Citation
The Independent Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Independent Florida alligator
Portion of title:
Florida allgator
Portion of title:
Alligator
Alternate Title:
University digest
Alternate Title:
University of Florida digest
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, FL
Publisher:
Campus Communications, Inc.
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2005
Frequency:
Daily (except Saturdays, Sundays, holidays and exam periods, Aug.-Apr.); semiweekly (May-July)
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. (some col.) ; 36 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
Online databases.
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Online databases ( lcsh )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.651781 x -82.336258

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Additional Physical Form:
Also available online.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 65, no. 75 (Feb. 1, 1973)-
General Note:
"Not officially associated with the University of Florida."
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator.Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non - profit research and educational purposes.Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000470760 ( ALEPH )
13827512 ( OCLC )
ACN5549 ( NOTIS )
sn 86010448 ( LCCN )
0889-2423 ( ISSN )

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Preceded by:
Florida alligator

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Full Text
After county officials endorse him
York den ies UF presidency again

By 808 LICHTENSTEIN
Alligator Staff Writer
Amid rumors that he would accept the presidency of UF
on a permanent basis if it was offered to him, Acting
President E. T. York told the University Senate Thursday,
I havenot expressed a willingness to anyone in either
written or oral form.
The rumors reported by the Gainesville Sun apparently
came from the Miami Beach convention of the State
Association of County Commissioners, which voted to
support York for the presidency.

Night raiders nab 3 men;
Seize 100 pounds of grass

By JIMMY THARPE
Alligator Staff Writer
Three Gainesville men were arrested in a
drug bust that netted 100 pounds of
marijuana carried out by state
attorneys task force at 4120 14th Ter.
Wednesday at 11 p.m.
Arrested were Stephen Sternfield, 20,
and Victor Boccumini, 23, both of 4120
14th Ter., and Eric Lesneski, 24, of P. 0.
Box 12467 University Station.
STERNFIELD AND BOCCUMINI told
officials at the county jail that they were
students. An examination of UF registrars
lists failed to produce either of their
names. Lesneski Said he is employed as a

G'ville murder rate 2nd in nation

By JOE COLLUM
Alligator Staff Writer
Murder: illegal homicide.
The blotting of a human life
outside the striction of the
law.
There is manslaughter
and three degrees of
murder. The categories
stretch from premeditated
murder to murder through
culpable negligence, and in
1972 only one metropolis in

TfteTTnde peri dent
Florida Alligator
Published by Campus Communications. Inc.. Gainesville. Florida
Not officially associated with the. University of Florida

the nation ranked higher per
capita than Gainesville in
such crimes.
IN 1972 there were 25
murders in Gainesville. In
New York City there were
1,725 during the same
period.
But because there are just
over 100,000 people living
in Gianesville and over 10
million in the New York
City area, a just released
FBI report ranks Gainesville

MARION COUNTY Commissioner George M. Rou Jr., a
friend of York, said, Its been indicated to me that if the
job were offered to him hed accept it.
Rou said his source is a letter from York to a mutual
friend on the subject of Yorks interest in becoming UF
president.
York said he never has had or will have an interest in a
permanent appointment because of a compelling desire to
do other things.
YORKS comments came after the University Senate
conducted its regular business, which included a proposal to
change the name of the Department of Comprehensive
Logic to the Department of Behavioral Studies.

tile l^yer.
All three men were arrested while trying
to sell 100 pounds of marijuana to
undercover agents for a reported $14,700.
State Attorney Gene Whitworth said the
pot had a street value of $32,000.
Whitworth said the arrests came after a
three-day investigation by undercover
agents.
IN A FIRST appearance before County
Judge Emory Cross at 9 a.m. Thursday, all
three men had their bail set at $2,000.
Sternfield and Lesneski were released
after posting bail Thursday and at 3:30
p.m. Boccumini had not paid bail and was
still being held in the county jail.

ahead of even New York in
the rate of murder.
Atlanta has the nations
highest rate with 23
murders per 100,000
residents. The Gainesville
metropolitan area is close
behind with 22.3 # murders
per 100,000.
Some of the nations
largest cities rank far behind
Gainesville. Chicagos rate
was only 11.5. Los Angeles
had a 12.8 rate per 100,000

" 1 XL
| i.i i ACEY HARPER
The original mobile home

Moving a house can be slow and
tedious due to the care involved in going
under power lines and having to move

and New York, the worlds
largest city, was three
murders per 100,000 behing
Gainesville with 19.1.
How does a mellow little
college town rate ahead of
the Big City in the
horrendous crime of
murder?
Some criminologists have
been reported as blaming it
on the lack of stringent gun
control legislation. For
years New York has had the
toughest gun laws in the
country.
Gainesville got its first
ordinance Handgun
Control Ordinance no. 30
last May. It was only the
second gun control law ever
passed in Floridas history.
Ordinance no 30 consists
of a three day cooling off
period before any person
can purchase a pistol. It also
provides for registration of
store bought handguns with
the sheriffs office.
Gainesville Police Chief
Nolan Freeman declined to
say whether or not the
ordinance has had a positive
effect on Gainesvilles crime

/ FRIDAY
SEPTEMBER 28, 1973
VOL. 66, NO. 5

Dr. Harry Grater Jr., chairman of the department,
explained that the current name is not consistent with
proposed changes in the curriculum.
GRATER explained the course would be organized
around topics rather than disciplines. Topics would be
selected that are contemporary in nature and can be
understood by introducing students to principles and
information from sociology, psychology, anthropology,
speech, etc.
. In addition, the University Senate took action on two
other minor proposals. The next meeting will be October
15.

rate but he did offer some
statistics on murder.
Between January and
August 1972 there were 12
murders committed in
Gainesville. This year during
the same period there were
just seven murders. And
from Mav tthe month the
ordinance went into effect)
through August there have
been only two murders in
the city.
Freeman blames
Gainesvilles young
population as being a
decisive factor in the high
murder rate.
The average Gainesville
dwellers age is only 22.6.
Gainesville, however, has
-always been a youth haven
and the areas murder rate
in 1971 was only 13.8 per
100,000, or nearly 40 per
cent less than reported in
1972.
Lt. Gene E. Watson of
the UF Police Department
said none of UFs 23,000
plus students were involved
in any murders in 1972 and,
to his knowledge, only four
students in the schools

redlights from the houses path. There is
an advantage though. If one runs out of
gas he hasnt far to walk to gei home.

history have ever been
murdered or arrested for
murder.
Freeman agrees: I dont
think the university
population itself contributes
to the murder rate. But we
have many young people
who are not students in
Gainesville and many of our
murders involve them.
Freeman says most
murders are crimes of
passion. The majority of
them are committed on the
spur of the moment. The
people dont mean in most
cases to kill anyone.
Freeman also complained
police are usually blamed
for statistics like the ones
that put Gainesville near the
top of the nations murder
heap.
People dont realize the
police department is only
one of five agencies in the
criminal justice system.
There is also the public
defender; the state attorney;
(See Murder Page 4)



Page 2

>, The Independent Florida Alligator, Friday, September 28, 1973

By SUE CLINE
Alligator Staff Writer
A proposal to reduce
costs of graduate study
through a common
market agreemept among
14 southern states comes up
for approval Monday when
the Board of Regents (BOR)
meets in the J. Wayne Reitz
Union.
The board will meet in
room 235 of the J. Wayne
Reitz Tlnion at 9:30 a.m.
If approved, students
would be able to enroll in
graduate or highly

No new leads inTuesday rape case

There are no new developments in a case involving the
Tuesday morning rape of a young woman abducted from
the parking lot near Jennings Hall, Audie Shuler, chief of
the University Police Department (UPD), said Thursday.
Shuler said that a coordinated effort was being made by
his department along with those of the sheriffs department
and the city police department.
We are hopeful for some breaks anytime, said Shuler ?
but so far we just havent had any.
Shuler said that four full-time investigators were on the

4
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PINBALL, AIRHOCKEY,
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* i then, there is only one
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The deli with a gamesroom
1245 W. Univ. Ave.
COUPON
Good for 1 free play on
any game at Fun City
Friday, Saturday, Sunday & Monday
9-28-73 thru 10-1-73
she independent Florida Alligator is a publication of Campus Communications,
ncorporated. a private, non profit corporation. It it published five times weekly
except during June. July and August when it's published semi weekly, and during
student holidays and exam periods Opinions expressed in the Independent Florida
Alligator are those of the editors or of the writers of the articles and not those of the
university of Florida, the campus served by the Independent Florida Alligator
Address correspondence to The Independent Florida Alligator. P.O. Box 11266.
University Station. Gainesville. Florida. 32601. The Independent Florida Alligator is
entered as second class matter at tr.e United States Post Office at Gainesville Florida
22601
Subscription rate is $20.00 per year or SS 00 per quarter
The Independent Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to revise or turn away all copy it considers
objectionable
The Independent Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment for
any advertisements involving typographical error or erroneous insertion unless notice
IS given to the advertising manager within (1) one day after the advertisement
appears. The Independent Florida Alligator will not be responsible for more than one
incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run >everal times Notice tor
correction must be given before the next insertion
r\

BOR to vote on grad study pact

specialized courses on a
space-available base in
another state without
having to pay out-of-state
tuition.
HENDRIX CHANDLER,
director of public relations
for the BOR, said it would
make available some
programs that are too
expensive to operate in any
one state.
Warning that universities
are going to have a hard
time getting funds from
the Florida Legislature next
vear, particularly in the area

of graduate programs,
Chancellor Robert Mautz
said the market plan is the
kind of action that may
eliminate some of the
legislative concern.
Mautz said a common
market would eliminate
unnecessary duplication of
graduate programs.
Rather than starting a
new specialized program,
facilities could be made
available to the whole
southern region if they
already exist in one state.
ENDORSED MONDAY

case and other personnel were being called in as they are
needed.
The young, woman was abducted from the Jennings area
early Tuesday morning after she had been to visit her
stepdaughter who was staying at the hall.
The woman was then taken to the north end of the
county by her three male abductors and raped six times,
according to police.
A county-wide search for the assailants is still underway
and anyone with any information concerning the case
should call the UPD or the sheriffs department.

Â¥ BIG BIG BIG
SMv ,!e j 2ND ANNIVERSARY
SALE! I
(sorry- no Master Charge or BAC this sale)
-FOR BOTH NIGHT OWLS AND EARLY BIRDS BIRDSFRI.
FRI. BIRDSFRI. NITE 10 P.M.- 2 A.M.
SAT. 10 A.M.- NOON
ALL RECORDS ON SALE!
fCLASSICAL ROCK, JAZZ, BLUES, BLUEGRASS, COUNTRY
SOUL, LANGUAGE COMEDY, FOLK, ETC.)
NEW ROLLING STONES 1 Y e,THER MBGET CLASSICS
1- | s/ STAftlSffffgS I
I SPECIAL 6 THELYLE" I $329 \ EW LA s OHEME I
SPECIAL THE LYLE $3.29 WITH PAVAROTTI
FROM GIBSON, LIST TAPE ON LONDON RECORDS
L nice SIOO-JUSTS79.9S I I $4.49 | I
REPEATING ALL RECORDS ON SALE!
STRICTL Y FOLK GAINESVILLE'S FINEST RECORD STORE

by the Council of
Presidents, the plan must
win the approval of the
BOR, c a binet and
Legislature.
It would also require
action by the legislature to
remove the current ceiling
on admission of nonresident
graduate students.
Regents are also to be
asked to approve a request
to the legislature for new
buildings in the state
university system.
Mautz said emphasis will
be placed on construction

needs on some of the older
campuses to replace
outmoded and temporary
structures.
EXCEPT FOR Florida
International University and
the University of North
Florida and possibly one or
two other of the newer
institutions, it is likely that
construction of new
buildings to accommodate
growth will be at a slower
pace during the next few
years, Mautz said.
In other business, Mautz
will recommend increasing
fees for Florida students
participating in regional
programs in medicine,
dentistry and veterinary
medicine in other states,
effective by fall of 1974.
If the BOR approves the
request,
contract-for-services fees for
veterinary medicine will
increase from $3,000 to
$4,500 and for medicine
and dentistry from $2,750
to $3,250 each.
These higher fees in a
number of regional
programs had been
approved by the Southern

' ;V
ST*
Robert Mautz
... common market
Regional Education Board
because of increased cost
factors at participating
institutions, according to
Mautz.
Regents will also name
next terms chairman and
vice chairman, to be
formally elected in January,
as well as vote on requests
for tenure for all faculty
persons nominated from UF
and Florida State
University.



Reitz Union
Subscription
Series
t >
Tickets for the performances of Carlos
Montoya, Richard Harris, Journey Into
Blackness and "I Am A Woman will be
available in a subscription series which offers
both seating priority and a reduction in
price.
Beginning Thursday, September 20, the
University Box Office (Constans Theatre)
will be selling the subscription plan.
Series A: SIO.OO available to University
of Florida students;
SERIES B: $12.00 available to the
General Public.
SPECIAL BONUS FOR UNIVERSITY OF
FLORIDA STUDENTS
Included in Series Aat no extra charge the
Asolo State Theater production of Noel
Coward's Private Lives."
Series Subscribers will receive a wallet card
with a reserved location indicated on it.
Individual tickets will be available
approximately two weeks prior to each
performance at the following prices:
Uof F Students 52.50
General Public 53.50

LESSONS
REGISTRATION INFORMATION NON-CREDIT
COURSES
Registration for all workshops and lessons will take
place in Room 310, from 8:30 a.m. 4:30 p.m.
beginning Sept. 24.
Students, faculty and staff members and their spouses
will have priority for lesson enrollment from Sept. 24
through Sept. 28. Only after that time may other
persons register.
Due to price and registration differentials, it will be
necessary that each person come to register with
appropriate identification.
Because registration for all workshops and lessons is
limited, we must consider your decision to enroll
final by the beginning of the first scheduled session.
(If the class is held in the evening, notification of
cancellation of registration must be given to the
Program Office by 5:00 p.m. on the day the class is
scheduled to begin.)
These procedures must be followed in order to
qualify for a refund.
Games Area
HAVE SOME FUN!
Join a bowling league
in the Reitz Union
Games Area! Leagues
are now being formed.
The Organizational meetings
are as follows...
Mixed doubles
Mon., Oct. 1, 7:30
Stu-Fax Wed., Oct. 3, 6:15
A II other league meetings will
be Tues., Oct. 2at 7:30 in the
Union Games Area.

MTiymES
_ A Carlos
Montoya/
\ 8:15 pm
J Wayne Reitz
Union Ballroom
on subscription
series or individually
at $2.50 for Uof F
students and $3.50
for general public.
Tickets are available
at the University
Box Office in the
Constans Theatre

Yoga
SIO.OO students
$15.00 non-students
Beginning Gasses
TUESDAYS
Oct. 9 Dec. 4
5 PM-7 PM
TUESDAYS
Oct. 9- Dec. 4
7:30 PM-9:30 PM
WEDNESDAYS
Oct. 10-Dec. 5
10 AM-12 NOON
THURSDA YS
Oct. 11 Dec. 6
5 PM- 7 PM
THURSDAYS
Oct. 11 Dec. 6
7:30 PM 9:30 PM
FRIDA YS
Oct. 12 Dec. 7
10 AM-12 NOON
FRIDA YS
Oct. 12-Dec. 7
7:30 PM -9:30 PM
Intermediate
Students
WEDNESDAYS
Oct. 10- Dec. 5
S:OOPM- 7:00 PM

WE A VING
Wednesdays
Oct 10 Dec 5
7:30 PM 10 PM
$15.00 students
$20.00 non-students
COPPER
ENAMELING
Thursday
Oct 11 Nov 1
7:30 P.M. 10 P.M.
SB.OO students
SIO.OO non-students
BEGINNERS WINE
COURSE
October 11, October
18, October 26,
November 1 and
November 8 8:00 p.m.
9:30 p.m.
This course is intended
for the novice. Such
elements of wine
knowledge as label
reading, proper
presentation and
service, consumer
knowledge and the
grading and tasting of
wines will be covered in
this course. New York
State, California and
selected foreign wines
will be offered. SIO.OO
- students $15.00
non-students

Friday, September 28, 1973, The Independent Florida Alligator,

Imp Ilf
w x- -HSU
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MrnSmmrnAs'
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- WMIHUb v I r illl
m J§§| pp
I 2001:
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Special Sat. Matinee at 2:00 PM
I Thun, Sept 27, 7:00, 9:45
Fri, Sept 28,5:30, 8:15, 11:00
Sat, Sept 29, 2:00, 5:30. 8:15
11:00
75 cents
I Union Auditorium
I MMI' H ACADEMY AWARD
Iwll m WINNER
\ Cinema 5 presents
the Garden
ot the
Finzi-Continis
NOW IN ENGLISH 19
HB / Sfl 6:00, 8:00, 10:00
B* ill cents Union Auditorium
Sunday Sept. 30

w
end
craft
sale
SEPT. 27 & 28
11 AM-9 PM
All kinds of
posters, prints
&drawings
on sale.
ALSO...
featuring handicrafts made by
local artists & craftsmen.
Enjoy creating an ice cream
masterpiece at the Make
Your Own Sundae Special...
Sept. 27 11 AM 2 PM.
CO-SPONSORED BY
SER VOMA T/ON

Page 3



Page 4

The Independent Florida Alligator, Friday, September 28, 1973

Local fugitive caught in Indiana

By JIM YACAVONE
and
HARRY COVERSTON
Alligator Staff Writers
A former UF student,
fleeing trial in Gainesville on

Non-credit courses offered

By DOUGLAS HATCH
Alligator Staff Writer
Noncredit continuing
education courses ranging
from arts and crafts to
professional help courses,
will be offered at UF
starting Oct. 1, according to
Dr. B. Scott, of UFs
Division of Continuing
Education.
Among the 47 courses
that will be offered, there
will be a special course for
expectant mothers, and

Murder
:1'
(From Page One)
the courts, many of which
have very low conviction
rates; the probation and
parole agencies, which have
historically been a failure,
and we have a penal system
that hasnt changed in 100
years.
* But its always the
police who get blamed for
crime.

College Inn
HAS
SOMETHING ELSE
An arcade has taken over the front room of
the College Inn. The latest and greatest games
in Florida are here for your pleasure
o PIN BALLSo PIN BALLS o PINBALLS
0 AIR HOCKEY o ELECTRONIC TENNIS
Largest Selection of Games in Gainesville
1728 W. Univ. Ave.
Across from Murphree Area

drug charges, was caught
late Wednesday afternoon
by Indiana State Police
outside of Ft. Wayne, Ind.
Richard Anthony Hall,
21, was taken to the
intensive care unit of Saint

mothers with new born
infants. The course, which
will be offered one morning
a week, will use the latest
methods to teach infant
care, Scott said.
ANOTHER OF THE new
courses will focus on
understanding mans
brain, and will study the
brain and its effect on
behavior, Scott said.
One course will focus on
the possibility the Earth has
been visited by persons
from other planets. This

We did a study on 25
people arrested who were
eventually convicted for
various crimes. In 25 of
those cases the people had
been arrested before. One of
them was arrested 26 times.
So here the police had done
its job 26 times but the
courts and other
agencies involved had
failed.

Joseph Hospital in Ft.
Wayne suffering from what
the Allen County, Ind.,
Sheriffs Office termed
withdrawal.
STATE POLICE, acting
on motorists reports of a

course, visitors from space:
comets, planets, or
spacemen? will explore the
theories of Immanuel
Velikovsky, Scott said.
American involvement in
the Vietnam war is another
course topic. The course
the Vietnam war: the
American involvement will
attempt to answer the
question of just how did we
get into Vietnam, and why
we stayed there.
OTHER COURSES will
concern arts and crafts,

Bond, arraignment set
in cocaine arrests
Bond has been set at SIO,OOO for each of the four men
arrested in connection with Tuesday nights cocaine seizure.
The almost one pound of cocaine seized in the parking lot
of the Picadilly Apartments, 2220 SW 34th St., is the
largest cocaine seizure in Gainesville.
The arrested men, Bruce Farrell, 22, Greg Sale, 18, Ernie
Miller, 23, all of Gainesville, and Steve Raulerson, 19, of
Lake City, will be arraigned Oct. 8, according to State
Attorney Gene Whitworth.

( Sun I 1
BLiJ Ww Mk+
kfUl
mS V\ Ja§WMinrsuillc £ur)l
\ a' ..

man acting strangely on the
median, caught Hall on
Interstate Highway-69.
Florida State Attorney
Eugene Whitworth reported
Hall was hitchhiking.
Indiana police had been

careers for women, world
citizenship, music, art and
human sexual
communications.
Admission to the courses
is open to anyone regardless
of academic achievement,
Scott said.
Scott said registration for
these classes shall be at the
first meeting of the class.
All classes except the special
class for mothers shall meet
one night a week.
For further information
contact Scott at 392-2317.

earlier alerted to be on the
look out for Hall, sought on
fugitive charges, by Muncie,
Ind., police. Muncie police
reported Hall was fleeing to
Canada from Muncie, where
his parents live.
Hall was arrested last
June in Gainesville in a SE
Bth St. apartment when he
attempted to sell narcotics
to an undercover agent. He
was charged with six counts
of possession of
hallucinogenic drugs, two
counts of possession of

4 pot smugglers
not from G'ville
Contrary to news reports, four persons arrested Tuesday
attempting to smuggle more than a ton of marijuana valued
at $1.5 million into the country are not from the
Gainesville area.
According to Charles Walker of the Drug Enforcement
Administration in Miami, the three men and one woman
were seized aboard the Moby Dick Tuesday night about
150 miles southeast of Miami in the Florida Straits.
A COAST GUARD official said the crew of the cutter
Courageous became suspicious of an unusual number of
fuel drums aboard the 36-foot American yacht.
Less than two weeks ago, the Courageous ran down
another American vessel carrying eight tons of marijuana in
the Cal Sal group of the Bahama Islands.
Arraigned by U.S. Magistrate Peter Palermo in Miami
Thursday afternoon were Allan Edes, 26, Whitingham, Vt.,
John Goodwin, 28, Charlemont, Mass., Hayward
McKinney, 29, and Anna Bolonani, 21, both of
Steinhatchee, Fla.
THE THREE men are being held in Miami in lieu of
$15,000 bond each. Bolonani was released Thursday on her
own recognizance.
Earlier, Coast Guard officials were quoted as believing
four persons were from the Gainesville area.
Owned and captained by McKinney, the boat is
registered out of Shamrock, a small community near the
Gulf Coast west of Gainesville.
Old Fashioned Day
Sept. 30
a /i/? Students And Visitors to our 9:45
, unday School will be our Special Guests
for Dmner-under-the-Pines.
First Assembly of God
2925 NW 39 Ave.
Rev. James E. Ferrell, Pastor

cocaine and one count of
conspiracy to deliver and
sell marijuana.
RELEASED ON BOND
Hall failed to appear at his
Sept. 19 trial. The state
attorney then issued a
bench warrant for Halls
arrest.
No action has been taken
by the state on extradition
thus far as Hall is still i n
intensive care and could not
be reached to discuss
waiving extradition.



Spheeris at
Plaza concert
By SONI VELIZ
Alligator Entertainment Editor
Student Government Productions will present Jimmie
Spheeris in a free concert Saturday at 8 p.m. in the Plaza of
the Americas.
Jimmie Spheeris plays easy and melodic guitar and piano.
But there is more to Spheeris music. A poet as well as a
composer, his songs tell well-spun stories.
Most people, he said, take the view from down in the
abyss. But right now, Im on the ceiling, and I stay here.
From the ceiling, Jimmie said its easier to
communicate. And communication is what his act is
about. Its the most important tie between Jimmie and his
friend Lee Calvin Nicoli, who accompanies him on flute,
bass guitar, acoustic guitar and occasionally vocals.
Describing their musical involvement, Jimmie says there
is mo space between us, its complete communication. He
understands what Im doing and enhances it.
Jimmie Spheeris said he is a peaceful person, explaining
his calm in terms rosy and sweet, I love people, thats
really the only thing in this whole universe and the secret of
any kind of greatness is just to continue to love ... I could
never desire revenge for anybody, no matter what he does
to me.
Jimmie Spheeris has played in Gainesville twice in the
last two years. Both times as a pre-booked attraction. He
said his welcome was so warm, and he liked the feeling here
so much, that this time hes returning for a free concert.

Govt, internships offered at UF

By CELESTE CALVITTO
Alligator Staff Writer
Interested in pursuing a
career in urban studies?
Then heres your chance
to get some practical
experience and earn four
hours credit at the same
time.
FIFTEEN STUDENT
internships with various
city, county and state
agencies will be available to

UM medical interviews set

Senior premedical students who have
applied for admission to the University of
Miami Medical School should make
arrangements for admission interviews
before Oct. 5, according to Carolyn
Grantham, secretary to the Assistant Dean
for Pre-Professional Education.
Grantham said a five-man team led by
Dr. Bernard Fogle, will be in Gainesville to
interview prospective students for

"Crazy Dave"
EXPANDS
Over the Summer we have quadrupled
our showroom space with stock to match our size.
IIAIfC'C ELECTRONICS
U# llf L U 621 W. Univ. Ave.
Come see us during our sth Anniversary Sale
(The ugly green building on the corner)

UF students, according to
Tom Munkittrick,
student-city liaison officer.
The program is funded
under a grant from the U. S.
Department of Housing and
Urban Development (HUD).
The grant has been
approved, says
Munkittrick, but funding is
a different matter.
MUNKITTRICK
explained the funding
depends upon what is

admission to the September 1974 term.
All prospective students must have an
interview before they can be admitted, and
the interview must be either in Gainesville
or Miami, Grantham said.
Grantham said these may be the only
interviews in Gainesville.
For an interview, call Grantham at
392-2701.

SM: .... :*
.mm
'j> <
r *4s3?.TOrSK/^&jy.
BM ;
' WL H|y i
§&> mmWiM WPI
**>:s*-,
BKafefc.''- HMRHp
Kjfiujr
ggyp
Jimmie Spheeris
. . weaves musical stories on guitar and piano

available from unused grant
applications in the nation.
He estimated the chances
for funding during the
winter and spring quarters
as very good although the
outlook for this quarter is
minimal.
Internships with the
following city agencies will
be available:
Gainesville Police
Department

Department of Public
Works
Department of Traffic
Engineering
Personnel Department.
And two with the
Regional Utilities
Department.
COUNTY INTERNSHIPS
are in the county
administrators office, the
planning and zoning
department, and in the
office of superintendent of
public instruction.
State agencies offering
internships are the North
Central Florida Regional
Planning Council, North
Central Florida Health
Council, the Governors
Council on Criminal Justice
for Region 11, and the
Manpower Planning
Council.
For further information
call UFs Regional
Development Center at
392-0296.

1 4 Friday, September 28, 19?3v The Independent Florida Alligator; I

(Editors Note: Inside Information will be a weekly
feature in The Independent Alligator, providing readers
with authoritative information on all aspects of personal
health and policies of the University Health Service. Bring
your questions to Room 305 Reitz Union or the lobby of
the University Health Service. For further information
please contact the Health Education Office at the
University Health Service Room 307.)
Todays Consultants
Dr. B. Barger
V. Cave, Ins.
Dr. W. J. Coggins
S. Jones, R. N.
Dr. R. B. Shaara
Why do birth control pills make you nauseated?
Nausea is believed to be due to the estrogen component
of the birth control pill which tends to irritate the stomach
and upper intestine. When nausea occurs, it is in the first
few months on the pills and it usually diminishes thereafter.
Most of the nausea may be circumvented by taking the pill
with a LARGE glass of water at night. If the nausea persists
in the mornings, you should see your physician for
appropriate medication to carry you through the first few
cycles. Occasionally, a reduction in estrogen content of the
pill is required.
Are the records at the Student Health Service
confidential?
The Student Health Service fully respects the
confidential nature of a students health record by not
permitting the release of any information from that record
to anyone, on or off campus, without a specific written
request by the student.
What is the best treatment for a blister?
Usually blisters are best left alone and kept clean, dry
and covered. The fluid inside is a good culture media for
bacteria and should not be contaminated. No cover
available is as protective as skin. If a blister needs to be
opened for whatever reason, i.e., location, performance,
etc., then under clean conditions the top layer of skin
should be removed and an antibiotic ointment applied. The
best cover we have found is called moleskin and is
available commercially. Moleskin is quite useful in
prevention of blister formation.
Are there any unusual hazards of going barefoot around
campus?
Yes flip tops, broken bottles, stubbed toes, creeping
eruption, hookworm and tetanus.

Page 5



Page 6

i, The Independent Florida Alligator, Friday, September 28, 1973

New course possible

A new course leading to a
new degree will be offered
winter quarter if there is
enough interest, according
to Dr. Herbert A. Be vis, of
the environmental
engineering department, of
the College of Engineering.
The new course, ENE
201, Concepts of
Environmental Engineering
Sciences, will study
concepts affecting the
environment and how to
clean up the environment

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Why no,Jo* .he thousands who are rediscovering .he lays MORE MODELS MORE SERVICE
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; j
W. UNIVERSITY fV E I
From Mighty to Mini, Streit's has it all.

by environmental
engineering.
THE NEW degree is a
bachelor of science in
Environmental Engineering
Sciences, Be vis said.
The course can be used as
an introduction to
environmental engineering,
Bevis said.
DR. SUZANNE Bayley,
one of the two instructors,
said she would instruct
about air pollution, water
pollution and other
problems facing man and

particularly Florida.
The other instructor, Dr.
Emmett Bolch, will lecture
on waste disposal and the
effects of radiation on man
and the environment.
Requirements for the
new degree include 220
hours of work, and
traditional engineering
subjects such as
thermodynamics. But more
emphasis will be on the
sciences, especially biology.
Students can call Bevis at
392-0841.

