Citation
The Independent Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Independent Florida alligator
Portion of title:
Florida allgator
Portion of title:
Alligator
Alternate Title:
University digest
Alternate Title:
University of Florida digest
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, FL
Publisher:
Campus Communications, Inc.
Creation Date:
January 17, 1975
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
1975
Frequency:
Daily (except Saturdays, Sundays, holidays and exam periods, Aug.-Apr.); semiweekly (May-July)
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. (some col.) ; 36 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
Online databases.
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Online databases ( lcsh )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Additional Physical Form:
Also available online.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 65, no. 75 (Feb. 1, 1973)-
General Note:
"Not officially associated with the University of Florida."
Funding:
Funded by NEH in support of the National Digital Newspaper Project (NDNP), NEH Award Number: PJ-50006-05

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000470760 ( ALEPH )
13827512 ( OCLC )
ACN5549 ( NOTIS )
sn 86010448 ( LCCN )
0889-2423 ( ISSN )

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, The Independent FRIDAY



,I Florida Alligator JAN. 17 1975 '.


VOL. 67, NO. 62.

Published by Campus Communications Inc., Gainesville! Florida Not officially c iocat! d wl h' the Univ.r.ity of' Florida




I Grad, assistants keep jobs ; .1.18y



I I I

TOM SHRODER by the operating expense cut, Hanson said TO DATE UF'S operating expense budgethas that most would be laid off spring quarter if '
Alligator Staff Writer "WE ARE simply shifting deficits, there is been cut by $400,000 ((10 per cent). no additional money became available. ,
Another five per cent cutback in operating no new money" he said. Bryan asked the Council of Academic Brown said he believes, the $200,000 will.
expense money will enable UF to keep Hanson said the budget shift should Deans Wednesday if another expense budgetcut make that unnecessary.
commitments to graduate students UF provide enough money to cover all formal and would hinder basic expenditures such as SHERI DALTON, president ,of the
ExecutiveVice President Harold Hanson said ,informal commitments to graduate assistants Xeroxing. Graduate Student Union, claimed pressure
Thursday. through spring quarter."It The deans generally agreed it would. 'from the GSU is responsible for the shift of
A $200,000 deficit in funds used mainly for will)) still be tight but 1 think we will)) be HANSON SAID, "Everything allocated for. funds.
graduate student salaries will be eliminated able to meet commitments," Hanson said. is a basic expense. It's a matter of setting "We are claiming victory at this point. We
priorities." are pleased that the administration came up
"This will just about shut down travel with money that supposedly they didn't
completely. There's probably enough for have," Dalton said.
Seventh UF president to paper telephones and Xerox. That's about all However, Dalton said the problem is not
they'll have," Bryan said. solved.
University College Dean Bob Burton Brown "IT'S JUST A temporary solution. Nothingis
said, "This will pretty well crimp:our style. solved for next 'year and nothing can
beinauguratedtod y You'll probably see exams given off 'the prevent the administration turning right !
blackboard and it will pretty well eliminate around and taking the money back,"she said.
travel," Brown said. GSU originally planned to picket UF
By GARY BALANOFF Aspokesman for the APSP Pitts and HOWEVER, Brown said he' was not President Robert Q. Marston's inaugurationtoday. 'I

Alligator Staff WriterDr. Lee Defense Committee said they planned a surprised."It's +
picket of about 10 people to keep pressure on just one more.tightening of the belt. If Dalton said a smaller "Victory line" will be :
Robert Q. Marston will be inauguratedin visiting public officials to reconsider the Pitts this saves jobs then it's worth it," he said. held instead.The line will organize at the Hubat
Florida Gym as the seventh UF president and Lee case.WILBERT. UC recently informed its graduate students 9 a.m., she said. !

today. LEE and Freddie Pitts have __ ... __., ___ ____ ..... .-
The original scheduled over a ,. N A.
program been imprisoned for 10 yean on a conviction a 'yM p > & sp I
two-day period, was cut in an effort to save for' murder. Even though a, witness 'who A ( aP
state funds.A testified against Pitts and Lee in the original
CUTBACK' of $16,000 was made from trial has admitted falsifying testimony, the' ,, ,
the original inauguration budget of $19,000. '
two men remain in jail. t 3's, F
The inauguration festivites began last nightat Demonstrators will be distributing a leaflet
7 p.m. when out-of-town guests and describing the case's history.
convocation participants attended a receptionat Among the state officials who will attendare +
the J. Wayne Reitz Union ballroom. State Education Commissioner Ralph,
The fourth annual President's Festival of State CommissionerDoyle '
Turlington Agricultural : "
Music was next on the agenda last night at Conner Rep. Don Fuqua, D-Altha, '; .
8:30: p.m. in Universtiy Auditorium. Peter Board of Regents members Burke Kibler a ;w< Y
.t
Herman Adler conducted Beethoven's Ninth Jack McGriff Chester and r
Ferguson, i; Y
Symphony (Choral)). Chairman Marshall Criser.

CRISER WILL preside over the con
vocation and will deliver the oath of office to
the new president.
\
Former UF Presidents J. Wayne Reitz and i" r
Stephen C. O'Connell will also be in at-
tendence.
One hundred and thirty-one' student
organizations will march in the processional.
TWO HUNDRED and seventy five faculty '' e

members also,responded to the call for those
r+f interested in marching, making a total' of,
more than 400 people participating in the
processional. r R' O
Procession Marshal Dr. Earl G., Rodgers. i'a
UF,professor of agronomy, said there would d :s '
also be a recessional. Those in academic
regalia will depart in reverse order from the
way they entered.Twentynine .
other colleges have indicated .
they will send representatives to the
DR. ROBERT MARSTON inauguration including six of the other eight i'4 rl iM
inauguration begins this morning schools in the State University System
UF'S MORE than 6.000 Career Service
Employes have been extended a special invitation -
DURING HIS inaugural address Marston to attend. The 9:30: a.m. to noon
will summarize the findings of the UF goals ceremony 'will, be, counted as work time for :
task force. such employes. ?
Twelve preliminary goals were identified as' Among the visiting dignitaries who will
"problem areas" by the task force. The 12 speak are Lt. Gov. James Williams, D-Ocala,
.goals outlined by the committee include who will make a short greeting at the con
decisions on which programs should be vocation. Wt
allowed to grow in the future whether admission Other greetings will be extended by Andrew
to UF should be selective or open. H. Hines of St. Petersburg. on behalf of the ,
and how to determine productivity and valuesof alumni; Dr. David M. Chalmers UF history ,
programs. professor on behalf of the faculty; and Steve !!
Marston will deliver his inaugural addressat Mcrryday UF_ student body president on
i
10 a.m. after a 9:30 processional begins the behalf of UF students.. 'tw
ceremonies. THE INVOCATION and benediction will photo by g.org kochonivc Jr.
WUFT-TV channel 5 will carry live be delivered by the Rev Eaile C. Page (

coverage of {the ceremonies.The rector of the, Holy' Trinity Episcopal Churchof Mm mm mm good !
African Peoples Socialist Party(APSP) Gainesville. -
has,indicated they will hold a demonstration! The University Symphonic Band will play
outside the gym while the ceeeremony is in before the Convocation, ,and' during the okay, let',get to the bottom of this. cream lover. Her sticky fingers reveal
progress. processional and recessional. That is the determination of this little Ice she's had quite a mouthful already.



...
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... ... ""
The .
Page 2, Independent Florida Alligator, Friday January. 17, 1975' ? ,,?. r '. '%-A--. ". .. H'."..H''t"Jt.. ...(. .. ,-.-
s ,' ', .r'. .. .. I \ *T \ *.'CA"* jf+riJ J* ** I. ...." ,



. U.S. in worst recession





of post-World War II era. CIA



Helms defends
WASHINGTON (UPI)-The United States is in the midstof "TilE CURRENT economic situation is very bad," he said spyingWASHINGTON

the worst recession of the post World War II era, accordingto grimly. "These are the facts. They speak for themselves. (UPI) .. Former CIA Director Richard

government statistics released Thursday.A Everything is bad." Helms said Thursday his agents had to spy upon American
Commerce Department report on the nation's Gross From November, 1973, when the constantly fluctuating radicals because some .of them had. links with foreign
National Product showed that output of the economy, adjusted business cycle reached its latest peak, through December, subversives and he defended the CIA's record "without

for the effects of inflation, dropped at a startling 9.1 1974, the latest date for which figures are available the GNP regrets without qualms, :without apology."

per cent annual rate between October and December. fell 5 per cent. That is a much bigger drop than in any of the Helms lashed back at the CIA's critics in prepared

INFLATION, meanwhile, spurted at a 13.7 per cent pace, five recessions since the end of World War II. testimony at a special Senate hearing, describing himselfas

the quickest since the department began collecting! quarterly "indignant at the irresponsible attacks" against the
the
1945-46
statistics in 1947.It There was a huge business contraction in as
and warning they could seriously damage U.S.
decline in underwent the readjustment from war to peace, but agency
was the fourth consecutive quarterly real or economy "if suffered to unchallenged."
noninflated! GNP and James L Pate, the department's chief economists consider this a special case that should not be interests Helms now ambassador pass to Iran, was CIA director from
said end is in compared with the usual recession.Not .
economist, the not sight."I 1966 to 1973 and deputy director before that when most of
don't thing we're at the trough (recession bottom) yet," since the 1930s when the economy took two separatenose activities'outlined

: said Pate, predicting that the growth rate would take another dives in the wake of the Great Depression, has there beenan the the domestic current director intelligence, William E. Colby, took Wednesday place. by
"substantial" loss I in! the current January-March quarter. economic slump as big as the one now under way.



I frida April 1 may see lower faxes I



% ; WASHINGTON (UPI) .. Congressional Leaders told a '
'Vli'VliI
P le President' Ford Thursday they believe an Income Tax rebatecan I

be enacted by April 1, but not necessarily in the exact

. form he requested.
.E White House Press Secretary Ron Nessen told reporters the e tw T1 t

" Democratic leadership had predicted modifications in Ford's

Senior/ chairmen deposed 'plan to return to individual taxpayers 12 per cent of their 1974

tax bill.
ASST. Senate Democratic Leader Robert Byrd of West
WASHINGTON (UPI) .. House Democrats, with the Virginia,one of those at the meeting with Ford, told reportershe
liberals forcing revolutionary reforms, deposed two senior and others thought Congress would want to aim the 1974
committee chairman Thursday but the dean of the
gave tax cut more at low and middle-income families than the
House. Rep. Wright Patman of Texas, a fighting chance to President suggested.

retain his Banking Committee chairmanship.Two Byrd also said Democratic leaders were less than enthusiastic
of the most powerful and most senior House Chairmen
about Ford's energy conservation plans which are
Edward Herbert of armed services and W.R. Poage of _
.. meant to reduce fuel consumption by raising prices through _
Agriculture ousted earlier in the _
were
day.
taxes that would bring in about $30 billion. _
Then on a narrow 146.141 vote, the Democrats voted down _
Ford should have
Byrd said he and others felt proposed a
Rep. Henry Reuss D-Wis. This that Patman will
means now
policy built on fuel rationing and that Congress might move to vN
come to a vote of the full party caucus, probably within 10
the President's
pass rationing legislation despite opposition to
days.
.it.NESSEN PRESIDENT FORD
SAID Ford's "primary concern is that there be wants fast action
Israel deadline action quickly" on the economy as well as the energy front
given and declined to speculate about possible compromises. "He

believes his plan will work" Nessen said. activity calculated to win political backing for his new

WASHINGTON (UPI)) .. Egyptian President Anwar Sadat Ford feels that gasoline rationing would require a long. economic and energy policies.

Thursday gave Israel three months to make further with.: term expansion of the government bureaucracy and that "no Following the leadership meeting) he delivered a personal
drawals from occupied Egyptian Syrian and Jordanian one would be happy with the decisions" on how much fuel sales pitch to scores of state and local government officials.

Territory. Otherwise he said the Arads including the could be consumed and by whom Nessen explained. Nessen said the leadership told the President they thoughtthe

Palestinians would "explode oerything" when the Geneva Ford's early morning meeting with Democratic and House and Senate could complete action by April 1 on
Middle East Peace Conference resumes. Republican leaders was the start of a strenuous round of legislation to cut 1974 taxes.

I

I C ; Restaurant


fisherman specialtiesSAUTEED oIe9s .S Motel o Lounge



SCALLOPS Sauteed in a Wine Sauce with a Hint of Garlic . .3.25 Gourmet Fresh Seafoods
BROILED STUFFED SHRIMP Shrimp Stuffed with Our. Own Devil Crab 3.25
DANISH LOBSTER\ Tender Petite Lobster Tails .. . . . ..., .495
FLORIDA LOBSTER Taste Tempting Lobster stutfed with our Snapper 0.-..

own Crab Stuffing ... . . . . .. . .,.. . .5.75
.LAND & SEA Half Florida Lobster Served with a Delicious Filet Lobster

: Sirloin Steak Cooked to Perfection . i. .. . . . . S.7S
OYSTERS AUGRATIN Sutculet Oysters Baked in a Delicious Sauce . 2.95 Scallops Crab Claws"G" :

Mullet Shrimp


fillet oF fish Italian Recipes Trout Stone Crab Rock Claws Shrimp In Unxeploited Parties Areas N


.. ITALIAN FLOUNDER Tender Flounder Baked in the Italian Private

bv Most at the King.of the Sea . .. .. ._ 3.8. :'. Fnherman 0n Speual. Garlic Sauce, .. .. 2.aS
SNAPPER Regarded
RED : SPAGHETTI The All Time Italian Favorite,Served with Men Sauce You
295
FLOUNDER Fillet of! One of the World Mott Popular FISh.. . . : LASAGNE; EN CASSEROLE The Prime of Italian. Foods Served Everything Prepared Fresh For _
Fried of Broiled . . . . 275 Piping, Hot . . 295
SCAMPI' Tender Shrimp Broiled in ihe Italian Fnherman t Own -
GROUPER A Large Portion of That Ever Popular Florida Fish Garliv Same . .. . . .
Fried or Broiled . . . . .. .. ...... .. .,., 295 VEAL PARMAGIANA Vcjl l Prepared" with Meat Sauce.Mon. arell* 255 The Independent Florida Alligator It a publication of Campus Communication, '
STUFFED FLOUNDER Stuffed with, Our Own Home Made Devil Crab ;, Cheese and Served with . ., .. .. .i. five It"e. weekly
Spaghetti incorporated o private nort profil corporation It it published ,
Broiled Only . . . ,. :;" .'.. .. J2S: I SHRIMP PARMAGIANA' Delicious Shrimp Smothered 295 except during June and when semi-weekly, ond during
In Our Own July August Ira published
FRIED FISH SANDWICH Delicious Flounder on a Toasted Bun .. .." 125.:. SauceTupped with Monuarella Cheese '.. ...' .. .;.... .. . 2.95'f'opfi. Wudtnl holidays ond e.am period Opin n eiprewed In the Independent,A'8' I "5
ore thote of the editors of the writeri of thh article and" not thoie of the University
Florida the campus served by the Independent Florida Alligator Address
"', correspondence to The Independent Florida Alligator, P.O. Bo. 13266 \\Jniverl"
Station Gainesville, Florida 32601. ",Independent' Florida Alligator i I. entered. o.
second clout matter at the United States Port Office Of Gainesville, Florida 3260))
,,' Subscription rote it$20.00 per year,or$5.50 per quarter.
''. :: \. of Ilh.
< (<. '\ !t':"" : .r", .&'.' Bulk subscriptions are provided. through Wudent government for the itudentt
r
University of Florida. ,
The Independent Florida Alligator'''tt\/fll''e nght. to fegulate-lhe typogrophlcdtone
We accept Master Charge of all.odvertiiementt and to revise Of turn away oil copy'" considers wleclionable

!_i The Independent Florida Alligator wilt not Cen lder.dluitment*of payment W''any N
and 'J odvert: ,,ementt involving typographical Insertion unlea notice
.BankAmericard J The'
given 10 the adverting ,manager within((1)) dayofter the-odvertitemeni appears incorreointen.on
Independent Florida Alligator will not be responsible for more than one
of on odvertitement scheduled, to run..veroll/in./ ..



.


.. .t\ ..A"U. ,



9
1

I' Th}..Inp.nd.nfloddaItr.Mdayonua7.1,75g.3UCevaluation;
I

; When it comes to sound, everyone comes to. ,



! ,. SOUNDCITY :."i"I I team selected

I :1< .1, \ .
I _. I .
The evaluation team for University College (UC) has been
selected. -
Dr. Eric Goldman Rollins Professor of History at Prin-
: ; ceton,University; Dr. James McCain president of Kansas
: : T 0 N I G HT State University; and Dt. John Silber president of Boston

: interim University assistant have been vice named president to the for team academic by Gene affairs.Hemp UP


THE EVALUATION team,was ordered by UF President ,
Robert Q. Marston after a UC survey last fall showed more
than 50 per cent of the faculty said morale was poor.
UC Dean Bob Burton Brown suggested the UC Advisory
Board begin their own investigation to supplement the outside
investigation.The .

MIDNIGHTMADNESS new team evaluation has been scheduled for Feb. 17-
18. ,
During that time the three members will evaluate ,the
situation in UC in terms of faculty morale. ,




; UF directories



I might run shortGator


Guides -- the phone directory for students,'faculty
and staff are on sale at the HUB for$1.50.
There are still student copies available free in the Student!
SALE Government office, according to Eudine McLeod, staff
assistant in the SG office.
; "

i MCLEOD SAID,"There were 4,000 guides for off-campus
students but there are fewer than$00 left. I'm not sure we'll
have enough to last through this quarter."
Everything in the store ( She added'"I've been working in this office for 15 years
and we've never run out out of Gator Guides. This may be t
,he first."

ON SALE
The Gator Guides on sale in the bookstore'were not intended
to be bought by students, said Mary Ann Green a
personnel staff member who gathered the, names for the
student and staff directory.
'..

11:55: pm ;, DOORS OPEN THESE EXTRA copies ordered under a separate contract
by the bookstore are for wives of faculty members, local
businesses or anyone who really wants one,said Green
12:00 MIDNIGHT SALE BEGINS
These guides are intended for persons who are not entitled ,
to a free Gator Guide. under the present. system. of

12:00: 12:30: 10 % OFF, distribution.She said.'there were 18,000 copies of- the Gator Guide

printed this,year..

12:30 =- 1 1:00 : 15 % OFF MCLEOD SAID students were allotted 8,000 of those
a nn ;
: : ,: tt copies of which 4,000 were distributed to campus residents

.' .;' ,,,._ .. fraternities sororities and married housing.The .

1 1:00: --1 1:30: : '<'V: il 20 % OFF other 4,000 student copies were delivered to the SG
office,where a student may pick one up by showing a current
fee card and identification according to Mcleod
"* :" Gator Guides were distributed to campus offices one per
1 1:30: 2:00': :: ; t" '1' 25 % OFF telephone according to Green.

Even if there are no more copies left for students there are
2:00 2:30: am :: -7j} : 20; % OFF no plans to have more printed according to Green since
: ,;'. .. extra copies would,have to be paid for by UFo
I .. ,. ," ,. McLeod ....., Guides. "The publishing company solicits ads to cover the ,
-
-'! : :: : cost of the number of copies ordered"she said.

WjSl'I": ,:,;..' ..
.. .1'I1I'-" "" !., : : i
.
:
., SG positions availableThe ,

SALE LIMITED TO CERTAIN FAIR-
deadline for filing applications for'eight student officesis

STOCK ON HAND TRADE ITEMS EXCLUDED, 5 p.m. today. '.
Interested students may apply for the positions of student
delegate and alternate to the University Senate; a post on the
WE Activity Fee Service Advisory Committee; and five positionson
the Distinguished Professor Chair Committee.For : .
SERVICEWHAT
378-2331 ouNp 'IT'
further information or description on any of the
WESELL1 positions.call 392.J 665 or see Ken Ofgang in the Student
;U9 NW 13th St. Government office in the J. Wayne Reitz Union Room 305.


E
a



,Independent Ftorido Alligator,friday January 17. 1975 I


Merrydoy calls for open




hearings on tuition planBy c4icy;


KAREN MEYER would suggest a morning or an afternoon
Alligator Staff WriterIn on campuses in different geographical'
a letter to the chairman of the ) might suffice in providing an op
Regents (BOR this week Student for parties often not heard to
President Steve Merryday requested their views as to the merits of both the GAINESVILLE MALL
hearings "on the issue of tuition" and amounts of fees," the letter said
regents: submit their fee there had been public hearings last year 2546 NW. 13th Street 4i
the coming legislative session. the tuition per credit hour was,
Both State University System Merryday said, "Some,of the liberal
Robert Mautz and newly appointed and largely elective colleges would have
Marshall Harris speculated on the ."
of a tuition increase at the January PRESIDENT Robert Q. Marston said
meeting. letter "constituted a reasonable
REFERRING to the "probable ." '
THE
effects (of such an increase) on the am and have been for some time an
situation," Merryday suggested of low tuition," said Marston, .
modeled after utilities rate he was"by no means neutral"on the

hearings. IIN4ASHION STOREEspecially
i 4Ir ; hearings would "make sure the BOR
the reasons and feelings behind
to keep tuition low," said Mar

Jack McGriff had not seen the I
,r y> but thought he would endorse the i1 r its
of hearings.
it comes to changes in tuition, I '
like any kind of input from students or p
else" said McGriff.
said the regents should provide time for ro
I II
"on a reasonable level" adding they
be going all over the state" for it.
the hearings might not prevent!
: increase i in tuition, Merryday said "it''
I i iw
make the decision more legitimate."
:: eventual aim is to see "some sort of cap f
on tuition," where fees for 15 or 16
STEVE MERRYDAY would be maximum, no matter how I i 1R C IIf

.sends letter to regents additional hours a student carried, he
m


Sexual- a ft r o* ',




I exposed- in and"I lecture,, _. _' : ___ __a"A I It Ii i 4 IF f



By LINDA WISNIEWSKI clinic they found "the direct
Alligator Staff Writer of,the tip of the clitoris turned
"Sexual relationships involve off because it was too intense."
munication but most males try to deal and Johnson were the first people
women by a touch of the lips a brush of look at a woman at her,sexual :
breast and then a dive for the crotch," and her length of orgasm," she ad '
Newman said Wednesday night. _
The topic of the lecture at the J. Newman said males were. "quickly 'tA1 '--
:
I Rcitz Union was "Understanding' and needed "no physical __
Sexual Self. ..* to have a full erection and _
The audience largely was made up ." r**
students who. like Don Cournoyer, MALES worry about the size of
came "to expand my knowledge on the penis. Newman said, although "the size
self and. learn what 1 haven't learned penis is not much of a criteria because
THE LECTURERS, Laura and elasticity of the vagina."
Newman both practice in Gainesville. 'our, country we're obsessed with big
New is a psychiatrist at the Student big houses and big penises," he added.'
Service in the 'JF infirmary. the last 45 minutes of the program
Laura Newman is a marriage and : held a question and answer
counselor in Gainesville. She received with the audience. pi
training in sexual counseling last asked the Newmans to "define
Yours!
under Masters and Johnson in St. Louis.Laura relationship."
Newman explained that while Newman replied a "meaningful
was in St. Louis working under Masters must be mutual and must have a Lerner Shops proportioned Polyester Slacks are just for you.
Johnson they"tried to find the limit of deal' of meaning to both people." Naturally they are available in short, average or tall in all the
sexual capacity." \ admitted some relationships newest of spring colors.

ONE QUESTION the researchers but added "most of the time it takes Shop today and choose your correct length then top them off

answer was how many orgasms a time" to develop a meaningful with-an assortment of our new Print tops or Knits.
could have. Newman said. ip.
The clinic "lined up a bunch of willing asked, "Does a good marriage Get that Spring feeling by adding a few new, touches to your
and one willing woman" she said. "After a good sex life?" wardrobe.

orgasms the men had had it while the, NEWMAN replied, a good marriage Giselle has chosen. a V-neck top to go with her proportioned
was still going strong." good sex life "are inseparable. There slacks .
During the lecture the Newmans good marriages where there is no See you here!
models of male and female external gent sex alone won't keep a marriage
illustrate how women and men ." '
Top S7.99 Slacks 15.99
respond. Newman added_ "what goes on in the
LAURA NEWMAN: explained that begins to creep, in on the other >en Sunday for
clitoris is "the primary organ of $ in marriage." your shopping Convenienc

stimulation. ) person asked the /Newmans to 1:00: 6:00 P.M.;
"As the clitoris is stimulated it gets in non-technical terms what a non'

at first and then goes away" she said. female feels.when she has her first it s easy to be fashionable just charge it
"The old sex manuals used to tell the ,
one thing find the clitoris and hang Newman .answ red, '"most women
there." Newman said. : \ !' That's as non-technical as I can I IPag.4
BUT NEWMAN said at the Masters



-."," .' ., "
-.


j .

Independent Florida Alligator, Friday,January 17, 1975, Pag 5


, Ex-prison chief heads criminal justice .program I

-
By RICHARD BURKHOLDER corrections and rehabilitation instead of undergo re-evaluation.." he said.
,Alligator Staff WRIter police science or punishment.\ : At UF the sponsors of this new liberal arts
IN KEEPING with the limes, and in curriculum are the departments of political
Surrounding the walls of Dr. Myrl E.Alexander's response "to the changes that the study of science, psychology and sociology. Offered is
,
office are a battery of criminal justice has undergone," the focus of a bachelor of arts degree with graduate work,
autographed portraits from such luminariesas the program which leads to an interdisciplinary "available in the departments of health-related
John D. Mitchell, Ramsey Clark,' and major, is based in a "social professions, recreation, and law school. '
Robert Ff Kennedy.. science perspective" Alexander said. WHEN THE program was first announced
Alexander former director of the 'U.S. This curricula decision was made, he said, at the beginning of fall quarter, only 85
Bureau of Prisons, has had long and because criminal embraces
justice so many students signed up and they all had to go
distinguished. experience with attorneysgeneral. disciplines that an interdisciplinary approachwas through dropadd.Now .

mandatory. Alexander estimated there are
"STILL," he mused, "one wonders aboutthe Nowadays, he said it's important that "roughly 450 this quarter, with 300 of these as I'
question of a dual standard of justice in "strong research components" be developedto announced majors."

,'ter America" especially after the Watergateaffair. define and handle the personal makeup of In fact, he said, the program is so new that 4his
At this he cocks his head
toward the the American criminal.
office has a sink'since originally his
portrait of John D. Mitchell' over his filing THUS, NEW practitioners, new research quarters were to be part of a psychological
cabinet. designs, new institutional models need for testing laboratory.
Dr. Alexander is chairman of the newly mulation. Here is where a modernized
For the future, he saad, "we intend to
initiated criminal justice program at UF. criminal justice program comes in, Alexander maintain our perspective over the total field
After having studied the and
sociological added.
and hopefully open a series of subdivisional
psychological phenomena of ,crime in "In light of Vietnam, the student riots of 'tracks' with specialty considerations con
DR. MYRL ALEXANDER
America for 30 years, he has carefully con- the 1960's and expecially Watergate, it's cerning pre-law, police correctional work and
directs
new program structed an academic program emphasizing"Sugar necessary that the science of criminal justice: other nreas."

r "'


.
: -
Store Brand Dixie Crystals Sw..tnLow
(cents per oz.) (cents per oz.) (cents per oz.)

AlP 3.6 3.75 1.6
,
.' ; :' '; ., I
You live without it oJ
can 1 Wlnn Dixie 3.6 3.6, 1 6 I f' .<" j jr I
.1 Iir wt..a. .
., \ r (. "
Despite its sweet taste, sugar is not one's teeth, according .to Dr. Dennis Pantry Pride 3.7r.. 3.7.;" "ft.. .3 It'IH'! r.J1 ";
actually necessary to the body. Birdsell, assistant professor in basic dental ', \\1-: ,':'ii' ." ,. i' 'r": '
According to Dr. Howard Appledorf sciences at UF. Thriftwoy 3.6. '." :" -- ''':J"..';.;," .J T,
assistant professor in nutrition and food Birdsell said the effect of the sugar o' ,I':
sciences, the body only needs sugar for depends on how sticky it is. Publix '-.I': 3.6 3 ...-
and not for sweetness. "Sucrose, which is the main ,
energy t.t.
sugar I' 7; ;
Star /
Big 3.6 3.6 1.3 '", '.,
"THE BODYcould get the energy it makes a sticky substance in the mouth i: ', \, : .
needs not from sugar, but from starches which is hard to remove," he said. ; i ::j': ; ifl ..
and carboyhydrates," he said. Substitutessuch Microorganisms in the mouth convert the Sucaryl < Sugar Twin Sweet 10 Evercone4cents : "

as apples and honey, which, are sugar to acid, which, if untreated, can ( per oz.) (cents per oz.) (cents per oz.) (cents per oz.)
carbohydrates, could provide the needed cause serious tooth decay.
energy. BIRDSELL added that the so-called ASP 1.6 .- 1.6 -

One tablespoon of sugar provides 50 sugarless gums contain alcohol sugars. .
Wlnn Dixie 1.6 2 V 1.6 -- ,
calories, according to a book entitled "The "These sugars also cause acid to be

Story of, Sugar" by W.R.Aykroyd.Su made and you can still get cavities," he Pantry Pride 1.4 2 1.2 --
ar itself doesn't provide any of the said. ..: '" .

vitamins or protein needed for health. According to newspaper reports, the Thrlftway. .. 2" :.) ...I 1.6 -" 3.6' .,; .; : .'
Also, according to the book, too much risk of tooth decay depends on how often a /t,",: '1. > :,:) :" '" :
sugar in the diet may "crowd out" other person eats sugar every day. Publix 1.1 2.r : 1.2. 3.6
foods needed for good health. Dr. W.H. Bowen of the National In- ",'., "
"You could cut down on sugar and still stitute of Dental research, in Bethesda, Big Star 1.6 2 1.7' __
get energy by eating starches," he said. 'It Md., said a person who eats three meals a
would probably be well if people ate less day, even if the meals are high in sugar
sugar." content, risks tooth decay less than a
SUGAR CANalso be extremely hard on person who nibbles at sweets all day. t

Prices, demand downSugar

Laurie Penrose I .
I Text by Jo If
.: prices have dropped since the big used in pastries. Those sugars sell for
rise last fall, and grocers say they don't about 65 cents a pound.
expect them to go up any time soon. Sugar prices in Pantry Pride were
Sweeteners cheaper Over the Christmas holidays a five slightly higher. Pantry Pride sugar in a
are pound sack of sugar retailed in local five pound bag sold for $2.99. Dixie:
supermarkets for as much as $3.39 a bag. Crystals was also slightly higher at $3.09
Synthetic sweeteners are proving to bea Synthetic sweeteners ,also cost less to Now, most Gainesville chain stores sell the for a' five pound bag.
less expensive method of sweetening food buy A 6 oz. bottle liquid sweetener costs sugar for less than three dollars.. Consumer pressure, seems to be the
and drink than sugar. 59 cents in most stores. In addition, IN 1973 sugar sold for 70 cents for five major factor in the drop according to E.O.,
Synthetic sweeteners are made from saccharine tablets arc available, as are pounds. Then, in 1974, sugar prices began Long, vice-president of Florida Food
saccharin a chemical. These boxes of synthetic sweeteners in packets., climbing reaching $2.00 or, more at most Service Inc. a food wholesaler.
sweeteners claim to have all the sweeteningpower "AFTER A while it tastes terrible," Jeff supermarkets in November.In "People have backed off from buying, so
I of granulated,: sugar, and are less Maro, 4JM said. "But its cheaper than- December, a five pound bag of A&P packers have lowered their 'prices," Long
costly. sugar" sugar sold for $3.20. Now it is down to commented.
SACCHARIN is under study as a Dr Howard Appledorf, associate $2.89. Dixie Crystals sugar sells for $2.99
'
possible cancer-causing 'agent. accordingto professor in nutrition and food sciences- now. NATIONALLY the demand for refined
the Food and Drug Administration Its said the synthetic sweeteners are useful "I 1 don't believe it will (go: up, either" sugar is only about half of what it was a
use is carefully regulated by law. because they provide no calories.. A&P Managce John Pruett said.A year ago, according to newspaper reports.
The chemical was removed from the "In addition they are, not metabolized in SIGN ON. the sugar counter of the Officials at the Amstar Corp, one of the
government's: \ list of "generally recognized the body, and of course they are less ex Winn Dixie store on N.W. 6th Street says, nation's largest sugar refiners, say sugar
as safe" food additives in 1972 and has pensive." he said.RECENTLY "Quantity rights reserved" Thrifty Maid ,may have been hoarded earlier when prices
!not been placed back on the list. retails for 52.89. with Dixie Crystals sugar, were,going up. Since then, with demand
The )government now recommends use according to newspaper a five pound\ bag priced at $2.95. ,down, Amstar has cut back its ,refining
saccharin by not more than one gram a reports food processors have been addingthe Evercane sugar and Dixie Crystals sugarin operations slightly.
synthetic sweetener saccharin to foods the Publix store in the Gainesville Mall Late in 1974, when sugar rose from 70
daySYNTHETIC sweeteners come jn liquid to cut the cost of sugar in production.Under both retail for $2.89 a bag. Manager Bill cents, supermarkets in some areas of the
and I powdered form and usually are used federal food regulations, putting Curry said'Dixie Crystals sugar reached a country began discouraging customers
by dieted{. Howcv; 'cr,,with t the high price of saccharin in foods is illegal unless the label high of S3.35 in December."It from buying sugar.In .
sugar) this has changed. clearly identifies the product as a special supposed!\ to .be coming down." Gainesville at that time, most
"I 1 don't use! anything rise Lynn Sloan. diet food' manager Curry said. "All the other sugars supermarkets limited customers to one five
4JM. said. "To me: there's little difference It's also illegal, to combine saccharin have come down." pound sack of sugar with each grocery
between synthetic sweetener and sugar. It with sugar) in soft drinks unless the soft "OTHER ar\" include brown sugar, order. However, this is no longer the

dissolves better, too." drinks are specially labeled. powdered sugar und confectioner's sugar, policy. I II I

e


.r.J
_.



M
Th. btdopwKUnt Florida Alligator,Friday January 17, 1!7.5



Iranian students chant




criticisms of Shah gov't ..rn, r



.' l
By DEBBIE ERICKSONand the Plaza of the Americas at noon Thursday l

chanting. protests.
BILL WALL Placards denouncing the Shah's government .

Alligator Staff Writers covered the faces of the Iranian

demonstrators to prevent political retaliation.A .

Twenty UF and Santa Fe Iranian studentsand SPOKESMAN who refused to identify

supporters circled around a flaming .himself said the Iranian Student Association
> '
effigy of Shah Mohammad Reza Pahlavi in in Gainesville is trying to bring ,attention to : ';;:;:- -> ';I "

the political plight of Iranians at home and in ,, .,.."":' : '.. t' ,<<:,. "
.". "V' { ; > ..
,f\t
n" '. .
.q. '" ''' (; .L. :
READER'S the U.S. f f"f',. K tel., ':';'._ > ...r'. 't. N 1.<- i '-" .... Ii_._ _:....3
The demonstrators contended there are photo by- george kochanlac: |r.

more than 25,000 political prisoners in Iran IRANIAN STUDENTS

REDRESS under the threat of murder or forms of ? bum Shah In effigy at Plaza of the Americas

Thursday's Alligator incorrectly stated that medieval torture.

the. Activity and Service Fee Advisory According to one. demonstrator the
Committee (ASFAC) has total control over the political prisoners include intellectuals who militarily the Shah is relying on U.S. sup said "a peaceful protest in a foreign: countrycan

allocation, of $175,000 surplus Student have been imprisoned without having charges port," a demonstrator said. bring. 3.10 years in jail."

Government money. brought against the I. Support of the present Iranian governmentis Most Iranian demonstrators )plan to returnto

ASFAC can only make recommendationsas The demonstrate* are demanding that the due to U.S. involvement dating back to Iran eventually and would not allow their

to where the money should go. SG and UF Iranian government immediately announce 1953 one demonstrator said. pictures on names to. be taken for fear of

administrative officials must then approve the. charges against the prisoners, announce trial Leaving WGGG radio station on Waldo reprisal.

recommendations. dates and allow international. observers to Road .at 9:30: a.m., the demonstrators "People at home are hurt and ,my father

In addition, this $175,000 is not SG money. attend all trials. marched down University Avenue into the would lose his job if 1 am identified," a

The funds were allocated directly to the The demonstrators are also protesting the Plaza of the Americas chanting "The Shah is demonstrator said.

advisory committee. United States' financial support of the Shah a fascist butcher! and. "Down with U.S. A joint 'UF.University of. South Florida

Alligator staff writer Leslie Golay regretsthe through oil purchases."ECONOMICA..Y. imperialism!" protest is being planned for Thursday, Jan.

error. politically and A 'SPOKESMAN for the demonstrators 23 in Tampa..
.

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F sir } J .K .
-?.crs' "

r r+ys i2f'r 'i rL3ASS' {F'a. qZ at,,r..r. brFit' k< J t

;<<: .

F{. .maximum chug torn on..mlnuU Cill within the state, I V I
every night from 11 PM. to 8 ".M., it *20{.Since mOlt }
2Sr'v.. people speak it the rat of 120 to 140 words per minute I 1 1
,
:?4 d..'4v.,{,C .fi L{ )ck,2 F SSGI :c7.y.k r 4 fy.:,:}}St Ih2 ,Y Y! h yyq..Y (4 < C.Y GS'.,'. n B you too can pack t lot Into oM-minuM quickie all. 6I V t

'" < '1''''' l t.. 'r< .{../'' ff.: [ U'PV: <"71 <,,";' ,..><'", ,"" '" ...
-I ,4'
j :(\ f./: : / ., .i.
*' ', "+ '. A'ifiI0P.

: .".}, III1" :
} :.? ( r>ly If'> 9A} kfq'y. nL.<) w.r:.: .
!: : ; :i(} fi y; < s'si fk S'; f: ; ai:..72..i.Y y 1'{: 4Rlrf% w24i. rot Call 3764482 ;
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na %r.
$ % }
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garY{ {aal. }>t.,.,{; : a
?.:';.b.. A qY .. 1'':':' Y oun8Amens o n *W.t ttJnlwersltr:Ay.nwt rs .%-j"r: ,;./; ':}.J.i::ny 4 ; ,1- .
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,, 'f;< "';:; 1; 'ft,
.. r '.. %";,': ) i.YC $ ''i:.r ,.a"'s.. diJe : 'to place your ad.Mop.4 .



'm .>:,: "'; ,' :': h,. I 'lit*Independent f Florida Alligator,'Friday,January f ii, 1975:Page 7'

..xthe Annual f )anuoRiGeaRance / : '


( Safe. .. 7 ..t ; ,' WHATSJIAPPENINGBy '

.
.
'
(ONE OF 'ONLY TWO SALES A YEAR) ';', \

.
AlmoSlCVeRfthlng! in stock Reduced Alligator STEVE Staff PROCKO Writer


{ DISCUSSION: on Baha'i Faith tonight at 8 in the J. Wayne
@a/o J.@ % Reitz Union, room 118. For further information call 378-
. .< off 3575. '

LITERATURE DISTRIBUTION! this afternoon from 12:30-:
Jeans Shirts Dresses Suits Jackets 2:00..Copies: of the Christian Science textbook can also be
borrowed or purchased from the J. Wayne Reitz Union
Jewelry Purses Belts Shoes colonade. For further information call 373-1850.

DOUG CLARK AND THE HOT NUTS are featured this
evening and Saturday at the Rat from 9-11 p.m. Admission is I-
52.
3
RECORD HOP: tonight at 8 at the Catholic Student Center
Lounge for all Catholic students. Admission is free.
GODHEAD REVEALED: this Sunday at 4:30: p.m. at the
S1R Society for Krishna Consciousness Varnashrama Institute,
921 featured.SW Depot Ave. A 20-course Vedic love feast will also be

ORGANIC GARDENING MEETING: Join the organic
\\PPEN 10-10 DAILY; SUNDAY 12-8 gardening co-op Saturday at 10 a.m. at the organic gardens.For .

8 SW 7th St. further information call 377-8087.
MIDDLE EARTH COFFEEHOUSE: will be held Saturdayat
r Next to Subterranean Circus 9 p.m. in Underground Sledd B, Murphree Area. For
r further information call 392-7466.
DISC DANCE: will be held Saturday at 9 p.m. in Broward
Hall.Admission is$1.50 without an activity card, SI with one.
For further information call 392-6051.
STUDENTS FOR FARMWORKERS: will meet Sunday at 7
p.m.. in the J. Wayne Reitz Union, room 150B. For further
information call 372.7362.REV'bLUTIONARY .
STUDENT BRIGADE: will meet
Sunday at 8 p.m. in the J. Wayne Reitz Union room 355. For
further information call 373-5988.
64
MOVIE: "Prisoner" starring Alec: Guiness will be presented
Sunday at 8 p.m.in the Law School Auditorium. Admission is
50 cents for all students.
''' ''' ,'''' 'A' ,., .."" ... --->!II&, PRAYER RALLY will be held Sunday at 2:30 at St.Augustine's .
'' "
,I' ... ',". '" v' .- ,' .v ,, .' .'..* :>,?p$...'.''.';" ''f!:f"Ji;;:1k:. ,":m"t", ,:>, :' ;.'h. .f ): O '::;'. yda"kr'. : -?{,-'''>;..!.''>, '' + p.m.
.w MM: < \ ri''> 'ii"i>c* Catholic Student Center. Sponsored by Right to
1 Life. For further information call 3789192.
KOSHER MEAL PLAN: if you're interested come to this
SAVEMONET organizational meeting Sunday at noon at 16 NW 18th St. For
further information' call 3721015.
BRUNCH: sponsored the Hillel foundation Sunday at 11
of a.m. at 16 NW 18th St. For further information call 3722900.




.<.

i t1i>f: Students injured

'
o.


in bike accidents
I'
a DOMINO'S DOUGH
--
e ri .
i1' By JOE MORAN
,. Alligator Staff Writer
$1.00 OFFS :
/ .
J/VMENU \
l .. ON ANY ''
$ M3"Ch t :$ .2SD.Iv.s4.00 fr
: / ONE ITEM OR MORE ) Two UF students were injured in separate bicycle accidents

+>* ftra i items.45. f DOMINO'S PIZZA. t1; Thursday.
t 1 le"CHe fe:$3 50DttwBt iName Gary Estes 3EG, was treated at Shands Teaching Hospitalafter
i :$A 00litre 5, suffering cuts and head injuries in a two-bike collisionon
.m:33./ ---- Stadium Road.

.,? T* w lifal( ccwpen fill ti ESTES WAS listed in "fair" condition according to a
:. On c.vp.np.r pin* n.n. end pAM.
hospital spokesman.
pl M..lh nki. .
Marianne Reith. 3AS, received lacerations of the foot after
FREE DELIVERY ::1'f. being struck by a truck at 13th Street and Union Road, ac.
cording to University Police Department spokesman Jim
'f. I Shuler.
Reith was treated at the UF infirmary and released.

. .? ACCORDING to an eyewitness, who wished to remain
t1.f' anonymous Estes collided with a bicycle ridden by Julie

.. USE OURS. \ Black. I IUC,as He was traveling east on Stadium Road. ....
With inflation these day'i Black was traveling on the wrong side of the street at a high'

m everybody could use a break now and then..so why not take a break : rate of speed the witness said.
Keith Rosen 2UC and Robert Vogel. lUC, administered
:4 with Domino's Pizza and save money at the same time?
first aid to Estes until an ambulance arrived on the scene.
tI Here's a $1.00 toward your next 16': one item or more pizza. You l.:i : The accident,is still under investigation, but according to

can pick,it up or call for our fast free delivery. lotI Shuler no charges had been filed by late Thursday afternoon.

Rcith was traveling south on 13th Street according to UPD
reports,when the front wheel of her bike struck the rear wheelof
a delivery truck driven by Robert Larsen,as the truck madea
""d. DOMINO'S.PIZZA ... right turn in>front of her

1. Shulcrsaid no.charges,were tiled in the!incident.


HAPPY: HOUR: ;
FREE DELIVERY;
', ,:,, .i

.. .
r Campus Eastslde Westside z zk Sandwiches served atLONGBRANCH
376-3317378-2415 ;. CUSTOM FRAMING
,.. .. ,. f.-I:>d't.,!...:"t"376-2487'<".. -.. ,"*, ....I"fJ'. .,. ,q '. .. .!: .'.!!.it.. .. .t'}.. .; ""I: 1
I. '' '', v ,,, .. ,., : .t ,, ,
y. '<'!': .,.; ")T<".*.*....;:>&,<* :""."", ", >"Ac. .,,:-<. < '"", '01"' ">" ." *:"""" ... '.w e .".J'J. : :!"-'. ) '' .y' 22 N.Unlv.Ave. 373-81M




_,,,1



-
-- -


-I



fog I,Independent Florida Alligator,Friday January !17, 1975 y A111 n
:y

EDITORIAL




Tighten




It's no secret by now, but in case anyone hasn't

been listening, times are tough.
And they're not getting any better.

* Just glance at some of our headlines this week

and shiver a little. Book prices are rising,
enrollment has been frozen, air conditioning and
heat are being turned off or restricted around the

university due to huge funding problems, and
chances are good that tuition will rise again next

year for the second time. /

.
That's not to mention what's going on outsidethe

State University System. Mass lay-offs,

runaway inflation, recession, and rising prices.It's .
a sign of the times that in the midst of the

-current economic situation more and more peopleare

rushing to qualify for the federal food stamp /1

program.

