closing

Alligator Staff Writer
Hurley Hall soup kitchen sponsors Thurs Thursday
day Thursday accused local government officials of
trying to make them look bad because they
are feeding transients.
Alachua County Health and Rehabilitative
Services Tuesday closed the soup kitchen, on
the border of the Student Ghetto, becuase
they said it did not meet state health re requirements.
quirements. requirements.
Father John Gillespie, pastor of St.
Augustine Catholic Church that sponsors the
soup kitchen, and sister Claire Norton, the
president of the kitchen's board of directors,
held a press conference Thursday to rebut
the health department's complaints.
I think she major problem is why isn't the
city doing something (about the vagrants)?"
said Gillespie. We are being put on the
defensive. The city should be put on the
defensive.
Gillespie and Norton said that the city has
done nothing to help with the soup kitchen.
The approximately SBOO a month it costs to
run the kitchen comes only from private
donations, Norton said.

Building money
from poge one
give UF $600,000 for planning an engineer engineering
ing engineering building and $300,000 for planning on
the Reid Hall science building.
House members also gave UF $1.5 million
tor expansion of the Holland Law Center.
That money is being given to match a $1.5
million donation to the UF law school from
lawyers throughout the state.
But Nattress said state legislators tampered
with the priority list UF officials submitted
to the state Board of Regents, leaving UF
with only that $900,000 for future projects.
Meanwhile, he said, USF in Tampa got a hef hefty
ty hefty $lO million for planning future construc construction
tion construction projects.
That generous appropriation was probably
due to the influence of Rep Lee Maffit, D-

CCampusShop
5 E3&Book store t
in the hub e 3920194 I
|

I think we have the right to question an
agency that brings nothing to the city but
harrassment, said Gillespie in reference to
Health and Rehabilitative Services.
HRS closed the soup kitchen because it
lacked proper handwashing facilities,
dishwashing facilities, fire extinguishers and
food protection devices, HRS officials said.
Soup kitchen sponsors, they said, also
violated an agreement made two years ago to
cook the food at the church and serve it at
Hurley Hall down the street. Instead, kitchen
workers started both cooking and serving the
food at the soup kitchen.
Board members said HRS dosed the soup
kitchen without making any inspections.
According to health department records,
the soup kitchen was inspected when it in initially
itially initially opened three years ago. It was in inspected
spected inspected again February 19 of this year after
workers at The Sweet Connection ice cream
store complained to the health department
about rats and filth, health department
records say.
Director of Environmental Health Cary
Pafford said a letter of warning was sent out
March 1, telling St. Francis Hall to correct
the health violations. Pafford said that the

Tampa, who is expected to be the next
speaker of the House, Nattress said.
Alsobrook agreed Moffit wielded heavy clout
in the capital outlay budget decision.
But Rep. Sid Martin, D-Hawthome, said
he doesn't think UF came out as bad as Nat Nattress
tress Nattress claims.
Dr. Nattress doesn't know what hes talk talking
ing talking about, Martin said. We have the finest
capital outlay program, right here, in the
history of UF.
Capital outlay money, which comes from
a portion of every students tuition, goes into
a state trust fund that pays for state univer university
sity university buildings and equipment.
W ith depleted state revenues and uncer uncertain
tain uncertain projections for next year, Martin said
UF probably made out as well as it could.
One thing UF officials lost, however, was
state money for a meat lab at the Institute
of Food and Agricultural Sciences which is
nearly completed, Martin, said. That was

Soup kltchon customers ' burtxin k
. . lounge on steps of Hurley Hall during rainstorm

soup kitchen was told to close March 15,
after City Housing Board member Monica
Smith complained and a follow-up inspec inspection
tion inspection was made March 16.
But soup kitchen board member Ed
Olowin, one of the people Pafford said the
health department was in contact with, said,
As far as I know, they (HRS) never made
any physical review erf our facility.
St. Francis officials also are upset that
neighbor business people and residents say
the church is responsible for bringing the
vagrants into Gainesville. Gillespie said the
vagrants were in the city before the soup kit kitchen
chen kitchen ever opened. He said 40 percent of the

probably due to hard feelings among state
legislators who distrust IF AS after a recent
error IFAS officials made in their salary
budget.
Regents Capital Programs Director Forrest
Kelley said he was also surprised that state
lawmakers struck the meat lab from their
priority list. Usually, state lawmakers cut
planning money before cutting into the ac actual
tual actual construction money for completing a
construction project, he said. But that didnt
happen this time.
Marston also said he was particularly
upset that state lawmakers disregarded the
UF priority list. That list had the renovation
of Leigh Hall chemistry laboratories and the
IFAS meat lab ahead of all other UF
priorities.
The single most important thing is the
chemistry lab, Marston said. Naturally,
Im disappointed." Facilities in the UF
chemistry department are seriously over overcrowded,

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soup kitchens customers are UF students
not vagrants.
"St. Augustines had nothing to do with br bringing
inging bringing the poor into Gainesville," Gillespie
said. 'Theyre craning streaming off of 1-75
into Gainesville for our gourmet cuisine
here," he added sarcastically.
Until a certified stove is found, the board
members said bag lunches will be prepared
at St. Augustines and served at Hurley Hall.
Were gonna take care of them somehow,
somewhere, said board member Russel
Ramsey. The members say it is their respon responsibility
sibility responsibility to feed the poor because that is what
the Scriptures say to do.

crowded, overcrowded, Marston said. That space crunch is
handicapping UF engineering majors as well
as chemistry majors, he said.
But its too early to predict gloom and
doom for UF, Marston said. Representatives
of both state houses have meetings scheduled
this weekend to come to a compromise plan
and some erf the capital outlay priorities may
change then, he said.
I hope the Legislature does not make any
decision in the final analysis without giving
serious consideration to the priority list,
Marston said.
Alsobtook said hes watching that con
ference committee between the two houses
anxiously. Both Sen. George Kirkpatrick, D-
Gainesville, and Sen. Pete Skinner, D-Lake
City, are on that committee, Alsobrook said.
Members of both houses are predicting a
long, drawn-out bargaining session, he said.
Its a real sparring match up here, Mar Martin
tin Martin said.



It was no rosy night for teary-eyed SUN party losers

By Prank LoMont*
Alligator Staff Writer
The bright yellow roses in their lapels
couldnt hide what they knew.
Students Unite Nows Student Body Vice
Presidential candidate Ava Parker sat
slumped in a chair in the Orange and Brew,
forcing a smile. She was exhausted from two
weeks of campaigning. And she knew she
didnt have anything to show for it.
After 6 oclock, 1 knew, Parker said
after the results of the Student Government
runoffs were announced about 8 oclock. In
the final tally of SG runoff elections Wednes Wednesday
day Wednesday and Thursday, she and SUN Student
Body presidential candidate Brian Ballard
fell 3 percentage points short of taking the
election from University Students Alliance
Student Body President-Elect Steve
Southerland and his running mate, Charlotte
Mather.
Southerland, Mather and Ballard all knew
the results before the official announcement.
They all had representatives stationed at
voting booths to await their opening shortly
after 6:30 p.m. which Thursday night also
opened Southerlands administration, which
begins in two weeks.
I can look in the mirror and say Im pro proud
ud proud we did what we did, said a somber
Ballard after the totals were announced.
Ballard clutched a drink in his right hand,
his left hand fingering the lapel with the
yellow rose. Yellow, of course, was SUNs
campaign color.
The victory celebration they expected
wasnt there. After winning 47 percent of the
vote last Wednesday and Thursday in the
general election, Ballard said all his friends
told him he couldnt lose. And that, Ballard
said, was what did him in.
We just got overconfident, he said.
Garrett and Parker concluded the same
thing, as did Ballards campaign manager,
John Gilliam.
I think a lot of people felt we had it in the
bag, Gilliam said, leaning dejectedly
against the bar at the Orange and Brew.
I have to hand it to them (USA), Gilliam
said. "The last two days, they just got out

Winners
continued
from page one
work, said a smiling Charles. Ive been
working in the traffic court for a long time,
and now I can get some things done.
Charles. said he was off to Dubs Steer
Room lounge and then the hot tubs
But the results of Thursday nights election
stand the chance of being nullified if the
Board of Masters, the SG equivalent of the
Supreme Court, finds the SG Elections

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SG Elections Commissioner Andrew Katz. left, and SUN's Brian Ballard barbara hansen
. .share a post-election moment of sadness as a teary-eyed Ballard loses his bid for student
body president

and busted it.
That doesnt mean, however, that there
werent some cries of no fair coming from
the SUN camp.
I just hate the way they won, Parker
said, fighting not to break down into tears as
she had before when her SUN comrades ap approached
proached approached with consoling hugs.
Ballard said he also thought the USA cam campaign
paign campaign was rather dirty, citing pieces of
literature USA members passed out with at attacks
tacks attacks on the SUN candidates.
There was nothing for the losers to do but
contemplate their futures. And for Garrett,

Commission guilty of ineptness in han handling
dling handling last weeks election,
Two of the three parties accused the
commission earlier this week of not in informing
forming informing parties more fully of tallying
procedures. The board is scheduled to meet
next Wednesday.
Following the tallying both winners and
losers shook hands and agreed on at least one
thing: they were oh-so-glad the election
scramble was over.
After three weeks of missing classes and
talking to people, its a relief, Fried said.

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the future has more immediate concerns than
politics.
I need a job, she laughed, breaking her
first smile since the vote totals came in. Its
a relief not to be campaigning, but I invested
so much in it. The end of the campaign
means she and the other candidates will be
able to concentrate on classes for the first
time in several weeks, Garrett added.
Parker also let some enthusiasm break
through her tearful exterior. Im not going
to just drop out of sight, she smiled. Im
too young, Im just a sophomore.
But Ballard, who has served in Student

Accounting Debra Kronengold (USA); Agriculture (1)
Hal Phillips (SUN), Danny Olson (write-in); Architecture
Vincent Nicolra (USA).
Building Construction Greg Bauer (SUN); Business
Administration (1) Barbara lorch (USA), Jack Schlossberg
(USA).
Dentistry Robbin Quartermon (SUN), Keith Francois
(write-in).
education (1) Cheryl Downing (USA), Margie Zucker
(SUN); engineering (I) Lisa Shirley (SUN), Ted Rogers
(SUN), Mike Simmermocher (SUN).
Pino Arts No candidates; Forestry Jennifer Kormen Kormendy
dy Kormendy (USA).
Health Related Professions Marianne Reed (SUN).
Journalism Keith Kriegler.

Senate Winners

qlltgotof x frfday, rr\ar<;hl9,.}992.

Body President Mike Bedkes cabinet for a
year, said hes had enough of politics.
Ive learned a lot about SG but now I
think my learning experience is over,
Ballard said with a sigh.
But that doesnt mean Ballard is playing
the disgruntled loser, he was quick to add.
No sour grapes, he said quietly, his eyes
wandering to the spot 20 feet away where
Southerland supporters were drenching their
man of the hour in champagne. They beat
us fair and square and thats all there is to
it.

Low Dyanne Feinberg (Solidarity); Llborai Arts and
Sdancot (A) Paula Bono (SUN), Michoel Stein (SUN), Tim
Koteff (SUN), Marsh McLawhorn (SUN), Cloy Burton (SUN),
Katherine lima (SUN).
Medicine Fredrick Boyd (Solidarity); Nursing Shellie
McMahon (SUN); Pharmacy Lillian Silvershein (Ind.).
Physical Iducatlon Robert Samiljan (SUN).
Veterinary Medicine Russell Swift (SUN).
1 UP (I) Sam Katz (USA), Phillip Laserna (SUN), Dennis
Franco (SUN), Lisa Gondy (SUN, Charneta Scott (SUN).
IUP (A) Kathy Duncan (SUN), Oscar Brennan (SUN),
David Hopkins (SUN), Ray Hannigan (SUN), Omar Zamora
(SUN), Shelanda Shaw (SUN).
*to be voted on by the Student Senate

3



4

olligqto f, friday, march 19, 1982

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WORLD |
NEWS I
Compiled from
United Press International
Florida Senate
pastes penny
sales tax hike
TALLAHASSEE The Senate passed a
penny sales tax hike Thursday after
legislators extended the session 11 days and
resurrected a compromise strategy d to avoid a full spring of turbulent special ses sessions.
sions. sessions.
The Senate voted 31-6 for Melbourne Sen.
Clark Maxwells pltm raising the sales tax to
a nickel on the dollar and earmarking $440
million of the $770 million that would be
generated to reduce property taxes or pre prevent
vent prevent tax increases scheduled to take effect
this fall.
It also endorsed a proposed constitutional
amendment reducing property taxes going to
schools, by $1.50 per SI,OOO of taxable
assessed value, or about S7S on a $75,000
house.
A critical vote on new taxes out of the way,
the Senate then began final work on a nearly
$lO billion state budget.
Four Dutch journalists
klllod in El Salvador
SAN SALVADOR Four Dutch jour journalists,
nalists, journalists, one recently questioned by police on
his ties to guerrillas, were shot to death
Thursday in a clash between soldiers and
rebels, the Dutch consul said.
The four journalists were members of a
television crew working for Dutch Radio and
Television News that went to northern
Chalatenango Province early in the day.
They were reported killed near the town of
El Paraiso, 36 miles north of San Salvador.
There were no other details about how they
died.
. The slayings followed the delivery of death
threats Wednesday to local journalists by the
Anti-Communist Alliance of El Salvador
which listed 35 foreign and Salvadoran jour journalists
nalists journalists scheduled for death. The four Dutch
journalists were not on the list.
Five other journalists have been killed
covering El Salvadors civil war in the past
two years, two others are missing and
presumed dead and about 12 have been
wounded.
The four Dutchmen were indentified as
producer Jacobus Andries Koos Koster,
soundman Hans Lodewijkter Laag, director
Jan Comeilis Chuisper and cameraman
Johannes Willemsen.

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The foreign ministry gave me the in information
formation information about their deaths, said Koen
Stefnitjk, a businessman who is Hollands
honorary consul in San Salvador. "The
report is unfortunately 99.9 percent ac accurate.
curate. accurate.
McCarthy to took Sonata
foot ho gavo up In 1970
ST. PAUL, Minn. Three-time presiden presidential
tial presidential candidate Eugene McCarthy said Thurs Thursday
day Thursday he will seek the Democratic nomination
for the Senate seat he gave up more than a
decade ago.
One never has a personal claim to a
Senate seat but it is the same seat, by se sequence
quence sequence of election, that I first won in 1958,
McCarthy told reporters in making his
political comeback announcement.
The seat was won by former Vice President
Hubert Humphrey in 1970. after McCarthy
declined to seek re-election and Humphrey
lost the 1968 presidential race to Richard
Nixon. Humphrey held the seat until his
death in 1978.
It now is held by Republican David
Durenberger, who faces no opposition this
year within his own Independent-Republican
party.
In seeking the partys backing, the. silver silverhaired
haired silverhaired McCarthy downplayed his 1980 en endorsement
dorsement endorsement of Reagan. It was a very modest
endorsement. The difference between
repudiating it and reaffirming it would be
very modest, he said.
The other two Democratic candidates for
the Senate nomination are Mark Dayton, 35,
a former state economic development com commissioner
missioner commissioner and member of the wealthy
Daytons department store family, and
Grant J. Merritt, 41, a Minneapolis lawyer
and former director of the state Pollution
Control Agency.
McCarthys childrens crusade erf the
1968 presidential campaign helped force
Lyndon Johnson from the White House. But
McCarthy says, if the Senate had exercised
its constitutional responsibilities properly,
the war in Vietnam never would have reach reached
ed reached the magnitude it did and the campaign
challenge of 1968 might not have been
necessary.
Houso and Sonata in
italomato ovor
altornato budget plant
WASHINGTON Despite calls for im immediate
mediate immediate action, Congress moved slowly and
seemingly in opposite directions Thursday in
trying to reach a bipartisan alternative to
President Reagans embattled 1983 budget
proposal.
Senate GOP Leader Howard Baker said
the Senate could pass a budget resolution
now, but he would prefer that the House
make the first move since it would be more
difficult for the Democratic-dominated
House to develop a consensus.
But House Speaker Thomas ONeill said
Wednesday the Democrats probably would
wait for Senate Republicans to make the first
move toward a comprehensive, deficit deficitreducing
reducing deficitreducing alternative budget plan.
The confused stalemate became even more
obvious during a brief conversation Thurs Thursday
day Thursday morning between ONeill and House
GOP Leader Bob Michel of Illinois, who is

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trying to resume deadlocked budget negotia negotiations
tions negotiations in the House.
Michel asked ONeill in a private conver conversation
sation conversation what kind of compromise package he
could take to the President, and ONeill
replied one that reduces the growth of
defense spending and offers the 1983 tax cut,
Congressional sources said.
Michel said the president wont even
listen to proposals in any of those areas, and
the conversation ended, said a Congressional
source.
Slngor Toddy Pondorgrass
injurod In car crash
PHILADELPHIA Rhythm-and-blues
singer Teddy Pendergrass, an electrifying
stage performer revered by his fans, crashed
his Rolls Royce into a tree along a winding
highway Thursday, suffering critical spine
injuries and partial paralysis of his legs.
The 1:30 a.m. crash trapped Pendergrass,
31, and a passenger, Tenika Watson, 31, for
45 minutes before rescue crews pried open
the jammed doors of his 1981 Rolls Royce in
the Germantown section of Philadelphia.
Pendergrass was transferred to Thomas
Jefferson University Hospitals spinal cord
injury center after initial treatment at Ger Germantown
mantown Germantown Hospital.
The spinal cord injury caused some
paralysis of the singers legs but the extent of
the damage will not be known until his con condition
dition condition stabilizes in three of four days, Fran Francis
cis Francis Sweeney, director of Thomas Jefferson
University Hospital, said.
Watson was released from Germantown
Hospital after treatment for multiple contu contusions.
sions. contusions.
Police accident investigator Martin
Kelly said police investigators were unable to
talk to Pendergrass and had not determined
where the singer was headed when the acci accident
dent accident occurred. Kelly said there were no in indications
dications indications of drug or alcohol use.
Chinoto factory oxplotion
loavot 'many 1 doad
PEKING A massive explosion in a
medical factory on the southeastern Chinese
coast opposite Taiwan caused many
casualties last week, Radio Peking disclosed
Thursday.
The broadcast did not give an exact
casualty figure but said only that many
comrades gave up their lives or suffered in injuries
juries injuries in the blast on the morning of March
9.
The radio said the casualties included the
Communist party representative as well as
the director, vice director and many young
workers at the factory in Fuding County in
Fujian Province, across the narrow Formosa
Strait from Taiwan.
There was no suggestion of sabotage and
the broadcast said a fire started
due to carelessness which caused
stockpiled gasoline and inflammable
material, probably chemicals, to explode.
The radio said a bigger explosion was
averted because of the gallant efforts of
people at the scene who moved some 100
tons of gasoline and inflammable material

from the fire.
It said all three services of the Peoples
Liberation Army were mobilized shortly
after the blast to either fight the fire,
evacuate the injured or fly in emergency
medical'teams from nearby areas.
There were apparently so many casualtie
an air force airlift was mounted to transpori
the injured to hospitals in surrounding area:
and even other provinces.
Bill passos rostricting
prott from naming splat
WASHINGTON The Senate Thursday
approved and sent on its way to almost cer certain
tain certain enactment an unprecedented press
restriction making it illegal to print the
.names of American spies, even when they are
public knowledge.
On a vote of 90-6, the Senate sent the
administration-backed bill to conference
with the House, which approved a similar
version last year 354-46.
One of the bills sponsors. Sen. Joseph
Biden, D-Del., predicted it would be declared
unconstitutional in the courts because of a
House-passed provision adopted by the
Senate Wednesday.
The critical language in that amendment
would make an authors reason to believe
that disclosures would harm U.S. in intelligence
telligence intelligence a criterion for prosecution. Op Opponents
ponents Opponents wanted a stricter standard of having
to prove intent to impair or impede the
CIA and sister agencies.
The bill is part of an administration
package to bolster the ClAs effectiveness
and was aimed at newsletters such as
Counterspy and Covert Action Information
Bulletin, which sponsors of the bill said are
in the business of naming names of agents.
Biden, the American Civil Liberties Union
and news media groups all contended the bill
is unconstitutional because it penalizes the
publication erf information that in many
cases is neither classified nor harmful to na national
tional national security.
Bandit gats moro attention
in bar than ho oxpocts
RENO, Nev. The St. Patricks day
festivities were still in full swing early
Thursday when a man with a bandanna
over his face and a gun in his hand walk walked
ed walked into the Ranch House Bar.
This is a stickup! he yelled.
If anyone heard him over the din, they
showed no respect. The bartender con continued
tinued continued drawing beers.
But when he threatened to shoot, the
mood changed. Some patrons grabbed
him, bounced him off the wall and beat
him until he was unconscious. No shots
were fired.
Police rescued the suspect, took him to
a hospital for treatment of a broken nose,
then jailed him.
William Michaud, 25, was booked for
investigation of robbery.

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alligator, triday, march 19,-198 2,

5



w alligator, friday, march 19, 1982

6

Playing
with matches
The head of one concerned group likes to paint
this analogy to the danger:
Imagine two young kids standing in a room
with gasoline up to their knees. One kid has eight
matches, the other 10. Since neither trusts the
other, both say they need more matches to feel
safe.
Now imagine yourself locked in the room with
the two as they yell at each other and threaten to
strike a match.
Feel a little uncomfortable?
You certainly should. Because even if you
arent locked in a gasoline-flooded room with a
pair of pyromaniacal brats, you are trapped in a
world that could disappear any moment in an
atomic puff of smoke.
And two nearly uncontrollable children, the
United States and Russia, stand ready to strike
their nuclear weapon matches.
The absurd situation has existed for years, of
course, but these days Americans across the coun country
try country are becoming concerned about the never neverending
ending neverending weapons race for a very good reason an
economic one.
President Reagan, attempting to ring up record
federal deficits, insists his proposals for defense
spending leave no room for cuts. Many
Americans, concerned that the deficits will push
the country into near-depression, are starting to
offer suggestions of where military spending can
be trimmed.
In a grass-roots movement calling for a freeze
on the production of nuclear weapons, folks are
suggesting the nuclear arms race should be the
first luxury to go. So far, resolutions supporting a
freeze have been passed by five state legislatures
and 194 of 236 town meetings where it was con considered
sidered considered in New Hampshire and Vermont.
The resolutions passed by farmers in Vermont
and ranchers in Oregon do not call for nuclear
surrender to the Soviets. They ask that the United
States and Russia agree on a treaty freezing the
arms race, a treaty which would include
guarantees that neither side could cheat.
The Reagan administration hellbent on ad adding
ding adding to its arsenal of matches is criticizing the
proposal, saying it would lock in a current Rus Russian
sian Russian advantage. Actually, neither side has a clear clearcut
cut clearcut lead in the arms race. Russia holds the ad advantage
vantage advantage in total missile payload but the United
States is ahead in total number of warheads.
The Russians have reacted favorably to the pro proposal,
posal, proposal, and not without reason. Because of
Americas continuing technological superiority,
more than two decades of a costly arms race has
yet to give the Soviets the advantage. With the
drain weapons production has made on their
sickly economy, they should be more than willing
to take a breather.
The push for a nuclear freeze has moved into
Congress,with 141 senators and representatives
pledged to support a resolution calling for it. Un Unfortunately,
fortunately, Unfortunately, neither area Congressman Don Fu Fuqua
qua Fuqua nor Florida Sens. Paula Hawkins or Lawton
Chiles now are among the resolutions backers.
They would change their minds quickly,
however, if their constituents joined the national
call for a stop to the nuclear arms race. In
Gainesville, the UF student and faculty senates
should consider resolutions supporting the freeze.
So should the city and county commissions, after
holding public hearings to listen to their voters.
Some people might oppose the idea, saying
local governments should not concern themselves
with national affairs.
Lets put it this way: Locked in the gasoline-,
flooded room with the two kids preparing to light
up, would you stay silent?

opinions

\
ipoKjfiwmwKarMA
mmi
V,

LETTERS |
Penny sales tax increase
should be passed quickly
Editor: The Florida Education Association/United,
representing more than 60,000 school employees in Florida
public schools, /immunity colleges and universities, has
been on record since 1975 urging the Florida Legislature to
enact a 1 cent increase in the sales tax.
Although FEA/United is a strong advocate for money for
education, we support the sales tax to also fund other critical
governmental responsibilities including law enforcement,
transportation and human services.
The sales tax should be passed even under normal
economic conditions, but with declining state revenues and
cutbacks from Washington, the Legislature no longer has
the luxury to delay.
Polls indicate a growing public support for the penny in increase.
crease. increase. While no one likes taxes, it is better to have aperiny in increase
crease increase than for essential services to be drastically curtailed.
Speaker Ralph Haben and the Florida House of Represen Representatives
tatives Representatives should be commended for .their leadership in passing
a sales tax increase. Gov. Bob Graham has now joined this
effort.
The time has come for the Florida Senate to put aside
political one-upmanshipand do what is best for the citizens
of Florida guarantee the continuation of programs in
education, law enforcement, transportation and human ser services,
vices, services, through an increase in the sales tax. This should be
done immediately and thert the Legislature should go home.
PatTomiltoi Jr.
FEA/Unltad President
Tolbert Area government
shortchanges dorm residents
Editor: The residents of the Tolbert Area have continually
been shortchanged by their area government, TAC. TAC is
wasting the students money and has of this year not justified
its existence. It has evolved into a political tea room, with
members too busy patting each others backs to worry about
students needs.
In the beginning of the year, students were urged to join
the bandwagon and buy a TAC card. They enthusiastically
looked forward to borrowing numerous items that could be
checked out for free with the card. Upon trying to use this
miracle card, they were horribly disappointed. Most of the
equipment to be checked out was either broken, or nonexis nonexistent.
tent. nonexistent. When I inquired about new equipment I was told, Its
here somewhere. This became a grimly familiar phrase,
later concerning a piano and then televisions.
TAC had the opportunity this semester to acquire a tree
band with a popular following for a promotional concert. Os
course, this was out of the question since this would actual actually
ly actually make money instead of spend it. The money could have
been used to hire another band, or for any other projects
benefiting the area. TAC, consistent with, its previous poor
record, voted down the motion for the free band.

f UftUnllT)
ftmr

Another example of TACs reckless spending can. be
illustrated by their purchase of new televisions for every
floor. The televisions were bought many many months ago
but certainly could not be put in until last week. The theft theftproof
proof theftproof cabinets had not yet been built. These cabinets are so
theft-proof that we daily dismantle ours to adjust the vertical
hold on a ghastly picture. This is the ultimate paradox; we
have plenty of black and white televisions, they just do not
receive any stations!
Akm ML Taliaferro, Spokesman
Studonts United lor Responsible
Governmental Expenditures lUF
Fraternities offer privileges
afforded peasants by Stalin
Editor: It occurred to me recently that the many pleasant
repercussions of the collectivization of peasants by Joseph
Stalin run parallel to the beneficial influences afforded by
UFs fraternities. I thought I would share my thoughts.
Such virtu res as the homogenization of an otherwise
rebellious though dull class of people, and the grafting of
some higher purpose for which to strive in life (be it mass in industrialization
dustrialization industrialization or the beefing up of resumes), are immediate immediately
ly immediately apparent. The spirit generated at the prospect of this striv striving,
ing, striving, by peasant or pledge, is ennobling: the peasant was
eager to join the collective farm (Stalin), and now ea9h
year enthusiastic students literally rush to the various
houses. Perhaps the most fulfilling aspect to the integrant is
the spontaneous fellowship forged, then as now, in either
sodality.
Stalins plan did, and our fraternities do, offer structural
coherence so needed for a pleasant glide through our other otherwise
wise otherwise chaotic lives. The condemnations hurled at our frats by
so many of the students are obviously birthed from bitterly
misguided thought. I, as a future pledge (I fervently pray
that I might one day be a brother), frankly do not unders understand
tand understand all the misgivings, and I am resentful. Fraternities are
the balm for wounds delivered to our comfortable existence
by those who, with utterly confusing and obviously insidious
argument, dare question the insulation lent by such asylums!
Kan Struva
JUF
llee lleemlriM
mlriM lleemlriM
alligator

Editor: Donna Worn
Managing Editor: Robert McClure
News Editor: Diane Julin
News Editor: Adam Yeomans
Inside Editor: Barr> Klein
Sports Editor: Peter Kerasotis
Photo Editor: Joe Burbank
Opinions Editor; Tarry Godbey

Published by
Campus Communications, Inc.
P.O. Box 14257 University Station, Gainesville, Florida. Office
behind the College Inn, 1728 West University Ave. Classified
Advertising: 376-4446; Retail Display Advertising: 376-4482,
Newsroom: 376-4458; Production: 373-9926; Business Office:
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Letters Policy
Letters must be typed and double-spaced on a 60
character line, dated and signed with the author's
real name, have address and telephone number of
not b

General Manager: C.E. Barber
Administrator: Mrs Evelyn Best
Operations Manager: Susan Ahik
Business Manager: Harry Montevideo
Advertising Director: Tricia Carey



The stage has been set,
weve opened the door.
Beware, Salvadorans,
the U.S. wants war.
The draft has restarted,
our young men are tense.
To die in a foxhole,
it doesnt make sense.
But what of our freedom?
our great hemisphere!
As rumor would have it,
the commies are near.

Nicaraguans faring better
under Sandinista leaders
Mltors As a supporter of the Nicaraguan revolution and
also a firm believer in the principles of democracy, 1 have
been quite disappointed in the extraordinarily one-sided
treatment that Nicaragua has received in the press in recent
months. Administration officials are regularly heard referr referring
ing referring to the leftist government as totalitarian or as drifting in
that direction. Editors of major newspapers have sought to
portray the FSLN (Sandinista National Liberation Front
leaders of the new government) as enemies of freedom of the
press.
According to the critics, the hostilities between the govern government
ment government and the right-wing newspaper La Prensa show that the
FSLN are no better than dictator Anastasio Somoza who was
overthrown by a massive nationwide uprising 2Vi years ago.
A November 9 Washington Post editorial warned that
Nicaraguan freedom of the press was under siege. On
November 25, a New York Times editorial lamented that
LaPrensa, the newspaper that led the fight against the
Somoza tyranny has repeatedly been closed down.
While it is true that La Prensa was closed down five times
last year, for a total of seven days, these measures were car carried
ried carried out because erf violations of a law regarding accurate
reporting of the news, not as blows against a free press. All
three of Nicaraguas daily papers, La Prensa, El Nuevo
Diario, and the FSLNs own Barricada, continue to voice
criticism, sometimes quite strong, of government officials.
In reality, there is more freedom of the press, and con considerably
siderably considerably more diversity of opinion in Nicaragua, than in
any other Latin American country, (n addition to the three
newspapers mentioned, Time, Newsweek and La Nacion, a
daily paper from San Jose, Costa Rica, are available. None of
these are friendly to the Nicaraguan government. A wide
variety of other English and Spanish-language magazines
are also distributed. Several anti-Sandinista radio stations
broadcast freely, alongside the governments own Voice of
Nicaragua and the FSLNs Radio Sandino.
Another very serious charge being leveled at the San Sandinistas
dinistas Sandinistas is that they have been mistreating the native popula population.ln
tion.ln population.ln his speech to the Organization of American States
Feb. 24, President Reagan accused the Sandinistas of carry carrying
ing carrying out a forced relocation of Miskitus (Nicaraguas
largest Indian tribe) and of burning their communities to
the ground."
But the emergency, order to evacuate 8,500 Miskitus (of a
total population more than 150,000) was issued in order to
protect them from attacks by counterrevolutionaries
operating out of Honduras. These attacks have claimed the
lives of 60 Nicaraguans, including Miskitus, in the past few
months.
Nicaragua has devoted a large amount of resources to the
development of the Atlantic coast region where the Miskitus
live. More than $25 million were allocated to this sparsely sparselypopulated
populated sparselypopulated region in 1981. Access to free education and
medical care have been provided for the first time. The San Sandinista
dinista Sandinista government has also implemented measures to ex extend
tend extend credit to farmers and guarantee the Indians right to
practice their own culture and organize their own com communities.
munities. communities.
The centerpiece of the administrations case has been ex exposed
posed exposed as a hoax. According to the March 3 Miami Herald
photographs that were supposed to show bodies of 200 In Indians
dians Indians massacred by the Sandinista army were actually dated
Sept. 1978, when dictator Somozas National Guard was
carrying out unprecedented atrocities throughout the coun countryside.
tryside. countryside. The article, then goes on to quote an unnamed of official
ficial official as saying that the U.S. State Department has known
about the hoax since last February. This revelation gives me
the unnerving feeling that usefulness of information has
become more important than accuracy when it comes to giv giving
ing giving official U.S. Government statements about Central
America. Crude attempts to discredit the Nicaraguan
government are designed to rally dwindling support for U.S.
maintenance of the Salvadoran and Guatemalan govern governments,
ments, governments, two of the detested regimes in the world.
William T. Patorson
OaliMarllla

An Ode to James Monroe

So off we will go,
fraternities too.
To defend Exxon oil,
and the red, white and blue.
STAFF WRITINGS
Alan Bookman
Six weeks of training,
thats all we will need.
But well get just one bullet,
to learn how to bleed.

WHAT SHOOTS £
-v.. ,#\ mm

Nuclear power will be safest,
cheapest energy in future
Editor: After reading Heidi Smiths article about the
nuclear industry (UF nuke studies shunned since 3-mile
Island), I felt some comments are needed to more adequate adequately
ly adequately represent the pro-nuclear side of this issue.
No commercial-size generating station, nuclear or fossil
fueled, was ever built for $500,000, as Smith wrofe. The
relatively small plants built in the 1960 s cost around SSOO
million, and todays plants are being built for around $2
billion, a four-fold rather than 6,000-fold increase, as the ar article
ticle article led the reader to believe. This cost increase is attributed
to inflation, the larger size of the plants, and especially to the
large amount of interest accrued due to government delays
and redtape. High-cost nuclear power is still competitive
with coal, and when the unnecessary federal delays are
eliminated, nuclear electricity will be, by far, the cheapest
source of energy in the country, as well as the cleanest and
the safest. The safest? Absolutely. No member of the
public has ever been harmed in any way, no private property
has ever been damaged in any way by the commercial
nuclear power industry. Compare these two facts with any
other industry the safety record of nuclear power is
unreachable.
Opponents' of nuclear power say the nuclear industry is
dying. A strong statement, completely unfounded by the.
facts: as was mentioned, an estimated 41,000 jobs will be
available in the 150 power plants operating now or being
constructed, with starting salaries of up to $30,000 a year.
Are these symptoms of a dying industry? Compare these
figures with any college major.
Smith also mentions Crystal hiver Nuclear Power Plant
costing UF thousands of dollars in energy deficits. She also
mentioned the high cost erf nuclear power. These two
statements are contradictory; in fact, the high cost to UF
was in replacing the cheap nuclear electricity with expensive
coal and oil, and in fact Crystal River has saved consumers

opinions

It all brings back memories,
of days long forgot.
When Nixon was president,
until he was caught.
His so-called advisers,
they told him one time.
Stop the war now,
and youll save numerous lives!
Hundreds and hundreds,
of our boys would be safe.
And Nixon said Fuck em.
They have it on tape.

several million dollars in fuel costs, despite its operational
problems.
Much was made erf strong anti-nuclear sentiments of
Richard Udell and Bob Polla rd. Their emotional and biased
opinions were amusing, if not insulting: the brightest young
minds know better (than to study nuclear engineering). It is
typical of the anti-nuclear establishment to make such
asinine, untrue statements.
In conclusion, the nuclear industry is far from dead;
rather it has been stifled by (hopefully) temporary economic
conditions and an unfair and uninformed attitude of the
public, which is encouraged and supported by the media.
The men and women who enter this industry are making
Americas energy independence a reality, and they should
not be subjected to the insulting, biased opinions which
dominate this papers articles on nuclear power.
Hoards
SCO
Little, Junior's partnership
shouldn't extend to City Hall
Editor: Joe Little is an honorable man. Gainesville City
Commissioner Gary Junior is an honorable man. Joe and
Gary are business partners on several real estate
developments. Now they would also like to be partners on
the City Commission. As you previously stated, Joe Little is
asking a lot. Business partners would have a tendency to
vote together on public issues. This carryover to the political
arena at best widens the credibility gap suffered by the cur current
rent current commission and at worst could run counter to the
public welfare. The citizens of Gainesville should rise up and
vote against this in the March 23 runoff election.
Robert M. Ootdstoin Ml

alligator, friday, march 19, 1982,

But now its El Salvador,
and thats just the start.
In no time at all,
our troops shall depart.
What I guess is the moral,
if you really must know.
Is to dig up the body,
of ol James Monroe.
Make sure hes rested,
make sure hes fed.
Then graciously tell him,
his Doctrine is dead!

