Citation
The Independent Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Independent Florida alligator
Portion of title:
Florida allgator
Portion of title:
Alligator
Alternate Title:
University digest
Alternate Title:
University of Florida digest
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, FL
Publisher:
Campus Communications, Inc.
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2005
Frequency:
Daily (except Saturdays, Sundays, holidays and exam periods, Aug.-Apr.); semiweekly (May-July)
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. (some col.) ; 36 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
Online databases.
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Online databases ( lcsh )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.651781 x -82.336258

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Additional Physical Form:
Also available online.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 65, no. 75 (Feb. 1, 1973)-
General Note:
"Not officially associated with the University of Florida."
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator.Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non - profit research and educational purposes.Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000470760 ( ALEPH )
13827512 ( OCLC )
ACN5549 ( NOTIS )
sn 86010448 ( LCCN )
0889-2423 ( ISSN )

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Florida alligator

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Full Text
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birdseed
There's clutter in the sky
and clutter on the ground
as a UF garbage truck
empties its refuse. The
birds await the arrival of
their lunch.

Panel: let state foot bill for women's athletics

By Amy Pednr
Alligator Staff Writer
The state Legislature should help pay the
expense of making UF womens athletics pro programs
grams programs equal to the mens, a citizens task
force recommended in a report released
Tuesday.
In a report highly critical of the way sports
programs are handled at UF, the panel
recommends sweeping changes in the
organization of the overall womens athletics
program and the way it is funded.
The report also calls for a radical depar departure
ture departure from the current system by urging the

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Legislature to pay for the construction and
maintenance of all UF Athletic Association Associationbuilt
built Associationbuilt physical facilities.
The recommendations were the work of
the six-member UF Athletic Review Task
Force composer! of prestigious Floridians ap appointed
pointed appointed by UF President Robert Marston in
June.
Marston asked the task force to suggest
ways UF can effectively meet federal Title IX
guidelines, which require, among other man mandates,
dates, mandates, comparability between mens and
womens athletics programs at federally aid aided
ed aided universities.
The task force criticized the UF Division of

Intercollegiate Athletics for "an absence of
written policies, a lack of clearly defined
goals and objectives, a lack of clearly defined
job responsibilities and a lack of coordina coordination
tion coordination among the staff.
But the committee's main goal dealt with
funding womens athletics, a problem that
became a controversy in the summer when
Student Government officials battled for
months over how much money in student
fees should help foot the womens athletics
bill.
At issue was $410,000 in student fees that
previously had been spent on a student loan
fund until the Legislature handed it over to

Rapists increasingly
attack women at home

By Gina Thomas
Alligator Staff Writer
Sarah thought it was the rats. Her 15-year 15-yearold
old 15-yearold daughter Beth raiser! rats, and on other
nights the rodents had made similar noc nocturnal
turnal nocturnal noises.
And at 3 a.m., it had to be the rats again.
The noises continued, but transformed into
voices. As Sarah crawled out of bed to check
on her daughter, she expected nothing.
Instead, she saw a strange man.
He was in the hall. He brandished a knife.
Then she heard scuffling in Beths nxnn.
Another man was in the house.
Sarah and her daughter were raped. They
were raped inside their Gainesville home.
The two attackers simply remover! a jalousie
window from the back door and pushed open
the screen to enter the house.
For many nights afterward, Sarah
recalled, "even after they hao been con convicted,
victed, convicted, Beth Would bring her sleeping bag
into my room and sleep next to my bed.
Every time we heard a shrub brush against

Wednesday
January 17,1979
volume 71, no. 63

SG with the stipulation that some of it should
help fund the womens program.
SG originally allocated $206,000 to the
womens programs, but ultimately was over overruler!
ruler! overruler! when Marston reallocated the student
money and earmarked $280,000 for the
womens athletics program.
Still, the issue of how womens athletics
would be funded in the future was left hang hanging
ing hanging prompting Marston to appoint the
committee, which concluded the state should
pay for Title IX compliance.
Womens Athletics Coordinator Ruth Alex-
Sm Athletics
next page

the house we woke up frightened.
The case of Sarah and Beth, wht>se real
names are withheld here at their request, is
three years old. Other women who en encountered
countered encountered similar, more recent attacks were
too upset to discuss the incidents.
Nevertheless, the ordeal endured by Sarah
and Beth is indicative of an increasing
number of rapes taking place inside the home
after assailants have broken in, police
records indicate.
Records show 25 unsolved sexual assaults
took place from January to November in
1977, the most recent statistics available. Os
those reports, 16 victims were attacked
inside their house or apartment.
Fall quarter, at least one woman was
raped by a man who forcefully entered her
home. Another awoke to find the hand of a
strange man restirig on her bare hip, but the
potential attacker was scared away.
See Rapa
next page



2

l alligator, Wednesday, tonoory YT, 1979

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Howto
rape-proof
your home:

Rape

from poge one
Once a crime of deserted bus depots and
darkened streets, the sexual assault is moving
indoors into the security and privacy of the
home.
Rape Victim Advocate worker Joanne
DeMark said, **l think it makes the situation
harder to cope with, because not only do you
have fears about yourself, but you have fears
about the security of your home.
And Gainesville police Lt. Dick Gerard
said the trend may be growing.
When Sarah re-awakens the memories of
that one January night three years ago. she
becomes hesitant, her voice becomes shaky.
When I saw that man standing right there
in my doorway, she said, l slammed the
door and locked it. Its amazing how fast
things go through your mind. I thought, *1
have to get out of here and get help, call the
police. But then I got these visual images of
them taking off with her (Beth). Sarah said.
But I knew there were two, and if one of
them was armed, it was logical to assume the
other would be armed. I knew there was
nothing I could do, Sarah said, as it turned
out, both also had guns.
After moments of fear and indecision.

AFTER SIX YEARS, CAMIL HAS SAME MISGIVINGS
. says arrest and trial left anti-war group impotent

Gainesville 8
Top U.S. court to unravel civil suit

y Robert McClure
Alligator Staff Writer
The anti-war activists known as the
Gainesville Eight are scheduled to bring
arguments in a civil suit against their former
prosecutors to the U.S. Supreme Court
Cainesvillr Eight member John Briggs said
Tuesday he thought the three prosecutors
should lie compelled to travel to Washington
for the hearing along with a Washington
former proseeuter also charged in the suit.
The high court has agreed to hear
arguments about whether a federal judge in
Washington. D.C., can order an FBI agent, a
federal judge and a former assistant U.S. at attorney
torney attorney to answer the activists suit in
ll
A

With a rising number of rapes occurring inside Gainesville
homes, the attorney general's office has several recommen recommendations
dations recommendations to help people sleep more securely. Tips written
about in The Sexual Assault booklet, which may be obtained
from local law enforcement officials, include:
Buy exterior doors of solid wd core construction;
Use, high-quality deadbolt locks on all exterior doors, in including
cluding including the garage;
Have the locks on exterior doors changed when moving
into a new house or apartment;
Install a peephole viewer with a minimum ISOdegree
angle in the front door;
Never open the door without first checking who is there.
Do not rely on a chain lock;
Remove operator handles from awning windows, but
keep nearby in case of fire;

Sarah opened the door. For the next four
hours, she wondered whether she or her
daugher would live.
There were no agencies three years ago to
help women in the same situation as Sarah
and Beth cope with sexual assault. The rising
number of counseling centers today help
and the organizations must deal with the
dilemma of rapes in the home.
One center working to change attitudes
toward rape and the stigmas rape victims
Out of 25 unsolved sexuol
assaults that took place
from January to
Novefhber 1977, a total of
16 victims were attacked
inside their house or
apartment.
suffer is the Rape Victim Advocate program.
The agency has been in operation since
November 1978.
Florida has some of the most progressive
laws pertaining to sexual assault and is
making more progress through community
agencies, said Sandi Smith of Rape Victim
Advocate.
But even though Florida is progressive in

Washington. The officials claim they are not
under the Washington courts jurisdiction.
The suit charges that the officials violated
the activists' constitutional rights when they
prosecuted the Eight on anti-riot and con conspiracy
spiracy conspiracy charges in 1972.
The high court will decide if a federal
judge can try defendants from different
locales simply because one of the defendants
or plaintiffs lives in the courts jurisdiction.
I would think the burden is on the defen defendant.
dant. defendant. We had to travel all over the state for
our case. Id go to Washington to see this
thing end, Briggs said.
Briggs and seven other members of the
Vietnam Veterans Against the War were
cleared of the criminal charges in 1973. The
riot and conspiracy charges stemmed from
grand jury indictments alleging they planned
to incite riots at the 1972 Republican Na National
tional National Convention in Miami Beach.
The anti-war groups unnamed, but moat
outspoken leader was Scott Camil, who still
resides in Gainesville. Camil, 32, has been
arrested on 17 felony charges carrying a
total of 120 years imprisonment and one
death penalty as punishment.
But in each case Camil was acquitted or
the charges were dropped a fact which he
has contended lends support to his charge of
government harassment during his anti-war
years.
Camil could not be reached for comment
Tuesday, but has said his biggest misgiving
of the 1972-73 arrest and trial was that the
Nixon-appointed prosecutor succeeded in
preoccupying the Gainesville Eight and two
supporters, leaving their protest organiza organization

its attempts to provide communities with
information about rape and bring about
more individual awareness, the high rate of
breaking and entering rapes raises serious
questions: How much can a house or
apartment be fortified? How easy is it to
identify an assaulter who breaks in? Where
does a rape victim feel safe if police cannot
immediately apprehend the assailant?
The men who raped Sarah and her
daughter Beth were arrested in Polk County
four weeks later. In the following three years,
Sarah and Beth moved five times.
"It was really a bad feeling (not knowing
where they were). I was afraid of some sort of
retaliation, Sarah reflected.
Advocate worker DeMark said assaults via
break-ins pose the most difficult cases, to
solve.
If someone enters your house while you
are sleeping, has a knife to your cheek or a
blanket over your head before you realize
what has happened, how can you easily
identify your attacker?" DeMark said.
Reflecting on her experience, Sarah said,
Tve never really thought of anyone breaking
into my house. When Beth lieard the noises, l
didnt think it was anything.
Ive lived alone before, the 48-year-old
school teacher said, all over the country.
And I wasnt afraid.
Now I am.

Replace all jalousie doors and windows, or secure them
with heavy mesh or grill work;
Install adequate exterior lighting at all vulnerable en entrances
trances entrances to the house;
Request identification by all repair and maintenance
personnel;
List your last name and only first initial on the mailbox
and in the telephone book. Consider adding a dummy
name to give the appearance of having roommates;
Keep doors locked even if you leave for only a moment;
Keep drapes os blinds drawn when undressing or retir retiring
ing retiring for the night;
Have the Crime Prevention Unit of the Gainesville
police visit your home to make a security check. Police will
notify you if there are vulnerable areas in your home or
apartment that could be secured.

tion organization impotent for months.
In 1974 the activists filed civil suit against
former U.S. Attorney William Stafford, who
is now a federal judge in Jacksonville, former
assistant U.S. Attorney Stuart Carrouth,
Gainesville F*BI agent Claude Meadows and
former special prosecutor Guy Goodwin.
The Gainesville Eights suit claims the de defendants.
fendants. defendants. on behalf of the U.S. government,
ran roughshod over the Eights constitu constitutional
tional constitutional rights in trying to obtain convictions.
The Eight claim they were setup.
Goodwin, a Washington, D.C., resident,
was ordered to stand trial by a lower court.
The Supreme Court let the lower courts rul ruling
ing ruling stand.
Stafford, Carrouth and Meadows claim
their Florida residency negates the lower
courts jurisdiction in their cases.
The 1974 suit asks for $1.2 million, or
$150,000 for each of the activists tried and
later acquitted.
Even if he wins, Briggs said, he will not
collect all of the $ 150,000.
When that case was finally over, we owed
about $ 120,000 in lawyer fees. That was two
years of my life, and a lot of expense and
pain was taken up on that case, he said.
Besides the money, Briggs said, he and the
other defendants-turned-plaintiffs are
pushing the case to prove a point.
If the American people are willing to let
prosecutors set people up like that, well,
I . dont know, Briggs said.
If the high court rules the officials living in
Florida do not have to stand trial in the na nations
tions nations capital, the Gainesville Eights lawyers
still could file suit in Florida.

Athletics-

from poge one
ander said she would not be opposed to the
task force recommendation.
I would highly recommend any ap appropriation
propriation appropriation through the Legislature that
would eliminate the hassles of making the
women s athletics program comparable,
Alexander said.
Alexander said other states sporting top
womens athletics program.- such as
Minnesota, have used state mo (1 bring
their programs into compliance with federal
guidelines.
Marston said he would hav<= several
campus groups study the report before im implementing
plementing implementing the recommendations.
The study recommends that the state
should pay for building and maintaining
athletics facilities, which historically have
been built and maintained by the private
Athletic Association.
However, once these facilities are paid
for, they become the sole property of the
state. |t therefore seems more equitable for
the state to assume responsibility of construc constructing
ting constructing and maintaining these facilities. the
task force said.
Rep. Sid Martin. D-Hawthorne, agreed
with the recommendation.



White students charge race bias in law program

By Jack Collins
Alligator Staff Writer
The first-year law students filed nervously into their
Spessard Holland Law Center classroom for final exams in
the fall 1978 property law class taught by Professor Michael
Moorhead.
Few of them were as prepared as they wanted to be. But
because of a special tutoring program, several black students
in the class are now off academic probation.
And as a result, some white students who took Moorhead's
class see the Minority Retention Program, as it is known, as
racially biased and unfair. Complaining of "reverse
discrimination in this post-Bakke era, they claim passing
grades were virtually assured by the program.
The unfair thing is that a group, I dont care what group,
was given a considerable advantage in the test-taking, said
Eric Bolves, a white, first-year law student who took
Moorhead's class in property law.
The program was started fall quarter by the Black
American Law Students Association with a $2,000 grant
from the New York-based Carnegie Foundation.
It is reserved for students who were admitted to the College

Treatment center murder raises doubts

By Rick Hlrsch
Alligator Staff Writer
Five months after a state investigative
panel cited potentially dangerous working
conditions at a treatment center for mentally
ill prisoners, a 19-year-old patient was
charged Tqesdav with murdering a staff
housekeeper.
Walter Thomas Williams, a sex offender
patient from Miami, was charged with first firstdegree
degree firstdegree murder in the death of 21-year-old
Sarah Cliff fn of Hawthorne. Cliff in was
found sexually assaulted and strangled Mon Monday
day Monday afternoon under Williamss bed at the
North Florida Evaluation and Treatment
Center.
According to the police report made
following the arrest, Williams made a taped
statement confessing the murder.
But Dr. Robert David one of the 45
center employees who filed a grievance with
the state Department of Health and
Rehabilitative Services said it was "too
early to tell if the unsafe conditions cited in

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of Law under its minority admissions guidelines. Fourteen
students are participating in the program this quarter, and it
apparently is successful.
Association President Darryl Rouson said of 14 students
admitted last spiring under the law school's minority admis admissions
sions admissions program, 11 were on academic probation by fall. But
now, he said, only one or two are on academic probation.
Focusing on first-quarter students, the program provides
help sessions with the teacher and older law students.
Moorhead said he gave the special-help students regular
tests, increasingly difficult as the quarter wore on. Student
critics said the tests were so similar to the courses regular
tests that they were unfair.
Moorhead said there is no basis to criticize because he is
prepared to offer special help to anyone who needs it. Other
students simply cant participate in the Minority Retention
Program, he said, but if a significant number of regular regularadmission
admission regularadmission students in a class needed help he would schedule
special sessions.
"I meet with white students here extensively. On some oc occasions
casions occasions I have white students submit work for me to correct.
1 dont go through the process because hes white, but
because he made the request, Moorhead said.

August could be linked w ith the murder.
A three-member HRS committee in investigated
vestigated investigated the grievance and said
troublesome residents temporarily housed in
seclusion rooms created an "unsafe and un unsatisfactory"
satisfactory" unsatisfactory" situation "for clients and
staff."
The grievance signed by several top toplevel
level toplevel employees, including Dr. Michael
Stockton, head of the sex offender unit, and
David, head of the behavioral disorders unit
said if the problems persist, "incidents of
physical abuse and destruction of property
by patients will increase
David said Tuesday many of the problems
including charges of unresponsive ad administration
ministration administration have been fully or partially
corrected.
"We are analyzing it (the murder) to
determine if there is a relation, David said.
But right now we are a little shocked. It was
a very tragic thing."
Center Director, Thomas Reed said
Williams, a center patient for seven months
after a second-degree murder conviction in

Miami, was alone in his dormitory room
with Cliffin while she cleaned it. Williams
did not reside in a seclusion room.
Reed met for several hours Tuesday with
HRS District Administrator William Mc-
Clure. but neither were available for com comment
ment comment after the meeting.
Reed said Cl iff ins friends on the
housekeeping staff l>ecame suspicious when
Cliffin failed to show for a noon lunch date.
When they found her jacket and purse in her
usual work area, they began searching for
her, he said.
Lulu Cliffin said her granddaughter, a
two-year center employee, was a quiet per person
son person with a nice personality.
Ive been trying to understand why this
happened, but I cant, she said.
Cliffin is survived by her husband, Burt,
and a two-year-old daughter, her grand grandmother
mother grandmother said.
State Attorney Kenneth Hebert is expected
to present the case to the Alachua County
grand jury Jan. 30. Williams is being held
without bond in the Alachua County jail.

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olliQQtor, wednesdoy, jonuory 17, 1979,

One reason for criticism of the program is the way it first
was implemented. A list of students' names was posted on a
law center bulletin board with instructions for them to meet
at a certain time and place for a help session.
The notice did not specify the reason for the meeting, help helping
ing helping fuel suspicions on the part of the white students about the
reason for the meeting.
__ Since learning of the program, though, some students still
are angry. First-year student Victor Buttner described the
help sessions as "totally unfair and said the program should
be open "to those with less than a 2.5 or even a 3.0 grade
average instead of just minority admissions students.
It's for minorities only not for those who need it, But Buttner
tner Buttner said of the special help. Buttners feelings were echoed
by several other students, some erf whom would not be
quoted by name. ....
But Association President Rouson defended the program
and said it is necessary, in some cases, to keep minority
students in school.
If you specially admit people, you should have something
else to help them along, he said. The good student will
seek help on his own, but we need to have opportunities
available for these other students.

I
. . murdered by mental patient

3



4

. alligator, Wednesday, ianuory 17, 1979

Wednesday capsule.

Shah flees Iran;
citizens rejoice
TEHHAN, IRAN (UPI) Weeping openly, Shah
Mohammed Reza Pahlavi, Iran's king of kings fled to Egypt
Tuesday on the first stage of a voyage that may end in
lifetime exile in the United States. Tens of thousands of his
subjects jubilantly celebrated, dancing and singing in the
streets.
The shah, who has ruled this nation of 34 million for the
past 38 years wit i autocratic power, appeared somber as he
arrived with his beautiful empress, Farah, at the airport to
leave on what he insisted was a vacation.
Within minutes of their departure, tens of thousands of
Tehrans *4.5 million citizens poured into the streets in a
massive celebration.
Arriving In Kgypt, Shah Mohammed Reza Pahlavi and
the empress shielded their tear-stained, red-rimmed eyes
with sunglasses, as they receiver! a sympathetic welcome
from President Anwar Sadat and all the trappings of royalty.
The shah and empress were greeted by Sadat and his wife,
Jihan, with more sorrow than cheer on an occasion everyone
knew might be the end of the line for the royal house of
Pahlavi.
Prom his exile In Paris, Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini,
the shah's no. 1 enemy and leader of the Shiite clergy, hailed
the shahs departure and vowed to return to Iran within davs
to set up a Provisional government. Khomeini, who
claims millions of followers, refuses to recognize the
Bahktiar government.
The conservative Moslem leader, typically reluctant to
focus on his personal role in Irans affairs, declined to say
exactly when he would end his 15-year exile.
The 78-year-old Shiite Moslem holy man vowed to con continue
tinue continue his fight against Irans present civilian government and
said the opposition would not rest until Shah Mohammed
Reza Pahlavjs dynasty was finisher!. He caller! for con confiscation
fiscation confiscation of the royal family's wealth, a fortune worth
hundreds of millions of dollars.

XANADU
IF has
MOVED!
|s 209 S.E 2nd Place
372-2888
East of the Sun
s |
(The rape crisis number is

Israeli commandos, gunboats
attack Lebanese shoreline
IEL AVIV, ISRAEL (UPI) Seaborne Israeli commandos
lander! on Lebanons coast at dawn Tuesday and blew up a
house Israel said served as a Palestinian guerrilla base.
Accompanying gunboats shelled guerrilla concentrations.
In Beirut, a Palestinian guerrilla official said the house
belonged to a farmer.
Sadr followers hijack plane;
demand release of leader^
BEIRUT, (UPI) A Middle East Airlines Boe Boeing
ing Boeing 707 flying 73 passengers from Lebanon to Jordon was hi hijacker!
jacker! hijacker! by three disciples of a mysteriously missing Moslem
leader Tuesday, diverted to Cyprus and then forced back to
Beirut.
The state-run television said the hijackers were three
Lebanese from the Al Amal (Hope) organization, followers
of Moslem leader Imam Musa Sadr, who disappeared with
two companions last summer while on a visit to Libva.
I hey are demanding the release of Imam Sadr in return
for the release of the passengers," said a Lebanese television
announcer.
Florida seeking to keep
top students in state schools
TALLAHASSEE (UP!) Florida continues to lose main
of its top students to out-of-state colleges and universities so
the House Higher Education Committee is thinking about
making them an offer they cant refuse.
What lawmakers envision is a plan looselv called the
Florida legislative Scholars Program which would give
some kind of tuition relief to outstanding state students w ho
(Wide to earn caps and gowns here.

To School
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z prez dklability of back-to-schooi, Educate children about
£ many parents will become safety on the playground to
a, harried in the hub-bub and avoid possible injury and be
£ neglect the health of their sure the lunch you pack will
E children. harbor food poisoning
elements such as foods that
spoil easily.
A visit to the family physi- Children learn quickly,
cian should be as much a and should be taught early
part of the back-to-school that good health depends a
regimen as buying new lot on their good sense,
clothes, notebooks and pen pencfls.
cfls. pencfls. The beginning of the
school year should signal TL ~
parents to have their chid- V s r£V i j ,C^"f S ? 9e
\Z. -A from the Florida Medical
ren immunuedagamstthc Association in behad of the
doc,on n*ZZ2i£l
room Proper prepntionior PoMKeen^ce/mrfureof (Me

Law said this financial aid could take the form of a
scholarship and simply waive the yearly tuition of about
$575 a year, but noted there is some committee sentiment to
cover room and board expenses also. The projected cost for
such a program would be about $2 million.
Former girlfriend testifies
Marvin swore to share goods
LOS ANGELES (UPI) Michele Marvin testified
Tuesday she was intimate with Lee Marvin two weeks after
meeting him but that she did not move in with the actor until
he told her he would never marry again but what I have is
vours and what you have is mine.
The 46-year-old singer and dancer told the judge at her $ I
million breach of contract suit that for six years after that
time in 1964 she provided Marvin with companionship,
friendship, housekeeping and home cooking.
First U.S. woman skipper
to captain Coast Guard ship
HONOLULU (UPl',Coast Guard Lt. (JG) Beverly Kelley
will assume command of the 95-foot cutter Cape Newagen
April I, becoming the first woman to skipper a U.S. com commissioned
missioned commissioned ship.
Kelley, 26, a native of Bonita Springs, Fla., will head a
crew of 14 aboard the Newagen, whose home port is
Maalaea, Maui. The vessels principal duties involve search
and rescue, law enforcement and pollution control.
Kelley was graduated from the University of Miami. She
entered the Coast Guard in February, 1976.
The ships crew is currently all male, but since the Coast
Guard no longer differentiates between assignments given
men and women, Kelley may have some woman crew
members during her two-year command.



