Citation
The Black Prince

Material Information

Title:
The Black Prince a book for boys
Creator:
Jones, M ( Meredith )
M'Enery, Robert ( Illustrator )
Thomas Nelson & Sons ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
London ;
Edinburgh ;
New York
Publisher:
T. Nelson and Sons,
T. Nelson and Sons
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
1863
Language:
English
Physical Description:
295, [8] p., [6] leaves of plates : ill. (some col.) ; 17 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
History -- Juvenile literature -- Great Britain -- Edward III, 1327-1377 ( lcsh )
Pictorial cloth bindings (Binding) -- 1863 ( rbbin )
Biographies -- 1863 ( rbgenr )
Publishers' catalogues -- 1863 ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1863
Genre:
Pictorial cloth bindings (Binding) ( rbbin )
Biographies ( rbgenr )
Publishers' catalogues ( rbgenr )
non-fiction ( marcgt )
individual biography ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
Scotland -- Edinburgh
United States -- New York -- New York
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Added title page and plates printed in colors.
General Note:
Preface dated 1863.
General Note:
Publisher's catalogue follows text.
Statement of Responsibility:
by M. Jones ; with illustrations from designs by Robert M'Enery.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
ALG2513 ( NOTIS )
48395288 ( OCLC )
026829491 ( AlephBibNum )

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Drelace.

Berean wars of Edward III. in France are
Yate, sometimes spoken of as though they
were mere wars of aggression. To



this view of them I cannot give an unqualified
assent, ‘The law of succession, though pretty
well ascertained, was not so strictly observed in
those days as to prevent all controversy upon
the subject. And seeing that, in his peculiar
case, others, beside Edward himself, thought that
he had a claim to the crown of France, I am
disposed to look upon his French wars as spring-
ing from an honest determination on his own
part, and that of his people, to rectify, by force
the wrong which, as he conceived, had been
done him by the French nobles, in assigning the
throne to Philip of Valois.

I do not affirm that he was in the right; but



lV PREFACE.

I do think he had sufficient grounds for sup-
posing himself to be so. The circumstances of
the case were undoubtedly such as to leave room
for honest difference of opinion about it. Nor
do I think that any one of us, who had as
colourable a claim to a great estate as had
Edward III. to the French crown, would leave
any stone unturned in our efforts to get pos-
session of it. Of course we should not fight;
that is the ultimate process of nations. But
not a single law court should we leave unvisited,
carrying up our appeal step by step, until we
gained our cause, or were barred by the final
adverse decision of the highest court of all: as
Edward was ultimately barred by the final
adverse decision, unmistakeably expressed by
successes In arms, of the French nation.

Much, however, as men may differ as to the
merits of his claim, all must unite in unbounded
admiration of the courage, fortitude, judgment,
and generosity, displayed by our great monarch,
and his greater son, in thosé marvellous en-
counters between the few and the many, which
have, for five long centuries, made Crecy and
Poitiers names of pride throughout England.
And the present seems a pecvliarly suitable



PREFACE, v

time for recalling in detail the far-off glories
of the two Edwards; seeing that “wars and
rumours of wars” have, since 1854, been almost
incessantly around us; and we, the few, as we
were on those old battle-fields, are sometimes
disposed to look anxiously upon the many that,
as we apprehend, may be against us. But
Norman fire, grafted upon Anglo-Saxon endur-
ance, is still our inheritance; and should war,
either at home or abroad, be thrust upon us,—
with a just cause, and, above all, with “God”
for “ our Hope and Strength,” we may with con-
fidence look to come out of it as triumphantly
as did the little imperiled band that followed
Kdward into France, and with more permanence
of success than was awarded to them.
Englishmen still pray, as well as fight!

M. dg.

Lonpon, September 11, 1863.










Contents.

. The Childhood of the Black Prince, ees
. Origin of the Wars in France, aes
. Passage of the Somme, . eee
. The Battle of Crecy, ase see
. The Siege of Calais, ...