7



I, alligator, friday, march 19, 1982

8

UF prof: Columbus may have
carried syphilis to Europe
By Jon McKenna
Alligator Writer
Christopher Columbus sought the spices of India on his ex expedition
pedition expedition in 1492. What he brought back with him may have
caused some unwanted spice in the sex lives of millions for
centuries afterward.
UF microbiology Professor Donna Duckworth told about
50 people at the Miller Health Center Wednesday that she
believes Columbus unwittingly carried a bacterium from the
New World on his return voyage.
This bacterial plasma, she said, may have united with
bacteria already thriving in Europe to trigger a syphilis out outbreak

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break outbreak that ravaged the continent.
Duckworth suggested that by indirectly introducing syphilis
to the white world, early Indians may have been taking ad advance
vance advance revenge on Europeans for enslaving them.
She said syphilis cases were first recorded in epidemic pro proportions
portions proportions during the late 15th century, following Columbus
return to Spain. She said that innocuous spirochetes, which
cause syphilis, may have been made virulent by the new
bacteria plasmas.
The true origin of syphilis is something no one agrees
alx>ut, although it is the most written-alx>ut topic in
medicine, Duckworth said.
Another theory of the origin of syphilis is that Columbus
brought the venereal disease in its virulent form from the
New World. But Duckworth said no evidence of syphilis has
been found on the bones of pre-Columbus Indians. Syphilis
often digs crater-like lesions in skulls and longer bones.

People decided that since the disease sprang up suddenly,
and they didnt know where it came from theyd blame it on
Columbus, Duckworth said. Every body wanted to blame
it on someone else. In Russia they called it the Polish disease,
and in Poland they called it the Russian disease.
Duckworth showed pictures of the snakelike spirochete
bacterium, treponema pallidum, saying it looks quite nice
compared to other bacteria.
The first symptom of syphilis are a hard, painless ulcer
and swollen lymph glands, Duckworth said. Although these
disappear in a few days, they sometinrfes foretell bone
degeneration, blindness, heart failure and madness in late
stages of the disease.
Among the notables who have contracted syphilis are
Hitler, Henry the Eighth, Ivan the Terrible arid Abraham of
biblical fame. Duckworth suggested Hitlers hatred of Jews
may have stemmed from madness caused by syphilis.



I
1188 (itiinesville's I nteriaimnent IHrecton/ and Xdeertisint f 'supplement
JHHL JHL March

anilines
Civic Ballet, 373-1166 1325 NW 2nd St. Kim Tuttle
and Judy Skinner Artistic Directors. March
23-27; Bpm "Carmine Burana." University
Auditorium. Tickets available at the University
Box Office. 392-1653.
Community Calender. Inc. Box 12387. Offers
constantly updated 24-hour telephone recordings
of social and cultural events of interest to
Gainesville. Call 372-5678.
Devil's Millhopper 377-5935. Sat. 9:3oam free
tour.
Florida State Museum, 392-1721. Museum
Road. March 21; 2pm. "A Collage of
Afro American History," Dr. Bill Simmons, Direc Director,
tor, Director, Institute of Black Culture. In the classroom
(limited seating).
Gator Outdoor Recreation Program. 392-1655
Room 330 JWRU. March 20 Canoeing Juniper
Springs. April 4. Canoeing
Ichetuckneee/Suwannee Sign up by March. 22.
April 16-18 Hang Gliding r Kitty Hawk, N.
Carolina. Sign up by March 29. April
23-25 Horseback Packing Cades cove, N.
Carolina. Sign up by April 5.' April 28-May 8
Backpacking Machu Picchu, Peru, Sign up by Jan.
21.
Groat Southern Music Hall, 372-7469. 233 W.
University Ave.
Handicap Awareness Activities March
Hit. Mar. 22; lOam-Celebrity Wheelchair
simulation JWRU Colonade. mar. 22; 7:3opm,
Wheelchair Basketball Game: G'ville Renegades
vs. Jax- Roller. Mar. 23; Wheelchair
Relays. Plaza of Americas. Mar. 24-25; 10am-3pm
Displays, films blind and wheelchair simulations
JWRU Colonade. Mar. 24; 12:30-1:30pm. Inter Interpretive
pretive Interpretive Dance: St. Augustine School for the Deaf
and Bline. JWRU Colonade. Mar. 29; 3:30-4:30.
"Rehabilitation Process Transitional Living," Dr.
Jeff Roulston, Room Cl-15, J.H. Miller Center. For
more info, call Mary Skorheim, 392-1261, office
for student services.
Institute of Black Culture, 392-0895. 1510 W.
University Ave.
J. Wayne Reitz Union, 392-1649. Museum Road,
UF. Mar. 19-20; 7, 9:30, 12pm. "Arthur" JWRU
Aud. Mar. 20; 12am. "Scratch Bowling." Games
area. Mar. 21; 7,9:30pm "Women in Love." JWRU
Aud. Mar 22; 7,9:30pm "Mome." Mar 23; 6pm
"Rail Baron," finals, Games area, mar, 25;
7,9:30pm. "Picnic at Hanging Rock." JWRU Aud.
Kanapaha Botanical Gordons 372-4981 4625
SW 63rd Blvd. Open M-Sot, 9am-4:30 pm. Offered
is a lakeside gazabo, a bamboo forest, herb
gardens ja vinery, a water lily pond and car carnivorous
nivorous carnivorous plants. Free guided tour, first Sat. of each
month, 10am.
Momlnpsldo Nature Center, 374-2170. 3540 E.
University Ave. Mar. 20; 5:45 am. "Goodbye
Winter," early morning walk and pancake
breakfast. Mar. 20; B:lsam and spm. Family Farm
Chores. Mar. 20; 10am-3pm. Melon Basket
Workshop. Mar. 20 I:3opm Gardening Class Ses Session
sion Session 111. mar. 21; I:3opm Porch Pickin' IV. Mar. 21 ;
1:30-4pm Ask Dr, Hetrick. Mar. 21; spm Family
Farm Chores. Mar. 24; 3-spm The Songbirds.
O'Connell Center, 392-5500 North-South Drive,
UF. Mar. 19-20; Women's NCAA Swim Meet. Mar.
27; Bpm Jimmy Buffett.
Performing Arts Series, 392-1653. University
Auditorium, UF. Mar. 31; 8 pm The New England
Ragtime Ensemble. UF Students $3, Students and
Sr. Citizens $5, Gen. Admission $6.
Son ralesrrr Hammock State Preserve,
377-5935. Dec.-April, Ranger Walks. Advance
reservations required.
Santa Pe Community College, 372-1976. April
17 and 18 "13th Annual Spring Arts Festival,"

featuring 275 ortists and craftsmen, music, enter entertainment
tainment entertainment and food. Northeast First Street-
Sun Skate Center, 375-0003 751 NE 34th Place
and N. main (Between 23rd and 39th on Main.)
New skating rink equipped with modern
lighting/sound system, snack bar and electronic
games. Private party rooms available. "Come ;
Skate With Us."
University Auditorium, 392-0223. Newell, UF
Mar. 20; 8:15 pm. University Symphonic Band,
David Gregory, conductor. Karel Huso, composer.
Mar. 24-27; Bpm. "Carmina Burana" presented in
conjunction with Gainesville Civic Ballet and
Gainesville Civic Chorus. Budd Udell, con conductor/chorus
ductor/chorus conductor/chorus director; Tom Pazik,
choreographer; Paul Newman, producer. UF
students and senior citizens $5, Gen. Admission
$6.
after dark
i
Alan's Cubana, 375-6969. 1718 W. University
Ave. Open M-Sat. 10 am-2am Sun: 11am 11am-2amHappy
2amHappy 11am-2amHappy hour 5-7, 10-12 pm. Liquor license and
free campus delivery.
Backstage Bar, 372-7469. Open M-Sdt. 52am.
Fri. & Sat. Headlights. Inside Great Southern Music
Hall.
Big Daddy's Alibi Lounge, 372-9399. 3334 W.
Univ. M-Sat. 11am-2am, Sun 1 pm-llpm. Happy
Hour 5-8 M-Sat. Tues. spm-dosing. Live entertain entertainment.
ment. entertainment. March 19-27: Kathi Witkowski and Carl
Haskins.
Big Daddy's Cln City, 375-1011. 1611 SW 16th St.
Open M-Sat.: 8 p.m.-2am M-Sat: Top 40 by DJ Kip
Love. Daily Drink Specials.
Big Daddy's Lamplighter, 378-0090. 1 NW 10th
Ave., Open Tues. Sat. 4pm--2 a.m.Live entertain entertainment
ment entertainment T- Sat. March 19-27 Legend. Daily Drink
Specials.
Bogart's Restaurant and Bar, 375-4378. 2300
Nw 6th St. Open T-F 11:30-2 Lunch. T-Th 6-10 Din Dinner.
ner. Dinner. F-Sat. 6-10:30 Dinner. Sun. 11:30-2 Brunch.
Happy Hour F-Sat. 5-6:30 Reservations suggested
MV, V, AE. F-Sat. 7:30-10-Joan Crowell, Pianist.
Casey's Cafe*, 495-2224. Archer, 3 blocks south
of light. Open M-Sat. U:3oam-12pm. Happy hour
4-7 M-F. Busch Draft 45 cents. F-Sat. The Whiz
Bang Orchestra, formerly the Tex Fritter Band.
Catch 22, 4 1/2 miles W. of 1-75. 378-6093. Open
M-Sat. llam-2am. F-Sat. Craigger White-Rock
Chelsea Street Pub, 373-7382. 6305 Newberry
Rd. Open M-Th.: lam-I:lsam. F-Sat. Uam-2am.
MC, V, AE, Trav. C. happy hour M-Sat. 3-Bpm Live
entertainment. Thru March Roadside Review
Country/Southern Rock.
Copper Monkey Pub, 374-4984. 1702 W. Univ.
Ave. Open M-W llam-12pm. ThSat. 1 lam-lam
and Sun 12am- 10pm. Trav. C. F-Sat. Lenny and
Marseille. M-W Tom Savage. Specializing in
Quiche, Salad and Thick Stacked Deli Sandwiches.
. Vk
Dapper Dinar, 378-0044. 2562 NW 13th St. Open
M-Sat. 9am-12pm, Sun. lpm-6pm. General
Hospital Happy Hour, 3-4. Happy Hour M-SaJ. 5-7.
Featuring Pub and custom sandwiches. Call in
orders.
Dubs, 376-9175. 4560 NW 13th St. Open M-F:
1 pm-2am Sat: spm-2ant. Happy Hour lpm-Bpm.
Live Entertainment. F-Sat. River Street.
Harmonica Joe's, 376-2226. 18 NE University
Ave. Open M-Sat. 11am -2am. Happy Hour 11am 11am-7pm.
7pm. 11am-7pm. F-Sat. Boats.
LlHlan's, 372-1010. 112 Se Ist. St. Open M-Sat
11am-2am. Happy hour M-TH 1 lam-Bpm. F-Sat.
1 lam-6:30. Entertainment F-Sat. LeGrange.
Lobby Bar, 372-7469. Inside Great Southern
Music Hall, 233 W. Univ. Open Sun-Sat. spm-2am
happy Hour F-Sot. 5-8.

Lone Star, 377-4100. 238 W. University Ave.
Open T-Sat. Bpm-2am. Tues-free dance lessons.
Thurs-student night. Thru march midnight Flyer.
V.. yw'
Main Street, 376-6246. 106 S. Main St. Open
M-Th Bpm-2am. F spm-2am. Sot. Bpm-2am.
Entertainment: Buster Brown.
Olda College Inn, 377-9538. 1728 W University
Ave. Open M-W ll:30am-l I:3opm. Th 11:30am 11:30am-12:30am.
-12:30am. 11:30am-12:30am. F 11:30am-1:30am. Sat. spm-I:3oam.
Sun spm-llpm. MC, V, Local Personal and Trav.
C. Happy hour 3pm-6pm;l 1/2 hours prior to clos closing.
ing. closing. Live Entertainment W-Sat. Collage.9:3o-1:30.
Specializing in Homemade Quiche, Soup and
Salad.
Orange-N-Brewr, 392-1689 UF, Reitz Union Enter Entertainment
tainment Entertainment F-Sat. 9pm-lam Magic, a
The Pork, 373-8827. 1905 SW 13th St., next to
University Inn. Open M-Th. 3 p.m.-3am, F-Sat.:
3pm-sam, Sun: 4pm-lam. Lounge and Hot Tubs.
Th-Double Bubble-Champagne $3 a bottle with
Tub Resevation. F-Ladies drink free. 9-12 Tub
reservations suggested for weekends.
Rathskeller, 392-2097. UF Campus in Johnson
Hall. Open M-W Bpm/10pm Movies M-Groove
Tube. T-W:Cheech and Chongs next Movie. F-Sat.
The Riff. Personal Checks accepted for food.
Richenbachers, 372-6475 204 W. University Ave.
Open M-Fri. 4-1:30, Sat. 7:30-1:30. Fri-Sat. Jack
Hayford Band. Mon. Frank Sullivan Trio. Happy
hour 5-8 M-F. Friday happy hour entertainment.
Rickey's Restaurant and Lounge, 376-2442.
2800 SW 2nd Ave. Open Sun. Ipm-llpm. M-Sat
llam-2am. Trav. C. Specializing in Chicken Wings
(hot, med., mild.)
Sundowner Lounge, 493-9746, Highway 19 N.
Chief land. Open Sun-Th: 2pm-2am. F-Sat: Ipm Ipm-sa
-sa- Ipm-sa Happy Hour spm-7pm. Live Entertainment.
Whiskey River, 378-0013 108 S. Main St. Open
M-F 11am-2:ooam Sat. spm-2am. Trav. C. Happy
hour. 5-Bpm. Live Entertainment 6 days. Fri-Sat.
Eddie Ray and Southern Aire.
Wine Cellar, 372-7469. Inside Great Southern
Music Hall 233 W. Univ. Ave. Open W-Sat.
B:3opm-2am Happy hour M-F 7pm-B:3opm. Live
Entertainment. F-Sat. Bosco-Bays Band.
art
Art Collector Gallery, 377-4211. 802 W. Univ.
Ave. Open: M-Sat.;-10am-s:3opm. March 20-April
10 "Florida Craft Showecase H"Exhibition of works
in clay metals, fibers and wood. Reception Mar.
20; 7:30-9:30.
Artisens Guild, 378-1383. 806 W. Univ. Ave.
Open M-Sat.: 10am-5:30 Thru March: Dot Sterling,
Potter. "Womanspirit Rising," Ken Small, water watercolors/acrytic
colors/acrytic watercolors/acrytic paintings.
Community Gallery of Art, 377-5161, ext 429,
301. Santa Fe Community College. Open Sun:
Ipm-spm. M-Th: lpm-4pm. Thru April 4: "The
Athlete: The influence of the athlete on American
life." Robert Riger's one-man show of drawings,
color photography and video slow-motion tapes.
Gallery 21 375-1911. 21 SE 2nd Place. Open M-F:
9-5:30 Sat. 10-4 Featuring a wide selection of fine
art posters.
Joan Ling Gallery, 375-8158. 211 West Universi University
ty University Ave. Open T-F: 10am-s:3opm Sat. 10am-spm.
Thru April 1. "Lennie Kesl's World" one-man show
featuring paintings, drawings, prints and
sculpture by this Gainesville artist. April 3-may 12:
"Studies in luster and light," Twowoman show
featuring Jan Jacque's ceramics and Kerri
Silvernell's oil paintings.
Sendqulst Gallery, 829-8170 Spanish Military
Hospital, 3 Aviles St., St. Aug. Open: M,W-F:
10am-spm; Sun. J-spm Featuring original art and
crafts by 80 living American Artists. March 22-27
-7- The Hodgins 1982 Florida Painting Tour. Pain Painting
ting Painting Clinic given by John J. Hodgins, artis. Tuition
S6O. Write for information or reservations.

University Gallery, 392-0201. M-F 9 am spm;
Sun Ipm sipm. Thru march. 28 "The art of India"
from Florida Collections.
teas
Center Theatre, 372-5347. 1015 NW 13th St.
House of Wax in 3-D PG. Missing PG. The
Beast Within R. (Evening shows only. Meet me
in St. Louis G. (afternoon shows only.).
t
Cinema Plus. Dell and Pub, 371-2266
Gainesville Shopping Center, NW 10th + Main
Street. Beer, wine and sandwiches served at your
table while you watch a movie. Shark/s Machine
R. Ghost Story R. Must be at least 19 to enter
the theatre. /
Oaks 6 Theatre, 378-1818: 6309 Newberry Rd.
Evil Under the Sun PG. Atlantic City On
Golden Pond PG. Porky's. R. McVicar R.
Plaza Triple Theatre, 378-2434 1525 NW 23rd
Blvd. Death Wish II R. The Amateur R.
Chariots of Fire PG.
Royal Park Cinemas 4. 373-4277. 3702
Newberry Rd. Hounds of BAskervilles PG.
Raiders of the Lost Ark PG. Richard Pryor Live on
Sunset Strip (R). midnight movies: Rocky Horror
R. Raiders of the Lost Ark PG. Richard Pryor
Live on Sunset Strip R. Stir Crazy R.
i
theatres
Cons tans Theatre, 392-1653 JWRU, University
of Florida Campus, Box office, T-103 JWRU. March
19-20; B:lspm. "Twelth Night," performed by the
Florida Players.
Gainesville Community Playhouse, 376-4949.
4039 NW 16th Blvd. March 19-20, 24-27, 31 April
1-3 B|>m "You Can't Take It With You," by Moss
Hart and George S. Kaufman. Directed by Anna
Freeman.
Golden Hills Pine Arts Theatre, 629-4853,
622-4102 US Routhe 27, Ocala. April 2-4 "Best of
Broadway." An evening of music.
Hippodrome, 375-HIPP. 25 SE 2nd Place. Mar. 19;
6 and 8:30. "Walkabout," 1971 Australian Film.
Mar. 19-April 17; "The Gin Game," by D.L.
Coburn, directed by Mary Hausch. T-Sat.: 8:15,
Sun. 2pm, 7:30, exepetions. Mar. 20 2pm, 8:15,
and Mar. 21 no performance of "The Gin Game."
Mar. 21-25 "Watersong Celebration." Water Wateroriented
oriented Wateroriented displays, information and folk music.
Free to the public, on front steps of Hippodrime.
Mar. 21; Bpm, sculpture exhibit, multi-media per performance,
formance, performance, poetry readings and Florida folk music.
Admission $3.50.
places to
Jacksonville Symphony Orchestra, conducted
by Willis Page. Civic Auditorium Jacksonville.
March 22, 7:30; March 23, 8:30. Subscription Con Concert.
cert. Concert. The Romeros, Classical guitar quartet. Civic
Auditorium Jacksonville. April 17; B:3opm Fernan Fernandian
dian Fernandian Pops Concert, Fernandina Beach.
reslainals
Acorn Sandwich Shop, 376-6599. 330 NE 39th
Ave. Open M-F Bam-spm, Sat. 9am-2pm.
Specializing in Breakfast and Submarines.
Arby*s Roast Beaf, 378-6555. 1405 SW 13th St.
Open: Sun.-Wed 1 lam-1 lpm. Th.-I2pm. F-Sat.
lam. Specializing in Roast Beef Sandwiches and
Jamoc ha Shakes.



2

, Applause, An Advertising Supplement, March 19,1982

FRIDAY 3/19/82
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mlatrauls
Arthur Trach*r*s Fish and Chips, 376-9716.
2659 NW 13th St. Open Sun-Th. 1 lam-10pm, F-Sat.
llam-12pm. Specializing in Fish, Chips,
Chicken, Clams and Krunchpups.
Ashley's Pub, 375-4064. 3236 SW 35th Blvd.,
Butler Plaza. Open M-Sat. Bam-2am. Sun. Ipm Ipm-11pm.
-11pm. Ipm-11pm. Personal and Trav. C. Happy hour 4-7 pm,
Specializing in Mexican Food.
Athen's Greek Coffee Shop, 376-3696. 912 W.
Univ. Ave. Open M-Th. 10am-9pm. F-Sot. 10am 10am-10pm.
10pm. 10am-10pm. Personal and Trav. C. Specializing in
homemade Greek Pastry: Baklava, Gyros and
Souvlaki.
Breakfast and BBQ Nook, 377-5382. 2220 SW
Archer Rd. Open M-Sat. 7am-9pm. MC, V, Phillips
66 and Trav. C. Happy hour all day. Specializing
in Barbecue.
Bronson Rostaurant and Lounge, 486-2300. US
27A and State Rd. 24. Open M-Th-7am-Topm, F-
Sat 7am-12pm MC, V, AMEX, DC, Trav. C. Th Thladies
ladies Thladies night 50c drinks, F-Happy hour 5-7 2 for 1,
Fri-Sat. Live entertainment Southern Nights, Thru
march and April. Donny Beckham-
Country/Western. Restaurant specializes in
homecooking.
Brown Darby. 373-7077, 5220 SW 13th St. Open
M-F. 11:30-12:30am, Sat. Ipm-lam Sun. 11:30-10
p.m. All major credit cards, personal & Trav. C.
Happy hour M-F. 4:30-6:30 p.m. Live Music.
Satellite. Specializing in Seafood and Steaks.
Burger Chef, 378-9825 1412 N main St. Open M-
Sat. 6:3oam-10pm. Sun. 7:ooam-10pm. Trav. C.
Specializing in Big Burgers.
Burrlto Brothers Taco Co., 378-5948. 16 NW

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13th St. Open: M-Th. 11-11. F-11-12, Sat. 12-12,
Sun. 12-11. Complete Mexican menu; vegetarian
food available.
Cafo Gordons. 376-2233, 1643 NW First Ave.
Open M-Th 11am 12pm, F. Ham lam. Sat. 11am 11am-12pm.
12pm. 11am-12pm. Trav. C. Happy Hour 3-6, 9-closing.
Case Le Bistro, 371-2233. 3303 W. Univ. Open M-
Sat.: 10am-Bpm.Specializing in Euro-dining, case
style, featuring quiche, French onion soup, salad
bar, European specialties, beer and wine and 18
flavors of ice cream. Personal checks accepted.
Campus Subway of Gainasvilla. Inc., 375-8381
112 NW 13th St. Archer Road Subway 373-4465.
Across from Butler Plaza. Cin City Subway
374-8345. 1805 SW 13th St. Open 7 days 11am 11am-2am.
2am. 11am-2am. AE, Trav. C. Specializing in Submarine Sand Sandwiches.
wiches. Sandwiches.
Captain D's Restaurant ~ 375-4892. 3610 SW
Archer Rd. Open: Sun-Th-10:45am-10pm, F-
Sat-10:45-11. Local Personal & Trav. C. Specializ Specializing
ing Specializing in Fish.
Capt'n Louies Galley. 372-6311, 309 NW 13th
St. Open 7 days 11:30am-9:30pm. Specializing in
seafood and chicken.
The Casba, 377-2144. 516 NW 75th St. (Tower
Rd.). Open spm-10:30pm.All major credit cards
and Trav. C. Happy hours: spm-7pm. Free hors
d'oeuvres. Specializing in Mid East, French and
American food.
Cassadys. 375-0004, 114 NW 13th St. Gator
Plaza, Open Sun-1 pm 10pm, M-W 11:30am
)2pm,Th-F ll:30am-lam, Sat. 11:30 12pm. MC, V,
BK, Trav. C. Happy Hour M-F, Beer 2-4:30, Wine
4:30-6:30. Specializing in Pizza, Pasta and Sand Sandwiches.
wiches. Sandwiches.
Cathay Tea House. 372-7772, 3226 SW 35th Blvd.
Open M-Sat. Uam-lOpm, Sun. spm-10pm. Reser Reservations
vations Reservations suggested. MC, V, Trav. C. Specializing in
Chinese food.

V,
iatftsbeller
Tonight
&
Tomorrow
Th Riff
are Rockin'
at the RAT
Mon. 3/22
Groove Tube
Tues. 3/23
A
Wed. 3/24
Cheech & Chong's
Next Movie
FREE
HAPPY HOUR
M- F / 4-7 p, m.
ng /da r/i '5 1 ]
Behind Murphree
For further info?

It listing
FMDAY
3/19/82
SsOOAM-CK. (3): MOVE: A FUt FUtful
ful FUtful of Dynamite* A couple of mo momatched
matched momatched bandit,, a dynamite touing Irsh
revolutionary, and a rowdy Mexican thief
team up to rob banks but end up being
heroes of the Mexican Revolution. James
Coburn, Rod Steiger. 1972.
fcOOAM Os. [HBO]: M SHAPE
WITH VON DRAKE Eager Goofy takes
his lumps goodmaturedy wide scholarly
Ludwig von Drake recounts the history of
boxing.
7:00 AM Ch. [HBO]: MOVE:
When Hal Was in Session' The story
of a Vietnam vet who was held captive for
over seven and a half years. Hal Hoi-
L rn -L. Cum SA I- C -'-a
Droon, CwO maria DOHn.
* 7:30 AM- Ch. (3):MOVE:Ameri (3):MOVE:American
can (3):MOVE:American Pap* Pop music tunes by musical
greats from Gerswhin to Pot Benatar high highlight
light highlight this animated saga of a familys
struggle to reatze the American Dream.
1981. Rated R.
9:00 AM Ch. [10]: MOVE: *God
Is My Ca pMot* Based on Col. Robert E.
Scott's nbvel of ha exploit, flying with
Claire Chennauit. 1945.
94)0 AM Ch. [HBO}: SPORTS t-
LUSTRATED: THE FKST 25 YEARS
Great moments in sports are the subject of
sLr. ii
mis special.
9-JO AM Ot. (3h MOVE:Skate MOVE:Skatetown
town MOVE:Skatetown U.SJL' The Western Wheelers'
leader wB stop at nothing to stay lung of
the rink. Scott Bak>, Greg Bradford, Pa Patrick
trick Patrick Swayze. 1979, Rated PG.
104)0 AM Ch. [HBOt MOVE:
*Rolflcking Adventwes of Bbo Fraser'
The beautiful wife of a sea captain is in intrigued
trigued intrigued by a lecherous rogue on her hus husband's
band's husband's ship. Susannah York, Noel Fenier,
John Castle.
114)0 AM Ch. (3h MOVE: 'Vaf 'Vafeotino'
eotino' 'Vafeotino' The fife and loves of the movies'
legendary male sex symbol are recreated.
Rudolph Nureyev, Leslie Caron, Michelle
Phillips. 1977. Rated R.
11410 AM Ch. [10]: MOVE:
WUd and WondarfuT When the idol of
French fikns, a poodle, takes a leave, he
gets his mistress involved with an Ameri American
can American musician. Tony Curtis, Christine Kouf Koufmann,
mann, Koufmann, Larry Starch. 1964
1240 PM Ch. [HBO]: KE
SKATMG FROM PBUNG Two of Ameri America's
ca's America's most popular skaters join an interna international
tional international troupe of figure skating stars at
Pekings Capital Arena.
14)0 PM Ch. [lok MOVE:Jubi MOVE:Jubilee
lee MOVE:Jubilee TraiT A retired, eccentric judge who
now runs a private investigation firm with
the assistance of parolees, gets a murder
cose to handb. Very Ralston, Pot O'Brien,
Joan Losfie. 1954
140 PM Ch. (3k MOVE: Resur Resurrection
rection Resurrection Once Edna McCauley crosses
that fine between fife and death, no one
she touches wR ever be the same. Elen
Burstyn, Eva Le Gaetw. 1980. Rated
PG-

m IOTA

Coll for Show Timet
Dudley AXbore
"Hounds of Baskervilles"
"Raiders of the Lost Ark" (PG)
Richard Pryor Live
on Sirin "Great White" (PG )
Midnight Connection
All Scots ti.
"Rocky Horror W
"Raiders of the Lost Arfc" (PG)
"Richard Pryor Live on
Sunset Strip" (R)
Rxliord Piy*>-
Gene WilJtf <) 1



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rabwrMls
CHauccr'i, 373-8866. In the Renaissance Fair.
Open M-F 9am-9pm; Sat. 10am-9pm. Trav. C. and
Personal Checks. Specializing in homemade tradi traditional
tional traditional dishes and desserts, takeouts also.
Chick-Ftl-A, 377-6691. Open M-Sat. 9am-9:3opm.
Personal and Trav. C. specializing in the First-N-
Best Chicken Sandwich.
Christabal*s 378-7980. 921 W. Univ. Ave. Open
M-W llam-lOpm; Th-Sat. 1 lam-1 lpm. Specializ Specializing
ing Specializing in Mexican Pood.
Churchs Fried Chicken, 376-1462. 3006 NW 13th
St. Open Sun-Th. 10am-l lpm. F-Sat. 10am-12pm.
Trav. C. Specializing in Fried Chicken.
Cinema Plus Deli and Pub, 371-2266.
Gainesville Shopping Center. Open M-F:
llam-2:30 for lunch. Specializing in soups,
salads, sandwiches and quiche. (No movies
shown during lunch.
Clock Restaurant, 375-1411. 2010 Main Street.
Open 24 hours. Trav. C. Specializing in Breakfast.
The'Cornish Hen. 373-0077, 2526 NW 13th St.
Open M-Sat. 9am-9pm. Sun. 12:30-6. MC, V, Per Personal
sonal Personal and Trav C. Live Entertainment Th-Sat. 5-
9pm. Th. and Sat.: Roxanne, pianist, oldies but
goodies. F-Charlie Bush, Mellow guitar.
Country Boy's Market, 372-4391. 214 NE 16th
Ave. Open M-Sun: 10am-Bpm. Local Personal and
Trav. C. Specializing in a complete line of Latin
Foods and Produce.
The Crabshack. 1800 NE 23rd Ave. Open M-Sat.
llam-9pm. Trav. C. Specializing in Seafood,
especially Blue Crab.
Davids Real Pit Bar-B-Que, 373-7499. 516 NW
23rd Ave. Open M-Sat. ,9am-9pm. Local Personal

| 111111 JCM A A
I Midnight Show F&S It
* :3 :00 IQ:3QgI vV-JPSjjffiffl # 12:00 I
SHOGUN *-f
JAPANESE STEAK HOUSE & LOUNGE
|| tends a In
enjoy the finest m traditional
I Japanese dining. Our most
honorable chef will entertain your
party by preparing authentic nr M
I Japanese style meals right at your i
B Bating Oriental
373-1076 MBBBti t
Is of service and I*24S.w. 13th St. I MS4* j
lighly respected at Hours l J I j|
I Steak House and
e most pleasantly
prices.

Checks w/ID and Trav. C. Specializing in Real Pit
Bar-B-Que.
Deli RX, 378-6241. 720 SW 2nd Ave. (Physician's
Plaza). Open M-F 7am-4:3opm. Specializing in
New York style Deli Sandwiches and cuisisne, and
the Deli Gator Sandwich
Dixie Cream Restaurant, 372-5642. 2226 NW
6th St. Open Sun. Bam-2pm. M-Sat. 7am-2pm.
Trav. C. Specializing in breakfast and lunch.
Domino's Pizza, 373-8900, 373-2337* 376-3317.
3733 W. Univ. Avee. 2101 SW 13th St.. 1025 N.
Main. Open M-Th: 4:30-lam F: llom-3am. Sat:
4:3opm-2am, Sun: 4:3opm-lam. Specializing in
Pizza and Fast Free Delivery.
Dutch Pantry Restaurant, 373-1468. 1-75 and
University Ave. Open M-Sun. 6am-10pm. Lounge
M-Sat. spm-12pm. MC, V, AE Trav. C. Happy hour
spm-Bpm.
East Winds. 375-7171,606 NW 75th St. Open Sun-
Thur. 11:30-2:30; spm-10pm F-Sat: 11:30-2:30;
spm-10pm. Reservations suggested. MC, V, Trav.
C. Happy hour 5-7. Specializing in Cantonese and
American food.
El Mexicano 377-5151, 2409 SW 13th St. Open M
Sat. 11:30am 9pm. Trav. C. Specializing in Mex Mexican
ican Mexican Food.
Gainesville Hilton Prime Rib Restaurant.
377-4000, 2900 SW 13th SfT Open Sun-Sat. 6pm 6pm-11pm.
11pm. 6pm-11pm. Reservations suggested. All major Credit
Cards and Trav. .C. Pianist Dinner music.
Specializing in Prime Rib.
Gary's Pancake mid Steak House, 377-7494.
Williston Rd. and 1-75. Open M-Sun: 6:3oam-9pm.
MC, V, AE, Personal Checks w/ID and Trav. C.
Specializing in Pancakes, Omelets and Steaks.
Mr. Gatti's. 376-8444. 715 NW 13th St. Open
Sun-Th: llan-llpm F-Sat. 11am12pm Specializ Specializing
ing Specializing in Pizza.

MONDAY
I I I W I w bl I Iml I (id W 7" U [ Rstf l
II P\yt Wt K C WJXT WUFT WJCT WTLV WTBS WJKS WCJB ESPN I HBO |
|| IVI F**; 2 _, 1 [ CM 4 CRI7 CK2 I
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| 3** ***. Atlm ££ ~
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TUESDAY 3/23/82
E II W I hil 9 tm M l lid M Id | twol
WESH TMC WJXT WUFT WJCT WTLV WTBS WJKS WCJB ESPN HBO
au WWOMU MmL JtnMe CMI2 CMI7 CM. 17 CHJO
0 WM M*MV CM Ms w "Oil - -
7 u f^ m urbport MeJM* ammrnm kmttwm MM MSIf h
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Gator Baseball .£
Exclusive Play by Play K
THIS WHK'S I ASM 6 AMES O
Sat. March 20 Vanderbilt (2) 12:45 p.m. / s*A
Sun. March 21 Vanderbilt 12:45 p.m.
Brought to you in part by: m
Joes Deli W
Harmon Photo Center The Best Os All Times
Butler Plaza Merchants Assoc. w wy y -m-, .
Wendy's Old Fashioned Hamburgers \\l \f i 1 J alii
LaPraddDist W NjlX^

Sporting Goods
Liquidation
Continues

HEME ME JUST A FEW Os THE NAME WANDS Os MEBCHAMWSE THAT MUST BE SOLD PUtmtHS FINAL SAtE! lj|
adidas = U)i£aon &H555H9 (QconvEse) I
Jtk Athletic
K s 1 $1 .25 I l J Dolfin
\ reg. $2.50-2.75 I running shorts H
\J $5.99 + up reg. $13.99^1
I Hundreds of pairs of I
I Nike & Adidas & New Balance I
[ court & running shoes $14.99 &up
U More Merchandise More Bargains H
B Holiday Inn University Center Pooldeck
I Fri.-Marchlf lOam-Jpm
Sat. march 20

Alligator ; March 19 1982.

3



WEDNESDAY 3/24/82
W I I M I (11) I M I M I M I M I M iTw I fceol ||
WESH TIEC WJXT WUFT WJCT WTLV WTM WJKS WCJN ESFN HDD
- CM^ I ,21* CM 7 j2U* C mm 2mLL c tao l
I = ? =^~^ 7 ~^ ==^~==^=^ Sssg"wT"|
7 jgjj** v* r *T!' ao'bw jtfS* 3Si I
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10. : 55 jj 55 jj jK?
ll- I *~ gr* sis, ass. ? T*
- ss,Br £?- -r Ksrgs,

Crystal Cave
35 Video Games
Sunday 5-9 p.m.
Drjift Beer 25$
Refills 10 Just off Univ. Ave. on S. Main.
MMMMMIMIM Mil
The Skating P
Palace Offers |( \
Adult & College
Skating JJIU# i
l Wed. 8 to 11 \
Free Lessons 7 to t i
l BEER BLAST Sat. Nights \
11:30-2 a.m. S
FREE Beer + Coke SI.OO OFF Coupon
Good for either session 4
only at * 4
The Skating Palace t
e 1925 N.W. 2nd St. 37*-*SM ]

m n Exquisite Dining in the Unspoiled
Q 1 Beauty of Cross Creek M
B| Serving all types of Seafood. Steaks. Quail. IRj
Ye Soft Shelled Turtle. Frog Legs. & Alligator Tail N
Kj p v Open Tues.-Sat. 5:00 p.m.-10:M p.m.
I t. Closed Mondays Sun. 1:M p.m.-S:3O p.m. IN
ThV See our new t foot T.V. screen In the lounge tty
M Yearling Herb + Pat Herman. Owners
| Restaurant ft

~rnnnnnrrTTTTTTTTTiroVÂ¥^~
TOwUf 4 SANDWICH SHOP :
; NATIONALLY FAMOUS SANDWICHES
EAT IN OR TAKE OUT
Side Orders Available /ft
11 AM TN.lt PM Mon-St /C '< JAI.
11 AM TN 9PM Svn. A.- \
wm* a imported atcr Served [§
ASK AHOIITOIIH KAHOI/S OAllWOODrii ,]
378-2900
34MW UMV AW .j. V

Tm BWII n x
good f or events

ttppkuiM*

Call 376-4411.
mfffnWl MiKmtnffT
Classic Series
jMatlnees Only
SHES JUST row STYLE!
Y*l ImjWa
H //
HMRR9B
i|Hn| "TIOILET
W SOMG"

r CafeLe 1
L. Bistro , I
Shl fin
I All Imported Beer I
I 81.00 Bottle I

THUMOAV 3/26/82
~.-svi 0 S H RiJ H ra R 3 ra I 553
IK g WESH TMC WJXT WUFT WJCT WTLV WTSS WJKS WCja ESPN HDO
rM cmj cha CHI ? 2L 7 jSH* ;^_HsaaEass
Ngcws I jei If ST~ aSSS ** *"* STiLti. lltl/"
r~Sr r ss*si|£h l
B* *** ?" s. sy"* sl o*si **"?
9*5?- : a Fi : T '- 1 : a ?-*
10~ 5 P i : S. i_SF L
00 1 J.Y Micy Mom. HBUIt Voi* ****. JJJJJ 1

reslasrsuls
Godfather's, 378-5179. 1120 W. University. Open
M-Sat 7am-12pm. Local Personal Checks w/10,
Trav. C. Happy Hour llam-7pm; 10pm-12pm.
Specializing in Pita Bread Sandwiches.
Groat Wall Rastaurant. 378-3970, 3500 SW 13th
St. Open AA-F ll:30am-2pm, spm-9:3opm Sat-Sun
spm- 10:30pm. Reservations for parties of 8 or
more. AAC, V, AE. Specializing in Chinese food.
Gridirons Staakplt and Lounge, 377-0150. 215
NW 10th Ave. Open AA-F llam-lOpm. Sat. 6pm 6pm-10pm.
10pm. 6pm-10pm. Reservations suggested. All major credit
cards and Trav. C. Happy hour 11am-Bpm. Live
entertainment Th-Sat. Michael Newman-Classical
Style Guitar. Specializing in Steak and Seafood.
Harry's Place, 377-8417. 201 SW 16th Ave. Open
AA-Sat. 1 lam-I:3oam Sun: lpm-10pm Personal
and Trav. C. Happy Hour M-F: 5-6 pm. Specializing
in Homemade Food.
Health Horizons Natural Foods 4 Juke Bar.
373-1881, 3210 S.W 35th Blvd. Open M-F 11am 11am-6pm,
6pm, 11am-6pm, Sat, ]lam-4pm. MC, V, Personal and Trav.
C. Specializing in Whole, Natural Foods.
International House of Pancakes. 373-1438,
3613 SW 13th St. Open 24 hours. Personal and
Trav. C. Specializing in American food.
Ironwood Rastaurant and Lounge, 378-5111.
2100 NE 39th Ave. Open AA-Sat. ll:30am-2pm;
6pm-10:30pm. Reservations suggested. MC, V,
AE, Trav. C Specializing in Continental Cuisine.
Jerry's, 378-2481. 1501 NW 13th St. Open M:
6am-Sun:l2pm. MC, V, Trav. C. Specializing in
Fast Service.
Joe's Dell, 373-4026, 377-5637. 1802 W. Univ.
Ave. 1515 SW 13th St. Open AA-Sat.: llam-2am.