Attorney says UF police
blew ticket theft case

By Bill DlPaolo
Alligator Staff Writer
Charging the UF police blew the case and
are trying to save face, a defense attorney
argued in circuit court Tuesday on behalf of
a former UF police officer accused of selling
a portion of 200 stolen football tickets.
Defense Attorney Jeff Barker argued in his
opening statement that former UF police Of Officer
ficer Officer Edward Miles is being accused falsely
of selling some of the $2,500 worth of stolen
1977 UF football tickets.
When the trial is scheduler! to resume at
9:30 a.m. today, UF Athletic Director Ray
Graves is expected to testify before the four fourwoman,
woman, fourwoman, two-man jury trying the 36-year old
ex-cop. The trial is slated to end today.
In the opening statement of the state pro prosecutor,
secutor, prosecutor, Huntley Johnson said Tuesday the
prosecution will base the case on testimony
of Calvin Smith, who has been granted im immunity
munity immunity by the state in exchange for his
testimony against Miles.
The jury also heard testimony Tuesday
from two UF police investigative officers,
and Ticket Manager Jeremy Foley.
Huntley told the jury that although Smith,
formerly Miles's brother-in-law, is trying to
save his own reputation. Smiths testimony
must be taken seriously.
Unfortunately, the states witness is not a
bank president. I wish he was, Huntley told
the jury while Smith and the other witnesses
waited outside the courtroom. Calvin Smith
is out for Calvin Smith.
Smith testifying he and Miles were
good friends while they were brothers-in brothers-inlaw
law brothers-inlaw told the jury he and Miles split $75 for
tickets he sold for the Pittsburgh game. Miles
glared at Smith as he left the witness stand,
but Smith refused to look in his direction.
The charges stem from September 1977
when 200 choice, 50-yard-line seats, reserv-

Mishan plans sculpture display

Ezra Joshua Mishan, facing charges of
molesting four Gainesville women who
modeled nude while he sculpted, says he is
planning an impromptu display of his nude,
sculptures Friday.
Mishan, a former visiting UF economics
professor, is scheduled to stand trial in
Gainesville Feb. 19 on three charges of sex-

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ed for Florida Legislators, were discovered
missing by Foley. But because the tickets
may have been sold through the window,
Foley testified, he did not immediately notify
UF police until two weeks later, when tickets
reserved for the football team were
discovered missing.
A public announcement was made of the
stolen tickets, but nothing was released about
the players tickets, testified UF police in investigator
vestigator investigator Edward Stevens. Hopefully, this
would lead to the arrest of the ticket thief.
UF police officers then staked out section 34,
the players' area, and awaited the stolen
ticket buyers, hoping this would lead to the
arrest of the culprit.
The plan failed at the Pittsburgh game, but
two weeks later, five people from Jackson Jacksonville
ville Jacksonville seated in the missing section told UF
police they bought their tickets from a man
named "Calvin and described his 1969
Cadillac, Stevens said.
Stevens told Huntley under questioning
that he brought Smith to the UF police sta station
tion station and found 26 tickets for the Tennessee*
game hidden in his car, and they were in
direct sequence with the tickets that were
stolen.
Barker found holes in Smiths testimony
and hammered on his credibility as a
witness.
Despite Huntleys claim that Smith was the
first to bring up Miless name in the conver conversation
sation conversation concerning the immunity agreement.
Smith had no recollection of the sequence of
events while on the witness stand.
UF police officers did not arrest Smith im immediately
mediately immediately after the Tennessee game Oct. 22.
but waited until early November to make the
arrest. Charges were not brought against
Miles until June, one week after Smith agreed
to the immunity arrangement.
This was a precise plotted plan (by UF
police) to withhold that information hoping
they would trip somebody up, Barker said.

ual battery and one charge of attempted sex sexual
ual sexual battery. He was arrested in May on the
charges.
1 want to show that I am a serious artist,
the 61-year-old Mishan said Tuesday.
The display is set for the First Sun Art
Gallery, 112 SW 34th St, between 4:30 and
6:30 p.m.

Hie Sonthcaxtcrn Center lor Biix'iiergHic Annls sis
Wintcr/Spring '79 Schedule
Professional Bioenergetics
Workshop
sh lolloM-ng proletnonal B.on.fg#i,c Weekend *oft ihopi of* dengned io gi.e
pariictpann on r.nsiv. tipou/'f lo sh principle! of B.o.n*rg.f,r Analyui The
wofkthopi Mill dill Ml fh fb psychological and b>ofogicol role of psychotherapy Bioenergei c concepn ol enerqy character structure grounding
ond body omonng among others ,// b. explored The workshops Mill be
didactic ond experimental Midi group and some individual Mori
Alexander lessen. M.U.
Sat., Feb. 3 and Sun., Feb. 4 $ 125
Kd Svarta, M.S.W.
Sat., Apr. 7 and Sun.. Apr. 8 SBO
Robert Clazer, KD.S.
Sat., June 2 and Sun., June 3 SSO
INTRODUCTORY WORKSHOPS
ANGtISANOMONSfMS fHf MASJCS Wf dUfSftgl TO THf WOULD Th introductory
fiOenergehc wort shop Mill deal Midi ihe angelic and monstrous aspects of oof
personalities facial masks eye bloc it and body metaphors Mill be explored in
determining how Me conceal lor exaggerate) our leelingt in dealing with the
mot Id Bioenergehc principle! of body omonng bf.ofb.ng patterns and energy
flow Mill be used
Robert Clazer, KD.S.
Sat., March I 7 and Sun March 18 $35
for registration brochures qnd more information, contact Robert
Gloier, Route !, Bok 16 Alachua, FI 32615, (904)462-5155
i

g s > , ,-'0 ''
I |j|| |i|j l |
I FAS RESEARCHER PHILLIP CALLAHAN rick mccaw,ey
. . says flying forms resemble groups of locusts
UFOs
UF researcher describes
objects as 'moth swarms'

By Gina Thomas
Alligator Staff Writer
Like something out ol Close Encounters
reports of flying, humming, dome-shaped
objects blinking with a rrddish hue are
inundating the U.S. Air Force officials in
Utahs Uinta mountain area.
But the more than 40,000 UFO reports,
most of which occurred l>etween 1965-68,
look like swarms of migrating insects to a UF
entomologist.
Phillip Callahan, a federal researcher who
works for UFs Institute of Fikxl and
Agricultural Sciences, said the descriptions
of the flowing flying saucers" are similar to
a swarm of moths whose wings light up in
the electrical field of a storm.
Some swarms, like the spruce budworm,
are up to 60 miles long anti 10 miles wide,
he said.
Callahan said swarms of billions of locusts
are cohesive, and from a distance thev
appear cigar-shaped, which would explain
sightings of daylight flying saucers.
The locust swarms, and data gathered

olligotor, Wednesday, jonuory 17, 1979,

after reading Frank Salisburys The Utah
UK) Display, swayed Callahan to l>elievc
tin* sightings were insects.
Callahan tested his theory by putting five
different species of insects inside a voltage
field of 2,000 volts a cubic centimeter. All lit
up in shades <>f blue, red, green and orange.
Although Callahan's theory may account
for the UFO sightings, he said he doesn't rule
out the possibility of visitors from outer
space. But he does question the multitude ol
reports.
1 think (the possibility of visitors from
outer space) 31,000 times is ludicrous.
Maybe 10 or 12, lie said. "I dont think i
was crackpots who reported the sightings
but perhaps many of the UFOs can Ik* ex
plained as insects.
Callahan said his research is focused ir
two areas: to help explain UFO sightings an<
to study insect migration.
Callahans current research has deter
mined insects attraction to narrow bani
inf rarer! radiation radiation given off by <
candle. He said with this knowledge anc
further research, the possibility of doing
away with insecticides h.av lx* in the future.

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5



6

>, olliqotoc, wednesdoy, |onuory 17. 1979

Contract bidding reopens
for canceled UF project

y Christopher Borrus
Alligator Staff Writer /
After meeting with two UF officials in
Washington. D.C. Tuesday, a government
spokesman said the bidding would be
reopened for a year-long project contract
awarded to a UF research center two months
ago and then abruptly canceled last week
Ritlai Woods, director of public affairs for
the massive General Services Ad Administration,
ministration, Administration, said Tuesday she had met w ith
her superiors and said they agreed to reopen
the bidding on a citizens complaint complainthandling
handling complainthandling project.
The decision will enable officials of the UF
Saw schools Center for Governmental
Responsibility to rebid on that project,
canceled by the government Jan 7 because*
the contract wording was written in
violation of government guidelines
State Rep Jon Mills, director of the UF
center, and UF Associate Attorney Ashmun
Brown had traveled to Washington to learn
the reasons for the project's cancellation and
to ask for SIBB,OOO to pav for phasing out
the program
The contract drafted by GSA officials had
awarded the UF tenter $274,(M)0 for
evaluation and implementation of a citizens
complaint-handling system used at Federal
Information Centers
The information centers, based in Miami
and St. Petersburg, were experimenting with
direct handling of complaints, such as

what's
happening
By KyloKullsh
Alligator Writer
Have the constant pressures from school
and home stifled your creative spirts? The
profs are breathing down vour neck, stopp stopping
ing stopping that magical pencil from sweeping the
page in vour lab reports? Well, open that
valve, let those juices flow and enter the
Gainesville Children's Performing Arts
Theatre playwriting contest.
The contest is open to all young people and
adults. Entries must be submitted by Feb. 28
to the theater at 3502 NW 10th Ave.,
Gainesville, 32605. A real, soon-to-be phased
out $25 U.S. Savingsond is to be awarded
to the winner. (Could be a collectors edition.)
For further information call the theatre.
And other events include:
Tho Dtprawlow was loads of fun:To fun:Today
day fun:Today the History Forum is to present the film
Life in the Thirties from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. in
General Purpose Building A, room LOOS
The film recounts the Depression years in the
United States and Franklin Roosevelts role
as our president.
Kdtcrop ybfun A backward glance from
the Women's Rugby Team will remind
members about practice today at 5:30 p.m.
on Norman Field. New members are invited,
and no previous experience is necessary.
How ara things down at UPOT: JJ
Golden of the UF police is to be interviewed
tonight on BS-Uve from 10 to II on
WRUF, 85 AM radio. Title of the show:
UPD A hassle or a Help?
The Maranatha Student Fellowship is
sponsoring a luncheon buffet today at 11
a.m. at the Maranatha Center. Price for the
luncheon is $1.25.
Throw thorn hook*: The Criminal Justice

citizens having problems receiving Social
Security checks or food stamps
Irregularities in the government contract
were brought to the attention of GSA of officials
ficials officials Dec. 16 by an officer of a firm that
had lost the contract to UF, said Dale
Babione, a GSA assistant administrator.
John Goodman, vice president of the*
Washington-based Tarp Institute. said his
Firm also would be interested in rebidding for
the project. Tarp Institute previously had bid
$75,000 for the project, but failed to receive
the contract because GSA officials said the
firm lacked qualifications.
Grxxlman disagreed He said his firm had
worked w ith the type of evaluating involved
with the government project for four years
Babione said the UF centers contract
probably never would have been canceled
had the errors in it not been discovered bv
Goodman
But Babione confirmed that the errors
were caused bv GSA officials and did not
reflect on project operations at the UF
center.
The reason for cancellation had nothing
to do with what the* University of Florida
(center) did or did not do. Babione said.
"GSA regulations were not followed in
aw arding the contract.
When the contract is rebid. possibly as
soon as three weeks from now. the errors in
the contract w ill be corrected. Babione said
But. the essence of the contract will be
generally the same, Woods said

Association is scheduled to meet tonight at 6
in the J Wayne Reitz Union, room 361 Con Convention
vention Convention plans are to be discussed.
Th wheelers are making tracks: The
LF Cycle (dub plans to have an organiza organizational
tional organizational meeting tonight at 7:30. rooms 150-F
and C in the Union. The meeting is open to
anyone.
You ere no* welcome: The Florida
Cicerones are to conduct personal interviews
tonight from 7 to 8 in room 315 of the Union
for students wishing to become cicerones
Grouping together: Student Mental
Health Services is conducting three group
workshops today in room 350 of the In Infirmary.
firmary. Infirmary. The Workshops are on: interper interpersonal
sonal interpersonal growth, open to males and females
from 10 to 11:30 a.m.; stress management
group from 3 to 5 a.m.; and a women in non nontradional
tradional nontradional careers group open only to women
today from 2:30 to 4 p.m. These groups are
to be offered every Wednesday this quarter.
You can make lotto yen: Interviews for
the American Graduate School of Interna International
tional International Management are scheduled for todav
at the placement center in the Union.
Friends: The U.S. China Peoples Friend Friendship
ship Friendship Association is to conduct a Womens
Health Movement forum tonight at 7:30 in
room 363 of the Union
No corporals required to attend: A
mandatory general meeting is to be con conducted
ducted conducted by the Preprofessional Service
Organization at 7 tonight in rooms Cl-4 of
the J. Hillis Miller Health Center Com Communicore
municore Communicore to discuss elections.
Seme funny looking weeds ere grow growing.
ing. growing. . The Agriculture Council meeting is
planned for tonight at 6:30 in McCarty Hall,
room 1031.
Latin American agriculture: The Stu Student
dent Student Organization for Latin American
Studies and the Center for Latin American
Studies are sponsoring the talk
onAgricultural Division of Labor by Sex in
Peru and Columbia tonight at 8 in Grinter
Hall, room 427.

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Commission seeks removal of large city billboards

By Cindy loittar
Alligator Staff Writer
Gainesville city commissioners are seeking ways to con condemn
demn condemn and tear down some of the largest advertising
billboards in the city.
The City Commission Monday night voted to have City
Attorney J.T. Frankenberger research the legality of tearing
down the largest of 40 sigas that have been buiU in the last
six months.
Angered when they learned that the citys planning and
development staff had issued the large number of recent
permits, commissioners also voted to impose a moratorium
on issuing new sign construction permits.
While the moratorium is under way, commissioners said
they will begin rewriting the city ordinance umler which
Planning and Development Director Norm Bowman per permitted
mitted permitted the billboards to be built.
About 50 people were led by local auto dealer Bob Adams

Architect claims downtown Gainesville has 'potential 1

By Cindy Lanatw
Alligator Staff Writer
A Philadelphia architect said Tuesday downtown
Gainesville has a lot of potential to become a thriving
commercial area in harmony 'with the citys downtown
redevelopment plans.
Architect Steven Izenour of the Philadelphia firm of Ven Venturi
turi Venturi and Rauch said his firm is eager to take the job as a con consultant
sultant consultant to the City Commission planning downtown's
renaissance.
The City Commission Monday night voted to hire a con consultant
sultant consultant and instructed the city staff to prepare a request for
proposals to be sent to several architecture firms.

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in condemning the sign ordinance and asking that
restrictions be lifted. Commissioners ignored Adams ami his
delegation and proceeded to do just the opposite.
Ironically, the commission learned of the recent rash in
sign building because of Adams's complaint against
restrictions on signs.
The owner of Gainesville Auto Mart No. 2 on North
Waldo-Road, Adams faces a fine and a possible jail term for
refusing to take down a portable lighted advertising sign
from the road.
Adams spoke for about five minutes against restricting
signs in the city.
As Adams st Commissioner Cary junior made a motion for the hilllxxird
moratorium and the commission deflated about tlx- big signs
for 20 minutes, ignoring the car dealer.
Commissioners junior and Mark Goldstein were angered

We would lie more than happy to lx* considered lor the
job, Izenour said in a telephone interview. "I think
Gainesville has a lot of potential."
Izenour said the downbiwn area's biggest assets are the
time-honored buildings such as the Old Post Office and the
Star Garage.
"Planners can build on the character of tlx- older
buildings and make them a positive thing. Luckily,
Gainesville has enough of the nice, aged buildings left to
make the downtown area beautiful, Izenour said.
Izenour came to Gainesville in December after the City
Commission invited the Venturi aixlaucharchitects tovisit
the city for three days this year, to review the city staff's
redevelopment plans.
The Venturi firm declined the city's offer, Izenour said.

olllgotor, wdndoy. fqnuory 17,

when Bowman told the commission about the 40 billboard
permits that had been issued in the last six months.
It's been going on for some time now and the commission
is only finding out about it by driving down the street. Im
very upset at that. Coldstein said.
In order to stop construction of the 40 billboards.
Commissioner Aaron Green made a motion at the end of the
meeting to try to cancel the permits.
"It may lx* possible to condemn the 40 building permits
that have been issued. There may be some state law giving us
authority for condemnation, Green said.
junior said maybe the city staff could just refund the SSO
cost of the permit. :
No action was taken concerning Adamss request. He said
he will not remove the sign that has caused such controversy.
It once said This Country Boy Coin' to War" over the sign
ordinance.

Ix-cause he did not believe his firm could give Gainesville
any constructive criticism without studying the city for more
than three days.
They wouldn't have gotten much out of it because we
would have just sounded like a hunch nf experts just popping
off. Its tlx* kind of thing that takes more than three
days."lzenour said.
Commissioner Mark Coldstein said $30,000 has been
all ment. redevelopment. He was displeased with the orginial plan for Venturi
and Rauch to come for three days anti critique the city staffs
past plans and actions.
1 dont think the staff has the organization to make any
downtown plans. Theyve had 10 years and they haven't
done it vet, Coldstein said.

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7



8

Wednesday, january 17, 1979

editorials/opinions

What a waste
Now that inflation has sharpened the senses
of every politician intent on cutting waste in
government spending, weve found the
perfect place to start: the Florida Department
of Law Enforcement.
Sound the trumpets, maestro, the depart department
ment department has an announcement to make: from Ju July
ly July to October, the departments Division of
Criminal Investigation devoted 49,156
manhours 6O percent of its total resources
to investigating drug smuggling and en enforcing
forcing enforcing narcotics laws.
What a wasteWhat an incredible
squandering of time, money and personnel
merely to curb an overwhelming drug traf traffic
fic traffic that cannot be curbed, to enforce drug
laws that exist only to deny personal freedom.
The Department of Law Enforcement, an
umbrella agency with four divisions,boasts a
budget of $15.9 million this year. The Divi Division
sion Division of Criminal Investigation operates cur currently
rently currently on a $6.4 million bank account. But
the money is nowhere near enough to succeed
in stamping out marijuana smuggling the
expansive Florida coastline, ever-peaking de demand
mand demand and exhorbitant profits see to that
quite nicely.
In Hawaii, incidentally, pot smuggling has
surpassed the states No. 1 export, sugar, in
profit. The same goes for Colombia and its
former No. 1 export, coffee. A mammoth $5
billion worth of marijuana at wholesale
prices funnels through South Florida each
year, and the feds admit they capture only
about 10 percent of the flow.
There ~is immense profit to be made in
Gainesville, too the Gainesville Marijuana
Dealers Association, mythical or not, has cor cornered
nered cornered the market on high-grade sinsemilla
pot that sells for as high as $ 140 an ounce.
In these times of upward-spiraling inflation
and the plunging American dollar, a new,
growing source of revenue would be ideal
and marijuana, for starters, is the perfect
market. Rolling Stone estimates the national
paraphernalia industry amasses between
$l5O million and $250 million annually.
Floridians purchase 22,000 packets of rolling
papers every week. -
And the state of Florida is missing out on it
all. The state could greatly enhance its coffers
by legalizing or decriminalizing' pot
and taxing the hell out of it and its sup supplements.
plements. supplements. But the backwoods boys in the
Legislature would rather spend money than
make it: $3 million was shelled out in 1975,
by state estimates, for the housing and
feeding of just 72 persons convicted of pot
charges; $156,000 a year is spent on supervis supervising
ing supervising pot smokers on probation; and one should
not forget the 60 percent of the Division of
Criminal Investigations total resources that
was wasted from July to October.
When will they learn? The American
Medical Association, the American Bar
Association and President Carter have called
for full pot decriminalization. Will the
Florida Legislature? Ever?
Smoking marijuana is not a crime
anymore. More than 30 million Americans
have tried it; more than 13 million smoke pot
regularly. State Sen Jack Cordon, the pot
practitioners protagonist, should look into
the divisions enforcement priorities. Sens.
Pete Skinner and Buddy Mac Kay should join
Gordon in his decrim drive and stop the
waste.

Mishan quote not "witty;"
trial may affect all UF

Editor: The vulgar, sensationalized article by Rill DiPaolo
on Ezra Mishan which appeared in the Jan. 12 issue of The
Alligator was an insult to even student at UF. Evidently
DiPaolo thinks the legal situation involved is funnv and
regards Mishan as a wit. Wc* disagree.
Mishan faces legal charges for what he is alleged to have
done. If the charges are proven in court, he will have been
found guilty not only of breaking the law, but of humiliating
and frightening a numl>er of women students, of !>ctraving
the teacher-student and artist-model relationships, and of
bringing a great deal of shame and criticism to the College of
Business Administration and to UF.
That the Alligator should consciously allow itself to be us used
ed used as a vehicle for this man to denigrate the young women
who had the courage to press charges against him is
disgusting. Mishan is certainly entitled to make statements,
alligator

Dennis Kneole
Melissa Williams
- u
Patrick Cronin
Robert Rivas
Dan Ma|ors
Kit Carlson
Amy Youngblood
Mark Johnson
Paul C. Smith
Michael Kooren
Lee Herring
Jan Wood
C.E Barber
Frank Levy
Mrs Evelyn Best
Anne Simpson
Guy Hudspeth
Amy Dry den
Donald Holbrook
Elaine Gray
Katrina Hunt
Lyle Ask
Harry Montevideo

Published by
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P O. Box 14257 University Station, Gainesville. Florida
Office behind the College Inn, 1728 West University Ave
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373-9926; Business Office: 376-4446

Editor
Managing Editor
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but the Alligator is under no obligation to print them,
especially abusive ones.
Hopefully, if this case ever finally comes to trial. The
Alligator will decide to report it simply and factually
without the degrading quotes which seem to constitute
Mishans idea of responsible journalism.
Stephen Kerber
April McKenzie
Christine Nasie
Florida State Museum
Editor*a noto: The Alligator stands by Its story. Whon
Ezra Mishan cal tod with a praparad tatsmanl In
robuttal to public statomonts mado against him. It
was The Alligator's responsibility to print tho in information
formation information not ludgo tho statomont and dotonnlno
whothor It was worthy of publication.
Tigert officials
don't rule students
Editor: The cancellation of our Halloween Ball by Vice
President for Student Affairs Art Sandeen is a symptom of
UFs major problem. The students have lost their voice in
UF government. UF is US and we students are not the bunch
of bureaucrats in Tigert Hall. They are here to serve us, not
to rule us. But until we speak up, we will remain Presidents
Marstons subjects at his mercy.
Gary Antonellis
2UF
Letters policy
The Alligator welcomes opinion columns and letters to the
editor. All manuscripts must be:
Typed, double-spaced, on a 60-character line.
Signed by the author. Names may be withheld from
publication if die writer circles his or her name, writes
withhold name by the signature and provides a good reason
for withholding the name.
Send columns and letters to Alligator Opinions Editor
Bo* 14257, Gainesville, 32601," or drop them by Thi
Alligator 1728 West University Ave.
Letters, not typed double spaced on a 60-space-line cannot
he printed.



