Citation
The Independent Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Independent Florida alligator
Portion of title:
Florida allgator
Portion of title:
Alligator
Alternate Title:
University digest
Alternate Title:
University of Florida digest
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, FL
Publisher:
Campus Communications, Inc.
Creation Date:
February 26, 1975
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
1975
Frequency:
Daily (except Saturdays, Sundays, holidays and exam periods, Aug.-Apr.); semiweekly (May-July)
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. (some col.) ; 36 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
Online databases.
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Online databases ( lcsh )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Additional Physical Form:
Also available online.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 65, no. 75 (Feb. 1, 1973)-
General Note:
"Not officially associated with the University of Florida."
Funding:
Funded by NEH in support of the National Digital Newspaper Project (NDNP), NEH Award Number: PJ-50006-05

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000470760 ( ALEPH )
13827512 ( OCLC )
ACN5549 ( NOTIS )
sn 86010448 ( LCCN )
0889-2423 ( ISSN )

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; The Independent /

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Fl'orl'd'a. Alligator FEB.WEDNESDAY 26 1975 :i



: VOL. 67 N0.89
"I .. Puohshcd by Campus Communications Inc. GoltwvllU. Florida Not officially auociaMd with the University of Florida .

.



II! Nearly 30 faculty to be cut


.
By TOM SHRODER of the year.Normally. An additional 20 positions may be 4' gyp'
t
Alligator Staff Writer state universities' must return 2 eliminated to give UF'a $134,000 head start in :
to 2.5 per cent of salary appropriations to the meeting next.year's ,budget requirements and 6y
UF deans will notify 20 to 30 faculty state at the end of the year. to return 11, special faculty positions fundedby :a s 4 ;; (.
P members this week that their contracts will BRYAN SAID HE COULD SEE NO the legislature for this year only.
not be renewed next year. "philosophic basis" for continuing: the BRYAN TOLD A TUESDAY meeting of ..
; : In addition, the UF 1975 summer budgetwill practice in a year when universities are the Council of Vice Presidents that cuts will s.'
be reduced by 25 per cent-$658,000-' already facing drastic budget cuts, but he said include the elimination of funds for the 3b 4a fff .
reducing it to approximately the level of the legislature'might require it any way. Urban'and Regional Development Center and I
funding for the 1973 summer quarter. Bryan said he was able to cut 52 positionsby reductions in the Center of Latin American 4 K f '
UF INTERIM VICE PRESIDENT forAcademic freezing openings due to retirement, deathor Studies and the Office of Instructional ..
.. Affairs Robert Bryan said the transfer. *"" Resources.
faculty 'salary budget must be trimmed by THE 25 PER CENT REDUCTION of the UF's Institute of Food and Agricultural
SI.5 million to meet a request by the Board of 1975 summer budget will cut another 37.5 Sciences and J. Hillis Miller Health Centerare
Regents. positions, Bryan said., budgeted separately and are not directly
The 20 to 30 faculty members contracts Only 20 to 30 positions must be eliminatedby effected by the cuts.
which will not be renewed next year are part not rehiring faculty who presently hold However, the health 'center agreed to pay
of a 90 position cut required to meet. the 1.5 interim appointments or have been at UF for for 540,000 worth of faculty salaries in
million reduction. less than one year, biomedical engineering that are presently
,' The College of,Arts and Sciences, UF's Interim faculty and first year professors are funded by the severely cut general education ROBERT BRYAN
largest college: was forced to cut 32 of next the only positions that can be terminated .$1.5 million must be trimmed
'*,year's faculty positions, worth more than without one year's notice.'
$570.000 in salaries. UF INTERIM AFFIRMATIVE Action budget.UFsenators
BRYAN SAID THE FACULTY HIRING Coordinator Dorothy Neville'said the hiring endorseestablishment
freeze that began Dec. 12, will continue freeze and dismissal of first year faculty will I
throughout next year to enable UF to meet preclude meeting goals for the hiring of
committments to the legislature.In women and minorities. She said she will of PIRGBy
addition to cutting' salary expenses by follow the situation carefully to monitor the
1.5 million, UF may have to return as much as impact of the budget policies on women and
LESLIE GOLAY that "If the of
representatives general sense
$600,000 in unspent salary money at the end minority faculty presently UF.
Staff Writer the student that this
.. Alligator body right now says
tl<.8.'\' rfg .. .. .. (PIRG) is a good thing then that would be
The student Senate unanimously passedtwo sufficient as far as I'm concerned."
resolutions Tuesday endorsing the IN ORDER FOR PIRG to be establishedas
establishment of a Public Interset Research a student-funded group on campus, the
Group (PIRG) on campus. Board of Regents required signatures of 51
Vice President for Student Affairs Arthur per cent of the student body. PIRG completeda
Sandeen told PIRG representatives earlier, petition which fulfilled these requirementsin
Tuesday that it was up to the Student Senateto February 1973.
decide if UF's student body wants PIRG on Sandeen previously decided PIRG's
campus. petition was not valid because it was two years
SENATORS approved a resolution old, and not representative of the present
supporting the validation of PIRG's two-year student body. .
.,. old signature petition, and another sup- "I am suggesting that the Student Senate
porting PIRG and urging the UF administration speak to this issue as a group" Sandeen said.
< to aid in its implementation on "If the senate is a representative group thatis
campus. recognized, and it feels that the student
Student Senate President Kevin Malone body knows about PIRG and what's involved,
who drafted the two resolutions, and PIRG then I will listen to that" Sandeen said.
President, Roxanne Marietta' explained to WHEN MALONE ASKED Sandeen what
Senators PIRG's proposed funding system he would say if the Student Senate passes a
and the type of issues the group is involved in. resolution saying the petition is okay San
s Speaking for the petition's validation, deen answered, "I'm not totally inflexible. I
Malone said, "I think it's grossly unfair that will certainly consider it."
anyone who has long-term plans for this Sandeen said his new decision to listen to
the Senate's vote on PIRG is "obviously a
university can be put off for so long. The "
desires and needs of students are still the compromise. .
same." Sandeen told the PIRG representatives."We've .
spent enough time fiddling around
UF PRESIDENT ROBERT Q. Marston. and I'm sorry for you, but this petition was
photo by eric itrin informed of the Senate's decision late made before I came to UF. It's'time to move
Tuesday night, said, "I would guess Sandeenwill "
HAITIANS IN THE U.S.often have bitter memories of drastic political ahead.
do as he said he would do. I will go along is the number of
"My obligation to large
repression, but as officials crack down the who brave the
immigration on refugees
with what Sandeen says The next thing to do students who weren't here when the petitionwas
,oPen waters of the Atlantic to come to Florida's door, those memories loom aheadas is to hear from the Senate." made," Sandeen explained.
futuredangers as well. For an in-depth Investigation of the Haitians and their At the earlier meeting Sandeen told three Sandeen volunteered to go ,before the
plight! see special report page eight. PIRG representatives Malone and two SG Senate Tuesday night to speak on PIRG but

his offer was declined.IF .

I : .: Marmish asks court, for successor PIRG THE would PETITION be funded under IS VALIDATED an affirmative,

voluntary fee system which requires that at
By STUART EMMRICH halting all closed hearings and trials, and least 25 per cent of the student body donate$1
..
Alligator Staff Writer See related story page threethe what the administration could do to help. per quarter. This would not be a mandatory
HARRIS, and Petersen charged Mannish bill.' The student would have to check "yes" at
Honor Court Atty. Gen. Paul Marmish. job gets done." Mannish said, explaining with not cooperating with the other membersof the time student fees are paid to be assessed ,
'who will not be at UF next quarter, requestedthat his reasons for wanting a successor appointed the Honor Court and of taking too much the $1. \
a successor be chosen this week to take now responsibility on himself. PIRG is a consumer activist group which
over the investigation of cheating in the Much of Tuesday's meeting dealt with Marmish.agreed there had been a "break deals 'with, projects on the local state and
College of Business Administration.Honor ,errors that have been made in the in- down in communication"in the Honor Court, nation level. The group deals with student
Court Chancellor Robert Harris told 'estigadon and internal problems between but stressed that he was the person that rights,bank studies,landlord-tenant laws, sex :
Marmish he would, appoint a successor within Marmish Harris and Chief Defense. 'Counsel should have control: of the investigations, not and race discrimination and various other '.
the week at a 'meeting Tuesday with UF Bryon Petersen. the chancellor or the defense counsel. consumer-related issues.
administrators and Honor Court officials. Also discussed at Tuesday's meeting were Marmish and, Harris also clashed on the PIRG pays for the aid and advice' of
"I'VE' MADE SOME mistakes and I will, the problems the Honor Court was -experiencing projessionsals during the, course: of their
own up to them, but I really care about is,that under a circuit court Injunction (See 'Marmish, page five) projects..

I


_., -, -.. P



1

*2.Th.Upndnt Horidg Alligator,Wednesday,February 26.1175Wednesday .



J. GENGLERWlr ; Congress
Editor charges

L capsuleCor
.. I


prices cut with energy gambling.


HOLLYWOOD Fla. (UPI) President Ford accused *
as sales jump Congress Tuesday of taking a gamble on energy that
threatens America with disaster.By Aides Ford
DETROIT (UPI) American Motors Corp. Tuesday voting to suspend his increase in oil import fees and by say
followed the lead of General Motors and cut prices' by as failing to enact, a national energy program, "Congress is
much as$198 on some models to spur sales once cash rebates embarked on on a massive gamble a risk of increasing this sustain veto
end Friday. nation's vulnerability to future embargoes which we cannot can
afford." Ford said in a speech prepared for delivery to a
AMC announced the action to prevent a post-rebate sales White House-sponsored conference on domestic affairs and HOLLYWOOD. Fla. (UPI)- President Ford was told by
slump in March just as the industry reported midFebruarynew the economy. aides Tuesday he now has the votes in the Senate to sustain "
car sales missed matching last year's level by only 210 "So tar the only legislative move Congress has taken on the his promised veto of a bill suspending his oil tariff increases
carS one-tenth of one per cent. It was the closest energy problem was to block my proposal to increase tariffson tor 90 days.Presidential.
automakers have come to matching a year-ago pace since the oil imports. This is a purely negative action which will Press Secretary Ron Nessen told reporters
1975 models were introduced last (fall. force me to use the constitutional power of veto for the first aboard Air Force One en route here that John Marsh. White
time in the 94th Congress."In House chief of Congressional liason. and Max Friedersdorf
effect, the Congress voted to continue for the time White House legislative lobbyist informed Ford during a
Demos force oil vote being our ever-increasing dependency on Arab and other oil morning meeting with his energy advisers that they are now
producing nations. This course could lead America to convinced they have enough votes to sustain a veto in the
WASHINGTON (UPI) House Democrats voted 153 to disaster:" Senate and are picking up votes in the House.
98 Tuesday to force a House vote on whether to kill the oil The speech,opening two days of politics and golfing in this Nessen said Ford's response was: "That is good news."
depletion allowance.The Miami suburb mirrored the Harry S. Truman-type stumping The President has until next Tuesday to send his veto
depletion repeal would be attached to a pending $21.3 Ford displayed in grass roots campaigns for his energy- message to Congress or it will become law without his
billion tax-cut bill which is tentatively scheduled for House economic programs in Atlant. Houston and Topeka, Kan., in signature. There were indications the veto would be sent to
floor action on Thursday. the past month. Capitol Hill Friday.

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The'fn

Act may make L/F/ 'grind"to'a.halt'/ ; \.


By TOM SIIRODER sities have to comply with the APA im agencies from.making rules having the effect t tI I
Alligator Staff Writer mediately. of legislation without approval from the
Biggs said if the legislative committee did legislature.UPS uLI
UF may have to comply ,with the Administrative not order immediate compliance, the EXECUTIVE STAFF discussed the
Procedure Act (APA) beginning;! legislature would probably pass a law problem at a Tuesday meeting. Biggs;! asked
next week, an event UF Vice President for specifically requiring universities to coply this them to review all policies and procedures and
Academic Affairs Robert Bryan said could spring. to compile a list of areas where compliancewith
rind UF to a halt." REP. CARROLL WEBB, D-Tallahassee. the act would cause severe difficulties. R
The law would require UF'to publish the acting director of the Administrative UF President Robert Q. Marston asked k
agenda of all meetings at which policy matters Procedure Committee, has said that Biggs to draft a letter to University System
.would be considered three weeks prior to the, universities are not exempt' from the APA. Chancellor Robert Mautz expressing UF's
,scheduled meeting. However, Biggs said Webb told him he was hope that state universities would not be
IN ADDITION, UF must publish rules for willing to consider requests for specific instructed to comply with the APA until the
,operating procedure and justify each policy exemption for certain areas of university legislature specifically required it. I
" on the,basis of,state law, UF Attorney Tom operation.State However, Biggs said he believed that Mautz
Biggs said. Senate President Dempsey Barron and Chancellor-designate E.T. York both
The Board of Regents legislative;! committeewill D-Panama City, author of the APA, said the wanted the universities to comply im DEMPSEY BARRON
meet March 5 to decide if state univer intent of the legislation was to prevent tate mediately. author of APA act



1/k : Penalty hours are not appropriate says task force :I



,
By LINDA WISNIEWSKI problems be split into two separate areas. Honor Court," Mitchell said. The 16 member task force was formed by
.... Alligator Staff Writer The,Honor Court would handle problems THE TASK FORCE ALSO agreed to Vice President for Student Affairs Arthur
dealing with academic dishonesty among UF incorporate the Administrative ProceduresAct Sandeen and interim Vice President for
The Task Force on the Student Judiciary students,' and the Student Conduct Com (APA) as the "framework" of the Honor ,Academic Affairs Robert Bryan.
discussed Monday a list of "preliminary mittee, headed by task force member and Court, rather than using the Florida laws of Sandeen and Bryan asked the task force to
proposals" which includes elimination of Director of Student Judicial Affairs Rob criminal procedure.The also explore the traffic rout, the student
penalty hours in favor of a' "public Densen would handle other student problemssuch purpose of using the APA as a conduct committee, and the student housing
reprimand" for Honor Court offenders.The as ticket scalping and passing bad "framework" for the Honor Court is to council: Gordon said.
task force, headed by law 'professor checks. "provide reasonable guidelines for administrative
Michael Gordon, discussed the 'idea of a THE COMMITTEE also agreed that UF hearings and to provide a fair The task force was asked to determine if
"public reprimand" as the lowest penalty for faculty should be involved in the Honor hearing by due process through law," Gordon. the Honor Court "insured equal handling;! of
Honor Court violations, although no definite Court, although they could not agree on the said.The all, students," Mitchell said.
method of making the offenders' names form of the involvement. task force also recommended the APA
public was agreed upon. Craig Mitchell Honor Court representativeon should be used as the "framework" for the "We want to make sure the Honor Court
TilE, TASK, FORCE ,.has agreed ,that the task force, said that students would Honor Court so that it will not get "bogged isn't just a police group. We want all of the
penalty hours "are not appropriate" in, lightof raise objections against having a faculty down" in problems of legal technicalities. students to get. a fair shake," he said.
the Board of Regents' ruling that it is member on the Honor Court hearing I com THE TASK FORCE will meet again on
unlawful for students to register for more mittee because"a faculty. member would tendto March 3 to draft its final recommendations. It The committee was also asked to determineif
hours than they need to graduate;! because it repress students." will be "a couple of weeks" before the final the Honor Code should be continued,
would require more'funding from the state.. "I 1 want as much faculty input as possible recommendations will be decided on, Gordon decentralized, revised or eliminated, Mitchell
The task force also suggested student without ruining the student image of the said. said.
-



MJD MOTOWN RECORDS

puBs PRE'S

THE IMAGE FNT'


formerly ,



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:" .: : : .',
"
PIN ERA' Guitar, Magic Bag, Lead Vocals "
Past Member-BLUES IMAGE "Ride Captain:
Ride" IRON BUTTERFLY and RAMATAM from .
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r Tampa, Florida, CACTUS

s DUANE HITCHINGS Keyboard Bass (moog) piano, organ-
r M synthesizer, vocals
Past Member- Harvey Mandel Band, original
Buddy Miles,Express "Them Changes" and the

old "Cactus" ,Band, Syracuse. New York,
CACTUS

DONNY VOSBURGH Drummer Vocals
Duane (being
an original
Past Member- Entertainers, Drummer for James
member of Cactus) and Mike
Brown, ,Curtis Mayfield Impressions, Jerry
Fn'Sat.. SpecialsShot Butler, Delfonics; Tampa, Florida, CACTUS when teamed Tim up Bogert to take and over Carmine Cactus

THURSO"AYFfUOAYSATUROAYTequila Appice I left the group to them to
of Tequila or loin Jeff. Beck a year ago.' This is

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.4 Independent Florida Alligator Wednesday,February, 1975
11 7


MON-SAT 373-0617 10-9:30: ;,1 .r 3 ICNEW
I

Students air grievances SUNDAY 126BUS*. LP'S


BEINGRELEASED
By DEBBIE ERICKSON
Alligator Staff Writer

Audiology and Speech Pathology students
about the overcrowded THESE SALE PRICES
complained Tuesday
classroom situation and deterioration' of the GOOD ONLY THRU SATURDAY! THIS WEEKORDERS !

quality of their education to Arts and Acience
BEING TAKEN NOW-
Dean C.A. VanderWerf.Last NEW LED ZEPPLIN
Oct. 30 Speech Pathology and

Audiology students presented a petition to GRAFFITI" FLA. BLUEGRASS
Dean VanderWerf calling for smaller class "PHYSICAL
size, more space and facilities in the speech & OLD TIME MUSIC

and hearing clinic, and at least one clinical 2 LP'S 11.98 LIST CHAMPIONSHIPSRECORDED
supervisor to oversee the performance of
student-clinicians. JUST 6" LIVE IN

Tuesday was the first time students had any GAINESVILLEOCT.
contact with the administration about the
74
petition.
K
"WE'RE NOT GOING TO turn out S ir P YN 5 PRE PAY for these 2

professional people if we don't have enough BIG ALBUMS NOW AT JUST 449
teachers, time and space," Marcia Mac- '
Farland 4AS, said. BIG. SAVINGS!

Edward Hutchinson, acting speech
department chairman said, "Currently thereare

only six professors in the speech pathologyand CA. VANDERWERF Student Council
Arts & Sciences
audiology department. We have ap- .Arts and Sciences dean
proximately 300 undergraduate students and
over 90 graduate students in the depart- qualified graduate student can go. Van-
ment." derWerf said."Students' .
Approximately 1,000 graduate students will should realize that the depart- Photography Contest

apply for the graduate program and only IS ment is funded on the number of students we
will accepted.. Hutchinson said. have. The less students we have, the less
VanderWerf there are two alternativesto money we will receive," he said.
the overcrowding situation. HUTCHINSON SAID the number of

"TilE DEPARTMENT can get together students enrolled in the department is up but
in cash
with people in clinical work at the departmentof the level of funding is down. Over $200 prizes

communicative disorders and ask them to The department will be reviewed this
teach more classes than they already do. summer to determine if it will receive accreditation .

"If this is impossible, we will have to cap again.Hutchinson All students are eligible
enrollment." said, "There is a very' good
If the department restricts enrollment, chance we will receive a.severe warning or be
there will be nowhere in the state that a discredited."
All entries must be in no


I Mautz accepts solutionState I later than Friday March 1 4

-

University System Chancellor Robert waiting on figures." forms and information
Mautz has "for all practical purposes" accepted Although UF admissions officials said Entry

UF President Robert O. Marston's Sunday there was a good chance UF would
answer to the dilemma of 600 freshmen exceed the 2,900 limit on entering freshman 103 Anderson Hall

admitted in excess of a Board of Regents again this year, Mautz said he didn't think it
ceiling. would happen again except'as the "result of
Marston proposed that rather than be simple human error."
denied funds for those 600 sophomores next
year 600 fewer sophomore transfers will be UF Executive Vice President Harold

admitted in September. Hanson said from current figures, UF ,will
"For all practical purposes, the decisionhas "try to hit 700" sophomore admissions. Last
been made.. said Mautz. "We're just year, 1.318 were admitted, he said.


MIKE'S

Bookstore. Pipes THE CONNECTION

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Sot.*.* RUBY PRESENTS WINTERS LARGEST MIDWAY EVER, 50 SPECTACULAR :RIDES,

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publication of Campus Communications and FREE CIRCUS.' .
Incorporated a private, /ion-profit company : .... : :;.;
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Independent Alligator are those of the MONDAY thru WEDNESDAY '
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I .Th.. 'lnd.p.nrf.iit Florida Alligator,W.dn..d..y,hbnwiy J6, (979,to. 5Marmish
NOTARY .
PUBUC -
.
.
UNIVERSITY. CITY: TRAVKlJAMTRAKPLANESIHP 1 f. r'f

UI T: 1219 W. University I / \t I

373-2505
923 W. University Av. (/row page one) It was suggested that the Honor Court turn
Galn.svill., fla. 32601 Pat Mandoza over to the Office of Student Affairs the

future of the cheating( investigation. information about graduating students who
,1 MARMISH SUGGESTED the Honor might have been involved in the cheating, but
.: JUST SITTING AROUND Court turn over its investigation to a student. UF Atty. Tom Biggs said that UF might run
faculty task force because people think the into some legal problems.
f'- --' Honor Court has been paralyzed by the circuit Biggs said UF would have to take the
'. JT Move forward with Peach Corps and VISTA. court injunction against closed hearings and matter of the graduating students "com-
trials. pletely out of the Honor Court."
j u..your coll.g.d.gr..In a cr oHv, meaningful way. A yor In VISTA or 2 ytor In P.oc. He said the task force would not have as "WE WOULD HAVE TO USE only the
+ Corps will odd a unique dlmtntlon to your lit.and to th.llv\ ..of thot.you'll b.helping :
much trouble getting( students and faculty resources of the Office of Student Affairs and
.. PMC Corps and VISTA offer. more than 700 choices of volunteer assignments the U.S.A., members to turn in evidence or to compel not the resources of the Honor Court" Biggs
Africa..Asia, lotin America and the South Pacific The programs are In agriculture, business, witnesses to testify. explained.
education, architecture, / i
engineering law liberal arts home economics arts t crofts voc
tional education and many oth.r f fields. Harris and Petersen disagreed, saying they Rob Denson director of student conduct
thought the Honor Court should continue to said he didn't know if student affairs could
Sitting round I is nowhere.Find out If you can meet"the, challenge.S..the Peace Corps-VISTA have jurisdiction over the cheating in take over the investigation and decide on
recruiters campus Feb 24-27 at the Colonnod.or In front of/h.Ilbrory.W.d.fltAnnuafl.
vestigation."A penalities while the injunction was still in
TASK FORCE, as far as I am con effect.
cerned could do nothing that the Honor "Meanwhile, we don't want to do anythingthat
Court could not do," Harris argued. might go against the injunction," Denson \
Marmish said the task force, because it said adding an appeal against the injunction \
would be made up of more than one person has been filed by Biggs. I
would not be as vaulnerable to personal A DATE HAS NOT been set for the appeal
threats. but Denson said he hoped it might be
Marmish said defendants had threatenedhim heard in the next couple of weeks.In .
Clearance.sale with bodily harm and with political addition to asking that a'successor be
pressure which he said would not be as effective appointed this week, Marmish instructed
if there were more than one or two Biggs to start making a complete record of the
people at the head of an investigation. investigation so his successor would know
OFFICIALS also considered the problemof what to do.Marmish.
what can be done about charged students said he was going to start
who were planning to graduate this quarter "phasing out of the investigation within the
but whose status is uncertain because no next two weeks,"and said, "I 1 am willing to be
closed hearings can be held to determine an advisor, but I am not going to run this
Dresses penalities under the temporary injunction. thing by myself anymore."


a

1 ,I $30.00 STEVE PROCKO BEAM UP TO THE TOWERS Thursdayfor

Jaskion.'eieaing Now Alligator Staff Writer a meeting of S.T.A.R.; the Star Trek

Association for Revival from 5-7 p.m. in the
ECKANKAR SATSANG will have a Towers TV room. For further informationcall
/ u/ea/t/ / ; $10 discussion group tonight at 7:30 in the J. 3928784.
Wayne Reitz' Union room 333. CIRCLE K'ERS: will meet Thursday at 6
: TRANSCENDENTAL MEDITATION p.m. in J. Wayne Reitz Union, room 1 150C.
: introductory lecture tonight at 8 in Little Hall, Nominations for officers will be held. For
casual
oft a room 205. For further information call 372- further information call 3921678.
7550. PRAYER AND FELLOWSHIP by' Inter-
{ PIZZA PARTY for all Citizen Advocatesat Varsity Christian Fellowship will be held
{ about t ,. : Leonardo's Pizza today at 5:30: p.m. Thursday at 4:30: p.m. in the J. Wayne Reitz
day Admission $1.00 For further information call Union room 122. For further information call

1/2/ 3781409. 378-0759.
ASTROLOGY LECTURE by David YOUNG DEMOCRATS will meet
town Cochrane will be held this evening from 8 to Thursday at 7:30: p.m. in the J. Wayne Reitz
AI" OFF 9:30: at the Hillel foundation. $1.00 donation.For Union. For further information call 373-2271.
further information call 3722900.
ALACIIUA ALCOHOLISM PROGRAM
and UC STUDENT COUNCIL Will meet
will meet Thursday at 8 p.m. in the Veterans
today at 4:30: in Little Hall room 117. Opento
Administration Directors'
Hospital con
more on all interested students. For further in
formation call 3928807. ference room.
u V2 FILM SOCIETY will meet Thursday at 9
PARK FORMATIONS Inglis and Avon
in the J. Wayne Reitz Union room 363.
'..4 the store. parks will be discussed by Dr. Anthony I p.m.For further information call 392-6798.
Pandazzo tonight at 8 in Floyd Hall, room
213. For further information call 3922233. ,SIMULATED COMBATEES The
STUDENT SUPPER will be held at 6 Simulated Combat Club will meet Thursdayat
Great p.m. today at 1320 W. University Ave. 7:30: p.m. in the J. wayne Reitz Uniom,
Ju Donation $1.00. For further information call room 346. For further information call 378-
3728183. 3434.
s savings on _ A "' ''. ... ...A..o..o.. A .o. n. "
Great 9 ......... P41.4/4.U11411/VSw1! .

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Poge 4,Independent Florida Alligator Wednesday. February 2ft. 1975 -,





EDITORIAL MistakesStudent l.1


justice at UF is increasingly taking on

the appearance of an ineptly played charade r rIN'U.
with the lives and careers of countless UF students l ,

hanging in the balance.

But the charade may be coming apart at the l

seams, as witnessed by the bickering between "

Honor Court Chancellor Robert Harris and Atty. .FIX tHE FLONCIMYMY WAY t ,MYWAY... MYW...
Gen. Paul Marmish that bubbled to the surface

yesterday in the office of Vice President for

Student Affairs Art Sandeen.

Dressed up for the 'benefit of an Alligator

reporter who attended, the meeting over the
strident objections of Harris the problem

between the two law students basically boils downto

a case of glory hogging.
Harris, and Honor court Chief Defense Counsel

Byron Petersen, don't think Marmish has been 1
cooperating with other members of the Honor

Court in the investigation into alleged mass

cheating in the College of Business Ad- I W\5H/\ 1't\EY'D\ QUTFI6NfINGgNDJUSf

ministration. NO, MY WAY... WEU DOT\ mI WAY... FIX ITI]
They say Marmish hasn't been sharing information [
as much as he should with other

members of the court. And the implied corollarywe

sense is that they don't think he's shared the The Media-bug will
headlines adequately either. get you "
;
But even more disturbing is Marmish's con- .. .
fessions that he has made "some mistakes" in
if keep watching
handling the investigation. 0 you on
"
Since he's not going' to be here next quarter -

anyway, Marmish nobly offers to begin training a According to the latest unofficial surveys, taken completelyat
random. 99 per cent of all Americans suffer from some type r
successor to head up the cheating investigation as of medical ailment. BOB DAVIDSON

soon as possible.The THESE FORMS of sickness have the peculiar tendency of
most important point, however which we only infecting the bodies of Americans. If you suffer from any STAFF WRITINGSperiod
obviously feel can't be overemphasized is that of the following malaises, run to your nearest supermarket or
with the cloak of secrecy surrounding the conductof drug store and buy the latest commercially advertised cure-

the Honor Court probe, it's impossible to tell all. of time the media-bugs mysteriously come to life.
Americans suffer from Excedrin headaches, the blahs, iron
the extent of the "mistakes" committed by THE MEDIA-BUGS leave the television screen and enter
blood and the heartbreak of psoriasis. We are overweight the human
poor
victim through the eyes. The bugs blind the
Marmish or else in the student-run Honor
anyone have that bloated feeling suffer from occasional 'viewers conception of reality-removing his will to resist the
Court. And it's impossible to assess the damage to irregularity have the drop, drop, drop of post nasal drip. advertising propaganda on the television screen.
individuals and to justice caused by those Americans are plagued by ring-around-the-collar, static The victim watches a commercial showing a stomach being
mistakes.Of cling embarrasing warts and the frizzles. The 24 hour bug attacked by a puppet-flu virus (the infamous 24-Hour Bug).
course, we've heard rumors. Jusf the other and dragon mouth also periodically wreak, havoc on our His stomach becomes unsettled,he has "that queezy feeling."
day, a reporter waiting in the Honor Court office unsuspecting population. "My God, I need to buy some Pepto-bismo." the TV viewer
shouts. The media-bug has him hooked.
witnessed two furious students who came roaringin
THE MEDIA-BUG comes in forms and disguises.The .
complaining they'd been accused of cheating in ( SATIRE' ] most common variety is the many tension headache. You are
classes in which they were not even enrolled. watching a murder mystery on television. Will Kojac get his
Even earlier, Harris told us of a student who was man? The suspense is head-shattering. Tension. Tension.
granted immunity by Marmish, but was inad- TENSION!
OUR BODIES ARE a breeding ground for host of exotic At the
a
called 'back and in such moment of climax the screen switches to a Bufferin
vertantly questioned a
tropical diseases we didn't even know, or care, existed. commericial. "Bufferin overcomes those daily tensions causedby
manner that he ended up on Harris' doorstep Americans are infested with the viruses Marcus Welby-itus stress and anxiety. It helps you relax relax, relax." You
"hysterical." Medical Center-obia and the' dreaded pestilence Ben Casey run to the medicine cabinet and take two Bufferin. The
To his credit, Marmish has been willing to ia. media-bug giveth the pain and the media can taketh away.
admit he's made "mistakes." Americans are victims of tennis elbow,trick knees, athlete's YES, AMERICANS, the new strains of media-bugs are
And, in fact, it's perfectly understandable that toot and Monday Night Football posterior. Yes, we being created every day in the laboratories of drug
Americans in the
midst of
are massive media
a epidemic manufacturers and
Marmish and other members of the court would called hypochondria.What Gain' advertising offices. Before you rush out to
buy $ scrubbing bubbles or Contact's tiny time capsules
make mistakes. are the causes of these media-related diseases? ask yourself why you never hear about any cases of the
Although most law students sound like they Media-bugs lurk in the dark confines of your television set. "blahs" or "medicine breath" outside of America.If .
know more law than most Supreme Court Justices, ,They remain dormant as long as the TV set,is off. But if by this article keeps you up at night, "take Sominextonightand
chance an, viewer, foolishly watches TV for
unwary "
a long
the fact is they'are i inexperienced in the ad- sleep sleep sleep.

ministration of justice. In the rush to get student

help ,from the law school for his burgeoning investigation

we wonder how closely Marmish and The Independent Dovi Petersen were able to check the qualifications of Editor In-chi.f Managing EditorFlorida

cheaters.All the student. counselors who represent alleged '.. Alligatorall ;

this, coupled with the fact that the Honor a.\CGK; '
David*, Donna Brugman Brian Jonas
Court is part of a Student Government whose IF'
Newt Editor layout Editor Layout Editor
record in past years has been riddled with
misfeasance mandates public scrutiny of the RA"Tony" Kendzlor,...,....... ,.....,,;,. ......................General Manager
James V.Cook ..,.... .,... ... ... .... ... .. .".... ,.,.....0.Assistant General ManagerMrs. Published by
Honor Court procedures if they are to be keptin Evelyn BestAnneMalphurs ., ,...., ,.,.! ,. ......,'.'. .....,..,. .., ,...Administrative Assistant
the domain of the Honor Court at all. ..." :... ......... ...........,... ,. ........ ...Bookkeeper Campus Communications.Ino.
But the UF administration has refused to yieldto C.Roy Shipp! ....'. ... ....oj... .Business Manager
Tom MacNamara'.,'..'.... ., ...... ...... .... ....o.... ...Accountant P.O. Box 13256 University
the need for openness, and so the issue is in Roy McGee Jr .>.- ,.'"."{.: ..:..... ,.... .,., ... ..Advertising Manager Station,Gainesville, Florida with
"real" court, with settlement perhaps year away. Donna Lubrono .... ... .'..'. '.. .....'. .. ........ .'. '...Advertising Coordinator offices behind the College Inn
'In the meantime, how more "mistakes," key Harper. ,..t..f.,..,.,..." ... ....,.... ....:.. .Special Sections Coordinator 1728 West University Avenue.
many lynda Homier ..... ... ,. .. .:., .... ...,. .....Advertising Production Manager Business Office phone: 376-4446
due either to inexperience or conflicts of fragile Diana Snyder.. .. .....,.....,., .,, .,.... ..., ,... ,...,.Editorial Production Manager Editorial Department 376-4458.
egos, will be made?,And who wi.U suffer because of Lyon Sgldld ...Editorial Production Manager Advertising and Production
J : !. : : : Clastlflid.Manager .Deportments:' 3764482.
.them...... .. i'l? J ," '. ;'.', ,,',;. ',,' '.'j r', : -r.'''.......,..' ....\ \.'\.',.
f.0I1' .. ', .. r.': I I "'J '''r, "."4.,__: ... ,tt, t .ttt, .........t. ,........................................... '.... .. ":' r,It t," .'. .I:l, nf' t,'.
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b'. .-

> .. },' "! 'y ... ,, The Independent Florida Alligator,Wednesday, February 26, 1t7;Page 7
''''. 'J: .....'I. :.;. ;' ., ''. J(, 11" ..W' "

: % ,


. ; :i o for the Grade instead of the knowledge ::1:1r.