SmS&SSat
. aA q v lOK and Fun Run
V tV March 20
O n < lac^ C Proceeds go to
r AHA

Applause, An Advertising Supplement, March 19,1982,

Latin Catering
Home Service
Will Deliver To Your Door A Nice
Tasty Ready To Eat Meal.
Very Economical Prices.
For additional information about menus and
prices please call 373-0458

CHRIST ABELS NOW SERVING I
A FULL MEXICAN MENU |
.>v'
921 W, Univ. Ave. i

Sun: llam-12pm. Blue Key Card, Personal and
Trav. C. Happy Hour, Uni: M-F: '6-9pm 13th St:
M-W 6pm-closirg. Specializing in 7 Gator tail.
Knife 4 Fork Rastaurant 372-6666. 1225 W,
University Ave. Open daily 7am-3pm. Thur.-Sat.
11pm. ..Trav. C. Specializing in Homecooked
breakfast & lunch.
Laflttas 372-9928, 11 SE Ist Ave. Open AA-F
llam-2pm; spm-12pm, Sat. spm-1 lpm, Sun.
spm-12pm. MC, V, Trav. C. Specializing in
Seafood.
Leonardo's Pizza of Mlllhopper, 376-2001. 413
NW 16th Blvd. Open Sun-Th. Uam-11pm. F-Sat-.
1 lam-lam. Local Personal and Trav. C. Happy
hour 2pm-6pm; 9pm-closing. Specializing in
Chicago Style Pizza.
Leonardo's Pizza In a Pan, 378-2001. 706 W.
Univ. Ave. Open 11:30 am til. . Serving fine
Italian cuisine
Leonardo's Pizza by the Slice, 375-2007. 1245
W. Univ. Open 11:30 am til. . Serving fine
Italian Cuisine.
Little Pigs Barbecue Downtown 373-4086.
110 NW 6th St. Open AA-Sat: 6am-7pm. Local Per Personal
sonal Personal and Trav. C. Specializing in Real Pit
Barbecue.
Long John Silver's Seafood Shoppo, 372-7572
1235 NW 16th Ave., 371-3474 710 NW 60th St.,
Open M-Sun. llam-lOpm. Trav. C. Specializing in
Seafood and Chicken.
Louis' Lunch. 372-9294, 436 SE 2nd St. Open M-
Sat 9:3oam-Bpm. Th. 9:3oam-4pm. Trav. C.
Specializing in Sandwiches and Delicious
Hmburgers.
Lunw, 378-7043. 1621 SW 13th St. Open Sun.-Th:
7am-llpm F-Sat. 7am-12pm. Local Personal and
Trav. C. Happy Hour Sun-Sat. 3-6 pm. Specializing
in European style Chicken and Hot Dogs cooked in
Beer.

LIIIIIMMIIIIIIIIJ
For the BEST*
results,
l advertise
m m
| : Applause. ;
e
L. ;

4



Clearwater lawyer 'fascinated'
by UF attorney job prospect

By Dana McClroy
Alligator Staff Writer
Saying the idea of being UFs attorney is
fascinating, the third of six candidates
interviewed by Attorney Search Committee
members explained Thursday why he wants
the post.
Thomas Bustin, Clearwater city attorney,
told committee members that he has always
been interested in working in the area of
education.
I feel I could do a good job of building up
and developing the office as evidenced by my
work in Clearwater, Bustin said.
He is the third candidate to be interviewed
by the committee, which is headed by UF
Law School Dean Tom Read. Washington,
D.C., lawyer Judith Waldman and Frederick
Simpson, Jacksonville associate general

/ ALAN SCUANA'\~
/ ,r d, ""\
\s*4 mt w. Unlv. Aive. 50 /
\ S7S-MM /
\ food for SSf off ny /
\ wkwylin /
\ /
\ "l* wlh /

A
D
V
E
R
T
I
S
E
376-
4482

counsel, have already been interviewed.
Bustin has experience as a government
lawyer in the public sector, Read said. Bustin
previously served as the assistant city at attorney
torney attorney for Columbus, Ohio.
When asked why he chose to work in the
public rather than more lucrative private
sector, Bustin said, I like the public sector
because it gives me a wider area of practice.
Read said the fourth candidate will be in interviewed
terviewed interviewed next week and the search is pro progressing
gressing progressing rapidly because of the pressing need
to fill the position.
Former UF Attorney Tom Biggs left
March 1, leaving the office critically
understaffed.
The office usually has one main attorney
with three full-time assistant attorneys. Cur Currently
rently Currently there is only one full-time staff at attorney,
torney, attorney, Read said.

Improve your memory.
Order this memo board now-before you forget!
m
| remember,
pf' \ySla good times stir with
Seagram's 7 Crown.
' * t C- y -jf, .... rfft..
/ w 4 ~ i .

Here's What They're Saying About
JEAN CHALMERS
: -..''c ;> .a
; City Commission

*-V-
Jean has worked for many years in she
Gainesville community to improve the lot of all of
our citizens. I can'l think of anyone who is better
qualified to represent the caring aspect of public
service."
Michael Gannon
has always been involved in the community
and she has learned to know the people who move
things here. I believe she can work with these peo people
ple people and that's crucial."
John Mahon
"Jean is not the type of person that someone could
buy. She always has the whole community at
heart."
Rosa Williams
Paidj>ol. Adv. Paid for by Lucille Maloney, Traps.

alligator, fridgy, march 19, 1982,

9



I, alligator, friday, march 19, 1982

10

City may restrict local drug paraphernalia

By Bruca Mastron
Alligator Staff Writer^
Gainesville City Commissioner W.E.
Mac McEachern's efforts to control the ci citys
tys citys so-called head shops got a big boost
Thursday.
Commissioners Gary Junior and Bobbie
Kline joined McEachern in asking city At Attorney
torney Attorney J.T. Frankenberger to draw up an or ordinance
dinance ordinance similar to one recently approved by
the U.S. Supreme Court.
The law upheld by the Court was enacted
in Hoffman Estates, 111., and has these provi provisions:
sions: provisions:
owners of the shops, which sell items
that can be used with illegal drugs, shall be
licensed;
the owner or employees will not get a
license if they have been convicted of any
drug crimes;
v* sales to minors will be banned;
v* merchants will register those who buy
the items;
i* violators will pay a $lO to SSOO a day dayfine.
fine. dayfine.
Commissioners, meeting as a subcom subcommittee
mittee subcommittee of the city commission, heard from
Gainesville police Capt. Richard Ward, who

Ex-O'Dome worker charged
with 40 forgery, theft counts
By Phil Kuntz
Al I i gator Staff Writer
UF police investigators plan to wrap up a four-month in investigation
vestigation investigation today by charging former UF student and former
OConnell Center box office manager Richard Cimmerman
with 40 charges ranging from forgery to grand theft, ac according
cording according to UF police.
Cimmerman, 22, who was arrested in Gainesville Wednes Wednesday
day Wednesday by an Alachua County Sheriffs Deputy on a felony theft
charge from Atlanta, remained in Alachua County jail
Thursday night.' He is being held without bond, a jail
spokesman said.
The pending charges against Cimmerman stem from an
investigation by UF police investigator Robert Hester into
Cimmermans activities as the ticket manager at the OCon-

All YEAR LONG WE
SHI,SFII ,SH I,
IMS WEEKEM) WERE
GOMGTO
GIVE, GIVE, GIVE.
J yW \
VNNMrijK

This Saturday and Sunday something
exciting is happening at our dealership.
Wre having an Open House.
And to celebrate were giving away four
free Honda Passports.
Ever! if you dont win that, youll still
be a winner. We're also giving away a
free key chain or a free special edition

STREITS HONDA
OPEN HOUSE
Sot. March 20 9-7 pm 374-2437
Sun. March 21 Noon-4pm 4020 NW 13th Straat
*. \ '* V \* E- V* '* b * .* % 4 s. U* w w 4". C

said he likes the bill because it would require
purchasers to register.
People who buy a lot of the paraphernalia
may use the items to help their sales of illegal
drugs, he said. And finding out who buys a
lot could give police a clue to who sells the
drugs.
Maurice Giunta, misdemeanors division
chief at the State Attorneys Office, also
spoke at the meeting. He said the manufac manufacture
ture manufacture and delivery of such items is illegal
under state law.
But the only problem, he said, is that the
law cant be enforced while it is being ap appealed
pealed appealed in federal court. A law like the Illinois
law has already been OKd, and the state
would have no problem enforcing a similar
law in Gainesville, he said.
McEachern had initially asked the com commission
mission commission to vote for asking the attorney to
draft an ordinance at last Monday s regular
commission meeting. But his motion receiv received
ed received no second, and Kline said then she
thought the ordinance was unnecessary
because of the state law.
The request was then referred to the sub subcommittee,
committee, subcommittee, where McEachern asked com commissioners
missioners commissioners to take the first step in the
thousand-mile journey toward solving

nell Center, Hester said Thursday.
Cimmerman was charged with grand theft last December
after allegedly writing worthless checks in an apparent at attempt
tempt attempt to cover shortages in his receipts from concert' ticket
sales, Hester said. He apparently attempted to skip town
after the charge was filed, Hester said, but he was ap apprehended
prehended apprehended in Huntsville, Ala., during an attempt to defraud
a bank there.
Cimmerman was brought back to Gainesville by Hester.
Hester said he searched Cimmermans suitcase after he
brought him back to Gainesville, and found evidence im implicating
plicating implicating the former student attempted successful forgeries
in six cities in three states.
Hester said Cimmerman was apparently going to banks in
these cities, including the Atlantic First National and Sun
banks in Gainesville, and opening accounts with stolen iden identification
tification identification and forged or stolen checks. He then went to dif different
ferent different branches of the banks and withdrew cash from the
fraudulent accounts, Hester said.
Hester said he has informed officials in all the cities of the
alleged crimes. He said police in some, including Orlando
and Atlanta, probably will be filing charges of their own

Rolling Stones poster to everyone who
who drops in.
So (hop in. Its a great way to see all
our beautiful new 1982 Honda
motorcycles.
And who knows? Even though were
not planning to sell, sell, sell, you might
still want to huv. buv. buy.

crime.
Kline said she changed her mind because
she had not realized how the state law had
been tied up in the courts.
Kline said she could keep an open mind
on the ordinances constitutional questions,
but found the Subterranean Circus, a local
store which would come under the new or ordinance
dinance ordinance offensive.
Bill Killeen, owner of the Subterranean
Circus, defended his business.
Killeen said he found no objection to bann banning
ing banning sales to minors because were not very
patient about selling to high school kids.
Killeen, saying he has more to fear from
the state law, said if the city wanted him to
ban sales to minors, Why didnt you ask
me?
Ive got a 16-year-old kid myself and Im
not crazy about him using drugs.
He said he first had started out 15 years
ago selling buttons and posters, then started
selling brass pipes, and finally selling more
of the paraphernalia.
You go on for 13 years selling things, he
said. You get a mortgage, send the kids to
school, go through divorce proceedings.
He said it is unfair for the city to suddenly
tell him to close his business.

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I Enjoy playing golf or hitting range balls
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Driving Range Video Golf Lessons
Power Carts Leagues
V IPC Complete Pro Shop Scot Dombek Pro

At that point Junior broke in and said,
You dont mean youre asking for sym sympathy?
pathy? sympathy?
"I would never lower myself to selling
paraphernalia, Junior said. To defend
what youre doing is ridiculous. Sometimes
the law has to catch up with the man.
Killeen, his jaw tightening, replied that he
wasnt seeking sympathy, but just an
understanding of his business situation.
KiHeen has said that paraphernalia sales ac account
count account for about 75 percent of his business.
Yet to be determined is whether the pro proposal
posal proposal will be confined to shops such as
Killeens or to include stores like convenience
stores which sell rolling papers.
Before the meeting broke up Junior, sitting
within 5 feet of Killeen, said he wanted to do
"anything we can do to stop dope-dealing.
Any way we can get rid of the scumbags
is OK with me, Junior said.
After the meeting Killeen said Junior was
being unreasonable and, I think this is a
real black eye for a city as progressive as
Gainesville.
They want us to fold up our tents and go
away but were not going.
He added that he would challenge any law
that would force him out of business.
Commissioners expect to take up the pro proposal
posal proposal Monday at their regular commission
meeting.

against Cimmerman. Others, including Miami and Hunt Huntsville,
sville, Huntsville, might not because the banks involved do not wish to
press charges, he said.
Hester plans to charge Cimmerman with two counts of
grand theft, along with 38- counts of forgery and uttering a
forgery stemming from the bank stings. Hester said Cimmer Cimmerman,
man, Cimmerman, while he was employed by the OConnell Center,
rented a car to drive Halloween Festival performer Charles
Rockit to Jacksonville, using Rockits credit card number as
collateral.
Cimmerman allegedly kept the car for more than a month
and then anonymously returned it in the beginning of
December, Hester said. No one knew about the car, Hester
said, until Rockit got the bill.
The other grand theft charge stems from the purchase of a
stereo from a store in Gainesville that Cimmerman allegedly
made with another worthless check and false identification,
Hester said.
Hester estimated that Cimmerman defrauded banks in the
three states for about SIO,OOO during a period of about six
months from summer 1981 to December. He said Cimmer Cimmerman
man Cimmerman used about 10 stolen identifications in the frauds.

Alii gator s
[Classified* ran be*
| placed at any of f
. the following, lora-
| thms: |
| The \Uigator |
I 1728 NW Ist St.
Reitz Union- |
| cheek cashing room |
v Hub-
I jewerly counter |
| Medical Center |
Bkstore
| Beaty Towers |
Bookstore
f, ... |
I Smokers Den I
lf>2t)W. Univ. Ave.
L Briar Patch
Oaks Mall |



By Jonathan Sunklnd
Alligator Staff Writer
Every crack of a gun in Missing blows another gaping hole
in Ed Horman s staunch faith in the righteousness of
American foreign policy. Every blood-spattered Chilean cor corpse
pse corpse wrenches stomach and mind out of bourgeois com complacency.
placency. complacency. Maybe one time Ed Horman could have at attributed
tributed attributed the carnage to Latin blood types. But he is in San Santiago,
tiago, Santiago, it s October 1973, and the American embassy officers
who keep telling him they dont know what happened to his
son all have frozen, catty, canary-fed smiles.
If, by the end of Missing, it isnt clear that U.S. officials
were directly involved in the interrogation and execution of
American writer and filmmaker Charles Horman because he
knew too much about the Chilean coups American connec connection,
tion, connection, then it is at least quite evident that Henry Kissinger's
proteges wanted to keep bluffing about their knowledge of
Hormans murder. Even a State Department report
withheld for more than three years concluded that it
seemed strange that Chiles new leaders could even con contemplate
template contemplate killing an American without serious repercussions
in U.S.-Chile relations. Unless, of course, the boys draped in
red, white and blue decided a sudden case of diplomatic
blindness was in everyones best interests.
Historical revisionism seems to be the order of the day. No
sooner had director Costa-Cavras screened Missing than the
State Department,, its New York Times flak Flora Lewis and

what's j
HAPPENING |
By Panha Vaughan
Alligator Writer
Midnight Madness: with free games,
lawn movie and free entertainment in the
Orange and Brew tonight from 11 to 4at the
Reitz Union
Alpha Kappa Dal to: is sponsoring a
seminar entitled The Social Consequences
of Being Alive today at 12:15 in room 3102

Missing: a movie right on the mark

Friday, March 19
HUROPPI 9om-spm
lpm-Engineering Materials
2pm-Robotics
3pm-Engineering Education
4pm-Nudeor Science Expert
Dr Hugh Gampbel

dgt flr jjHE' JiHt E

of the General Purpose Building A.
Returned Peace Corps Volunteers:
present slides of Central African Republic
tonight at 7:30 in room 1157 of McCarty
Hall.
Students In African Studios Associa Association:
tion: Association: are providing a workshop entitled
What is Happening in the Rural Areas
from 8:30 to 2:30 today in room 427 of
Grinter Hall.
Stool Drum Concert: featuring the
University of Illinois band tonight at 8:15 in
room 101 of the Music Building.
Kappa Alpha Psl: presents the all-state
Stomp tonight at 10 in the Union
Ballroom and a champagne jam Saturday
at 9 in the Majestic Oaks clubhouse.

GNGINGGRS FAIR
March 18th, 19th and 20th
in the O'Connell Center
Its not iust fornqnt=6rs...lts for\bu!
Now is your chance to meet representatives from over 30 major
companies. FREE/ Discuss career opportunities. See exhibits. Com Companies
panies Companies like Texas IBM GE and more, wi display the
latest advances in engineering. <
This weekend come see the 1982 Engineer's Fair. It's for you...
Si and it's free

others denounced the film, which is based on Thomas
Hausers excellent book The Execution of Charles Horman
(recently re-released in paperback as Missing). Funny, but
the Pinochet regime didnt make a peep while Missing was in
production in Mexico City. Perhaps they thought any word
one way or another might shake their good standing with the
U.S. Defense Departments human-rights-and-Huey human-rights-and-Hueyhelicopter
helicopter human-rights-and-Hueyhelicopter division.
But enough dabbling in external affairs and on to the heart
of the review. Missing is a good movie, not just because of its
timely subject, but also for the superb acting by Jack Lem Lemmon
mon Lemmon and Sissy Spacek and the precise direction of Costa-
Gavras, best known for his successful movie Z. Faint indeed
are hopes that Missing will change foreign policy, but
perhaps it s a small consolation that it looks like another
commercial hit for Costa-Gavras and possibly a source of
some Oscars next year.
Lemmonminus the affected mannerisms of Felix Unger
or the barely controlled hysteria of The Front Page is con conservative
servative conservative Christian Scientist businessman Ed Horman, who
until now never had a reason to doubt the truth and bounty
of the American Way. His conversion to angry cynic is in influenced
fluenced influenced in part by daughter-in-law Beth, wife of the missing
writer, played by the most natural-looking Spacek Ive ever
seen.
A series of sometimes jarringly injected flashbacks tells the
story of how Charles Horman (John Shea) and his friend
Terry Simon (Melanie Mayron) learn the damning truth

" 'i 'i.
Engineers' Fair 'B2
A BASIS FOR THE FUTURE TODAY
r .i i
For More Information Contact
Engineers'Fair Office-405NAfeil Hall 3920994

Itack History: Institute of Black Culture
Director Bill Simmons is scheduled to speak
Sunday at 2 in the Florida State Museum.
Talking Hoads and others: everyone is
invited to a D.B. Party tonight at 9 in Sledd
A & H at Murphree Area. Women will be ad admitted
mitted admitted for free.
Help Bln Cystic Fibrosis: Sigma Nus
first annual wrestle-off will be held this
weekend with the tournament starting today
at 4 in the Florida Gym and continuing
Saturday'at 1 with finals at 7.
Spanlsh-Amorlcan Law Studants
Association: presents Thoughts on En Environmental
vironmental Environmental Law in Florida in the 80s to today
day today at 12:50 in the courtroom at the Holland
Law Center.

about American engineering of the coup from the seaside
resort of Vina del Mar. In at least one scene, however, the
flashbacks do work; as neighbors describe what they think
they saw the day Charles was arrested, the scene shifts and
reappears with the various accounts. But the incontroverti incontrovertible
ble incontrovertible evidence remains as solid as ever.
The character played by Shea is well-acted, although it
isn t quite the same one Hauser described in his thorough
book. In the movie, Charles is a not-too-successful rebellious
writer who, with his wife, settled in Santiago just because it
seemed to have the best of what Latin America offers. On the
printed page, however, he was an up-and-coming journalist
with a Harvard degree. A distortion is a distortion, although
on balance one has to allow Costa-Gavras more artistic
license than should be accorded the fact-twisters in th'-A;
American and Chilean governments.
With this movie, Costa-Gavras comes perilously close to
admitting that his own lefisf politics include an unshakeabie
image of the Ugly American. As Village Voice critic Andrew
Sarris put it, the director reveals an ancestral grudge
against the Truman Doctrine. The reference can be thrown
back another 130 years to President Monroe, but Missing
nevertheless is a well-done movie about a grievous blunder
in our history.
Missing, rated R, at the Plitt Center Theatres, 1015 NW
13th St. Lots of blood and profanity. CaU 372-5347 for
showtimes and prices.

Hoalthy Living Flvo-Mlla Classic will
be held Sunday at 4 p.m. at Nationwide In Insurance
surance Insurance at tfie comer of Southwest 34th
Street and Williston Road. Registration starts"
at 2:30.
UF Symphonic Bond Concort: will be
held at 8:15 p.m. in the University
Auditorium.
Hispanic Baxoar-Flosta: will be held
Sunday from:2 t 0.6 p.m. at the Catholic Stu Student
dent Student Center at West University Avenue and
18th Street. Admission is free.
Cantor for Latin American Studios:
presents a lecture on Update on Human
Rights in Latin America Sunday at 7:30
p.m: at the Hillel Student Center, 16 NW
18th St.

Saturday. March 20
FAIR OPEN 9am-4pm
830 am Fun Run > 9am Racquetbalh
10-2 pm College Toursl2:3o-2pm
Contests: Eoa Shuttle at Reitz Union,
Proinpipe Roper Air Airplane.
plane. Airplane. Calculator Olympics

alligator, friday, march 19, 1982,

11



altigator, fridgy, march 1 fr, 1982*

12

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FIND OUT ABOUT ENGINEERING
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THE ENGINEER RECRUITING TEAM
MEMBERS INVITE YOU FOR COFFEE,
AND CONVERSATION ABOUT YOUR
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PHONE: 305/378-6444
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A great way at Me.

Goldstein: I was screwed 1 in road plans

Mark Goldstein
. . chastised transporta transportation
tion transportation board members

to road- widening plans members passed last month.
Goldstein accused Weinstock ot some eleventh-hour
modifications* that were slipped by us after members had
meetings up the nose.
Weinstock denied the accusations. He said his suggestions
were asked for at the last meeting and were simply revisions
that were necessary after considering things such as whether
residents would even use widened roads.
He added that the revisions, such as six-laning Northwest
39th Avenue, were made by himself and three others
representing the state, county and city.
Goldstein replied that staff had decided theyre going to
meet privately and then tell members, Oh, by the way, we
adjusted the map and you guys gotta buy it.
Weinstock answered, Were not pushing anything on

II I
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CUtVO£SP£OI SOPOOOf IWOTTEO AOBOnt£OBWS 1981 HfUBUIN INC HABIFOfiO CN

y hruM Mastron
Alligator Staff Writer
Gainesville City Commis Commissioner
sioner Commissioner Mark Goldstein was at
it again.
Goldstein, a commissioner
known for his colorful
language, hit his verbal peak
earlier this week when he ac accused
cused accused members of the
Metropolitan Transportation
Planning Organization of
selling out to major lan landowners.
downers. landowners.
MTPO members, who are
city and Alachua County
commissioners, were discuss discussing
ing discussing how Gainesvilles roads
would look in the year 2005.
Jerry Weinstock, MTPO
planning director, had just
introduced some alterations

you, were not working behind the scenes, were not asking
for approval, just feedback.
MTPO Chairman and Alachua County Commissioner
John Schroepfer defended Weinstock for bringing some
"reality to MTPOs plans.
Then Goldstein exploded and asked what all the MTPOs
work since 1978 had been for.
Reality and the real world? he said. Reality is not deal dealing
ing dealing with fantasy. Otherwise what the hell were we doing?
Weve been presented with a fake world, he said of
Weinstocks earlier MTPO work. And since you admit it,
then Ive been screwed.
Goldstein said the widening of 39th Avenue, which he said
was turned down at earlier meetings, was reintroduced
under pressure from landowners who would benefit from
wide roads. The wide road would help their plans to in industrialize
dustrialize industrialize the area, he said.
The accusations of selling out were quickly denied.
City Commissioner Gary Junior said, Im not in
anybodys pocket. He added, 1 do not believe a person has
to be poor to get his voice heard.
He said he was rather amazed that rich people havent
applied more pressure.
County Commissioner Jack Durrance, complaining that
he felt he had stepped through the looking glass, said it
was counterproductive to use innuendos of back-room deal dealing.
ing. dealing.
Despite the name-calling, nothing was accomplished.
Weinstocks proposals were neither accepted nor rejected,
but referred to two committees of MTPO. One committee is
composed of citizens; the other of local professional people.
Weinstock listed several changes, but his top priority was
the widening of 39th Avenue to six lanes from Northwest
34th Street to North Main Street at a cost of $7.5 million.
The next MTPO hearing is scheduled for April.
But Weinstock wont be there. He is leaving his job to sell
microcomputers.




Robbery defendant fires attorney

By Janet Braunstein
Alligator Staff Writer
The armed robbery trial of Johnny Dia Diamond
mond Diamond Helton and his codefendant, Henry
Joshua Mitchell, Thursday was postponed
until next week after Helton fired his at attorney.
torney. attorney.
Helton, 29, and Mitchell, 43, are being
tried in: Alachua County Circuit Court for
the June 4, 1981 armed robbery of Bishops
Drug Store in Archer, Fla. Mitchell and
Helton, a Newberry resident, are charged
with stealing more than SIOO worth of nar narcotics
cotics narcotics and cash at gunpoint.
Helton expressed a lack of confidence in
Public Defender John Carlin, who was
representing him. Private attorney Bill
Salmon was appointed by the court to
replace Carlin. Circuit Judge Theron Yawn
ordered the trial postponed until March 24
so that Salmon can prepare to defend Helton.
Mitchell has waived his right to an at attorney
torney attorney and has chosen to defend himself. In
court, he told Yawn that he has subpoenaed
Department of Corrections Secretary Louis
Wainwright, Gainesville Police Chief Atkins
Warren, the chairman of the Florida Parole
Commission, and two members of the Helton
family.
Mitchell told Yawn that he wanted the
witnesses he subpoenaed to testify about the
problem of prison inmates who continue to

indrpnNleal
alligator
is accepting applications for
REPORTERS
Come by the Newsroom
Sunday, March 21st at 3:00
Independent Florida Alligator
1 1729 N.W. Ist Ave.
Y /AFFIRMATIVE ACTION EMPLOYER
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For Over 32 Years
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commit crimes after they are released from
prison.
However, Yawn told Mitchell, Such
evidence will not be permitted in this court.
You will be allowed any witnesses that
can testify to facts relating to this charge,
Yawn told Mitchell, who is currently serving
a 50-year term at the Federal Penitentiary in
Atlanta for armed robbery.
Mitchell said he plans to use duress as a
defense.
Yawn said that to prove duress, Mitchell
would have to show that he was forced to
commit the robbery.
But in a sworn deposition taken Feb. 24,
Mitchell told Assistant State Attorney
Howard Holtzendorf that he committed the
robbery and that he was responsible for it.
Mitchell also testified that Helton was in a
hotel in Lakeland at the time of the robbery.
Police however, identified a fingerprint
found on the safe in Bishop's Drug Store as
Heltons.
Helton requested that he be tried separate separately
ly separately from Mitchell, but Yawn denied that re request
quest request on March 9.
Helton, who was sentenced to fifteen years
in prison last week for selling marijuana and
cocaine in an unrelated case, was arrested
Sept. 29, 1981 in Gulfport, Miss. Mitchell
was arrested Feb. 25, 1982 after he was
transferred from the Federal penitentiary to
Alachua County Detention Center.

AH day,
all flight,
all movies.
,> TA'Ji W s&mm Ha
if kw : <.# t pRiEH
Watch for Cinemax!
g Mod Tonightooooooooooooog
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X Sponsored By: 11
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M Savant Studnet Govern. & The J.W.R.U. 1

alligator, friday, march 19, 1982,

13



\ t .fcMayv.rpprcb 1?, (982

14

idDlgalor classifieds

FOR RENT
Collegiate Living Og. has openings for
summer (under $550) and fall (under $650).
Co-op, cent, air, heat, 1 blk. from UF, co coed,
ed, coed, util. + 18 meals/wk. Call Brett at
372-9319 or write CIO, 117 NW 15th St,
G'ville 32603 3-22-5-1
BRANDYWINE
1 & 2 BEDROOM
From $275 00
Call 375-IMI
4-23-75-1
STONERIDGE
1 & 2 BEDROOM
From $285 00
Coll 375-1121
4-26-73-1
Houses, Apt., Dulexes
Coll 373-2505
P Mendoza Realtor
1219 W University Ave 3-31-21-1
A beautiful room for serious non-smoking
student 5 blocks from U of F Quiet, wooded
lot All utilities paid $ 170/mo. 373-2038
-31 -19-1
Country living close in No kids, pet ok Ef Effiency
fiency Effiency apt $135. One br apts sl9£ 2 be $165
2 br mh w/ porch $225. Coll 372-6881 or
378-9220 3-31-19-1
VICTORIAN HOUSE
Renovated, spacious rooms for rent. High
ceilings, big windows, kitchen, utilities On Only
ly Only $ 125/mo ondup. 371-7282. 3-24-10-1
Sublet 1 bdrm apt April-August. Yours to
rent Sept 1 Screened porch, partially furn.
2 blocks from campus. $225/mo Call
375-7251. 3-24-51
March free, wolk to campus; 1 br loft,
beamed ceiling, carpet, $235 mo. Contem Contemporary
porary Contemporary Management, broker 373-0067,
378-6663 4-1-151
PETS OK nice 2 br apt $275. Fenced back
yard Small, quiet complex. Avail mid-
Apnl Rick 392-0371 days, evenings
375 4063 3-19-6-1
Available now, new two br with dishwasher
and central o/c, close to campus, nice
carpet, reduced to $279/mo.. 375-1085 or
375-6173 3-25-10-1
Sublease for summer Howauon Village
Apartments 3 bedroom 2 baths price
negotiable Call 371-6562 for further
details. 3-19-5-1
2 bedroom opartment for $250/mon plus
the last month of lease is free. Ask at
University Garden Apts about apt 207.
3-19-5-1
Two female roommates needed to sublet
Oak Forest 3 bdrm/2 bath opt May 1-Aug
15. Totally furnished w/ washer-dryer $l4O
mo + 1/3 utl 377-2479 3-19-51
AMAZING VALUE!
Sublet quiet 1 br unfurn apt overlooking
pool Piccadilly $230 dishwshr. day daymanager
manager daymanager 3752483 eve 373-4489 3-19-5-1
Sublease March free very clean, quiet for.
1 br apt. Very close to UF. Avail. March 19.
$225/mo. Call 373-4837 after 5 pm
3-19-51

§MT§ WWffll
FRIDAY A SATURDAY AT 8:15 PM
1 SATURDAY MATINEE AT 2:00 PM
r I
Robert I i '^J
Skelley
THE PULITZER PRIZE-WINNER!
Little Lyons Realty & Investments, fnc.
Augustus L. "Skip' Little, Broker-President
presents
m mm
STUDENTS: $4.00 at the door every show
FREE Opening Night Cheese & Wine Party after the show.
HIPPODROME
25 SE 2nd Place Box Office: Noon-6:30 pm 375-HIPP

Sublease 2 bdrm, 2 bath
Gatorwood Apt $340/mo
Call 374-8372 3-22-51
Sublease a 1-bed. 1-bath oportment for the
summer w/ option for foil, close to campus,
S2OO/mo Call Serg.o at 373-5738 3-22-5-1
SUBLET, 1 bdrm furnished apt. close to col college
lege college & on bus route $230 mo + deposit.
Call before 8:30 am or after 9pm 378-5416.
3-29-10-1
2 affordobie houses 3/4 br/2 bath 10 blocks
to U of F 216 SW 5 Ave $350/mo or 3 br I
bath 406 NE 11 Ave. Lake Breeze Est
Hawthorne S3OO/mo 3759623 3-22-5-1
****** MUST SEE *****
furn opt on 4-acre grassy field w/ lake
privacy ond only 1/2 mile to UF. Ideal for
sfudent(s) or professional. Pool, a/h, laun laundry,
dry, laundry, on bus line Available now 373-3123
3-22-5-1
SUMMER OAK FOREST
furnished townhouse, need 2 roommates to
SUBLET. Available May-Aug. Wash/dryer
Call 3752671 3-24-7-1
HALF MONTH FREE on very cleon 1 br apt
Located 1/2 blk from UF $225 unfurn $240
furn. 373-3514/378-1814 3-22-5-1
BARGAIN MW 1 mile from UF. New 2br 1
ba. carpet, drapes, central heat/air, all ap appliances,
pliances, appliances, immed occup. $275 mo nego
377 4725 3-29-10-1
Sublease
OAK FOREST APTS 2 BEDROOM 2 BATH
STARTING MAY Ist CALL 377-1884 3-22-5-1
Almost fully furnished 8x32 1 br air condi conditioned
tioned conditioned mobile home located in Mobile City
*22 $125/month + SIOO deposit. 375-6725
3-22-5-1
3 bdrm apt available May thru July CHEAP!
Good location. Call 3755372 keep trying.
3 22-51
Oak Forest
Mar free 3 b/2 b. dishwasher
washer/dryer
disp sauna, tennis, 2 pools Call 375-1741
or 378-5358 3-22-5-1
Female needed to sublet 1 bedroom in 3
bedroom opt for summer Grad or pro stu
$147/month *- share utilities 371-2640
eve 3-30-9 t
Available Now. 1 br, 1 bath large kitchen
w/gas range fresh paint air spacious living
close to UF Call 378-1930 $l7O/Month -f
deposit 3-23-5-1
Sublet 2 bedroom 1 both furnished Bran Brandywine
dywine Brandywine Apt. May through August Only
$305. Call now for* more info. 373-9173.
3-23-51
Sublet for summer. Own bedroom in the
Pmes $l2O/month + 1/4 utilities Coll
375-0617 Ask for Greg after 2:00. 3-26-8-1
Choice 1 br furnished apt in Villoge Park on
pool and volleyball court. Available May 1.
Call Cliff 378-8117 2-23-5-1
PLAN AHEAD Sublet 3 bed 2 bath Vizcaya
apt large enough for 3 to 5 people.
Available May 1 close to UF + Law School.
Call 371-2704 3-23-51