Russian secret
tosses SALT
over shoulder
Secretary of Defense Harold Brown shook his head in
disbelief as he listened to a report on the latest Russian
military developments by the Joint Chiefs of Staff.
"Armadillos, he said. "What in hell are the Russians go going
ing going to do with armadillos?
Well sir, replied the Army general. A Harvard pro professor
fessor professor believes that through the use of genetic manipulation
armadillos can be developed to carry nuclear warheads. If
so, this could be a serious threat to our national security.
How are bomb-carrying armadillos going to threaten
us? Brown asked.
We all know the burrowing capabilities of the ar armadillo,"
madillo," armadillo," the General said. Equipped with nuclear war warheads,
heads, warheads, a super breed of armadillos could burrow under our
hardened missile silos and then be detonated by remote con control.
trol. control.
We feel, the general continued, "that the Russians may
believe the combination of a armadillo first-strike with their
civil defense system may give them the capability of winning
a nuclear war.
Just how do the Russians plan on delivering these super
armadillos? Brown asked.
Sir, the Navy admiral interrupted. There is evidence
that the Russians have been conducting a series of ALC tests
from nuclear submarines.
ALC? asked Brown.
Armadillo Landing Craft, sir. In the event of an interna international
tional international crisis, the armadillos would be launched from the
Pacific Coast. Through sensor instruments, the armadillos
would be directed to the missile sites and possibly even
California fault lines, destroying the entire West G>as*t with

'Black' news does it exist?

Paper covers
all groups
Editor: I agree with Al Heinermann's
statement that there is no black news. Os
course not, as there is not any white, Ger German,
man, German, Irish or Eskimo news. But, in fact,
there is news that is more noteworthy to
blacks, just as there are news stories which
are more interesting to the Irish, Germans
and Eskimos.
Al Heinermann, you missed the point of
the editors opinion. It seems to me that he
was trying to point out that often newspapers
such as The Alligator stick to the mainstream
news stories and we all know that the
mainstream does not include blacks and
other minorities.
I commend Dennis Kneale for his article
and he is right. The Alligator is not meant to
be a black publication, but it should print
news of special interest to all
groups,especially minorities whom are often
underrepresented in all areas. In this regard

Problems with semester switch mainly in status quo

Editor: I strongly support The Alligator's position
recommending a change from a system of quarters to
ons of semesters.
My first two years of undergraduate work were
spent attending a northern college which changed
from quarters to semesters during my second year of
studies.
Like many students who were comfortable with the
quarter system. I also harbored very negative feelings
toward this change. My reasons included all those
cited by opponents of such a change at UF i.e. less
flexibility in course scheduling, less chance to improve
ones grade point average, a shorter time to endure a
difficult course, etc. However, most of this criticism
was a rationalization for a more basic .resistance to a
change in the system: semesters would deviate from a
familiar status quo.
When the school actually changed to semesters my

satire
mike thomas
earthquakes."
If the crisis died down, the admiral continued,/the ar armadillos
madillos armadillos would be remotely disarmed ami directed towards
major highways. After a few big semis ran over them, the
evidence would lx- destroyer! ami the Russians would be in
the clear.
In addition to the ALCs. Mr. Brown, the Air Force
general said, We fear the Russians may lx* developing a
multiple armadillo capacity for their missiles.
Brown had heard enough. Dont you gentlemen think

The Alligator is setting itself apart from other
daily papers.
One recent example. The Alligator printed
that Julian Bond was the first black in history
to be nominated for the vice-presidencv, this
is not so, Fredrick Douglass was first, having
been nominated in New York in 1872 at the 1
convention of the Equal Bights League. This
fact has eluded history more often than not.
Also James W. Ford was nominated by the*
U.S. Communist party for the* peist in 1932.
Now, this is ne>t black news.
Furthermore, Al Heinermann. old be>v, the*
tone of your article is indicative of the verv
point the edite>r attempted to make. Beside*s,
your frame of mind would appear to fit well
in the era of the cenfeek*rate uniforms you
find so praiseworthy.
As an aspiring prtifessional, directly or in indirectly
directly indirectly connected with the fielel of jour journalism,
nalism, journalism, it appears to me that ye>u contribute
to the problem Mr. Kneale so eleiquently
pointed out.
Shirlev E. Hendlev
?UF

reactiems remained mixed. Students academic
metabolisms continued to function on a 10-week cycle
in the beginning; in the eleventh week everyone was
ready for the end of the session and there were still
four more weeks of dasjgjuleft!
My experience with semesters is that teachers do not
simply add extra papers and reading assignments in
rder to transform 10 crammed weeks into 15 cramm crammed
ed crammed weeks. On the contrary, professors, like students,
enjoyed the much more relaxed tempo of a longer
semester while at the same time feeling more at ease to
spend class time covering course materials more
thoroughly.
In transferring to UF in January of 1977, I was
again faced with the frustrating, frantic pace of the
quarter system. Quarters race a student through far<
too great a quantity of materials in far too short a
time. Quality education gets lost in struggle simply to

' j -anna

Blacks need
relevant stories
Editor: On Jan. 15, The Alligator printed
an editor's notes column on how it sadly
lacks the input from the perspective of black
students, black faculty anti black staff." This
has been a fact among the black community
for years. However, the question that im immediately
mediately immediately comes to mv mind is, "Who
cares?"
Certainly not the worker who accelerated
the UF truck in an effort to run me over. Nor
the worker who actually hit a black student
with a UF truck. After all, they are just doing
their job, and they believe that keeping the
campus beautiful involves the elimination of
the black populace.
Most definitely not the Kappa Alphas who
deem it necessary to humorously remind us
of the centuries of wage free labor our
forefathers were forced to give to strengthen
a country that does not even recognize their
existence. The KAs flaunt their Confederate

olligqtor, Wednesday, jonuory 17, 1979,

that this is all a little far fetched? he asked the somber look looking
ing looking grtHip of officers in front of him.
Well maybe, sir, the Army general replied, but the
Russians may hr* spending around two billion dollars a year
on the project.
We feel that we should spend at least half of that on our
own armadillo technology or we may be facing a serious ar armadillo
madillo armadillo gap in the future.
The last thing our economy needs is an escalating ar armadillo
madillo armadillo race with tlx* Russians," Brown replied.
We should at least develop some form of anti-armadillo
warfare system, the general said.
I believe the proper way to handle this. Brown
answered is to let the Russians know were wise to whats
going on and try to bring them to the bargaining table to
begin negotiations on Strategic Armadillos Limitation
Talks.

idiocies with the pride of a dead peacock.
This pompous perished procession is news.
Most importantly, not the UF ad administration.
ministration. administration. The administrators are so far
out in left field that you must send them a
telegram in order for them to come home.
They, firing white, are beginning to feel
threatened by the so-called equal op opportunities.
portunities. opportunities. They feel that if they do not stop
black men from advancing, and believe me,
they are employing every distasteful tactic
possible the black man will one day rule his
country. Surely, we cannot have that. And
The Alligator may never publish a picture of
a black scientist.
But again I ask, "Who cares? As a black
man I care. I care because I do not want my
sons and daughters to feel like they are still
fighting for the freedom supposedly granted
more than a hundred years ago. I care
because black people are very much a part of
this university, city, state and country. We
need to know what is relevant to us, and The
Alligator is the source of communication for
the UF population.
Nathan Robinson

get through.
In conclusion, I will say there exist valid criticisms
of the semester system which have been more than
adequately explicated in other editorials. My conten contention
tion contention is that most students opposing a change to
semesters do so simply out of a "comfortableness
with the status quo and outright fear of the unknown. I
have been involved with this issue for many years
from all sides, holding all major points of view.
I support the change to a semester system as a move
toward a more sound academic program and a more
enjoyable college experience. I also challenge the
faculty, administrators and students of UF to explore
their true motives for opposing this change. Such a*
change is a positive step toward quality education at
UF.
Kathleen La Camera
4LS

9



10

i olliQQtof, wdnedoy, ianuary 17, 1979

Graham to choosestudent regent

By Robert McClure
Alligator Staff Writer
Five UF nominees for the student post on the Board of
Regents are expected to go to the governors office today
amid speculation that the governor will choose a white
female from UF or Florida State University.
The five UF nominees include two substitutions for
students previously nominated, but who no longer will be
students when the post is filled.
The two new nominees are Raul Carreras, Student
Government gadfly and former vice presidential candidate,
and Mary Lynn Desjarlais, SG community liasion.
Former Student Senate President Rick Sharp has
graduated and former Student Sen. Nancy Medford expects
to graduate before Gov. Bob Graham chooses a student later
this month to replace outgoing Les Miller of the University
of South Florida.
Last quarters five nominations were made under the im impression
pression impression that former Gov. Reubin Askew would fill the spot

Faculty members oppose
student voice on senate

By John Tucfcor
Alligator Writer
A move to give students a voting voice on
the University Senate is receivingstiff opposi opposition
tion opposition from some faculty members, a Student
Government Cabinet member has charged
Joanne Rosenbluth, student director of
academic affairs, said she and other students
have been working since August on an
amendment to the senate constitution giving
voting rights to 10 student members. The
proposer! amendment, however, has been
bottled up for months in committees.
"The amendment is supposedly before the
steering committee, but we can't find out
when they meet, Rosenbluth said. "This is
the way they stalled us fall quarter.
Rosenbluth said the proposer! amendment
must go to the constitution committee, where
it is written up and then go back to the steer steering
ing steering committee, headed by Byron Spangler, a
professor in College of Engineering. The
steering committee gives final approval
before the amendment goes to the senate
floor for a vote.
A similiar amendment was proposed two
years ago, but was voter! down when it got to
the senate floor.
Rosenbluth also charged that senate
secretaries have been uncooperative in sup supplying
plying supplying her with senate membership lists.
I asked one senate secretary in Tigert for
a list of members on the steering committee,
and she told me she couldn't give me that in information.
formation. information. Rosenbluth said. I then asked

MOON MUtLINS
So says the U. .. ky
vA RW
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Contact naoroot V* afflaa
lonaot yaw phono book) or
toeol vatarana (roup.

for a list of senate membership rolls and she
said she didnt have that either..
Os the 450 members who make up the
senate, Rosenbluth said that only 50 or 60 at attended
tended attended most meetings.
Rosenbluth said Spangler "told me that he
was opposed to the student vote l>ecause he
felt 10 students would carry too much
power. It's not our fault if
faculty members dont attend meeings.
Student Body President Terry Brown said
10 student votes on the senate would not
curb faculty power.
"When a major issue is coming up, atten attendance
dance attendance at senate meetings is usually pretty
good, Brown said. "A student vote would
be of great symbolic importance. 1
Brown said three or four students now are
representing student interests on the senate as
non-voting members.
Vice-President for Academic Affairs
Robert Bryan, an influential senate member
said he supported the concept of giving
voting rights to several students, but that he
had not seen any specific amendment.
1 talked to Joanne several months ago and
told her I supported her idea, Bryan said.
Both Bryan and Spangler denied
Rosenbluths charges of senate stalling.
1 haven't given any thought to the amend amendment
ment amendment yet, Spangler said. I am not sure how
anyone in the senate will respond to it, but I
will take whatever recommendation is given
by the constitution committee.
Spangler said he was uncertain as to how
long the process would take.

WITH THE PURCHASE OF
I DEEP DISH PIZZA
12" DEEP DISH PIZZA- ONLY i.S* fK>s 2-<;
WE MAKE'EM YOU BAKE'EM
PIZZA TACO SHOP
3-9 Sun * Unlvortlty 3 ., |Wed Thots
Closed Mon. & Tues, 3-12 Fri. Sol.

before he left office. Askew, however, decided to leave the
decision to Graham.
UF Chief student lobbyist Marshall Geisser is expected to
deliver letters of recommendation to the governor's office by
8 a.m. today.
Tallahassee sources said the governor is expected to pick a
white female from UF or FSU, although they refused to say
where the information originated.
Regent Miller is the first student Regent to receive voting
rights on the board, which governs the State University
System.
The five nominees, according to Student
Body President Terry Brown, are: Carreras,
Desjarlais, Julie Jett, Earl Tryon, and Rob
Webb.
All nominations are due at the governors
office by Friday. A screening committee is
expected to pass along its recommendations
to the governor by the end of next week.
Jett and Desjarlais are white females.

in brief

County votes to back
group for truancy plan
A less-than-complete Alachua County
Commission voted Tuesday to sponsor a
Gainesville group applying for a nearly
$18,400 federal grant to begin a county
truancy program.
While County Administrator Frank
Spence and commissioners Perry McGriff Jr.
and Jack Durrance were in Tallahassee at attending
tending attending an Association of County Commis Commissioners
sioners Commissioners meeting, the remaining three com commissioners
missioners commissioners voted to sponsor Robert Lee,
director of Crest Services Inc., for his grant
application to the federal Law Enforcement
Assistance Administration.
Lee now can apply for the federal grant of
$ 18,384 for the Truancy Outreach Program,
which would provide family and individual
counseling for juveniles who constantly miss
school.
The commissioners also voted to sell the
countys old computer system to a firm in
Dallas for about $ 157,000.
Student senators OK
request for BSU funds
UF student senators approved a $3,000 re request
quest request for a Black History Month with only
one negative vote Tuesday night.
Black Student Union President Peter
Burnett presented the request and answered
senators questions about the program.
Comedian-activist Dick Gregory is
scheduled to appear at University
Auditorium Feb. 18 as part of the obser observance.

9 A Let your imagination H
run
Easily removable jp
ftfl l 4jrs With alcohol or A H
WmSP If "Of I
I Tw B
i Tjr \ Sand $4.50 check or money E
M 1 V order for set of three to: Iff
H PANDAMONHIM INC. H
English town. NJ 07726

. L JKwfF*' *fj
STUDENT RtGENT NOMINEE RAUL CARRERAS
. . one of five from UF up for post

vance. observance.
It makes you more willing to put forth
your full effort when you see this kind of
cperation. BSU has made the turn in
reaching other races of people, Burnett
said.
Twenty-seven black UF organizations are
expected to participate in the month-long
program.
/
Local women's center
schedules open house
The Gainesville Womens Health Center
has scheduled an open house for Jan. 27 to
acquaint UF students with new procedures
regarding vasectomies, abortions and
gynecological care.
Clinic Coordinator Pat Paul said the open
house will focus on the vasectomy program,
which the clinic began in November.
We will offer counseling, especially in the
vasectomy area, but also in abortion,
pregnancy testing and gynecological care,
Paul said. Our emphasis is on self help.
The open house should begin at 1 p.m.
Students can enroll
for UF study abroad
Students wishing to enroll in a new UF
summer study program in Innsbruck,
Austria, should contact UF history Professor
Julian Pleasants or UFs International
Studies and Programs Director Pat Rambo.
Pleasants office is in room 485 of Little
Hall, 392-1561, and Rambos office is in
room 186 of Grinter Hall, 392-4908.



inside.

jppf 4l
l v RmNP^S
michaol kooren

SUICIDE: DEATH BY DECISION

By Cindy Sponca
Alligator Staff Writer
The words form an incessant chorus in Bobs head. "I just
don't love you any more. I think it's best that we break up
It's been more than a month since Sheila broke up with him.
but instead of getting better the loneliness has only gotten
worse.
His whole life has gone awry. His grades have dropped, his
parents are angry and his friends have stopped inviting him
out. All his energy is concentrated on his pain as he sits alone
on his bed staring at the walls and the ceiling as they bounce
his rejection back at him.
Running into Sheila today on campus, seeing her smile
and laugh with her friends has sharpened his feelings of
rejection into an unbearable pain.
He takes the gun from the drawer and places it on the
bedside table. The thought of ending it all has been tugging
at his mind for wepks. The pain of seeing Sheila today makes
that thought into an all-too-real possibility.
The gun sits beside the telephone on the table, forcing him
to make a choice.
He reaches out for the telephone and dials the Suicide and
Crisis Intervention Center.
Though Bob is not a real person, his story is typical of
people who attempt suicide, according to at the
crisis center. The names can be changed and the reasons for
attempting suicide will vary, but loneliness, pain and
isolation are almost always factors in the decision to die.
Depression seems to be a common ailment of the young
during the college years supposedly the best years of
your life, At high school age 30 percent of suicides are
among dropouts. During college, however, more students
than non-students take their lives, with the rate increasing
with the prestige of the college.
The Happy Days attitude toward college seemed to
dissipate in the '6os when, amid the turbulence and moral
revolution, researchers began to notice a rash of depression
spreading among college youth.
That depression has led to an epidemic of suicides. In the
15 to 24 age group suicide is now the third leading cause of
death. Between 1968 and 1976. the suicide rate in the 20 to
24 age group more than doubled, according to the Mortality
Branch of the National Center for Health Statistics.
Officially, 5,000 young people a year commit suicide. But
researchers feel if the disguised suicides were reported, the
number of young people who die by decision would reach
about 10,000.
Researchers say that many auto accidents are suicides in

disguise. Doctors often label the cause of death accidental to
lessen the grief of the victim's family. The explanation for
the escalating rate of 13 suicides a dav depends on who is
asked.
Sociologist say the suicide rate has resulted from the
breakdown of the home and the church as sources of
stability for young people. Psychiatrists believe suicide is
caused by forcing kids to grow up too fast Moralists blame
promiscuity while liberals blame puritan rigidity.
Phiney Henderson, a volunteer with the crisis center, said
the majority of calls for help received at the center are
caused by problems with interrelationships, breaking up
with a boyfriend or girlfriend, finding a niche in society or
grades.
Sociologists say the suicide rate has
resulted from the breakdown of the
home and the church. Psychiatrists say
kids are growing up too fast. Moralists
blame promiscuity while liberals blame
puritan rigidity.
Sometimes its frustrating when you cant concentrate
and all you can think about is that youre about to fail and
you see it all slipping by you," Henderson said. Another
problem today is that students are too secure. Then when
they go out into the real world and have to find for them themselves
selves themselves they have problems.
The middle class has become the major breeding ground
for suicidally depressed people, researchers say. Middle class
over-protection and self-indulgence are the largest con contributing
tributing contributing factors in the inability of middle class youth to
cope with living.
But while the why of suicide remains a matter of opinion,
people concerned with the problem agree that an attempt at
suicide is a cry for help.
Suicide attempts outnumber actual suicides 50 to 1.
Although women attempt suicide three times as often as
men, the actual rate of suicide among men fs four times
higher than among women. Men apparently are more adept
at killing themselves. Statistics indicate that, like Bob, men
tend to use more violent methods of self-destruction, such as
hanging or shooting, while women tend to use more passive
methods, such as overdoses of medication or slit wrists.
Eight of 10 who voice suicidal threats eventually attempt
suicide and 75 percent of those who commit suicide give
repeated warning.

alligator, Wednesday, january 17, 1979,

"Communication is the key, Henderson said. No matter
how small the problem might seem to you, its a big thing to
the person youre counseling. You have to relate on an in individual
dividual individual Ixasis and be perceptive.
"Sometimes people are very vague and may Ik* in the
middle of a suicide attempt. You have to be perceptive and
pull it out of them and be ready to pick up on the hints they
drop.
Marshall Knudson, another volunteer with the crisis
tenter, said most suicidal people are desperately lonely and
insecure and probably just need someone to talk to.
Therapy we don't do over the phone we listen."
Knudson said. When you think about it people dont listen
to you all that much and usually it hurts you. Sometimes we
just help by listening.
"Some people are just terribly lonely and day after day
that wears on them to the point where they consider life to be
a waste and want to die. We try to help them explore their
options. The feelings of suicide usually passes within 48
hours, but unfortunately with suicide there is no option.
More Protestants commit suicide than Jews or Catholics.
In the North more blacks kill themselves, in the South more
whites. Highest suicide rates ape in April, second-highest
during the two weeks before Christmas. And Monday and
Friday are the days of the week most often chosen for
suicide.
The suicide rate for blacks has caught up with the suicide
rate for whites becauseof increasing competitive pressures
for high grades or good jobs, researchers say.
The increases in the suicide rate among youth have
focused a recent debate on the danger posed by schools.
Researchers are concerned that the competitive atmosphere
created by schools causes too many youftg people to fall
short of goals. A succession of failures leads tragically to
suicide.
Cainesville, however, is rich in resources for troubled
people. The crisis center staffs a 24-hour hotline. For UF
students there is the Psychological and Vocational Coun Counseling
seling Counseling Center in Little Hall and a Mental Health Section at
the Infirmary. The Corner Drug Store, 1128 SW First Ave.,
can help with drug problems and Pleasant House, 24 SW
Seventh St., is available for help with alcohol-related
problems.
But troubled people must want to help themselves and
search within themselves. Henderson said.
"As a volunteer, there's only so much 1 can do. If you try
and do everything in your power, what else can you do?
After all its that persons life and its in their hands till the
end.

11



12

t. olltqotof, wadrxwdoy, jonuory 17, 1979

rrr. imm
*i Hutu
Hippodrome
hits, misses
with Fugard
By Jim SwiMtt
Alligator Critic
Now playing at the Hippodrome Theatre.
If ytHi are interested in experiencing the
powerful expressions of South African
playwright Athol Fugard, the Hippodrome*
Theatre has the answer for you.
Director Margaret Bachus has fashioned
an interesting, if uneven, interpretation of
Fugards The Island and Statements Made
After an Arrest Under the Immorality Act for
our perusal
Your journey into the world of Athol
Fugard begins with The Island. It's the story
of two black men native Africans who
have been incarcerated on an island prison
for crimes against the state. Though their
specific crimes are irrelevant to the con continuity
tinuity continuity of the work, suffice it to say that their
deeds were deemed heinous by government
officials. So much so that one man was
sentenced to 10 years, the other to life.
Though injustice is a temporal issue in this
country, the situation here cannot compare
to the social atrocities perpetrated in Africa
today. Freedom of speech, social mobility,
and self-determination are just precious
dreams to people of racially embroiled lands.
Eddie Billups and Jonathan Peck are
absolutely stunning as the two prisoners,
John and Winston, respectively. They possess
all of the sensitivity, timing and presence
that is needed to successfully coax out the
intricate nuances of pathos contained within
this Fugard drama.
You will laugh at their preparation of
Antigone for an inmate variety show. You
will cry at their despair and longing for their
lives on the mainland. And you will think
about what "civilized men hath wrought
on their fellow men.
These two gifted actors share the ex experiences
periences experiences of oppressed everymen. The two
are cell mates and soul mates. They help
each other to survive their daily ration of
hell.
Ymi would indeed be fortunate if you are
able to witness the magic that these two fine
performers generate.
- Im afraid youll feel a little less fortunate
after experiencing the weak performances
offered in the second half of this double bill
Statements.
Statements is Fugards comment on the

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social taboo associated with an interracial
affair.
Malcom Mt*eks play Errol Philander, a
black man and school principal. Marv
Hausch |x>rtrays Frieda JoulH*rt, a white
woman who cannot deny her love for
Philander. Because of the incendiary nature
of their relationship, they must meet on the
sly, at night in a library, to profess their love.
But their Eden soon is shattered. They are
discovered and brought up on charges under
the immorality act.
Fugard explores the inner conflicts and
ecstasy that these two very human creatures
leel. The playwright also reveals how cold,
impersonal and blind the government is in its
sanctioning of legislated morality.
Unfortunately, Hausch (one podromes founding members and artistic artisticco-directors)
co-directors) artisticco-directors) and Meeks are unsuccessful in
providing the proper counterweight to keep
the evenings theatrical seesaw balanced.
Where The Island is major league theater.
Statements is embarrassing bush league. Burt
Taylors miniscule part as police detective detectivesergeant,
sergeant, detectivesergeant, J. duPreez, showed the onlv
glimmer of talent.
Perhaps Hausch and Meeks were nervous
in the handling of their nudity. Though one
can only speculate on such a possibility, the
truth of the matter is that their performances
were badly marred.

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Ihe two had trouble in voice projection
and in their ability of creating credible
characters. It was too obvious that thev-were
acting." Their poor accents didnt help
much either.
Blame for the failure of Statements must
also go to director Bachus, who stifled her
actors performances through poor blocking.
The two lovers should have moved about
with much more fluidity and carefullv
designed choreography. Their statements
could have been enhanced into a beautifully
touching dance true art in motion. In Instead,
stead, Instead, they came across with crippled
nonsensical flopping. It just made Ftigard
look like a hack.
Howard J. Hamagli Jr.s lights and the set
(designed in a communal effort by the
Hippodrome) were functional and adequate
but easily forgetable.
Despite Statements' many flaws, these two
Fugard companion pieces should be seen.
The true reputation of the Hippodrome
Theater rests on its steadfast commitment to
tin* presentation of dynamic and bold
dramatic expositions. It does not recline in
the supine and easy comfort of witless
fantasy.
Ihe Hipp beacon exposing the voices that address
themselves, candidly, to the truth. Voices
such as Athol Fugards.