\..
EDITOR,' As one who has taken two law courses under I he emphasis i on grades ,shows how materialistic we all are I do not pretend to be guiltless in all this for this disease
Professor Stephen Stitt, I believe it is indicative of our rigid in selfish i ignorance of the real fruit of college which lies in touches everyone of us in varying degrees. It is important.
and superficial educational system to consistently reject intellectual fulfillment and maturity. "Boy, you better make however to appreciate the decent and respectable motives of
alternative methods as a means of change, however novel. that grade" seems to be The motto of parents and the credo of one like Professor Stitt-motives which are contagious to any
such as the blanket grading system administered to Mr. Stitt's the working world. student who realizes that there has to be a better way.
Legal Systems class (of which I was not a member). Without WE ARE SHOVED into the college box and are expectedto AS LONG AS we place such a priority on those grades
,blindly defending. such an evaluation system I think it is produce. Productivity is acknowledged only by high markson cheating scandals will nourish concerned people like Mr.
significant i to speak to the reasons behind such an effort. that computer sheet that comes in the mail like a stock. Stitt will continue to be smothered in this mania of racing

MR. STITT'S methods may be unacceptable to the market report. We are brilliant because wet got an "A." while after the grade at any cost-save tor the too dear price
academic community but his motives are more attuned to Bozo down the street is dumb ,for getting a "C" It doesn't making an effort to find out "why" in spite of-not becauseof.
Socratic and matter that we crammed for it, lied and cheated to get it, and .
true philosophy! teaching than any other I have
encountered in my traditional schooling. Grade-grubbing is nevermind about the courses per set Warren Kniskern. 3LW
evil be done with and This is what makes the gradations so ridiculous. They are
the to away the I'oalls make the student
show levels of achievement but I that
supposed to suspect
curious and intellectually challenged enough to want to know
tits achievement lies in some other area than the mastery of Start bottomEDITOR
how the legal puzzle together.But practical knowledge; at

Professor Stitt's conflict with the Holland Law Center I CAN'T SPEAK for Professor Stitt. but many would agree
faculty and accreditation standards is just one example of a that )grades have become such a farce that they are almost : I'd like to know if classification or pay system 1
cancerous macro-problem in American education-a deep completely useless for their intended purposes. It is a sad, but the University's Affirmative that would give those at the
seated desire to go for the grade instead of the knowledge to true conclusion in America that in'school, it is the grade that Action Coordinator is goingto bottom without any real
be gained. [ counts. do anything for the average promotional ladder a better
black nursing assistant or standard of living now.
janitor or for the female clerkor Finally it would mean the
secretary stuck in a $6.000 development of time-related
Additional Data on governments a year job. Or is he just goingto programs to train motivated
ensure that highly trained, nursing assistants, for
well favored females and example to become LPN's
EDITOR*. In a letter appearing in The Alligator last Wednesday corporations from; foreign and domestic harm. Companies are blacks,have a crack at upper and med techs, to enable
Charles Pickett claims that big government is a paid by the government (with tax money) to make these level positions? The job clerks to become bookkeepers
"parasite on free production." He bases his claim on the products. market for professionals is and computer programmers.
following premises: Diplomats try to make agreements with .foreign countries to tight but blacks and females and to enable laborers or
I 1)) Government makes nothing. prevent direct American involvement in costly wars like Viet have ,an advantage in it now, secretaries to become craftsmen
2)) Government employees make nothing. Nam. Thus private businesses will not have a manpower if anything.It or women. Admittedly
3)) Private companies pay all the cost of government. shortage due to war losses. is blacks and females at developing a genuine affirmative
UNFORTUNATELY, Mr. Pickett has left out some Government secretaries type income tax refunds to major the bottom who have yet to action program
relevant information.First oil company executives despite the astronomical profit these benefit from equal op would take a lot of work. But
government is, not supposed to "make" anything. executives are making at a time of economic recession. These portunity. Genuine .affirmative money for many training and
Governments and their agencies are a service oriented in "burdened" companies also benefit from a 27 per cent oil action would meana upgrading programs may well
stitution. depletion allowance. It is a glaring fact that these large substantial increase in the be available through various
Government employes do not try to "make" things. companies are strangling the American consumer and the number of middle level Department of Labor and
Government janitors try to remove "non-essential" garbage American economy. positions open to women- HEW grants
(chewing gum wrappers, paper' cups cola containers IF MR. PICKETT does not like the way government staff assistants administrative An Affirmative Action plan
cigarette butts) from your public buildings and streets. employees are performing their jobs maybe he should vote to assistants clerk that is strictly oriented to
ADMINISTRATORS hire private companies to build replace the present "appointed" administration.Glenn. Vs. fiscal assistants. It would helping those with the
roads airplanes takns. guns and bombs to protect private Mans 3JM mean an increase in education and background to
promotional titles for janitors, help themselves seems a waste
laborers nursing assistants of effort.,
laundry help etc. or a direct
upgrading in the Eleanor Saluk
An old equalizerEDITOR
., f'. i
-
Please allow me before you begin applyingsome.
room in our Gator for this .
short reply to Janis Mara's The age old proven
column on Parenthood and temper tantrum equalizer is .
/ ftJL
Society: in ,the February 4th permanently attached on
issue of The Alligator. either of your wrists.
HAVING BEEN blessed You see if you begin this
with seven children of my own treatment early enough
,and one foster child I feel I obedience and manners will
am fairly qualified to make be a way of life for the little
this reply. ones where hissies and
Janis I fully agree.: that a tantrums is with the ones that
father should go at least fifty don't receive it.
percent or more in lugging ALSO THE ONES who n ._ .,
caring for and disciplining receive it and know how it ...... ... "
children. whether there's one works know that it can be ,.;. ?I j':"
or one dozen. I I'also agree it administered on the back side

would be fine it'. everywhereyou of their lap. any time aay ,-f i III"1iiL ". } -,
.
....
without their pants ..
wouldbe
take children there place. -
staff and facilities for being pulled down.Recommend .... .r.
keeping them"while you dines, this to your
shop or whatever.\ friend and when you get
However it may be most children of your own start '
owners of businesses think them on this treatment and
they have quite a lapful you can !shop, dine or '
dealing with adults all day. whatever happier ever: after.
YOU STARTED Howard Godwin ,
your I
tenth paragraph with. Sw Sf WRwcioRWArTOBPoirfflu) aw CH CMR I'D IDg t P'lD Yt 'PR&fiiIWfC/

"Problem like this begin not EDITOR: RE:, Jeffrey A. \esd ation, we are' trying to
with the. mother, or the The IndependentFlorida I r Soper's "A Second Look" establish' this policy now in1nticip.tion
children.. deficits. 1 Iam
concerning grade of such a con
Janis from where I stand. : currently working to have "clusion.If .
'you not, only missed the bull's'eye AlligatorDoug .' ,,' ,A. the University adopt a policy anyone has any questions
but the entire 'target in of having professors reevaluate this
Dial Ron Cunningham. or suggestions regarding
this !statement. Entertainment Editor ."oclote Editor their )grade curves innew matter, or if you have in-
As 1 understand modern classes here curves are made
r formation you want to give or
psychology, it might warp a George Kochoniec Jr. and students are convicted of if you want to work on having
child'smind if' \'OU'Jl \'e itsome Photo Editor cheating, und having the this policy made please call
of the treatment I fully -policy grades, changed accordingly; meat ,.378-sO77.;
recommend. Greg Form: Mind I Kwrnon .. I While no grade changes ,
This might have, merit if Sports Editor Asst:News Editor can be made until the Honor Bill Leach
you let the child get old I L Court concludes its in- Senator otT campus
enough to control the parent


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I" ': .. Miami center. gives- aidBy I


BOB MORRIS not to return to the school. One afternoon, while teaching a' Miami.
Alligator< Staff Writer class. Mompremier said, the Macoutes came with machine According to Mompremier- center operates on about I
guns and threatened to kill him if he returned to the school on $1,600 to $1,800 a week.
Rev. Jacques Mompremier is a patient man. With his job, it the following day.Mompremier "THIS IS USED primarily for direct assistance-.food,
doesn't pay to be otherwise.As packed his bags and left Haiti that night. shelter and medical aid..Lots of our cost is offset thanks to
director of the Haitian Refugee Information Center in After his arrival in Miami, Mompremier spent several families in the neighborhood who donate food and beds," he
Miami Mompremier must keep tabs on the 1,181 Haitiansnow months with friends before finally telling the INS of his said.The
in Florida seeking political asylum. It's a job that involves presence. center has its regular crowd of hangers-on who drop by
finding shelter, distributing food, locating odd jobs "I was afraid to come forth because, like all who leave daily to check on jobs or to gossip. For most, there is nothing
and serving as spiritual advisor for Haitians caught in the Haiti, I was fearful that they might make me return," he said. else to do.
limbo between sanctuary and deportation. BUT, IN 1967 before the current Western Hemisphere They line up on the worn-out chairs outside the center. In' j
Yes he's a patient man, but he admits that the patience swearing quotas on immigrants took.effect, there was no difficulty in excited flurries of conversation, laced with a blend of French,
thin. obtaining a visa and eventual residence status. Creole and English,that discuss their hopes for the future and
"YOU SEE THESE Mompremier said as he waved a When the first boatloads of Haitian refugees began comingto their overall reluctance to return to Hiati.
handful of white, official-looking papers. "They are the work Florida, Mompremier was one of the moving forces in "You see this?" Marcel Joseph said as he pointed to i
permits we have been waiting for. See for yourself." seeing that the refugees received fair treatment. snake-like scar near his chin. "That is why I came here."
He tossed the papers on the table. Across the middle of Along with the Rev. James Jenkins, of the Friendship I SCARS. That's one commodity all the refugees have in
each permit, in bold, black. ink it read: "Authorization Mission Baptist Church in Miami, and U.S. Rep. William abundance. And, they are almost proud to show them. Most
denied." Lehmen of Miami, Mompremier'convinced INS officials to of the scars circle the wrists and the anklesreminders of too-
"I just don't know," Mompremier shook' his head.' "Do you release the refugees on bond. tight prison chains.
suppose they want us to steal?" The Refugee Center started in April 1973 in the annex of Another item the refugees seem to share is a desire to work.
Despite the denial of work permits, Mompremier is often the Friendship Mission Baptist Church with donations from Many spend long days in the sugar cane fields near Belle
able to find jobs for some of the Haitians on the sly. The 25 local churches. Glade. Others find odd jobs in some of the hotels on the
Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) investigatorsare Later that year Rev. Jenkins went to Washington, D.C. to beach ,
so busy keeping up with the 100.000 illegal immigrants in meet with directors of the National Council of Churches. He But, all the work is temporary, and the refugees eventuallyend
Florida, from all countries that there is I ittle chance of getting convinced them ot the necessity of a larger center tor the up back at the Center looking something new.
caught for working illegally. Haitians, and in January 1974 the center moved to its present Nevertheless they all agree on one point-they are far better
STILL, MOMPREMIER would like to find jobs for his location--an abandoned toy store near 1-95 .In northwest off here than they would be in Haiti. '
people without "feeling sneaky" about it. .
"But until things become better for us we will have to '
sneak I suppose" he said. : '
Mompremier came to the U.S. from Haiti in 1967. when his Why they fledThe 1

life was threatened by the Tonton Macbute.: the secret police .
force of former President Francois Duvalier. Before he left -
Haiti he was principal of a school in Port-au-Prince which:fell following statements are from I '
immediately went back Leogane, hometown, where!
.. out of favor with the government. the, Immigration and Naturalization friends who my Haiti
We left
"I DID NOT LIKE to charge'my students more than they 'refugees who have been denied asylum in 17, 1973.arranged" to buy a small, boat.
could afford. Some of the students I collected more from than are being appealed. J Josepl'
others, if their families could pay it, so I could afford to teach Etienne
those with no money also," Mompremier said. "I 1 was a teacher in a small private :
Hut in a strongly anti-communist country like Hiati such (secret"police) who had a girl enrolled 1 1972
was a fisherman in Leo ane, Haiti. In February of J
practices are frowned upon. her attendance. 1 gave him, a bill for the refused
:
demanded I
whole catch of fish.
"The government said I was a Communist because of my day he and two others arrested me and out."I demand and my seven
school. I was arrested, beaten and thrown .in jail." Mom' was in prison from May 2, t972 until Feb. was held in prison was taken for two to months prison. and escaped during a
premier said. "WHEN!: IT WAS released I went (
detail. I hid In the months and then
woods for four
After several weeks behind bars. said he
Mompremier was begin teaching again. About week after We left
a that to America.
group was planning come to
finally taken before President Duvalier. Macoutes who had arrested me came in
"THEY TOOK ME to "papa Doc" (Duvalier) because I iM machine gun and threatened to kill me."At a I boat arrived on Oct.I 17, 1973. I wlS
had many friends in the army. He listened to me and then this point some of,the children was sick and unable to speak. of
to learn
too much would
say for fear Macoutes
ordered that I be set free." said Mompremier.But when the Macoute: turned'to quiet them. the "
for '
My
freedom meant that he was and hit him request asylum was denied.
apparently Mon1premier's over the head knocking him ". Nelio Saint Foil

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Independent Florid Alligator, Wednesday. February 26, 1915,Pa,. 9
'.
8180B MORRIS
..Alligator Staff Writer( .* '' '. to'j INS en'J .nercd: by the refugees s and not recorded by the Sonnett said. "The two investigators completed the 38-in
during, initial "
interviews terviews in less than three hours.

I Gerard Leander used to make kettles and pots to sell in his ,, To aid in its decisions, the INS routinely forwards SONNETT ALSO CLAIMS that the State Department just
Prince shop. He wasn't a rich man by certain .cases to Washington and the State Department. "hasn't been doing its homework" when it comes to investigating -
any means, butn
ort-au And It this '
is at level
that the Haitians
have come the conditions in Haiti.
income upon present
where the per capita is about $70
Haiti, a ,
was better off than most.In year major stumbling blocks in their search for asylum. "The State Department claims they are able to give close
ander 1957 Haitian presidential election, Leander Ira Gollobin, general counsel for the American Committee attention to each of the individual case reports that the INS
the the popularly elected candidate Daniel sup. for the Foreign Born, sees the refugees as little more than sends them. But, it just isn't so." Sonnett said. "For example,
Fignole.ut
rted
after only 19 days in office, Fignole 'was deposed unfortunate pawns in the game of international politics. a group of 42 Haitians was interviewed on a Friday afternoonby
by a "TilE
GOVERNMENT holds that these people are simply INS and their denied.
takeover that led to the ascension of Francois investigators asylum requests were
lilitary Duvalier, as "president-for-Iife" of Haiti. "Papa unhappy with conditions in Haiti. Unfortunately, the "The data on the 42 was transmitted to the State Depart
oc" government therefore sees them as economic refugees, not
ment. which by the following afternoon had also responded
Duvalier took Gerard
after power, Leander, "
Shortly
was one political refugees, said Gollobin.
arrested the Tonton negatively to the request. Now, do you mean to tell me that in
thousands by Macoute, Duvalier'ecret -,
jf in Gollobin said that in order to qualify as a political refugee less than 24 hours the State Department was able to round up
and thrown
force, prison for
police WAS LUCKY. While backing Fignole. there must be a "well-founded fear of'political punishmentand information on 42 people they had never heard of before and
LEANDER on a work' detail
he persecution if they back to their ? No
go : country. decide whether they had suffered political persecutions
made his
scaped and in late 1958 way to Nassau. "But the Immigration Service andthe State Departmentare !
When Duvalier died in 1971 and his son, Jean Claude, took saying that the Haitian government is not a repressive wayl"

,ver, Leander, like other Haitians, felt conditions might government; therefore, anyone who leaves Haiti cannot be
hange in Haiti. And so,he returned to his home.But treated "
as a political refugee, Gollobin said.
as Leander tells the story, his homecoming was Since Haiti has a strongly anti-communist government. 'Unfortunately* the ; .
:
nything but welcome. Gollobin claims the U.S. is unwilling to weaken its relations
"When I reached Haiti, the Macoutes put me in jail forour with its Caribbean neighbor by giving an open door treatmentto government sees 'the ',as'j'
months. I was ,beaten because I would not confess to its political dissidents."IT .

aving intentions of overthrowing the government., I tried to IS CLEAR to me that the question of political asylum
xplain that I wanted only to return to my work, but they for Haitians is not being settled on its true merits. It's all a economic refugees, not. .. ;
rould not listen, Leander said. As he spoke he rubbed the question of where you come from. The Haitians are stuck in '.
his wrists left from prison chains. "
"
cars on the middle he said.
"WHEN THEY LET ME out I met with some friends whore At present, however the Miami INS office is forced to cope political refugees.9Era it,

/ planning to sail a boat to the United States. For me, it with an even larger problem than 1,181 would-be immigrantsfrom : '
eemed like the only hope possible. So I left Haiti again." Haiti. They have their hands full rooting out the Gollobin .' "

Leander and 64 other Haitians washed ashore near estimated 100,000 illegal immigrants from all parts of the
'ompano Beach on Dec. 12, 1972. Making their escape from world now living and working in Florida. AttorneySonnett

I tyranny to what they supposed would be freedom, the And, since about half of the Latin American and Caribbean
aitians had completed their 800 mile odyssey in an over- tourists who enter through Miami International Airport are

rowded and battered sailboat without the aid of a compass. thought to stay on as illegal immigrants it is easy to see why said the action taken by the Fifth Circuit Court of
"We ran out of food after the first few days," said Leander. the understaffed INS might be skeptical of the claims made Appeals in remanding the cases to the. INS would allow the

I The only thing that,kept. us alive was our hope for a good by a few hundred Haitians. Haitians to present a great deal of new evidence."IT .

fe." According to one INS investigator, some of the difficulty in TAKES US BACK to the beginning. We are asking to
But those hopes soon disappeared.UPON picking out legitimate political refugees stems from the present evidence that wasn't presented at the earlier hearing,"
ARRIVAL the Haitians were taken into custody by inadequate interrogations by INS interviewers in Miami. Sonnett said. "Right now we are still waiting for the Immigration
I he U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS). After "ONLY THE UNUSUAL interrogations take longer than Service to tell us how we can go about presenting it.

asty interviews, where the Haitians asked for political 20 minutes," the investigator said. "If they have a story to tell, I would suppose that it will take place in a quasi-judicial
sylum all 65 were jailed and, within a few days, charged with we just take it down. We don't cross-examine them." setting with an INS-appointed judge."

(legal entry into the U.S. This kind of situation would seem to give credence to "If we lose out there," he added, "then we will end up backin
Since that time 478 other Haitians in 18 different groupsave claims by the Haitians' lawyers that their clients' complete the federal court."
come to Florida by boat and in search of sanctuary. The stories have never been heard by the INS. Despite the legal footwork carried out by Sonnett and his
ast group arrived in Marathon on Nov. 141974. At any rate, the Haitians were never allowed attorneys at colleagues, the inescapable problem faced by the Haitianrefugees
In addition to the 543 who came by boat, 638 other these initial interviews, to aid them with their stories. is contained in the current Immigration laws laws

aitians, who have entered Florida by various means, have And, according to another INS investigator, who has been that are difficult to sidestep. .
Iso asked for. asylum. All claim they face certain im- involved in checking out the stories of some of the Haitians, HAITIAN REFUGEES could benefit from new legislation
t risonment or death if they return to Haiti. there isn't enough information in many of the files to really that has twice passed the House only to die in the Senate. HR

But, with only a few exceptions, the 1,181 Haitian refugees determine if the claims are valid or not. 982 the Rodino Bill would create a special refugee status for .'..,..
ow in Florida have been denied political asylum and are "You have to really know Haiti to know where the holes in aliens of Western Hemisphere countries, besides'Cuba, for
I acing deportation.ONE the stories are or to feel the truth in a story that may be both the first time. Existing law restricts the definition of refugeesto

OF THEIR NUMBER, however, chose a differentay true and false" he said. those who flee from Communist or Middle East countries.
to escape possible reprisals in Haiti. Turenne Deville, a LOUIS GIDEL, acting director of the Miami INS office Although the measure passed the House by a whopping
7-year-old fisherman, was found dead in his Miami jail cellist admits that some of the Haitians may have deserved more 330-36 margin in September 1973, it died in the Senate when
: May- a sheet tied around his neck. attention when they arrived. Judiciary Committee Chairman James Eastland refused to
"If we had the staff we could do it," he said. "But, then call hearings. .

again, if every refugee who climbs off a boat in Miami says But, even if the legislation is carried out there will still be

'The only thing that kept he's a political refugee, it will break down the system." the problem of determining whether conditions in Haiti are
As for claims that the Haitians have suffered because of a such that political persecution exists.In .
"double standard" on refugees Gidel points out a situation a November interview with George Beebe associate
us alive was our hope which occurred in 1969 to disclaim the charge.At publisher of the. Miami Herald President Jean Claude

that time, 119 Haitian Coast Guardsmen who took partin Duvalier said political persecution in Haiti is a "myth that F''
for a good life. an unsuccessful revolution, sought and were granted already has been dispelled."
asylum in the U.S. THOSE WHO FLEE his country do so because "they are
Gerard Leander Gidel also said comparison between Haitian and Cuban just looking for a better life in lands with better employment
refugee situations were "unfair, since the Cubans are in a conditions," said the 24-year old president-for-Iife.

special category." "If they want to return home, they are free to do so. if they
Haitian refugeeThe "TilE AGREEMENT to recognize Cuban refugees was will work toward the development of this country," Duvalier

something that was done on a presidential level by President
MIlHBlBHflttHHIHHMHHBIi ll B Johnson in 1966. So, the only special, large-scale exceptionswe said.George Baboun Haiti's consul to Miami, agreed.

plight of the Haitians has aroused a number of make are'for Cuban refugees," he said. "Haiti is a democracy. There is no political persecution in
merican groups to take action in their behalf. One of the "When you come and knock: on the door and want in, thereare Haiti. Those who wish to return are welcome," he said.
rliest to do so was the National Council of Churches, which certain rules that have to be followed. The Haitians will be But, asked how Haiti would deal with the refugees upon "
, given every opportunity to state their cases according to these "This is I would discuss
unded Miami's Haitian Refugee Information Center in their return, Baboun said, something
Pril 1973. rules," Gidel said. with the U.S. government, not a reporter."
On Feb. 28 1974 the council adopted a resolution ex- But Neal Sonnett, a Miami attorney who represents "about AN OFFICIAL WITH the Jamaican consul in Miami
400" of the Haitians, claims the INS has not been followingthe there has "been to
I ressing "profound,disquiet" with the Haitian refugee claimed Haiti's consul regularly reporting
'tuation' and formed | task force. rules. the government of Haiti the names of those Haitians who
an nvestigatory "SO FAR, WE really have had no opportunity to place on U.S."
After ,a number of interviews Haitians, their enter the
with the
the claims these Haitians have, said
record legitimate
awyers and INS the "The government of Haiti knows who the refugees are. Iwouldn't
officials during June 1974 the task force not allowing attorneys to be present at the initial
neared its Sonnett. "By doubt for a moment that they will be imprisoned or
report. Among the, conclusions were: interviews the Immigration Service has violated a basic due "
.The U.S. executed should they return, he said. "I should think that
a has a double standard. on refugees. Whileextending process of law and acted in a most arbitrary and capricious those who have demonstrated against the Haitian governmentwhile
warm welcome to Cuban refugees. current "
the manner. in Miami would be well advised not to go back."
h policy discriminates against those who, are black andorfleeing The United Nations Convention and Protocol for the Statusof After a recent visit to Haiti Neal Sonnett had this to say for

from right-wing dictatorships; Refugees, signed by the U.S., calls for,attorneys to be made those who insist that conditions there have improved:
There is a real question as to whether the Haitians were at time when they are questioned
afforded available to refugees any "It's like me telling you that the temperature outside has
due process of law since attorneys were not allowedto their for political asylum.
concerning requests When
dropped from ISO degrees to 149 degrees. you go
be present at the,Initial interviews conducted by the INS;
violated this
According to Son nett, the INS has measure by off."
outside you'll still fry' ass
.The INS has been insensitive the of the Haitians initial interviews your
to plight barring attorneys from all of the given AND, WHAT ABOUT Gerard Leander
I and has} not fully investigated their claims of oppression. Haitian refugees. These interviews form the basis' of the
I FOR THE MOMENT,the fate of the refugees is suspendedby material that the INS forwards to the State Department for Well,he spends most of his time sitting around the Haitian
the grace of legal ,appeal The Fifth Circuit Court of asylum consideration."On Refugee Information Center, looking for the day when he will,
Appeals has remanded the cases of 367 Haitians to the INS receive permission to stay In the U.S. for good. r"
occasion. 38 Haitians were taken from their jail
one "
Vfunner. review and similar. action on other cases is exlxcted. cells at 2 a.m. and hauled the 100 miles to Immigration inestigation Does he think of going home now? "

Lawyers \' headquarters for interviews. With treatment like "Not me." said Leander. "Until all the Duvaliers are gone, \ .,
for the Haitians have detailed affidavits .
1 documenting prepared and that it's no wonder the Haitians didn't feel like talking" you can let me die right here."
individual cases of torture, imprisonment
:/, :,
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'Pog. HO.Th.lnd.p.nd.nt Florida AJIIgotor.W.dn.tdoy. frbrupry 26. 1975 This page paid for it t11t adVcnisi'ng' "nttCSH ..



I 14 Programs Distinction for UF :




Twenty-three programs of distinctionfor advantage of the 14 positions and$285,274
the nine universities in the State designated by the Legislature for this

University System will be recommendedto fiscal year.
for
the Board of Regents. Included are : The programs recommended
four for UF: biomedical engineering, ,f3,oa'rtlpfeeg'srtlMeatlng; :: : : approval have already been approved by
behavioral neuroscience,food economics each university and the BOR staff. It Is

'. and marketing. and thermonuclearfusion. :,U.rt: l\ler.ity\ '..of,',lest Ftorltta( "MarcEi; ., 10), asked anticipated to propose that universities additional will programs later be '

.\ The programs will be recommended "which they are willing to emphasize
._ for special funding by the State Legisla- through internal allocations ,of resour-
ture prior to the 1975 session.The fundingwill ces."
accrue to the universities as scheduled budgets by at least 25 per cent over programs..where, the programs will UF programs are summarized as
in the master plan over a six-year normal levels. have the greatest likelihood of gaining follows:
period and as resources become avail The master plan ,was developed as distinction.' Five of the programs,
able.It Is anticipated that the funding for required by the general appropriationsact including biomedical engineering at UF, Biomedical EngineeringWill
the special programs will increase their of 1974 "to provide.or such have previously been approved to take
focus on the applications engineer
,. Marston Speaks ing technology to medically related
problems. Already having attractedsome
$600,000 per year of extramural
,:.' To UF Senate support, the program will be housed in
Clnivessity 1 the College of Engineering but will
On ThursdayPresident interface with programs in the Colleges
of Medicine and Arts and Sciences.
A Produced by the Division of Information & Publications lf a
Robert Marston will report Services to communicate official notices I
.': on budgetary and legislative matters at f Important Information to students faculty & staff Mat Behavioral Neuroscience
tilt University of Florida. W0
the monthly meeting of the University
Senate at 3:30 p.m..Thursday McCarty To begin 197677. Will focus on neurological -
:-- Auditorium. The president will also human disorders and will be
f':.. entertain discussion and welcome developed as an Interdisciplinary effort
.;... thoughts from Senate members. 915-Car Parking; Structure involving faculty from the J.Hillis Miller
i.'" There are no action Items on the Health Center and'the Departments of
'y\: agenda; however, members have been Psychology and Biology in the College of
: reminded that a proposed patent policy For' JHMHC Contract Ready Arts and Sciences.Its first concentrationwill
".- was tabled at the January meeting and be on demyelenatlng diseases such
!ft.. could be removed from the table. as multiple sclerosis.
The BOR will be asked construction fora 915-car
to approve signing a contract
t Meetings of the Senate are open to the
.r. public. parking structure at the J.Hillis Miller Health Center with Drake Contracting Co. Food Economics and Marketing

r Distributed with the call for the Senate of Ocala.
r this week were lengthy reports from the The company submitted a low bid of $1,987,900 against a construction: budget of To begin 197879.Concentrates the effortsof
Committee on University libraries and '$2,750,000,resulting in an anticipated savings of approximately$700,000 after other the food economics: and marketing
1 ir the CLEP Advisory Committee. costs of moving a power line are finalized. faculty toward the solution of food and
.;, This project was authorized by the 1974 legislature under a special law that madeit marketing problems confronting Florida
possible for the BOR to handle all phases of construction rather than going agriculture.
t.r r BOR. Group through the Department of General Services.The project was brought to bid in Just
over seven months from its inception. Thermonuclear Fusion

f To Meet March 5
: ": Freshman Class Cut ProposedThe To begin 197980. Complementing the
( The Finance committee of the BOR effort at FSU, which emphasizes; low
'r will meet at 9 a.m.Wednesday, March 3, nuclear processes, the UF program in
"7., in the BOR Conference Room, Talla- Board of Regents will consider reducing enrollment of firsMime-in-college the Departments of Nuclear Engineering
;- hassee, to consider proposed fee students by 15 per cent, resulting in the following new limits: Sciences and Physics will stress high
increases and other matters on the University of Florida, 2,465; Florida State, 2,125; South Florida, 2,040; Florida energy nuclear reactions. It is hoped
; March ,10 agenda. Tech,1,700 and Florida A&M, 1,700. these programs will lead to the develop-

I. .",. I Increased Tuition Proposed ment of controlled Other Universities fusion power plants.



A new fee schedule for the State on a per-credit-hour system, but will other- than the MD, DMD and DVM, the Programs of distinction in other unity
University System will be considered by provide for four levels of payment in proposed fee schedule and breakdown of ersities are as follows:
I I the Board for recommendation to the place of the present two levels. allocations is as follows: (the first two A&M-Human resource management
Legislature. It will continue to be based For students enrolled in programs columns show current fees). ((1975-76)) and career education ((1977-78))
I'" FAU Ocean engineering ((197475)and )
Lower Level Upper Level Graduate exceptional child education ((1976-77))
,.a Undergraduate Graduate Undergraduate Undergraduate Graduate Thesis and FlU-Hotel and food service management -
: Course -Course Course Course -Course Dissertation ((1974-75)) and comparative inter-
to. national business management ((1976-77))
'\'. Matriculation Fee $7.93 $11.43 8.51 $ 9.51 $14.1 $IUl FSU Design and management of
'!" Building Fee 1.11 1.11 1.18 1.18 1.18 1.18 post-secondary education ((1975-76 nuclear -
Student Financial Aid Fee .28 .28 .52 .52 .'2 $2 science ((1977-78)), criminology:
}., Student Loan Fund Fee .28 .28 .21 .%8it ,
: ((1978-79)) and music ((197940)))
Capital Improvement Trust Fund 1.23 1.23 1.27 1.27 1.27 1.27
FTU-Computer science and
:':. Student Financial Aid Trust Fund Fee .18 .18 .20 .20 .20 .20 ((1975-76))
I' Activity and Service ...uL..ZJZ 2.a .--Ui ....ui ,..Jaii limnology, ,(lake ecology),:((1977-78))
2: Total Registration. Fee Per Hour '$13.00 lUO '14.00 $15.00 f20.oo $22.00 UNF -- Transportation and 'logistics:
.... ((1974-75)) and banking and Insurance:
i Tuition per credit hour for ((1976-77))
I- non-Florida students, in I. 1- USF-Urban 'community psychologyand
t..: 1 addition to the registration fee $24.00 ., 24.00 : $23.00 $37.00 $41.00 $41.00Present gerontology ((1974-75)), urban waters
\ resources ((1976-77)) and urban anthropology
Florida Present Non--Flortda ((1978-79))
Fee Student Fee Student
UWF Estuarine biology ((1975-76))

Matriculation Fee 194.85 $255.15 Sf4.15' $692.15 .: and city and county management
Building Fee ,,18.65 17.70 18.M" 17.70 ((1977-78))
For students enrolled in the MD, DMD Student Financial Fee4.20 7.80 4.20 7.80
and DVM programs,the fee schedule for Student Loan Fund Fee -Go 4020 .0. 4.20 FSU Rent IncreasesThe
each three-month period of enrollment ,Capttallmprovement
will be as follows: Trust Fund 18,45 19.os18.4s 19.0 BOR will be'asked to approve
Student Financial Aid rental increases for dormitories and
r Trust Fund Fee ,3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 apartments at Florida State University
.. Activity and Service,Fee 3405 -34.05!! -30.60! from$5 to$15 per quarter and from S3 to

Total l Student Fees $271.00 $338.00 $821.00 $775.00 $6 per month.

The University of Florida is an Equal Employment Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer


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This page *paid* for at usual advertising rats ft.lnd.p.nd.nt Honda Alligator.W.dn.idfly, fabiuary 26 1775.Pog. 11 1
"
u><

Faculty Terminations

PROCEDURES OUTLINED ExplainedBetween

20 and 30 University of Florida
Grad Student faculty members will receive notices
Appointments this week that they will not be reemployed -
for the 1975-76 academic year. Most
are interim instructors or interim assis-
Reaffirming the University's pledge to honor employ- length of time," Hemp said. tant professors and all are in the
ment commitments to graduate students, Interim Hemp said that he has become aware of several Education and General E&G budgetary
Assistant Vice President for Academic Affairs Gene instances in which appointments have been submitted colleges.The .
Hemp has outlined procedures that deans, directors and against the E&G budget for graduate students previouslypaid faculty cutbacks are in accordancewith
department chairmen must follow in making new from contract or grant funds. Board of Regents directions to
appointments or reappointments.Each reduce the E&G salary budget,for next
new appointment or reappointment of a graduate "If the student has a firm commitment, the appoint- year by $1,543,880 and to surrender 69
assistant forwarded to the Graduate School must include ment will be approved," Hemp said, "but the student"will manyear faculty positions by June 30.
either a copy of a letter of commitment dated prior to be required to engage in instructional activities and not The full package in complying with the
December 12, 1974, or the individual approval of the continue to work on the research that is no longer being cutback, according to interim Academic
appropriate dean, Hemp's Feb. 19 memorandum states. funded.If the student does not have a firm commitment, it affairs vice-President Robert Bryan,
"We are pledged to honor all commitments both written will be necessary for the departmemt to utilize includes a continuation of the freeze on
and verbal where the student understood, not hoped, that miscellaneous grants or foundation funds in ,order to filling 58 vacant positions, totaling salar-
he or she would have an assistantship for some specified continue providing the assistantship." ies of$989,181,put into effect since Dec.12.
It also includes cutting back funding for
summer school 25 per cent from last
summer's level, to approximatelythe
;nancaAid/ Applications 1973 level and reducing support for
Job Interview three centers financed from the E&G
budget. There are no plans to reduce ,
lust Be Readied summer enrollment.
by Friday Schedule For Bryan said that deans have been
notified that their department chairmenand
Financial aid applications for the 1975-76 academic year are available in 23 faculty may decide which faculty
Tigert Hall.All students, including those presently receiving financial assistance, Feb. 26-March 4 members are to be terminated but that
are required to complete and submit financial aid applications and confidential he hopes all will be those who have been
statements prior to Friday. employed to fill positions temporarily.
Students must complete either a Parents' Confidential Statement or a Student's The Career Planning and Placement "Tenured faculty, of course, are fully
Financial Statement and mail it to the College Scholarship Service (CSS) at the Center schedules employment interviewsfor protected, Bryan said'/asare regular
address shown on the form. No action can be taken on an application until the companies recruiting on campus. faculty members in tenure-earning posi-
Confidential Statement has been returned by CSS. Students should sign up for interviews at tions.Non-tenured faculty who have been
Prior to receiving financial assistance all eligible students are also required to least one day in advance in Room G-22 of employed for a year would have to be
I apply for the Florida Student,Assistance Grant (deadline March 1)) available Reitz Union. This service is also open to given a full year's" notice before they can
through the State Department of Education. alumni. be terminated.
Freshmen,Sophomores and Juniors are required to apply for the Federal Basic Employers visiting campus Feb. 26- Bryan said "every way possible"was
Educational Opportunity Grant Program prior to receiving financial assistance. March 4 are listed below. explored to prevent lay-offs. He said thatit
Wednesday BSAF Wyandotte Corp- was possible to shift some positions into
oration, Bell Telephone Laboratories, vacant lines financed by grants and
The Boeing contracts but that"ultimately, there was
Company, Greyhound Corporation -
elephone Bills on Campuso John Hancock Insurance Comp- not choice left except the regrettable one
,any, S.S. Kresge Company and Swift & of terminations."His action followed con-
Company will be interviewing. sultation with the Council of Academic
Up, Maybe More Later Thursday-AMoco Fabrics Company, Deans and faculty members on the
ACTION, Camp Sequoyah-Tsali, Exxon Budget and Professional Relations and
[That telephone you have on your officek service for UF, according to Mrs. Nancy Company, USA, Northrop Corporation, Standards Committee.The .
; or In your dormitory now costs the Swink, administrative assistant in the Pan American World Airways and J.E. UF's reduction was its share of the
versity $2.30 and $1.95 more per Physical Plant Division. Shrine Company will be recruiting. Bell 288 positions ordered cut throughout the
onth, respectively, effective Feb. 11. The new rates are an interim rate Labs will conclude its interviews. State University System.The number of
I All told, that means an approximate increase approved for Southern Bell by Friday =;. Camp Sequoyah-Tsali and persons aftected and the number of
.OOO monthly increase in telephone the Public Service Commission. Statewide '- Exxon Company, USA, win conclude positions ordered terminated do not
the increase will total $86 million. their interviews. coincide because not all faculty mem-
But in late August or early September the Monday the recruiters will be Aetna bers are employed at the average rate
ixit Interviews For Commission is expected to render a Life & Casualty Company, National and most are employed nine,rather than
decision on Bell's application for a,$216.5 Oceanic & Atmospheric Admin. (Com- 12, months. ,
Tads with Aid million increase. missioned Officers Corps) and U.S.' The reduction also provides for the elimination
Calvin Greene,director of the Physical Environmental Protection Agency. of 11 position the Legislature
Graduating seniors with National Def- Plant Division, said that approval of the Tuesday-American Graduate Schoolof ordered in the 1974-75 appropriations bill
could result in cost increases International Charleston that gave the universities extra positionsto
e, National Direct, Pharmacy, Nurs- full increase Management, -
,. Dentistry, Cuban, S.A.F.E. or Univ- on all items of telephone equipment.The County (S. Carolina) Public Schools, phase in what is known as the
rsity of Florida Term loans must interim increase raises main line John Hancock Mutual Life Insurance "manyear"concept of. faculty employ-
Long '
omplete the exit interview prior to stations from $11.50 per month to $13.80 Company, Haskins & Sells and U.s. ment, with the understanding the posi-
raduation. All student receivables and and dormitory stations from$7.20 to$9.15 .Geological Survey Conservation Division tions would be returned over two years.
ort Term Loan accounts must besought monthly. Main line stations are described will be the recruiters. Aetna Life & Under the manyear plan, universitiesmay
will conclude their spread faculty pay' over the full
as those phones represented by an Casualty Company
up to date prior to graduation.
interviews.It twelve months, rather than calculatingtwo
allure to do so will prevent release of individual number. separatge budgets for the regular

plomas and transcripts.Exit academic year and, the summer quar-
interviews may be completed ate Graduate Student DeadlinesFriday
Student Depository between 9 a.m. ter.Colleges in"which faculty terminations

d 4 P-m. weekdays. Payments on ,February 28 is the last day for is also the last day for graduate were required are Architecture and
ounts may be processed between 9 the final submission of theses for all students expecting to receive"a degree Fine Arts,Arts and Sciences, Educa-
Jn. and 3:30 p.m. graduate students expecting to receive a this quarter to file their Final Eramlna-: tion, Engineering, Law and University
master's degree this quarter. Papers tion Reports with the Graduate School- in College.All other E&G Colleges-Business
( should be turned in to Room 280, Grinter Room 288, Grinter Hall. ; Administration: Journalism and Com-
Faculty Cap, Gown Hall. munications, and Physical Education,
[ Health and Recreation-are: affected by
Deadline Extended Grad Open Door the freeze in filling vacant positions.I
Free Tennis For Funding for the Urban and Regional
The Campus Shoplane Bookstore has And StaffThe ,Dean Harry H. Sisler will keep his Development Center will be eliminated
extended its to Friday for Faculty office open today from 3 to 5 p.m., and director Carl Feiss will return to his
faculty members to order caps and intramurals sports office will offera Room 223, Grmier; Hall, to talk with any professorship in the Department of
[gowns for participation' in March 22 free beginning tennis class for faculty ,graduate students without appointmentabout Architecture and cutbacks will be effected -
I Commencement. staff from 5:30: to 6:30: p.m. Feb. 27, any matter they wish to discuss in the Center for Latin American
and
I Faculty wishing to reserve Commencement 10 and 17. with him or his staff.. "Open Door" Studies and the Office of Instructional
I regalia should stop by the Special and March information 3, and registratiod call meetings are held the second and fourth Instructional Resource:
[Services Desk on the mezzanine of the For or Freida Chewning at Wednesday of each month from 3 to 5 The Board of Regents has not ordered 't -
Campus Joe Regna, rt
Shop Bookstore at the Hub,
p.m. any reductions in the Health Center and
or call David 3924581.
Banded at 392-0194. IFAb budgets.

The University of Florida is an Equal Employment Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer .

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I Pale 12,The Independent Florida Alligator Wednesday.February 26, 1975 I I ,1 '
AndyV b hth"DRACULA"I
1hAtNtttml 1:55: 3:55:
I "Utterly 'Perverse andentertaining. NW 2)1 IOUL'VUD 5:55: 7:50: 9:50:

hilarious." ."

-1.,E..tl .yiiitf y... CLASSIFIEDSFOR
? 730 & THE

4' 9:30: STEPFORDWIVES

5100 I
FOR SALEbicycle FOR SALESanyo FOR SALEWeddIng B
.._ _...
@ ii Mi>Tnt AFIrnbPAU.MOVNISSEY.COIOR.A/RYANSTO'! flCTUMS Mil ASI

GeBt ichwlnn varsity IO. p..d 8 track cor stereo 4 channel matrix' Bonds, ft Engagement Rings. Z
t1e theril j vsic ell showroom condition brand new, excellent has many features $SO. ask for rob :376-. Traditional or Contemporary designs of IASTDAYITHAT'S I
condition, must sell, save 0358 (g.5t-B6-p) your choice. Handmade for Individual NW. Ihb slNEtr sal
233 W. Unlv:Ave. 377-3013 yourself $30 off retail call 378.5776 (a- For sale Mobile Home 8' x 35' Excellent who wont the best. Original work bySouth' 114 eauLIVAPO
5l-86-p) leading Artists. Master Cold !
cdnditlon Coll after 3 pm 01373-004810'( ENTERTAINMENT
Unconditional
Smith ond lopidist/
Cute 36' Mobile Home In country Ideal St-87-p) Guarantee OZZIE By appointment only 2:104:407:009:30TOMORROW 1
for student or close couple air condo 73 Honda 350, new set of hooker 3733894. A-13T-90-PJ( )
awnings, storage shed asking $1400, headers excellent con. $750.00. or best
485-2405 evenings (8T-85-P) offer Mike 373-0924 (o-St-87-p)

claricon 80 watt receiver and lab-24 Minolta Celtic 135 mm F 3.5 lense Never 1:55: 3:55: 5:55 7:509:50
turntable exet. cond. 270 new, asking used.Still in the box.Sells for$160 new.
165 or best offer, audiovox FM tuner for Only $90 377-7334 (o-5t-87-p)
car 8 track $25 call fred 377-8776 (o-5t- QUAD Speaker System 4-16, ohms "One of the
8'p). Panasonic Speakers for $80 or $25 apiece
Buy 2 and change that Stereo. to GAMBLEIROGERS I Best Moviesof
.' f&j p.r:".J.< rU quod AllAN 377-7011 (o-4t-87-p)

4r1.0 I!.v :< ",f For sale MMinolla SSR.1 35 mm camera 1974:
dtPi
: and I..n. $100 or best offer call Wayne
'> "U.c fY ''''''' 377-8645 (o3t89.p) -Gene Shaiit NBC-TV
Iti1: "''' l' ..41lliir371. \1973 Dodge sport auto.. A.c. 6 cycl.
: loaded take over payments and small
: 643"-.. cosh difference 378-5028.1ice sun man
:: :, .', ,. wed eve 392.3081 excellent cond.
19,000 miles (o-5t-B9-p)
JUNE ANITA 1971) Chev Novo green 41,000\ v. good RETURNS !
Ask Cfselr wi condition no air,power brakes,am radio
I power steering. gas saver'Call between
CARTER ; CARTER 8-12 pm 373-3627 (o-St-69-p)

r' 101" N. W..m.Jto A Pentax Spotmotlc II with a Tokumar F-
*, 1Iiii LT IIIIRIOIMI' .1.1 4 50 mm, a Takumar .3.5 28 mm, and
a Saligor f3.5 80-200 mm. Best offer.