Will pay you SIOO 00 to sublease apt for
summer with option for fall. One bedroom
furnished at Hawaiian Village. August is
free too! Call sandi-372-3430, day or late
evening. 3-19-3-1
2 females to sublet apartment. 1/3 rent,
$305/mo., 1/3 utilities. March rent paid.
Close to campus Landmark Apts. Call
371-1979 3-19-3-1
Rooms for Rent
SBO + utilities
3 blocks from UF
376-0218 3-31-11-1
2 bed 2 bath Stoneridge March rent free
Beautifully furnished, pool, tennis, sauna,
low deposit $450/month. Call Don
378-9994 3-30-10-1
* SUMMER SUBLET
Share 1 rm of 2 BR 2 Bath Hawaiian Village
Apt. (male) Aug. Free Pay May June July.
Charles 374-8397 3-22-4-1
Hawaiian Village 3 br for sublet starting
May Ist w/option for fall, very close to cam campus
pus campus Apt across trom pool $395/mth Call
376-8712 3-23-5-1
Brand new duplex 7 blocks from campus.
For rent May Ist one rm. available, only
$125/mth. All new appliances Call now
378-8928 or 376-8712 3-23-5-1
Sublease 1 br FURNISHED Apt. Hawaiian
Villoge. May 1 August. $260.00/mo.
NEGOTIABLE Call 377-6113. 3-19-3-1
Sublet 2 bedrooms in 3/2 Wmdmeodows
Apt. Furnished, pool, on bus route. From
May thru August. Reduced price. Coll
373-5501 3-23-5-1
Sublet for Summer
2 bdrm 1 1/2 bath unfurnished tnhse. Walk
to campus $305 00 Per month August rent
Free Call 373-0661 3-19-3-1
Vizcaya opts 3 bdrm. 2 both, own room.
furnished, pool, sauna, laundry, close to
UF. May I-July 31 ,$ 139 or best offer -f 1/3
utilities. Call 378-7402 3-23-5-1
Brandywine Sublet Apt. for Summer
(5/1-8/15). One bedroom Big enough for
two. 2 beds -1 sofa bed. Fully furnished,
me kitchen f bathroom accessories. A
great bargain for S3OO 00. Call 371-7459
3-23-5-1
Two floor townhouse apt. 2 bed., 1 1/2
bath, kitchen w/dishwasher. 1000 sq. ft.,
$325 monthly. Call Tom at 377-5534 after
10:30 pm 3-23-51
Sublet 4 bedroom townhouse for summer
The Village call 372-7938 3-22-5-1
1 + 2 Bedroom opts. 3 blks to UF. Brand
new kitchen 4- pamtsl2s 4- 250, Rooms for
rent in newely remodeled house. New kit kitchen
chen kitchen and many extras, ph. 378-8390 Hurry.
3-19-3-1
BKTTIR DCAL THAN DORMS
La Mancha Apts. Economical living for
tho mature tingle student. 2 blks
campus private bdrm fully furnished,
garden, pool, maid service, gas grills,
central air, color t.v. Summer A I2N
Summer B s2tt Summer A A B s3s#. Call
Carol 378-7224. 3-26-38-1
5 minute walk to Shands. Summit House.
Sublet 1 br m Ig 2 br apt. 2'pools. M or F.
$149/mo unfurn. May 1 378-5380. 3-22-3-1
Sublet-2 br apt. Summit House. Air, carpet,
5 mm walk to Shands. Call 377-1430; or
days 376-9668 & ask about apt A-l 3-24-5
1
Sublet master bedroom, private ba in Ig 2
bed/2 bd apt, furnished or unfurnished.
Available May-Aug. Call evenings 375-8603
or 377-9986 3-26-7-1
Regency Oaks
3 bdrm/2 b for summer. Rent now w/
option tor fall. Ideal location.
Rent negot.
Call 377-7820. 3-24-5-1
Nice 2 bd 1 bt apart. Only 2 1/2 yr old. Close
to campus, Shands and VA On bus route.
Dishwasher, carpet, rent negotiable 392-
0518 3-24-51
100 yds from UF, 3 bdr house w/ lots of
space. Sublet for summer A & B w/ option to
renew in fall. Located at 1220 SW Ist Ave.
(across from Tigert). Call 378-1256. 3-23-4-1
Sublet spacious one bedrm luxury apt at
Brandywine beginning Mayl Many extras.
$275 mo. unfurnished, $75 cash rebate. Call
Ross. 373-7154 or 392-2148. 3-22-3-1
2 BR Poolside apt is now available tor sublet
for only $275 with option to renew tor next
year. For more info call 375-1361. 3-24-5-1

RH
I 1 W4 T rTt WMMKm
LSAT
We have a new course
for the new exam format
tor the JuneLSAT. Reserve
your seat today!
4095.1N.2nd Ave.
call 377-0014

Sublet comfortable 1 bedrm opt $209/mo,
occupy April 1 Pool, laundry, good location
on SW 20 Ave. Call 375-6026 after 7 pm or
wkend. 3-22-3-1
Sublet for the summer 3 bdroom furnished
apt at Regency Oaks Call 374-8313. 3-24-5-
I
Wonted 2 non-smoking students to rent 2
bedroom 1 1/2 bath condo for summer
terms A & B Tennis, pools, raquetball $l5O
per term 4 1/2 utilities. Beautiful nor northwest
thwest northwest G'ville. Call Jeff or Greg 378-8403
3-24-5-1
1 BD APT furnished, close o school. ONLY
$209.00 POOL, laundry. Near shopping, no
pets, ovpiloble MAY Ist. 3750119 after 5
pm 3-24-5-1
REDUCED RENT camelot apts sublease or re rerent
rent rerent 1 bdr May 1-Aug 15. furn or unfurn.
Price negotiable. Call 371-3091 3-25-5-1
August Rent Free
Sublet one bedrm apt. May Ist to Aug 15,
reg $205 per month with Aug free $128.50
per montb-m SW sec of SW 16th St. Will talk
about early entry or other agreement Call
Tom at 377-1393 ofter 8 pm. 3-2551
OAK FOREST******
Summer Sublet Furnished 3 br twnhse with
WASHER/DRYER Rent negotiable. Cal! 377-
7923 3-2551
Sublet I br apt starting May 5. Your option
to stay for foil Near Butler plaza. $230/mo.
Coll 373-1356 weekdays. 377-0344. 3-25-5-
1
H'village *337 2 br 1 bath Irg. Summer
sublet w/ fall option. Furn., pool, laundry,
bus, neg dep. days 378-5905, eve 373-
0906. 3-24-4-1
2 br furn. mobije home on wooded acreage
1 mi. from Shands, vet school. Pets, garden
fine. $l9O mo. (incl. water, sewer), $l5O
dep 377-6325 3-19-1-1
THIS IS IT sublet nice house right across
from campus/Shands. May to August.
Completely furnished. Call Marc 3751654.
3-25-5-1
Sublease 2 br house til Aug w/ opt to
renew. Walk to campus & shopping. $225
furnished Call Nick 371-2394. 3751687. 3-
22-2-1
Sublet room in nicely furnished 2-bedroom
apt female available May w/ option for
fall $l5O mo 373-4841 3-2551
Have Your Own Place. Available May 2 thru
the end of August. Option to re-new.
$125/mo. 4 $l5O deposit. Call 378-7349. 3-
23-3-1
SUMMER Sublet huge 1-br apt. near Butler
Plaza. New carpet, bus to campus, pool
$230/mo Call 377-9797 anytime. 3-255-1
Sublease 2 BR/1 B apt unfurnished in SW.
Available AAay 1 thru Aug 15. $240/mo 4-
$l5O security. Call Joanne 374-4490. 3-23-
3-1
Furn'd 1 br apt on SW 20 Ave. Avail AAay 1
$220/mo. Call 3751519 9-5 M-F ONLY must
ask for Kim C. 3-2551
Want fern, to live in own bdrm. in furn.
home for sum. w/ opt. for fall. Close to UF,
on bus line, w/ washer. $l2O 4- 1/3 ut. 372-
5277. 3-2551
Beautiful 2 bdrm 1 bath apt. for sublet
beginning AAay. Call 377-3458. Close to UF.
3-23-3-1
Sublet 2 br/2 bth WINDMEADOWS POOLSIDE
APT Available immed. S3BO/mo. MARCH
FREE! Call 371-1213. 3-2551
ROOMMATE
Roommate wanted to share nice apt. only 5
min. from campus. $137 per month.
3753708 or 3758373. 3-23-152
SUBLET 1 BDR AVL 4/1/ slls AAO 4- UTIL.
CALL R6Y 371-760). 3 BLKS TO CAMPUS
3-31-18-2
Williamsburg Village. Female to share 3
bedrm apt Own bedroom. $133.50/mo 4-
util. Available Apr 1. 373-2910 7:00-11:00.
3-23-52
2 roommates need for 2 bdr ms in 3 bdrm
house 1.5 mi from campus, one room has Ig
waterbed $ 160/mo the other is unfurn
$135/mo 3755188. 3-19-5-2
Male roommate needed to share one
bedrm SW orea apt. non-smoker please,
pets allowed. Rent till end of AAay or thru
summer 373-9227 3-19-52
STEAL Wood gate Mnr. Male roommate own
room May-Aug nego. rent (about) SIOO 4-
1/4 util. Call Don 377-4222 after 5 p.m.
3-19-5-2
1 or 2, male or female to sublet master
! bedroom in Regency Oaks. $2Ol/mo +
ut.lit.es, 378-8925. 3-19-52
Female, own room & bath. Piccadilly apts.
$175 4- 1/2 utilities. Avail. AAay 1.
375- 3-19-5-2
[ male/female/couple to share 2 br/2 bath,
pool/tennis Begin AAay 1 until whenever.
$152.50/month. Call Jayne 392-1365 or
376- 3-19-5-2
I Oak Foresf Female non-smoking room-
I male wanted for next fall. 3 bedroom/2
I bath, furnished, wash/dryer, $l5O/mo +
I 1/3 util. Call 377-7315. 3-22-52
I Male roommate to share 3 bdrm apt own
I room wt room, tennis, r-ball, pool, new
I carpet $l3O 4 1/3 utilities Steve 373-2335.
- _.V r

M roommate-big bedroom-sublet for the
summer-no down payment-furnished apt-2
blks from campus. Call Les 371-6764 59 or
after 12 pm 3-22-52
Wanted 2 or 3 female (preferably) to share
Qtrs. Apts. Summer 1/3 rent $lO7, 1/4 rent
SBO 4- util. Call anytime 371-0662 3-22-5-2
Female roommate wanted for summer term
A & B. Own room in 4 bdrm townhouse The
Village. Also available for fall 378-3395
Lisa 3-22-5-2
Female roommate needed to share 4 br apt
in Village for summer & fall. Studious, par partying,
tying, partying, friendly, mature. $l2O/mo 4- elec.
371-1081 3-19-4-2
1 or 2 male rmts for master bdr w/ walk in
closet in spacious 2 bed/2 bath Gatorwood
Apt. Summer $225/month 377-9854 after
6:00 pm. 3-22-5-2
Female needed to shore bedroom w/ nurse
$92.00/mo 4- 1/3 util Summit House Apts,
by Shands. April rent free. CALL 377-9749
POOLS & laund mat. 3-22-52
VILLAGE APTS; athletic and other facilities 2
fern rmmts needed for summer w/ option
for fall Need bdrm furn only slls 4 1/4
util. Call Debbie 373-4092. 3-22-5-2
Fmle nonsmkr, clean, resp grad
stdnt/profssnl pref. own rm 8 bth in 2 br/2 b
large Brondywine Apt. All facilities $lB5 4
1/2 ut, can move in now, call Daleann
378-7353/373-7907 3-19-3-2
Tired of the dorms? 3 brs avail Ap or AAay.
Furn; NW area 15 bks from UF. Female,
non-smoker $l2O/mo. 4 J/4 utf. Call
375-3128. 3-22-5-2
Female roommate waed immediate oc occupancy.
cupancy. occupancy. Own room Millhopper Village
sll mo Call 3752423 keep trying.
3-22-5*2
CHEAPER THAN DORMS
LaMancha Apts. Economical living for the
mature single student. 2 blks campus,
private bdrm, fully furnished, garden, pool,
maid service, gas grills, central air, color
T V Summer A S2OO Summer B S2OO Sum Summer
mer Summer A & B $350. Call Carol 378-7224.
3-2530-2
LOSE THE LOTTERY
Turn loss into win! Relaxed, non-smoking
female student wanted as 4th rmmate. 2 br
Wmsburg Apt. Fall. Call 378-9751. 3-22-52
OWN MASTER bdrm/bath in beautifully fur furnished
nished furnished 2 bdrm/2 bath Windmeadows Apt.
Pool, tennis, etc. Available AAay 1
$127/month. Gary 371-2408. 3-22-5-2
Roommate wanted lo share 3-br apt. Own
room for sll3 per month 4 1/3 utilities. No
deposits. Georgetown apts. Call 371-0425.
3-22-52
Ser.ous male student own bdrm, own bath
in trailer. SW section $l2O mo. 4- 1/2
utilities. Call after 6 pm. 373-9160. 3-22-52
Own unfurnished room in house in N.E.
area near duckpond, Gainesville mall,
Publix. Close to campus $145/mo. 633 NE
10th Ave. Phone 371-6098. 3-22-5-2
male nonsmoker sublease for summer w/
fall option ir quiet Point West apt; pool,
laundry, cab 1 . $155/mo. 4 1/3 util/
3757433 3- 3-5-2
one bedroom with bunkbeds for one or two
six blocks to campus $ 150/mo. and share
utilities. NO Dogs. 373-1289 ask for wade.
3-24-52
SIOO dep. 4 AAARCHFree! 1 br. in 2 br. apt.
lots of storage, dish/oc/heat, etc. Close to
UF, bus, stores CALL Steve 378-1949.
3-23-52
r>
FOR SUAAAAER two rooms to choose from w.
univ. ave. 9 blocks to UF central air furn two
story house call 3752134. 3-23-52
Roommate needed summer' ABB; own
bedroom in luxury, furnished 3 bdrm.
Country Village Apt; $126 mo. 4 1/3
utilities; call 371-0733. 3-19-3-2
Roommate needed to finish out semester.
One block off campus. Help me get through
eco 2013 and your rent will be taken care of
Call 373-7615. 3-19-3-2
male roommate needed to share 2 bdrm.
apt, room poolside, close to UF, no pets,
must see to believe $l5O +' 1/2 utilites.
373-6526. 3-19-3-2
male/female to share a 3 brm./2 bth apt,
own room, at Oak Forest, close to Univ. low
utilities, sauna, pool, tennis. $129 call
Ricardo 3756255. 3-19-3-2
Own room in 2 br furn apt. $135.50 4 1/2*
util/mo. M Roomate for summer 4- option
for next year 10 mm. walk to campus. Coll
378-2688 3-23-52
Female to share master bedroom in
spacious apt beginning summer A 2 blocks
from campus 374-8784 great roommates
$106.00 p/mo. 3-23-52
Studious nonsmoking female needed to
share 1 bdrm poolside apt. next fall. 10
min. walk to campus on bus route. 373-0925
Angela. 3-23-52
Roommate wanted to share 3 bdrm/1 b
house House in the NW par* of town. SIOO
+ 1/3 util, a month Call Wally after 5:00
pm 377-1979 3-30-10-2
Large bedroom in lake Newnan area,
reasonable rates, first & 50 deposit, furnish-'
ed or not. call 375-0347 after noon anyday.
3-23 52
Female roommate needed to share master
suite in gorgeously furnished 2 br./2 bath
opt. Low utilities. Only slto./mo coll
377-4518 3-23-5?

2 roommates wonted starting May, 3 br. 1
1/2 bath, furnished, bosketboll ct, pool,
near butler plaza in maracaibo, sl3l/mo
4 1/3, ph. 3752932. 3-23-52
2 male rmmts. needed for FallSpring, no nosmoking,
smoking, nosmoking, study-party guys prfrd.
$77.50/mo., close to UF pool, etc. Call
392-7521 A.S.A.P 3-19-3-2
Conservative, clean female roommate
wanted for 2 bdrm townhouse. Call 377-
7981 for more info. 3-24-52
BCTTIB DCAL THAN DOOMS
LaMancha Apts. Economical living for
the mature tingle student 2 blks
campus, private bdrm. fully furnished,
garden, pool, maid service, gas grills,
central air. color t.v. Summer A INI
Summer B S2BB Summer A A B $358. Call
Carol 378-7224. 3-2533-2
Own furn room in 3 bdrm house, 4 mi from
campus. SIOO mo 4 1/3 utl. Call Gary at
3759941 Avail. May 1. 3-24-5-2
M or F non-smoking roommate wanted for
Fall-Spring. Must be neat, clean, respon responsible,
sible, responsible, and fun. Call for apt. details. Bob 392-
8525 3-24-52
AAARCH FREf! male roommate needed for
nice Gatorwood 1 bd/ 1 bth furn. apt. Close
to UF Call Barry 392-8774. 3-19-2-2
OWN ROOM spacious 2 br fern only, no
smoking, pool, laundry, 2-3 mi to campus,
Morocaibo Apts. Port furn. Avail May
$155/mo 377-1505. 3-22-3-2
DREAM COME TRUEM~
Female roommate wanted for nice 2 bdr apt
across from O'Connell Ctr. $149.00 a mo.
March free! 1/2 util. For more information
coll 377-5242 aft 6:00 pm Gisela. 3-22-3-2
2 roommates AAay thru July. Own bdrm in 3
bd/2 b deluxe opt. quiet, pool, NW, bike to
campus $l2O + 1/3 util. Mike, Tom 375-
0746. 3-24-5-2
* YOU HAVE YOUR CHOICE
2 female roommates wanted AAay 1. One to
share master bdrm A bath A one for own
room A bath. Whole apt beautifully fur furnished.
nished. furnished. Poolside A laundry. No deposits
SBS 00 A $150.00, 1/3 util. Call Lisa or Beth
378-3110 3-25-5-2
SUBLET EMPTY ROOM IN GATOR TOWN APT.
PAY AAAY, JUNE, JULY, AUG-FREE. 1/2
SECUR'ITY DEPOSIT TO BE PAID. CALL 378-
1216 TONY. 4-1-10-2
Roommate needed for 1 room in Oak Forest
3 bd. 2 1/2 bath townhouse for summer.
Sauna, washer, dryer, 2 pools Call Jodi or
Ela 371-2546 3-25-5-2
Roommate wanted 2 bdrm apt. No deposit
$l4O mo. 3 blocks from campus. Call Cindy
377-7295. 3-23-3-2
Summer Time
Female: own room in 2 bdrm, spacious
furn. apt w/ 2 pools, racquet, etc., Close lo
campus, on bus rt. $l6O + 1/2 util., storting
May 1.373-6966. 3-25-5-2
Roommate wanted, own room in 3
bedroom home, pay 1/3 expenses.
Milhopper area. Call 372-0599 after 1 pm.
3-25-5-2
FEAAALE GRAD STUDENT to share 3 br house.
Bike or bus to UF. $l3O/mo + 1/2. 372-0891
or 392-0515 (Sue) non-smoker only 3-26-6-
2
Roommate wanted to share 3 bedroom
spacious NW house with mole A female.
Immediate occup sll7 rent 1/3 utilities. Big
fenced yard 373-0448. 3-25-5-2
Roommate wanted to share apt 15 min.
from campus for the summer, option for
fall. $155 per mon A 1/2 util. 376-4833. 3-
25-5-2
Need 1 or 2 rm. $275 for sm. $325 for Fall.
Apt Furnished. Call between 6 and 7 P.M.
372- 3-22-2-2
Female own rm 1 block from campus.
Large house, fireploce. oc, skylights, pets
ok SBB/mo to util. 371-6154. 3-23-3-2
June Rent FREEI 1 fml rmmt for Summer B.
Share a furnished 1 bdrm apt at the Village
for sll2/mo. Call 392-8441 Anytimel 3-23-
3-
REAL ESTATE
C
Heavily wooded access lots lo Ichetucknee
and Same Fe rivers. Fishing, tubing, etc.
Terms available, great investment. For sale
by owner, Call Steve 377-4477. 3-19-3-3
FOR SALE
1/2 PRICE BEDDING
Desks, Dressers. Chests, Sofas, Dining rm
sets, bookshelves, lamps, coffee and end I
tables, etc. Wide selection to choose from.
See at Affordable Furniture & Bedding. 1201
E. Univ. Ave (1 block east of Waldo Road.)
373- 4-23-75-4
NINA'S NOOK
Dasks, couches, chairs, Shelving, beds.
USED FURNITURE
AREA'S BEST 377-6700
818 W. Univ. Ave behind Taco Bell
WE BUY FURNITURE
4-
STEREO n CHEAPER ot DISCOUNT HI FI. 722 S
AAam, The Red Bldg. Every Major Stereo
Brand 4-23-73-4



Cor Stareo Sp*oolts!s hot groat tound
systems, pmfoiionp .nstoltohons and
friendly advico. 2201 MW 13 St 372-2070
Open 10-7. 4-23-75-4
2 Z-28 tihror magi ISO, men's stio t 1/3 rink
skates $25. 20 got oquarium + equip *7O
bumper pool tabto *3O An J7J-236*
3-22-5-4
35mm automatic Comoro V*3 lontet. extras
$l5O/Pioneer cor stereo. 4 ipk*. ponlenna
w boos ter SIOO/Tran-Am front cower S4O
376-6782. 3-10-5-4
irS SPRING! Don't support UPO rnta a bike
to class. For sale Schwinn Vanity 10-speed
negotiable. Coll Rob after 600 373-3804.
3-19-5-4
SPEAKERS Cerwrin Vega 415RHED design. 3-
way w/15" woofer. Brand new Serious
calls only Scott 3723720 3-19-5-4
Waterless cooking SAIADMASTER the
world's finest quolity cookware stainless
steel cookware life guaranty -ms
378-7251 3-29-10-4
ELECTRONIC SCALE sarionus 1202. LEO
readout .01 gm accuracy, wery portable,
great condition, must sell $250. 392-7561
3-22-5-4
Head "360" skies. Post season bargian
Marker bindings. 195 cm. $75.00. Lange
racing boots 10 1/2 *6O-00 Coll John
373-5120. 3-22-5-4
FOIKWEAR PATTERNS inspire sewing
creativity. Fabric sole 50%. Silk ot
wholesale-custom clothing. 1636 W. Univ
Ave upstairs renaissance fair 375-6462.
3-22-5-4
STEREO realistic receiver 22wpc. 3 way
speakers. JVC turntable and cassette deck
Also, black recliner choir. Coll Gory ol
371-2408. 3-22-54
GUITAR: 197 GWron Es-335, wine
red, stop r 4*-,. tweed case S6SO.
AMP: Kustom Lead 1. 30 w mstr vol. #
rvrb. $l5O *BiH 378-9755 3-1*34
R lo R tape deck Akoi 636 4 . 2 ch auto autoreverse
reverse autoreverse + extras. Excellent con. SBOO neg.
if you're looking tar quality coll Brian
378-7594. 32353
For sale-guinea pigs, long how or short,
quiet affectionate pets, clean Buy com complete
plete complete set up or separate, mom won't alk>w
home 371-2907. 319-34

Counch, 3 matching choirs. 311 pm
3750530*95 32354
For sale cast iron kxincky tub SSO. wood
sewing table with storage 66"L2ff'D30"H
$75. tub is white enamel, after A 376-6329.
322-34
1976 Honda 550 four, good shape S7OO. firm
1975 Honda 360 twin clutch needs work
S3OO Coll 377 4953 324-54
Furnishings, kmmchairs. choirs, bureau,
cases, pots. beds, cabinets, etc. Garage
Sale. 1430 NW 6ih Place, on 321-82. from
11 a m. to2p.m.. 3732422. 319-24
SCUBA TANK l PAC! US Divers 80 cu ft. K
valve w/ White Stag OS PAC need to sell
fast 3731847 324-54
Look! Hogstrom Swede guitar $350 w/ case.
Yamaha 2 10" Amplifier 65 watts peak
S2OO. Electro Harmomx hanger, phoser. big
muff SSO. $25. S3O ne. 2 microphones plus
more. Coll Ken 372-9190 324-34
Ibo net strot copy $225.00 and Yamaha SO
watt amp $240.00. Together $42300 Coll
Jeff 373-0487. Both in excellent condition
322-34
Need to sell outrageous stereo system.
Includes Sony 4800 receiver. Gonad GT-3S.
Sound Shaper I equalizer $ BSR speoners.
Alos Ovation Fodore guitar. Terms
negotiable Call 3739930 324-34
For sale: 20-gal aquarium w/ light pump $
healer. Also homster habitrail cage w/
attachments must sell. Cafl Fred at 378-
4272 32334
NEW STEREO t SPEAKERS Vector research
digital receiver w/ 12 preset-station
memory t remote control 90 watts per
chonel 2 cerwm-vego bed 8 2 btc 100 watt
speakers. Must se. CPI 3784272. 32334
1974 VW Bug excellem condition, low
milage, S2BOO Cod 377-6480- 32334
1976 boiler 8x27 air. owning, perfect for
student, set up in park 1/2 m> from U of F.
Coll I-935-0889. 32364
For sale king Size water bed. Padded side
boards, elevated pladorm. mattress and all
equipment needed. Is approx. 4 yrs old. In
good shape. Asking SIBO. Cafl Randy at
3734348 after 5:30 pm for info. 32354
Steal My Crown
Need cash quickly. Crown 075 main amp
almost new 28 months sfcll on wanonty
*275 00 or best offer. Co* Bruce 375-6379
32354
Leovm Ih Planet Sale. Belt helmet. mxocord
620 u able-speafceis, kitchenware, beaks,
dress sons, earthy prices Fr Sot 1512 NW 1
PI 319-14
STEREO separate component system JVC
quartz table. JVC tuner and amp, teoc tope
ployer. oudra reflex equrltzer. ohm C 2
speafers with stands, call Andrew for more
info $llOO. Phone 3735985 319-14
Zoom lons 80-2 K) mm with macro, new,
hardly used SIBO3XI component speakers,
lorge with 15" woofer. CaH Make 3737751
day 3774132 nMe. 32324

Areas Largest Setpcfioo
I Quality used Furnitur*
818 W Universtiy Avo f
W Buy Fumltur* I

*** rww.
2 Will mil
tor *6OOOO Jeff 392-7496 32334
Cheapest prices in town
bonw shtmo component Abo. a wide
selection of various electronics. video and
am
AUTOS
Good dependable cor 1973 Fury Plymouth
l Interior, body and engine in superb corv
ditioo Yours for only *950.00 Coll Julie
377-4359 319-35
1981 ISUZU 4 door sedan silver, blue in interior.
terior. interior. oulomottc, air. stereo casette. one
owner, garage kepi *6175 Must sell
376-2492 319-35
1981 Datsun 200sx hatch white w red in interior
terior interior 5 sp dc sidemolding, rusty (ones amfm
stereo tape ptaypm stripes s6Booorbesi
3735668 323-7 5
VW Scirocco 1960 Excellent condition. Only
24,000 miles. Traveling to So. America must
sell. A gill for $6,800 neoohable 32335
79 MGB om/fm tape 38.000 excellent coo coodihon.
dihon. coodihon. a/c asking $5,600 3730870
32335
FOR SALE 1976 Chev.ne Exiehen. shape
new auto transmission, muffler red clean
$2,300 Must see! coll Eileen 374-8440
319-35
Sacrifice 1974 Movnck, 6 cylinder, auto new
tune-up. great gas milage, runs fantastic,
only $495 or offers 3735432 anytime. 329-
8-5
77 VW Schtrroco Silver, am-fm stereo
radio, tinned windows $4200. Mint con condition
dition condition 392 9520 324-35
1975 Tradesman 200 oc power storing
automatic AM-FM cassette $2850 or best
offer Will consider cor in trade 376-0074
Brian. 32335
SUZUKI GS 4505 1960 with 7000 fTM. novo
helmet, tank bog. quartz headlight, case
ban. SI4OO Coll Andrew 375-5985. 3-19-1-
5
76 MGB burgendy. wire wheels, am-fm,
toneou cover. Great cor. great price $2,800
375-2803. 3-24-4-5
SERVICES
Fypmg. Bookkeeping. 8 Notary Service
Professional Quolity 10 years experience
IBM Selectnc 111. Down 3733913. 331-11-6
IYFBIO SERVICE Quality work, fast ser service,
vice, service, specialize in brochures, large
mailouts. Editing available. Coll 378-8950
4-2355-6
TYPING
IBM Mag Card II-
Spiral binding-Xerox Copies-Editmg
1219 W. University Ave. 378-9353
(One Block from Campus)
-23 736
WWW UNUMITH) Professional
resume preparation. Develop a lifetime
skills-onenled resume. Reasonable rates
Coll 378-0950. 4-23j55-6
HORSES come ride at Sleepy Hollow
wooded bails leasing l rentals. Instruction
- hunt seat & dressage Complete boarding.
3738080.4633224 4-2375-6
Typing: Fast and accurate. Reasonable
rales. Expert proofreading. Papers, theses,
dissertations, resumes, etc. Rita 3731486
4-23736
TYPING: VERY reasonable rotes. Editing for
spelling, grammar Work guaranteed
Delivery service for a charge. 3732692
331-236
Professional Typing
Recorded on mog card-Updoting without
retyping-Grad School approved. 919 NW
13th St 3739822 Alter 5 3733766
4-23736
THE DISSERTATION DOCTOR
6. A. English; M.Ed.
Typing 8 Editorial Services
Sue Kbkpobick. 3731781
4-23536
AUTO WINDOW TINTING NEW Scratch
Resistant Film, Highest Quality. Professional
Installation, 5 yr. warranty. SOtAR-X
3730369. 4-320-6
When you really core, give 14 kl. GOLDI I
hove chains, ond earrings ol the lowest
prices in I data. Coll Scott at 378-3041.
4-2354-6
TYPING: Legol, theses, dissertations,
reports Professional quolity. IBM Selectnc.
Nancy. 372-2750. 32310-6
SCUBA dosses Tues. Feb. 27, or Wed Mar
10, or Mor 25 Earn InlernoTl cert. 5 wk
course, open water dive, sunset dive I
seafood party. ALIEN'S AQUATIC $ TRAIL
CENTER 34th 8 W Unlv 3739233 3-2329-6
TYPING
Overnight Service
Coll 3731989
323204
IMPROVE VOUB ORADESI Research
catalog
-306 pages-10,278 tapks
Rush $1 00 Box 25097 C
las Angeles, 900/5 (213) 477-8226
. 4-2 -26 6
When you core enough lo get the very best
Hogiown Typing. J 738332 Bed time k
coll-S:2O l0:20o m, 319-104
Quolity point 8 body shop, quolity co
repot/ Ol reasonable rotes, specie
rates for faculty, staff, students. Os
fle 37* 9952 home 472-3490 319-204
Typfag / Weed Presem/Copying"
e..,-tslw-f <4kwwLixw
w yjvwwwvtlvvy/ Ww wvw^fiewr
m J 4 88 48-8---
wwy mwv VW 9 W eWeet
| ffy Bn. S7I-SSII/$7MBl$. 84M84

STEREO REPAIR
FAST
FAIR
Bryce Welch in We Place ta take yew Sraeo
xrhen it Breaks. 3734653 31*86
Acu-Po.ni Therapy. #w Ouisst eaey way
far weight loss. pax. rebel, mas* esvrgy.
sbess conbol. slap smoking. Co* 375-6458
for FREE Information Flo ImaPi but
31*86
Spelling ckd imnor edrbng. Tm psqmrs.
F4'lists, scnpss. letter
** *Nr G ville Mott-NW 17lh $r
4 23336
Prof-quick service for typeset, word f*o/
type/ print 1015 W U 2 b*s fm UE 373
3355/3738613. *!?l?6
Keypunching. Data enby. Aqyixiini.nq.
statistical Analyses. Call MFO lECH PSC
3737624 or after 6 472-2413 32364
BEST TYPIST IN TOWN. Exp Grad Sch. Term
Papers. Resumes, esc. 100. 3774)528
Results Guaranteed* 4-14-204
WANTED
CASH lor gold. Sterling, demands, jewelry,
class rings, corns. Witt visit your home
anywhere 376-5235 Mr tmun 323737
377-2344 tor TOP Market CASH on Silver and
Gold Items of Oil kinds Yes! We buy dam
rings of all types 4- sizes. 377-2344
4-23737
SINGER. Commeraol full Me rock 8 roR
bond looking for lead vocai/Sroni man CaU
Ellis 3731962. 3-1-10-7
Two Buffet heketa. Floor or txs> level. CM
376-9527 altar 6pm 322-2-7
HELD WANTED
EARN EXTRA MONEY 2-3 hours o week m
your SPARE TIME Earn $ twice a week
Donate Plasma GAINESVILLE PLASMA
CORP (Since 19WL 516 W Urvv Ave
3789431 Call for appointment THB AO
WORTH *2 EXTRA for new donors only
4-23738
ALWAYS NEED CASH??
Add over S9OO per year U your income
hlelp fight sickness and disease vdi your
Mood plasma donations New donors ac accepted
cepted accepted doily 9-2 Noappt neceseoiy
International OioiogKp Inc
9S.W IP Sheer 377-5542
This ad worth $2 far new stances thru
4/23/82. 323494
Former Amvoy Dromond Dvect has storied
more profitable business 2D % vs 3% I
couldn't believe it either? 373-8596.
325-124
Spanish speaking temole U teach English
lOom-to !2om 3 days each week five
doltars per hour, phone 3784402 31*34
THE ALLIGATOR has two gasmans open
for part-time typnh Must type at least 55
wpm. Evening hours, mm. wage Came by
PRODUCTION at 1728 NW IP Ave bdhmd
the Olde College Inn AFTER *pm Ask tar
Lee. No phone cads please.
TEACH OVERSEAS! Graduating samars are
encourage ta apply for details send o self selfaddressed
addressed selfaddressed susmped tang envelope ta:
Friends ol World Teaching. Bax 1049. San
Diego. Co 92112-1049 32334
CRUISE SHIP JOBS Employer Usfcng*. In Infarmohion
farmohion Infarmohion $ Application. S3OO ta Employ Employment
ment Employment Research Semens. PO. Box 2552
Carbondata. II 62901 22338
Art. art ed. graphics for pan bane pk SUI
in art lettering, now and Wru summer $250
to start Reply with schedule so box 286
Gainesville 32601 222-34
Experienced part-time mfsitady tar hades
reai I clothing dept. Fhtrdy. oubgomg
experience preferred- 31 men's 225 W
Univ. Ave. 32354
Lead Singer Wanted
for hard rack band. Baokmga avmtabte
immediately- Call Bob 3/89*97 or Mw
376 7562 22338
Exciting summer |ofas tar cobage stadenta or
foculty os counselor mpruesan m Mama,
water ski. koyack canoe, scska rdtory
rock climb, crafts, etc. litrkdp gnnd salary,
food, lodgmg 8 a fun 8 aemardng wx
penance Write The Summa Cimps. Box
100. Cedar Mtn .NC 28718 tar appl 21*1-
8
PERSONAL
onesihetm m a queddmd Games be physi
don't oHtce. Go 372-14*4 331 >9 9
BODY BEAUT HA TAM et {BANE'S MaaM> 8
Figure Salon Sun Roam. TAM aew far Spr Spring
ing Spring 3789133. 4-2 20-9
NIKE BACKPACKS $15.88
plus 20% off PI odor podke ixrl.dxg do
very high quoftty Eagle Cad km Lloyd
Clarke's Backet Shop ISO* NW 136 Sr
372-7836 Open 7 days, 31834
1000DOLFIN
SIOBB (unbend sobdj Addas rtmxmg
shortsllO(lmad)xdt ptWtncftawed
only os Lloyd Clarke's inches Shop HOB
NW I3#i It 372-780* Ope* 7 days.
J 219-34
RACKETBALLSALE:
WMsen force 250 Puauapw *ls 88 e
23,99 -1 year guarantee j#* bu* deg
ot Lloyd aorta's Backet Rvp 1568 KB.
I3WSI 372 783*0p*n7de*6 2***4

$7,008*12000
Can Be Yews
Be e Mabkct Manager wvti COLLEGE
SIUSMS MtffMG CD. taring e barn
dorse IORWII Hard Wek A Atom* Na Exp.
Harr For wAe. send case sk
W BEST SUMMER KM
2184-4
BIRTH
THiGVT
OF
ABORTION
IS
CHILD SACRIFICE
22224
You 8 torsxar Bared? Nay Erotic SfafNatooo
Cardguiee Grace grft/breakar-iend
$9 951E5. 500 P* 753 4191 4-12179
Need a compomon far those tanefy mgpxcF
How about a oat Seawdui orangs male
n| "A a "ew home. Cn4 Steven or 377
1439 22229
SNOB B GMO STUDENTS ~~~|~
covered dmh dmner be X 73. 630 pm
CnWatu S/nr C 1738 W Umv Ave 222
24
Pwtt Then 1 belie 1 1 m yauf Take a chance
You could be me man of my .beams CaH
376 2879 ai
tor Enema. 21*19

DANSAIN- OANSX IN' SWIMWEAR $
FOTAAD6 starting or ant 89 93 The Dance
Factory I2IBW Umv Ave (mm Mack
ot campus) 22229
LCT* swear Love? Luckey tody eanaed Atop
be ntan go it eryoy sorting brtnng end
kb. # you Suk we imgfir be cenpedW
_ caA 3730093A5u< after 7pm 319-1-9
I Theyreachl
The Riff
AttaeUEWxiMkeAer
Friday 8 Sahnday 9pm 21*14
CM you know they can spray rfumi. ii
over We hekds so e wsects an* makmg love ta *>e keovesT AHEM (fcAmgt;
218-1-4
SWEATPANTS $7.88
plus 40% off Adidas warmups. Other war warmups
mups warmups bam SIBBB Lloyd Cartes Backer
Shop I SOB NW I3W 3 372-7836 Open 7
days. 218-39
Ficvd | bad a Tear nnse or Dubs an En
Watdd feme ta meet you 4m Fn Ryoudox't
how ta po fcshmg haw abaur We beach
Tracy. 21*2-4
S7RMG GETAWAY
A tpne* spring wscakon m the Smokies xnpi
"id by We btsds m your own cottage
SzOmtafa/WBO I eskl, by 2people Maun
** Brook. U 5 441 Saudi Sytvo XC
704-5864329 226134
*r*T r ~+~
8ryan3762275 Jxw 372*661 4-20-30-9
craft, WZ79K29Q7. FtvlJx 322164
WINDSURFER
SCHOOL
Z Sad Shop 4323 MB* *W 3 377-SA6
2188-8
BIC SAILBOARDS
ftB ban IX as We tutor Wtog be
MBEBWSL 387-SAB- 21844
*DEAD*
tor yew iiaxpat exbar roxnixg m ta CM
. xg to be cox- O/aspy 5822E
PUW MfffWKi FEELING or ELAM'S
31*34 264133
1000DCXFIN
xapHBB*BR 1363 BMb 21*34
Wk CPwwxd Otaym RE. bodtol
hi xii Fes bev g, .a lx,, a BMrma*4DM
372403*. *22734
TOGA II
r JRUC
of AAAERICA
60 KEGS OF
MILLER
4pi3pw..*g
31*24