. Treachery at Calais,

. The Prince’s Expedition from Bordeaux,

. The Battle of Poitiers, ees

. The English again invade France,

» The Prince’s Court in Aquitaine,

. The Prince’s Spanish Campaign,

. Troubles in Aquitaine, oes

. Treaty of Peace broken by the French, ...
. Incidents of the War—Death of Chandos,
. The Sack of Limoges—The Prince returns to England,
. The Death of the Prince, eee



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I.

The Childhood of the Black Prince.

Fp LE French wars of our great Edward III., and

his greater son, Edward the Black Prince,
afford a wonderful example of what stout
English hearts and hands can achieve, even in the
face of overwhelming numbers. Those wars have
made Crecy and Poitiers household words in England,
and we now propose to tell, in detail, their story; to-
gether with that of the gallant leader under whom the
English name became terrible in France. We shall
find the narrative present us with admirable pictures
of fortitude, humanity, and generosity, as well as of
warlike skill and daring.

Edward, the Black Prince, the heroic son of Edward
III. of England, was born at the old royal palace of
Woodstock, on the 15th of June, 1330. His mother
was Philippa, daughter of William, Count of Hainault.
In 1327, when she was a mere girl of fourteen, the



princess, attended by a brilliant train of knights



12 THE CHILDHOOD OF THE BLACK PRINCE.

and gentlemen, came over to England to marry its
young monarch, who was only two or three months
older than herself. The marriage proved a happy one;
more so than usually falls to the lot of royal person-
ages: for Philippa was gentle and good, and sincerely
attached to her husband ; and he, in return, gave her,
throughout their long life, the affection she so well
deserved. The birth of their boy was a great delight
both to them and the whole nation; and in the glad-
ness of his heart the king munificently rewarded the
bearer of such welcome tidings, assigning him a liberal
yearly pension in money, till he could settle lands
upon him to the same value.

We do not know much about the royal nursery in
those days. One thing, however, we do know, that the
first year or two in that apartment are spent very
much alike, whatever may be the centuries compared.
Whether the date be 1800 or 1300,—kicking, crawling,
squalling, and eating porridge, equally engrosses the
young occupant, be he prince or be he peasant. This
may not be very dignified, but we cannot help that.
The further process of shortening those interminable
long tails to their petticoats, with which it is the cus-
tom to endow very young babies, also passes upon a
Prince of Wales, irrespective of the date of his birth.
While in his first attempts to walk, the tumbles and -
knocks upon the head, encountered by the heir-apparent
of our day, have certainly been shared by that. stalwart



TILE CHILDHOOD OF THE BLACK PRINCE. 13

child whom we see so dimly through the mist of five
receding centuries. For both, the same mother’s heart
has beaten ; and, tender as was that of Philippa for her
first-born, we may not believe that it was more tender
than that of her whom we English of this day love to
call our sovereign.

One would certainly have liked to know something
of the childhood of one who was destined to fill so im-
portant a part in our own history, and in that of our
neighbours across the channel, as does the Black |
Prince. But though we have gossip five centuries old,
it is not gossip about babies. For grave historians to
record that Joan of Oxford was his nurse; that Mistress
Matilda Frampton had the honour of rocking the royal
cradle ; and that, in his third year, he was created
Karl of Chester; is not telling us much: it is the boy
himself we want to hear about. But the nursery door
is close shut upon its little princely inmate, and how-
ever precocious or stupid he may have been, to us it is
all a blank.