9jDD Coll Cannon 8900od5l88-p 135 mm( f3.5 lens)) W-lens hood eef & ottle "HARRYbib

l'l'u[ 1 and case, year old good condition. $80or
Best offer Call 392-7318 (o-5t-88-p)

kEN i1610ft. (G o100L unlvox electric piano mint condition 5220 SOUTHWEST 13th S7
CASH DAUGHTERS $360 call after 4 00 378-9779 (o-5t-S8-p) 372-3449
: 9:30:
Fender jazz bats natural finish with
Rosanne & Rosey aslt Ceeh maple neck perfect condition $235, call
Gordon 2 ken of 392-8845 (o-5t-88-p)
Terry New in Gainesville
New SAE Mark XI Speakers,with new 5-
& IIt$ N. W. 1U* SF, yr. factory warranty In your name, $450
Tennessee Three pair (list$600)). Call Wiley 378-9994 (o3t88p -

Sunday March 2 8:00PM 6:15: 9:15: ) gQ Q uUe lCa"OCRegtauftant '
: 1973 mobile 12x50 central heat 8 air 2
bedrooms fully furnished$1200 equity ft
Florida
Gym assume monthly note 75.77 or make REAL MEXICAN
Students. S3.50-5.SO offer must sell call 3732064 (A-7T-B5-P)

General Public U50-4.50 Mobile home 1972 12 i 60 carpet brick
Unlv.r Jty'Box 0 fic.R.b.l Diicount Strictly Folk Roncher skirt ft anchored 377-3090 $3900 must FOOD
PG see 4400 SW 20 Ave. lot No. 27. (m-5l-
OnlYotUnve) Rcordsvill
| >AI ltY Box Office 88-0))
'
30 gal aquarium complete. over $180\ Village Square
invested 3 mo old. selling to buylorger)
tank. The best of everything asking 2409 SW 13th St. 377.5151r
$130. toll 378-5917 after 5'(o-3t-89-p)

69 Firebird air con power steering +
brakes auto trans new exhaust system
brakes ccxb starter sell or trade for
motorcycle call 372-1008 (o-St-89-p)

Gainesville's Largest. Indoor
FLEA MARKET
Every Frl.-Sat.-Sunday
A little' bit of everything for royx

1201\ E.Univ.everyone.Ave. 378-3431
(A-8T-90-P( ) Popptftiweekend \

HEWtlTT-PACKARD HP.35 almost new
cost me' $295 will sell for $ISO also fisher
sdicblate stereo amp $95 372-2020 (A.
3T-90-P( ) 8Pm'

1973 Kawasaki 90cc street bike Very
good condition. Come by and see and
ride after 5.00 pm. No phone. Only
$300,00 216 sw 3 Ave.Apt. No. 2 (A-5T. at tfie
-
90-P)

8.35 trailer all electric oc excellent
condition moveable must sell $1000 or
best offer call nancy 378-6355 after 6 fiippodrometheatre
(A-4T-90-P)

enlarger durst m600 w-lens, for 35mm or
l.JlcliJSa 2%. 11x14 easel and print washer $125 x.
377-0355 510\ nw IS ove (A-4T-QQ.PJ( ) I
Collecter selling old original movie
posters limited supply so call 373-8704
ferf
(A-5T-90-P) coll 3738375AA'fcNFrf.

Diamonds, Sapphires, Emeralds Jade !
and 95 other gem minerals All qualities .v\XJ
available Priced from 25 percent to 50
percent below retail; Custom cutting
from $1000 Unconditional/ Guarantee
OZZIE By appointment. only 373-3894
(A-I3T.90-P( )





0:1_

[ : t1


.J1il1lCllPstcf tt


SPECIAL GUesT TS;

9'1""JI &torrf4t SIjtorri


,\ SATURDAY. MARCH \197S

GREAT SOUTHERN MUSIC HALL ?

TIME a. 11 P.M. 233W.UNIVERSITY_ AVENUE ALL SEATS RESERVED 4.00

Tk.ti AwM" At: RtM OIKOUM 1MI.| | ...Bo Oltiet .
c loom only II10 SI'
Marl ..... ..
\ 0. S nd lt.ddnn.d.tsnp.d" nv top nd 50 Clftlllor lieidli'. f
Monty Order PivrtittTe: Greg Sou....'.MUM Hall.Inc. -
P ostXficSoii142MOtmNMll
..*.dories:13604 .. .
u. . . .. .
i 0:0: :' ,. '.,'. '. .':..-;' ';.''''';':-''._:':'. .......!.... ..:..... ....... .... ... .: '.',' '; ;. .;. .:. ,', .:. .

.'


--- --- -- -- -- ____ _h ____.__ ,
--



-,'



.

n@lJ Independent Florida Alligator,dnidoy,February 26, H75, Pope 13


THEWS TO SEE MORE WITH !! !J@ l FREE

( CLASSIFIEDS
CAM TV '\. -
"HIGH PLAINS DRIFTER"WITH
NEW ti USFD
""" ;: CO"'U'll'.f O.
alLoADIN COMpoNENS: CLINT EASTWOOD
'
A weetnerchirm ..
1 TV Channel /v/rrNt Ovl N.OYMfT
*!. OPI New New York luY ..........
-SILL
Stock Exchange 2 fM stations on Dt.REPAIR63340s FOR SALEJEWELRY FOR RENTOWN
I TVChennelfc' end t FM end 4 AM
tt,tion on the PM band.UNIVERSITY .
Custom made (for those who BEDROOM AVAILABLE $80 + 'V.
CITY \ appreciate ort In gold tllver, and fine utilities Village Apt townhouse, furnished -

TBIVISIONCASUCO.INCI23N.MAIN IT. : -. 0_ : Gems 373-3894 Studio' (A-13T.9Q.P 103 By appointment; only P". 373, two 2U.both call Debbie after six TONITE 9 & 11

opel kodet runs good inspected 35 mpg female Roommate Wonted""Hawaiian
___ __ 250$ready to go coil 373-2403
nUh or tee ot Village Apt. 2 bdr 2 bth, a-e heat pool
1021 nw 55 ten (A.2T-90-P) etc.$61.25 a mo. + Vfc util.call 373-9767
for Sale: Superb Stereo System Morontx after 4 p.m. Available Mar. j (b-IOt-89- LAST NIGHT
TYPEWRITERPROBI4EMS 1200 Infmty= 2000A electrostatic speakers Pj)
Thorns TO 125 |Luc Sea '10 Coll Ken 376- sublet large one br. unf apartment
? 2402 (A-5T-90-P) University Gardens $143 per month
greenhouse tale healthy plants. in clay available March 1 call anytime 378-5466
pots Sunday only I0am-4pm.go west on ((b.3t89p)
We've got al> the answers newberry rd past '1-75 to nw 91st st sublet room la monctia opts $90 per at the RAT
SalesServiceSuppliesLease follow ngns (A-3T.90-P) month pool oc furnished carpets ph373.
6474 Jerry available March 1 (b-5t-89-p)

FOR Female roommate, own bedroom 3 blk
RENT
from campus,$65 mo + 1-3 utilities call
ASSOCIATEDBUSINESS Schovown or Anne 3778005. (b-St-882))
female, own room 2-br dupl., unfurn.
for fem roommate needed at
qlr.
spr
SYSTEMS central. heat-ac. pets. allowed nice, landmark opts 2 br. pool,oc, heat, dishwasher 11J1wm
quiet. ; privacy see (Julie, 2120 e. unlv.ove / laundry. $58 ,-tVt util. Ise thru
373-3359 no. 4 after 6:00: (b-5t-89-p)
724 N. Main June 15. call 377-6016 (b-5t-88-p)
roommate needed georgetown opts. Beautiful 3 BR unfurnished iosubl.os. .1taHn n".P1atJ1Hoffers
apt.
II No.71 $85 plus/i utl.
own room pool air .
starting 3.'-75 call 377-5747
walk or bike to campus Please contact after'5:30. (b-5t-68-p)
ann 378-2994 (b-3t-89-p)'
ittQe gat CBoy' Sublet large 2 br 1 both unfurn. opt. 2
own room In comfortable ook forest
,
miles from campus SW$205 Mo.All x-tra
town house.$86.mo + V util.easy bikeor facilities included call after 6:00: 377- ONEYEARPROGRA S ,
bus to UF call chuck or bill 373-1617 '
Now Open For Breakfast (b-5t.89-p) 8318 (b-5t-88-p) SPRING SEMESTER
sublet pvt room mole 2 blks from
female roommate needed own room campus$85(month spring qtr-oc, carpet,
"hay lion village" $6250! mth plus 1.3 maid,cooking-pay no utilities call glenn SUMMER & ARCHAEOLOGY
7-lO:3Oam MON.-FRI. utilities' call after 5 376-1467 (B-8t-86-p) 378-5443 ((8-5T.90-P) PROGRAMS

$95 sublet utilities electric included. air FURN 1 BR Apt 85 first last dep reg 723 se
and heat one room,share bath,frig, hotplate 5th ove nice yard neighbor. mellow
LUNCH SPECIALS 3 blocks off campus quiet folks sublease (B-1T-90-P) Information & applications/ :
.
.. responsible mole grad student desired. I br. ,opt furnished. $110-mo.( 5 blks.
Available immediately. Call 373-3627 north or. library West Available immediatley. ONE YEAR PROGRAM SPRING SUMMER PROGRAMS
r between 8-12 PM (b-5t-89-p) Call 377-0654 anytime. (B- American Friends of the Israel Program Center-AZYF
New Low Prices Private bedroom, Windmeadows lux. 3T-90-P) Tel Aviv University I 515 Park Avenue
Apts private bath $99-mo+l-3util. roomate wanted for trailer own room 342 Madison Avenue New York New York 10022
1728 W. UNIVERSITY 373-9453 furnished, cable TV, 2712 SW 34th St $50a mo call 377-5497 after 5 pm (B-1T New York New York 10017 ((212)) 753-0230/0282
373-3558 or 377-8440 (BT.. "-P) 90-P() ) ( )

wanted 2 female roommates to sublet 1 bedroom opt. I block from med center
Heinleinl luxurious 2 bedroom 2 bath opt to shore + campus $169.00 unfurn. or $189.00 (212)MU5651AcareerinlaW
The !
new with 2 girls rent 62.25 plus util! country. furn. dishwasher laundry carpet pool
Robe A gardens call 373-0177 (b-5t-86-p) tec. room no pets call 373-8063) (BST.90.P .
Male Roommate Wanted () )
Appro$25.00 .
'The Past Through Tomorrow weekly plus Vt utilities -. many extras. a room in a nice house 3 blokes from uf .,. .. ... .
by Con 377-5Q.C3 (b-5t-86-p) In 2 acres of land $95 monthly need a .: ':' '.l. .

I-teiiileiii bertA.Heinlein sublet 1 bdrm in 2 bdrm furn duplex quiet responsible female call 372-1724 .
77.50! month 6 blks to campus available befor Horn after 5 pm (B-ST.90-P) .
:'; .. .
of feb free call 3787S.7 .. : ..
The complete "Future History" immediately rest .... ---, :
= keep trying (b-5t-86-p)
illttlle HlsttQ"iftUIft.'S stories, at last in pa- .
BEAT THE HOUSING SHORTAGEIII!!!
ollllpldrinnnt\ perback. From the dean of Now lithe time to start looking for !that MASTEN
"' American science fiction ideal home for spring or fall qtr.. We
.The JJj and have many listings avail for then a
writers 21 dazzling
pro small deposit can hold It for you. Coll "Big Sur
|
phetic stories about life in today 377Sublet -

the next century-and far Ig 1 bedroom opt. unfurnished Poet-guitarist | .

)1nouqh beyond. A major publishingevent available late March thru June $165 without law school:
mnth includes AC good view high rise Fob.26 and feb.27 i
call 373-2806 after 6 pm. (b-5t-89-p) {
...I't.. McCartyAud.fOOp.m.
1Ul11UI1Vt1'paperback $1.95 WANT TO MOVE No admission.charge What can you do with only a bachelor's degree?
If you desire to move from your present Now there is a way to bridge; the gap between an
location we can rent,sublet it or find you undergraduate education and a challenging,responsible -
roommate immediately at NO COST. Let Rlc and Bill!. Barbara | ,
/ a career The Lawyer's Assistant is able to do
__ \\ I II Call todoyll Masten give you an earthy i work traditionally done by lawyers. '
::: United Real Estate Asset. Inc. life and i
perspective on Three months of intensive training can:give you
NE 16th Ave 377-6992 (b-fr-55-c).
113 )
P n1ing Inc. ::::: your place in.It. the skills-the courses are taught by lawyers. You
Renaissance choose one of the six courses offered-choose the
-olfefS- .... < % city in which you want to work. '
:>.: .f.U' ':': ..:i Since 1970. The Institute for Paralegal Training
FAST OFFSET PRINTINGfrom ."....;.\:.;.':>">-. ... /,<'f: has placed more than 700 graduates in law firms
camera ready copy .' banks,'and corporations in over 60 cities:
:
{- any fW ., /u If you are a student of high academic standing and
t are interested in a career.as a Lawyer's Assistant.
.200 copieS we'd like to meet you.
.. < .
only $3.95 ,Contact your placement office for an interview with

for ARTS & SCIENCES .,
1000. copies ./',"%". We will visit your campus 01'.1. ,

or for $9.95. t ,' TEACHER OF THE .''At FRIDAY, MARCH 7. -: : .

most orders. YEAR SELECTION .,:"lifi! 't V. );
V
on
service :. ,
Same day ':. 'f
\\c STUDENT "I
low asW.lynversrn "
Copies as The Institute for :;"
.
\ Ave.632 SPONSORSHIP :..,:. Paralegal Training :
312.1436 ,;
hx ') ....
"
In N Renaissance PACKETS: Public Sponsored Functions II,, Commit 235'South 17th" Street Philadelphia.Pennsylvtmt' 19103. ;..
((215))7324600An :
113 ANDERSON OR Oopts. of Ooctrlcal !n,',
r
& Sociology 'J :
STUDENT

I I'FO'( (HUB) ,, "
"M" -"aS -" --eaap,4

.

blooming variety of loans to pick from : ': .,'. : :

ever '

<

*VACATION LOANS BOAT LOANS CAR LOANS :...:_ ., '
LOANS
BILL PAYING : /W. .

HARD GOOD LOANS *PERSONAl LOANS HOUSE IMPROVEMENT LOANS '

r :

Monday thru Friday 1200 SW 5th Ave. --

Open 8:00- am 3:30pm:



GAS, ILLE FLORIDA: .CAMPUS FEDERAL CREDIT

"
.
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Poo. 14 1b.lndependent florida Alligator,Wednesday, February 26 1975





I-GATORCLASSIFIE.DSI nii-iifii"i---I


I BOOKS ..COLLECTOR'S I II II

I PRINTS I II

FOR RENTHouses FOR RENTroommate PERSONAL SERVICESScuba I I LIMITED EDITION PRINTS I I

to that 2 bedroom opt $83- 5>AMM!IE'S ARRIVED FROM LONDON, Classes stoning Feb. 26th. Wreck 378.3264
G I I. $90 Cottage on lake 377-6992 month + ''I other Apt 428 Hawaiian NOW OPEN,Specialising\! In English hair Dive March 9lh. Sales Service Rental 117. W Univ! : -"
IMIy 2 2 bdr $125 NW Sect. 377-6992 Village or call after 377-9859 (IB-H-90- using' blow waving for the In look Tom Allen(Co-host of Wild Kingdom.
3. 3 bdr $155 Walk to campus 377-6992 PJ) unisex. Drop by Colonial Plaza 716 W T.V.) Allen Aquatic Troll Center Inc.
CUSTOM FRAMING 4. 24 acres miles to U of F 377-6992 OWN MDROOM available Immediately Univ. Ave. 377264350t53p(| ) 3448 W. Unlv 373-9233 (m-h-86.() COPY EDITOR

lBO +'. ufilitie Village, Apt, furnished. Wedding Invitation $11.40 per 1 loll{ major and minor repair on all foreign
22 W July Ave S7301116 Apts two both, call Patty 3731980. ((8-7T-90- business card $9.95. rubber stomps and domestic auto. See Bill and Mike
I. $85 Util' Paid 377-6992 PJ) magnetic signs, offset' printing Cliff Hal Auto Repair at 2225 NW 6 St.or call 376- NEEDED
2. $70 Walk to Campus 377-6992
Printing 1103 N Main (J-FR-58-C)
9479 m-5t-87-p)
HORSBACK RIDING 3. 2 bdr $90 Save tl 377-6992 WANTEDMed (
ROCKIN "M" RANCH 4. 5 acres Pool-2 bdr. 377-6992 Term Papers! Canada' largest Service. WIRED FOR SIGHT
Avail for Spring Qtr. student seek roommate for own For catalogue send$2 to: Essay Services, Mart"
"The Eyeglass Super
Horses ranted by the Hr. 1. $75 Efficiency Utl. pd. 377-6992 bedroom, bath in country gardens 57 Spadino Avenue. Suite 208, Toronto UNIVERSITY OPTICIANS for the next two
Also hones for sal*. -59)) 2. 2 bdr Walk to campus 377-6992 behind med center$116. mo prefer grador Ont. Canada Also, campus representative '300 SW 4th Av. 378-4480:
of! prof student 373-7144 (c-St-88-p) required. Please write (|-351.74p
1347; 20 ,mi. So 3. 3 bdr $170 No lease or deposit 377-- ) (M-50-53-C) weeks.
Gainesville on new 441 6992
4. $85 Moble ham. 377-6992 mole roomate to share furn I bedroomopt Poncho', Backpacks, Pock W-fromes, Europe Israel Africa Asia travel
Olympia opts 1100 sw 8th Ave $75 Tents. Rugby Shirts, Trail Shoes, White discounts year round student air travel
United Real Estate mo. + '<* utilities c-oir, heat, carpet 2 Stag Speedo Bathing Suits Join Univ Inc.4228 first ave tucker go. 30084 ((404)) Salary $20 a week
:"" ",:': :' ::' W! WiAd: :: :,: I-13NE 16th Ave blocks fr campus call Bob 373-8874 (c-5t- Hiking Club. Allen Aquatic ft Troll 934-6660 (m-25t-88-p) ,
:< S' allm *:': Open 9AM to 8 PM 377-6992 88-p) Center' 3448 W. Univ. 3739233fr72(| -

Female roommate wonted own room In ej__ work.
four
wanted mole roomot.own room In days
one
2 bedroom duplex ok, central heat,
three bedroom opt. $75 + 'V utilities pets COED' facial hair removed per
air phone 378-8917 (c- t-88-p)
I Mark 373-1326 ((5.3T-90-P) monently. Call Edmund Dwyer -
: WANTED TO BUY Tenor Guitar Must be electrologlst over 20 year experience BEER
:71&W 'i wonted, luxuriousCountry
'* Female roomate
: : ve" reasonable. Most any condition. 378- Coll 3728039 (J-FR-61-C) No experience
Gardens, opt. must be neat.
; ? ,n : :,: { $95+''A util.,' .b.rent free call Dee 372- 7700 anytime (c-5t-89-p) SUMMER IN EUROPE. Uni-Travel ON SUNDAY ,
1366 or 373-2638 (B-5T-90-P) Female roommate wonted! Gatorwood Charter at lets than H reg. economy
Need roomate own bedrm in 4 bdrm opt. share 2 bedroom 2 bath $60 call fore 65 day advance payment NUBBY'S TACKLE BOX nec.,.,;
Now 377-7914 (c-5t-89-p) required. US Gov't, approved. TWAPo"AmTronlOvlo707'
house 3 blks from campus 323 nw 14sl 1
STREIT'SSCHWINNCYCLERY 1 1BI. South at Light
$75 mo + 1-5 utl $75 dep.call Ken 377. Mole roomate wanted to sub-lease on .. Call toll free 1-800-
,'-. 5081 after 4pm avail mar 1 (B-5T-90-P) apartment $50.56 a month +.. V 325-4B67. (I(1-131-86) Newberry, Fla.
bdrm with utilities, call AI at 373-1092 move In
need one roomate. own
1614 N.W. 13th ST. private bath In three bdrm home. $63 r>ow. (c-3 -86-p) Gainesville' Largest MARKET Indoor

per mo. plus 1-3 Trade: Sec III at Med Center with See III Every pri.-Sat-Sunday FLEA NEED GASH CALL
call Mike, 377. 377-9821 after
utilities bike to campu anywhere on campus 40 lockable Booth
00I 6026' (B-3T-90-P) 330 .All Pay on weekends (c-5t-86-p) $4 Doyly, 1st Weekend Free when you (JnllVW'TY' ( PAWNBROKERS

Female Roomate needed Immediately. stay a month. Reserve your now '
TV W Un v 6 I itJ4!
LEWIS responsible and neat. brandwine $68 1201 E. University Ave. 378-3431 1 (J-8T-
I DAY fUVICI mo. + 'I. utilities call 376-2496 after 5 or 90-P) LOAN BUY ',fU TRADi 376-4458
weekends (c-5t-86-p)
Jewel
ryCompany
< ASH WHfN YOU NEED IT
1 DAY SERVICE CLASS RINGS Wanted, roomate or roomates to share Ron "I've missed you. Do you rememberme
FRANCHISED DEALER DIAMONDSWATCH 2 bedroom opt own room A bathroomor ? J'm not sod llza anymore. keep In
( shore with a friend) rent $100 (or touch (J-1T-9Q.P, STEVE' HANCOCK'S
ALL ACCESSORIES REPAIRS $50)) H uti (or 1-3 utI)call 376-1186 (c-5t- .4 MS.Rights looking for MR Rights 5'10"
200 W. University Ave. 86-o 6'2" high aspirations Intelligent, attractive -

CALL 377-BIKE 372-4106 Gab & SILVER Top prices paid for etc pleasant, gentleman, athletic, AUTO REPAIR Ask for DAVE or
rings, old lewelry, etc. confidential can no creeps Box 28-0323 (J-IT-90-P)
All Work Guaranteed
--------- Orzle 373-3119.c.SO'53-c( ) '
>>
ft
1-------- Consolidations to the new Delta
FREE ELECTRONIC ENGINE ANALYSIS Help! Female roommate needed Gamma sisters with love from your Major-Minor Repairs TERRI.,
1 % utilities Gatorwood
urgently- $60 +
resident holdovers Eternal and Ruth
UP 208 N.W.10 Ave. 377-5183
WItH ATUNE close call
deposits
to campus no
and the winter oledaes (J-1T-90-P)
10 OFF plugs, pts. cond. marlene 373-3735 anytime at all! (c-5t-
percent "This handful of dust, the earth it one = = =
ft labor thN F.b.28 88-p) home. let it be In unity." Baho'l
:::m:: J I
1952 N. MAIN ST. PHONE 372-5247 HELP. WANTED Writings (J-1T-90-C)

Female to deliver new Corvette during Quality leatherwork never wears out -
spore time. Must be attractive and a it always wears In. MaSanDu we
competent driver. For Interview call 372- specialize In custom leatherwork LWCII DINNER
8152. (F.-10T-9Q.P) purses, belts, coots, (jackets, sandals,
SUMMER POSITIONSFine travel bags. If it can be mode of leather, 1 11AM-3PM ALL DAY
we can make it to suit you. .MaSanDu, FOR FOR I
positions for men in New England 1 1131 W.University Ave. open 10am-6pm
IT WILL Monday thru Saturday, by appointment
summer camp for boys ((47tK year). 89 $1.39
Extensive aquatics program ((26 WSI Sundays & evenings, 373-7470. ()j-sp-74-

staff) openings for swim Instructors; C)"

soiling; waterskiing; kayaks; canoeing. WANTED: succulent red-blooded 10% STUDENT DtSCOUHT
Also, experienced tennis Instructors ((14 virgin for dinner with dark-haired
courts), Other openings.. Campus Interviews Rumanian Count. Call after dusk: 376-
Travel allowance Only full 2794 or 373-5596(females only) ((j-3t-89- OPEN 11AMMIDNIGHTx
BE HERE resumes considered. Camp Mah-Kee- (p}) DAILY
Noc, 137 Thacher Lone, South Orange 18055W 135T .,?".......rr.. ....
N J. 07079 ((201-762-3536)) (3T.90-P) Gay men and women meet Thurs at 7
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ti I.



The Independent '\'" :


Florida Alligator / SPORTSI : ;"- ",

W.dn.adoyFebrvory 26, 1975,Page IS





I Hancock not cocky-iust confident Iby I



PAT McGRATII I. I -

Alligator Sports WriterConfidence..Assurance "We expect to win every time we tee it up in a tournament.

We're not cocky, just confident. It comes from success and

playing together as a team."
; Belief in one's own abilities", Ironically, it has been ..
winning on an individual basis that
That's how Webster defines the magical word that breeds ..
Hancock has had sf r r x
trouble
Since final in
success to those who characterize it. achieving. a round 69 p YQ4 4 a.
the Falstaff Amateur last the 5-Foot-9
HOWEVER, IF close inspectors of the UF year 160-pound
golf scene were junior has
been in contention to win innumerable times. He
permitted to coin their own interpretation of the term, it no finished 2nd in the NACC last June 4th in the'SunnehannaPa.
doubt could read: Confidence-'Thil Hancock." .
( .) Invitational, made the semi-finals in the Western, placed8th
Hancock plays and speaks with all the
self-assurance you in the Southern, 10th in the Easter, 5th at Ohio State this
might expect.of a guy who has been a bulwark on BusterBishop's '
past fall, and 8th in the Dixie Intercollegiate.
Gator Golf team from the .
'
moment he came to Always a problem or two has arisen to keep victory from his
Gainesville in 1972. As a freshman, the
smiling sandy-haired grasp. but by no means has this affected his highly positive "
youngster from Greenville, Alabama stepped right into the outlook."I E .

pressure packed college scene and won his very first tour FEEL I'm playing well enough to win. It seems that I w. .. ,

nament, the Placid Lakes Invitational.That always run into a bad hole or a bad nine holes" he says :.

year Bishop had Gary Koch Andy Bean. Ben matter-of-factly. "Sometimes breaks will beat you. Take last t,

Duncan, and Woody Blackburn returning from the previous years NCAA. I was tied with Gary (Koch) for the lead and .'.,

years' SEC championship team and was looking (much the Curtis(Strange from Wake Forest) makes an eagle on the last .
same as he is this year),f for a solid player who could in and "
step hole to win by one. You know what can you do? he asked i, .'
the team make a strong challenge for the NCAA .;.
help title. nonchalantly. "Look at Forrest Fezler and Tom Watson onthe ,
HANCOCK FILLED in perfectly. He shot 210, six under tour. How many times did they finish second before they :;

par, for the first three rounds of the NCAA Tournament and won?" ".,

was within f tour shots of tourney leader Ben Crenshaw. On the When he speaks of his'many near-victories there's not the ,"

linal day, he balooned to an 86 but since the four best scores slightest trace of frustration in his voice. A Phil Hancock S.

of each day were the ones that counted, it didn't matter for victory is inevitable and he knows it, but being an easy going
.1
the team total. He had already done his damage and the relaxed type of guy, he is not about to lose any sleep over whenor photo _by chip hires }

Gators coasted to the national championship.Now where. He talks about someday gaining a berth on the

two years later with Koch and Blackburn departed, Walker Cup team and taking a trip to the Masters as easily as GATOR GOLFER PHIL HANCOCK :

Hancock still exudes the confidence that was born during that youor, I would mention a trip to the supermarket. won his first collegiate tourney

historic week in Stillwater Oklahoma. Hancock ..
_. is not cocky just radiantly confident.
-
.
,

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.Gainesville, Florida Phon. 371 1971 Fill 1012 S. MAIN ST. 372.4341 .


,





I : I




ACADEMY AWARD NOMINEE "BEST ACTOR"Many NEW PATHS FOR ARTIST IN RESIDENCE : .

SELF ERY L __
.
of his 9 Jean Claude Van
Itallie. playwright/ of
fellow officers the modern theatre,
-i will be at the
I consider him University/ Florida. .
Y as an Artist In- .
the mostdangerous Residence from
March 2'a. During
f, <, < A series of Informal lecture- this time he will be
alive- discussions on various topics concerning conducting ..
man personal growth and workshops and
development. seminars/ creative ..
honest
an cop. ,
CONFRONTATION WITH DEATH writing acting and .
directing well as
AND REBIRTH
? In .
speaking mass
Graham Kosch. Ph.D., .
lectures and to Individual ..,
Clinical PsychologistWed. classes. In
..February 2t,7t30 to':30 p.m. 'i addition, there will "
Lounges 122 ft 133 ] be times when he will
FREt AND OPEN TO THI PUBLIC probably make
...
Sponsored by the J. Wayne Reitz, .ii:: himself available to :
All Union activities are free and open to Individuals I I I In.
and Student Mental
Union Health. Because attendance for most
the public. Lounges 122 & 123, :
Staff things is limited,registration by phone will JWRU, depending on i
be held beginning February 17 on a first- his time. ;
FLEA MARKETJ. come. ,first-served basis.
A MIIAMOUNT RELEASE
DING DI LAUilINTIII Actors Workshop. : Tues. (h Wed., March & 5
preMIUAI. limit:35 2:00-:00: : p.m., Ballroom
WAYNE RBTZ UNION COLONNADE JWRU.'Instructions: wear
... PACINO"BEllPlCDnProcMed SATURDAY, MARCH, 10:00 a.m. to work clothes or leotardsand i
IALT.nd soft soled or ballet
WALDO 4:00
by MARTN eREOMAN[)acted by SIDNEY WMIT Sc i."pMY by TNEODORAUS p.m. shoes. _
NORMAN WEla/w 8eMd on tile book by PETER MAM Musoc by MMCIS Advance registration for tables required You Creative Writing Seminars Mon. & Tues. March 3 & 4
o-.w........._M .._.....rti,_ Color by nCHNlCOlOA"" Ii p.--.c I NIN .ft\ may register 'In Room 930, JWRU beginning limit: 20 10:00-12 Noon; Ballroom,
[H@I I. : :. March 3 through March 7 from 9:00 to '4:30. .. JWRU.instructions: Bring
---.:" Student tables -'FREE.,non-students tables notebook and pencils. _
Director's Workshop: Thurs,March 2:00.4:00: : pm
table. Phone 392-1655 'for In-
$2.00 per more limit: 20 Frl March 110:0012 Ballroom
formation. JWRU Instructions: wear
work clothes or leotardsand

Thurs., Feb. 27 6:30: ; 9:30: shoes.soft soled or ballet
We request that' Interested people not sign/ up 7w
Fri. March 1 5:00: ; 8:00: ; unless '
& Sat., Feb. 28 & 1. They are sure they will attend.
2. They can attend for all total hours a
& 11:00: 2nd Floor Aud. 50 cents workshop will run. For example: 10:0012
.
Noon both Monday and Tuesday. >




.:q.



...

".
4,

Ng 16,thalnda.dent Rorida Alligator,Wdndoy,February 2A, WS I I'I'I'


I U F netters try to beat -.., ..Y --HOMI ,HUNTERSw. tThe CPek ect Q t tv4

hlCatqlJetg
.con help you/find a homt. ( \ )
oporlmcnf mobll horn,or
E weather Furman todayBy oorrfmott the aty way! 1008 of varieties

OUR FEE IS REFUNDABLE: 1000's of violets

KEITH CANNON UF's tennis season Monday, (Ga.) State was rescheduledfor : JOEL R. BRIDGES.II II from. $1.00 up
'Alligator Sports WriterThundershowers but the Gators will try again next Monday afternoon in
the
today when they host Fur- Valdosta. REALTOR 404SW4ihAv.. Violet House
put a THE WASHOUT not only Open 7 Da*,,17:00: 377670Q '. Open 9-6pm: 15 JSE 4th Ave 377-8465

literal damper on the start of man.The match with Valdosta delayed the start of the Besld.( the Tenneco Station( on S. Main
.. .. .. .. .. ''' .. .. ''' '"
season, but it also marked the Ibm : --
-
_____
fourth straight day the UF .hh"'hhm. m

.: British invade players have not been able to -

practice or play due to bad
weather. Coach Bill Potter WESTSIDEEjfcON

rugger domainToday doesn't feel the layoff will

hurt his team. "We've' been

at 5:30: p.m. the UF rugby team will host two teams working a long time," he said. '$14.95 3325W.Univ.r rr$14.95

from the British aircraft carrier H.M.S. Ark Royal. The game "A few days shouldn't make Phone .

will be played at Schnell Field which is located next to the law too much difference." 24 Now WICCN111SI/1VICa;
!school. About the Furman fiii M}

The first team from the "Ark Royal" have been the British Paladins, Potter said, "They .... JACK'S. 20 POINT ANNUAL'

.' Navy rugby champions in the past. usually have a good team. It SERVICE SPECIAL,
"
t1 This weekend the Florida should be a fine match.
past ruggers lost to the Winter
Tr Park Rugby Club by a 12.4 score. Bill Roberts scored the lone Match time is 2:30: p.m. .at 1. CLEAN AND TIGHTEN BATTERY CONNECTIONS. .,'r: .

{ try ((4 points) for the Gators. The UF rugby "B" team lost to the UF tennis courts, located 2. INSPECT BRAKE SYSTEM ADJUST BRAKES (DRUM TYPE)':'. \

the Melbourne Rugby Club, by a 20-4 score with Mark west of Fraternity Row by the 3. PACK FRONT WHEEL BEARINGS(DRUM BRAKES)

'ti... Campbell scoring a try for the Gator'ruggers.SCOREBOARD. Holland Law Center, 4. PRESSURE TEST COOLING SYSTEM T
5. TEST COOLANT AND ADD FOR 50150 MIXTURE ? ..
INTRAMURALS 8. INSPECT WIPER BLADES AND CHECK OPERATION
.q 7. TEST W/S WASHER OPERATION FILL RESERVOIR

The deadline for sign up for 8.' CLEAN AND INSPECT BRAKE HOSES .
the Men's and Women's 9. INSPECT AND ADJUST ALL BELTS *

Doubles Tennis Tournamentis 10. INSPECT AIR CLEANER AND BLOW OUT' ,r:' .
Feb. 28. The event will be 11. INSPECT AIR CONDITIONING SYSTEM FOR LEAKS AND FREON
12. LUBRICATE CHASSIS
held March 89. For
NIA more 13. CHANGE OIL (IF NECESSARY)
N.M..MV1 .44,51IUTII.
.
CMOIINCS. ...._ IRt"R' at.NI44,5,5au.N1. information contact the 1M 14. CHECK ALL LIGHTS FOR PROPER OPERATION
N I .... IN .II...l.W Y441' .A 55.M.15MIIL *IA.,5 office 229 Florida Gym 392- 15. CHECK ALL FLUIDS
5"M .1 11.15. Yltll.1 04554
11111.1..... ,.,. II N 31 II........ 110111.11511I lit 0581. 16. INSPECT ALL TIRES FOR CUTS BRUISES,WEAR '..
CMWI...It. It.... 11 Jennings 2 won the all- 17. INSPECT POWER STEERING SYSTEM FOR LEAKS V ,.t':
._,...,. TMtM T*WtV. Oil*flrilMM* I.IM .
N ".11' ,,., 18. "
... I. Mr.MM"v 5.1511 (I.1 dormitory bowling INSPECT FRONT SUSPENSION FOR SAFETY '
c. 5a. n ".Jr' 11 .._. campus ,
Mw11M"tIR' II 1II II...f5" 1.1t 1115 61._,_661t ON.M NNM II M I IMd...*MIMI l4* ....PMlltl....,. tournament last week. Area 19. INSPECT SHOCKS FOR LEAKS AND WEAR". '"
.... D".R tI II.1" ,.,. "
/LWI1. 115 TN 20. ROAD TEST CAR .: .
NI/5155 CONOIIINCI .. _.._ '" winners which competed for ."
44/1.55$ M54.45. Leal...... 15.1 W '
CMcmIMU $7 n.U' 'the ,' b
6. N.N15I M III championships were: "
CII*OMMOMrMI $57.07 ..
UCLA 1W IM
n 5.MM .. _.. ... "
... I IN Little Hume Newins
1 5$111.5$15 N 1 ,. H. CtrMIM 5.55. N 1M ; .'Oil, Parts and Coolant Additional .
,'.- 05$5$154444. .. ..._ .... ,
I" r
NWM .
..... Graham SouthG&l N.E.
.
/ ; ,
II.' t. .1 1115110 5$3 lit ;
...... .
.. 35 n. 1 91. / 505.5515. 535 ,.,' ELECTRONIC MOTOR TUNE UP WITH THIS SPECIAL' :, .
01155 North G&l I Tolbert FletcherR
5s Y.NI tit n. CN..M 141 'N ;
0,51155. 51 ".m It ,.. %. C441IfNI6.. Ma '
L" A54.1.1 II N.IM tilt 11.. Cr"111I. 1M 111 I I. Murphree; and Jennings '. 4 Cyl. Foreign Can $9.50+Parts ,\
11 N4411 C.r441. 161 15
All 11.. '..__11 r.... I.e I' 2. S.E 6 Cyl.American Cart $9.95+ Parts
55$1.1W11M I* 51.4,1 161 NN
.. 1011..1_ t>. Ornn H.l. It.* IiN. Today, the Orange 8 Cyl.American Cars 12.95+Parts
'er' M 11,111 U, PM AiMrWMI II Itfrt NNMIu1I League
IIMI. N II 11,315 15.514 lilt IM. *, N.W..IM ArtMMH 161. IIN. II Fraternity Bowling championships (with Air Conditioning$2.00 extra)
145..145 II 11,115 11 OHMT*rMMVlM .
YIryLII IC II.In II 415/vt ,CmiMwrv,1'CIIM/I.541I. 0.1..1.... will be held at the

a5 DI..I A/N551./ 15 5$155 INIIIIM M II II.II.$.... II_ .titrmtu..*.....N54...kmut........WI....1./.145....TMMtM... ...M......MiltVMM. .Mlttill U14554 .- JWRU lanes. Thursday, the NATIONAL CERTIFIED MECHANIC ON DUTY 7 DAYS A WEEK
n 51.5$1 5415 VtoC.CIIaIet...._ .. 07I1... 015.,5.Ylal Blue League will have its roll-
Nil.... MM 11.!_. T__ 1,55 MM.S .
.....
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ON. II $ $ II ToWM. MM I off.Seven teams will compete.