FREE it it
PREGNANCY TEST
-Cad "WTIRtCIt! o prebtam pregnancy
377-49*7
*22734
9QOPG PBATAnONB anp week dabvery
tamWedb of Styles. CMf HM Rrmang 1103
N Mam 3 176*951 *23734
MAKING A CABBH DEOSiONh
TeehnnSxgtr) xnW a XWS ug salary of
$13,000 ta SMuOOO and fivx arm op.
*22734 BVaB
A OOUUa£CdCS CAAEEB
The SFCC Nuctom Atadtame Technology - A earing salary of $13.000418400
- Grow* and up ixuoiaaiif m a dynamic
held
Ear axrgAmaxr m June enwexet Courtaaior
3734000 *22734
_e
SHALOM: HEAR O
ISRAEL
MmmpxmNrmaap
*22734

FREE PREGNANCY TESTS
ABORTION
UCEMfCtafrSOAM
PBJNOUAk CQUAGHMG fSmwe Day'
sukry aoMetnAc
BIRTH CONTROL CLINIC
378-9191
All Women's
Health Center
of Gainesville
'90341136 3
tarwl dense apt tattoo
RASSPOBTiiW spplrnxn i n-iiia ptaaet
e e READY Ptac Smumdse e e
ton
3731811 *22689
Al-1 dz-Sest prices a
pp ** casH
show Plays wax you wear. Cad tar your
nexrparty 3733161 0r3737002. *23474
ABORTION
Evee Awgxancy Teex
Gainesville Womens
Health Center
0053 W 4h Axe.
Ssrwng WeG wAe ext be 7 yvs.
*y bisevet xax prait dime.
eGanmlc.
377-5055
CerwaPCepa
21*1*4
GoxgwftUeaktadeddesi*
23*304 U
373-GATS | pe-11pm)
GeyTeW. Tuesday. 720 pm
1971 MR 2nd Ave
**344
auto bn iggmntarbmdW pin n
sere
FREE
SPINAL
EXAMINA
J!ON_
ShergM. DC 3737098 IID7 SR 2 Am 2
bisikitill s n LJLE *223*4
w bxtag tor ar cad IBWS NOOK 010 W.
Itor Ave 377-6700 QUALITY fax 8 m m-9ns
-9ns m-9ns *22374
xml *' a.py grt *M> so Joe 3530 9R
f. ft -..HA3MBR gs_
SAVANT 14
t.ibdyHmeei
9pna.eto.spid y
Appkcohoxs ovwaabto
336 Beta Ltoipv
236*44
am me to e warn -end re aim, war A
Sfdy ft Max sll 4 sew DC SPA
-4QPH. Termer 372331 *2*S4

alligator friday, march 19, 1982

VOTE
JEAN CHALMERS
City Commission
Pd poi nd pdbyL Atotaney 23264
SAVEONRAYBANS
3005 w xwamTxqLdaao
*32739
PROTECTION FROM CRIAtt
SHF OBO4S OJOPSG *4fU KABAIE 80* W
LJMM ME 374*172 *CW KCWBG
CLASS EQUOMBOSSAtE- 23*14
Queeton- snex sMeswr
Wwd3/t70r600 iGP 2318
SgramedbyCJS
7-24
SKYDIVE^
cowse bi Id We mot xto 349 or 7 pm
Fumyon* xetcame mho ce 377-1857
*4144
HEADACHES
obour flew ond yd
mtweft nihwi owr
CHIROPRATIC
We heaPt scene* Wm hex been map tue tue-23414
-23414 tue-23414 wegrem of fit ns
nr -has comm Stow x a done? Find
37*4725 *6154
fhx tiSid 37*8795740pm' 21*34
x fOISNI BfiAWR
S3OOB
PSms2ooofcxdi.ppmizexd iisu.my 81332
BR.MAta &dto 21*29
WP jddasc maaaege Goad ta darn We
smriaWto Neartaceaypus. 0r*37640A2
*22344
pnbad and orange and totaw xd 4 ampi 2
I*l4
x Wour .!> yam 4 L.-.T 21*14
R.YING
canracr R. exoafr Cfcxck 375-3100 2
25-54
GaybnJmxDsy
fgongAmetawearbtoeieara. 2363
9
lata Shoe tar
CHEAPSKATES
P sQSk"n.,PUkxx 192570* 2nd Sr Friday
RMBES
Meede nde? MS A OUSI BfS fauras new es
cam Lore 3774*91 AmyS mtf 22*3410
LOST
AND TOUND
FOUPO Mdto pxppy goto w4i Meek
Found arELwPekwck 630. Ttoes. 37448X2
21*311
Hera you to* a imo bfeck sowar Sypa deg*
eftodsbwbaem CPI 3764076 8r
342-1721 aP tar Cadsrye Young 21*311
FOUND: Psftoyssaeif towtawg
CPI W danai, 3761830 222-311
IP. Putox watab tod m 2nd Deer
3730*50 2.19.2 11
led pwsri ptn #eass OX gen si censor
Dawn 24087 I*9BBBI 21*211
oadLu 3733822 21*211
UamsPQJA St taxed ptoaaa


37*6135Ptar 448 pm 2**2U
LOSE torn mp m OXaeaP Cemw
w* 377-2*53 2** I-II
wbsto tomets m PtoiM pi
laSEOBStOB
ptaaae cPi 3*2-7995 senammnap nfcs Me
ii >P axii sdsd 21*211

15



16

w alligator, friday, march 19, 1982

UF strokes to 59-point lead in NCAA championships

By Gian Gifford
Al I igator Staff Writer
It is a little early yet for the Lady Gators to raise the
championship banner, but on the strength of their first-night
performance in the NCAA Womens Swimming and Diving
Championships Thursday in the 6Connell Center, theyve
already taken a big step toward sewing up the title.
Although two nights and sixteen events remain before the
actual crowning takes place, winning efforts by swimmers
Tracy Caulkins and Kathy Treible and diver Megan Meyer
have given the Lady Gators what appears to be an in insurmountable
surmountable insurmountable lead.
Caulkins, holder of 35 national titles, swam to wins in two
events, the 100-yard butterfly and 200-yard individual
medley in back-to-back races. Treible, who swept the three
breaststroke races at last years national meet, won the 100-
yard breaststroke and finished second to Caulkins in the
medley. And Meyer, the Female Springboard Diver of the
Year in 1981, was the winner in the 1-meter diving, only her
second-best event.
Add it all up and it equals a whopping 59-point lead for
the Lady Gators.
With eight events completed, UF leads the 37-team field
with 170 points, followed'Tjy Stanford University (111),
University of North Carolina (105), Auburn University (87),
University of Southern California (74) and Arizona State
University (60).
Stanford Coach George Haines, whose Stanford team
shared the pre-meet co-favorite tag with UF, was about
ready to call it quits but not quite.
I think we probably are out of it, he said, We still have
a chance to come back. At least we can still pick up quite a
few points on em.
Lady Gator coach Randy Reese said he expected a better
showing from Stanford:
It was a very good first night for us but I thought

UF hosts Lady Gator
Relays on Saturday
By Daborah Witt
Alligator Staff Writer
After weeks of competing indoors, the Lady Gator track
team moves into the sunshine Saturday as host of the Lady
Gator Relays at Percy Beard Track.
The meet, which kicks off at 9 a.m. with the 10,000
meters, concludes with the mile relay at 9:45 p.m.
Saturday is the sixth anniversary of the relays, and UF
coach Carol Slowik said the meet probably is the most com competitive
petitive competitive event in the Southeast. About 2,000 athletes from 75
high schools and 50 to 60 universities will be in Gainesville,
many who are competing outdoors for the first time this
season.
Admission is $1 for students with a picture I.D. and fee
card, and $3 for the general public.
In every event, the top people are national-class
athletes, Slowik said. Its not just (schools from) Florida.
On paper, it looks like a national championship.
The Lady Gators will be up against stiff competition from
Florida State University, Southeastern Conference rivals
University of Kentucky and the University of Alabama, In Indiana
diana Indiana University, as well as top-notch Canadian athletes.
Outdoor track season
opens at home for UF
By Bill Ward
Alligator Staff Writer
With the success of the 1982 indoor season behind it
now,'the UF track team opens its outdoor season tonight in a
tri-meet with Princeton University and University of lowa.
The meet, which is free to everyone, begins at Percy Beard
Track with field events beginning at 6:30 p.m. and running
events beginning at 7:15.
Princeton is the Tennessee (Southeastern Conference In Indoor
door Indoor track champs) of the Hectagonal Conference, said UF
head track coach John Randolph. They have good balance
with excellent people in the field events.
Some of Princeton's talent in the field events include Augie
Wolf, who was third in the NCAA indoor finals of the shot
put with a heave of 645. Wolf s toss is almost 4 feet better

Summer Session in Colorado
Top U.F. Professors
Ecology, Astronomy, Geology, Anthropology
May 7-June 7. Return home in t ime to work remainder of summer.
'"1
Fantastic recreational opportunities near Pikes Peak
Satisfys summer session requirement
Deadline for filing March 26
Pre-registration fee is SSO
Call 392-1701 for details.

mJf Ifi * ' s f I
[f 11 j 111I111J fi! I 1111; ii ; v
I illr f 11111111 i ti i
najlah feanny
UF swimmers Tracy Caulkins, left, and Kathy Treible congratulate each
other after finishing first and second respectively in the 200 individual
medley.

Stanford could swim a little better, Reese said. I dont
think Stanford swam as well as they were capable.
Caulkins two wins are all the more remarkable because
they came in consecutive races. In the individual medley, she
set a new collegiate record, one of five recorded in the night.
But she was more concerned with the butterfly
I think I couldve gone a little faster in my fly if Id hit the
walls better, she said. Everybodys having good swims
and bad swims, so its pretty much like we expected. By no
means is it over yet.
Treible, who earned a collegiate record of her own with a
28.89 clocking in the 50-yard breaststroke, disagreed.

than UFs shot putter Neil Serafenas best throw. Wolf is also
a 200-foot-plus discus thrower.
Joining Wolf in the field events for Princeton is pro probably
bably probably one of the best javelin throwers in the east, Tom
Meyer. Meyers best throw in the javelin is over 260 feet.
Princeton also has a 7-foot high jumper in freshman Bob
Merrilees and a 50-foot triple jumper in Mike Gray.
If all that isnt enough to worry Randolph, the injury situa situation
tion situation for the Gators is. Gator hurdler Greg Robinson, miler
David Strahl, half-milers Cullen Mattox and Mike Lindsey
all will miss tonights meet due to injuries. Robinson still is
nursing a hamstring pull from the SEC Indoor Champion Championships,
ships, Championships, Strahl missed all of the indoor season with a knee
operation and still is recovering, Mattox has a sore foot, and
Lindsey aggravated the stress fracture in his foot last week.
Gymnasts compete
for AIAW regionals
By Jorga Million
Alligator Writer
With a bid to the NCAA national championship firmly in
hand, the UF gymnastics team travels to Athens, Ga., for the
AIAW regional championship tonight and Saturday night.
Coming off last weeks NCAA regional championship win
in the OConnell Center, the Lady Gators compete this
weekend against the University erf Alabama, University of
Georgia and Jacksonville State University for the chance to
perform in the AIAW national championship to be held in
Memphis, Tenn., on April 2.
Last Sunday. UF head coach Ernestine Weaver was in informed
formed informed by the NCAA that her team had received the third
seed, behind the Univerity of Utah and Oregon State Univer University,
sity, University, for next weeks NCAA national championship in Salt
Lake City.
This weekend the Lady Gators are involved in their second
straight pressurized meet in two weeks but Weaver does not
think her squad is feeling any extra burden.
I think last week we felt a little pressure because we were
performing before the home folks, Weaver said. This
week, though, the team has been in good spirits. The win last
week sort of relaxed everyone. Obviously we would love to
win this weekend If we go to both the NCAA and AIAW na national
tional national championships it cant help but bring our program
prestige and respect from other teams around the country."

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That big lead is going to help us. Stanford could have a
lot of people in the f inals the next two nights but I cant see
them making that up, she said.
Stanfords one bright spot came in the 500-yard
freestyle when Marybeth Linzmeier and Sherri Hannph
finished one-two, Linzmeier in a collegiate record of
4:41.61.
I went out pretty strong, she said. I felt like T was
tightening up so I tried to smooth my stroke down. I ex expected
pected expected more out of (USCs) Michele Ford and (UFs) Rosie
Brown.
I think we can come back really well. The girls are
thinking positive and showing a lot of spirit.

Gator baseball team
visits Vanderbilt
By Gian Gifford
Al I igator Staff Writer
v
After a week in which the UF baseball team had a chance
to lick its wounds and regroup from last weekends grueling
series with Florida State University, the Gators return to the
rigors of Southeastern Conference action this weekend with
a three-game series at Vanderbilt University.
The Gators, 10-9 overall and 2-1 in the conference, meet
the Commodores in a Saturday doubleheader followed by a
Sunday afternoon game.
The week off helped us heal up, said UF coach Jack
Rhine. We were a little leg-weary. It (the week off) has
given our pitchers some rest. But anytime you lay off in
baseball, you never know how youre gonna play when you
come back.
Including the four games against Florida State, UF had
played six games in five days by last Sunday. Rhine said the
rest was needed so the Gators could be in top shape for Van Vandy.
dy. Vandy. On the other hand, hes worried the sudden change of
pace may have dulled their competitive edge.
Were in real good shape right now, but we hope the
layoff hasn t hurt us, he said. You play a lot of games and
all of a sudden you take five days off. We dont know what
kind of shape were in.
Lady netters win, 5-2
By Alisa Milgrom
Alligator Writer
The Lady Gators tennis team chalked up its 10th victory
of the season Thursday afternoon as it defeated the
Princeton University Tigers 5-2 at the Varsity Courts.
The top five singles players all won their matches. Cissie
Donigan, playing the No. 1 position, defeated Joy Cummings
in straight sets.
The line-up, which has been shifted all season, once again
was juggled. June Ferestien and Lisa Levins were out of ac action
tion action at the No. 3 and 4 spots due to injuries. This caused the
lower positions to play a spot higher.
The match was much closer than the score indicated. Bet Betty
ty Betty Newfield and Martha Korbut, playing the No. 3 and 4
positions, needed nearly 2*/j hours to defeat their opponents.
The Lady Gators will play again on Saturday afternoon as
they host Middle Tennessee State University at 1.



Full Text

PAGE 1

the Independent florida aiiiRtor Punbishedby Campus Communications, Iic. of Gainesville, Fla. N ticially associated with the University of Florido volume 75, no. 129 friday, march 19, 1982 Southerland narrowly captures top SG spot USA's Steve Southerland .winces as he toasts his student body presidential victory with a champagne both from fellow celebrants By Lisa Beckman Alligator Staff Writer Squeezing by with a 6 percent margin, University Student Alliance party longshots Steve Southerland and Charlotte Mather swiped the UF student body presidency and vice presidency Thursday night. During the first round of balloting last week, the duo finished second with 13 percent of the vote. But in Thursday night's runoff race, Southerland and Mather won with 53 percent of the vote. Students Unite Now Party contenders Brian Ballard and Ava Parker finished close behind with 47 percent. During the two-day runoff election, 12 percent of the UF student body turned out to sweep Southerland, Mather and USA student body treasurer candidate Jim Fried into.office. The results are to be validated today. "First, I can't believe it," said Southerland, a 21-year-old history major from Miami. "And second, I think dedication and hard work came through. "I ste disabilities as a thing of the mind," said Southerland, who lost his left leg to cancer at the age of 14. A teary-eyed Mather turned up nearly an hour after the results were announced at 8 p.m., explaining her pet rabbit had died earlier in the evening. But her victors -and the dozens of hugs and kisses she received from supporters soon made the tears go awa. A jubilant Fried inched his was into the treasurer spot with 50.6 percent of the vote, narrowly defeating SUN candidate Linda Garrett, who polled just more than 49 percent of the vote. Fried won by 42 votes. An ecstatic Fried jumped from hug to handshake. "The fat lady finally sang and she sang the right tune," he said, taking a breather outside the Orange and Brew. "I won't be bothering everylbody tomorrow," he said. "I'll just go to class like everybody else. I am an average student you know." In the Student Traffic Court chief justice race, Deputy Chief Justice Jimmy Charles picked up 54 percent of the vote, beating opponent Mike Trentalange, who garnered 47.6 percent. "It's so satisfying after three weeks of hard So. 'Winners' page three By FUenu* LoMante Alligator Staff Writer UF President Robert Marston and other UF officials are up in arms over the state Senate budget that passed Thursday evening -saying the budget cuts building money for UF's most prized building projects while pampering the University of-South Florida. The Houpe of Iepresentatives' 1982-83 state budget -which was passed Wednesday -also jarred UF officials when they discovered that money for a chemistry lab and a science library were cut. In the Senate appropriations bill, UF lost a total of $2,630,000, including $1,800,000. foq a meat laboratory, $480,000 for a science library and $350,000 for renovation of Leigh Hall, the chemistry building. While both the House and Senate members are figuring on about $30 million for capital outlay next year tor Florida's nine public universities, UP lobbyist Al Alsobrook said the way senators distributed the money makes the House members look generous by comparison. "The Senate bill is much leaner, of course," Alsobrook said. "It doesn't hardly have anything in there."' That's because even though both House and Senate members passed a one-cent sales tax, only 25 percent of that money would go back to state general revenue accounts in the Senate plan, Alsobrook said. In the House budget, 50 percent of that tax revenue would go into state revenue accounts, he said. In both plans, local governments would get the rest of the money. Much of that would be givennut in property tax rebates. UF]Executive Vice P'esident John Nattress said UF officials think the,ce being shortchanged in the Legislature. "There's no planning money for anything at Florida," Nattress said "It's all in engineering." In _the House plan, UF would get $7 million for the last phase of construction of the Shands Teaching Hospital patient services building. House members would also See'Bulingm money' next page SPORTS page 16 LIF's women swimmers take a big lead in the first-ever NCAA women's swimming championship LOCAL page 2 Former O'Connell Center box office manager Rick Cimmerman is charged with two counts of grand theft and 38 counts of forgery and uttering a forgery CAMPUS pageSa A microbiology professor tells a IF audience Cfhrislopher Columbus may have been responsible for tl'nsporting syphilis from the New World to the Old World No Ifs, anids, or butts Eleven Sigma Phi Epsilon fraternity wisecrackers bare their opinions about the recent controversy over the pending removal of the UF Lesbian and Gay Society from its Reitz Union office. UFLAGS is scheduled to be evicted from its office today, but members plan to appeal to the Board of Regents. al ferguson Senate shreds UF construction budget

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Church officials defend soup kitchen, blame city for closing wy wk.ne .wnew Alfigor Staff Writmr Hurley Hall soup kitchen sponsors Tursday accused local government officials of trying to make them look bad because the, are feeding transients. Alachua County Health and Rehabilitative Services Tuesday closed the soup kitchen, on the border of the Student Ghetto, becuase they said it did not meet state health requirements. Father John Gillespie, pastor of St. Augustine Catholic Church that sponsors the soup kitchen, and sister Claire Norton, the president of the kitchen's board of directors, held a press conference Thursday to rebut the health department's complaints. "I think the major problem is whs isn't the city doing something (about the vagrants)?" said Gillespie. "We are being put on the defensive. The city should be put on the defensive.' Gillespie and Norton said that the cits hs done nothing to help with the soup kitchen. The approximately $800 a month it costs to run the kitchen comes only from pri ate donations. Norton said. Building money from poge one gioe UF $600,000 for planning an engineerng building and $300.000 for planning on the Reid Hall science building. House members also gave IF $1.5 million for expansion of the Holland Law Center. That money is being given to match a $1.5 million donation to the UF las% school from lawyers throughout the state. But Nattress said state legislators tampered with the priority list UF officials submitted to the state Board of Regents, leaving tF with only that $900,000 for future projects. Meanwhile, he said, USF in Tampa got a hefotv $10 million for planning future construetion projects. That generous appropriation was probably due to the influence of Rep .I e Moftit, D"I think we have the right to question an agency that brings nothing to the city but harrassment," said Gilespie in reference to Health and Rehabditative Services. HRS closed the soup kitchen because it lacked proper handwashing facilities, dishwashing facilities, fire extinguishers and food protection devices, HRS officials said. Soup kitchen sponsors, they said, also violated an agreement made two years ago to cook the food at the church and serve it at Hurle Hall down the street. Instead, kitchen workers started both cooking and serving the food at the soup kitchen. Board members said HRS closed the soup kitchen without making an'y inspections. According to health department records, the soup kitchen was inspected when it initially opened three years ago. It was inspected again February 19 of this year after workers at The Sweet Connection ice cream store complained to the health department about "rats and filth," health department records say. Director of Environmental Health Car Pafford said a letter of warning was sent out March 1. telling St. Francis Hall to correct the health violations. Pafford said that the Tampa, who is expected to be the next speaker of the House, Nattress said. Alsobrook agreed Moffit wielded heas'N clout in the capital-outlay budget decision. But Rep. Sid Martin, D-Hawthorne, said he doesn't think UF came out as bad as Nattress claims. "Dr. Nattress doesn't know what he's talking about," Martin said. "We have the finest capital outla, program, right here, in the history of UF-" Capital outlay nones, which comes from a portion of ever% student's tuition, goes into a state trust fund that pays for state university buildings and equipment. With depleted state revenues and uncertain projections for next year, Martin said UF probably made out as well as it could. One thing UF officials lost, however, was state money for a meat lab at the Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences which is nearly completed, Martin said. That was Soup kto,.cuWOmwf ..lounge on steps of Hurley Hall during rainstorm soup kitchen was told to close March 15, after City Housing Board member Monica Smith complained and a follow-up inspection was made March 16. But soup kitchen board member Ed Olowin, one of the people Pafford said the health department was in contact with, said, "As far as I know, they (HRS) never made any physical review of our facility." St. Francis officials also are upset that neighbor business people and residents say the church is responsible for bringing the vagrants into Gainesville. Gillespie said the vagrants were in the city before the soup kitchen ever opened. He said 40 percent of the probably due to hard feelings among state legislators who distrust IFAS after a recent error IFAS officials made in their salary budget. Regents Capital Programs Director Forrest Kelley said he was also surprised that state lawmakers struck the meat lab from their priority list. Usually, state lawmakers cut planning money before cutting into the actual construction money for completing a construction project, he said. But that didn't happen this time. Marston also said he was particularly upset that state lawmakers disregarded the UF priority list. That list had the renovation of Leigh Hall chemistry laboratories and the IFAS meat lab ahead of all other UF priorities. "The single most important thing is the chemistry lab," Marston said. "Naturally, I'm disappointed." Facilities in the UF chemistry department are seriously oversoup kitchen's customers are UF students, not vagrants. "St. Augustine's had nothing to do with bringing the poor into Gainesville," Gillespie said. "They're coming streaming off of 1-75 into Gainesville for our gourmet cuisine here," he added sarcasticaly. Until a certified stove is found, the board members said bag lunches will be prepared at St. Augustine's and served at Hurley Hall. "We're gonna take care of them somehow, somewhere," said board member Russel Ramsey. The members say it is their responsibility to feed the poor because that is what "the Scriptures say to do." crowded, Marston said. That space crunch is handicapping UF engineering majors as well as chemistry majors, he said. But it's too early to predict gloom and doom for UF, Marston said. Representatives of both state houses have meetings scheduled this weekend to come to a compromise plan and some of the capital outlay priorities may change then, he said. "I hope the Legislature does not make any decision in the final analysis without giving serious consideration to the priority list," Marston said. Alsobrook said he's watching that conference committee between the two houses anxiously. Both Sen. George Kirkpatrick, DGainesville, and Sen. Pete Skinner, D-Lake City, are on that committee, Alsobrook said. Members of both houses are predicting a long, drawn-out bargaining session, he said. "It's a real sparring match up here," Martin said. Holland Law Center March 12-21 great0 wcha ECampus Shop 5 -&Bookstore in the hub. 392-0194 Today, March 19 -David SIV, Environmental Lawyer and Activist. 3:30 P.M. Law Center Auditorium. Reception follows on concourse. Sponsored by Environmental Low Society. Saturday, March 20 and Sunday March 21 Southeast Regional Moot Court Competition. All day in Law CenterAuditorium. K Law Day XXV : A Generation of Progress. 3obn IilarsbaU ~Isipejoocation Cetleeof Low, Unlvlrslty of Olorid. Junbei bbp WOO ,Imited MEIXELL Tape Offer' maxell. UD-XLIIC-90 TWIN for $6.99 with this coupon while supply lasts No credit cards on tape offer 6OUND IDrPA6 "Gainesville's Most Popular Stereo Store" 2201 N.W. 13th St. 378-6192 Just North of Mr. Donut I L I I rmmm l6mmm I

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cO I igatorfr4day, 94~ It was no ros By Fesak LWawen. Alligator Staff Wrter The bright yellow roses in their lapels couldn't hide what they knew. Students Unite Now's Student Body Vice Presidential candidate Ava Parker sat slumped in a chair in the Orange and Brew, forcing a smile. She was exhausted from two weeks of campaigning. And she knew she didn't have anything to show for it. "After 6 o'clock, I knew," Parker said after the results of the Student Government runoffs were announced about 8 o'clock. In the final tally of SG runoff elections Wednesday and Thursday, she and SUN Student Body presidential candidate Brian Ballard fell 3 percentage points short of taking the election from University Students Alliance Student Body President-Elect Steve Southerland and his running mate, Charlotte Mather. Southerland, Mather and Ballard all knew the results before the official announcement. They all had representatives stationed at voting booths to await their opening shortly after 6:30 p.m. -which Thursday night also opened Southerland's administration, which begins in two weeks. "I can look in the mirror and say I'm proud we did what we did," said a somber Ballard after the totals were announced. Ballard clutched a drink in his right hand, his left hand fingering the lapel with the yellow rose. Yellow, of course, was SUN's campaign color. The victory celebration they expected wasn't there. After winning 47 percent of the vote last Wednesday and Thursday in the general election, Ballard said all his friends told him he couldn't lose. And that, Ballard said, was what did him in. "We just got overconfident," he said. Garrett and Parker concluded the same thing, as did Ballard's campaign manager, John Gilliam. "I think a lot of people felt we had it in the bag," Gilliam said, leaning dejectedlys against the bar at the Orange and Brew. "I have to hand it to them (USA)," Gilliam said. "The last two days, they just got out ight for teary-eyed SUN party losers SO Elections Commissioner Andrew Katz, left, and SUN's Brian Ballard share a post-election moment of sadness as a teary-eyed Ballard loses his bid for student body president and busted it." That doesn't mean, however, that there weren't some cries of "no fair" coming from the SUN camp. "I just hate the way they won," Parker said, fighting not to break down into tears as she had beore when her SUN comrades approached with consoling hugs. Ballard said he also thought the USA campaign was rather dirty, citing pieces of literature USA members passed out with attacks on the SUN candidates. There was nothing for the losers to do but contemplate their futures. And for Garrett, the future has more immediate concerns than politics. "I need a job," she laughed, breaking her first smile since the vote totals came in. "It's a relief not to be campaigning, but I invested so much in it." The end of the campaign means she and the other candidates will be able to concentrate on classes for the first time in several weeks, Garrett added. Parker also let some enthusiasm break through her tearful exterior. "I'm not going to just drop out of sight," she smiled. "I'm too young, I'm just a sophomore." But Ballard, who has served in Student Body President Mike Bedke's cabinet for a year, said he's had enough of politics. "I've learned a lot about SG but now I think my learning experience is over" Ballard said with a sigh. But that doesn't mean Ballard is playing the disgruntled loser, he was quick to add. "No sour grapes," he said quietly, his eyes wandering to the spot 20 feet away where Southerland supporters were drenching their man of the hour in champagne. "They beat us fair and square and that's all there is to it." Winners continue from page one work," said a smiling Charles. "I've been working in the traffic court for a long time, and now I can get some things done." Charles .said he was off to Dub's Steer Room lounge and then the hot tubs But the results of Thursday night's election stand the chance of being nullified if the Board of Masters, the SG equivalent of the SmwC nurtfinc the CC Elections Commission guilty of "ineptness" in handling last week's election, Two of the three parties accused the commission earlier this week of not informing parties more fully of tallying procedures. The board is scheduled to meet next Wednesday. Following the tallying both winners and losers shook hands and agreed on at least one thing: they were oh-so-glad the election scramble was over. "After three weeks of missing classes and talking to people, it's a relief," Fried said. Senate Winners Accounting -Debra Kronengold (USA); Agriculture (2) Lew -Dyonne Feinberg (Soldority); Libre Arts ed Hal Phillips (SUN), Danny Olson (write-in);Architecture -scivenes (6) -Paulo Bono (SUN), Michael Stein (SUN), Tim Vincent Nicorr(USA). Koteff (SUN), Marsh McLowhorn (SUN), Clay Burton (SUN), Silding ComNinctrion -Greg Buer (SUN); SusbiWe KatherineLima(SUN). Ad.inibtrution(2) -Barbaro Lorch (USA), Jack Schlossberg Medkine -Fredrick Boyd (Solidaoty); Nursing -Shellbe (USA). McMahon(SUN);1PheesicyLillanSilvershein(Ind.). *0e*"isthy -Robbin Quo'erman (SUN), Keith Francois Pysk.elEdutPionRobert Smijon (SUN). write-in). VatebortyM edite -Russell Swift (SUN). ,detleion (2) -Cheryl Downing (USA), Margie Zucker 1 UF (5) -Som Katz (USA), Phillip Laserno (SUN), Dennis (SUN); Segineerig (3) -Lisa Shirley (SUN), Ted Rogers Franco (SUN), Liso Gandy (SUN, Chorneto Scott (SUN). (SUN), Mike S, mermch., (SUN). 2 UP (U) -Kathy DDcani. (SUN), UOscrBennan (SUN), FisAt%No candidates: eF tetry -Jennifer KarmenDavid Hopkins (SUN),Roy HnUng r (SUN), Unon Zamom dy(USA). (SUN), ShelondoShow (SUN). H "*Ith1*tedProess.i.sMarianne Reed (SUN) JournslKeh Kegler 'tobe voedobyte StdentSenate Buffett's Back! t is an Easy Pick-up I lig tr The soundtrack of our lives L Every #1 hit in order from rrom Somewhere Over China In Concert at the O'Connell Center SATURDAY MARCH 27 I PM Ail St oBseeved $1.g @#iSAL ATU Galtther'scafe. Reitz Union Box Qifice e Spec's Musice Both Belk Undsey locationsor phone 392-1653 presented by: SGP/Florida Concerts EACH CLUB Usedliss 105 January 1964 to today! Sunday, March 21st 6-10 PM March 22nd-March 25th 7-10 PM ABC Liquors e Central Builder Supplies LiphoaMusic Pagliai's Pizza Roderick's e Show & Keeter Ford eSound Idens Street's Honda 0 Wendy's Old Fashioned Hamburgers Exclusively on I --: ,AmiL-I MAO -77A

PAGE 4

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olilgatorfridaymarch19,. 1S2r-'Comnpiled from UnifedPress tnemaflonal Florida Senate posses penny sales tax hike TALIAHASSEE -The Senate passed a penny sales tax hike Thursday after legislators extended the session 11 days and resurrected a compromise strategy designed to avoid a full spring of turbulent special sessions. The Senate voted 31-6 for Melbourne Sen Clark Maxwell's plkn raising the sales tax to a nickel on the dollar and earmarking $440 million of the $770 million that would be generated to reduce property taxes or prevent tax increases scheduled to take effect this fall. It also endorsed a proposed constitutional amendment reducing property taxes going to schools. by $1.50 per $1,000 of taxable' assessed value, or about $75 on a $75,000 house. A critical vote on new taxes out of the way, the Senate then began final work on a nearly $10 billion state budget. Four Dutch journalists killed in El Salvador SAN SALVADOR -Four Dutch journalists, one recently questioned by police on his ties to guerrillas, were shot to death Thursday in a clash between soldiers and rebels, the Dutch consul said. The four journalists were members of a television crew'working for Dutch Radio and Television News that went to northern Chalatenango Provinceearly in the day. They were reported killed near the town of El Paraiso, 36 miles north of San Salvador. There were no other details about how they died. .The slayings followed the delivery of death threats Wednesday to local journalists by the Anti-Communist Alliance of El Salvador which listed 35 foreign and Salvadoran journalists scheduled for death. The four Dutch journalists were not on the list. Five other journalists have been killed covering El Salvador's civil war in the past two years, two others are missing and presumed dead and about 12 have been wounded. The four Dutchmen were indentified as producer Jacobus Andries "Koos" Koster, soundman Hans Lodewijkter Laag, director Jan Corneilis Chuisper and cameraman Johannes Willemsen. "The foreign ministry gave me the information about their deaths," said Koen Stefnitjk, a businessman who is Holland's honorary consul in San Salvador. "The report is unfortunately 99.9 percent accurate. McCarthy to seek Senate seat he gave up in 1970 ST. PAUL, Minn. -Three-time presidential candidate Eugene McCarthy said Thursday he will seek the Democratic nomination for the Senate seat he gave up more than a decade ago. "One never has a personal claim to a Seat seat -but it is the same seat, by sequence of election, that I first won in 1958," McCarthy told reporters in making his political comeback announcement. The seat was won by former Vice President Hubert Humphrey in 1970, after McCarthy declined to seek re-election and Humphrey lost the 1968 presidential race to Richard Nixon. Humphrey held the seat until his death in 1978, It now is held by Republican David Durenberger, who faces no opposition this year within his own Independent-Republican party.I In seeking the party's backing, the. silverhaired McCarthy downplayed his 1980 endorsement of Reagan. "It was a very modest endorsement. The difference between repudiating it and reaffirming it would be very modest," he said. The other two Democratic candidates for the Senate nomination are Mark Dayton, 35, a former state economic development commissioner and member of the wealthy Dayton's department store family, and Grant J. Merritt, 41, a Minneapolis lawyer and former director of the state Pollution Control Agency. McCarthy's "children's crusade" of the 1968 presidential campaign helped force Lyndon Johnson from the White House. But McCarthy says, "if the Senate had exercised its constitutional responsibilities properly, the war in Vietnam never would have reached the magnitude-it did and the campaign challenge of 1968 might not have been necessary. House and Senate in stalemate over alternate budget plans WASHINGTON -Despite calls for immediate action, Congress moved slowly and seemingly in opposite directions Thursday in trying to reach a bipartisan alternative to President Reagan's embattled 1983 budget proposal. Senate GOP Leader Howard Baker said the Senate could pass a budget resolution now, but he would prefer that the House make the first move since it would be more difficult for the Democratic-dominated House to develop a consensus. But House Speaker Thomas O'Neill said Wednesday the Democrats probably w-ould wait for Senate Republicans to make the first move toward a comprehensive, deficitreducing alternative budget plan. The confused stalemate became even more obvious during a brief conversation Thursday morning between O'Neill and House GOP Leader Bob Michel of Illinois, who is trying to resume deadlocked budget negotiations in the House. Michel asked O'Neill in a private conversation what kind of compromise package he could take to the President, and O'Neill replied one that reduces the growth of defense spending and offers the 1983 tax cut, Congressional sources said. "Michel said the president won't even listen to proposals in any of those areas," and the conversation ended, said a Congressional source. Singer Teddy Pendergrass injured in car crash. PHILADELPHIA -Rhythm-and-blues singer Teddy Pendergrass, an electrifying stage performer revered by his fans, crashed his Rolls Royce into a tree along a winding highway Thursday, suffering critical spine injuries and partial paralysis of his legs. The 1:30 a.m. crash trapped Pendergrass, 31, and a passenger, Tenika Watson, 31, for 45 minutes before rescue crews pried open the jammed doors of his 1981 Rolls Royce in the Germantown section of Philadelphia. Pendergrass was transferred to Thomas Jefferson University Hospital's spinal cord injury center after initial treatment at Germantown Hospital. The spinal cord injury caused some paralysis of the singer's legs but the extent of the damage will not be known until his condition stabilizes in three or four days, Francis Sweeney, director of Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, said. Watson was released from Germantown Hospital after treatment for multiple contusions. Police accident investigator Martin Kelly said police investigators were unable to talk to Pendergrass and had not determined where the singer was headed when the accident occurred. Kelly said there were no indications of drug or alcohol use. Chinese factory explosion leaves 'many' dead PEKING -A massive explosion in a medical factory on the southeastern Chinese coast opposite Taiwan caused "many" casualties last week, Radio Peking disclosed Thursday. The broadcast did not give an exact casualty figure but said only that "many comrades gave up their lives or suffered injuries" in the blast on the morning of March 9. The radio said the casualties included the Communist party representative as well as the director, vice director "and many young workers" at the factory in Fuding County in Fujian Province, across the narrow Formosa Strait from Taiwan. There was no suggestion of sabotage and the broadcast said a fire started due to "carelessness" which caused stockpiled gasoline and inflammable material, probably chemicals, to explode. The radio said a bigger explosion was averted because of the "gallant" efforts of people at the scene who moved some 100 tons of gasoline and inflammable material from the fire. It said all three services of the Peoples Liberation Army were mobilized shortly after the blast to either fight the fire, evacuate the injured or fly in emergency medical teams from nearby areas. There were apparently so many casualties an air force airlift was mounted to transport the injured to hospitals in surrounding area! and even other provinces. Bill passes restricting press from naming spies WASHINGTON -The Senate Thursday approved and sent on its way to almost certain enactment an unprecedented press restriction making it illegal to print the ,names of American spies, even when they are public knowledge. On a vote of 90-6, the Senate sent the administration-backed bill to conference with the House, which approved a similar version last year 354-46. One of the bill's sponsors, Sen. Joseph Biden, D-Del., predicted it would be declared unconstitutional in the courts because of a House-passed provision adopted by the Senate Wednesday. The critical language in that amendment would make an author's "reason to believe" that disclosures would harm U.S. intelligence a criterion for prosecution. Opponents wanted a stricter standard of having to prove "intent" to "impair or impede" the CIA and sister agencies. The bill is part of an administration package to bolster the CIA's effectiveness and was aimed at newsletters such as Counterspy and Covert Action Information Bulletin, which sponsors of the bill said are "in the business of naming names" of agents. Biden, the American Civil Liberties Union and news media groups all contended the bill is unconstitutional because it penalizes the publication of information that in many cases is neither classified nor harmful to national security. Bandit gets more attention in bar than he expects RENO, Nev. -The St. Patrick's day festivities were still in full swing early Thursday when a man with a bandanna over his face and a gun in his hand walked into the Ranch House Bar. "This is a stickup!" he yelled. If anyone heard him over the din, they showed no respect. The bartender continued drawing beers. But when he threatened to shoot, the mood changed. Some patrons grabbed him, bounced him off the wall and beat him until he was unconscious. No shots were fired. Police rescued the suspect, took him to a hospital for treatment of a broken nose, then jailed him. William Michaud, 25, was booked for investigation of robbery. Safe -Young& Hard Luck Drivers I to call & check our low lowauto insurance rate a Florida Highway lnensce 540S.W 13thlSt. (Bid.BmvWnby) 3 ~TAM***************