Once a program primarily designed for peopleon Can U.S. learn to accept
public assistance, it's main aim was to provide
an improved diet to low income families. But now

the program is attracting thousands of middle- Latin American independence ?
class working families who can't seem to make

ends meet anymore. In addition, an increasing Recently the Miami Herald complained that the U.S. was -
number of students are qualifying. erecting discriminatory trade barriers against Venezuela and RICHARD
Ecuador, members of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting
Nationally almost 250,000 Americans a monthare Countries (OPEC). The Herald maintained that this RURKHOLDER
being certified for the program. Here in was a. "poor fence to separate Good Neighbors" and that the
Alachua County, there are over 4,300 on the rolls, U.S. should take steps to re-cement amicable hemispheric HOWEVER, it has always been impossible to completely
relations. eradicate Yankee influence due to these nations' dependenceupon
up 110 per cent from December 1973. About one All of which strikes me as being politically> and historicallynaive. the U.S. for market consumption of their raw product
third of those are students.But exports and the overarching pervasion of U.S. politics and
PRACTICALLY speaking U.S.-Latin American relations culture.
now there are those in Washington, including have been in the U.S. "Good
always paternalistic nature Which, in essence means that the vaunted Neigh
President Ford, who are growing alarmedover "protects" the Latins from such scourges as international bor Policy" is pretty much a one-way street.
the rapid growth of the food stamp rolls. Communism while helping to "develop" Latin American Until now.
Adding to their alarm is the fact that there are stillan economies through private multi-national enterprise.Now Now the U.S. has its greatest opportunity to show its true
estimated 15 to 35 million Americans who are certain of these wayward stepchildren namely, faith in the viability of the GNP. Now that some of our Latin
those OPEC signatories have taken it themselves to their own
upon American associates have the capacity to develop
for the but have not taken
eligible program yet cut the umbilical cord with Uncle Sam. For undertaking sucha homelands something which( the U.S. has always paid lip
advantage of it. bold endeavor they are to be punished by thoscs! "onerous" sen-ice in its pronouncements on Latin American policy,
provisions incorporated within the new U.S. trade bill. Congress! has decided to pull the rug out.
Ford has proposed a raise in the cost of the And now these Hispanic nations are wailing.OPINION WHICH IS typical! of the way North Americans have
stamps beginning in March. Under existing reacted to displays of Latin backbone since Fidel's Marxi'iuo.
regulations food stamp recipients pay an averageof The central question to all this is whether the L S. will ever
23 per cent of their income to buy food stamps. learn to toss hypocrisy aside in its dealings with V enc/iielJ ftal.
has be two-faced advocates of
History shown the gringos to
Beginning in March, most will have to the
pay IT IS WELL that they might; benevolence has never been "enlightenment" at the expense of others. Now that the power
maximum 30 per cent. the strong suit in North America's relationships with her alignments vis-a-vis the U.S. and Latin America are
Spanish-speaking neighbors. changing, can the U.S. be mature enough to accept the
Even more ominous for the approximately 1,500 From the 1930's Cordell Hull machinations for North political and economic sovereignties of its fellow hemispheric
households of students on the program in Alachua American economic security,to the ill-fated economic debacleof nations?
County, and 60,000 students nationally, is a the Alliance for Progress the U.S. has imposed> mightily :To all you closet isolationists and-creeping chauvinists t I
proposed regulation by the Department of upon the stage of twentieth-century Latin America. profer one tantalizing, yet ultimately regrettable( tidbit. Since
To a great extent former Yankee activity in Venezuela and Venezuela and Ecuador are OPEC members.they are, for the
and that would bar students
Agriculture Congress Ecuador. representative: both countries had to wrest control moment at least forbidden' to jack up the price of their ex-
who get more than half of their support from from foreign firms that lorded imperiously over the fiscal fates ported crude oil for fear of damaging the cartel. So about all
another household, most commonly their parents, of their countries (a U.S.-British-Dutch petroleum syndicatein they can do row is protest,long and vehemently.
from getting the stamps. Venezuela the United Fruit Company in Ecuador). The While the U.S. has this respite before the next OPEC price
U.S. usually gave: in grudgingly after being warned of more conference it should, but probably won't seriously re-evaluate
Even a student who does get part of his income dire measures being considered by.the financially harried host the taking away of the "privileged"nation" sratus from these
.
from parents may not be able to make ends meet countries. two now-disabused "Good Neighbors."

after he's paid for his books, rent, loans, tuition -

and other day to day expenses.They're .
The Wood
oavid
Independent smith urni
telling stories now of families who driveto
Edltor.ln.chlef Managing Editor
the food stamp office in Cadillacs to collect their

monthly allotment. If they can't make it, what Florida Alligator .
chance do students have
all QtH'tiCGK/
David KI.ln Debl Fumiss Brian Jones

Ford's decision to raise the cost of the stampshas fFJ N.ws editor Layout editor layo\ot Editor

been delayed because of criticism from
and chances of R.A."To"y"l Congress it being put into effectare Jams V.Cook .... .... ........... t..,... .......... ......halmntGeneral Manag.r Published by
still uncertain. But the fact remains that even Mrs. Evelyn Be.t .. s.... ...,..... ...'.... ... .... ... ..........Admlnlstratlv.haldant Cam Com municatio .. Inc.Mn. .
if the raise is not approved, the regulation .Malphurs ..... ......'. ..'.. .......... .....,.. ..... .,..... ,.....8ookbep.r pus ,
C.Roy Shipp ". .<,... .. ......,... ...... ......., .... .... ......Busin.ssManag.r' P.O. Box 13266 Unlver.l
prohibiting some students could be. We hope not. Tom MocNomoro ... ........... .... .,...... ..... ... .,.. ...... .. ..Accountant Station, Galn..m., Florida with
Already we are getting storm warnings from Ray McGee Jr. . .... ... ., ...... ...,... ., ....,....... ,.. ,... .Advertillng" Manager offic.s behind the College Inn.
Tallahassee that tell us it is going to get even more Donna Lubrano" . ... ............ .....,.., .. .... ... Advertiling Coordinator 1728 West University Avenue.
key Harper . . .. I .. ... ., ., .. Special Sections Coordinator Business Offlc. phone: 376-.u.ab.
expensive to go to school in the State University Lynda Homier " . . . . . . . ... <..Advertillng Production Manager Editorial Deportment: 316-.u58.
System. It would be a cruel blow to be subjected to Diana Snyder" "..": ..,. '" : . '.' . Editorial Production Manager Advertising and Production. .
'o' .. .
. .. ''<
similar i warnings from Washington. \.. LynnSokler .Editoriolpiod c\\ Mdrio9ai' Ds ?itin..mU32:
-J

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Independent Florida Alligator, Friday,January 17, 1975. Pag*9

,, .. ',





Equal. justice f rPi.tfs'.and. Lee, ;:: $ : .l\\ '


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r
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Editor: In the year 1963, two black men. Freddie Lee Pitts troduced by the state to support its charges! No fingerprintsof is no surprise that Pitts and Lee and many others have been ;
and Wilbert Lee sentenced .
were to death
row for the murderof '
the deceased in Pitts' car; no fingerprints of Lee or Pitts on subjected to such gross injustices.
two white gas station attendants in Port St. Joe, Florida. the gas station cash register which was broken into the nightof In recent months, a letter writing campaign, petition
Since 1963a number of facts
have surfaced to prove that the crime; no weapons proceeds from the robbery in Pittsor signings, demonstrations, fund raising activities, and
Pitts and Lee innocent and
have
are
not received fair trials in Lee's possession; no bloodstains soil samples on Pitts programs have been organized, in support of Pitts and Lee.
either Gulf County, where the first trial
took place, or Jackson and Lee's clothing.: Also, Pitts and Lee could not identify the The Pitts and Lee. Defense Committee at the University of
County, where the second trial took place. Many of these facts murder site; Curtis Adams, Jr., who confessed to the crime, Florida urges each freedom loving student faculty member "
have either been withheld from
presentation in the court or not could identify the murder site. and worker to support the struggle to free Pitts and Lee by
admitted into the record.A 'I
court In 1971,this case was moved from Gulf County to Jackson signing a petition, donating money, or other resources,
white man, Curtis Adams Jr., has confessed to the crime County because prejudicial news publicity in the area had writing letters to Governor Askew demanding that he end the
and supporting evidence of his J guilt has been given by Mary made a fair trial impossible. However, the newspaper read in eleven year old injustices afflicting: Pitts and Lee writing
Jean Akins,(,his former mistress who was with him at the time Jackson County was owned by the same publisher (The letters to Pitts and Lee to let them know that the people are
of his premeditation of the crime. 'This "voluntary con'fession" Panhandle Banner, Gulf County) who ran the racist news struggling to set them free.
of Adams is on tape and has not been permitted to be articles and-editorials against ,Pitts and Lee. REUB'IN' ASKEW will be at the University of Florida,
presented as evidence for the defense. Mary Akins and BLACKS WERE systematically excluded from the Grand Friday, January 17. The Pitts and Lee Defense Committee will
. Warren Holmes ,the polygraph expert who taped Adams' Jury. The original conviction pf 1963 was overturned by the not allow Askew to come to the University of Florida and not
confession were not called on to testify about that confession. Florida Supreme Court for this reason. There are several be confronted with,the issue of Pitts and Lee. The Pitts and
THE MAIN witness for the prosecution, Willie Mae Lee, witnesses to the fact that their original confessions were Lee Defense Committee (PLDC) needs the support of the
has repeatedly changed her testimony and the State sup forced from them after they were beaten in j jail. people on the University of Florida campus. Please support'
pressed evidence in 1968 of a tape recording in which she Although the facts obviously prove them innocent, Pitts our efforts to tree Pitts and Lee. If there are any questions
changed her testimony,which initially implicated Wilbert Lee and Lee have had to endure the inhumane conditions of the please call 376-8937.
and a Pvt. Smith, saying she lied because police threatened to Florida prison system tor eleven consecutive years. In view of
put her in the electric chair or a chain gang.! the fact that the state of Florida's prison population is fourthin Pitts Lee Defense Committee

There has never, been one shred of physical evidence in the nation, with 55 per cent of the prisoners being black, it Vicki Adams
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ADVICE & DISSENTMisunderstood < '. :. ; 'I





.
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: %


4VIETNAMAR' ,


Editor: Your article in last college. What I said was that

Tuesdays Alligator concerning all faculty members should "
the discussion bet receive a good: basic salary '
ween the Committee of and their raises should be PART II
Concerned Faculty and true increases in buying

myself was generally ac power. Beyond that point we .
curate however, believe deserving faculty
; one
COMING SOON : 17
statement attributed to me members should be eligiblefor "? R = N gARIFLE
does not truly reflect my views merit raises, and other 'ii'corrGJ(1WZJDIiI&W@:;gJr:6O@'fl'

or those of the United Facultyof adjustments should be madeto r
Florida. reflect the realities of the

I was quoted as saying that marketplace in the larger
UFF was opposed to any society. rA.: ..J ", ..
college's receiving higher: I Robert A. Blume
.. Vice President, UFF "
salaries than other
any ... I JUST HATE QUEL5 ..


.' ,' ; ..
","'. ". ,.," 1 : : ,< ; :' ..,'', ,:, : \ ', .'......., .. :: ', :'. ..
," ; :"!.f'l"' t. .,_ ',' ., : : ; ;: : i,. .; ,, : ;: 'I. :, :'; '\(' ii : ;t; :! ,1' : ;! <
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You're ripping off the wrong people ,' :: : I


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One of the tint principles a radical activist learns is to told me. But, the fact remains, they ,are not free for the you'll never accidentally buy a yesterday's paper before I get! : "
Identity "the Enemy" correctly. (Abby Hoffman gives many carriers, whose profit is often incredibly small, and who carry there (Trying to keep the customer satisfied!) This job has to
suggestions in Steal This Book on the fine art of ripping off all the financial risk. Paper companies take care themselves, support me and my four kids, and it ain't easy! But it's a job.
the Establishment.) However, it is easy to be confused as to first-you can be lure of that! They get their money-100 per Your Miami Heralds are brought in by a lovely, friendly,
the exact identity of "the Establishment." It is often not the cent of it! Here's the picture for the carrier: There is no gentle man who has been running papers in Gainesville for 48

Establishment who gets: hit. but some poor individual Union, no rate bargaining, ho job security, no fringe beneits, years';, and is "Mr. Miami Herald" to us.
struggling) against heavy odds to get: by. Such is the case with no unemployment: insurance, when Injured-no workman'scomp. The Times Union! racks are run by a far-out Scorpio dude
the night workers who fill all those morning newspaper racks ., no vacations, no holidays, no sick days (they show up! who has the reputation of being so fast he never uses first gear!
you see all over the campus and 'cit)'. or they're tired!). It's 365 nights a year, running out a'morning in his VW. van-It's in second when he jumps out to'fiJI'arack
"PAPERS SHOULD be free tor the People!" someone once paper. ,Carriers must rent those vending racks, repair and still going when he jumps back in! (He has a couple
them, buy the papers, and sell the unsold copies,back to the of years experience on most of us and i is a pro!)
paper company. The cost for stolen papers comes directly out THE TAMPA Tribune rack route has a new carrier,
of the carriers' veins (and they do bleed!). though he's not new to the Tribune. He had home deliveries
-- The Independent It is misplaced kindness to prop; open a rack door to allow 'here for'several years, and knows the business.We .

anyone and everyone to help themselves to,"free" papers, or all live in a rip-off society. Gov't., Corporations etc., all
Florida AlligatorDoug to lay a pile on top of a rack to be carried off. The real kind. seem to'have their hands in our pockets, and prices keep

,, ness is to shut such propped doors, or, when buying paper rising. But if one's, head is into fighting: back,the effort shouldbe
Dial Ron CunninghamEnt.rtonm.ntEditor to put the pile outside back in, and help the ,real underdog directed at those who are guilty of the abuses-not at some
Aiociat Editor sun'he-the carrier being ripped off! other victim of the same oppression. So, if you are into ripping,
I... MACHINES SEEM so impersonal that it's difficult to off "the E\tablishment"-identify your "Enemy." Don't'liberate !
George, Kochomec Jr. think of someone being associated with them. Ever see an old our newspapers, please. A free press is for the free,
Photo Editor red Mustang with one door off, full of dents, with expression of ideas, but the paper used is expensive! ,.)

Greg Forr.r ,Mind) K.'rnon "Qu cksilH'r" written on it. tearing! around the campus? Hoping for jour coopration and continued patronage.
Sporn Editor A it. News Editor That's me jour St. Pete Times. rack-lady inside I get mjpjpvis '
later than mj competitors I date-card m>:.racks so "Quicksilver"w

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This
page paid
..._.... 10,1fc._ lndf.>*ndnt Rorida N1......_.._....hido e'_January 17.Inauguration. ..97S at

Indoor SportsTournament




Today Open To All"

Those who specialize in indoor sports
and want to prove it, can register for the
weeklong Reitz Union Games Area
Campus Tournament before midnight
Sunday.
The tournament includes competition '

Classes' Dismissed 9:05 to 12:20 categories for students,faculty and staff,
with certain events open only to full-time
students. ,Games Area Manager Bill
Faust said winners of student-only events

Career Service Staffers May Attend will College represent Unions the UF International at the Associationof regional

tournament which will be held here Feb.

Dr. Robert Quarles Marston will be inaugurated the seventh president of the L! r M Ih ilk uI ply P i II I 91A u! 68.Student-only categories, for which

University of Florida in a convocation ceremony today in Florida Gymnasium.The K registration is $1.50 per event, are chessa
Processional begins at 9:30 a.m. and the program at 10 o'clock.
( Monday through Friday evening
Second,third and fourth period classes will be dismissed so that students and Swiss-style tournament in Union rooms
faculty may attend and Career Service employees may attend the program as 346 and 347)), men's and women's singles
work-time. The general public is also invited. Parking will be available on table tennis, doubles and mixed doubles
Fleming Field, using the entrance off Newberry Road and W. University table tennis, men's: and women's pocket
Avenue west off North-South Drive. billiards, three-cushion billiards and

The entire proceedings will be telecast by WUFT, Channel 5 and replayed snooker.
Friday evening at 8 o'clock on cable Channel 9. Events open to students, faculty and
,. t staff are bumper pool, singles and
Dr. Marston will deliver an address entitled, "The University and Life in the doubles Foosball, air hockey and bow-
Future."He will be officially installed and given a charge of office by Marshall ling. Sign-up will be at the Games Area
Criser, chairman of the State Board of Regents', who will also preside for the ; desk until midnight Sunday. Entry fees
hour-and-a-half-long,ceremony. 8A are $1 for each event except bowling,
Ll Gov.James Williams will bring greetings to the new president from state which will cost $4.50 for four fourgamesets.
government Others to bring-greetings are Andrew H. Hines, Jr., in behalf of .
the Alumni Association; history Prof. Dr. David Chalmers, in behalf of the The final competition is bridge, star
faculty, and student body president Steven Merryday, in behalf of students.An ting at 7:30: p.m. Tuesday in Union rooms

academic procession will be composed of approximately 275 faculty 150 C and D. Only full-time student
members, 110 students representing registered organizations on campus, and winners will advance to regional play,
representatives of 28 Florida colleges,including 18 presidents. Music precedingand Faust said, but the tournament is open to
for the Processional and for the Recessional will be played by the all Registration, including a 50 cent
University Symphonic Band, conducted by Frank Wickes, Rev. Earl Page, entry fee, will be at the Games Area,
rector of Holy Trinity Episcopal Church, will deliver the invocation and desk through Sunday and at the door
benediction. before the tournament'starts.
Only six other men have headed the University of Florida since it was movedto Trophies will be awarded in all events.
Gainesville from Lake City in 1905. And only the last three made formal
inaugural addresses. Two of those-Dr. J. Wayne Reitz and Dr. Stephen C. Street Dance Tonight
O'Connell- will be present for the Marston inauguration.Other .
dignitaries who have indicated they will be present include Panhellenic Council is sponsoring a
Congressman Don Fuqua, Education Commissioner Ralph.Turlington, i street dance tonight from 6:30: to 9:30: on
Agricultural Commissioner Doyle Conner, Rep. Bill Andrews, Regents Chester the east end of Sorority Row, celebratingthe
Ferguson, Burke Kibler HI, and Jack McGriff, Chancellor Robert Mautz. and inauguration today of President
Chancellor-designate E.T. York Jr. Robert Q. Marston. Dr. and Mrs.
DR.ROBERT QUARLES MARSTON Marston plan to attend the dance.
UF's Seventh President The dance, which features the rock
band, "Cataro," is free and open to all.


I I Soprano Veronica Tyler' Likes Her Worst, Best' LifeSeems I


almost every time black singers the niece of two other professional has gone up. When I say 'take five,' I
make.it big, their promoters say they operatic sopranos. "I didn't even need mean five! Not six, not even fiveandahalf. -
were discovered singing in the church much training,just some help learning to Such professional demands just
choir. use what I had." might help them decide on their ca-
Not so with soprano Veronica Tyler. She learned to use it well. Before the reers," she says.
The graduate of both the JuiUiard Schoolof Moscow competition, the mother of a She paints no glamorous pictures of an
Music and the Peabody Conservatorysays 13-year-old daughter brought home first operatic career to her eager pupils."I .
she discovered herself! prize from the 1963 Munich International tell them if I didn't love to sing and
"Sure, I went to church and I sang in Competition. After Russia, she made her didn't love meeting people, this could be
the choir, but the faith that really w much-acclaimed European debut in the the worst life I could possibly imagine,"
counted was. my faith in myself and in my ; Bergen (Norway) Festival of 1968. she continues. "That first year,steppingoff
Godgiven.voice," believes the Balti During the 1969-70 concert season, the your first plane, in your first mink is
more-born winner of the First Tchaikovsky self-described "loner" made her Italian great!
International Vocal Competitionin ;; debut at the Teatro la Fenice in Venice in "Then,boom! You begin to learn what
Russia eight years ago. 5 t a new production of "Turandor." it's really all about.: Flights after
She is the soprano soloist for the She lists her favorite roles as Mimi in midnight! Taxis! Two minutes to eat a
performances of Beethoven's Ninth Sym- "La Boheme,"Zerlina in"Don Giovani," cold sandwich! Hours,days and weeks of
phony last night and tonight as the and "don't forget Miss Smith at the rehearsals! Critics!"
opening concert in the Florida's Fourth VERONICA TYLER University of Florida." Finally, the Tyler grin returns-and,
Annual President's Festival of Music. UF Prof.,Opera Star "Unlike my Miss Smith back in this time it's bigger than her repertoire.
Now a voice professor at the Universityof Baltimore, I never advise my students to "But I must admit I also tell my students
Florida, Veronica Tyler teaches heralded interpreter of La Boheme's jump face forward into a professional about the curtain calls. And being met at
development of faith and confidence as "Miml." singing career,"explains the soloist who the plane.And being thrown armloads of,
ambitiously as she teaches her students "My 'Miss Smith' was really Miss appeared during inauguration week at roses. And receiving adoring telegrams.
how to sing. And she packs the lessons Marianne Smith. She sat me down one Washington's Kennedy Center. "Sure, It's the worst possible life. But
between appearances with the New York day and told me to forget about my early "If they want such a life, they'll go it'se best one, too." ,
City Opera Company and the major ambition to become a psychiatrist and .after it. But if I feel they really don't Veronica Tyler thinks if she can teach
symphony orchestras of the world. try this opera business." want it, I never shove." her pupils to understand that particularbit
"Teaching? Why not? I suppose I Just Even Miss Smith didn't believe in But she does show her students what of irony-and some voice lessons in theprocessthe'll
want to be another Miss Smith. You know Veronica Tyler as much as Veronica the life is all about."I much satisfactionfrom
her,that school teacher all of us seem to Tyler believes in Veronica Tyler. treat them in class as they would be the teacher get aspect as of her musical
have had..the one who turned us in the "Even then I knew I had abflity.No one treated in an opera company.If a student career as she did soloing in Beethoven'sNinth
right direction," explains the critically- could tell me I couldn't sing," contends is late for a lesson, I tell them the curtain: Symphony at Hollywood Bowl.

,E
The University/ 1 ii an. Equal



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advertising rates
usual
at Independent' Florida Alligator,friday January 17, If 75,Pag 11
4 mf m *mfim mmm ***mmmummmmmm mimmm


$200,000 Earmarked for Grad Assistantsl I IIn


order to be able to honor commit- '
"Our the fiscal year will be $600,000, but only
ments to graduate assistants and to meet Principal Objective is to see that no $400,000 can be used for expenses.That is
i The teaching responsibilities of the
University 'loses his'or" her ob apportioned to each college.
I University$200,000 orginally earmarked employee ; Hanson has written Bryan to "work
1 in the Education
for expenses and
with to make the
colleges appropriate
i General (E&G) budget will be reserved -Executive Vice-President Hansont1nivesity adjustments. All colleges are effected
, for Other Personnel Services Executive except those in the Health Center and in
M Vice-President Harold Hanson informed IFAS, which are budgeted separately.The .
\ Dr. Robert A. Bryan acting vicepresident decision to transfer expense
j for Academic Affairs, Thursday."It money to OPS out'of which graduate
! is anticipated," Hanson said, "thatwe Produced by the Division Information a Public assistants are paid,was in keeping with a
should be able to retain graduate ations Services to communicate official notices & commitment earlier this week by Presi-
important information to students, faculty t staff iciest
assistants who are making
responsible
at the University of Florida. dent Robert Marston that "it has been
:, academic progress and who had been and remains the policy of this Universityto
firmly committed to positions." exert every effort to honor commitments
It also means Dr. Hanson explained, quarter. Overall, he explained further, dable supplies, travel, telephones and that have been made to graduate
that only two-thirds of the expense this means a 10 per cent reduction in other costs of day-to-day operations, is assistants. This will 1 have priority over
money normally available in E&G expense money for the entire year. released quarterly. The March releasefor expenditures in the categories of expense
budgets will be available for the spring Money for expenses, such as expen the spring quarter, or final quarter of and Operating Capital Outlay."
All OCO funds have previously been
frozen as well as a 5 per cent cut in

Largest Gift In History to UF cooling expense air expenditures to most buildings, a ,shutdown and shutting of

e down of heat at noon have been ordered,
and no new persons may be employed.
"Other areas are being explored and
For Broad Jewish Studies CenterThe hopefully every individual on ,campus

will cooperate in effecting utility and
'other savings," said Hanson. "Our
University has received a gift of University will be seeking the balance of firm of Broad and Cassel. He also principal objective is to see that no
property from Mrs. Shepard Broad of the funds needed from individuals founded and is Chairman of the Board of University employee loses his job."
Bay Harbor Islands in Dade County throughout the state of Florida.At American Savings& Loan Association of In Tigert Hall, three-fourths of the
from which it expects to realize approx- a news conference in Miami Florida which has eight offices and xerox machines have been ordered
imately $1,400,000,. making it the largest Wednesday, Mr. Broad said his wife assets exceeding$350 million. Mr. Broadis removed.
gift ever presented by an individual to decided to make the gift to the UF a founder and trustee of Mount Sinai In another matter related to graduate
the University.The because"the University of Florida is one Medical Center of Greater Miami, a assistants, President ,Marston has ex-
used toward of the most schools in the of Francis of Miami
money will be distinguished trustee St. Hospital plained why he was unable to attend a
construction of a building on campus for nation, the Board of Regents showed its Beach, and Chairman of the Board of meeting of the Graduate Student Union,
the Shepard Broad Center for Jewish faith in the University by establishing the Trustees of Barry College of. Miami to which he had been,invited Tuesday
Studies.The total cost of the building anda Center for Jewish Studies and because Shores. He originated the idea for and night.Dr..
library it will house is expected to be there is no WASPish anti-Jewish attitude was the guiding spirit in the building of Marston wrote Sheri A. Dalton,
approximately $2 1H4 million. A cam- at the University." Dade County's Broad Causeway, named president of the GSU, who extended the
paign is underway to raise the additional The Shepard Broads reside in Bay 'In his honor. invitation "I am always happy to meet
funds needed from private sources. Site Harbor Islands, a town founded by Mr. and talk with graduate students as I did
of the building on campus has not been Broad. He served as mayor of the town Mrs. Broad, a graduate of Syracuse last December. However you write as
decided. for 27 years and is now mayor emeritus.Mr. University, is a founder of Moant Sinai president of the Graduate Student Union
Mrs. Broad has conveyed to UF a deedto Broad emigrated from Russia in Medical Center. They have two children, and use the letterhead stationery of the
two dormitory buildings and the landon 1920 to New York City, where he earnedhis Morris N. Broad of Bay Harbor Islands United Faculty of Florida. Consequently
which they are located near the St. degree from the New York Law and Mrs. Irving Bussel of Coral Gables., according to the procedures and instructions
Johns River Community College in School. He and Mrs. Broad, the former Morris Broad is President of American that have been given to" us for
Ruth of Glens Falls, New York, Savings & Loan Association of Florida
Palatka. The buildings are privately Kugel -- dealing with unions, I am referring your
owned and have been used by students moved to Miami Beach in 1940. and Chairman of the Board of Barnett l letter to Dr. George Bedell of the Board
attending the college. Mr. Broad is senior partner in the law Bank. of Bay Harbor Islands, N.A., Office staff."
The property has been appraised at a ---- -- Ms. Dalton had invited the president to
value of$1,758,000 by Earl B. Miller of the i the meeting "to defend your actions and "
Jacksonville firm of Rogers, Miller, those of your subordinates" in matters
Taylor and Co. The property is encum- Q relating to alleged graduate assistant
bered with a mortage debt of $350,000, dismissals.
leaving a net value of$1,408,000. Disposalof Hanson said Thursday that so far as his wr,
the property has not been decided, but L t K IV office knows only one graduate assistantto
several proposals are being considered.The whom a commitment had been made
University's Center for Jewish has not as yet been re-employed,and that
Studies has been in existence since Boardof case is still pending.
Regents approval July 1973. Under All universities in the State University
direction of Dr. Barry Mesch and now \ System are under directive from Chan-
offering 14 (courses the Center is aimed cellor Robert Mautz to refer all union
toward developing interdisciplinary pro- matters to the Board Office. His directive
grams exploring the various facets of reads, in part as follows: "When

Jewish culture history language litera- ....... ': .{ approached by representatives of an
e
ture and religion. More than 500 students 11-. organized group of employees on your
will be enrolled in the Center's courses MORRIS BROAD (L),MR.AND MRS.SHEPARD BROADAt campus, you and all supervisors should
this academic year. News Conference in Miami Where Gift Was Announced refer all such persons to Steve McArthuror
The University,has been offered the George Bedell in my office.
opportunity of purchasing from a Chicago Premed Predtnt Preoptometry Students The Board of Regents has been
Rabbi comprehensive library of designated as the bargaining unit for all
Judaica comprising more than 40,000 faculty employees in legislation permitting -
books and periodicals. Asked to Report to Anderson Hall Office collective bargaining by state em-

"With the acquisition of this collectionand ployees.
construction of the Shepard Broad Premedical, predental and preopto- Dr.Frank Maturo,who chose return to
Center for Jewish Studies distinguished metry students should stop by the Officeof full-time professor of zoology and Super- Financial Aid
scholars in the various areas of Jewish Preprofessional Education, 113 Anderson visor of the Marine Laboratory at Cedar
Studies will be attracted to the Center." Hall during the week of January Key.Dr. Info Sessions Set
Dr. Mach said, "A wide spectrum of 20-24, to register or update their prepro- Rosenshein notes "There are
undergraduate students of every religious fessional Quarterly Record Form. many many applicants for medical and Student Financial Affairs will be
persuasion will be encouraged to The Office wishes to identify all dental schools these days. I feel the sponsoring Financial Aid information
acquire an in-depth understanding of the preprofessional students, inform them of Office of Preprofessional Education can sessions in dorm areas throughout ,
Jewish people,,their role in history and services available to them, collect information best serve the University and the Winter Quarter to acquaint students with
contemporary society and the foundations on quarterly activities and eval- community by assisting these applicants requirements and deadlines for:financial
of the JudeoChristian tradition." uate preprofessional advisement. realistically to evaluate their, capabilities aid' application. !*
and with Sessions will be held Monday at 7 ,
In addition to the library the Shepard goals requirements a p.m.
Broad Center will contain a large lecture A new Director of Preprofessional coordinated activity involving advisers in the Hume Hall Recreation Room and
Education, Dr. Joseph S. Rosenshein, counseling services and centralized. In- Wednesday at 7 p.m.1n the Broward Hall
hall,several lecture rooms,study carrels recently named to take over from, formation facilities." Lobby Classroom.Id .
and ,offices for the Center staff. The was

oyment Opportvnity irmative.Actiofl-,EmptWerI *

'!.
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I DOUG CII1RK :' ,: ALLIGATOR CLASSIFIEDS '


& the Hot Nuts 1 'I


FRI-SAT JAN 17,18 9ft 11 f \ * *. * *' * * '



Tickets'on sale $2 JWRU box office FOR SALE FOR SALEDown FOR RENT

& at Information


12 STRING ELECTRIC YAMAHA GUITAR steeping bog 'lyroid rated to 15degrees 2 bdr-Behlnd Norman Hollll Brand newexclusive 376-4446
LIfnrlI $125 392-8405 (A-ST-57-P) 5'8" to 6' in length, excellent listing!) Spacious apt with air
kopo Acoustic guitar fine shape 50) condition. $50 call sub 377-5329 (a-2t-62- hear corpets. Walk to campul ((11416)I )
3716992U.Efflcl.ncy
1
small 70wt. gibson amplifier two input P) Open 1 Days
No bit month deposit.
$ )( or
20$ large portable b&w tv work well
35$ 512 n. 6th street (o-4t-59-p, ) FOR RENT Fully furnnhed Quiet or oll ((11415))
Open 9am to 8pm 377-6992 HORSEBACK RIDING
67 mgb-cellent condition Iron 3 bdr-5 blocks from U of Flo-Brond new
I recently rebuilt w- steel radial*, podded exclusive lilting!I Rustic horn with air ROCKIN "M" RANCH
tl rollbor.72 teat. $1200 378-0663 or after heat, fenced Pets OK ((1149)) Hones rented by the Hr.
6 ((tues-Fri) 22061 ( 4t 59 male roommate needed to sublet apt.
1 o- -p) close \to compur4950per mo \V util. 2 Open 7 Days 377-o99? Also hones for sol*. 5911347 -
1 Down sleeping bog,mummy with v-tube bdroomi furnished iwlmmlng pool + 3 bdr-160 large house located near ; 20 ml.) So of
Construction, Medium weight' hiking University Ave. Heat, shag carpeting
boots! never tiled, size 9. call 373-2353. laundry call 378-3981 Ask for Steve ((8- dropes. Short lease ((1143)) Gainesville on new 441 1
5T-60-P ,
offer 3 p.m (a-5t-59-p) ) ____ Open 9am to 8pm 377-6992
I.t I. Weber 'Pig' Surfboord. Must Sell.BO.. for tublet-tipartment at the modern $85 include utilities-Coiy house within
1 Excellent Condition Call 376-8334 After 'place opart beginning feb.1.central air walking distance of campul. Ideal for PRiAl FOP!*
6o-St 59 cond A heating pool foxes, all for ; Better ?)
1 1t ( -p) couples or single hurryll ((114
.
$93 25 per mth 377-701 I l.george. (B-3T-
1972 lutukl tSOO, excellent condition 60-P) COLDBKRLONGBRANCH I t i it
slsiy bor,fairing 2 helmets, turn signals,
L'P $7X1 or belt offer- mutt sell 376-9667, WANT TO MOVE? United Real Estate Assoc t
1 .
113 N E,16th Ave.Open
evenings (o-5t-59-p) If you desire to move from your present 9om-8pm 377-6992 SALOON
URGENT Must tell Hondo 1974 CB 360. A1' location we can rent lublet It or find you (B-5T-61-C)
condition lust(| out of shop for tune up), a roommate Immediately at NO COST: 11 AM2 AM
j i Call today!)
Aiding price but will take belt offer Call
Howard at 2-7364 (afternoons) (A-5T-58-P)I I, United Real Estate Assoc Inc. ROOM for liberal Student; $75 + '/. util.
113 NE 16th, Ave. 377-6992 (b-h-55-c) and $50 dep. Furnished two bdm. trailerNE

1949 triumph gt6t overhauled trans men student' room for rent by quarter ..- section .--376-4378 (B-3T-6U MIKE'SBookstorePipes
motor very good body good radio, new 115 nw 10th it.:3 blocks from campus call PJ)
carpeting new brakes, clutch. Nice. 25 greg 377-9625 5:30: to 7.00; daily or stop Roommate' needed. 2 bedroom opts,
mpg ken 3784432. $1600. (o-St-59-p) by> (b-5t-59-p) close to campul. Free parking water, Tobacco hopDowntown
JAN RENT PAID! Move in now. female gas&sewage $83-a-month + electric 4
1972 VOGUE mobile home. 12 70. Has
x phone. Call Bart at 373.3802 after 10:3C
den bar kitchen, living room with roommate needed for luxury 1-bedrm lloS.LItt.' M.f 8-,
opt. $95,month + \ft utilitiet. Call 373- pm. (B-5T-61-P)
fireplace, 2 br; 1 bath wall to wall Sat. .-6ICOUPONl
0668 (b-5t-59-p)
carpet, central air-heat, completely' r
I furnished. luxurious, economical,
ea.yterms. --------- ---------
r I Call 373-1071 and leave name .
r1 and pheoe. (A-3T-60-P) o+aexf FREE ELECTRONIC ENGINE ANALYSIS

greenhouse sole, healthy ferns, cacti r:> WITH A TUNE-UP I

; 1 foliage I0am-4pm.plants go west In on cloy newberry pots. rd.Sunday past Hairstylmg i3tu.b I ... 10 percent OFF plugs, pts. condo

/ I-7S to nw 91 st. follow signs. (A3T60P T.fv l/AIaX. & labor thru Jan. 31st
) -....
Ila I' I k.nwooefkr1< r rI $370 .dual 1229 for $155, Integratedcircuit sew
stereo.equalizer for $100 kenwood .
8002 power amp $150, call 373-',
I r I I r' 7930 (o-5t-59-p) FRI AND SAT NIGHT

Surfboard 6'10"Challenger rounded-pin
? Good Condition call Herb 392-9178 (A-
r r I I I 2T-61.P)

Electric Guitar S amp $300 phone 378-
LATESHOWEATLs'
I 4744 after 6pm. (A-5T-61-P)
I I I I Panasonic om-fm itereo and cassette
'lope player and amplifier. $120 or best
offer 377-1496 (A-3T-61-P)

II I II Sherwood 5-7100 am-fm stereo amp 100
I I watts w- Dual 1215i auto turntable' and
quodrflex 12 inch speaker Just $425.
377-1496 (A-3T-61-P)

I I IBM Selectric II typewriter 7 months old-
i used less than 100 hours only $500 or
beat offer 377-1496 (A-3T-6I-P)

NiiiRifi Teduicolor Guild MADEIRA steel' string guitor like, ;
APiruiiounlPicturejj new $12500 377-1496 (A-3T-61-P)

n H'simcTi !) >?. >..,! ; .' For Sale New women's 3-speed bike
PERFECT condition$60 call Peggy at 392-
1268 between 8:00 and 5:00: (A-5T-61-P)
OrAl MfKIJI
Far Sale: f33 11'I11'I2.11 Auto Yashin on-DX
foray 1:30No : Lens Good Condition $80.00 with cose.
5:00.1:30 Call 377.5716 Anytime. (A-5T-A1-NC)
Po.... Nlwirttr *|> M<)*| a 42
ACDCCassette Recorder, mint con'
dition cord, mic, case, spore tapes ((4)).
extra, 3500. Call 372-0545. Keep
trying! (A-3T-61-P)
Above allIts
Sharp TV b-w 10 inch screen. 8 months
old lust $4000377-1496 (A-3T-6LP) '

a love story.James for solo: '66 plymouth valiant with

radio.heater, engine running perfectly
call mono -- after 7 pm ot 372-7248
$150. (a-St-62-p) '
.
v

(;;') (lF) .r,, 1)1 L
';:: ::':,
'f
(i ) ttf & jIilottit
"IS COMING TO TAKE YOU AWAY"

Entirtoiiw's

.. Loungt ll MADE A COLOUR IN ENGLAND FILM

'. .\ I 5220 S.W14th St. a i BY..11

presents
The Beatles '



CaanAlanArkin January 17..18 'A /I. ...


Vince Martin wUI.RI. S Cltf UI
f.
Freebie and -
$lAPSTltK I CH'AP'ln'. ,
Capital Records IMMORTALITY
the Bean f/1



Of COMEDY
Jan'J(1ry( ?01, 1 tART


Severin'browne'
Starring
...and lookwho's

playing CHARLIE CHAPLIN-BEN TURPIN-EDNA PURVIANCE


1e Consuelo. Motown Records

Early j

3co.120: Show> Tlck.ts on SALE Doors
7x410:00: Sat&Sun121.cG iidiI COMING SOON l1:00M: t 12:05AM open

Red, White, a Blue (Gross)

ODtfTA, Chuck Monglon ,
.. . . . . . ... . . ....... ... . . .
. . ... ,
v "..... .... ... .... . .
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31



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f:" .
EXCITING ADVENTURE! .

FOR RENT FOR RENT FOR RENT FOR RENTFemale INFORMATION: hOlDEROTALL

3764446i1iEQIiKiEil

SPACIOUS TWO BEDROOM FURNISHED ROOMMATE-3
: MOBILE HOME LOCATED NEAR THE U.F. WENT REGENCY BEDROOM OAKS APART One bedroom In townhouse 3 blocks room-mote wonted; S52.25 per
I J A MONTH$25 DEPOSIT (b- OWN from school ova,loble first of feb 110 monthf utilities Park
puiJUO BEDROOM Village Apis
$120 + 1 1.3 UTILITIES MIKE includ month 4 ; ; NEETOSHIjflWMs1hrMWMMl "ONE OF THE BEST EVER MADE'
utilities .
1t-62.pl) 373-8246 (BST40P) per call 373-6029 /January rent free; call 373 5750 or 3776789 .
or 378.9153 after six (b.2t-62.p) (b.5t-62.p) Ls- 1.:: ...e f .e ea

_. _. .. .. .. or r f] I female wonted Brondywlne apt. $67 2 ; !
444 44 bdrm 2 bath large rmi Jon rent flf W Ohix m3.144 s Gil. wt
.
negotiable) furn tv stereo htd pool etc .
call or come by W.189 370-4031 (B.2T41 ill '-.
*The Free Movie Is Back .P) s tors w. w. the sr. *|1S e
FEMALE ROOMMATE share 2 bd
frunlthed apt on lake.pool fully f
equipped, one month free rent $75 mo TcA.cIf'FEfII
!
1-3 utilities, 373.4737 (B.2T-6I.P) !

: Jonathan Livingston WANTEDLiberal BOOKS PRINTS COLLECTOR'S


4K LIMITED EDITION PRINTS .e
4K 17W. Univ. 378-3264 -.ee.efe .eeS..
Seagull Female Roommate Wonted to ,
shore luxurious opt. 2 bedroom all
furnished $150 a month. Inquire after 5
p.m. at the Village Susan 2002 (C-IOT- e DOORS OPEN 1 1:45
Original Score I I 1
: By Neil Diamond 40'P)
Student or couple wanted to (haretpaciout
NW. 13th STREET and
P.M.'J
3 b r house with 2 m studentsUmln
drive Pets welcome 67mo. 315 23rd BOULEVARD 2:00 3:40 5:10 6:45 1.1$
AND
** N.E. 43rd Terrace 5 p.m. (C.31-6G-P) :.
Wanted: Place to live Own room Into
Jack Lemmon in his Oscar role T.M,,good music,good people.call: 392-
winning 9573 or 8133 leave name A number
Please respond Man (e.5t.59.p)
roommate,2 br apt Furnished$52.00 +

r Save The Tiger Vt 377 utilities-9993 (e monthly.5t.J9,p)gotortown opts call I

Female own room + Vi bath Kitchen
.washer-dryer privileges $85.oo mo. +
'* h utilities Corol 392.1655 8-5 or 373-
9458 After 3 No pets Please (C..sP-6G-PI')'

emote roommate urgently + desperately

Friday At 8 :00 pm needed utilities please vizcaya contact opt $70 debl monthly or cindy Immediately 1-3.
373-9147/ (C5T.58.P)

GOLD & SILVER Top prices paid for class AN OUTRAGEOUS PARODY OF .
On The Grass By The Union rings, old jewelry, etc confidential call YESTERYEARS'SUPER HEROES!.
50-53-t
Ozzie 373-3894( :)

\4Ry', I ., 3 Grad Students need roommate own
A \t\ \ :
.
room in great house Fireplace, plants,
music yard friendship. $88 mof '/ itryaa.
*
Double Feature expenses call 373.3734 (C-2T-41)
male roommate own room In 2 br apt In ., It '
nw section$85 mo. + V4 util)call )John at
* * * 377.8812 after 2'00 (C-3T-41)
Female roommate to shore brm in
beautiful WInd meadow.. $66 mo.i'
ulil Desperate. AC pool tennis sauna
Call Rhonda or Deb 372-0379 (C-
41-61-P)



HELP WANTED .
;f > < '1
yatK
;



Camp Counselors interviews 'one day
only Saturday January 18. 94 Camp
Wohela and Comet'Sister.Brother Camps ]- .
233 W. University Ave Phone 377-3013 In Pennsylvania Director seeking' .t
6:00, 8:00 Qualified( personnel In all departments j
TODAY Call 373-0280 for appointment and.
STARTS 10:00 1t"'IoIF.3T6GC\ NOTTO BE CONFUSED

BRUCE LEE IN HIS MOST MEMORABLE ROLE Spare-lime selling 60 per cent prof WITH THE ORIGINAL 14
selling mushroom wall plaques moil "FLASH GORDON" 'tr
2.50 including postage for sample plus
THE ONE YOU'VE BEEN WAITING FOR... catalogues The Pedler Cart P,O. Bon a e
304 Carbondalc Kansas 44414 FLESH achieves exotic visual splendors.
secretary.part lime 10 hrs per wb.,l
What could be deIightfuI"Howard !
LEE more
BRUCE temporary eves must be obfe to type 65
wpm.P.)S3.00.hour coll eves 373-7102 (E3T41 Kissell Women's Wear Daih

Li "FLESH GORDON Is a frisky,feisty

'iATO" PC ) takeoff I It's all camp! It's fun! It's laughs!"

-Bob Salmaggi,WINS Radio]

in aaoN, ART Starring:JASON VIUUMS SUZANNE E FIELDS,IOSEPH HUOCINS and WIllIAM HUNT

.ind WIWAM OSCO Directed Iq HOWAR1IZ ZIEHM and MICHAEL[ BENM[ 'i'Music

THE GREEN HORNET FRI by IALPII fIRRJRO and IUEi( IIYIS Edited try ABBAS AMI""

SAT ,w'' ,
MIDNIGHT SHOW Z ,91.25 EXClPrsUNDAYS TIU 2:30 P.M.