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Full Text

PAGE 1

The Independent Florida P st, d 1, onp mnuvh.ca.Ions Im Go Mdil. Fkndo Not officially ossoc'o~.d w~h ih. Unmve.wsy of Flondo WEDNESDAY FEB. 26 1975 VOL. 67 NO.89 Nearly 30 faculty to be cut Dy TOM SHRODEIt ABIS., Staff Writer UP deans will notify 20 to 30 faculty members this week that their contracts will not be renewed next year. In addition, the UF 1975 summer budget will be reduced by 25 per cent-565&OWreducing it to approximately the level of futiding for the 1973 summer quarter. UF INTERIM ViCE PRESIDENT for Academic Affairs Robert Bryan said the faculty salary budget must be trimmed by Sl.Smilliontomeet arqucubythefloardof Regents. The 20 to 30 faculty members contracts which will not be renewed next year are part of a 90 position cut required to meet the 1.5 million reduction. The College of Arts and Selaics, UP'. largest college, was forced to cut 32 of next years facuky positions, worth more the ssmom i~ sskrIus. BRYAN SAID TUE FACULTY HIDING frees that began Dec. lZ will continue throughout next year to enable UP to mat contmlttmeuits to the legislature. In addition to cutting salary expense by 1.5 mIllion. LIP may haveto return as much as 56 WHO In unspent salary money at the end snjar neeucu A~Se S~ WiSe, Honor Cowl Ally. 0n. Paul Mannish. who .dll net be at UF next quartet requested that a succeuw bevitosa, this week to take over the luwetlgatlon of cheating in the College of Dame. Admlnimarslon. Haste, Cowl Charnel I. Robert Harris told Marmish he would appoirn a meager within th. week at a meting Tuesday with UF adminisaratsn and Honor Court officials. I'VE M~3 tHU mistakes and I will own up to them. bug I -ally cars about Is that ci the year. Normally, state universities must return 2 to 2.5 per cent of salary appropriations to the state at the end of the year. BRYAN SAID HE COULD SEE NO "philosophic basis" for continuing the practice in a year when universities arc already facing drastic budget cuts, but he said the lepislaturemight require it any way. Bryan said he was able to cut 52 positions by freezing openings due to retirement, death or transfer. -. TUE 23 PER CENT REDUCflON of the 1915 summer budget will cut another 37.5 positions. Dryan said. Only 20 to 30 posItions must be eliminated by not rehiring faculty who presently hold interim appointments or have beat at UP fri less than one yen. interim faculty and first year professors art the only position that can be terminated wIthout one yea? u notice. UP IPfl 33 IN AFfiRMATIVE Action Coordinator Dorothy Nevifle said the hiring frees and dismissal of first year faculty will preclude meeting goals for the hiring of women and minorlti. She said she will follow the situatIon carefully to monitor the impact of the budget policies on women and minority faculty presently at UF. photo by edt eons. HM1WS mist us. often have bluer mummies M drodc polittal rupemico. but as lmmlgrflon officials crack dswn oath. refugee who breve the w weiss of t. Allude l corn. g Fiends's door. thee m.Mo4e, loom shoed as futemdmig.rs -well. For on In-depth InvedIgallon of lb. Hollies end their plight, see mpnIal upon page eIght See related a*w,~. pqe tine the job gets dose." Mannish said. explainIng his reasons for warning a succeac, appointed now. Much of Tuesday's meeting dealt with errors that have been made in the in'sagation and internal problems between Mannish. Harris and amid Deft,. Couuuel Bryan Pen. Also diseased at Tuesdaf s meeting were the problems the Hans Court was aperlencing under a circuit court injunction An additional 20 positions may be eliminated to Mive UFaSl34.O~head start iii meeting next year s budget requirements and to return II special faculty positions funded by the legislature for this year only. BRYAN TOLD A TUESDAY meeting of the Council of Vice Pnsidents that cuts will include the elimination of funds for the Urban and Regional Development Center and reductions in the Center of Latin American Studs and the Office of Instructional Resources. UP's Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences and I. Hillis Miller Health Center are budgeted separately and are not directly ef&cted by the cuts. bmw. the health center agreed to ~y for S*3,OO0 worth of faculty salaries I,, biomedical engineering that are presently handed by the severely cut general education budget. halting all dosed hearings and trials. and what the adulaMySlo. could do to h4 MASSE and Pserusi charged Mannish with net cooperating with the other members of the Hone, Court and of taking too mud, responsIbIlIty on himself. Warmish egged thee l.S boa a "baskdown In commualcatlon" Is the Hence Court. but stressed that betas th. peso. that should have eel of the lnveslgstlons. ".4 the chaugcelIo, or the defense counsel. Murniimh and Harris also cAshed ci, the (See Marnujak' pqe five) ROIST BRYAN .11.5 millIon muatb.ftlmm.d UFsenotors endorse establishment of PIRG Dy LESLIE GOLAY Alipta Staff WElter The student Senate unanimously passed two resolutions Tuesday endorsing the establishment of a Public Interset Research Group (PIRG) on campus. Vice President for Student Affairs Arthur Sandeen told P1KG representatives earlier Tuesday that it was up to the Student Senate to decide if UF's student body wants PIRO on campus. SENATORS approved a resolution supporting the validation of P1110's two-year old signature petition. and another supporting PIRO and urging the UF administration to aid in its implementation on campus. Student Senate President Kevin Malone, who drafted the two resolutions, and PIRO President Roxanne Marietta explained to Senators PIRO's proposed handing system and the type of issues the group is involved in. Speaking for the petition's validation, Malone said. 'I think it's grossly unfair that snyose who has long-term plans fo, this unIversity can be put off for so 1ong. The desires and needs of students are Still the same. (iF PRESIDENT RODENT Q. Marston. informed of the Senate's decision late Tuesday night, said. "I would guess Sands, will do as he said he would do. Iwiligo along with what Sandeen says. The next thing to do is to hear from the Senate.' At the earlier meeting Sodas told three P1110 representatives. Malone and two SO representatives that "If the general sense of the student body right now says that ths (P1KG) is a good thing that that would be sufficient as far as Pm concerned." IN ORDER FOR PUG to be established as a student-handed group on campus, the Board of Regents required signatures of 51 per cent of the student body. PIRG completed a petition which fulfilled these requirements in February 1Q73. Sandeen previously decided P1110's petition was not valid because it was two yeafl old. and not representative of the present student body. "I am suggesting that the Student Senate speak to this issue as a group." Sandeen said. "If the senate is a representative group that is recognized, and it feels that the student body knows about PIRO and what's involved. then I will listen to that." Sandeen said. WHEN MALONE ASKED Sodeen what he would say if the Student Senate passe a resolution saying the petition Is okay. San dee,, answered. "lm not totally inflexible. I will certainly consider it." Sandeen said his new decision to listen to the Saute's vote on P1KG ii "obviously a coin prom 155. Sandeen told the PIRO representatives. "We've spent enough time fiddling around and lm'ytryou, but this petition was made before I came to UP. It's time to move sead." "My obligation is to the large number of students who weren't here when the petition was made," Sandeen explained. Sandeen volunteered to p before the Senate Tuesday night to speak on PIRG but his offer vs deviled. IF TUE PInTION IS VALIDATED, P1MG would be funded under an affirmatIve voluntary he systun which requires that at least 25 per cent of the studemtbodydoaetsSI per quarts. nil, would not be a medafly bill. The etudes would have to chat "yes" at the time student fees are -to be unsaid the SI. PING Is a conswnr activist poop which deals with projects on the local. Sate and nation loS. 'The group deals with student righa, bank studies. ladlord.tmmaat law, and urns dIscrImluatIp. and various other eas PING pays for the aid and advice of proftuslwu.Js dudn the seem of thsfr propS. Marmish asks court for successor

PAGE 2

P.g. 2, Th. Ind.0.4.o* Ro.lde Milgar. W.dn.d.y. February 26, ?975 wecir >escioy ~LAN Fdor capsule Car prices cut as sales jump DETROIT (UPI) -American Motors Corp. Tuesday followed the lead of General Moton and cut prices by as much as $196 on ~me models to spur sales once cash rebates end Friday. AMC announced the action to prevent a post-rebate sales 'lump in March just as the industry reported rnid*February new car sales missed matching last years level by only 210 cars -one-tenth of one per cent. It was the closest autor,,akers have come to matching a year-ago pace since the 1975 models were Introduced last fall. Demos force oil vofe WASHINGTON (UPI) -House Democrats voted 153 to 4S Tuesday to force a House vote on whether to kill the oil depletion allowance. the depletion repeal wotild he attad~ed to a pending S21.3 hithon tax-cut bill which is tentatively scheduled for House floor action on Thursday. Ford charges with energy HOLLYWOOD. Fla. (UPI) -President Ford accused Congress Tuesday of taking a gamble on energy that threatens America with disaster. By voting so suspend his increase in oil :n~port fees and by tailing to enact a national energy program. 'Congress is enibarked on ona massive gamble -a risk of increasing this nation s vulnerability to future embargoes which we cannot alTord7 Ford said in a speech prepared br delivery to a White House-sponsored conference on domestic aiThirs and the economy. Sot~r. the onjy legislative move Congress has taken onthe energy problem was to block my proposal to increase tariffs on oil imports. This is a purely negative action which will tbrce me to use the constitutional power of veto for the first time In the 94th Congress. In effect, the Congress voted to continue for the time being our ever-increasing dependency on Arab and other oilproducing nations, This course could lead America to disaster' The speech, opening two days of politics and golfing in this Miami suburb, mirrored the Harry S. Truman-type stumping Ford displayed in grass roots campaigns for his energyeconomic programs in Atlant, Houston and Topeka. Kan. in the past month. Congress gambling Aides say Ford can sustain veto HOLLYWOOD. Fla. (UPI) -President Ford was told by aides Tuesday he now has the votes in the Senate to sustain his promised veto of a bill suspending his oil tariff increases tar ) days. Presidential Press Secretary Ron Nessen told reporter~ aboard Air Force One en route here that John Marsh, White House chief of Congressional liaison, and Max Friedersdort White House legislative lobbyist. inlbrmed Ford during a morning n~eeting with his energy advisers that they are now convinced they have enough votes to sustain a veto in the Senate and are picking up votes in the House. Nessen said Ford's response was: That is good news. The President has until next Tuesday to send his veto niessage to Congress or it will become law without his signature. There were indications the veto would be sent so Capitol Hill Friday. 0 MAAS BROTHERS On your coming job intwview,, make the vefy best impression with our coordinates from College Town In 100 percent polyester. Get it in our Junior Sportswear Ama. -at Mao. Brothers, of course. COLONY SHOPS SHOE SALON Her.'. ft. Iotnt si$. from Bar. Trap. .0 gmat platform wedge with soft eater upper,, in camel or brown, just 621.001 Mdo new twist from Greece that II keep your feet coolby Red Hot In navy brown and white. $2800. U

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Th. Ind.p.n&nt florid. AJlIgatr, W.dn.M.y, P.brvory 2', jUL P.rS Act may make UF 'grindtoaha It' By TOM SI! RODER AllIgator Staff Writer UP may have rn comply with the Adniinistrative Procedure Act APA) beginning neit week, an event LJF Vice President for Academic Affairs Robert Bryan said could "grind UP to a halt. The law would require UP to publish the agenda of all meetings at which policy matters would be considered three weeks prior to the scheduled niecting. IN ADDITION, UF must publish rules for operating pr&edure and justify each policy on the basis of state law. UP Attorney Ton, Riggs said. The Board of Regents legislative committee will meet March 5 to decide it state univer''ties have to comply '. di the APA immediately. Riggs said C the legislative comn~ittee did not order mi mediate corn pliance, the legislature would probably pass a law specifically requiring universities to coply this '.prliig REP. CARROLL WEBB, D-Tallahassee. acting director of the Adni in strative Procedure Committee, has said that universities are not exempt from the APA. However. Riggs said Webb told him he was itillimig to consider requests for specific exeniption for certain areas of university operation. State Senate President Denipsey Barron. U-Panama City, author of the APA, said the intent of the legislation was to nrevcrt 'tate igeticies Ironi making tile; having the effect ot legislation thout approval tioni the legi~lat ore. iirS EXECUTIVE STAFF discussed the problem at a Tuesday meeting. Biggs asked then, to review all policies and procedures and to compile a list of areas where compliance "Id~ the act would cause severe difficulties. UF President Robert 0. Marston asked Riggs to draft a letter to University System Chancellor Robert Maut, expressing UP's hope that state universities would not be instructed to comply with the APA until the legislature specifically required it. However. Riggs said he believed that Mautz and Chancellor-designate FT. York both wanted the universities to comply 'nimediately. Penalty hours are not appropriate says task force By LINDA WISNIEWSKI AilIgabr SWE Wit., The Task Force on the Student Judiciary discussed Monday a list of preliminary proposals" which includes elimination of penalty hours in favor of a 'public reprimand" for Honor Court offenders. The task force, headed by law professor Michael Gordon. discussed the idea of a publicc reprimand' as the lowest penalty for Honor Court violations, although no definite niethod of making the offenders' names public was agreed upon. 1113 TASK FORCE has agreed that penalty hours "are not appropriate" in light of the Board of Regaits ruling that it is unlawful fbr students to register for more hours than they need to graduate. because it would require more funding ftoin the state. The task force also suggested student problems be split into two separate areas. The Honor Court would handle problems dealing with academic dishonesty among UP students, and the Student Conduct Con,niittee, headed by task force niember and Director of Student Judicial Affairs Rob Densen. would handle other student problems such as ticket scalping and passing bad checks. TEE COMMItTEE also agreed that UP faculty should be involved in the Honor Court. although they could not agree on the form of the involvement. Craig Mitchell. Honor Court representative on the task force, said that students would raise objections against having a faculty member on the Honor Court hearing cornmnittee because "a faculty member would tend to repress students. "I want as much faculty input as possible without ruining the student image of the Honor Court." Mitchell said. THE TASK FORCE ALSO agreed to incorporate the Administrative Procedures Ad (APA) as the framework" of the Honor Coon, rather than using the florida laws of criminal procedure. The purpose of using the APA as a 'framework" for the Honor Court is to provide reasonable guidelines for adninistrative hearings and to provide a fair hearing by due process through law," Gordon said. The task force also recommended the APA should be used as the "framework' for the Honor Court so that it will not get "bogged down" in problems of legal technicalities. THE TASK FORCE will meet again on March 3 to draft its final recommendations. It will be 'a couple of weeks before the final recommendations will be decided on. Cordon said. The 16 member task force was formed by Vice President for Student Affairs Arthur Sandeen and interim Vice President tbr Academic Affairs Robert Bryan. Sandeen and Bryan asked the task force to also explore the traffic rout, the student conduct committee, and the student housing council. Gordon said The task force was asked to determine if the Honor Court insured equal handling of all students, Mitchell said. We want to make sure the Honor Court isn't just a police group. We want all of the students to get a fair shake," he said. [he committee was also asked to determine if the Honor Code should be continued. decentralized, revised or eliminated. Mitchell said. DEMPSEY BARRa.J author of APA act

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p.o. 4Th. tnd.~nd.m* Rend. AJIIgoor. W.dn.day F.brv.vy 24, 1975 Students a By DEBBIE ERICKSON Alliga. SuN Writer Audiology and Speech Pathology students toniplarned Tuesday about the overcrowded classroom situation and deterioration of the qualityot their education to Arts and Acience Dean CA. Vanderert. Last Oct. 30 Speech Pathology and Audiology students presented a petition to Dean VanderWerf calling for smaller class qn, more space and facilities in the speech and hearing clinic, and at least one clinical supervisor to oversee the performance of student-clinicians. Tuesday was the lint time students had any contact with the administration about the petition "WE'RE NOT GOING TO turn out professional people if we don't have enough teachers, time and space, Marcia MacFarland. 4AS, said. Edward Hutchinson, acting speech department chairman, said. Currently there are only six professors in the speech pathology and audiology department. We have approximately 300 undergraduate students and over 90 graduate students in the departiiicnt." Approximately I fit) graduate students will apply for the graduate program and only IS will be accepted. Hutehinson said. VandcrWerf said then are two alternatives to the overcrowding situation. "ThE DEPARTMENT can get together with people in clinical work at the department of communicative disorders and ask them to teach more classes than they already do. If this is impossible. we will have to cap enrollment If the department restricts enrollment. there will be nowhere in the state that a Mautz State University System Chancellor Robert Mauti has icr all practical purposes accepted UF President Robert 0. Marstons answer to the dilemma of 600 freshmen admitted in excess of a Board of ReRents ceiling. Marston proposed that rather than he denied lbnds br those 600 sophomores next year, 600 fewer sophomore transfers will be admitted in September. "For .11 practical purpose, the decision has been wade." said Mautz. "We're just rgr CA. VANCUtWUF Arts and ScIence dean qualified graduate student can go. VanderWerf said. Students should realize that the department is funded on the number of students we have. The less students we have, the less money we will receive." he said. HUTCHINSON SAID the number of students enrolled in the department is up. but the level of funding is down. The department will be reviewed this summer to detennine if it will receive mccteditation again. Hutchinson said. 'There is a very good chance we will receive a severe warninR or be discredited. solution waiting on figure,." Although UF admissions officials aid Sunday there was a good chance UF would exceed the 2.9W limit on entering freshman again this year, Mauti said he did&t think it would happen again except as the "result of simple human error. UP Executive Vice Pnuidaxt Harold Hanson said from current figures. UF will 'try to hit 700" sophomore admissions. Last year, 1.318 were admitted. he said. MIKE'S hdae -Rpm Macrn ~w Oowntcwn tilLs. S.,,, 'St.' Tb. lndpnd.rd Florida AJIIS.r I.e publ.co'on of Coinp.a Camn.unklcdi nco,~ot,.d. a private, non-reEl. cmpochiofl ~ S publltwd liv. tIw.~ wnk iv MC* dtw4n~ jufle. July. cr4 Augut who II's ~biiAS semi. w.kiy, a~nd d.rlng u&nt IwWow ond *mompalod. OpdnIoflh*.r.ss.dln 0*. independels Aikgao. e. *ose of 0%.' edna. of 0,. writers of *.4~ onlci. end na $,cnof'M University f FlorIda, ibe campus ad by *e Ind.pr4e~4 Florida Afl1. Adtes cww.n~ den'. *0 The 'n*p.Me.' Florida AIIhga*0', P0 km 1S4, UnlnnJy i.s.o. GoineviIl., Field. 32601 The ind.nndent Florida AIII., is entered -second clan mate a. 0,. UnIted 5.o4 Poe O$Ict 04 G.ne.ville, Fb.d. 320 Sobsai.i.n a.,. a $20.U p.r yew or 5550w ~uw1r Sulk subscflp.Iorw ore provided $n&4' sod.M gcvnin.c fgr he M ~. University of Florida Th nda~ndent Florid. Allis. OW '.N to ie.Mw. the WOGO#~k.J lane of oil otvwtis.mdts and Ic revig. -'urn owoy oil ~ is c.nuld.rs a~jtc anti. The Ind.pe.~d.rd Florida Alligator WIN -'amid. od1utn,.nft of part Mr any odverilseftenhs .nvalvlOg ypowo*$ol en. q' rrocn. In. .oti@fl uflle notice is qve, I. 0, odnn.s'ng n.ricg.r wi*ln 'IdeyS. tie odveit -meet ft. isdependert Fond. AUipe wIll -k reeponsIble I.' -. Own -. h.t Insertion a# On adflflhgegtM sce4d.d te tun .vetl time. evance~ accepts I CARNIGRAS 75 LARGEST MIDWAY EYELID SPECTACULAR RIDES. FREE ORCUS. SPECIAL ADVANCE TICKETS 5 for $1 Avuable: Rebel Discount. Univeiuity Box Office, fraternities & soauuitiss.

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iN I~ EI(MI'i'~ ci'i'~ 'nt ~ LIE AHTRAK-PIANF:.snEp T 923 W. Uninmlty Ave. GaInesvIlle, No. 32601 At2, ~1 NOTARY PUBLIC 1219 W. University 373-2505 Pat Mondoza JUST SITTING AROUND? Move forward wIth Peach Coups ond VISTA U. ~@ur coiI*g. dogro. nO croohyt m.oningtu~ way A VSO' hfl ViSTA or 2 year. *n Corps w41i odd a un.qu* dimension 'a your Iii. and a hv. of $bos you lb. h.Ip'ng Pooc. Corps and VISTA oft., moro ton 700 choices of voiuntnr onsgnrn.nft fl U S A Afruto Asic ts~'n Am.rco and i~. Sojj$, Pacific Th. progrurn. ore in ogn.cuiiur., bus4nfls educofion archi~ecu,. *ng'nnr'ng, ow igb.roi cr1,. horn. economics, ors A croft VO(t hanoi dtjcoflon and many at., field~ Sifliq .rtad in.wh.r. And ,uflf vow coit n.,*. ch.il.4.p. 1. ** P.a ~~VflIA mavi.n a ~.& 2*27., 9%. C.I.nn.4. .r in *.MM 1 III.ryW.t. Clearance sale Dresses C it (P.9 Were ag~io~. $30.00 CVC~Lfl9 WQQft $10 day about town 112 OFF more on '2the store. savings on 5g 60k Groat Cvc/(tA SIZES 3 TO 18 GYPSY 1638 W. University Ave Open 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. Sat. 10 am. tQ 6 p.m. 4 U,. Ind.p.nd.n~ Florid. AllIgator, Wedn.d.y, F.bnrnry fl, 3975 Pc. Marmish f/to,,, pagc ',ne) uture of the heating Investigation. MARMISH SUGGESThO the Honot Court turn over its investigation to a studentt faculty task force because people thank the Honor Court has been paralyzed by the circuit court injunction against closed hearings and trials. He said the task force would nor have as ,iuch trouble getting students and faculty members to turn in evidence or to compel 'utnesses to testify. Harris and Petersen disagreed, saying they thought the Honor Court should continue to have jurisdiction over the cheating investigation. "A JASIC FORCE, as far as I an' concerned. could do nothing that the Honor Court could not do. Harris argued. Marnish said the task three, because it would be made up of more than one person. would not be as vaulnerable to personal threats. Marnish said defendants had threatened him with bodily harn~ and with political pressure. which he said would not be as eftective if there were more than one or two l)eople at the head of an investigation. OFFICIALS also considered the problem of what can be done about charged students who were planning to graduate this quarter, but whose status is uncertain because no closed hearings can be held to determine penalities under the temporary injunction, WHAT'S I By STEVE PROCKO Alligator 51.1! WrIter ECKANKAR SATSANG: will have a discussion group tonight at 7:30 in the I. Wayne Reitz Union. room 333. TRANSCENDENTAL MEDITATION: introductory lecture tonight at Sin Little Hall. room 205For further information call 3727550. PIZZA PARTY: for all Citizen Advocates at Leonardo's Pizza today at 5:30 pin Admission $1.00 For further information call 378-1409. ASTROLOGY LECTURE: by David Cochrane will be held this evening from 8 to 9:30 at the Hillel foundation. $1.00 donation. For further information call 372-2900. tiC STUDENT COUNCIL: Will nect today at 4:30 in Little Hall, room 117. Open to all interested students. For further in formation call 392-8807. PARK FORMATIONS: Inglis and Avon parks will be discussed by Dr. Anthony Pandano tonight at 8 in Floyd Hall, room 213. For further information call 392-2233. STUDENT SUPPER: will be held at pm. today at 320 W. University Ave. Donation $1.00. For further information call 372.8183. It (ThCF to 'uggested that the Honor Court the Office ot' Student AtTar~ turn the ntorinauon about graduating students who might have been involved in the cheating. but LIF Atty. Ton, Riggs said that UF might run into IOnIC legal problen~s. Biggs said UF would have to take the hatter of the graduating students conipletely out of the Honor Court.' "WE WOULD HAVE TO ElSE only the resources of the Office of Student Affairs and not the resources of the Honor Court. Biggs explained. Rob Denson, director of student conduct, said he didn't know if student affairs could ake over the tnve~tigatmon and decide on penalties while the injunction was still in effect. Meanwhile, we don't want to do anything that might go against the Injunction." Denson said, adding an appeal against the injunction has been tiled by Biggs. A DATE HAS NOT been ~et for the appeal, but Benson said he hoped it niigh be heard in the next couple of weeks. In addition to asking that a successor be appointed this week. Marnhish instructed Riggs to start making a complete record of the investigation so his successor would know what to do. Marmish said he was going to start phasing out of the investigation within the next two weeks." and said, 'I am wilting to be an advisor, but I am not going to run this thing by myself anymore HAPPENING BEAM UP TO THE TOWERS: Thursday for a meeting of S.T.A.R.: the Star Trek Association for Revival from 5-7 p.m. in the Flowers TV room. For further information call 392.8784. CIRCLE K'ERS: will meet Thursday at 6 p.m. in I. Wayne Reitz Union, room ISOC. Nominations for officers will be held. For further information call 392-1678. PRAYER AND FELLOWSHIP: by InterVarsity Christian Fellowshtp will be held Thursday at 4:30 p-rnin the I. Wayne Rein Union room 122. For further information call 378.0759. YOUNG DEMOCRATS: will meet thursday at 7:30 p.m. in the J. Wayne Reitz Union. For further information call 373.2271. ALACIJUA ALCOHOLISM PROGRAM: will meet Thursday at 8 p.m. in the Veterans Administration Hospital Directors conterenee room. FILM SOCIETY: will meet Thursday at 9 I' ll~. In the J. Wayne Rear Union. room 363. For further information call 392-6798. SIMULATED COMBATEES: The Siniulated Combat Club will meet Thursday at 7:30 p.m. in the ]. Wayne Rein Uniow, room 346. For hhither information call 3783434. PATHWAY MOVEDIIII AND iTh CELEBRATING WITH A 510111 A L EOt4~ ART r20 to so% OFEt SUPPLY 11* 'm~s-s::i :~'jjtj~~ fek 24 thru 2Q29NW13thST. mrch ii t e ENSUE EACYSRY

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PW.4.Th.Ind.nnd.otNodd.MII,.tv. W.dn.d.y, P.brvory 24 EDITORIAL 0 Mistakes Student justice at UP is increasingly taking on the appearance of an ineptly played charade with the Itycs and careers of countless UF students hanging in the balance. But the charade may be coming apart at the seams, as witnessed by the bickering between Honor Court Chancellor Robert Harris and Atty. Gen. Paul Marmish that bubbled to the surface yesterday in the office of Vice President for Student Affairs Art Sandeen. Dressed up for the benefit of an Alligator reporter -who attended the meeting over the strident objections of Harris -the problem between the two law students basically boils down to a case of glory hogging. Harris, and Honor court Chief Defense Counsel Byron Petersen. don't think Mannish has been cooperating with other members of the Honor Court in the investigation into alleged mass cheating in the College of Business Administration. They say Marmish hasn't been sharing information as much as he should with other members of the court. And the implied corollary we sense is that they don't think he's shared the headlines adequately either. But even more disturbing is Mannish's confessions that he has made "some mistakes" in handling the investigation. Since he's not going to be here next quarter anyway, Marmish nobly offers to begin training a successor to head up the cheating investigation as soon as possible. The most important point, however -which we obviously feel can't be overemphasized -is that with the cloak of secrecy surrounding the conduct of the Honor Court probe, it's impossible to tell the extent of the mistakess" committed by Marniish or anyone else in the student-run Honor Court. And it's impossible toassessthe damage to individuals and to justice caused by those mistakes. Of course, we've heard rumors. Just the other day. a reporter waiting in the Honor Court office witnessed two furious students who came roaring in. complaining they'd been accused of cheating in classes in which they were not even enrolled. Even earlier, Harris told us of a student who was granted immunity by Marmish, but was madvertantly called back and questioned in such a manner that he ended up on Harris' doorstep ~hysterical.' To his credit, Marmish has been willing to admit he's made "mistakes." And, in fact, it's perfectly understandable that Marmish and other members of the court would make mistakesAlthough most law students sound like they know more law than most Supreme Court Justices. the fad is they are inexperienced in the administration of justice. In the rush to get student help from the law school for his burgeoning investigation. we wonder how closely Mannish and Petersen were able to check the qualifications of the student counselors who represent alleged cheaters. All this, coupled with the fact that the Honor Court is part of a Student Government whose record in past years has been riddled with misfeasance, mandates public scrutiny of the Honor Court procedures -if they are to be kept in the domain otthe Honor Court at all. But the UP administration has refused to yield to the need for openness, and so the issue is in "real" court, with settlement perhaps a year away. In the meantime. how many more 'mistakes." due either to inerpersence or conflicts of fragile egos, will be made? And who will suffer because of them? -*1~4' ,,. Ii I Nr WELL fl KflAWW. WOAWWAt. The if DO if NO' C Media-bug wi you According to the latest unofficial surveys, taken completely at random. 99 per cent of all Americatis suffer from some type ot medical ailment. THESE FORMS of sickness have the peculiar tendency of only infecting the bodies of Americans. If you suffer from any of the following nialuises, run to your nearest supermarket or (Irug store and buy the latest commercially advertised cureall Ai~iericans ~ut1er from Excedrin headaches, the blahs. iron poor blood and the heartbreak of psoriasis. We are overweight, have that bloated feeling, suffer from occasional irregularity and have the drop. drop. drop of post nasal drip. Americans are plagued by ring-around-the-collar, static cling, enibarrasing warts and the frizzies. The 24 hour bug and dragon mouth also periodically wreak havoc on our unsuspecting population. SATIRE OUR BODIES ARE a breeding ground for a host of exotic tropical diseases we didn't even know, or care, existed. Americans are infested with the viruses Marcus Welby-itus, Medical Center-obia and the dreaded pestilence Ben Casey'a. Americans are victims of tennis elbow, trick knees, athlete's foot and Monday Night Football posterior. Yes, we Americans are in the midst of a massive media epidemic called hypochondria. What are the causes of these media-related diseases? Media-bugs lurk in the dark confines of your television set. Ihey remain dormant as long as the TV set is off. But if by chance an unwary viewer foolishly watches TV for a long AW Vfl~t. IWWHThEYD Q4~t RG4TIMGAtVJAST FIX iT! get you watching DOD DAVIDSON STAFF WRITINGS period ot time, the media-bugs mysteriously conic to life. THE MEDIA-BUGS leave the television screen and enter the human victin, through the eyes. The bugs blind the viewers conception of reality-removing his will to resist the advertising propaganda on the televislo. soften. The victim watches a comniercial showing a stomach being attacked by a puppet-ilu virus (Ilte infamous 24-Hour Bug). Has stomach becomes unsettled, he has that qucezy feeling My God. I need to buy 'ome Pepbo-bismo." the TV viev~cr 'bouts. The media-bug has him hooked. THE MEDIA-BUG conies in many forms and disguises be most common variety is the tension headache. You are watching a murder mystery on television. Will Kojac get hi' than? The suspense is head-shattering. Tensioti. Tension I PENSION! At the moment of climax. the screen switches to a Btifferiii corn mericial. Bufferin overcomes those daily tensions cu~t'd by stress and anxiety. It helps you relax, relax, relax." You run to the medicine cabins and take two Bufferin. The media-bug giveth the pain and the media can taketh away. YES AMERICANS, the new strains of media-bugs are being created every day in the laboratories of druM manufacturers and advertising offices. Before you rush out to buy Gain's scrubbing bubbles or Contact's tiny time capsules. ask yourself why you never heat about any casts of the blabs" or "medicine breath' outside of Amenca. If this article keeps you up at night. "take Somninel tonight and sleep, sleep, sleep.' r The Independent Florida Alligator CU Omnucan p hyld-Smit, SItc.'In-chiM hM N.m Nawa fiber T.M Wood Managing St. Lnyo.4M10, IA Tony K.ndzIo .Qpj~ Maa.aa, Je. V. Cook .AaIansO.w.l Ma Enlyn g ~ylnISrflv. ASSst Mn.Mslphnt. Sam Ms-apr i'm. M@ddeso. Acm~b,$ by MeG. Jr M Deem. bAne. -~ -I -kttm. C.Snr -t"-pm'sburn -UbS ft.6~ Mmq rz~L. U artu4na, a Chaos Ssaa.r Idon Jaws -, S~ AMSWS by C.inpmn CowiflufliGStIOflS. Inc P.O. km 1St Ualv.rsHy ma,, aawa nwsu .49kg. buI'dnd Sm Cdq. he, 173 Wa IhSnfly Mn. bSrcm am. cw ma fleds -flS Unties5 mid Aududn bwha adS I .4 keep on

PAGE 7

Th. Ind.p.ni.n' Morida AJIgator, Wedn.doy, F.bni.ry 2~, 1973. Pag.) Go for the Grade instead of the knowledge EDITOR: A~ one who has taken two law courses under Professor Stephen Stilt, I helse~e it s ndrcntivc ol our igid and superficial edUcational systeni to Cot1~i~tenI Iv eject alternative methods as means of change. hm.ever novel, such as the blanket grading system administered to Mr. Stints Legal Systems class (ut which I was not a member). Without blindly defrnding such an evaluation system. I think it is significant to speak to the season behind 'uch an elton MR. STITI'S methods may be unacceptable to the academic con~niunity. but his motives are more attuned to true Socratic philosophy and teaching than any other I have encountered in my traditional schooling. Gradegrubbing is the evil to be done away with and the Meal IS make the student curious jand intellectually challenged enough to want to know how the legal ruzrIe lbs together. But Professor Stitts conflict with the Holland Law Center acuity and accreditation standards is lust one example of a cancerous macro-problem in American education-a deep seated desire to go lot the grade instead of the knowledge to he gained. EDITOR: In a letter appearing in The Alligator last Wedneiday. Charles Pickett claims that big government is a "parasite on free production.' He bases his claim on the following premises: I) Government makes nothing. 2) Government employees make nothing. M Private companies pay all the cost of government. UNPOETENAmLY, Mr. Pickett has left out some relevant information. First, government is not supposed to "make" anything. Governments and their agencies are a service oriented inslit sit ion. Goveniniene eniployes do not try to 'make" things. Government janitors try to remove ~~non-essential" garbage (chewing gum wrappers, paper cups. cola containers. cigarette butts) from your public buildings and streets ADMINISTRATORS hire private companies to build roads, airplanes. tak,,, suns and bombs to protect private An old equalizer I lie c ni 4'' Dii i ades shows hos, ii ate, al sic s. C a I arc m ~elIish ignol unce of the teal Iruit ot college ~.hch lies in nqtlhtual lultillment and marunt~. Boy. you bette, make H .i ~ ade, %CCI1I% to hC IiW 1)10110 ot pave nts and die credo of the ~orkin~ ~. odd WE ARE SHOVED into the college box and are expected to pi 0(111cc. Productivity is acknowledged only by high marks 'ii that toni puter sheet that cones in the mail like a stocks market report. We are brilliant because we get an A.'' while Boio down the street is dumb tbr getting a C." It deestVt iiatter that ~e crammed for it. lied and cheated to get it. and nevermind about the courses per se. This is what iiiakes the gradations so ridiculous. They are supposed to show levels of achievement. but I suspect that achievement lies in some other area than the mastery of practical knowledge. I CAN'T SPEAK br Professor Stlu. but many would agree that grades have become such a farce that they are almost conll)lCtCly useless tot their intended purposes. It is a sad. but true, conclusion in America that In school, it is the grade that counts. corporations from foreign and domestic harm. Companies are paid by the government (with tax money) to make these products. Diploniats try to n~ake agreements with tbreign countries to prevent direct American involvement in costly wars like Viet Nam. thus, private businesses will not have a manpower shortage due to war losses. Government secretaries type income tax refunds to major oil company executives despite the astronomical profit these executives are n~aking at a time of economic recession. Then 'burdened" companies also benefit from a 27 per cent oil depletion allowance. It is a glaring fact that these large conipanies are strangling the American consumer and the American economy. IF MR. PICKET? does not like the way government employees are performing their jobs, maybe he should vote to replace the present appointed' administration. Glenn Mans, 31M I ~lo not pietend to be guihiess in all this, for this disease mouche~ es en one ot us in s arvin~ degrees. It is iiporant. 10W C~ Cr. to appreciate the decent and respectable motives of tilie like Pt otessor Stitt-i~iotives ~ hich are contagious to any ~tudenc ,. ho realizes that there has go be a better way. AS LONG AS ~e place such a priority on those grades. heating scandals wilt Ilourishandeoncerned people like Mr. Sort wll continue to be smothered in this mania of racing after the grade at any cost-save fbr the too dear price making an ellen to find out why' in spite Of-not because of Warren Kniskern, 3LW Start at bottom EDITOR: I'd like to know if the University's Afflrnative Action Coordinator is going rode anything for the average black nursing assistant or janitor, or for the female clerk or secretary stuck in a S6,WO year job. Or is he just going to ensure that highly trained. ,.ell 6vored females and blacks have a crack at upper level positions? Ihe job market for professionals is tight, but blacks and females have an advantage in it now. it' anything. It is blacks and females at the bottom who have yet to benefit from equal opl)ortunity. Genuine *1tirmative action would mean a substantial increase in the number of middle level positions open to womenstaff assistants, adninhstrative assistants, clerk V's. fiscal assistants. It would mean an increase In promotional titles for janitors. laborers, nursing assistants. laundry help. etc. or a direct upgrading in tl~ classiticatwn or pay systeiil that would give those at the bottom without any real promotional ladder a better standard of living now. Finally it would mean the development of tinie~related programs to train motivated ntitsing assistants, for example, to become LPN's and med teolts. to enable clerks to become bookkeepers 'and computer programmers. and to enable laborers or secretaries to become craftsmen or women. Admittedly developing a genuine afArmalive action program would take, lot of work. But money for niany training and upgrading programs nisy well be available through various Department of Labor and HEW grants. An Affirmative Action plan that is strictly oriented to helping those with the education and background to help themselves seems a waste of effort. Eleanor Saluk EDITOR: Please allow me room in our Cater br this short reply to Janis Maras column on Parenthood and Society. it the February 4th 'sue of Ihe Alligator. HAVING BEEN blessed i.ith 'even children of in own md one foster child I led I ant fairly qualified to make this reply. kids I fully agree that a lather should go at least fifty per cent or more in lugging. string tot mid disciplining children, whether rher&s one or one dozen. I also agree *t would be flue it. everywhere you take children there would be staff and facilities for keeping them while you dine. 'hop or whatever. However, it may be most ownen of businesses think they have quite a laplul dealing with adults all day. YOU STARTED your tenth paragraph with. "Problan% like this begin ns with the mother or the thildresC Janis from where I stand. ~ its only missed the bulls cyt hut the owire target in this statenient. As I understand modern lUyChdICtY. it might warp a chIlC. mind if vote girt It ~ow of the treatment I fully reccmnwnd. lb's might have merit it' let the child get old enough to control the pitrent before you begin applying so nc. he age old, proven. temper tantrum equalizer, is pernianently attached on either at your wrists. You see il you begin this treatment early enough. obedience and manners will be i~ay ol tile for the little ones, where hisses and tantrum' is with the ones that don't receive it. ALSO THE ONES tho receive it and know how it ~.orks. know that it can be administered on the back side of their lap. any time aay p1w. without their ~ being pulled down. Recommend this to you, friend and when you get children of your own start sheni on this treatment and >ou can ~hop. dine or ~,hatever. happier ever after. Howard Godwin 'nsf mcn a Dfl so pout amass as mu as sewus inmrar" The Independent Florida Alligator Doug Dial frwrWniViM S., Eon Cur.flflta. ~ Sitar G.orr K.cIOfliC Jr. Pha EdIWv on. PtSite MIMI Kwns. Afl N.w.SI,.r I A new policy I EDITORi RE: Jeffrey A. Sowers 'A Second Look" concerning grade deficit,. I sin. currently working to have the University adopt policy of having professors ret'aluare their grade curves in lasses ,.here curves are made and students are convicted of theatirni. and having the grades changed acnrdlsg)y. While ito grade changes ttfl he made until the Honor ( ,tirt concludes its in'estigation. we sit trying to nablish this policy now in anticipatici, of such a con. thalon. If anyone has any questions or suggestions regarding this mitatter. or if you have information you waist to give or if~ou want to work on having this policy made. pleas call me as 37S~M77. Bill Leach. Senator. off-campus Additional Data on governments

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P~. S. ii,. te&eendm* Mad. Mugs,. W.dnS.p, hhv~~h, I,?' a S p. 3-. S aIs HAITI S By SOD MORRIS AilIgar Staff Wilt. Rev. Jacques Monipremier is a patient man. With his job, It doesn't pay to be otherwise. As director of the Haitian Refugee Information Center in Miami. Monipremier must keep tabs on the 1.181 Haitians now in Florida seeking political asylum. it's a job that involves finding shelter, distributing food, locating odd jobs and serving as spiritual advisor for Haitians caught in the limbo between sanctuary and deportation. Yes, he's i patient man. but he admits that the patience is wearing thin. "YOU SEE ThESE?" Mompremier said as he waved a handftd of white, official-looking papers. "They are the work permits we have been waiting for. See for yourself." He tossed the papers on the table. Across the middle of each permit, in bold, black ink it read: "Authorization denied." '1 just don't know." Mompremier shook his head. "DO you suppose they want us to steal?' Despite the denial of work permits. Mompremier is often able to find jobs for sonic of the Haitians on the sly. The Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) investigators are so busy keeping up with the IWAXX) illegal immigrants in Florida from all countries that there is I ittle chance of getting caught Ibe working illegally. STILL. MOMPREMER would like to find jobs for his people without "feeling sneaky" about It. "But, until things become better for us we will have to sneak. I suppose." he said. Mompremiercametothe U.S. from Haiti in 1967. when his life was threatened b~ the Tent., Maccute, the secret police force of forum President FrancS, Duvuiler. Deface he left Haiti he was principal of a school in Nhl.au-Prlncs which fell out of later with the boverumat. -t DID NOT LIKE to chaise my students -than the) ~ould afford. Some of the students I collected mon from than others. if their families could pay it. .@ I could afford to teach those with no money also.' Mompremier said. Hut, In a strongly anti-communist country like Hiati. such practices are frowned upon. "The government said I was a Communist because of my school. I was arrested. btatat and thrown in jail." Mon.premier said. After several weeks behind bars. Mompremier said he was finally taken betre Presider Duvaller. TUEY TOOK ME to."" Doe" ID.,valler) because I had many Mends in the army. He listeswd to nit and thai ordered that I be S free." said Mompreniier. nut apparently. Momprernin's freedom meant that he was i center gi not to return to the school. One afternoon, while teaching a class, Monipremier said, the Macoutes came with machine guns and threatened to kill him if he returned to the school on the following day. Monipremier packed his bags and left Haiti that night. After his arrival in Miami. Momprenier spent several months with friends before finally telling the INS of his presence. 'I was afraid to conic forth because, like all who leave Haiti.! was fretful that they might make inc return.' he said. HUT, IN 2967, before the current Water, Hemisphere quotas on immigrants todk effect, there was no difficulty in obtaining a vis, and eventual residence status. When the first boatloads of Haitian refugees began coming to Florida, Mompremier was one of the moving forces in seeing that the refugees received fair treatment. Along with the Rev. James Jenkins. of the Friendship Mission Baptist Church in Miami, and U.S. Rep. William Lebmen of Miami, Mompremier convinced INS officials to release the refugees on bond. The Rehgee Center started in April 1973 in the annex of the Friendship Mission Baptist Church with donations from 23 local churches. Later that year. Rev. Jenkins went to Washington. D.C. to meet with directors of the National Council of Churches. He convinced them ot the necessity of a larger center Mr the Haitians, and in January1974. the center moved to its present location--an abandoned toy store near 1-95 in northwest yth The following statements are from Sdnlts submitted to the I*nmigraticn and Naturatatlac Service by Haitian refugees whodiave been denied asylum In the U.S. Their cases are being appealed. "I was a teacher in a small private school. A Macoute (secret police) who had a girl enrolled then had not paId for her attendance. I gave him a bill for the money and the next day he and two others arrested me and took me to prison. I was in prison froni May 2. 1972 until Pet. 3. 1973. "U'UEN IT WAS released I went back to my school to begin teadving again. About week after my runin one of the Macoutes who had arrested me caste to the school with. machine gun mid threatened to kill we. "At this point some of the children began so shout, and when the Maccute turned to quiet them. I picked up a chair and hit him ceer the head. knocking him out. es Miami. According to Mompremier. the center operates on thout 52.600 to $1,800 a week. "THIS IS USED primarily for direct assistance--toM. shelter, and medical aid. Lots of our cot is othet thanks to families in the neighborhood who donate food and beds. he 'aid. The center has its regular crowd of hangers-on who drop h~ daily to check on jobs or to gossip. For most, there is nohsng else to do. They line up on the worn-out chain outside the center In excited flurries of conversation, laced with a blend of French. Creole and English, that discuss their hopes for the future and their overall reluctance to return to Hiati. "You see this?" Marcel Joseph saId as he pointed 103 snake-like scar near his chin. That is why I came here SCARS. That's one commodity all the refugees have In abundance. And, they are almost proud to show then Most of the K8flCirCICthCWfl5t5aiidthC3gIkIC5.~. reminders of too tight prison chains. Another item the refugees seem to share isa desire to work Many spend long days in the sugar cane fields near Belle Glade. Others find odd jobs in some of the hotels on the beach. Rut, all the work is temporary, and the refugees eventual end up back at the Center looking for something new. Nevertheless, they all agree on one point--they arc far hctW off here than they would be in Haiti. ~y fled I immediately went back Leo1.,. my home town, where I met fnends Who arranged to buy a small boat. We left Halt on Oct. 17, 2973.' Etleiuite Joseph 'I was atisterman in Leogam. Haiti. hi February of 19728 Maccute demanded my whole catch of metes' fish. I refined his demand and was taken to piles. "I was held in prison for two months and sewed duni'g8 work detail. I hid In the woods for four mocks and thtfi joined a group that was planning to come to Amulet Weld Haiti in boat on Oct. 21, 2973. 'Whenlariv.AIw,~~~5pqg. V8 afraid to say too ninth for fear the Maccan .~ld canto' me. My request for asylum was denied." Null. Saint Fed