At the age of six, however, we get a glimpse of our
Edward of the olden time; for his father then created
him Duke of Cornwall, a title that is still borne by the
Prince of Wales. In those days, the creation of a peer
was a ceremony; not as now, when a slip of paper con-
verts a banker into a lord ; and the ceremony, in this
case, must have been a sight worth seeing. A title
meant something then. It carried with it power and



14 THE CHILDHOOD OF THE BLACK PRINCE.

authority, and the symbols of these were formally de-
livered to him who received it. Perhaps it was because
the prince was such a very little fellow that all the
usual formalities were not gone through on this occa-
sion. His rights over the duchy of Cornwall were,
ceremoniously, conveyed to him simply by girding his
tiny waist with a sword; the other usual ensigns of
authority—the ring and the staff—were not transferred
to him. The new-made duke, the first that England
had ever known, immediately proceeded to show that
the distinction conferred upon him was no empty one.
Bestowing knighthood was one of the powers attached
to it, and twenty gallant youths that day received it
from his hand. By this time, too, we find that the
small man was minding his book, with grave Dr.
Burley for his tutor, and a group of youngsters to
learn lessons with him, instead of being left in
stately solitude to con them over by himself. Among
these associates, Simon Burley afterwards became
one of the prince’s favoured and most distinguished
knights, |

King Edward’s French wars, of which we shall speak
presently, carried him much abroad; and his Highness
of Cornwall (he was not Prince of Wales yet), was,
in his father’s absence, appointed Lieutenant of the
kingdom. Hig lieutenancy was no mere pretence,
not a name only; for this child of eight years old
actually held a parliament for his father at Northam p-



THE CHILDHOOD OF THE BLACK PRINCE. 15

ton, in 1338. for, under the young duke’s presidency, it voted large
supphes for carrying on the popular war with Philip
of Valois and his friends.

Here, again, those tiresome old chroniclers do not
tell us how the prince got through his important busi-
ness, nor even how much of it fell to his share. But
at the mature age of eight, he would certainly get on
better than did James VI. of Scotland, who, (at three
or four years old), having to perform a regal duty of
the same kind, wound up his address to Lords and
Commons, by remarking, in the same breath, that
there was a hole in the roof of the parliament-
house. We cannot for one moment suppose that
our Edward made such “a hole” in his manners as
this !

The promise of the young prince’s babyhood—for he
really was a fine child—was now being fulfilled. He
grew up a handsome, strong-limbed, intelligent lad ;
and at the age of nine, when his father, who was busy
preparing for his contest with the French, sent for him
to the castle of Louvain to keep Christmas with him-
self and his queen, one of the Christmas amusements
of that “noble and royal” assembly was to propose a
-inarriage between the boy and the little daughter of
the Duke of Brabant, the young lady being then four
years old. The match went no further than those

Christmas conversations by a blazing log-fire; one of



‘16 THE CHILDHOOD OF THE BLACK PRINCE.

the prince’s own countrywomen, celebrated for her
beauty as the “Fair Maid of Kent,” being destined
for the wife, not of a hopeful boy, but of a man re-
nowned throughout Christendom as the hero of Crecy,

Poitiers, and Najara.





)










II.

Origin of the Wars in France,

c< ea T the time that King Edward III. came to the
Ying) throne, the English had considerable pos-



sessions in the south of France, which had
been brought by Queen Eleanor, wife of Henry IL. as
her marriage portion. For these possessions the kings
of England had been accustomed to do homage to the
kings of France, as (what was called) their feudal su-
periors. This ceremony did not at all affect their in-
dependence as sovereigns of England. It only related
to their lordship over those French duchies, in relation
to which they were not quite so supreme as was the
monarch of France, and as they themselves were at
home: they owed to the French king, so far as these
French dominions were concerned, a limited sort of
obedience, in compliance with what was called the
feudal law.

The feudal system, of which this law was a part,
was a relic of the old conquering times when he who
had won lands by his sword—-as William the Norman



20 ORIGIN OF THE WARS IN FRANCE.

did in England—portioned them out among his fol-
lowers, on condition that their swords should help him
in case of need: the amount of military service, thus
rendered, being in proportion to the extent of lands
bestowed. Other independent sovereigns, besides
those of England, though none of such importance and
grandeur as they, were in the same position as Edward:
owning feudal obedience to some one who, in that par-
ticular, was greater than they. But, saving this mere
feudal obedience, it would not have been wise for any
feudal lord, however high and mighty, to require more
from them. In such a case, they would have flown in
the face even of his Highness of France as readily as
in that of a neaner potentate.