Drop policy tightened

By JIM YACAVONE
Alligator Staff Writer
University College (UC) students will
find it harder to drop and add this quarter,
according to Dr. Harry Shaw, UC assistant
dean for academic advisement.
Students no longer can capriciously
drop a cMRs the last week of the quarter to
avoid a poor grade, Shaw said.
THIS IS NOT a new policy, Shaw said,
but an enforcement of existing policy. The
rules for petitioning to drop and add a
course after the normal drop and add
period will be interpreted much more
stringently than in the past.
Normal drop and add ended Wednesday.
Though a student may drop a course
arbitrarily until next Wednesday, the

Dgg/ERANCE J1
WE "deliver OUR GOODIES HOT. FAST,
CALL US 378-1628 372-6582 376-6582

student now has to petition to add a
course. After next Wednesday a petition
will be required to drop a course.
The petitioning procedure requires a
student to take his petition to the UC
petition cleric. The clerk assigns the student
an advisor who, after consultation with the
student and a review of the petition, will
recommend acceptance or rejection of the
petition.
A RECOMMENDATION is also needed
from the instructor of the course the
student is dropping or adding. If adding a
course, permission is needed from the
department.
Ultimate action on the petition rests
with Shaw. Shaw said approval will depend
upon documented extenuating
circumstances such as illness, family
problems or financial problems.



HUD approves UF loan
for married housing site

The University of Florida has received
verbal notivication that the Department of
Housing (HUD) has approved a $2.8
million loan for the purchase of
Tanglewood Manor Apartments, according
to Ken Peet, UF housing business manager.
The university seeks to purchase the
208-unit complex at 2901 SW 13th St. to
replace the aging Flavet married housing.
Last spring the Board of Regents (BOR)
authorized UF to seek the loan.

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In April it was reported that the owners
of the property were asking $2.9 million.
The land was assessed at $2.3 minion this
year by the county.
Peet said no price was agreed upon.
When UF receives written notification of
the HUD loan, it will go to the BOR, which
will authorize an offering price.
If the offering price is not accepted,
there will then be a series of negotiations
between UF, the Board of Regents and the
property owners.

The St. Petersburg Times
. .s.
the significant
- starts
\ here!
Pencils are impartial. The writer makes the
difference. And St. Petersburg Times read readers
ers readers have an advantage that begins with in indepth
depth indepth reporting and continues through con concise
cise concise editing and Florida's sharpest printing.
Result is a package of news, features, sports
and comment with a significant difference
that you'll like.
If We're So Good, Why Cut the Price?
You get The St. Petersburg Times at a re reduced
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consider this an investment in our future ...
in your future, too! So, start each day with
The St. Petersburg Times. We'll provide
"guaranteed home delivery" and the kind of
news coverage that makes your newspaper
reading time well spent.
CALL 372-4532
{lftprshurg SlimST')
N BEST NEWSPAPER
Circulation Department STUDENT SPECIAL
St. Petersburg Times Subscription Offer
P.O. Box 1127 Date
St. Petersburg, Fla., 33731 |
Four Great Offers To Choose From! Check One:
1 quarter for $6.25 3 quarters for $17.25
runs now thru Dec. 14, 1973 runs now thru June 7, 1974
You save up to $5.75! You save up to $16.75!
2 quarters for $11.75 4 quarters for $22.75
runs now thru Mar. 24, 1974 runs now thru Aug. 23, 1974
I You save up to $11.25! You save up to $22.25!
Delivery stops Dec. 15 thru Jan. 4 for the Holidays. A refund will be made if you
- | permanently leave school. Mail today! Offer expires October 15, 1973.
Please start delivery. I am a student or faculty member.
I
NAME ... (
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Friday, September 28, 1973, The Independent Florida Alligator,

Page 7



Page 8

I, The Independent Florida Alligator, Friday, September 28, 1973

Editorial
Dormitory
absurdity
If youre 18-years-old, you can buy a car and
finance it yourself. You can go into any bar in
town, sign any binding legal agreement and
generally do anything with your life you want.
But if you live in a UF dormitory, you cant
have friends of the opposite sex visit you after 11
p.m.
Gov. Reubin Askew signed the Adult-Rights Bill
May 9th, granting 18 to 21 year-olds all the legal
rights and responsibilities of an adult.
Apparently word hasnt reached the Board of
Regents (BOR) yet.
Students can have friends of the opposite sex in
their rooms from 2-11 p.m. Sunday and from 2
12 p.m. Friday and Saturday.
This absurd ruling is an anachronism left from
the days of Elizabeth Kovachevich, the regent who
managed to convince many Florida parents that
university dormitories were whorehouses.
There is absolutely no justification for
continuing the strict visitation hours.
At their Monday meeting, the BOR should
rescind the regulation and recognize the fact that
as adults, the bulk of students in the dorms have a
right to 24-hour visitation.
If they do anything less, the BOR will be
violating the rights of 6,000 Florida residents.
Parking pains
When it was announced last year that freshmen
could bring their cars on campus, many people
wondered just where all the cars were going to be
parked.
The solution the Traffic and Parking Division
came up with is hardly satisfactory.
Many freshmen brought their cars to campus
expecting to be given a parking decal that would
allow them to park near their residence hall.
They had been sent a notice during the summer
that explained the type of decal issued is
determined by the location of the students local
residence.
But that certainly isnt the case. Freshmen are
being issued only decals for area D by Fraternity
Row.
Cars are double-parked along Frat Row and
freshmen are complaining bitterly that their cars are
of no use to them when they have to park so far
from their dorms.
Royce Williams, coordinator of traffic and
parking, should see that decals are issued for the
parking.lots nearest the halls students live in.
If there isnt enough room, students should be
allowed to park in the lots serving nearby buildings
after 7 p.m.
Its a long walk from Frat Row to Rawlings or
Yulee Hall. Students shouldnt be expected to hike
That Tar-after-many brought their^ar^on ly because
they were led to believe there would be convenient
parking available.

" ,| | -1
MIRROR, MIRROR,-
ON THE WALL-WHOS
, , THE FAIREST OF
7 j| US ALL ?
if! \
CqnnalJ-y! V

Office of the President
September 27, 1973
Spiro T. Agnew
Executive Office Building
Washington, D. C.
Dear Spiro:
In response to your somewhat angry letter of the 26th, I
have enumerated below the answers to those questions that
concerned you.
First, the matter of your parking space: I have
temporarily given John Connally permission to park there,
as he will be staying with Pat and me for the next few
weeks. I bet you never saw a Lincoln Continental pickup
truck before, huh? You may park your new Volvo in the
pay lot down the street (we will reimburse you later).
Secondly, I can understand your concern over the
absence of any Secret Service agents these past few weeks. I
was astonished to hear that Barbara Walters managed to
break in to your bathroom this morning for an interview.
Anyway, our visitor from Texas requires the best
possible security so I have reassigned your agents to him. In
the meantime, Boy Scout Troop 144 will be assigned to
guard you and Judy (watch your language around the
boys!).
Third, I apologize for throwing out all your Frank
Sinatra albums. I thought they were Tricias. I will order
you a new set immediately. Incidentally, during John
Connallys visit, we will be piping Ferlin Husky music
throughout the White House.
Next, you have objected to my decision to move your
office downstairs next to the bowling alley. Look at the
bright side: reporters cant find you there, and you can
bowl all day for only half-price.
In addition, Mr. Connally can use your old office for
phone calls, job interviews, barbeques or short naps.
Next, Im sorry if I hurt your feelings by not inviting you
to Kissingers big state dinner the other night. I do,
however, have a good excuse: at the last minute, Lawrence
Welk and two of the Lennon Sisters dropped by so I gave

The Independent
FLORIDA
ALLIGATOR

Business Staff
R.A. Tony Kendzior General Manager
Ed Cornwell Advertising Director
Tra Isaacs r.T~.Advertising Manager
Mrs. Evelyn Best Office Manager
Towney G. Kennard.Jr .... Business Manager

Agnew vies with Connally

THAT'S A
__ DAMNABLE
m LIE!
7
I
A

I I I 1 CARL
II rn ^
them your seats. You understand.
There are a few additional items you should know about
before coming to work tomorrow:
First, Mr. Connally will be borrowing your speechwriters
and personal secretary for the next few weeks. In the
meantime, youll have to do your own shorthand and
typing. Your new speechwriter is somewhat of a celebrity
a former comedy writer for the Mike Douglas Show. He
said he is familiar with your style.
Secondly, I forgot to reorder your office stationery. You
can use notebook paper in the meantime.
Also, I accidentally opened all your mail yesterday.
Dont worry, though, it was just another bill from those
Charles Atlas people.
Please dont feel hurt if you dont get invited to
breakfast for a while. Elliot Richardson and a few other
lawyers will be dropping by for a chat just silly old
lawyer talk. I took the liberty of ordering you breakfast
tomorrow. The guy from MacDonalds said the Egg
McMuffm would be ready around eight.
Finally, I want to reiterate my support for you in this
pending crisis. You should tackle this head-on, and with the
confidence that the White House is 1000 per cent behind
you. Dont give a second thought to all this ridiculous talk
about your resigning! Your job is secure.
I know these last few weeks have been hell for you, but
dont be depressed. Just think of Tom Eagleton . look
what resigning did for him! Hes more popular than ever.
Be sure' to keep me posted on the latest legal
developments. In the meantime, John Connally says youre
welcome to drop in his office anytime to chat about old
times over a mint julep.
Your pal,
Richard M. Nixon

Debbi Smith
Editor-in-Chief
Jim Seale
News Editor

Diana Snyder
Layout Editor

Editorial Staff

Leslie Voight
Layout Editor

Published by Campus Communications Inc.
P.O. Box 13266 Univ. Sta. Gainesville, Fla.
Office Behind the College Inn
1728 W. University Ave.
Editorial Phone 376-4458
Advertising 376-4482

Dale Thomas
Managing Editor
Robert Dodge
Assistant News Editor

Wendy Snyder
Associate Editor



Women, arise

By ALYCE McADAM
(EDITORS NOTE:) Alyce
Me Adam had taught a
womens self-defense class
and worked in forming the
nations first rape crisis
center in Washington, D.C.)
Early Tuesday morning, a
woman was abducted from
campus and raped by three
men. According to the
University Police
Department, at least three
women reported hearing the
screaming and one said she
heard tires screeching,
and a male voice yelling,
shut up!
Because students did not
respond promptly, the
police arrived too late to
prevent the abduction.
Women must realize that
as long as women are still
being raped no woman on
this campus is realistically
free fr the fear of rape.
Every time we aid a sister in
danger we make our
community a little safer for
all of us tomorrow it may
be you who needs the aid of
sisters.
Such assistance is not all
that difficult or dangerous
to render. I saw a man
hassling a woman in the
Tampa airport. When I went
up to her he had already
taken her mopey and was
attempting to take her
ticket. All I did was to say

Both sides
EDITOR: Your editorial
first published in The
Alligator of Friday, August
17, 1973, in the special
issue for freshmen argues
that only a liberal position
is presented in the social
science departments at the
University of Florida
including such departments
as political science and
economics. It also presents a
picture of faculty as
humiliating students who
raise an opposite point of

The Independent
Florida Alligator

- - V -X/ ~ -

, '--I
Andy Cohen
Sports Editor
ts

Sonya Booth
Features Editor

leave her alone. The man
left and we got the police to
recover her stolen money.
Dont assume that
because a man and woman
know one another that you
should not interfere.
Protecting the safety or life
of another woman is not
interference. According to
FBI statistics a third of
reported rapes are
committed by someone the
woman knows from work,
school or her neighborhood.
Dont assume someone is
fooling around. Dont be
embarassed to interrupt and
ask a woman if she is in
trouble. Your temporary
embarassment will be easily
forgotten. Rape isnt.
In a released statement
Acting Interim UF President
E. T. York said, Women
especially must be
extremely careful not to
move about after dark
unaccompanied on
campus or anywhere else.
I believe that I and other
women have the right to
move about unaccompanied,
after dark on campus or
anywhere else but
especially on campus.
Unwittingly (I hope) York
is aiding the rapist to act as
a policeman for the rest of
the men in this society. As
long as women fear walking
alone after dark and as long
as men tell women to fear

view. Frankly, if this is what
the University of Florida is I
think it would be a travesty
on higher education.
The purpose of our
education is to have faculty
with varying points of view,
on matters that are not
simply a part of a skill or
training process, present
different points of view and
encourage students to study
these divergent topics and
be a part of an educational
process. This educational
process rightfully means
that the student explores,
learns to test, and judges for

Soni Velez
Entertainment Editor

Acey Harper
Photo Editor

walking alone after dark and
as long as rape is tolerated,
men will always know the
whereabouts of their
women, know that
womens activities are
restricted and further
prevent women from taking
full part in the life of this
society.
Yorks statement ended
with Everything in our
power will be done to
prevent a recurrence of this
type of thing. Lets hope
so. And theres plenty that
can be done. Such as:
o More and better
lighting on campus,
particularly around Little
Hall and the libraries. But
lighting is a simple answer.
Self-defense for
women. Classes for women
only should be taught by
women only, offered for
credit thrbugh the physical
education department, or
noncredit courses through
the intramurals department
every quarter free of
on the proceedings that a
rape victim goes through to
report the crime and/or
receive medical treatment.
Many women are reluctant
to report the crime for the
hassles or embarassment
hey think they will endure.
All women who have been
raped need immediate and
adequate medical treatment.
The problems in the process

advice & dissent

himself. If the educational
process is simple
indoctrination, then it
becomes a mockery.
Libertarianism is based on
the principle of
noninitiation of force )no
man may initiate the use of
force against any other
man).
Conservatism, on the
other hand, is based on a
devotion to traditional
Western values.
Noninitiation of force,
regrettably, is not among
these values.
The two philosophies
should be difficult to
confuse. Libertarians have
no more in common with
traditional conservatives
than they do with
ACLU-style liberals.
Mr. Jones would have
done well to note the
following projects of SLM
and FPP:
marching in support of
the Gainesville 8
As I have observed
college students they would
rightfully resent being
exposed only to a liberal, a
middle of the road, or a
conservative point of view
and certainly would resist
indoctrination. The editorial
presents only one point of
view which is that of the
extremist right wing

r( c C (c ~ |i -1 0I ; j-| < i ) i
T Friday. September 28, 1973', The Independent Florida Alligator,

V <^* i<
196+

charge. While training in the
martial arts (judo, karate,
etc.) is valuable, it is not
adequate. An important
aspect of womens
self-defense is the mental
preparedness and
confidence to quickly
respond an aspect not
always dealt with in the
martial arts training. The
martial arts also take a great
time commitment before
experiencing any body
contact. Many women do
not feel physically adequate
to undertake such training.
Basic self-defense can be
taught in a shorter period of
time and women do not
need to be in good
physical condition to
leam.
A campus-wide study
of aiding a rape victim must
be discovered and steps

libertarian position and
takes exception to
everything in opposition to
it.
It seems to me that point
of view should be presented
but should be subject to
criticism and discussion. If
it can stand the test of the
market place, it should
survive. If not, it should be
rejected. This is what I
think the university is all
about and I think the
editorial showed little
understanding of what
education is. As a member
of a social science
department and chairman of
the Political Science
Department, I simply wish
to express to students the
idea that things are quite
different from that in the
editorial and I think we
have a different university
from what was presented in
that editorial. The editorial
while accusing others of
having only one point of
view actually shows extreme
hostility to any positiop
different from that of the
writer of the editorial.
Manning J. Dauer
Chairman
Department of Political Sden

taken to correct them. The
FBI estimates only 20 to 25
per cent of all rapes are
reported. If the percentage
of reported rape increased,
more public attention
would be given to the
problem and more pressure
to capture, prosecute and
convict rapists would be
applied.
Female police officers
trained to question victims
and investigate the crime.
This may help in
encouraging victims to
report.
An educational
program for all female
students covering basic
self-defense, what to do if
raped, medical and legal
information. This could
perhaps be done by a panel
of female police officers,
female law students, people

FFP
EDITOR: An article in the
Sept. 24 edition of The
Independent Florida
Alligator described the
Fundamental Freedom
Party (FPP) and the Student
Libertarian Movement
(SLM) as being right of the
political center.
The article, Student
Groups: Politics to
Ecology by Brian Jones,
went on to describe these
groups as working to
include more conservative
viewpoints in university
courses.
This is extremely
misleading. Both of these
groups adhere to a
libertarian philosophy.
working for the
decriminalization of
marijuana
bringing
anarcho-syndicalist Karl
Hess to campus to advocate
impeaching the President.
None of these projects
fits very neatly into the
conservative pigeon-hole
he provided for us.
Sue Valek
Acting Chairman, FFP
Calvin Timmerman
ice President, SLM

from the Womens Health
Care Clinic and other
womens groups on campus.
o An escort system for
women. There has been
some talk in the past about
such a system. Contact your
student senator and urge
him or her to get moving on
this. Also offer your ideas.
And help.
An end to the
paternalistic attitude
espoused by the
administration, police
officers, teachers, fathers,
husbands, boyfriends, and
male friends that women
need to be protected
from men, by men. Wake up
women! Theyre doing a
lousy job of protecting us
from themselves. Protect
your sister, protect
yourself!

economics
EDITOR: Who is Brian
Donerly to say that all those
who are in favor of the price
freeze are either suffering
from terminal stupidity or
are those who oppose
freedom on principle?
Sixty-four per cent of the
population hardly qualify as
smarter than John K.
Galbraith because they
oppose price controls. All
that is proved is that Brian
Donerly does not have any
idea of what Galbraith has
said.
I am not defending
Nixonomics, but I do not
believe that Donerly is
qualified to hold any
rational opinion on the
subject. He consistently
thinks in absolutes, classing
people as stupid and
totalitarian who do not
agree that libertarian
capitalism is the answer to
the worlds problems. He
simplifies issues, ignoring all
that is inconvenient, and
then launches another
juvenile diatribe.
Donerly exemplifies all
that is bad about libertarian
capitalism: the selfishness,
the arrogance, and the
anti-intellectualism.
Michael Woodhouse 3AS

Page 9



Page 10

I, The I ndependent Florida Alligator, Friday, September 28, 1973

Paint Your Wagon' starts season
Florida Players prepare for new year

Bkl|
WF Iv 9HW
_, Rick Rosen
Singing And Dancing
... trying out for musical

College Councils held back by student apathy

By SUSAN SPINGLER
Alligator Staff Writer
Since the inception of college councils last February,
colleges that previously had not developed councils have
been frantically trying to organize councils in order to get
full use of appropriated Student Government (SG) funds.
The short time in which the college councils have been
created and the lack of student awareness of the councils
may be reasons for the apparent student apathy.
THE IDEA of the college council was formulated in
1963 by the Student Senate. No funds were made available
for the councils to use until this year when The Alligator
went independent and left SG with enough funds to
support the councils.
The councils now get $1 for each full-time student
enrolled in each college. Fourteen of the 16 colleges at UF
have organized councils. Forestry and Medicine are the
only two colleges which have not formed councils.
SG has no say in what the councils do with their money.
Budgets must be approved by the dean of the councils
college and must then go to the Student Body Treasurer,
who distributes the funds.
STUDENT BODY Treasurer Gary Neubert said he will
reject a budget if funds are allocated for anything illegal,
but otherwise he has nothing to say about the use of the
funds.
Councils are representative bodies, elected in the colleges
in different ways. Most colleges elect a certain number of
representatives from each of the departments within the
college.
Neubert said the idea behind the councils is to further
activities in the individual colleges by providing money
directly to them as opposed to money that goes to SG.
Interest in the councils in the form of voter participation
and number of candidates running for election has be£n
low.

By ROBIN WILLIAMS
Alligator Staff Writer
Tryouts were held this week for fall quarters production
of Paint Your Wagon. The show, which will run Nov.
2-10 in the H.P. Constans Theater, is a rollicking musical
about the Old West gold rush days.
PAINT YOUR WAGON will be produced by the
Florida Players in conjunction with the department of
music. Dr. Clyde G. Sumpter is directing the show. Musical
directors are Dr. John Grigsby and Dr. Gustav Holley.
From today through Nov. 1, there will be work going on
at the theater to construct sets, focus lights and make
costumes for the show.
Work sessions in the theater shop will be 7-10 p.m.
Monday and 2-5:30 p.m. Tuesday through Friday. Dr. A1
Wehlburg and his corps of shop assistants will greet all
newcomers and invite them to grab a paintbrush or
hammer.
THE COSTUME shop located upstairs at the theater will
begin making costumes for Paint Your Wagon next week.
The costume shop is open form 9 a.m. 5 p.m. each
weekday. Costumers will also be at work Monday through
Wednesday nights from beginning at 7:30.
Max Frischs Andora will be the major production
winter quarter. The director, Dr. L.L. Zimmerman, said he
considered Frisch one of the best contemporary Central
European playwrights.
Because of this summers favorable response to Florida
Players performance of the childrens play Androcles and
the Lion, the theater department decided to produce
another childrens show this winter.
DR. CLYDE G. Sumpter will direct Nicolo and
Nicolette, a childrens fantasy by Alan Cullen. The fantasy
will open for matinee performances March 2. h
Spring quarter the Players will offer a former Broadway
hit and a contemporary comedy which hasnt been
announced yet.
The Broadway show, And Miss Reardon Drinks a
Little, by Paul Zindel will open May 6. Director Richard
Lake described the show as a hilarious, revealing and
touching comedy.
JULIE HARRIS starred in the show when it opened on
Broadway in Feb. 1971.
Graduate student Shep Sobel will be directing the
comedy. It will open May 28.

GARY SEIBERT of the College of Engineering said not
too many people voted in their college council election,
and said they had to look for people to run for their
25-member council.
Reports were similar from other colleges. Cecelia
Wicklin, a member of the University College Council, said
no one received more than 50 votes and voter turnout was
pretty low. Along with Arts and Sciences, UC is one of
the largest colleges at UF.
Larry Harrison, of the Arts and Sciences council said it
differed in each department, but voter turnout and interest
in the councils was generally low in his college.
THE ONLY exception seemed to be the Law School, which
incorporated its college council into the John Marshall Bar
Association (JMBA), a law student organization that has

'y.- % £.., .. .
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Greg Sherman
... business scholarships

JH
Gary Neubert
... I ittle control

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Ins.
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K
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Rick Rosen
Under The Lights
.. hopefuls read for Western
The one-acts will appear in either fall or spring quarter.
SEASON TICKETS to the Players Productions are
available at the Constans Theater Box Office from 12:30-4
p.m. Anyone butying a season ticket will be able to reserve
their tickets for the show one week before regular tickets
go on sale.
Price for the tickets will be $8 for non students and $4
for students. The price of a ticket covers admission for the
four major productions and for the graduate student one
acts.

existed for some time. According to John Wilcox, president
of JMBA, voter turnout was about 50 per cent.
Despite the low student interest, the councils have been
busy using the appropriated funds.
UC Council projects have included financing fencers to
go to a tournament, purchasing a 90-minute documentary
film on China and giving money to the Equal Education
Opportunity Program (EEOP).
THE ARTS and Sciences Councils money must benefit
all Arts and Science students or all UF students, according
to Harrison. They rejected a request to send some botany
students on a trip because the benefits received from the
money would not be far-reaching enough, he said.
One of the colleges biggest projects was setting up a
calculator lab in 116 Building D which is open to all
undergraduate and graduate students.
Plans for the future include such projects as a peer
advisory board that will provide a student advisory service
for students in the hopes the communication gap between
student and advisor will be diminished.
THE COUNCIL plans to give money to Accent for
speakers, and donate to the Florida Quarterly for a literary
magazine.
The law school council has fixed up the student lounge,
financed the brown baggers weekly luncheon, have fixed up
the JMBA office and sent representatives to the American
Bar Association convention.
The journalism college plans to build a lounge in one of
the classrooms at the college, buy casette tape recorders for
students to rent, provide more cameras and other
equipment for the journalism students and extend the
hours of the college library.
THE COLLEGE of Business Administration Council has
used its funds to provide scholarships, a book exchange,
teacher of the year awards, and money for assistantships
within the college, council member Greg Sherman said.



Meat
By JOE COLLUM
Alligator Staff Writer
The price of meat seems
to have followed that
proverbial cow who jumped
over the ihoon. Its
skyrocketed.
But the meat-eating
species man is not destined
to become extinct.
THE CARNIVORE is
coming up with ways to
beat the meat squeeze.
Buying meat on the hoof
live steeis has become
popular with carnivores with
big freezers.
Lonnie Thompson Jr., of
the Gainesville Livestock
Market, said there was a
flurry of live steer buying
after President Nixons meat
price freeze was lifted two
weeks ago.
THERE WAS a pretty
good group in here then.
They meetly bought 1,000
pound steers. From 800 to
1,000 pounds is a good size
for freezing, Thompson
said.
A 1,000 pound steer
today goes for 38 cents per
pound. The heavier the steer
the cheaper. After slaughter
and processing, the carcass
weighs about 600 pounds
and the total cost is about
$450. About 25 per cent, or
150 pounds, of that carcass
is bone and fat.

Meat Counter
... prices to drop?

Hey diddle, diddle

prices drop

So in the end a 1,000
pound steer will bring its
buyer about 450 pounds of
steaks, roasts, stew meat
and hamburger for $450, or
$1 per pound.
CHEAP? IF youve got a
S9OO freezer to store a
quarter ton of meat.
Gruver & Cotting Inc. is a
wholesale meat dealership
which caters mostly to
eateries such as restaurants,
hotels and schools. But it
also serves individuals with
room for a side of beef.
Proprietor Richard
Gruver said most of his
individual customers buy a
275 pound side of beef that
is reduced to almost 200
pounds after it is processed
and frozen. The price per
pound comes out to 87
cents.
CHEAP? AGAIN, yes, if
youve got a place to put it.
Most students obviously
dont. But that doesnt spell
the end of the average
student carnivore whos got
to fill his stomach on SSO or
$75 a month.
At Thompsons
Gainesville Livestock
Market The price of 1,000
pound steers has dropped
from 48 to 38 cents a
pound in the last 10 days,
Thompson said.
THATS A 20 per cent
drop and Thompson said

retail price trends at meat
counters usually run two
weeks behind price changes
at his market.
Gruver said, Probably
next week youll see lots of
specials at meat and stiper
markets. And the week after
that youll see even more
specials.
The reason? During the
Nixon freeze cattlemen kept
their steers off the market
and in Midwestern feedlots.
Unfortunately, said
Thompson, there comes a
time in every steers life
when he just cant get any
fatter, so when the freeze
was lifted there was a
surplus of steers that
couldnt be held any longer.
NOW, SAID Gruver,
The pipelines are full.
Thus, the price of beef is
sinking almost as fast as it
skyrocketed earlier this
year.
The s situation is
temporary, however.
Thompson and Gruver agree
the pipelines will unclog
when telescopic retail prices
sink back into the
atmosphere of the average
consumer.
So carnivores better
enjoy a sirloin or two while
they can, because if what
the experts say is true, come
January that old cows
going back into orbit.

jff
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W- II I m
..... a. v
.. Jr Ml 'jt ;
, Aw W ' ** '' **
C. Hires
Dorm Lounges
>- ... home, sweet home
More room in dorms
t *,

By BRUCE MAULDEN
and
BERNIE WROBLE
Alligator Staff Writers
The UF Division of
Housing began accepting
cancellations from
students in dormitory
rooms Wednesday, to
provide relief for those
stuck in dormitory
lounges. Students moving
out, though, must be
prepared to pay partial
rent for their rooms.
We have reopened
our door for contract
releases, until we find
enough rooms for
students now in
lounges, Joe Ball,
assistant to the director
of housing said.
Students who decide
to move out must pay
only for the time they
have already spent in
their rooms, he said. A
student cancelling his
room today will be
charged S3O to S4O, or
1/5 the quarters rent.
The remainder of the
rent will be refunded to
the student by mail.
All cancellations
should go through my
office, Ball aid.
Students should make
sure they are released
from their contracts
before signing any leases
or agreements off
campus. Ball also
pointed out that
freshmen will not be
released from their
housing contracts under
any circumstances.
A new rule passed by
the Board of Regents
(BOR) in July, allowing
sophomores to live off
campus, a BOR cut in

Friday, September 28, 1973, The Independent Florida Alligator,

funds to universities and
an increase in the
number of apartments in
Gainesville did not stop a
large percentage of
transfer students and
sophomores from
wanting dorms. As a
result, more than 300
students had to be
assigned to dormitory
lounges when the fall
term opened this week.
UF Director of
Housing James T.
Hennessey said sleeping
in lounges was normal
for the school years
opening, although he
admitted that this falls
number was greater than
anticipated. Things
should be okay in two or
three weeks, however,
he said. Most of the
students dont want to
leave the lounges. Its air
conditioned, carpeted
and they would really
rather stay there.
Hennessey predicted
by mid-term there would
be plenty of rooms for
everyone and things
would return to normal.
DESPITE THE critical
shortage of space,
students who did have
rooms were not allowed
contract releases earlier
this week. Housing
stopped taking
cancellations from
women in rooms last
Thursday, and from men
on Tuesday morning.
Releases have been
granted to students in
lounges if they paid for
the time they lived in
makeshift facilities.
Based on $l3O-$l4O
per quarter rates, lounge
students breaking their
contracts were required

to pay 10% of their rent
for each week they
occupied the lounges or
$26 to S2B if they left
this week.
Every effort is being
made to help students in
lounges, Ball said.
Tuesday night we
placed several long
distance phone calls to
persons who have not
checked into their
assigned rooms yet, he
said. When we can
determine how many
rooms will be available
due to these no-shows,
we will assign such rooms
to those now in
lounges.
About one dozen
graduate students in
lounges were moved into
rooms Wednesday, Ball
said, and added that
these were the first of
the lounge dwellers to be
accommodated aside
from exceptional cases
handled earlier.
The bulk of the 209
men and 92 women
assigned to lounge spaces
still await room
assignments. All men in
Rawlings Hall lounge
were given rooms by
Wednesday night, Ball
said. Remaining lounge
students will be moved
into rooms as space
becomes available, he
said.
Ball urged students
interested in moving out
of their dormitory rooms
to act quickly. He could
not promise that
contract cancellations
would be granted after
today and he estimated
that releases of womens
dorm contracts would
end very soon.