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Th. ind.p.,d.at Most. Mftgeflt W.&.ud.y. F.&.v.ry 5. 1915, h.9 By MOB MORRIS Alllgpts. Staff WrIst, Gerard Irandei Used to ns&kc kettles and pOts It) 'elI in hi~ ortauprince shop. He wasn't a rich man by any nican~, but Haiti. where the per capital income is about ~ a year. ander was better oil than most In the 1957 Haitian presidential eleetmon, leaderr supned the popularly elected candidate -Daniel Fignole. it. after only 19 days in office. Fignole was deposed by a ilitary taktoflt that led to the ascension of Francois 'Papa Duvalier. as president-for-life" of Haiti Shortly after Duvaller took power. Gerard Leander was one I thousands arrested by the Tonton Macoute. Duvalier's et police force, and thrown in prison for backing Fignole LEANDER WAS LUCKY. While on a work detail he aped and in late 1958 made his way to Nassau. When Duvalie" died in 1971 and his son. Jean Claude. took ver, sanderr, like other Haitians, felt conditions might harge n Haiti. And so. he returned to his home. But, as Leander tells the story, his homecoming was nyihing bitt welcome. "When I reached Haiti. the Maceutes put mc in jail for ur months I was beaten because I would not confess to eying intentions of ovestbrowing the government. I tried to plain that I wanted only to return to my work, but they uld not listen." Leassder said. As he spoke he rubbed the an on his wrists Itt from prison chains. "WHEN ThEY LET MI out I met with some friends who re planning to sail a boa to the United States, For me. it ned like the only hope possible. So. I left Haiti again. [under and 64 other Haitians washed ashore near nipano Beach on Dec. 12. 1972. Making their escape from tyranny to what they supposed would be freedom, the aitians had completed their SW mile odyssey in an overowded and battered sailboat without the aid of a compass. "We ran out of ted after the first few days." said lander. The only thing that kept us alive was our hope for a good But those hopes soon disappeared. UPON ARRIVAL the Haitians were taken into custody by he U S Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS). After asty interview., where the Haitians asked for political sylum. all 65 were jailed and, within a few days. charged with legal entry into the U.S. Since that time. 478 other Haitians in IS different groups aye conic to florida by boat and in search of sanctuary. The st group arrived in Marathon on Nov. 34. 1974. In addition to the 543 who came by boat, 638 other aitians, who have entered florida by various means, have Iso asked for asylum. All claim they face certain 'insonment or death if they return to Haiti. But, with only a few exceptions. the 1.181 Haitian refugees ow in Florida have been denied political asylum and are acing deportation. ONE OF THEIR NIJMDER, however, chose a different ay to escape possible reprisals in Haiti. Turenne Deville, a 7-year-old fisherman, was found dead in his Miami jail cell sIMav-asheettiedar.y.andhisneck. 'Tise only thing that kept Ifs alive was our hope for a good lire.' Gerard reader Haitian refugee The plight of the Haitians has aroused a number of merican groups to take action in their behalf One of the rliest to do so was the National Council of Churches, which lAnded Miami's Haitian Refugee Information Center in pral 1973. On Feb. 28. 2974, the council adopted a resolution cxSing 'profound disquiet" with the Haitian refugee tiation and formed -investigatory task force. Afler a num~ d Iimtul.ws with the Haitians. their WYCI'S and INS officials diarlag June 1Q74. the task force pared its report. Among the conclusions were: cUe U.S. has a ~ stad ad on refugees. While xtendwg a wa~ welsi. to Cuban refuses, the current Iky disaimin spins thee wIse are black and-or ing fron, right-wing dictatorships; eThere Is a liSt qiamelms -to whether the Haitians won Orded due P"6U @1 law since attormys were not allowed 0 be PIUCIIf S IbsIuitial IntervIews conducted by the INS; INS has bees Inamulelve to the plight of the Haitians the pace or legs appeals. me nms Circuit Court of Appea~5 has Wounds the ease .f 367 Haitians to the INS lbr rther ~ ibis, atlaS on other case. is cxed. fOr the HaltIan, have papered detailed affidavits umentlag individual case of ton'. Impritouinitilt and liarrassticnt wtlered by the refugees and not recorded by the INS luring nitijl i,,ien 'e~. v aid in it~ decisions, the INS 'outinely forwards ~Ci1Jiii tases to Washin0on and the State Department An I it i' at ibis level that the Haitians have conic upon ilI8~or 'tumbling blocks in their search for asylum. Ira (jol!ob1~1 general counsel tot the American Comniuee (or (he Foreign Born, sees the refugees as little more than unfortunate pawns in the game of international politics. "THE GOVERNMENT holds that these people are simply unhappy with conditions in Haiti. Unfortunately, the government therefore sees them as economic refugees, not political refugees' said Gollobin. Gollobii, said that an order to quali~ ass political refugee there must be a 'well-founded fear of political punishment and persecution if they go back to their country. 'Rut, the Immigration Service and the State Department are saying that the Haitian government is not a repressive ~overnn)ent; therefore, anyone who leaves Haiti cannot be treated as a political refugee, Gollobin said. Since Haiti has a strongly anti-communist government. Collobin claims the U.S. is unwilling to weaken its relations with its Caribbean neighbor by giving an open door treatment to its political dissidents. "IT IS CLEAR tonic that the question of political asylum for Haitians is not being settled on its true merits. It's all S question of where you come front The Haitians are stuck in the middle.' he said. At present, however, the Miami INS office is forced to cope with an even larger problem than 1,181 would-be immigrants (ron, Haiti. They have their hands 6.11 rooting out the estimated lO0~~0 illegal immigrants from all pans of the world now living and working in florida. And, since about half of the Latin American and Caribbean tourists who enter through Miami International Airport are thought to stay on as ilIqal immigrants, it is easy to see why the understaffed INS might be skeptical of the claims made by a few hundred Haitians. According to one INS investigator, some of the difficulty Sn picking out legitimate political refugees stems from the inadequate interrogations by INS interviewers in Miami. "ONLY THE UNUSUAL interrogations take longer than 20 minutes,' the investigator said. "If they have a story to tell, we just take it down. We don't cross-examine then,. this kind of situation would seem to give credence to claims by the Haitians' lawyers that their clients' complete storiess have never been heard by the INS. At any rate, the Haitians were never allowed attorneys at these initial interviews, to aid them with their stories. And, according to another INS investigator, who has been involved ii, checking out the stories of some of the Haitians. (here isn't enough information in many of the files to really determine it the claims are valid or not. "You have to really know Haiti to know where the holes in the stories are otto feel the truth in a story that may be both true and false.'' he said. LOUIS GIDEL, acting director of the Miami INS office. admits that some of the Haitians may have deserved more attention when they arrived. If we had the staff we could do it." he said. "But, then again. if every refugee who climbs off a boat in Miami says he's a political refugee, it will break down the system' As rot claims that the Haitians have suffered because of a "double standard" on refugees. Gidel points out a situation which occurred in 1969 to disclaim the charge. At that time, 119 Haitian Coast Guardsmen who took part in an unsuccessful revolution, sought and were granted asylum in the U.S. Gidel also said comparison between Haitian and Cuban refugee situations were "unfair. since the Cubans arc in a special category." "THE AGREEMENT to recognize Cuban refugees was something that was done on a presidential level by President Johnson in 1966. So. the only special. large-scale exceptions we make are for Cuban refugees" he said. When you conic and knock on the door and want in. there are certain rules that have to he followed. The Haitians will be given every opportunity to state their cases according to these rules." (ide! said. But Neal Sonnett, Miami attorney who represents "about 4(X)" of the Haitians. claims the INS ha not been following the rules. "SO FAR. WE really have had no opportunity to place on the record the legitimate claims these Haitians have," said Sonneti. "By not allowing attorneys to be present at the initial interviews the Immigration Service has violated a basic due process of law and acted in a most arbitrary and capricious manner. The United Nations Convention and Protocol for the Status ofRefugees.sign.dbythU.S.,flllhf attorneystobe made available to refugees at any time whets they an questioned concerning their requests hr political asylum. According to Sonnit. the INS has violated this measure barring attorneys from all of the Initial Intervis,. give, Haitian refqees. These interviews form the basis of the material that the INS forwards to the State Department hr asylum consideration 'On one occasIon. 38 Haitians won taken frog,, their jail cells at 2 an. and hauled the 1W mile to ImmIgratIon isvegigation headjuarten for Igitenien. With treatmaut like that it's no wonder the Haltant didn't fool like talking." Sonneti said The two nvestigator~ completed the 48 iii terviews in less llan three hour~.' SONNETI' ALSO CLAIMS that the State Department Just hasn't been doing its homework" when it comes to in~cstigating the present conditions In Haiti. rhe Slate Department claims they are able to give close attention to each of the individual case reports that the INS sends theni. But. it just isn't so." Sonnett said. "For example. a group of 42 Haitians was interviewed on a Friday afternoon by INS investigators and their asylum requests were denied. "The data on the 42 was transmitted to the State Departnent. which by the tbllowihg afternoon had also responded negatively to the request. Now, do you mean to tell me that in less than 24 hours the State Department was able to round up information on 42 people they had never heard of before and decide whether they had suffered political persecutions? No way!' 'Lu fortunately, the gneruut eat sen them as economic refugees, net political refugees. Ira GoUebin A tterne~ Sonnet said the action taken by the Fib Circuit Court of Appeals in remanding the cases to the INS would allow the Haitians to present a great deal of new evidence. "IT TAKES VS mACK to the beuiunln* We are asking to present evidence that wasn't presented at the earlier hearing." Sonnet said. "Right now we as-. still waiting for the tinmigration Service to tell us how we can go about presenting it. I would suppose that it will take place in a quasi-judicial setting with an INS-appointed judge." If we lose out there," he added. "then we will end up back in the federal court." Despite the legal footwork carried out by Sonnett and his colleagues, the inescapable problem faced by the Haitian refugees is contained in the current Immigration laws -laws that are difficult to sidestep. HAITIAN REFUGEES could benefit from new legislation that has twice passed the House only to die in the Senate. HR 982. the Rodino Bill, would create a special refugee status for aliens of Western Hemisphere countries, besides Cuba. for the first time. Existing law restricts the definition of refugees to those who flee from Communist or Middle East countries. Although the measure passed the House by a whopping 330-36 margin in September 1*73. it died in the Senate when Judiciary Committee Chairman James Eastland refused to call hearings. But, even if the legislation is carried out, there will still be the probleni of determining whether conditions in Haiti are such that Mittical persecution exists. In a November interview with George Beebe. associate publisher of the Miami Herald. President Jean Claude Duvalier said political persecution In Haiti is a "myth that already has been dispelled" THOSE WHO FLEE his country do so because they are just looking for a better lift in lands with better employment conditions.' said the 24.year old preuideut-fo.-lifr. "If they want to return home, they are free to do so. if they will work toward the development of this country.' Duvalier said. George Baboun. Haiti's consul to Miami. speed. "Haiti is a democracy. Then is no political persecution in Haiti. Those who wish to return are welcome," he said. But, asked how Haiti would deal with the refugees upon their return. Baboon said. "This is something I would discuss with the U.S. government. not a reporter." AN OFfiCIAL WITH the Jamaican consul in Miami claimed Haiti's consul there has "been regularly reporting to the goynment of Haiti the names of those Haitians who enter the U.S. "The government of Haiti knows who the retape are. I wouldn't doubt for a moment that they will be Ianpuiaoeed or executed should they stun,, he said. "I should think that those who han dumonulrand against the Haitian gowument while in Miami would be well advised not top back." After a recent visit to Haiti, Neal Sonata had this tony hr thee who Insist that conditions thee have improwd: "h's like me telling you that the tempesuse outside has dropped from ISO degrees to 149 degrees. When you go outside you'll still fry your -off." AND, WHAT ABOUT Gerard Isade? Well. he spends mci cEbit time sitting urotad the Haitian Refuge lnhrmatlon Center. lookIng for the day when he will receive permIssion tostaylathe U.S. forgood. Does he think of going home now? "Not nb.'4 said Leander. 'Until all the Duvulen are pee. yOU CUI Itt motile rite ha'

PAGE 10

.g. V. in. 'n.p.na.n. ncna ~'gsr, w.an.say. ~.Onh.ry 4*. I~'~ r-~r-~ *~' -' ~-. ~ ~ia.6 Tb i~ ni Ct niA fnr .a'.'ii' .*qarte,.,., Programs of Distinction fr 0 UF Twenty-three programs of distinction for the nine wilverulfies In the State University System will be recommended to the Board of Regatta. Included are four for U?: bjcflbedlcal englneerliig, behavioral neuroeclaice, food econanics and marketing and thermonuclear fusion. The programs will be recanmeded for special funding by the State 14151*hare -to the 105 asia. The funding will accrue to the uulvnflu as ached tiled In the master -ova a aix-year period and as names becen avail. able. It I. anticipated that the faming for the -program will Inane their Morston Speaks To UF Senate On Thursday President Robert MaSon will report -budgetary and legIslativ, matte. at the monthly meeting ci the Uuiveralty 4 Srnateat3:3O pa. Thuruhy in McCarty Auditorium. The president will also entertain discussion mi welcome -fre Senate ushers. There are no actS. kant a the agenda; however, members have bee. that a --pilicy was tabled at the Januaq mauling and could be runoved bun the table. Meetings cRib Seats an cpa to the ~blIc. Dial bsS with the call Is the Beat. this week -Is Vt by apart. fran the Cameos University U Wail. and the CLtP Advisory Commits. BOR Group To Meet March 5 The lime. commIttee S th. BOA will mat at Sam. Wehuday Mardi 5, in the nOR Cuaferuice Noun, Tallabass., to comulder proposed fee Increases and other matters on the March 10 ageS. Increased A new fee schedule far the State University Sytnia will be considered by the DeaN for recommendatlc. to the Legislature. It will cetlam to be based budgets by at least U pa emit over normal levels. The master -was developed as required by the geeml awoprlaUeu act of 1974 "to provlde.for such Univi 7pvceund by th bIv~.~.e of I'tf*rmat~*e & Pall. 5.nl.u t. **mmug'laata aft I.'.' notice & m.n.nt ~nflvmat~on to stutals. fl.ssty & .6.99 at tow UnInrs~ty .9 PI.rWa. programs. where the pews will have the greatest likelihood of pining distinction? Five of the programs, Including Mamedical aglneulng at UP. have prevIously bern approved to take I 915-Car Parking Structure For JHMHC Contract Ready The DOR will be ted to approve signing a ca ombad for a 91&ear parking flture at the j* Ellis Slier Health Cuter ulib Drake Qsbactluag Cc. of Ocala. The cunpmny Sited a low Nd S *1,1W JU apis a casts budget ci $2,2UIU, ruSting In -anticipated S arahately hI'MM after other coats S moving a power line -habit ThIs project was authoSed by t. 134 legMa~e ads a special law that made It poSe for the DON to handle all plans. .1 curntrucfih. rather than going through the Duperbuint .1 General Bela The project was trough to Nd In over -mats bun Its Incepilm. Freshman Class Cut Proposed The Board of Regents will easier reducing coil mat ci flt4 lme4n.cofl sue students by 15 pa cut, resulUng In the foilewlag -limb: Univaulty ci Florida, 2,45: FlorIda Stat., 243; Booth Florida, tOt Florida Tech. 1,700 and Florida A&M, Tuition on a per-credlthour system, but will provide for four level. ci paymnint In place of the present two levels. For stud wts enrolled In programs Undergraduate CMannIng. F sang t. Shied Flamade Aid Fm Muds Loan P.S Fm cqke kprwined That tad B~* FImSl Aid flS Pad Fee MUSY ad Sink. Teal RagSla Fee Pr Ba ThUrn pm weB ha hr mVkdS a adieu s fl warn. im p. LII .3 1.25 18 -Ia 'flu mu For tSta coiled ha flue MD, DUD and DVII program, the Lu schedule far each tbe.esth period S unlbnut will be as loUses: Graduate C$11.43 Ill .3 LU .18 ~111 "em a, Undergraduate Cow. $811 1.18 .52 .3 1.17 .3 dl a. MaUlcdatlm Fee Eddeg Vie Ifle Vmm~I Fee MISS L.a 7.5 Fee cflue Fad BeSS Fkadal Aid Tin Paid F. Act litty and Smile. Fe Total Muds Fm "Fe. 'In It .1 1t~ a' -a Dm4 Proposed other than the MD, DUD and DVM, the proposed ft. schedule and breakdown ci allocation has fallout (the ftrst two columns show current tees). Upper Level Undargraate C* Si) 1.18 .12 .3 Ii? U -Lu 815W "Lu us MS ass a e.g 17.3 3 7.3 4.3 u.s N LU * pae.u Graduate C$14.51 1.1s .52 .3 117 .3 AM U. IOU Pee 544.3 am tS 4. 11.46 5. -Ma ease Graduate mmii and La $1611 lii .12 1.11 .3 -m a, $41.U MIUt. I?.'. Is 4.3 urn Lu -aft tnt. advantage of the 14 poutloin and $2M.2T4 designated by the LegIslatUre for thin fiscal year. The programs recommended for approval have already been approved by each university and the DOR staff. It Is antIcIpated that unIversItIes will later be asked to props additisial program "which they are willing to an~hl through Internal slices ties of reseatCe'.,. U? programs are summarized as follows: win foam -the applicatlmu engineering technology to medically related problems. Already having attracted -PUPS w year ci flammal sport. the piam .111 be burned in the College of Engineering but will Interface with prugres In the Cd ages of Medicine and Aflh and Ideacee. MS. To begIn 376.77. WIll feces aegrdcglea) human disorders and will be develapedman bierdb~~ Cut Sn 7Z~Ldt. ci ftvdmaIoe and BUS up S Arts and 1d the cmmeflulim will be -dmayduuaw Omma. mdl -multiple Sues. F.S einemiu a tang To begin 1971.71. Cmciee S. darts of the feed teemS .S umkedq faculty IowaN the ails. S foci and marbling -mtmCq fla agS. mumain VS. To begIn 1933. Caqiunedluig the Cart at flU, uSda augheS. law midair procanee, the UP program In the Dquuflmfl S Mache bglaeulag Maca and P byte wE -s-Mga mergy endear rents It shaped thee programs will lead to the develop' mutt ci candled IS power plants OS.r UdvenlUes Programs ci dlatlnetla In other 'mIv enilee are -follows: AbS -Ikman remurce management (193-76) and cares uuhacatlua (1977-3) Thu -Ocean uaglneerlng (134-U) and ezceptsd aw .as. (WI) FlU -Bid and food aenice unzip. mat (374-U) and curquadv. Su' national 15Dm magma (INS-fl) ISV -Deign IS managua S poet madury eats. (571-IS, -. clear incline (3W48), shindig (IIYMS)mdasu (UrnS) 1212 -CangSw salem. (DIMS) and lbmhgy (3ThU~ lIMP -and hg~u (13445) ad leaking IS ~mae (S-fl) US-Whim cay ad 134-IS), Sm Ci ad Sm a. "S HOg (flu) and Sty and county mmnagemet (tm-N) flU Rent Increases me non urn w nag b w~,e rfll harem hr ai. a apaban a Flask Its tMvedty fuamPto Wperquutermihunwt. w~a. -University of Florida Is -Eqmul Enip&oy mat Oppcrtuultrhffirmat iv. Action Employer -A r 4

PAGE 11

This pagc paid for at usual advertising rates 1%. nd.pad.nt Mend. MIIg.lo,. W.dn.d.y, F.bnh.vy S. 975. P. Student P-affirming to University's pledge to honor employment commitments to graduate students, Interim Assistant Vice President for Academic Affairs Gene Hemp has outlined procedures that deans, directors and department chairmen must follow In making new appdlflbflfl Or reappointunents. Each new appointment or reappointment of a graduate ,~jgsg forwarded to the Graduate School must Include either a copy of a letter of commitment dated prior to December 12, 374, or the individual approval of the appropriate dean, Hemp's Feb. 19 memorandum states. "Wearephdpdtohcnor all commitments both written and verbal where the student understood, not hoped, that he or she would have an aulatantahip for some specified S Aid QUILINED 0 Appointments length of tune Hemp said Hemp said that he has become awn of several instances in which appointments have been submitted against the E&O budget for graduate students previously paid from contract or grant funds. 'If the student has a firm commItment, the appointinent will be approved," Hemp said, "but the student will be required to engage in Instructional activities and not Continue to work on the research that Ii no longer being funded. If the student does not have a firm commitment, It will be necessary for the department to utilize miscellaneous grants or foundation funds In order to continue providing the aulatantahip." Applications lust Be Readied by Friday Financial aid applications for the 1975-76 academic year are available in 23 Tlgert Ball. All flduits, Including those presently receiving financial assistance, are required to complete and submit financial aid applications and confidential stateein -to Friday. Students uS coniplete either a Parents' Confidential Statement or a Student's Financial Statamui and mail It to the College Scholarship Service ((XS) at the address Sun -the teem. No action can be taken on an application until the Conflintlal Statunuit baa beau returned by C~8. Prior to receiving financial assistance all eligible students are also required to apply for the Florida Studut Asistance Grant (deadline March 1) available throqb the State Dqurtnext of Education. Freshmen, Sophomores and Juniors are required to apply for the Federal Basic Educational Opportunity Grant Program prior to receiving financial assistance. telephone Bills on Campus ;~ Up, Maybe More Later That telephone you have -your office uk or In you dumlicry now costs the university PS and $1.3 -per ash, req.ctlvely, effective Feb. 11. MI told, that menu an approximate 6MG may Men. In telephone xii Interviews For rods with Aid Graduating micra wit National DelNatimal Direct, Phamnucy, Mars,D~tla7, cam., S.A.FZ. or Unlvty of Flora lag Turn toes miS the aft interview snot Urn, Al ais receIvables and Turn Lam ainowb US be '9 to Ste ads to ~iaUs. dnt.ao. utpeva reload and tilt lntuyjgwg may be canipluted at USa fiqodwy between ~ as. 4 pa. wukbya. Payments US may be paused between 9 a. and 3:3 p.m. Faculty Cap, Gown Deadline Extended The camp. e ani Dam has extended Its dm411. to Friday for faculty to tiS -~ jofla for put *Sim hi Cemm~ Faculty u~ b laY. ~UI Ct2Utnga~jjj~pby~5pecW t'lces Date U CanIpmmapaa.~.sa.IIa if call Da~j ma a m41U. service for 137, according to Mrs. Nancy Swink, administrative assistant In the Physical Plant Division. The new rates are an Interim rate Increase approved for Southern Bell by the Public Service Commission. Statewide the Increase will total U million. But In late August or early September the Comjnlsla Is expected to render a decision on Bell's application for a P16.5 million Increase. Calvin Greene, director of the Physical Plant Division, said that approval ci the full Increase could remit In coat lucre.--all Items of telephone equlpuet. The Interim Increase raises main line stations frown 811.50 per math to $13.10 and dormitory states frown $7.3 toNi) monthly. Main line station are ducribS as those phone represented by an Individual nnib&. The Care Planning and Placement cats a -Servim for companies recruiting a campus. Students should ~~p' for Interviews at least one day in advance In Roan U-fl of Belt: Union. This service Is ala open to alumni. Employers visiting camps Feb. 26 March 4 are listed belw washy -DMA? Wyandotte Corp~ oration. Bell Teiqubsie Lahmatorles, Th Boeing cm pay, Greyhernid Caporation, John Hancock Isurmee Campany, SE. Kruge Conway and Swift & Canpany. will be IntervIewIng. Thursday -AMoco Fables Company, ACTION, Camp SequoyahTull, Bran Company, USA, Noutirop Corporation, Pan American World Airways and LU. Sirrine Company will be rwulflng. Bell Labs will conclude Its IntervIews. Friday -Camp Seq woyab-Tiall and Ens Company, USA, will conclude their Interviews. Meaday -the recruits will be Mba Life & Casualty ComPa~L~atIonal Oceanic & Atmoqihule missioned Officers Corp.) and U.S. Envlrsmutal Protection Agmq Tuesday -American Graduate Sited of IntonatIonal Managemmi, anileton Camty (S. Carolina) Public Simoola, John Hancock USual 1.8. Insane. Canpmy, usa. & 551. and U.S GSOgi~ -Cfl DM~ will be S. recrultn. Aetna Life & Camky canpmny MD eS their Is-rn. Graduate Student Deadlines Friday, Felnary U lathe Rat day tow the final submblcfl of tu. for all graduate students expecting to receive a maiWs degree this quarter. Pap.: should be tuned In to Ron 5, Grlnte Hall. Free Tennis For Faculty And Staff The IntramufalE sports office will dee a free beginalfig tennis di. for faculty and staff frona 5:3 to 6:3 p.m. Felt xl, and March 3, le and 17. For Inftaiii tie and registratlal call Joe Regna or TreAds Chewitisig at ma. It Is also lb lad day hi graduate taints ~eethg to receive a imp. thIs quarts I. U. 5* VIsa) bandanadan Rapub wOk S. Gradual. Sited I. Horn US, aSter i.t Grad Open Door Dean Harry H. lisle will keep his Smqmt.d.y km toIpa. Ream S~ Gina S.D. to tat at my -a a abS any mailer tk~' at to bourn with Nm a, him gaff. "Open Des" meetings an held the was ad feet Webeday @1 mdi .fl km I t. S pa. PROCEDURE me Unhwuity ci Florida Is an tqma' gmpbginS Ousutmltwhffinnhdv. ASam flhy 8'. -Itt' Grad a financial Faculty Terminations Explained Between 3 and 30 UnIversity of Florida faculty members will receive notices this week that they will not be re-euployS for the 1975-78 academIc year. Moat are Interim Instructors or Interim aSstant professors and all are In the EducatlonandGeneral flO budgetary college. The faculty cutbacks are in accordance with Board of Regents direction to reduce the flO salary budget for next year by *1,543,UO and to surrender U manyear faculty position by June 30. The full package in complying with the cutback, according to Interim Academic affairs vice-President Robert Bryan. Include a continuation of the free. on filling K vacant positions totaling salarlea of PU.U. put Into effect slnc Dec.12. It also Includes cutting back funding for summer school 25 per cent from last summer's level, to approximately the 1973 level and reducing support for three centers financed frown the E&G budget. There are no -to reduce summer enrollment. Bryan said that deans have been notified that their department chairmen and faculty may decide which faculty members are to be terminated, but that he hopes all will be those who have bee employed to fill positions tunporrily "Tenured faculty, of course, are fully protected,' Bryan salC'u are regular faculty members In teun-earning tium. Noc-tenured faculty who lure been employed for a year would have to be given a full year's notice before they can be terminated." Bryan said "every way poSble" was explored to prevent layoff a. H. said that it was possible to shift some position Into vacant lines financed by grants and contracts but that "ultImately, there was net choice left except the regrettable one of termlnatlons."Hla action followed mmUtation with the Council of Academic Deans and faculty members a the Budget and ProfessIonal Relations and Cane. The LIT's reduction was its share of the S positions ordered cut tlnughot the State University Sytem.The number of permit affects ana the nmnber of positions ordered terminated do not coincide bemuse not all faculty menbets are employed at the average rate and moat are employed nine, rater than 12, mats. The reduction also provide for the elimlnatlon ciii polkAs the Legislature ordered In the 1174-71 app qrlaUowu bill that gave the mmlverultlu eats posItIons to phase In what Is bows as the "manyear"cmcept ci faculty UWlOYmat, with the widesta Sng the lions would be returned ove two yeas. Under the manyan plan, uuive Sum may -faculty pay ow the full twelve months, rather ibm cuMulating two separate -for th, regular academIc year and the -qua,Lw. Coflegu In 'whIch faculty temlnatlrna were required are ArchItecture and Fine Mt. AS and timorn, Nbalion, Enghaeulng. Law and US meity College. All a NW Osqeasam Afl Join aid ~ mutmUa~ and F~ScS 3bcd~ Health and ReenSmn. Odd by the hue in filling vast pe~Ia I or U is Ur ban a. d .idadw Owl ra will return to ha professorship I. the Dhpautuet 41 Azalea. and Shea uS he asdin S. Carter [fl Asu~ Undies and the 0Mm S Jaac~ Th. Board of Regain has not ordered any ndmctlauu h, to Smelt Cain and NYM budjSs.

PAGE 12

-b' ts.d luirnNd (tJ-" Andy'sbhd's "DRACULA" "Perverse and entertaining." 73 ft 9~O S TONIGHT $1. -u.t i Y.S A ~in, by PALL *.Aoe*I,,iy.cc Ofl. A esvANsTCe~ rc tufl S [I S 233W. Un.vAv. 377*3013 IN,. It Th. lnd~a.d.nt M.rId. MIIga., W.dn.d.y. P.&wwry X, 3175 F FOR SALE bicycle schw~,,n vOlit~ lO-pe.d sMowroon, cordon brand new e*toIl.nt condition, null teN in. tOL~r5elf $X off clod coil 378 5776 (0 55k ph FOR SALE Sanyo 0 rack car .,.r.o A channel mat,,. ho5 rrony fnsun 550 nik for rob 376 035 (a 5 t-pj far sole Mobile None 8 35 IxcaIlent cdndh$ior Coil o%. 3 pn, at 373~E a St-87-p) 73 Honda 350 new -ol hook., heeds,, .mceIl.nt con P50 00 ar best offer MIk. 3~3-O924 (o-St-Ppfl Minolta Celtic 35mm 35 lens. Never used Stilt in 'he box 5.111 to, itt new Only $90 377 '334 (o5l-87of QUAD Spoker System 4 6 ohmn Panosonic Sveok.n for 580 0, 525 piec. Buy 2 and change that St.r.o to Wad AlLAN 377.7031 o-41*7p) to, sole t~4Ainolta 55* I 35 rrrn camera and lear, $100 a. b.ut off., call Wayr' 377-SC (o-369-pJ 1973 Oodg. sporI nuto AC 6 cycI coded joke over poyrn.nt. and snohl cash d'ff.nce 37W5028 olce sun mon w.d *ve 392.aUl excellent cond I9~ r'l.s a St-89-p} 971 Chev Nova gran 43,~ v condition no a,, powet b.okes. or,, radio pow., tinting go. tovert Call b.tww 8 2 pm P3-3dQ7 (o.~-89-p~ A P.r,*am Sotmotic 'wilt, a Tokumor FIS 5Oinrm a Iokur,,or 135 28 rnni and o Soligo' 1-35 ~-2~ gnn~ .at off. CoIl 376 S~(od51fi&p3 Cannon 35 mm f-3 5 lens W-lenm hood nn~ 'as. ye old good condition SW a. Bet off., Call $9~.73I8 a-5t-U.p) unwox *lntr'c piono mint condilioc $360 coil oft., 4 ~ 3Th-9779 (a-S4-IS-p) Fends, on boa. natural finish wilts maple r,.ck petl.d cordtic., 5235, coil k.n o W2JSAS a-St-SpJ Ncw SAC Mk Xl Seokr,. wilt, n.w 5yr focto~r warranty in your non,., $450 poir (list Sew) Call Wiley. 3Th-9994 (a3t88-pl 973 rnobit* l2~50 c.ntroi heat air 2 b.droorns fully furnished tl2~ equity assume rronitly no.e 7577 a make oHs, must sell call V32064 (A-fl-US) MobsI. horn 972 12 60 carpet brick skin S anchored 3773090 M9CO nuts 'a. aSW 2OAv. log No 27 (ni-Se0&o 30 gal oquariLim conwle$. over SIlO invested 3 no old liing to buylo.g.r tonk the best of *veflvthinQ ae&ing $130 coN 378-5917 aft.' 5 (o-319-p) 69 Firebird nit con power stewing + hiok. auto trans flew exhaust system brat. cot stone. sell a, trod. for motorcycle call 372-Im (o-&-89-p) Ooin.si.hles Largest indoor FLEA #ARXE~ fiery Fri -Sal -Sunday A huh. bit of .ve'ythiri of everyone 1201 1 Ur,,y Ave 37S-3431 (AS? qO-~~ HEWL$fl-PACKARD HP-35 almost new coat mc 5245 will s.ll Ic' $150 alto fistier Ididarote stereo amp $95 372 2020 lAST Q0-P) 973 kowomok, 90cc street bik. Very good condition Crim, by und s ond ride after $00 pm No pJone Only 5~W2l6,w SAve A~t tt 2 (AS? 9Q-P I 8*35 tai let nil *lectrc a' excellent condition rToveobl. mist sell $1 or best offer call nancy 378-6355 oft., 6 A 4TS0.P) engage' durttm~)w loris IC. 3Srnn, or 2. IsiS cml aind *int wash., $125 3770355 510 nw IS aye (A-C-90PI Collector selling old original movie potters linvt.d supply so coil 373.8704 IA 5? 90 P) Diamonds, SopcAire. Emeralds. lode and 95 orIe, g.m. rnneols All quolsti. ovoilobi. Priced ron, 25 p.'c.nt to '0 percent below retail custom.' cutiin Iron, $1000 Urcooditsonol Guotonse. OZZlE By opriaintnnt only 373-3804 IA 3? 90-PI FOR SALE h.dding lords Errg.rrenl ~,flgS Trodittocal or Contemporary designs of tour c*.o'ce Hnndnod. or ,ndvidudll who non the b.st Osiginol work by South a l.od.ng Aitist. Moss. Gold $inith and topidisi Uncond~t 'oral Guarorit. OZZIE By oppoifl*rr*rlt only 373-~94 A III 90 Ph THArS ENTEPAINMEND N, >pappj r tNi weekend SPill at the "pp r Vt I call odrome icatre T3-8375 Ii I El 4 4.,. 4, 4 .4~ A r .4-