What do Marlin Brando, Richard Burton'Jam Ccbum, HUNGRY NW. 13th STREET and

John Huston, Walter Matthau, Ringo Starr,and John Astln UPS 23rd BOULEVARD 2:00 P.M. end 8:00 P.M.

have In common? THEY ALL LOVE CANDYCANDY R The


,'. most magnificentpicture '

'. ever!

aMy
!
FRI
MIDNITEDON'T COUNTRY. ; h
"jg'
> HOOKER I
-
...
SAT --
t .
x. CIARKGABLEMVIEN
r.SINFUL f w-Lt
y
c LEIGH V

F 'LESLIE HOWARDOLWIAdellAVILLAND\

COME AGAIN. W '...
MISS IT. SHE MAY NEVER DWARF. . TRol pl,9TjI IMTFR .
::. t bt .
<< ti;
flO NS'.O :RUBEl>E : : : i ':'.
;a=':'':'':'J AN'lltw( : :.:TV1/4:'C>rENfR



----- i iAUTOS




H Indapandant Florida Alligator, Friday, January 17,1

',\c. .. .
'
THERE'S MORE

: .;" TO SEE WITH Alachua CountyGenerator


y rw CABLE TV AltarnotorsStarUrsGenerators Service CLASSIFIEDS


-
"'.r Pew
-
1 8 TV Channels A weatner Something for
channel. UPI News, New York, Foreign CarService PERSONALOVERSEAS LOST&FOUND
Stock Exchange, 2 FM stations on '
TV Channels, and 9 FM and 4 AM Everyone,
stations on the FM band.UNIVERSITY t'J

CITY Ph. 378-4011 1967 mustang pt ac auto 289 v8 new JOBS -- Australia, Europe, S. $25 "Reward' for return of red and white
tires 17 mpg body and Interior good America.Africo. Student all professions Beagle male lost vicinity of sears Jon.9.
TELEVISION CABLE CO. INC 508 N.W. 8th Ave condition drive train perfect $650 see at and occupation $700 to $3000 monthly. HoiDodt co.togs no question,call 377.
522 N.MAIN ST. 116 nw 18 tt. opt c after 9 pm (G-5T-60- Expenses paid, overtime, Sightseeing 7904, 392-2977 (l-3t-59-p) .
ST-60-P1) Free Information. TRANSWORLO
loit-SR SO calculator bet. Wm 10TM and
73 mazda 808, automatic, air, 22-31 RESEARCH CO. Dept. G6, P.O. Box 603,
etc. Shards, poss. on bu Gen. Reward No quei DEPRESSION ART "FOUND"Public
UNIVERSITY CITY: mpg. 2000. In good condition. 377. 514 or Corle Mnderg CA 94985 (J-6T-60) asked. Coll 392-8843 or 373-6976. (L-5T-5S-
373-6701 ext 235 (S-5T-58-P) COED'* facial' hair removed per- .P)

TRAVELWCjtITRAI.PLANE.SIIIP 69 Comoro excellent condition, air, auto manently. Call Edmund Dwyerelectrologist -
, \ FOUND SET Of Cor Keys Identify CALl Offered1937U.S.Govft
irons,350 cl,Aie owner.$1100. Call 378- Cat) 372-8039 over(J-FR-61-C 20 yeas) experience. LANA 373.9204 (L-3T-60-N-C)
8361. G-3T-61-P
( ) _
923 Found Pair of block glosses In
W.
University Ave. : mens
Book Packs, "Rugby" Shirts, Hiking
1971 Subaru wagon. good tires, a-c, 30 block vinyl case with rubber nose
Short Trail
Shoe, Woolrich Shirts,
Colnesvllle, Flo. 32601 377.4226 mpg. $1200.call 373-2353 after 3 pm (g- White Stag Speedo Bathing Suit Allen bridge. found thursday night in street
5l-59-p) near univ. & 17th St. Ask for Wanda at
Aquatic Toll Cent.r HAM W llnlu. 17.1.
"0
vegago condition, 3-speed must 9233 ((|.t-55-p---; ) 392-1882 (l-5t-59-nc)
sell $1300. call 3764610 oft. 3 or
:
CHINA pm Wedding Invitation $11.40 100business ,, PrintsA
'} 392-6580 during the day ask for michel. per SERVICES Art
, G-5T-60-P cords $995, rubber stamps,
( )
WEEK .. magnetic signs, offset printing. Cliff Hal i.
H7-73 FRIDAY
Volvo, 1970 144 A-C, $1650,
Printing 1103 N. Main (J-fR-58-C) Experienced typist will type term paper,
v( 730'WOMEN< INCHMA'SPEAKER BECKY HAMILTON, Negotiable, 373-5250 keep trying (G- !KARATE LESSONS thesis or dissertation. Fast & accurate
MCCARTY Gn6 I 5T-60-P) Call 373-
reasonable
Smoll classes $20 per mon service at rates.
PLUS: 1971 Capri 1600 must sell 4 sped rodiolt 1215 NW 5th Ave (off 13th St.) Mon thru 8923 (m-IOt-55-p)
CONTEMPORARY' CHINESE ARTlFACTS-aA STATE MUSEUM air cond. low mileage air condition call Sat even, 7 to 9. 378-7131. (J-20T-60-P) Scuba Class starting.-Scuba equipment

te"17"7 373-9637 asking 1600 willing to work. KARATE UNIFORMS. Quality, bleached. provided, 4 open wall"! dives, International series of rare coincidenceshas
t CONTEMPORARY' CHINESE POSTER EXHIBIT PRINTER GALLERY.1O75HI773 thing out (g-5t-62-p) $24 up. Karate-Do; 1215 NW 5th Ave, I Certification, Tom Allen (cohort led to the historic discoveryof
.
: .PI...UICM....n._ CLASSIC 66 MGB mint cond., custom blk east of 13th St. Mon-Wed-Frl eve. Wild Kingdom) Repairs, Service, several thousand sets of full
CHINESE PRINT EXHIBIT 2ND FLOOR REITZ UNION
378-7131 (J-5T-60-P) Sales, Rentals Aliens Aquatic 4 Troll
Interior,Hero tape,michelinsx rodials 30 that
,",",-1.7-75' color antique art prints
-..r mpg must see to appreciate $1375 or tuuia, Berlin, London Paris, Want to travel' Center 3448 W. Univ. 373-9233 (mfr55p "lost since 1937." Theyare
best offer 3734254 (g-5t-62-p) !'w four weeks with fellow students and the ) were
t Sm offered to thea
s 'orelgn study league-July,deporture-$1350. Auto repair, Foreign and Domestic",, now being
Contact Carl or Marilyn 378-7104 or Joyce guaranteed work at good rotes; see Bill American public.
STUDENT COUNCIL PERSONAL 373-3287 after 5 PM for more Info. (J-7T-58- Mike at 216 N.E.3rd Ave.from 10:00: till 7.00; I Eleanor Roosevelt
P) (5T-58-P)
]_
Back in 1937, immediately

gotor parking now open on SW 13th St. 3' my dearest cutie: one great year down TORTUGAS for spring break diving from and following the depression years,
1 lit Ave. pork close to bryont tight, and a zillion more to come. have a nice camping trip. Fly by seaplane All scuba Key Mrs. Eleanor Roosevelt and a
EJ West march 21-25 or 25-29
::1 ;. J norman A little hold. hourly, dally A lobster lonite.hope you enjoy me a* I do equipment provided Explore historic Fort select group of a dozen
monthly rotes (|-l2t-36-p). you. cuddle LOVE Jefferson $115 with certification $150 includes nationally prominent people

, Doug Clark And The Hot Nuts coming to (J-lt-62-p) full scuba course call Scubr formed a voluntary national
SAN MING ORIENTAL MART the Rat Frl. a Sat. 17th* 18th of Jan.two "All men have been created to carry Dynamic 373-5069 (AA-5T-58-P) committee for art appreciationto
shows, 911 Tickets $2. In advance at forward on ever-advancing create an art program that
.. Tel. 377-2492 403 NE 23rd Ave rot or union ball office4tS9c(| ) civilization.) "- Baho'l Writing (|-lt62cj THE FUll MARRIED RANGE STUDENT OF HELPING CENTER SERVICES.OFFERS would give the public a well

goy community service center gay men MEDICAL AND DAY CARE REFERRAL. FREE needed moral lift. It was the
+ (Corner of N.Main & 23rd Ave) and women meet thursday at 7 pm 107 Surprise Surprise Happy 19th SLDI Mony 24 HOUR SERVICE. CALL 3774125. (M-9T- committee's decision to select
NW 15 terr info call tom at 372-1881 happy Quarts) Keep Smiling! Kot. ((1-11-|
60-C) the world's most famous pain-
_____ ____
OPEN MON.-SAT. 10-6 Jean or Dove at 392157310t59p(| ) -M-P)
custom clothing-mode to your wishes tings from the 16th, 17th. 18th,
CHINESE AND JAPANESE FOODS SAMMIE'S ARRIVED FROM LONDON, M.S. Pooh,its been. 10 short,but 10 long. western shirts, gowns, slacks, alteration 19th and 20th centuries the
NOW OPEN, Specializing In English haircutting I mill you so much It hurt Fuzzy thinker .1' general sewing. experienced best paintings of Matisse, Van
Groceries, gifts, spices, over 100 blow waving for the In look need worm fciendsl I need you. I love ( Gogh, Gainsborough, Picasso,
TIGGER (|-lt-62-p) M3T6l.HORSE
you
unisex. Drop by Colonial Plaza 716 W. )
items to choose from Gauguin Titian, etc., and to
Univ. Ave. 377264350t53p(| ) Wildlife T-shirts hand painted. Order
e Egg Roll Skin e Fish Sauce e Instant Noodle ; LEARN KARATE qualified instructor now. Most any animal) done. Handwashable. FOR LEASE-m. Reg. American reproduce them in full color as
Saddlebred
new Geld. For
.Price*- $6-8 Call Janet 392- pleasure or show. perfectly as humanly possible
clot starting soon all ages male A 9436 (t-H-62-p) 376-1881 (M-5T-61-P) and make them available to the
female, for A further Info call
howard 3734252Bt55pd reg. (| ) Loco, happy anniversary on Sunday, a Will type your dissertation, Thesis l public at a price within the
Reports, manuscripts Etc. experienced.Fost reach of nearly
ONE-YEAR-OLD LAB needs year filled with two rose day,you know everyone.
(mostly) and
SUNFLOWER home.Very affectionate ond Intelligent.Coll que/te omo mucho. and always will OK? accu 377-6613_ (M-5T-6I-P) Abandoned 'In 1937
lorry or Howie 377-6087. 315 nw Hong In there babes Lac (|-ll-62-p) LEARN KARATE quoilfied'instructors nw For some unknown reason,
HEALTH FOODS 14th Or. (J-SR-54-NC) People Interested In the Baho'l Writingsare class starting soon 'oil ages mole after a quantity of these
female for
reg. & further Info call
Invited to a discussion ,"Proving the beautiful
If you sow the 1-blcycle accident howord 373-8252 reproductions were
(nvBt-55-p
Hoffman ft Welder Monday 1-6-75 at 3:15: In front of YULLEHAU. Existence of God"8 pm, this Friday. Jon ) ., made the entire project was
a 17, Rm 118 Reitz Union (|.U-e2-c) "EUROPf-ISRAEL-AFRICA-ASIA
,Call 392-9002 URGENT (J-5T-60-P) abandoned and this collection of
HI
Pro Products Travel discounts year-round. Student Art)
Trcvel! Agency, Inc. 5299 Roswell Rd. perfect reproductions was
Natural Vitamins, Minerals STEVE HANCOCK'S Atlanta, Go. 30342,252-3433 ((4414140.P stored 1n a Brooklyn

Herbs, Dairy Products ) warehouse where they remaIned -

AUTO REPAIR HORSES BOARDED: little prairie ranch, undisturbed since 1937.
Books, Cosmetics Informal, friendly, all focllitie 5 ml The lost collection was

Mntonttock Sandals All Wade Guaranteed from ufo stolls-$7S., pasture-$30. 376- "rediscovered" and leading
' 7 Wo* Unhwntty. A.,.. Downtown 4719, keep trying. (M-10T-60-P) lithographers and art critics

I igatnatyffla, Florida. Phone 371 tt7l Major-Minor Repair dive the bahamos spring break agree that the subject matter
3743 208 N.W. 10 Ava.377.5185 unlimited oir-3 meals a doy-o bunk all and quality of detail and color
for$140 I I for 5 glorious days mar 24-28-ph reproduction is incredibly ac
|john oppelboom 392-8755 (M-5T-60-P) curate. Over $500,000.00 had

,Self Realization Assistance A personalrap been spent to make finely
on your spiritual evolvement aided engraved glass printing plates.
by your astrology chart. Dennis 3774159will These authentic original 1937
( teach) (m-5t-59-p) prints are literally collectors'
DOUG HYPNOSIS HELPS PEOPLE ATTAIN GOALS items and have been appraised
: BY AIDING ANY PHYSICAL AND MENTAL by the American Appraisers

ABILITY-STUDYING MEMORY ATHLETICS Assoc. at $7.00 each print. Once
373-3059 Donald G. Piull-Certlfled
they have been sold there will
AAEH,_!FAPHJm-21M8-p! ) be no more available. A truly

excellent art"investment" that

makes a fabulous gift.

CLARK happy birthdayto

Available to Public

: my favorite Dog Now. after 38 years these full
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are finally 'available to the
public at $19.95 for a collectionof

and tfie ; yes that's you 18 prints. Send cash, check or
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AT# Rn: I /MPORTEPPART SNC ,





IMPORTED .PARTS & ACCESSORIES;


FRI MT jan IT. is '9&n FOR ALL FOREIGN CARSASK


ABOUT OUR STUDENT DISCOUNT


Tickets on sale $2 Reitz Union Box Office & the Rat MON 1012 S.FRI.MAIN 9:00-6:00PM ST.: 3724341Poge SAT.; 10:00-2:00PM:



.\:'!.'. ,..__.": .'5'- .,.. ,' 'f r ,', d. '>

"The Independent Florida Altlaator,'Friday.January 17, 1175 Psg.15


I _i_ garage to be built ctes]pite complaintsseeking


By KEN GOODMAN
Alligator Staff Writer complex and the J. Hillis Miller Health Center, ..' a barricade that would not close off the drive com-
Diamond Village Mayor Don Senatore said he hoped a* pletely, as Koepke suggested but allow village residents onlyto

Diamond Village residents will not obtain relief for what "lever-arm" barricade, similar to the one guarding the J. use the drive. Senatore said.

they believe will be a dangerous increase in traffic Wayne Reitz Union, would be erected.
the completion of a nearby parking said following Residents would actuate the barricade by using either But according to Bonnie Jones traffic and parking

Koepke planning consultant in the UF Division garage of Gary special cards or keys. coordinator and secretary for the Parking and Transportation
Analysis. Planningand FOLLOWING a series of petitions and letters, includingone Committee Senatore "indicated (at the meeting) that he did

Residents fear that traffic on Diamond to Gov. Reubin Askew, Koepke said in a December 16th not feel that Diamond Village residents had any serious
Village Drive
will letter to Senatore, "provisions will be taken to close the road problems as far parking and traffic flow."
increase to dangerous proportions as autos leaving the facilityuse
the drive to reach Southwest 13th Street. through Diamond Village at its southwest extremity.-
,WHEN COMPLETED, the 800-car, multilevel Three weeks later, on Jan. 6, Senatore approached a' Koepke, who did not attend the meeting received this
garage will information from Jones and said
"They want it left just as it
lie southwest of the married housing meeting, of
complex, the
r HHOBBKmBi between- the Parking and Transportation Committee is. Therefore nothing will be done at their request."

.& j




I I It.1J






74-75 CAMPUS' GAMES
MEDEA

REITZ UNION GAMES AREA.b

X it,
4 U
.
R


N

rrj
A


M



i Maria Callas stars In her first BOWLING E

dramatic movie, an adaptation of BILLIARUS N
THURS. & SAT. Euripides' classic drama about
COLOn- BY DE LUXE JAN. 16, 17 8 18 6) revenge. Directed by Pier Paolo ja BRIDGE T

[pGg3| >' Thurs. 6:30: ; 9:30: ) Pasollnl the story Is developed TABLF TENNIS

Fri. & Sat. 5:00: ; 8:00: ; 11:00: Into a primitive ritual of earth
2ND FLOOR AUD. 50< and darkness. Rolling Stone calledIt CHESS'

I "One of the year's 'ten-best!" '
TOURNAMENT' BEGINS JAN. ?0

A Man Escaped ,MON. JAN. 20 7:00: ; 9:30 LAST DAY TO REGISTER JAN. 19
MSB AUD. SOC
ttila.wl.IRB t.BirtteLts -, ,,. .
On January 24, 1975 the J. Wayne Reitz
Union will sponsor NON-CREDIT COURSESRegistration

THE APPLE TREE

for all workshops and lessons will lake place In Room 330. from
it of DlnnerTheatrrPresented
1 An Evening 9:00 a.m.to 4:00: p.m..January 6 through January 17.
By

The New York Theatre Company Students faculty and staff members and their spouses will have priority for
lesson enrollment from January 6 through January 10. Only after this time
Dinner begins at 6:30: p.m. In the J. Wayne will registration be open to other persons.
Reitz Union Ballroom and Is followed by'a
performance of three famous American short. Due to price and registration differentials, it will be necessary that each
person come to register.with appropriate identification. Enrollment for Individual -
stories set to music. classes is limited and therefore, on a first-come,.first-served basis.
Persons may only register, for themselves. .
Tickets available at the University Box Office, t
f :'J (Conitans Theatre) beginning Monday. Because registration for all workshops and tenons Is limited we must
13th.U consider/ your decision to enroll final by 4:00 p.m. the working day
In
A young Resistance man facet death from hit Nazi captors occupied January '
with such preceding the first scheduled class. Refunds will only be mode under these
Francs His determination to eicape evolves of F students $UO General Public $6.00 circumstances. .
breathtaking suspense mot each sound fill the silence with an aura
of doom and Imminent danger The powerful acting by a non. BRIDGE r CROW yoUR OWN t
profeuional' cast is tribute to the extraordinary talent of director red.Jan. 22-Mar.5 IJ (ORGANIC CAROMING)
Robert Sreston. Having been a prisoner of war in a Neal camp 7130-'13OP.M. Thu,'..Jan. 23March'INSTlUCTOII
hlmtelf. this film has a special penonal meaning for Bruon. .
Winner of the Grand Prize, Best Rim of the Year for 19S7 from the Adrian Dovell 7130130 p.m.INSTRUCTOR: I
French Film Acad."" $10.00 Students Stan Pollock

sun. JAN. it2NDFIOORAUO. 7:00 ':30 15.00 Nan-Students $10.00 Students I
Me ... tl-nn S.OO Nan-Students)
r BRIDGE
I 'I1Iu.Jan.U-Ma,.6 r
r DECOUPAGE
NEW PATHS FOR SELFDISCOVERYA BEGINNING r GROUP FOR 713O-'I30P.M.INSTRUCTOR, f Mon Jan.20. 27 and Feb. 3 I
r ENRICHMENT
CONSTRUCTION f AdrtDoveli. 7:3O-:3OP.M. rThur.
COUPLES
Mo".Jon20-Mar ., Jean. 2.Feb. 27 Slo.oo Students J INSTRUCTOR.
7130-':30 P.M. 15.00 Non-Studen" EmIIStoln""'...
7:>>'130 p.m. J
INSTRUCTOR INStlUCTOII' $4,00Students8.anor JSlo.00
Lelghllte 6.00 Non-Stud..te J -
Ann LJ"ch.Cou..I1"

15.00 Studen".J Psychologist (BEGINNING CHEn I If
55.00 Students Tectics$Strategy YOGA 11
r PAINTING: (per couple) Tu..Jon.21-Mar.4 r T_Jon 21-Mar d
Th".Jan 23-Mar' 7.00 No..d- ..00-,........ 5:00-7:00P.M.: :
.....,.;.. ..: (p.rcoupl..J} INSTRUCTOR, INSTRUCTOR I
INSTRUCTOR MIchael lest Rolf.
11\1\ School 'lo.00Studan". $10.00l....... .J
.Non.Stud.n"I 5. Maui.Student .J 15.00 Non.Shsdents I

$15.00 .
A series of Informal' (lecfure-discussions on various topicsconcerning

personal growth and development. (sow YOUR OWN (ORGANIC r. -STRING BANJO i
v STRING BANJO
-
THROUGH GESTALT GARDENING) r. 1Tues.
GROWTH (Beginning)
YOGA MEDITATION (Beginning' )
.. .. 2t Mar.4
DREAMS
fANTASY AND r iva...." -'Mar 4 3 ? 7:30 '130 p a. TlleL Jon! 21-Mar 4 ., Thurs. Jon 23-Mar 6
BobWHcKel.Ed.D., 71"-13OP.M. INSTRUCTOR 7SO-:3O: P.M. 7:300:30 P.M..w' :
"INStlUCTOI,,
Gestalt Therapist INSTRUCTOR: Pollack INSTRUCTOR:
Store
,Wed..Jan.2Z7i3030p.m.. thud. J $10.00 Students Tom Mont sey Gall. Gilled 1 "
Slo.00 Student I 510.00 Students J $ t. J I
FHHANDOPCNTOTHIPUBUCSponsored 1.0"1. 122& 13 JWRU 15.00 Non.StudenM J S15.ooNon.Studen".I. 15.00 Nan.Stud.n" J 15.00 Non-Stud.nte JParking

by the. J. Wayne Ritz Union and Student Mentol
Health Staff



)

i Page 14,'lh.titd.p ndmt Florida Alllgoter.Friday,January 17. 1975 I I


Victorious ERA draws AN OFFER YOU CAN'T REFUSE

'
SUPER LUNCH SPECIAL "

,
in Gainesville .
support .
...
10:30: anrvSpm
..:,'"
By RENA EPSTEIN year and Sen. Buddy MacKay has not had a '.
Alligator Staff Writer chance to vote on it yet," she said. $1
\ Wednesday's passage of the Equal Rights Blevins is trying to conduct :a public ONLY o
Amendment for Women(ERA)by the Florida education campaign to generate community Any Sandwich (except the Gator tail)
House Committee on Human Rights and support for ERA.
Needs drew praise from Gainesville sup. "We are sponsoring a workshop on March A Glass Of Beer Or Soft Drink .

porters of the ERA. 8 to provide information on ERA 'end: Potato Chips & Pickle "
The ERA only needs approval by the rules distributing literature and encouraging other
Pitcher of Beer $1.00 "
Only
committee before going on the house floor fora organizations to endorse the ERA" Blevins -

vote. said.ALTHOUGH Over 50 Sandwiches To Choose From
THE AMENDMENT was defeated by the there is not much oppositionto
Senate,during the last legislative session, by a ERA, Blevins said many people are
21.19 vote. apathetic and don't realize the amendment's

Alyce McAdam, president UF's National' importance. .
\ Organization for Women, said she is A recent poll of Florida voters. indicated -
"delighted and excited" about the ERA's that 72 per cent favored the ERA.
Wednesday victory. The most encouragement for this year's QrDELI
"We expect it to pass the house without any passage of ERA is that not one legislator who
1 problem and we're hoping to increase the voted against ERA last year was re-elected to Open 'til 4 AM 1515 SW 13th St
margin in the house to two-thirds majority. If the legislature, according to Blevins.
the legislature passes the ERA then we'll be. Another Gainesville supporter of ERA also
up there in April to,thank them for it," she praised Wednesday's victory.
.... JUNE LITTLER, president of the
said.A PARADE is scheduled for April 14 in Gainesville Organization for ERA, said there .....: .'" .
for ERA. .. -, ,, ,,1,. .' '.... ., .k.kl9T/ +u'.'
Tallahassee to show support were many good people on the committee. .: 'ti".:WMtd} t '" .r1'.. :
\ According to McAdam, people from allover "It's just great but we have much to do in ... .ft"ryw:!!.< 1i. .
I Florida, including legislators, will be the senate. We still have a certain amount of !!' : 1 '
c there to show their support. educational processes to work on members of .
Jeanette Blevins, president of the Alachua the Senate," she said. i
County Women's Political Caucus, said she She said she hopes it will pass but doesn't : 7 ,
thinks the ERA will pass the house but ex want to be "overconfident." < N ,
pects a close vote in the senate. A petition to drum up support for the ERAis e : !
..
.,
SHE SAID area supporters of ERA are also being circulated now. [ijf' : Don from Bushwockert now The Mod.,, ',.,
trying to lobby Senators Bob Saunders, D- According to Blevins, they already have ,(, '1 i'::' free Hacker.parking Sensible Call scheduling 377-4024 or plenty come by of' ':":,,, ..
Gainesville, and Buddy MacKay, D-Ocala: to enough signatures to show the legislators. r ,: .:. .
vote for the ERA when it goes to the senate fora "It will show that if ERA doesn't pass, the -
vote. legislators who vote against ERA will be +;::. ;: !::11 :" : ,," .. :,,
.
"Sen. Bob Saunders voted against ERA last defeated in the next election," she said. _'" ;'. !' .- ,., '.
!,,,.. ., ,r' .. ', ..
-;.. "' .. ::}
; -:.: ,
I HEALTH INFORMATIONEDITOR'S ': -' .' + 't Y.. Jtoi,r It "
:.: 4 "pya "warg wr 1Wf :: .. ,' .'- '
;; ;-" '.. :f; ;! J -: ;:,

.
( NOTE Inside Information Is a indicating heredity is a factor in the I .
,
weekly feature in The Alligator, providing development of the disease. However, the I 1 .. '
readers with authoritative Information on all exact mode of transmission is not understood.
aspects of personal health and policies of the Factors, such as air pollution, pollen and
Student Health Service. Bring your questionsto other allergens, psychological stress, and
Room 305, J. Wayne Reltx Union or the infections serve to precipitate episodes of .
lobby of the Student Health Service. For wheezing in persons presumably susceptibleto
further information please contact the Health asthma because of this inherited 'trait.

Education Office at the Student Health What are the symptoms of diabetes? Do you. GO M1OOH1G:
Service Room 237.) always have to take shots? .


What is the best thing to do for a black eye? frequency Symptoms of of urination increased, increased thirst hunger, increased'and .LIVE: BAND \lERV: WEEK: :

weight loss strongly suggest the diagnosis of
You should apply cold compresses to the eye diabetes.The finding of sugar (glucose) in the JULES VERNE BAND
for about IS minutes hour. The
t every, compresses -
urine and an abnormally high blood glucose
L i will help stop the bleeding and
generally confirms the diagnosis. Treatment
minimize the swelling. After 24 hours, use LAST 2 NIGHTS !
consists of diet, exercise, and insulin. Some
instead of cold The
warm compresses ones. diabetics do not require insulin.Those who do "
heat will speed the blood circulation around Tues., Wed., 'Thurs. NO COVER
almost, always require daily shots of insulinfor
the eye, hasten the reabsorption of the blood the remainder of their lifetime. Fri. 6 Sat $$100
and decrease swelling.,Continue to use warm

compresses until the swelling and What actually Is herpes? Can you get it ALL me: DEER: : OR wine: YOU CARE: TO DRINK
discoloration The black should
improve. eye again? Is there any relationship to cancer?
get: increasingly better with continuous use of "Herpes" is a viral infection caused by the
compresses. In most cases, the discolorationwill Guys $$2.00 Girls FREEJacksonDI
virus Herpes Hominis. There are two forms,
begin to fade from '
changing a
purpleto type 1 and type II. The virus is responsible for EiON.8'10
a ye\1ow-\ green hue in a few days,
many different i disease states.: Most comon
although it may take as long as one or two "
are "fever blisters"or"cold sores. It tends to
weeks to Since blowto
disappear completely. a
be recurrent. A relationship between herpes
the eye can cause serious damage, you I II I and cancer of the cenixithe( mouth of the'
should consult a physician. womb) has been shown to exist: Women who
\ Is asthma Inherited? have had genital infections caused by herpes
In approximately one third of all asthma virus should have a yearly check-up includinga ,' Gainoivlllo1430S.W.1JStroot
patients there is a family history of asthma. Pap smear. Corner of Park& King
1




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If your ;heating system has seen better days. replace it now. I Ij


let us make a loan.'GAINESVILLE ( ,//\ \'


FLORIDA CAMPUS FEDERAL CREDIT UNION \

ir YI

1200 S.W. Fifth Avenue Phone 3920393I ;




-



I !

.--.. .- ,..

'I lnd.p.n<....Florida Alligator1,Friday January 17,' 1975,Page 17


WEEKEND SPECIAL V MFM
l
Ax ,
I FRIDAVSATURDAVSUNDAV




50c
OFF- on 12-piece buckets

[ 1

dti
'
/5) OFFon 15-piece buckets

.

., .a it rR..fy
$1.00 OFFon 21 piece barrel
'
NOW MEMBERS photo by ondy wman

.moved to smaller office


2205 NW 6th St. 378-7411 NOW office moved ; .




L4OJb McAdam. plans appeal A


By RENA EPSTEIN "carefully"and decided to abide by the Board
Rutherford's Guarantees Alligator Staff Writer of Managers decision to move NOW.
"I urged NOW and the Board of Managersto
The Most for Your UF's National Organization for Women review the decision at the board meeting
Money (NOW)moved out of its J.Wayne Reitz Union Wednesday. I don't know what they will
office Thursday, but will appeal the decisionof decide but I think they have a lot more important .
/::. I In A Diamond the board of-managers at a board meeting things to do than justify space
Wednesday at 4 p.m. allocations," he said.
The Union Board of Managers voted last BOARD OF Managers member Bert
November to move NOW to a smaller office in Harris refused to comment on the decision to
the Union's student activities center. move NOW out of its office.
See' Uft Before You Buy! IN THE PAST year NOW has fought many Harris said he was working on a report of
attempts to move them to another office. the events leading up to the Board of
On April 2, 1974, members fought off an Managers decision that he will present at the
attempt to( move the Florida Quarterly into Wednesday meeting.
the NOW office. According: to Sandeen all student groups
On May 14, 1974, they kept Florida Blue were notified of the November space
Key (FBK) from moving into the office. allocation decision by Harris.
NOW's former office will be used as a NOW director Alyce McAdam said NOW
"floating" office for groups like In* did not get "due process" because they were
terfraternity Council (IFC), Internal! Council, never informed that they were up for consideration
.. : Gator Growl and Panhellenic, a sorority for a new space.
group. MCADAM said at the Wednesday appeal
THE BOARD of managers voted that these NOW will explain their use of the office.
groups will share the office, each using it at. a "We are going to prove we use the office.
?k different time of the year. And we have the logs to .prove it, also." she
Although NOW Director Alyce McAdam said.NOW
requested Vice President for Student Affairs moved its office furniture and
Arthur Sandeen to permit NOW to remain in literature into the new office but are not
its former office until.an appeal was made, unpacking, according to McAdam. She said
t Sandeen denied the request. the new office is one-third smaller than the
Sandeen said he reviewed* the situation former one.We'll .

4

jj I give you back



$350.00Fine your Saturdays.


quality 38-point diamond-engagement .

ring, beautifully set in a six prong white' gold
Tiffany mounting and lovingly nestled in the

luxury of a Rutherford's box.

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4/
.
r

The Independent Greg Forrer


Florida Alligator / S PORiTS, Sports -Editor

Mdoy.January 17. 1 W Pag* 18 .. '
"
-'
:
;,
'
.' ., \ ,
Houston Astros. ; ;

.



I' Alligator By GREG Sports FORR Editor ER a strange and terrible saga


1 _

Six deaths, one near-death, and a stabbing no pennants,
no World Championships. It's just\ about all the Houston
Astros of the National Baseball league have to offer the record

books.; -
Perhaps they should be called the DisAstros.It .
seems appropriate. The club, while playing under a .y
dome,seems to be playing under a cloud of doom also. Check _-
the list way too long-long enough to make one shudder. .
JUST LAST SUNDAY, January 5, the Astros' Don Wilsonwas __
'found dead in his car. The car was in the garage of their
p
suburban Houston home Wilson's five-year-old son was N
also in the garage-dead. His nine-year-old daughter, above r
the garage in a bedrrom sleeping, was overcome by carbon
..... t
monoxide fumes that leaked from the garage. She\ entered the _
hospital in a coma in critical condition. She is now
reported to be recovering. :i
After an autopsy, it was discovered that Wilson, who
plagued national league hitters with his fastball, had been
drunk.
Just a little more than a year before, the Astros' fine
ccntcrficlder Cesar Cedeno shot a 19-year-old girl in a motel Y
room that was situated in a rather run-down section of the
a
star's Dominican l Republic. He was charged with involuntary
manslaughter.
THATS THREE DEATHS so far. Three too many, but

there are more.Leukemia .
hit the Astros' Walter Bond in 1967. He had
shown real promise in 1964 when he used his 6-foot7, 235-
pound frame to hit 16 doubles, seven triples, and 20 homers ( _.
and drive in 85 runs for the Astors. But the dreaded blood
I disease he contracted cut} short his career- and his life. He ::1

was just 29.Someone.
even younger died as a result of mishap involving 'i

an Astros player in the spring of 1973. Larry Dierker, ....,. _, ,I
,
r. '
If' ""
a strong-armed pitcher for the Astros since 1964, hit a 12 year ; : .
old boy while driving near Cape Kennedy. The accident, the
result of large crowds just after a space shot, killed the boy
instantly. Dierker was not charged, since witnesses said the
boy dashed out in front of the pitcher's car. '
f THE FIRST in the long line of Astro misfortunes came in iUDag
1964 I when Jim Umbright a pitcher in his early 30's developed as
black mole cancer. There was no cure then, there is none y1
now. Umbright died.
Then there are those other calamities -- the near-death of
Houston shortstop Roger Metzger. Oddly enough, Wilsonwas
involved in this one, also. The'two collided while chasing .
a pop fly in the outfield of the Astrodome last April. Metzger '" if '
1 swallowed his tongue. Only quick action by the Astros' Doug
At Reder and John Edwards saved Metzger's life.

Quick action also was a part of a stabbing involving the cidenfs. involving the Astros since their inception in 1962. "We're.going to keep punching, maybe we'll get lucky."
Astros' former slugger Jim Wynn. Wynn came home late one MAYBE IT'S NOT nice to fool Mother Nature and play Whether they'll get lucky remains to be seen. But one thing
night in December of 1970-his wife gave him a quick stab under that dome. Whatever it is, the Astros' Sports .In* seems.,certain, the grim reaper has a locker in the
and Wynn gave her a quick divorce. While divorce is not formation Director Bobby Risinger, put it the only way any Astrodome. '
1 the nicest thing in the world it doesn't come near the in- Houston official could. Or should it be the Astrodoom?

Challenge Tennessee in Knoxville IGators



r 21'r try to dethrone KinaBy I

""
ANDY COHEN 3 "overall mark so far this overall and '22 in the con aggressive game" against
.Alligator Sports Writer season. ference. Auburn.
And after a dishearteningdefeat Though devoting much of Despite the poor showing
The Tennessee Volunteersare against Auburn 'his thought to Tennessee, against Auburn, Lotz doesn't
r the.only Southeastern Monday night, Lotz seems Lotz could not help but reflect plan on juggling his starting
Conference club John Lotz wary about the Gators next on the Gators' poor showing five for Tennessee.
f has failed to upend since obstacle. earlier in the week against NORMAL CALDWELL
coming to UF nearly two "They have two of the top Auburn. and Don Bostic will start at
years ago.Saturday. players in the nation in King "We played poorly in the guard, Moore and Gene Sh,
night in Knox- anu Grunfeld," Lotz said. first half and then played even will be at forward and Chip
A ville's spacious coliseum Lotz "King is so good: that most worse in the second half while ,Williams,will play center
and his Gators will get, the teamshave been :concedinghim trying to catch up," Lotz said. Shy is currently leading the
opportunity to change all 25 points a game. "MOST OF THE teams we Gators in scoring with a 15.7
r that as they challenge, the "They're a very-,physical play in this league are more average. He is followed closely
} nationally ranked Volunteers. team that likes to run the ball talented than we are so in by Norman Caldwell, who is
BUT A WIN won't be easyas tight.: up their' opponent's order to win we have to do averaging( slightly over 14
Tennessee sports two of the throats." everything we're capable of to points a Jam( .
nation's top players in TENNESSEE IS currently the hilt. Against Auburn we After the Tennessee game,
sophomore Ernie Grunleld 2.2 in the conference as they just didn't: the Gators return home to
and freshman superstar have lost two close decisionsat He once again singled out begin preparation for .a
TENNESSEE FRESHMAN BERNARD KING Bernard King Both have Alabama and Kentucky, sophomore forward Jerry Monday Alligator Alleybattlewith
.29 points, 12 rebounds'a game guided the Volunteers to an 8* The Gators are currently 6-8 Moore for playing "an Mississippi. .




I.,

y



I .__.. .. . .. _. ......

..... .. . -O.-- .h.u..-.......-, ... ,..Y tti..ln>lnn

I Track team breezes at S eniorBowl f '- IVINCE


- - -
By lUCK ADELMAN
Alligator Sports WriterAn IN ONE of the major upsets of the evening Gators Mike
Sharpe and Willie Wilder finished one-two in the 50 yard
'
awesome display of and dash.
power balance
was exhibited
the UF track team at Wednesday night's Senior Bowl by "That was the biggest surprise of the night," said Assistant
Mobile Ala. meet in Coach Roy Benson, "because they beat one of the conference's -

The G a tors copped five first places and totaled 73V4 points best sprinters in Cliff Outlin of Auburn..
to win in a Cakewalk over second place finisher Florida State seconds.Both Sharpe and Wilder were clocked in a respectable 5.3
who tallied 34 points.
JACKSON 'STATE was' third with 21 points THE HURDLES resulted in a photo finish as FSU's Danny
followed
Auburn with. 13, Southern Mississippi with 5'/i.' by Smith, the NCAA champion, edged UF's Hesley Bostic.
Mississippi State with five. and "Hesley ran a super race,"said B cnson. "In fact I thought ay gsS
he beat Smith. I think Hesley was real pleased with it also." tq ih '
Alabama brought the fp
up rear as they
only
managed one Horace Tuitt won his first race as a Gator in the 600 yard

point.Senior Beaufort Brown and Will Freeman dash. The Trinidad native broke the tape in 1:13.3: but according
were both to Benson the starting line 15 in
victorious in their was actually yards
respective events
.
NCAA's. thereby qualifying for the back of where it should have been.
"HIS TIME was'really two seconds'better," said Benson.
,
BROWN SET a meet record in the 440 and Coach a Y x ?
Dave y
Also
Be nson was extremely pleased with the performancesturned
Adkins believes that the speedster is
re-gaining the form that
in by Steve Gomez and Tom Doerr.
made him the nation's top 600 man two seasons ago. Gomez,a sophomore from Colon Ie. N.J.,captured the 1000
"Beaufort continues
to show why" this year will be a returnto yard run in 2:14.3: while Doerr was victorious in the 880 with a
the prominence he had in 73, said Adkins. "He was incomplete time of 1579.
.control. He knew the track like the back of his
Cross country standout Vince Cartier took the mile run in
hand.
4:13.7: with teammate Frank Betts getting second place.
Freeman won the pole vault clearing 16-1,The Gainesville THE MILE relay team,consisting of Brown, Mitch Goings,
junior is defending his 1974 SEC indoor and outdoor Tuitt,
and anchorman Bob Rambo, prevailed once again in a
championships. time of 3:16.4. ..

"They ran exceptionally well considering there was virtuallyno
competition" said Adkins. 't.
Florida vs. TennesseePredictions The two mile relay team finished second as did Fletcher
Lewis in the long jump with a leap of 24'3".
IN THE high jump, Steve Ott and Ellis Miller both cleared:
6'8"to finish third and fourth respectively while Bill Kovach,
and Mark Schrader were second and third in the shot put.
Andy Cohen .......Florida by 3
Both Benson and Adkins were extremely pleased with the

Greg Forrer ......Tennessee by 4 team's overall showing.
"I'm glad that we won so many events without having to
Rick Adelman ........Tennessee by 15 run so fast," explained Benson. "That means there is a lot of .E

Chris ....... room for improvement..
Garrity Tennessee by 18 "
"This meet really reflects the improvement on our team,

Lou Brancacclo ........Tennessee by 12 added Benson..,"We've added people in all the areas where
we've been weak. All we need to do is just keep the
Consensus .......-Tennessee by 9 momentum going and not peak too soon." CARTIER
"They are really starting to.believe in themselves," said :.victorious in mile run
Adkins.



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The Independent Greg Forrer

Florida Alligator / SPORTS I Sports EditorHouston

Friday,January 17.1975 Pag II ,

....
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Astros.By '. ;, ry;
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1} Alligator GREG Sports FORR Editor ER a strange and terrible saga


5 J

Six deaths,one near-death, and a itabbing no pennants,
no World Championships. It's just\ ,about all the Houston
Astros of the National Baseball league have to offer the record
books.
Perhaps they !should be called the DisAstros.It .
seems appropriate. The club while playing under a
dome, seems to be playing under a cloud of doom also. Check
the list way too long -long enough to make one shudder.
, JUST LAST SUNDAY, January 5, the Astros' Don Wilsonwas
found dead in his car. The car was in the garage of their :
suburban Houston home Wilson's five-year-old son was !ilpL
_
also in the garage-dead.: His nine-year-old daughter, above
the garage: in a bedrrom sleeping, was overcome by carbon Z H
.a monoxide fumes that leaked from the garage. She entered the
hospital in a coma in critical condition. She is now _
reported to be recovering.After _
an autopsy, it was ,discovered that Wilson, who I.
plagued': national league hitters with his fastball, had been
drunk.
Just a little more than a year before, the Astros' fine
ccnterfielder Cesar Cedeno, shot a 19-year-old girl in a motel
room that was situated in a rather run-down section of the
i star's Dominican Republic. He was charged with involuntary
manslaughter.
THATS THREE DEATHS so far. Three too many, but
there are more.
Leukemia hit the Astros' Walter Bond in 1967. He had -
shown real promise in 1964 when he used his 6-foot-7, 235-
pound frame to hit 16 doubles, seven triples, and( 20 homers -.
and drive in 85 runs for the Astors. But the dreaded blood
i disease he contracted cut short his career and his life. He 3. Jlr --
was just 29.Someone. : ':i
l even younger died as a result of mishap involving : '

an Astros player in the spring of 1973. Larry Dierker, '" :
'
a strong-armed pitcher for the Astros since 1964 hit a 12 year ", : .
old boy while driving near Cape Kennedy. The accident, the "
result of large crowds just after a space shot killed the boy
instantly. Dierker was not charged, since witnesses said the
i boy dashed out in front of the pitcher's car.
THE FIRST in the long line of Astro misfortunes came in -amDay
{ 1964 when Jim Umbright, a pitcher in'his early 30's developedblack e4
mole cancer. There was no cure then there is none
now Umbright died.
Then there are those other calamities -- the near-death of
Houston shortstop Roger Metzger. Oddly enough Wilsonwas
involved in this one, also. The'two collided while chasinga
pop fly in the outfield of the Astrodome last April. Metzger
t swallowed his tongue. Only quick action by the Astros',Doug
t Reder and John Edwards saved Metzger's life.,

Quick action also was a part of a stabbing involving the cidenfs involving the Astros since their inception in 1962. "We're going to keep punching, maybe we'll get lucky."
Astros' former slugger Jim Wynn. Wynn came home late one MAYBE IT'S NOT nice,to fool Mother Nature and play Whether they'll get lucky remains to be seen. But one thing
night in December of 1970-his wife gave him a quick stab under that dome. Whatever it i is, the Astros' Sports Information *' seems..,certain, the grim reaper has a locker in the I
and Wynn gave her a quick divorce. While divorce is not Director, Bobby,,Risinger, put it the only way any Astrodome.
the nicest thing in the world it doesn't come near the in- Houston official could. ,Or should it be Astrodoom?

Challenge Tennessee in KnoxvilleGatorstrytodethroneKina

k .

1 I



'By ANDY COHEN 3 overall mark so far this overall and ''2-2 in the con- aggressive game" against
Alligator Sport Writer season. ference. Auburn.
.And after a disheartening: Though devoting much of Despite the poor showing
, The Tennessee Volunteersarc defeat against Auburn his thought to Tennessee against Auburn Lotz doesn't
the.only Southeastern Monday night, Lotz seems Lotz could not help but reflecton plan on juggling his starting
Conference club John Lotz wary about the Gators next the Gators' poor showing five for Tennessee.
f ft has failed to upend since obstacle.: earlier in the week against NORMAL CALDWELL
coming to UF ,nearly two "They have two of the top Auburn. and Don Bostic will start at
years ago.Saturday. players in the nation in,King "We played poorly in the guard( Moore and Gene Shy
night in Knox- anu Grunfeld," Lotz, said. first half and then played even will be at, forward and Chip
y ville's spacious coliseum Lotz "King is so good that m'ost worse in the second half while Williams will play center.
and his Gators ,will get the teams have been conceding trying to catch up," Lotz said. Shy is currently leading the
opportunity to change all him '25 points a game. "MOST OF THE teams we Gators in scoring with a 15.7
that as they challenge the "They're a very physicalteam play in this league are more average. He is followed closely
nationally ranked Volunteers. that likes to run the ball talented than we are so in by Norman Caldwell, who \is
t BUT A WIN wonOt be their order win ,
easy right p' opponent's to we have to do averaging:, slightly over 14
r as Tennessee sports two of the throats. everything we're capable of to points a game.
nation's top players in TENNESSEE IS currently the hilt. Against Auburn we Alter the Tennessee ,
sophomore Ernie Grunfeld 2.2 in the conference as they just didn't." the Gators return home game to
and freshman superstar have lost two close ,decisionsat He once again singled out begin preparation for .
FRESHMAN BERNARD KING Bernard King. Both have Alabama and Kentucky.The sophomore forward Jerry Monday Alligator Alley battle a
.29 points, l2raboundso game guided the Volunteers to an 8- Gators are currently 6-8 Moore for, playing Man with Mississippi. "



1.,

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Th.Nid.B. d.n$H.Hdo Alllaatorr F.idov.Jonuorv.l7,147&pas 11


r 'k't-e' ;'" breezes 'a t"s enior Bowl -


By RICK ADELMAN
Alligator Sports WriterAn IN ONE of the major upsets of the evening Gators Mike
Sharpe and Willie Wilder finished one-two in the 50 yard
awesome display of power and balance dash. /
the UF track team at Wednesday night's Senior was exhibited by "That was the biggest surprise of the night," said Assistant
Bowl
Mobile, Ala. meet in Coach Roy Benson, "because they beat one of the con- f
The Gators copped five first places and totaled 73/i points ference's best sprinters in Cliff Outlin of Auburn.. tS iIEt1
to win in a Cakewalk over second place finisher Florida State seconds.Both Sharpe and Wilder were clocked In a respectable 5.3
who tallied 34 points.
JACKSON'STATE was third with 21 THE HURDLES resulted.in a photo finish as FSU's Danny
points
Auburn with. 13, Southern Mississippi with followed by Smith, the NCAA champion, edged UF's Hesley Bostic.. :S
S'and
Mississippi State with five. "Hesley ran a super race,"said B cnson. "In fact, I thought
Alabama brought the he beat Smith. I think Hesley was real pleased with it also."
up rear as
point. they. only managed one Horace Tuitt won his first race as.a Gator in the 600 yard
Senior Beaufort Brown and Will Freeman dash. The Trinidad native broke the tape in 1:13.3 but according
victorious in their respective events were both to Benson the starting line was actually 15 yards in
NCAA's.BROWN. thereby qualifying for the back of where it should have been.
'
"HIS TIME was really two seconds better," said Benson.
SET a meet record in
the 440 and Coach
Dave Also Be nson was extremely pleased with the performancesturned
Adkins believes that the is
speedster regaining the form that
in by Steve Gomez and Tom Doerr,
made him the nation's top 600 man two seasons ago. Gomez,a sophomore from Colonie, N.J.,captured the 1000
"Beaufort continues to show' why" this year will be a returnto yard run in 2:14.3: while Doerr was victorious in the 880 with a
the prominence he had in 73, said Adkins. "He was incomplete time of 1579.: ?
.control. He knew the track like the back of his
hand." Cross country standout Vince Cartier took the mile run in
4:13.7: with teammate Frank Betts getting second place.
Freeman won the pole vault clearing 16-L The Gainesville THE MILE relay team,consisting of Brown, Mitch Goings.
junior is defending his 1974 SEC indoor and outdoor 2w
Tuitt and anchorman Bob Rambo, prevailed once again in a
championships. time'of 3:16.4.: ..
"They ran exceptionally well considering there was virtuallyno
competition," said Adkins.
Florida vs. TennesseePredictions The two mile relay team finished second as did Fletcher
Lewis in the long jump with a leap of 24'3". .. ; ,..5Y
IN THE high jump Steve Ott and Ellis Miller both cleared
6'8"to finish third and fourth, respectively while Bill Kovach, f G d
and Mark Schrader were second and third in the shot put.
Andy CohenFlorlda by 3 Both Benson and Adkins were extremely pleased with the

Greg Form .......Tennessee by 4 team's overall showing.
"I'm glad that we won so many events without having to
Rick Adelman ........Tennessee by 15 run so fast" explained Benson. "That means there is a lot of

Chris. ....... room for improvement."
Garrity Tennessee by 18 "
"This meet really reflects the improvement on our team,
added Benson. "We've added people in all the areas where
Lou
BrancaccloTennessee by 12
we've been weak. All we need to do is just keep the
Consensus ........Tennessee by 9 momentum going and not peak too soon." VINCE CART1ER
"They are really starting believe in themselves," said victorious in mile run
Adkins.



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Page 20 Independent Florida Alligator Friday,January 17, IUS .,:. ', I
I ,', UrO: X? ,,4

..Hi'i' I. NORTHFACE SELECTED SECONDS.