Page 11



Page 12

' i
, The Independent Florida Alligator, Friday, September 28, 1973

Women voters
hold workshop
An administration of justice workshop dealing with
Crime and punishment sponsored by the League of
Women Voters of Florida (LWV), will be held at the Flagler
Inn October 2 and 3.
Registration will end at 1 p. m. Oct. 2. A luncheon
address will follow on The state of corrections in Florida
by the Secretary of Floridas Department of Rehabilitative
Services, O. J. Keller Jr.
After a panel discussion on alternatives to prison, Dr.
Stanley Brodsky, coordinator for correctional psychology
at the University of Alabama is to speak on the
philosophy of incarceration.
The second day of the workshop features a special
problems in corrections panel discussion and a tour of
several of Floridas state correctional institutions.
Most of the participants will be members of the LWV
Administration of Justice Committee. Other interested
persons may attend on a space available basis.
More information may be obtained from Millie Combs,
372-5127.
' 1 '"' 11 1 L l| !' u
'
According to the Educational Testing Service report,
only a veteran who earns $2,400 a year with a working wife
can afford to meet his expenses, contrary to what was
reported in The Alligator Wednesday.
The Alligator regrets the error.
Coordinator of Veteran Affairs Rolf Groseth further
clarified his position on a bill that would waive tuition fees
for all veterans attending state schools.
He said he thinks the bill could not pass unless a
provision requiring the state to reimburse UF for loss of the
fees is included in the bill.

SAMSON is Recruiting You
Tuesday, Oct. 2 at 7:30 pm
NORMAN HALL AUD.
ir
Curiosity is a good
\ reason to come and
( A hear about SAMSON
I And naming to help
\ / (fliers is the best
\. (/ / reason to join us
- 9
Do Unto Others...
with SAMSON
* >

Pffcll IMpiififil
UULJUU^Mj

By STEVE SCHLITT
Alligator Staff Writer
BAHAII: The Bahaii Association will have a Bahaii
Fireside tonight at 8:00 in room 118 of the J. Wayne Reitz
Union. It will be an informal discussion for those curious
about the Bahaii faith.
GET ACQUAINTED: There will be a folk dancing get
acquainted party tonight from 9 to midnight in the Norman
Hall Gym and it is sponsored by the Folk Dancing Club.
There will be a beginners session to teach newcomers from
9 to 10 p.m.
ELECTION: Officers for the Student Libertarian
Movement will be elected at tonights meeting in room
1508 of the Union. The meeting will begin at 8 p.m.
ROSH HASHANA SERVICES: The Hillel Foundation
will hold Rosh Hashana Services today at 9:30a.m. and 5
p.m. in the McCarty Auditorium.
SLAUGHTERHOUSE: Slaughterhouse Five will be
shown tonight in the Beatty Towers Rec Room at 7:30,
9:30, and Admission will be 50 cents. Popcorn and
cokes will be sold.
SG ABOLITION: Student Government abolition will be
discussed at tonights Fundamental Freedom Party meeting
in room 1508 of the Union at 8 p.m. A Lunch n rap
session will be held on the Plaza of the Americas today
from noon until 2 p. m. There will be hot dogs and cokes,
and SG officials will be there to talk with students.
ITS A TRIP: A one-and-a-half hour bicycling trip will
begin at the Plaza of the Americas tomorrow at 3:45 p.m.
The ride will last ab£>ut one hour and it is sponsored by the
UF Cycle Club.
FILM PROGRAM: A film program sponsored by the
Divine Light Mission will give information on Millenium
73, a gathering in which Guru Maharaji will present his
program to bring peace to the world. The film will be held
at the Center for United Ministries at 7:30 p.m.
CRAFTY: An arts and crafts sale is being held today and
tomorrow in the union ballroom starting at 11 a.m.
FUTURISTIC: 2001:A Space Odyssey will be shown
in the Union Auditorium at 5:30, 8:15, and 11, and

Take Your Laundry to I

The Villa... I
i : n
Still Home of the
* M
The Villa Northeast I
/ n
j"
is 3 blocks East of I
Burger King _l
210 NE 16 Ave. -4 I
1
r mmm 1 -- |g
s H
The VillaNorth THE VILLAS
is 2 blocks North of Take time to
the Atlantic Bank save a dime...
4107 NW 13 St | At the home
the quarterwash

Saturday afternoon and night at 2:30, 5:30, 8:15 and
11:00.
SPHEERIS: Jimmy Spheeris will perform Saturday in
the Plaza of the Americas at 8 p.m. The concert is being
sponsored by Student Government Productions.
AWARD WINNER: The acclaimed movie Garden of the
Finzi-Continis will be shown Sunday night in the Union
Auditorium at 6, 8 and 10.
GOOD CONNECTION: Student 'Government
Productions will present The French Connection in the
Plaza of the Americas at 8 p. m. Sunday.
DONT MISS MISS: The Catholic Student Federation
will be holding a Listening party to hear the
Florida-Mississippi football game on the radio. The party
will be in the Catholic Student Center at 7:30 p. m.
Saturday. Refreshments will be served.
GATOR CENTURY: A 100-mile bicycling tour will be
sponsored by the UF Cycle Club Saturday beginning at 7
a.m. The Gator Century Tour will start in the Plaza of
the Americas. Previous experience and a 10-speed bike are
required.
THATS CRICKET: The Cricket Club will meet every
Saturday beinning Saturday on Alice Field. Interested
persons please contact Siva at 372-5276.
BACK TO NATURE: An organic gardening project
will be held Saturday morning at 10 a.m. by the
Environmental Action Group west of Lake Alice across
from the Physical Plant. Admission will be $lO and is open
to all students.
CATHOLIC STUDENTS: There will be a general meeting
of all those students interested in the Catholic Student
Federation Sunday at 7:30 p.m. in the Catholic Student
Center.
UF VS. TULANE: The UF Rugby Team will be playing
against Tulane in Norman Field at noon Sunday.
OFF THE DEEP END: Skin and Scuba diving classes
sponsored by the Gainesville YMCA will begin Monday
with lectures and pool sessions which will be Mondays and
Tuesdays at 7 p.m. Successful completion of the course will
give the student international certification.



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Friday, September 28, 1973, The Independent Florida AHigator,

Page 13



Page 14

i .... f
The Independent Florida Alligator, Friday, September 28, 1973

GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

< rol
ampex 87r cassette tape deck,
amp. & tuner (one unit); plus
two ampex 6x9 speakers (wood
cabinet), matched set $225
(negotiable), jim 3789950.
(A-4t-3-p)
green JbANNOU RACER 10
SPEED 460.00 3 7 3 7 0 77.
(A-2t-4-p)
black & white with stand in
good condition has a timer, call
373-7839. (A-3t-3-p)
For Sale: 4 tickets to Miss. St
Game call Glen or Paul
376-9208. (A-3t-3-p)
kenmore washer frigidaire delux
dryer $1 50 for both exc working
ond (A-3t-3-p)
teac 60lOu stereo tape deck in
like new condition, automatic
reverse, special remote control
unit. $425 or best offer, allan
392-0846 or 392-0484.
(A-3t-3-p)
tape deck magnacord 1020
(telex) professional quality, used
in many studios, large vu meters
cost $725 new, asking S3OO or
best offer 372-0360. (A-st-2-p)
1973 Honda 350 1 mo. old
SBOO.OO call 376-8633 or
495-2357 after 5 p.m. (A-st-2-p)
COAST TO COAST
Milex, )
PRECISION AUTO TUNE UM^f
AIR CONDITIONER
BRAKE
SERVICE
ELECTRONIC TUNE-UPS
Ignition & Carburetion, Alterna
tors & Generators & Starters
1952 N. Main St.
Phone 372-5247

wwpwppp.MiipiiLf 1
Smokin Joe
~j J^QB^ H Gainesvilles most complete headshop
i ( i£ ~ Jw over 60 kinds of papers, pipes
* ft made of clay, wood, brass, silver
. J glass, stone, acrylic, plexiglass, bongs, water
" electric pipes, carbs, chambers, and many more
Vs -( theres 36 flavors of incense
rf x at 3 cents a stick the lowest price
1 VaICwC? / iaround plus hand held electric pipes
| Y nkjir 4 -' Jtons of scented drip sand candles, over 50
I 4k 1 /styles of clips, onyx ashtrays
! \jT J / carved wooden boxes from India
V V fcl p,us man y unmentionable goodies all at
Jl Cfair prices the lowest in town
i ' ?vl WBfX Jjpthem folks aim to please
corner of N.W sth Ave. & N.W. 13th St. love
0
Need something for your apartment?
M O ;
Need an apartment ?
. A
Shop Gator Classifieds!

x FOR~SALE
HODAKA super rat 6 months
old never raced excellent
condition many extras asking
$4 75.00 call 3730166.
(A-4t-3-p).
1972 V? yamaha 360 less than 1
yr. old 1650 miles great
condition $650.00 or trade for
vw call 373-2319 see at 5239
s.w. 67th st. (A-4t-3-p)
Siamese Hobbits! Guaranteed to
tapdance their way into your
heart! 5 weeks old. first shots &
wormed. purebred S2O
373-6656 go kitty crazy.
(A-st-3-p)
68 dodge camper 318 cu in
engine refrigerator sink excellent
running ondition needs minor
repairs call between 6 & 10
4681674. (A-3t-3-p)
stereo components- dynaco
120 w amp. S3OO, dynaco
bookshelf 2way speakers $75.
nikko receiver S9O. garrard 40b
turntable S4O. call 373-8381.
(A-st-3-p)
used hammond c 3 console organ
with speaker excellent condition
call 3721954 or 3721487.
(A-10t-2-p)
t THERE'S MORE
TO SEE WITH
CABLE TV
8 TV Channels. A weather
channel, UPI News, New York
Stock Exchange, 2 FM stations on
TV Channels, and 9 FM and 4 AM
stations on the FM band.
UNIVERSITY CITY
TELEVISION CABLE CO-INC.
522 N. MAIN ST. 378-2447

---A
X FOR SALE p
womens j-speed schwinn.
basket, lock, chain.good
condition; $50.00 call 378-5669
after 6:00 p.m. ask for frank.
(A-3t-3-p)
for sale: boys 10 speed bike low
mileage, excellent condition
with generator light, call nights
373-3607 $75 or best offer
(a-2t-4-p)
DIAMOND ENGAGEMENT
RING V 4 carat "orange blossom"
perfect quality, $75 or best
offer, 372-0360. (A-st-2-p)
H-D- xlch 1972 excellenv
condition with 6 tubes spoolie
wheel 16" rear wheel 6 risers,
drag bars.struts.loors sharp runs
Tret ter 1500 468-1722 after 6
pm see to appreciate (a-3t-4-p)
green JOANNOM RACER 10
SPPEED $60.00 3737077 (a-2t-4-
NEW & USED New LR coffee
& end tables $8.95 Genuine
Simmons matt & box spgs.
$29.95 set- Danish 3pc liv rm
suits $19.95 up Supply limited
Beautiful new walnut BR suits
were $l5O now $99.50 Lawson
LR suits now $99.50 100s of
other items not on sale,
stereo componants dynaco 120 w
amp. S3OO, dynaco bookshelf
2way speakers $75. nikko
receiver S9O, garrard 40b
turntable S4O. together $450.
FURNITURE CITY USA, COR
E Univ & SE Ist Sts (across from
the Court House in the old Baird
Hardware Bldg.)
(A-st-2-p)
1969 Fiat 850 Spyder
Convertible White with blue top
New inspection & tag $625.00
or Best offer 372-6242
(a-st-4-pd)
73 1-82 vette leather stereo dark
blue low low miles air 4speed
$6599; 25" color tv $175;72
yamaha 125mx superb cond
never raced $499. 3723835
(a-3t-5-p)

FOR SALE y
Dorm-size refrigerator w/
freezer, 1 yr. old Sears Coldspot
like new was $l5O, now SBO
373-9252 daytime, 372-0801
nightime (a-st-4-p)
Dorm-size refrigerator w/
freezer, 4 yr. old Sears Coldspot
like new was $l5O, now SBO
373-9252 daytime, 372-0801
nightime (a-st-4-p)
Zenith portable black & white tv
17" good condition SSO 376
2962 (a-2t-5-p)
3 bedroom mobile home, central
air & heat,wall-to-wall shag
rug,water bed,nice shady lot
close to campus.equity & assume
payments 378-9109 (a-st-5-p)
Sanyo electronic pocket
calculator 8 digit readout with
up to 16 digit capacity, $l5O
p new now only s6o,in perfect
condition,call 3788116
(a-3t-5-p)
garage sale air cond new tv 17"
80 12 tv 35 dishes clothes hair
dryerbooks & more apt 322-8
university village south
378-1876 sat. and sun. (a-lt-5-p)
72% honda cl 350 red good
condition $650 come by 1830
nwlst ave aptc after six or any
time weekends (a-2t-5-p)
Dorm Size REFRIGERATOR
excellent condition $75 firm call
372- (a-2t-4-p)
FOR RENT
female roommate wanted, grad
student preferred, own bdrm 2
blocks from campus, call Sherry
373- (B-st-2-p)

from one
finest facilities featuring the NAUTILUS
line of exercising equipment and CON
VENTIONAL WEIGHTS AND BARS
llRw) women men I
Showers Showers I

I Well Do Wonderful!
[Things to Your Bodyl
I// the exercise I
I / | 378 6927 1 /w \

f ******* sgV presents s
SPECIAL GUEST STAR
SKYLAKE
FREE at the Plaza of the Americas!
: :
S 8:00 P.M. SATURDAY SEPT. 29




gator
classifieds

Z '. FOR
one bedroom garage apartment,
semifurnished. couples only, call
after 5:30 -376-3164 S9B 1 block
campus. (B-st-3-p)
Don t say it hiss it

jJ AH

Certificate Entitles the B
Bearer to Food in the Amount i| gi|>
M tfco# up TO 500 off j #y g
IS ITALIAN FI&NERMAN
SOuth on 441"

t*KXP *j -*Aj.
4
V '?
- v

Take an Alligator to lunch.
(

C FOR RENT
2 roommates wanted to share
large 3 bedroom house by mall.
SBS mo. includes all utilities, call
David at 373-0403 and leave
message. (B-4t-2-p)
MIKES
COLLEGE INN
FULL LUNCH
MENU
MIKE'S FAMOUS
GIANT SUBS
OPEN
10a.m l2 p.m.
7 DAYS A WEEK

x FOR RENT
student or faculty wanted to
share large house rent &
expenses near campus own
rooms approx $95/mo 3737715
or lv message at 3920204
winarsky. (B-4t-2-p)
save your gas money! 14 new
apts Vz block from campus,
lbedroom KE or fully furnished.
Graduate Apts. 1241 sw 4th ave.
(B-st-2-p)
Alachua Couaty
Generator Service
Alternators-Starters Alternators-Starters-Generators
-Generators- Alternators-Starters-Generators
Foreign Car
Service
Ph. 378-4011
508 N.W. Bth Ave.

for rent: one room in four
bedroom two bath house. $55
per month call anytime at
3735496 ask for tim. (B-st-2-p)
1 or 2 female roommates needed
to share french quarter apt. with
2 other girls. 56.25 per mo.
372-128?. (B-3t-4-p)
Rooms for rent Male students*
private entrance come after 6:30
115nw lOst. (B-st-3-p)
female roomate wanted, share
bedroom 132.00 per qtr. + 1/3
utilities. 1 blk from campus, call
376-1852 after 5:00. (B-3t-3-p)
wanted male roomate for own
room in 12 x 60 trailer, ac, heat,
dishwasher, close to campus.
$55 month plus >/2 utilities, call
378-0245. (B-3t-3-p)
4-bedroom furnished house unit
air garage $215. p-mo. oct 1
3242 N.W. 12th Terrace no
phone ask for Mark or Bob.

Friday, September 28, The Independent Florid^Ajliga^

ORDER YOUR UNIVERSITY
RINGS NOW!
# LARGE SELECTION
courteous service
professional ring
LADIES' & MEN'S
WM ALL RINGS GUARANTEED
HATCHERS JEWELERS
"Your Better Jeweler
2 EAST UNIV. AVE 376-6892
WINNER 1972 CANNES FILM FESTIVAL
JURY PRIZE AWARD
Only American Film to be so Honored
Billy Pilgrim
lives
from tune
to time
to time...
A GEORGE ROY HILL PAUI MONASH PRODUCTION
[slaughterhouse-five!
Oneol' h^
MICHAEL SACKS RON IEIBMAN VALERIE PERRINE HHLaHH
. KURT VONNEGUT.Jr n-.
_ Nus cby Giew Gou'd a TECHNICOLOR
R v.t:
Tonight in the Towers Rec Room.
Shows at 7:30, 9:30 &__ 11:00 Admission 504
Popcorn & Cokes will be sold
sgp
tRTI OCTOBER 21
UT ALL TICKETS
' $6.00
I Q FLORID*
ELTCNJCHN G
HITH
MGEI DEE CAVEy
CLSSI N miLLAY IfUNSRNE B*oo P*/W.
*Ute Sutlte\la*ui. fcltdh&U. £ 2.**ioeA.
TICKETS A VAILABLEAT:
REITZ UNION
BOXOFFICE
ADVANCED SALE nrmRFR i
U of F STUDENTS ONLY VUTVBtHJ
GENERAL PUBLIC TICKETS
AVAILABLE OCTOBER 10
REBEL DISCOUNT
RECORDS VILLE

Page 15



Page 16

so;; 3 cI /. ) ti n i ; f i\ : r r v:
i, The Independent Florida Alligator, Friday, September 28, 1973

OATOR CLASSIFIEDS

FOR RENT
jre a house with your own
droom S6O/mo.' near mall
replace garage screened porch
rivate liberal male call 3761431
between 6-10 pm leave no.
(B-3t-4-p)
Male room mate wanted to share
two bedroom,completely
furnished apartment, for further
information call 373-5953
(b-3t-5-p)
sublet 2br 2bath unfurnished apt
country village apts $ 195/mo
S2OO security deposit required
376-6956 373-3782 after 5:30
weekdays. (B-st-2-p)
1 or 2 female roommates needed
to share french quarter apt. with
2 other girls. 56.25 per mo.
372-1282 (b-3t-4-p) h
share house with your own
bedroom S6O/mo near mall
fireplace garage screened porch
private liberal male call 3761431
between 6-10 pm leave (b-3t-4-p)
1 room S6O mth '/ utilities
central a/c&heat liberal female
preferred large.nice house all
privleges no pets 3739195 ask
for rick terri or harry (b-st-5-p)
BILL'S
SHOE SHOP
Mens Work Shoes
Moccasins
Boots Dog Collars
Nameplates
EXPERT
SHOE REPAIR
114 S. Main St
DERWOODS
Paint &
Body Shop
Foreign
and Domestic
2425 NE 19 Dr.
373-8997

MICHELOB
%-price
All flight Friday with
purchase of any
food item.
EAT DRINK
and
PLAY PINBALL
at
FUN CITY
The Deli with a gamesroom'

1245 W. Univ. Ave.

C WANTED
need female rbommate to take
my place in 2rbr apt. frederick
garden 45/mo + utilities.
373-7200. (C-st-4-p)
Easy-going roommate for Village
34. S7O + >/2 utilities. Prefer grad
student. 372-2075 before 5 p.m.
Mike. (C-3t-4-p)
Roommate to snare apartment 3
blocks from campus pool and
AC SSO per month utilities
1512 NW sth AVE Apt 48
(c-2t-4-p)
friendly female wanted! own
room in 2 bedroom townhouse
apt. to share with 2 other
friendly girls 75/mo. + utilities
french quarter 373-9337
(c-3t-4-p)
SIO.OO reward for best chosen
name of discoteque in jax
immaculate place appr* 5500 sq
ft including swimming pool
game room beer wine sandwich
send names + address to 421 nw
15th st university apts. no. 86
before 10-1-73. (C-4t-2-p)
Part Time secretary must be able
to type and keep records
schedule can be worked out call
376-0968 or 373-2917 ask for
drew. (C-4t-2-p)
female roomates to share 2
bedroom apt near med center
furnished call after 5 3735824.
female roommate to share one
bedroom apt. one block from
campus, 9 month lease and
completely furnished, call
jacquie 372-1884. (C-st-2-p)
roommate needed -2 bdrm
furnished la bonne vie apts
60-65$ mo. room with 2 male
grad students call 372-6844, apt
255 (c-4t-5-p)
Babysitting 1% days a week in
NW section for infant and 4 year
old. Must have own
transportation, call after 5 P.M.
372-0775 (c-3t-5-p)
Female med-student needs
roomate for 1 bedroom Summit
House apartment. Call Cheryl
after 5:30 at 376-8021.
(C-st-3-p)
Part time help wanted. Apply in
person at FUN CITY, (c-3t-4-c)

HELP WANTED >
Babysitter needed in our home
from 9:30 11:30 am Mon. thru
Fri. for 3 year old twins. Will
pay SI.OO per hour. Call
373-4767. (E-4t-2-p)
WANTED coed to clean mature
bachelor's apartment. Oak
Forest. Must have own
transportation. Work schedule is
flexible $2.00 per hour. Call
392-9656 between 8 & 5.
(e-st-5-p)
Photographers with 35mm
cameras and strobes (prefer at
least 300 shot capacity) for
short and profitable assignments,
call 378-4700 or 378-9963.
immediately (e-2t-5-p)
parttime guys or gals neat for
national Motel reservation
system promotion must have
own car call ken burns toll free
800654-4814 (e-2t-5-p)
income S4O to S7O a week part
time evenings and Saturdays, call
tim smith 378-0121 7to9pm
only. (e-st-5-p)

f WELCOME
|j\ BACK GANG!
11 L J 1/ Hope you had a nice summer. To help
1 \ 1/ you celebrate your arrival -here's a
1 V CZjJm coupon, good for 50 t off any pizza.
\
I \ II y r 9 friends over and celebrate.
I
I / N \ \|. ./ | OFF ON THE PRICE i
/ jC \ I \V / |OF ANY PIZZA.
l/y\ sr 1 \y j y i
\ W 117 *1 EXPIRES
I '' >- N / c\ \ yv i. /, --i i
\ / Jr X X Not valid with any I
jr other offer.
"V rfcwkS I One coupon per
0 pizza, please.
* VTw 376-2487
_3Gi> J £-- westside 378-2415
HFAST HOT FREE DELIVERY
DOMINOS
PIZZA
OPEN FOR LUNCH 11 AM i

< AU -I S D
70 VW wide tires, Hurst shift,
stereo tape player, bronze
$1250, Paula 376*0779 or
392-1635 (G-3t-4-p)
1967 Pontiac Catalina 2 dr hard
top extra clean, a/c power
brakes & steering new shocks
and brakes, low milage S9OO
3763442, 3782996. (G-st-4-p)
1969 pontiac lemans custom s
fully equipped best offer takes
it! call corey 378-7776 or
373-5266. (G-st-2-p)
PERSONAL
WANTED same kind person to
adopt our cat. small,
affectionate, long-haired,
beautiful! call 373-8737 after 3
please (j-3t-5-p)
Fresh whole wheat bread every
day monday thru friday. Warm
from the oven around Ipm
Mother Earth 604nw 13th st
mon-fri 10-8 sat 10-6 (j-st-5-p)
DIVORCE KIT for Floridas
new no-fault law. Written
guarantee yet only $20.80. Free
details Write: KIT, Box 791,
Pompano, Fla. 33061 (j-2t-5-p)

i i 4
In the great tradition :
of American thrillers. <
8:00Pm Sunday, Sept. 30 SGP Presents^H^^
THE FRENCH
CONNECTON Bi
20th CENTURY-FOX PRESENTS THE FRENCH CONNECTON" A PHUP OANTONI PRODUCTION
SlM*# GENE HACKMAN FERNANOOREY ROY SOCCER TONY 10 BIANCO MARCEL 90ZZUFF
. WILLIAM FREOKM -ma.r PHUP DANTONI KENNETH UTT
fxcuTM pftoouct G DAW SCHME sowwuw * ERNEST TOYMAN nusccmwMwicowiciwrr DON ELLIS
CaOR BY OE LUXE* 1
in the Plaza of the Americas free



p" MIDNIGHT SHOW I
"IT IS A JOY!"
Judith Crist, New York Magazine
Paramount Pictures Presents
HAROLD and MAUDE
iGPj Color by Technicolor* A Paramount Picture] ~
imnii n m
y

I WEEK 7:00 9:30 I
Wf \ WO OHf iMOfm ;
P"H£iZDBSSHI TODAY AT
A BEAUTY KmiFd tl*.lr o a
UNSURPASSED A|||Mfi|MMfc|ifl F~ 4
iMMlililiilHliliilMHll 6Blo
;SE)DHARTHA
is an exquisite movie!
H REX REED. Syndicittd Columnist
"Both in music and ff A special film for special
visible beauty audiences, for devotees
the picture is a of Hesses novels, for
continuing delight. 1 admirers of the exotic,
ARCHER WINSTEN, N V Posl and for everyone
"Impossibly who wants to he
beautiful to the adventurous
eye. Visually 111 fi,m K ,nP ,nPexquisite.
exquisite. ,nPexquisite.
BERNARD DREW. Gannett News Service
"A visually
exquisite film... A
Mk
welcome
experience."
WILLIAM Cue
COlUUfli* PiClut S Pf S(N'S ; VB< fIjHHB
UOOMAarMA si Smash *POO
enotOGBAPnEO Bv SVEN nvkviST
l" . Vrirw ** **. '

gator classifieds

x PERSONAL ~)
wantechyou. corner drugstore
begins volunteer training Oct 1
Call 378-1588 or come by 1128
sw 1 ave for details. Help us all
(j-2t-5-p)
COED facial hair remove
permanently call Edmued
Dwyer, Electrologist, for your
appointment 3 72-8039
(J-fr-4-ch)

s~ --'- v
< PERSONAL >
i am an exchange student from
the netherlands and have my 11
year old son with me. on campus
there are no friends his age.
which child likes to make a new
friend, call mrs. kuiper 3928941
after 7 p.m. (J-3t-4-p)
LOST & FOUND
Lost: Blue Key Weekend, on the
cruise, a gold beaded necklace of
great sentimental value please
call joyce at 392-7811 reward
offered. (L-st-3-p)
BROWN LEATHER PURSE
WITH DEER ANTLER
ORNAMENT wallet inside.
REWARD! kristy 376-8532.
(L-3t-3-p)
lost gold charm bracelet great
sentimental value S2O reward
please call sue at 373-7185
(l-5t~5-pl

In w -i'h street
?3rd BOULEVARD I ~
| the movie...
l tmcrs.il Pictures H i Robert SugwtxxJ [,,<*, A NORMAN JEWISON Him 1
JESUS CHRIST SUPERSDVR" I
sljrnny
TED NEEI EA ( ARE ANDERSON VVDNM El LIMAN BARRY 1)1 NNEN I
. . s.r,mpLtt.'K Mel\vn .in*t Virman Jewison
I 1 M... r .iup.MiVtw..vkT)prr.,JcsusC : hrist Superstar*'.-* k Tim Rice
mm. k Andrew l loyd Webber ihi I ini Rice
Mu.h (.ndiic.i h. Andre Pre\in tM ki< kpmmi r i>,..-.ik NORMAN JEWISON I
NORVUM^VISO^^ROBn^IKiWOOIH
________ All Seats SI.OO till 2 30
except Sundays & Holidays
3: 55 :c : ; M? EXPERIMENT $
5:50 prjjt Harrad College where free, f s9l
_ re: e / liberated relations between
coed students encouraged!^^^(fltt^^^^^

Friday, September 28, 1973, The Independent Florida Alligator,

SERVICES
KARATE SMALT, class,
qualified instructor, girls are
invited, new class begins oct 2,
call eddie 373-2823. (M-9t-2-p)
CYCLE ACCESSORY WORLD
209 N.E. 16th ave. phone
376-4916 for your complete
motor cycle accessories.
(M-st-2-p)
graduating students do you hate
writing business letters? ill
WRIGHT them + type, start now
to bet info for jobs! call
373-9742 (m-lt-5-p)
GUITAR LESSONS by qualified
instructor low rates call .-nytime
3 786019 ask for mike.
(M-2t-4-p)
GUITAR LESSONS Flatpicking,
Folk, Rock, Classical, Chord
Theory, plus Banjo, Fiddle.
Mandolin, Sabine String Shop
311 N.Main 373-6396. (M-ft-3-c)

x SERVICES
$$ PAID VOLUNTEERS $$
needed for vaccine study come
by rm-118 at union oct 1 morn.
& aft. for more info. (M-3t-3-p)
WERE WIRED FOR SIGHT AT
UNIVERSITY OPTICIANS. 535
S.W. 4th AVE. 378-4480
(m-ft-st-c)
College Men 18-27 become a
naval officer. 12-18 mos. flight
training. $10,200 to start; travel,
responsibility, for info interview
and a chance to fly Navy, call
372- Gainsv. (m-4t-5-c)
CLASSICAL GUITAR The best
instruction for those with a real
interest. Beginning or advanced
students. Robert Long
373- (M-st-3-p)
self hypnosis for self
improvement motivation study
Aids donafd g. pratt. ethical
hypnotist, for information
373-3059 (M-30t-2-p)

Page 17



Page 18

t, The Independent Florida Alligator, Friday, September 28,1973

;
"'7. CJ '
% /
f /
So you though
Hitachi was junk!
Read this and reconsider
Dollar for dollar Hitachi:
V*
I 'w
[ No. 1. Outperforms the 5 top receivers
, j
t No. 2. Out-warranties the? 5 top receivers J
The Hitachi Story
In the beginning, Hitachi made most of insides,
under contraet. for many Japanese and American
companies. This was contracted for over 10 years.
Hitachi didn't compete with such brands as
Pioneer. Harmon-Kardon. Altec, Marant/.
and fisher until now!
Instead of manufacturing for other companies.
Hitachi is now bring their own Hi-fidelity
line to the United States of America
DIG ON IT!
See us now during our sth Anniversary Sale
in our E-X-P-A-N-D-E-D showroom
>
fijJl I# K O EItCIRONICS
11# llf L O 621 W. Univ. Ave.
...