PAGE 13

> I N0E$ MOM TO SE WITh H T~ Chenflell, A weather Ch*fliWl UPI Newt, New YOk StOCK EEchSfl, I~M tMtIOflt on TV ct,.Wnett and9 FM -LAM ~ttI0flt Ce the FM bW -aw -USE (alt mtMD.'tt a: 'S awe o ''4-CAnING ~iwtetr I *uy -466-3340 ~ *tCKwi,.q Cud OtAN TI PEWERITER PROBLEMS? Weve got o11the answers S@hs4rnvlce SuppihaLsas r ASSOCIATED BUSINESS SISTERS 7U N. Main 373.335w ~LOe Jot CPog'g Now Open For Breakfast 7*10:30am MON.*FR LUNCH SPECIALS I UNIVERSITY 373~9453 N The new Heinlein! The Pus Through Tmnoemw by R1ICIJI Kahn A. Heiuein iWut Hidoir Stoics ~ ~ ~ Hi.Fr.' die dam ci neiman science fiction the Rist wuSut2t dmnlbu uS wo $eth atari. teat life ii, time net csluy-and far Isyud. A new paMiskng e~I hUevpeputeck SiN FAST OFFSET PfiINflNG(toni SPY csmfl~A ready capy -copWUYPS wi-chit0 Same day a~ tOPICS as OW ~S N iders Th. Independent Aofld. AJII9o.0,. W.dn.d.p F.bn.ry 26, 1fl5. Peg. 3 CLASSIFIED FOR SALE It L ~y Oslo,, nod. lot hose who pPr*ciote art In gnld ~I~rn ond Fm. ,em~ Si udo t 03 By SppointMenl Or~ly 3'3 38~4 A 31 QC-P Opel Fodet runt good n~p.cr.d 35 mpg 2501 ~,ody to ~a coil 3732403 or ,nn 0' '02! nw 55 err AZI 9OP~ For Sole Supe,6 SI.ro System Moronr~ I 2~ *nhir~ty 2~A ci sctrosIotr speaker' horn, t~ 125 I UC Sco 0 Coil Ken 376 2402 IA 5! 9091 l~reenhoue ~oIe healthy ploflis I,. ciny poit iundoy only ~m 4pm go west or' ewberry d oost I-IS ho nw 91t' ~t follow ~ipns (A V ~ P) FOR RENT female, own room 2-b. dupi unfurm, central heat or pelt allowed nice, ~UiSt privory IfS julie, 2)20 e univ ~vS no 4 ofi*r 6 ~ (b-StP-p} roommate needed g.otrown apis No 7' MS plus I/~ uti own con, pool air walk or bike to campus Pkeo cortocl anti 375 2994 (b-3t-89-p} own roam in comfortable oak forest town haute M6 ma + uhil easy bike or bus to UF roll chuck or bill 373.1617 lb 5' 9 female roonnote needed own room hovion village 16250 mth plus 1-3 ,tillte' call oiler S 376-I 467 (S-&46-p~ 595 jublel utilize, el.ctic included air arid heo, one room thor. bosh, trig. hot plole 3 block. off conipus quid nponsible mole grod studeot dfir.d Avoifoble IrTirredlolely Ccli 373-3627 between 8-12 PM b St-89-p) Pryate bedroom Wlrdm.odovn Ltx Apts private both Sfl-mo+ l-3ot.l fuin.jled coble TV, 27)2 S* 3MI St 373-3558 or 377-8440 8 T-91 wonted 2 female reanimate. to sublet lu~urous 2 bedroom 2both Opt to 'ha. with 2 girls rent 6225 plus util country garden calf 372-0177 lb-Si-Mo) Mole ~oammote Wonted Awro~ $25 ~ weekly plus i~, utilities tiorly *Nt,05 Calf 377-5643 (b Si46.) I sublet I bdrm en 2 b&m (urn dopleK 77 50 nionil, 6 blki to camp's available I immediately rat of ~eb free coil 3757547 ~.ep trypo lb-5446-p) BEAT M HOUSING SNOPTAGEIII Now 5 the me to start cakIng for deal han,. or spring a fall 0' hove many titlIng. ovoil for dun mmli detotit con hold it for yao ioda~ 377-SQl 6~ we -o Call Sublet Ig I bedroom op ucfurnnhed ovoeloble ote March bet, Jut. 5163 ninth include. AC good view high ris roll 3?3-2W6 afr 6pm (b-SI-H-p) WANT TO MQ~I? If you deir* to nton train yew preen, location We cog, rent, sublet I Cr fInd you o roommate inirnedlolely cQC flt. Call todayll United Reel Estate Aae~. Inc. 113 '4 Mm Aye P74992 (b-fr-iS') TEACHER OF THE YEAR SELECTION STUOBET SPONSORSHIP PACKETS: 113 ANDESON OR p., STUDENT fUND FOR RENT OWN BROOM AVA&ABtE 580 utiluliet Vihloge Apt. townhotus fur nIshed, two boil, coil Debbie oft., *,~ pm 3732Q44 female ~oommo,. Wonl.d Howoiton tlLag. Apt 2 bdr 2 bth or heat, pool etc $61 25, mo 4 .iii' coil 373 926? oftet 4pm Avoilable Mar I (b-WI-SQ. p1 ~ubIet binge one 6, unf oportm.nt University God.ns $143 per monih available Morch I call anytime 378-5466 lb 3189 p) ~ubiet room a mofl&o Opts SQQ Se' rand, pool or funi.hed carpet' ph 373 6474 Jerry ovojiobi. March I (b-5tS-p} Fernol. roommole, own bedroom 3 blk from,, campus, 568 mo 4 I .3 utjihti.t coil Schavowr, or Ann. 3flfl5 (b-$-SS-p~ for 9. qtr ten, ,oc.nmot. needed at londnork opts 2 6. pool. oc. h.ot dishnosher oundry 53 4'~ till' lIe tint, hun. '5 cOil 3fl.aI* (b-54-w-p) B.nLJtful 3 Ba unfurnhshed opt to tubleos. stoning 3' -75 cal1 3775247 after 5 ~ (b-5s-88-o) Subjel lwg. 2 be I bath unfurt, opt 2 inlet from comp.n SW 5206 Mc All stro focilitia included coii oft. 6 ~ 3778318 (65448-.) sublet pvt room mole 2 blks from cOmoul MS mccii, rj~o 0,-ac. Corpat, 'roid, cooking-poy no utdllie. call glenn 378.5443 (5 ST-0-P~ FURN I B# Aot 85 Ilr~ last dep reg fl2ss Sti, ove nic. yard neIghbors mellow folk. sublease (S-lT-flP) I b oPt Iu.nish.d Si 10-mo 5 61k. north or t'6roy Wet Avoiloble 'in,, mediotley Call 3fl0654 onetime B35 ~.P) roonote wonsed for trailer ow~ room ISOn niocoll 3~7-5497after 5 pci (B-IT 90P~ I bedroom opt I Nod ft.,, ned cent. + rornpos 516 00 ocfwn or 51000 fjrn d,*wo.htt laundry carpet pool rec room no p.'. call 2)3-aS (5-5?Qo~ o rOar,, in a nice home 3 bIok, from ji in 2 aces of land 595 n'crshly 'ned a quiet reaponsIb~e feniol. call P2-1724 beIe. I*n offer 5p. (S-SMO.fl IC MAST TqSC Pset-~iut Fek Maid PUb. U McCatyAsd.IdOpa N. ededS deqe Let Ec and Will. k&.m Mash give y.i0t eodsy ~~eclIfl CI, hOC Ged yo.r plot, in It Swa.d kys Pwbb a CaSe DePt d leased tsgg CUSS,6, FREE 5'HIGH PLAINS DRIFTER" WITH CLINT EASTWOOD 11 7' at the RAT ~n 2Ufl4fl flV'W12'ilfl otters ONE YEAR PROGRAMS SPRING SEMESTER SUMMER & ARCHAEOLOGY PROGRAMS Intormaton & appIiCaIiors: ONE YEAR PROGRAM Arrericv Fronds oh he Tel Aviv University 342 Madison Avenue Nein York, New York 10017 (212) MU 7.5451 SPRING A SUMMER PROGRAMS Israel Program Color Sib Park Avenue New York New York 10022 (212) 7534230/NIt IIW t cm. you do with ocly a bactelori. teorne? ow n.m lea way to brl~ge 11w pp between an undeqiaduat. education and S chahI.utglna i saw. career. The tsvtyers AuIstwt Is able to do wovk traditioflhlly don by lawyers Three months of intensive, training can give you the flhIls-the course are taught by Iawyert You C hoc. OP. Of the six course. offered-choose tt, CIt~ Ifi wItic h~ want to work. Inca ig Tb. lntitule to, Paralegal Training has placed more tlwi 700 graduate, In law lintis. baits, and cotporatlooe Iii OS 60 clUes ar' t~ areastud:nt of high academic standing and career as a Lawyers AssIstant. wed Ilk, to mat you Contact your placement office for an nterv.ew witI~ our r.prematalive. We will visit your um9gs oil FRIDAY, MARCN 7 The Institute for Parasgal Training 235 Scott III, Sireet Phii.delptia Pe*.t4www ISO) (?I5I ?324U0 Au ever U$nmitsg variety et tunas to pIck ft SILL PAYING I *HARD 0000 Open 8:00 cm I S kit *UAt ATION LOANS BOAT LOANS SCAR LOANS LUMI~J ..-.--. ---LOANS *PERSONAL LOANS HOUSE IMPROVEMENT LOANS -3:30pm Monday thru Friday 1200 SW 5* Ave. flORIDA CAMPUS FEDERAL CEWIT Ii TONITE 9 Ft LAST NIGHi IK 172 New Low Prices ~W U. USiU~~W Awe. b U ,~ rn-i 43 S / I -I ~I

PAGE 14

S Peg. 141k. In&~nt.n* Rodde MhI~tr. W.dne.dey, P&.a.ry 25, 1975 La CUSTOM NAMING I U. fliLA!4 vs.'. earn SacS M RANCH Hone, rer*ed by tI~e I-I, Me. hon. for sal. 593 1347, 20 n, So of GonewlIle on new 44! SmElT'S SOS CONY 1614N.W. 150. I DAY asic. 1 DAY SERVICE FRANCNISW DEALER All. ACCESSORIES CALL 377-DIKE I BE SOD 2 3 FOR RENT Houses $90 Cottoge an lake 3776092 2 bdr $125 NW ~ct 34-6092 3 bdr $155 Walk a campus 377 699~ 24 ~ miles to U o~ F 377.499~ Apt, $85 Ut-I Paid 377 6992 $70 Wolk to Campus 377-4992 2 bdr $90 Save ii 377-6992 5 ocr., Pool 2 bdr 377-6092 Avail for Spring 0*' VS Ffficienc y Ut' pd 377 699~ hdr Walk Ic rcrtpus 37' 6992 3 bd. 5170 No 10 or deposit 377 6992 A 585 Mable home 37' 6092 tJrited Real Estole I 3 N~ 16th A.,. Open 9AM toe PM wanted one mole roornole ovvn room in hr. be&oom apt $75 I. ulihities Mark 373-326 (8 3T gap) Female ,oomote wanted. luxurious Country Gardens apt must be neat $95 + i~ util f.b rent free coil L~ee 3~2 366 or 373 2630 (B-5T-90-P~ Need roomot. own b.drm in 4 bdrrT, house 3 blks lion, campus 323 nw lAst S?5r,,o I I Still V5dep coil Ker, 377 fli oft., ~9n mmii nma, B-5T.~-P~ need on. roono.e ow,, born, wigh prival. bt in three bdrin home 563 per mo ~l~i I3 ullqlSs bik. Ic campus 'oil M.ke 377 W26 (B-3t~-P) LEWIS JewS p C p ClASS RING6 WATCH RWAiRS 2UW. Univenity Ave. 172-AIM I ERE I U corro. to Oore noflif, j cther ~iIIoge or coIl after P1 2 bedroom opt SU Apt 428 Hawaiian 6377-9659 (B-H 90 OWN SEOQOOM ovoiloble immediately $00 i utilities Vii loge Apts furnished two borh, coi1 Patsy 373-Is SiT 90 P WANTED Med student seeks roommate fo, own bedroom, both in country gardens behind med center $116 ma prefer grad or prof student 373-7344 (r-St-4p) male roomote to shore Furn I bedroom opt Otympo op4. I I~ iw *IM Ave 575 mo + ~ utilities coir, heat. carpet 2 blocks ir campus roll Bob 373-SPA Cc Si 377-6092 flOp) Female CoinmolS wanted own room in 2 bedroom duplex pels ok, c.rtrol heat air tone 375-8917 (c-M-SO-p) WANTiD 70 ty Tenor Guitar Must be reasonobi. Most ony ronditior, 3flOW anylin'. C St-Hp) F.moie ,oornnote ~vocledt Gotorwood op. thor. 2 bedroom 2 bath $60 coil Now 377-fl14 (c-54-SQ-p) Mole 000,01. wanted go sub-lease at opodmefil $5056 a month + A utilities coIl Al 01 373-1092 nave in now (c-S-S-p) trade Sec III at Med Center with Sec Ill o~vw*ere on campus 377-9821 after S ~ All Day on weekends (c-5.-86-a) Female Roomoqe needed immedIately r.pon.able and nec handwin. IS no + /* utilities call 376-2*6 after 5 or weekend. (c-S-Up) Wanted roomote Or roornote. to tin 2 beaoor,, apI owe, roan, S battiroca, or Mr. will, a frend~ rent 53W (or $50~ A Ut (or 13 ut) call 376-I 186 (cS-a' oao a sw.wa Top prices paid for ci. riii0, old jewelry. -wnfidenloi cq,, Oale 3flflW(c50.53-c) Helpi Female roommot. needed urgeelly $60 + utilities Gotorwood close to campus no deposits cci1 marlene 373-3733 anytime 01 0111 (c-St 88-p) HELP WANTED femele -go deliver new Corvettee during ware tii"e Must be attractive and competent (*ive, Foe int.rview coil 3729152 It I0T-~.P) SUA~'ER POSITIONS Fine position, fo, men in New ~nglond sunnier camp for bays (47th yea) ht.nsive oquolics program (26 WSI uafl) opening. for swim instructors 'aPing, wotersking kayaks, caning Al30 expertenced tennis inwructors (I ourts ) Other openings Conp4us -n terviews Travel ollowonce Only full res~jmn considered Comp Moh ICesNa' 37 Thoche, Lane. South Orange. Ni 07079 (201-762-3536) (t 3t-90-P~ $75 ~ 10 recOverer of raleigh sopet course 0 speed wos green all 26 Ironic 21 aluminum wheel,. low mdii. brown gumwoil tires, brooks champion narrow leather seat on frame wheels. UF266333528 bike No 34968) on left rear fork call (~4~ 392 7325 lEST ~.P) AUTOS MAZDA I 9~3 silver grey air am In, rodia jour dcc, sedan. std tonsmishian. only 17, miles 527~ coIl 376-5012 (0-FR-IS-NC) WANTEO low mileage Wt -Toyota wagon Preferably wIh automatic tronsni.lon Cull 3770W t5'-"-') 1969 cOol no Pontiac teflon wagon new medial tree, new eshaite syte. heavy duty s.inp cci1 after 4W mS .~th 3W (O4~ Good buyi I970~ In good shape rite. ~ e~ lent casOla Pile i.'k~ end exterIor Oni, m negotiable Call P7SGS (.546-,) 'LOWS cOVifli RAG W. b cite sell Jet be.,, lie F Icr ide I -S. I -I. 10 end Ceseot Ave. (.-fl-fl*) P0 SAtE '969 fl eiimlh.w med. wdemn sos coil dowid nsa 5e'e -04 N.W 21St, alterS (g.). .9-,) ass ma u~ AlL 'erllOtChOfl JewsIns IL 1Mw. he FOR RENT SERVICES For .gn car awnes, need r.l.~l. arvce? Grand rix Motors of tod.ron wdl service on weekend. ltmeeed? Call John P84159 (M-37-90-P) typ.ftg sav.ce any rnc.eulcI prIce thesis typing Profenhoael work 0.1,. G-V29 (M-5T0.PI ~O5E5 SQASO. Lilti. Pyelrle ~onch. informal *iety oil focII*1e 4 'S kept ~ iSIS Pt P'Se IS me 174 4739 ewe. (m.044t1 14Yfl04 lCfl MUIR AflAWI COASt WY ACG ANY WYSCM Mt inNTA4 AMIIY-STl*flsSM0sY.AIIOTIcS La,, seW 4wPahs W$W "erg odd 0 ASh 1m4 3) -. SiftS SUMS l. PAITS-317-~ffi A SERVICE377-0722 lOAM6PM 7 DAYS A WW WI SW. Awe m.D. SERVICES Scuba Classes starling Feb 26th Wreck Dive March 9,1, Sole, Service Rental, torn Aller, (Co-heel of Wild KncdorTl V AlIens Aquatic a Trail Center Inc 348 Vt Univ 373-9233 (n,-ft-S6-c) mo~or and mino, repel, on all foreign and domestic autos See Bill and Mi~es AutoR~airot2225NVd6St a coIl 37694N (in-St-Vp) WIRtO FOR SIGHT VheE~~glos. Super Mart UNIVERSITY OPtICIANS 3~SW4tltAve flMbO (M-5&53-Cj europe I *roe I AF rico Asia trove I discounts ye~ round student air 5,0,01 mc 4228 first ave tucker go ~4 ~4) 934-4660 (m 23t-Wp) PERSONAL SAAOAIES ARRIVED FROM LGJ~l, CW O$IN, Sec.allslng n English ho', :uflirg. blow waving far the in lock uni.en Orop by Colonial plo*a 716 Univ Ave 377-2643 (l40t43%~ Wedding invitallons SI 40 p.r business cords 1* '5. rubber slump. magnetic sign,, offflt puinhing 01ff Ho' rirt.no 1103 N Main (S-FR-SC) term Popenl Conados longest Servic. For caalogu. s.ndS2 to Essay Services. 57 Spodino Avenue Suite 2W. Toronto. On, Canada Also. campus representollyst required Plea. write j-35t70Poncho s. Bookpo&s. Pock, Wfromes. J.nts. Rugby Shirts. trail Shoes. White Stog 50.do Bathing Suits Join Univ Hiking Club AlIens Aquatic A 'roil Cent. 3448W Univ 3'3-fl33 (g-fr 72cL COEDs facial Mo,, removed p.r n~onenlly Coil Edmord Owy. el.cItolagi.t OV ~ years empetie~e Colt 377mg (J-F#6I-C) 54J1R WI EUROPI -Uni-Trovel Chatters ~ lees 'hop A .g econOmy fore 65 days odvonce poymeni required US Govt approved iWA-Pon ArTTronhavla 707. Call toil free I 323-480 l13*46-P) Goinesvill&s Lorgesi Indoor REA ~R~ET ~vmy $ri Sot -Sondoy C Lockobl. Sooth. $4 Doyly, lit Weekend Free when you stay month R.se.ve yours now 201 E Un.v.rsuty A,. 37S-3431 (4-IT90-P) Ran i've missed you Oo you ren,.mb.r me? In, -sod ira anymore k.p in MS R'tds looking Ic, &t& htts Sir 67 high osp.ratiocs. intelligent, 0roctive. pI.son. gentleman. athletic. no cvens So. 280323 0IT.q0-P) Conqotulotions to the new Della Gommo its. with love from your resident holdovers Et.rnol and Ruth and the winIe, pledges (.J-IT-90-P) *is handful of dus, he earth is one home L it be in unity SaM, *rilinos (i-IT-go-C) Quality leatherwork r~*vr weal Ciii it always wee' in At MaSonOti we specific*. in custon, eatherwork purseS, belt,, coats. ockel,. sandals. ravel bogs if it con be mode of leather. we con flake it to suit you MoSonDu, 131 W University Ave open ~m-4~n' Monday thu Solurday. by oppoinlnent Sundays evening. 3,3-74,0 (i-w-flWANTED succulent red-blooded rirgin for dime, wilt, dink-haired ~unonoh Count Call alter dusk 376 V94o. 373-5596 (!.mnolee o~$y) l-)-9p) Gay men ond women me.l mu,. at pm 07 nw STer inpeak. from Arico It ti-S-p LOST & FOUND FC~J'C a block cot with white paws behind crytol coIl Jl 372-flfl keep trying (LSr-S0-P) Found a wct~ and elms rIng mute deitfy to cloim call 3749471 -fat Seeve (I-5T-~.P) NUBBYS TACKLE Box 1 BI. Soutotught Newberry. Flo ____ 515W I4MicOW S AUTO REPAIR Al W.A Osned M*r-MJnorEeoIvu 205 NW. tOMe. rn-sin LUNCH 1 1AflM 59e it I. ----a -----MI MCIIKEE't' I BOOKS 4COLlECTOR'S I I PUNTS I I I LIMIlEO EDITiON fliNTS I I7W.Univ. 3734fl4 I -n~a con EDITOR MEOW It, *9 ~Xt IWO weds. Sabq $20 a went Sw days wink. Ieexpedurca CALL 316-4458 Ask far DAVEor TERRI. DINNER ALL DAY FOR $1.39 BEER ON SUNDAY 10% STtDEJ~7 DISCOEiPvl OPEN DAILY 1 1AM-MO4IGIIT 18355W ISST 377.0901 --------------------------------Have you considered a Career In INTIEHATIONAL BUSINESS? Our two-year program, Master In International Business Studies, Includes intensive language study; In-depth cultural studies: business skills; and a altmonth work experle~c. In Latin America or Europe. Other busies graduate degree pwgrams at the University ot South Carolina Include master's In busing. admlnletratlon, economics, accountancy and frauportutlon: arId Ph.D. In business admInIstratIon ad economics. Faq tue., lofo.mS SJP bid IRS tIS fl.ipOfi toOflar sl ~waa 8i0 Oo#g E Stesluw ASSlnbISIon lbs Unlwa~ Sled. OwodIn. C. kbde. led' Caresna NW. P.1db, by SC Pafln.al9Fund)

PAGE 15

The Indepenc Florida AI1i~ W.dn.d.y. F.bnay K, un lent ~ator LPq. IS Hancock no by PAT MCGRATH Alligator Spoils Writer Confidence--'Assurance: Belief an one's own abilities", mat's how Webster defines the magical word that breeds ~Ljceess to those who characterize It. HOWEVER, IF close inspectors of the UF go1t scene were permitted to coin their own interpretation of the (cmi, no doubt could read: Confidence--Phil Hancock.' Hancock plays and speaks with all the selIXassurance you nIght expect of a ~uy who has been a bulwark oil Buster Bishop's Gator Golf team from the moment he Caine to Gainesville in 1972. Ass freshman, the smiling. sandy-haired youngster from Greenville. Alabama stepped right into the pressurepacked college scene and won his very first tournanient. the Placid Lakes invitational. Ibm year. Bishop had Gary Koch. Andy Bean. Ben Duncan. and Woody Blackburn returning from the previous years SEC championship team and was looking much the ~anie as he is this year)j'or a solid player who could step in and help the team make a strong challenge for the NCAA title. HANCOCK FILLED in perfectly. He shot 210, six under ~ for the lint three rounds of the NCAA Tournament and was within four shots of tourney leader Ben Crenshaw. On the final day, he ballooned to an 86 but since the four best scores of each day were the ones that counted, it didn't matter for the team total. He had already done his damage and the Gators coasted to the national championship. Now, two years later with Koch and Blackburn departed. Hancock still exudes the confidence that was born during that historic week in Stillwater. Oklahoma. cocky. iu We expect to i in every time we tee It up in a touritnient. We're not cocky, just confident. It comes from success and layingg together as a team Ironically, at has been winning on an individual basis that Hancock has had trouble achieving. Since a final wund 69 in the Fal~tat1 Amateur last year. the 5-Foot-9. 160-pound lunor has been in contention to win innumerable times. He lhiished 2nd in the NACC last June 4th in the Sunnehanna (Pa.) Invitational. made the semi-finals in the Western, placed 8th in the Southern, 10th in the Easter, 5th at Ohio State this past fall, and 8th in the Dixie Intercollegiate. Always a problem, or two has arisen to keep victory from his grasp, but by no means has this affected his highly positive outlook. *bj FEEL In, playing well enough to win. It seems that I always run into a bad hole or a bad nine holes," he says niatter-of.factly. Sometimes breaks will beat you. Take last years NCAA. I was tied with Gary (Koch) for the lead and Curtis (Strange from Wake Forest) makes an eagle on the last hole to win by one. You know, what can you do?" he asked nonchalantly. Look at Forrest Fezier and Tom Watson oat the tour, How many times did they finish second betbre they won?'' When he speaks of his many near-victories there's not the lightestt trace of frustration in his voice. A Phil Hancock victory is inevitable and he knows it. but being an easy going relaxed type of guy, he is not about to lose any sleep over when or where. I-ic talks about someday gaining a berth on the Walker Cup team and taking a trip to the Masters as easily as vouor I would mention a trip to the supermarket. Hauicock is not cocky. just radiantly confident. si confident photo by chip him. GAT(R GCLF PHIL HANCOCK .won hIsfirstcolI~Ioh tourney 4 D E -4

PAGE 16

Peg. gE~Th. Ia4~.d.el R.rld. AJhgav, W.dn.S.y, binj.ry It 1975 U F netters try to beat weather, Furman today By KEITH CANNON Thun dershowers Afligat. Spats Wdhr put start a of literal damper on the British UF's tennis season Monday, but the Gators will try again today when they host Furnigh. The match with Valdosta invade I rugger domain Today at 5:30 p.m. the UP rugby team will host two learns I~orn the British aircraft carrier H.M.S. Ark Royal. The game will be played at Schnell Field which is located next to the law school. The first team from the "Ark Royal" have been the British Navy rugby champion, in the past. ibis past weekend the Florida ruers lost to the Winter Park RugbyClub bya 12-4score. Bill Roberts scored the lone try 44 points) for the Gatos. The UF rugby "B' team lost to the Melbourne Rugby Club by a score with Mark Campbell scoring a try for the Gator fllen. SCOREBOARD -A **s,*.u Cn. *Na.S n.S. t .fl C. 4Sn~ a-,.,. 3* 31 SS -y.~ 3* 3~ S S S 'It tn. m 44 U ft a ,4 -ml -5' 3, a 'Sw Al,. 33 4 Sfl in, S. 0"temg 4 5 3M *3t13** Can**O*flt ~-e ma Ch*(*C* II 'Sat Mamas Cliv sa 33 Il III I *nnJI U US 'It flh.n U 3' In pm i~ m-t--U 11.1. 5 35 5 a.,. nsa., nfl,,. ,. a a n. *mia.4 U S~ -U Lee A*e**** 39 It -'dli Aaau~. mylsi. L ha *t Mn y.t U I flI s-rn., 4. 0 tea it, IC flit 'S Ii -itt, flit I. di -II I' It -II *~* "'? -V., -As.,. a U S .unA nw-in .5.-" *.a-tt *.e. -I. Si M.Smfl It LnI* a -. *ee WSfl S ijiat al *~* aim tin to Ytniy. tb nni.e .54. Ia mw~**t. -iflfl~ *flna I. .U -me. adat. .Sts ta~ -b~. -W**~*S~I. 4. S.4*Sd~ as *6'1 .e. *3 5 Laynu. 5 '-a. S. S S UCLA *3 S ~ S. Ca54~ -*4 S & LIatama S. Pt -I3-ft SS St '0 tfl* *4 '05 CIS 34 I, S Ci.na t~ ,* *1 "en C--'a. Ii 95 V.Ii p.*4 ** '4 -te S. *4 II it U Ut U I. *e* *-.4.~ 3'* Ii ,* -.*5 U U 31Sfl *3 S q6 n.VI. y,. UIS aiSli. Pr. U.S.a LaBel. afhS Si.-. nina. udoag t.n.a. Si. SkiS. -S St*II* Slat, kneeS-La Vms. UIEC C Sauna. fl0t. hon SMISfl 5331-. t*efluIa*. tt*aS LAS. 'em. Wa Sl (Ga.) State ~.as resthedujed br next Monday afternoon in Valdosta. THE WASHOUT not only delayed the start of the season. but it also marked the fourth straight day the UF players have not been able to practice or play due to bad '.eather. Coach Bill Potter doesn't feel the layoff will hurt his leant "We've been working a long time." he said. "A few days shouldn't make too much difference.' About the Furman Paladins. Potter said, They usually have a good team. It should be a fine rnatchY Match time is 2:30 p.m. at the UF tennis courts. located west of Fraternity Row by the Holland Law Center. INTRANUIRALS The deadline for sign up for the Me&s and Wome&s Doubles Tennis Tournament is Feb. 28. The event will be held March 8-9. For more information contact the IM office. 229 florida Gym, 3920562. Jennings 2 won the allcam pus donnitory bowling tournament last week, Area winners which competed for the championships were~ Little. flume; Newins, Graham: SouthG&l, N.E.; North G&I. Tolbert: fletcher R I. Murphree: and Jennings 2, S.E. Today, the Orange League Fraternity Bowling cham* pionships will be held at the JWRU lane,. Thursday. the Blue League will have its rolloff. Seven teams will compete. noun mans COf~ icip you ,rd a horn. flporhr*fl9, nobI. horn. o~ roov$moIe iie easy way' OIj~ FEE is EFUNOAILE jot a. mmcm is flAt TO 0pn~Oon',I 7 ~ ~4 SW 4* Av. 3fl 6~OQ WESTSIDE E*pN $14.1 t 1 2. a 4. S. & 7. a. I. 10. Ii. 12. 13. '4. II16. '7. ia. I,. 20. 4 Cvi. Fonqn Ca. 6 Cvi. Anurics. Cars S Cyl. Am.rgc.n Can 3325W. Univwu.ty Avant. Pio. 3fl754Z 2* OttA *RCCKBRSIMVICS JACK'S 20 POINT ANNUAL SERVICE SPECIAL 05 I I '5$14.95 CLEAN AND TIGHTEN BAflERY CONNECTIONS. INSPECT BRAKE SYSTEM & ADJUST BAAKES (DAIS TYPSI PACK FRONT WHEEL BEARINGS IDRUM BRAKESI PRESSURE TEST COOLING SYSTEM TEST COOLANT AND ADO FOR BOilO MIXTURE INSPECT WIPER BLADES MD CHECK OPERATION TEST WdSWAS4EA OPERATION & FILL RESERVOIR CLEAN AND INSPECT BRAKE ICES INSPECT AND ADJUST ALL BELTS INSPECT MA CLEANER MO BLOW OUT INSPECT AIR CONCITIOWINd SYSTEM FOR LEAKS AND PRICE LUBRICATE ClASS CHANGE OIL IF MICESARYI CHICK ALL LIGHTS FOR PROPER OPERATION CHICK ALL FLUIDS INSPECT ALL TIRES FOR CUTS, BRUISES, WEAR INSPECT POWER STEERING SYSTEM FOR LEAKS ASPECT FRONT UJWEAUIOW FOR SAFETY INSPECT WICKS FOR LEAKS AND WEAR ROW TEST CAR *OII. Pn and Coolant Auditwul ELECTRONIC MOTOR TUNE 43 WITH THIS SPECIAL 4 550. Pet SB.16.Pn 512.36. Putt (wa* Au CoMltio.,gn 8200 .xtn) NATIONAL CERTIFIED MECHANICON DUTY 7 DAYS A WEEK I



PAGE 1

The Independent FloridaAlgtr P olstd by Compu Cmmnuvhca.Ions Incm Go nMdil.e Fkndo Not officially ossoc'ot.d with ih. Unwversy of Flondo WEDNESDAY FEB. 26 1975 VOL. 67 NO.89 Nearly 30 faculty to be cut Dy TOM SHRODER AllIS.,o Staff Writer UP deans will notify 20 to 30 faculty members this week that their contracts will not be renewed next year. In addition, the UF 1975 summer budget will be reduced by 25 per cent-5658,OW-. reducing it to approximately the level of futiding for the 1973 summer quarter. UF INTERIM ViCE PRESIDENT for Academic Affairs Robert Bryan said the faculty salary budget must be trimmed by Sl.S million to meet a rqucutby thefBoard of Regents. The 20 to 30 faculty members contracts which will not be renewed next year are part of a 90 position cut required to meet the 1.5 million reduction. The College of Arts and Selaices, UF'. largest college, was forced to cut 32 of next year's facukty positions, worth more then ssm,om in sskrIus. BRYAN SAID TUE FACULTY HIDING freese that began Dec. l2, will continue throughout next year to enable UP to mat comlttmeuits to the legislature. In addition to cutting salary expenses by 1.5 mIllion, LIP may have to return as much as 56 WHO In unspent salary money at the end ysTUAR EeuRCu A iSser Sam WilSe, Honor Cowl~ Ally. G0n. Paul Mannish,. who .dll net be at UF next quarter, requested that a succoew bevchosa, this week to take over the luwetlgatlon of cheating in the College of Damie.s Admlnimarrslon. HasneCowrl Charnel I.r Robert Harris told Marmish he would appoirn a muceger within th. week at a meeting Tuesday with UF adminisarats and Honor Court officials. I'VE Man3 tHU mistakes and I will own up to them. bug I -eally cars about Is that ci the year. Normally, state universities must return 2 to 2.5 per cent of salary appropriations to the state at the end of the year. BRYAN SAID HE COULD SEE NO "philosophic basis" for continuing the practice in a year when universities arc already facing drastic budget cuts, but he said the legislatue'might require it any way. Bryan said he was able to cut 52 positions by freezing openings due to retirement, death or transfer. ~TUE 23 PER CENT REDUCTlON of the 1975 summer budget will cut another 37.5 positions. Dryan said. Only 20 to 30 posItions must be eliminated by not rehiring faculty who presently hold interim appointments or have beat at UP fr less than one yer. interim faculty and first year professors art the only positions that can be terminated wIthout one yea?'u notice. UP INTlE33IN AFfiRMATIVE Action Coordinator Dorothy Nevifle said the hiring freese and dismissal of first year faculty will preclude meeting goals for the hiring of women and minorti.s. She said she will follow the situatIon carefully to monitor the impact of the budget policies on women and minority faculty presently at UF. photo by edt eos.n HM1WSN mist Us. often have bluier mumories Mf drodcl political rupremco.n but as lmmlgrflon officials crack dswn oath.e refugees who breve the wpe waess of th. Atllnud lo corn. g Fierkds's door. these m.norie, loom soed as futuedmigers -well. For on In-depth InvedlIgallon of lh. Holiens end their plight, see mpncIal rupont page eIght See related atow,. pqe tine the job gets dose," Marnish aid. explainIng his reasons for warning a succeacr appointed now. Much of Tuesday's meeting dealt with errors that have been made in the in'sgation and internal problems between Mannish. Harris and Chidf Deftn,. Couuuel Bryan Ptren. Also dicsesed at Tuesdaf's meeting were the problems the Hansr Court was a-. perlencing under a circuit court injunction An additional 20 positions may be eliminated to Mive UF a 534.O00head start iin meeting next year's budget requirements and to return II special faculty positions funded by the legislature for this year only. BRYAN TOLD A TUESDAY meeting of the Council of Vice Pnsidents that cuts will include the elimination of funds for the Urban and Regional Development Center and reductions in the Center of Latin American Studs and the Office of Instructional Resources. UP's Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences and I. Hillis Miller Health Center are budgeted separately and are not directly effected by the cuts. How.r the health center agreed to pay for S*3,OO0 worth of faculty salaries I,, biomedical engineering that are presently handed by the severely cut general education budget. halting all closed hearings and trials, and what the adulhatio. could do to h4l, MASSES and Psersi charged Marnish with net cooperating with the other members of the Honer Court and of taking too mudh, responslblIty on himself. Warmish eggeed there l.S boan a "baesk.downIn commualcatlon" Isthe HenceCourt. but stressed that betwas th. peso. that should have coerl of the lnvesligstkns, no. the chaugcellor or the defense counsel. Murniimh and Harris also clAshed cin the (See 'Marnujak' pqge fie) ROERT BRYAN .1.1.5 millIon muat be ftmmed Useno0tors eno rse Dy LESLIE GOLAY AnlpaStaffWrlter Thbe student Senate unanimously passed two resolutions Tuesday endorsing the establishment of a Public Interset Research Group (PIRG) on campus. Vice President for Student Affairs Arthur Sandeen told P1KG representatives earlier Tuesday that it was up to the Student Senate to decide if UF's student body wants PIRO on campus. SENATORS approved a resolution supporting the validation of P11RG's two-year old signature petition, and another supporting PIRG and urging the UF administration to aid in its implementation on campus. Student Senate President Kevin Malone, who drafted the two resolutions, and PIRG President Roxanne Marietta explained to Senators PIRG's proposed handing system and the type of issues the group is involved in. Speaking for the petition's validation, Malone said. "I think it's grossly unfair that snyose who has long-term plans fo, this unIversity can be put off for so 1ong. The desires and needs of students are Still the same. (iF PRESIDENT RODENT Q. Marstoninformed of the Senate's decision late wil doas hesi ewul do. Iwlgo ang with whast Sandeen says. The next thing to do is to hear from the Senate."' At the earlier meeting Sase told three P111G representatives. Malone and two SGO representatives that "If the general sense of the student body right now says that this (P1RG) is a good thing that that would be sufficient as far as P'm concerned." IN ORDER FOR PURG to be established as a student-handed group on campus, the Board of Regents required signatures of 51 per cent of the student body. PIRG completed a petition which fulfilled these requirements in February 1Q73. Sandeen previously decided P11RG's petition was not valid because it was two yearly old. and not representative of the present student body. "I am suggesting that the Student Senate speak to this issue as a group." Sandeen said. "If the senate is a representative group that is recognized, and it feels that the student body knows about PIRG and what's involved, then I will listen to that." Sandeen said. WHEN MALONE ASKED Sondeen what he would say if the Student Senate passes a resolution saying the petition Is okay. Sandeen, answered. "l'm not totally inflexible. I will certainly consider it." Sandeen said his new decision to listen to the Seate's vote on P1KG is "obviously a coinprom 15. Sandeen told the PIRG representatives. "We've spent enough time fidling around and l'ryfr you, but this petition was made before I came to UF. It's time to move sead." student who wee'tt here whe the petition was made," Sandeen explained. Sandeen volunteered to gp before the Senate Tuesday night to speak on PIRG but his offer vas devlned. IF TUE PITION IS VALIDATED, P1MG-would befunded underana-ffirmatIve voluntary fhe systun which requires that at least 25 per cent of the studemtbody donaeSI per quart. Ti, would not be a meafly bill.'The etudens would have tochatk "yes" at the time student fees are -a to be un=said the $I. PING Is a conswner activist gpoop which deals with projects on the local. State and nation loSe. 'The group deals with student righa, bank studies. ladlordtmatlaws, -e and rns dhscrImluatIp. and various other ce a sm-eatdiss PING pays for the aid and advice of proftuslwu.Jls duing the seems of thsfr propcS. Marmish asks court for successor

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Pag. 2, h. Ind.p.4.o* Rodlde Milgasr, Wedn.dey, F-ebruary 26 ?975 capsule Car prices cut as saOles jumpD DETROIT (UPI) -American Motors Corp. Tuesday followed the lead of General Motors and cut prices by as much as $196 on some models to spur sales once cash rebates end Friday. AMC announced the action to prevent a post-rebate sales 'lump in March just as the industry reported mnid-February new car sales missed matching last year's level by only 210 cars -one-tenth of one per cent. It was the closest automakers have come to matching a year-ago pace since the 1975 models were Iroduced last fall. D em os f or ce o il vofe W ASH INGTON (UPI) -House Democrats voted 1 53 to 4S Tuesday to force a House vote on whether to kill the oil depletion allowance. the depletion repeal wotild he attacdied to a pending S21.3 hithon tax-cut bill which is tentatively scheduled for House floor action on Thursday. Ford charges with energy HOLLYWOOD. Fla. (UPI) -President Ford accused Congress Tuesday of taking a gamble on energy that threatens America with disaster. By voting so suspend his increase in oil :nmport fees and by tailing to enact a national energy program. 'Congress is enmbarked on on a massive gamble -a risk of increasing this nation's vulnerability to future embargoes which we cannot alford." Ford said in a speech prepared bor delivery to a White House-sponsored conference on domestic affairs and the economy. "Sotar, the onjy legislative move Congress has taken on the energy problem was to block my proposal to increase tariffs on oil imports. This is a purely negative action which will tbrce me to use the constitutional power of veto for the first time mn the 94th Congress. "In effect, the Congress voted to continue for the time being our ever-increasing dependency on Arab and other oilproducing nations. This course could lead America to disaster'" The speech, opening two days of politics and golfing in this Miami suburb, mirrored the Harry S. Truman-type stumping Ford displayed in grass roots campaigns for his energyeconomic programs in Atlant, Houston and Topeka. Kan., in the past month. Congress gambling r Ades say Fo rd HOLLYWOOD. Fla. (UPI) -President Ford was told by aides Tuesday he now has the votes in the Senate to sustain his promised veto of a bill suspending his oil tariff increases tar 9) days. Presidential Press Secretary Ron Nessen told reporters aboard Air Force One en route here that John Marsh, White House chief of Congressional liason, and Max Friedersdort, White House legislative lobbyist. inlbrmed Ford during a morning meeting with his energy advisers that they are now convinced they have enough votes to sustain a veto in the Senate and are picking up votes in the House. Nessen said Ford's response was: "That is good news." The President has until next Tuesday to send his veto message to Congress or it will become law without his signature. There were indications the veto would be sent so Capitol Hill Friday. 0 MAAS BROTHERS On your coming job interview,, make the very best impression with our coordinates from College Town In 100 percent polyester. Get it in our Junior Sportswear Arma. .at Mo. Brothers, of course. COLONY SHOPS SHOE SALON Her.'. ft. Iotnt si$. from Bar. Trap. .0 gmat platform wedge with soft eater upper,, in camel or brown, just 621.001 Mdo new twist from Greece that II keep your feet coolby Red Hot In navy brown and white. $2800. U

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Th. Independent florid. AMlIgator, Wedn.sMy, Pebrvory 2', jUL PagrS Act may make UF 'grind to ahaIt' By TOM SI!RODER AllIgator Staff Writer UF may have rn comply with the Adniiistrative Procedure Act (APA) beginnng neit week, an event UJF Vice President for Academic Affairs Robert Bryan said could "grind UF to a halt." The law would require UP to publish the agenda of all meetings at which policy matters would be considered three weeks prior to the scheduled nmecting. IN ADDITION, UF must publish rules for operating procedure and justify each policy on the basis of state law. UP Attorney Ton, Riggs said. The Board of Regents legislative committee will meet March 5 to decide it state univer''ties have to comply .ih the APA immediately. Riggs said Cf the legislative committee did not order immediate compliance, the legislature would probably pass a law specifically requiring universities to copy this '.prlig REP. CARROLL WEBB, D-Tallahassee. acting director of the Adnmin strative Procedure Committee, has said that universities are not exempt from the A PA. However. Biggs said Webb told him he was itillinig to consider requests for specific exenmption for certain areas of university operation. State Senate President Denipsey Barron. U-Panama City, author of the APA. said the itent of the legislation was to nrevcrt 'tate igenicies Ironm making tile; having the effect ot legislation wthout approval tiomi the legislature. Ui'S EXECUTIVE STAFF discussed the problem at a Tuesday meeting. Biggs asked them, to review all policies and procedures and to compile a list of areas where compliance wIdh the act would cause severe difficulties. UF President Robert 0. Marston asked Riggs to draft a letter to University System Chancellor Robert Maut, expressing UF's hope that state universities would not be instructed to comply with the APA until the legislature specifically required it. However. Biggs said he believed that Mautz and Chancellor-designate E.T. York both wanted the universities to comply immediately. Penalty hours are not appropriate says task force By LINDA WISNIEWSKI AlIgaber SWE Wit.r The Task Force on the Student Judiciary discussed Monday a list of "preliminary proposals" which includes elimination of penalty hours in favor of a 'public reprimand" for Honor Court offenders. The task force, headed by law professor Michael Gordon. discussed the .idea of a publicc reprimand' as the lowest penalty for Honor Court violations, although no definite method of making the offenders' names public was agreed upon. 1T1E TASK FORCE has agreed that penalty hours "are not appropriate" in light of the Board of Regaits' ruling that it is unlawful fbr students to register for more hours than they need to graduate. because it would require more funding froin the state. The task force also suggested student problems be split into two separate areas. The Honor Court would handle problems dealing with academic dishonesty among UP students, and the Student Conduct Conmniittee, headed by task force member and Director of Student Judicial Affairs Rob Densen. would handle other student problems such as ticket scalping and passing bad checks. TEE COMMItTEE also agreed that UFP faculty should be involved in the Honor Court. although they could not agree on the form of the involvement. Craig Mitchell. Honor Court representative on the task force, said that students would raise objections against having a faculty member on the Honor Court hearing conmittee because "a faculty member would tend to repress students." "I want as much faculty input as possible without ruining the student image of the Honor Court." Mitchell said. THE TASK FORCE ALSO agreed to incorporate the Administrative Procedures Adt (APA) as the "framework" of the Honor Coont, rather than using the Florida laws of criminal procedure. The purpose of using the APA as a "framework" for the Honor Court is to "provide reasonable guidelines for adnministrative hearings and to provide a fair hearing by due process through law," Gordon said. The task force also recommended the APA should be used as the "framework' for the Honor Court so that it will not get "bogged down" in problems of legal technicalities THE TASK FORCE will meet again on March 3 to draft its final recommendations. It wtil be 'a couple of weeks" before the final recommendations will be decided on. Cordon said. The 16 member task force was formed by Vice President for Student Affairs Arthur Sandeen and interim Vice President tbr Academic Affairs Robert Bryan. Sandeen and Bryan asked the task force to also explore the traffic rout, the student conduct committee, and the student housing council. Gordon said. The task force was asked to determine if the Honor Court "insured equal handling of all students," Mitchell said. "We want to make sure the Honor Court isn't just a police group. We want all of the students to get a fair shake," he said. [he committee was also asked to determine if the Honor Code should be continued. decentralized, revised or eliminated. Mitchell said. DEMPSEY BARRa.N author of APA act