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6, alligator, friday, march 19, 1982 onlnions Playing with matches The head of one concerned group likes to paint this analogy to the danger: Imagine two young kids standing in a room with gasoline up to their knees. One kid has eight matches, the other 10. Since neither trusts the other, both say they need more matches 'to feel "safe". Now imagine yourself locked in the room with the two as they yell at each other and threaten to strike a match. Feel a little uncomfortable? You certainly should. Because even if you aren't locked in a gasoline-flooded room with a pair of pyromaniacal brats, you are trapped in a world that could disappear any moment in an atomic puff of smoke. And two nearly uncontrollable children, the United States and Russia, stand ready to strike their nuclear weapon matches. The absurd situation has existed for years, of course, but these days Americans across the country are becoming concerned about the neverending weapons race for a very good reason -an economic one. President Reagan, attempting to ring up record federal deficits, insists his proposals for defense spending leave no room for cuts. Many Americans, concerned that the deficits will push the country into near-depression, are starting to offer suggestions of where military spending can be trimmed. In a grass-roots movement calling for a freeze on the production of nuclear weapons, folks are suggesting the nuclear arms race should be the first luxury to go. So far, resolutions supporting a freeze have been passed by five state legislatures and 194 of 236 town meetings where it was considered in New Hampshire and Vermont. The resolutions passed by farmers in Vermont and ranchers in Oregon do not call for nuclear. surrender to the Soviets. They ask that the United States and Russia agree on a treaty freezing the arms race, a treaty which would include guarantees that neither side could cheat. The Reagan administration -hellbent on adding to its arsenal of matches -is criticizing the proposal, saying it would lock in a current Russian advantage. Actually, neither side has aclearcut lead in the arms race. Russia holds the advantage in total missile payload but the United States is ahead in total number of warheads. The Russians have reacted favorably to the proposal, and not without reason. Because of America's continuing technological superiority, more than twodecades of a costly arms race has yet to give the Soviets the advantage. With the drain weapons production has made on their sickly economy, they should be more than willing to take a breather, The push for a nuclear freeze has moved into Congres,with 141 senators and representatives pledged to support a resolution calling for it. Unfortunately, neither area Congressman Don Fuqua nor Florida Sens. Paula Hawkins or Lawton Chiles now are among the resolution's backers. They would change their minds quickly, however, if their constituents joined the national call for a stop to the nuclear arms race. In Gainesville, the UF student and faculty senates should consider resolutions supporting the freeze. So should the city and county commissions, after holding public hearings to listen to their voters. Some people might oppose the idea, saying local governments should not concern themselves with national affairs. Let's put it this way: Locked in the gasoline flooded room with the two kids preparing to light up, would you stay silent? LE'r'rEls Penny sales tax Increase should be passed quickly Editor: The Florida Education Association/United, representing more than 60,000 school employees in Florida public schools, community colleges and universities, has been on record since 1975 urging the Florida Legislature to enact a I cent increase in the sales tax. Although FEA/United is a strong advocate for money for education, we support the sales tax to also fund other critical governmental.responsibilities including law enforcement, transportation and human services. The sales tax should be passed even under normal economic conditionsbut with declining state revenues and cutbacks from Washington, the Legislature no longer has the luxury to delay. Polls indicate a growing public support for the penny increase. While no one likes taxesit is better to have apenny increase than for essential services to be drastically curtailed. Speaker Ralph Haben and the Florida House of Representatives should be commended for.their leadership in passing a sales tax increase. Gov. Bob Graham has now joined this effort. The time has come for the Florida Senate to put aside "political one-upmanship"and dowhat is best for the citizens of Florida -guarantee the continuation of programs in education, law enforcement, transportation and human services, through an increase in the sales tax. This should be done immediately and theA the Legislature should go home. Put Tornillei Jr. FEA/United President Tolbert Area government shortchanges dorm residents Editor: The residents of theTolbert Area have continually been shortchanged by their area government, TAC. TAC is wasting the students' money and has of this year not justified its existence. It has evolved into a political tea room, with members too busy patting each others' backs to worry about students' needs.I In the beginning of the year, students were urged to join the bandwagon and buy a TAC card. They enthusiastically looked forward to borrowing numerous items that could be checked out for free with the card. Upon trying to use this miracle card, they were horribly disappointed. Most of the equipment to be checked out was either broken, or ionexis. tent. When I inquired about new equipment I was told, "It's here somewhere." This became a grimly familiar phrase, later concerning a piano and then televisions. TAC had the opportunity this semester to acquire a tree band with a popular following for a promotional concert. Of course, this was out of the question since this would actually make money instead of spend it. The money could have been used to hire another band, or for any other projects benefiting the area. TAC, consistent with, its previous poor record, voted down the motion for the free band. Another example of TAC's reckless spending canbe illustrated by their purchase of new televisions for every floor. The televisions were bought many many months ago but certainly could not be put in until last week. The "theftproof" cabinets had not yet been built. These cabinets are so theft-proof that we daily dismantle ours to adjust the vertical hold on a ghastly picture. This is the ultimate paradox; we have plenty of black and white televisions, they just do not receive any stations! AmM. el. lef. o. Spokese. Students United for fesponsibie o"ve""n~ t' "pe" -tures Iup' Fraternities offer privileges afforded peasants by Stal in Editor: It occurred to me recently that the many pleasant repercussions of the collectivization of peasants by Joseph Stalin run parallel to the beneficial influences afforded by UF's fraternities. I thought I would share my thoughts. Such virtures as the homogenization of an otherwise rebellious though dull class of people, and the grafting of some higher purpose for which to strive in life (be it mass industrialization or the beefing up of resumes), are immediately apparent .'he spirit generated at the prospect of this striving, by peasant or pledge, is ennobling: the peasant was "eager to join the collective farm" (Stalin), and now eaVh year enthusiastic students literally rush to the various houses. Perhaps the most fulfilling aspect to the integrant is the spontaneous fellowship forged, then as now, in either sodality. Stalin's plan did, and our fraternities do, offer structural coherence so needed for a pleasant glide through our otherwise chaotic lives. The condemnations hurled at our frats by so many of the students are obviously birthed from bitterly misguided thought. I, as a future pledge (I fervently pray that I might one day be a brother), frankly do not understand all the misgivings, and I am resentful. Fraternities are the balm for wounds delivered to our comfortable existence by those who, with utterly confusing and obviously insidious argument, dare question the insulation lent by such asylums! Ken Strvs 3UF por e s insideEdtdsor: Bor Kle n Advertising director: Trici Corey PheoEdt or:JoeBubank OpnionsEdtor; TerryGodbey Published by Campus Communications, Inc. P.O. Bso 14257 Univesity Stotion, Goiqpsville, Florid. Off ice behind the Collesg. einn, 1728 West. UMtsesty Av. Clsfied Advertising: 376-4446,1tRetil Dsplay Adee4sing: 376-4482, Nesroom:e 376-44d58; Podsution: 3734m, l~aSsn sOffice: 376-44,46 Letters Policy Letters must be typed and double-spaced on 060 character line, dated and signed with the author's real nome, have address and telephone number of wrierand nxc edx wrds MMOM podM MIL'.

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anininsa _ alligator, triay, march19, ip 92Y Ode to James Mi The stage has been set, we've opened the door. Beware, Salvadorans, the U.S.wants war. The draft has restarted, our young men are tense. To die ina foxhole, it doesn't make sense. But what of our freedom? our great hemisphere! As rumor would have it, the commies are near. So off we will go, fraternities too. To defend Exxon oil, and the red, white and blue. Alan Bookmaan Six weeks of training, that's all we will need. But we'll get just one bullet, to learn how to bleed. It all brings back memories, of days long forgot. When Nixon was president, until he was caught. His so-called advisers, they told him one time. "Stop the war now, and you'll save numerous lives!" Hundreds and hundreds, of our boys would be safe. And Nixon said "Fuck 'em." They have it on tape. But now it's El Salvador, and that's just the start. In no time at all, our troops shall depart. What I guess is the moral, if you really must know. Is to dig up the body, of ol' James Monroe. Make sure he's rested, make sure he's fed. Then graciously tell him, his Doctrine is dead! Nicaraguans faring better under. Sandinista leaders Ed o As a supporter of the Nicaraguan revolution and also a firm believer in the principles of democracy, I have been quite disappointed in the extraordinarily one-sided treatment that Nicaragua has received in the press in recent months. Administration officials are regularly heard referring to the leftist government as totalitarian or as drifting in that direction. Editors of major newspapers have sought to portray the FSLN (Sandinista National Liberation Front leaders of the new government) as enemies of freedom of the press. According to the critics, the hostilities between the government and the right-wing newspaper La Prensa show that the FSLN are no better than dictator Anastasio Somoza who was overthrown by a massive nationwide uprising 2/ years ago. A 'November 9 Washngfon Post editorial warned that Nicaraguan freedom of the press was "under siege." On November 25, a New York Timeseditorial lamented that LdPrensa, the newspaper that led the fight against the Somoza tyranny has repeatedly been closed down." While it is true that La Prensa was closed down five times last year, for a total of seven days, these measures were carried out because of violations of a law regarding accurate reporting of the news, not as blows against a free press. All three of Nicaragua's daily papers, La Prensa, El Nuevo Diario, and the FSLN's own Barnlcada, continue to voice criticism, sometimes quite strong, of government officials. In reality, there is more freedom of the press; and considerably more diversity of opinion in Nicaragua, than in any other Latin American country. In addition to the three newspapers mentioned, Time, Newsweek and La Nacion, a daily paper from San Jose, Costa Rica, are available. None of these are friendly to the Nicaraguan government. A wide variety of other English and Spanishlanguage magazines are also distributed. Several anti-Sandinista radio stations broadcast freely, alongside the government's own Voice of Nicaragua and the FSLN's Radio Sandino. Another very serious charge being leveled at the Sandinistas is that they have been mistreating the native population.In his speech to the Organization of American States Feb. 24, President Reagan accused the Sandinistas of carrying out a "forced relocation" of Miskitus (Nicaragua's largest Indian tribe) and of burning their communities "to the ground." But the emergency order to evacuate 8,500 Miskitus (of a total population more than 150,000) was issued in order to protect them from attacks by counterrevolutionaries operating out of Honduras. These attacks have claimed the lives of 60 Nicaraguans, including Miskitus, in the past few months. Nicaragua has devoted a large amount of resources to the development of the Atlantic coast region where the Miskitus live. Mom than $25 million were allocated to this sparselypopulated region in 1981. Access to free education and medical care have been provided for the first time. The Sandinista government has also implemented measures to extend -credit to farmers and guarantee the Indians' right to practice their own culture and organize their own communities. The centerpiece of the administration's case has been expoaed as a hoax. According to the March 3 Miami HJerald photographs that were supposed to show bodies of 200 Indians massacred by the Sandinista army were actually dated Sept. 1978, when dictator Somoza's National Guard was carrying out unprecedented atrocities throughout the countryside. The article, then goes on to quote an unnamed official as saying that the U.S. State Department has known about the hoax since last February. This revelation gives me the unnerving feeling that usefulness of information has becomesmore important than accuracy when it comes to giving official U.S. Government statements about Central AMWWrica Crude attempts to discredit the Nicaraguan goveniantare designed to rally dwindling support for U.S. masintaance of the Salvadoran and Guatemalan governments, twoof thedetawtedregimesin the world, WIIainT. P.9ors. WUAT -UOOT$ COMEDoN' wolq8 Nuclear pow er will be safest, several million dollars in fuel costs, despite its operational problems. cheapest energy In future Editor: After reading Heidi Smith's article about the nuclear industry ("UF nuke studies shunned since 3-mile Island"), I felt some comments are needed to more adequately represent the "pro-nuclear" side of this issue. No commercial-size generating station, nuclear or fossil fueled, was ever built for $500,000, as Smith wrote. The relatively small plants built in the 1960s cost around $500 million, and today's plants are being built for around $2 billion, a four-fold rather than 6,000-fold increase, as the article led the reader to believe. This cost increase is attributed to inflation, the larger size of the plants, and especially to the large amount of interest accrued due to government delays and redtape. "High-cost" nuclear power is still competitive with coal, and when the unnecessary federal delays are eliminated, nuclear electricity will be, by far, the cheapest source of energy in the country, as well as the cleanest and the safest. The safest? -Absolutely. No member of the public has ever been harmed in any way, no private property has ever been damaged in any way by the commercial nuclear power industry. Compare these two facts with any other industry -the safety record of nuclear power is unreachable. "Opponents of nuclear power say the nuclear industry is dying." A strong statement, completely unfounded by the. facts: as was mentioned, an estimated 41,000 jobs will be available in the 150 power plants operating now or being constructed, with starting salaries of up to $30,000 a year. Are these symptoms of a dying industry? Compare these figures with any college major. Smith also mentions Crystal River Nuclear Power kisant costing UF thousands of dollars in energy deficits. She also mentioned the "high cost" of nuclear power. These two statements are contradictory; in fact, the high cost to UF was in replacing the cheap nuclear electricity with expensive coal and oil, and in fact Crystal River hasaved consumersMuch was made of strong anti-nuclear sentiments of Richard Udell and Bob Ptlla rd, Their emotional aed biased opinions were amusing, if not insulting: "the brightest young minds know better" (than to study nuclear engineering). It is typical of the anti-nuclear establishment to make such asinine, untrue statements. In conclusion, the nuclear industry is far from dead; rather it has been stifled by (hopefully) temporary economic conditions and an unfair and uninformed attitude of the public, which is encouraged and supported by the media. The men and women who enter this industry are making America's energy independence a reality, and they should not be subjected to the insulting, biased opinions which dominate this paper's articles on nuclear power. Andrew Howe me0 Little, Junior's partnership shouldn't extend to City Hall Editor: Joe Little is an honorable man. Gainesville City Commissioner Gary Junior is an honorable man. Joe and Gary are business partners on several real estate developments. Now they would also like to be partners on the City Commission. As you previously stated, "Joe Little is asking a lot." Business partners would have a tendency to vote together on public issues. This carryover to the political arena at best widens the credibility gap suffered by the current -gommission and at worst could run counter to the public welfare. The citizens of Gainesville should riseup and vote against this in the March 23 runoff election. *ebeert M.OeIktolsin An~s ion -1-:-J-. ----L. M IfI00% W F

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8, alligator, friday, march 19, 1982-.--.-..-. UF prof: Columbus may have carried syphilis to Europe By Jon McKenna Alligator Writer Christopher Columbus sought the spices of India on his expedition in 1492. What he brought back with him may have caused some unwanted spice in the sex lives of millions for centuries afterward. UF microbiology Professor Donna Duckworth told about 50 people at the Miller Health Center Wednesday that she believes Columbus unwittingly carried a bacterium from the New World on his return voyage. This bacterial plasma, she said, may have united with bacteria already thriving in Europe to trigger a syphilis outbreak that ravaged the continent. Duckworth suggested that by indirectly introducing syphilis to the white word, early Indians may have been taking advance revenge on Europeans fur enslaving them. She said syphilis cases were first recorded in epidemic proportions during the late 15th century, following Columbus' return to Spain. She said that innocuous spirochetes, which cause syphilis, may have been made virulent by the new bacteria plasmas. "The true origin of syphilis is something no one agrees about, although it is the most written-about topic in medicine," Duckworth said. Another theory of the origin of syphilis is that Columbus brought the venereal disease in its virulent form from the New World. But Duckworth said no evidence of syphilis has been found on the bones of pre-Columbus Indians. Syphilis often digs cratr-like lesions in skulls and longer bones. "People decided that since the disease sprang up suddenly, and they didn't know where it came from they'd blame it on Columbus," Duckworth said. "Everybody wanted to blame it sn someone else. In Russia they called it the Polish disease, and in Poland they Called it the Russian disease." Duckworth showed pictures of the snakelike spirochete bacterium, treponema pallidum, saying it looks "quite nice compared to other bacteria." The first symptom of syphilis are a hard, painless ulcer and swollen lymph glands, Duckworth said. Although these disappear in a few days, they sometimes foretell bone degeneration, blindness, heart failure and madness in late stages of the disease. Among the notables who have contracted syphilis are Hitler, Henry the Eighth, Ivan the Terrible and Abraham of biblical fame. Duckworth suggested Hitler's hatred of Jews may have stemmed from madness caused by syphilis. ng RECEIVERS CAR STEREO' ANKneh Deluxe Stereo Reever Price War Prie Car Speaker t F"ling Tapee .BE a9 igl cn Beat 25 Watt Amp Priced to 00! Audovox's Great Door Mount 3, D25Waf Am Prcedt T ol Speaker! deal on Ampex's Sot sAM Tuner AUDOVOX E.""|*"Jensen 'a Best Buy Speakers 4","IW14Vi 7U., I C222 EA :*139$2 ts Closeout! Vector 22 Watt Receiver .JENSEN --2 x *~~199 m -'-------iPone's Bet Bos-loundIng $199 -Car Speaker! vetucrresearcti 5,.io ". O s Y Friday 11:00 a.m.-8:00 p.m. LAYAWAY loA WattDigital Rece2 4TABLES Saturday 10:00-6:00 p.m. .OW Je nsePresents Unheard-Of ocord Change!2412.2.-.9. TAPE DECKS SSPioneer4 Watt Digital Raceiver $5E Kentech Dual Meter Cassette Great-Sounding Deck at an Unbelievable Price! Bookshelf Speaker -A0 .ss JENEN .-~ m. .osua.: ..Great Deal on this Audiovox Car matic Turntable """p2"C qualer-Amp -77 "HAF OFFI" Vest Seling Casee actor 45 Watt Rece ver $ 9 Dek .d c 12 W er sah nn x AdF12 aCrS. tableMini e ,. w$* e8 o Prrmmabie Receivers .*i.c i".sw," osusu" sD v Tancredi's Peated Selling Car $1 -.; ECI Home Speakers with r""wit"MonAFM ..a Concer-ali Sound'Fe P1on 's Moot Sought-After -. --Cassette Deck --ot Tt .soI109 EA Eanred-do--Car St -5taSPECIAL :1. -*21 9 3W y oeea-ker BRAN-5~~.'U' PL.dUMowe Computerized C umnn i E.iy fru Deck atosic War Prices!saMnaAueRvreCrSro emote Contrel TV 0c f*Cn olTo HALF OFF rvec Aor Car$7 9 S;oMii Dck lny 19'Pro gr mab e 1om, ECIHBass Reflex Speaker ver n Co', te re" Prce This Low Before! only. $599. n V trMaTp Cassette Dock'''2"';, Metal Taps Cases'-aO'SullrvSn CF-1er Stereo 1o IC and_.P .__! |" .vctr rXseart 'E'" rock/gloss door. $119 Audiovo-sTancredf Car S SSORIES*2': "c'rBelow 0rigina3 Cerwin Vega Speaker cobreedy $499. $ tP Vector Metal Tape Cassette w :nw ss., D eck atPric e a r e he a _oaC eette Ca rying Case AU 9Io9 6 1999 o--lio~ oA, .k$109 t1PioneAoR evMini Car Stereo se Verit Hoadpheone! Pionwe's Beat Selling Axle ECI 5-Way Tower Demognetlzer $22. CnrTV ..te,"l PIoneer CTF-750 $239.19 $239r,.-A Priced Tsiow e C nt. 5 VcreMeEowPSpertuner Sl.$ "5 9 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ---~ ~-sin'. -n-Spci-l King of the Discounters p2 -$420 N.W. 13th St. CarMte 372-8558 --11R-9l, Mmes I j iimn (ent ltle Ma m) se anono u2,0 '-n nsa o Loborntifs $ 7 !49 Bony Casset 6 FOR $1326 SOTS TURN Automatic R atmatii $79 Vector Auto $149 vetor rese TELE lianimex Per Television $139 195" diag. Ri Baiutiful Mo '399 moms Panasonic R $499 Panason \CCE Mattel Game Dealer's Coo $995 e .ightweightI $1997 r6Tmioiv-o 4 me re-sPh -w 1 99 &%.MAO" STOM hwimfi DISCOuni

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Civic 3 Sllet, 373-1166 1325 NW 2nd St. Kim Tuttler and Judy Skinner -Artistic Directors. March 23-27; 8pm "Crmin Burno." University1 Auditorium. Tickets available at the University Box Office. 392-1653. COmunNity Celender, Inc. Box 12387. Offers constantly updated 24-hour telephone recordings of social and cultural events of interest to Gainesville. Call 372-5678. Devi's Millhopper. 377-5935. Sat. 9:30am free tour. Flerid. State Museum, 392-1721. Museum Rood. March 21; 2pm. "A Collage of AfroAmerican History," Dr. Bill Simmons, Direc-tor, Institute of Block Culture. In the classroom (limited seating). GstorOssdowil eoretion Pregrm. 392-1655 Room 330 JWRU. March 20 Canoeing -Juniper S p rings ApriI 4. Canoeing lchetckneee/Suwonnee -Sign up by March. 22. April 16-18 Hong Gliding -Kitty Hawk, N. Carolina. Sign up by March 29. April 23-25 Horseback Packing -Codes cove, N. Carolina. Sign up by April 5.' April 28-May 8 Backpacking Machu Picchu, Peru, Sign up by Jan. 21. G'eet Southern Music Hell, 372-7469. 233 W. University Ave. Hedficap Awereness Activiies -March 2M-2. Mar. 22; 10am-Celebrity Wheelchair simulation JWRU Colonade. mar. 22; 7:30pm, Wheelchair Basketball Game: Gvile Renegades vs. JaxRoller. Mar. 23; 11:30-1pm Wheelchair Relays. Plaza of Americas. Mar. 24-25; l0am-3pm Displays, films blind and wheelchair simulations JWRU Clonode. Mar. 24; 12:30-1:3pm, Interpretive Dance: St. Augustine School for the Deaf and Bline. JWRU Colonade. Mar. 29; 3:30-4:30. "Rehabilitation Process-Transitional Living," Dr. Jeff Roulston, Room Cl-15, J.H. Miller Center. For more info. call Mary Skrheim, 392-1261, office for studenttservices. Inetifute of Black Culturs, 392-0895. 1510 W. University Ave. J. Wayne ReitzftiUn, 392-1649. Museum Rood, UF. Mar 19-20; 7, 9:30, 12pm. "Arthur" JWRU Aud Mar. 20; 12am. "Scratch Bowling." Games area. Mar. 21; 7,9:3pm"Wmen in Love." JWRU Aud. Mar 22; 7,9:30pm "Mone." Mar 23; 6pm "Rail Baron," finals, Games area. mar, 25; 7,9:30pm. "Picnic at Hanging Rock." JWU Ad. Kmpahe g anicalGarden372-4981 4625 SW 63rd Blvd. Open M-Sot, 9am-4:30 pm. Offered is a lakeside gazbo, a bamboo forest, herb gordens,a vinery, a water lily pond and carnivorous plants. Free guided tour, first Sat. of each month, 10om. Monsigside Nsf us' Cenfer, 374-2170. 3540 E. University Ave. Mar. 20; 5:45 am. "Goodbye Winter," early morning walk and pancake breakfast. Mar. 20; 8:10am and Spm. aFmily Form Chores. Mar. 20; I0am.3pm. Melon Basket Workshop. Mar. 20 1:30pm Gardening Class Session ll. mar. 21; 1:30pm Porch Pickin' IV. Mar. 21; 1:30-4pm Ask Dr, Hetrick. Mar. 21; 5pm Family Form Chores. Mar. 24; 3-pm The Songbirds. OCyeeNi Ceefer, 392-5500 North-South Drive, UF. Mar. 19-20, Women's NCAA Swim Meet. Mar. 27, 8pm JmmytBuffe Perferislg Artf Sere, 392-1653. University Auditorium, UF. Mar. 31; 8 pm The New England Rogtime Ensemble. UF Students $3, Students and Sr. Citizens $5, Gen. Admission $6. See Isles. Hem. Bie. preserve 377-8935. Dec.-Aprl, Ranger Walks. Advance -eservatomansuired V 0s Caemmeity C~leeg, 372-1W .Aprit 17-end18 "'thlsAsnualSprfts A sPetial," Sun Skate Center, 375-0003 751 NE 34th Place and N. main (Between 23rd and 39th on Main.) New skating rink equipped with modern lighting/sound system, snack bar and electronic games. Private party rooms available. "Come. Skate With Us." University Auditoriss, 392-0223. Newell, UF Mar. 20; 8:15 pm. University Symphonic Bond, David Gregory, conductor. Karel Husa, composer. Mar. 24-27; 8pm. "Carmina Burona" presented in conjunction with Gainesville Civic Ballet and Gainesville Civic Chorus. Budd Udell, conductor/chorus director; Tom Pzik, choreographer; Paul Newman, producer. UF students and senior citizens $5, Gen. Admission $6 aftr darK Alan's Cukene, 375-6969. 1718 W. University Ave. Open M-Sat. 10 am-2m Sun: 11am2amHoppy hour 5-7, 10-2pm. Liquor license and free campus delivery. Bakdstage Bar, 372-7469. Open M.-Sat. 52am. Fri. & Sat. Headlights. Inside Great Southern Music Hall. Big Deddy's Alibi Lounge, 372-9399. 3334 W. Univ. M-Sat. llam-2am, Sun 1 pm-llpm. Happy Hour 5-8 M-Sat. Tues. Spm-closing. Live entertainment. March 19-27: Kathi Witkowski and Carl Haskins. Big Doddy's Cin City, 375-1011. 1611 SW 16th St. Open M-Sat.: 8 p.m.-2am M-Sat: Top 40 by DJ Kip Love. Daily Drink Specials. Big Daddy's Lansplighter, 378-0090. 1 NW 10th Ave., Open Tues. Sat. 4pm--2 a.m.Live entertainment TSat. March 19-27 Legend. Daily Drink Specials. Bogert's Restaurenta nd Bar, 375-4378. 2300 .Nw 6th St. Open TF 11:30-2 Lunch. T-Th 6-10 Dinner. F-Sat. 6-10:30 Dinner. Sun. 11:30-2 Brunch. Happy Hour F-Sat. 5-6:30 Reservations suggested MV, V, AE. F-Sot. 7:30-10-Joon Crowell, Pianist. Casey's Cafe', 495-2224. Archer, 3 blocks south of light. Open M-Sat. 11:30am-2pm. Happy hour 4-7 M.-F. Busch Draft 45 cents. F-Sat. The Whiz Bang Orchestra, formerly the Tex Fritter Band. Catch 22, 4 1/2 miles W. of 1-75. 378-6093. Open M-Sat. Iam-2am. F-Sat. Craigger White-Rock Chelsea Street Pub, 373-7382. 6305 Newberry Rd. Open M-Th.: lam-1:15am. F-St. IIam-2am MC, V, AE, Trav. C. happy hour 6-Sat. 3-pm Live entertainment. Thr March Roadside Review Country/Southern Rock. Copper Monkey Pub, 374-4984. 1702 W. Univ. Ave. Open M-W llam-12pm. ThSt. l1am-lam and Sun l2am-10pm. Trov. C. F-St. Lenny and Marseille. -W Tom Savage. Specializing in Quiche, Salad and Thick Stocked Deli Sandwiches. 10 Dapper Diner, 378-0044.2562 NW 13th St. Open M-Sat. 9am-2pm, Sun. lpm-6pm. General Hospital Happy Hour, 3-4. Happy Hour M-So). 5-7. Featuring Pub and custom sandwiches. Call in orders. Duk's, 376-9175. 4560 NW 13th St. Open M-F: lpm-2om Sat: Spm-2a5. Happy Hour lpm-fpm Live Entertainment. F-Sat. RiverStreet. H Pr eels Joe's, 376-2226. 18 NE University Ave. Open M-Sat. 11am -am. Happy Hour 11am-7pm. F-Sat. Boots LIie's, 372-1010. 112 Se st. St. Open M-Sat 11am-2am. Happy hour WTN 1Iam-Spm. F-St. 11 am-6:30. Entertainment F-Sat. LeGrangeLebby Bar, 3-7469. Inside Grat Southern Mutitc*1l, 233W. Unsfv Open Sn.Saf. Spm-2"m happy J$qr -FSt, 3-8Lasts111er, 377-4100. 238 W. University Ave. 0t on T-Sat. Bpm-2om. Tes-free dance lessons. hur s student night. Thru march midnight Flyer. Mein Street, 376-6246. 106 S. Main St. Open M-Th Bpm-2am. F 5pm-2am. Sat. fpm-2am. Entertainment: Buster Brown. Oie Coalgs inn, 377-9538. 1728W University Ave. Open M-W 11:3am-11:30pm. Th 11:30am12:30am. F 11:3am-1:3am. Sat. 5pm-1:3am. Sun 5pm-1I1pm. MC, V, Local Personal and Trav. C. Happy hour 3pm-6pm;1 1/2 hours prior to closing. Live Entertainment W-Sat. Cllage.9:30-:30. Specializing in Homemade Quiche, Soup and Solod. Ornge-N-Bsrew, 392-1689 UF, Reitz Union Entertainment F-Sat. 9pm-l am Magic. The Perk, 373-8827. 1905 SW 13th St., next to University Inn. Open M-Th. 3 p.m.-3am, F-Sat.: 3pm-Sam, Sun: 4pm-lom. Lounge and Hot Tubs. Th-Doble Bubble-Champagne $3 a bottle with Tub Resevotion. F-Ldies drink free. 9-12 Tub reservations suggested for weekends. Rotheskllsr, 392-2097. UF Campus in Johnson Hall. Open W-W 8pm/t0pm Movies M-Groove Tube. T-W:Cheech and Chongs next Movie. F-Sat. The Riff.Personal Checks accepted for food. Richenbachers, 372-6475204W. University Ave. Open M-Fri. 4-1:30, Sot. 7:30-1:30. Fri-Sot. Jack Hayford Bond. Mon. Frank Sullivan Trio. Happy hour 5-8M-F. Friday happy hour entertainment. Rickey's REsesturent and Lounge, 376-2442. 2800 SW 2nd Ave. Open Sun. lpm-lpm. M-Sat 1 lam-2am. Trav. C. Specializing in Chicken Wings (hot, med., mild.) Sundownsr Lounge, 493-9746, Highway 19 N. Chiefland. Open Sun-Th: 2pm-2am. F-Sat: 1pmSamHappy Hour 5pm-7pm. Live Entertainrmnt Whiskey River, 378-0013 108 S. Main St. Open M-F 1lam-2:00oam Sot. Spm-2am. Trav. C. Happy hour. 5-8pm. Live Entertainment 6 days. Fri-Sat. Eddie Ray and Southern Aire. Wine Clker, 372-7469. Inside Great Southern Music Hall 23 W. Univ. Ave. Open W-Sat. 8:30pm-2am Happy hour M-F 7pm-8:3pm. Live Entertainment. F-Sat. Bosco-Bys Band. Ar Art Coscfor Gallery, 377-4211. 802 W. Univ. Ave. Open: M-Sat.;-10am-5:30pm. March 20-April W "Florida Craft Showecase I"Exhibitin of works in clay metals, fibers and wood. Reception Mar. 20; 7:30-9:3D. Arisen's GIld, 378-1383. 806 W. Univ. Ave. Open M-Sat.: I0am-5:30 Thru March: Dot Sterling, Potter. "Womonspirit Rising," Ken Small, watercolors/acrylic paintings. Csass.an.ity Gallery of Art, 377-5161, ext 429, 301. Santa Fe Community College. Open Sun: tpm-5pm. M-T: lpm-4pm. Thr April 4: "The Athlete: The influence of the athlete on American life." Robert Riger's one-man show of drawings, color photogrphy and video slow-motion tapes. Gallery 213 75-1911. 21 SE 2nd Place. Open M-F: 9-5:30 Sat. 10-4 Featuring a wide selection of fine art posters. Jen ing Gallery, 375-8158. 211 West University Ave. Open T-F: 10am-5:30pm Sat. 10am-5pm. Thru April 1. "Lennie Kess World" one-man show featuring paintings, drawings, prints and sculpture by this Gainesville artist. April 3-may12: "Studies in luster and light," Twowomon show featuring Jon Jacque's ceramics and Kerri Silvernell's oil paintings. Seadqsist Gallery, 829-8170 Spanish Military Hospital, 3 Aviles St., St. Aug. Open: M,W-F: lam-pm; Sun. 1-5pn Featuring original art and crafts by80 living American ArtIsts, March 22-27 -The Hodgins 1982 Florida Painting Tour. Painting Cinc given by John J. Hodgins, ortis, Tuition $60,%*It for lInormaton ortsaervatonoss. Center Theatre, 372-5347. 1015 NW 13th St. House of Wax in 3-D -PG. Missing -PG. The Beast Within -R. (Evening shows only. Meet me in St. Louis -G. (afternoon shows only.). Cinema Plus. Deli and Pub, 371-2266 Gainesville Shopping Center, NW 10th + Main Street. Beer, wine and sandwiches served at your table while you watch a movie. Sharky's Machine -R. Ghost Story -R. Must be at least 19to enter the theatre. Oaks 6 Theatre, 378-1818. 6309 Newberry Rd. Evil Under the Sun -PG. Atlantic City -On Golden Pond -PG. Porky's -R. McVicar -R. Plaza Triple Theatre, 378-2434 1525 NW 23rd Blvd. Death Wish I -R. The Amateur -R. Chariots of Fire -PG. Royal Park Cinemas 4. 373-4277. 3702 Newberry Rd. Hounds of BAskervilles -PG. Raiders of the Lost Ark -PG. Richard Pryor Live on Sunset Strip -(R). midnight movies: Rocky Horror -R. Raiders of the Lost Ark -PG. Richard Pryor Live on Sunset Strip -R. Stir Crazy -R. Consteas Theatre, 392-1653 JWRU, University of Florida Campus, Box office, T-103 JWRU. March 19-20; 8:15pm. "TweIth Night," performed by the Florida Players. Gainesville Coaunity Pleyhouse, 376-4949. 4039 NW 16th Blvd. March 19-20, 24-27, 31 April 1-3 8pm "You Can't Take It With You," by Moss Hart and George S. Kaufman. Directed by Anna Freeman. Golden Hilla Fine Arts Theatre, 629-4653, 622-4102 US Routhe 27, Ocala. April 2-4 "Best of Broadway." An evening of music. Hippoa nme, 375-HIPP. 25SE 2nd Place. Mar. 19; 6 and 8:30. "Walkabout," 1971 Australian Film. Mar. 19-April 17; "The Gin Game," by D.L. Coburn, directed by Mary Hausch. T-Sot.: 8:15, Sun. 2pm, 7:30, eocpetions. Mar. 20 2pm, 8:15, and Mar. 21 no performance of "The Gin Game." Mar. 21-25 "Watersong Celebration." Wateroriented displays, information and folk music. Free to the public, on front steps of Hippodrime. Mar. 21; 8pm, sculpture exhibit, mnulti-media performance, poetry readings and Florida folk music. Admission $3.50. Jacksoneille Symphony Orchestre, conducted by Wilis Page. Civic Auditorium Jacksonville. March 22, 7:30; March 23, 8:30. Subscription Concert. The Romeros, Classical guitar quartet. Civic Auditorium Jacksonville. April 17; 8:30pm Fernandion PopsConcert, Fernandina Beach. Acer's Sendwich hep, 376-699:. 330 NE 39th Ave. Open M-F Ram-5pm, Sat. 9am-2pm. Specializing in Breakfastand Submarines. Arby's kaif Baof, 378-6555. 1405 SW 13th St. Open: Sun.-Wed 1 tons,-lipm. Th.-12pm. F-Sat.tam. Specializing Ifs Roast Beef Sandwicthes and