This sort of feudal obedience, then, had been rendered
by our monarchs, on account of their portion of the
kingdom of France. But on the death of Charles the
Fair, King of France, in 1328, our Edward IIT, as his
nephew, considered that he was the next heir to the
throne, and therefore, as supreme lord, had a right to
the whole kingdom. The great lords and peers of
France thought otherwise, and gave the crown to Philip
of Valois, cousin to the late king. Their reason for
preferring a more distant relation than Edward, was
that as (according to the custom of France, which does
not suffer a woman to reign), Queen Isabella of Eng-
land could not succeed to the crown herself, neither
could her son inherit through her. Edward and his



ORIGIN OF THE WARS IN FRANCE. 21

friends were, however, confident in their view of the
case. Indeed, there was room for dispute in the
matter; and most probably the real reason why Philip
was chosen instead of Edward, was, not so much out of
regard to the Salic law, as to the circumstance of
Philip’s being a Frenchman, one of themselves, while
Edward was an English king.

There was only one way of deciding such a quarrel,
that is, by fighting; and to this the English king, with
the hearty concurrence of his people, and the pur-
chased help of his allies, speedily resorted.

Believing himself to be the rightful heir to the
French throne, it was not particularly agreeable to
Edward, in the first flush of youth and sovereignty, to
be called upon to go over to France, and perform that
customary homage of which we have been speaking,
for a mere corner of the kingdom. The whole belonged
to him, as he thought; why then should he go down
upon his knees to return thanks for the limited owner-
ship of a part of it? King Philip had already been
erowned a twelvemonth, and all his other feudatories—
as those who acknowledged him for feudal superior,
were called—had done homage to their lord in the
manner prescribed. The mode of doing this was for
the feudatory or vassal, to kneel bareheaded, un-
belted, and unarmed before his lord, between whose
hands he placed his own, vowing the customary
obedience ; or, in other and old words, promising



22, ORIGIN OF THE WARS IN FRANCE.

to become his “man.” The lord then bestowed a
kiss upon the kneeling knight, and the ceremony was
at an end,

It was, as has been said, excessively disagreeable to
Edward, as King of England, thus to humble himself
to his neighbour. Young as he was (he was only seven-
teen), he was already distinguished, not only as sove-
reign of a realm that might vie in importance with
that of France, but for the energy and valour which he
had displayed in his contests with the fierce, rude
warriors of Scotland. And his high spirit, high both
from his position, and from his personal merit, re-
volted from the ceremonial submissiveness required
from him. According to the custom of that age, how-
ever, he could not absolutely refuse it when summoned,
unless he had been prepared ai once to go to war
about the matter.

Accordingly, when Philip’s messengers requiring the
accustomed duty from the English king, presented
themselves at Windsor,—which had, even then, for
more than two centuries been a royal palace,—they
were received with all the courtesy due to their own
rank, and that of their master. But, with the same
punctilious politeness, they were informed that the
king must consult with his council, before he could
engage to perform the homage demanded from him.
Edward forthwith came up to town, and assembled
his trusty councillors at Westminster. Before them



ORIGIN OF THE WARS IN FRANCE, 23

the messengers laid their credentials, and then with-
drew, while the knotty question, to pay homage or
refuse it—in other words, peace or war—was discussed.
Discretion is said to be the better part of valour, and
the council possessed this valuable quality; for, seeing
that the nation was not, just then, in a condition to back
their king, with “bills and bows,” if he declined com-
pliance with the French king’s demands, they decided
that he should obey Philip’s bidding. The messengers
were then again summoned before that stately assem-
blage; and by the msuth of the Bishop of London (in
those days bishops were often leading statesmen), were
duly informed that the king, their master, would forth-
with pass over into France to render the homage re-
quired by his cousin Philip.