'Norman 1 is
uninspired,
unamusing
. V
tvJffrtym v t~*
Alligator Critic __ ___
Now playing at the Gainesville Little
Theatre.
Norman Is That You?is an unamusing
comedy given amateurish production at the
Gainesville Little Theatre.
Norman is the tale of poor Ben Chambers,
whose wife has run off with his brother and
whose son he discovers is gay. It is certainly
an uninspired basis for a comedy, and
uninspired is a good term for this creaky play
written by Ron Clark and Sam Bobrick.
Norman is living with his lover Garson
when his father turns up in town. Garson is
unfortunately shown aas stereotyped
homosexual, limp-wristed, funny-walking
fellow who wears red velvet pants and eye
makeup, and also owns a couple dresses.
In contrast, Norman is a good looking,
masculine man, and his father sets about try trying
ing trying to cure him.
This play is stale when it concerns itself
with Bens wife, Beatrice, and her affair with
her brother-in-law. Long distance phone
calls provide Ben with several lightly
humorous monologs. We have seen this in
plays and movies before and it has been done
with more wit and humor.
Overall, there is very little to laugh about,
and when we do snicker, we do so against
our better judgment.
The production has a workable two-room
set, that features a pink bedroom with a
poster of Robert Urick, bare chested, on the
wall. The directing by Tom Godey is slow at
times, but he keeps the actors moving and
tries to keep things visually humorous.
Bill Stensgaard, who reminds one of Tom
Bosley, is sure of himself as the beleaguered
father. Richard Schneider is attractive, but
often stiff as the title character.
Normans mother is played with some
unsteadiness by Catherine F. Huber. Only
Mitchell Bronstein as Garson, is amusing.
While the character is an insulting stereotype
of homosexuals, Bronstein plays it to the hilt
with plenty of camp an create laugh not iri the script.
Other disappointments: The cast dropped
lines and the actors could be seen changing
clothes on stage during the scene changes.
While the cast works hard, there is not
much mileage left in this old comedy that is
neither intelligent nor funny.,

JONATHAN
PECK AND
EDDIE
BILLUPS
. . staging
'Antigone'
for fellow
prisoners

j -9 -'rt
J L W C * f M
J INSURANCE PI
Students Save |1
Check Our 6-Mos. Liability Rate 1 j
, Small Down Payment-low Monthly Terms 11
CALL US FOR OUR LOW COST H
1 P.I.P. INSURANCE-TO GET TAGS H
B "?££££* CALL: 373-MSS Q



alligator classifieds

FOE-SALE
DISCOUNT HI FI 722 S. Mom All motor
brorafe. Son Monoy On Stereo Opon 1-6
J75A363 WERE CHEATER (3-9^460)
If you need Sound In your cor Cor Stereo
Specialists hot go II oil I low prrcet. mony
brondt l quality installations! opon 10-7
m-f, 10-5 on sat 2201 nw Kkt 378-0192 (2-
2-20-a)
2-Spood Automatic MOFEO low Mitooge
Botl performing, moot reliable moped
avoiloblo 5350 or off or PAIR 392-9528 (1-
18-5-0)
ggBaStssiiwC
1 A.wlafele Anytime37MSsl
1 o#kp 377-73661
L DC DISCO
||Mm, Top 40, R & rJ
I 13311 W MAn Funk, etc. I
w^BiuSSShM
STREET'S
SCHWINN CYCLERY i
1414 NW 13th St.
\K
OpenTue* 4 Thurs
'till 9 00 p m
Fri 4 Sol -W -W---
-- -W--- we repair all mokes t models
1 Day Sorytco 377-Bike
1614 NW 13th St

jflii^R* * m
:::: ::: ;:i: X *::::::::::Hp
nkhol/akii
mmm| o
FOE BALE
SSooloq 4 itond. S23otwo lOpaloq. IS
ond S2O. Pond sls; complete setups, e
collorM condition, coll 375-1878 after A (I (I---18-5-0)
--18-5-0) (I---18-5-0)
**utt Mil Ape Storoo one cond. very
choapt alto I nood lest T V prod handbook
will poy top price cod Mike 3738057 (118
Sn.)
-
35mm camera fully automatic with manual
ovenide-5 r-petri HI w/SOmm 7 inter
changeable lent Bmo old 8 caw included
SIOO 376-4910 (1 18-4-0)
Uted tv's 19" go Block ond White SSO 00
Econo travel, 2649 tw I}tl 373-7816 (1-19-
H>)
Refrigerator. Hot Potnt. Cappertone. !2cu
ft $125.00 377-2615(1-29-100)
AKC DALMATIAN PUPPIES EXCELLENT QUAD
TV. VERY WEU SPOTTED SHOTS 4 WORMING
INCLUDEDSIOO.OO372-2800 (I 22 So)
firewood, watoned ond tplit oak ond pine
deliver ed includes kindling S3O I /2cord
coll 462 7763 (I 30-1 Da)
electrophonic tlereo system om/fm
receiver, lurnlable. speakers very good
condition coll between spm 4 6pm
weekdays 372 7153(1-23-5-0)
TICKETS 3 tickets to sty* 4 tolo in concert in
lakeland civic center ion 21 800pcn $8 00 o
piece face value, coll lee 392-9895 (1-18-
USED FURNITURE office desks from S7O
sleno choirs from $lO other great buytl of office
fice office mort, 690 ne 23ove 373-7516 (1-26

MCAT
IVIV. PA 1 Q Rt ,GM A T
SAT TIE*
Class Starting
Jan. 71 For April Esam
STANLEY H. K APLAN
Educational Cpntor
1015 W University

FOE BALE
WS-10 speeds S4O 8 $45 3 speed $25
WANT TO BUY SMALL ELECTRIC FARM fhJMP
3738469(1 18-2-0)
rolergh record 10-speed with ait new surv
tour drive tram in great shape car rack in included
cluded included all far prst $75 coll 372-0303 (123
3a)
FOE RENT
HOMES 4 APARTMENTS PC* RENT
all areas all prices! new listings daily coll
378-8844 RENTAL INFORMATION CENTER
REALTOR (3 9-45-b)
LANDLORDS
the RENTAL INFORMATION CENTER wilt lilt
your vacancies oi no cost to you call
3788844 REALTOR (39-45 b)
Horse lovers live on hr farm 12*60 mh 2br
11/2balh eschonge partial rent horse
board/lease far life work with horses
481 2026/481 33760 ft IOpm(M8 sb)
sublet Ibr apt brandywme furnished after
5. 375-0116 (I-166b)
big one bdr apt sublease I block from
shands Ms holidoy gordens $175/mo 4 kni
and SIOO sac. gen man at 3761895 turn,
clean, quiet, afl Bpm (1-17-3-b)
2 bedroom trailer no pels close lo campus
150 00 month 5000 sac 377 8891 Ed NO
PETS
Ibadr trailer lor rent 135 00 mo SSO
deposit 4546 nw 13th si lot II enquire lot 43
Tty apt. unfurnished $240 slotting leb 1800
nw 4sl pool, nice grounds, spocious. cen central
tral central oc/heot cots ok coll debbie anytime
3735276 (l-!33b)
TteydClZr!^
1588 MW lifts St. \ffvv
372 783* li> >

FOE EENT
inempdnsrve living oi georgra seogle co-op
room ond board for only $340 a quarter
located at 1002 w untv ove coll 3769179
men only (I 22- 6b)
far rant-large 2 bdrm aportmeni clow to
downtown, no pels. S3OO/mo leow re required
quired required call 378-3792 after spm tor more
details (I 22-6 b)
I bdrm apt 4 rent 4 blocks from campus
$l3O/month, fully fur rushed first $ lost.
$75 security call 178-1853. kenrvy (I 19-J-b)
io sublet in stone ridge room 4 both in
beautiful turn 2br apt I l9mo keep deposit
of 119 refl o 4 ion free coll ondy 3763535
esi 247(1 19 3 b)
sublease Jbedroom-Tbolfvoom "laSonne
Vie" aponmenr-ony time from now $290
per month. Bminuiet to campus coll
375-6356(1 23-6 b)
unfurnished 38 R 2boh house central on
ond heal kitchen equipped no pels even evenings
ings evenings 372-0640 260 monthly + deposit (119
6b)
ton rent free one bedroom furnished apt
tennis, pool, clubhouse $l6O per month coll
collect 404 563 5588 dovd (1 23 6b)
ROOMMATE
mole or femote. own room m new 3br 2bo
furnished home S2O week s- 1/3 uiil coll
onyl.me 372 2640 (t 17 6r)
roommate wonted in 2br ol ala mar
gordens $95/mo l/2utilihes pool lenms
court, boskeiboll ski please call olan ai
3738439 after 7(1-17 5-r)
female roommate own room in lorge house
5 blks from campus senior or grod student
preferred nonsmoker no pels 40 -t- I 6u"l
372-7293 evenings (1-17-6 r)
emoto-io shore opi with 3 others 2bdrm
2boih wmdmeodows close lo compos ond
bus slops here 377-0199 SBO/mo I futilities
(I 17 6r)
female rmi ook forest own room $lO4 plus
1/4 utilities immediate occupancy coll
378-5318 alter spm (I l7 6r)
Non smoking-mole wonted to shore a one
bedroom opi S9B per mo plus I futilities
pool ond loundry Call 377-0768 oiler 7 00
ask lor scow (I 18-5-r)
Own rm in 3brm I bath house $67 50/mo r rl/4ul
l/4ul rl/4ul Fenced in yd cen hi AC un unlurn
lurn unlurn carpeted Mor F Coll Barb 372 9818.
936 NE 7 PI (118 6 r)
emale to shore furn 3 bdrm tyynhse plus
l/3ulilines washer dryer no lease imm oc occuponcy
cuponcy occuponcy available call evenings 376-2143
(1-18-6 r)
lemole roommote wonted (urn own room
biking disionce ol comus $1 lOmo 4
t/2uiilhes call 376 2949 oiler 10pm or
372 4070doy(1 166 r)
Need to sublet I bdrm in spocious 3
bdrm town house ol in the Pines opts
l/3ulitilies 4 slls rent, washer and
dryer ond lots more< 373-0019 (I 18-5 r)
female or male room mer wanted
reasonable kitchen pvgs 4306 nw I9lh
si or coll 372 4827 (1-18 6r)
want neat wholesome mole or female lo
shore nice opi no drugs or pot coll ion
372-0182(1 18 4 r)
female lo shore room in furn house near
ul security deposit no pels 110/mo double
150/ mo single includes utilities coll
3728608 or 3761349 (l-19-6r)
live in style Great NW 38drm 2bath house.
Gas grill in fenced yard $l2O/month Own
br Male or Female 3761627 Keep trying!
(I -163-r)
own private br $ blh in 2br 2bth opi pool
bike park oc h you hove lo see it walking
dtsi ul dishwasher sh 3 u 1/3 SIOO oiler spm
3766175 (I-161-r)
share a spocious. furnished one-bedroom
aportmeni clow lo campus $65 per mo +
!/2uhlitie coll 3766373 after spm or slop
by 1533 nw sov (I -18-3-r)
Mole roommate wanted far a 2bdrm opt. on
s. w. 34ih tt near campus 115 rent 4 unities
coll 3768288 (I-19-4-r)
OWN ROOM in 3 room furnished house
near campus winter qtr o/c heater fireplace
ond cable color tv only 55 month 6 I fold
377-6796(1 22-S-r)
L A rrsAsvsiewekm l/ms4seww4 . ri --
* W*TiO*w I* I FTKJIR KJ '*lll lOT R Opf| Own
bedroom, I futilities. $125 per month
el 3761581 (1-17-1-c)
own room In houeo 67.50 6 l/4util no
leow call 377-3188 keep trying 1710 ne Ist
ove. (1-162-r)

alligator, wodndoy, jonuary 17, 1979,

Catch cablegator classifieds
on Cable channel 6
7.30 am., 1:30,5:30, 7.30 pm.

ROOMMATE
own rm/hauw in ne/$56 25m0 4 share
o.psntw fenced yard-towndry room eaey
access to compos-call after spm 373-5213
quiet neighborhood (1-23-5-r)
COLONIAL MANOR ARTS fully furnrthed.
across from ligort S9O omo 4 Ifuttl rest
of ton boo coll 3788122. 65pm or go to
optf77(l-19-3-r)
r oommote wonted own room in Jbdrm
house nw section kg yard healed, on cond
SBO/month 4 I futilities 373-3478 (1-23-
mole roommate needed own bedroom in 3
bedroom apt in country vitlogo opts rent
$93 a month call 3763275 lote. (1-19- w )
lemole rmf wonted own bdrm ond berth
$125 00 par mo If util, caii god 375-3367
creekwood opts pool, lervtis cts must bo
neot prefer non-smoker. 375-3367 (1-23-5-r)
Mole or Femote r oommote wonted own
bdrm in 3bdrm house good location,
washer $ dryer $92/mo 4 If 3763003
keep trying (I 19 6r)
Mole Room mote Wanted own room in ntce
aportmeni completely furnished 95 o month
F utilities, clow to compus viltoge park call
3760307 (-19-3-c)
need female roommate, winter qtr. rent S9O
+ If util rent free if you ore competent m
siotitiicil no smokers, coll 373-0690 (1-19-
PLANT PCTALEP
FREE Plant
with any purchase
upstairs in
Renaissance Pla/a
1642 W. Univ. Ave.

TONIGHT
THRU SAT.!
Skeets Stevens Studios
present
! / ; ~ F c)
THE ISLAND
STATEMENTS
MADE AFTEP AN ARRfSI
UNDFR THE IMMORALITY A Q 1
TICKETS ON SALE NOW
AT REBEL DISCOUNT
lor Waturi 1 Audi<>n(cs
HIPPODROME


pBI^MHI^IHII MHWIMta
i
i 2B3ift i
Ujr |
( Sunday January 21
j Union North Lawn
I 8:00 p.m.
BBBWBBW

wanted-.
CASH FOR RECORDS AT FRStNDL KOBS
up- stows on the corner es nw 17 p 6 ent*
ove 377-5215 W( FAY MORI (36-46-c)
. n aPWN>eWMMRMF
GOLD 4 SBVBR
Class Rings. Joweby. Ciems CusF or Trade
OIZ* 3001 nw 43rd St *73 9242 (39-JF-c)
Collector buying Japarww tin milt oral
weapons Also buying eny quality arte Wei
itorae Foe prtcos paid far oi goad ptoaae.
cotl 374-0729 (1-162-0
goad quohty used iracwcopo to 400* ed
mmersran up to SIOO 00 cad 373*10
evenings (1-162-c)

UstFdod^R^ftndme
NT4RLIMi(
Mon.-Sat. 164
FRIDAY
& SAT. AT 11P.M.
SUN. AT 7:98 P.M.
GENERAL ADMISSION:
$2.00
FRIENDS OF HIFFOOROME
SI.OO
TICKETS ON SALE AT DOOR
30 MINUTES BEFORE SHOW

13



14

>, olligotor, wednesdoy, jonuory 17. 1979

alligator classifieds

FOTPOORRI Gomesville's honest |r. clothing
Hor it cunMly looking thorp oggreettve
soletpeople If you understood progressive
contomporory fashion and liko to toll,
P*oo opplylnporton 01 theOoktMoll (I (I-aro
aro (I-aro you hooding 10 miomi nood you to Soul
modicol o io htoloah pay SOO or 00 00
minut uhoul If noodod go morn of tht* week
c 011376-7300 (I-19-5-to)
BUSINESS MAJORS gain vatuabto ex expel
pel expel wn< SAMSON noodt o now butmott
monogor If inlorotlod call 392-1600 (1-17-
2-0)
Miners
{ oohttorp Pipot
X loboccoShop
j) Downtown
muinti
IMM M M Im I
__ Hair Affair Salon
For Men And Women
UNIPERM
Reg 125 Now 1 70 00
Haircut Blowdry Shampoo
with ad 7
902 N Mom 375 2472

Congratulations
i
To the men of
Delta Fan Delta
for receiving the
lntrafratemity Council
Chapter excellence Award
Love, Your Little Sisters
DISCO & TAP
/vll Jl DANCE LESSONS
if ONLY S 14.00 Per Quarter
\ W J[\ Registration This Sun
j jLsQfosi Jan 21 5 00pm At
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\J V* \A 16 NW 10th S*.
(hind Bllmpiet)
Dance mM#
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HELP WANTED
comolort tor north coroilno privoto co-od 0
wook tummor comp, from $330 to 500 wtlft
room, moo It, loundry ony cloon cut con
torvolivo nontmoklng collogo ttudontt
nood apply writo comp p*nowood 1001
clovolond rd miomi booch. fla 33141 (I
22 S-m)
ALTOS
1970 dodgo don vary good transportation
mutt toll now S6OO sum |ordon 377 3464 (I
19-5-g)
*<,!: swogen 74 t#ep thing SI6OO escellent
ru nmg corvd ytNow moped '77 Hercules
900 mi $395 coll 370 2934 1010 nw 36ih
drive (1 -23-5-g)
thorp 74 Motto ng II Zt2 halchbock.
ocohomicol v-6. |ust tuned, now liret et
cellem condition mutt too loaded S2OOO
nogohoble 376 7564 (I 18 2 g)
OO IT VOURSfIf AUTO REPAIR Tool* o
electricity, AM lor $2 50 an hou, of $lO oil
day open 7 doys 375 4030 |1 30-10-g)
PERSONAL
WEDDING INVITATIONS One week delivery
Hundred! of ttylet Cliff Hal! Printing 1103
N Mam 376-9951 (3 9 48 j)

PERSONAL
SKI Vrnwrt Mar 17-24 o*r, hose I, lefts. and
transfert from 290 00 to 221 00 coll Univer
ufy City Trove* 377 4226 (1-29-IS-j)
SAMMIf OF lONOON Units* Nov Styling
*c London Trotned Staff Opon Thun
Ivomng Bpm 716 W Umv 377 2643 (3-9
4S-,)
YfS 1 1% TRUE* The BLACKBIRD hot boon
r*novotod ond it lo**4ii SURER Wo hove
KHip. v>ndwtchos, Quiches, ond soiodt
Foeuby ond Studonf lunch Spoooi Bring
this od for 25c off ony $2 purchase for lunch
Foot wring dorit ond hoothor fhor., ond OS
olwoyt our favorito JANE YM, frir, sot ond
sun svov NO Cover Como soo us for
good Brow, fin# food and Good Timos 92)
W Un.v Avo 375 7706(1 17-6-t)
SOilplono rdot oirplono pilots solo glider
for SBS coll 495 9082 (2 7 20-j)
Mod'fol rosoorrhor noods healthy mole
volunteers 21 35 years of ogo for phot
moeokmotic study 135 por day coll 392 3412
dr Bolor (1-17 5 j)
Europe n 79 Wo re poorer thon you ond
we're going ogom Send $1 to Eothon Press
Bo* 6008 TaHahossee Flondo 32301 for
money SOv mg ideas (I 18 3-|)
gommo sigma sigma congratulotos its new
! s tors gwe n, fisha roberta. dioa,
rmchollo, mitheie. hso. stepbome, mon*ca,
tod', mondith *sobi, debbie cyndee
monica, onn dane ollon; tammy hso
tdo. koron, nto, mary hot
ty, chorna. corol, corlo, cossondro cothy
koron ilene wo aro proud of youttt (1 17
1-1)
if yOu or somoone you know could use o
very versatile large speaker 30 20000 h/ 90
watt rms for $250 con be used for bass
guitor please phone 377 3329 ony time (1
looking for household bargains 9 visit our
two family yard sale'house clearance live
music refreshm e on sw sth ove o 436 sw
3rd st ton 20 21, 27 28- loom to 6pm or
phone 377 3329 (1-19 3 ,)
Student with bod bock wants female for
therapeutic bock massage will pay
reasonable amount call ron ot 377 4541 (I
Come visit the newly remodeled
BLACKBIRD I Fine Food Brew, ond Entertain
men? All Staff and Students bring this od for
25c off any slice Quiche (limit one), or try
our soup, salad, or Sandwiches Thurs eve
John Middleton, and fri & Sat & Sun eve
JANE Yll who just keeps getting better* Br
mg this od for a cheese plate & bottle of
hebraumilch for $5 00 BLACKBIRD 921 W
Univ 375 7706 close to compos (I 23 5-j)
DANCE partner wanted (femole) for weekly
doncmg with tall male of overoge obihty
leave message for Ed at student info
booth, or at 392 1650 disco (MB 2 |)
Christ, Krishna. Moses Buddha,
Bohau'lloh all were perfect Mirrors of God
They ore like teochers in the some school
Baha'i Faith (l-17-l-i)
HIF
us
help
Drugstore volunteers men phone
lines, give emergency drug treat treatment
ment treatment and help people with prob problems
lems problems in many ways
Drugstore volunteer training
I teaches basic counseling skills,
drug overdose treatment, emergen emergency
cy emergency suicide counseling, first aid and
' where to find help for people in
I need.
i Drugstore experience can be used
for class credit in some courses
Drugstore volunteers work three
hours a week helping people.
CALL
378-1588
i
HI CORNER
ORUOSTORE
*w HIT AVI, OAMatVILLI, *L IMPI

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sports.

dk (M -IT fl
\ Mn il v'jv^ ^^ry r L.f jb^H
if ? es
I GATOR HEAVYWEIGHT WRESTLER BRIAN GAFFNEY GRAPPLES WITH GORGI/^oHaO^^^
WORKS OUT ON LEG MACHINE (RIGHT)
I ... after dismai start in 1977, Gaffney placed 12th in nation at NCAA's
Gaffney gains new confidence
and finally becomes a winner

IDy Ralph Dias
I Alligator Staff Writer
Brian Gaffney may be huge and slightly sluggish, but the
UF wrestlers 190-pound frame didnt deter him from
exhibiting an unusual bit of quickness in getting to his feet
I last year.
The Gators were wrestling Auburn University and Gaff-
Iney was on the mat battling with 190-pound Tiger Chris
Gardner. Down 19-11, the Gators needed a win from
Gaffney to avoid a loss. Midway through the second period,
I however, it seemed apparent Auburn was on its wav to
victory.
I Gaffney was losing convincingly. UF wrestling coach
Gary Schneider looked on in disbelief. With the final period
Ijust starting and Gaffney laying face down on the mat,
ISchneider suddenly screamed at Gaffney. Brian if you
(dont get up and wrestle, youre not going to wrestle here
I again.
Gaffney got up but only to lose 4-3. After the match.
(Schneider told Gaffney he was off the first team and would
I remain off it until he proved himself capable of regaining the
(berth.
Somehow, threats have away of getting a message across.
I For Gaffney, the threat stayed in his mind and pushed him to

PP ; '
llvX.w ''
Sfrapefet y&<&3£(&\ J-- %
UF PHYS. ED. PROFESSOR TIM SCOTT PREPARES TO SEND A HANDBALL HOMEWARD
. . 18 area courts await handball enthusiasts

Enthusiasts agree, handball isn't for everyone

emerge from an average wrestler to one of the top wrestlers
in the Southeastern Conference last year.
Gaffney recalled the moment that changed his season.
After the match, Schneider told me if 1 wanted to make
the starting team hed give me another shot against
(University of) Georgia, Gaffney said. And when I
wrestled in Georgia. I pinned the kid.
1 wanted to start. I wanted to wrestle. And I knew I letter
start doing well, Gaffney said.
Gaffney caught on fire and didn't stop smoking until after
the season ended. He won by pin against Georgia. And he
proceeded to win four of his last five matches to finish /the
season at 6-3. His only loss the second part of the season
came when he was disqualified for stalling against
University of Alabamas three-time SEC champ Billy King.
In the SEC tournament, Gaffney finished a surprising
second losing the championship 8-5 against King. To cap
the year off, Gaffney placed 12th at the NCAA tournament
to help lead the Gators to their first Tt>p-20 finish ever.
Gaffney w'as named the teams most improved wrestler
after his comeback season. The year before, Gaffnev
separated his shoulder and sufferer! through an agonizing 2-
5-1 freshman season.
"Brians first year and a half definitely were marginal
here, Schneider said. His first year we had such high

oUigotor, wadnatdoy, tonuary 17. 197 V.

hopes for him and he never produced for us. He never came
through so we had to pull him off the first team right before
theSE£) tournament.
Schneider didn't give up on Gaffney. He knew Gaffney
was not in good physical shape so he turned him over to
assistant coach Tim Worsowicz. Worsowicz got his whip
out.
Tim really worked hard with him, Schneider said. He
really pushed him and on some occasions beat the heck out
of him to get him to go.
Gaffney got going. Rocky would have been proud of him.
Gaffney had to run before and after practice and before
matches. He worked harder in practice when he wanted
to give up Worsowicz made him push harder.
He found out last year just how much work it was going
to take him to get into shape to wrestle, Worsowicz said.
The results were nothing but good. Gaffney finished the
year strong and is continuing his winning wrestling this
season. So far, Gaffney is 6-1 in dual matches as a
heavyweight wrestler.

y Amy Cohen
Alligator Staff Writer
Leaping as high as he can. Reed Cook swings at the
ball and follows through with one last over-head
smash that springs off the wall and whizzes past his
opponent for the game-winning point.
The handball match is over. The victor smiles as he
pulls the glove off his hand and reveals a pounding red
palm that looks like a wrinkled tomato with a heart heartbeat.
beat. heartbeat.
But pain and victory go hand-in-hand in the sport
of handball. For this and other reasons, Cainesville Cainesvillearea
area Cainesvillearea handball players like Cook believe the sport
HEB £
Wl moftiim
nU life
requires only the most devoted athletes.
Devotion and dedication are the keys to the support of
handball. Players must learn how to use both hands there
is no backhand in handball players also must deal with
pain in every match, and the sport requires more skill from
its players than other sports
One of those other sports is racquetball. Admittedly,
Gainesville handball players say the sport is losing
many followers to racquetball. These same athletes.
So# "NsMlksll"
naxtpog*

15



16

>. alligator, wednesdoy, jonuory 17, 1979

ports brtofs

Lady Gators' charity
gives GSU easy win
The Lady Gator basketball team fizzled its own fuse
Monday night against Georgia State University, and the UF
womens foul trouble was the only spark the Lady Panthers
needed to coast to a 91 -68 victory.
UF head coach Cathy Davis said the team's probkim
began early in the game with a one-on-one foul situation.
"For the first 15 minutes, we were trading point for point
with GSU," Davis said. "But then the fexil trouble began ami
we got killed."
UF star center Quien Bonner had three fouls with 18 min minutes
utes minutes left in the evenly matched first half. Davis repeatedly
shuffled Bonner in and out to keep her adrift of foul trouble.
"Quien couldn't change the defense because of her foul
trouble, Davis said. So with four minutes left in the half,
and GSU holding a 14-point lead. I told her to chop down
the lead to 10 points.
"She went in, took only what was given to her, instead of
charging the ball, and cut the score down to a six-point
GSU' lead."
But GSU pullet! awav and the Gators were caught
with their hands tied.
Doreen Lartdulfi anti Kathy McKean led the UF women
with 20 [Hunts apiece.