By CELESTE CALVITTO
Alligator Staff Writer
Soft-spoken and forthright, UF Student
Body Vice President Richard (Dole
staunchly defends Student Government
and says its easy to come up with an
argument why SG shouldnt be abolished.
Cole, former Chief Justice of the Traffic
Court, was chosen by the Student Senate
last summer to fill the vice-presidential
post after The Alligator learned that Bemi
Singleys summer registration was
cancelled.
IM disappointed that it happened that
way, says Cole about his transition from
Traffic Court Justice to the
vice-presidency. I thought Bemi had quite
a potential for the vice presidency.
Cole, noting he and Singley are still
friendly says he hates to pass judgemnt
on what the (UF) administration did.
I dont think they handled it
properly ... The fact that a students
record became public information to a

I! -* .H .H---'
--' .H---' ' '" ''
'' lvnne pbeston
New Student Body Vice President
.. easy to say why SG should stay

UFW pushing grope organization

By DENNIS CONRAD
Alligator Staff Writer
The United Farm Workers (UFW) are currently
embroiled with the Teamsters in a battle to organize the
grape pickers of California. At UF students appear to be
siding with the UFW.
This week students organized a spaghetti dinner to raise
funds for the UFW and in previous months they have
conducted boycotts of local supermarkets carrying
non-UFW grapes.
SEVERAL MAJOR differences exist in the benefits of
different contracts with California growers signed by the
Teamsters and the UFW, according to Orrin Baird, Apopka
field director of the UFW.
Included in the contract differences between the two
unions are the UFWs favoring of the use of the hiring hall,
grievance procedure subject to binding arbitration and
tougher control over pesticides, Baird said.
Under the two different union contracts signed with
growers in Coachella Valley last April, there is very little
difference in what a farm worker would make in hourly
earnings. The Teamsters contract provides 52.30 an hour
while the UFW pays 10 cents more.
BAIRD SAID THE critical difference between the two
contracts was the Teamsters preference for the labor
contractor or crew leader system. A crew leader is
respohsible for getting the grower the labor he needs and
for doing so he receives a percentage of the workers
earnings.

Richard Cole: defender of SG

newspaper I dont think is proper... The
fact that she was no longer
vice-president would have to become
public but the way it came about was very
unfortunate.
IN FACT, The Alligator was the way
we found out about it. It made us look bad
too because it gave the appearance that we
were trying to hide something, he said.
COLE SAYS he prefers the traditional
role of the vice-president to be in
charge of the cabinet. It frees him (the
president) to do emergency-type things
that only the president can give an answer
to. The cabinet is a more day-to-day thing
that can really affect a students life.
I try to be very organized, One of
the things Im trying to do as vice president
is to keep a filing system that means
something.
ASKED IF the average student takes SG
seriously, Cole commented that he didnt
think the normal student body person
knows what their elected officers do for

Describing the crew leader as the most infamous part of
the agricultural scene, Baird said workers can be hired and
fired at the whim of the crew leader.
Because the crew leader has the power to dismiss workers
at his discretion, Baird says the crew leader often uses it to

Friday, September 28, 1973, The Independent Florida Alligator,

them.
He says that situation is partly the fault
of SG, The Alligator and UFs
administration. Things are available to the
students that they dont know about.
Cole says SG is like any government
you cant build a road by yourself but if
anybody pays taxes, a road gets built. It
(SG) really does have a service.
AND THAT is a main reason, Cole
believes, that SG should not be abolished.
The four dollars of your money that
goes to SG each quarter has a greater
return, I believe, to students than almost
any other money they give to this
university.
I dont think that if they abolished
student government the activity fee
(included in the tuition) would go down
any. All they would do is reallocate these
funds. And the people who compete for
funds usually are the Athletic Association,
the Reitz Union, and sometimes the
Infirmary.
IF STUDENTS compare the value they
get out of each one of these groups, SG
does more with four dollars than the other
groups do. I dont think its hard to defend
it (SG) at all.
Cole said his first contact with student
activities came in his senior year in
undergraduate school when he became
involved with SAMSON. He tutored a
young boy who had been through Head
Start and kindergarten, but he couldnt
read or count.
IT WAS very shocking, Cole said.
What I read about these things made it
seem like a good deal, yet here was a child
that didnt know how to do any of the
things that I had anticipated him to know
how to do.
Cole then worked for a year before
entering law school, where he became
more interested in politics and student
life and making it better than it was.
He participated in a friends campaign
for Student Body Treasurer and then met
Boyer, who was running for Traffic Court
Chief Justice. After working in that
department for some time former UF
Student Body President Sam Taylor asked
Cole to be Director of Transportation.

force the farm workers to pay exhorbitant prices for soda,
ice water, food, transportation and housing facilities.
SCOTTIE BUTLER, general counsel for the Florida
Farm Bureau Federation (FFBF), a voluntary association of
farm families usually in opposition to the UFW, conceded
some crew leaders make as much as $60,000 to $70,000 a
year.
I personally hate the fact Florida agriculture relies on
the crew leader system as it does, Bulter said.
Jim Burt, director of labor relations for the FFBF, said
the crew leader is now being used more than a decade ago
because of the shortage of farm labor. Explaining why, Burt
said, They can find labor more easily.
BURT CHALLENGED the UFW assertion that the hiring
hall, where the union issues dispatch cards to those workers
having the most seniority, would provide a steadier, more
depndable flow of labor than the labor contractor system.
Burt said the hiring hall has proven to be unreliable.
Unions often will call growers one day prior to harvest to
tell them then they dont have the necessary number of
workers, he said.
Burt said if the hiring' hall worked in practice as in
theory, growers might jump at the chance of going along
with the hiring hall.
Butler suggested what was needed was not a hiring hall to
replace the crew leader but a system whereby crew leaders
were supervised.
A supervised crew leader system would remove some
of the black from the eye of agriculture and help growers in
record keeping requirements, Butler maintained.

Richard Cole
came from traffic court
AND THATS when it all started.
I ran for traffic court and I heard about
people who were running and none of
them had anything to do with the traffic
court. I didnt want it to go back to being
nothing Tyrie had done so much. Thats
why I ran then events changed, Cole
explained.
And Cole adds that he does not intend
to use his position as a springboard for a
political career. Hes more interested in
pursuing a law career after graduation next
June.
I REALLY dont have any interest in
pursuing a political career as a candidate,
he says. It was something I did once and
Im glad I did, but it takes a different kind
of person to go out and campaign. In
politics in the outside world, all they do is
shake hands and tape speeches. I wouldnt
get anything out of that, Cole says.

Page 19



The Independent
Florida Alligator

Page 20

Offense needed by UF vs. Miss. State

By ANDY COHEN
Sports Editor
UFs highly touted
defensive unit will have
their hands more than full
this Saturday evening when
the Gators travel to
Jackson, Miss, to face the
offensive minded Mississippi
State Bulldogs (MSU).
The Gatois, who are
presently 2-0 and ranked
15th in the nation should
have their toughest game to
date against the Bulldogs.
In the Gators opening two
victories over Kansas State
and Southern Mississippi,
the defensive unit carried
most of the burden as the
i n e f fective offense
continuously coughed up
the ball deep in their own
territory.
UF coach Doug Dickey is
well aware of the problem.
MSIFs potent offensive
unit makes it doubly
important for the Gators to
consistently move the ball,
noted Dickey on Thursday.
If we dont eliminate our
mistakes, especially deep in
our own territory, well be
in for a long evening.
MSU IS presently 1-0-1,
while coming off the heels
of an astonishing 52-21
mauling over Vanderbilt. In
that contest the Bulldogs
racked up 610 yards on
offense.

Photo I
finishing I

Mftow 1
total photography I
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75% DISCOUNT TO STUDENTS
TAKING PHOTOGRAPHY
COURSES. ASK YOUR INSTRUCTOR!
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>, Friday, September 28, 1973

ftp! W m
F'F,' S'ljMty % S W JPPBr
ppsf -*1
H J f ly BW" 11 /Jf I
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Q|-J| D l_j| DCC
UF Defensive End Preston Kendrick About To Cream" Opponent
... Kendricks teammates look on with obvious enjoyment

After viewing films of
MSUs victory Dickey
praised their entire offensive
unit. Theyve got more
confidence in their running
and passing game than any
team weve faced in a long
time, noted UFs coach.
Theyve got two excellent

Cameras I

receivers, a fine quarterback
and a fullback named
Wayne Jones, who is as
good as any runner Ive seen
this season.
In last weeks contest,
Jones gained 113 yards on
16 carries for three
touchdowns.

Supplies I

/jjy l est/

MSUS DEFENSE is
young, but very aggressive,
continued Dickey. Their
punter is oneof the top
kickers in the country. Hes
presently averaging
somewhere near 50 yards
per punt.

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1973 bikes at 1969 prices!
1973 CZ 175 STREET with helmet
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Phone: 373-7990
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0% discount on all accessories with this ad.

During the off-season
UFs running duo of Nat
Moore and Vince Kendrick
were rated near the top of
UFs illustrious football
history. To the surprise of
the coaches and players
alike, both have been no
more than adequate in the

Gators First two outings.
We just need better
execution, said Dickey.
We can cure a lot of our
ills on the rushing game by
getting it and it is surprising
we have not yet reached the
point where our offensive
execution is sharp.
THE GATORS only
injury is Glenn Sever, who
will miss the MSU contest
with slightly torn ligaments.
Linebacker Joe Allen was
suspended for the game, due
to an incident which
occurred last spring.
David Bowden, the SECs
leading passer will start for
the Gators for the third
consecutive week. Hank
Foldberg Jr. will see his first
action of the season for the
Gators after recovering from
a shoulder injury.
MSU will have their
entire first unit both
offensive and defensive
healthy for Saturdays
contest.
NAT MOORE will be the
games captain for the
Gatois while Kris Anderson
and John Lacer will be
co-captains.
Dickey concluded by
noting that he hopes the
Gators will get their first
opportunity to compete on
a dry field this Saturday
evening. Its always nicer
that way, Dickey
concluded.



A plea from mothers

Joe Namaths mother
must have been really upset
last Sunday, watching her
son get plowed under by a
huge Baltimore linebacker.
If she was watching tv
between games she got to
see it again three times, in
slow motion.
If she was still watching,
after that, she could have
caught it again on the after
game wrap-up and again on
the late news.
MONDAY NIGHT
Howard Cosell showed it in
slow motion adding his own
comments. Cosell also got a
thrill later being able to add
his witness and comment on
the fresh injury of
Cowboys Rodger Staubach,
who also got knocked out
of the game. (Both injuries
will probably be included in
those funny NFL Films
showing people being
murdered in which Johnny
Carson loves to show.)
Is this pandering
violence? There seems to be
a trend going in that
direction in sports
broadcasting today.
During last years Indy
500 the .'ABC crew
broadcast one driver getting

Ruggers open season

At noon this Sunday, the Tulane Rugby
Club and the UF rugby team will face off
on Norman Field, starting off the 73-74
season.
Even though the season is starting, the
club is still looking for members. They are
looking for people who have played before
and those who have never but want to play
the game.
THE TEAM is playing one of the largest
and toughest schedules in the country,
playing in forty matches and tournaments

By DAVE WING
Alligator Correspondent
If youre new to UF and
are wondering what is the
name of the game
everybody is playing on the
handball courts with what
looks like sawed off tennis
rackets, well the name of
the game is Racquetball.
The UF Racquetball Club in
its second year of existence
would like to welcome back
racquetball enthusiasts and
beginners at their Fust
meeting Monday Oct. 1 in
room 220 Florida Gym at 8

wiped out in slow motion,
stop action with little
arrows pointing out the
body for those hard of
seeing.
MY FAVORITE example
came from a broadcast of
the national wrist wrestling
championships last year.
One beefy wrestlers arm
broke in the middle of a
match. They re-broadcast
the event in slow motion,
while an excited announcer
was crooning into his
mike, Listen for the
sickening crunch as his arm
breaks.
The essence of sports, as
has been defined by at least
100 grammar school, high
school and college coaches
Ive met, is competition.
VIOLENCE HAS always
happened in sports, but it
hasnt been the drawing
card, according to tv, that it
is now becoming.

JUullU mm fiJIM)

p. m. The club is open to all
students, faculty, staff and
spouses.
Flag football season will
be under way soon so all
interested students should
get their teams organized
and signed up at the IM
office. The IM office ii
located in room 229,
Florida Gym, 392-0581. If
youre not sure of your
league classification, call the
IM office prior to the
deadline dates so you dont
miss all the action. The
deadline dates for the mens
leagues are as follows: Mens

MIKE ENGLISH

from now until May.
We should do real well this year barring
any injuries, Buck Curtain, the team
adviser said.
By the end of last season, Curtain said
that they had only 18 players to fill the 15
team positions while playing four games in
a tournament one day.
Next weekend, the team will travel up to
Atlanta for a big tournament that will
include Texas A & M and Dartmouth, two
national rugby powerhouses.

Television has to pay a
lot of money for the rights
to broadcast sporting events
and advertisers have to lay a
bundle down in tum to
hustle their goods. All of
this needs a large audience
to watch it.
Death, probably the
greatest literature ploy, is
full of strong emotion and
attracts probably the
greatest attention. Mayhem,
violence and on down the
line, also attract great
interest, and crowds.
Television only provides
the seats for the action, the
advertisers provide the
popcorn
Im not saying that it is
wrong. The Indy crash and
Namaths shoulder were
news and should haVe been
reported, but harping on
such events re-play after
slow motion re-play as a
sales attraction is a very
base appeal.
It probably upsets a
bunch of mothers.

Independent Oct. 8; Mens
Dormitory Oct. 11; Law
Oct. 12; Engineering Oct.
18.
Tennis Tournament
(singles) signup deadline is
Oct. 17. The mens and
womens singles tournament
will be open to all students,
staff, faculty and spouses.
All students interested in
officiating flag football, and
volleyball are encouraged to
sign up soon at the IM
office. This is a good way to
pick up extra cash while
doing a service for UF.

I BQ9KHM m e HHO 1
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YOUR CONSIDERATION
What good is a shop's 5, 10, or 20 year guarantee on a product when that
shop has only been t around a few months? And what good is a
manufacturer's guarantee when the manufacturer has no track record?
Don't swallow the hype that some of the local fly-by-night waterbed
shops are baiting their hooks with. Mere desperation tactics. Anyone offering
you a 20-year guarantee on a $17.95 waterbed is insulting your intelligence.
Anyone telling you a bed in that price range doesn't require a frame, will tell
you anything for a buck. And anyone alleging that their beds are larger than
our beds is telling you a naughty lie.
Just to further clarify matters, our personal store guarantee is 5 years, not
3 months (We'vebeen here since Sept. 20, 1967). We'll also replace defective
bean bags over any reasonable period of time half a year if you're nice.
There, you've got it all in writing.
And you other shops out there you be nice now. After all, where would
you be without us? How would you know what to sell? Or what kind of ads
to use? Or anything
w. won't invite you to our 25th anniversary parly either.
Those Other Guys

SUBTERRANEAN
CIRCUS
10SW 7th ST. 376-1583
OPEN WEEKDAYS: 10-10
SUNDAYS: 12-8 I

Friday, September 28, 1973, The Independent Florida Alligator,

SILVER CITY
THE SUPERSTAR
BOUTIQUE
8 SW 7th ST 378-0 758
OPEN WEEKDAYS: 10-10
SUNDAYS: 17-8

Page 21



Page 22

, The Independent Florida Alligator, Friday, September 28, 1973
~i i n

McGriff leading SEI ;
Once banned from game

By GREG FORRER
Alligator Sports Writer
In the eighth grade, the
SECs leading pass receiver
weighed 85 pounds. In the
ninth grade, he was
prohibited from playing
football.
Lee McGriff, the Little
Big Man of UFs squad,
was banned from the
Field because of his
size even after he had
beefed up to a whopping 98
pounds.
I wanted to play
football, but a rule came
into effect that year which
made it mandatory for
anyone playing high school
ball to weigh 110 pounds. I
went to basketball,
McGriff said.
LUCKILY FOR the
Gators, McGriff was able to
tip the scales correctly a
year later, so he went back
to football.
I went back in the tenth
grade, but dont think that
the basketball didnt help.
The hand-to-eye
coordination I picked up
playing helped me out quite
a bit, said the 5 foot 9
inch, 163 lb. Junior.
Obviously it helped
somewhat, for going into
Saturdays game McGriff
had compiled 133 yards on
eight receptions including
two touchdowns, enough to
give him a slim lead over last
years top receiver, Bill
Buckley of Miss. State.
ID LIKE it to end up
that way, said McGriff of
his lead, but sometimes
the ball might not be
coming my way. It all
depends on how the game is
going.
When asked if he had ever
encountrered any coaches
opposition with regards to
his size, McGriff quickly
answered negatively.

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3 BR Unfurn.
149.00 monthly
Including aii Utilities
Central Heat & Air Kitchen Equipped
Wall to Wall Carpeting Schools & Shopping Nearby
Spacious Play Area for Children
Office open till 5:00 Daily
call 378-9135 or 378-0211

Mi''
WKKm
CHIP HIRES
UF Wide Receiver Lee McGriff Grabs Bowden Pass
.. Little Big Man leads SEC in receptions, yards

Not one coach has ever
turned me away. Many
people not connected with
the game have tried to
discourage me, but the
coaches were always willing
to see what I could do, he
said.
McGRIFF PLAYED
quarterback in his early
days, not becoming a
receiver until high school
where he met with success
at that position. In his
senior year at Plant High
School in Tampa, McGriff
led the conference in
touchdowns and pass
receiving, only to be
somewhat disappointed
when he received just an
Honorable Mention in the
post-season awards.

I dont think our
coaches made much of an
effort to get recognition for
the players. Not only in my
case, but we had a few
ballplayers that were
definitely college material
but they never received so
much as a tumble, said the
Tampan.
SINCE THEN McGriff
has made tremendous
strides. Last year as a
sophomore he shared duties
at flanker with Hollis
Boardman. This year he is a
starting wide receiver for
the Gators, and McGriff
attributes much of his early
success to the coach of the
wide receivers, Don Breaux.
Breaux has been doing a
tremendous job with the
receivers. I believe he is the
reason that there has been

3.0 G.PA?
450 Florida
Boards?
Division Lecture
Notes wants to buy
your notes to:
CHN 251 UCC 191 PCI 201
392-1665. ... 305 JWRU

such a turnabout in the play
of the receivers, McGriff
remarked. In one spring he
taught me more football
than I had learned from all
the coaches Ive known.
Breaux knows football
and he also knows how to
handle people. Hes worked
with us on our downfield
blocking, and let me tell
you, Id be embarrassed to
see movies of our downfield
blocking last year, thats
how much of a difference
hes made, McGriff
commented.
As to what can be
expected of the Gators in
the future, McGriff
remarked that Nobody
knows, but were a together
team that is going to put
out and give our best.

of Being
Ripped off?
COME TO THE COLLEGE OF BUSINESS
BOOK EXCHANGE
Administered by Alpha Kappa Psi
Room 113 C
Bryan Hall Stacks
OPEN ALL THIS WEEK
10:00 AM TO 1:00 PM
Sponsored by The College Council of Bus. Adm.
BUSINESS BOOKS
Sold and Exchanged Set Your Own Price
10 Cents per book sold retained.
ROBBIES REEF
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WE CARRY A COMPLETE
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PHONE: 378-REEF



By Alligator Services
CORAL GABLES, FLA.
University of Miami
hasnt won a football game
from Florida State
University (FSU) since it
got by in a 7-6 squeaker in
1962.
Since then the teams have
met seven times and though
the Hurricanes enjoyed the
favorites role on several
occasions, the Seminoles
have won every game to
achieve the longest winning
streak any team ever has
enjoyed at Miamis expense.
A YEAR ago, Florida
State humbled Miami 37-14
to deadlock the all-time
series at eight victories
apiece. There never has been

The school year
has changed
but
one thing
at Burger King
'' '' |) '' -' ; I -
hasnt.
..
If you buy a burger with any kind of cereal filler or vege vegetable
table vegetable additive in it, you're not at Burger King. Because our QIIQCCQ
burgers are 100% beef and seasoned with salt. We don't make Pffjjjri
them any other way. BflAlfS
In fact, at Burger King we don't think it's a burger at all
unless it's 100% beef. And we think you agree.
8 N.W.I6TH AVE.
* ~ i \

Miami collides with FSU

a tie though Miami has won
twice by a single point.
The two teams will do
battle this coming Saturday
night in Tallahassee. FSU is
currently 0-2, while Miamis
only game this season was
their upset victory over
Texas.
The Hurricanes, who
tallied 20 points on Texas in
their opener, seem much
more potent on offense
than they did at this time in
1972. The team has adapted
well to the new system of
attack with the powerful
running of Woody
Thompson a key factor.
WOODY GAINED 80
yards in 25 tries against
Texas for a 3.2 average

but when he got close to the
goal line, he was a raging
bull.
On Miamis first score, he
blasted over from the three
in two shots. Next time
around, he ripped over from
the eight in one shot. In the
third quarter, he gained 11
on his first try from the 14
and scored on two more
drives. Thus, when the goal
line territory, he was given
the ball six times in the
toughest part of the ball
field and got 25 yards, an
average of 4.2.
Naturally, his running
made the passing more
effective and the
excellent passing of both
Coy Hall and Kary Baker

did the rest. Baker hit on his
first five tries, Hall
connected on five of his
first six, with seven receivers
getting into the act.
Silvio Cardosa was an
ideal foil for Thompson
from the I-back spot and his
35 yards included key
dashes of seven and nine
yards.
But the Hurricanes
employed only a limited
portion of the possibilities
of their attacking plan and
can be counted on to
uncover more as they
absorb the patient and well
conceived teaching of their
coaches.
The Hurricanes will meet
UF in Miami on Nov. 24.

Friday, September 28, 1973, The Independent Florida Alligator,

j 'y' > N Wfif; "1
B at* B
v;Bii
M
BEAN BAG CHAIRS
j FURS VELVETS NAUGAHYDE COUCHES 1
WATERBEDS
FRAMES LINERS FOAM PADS
J FITTED SHEETS VIBRATORS HEATERS
I Indian Bedspreads I
TAPESTRYS FROM POLAND, SPAIN,
I MOROCCO. ITALY. INDIA |
I BEADED CURTAINS I
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I j: EMPORIUM ;; I
Let us BLOW YOUR MIND !li
with our LOW PRICES!!! 1
JEWELRY
from 25 countries I
AMER. INDIAN TURQUOISE
MOTHER OF PEARL. FEATHERS. COPPER, WOOD |
SILVER. BONE. ELEPHANT HAIR. & MORE
SEMI PRECIOUS STONES
RfNGS-BRACELETS-PENPANTS I
I A COMPLETE
CLOTHES BOUTIQUE
I Tor guys & gals
I DRESSES SHIRTS TOPS SLAP SANDALS-
I CANDLES INCENSE \ u
KAMA SUTRA PRODUCTS \
TEA SETS BEAD CURTAINS X
LAMP SHADES WOODEN BOXES t Lf> % *4
NATURAL COSMETICS
EMPORIUM
w Youa >fpFTg
SoNfT^siDE
1 ~ fT
atcorner * I
rkj/ Across From Campus
I F Mon-Fri 10-9:00 I
|| Sat 10-7:00