So far all seemed smooth. Edward kept his word,
and on the 26th of May 1329, set out on this unplea-
sant errand, attended by a fitting train of nobles,
bishops, and knights. His suite comprised a thousand
horse, and he was received by Philip, with correspond-
ing magnificence, at Amiens; where the homage was
paid in presence of three kings—those of Bohemia,
Navarre, and Majorca, and a crowd of nobles, drawn
together to do honour to the new liegeman. Never
was bitter pill more brightly gilded. But it was a
bitter pill, that Edward at first made some difficulty
about swallowing in the prescribed fashion. He made
his appearance in the Cathedral of Amiens (where his



24 ORIGIN OF THE WARS IN FRANCE.

“lord” sat in a chair of state), armed and royally
robed ; nor was he disposed either to strip himself of his
regal and knightly insignia, or to do the kneeling part
of the business. Both, however, were relentlessly ex-
acted of him; and, in a terrible temper, Edward of
England, avowed himself vassal—for Guienne—to
Philip of France; whom, in his secret soul, he wished
at Jericho.* Fifteen days were afterwards passed in
feasting, tournaments, and grave conferences, between
the politicians of that brilliant congress; and then
Edward returned to his young wife at Windsor, well
pleased with his reception at the French court, however
much he might dislike that part of the performance
in which he had been the leading actor.

Among the nobles of France who had assisted in
placing the crown upon the head of Philip of Valois,
was his brother-in-law, Count Robert of Artois. He was
a particularly great man, and stood so high in Philip’s
good graces, that almost everything in the kingdom
was guided and ordered by my Lord Robert. Ere long,
however, Philip’s violent liking for his brother-in-law
turned, as is not uncommon, to an equally violent
hatred of him. The count’s moral character was cer-
tainly nothing to boast of. Indeed, it is said that he
was guilty of the shabby vice of forging title deeds, in
order to mend his claim on certain lands in France.

* It has been denied that Edward performed his homage in the humiliats
ing manner described. But some old authorities take this view of it.



ORIGIN OF THE WARS IN FRANCE. 25

On account of this, Philip was strongly inclined to cut
off the count’s head, if he could only catch him! and
after having hunted his intended victim out of several
states, to which, in succession, he had fied from the
axe and block prepared for him, Robert was at last
fairly driven to England, for the shelter denied him
elsewhere,

Philip had much better have let his brother-in-law
stay quietly at home, and keep his cunning head on
his broad shoulders; for, once in the court of England,
he diligently employed all the influence which a man
of his reputation possessed, in urging upon the king the
justice of his claim to the French throne, and in inciting
that young, valorous spirit to plead his cause with the
sword. Such a mode of upholding it could not but be
agreeable to one yet glowing with successful fight
against those, over whom his grandfather had so long
ridden, rough-shod, that he began at last to think he
really had a right to do it. The Frenchman accom-
panied Edward in his expedition against the Scots,
and while in the field plied him well with arguments
for flying at higher game. He further comforted the
soul of the young monarch by assuring him that his
claim was held good by several lawyers.

Count Robert was reckoned a man of great sagacity.
He was also of royal descent. No wonder that the
king began at last to yield to his persuasions, and to
hold many anxious conferences with his council, as to



856 ORIGIN OF THE WARS IN FRANCE,

whether he should, or should not, carry bis steel-clad
host from the bare heaths of Scotland, which they had
already trampled down, to try their fortune on the fair
fields of France. The knights of those days, be it said,
rather preferred fighting in France, to fighting in
Scotland; as the former country afforded them more
luxurious quarters.