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2. Applause, An Advertising Supplement, March 191982 FRDAY 3/19/82 SATUROAY -3/20/82 VIVAHI CAMIE PM CH2vnm TU I ___1d9I2 tn To place your free listing In Applause, call 376-4482 LAST WEEK F, M-Th: 6:00 A:." 10:00 S+S2:*G 4:*G6:6:0 8 1:00 Thte CIA b~bdhu bd'efed arnm m d himn, LAST WEEK F, M-Th: 1 5:35 7:45 9:ss.5 S + S2:45 5:35 7:45 9:55 ACADEMY AWARD NOMINATIONS FMhA5:1OT309:45FIRE SS: :051 :0945 resb~vraMU Arthur Treachers Fish and Chips, 376-9716. 2659 NW 13th St. Open Sun-Th. I1am-IOpm, F-Sat. I1lam-12pm. Specializing in Fish, Chips, Chicken, Clams and Krunchpups. Ashley's Pub, 375-4064. 3236 SW 35th Blvd., Butler Plaza. Open M-Sat. 8am-2am. Sun. Ipm11pm. Personal and Trav. C. Happy hour 4-7pm. Specializing in Mexican Food. Athen's Greek Coffee Shop, 376-3696. 912 W. Univ. Ave. Open M-Th. 10am-9pm. F-Sal. 10am10pm. Personal and Trav. C. Specializing in homemade Greek Pastry: Baklava, Gyros and Souvlaki. 13th St. Open: M-Th. 11-11. F--11-12, Sat. 12-12, Sun. 12-11. Complete Mexican menu; vegetarian food available. Cafe Gardens. 376-2233, 1643 NW First Ave. Open M-Th 11am 12pm, F. Ilam lam, Sat. Ilam12pm. Trav. C. Happy Hour 3-6, 9-closing. Cafe La Bistro, 371-2233. 3303 W. Univ. Open MSat.: IOam-8pm. Specializing in Euro-dining, cafe style, featuring quiche, French onion soup, salad bar, European specialties, beer and wine and 18 flavors of ice cream. Personal checks accepted. Campus Subway of Gainesville, Inc., 375-8381 112 NW 13th St. Archer Road Subway -373-4465. Across from Butler Plaza. Cin City Subway 374-8345. 1805 SW 13th St. Open 7 days 11am2am. AE, Trav. C. Specializing in Submarine Sandwiches. Captain D's Restaurant ., 375-4892. 3610 SW Breakfast and BBQ Nook, 377-5382. 2220 SW Archer Rd. Open: Sun-Th-10:45am-lGpm, FArcher Rd. Open M-Sat. 7am-9pm. MC, V, Phillips Sat-10:45-1 1. Local Personal & Trav. C. Specializ66 and Trav. C. Happy hour all day. Specializing ing in Fish. in Barbecue. Bronson Restaurant and Lounge, 486-2300. US 27A and State Rd. 24. Open M-Th-7am-TOpm, FSat 7am-12pm MC, V, AMEX, DC, Trav. C. Thladies night 50c drinks, F-Happy hour 5-7 2 for 1, Fri-Sat. Live entertainment Southern Nights, Thru march and April. Donny BeckhamCountry/Western. Restaurant specializes in homecooking. Brown Derby. 373-7077, 5220 SW 13th St. Open M-F. 11:30-12:30am, Sat. 1pm-lam Sun. 11:30-10 p.m. All major credit cards, personal & Trav. C. Happy hour M-F. 4:30-6:30 p.m. Live Music. Satellite. Specializing in Seafood and Steaks. Burger Chef, 378-9825 1412 N main St. Open MSat. 6:30am-lOpm. Sun. 7:00am-lOpm. Trav. C. Specializing in Big Burgers. Burrito Brothers Taco Co., 378-5948. 16 NW ,I 41%C e a378-8818 INSIDE OAKS MAI.C EAST OF 175 0N NE W E9Y RO (CI1.75"T"SEA"" YOUR ENTERTA NMENT SS C1.75 L EN.AGEMENlTS EXCLUDED BUYS MORE T AMC Keep aney out fDr the funniest nwvie about goigup P W ever made! You'll be glad you came CK(5:15 @ $1.75)-8:00-10:30 Nonanted for, 10 MOST WANTED Academy Awards rl le ROGER DALTRtEY i M (5:00 @ $1.75)-7:50-10:15 1 (5:00 @ $1.75)7:45.9:55 PF=TFn fIt'Dc U5TcNOV IN Titm J(4:45@ $1.75)7:30-10:15 Nominated for 5 Academy Awards ATLANTIC CITY m (S:1S @91.75)7:45-9:55 1225 WEST UNIVERSITY AVENUE Announces NEWNightime hours for Thursday, Friday, & Saturday Nights! The Knife & Fork will *Re-Open at 11:00 p.m. and stay open All Night Long C'mon in for your late-night munchies *Aboop en dlby 7" e to 3:" Capt'n Louie's Galley. 372-6311, 309 NW 13th St. Open 7 days 11:30am-9:30pm. Specializing in seafood and chicken. The Casba, 377-2144. 516 NW 75th St. (Tower Rd.). Open 5pm-10:30pm.All major credit cards and Trav. C. Happy hours: Spm-7pm. Free hours d'oeuvres. Specializing in Mid East, French and American food. Cassady's. 375-0004, 114 NW 13th St. Gator Plaza, Open Sun-lpm 10pm, M-W 11:30am 12pm,Th-F 11:30am-Iam, Sat. 11:30 12pm. MC, V, BK, Trav. C. Happy Hour M-F, Beer 2-4:30, Wine 4:30-6:30. Specializing in Pizza, Pasta and Sandwiches. Cathay Tee House. 372-7772, 3226 SW 35th Blvd. Open M-Sat. I lam-10pm, Sun. 5pm-l0pm. Reservaotions suggested. MC, V, Trav. C. Specializing in Chinese food. Ratbo ketter Tonight a Tomorrow The Riff are Rockin' at the RAT Mon. 3/22 Groove Tube Tues. 3/23 Wed. 3/24 Cheech & Chong's Next Movie FREE HAPPY HOUR ME 47pWS M FD' 4tEL 7 t m Behind Murphree For further Info7 392-2097 mu ~ I If 118111gs 3/19/82 SAO AMCL. (3):Mov'A ra.s f9 of DyaemI' A 59pl5 99 tmiatchud bndts, u -y e tu hIri e"oluonary and a u dy Moua chief .uufprh b atbutand up Ccbu, Rod Stger. 1972. 640AM -'L[HINBo) BE I APE WITH VON OBAKE Eusur GIofy tub., his uopsaood-5urdy whdu sdcry Ludwig von Dre recounts the history of boxn. 7:AAM -C. (wHOk MOVIE 'WI, =11.1 Wa In Slaessi' The stuy 0f aVen v who s hld cp fxsen and a hat ye. Hal Hibrmck. Beu MriaSit 7:3AM-CO. (3)MOVE'Aae. S Pup' Pop music tut by musical g'uts frnGeroUn to Pat Bna tahighlih Na uM6ttd sag o family's struggllsto Iu the American Dream. 1981. Raed R. 9:0AM -C. [101 MOVIE:Gud Is My Ca-pilP Bnd n Col. Robert E. Scoc's nvel 9 has ps flying wMth Cli' Churaut. 1945. 9m AM -h. [HBO: SPOTS, LURA1 TIE FFlT 25 YEAS Great moents int pu.sar the sujct f this special. 9: AM-CL (3 o MOM'at. town USA' The Weuto Wheelers' htde rko afnothingt Dstay king of a k o Be, Greg lodor, Parick Swayne. 1979. Rated PG. 10:0OAM -C. (HBO MOVIE Volkidd.Advenures of ka111 uusFr lrfgkud by a lscherous rogue n her huhbands ship. Susannah York, Noel FPrrier, John Castle. I1:0CAM -C. (3) MOVE 'Valsutam' Thu a Nandlem of9 tovie' lgnday mae uboaeod. Raduh Nuryu, Lase Cron, Michul Php. 1977. Rated R. IIAOAM -M. [101: MOVIE WWoadW d r When the idol Of French fils, a poodk, tub a lhat., he gets his mistress iwoed with an Amedanuician. Tony Curtis, Christtu Kafmunn, Lasy Sted. 1964 12:PM -C H. [HBOa: ICE SKAINIG FPOM PURITwof Aerica's.t op4pa r o .join an inotn.naslroe o fx"sming oat Peg'sCaptolAeas. 1:00PM -cM.[10kMOVIE:-JWhos Tr A r ad.d untb 9dg.etwho -runsaa pivaen --eadh Pr with the atatoi 99 puar ,I gets a mudue cas to handed. Very Rdahua, Pat O'Brien, Joan Lese. 1954 lt25PM-Co. (3: MOVIE:'taur,dh, uOna E U McCusiycn that It haea.go m and dkn on sh. tochs wl ever be lha same. Elen BurtyuE e Lu Gatnne,. 1990. Rated PG. Duley AI e Iaodsmm "aidaesof the LaetArk" (P) "MclhodPryrLle. Great White.9 .l le .-2. d otkoLstArk"(P) lubasdP reewriensus uvst *W *misbown 1 [4) 1 [11 1 1 [ 1 t1 I' WJT WurTWJCT W.V WTI Wj m CJAESP" HBO CHA C Cu Cuts I CO17 C -7 I Ct.20 M to I 30 rtsoo00 aft P.& st I" suo-95 Sualt PW ama" fm m ho tomp bm**~ q a *Vf f bo 00acftl~ aWt hum m -mom*",mww uWcisu 30 .0afts~ "W" od*90 Ot" IV 8 f19 sta 359 00 tft Tmua*& RW D" Om ---. 00 ld. e.*u-a"" mr&MTo t f f" t"ftfdft fOVft f" b 30 WC.mm ft as f utsa 9 0 0" .taO, 0950 10 i ftftu uH a, M 2 3 5 w-vulff~ nma No& see&

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AU atrMachI9 gummy /21/82 ww I/2/2DENO Ia m-ap WN I I Ud WYdImE "LL W TsC ws UTw J WW W w in wm AS *cis nn HBO BMW" ftIm1 I I 7 i. C~se CeaCr7Cn1 Ct7 S1 C an2 .sa m San m sa n e .w, s.c -ema a~e.ts -tftft ----f.t.a a mr -a. m. *-ceu a .am.IW asoawm ED --., -...-: Chaucer's, 373-8866. In the Renaissance Fair. Open M-F 9am-9pm; Sat. Oam-9pm. Trav. C. and Personal Checks. Specializing in homemade traditional dishes and desserts, takeouts also. Checks w/ID and Trov. C. Specializing in Real Pit Bar-B-Que. Dell RX, 378-6241. 720 SW 2nd Ave. (Physician's Plaza). Open M-F 7am-4:30pm. Specializing in New York style Deli Sandwiches and cuisisne, and the Deli Gotor Sandwich ChIck-FII-A, I377-69. Open M-Sat. 9am-9:30pm Dixie Cream Restaurant, 372-5642. 2226 NW CsIckA, 377-6691. .pe zgin Math. FrsptN6th St. Open San. an-prn. M-Sat. 7atn-2pn. Petsanal and Stan. C. specializing in the First-NTtav. C. Specializing in breakfast and lunch. Best Chicken Sandwitch. Christabel's 378-7980. 921 W. Univ. Ave. Open M-W llam-lOpm; Th-Sot. ltam-llpm. Specializing in Mexicgn Peed. Church's Fried Chicken, 376-1462. 3006 NW 13th St. Open Sun-Th. 10oam-lpm. F-Sot. tOam-12pm. Trav. C. Specializing'in Fried Chicken. Cinema Plus Delil and Pub, 371-2266. Gainesville Shopping Center. Open M-F: 1lam-2:30 for lunch. Specializing in soups, solods, sandwiches and quiche. (No movies shown during lunch. Clock Restaurant, 375-1411. 2010 Main Street. Open 24 hours. Trav. C. Specializing in Breakfast. The' Cornish Han. 373-0077, 2526 NW 13th St. Open M-Sot. 9om-9pm. Sun. 13:30-6. MC, V, Personal and Trov C. Live Entertainment Th-Sat. 59pm. Th. and Sat.: Roxanne, pianist, oldies but goodies. F-Chorlie Bush, Mellow guitar. Country Boy's Market, 372-4391. 214 NE 16th Ave. Open W-Sun: 10am-8pm. Local Personal and Trav. C. Specializing in a complete line of Latin Foods and Produce. Domino's Pi.=, 373-8900, 373-233, 376-3317. 3733 W. Univ. Avee. 2101 SW 13th St., 1025 N. Main. Open M-Th: 4:30-lam F: 1lam-3am, Sat. 4:30pm-2am, Sun: 4:30pm-lam. Specializing in Pizza and Fast Free Delivery. Dutch Pantry Restaurant, 373-1468. 1-75 and University Ave. Open M-Sun. 6am-l0pm. Lounge M-Sat. Spm-I2pm. MC, V, AE Trv. C. Happy hour Spm-8pm. East Winds. 375-7171, 606 NW 75th St. Open SunThur. 11:30-2:30; tpm-10pm F-Sat: 11:30-2:30; 5pm-l0pm. Reservations suggested. MC, V, Trav. C. Happy hour 5-7. Specializing in Cantonese and American food. El Mexicano 377-5151, 2409 SW 13th St. Open MSat. 11:30am 9pm. Trov. C. Specializing in Mexican Food. Gainesville Hilton Prhne Rib Restaurant. 377-4000, 2900 SW 13th St' Open Sun-Sot. 6pm11pm. Reservations suggested. All major Credit Cards and Trov. C. Pianist -Dinner music. Specializing in Prime Rib. Gary's Pancake and Steak House, 377-7494. Williston Rd. and 1-75. Open M-Sun: 6:30am-9pm. The Crabahack. 1800 NE 23rd Ave. Open M-Sat. MC, V, AE, Personal Checks w/ID and Trov. C. l1am-9pm. Trav. C. Specializing in Seafood, Specializing inPancakes, Omeletsand Steaks. especially Blue Crab. Mr. Gatti's, 376-8444. 715 NW 13th St. Open DavId's Real Pit Rar-R-Que, 373-7499. 516 NW Sun-Th: Ilon-I1pm F-Sot. 11am--l2pm SpecializI [[12h. i I. -I L1'. ionLi UCA SISIMI 1 Uo MIlT dl o 1 s altd C" I I IP hIA''I W-aeurV" WJCT VWTLV WDE eccJ -j* RRl Gutor Baseball7 Exclusive Play by Play TESWEEK'SRADI GAMES Sat. March 20 Vanderbilt (2)12:45 p.m. Sun. March 21 Vanderbilt 12:45 p.m. Brought to you in part by: Jloe's Deli Harmon Photo Center The Besg Of AlI Imes -Butler Plaza Merchants Assoc. Wendy's Old Fashioned Hamburgers jU of GainesvilleW K J 14 LaPradd Dist. R Q R F0R YN AMLT Ila caanI aK. I1.CM17 1 C&17rnacI 7 tf an" mft5llam 8 .' .C7 7 bw I. T.m. momm ffin ot m ft %a O A 10 _* 11 r1WTE 1M T iF 1 W h l T [a 1 W i W I an i IDwaH Tusc waTI WUFI WJlCT WILY WIDE WJOlCS jCB E-~s H m EIIC.2 Cl A C J~ C.7 10.121 CS.t7 C 8.17 ICH.2S 8w .s o E t." 8 12 se ..--'DE -_ -"'iL o m c a -r ----ctd (to lid -m I-d a~ PM C14 CKA CHA H.7 .12-.C.17 H. JMfdf Odunif odoit -h mft AN hm m. o ma a .6" .tm. fwo a e om .an W .am law Cod _w-_ __* -_ -7kb amdi

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A/2March 19,1982, 4 e is U IPN. M Tu i-sm wwrT w~ar wratv wise i-ace '.d5 ISPO 04.2 06,4 018 .012 06.17 04t17 012es L. Crystal Cave 35 Video Games Sunday 5-9 p.m. A Draft Beer 25t A Rfi 0,0 Just off Univ. Ave. on S. Main. The Skating Palace Offers4 Adult& College : Skating Wed.8 to 11* Free Lessons 7 to I BEER BLAST Sat. Nights 1l :30-2a.m. 0 FREE Beer + Coke $1.00 OFF Coupon Good for either session onlyoat0 The Skoting Palace 1925 N.W. 2nd St. 376-65 e~~e*e 9OOOOOO466e OO@e e*ee g g The Yearling Restaurant Exquisite Dining In the Unspoiled Beauty of Cross Creek Serving all types of Seafood. Steoks. Quod Soft Shelled Turtle, Frog Legs. & Alligator Toil Open Tues.-Sat. 5:60 p.m.-1S:W4 p.m. Closed Mondays Sun. 1:00 p.m.4:36 p.m. The Se our new foot T.V. screen In the lounge Yearling Herb + Pat Herman Owners Godeater's, 378-5179. 1120W. University. Open M-Sat 7am-12pm. Local Personal Checks w/ID, Trav. C. Happy Hour 11am-7pm; tOpm-l2pm. Specializing in Pita Broad Sandwiches. C ,t WellReturan.378-3970, 3500SW 13th St. Open M-F 11:30am-2pm, 5pm-9:30pm Sot-Sun "*"S pm-10:30pm. reservation for parties of 8 or JI Seats $2 more. MC, V, AE. Specializing in Chinese food. P Jun YOM Orkdiros Steekpit and Lounge, 377-0150.215 -NW 10th Ave. Open M-F 1lom-IOpm. Sat. 6pm10pm. Reservations suggested. All major credit cords and Trov. C. Happy hour 1lom-Sprn. Live entertainment Th-Sat. Michael Newman-Classical Style Guitar. Specializing in Steak and Seafood. Horry's Piece, 377-8417. 201 SW 16th Ave. Open M-Sat. ttam-1:30am Sun: lpm-l0pm Personal and Trav. C. Happy Hour M-F: 5-6pm. Specializing in Homemade Food. Health Horizons Natural Fnods & Juice er. 373-1881, 3210 S.W 35th Blvd. Open M-F 11am6pm, Sat, 1lom-4pm. MC, V, Personal and Trav. C. Specializing in Whole, Natural Foods. Internio.nai Hose of Pencekes. 373-1438, 3613 SW 13th St. Open 24 hours. Personal and Trav. C. Specializing in American food. Ironwed esteeurent and Loungp, 378-5111. 2100 NE 39th Ave. Open M-Sat. 11:30am-2pm; 6pm-10:30pm. Reservations suggested. MC, V, AE, Trav. C. Specializing in Continental Cuisine. Jerry's, 378-2481. 1501 NW 13th St. Open M: ha 6am-Sun:12pm. MC, V, Trav. C. Specializing in Fast Service. 2:20 4:0g Joe's Dell, 373-4026, 377-5637. 1802 W. Univ. Ave. 1515 SW 13th St. Open M-Sat.: llom-2am, WE i I DOW Jamb &mid I Aefthift S*mft ;at., Ion !NW Iowa 49 Qc OU =OR%* 7: fto -dam ad on T. p Nollift fts" M IASI= a In am. fts our 019. MISO 9: Oman mmon wa m &V Am"d %@New Cop OR lub ftlbdub bow Noun TodlM Sm Anuftib. Tam" oweafty PULIM Bad Mft Lmw MMIMd am mow" S N" j "'~ ~ u o adrun Run ILe xc; s PrCeed go to 00 Proceeds go to For the DES sdt'ertise in the Applenseo Wke"4 4 SANDWICH SHOP NATIONALLY FAMOUS SA NDWICHES EAT iN OR TAKE OUT Sde Ordlers Available W. I1 IAM TL10PM 5sas-S.S 11 AM TL 9PM ee. .0 A5 lIMIf'IiO /1(P'FAfOOI.% i #A ; Wtuui y 378-29M4 345OW. UMV. AVE.AW S Help Cystic K Flor Fri. I 4: Sol. -1 5 Kegs .'0 Final A Raff le s ed don. good tor all ever Cafe* Le Rl1stro Univ. 371-CAFE All imported Beer 1." Bottle Latin Catering .Home Service Will Deliver To Your Door A Nice Tasty Ready To Eat Meal. Very Economical Prices. For additional information about menus and prices please call 373-0458 I VaAN mes AWT U T c WTLV WW~A CDWas s eise o CHA CIL7 ~ CI CL7CL1 CU I vromplonswAy 3/74/52 82 Gas NW e e 9 a so d~ febf amsof low rafit l~emem An Sun: 11am-12pm. Blue Key Card, Personal and Trav. C. Happy Hour, Uni: M-F:-6-9pm 13th St: M-W 6pm-closing.Specializing in 2' Gotor tail. Knife& ForkRestaurent 372-6666. 1225 W, University Ave. Open daily 7om-3pm. Thur.-Sot. 11pm. .Trov. C. Specializing in Homecooked breakfast &lunch. Lafifte's 372-9928, 11 SE 1st Ave. Open M-F 1lam-2pm; 5pm-l2pm, Sat. Spm-i1pm, Sun. 5pm-12pm. MC, V, Troy. C. Specializing in Seafood. Leonerdq's Pizze of Millhepper, 376-2001. 413 NW 16th Blvd. Open Sun.-Th. IIam-IIpm. F-Sat-. 1torm-lam. Local Personal and Trov. C. Happy hour 2pm-6pm; 9pm-closing. Specializing in Chicago Style Pizza. teonredo's Pizze In a Pen, 378-2001. 706 W. Univ. Ave. Open 11:20 am til. Serving fine Italian cuisine Lenardo's Pizza by the Slice, 375-2007. 1245 W. Univ. Open 11:30 am til. Serving fine Italian Cuisine. Little Pigs Barbecue -Dowstown 373-4086. 110 NW 6th St. Open M-Sat: 6am-7pm. Local Personal and Trav. C. Specializing in Real Pit Barbecue. Lone John Silver's Se.fed Sheppe, 372-7572 1235 NW 16th Ave., 371-3474 710 NW 60th St., Open M-Sun. Ilam-IOpm. Trav. C. Specializing in Seafood and Chicken. Leuis' Lunch. 372-9294, 436 SE 2nd St. Open MSot 9:30am-8pm. Th. 9:30am-4pm. Trav. C. Specializing in -Sandwiches and Delicious Hmburgers. Lanes, 378-7043. 1621 SW 13th St. Open Sun.-Th: 7am-t1pm F-Sot. 7am-t2pm. Local Personal and Trov. C. Happy Hour Sun-Sot. 3-6pm. Specializing in European style Chicken and Hot Dogs cooked in Beer. W, anim S

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Clearwater lawyer 'fascinated' by UF attorney job prospect SyDamnMOMee Aligator Staff Writer Saying the "idea of being UF's attorney is fascinating," the third of six candidates interviewed by Attorney Search Committee members explained Thursday why he wants the post. Thomas Bustin, Clearwater city attorney, told committee members that he has always been interested in working in the area of education. "I feel I could do a good job of building up and developing the office as evidenced by my work in Clearwater," Bustin said. He is the third candidate to be interviewed by the committee, which is headed by UF Law School Dean Tom Read. Washington, D.C., lawyer Judith Waldman and Frederick Simpson, Jacksonville associate general ALA 9ISANA fr" eh er .4 174W.aio. Ae. 5f aeta~d Vth counsel, have already been interviewed. Bustin has experience as a government lawyer in the public sector, Read said. Bustin previously served as the assistant city attorney for Columbus, Ohio. When asked why he chose to work in the public rather than more lucrative private sector, Bustin said, "I like the public sector because it gives me a wider area of practice." Read said the fourth candidate will be interviewed next week and "the search is progressing rapidly because of the pressing need to fill the position." Former UF Attorney Tom Biggs left March 1, leaving the office "critically understaffed." The office usually has one main attorney with three full-time assistant attorneys. Currently there is only one full-time staff attorney, Read said. Improve your memory. Order this memo board now-before you forget! alligator, friday, march 19, 1962, 9 1-one INS Andk F ol ue u WU Seagfras7Cwn E0 tpSI~RgY MEiMII-SS r~ j ,Jo'i.-''t,.' -~ at .-a '~ a~ a --'--' a a -0' -, ,. a.'-a----' ' Here's What They're Saying About JEAN CHALMERS City Commission Jean has worked for many years in he Gainoesvlcomuntyto, prvethe lot of oallof oui izens. I nt hik of anyone a-hois bet qualified to represeot the coring aspect of poblc serie Michael Gannon "Jeonhos always been involved in the community and she hos learned to know the people who move thngs here. I believe she can awork a-ihthesepeo. ple and that's crucl. John Mahon Jean snotthe type of person ,hot someone could boy. She always hos the whole community at heart. Rosa Williams Paid Pal. Adv. Paid for by Lucille Maloney, Treas. .4 .1 --! -, L-.= A wave, a jkj

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10, alligator, friday, march 19, 1982 By Bruce Mastron Alligotor Staff Writer Gainesville City Commissioner W.E. 'Mac" McEachern's efforts to control the city's so-called head shops got a big boost Thursday. Commissioners Gary Junior and Bobbie Kline joined McEachern in asking city Attorney J.T. Frankenberger to draw up an ordinance similar to one recently approved by the U.S. Supreme Court. The law upheld by the Court was enacted in Hoffman Estates, Ill., and has these provisions.: ,-owners of the shops, which sell items that can be used with illegal drugs, shall be licensed; P-the owner or employees will not get a license if they have been convicted of any drug crimes; o.,sales to minors will be banned; ,-merchants will register those who buy the items; violators will pay a $10 to $500 a day fine. Commissioners, meeting as a subcommittee of the city commission, heard from Gainesville police Capt. Richard Ward, who said he likes the bill because it would require purchasers to register. people who buy a lot of the paraphernalia may use the items to help their sales of illegal drugs, he said. And finding out who buys a lot could give police a clue to who sells the drugs. Maurice Giunta, misdemeanors division chief at the State Attorney's Office, also spoke at the meeting. He said the manufacture and delivery of such items is illegal under state law. But the only problem, he said, is that the law can't be enforced while it is being appealed in federal court. A law like the Illinois law has already been OKd, and the state would have no problem enforcing a similar law in Gainesville, he said. McEachern had initially asked the commission to vote for asking the attorney to draft an ordinance at last Monday's regular commission meeting. But his motion received no second, and Kline said then she thought the ordinance was unnecessary because of the state law. The request was then referred to the subcommittee, where McEachern asked commissioners to take "the first step in the thousand-mile journey toward solving crime.' Kline said she changed her mind becaus'. she had not realized how the state law had been tied up in the courts. Kline said she could keep an "open mind" on the ordinance's constitutional questions,' but found the Subterranean Circus, a local store which would come under the new ordinance "offensive." Bill Killeen, owner of the Subterranean Circus, defended his business. Killeen said he found no objection to banning sales to minors because "we're not very patient about selling to high school kids." Killeen, saying he has more to fear from the state law, said if the city wanted him to ban sales to minors, "Why didn't you ask me? "I've got a 16-year-old kid myself and I'm not crazy about him using drugs." He said he first had started out 15 years ago selling buttons and posters, then started selling brass pipes, and finally selling more of the paraphernalia. "You go on for 13 years selling things," he said. "You get a mortgage, send the kids to school, go through divorce proceedings." He said it is unfair for the city to suddenly tell him to close his business. City may restrict local drug paraphernalia Ex-O Dome worker charged with 40 forgery, theft counts By Phil Kuntz Alligator Staff Writer UF police investigators plan to wrap up a four-month investigation today by charging former UF student and former O'Connell Center box office manager Richard Cimmerman with 40 charges -ranging from forgery to grand theft, according to UF police. Cimmerman, 22, who was arrested in Gainesville Wednesday by an Alachua County Sheriff's Deputy on a felony theft charge from Atlanta, remained in Alachua County jail Thursday night. He is being held without bond, a jail spokesman said. .The pending charges against Cimmerman stem from an investigation by UF police investigator Robert Hester into Cimmerman's activities as the ticket manager at the OConnell Center, Hester said Thursday. Cimmerman was charged with grand theft last December after allegedly writing worthless checks in an apparent attempt to cover shortages in his receipts from concert ticket sales, Hester said. He apparently attempted to skip town after the charge was filed, Hester said, but he was apprehended in Huntsville, Ala., during an attempt to defraud a bank there. Cimmerman was brought back to Gainesville by Hester. Hester said he searched Cimmerman's suitcase after he brought him back to Gainesville, and found evidence implicating the former student attempted successful forgeries in six cities in three states. Hester said Cimmerman was apparently going to banks in these cities, including the Atlantic First National and Sun banks in Gainesville, and opening accounts with stolen identification and forged or stolen checks. He then went to different branches of the banks and withdrew cash from the fraudulent accounts, Hester said. Hester said he has informed officials in all the cities of the alleged crimes. He said police in some, including Orlando and Atlanta, probably will be filing charges of their own against Cimmerman. Others, including Miami and Huntsville, might not because the banks involved do not wish to press charges, he said. Hester plans to charge Cimmerman with two counts of grand theft, along with 38'counts of forgery and uttering a forgery stemming from the bank stings. Hester said Cimmerman, while he was employed by the O'Connell Center, rented a car to drive Halloween Festival performer Charles Rockit to Jacksonville, using Rockit's credit card number as collateral. Cimmerman allegedly kept the car for more than a month and then anonymously returned it in the beginning of December, Hester said. No one knew about the car, Hester said, until Rockit got the bill. The other grand theft charge stems from the purchase of a stereo from a store in Gainesville that Cimmerman allegedly made with another worthless check and false identification, Hester said. Hester estimated that Cimmerman defrauded banks in the three states for about $10,000 during a period of about six months from summer 1981 to December. He said Cimmerman used about IQ stolen identifications in the frauds. ALL-YEAR WNG WE M-SKILSaL GOING 1 CW GWC"WL This Saturday and Sunday something Rolling Stones poster to everyone who exciting is happening at our dealership. who drops in. We'e havinganOpen House. So drop in. It's a great way to see all And to celebrate we're giving away four our beautifulnew1982 Honda free Honda Passports." motorcycles. Eved if you don'twin that, you'll still And who knows? Even though we're be a winner. We'ealso giving away a not planning to sell, sell, sell, you might free key chain or a free special editing still want to buv. buv. buy. STREITS HONDA Sat. March 26 9-7pm 37&2637 Sun. March 21 NoonpU. 482 NW 13th Street alwsio a d~b o4 ALTERNATORS, GENERATORS, & STARTERS Prices as $$2495? FREE Electrical Check AAMACAuto-Electric1 oetell & 508 N.W. Ith Ave. Wholge"ap Daily -: Set. :4-1:48 376-767 '4 Youitr Alligato77 C:lassifls,&d ca it beA the fulssoing I usaj Te ,,ligator 1728 NW 'IstSt. ReltzUnsng cha'ekcashing risou jewerk supter Medical Center Bookstore Beaty Towers BIkstors' S moker's Den 1620l W, Uulis A\ e Briar Patch Oas Mai The lights are on at West End Enjoy playing golf or hitting range balls every night till midnight Driving Range Video Golf Lessons Power Carts Leagues Complete Pro Shop Scot Dombek Pro A At that point Junior broke in and said, "You don't mean you're asking for sympathy? "I would never lower myself to selling paraphernalia," Junior said. "To defend what you're doing is ridiculous. Sometimes the law has to catch up with the man." Killeen, his jaw tightening, replied that he wasn't seeking sympathy, but just an understanding of his business situation. Kifeen has said that paraphernalia sales account for about 75 percent of his business. Yet to be determined is whether the proposal will be confined to shops such as Killeen's or to include stores like convenience stores which sell rolling papers. Before the meeting broke up Junior, sitting within 5 feet of Killeen, said he wanted to do anything we can do to stop dope-dealing." -Any way we can get rid of the scumbags is OK with me," Junior said. After the meeting Killeen said Junior was being unreasonable and, "I think this is a real black eye for a city as progressive as Gainesville." "They want us to fold up our tents and go away but we're not going." He added that he would challenge any law that would force him out of business. Commissioners expect to take up the proposal Monday at their regular commission meeting. lie -F m I br

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'Missing': my Jonmthen SussIgnd Alligator Staff Writer Every crack of a gun in Missing blows another gaping hole in Ed Horman's staunch faith in the righteousness of American foreign policy. Every blood-spattered Chilean corpse wrenches stomach and mind out of bourgeois complacency. Maybeat one time Ed Horman could have attributed the carnage to Latin blood types. But he is in Santiago, it's October 1973, and the American embassy officers who keep telling him they don't know what happened to his son all have frozen, catty, canary-fed smiles. I, by the end of Missing, it isn't clear that U.S. officials were directly involved in the interrogation and execution of American writer and filmmaker Charles Horman because he knew too much about the Chilean coup's American connection, then it is at least quite evident that Henry Kissinger's proteges wanted to keep bluffing about their knowledge of Horman's murder. Even a State Department report withheld for more than three years -concluded that it seemed "strange" that Chile's new leaders could even contemplate killing an American without serious repercussions in U.S.-Chile relations. Unless, of course, the boys draped in red, white and blue decided a sudden case of diplomatic blindness was in everyone's best interests. Historical revisionism seems to be the order ol the day. No sooner had director Costa-Cavras screened Missing than the State Department,.its New York Times flak Flora Lewis and WHNATS HAPENIG own%"Mada"M with free games, lawn movie and free entertainment in the Orange and Brew tonight from 11 to 4 at the Reitz Union Alpha Kappe Deltas is sponsoring a seminar entitled "'The Social Consequences of Being Alive" today at 12:15 in room 3102 a movie right on others denounced the film, which is based 'on Thomas Hauser's excellent book The Execution of Charles Horman (recently re-released in paperback as Missing). Funny, but the Pinochet regime didn't make a peep while Missing was in production in Mexico City. Perhaps they thought any word one way or another might shake their good standing with the U.S. Defense Department's human-rights-and-Hueyhelicopter division. But enough dabbling in external affairs and on to the heart of the review. Missing is a good movie, not just because of its timely subject, but also for the superb acting by Jack Lemmon and Sissy Spacek and the precise direction of CostaGavras, best known for his successful movie Z. Faint indeed are hopes that Missing will change foreign policy, but perhaps it's a small consolation that it looks like another commercial hit for Costa-Gavras and possibly a source of some Oscars next year. Lemmon -minus the affected mannerisms of Felix Unger or the barely controlled hysteria of The Front Page -is conservative Christian Scientist businessman Ed Horman, who until now never had a reason to doubt the truth and bounty of the American Way. His conversion to angry cynic is influenced in part by daughter-in-law Beth, wife of the missing writer, played by the most natural-looking Spacek I've ever seen. A series of sometimes jarringly injected flashbacks tells the story of how Charles Horman (John Shea) and his friend Terry Simon (Melanie Mayron) learn the damning truth of the General Purpose Building A. Returned Peace Corps Volunteers: present slides of Central African Republic tonight at 7:30 in room 1157 of McCarty Hall. Students In African Studies Association: are providing a workshop entitled "What is Happening in the Rural Areas" from 8:30 to 2:30 today in room 427 of Grinter Hall. Steel Drum Concert: featuring the University of Illinois band tonight at 8:15 in room 101 of the Music Building. Kappa Alpha Ps: presents the all-state' "Stomp" tonight at .10 in the Union Ballroom and a "champagne jam" Saturday at 9 in the Majestic Oaks clubhouse. the mark about American engineering of the coup from the seaside resort of Vina del Mar. In at least one scene, however, the flashbacks do work; as neighbors describe what they think they saw the day Charles was arrested, the scene shifts and reappears with the various accounts. But the incontrovertible evidence remains as solid as ever. The character played by Shea is well-acted, although it isn't quite the same one Hauser described in his thorough book. In the movie, Charles is anot-too-successful rebellious writer who, with his wife, settled in Santiago just because it seemed to have the best of what Latin America offers. On the printed page, however, he was an up-and-coming journalist with a Harvard degree. A distortion is a distortion, although on balance one has to allow Costa-Gavras more artistic license than should be accorded the fact-twisters in th4American and Chilean goveronients. With this movie, Costa-Gavras comes perilously close to admitting that his own leftist politics include an unshakeable image of the Ugly American. As Village Voice critic Andrew Sarris put it, the director reveals "an ancestral grudge against the Truman Doctrine." The reference can be thrown back another 130 years to President Monroe, but Missing nevertheless is a well-done movie about a grievous blunder in our history. Missing, rated R, at the Plitt Center Theatres, 1015 NW 13th St. Lots of blood and profanity. Call 372-5347 for showtimes and prices. Blank History: Institute of Black Culture Healthy Living Five-Mile Classic will Director Bill Simmons is scheduled to speak be held Sunday at 4 p.m. at Nationwide InSunday at2 in the Florida State Museum. surance at t$e corner of Southwest 34th yaiking Heeds and others: everyone is Street and Williston Road. Registration starts invited to a D.B. Party tonight at 9 in Sledd at 2:30. A & H at Murphree Area. Women will be adUF Symphonlc Band Concert will be minted for free. held at 8:15 p.m. in the University eip Pin Cystic Fibrosis: Sigma Nu's Auditorium. first nnuaI wrestle-off will be held this Hispanic sear-Fiesta: will be held weekend with the tournament starting today Sunday from:2 to.6 p.m. at the Catholic Stuat 4' in the Florida Gym and continuing dent Center at West University Avenue and Satfsdy at I with finals at 7. 18th Street. Admission isfree. Seaenlh-Awerican Law Students Center for Latin Aaercsn Studies: Assed ltlonu presents "Thoughts on Enpresents a lecture on "Update on Human vironpental Law in Florida in the '80s" toRights in Latin America" Sunday at 7:30 day at 12:50 in the courtroom at the Holland p.m: at the Hillel Student Center, 16 NW Law Center. 18th St. EN in the O'Connell Center Its not just forEnginees.its frYOU! Now is your chance to meet representatives from over 30 major companies. FREE/ Discuss cm orte See exhibits. Comlike Texas nstrumen M OK and more, wi display the t ad vancesin This weekend comsev8engineer's FairIt's for you. and it's free FriC March 19 20 OMEN 9cm-5pm FAIR OPEN 9mn4pm Pr8:30ia: am Fu 9m R cqub -r10-2pm Co. TOrs12:30-2pm Engineersq Fair '82 n : EgSfl at Raitz Unian, A BASIS FOR THE FUTURE. TODAY Dke Hudn MVW QiQ"Ko lymics *ForcOre 'i-A, rmaiOnCon4oc Engineers-FirOffice-405MU Hal 392-0994 I U ~ PisU MMI I I I alligator, friday, march 19, 1982, 11