I Women's SportsThe ./371>""26" '... bos QOU MINOR SIERRA FARM IMPERFECTIONSNORTHFACE ,PRIME GOOSE DOWN$52.50

SECONDS. $40.00NORTHFACE
PUMA PARKA. fiBERFILL II MAINTAINS
? PresentsBARRY LOFT WHEN WET. $42.50 SECONDS$32.00
University of Florida at 2 p.m.
women's swimming team Lady Gator swimmingcoach !,USETI SECONDS$2111kJ
NORTHFACE DOWN VEST$27.so
faces the University of Sue Halfacre said that MELTONFormerly
,Georgia.: and Emory she knew nothing about eitherof TRAIL SHOP
University in a triangularmeet the, teams her women COMHITI" Hid o' )
Saturday in Athens Ga., would be facing."I ..:1.J LOADING tVII COMPONENTSMVMIOtf auwl HI MM Country with Joe 6HJp 1518 N.W.13 St.
AM NOT OVERLY .
:. t concerned, though, because'we -EEII-TliAOtAE/AtA! t Pit fish 372-0521
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rp wPxa are really swimming well Thurs..Sat.1.SO ,
MIu Sale limited to Gainesville store
4663340MM t
and have tremendous depthon At The Door I
the team," Halfacre said. MCKWIIM GUN Of Atl J stock only-ends Jan. 22
:
The Lady Gators go into )
the with 2-0 record for -----
meet
a n=n..P.ltIlft": "" --ran nvn ma nan mn nun twi fun ran nm fl
the season. They will be .. .
swimming in off-events,
rather than their speciality, 20,000 INVENTORY
attempting to qualify for the REDUCTIO.I
May .A1AW Nationals in I

\ "Jt: Gators Arizona.The next is against home meet their for major the STILL IN PROGRESS S i i I

rival,the University of Miami,

A Feb. I. C. AR SPEAKERS CLOSE OUT-DEMOS AND .STOCK

The Lady Gator basketballteam .
tips-off against Florida ARMs Reg $295 each NOW 475.00 pair SAVE $115.00
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COACH SUE HALPACRE AR2AXs Reg $165 each NOW 250.00 pair SAVE $80.00
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i Gate 13 ticket office will be open between 9 a.m.and 6 p.m. .
Any full time UF student may pick up a ticket with their BOMAR MX 55 Reg $49.95.. NOW 35.00 SAVE $16.00\
tt basketball season,ticket card or 75 cents. NOVIS 820 Reg $35.00 NOW ONLY $32

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PAGE 1

The Independent Florida Algtr Pubbsied by Comipus Communicofions Inc Go Gnev~I~. FI'oridc Nor olliclolly osmcoIatd wd9h the Univen'y of Florido tyGARY DAL4NOF AMtw BidWrlage Dr. Reburt C). Marsten will be inaugurated in Florida Gym as the seventh UP president today-. The original program, scheduled over a two-day period, was cut in an effort to save state funds. A CUT-flACK of S16,OU0 was made from the original Inauguration budget of S19,.0E-. The inauguration festivites began last night at 7 p~ii. when out-of-town wests and convocation participants attended a reception at the J. Wayne Relhz Union ballroom-. The fourth annual President's Festival of Music was next on the agenda last night at 8:30 p.m. in Universtiy Auditorium. Peter Herman Adler conducted Beethoven's Ninth Symphony (Cboral). -.Inauguration begins this morning DURING HIS inaugural address. Marston will summarize the findings of the UP goals task force. Twelve preliminary goals *erc identified as "problem areas" by the task force. The 12 itoals outlined by the committee include decisions on which programs should be allowed to grow in the future, whether admission to UP should be selective or opts,. and how to determine productivity and values or programs. Marston will deliver his inaugural address at 10 a.m. ar a QtiO processIonal begins the WUFT-TV channel $ will carry live coverage of the ceremonies. The Afulcagi Peoples Socialist Party (APSP) has IudIcated they will hold a demonstration outside the gym while the ceeernmony is ii A spokesman for the APSP Pltts and Lee Defense Committee said they planned a pickst cf about ID people to keep pressure -n visiting public officials to reconsider the Pitt. and Lee case. WILDERT LEE and Freddie Pitt. have been 'iprisonad for 20 years on a conviction for nmurder. Even though a witness who testified against Pluts and Lee in the original trial has adniitted faluifynh testimony. the two mnef remain in jail. Demonstrators will be distributing a leaflet describing the case's history. Among the state officials who will attend are State Education Commissioner Balph Turlington, State Agricultural Commissioner Doyle Conner, Rep. Don Fuqua, D-Altha, Board of Regents members Burke Kibler. lack McGriff. Chester Ferguson. and Chairman Marshall Criser. CRISER WILL preside over the convocation and will deliver the oath of office to the new president. Former UP Presidents J. Wayne Reitz and Stephen C. O'Connell will also be in attendence. One hundred and thirty-one student organizations will march in the processional. TWO HUNDRED and seventy five faculty members also responded to the call for those interested in marching, making a total of more than 400 people participating in the processional. Procession Marshal Dr. Earl G. Rodgers, U F professor of agronomy, said there would also be a recessional Those in academic regalia will depart in reverse order from the way they entered. Twenty-nine other colleges have indicated they will said representatives to the inauguration, Including six of the other eight schools in the State University System. UP'S HONE than 6,l10 Career Service Employes have been extended a special invitation to attend. The 9:30 am, to noon ceremony will be counted as work time fbr such employs. Among the visiting dignitaries who will speak are Lt. Gow. James Williams. D-Ocala, who will make a short greeting at the convocation. Other greetings will be extended by Andre. H. Hines of St. Petersburg. on behalf of the alumni; Dr. David MI. Chalmers, UF history professor, on behalf of the faculty; and Steve Merryday, UP student body president, Os' behalf of UF students. THlE INVOCATION and benediction will be delivered by the Rev. Earle C. Pap., rector of the Holy Trinity Episcopal Church of GainesvIlle,. The University Symphonic Band will play betbne the Coutocatian and dining the processional and recessional. FIIAY JA.-.17 VOL. 67, NO. 62 2 Grad assistants keep lobs By TOM 511RODER Alpgtor Staff Wrier Another five per cent cut-back in operating expense money will enable UP to keep commitments to graduate students. UF Executive Vice President Harold Hanson said Thursday. A 12(KI,(EO deficit in funds used mainly for graduate student 'alaries wilt be eliminated by the operating expense cut, Hanson said. "WE ARE simply shifting deficits, there is no new money." le 'aid. Hanson said the budget shift should provide enough money to cover all formal and informal commitments to graduate assistants through spring quarter. "It will still be tight, but I think we will be able to meet commitments.' Hanson said. TO DATE UF'S operating expense budget has been cut by S400.aD0 (10 per cent). Bryan asked the Council of Academic Deans Wednesday it another expense budget cut would hinder basic expenditures such as K eroxin g. The deans generally agreed it would. HANSON SAID, "Eerything allocated for is a basic expense. It's a matter of setting priorities." "This will just about shut down travel thy'lhae" Bryansaib University College Dean Bob Burton Brown said, "This will pretty well crimp our style. You'll probably see exams given off the blackboard and it will pretty well eliminate travel." Brown said. HOWEVER, Brown said he wa, not surprised. "It's just one more tightening of the belt, If this saves jobs then ft's worth it," he said. UC recently informed its graduate students that most would be laid off spring quarter if no additional mercey became available, Brown said he believes the S2fE,.0 will make that unnecessary. SHERI DALTON, president of the Graduate Student Union, claimed pressure from the GSU is responsible for the shift of funds. "We are claiming .ictory at this point. We are pleased that the administration came up with money that supposedly they didn't However Datonsaid the problem is not "IT'S JUST A temporary solution. Nothing is solved for next year and nothing can prevent the administration turning right around arid taking the money back," she said. GSU originally planned to pickst UF President Robert Q. Marston's inauguration today. Dalton said a smaller "Victory line" will be held instead. 'The line will organize at the Hub at 9 am., she said. Mmmmmmgoo I Okay, Ida' get to the hoflow of thit. cmeam lovm. Her sticky fingnis reveal That lstbe delwmincton of this little Ics she's had quits a mouthful already. Seventh UF president to be inaugurated today

PAGE 2

Poq 2, Tthe Independen* Mofldo Allgator, Friday Joynuory 17, 1975 U.S. of in post worst recession -World War I W ASH INGTON (UPI) -The United States is in the midst If the worst recession of the post-World War II eta, according to government statistics released Thursday. A Commerce Department report on the nation's Cross National Product showed that output of the economy, adlusted fbr the effects of inflation, dropped at a startling 9.1 per cent annual rate between October and December. INFLATION, meanwhile, spurted at a 137 per cent pace, the quickest since the department began collecting quarterly statistics in 947. It was the Iourth consecutive quarterly decline in real, or noninflated, GNP and James L Pate, the department's chief economist, said the end is not in sight. "I don't thing we're at the trough (recession bottom) yet," said Pate, predicting that the growth rate would take another substantiall" loss in the current January-March quarter fday__ C fi J G O Q wirsSin Senior chair men deposed WASHINGTON (UPN) -House Democrats, with the liberals forcing revolutionary reforms, deposed two senior committee chairman Thursday but gave the dean of the House. Rep. Wright Patman of Texas, a fighting chance to retain his BankinR Committee chairmanship. Two of the most powerful and most senior House Chairmen -Edward Herbert of armed services and W.R. Poage of Agriculture -were ousted earlier in the day. Then on a narrow 246-141 vote, the Democrats voted down Rep. Henry Reuss, D-Wis. This means that Patman will now comie to a vote of the full party caucus, probably within 10 Israe~l gvndeadlin WASHINGTON (UPI) -Egyptian President Anwar Sadat Shtirsda) gave Israel three months to make further with(Idas 1rom occupied Egyptian. Syrian and Jordanian I errutory. Otherwise he said the Arads, including the Paetmas would "explode eserything" when the Geneva Middle East Peace Conference resumes., era "THE CURRENT economic situation is 'ery bad.' he said grimly. 'These arc the tacts. fhie> speak for themselves, &Esrythimg is bad From November, 1973, when the constantly fluctuating husmess cycle reached its latest peak. through Deceniber'. 1q74, the latest dale for which figures are available, the GNP tell S per cent [hat I' 'a much bigger drop than in any or the live recessions sine the end of World War II. There was a huge business contraction Inm 454 as bte economy underwent the readjustment from war to peace, bt economists consider this a special case that should not be compared with the usual recession.te Not smnes the 1930s, when the economy took twohseparat nose dives im the wake of the Great Depression. has thee ben an economic slump as big as the one now under way. April 1 WASHINGTON (UP) .Congressional Leaders told President Ford TIhursday they believe an Income Tax rebate can be enacted by April I, but not necessarily in the exact torn' he requested. White House Press Secretary Ron Nessen told reporters the Democratic leadership had predicted modifications in Ford's pla to return to individual taxpayers 12 per cent of their 1974 tax bill. ASST. Senate Democratic Leader Robert Byrd of West Virginia, one of those at the meeting with Ford. told reporters he and others thought Congress would want to aim the 1974 tax cut more at low and middle-income families than the President suggested. Byrd also said Democratic leaders were less than enthusiastic about Ford's energy conservation plans, which are meant to reduce fuhel consumption by raising prices through taxes that would bring in about 130 billion. Byrd said he and others felt Ford should have proposed a policy built on fuel rationing and that Congress might move to pass rationing legislation despite the President's opposition to it. NESSEN SAID Ford's "primiar5 concern is that there be action quickly' on the econom' as well as the energy front and dIeclined to speculate about possible compromises. "He believes his plan will work.' Nessen said. Ford feels that gasoline rationing wouldl require a longterm expansion of the government bureaucracy and that "no one would be happy with the decisions' on how much luet could be consumed, and by sdhom, Nessen explained. Ford's early morning meeting, with Democratic and Republican leaders was the start of a strenuous round of St '-A-Th CIA H elms def ends s py ing WASHINGTON (UP) --Former CIA Director Richard Helms said Thursday his agents had to spy upon Amecric~n r-adicals because some of them had links with foreign subversiwes, and he defended the CIA's record wAthtiut regrets. wvithoul qualms, without apology." Helms lashed back at the CIA's critics in prepared testimony at a special Senate hearing, describing himself as indignant at the irresponsible attacks" against the agency and warning they could seriously damage U.S oterests "it suffered to pass unchallenged.' Helms, now ambassador to Iran. was CIA director from I6 to 1973 and deputy director beforethat, when most of the domestic intelligence activities outlined Wednesda) by the current director. William E. Colby, took place. PRESIDEOIT FORD ...wontsfostoction Jctmity calculated to win political backin~ ltr Lm WV economic and energy policies. Following the leadership meeting. he delivered A peOnl sales pitch to scores of state and local government ItticialL. Nessen said the leadership told the President they though~ the House and Senate could complete action by April oft legislation to cut 1974 taxes. C 0 U Restauit .sMutSal Lounge Gourmet Fresh Seafoads 'Snapper 'Lobster. Scallops Crab Claws Mullet Shrimp Trout Rock Shrimp In Unxepllied Areas Stone Crab ClawsPrvtPaie E&er yrhibg Prepared Fresh For You _I Th,. indpnden, Florida Ailigotor iS 0 pujbiicgrin of Campus cmu.N 'ncopovoted o p'.vo'. nor-p',fit ceorieon if iS p*bsse f'n Mre *.cap. dtnn Jt"*, July, and A.uti whot er' p .*.hd .miew.kly and dvu'l ludeni Ol idoyvband .e.n, perods. Osume .prssed in ii, Indeende' Ig' or. h.oseofH. dit.n of h* wvii.,s o,h viscics ,d no.,,h. ofs -e~~,iyo FIo,,dc tie campus wnrvd by th *.Aapr4dtt Florida Alligare Adfl' carsupcndnc. to The indsp.,du,. Fiariae ApgIIrI ', 0 1 26,U'Ih staton Goinnvdi, Floia 32Si The iadependene Florda Aligato it .ftra se ioes "4e @Meuniaod Stee .OFco .aranevdCFlw4O 20 skkSMCb.M wn. epevlded0w~,fla~mEi serne fa.,fy stude" f* Univernyw of Florida & ton ofal edv.neqi.s aMd it rev's. ,r lerA swoy ci co i'cntd e*"mer~ nvolvin; 'vpogrphme erns pr vrwa.o insertion **"f f l e *fl is 'de odveutinii ,tnagav wiftin I) dc ad'. ,ieedureiat10pp0"Ti lfdnd cdi #10,44. Ailpaer will -e be .eom*enIbl ICr mer n fl '" *'n"*o on en.smel schejdedw.e awerci tnt'. may see lower taxes

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1%. Independent Florid. Ailgeor, Fudty. Jenvwsy I7, 1975 Peg. S UC evaluation team selected The evaluation team toUniser-sit) College (UC) has been selected. Dr Eric Goldman, Rollins Professor of History at Prnceton University: Dr James McCain, president of Kansas State University: and Ot. John Silber. president of Boston University, have been named to the team by Gene Hemp, UP interim assistant 'ice president for academic affairs. THE EVALUATION team was ordered by UF President Robert U Marston after a UC .urvey last fall showed more than 50 per cent ot the faculty said morale war poor tUC Dean Bob Burton Brown suggested the UC Advisory Hoard begin their own invectigation to supplement the outside Invest i at ion. fhe new team e' aluation has been scheduled tor Feb. 27. During that time, the three members will evaluate the stuation in UC in terms olf faculty morale. UF directories might run short Gator Guides-the phone directory for students,-faculty and stall are on sale at the H UB fof 51.50. There are still student copies available free in the Student Government office, according to Eudine McLeod, staff assistant in the SG office. MCLEOD SAID, "There were 4.0 guides for off-campus students. but there are fewer than 50W left. V'm not sure we'll have enough to last through this quarter." She added. "I've been working in this office for IS years and we've never run out out of Gator Guides. This may be he listt' The Gator Guides on sale in the bookstore were not intended to be bought by students, said Mary Ann Green, a personnel staff member who gathered the names for the student and staff directory. THESE EXTRA copies, ordered under a separate contract by the bookstore, are for wives of faculty niembers, local businesses or anyone who really wants one, said Green fhese guides are intended bor persons who are not entitled to a tree Gator Guide under the present system of distribution. She said there were I8.00 copies of the Gator Guide printed this year. MCLEOD SA1D) students were allotted 8.000 of those copies, of which 4,0 were distributed to campus residents. fraternities, sororities and married housing. The other 4,XX) student copies welt delivered to the SG office, where a student may pick one tp by showing a current tee card and identification, according to MeLeod. Gator Guides were distributed to campus offices, one per telephone, according to Green. Even if there are no more copies left for students, there are no plans to have more printed, according to Green, since extra copies would have to be paid for by UP. Meited said neither UF nor the students pay for the Gator Guides. "The publishing company solicits ads to cover the cost of the number of copies ordered,' she said. SG positions available The deadline for tiling applicatlons. fir eight student offices is 5 p.m. today. Interested students may apply for the positions of student deiqgate and alternate to the University Senate: a post on the Activity Fee Service Advisory Comimittee; and five positions on the Distinguished Professor Chair Committee. For lbrther information or description on any of the positions call 3921665 or see Ken Ofgasg in the Student Govrment office in the I Wayne Reinz Union, Room 3i5.

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Pog.4 The lndependen* fovdc Alligator hidoy Jonuorv 1' 1975 Merryday calls for open hearings on tuition plan By KAREN MEYER Alljigr Staff Writer lin a letter to the chairman of the Board of Regents iBOR) this w&eek. Student Body President Steve Merryday requested pubic hearings "on the issue of tuition" before the regents submiit their fee recommendations lot the coming legislative scsio1. Both State Umnie-sits Systcm Chancellor Rohert Mauty and ne'.I appointed regent MarshalI Harris speculated on the probability ofa tuition increase at the January BOR meeting REFERRING to the 'probable adverse et*L'cts (I such .an increase) on the academic situation," Merryday suggested hearings modeled alter utilities rate regulation hearings. STEVE MERRYDAY .sends left.,rto regents I %,uIld suggest .i Imo(rnmig 'r in afternoon session on cam puss im dIifterent goegraphical tegions might suffice Im pro ding an opport umf lv for parties oh en rot heard to express their vieos' a' to the met-its of both the tVpe andI amounts if tees.'' the letter said, lI there had been public hearings laMt year hectore the tuition per credit hour was adopted. Mcrryd a' said."Sonmeot the liberal art' amd largely elect 'c colleges wmild biase cime ." UIF PRESIDENT Robert 0 Marston said Merryday's letter "constituted a reasonable request" "I am and have been bor some time an ad vocale of low tuition.' said MIa rston, claiminghe was'by no means neutral" on the issue [he hearings would "make sure lie NOR understands the reasons and teelings behind arguments to keep tuition low." said Marston REGENT Jack Mc~riff' had not seen the letter hut thought he ,would endorse the concept of hearings. "When it conies to changes in tuition. I would like anyv kind of input from studetits or anyone else,"' said McGrilt He said the regents should provide time for input "tn a reasonable level" adding they 'can't be going all over the state" tot it. Although the hearings might not prevent any Increase in tuition. Merryday said "it would make the decision more legitimate." His eventual aim is to see "some sort of cap placed on tuition." where fees tor IS or lb hours would be maximum, no matter how many additional hours a student carried, he said. Sexual relationships exposed in open lecture By LINDA WISNIEWSII Alflgstr Staff Wrltet "Sexual relationships nsolve cornmunication. hut most males try to deal with women by a touch of the lips, a brush of the breast, and ihen 'a dive for the crotch," Laura Newman said Wednesday night. fhc topic of the lecture at the J. Wayne Rciti Union was "Understanding Your 'exual Self."fthe audience largely was made up of students who, like Don Cournoyer. 3ED. canic 'to expand my knowledge on the sexual sell' and learn what I haven't learned yet." THE LECTURERS, Laujra and Gus Newman. both practice in Gainesville. Gus New is a psychiatrist at the Student Health Service in the iJF iirmary LUira Newman is a marriage and famnil) counselor in Gainesville. She received special raining in sexual counseling last summer tinder Masters and Johnson in St. Louis. Laura Newman explained that while she was in St. Lonuis working under Masters and Johnson they 'tried to find the limit of female sexual capacity."' ONE QUESTION the researchers tried to answer was how many orgasms a woman could have. Newman said. The clinic 'lined up a bunch of willing "men and one willing woman' she said. 'After 60 orgasms the men had had it while the woman "as still going strong." During the lecture the Ncwmans used iuodels of nale and female external gentilia to illustrate how women and men sexually respond. LAURA NEWMAN explained that the clitoris is "'the primary organ of sexual stimutlation. 'As the clitoris is stimulated it gets bigger it tirst and theta, goes away." she said. "The old sex manuals used to tell the men one thing -find the clitoris and hang in there.' Newmian said. NUT NEWMAN said at the Masters and Johnson clinic they found 'the direct stimulation of the tip of the clitoris turned women ot,. because it was too intense." "Masters and Johnson were the first people to really look at a woman -at her sexual arousal and her length of orgasm." she ad* ded. Gus Newman said males were "quickly aroused" and needed 'no physical stimulation to have a full erection and ejaculation" MOST MALES worry about the size of rheir penis. Newman said, although "the site of the penis is not niuch ot a criteria because of the elasticity of the vagina.'' "In our country we're obsessed with big cars. hig houses and big penises." he added. During the last 45 minutes of the program the Newiians held a question and answer session with the audience. SOMEONE asked the Newmans to 'define a meaningful relationship." Gus Newman replied a meaningfull relationship must be mutual and must ha'e a great $eal of meaning to both people." Neswnan sdmiitted some relationships'are instant" but added "most of the time it takes a long time to develop a meaningful relationship.' Someone asked. 'Does a good marriage make a good sex life?" GUS NEWMAN replied, a good marriage and a good sex Site "are inseparable. There are some good marriages where there is In, sn. but sex alone won't keep a marriage together." Laura Newman added "what goes on in the bedroom begins to creep in on the other relationships in marriage." Another person asked the Newmians to "Explain in non-technical terms what a nonorgasmic female feels when she has her first orgas." Laura Newmtan .answered. 'most women say 'Wow! That's as non-technfral as I can Let."

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Ii,. independen, Acerid. Aig.~ov, Madey, J.uo~y '7. 1U5. Ping# 5 Ex-prison chief heads criminal justice program By RICHARD BURKHOLDER AllIgator Staff WRIt., DR. MYRL AJLANI~t *. ..directs now prmgwm Surrounding the walls of Dr. Mil E. Alexander's office are a batter) of autographed portraits from such luminaries as John D). Mitchell. Ramsey Clark. anid Robert F. Kennedy. Alexander. former director of the U.S. Bureau of Prisons, has had long and distinguished experience with attorneys general. "STILL," he mused, "one wonders about the question of a dual standard of justice in America. especially after the Watergate affair." At this he cocks his head toward the portrait of John D. Mitchell over his filing cabinet. Dr. Alexander is chairman of the newly nittated criminal justice program at UP. After having studied the sociological and psychological phenomena of crime in America fbr 30 years. he has carefully construeted an academic program emphasizing corrcct Ions an rd rehabilitation mi'!e-d ol police science or punishment. IN KEEPING will, the time'. ,,d in response 'to the changes that the 'tud4 of criminal justice has undergone." the focus of the program. which leads to an .n terdisciplinary major, is based in a "social science perspective.' Alexander said. This curricula decision was made, he said. because criminal justice embraces so many disciplines that an interdisciplinary approach was mandatory. Nowadays, he said, it's important that 'strong research components" be developed to define and handle the personal makeup of the American criminal-. THUS, NEW practitioners. new research designs, new institutional models need for-' mulation. Here is where a modernized criminal justice program comes in. Alexander added. "In light of Vietnam, the student riots of the 1%60's and expecially Watergate. it's necessar, that the science of criminal ,ustk-e undergo a re-evaluation.' he said At UFI thc 'ponsors of this new liberal arts turriculun, are the deparlnents cf political science, psychology and sociology. Offered is a bachelor of arts degree with graduate work available in the departments of health-related professions, recreation, and law school. WHEN THE program was first announced at the beginning of fall quarter. only 85 students signed up -and they all had to go through drop-add. Now, Alexander estimated, there are "roughly 45othis quarter. with3M of these as announced majors.' In fact, he said, the program is so new that his office has a sink since or iginally his quarters were to be part of a psychological testing laboratory. For the future, he saad. "we intend to maintain our perspective over the total field and hopefully open a series of subdivisional 'tracks' with specialty considerations concerning pre-law. police correctional work and other nreas." Despite its sweet taste, sugar is not actually necessary to the body. According to Dr. Howard Appledort, assistant professor in nutrition and food sciences, the body only needs sugar for energy, and not for sweetness. "THE BODYcould gel the energy it needs not r.fro sugar, but from starches and carboyhydrates." he said. Substitutes such as apples and honey, which are carbohydrates, could provide the needed energy. One tablespoon of sugar provides 50O calories, according to a book entitled "The Story of Sugar' by W.R.Aykroyd. Sugar itself doesn't provide any of the vitamins or protein needed for health Also, according to the hook, too much sugar in the diet may "crowd out" other foods needed for good health. "You could cut down on sugar and still get energy by eating starches.' he said. 'It would probably be well if people ate less sugar." SUGAR CANalso be extremely hard on one's teeth, according to Dr. Dennis Birdsell, assistant professo* in basic dental sciences at UP. Birdsell said the effect of the sugar depends on how sticky it is. "Sucrose, which is the main sugar,. makes a sticky substance in the mouth which is hard to remove," he said. Microorganisms in the mouth convert the sugar to acid, which, if untreated. can cause serious tooth decay. BIRDSELI. added that the so-called sugarless gums contain alcohol sugars. "These sugars also cause acid to be made and you can still get cavities." he said. According to newspaper reports, the risk of tooth decay depends on how often a person eats sugar every day. Dr. W.H. Bowen of the National Institute of Dental research, in Bethesda, Md. said a person who eats three meals a (lay, even if' the meals are high in sugar content, risks tooth decay less than a person who nibbles at sweets all day. Text by Jo Laurie PenroseI Sweeteners are cheaper Synthetic sweeteners are proving to be a less expensive method of sweetening food and drink than sugar. Synthetic sweeteners are made Iron, saccharin, a chemical. These sweeteners claim to have all the sweetening power ol' granulated sugar, and are less costly. SACCHARIN is under study as a possible cancer-causing agent. according to the Food and Drug Administration Its use is carefully regulated by law. The chemical wtas removed 1rom the governnment's list of "iwnerall) recognized us safe" tIbod oddiies in 1972. and has not been placed bacLs on the list. The government row rccommnends use ci' saccharin by not more than one grew a day SYNTHETIC sweeteners conc in liquid and pow4 ened form, and usually art fled by diet However, with the high pric of sugar this has changed. "I don't use anything else." Lynn Sloan. 4JM. said. 'Tome. here's little dlfkrenct between synthetic sweetener and sugar. It dissolves better. too." Synthetic sweeteners also cost less to buys A ('oz. bottle of liquid sweetener costs 59 cents in most stores. In addition,. saccharine tablets are asailable, as are boxes of synthetic sweeteners in packets. "A FTER A while it tastes terrible," Jeff Marc. 4JM said. 'But its cheaper than 511gar." Dr. Howard Appledort. associate professor in nutrition and food sciences. said the synthetic sweeteners are useful because they provide no calories. "in addition they are not nietabolited in the body, and of course they are less expensive." he said. RECENTLY, according to newspaper reports, Ibod processors have been adding the synthetic sweetener saccharin to foods to cut the cost of sugar in production. Under federal food regulations. putting saccharin in Ibods is illegal unless the label clearly identifies the product as a special diet fbod. It's also illegal to combine saccharin wth sugar in soft drinks, unless the soft drinks art specially labeled. Utrn bnd (cemt. pMr ci.) ASP WiDli Ponny PrMd. Thrift.1 Publix fig 9er 3.6 Dlxi. C'ly.ms (enis p.r a.) 3.75 1& 3.7 Sw at tow (cnsper n.) I.6 l.6 a 3.6 3.6 Socoeyl (cent. per ox.) 16 Win,, Dlxi. Pantry Prd. .6 Sugar Twin (cant. pmr ox.) Swnet 10 (canti. per 3 1.3 ox.) I.6 1 6 1 2 1.6 1 2 '.7 Iihrifwoy Publix Big Star (cnsper oz.) 3.6 3.6 Prices, demand down Sugar prices have dropped since the big rise last fall, and grocers say they don't expect them to go up any time soon. Over the Christmas holidays a five pound sack of sugar retailed in local supermarkets for as much as 53.39 a bag. Now, most Gainesville chain stores sell the sugar for less than three dollars. IN 1q73 sugar sold for 70 cents for five pounds. Then, in l974, sugar prices began climbing( reaching 12.W) or more at most supermarkets in November. In December. a five pound bag of A&P sugar sold for 13.20. Now it Is down to S2.89. Dixie Crystals sugar sells for 52.99 n0W. "I don't bejieve it will go up. either." A&P Managee John Pruett said. A SIGN ON the sugar counter of the Wmn Dixie store on N.W. 6th S treet says, "Quantity rights reserved." Thrifty Maid retails for 52.89, with Dixie Crystals sugar,. a five pound bag, priced at S2.95. Evereane sugar and Dixie Crystals sugar in the Publix store in the Gainesville Mall both retail to, 52.89 a bag. Manager Bill Curry said Dixie Crystals sugar reached a hi1Ih of 53.36 in December. "It is supposed to be coming down." manager Curry said. "All the other sugars have come down." "OTHER sugars' include brown sugar,. ipor dertd SUMS? Mnd conlectiener's suflar, used in pastries. Those sugars sell for about 65 cents a pound. Sugar prices in Pantry Pride were slightly higher. Pantry Pride sugar irn a five pound bag sold for 52.99. Dixie Crystals was also slightly higher at 53.09 for a frye pound bag. Consumer pressure seems to he the major factor in the drop, according to E.O. Long. vice-president of Florida Food Service Inc. a food wholesaler. "People have backed offrom, buying. so packers have lowered their prices," long commented. NATIONALLY the demand for refined sugar is only about half of what it was a year ago, according to newspaper reports. Officials at the Anmstar Corp, one of the nation's largest sugar refiners, say sugar may have been hoarded earlier when prices were going up. Since then, with demand down, Amstar has cut back its refining operations slightly. Late in 1974, when sugar rose from 70 cents, supermarkets in some areas of the country began discouraging customers from buying sugar. In Gainesville at that time, most supermarkets limited custom to one five pound sack of sugar with each grocery order. However, this is no eager the policy. Sga You can live without it

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lb, hm idep.,&o, NM.d AMhIrtr, Mdey, Janusry I7 197s Iran Ian students chant criticisms of By DEBBIE ERICKSON and BILL WA~LL Alligator Staff Writens Twenty UF and Santa Fe Iranian students and suppow-tets circled around a flaming effigy 0f Shah Mohammrad Heza Pahlavi in READER'S REDRESS Thursday's Alligator incorrectly stated that the Activity and Service Fee Advisory Committee ASFAC) has total control over the allocation, of 1175.000 surplus Student Government money. ASFAC can only make recommendations as to where the money should go. SG and UF administrative officials must then approve the recommendations. ln addition, this SI 75,0 is not SG money. The funds were allocated directly to the advisory committee. Alligator staff writer Leslie Golay regrets the errr Shah gov't the Plaza ol the Americas it nmxm Ihurday chanting protests Placards deiouncrng the Shah's governmient covered the taccs of the Iranman demonstrators to prevent political retaliation. A SPOKESMAN who refused to identify himself said the Iranian Student Association in Gainesville is trying to bring attention to the political plight of Iramians at homne and in fe Demonstrators contentled there are more than 25,(UO political prisoners in tan under the threat of murder ot forms of medieval torture. According to one demonstrator, the political prisoners include intellectuals who have been imprisoned without having charges brought against the The demonstrato. are demanding that the Iramian Rosernment immediately announce charges against the prisoners, announce trial dates and allow international observers to attend all trials. The demonstrators are also protesting the United States' financial support of the Shah through oil purchases. "ECONOMICA. YV, politically and poby g IRANIAN STUDENrS hum Shob in effigy at Plaza of the Americos militarily the Shah is relying on U.S. support," a demonstrator said Support of the present Iranian government is due to U S. involvement dating back to I 953, one demonstrator said. Leaving WGGG radio station on Waldo Road at 9:30 am. the demonstrators marched down University Asenue into the Plaza of the Americas chanting. "The Shah is a fascist butcher!' and "Down with U.S. imperialism!"' A SPOKESMAN for the demonstrators eOrg. kohai r said "a peaceful protest in a tore g' country can bring. 3-10 years in jail." Most Iranian detnonstratvrs plan to return to Iran eventually and would not allow their pictures on names to be taken for fear of reprisal. "People at home are hurt and my lather would lose his job if I am identified." a demonstrator said. A joint UP-University of South florida protest is being planned for Thursday, Jan. 23. in Tampa. ftmn.uber to oIIl Moen to thank hi.r f6. lh. 11 / / / / "(I /4 / // / / I' 92 / ~/ r1 / I /ff 7\ ~ lit. *alma &an. fart .rI.4.tbIJt. -wiIkn, tkw .1st., [I'lL oBAM .004.-k atiwitt.ot120t0 140.crdspnn6nut. you tOo Cs ch aol W.in a oflinInut qqikki. i / ( 4 I N K I!! \ I 'I ( ( y I' ~ I~ III [.1 b (II / /1 I, / / ~1 I / If 1 I' I) @ Sam. 311 M82 to pae ye 'V

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the Anad Cewranc (ONE OF ONLY TWO1 Jeans Shirts Dressi Jewelry Purses MENU 7 ~J Eu. ,it-:45 -s lana.e 3. ol.20e~o a9~ --e:aS ca. ---------------------h (JanuaRt SALES AYEAR es Suits J~es Belts Shoes rOPE N 10-10 DA ILY; SU NDAY 12-8 S SW 7th St. Next to Subterranean Circus _C DID 0 With everybody could uses b reak new and then. with Demise's Pizza and save money at the Heme's a $1.00 toward your next l)6, ens 1 can pick it up -or colt firmau fast Ire, deliver 'OUGH $1.00 OF. .1 ONE ITEM OR MORE COMlINO'S PIZZA. I aN. -----*/hoe---&T. talidas.es. Is inflation these diny, f .aewhyanmt tdae bcgu .m ek.? ten er mere plasm. Thu 4 y,. PIZZA FREE OSLIVEY Ca-"p's 376-2467 EastidO 376-3317 Westelde 37n-2atm It. indep.nd.nt Florido AIlgokir Fndcy Jenuory I' 1975, Peg.)7 DISCUSSION: on Baha'i Faith tonight at 8 in the I. Wayne Rciti Unmon, room 118. For luther information call 3783575 LITERAITURE DISTRIBUTION: this afternoon from 12:30. 2 (X. Copies of the Christian Science textbook can also be borrowed or purchased from the I. Wayne Reith Union colonade. For further intornmatiotn call 373-1850. DOUG CLARK AND THE HOT NUTS: are featured this evenng and Saturday at the Rat from 9-I I p.m. Admission is $2. RECORD H0P: tonight at 8 at the Catholic Student Center Lounge lot all Catholic students. Admission is free, GODHEAD REVEALED: this Sunday at 4:30 p.m. at the Society ror Krishna Consciousness Varnaslirama Institute. 'J21 SW Depot Ave. A 20-course Vedic love feast will also be leaf ured. ORGANIC GARDENING MEETING: Join the organic gardening co-op Saturday at 10 am. at the organic gardens. For further information call 377-81087. MIDDLE EARTH COFFEEHOUSE: will be held Saturday at 9 p.n Underground Sledd B. Murphree Area. For further information call 392-7466. DISC DANCE: wilt be held Saturday at 9 p.m. in Broward Huall. Admission is Si withoutt an activity card. SI with one. For further information call 392-6051. STUDENTS FOR FAUMWORICERS: will meet Sunday at 7 pin, in the J. Wayne Reitz Union. room 15GB. For further information call 372-7362. REibLUTIONARY STUDENT BRIGADE: will meet Sunday atS8 p.m. in the J. Wayne Reitz Union, room 355. For further information call 373-5968. MOVIE: "Prisoner" starring Alec Guineas will be presented Sunday at 8p.m. in the LwSchool Auditorium. Admission is 50 cents for all students. PRAYER RALLY: will be held Sunday at 2:30 p.m. at St. AugustIne's Catholic Student Center. Sponsored by Right to Life. For further information call 378-9192. KOSHER MEAL PlAN?: if you'rt interested come to this organizational meeting Sunday at noon at 16 NW 18th St. For further information call 372-loi. BRUNCH: sponsored by the Hillel foundation Sunday at II am, at 6 NW 18th St. For further information call 372-290). Students in bike injured accidents By JOE MORAN Allgator Staf riter Two UF students were injured in separate bicycle accidents Thursday. Gary Estes, 3EG, was treated at Shands Teaching Hospital after suffering cuts and head injuries in a two-bike collision on Stadium Road. ESTES WAS listed in 'lair" condition, according to a hospital spokesman. Marianne Reith. 3A5. received lacerations of the tbot after being struck by a truck at 13th Strect and Union Road. actordiug to University Police Department spokesman Jim Shu Icr. Reith was treated at the UF infirmary and released. ACCORDING to an eyewitness, who wished to remain anonymous. Estes collided with a bicycle ridden by Julie Black, I 1C, as he wss traveling east on Stadium Road. Black was traveling on the wrong side of the street at a high rate of speed, the witness said. Keith Rosen. 2UC. and Robert Vogel. IUC, administered tint aid to Ektes until an ambulance arrived on the scene. The accident Is still under investigatIon, but according to Shuler, nocharris had been tiled by late Thursday afternoon. Reith was traveling south on 13th Street according to UPD) reports. when the Iront wheel of her bike struck the rear wheel ot adelivcryrtruck driven by Robert [arnti, as the track made a right tun int ront of her. Shuler said no charges -ere tiled In the incident. CUSTOM U2N.Uaw. An., mA-MNG use's18 $ S

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eg. g. Th. Indepunden'flofld Megtor, Mdoy Jenuor7I?. HI's UsflTORIAL Tighten up It's no secret been listening,. And they're by now, but in case anyone hasn't times are tough. not Metting any better. Just glance at some of our headlines this week and shiver a little. Book prices are rising. enrollment has been frozen, air conditioning and heat are being turned off or restricted around the university due to huge funding problems. and chances are good that tuition will rise again next year for the second time. That's not to mention what's going on outside the State University System. Mass lay-offs. runaway inflation, recession, and rising prices. It's a sign ot the times that in the midst of the current economic situation more and more people are rushing to qualify for the federal food stamp program. Once a program primarily designed for people on public assistance, it's main aim was to provide an improved diet to low income families. But now the program is attracting thousands of middleclass working families who can't seem to make ends meet anymore. In addition, an increasing number of students are qualifying. Nationally almost 2S0,000 Americans a month are being certified tor the program. Here in Alachua County, there are over 4,300 on the rolls. up 1 10 per cent from December 1973. About one third of those are students-. But now there are those in Washington. including President Ford. who are growing alarmed o'er the rapid growth of the food stamp rolls. Adding to their alarm is the tact that there are still dita sIm at ed I $ to 3$ tmllhon Amrericans w ho are eligible for the pi ogram hut hainc not vet taken lid\ anfage of ii1-ord has lpropoStd a raise im the cost of the stmips Iieginninti 1' Marc' I> rjdcr e.\i:se ieIgtlaiwins lood stamp recipients p di a feage oZ 23 pet ccen! at their income to buy food stamp Begin rnkmg in NIarch. mu st w'ii have to pa' the miaxitn 34) par cent Even more ominous tot the approximately I .54X households students on the program in Alachua C ountv. anti 6OKX) students nationally, is a proposed regulation by the Department of Agriculture and Congress that would bar students 'tho get more than half of their support from another household, most commonly their parents. from getting the stamps. Even a student who does get part of his income from parents may not be able to make ends meet after he's paid for his books, rent, loans, tuition They're teling stories now families who drive to the food stamp office in Cadillacs to collect their monthly allotment. If they can't make it, what chance do students have Ford's decision to raise the cost of the stamps has been delayed because of criticism from Congress and chances of it being put into effect are still uncertain. But the fact remains that even if the raise is not approved, the regulation prohibiting some students could be. We hope not. Already we are getting storm warnings from Tallahassee that tell us it is going to get even more expensive to go to school in the State University System. It would be a cruel blow to be subjected to similar warn in c from W a "pu Can U.S. learn to accept Latin American independence? Recently the Miami Herald complained that the U.S was erecing discriminatory trade harriers against Venezuela and Ecuador. members of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC). the Herald maintained that th, was .t "pxw fence wo scparawe Good Neighbors' and that the U.S. should take steps to re-cemntl amicable hemispheric relations All ol thi ch s' rikes me as being political Iy andI h islorica lb naive PRACTICALLY spcakinw. I' t -1ten Amican relai ons ha'e akways been paternalistic in nature -lhe L: s "protect'" the I atmin trot, stich sctw rye' a' intern at ional (omminumhsm w'hik hclpitw to "de'clop" latin American atilomics throud, prnaic multi iationaI enterprise Now eriniin e -se wiv'ard stepchildren -,areh. those (~II C Nwtiat,.rw --han. Ack It upon themselves t Cut the miilililcird n'ih GiL [ Sai, t 'trudcriikmv sutF .4 1111d LtIdttu~ thc' .irL to hr ptuohel Ft hosts ''nerou' )rtesiNltk(tptriitldwithiri 1h w 1 S tutte oii] iIS 1WE! I thit thcensli twhcrbeneoLene kjt hoer been thie stroile suit mNorih Amierici S relationship s~il wiit \punmsh-. or km ine'ighbhors l-rtom lhe 13Vs Cordell Hull michimatws bor North fimencallnL tU Ceseurit'. to tiheill -ated c now icdebaci I mliie All'an" lor Progress, the I S has imppised miightiks tpm" the 'tage ol twentieth-centur) Latin Arierica ino a great extent former Yankee activit, in, Venezuela and Ecuador is representative: both countries had to wrest control trom lorcign firms that lorded tnmperiously over the fiscal fates ot their countries Ia U.S.-British-Dutch petroleum syndicate 'n Venezuela, the United Fruit Comparn in Ecuador). fhe U.S. usually gate in grudgingly after bemnR wared of more dire measures being considered b) the financially hamted host couitrts-. r The Independent Florida Alligator Gi Gmeca. a b cy k AnweMlh. c. Roy 5h10 To"., MoCd'ln.z Roy MeG. Jr. Donna Lubrono Ake IHoPMr Lyndo HomIer oosoyder LynSsokier RIECH AR D BURKEHOLDER HIOWEVER. it has always been impossible t n cople eradicate Yankee influence due to these nations' dcpcndenite upon the U.S. tot market consumption of their raw prfltttt exports and the overarching pervasion of U.S politics a tiluicr Wih, in essence, nmcans that the vaunted "Gool Nt ci Ibor Pol cx" is pretty mu tc h a oneway street. tirni now Ne n.he ].5 Sh, s its greatest opportunity) to sho" i lili in the ,iabiliiv it the GN!'. Nmw that somic .1 iii [ Ameulei a.stcidte' hase ihe tdspaclty to develop Ia lioiii jrds -somethintw i~ htch the U'S has ,lwais p .seou )Iiiitiincnients on l atin Ameritdri ii211rM hi. lecitled t uLl the rug out w ill IS apiuei li e was Nth Amel~ri.t eieted io displasnt, el atir Iackhone NitnCCeI N I he icnlraiI cutstion it ill this is whether iho N :I libtin hasshinshe grmrcs to betwo-latel it'> I enliglleinicnt"t it the expense eo hers. Now than:ialign men is 1% a'is the U.S and latin Am ik Lhangitit2 tan the t S be nmalire enoIgh to ,iccp political d eConiic~i soserewflties of its bellow henpl i.l niat itnI I,, all c loset isolationists and creepmng chtusiIuN\ proter one tantaliimg. yet ultimately regrettable. tidbit Si seneeruela and Ecuador are OPEC members, they arc, lot i'm mioment at least. lorhidden to jack up the price of their e ported crude oil for cearolt damaging the cartel, So about a they can do now is protest, long and vehemently. While the U.S has this respite before the next OPEC price conference it should. but probably won't seriously re-vvaluate the taking away of the "privileged nation' statub from flhese two now-disabused "Good Neiahbo&' Eo.vidI.h CuvId KaIM., h.ev. Slt men wocd Mn.) ng Slimo 0.61 Ftea -aou Mdor .sbin.e Mng.r .* ..Mcetat A&.nriing Mooagr S.lo Advctton, Coon.).,or Advrsng ProduclIon Managgrn Mhtrt~ol,,rducitn Monqg, Mflto$ )4d&kebA Mddogyr a -no iay.W Shoe Puhiuhd 'y Camipu. CommflnitbOfl.t P.O. Sex 132w UnIveflhlY stain, Geiui.vlI. Ronedo v4$ ile. W4,lnd Ih. Coll.ge Is"" 21 Wast UnIvernty Avnu. ben.Oi4$c tde. 376-44* Ed~odMI kepanment: 376.4*s8. Ad,,,tlelng *nd ,,oduetiOn 5

PAGE 9

Th* independnFIorldo AlIgotor, Fridoy Jonuory I, 197$. Pog.9 Equal justice for Pitts and Lee andt Wibr thee were sentenced todeath rowfr the mer its of trn white gas station attendants in Port St. Joe Flordra Since I%3, a number of facts have surfaced to prove that Pitts and Lee are Imnocent and have not received fair trials in either Gulf County, where the first trial took place, or Jackson County. where the second trial took place. Many of these facts have either beet, withheld from presentation in the court or not admitted into the court record. A white man. Curtis Adams Jr., has confessed to the crime. and supporting evidence of his guilt has been given by Mary Jean Akins, his former mistress who was with him at the time of his premeditation of the crime. This 'voluntary conlesijon' of Adanms is on tape and has not been permitted to be presented as evidence for the defense. Mary Akins and Warren Holmes. the polygraph expert who taped Adams' confession, were not called an to testify about that confession. THE MAIN witness for the prosecution. Willie Mae Le. has repeatedly changed her testimony and the Slate slippressed evidence in 29%8 of a tape recording mi "hich she changed her testimony, which initially implicated Wilbert Lee and a Pvt. Smith. saying she lied because polite threatened to put her in the electric chair or a chain gang. lhcre has never been ine shred ot physical en dense inIi oduced by the state to support its charges! No fingerprints ol the deceased in Pitts car, no fingerpris ot Lee or Pitt, on the jgas station cash register which was broken into the night of the ernme; no weapons. proceeds from the robbery in Pitts (r Lee's possession: ro bloodstains or soil samples on Pitts and [xe's clothing. Also. Pills and Lee could not identify the imitr.er site, Curtis Adams, Jr. who confessed to the crime. could identify the murder site. In 1971. this case was mosed Ironm Gulf County to Jackson County because prejudicial news publicity in the area had made a lair trial impossible. However, the newspaper read in Jackson County was owned by the same publisher (The Panhandle Banner, Gulf County) who ran the racist news articles and-editorials against Pitts and Lee. BLACKS WERE systematically excluded hrn the Grand Jury The original conviction of 1%63 was overturned by the Florida Supreme Couirt for this reason. There are several in~eses to the tact that their original confessions were forced Irom them after they were beaten in jail. Although the facts obviously prove them innocent, Pitts and Lee have had to endure the inhumane conditions at the H-orida prison system for eleven consecutive years. In siew of the baeg that the state of Florida's prison population is fourth 'in the nation, with 55 pet Lent of the prisoners being black, it is 10 surprI e that Pitis and [ce and manv others have been subjected to such gross injustices. In i ecent months, a letter writmng campaign. petition signings. demonstrations, fund raising activities. and programs have been organized in support of Pitts and [ee, The Pitts and Lee Defense Committee at the University of Florida urges each freedom loving student, faculty member. and worker to support the struggle to free Pitus and Lee by signing a petition. donating money, or other resources. writing letter, to Governor Askew demanding that lie end the cloven year old injustices afflicting Piuts and Lee. waiting letters to Pitts and Lee to let them know that the people are struggling to set then, tree. RELBIN ASKEW will be at the University of Florida Friday. January 17. The Pitts and Lee Defense Committee will not allow Askew to come to the University of Florida and not he confronted with the issue of Pitts and Lee. The PlIts and Lee IDefense Committee (PLDC) needs the support of the people on the University of Florida campus. Please support our efforts to tree Pitts and Le. If there are any questions. lease call 376-8937 Pitt s-L e IDefense Conmmittec Vicki Adams ADVICE & DISSENT l&Iitor: Your article in last tuesday's Aligator concerning the discussion between the Committee of Concerned Faculty and myself was generally accurate: however, one statement attributed to me does not truly reflect my views or those of' the United Faculty ol Florida. I was quoted as saying that UFF was opposed to any college', receiving higher salaries than any other college. What I said was that all Iaculty memcnbers should receive a good basic salary indI their raise' should be true increases in buying power. Beyond that point we believe deserving faculty members should be eligible tar merit raises.,oind other adjustments should be made to reflect the realities of the marketplace in the larger society. Robert A. Blume Vice President. UFF zw*Yu*LIC"^PAT2 OU'LLLOE. LA rO 'I COMIN SOON At3 ---4 It --.e .I .,fI JNRThAE n~'W., flhSrAC MCWRAI&DE DV A maE You re ripping off the wrong people One of the first principles a radical aeti ist learns is to idecntify "the Einemv" correctly. CAbby Hoffman gives nmany suiggcslioins in Steal This BOak on the line art of ripping oft the Establishment.) Howeser. it is easy to be confused as to the exact identity of "the Establishment.' It is often not the Establishment who gets hit, but sonic poor individual struggling against heavy odds to get by. Such is the case wah the iight workers who fill all these morning newspaper racks you see all oser the campus and city.' "PAPERS SHOULD be tree for the People!" someone once The Independent Florida Alligator Doug DoIa bl.Irnm.n, Editor Ron Cunningkom AMsOCIa Edio Georg. KochomlIC Jr Phot Eir GeFountr Sport Editor Mivdi Ke-mnn Anti NewsEdlio told meI. Htit, the fact remains, they are not free for the carriers, whose profit is often incredibly small, and who carry till the financial risk. Paper companies take care of themselves lirst--ou can he surl of that! They get their money-lW0 per cent of it! Here's the picture for the carrier: There is no Union. no rate bargaining, ho job security, no fringe beneits, no unemployment insurance, -when injured-no workman's Ct'mpi. 10 iacatiors, no holidays, no sick days (they show uip or they're fired!). It's 365 nights a year, running out a rnoriing paper. Carriers must rent those sending racks, repair them. buy the papers, and sell the unsold copies back to the jiaper company. The cost for stolen papers comes directly out of the carriers* veins (and they do bleed!). It is displaced kindness to prop open a rack door to allow ainvole and everyone to help thenmelses to "free" papers. or to lay a pitt' on top ci a rack to be carried ofT. The neal kindties, is to shut such propped doors, or. when buying a paper. 10 put the pile outside back in. and help the real underdog 'qriie-thc carrier being ripped ofi MACHINES SEEM so impersonal that it's difficult to think of someone hcimg associated stith them. Ever see an old ied Mustang. swith one door oft, full 9f dents, tith "Quicksi'cr" n.itten on it. tearing around the campus? Ilhit's mie. 'our Sc. Petc Times rack -lads inside. I get mi' papjt kiwi' ta miy competitors. so I date-card mn racks so you'll never accidentally buy a yesterday's paper before I pet there. (Trying to keep the customer satisfied!) This job has to support nmt and my four kids, and it ain't easy! Rut it's a job. Your Miami Heralds are brought in by a lovely, friendly. gentle man who has been running papers in Gainesville for 48 yeart. and is "Mr. Miami Herald" to us. The TimesUnion racks art run by a rat-out Scorpio dude who has the reputation of being so fast he never uses first gear in his V.W. van-It's in second when he jumps out to fill a rack, and stilt going when he jumps beck in! (He has a couple of yeats experience on most of us and is.a pro!) THE TAMPA Tribune rack route has a new carrier. though he's not new to the Tribune. He had home deliveries here fbr several years. and know, the business. We all live in a rip-oft society. (ov't., Corporations. etc., all seem to have their hand, in our pockets, and prices keep rising. But if one's head ls into fighting back, the efibri should be directed at those who are guilty of the abuses-not at some other ictini olithe same oppression. So, if you are into ripping (it "the Estabhishment"'-identify your "Enemy." Don't liberate our newspapers, please. A free press Is for the free expression of idea,but the pape' used is expensive! Hoping for 'our coopration and continued patronage. "Quicksilver" Misunderstood SEQUELS i -a e