Page 23



Page 24

, The Independent Florida Alligator, Friday, September 28, 1973

The Harmon Football Forecast
1 NEBRASKA fiOKLAHOMA STATE 11-NO CAROLINA ST 11 TEXAS
2 ALABAMA 7-OHIO STATE 12 MIAMI 17 KANSAS
1 OKLAHOMA tNOTRE OAME IJ IOWA STATE IITEXAS TECH
4 SOUTHERN CAL S-PENN STATE 14 MISSOURI ISARIZONA STATE
5 MICHIGAN 10L.S.U ISU C L.A 20 HOUSTON
Saturday, Sept. 29 Major Colleges T > 10
* m T*.r \f 23 Tens Lu!6*'~ !9
Alabama* V T.: a "r,r l *A B NTO" M, 25 So!thSl"\ Tan" JO
ii *aV> oglO" 4 Lea 21 Cant-a 6
J**** c /?". *? Naita-n Cjhi.ii 21 W.Ddl 13
* S,#l S
X? t !,n 8 & &
f! £%? Other Games-East
Colorado 20 Bayior 14 Alfred 33 PP 0
Coiomta 27 Buohneii 2 b Amencan Internal 28 Nor*-ch 0
$* rn *" ll £**'* Amherst 24 spr.n|f.:d 0
Dartmouth 34 N-* wampsh 0 Boston u 20 Ve-mont 17
*; S* mtr ** Bridgeport 25 Northeastern 20
? wh J{ 2>rgin.a b C Post 28 Mortcia.r 10
12 L U !7!f Central Connecticut 21 Ma-ne 13
Honda 2b Mississippi State- 20 c.ar.on 20 Oeiaeeare Stare 10
Georgia Tech 23 Ciemson 7 Delaware 28 Leh.gh 6
Holy Cross 27 Tempi#- 23 Deiae-are Valley 17 Muhlenberg 13
Houston 2b Memphis State 4 D.ch.nson 16 Serirthmore
Illinois 17 / **" S, ,,r ** Arkansas 6 Hobart 21 Mount Union 7
Kansas 28 Minnesota 10 irxJ.jn* U 20 NoHhwood 8
W "hat* 20 Cortland 15
Kentucky 30 *"<*' n }3 K.ng s Po.nt 15 Gettysburg 14
L w t;' C< M.llersvl'* 19 KutZtOwn 7
Marshall 17 ** Moravian 20 Upsaia 19
Maryland 26 V.llanova 7 Rochester 14 Hamilton 6
Massachusetts 24 Harvard 21 Sl.ppery Rock ?? Ed.nboro
Miam. Fia 31 r, a J* Southern Connecticut 25 Ma-ne Maritime 0
Miam. (Ohioi 23 South Carolina 20 Tufts 21 Bates 6 p
Michigan 42 J West Chester 28 East Stroudsburg
Mi'.s.ss.pp. 11 St,ulnar" 8 w,11.4ms 21 Tr.n.ty 14
M.MOO', 28 North CarcH.na 12 Worcester Tech 20 Bowden 12
Montana State 19 Fresno State
Nebraska 45 Wisconsin 10 Other fiamPS MlflwPSt
New Mexico state 21 w.chita 19 uincr uames iviiawesi
North Carol.n* state 21 Ceor.a 1 Ashland 20 -W.ltenberg 17
Northern 111.n0.s 2' West Ttas 13 Ball stala j 3 A kron 20
Notre Oan.e 11 Purdue 13 Blullton 21 Adrian 13
?!l' o s. I 4. Buena Vista 29 Wartburg
Oklahoma 2*> Southern Cat 1 Case-Western 20 Washington A Jeff son 15
Oklahoma State 41 Southern lll.no.s' 0 central Method.st 22 Ottawa 14
Orenon state 22 Br.Kham rounii 10 Colorado College 35 Fr.ends 13
Pennsylvania 38 Latavettle 6 Det.ance 21 F.ndtay 7
Penn State 31 lowa 6 OePauw IS Ol.yet 6
P.ttsburh 23 Northwestern 11 Eastern Illinois 33 Chicago, C.rcle 0
Rhode island 21 Brown 15 Eastern M.ch.gan 35 St Norbert 0
Richmond 14 Wake Forest 8 Evansy.lle 20 SE M.ssour. 10
Rut Re rs 27 Princeton 13 Frankl.n 23 Ind.ana Central 13
San Diego Slat#- 20 Kent State 7 Hastings 17 Nebraska Wesleyan 12
584 U 27 VP I 10 Heidelberg 22 Muskingum 21
Stanford 21 San Jose State 7 Hillsdale 23 Northern M.ch.gan 21
***' l* l*** s T t ch 111.n0.s State 33 SW M.ssour. 7
Texas A A M 20 Boston College 17 lowa Wesleyan 20 Illinois College
Toledo 27 Oh.o U 14 Kearney 21 Chadron 6
Tulane 42 VM l 0 Langston 23 Central Oklahoma 17
Tulsa 20 Cincinnati 10 Lincoln 21 Arkansas Tech 14
UCLA 35 Michigan State 13 Manchester 20 Taylor 14
Utah 22 Oregon 16 Mar.etta 26 H.ram 21
Utah State 28 Nevada (Las Vegas) 13 M.lhk.n 27 Carroll 0
Washington 20 Syracuse 9 Missouri Southern 26 Rolla 13
Washington State 24 Idaho 0 M.ssour. Valley 30 Tark.o 7
William & Mary 28 The Citadel 6 Ohio Northern 21 Kalamazoo 7
Wyoming 45 U T E P 0 Omaha 34 Washburn 7
Yale 27 Conned.cul 8 R.wer Falls 17 Northland 14
Other Games South and Southwest ll ot'^om.* 0
, Southwestern. Kansas 28 Bethel. Kansas 6
Abilene Christian 25 SW Texas 20 Th el 15 John Carroll 6
Angelo State 28 Tarteton 6 Valparaiso -20 Illinois Wesleyan 16
Arkansas State 20 Indiana State 15 Wayne, Mich 17 Illinois Benedictine 13
Catawba 20 Emory A Henry 7 Western Illinois 24 Milwaukee 14
Chattanooga 22 SW Louisiana 17 William Jewell 36 College of Emporia 7
East Texas 21 Howard Payne 14
Eastarn Kentucky 20 Austin Pray 11 Other Games Far West
Fayetteville 28 Shaw 13 . -**
Fisk 24 Savannah 7 Boise State 49 Portland 0
Gardner Webb 21 Guilford 7 Cal Poly (Pomona) 21 Los Angeles 10
Glenville 27 Fairmont 6 Cal Poly (S L O.) 36 Riverside 0
Hampden Sydney 17 Bridgewaft-r 0 Central Washington 27 Southern Oregon 7
Hardmg 23 Henderson 20 Eastern New Mexico 17 Southern Colorado 8
Leno.r Rhyne 26 Newberry 21 E'astern Oregon 23 Whitman 6
Livingston 26 Florence 7 Eastern Washington 21 Western Washington 20
Louisiana Tech 27 McNeese 22 Hawaii 22 Texas Southern 14
Mississippi College 21 Delta State 19 Montana 24 Northern Arizona 14
Morgan State 21 No Caroling Central 17 Norther Colorado 20 Fort Hays 15
Murray 21 Morehead 10 Northr.dge 23 Hayward 19
NE Missouri 22 State College 13 Pacific U 14 Pac.fic Lutheran
NW Louisiana 22 NE Louisiana 20 Puget Sound 21 Humboldt 10
S F Austin 24 Texas A A I 23 Sacramento 23 St Mary s 21
Salem 21 Concord 0 San Francisco State 20 Cal Lutheran 10
Sam Houston 27 Sul Ross 24 Santa Clara 17 Oav.s 14-
Samford 20 Ark at Mont.cello 14 Weber 24 Fullerton
Sewanee 19 M.llsaps 7 Whittier 27 Claremont 6
SE Louisiana 21 Nicholls 16 W.llamette 20 Lewis 4 Clark 17
CnApfr
MiT W ft A w
picture
The first week the headliner was
U.C. L. A .-N ebr ask a. . the second week,
L.S.U.-Colorado.. last week, it was North Carolina
State-Nebraska ... and this week the national spotlight is
on the blockbuster between Oklahoma and Southern
California. Theyre ranked 3rd and 4th in that order in our
top 20. The Sooners have had a week off since their
impressive trouncing of Baylor in their season opener, and
the Trojans have defeated Arkansas and Georgia Tech on
successive Saturdays. Both teams are capable of such
offensive explosions, it should be a tremendous show. Our
pick is possibly a surprise: Oklahoma by nine points.
However, Nebraska is still Number One this week,
challenged by runner-up Alabama. The Comhuskers have a
little easier task this Saturday than last as they plan
Wisconsin. The Tide meets Vanderbilt. And depending on
the outcome of Southern Cal-Oklahoma, the two powers
could still be on top next week. Nebraska will dump the
Badgers by 35, and Alabama will top the Commodores by bywow
wow bywow 55 points!
An old nemesis faces Bth-ranked Notre Dame. The
Boilermakers of Purdue, thorns in the sides of the Fighting
Irish in past years, meet the Irish in West Lafayette. The
Riveters are much more of a darkhorse this fall, but are still
figured to be an 18-point underdog to Notre Dame.
The two powers in the Big Ten, Michigan and Ohio State,
are rated sth and 7th respectively in our national rankings.
The Buckeyes will clip T.C.U. by 20 points, and the
Wolverines are a heavy 35-point choice over Navy.
Miami, the big upsetter a week ago, goes after Florida
State Saturday. The 12th-rated Hurricanes will win by 25
points.
Three other members of the Big 8 Conference are in the
Top 20 again . Oklahoma State is a surprising 6th, lowa
State is 13th, and Missouri is 14th. The Cowboys are
favored over Southern Illinois by 49 points .. the
Cyclones will be a 15-point winner over Arkansas, and
Mizzou will take North Carolina by sixteen.
In the Southeast Conference, match-ups between
conference title contenders and national powers occur
almost weekly. This Saturday, its Tennessee against
Auburn. Last fall, the Tigers upset the Volunteers, 10-6,
and this year well, it could be the same story. Auburn is
favored by just one point.

An amazing adventure is awaiting you.
An adventure more unique than travel to foreign lands,
More awe-inspiring than walking on the moon.
An adventure beyond the limits of finite time and space.
It is the adventure of realization -of discovering just who and
what you really are.
Guru Maharaj Ji, the fifteen year old Perfect Master, through
a simple, direct experience can take you to this place inside.
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The Independent FRIDAY I lor ida Alligator /SEPTEMBER 28, 1973 Published hy Cainpus Comniunications, Inc. Gainesville. Florida/ VOL. 66, NO. 5 Ni offi ally associated with the University of Florida After county officials endorse him York denies UF presidency again By BOB LICHTENSTEIN MARION COUNTY Commissioner George M. Rou Jr., a Dr. Harry Grater Jr., chairman of the department, Alligator Staff Writer friend of York, said, "It's been indicated to me that if the explained that the current name is not consistent with job were offered to him he'd accept it." proposed changes in the curriculum. Rou said his source is a letter from York to a mutual GRATER explained the course "would be organized Amid rumors that he would accept the presidency of UF friend on the subject of York's interest in becoming UF around topics rather than disciplines. Topics would be on a permanent basis if it was offered to him, Acting president. selected that are contemporary in nature and can be President E. T. York told the University Senate Thursday, York said he never has had or will have an interest in a understood by introducing students to principles and "I havenot expressed a willingness to anyone in either permanent appointment "because of a compelling desire to information from sociology, psychology, anthropology. written or oral form." do other things.",, The rumors reported by the Gainesville Sun apparently YORK'S comments came after the University Senate speech, etc. came from the Miami Beach convention of the State conducted its regular business, which included a proposal to In addition, the University Senate took action on two Association of County Commissioners, which voted to change the name of the Department of Comprehensive other minor proposals. The next meeting will be October support York for the presidency. Logic to the "Department of Behavioral Studies." 15. Night raiders nab 3 men; Seize 100 pounds of grass By JIMMY THARPE Alligator Staff Writer Three Gainesville men were arrested in a drug bust that netted 100 pounds of marijuana carried out by the state attorney's task force at 4120 14th Ter. Wednesday at 11 p.m. Arrested were Stephen Sternfield, 20, and Victor Boccumini, 23, both of 4120 14th Ter., and Eric Lesneski, 24, of P. 0. Box 12467 University Station. STERNFIELD AND BOCCUMINI told officials at the county jail that they were students. An examination of UF registrar's lists failed to produce either of their names. Lesneski said he is employed as a tile layer. All three men were arrested while trying to sell 100 pounds of marijuana to undercover agents for a reported $14,700. State Attorney Gene Whitworth said the pot had a street value of $32,000. Whitworth said the arrests came after a three-day investigation by undercover agents. IN A FIRST appearance before County Judge Emory Cross at 9 a.m. Thursday, all three men had their bail set at $2,000. Sternfield and Lesneski were released after posting bail Thursday and at 3:30 p.m. Boccumini had not paid bail and was still being held in the county jail. The original mobile home ACEY HARPER Moving a house can be slow and redlights from the house's path. There is tedious due to the care involved in going an advantage though. If one runs out of under power lines and having to move gas he hasn't far to walk to gei home. G'vile murder rate 2nd in nation By JOE COLLUM the nation ranked higner per Alligator Staff Writer capita than Gainesville in such crimes. Murder: illegal homicide. IN 1972 there were 25 The blotting of a human life murders in Gainesville. In outside the striction of the New York City there were law. 1,725 during the same There is manslaughter period. and three degrees of But because there are just murder. The categories over 100,000 people living stretch from premeditated in Gianesville and over 10 murder to murder through million in the New York culpable negligence, and in City area, a just released 1972 only one metropolis in FBI report ranks Gainesville '0 ahead of even New York in the rate of murder. Atlanta has the nation's highest rate with 23 murders per 100,000 residents. The Gainesville metropolitan area is close behind with 22.3. murders per 100,000. Some of the nations largest cities rank far behind Gainesville. Chicago's rate was only 11.5. Los Angeles had a 12.8 rate per 100,000 and New York, the worlds largest city, was three murders per 100,000 being Gainesville with 19.1. How does a mellow little college town rate ahead of the "Big City" in the horrendous crime of murder? Some criminologists have been reported as blaming it on the lack of stringent gun control legislation. For years New York has had the toughest gun laws in the country. Gainesville got its first ordinance -Handgun Control Ordinance no. 30 last May. It was only the second gun control law ever passed in Florida's history. Ordinance no 30 consists of a three day "cooling off" period before any person can purchase a pistol. It also provides for registration of store bought handguns with the sheriff's office. Gainesville Police Chief Nolan Freeman declined to say whether or not t he ordinance has had a positive effect on Gainesville's crime rate but he did offer some statistics on murder. Between January and August 1972 there were 12 murders committed in Gainesville. This year during the same period there were just seven murders. And from May (the month the ordinance went into effect) through August there have been only two murders in the city. F r e e m a n b I a m e s G ai nesvi lle's y o u n g population as being a decisive factor in the high murder rate. The average Gainesville dwellers age is only 22.6. Gainesville, however, has always been a youth haven and the area's murder rate in 1971 was only 13.8 per 100,000, or nearly 40 per cent less than reported in 1972. Lt. Gene E. Watson of the UF Police Department said none of UF's 23,000 plus students were involved in any murders in 1972. and, to his knowledge, only four students in the school's history have ever been murdered or arrested for murder. Freeman agrees: "I don't t h i n k t he university population itself contributes to the murder rate. But we have many young people who are not students in Gainesville and many of our murders involve them." Freeman says most murders are "crimes of passion." The majority of them are committed on the spur of the moment. The people don't mean in most cases to kill anyone." Freeman also complained police are usually blamed for statistics like the ones that put Gainesville near the top of the nation's murder heap. "People don't realize the police department is only one of five agencies in the criminal justice system. There is also the public defender; the state attorney: (Sec Murder, Page 4) 0 000

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Page 2, The Independent Florida Alligator, Friday, September 28, 1973 BOR to vote on grad study pact By SUE CLINE Alligator Staff Writer A proposal to reduce costs of graduate study through a "common market" agreement among 14 southern states comes up for approval Monday when the Board of Regents (BOR) meets in the J. Wayne Reitz Union. The board will meet in room 235 of the J. Wayne Reitz Union at 9:30 a.m. If approved, students would be able to enroll in g r a d u a t e or h i g h ly specialized courses on a space-available basis in another state without having to pay out-of-state tuition. HENDRIX CHANDLER, director of public relations for the BOR, said it would m a k e available some programs that are too expensive to operate in any one state. Warning that universities "are going to have a hard time" getting funds from the Florida Legislature next year, particularly in the area of graduate programs, Chancellor Robert Mautz said the market plan is "the kind of action that may eliminate some of the legislative concern." Mautz said a common market would "eliminate unnecessary duplication of graduate programs. "Rather than starting a new specialized program, facilities could be made available to the whole southern region if they already exist in one state." ENDORSED MONDAY by the Council of Presidents, the plan must win the approval of the BOR. c a b i n e t a n d Legislature. It would also require action by the legislature to remove the current ceiling on admission of nonresident graduate students. Regents are also to be asked to approve a request to the legislature for new buildings in the state university system. Mautz said emphasis will be placed on construction No new leads in Tuesday rape case There are no new developments in a case involving the Tuesday morning rape of a young woman abducted from the parking lot near Jennings Hall, Audie Shuler, chief of the University Police Department (UPD), said Thursday. Shuler said that a coordinated effort was being made by his department along with those of the sheriff's department and the city police department. "We are hopeful for some breaks anytime," said Shuler, "but so far we just haven't had any." Shuler said that four full-time investigators were on the Hello there, it's me, Rudy, the FUN CITY Pinball W wizard giving you a free chance to match my own phenomenal skills at PINBALL, AIRHOCKEY, ELECT-tronic Volly, Foosball, or any of the other games here. Naturally you won't be as fantastic at X these games as myself, but * i then, there is only one pinball wizard. FUN CITY Thc dell \witlls a an sroom' 1245 W. UlixAve. COUPON Good for I free play on any game atFun City Friday, Saturday, Sunday & Monday 9-28-73 thru 10-1-73 e-6 d,, n J n e S JU ly and August when I s .p3263 s 33 e6 _wekly a 33 d rin 3tdei 333333,3days 3 i 3n3d3exam 66periods 6 Opno s expressed36 n 0 he ndepend 6ntFlorid Un 3versty F 3,o a h3 campus served by the Independent ,lor da Al gator University tation, Gai esville. Fl rida. 32601 The Indepen ent3 Florida Alligator3 i p T th e I n d e p e n d nt F o i a lg a t o r r es e st he rin o r ie g an te t h e t y p o r r a p hm c a l to e of A % o a advertisement n d ld to reie o t u n way al op t ons ide efr .cor rect e ton u f Anbe advef retisee nt e tuleto n eea ies N tc o c 3 3 3 ,t663 3 3ust 3be given33 before the next,3, 3insertion.3 case and other personnel were being called in as they are needed. The young.woman was abducted from the Jennings area early Tuesday morning after she had been to visit her stepdaughter who was staying at the hall. The woman was then taken to the north end of the county by her three male abductors and raped six times, according to police. A county-wide search for the assailants is still underway and anyone with any information concerning the case should call the UPD or the sheriff's depar ment. 720 W. Univ. Mon-Sat 10-9:30 (This Fri. til 2am) Sunday 12-6 IRMEW needs on some of the older cam uses to replace outmoded and temporary structures. "EXCEPT FOR Florida International University and the University of North Florida and possibly one or two other of the newer institutions, it is likely that construction of new buildings to accommodate growth will be at a slower pace during the next few years," Mautz said. In other business, Mautz will recommend increasing fees for Florida students participating in regional programs in medicine, d e ntistry and veterinary medicine in other states, effective by fall of 1974. If the BOR approves the r e q u e s t contract-for-services fees for veterinary medicine will increase from $3,000 to $4,500 and for medicine and dentistry from $2,750 to $3,250 each. These higher fees in a n u m b e r of regional programs had been approved by the Southern BIG BIG BIG 2ND ANNIVERSARY SALE! s (sorryno Master Charge or BAC this sale) -FOR BOTH NIGHT OWLS AND EARLY BIRDSFRI. NITE 10 P.M.2 A.M. I SAT. 10 A.M.NOON ALL RECORDS ON SALE. (CLASSICAL, ROCK, JAZZ, BLUES, BLUEGRASS, COUNTRY, SOUL, LANGUAGE COMEDY, FOLK, ETC.) NEW ROLLIA PMLP -JUST $3 12 STRING G SPECIAL -T FROM GIBSO PRICE $?X10 IT'S WORTH REPEA TING STONES EITHER I i2 STONES ITJMMRBUDGET CLASSICS ?9H Rij STARTING AT $1.69 UIT AR .LPI NEW LA BOHEME 'E"L YL E"$3.29WITH PA VAROTT/ N, LIST TAPE ON LONDON RECORDS -JUST $79.95 $4.49 3LPSET$17.6 LIST L PRICE -JUST $1269 ALL RECORDS ON SALE! STRICTL Y FOLK -GAINESVILLE'S FINEST RECORD STORE wm Robert Mautz common market Regional Education Board because of increased cost factors at participating institutions, according to Mautz. Regents will also narne next term's chairman and vice chairman, to be formally elected in January, as well as vote on requests for tenure for all faculty persons nominated from UF a n d F l o r i d a S t a t e University.

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Friday, September 28, 1973, The Independent Florida Alligator, Page 3 0 I LESSONS REGISTRATION INFORMATION -NON-CREDIT COURSES Registration for all workshops and lessons will take place in Room 310, from 8:30 a.m. -4:30 p.m. beginning Sept. 24. Students, faculty and staff members and their spouses will have priority for lesson enrollment from Sept. 24 through Sept. 28. Only after that time may other persons register. Due to price and registration differentials, it will be necessary that each person come to register with appropriate identification. Because registration for all workshops and lessons is limited, we must consider your decision to enroll final by the beginning of the first scheduled session. (If the class is held in the evening, notification of cancellation of registration must be given to the Program Office by 5:00 p.m. on the day the class is scheduled to begin.) These procedures must be followed in order to qualify for a refund. Games Area HAVE SOME FUN! Join a bowling league in the Reitz Union Games Area! Leagues are now being formed. The Organizational meetings are as follows. Mixed doubles -Mon., Oct. 1, 7:30 Stu-Fax -Wed, Oct. 3, 6:15 All other league meetings will be Tues., Oct. 2at 7:30 in the Union Games Area. M1T m -u Yoga $10.00 students $15.00 non-students Beginning Classes TUESDA YS Oct. 9 -Dec. 4 5 PM -7 PM TUESDA YS Oct. 9 -Dec. 4 7:30 PM -9: 30 PM WEDNESDAYS Oct. 10 -Dec. 5 10 AM -12 NOON THURSDA YS Oct. 11-Dec. 6 5 PM -7PM THURSDAYS Oct. 11-Dec. 6 7:30PM -9:30 PM FRIDAYS Oct. 12 -Dec. 7 10 AM -12 NOON FRIDAYS Oct. 12-Dec. 7 7:30 PM -9:30 PM Intermediate Students WEDNESDAYS Oct. 10 -Dec. 5 5:00 PM -7:00 PM U I Reitz Union Subscription Series Tickets for the performances of Carlos Montoya, Richard Harris, "Journey Into Blackness" and "I Am A Woman" will be available in a subscription series which offers both seating priority and a reduction in price. Beginning Thursday, September 20, the University Box Office (Constans Theatre) will be selling the subscription plan. Series A: $10.00 -available to University of Florida students; SERIES B: $12.00 -available to the General Public. SPECIAL BONUS FOR UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA STUDENTS Included in Series A at no extra charge -the Asolo State Theater production of Noel Coward's "Private Lives." Series Subscribers will receive a wallet card with a reserved location indicated on it. Individual tickets will be available approximately two weeks prior to each performance at the following prices: U of F Students -$2.50 General Public -$3.50 WEA VING Wednesdays Oct 10 -Dec 5 7:30 PM10PM $15.00 students $20.00 non-students COPPER ENAMELING Thursday Oct11 -Nov 1 7:30 P.M. -10P.M. $8.00 students $10.00 non-students BEGINNERS WINE COURSE October 11, October 18. October 26, November 1 and November 8 8:00 p.m. 9:30 p.m. This course is intended for the novice. Such elements of wine knowledge as label reading, proper presentation and service, consumer knowledge and the grading and tasting of wines will be covered in this course. New York State, California and selected foreign wines will be offered. $10.00 -students $15.00 non-students 2001: a space odysse Special Sat. Matinee at 2:00 PM Thurs, Sept 27, 7:00, 9:45 Fri, Sept 28, 5:30, 8:15, 11:00 Sat, Sept 29, 2:00, 5:30, 8:15 11:00 7 rtnt AC AD EMYAW AR D WINNER Cinema 5 presents the Garden of the Fnzi-Continis NOW IN ENGLISH E 6:00, 8:00, 10:00 75 cents Union Auditorium Sunday Sept. 30 iearics Montoya' In Concert Thurs. Oct. 4 8:15 pm J. Wayne Reitz Union Ballroom Tickets available On subscription series or individually' at $2.50 for Uof F students and $3.50 for general public. Tickets are available at the University Box Office in the Constans Theatre I SEPT. 27 & 28 11 AM-9 PM All kinds of posters, prints & drawings on sale. ALSO. featuring handicrafts made by local artists & craftsmen. Enjoy creating an ice cream masterpiece at the "Make Your Own Sundae" Special. Sept. 27 -11 AM -2 PM. CO-SPONSORED BY

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Page 4, The Independent Florida Alligator, Friday, September 28, 1973 Local fugitive caught in indiana By JI M YACAVONE and HARRY COVERSTON Alligator Staff Writers A former UF student, fleeing trial in Gainesville on drug charges, was caught late Wednesday afternoon by Indiana State Police outside of Ft. Wayne, Ind. Richard Anthony Hall, 21, was taken to the intensive care unit of Saint Joseph Hospital in Ft. Wayne suffering from what the Allen County, Ind., Sheriff's Office termed "withdrawal." STATE POLICE, acting on motorists' reports of a man acting strangely oin the median, caught Halt on Interstate Highway -69. Florida StatetAttorney Eugene Whitworth reported Hall was hitchhiking. Indiana police had been earlier alerted to be on the took out for Hall, sought on fugitive charges, by Muncie, Ind., police. Muncie police repo rted Hall was fleeing to Canada from Muncie, where his parents live. Hall was arrested last June in Gainesville in a SE 8th St. apartment when he attempted to sell narcotics to an undercover agent. He was charged with six counts o f p o s s e s s i o n of hallucinogenic drugs, two counts of possession of cocaine andone count of conspiracy to deliver and sell marijuana. RELEASED ON BOND, Hall failed to appear at his Sept. 19 trial. The state attorney then issued a bench warrant for Hall's arrest. No action has been takes by the state on extradition thus far as Hall is still in intensive care and could not be reached to discus waiving extradition By DOUGLAS HATCH Aligator Staff WrItet Noncredit continuing education courses ranging from arts arid crafts to professional help courses, wilt be offered at U' starting Oct. 1,according to Dr. B. Scott, of UF's Division of Continuing Education. Among the 47 courses that will be offered, there will be a special course for expectant mothers, and Murder (From Page One) mothers with new born infants. The course, which will be offered one morning a week, will use the latest methods to teach infant care, Scott said. ANOTHER OF THE new courses will focus on ''u nderstanding man's brain," and will study the brain and its effect on behavior, Scott said. One course will focus on the possibility the Earth has been visited by persons from other planets. This "We did a study on 25 the courts, many of which people arrested who were have very low conviction eventually convicted for rates; the probation and various crimes. In 25 of parole agencies, which have those cases the people had historically been a failure, been arrested before. One of and we have a penal system them was arrested 26 times. that hasn't changed in 100 So here the police had done years. its job 26 times but the "But it's always the courts and other police who get blamed for agencies involved had crime. failed." course, "visitors from space: comets, planets, or spacemen?" will explore the theories of Immanuel Velikovsky, Scott said. American involvement in the Vietnam war is another course topic. The course "the Vietnam war: the American involvement" will attempt to answer the question of just how did we get into Vietnam, and why we stayed there. OTHER COURSES will concern arts and crafts, careers for wonen. world citizenship, musi C. cdrt Mid hi u m a n s e \ uIa commuelcatlons. Admission to the couirs cis open to anyone regardles. of academic acIeveient, Scott said. Scot said registration [or these classes shall be at ths first meeting of the class. All classes except the special class for mothers shall meet one night a week. For further information contact Scott at 392-2317. Bond, arraignment set in cocaine arrests Bond has been set at $10,000 for each of the four men arrested in connection with Tuesday night's cocaine seizure. The almost one pound of cocaine seized in the parking lot of the Picadilly Apartments, 2220 SW 34th St., is the largest cocaine seizure in Gainesville. The arrested men, Bruce Farrell, 22, Greg Sale, 18, Ernie Miller, 23, all of Gainesville, and Steve Raulerson, 19, of Lake City, will be arraigned Oct. 8, according to State Attorney Gene Whitworth. 4 pot smugglers not from G'ville Contrary to news reports, four persons arrested Tuesda attempting to smuggle more than a ton of marijuana valued at $1.5 million into the country are not from the Gainesville area. According to Charles Walker of the Drug Enforcement Administration in Miami, the three men and one woman were seized aboard the "Moby Dick" Tuesday night about 150 miles southeast of Miami in the Florida Straits. A COAST GUARD official said the crew of the cutter Courageous became suspicious of an unusual number of fuel drums aboard the 36-foot American yacht. Less than two weeks ago, the Courageous ran down another American vessel carrying eight tons f marijuana in the Cal Sal group of the Bahama Islands. Arraigned by U.S. Magistrate Peter Palermo in Miami Thursday aftemoon were Allan Edes, 26, Whitingham, Vt., John Goodwin, 28, Charlemont, Mass., Hayward McKinney, 29, and Anna Bolonani, 21, both of Steinhatchee, Fla. THE THREE men are being held in Miami in lieu of $15,000 bond each. Bolonani was released Thursday on her own recognizance. Earlier, Coast Guard officials were quoted as believing four persons were from the Gainesville area. Owned and captained by McKinney, the boat is registered out of Shamrock, a small community near the Gulf Coast west of Gainesville. rwr Old fashion d Dag Sept. 30 All College Students And Visitors to our 9:45 AM Sunday School will be our Special Guests for Dinner-under-the-Pines. First Assembly of God 2925 NW 39 Ave. (66 Rev. James E. Ferrell, Pastor INKA RED Non-credit courses offered College Inn HAS SOMETHING ELSE An arcade has taken over the front room of the College Inn. The latest and greatest games in Florida are here for your pleasure o PIN BALLS o PIN BALLS o PINBALLS 0 AIR HOCKEY o ELECTRONIC TENNIS Largest Selection of Games in Gainesville 1728 W. Univ. Ave. Across from Murphree Area