Edward’s council were well enough disposed that
the king should advance his claim to the French
crown, and prosecute it by arms, if need were. The
resources of his own kingdom were not, however, at
the time adequate to do this; and to do it effectually
he must seek aid from his friends and allies on the
continent, They, therefore, advised that he should
send ambassadors to his gallant and gouty father-in-
law, the Earl of Hainault, to ascertain what could be
done in that quarter. To these ambassadors, the earl
and his brother, the Lord John, gave all that was in
their power to give, that is, advice; a very good thing
when nothing better is to be had. And acting upon
their counsel, Edward contracted alliances with the
lords, and small sovereigns of the Low Countries ; who,
some for love, more for money, and others, won by the
cheaper means of flattery and promises, agreed to aid
him in his grand enterprise.

One of Edward’s allies in this business was, it is
true, neither sovereign nor lord, though he was as
powerful and important as though he were both the



ORIGIN OF THE WARS IN FRANCE, 27

one and the other. This ally was Jacob van Arteveld,
who, having retired from the brewing business, which
he had carried on with great success, next took up
that of governing the Flemings, in a style rather more
imperative than had ever been adopted by their lawful
sovereign, the Earl of Flanders. From the earl they
had thought proper to revolt; but whether they liked
the brewer any better, after they had got him, may be
questioned, for Jacob had an awkward habit of killing
off, without the slightest ceremony, any one to whom
it pleased him to take a dislike. Further, as is fre-
quently the case, when men of low birth are raised to
power and wealth, he was much more extragavant—
with the money of the Flemings—than the earl had ever
been, who was born to these two good things. He
taxed the Flemings heavily ina variety of ways. They
had both indirect, and direct, exceedingly direct, taxation;
for after he had spent the accustomed duties, no one
knew, nor dared to ask, how, he would proceed to
what he called borrowing large sums from the citizens ;
his borrowing, being the next best, or worst thing to
demanding, seeing that no one who had any regard for
his own safety, felt at liberty to say—no! Indeed,
whenever he thought fit to tell them he wanted more
money, it was always best to take his word for it, and
let him have it. In short, Jacob played King Stork
among his new subjects with a vengeance!

To this amiable individual King Edward addressed



28 ORIGIN OF THE WARS IN FRANCE.

himself so effectually, that the stout, sturdy Flemings, fat-
tened and strengthened on such beer as Jacob had been
wont to brew, were joined in his cause, with the more
sprightly cavaliers of the empire; that is, of Austria
and Germany. When Edward’s own forces were united
to these, there was a gallant army under his direction,
or that of his lieutenants, who, with various fortune,
kept fighting a little here, and a little there, for the next
eight years. Amid their skirmishing we may notice
that Count Robert came to his end; and finally found
a quiet resting-place in the choir of our old St. Paul’s.
The din of the city, teeming with mercantile life, per-
chance even now roars around the ashes of that turbu-
lent warrior. His death was lamented in England, for
he had qualities to win admiration in those far off days ;
and according to the fashion (more heathen than Chris-
tian), of the times, Edward swore to take a terrible re-
venge for it.

Towards the close of this period of skirmishing, that
is in 1343, when the young Edward was thirteen years
old, his father, with all solemnity, conferred upon him
the title of Prince of Wales. The king also thought
that with the help of Jacob the brewer, the revolted
Flemings might be persuaded to accept the young prince
as their sovereign. But the earldom of Flanders was
not to be added to the rest of his titles and possessions.
Van Arteveld was heartily willing to dv all that Edward
wished from him. It was very pleasant to patronize a



ORIGIN OF THE WARS IN FRANCE. 29

king. But he soon found that he had promised more
than he could perform. He condescended to consult
with his turbulent Flemings, on the question of this con-
templated transfer of their allegiance; but it seems that
by this time they were tired of Jacob and his iron rule.
They murmured loudly at the proposal, declaring that,
with God’s help, they would never disgrace themselves
so far as to disinherit their “natural lord, in favour of
a stranger.” And they whispered, one to another, that
Jacob was carrying things with rather too high a hand ;
and they would not endure it any longer. Nor did
they ; for forthwith the mob fell upon the unfortunate
brewer, and killed him.