PAGE 10

Indoor Sport Tournament 13OODR3 |38Open To All Those who specialize in indoor sports and want to prove It, can register for the weeklong Remt Union Games Area CampThunhmunt before midpjght Sunday. The tournament Includes compettion Classes Dismissed 9:05 to 12:20, wih eai vet|-alolyt fl-tn students. Games Area Manager Bill wiF rset thnerUP a sthdenAit-onee Career Service Staffers May Attend a~e.: tournament which will be held here Feb. Dr. Robert Quarles idarsten wifibe inaugurated the seventh president cifi h64 etonyctgres o hc University cf Florida in a cunwocatlon cer sty today In Florida Gymamfam. Stenit-tonl cat1. erese, for wchs The Processional begins at 9:U0 anm and the program at 10 o'clockre(aonatrg perdy evemecgs Second, third and fourth period dae will be dismiaed so that students and swlse-tyl. tournament In Union rooms faculty may attend and Career Sornic. enpl'yees may attend thm program Us 36 and 347), mmn's and wanen's singles work.-time. 'The general public is also Invited. Parking Will be available on table tennis, doubles and mixed doubles Fleming Field, using the entrance off Newberry Road and W. University table tennIs, men'u and women's pocket Avene wst ff orthcut Drve.billiards, three-cushion billiards and The entire proceedings will hi telecast by WUFT, Channel S and replayed smooker. Friday evening at 3 o'clock on cab]. Channel g. Events open to students, faculty and Dr. Marston wBi deliver an address entitled, "Th. University andvie in th staff bumper pool singles ad Future." He will be officially InSaled and given a charge ci office by Marshall dl e oabil, ar hcey Gands bowCriser, chairman ci the State Board of Regents, who win -ls pralie fo thendg. Siuwill bedn t tedames Anr ea hour-and-a-haff-long CrSSWn. dre unti midniht Snda E ntr y feesn LI. Gov. James WIams will bring greetings to the new president fran state arec $1 o t5 for eah et xcr for-gam government. Others to bring greetings are Andrew H. Hines, Jr., In behalf of e. the AMurni Ansodatlan; biStry Prof. Dr. David Chahmers, In behalf ofteTh ia competition is bridge, starfaculty, and student body preidet Steven Merrydny, in behalf ci students. iga73 ~.Tedyi no om An academic prmcesaion will be composed of approximately 275 faculty 150 C and D. Only full-time student members, 110 students representing registered organizatIons -n campus, and winners will advance to rgonal play representatives aIM 2Florida colleges, including IS presidents. Music preceding Faust said, but the tournament Is open to and for the ProcessIonal and for the Recessional will be played by the .Rgsrti, nudga5 ct University Symphonic Band, conducted by Frank Wicket. Rev. Earl Page, allry Reg, strteon nlhie Games Acent rectr o Hoy Tiniy Epscoal hurh, iH enve th inocaionanddesk through Sunday and at the door benedictIon.-berehetrnmn ars Only six other men have headed the University of Florida sic twa e bTfre the tarnet tarts. nevns to Gainesvlile from Lake City In is0. And onl 'he Last themd ft,,n roremilaeaare al vns inaugural address. Two of these -Dr. J. Wayne Rei and Dr. Stephen C. Str feet OGn Tonight6 O'Cmneli -will be present for the Naritan inaDanceon Other dignitaries who have Indicated they will be present include Panhellenic Council Is sponsoring a Congressman Don Fuqua, E ducation Commissioner Ralph Turllngton, street dance tonight cele:rati : n Agricnjturai Comjssioner Doyle Casner Rep. Bill Andrews, Regents Cheter the east end ci Sorority Row,cebrin Ferguson, Burke Kibler mI, and Jack McGrlff, Chancellor Robert Mauts aid the Inauguration today of President Chancelior-deslgnate E.T. York Jr. Robert Q. Marston. Dr. and Mrs. DR. ROBERT QUAIILESMABMTDN Mars pto attend the dance. UPr's Sevefl Pr,.Ma The dance, which features the rock band, "Cater.," Is free and open to all. Soprano Veronica T yler Likes H er'Worst, Best' Life Seams almost every time black Mnge the niece of two other professional has gone up. Whan I say 'take five,' I make ft biter rmtr -a t operatic sopranos. "1 didn't even need mean five! Not six, at even fi-nd-aweediscovered miging in the chureb much training, justsome help learning to half. Such prof. tional demands just chi.urn what I had." might help than decide an thelr caNot so with soprano Verica Tyler. She learned to -s It well. Before the remr," ihn says. The graduate of both the Julard School MOSCOW (SpeIqSUon, the mother Sf a She paints urn glamermu. pictures of 81n of Music and the Peabody Ceaaernatory 13-year-cid daughter brought hane first operatic mawee to hsr tiger pupils. says she dIscovered herself! prize from the 1103 Munich Interational "I tail thfi II didn't love to sing and "Sure, I wet to dhurdi and I sang in Campetitlin. Alter Ruulia, she made ber didn't love meeting people, this could be the choir, but the faith that really much-acclaImSd European debut In the the worjj life I cou aMhl imagine," counted was my faith In myself and In my Dirgen (Norway) Fedtini Sf lit8 she cafla.e. "That year, *Mtn Gcd-glvu voice believes the BaldiDlaring the 19-IS couet menen, the off ywr first plans, In ye. first mink is niore-brn winer of the Fit Tchiself-'described "biner" made her Italan grea kovtky International Vocal Campstani debut at the Teafro Ia Fedece In Vetc In "'pha, ttneI v-ubegin to learn what In Russia eaght years ago. a mew producila of '"Tfnndm." It's rea~y aD about. Flights after She Is the sora aisfrth h flst h r fayOrSt RUMe Minl In mU1*49* Tazis! To HMidSU to et B peflranee Sf Beetbovmn's NInth 53's. "IA Dae Zerlina ln "Don Glovani," cold sanduflhi tear, days and weeks of phony lait night and tonight an the _____ad "don't forget MI.s hubt at Whe reheemel Otis!l" opening concert In the Flartd's erth vEguEta Tinn Univatsty ci Florida." piagy u. Tw ph gramE ANoavoicPr 'SuFeulatt u vSt Urvrti,apeaaie "Unlike my Miss Smith back In t at's tanherrprr. Now a vece profsser atthe UniersityDaltimere, I never advise my Stant to "Bat Iu a i a te mytudets of Florida, Veronica Tyler teaches heralded Interpretsr f La DCIIUDWS jump face forward Into a prisSinaJ abutS. cutS oh. Asabinmetat develpnent of faIth and omtldam -s "MIti" igg re,"epan h ast h pn.Ad ewamcd o amhiilmuly a h t-eabar flisne "My 'MI. bait' was really MI.s M"ppe ret d a;n ina therahis who a t elnae.s oha l buring asugrio. how to slag. And she patks fle 1mmn Maim.n knith. usi at inde oe higns aw 'rure tr-"e -' -e wr t bl ie.nt beteenapparaceswimtheNewYor da an tod m toforet bod y erly"If they want .wch a lie, they go It's Uwbet cm, los" Ciyopera Cam-Ve 5n fle mao -nwt -ns a pysejiak4A mid after It. Dot If I feel they r-ll don't Veronima T71wr mS~ if -h ant iypnyace tra ufth wcrwd. try this opura in~nm want It, I never Shove." he ils toedril M e inel "aduing' Why not' I suoe I j-s Even Ml.s hubt didn't believe Ian Butinhedoes hew her Sudanswhat htfIey-nsmvie.s i h want to be moter Hims Smith. You knew Veronica Tyer aU RUt -Veronica the life Is all about. rcs-e' dasmc dsato her, that school teacher a f uS --to Tyler believes I. Yetonca Tyl&. "I treat then in classa they would be from the Sedi aqspe ci hr muicaS have had.tbe se whot tedasia the "Evanthmlbhewlkadaflty. Noos Sretmdnanopracmpy.atud csnrmad Sag a3utovef-s rajt dgeciw,u" ngpa th crjejesflycould tell -I coulkn't ing," contends Is late for a lee, I tell than thne curtain mant Sympay ens.,-Bowl The ten%-oy -F.rd *s jan Equal E9

PAGE 11

w atd ~ ~ advenisint races Th. I.d.p.nd.n~ Ro,~do AMI a,, Md.,', Jwisrv II, 1975 P~* II I $200,000 In order to be able to honor commitmentstogrmduatiinslstants and to meet The teaching responslbllties of the university, #00000 orginallyearmarked foreqUre h Educatonran~d for Other Personnel Services, Executive vice-Presde Harold Hanson Informed Dr. ROuet A. Bryan, acting vlce-presi-. dent fcr Acedimic Affairs, Thursday. "It Is antIcIpated," Hanson said, "that we shaild be able to retain graduate assistaiiti WhO Wr IDaklfg responsible acadunlc progras and Who had been firmly camifled to position." It also sem,. Dr. HlEn explained, that only two-thirds of the expense money normally available in E&G budgets will be available for the spring LarestGi The University baa received a gift of property frown Mrs. Shepard Broad of Bay Harbor Isandes In Dade County, from witch It expects to realize approximately $1,m11,m0, makn It the largest gift ever preented by -n Individual to the University. The money will be used toward constructive cf a building on campus for the Shepard Bread Center for Jewish Studies. The total cat of the building and a library It will house Is expected to be approximately $2 I%4 million. A campaign i underway to raise the additional 1mnd needed from private sources. Sits of the building on campus has not been decided. Mrs. Broad has conveyed to UF a deed to two drnitory buildings and the land on which they are located near the St. Johns River Community College in Palalka. TI. buildngs are privately owned and have beat used by students attending the college. The pr'puty has bean appraised at a valueof $IJ,m0 by Earl B. Milleraof the Jacksonville firm of Rogers, Miller, Taylor and Co. The property i encunbernd with a mutage debt of $00000,. leaving a net valuedof$1,40S,M)0 Disposal of the property bus mlt beat decided, but several pr-sl arn being considered. The Univurfl'. Cantr far Jewish Studies has bum In alatauce ince Board of Begets approval In July. lf73. Under direction of Dr. Barry Musch and now offerIng 14 courses, lihe Cutter Is aimed toward developing lnterlsdeinry programs exploring the various facets of Jewiah aisr, history, language, literslure and raMore than S students wllbe ad bthe Cantr's coins tie am adel yetrThe Uslyitay Ins bee elated the ap" u ty"'' pn'" w'li a'"'" cage Rabit eunrehutsve library at Jida in compwaig more than 40,000 b -sad pn-d-"U lbs.mpa. a hs c0115d011 and c n .rcai b e Maqpard Broad Cut.er r LaS Sh~in, dflgIdhsd scudrsin e various areas ci Jeth Studies wil e atraeted tothe Cutter." Dr. Mudh mid, "A wide sctrui of underpamts sa t ney reiglomn pm'umig wil be aentraed to sequin-b t msassandag at the JetS, p eope hir roe I. story Und anse society a .Lh ouSeZ7e'Iu d .so-h san trait." In ab e tote ibrhhy, the Shepard Broad Outer wUil cntain a urge lecture h31ana t roas, study carrel for Grad "Our Principal Objective is to see that no loses his or her job" -E xe utive Vice-Pres ident Hanson saane~eDav .'on.C nfoe.on. & PubI,. hi he n.'syo F lom neecenoe a quarter. Overall, he explained further, this means a 10 per cent reduction In expense money for the entIre year. Money for expenses, such as expenHisor Ve I dable supplies, travel, telephMnes and other costs of day-to-day operations, Is released quarterly. The March release for the spring quarter, or final quarter of to UF Studies Center University will be seeking the balance of firm at the funds needed from individuals founded a throughout the state of Florida. American At a news conference in Miami Florida Wednesday, Mr. Broad said his wife assets ex decided to make the gift to the U1? is a fain because "theUniversity of Florida worn Medical of the most distinguished schools in the trlstee ad nation, the Board of Regents showed Its Beach, a faith inthe University by establishing the Trustees Center for Jewish Studies and because Shores. H there is no WASPIsh anti-Jewish attitude was thejg at the University." Dade Cot The Shepard Breads reside In Bay in his han Harbor Islands, a town founded by Mr. Broad. He served as mayor of thietown Mrs. B for 27 years and is now nuyor emeritus. Universit Mr. Broad emigrated from RussIa In MedicalC 1920 to New York City, where he earned Morris N. his degree from the New York Law and Mrs. School. He and Mrs. Broad, the former Morris B Ruth Kugel of Glens Falls, New York, Savings moved to Miami Beach in 1940. and ChaI Mr. Broadis senior partner ln the law Bank &f .4. r MORRBDBROAD (L, MR. MD3R.I At News Camf race h Naml Where Gil Premed, Predeut, Preoptoi Broad and Cassel. He also md Is Chairman of the Board of iSavings & Loan Assoclation of which has eight offices and ceeding $350 million. Mr. Broad der and trustee of Meut Sinai Center of Greater Miami, a St. Francis Hospital of Miami nd Chairman of the Board of of Barry College tf Miami le originated the Idea for and ualdlng spirit i the building of mty's Broad Causeway, named nor. road, a graduate of Syracuse y sa founder of Mat Sinai center. They have two childen, Broad of Bay Harbor Islaunds Irving BumIe of Coral Gables. road ii President of American It Loan Association of Florida rman of the Board of Barnett Bay Harbor Islands, N.A. m ai ann otry Studeuts Asked to Report to Amdersou Hiall Office premedicaL, -rdna and -t atd eta hshoudtp byd of Prqfepr13.hn1 Edicalioi, 111 Alier-in Hall during the wetk cf January *24, to register or update thair prepofeulional Quarterly Record Fa. The Office wishes to Identity all wewotmSnal students, Inform them of Igrvlces available to thea, collect Infor.mation cc quarterly activities and eval.uate preprofessional advisueent, -I-Inkal S. Rosunsheln, take over tram Dr.Frank Daturm, who dam to return to full-timepron of zmool ad Sp. visor of th. Marine Laboratory at Ceder Key. Dr. Roseusbela motes "Tbere are many, many applman for medicaid and detal weels these dayt. I feel the Office at Preprctedssil Edaden -e best serve the University and the cmueena by auddting thea .pptena s rmaiStally to evaluate Shd, capabilill.s, goals and requirements with a -odted -eR involvng advice, sonieng service s ad cuatrahied bn. Inrmtion a~a." E armarked ~4OVment OWoflwuityAAffImatve -Anion Employm University employ. ft For In Broad Jewish A new Director af Education, Dr. Joseph was recently named to Assistants apprtinedtoeach college. ansonas tte ra t Wr wit ci ee tAo m e e ap r ri e except those In the Health Cutter and In WFAS, which are budgeted separately. The decision to transfer expense money to OPt, out of which graduate assistants ane paid, was In keepig with a com at e are th a we y P ei dent Robert Matsten that "it han been and remains the policy of this University to exert every effort to bnur eammitmants that have been made to graduate assistants. This will have prIOrIty over expenditure in the categorie of expae and Operating Capital Outlay." All CEO funS have previously ben frozen, a, well as al0psr cent cut In expense e.ediir,s a. i d-own ci dews of heat at noon have besn orderSd, and no new per.n. may be awloyed. othe svig' said Hanson "Our University employee loses his job." In Tigert Hal threfmrts ci th xerox machine. have been ordered removed. In another matter related to graduate assistants, Prusdent Marten has explainSd why he was unable to atted a meeting of the Graduate Student Union, to which he had been Invited Tuesday night. Dr. Mars wrote Sherd A. Dalton. president of the G61U, who extended the Invitation "Ilam alway, happy to meet and talk with graduate students as I did 1ast December. However, you write as president of the Graduate Student Union and use the letterhead stationery of the United Faculty of Florida. Consequently. according to the prcursand inst'uetions that have been given to us for dealing with union, I amreferig your letter to Dr. George BedSH of the Board Office tat." Ms. Dalton bad Invited the president to the meeting "to defend your actions and those of your ubordlnates" In mittens relating to alleged graduate assistant damssl. Haumet said Thursday that so fars as office knows only one graduate assistant to whnn a cemitifent had been made has not as yet beam reeployed, and that case i still pending. All unIversItIes In the State University System are under directive frown Cbancellor Hubert Mauls to refer all union matters to the Board Office. His directive reads, In part, as follows: "When approached by reprusmtatvms at organised grmqp of aupayeses -your amnp, yu and iii uevn houlb refer all aa pmns to Stev DeAths, or George Bili in my a.c" Th Bar of-' Regents has been dd sgad a th bargaining mnit tor aD faculty unployeusi In glslatl permitWi d cu e bargang by,.ate.m -la Financial Aid Info Sessions S.D Student Financial Attairn wil be qpmuubring nancial Ai WdarattSn sessions In dorm areas throegheat Wirder Quarter to aquab Stis uba reqluireats eim flu.m. for fianalh aid anppliata SSuuiaswUH be ed umiaat 7p.a. Inte Htue Hall feetest. Roam ad Webaeday at7I p.m. In lhs DrowNr -a Loby Canom

PAGE 12

ALLIGATOR CLASSIFIEDS FOR SA LE I 2 -STRING ELECtftIC YAMHA GtJITAR $125 392-S405 (A-5t.57-P) kopo Acoustic guiler fin. shop. 506 troll 70w, gibeon ornphiher two nptls XC2 large poulobi. b~w iv work. well 345)2 nejlh street (o-dt-59.p>) 67 nmgbncellenl ccndlelon irons receuly rebuils wste.' radial., padded 'c~ba.,72seois,.St20 378-0663 or after {(Wa-.Fu) 22W') (o-*0-5-p) Downsleeping bog, Mummy with v-lube ctrution, Medlun weight hiking bools. never used, sits 9. coil 373.2353 di.e 3 p fl (o-Sl-5-p) Weter 'Pig' Sklrftoord Must 5.11 580 Ec.lnt Condition Coil 376-4334 Aft.r. 1972 sujtuki *SW. ettellent condition,. sivybor, lowing, 2 helmet., turn signal., $75l er best offer-nmust s.Uf37667 evwneng. (o-St-59-p) URGENt Must sell Sondo 1974 C8 360 Al condition {lust out of shop fo. tune up) Ashirig prIc, but wilt take best off., Coill Howord 0* 2-7364 (oflernoons) (A-51-5P) IPS triumph gtot ovnrhouied trans motor very gocd body good rodic. new carpeting, new brck., clutch Nice 25 mpG ken 378-4432 $1603 (o-5t-59Qp) 1972 VOGL1E rnobt homa 12x 70 Has den bar, kitchen, iving room with fiweplace 2 b': I both, walt to w.aI corp. control ow heat, complMteiy furnished Luxiurious *conomicol, .osy em Coti 373-1071 and levy. nome and pon (A 31-60-P> greenhcus. sol. healthy ferns, cod'. foliage plants in cloy pots Sunday lon, dpn. go west on newberry rd post 1-75 to nw 9' *1 follow signs [A-3VeO. Pl kenwood kr7403 receiver btt $520 sell $370, dual 72fl for 5155. integrated circuit sterno ecsuolizer to. SI 0, kenwood 8002 power omp $150, coil 37379ZI (o St-59-p) Surftoord6O0"Challenger rounded-pin Good Cordilior call herb 392-9178 IA 2T.61-P) Electinc Guitar & amp $30 phon. 3784744 oft.r 6p ,y (A 51l-P) Pariasonic am-Fm stereo end cohsen. tape ploy. ond ampbifier $120 or best off.' 377-l4% (A-3141l Pl ShmrwoodS-71l0on-fnstereo omp10 waits w Dual 1215. auto turmtable and quodrfiM 12 inch speakers just $425 377496 (A-ST-61-P) 'SM Selectric Ii typewvier 7 months oldsed lssa lhn 10 hours only IS0 or best offer 377-la9 (A-3T4-l-) Guild MAOEIRA sle.I siring guitar like new -5I2500 377-1494 (A-3T461-P) For Sat. New women-s 3-wpeed bike nUY*ECI condition $60 toll Peggy 01 392I2ZI betweenS0OO nd 5.M (A-5T-41.P) Per Sole: 115mm 2 8 Auto Vesbin on-OX Lar. Good Condition $M-0 wilt, -a Call 37-5716 Anytime (A-514C) AC-DC Cossen. Recorder, mint condillon, Cord, mit, c0.e spa. tapeS (4), C.*t, $3500 Colt 372-0645 (ep Iryingi (A.ST.6l-P) $*'crp N b-w 10 inch xtreen. 8 months old lutr $CW. 377-1496 (A-37-4I-P) for sole '66 pymouth voliows wilt radio-4., *no. nnin,,e,,.,t, call rmorio oft.r 7 pm at 372-724 S$l5 fa-62 p1 #efl & Jottit 520 L.W. 1Mb i. January U7-18 Vince Mardin Capitol Records FOR SALE t0wr sleeping bog, ryaid rated Jo IS dngrees 58" to 6 in length *xcellglt condition 150 toll sue 377 5329 o-2t 62 FOR RENT niol. roommate needed to sublet opt bls o campus 49 50 per ma til 2 laundry coil 378-3961 Ask I.r Sieve (Bfor sublet uporment ci Ih. modern place oporn beginning feb I central air cord A heating, poC', loses, oil far $9325 per mth 3f7.7Ol gecrg. (B-31WANT TO MOWE? if you desire to move franm your p~rsn tocotion we can rent, sublet it or find you o 'oor'"'"bte i"'nediately at N COT Coil todoylt Undied Real Estate Ansoc Inc 113 NE 16th Ave 377-6992 (b-fr-5S-cp mleA students roon, for rent by quart., 115 nw lath it 3 blocks from campus coill g'eg 377-9625 SX3 to~ 7 doily or step oy, (b-Si-59-p) JANRENT PAIDI Movn in now femol. ,oornvnte needed for lusury I1-bedrrn cpu 595 month + ,, utilities C011 3730880 lb-51-59-p) FOR RENT 2 bdr Behind Norman Hailti Brand new esclus'v. istinoll Spacious opt with nir heat. carpets Walk to corpus3 (46 SIW-Elfcincy No last nmonil, or deposit 'Ope r to n*m ''7' "" 92 3 bdr 5 blacks from U of Flo-krond new .xclusiye listingil R ustic home with air, heot fenced Pet, OI( (1149) 3 bd,-5?60 Large house located near University Aye Heot, shag corpeting, drapes Short leo. (1143) COpen9otO 8pml 377 6992 $85 includes uttibtie,-Cory house within wolkimg distance of compus ideal for couples or singles Better hurryl I({1142) I3N E 6th~ (B-ST-SI-C) ROOM For Liberal Student. $75 +* utit and $50 dep Furnished Iwo bdm trailer NE section CHIP 376-4378 6B-31 61p) Rornmmo. needed 2 bedroom opts close to campus tree parking, wotr gsl sewage 53ootyI eleti S pn (-5161 P Information HOUEoACKEUMG WCWN iM' RANCH Hovses renned by th. Hr. AM hie lo sal. 51347. 20 rni. So of Coinorvill. on new 441 MIKE'S Bookstore -Pipes --.--------FREE ELECJUONIC EdGINE ANALYs|s WITH AITUNE-UP Iti tO prnnt OFF plugs pts. cond. 192N. MAIN ST. PHONE 372-5247 Jany r ?0,91 Severin bmwne Motown Records -Coajmil 01 lad, Wilt., A fles (Sm.e) USI5Ar Cube Mei.

PAGE 13

FOR RENT SPA( lo TWO MEDR#M *URNISKEI MoBLE HOME LOCATED NEAP THE UiF Corpus 5140 A MO!H$25 CEPOSlt t It 62p P TII, Independent florid. Ailigelo. Fdey. iJoery I, 1975, Pug. Ua :Ar 4 FOR RENT FOR RENT WOOMATE I HFP2 MEN'J PFFEN( .'A& (.t BEDQ(X5M S'QO
PAGE 14

Page IA. Th. lndependen' Florida Ailgofor. Friday. January 1 I975 tHERE S MORF TO SEE WITH R TV Charnnels A weather channel LiP I Ne,&s New York StocIk E xcbong., 2 F M stations on T V Channels, and 9 FM and AM stations on the FM band UNIVUSIIY CITY TUVISION CAIE CO. INC. 522 N. MAIN ST, INIVIJISIT Y CITYV TR A VEL 923 W. Univernhy Aye. Gclnesvllle, Ma. 32601 a 377-4226 CHINA WE MCM' Gm flW C~iNESE wrrfACTh-alA STATE JM. 445N?.-75 c01C 041ME 11'TER EXMIBIT G#INTEn OdS PRINT 041SV 2CFWR0 REITZ UNiON n.'td ea 'Jti] SAN MING ORIENTAL MRT Tel. 377-2492 403 NE 23rd A ve (Corner of N.Main & 23rd Aye) OPEN MON.-SA T. 10-6 CHoNmE AND JAPANUE room Orcadin gift. -~cs onyr IS0 ihms b clan fusn. Eu. 3.11 Sin. Nd, Sc. lminsnt Needs a -r 7 W. HEALTh FOODS Hoff mmn Wed.r HI PsMduas AUTOS 967 mustang ps ac auto 289 vO new tire. 17 mpg body and 'ntehor oood condition drive rin perfect $650. oHea 16 r-w Ia u ops r after 5 pm 0G-ST-tO'73 mozdo 06 ouloniolic, owr etc 22-31 ,pg $ x. 'n good condiion37o 373-6701 est 235 (GS5T5.-P) 1971 Suhbaru wagon good tires, a-c 33 'pg I200 coIl 373-2353 oft., 3 pa, (9. S'59p) neg7Yt godrond tio 3-speed risI Vulva, 1970 1h4t A-C. $1650 Negotioble. 373-525O, keep trying (G0 ST &-P) 1971 Cope l600 must toll A speed rodiols air cond low rniege air condition coill 373-9637 asking 16W willing to ward thing out (g-54-2-p) rrpg must ne to 0ppreciore $1375 or best offe. 373-0254 (g-sl-2-pI PESONAL gelu porting now openot. SW l3th Si S i Ave park clone to bryan', tigers, noro A lItle halls hourly, daily S Dog ClarkAnd Th. l~cNut cormingto theaeFrlasa 1h611*afJanswo shows 95 Ii Tie. li andv,ce. o -'or' nio ha'."""' ofic I-~9 gay CommuWnfly sarvic. caer gay mn. NW iS trr Info oil ton at 372-Ili Je-n at 0ove a -3575 (0-Of-P-p S**"" ^NWD FUG LGNDO. NCW 09EN, peciolhzlnq In nglush hok cutng, blow wivng for the In loch unuDrop yCeu4M a W Unv v Wa4 (I,,l-e$ Sfe.cl* fa reg S fh re nf ol hewerd 373-8252( I-b-U-pd) 0E-YEAa-OD (nioly LAS ne ho. Very oftectiocare and itlIgrnl Ccli tcory or Howie 3f7l-W 335 1* if you -t' I,.cl ocidn Monday 4--75 at 3.1 in front of YULE M~*L Call 392-12 UIGENT (J-$I-40-P) PERSONAL OVERSEAS JOBS Australia, Europe 5 Armerico, Africa Students all profeujion' and occupolions $700 to $00 montly E spens. pold Overtinme, sightseeing Free *.nformotior, TPANSWORLD RESEARCH CO D)ept G6, 0 Box 603, '"''' Mo"e" (A 94'"5 flT 60 P1 'Cm,' fociol hor removed per, Book Pock. "Rugby" sk,,'. Hiking Aquotic & Trail Cent.r 3448 W Univ 373 9233 (i I, 55-p) nognetic signs, office p.ntirg Cliff Hall rnIog110N in J-F58-C) &ARA1TE LESSONS Small Clossos m2p nn 1215 NW54k Ave (off 13'h S. Mon thru Sat even. 7 to 9 37*-7131 (-20-tO.P) KARATT UNIFORMS Qual ty, blocked $24 up kovat.-Do, 1215 NW 5th Ave, I au.Jo, Berlin. London, Fars, Wool to travel or our weeks will, fellow studeel. cod the -r shnatdy eogu.-luly. depalur.-$1350 Zontoce Carl or Moillyn 371-7104 or Joyce 3P3-WoN7 Sfe PM foe nor. Info (J-7T-58. P1 ny decrent eutle one great yer down and a tililon more to con,. hove a nice learsnile hope you emoyme as i do you -cuddles LOVE "All men have bwe created It carry forward on .ver-odvarncig Surpynl. 5pre Hpy IfmSW Mor .1,. A&$ Pact'. been so son, bat so long flm4 youso Much it hurtt Puty thinkers need w m'reds need yo I ove 9436 (1-1-42-p tao, happy w'nlversory an sunday. o yeW'filledwalk WO romedays, yu now *4*' ICOimo cha. and always will OK? i"9 n here babe Icc (l-1t42.) Esi'tence ci God' p.,, tt Friday Jon It7, I S R1. .tz UnIon {142-c) LOST & FOUND 125 kowcnd for return of red and wi'it Beogi fbi. Io.I vicinity of soor. ion 9 Hot Dod. co togs no quutiolns (oil 37 79O4 392 2977 1 3t-S9pl lost Sk 50 colculolo. bet Wa 10-A ond Shond., pots on busoen Reword 'JO wuei o.w.d Coil 392864 o' 33697 1ST 5 Found P0'' of me"s blink g'o''e. in block vinyl cosn with rubber noWe budge Found 'hursdoy night in street rneor univ 17th Si Ask for Worido or SERVICES m P -IS myfwadwoat V., UhUt'3 you, Dana lov, LGL Something for Eeryone DEPRES" hil i" Publi Offered 1937e U.Go' ArtPits Experienced lypasi will hype ermrpapers, thesis Or diusetoaon Fosi occurote seryic. at reosonoble roles Coll 3138923 nm-tor 53-') Scubo Class Storing Scuba equiprnt provided, A apen wt' dives, Internolionol Cenficaosir, Tort Allen (CaCent., 344BW Univ 373-9233 (mn-f. 55Auto repaIr, Foreign anid Oon.ics, gtoronleed watt at good rates, .e Sill o,. Mi&. ortot6N E 3rd Ave Iron, i 0 till 7 00 fA-T-Me-P) ORY T rJUGAS to, sprIng break diving and capng trpFyb ~poebn e quipee provided Esplo. hNticn Fen Jefferson $115 wIth ceqtlflcafla. $I5 i cdude. full scuba course coll Sc',a Dynonmic 373-dO69 (M5T-U-P) FUL RANGE OP EfNG eSEIVCUS MWICAL AIC DAY CAME RFEA4 FM!E 2AiCUR SERVfCE CALL 377-412$5 (M9TCuom c3.lbng-rriod. ,o y,, wishes .,ewern shins, gown, clocks, olterallon general sewing e'eraenced samenles .uson i750 (M-3t-6 l E R LE5-hIReAnerio Will ype ye du ion. Thesis Fataidcuna 37M1 M edlLEAR AAh qualifed ineucaors new Irevel Aoency, Inc. s299 Roev4 Rd A4a, eGo ;x 252-3 (M-JT S) tORS5 IOAICEDlinit. predre ranch, ,nfommol, frIendly. dll fatcitales 3 ml tie,, uf .toll.-P5,, psture-SaD a.4799 keep trying. (M-4.P) dive the bahamas spring breok .jnllnmited or-3 rweols a day-a bank all for$[Cfarsgiorausdoys nor 24.-3-ph ten oppelboon. 392-4755 MST-4O-P) Self Reolizatioo Asejetonce A 9aefia tap On your spirikiel evoivemeil aided by yet. astrology chat, Qennis rn-A's0 w"il tc) min-5S-o)Pl HYPOS5anLP PEOFE ATTAIN GOALS By ACTING ANY n4YSICAL AND MENTAL MtfLRY-TUOV NG NEMO~Y A114E10s 373-m09 boneld G Pault-CertIfied AA4 A'4jl-Ansp) __ IMPORTED PARTS S ACC.ESSORIES FOR ALL FOREIGN CARS ASK ABOUT OUR STUDENT DISCOUNT MON -FRI. 9:00-6:OO PM SAt. 1O:OO-2:OO PM 1IO2 S. MAIN ST. 372-4w4 IH A series of rare coincidences has led to the historic dascovery are now bein offered to the American public line Reo.fvhl Bac in 17 imdately following the depresIn years, Mrs Eflanor Roosevelt andi a select group of a dozes nationally prominent peopie formed a voluntary natim0i committee for art appreciation to create an art jiuamtat would give the pulca velneeded moral lif. It was the commIttee': decil to sleet the world'. m~ famous pintin frm the 17t lat, best paintings fMaum.eVa Gogh, Garnsborough, Please, Gaugpin, Titian, Stc., aitd to reroue them n f lco and make them available tothe public at a price withi, the reach of nearly everyawe. Ab.d.*.d In 1937 For sine unknown relic., alera quatiy o tes made, the entire project was aadoned anda hi colcta perfect reproductIons was stored In a Brooklyn warahooge, *w. -remainedundturbe -~e iT The lost collectIon was rediscovered" aid leading lithographers and art cities agree that the subject matter arid qualIty of detaUl andi color reproduction Is incredibly ac. curate, Over $5,OU.O had been spent to make finely enrae glass plates Teeauthent!r~a i ii3 pris are literally colectors' Items and have been appraised by the American Appaisers Assoc. at 5700o each pit. Once they have been sold tiher, will be no more available. A truly excellent art "investmlefit" that makes a fabulous gift. AvedJabl. 1. Pwhlic Now, after 38 years lhine full color lixi" (ave. slue prints are fInally, availahie to the public at U Iot~ra cilkectlo. olI18prints. Seid cashichechkor mmny orde, to: U.S. Surplus, Dept 'X35 .PO.Boxtos tarmana.Calif 91356 Fully GUARANTEED. Cernhlcate of authenticity given with each set. Mastercharge ant BarlkAmericard OK give card ?iufbert.

PAGE 15

Parking garage to be bu By KEN GOODMAN AHIgator Staff WrIter, Diamond Village resident, will nit ilb am ciehci lor wha hcy believe will be a dangerous mcrcase mI iXralic Itlluii the completion of a nearby parking gdragc said Gn Koepke, planning consultant in the UDImvision ot Pl arvn and Anajysis. amg Residents tear that traffic on Diamond Village [)iv il increase to dangerous proportions as autos leaubng the tac lt use the diy to menc South~west 13th Street WHEN COMPLETED, the 8(f-car. mulnile lie southwest f te aridhungoml vlgarage wil t despite complaints "iiiplcs arid thc ] )1ibl Miller Health Center. I iii. id Vill 'ge MIa or Don Senatore said he hoped a ltr lt i" hirimcadlc. umilar to the one guarding the I. W iVP C Ret t i llor, would be erected. Residents would acti'ate the barricade bx using either special card or keys. FOLlOWING a series ot petitions and letters, including One to Coy. Reuban Askew. Koepke satd in a December tbth letter to Senitore. "protIsons will be taken to close the road through [)iamond Village at its southwest extremity." Three wecks later, on ian 6. Senatore approached a fleeting at the Parking and Fran~,~ttn.inn ncekmig a bai ricade thai would not ckvse oft ihe drive cornpletely, is Kocpke suggestedl, but allow village residents only to use the drive. Senatore satd But according to Bonnie Jones, traffic and parking coordinator and secretary tor the Parking and Transportation Committee. Senatore "indicated (at the meeting) that he did not teel that Diamond Village residents had problems as tar as parking and traffic flow." any Koepke. who did not attend the meeting. received infornmatioii rom Jones and said "They want it left just erious this as it -...,. 13. I '~* ~ I 'ut',,* win uc uunc a' rneir request. -Crni n,,t*=. TKURs. FRI & A. CadW CE UXEJAH. IS. 17 6 18 Thurs., 6 30, 9 30 Fri. Sat. 5 00, 8 00, fl 00 2ND FLOOR AUD. 50c A Man Escaped A posng hssegnc* we laceS dMo* frvom his Nazi flptr5 in occup#.d pence. His de.ninaoci So escape .volvns with juch brhtfldg .*ysena that .ch tound tills the 'hlsnc. wit. an aum .4 doe., end imneu. dunger Th. powerl .cldng by a non.elssanal -s tbos ta Ah. esrordinory tairn of dhcsctorc Rcbefl *rnn. H9ewing bee. prisoner of war in o Not. camp hoM,.f. di Ill. ii. a wpdcl pernonai meaning icr Sto."n Wine .4. Qh Gand Mna, ssm AIm at te for fat 957ro. he hNed Rh. Amdenty sua., 3*N. '9 SC ROWaan M ':06. *:S ak NEW PATHS FOR SELF-DISCOVERY A nSare of kihle V letr.-dicusionI On VariOUS toplco mobwtMhI.Ed D. GeealtlheroIi't Iiin IA 123JPERU sflOnSr by A. I Wavme bel Unlo.' ad S'udent *MI I MEDEA Marl. d ramal Eur ipi Cal lag t ic mOVl Ides' c stars it, on lassie revenge. Directed Paso? ini, the stor Into a primitive and darkness. Rol it 'One of the yea MON., JAN. 20 MSB AUD. On Jonuory 24, 1975,. Unio wil sposo Tn her first adaptation of drama about by Pier Piolo y is developed itual of earth liqStone called rs ten best!" 7:00; 9:30 5Cc Ih. J. Wayne Reliz THE APPLE TREE lb. New Yrk That. Canpeny dinner begins at 6:30 p.m. In the J. Wayne flein Union Uolnrooom and Is followed by o prformonce of tire, famous Amarcoo Shorfl storles. set to music. Tickets available oa th. Unilvefity tx d4fIc. (Constant Theatre) beginning Mondoy. January 136. Uc4PS F sh tE 4 OensS PUblC SLOG U r mcgGeJno 7,3--9:3 P.M. i.umim 38.0 N.Iden* C5,0xNn-'ee *,ischw.nds C r. he', 13 a tedsou.su 7:S09:p.a. INIIUCOOUI hsnLysdh. C.ulks Pqych. eIqt aogetdnsse (p'erupe) P.C M.4eafits (wcule) -di onoWYou WOOSAi TuN.J.2UO t* lSlsnp -.sk Sm.cmm:des in. 0MI.-tue I 74-75 CAMPUS GAMES REITZ UNION GAMES AREA CHESS TOURNAMFNT BEGINS JAN 20 lAST PAY TO REGISTER JAN 19 NON-CREDIT COURSES Regsinrrofon to, all worvlahop. and esnt will take ploc. in Roomn 3 truri 900c rn'o4W0pn,.Jonucry6*roughJonuoryI7 sibden's faculty and staff rnembe,. anid ther spouse. will hae priority her lesoc .nroJlment from Jonuory 6 Ahmugh Januory 10. Oly oler is nine wl relsion be Open so oihlr penun Oje* t'o prce"d mgiMmtlc" dil.,.oWMal. I, will 6. secesary .hat each pcisn com'. to regiMler yai esppoprio. iduiticealton. fnrmllvn.,or n, dMduml ci.s islimited mid, Aher.Eorn on a fiestcom fIrs.nd beete Persn fly Only vegia.e lor henmeIvns hecoa.s '.gIsftoon F falle woddhope end lessons Is coneld. yawr decision -o enmil final by 4S p.m,. pmnding iIn vsched.Med clan. Relwd wHil only he anmos SGOWY WSd. Jan. f-Mar.S (CEAIC 7,S-9t30R Ps Sddnv $1Oidn SILSIeSdana r. Jan-a. 7:8h 9.3 P.M. LU-ndess e CTs I.M-.4 is-9Mp~a -MiUC0 fal.4 st S$tU basdma IL. t.4.idna INI1UIORf 'tee M.niE'y -a) hItn.Id. -e A.e wedldng day mode wnde Ahs. cm-N S)n $a0n'e8mai 7:U0-U3P.M.a SIsUORE: tel -e S.&U S-Euds C yga i i Yuae.J.m II-M4 500-.-7SP.M sinI tendS hi.l 'Man'.-.ma la aC~isaadee -di a) MVI-SYUING SANJO oea Gap. SItUI'eudenf t r s

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N.g 14, Th. Indwpend.MRdc AMIgotr, Mdcy. hanuary I7, 415 Victorious ERA draws support in Gainesville By RENA EPSTEIN Alligator Staff Writer Wednesday's passage of the Equal Rights Amendment bor Women lERA) by the Florid. House Committee on Human Rights and Needs drew praise tromi Gainesville supporters ol the ERA. The ERA only needs approval by the rules committee before going on the house floor for a vote. THE AMENDMENT was defeated by the Senate, during the last legislative session, by a 21-19 vote. Alyce MeAdan, president of UF's National Organization fbr Women, said she is "delighted and excited" about the ERA's Wednesday victory. "We expect it to pass the house without any problem and we're hoping to increase the margin in the house to two-thirds majority. if the legislature passes the ERA then we'll be up there in April to thank them for it." she .said. A PARADE is scheduled for April 14 in Tallahassee to show support for ERA. According to McAdam, people from all over Florida, including legislators, will be there to show their support. icanette Blevins. president of the Alachua County Women's Political Caucus, said she thinks the ERA will pass the house but cxpocts a close vote in the senate. SHE SAID area supporters of ERA are trying to lobby Senators Bob Saunders, DGainesville, and Buddy MacKay, D-Ocala, to vote for the ER A when it goes to the senate for a vote. "Sen. Bob Saunders voted against ERA last 'car and Sen Buddy MacKa) has not Had a chance to vote on at yet," she said. Blevins is trying to conduct a public education campaign to generate commumal) support tbr ERA. "We are sponsoring a workshop on March Ii to provide information on ERA uid distributing literature and encouraging other organizations to &ndorse the ERA." Blevins said. ALTHOUGH there as not much opposition to ERA, Blevins said many people are apathetic and don't realize the amendment's importance. A recent poll of Florida voters indicated that 72 per cent favored the ERA. The most encouragement for this yean's passage of ERA is that not one Iegislator who voted against ERA last year was re-elected to the legislature, according to Blevins. Another Gainesville supporter of ERA also praised Wednesday's victory. JUNE LITTLER, president of the Gainesville Organization for ERA, said there were many good people on the committee. "it's just great but we have much to do in the satiate. We still have a certain ainrnnt of educational processes to work on members of the Senate." she said, She said she hopes it will pass but doesn't want to be "overconfident." A petition to drum up support for the ER A is also being circulated now. According to Blevins, they already have enough signatures to show the legislators. "It will show that if ERA doesn't pass, the legislators who vote against ERA will be defeated in the next election," she said. AN OFFER YOU CAN'T REFUSE SUlPER LUNCH SPECIAL 10:30 am-3pin ONLY Any Sandwich (except the Gator tail) A Glass Of Beor Or Soft Drink Potato Chips Pickle pitcher of Beer Only $1.00 Over 50 Sandwichesro Choose From Open 'til 4A HEALTH INFORMATION (EDITOR'S NOTE: luside Iunu.mtlo. 6. a weekly feature In The Allgfto., provdding readers wIth .uthorltath. Info.adio. -n aD .,pects of paernal health and p.llem. of the Student Health ServIce. Bring your quasd. to Roont 305, i. Way. Relta Union or the lobby of the Student Health Servlee. F. further Information pbes. contact the Health Education Office at the Studeut Health Service -Ro., 237.) What 6s the beat thing to do for a black eye? You should apply cold compresses to the eye bor about 35 minutes every hour. The compresses will help stop the bleeding and minimize the swelling. After 24 hours, use warmi compresses instead of cold ones. The heat will speed the blood circulation around the eye, hasten the reabsorption of the blood and decrease swelling. Continue to use warmi compresses unti the swelling and discoloration improse. The black eye should get increasingly better with continuous use of compresses. In most cases, the discoloration will begin to lade -changing fronm a purple to a yellow-green hue -in a few days. although it may take as long as one or two ,&ecks to disappear completely. Since a blow to the eye can cause serious damage. )OU should coimult a physician. indicating heredity is a factor in the development of the disease. However, the exact mode of transmission is not understood. Factors, such as air pollution, pollen and other allergens, psychological stress, and infections serve to precipitate episodes of wheezing in persons presumably susceptible to asthma because of this inherited trait. What ane the mymploms of diabota? 0. you alway. ha. to take shoes? Symptoms of increased hrst, increse weight loss strongly suggest the diagnosis of diabetes. The finding of sugar (glucose) in the urine and an abnormally high blood glucose generally confirms the diagnosis. Treatment consists of diet, exercise, and insulin. Some diabetics do not require insulin. Those who do almost always require daily shots of insulin for the remainder of their lifetime,. GO INI ALL THf I FALLC~'lr'cr MMND CMCERY WCCk JLES VERN BAN LAST 2 N IG HTS! Tues., Wed., Thurs NO COVER Fri. t Sat. $1.00 ECR OR WII1C VOU CARC TO DR .Every MON. 8-00 1515 SW 13th St. Dcc1mSeshwockn isn T=h. Mod 50o NW & h5 sondw.vH.vI rD INK AM

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WEEKEND SPECIAL FRIDAY, SATURDAY, SUNDAY 750 $1.00 OFF-OFFOFF-on12-piecebuckets 15-piece buckets =n21 piecebrrel 378741 Rutherford's Guarantees The Mos fo Your Moe S I r Dimony See Us Before You Rn y.'I $350.00 Fine quality 38-point diamond-engagement ring, beautifully set noa six prong white gold Tiffany mounting and lovingly nestled in the luxury of a Rutherford's box. y3 carat $250.00 IN THE MALL -c The independen*RordAllIgator Frday, J.w'ry l7 1975. Pq.e 17 NOW MEMBERS moved to smilleroff ice photo by andy newman NOW office moved; McAdam plans appeal By RENA EPSTEIN Ai"l-tSta-' Wr'i-r UF's National Organization for Women (NOW)moved out of its]. Wayne ReitzUnion office Th~usday, but will appeal the decision Ot the board of managers at a board meeting Wednesday at 4 p.m. The Union Board of Managers voted last November to move NOW to a smaller office in the Union's studeiat activities venter. IN THE PAST year NOW has taught many attempts to move them to another office. On April 2. 1974, members fought oft an attempt to move the Florida Quarterly into the NOW office. On May 24, 1Q74, they kept Florida Blue Key (FBK) from moving into the office. NOW's former office will be used as a "floating" office for groups like Interfraternity Council (IFC), Interhall Council,. Gator Growl and Panhellenic, a sorority group. THE BOARD of managers voted that these groups will share the office, each using it at a different time of the year. Although NOW Director Alyce McAdam requested Vice President for Student Affairs Arthur Sandeen to permit NOW to remain in its former office until an appeal was made., Sandeen denied the request. Sandeen said he reviewed the situation "carefully" and decided to abide by the Board ol Managersdecision to mot NOW "1 urged NOW and the Board of Managers to review the decision at the board meeting Wednesday. I don't know wha decide but I think they have a Ic portant things to do than ju allocations." he said. BOARD OF Managers me Harris refused to comment on the move NOW out of its office. Harris said he was working on the events leading up to the Lt they will At more ittstify space imber Bert decision to a report Board of of Managers decision that he will present at the Wednesday meeting. According to Sandeen all student groups were notified of the November space allocation decision by Harris. NOW director Alyce McAdam said NOW did not get "due process' because they were never informed that they were up for consideration fbr a new space. MCADAM said at the Wednesday appeal NOW will explain their use of the office. "We are going to prove we use the office. And we have the logs to prove it. also" she said. NOW moved its office furniture and literature into the new office but are not unpacking, according to McAdan,. She said the new office is one-third smaller than the former one. 2205 NWt S ~H4L 14 carat $175.00 HI?4~443j

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The Independent Florida Alligator D w 1F r Houston Astms By GREG FORK ER AllIgator Sport. EdItor a strange and terrible saga Six deaths. one near-death, and a stabbing -no pennants. no World Championships. It's just about all the Houston Astros ot the N ational Baseball league have to oiler the record lxooks. Perhaps they should he called the DikAstros. it seems appropriate. The club, while playing under a dome. seems lo be playing under a ('loud of doom also. Cheek the list -way too long -long enough to make one shudder. JUST LAST SUNDAY, January 5, the Astros' Don Wilson ,.a' lound dead in his carThie car was in the garage of their suburban HOUStOn home -Wilson's five-year-old son was also mn the garage-dead. His mine-year-old daughter. above the garage in a bedrronm sleeping. waM overcome by carbon monoxide lumes that leaked from the garage. She entered the hospital in a coma inm critical condition. She is now reported to he recovering. After an autopsy. it was discovered that Wilson, who plagued national league hitters with his fastball. had been dIrunk. Just a little more than a year betbre, the Astros' fine ccntcrtielder Cesar Cedeno shot a I 9-year-old girl in a motel room that was situated in a rather run-down section of the star's Dominican Republic. He was charged with involuntary mnans laughter. THArs THREE DEATHS so tar. Three too many, but there are more. Leukemia hit the Astros' Walter Bond in 1%67. He had shown real promise in 1%64 when he used his 6-foot-7, 235pound tramie to bit l6 doubles, seven triples, and 20 homers and drive in 85 runs bor the Astors. But the dreaded blood disease he contracted cut short his career -and his lift. He was just 29. Someone even younger died as a result of a mishap involvmng an MAcos player in the spring of 3973. Larry Dierker, .1 strong-armed pitcher for the Astros since 1%64, hit a 12 year old boy while driving near Cape Kennedy. The accident, the result of large crowds just after a space shot, killed the boy instantly. Dierker was not charged, since witnesses said the boy dashed out in front of the pitcher's ar. THE FIRST in the long line of Astro misfortunes came in 964 when Jim Umnbright, a pitcher im his early 30's developed black mole cancer. There was no cure then, there is none now. Umbright died. Then there are those other calamities -the near-death of Houston shortstop Roger Metiger. Oddly enough. Wilson was involved in this one, also. The two collided while chasing a pop fly in the outfield of the Astrodom~e last April. Metzger swallowed his tongue. Only quick action by the Astros' Doug Reder and John Edwards saved Metzrer's life. Quick action also was a part of a stabbing involving the Astros' former slugger Jim Wynn. Wynn came home late one night in December of 1970 --his wife pave him a quick stab -and Wynn gave her a quick divorce. While divorce is not the nicest thing in the world, it doesn't come near the indidents involving the Astros since their inception in 1962. MAYBE IT'S NOT nice to fool Mother Nature and play under that dome. Whatever it is, the Astros' Sports Information Director, Bobby Risinger. put it the only way any Houston official could. "We're going to keep punching, maybe we'll get lucky." Whether they'll get lucky remains to be seen. But one thing seems certain -the grim reaper has a locker in the Astrodome. Or should it be the Astrodoom?' Challenge Tennessee in Knoxville Gators try to dethrone King By ANDY COHEN Alligator Sped.s Witsr The Tennessee Volunteers are the only Southeastern Conference club John Lotz has failed to upend since coming to UF' nearly two years ago. Saturday night in Knoxville's spacious coliseum Loftz and his Gators will get the opportunity to change all that ass they challenge the nationally ranked Volunteers. DUT A WIN won't be easy as Tennessee sports two of the nation's top players in sophomore Ernie Grunteld and freshman superstar Bernard King. Both ha e guided the Volunteer, toan83 overall mark so far this season. And after a disheartening defeat against Auburn Monday night. Lotz seem' wary about the Gators next obstacle. 'They have two of the top players in the nation in King nOI Grunfeld." Lotz said. "King is so good that most teams have been conceding him 25 points a game. "They're a very physical team that likes to run the ball right up their opponeVs throats." TENNESSEE IS currently 2.2 in the conference as they have lost two close decisions at Alabama and Kentucky. The Gaton are currently 6-A overall and 2-2 in the conference. Though devoting much of his thought to Tennessee, Lotzcmuld not helphbut retiect on the Gators' poor showing earlier in the week against Auburn. "We played poorly in the first half and then played even worse in the second half while trying tocatch up," Loti said. "HOST OF TUE teams we play in this league are more talented than we are so in order to win we have to do everything we're capable of to the hilt. Against Auburn we just didn't.'' He once again singled out sophomore forward Jerry Moore bor playing "am aggressive game' against Auburn. Despite the poor showing against Auburn. Lotz doesn't plan on juggling his starting five for Tennessee. NORMAL CALDWELL and Don Bostic will start at guard. Moore and Gene Shy will be at forward and Calp Williams trill play center. Shy Is currently leading the Gators in scoring with a 35.7 average. He is followed closely by Norman Caidwell, who is averaging slightly over 14 points a game. After the Tennessee game. che Ga te,, return home to begin preparation for a Monday Alligator Alley battle with Mississippi. r t iWENNEUSE FUNMAN UP NAN D ING .29pclnhsl2rsboundsagum.