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By CELESTE CALVITTO Alligator Staff Writer Interested in pursuing a career in urban studies? Then here's your chance to get some practical experience and earn four hours credit at the same time. FIFTEEN STUDENT internships with various city, county and state agencies will be available to UF students, according to Tom M u n k i t t r i c k student-city liaison officer. The program is funded under a grant from the U. S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). "The grant has been approved,'' s a y s Munkittrick, "but funding is a different matter." M U N KI T T R I C K explained the funding depends upon what is available from unused grant applications in the nation. He estimated the chances for funding during the winter and spring quarters as 'very good" although the outlook for this quarter is minimal. Internships with the following city agencies will be available: e Gainesville Police Department UM medical interviews set Senior premedical students who have admission to the September 1974 term. applied for admission to the University of All prospective students must have an Miami Medical School should make interview before they can be admitted, and arrangements for admission interviews the interview must be either in Gainesville before Oct. 5, according to Carolyn or Miami, Grantham said. Grantham, secretary to the Assistant Dean G for Pre-Professional Education. Grantham said these may be the only Grantham said a five-man team led by interviews in Gainesville. Dr. Bernard Fogle, will be in Gainesville to For an interview, call Grantham at interview prospective students for 392-2701. e Department of Public Works e Department of Traffic Engineering Personnel Department. And two with the R e g i o n a I U t i I i t i e s Department. COUNTY INTERNSHIPS are i n t h e county administrator's office, the planning and zoning department, and in the office of superintendent of public instruction. State agencies offering internships are the North Central Florida Regional Planning Council, North Central Florida Health Council, the Governor's Council on Criminal Justice for Region II, and the Manpower Planning Council. For further information c a l l UF's Regional Development Center at 392-0296. September 28, 1973, The Independent Fforida Alligator; Page 5 Friday,! Spheeris at Plaza concert By SONI VELIZ Alligator Entertainment Editor Student Government Productions will present Jimmie Spheeris in a free concert Saturday at 8 p.m. in the Plaza of the Americas. Jimmie Spheeris plays easy and melodic guitar and piano. But there is more to Spheeris' music. A poet as well as a composer, his songs tell well-spun stories. "Most people," he said, "take the view from down in the abyss. But right now, I'm on the ceiling, and I stay here." From the ceiling, Jimmie said it's "easier to communicate." And communication is what his act is about. It's the most important tie between Jimmie and his friend Lee Calvin Nicoli, who accompanies him on flute, bass guitar, acoustic guitar and occasionally vocals. Describing their musical involvement, Jimmie says "there is -no space between us, it's complete communication. He understands what I'm doing and enhances it." Jimmie Spheeris said he is a peaceful person, explaining his calm in terms rosy and sweet, "I love people, that's really the only thing in this whole universe and the secret of any kind of greatness is just to continue to love ...I could never desire revenge for anybody, no matter what he does to me." Jimmie Spheeris has played in Gainesville twice in the last two years. Both times as a pre-booked attraction. He said his welcome was so warm, and he liked the feeling here Jimmie Spheeris so much, that this time he's returning for a free concert. .weaves musical stories on guitar and piano Govt. internships offered at UF "Crazy Dave" E-X-P A N D-S Over the Summer we have quadrupled our showroom space with stock to match our size. 9"ELETRONICS IA VIE S 621 W. Univ. Ave. Come see us during our 5th Anniversary Sale (The ugly green building on the corner) (Editor's Note: Inside Information will be a weekly feature in The Independent Alligator, providing readers with authoritative information on all aspects of personal health and policies of the University Health Service. Bring your questions to Room 305 Reitz Union or the lobbyof the University Health Service. For further information please contact the Health Education Office at the University Health Service -Room 307.) Today's Consultants Dr. B. Barger V. Cave, Ins. Dr. W. J. Coggins S. Jones, R. N. Dr. R. B. Shaara Why do birth control pills make you nauseated? Nausea is believed to be due to the estrogen component of the birth control pill which tends to irritate the stomach and upper intestine. When nausea occurs, it is in the first few months on the pills and it usually diminishes thereafter. Most of the nausea may be circumvented by taking the pill with a LARGE glass of water at night. If the nausea persists in the mornings, you should see your physician for appropriate medication to carry you through the first few cycles. Occasionally, a reduction in estrogen content of the pill is required. Are the records at the Student Health Service confidential? The Student Health Service fully respects the confidential nature of a student's health record by not permitting the release of any information from that record to anyone, on or off campus, without a specific written request by the student. What is the best treatment for a blister? Usually blisters are best left alone and kept clean, dry and covered. The fluid inside is a good culture media for bacteria and should not be contaminated. No cover available is as protective as skin. If a blister needs to be opened for whatever reason, i.e., location, performance, etc., then under clean conditions the top layer of skin should be removed and an antibiotic ointment applied. The best cover we have found is called "moleskin" and is available commercially. Moleskin is quite useful in prevention of blister formation. Are there any unusual hazards of going barefoot around campus? Yes -flip tops, broken bottles, stubbed toes, creeping eruption, hookworm and tetanus. -A -..A,. -I -'. --+ -1 'T

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Page 6, The Independent Florida Alligator, Friday, September 28, 1973 Drop policy tightened By JIM YACAVONE Alligator Staff Writer University College (UC) students will find it harder to drop and add this quarter, according to Dr. Harry Shaw, UC assistant dean for academic advisement. Students no longer can "capriciously drop a cls the last week of the quarter to avoid a poos grade," Shaw said. THIS IS NOT a new policy, Shaw said, but an enforcement of existing policy. The rules for petitioning to drop and add a course after the normal drop and add period will be interpreted "much more stringently than in the past." Normal drop and add ended Wednesday. Though a student may drop a course arbitrarily until next Wednesday, the A new course leading to a new degree will be offered winter quarter if there is enough interest, according to Dr. Herbert A. Bevis, of t h e e n v i r o n m e n t alI engineering department, of the College of Engineering. The new course, ENE 201 C o n c e pts of Environmental Engineering Sciences, will study concepts affecting the environment and how to clean up the environment b y e n v i r o n m e n t a l particularly Florida. engineering. The other instructor, Dr. THE NEW degree is a Emmett Bolch, will lecture bachelor of science in on waste disposal and the Environmental Engineering effects of radiation on man Sciences, Bevis said. and the environment. The course can be used as Requirements for the an i n t r o d u c t i o n to new degree include 220 environmental engineering, hours of work, and Bevis said. traditional engineering DR. SUZANNE Bayley, s u b j e c t s s u c h as one of the two instructors, thermodynamics. But more said she would instruct emphasis will be on the about air pollution, water sciences, especially biology. pollution and other Students can call Bevisat problems facing man and 392-0841. student now has to petition to add a course. After next Wednesday a petition will be required to drop a course. The petitioning procedure requires a student to take his petition to the UC petition clerk. The clerk assigns the student an advisor who, after consultation with the student and a review of the petition, will recommend acceptance or rejection of the petition. A RECOMMENDATION is also needed from the instructor of the course the student is dropping or adding. If adding a course, permission is needed from the department. Ultimate action on the petition rests with Shaw. Shaw said approval will depend upon documented "extenuating circumstances" such as illness, family problems or financial problems. o VERANCE -I BY shell WE DELIVER OUR GOODIES HOT, FAST, AND FREE TO MOST AREAS CALL US 378-1628 372-6582 376-6582 WE'LL BE RIGHT OVER Two good ways to stay friends with your feet Why not Join the thousands who are rediscovering the joys of cycling ...getting there under your own power is a thrill and the wonderful things it does for your health are special bonuses. r I TDA I. All the many worlds of motorcycling in one place. MORE MODELS m MORE SERVICE MORE ACCESSORIES s MORE PARTS )Nj.U'EST VE372637 e 818 W UNIVERSITY kVF I ~From Mighty to Mini, ftreit' has it all., New course possible to I v & ArAA-

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HUD approves UF loan for married housing site The University of Florida has received verbal notivication that the Department of Housing (HUD) has approved a $2.8 million Iloan for the purchase of Tanglewood Manor Apartments, according to Ken Peet, UF housing business manager. The university seeks to purchase the 208-unit complex at 2901 SW 13th St. to replace the aging Flavet married housing. Last spring the Board of Regents (BOR) authorized UF to seek the loan. In April it was reported that the owners of the property were asking $2.9 million. The land was assessed at $2.3 million this year by the county. Peet said no price was agreed upon. When UF receives written notification of the HUD loan, it will go to the BOR, which will authorize an offering price. If the offering price is not accepted, there will then be a series of negotiations between UF, the Board of Regents and the property owners. 11 / .I JN ~~{N 7 What does a diamond ring mean to you? Above all, a ciamon ring means love. And that's w.at ArtCarved keeps in mind every time they create one They know you want!t to, be beautii. Because your d amend nng symrboies the beauty and cermnence' of your love C m n and see ArtCrved scmany expressions of ove .e 1e p yo. select the ring that best e\presses yours THRESHOLD AN QUE E A CArt Carved IN THE GAINESVILLE MALL P,.,ne __ 3 786-443 1.Friday, September 28, 1973, The independent Florida Alligator, Page 7 The St. Petersburg Times .the significant difference Pencils are impartial. The writer makes the difference. And St. Petersburg Times readers have an advantage that begins with indepth reporting and continues through concise editing and Florida's sharpest printing. Result is a package of news, features, sports and comment with a significant difference that you'll like. If We're So Good, Why Cut the Price? You get The St. Petersburg Times at a reduced Student Special Rate because we consider this an investment in our future ... in your future, too! So, start each day with The St. Petersburg Times. We'll provide "guaranteed home delivery" and the kind of news coverage that makes your newspaper reading time well spent. CALL 372-4532 FLORIDA'S BEST NEWSPAPER Circulation Department STUDENT SPECIAL St. Petersburg Times Subscription Offer P.O. Box 1121 Date. St. Petersburg, Fla., 33731 Four Great Offers To Choose From! Check One: 1 quarter for $6.25 7 3 quarters for $17.25 runs now thru Dec. 14, 1973 runs now thru June 7, 1974 You save up to $5.75! You save up to $16.75! 2 quarters for $11.75 7 4 quarters for $22.75 runs now thru Mar. 24, 1974 runs now thru Aug. 23, 1974 You save up to $11.25! You save up to $22.25! Delivery stops Dec. 15 thru Jan. 4 for the Holidays. A refund will be made if you permanently leave school. Mail today! Offer expires October 15, 1973. Please start delivery. I am a student or faculty member. NAM E ADDRESS .APT C.I CITY ..ZIP ISIGNED.I r--------------i -1 -.J. -.1; --t-73--, 1-2 I

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Page 8, The Independent Florida Alligator, Friday, September 28, 1973 Editorial Dormitory absurdity If you're I 8-years-old, you can buy a car and finance it yourself. You can go into any bar in town, sign any binding legal agreement and generally do anything with your life you want. But if you live in a UF dormitory, you can't have friends of the opposite sex visit you after 11 p.m. Gov. Reubin Askew signed the Adult-Rights Bill May 9th, granting 18 to 21 year-olds all the legal rights and responsibilities of an adult. Apparently word hasn't reached the Board of Regents (BOR) yet. Students can have friends of the opposite sex in their rooms from 2 -11 p.m. Sunday and from 2 12 p.m. Friday and Saturday. This absurd ruling is an anachronism left from the days of Elizabeth Kovachevich, the regent who managed to convince many Florida parents that university dormitories were 'whorehouses". There is absolutely no justification for continuing the strict visitation sours. At their Monday meeting, the BOR should rescind the regulation and recognize the fact that as adults, the bulk of students in the dorms have a right to 24-hour visitation. If they do anything less, the BOR will be violating the rights of 6,000 Florida residents. Parking pains When it was announced last year that freshmen could bring their cars on campus, many people wondered just where all the cars were going to be parked. The solution the Traffic and Parking Division came up with is hardly satisfactory. Many freshmen brought their cars to campus expecting to be given a parking decal that would allow them to park near their residence hall. They had been sent a notice during the summer t ha t explained the "type of decal issued is determined by the location of the student's local residence." But that certainly isn't the case. Freshmen are being issued only decals for area i) by Fraternity Row. Cars are double-parked along Frat Row and freshmen are complainingbitterly that their cars are of no use to them when they have to park so far from their dorms. Royce Williams, coordinator of traffic and parking, should see that decals are issued for the parking lots nearest the aIls students live in. If there isn't enough room, students should be allowed to park in the lots serving nearby buildings after 7 p.m. It's a long walk from Frat Row to Rawlings or Yulee Hall. Students shouldn't be expected to hike that far after many brought their cars only because they were led to believe there woUld be convenient parking available. AA In nnn rrb A A I nfz"'rI F 2; THAT'S A ON THE WALL-W40' -.THWE FAIPRE5T OF DAMNABLE THE A1P~STOP .MAL US ALE, L1E +.IE NN CONNM Iy Agnew vies with Connally Spiro T. Ags Executive 0 Washington, Dear Spiro: new fice Building D.C. Office of the President September 27, 1973 In response to your somewhat angry letter of the 26th, I have enumerated below the answers to those questions that oncerned you. First, the matter of your parking space: I have emporarily given John Connally permission to park there, s he will be staying with Pat and me for the next few weeks. I bet you never saw a Lincoln Continental pickup ruck before, huh? You may park your new Volvo in the )ay lot down the street (we will reimburse you later). Secondly, I can understand your concern over the absence of any Secret Service agents these past few weeks. I was astonished to hear that Barbara Walters managed to reak in to your bathroom this morning for an interview. Anyway, our visitor from Texas requires the best ossible security so I have reassigned your agents to him. In he meantime, Boy Scout Troop 144 will be assigned to guard you and Judy (watch your language around the oys!). Third, I apologize for throwing out all your Frank inatra albums. I thought they were Tricia's. I will order you a new set immediately. Incidentally, during John Connally's visit, we will be piping Ferlin Husky music throughout the White House. Next, you have objected to my decision to move your ffice downstairs next to the bowling alley. Look at the bright side: reporters can't find you there, and you can bowl all day for only half-price. In addition, Mr. Connally can use your old office for phone calls, job interviews, barbeques or short naps. Next, I'm sorry if I hurt your feelings by not inviting you .o Kissinger's big state dinner the other night. I do, however, have a good excuse: at the last minute, Lawrence Welk and two of the Lennon Sisters dropped by so I gave CAR L H IAASEN them your seats. You understand. There are a few additional items you should know about before coming to work tomorrow: First, Mr. Connally will be borrowing your speechwriters and personal secretary for the next few weeks. In the meantime, you'll have to do your own shorthand and typing. Your new speechwriter is somewhat of a celebrity a former comedy writer for the Mike Douglas Show. He said he is familiar with your style. Secondly, I forgot to reorder your office stationery. You can use notebook paper in the meantime. Also, I accidentally opened all your mail yesterday. Don't worry, though, it was just another bill from those Charles Atlas people. Please don't feel hurt if you don't get invited to breakfast for a while. Elliot Richardson and a few other lawyers will be dropping by for a chat -just silly old lawyer talk. I took the liberty of ordering you breakfast tomorrow. The guy from MacDonald's said the Egg McMuffin would be ready around eight. Finally, I want to reiterate my support for you in this pending crisis. You should tackle this head-on, and with the confidence that the White House is 1000 per cent behind you. Don't give a second thought to all this ridiculous talk about your resigning! Your job is secure. I know these last few weeks have been hell for you, but don't be depressed. Just think of Tom Eagleton .look what resigning did for him! He's more popular than ever. Be sure to keep me posted on the latest legal developments. In the meantime, John Connally says you're welcome to drop in his office anytime to chat about old times over a mint julep. Your pal, Richard M. Nixon Editorial Staff The Independent Debbi Smith Dale Thomas FLOd I dA Editor-in-Chef Managing Editor Jim Seale Robert Dodge ALLIGATOR News Editor Assistant News Editor D'ana Snyder Leslie Vriqhi Wendy Snyder Lavout Editor Lavour Editor Associate Editor BusinessS t a ffPublished by Campus Communications Inc. .'Tony' KendoP General Manager .O. Boxt3266 Univ. Sta. Gainesville, Fla. P A ar s 0 CeeralMangerOffice Behind the College lIn 0Cornwell. AcivertisingsUirector 1728W. University Ave. Ira Isav B Advertsi e Manager Editorial Phone 376-4458 Mrs vsy .Bestn.rdJ nOffice Manager Advertising 376-4482 Towney C. Ks naro Jr Bvsiness Manager t a t p a b p t g b S y t o p t

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By ALYCE McADAM (EDITOR'S NOTE:) Alyce McAdam had taught a women's self-defense class and worked in forming the nation's first rape crisis center in Washington, D.C.) Early Tuesday morning, a woman was abducted from campus and raped by three men. According to the U n i v e r s i t y P olI i c e Department, at least three women reported hearing the screaming and one said she heard "tires screeching," and a male voice yelling, "shut up!" Because students did not respond promptly, the police arrived too late to prevent the abduction. Women must realize that as long as women are still being raped no woman on this campus is realistically free fr the fear of rape. Every time we aid a sister in danger we make our community a little safer for all of us -tomorrow it may be you who needs the aid of sisters. Such assistance is not all that difficult or dangerous to render. I saw a man hassling a woman in the Tampa airport. When I went up to her he had already taken her mopey and was attempting to take her ticket. All I did was to say "leave her alone." The man left and we got the police to recover her stolen money. Don't assume that because a man and woman know one another that you should not "interfere." Protecting the safety or life of another woman is not interference. According to FBI statistics a third of reported rapes are committed by someone the woman knows from work, school or her neighborhood. Don't assume someone is "fooling around." Don't be embarassed to interrupt and ask a woman if she is in trouble. Your temporary embarrassment will be easily forgotten. Rape isn't. In a released statement Acting Interim UF President E. T. York said, "Women especially must be extremely careful not to move about after dark unaccompanied -on campus or anywhere else." I believe that I and other women have the right to move about unaccompanied after dark on campus or anywhere else -but especially on campus. Unwittingly (I hope) York is aiding the rapist to act as a policeman for the rest of the men in this society. As long as women fear walking alone after dark and as long as men tell women to fear walking alone after dark and as long as rape is tolerated, men will always know the whereabouts of "their women," know that women's activities are restricted and further prevent women from taking full part in the life of this society. York's statement ended with "Everything in our power will be done to prevent a recurrence of this type of thing." Let's hope so. And there's plenty that can be done. Such as: o More and better lighting on campus, particularly around Little Hall and the libraries. But lighting is a simple answer. 9 Self-defense for women. Classes for women only should be taught by women only, offered for credit through the physical education department, or noncredit courses through the intramurals department every quarter -free of on the proceedings that a rape victim goes through to report the crime and/or receive medical treatment. Many women are reluctant to report the crime for the "hassles" or embarrassment hey think they will endure. All women who have been raped need immediate and adequate medical treatment. The problems in the process Women, arise charge. While training in the martial arts (judo, karate, etc.) is valuable, it is not adequate. An important aspect of women's self-defense is the mental p r e p a r e d n e s s a n d confidence to quickly respond -an aspect not always dealt with in the martial arts training. The martial arts also take a great time commitment before experiencing any body contact. Many women do not feel physically adequate to undertake such training. Basic self-defense can be taught in a shorter period of time and women do not need to be in "good physical condition" to learn. e A campus-wide study of aiding a rape victim must be discovered and steps taken to correct them. The from the Women's Health FBI estimates only 20 to 25 Care Clinic and other per cent of all rapes are women's groups on campus. reported. If the percentage o An escort system for of reported rape increased, women. There has been more public attention some talk in the past about would be given to the such a system. Contact your problem and more pressure student senator and urge to capture, prosecute and him or her to get moving on convict rapists would be this. Also offer your ideas. applied. And help. Female police officers An end to the trained to question victims and investigate the crime. paternalistic attitude T h i s may help in espo usesd by thde encouraging victims to administration, police report. dmiisrat nplie e A n educational officers, teachers, fathers, program for all female husbands, boyfriends, and stuent coerig bsicmale friends that women students covering basic need to be protected self-defense, what to do if from men, by men. Wake up raped, medical and legal women! They're doing a information. This could lousy job of protecting us perhaps be done by a panel from themselves. Protect of female police officers, your s ist e r, protect female law students, people yourself! Both sides EDITOR: Your editorial first published in The Alligator of Friday, August 17, 1973, in the special issue for freshmen argues that only a liberal position is presented in the social science departments at the University of Florida including such departments as political science and economics. It also presents a picture of faculty as humiliating students who raise an opposite point of view. Frankly, if this is what the University of Florida is I think it would be a travesty on higher education. The purpose of our education is to have faculty with varying points of view, on matters that are not simply a part of a skill or training process, present different points of view and encourage students to study these divergent topics and be a part of an educational process. This educational process rightfully means that the student explores, learns to test, and judges for The Independent Florida Alligator C-" Soni Velez Entertainment Editor Acey Harper Photo Editor Andy Cohen Sports Editor Sonya Booth Features Editor himself. If the educational process is s i m p le indoctrination, then it becomes a mockery. Libertarianism is based on t h e p r i n c i p le o f noninitiation of force )no man may initiate the use of force against any other man). Conservatism, on the other hand, is based on a devotion to traditional W e s t e r n v a l u e s Noninitiation of force, regrettably, is not among these values. The two philosophies should be difficult to confuse. Libertarians have no more in common with traditional conservatives than they do with ACLU-style liberals. Mr. Jones would have done well to note the following projects of SLM and FPP: marching in support of the Gainesville 8 As I have observed college students they would rightfully resent being exposed only to a liberal, a middle of the road, or a conservative point of view and certainly would resist indoctrination. The editorial presents only one point of view which is that of the extremist right wing libertarian position and t a k e s exception to everything in opposition toE it.E It seems to me that point S of view should be presented Ii but should be subject to A criticism and discussion. If F it can stand the test of the P market place, it should L survive. If not, it should be ( rejected. This is what I P think the university is all G about and I think the G4 editorial showed little E understanding of what w education is. As a member g of a social sciencevi department and chairman of v the Political Science c Department, I simply wish M to express to students the g idea that things are quite different from that in the editorial and I think wed have a different university d from what was presented in that editorial. The editorial while accusing others of a having only one point of H view actually shows extreme in hostility to any positions different from that of the 44 writer of the editorial. h Manning J. Dauer Chairman Department of Political Science FFP DITOR: An article in the ept. 24 edition of The dependent Florida lligator described the undamental Freedom arty (FPP) and the Student ibertarian Movement SLM) as being "right of the political center." The article, "Student groups: Politics to ecology" by Brian Jones, ent on to describe these roups as "working to clude more conservative viewpoints in university nurses." This is extremely misleading. Both of these roups adhere to a bertarian philosophy. working for the ecriminalization of arijuana b r i n g i n g narcho-syndicalist Karl ess to campus to advocate npeaching the President. None of these projects ts very neatly into the conservative" pigeon-hole e provided for us. Sue Valek Acting Chairman, FFP economics EDITOR: Who is Brian Donerly to say that all those who are in favor of the price freeze are either "suffering from terminal stupidity" or are those "who oppose freedom on principle?" Sixty-four per cent of the population hardly qualify as "smarter than John K. Galbraith" because they oppose price controls. All that is proved is that Brian Donerly does not have any idea of what Galbraith has said. I am not defending Nixonomics, but I do not believe that Donerlynis qualified to hold any rational opinion on the subject. He consistently thinks in absolutes, classing people as stupid and totalitarian who do not agree that libertarian capitalism is the answer to the world's problems. He simplifies issues, ignoring all that is inconvenient, and then launches another juvenile diatribe. Donerly exemplifies all that is bad about libertarian capitalism: the selfishness, the arrogance, and the anti-intellectualism. Calvin Timmerman President, SLM Michael Woodhouse 3AS Friday, Se member 28, 1973, The Independent Florida Alligator, Page 9 1714

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Page 10, The Independent Florida Alligator, Friday, September 28, 1973 'Paint Your Wagon' starts season Florida Players prepare for new year By ROBIN WILLIAMS Alligator Staff Writer Tryouts were held this week for fall quarter's production of "Paint Your Wagon". The show, which will run Nov. 2-10 in the H.P. Constans Theater, is a rollicking musical about the Old West gold rush days. "PAINT YOUR WAGON" will be produced by the Florida Players in conjunction with the department of music. Dr. Clyde G. Sumpter is directing the show. Musical directors are Dr. John Grigsby and Dr. Gustav Holley. From today through Nov. 1, there will be work going on at the theater to construct sets, focus lights and make costumes for the show. Work sessions in the theater shop will be 7-10 p.m. Monday and 2-5:30 p.m. Tuesday through Friday. Dr. Al Wehlburg and his corps of shop assistants will greet all newcomers and invite them to grab a paintbrush or hammer. THE COSTUME shop located upstairs at the theater will begin making costumes for "Paint Your Wagon" next week. The costume shop is open form 9 a.m. -5 p.m. each weekday. Costumers will also be at work Monday through Wednesday nights from beginning at 7:30. Max Frisch's "Andora" will be the major production winter quarter. The director, Dr. L.L. Zimmerman, said he considered Frisch one of the best contemporary Central European playwrights. Because of this summer's favorable response to Florida Players' performance of the children's play "Androcles and the Lion", the theater department decided to produce another children's show this winter. DR. CLYDE G. Sumpter will direct "Nicolo and Nicolette", a children's fantasy by Alan Cullen. The fantasy will open for matinee performances March 2. Spring quarter the Players will offer a former Broadway hit and a contemporary comedy which hasn't been announced yet. The Broadway show, "And Miss Reardon Drinks a Little", by Paul Zindel will open May 6. Director Richard Lake described the show as a "hilarious, revealing and touching comedy." JULIE IL1RRIS starred in the show when it opened on Rick Rosen Broadway in Feb. 1971. Graduate student Shep Sobel will be directing the comedy. It will open May 28. Rick Rosen Under The Lights .hopefuls read for Western The one-acts will appear in either fall or spring quarter. SEASON TICKETS to the Players Productions are available at the Constans Theater Box Office from 12:30-4 p.m. Anyone butying a season ticket will be able to reserve their tickets for the show one week before regular tickets go on sale. Price for the tickets will be $8 for non students and $4 for students. The price of a ticket covers admission for the four major productions and for the graduate student one acts. College Counc'is held back by student apathy P/ SUSAN SPINGLER AlmiaWor Staff Writer ne vIhiptin of college councils last February, thlat previously hdd not developed counciLs have a. franticalltrvg to organi e councils in order to get 10i! use Of appropriate Stud(nt Governmrnt (SG funds is short me itn whs the college councils have been reatid and the lack of A dent wareness of the councils ma bc reasons for the apparent student apathy. THE IDEA of the college council was formulated in 1963 by the Student Senate. No funds were made available for the councils to use until this year when The Alligator went independent and left SG with enough funds to support the councils. The councils now get $1 for each full-time student enrolled in each college. Fourteen of the 16 colleges at UF have organized council's. Forestry and Medicine are the only two colleges which have not formed councils. SG has no say in what the councils do with their money. Budgets must be approved by the dean of the council's college and must then go to the Student Body Treasurer, who distributes the funds. STUDENT BODY Treasurer Gary Neubert said he will reject a budget if funds are allocated for anything illegal, but otherwise he has nothing to say about the use of the funds. Councils are representative bodies, elected in the colleges in different ways. Most colleges elect a certain number of representatives from each of the departments within the college. Neubert said the idea behind the councils is to further activities in the individual colleges by providing money directly to them as opposed to money that goes to SG. Interest in the councils in the form of voter participation and number of candidates running for election has been low. GARY SEIBERT of the College o too many" people voted in their c and said they had to "look for pe 25-inember council. Reports ,ere similar from o Wicklin, a member of the Universit no onr rec' ived more than 50 votes "pretty low". Along with Arts and tie largest colleges at UF. Larry Harrison, of the Arts and differed in each department, but vo in the councils was generally low in I THE ONLY exception seemed to be incorporated its college council intc Association (JMBA), a law studen I Greg Sherman .business scholarships f Engineering said "aot ollege council election. ople to run" for their ther colleges. Cecelia y College Council, said and voter turnout was Sciences, UC is one of existed for some time. According to John Wilcox, president of JMBA, voter turnout was about 50 per cent. Despite the low student interest, the councils have been busy using the appropriated funds. UC Council projects have included financing fencers t go to a tournament, purchasing a 90-minute documrentarv film on China and giving money to the Equal Education Opportunity Program (EEOP). Sciences council said it THE ARTS and Sciences Council's money must benefit ter turnout and interest all Arts and Science students or all UF students, according his college. to Harrison. They rejected a request to send some botanN the Law School, which students on a trip because the benefits received from the the John Marshall Bar money would not be far-reaching enough, he said. 1 organization that has One of the college's biggest projects was setting up a calculator lab in 116 Building D which is open to all undergraduate and graduate students. Plans for the future include such projects as a peer advisory board that will provide a student advisory service for students in the hopes the communication gap between student and advisor will be diminished. THE COUNCIL plans to give money to Accent for speakers, and donate to the Florida Quarterly for a literary magazine. The law school council has fixed up the student lounge, financed the brown baggers weekly luncheon, have fixed up the JMBA office and sent representatives to the American Bar Association convention. The journalism college plans to build a lounge in one of the classrooms at the college, buy casette tape recorders for students to rent, provide more cameras 'and other equipment for the journalism students and extend the hours of the college library. THE COLLEGE of Business Administration Council has used its funds to provide scholarships, a book exchange, Gary Neubert teacher of the year awards, and money for assistantships l .ittle control within the college, council member Greg Sherman said. Singing And Dancing .trying out for musical