Tickets for home stand
on sale at ticket office
Student basketball tickets for the Mississippi State
University, University of Alabama and Vanderbilt Universi University
ty University basketball games are to goon sale today at the main ticket
office.
A validated winter quarter fee* card must lie shown in

Handball

continued
from page fifteen
however, sav handball players have much more skill
than racquethall players.
Hacquetb.ill players just lx*al the hell out of the
ball versus the precision placement shots of handball."
Cook, a UF' engineering student said. Handball
players have more physical ability, they must use a lot
more precision.
Despite the requirement of top physical athletes,
more people are presently plaving racquethall than
handball. Mainly because more varieties of people can
play.
I*or example, both young and old can pick up rac racqucthall
qucthall racqucthall relatively easy, along with females, Tim
Scott, a UF physical education-teacher, said.
But the recent surge in racquet ball and drop in
handball d Gainesville handball.
"Ive seen it come and go. Scott said It goes in
cycles. Right now racquethall is the in thing, a lot of
people can play that can't play handball. But there is a
real dedicated group of handball players
Racquethall allows for different ages voting, old
and girls, Scott added. "But liandall is a more ex exclusive
clusive exclusive activity, it demands that those that can't play
pull out.
In his 34 years, Scott says the biggest development in area
handball has l>een the different court constructions.
Originally, Scott says the* only courts were* the* three threewall
wall threewall courts in the Murphre*e* are*a. New ee >urts,
I CAR INSURANCE 1
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Ourratatartlfc* Am* In twm.
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Now 2 Convenient Locations
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oreler to purchase the*se tickets. Each student is allerwed to
pure*hase one* tie*ket for each game. Coat of the* ticket is sl.
There also are a limiteeTnumber of 13 gue*st tickets available
for the three games.
A reminek*r to stuekmts with seasein basketball cards: the
carels must be exchanged fer another gcKxl card for the re*st
of the seasem at the main ticket erffice before the Mississippi
State* game Jan. 20.
Women booters whip
Tampa to stay perfect
The UF womens sex*t*er te*am upped its re*cord to 2-0 (3-0
including exhibition) Saturelay after be*ating the* University
of Tampa in Tampa 3-1.
Hilda Muineis seeired two goals anel De*l>l>ie* Haieluven hael
games,
Adult soccer league
now being organized
An aeiult sexce*r league is lx*ing organized again this vear.
I he* league is open to all adults who wish to participate.
Teams will be* organized and games an* scheduled to start
Jan. 2 I Businesses wishing to sponsor a team are* we*leeme.
For more information call 378-1246 or 373-5571.
UF intramurals plan
arm wrestling tourney
The* UF intranmrals department will hold an arm
wrestling tournament Jan. 26 in the* J. Wayne* Reitz Union
game* room at 5 p in. The* deadline for sign-up is Jan. 19. The*
intranuirals department alse> baellv needs foeithall officials.

however, have* lx*e*n limit in se*ve*ral pl.u-e*s on campus.
Prcsentb tlie*re* are |2 four-wall (adjacent to Schncll
lie*lel) and six more* thm-wall enurts lx*hioei Hume*
Hall.
Along with the cexirts on the* UF campus, Scott explains
that several Gainexville handball enthusiasts have had in ineloeir
eloeir ineloeir enurts built in their homes. In Fact, Steve Schnell,
D.D.S. holds tournaments at his hemx* that attract some of
the* top names in tlx* sport.
Tlx* indoor and four-wall courts aelel a lot more*
strategs to the* game*. Seeitt savs.
"Four-wall is like* enmparing che*ss to che*ckers,
Ceieik saiel. I here* is a lot more speirts strate*gv than
|x>we*r. Alsei, you don't have* to chase* tlx* ball as
much."
One* otlxr development that Seeitt has neiliced is the*
improvement in the* hall. A handball is smaller than a
raee|ue*tball anel has a much thie*ke*r eeve*r. He* savs
that Spalding is prexlueiug a lie*tter ball.
* l hv ball is exx* eif only thre*e* piee*e*s of equipment
that is re*e|uire*el to play the sport. The <>the*r two are* a
|xnr el sne*akc*rs and a pair of gleives.
Thus, the* initial cost of handball is a little less than rac racquetball.
quetball. racquetball. The balls cost abeiut the same per can, but the
gleives cost only abeiut $12.50 a pair, as compared to the
more expensive racxjuets.
Scott is quick to point eiut, heiwever, that teiumament plav
re*quires at least six glove*s.
He alsei said he believes the tournaments are some of the!
motivating facteirs keeping the speirt alive.
According tei Seeitt. handball is neit declining, it just
eloe*s not look as big when ceimpared tei the* great in increase
crease increase in racquethall.

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Full Text

PAGE 1

the independent florida january 17,1979 volume 71, no.63 P,,cdb xpC.xxah sol. br iI ors ~ 4KAL birdf.ed There's clutter in the sky and clutter on the ground as a UF garbage truck empties its refuse. The birds await the arrival of their lunch. Panel: let state foot bill for women's athletics By Amy Fedwr Aligator Staff Writer The state Legislature should help pay the expense of making UF women s athletics programs equal to the men's, a citizens task force recommended in a report released Tuesday. In a report highly critical of the way sports programs are handled at UF, the panel recommends sweeping changes in the organization of the overall women's athletics program and the way it is funded. The report also calls for a radical departure from the current system by urging the I Agislature to pay for the construction and maintenance of all UF Athletic Associationbuilt physical facilities. The recommendations were th w ork ol the six-member UF Athletic Review Task Force composed of prestigious tFloridians appointed by UF President Robert Marston m June. Marston asked the task force to suggest ways UF can effectively meet federal Title IX guidelines, which require, among other mat-i dates, "comparability" betweenien's and women's athletics programs at federally ided universities. The task force criticized the UtF Divisimi of Intercollegiate Athletics for "an absence of written xlicis, a lack of lea rk def med goals and objectives, a lack ofi learns lef ined job responsibilities 0md a lack of coori tion among the staff But the committee's main goal dealt with funding women's athletics, a problem that xcarne a controversy in the summer when Student Government officials battled for monthsoser how -nuchi ones in student fees should help floot the women'% itiletl(,% At issue was $410,000 in student ieshat tiriioisly had been 1( ispit on a studentloan fund until lOWIA gislatir' handedit t i%-cto SG with the stipulation that some of it should help fund the women's program. SG originally allocated $206,011 to the women's programs, but ultimately was overruled when Marston reallocated the student monw and earmarked $280,000 for the Wssome'ns athl'tics program. Still, the issue of how women's athletics wouill be funded in the future was left hanging -prompting Marston to appoint the committee, which concluded the state should pa, for Title IX compliance. Women's Athletics Coolinator Ruth AlexS. Athletics next page Rapists increasingly attack women at home RAPE VICTIM STILL PLAGUED BY MEMORIES Of ATTACK .has moved five times, but the fear remains By Gina Thomas Alligator Staff Writer Sarai ttiought it was tO rats. Her I S -ear old daughtier Beti raised rats, and on other mghits the rodenklhad imadc siimla r fnoe turnatlnoisi's, Arndat 3 am., it liad to b[ t rats again Ie noises contimied. but transformed ino voices. As Sarah (irawsledotit of bed to click on hier datighter, site txp(,(tf-d mnfhmg instead, si' sa iA straige man. Hwas ii tli hall Ii hfbrandislid a kni 'Then sieard scuilng in Bat's room Another man was ii thi ouse. Sarah arid llir idaiightii Il crAp-d' Tis were rat-d inside th ir Gainesvillehome 'The two attackers simply reinoved si tills window fron thie back dooiiaridkir nd pislIed o tht( screen to (-it(r the hiousv. For oma nights afterward, -Sari r-called, "evi) after this t-iaibe i (mvited, Beth Wiid bring ter seping bag into y rcxon arid sleep next toi m bed. Every time we heard a shrub briisli against the hoiswe woke up ftrightened.The -cas of Sarah and Beth, whose real names art withheld here at theic reqiest, is three sears old. Other women who encountered similar, morc recent attacks wer' to() uplset tO diSCuISS tht in)CidlentS. Nevertheless, the ordeal endureds Sarah and Beth is indiative it a icreasmg number of rapes taking placeinside the home after assailants havbrokecin Impolce r cs rmicate. Records show 25 unsolved sextial assaults tiik place from Januar to November i 1977 -,the most recent statist i-s as alable. Of tliosi reports, lb6 victims were attacked inside their house or apartment. I-Al quarter, at least one woman was raped bv a man ho forcefully entered her ho AieAnother awoke to find the hand of a stratige man resting on her bare hip, but the potentialattacker wasscared awa S".Rep. nest poag 'a

PAGE 2

Gainesville 8 Top U.S. court to unravel civil suit By Robert McClure Alligator Staff Writer The anti-war activ ists known asth( Gainesville Vight are scheduled bring arguments m a ciil suit against their former prosecutors to the U.S. Supreme Court. Gainesville Fight mermber John Briggs said Tuesday he thought the three prosecutors should be compiled to travel to Washington for hi' -earing along with a Washington former proseciiter also charged in the suit. Tle high court has agreed to hear arguments abotit whether a federal judge in Washington, D.C. ,can order an FBI agent. a federal judge and a former assistant U.S. attory i to answer the ,tivists' suit in AFTER SIX YEARS, CAMIL HAS SAME MISGIVINGS ..says arrest and trial left anti-war group impotent Washington. The officials claim they are not under the Washington court's jurisdiction. The suit charges that the officials violated the activists' constitutional rights when they proii'-cuted the Eight on anti-riot and con%piracy charges in 1972. The high court will de-ide if a federal judge-can tr defendants from different loales simply because' One Of the defendants or plaintiffs lives in the court's jurisdiction. .I would think the burden is on the defendant. We had to travel all over the state for oir casi, I'd go to Washington to see this thing end," Briggs said. Briggs and seven other members of the Vietnan Veterans Against the War were cleared of thicriminal charges in 1973. The riot and conspiracy charges stemmed from grand jury indictments alleging they planned to incite riots at the 1972 Republican National Convention in Miami Beach. The anti-war group's unnamed, but most outspoken leader was Scott Camil, who still resides in Gainesville. Camil, 32, has been arrested on 17 felony charges carrying a total of 120 years imprisonment and one death penalty as punishment. But in each case Camil was acquitted or the charges were dropped -a fact which he has contended lends support to his charge of government harassment during his anti-war years. Camil could not be reached for comment Tuesday, but has said his biggest misgiving of the 1972-73 arrest and trial was that the Nixon-appointed prosecutor succeeded in preoccupying the Gainesville Eight and two supporters, leaving their protest organization impotent for months. In 1974 the activists filed civil suit against former U.S. Attorney William Stafford, who is now a federal judge in Jacksonville, former assistant U.S. Attorney Stuart Carrouth, Gainesville FBI agent Claude Meadows and former special prosecutor Guy Goodwin. The Gainesville Eight's suit claims the defendants, on behalf of the U.S. government, ran roughshod over the Eight's constitutional rights in trying to obtain convictions. The Eight claim they were setup. Goodwin, a Washington, D.C., resident, was ordered to stand trial by a lower court. The Supreme Court let the lower court's ruling stand. Stafford, Carrouth and Meadows claim their Florida residency negates the lower court's jurisdiction in their cases. The 1974 suit asks for $1.2 million, or $ 150,000 for each of the activists tried and later acquitted. Even if he wins, Briggs said, he will not collect all of the $150,000. "When that case was finally over, we owed about $120,000 in lawyer fees. That was two years of my life, and a lot of expense and pain was taken up on that case," he said. Besides the money, Briggs said, he and the other defendants-turned-plaintiffs are pushing the case to prove a point. "If the American people are willing to let prosecutors set people up like that, well, I .don't know," Briggs said. If the high court rules the officials living in Florida do not have to stand trial in the nation's capital, the Gainesville Eight's lawyers still could file suit in Florida. -h Rape from page one Once a crime of deserted bus depots and darkened streets, the sexual assault is moving indoors into the security and privacy of the home. Rape Victim Advocate worker Joanne DeMark said, "I think it makes the situation harder to cope with, because not only do you have fears about yourself, but you have fears about the security of your home. And Gainesville police Lt. Dick Gerard said the trend may be growing. When Sarah re-awakens the memories of that one January night three years ago, shi becomes hesitant, her voice becomes shaky. "When I saw that man standing right there in my doorway," she said, "I slammed the door and locked it. It's amazing how fast things go through your mind. I thought, 'I have to get out of here and get help, call the police.' But then I got these visual images of them taking off with her (Beth)," Sarah sail. "But I knew there were two, and if one of them was armed, it was logical to assume the other would be armed. I knew there was nothing I could do," Sarah said. "as I turned out, both also had guns." After moments of fear and indecision, Saran opened lt' door. ror thme sent tour hours, she wondered whether she or her daugher would live. There were no agencies three years ago to help women in the same situation as Sarah and Beth cope with sexual assault. The rising number of counseling centers today help and the organizations must deal with the dilemma of rapes in the home. One center working to change attitudes toward rape and the stigmas rape victims Out of 25 unsolved sexual assaults that took place f rom January to November 1977, a total of 16 victims were attacked Inside their house or apartment. suffer is the Rape Victim Advocate program. The agency has been in operation since November 1978. "Florida has some of the most progressive laws pertaining to sexual assault and is making more progress through community agencies," said Sandi Smith of Rape Victim Advocate. But even though Florida is progressive in its attempts to provide communities with information about rape and bring about more individual awareness, the high rate of breaking and entering rapes raises serious questions: How much can a house or apartment he fortified? How easy is it to identify an assaulter who breaks in? Where does a rape victim feel safe if police cannot immediately apprehend the assailant? Thi' men whio raped Sarah and her laughter Beth were arrested in Polk County four weeks later. In the following three years, Sarah and Beth moved five times. "It was really a bad feeling (not knowing where they were). I was af raid of some sort of retaliation," Sarah reflected. Advocate worker DeMark said assaults via break-ins pose the most difficult cases, to solve. 'If someone enters your house while you are sleeping, has a knife to your cheek or a blanket over your head before you realize what has happened, how can you easily identify your attacker?" DeMark said. Reflecting on her experience, Sarah ssid, 'I've never really thought of anyone breaking into my house. When Beth heard the noises, I didn't think it was anything. "I've lived alone before," the 48-year-old school teacher said, "all over the country. And I wasn't afraid. "Now I am." Athletics to fromn page one ander said she "would not be opposed" to the task force recommendation. "I would highly recommend any appropriation through the Legislature that would eliminate the hassles of making the women's athletics program comparable," Alexander said. Alexander said other states sporting top women's athletics program such as Minnesota, have used state mu ,, bring their programs into compliance with federal guidelies. Marston said he would havseveral campus groups study the report before implementing the recommendations. The study recommends that the state should pay for building and maintaining athletics facilities, which historically have been built and maintained by the private Athletic Association. "However, once these facilities are paid for, they become the sole property of the state. It therefore seems more equitable for the state to assume responsibility of constructing and maintaining thcse facilities," the task force said, Rep. Sid Martin, D-Hawthorne, agreed with the recommendation. SCOTT CAMIL arrested on 17 charges With a rising number of rapes occurring inside Gainesville &,Replace all jalousie doors and windows, or secure them A homes, the attorney general's office has several recommenwith heavy mesh or grill work; 11 o rdations to help people sleep more securely. Tips written ,,Install adequate exterior lighting at all vulnerable enAbout in The Sexual Assault booklet, which may be obtained trances to the house; from local law enforcement officials, include: -&.Request identification by all repair and maintenance .-Buy exterior doors of solid wood core construction, personnel; &-Use, high-quality deadbolt locks on all exterior doors, in,List your last name and only first initial on the mailbox cluding the garage; and in the telephone book. Consider adding a "dummy" ra p e -p ro o f .-Have the locks on exterior doors changed when moving name to give the appearance of having roommates; into a new house or apartment; -"Keep doors locked even if you leave foronly a moment; w-Install a peephole viewer with a minimum 180degree .-Keep drapes os blinds drawn when undressing or retirangle in the front disir; ing for the night; -. .Never open the door without f irst check ing who is there. -Have the Crime Prevention Unit of the Gainesville hDo not rely on a chain lock; police visit your home to make a security check. Police will n-Remove operator handles from awning windows, but notify you if there are vulnerable areas in your home or keep nearby in case of f ire; apartment that could be secured. I w

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sllsgator, wednesdayrrbnuory7. 19b79,p White students charge race bias in law program UB8 Jock-Collins alligator Staff Writer The first-year law students filed nervously into their Spessard Holland Law Center classroom for final exams in the fall 1978 property law class taught by Professor Michael Moorhead. Few of them were as prepared as they wanted to be. But because of a special tutoring program, several black students in the class are now off academic probation. And as a result, some white students who took Moorhead's class see the Minority Retention Program. as it is knotswn, s racially biased and unfair. Complaining of "reveric discrimination" in this post-Bakke era, they claini passing grades were virtually assured by the program. "The unfair thing is that a group, I don't care what group, Wis given a considerable advantage in the test-taking,' said Eric Bolves. a white, firsti-ar las student w took Mooirhead'sclass in property lass The program ws as started fall quiarti b liIflat k Anirican Law Students Association ith a $2.000 grant froin the New York-basid Carnegie Fotudation It is reserved for students wAho were admitted to th, lee of Law under its minority admissions guidelines. Fourteen students are participating in the program this quarter, and it apparently is successful. Association President DarryI Rouson said of 14 students admitted last spring under the law school's minority admissions program, t I were on academic probation by fall. But now, he said. only "one or two" are on academic probation. Focusing on first-quarter students, the program provides help sessions with the teacher and older law students. M4tmtrhead said he gave the special-help students regular tests. increasimgl difficult as the quarter wore on. Student i-ritii-s said the tests were so similar to the course's regular tesi that the were unfair ltirhad % said there is no basis to t-riti-iI--canse he is prepared to ffer social help to anioii wh iii-ds it. Other students siipl can't participate ithe Mmorit R-ett-ntion ProgramI. I(-% satl. but if a significant nmiiber if regularAd S-iii-tud lass -i-ililti-Ie t ded help he wml siichd-ulI me-t ssith wAlht-stuv -dr ts it -i itt sisit)n i siii i I sI h whIit stiiidiiits sudn tbtut iork lir ii t( -ir it-u-i. i don't go thriigh thi l-process bemimusmh-whbut b iii aus io madlthurequest.\tuumurhead-.siul One reason for criticism of the program is the way it first was implemented. A list of students' names was posted on a law center bulletin board with instructions for them to meet at a certain time and place for a help session. The notice did not specify the reason for the meeting, helping fuel suspicions on the part of the white students about the reason for the meeting. Since learning of the program, though, some students still are angry. First-year student Victor Buttner described the help sessions as "totally unfair" and said the program should be open "to those with less than a 2.5 or even a 3.0 grade average" instead of just minority admissions students. "It'i for minorities only -not for those who need it." Butttier said of the special help. Butttier's feeliimgs were echoed is several other students, some of whom would not be quoted by name. But Association Presilent Rotison defended the program AM] smd it is necessar ii sm icass. to keep minority sttidents if) chtx& "If Nilspecially admit people. voiu should have something eske to h Ip the u t along.' he said.The gooi udeitwill %4-k heIlp on i 1S 0owI, bUt WV 1144d to ha"V 0Ipportumtie% .nA% lable 1(,r thew othr students Treatment center murder raises doubts By Rick Hirsch Alligator Staff Writer Fi ,emonths after it statv m\-stigat,\(panel citedI ptentially dangerous iwotrkitig i-tiiilitions at a treatment center for ientalk ill prisoners, a 19-vear-old patient is chargedITuesdaav with murdering a staft housekeeper. Walter Thomas Williams. i s i(Mender patient from Miami, was charged with firstdegree murder iii the death it1 I year-ld Sarah L. Cliffin of Hawthorne. Clifltin was found sexually assaulted and stratigled Monday afternonU inder Williams's bed at thc North Florida Evaluation and Treatment Center. According to the police ret mad I following the arrest, Williams made a tapl-ei statement confessing the murder. But Dr. Robert David -iit-t of the 45 center employees who filed a grievances wsitf the state Department of Health and Rehabilitative Services -said it was "to(i earls to tell" if the unsafe cinlitions cited in \1ugt %t(() 1 f t i dbeh k d ,%ith ith i mfi r ii (Ic A threc e ndwb r I I S t imnittf-f in trilh tI-s i I-snits I -tmIpririls h d miiI.II sutisfictrim iii slitsIfm ''ii r ri-Ifiiso m %~ittM(Iulut-iils t t i i t-ui i iiia rults iiitii stritI-i.til TINit -Vrtmiti t IIi f it ui -,tutuf-tr i i If-,el empl(mevs. mchidmg I )r \1 whau-l St Rckton, hen' w the sear a endIrt t ittmit. It i i s n t head)I thigb. hanioralIthsm(Iers 111t sidit th proabi-i-tite p ri ist,'t f 'u misA physical sibus anddee-mtriton titIvIt iit i b\ pat ients \% ilmicrease Da\, id said Tiicsdit man% (f the problems -including charges ()I unrcsponsi\,cadnmstration ba-, been hilk or partial -W e itre ani a I zmg i t ( thte murder ) to determine if there is it relation.'' Da% id sai "But right now we are it little shocked. It was a very tragic thing." Center D director, TIhiimai t %lieda id Williams, it center patient for %ven months after it second-degree murdvir conviction mn \1 im l. \Ais A m ic Il i -l l is o utor\ I m)Ius Iti-(ilmif hIrst-e tll -iinId it. Wi o z SEBAGO (CREPE SOLES) 4706 WOOL SWEATERS AND PANTS zo ASSORTED DRESSY OUTFITS 0O 95 MENS 00 z > a"""' ">"' Oz SPECIAL GROUP OF MERCHANDISE 1/3 OFF <0i zo WOOL PLAID& CORDUROYPANTS (0 LONG SLEEVE FLANNE 2zl 95 KNITS & VELOURS 05 oz ASSORTED SUITS ()z Oc, SPECIAL GROUP OF TIES 50% OFF CAMERAS AT A PRICE YOU'LL LOVE / CCanon The electronic system camera that s changing the course of photography The Best selling compact 35mm cam* Shutter-poniy atomic era in the industry.It comes equipped exposueSLR with the F1.8 lens by Canon and the *'tscredoNytngN weemgt accessory Blash and power wknder are conmpac and easy availabe. Imperial House carries the to use complete line atCanon products. See Accepts all Canon FD Them Todayi lenses ior AE operateon nbeatabteerte Reference rice 451.00 at'a""unbea'b'e p"s*eIMPMRIAL NOUM PROCM 299.97 Mn.-Set. O-mS Wn e y n sw-il Thanks to you, its working I .murdered by mental patient jooxo I ash.m.ne.a.mm.-ma.m.