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Track team breezes at Senior Bowl By RICK AI)EIMAN Alligator Sports Writer Arn awesome display cii power andi bfhai ne e lihneda K the UII track team at Wednesdav might \ Sen 'or 13 tA rmee In Mh eG tors copped ui e first places and total d 731 pi to win in a cakewalk over second place fimiiher Florida State who tallied 34 points. JACKSON STATE was third with 21 poii followed h) Auburn with 13. Southern M~ismsippi wirh S 2 andc M .ssissippi State with live. Alabama brought up the rear a' the) nl) nmarnaged one point. Senior Beaufort Brown and Will Freeman "ere both victorious in their respective events thereby qualiyig tbr he NCAA's. BROWN SET a meet record in the 440 and Coach Dave Adkins believes that the spetdster is re-gaining the mirm that made him the nation's top&600nman two seasons ago. "Beaufhrt continuas to show why ibis year will be a ret urn to the prominence he had in '73," said Adkins. "He was in complete control. He knew the track like the back of his hand." Freeman won the pole vault clearing 16-I, The Gainesville junior is defending his 1974 SEC mdoor and outdoor championshIps. Flerida vs. Tennessee Pmhfrns A4.fld Coinm.-.FleuId by 3 Gnu FVrinr -----.Tmaese by 4 Rick Ad .~ ---Taunsee by I5S Chti Gases3y.---Tenm. by IA Lou Uqae.--.Tammesse by 12 Comesia.---.Temnece by 9 IN UNEt Lt lie major upsets ofthe esening. Gato'' Mike wrptand Willie Wilder tinished tone-two in the 50 yard I ash Shat ws the lbiggcst surpirisc ol the night.'' saad Assistant n wh Rev Benson, lbccause they beat one of the Cefllerenc' hest sprinters in Cliff Outlin, ol Auburn.' Bot dsharpe anid Wilder were clocked in a respectable 5.3 T HE HURDLES resulted in a photo finish as FSU's Danny Snuth, the NCAA champion, edged UP's Hesley Bostic. 'Helcy r-an d 'uper race," said Becnson 'In fact, I thought he heat Smith. I think Hesley was real pleased with it also." Horace ruitt swon his first race as a Gator in the 600 yard clash The Trinidad native broke the tape in 1:13.3 but according to Benson the starting ine was actually 15 yards in back of' where it should hnve been. "HIS TIME was really two seconds better," said Benson. Also Be nson was extremely pleased with the performances turned in by Steve Gomez and Tom Doerr. Come,, a sophomore from Colonie. N.J., captured the l(00 yard run In 2:14.3 while Doert was victorious in the 880 with a time of 1:57.9. Cross country standout Vine Cartier took the mile ran in 4:13.7 with teammate Frank Befts getting second place. THE MILE relay team, consisting of Brown, Mitch Goings, Tuttu, and anchorman Bobambo, prevailed once again in a time of 3:16.4. "They ran exceptionally well considering there was virtually no competition." said Adkins. The to sme rela team finished second as did Fletcher Lewis in the long jump with a leap of 24 3". IN THE high jump, Steve Ott and Ellis Miller both dlared 6'" to finish third and fourth. respectively while Bill Kovadh and Mark Schiader were second and third In the shot put. Both Benson and Adklns were extremely pleased with the team's overall showing. "Inm glad that we won so many events without having to run so fast," explained Benson. "That means there is a lot of room for improvement." "This meet really reflects the improvement on our team," added Benson. "We've added people in all the areas where we've been weak. All we need to do is just keep the momentum going and not peak too soon."-, 'They are really starting to believe In themselves," said Adkins. a VINCE CAuTlE -.vlctorous In mile run a ---i-~-a --C ~e -------~e -e --. wp. fr O\aat 761 NC EDIBLE 22 A) i9h ta lAn.e kern FLAGUII IN 621 -24 Ckst hetl tAn. 0-nGC Mmrphyi pa IC * S (9( PLANT STORCS :14 g7722 N TIL 3O.II' TROPICAL F1514 AND SUPPLIES DISCOUNT PRICES FREE ADVICE 4 a

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Houston I) ByGREG FORE is. a strange and terrible saga Six deaths. one near death. and a stabbing -no pennants, no World Championships. It's just about all the Houston Astrmsot the National Baseball league hale to offer the record books. Perhaps they should he called the DisAstros It senm appropriate. The club, while playing under a dome, seem,' to he playing under a cloud of dooni also. Check the list -way too lonM -long enough to niake one shudder. JUST LAST SUNDAY, January 5. the AMiros' Don Wilson was lound dead in his car. The car was in the garage of their suburban Houston home -Wilson's Iive-)ear-old son was also in the garage -dead. His nine-year-old daughter. above the garage in a bedrrom sleeping, was overcome by carbon monoxide tunics that leaked from the garage. She entered the hospital in a coma -in critical condition She is now reported to be recovering. After an autopsy. it was discovered that Wilson, who plagued national league hitters with hi, fastball, had been drunk. Just a little more than a year before, the Astros' fine centerfielder Cesar Cedeno shot a 19-year-old girl in a motel room that was situated in a rather run-down section of the star's Dominican Republic. He was charged with involuntary manslaughter. THAT'S THREE DEATHS so tar. Three too many, but there are more. leukemia hit the Astros' Walter Bond in 1%67. He had shown real promise it, 1%64 when he used his 6-foot-7. 235pound trame to hit l6 doubles, seven triples, and 20 homers and drnvc in 85 runs for the Astors. But the dreaded blood disease he contracted cut short his career -and his life. He was just 29 Sonieone even younger died as a result of a mishap in. volvmg an Astros player in the spring of 1973. Larry Dierker, a strong-armed pitcher for the Astros since 1%64, hit a 12 year old boy while driving near Cape Kennedy. The accident, the result of large crowds just after a space shot, killed the boy instantly. Dierker was not charged, since witnesses said the boy dashed out in front of the pitcher's car. THE FIRST in the long tine of Astro rmisfortunes came in 1%64 when Jim Umnbright. a pitcher in his earl) 30's developed black mole cancerThere was no cure then, there is none now. Unmbright died. Then there are those other calamities -the near-death of Houston shortstop Roger Metzger, Oddly enough. Wilson was involved In this one, also. The two collided while chasing a pop fly in the outfield of the Astrodome last April. Metzger swallowed his tongue. Only quick action by the Astres' Doug Reder and John Edwards saved Metrger's life. Quick action also was a part of a stabbing involving the Astros' former slugger Jim Wynn. Wynn came home late one night in Decemiber of 1970-his wife gave him a quidk stab -and Wynn gave her a quick divorce. While divorce is not the nicest thing in the world, it doesn't come near the incidents involving the Astros since their inception in 1962. MAYDE IT'S NOT nice to fool Mother Nature and play under that dome. Whatever it is. the Astros' Sports Information Director. Bobby Risinger, put it the only way any Houston official could."We're going to keep punching, maybe we'll get lucky." Whether they'll get lucky reins to be seen. But one thing seems certain -the grimi reaper has a locker in the Astrodome. Or should it be the Astrodoom? Challenge Tennessee in Knoxville Gators try to dethrone King By ANDY COHEN Alti SpasWrellr The Tennessee Volunteers arc the only Southeastern Conference club John Lotz has failed to upend since coining to UF' nearly two years ago. Saturday night in Knoxville's spacious coliseum Lotz and his Gaters will get the opportunity to change all that ss they challenge the nationally ranked Volunteers. BUT A WiN son't be easy as Tennessee sports two of the notiOn's top players in sophomore Ernie Grunteld and treshman superstar Bernard King. Both base guiddthe Volunteers to an83 pverall mark so tar this season. And after a disheartening defeat against Auburn Monday night. Lotz seems wary about the Gators next o bit cie. "They have two of the top players ii, the nation in King ano Grunield," Lotz said. "King is so good that most teams have been conceding him 25 points a genie. "Thcy're a 'ery physical team that likes to run the ball right up their opponent's throats." TENNESSEE IS currently 2-2 in the conference as they have lost two close decisions at Alabama and Kentucky. The Garors are currently 6-8 overall and 2-2 in the conThough devoting much of his thought to Tennessee,. Lotz could not help but reflect on the Caters' poor showing earlier in the week against Auburn. "We played poorly in the first half and then played even worse in the second half while trying to catch up," Lot: skid. "MOST OF ThE teams we play in this league are mote talented than we are so in order to win we have to do everything we're capable of to the hilt. Against Auburn we just didn't." He once again singled out sophomore forward Jerry Moore for playing "an aggressive game" against Auburn. Despite the poor showing against Auburn, Lot: doesn't plan on juggling his starting five for Tennessee. NOlMAL CALDWELL and Don flostic will start at guard. Moore and Gent Shy will be at forward and Chip Williass will play center. Shy ii currently leading the Otter, In scordng with a 15.7 average. He is followed closely by Norman Caldwell, who is averaging slightly over 14 points a game. After the Tennessee game. the Gatons return home to begin preparation for a Monday Alligator Alley battle with Mississippi. U The Independent -in I Fl
PAGE 21

team By Rick AI)ILNIAN Alligator Sport. Wlter An awesome display of power and bhade as elhilhFted the UP track team at Wednesday nighs Senior Btw I mee in The Ga ton capped tie lirst place' and (wtaled '3 T,' to wim in a cakewalk over second place Iinisher Plor,(a State who tallied 34 points. JACKSON STATE was third with 21 points Iollo,&ed by Auburn with 13. Southern Mississippi with 5'2. and Mississippi State with iive'. Alabama brought up the rear a' they .inly managed one point. Senior Beaufort Brown and Will Freeman were both victorious in their respective cents thereby quahitying bor the NCAA's. BROWN SET a meet record mn the 440 and Coach Dave Adkins believes that the speedster is re-gaining the torn, that made him the nation's top 600 man two seasons ago. "Beaufirt continues to show why this year will be a return to the prominence he had in '73," said Adkins. "He was in complete control. He knew the track like the back of his hand." Freeman won the pole vault clearing l6-I, The Gainesville junior is defending his 1974 SEC indoor and outdoor champtonship.Flerida vs. Tennessee A.* ECkih.--ethl by 3 Gaog Fm,.,r----Tenn.m by 4 3ik Adaba.m .--Tanessee by IS Chrit Gnrdty----Temma-,. by IS Len D.ucac.Taneuwe by 12 Cauuinus.-.-Tannine by 9 breezes at IN ONE oF 4he u,ajorupsets of the evening. Gatirs ihrpe and Willie Wilder finished one-t wf n the 5S li hat was the biggeMt surprise of the night, said Assist ant (irch Ray Benson, because they beat one of the conCi ies best sprtntcrs mn Cliff Outlin of Auburn." Ie th Sharpe and Wilder were clocked in a respectable 5.3 THE HURDLES resulted in a photo finish as FSU's Danny Smith. the NCAA champion, edged UF's Hesley Rostic. "iesley ran super race"said Bcnson."'In fact. Thought he beat Smith. I think Hesley was real pleased with it also." Horace Tuitt won his first race as a Gator in the 600 yard dash The Trinidad native broke the tape in 1:13.3 but accordmng to Benson the starting line was actually IS yards in back of where it should have been. "HIS TIME was really two seconds better.' said Benson. Also Be nson was extremely pleased with the performances turned in by Steve Gomez and Tom Doert. Gonmez, a sophomore from Colonie. N.J., captured the 1000 yard run in 2:14.3 while Doerr was victorious in the 880 with a time of l:57.9. Cross country standout Vince Cartler took the mile run in 4:13.7 with teammate Frank Betti getting second place. THlE MILE relay team, consisting of Brown. Mitch Goings. Tutu, and anchorman Bobambo, prevailed once wgin in a time of 3:16.4. 'They ran exceptionally well considering there was virtually no competition," said Adkins. The wo milerelay tea finfle second -s did Fletcher Lewis in the long jump with a leapof 24'3 IN THE high jump, Steve Ott and Ellis Miller both cleared 6'8" to finish third and fourth, respectively while Bill Kmvadi and Mark Sohrader were second and third in the shot put. Both Benson and Adkins were extremely pleaSd with the team's overall showing. "I'm glad that we won so many events without having to run so fast." explained Benson. 'That mewns there is a lot of room rot improvement." 'This meet really reflects the improvement on our team." added Benson. 'We've added people in all the areas where wo've been weak. All we need to do is just keep the nmomentunm going and not peak too soon.",, "They are really starting to believe in themselves," said AdkCins. Senior Bowl Mike yard a VINCE CAR11lE -victorious in mile run r A NC wieiti 22 AW I~ An. hen ~LA(,LLK '~I 62? -24 CUjcst QLnan~dy IAn. be CL. tlse~~d *Pus * Is (9 baaTILL HP~ W.S l~ a-. PLANT 94) 977-2244 .00P19 0 ve&gdaq I TROPICAL FISH AND SUPPLIB DISCOUNT PRICES FREE ADVICE TODA AL DA 0ainal rcai C 4 I T rack 4 "l I

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r Ping* 20, The Independeat Florid. Aligoior, Frday. Jonsuory I7, I97S Women's Sports rhe University of Florida womensswimming team laces the University ol Gecorgia and Emiory University in a triangular meet Saturday in Athens Ga., COACH SUE HALPACRE .not overly concerned" iTicket at 2 p.m Lady Gator swimming coach Sue Haltacre said that shc knew nothinM about either ol the teams her women would be facing. "I AM NOT OVERLY concerned, though. because we arc really swimming well and have tremendous depth on the team." Halfacre 'aid. The Lady Glators go Into the meet with a 2-0 record for the season. They will be swimming in off-events, rather than their speciality. attempting to qualify for the May AMAW Nationals in Arizona. The next home meet for the Gators is against their major rival, the University ofMiami, Feb. I. S. The Lady Gator basketball team tips-off against florida Tedh Saturday in florida Gym at 5 p.m. There is no admission charge. information for Ole Miss game Stud. is ane .omkd so p-e up theic ha ketbhail ticks tod.y Inr MNeds7'. daeh hi Mipc Mb-* Aly with OH. MNb. Ga.e 13 ticksef ic.e wEl be qpee befleen 9 .j. snd 6 p. Any full dame UP smudSt -y pick up a ticket with their bakehaiI .e. ticket cad cr 75 cflt. The University has a Mtke shopping traM.e go away With.a GmturM tdayt hSammy & 1lggat



PAGE 1

The Independent Florida PubIiMd by Conipus Communicofions nc Go nnv~I~. FI'~ridc Nor olliclolly osmocoI.d wd9, the Univ.n'ty of Florido t GARY DAL4NOPF A~tw Bid Wrila Dr. Rebut C). Marten will be inaugurated in Florida Gym as the seventh UP president today. The original program, scheduled over a two-day period, was cut in an efIbyt to save state funds. A CUT-flACK of S16,OU was made from the original Inauguration budget of S19.(EO. The inauguration festivites began last night at 7 p~ii. when out-of-ton wets and convocation participants attended a reception at the J. Wayne Relh Union ballroom. The fourth annual President's Festival of Music was next on the agenda last night at 8:30 p.m. in Universtiy Auditorium. Peter Herman Adler conducted Beethoven's Ninth Symphony (Cboral). at ROSETQ.MARSTON -. .Inauguration begins this morning DURING HIS inaugural address. Marston will summarize the findings of the UP goals task force. Twelve preliminary goals *erc identified as problem areas" by the task force. The 12 itoals outlined by the committee include decisions on which programs should be allowed to grow in the future, whether admission to UP should be selective or opts'. and how to determine productivity and values or programs. Marston will deliver his inaugural address at 10a.m. Ma a QtiO processIonal begins the WUFT.TV channel $ will carry live coverage of the ceremonies. The Afulcagi Peoples Socialist Party (APSP) has IudIcated they will hold a demonstration outside the ~m while the ceeenmony is Iii Aspokesman fortheAPSPPlttsand Lee Defense Committee said they planned a picks ci about ID people to keep pressure visiting public officials to reconsider the Pitt. and Lee case. WILDERT LEE and Freddie Pitt. have been 'miprisonal for 20 years on a conviction for niurdet Even though a witness who testified against Plus and Lee in the original trial has adniitted faluiMnh testimony, the two ~nefl remain in jail. Demonstrators will be distributing a leaflet describing the case's history. Among the state officials who will attend are State Education Commissioner Balph Turlington, State Agricultural Commissioner Doyle Conner, Rep. Don Fuqua, D-Altha. Board of Regents members Burke Kibler. lack MeGriff. Chester Ferguson. and Chairman Marshall Criser. CRISER Will preside over the convocation and will deliver the oath of office to the new president. Former UP Presidents J. Wayne Reitz and Stephen C. O'Connell will also be in attendence. One hundred and thirty-one student organizations will march in the processional. TWO HUNDRED and seventy five faculty members also responded to the call for those interested in marching, making a total of more than 400 people participating in the ptocessional. Procession Marshal Dr. Earl 6. Rodgers. U F professor of agronomy, said there would also be a recessional. Those in academic regalia will depart in reverse order from the way they entered. Twenty-nine other colleges have indicated they will said representatives to the inauguration, Including six of the other eight schools in the State University System. UP'S HONE than 6fl10 Career Service Employes have been extended a special invitation to attend. The 9:30 am, to noon ceremony will be counted as work time fbr such employs. Among the visiting dignitaries who will speak are Lt. Cow. James Williams. D-Ocala, who will make a short greeting at the convocation. Other greetings will be extended by Andre. H. Hines of St. Petersburg. on behalf of the alumni; Dr. David NI. Chalmers. 1W history professor. on behalf of the faculty; and Steve Merryday, UP student body president, Os' behalf of UF students. TIlE INVOCATION and benediction will be delivered by the Rev. Eade C. Pap. rector of the Holy Trinity Episcopal Church of GainesvIlle. The University Symphonic Band will play betbn the Coutwocatia and dining the processional and recessional. FIIII)AY JAN. 17. 1975 VOL. 67. NO. 62 2 Grad assistants keep lobs By TOM 511 RODER ADlpt.w Staff Writer Another five per cent cut-back in operating expense money will enable UP to keep commitnhents to graduate students. UF Executive Vice President Harold Hanson said Thursday. A 12(KI,(EO deficit in funds used mainly for graduate student 'alari~ wilt be eliminated by the operating expense cut, Hanson said. "WE ARE simply shifting deficits, there is no new money. lie 'aid. Hanson said the budget shift should provide enough money to cover all formal and informal commitments to graduate assistants through spring quarter. "It will still he tight, but I think we will be able to meet commitments.' Hanson said. TO DATE UF'S operating expense budget has been cut by S400.aD (10 per cent). Bryan asked the Council of Academic Deans Wednesday it another expense budget cut would hinder basic expenditures such as K eroxin g. The deans generally agreed it would. HANSON SAID, 'E'erything allocated for is a basic expense. It's a matter of setting priorities." "This will just about shut down travel completely. There's probably enough for paper, telephones and Xerox. That's about all they'll have," Bryan said. University College Dean Bob Burton Brown said, "This will pretty well crimp our style. You'll probably see exams givet off the blackboard and it will pretty well eliminate travel." Brown said. HOWEVER, Brown said he wa, not surprised. "It's just one more tightening of the belt, If this saves jobs then ft's worth it," he said. UC recently intbrmed its graduate students that most would be laid off spring quarter if no additional mercy became available, Brown said he believes the S2fE.~ will make that unnecessary. SHERI DALTON, president of the Graduate Student Union, claimed pressure from the GSU is responsible for the shift of funds. "We are claiming victoryy at this point. We are pleased that the administration came up with money that supposedly they didn't Dalton said. However, Dalton said the problem is not solved. "IT'S JUST A temporary solution. Nothing is solved for next year and nothing can prevent the administration turning right around arid taking the money back," she said. GSU originally planned to picks liP President Robert Q. Marston's inauguration today. Dalton said a smaller "Victory line" will be held instead. 'The line will organize at the Hub at 9 am., she said. Mmmmmm good I Okay, Ida get to the hoflow of thit cmam lovm. Her sticky finginis reveal That lstb.d.wmilnctlon of this litWe Its she's had quits a mouthful already. Seventh UF president to be inaugurated today

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Poq. 2, Tt~e Ind.p.nd.n* ~ofldo Aillgaor, Friday Joyluory '7, 1975 U.S. of in post worst recession -World War II WASHINGTON(UPI)-The United States s in the midst I the worst recession of the post-World War II eta, according to government statistics released Thursday A Commerce Department report on the nation's Cross National Product showed that output of the economy, adusted fbr he effects of inflation, dropped at a startling 9.1 per cent annual rate between October and December. INFLATION, meanwhile, spurted at a 3.7 per cent pace, the quickest since the department began collecting quarterly statistics in 947. It was the Iourth consecutive quarterly decline in real, or noninflated, GNP and James L Pate, the departments chief economist, said the end is not in sight. I don't thing we're at the trough (recession bottom) yet" said P.te, predicting that the growth rate would take another 'suhstantial" loss in the current January-March quarter ifiday M~fi J GOJQS wirs Sin; capsule Senior chairmen deposed WASHINGTON (UN) -House Democrats, with the liberals forcing revolutionary reforms, deposed two senior committee chairman Thursday but gave the dean of the House. Rep. Wright Patman of Texas, a fighting chance to retain his BankinR Committee chairmanship. Twoof the most powerful and most senior House Chairmen -. Edward Herbert of armed services and WR. Poage of Agriculture -. were ousted earlier in the day. Then or a narrow 246-141 vote, the Democrats voted down Rep. Henry Reuss. 0-Wis. This means that Patman will now conic to a vote of the full party caucus, probably within 10 Israel given deadline WASHINGTON UI'I) -Egyptian President Anwar Sadat I htirsda) gave Israel three months to make further with(Ird'. as 1mm occupied Egyptian. Syrian and Jordanian I errutory. Otherwise he said the Arads, including the ~ would explode everything" when the Geneva Middle East Peace Conference resumes, era "THE CURRENT economic situation is 'cry bad.' he said grimly. 'These arc the tacts. flie> speak for themselves Estrything is bad From November. 973, when the constantly fluctuating husmess cycle reached its latest peak. through Deceniber. 1q74, the latest dale for which figures are available, the GNP tell S per cent [hat I' 'a much bigger drop than in any or the live recessions since the end of World War II. There was a huge business contraction In 1445-46 as the economy underwent the readjustment from war to peace. but economists consider this a special case that should not be compared with the usual recession. Not sines the 1930s, when the economy took two separate nose dives in the wake of the Great Depression. has there been an economic slump as big as the one now under way. April 1 WASHINGTON (UPI) .Congressional Leaden told President Ford Thursday they believe an Income Tax rebate can be enacted by April I. but not necessarily in the exact torn' he requested. White House Press Secretary Ron Nessen told reporters the Democratic leadership had predicted modifications in Ford's plea to return to individual taxpayers 12 per cent of their 1974 tax bill. ASST. Senate Democratic Leader Robeit Byrd of West Virginia. one of those at the meeting with Ford. told reporters he and others thought Congress would want to aim the 1974 tax cut more at low and middle-income families than the President suggested. Byrd also said Democratic leaders were less than enthusiastic about Ford's energy conservation plans, which are meant to reduce flhel consumption by raising prices through taxes that would bring in about 130 billion. Byrd s.id he and others felt Ford should have proposed a policy built on fuel rationing and that Congress might move to pass rationing legislation despite the President's opposition to it. NESSEN SAID Ford's priniar5 concern is that there be action quicklyy'' on the economy' as well as the energy front and ~Ieclined to speculate about possible compromises. He believes his plan will work' Nessen said. Ford feels that gasoline rationing ~oul~l require a longterm c~pansion of the government bureaucrat and that no one would be happy with the decisions' on how much luet could be consumed, and by sdiom. Nessen explained. Ford's early morning meeting, with Democratic and Republican leaders was the start of a strenuous round of St '-A-Th CIA Helms defends spying WASHINGTON (Un) --Former CIA Director Richard Helms said Thursday his agents had to spy upon Anicric~n radicals because some of them had links With foreign subversives, and he defended the CIA's record w~thtiut egrets. ~vithoul qualms. without apology, Helms lashed back at the CIA's critics in prepared testimony at a special Senate hearing, describing himself as indignant at the irresponsible attacks" against the agency and warning they could seriously damage U.S oterests it suffered to pass unchallenged.' Helms, now ambassador to Iran. was CIA director from I96~ to 1973 and deputy director beforeth.t. when most of the domestic intelligence activities outlined Wednesda) by the current director. William E. Colby, took place. PRESICOIT FORD -, .wontsfostoction Jctmty calculated to win political backing ~ lot L~ WV economic and energy policies. Following the leadership meeting. he delivered A perOTiil sales pitch to scores of state and local go.ernrnent IficialL Nessen said the leadership told the President the though the House and Senate could complete action by April oft legislation to cut 1974 taxes. U, Coo~js Reatmaruit sMutS a Lounge Gourmet Fresh Seafoads 'Snapper 'Lobster Scallops Crab Claws Mullet Shrimp Trout Rock Shrimp In UnxepIolled Areas Stone Crab Claws Private Parties Ever yrhibg Prepared Fresh For You I TI,. ind.nd.n, Florida Ailigotor S 0 p~jbiicg4ion of Campus 'ncopovot.d o p'.vo'. nor-p',f~ ce.eotion if S p*~ '~ ~ *.c.p. dtnin Jt"* July, an~ A.4uti w*t ri p .*.d .mi.w.Hv and dv~'l Uud.ni Olidovband .~.n, periods. ~vu.e .prss.d in ii, nMender't AI'gO'~ ore those of H. ditan of h* wviies of *,h vicics ,d no. '1w. of he ~,~*,Sity ol FIo,,dc tie campus wnd b~ h *.Aapr4.,tt Floid Alligator Adfl' carrs~cn~rc. to The indsp.,du,. Fiaria AIIIO', 0 Ba. 3266, Ur'IVhIIY Station Goinnv.ih* Florida, 32Si The iadependen Florida Alligator it .fIt.rad ~ sewod ciost "o4~e @4Muni.od Stolee Po.Offic.o. Ga.n.vdiC. Flw4O 22601 S~bw'pnioc rate 4mwp. S. .rUuwqa.'. kAk SMCiPb.M w. pevld~ 0w.u#,flaEi ~ fa.,j~y* stud"" of N Univ.niw of Florida & ton, of all odv.,.neqi. aM it rev's. l~rA swoy cii co~ i' contid' ~ ittorabi. ~Y~~merIl involving; 'vp.p~me.4 ens p vwa. insertion ~nIfl flC~ *flfi '~~.odveut'sin nwaagav wiftin I) dcv ad'. ,irtc10p00" Thi lfld*p.nd.ci #10,44. Aiflpe. will -be .ewom*I. ICC men flfl 'n.r.or o~a,' adven.mm.fl ch#jIdcw. awerci tnt'., may see lower taxes

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1%. Ind.p.nd.nt Floild. AJlIg.ior, FuIt.y. J.nvwy Il. 1975 Peg. S UC evaluation team selected Fhe evaluation team to,Unse,-st) College (UC) has been selected. Dr Eric Goldman. Rollins Professor of History at Nanceton University: Dr James MeCain, president of Kansas State University: and Ot. John Silber. president of Boston University, have been named to the team by Gene Hemp. UP interim assistant 'ice president for academic affairs. THE EVALUATION team was ordered by UF President Robert U Marston after a UC .urvey last fall showed more than 50 per cent ot the taculty said morale wr poor tIC Dean Bob Burton Brown suggested the UC Advisory Hoard begin their own in~c~igation to ~uppIement the outside Invest i ~at ion. he new team e' valuation has been scheduled tor Feb. 27 8. During that time, the three members will evaluate the tuitionon in IJC in terms ol' faculty morale. UF directories might run short Gator Guides-the phone directory for students.faculty and stall are on sale at the HUB fof 51.50. There are still student copies available free in the Student Government office, according to Eudine McLeod, staff assistant in the SG office. MCLEOD SAID. There were 4.~ guides for off-campus students. but there are fewer than SW left. Vm not sure well have enough to last through this quarter." She added. I've been working in this office for IS ynrs and we've never run out out of Gator Guides. This may be he lint.' The Gator Guides on sale in the bookstore were not intended to be bought by students, said Mary Ann Green. a personnel staff member who gathered the names for the student and staff directory. THESE EXTRA copies, ordered under a separate contract by the bookstore, are for wives of faculty nienibers, local businesses or anyone who really wants one, said Green fhese guides are intended br persons who are not entitled to a tree (ator Guide under the present system of distribution. She said there were I8.~ copies of the Gator Guide printed this year. MCLEOD SAIl) students were allotted 8.000 of those copies, of which 4,~ were distributed to campus residents. fraternities, sororities and married housing. The other 4SXX) student copies welt delivered to the SC office, where a student may pick one tp by showing current tee card and identification, according to MeLeod. Gator Guides were distributed to campus offices, one per telephone, according to Green. Even if there are no more copies left for students, there are no plans to have more printed. ccordlng to Green, since extra copies would have to be paid for by UP. MeLted said neither UF nor the students pay for the Gator Guides. "The publishing company solicits ads to cover the cost of the number of copies ordered,' she said. SG positions available The deadline for tiling applicatlo.u. fin eight student offices is 5 p.m. today. Interested students may apply for the positions of student deiqate and alternate to the University Senate: a post on the Activity Fee Service Advisory Conimittee: and five positions on the Distinguished Professor Chair Committee. For brother information or description on any of the positions call 3921665 or see Ken Ofgasg in the Student Govnrent office in the I Wayne Rein Union, Room iGS

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Pog.4 The lnd.p.nd.n* flovIdc AJliga~or hidoy Jonuov 1' 1q75 Merryday calls for open hearings on tuition plan By KAREN MEYER AlIljairn Staff Writer lvi a letter to the chairman of the Board (4 Hegents BOR) this ~&eek. Student Body President Steve Merryday requested pub[ic hearings "on the issue of tuition before the regt'ns ~uhniit their fee rcc(,nrncndations lot the coming le~isIative sc~%iot1. Both State tJni'et-sit~ S~vcm Chancellor Rohert Maut~ and ne'.I~ appointed regent Mar~halI Harris speculated or he probability a tuition increase at the Januar~ BOR meeting REFERRING to thu 'probable adverse et*L'cts (I such .an increase) on the academic situation," Merryday suggested hearings modeled alter utilities rate regulation cheating. STIVE MERRYDAY -sends left., to regents I % ,uI(l suggest .i Iii()rrliilg 't in afternoon session on cam pus~ iii ~Iifterent geographical regions might suflice In pros ding an opport u fl liv or parties oh en rot heard to express their vios~' a' to the met-its of both the tV~C aIRI anlounts if tees.'' the letter said, II there had been public hearings laM year lictore the tuition per credit hour ~as adopted Mcrrvd a' said. Sonic ot the liberal art' am' largely elect 'c colleges ~mild Ii ase LOifl C. [IF PRESIDENT Robert 0 Marston said Merryday's letter constituted a reasonable request 'I am and have been br some time an a1 vocal of low tuition.' said NI a rston claiming he was 'by no means neutral" on the issue [he hearings ~.ouId 'make sure lie NOR understand~ the reasons and feelings behind arguments to keep tuition low." said Marston REGENT Jack MWrifl' had not seen the letwr hut thought he ,~ould endorse the concept of hearings. "When it cones to changes in tuition. I would like aviv kind of input from studetits or anyone else.'' said MeGrilt He said the regents should provide time for input 'tn a reasonable level adding they 'can't be going all over the state tot it. Although the hearings might not prevent any Increase in tuition. Merryday said 'it would make the decision more legitimate." His eventual aim is to see some sort of cap placed on tuition." where fees tor IS or lb hours would be maximum, no matter how many additional hours a student carried, he said. Sexual relationships exposed in open lecture By LINDA WISNIEWSI(I AlflgsWr Staff W.ltet 'Sexual relationships n.olve corn munication. hut most males try to deal with women by a touch of the lips, a brush of the breast, and ihen 'a dive for the crotch," Laura Newman said Wednesday night. ftc topic of the lecture at the J. Wa3ne Rciti Union was 'Understanding Your sexuall Self. ftc audience largely was made up of students who, like Don Cournoyer. 3ED. canic 'to expand my knowledge on the sexual sell' ~nd learn what I haven't learned ~et.' THE LECTURERS, La.jra and Gus Newman. both practice in Gainesville. Gus New is a psychiatrist at the Student Health Service in the iF infirmary Utira Newman is a marriage and farnil) counselor in Gainesville. She received special raining in sexual counseling last summer tinder Masters and Johnson in St. Louis. Laura Newman explained that while she was in St. Louis working under Masters and Johnson they 'tried to find the limit of female sexual capacity.' ONE QUESTION the researchers tried to answer was how many orgasms a woman could have. Newman said. The clinic 'lined up a bunch of willing "'en ~nd one willing won~an' she said. 'After 60 orgasms the men had had it while the woman "as still going strong. During the l&ture the Ncwmans used iuiodels of nuale and female external gentilia to illustrate how women and men sexually respond. LAURA NEWMAN e~plaincd that the clitoris is ''the primary organ of sexual stinitilation. 'As the clitoris is stimulated it gets bigger it tint and thet, goes away" she said. "The old sex manuals used to tell the men one thing -find the clitoris and hang in there.' Newniari said. NUT NEWMAN said at the Masters and Johnson clinic they found 'the direct stimulation of the tip of the clitoris turned women oft, because it was too intense. "Masters and Johnson were the first people to really look at a woman -at her sexual arousal and her length of orgasm" she ad* ded. Gus Newman said males were "quickly aroused" and needed 'no physical stimulation to have a full erection and ejaculation MOST MALES worry about the size of rheir penis. Newman said, although "the site of the penis is not niuch ot a criteria because of the elasticity of the vagina.'' 'In our country w&re obsessed with big cars. Hg houses and big penises. he added. During the last 45 minutes of the program the Newiiians held a question and answer session with the audience. SOMEONE asked the Newmans to 'define a meaningful relationship.' Gus Newman replied a meaningfull relationship must be mutual and must ha'e a great $eal of meaning to both people." Nes.nan sdniitted some relationships'are instant" but added "most of the time it takes a long time to develop a meaningful relationship.' Someone asked. 'Does a good marriage make a good sex life?" GUS NEWMAN replied, a good marriage and a good sex Site 'are inseparable. There are some good marriages where there is In, sn. but sex alone wont keep a marriage together. Laura Newman added what goes on in the bedroom begins to creep in on the other relationships in marriage." Another person asked the Newnians to "Explain in non-technical terms what a nonorgasmic female feels when she has her first orgas.lt. Laura Ne~ntan 'answered. 'most women say 'Wow! That's as non*technfral as I can Let.

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Ii,. ind.p.nd.n, Acrid. AiIIg.~ov, Md.y. J.nuo.y '7, 1U5. Ping# 5 Ex-prison chief heads criminal justice program By RICHARD BURKHOLDER AllIgator Staff WRIt., DR. MYRL AJBLAN ..directs now pmgwm Surrounding the walls of Dr. M~i'l F. Alexander's office are a batter) of autographed portraits from such luminaries as John I). Mitchell. Ramsey Clark. arid Robert F. Kennedy. Alexander. former director of the U.S. Bureau of Prisons, has had long and distinguished experience with attoCneys general. "STILL," he mused, "one wonders about the question of a dual standard of justice in America. especially after the Watergate affair." At this he cock, his head toward the portrait of John U. Mitchell over his filing cabinet. Dr. Alexander is chairman of the newly nit~ated criminal justice program at UP. After having studied the sociological and psychological phenomena of crime in America fbr 30 years. he has carefully construeted an academic program emphasizing correct Ions at rid rehabilitation ii'! ed ol police science or punishment. IN KEEPING will, the time'. ~,,d in response 'to the changes that the 'tu4 of criminal justice has undergone." the focus of the program, which leads to an .n~ terdisciplinary mawr. is based in a social science perspective.' Alexander said. This curricula decision was made, he said. because criminal justice embraces so many disciplines that an interdisciplinary approach was mandatory. Nowadays, he said, its important that 'strong research components be developed to define and handle the personal makeup of the American criminal. THUS, NEW practitioners. new research designs. new institutional models need for' mulation. Here is where a modernized criminal justice program comes in. Alexander added. I~ light of Vietnam, the student riots of the 1960'S and especially Watergate. it's necessary, that the science of criminal ,ustke un~lergo a re-evaluation.' he said At U Ithc sponsorss of this new liberal arts urriculun, are the deparlnwnts ci political science, psychology and sociology. Offered is a bachelor of arts degree with graduate work available in the departments of health-related professions, recreation, and law school. WHEN THE program was first announced at the beginning of fall quarter. only 85 students signed up -and they all had to go through drop-add. Now, Alexander estimated, there are roughly 45othis quarter. with M~ of these as announced majors.' In fact, he said, the program is so new that his office has a sink since or originally his quarters were to be part of a psychological testing laboratory. For the future, he sa.d. "we intend to maintain our perspective over the total field and hopefully open a series of subdivisional tracks' with specialty considerations concerning pre'law. police correctional work and other nreas. Despite its sweet taste, sugar is not actually necessary to the body. According to Dr. Howard Appledort assistant professor in nutrition and food sciences, the body only needs sugar for energy, and not for sweetness. "THE BODYcould gel the energy it needs not r.Ofl~ sugar, but froni starches and carboyhydrates" he said. Substitutes such as apples and honey, which are carbohydrates, could provide the needed energy. One tablespoon of sugar provides SO calories, according to a book entitled The Story of Sugar' by W.R.Aykroyd. Sugar itself doesn't provide any of the vitamins or protein needed for health Also, according to the hook, too much sugar in the diet may crowd out" other foods needed br good health. You could cut down on sugar and still get energy by eating starches.' he said. 'It would probably be well if people ate less sugar. SUGAR CANalso be extremely hard on ones teeth, according to Dr. Dennis Birdsell. assistant professor* in basic dental sciences at UP. Birdiell said the effect of the sugar depends on how sticky it is. Sucrose, which is the main sugar. makes a sticky substance in the mouth which is hard to remove. he said. Microorganisms in the mouth convert the sugar to acid, which, if untreated. can cause serious tooth decay. BIRDSELI. added that the so-called sugarless gums contain alcohol sugars. "These sugars also cause acid to be made and you can still get cavities." he said. According to newspaper reports, the risk of tooth decay depends on how often a person eats sugar every day. Dr. W.H. Bowen of the National Institute of Dental research, in Bethesda. Md. said a person who eats three meals a (lay, even if' the meals are high in sugar content, risks tooth decay less than a person who nibbles at sweets all day. Text by Jo Laurie Penrose I Sweeteners are cheaper Synthetic sweeteners are proving to be a less expensive method of sweetening food and drink than sugar. Synthetic sweeteners are made Iron, saccharin, a chemical. These sweeteners claim to have all the sweetening power ol' granulated sugar. and are less costly. SACCHARIN is under study as a possible cancer-causing agent. according to the Food and Drug Administration Its use is careftilly regulated by law. The chemical ~tas removed 1mm the ~overnncnts list of 'iwnerall) recognized us safe" Ibod oddlijies in 1972. and has not been placed bacL on the list. The government row rcconnends use ci' saccharin by not more than one grew a day SYNTHErIC weeteners conic in liquid and pow4 end form, and usually art fled by diet4. However, with the high pm of sugar this has changed. "I don't use anything else." Lynn Sloan. 4JM. said. 'Tome. rher&s little dlfkrenct between synthetic sweetener and ~upr. It dissolves better. too." Synthetic sweeteners also cost less to buy~ A ('oz. bottle of liquid sweetener costs 59 cents in most stores. In addition. saccharine tablets are available, as are boxes of synthetic sweeteners in packets. "AFTER A while it tastes terrible." Jeff Marc. 4JM said. 'But its cheaper than 511 gar. Dr. Howard Appledort. associate professor in nutrition and food sciences. said the synthetic sweeteners are useful because they provide no calories. in addition they are not nietabolited in the body, and of course they are less expensive." he said. RECENTLY according to newspaper reports, Ibod processors have ben adding the synthetic sweetener saccharin to foods to cut the cost of sugar in production. Under federal food regulations. putting saccharin in Ibods is illegal unless the label clearly identifies the product as a special diet fbod. It's also illegal to combine saccharin tush sugar in soft drinks, unless the soft drinks art specially labeled. Urn bad (emit. Mr ci.) ASP Wire, Dlxi. Pony PM. Thrift.1 Public fig 9cr 3.6 Dlxi. C'yal. (eanis p. a.) 175 1& 3.7 Sw at to p.r n.j I.' l.6 a 16 3.6 Socoeyl (c.nt. p.c ox.) 16 Win,, Dlxi. Panty Md. 16 Sugar Twin (cant. pm ox.) Swnt 10 (cacti. p.r 3 1.3 ox.) I.' 16 12 1.6 12 '.7 Iii rifiwoy Public Big Star a.con. p.r oz.) 3.6 3.6 Prices, demand down Sugar prices have dropped since the big rise last fall, and grocers say they don't expect them to go up any time soon. Over the Christmas holidays a five pound sack of sugar retailed in local supermarkets for as much as 53.39 a bag. Now, most Gainesville chain stores sell the sugar for less than three dollars. IN 1q73 sugar sold for 70 cents for five pounds. Then, in 974. sugar prices began climbing reaching 12W) or more at most supernorkets in November. In December. a five pound bag of A&P sugar sold for 13.20. Now it Is down to S2.89. Dixie Crystals sugar sells for 52.99 110W. 'I don't believe it will go up. either." A&P Managee John Pruett said. A SIGN ON the sugar counter of the Win Dixie storeon NW. 6th Street says. Quantity rights reserved." Thrifty Maid retails for 52.89, with Dixie Crystals sugar. a five pound bag, priced at S2.95. Evereane sugar and Dixie Crystals sugar in the Publix store in the Gainesville Mall both retail to, 52.89 a bag. Manager Bill Curry said Dixie Crystals sugar reached a hi1I, of 5326 in December. "It is supposed to be conhing down." manager Curry said. "All the other sugars have cone down." "OTHER sugars' include brown sugar. io~.dertd SUMS? Mud conlectiener's suflar, used in pastries. Those sugars sell for about 65 cents a pound. Sugar prices in Pantry Pride were slightly higher. Pantry Pride sugar in a five pound bag sold for 52.99. Dixie Crystals was also slightly higher at 53.09 for a frye pound bag. Consumer pressure seems to he the major factor in the drop, according to E.O. Long. vice-president of Florida Food Service Inc. a food wholesaler. "People havebackedotTfron, buying. so packers have lowered their prices," long commented. NATIONALLY the demand for refined sugar is only about half of what it was a year ago, according to newspaper reports. Officials at the Anistar Corp. one of the nation's largest sugar refiners, say sugar may have been hoarded earlier when prices were going up. Since then, with demand down, Amstar has cut back its refining operations slightly. Late in 1974, when sugar rose from 70 cents, supermarkets in some areas of the country began discouraging customers from buying sugar. In Gainesville at that time, most supermarkets limited custom to one five pound sack of sugar with each grocery order. However, this is no eager the polky. Sugar You can live without it

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lb. hd.p.,&o, N.M. MhIrtr, Md.y, Janusy I? 1973 Iran Ian students chant criticisms of By DEBBIE ERICKSON and BILL WAIl Alligator Staff Writen twenty UF and Santa Fe Iranian students and suppow-tets circled around a flaming effigy 0f Shah Mohanirnad Hen Pahavi in READER'S REDRESS Thursday's Alligator incorrectly stated that the Activity and Service Fee Advisory Committee ASFAC) has total control over the allocation, of 1175.000 surplus Student Government money. ASFAC can only make recommendations as to where the money should go. SO and UF administrative officials must then approve the recommendations. l~ addition, this SI 75,~ is not SC money. The funds were allocated directly to the advisory committee. Alligator staff writer Leslie Golay regrets the error I Shah govt the Plaza ol the Americas it noon Ihunday chanting protests Placards deiouncrng the Shah~ governnient covered the t~ccs of the Iranan demonstrators to prevent political retaliation. A SPOKESMAN who retued to identify himself said the Iranian Student Association in Gainesville is trying to bring attention to the political plight of Iranians at borne and in the U.S. fle demonstrators contentled there are more than 25,(UO political prisoners in tan under the threat of murder ot forms of medieval torture. According to one demonstrator, the politicall prisoners include intellectuals who have been imprisoned without having charges brought against the The demonstrate. are demanding that the Iranian Ro~crnment immediately announce charges against the prisoners, announce trial dates and allow international observers to attend all trials. The demonstrators are also protesting the United States financial support of the Shah through oil purchases. "ECONOMICA'. IV, politically and photby I IRANIAN SIUDSJrS hum Shob in effigy at Plaza of theAmericos militarily the Shah is relying on U.S. support, a demonstrator said Support of the present Iranian gosernmnent is due to U S. involvement dating back to I 953, one demonstrator said. Leaving WOOG radio station on Waldo Road at 9:30 am., the demonstrators marched down University Asenue into the Plaza of the Americas chanting. Th~ Shah is a fascist butcher!' and Down with U.S. imperialism!' A SPOKESMAN for the demonstrators -~ ~Org. kochani.~ r. said a peaceful protest in a tor&g'i country can bring 3-10 years in jail." Most Iranian detnonstratvrs plan to return to Iran eventually and would not allow their pictures on names to be taken for fear of reprisal. People at home are hurt and my lather would lose his job if I am identified. a demonstrator said. A ~oint UP-University of South florida protest is being planned for Thursday, Jan. 23. in Tampa. ftmn.uib.r to oII Mo.n to thank Ii. 6. lb. 11 / / / / "(I /4 / // / / I' 92 / ~/ r1 / I /ff 7\ ~ lit. *alma &an. fart .rI.4.tbIJt. -wiIkn, tkw .1st., [I'lL oBAM .004.-k atiwitt.ot120t0 140.crdspnn6nut. you tOo Cs ch aol W.in a oflinInut qqikki. i / ( 4 I N K I!! \ I 'I ( ( y I' ~ I~ III [.1 b (II / /1 I, / / ~1 I / If 1 I' I) @ Sam. 311 M82 to~ ye 'V