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By JOE COLLUM So in the end a 1,000 Alligator Staff Writer pound steer will bring its buyer about 450 pounds of The price of meat seems steaks, roasts, stew meat to have followed that and hamburger for $450, or proverbial cow who jumped $1 per pound. over the moon. It's CHEAP? IF you've got a skyrocketed. $900 freezer to store a But the meat-eating quarter ton of meat. species man is not destined Gruver & Cotting Inc. is a to become extinct. wholesale meat dealership THE CARNIVORE is which caters mostly to coming up with ways to eateries such as restaurants, beat the meat squeeze. hotels and schools. But it Buying meat on the hoof also serves individuals with -live steers -has become room for a side of beef. popular with carnivores with Proprietor Richard big freezers. Gruver said most of his Lonnie Thompson Jr., of individual customers buy a the Gainesville Livestock 275 pound side of beef that Market, said there was a is reduced to almost 200 flurry of live steer buying pounds after it is processed after President Nixon's meat and frozen. The price per price freeze was lifted two pound comes out to 87 weeks ago. cents. "THERE WAS a pretty CHEAP? AGAIN, yes, if good group in here then. you've got a place to put it. They mostly bought 1,000 Most students obviously pound steers. From 800 to don't. But that doesn't spell 1,000 pounds is a good size the end of the average for freezing," Thompson student carnivore who's got said. to fill his stomach on $50 or A 1,000 pound steer $75 a month. today goes for38 cents per A t T h o m p s o n's pound. The heavier the steer Gaines ville Livestock the cheaper. After slaughter Market "The price of 1,000 and processing, the carcass pound steers has dropped weighs about 600 pounds from 48 to 38 cents a and the total cost is about pound in the last 10 days," $450. About 25 per cent, or Thompson said. 150 pounds, of that carcass THAT'S A 20 per cent is bone and fat. drop and Thompson said retail price trends at meat counters usually run two weeks behind price changes at his market. Gruver said, "Probably next week you'll see lots of specials at meat and super markets. And the week after that you'll see even more specials." The reason? During the Nixon freeze cattlemen kept their steers off the market and in Midwestern feedlots. Unfortunately, said Thompson, there comes a time in every steer's life when he just can't get any fatter, so when the freeze was lifted there was a surplus of steers that couldn't be held any longer. NOW, SAID Gruver, "The pipelines are full." Thus, the price of beef is sinking almost as fast as it skyrocketed earlier this year. Thes situation is temporary, however. Thompson and Gruver agree the "pipelines" will unclog when telescopic retail prices sink back into the atmosphere of the average consumer. So carnivores better enjoy a sirloin or two while they can, because if what the experts say is true, come January that old cow's going back into orbit. MaI Friday, September 28, 1973, The Independent Florida Alligator, Page 11 C. Hires Dorm Lounges .home, sweet home More room in dorms By BRUCE MAULDEN and BERNIE WROBLE Alligator Staff Writers The UF Division of Housing began accepting cancellations from students in dormitory rooms Wednesday, to provide relief for those stuck in dormitory lounges. Students moving out, though, must be prepared to pay partial rent for their rooms. "We have reopened our door for contract releases, until we find enough rooms for s t u d e n t s now in lounges," Joe Ball, assistant to the director of housing said. Students who decide to move out must pay only for the time they have already spent in their rooms, he said. A student cancelling his room today will be charged $30 to $40, or 1/5 the quarter's rent. The remainder of the rent will be refunded to the student by mail. "All cancellations should go through my office," Ball aid. "Students should make sure they are released from their contracts before signing any leases or agreements off campus." Ball also pointed out t hat freshmen will not be released from their housing contracts under any circumstances. A new rule passed by the Board of Regents (BOR) in July, allowing sophomores to live off campus, a BOR cut in funds to universities and an increase in the number of apartments in Gainesville did not stop a large percentage of transfer students and sophomores from wanting dorms. As a result, more than 300 students had to be assigned to dormitory lounges when the fall term opened this week. UF Director of Housing James T. Hennessey said sleeping in lounges was normal for the school year's opening, although he admitted that this fall's number was greater than anticipated. "Things should be okay in two or three weeks, however," he said. "Most of the students don't want to leave the lounges. It's air conditioned, carpeted and they would really rather stay there." Hennessey ,predicted by mid-term there would be plenty of rooms for everyone and things would return to normal. DESPITE THE critical shortage of space, students who did have rooms were not allowed contract releases earlier this week. Housing s t o p p e d t a k i n g cancellations from women in rooms last Thursday, and from men on Tuesday morning. Releases have been granted to students in lounges if they paid for the time they lived in makeshift facilities. Based on $130-$140 per quarter rates, lounge students breaking their contracts were required to pay 10% of their rent for each week they occupied the lounges or $26 to $28 if they left this week. Every effort is being made to help students in lounges, Ball said. "Tuesday night we placed several long distance phone calls to persons who have not checked into their assigned rooms yet," he said. "When we can determine how many rooms will be available due to these no-shows, we will assign such rooms to those now i n lounges." About one dozen graduate students in lounges were moved into rooms Wednesday, Ball said, and added that these were the first of the lounge dwellers to be accommodated aside from exceptional cases handled earlier. The bulk of the 209 men and 92 women assigned to lounge spaces still await room assignments. All men in Rawlings Hall lounge were given rooms by Wednesday night, Ball said. Remaining lounge students will be moved into rooms as space becomes available, he said. Ball urged students interested in moving out of their dormitory rooms to act quickly. He could not promise that contract cancellations would be granted after today and he estimated that releases of women's dorm contracts would end very soon. .1 Hey diddle, diddle Meat prices drop L

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Page 12, The Independent Florida Alligator, Friday, Septemb Women voters hold workshop An administration of justice workshop dealing with "Crime and punishment" sponsored by the League of Women Voters of Florida (LWV), will be held at the Flagler Inn October 2 and 3. Registration will end at 1 p. m. Oct. 2. A luncheon address will follow on "The state of corrections in Florida" by the Secretary of Florida's Department of Rehabilitative Services, 0. J. Keller Jr. After a panel discussion on "alternatives to prison," Dr. Stanley Brodsky, coordinator for correctional psychology at the University of Alabama is to speak on "the philosophy of incarceration." The second day of the workshop features a "special problems in corrections" panel discussion and a tour of several of Florida's state correctional institutions. Most of the participants will be members of the LWV Administration of Justice Committee. Other interested persons may attend on a space available basis. More information may be obtained from Millie Combs, 372-5127. According to the Educational Testing Service report, only a veteran who earns $2,400 a year with a working wife can afford to meet his expenses, contrary to what was reported in The Alligator Wednesday. The Alligator regrets the error. Coordinator of Veteran Affairs Rolf Groseth further clarified his position on a bill that would waive tuition fees for all veterans attending state schools. He said he thinks the bill could not pass unless a provision requiring the state to reimburse UF for loss of the fees is included in the bill. ier By STEVE SCHLITT Alligator Staff Writer BAHAII: The Bahai Association will have a Bahaii Fireside tonight at 8:00 in room 118 of the J. Wayne Reitz Union. It will be an informal discussion for those curious about the Bahaii faith. GET ACQUAINTED: There will be a folk dancing get acquainted party tonight from 9 to midnight in the Norman Hall Gym and it is sponsored by the Folk Dancing Club. There will be a beginners session to teach newcomers from 9 to 10 p.m. ELECTION: Officers for the Student Libertarian Movement will be elected at tonight's meeting in room 150B of the Union. The meeting will begin at 8 p.m. ROSH HASHANA SERVICES: The Hillel Foundation will hold Rosh Hashana Services today at 9:30a.m. and 5 p.m. in the McCarty Auditorium. SLAUGHTERHOUSE: "Slaughterhouse Five" will be shown tonight in the Beatty Towers' Rec Room at 7:30, 9:30, and 11:30. Admission will be 50 cents. Popcorn and cokes will be sold. SG ABOLITION: Student Government abolition will be discussed at tonight's Fundamental Freedom Party meeting in room 150B of the Union at 8 p.m. A "Lunch n' rap session" will be held on the Plaza of the Americas today from noon until 2 p. m. There will be hot dogs and cokes, and SG officials will be there to talk with students. IT'S A TRIP: A one-and-a-half hour bicycling trip will begin at the Plaza of the Americas tomorrow at 3:45 p.m. The ride will last abbut one hour and it is sponsored by the UF Cycle Club. FILM PROGRAM: A film program sponsored by the Divine Light Mission will give information on "Millenium '73," a gathering in which Guru Maharaji will present his program to bring peace to the world. The film will be held at the Center for United Ministries at 7:30 p.m. CRAFTY: An arts and crafts sale is being held today and tomorrow in the union ballroom starting at 11 a.m. FUTURISTIC: "2001:A Space Odyssey" will be shown in the Union Auditorium at 5:30, 8:15, and 11, and Saturday afternoon and night at 2:30, 5:30, 8:15 and 11:00. SPHEERIS: Jimmy Spheeris will perform Saturday in the Plaza of the Americas at 8 p.m. The concert is being sponsored by Student Government Productions. AWARD WINNER: The acclaimed movie "Garden of the Finzi-Continis" will be shown Sunday night in the Union Auditorium at 6, 8 and 10. GOOD CONNECTION: Student 'Government Productions will present "The French Connection" in the Plaza of the Americas" at 8 p. m. Sunday. DON'T MISS MISS: The Catholic Student Federation will be holding a "Listening party to hear the Florida-Mississippi football game on the radio. The party will be in the Catholic Student Center at 7:30 p. m. Saturday. Refreshments will be served. GATOR CENTURY: A 100-mile bicycling tour will be sponsored by the UF Cycle Club Saturday beginning at 7 a.m. The "Gator Century Tour" will start in the Plaza of the Americas. Previous experience and a 10-speed bike are required. THAT'S CRICKET: The Cricket Club will meet every Saturday beinning Saturday on Alice Field. Interested persons please contact Siva at 372-5276. BACK TO NATURE: An organic gardening project will be held Saturday morning at 10 a.m. by the Environmental Action Group west of Lake Alice across from the Physical Plant. Admission will be $10 and is open to all students. CATHOLIC STUDENTS: There will be a general meeting of all those students interested in the Catholic Student Federation Sunday at 7:30 p.m. in the Catholic Student Center. UF VS. TULANE: The UF Rugby Team will be playing against Tulane in Norman Field at noon Sunday. OFF THE DEEP END: Skin and Scuba diving classes sponsored by the Gainesville YMCA will begin Monday with lectures and pool sessions which will be Mondays and Tuesdays at 7 p.m. Successful completion of the course will give the student international certification. SAMSON is Recruiting You Tuesday, Oct. 2 at 7:30 pm NORMAN HALL AUD. CIrhiosiyI' is a go o d 1e(so1 1o ( II', (I(i1 hear about NA S ON 1IlCId lsltiig to 1 "' othlers is thle best re(IsoH /o.oIII Its Do Unto Others. with SAMSON Take Your Laundry to The Villa. Still Homeof the 25 wash The VillaNortheast is 3 blocks Eastof Burger King 210 NE 16 Ave. The Villa-North THE VILLAS is 2 blocks North of Take time to the Atlantic Bank save a dime. 4107 NW 13 St At the home ,the quarterwash UI 1"K EARED .......... ...... . .. .. .. ...X

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Friday, September 28, 1973, The Independent Florida Aigator, Page 131LZA"A GAINESVIL HAG GAR*PUTS YOU RIGHT IN FASHION WITH 21/2" CUFFS Fashion-right is just what these great Haggar slacks are with their 21,2'' cuffs, belt loops, and flare legs. Large, colorful plaids in your choice of blue, olive or red against camel and gray background. They're all polyester knit for easy-care and are machine washable. Sizes 32 to 40. 22.50. Men's Slacks *Use Your Maas Brothers Charge Card ...It's Better Than Money! AR .LE MALL I I pj r^l MELA W own*

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Page 14, The Independent Florida Alligator, Friday, September 28, 1973 GATR C~L AssI FlEIDS FORnSALE ) ampex 87r cassette tape deck. amp. & tuner (one unit); plus two ampex 6x9 speakers (wood ca bnet). matched set $225 negotiable). pjm 3789950. green JOANNOU RACER 10 SPEED 460.00 3 7 3 7 0 7 7. (A-2t-4-p) black & white t. with stand ias good condition has a timer. call 3/3-7831. (A-3t 3-p) or Sale:4 tickets to Miss. St Game c)II Glen or Paul 370'208. (A-3t-3-p) kerrnmore washer frigidaire deluxe dr yer $150 for both exc working nd 178-7122. (A-3t-3 p) teac 6010u stereo tape deck in like new condition. automatic reverse. special remote control unit. $425 or best offer. allan 392-0846 o r 392-0484. (A-3t-3-p) tape deck magnacord 1020 (telex) professionalquality, used in many studios, large vu meters cost $725 new, asking $300 or best offer 372-0360. (A-St-2-p) 1973 Honda 350 1 mo. old $800.00 call 376-8633 or 495-2357 after 5 p.m. (A-5t-2-p) COAST TO COAST PRECISION AUTO TUNE-UW' AIR CONDITIONER S E R V IC E O ELECTRONIC TUNE-UPS IgnitiOnl & Carburetim, Alterators & Geerators & Starters 1952 N. Main St. Phone372-5247 FOR SALE HODAKA super rat 6 months old never raced excellent condition many extras asking 83 7 5 .00 c all 1 3 730166. 19721 yamaha 360 less than 1 y? old 1 650 miles great c(salitron $650.00 or trade for aw c ll 373-2319 see at 5239 sv 67th s. (-\4t-3-p) rrirmese liibbits' Guaranteed to tioarrnce their way into your -i weeks old. ftrst shots & v e me d. purebred $20 1 73b656b go kittycrazy. (A tSt-3-p) r8 dodge canper 318 cu ini eninre refrigerator sink excellent urrni ond'tion needs minor repairs call between( 6 & 10 4681674 (A 3t-3-p) s teieo (orrrponentsdynaco 120w armp $300, dynaco bookshelf 2way speakers $75, nikko receiver $90, garrard 40b rintable $0, call 373-8381. (A St 3-p) used hammond c3 console organ with speaker excellent condition call 3721954 or 3721487. (A10t-2-p) THERE'S M9RE TO SEE WITH CABLE TV 8 TV Channels, A weather channel, UPI News, New York Stock E change, 2 FM stations on TV channels, and 9 FM and 4 AM static o n the FM band. UNIVERSITY CITY TELEVISION CABLE CO INC522 N. MAIN ST 378-2447 FORSALE wo me j -,,peed schwinn. basket lock. cha n good condition. $50.00 call 378-5669 after ( 06 p r. ask for frank. (A 3t 3 ) for sale: boys 10 speed bike low mileage, excellent condition with generator light. call nights 373-3607 $75 or best offer (a-2t-4-p) F0R SA LE Dorm-size refrigerator w/ freezer, 1 yr. old Sears Coldspot like new was $150, now $80 373-9252 daytime, 372-0801 nightie (a-5t-4-p) Dorm-size refrigerator w/ freezer, 4 yr. old Sears Coldspot like new was $150, now $80 373-9252 daytime, 372-0801 nightime (a-5t-4-p) DIAMOND ENGAGEMENT Zenith portable black & white tv RING 14 carat "orange blossom" 17" good condition $50 376 perfect quality, $75 or best 2962 (a-2t-5-p) otter, 372-0360. fA-5t-2-p) 3 bedroom mobile home. central H--air & heatwall-to-wall shag H-Dxch 1972 excellenrugwater bed,nice shady lot condition with 6" tubes spoolie close to campus.equity & assume wheel 16" rear wheelk"hrsers, payments 378-9109 (a-5t-5-p) drag bars,strotsloors sharp rons _________________ better 1500 468-1722 after 6 spm see to appreciateA a-3t-4-pl calculator 8 digit readout with green JOANNOM RACER 10 up to 16 digit capacity, $150 SIPPEED $60.00 3737077 la-2t-4-pl new now oniy$60,in perfect t ~f n 2 1 NEW & USED -New LR coffee & end tables $3.95 Genuine Simmons matt & box spgs. $29.95 setDanish 3pc liv rm suits $19.95 up supply limited Beautiful new walnut BR suits were $150 now $99.50 Lawson LR suits now $99.50 100's of other items not on sale. stereo components dynaco 120w amp. $300, dynaco bookshelf 2way speakers $75, nikko receiver $90, garrard 40b turntable $40, together $450. FURNITURE CITY USA, COR E Univ & SE ist Sts (across from the Court House in the old Baird Hardware Bldg.) (A-5t-2-p) 1969 Fiat 850 Spyder Convertible White with blue top New inspection & tag $625.00 o r Best offer 372-6242 (a-5t-4-pd) 73 1-82 vette leather stereo dark blue low low miles air 4speed $6599; 25" color tv $175;72 yamaha 125mx superb cond never raced $499. 3723835 (a-3t-5-p) zond toncaiiJ/dZ (a-3t-5-p) garage sale air cond new tv 17" 80 12" tv 35 dishes clothes hair dryerbooks & more apt 322-8 university village south 378-1876 sat. and sun. (a-lt-5-p) 72 honda c1350 red good condition $650 come by 1830 nwlst ave aptc after six or any time weekends (a-2t-5-p) Dorm Size REFRIGERATOR excellent condition $75 firm call 372-9539 (a-2t-4-p) FOR RENT female roommate wanted, grad student preferred, own bdrm 2 blocks from campus. call Sherry 373-6575. (B-5t-2-p) 0 SPECIAL GUEST STAR SKYLAKE FREE at the Plaza of the Americas** 8 P 0 8:0PM AUDYSP.2 *.000000000 .****. mu m Smokin' Joe Shmoe 'S Gainesville's most complete headshop over 60 kinds of papers, pipes made of clay, wood, brass, silver glass, stone, acrylic, plexiglass, bongs, water electric pipes, carbs, chambers, and many more there's 36 flavors of incense at 3 cents a stick -the lowest price around -plus hand held electric pipes tons of scented drip sand candles, over 50 styles of clips, onyx ashtrays carved wooden boxes from India plus many unmentionable goodies -all at fair prices -the lowest in town them folks aim to please -corner of N.W. 5th Ave. & NW. 13th St. love Need something for your apartment? Need an apartment ? Shop Gator Classifieds! 1 ~ We would like to sign your body up for an individally tailored PHYSICAL FITNESS PROGRAM that will last from one month to a full year. We haVe the finest facilities featuring the NAUTILUS line of exercising equipment and CONVENTIONAL WEIGHTS AND BARS WOMEN Shirver 5 Slpnas Whirlpoo)l Baith MEN Steam Riom Lrcksers 1 We'll Do Wonderful' igs to Your Body 378-6927 806 WEST UNIVERSITY AVENUE Ud TED DMGSSION 0

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LEIW c~L~~SI IE30S FOR RENT one bedroom garage apartment. semifurnished. couples only. call after 5:30 .376-3164 $98 1 block campus. (B-5t-3-p) 800 PLUS 9s FOR RENT student or faculty wanted to share l arge house rent & expenses near campus own rooms appro $95/mo 3737715 or lv message at 3920204 winarsky. (B-4t-2-p) save your gas money! 14 new apts 1 block from campus. bedroom KE or fully furnished. Graduate Apts. 1241 sw 4th ave. (B-5t-2-p) Alachua County Generator Service Alternators-Starters-GeneratorsForeign Car Service Ph 378-4011 508 N.W. 8th Ave. Friday, Sep < FR RENT for rent: one room in tour bedroom two bath house. $55 per month call anytime at 3735496 ask for tim. (B-5t-2-p) 1 or 2 female roommates needed to share french quarter apt. vith 2 other girls. 56.25 per mo. 372-1282. (B-3t-4-p) Rooms for rent Male students' private entrance come after 6:30 115nw 10st. (B-5t-3p) female rooniate waanted. share bedroom 132.00 per qt. 1/3 utthtis. 1 016 from cirmyos. call 376-1652 after 5:00. (h3t3) wanted mal eroorate for ewn room in 12 x 60 traier. ac. heat d shwasher. close to canipus. $56 morrth[IMrs2Utriities.Coll 378.0215. (h-3t-3-ts) 4hedroarn turnished house unit air garage $215. p-mo. en 1 3242 N.W. 12th Terrare no phone ask for Mark or B tember 28, 1973, The Independent IF1rid lligakPage 15 ORDER YOUR UNIVERSITY RINGS NOW'. LARGE SELECTION COURTEOUS SERVICE PROFESSIONAL RING SIZING LADIESE' & MEN'S STYLES ALL RINGS GUARANTEED HATCHERS JEWELERS "5Your Better Jeweler" 2 EAST UNIV. AVE 376-6892 This Certificate Entitles the Bearer to Food in the Amount UP TO 500 OFF EXPIRES OCTOBER 5, 1973 ITALIAN F1iERMAN south on 441" Take an Alligator to lunch. WINNER 1972 CANNES FILM FESTIVAL JURY PRIZE AWARD Only American Film to be so Honored A GORGE ROY HILL PAUL M0NASH PRHtUClON a iy Plgrim Wues from time to time tontime. SLAUGHTERHOUSE-FIVE ICHAk SACKS RON LEISMAN VAt RIPFR5NE R Tonight in the Towers Rec Room. Shows at 7:30, 9:30 1!:00 Admission 504 Popcorn & Cokes will be sold SGP PRESENTS SUNDAY OCTOBER 21 ALL TICKETS $6.00 FLORIDA U-LTONAJUN S GY %WUUt ~ e~ t-%%4 % 4AILLA IPtiot %r 8:00 P.M. TICKETSAVAILABLEAT: REITZ UNION BOXOFFICE ADVANCEDSALE Uof F STUDENTS ONLY OCTOBER 3 GENERAL PUBLIC TICKETS AVAILABLEOCTOBER 10 REBEL DISCOUNT RECORDSVWLLE FOR RENT 2 roommates wanted to share large 3 bedroom house by mall. $85 mo. includes all utilities. call David at 373-0403 and leave message. (B-4t-2-p) MIKE'S COLLEGE INN FULL LUNCH MENU MIKE'S FAMOUS GIANT SUBS OPEN 10am. -12p.m. 7 DA YS A WEEK .-A r

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Pu7e 16, The independent Florida Alligator, Friday, September 28, 1973 ~AT4R cL ASSI Fl EIS In the great tradition of American thrillersFOR RENT ire a house with your own droom $60/mo. near mal -eplace garage screened porch ivate liberal male call 3761431 etween 6-10 pm leave no. B-3t-4-p) Male room mate wanted to share t w o bed r oom,completely furnished apartment. for further information call 373-5953 (b-3t-5-p) sublet 2br 2bath unfurnished apt country village apts $195/mo $200 security deposit required 376-6956 373-3782 after 5:30 weekdays. (B-5t-2-p) I or 2 female roommates needed to hare french quarter apt. with 2 other girls. 56.25 per mo. 372-1282 (b-3t-4-p)In share -house with your own bedroom $60/mo near mail fireplace garage screened porch private liberal male call 3761431 between 6-10pm leave (b-3t-4-p) I room $60 mth /4 utilities central a/c&heat liberal female preferred largenice house all privleges no pets 3739195 ask for rick terri or harry (b-5t-5-p) BILL'S SHOE SHOP Mens Work Shoes 0 Moccasins 0 aoots Dog Collars 0 Nameplates EXPERT SHOE REPAIR 114 S. Main St 376-4978 DERWOOD'S Paint & Body Shop Foreign and Domestic 2425 NE 19 Dr. 373-8997 .WANTED need female roommate to take my place in 2-fr apt. frederick garden 45/mo utilities. 373-7200. (C-5t-4-p) Easy-going roommate for Village 34. $70 + 1 utilities. Prefer grad student. 372-2075 before 5 p.n. Mike. IC-31-d-ol Roommate to snare apartment 3 blocks from campus pool and AC $50 per month .utilities 1512 NW 5th AVE Apt 48 (c-2t-4-p) friendly female wanted! own room in 2 bedroom townhouse apt. t(o share with 2 other friendly girls 75/no. + utilities french quarter 373-9337 lc-3t-4-cS $10.00 reward for best chosen na me of discoleque in tan immaculate place apprd 5500 s0 ft including swimming pool game room beer wine sandwich send names + address to d21 nw 1 5th st university apts. no. 86 before 10-1-73. (C-4t-2-p) Par t Time secretary must be able to type and keep records schedule can be worked out call 376-0968 or 373-2917 ask for drew (C-4t-2-p) female roomates to share 2 bedroom apt near med center furnished call after 5 3735824. female roommate to share one bedroom apt. one block from campus, 9 month lease and completely furnished, call jacquie 372-1884. (C-bt-2-p) roommate needed -2 bdrm furnished la bonne vie apts 60-65$ mo. room with 2 male grad students call 372-6844, apt 255 (c-41-5-p) Babysitting 1il days a week in NWdsection fortinfant and 4 year o Id. M u sIt h a ve own transportation. call after 5 P.M. 372-0775 (c-3t-5-p) Female med-student needs roomate for 1 bedroom Summit House apartment. Call Cheryl after 5:30 at 376-8021. (C-bt-3-p) Part time help wanted. Apply in person at FUN CITY. (c-3t-4-c) HELP WANTED ) Babysitter needed in our home from 9:30 -11:30 am Mon. thru Fr, for 3 year old twins. Will pay $1.00 per hour. Call 373-4767. (E-4t-2-p) WANTED coed to clean mature bachelor'sapartment. Oak Feo r e st. Must have own transportation. Work schedule is flexible $2.00 per hour. Call 392-9656 between 8 & 5. (e5-5-p) Photographers with 35mm cameras and strobes (prefer at least 300 shot capacity) for short and profitable assignments. call 378-4700 or 378-9963. immediately (e-2t-5-p) parttime guys or gals neat for national Motel reservation system promotion must have own car call ken burns toll free 800654-4814 (e-2t-5-p) income $40 to $70 a week part time evenings and saturdays. call tim smith 378-0121 7to9pm only. (e-5t-5-p) AUTOS 70 VW wide tires, Hurst shift, stereo tape player, bronze $1250, Paula 376-0779 or 392-1635 (G-3t-4-p) 1967 Pontiac Catalina 2 dr hard top extra clean, a/c power brakes & steering new shocks and brakes, low milage $900 3763442, 3782996. (G-5t-4-p) 1969 pontiac lemans custom s fully equipped best offer takes it' call corey 378-7776 or 373-5266. (G-5t-2-p) PERSONAL WANTED some kind person to adopt o u r c a t .small1, a ff ectionate, long-haired, beautiful! call 373-8737 after 3 please (j-3t-5-p) Fresh whole wheat bread every day monday thru friday. Warm from the oven around 1pm Mother Earth 604nw 13th st mon-fri 10-8 sat 10-6 (j-5t-5-p) DIVORCE KIT for Florida's new no-fault law. Written guarantee yet only $20.80. Free details Write: KIT, Box 791, Pompano, Fla. 33061 (J-2t-5-p) 8:00Pm Sunday, Sept. 30 SGP Presents THE FRECH -I WNNKTON 2~~nt 20HcEEIIJ-FOt eesEet~s-lE MNcEC cEtN e M"afTrteI .1-CICU~WULICM ALVOE OW fEWM AI IA*"""nU& 1 Imal eor G.DAr' SCHNE sex ERST one o t m wMN Amme .iDN EL COLOR BY DELUXE R|,. I in the Plaza of the Arr-ericas FREE WNELCOMAE BACK GANG! Hope you had a nice summer. To help you celebrate your arrival -here's a coupon, good for 50 6 off any pizza. Order a Domino's pizza and invite your friends over and celebrate. .1 OFF ON THE PRICE OF ANY PIZZA. EXPIRES -9-30-73 -One couoon per pizza please 000 -campus 376-2487 eastside 376-3317 .--westside 378-2415 FAST. HOT. FREE DELIVERY DOMINO'S PIZZA OPEN FOR LUNCH 11 AM -Ms_ ARE MICHELOB /2-price All night Friday with )I1rchase of aly food item. EAT -DRINK and PLAY PINBALL at FUN CITY 'The Deli with a gamesroom' 1245 W. Univ. Ave. I