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pag. 4Tlh. tnd.pndemn Rd. AJIugoor. Wedn.day. Febrvary 24 197 Students a By DEBBIE ERICKSON Alliga.o SuNl Writer Audiology and Speech Pathology students onmplarned Tuesday about the overcrowded classroom situation and deterioration of the quality ot their education to Arts and Acience Dean C.A. Vander~ert. Last Oct. 30 Speech Pathology and Audiology students presented a petition to Dean VanderWerf calling for smaller class qnz, more space and facilities in the speech and hearing clinic, and at least one clinical supervisor to oversee the performance of student-clinicians. Tuesday was the linst time students had any contact with the administration about the petition. "WE'RE NOT GOING TO turn out professional people if we don't have enough teachers, time and space," Marcia MacFarland. 4AS, said. Edward Hutchinson, acting speech department chairman, said. "Currently there are only six professors in the speech pathology and audiology department. We have approximately 300 undergraduate students and over 90 graduate students in the departmeint." Approximately I .it)graduate students will apply for the graduate program and only I5S will be accepted, Hutehinson said. VandcrWerf said there are two alternatives to the overcrowding situation. "Th E DEPARTMENT can get together with people in clinical work at the department of communicative disorders and ask them to teach more classes than they already do. "If this is impossible. we will have to cap enrollment." If the department restricts enrollment. there will be nowhere in the state that a Mautz State University System Chancellor Robert Mauti has "for all practical purposes" aceepted UF President Robert 0. Marston's answer to the dilemma of 600 freshmen admitted in excess of a Board of Regents ceiling. Marston proposed that rather than be denied lbnds for those 600 sophomores next year, 600 fewer sophomore transfers will be admitted in September. "For .l1 practical purposes, the decision has been wade," said Mautz. "We're just r gr C.A. VANCEtWEUF .Arts and ScIence dean qualified graduate student can go. VanderWerf said. "Students should realize that the department is funded on the number of students we have. The less students we have, the less money we will receive." he said. HUTCHINSON SAID the number of students enrolled in the department is up. but the level of funding is down. The department will be reviewed this summer to determine if it will receive mccteditation again. Hutchinson said. 'There is a very good chance we will receive a severe warninR or be discredited." solution waiting on figure,." Although UF admissions officials said Sunday there was a good chance UF would exceed the 2,90W limit on entering freshman again this year, Mauti said he didn't think it would happen again except as the "result of simple human error." UP Executive Vice Prnuidaxt Harold Hanson said from current igures, UF will "try to hit 700" sophomore admissions. Last year, 1.318 were admitted. he said. MIKE'S hd~. .Rp acrn=1 w publbcoon of Comnpua Camnmunkia ncorpot,.d. a private, non-refl. cmrporhiof t iS publltwd liv. tIw.' wneky iv p dtring jufle. July. cr4 Augut whon II's pubiiSh semi-. w.ky, and during udent Iwdo ond *mom parod. OpnIoflh*pressed ln 0*. independent Aikgao.r e *hse of 0%.' edna.s of 0h. writers of *.hh onri. end nar hocnof' thUmwersity of FlorIda, ihe campus aevd by *ie Indepred4n Florida Al1. Adkens cwrwe5nindepnndent Florida AIII.r is entered asecond ciln maler a. 0,. UnIted ,.4 Poe O$ct04G.ne.le Frd ssai .n .a$0Uprywo Sulk subscflptIorw ore provided The ndapendent Florid. MuAlsr. reser OW '.Ngh to ie.Mw.l the WyOGrOphk.J lane of oil otvwtisemds and Ic revig. -r 'urn owoy ils cop is cenulders abjtc ti.b The Indepen~derd Florida Alligator wW -o conmid.r odtn,ntm of pamte fr any odverlseftenhs .nvalvlng sypowo*phol er. qr erron.u In. .otion unlles notice is gqven I. 0h, odnnes'ng mnaiger within 'I )dey S.e the odveit -een mleert ft. isd.,.nd.rt Fiond.l AUgie wIll -ai k reeponsIble fIr m' -. Owan -n. h.tr Insertion a# On adfllegrtMe schedld te tun .evetal time. evances accepts I CARNIGR AS '75 LARGEST MIDWAY EYERLID SPECTACULAR RIDES, FREE RCUS SPECIAL ADVANCE TICKETS 5 for $1 Avuiable: Rebel Discount, Univeiuity Box Office, fraternities & soauuitiss. ==

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AHTRAK-PIANF:.snp T 923 W. Uninmlsty Ave. GaInesvIlle, No. 32601 AtNOTARY PUBLIC 1219 W. University 373-2505 Pat Mondoza J UST SIT TING A ROU ND? Move forward wIth Peach Coups ond VISTA. Pooc. Corps and VISTA oft., moro ,ton 700 choices of voiunter osgnrnenft m 1U S A Afruto Asic tsef'n Amernco and ih. Sojj$, Pacific Th. progrurm. ore in ogricuiiur. busmnfs e u o io ac hi e cum. n n g ow igbe roi cr1, ho rn .econo mn ics orn s A cr s oft V hatngidtoln andwhm.an at, fed neseeceag~eeh~aeorsVs mavniosn a pu.& 2*27., 9%.C.Ienn.4. .r sin .M1IsIbI.y-Wet. Dresses C it(. Were ag~io~.$30.00 CVC~fl9 Q~ft$10 OFF more on 'the store. savings on SIZES 3 TO 18 GYPSY 1638 W. University Ave Open 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. Sat. 10 am. tQ 6 p.m. Uh. Independent Florid. AlIkgator, Wedn.dey, Febnrnry fl. 3975. Pc.e Mmish f/trom pagc ',ne) future of the theating Imvestigation. MARMISH SUGGESTED the Honot Court turn over its investigation to a student. faculty task force because people thamk the Honor Court has been paralyzed by the circuit court mnjunction against closed hearings and trials. He said the task force would nor have as much trouble getting students and faculty members to turn in evidence or to compel witnessess to testify. Harris and Petersen disagreed, saying they thought the Honor Court should coninue to have jurisdiction over the cheating investigation. "A JASC FORCE, as far as I anm concerned. could do nothing that the Honor Court could not do." Harris argued. Marnmish said the task three, because it would be made up of more than one person. would not be as vaulnerable to personal threats. Marnmish said defendants had threatened him with bodily harnm and with political pressure. which he said would not be as eftective if there were more than one or two people at the head of an investigation. OFFICIALS also considered the problem of what can be done about charged students who were planning to graduate this quarter, but whose status is uncertain because no closed hearings can be held to determine penalities under the temporary ijuction, WHAT'S I By STEVE PROCKO Alligator 51.1!WrIter ECKANKAR SATSANG: will have a discussion group tonight at 7:30 in the I. Wayne Reitz Union. room 333. TRANSCENDENTAL MEDITATION: introductory lecture tonight at SinLittle Hall. room 205. For further information call 3727550. PIZZA PARTY: for all Citizen Advocates at Leonardo's Pizza today at 5:30 pin Admission $1.00 For further information call 378-1409. ASTROLOGY LECTURE: by David Cochrane will be held this evening from 8 to 9:30 at the Hillel foundation. $1.00 donation. For further information call 372-2900. UiC STUDENT COUNCIL: Will mect today at 4:30 in Little Hall. room 117. Open to all ierested students. For further in PRK FORMal ATION: Inglis and Avon parks will be discussed by Dr. Anthony Pandazzo tonight at 8 in Floyd Hall, room 213. For further information call 392-2233. STUDENT SUPPER: will be held at 6 pm. today at 1320 W. University Ave. Donation $1.00. For further information call 372-8183. It (TveF to 'uggested that the Honor Court the Office of' Student Atfairs turn the mtorimaton about graduating students who might have been involved in the cheating. but LIF Atty. Tonm Riggs said that UF might run into IOmeC legal problems. Biggs said UF would have to take the matter of the graduating students "conmpletely out of the Honor Court.' "WE WOULD HAVE TO UlSE only the resources of the Office of Student Affairs and not the resources of the Honor Court." Biggs explained. Rob Denson, director of student conduct, said he didn't know if student affairs could take over the mnvestigatmon and decide on penalities while the injunction was still in effect. "Meanwhile, we don't want to do anything that might go against the Injunction." Denson said, adding an appeal against the injunction has been tiled by Biggs A DATE HAS NOT been set for the appeal, but Benson said he hoped it miight be heard in the next couple of weeks. In addition to asking that a successor be appointed this week. Marnhish instructed Riggs to start making a complete record of the investigation so his successor would know what to do. Marmish said he was going to start "phasmng out of the investigation within the next two weeks." and said, "I am wilting to be an advisor, but I am not going to run this thing by myself anymore" HAPPENING BEAM UP TO THE TOWERS: Thursday for a meeting of S.T.A.R.; the Star Trek Association for Revival from 5-7 p.m. in the Flowers TV room. For further information call 392-8784. CIRCLE K'ERS: wil meet Thursday at 6 p.m. in I. Wayne Reitz Union, room I5OC. Nominations for officers will be held. For further information call 392-1678. PRAYER AND FELLOWSHIP: by InterVarsity Christian Fellowshtp will be held Thursday at 4:30 prn. in the I. Wayne Reitz Union, room 122. For further information call 378-0759. YOUNG DEMOCRATS: will meet l hursday at 7:30 p.m. in the J. Wayne Reitz Union. For further information call 373-2271. ALACIJUA ALCOHOLISM PROGRAM: will meet Thursday at 8 p.m. in the Veterans Administration Hospital Directors' conterenee room. FILM SOCIETY: will meet Thursday at 9 I' ml. In the J. Wayne Reitz Union. room 363. For further information call 392-6798. SIMULATED COMBATEES: The Sinmulated Combat Club will meet Thursday at 7:30 p.m. in the ]. wayne Reitz Uniom. room 346. For fhrther information call 3783434. PATHWAY MOVE D IlI AND iT'h CELEBRATING WITH A =510111 A L 94 R 2Q29 NW 13th ST. march

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PW.4 .Th. Indepnndeot Fordd.MAlIItvr Wedn.day, PFbrvory 24, E DITORIAL Mistakes Student justice at UP is increasingly taking on the appearance of an ineptly played charade -with the lItys and careers of countless UF students hanging in the balance. But the charade may be coming apart at the seams, as witnessed by the bickering between Honor Court Chancellor Robert Harris and Atty. Gen. Paul Marmish that bubbled to the surface yesterday in the office of Vice President for Student Affairs Art Sandeen. Dressed up for the benefit of an Alligator reporter -who attended the meeting over the strident objections of Harris -the problem between the two law students basically boils down to a case of glory hogging. Harris, and Honor court Chief Defense Counsel Byron Petersen, don't think Mannish has been cooperating with other members of the Honor Court in the investigation into alleged mass cheating in the College of Business Administration. They say Marmish hasn't been sharing information as much as he should with other members of the court. And the implied corollary we snse s ta t they dont think he's shared the But even more disturbing is Mannish's confessions tha he haes igmade "some mistakes" in Since he's not going to be here next quarter anyway, Marmish nobly offers to begin training a successor to head up the cheating investigation as soon as possible-. The most important point, however -which we obviously feel can't be overemphasized -is that with the cloak of secrecy surrounding the conduct of the Honor Court probe, it's impossible to tell the extent of the mistakess" committed by Marnmish or anyone else in the student-run Honor Court. And it's impossible toassessthe damage to individuals and to justice caused by those mistakes. Of course, we've heard rumors. Just the other day, a reporter waiting in the Honor Court office witnessed two furious students who came roaring in. complaining they'd been accused of cheating in classes in which they were not even enrolled. Even earlier, Harris told us of a student who was granted immunity by Marmish, but was mnadvertantly called back and questioned in such a manner that he ended up on Harris' doorstep "hysterical." To his credit, Marmish has been willing to admit he's made "mistakes." And, in fact, it's perfectly understandable that Marmish and other members of the court would make mistakes.Although most law students sound like they know more law than most Supreme Court Justices,. the fadt is they are inexperienced in the administration of justice. In the rush to get student help from the law school for his burgeoning investigation. we wonder how closely Marnish and Petersen were able to check the qualifications of the student counselors who represent alleged cheaters. All this, coupled with the fact that the Honor Court is part of a Student Government whose record in past years has been riddled with misfeasance, mandates public scrutiny of the Honor Court procedures -if they are to be kept in the domain ot the Honor Court at all. But the UF administration has refused to yield to the need for openness, and so the issue is in "real" court, with settlement perhaps a year away. In the meantime. how many more "mistakes." due either to inerperience or conflicts of fragile egos, will be made? And who will suffer because of them? agg gwwI NO,AWVWA. The if NO WAY. Med ia-bug wi you According to the latest unofficial surveys, taken completely at random. 99per cent of all Americatis suffer from some type THESE FORMS of sickness have the peculiar tendency of only infecting the bodies of Americans. If you suffer from any of the following mialuises, run to your nearest supermarket or dIrug store and buy the latest commercially advertised cureall Aimericans sutler from Excedrin headaches, the blahs. iron poor blood and the heartbreak of psoriasis. We are overweight, have that bloated feeling, suffer from occasional irregularity and have the drop. drop. drop of post nasal drip. Americans are plagued by ring-around-the-collar, static climg, enmbarrasing warts and the frizzies. The 24 hour bug 'nd dragon mouth also periodically wreak havoc on our "unsuspecting population. SA TIR E OUR BODIES ARE a breeding ground for a host of exotic tropical diseases we didn't even know, or care, existed. Americans are infested with the viruses Marcus Welby-itus, Medical Center-obia and the dreaded pestilence Ben Casey'a. Americans are victims of tennis elbow, trick knees. athlete's foot and Monday Night Football posterior. Yes, we Americans are in the midst of a massive media epidemic called hypochondria. What are the causes of these media-related diseases? Media-bugs lurk in the dark confines of your television set. I'hey remain dormant as long as the TV set is off. But if by chance an unwary viewer foolishly watches TV for a long AW Vf--IWWMED Q4f ReG4TIG AtDVJAT FIX iT! get you watching ST AFF WRITINGS period ot time, the media-bugs mysteriously conie to life. THE MEDIA-BUGS leave the television screen and enter the human victim through the eyes. The bugs blind the viewers conception of reality--removing his will to resist the advertising propaganda on the television soften. The victim watches a commercial showing a stomach being attacked by a puppet-ilu virus (Ile infamous 24-Hour Bug). Has stomach becomes unsettled, he has "that qucezy feeling" "My God. I need to buy 'ome Pepbo-bismo." the TV vievwer huTHE EABUG conis in mnforms and disguises 'be most common variety is the tension headache. You are watching a murder mystery on television. Will Kojac get hi' mhan? The suspense is head-shattering. Tensioti. Tension 'I ENSION! At the moment of climax. the screen switches to a Btifferii comnmericial."Bufferinovercomes those daily tensions caused by stress and anxiety. It helps you relax, relax, relax." You run to the medicine cabinst and take two Bufferin. The media-bug giveth the pain and the media can taketh away. YES AMERICANS, the new strains of media-bugs are being created every day in the laboratories of druM manufacturers and advertising offices. Before you rush out to buy Gain's scrubbing bubbles or Contact's tiny time capsules. ask yourself why you never heat about any casts of the "blabs" or "medicine breath' outside of Amernca. If this article keeps you up at night. "take Somninex tonight and sleep, sleep, sleep. r The Independent Florida Alligator CU Omnucan Smc.In-chiMr .Wood Managing St. Lnyo.4M10, IA "Tony"Kendzdo .Q. GMen eag.a Mn.Mselphnt.eese Dene rbAne. .-deren cenne -t'""'e -p's-oeinlr buyn -Ub. S ..ftn.6n~mu eMmqg rz4 .artun a Ca. aa.rw Idon Jaws -, S~ AMSWS by P.O. kmx 1Stn Ualversn .49kg. buI'nd Smhdq chle n, fledsl -smao fSe Unti'es5 m"d A'dudn b. ana adSsa I .4 k eep on -.

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Th. Indepenien' FMorida AJlgator, Wednesdoy, Febniary 2A, 1973. Pag.)7 Go for the Grade ins tead of the knowledge EDITOR: As one who has taken two law courses under Professor Stephen Sttit, I bhese it s mdrcntivc ol our igi and superficial edUcational system to Con1sistenIl Iveject alternative methods as means of change. however novel, such as the blanket grading system administered to Mr. Start's Legal Systems class (ut which I was not a member). Without blindly defending such an evaluation system. I think it is significant to speak to the reasons behind 'uch an eltort MR. STITT'S methods may be unacceptable to the academic community. but his motives are more attuned to true Socratic philosophy and teaching than any other I have encountered in my traditional schooling. Gradegrubbimg is the evil to be done away with and the Meal IS make the student curious jand intellectually challenged enough to want to know how the legal puzrle lits together. But Professor Stitt's conflict with the Holland Law Center lacuity and accreditation standards is lust one example of a cancerous macro-problem in A merican education-a deep seated desire to go lot the grade instead of the knowledge to he gained. EDITOR: In a letter appearing in The Alligator last Wedneiday. Charles Pickett claims that big government is a "parasite on free production." He bases his claim on the following premises: I) Government makes nothing. 2) Government employees make nothing. 3) Private companies pay all the cost of government. UNFOETENATELY, Mr. Pickett has left out some relevant information. First, government is not supposed to "make" anything. Governments and their agencies are a service oriented inst it tion. Governmnene emiployes do not try to 'make" things. Government janitors try to remove non-essential" garbage (chewing gum wrappers, paper cups. cola containers. cigarette butts) from your public buildings and streets ADMINISTRATORS hire private companies to build roads,, airplanes, tak,,, suns and bombs to protect private A n old equalizer I lie empnis 4'n gi iades shows how, iiate, al stic we a I arc m sellish ignol unce of the teal Iruit ot college which lies in mqtlhetual lultillment and marurnty. "Boy. you hette, make Hh.i grade," %CCImI to hC'h mIiW 1)0o pare nts and die credo of the workmg~ a ord WE ARE SHOVED io the college box and are expected to pi 0du1cc. Productivity is acknowledged only by high marks 'in that tomiputer sheet that comes in the mail like a stock-s market report. We are brilliant because we get an "A.'' while Boio down the street is dumb tbr getting a "C." It dees t t iniatter that we crammed for it. lied and cheated to get it. and nevermmnd about the courses per se. This is what makes the gradations so ridiculous. They are supposed to show levels of achievement. but I suspect that achieement ie in some other area than the mastery of I CAN'T SPEAK bor Professor Stlu., but many would agree that grades have become such a farce that they are almost conmpletely useless tot their intended purposes. It is a sad. but true, conclusion in America that in school, it is the grade that counts. corporations from foreign and domestic harm. Companies are paid by the government (with tax money) to make these products. Diplomats try tomnake agreements with tbreign countries to prevent direct American involvement in costly wars like Viet Nam. thus, private businesses will not have a manpower shortage due to war losses. Government secretaries type income tax refunds to major oil company executives despite the astronomical profit these executives are making at a time of economic recession. Thene 'burdened" companies also benefit from a 27 per cent oil depletion allowance. It is a glaring fact that these large companies are strangling the American consumer and the American economy. IF MR. PICKET? does not like the way government employees are performing their jobs, maybe he should vote to replace the present "appointed" administration. Glenn Mans 31M I dlo not pretend to be guihiless im all this, for this disease mouches es er one ot us in s arymn degrees. It is important. 10W Cser. to appreciate the decent and respectable motives of tine like Pt otessor Stitt-i-motives w hich are contagious to any studenc ho realizes that there has go be a better way. AS LONG AS we place such a priority on those grades. heating scandals wilt Ilourishandeoncerned people like Mr. Sortt will continue to be smothered in this mania of racing after the grade at any cost-save fbr the too dear price making an elforn to find out "why' in spite Of-not because of. Warren Kmiskern, 3LW Start at0 bottom EDITOR: I'd like to know if the University's Aflirnmative Action Coordinator is going ro de anything for the average black nursing assistant or janitor, or for the female clerk or secretary stuck in a S6,WO0 Year job. Or is he just going to ensure that highly trained. ,.ell favored females and blacks have a crack at upper level positions? The job market for professionals is tight, but blacks and females have an advantage in it now,. si anything. It is blacks and females at the bottom who have yet to benefit from equal oplportunity. Genuine *1tirmative action would mean a substantial increase in the number of middle level positions open to womenstaff assistants, adnminhstrative assistants, clerk V's, fiscal assistants. It would mean an increase In promotional titles for janitors. laborers, nursing assistants,. laundry help. etc. or a direct upgrading in tlte classiticatwon or pay systeii that would give those at the bottom without any real promotional ladder a better standard of living now. Finally it would mean the development of timie-related programs to train motivated ntitsing assistants, for example, to become LPN's and med techs. to enable clerks to become bookkeepers 'and computer programmers, and to enable laborers or secretaries to become craftsmen or women. Admittedly developing a genuine afAirmalive action program would take lot of work. But money for many training and upgrading programs nisy well be available through various Department of Labor and HEW grants. An Affirmative Action plan that is strictly oriented to helping those with the education and background to help themselves seems a waste of effort. Eleanor Saluk EDITOR: Please allow me room in our Gater bor this short reply to Janis Mara's column on Parenthood and Society. im the February 4th issuee of Ihe Alligator. HAVING BEEN blessed iwith 'even children ofmiyown .md one foster child I leel I ant fairly qualified to make this reply. kais I fully agree that a lather should go at least fifty per cent or more in lugging. daring tot mnd disciplining children, whether here's one or one dozen. I also agree it would be flue it, everywhere you take children there would be staff and facilities for keeping them while you dine. 'hop or whatever,. However, it may be most owners of businesses think they have quite a laplul dealing with adults all day. YOU STARTED your tenth paragraph with. "Problan% like this begin nst with the mother or the childresyois nl misse thte bulls cyt hut the enwire target in this statementt. As I understand modern lsyChdIogy. it might warp a chIld .mind if votu girt It sowe of the treatment I fully reccmnwnd-. lh's might have merit it' le it the child get old enough to control the pitrent before you begin applying some,. he age old, proven. temper tantrum equalizer, is permanently attached on either at your wrists. You see il you begin this treatment early enough. obedience ,nd manners will be a way ol te for the little ones, where hissies and tantrum' is with the ones that don't receive it. ALSO THE ONES tho receive it and know how it w.orks. know that it can be administered on the back side of their lap. any time aay plac. without their pat being pulled down. Recommend this to your friend and when you get children of your own start shemi on this treatment and >ou can shop. dine or whatever. happier ever after. Howard Godwmn 'nfm cna flsopot m assam u assess m rar The Independent Florida Alligator Doug Dial frwWni y S. Eon Curnflgflta mea Sita .orr KocIhliC Jr. Pha Ed~ ,,Sditer MIMdI Kwmn Afle New.SIdr' A n ew policy I EDITORi RE: Jeffrey A. Soper's 'A Second Look" concerning grade deficit,. I of having professors ret'aluare their grade curves in asses ,heecurves are made and students are convicted of theatirni. and having the grades changed acnrdlgy,. While ito grade changes ttfl he made until the Honor ( ,trt concludes its in'estigation. we srt trying to nsablish this policy now in anticipation, of such a conIfanyone has any questions or suggestions regarding this matter. or if you have information you w.st to give or if you want to work on having this policy made. please call me as 37S0M77. Bill Leach. Senator. off-campus Addit~ional Data on government

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Pge. i,.tedesendemMd.~Mgs. WdneeSipbhhvrd, I,? a S p.e S aIs HAITIl S By SOD MORRIS AlIgar Staff Writ.r. Rev. Jacques Monmpremier is a patient man. With his job, It doesn't pay to be otherwise. As director of the Haitian Refugee Information Center in Miami. Momipremier must keep tabs on the 1,181 Haitians now in Florida seeking political asylum. it's a job that involves finding shelter, d istributing food, locating odd jobs and serving as spiritual advisor for Haitians caught in the limbo between sanctuary and deportation. Yes, he's i patient man. but he admits that the patience is wearing thin. "YOU SEE THESE?" Mompremier said as he waved a handftd of white, official-looking papers. "They are the work permits we have been waiting for. See for yourself." He tossed the papers on the table. Across the middle of each permit, in bold, black ink it read: "Authorization denied." "1 just don't know." Mompremier shook his head. "DO you suppose they want us to steal?"' Despite the denial of work permits, Mompremier is often able to find jobs for sonmc of the Haitians on the sly. The Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) investigators are so busy keeping up with the IWAXX) illegal immigrants in Florida from all countries that there is I ittle chance of getting caught Ibr working illegally. STILL, MOMPRE!ME!R would like to find jobs for his people without "feeling sneaky" about It. "But, until things become better for us we will have to sneak. I suppose." he said. Mompremier came to the U.S. from Haiti in 1%67. when his life was threatened by the Tent., Maccute, the secret police force of former President FrancoS Duvuler. Deface he left Haiti he was principal of a school in Nhlt-au-Prlncs which fell out of later with the boverumant. "t DID NOT LIKE to charge my students -or than the) ;ould afford. Some of the students I collected more from than others. if their families could pay it. .@ I could afford to teach those with no money also." Mompremier said. Hut, In a strongly anti-communist country like Hiati, such practices are frowned upon. "The government said I was a Communist because of my school. I was arrested. btatat and thrown in jaid," Monmpremier said. After several weeks behind bars. Mompremier said he was finally taken before Presidert Duvaller. "TUEY TOOK ME to.""p Doe" ID.,valler) because I had many Mrends in the army. He listeswd to nit and then ordered that I be Se free." said Mompreniier. nut apparently. Mompreri's freedom meant that he was i center gi not to return to the school. One afternoon, while teaching a class, Momipremier said, the Macoutes came with machine guns and threatened to kill him if he returned to the school on the following day. Momipremier packed his bags and left Haiti that night. After his arrival in Miami, Momprenier spent several months with friends before finally telling the INS of his presence. "I was afraid to comec forth because, like all who leave Haiti.!I was fretful that they might make ine return." he said. BUT, IN 2967, before the current Waster, Hemisphere quotas on immigrants todk effect, there was no difficulty in obtaining a vis, and eventual residence status,. When the first boatloads of Haitian refugees began coming to Florida, Mompremier was one of the moving forces in seeing that the refugees received fair treatment. Along with the Rev. James Jenkins. of the Friendship Mission Baptist Church in Miami, and U.S. Rep. William Lebmen of Miami, Mompremier convinced INS officials to release the refugees on bond,. The Rehugee Center started in April 1973 in the annex of the Friendship Mission Baptist Church with donations from 23 local churches. Later that year, Rev. Jenkins went to Washington, D.C. to meet with directors of the National Council of Churches. He convinced them ot the necessity of a larger center for the Haitians, and in January 1974. the center moved to its present location-an abandoned toy store near 1-95 in northwest The following statements are from Sdlavts submitted to the Imnmigraticn and Naturatatac Service by Haitian refugees whodiave been denied asylum In the U.S. Their cases are being appealed. "I was a teacher in a small private school. A Macoute (secret police) who had a girl enrolled then had not paId for her attendance. I gave him a bill for the money and the next day he and two others arrested me and took me to prison. I was in prison fromi May 2. 1972 until Peb. 3. 1973,. "U'UEN IT WAS released I went back to my school to begin teaching again. About week after my rurin one of the Macoutes who had arrested me camte to the school with.a machine gun mid threatened to kill we-. "At this point some of the children began so shout, and when the Maccute turned to quiet them. I picked up a chair and hit him ceer the head. knocking him out. res Miami. According to Mompremier, the center operates on tbout S52.600 to S$1,800 a week. "T HIS IS USED primarily for direct assistance--tood. shelte, and medica aid. Lots of our cost is othset thanks to tamilies in the neighborhood who donate food and beds." he. 'aid. The center has its regular crowd of hangers-on who drop bh daily to check on jobs or to gossip. For most, there is nohng else to do. They line up on the worn-out chain outside the center In excited flurries of conversation, laced with a blend of French. Creole and English, that discuss their hopes for the tuture and their overall reluctance to return to Hiati. "You see this?" Marcel Joseph saId as he pointed to 3 snake-like scar near his chin. "That is why I came here" SCARS. That's one commodity all the refugees have In abundance. And, they are almost proud to show them Most of the KsfcarirCIe th Wrlsts and th akC5.~ reminders of too. tight prison chains. Another item the refugees seem to share is a desire to work Many spend long days in the sugar cane fields near Belk Glade. Others find odd jobs in some of the hotels on the beach. Rut, all the work is temporary, and the refugees eventually end up back at the Center looking for something new. Nevertheless, they all agree on one point-they arc far hctWe off here than they would be in Haiti. "I immediately went back Leogan, my home town, where I met friends Who arrangdt u m ot We left Halti on Oct. 17, 2973.'ne obya ml ot Etiuite Joseph "I was atfisterman in Leogam., Haiti. hi February of 19728 Maccute demanded my whole catch of metes' fsh. I refine his demand and was taken topls. "I was held in prison for two monhsand ewaed duri'g8 work detail. I hid In the woods for four mockhs and thfil joined a group that was planningt oet Amueta Welid Haiti in boat on Oct 1, 2973.cmet "Whenari.Aw, 5pg V8 afraid to say to nfor ferthe Maca .l arnto' me y request for asylum was denied." NloSan e

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Th. indep.,deat Most. Mftgeflt W.&dndy, F.&.viry 5. 1915, ..a9 By MOB MORRIS Alllgpts. Staff WrItr erard Irandei Used to ma~kc kettles and pOts t) 'elI in hi oau-Prmce shop. He wasn't a rich man by any nicans, but Haiti where the per capita income is about 17 a year ader was better oil than most a, Ithe 1957 Haitian presidential eleetmon, wanderr supned the popularly elected candidate -Daniel Fignole. tatr ol 19 day in offce F i a deoe by a ilttary taktofr that led to the ascenion of Francos 'Papa Duvalier. as "president-for-life" of Haiti p Shortly after Duvaller took power, Gerard Leander was one thousands arrse y th onton Macoute. Duvalier's EA poiefocadtrw inWprison for backing Flinole caped and in late 198made his way to Nassau-. When Duvalier died in 1971 and his son. Jean Claude. took ver, sanderr, like other Haitians, felt conditions might harge n Haiti. And so. he returned to his home. But, as Leander tells the story, his homecoming was nyihing butt welcome. "When I reached Haiti. the Maceutes put me in jai for aur months. I was beaten because I would not confess to .eying intentions of overtbrowing the government. I tried to plain that I wanted only to return to my work, but they would not listen." Leassder said. As he spoke he rubbed the ars on his wrists Itt from prison chains. "WHEN ThEY LET ME out I met with some friends who sre planning to sail a boat to the United States, For me. it .-eed like the only hope possible. So.Ilieft Haiti again." underr and 64 other Haitians washed ashore near -nmpano Beach on Dec. 12. 1972. Making their escape from tyranny to what they supposed would be freedom, the |aitians had completed their S0W mile odyssey in an overrowded and battered sailboat without the aid of a compass. "We ran out of foed after the first few days." said lander. The only thing that kept us alive was our hope for a good But those hopes soon disappeared. UPON ARRIVAL the Haitians were taken into custody by he U S Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS). After asty interview. where the Haitians asked for political sylum, all 65 were jailed and, within a few days. charged with !legal entry into the U.S. Since that time. 478 other Haitians in IS different groups ,aye conmc to florida by boat and in search of sanctuary. The ast group arrived in Marathon on Nov. 34. 1974. In addition to the 543 who came by boat, 638 other |aitians. who have entered Florida by various means, have Iso asked for asylum. All claim they face certain insonment or death if they return to Haiti. But, with only a few exceptions. the 1.181 Haitian refugees ow in Florida have been denied political asylum and are acing deportation. ONE OF THEIR NUJMBER, however, chose a different ay to escape possible reprisals in Haiti. Turenne Deville, a 7-year-old fisherman, was found dead in his Miami jail cell esIMav -sheet tied around his neck. 'Tise only thing that kept for a good lire.'e Gerard treander The plight of the Haitians has aroused a number of merican groups to take action in their behalf. One of the rliest to do so was the National Council of Churches, which -unded Miami's Haitian Refugee Information Center in pral 1973. On Feb. 28. 2974, the council adopted a resolution cx.eSing 'profound disquiet" with the Haitian refugee station and formed -ivtgaoytask force. Aflranm d n Iilwsdwthn teHian .i WYI' and NS officials dragJune 1974,te task foc pared its rport. Among the conclusions were: ctedinS. has a dobl stand ad on refugees. While xedg awam welsi. to Cuban refuses, the current Iy disarimian spinst these whse are black and-or igfron, right-wing dictatorships; e~eeIs a leit quiaem -to whether the Haitians worn Oed due P"6Usi @1 law since attorneys were not allowed re ICnt S Ibse-ial IntervIews conducted by the INS; e~eINS has bees Insamuelve to the plight of the Haitians the grace or legsl appeals 'me Fnmh Circuit Court of Appeal5 has roundsd the eases .f 367 Haitians to the INS lbr r.her reiw n ibila atlaS on other case. is cxLaysfOr the Haltdan, hav pered detailed affiavits cumentlag individual cases of ton'.e Impritounmenlt and lrrassticnt wtilered by the refugees and not recorded by the IN urimg nitijl iniern ew. v Said in its decisions, the INS 'outmnely forwards eC Jii tases to Washington and the State Department AnIit i' at ibis level that the Haitians have comec upon maI8or stumbling blocks in their search for asylum. Iorra (ollobm,1 general counsel tot the American Comnmiuee (or (h oreign Born, sees the refugees as little more than unfortunate pawns in the game of international politics. THE GOVERNMENT holds that these people are simply unhappy with conditions in Haiti. Unfortunately, the goernmnt therefore sees them as economic refugees, not polticl rfuges'said Gollobin-. Gollobii, said that mn order to qualify assa political refugee there must be a 'well-founded fear of political punishment and persecution if they go back to their country. 'Rut, the Immigration Service and the State Department are saying that the Haitian government is not a repressive government; therefore, anyone who leaves Haiti cannot be treated as a political refugee," Gollobin said. Since Haiti has a strongly anti-communist government. Gollobin claims the U.S. is unwilling to weaken its relations with its Caribbean neighbor by giving an open door treatment to its political dissidents. "IT IS CLEAR tonmc that the question of political asylum for Haitians is not being settled on its true merits. It's all S question of where you come front The Haitians are stuck in the middle.' he said. At present, however, the Miami INS office is forced to cope with an even larger problem than 1,181 would-be immigrants from, Haiti. They have their hands 6.11 rooting out the estimated l0,00 illegal immigrants from all pants of the world now living and working in Florida, And, since about half of the Latin American and Caribbean tourists who enter through Miami International Airport are thought to stay on as illegal immigrants, it is easy to see why the understaffed INS might be skeptical of the claims made by a few hundred Haitians. According to one INS investigator, some of the difficulty Sn picking out legitimate political refugees stems from the inadequate interrogations by INS interviewers in Miami. "ONLY THE UNUSUAL interrogations take longer than 20 minutes,' the investigator said. "If they have a story to tell, we just take it down. We don't cross-examine then,." this kind of situation would seem to give credence to claims by the Haitians' lawyers that their clients' complete 'tories have never been heard by the INS. At any rate, the Haitians were never allowed attorneys at these initial interviews, to aid them with their stories. And, according to another INS investigator, who has been involved in, checking out the stories of some of the Haitians. (here isn't enough information in many of the files to really determine it the claims are valid or not. "You have to really know Haiti to know where the holes in the stories are ot to feel the truth in a story that may be both true and false.'' he said. LOUIS GIDEL, acting director of the Miami INS office. admits that some of the Haitians may have deserved more attention when they arrived. "If we had the staff we could do it." he said. "But, then agaim. if every refugee who climbs off a boat in Miami says he's a political refugee, it will break down the system'" As rot claims that the Haitians have suffered because of a "double standard" on refugees. Gidel points out a situation which occurred in 1%69 to disclaim the charge-. At that time, 119 Haitian Coast Guardsmen who took part mn an unsuccessful revolution, sought and were granted asylum in the U.S. Gidel also said comparison between Haitian and Cuban refugee situations were "unfair, since the Cubans arc in a special category." "THE AGREEMENT to recognize Cuban refugees was something that was donie on a presidential level by President Johnson in 1%66. So. the only special, large-scale exceptions we make are for Cuban refugees he said. "When you conic and knock on thse door and want in. there are certain rules that have to be followed. The Haitians will be given every opportunity to state their cases according to these rules." ide! said. But Neal Sonnett, Miami attorney who represents "about 4(X)" of the Haitians. claims the INS has not been following the rules. "SO FAR, WE really have had no opportunity to place on the record the letiate clais these Haitians have,". si interviews the Immigration Service has violated a basic due process of law and acted in a most arbitrary and capricios manner. The United Nations Convention and Protocol for the Status of Refugees. signd by thU.S.,flllfr attorneys to be made available to refugees at any time whets they arn questione concerning their requests hor politcal asyum,. According to Sonnitt, the INS has violated this measureby barring attorneys from all of the Initial Intervies iven Haitian refugees. These interviews form the basis ofthe material that the INS forwards to the State Department or asylum consideration. 'On one occasion. 38 Haitians wone taken frog, their jail cells at 2 anm. and hauled the 1W0 miles to ImmIgratIon isvesgigation headquarters for Iiteien. With treatment like that it's no wonder the Haktant didn't fool like talking." Sonneti said "The two investigators completed the 48 ii terviews in less llhan three hours.' SONNETT' ALSO CLAIMS that the State Department Just "hasn't been doing its homework" when it comes to inrcstigatmng the present conditions In Haiti. r he Slate Department claims they are able to give close attention to each of the individual case reports that the INS sends them. But. it just isn't so." Sonnett said. "For example. a group of 42 Haitians was interviewed on a Friday afternoon by INS investigators and their asylum requests were denied. "The data on the 42 was transmitted to the State Departnment. which by the tbllowihg afternoon had also responded negatively to the request. Now, do you mean to tell me that in less than 24 hours the State Department was able to round up information on 42 people they had never heard of before and decide whether they had suffered political persecutions? No way!' 'L otnaey h gnerut et se the as ecommic efug e netN political refugees. Ira Goeing A tterneg Sonneti said the action taken by the Fibk Circuit Court of Appeals in remanding the cases to the INS would allow the Haitians to present a great deal of new evidence. "IT TAKES US mACK to the beuinn*g We are asking to present evidence that wasn't presented at the earlier hearing." Sonnett said. "Right now we ar-. still waiting for the tinmigration Service to tell us how we can go about presenting it. I would suppose that it will take place in a quasi-judicial setting with an INS-appointed judge." "If we lose out there," he added. "then we will end up back in the federal court." Despite the legal footwork carried out by Sonnett and his colleagues, the inescapable problem faced by the Haitian refugees is contained in the current Immigration laws -laws that are difficult to sidestep. HAITIAN REFUGEES could benefit from new legislation that has twice passed the House only to die in the Senate. HR 982. the Rodino Bill, would create a special refugee status for aliens of Western Hemisphere countries, besides Cuba. for the first time. Existing law restricts the definition of refugees to those who flee from Communist or Middle East countries. Although the measure passed the House by a whopping 330-36 margin in September, 1*73, it died in the Senate when Judiciary Committee Chairman James Eastland refused to call hearings. But, even if the legislation is carried out, there will still be the problems of determining whether conditions in Haiti are such that Moitical persecution exists. In a November interview with George Beebe. associate publisher of the Miami Herald. President Jean Claude Duvalier said political persecution In Haiti is a "myth that already has been dispelled." THOSE WHO FLEE his country do so because "they are just looking for a better lift in lands with better employment conditions.' said the 24-year old preuideut-for-lifr. "If they want to return home, they are free to do so. if they will work toward the development of this country.' Duvalier said. George Baboun. Haiti's consul to Miami. sgreed. "Haiti is a democracy. Thern is no political persecution in Haiti. Those who wish to return are welcome," he said. But, asked how Haiti would deal with the refugees upon their return. Baboon said. "This is something I would discuss with the U.S. government. not a reporter." AN OFFICIAL WITH the Jamaican consul in Miami claimed Haiti's consul there has "been regularly reporting to the goyenment of Haiti the names of those Haitians who etrthe U.S. wuldn't dutfor a momet that they wil be Iapriaoeed or executed should they stun," he said. "I should think that those who hane dumonulraned against the Haitian gowurment while in Miami would be well advised not topg back." After a recent visit to Haitd, Neal Sonnata had this tonsy for these who Insist that conditions there have improved: "h's like me telling you that the tempesause outside has dropped from ISO degrees to 149 degrees. When you go out ide you'll still f y your -of Well. he spends mcit c hit time sitting uround the Haitian Refugee lnhrmatlon Center. lookIng for the day when he will receive permIssion to staylanthe U.S. for good. Does he think of going home now? "Not mb.'" said Leander. "Until all the Duvlen are poe, yOU CUI Itt mtie rit hare'