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4. alligator, wed 17, 1979 wednedlay capsule. Shah flees Iran; O tS 411 citizens rejoice MIRAN, IRAN (UPI) -Weeping opnl. Shah Mohammed Reza Pahlavi, Iran's king of kings fled to Fgypt Tuesday on the first stage of a voyage that may erid iii lifetime exile in the United States. Tens of thotfsais tfit subjects jubilantly celebrated, dancing and siging m Oicstreets. The shah, who has ruled this natit i of 34 million for the past 381 Years swit i atitin ratit po:iwn r ax-awo-m beritl i is fte arrived with his beautiful express. I arah, at the airfo t to leave on what Ih( insisted was a "vacation Within mintites of their departureI tens of thotstiis if lehran s 4.5 million citizens p urd into -the str-ts iin a iiiassivi icelebraititit Arriving In Egypt, Shah Mohammeduicra Pahl.liitid tth empress shielded their tearsatined, red-riitned ies with sunglasses, ais thes received it simpathe-tii welcm from President Anwsar Sadat and all the trappigs of ro ialt fheshah and emnpress-wereigreetled bs Sadat and it, wt sife. Jihan, with more sorrows than chier on tii tiiciison i isis kiiuss itight be the end A t# -ih ine for i fur thir sl houts,if Pahlavi. From his exile In Paris, Ayatollah liihollh Kh"i'ci". the shah's no. I enemy aid aleadr of Ohi Shute il-rgs, bade the shAh's departtire and vowed to return to Iran ws ithi Its to set tip a "Provisional government Khomtiiiii, w l clains millions of followers, r-efuses to ircog i the Bahktiar government. The conservative Moslem leader, ty rpicalk reltictat to ftius on his personal role in Iran's affairs, deied1 itti sit exactly when he would end his I5-year exile. The 78--year-old Shiite Moslem holv manistwnisIftoon t inue his fight against Irii's priesenit civilian gosrnmnt and said the oppsition would iot rest until Shah Moht med li-ia Pahlavi's dyns asts wis finished. lit-c allied fsr s(-(,I fication of thii royal family'swalthfottunes.f(rFlar hitindreds of milhons of dollars. Israeli commandos, gunboats attack Lebanese shoreline TEL-AVIS ISRAE(UPI) -Sialni Israili commandos latided on IAbanons coast at dawn Tuesday and blew up a tusiIsrael sailsirveidis a Palest inianiguerrilla base Ait-uimlamus tug guitiitats she-lldgumerrilla-t Iiitratims in Beirt a Palestiman guerrilla Ihmtat Isaid the house fitonged to a farmer Sadr followers hijack plane; demand release of leader BEIUT. L FBANON (UIt) -i A Middle East Airlines Boe tng 707 flying 73 passengers froin LAbanoi to Jordon was hifit ked t thredisciples of a imyssteriouss missing Moslem leader Tu tsdaN. diverted to Ctprus and then forced back to Thfstati-rti ti-levision sai d th l fith trsr vs r three l bati-s froui thiA l tit l t iope) i rg i atiit, foItlltwirs (J M sIt m tttit) s I st m rI itti tim Ms i SmIr. \ ,Iw -m (Isaipt a red'Aitu i ) t'%( (I ol p.1111)1s last %sanIonIw& hile ( a m I\ IO too I.b1\ ."Il he I rf, (demnamh ( ig thfit-re Iv. sc ()I m I n iSa (Ir Imi ret itri for till-relvas(J thc passengers,' siid aIrbiakncse tele" ism l Florida seeking to keep top students in state schools the Homsc f uther FEduiatinii Comnuiltter i hmlki mbt makig themlii er thts e\ n tt i trefts Whait lissmakersmit\sutitI, plan-mt hchcalled the FIttlf l ,gusliit holms Progriu N it ch t s l gistsoimit kmd(I tsi imhiai rc ct too istaltht i sl-ttid ts whlt decide to cn rn < ips .mi von nswhcrc Law said this financial aid could take the form of a scholarship and simply waive the yearly tuition of about $575 a year, but noted there is some committee sentiment to over room and board expenses also. The projected cost for such a programwould be about $2 million. Former girlfriend testifies Marvin swore to share goods IOS ANGELES (UPI) -Michele Marvin testified Tuesday she was intimate withLee Marvin two weeks after mieting him bitt that she did not move in with the actor until he told her he would never marry again but "what I have is ours and what you have is mine." [hi 46-vear-old singer and dancer told the judge at her $ I million breach of contract suit that for six years after that tii -1964 she provided Marvin with comnpanionship, f rindship, housekeeping and home cixiking. First U.S. woman skipper to captain Coast Guard ship HONOlULU (UPI'-Coast Guard Lt. (G) Beverly Kelley %sill assume command of the 95-foot cutter Cape Newagen April 1, becoming the first woman to skipper a U.S. com" "i"s im-il slop. Kelles. 26, a native of Bonita Springs, Fla., will head a crew of 14 aboard the Newagen, whose home port is Matlaa. Maui. The vessel's principal duties involve search t"'d rescue, law enforcement and pollution control. Kellev as graduated from the University of Miami. She entered the Coast Guard in Februarv. 1976. The ship's crew is ctirrently all male, but since the Coast Giard no longer differentiates between assignments given men and wonien. Kelley may havestie woman crew members d(tring her two-year-command. IIIN I1 E Back To School the lurking germs and bacteria will help prevent illness during the year. In addition, a thorough physical by your doctor will detect any problems your child might have, and possibly prevent more serious health problems later. Parents should instruct September will probably always be synonymous with the beginning of another school year. Despite the predictability of back-to-school, many parents will become harried in the hub-bub and neglect the health of their children. A visit to the family physician should be as much a part of the back-to-school regimen as buying new clothes, notebooks andpencias. The beginning of the school year should sigual parents to have their children inuianized against the on asg ft f bieeecertain to face them in the classroom. Proper pre in for their children each year about health hazards they may encounter--sharing eating utensils will only result in sharing an illness; avoid contact with children who exhibit signs of illness; don't trade eyeglasses, try on another child's clothing, borrow headgear, combs or hairbrushes because of the threat of head lice. If, during the school year, your child has a fever or appears ill, keep him at home to avoid infecting other children. Educate children about safety on the playground to avoid possible injury and be sure the lunch you pack will not harbor food poisoning elements such as foods that spoil easily. Children learn quickly, and should be taught early that good health depends a lot on their good sense. Tis .isoa medical message from fthe Florida Medkel Aaaociation in beWa a/the doctors a4Florida eid as a pubic sericefmafurof dab newspaper. r The rape crisis number Is 377-RAPE -t -Ow 41 il

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Ialligator, wednesday, ionuory 17, 1979, 5 Attorney says UF police blew ticket theft case By Bill DiPeolo Alligator Staff Writer Charging the UF police ''bilew h cast'ad are trying to save face, a defense attorney argued i circuit court Tuesdla' on behalf of a former UF policeiofficer accused of selling a portion of 200 stolen footall tickets. Defense Attorney Jeff Barker argued imhis opening statement that former IF police Of ficer Edward Miles is being accused falsely of selling some of the $2,500 worth of stolen 1977 Ut footbIall tickets. Wheii the trial is scheduled to resium at 9:30 a.m today, UF Athletic Director lis ;raves is expected to testify before the fouirwoman, two-man jury trying the 36-vear old ex-cop. The trial is slated to end today. fin the opening statement of the state prosecutor, Huntley Johnson said Tuesday the prosecution will base the case on testimony of Calvin Smith, who has been granted im. inunity by the state in exchange for his testimony against Miles. The jury also heard testimony Tuesday front two UF police investigative officers, and Ticket Manager Jeremy Foley. Huntley told the jury that although Smith, formerly Miles s brother-in-law, is trying to save his own reputation, Smith's testimony must be taken seriously. "Unfortunately, the state's witness is not a bank president. I wish he was," Huntley told the jury while Smith and the other witnesses waited outside the courtroom. "Calvin Smith' is out for Calvin Smith." Smith -testifying he and Miles "were good friends" while they were brothers-inlaw -told the jury he and Miles split $75 for tickets he sold for the Pittsburgh game. Miles glared at Smith as he left the witness stand, but Smith refused to look in his direction. The charges stem from September 1977 when 200 choice, S0-yard-line seats, reserved for Florida IAgislators, wir( discovered missing by Foley. But because the tickets may have been sold through the widow,' Folev testified, he did not inimediatelv notify UF police until two weeks later, when tickets reserved for the hiittall teai were discovered missing A public announcement was made of the stolentickets. but nothing was released about the players' tickets, testified UF police nvestigator Edward Stevens. lipefully'. this lould lead to the arrest of the ticket thief. UF police officers then staked out section 34, the players' area. and a waited the 'tolen ticket luvers, hoping this woui tad to the arrest of the cidprit The plan fail(il at the Pittsburgh gaie, but two weeks later, five poplt from Jacksonville seated in the nussing section told U l police they bought their tickets fror a man named "Calvin" and described his 1969 Cadillac, Stevens said. Stevens told Hunts under questioni g that he brought Smith to the UF police station and fouil 26 tickets for the Tennessee game hidden in his car, "and they were in direct sequence with the tickets that were stolen. Barker found holes in Sith's testirnoni and hammered on his credibility as a witness. Despite Huntley's claim that Smith was the first to bring up Miles's name in the conversation concerning the immunity agreement, Smith had no recollection of the sequence of events while on the witness stand. UF police officers did not arrest Smith ii. mediately after the Tennessee game Oct. 22 but waited until early November to make thi arrest. Charges were not brought against ,Miles until June, one week after Smith agreed to the immunity arrangement. "This was a precise plotted plan (by UF police) to withhold that information hoping they would trip somebody up," Barker said. Ezra Joshua Mishan, facing charges of molesting four Gainesville women who modeled nude while he sculpted, says he is planning an impromptu display of his nude sculptures Friday. Mishan, a former visiting UF economics professor, is scheduled to stand trial in Gainesville Feb. 19 on three charges of sexI ual battery and one charge of attemptedsexual battery. He was arrested in May on the charges. "I want to show that I am a serious artist," the 61-year-old Mishan said Tuesday. The display is set for the First Sun Art Gallery, 112 SW 34th St, between 4:30 and 6:30 p.m. IFAS RESEARCHER PHILLIP CALLAHAN says flying forms resemble groups of locusts rick mccowley UFOs UF researcher describes objects as -'moth swarms'* By Gina Thomas Aligotor Staff Writer iAk' siimi'timig it i ( ) oI I' ( e suniiers. rf-Im rts ()1 11.%h1m1g. .1111ili d~mic shqp d utbtits bulikmg visli I ridulutshi iivi are iiiiiiiilati g fit' ('S Air lF uric't t iaIs ili 'tutu's ljuimuut. iiiiiiritut llut tit( morc t h.m 40.000 V FO rcpmrks. m t f lhi't ucucurril ii'twen'i l6iS 0, l((k like sw tarim it (Imigra tmg insetiis it a UF PhiliIp C illpt I II'iIederII retsitrchIi rswhIuou works efor F's listitut o"f Fuxl uid Agriculttiril Sciciiis. sauid tih'sde'riptions if h'thus tuwig fstug s.StCrs'' in'simmitar ii a s%%mI it thitis iswhos' ismigs light lilt in Ibc vivtrici ifild it a storm, ''S4)m swims, like Iliv spruce budwormn, ar up to 60 riies king tind 10 tiOles widii f( sit d. Cllhit"n stid swarnis if bliois it liii'usts are cohesive, and f rot a istaniut' ii(% ipitear igar-stapId, wincli would xplaiti sighitings(itftayligfitfliving saucers, TIhe ltcust swarmnsti aind dtiata gather-d iltir reading Frtink Sahsbtiuru's 'Th itah I Io )spiy. ss'iwa (d Callauanto bhv t'sightings w'r'e iects Cill.iiii tistedI lII heor b,tittig 1it' (I i ervot %Ipec iv% (J I mects ImI(if -I %oh age held o2.000 lts a ctii cetimiit'ter All It ip III shades of ite, rd, greiii and orange. Although Callahat' th'or' mia accomia fur the IO sightitiigs. fi sd he i is't ruleimt thc possibility\ of \v isitors f ront mite' %pace. But he flows question the mutltittudt (4 reports. "I think (the pissitbilits if visitors from otier space 31.000 times is ludiirouis Mafbe 10 or 12. Ii said. "I don't thiiik it was crackpots who reported the sightings but pe-rhaps marie )I the UFOs canI 'ex paiied as insects. Callahian said his research is focutisdit two areas: to help explain UFO sightings am to stidy insect migrataim. Callahan's current resear ch has deter mined nseits attraction to itarrow bant Inf rared radiation -radiation given offt Iv caIdle. Iie said with this knowledge ami i further re'sarch, the pissibiht of doiiap. awa' with inseCticidu'1s i as Ix in the ftiture. BIG FAT SALE Winter Clearance SHOES CLOGS HANDBAGS BOOTS 1029 W. University Ave. 10-6 Mon.-Sat. VISA Mishan plans sculpture display Th Sotidaisthl (eit (-r Im Biii'iii'rgi-tii Ami I.%"is Winer!Sprig' 74 Siediiitilf. Professional Bioenergetics Workshop worithWpll1,01 alwth the jpi,r~h0oq.Cofor" dhsoing,C(31 role of the holy ondl boly aomg among others -N bexeplorwi Me -1hos 'h. 1ok,( ,( ood exper-mentai w-Th gro >p oanj sotemi .n of lwori Alexander Lowen, M.D. Sat. Feb. 3 and Sun.Feb. 4 $125 Ed Svasta, M.S.W. Sat. Apr. 7 and Sun. Apr. 8 $80 Robert (later, ED.S. Sat.,June 2 and Sin., June 3 $50 INTRODUC'ToRY WORKSHOPS ^NGH'S^ADN S UoRS Ts 4'ASS Aff we SNT rs oiT o OL i -t o 1a, por pe'sonol'tv, Fat'& nlki ee N ois,0-1Nd o pto m s -1 h b I datoaSmrng how we conceal t (sr eaxrns)0 jr Inoaiv d4lr.w h the oId io'ner"Igc p'.pl. of b 'odyi'oro9 eoths i vpntle-1 nd'.". rgy flow WIN be VSed Robert (;lazer, ED.S. Sat., March I 7 and Sian., March 18 $35 For registration brochures iund more inforrictaonaCo, ntaotRobert Glazer, Route 1. box 16 Alachua. Fl 32615, (904)462-5155 dIfIL2b .WN AN'S) KNOCK A IIOUNI)S KHAKI PANI'S .s1.() PAINTERS PANTS ....$13.() A I I( )(U .FS ) ..I |. 1123 W. University 373-5572

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6. alligator, wednoesday. jafLuoy 17, 1979 Contract bidding reopens for canceled UF project Aigotor Staff Writer After meeting wkithl tw% ) t' fluifs mI Washington. D C Iiesdas, a gis'ier it-ii spikesmai said the iibidit soi hI t1 reopened for a tvar hmv 1pr,)jt < (otrat aw arded to )a t T reset irms I t t0 tiii i' f tii n I hI iii'iti is upe to You are not welcome: 'Ic iIFria C('neroiws trf-toiinudut persual interSiiw, iii glut It i irom 7i to h inItrmi 315 ( i t -1monI tr Nt uden tsAwiskug to IbecInmfcienes Grouping together: Student Mnta Health Ser i-es is induttiig thre' group workshops tiolas in rnm 350 of theI llfirtiars 'Vh' iirkshops are i iterpersut Ial griuswth. iipeii Orto males aiitnd ftialeS trom 10 to I I 30 a in .stress maiageniiit group f r )io 3 to .5 a i .and a soienin miontradionat careers group open inls to w.mien tidas from 2 30 to 4 p m. These groups arr to 6e offered es ers Wednesdas this qua rter You can make lotte yen: Interiews s for the American Graduate School of Interna tional Management are scheduled for todas at the placement center in the lnion Friends: The U.S China Peoples Friend. ship Association is to conduct a Women's Health Movement forum tonight at 7 30 in room 363 of the Union. No corporals required to attend: A mandatory general meeting is to be conducted by the Preprofessional Service Organization at 7 tonight in rooms Cl-4 of the J. Hillis Miller Health Center Cornmunicore to discuss elections. Some funny looking weeds are growIng. ..The Agriculture Council meeting is planned for tonight at 6:30 in McCarty Hall, room 1031. Letin American agriculture: The Student Organization for Latin American Studies and the Center for Latin American Studies are sponsoring the talk onAgricultural Division of Labor by Sex in Peru and Columbia tonight at 8 in Grinter Hall. room 427. 1710 SW 13th St. 37.-24M 2 + 2 SPECIAL Double Crust & 2 FREE Cokes or Domestic Beer REQUEST SPECIAL WHEN ORDERING OPEN: 1 m Sr r, I I I I I I riU" WONcOibPiing Walrs TurchcserOfonYAmp, VALUES )lDeck t4Osoi ~Of ttQSeU Receivers Reg. NOW KR-4070 AM/FM Stereo Receiver $34500 $259.00 KR-3090 AM/FM Stereo Receiver $285.00 $199.00 KR-2090 AM/FM Stereo Receiver $23500 $177.00 Amplifirs KA-7100 Integrated Stereo Amplifiers KA-5700 Integrated Stereo Amplifiers Stereo Tuners KT-7500 AM/FM Stereo Tuner KT-5500 AM/FM Stereo Tuner Turntobles KD.2000 Semi-Automatic Turntable Cassettes KX-20 Cassette Deck KX-M Cassette Deck Speakers LSK-200 2-Way Speaker System LS4078 3-Way Speaker System LS$408B 3-Way Speaker System $345.00 $259.00 $230.00 $19000 $175.00 $154.00 $34000 $259.00 $15800 $129.00 $225-00 $ 174.00 $350.00 $299.00 $135.00 pr $67.50 pr. $450.00 pr. $299.00 pr. $600.00 pr. $399.00 pr. 0 Bassnre-iriliiien 0 9. ar----n ram m m I w1w

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Ialligaor, wednesday. kwwmsy 17, 179' Commission seeks removal of large city billboards igtor Stff Wrier Gainesville city commissioners are seeking ways to condemn and tear down some of the largest advertising billboards in the city. The City Commission Monday night voted to have City Attorney J.T. Frankenberger research the legality of tearing down the largest of 40 signs that have been built iii the last six months. Angered when they learned that the city's planning and development staff had issued the large number of recent permits. commissioners also voted to impose a moratorium on issuing new sign construction permits. While the moratoriin is under way, commissioners s.11d they will begin rewriting the city ordinance iuder which Planning and Dlevelopment Director Norm Bowman prmitted the billboards to be built. Aboit 50 people were led ibv local auto diAer Bob Adams in condemning the sign ordinance and asking that restrictions be lifted. Commissioners ignored Adams and his delegation and] proceeded to do just the opposite. IronicalIs, the commission learned of' the recent rash int sign bililding becais' of Adams's complaint against restrictio s ()i signs. The owrer of G ii'ss ie Auto Mart No. 2 )i North Waldo-Road, Adams faces a fne andi a possible jail term for ref using to take duowi. a IpOrtable lighted adertising sign from the roaf. Adams spoke for Abut is i'immintls against I-strtmic g 'igns ifl the lit. A% Adains stxio at the fihum waitiigI li a repls.Commissioner g.irii fim maler. motion for the bilbomrd moratorium avid the commission debated abomm thw biv ogms lor 20 minutes. ignoring thfcar dealer. Commiissioncrs junior md Mark (Goldstcm Avic .meered when Bowman told the commission about the 40 billboard permits that had been issued in the last six months. "It's feen going on for slome time now and the commission is only finding out alout it by driving down the street. I'm vers tipset at that," Goldstein said. In order to stop construction of the 40 billboards, Coiioner Aaron Greern made a motion at the end of the ineting to try to cance I the permits. -it iliay Ie Issible to condemn the 40 building permits that hav en 191snd. There mayl be some stateI law giving 0s .Iithorits for condeniation,. Grcen sal. j1inior %ui mavb' the citv staff could juist ref und the $St cost ofrth perinit. No action was taken concerning Adaims's request. lIe said he will not remove the sign that has caused such controversy. It onc9 said "This Comtr B.v'( Gon' to War" over the sign ordin111.1 C Architect claims downtown Gainesville has'potential' By Cindy Lasseter Alligator Staff Writer A Philadelphia architect said Tuesday doiiwit II ,aiiesville has "a lot of potential" to bomei a thriving commercial area in harny v with the el v's downtown redevelopment plans. Architect Steven Izenour of the Philadelphia firm of Ven turi and Rauch said his firm is lager to take the jobit as al(it sultant to the City Commission planniing downtown's renaissance. The City Commission Monday (ight voted to hire a ciisultant and instructed the city staff to prepare a request for proposals to be sent to several architecture firms. --' Old be more than happ% to be conlsidercd 1h'r tht(. job.'' izetour siat in a i telephone interview .''I think (.'ss ilr' has a lot of potenitial."' t/enoir s.id the downtowsiii area's biggest assets ar ith tiehonoredd buildings sii.'a Is the Old Post (fhIc .)midt h Star (arage. -Plannrs iin .ibuild on th 'character ofIthe( 1(er bmildhng% and make them a pNosit ivv tihmg I i ik 11'. ;aiinesilie has 'o.ugh i At ieni'e, aged b digs left t h make thidowintswn ara bei'aitifl," Ienor said. Ilenouir came to Gainesville in De mcembr after the Cits Commission invited th, Veitiri aidRaufiar'hife ts fovisit the cits for three dass this sear, to ri's iw fth, (it staff's reidevelopment plas. The Venturi firm decided th1 %Il's tfer, tIenuotr %aid, bxec-mw licdid not believe his firm coi give Gaies'ille .ms ciOtriictive riticism without stidving the city for more than three das. 'Thewofldit hav 9 gotten 111ich out of it b cause we wild have jtst sotindec like a nu.ch of experts just popping Off. It's the kindfit thug that takes more than thres datr."iinour said. Commissioner Mark Goldtein% said $30,0M fhas 9,99 Itloiated to hire an architect to pla downtown redevelop t' HeAis displrasef with the orginial plan for Venturi 11fd Raulch to come for threr days and critique he i'itv staff's past plans aid actions. "I don't think the staff has the organization to make aiy dowt'town plans Thev've had 10 years amt they haven't doie it vet.,' Goldstein suld. 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Juyiy nd Agust when it is pubhd ia-weekly. and dwnng sid' holidays ond exom periods Opwrions empreamid in WM ION000 NVFLOW"B ALLGATOr* i-'ho.oth e'edit osr'. 99. .'w"''ft* .."e .andnot'' of*t' Unisit'y of Fi.,.d. lb. iseip.served by T 011 UWU W PL OW"A AA16A1 Address correspondence so T.MI U .f OM .A AUMAOIC. P0 boa 14257. Uni-ersi Son,1one-i."Florid.32' Subscrpon rose is $20 Wpo yr 1orS S0 per quorlier TM. W UI ..OA -UJE-SIOS -.es o.o ( e.l9. typog ophi tone of oil advirsemients nds o revise or nway a copy itconsiders TIM UOOMNUIP P fOrn.ALLUGATOS.i w it oame d jutntn.9ofpw.'. fo, any odvetententsinvmoing. ypogrophicail error or eironeous inam-on unkma nobire ns.i .n.9 .dve.is.f.,ge9within 0,i(1) dp O. E.m.d.s.9 n.n. corUectSserton of an odvernaeAMenSch.duled to run several b99 A. Over 20,000 people have received successful kidney transplants from people like you. It's the most valuable gift youll1 ever give. 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PAGE 8