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Fri & MIDNIGHT SHOW Sat. "IT IS A JOY!" -Judith Crist, New York Magazine Paramount PicturesPresents HARMLDand MAUDE Gm Color by TechniolorA Paramount Picture --'e PERSONAL wanted:you. corner drugstore begins volunteer training Oct 1 Call 378-1588 or come by 1128 sw 1 ave for details. Help us all (j-2t-5-p) COED -facial hair remove permanently call Edmued Dwyer, Electrologist, for your appointment 372-8039. (J-fr-4-ch) HIRROYAPARK 2:00 4:30 SMASH WEEK .7:00 9:30 I PERSONAL SERVICES i am an exchange student from the netherlands and haoe my 11 year old son with me. on campus there are no friends his age. which child likes to makesa new friend. call mrs. kuiper 3928941 after 7 p.m. (J-3t-4-p) LOST & FOUND Lost: Blue Key Weekend, on the cruise, a gold beaded necklace of groat sentimental oalue please call loyce at 392-7811 reward offered. (L-5t-3-p) BROWN LEATHER PURSE WITH DEER ANTLER ORNAMENT' wallet inside. REWARD! kristy 376-8532. (L-3t-3-p) lost gold charm bracelet great sentimental value $20 reward please call sue at 373-7185 (1-51--D)o KARATE SMALL class, qualified instructor, girls are invited, new class begin oct 2, call eddie 373-2823. (M-9t-2-p) CYCLE ACCESSORY WORLD 209 N.E. 16th ave. phone 376-4916 for your complete motor cycle accessories. IM-5t-2-pl graduating students do you hate writing business letters? i'll WRIGHT them + type. start now to bet info for jobs call 373-9742 Im-it-5-p) GUITAR LESSONS by qualified instructor low rates call nytime 3 78h019 ask f o r mike. (M-2t-4-pl GUITAR LESSONS Flatpicking, Folk, Rock, Classical, Chord Theoiy. plus Banjo, Fiddle, Mandolin, Sabine String Shop 311 N.Main 373-6396. (M-ft-3-c) z SERVICES $$ PAID VOLUNTEERS $$ needed for vaccine study come by rm118 at anion oct 1Imorn. & att. for more info. IM-3t-3-pl WE'RE WIRED FOR SIGHT AT UNIVERSITY OPTICIANS. 535 SmW. 4th AVE. 378-4480 (m-ft-5t-c) College Men 18-27 become a naval officer. 12-18 mos. flight training. $10,200 to start; travel, responsibility. for info interview and a chance to fly Navy, call 372-6289 Gainse. (m-4t-S-cl CLASSICAL GUITAR The best instruction for those with a real interest. Beginning or advanced students. Robert Long 373-5085. (M-5t-3-p) s e I f h y p n o s i s f o r self improvement -motivation study Aids donald g. pratt. ethical hypnotist. for information 373-3059 (M-30t-2-p) ROYAL PARK A BEAUTY I I UNSURPASSED ?41 N b I t~eY RD -PHOI 37J 421, TODAY AT 2-4 6-8-10 All Sea ts$I1-00 rill 2.30 ibexcept Sundays & Hoda s c sW 13th STREET and 23rd BOUTHE 2:05 3:55 EXPERIMENT 5:50Harrad College. where free, lierated reltfions between 7:45 coed students are encouraged! Friday, September 28, 1973, The Independent Florida Alligator, Page 17 GATOR CL A IrFEIS SID)DHARTHA is an exquisite movie. -REX REED. Syndicated Columnist "Both in music and "A special filn for special visible beauty audiences, for devotees the picture is a of lesse's novels, for continuing delight. admirers of the exotic, -ARCHER WINST EN.N Y Postan for eve one impossibly wio wants to be beautiful to the adventurous eye. Visually il fil in going. exquisite:' --GENE SHA IT WNBC-TV -BERNARD DREW. Gannett News Se.'c "A visually exquisite film. an unusual and welcome experience." -WILLIAM WOLF. Cue COUMBI PICTURS PRESENTS, A LVBCORDW f4AN.tJ USB6 BA -STARBRINGSMSHOR SI 16A"JN A PRO00E DOIECTE AND WEFOR THESRE 1 O N",r. "00-, PHTG4~4DBy SVEN YK S T ,r ~VAA R 23rd BOULEVARD And now the movie. )epci's thc (ill)So I fle llal c 2:00 o 3:55 VERNON SCOTT UP/ 5:55 7:55 10:00 ti\cr-.l Ii orc, R hcligs xi \ N)R\I \N I R S()NIim "JESUS CHRIST SUPERSTAR" II1) N lII ( ARI ANI) N RNN 'r\II I 1 AN tBARR N NWI N \f, -CL l lli(Vlm o VNr L I i in \n Ic -i I k Lid Sii-r i'-ii .i Ri m Andre Pri';: i \ ,-r.,!i, li w( K ii i s p *,-N(RM S I N r,.iNORMAN i AISON I, Fe)l RI S I KiIVX )) 1-. i, .A0.,i., Iq r

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Page 18. The I"dependent Florida Alligator, Friday. Senten

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By CELESTE CALVITTO Alligator Staff Writer Soft-spoken and forthright, UF Student Body Vice President Richard Cole staunchly defends Student Government and says "it's easy to come up with an argument why SG shouldn't be abolished." Cole, former Chief Justice of the Traffic Court, was chosen by the Student Senate last summer to fill the vice-presidential post after The Alligator learned that Berni Singley's summer registration was cancelled. "I'M disappointed that it happened that way," says Cole about his transition from Traffic Court Justice to the vice-presidency. "I thought Berni had quite a potential for the vice presidency." Cole, noting he and Singley are "still friendly says he "hates to pass judgemnt on what the (UF) administration did. I don't think they handled it properly ...The fact that a student's record became public information to a newspaper I don't think is proper. The fact that she was no longer vice-president would have to become public but the way it came about was very unfortunate." "IN FACT, The Alligator was the way we found out about it. It made us look bad too because it gave the appearance that we were trying to hide something," he said. COLE SAYS he prefers the "traditional role" of the vice-president -"to be in charge of the cabinet. It frees him (the president) to do emergency-type things that only the president can give an answer to. The cabinet is a more day-to-day thing that can really affect a student's life." "I try to be very organized," "One of the things I'm trying to do as vice president is to keep a filing system that means something. ASKED IF the average student takes SG seriously, Cole commented that he didn't think "the normal student body person knows what their elected officers do for PHOTOS BY LYNNE PRESTON New. Student Body Vice President .easy to say why SG should stay them." He says that situation is partly the fault of SG, The Alligator and UF's administration. "Things are available to the students that they don't know about." Cole says SG "is like any government you can't build a road by yourself but if anybody pays taxes, a road gets built. It (SG) really does have a service." AND THAT is a main reason, Cole believes, that SG should not be abolished. "The four dollars of your money that goes to SG each quarter has a greater return, I believe, to students than almost any other money they give to this university. I don't think that if they abolished student government the activity fee (included in the tuition) would go down any. All they would do is reallocate these funds. And the people who compete for funds usually are the Athletic Association, the Reitz Union, and sometimes the Infirmary. "IF STUDENTS compare the value they get out of each one of these groups, SG does more with four dollars thanthe other groups do. I don't think its hard to defend~ it (SG) at all." Cole said his first contact with student activities came in his senior year in undergraduate chool when he became involved with 9AMSON. He tutored a young boy who had been through Head Start and kindergarten, but he couldn't read or count. "IT WAS very shocking," Cole said. "What I read about these things made it seem like a good deal, yet here was a child that didn't know how to do any of the things that I had anticipated him to know how to do." Cole then worked for a year before entering law school, where he became "'m'Tre interested in politics and student lifend making it 'better than it was." He participated in a friend's campaign for Student Body Treasurer and then met Boyer, who was running for Traffic Court Chief Justice. After working in that department for some time fornor "F Student Body President Sam Taylor at d Cole to be Director of Transportation. Richard Cole ...came from traffic court AND THAT'S when it all started. "I ran for traffic court and I heard about people who were running and none of them had anything to do with the traffic court. I didn't want it to go back to being nothing -Tyrie had done so much. That's why I ran -then events changed," Cole explained. And Cole adds that he does not intend to use his position as a springboard for a political career. He's more interested in pursuing a law career after graduation next June. I REALLY don't have any interest in pursuing a political career as a candidate," he says. "It wias something I did once and I'm glad I did, but it takes a different kind of person to go out and campaign. In politics in the outside world, all they do is shake hands and tape speeches. I wouldn't get anything out of that," Cole says. UFW pushing grape organization By DENNIS CONRAD Alligator Staff Writer The United Farmi Workers (UFW) are currently embroiled with the Teamsters in a battle to organize the grape pickers of California. At UF students appear to be siding with the UFW. This week students organized a spaghetti dinner to raise funds for the UFW and in previous months they have conducted boycotts of local supermarkets carrying non-UFW raoes. SEVERAL MAJOR differences exist in the benefits of different contracts with California growers signed by the Teamsters and the UFW, according to Orrin Baird, Apopka field director of the UFW. Included in the contract differences between the two unions are the UFW's favoring of the use of the hiring hall, grievance procedure subject to binding arbitration and tougher control over pesticides, Baird said. Under the two different union contracts signed with growers in Coachella Valley last April, there is very little difference in what a farm worker would make in hourly earnings. The Teamsters' contract provides S2.30 an hour while the UFW pays 10 cents more. BAIRD SAID THE critical difference between the two contracts was the Teamsters' preference for the labor contractor or crew leader system. A crew leader is responsible for getting the grower the labor he needs and for doing so he receives a percentage of the worker's eamings. Describing the crew leader as the "most infamous part of the agricultural scene," Baird said workers can be hired and fired at the whim of the crew leader. Because the crew leader has the power to dismiss workers at his discretion, Baird says the crew leader often uses it to force the farm workers to pay exhorbitant prices for soda, ice water, food, transportation and housing facilities. SCOTTIE BUTLER, general counsel for the Florida Farm Bureau Federation (FFBF), a voluntary association of farm families usually in opposition to the UFW, conceded some crew leaders make as much as $60,000 to $70,000 a year. "I personally hate the fact Florida agriculture relies on the crew leader system as it does," Bulter said. Jim Burt, director of labor relations for the FFBF, said the crew leader is now being used more than a decade ago because of the shortage of farm labor. Explaining why, Burt said, "They can find labor more easily." BURT CHALLENGED the UFW assertion that the hiring hall, where the union issues dispatch cards to those workers having the most seniority, would provide a "steadier, more depndable flow of labor" than the labor contractor system. Burt said the hiring hall has proven to be unreliable. Unions often will call growers one day prior to harvest to tell them then they don't have the necessary number of workers, he said. Burt said if the hiring' hall "worked in practice as in theory, growers might jump at the chance of going along with the hiring hall." Butler suggested what was needed was not a hiring hall to replace the crew leader but a system whereby crew leaders were "supervised." A "supervised" crew leader system would "remove some of the black from theeyeof agriculture" and help growers is record keeping requirements," Butler maintained. -EARED Friday, September 28, 1973, The Independent Florida Alligator, Page 19 Richard Cole: defender of SG

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l I I I e I e I (1 1-1t 1. .. [lorida Alligiator / Page 20, Friday, September 28, 1973 Offense needed by UF vs. Miss. State By ANDY COHEN Sports Editor UF's highly touted defensive unit will have their hands more than full this Saturday evening when the Gators travel to Jackson, Miss. to face the offensive minded Mississippi State Bulldogs (MSU). The Gators, who are presently 2-0 and ranked 15th in the nation should have their toughest game to date against the Bulldogs. In the Gators opening two victories over Kansas State and Southern Mississippi, the defensive unit carried most of the burden as the i n e f f ective offense continuously coughed up the ball deep in their own territory. UF coach Doug Dickey is well aware of the problem. "MSU's potent offensive unit makes it doubly important for the Gators to consistently move the ball," noted Dickey on Thursday. "If we don't eliminate our mistakes, especially deep in our own territory, we'll be in for a lone evening." MSU IS presently 1-0-1, while coming off the heels of an astonishing 52-21 mauling over Vanderbilt. In that contest the Bulldogs racked up 610 yards on offense. UF Defensive End Preston Kendrick About To "Cream" Opponent .Kendrick's teammates look on with obvious enjoyment After viewing films of MSU's victory Dickey praised their entire offensive unit. "They've got more confidence in their running and passing game than any team we've faced in a long time," noted UF's coach. "They've got two excellent receivers, a rMe quarterback and. a fullback named Wayne Jones, who is as good as any runner I've seen this season." In last week's contest, Jones gained 113 yards on 16 carries for three touchdowns. "MSU'S DEFENSE is young, but very aggressive," continued "Digkey. "Their punter is one 5of the top kickers in the country. He's presently averaging somewhere near 50 yards per punt." Gators' first two outings. "We just need better execution," said Dickey. "We can cure a lot of our ills on the rushing game by getting it and it is surprising we have not yet reached the point where our offensive execution is sharp." THE GATORS only injury is Glenn Sever, who will miss the MSU contest with slightly torn ligaments. Linebacker Joe Allen was suspended for the game, due to an incident which occurred last spring. David Bowden, the SEC's leading passer will start for the Gators for the third consecutive week. Hank Foldberg Jr. will see his first action of the season for the Gators after recovering from a shoulder injury. MSU will have their entire first unit both offensive and defensive healthy for Saturday's contest. NAT MOORE will be the CHIP HI RES game's captain for the Gators while Kris Anderson and John Lacer will be During the off-season cocaptains. UF's running duo of Nat Dickey coficluded by Moore and Vince Kendrick noting that he hopes the were rated near the top of Gators will get their first UF's illustrious football opportunity to compete on history. To the surprise of a dry field this Saturday the coaches and players evening. "It's always nicer alike, both have been no that way," Dickey more than adequate in the concluded. Photo CS finishing Cameras Supplies total photography We have the SUPPLIES 15% DISCOUNT TO STUDENTS TAKING PHOTOGRAPHY COURSES. ASK YOUR INSTRUCTOR! 1232 W. UNIVERSITY AVE. 376-7657 FIRST ANNIVERSARY SALE 1973 bikes at 1969 prices! 1973 CZ 175 STREET with helmet 53900 4134 N.W. 6th Street Phone: 373-7990 Free Pickup and Delivery 0% discount on all accessories with this ad. I I

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A plea from mothers Joe Namath's mother must have been really upset last Sunday, watching her son get plowed under by a huge Baltimore linebacker. If she was watching tv between games she got to see it again three times, in slow motion. If she was still watching, after that, she could have caught it again on the after game wrap-up and again on the late news. MONDAY NIGHT Howard Cosell showed it in slow motion adding his own comments. Cosell also got a thrill later being able to add his witness and comment on t h e f r e s h injury of Cowboy's Rodger Staubach, who also got knocked out of the game. (Both injuries will probably be included in those funny NFL films showing people being murdered in which Johnny Carson loves to show.) Is t h i s pandering violence? There seems to be a trend going in that direction in sports broadcasting today. During last year's Indy 500 the .-ABC crew broadcast one driver getting wiped out in slow motion, stop action with little arrows pointing out the body for those hard of seeing. MY FAVORITE example came from a broadcast of the national wrist wrestling championships last year. One beefy wrestler's arm broke in the middle of a match. They re-broadcast the event in slow motion, while an excited announcer was crooning into his mike, "Listen for the sickening crunch as his arm breaks." The essence of sports, as has been defined by at least 100 grammar school, high school and college coaches I've met, is competition. VIOLENCE HAS always happened in sports, but it hasn't been the drawing card, according to tv, that it is now becoming. Television has to pay a lot of money for the rights to broadcast sporting events and advertisers have to lay a bundle down in turn to hustle their goods. All of this needs a large audience to watch it. Death, probably the greatest literature ploy, is full of strong emotion and attracts probably the greatest attention. Mayhem, violence and on down the line, also attract great interest, and crowds. Television only provides the seats for the action, the advertisers provide the popcorn" I'm not saying that it is wrong. The Indy crash and Namath's shoulder were news and should have been reported, but harping on such events re-play after slow motion re-play as a sales attraction is a very base appeal. It probably upsets a bunch of mothers. Ruggers open season At noon this Sunday, the Tulane Rugby Club and the UF rugby team will face off on Norman Field, starting off the '73-74 season. Even though the season is starting, the club is still looking for members. They are looking for people who have played before and those who have never but want to play the game. THE TEAM is playing one of the largest and toughest schedules in the country, playing in forty matches and tournaments from now until May. "We should do real well this year barnng any injuries," Buck Curtain, the team adviser said. By the end of last season, Curtain said that they had only 18 players to fill the 15 team positions while playing four games in a tournament one'day. Next weekend, the team will travel up to Atlanta for a big tournament that will include Texas A & M and Dartmouth, two national rugby powerhouses. L iltK,--Li By DAVE WING Alligator Correspondent If you're new to UF and are wondering what is the name of the game everybody is playing on the handball courts with what looks like sawed off tennis rackets, well the name of the game is Racquetball. The UF Racquetball Club in ite second year of existence would like to welcome back racquetball enthusiasts and beginners at t heir first meeting Monday Oct. 1 in room 220 Florida Gym at 8 p. m. The club is open to all students, faculty, staff and spouses. Flag football season will be under way soon so all interested students should get their teams organized and signed up at the IM office. The IM office is located in room 229, Florida Gym, 392-0581. If you're not sure of your league classification, call the SM office prior to the deadline dates so you don't miss all the action. The deadline dates for the men's leagues are as follows: Men's Independent Oct. 8; Men's Dormitory Oct. 11; Law Oct. 12; Engineering Oct. 18. T e n n i s Tournament (singles) signup deadline is Oct. 17. The men's and women's singles tournament will be open to all students, staff, faculty and spouses. All students interested in officiating flag football, and volleyball are encouraged to sign up scon at the SM office. This is a good way to pick up extra cash while doing a service for UF. 0 Friday, September 28, 1973, The Independent Florida Alligator, Page 21 MIKE ENGLISH THE ONLY WATERBED DEALERS WORTH YOUR CONSIDERATION What good is a shop's 5, 10, or 20 year guarantee on a product when that shop has only been around a few months? And what good is a manufacturer's guarantee when the manufacturer has no track record? Don't swallow the hype that some of the local fly-by-night waterbed shops are baiting their hooks with. Mere desperation tactics. Anyone offering you a 20-year guarantee on a $17.95 waterbed is insulting your intelligence. Anyone telling you a bed in that price range doesn't require a frame, will tell you anything for a buck. And anyone alleging that their beds are larger than our beds is telling you a naughty lie. Just to further clarify matters, our personal store guarantee is 5 years, not 3 months (We've been here since Sept. 20, 1967). We'll also replace defective beanbags over any reasonable period of time -half a year if you're nice. There, you've got it all in writing. And you other shops out there -you be nice now. A fter all, where would you be without us? How would you know what to sell Or what kind of ads to use? Or anything Y'all behave, or we won't invite you to our 25th anniversary party either. Those Other Guys SUBTERRAN EAN CIRCUS 10SW 7th ST. 376-1583 OPEN WEEKDAYS: 10-10 SUNDAYS: 12-8 bMAW SILVER CITY THE SUPEPS TABR BOUTIQUE 8 SW 7th ST 378-0 758 OPEN WEEKDAYS: 10-10 SUNDAYS: 12-8 ,.do ammIr(a rae RK(nD COME ON BY CALL 373-3377 FOR FREE DELIVERY & 2 FREE COKES ~ p~fl ~ __ with each O 1 pizza delivered 1515 SW 13th Street I I

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Page 22, The Independent Florida Alligator, Friday, SeptembW 28, 1973 M ff cGriffleading SEC; Once banned from came By GREG FORRER Alligator Sports Writer In the eighth grade, the SEC's leading pass receiver weighed 85 pounds. In the ninth grade, he was prohibited from playing football. Lee McGriff, the "Little Big Man" of UF's squad, was banned from the football field because of his size -even after he had beefed up to a whopping 98 pounds. "I wanted to play football, but a rule came into effect that year which made it mandatory for anyone playing high school ball to weigh 110 pounds. I went to basketball," McGriff said. LUCKILY FOR the Gators, McGriff was able to tip the scales correctly a year later, so he went back to football. "I went back in the tenth grade, but don't think that the basketball didn't help. T h e h a n d -t o -e y e coordination I picked up playing helped me out quite a bit," said the 5 foot 9 inch, 163 lb. Junior. O obviously it helped somewhat, for going into Saturday's game McGriff had compiled 133 yards on eight receptions including two touchdowns, enough to give him a slim lead over last year's top receiver, Bill Buckley of Miss. State. "I'D LIKE it to end up that way," said McGriff of his lead, "but sometimes the ball might not be coming my way. It all depends on how the game is going." When asked if he had ever encountrered any coaches opposition with regards to his size, McGriff quickly answered negatively. UF Wide Receiver Lee McGriff Grabs Bowden Pass ..."Little Big Man" leads SEC in receptions, yards "Not one coach has ever turned me away. Many people not connected with the game have tried to discourage me, but the coaches were always willing to see what I could do," he said. McGRIFF PLAYED quarterback in his early days, not becoming a receiver until high school where he met with success at that position. In his senior year at Plant High School in Tampa, McGriff led the conference in touchdowns and pass receiving, only to be somewhat disappointed when he received just an "Honorable Mention" in the post-season awards. "I don't think our coaches made much of an effort to get recognition for the players. Not only in my case, but we had a few ballplayers that were definitely college material but they never received so much as a tumble," said the Tampan. SINCE THEN McGriff has made tremendous strides. Last year as a sophomore he shared duties at flanker with Hollis Boardman. This year he is a starting wide receiver for the Gators, and McGriff attributes much of his early success to the coach of the wide receivers, Don Breaux. "Breaux has been doing a tremendous job with the receivers. I believe he is the reason that there has been CHIP HIRES such a turnabout in the play of the receivers," McGriff remarked. "In one spring he taught me more football than I had learned from all the coaches I've known." "Breaux knows football and he also knows how to handle people. He's worked with us on our downfield blocking, and let me tell you, I'd be embarrassed to see movies of our downfield blocking last year, that's how much of a difference he's made," McGriff commented. As to what can be expected of the Gators in t h e future, McGriff remarked that "Nobody knows, but we're a together team that is going to put out and give our best." Tired of Being .we off? COME TO THE COLLEGE OF BUSINESS IOOK EXCHANGE Administered oy Alpha Kappa Psi Room 113C Bryan Hall Stacks OPEN ALL THIS WEEK 10:00AM TO 1:0PM Sponsored by The College Council of Bus. Adm. BUSINESS BOOKS Sold and Exchanged -Set Your Own Price 10 Cents per book sold retained. ROBBIES REEF WHILE THEY LAST: 10 GAL. ALL GLASS AQUARIUMS $4.50 THIS FRIDAY, SATURDAY, SUNDAY WE CARRY A COMPLETE LINE OF FRESH WATER AND SALTWATER SUPPLIES QUALITY FISH AT A COMPETITIVE PRICE. COME IN AND SEE US 10 -9 MON. -FRI. 10A8 SAT. 1 -5 SUN. 2201 N.W. 13th Street PHONE: 378-REEF -I~ Village Green Apartments 3101 N.E. 15th Street 3 BR -Unfurn. 149.00 monthly Including All Utilities .Central Heat & .r *Kitchen Equipped Wall to Wall Carpeting Schools & Shopping Nearby eSpacious Play Area for Children Office open till 5:00 Daily call 378-9135 or 378-0211 3.0 G.P.A.? 450 Florida Boards? Division Lecture Notes wants to buy your notes to. CHN 251 UCC 191 PCL 201 392-665. 305 JWRI own& Dl

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By Alligato CORAL GA -University hasn't won a f from Flori University (FS got by in a 71962. Since then th met seven time the Hurricanes favorite's role occasions, th have won ev achieve the lo streak any te enjoyed at Mia A YEAR State humbled to deadlock series at ei apiece. There n C ta b t L1 r Services BLES, FLA. of Miami ootball game ida State U) since it 6 squeaker in ie teams have s and though enjoyed the on several e Seminoles ery game to ngest winning am ever has mi's expense. ago, Florida Miami 37-14 the all-time ght victories ever has been a tie though Miami has won but when he got close to the twice by a single point. goal line, he was a raging The two teams will do -bull. battle this coming Saturday On Miami's first score, he night in Tallahassee. FSU is blasted over from the three currently 0-2, while Miami's in two shots. Next time only game this season was around, he ripped over from their upset victory over the eight in one shot. In the Texas. third quarter, he gained 11 The Hurricanes, who on his first try from the 14 tallied 20 points on Texas in and scored on two more their opener, seem much drives. Thus, when the goal more potent on offense line territory, he was given than they did at this time in the ball six times in the 1972. The team has adapted toughest part of the ball well to the new system of field and got 25 yards, an attack with the powerful average of 4.2. r u n n i n g of Woody Naturally, his running Thompson a key factor. made the passing more NOODY GAINED 80 effective -and the yards in 25 tries against excellent passing of both Texas for a 3.2 average -Coy Hall and Kary Baker The school year has changed but one thing at Burger King hasn't. urn* If you buy a burger with any kind of cereal filler or vege able additive in it, you're e not at Burger K ing. Because our E urgersare 100% beef and seasoned with salt. We don't make B hem any other way. a K IN G In fact, at Burger King we don't think it's a burger at al unless it's 100% beef. And we think You agree. 8 N.W.16TH AVE. Miami collides with FSU MPORIU Ree~p aout SUNN4Y SiDe up, 1642 W. Univ. Ave. at corner of N.W. 17th St. Across From Campus n. -Fri 109:00 Sat 10.7:00 Friday, September 28, 1973, The inde dent Florida Alligator, Page 23 est. Baker hit on his ive tries, Hall d on five of his with seven receivers ito the act. Cardosa was an il for Thompson SI-back spot and his ds included key Af seven and nine BEAN BAG CHAIRS the Hurricanes FURS VELVETS NAUGAHYDE COUCHES d only a limited of the possibilities attacking plan and ATERBEDS counted on to FRAMES LINERS FOAM PADS r more as they FITTED SHEETS VIBRATORS HEATERS ,he patient and well d teaching of their Indian Bedspreads hurricanes will meet TAPESTRYS FROM POLAND, SPAIN, lami on Nov. 24. MOROCCO, ITALY, INDIA BEADED CURTAINS TIFFANY LAMP SHADES ALL AT THE I EMPORIUM --------Let us BLOW YOUR MIND!! with our LOW PRICES!!! JEWELRY from 25 countries AMER. INDIAN TURQUOISE MOTHER OF PEARL, FEATHERS, COPPER, WOOD SILVER, BONE, ELEPHANT HAIR,& MOPE SEMI PRECIOUS STONES RINGS-BRACELETS-PENDANTS A COMPLETE CLOTHES BOUTIQUE for guys & gals DRESSES -SHIRTS -TOPS -SLAP SANDk CANDLES -INCENSE KAMA SUTRA PRODUCTS TEA SETS -BEAD CURTAINS LAMP SHADES -WOODEN BOXES40 NATURAL COSMETICS0 oo -----------

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Page 24, The Independent Florida Alligator, Friday, September 28, 1973 The Harmon Football Forecast A-"ESRASKA --OKLAHOMA STATE 11-NO CAROLINA ST -STEXAS 2-ALABAMA 07O10 STATE -MIAI 7-KANSAS -OKLAHOMA ,-NOTRE DAME 1_-O1WA STATE I -TEXAS TECH SOUTER CAL -PEN A1 ASSOUR S-ARIZONA STATE --MICHIGAN 1S U U C L A 1 -HOUSTONS Saturday, Sept 29 -Ma or Coleges A~ Other GsesEast OhshersGames -hMddwhs Oher Games Fr Wst "ict Ujre rA The first week the headliner was U.C.L.A.-Nebraska ..the second week, L.S.U.-Colorado ..last week, it was North Carolina State-Nebraska .and this week the national spotlight is on the blockbuster between Oklahoma and Southern California. They're ranked 3rd and 4th in that order in our top 20. The Sooners have had a week off since their impressive trouncing of Baylor in their season opener, and the Trojans have defeated Arkansas and Georgia Tech on successive Saturdays. Both Ce ams are capable of such offensive explosions, it should be a tremendous show. Our pick is possibly a surprise: Oklahoma by nine points. However, Nebraska is still Number One this week, challenged by runner-op Alabama. The Cornhuskers have a little easier task this Saturday than last as they plan Wisconsin. The Tide meets Vanderbilt. And depending on the outcome of Southern Cal-Oklahoma, the two powers esitld still be on top next week. Nebraska will dump the Badgers by 35, and Alabama swilt top the Commodores by -wow -55 points! An old nemesis faces 8th-ranked Notre Oame. The Boilermakers of Purdue. thorns in the sides of the Fighting Irish in past years, meet the Irish in West Lafayette. The Riveters are much more of a darkhorse this fall, but are still figured to be an 18-point ttnderdog to Notre Dame. a red 5t and 7t rpctvl inour atonl rakngs Miami. the big upsetter a week ago, goes after Florida tt Saturday. The 12th-rated H-urncanes wsttl win by 25 Three other rnembirs of thiBig 8 Cointerenceare in the Top 20 again ...Oklahoma Stati is ai surprising 6th, Iowa State is 13th, and Missouri is 1 lii. Ibe Cowboys ame Cyclones wil be a1-oint sinner oser \rasas. an Miznwillk Nort arolina bs ~ien. In Ibe Soth si orii-rium ats o us bewee conference title conenders and national power, occur almost weekly. This Satl uy it s T-ntssee against Auburn. Last fall, 5tigersupsit tho\otsint-s-rs. 10-6, and this year -well. It could hieI hosaiistory.-Vbuirn is favored by jusl one pmilto. AO BIG DADDY S Welcomes all Gators to the Bigger and Better Lamplighter Relax Now Presenting an res A06o gone w ith Fresh Squeeze ONDAY OCT. I in C'm Ci y ounge SQUADI Mon. TUeS. Thurs. eds All Night 'Dornestic Beer 1U Drinks 2U Any Drink 50t one 25c Gin & Vodka For Ladies ounce High Ball Tonic Drinks PM 2 AM 9 p M 10 p "A 9pM 1 ipm ()pM 11 K/1 .. ..... .. .: ...: .. ... ..X ....... .. ... ..X ... ........ ..... ..*. -* .-% ***. .:. :X ..... .X. -K ...** *' ... ... .... ... ..... ... ....%% ... ... .... ..r ...A. *ft:!2 Y 101. .n .... ....i ... ... .. .. .... ...... ... ..***'**** ... ... ... .. ... . . ... ... .J .* .%. ... ..... .... ... ....... . ... .. .. .X X . .. .. .H .... .. .... .. .... ... . .... .. .11 A ... .. .. ......... .. .xi:4 1 . .: ... ........ .... .. .... .. . .. ---------.. An amazing adventure is awaiting you. An adventure more unique than travel to foreign lands, More awe-inspiring than walking on the moon. An adventure beyond the limits of finite time and space. It is the adventure of realization -of discovering just who and what you really are. Guru Maharaj Ji, the fifteen year old Perfect Master, through a simple, direct experience can take you to this place inside. And then the ultimate adventure of living begins. FILM AND DISCUSSION OF THE KNOWLEDGE REVEALED BY GURU MAHARAJ JI WILL BE PRESENTED THIS EVENING, 7:30 PM, CENTER FOR UNITED MINISTRIES 1402 W. UNIV. A VE. DIVINE LIGHT MISSION 378-8184