PAGE 10

.g. V. in. 'n.p.na.n. ncna ~'gsr, w.an.say. ~.Onh.ry 4*. I~'~ r-~r-~ *~' -' ~-. ~ ~ia.6 Tb i~ ni Ct niA fnr .a'.'ii' .*qarte,.,., Programs of Distinction for UF Twenty-three programs of distinction for the nine niverulfies In the State University System will be recommended to the Board of Reaet. Included are four for UF: bjcfledlcal englneerling, behavioral neuroeclince, food econanics and marketing and thermonuclear fusion. The programs wHil be recammended for special funding by the State L1g151*. hare -ro to the 190 asia. The funding will accrue to the uunflusii as achedtiled In the master -la ovar a aix-year period and as rnamres bece avail. able. It I.anticipated that the faming for the -pca programs will Inrae their Morston Speaks To UF Senate On Thursday Proesdn Robert MarSon wil report .bdga,,and le,,,lat, matte, a the monthymetin c te Uuea, 4 Senate at 3:3O pam. Thurudhy in McCarty Auditorium. The president will also entertain discussion mid welcome There are no actlS. kt a the agenda; however, members have bee. r-tatapr-pilcy was tabled at the January mauling and coul be unovd bu thetable. ,s rMweeti c i aets le c a th the CLtP Advisory Cnommit. BOR Group To Meet March 5 The limne cmmmtte S th. BOA will mat at am. Wehuday, Mardi 5, in the nOR Cuaferuice Noun, Tallabass., to comulder proposed fee Increases and other matters on the March 10 ageSd. Increased A new fee schedule far the State University Systni will be considered by the Deard for recommendatlc. to the Legislature. It will centlam to be based budgets by at least 2U par ent over normal levels. 'The master -la was developed as required by the generl apwopratieus act of 1974 "to provlde.for such Univ 7.pv.eundr by.t. bsvm.i.e fMe I'frane &e Pal .",.l.,.t. .,,,.,,,o.,,& .n.,tfmto o tl. lst&.69 programs.where the porws will have the greatest likelhood of pining distinction." Five of the programs, Including Maemedical angneurlng at UP,. have prevIously bern approved to take I 915-Car Parking Structure For JHMHC Contract Ready The DiOR will be tsed to approve signing a ca rctombnadt for a 91&ear parking ftruture at the J. Ellis Slier Health Cunter ulib Drake Qsbarctuag Cc. Th cpmy Sited a low Nid Sf *1, agpis a cast s~a budget cf $2,,, ruMtng In -m a"ticia Snng araateyIMatrN other coats Sf moving a power line -ar bitMed ThIs project was authoried by t. 134 egswesandsra special law that made It poSbe for the DONR to handle all phas. .1 curntruech rather than going throute Dperbunt1Geneal Bel The project wa toughto dIn over -er mnths n Its Incepilm. Freshman Class Cut Proposed The Board of Regents will esider reducing cnol mat ci flrtlme-in-cofl gue students by 15 par cunt, resuldng In the foilewlag -e limbt: Univaulity ci Florida, 2,465; FlorIda Stat., 2,43; Booth Florida, t,0t Florida Tech, 1,700 and Florida A&M, : Tuitison on a per-credlthour system, but will provide for four level. cf paymnint In place of the present two levels. For stud wts enrolled In programs Undergraduate C-use ManrIcuain. Fe salkng t.e Shid Fla=mae Aid Fme Mludsn Loan P.Sd Fm Cqk p rwine Trhat ad Tetal Rglae Fee Per Baer ThUrin pmr eB har ar ma.FkrdS as, adeue so fhl an. ime 1.31 1.2 1. -Ia08 For tueta cnoled ha flhe MD, DUD and VI "rg"am,"'he ""hedu fa each threesth period f unlnu t wll be as lo~ess: Graduate $11.3 1.23 LU650 .18il Undergraduate Cour. $8.1 1.18 .52 .3 1.17 Sta Matrcdtlmd Fee I fl V mI Fee MISSt La 7.5 Fee fluet Fnd BaeS Fk"""l Aid Trin Paid F.e Act litryand SmieFe Total MudsM Fmas F. 1. 1t. a' -a1. Proposed other than the MD, DUD and DVM, the proposed ft. schedule and breakdown ci allocations hsas fallout: (the ftrst two columns show current tees). Upper Level Undrgraate 1.18 .2 1.3 us MSria a emg 17.3 30 7.3 g 4.3 u300s Graduate 1.1s .52 .3 1.37 AmM U. _4. 11.46 Gradute Thmii and $16.1 12 31.11 m ur.n Lu80 _-atnt5. advantage of the 14 positlin and $2M.2T designated by the LegIslatUre for ti fiscal year. The programs recommended for approval have already been approved by each university and the DOR staff. It Is antIcIpated that unIversItIes will later be asked to propose additional program "which they are willing to aniahl through Intern al lcstiens of reseat e'., U? programs are summarized as follows: win oame platlmu gier in teclog to medicall reae problems. Already having attracted -am PPaSco w year cifammn~al .,,rt. te, giam 11 b b rned i the College of Engineering but will of Mn.eand A;han:Ie|acee To begIn 376.7. WIll fecs e rdcnglea) human disorders and will be develapedmasan biry~ Cufot ftvdal oe and hS upf APshl and d the cmmellim will be -n dimayduuawn dmma. mdl -ute Su.n grag To begin 1971.7. Cmcnrie e .darts of the feed teenmS .Sd ue dqgl faculty Ioward the ails.n S foci and marblingpr-b tm C q renflra agSuhr. mum------in midlar procaees, the UP program In the Dquuflmfl S Mfaela nieurag leeMc and P byles wEl -sMga energy endlear rencts. It ishe these programs will lead to the dvlp m.t ic ld.p.o,.r plants Programs cf dlatlntlan In other 'mIverniee are -s follows: AbS -Ikman resource maement (1976%) and caresr u-hacal (1977-3) TAU -Ocean uaglneerlng (134-U) and ezcMeptsd w .ads. (WI16) FlU -Bid and food aenilce unzgp mant (3974-) and cuoradv. Su'e national 15Dinm magma (INS-f) ISU -Dign I a nagua~n St poet anmauy eat. (57gISg, -., clear incinme (3W4.8), shkingy 12 -)ang msle.(DIS) an UNMP and h~ and (134.IS), Sm Ci -"Srn MHig (flu0) and Sty and county mmnagenent fetlU inRent In reasees n apabman a Fas It M e d fua~to Wperquuerihn w praud. -University of Florida Is -n Eqpmul Eniploy mat Oppcrtuutrhffirmat iv. Action Epoe -A r 4

PAGE 11

This pagc paid for at usual advertising rates 1%. nd.p.ad.nt Mend. MIu.lo,. Wedn.day, Feibnhary2 S.75. P. Student P-affirming the University's pledge to honor employment commitments to graduate students, Interim Assistant Vice President for Academic Affairs Gene Hemp has outlined procedures that deans, directors and department chairmen must follow In making new appdlntbflfl Or reappointunents. Each new appointment or reappointment of a graduate ,ajsgitn forwarded to the Graduate School must Include either a copy of a letter of commitment dated prior to December 12, 37/4, or the individual approval of the appropriate dean, Hemp's Feb. 19 memorandum states. "Wearephedgdtohcnorallcommnitments both written and verbal where the student understood, not hoped, that he or she would have an aulatantahip for some specified Aid QUILINED A ppoint ments length of tune, Hemp said Hemp said that he has become awnr of several instances in which appointments have been submitted against the E&G budget for graduate students previously paid from contract or grant funds. "If the student has a firm commItment, the appointinent will be approved," Hemp said, "but the student will be required to engage in Instructional activities and not Continue to work on the research that i no longer being funded. If the student does not have a firm commitment, It will be necessary for the departmemt to utilize miscellaneous grants or foundation funds In order to continue providing the auliatantahip." Applications lust Be R ead ied by Frid ay Financial aid applications for the 1975-76 academic year are available in 23 Tlgert Ball. All flduits Including those presently receiving financial assistance, are required to comple and submit financial aid applications and confidential stateein -ro to Friday. Students uS coniplete either a Parents' Confidential Statement or a Student's Financial Stat"m"i and mail It to the College Scholarship Service ((XS) at the address Suon -a the teem. No action can be taken on an application until the Confintlal Statumnt baa bean returned by CS8. Prior to receiving financial assistance all eligible students are also required to apply for the Florida Studunt Asistance Grant (deadline March 1) available through the State Dqpurtnext of Education. Freshmen, Sophomores and Juniors are required to apply for the Federal Basic Educational Opportunity Grant Program prior to receiving financial assistance. 'elephone Bills on Campus ;o Up, May be More Later Thlat telephone you have -n your offie =k or In your durmlicry now costs the .iverslty PS. and $1.3 -or per asth, reqpctvely, effective Feb. 11. AMI told, that menua an approximate 6,MG maly Mn.s In telephone xii Interviews For rods with Aid Graduating maicra wit Nation.l Del-. ,Natimal Diret, Pharmcy, Mars, Dentla7, Ca., S.A.F.E. or Unlvety of Florda la Turn toens miSt mmpetethe aftitersview sno rdin, Al as eevale and urn am ainowb USt be '9 to Se ads to eia f a4 pam. wekba. Payments US M may be pausned between 9 .a. and 3:3 p Faculty Cap, G own Deadline Extended Thecap. ani Bam has extended Its d 1.to Friday for aculty tomnne ti Sa -sp a jfafor put*im h in ad Faculty uM b aY. CgUIn. Ct2tngasjjjelbytpha eWi t'lc spe U s u, Caen aIipmmaaa.sa.I service for UF7, according to Mrs. Nancy Swink, administrative assistant In the Physical Plant Division. The new rates are an Interim rate Increase approved for Southern Bell by the Public Service Commission. Statewide the Increase will total UN million. But In late August or early September the Comjnslao Is expected to render a decision on Bell's application for a P216.5 million Increase. Calvin Greene, director of the Physical Plant Division, said that approval ci the full Increaen could remilt In coat lucre.-e -n all Items of telephone equlpuet. The Interim Increase raises main line stations frown 81.50 per manth to $13.10 and dormitory states frown $7.3 to $i)5 monthly. Main line stations are duscribIndiidua nnib&. The Carer Planning and Placement Cantscha -Smpoy e rtvim for companies recruiting a campus. Students should sin p for Interviews at least one day in advance In Roan G-fl of Belt: Union. This service Is alao open to alumni. Employers visiting campus Feb. 26 March 4 are listed below. wash=ay -DMA? Wyandotte Corp. oratio, Bell Teiqubse Iahmratorles, ""Th oicm ay, "GrherdCap any, S.E. Krusge Conwany and Swift & Canpany.will be IntervIewIng,. Thursday -AMoco Fabrles Company, ACTION, Camp SequoyahTual, EBan Company, USA, Noutirop Corporation, Pan American World Airways and J. Sirrine Company will be rwcuflng. Bell Labs will conclude Its IntervIews. Friday -Camp Seq woyab-Tiall and Exn Company, USA, will conclude their Interviews. Meaday -the recruits will be AMba Life & Casualty Compan atIonal Oceanic & Am hue Ca. missioned Officers Cor,.) and U.S. Envlrsmutal Protection Agmqy. Tuesday -American Graduate Sihoed of Intornmatnal ManagmmiCarleto Camnty (S. Carnao) Public Simola, John Hancock UMal 1.8 I~insane Canpmny, us=a. & 551.s and U.S. GSnigia -uve C flratc DMvsin will be the recrutnr. Aetna Life & CakynpmyM e h Graduate Student Deadlines Friday, Febrnary U la the Rast day tor th final submblcfln of thu.e for all graduate students expecting to receive a mai.,, degree this quarter. Pap.:s should be turned In to Ronm 50, Grlnter all. Free Tennis For Faculty And Stf The IntramuraE sports office will dge a fee egialing tennis di.s for faculty an staff frona 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. Feb. x7, and Mach3,l and 17. Fo nd taii teadregistruata call Je-Regna or Treids Chewing at "2mL It Is also thb lad day fhr graduate taints sethg to receive a imp.e thIs quarter I. U.l 5h*i VIsa) bmnndanRapetub ekSGradual. Sbited I Horn US8, Gater ia. Grad Open Door Den Hary H. lsle will keep his Smqm oentday kom to5p., Ream S, Gina S.D, to ta t my -rihd sa atswto nra" abSd any mtailer tke' ati to diourn with hNm ar hm taff. "Open Des" meetings arn held the w-a ad feert Wehesday @1 mdch .nt kam I t. S p. PROCEDURE mhe Unhivety cf Florida Is an Etqma' gmbgn Ouum ltwhf nnh Acam Eflhyu 8'. -It Grad .a inancial S Faculty Terminations Explained Between 23 and 30 UnIversity of Florida are Interim Instructors or Interim aSsstant professors and all are In the EducatlonandGeneral FlG budgetary colleges. The faculty cutbacks are in accordance with Board of Regents direction to reduce the FlG salary budget for next year by $1,543,UO0 and to surrender U9 manyear faculty positins by June 30. The full package in complying with the cutback, according to Interim Academic affairs vice-President Robert Bryan, Includes a continuation of the free.e on filling K6 vacant positions, totaling salarlea of $PU.U.1 put Into effect slnce Dec.12. It also Includes cutting back funding for summer school 25 per cent from last sumer'slevelto.,,roximtely th-17 lvendruingupprtfor three centers financed fromn the E&G budget. There are no -ln to reduce summer.nrollment. notified that their department chairmen and faculty may decid which faculty members are to be terminated, but that he hopes all will be those who have been employed to fill positions tunporarily. "Tenured faculty, of course, are fully protected,'" Bryan sald'ua are regular faculty mnembers In ten-erning -os tium. Non-tenured faculty who lure been employed for a year would have to be given a full year's notice before they can be terminated." Bryan said "every way poSsble" was explored to prevent lay-off a. H. said that it was possible to shift some position Into vacant lines financed by grants and ntcice left exep herretaleoe of termlnatlons."Ha action followed mosUltation with the Coun of Academic Deans and faculty members an the Budget and ProfessIonal Relations and StadadsCannite. The UFT's reduction was its share of the SB poitions ordered cut thnughot the State University Sytem.The number of perminw affectsa ana the nmnber of positions ordered terminated do not coincide because not all faculty menbers are employed at the average rate and moat are employed nine, rather than 12, mnths. The reduction alsoprovidefor the elmlnatlon ciii1 polken the Legislature ordered In the 117-71 appnradowu bill that gave the mmverutlus eas posItons toase In wa Is bow ah "manyear 'cmcept cf faclty UinlOYmaet, with the widesa ng~ the pulions wol e retuned oer two yeas. Under the manyean plan, unive Sutme were required are ArchItecture and Fine AMt, ArS and tione Edbalion, Enghaneurng, Law and US eity College. All a NWEOGaanm Aflartis Jouaain aid Cam mutemUans and PFyScSa 3b-dte hu.e infllng v~ea.t FumIg orU Ur ban a.d .idardwr Ol reas will retur to has proessorsp .the Dhpatuet 41 Azmale. and Seak uS he as-eb edin S.e Cater ft Asurie Unie and ti h ee m IJ aa iTh. Board of Regan has not ordered any rndmctlauu h toheltsh Can and

PAGE 12

-b' ts.d luirnNd (tJ-" "Perverse and entrt-ningeu. S TONIGHT $1.-.ti Y.Swes A sim by PAuL *.oleiyc-Ofl.R A esAymsTON ric tufl Sh AS 233 W. UinivAv. 377*313 IN,. It Th. lnd~a.d.nt M.rId. MIIga., W.dn.d.y. P.&wwry X, 3175 F FOR SALE b.cycle schwmn vOrlity lO--peed showroom, corndston brand new e*toelnt condition. nullt eN sin. tOLwr"ef $3X off rlod coil 378 5776 (0 5k ph> FOR SALE Sanyo 0rack car .,.reo Achannel mat,,. ho5 mrony fnsuren 550 nik for rob 376 0358 (a 5 t-pj farsole Mobile None 835' Ixcallent St-87-p) 73 Honda 350, new -e ol hook.r, heeds .mcelnt con P750 00 ar best offer MIk. 373-O924 (o-t-P7pfl Minolta Celtic 135mm 35lenis. Never used Stil in he box 5.111 to, itt0 new Only $90 377 7334 (o-5l-87 pf QUAD Spooker System 4-16 ohmn Panosonic Speoker for 580 0, 525 piec. Buy 2 and change that Stereo to quad AlLAN 377-7031 oa-4187-p) to, sole tM4Amolta 55* I 35 rmm carnera and lear, $100 a. beut off., call Wayr'e 377-S45 (o-36-9-pJ 1973 Oodg. sporI nuto A C 6 cycI cooded joke over poymnent. and smaoll cash d'ff.nce 37W-5028 ol~ce sun mon wed *ve 392.aml excellent cond I90 r'les la St-89-p) 1971 Chev Nova graen 4,0 v go conditon no a, power brokes, orm radio pow., tintig go. tovert Call betwwe 8 12 pm 33-3dQ7 (o-5-89-p) A Per*am pomort i 'wilt, a Tokumor FIS4 5Oir am o kuror 3 5 28 mmi and o Soligo' 1-35 00-200 gnm .at off.r Coll 376 S9(d51i0p) Cannon 135 mm f-3 5 lens W-lenm hood n 'as., yer old good condition SW0 a. Best off., Call $92-73I8 ao-5t-.p) unwos *lntrc piono mint condilioc $360 coil oft., 4 W 3Th-9779 (a-S4-IS-p) Fends, ion ba. natural finish wilts maple r,.ck perflcd con~detic., 5235, coil kan of W92-SA (a-St-S8p Ncw SAE Mark Xl Speokr, wilt, new 5yr factory warranty in your non,. $450 poir (list $ew) Call Wiley. 3Th-9994 (a3t-88-pl 1973 rnobit* l2x50 centroi heat air 2 bedroorns fully furnished l200 equity assume mronitbly noie 7577 ar make offsr must sell call V32064 (A-7l-US-) MobsI. horn 1972 12 x60 carpet brick skirn S anchored 377-3090 M9CO nuts 'a. a40SW 2O Av. log No 27 (ni-Se30 gal oquaruim couple$. over S1lO invested 3 mo old eiimg to buylorger tonk the best of *efvrthin aeskmg $130 coNl 378-5917 aft.r 5 (o-31-9-p) 69 Firebird nit con power stewing + hiok. auto trans flew exhaust system brak. cotb storne. sell a, trod. for motorcycle call 372-Im0 (o-5&-89-p) Goinesie-s Larest ndoor FLEA MARXE T fiery Fri -Sal -Sunday A huh. bi of .verythr f everyone 1201 E Ur,, Ave 37S-3431 (AS qO9-P) HEWLIfl-PACKARD HP-35 almost new coat mc 5245 will sell fo' $150 alto fistier Idlidarote stereo amp $95 372 2020 lA97 kowomok, 90cc stre bik. Very good conditin Crim, by und se ond ride after $00 pm No pJhone Only 5%XW26w SAve Apt Nt 2 (A S? 9Q-P I 8*35 trai ler nil *lectric a' excellent condition rnoveobl. mist sell $1(X or best offer call nancy 378-6355 oft 6 *A 4T-0.P) eniarge' dursttmeC)w lorns IC. 3Srmm or 2. IsiS cmsl aind pint wash., $125 377-0355 510 nw IS aye (A-4C-0PI Collecter selling old original movie potters limvted supply so coil 373-8704 IA 5?90 P) Diamonds. Sopphire., Emeralds. Jode and 95 orIhe, gem mnmerols All quoltti. ovoilobi. Priced from, 25 p.rcent to '0 percent below reils Custom cuting Irom, $1000 Urncooditsonol Guotonse. OZZlE By oantnent only 373-3804 IA 13? 90-PI FOR SALE wedding lords Erggrenl RfgS Trodittocal or Contemporary designs of your c*.o'ce Hnndrnod. for ,ndsvidudll who non' the best Os"giol wor' by South aleoding Aities Moss. Gold $inith and topidisi Uncondit 'onal -uaorint. OZZIE By oppoiflmrerl only 373-3894 A II3 90 Ph TH~rSENTEPTAINMEND rtNi weekend SPil "pp r Vt I call odrome icatre T3-8375 Ii I El 4 4.,. 4, 4 .4~ A r .4-

PAGE 13

> I TH0E$ MO-a a: 'S Sw.e coo ''AnI aiwtet TI PEWERITER PROBLENSe We ve got o11the answers Supplih-Less r ASSOCIA TED BUSINESS SIST E S 72U N. Main 373.33259 ~~Lie Jt C0"g'g Now Open For Breakfast 7-10:30am MON.-FR LNCH SPECIAL S I UNIVERSITY 373-9453 N h new Henlein!T --. .e The Pust Through Tamow Ay R1IIJI ahn .Heuei tampheduth him.' inte deam ci neiman science fiction hetih atari. e at if ii, tme next cslumy-and far Isyud A nw paiing e~gI FASTOFFST PfIN lNG (toi SPYcsmrA ready capy -copWUYPS wi-chit0 same day a tOPICS as OW~ N ies Th Independent Aofld. AJIIao, Wedn.d. Febn.ry 26, 1975 Peg. 3 CLASSIFIEDS FOR SALE -t L r c O s l , n d .l o h o s e w h Opel odetr um good nspecred 35 mpg 2501 rody to ga coil 373-2403 or snn 0f '02_! nw 55 terr (AZI 9O.P) For Sole Supe,6 SIereo System Moronre horns tD 125 UC Sco 10 Coil Ken 376 lgreenhouse sol. healhy,,1ofis I, ciny point iundoy only 10m 4pmn go west or ewberry da oost I-I5 ho nw 91' st follow ogpns (A V 90P) FOR RENT temae, wnrom 2dup unu ;ei;tp'iv;; If j'le, )0e unTvS no 4 of'er 6 40 (b-StP-p} roomenate needed georown apis No 7' MS5 plus I/ uti own ronm pool a''r anti ,"5 299, (b-3t-8"-p town0* haute'"6 m + ""hilaesy be or bus to UF coll chuck or bill 373-1617 lb5''e 9 hoi *"vllge.* 650 mt,,,",s 1,tilt--cal--lr S37-I 67 (-46-p 595 jublel utilihie, electric included air arnd heo, one room thor. bosh, trg. hot plole 3 block. off conmpus quidr rnporisible mole grodstudeot dfired Avoifoble Irirmedlolely Ccli 373-3627 between 8-12 PM (b St-89-p) Pryate bedroom Wlrdm.odovn Lt.x Apts private both $fl-mo+ l-3otti fui"jae coble 2' T,272S 3M S wanted 2 female reanmmate. to sublet lumnrous 2 bedroom 2 both Opt to 'har. with 2 girls rent 62 25 plus util country garden calf 372-4177 lb-i-Mo.) Mole oammote Wonted Approx $250 ~ weeky s utlitis tiory *et.05 Calf 377-5643 (b i46.p) I ub'*' bdrm en 2 bd~m (urn dopl.,K 77 50 moni,h 6 blki.to cam. availabl.e immediately rast of Feb fee coil 3757547 keep trypo (b-546-) .deal han. for sprig ar fall 0' hove many titlng. ovoil for dun mmali detotit con hold it for yo ,oda 377-S ,6, w. -oa Call Sublet I, bedoom o,, ucfurnnhed ovoeloble oate March betrut.r 5163 minth include. AC good view high ris coll 373-2W06 afer 6 pm (b-SI-H-p) WANT TO MQoI? If you deir* to nmov train yewr preen, locationWe cogrent, subiet ICr fInd you o roommate iniredlolely cQC fl t. Call todayll U"'ted "elEsae a C Ic TEACHER OF THE YEAR SELECTION STUET SPONSORSHIP PACKETS: 113 ANDERSON OR p., STUDENT fUNDa FOR RENT ONBERO AA Bt 80 p m ed tw 9 b oil, col Debbie oft., *, female Roommo,. Wonled 'Howoiton tlaag. Apt 2 bdr 2 bth orc hea, pool etc $61 25,a mo + .ail coil 373 976? oftet 4 pm Avoilable Mar I (b-WI1-SQ. sublet birge one br unf oportment Unity Gordens 14 per mnoni availabl. Morch I call anyime.378-546 lb 39 9p) subiet room la m.flbo Opts SQQ Se, mond, pool orfurnished carpet' ph 373 6474 Jerry ovoiobi. March I (b-5t-S-p} Fermol. roommole, own bedroom 3 blk from campus, 568 mo + I .3 utihit coil ,un. ,5 ceil 377.aI*4 (b.54-w-p) BenLutiful 3 Ba unfurnished opt to tubleos. stoning 3' -75 cal 377-5747 after 5 30 (b-5r-88-P) 8318 (644-.) suble, ,v, room mole 2 bks ,,om 37.5443 (5-0-9e FURN I B# Apt 85 Ilra last dep reg fl ss Stih ove nic. yard neIghbors mellow folk. sublease (S-lT1-fP) I br opt Iurnished Si 10-mo 5 b1k. north or t'brory West Avoiloble 'im, mediotley Call 3774654 anytime 6roonmote wonsed for irailer own room IS n n o ol 3an n 7-5 9 7 f e r 5 p ci (B-I I bedroom opt I Nlc om mt., ed cent. + ormpos 5169 00 onfwrn or 51800 fumr dhwo.htt leandry carpet pool rec room no p.'. call 2)3-aS6 (5-5?o,.o.r, in a nce home. 3 bloks fom ji in 2 acres of land 595 mn'crhly 'need a quiet reapons b e feniol. call 37-1724 bete. lIan ofer 5p. (S r-SMO-f IC MAST TqSC Pset-~iut FM aind Pab. N. eddSle dhneqe Let Etc and Will.e k&.mna Mashe give y.iu eoedsy peleclIfl CI, lhC ed yo.r plot, in I. Pb sa aSe FR EE "'HIGH PLAINS DRIFTER" WITH CLINT EASTWOOD 11 7' at the RAT ~n 2Ufl4fl flV'W12'ilfl otters ONE YEAR PROGRAMS SPRING SEMESTER SUMMER & ARCHAEOLOGY PROGRAMS IntormatORon ppiCaioris: ONE YEAR PROGRAM Amrerican Froends oh the Te Avi Uiersity 342 Madison Avenue Nei ok N e sYork 0017 SPRING A SUMMER PROGRAMS Israel Program Conlor -AY sibsPark Avenue New York New York 10022 (22 753423/NM IIW W, t cm. you do with ocly a baChelori.'tegrne? Now e lhe a way to bridge the p between an undeqgraduat. education and SahItgln ifepn saw.e career. The tsvtyer's AusIstwt Isable to do wovk traditionally done by lawyers Three months of intensiv, training cant give you the flkml-the courses are taught by Iawyert. You C ho. OP. Of the six course. ofeed-hoose tt, CIt Iin whtic h y want to work. I"c* i"Tb* lntituleto aral'ega*l* Tra'iin has placed more tlwi 700 graduate, In law lintis. banks, and corporatlooe in OSe 60 clties ar t are student of high academic standing and arenteestd i career as a L.awyer's AssIstant. we'd lk, to maet you Contact your placement office for an interview with our repremataive. We will visit your uampgs onl FRIC|AY, MARtCH 7 Th Intiut fo Paagl.Taining 235Scoutt17II, SreetPidepa P.tnwww. I.O) Au ever Ulonmitsg variety et tuass to pIcke ft SILL PAYING I *HARD 0000 Open 8:00 cm I S kit *UAC ATION LON BOAT LOANS SCAR LOANS LUMANS .-.-. LOANS PERSONAL LOANS HOUSE IMPROVEMENT LOANS -3:30pm Monday thru Friday 1200 SW 5*f Ave. 1,EFLORIDA CAMPUS FEDERAL CEWIT Ii TONITE 9 Ft LAST NIGHi IK 172 New Low Prices nW -. UaU~ Ae b U, -i4 S / I -I ~I pJ |

PAGE 14

S Pseg. 14 1k. In&epntn* Rodde MhIeltr, Wedneedey, P'&.aory 25, 1975 La CUSTMNMNG I U.fiL A!._ vs'. aCSN "M' RANCH Horne, rerted by tIhe I-r Me. horn. for sal. 5931347. 20 rn So of Goinewlle on new 44! STRElT'S 1614N.W. 150S. I AY sic. 1 DAY SERVICE FRANCHISED DEALER All ACCESSOIES CALL 377-DIKE I BE SOD 2 3 FOR RENT Houses $90 Cottoge an lake 377 6092 2 bdr $125 NW sect 37-6992 3 bdr $155 Walk ta compus 377 6992 24 cre 3mles to U oF 377.4992 Apts, $85 Ut-I Paid 377 6992 $70Wol o Cmpu 3-92 5 ocr., Pool 2 bdr 377-02 Avail for Sprnng 0r VS5 Ffficienc y Ut' pd 377 6992 h d, walk Ic
PAGE 15

The Indepenc Florida AIli~ Wedn.day, Febnary K, un lent ~ator Lgq paeIS H ancock no by PAT MCGRATH Alligator Sporls Writer Confidence--"Assurance; Belief mn one's own abilities", That's how Webster defines the magical word that breeds sujceess to those who characterize it. HOWEVER, IF close inspectors of the UF golf scene were permitted to coin their own interpretation of the erm, tno doubt could read: Confidence-Phil Hancock.' Hancock plays and speaks with all the self-assurance you nught expect of a guy who has been a bulwark oil Buster Bishop's Gator Golf team from the moment he camne to Gainesville in 1972. Assa freshman, the smiling. sandy-haired youngster from Greenville. Alabama stepped right into the pressure-packed college scene and won his very first tournanment. the Placid Lakes invitational. That year. Bishop had Gary Koch. Andy Bean. Ben Duncan. and Woody Blackburn returning from the previous years' SEC championship team and was looking (much the samie as he is this yearkf'or a solid player who could step in and help the team make a strong challenge for the NCAA title. HANCOCK FILLED in perfectly. He shot 210, six under par for the lirst three rounds of the NCA A Tournament and was within four shots of tourney leader Ben Crenshaw. On the final day, he balooned to an 86 but since the four best scores of each day were the ones that counted, it didn't matter for the team total. He had already done his damage and the Gators coasted to the national championship. Now, two years later with Koch and Blackburn departed. H ancock still exudes the confidence that was born during that historic week in Stillwater, Oklahoma. t cocky-jiu .We expect to i in every time we tee it up in a tournament. We're not cocky, just confident. It comes from success and playmng together as a team" Ironically. at has been winig on an individual basis that H ancock has had trouble achieving. Since a final rwund 69 in the Falstat1 Amateur last year. the 5-Foot-9. 160-pound lunor has been in contention to win innumerable times. He finished 2nd in the NACC last June 4th in the Sunnehanna (Pa.) Invitational. made the semi-finals in the Western, placed 8th in the Southern, 10th in the Easter, 5th at Ohio State this past fall, and 8th in the Dixie Intercollegiate. Always a problem, or two has arisen to keep victory from his grasp, but by no means has this affected his highly positive outlook. "bj FEEL In, playing well enough to win. It seems that I always run into a bad hole or a bad nine holes," he says miatter-of-factly. "Sometimes breaks will beat you. Take last years NCAA. I was tied with Gary (Koch) for the lead and Curtis (Strange from Wake Forest) makes an eagle on the last hole to win by one. You know, what can you do?" he asked nonchalantly. "Look at Forrest Fezier and Tom Watson oan the tour, How many times did they finish second betbre they won ?" When he speaks of his many near-victories there's not the slightest trace of frustration in his voice. A Phil Hancock victory is inevitable and he knows it. but being an easy going relaxed type of guy, he is not about to lose any sleep over when or where. I-e talks about someday gaining a berth on the Walker Cup team and taking a trip to the Masters as easily as vouor I would mention a trip to the supermarket. Hauncock is not cocky. just radiantly confident. sti confident photo by chip him. GAT(R GCLFE PHIL HANCOCK .won hIs first colIegIoh tourney 4 D E -4

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Peg. g6, lh. Ia4d .neln Rerld. Allhgave, Wedne.Sey, Fbnjry 26. 1975 U F netters try to beat weather, Furman today By KEITH CANNON Afligat. Spatis Wdrilr put start a of literal damper on the British UF's tennis season Monday, but the Gators will try again today when they host Furmnig. The match with Valdosta invade Ia rugger dom ain Today at 5:30 p.m. the UP rugby team wtil host two leans l'rnm the British aircraft carrier H.M.S. Ark Royal. The game wtil be played at Schnell Field which is located next to the law school. The first team from the "Ark Royal" have been the British Navy rugby champion, in the past. ibis past weekend the Florida rulers lost to the Winter Park Rugby Club by a 12-4 score. Bill Roberts scored the lone try 44 points) for the Gators. The UF rugby "B" team lost to the Melbourne Rugby Club by a 204score with Mark Campbell scoring a try for the Gator fler. SCOREBOARD. -A **s,*.u Cn. *Na.S n.S. t .fl C. 4Sn~ a-,.,. 3* 31 SS -y.~ 3* 3~ S S S 'It tn. m 44 U ft a ,4 -ml -5' 3, a 'Sw Al,. 33 4 Sfl in, S. 0"temg 4 5 3M *3t13** Can**O*flt ~-e ma Ch*(*C* II 'Sat Mamas Cliv sa 33 Il III I *nnJI U US 'It flh.n U 3' In pm i~ m-t--U 11.1. 5 35 5 a.,. nsa., nfl,,. ,. a a n. *mia.4 U S~ -U Lee A*e**** 39 It -'dli Aaau~. mylsi. L ha *t Mn y.t U I flI s-rn., 4. 0 tea it, IC flit 'S Ii -itt, flit I. di -II I' It -II *~* "'? -V., -As.,. a U S .unA nw-in .5.-" *.a-tt *.e. -I. Si M.Smfl It LnI* a -. *ee WSfl S ijiat al *~* aim tin to Ytniy. tb nni.e .54. Ia mw~**t. -iflfl~ *flna I. .U -me. adat. .Sts ta~ -b~. -W**~*S~I. 4. S.4*Sd~ as *6'1 .e. *3 5 Laynu. 5 '-a. S. S S UCLA *3 S ~ S. Ca54~ -*4 S & LIatama S. Pt -I3-ft SS St '0 tfl* *4 '05 CIS 34 I, S Ci.na t~ ,* *1 "en C--'a. Ii 95 V.Ii p.*4 ** '4 -te S. *4 II it U Ut U I. *e* *-.4.~ 3'* Ii ,* -.*5 U U 31Sfl *3 S q6 n.VI. y,. UIS aiSli. Pr. U.S.a LaBel. afhS Si.-. nina. udoag t.n.a. Si. SkiS. -S St*II* Slat, kneeS-La Vms. UIEC C Sauna. fl0t. hon SMISfl 5331-. t*efluIa*. tt*aS LAS. 'em. Wa Sl (Ga.) State w.as rescheduled for next Monday afternoon in Valdosta*. THE WASHOUT not only delayed the start of the season. but it also marked the fourth straight day the UF players have-noten-bleto practice or play due to bad '.eather. Coach Bill Potter doesn't feel the layoff will hurt his lean, "We've been working a long time." he said. "A few days shouldn't make too much difference."' About the Furman Paladins. Potter said, "They usually have a good team. It should be a fine matchh" Match time is 2:30 p.m. at the UF tennis courts. located west of Fraternity Row by the Holland Law Center. INTR AMUIRA L$ The deadline for sign up for the Men's and Wome's Doubles Tennis Tournament is Feb. 28. The event will be held March 8-9. For more information contact the IM office. 229 Florida Gym, 3920562. Jennings 2 won the allcam pus dormitory bowling tournament last week, Area winners which competed for the championships were: Little. flume; Newins, Graham: SouthG&l, N.E.; North G& I. Tolbert: Fletcher R I. Murphree; and Jennings 2, S.E. Today, the Orange League Fraternity Bowling cham. pionships will be held at the JWRU lanes. Thursday. the Blue League will have its rolloff. Seven teams will compete. We~ ciep you ,rd ahorn. OUjR FEE is REFUNOAILE fEAt0 T 0pnaOon',I 0 ~ d4 sW 4*Av. 3fl760OQ WESTSIDE E pN 1. 2. a. 4. S. &. 7. a. I. 10. Ii. 12. 13. '4. 1I. 16. '7. 1a. 1,. 20. 4 Cyi. Fornqn Ca.s 6 Cyi. Anuric. Cars S Cyl. Amergcan Can. 3325 W. Univwusty Avant. Pho. 372-754Z 2*u OtA RCCKBRSIMVICS JACK'S 20 POINT ANNUAL SERVICE SPECIAL 05 I I '5$14.95 CLEAN AND TIGHTEN BAfTTERY CONNECTIONS. INSPECT BRAKE SYSTEM & ADJUST BRAKES (DAUM TYPSI PACK FRONT WHEEL BEARINGS IDRUM BRAKES PRESSURE TEST COOLING SYSTEM TEST COOLANT AND ADD FOR B0ilO MIXTURE INSPECT WIPER BLADES AND CHECK OPERA TION TEST WdS WAS4EA OPERATION & FILL RESERVOIR CLEAN AND INSPECT BRAKE IOCES INSPECT AND ADJUST ALL BELTS INSPECT A CLEANER AND BLOW OUT INSPECT AIR CONCITIOWINd SYST EM FOR LEAKS AND PRECIE LUBRICATE ClABSS CHANGE OIL IF MECESBARYI CHICK ALL LIGHTS FOR PROPER OPERATION CHICK ALL FLUIDS INSPECT ALL TIRES FOR CUTS, BRUISES. WEAR INSPECT POWER STEERING SYSTEM FOR LEAKS SPS'ECT FRONT 8UWEAUIOW FOR SAFETY INSPECT WIOCKS FOR LEAKS AND WEAR ROWD TEST CAR *OII.Pn aColantAudt ELECTRONIC MOTOR TUNE-UP WITH THIS SPECIAL 4 50. Prts SB.ss+Pn 512.6.+Purt. (wa* AuConlio.,n 8200.xtrn) NATIONAL CERTIFIED MECHANIC ON DUTY 7 DAYS A WEEK I