8, alligator, wednesda y, 'onuary 17, 1979 ekiltoriaL What a waste Now that inflation has sharpened the senses of every politician intent on cutting waste ii government spending, we've v fo id the perfect place to start: the Florida Department of Law Enforcement, Sound the trumpets, iaestro, the department has art announcement to make: rom Jily to October, the department's Division if Criminal Ilnvestigation (I eottcd 49,1 56 inanhours -60 percent of its total resources -to investigating drug smouggling and itforcing narcotics laws. What a waste. What ain incrndilte squandering of time, money and personnel merely to curb an overwhelming drtig trafiic that cannot be curbed, to enforce (rug laws that exist only to deny personaI freedom. The Department of Law Enforcemint, an umbrella agency with four diisions,boasts a budget of $15.9 million this vear. The Dii sion of Criminal Investigation operates currentkl on a $6.4 million hank account. But the oonev is nowhere near enough to succeed in stamping out marijuana smuggling -the expansive Florida coastline, ever-peaking dcmand and exhorbitant profits see to that quite niCely. Itn Hawaii, ircidentally, pot smuggling has surpassed the state's No. I export, sugar, in profit. The same goes for Colombia and its former No. I export, coffee. A mammoth $5 billion worth of marijuana -at wholesale prices -funnels through South Florida each year, and the feds admit they capture oniy about 10 percent of the flow. 'There is immense profit to be iade in Gainesville, too -the Gainesville Narijuana Dealers Association, mythical or not, has cornered the ma rket on high-grade sinsemilla pot that sells for as high as $ 140 an ounce. In these times of upward-spiraling inflation and the plunging American dollar, a new, growing source of revenue would be ideal -and marijuana, for starters, is the perfect market. Rolling Stone estimates the national paraphernalia industry amasses between $ 150 million and $250 million annually. Floridians purchase 22,000 packets of rolling pa pers every week. And the state of Florida is missing out on it all. The state could greatly enhance its coffers by legalizing -or decriminalizing -pot and taxing the hell out of it and its supplements. But the backwoods boys in the Legislature would rather spend money than make it: $3 million was shelled out in 1975, by state estimates, for the housing and feeding of just 72 persons convicted of pot charges; $156,000 a year is spent on supervising pot smokers on probation; and one should not forget the 60 percent of the Division of Criminal Investigation's total resources that was wasted from July to October. When will they learn? The American Medical Association, the American Bar Association and President Carter have called for full pot decriminalization. Will the Florida Legislature? Ever? Smoking marijuana is not a crime anymore. More than 30 million Americans have tried it; more than 13 million smoke pot regularly. State Sen Jack Cordon, the potty practitioner's protagonist, should look into the division's enforcement priorities. Sens. Pete 9kinner and Buddy MacKay should join Gordon in has "decrim drive" -and stop the waste. 44 (Attf-(~L Mishan quote not "witty;" trial may affect all UF Editor: The\t lgair erisition-il/il irti( I( -b Bill I)iPiolo fni r 'sliist w h"i'i appir';r irit he J.11. J. 12 isso ()IThe Vtgator\ s ni insiiislt itt-i-r sutitent .it UF. idvn regpirls thin, the gal it iadign 1 he(l %1111\ad ilan lg als charg< fuor s Ait hii .ill-g(-i Ito ha'don IttItiv rge ut-are r t ti c t et It(-5wii t\,( -n1 ftiiuilguilt% stuit u()I1 breaking the tslin, t it tiiiiiliatinig .1d rightuning i tniber (I women stiuitents. ofit trading the ticheri-sudent indl artist-mitlrI relitionships, and of bringing a great deil of shame and criticism to the C:)-llege of Business Administration and to U That the Alligator should consciously allow itself to be used as a vehicle for this man to denigrate the young women who had the courage to press charges against him is disgusting. Mishan is certainly entitled to make statements, a anwator Denns Kneale Edtor Meissaclla"s MonogitngEditor PatrrickCoinNews Edior Robert Rivas News Editor Don Moors Assistant News Editor Kit Cartson Wire Editor Amy Yongbload Opinions Editor Mark Johnson inside Editor Poul C Smith Sports Editor Michael Konren Photo Editor Lee Herring Layout Editor Jon Wood Layout Editor C E Barber Geneol Manager Frronk Levy Advertising Director Mrs Evelyn Best Administrator Anne Simpson Bookkeeper Guy Hudspeth Operations Manager Amy Dryden Interim Production Supervisor Donald Holbrook Production Supervisor Elaine Gray Advertising Assistant Kotrina Hunt Classified Manager Lyle Ask Credit Manager Harry Montevideo Accountant Published by Campus Cointvikationls. li.c P o0box 14257 University Station. Gainesville. Florida Office behind the College inn, 172B West University Ave Classified Advertising 376-4446, Rtol Display Advertising: 376-4482; Newsroom: 376-458, Production 373-9926; Businoss Office. 3764446 but the Alligator is under no obligation to print them, especially abusive ones. Hopefully, if this case ever finally comes to trial, The Alligator will decide to report it simply and factually without the degrading quotes which seem to constitute Mishan's idea of responsible journalism. Stephen Kerber April McKenzie Christine Nasie Florida State Museum Editor's note: The Alligator stands by Its story. When Ezra Miehan culled with a proered etutement in rebu ttel to public statement mud uagIet hm. it was The Alligator's responsbility to print the In. foreeation -not lude the statement end determine whether it was worthy of publication. Tigert officials don't rule students Editor: The cancellation of our Halloween Ball by Vice President for Student Affairs Art Sandeen is a symptom of UF's major .problem. The students have lost their voice in UF government. UF is US andwe students are not the bunch of bureaucrats in Tigert Hall. They are here to serve us, not to rule us. But until we speak up, we will remain Presidents Marston's subjects at his mercy. Gary Antoneilis 2UF Letters policy The Alligator welcoes opinion columns and letters to the editor. All manuscripts must bet Typed, double-spaced, on a O-character line. Signed by the author. Names may he withheld rum publication if the writer circles his or her name, writes "withhold name" by the signature and provides a good reason for withholding the name. Send column. and letters to -Alligator Opinions Fditor, Box 14257, Gainesville, 32601," or drop them by The Alligator, 1728 West Univemity Ave. Letters not typed double ,paced on a 6O-pe-ine cauot he printed. Agro s opunfont E I (70 A*A ope

PAGE 9

alligator, wednesday january 17, 1979, 9 Russian secret tosses SALT over shoulder Secretary of Defense Harold Brown shook his head if) disbelief as he listened to a report on the latest Russian military developments by the Joint Chiefs of Staff. "Armadillos," he said. "What in hell are the Russians gomug to do with armadillos?" "Well sir," replied the Army general. "A Harvard pro fessor believes that through the use of genetic manipulation armadillos can be developed to carry nuclear warheads. If so, this could be a serious threat to our national security." "How are bomb-carrying armadillos going to threaten us?" Brown asked. "We all know the burrowing capabilities of the ar iiadillo," the General said. "Equipped with nuclear war heads, a super breed of armadillos could burrow under our hardened missile silos and then be detonated li),i remote con t rol.'' "We feel," the general continued, "that the Russians mas believe the combination of a armadillo first-strike with thi-ir civil defense system may give them the capability of winning a nuclear war." "Just how do the Russians plan on delivering thew' simper armadillos?" Brown asked. "Sir," the Navy admiral interrupted. "There is evidence that the Russians have been conducting a series of ALC tists from nuclear submarines.' "ALC?"asked Brown. "Armadillo Landing Craft, sir. In the event of an international crisis, the armadillos would be launched from the Pacific Coast. Through sensor instruments, the armadillos would be directed to the missile sites and possibly even California fault lines, destroying the entire West Coast with 1mikel bmus earthquakes." "If the crisis died dowi," the admiral conitinued. ti armadillos would he remotely disarmed and directed towards major highways. After a few lig semis ra over them, the evi(dli(ce woni x-id be dIstroved aid the Rissiais would txin the cIear." "In addition to the A C'. Mr. Brow,"i the Air Force general aid, "We fear the Russiaismay developing a multiple armadillocapacity for their missiles.-, Brown had heard enough. "Dont vou gentlemen imik that this is all i little far fetched?" he asked the somber looking group of officers in front of him. "Well mnavbe, sir," the Army general replied, "but the tussians iay spending around two billion dollars a year in the proijct. "We feel that we should spend at least half of that on our own armadillo technology or we may be facing a serious armadillo gap in the future." "The last thing our economy needs is an escalating armadillo race with the Russians," Brown replied. 'We should at least develop some form of anti-armadillo warfare system." the general said. "I believe the proper way to handle this," Brown answered "is to let the Russians know we're wise to what's going on and try to bring them to the bargaining table to begin negotiationsion Strategic Armadillos Limitation Talks.'Black' news -does it exist Paper covers all groups Editor: I agree with Al Heinermann's statement that there is no black news. Of course not, as there is not any white, German, Irish or Eskimo news. But, in fact, there is news that is more noteworthy to blacks, just as there are news stories which are more interesting to the Irish, Germans and Eskimos. Al Heinermann, you missed the point of the editor's opinion. It seems to me that he was trying to point out that often newspapers such as The Alligator stick to the mainstream news stories and we all know that the mainstream does not include blacks and other minorities. I commend Dennis Kneale for his article and he is right. The Alligator is not meant to be a black publication, but it should print news of special interest to all groupsespecially mi'iorities whom are often underrepresented in all areas. In this regard The Atligatoris a'tting it dailv papers. One recent example,T that JulianBond was the to he nominated for the is not so, Fredrick Dougl been nominated in New convention of the Fqual fact has eluded history r Also James W. Fordit w U.S. Communist party f Now, this is not black ne Furthermore, Al Hei tone of your article is in point the editor attempt( your frame of mind wou in the era of the confed find so praiseworthy. As an aspiring profess directly connected with nalism, it appears to nw to the problem Mr. Ki pointed out. 'a'If apartfrnoiiothe"r the Alligatornrinted r Blacks need first black ihistIor relevant stories vice-preidenc, this lass wis first, having Editor: On Jan. I5. The Alligator printedl York in 1872 at the in editor's notes column n ithow it "sadly Rights Iague. This lacks th input front the perspective of black more often than not students, black faculty and black staff. This is nominated by the has been-11 a fact among the black community ior thi piist in 1432. for ears. tiowever, the question that imws .mdiahly comes to my mind is. "Who vrmiiann old bu the carss" idicative of the very Certainls not the worker who accelerated ed to make. Besides, the UF truck in an effort to run me over. Nor Id appear to fit well the worker who actually hit a black student lerate uniforms vou with a UF truck. After all, they are just doing their job, and they believe that keeping the ional, directly or in. campus beautiful involves the elimination of the field of jour. the black populace. that you contribute Most definitely not the Kappa Alphas who neale so eloquently leem it necessary to humorously remind us of the centuries of wage free labor our forefathers were forced to give to strengthen Shirley E. Hendlev a country that does not even recognize their 71 F existence. The KAs flaunt their Confederate iiiici" with the pride of a dead peacock. This )4impiius perished procession is news. Most importantly, not the UF administratii. The administrators are so far out in left field that you must send them a telegram in order for them to come home. They, being white, are beginning to feel threatened by the so-called equal opportunities. They feel that if they do not stop black men from advancing, and believe me, they are employing every distasteful tactic possible the black man will one day rule his country. Surely, we cannot have that. And The Alligator may never publish a picture of a black scientist. But again I ask, "Who cares?" As a black man I care. I care because I do not want my sons and daughters to feel like they are still fighting for the freedom supposedly granted more than a hundred years ago. I care because black people are very much a part of this university, city, state and country. We need to know what is relevant to us, and The Alligator is the source of communication for the UF population. Nathan Robinson Problems with semester switch mainly in status quo Editor: I strongly support The Alligator's position recommending a change from a system of quarters to one of semesters. My first two years of undergraduate work were spent attending a northern college which changed from quarters to semesters during my second year of studies. Like many students who were comfortable with the quarter system, I also harbored very negative feelings toward this change. My reasons included all those cited by opponents of such a change at UF -i.e. less flexibility in course scheduling, less chance to improve one's grade point average, a shorter time to endure a difficult course, etc. However, most of this criticism was a rationalization for a more basic resistance to a change in the system: semesters would deviate from a familiar status quo. When the school actually changed to semesters my reactions remained mixed. Students' academic metabolisms continued to function n a 10-week cycle in the beginning; in the eleventh week everyone was ready for the end of the session and there were still four more weeks of clas1r&t! My experience with semnters is that teachers do not simply add extra papers and reading assignments in >rder to transform 10 crammed weeks into 15 crammed weeks. On the contrary, professors, like students, enjoyed the much more relaxed tempo of a longer semester while at the same time feeling more at ease to spend class time covering course materials more thoroughly. In transferring to UF in January of 1977, 1 was again faced with the frustrating, frantic pace of the quarter system. Quarters race a student through far' too great a quantity of materials in far too short a time. Quality education gets lost in struggle simply to "get through." In conclusion, I will say there exist valid criticisms of the semester system which have been more than adequately explicated in other editorials. My contention is that most students opposing a change to semesters do so simply out of a "comfortabiness" with the status quo and outright fear of the unknown. I have been involved with this issue for many years from all sides, holding all major points of view. I support the change to a semester system as a move toward a more sound academic program and a more enjoyable college experience. I also challenge the faculty, administrators and students of UF to explore their true motives for opposing this change. Such achange is a positive step toward quality education at UF. Kathleen LaCamera 41S

PAGE 10

M. alligkator, wednesday, january 17, 1979 Graham to choosestudent regent By Robert McClure Alligator Staff Writer Five UF nominees for the student post on the Board of Regents are expected to go to the governor's office txliav anid speculation that the governor will choose a white female from UF or Florida State Universit' The five UF nominees include twoi stbititutions for students previously nominated, but t 0o n longer w III b stIidents when t'he post is filled. The two new nominees ire taul Carriras, Stiiilent Government gadfly and former viir' presidential candidate., and Mary Lynn Desjarlais, SG communit' liasion Former Student Senate President Rick Sharp has graduated and former Student ien. Nanv Medford expits to graduate before Go,. Bob Graham ch( seslstiiudent later this month to replace outgoing Les NfillerAthei of South Florida. Last quarter's five nominations were made irider the il i pression that former Gov. licubin Aske Aw wmid fill the %1)(t before he left office. Askew, however, deIcided to leave the decision to Graham. UF Chief student lobbyist Marshall Geisser is expected to deliver letters of recommendation to the governor's office Iby 8 a.m. today. Tallahassee sources said the governor is expected to pick a white female from UF or FSU, although they refused to say where the information originated. Regent Miller is the first student Regent to receive voting rights on the board, whiit governs the State Universits System. The f ive nominees, according ti St tiudti Boidy President Ter' r-Brown, a re Ca r reras, Il)isjarlais. Julie Jel. I arl I Troi i .a(n Rob Well. A I I t i i t iii wtti )is tre (I tic al t tc 1'()Vf'rnor Oil ice I Fr idis A sir i iomg cninittee I, 'xtpe(t( a(I)t() pass aillg it'ii em. M datI h) the governor b the endI of next weeIk jett ad DeINSjarhL1s arv white icnmalf-S STUDENt RtGENT NOMINEE RAUL CARRERAS ...one of five from UF up for post In WI@If Faculty members oppose student voice on senate By John Tucker A tgator Writer A move to give students a voting voice on the University Senate is receivingstiff opposition from some fault members, a Student governmentt Cabinet member has charged Joanne Rosenbluth, student director of academic affairs, said she and other stiden s have been working since August ian amendment to the senate constitution giving voting rights to 10 student members. The proposed amendment, however, has been bottled tip for months in committees. '"The amendment is suppostily before tie steering committee, but we can't find out when they meet," Rosenbluth said. "This is the way they stalled us fall quarter." Bosenibluth said the proposed amendment niist go to th constitut ion committee, wherc it is written lip and then go back to thei lstiering committee, head by Byron Spangler, a professor in College of Engineering. Th steering committee gives final approval before ti i i amendment goes l iti -senate floor for a vote. A similar amendment was proposed tw years ago, but was voted down when it gotI () the senate floor. Rosenbluth also charged that senate secretaries have been uncooperative in supplying her with senate membership lists. "I asked one senate secretary in Tigert for a list of members on the steering committee, and she told me ste couldn't give ilt that information, Rosenbiutith said. I then asked fiir a list it senate membership roils and she said she didn't have that either" Of the 450 members who inake up the senate, Rosenbluth said that unly 50 or 60 at tended most meetings. Ollsiitih Said Spagler "told mi-re that wa% (qppos'ed to the Student %'(t(because he felt 10 students would carr tix much 1) ( w c r, I t s n i t () t r f a u I t i f IiIcuI lt imemibersdi't attIend n i t i Inigs'." Student Bidy President Terry Brown said 10 student votes on thc m-nate would riot eIirb faculty power, ''Whenit major issue is coming up, attendance at senate meetings is usually pretty gio1," Brown said. "A student vote would be it great smvibolic iiportance." Brown sa id three or four students nows are repreenting student interests on the situate as sion-voting members. V ice-President fr A caldemttic Affairs Robert Bryana iinf luential senate member said ie supported "the concept" of giving siuting rights to several students but that he had iot seen atn itispecific amendment. I tki l iked to Jianne several Imonths agoi atnd told her I supported her idea," Bryan said. Both Bryan and Spangler denied Rosenbluth's charges of senate stalling. "I haven't given at thought to the iaminidment yet," Spangler said. "I ami not sure how anyone in the senate will respond to it. but I will take whatever recomimuiedation is given by the constitution committee." Spangler said he was uncertain as to how Inno t ~e nverai t County votes to back group for truancy plan A less-thiiin-coiimplete Alachua Count Commission voted Tuesdav to sponsor a Gainesville groutip applying for itaharl $184400 federal grant to begin account triiancy program. While Coins Administrator Friank Splic aind comiiissioners Perry McGriff Jr. and Jack Durrance were in Tallahassee attendingii a Association of County Coitnissioners meeting, the remaining three commuissioners voted to sponsor Robert Ia', director of Crest Services Inc., for his grant application to the federal ta Enforcement Assistance Administration. Iae now can apply for the federal grant of $18.384 for the Truancy Outreach Program, which would provide family and individual counseling for juveniles who constantly miss school. The commissioners also voted to sell the county's old computer system to ia firm in Dallas for about $ 157,000. UP student senators approve( a $3.,uuu request for a Black History Month with only one negative vote Tuesday night. Black Stident Union President Peter Burtiett presented the request and answered senators questiuis aboutthe program. Comedian-activist Dick Gregory is scheduled t i appear at University Aiiditoiui tFeb. 18 as part of the obser"It makes you more willing to put forth our full effort when you see this kind of cooperation. BSU has made the turn in reaching other races of people," Burnett said. Twenty-seven black UF organizations are expected to participate in the month-long program. Local women's center schedules open house The Gainesville Women's Health Center has scheduled an open house for Jan. 27 to acquaint UF students with new procedures regarding vasectomies, abortions and gynecological care. Clinic Coordinator Pat Paul said the open house will focus on the vasectomy program, which the clinic began in November. "We will offer counseling, especially in the vasectomy area, but also in abortion, pregnancy testing and gynecological care," Paul said. "Our emphasis is on self help." The open house should begin at I p.m. Students wishing to enroll in a new UF summer study program in Innsbruck, Austria, should contact UF history Professor Julian Pleasants or UF's International Studies and Programs Director Pat Rambo. Pleasant's office is in room 485 of Little flall, 392-1561, and Rambo's office is in room 186 of Grinter Hall, 392-4908. BEEF TACO WITH THE PURCHASE OF 1 DEEP DISH PIZZA 12" DEEP DISH PIZZA-ONLY $2.59 (FEEDS 2-4) WE MAKE'EM YOU BAKE'EM PIZZA -TACO SHOP 3 9 Sun 1;1 W. University 3 11 Wed.Thurs. Closed Mon & Tues 3 12Fri. St student senators UK request for BSU funds Students can enroll for UF study abroad So says the VA. 6 TREASJR CHEST ooyo---...u.