PAGE 7

,.~ the ~ C&w~an (ONE OF ONLY TWO (VmOST CvCRyihn9 1 Jeans Shirts Dressi Jewelry Purses a MENU 7 CI. $2 25 --Dta.: $4.00 ~J Eu:. it45 ,6cI~nh25o O.Is. MM lana. 43. .20 a9~ --aS ~a. ------~--------,-----.-~~-.----------.-----Th (JanuaR6r :e SALES A YEAR) fl arc cli Reduced S Suits Belts Shoes r OPEN 10-10 DAILY; SUNDAY 12-8 S SW 7th St. Next to Subterranean Circus C DID I a CIUVE USE OURS 0 With everybody could uses break new and then with Demise's Pizza and save money at the Hem's a $1.00 toward your next )6' ens 1 can pick it up .or colt firma fast Ire, deliver WI! I A 'OUGH 'I $1.00 OFF .1' Ott ANY 14 ONE ITEM OR MORE COtlINO'S PIZZA. I Main. -----*/Phone ----& T. tSids.~.sq. Is ___________ I inflation these din7, ft .awhyamttdae.bcguk .~. tuner mere plasm. Thu 4 'V. PIZZA FREE OSLIVEY Ca-"' 376-2467 EastildO 316-3317 Westelde an-atm It. nd.p.nd.nt Florido MIlgoki Fndcy Jenuor~ I' 1915, Peg.) WHAT'S HAPPENING By STEVE PROCKO Alligator Staff Wdtn DISCUSSION: on Baha'i Faith tonight at 8 in the I. Wayne Rciti Union, room 118. For luther information call 3783575 LITERAIIJRE DISTRIBUTION: this afternoon from 12:30. 2 (XI Copies of the Christian Science textbook can also be borrowed or purchased from the I. Wayne Reuh Union colonade. For further intorniatiot, call 373-1850. DOUG CLARK AND THE HOT NUTS: are featured this ecntnj~ and Saturday at the Rat from 9-I I p.m. Admission is $2. RECORD H0P~ tonight at 8 at the Catholic Student Center Lounge lot all Catholic students. Admission is free, GODHEAD REVEALED: this Sunday at 4:30 p.m. at the Society ror Krishna Consciousness Varnaslirama Institute. 'J21 SW Depot Ave. A 20-course Vedic love feast will also be leaf ured. ORGANIC GARDENING MEETING: Join the organic gardening co-op Saturday at 10 am. at the organic gardens. For further information call 377-8087. MIDDLE EARTH COFFEEHOUSE: will be held Saturday at 9 pm. in Underground Sledd B. Murphree Area. For further information call 392-7466. DISC DANCE: wilt be held Saturday at 9 p.m. in Broward Hull. Admission isSiSOwithout an activitycard. SI with one. For further information call 392-6051. STUDENTS FOR FAUMWORICERS: will meet Sunday at 7 pin, in the I. Wayne Reitz Union. room 15GB. For further information call 372-7362. REVbLUTIONARY STUDENT DRIGADE: will meet Sunday atS p.m. in the J. Wayne Reitz Union, room 355. For further information call 373-5968. MOVIE: "Prisoner" starring Alec Guineas will be presented Sundayat8p.m.intheL.wSchool Auditorium. Admission is 50 cents for all students. PRAYER RALLY: will be held Sunday at 2:30 p.m. at St. AugustIne's Catholic Student Center. Sponsored by Right to Life. For further information call 378-9192. KOSHER MEAL PlAN?: if yoWrt interested come to this organizational meeting Sunday at noon at 16 NW 18th St. For further information call 372-lois. BRUNCH: sponsored by the Hillel foundation Sunday at II am, at 6 NW 18th St. For further information call 372-2~). Students in bike injured accidents Dy JOE MORAN Alligator Staff Writer Two UF students were injured in separate bicycle accidents Thursday. Gary Estes, 3E6. was treated at Shands Teaching Hospital after suffering cuts and head injuries in a two-bike collision on Stadium Road. ESTES WAS listed in 'lair" condition, according to a hospital spokesman. Marianne Reith. 3A5. received lacerations of the tbot after being struck by a truck at 13th Strect and Union Road. actordliug to University Police Department spokesman Jim Shu Icr. Reith was treated at the UF infirmary and released. ACCORDING to an eyewitness. who wished to remain anonymous. Estes collided with a bicycle ridden by Julie Black. I 1W, as he wss travelhg east on Stadium Road. Black was traveling on the wrong side of the street at a high rate of speed, the witness said. Keith Rosen. 2UC. and Robert Vogel. IUC, administered tint aid to Ekes until an ambulance arrived on the scene. The accident Is still under investigatIon, but according to Shuler, nocharri had been tiled by late Thursday afternoon. Reith was traveling south on 13th Street according to UP!) reports. when the Iront wheel of her bike struck the rear wheel otadelivcryrruckdriven by Robert [anti, asthetrtack made a right tunt intront of her. Shulersaid nocharges-ere tiled In the incident. CUSTOM UN.UaIw. An. ms-MG use's $ S

PAGE 8

peg. g.Th. Ind~.u.d.n'flofld. MIIg.tor, Mdoy Jenuor7I?. HIS U~flITORIAL Tighten up It's no secret been listening. And they're by now, but in case anyone hasn't times are tough. not Metting any better. Just glance at some of our headlines this week and shiver a little. Book prices are rising. enrollment has been frozen, air conditioning and heat are being turned off or restricted around the university due to huge funding problems. and chances are good that tuition will rise again next year for the second time. Thats not to mention what's going on outside the State University System. Mass lay-offs. runaway inflation, recession, and rising prices. Ifs a sign ot the times that in the midst of the current economic situation more and more people are rushing to qualify for the federal food stamp program. Once a program primarily designed for people on public assistance, it's main aim was to provide an improved diet to low income families. But now the program is attracting thousands of middleclass working families who can't seem to make ends meet anymore. In addition, an increasing number of students are qualifying. Nationally almost 2S0,~J0 Americans a month are being certified tor the program. Here in Alachua County, there are over 4,300 on the rolls. up 110 per cent from December 1973. About one third of those are students. But now there are those in Washington. including President Ford. ~ho are growing alarmed o'er the rapid growth of the food stamp rolls. Adding to their alarm is the tact that there are still dii c~t Im at ed I $ to 3$ mill 'on A ruericans ~ ho are eligible for the pi ogram hut ha~ c not vet taken lid' anfage of ii. 1-ord has l)rop~Std a raise in the cost of tnt st.rinp~ Iie~innint 'p Marc? I> rjdcr exis ieI4tilaliwis lood stamp recipients ~ dii a~cfa~c oZ 23 pet ccii! at their income to buy food stamp Begi rink tic in NI arch ru ~st ~'ii have to pa' the niaxitnuni 34) pa cent Even more ominous tot the approximately I .54X~ households of students on the program in Alachua C ountv. anti 6OAKX) rodentss nationally, is a proposed regulation by the Department of Agriculture and Congress that would bar students 'tho get more than half of their support from another household, most commonly their parents. from getting the stamps. Even a student who does get part of his income from parents may not be able to make ends meet after he's paid for his books, rent, loans, tuition and other day to day expenses. They're telling stories now of families who drive to the food stamp office in Cadillacs to collect their monthly allotment. If they can't make it. what chance do students havey Ford's decision to raise the cost of the stamps has been delayed because of criticism from Congress and chances of it being put into effect are still uncertain. Hut the fact remains that even if the raise is not approved, the regulation prohibiting some students could be. We hope not. Already we are getting storm warnings from Tallahassee that tell us it is going to get even more expensive to go to school in the State University System. It would be a cruel blow to be subjected to similar warn in cs from W as P "pu' Can U.S. learn to accept Latin American independence? Recently the Miami Herald complained that the U.S was erecting discriminatory trade harriers against Venezuela and Ecuador. ntembers of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC). the Herald maintained that h,~ was .t ;xw fence w scparaw Good Neighbors and that the U.S. should take steps to re-centeril amicable hemispheric relations All ol ~thi ch ~' riLes me as being political I~ an~I h islorica lb naive PRACTICALLY spcakivw. I' St ~itn Anicrwan relti ions ha'e aka~s been paternalistic in nature -lie L: s protect'' the I at in' trot, stich sctw ,~e' a' in tern at iona~ (oriinunhsn, ~' hik hclpitw to de'clop latin American atilomics thrud, ~,n~ic multi iat~onaI enterprise No~ eriiin these "iv'~ard stepchildren -,,ariel~. hose (III C Nwti~ut,.rw --ha~ Ac~ I upon themselves It Cut the iiillI~ilI(,il cird ~'iih ~iL [C Sai~, Itt 'tdcriikinv ~utF .4 111)1(1 LtIttCI~tIi thc' .iTL to hr ptu~hel Ft Ihost~ ''nertuJ )rt~IsItiiNltk(,tptriictlQIihir 1w 1 S tuttle ii] OPINION ir IS WE! I tWit thc~ n~~lii hcrc~oLei.e kjt~ hoer been the stroile suit Noni, Ajilerici S relationsIiip~ s~iIl, imi \pun ish .or ik in 'ci ~h hors l-rtin lie l~3Vs (ordell Hull nichinaitws br North fliCt call IL I utU IC scelirit' .to ti C ill -ated cc now ic debac It mlii Alliarte lot Progrct~. the I S has in~pimcd niightik tim" the 'tai~e ol twentieth-centur) Latin Arierici in a great extent former Yankee activit, ii, Veneuela and Ecuador is representative: both countries had to wrest control trom lorcign firms that lorded tniperiousl~ over the fiscal fates ot their countries Ia U.S-British-Dutch petroleum syndicate in Venezuela the United Fruit Compar~ in Ecuador). fhe U.S. usually gate in grudgingly after beinR ~amed of more dire measures being considered b) the financially hearted host couittrtcs. r The Independent Florida Alligator Gil Gmneca. F IA Ta.y' Esndwloe. J-v.c-k Ma bSy k.t AnwM.l~. C. Roy 5h10 To., Modda'n.z Roy MeG. Jr. Donna Lubrono k~ I4orp.r Lyndo HomI.r ~cooSoyd.r Lynn Soki.r RICHARD BURKEOLDER IIOWEVLR it has always been impossible t n p eradicate Yankee influence due to these nations' dcpcndlerite upon the U.S. tot niarket consumption of their raw prflttti4i exports and the overarching pervasion of U.S politics ~iilIUic W ci,. in essence, nicans that the vaunted Gool Nt ci' Ioi Pol cxi' is pretty iii tic h a one. way street triril now N n. he I]. S I, is its greatest opportu nit) to sho" ii loili in the ,iabiliiv it tie UN!'. Nm~ that sonic .1 iii [ Ameuleir as'tCidte' ha~e he td~~aclt~ to 1e'elop Ia lioiiit jrid~ -~oneIhirw ii, ~.hch the U S has ,il~~is~ p I K )Iiiiitiiiict'nients on latin Aneritdri 'ii211M Li. lecitled It L11I the rug out ~ lilCil IS ~jiu.ii lie ,~as Ntinh ,\tlcri.tIl eietr~l io diplas~ tI l.atir I'ackhone NitiCC FIBLI N I hr icnlriI clutstion it ill this is ~hethcr iho N ciiii ios. I' )14Lrist i~idt ii its dealing' s&itk I libti has shin.n he grirwcis to be two-latel it'> I cnliglleiinictit' it the e~pensc of ohers. Not~ thai align men is 1% a' is the U.S and latin A iliti k Lhangitit2. tan the t S be naliire ctotIMh to ,icccp' political dm1 CCt~iiOi~iL soserewflties of its bellow he!tl iSI)l1 ii at it, I S I,, all closet isolationists and creeping ch.tu~iI1kN\ proper one tantalizing. yet ultimately regrettable. tidbit Si, ~cie~uela and Ecuador are OPEC members, they arc, lot i'm liniment at least. lorh~dden to jack up the price of their ported crude oil for carol damaging the cartel, So about a~ they can do now is protest, long and vehemently. While the U.S. has thi' respite before the next OPEC price conkreice it should, but probably won't seriously re.vvalVatC the taking away of the "privileged nation' stattLb from fliese two now-disabused %ood Neiahbo&' Edlto.'lvi.dI. C~Id KIM., h.~v. Slt~ mnw.cd Mn.) no Slim 0.61 Fta. -M~ o-a~ ~G-~ A h Nan AuMa abin. Mng. .Me A&.niing Moo.rr A~ cOOCeMOIO, Sp.clol S.ctton, CooMIn.)., Mv.rts.ing Pv~4uclIon Maogin Mhtrtol Produciton Monq Mfl$o$ )4~&k~bA Mdd.g.r Ma iay.~t Shoe PuhiSud 'V C.nipu. Commflnic.tbOfl. tue P.O. S.x 132w UnIv.flhlY s4n~, G.iui.vlII., Rondo v4I$~ Mile. W4,lnd I. C.ll.~ Is"'. 1721 Was UnIv.nIty Anou. ben.Oi4$c. tea. 376.44*6. SIIoMI kp.nm.nt: 376.4*58. Adv.rtl.lng *nd ProduCtiOn

PAGE 9

Th* ind.p.nd.n*FIorIdo AJIIgo$or. Fridoy Jonuo.y Il, 197$, Pog.1 Equal justice for Pitts and Lee Editor: In the year 1963, Iwo black me,,, Freddie [cc Pitts and Wilbert Lee, were sentenced to death row for the murder of trn white gas station attendants in Port St. Joe Florida Since I~3. a number of facts have surfaced to prove that Pith and Lee are Innocent and have not received fair trials in either Gulf County, where the first trial took place, or Jackson County. where the second trial took place. Many of these facts have either beet, withheld from presentation in the court or not admitted into the court record. A white man, Curtis Adams Jr., has confessed to the crime. and supporting evidence of his guilt has been given by Mary Jean Akins, his former mistress who was with him at the time of his prenieditation of the crime. This 'voluntary conlevijon' of Adonis is on tape and has not been permitted to be presented as evidence for the defense. Mary Akins and Warren Holmes. the polygraph expert who taped Adams' confusion, were not called an to testify about that confession. THE MAIN witness for the prosecution. Willie Mae Lee. has repeatedly changed her testimony and the Slate slippressed evidence in 2968 of a tape recording ii "hich she changed her testimony, which initially implicated Wilbert Lee and a Pvt. Smith. saying she lied because police threatened to put her in the electric chair or a chain gang. lucre has never been inc shred ot physical e~ dense inIi oduced by the state to support its charges! No fingerprints ol the deceased in Pitts car, no fingerprints ot Lee or Pitt, on the j~as station cash register which was broken into the night of the ernie: no weapons. proceeds from the robbery in Pitts (U Lee's possession: ro bloodstains or soil samples on Pitts ~nd [xe's clothing. Also. Pills and Lee could not dentf~ the i~iit-.Ier site, Curtis Adams, Jr. who contested to the crime. could identify the ni urder site. In 1971. this case was mosed Iron, Gulf County to Jackson County because prejudicial news publicity in the area had ,~ade a lair trial impossible. However, the newspaper read in Jackson County was owned by the same publisher (Tbe Panhandle Banner, Gulf County) who ran the racist news articles and-editorials against Pitts and Lee. BLACKS WERE systematically excluded horn the Grand Jury The original conviction of 1963 was overturned by the Florida Supreme Court for this reason. There are several iJ~tiesses to the tact that their original confessions were forced Irom them after they were beaten in jail. Although the facts obviously prove then, innocent, Pitts anl Lee have had to cndure the inhumane conditions at the 1-lorida prison system for eleven consecutive years. In siew of the beg that the state of Florida's prison population is fourth 'ii the nation, with 55 pet Lent of the prisoners being black, it is 10 surpI he that Pitis and [cc and nanv others have been subjected to such gross injustices. In i ecent months, a letter riotingg campaign. petition signings. demonstrations, fund raising activities, and programs have been organized in support of Pith and [cc. The Pitts and Lee Defense Committee at the University of Florida urges each freedom loving student, faculty member. and worker to support the struggle to free Pius and Lee by signing a petition. donating money, or other resources. writing letter, to Governor Askew demanding that lie end the cloven year old injustices afflicting Pius and Lee. wilting letters to Pitts and Lee to let them know that the people are struggling to set then, tree. RELBIN ASKEW will be at the University of Florida Friday. January 17. The Pitts and Lee Defense Committee will not allow Askew to come to the University of florida and not he confronted with the issue of Pitts and Lee. The FlIts and Lee I)cfense Committee (PLDC) needs the support of the people on the University of Florida campus. Please support our etforts to tree Pitts and Lee. If there are any questions. rlcase call 376-8937 Pitt s-Lee I)cfensc Conniittec Vicki Adams ADVICE & DISSENT l&Ii tor: Your article in last tuesday's Alligator concerning the discussion between the Committee of Concerned Faculty and myself was generally accurate: however, one statement attributed to me does not truly reflect my views or those of' the United Faculty ol Florida. I was quoted as saying that UFF was opposed to any college', receiving higher salaries than any other college. What I said was that all Iacultv nicnbers should receive a good basic salary in~I their raise' should be true increases in buying power. Beyond that point we believe deserving faculty i,,embers should he eligible tar merit raises. oid other adjustments should be made to reflect the realities of the marketplace in the arMor society. Robert A. Blume Vice President. UFF zw You LIICEP PART2~ YOU'LL LOVE. LA rO 'I COMING SOON: '9flGsTr0cnMfln @zwMflV' t3It --. ~ ..em. In *.1,JtflI NRIh n~'WI, flhJSrAC MCWRANI&D DV A maE ii You I re ripping off the wrong people One of the first principles a radical aeth ist learns is to i~lcntify the Eiemv correctly. CAbby Hoffman gives nian~ sLiggcslioiIs in Steal This Oaf. on the line art of ripping oft the Establishment.) Howeser, it is easy to be confused as to the exact identity of "the Establishment.' It is often not the Estoblishment who gets hit, but sonic poor individual struggling against heavy odds to get by. Such is the case the iight workers who fill all these niorning newspaper racks ~ou see all oser the campus and city' "PAPERS SHOULD be tree for the People! someone once The Independent Florida Alligator Doug ~oI bt.ul.Inm.,, Editor Ron Cun,,ingkom AMOCI Editor G.org. Ko~h@flIC Jr Photo Editor Fount Spout Editor Mivdi K.rnoni Ant N.wsEclitoV told IIIC. Htit, the fact remains, they are not free for the carriers, whose profit is often incredibly small, and who carry till the financial risk. Paper companies take care of themselves lirst.-vou can he 'ml of that! They get their money-lW per cent of it! Here's the picture for the carrier: There is no Union. no rate bargaining, ho job security, no fringe benefits, no unemployment insurance, when injured-no workman's Ct'iii~. 10 iacatiors, no holidays, no sick days (they show u~ or they're fired!). It's 365 nights a year, running out a rnor* iirng paper. Carriers must rent those sending racks, repair theni, buy the papers and sell the unsold copies back to the jiaper company. The cost for stolen papers cones directly out of the carriers' veins (and they do bleed!). It is itmasplaced kindness to prop open a rack door to allow ailvolie and everyone to help thennelses to 'free" papers. or to lay a pitt' on top ci a rack to be carried ofT. The nal kindties, i~ to shut such propped doors, or. when buying a paper. 10 put the pile outside back in. and help the real underdog 'qini~e-thc carrier being ripped offi MACHINES SEEM so impersonal that its difficult to think of someone hcin~ associated stith them. Ever see an old ed Mustang. s.ith one door oft, full 9f dents, tith Ouicksil'cr ~.itten on it. tearing around the campus? I l,~its nit. 'our Sc, 'etc Times rack -lads inside. I get ii' j~Uj)ti% kiwi' butt ,i~ competitors. so I date-card on racks so you'll lever accidentally buy a yesterday's paper before I pet there. (Trying to keep the customer satisfied!) This job has to support nit and my f~ur kids, and it ain't easy! Rut it's a job. Your Miami Heralds are brought in by a lovely, friendly. gentle man who has been running papers in Gainesville for 48 veart. and is Mr. Miami Herald~ to us. The TimesUnion racks art run by a rat-out Scorpio dude who has the reputation of being so fast he never uses first gear in his VW. van-It's in second when he jumps out to fill a rack, and stilt going when hejiamps beck in! (He has a couple of yeats experience on most of us and is. pro!) THE TAMPA Tribune rack route has a new carrier. though he's not new to the Tribune. He had home deliveries here fbr several years. and know, the business. We all live in a rip-oft society. (~v't. Corporations. etc., all seem to have their hand, in our pockets, and prices keep rising. But if one's head l~ into fighting back, the efibri should be directed at those who are guilty of the abuses-not at some other iletini olihe sameoppression. So, if you areinto ripping (itt the tstabhishment''-identify your Enemy." Don't liberate our newspapers, please. A free press Is for the free expression of idea,, but the pape' used is expensive! Hoping for 'our cooperation and continued patronage. 'Quicksilver" Misunderstood

PAGE 10

I hi Tournament Open To All Those who specialize in indoor sports and want toprove It. can register for The weeklong Rem Union Games Area CampThnhmut before midpjgjn Sunday The touniamut Includes competition categories for admits. faculty and staff, Classes Dismissed 9:05 to 12:20I with celain events opal only to full-tune students. Games Area Manager Bill will represent the UP at the Association Career Service Staffers MayAttend of College Unions InternatIonal regional tournament which will be held here Feb. Dr Robert Quarles idarste wifibe inaugurated the seventh president ci fi~ 64 University ci Florida in a cuwocatlon cm sty today In Florida Gymamflam. Student-only categories, for which The Processional begins at ~:U an and the program at 10 o'clock. registratIon laStS per event, are chess Second, third and fourth period dma will be dismissed so that students and swlsetyl. tournamat In Union rooms faculty may attend and Career Sonic. enp&fl'ees my attad tim program U 36 and 347), mm's and wanen's singles work-time. The general public is also Invited. Parking Will be available on table tennis. doubles and mixed doubles Fleming Field, using the entrance off Newberry Road and W. University table tennIs, menu and women's pocket Avenue west off NorthSuit Drive. billiards, three-cushion billiards and The enbre proceedings will hi telecast by WUFT, Channel S and replayed smoker. Friday evening at 3 o'clock on cab]. Camel g* Events open to students, faculty and Dr. Marston will deliveran address eltitled. "in. University avi in. ~ staff bumper pool, singles and Future." He will be officially ISailed and give a charge ci office by Marshall doubles Focabail, air hockey and bowCnser, chairman ci the State Board of Regents, who win -~ pra~ltie ~ ling. Sign-up will be at the Games Area hour-and-a-haff-long CSSW. desk until midnight Sunday. Entry fees LI Gov. James WWIams will bring greetings to the new president fran state are $1 for each event except bowhn~ which will cost $JO for four four-game government. Others to bring greetings are Andrew H. Hines. Jr., In behalf of the Murnni Anodatla; biSry Prof. Dr. David Chalmers, In behalf ~ competition is bndge, starfaculty, and student body preuidet Steven Merrydny, in behalf ci students. ting at 7 :30 p.m. Tuaday in Union rooms An academic pmcesaion will be composed of approximately Zn faculty 150 C and D. Only full-time student members, 110 students representing registered organizatIons -campus, and winners will advance to regional play, representatives aIM Florida colleges, including IS presidents. Music preceding Faust said, but the tournament Is open to and for the ProcessIonal and for the Recessional will be played by the University Symphonic Band, conducted by Frank Wicket Rev. Earl Page, all. RegIstratIon. Including a 50 cent rector of Holy Trinity Episcopal Cl.~rrji, wnJ de~ ~ entry f~, will be at the Games Area, desk through Sunday and at the door benedictIon. Only six other men have headed the University of Florida ~ before the tarnameat starts. to Gainesvlile from Lake Cily In is. And ~ '-~ L~~ ft,.,in] Trophies will be awarded mall events. inaugural address. Two of thee -Dr. J. Wayne Relti and Dr. Stephen C. Street Tonight O'Cameli -will be present for the Narita ~ Dance Other dignitaries who have Indicated they will be present include Panhellenic Council Is sponsoring a Congressman Don Fuqua, Education Commissioner Ralph Turllngton, street dance tonight celebrating Agricnjturai Cmjssioner Doyle Cast. Rep. Bill Andrews, Regents dieter the east end ci Sorority Row, Ferguson, Burke Kibler m, and Jack McGrlff, Chancellor Robert Mats aid the Inauguration today of President Chancelior-deslgnate El. York Jr. Robert Q. Marston. Dr. and Mrs DR. ROBERT QUAIILFS MABMDN Mantis -to attinnd the dance. UP's Sevefl Pr-Meat The dance which features the rock band, "Cater.," Is free and open to all S Soprano Veronica Tyler Likes Her ~Worst, Best' Life Seams almost every time black Mange the niece of two other professional has gone up. What I say 'take five,' I ___ ft ~ -operatic sopranos. "1 didn't even need mean five! Not six, at even fin-nd-& discovered mging in the dureb much training, jut some help learning to half. Such prof. tonal demands Just urn what I had." might help than decide an tell caNot so with soprano Verwilca Tyler She learned to -It well. Before the rem," in says The graduate of both the Jumlard School MOSCOW (SIqSUUn, the mother S a She paints urn glamerm. pictures of 811 of Music and the Peabody Ceaaenatory 13-yearcid daughter brought bane first operatic maw to is' tiger pupils says she dIscovered herself! prize from the 110 Munich Intenatonal "I tail fin III didn't love to sing and "Sure, I wet to dzrdi and I sang in Cmnpetitlai. Alter Ruula. she made bet didn't love meeting people, this could b the choir, but the faith that really much-acclaImS European debt In the fl~ ~njj life J g~n~ va.dhlv imagine," counted was my faith In myself and In my Dirge (Norway) Fedini S lit she cafla. "that &~~t* *MUIt Gcdglvu vole.," believe the Baldflaring the lUg-IS cutout men, the off yaw first plans, In ye. first mink is ni~re-bn whiner of the Flit TOilself 'described "bier" made hr Italian great kovty International Vocal Capstan debt at the Teafro Ia Fedee In Vet, In "'p, tt~~I v-begin to learn what In Russia earn years ago a mew producila of '"flnndm." It's reaDy aD about. Flights after She Is the sogra fl1 ~ ~ f~yOS FORUM MIinl In U1*49*I Tazis! Tm HIMSU to t B peflnanee S Beetbovmn's NInth 53's'IA Duane Zerinaln "Don Glovani," cold sandufli tea, days and weeks of phony lit night and tonight an the ________ and 'don't forget MI. hub at We reheemebl Otis!" opening concert In the FlatS's Poet vagueta inn Univatty ci Florida." pi.g~ u. iw ph ram~mnd MamA PraMS's Ftyal S USc. NowavoiceprSuurattIuUnIvuSty urvrtapeaa~ "Unlike my Miss Smith back In tnats taherrW r Daltimee, I never advise my SSmta to "Bat I ai ate ytu~ts of Florida, Veronica Tyler teaches heralded Interprets S La DCIIUDWS jump face forward Into a pSsSmiaJ abutS. cutS oh. Asametat dev*pnent of faIth and comtlda.m -"MIt" amhiilmuly -a team bar flis "My MI. bait was really MI. M"~'~ cret* a; Wiia the sahist who the plane. had bflu bourn asukitol how to slag. And he pats flue 1mm Maim. knit. us at ins awn --'ueu ~ --tiegrant' __ Washington at __ -'S -~ Kennedy Cede. "ne, It's t wet peSMe lift. But "If they want .win a life, theyl go It's Uw bet cmi, ~" opera Cam-V 5 flue ~ ~n a pyejiak4A mid after It. Dot If I feel they -don't Veronim T71w US~ i ~u1lcdsT it u~. wcrw. try this opus ~mm" want It, I never Stove." her pupils to ederifli ~ ~ tine readingg' Why not' I ~pue I -Even Ml. hub didn't believe Ian ButindoeshewherSudanwhat bit of who frm~ want to be mote Him Smith. You knew Veronica me U RUt -Veronica the life Is all about. ~ceu-aI pt -mdx iM~ her, that school teacher aft S --to Tyler believes I. YetSca T~l&. "I treat then in claaan they would be from the SOit aqes ci hr muiitS~ have hat.tbe sue who teed asia the "Evanthmlbewlkadaflty. Noose Slmnanopsracampmy.ua~~~ csneruimaud Sag ha 3ustoYef'~ ajt gw,~u" nga ~ cgjejesfly. could tell -I couldn't ins" contends Is late for a lame, I t.ll than tine curtain ma Sy.play ens.,-' Bowl Tiw tJnIwSy .~ *~ ja.~, E~u8I 09

PAGE 11

w atd ~ ~ advenisint races Th. I.d.p.nd.n~ Ro,~do AMI a,, Md.,', Jwisrv II, 1975 P~* II I $200,000 In order to be able to honor comxwtmentstogmduatiinslstants and to meet The teaching responslblllties of the university, #00.000 orginally earmarked for eqUISeU In the Education and General (NW) budget will be reserved for Other Personnel Service, Executive vice-Presides Harold Hanson Info mied Dr. ROut A. Dryan, acting vlcepresi. dent fcc Aedimic Affairs, Thursday. "It Is antIcIpated," Hanson said, "that we shaild be able to retain graduate assistaiiti WhO W IDBklflg responsible acadunlc program and Who had been firmly camifled to position." It also seem, Dr. lEarnt explained, that only two-thirds of the expense money normally available in E&G budgets will be available for the spring Largest Gi The University baa received a gift of property frown Mrs. Shepard Broad of Bay Harbor Islands In Dade County, from witch It expects to realize approximately gimm, making It the largest gift ever presented by -Individual to the University. The money will be used toward constructive ci a building on campus for the Shepard Bread Center for Jewish Studies. The total cat of the building and a library It will house Is expected to be approximately $2 I%4 million. A campaign Ii underway to raise the additional 1mb needed from private sources. Sits of the building on campus has not been decided. Mrs. Broad has conveyed to UP a deed to two dtniltoq buildings and the land on which they are located near the St. Johns River Community College in Palalka. TI. buildings are privately owned ad have beat used by students attending the college. The p'~uty has beat appraised at a valueaf$IJUmbyEarlB. Milleraf the Jacksonville firm of Rogers. Miller, Taylor and Co. The property Ii encuinbend with a mutage debt of 00.000. leaving netvalued$1,40SM) Disposal of the property bus ml beat decided, but several -an being considered. Ike USvudfl'. Cats far Jewish Studies has bum In alatauce mince Board of Begets approval In July. lfl. Under direction of Dr. Barry Much and now offerIng 14 courses, line Cutter Is aimed toward developing lnterdlsdplinrj programs exploring the various facets of Jewia aims, hiscry, language, literslure and rSa More than S students wlflb ads bite Cats' coins tie am Bade yet The Uslymity Ins bee elated the appu~ty at pnOahw lien a Cliicage Rabbit eurqehutve library at Ji*iin c~wag more than 40,000 bats and pnmadIcSa "U lbs mopSa at this c0115d1011 and can. ci be Maqard Broad Cuter hr LaS ShiMs, dflgUIdUd in be varies areas ci Jet Studies will be ataeted to the Cutter." Dr. Mud, mid, "A wide qscUuii of underpibats a t ny reMglomn pm'mulm will be accented to sequin -bd.pth msassadlag at the JetS, people, their role I. history U~d a. LouSeZ7~'Iud.M2.NsUan fraCt" In abBe. to the librhh7. the Shepard Broad Outer will contain a urge lecture 1311. anal Intro roan, study carrels as a. t~ flue Cater aft. The for Grad "Our Principal Objective is to see that no loses his or her job" -Executive Vice-President Hanson Univi D.v.s'on Cf *nfom.ton & PubI,~ 'mQ, ant ,nfo.matcn to *tud.nt,, acuityy .taf* hi the U n'vsrtty of F lone. quarter. Overall, he explained further, this means a 10 per cent reduction In expense money for the entIre year. Money for expenses, such as expenHistory V I dable supplis, travel, tele Mnes and other costs of day-today operations, Is released quarterly. The March release for the spring quarter, or final quarter of to UF Studies Center University will be seeking the balance of firm at the funds needed from individuals founded a throughout the state of Florida. America At a news conference in Miami Florida Wednesday, Mr. Broad said his wife assets ex' decided to make the gift to the 11? is a fain because "theUniversity of Florida worn Medical of the most distinguished schools in the flstee ad nation, the Board of Regents showed Its Beach, a faith inthe University by establishing the Trustees Center for Jewish Studies and because Shores. I there is no WASPIsh anti-Jewish attitude was thej at the University." Dade Cot The Shepard Breads reside In Bay in his ha Harbor Islands, a ton founded by Mr. Broad.Heservedasmayoroftiietown Mrs. B for 27 years and is now nuyor emeritus. University Mr. Broad emigrated from RussIa In Medical 1920 to New York City, where he earned Morris N his degree from the New York Law and Mrs. School. He and Mrs. Broad, the former Morris B Ruth Kugel of Glens Falls, New York, Savings moved to Miami Beach in 1940. and CMI Mr.BroadlssenlorpartDerlflthelaw Bank& -a. 'S 'V '-I 4 4. r MORBUDBOAD (U, MR. M4D3.I At News Ceaf grace h N~l Where Gil Premed, Predeut, Preopto Broad and Casel. He also md Is Chairman of the Board of iSavings & Loan Asoclati.i of which has eight offices and feeding $350 million. Mr. Broad ler and trustee of Met Sinai Center of Greater Miami, a St. Francis Hospital of Miami S Chairman of the Board of of Barry College t Miami le originated the Idea for and ~aldlng spirit hi the building of mty's Broad Causeway, named nor. road, a graduate of Syracuse a founder of Mat Sinai center. They have two children, Broad of Bay Harbor Islands Irving BumI of Coral Gables. road ii President of American It Loan Association of Florida rman of the Board of Barnett Bay Harbor Islands. NA. -. main ann ~ We Amemeud otry Studeuts Asked to Report to Amdersou Hill Office premedicaL -and -at ad eta should top b~ of Prqttif e131 EGicaliUi, 111 flier-i Hall during the wet ci January *24, to register or update flair pr~ofeulonal Quarterly Record Fa The Office wishes to Identity all wewotmlSal students, Inform them of Igylce available to teat, collect Information cc quarterly activities and evaluate preprolessional advisunelit. -I-I S. Rosu.heln, take over tram Dr Frank Datum, who dam to return to full-time protean of zoology aid S~. visor of U. Marine Laboratos7 at Ceder Key. Dr. Roseusbela motes 'Tbere are many. map applima for medical asS detal wheels these dayt I feel the Office at Preprctedu.sl Educade best serve the University and the cmu~ by adding tea .ppta fits miSally to evaluate Sd, capabilill., goals and requirunets with a -ted -involving advises, soling service sad cuatrahed b Inutim baa." Earmarked ~4OVment OWoflwuityAAffImatve -Anion Employm University employ. ft For In 0 Broad Jewish A new Director at Education, Dr. Joseph was recently named to 0 Assistants the fiscal year, will be geurn, beat only $400,000 can be used for expeosm. That In apportioned to each college. Hanson has written Bryan to "Work with colleges to make the appropriate adjustments." AM collages are Ceded except those In the Health Cutter and In WAS, which are budgeted separately. The decision to transfer expense money to OPt out of which graduate assistants an paid was In keeping with a cominlbnat earlier thIs wet by P resident Robert Matte that "it Ian been and remains the policy of this University to exert every effort to nut eammitmats that have bee made to graduate assistants. This will have prIOrIty over expenditure in the categories of expame and Operating Capital Outlay." All CEO u.S have previously be frozen, a, well as alps cent cut In expense expeuditira, a dint down ci cooling air to most buildings and slatting dews of heat at noon have best orderS, and no new per. may be awlored. "Other arms are being -and hopefully even kdvl& is] a campus will cooperate In Ceding utility and other savings,' aid Hanson. "Our principal objective Is to m that no University employee lose his job." In Tigert Hall, threefmrtbs ci the xerox machine. have been ordered removed. In another matter related to graduate assistants, Prudent Marten has explainS why he was unable to attend a meeting of the Graduate Student Union, to which he had been Invited Tuesday night. Dr. Marts wrote Shed A. Dalton. president of the 0611, who extended the Invitation, "lam alway, happy to meet and talk with graduate students as I did 1st December. However, you write a president of the Graduate Student Union and use the letterhead stationery of the United Faculty of Florida. Consequently. according to the procedures and instruetions that have been given to us for dealing with union, I am referring your letter to Dr. George BedS of the Board Office tat" Ms. Dalton bad Invited the president to the meeting "to defend yuir actions and those of your uabordlnates" In mitten relating to alleged graduate assistant a. Haumet said Thursday that so fats Ida office knows only one graduate assistant to wlnn a ceitaiflent had been made has not as yet beam redeployed, and that case Ii still pending. All unIversItIes In the State University System are under directive frown Obancellor Hubert Mauls to refer all union matters to the Board Office. His directive reads, In part, as follows: "When approached by reprusumtatlvm at organised grmq, of auplayess -your cam~, you ad iii uevlucn should refer all ada gnus. to Steve DeAths, or George Beisli in my a." Th. Board of Regents has been dud ad sat bargaining mit tot aD faculty unployeu In leglslatlma permitWig edlecuve bargaining by Sate a-a Financial Aid Info Sessions S.D Student Financial Attain will be qmuub Financial Mi WattS sessions In dorm areas throegheat Weirder Quarter to aqua Sims ub requirements semi flu for financial aid applicatla S.SuuwUWbeIdMmiayat7p.a In the tue Hall fleetest. Roam ad Webaday at I p.m. In lbs DrowN ~ty Can

PAGE 12

ALLIGATOR DECLASSIFIED FOR SALE I 2 -STRING ELECtftIC Y~HA OtJITA~ $125 392-S~6 (A-5t.5~-P) kopo Acoustic guile, fin. shop. 506 troll 70w, gibeon orrpIi~ier two nptls XC large poulobi. bw iv work. well 345)2 nejh street (o-dt-59.p) 6' n.gbncellenl ccn4lelon irons receuly r.buiIs wste.' radial., paddd 'cUba., 72seois, St2~ 378-0663 or after (Wa-Pu) 22W' (o-*-5-p) Dow,,sleeing bog, Mummy with v-lube truttion. Medlun weight hiking bools. never used, sits 9. coil 3fl2353 di. 3 ~ fly (o-Sl-S-p) Weter Pig Sklrftoord Must 5.11 580 Ewc.~l.nt Condition Coil 3764334 Aft. 6. (o-k59-p) 1972 s.jtuki *SW ettellent condition. sJvboc lowing, 2 helmel., turn s~gnol., $flCerbestoffer--nusts.U376s7 ewn.n~. (o-St-59-p) UGENt Must sell Sondo 9,4 C8 360 Al condition lust out of shop fo. tune up) Ashirig prIc, but wilt take b.st off., Coil Howoud 0* 2-7364 (oIl.rnoons) (A-51-SP) PS triumph gt6t onrhouied trans motor very 9ocd body good rodic. new carpeting new buck. clutch Nice 25 mpG ken 378-4432 $1603 (o-5t-5Qp~ 1972 VOGL1~ rno~,t. 'ama 2x 70 Has den bar, kitchen, living room with fireplace 2 b's I both, waIt to '.aII corp.,, control ow heat complM.iy furnished Lu~irious, *cononicol, .os~ Coti 373.1071 and levy. rome and to.~. (A 31-doP) gre.nhcus. sol. healthy ferns, cod'. foliage plonts in cloy pots Sunday lOon, dpn. go west on newberry rd post -75 to nw 9' *1 follow signs A-3VeO. pl kenwood k0403 receiver itt $520 sell $370, dual 2fl for 5155. integrated circuit stern ecsuoliz.r to. SI ~. k.nwood 8002 power omp $150. coil 37379Z (o St-W-p) Surftoord6lO~ Challenger rounded-pin Good Cordilior, call herb 392-9178 A 2T.61-P) Electric Guitar & amp $ phon. 3784744 oft., 6p ,y~ A 51-6l -P) Panasonic am-Fm stereo end cohen. tape ploy. ond amplifier 5120 or best off.' 3fll4% A-3~-6l pl ShmwoodS-7l~oni-fn, stereo onip waits w Dual 1215. auto turntable and quo&fi.M 12 inch speakers just $425 377496 (A-ST-61P) 'SM Selectric Ii typewriter 7 months old used less lyon ~ hours only IS or best offer an-la (A-3T-6l-~) Guild MOEIRA sle.I siring guitar like new -5I25~ 377-1494 (A-3T-61-P) For Sat. New women 3-weed bike nUY*CI condition $60 toll Peggy 01 392IZI betwe.nSOO and 5.~ (A-5T-41.P) P.r Sole: 115mm 28 Auto Vesbin on-OX La,. Good Condition $~ wilt, Call P7-5716 Anytime (A-514)44C) AC-DC Cosen. R.corder mint condillon. Cord, mit, C0. spa. apeS (4), C.*Ot 53500 Colt P2-0645 (ep Ifyingi (A.ST.6l-P) S*'crp N b-w 10 inch xteen. 8 month old lut $CW 377-1496 (A-37-4I-P) fo. sole 66 plymouth voliows wilt, radio-heat., *no.n. running rl.ctly call rorio oft. 7 pm at 372-724 SIlO fa5-62 p1 #efl & Jottit ~6 523 LW. 1Mb. January 17-18 Vince Madin Capitol Records FOR SALE t~wr sleeping bog. raid rated Jo IS dnr.es 58 to 6 in length *~ClIgflt condition 150 toll sue 377 53~ o-2t 62 p) FOR RENT niol. roommate needed to sublet opt 'los. to campus 49 50 per ma util 2 bdooni. furnished swimming pool + laundry coil 378-3961 Ask I. Sieve (BST-toP) for sublet uorim*nt ci I,. modern place opon beginning feb I central air cord A heating, MC', loses, oil far $325pe.nth3fl.,Oll gecig. (B-31WANT TO MOW? if you desire to move fran, your p.ears ocotion we can rent, sublet it or find you o roorTrTbote immediately at NO COST Coil todoylt Uni.d Real Estate Anoc Inc 113 NE 6th Ave 377-6992 (b-fv-5S-cp fleA students roon, for rent by quart. 115 nw lath it 3 blocks from campus coil greg 377-9625 SX to~ ~ doily or step oy, (b-Si-SOp) JANRENT PAIDI Mon in now f.mol. ,oornvnote needed for usury I -b.drrn cpu 595 month + ,, utilities C011 3730088 lb-51-59-p) FOR RENT 2 bdr Behind Norman Hailti Brand new esclus'v. I istinoll Spacious opt with nir heat. carpets Walk to corpus (1416) Open Days 377 6492 SIW-Elficiency No last nonil, or deposit $uliy furnished Quiet oreoll (I l4I5~ Open Porn topm 3774992 3 bdr 5 blacks from U of Flo-kond new .xclusiye listingi I Qustic home with air, heot. fenced Pet, OI( (1149) OperZDoys 377-699? 3 bd,-5?60 Large house located near University Aye Heot, shag corp.ting, drapes Short leo. (1143) C~,en9otrtOSpfl, 3776992 585 includes utttitie,-Co~y house within wolkirg distance of campus deal for couples or singles Better hurryl I { 1142) United Real Estate Asset I3NE thAve Open Qorn-Opm 377-699' (B-ST-SI-C) ROOM For Liberal Student. $75 utit and 550 d.p Furnished Iwo bdm trailer NE section CHIP 376-4378 6-31 61p) Raornnot. needed 2 bedroom opts. close to campus tree parking wot.r. gasl sewage 583-omontly Ielectric S phone Cell Sc,' at 373-3802 oft.' lOX pni (8-5161 P) Information 37(5-4446 HOUEACKEUMG WCWN iMi RANCH Hovss r.nnd by h. Hr. AMa hoise, lot sal. 59)1347. 20 rn~. So of Coinorill. on n.w 441 MIKE'S Bookstore -Pipes Tobocco Shop Downtown 1161.LIS M-FSY --------------FREE BECJUONIC EdGING ANALYsIs WITh AIIJNIUP Iti tO prnnnt Off plugs. pm. cond. iII~A?!2 ohm thru Jon. 21st N. MAIN ST. PHONE 372-5247 Jan lqr~ 2091 Severing bmwne Motowi~ Records -coajam lad, Wilt., A flue (Sm.) USIA, Cub Muegi.