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12, alt got'''f4iG ''' ) t ................ *Make this space "rs next weel. C.U 376-4482 TODAY. Going Paces? We can get you there for LESS! Toyota Economy Rentals Rent 1982 Toyotas $49.90 From anytime Friday to same time Monday 0 Free Pick up & Delivery Major Credit Cards or Cash Deposit Accepted 33464. Main St. 372-7410 COLOR 0; Si 12 PRINT i 95 with coupon 135 KODACOLOR, C-41 NE GATIVES OLY COLOR LAB 1232 W. University Ave. M-F 9:00-5:30p. m. Sat. 9-1:00 ROI OFFER EXPIRES MAR. 31,1982 Just Received Shipment of Long Sleeve Surfer Shirts $12.00 Sizes S-M-L-XL The Gator Shop The Original Gator Shop in Business Over 30 Years 1702 W. University Ave. UF Plaza -376-5191 Formerly Hardee's Plaza ENGINEERING STUDENTS FIND OUT ABOUT ENGINEERING OPPORTUNITIES IN THE UNITED STATES AIR FORCE. THE ENGINEER RECRUITING TEAM MEMBERS INVITE YOU FOR COFFEE, AND CONVERSATION ABOUT YOUR FUTURE IN THE UNITED STATES AIR FORCE AS AN ENGINEER. SEE US AT THE REITZ UNION, MARCH 23, 24 and 25th. 8:30AM-4:30PM. FOR DETAILS, CONTACT SERGEANT TOM FARRELL, FEDERAL BLDG, Rm. 329, GAINESVILLE, FLA. 32601 PHONE: 305/378-6444 A ealsatsey.Es Goldstein: I was screwedd' In road plans By Bruce Mutren Alligator StaffWriter Gainesville City Commissioner Mark Goldstein was at it again. Goldstein, a commissioner known for his colorful language, hit his verbal peak earlier this week when he accused members of the Metropolitan Transportation Planning Organization of selling out to major landowners. MTPO members, who are city and Alachua County MarG ln commissioners, were discussMufk ~id~~ifl ing how Gainesville's roads chastised transportawould look in the year 2005. tion board members Jerry Weinstock, MTPO planning director, had just introduced some alterations to roadwidening plans members passed last month. Goldstein accused Weinstock ol some "eleventh-hour modifications" that were "slipped by us" after members had meetings "up the nose." Weinstock denied the accusations. He said his suggestions were asked for at the last meeting and were simply revisions that were necessary after considering things such as whether residents would even use widened roads. He added that the revisions, such as six-laning Northwest 39th Avenue, were made by himself and three others representing the state, county and city. Goldstein replied that "staff had decided they're going to meet privately" and then tell members, "Oh, by the way, we adjusted the map and you guys gotta buy it." Weinstock answered, "We're not pushing anything on you, we're not working behind the scenes, we're not asking for approval, just feedback." MTPO Chairman and Alachua County Commissioner John Schroepfer defended Weinstock for bringing some "reality" to MTPO's plans. Then Goldstein exploded and asked what all the MTPO's work since 1978 had been for. "Reality and the real world?" he said. "Reality is not dealing with fantasy. Otherwise what the hell were we doing? "We've been presented with a fake world," he said of Weinstock's earlier MTPO work. "And since you admit it, then I've been screwed." Goldstein said the widening of 39th Avenue, which he said was turned down at earlier meetings, was reintroduced under pressure from landowners who would benefit from wide roads. The wide road would help their plans to industrialize the area, he said. The accusations of selling out were quickly denied. City Commissioner Gary Junior said, "I'm not in anybody's pocket." He added, "I do not believe a person has to be poor to get his voice heard." He said he was "rather amazed" that rich people haven't applied more pressure. County Commissioner Jack Durrance, complaining that he felt he had "stepped through the looking glass," said it was "counterproductive to use innuendos of back-room dealing." Despite the name-calling, nothing was accomplished. Weinstock's'proposals were neither accepted nor rejected, but referred to two committees of MTPO. One committee is composed of citizens; the other of local professional people. Weinstock listed several changes, but his top priority was the widening of 39th Avenue to six lanes from Northwest 34th Street to North Main Street at a cost of $7.5 million. The next MTPO hearing is scheduled for April. But Weinstock won't be there. He is leaving his job to sell microcomputers. CtJERVEMPEOAL 0TEQUIU I

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alligator. fridov, march 19 1982. t2 Robbery defendant fires attorney gy Janot Uraunstelin Alligator Staff Writer The armed robbery trial of Johnny Diamond Helton and his codefendant, Henry Joshua Mitchell, Thursday was postponed until next week after Helton fired his attorney. Heiton, 29, and Mitchell, 43, are being tried in Alachua County Circuit Court for the June 4, 1981 armed robbery of Bishop's Drug Store in Archer, Fla. Mitchell and Helton, a Newberry resident, are charged with stealing more than $100 worth of narcotics and cash at gunpoint. Helton expressed a lack of confidence in Public Defender John Carlin, who was representing him. Private attorney Bill Salmon was appointed by the court to replace Carlin. Circuit Judge Theron Yawn ordered the trial postponed until March 24 so that Salmon can prepare to defend Heltin, Mitchell has waived his right tii an attorney and has chosen to defend himself. In court, he told Yawn that he has subpoenaed Department of Corrections Secretary Louis Wainwright, Gainesville Police Chief Atkins Warren, the chairman of the Florida Parole Commission, and two members of the Helton family. Mitchell told Yawn that he wanted the witnesses he subpoenaed to testify about the problem of prison inmates who continue to commit crimes after they are released from prison. However, Yawn told Mitchell, .Such evidence will not be permitted in this court." "You will be allowed any witnesses that can testify to facts relating to this charge," Yawn told Mitchell, who is currently serving a 50-year term at the Federal Penitentiary in Atlanta for armed robbery. Mitchell said he plans to use "duress" as a defense. Yawn said that to prove duress, Mitchell would have to show that he was forced to commit the robbery. But in a sworn deposition taken Feb. 24, Mitchell told Assistant State Attornev Howard Holtzendorf that he committed the robbery and that he was responsible for it. Mitchell also testified that Helton was in a hotel in Lakeland at the time of the robbery-. Police however, identified a fingerprint found in the safe in Bishop's Drug Store as Helton's. Helton requested that he be tried separately from Mitchell, but Yawn denied that request on March 9. Helton, who was sentenced to fifteen years in prison last week for selling marijuana and cocaine in an unrelated case, was arrested Sept. 29, 1981 in Gulfport, Miss. Mitchell was arrested Feb. 25, 1982 after he was transferred from the Federal penitentiary to Alachua County Detention Center. ahe indepeneen florida aligator is accepting applications for REPORTERS Come by the Newsroom Sunday, March 21st at 3:00 Independent Florida Alligator. 1729 N.W. Ist Ave. AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY/AFFIRMATIVE ACTION EMPLOYER Sporting Goods Headquarters For Over 32 Years TEAM OUTFITTERS FROM LITTLE LEAGUE TO THE PROSOUR SPECIALTY! OUR SHIPMENTS ARE INI BASEBALL-SOIFTBALL GLOVES and MITTS Over 1000 in stock by Rawlings, Wilson ALL STOCK AT EIA PRI Mosks-body protectors COMPUTE ACCESSORIES -AlsoBaseball Shoes by Spotbilt and. Pony Both Cleated and Multipurpose we e.havefiberglas cateda beboads, goas A brackets. TI #Ai vim UEIMlINeT A 24 L RESUll JIMMIE HUGHES SPORTING GOODS 1113 W. University Ave. 2 Blocks East of Campus I --7 w I y, , U0 Watch for Cinemawax ooOOOOOOOOOGet Mad Tonighti,---Oooooo lDNG aOer pG4 ateJ.W.R.U.-ii P.m.-4a.m. 4 U Lawn Movie.,. Stripes (Begins at I1) Games ...Ping-Pong, Pool, Foosball, bowling (starts at 1:00) Dancing. Entertainment ."Magic" in the O& B Access to the Pinball/Video-Games Room Sponsored By: The Inter-residence Hall Assoc. Savant Studnet Govern. & The J.W.R.U. All day all movies. .I 'T'7-T r r ,T I .iT 7.

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,3,-~ettgqoc,,f~toy3,rprc~19,,,1982 FOR RENT Colegiatei 0ving Org has openings for summer (under $550) and fall (under 650) Co-op. cent i, heat, I blk from UF coed, uld + 18 meols/wk Call Brett at 372-9319 r wn3eCLO. 117 NW 15h 5 1 G'vIle 32603 3 22 .5 1 BRANDYWINE I & 2 BEDROOM From $275 003 Call 375 1 3033 0 4 23 75 8 3 STONERIDGE I & 2 BEDROOM From $285 00 Call 375 1121 4-26 73-)i Houses, Apt Dulexes Call 3732505 P Me-doz. Realtor 219 W Unvers3 3y Ave 3 31 2 1 A beautiful foom for serious non-smoking student 5 blocks from U of F Quiet. wooded rit All utilites paid $170/mo 373 2038 3 31 19 1 Country iving (lose in No kids pet ok Ef tiency apt $135 One br apts $19fi 2 bnc S165 3 50 3 3 2orchb$2 $25 Call 372-6881 3 33789203 33,33313953 03313 VICTORIAN HOUSE Renovated spacious rooms for rent High ceilings. big windows, kocc-hen utilities On ly $125/mo and up 371 7282 3 24 10Sublet I bdrm apt Api-August Yours to ent Sept I Screened porchpartilly frn 2 blocks from campus $225/mo Cal 375 7251 3 24-5March free walk to campus, I br loft, beamed ceing apet $235 3o Conem. porory Management broker 373-00673 378-6663 4 1 15 1 PETS OK -nice 2 br 3p $275 Fenced back yard Smail. quiet complex Avail mid April Rick 392-0371 days23 evenings 375 4063 3 19 6 13 Avoaloble now new, two br with d-shwasher rnd central c -c close to campus, nce c 3rpet, reduced to $279, o 375-1085 r 375-6173 325 10 1 3 Sublease for summer Hawaiian Village Apartments 3 bedroom 2 bothsprice nego ble C 3ll 371-6562 for further' details 3 19 5 1 2 bedroom apartment for $250/mon plus the last month of lease is free Ask or University Garden ApIs about apt 207 3 19-5-1 Two female roommates needed to sublet Oak Forest 3 bdrm/2 both apt May I-Aig 15 Totally furnished w'washer-dryer S 140 mo 1 '3 uil 377 2479 319-5-1 AMAZING VALUE t Sublet quiet I b unfurn opt overlooking pool -Piccadilly $230 dishwshr day manager 376-2483 eve 373-4489 319-5 1 SubleseMrc reevery clean, quiet fur I r opt Ver y close to UF Avail Mar ch 19 $225/nmo Call 373-4837 after 5 p m Sublease 2 bdr53 m 2 both Gotor-ood Apt S340/m C23374-8372 3-22-5 31 Sublease a I bed, I-both apartment for the summer w/ option for fall, close to campus, $200/mo Call Sergio at 3735738 3 22 5 1 SUBLET. I bdrm furnished apt close to col lege & 3 bus route $230 mo + deposit C before 8 30 am or after 9 pm 378-5416 2 a 2ordob e houses 3 4 br 2 both 10 blocks to U of F 216 SW 5 Ave $350/m33 a3 3b, b-ith 408 NE I I A ve Lake Br eeze Est Hawthorne $300, mo 376 9623 3-22 5 1 * * * MUST SEE * * * turn apt on 4-ocre grassy field w' lake privacy and only 1 /2 mile to UF ideal for student(s) or professional Pool.o/ h loun dry or, bus line Avariable now 373 3123 3 22 5 1 SUMMER OAK FOREST fur"'shed townhoUSe, need 2 roommates to SUBLET Ava3able May-Aug Washdryer Coil 375 2671 3-24-7 1$ HALF MONTH FREE on ve-y clean I br apt Located 1 '2 bi k from UF $225 nurnS 2410 turn 373 3514 378-1814 3322 5 32 BARGAIN MW I mile from UF Ne2 lb, I bo, carpet drapes, central heot. air. oil ap dances. mmed -occup $275 mo nego Sublease OAK FOREST APTS 2 BEDROOM 2 BATH STARTING MAY IsI CALL 377 1884 3-22 5 1 Almnost fully furnished 8x32 I bf air condi honed mobile home located mn Mobile City #22 $125 month + $100 deposit 375 6725 3 22 5 1 3 bdrm opt available May bhru July CHEAPI Good locaon Cll 375-5372 keep trying 3 22-5-1 3 Oak Forest Mar free 3 bn 2 b dishwasher washer/dryer d2spsUn 333tennis2 2 pools Cal 375 1741 or 378-5358 3-22-5-1 Female needed to sublet I bedroom in 3 bedron-ap, tnr summer Grad or pro stu 2347 -shore utities 371 2640 e,,e A) V Available Now I br. I both large kitchen w gas range fresh point air spacious living close to UF Call 378-'93e S170Month t depos 3-23-5-13 Sublet 2 bedroom I both furnished Bran dlywine Apt May through August Only 335 Call now for -ore32n3o 373-9173 3-23 5-3 3 Sublet for summer Own bedroom in the Pines $120/month + 1, 4 utlities Coll 375-0617 Ask for Gr eg af ter 2 00 3 26-81 Choice I br furnished apt in Village Park on pool and volleyball court Available May I Coll Clhff 378-8117 223-51 PLAN AHEAD Sublet 3 bed 2 both Vizcaya opt large enough for 3 to 5 people Available May 3 close to UF + La School Call 371-2704 3-23-51 FRIDAY & SATURDAY AT 8:15 PM SATURDAY MATINEE AT 2:00 PM \I t by--[ THE PULITZER PRIZE-WINNER! Little Lyons Realty & investmeets, Inc. Augustus L. "Ship" Little, BrokerPresident presents STUDENTS: $4.00 at the door every show FREE Openig Nght Cheese & Wine Party after the show. HIPPODROME 25 SE 2nd Place o Box Otice: Noon-4:30 pe *e 375-HIPP 0.3 3 p3y y33 $30003 33 sbl-s p53f' t,"mer w 00 00 On bd333 furn-hed a H-wclanVillage Agst s 3e3 I 3333 3333 Sand,-372-3430, dy 3r3lt evnn 93-1 2 f3mles to s-blet 3 p3 et 1/3 r33 '-3 $305/m3 .3-3 ltos, Mrh33 r333 333od Cls '. campusLadmk Aps Cll 3711979 3 19331 Pooms forRenI $80 + hns 37bocks fomUF 2 bed 2 bth Soner.dge Mrch 33n3 free Beau1-f-Ily turnihd, poo nc ,sanJ low deposi $4tlL, mon' c Dn 378-334 3-30103 UmmER UBLET 33r 23533 323R 2 3H3333V03 AI (maofe) AugkreePoy :, JeJ-ly Ch3e3 374-8397 22-)-3 Haw.oan Vllge3 r or ubeIstog P.3 Apc 3cr. r. m 33pol $39533h Cll 376-8712 3 23 501 Brad ew dple ck rm aps Forn My1s ,nem ava.ble, ony $15mhAll -waphncsll now 033789283768712 3235$ Sb .e seI b FURNISHED Ap Haa 7 n V0log 33M33y332 I33 A 29 3 m33 NEGOTIABLE Cll 3776113 319-3SIblel 2 bdros n /l Wndedas Ap unsepool, on b2 s route From May lhr Aus educd p"t, Col 373 5501 3-233. 2d bd 1 1 2 both -f rnsed 1,1se101, k1 .-133p 135.003e P 3othAgtr 33e Cll 3730661 339-3 33 Vz33.303333338303b 2 b3th3 333-33 furn-hed p-o1, --o aud,l-s o UF May I-Jly 31,5139 or bes offer + ,3 $325 C3333 378-702 323 5 3 3 Bradw-e Sble' Ap lo S-m-, ( 5/I-8/15) Onbedoom -Big .gh to 2,w o 2bds -I sfotabd Flyfrse n k chen t bthom cesns A g"e, borg',ntor $300 00 Cl 3717459 3353-23-5T. fl-or1-w1-ue opt 2 bed .1 112 th .llhen w dhw, her. 1000 q It S325 m nv yCaIII Tom 13775534 fer 1 0 L3t)pI m 3-23 5 TheV0ge cil372-7938 3-22-5-1 I + 2 d8oo ps 3 biksI F 3 od 1ew3ki3333 4 + 3n335+525, 3Ro.iosf .,: n w lyre oeled hos~ Nwkithe nd ma3y333333s ph 378-8390 H3y 3-19-3-1 BETTER DEAL THAN DORMS L3M nch Apts. E on oml living f t th5 :.Ware slt.n stadef. 2 blks .pa s pe .b dm f l y f ilshe d ,. g i .32 ., paa. s ld s e I -, g .g e ills. -ntra .ir 11S. Swmr A 1121111 S3r33 3 33. I Sum3333233 3 28353333. C1 C3337137224.33 3 335-15 5 m--le wok to Shads Smm Ho-s. SuIblet I br n g2 b p 2 pools M .r F 5149/mo323r 3M3y 1 3785380 33223-1 Subet-2 b op S5 mm-' H. s, A o pt. 5 m-nwak 5S1-ds Cll 377 130.,or dy376-9668 3&2k33b-3 IpA-1 3-24-5Sbl,3,3 33d,3 p3,te boo1 3g 2 bed/2 ld p ur,,hd w rIn,,rIshd Av2oble0 y.A33C3.333233333 8603 0377-996 33-027 1 Regency Oaks 1 dm2b lors-m-rRen nw / pn for .1lIdeil-l-nn Ren negot. Ca33777820 3 324-51 Nice 2 ld I bi ao Oly 2 /2 y old Close o ampus ,Shds d VA 0.n bs ru 335s4s_, 3orp g rn gohle 392100 yds f-omUF. 3 bdr hose M ot f sp:e SubWetfo Smm, A & 8 / p-on 1, Foewin al L caed t 122 SW sv Av (3533333333333333) Cl378-1256 3-23-3-1 53bl3 -sp3c3o3s oe bed3 3333 3opt 33 $2753 $2nf5nhed 75 3s 3 Cll Ross 373-7154 3922148 3 22-3 3-1 2 R PooIde p -snw v befr ult orol 275 wihop-on "orenewtor' e yerF, m,. n. .It3751361 3-2451 Subet comortableI bed m apt $209/mo M roommae-b g bedroom-sublet for the occupy Ap3l3 3 Pool.-laundry, good location summer-no down payment-furnshed op-2 on SW 20 Ave Call 375-6026 offer 7 pm or bks from campus Coll Los 371-6764 5-9 or wkend 3-22-3-1 3fer 12pm 3-22-5-2 Sublet for the summer 3 bedroom furnished Wnted 2 or 3 em e (preferably) to share apt at Regency Oaks Call 374-8313 3-24-52 bdrm 2 both townhouse apt. of French QIrs. Aps Summer 1/3 rent $107.1/4 rent $803 utl Cll3anytime371-0662 3-22-5-2 Wanted 2 non-moking students to renmt rm2 -r 33323333333123b2t03333332333333333333 33333roommate03a3t3332o33su33333t333 ter ms A & B Tennis, pools, raquetball S 150 A & B Own room in 4 bdrm townhouse -The 53r33333331/233333383333333 r Vllage. Also available for fall 378-3395 hwes0 G'ville Call Jeff or Greg 378-8403 Lisa 3-22-5-2 Female roommate needed to share 4 bf opt I B 3D APT fr3shed, close to school ONLY in Vlage for summer & fall Studious, par$209 00 POOL, laundry Near shopping, no ty'ng, frerdly, mature 120/mo + elec 3 3 3lble MAYI s, 376-0119 afer 5 371-1081 3-19-4-2 353324-5-1 ---2 pm --I or 2 mole rmis for master bdr w/ walk in closet in spacious 2 bed/2 both Gatorwood REDUCED RENT c 3melot opts sublease or reApt Summer $225/month 377-9854 fer rent8 bdr May 15-Aug 15 furn or unfurn 6 00 pm. 3-22-5-2 2 Price nego able Coll371-3091 3-25-5-1 .3 _3 .5 __0 -------Female needed to shore bedroom w/ nurse August Rent Free $92.00/mo + 1/3 u 3l -Summit House Apts Sublet one bedrm apt May I st to Aug IS. by Shonds Apil rent free CALL 377-9749 reg $205 per month with A g free $128.50333333 3 0 3-22-5-2 per month-in SW sec of SW 16th St Will talk about early entry or other agreement Coll VLAEAT tln n te a ns2 Tom at 377-13933a0ter3 8pm 3-25-5-1333333 fem rmmts needed for summer w/ option .*.**OAK ORES*** for fall Need bdrm furn only $115 + 1/4 AK FOEST-url Coll Debbie 373-4092 3-22-5-2 Summer Sublet Furnished 3 br fwnhse with WASHER/DRYER Rent negotiable. Call 3773323 3-25-3-31 Fm 33333323, clean, resp grod 333333t/profsn 3 o3n rm & bh 2 br/2b SubletI br apt staring May 5 Your option large Brandywine Apt All faces $185 + to stay for fall Near Buffer plaza $230/mo 1/2 ut, can move in now, call Doleann Col 373-1356 weekdays, 377-0344 3-25-5378-7353/373-7907 3-19-3-2 1 Tired of the dorms? 3 brs ovil Ap or May. 3'villoge #337 2 br I both Irg Summer Fun; NW rea 15 bks from UF. Female, sublet w/ fall opton Furn pool, laundry, non-smoker $120/mo + 1343 f ..Call bus. reg dep dys 378-5905, eve 373. 375-3128 3-22-5-2 0906 3 24-4-1 -_-_ Female roommate waed -immediate oc2 br turn mobile home on wooded acreage cupancy Own room Millhopper Village I m8 from Sh3nds, vet school Pets, garden $118 mo Call 375-2423 keep trying. fine $190 mo (cl water, sewer), $150 3-22-5-2 dep 377-6325 3-19-1-1 ._ CHEAPER THAN DORMS THIS 15 ITsublet nice house right across LaMoncho Apis Economical iving for the from campus 'Shands May to August mature single student. 2 blks campus, Completely furnished Cal Marc 375-1654 private bdrm. fully furnished, garden, pool, 3-25-5-1 maid service, gas grills.
PAGE 19

993 Car0Stereo 5p9da39663399394909.4 2tZ28sif 2. n .--e. 1/ n 530939453433t8ble $0 Art v9299. $.I 5/p 03 333-0v3a 84ks.panhinna whoosW $WTPOMnA" *ot m W $ 376.69363-19-3-4 ITSPR04GI Don't support WD twoa bmke to class. For 11014 Sch-*nV00110y 10-4P"Wd nepowae. C.n .ob.,,.r&W V3-3KA 3-19-5-4 SpEAKERS Corwin VegW 415REDdowV. 3way w/15* woafe. Dranl now. Serious callsonlyScot3793-93720319--4 .wl-ris cooking SALADVASTER --the word's finest quality cookware stainless steel cookware -life g-ty -nf 378-725. 3-29-10-4 ELECTRONIC SCALE sorornu 1202. LED readout 01 gmn accuracy. very Park. gre3 Condition.Must390SM.2 392-7561 3-22-5-4 Heod ~360 3skies -Post season bgon 005d 0 195 cm &75009 L4na 07 Awb". :km r n 1ns. ..-90 3-23-5-5 --6 x --N boos0 2600 C741 2-39j_ WANTEDohn06 5c.9rs 7 uczsASHALOM: HEAR 0 373-5120 3-22-4 FOR SALE 1976 C007E9 E3xe09009n0 sh -p-----------30003 tr3nsm9son. muff0erre on~9 _ _ _ _ _I R E FOKWEAR PATTERNS -spw. s.$g 2.300 s c.1oll 374-6433 e 3m39-d 0rI-7,3 Fbx s4 5 D9%. S0k o 3-19-3-5 c ss 3ngs.-Ar-ns W3 yu3n d2a_ '9'9 t 9 0e39 o '5-0n739r -9--.p who00s399-c0s900 909883n9 3636W. Unoo 3-----------&------37523SW0 R 8-23-7-7fhe i biseIT o*3 y 3Tk3 h-.e 9 3 Avps s r99ss9nc 59. 375-6862. 001974 M 3ck3 6030.0 .yhd 0r,91-0-463b. __ _eheof y ro .Co 2375-' 3-22-5-4 "P9*', 9r 9 90-9s m og,. -sfoo t. 0 j 3723 0 for TOP Ak .CASH oShe ord. 376 2379 ---n-y $-95 o 5o0r 373-5432-yony-m 3-29God j -o of 3III Y=s W y k -orE ., 39FREEPREGNANCYTESTS STEREO rsr cv 22.p, 3 .,y 8-5 s of oil" y s ssP" .377-23-k.s 20JVC036908W -"d oss dk ---4-----23-75-7 DAM6K6M--OAsZ1X IN, 0SW00WEAR a QPRATIC A3s .bimk rechn-r cho. r Cll Goryor 3n772W r Sh0IF S0v3 oo 0e00 ----------6900^ r -90g.0 SO999 ITheD.A 371-2408 3-22-5-4 r3d3. d 05nitd 9d 9w $25 n m 1 SI5NGER Cm-n f.1 --k0 9,A3-1ro -1v f029 W U9A --I-, ,-. .9rW II I 0II0on 392-9520 3-24-5-5 b 'n rd 'o-""-/-3 r .3-d Inor d co rn nC I2 9 3 1CE--F ,90e 39A 9 G R0--7E8bs0375-962 4-1-0-7 toEe 20090 3GUITAR: 7Gb0s 335 1975 T od m 20 0 0 o vM 375-9s 7 B 9d sp Ipc-,0503d096F s dM $5r -37909 3 9 7ONTRO CFLINorIC-Iee Co IIb p 0005-w hd37074 37952796979909903-2-27 fe i YBRTH.9358969UN AMP: K 9o Le9.d 1 ms30 r vo .o37s1mR3plu Fwr7 1 Jg19 -I09,3393 -193,111 9s .300 094.00 5900999099 5-99378-9191 UZUK GS 450 1960W 70Om ooML W m ~ -_3950-8.0038 l7553-q,--,,00996033 50 o, HELP WANTED All Women's s.'~-lR to tpe d-1 m6W ,2 letakbg qat odlgt af -r e + -9rs Excl nb .5090 0 9C00 AAndr375-5985 3-H9-10__ S' 099 k9 ng9 9fqu90ty 9000 33900 EARN EXTRA MON Y2-3 h90r T he R iftofGaineville 37_7594. 3-23-S-3 _---------ou PRE T 3A93 E 9rn 8 75c6999A 5 he 3-09 0 9 76M--bugny r Dhel mf -n P-sn GA SEY4W PASA F-dv a$-d 9 p 19_ 9 -9.r.C-r 000093F-1009w902932,901) CORP 14"1 1113-31For s1O9-gu oo p.W, g 3 5 o206G3-2--S r.9(.,-200 C (n 1969). 516 W UAv ___7 Y' q3 tf 999005099903 p7t.'I099 ." By 9n375-2-,33 3-23-3-5 37-930Cll for 9o99330 S AD Dd yoW 9903 '93 y 00.0 pM-p -1t se P -"-r -"mo Y'10S ORH 2 EXTRA For nwd-,rs wIIV Lkh Ica SACnscv aaTe ae --------5-00m371-297. 3-9-3-4 4-.23-7"__ i-,1 ANEW f -gh39.4 6501 3z0.3o -h-, 3---WN --g----I-I ---A--A --9 --IIE Oe t ac Sft It 22 e m n --v .z22 -SERVICES A AAdd CA9N0 r s _* Counch 3 mchmnP'ch -rs. -pm AddPveTS $7.88r3y5 23-6 11-4 7-53$9 -23-54 Help fgh s io 1 nd I,-Wy 95 3 For ____ _w7_ 057909tub SM.pTg,B o g. 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PAGE 20

I&, aniuutoe. frday, march 19.,1982 sunaiits UF strokes to 59-point lead in NCAA championships By Glen Giffard Alligator Staff Writer It is a little early yet for the Lady Gators to raise the championship banner, but on the strength of their first-night performance in the NCAA Women's Swimming and Diving Championships Thursday in the b'Connell Center, they've already taken a big step toward sewing up the title. Although two nights and sixteen events remain before the actual crowning takes place, winning efforts by swimmers Tracy Caulkins and Kathy Treible and diver Megan Meyer have given the Lady Gators what appears to be an insurmountable lead. Caulkins, holder of 35 national titles, swam to wins in two events, the 100-yard butterls asd 200-sard individual medle in back-to-back races. Telibls, who swept the three breaststrokeraces at last Near's national eet, won the 100%ard breaststroke ans liished second to Caulkins isthe m Adle. And Meyer, the Ferale Sringboard Dissr if the Year in 1981, was the winner in the I-meter dining, onl her second-best event. Ads i tll stand it equals a whopping 59-point leadlor the LashC tose With eight evsents completed, UF leads the 37-Iami fis-l with 170 points, followed; Stanford Utirsity (II 1), University of North Carolina (105), Auburn Universiy (87), University of Southern California (74) and Arizona State University h(60). Stanford Coach George Haines, whose Stanford teanis shared the pre-meet co-avorite tag with UF, was about ready to call it quits -but not quite. "I think we probably are out of it," he said, "We still have a chance tocome back. At least we can still pick op quits' a few points on 'em." Lady Gator coach Randy Reese said he expe-ted a better showing from Stanford "It was a very good first night for us lint I thought UF hosts Lady Gator Relays on Saturday By Dborah Witt Alligator Staff Writer After weeks of competing indoors, the Lady Gator track team moves into the sunshine Saturday as host of the Lady Gator Relays at Percy Beard Track. The meet, which kicks off at 9 a.m. with the 10,000 meters, concludes with the mile relay at 9:45 p.m. Saturday is the sixth anniversary of the relays, and UF coach Carol Slowik said the meet probably is the most esnpetiive event in the Southeast. About 2,000 athletes 1rom 75 high schools ani 50 to 60 universities will be in Gainesville, many who are competing outdoors for the first time this season. Admission is $1 for students with a picture I.D. and Is's card, and $3 for the general public. "In every event, the top people are national-class athletes," Slowik said. "It's not just (schools from) Florida. On paper, it looks like a national championship." The Lady Gators will be up against stiff competition from Florida State University, Southeastern Conference rivals University of Kentucky and the University of Alabama, Indiana University, as well as top-notch Canadian athletes. Outdoor track season opens at home for UF By Bill Ward Alligator Stff Writer With the success of the 1982 indoor season behind it now,the UF track team opens its outdoor season tonight in a tri-meet with Princeton University and University of Iowa. The meet, which is free to everyone, begins at Percy Beard Track with field events beginning at 6:30 p.m. and running events beginning at 7:15. "Princeton is the Tennessee (Southeastern Conference Indoor track champs) of the Hectagonal Conference," said UF head track coach John Randolph. "They have gsxd balance with excellent people in the field events." Some of Princeton's talent in the field events include Agie Wolf, who was third in the NCAA indosir finals of the shot put with a heave of 64'5". Wolf's toss is almost 4 feet better Summer Session in I Top U.F. Professors Ecology, Astronomy, Geology, Anthropology May 7-June 7. Return home in I ime to work res Fantastic recreotionol opportunities near Pikes Satssys summer session requirement Deadline for filing March 26 Pre-reg istrat ion fee is $50 Call 392-1701 for details. CAI IfNS 1 & 2 B:' droomn SPACIOUS Apartments On Site: 2 Pools 2 Racquetball Courts 1 Acre Pond 4 Laundry Facilities acres and acres of landscaping .Available Immediately Pre-Leasing for Summer & Fall 708 S.W. 16th Ave. 376-6720 Stanford could swim a little better," Reese said. -I don't think Stanford swam as well as they were capable." Caulkins' two wins are all the more remarkable lbscause they came in consecutive races. In the individual medley, she set a new collegiate record, one of five recorded in the night. But she was more concerned with the butterfly -. "I think I could've gone a little faster in my fly it I'd hit the walls better," she said. "Everybody's having good swims and bad swims, so it's pretty much like we expected. By no sneans is it over yet." Treible, who earned a collegiate record of her own with a 28.89 clocking in the 50-yard breaststroke, disagreed. than UF's shot putter Neil Serafenas' best throw. Wolf is also a 200-foot-plus discusthrower. Joining Wolf in the field events for Princeton is probably one of the best javelin throwers in the east, Tom Meyer. Meyer's best throw in the javelin is over 260 feet. Princeton also has a 7-foot high jumper in freshman Bob Merrilees and a 50-foot triple jumper in Mike Gray. If all that isn't enough to worry Randolph, the injury situation for the Gators is. Gator hurdler Greg Robinson, miler David Strahl, half-milers Cullen Mattox and Mike Lindsey all will miss tonight's meet due to injuries. Robinson still is nursing a hamstring pull from the SEC Indoor Championships, Strahl missed all of the indoor season with a knee operation and still is recovering, Mattox has a sore foot, and Lindsey aggravated the stress fracture in his foot last week. Gymnasts compete for ADAW regionals By Jorge Millian Alligator Writer With a bid to the NCAA national championship firmly in hand, the UF gymnastics team travels to Athens, Ga., for the AIAW regional championship tonight and Saturday night. Coming off last week's NCAA regional championship win in the O'Connell Center, the Lady Gators compete this weekend against the University of Alabama, University of Georgia and Jacksonville State University for the chance to perform in the AIAW national championship to be held in Memphis, Tenn., on April 2. Last Sunday UF head coach Ernestine Weaver was informed by the NCAA that her team had received the third seed, behind the Univerity of Utah and Oregon State University, for next week's NCAA national championship in Salt Lake City. This weekend the Lady Gators are involved in their second straight pressurized meet in two weeks but Weaver does not think her squad is feeling any extra burden. "I think last week we felt a little pressure because we were performing before the home folks," Weaver said. "This week, though, the team has been in good spirits. The win last week sort of relaxed everyone. Obviously we would love to win this weekend If we go to both the NCAA and AIAW national championships it can't help but bring our program prestige and respect from other teams around the country. Colorado mainder of summer. Peak "That big lead is going to help us. Stanford could have a lot of people in the finals the next two nights but I can't see them making that up," she said. Stanford's one bright spot came in the 500-yard freestyle when Marybeth Linzmeier and Sherri Hanaph linished one-two, Linzmeier in a collegiate record of 4:41.61. I went out pretty strong," she said. "I felt like was tightening up so I tried to smooth my stroke down. I expected more out of (USC's) Michele Ford and (UF's) Rosie Brown. "I think we can come back really well. The girls are thinking positive and showing a lot of spirit." Gator baseball team visits Vanderbilt By Glen Giftord Alligator Staff Writer After a week in which the UF baseball team had a chance to lick its wounds and regroup from last weekend's grueling series with Florida State University, the Gators return to the rigors of Southeastern Conference action this weekend with a three-game series at Vanderbilt University. The Cators, 10-9 overall and 2-1 in the conference, meet the Commodores in a Saturday doubleheader followed by a Sunday afternoon game. "The week off helped us heal up," said UF coach Jack Rhine. "We were a little leg-weary. It (the week off) has given our pitchers some rest. But anytime you lay off in baseball, you never know how you're gonna play when you come back." Including the four games against Florida State, UF had played six games in five days by last Sunday. Rhine said the rest was needed so the Gators could be in top shape for Vansly. On the other hand, he's worried the sudden change of pace may have dulled their competitive edge. "We're in real good shape right now, but we hope the layoff hasn't hurt us," he said. "You play a lot of games and all of a sudden you take five days off. We don't know what kind of shape we'rein. Lady netters win, 5w2 By Alsa Miigrom Alligator Writer The Lady Gators tennis team chalked up its 10th victory of the season Thursday afternoon as it defeated the Princeton University Tigers 5-2 at the Varsity Courts. The top five singles players all won their matches. Cissie Donigan, playing the No. 1 position, defeated Joy Cummings in straight sets. The line-up, which has been shifted all season, once again was juggled. June Ferestien and Lisa Ievins were out of action at the No. 3 and 4 spots due to injuries. This caused the lower positions to play a spot higher. The match was much closer than the score indicated. Betty Newfield and Martha Korbut; playing the No. 3 and 4 positions, needed nearly 2%/ hours to defeat their opponents. The Lady Gators will play again on Saturday afternoon as they host Middle Tefifsessee State University at 1. UF swimmers Tracy Caulkins, left, and Kathy Trelbie congratulate each other after finishing first and second respectively in the 200 individual medley. 41W, W.AggifilrA, --)Fl .1, .cvmwmw!! MFCF 0 ---1I