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OWii eiHidie .alligator, wednesday, january 17, 1979, 11 -&---F MicIEADEkooreN Si CID: DATII Y1DEIsWIION By Cindy Spence Alligator Staff Writer The words form an incessant chorus in Bo's head "I just don't love you any more. I think it's best that we break up It's been more than a month since Sheila broke up rith him. but instead of getting better the loneliness has only gotten worse. His whole life has gone awry. His grades havr dropped, his parents are angry and his friends hace stopped initing him out. All his energy is concentrated on his pain as he sits alone on his bed, staring at the walls and the ceiling as they bouncer his rejection back at him. Running into Sheila today on campus, seeing her smile and laugh with her friends, has sharpened his feelings of rejection into an unbearable pain. He takes the gun from the drawer and places it on the bedside table. The thought of ending it all has been tugging at his mind for wgeks. The pain of seeing Sheila today makes that thought into an all-too-real possibility. The gun sits beside the telephone on the table, forcing him to make a choice. He reaches out for the telephone and dials the Suicide and Crisis Intervention Center. Though Bob is not a real person, his story is typical of people who attempt suicide, according to volunteers at the crisis center. The names can be changed and the reasons for attempting suicide will vary, but loneliness, pain and isolation are almost always factors in the decision to die. Depression seems to be a common ailment of the young during the college years -supposedly "the best years of your life." At high school age 30 percent of suicides are among dropouts. During college, however, more students than non-students take their lives, with the rate increasing with the prestige of the college. The "Happy Days" attitude toward college seemed to dissipate in the '60s when, amid the turbulence and moral revolution, researchers began to notice a rash of depression spreading among college youth. That depression has led to an epidemic of suicides. In the 15 to 24 age group suicide is now the third leading cause of death. Between 1968 and 1976. the suicide rate in the 20 to 24 age group more than doubled, according to the Mortality Branch of the National Center for Health Statistics. Officially, 5,000 young people a year commit suicide. But researchers feel if the "disguised suicides" were reported, the number of young people who die by decision would reach about 10,000. Researchers say that many auto accidents are suicides in 3li.g im .Doch)ctors (3Jtel3 I3 Ib3 he ist, ()( Icat 3 I( acctIde tl I I t ) lessen thc grit(f If Ihe i < 3 ftim's fam3 The3 sfplanation 3r Ihe vs(ala rit f 1:3 sm11cf 3sc ..3 dfifit3 I <> %% wh13 i Soc I(1()f t s3 fI \ th' su i r.tre has rs d f romil thi brvakdon i i f the -a n 3f 313'thc l(hurch ,s aitrces I stabilik for 333333g f33 P %\ '3 ch' tri'ts' f behl smcid is CAUSd b1 I forcing kidi to gro3 f)up t3 lIfst. Mwralms blni. promise i 3 w 3hA ill Iib-ra .I % 1Man3ifptirita 33rigii( II. PIii3 I lb\ I 1endersmi a %()hmi t ier wA itI 3t r-cris cente .3Id the mnajorit 31 fcaills for help received at the center are ca.msedI 1 problems% with "intcrrelati3mships, breaking li11 with a blyfriend or girlfriend, findling a niche ii 3 i3 t\ or grades." Sociologists say the suicide rate has resulted from the breakdown of the home and the church. Psychiatrists say kids are growing up too fast. Moralists blame promiscuity while liberals blame puritan rigidity. "Sometimes it's frustrating when you can't concentrate arnd all you can think about is that you're about to fail and you see it all slipping by you," Henderson said. "Another problem today is that students are tit secure. Then when they go out into the real world and have to find for thermselves they have problems." The middle class has become the major breeding ground for suicidally depressed people, researchers say. Middle class over-protection and self-indulgence are the largest contributing factors in the inability of middle class youth to cope with living. But while the why of suicide remains a matter of opinion, people concerned with the problem agree that an attempt at suicide is a cry for help. Suicide attempts outnumber actual suicides 50 to I Although women attempt suicide three times as often as men, the actual rate of suicide among men Is four times higher than among women. Men apparently are more adept at killing themselves. Statistics indicate Ibat, like Bob, men tend to use more violent methods of self-destruction, such as hanging or shooting, while women tend to use more passive methods, such as overdoses of medication or slit wrists. Eight of 10 who voice suicidal threats eventually attempt suicide and 75 percent of those who commit suicide give repeated warning. Cnnmetinis tht(-keN .-' Henderson %aid. "No matter ho"w small the problem might setiti to,iI'% it's a big thing to tiIper%(s3)I rik s'(sre r( 'alingi '13333 haY i-ve t r-lite i iii (I\ 3I( I3 Ia isi s 33331Ilit' be x r-' pti vt 3 ''Som 3etime people are si-rs' s ig .nd 3 s-b in the IlkiddI(i3I 331 .f Siicide' attmtfIf. '3331.Y01 3,' h it' -be perceptive anl pull it out of theim an(I be read tpcs t k 3333p3 ii t(hint' thev (Irop. Marshall IKindson .aIilot-her s ount-er ss ilthte crisis -enter, I.i i i must siiicidal I ople arte de lts ratt'I s one INt ic(3d inst'cU in probably just need somone to talk to. "TF-heraps w313on't 1h overtr thli ne we listen Knudson said. "When oiu think about it popleldon't listen to 333 all tthat muich and iisualls' it hurts vo. Sounetlimes we Just helf\i s listing. "Some people are just terriblv lonely andt after lil that wearsa' thei to te point where they consider life to be it waste and want to lie. We try to help them explore their Option%' Th' feelings of suicilt iUsually passes within 48 hours, but unfortunatt Is with suicide there is no option." Mon' Protestants commit suicide than Jews or Catholics. lii tfit' North more blacks kill themselves, in the South more whites. Highest suicide rates are in April, second-highest during the two weeks before Christmas. And Monday and Friday are the lays of the week most often chosen for suicile. The suicide rate for blacks has caught up with the suicide rate for whites becauseof increasing competitive pressures for high grades or good jobs, researchers say. The increases in the suicide rate among youth have focused a recent debate on the danger posed by schools. Researchers are concerned that the competitive atmosphere created by schools causes too many young people to fall short of goals. A succession of failures leads tragically to suicide. Gainesville, however, is rich in resources for troubled people. The crisis center staffs a 24-hour hotline. For UF students there is the Psychological and Vocational Counseling Center in Little Hall and a Mental Health Section at the Infirmary. The Corner Drug Store, 1128 SW First Ave., can help with drug problems and Pleasant House, 24 SW Seventh St., is available for help with alcohol-related problems. But troubled people must "want to help themselves and search within themselves," Henderson said. "As a volunteer, there's only so much I can do. If you try and do everything in your power, what else can you do? After all it's that person's life and it's in their hands till the end. Ar

PAGE 12

12. alligaor, wednesday, january 17, 1979 A.we Hippodrome hits, misses with Fugard By Jin enneft Alligator Critic Now playing at the Hlippodrome Theatre If you are interested mi lexxritrig tflit ttiwerful expressioosif South African playwright Athol Fiigard, thf iippid roii. Theiatri' has the itiswir ii situ.m Director Margar't tfachus has fashioned JI interesting, if i iriii n. interpretation of Fugard's The Island mid Statemtents Made After an Arrest t'nder the I rrimoralitiy Act for our perusal. Your journis iiit Ithe world of Athol Ftigard begins with The Island It's the stor of two black rn native Africans -who havei ben incarco-rated i i island prisoti for crimes against th state. Thogh their stptif it rimes a reirrel-vat t the continuity of the work, siffici it to sa that their dfetds were emned hemoits governnitit officials. So much so that oiie man was sentiiced to 10 yeavr%, Ithe other to Ilife. Though injustice Is a teiporal issii mithist couitrv, the situation here cannot compare to the social atrocitii pepeetrated in AfrliA today Fretdom of t pttch, social iobilits and self-deterinat mn are just precious dreams to people of racially embroiled lnds Fddi Billupsllt d Jonathan Peck are absolutely stunni g is the two prisoners, John and Winstoti, isptctivel ITheI pisst'ss all of the sensitivity, ttiring and pretnce that is needed to successfully coax out tiltintricate nuances ()f pathos cti ined with i this Fugard draia. You will laugh 0lit teir preparation( I Antigone for an inmate variety show. You will crv at their despair and longing for their lives oil the mnainland. And you will think abiut what "civiized'' itei ihath wrought on their fellow ie. i These two gifted actors shitre the e periences of oppressed everymien. The two are cell mates and sol mates. They help each other to survive their dailv ration f hell. You would indeed ie fortunate if vou artable to witness the iagic that these two lIte pefortners generate. I'm afraid vtu'll feel a little less fortutiate after experieticing the weak perforiances offered in the second half of this double bill -Statements. Statements is Fugard's content on the SOCIidtabooassociate with ai iiterraciial Allir. M i' Meks 1 E1,i% irrol Phil.rnii lack m and school prminipal Mar-S I h i s( It ort ra .I, Fr I ,i ( )i il m rt I \white wA( miaI iIt(rs cmit'ifdem JIihe. ,cfor Phih r sfi.Becisefthimt teIinas turc (i thir relationship, tit's must itet i the ss ,i t m ghtt ii a r r to prOfe s' th ir li Bit fhlir Fden% smt is shattered Ths art' disco itredid broht iftnp it charge's under the imtorairts'act. Fugard xplor the miter conf litsand ustass tht ut twsh ivers tutiman creatirt's fl.iTh' playwsright also eea how col, im.ifpersonial and blin t it'government is in its sanctioing of legislated moralist. Unifortmnateky, Hauisch (()I i of Hip. pndtirome's founding umbers and artistic co--irectors) and Meeks are' unsuccessful it providing the progi r cointerwueight to keep It' 'evenmItig's theatrical snesaw bialait'nced. Where The Island is major league tht'ater, Statemrrints is embarrassig bush league. Burt Talor's ministile part as police detective sergeant, J. duPreeti showed the i ti glitti er of talent Perhaps fausch aiNd Meeks were inervoius mi tihehanodling of their nid it .Though ()tit CIi M Ii I speculate suchit a ipossilbilit. fit'truth of t matter is that their performances were badly marred. JONATHAN PECK AND EDDIE BILLUPS *,.staging Antigone' for fellow prisoners Theli two hi trouble in voice projection mid iii their ability if creating credible characters. It w1s ttitiblviussthat the-were "actmg." TIhvir 1poxr arnsdidn't hell) imih 'ither. ln i fr the laitue I iStatements must ifso o to director Bachus, who stifled her actors' 'ruiformance through p ixir blocking. Th two loves should have moved about if it uch mrn fluidit and carefully designed choretgrapthv. Their statements C tld have bii enhaticed into a itautifully totiching dice --true art in motion. Instead, they came across with crippled titist'ttsical flopprittg. It just made Fugard link Iike t hack. Howard J. Hamnagli Jr.'s lights and the set (designed in a communal effort by t i Iipfruudrome) were functional and aequate but easily forgetable. l)t spit Statements'nrany flaws, these two Fugard companion pieces should be seen. The true reputation of the Hippodrome Th'iter rests on its steadfast commitment to the Iresentaititi of dynami' ic and bold dramati exs iti i s. It di'ts not reeli' in tfli stifriti and easy comfort of w iflss I anti Thc Hippttrome'is a iinguard -a beaci n exposing th'' nitis that address themselves, candidly, to the truth. Voices 'ich as Aithol Fugard's. --~ GATOR AUTO LEASING WILL MAKE YOU AN OFFER YOU CAN'T REFUSE ... WEEKEND SPECIAL Unlimited mileage in Florida only, to qualified drivers, on all size cars. We also rent Vans and Trucks. Rates start as low as $29." plus tax. GATOR Call for reservations. AUTO LEASING 3535 N. Main 372-2569 Affiliated with Hawes -Chrysler Plymouth 'Norman'is uninspired, unamusing MY Je" Lynn A I igator Critic Nou playing at the Gainesville Little Theatre. "Norman, Is That You?"is an unamusing comedy given amateurish production at the Ga inesville Little Theatre. Norman is the tale of poor Ben Chambers, whose wife has run off with his brother and whose son he discovers is gay. It is certainly an uninspired basis for a comedy, and uninspired is a good term for this creaky play written by Ron Clark and Sam Bobrick. Norman is living with his lover Garson when his father turns up in town. Garson is unfortunately shown 5 as stereotyped homosexual, limp-wristed, funny-walking fellow who wears red velvet pants and eye makeup, and also owns a couple dresses. In contrast, Norman is a good looking, masculine man, and his father sets about trying to cure him. This play is stale when it concerns itself with Ben's wife, Beatrice, and her affair with her brother-in-law. Long distance phone calls provide Ben with several lightly humorous monologs. We have seen this in plays and movies before and it has been done with more wit and humor. Overall, there is very little to laugh about, and when we do snicker, we do so against our better judgment. The production has a workable two-room set, that features a pink bedroom with a poster of Robert Urick, bare chested, on the wall. The directing by Tom Godey is slow at times, but he keeps the actors moving and tries to keep things visually humorous. Bill Stensgaard, who reminds one of Tom Bosley, is sure of himself as the beleaguered father. Richard Schneider is attractive, but often stiff as the title character. Norman's mother is played with some unsteadiness by Catherine F. Huber. Only Mitchell Bronstein as Garson, is amusing. While the character is an insulting stereotype of homosexuals, Bronstein plays it to the hilt with plenty of camp and quick reactions that create laugh not in the script. Other disappointments: The cast dropped lines and the actors could be seen changing clothes on stage during the scene changes. While the cast works hard, there is not much mileage left in this old comedy that is neither intelligent nor funny. Low Cost AUTO ~4 INSURANCE $TUDENTS $AVE Chock Our 6-Mos. Liability Rate Small Dc Payment -Low Monthly Terms CALL US FOR OUR LOW COST P.I.P. INSURANCE -TO GET TAGS AMMRICAN AuTO CALL: 373-3155 IWSURANCL M3 NW 10th A vn. OP SAT.

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O. .".l sCaECE -iooN a COMIC convention 2ot J2on 77 UFHoltday Inn adm 2 90 films oil day doolor 061M 9 30am Opm cll 378-8794 (1 264I) A TTINTtON GM GAIRSVItEl' Do you know how good you ho.ve o IlooA 0, tohe lom.grown on pg s 81 and 82 of the Fob H,gh T~mos then do yourmolf a fovor ond IcA of page 7 To Mod Monopon (1 19 LOST & FOUND_ FO'JUD Prescroptinn glaises afto-roon ,# h, w 11 ,I 56GPAthIdg Plen o mn by A 10"0' y -;1 23 5 '' SERVICES 'S 1i NSTRUC70R CLINK fHosted lty Alr, % Aq,,ot &TKRAIl enve ; E ARN YO1)UR INT NATIONAL INST, RUC TOR W FN N MANY OPP)R TUJNITF 5 PRE 'IN)( WORKSHOP FEB 3&4 ClNJ( FEB if 1' FOR MORE INFORMATION & WfSRATI'ON STOP BY AJACis5AuA Tt 4 TWAf r FNTF R OR ( Al j INCFkAT J1,7W 76 of h ,AT 1 j 1 0 3.41 1 1 4 1 Ste I~ To 1 2:00 riv as ion of the tBody Snatchers 11t STU -7:00 9:40 7ld_ SOUJJVAND Dolby Srereo N,; T h 't -a T N,, ErvyvB-fds Auce;pel BASIC SCU&A-TAUGHT By TE 0PROFEICONALS AT AUEN'S AQUATIC & TRAIL CENTER CLASSES START TCES JAN 16 OR WED FE8 14 FINISH WFOW FINALS FUNSAFE WARM-HCATED P0(5-1T0ST EQI INTERNATIONAL CERTIFCATION LET US START YOU ON A LWF1TIMAIADVENTUfE THIS 79 ALLEN'S AQAATI & TRAIL CENTER, 34MR W UNIV AVE 373 9233 MON-SAT 9 7 (-7 26-m) Horsen amrn d 4x]4 molls luwps dressage rlng lghIS MiWs of troll$M "y 9X10 1Constont 0 crgpciTo1ty-*ven1 0 41-2026W3376 Oft T5opm(I-1-65-m) T1*SIS dining, RESUME prOPar01 n, relotod wrvicis Call 378-1390 ofleo 5 (1 29-10--) P.,1.1.%%-oI TYPING Recodd on IBM flog TYPING-dosserslions, thses report .b4m 7ro 'n YPN.g earned t-P'Y G dcY correcting s0l0c)ric b0rbor0 at 377-2377 ,Cole,, AWilgooams3d6-376 1 1.-Prm I lindooata372-347 or 378-5788 (1-22-5-m) .Cegno b,,thgqht vol.nt.1rs wont to Spend 5 days + 4 nigh s this Spring break help # $tee nnd confidential pregnioncy BACKPACKING on the APPLACHIAN TRALin 1-101n .o d o,nsel-ng col 377 4947 24hr North Carolna March 18-22 No experience 1 947 needed Equipment + Instruction provided Outdoor Adventures 3754160 (1-3010o-m) FIr, 2lbor Iosses C1og Nh, bg.nn.ng bsmflo qy-mf 5 30 7 00 chimney sweep for hire dirty chimneys are I, m .'he Yie )ndIphdo'ophi f, te hazards protect your home by having 4 komv 19 10m your chimney and fireplace cleaned coll A622763 (1 30CO0m) YVINI. 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tJPiiJ HtAV tr-c1 et WKESLEK BKIAN GAFtNEY GRAPPLt WITH GEORGIA FOE (ABOVE), WORKS OUT ON LEG MACHINE (RIGHT) after dismal start in 1977, Gaffney placed 12th in nation at NCAA's uffney gains new confidence id finally becomes a winner alligator Staff Writer Brian Gaffney may be huge and slightly sluggish, but the JF wrestler's 190-pound frame didn't deter hini froni' shibiting an unusual bit of quickness in getting to his feet ast year. The Gators were wrestling Auburn University and Gaffwy was on the mat battling with 190-pound Tiger Chris ardner. Down 19-11, the Gators needed a win front iaffney to avoid a loss. Midway through the second period, however it seemed apparent Auburn was on its way to ictory. Gaffney was losing convincingly. UF wrestling coach ;ary Schneider looked on in disbelief. With the final period ust starting and Gaffney laying face down on the mat, chneider suddenly screamed at Gaffney, "Brian if you don't get up and wrestle, you're not going to wrestle hire gain." Gaffney got up -but only to lose 4-3. After the match. ichneider told Gaffney he was off the first team and would emain off it until he proved himself capable of regaining the terth. Somehow, threats have a way of getting a message across. For Gaffney, the threat stayed in his mind and pushed him to emerge from an average wrestler to one(of the top %restlers in the Southeastern Conference last sear. Gaffne% recalled the moment that changed his season. "After the match, Schneidier told inc if I wanted to make the starting team he'd give me another shot against (University of) Georgia," Gaffney said. "And when I wrestled in Georgia, I pinnes the k iil. -I wanted to start. I wanted to wrestle. And I knew Ilttir start doing well,"Gaffney said. Gaffia'y caught on fire and didn't stop smoking until after thie season ended. He won by pin against Georgia. Anul he proceeded to win four of his last five matches to finish Ahe season at 6-3. His only loss Itssecond part of the season came when he was disqualified for stalling against University of Alabama's three-time SEC champ Billy King. In the SEC tournament, Gaffne'y finished a surprising second -losing the champiumship 8-5 against King. To cap the sear off, Gaffney placed 12th at the NCAA tournament to help leal the Gators 14) thi'ir first Top-20 finish ever. Gaffney was named Ithe team's most inprovud wrestler after his comeback season. The year I-t'fore, Gaffney separated his shoulder andl suffered through in agonizing 25-1 freshman season. "Brian's first year and a half definitely were marginal here," Schneider said. "His first year we had such high hopes for him and he never produced for us. He never came through so we had to pull him off the first team right before the SEC tournament." Schneider didn't give up on Gaffney. He knew Gaffney was not in good physical shape so he turned him over to assistant coach Tim Worsowicz. Worsowicz got his whip out. "Tim really worked hard with him," Schneider said. "He really pushed him and on -some occasions beat the heck out of him to get him to go." Gaffney got going. Rocky would have been proud of him. Gaffney had to run before and after practice and before matches. He worked harder in practice -when he wanted togive up Worsowicz made him pushharder. "He found out last year just how much work it was going to take hini to get into shape to wrestle," Worsowicz said. The results were nothing but good. Gaffney finished the year strong and is continuing his winning wrestling this season. So far, Gaffney is 6-I in dual matches as a heavyweight wrestler. Enthusiasts agree, handball isn't for everyone Iy Amy Cohen Alligator Staff Writer UF PHYS. ED. PROFESSOR TIM SCOTT PREPARES TO END A HANDBALL HOMEWARD ..18 area courts await handball enthusiasts Leaping as high as he can, Reed Cook swings at the hall and follows through with one last over-head smash that springs off the wall and whizzes past his opponent for the game-winning point. The handball match is over. The victor smiles as he pulls the glove off his hand and reveals a pounding red palm that looks like a wrinkled tomato with a heartbeat. But pain and victory go hand-in-hand in the sport of handball. For this and other reasons, Gainesvillearea handball players -like Cook -believe the sport requires only the most devoted athletes. Devotion and dedication are the keys to the support of handball. Players must learn how to use both hands -there is no backhand in handball -players also must deal with pain in every match, and the sport requires more skill from Rts players than other sports One of those other sports is racquetball. Admittedly, Gainesville handball players say the sport is losing many followers to racquetball. These same athletes, see 10e8db40 next page Imbsalligator wednes av. isuw 17-1@"Aa I ......, y, y t m m m m m mommomom

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16. alligator, wednesday, jcr%#ary 17, 1979n --------Lady Gators' charity gives GSU easy win The Lady Gator basketball team filed it's own fuss Monday night against Georgia State University, anI tb Ut wornen's foul trouble was the only spark thie at-dv PantihFrs seeded torcoast toa 91-68 victory. UF head coach Cathy Davis said te teami's iproblvii began early in lgane w)itf one-on-one f oul situat ion. For the first 15 iniutes, we were trading paint for pm55 with GSU," Davis sad.* But then the foul trouble hs-gasi aid we got killed." UF star center Quien Bonner hadthree foulswith 18 min utes left in the evenly matched first half. Davis reps'atsesh shuffled Banner in and out to keep her adrift of Ioul trouble "Quien couldn'lt change the stiifesei b-caase of her fou trouble," Davis said. So with four minutes left ith' half and GSU holding a 14-pont lead. I told her to chop down thei ead to 10 pint's. "She went in. took oii what Aas giveii to hr sistai of charging the ball. and cut fhe 's-ors dowii to a ii-potit GSU' Icad." But GSU pulled aas a ith Ladl Gators ws-re eightt with fsh-r hands tied Doreis andolfi ad Kahth McKeaiil lidithi it' wis with 20 pitits apii Tickets for home stand on sale at ticket office Studet basketball tists t isfor th MstssIp SitsUniiversitN, Umpersit% (fA M abama and V andvrbil i Ners, tvybasketball gamssarv hiigOis sits1itod. ist ithmOsir i sikit office. -A s aIiFda I sed w% t qi ii Itsilrtcr sI it d iii si Ii shiioi,% n m --_2L -I iirder to purchase these tickets. Each student is allowed to pirchaseows tistet for eac ss hgame ('aist of ttistiiike'fi's $ 1 There also are a limit Timmbni er sit $3 guest ickets available if the'hreegai-s. A reinneir to stsients with season basketball cards: the cards iust Ie exchanged for another gasl card for t xs rest of the season at the ma n ticket offis r tt-fore the Mississippi Siate gani-i. 20. Women booters whip Tampa to stay perfect I'li-(ItF s isisi's sa--r t-am uppds its record 2t -0 -t 3-f sachiling exhbitit so Satirday after Ib-at tmg tf Umssr-sitV i Taipa iiiTamipa 3-I Hila Maious 'sordI iwo goals and s-bb ilduseihad (11111 Gobao-Tiker Marsh has allowed ()i siosii goal I re Adult soccer league now being organized Alli i sis situ o )leagiiitsm aiorg si/vdsagasOs iltsrar 'Ih fa u (IX" 11 '" i " t 4'"11) %~l1)pa" l tle tIsoWill is crgasizedid games arsschliiled to start "'l 1 lsnvom%%i ng to sponsor i evmarewelcm 1m iii cinfi irmit iniiiA il 3781 I24f6iir 373 54571 UF intramurals plan arm wrestling tourney A Ili I F 1ti a m ir irilis < i-part isei l sIll hidd a a r m isiiui rinaini-utJinm26 intheJ Wisii-Ficil/ t'moii im ii it ii 1-ThFdadih ifor signs-ssjssJan 19. The ilt I ir ils 1d iri met iii li 1 l b isis's-i's bsiitlbill itt us-u s Handall continued from page fifteen howlleverts-i hiiball r m is mississskill than ritcquciball platar% 1As w 114, t'-1plag r 1s -iiibi at the he ll t )f thc ball \,isiii Ilhic pro-o-mon plam ni shAm s ()I landball (ook, 't VF engmlect 111V stildent %.i d I 1.111h,11 plas-rst. sim rph\issai l itssli.tst ims i more preci '' I tsspitIIth, re'usirs-mnss t if top ph sw .0 h m orc pcitple itrc pro-4ei th pla\ im, rawquItiIbAl thmi handball MaNii ts iimsii rii iii-,r-t iesif pinol .ml tio5 Fmr ueximpl botht i 1un 11 (1tl (.i l.l pwk "1 I" iietball relatuschls iis uli\g wiili e-Imaii i "" Scott, a t J.,pbnswal edlcaw il lm ea 4hr, s.ld But thiri-ceiit -uirgii l riwpii-thall mil