PAGE 13

QQQQOQ 0000 00 00 0 FOR RENT SPA(~ lolA TWO MD#~M *URNISKEI MoBILE HOME LOCATtO ~iAP THE Ii F Corpus 5' 40 A M~!H $25 CEPOSIt t It 62 P1 upp*ppppp~ II,. Ind.p.nd.nt florid. Ailigelo. Md.y. i.no.ry I?, 1975, Pug. U :Ar 4 FOR RENT FOR RENT WOOMMAR I HFDP{2r M A F A P MEI'J~ PFFN( I ',A~&, (.Wt~ BEDQ(X5M SQO <'iii' N 3736246 ~9~JP ------------F .-.-y.* .* ~The Free Movie J 0 nathan e h#doo ir,' Fot~i koLAe 3 block LA' o~th in,' Wi 6029 0A 9I~J ,,fi~, ~ lb 2' 62 p1 ji~ 44;;~444~ Is Bock v~ng SeoQu Original * Score AND Jack Lemmon in his Oscar S a ye The L winning role ger sto *fl I Ft I :1 n S 'Li ~ 4 L~ F feature 444444444 233 W. University Ave Phone STARTS TODAY Eli! LEE U uS MOST WMORABI.E ROLE 'NE CE ~UrVE HEN WAmNG FOR. erie do, n I4 i~ir,, in F'i~r'r (I ''mci L)mrerh~i'ekmnn m~liflimtmemj .m.I~oPn mn nil iItr~nrFnf.nl iii 47~ O!~ ',, oorvmtr'r.~nn 0' minim -:rfl, 60 -a 5EXCITING ADVENTURE! -S INFORM 15*.3761446 IA DEOtICEMS Boon + cotticiot's POINTS LIMITED ECIllON PRINTS 17W. UnIv. 378.3264 FOR RENT remove oar role wanted. 55225 pr month 4 utihitres, Villog. Pork Ape., lonun. y sf1 ne roll 373 5750 or 377 8209 (b "62 pi female wnrted Brondywir,. opt $67 2 din, 2 koth (org. ml JOfl rent reootloble urn iv stereo hid pool etc roll or corre by W ISO Jfl-6031 21 61 P) FEMALE ROOMMATE sHore 2 bd fnjrished opi on lokepoof fulli eqwpped or,, rand, free rent 575 mc I 3 uP lilies 3734737 (8-2T-6I P) WANTED I 'berol Fentole RnorTmal. Wanted to ~hnre luxurious opt 2 bedroom oil f,'rnished $50 a month Inquire a~m 5 p iii at he V'lloge Susan 2~2 (C JOT 60P} Student a, couple wanted a 'ho,. spocqous 3 br house with 2 rr students I 5 nin drve Pets welcome 67-mo 315 NE 43rd Yerrrne 5 pr C-3T-4&P) Wonted P10cc to live Own roe," Into I M good ,T'USFC. good peopl, coIl 392 9573 or 0133 (cove non,. & nurTiber Please respond Mon c-5l59-p) roommot. 2 N opt. Furnished $52 ~ 1 sIflipes ronibly gatortow,, opit coIl 377W3 '5' 59 P1 ~eniole own room 4both kitchen 401he1 dryer piv'l.g.s SSScc mo ut'1 ties Coral 39~ 655 85 or 373 QJSO After 5 No pets P1.0. (C.SP-tO-P} emol. roomniot. urgently -4 d.s.sroteIy needed rircoyc opt $70 monthly + -3 utilities pleoso contact deb' 0r cindy in,mediately 373-~I4Y (C5T.58.~~ oat a SILVER Top prices paid or cIa., rings, old eweIry. sic confidenliol coil (Vcd Studenti need roommate own 'oar" in greol Home Friepioce plan's, iiitic yard tri~ndship 588 ta F 'penses cull 3733734 (C 21-61 P mnle oarr'r~ot. own rOOfl~ FF~ 2 N opt in tedior' Sas run util colt aIm at In ~8I2 ofter 2 ~ C 3761 P~ nonimate to shore bra, I i)OFi~*t U! W ird rr~ndows $66 to I D'sp~rote AC pool tennis sauna nI' %o'rdc C~&, 372 0379 0 4' 6' HELP WANTED a U El PG In THE GREEN HORNET MIDNIGHT SHOW Mused. Moutin Brando, Richard Burton, ioni@3 Cohuni, Jell. MuSe, Weller Matthou. Bingo 9cw. end Job,. AulIn he,. I., common? THEY Mi. LOW CANDY CANDY FRI SAT / 001ST MISS IT SHE MAY NEVER COME AGAIN ,. I,. YW' OENERAfIONSOfsWMCft By Neil Diamond Friday At 8:00 pm On The Grass By The Union .* 01ff ALL lENTIl ESTEWRMAEL' Lap~qby.* Climp. ~. ,~

PAGE 14

Page IA. Tb. lnd.p.nd.n' Florida Ailigofor. Friday. January 31 IV5 tHERE S MORF TO SEE WITH R TV Channels A weather channel Li P I Ne,&s New Yolk StocI~ E ~cbong., ~ FM ~tatgons on TV Channels, and 9 FM and AM stations on he ~M band UNIVUSIIY CITY DIVISION CMLI CO. INC. 522 N. MAIN ST. INIVIJISITY CITY TRAVEL 923 W. Univenhy Aye. Cclnesvllle, Ma. 32601 a 377-4226 CHINA WEEK MCCM'Y Gm NO tue. C" kt ~F MEI~ IS KY ~J4lLT0% flAW C*iNESE wrrACTh-aA STATE JUIM. 445N?.75 c01W 041MM ~6'TR EXMIBIT G#INTE A l-aqs.-4*l7-Th i .,. OdES PRINT 041SV 2C FW0 REITZ UNiON nn-.' tide I45-i-INS rwiSbvI. ARTS4SZB4LES Sm ~fl e 0~ 'Jti] SAN MING ORIENTAL MART Tel. 377-2492 403 NE 23rd Ave (Corner of N.Main & 23rd Aye) OPEN MON-SAT. 10-6 comma AND JAPANUE room Orocain gift. -ony IS hems b clan fuss. Eu. 3.11 Skin. Nd, Smic. lmisnt Needs a r 7W. SUNFieDiiR~~~ HEALTh FOODS Hoff mm Wed., HI ft. Psdua AUTOS 967 mustong PS a auto ~89 vO new tire. 7 n~g body ned 'ntehior oood condition drive rain perfect $650. oH 6 ew IOu opr after 5pm 0-ST-tO73 mozdo 006 ouoniolic. oar etc 22-31 npg $2. In good condition 377-ASIA or 373-6701 est 235 GST 5.Py 69 Comoro ,xc.llert condition air auto trans 350 ci dne owner SI 100 CoIl 378836) (0-31-al P) ___________ 1971 Suhau wagon good tires, ac 33 'pg SI2~ coIl 3732353 oft., 3 pa, (9. S'59p ~~7Y~~Wrondtior 3-sped r'iusI sell $I call 376-0610 oft S pit or S'-5~ during he day, ask for nickel 0 5T-eOP) Vulva, 970 hAt A-C $1650 Netotioble. 3735~5O. keep trying (0 ST t&~) 1971 Cope. l6~ must toll A s~ieed rodiols air cond low rnileoge air condition coil 373~937 asking 6W wiilin~ to wad thing out (g-54-02-p) CLA5SIC 66 MGS mint cond custom interior. tIeso tap., mi~hel.nsm rodiols Z rrpg must n to 0,precioe $1375 or best of4e. 373-0254 (g-Sl-2-pI PERSONAL g.u porting now openot. SW l~k S S it Ave park c1on to bryan', tigers, minor, A IlItle halls hourly daily S Do.,g Clan And Tb. l4ct Nut corning to tb.eaeFlasas 71h611*afJanwo .hows, 95 Ii Tide U. li~ advance of -or union ha. office I-4~59-c) gay C#flWWJflly savic. cern. gay nfl., grid women me. thuredoys al 7 pm IP NW Sterr Info coil ton a 372-IUl Jean at 0ove at 392-3575 (~-)Of-3P-p) S~E5 ANW FUGA LG~J. CW 091W. Speciolhzlnq In Ingush hok cuttIng. blow wing for the In loch uneu Drop by Colenua4 Moan 716 W Univ Ave W-2643 (I.fl-5$) LLARN kARAIV qualified lITWtCfl fflw close Sating Soc., oIl 09" mdc A fe.cl* fat reg S funher info toll hewed 373-8252 I-b-U-pd) ~E-YEAa-aO (niosly) LAS nee ho. Very oftectiocare and int.lIIrl Ccli tory or How~ 3fl-W 335 1* Mi, 0, (J-SO-54-NC) if you -it'. I-bicycle accident Monday 4-75 at ~ in front of VULL! ~*L Call 392-2 UIG4NT (J-5I-40-P) PERSONAL OVERSEAS JOE Australia Europe S Arerico Africa Students all profeujon' and occupolions $700 to $~ monthly Espens. pod. Overtinie, sightseeing Free *rformoior, TPANSWORLD RESiARCH CO ~)ept 06. 0 Box 603 (one Modeo (A 94925 fl6T 60 P1 Cm, fociol ho,, renioved ~c, nianently Call Edmund Owy.' eI.rtolog'.t over 20 years experience Colt 312 8039 i-FR-MCI Book Pock,. "Rugby 5k,,'., Hiking Shorn. 'rag I Shoe. Wooltich Shirts, Whet. Stag Sp.dc Bathing Suds Aliens A~uotic & Trail Cent. 3448W Univ 373 9233 (~ I, 55-p) 4'edding invitot or. III 40 p.r tOO. ~Ltifl*55 cords $995. rubber stomps. nognetic signs, office p.ntir,~ Cliff Hall ~pnIIp~N~inJJ.!&58-C) &ARA1'~ LESSGJS Small Clossos man 1215 54k Ave (off I 'h S. Mon thru Sat even. ito 9 37*7131 (i-20t.tO.P) KARATT UNIF~MS QualIty, bl.ock.d $24 up kovat.Do, 1215 NW 5th Ave I 1,1k of t~. St ~n-Wed-Frj eve 371.7131 (J-5T-~OPl ~t.Jo. Berlin. London, F1s, Wool to travel or Mu weeks will, fellow studeel. cod the -.r shady eogu.-luly. d.paflur.-$1350 Zontoc Carl or Moillyn 371-7104 or Joyce P3-WoN, S PM foe nor. Info J-7T-58. P1 nw decent eutle one great ye down and a tililon 'ore to con,. hove a nice lotef anile kope you e oy me as i do you -cuddle LO~Y (J.Ii42~) All mn have bw creot.d It carry forward on *ver-odvarcing cvillbatoo -'i0'i writing. (j-ll-2C) Surnl. 5.spr1.e Happy If, SWP Mo.,y hopy Quorfll kess Smnilingi Kot (jil62-p) ~&$ Pact'. i~been sosJ~ort bat so long fl~4 you so Much it hurtt Putty thinkers need wm friends I need you I love you ~lGO~R (~-It42-p) Wildtfe t-*ins hoed tcined Order no,. Moe, any oninaf dane fond washable Pt.ce. --$6-I Coil Jore 3929436 (11142-9) taco, happy w'nlvee.ory an sunday. o yeW filledwalk IWO roe days, you know *4* IC OfilO mocha and always will O~? in here babes Icc (l-1t42.9) Peopl. interested in lb. Babel Writing. Ge invited to a dIscussion "Moving the Existence ci God' p.,, ttn Friday Jon It ~n, I ~S, R.tz UnIon 1.1t42.c) LOST & FOUND 125 kowcnd or return of red and wi'it. esogi. fbi. Io.I vicinity of soot. ion 9 Not Dod. co togs no qu~tiofls (oil 3~7 ~O4 392 297U1 3t-Sp~ ost5k 50 colculolo. bet Wa ~-A ond Shond., pots on busoen Reword 'JO ~uei o.~.d Coil 3928643o' 3736976 1ST 58FO4JND SiT 04 Car Keys Identify CALL LANA 373-9204 L-3T6ON-0 Found P0*, of m*ns blink gPo. in block vinyl con with rubber noW budge Found 'hursdoy night in street reor univ 7th Si Ask for Wordo or 392 U2 IS' 59-eel SERVICES -IS myfwadwoat V., UhUt'3 you, Dana love. LG Something for Everyone DEPRESSED hiLlEl" Publi Offered 1937 U.S. Gov't Art Prints Experienced lypasi will hype errr papers, thesis Or diue.totaon Fosi occurote seryic. at reosonoble roles CoIl 3138923 n~-t~ 534') Scubo Class Stoning Scuba e~uiprnt provided. A apen wot' dives, Internolionol C.nlficosiori, Tort, Allen (Caho.t Wild Kingdom Repairs, Service. Sole., *ertols. -Allen. Aouotic 1roil Cent., 344W Univ 373-9233 (rn-f. 55Auto repaIr, Foreign arid Ooin.ics. gtoronl.ed watt at good rates, .e Sill o. Mi&.otZt6N C 3rd Ave Iron, 0 Wtill 7 ~ fA-ST-M-P) OY TCrJGAS to, sprIng break diving and camping trip Fly by s.opjone ban, Key West march 21-25 of 25-29 All scuba uipenefl provided Esplo. hIstoric Pen Jefferson $115 wIth ceqtlflcafla. $I~ indude. full scuba course toll Sc', Dynonia 373-~O69 (M-5T-U-P) M 1C SIUVENT aNTiS ~!R~ FULL RANGE OP IfWING SEIVICUS. MWICAL AIC DAY CAM KRhtA4 FM! 2AiCVRSERVfl CM' 3774125 (M-9TCuilom cIolblng.rriod. 10 yOur wishes .,ewern shins, gown,. clocks~ olterallon general sewing e'e.aenced aenl.e.e euson3i7-5607 (M-3t-6IlOSE RA LEA5E--.hI~ Reg Aniericoes Soddlebred Geld Far pleosur. or show 376-lIST (M-ST-43.P) Will lype yew diutoiion Thesis Reports, monuwipn, Etc experienced d Faetanidoccuae 377M13 M4ttl-P) LEARN KA*ATh qualified insuctars new does SIng soon all age. mole & finale, for req. S f.nlher info coil hoviand 3734252 rn-k-55-) tuec,,want-Alt CA-AMA travel dIscounts year-round. Sudevit Alt IrQvel Ao.ncy, Inc. 5299 Roev4I Rd A4IOra, Go ~ 252-3S (M-IJT. S#) t~5 IOAICED lint. prede ranch, ,nfommol, frIendly. dl fatUitIes 3 ml tie,, uf .toll.-P5,, posture-SaD an4799. keep trying. (M-$OT-4O-P) dive the bahamas spring br.ok .jnllnited ow-S rweols a day-a bank all for$[Cfar5gioriau.doys nor 24-3-pi. te oppelboon. 3924755 M-ST-4O-P) Self Reolizaioo Asejetonce A 9effiaI tap On your spirikiel evoivemefil aided by yet. astrology chat,. Qennis rn-A's will teach) min-5-S-o) an NOtE ATTAIN GOAlS By ACING ANY n4YSICAI AS WE NTA I MtflY4TUO~ NO NEMOY A114E10 373-m9 boned 0 Pault-CertIfied AAO4, PA~4jvn-2lt-A&p) ___ IMPORTED PARTS S ACCESSORIES FOR ALL FOREIGN CARS ASK ABOUT OUR STU~4T DISCOUNT MON -FRI. 9;006:OO PM SAt 1O:OO'2:OO PM IOU S. MAIN ST. 372-4w I A series of rare coincidences has led to the historic dascove7 color antique art prints dint were 'lost sInce 1937 Thy are now being offered to the American public line., R.o.flhl Back in 1937. immediately following the depressIon years, Mrs Eflanor Roosevelt and a select group of a dozes nationally prominent people formed a voluntary natimial committee for art appreciation to create an art jiouram that would give the public a veilneeded moral lift. It was the commIttee: decla to sleet the world. ~ famous pain17th, latit best paintings Maum. Gogh, Galrnborough, Please, Gaupin, Titian, Sc., aitd to reproduce them in f dl color perfectly as humanly possible and make them available to the public at a price withi, the reach of nearly everyaw. Ah.d.*.d In 1937 For wine unknown relic.,. alter a quantity of these beautiful reproductions were made, the entire project was abandoced and this collectlatof perfect reproductIons was stored In a Brooklyn waraoo.e, *1w. -remain. edundbturbed sIne. lifT. The lost collectIon was i rediscovered" aid leading lithographers and art cities agree that the subject matter arid qualIty of detaIl and color reproduction Is incredibly ac~ curate, Over $5,OU.iO had been spent to make finely ~ glass plates authent!~'ri~LaR liii prints are literally collectors Items and have been appraised by the American Appraisers Assoc. at 5700 each print. Once they have ben sold. titer, will be no more available. A truly excellent art iiflvestflefiti that makes a fabulous gift. Av.dJ.bl. 1. PwhIic Now, after 38 years line full color lixis (ave. slue prints are fInal~', availahie to the public at U Iota colketlo. olISprints. Sesidca.hcheckor mmy orde, to: U.S. Surplus, Dept 'X35.PO.Boxtos. tarmanaCalif 91356 Fully GUARANTEED. Cenhlcate of authenticity given with each set. Mastercharge ant BarlkAmericard OK give card ?iufnbert.

PAGE 15

Parking garage to be bu By KEN GOODMAN AHIgator Staff WrIte, Diamond Village resident, "ill nit ill am ci, ci l~ h hcy believe will be a dangerous ncrca~c HI iXIllic I~illui~ing the completion of a nearby parking gdragc said Gin Koepke planning consultant in the hF I)mvision ot Planning and Anajysis. Residents tear that traffic on Diamond Village [)rivc will increase to dangerous proportions as autos lea~bng the taclt~ use the dityc to men ~outlIwest 13th Street WHEN cOMPLETED, the 8(flcar. mulnie lie southwest of the married housing complex vel garage will x. between tlw 1%. ledwe.&.t n.M. MkS.v. MS.y, January Il. 3971 P.~15 t despite complaints niiiplc~ ari~l hc ] )1i]li~ Miller Health Center. I iii. iid ill '~e NI a or Don Senatore said he hoped a ltVLr liii hirimca~lc. ~~miIar to the one guarding the I W .i VP C Ret it Iii or, would be erected Residents ~~tuld acti' ate the barricade bx using either special c a or keys. FOLlOWING a series ot petitions and letters, including One to Coy. Reuban Askew. Koepke ~atd in a December tbth letter to Senitore, pro~itIons will be taken to close the road through diamond d Village at its southwest extremity." Three '~ecks later, on ian 6. Senator approached a fleeting at the Parking and Fran~,~ttn.inn nck ing a bai rcadc thai ~ouId not ckve oft ihe drive corniletely, i~ Kocpke ~uggesIe~l, but allow village residents only to use the drive. Senator ~atd But according to Bonnie Jones. traffic and parking coordinator and secretaryy tor the Parking and Transportation Committee. Senator indicated (at the meeting) that he did not tel that Diamond Village residents had problems as tar as parking and traffic flow.' any Koepke. who did not attend the rtieeting. received inforniatioii from Jones and said, They want it left just -,L:-.~Ii t~. A------serious this flit -...,. 13. I '~* ~ I 'ut',,* win uc uunc a' rneir request. -Crni n,,t*=. IerNtt TKURS FR & CadWYCE LUXE JAH. IS. 17 6 8 Thurs., 6 30. 9 30 Fri. Sat. 5 00, 8 00, fl 00 2ND FLOOR AUD. 50c A Man Escaped ~r Mrrw mu A p.sng hssnc* w laceS Mo* f von' his Nazi fl9t'5 in occu#.d Pence. His de.ninatoci So escape .v.ins wit. jc~ hntflMg .*ys.a tat .ch ound tills tie 'hlsn'. wit. an aum .4 doe., end i.nI.wu.* dune. Tb. powedul .cldng by a non.lsslan.l -,s *tbo~ ta A. es*ooidnory air of dhcsctoc Rcb.fl *nn. Hewing bee. prison' of war in o Not. camp hM,.fl. dii. Ill., ii. a wdcl p.nonai meaning icr Sto.on Win .4*. Qacid Mn, less AIm at tie for fat 957 ro.~ Need. Rh. Ac.d.nty ua. 3*N. '9 SC ROW MS ':06. *:S a NEW PATHS FOR SELF-DISCOVERY A nSa of kh.me V r.dhcuionI On VOflOUS toplo ~mhg --'~ ~ SAW IN ThROUGH GUIALI FANTASY ABC N1 m.bwtMI.Id D. G.altlh.toIi' WaS. Jafl 7.91S ~.m Iiin ISA 123 PERU lOIN. W ~flOS by A. I Wavm bIt Unlo.' and Student M*MOI rn-iI MEDEA Marl. d raFfle Eur i p Cal lag tic TIOV Ides' stars it, on lassie revenge. Directed Paso? Hi, the stor Ito a primitive and darkness. Rol it 'One of the yea MON., JAN. 20 MSB AUD On Jonuory 24, 975. Union will sponsor Tn her first adaptation of drama about by Pier Piolo y is developed itual of earth Stone called r ten est' 7:00; 9:30 5Cc Ih. J. Wayne Relti THE APPLE TREE hi bes.Iq of Ann. Th.fl. ft.a.tfld By lb. New Y,& That. Ca.npeny dinner begins at 6:30 p.m. In the J. Wayne fl.in Union UolIrooo. and Is followed by o p.rormnonce of tire, famous Aa.dcoo Sofl stofl.s. set to music. Ticitets available alt,. Ucilvefity tx d4Ic. (Constant Theatre) beginning Mondoy. January 13*. Uc4PS.d.sh StE O.s.S PUblIC SLOG U r mcgee no S Ma. M. UU.! 7,39:3 P.M. i.~umi k-F-I'.IIeIeud.n 38.0 N.Inden* C~xn-' TvUSsU Pa Sfla SI'.' 51t614de.* *,scow.mnd.sa YOGA UTADON C r. he',. 13Mar A 7,3-SOPS. Nil RU CT S teds. ,ltUIqMd.a liOSNe.U.des' C ame aecur roe C CU ME liwa ha SP.&. 17 7:S9:Up.a INIIUUCTOU hsnLysdt. C.a.lkss Pqch.IqIt aotndasse (w'."e~e) P.C Me.4edafit (wc.wle) -di (WOOS Tu.e.Ja. 21 U.t* ldS4sUp -. macmm: in. MI.~ I 74-75CAMPUS GAMES REITZ UNION GAMES AREA CHESS TOURNAMENT BEGINS JAN 20 lAST PAY TO REGISTER JAN 19 NON-CREDIT COURSES R~Isinroflon to, all wov4abop. acid kent will take ploc. in Roo.n 3~ trur 900c rn'o4Wpn, .Jonuc~6*roughJonuo~ I' Sibden's faculty and staff rn.i,,be,. acid tielr spouse. will hen p.iori'y he l.soc .coJIm.nt from Jonuory 6 Amugh Januory '0. fly ofle tis nine will regls*oMon be Open so oils pe.nu. Oje to price and mgiMmIlcn difl.,.oWM. I, will 6. seceary .bat each pcinfl 'on'. to r.giM.r~y4ii eppop$o. iduitl*icalton. fnmllvn., torn. dMd.ml ci. limited mid, A.r.Eon. on a fivstcom I Ire.s.nd beet P.ncn fly O~y vegia. lot *en.eIvn hco.a. '.gIsftoton F. all woddiope end lessons Is coned. yaw decision -enmJl final by 4S p.m. pending di. I vs. .ch.d.Md clan RMw,& will only he cirtunsnc S amos SOW WS. Jan fl-MarS (CESIOC 7,S-9t3 Ps~ Sn ~O.vd SILSISa lLUNas4hrjd.e* r man 7:89.3 P.M. -i PM b~aM Situ LU N-Indessle CT~4ts I*se~ i.s-9ap.a -i fl.4 SItU Ibda IL. t.4#.dn (Nbli::I2A7Jo lv. Jest Il-Mart INIUIIfl 'tee M.E'4y SItUI$vd.fl Ito Nes.I*jtaM5 -a) IIn.Ibd. -A. wedding day mode w~ As. cm-N S) Thus. Ma Uas* & Its9iUp.a an' In. ftIe~ tItUIwdSS* Site a. Wets less. SD and b& U 7:U-tUP.M. ShIUCTOR: teal S&U Sudass a.gSIb.4*edaws C ymaii Yuae. .~ II -~4 5007S P.M. sin tedS hi. 'MaIn'.-. lam aa.saa -di a) MVI.SYUNG SANJO (SqInnM~ lIsuaJ.nU-M.& 7dC-'MSP~M. ,muuaaa2 oea api. SItUI'ed.fl 310 N-b.d.a t r

PAGE 16

N. 14, Th. Indw.nd.R.ddc MIIgot.r, Mdcy, hnu.ry I?, 4915 Victorious ERA draws support in Gainesville By RENA EPSTEIN Ailigator Staff Writer Wednesday passage of the Equal Rights Amendment br Women ERA) by the Florid. House Committee on Human Rights and Needs drew praise troni Gainesville supporters ol the ERA. The ERA only needs approval by the rules committee before going on the house floor for a vote. THE AMENDMENT was defeated by the Senate, during the last legislative session, by a 21-19 vote. Alyce MeAdan,. president of UF's National Organization fbr Women, said she is delighted and excited" about the ERAs Wednesday victory. 'We expect it to pass the house without any problem and we're hoping to increase the margin in the house to two-thirds majority. if the legislature passes the ERA then well be up there in April to thank them for it." she said. A PARADE is scheduled for April 14 in Tallahassee to show support for ERA. According to McAdam. people from all over Florida, including legislators. will be there to show their support. icanette Blevins. president of the Alachua County Women s Political Caucus, said she thinks the ERA will pass the house but cxpont a close vote in the senate. SHE SAID area supporters of ERA are trying to lobby Senators Bob Saunders, DGainesville, and Buddy MacKay, D-Ocala, to vote for the ERA when it goes to the senate for a vote. 'Sen. Bob Saunders voted apinst ERA last 'car and Sen Buddy MacKa) has not Had a chance to vote on at yet. she said. Blevins is trying to conduct a public education campaign to generate communal) support tbr ERA. We are sponsoring a workshop on March Ii to provide information on ERA &uid distributing literature and encouraging other organizations to endorsee the ERA." Blevins said. ALTHOUGH there as not much opposition to ERA, Blevins said niany people are apathetic and don't realize the amendments importance. A recent poll of Florida voters indicated that 72 per cent favored the ERA. Die most encouragement for this yen's passage of ERA is that not one Iqislator who voteti against ERA last year was re-elected to the legislature, according to Blevins. Another Gainesville supporter of ERA also praised Wednesday's victory. JUNE LITTLER, president of the Gainesville Organization for ERA, said there were many good people on the conunittee. it's just great but we have much to do in the satiate. We still have a certain ainrnrnt of educational processes to work on members of the Senate." she said, She said she hopes it will pass but doesn't want to be "overconfident." A petition to drum up support for the ERA is also being circulated now. According to Blevins, they already have enough signatures to show the legislators. It will show that if ERA doesn't pass, the legislators who vote against ERA will be defeated in the next election," she said. AN OFFER YOU CAN T REFUSE SUPER LUNCH SPECIAL 10:30 am-Spin $1.25 ONLY Any Sandwich (except the Gator tail) A Glass Of Beor Or Soft Drink Potato Chips Pickle pitcher of Beer Only $1.00 Over 50 Sandwichesrochoos~From Open til A HEALTH INFORMATION (EDITOR'S NOTE luside Iufnu.tlo. 6. weekly feature In The Alilgfto., pr.ddin reader wIth .utho.ltath. Infoe.ado. -aD .,pects of paternal health and p.1km. of the Student Health ServIce. Bring your quad. to Roont 305, i. Way. Relta Union or the lobby of the Student Health ServIce. F. further Information pbs. contact the Health Education Office at the Studeut Health Senice -Ro., 237.) What 6 the bat thing to do foe a black eye? You should apply cold compresses to the eye br about 35 minutes every hour. The compresses will help stop the bleeding and minimize the swelling. After 24 hours, use warni compresses instead of cold ones. The heat will speed the blood circulation around the eye, hasten the reabsorption of the blood and decrease swelling. Continue to use warni compresses until the swelling and discoloration improve. The black eye should get increasingly better with continuous use of compresses. In most cases, the discoloration will begin to lade -changing flon, a purple to a yellow-green hue -in a few days. although it may take as long as one or two ,&ecks to disappear completely. Since a blow to the eye can cause serious damage. )OU should coimult a physician. indicating heredity is a factor in the development of the disease. However, the exact mode of transmission is not understood. Factors, such as air pollution, pollen and other allergens, psychological stress, and infections serve to precipitate episodes of wheezing in persons presumably susceptible to asthma because of this inherited trait. What an the mymplomns of dakota? 0. you alway. ha. to take shoes? Symptoms of increased thirst, increased frequency of urination, increased hunger and weight loss strongly suggest the diagnosis of diabetes. The finding of sugar (glucose) in the urine and an abnormally high blood glucose generally confirms the diagnosis. Treatment consists of diet, exercise, and insulin. Some diabetics do not require insulin. Those who do almost always require daily shots of insulin for the remainder of their lifetime. GO INI ALL TIff I FALLCOr'lr'cr. MMD CMC~Y WCCI< JULES VERNE BAND LAST 2 NIGHTS! Tues., Wed., Thurs NO COVER Fri. ft Sat $1.00 ~CCRORWII1C VOUCARCTODR Every MON. 8-10 1515 SW 13th St. Dcc 1mm Sewock.n snow Th. Mod 1a 5.neS. ,cMduUn~ pI.niy ot ft. pinking. Coil 377CA crco~ b~ 50 NW &h5 ondwvH.vI rD INK

PAGE 17

WEEKEND SPECIAL FRIDAY, SATURDAY, SUNDAY 500 750 $1.00 OFFOFFOFFon l2-piecebujetg 15-piece buckets =21 piecebrrel 378-7411 Rutherford's Guarantees The Most for Your Money I n A Diamond See Us Before You Rny.' $350.00 Fine quality 38-point diamond-engagement ring, beautifully set no six prong white gold Tiffany mounting and lovingly nestled in the luxury of a Rutherford's box. y3 carat $250.00 IN THE MALL -c Th.indep.nd.n*AoddAJlIgaor Md.y, J.w'y Il. 1975. Pq. 17 NOW MEMBERS moved to sniolleroff ice photo by andy newman NOW office moved; McAdam plans appeal By RENA EPSTEIN Aillptn Staff Writer UF's National Organization for Women (NOW)moved out of its]. Wayne Reit, Union offict flunday, but will appeal the decision Ot the board of managers at a board meeting Wednesday at 4 p.m. The Union Board of Managers voted l.st November to move NOW to a smaller office in the Union's studeiat activities venter. IN THE PAST year NOW has taught many attempts to move them to another office. O~ April 2. 1974, members fought oft an attempt to move the florida Quarterly into the NOW office. On May 24, 1Q74, they kept florida Blue Key (FBK) from moving into the office. NOW's former office will he used as a 'floating" office for groups like Interfraternity Council (IFC), Interhall Council. Cator Growl and Panhelenic. a sorority group. THE BOARD of managers voted that these groups will share the office, each using it at a diftrent time of the year. Although NOW Director Alyce McAdam requested Vice President for Student Affairs Arthur Sandeen to permit NOW to remain in its former office until an appeal was made, Sandeen denied the request. Sandeen said he reviewed the situation 'carefully' and decided to abide by the Board ol Managers decision to mot NOW. 1 urged NOW and the Board of Managers to review the decision at the board meeting Wednesday. I don't know wh~ decide but I think they have a Ic portent things to do than ju allocations." he said. BOARn OF Managers me Harris refused to comment on the move NOW out of its office. Harris said he was working on the ~ents leading up to the Lt they will A more ittiLsti~ space iTiber Bert decision to a report Board of of Managers decision that he will present at the Wednesday meeting. According to Sandeen all student groups were notified of the November space allocation decision by Harris. NOW director Alyce McAdam said NOW did not get due process' because they were never informed that they were up for consideration tbr a new space. MCADAM said at the Wednesday appeal NOW will explain their use of the office. "We are going to prove we use the office. And we have the logs to prove it. also' she said. NOW moved its office furniture and literature into the new office but are not unpacking, according to McAdan,. She said the new office is one-third smaller than the former one. 2205 NW 6th St. ~H4L 14 carat $175.00 HI?4~443j

PAGE 18

The Independent Florida Alligator Mtoy. J*nu*iy Il, 1915 Peg. 18 '4'. D w 1 F irK i S~ ~(~rtb Kit' Houston Astms By GREG FORK ER AllIgator Sport. EdItor a strange and terrible saga Six deaths. one near-death, and a ~tabhing -no pennants. no World Championships. Its just about all the Houston A~tros ot the National Baseball league have to oiler the record lx~oks. Perhaps they should he called the DkAstros. it seems appropriate. The club, while playing under a dome. seems lobe playing under a ('loud of doom also. Cheek the list -~ way too long -long enough to make one shudder. JUST LAST SUNDAY, January 5, the Astros' Don Wilson ,.a' lotind dead in his carFlie car was in the garage of their suburban HOUStOn home -Wilson's five-year-old son was also In the garagedead. His nine-year-old daughter. above the garage in a bedrron, sleeping. wM overcome by carbon monoxide umes that leaked from the garage. She entered the hospital in a coma in critical condition. She is now reported to he recovering. After an autopsy. it was discovered that Wilson, who plagued national league hitters with his lasthall. had been ~Irunk. Just a little more than a year betbre, the Astros fine ccntcrtielder Cesar Cedeno shot a I 9-year-old girl in a motel room that was situated in a rather run-down section of the star's Dominican Republic. He was charged with involuntary in ans laughter. mArs THREE DEATHS so t~r. Three too many, but there are more. Leukemia hit the Astros' Walter Bond in 1967. He had shown real promise in 1964 when he used his 6-foot-7. 235pound trance to bit lb doubles, seven triples, and 20 homers and drive in 85 runs br the Astors. But the dreaded blood disease he contracted cut short his career -and his lift. He was just 29. Someone even younger died as a result of a mishap in~olvng an Macos player in the spring of 3973. Larry Dierker, .1 strong-anned pitcher for the Astros since 1964. hit a 12 year old boy while driving near Cape Kennedy. The accident, the result of large crowds just after a space shot, killed the boy instantly. Dierker was not charged, since witnesses said the boy dashed out in front of the pitchersear. THE FIRST in the long line of Astro misfortunes came in 964 when Jim Uinbright.a pitcher in hisearly 30's developed black mole cancer. There was no cure then, there is none now. Umbright died. Fhen there are those other calamities -the near-death of Houston shortstop Roger Metiger. Oddly enough. Wilson was involved in this one, also. The two collided while chasing a pop fly in the outfield of the Astrodone last April. Metzger swallowed his tongue. Only quick action by the Astros' Doug Reder and John Edwards saved Metzrr's life. Quick action also was a part of a stabbing involving the Astros' former slugger Jim Wynn. Wynn came home late one night in December of 1970 -his wife pave him a quick stab -and Wynn gave her a quick divorce. While divorce is not the nicest thing in the world, it doesn't come near the indents involving the Astros since their inception in 1962. MAYBE IT'S NOT nice to fool Mother Nature and play under that dome. Whatever it is, the Astros' Sports Information Director, Bobby Risinger. put it the only way any Houston official could. "We're going to keep punching, maybe we'll get lucky. Whether they'll get lucky remains to be seen. But one thing seems certain -the grim reaper has a locker in the Astrodome. Or should it be the Astrodoon,' Challenge Tennessee in Knoxville Gators try to dethrone King By ANDY COHEN Alligator Sped. Wits The Tennessee Volunteers are the only Southeastern Conference club John Lotz has failed to upend since coming to UN' nearly two years ago. Saturday night in Knoxville's spacious coliseum Loft and his Gators will get the opportunity to change all that ~ss they challenge the nationally ranked Volunteers. DUT A WIN won't be easy as Tennessee sports two of the nations top planets in sophomore Ernie Grunt~ld and freshman superstar Bernard King. Both ha'e guided the Volunteer, to an 3 overall mark so far this season. And after a disheartening defeat against Auburn Monday night. Lotz seem' wary about the Gators next obstacle. 'They have two of the top players in the nation in King OIW Grunfeld." Lotz said. "King is so good that most teams have been conceding him 25 points a game. "They're a very physical team that likes to run the ball right up their opponetV throats." TENNESSEE IS currently 22 in the conference as they have lost two close decisions ~t Alabama and Kentucky. The Gaton are currently 6-A overall and 2-2 in the conference. Though devoting much of his thought to Tennessee. Lotzccmuld not helphut retied on the Gators' poor showing earlier in the week against Auburn. "We played poorly in the first half and then played even worse in the second half while trylngtocatch up,' Loti said. "HOST OF TUE teams we play in this league are more talented than we are so in order to win we have to do everything were capable of to the hilt. Against Auburn we just didn't.'' He once again singled out sophomore forward Jerry Moore br playing "am aggressive game' against Auburn. Despite the poor showing against Auburn. Lou doesn't plan on juggling his starting five for Tennessee. NORMAL CALDWELL and Don Bostic will start at guard. Moore and Gene Shy will be at forward and alp Williams trill play center Shy Is currently leading the Gators in scoring with a 35.7 average. He is followed closely by Norman Caidwell. who is averaging slightly over 14 points a game. After the Tennessee game. che Gate,, return home to begin preparation for a Monday Alligator Alley battle with Mississippi. r t iWI N USE UNMAN UP NAN D KING .29pclnh~ l2rsboundsagum.

PAGE 19

The h.d.ndn~ ~.ie0 AhII*r, Sdd.~, Jc.w.w I?, 1971 p.o. II Track team breezes at Senior Bowl By RICK AI)EIMAN Alligator Sports Writer Ar, awesome display cii power anti bflhIi(c ~ ~lihea K thy LII track team at Wedne~dav night \ Sen 'or 13 tA I med I Mobile. Ala, The G ators copped us e f.r~t placc~ and tot dcci 13 ptin~~ to win in a cakewalk over second place irii~her Florida State who tallied 34 points. JACKSON STATE was third with 21 poini~ tollot&ed h) Auburn with 13. Southern M.s.is~ippi wrh S atici M .ssissippi State with live. Alabama brought up the rear a' the) ml) nmarla~ed one point Senior Beaufort Brown and Will Freeman "crc both victorious in their respective events thereby qualil)ing tbr be NCAAs. BROWN SET a meet record in the 440 and Coach Dave Adkins believes that the spetdster is re-gaining the mini that madehim the nation's top&N)nian two seasons ago. 'Be.uhxt continue to show why ibis year will be a return to the prominence he had in 73,' said Adkins. He was in complete control. He knew the track like the back of his hand." Freeman won the pole vault clearing 16-I. The Gainesville junior is defending his 1974 SEC Moor and outdoor championshIps. Flerida vs. Tennessee Pmhfrs 44.fldy C&inm.FleuI~ by 3 Gnu Vein, -.Tmmaeuse by 4 Rick Adds.Tausmee by IS ~t Gases3.T.m. by IA Lou Uqaaeaeel.Tamm.e by 12 Comesia.Temneme. by 9 IN UNIt Lit lie major upsets the evening. G~to'' Mike and Willie Wilder tini~hed t)ne-t~o in the 5~ yard I ash hat wi~ he l~iggcst sur;irisc ol the night.'' ~aad Assistant n.h R~ Benson l'ccau~e they beat one of the COfllerenec~ best sprinters in Cliff Outlir, ol Auburn.' Both Sharpe arid Wilder were clocked in a respectable 5.3 SCL (muds THE HURDLES resulted in a photo finish as FSU's Danny Snuth, the NCAA champion, edged UP's Hesley Bostic. 'Helcy I-an d 'uper race, said B cnson 'In fact, I thought he heat Smith. I think Hesley was real pleased with it also. Horace ruitt s~on his first race as a Gator in the 600 yard clash The Trinidad native broke the tape in 1:13.3 but according to Benson the starting line was actually 15 yards in back of' where it should hne been. "HIS TIME was really two seconds better," said Benson. Also Be nson was extremely pleased with the performances turned in by Steve Gomez and Tom Doerr. Come,, a sophomore from Colonie. N.J., captured the l(~ yard run In 2:14.3 while Doert was victorious in the 880 with a time of 1:57.9. Cross country standout Vine. Cattier took the mile ran in 4:13.7 with teammate Frank Hefts getting second place. THE MILE relay team, consisting of Brown, Mitch Goings, Tutu, and anchorman Bobambo, prevailed once again in a time of 3:16.4. "They ran exceptionally well considering there was virtually no competition." said Adkins. The two mile relay team finished second a did Fletcher Lewis in the long jump with a leap of 243". IN THE high jump, Steve Ott and Ellis Miller both dared 68' to finish third and fourth. respectively while Bill Kovadi and Mark Schiader were second and third In the shot put. Both Benson and Adklns were extremely pleased with the team s overall showing. "In, glad that we won so many events without having to run so fat," explained Benson. That means there isa lot of room for improvement." This meet really reflects the improvement on our team, added Benson. We've added people in all the areas where we've been weak. All we need to do is just keep the momentum going and not peak too soon." 'They are really starting to believe In themselves." said Adkins. a VINCE CAulK .vlctrlous In mile nut a ---i-~-a --C ~e -------~e -e --. wp. fr O\aat 761 r NC EDIBLE I 22 A) i~ An.e kern FLAGUII IN 621 -24 CWcst ~ tAn. 0-G.C. Mmin*i pa IC S (9( r 4 A. PLANT STORES :14) g77-2244 N TILL 3:OOI'I'1 TROPICAL P1514 AND SUPPLIES DISCOUNT PRICES FREE ADVICE -4 a

PAGE 20

Houston I) By GREG FORR ER Alligator Spela Editor S a strange and terrible saga Si~ deaths. one near death, and a stabbing -no pennants. no World Championships. Its just about all the Houston A~tmsot the National Baseball league hale tooffer the record books. Perhaps they should he called the DsAstros It scenm appropriate. The club, while playing under a dome, seen,' to he playing under a cloudofdooni also. Check the list -~ay too lonM -long enough to niake one shudder. JUST LAST SUNDAY, January 5. the Miros' Don Wilson was lound dead in his car. The car was in the garage of their suburban Houston home -Wilson's Iive-)ear-old son was also in the garage dead. His nine-year-old daughter. above the garage in a bedrrom sleeping, was overcome by carbon monoxide tunics that leaked from the garage. She entered the hospital in a coma -in critical condition She is now reported o be recovering. After an autopsy. it was discovered that Wilson, who plagued national league hitters with hi, fasthalt, had been ~lrunk. Just a little more than a year before, the Astros fine centerfieldor Cesar Cedeno shot a 19-year-old girl in a motel room that was situated in a rather run-down section of the stars Dominican Republic. He was charged with involuntary iiianslaughter. THAT'S THREE DEATHS so tar. Three too many, but there are more. leukemia hit the Astros' Walter Bond in 1967. He had shown real promise it, 1964 when he used his 6-foot-7. 235pound trame to hit lb doubles, seven triples, and 20 homers and dnvc in 85 runs for the Astors. But the dreaded blood disease he contracted cut short his career -and his life. He was just 2~ Sonicone even younger died as a result of a mishap in. volvmg an Astros player in the spring of 1973. Larry Dierker. a strong-armed pitcher fortheAstros since 1964, hit a 12 year old boy while driving near Cape Kennedy. The accident, the result of large crowds just after a space shot, killed the boy instantly. Dierker was not charged, since witnesses said the boy dashed out in front of the pitchers car. THE FIRST in the long tine of Astro misfortunes came in 1964 when Jim Lhnbright. a pitcher in hisearl) 30's developed black mole cancerThere was no cure then, there is none now. Unibright died. Then there are those other calamities -the near-death of Houston shortstop Roger Metiger. Oddly enough. Wilson was involved In this one, also. The two collided while chasing a ~p fly in the outfield of the Astrodome last April. Metzger swallowed his tongue. Only quick action by the Astres' Doug Reder and John Edwards saved M.trgeCs life. Quick action also was a part of a stabbing involving the Astros' former slugger Jim Wynn. Wynn came home late one night in Deceniber of 1970his wife gave him a quid stab -and Wynn gave her a quick divorce. While divorce is not the nicest thing in the world, it does&t come near the incden;s involving the Astros since their inception in 1962. MAYDE IT'S NOT nice to fool Mother Nature and play under that dome. Whatever it is. the Astros Sports Information Director. Bobby Risinger, put it the only way any Houston official could"We're going to keep punching, maybe we'll get lucky." Whether they'll get lucky renting to be seen. But one thing seems certain -the grini reaper has a locker in the Astrodome Or should it be the Astrodoom? Challenge Tennessee in Knoxville Gators try to dethrone King By ANDY COHEN AUstin Spats Write The Tennessee Volunteers arc the only Southeastern Conference club John Lotz has failed to upend since coining to Ut' nearly two years ago. Saturday night in Knoxvill&s spacious coliseum Lotz and his Caters will get the opportunity to change all that ss they challenge the nationally ranked Volunteers. BUT A WiN ~oWt be easy as Tennessee sports two of the notiOn's top players in sophomore Ernie Grunteld and freshman superstar Bernard King. Both base guUcd the Volunteers to an 83 overall mark so tar this season. And after a disheartening defeat against Auburn Monday night. Lotz seems wary about the Gators net o bit cUe. ~fley have two of the top players ii, the nation in King ano Grunield," Loti said. "King is so good that most teams have been conceding him 25 points a genie. "Tbcy're a 'cry physical team that likes to run the ball right up their opponents throats." TENNESSEE IS currently 2-2 in the conference as they have lost two close decisions at Alabama and Kentucky. The Garors are currently 6-8 overall and 2-2 in the conThough devoting much of his thought to Tennessee. Lotz could not help but reflect on the Caters poor showing earlier in the week against Auburn. "We played poorly in the first half and then played even worse in the second half while trying tocatch up," Lot: ski. "MOST OF ThE teams we play in this league are mote tatented than we are so in order to win we have to do everything w&re capable of to the hilt. Against Auburn we just didn't.' He once again singled out sophomore forward Jerry Moore for playing an aggressive game" against Auburn. Despite the poor showing against Auburn. Lot: doesn't plan on juggling his starting five for Tennessee. NOMINAL CALDWELL and Don flostic will start at guard. Moore and Gent Shy will be at forward and Chip Williass will play center. Shy ii currently leading the Otter, In scodag with a 15.7 average. He is followed closely by Norman CaIdwell. who is averaging slightly over 14 points a game. After the Tennessee game. the Gaton return home to begin preparation for a Monday Alligator Alley battle with Mississippi. U The Independent -in> I Fl ~rrcr Florida Alligator SpKIdS L ~ b Mday. Jeituory Il. flfl P~. II 194N555 RWIMAN URNAID KING .29 painS. l2rtoundsa gum.

PAGE 21

team By Rick AI)IKLNIAN Alligator Sport. Wlter An awesome display of power and halduLe a~ c~l~il~Fted the UP track team at Wednesday ni~h,~ Senior Bt~ I meet in Mobile Ala. The Ga ton capped ti, e lint place' and (waled '3' Th,,n' to win in a cakewalk over second place Iini~hcr Plor,(Ia State who tallied 34 points. JACKSON STATE was third with 21 points Iollo,&e1 b~ Auburn with 13. Southern Mississippi With 52. and Mississippi State with iive. Alabama brought up the rear a' they .inl~ managed one point. Senior Beaufort Brown and Will Freeman were both victorious in their respective cents thereby quaIityin~ br the NCAAs. BROWN SET a meet record In the 440 and Coach Dave Adkins believes that the speedsters is re-gaining the torn, that made him the nation's top 6~ man two seasons ago. 'BeauiWt continues to show why this year will be a return to the prominence he had in '73,' said Adkins. "He was in complete control. He knew the track like the back of his hand." Freeman won the pole vault clearing lb-I, The Gainesville junior is defending his 1974 SEC indoor and outdoor championship. Flerida vs. Tennessee Pam ~.* Eckim.Fiseth by 3 Gag Fm,.,----Tenon. by 4 3kb Adaba.Tanesee by IS Chit Gndty-----Temma.ae by IS Len Dh.ucacd.Taineuw by 12 Cauuiuws.Tannin by 9 breezes at IN ON F 4 he uajotupsets of the evening. (Satins irpe and Willie W Her finished onet wfl in the SO Itsh lii at as the iggeM surprise of the night. said Assist ant ,irch Ray Benson, because they beat one of the CO'V Ci tiRes best s~rtntcrs in Cliii Outlin of Auburn. Iloth Sharpe and Wilder were clocked in a respectable 5.3 ~cconds. THE HURDLES rc~ulted in a photo finish as PSUs Danny Smith. the NCAA champion, edged UPs Hesley Rostic. liesley ran a super race' said Bc nson. 'In fact. I thought he beat Smith. I think Hesley was real pleased with it also." Horace Tuitt won his first race as a Gator in the 6~ yard dash The Trinidad native broke the tape in 1:13.3 but according to Benson the starting line was actually IS yards in back of where it should have been. "HIS TIME was really two seconds better.' said Benson. Also Be nson was extremely pleased with the performances turned in by Steve Gomez and Tom Doert. (onez. a sophomore from Colonie. N.J., captured the 1000 yard run in 2:14.3 while Doerr was victorious in the 880 with a time of l~S7.9. Cross country standout Vince Cartler took the mile run in 4:13.7 with teammate Frank Betti getting second place. TIlE MILE relay team, consisting of Brown. Mitch Goings. Tutu, and anchorman Bobambo. prevailed once win in a time of 3:16.4. 'They ran exceptionally well considering there was virtually no competition." said Adkins. The two mile relay team finfled second -did Fletcher Lewis in the long jump with aleapof24'3. IN THE high jump, Steve Ott and Bills Miller both cleared 68" to finish third and fourth. respectively while Bill Kmadi and Mark Sobrader were second and third in the shot put. Both Benson and Adkins were extremely pleaS with the teams overall showing. 'I'm glad that we won so many events without having to run so fast." explained Benson. 'That mews there is a lot of room rot improvement. 'This meet really reflects the improvement on our team" added Benson. 'We've added people in all the areas where wove been weak. All we need to do is just keep the nomentuni going and not peak too soon." They are really starting to believe in themselves said AdIC ins. Th.hdn.nvk'Ae$4. Milsar, M&, i.t.u.~ I?, 1971 Pu. 11 Senior Bowl Mike yard a VINCE CAR11E victorious in mile run r A NC wieiti 22 AW I~ An. hen ~LA(,LLK '~I 62? -24 CUjcst QLnan~dy IAn. be CL. tlse~~d *Pus Is (9( baaTILL HP~ W.S l~ a-. a, ~ j~ p '4 PLANT STORES 94) 977-2244 .00P19 0 ve&gdaq I TROPICAL FISH AND SUPPLIB I DISCOUNT PRICES FREE ADVICE 0I~ A 0 0 C 4 I T rack 4 ml I

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r Ping* 20. The Ind.p.nd.at florid. AiIIgoor, Mdy. Jonuomy I?, IflS Women's Sports rhe University of Florida womenswimming team laces the University ol (icorgia and Eniory University in a triangular meet Saturday in Athens Ga., COACH SUE HAIPACRE not overly conc.rn.d" 0 Ticket at 2 p.m Lady Gator swimming coach Sue Haltacre said that ~hc knew nothinM about either ol the tean,~ her women would be facing. "I AM NOT OVERLY concerned, though. because we arc really swimming well and have tremendous depth on the team. Halfacre 'aid. The Lady (liators go Into the meet with a 2-0 record for the season. They will be swimming in off-events, rather than their speciality. attempting to qualify for the May MAW Nationals in Arizona. The next home meet for the Gators is against their major rival, the UnivnsityofMi.mi, Feb. I. S. The Lady Gator basketball tan, tips-off against florida Tedi Saturday in florida Gym at 5 p.m. Then is no admission charge. 0 0 informatio for Ole Miss game Stud. is an .mkded so -up theic ha ket hail ticks. t.d.~ In Needs7'. da.h hi Milptc. Mby with OH. Nb. Ga. 13 ticks effic. wE be qee beflee 9.j. s.d 6 pa. Any full dame UP mtud.S -y pick up a ticket with their bkelh.iI .me. ticks caM cr75 cfl. The University has a Mte shopping traM. go away With. GmtuMtd.yt Sammy & lbggat