Edward, who, attended by the prince, and a stately
retinue, had come over to Sluys in Flanders, and was
there anxiously awaiting the result of Jacob’s negotia-
tions, was not easily pacified after this destruction of
his hopes. He immediately took his son home again,
vowing vengeance against the Flemings, and all belong-
ing to them. Those discreet people, however, soon
patched up a peace with him; and though they begged
to be excused from any attempt to deprive their young
Earl Lewis of his rights, they adroitly insinuated that,
as the king had a daughter, Flanders might very pos-
sibly be ruled by his family after all, through her mar-
riage with their lord.

And so the poor brewer, whose mangled remains were
scarcely cold in their unhonoured grave, was forgotten



30 ORIGIN OF THE WARS IN FRANCE.

as speedily as possible, and every one was quite com-
fortable.

Jacob’s fate was sad; but his violence had merited
it, He had taken “the sword,” and he “perished”
by it.








, ta) re

“E : 8 , \









Ii.

Passage of the Sonne.

Bee 2 DWARD'S disappointment at the loss of the
press, carldom of Flanders, which he had hoped to

secure for his son, was not merely for the



loss of title and territory. We know how he longed to
gain possession of what he considered his rightful in-
heritance; how this longing had led him to court the
brewer of Ghent; and might have induced him to culti-
vate even more ignoble acquaintance, could they have
served him in the matter. The reason for his wish to
gain the Flemings was his having entertained the hope
of making Flanders his key to unlock that beautiful,
fertile France, out of which (with the exception of his
own hereditary portion) he was kept, as he thought, so
unjustly. And now that roaring raging mob in the
peaked and gabled streets of Ghent, had put an end
to his fine scheme. But for this, itis to be feared that
the slaughter of a dozen brewers, instead of only one,
would not have disturbed his tranquillity.

But there were other roads into France besides those

(3) 3



34 PASSAGE OF THE SOMME.

through Flanders, and King Edward was soon to find
them. For two years or more his lieutenants in the
south of France, where he was “at home,” and no one
denied it, had been as busy as possible in dealing out
hard knocks to their neighbours—the less loved that
they were such near neighbours. His cousin, the Karl
of Derby, (not of the house of Stanley, but a royal
Plantagenet), was driving all before him in Gascony
where he had met with little opposition ; for to carry on
war successfully requires plenty of money; and money
was just the thing that Philip of Valois wanted. In
the early part of 1346, however, Philip contrived to
get so far out of his difficulties as to raise an army of
a hundred thousand men, who, with lords and knights
almost innumerable, marched into Gascony, under the
command of the Duke of Normandy, and set them-
selves, so steadily, and successfully, to the retaking of
the Earl of Derby’s conquests in that province, that
the thing soon became serious. Sir Walter Manny, who
had, a few years before, come over to England in the
train of the good Queen Philippa, was with the com-
paratively small body of English who were thus fiercely
attacked in southern France; and though he was in him-
self a host, his skill and bravery, with that of other
knights, also brave and skilful, did not prevent the
fortune of war from going sadly against them.

In this strait Edward proposed going himself to the
assistance of his faithful, but harassed followers, His



PASSAGE OF THE SOMME. ao

people ucartily seconded him. Men and arms, and ships
for their transport, were soon collected, and the young
prince, now in his sixteenth year, was to have his first
experience of actual war among them.

Masses of soldiers, armed and accoutred for their
deadly, though necessary function, form a picturesque
spectacle even in our own days. But, in comparison
with the very olden time of which we are writing, war
is now shorn of almost all its strange, outside beauty.
There were the knights glittering in plate armour, hel-
meted, crested, plumed, with each one his bright shield,
throwing off sunbeams as he moved along; while their
satin and embroidered surcoats were fit for the train of
a duchess on drawing-room days. The surcoat was a
flowing sort of robe, thrown over the armour. ‘The
lance, with its little fluttering pennon, was an exceed-
ingly picturesque weapon, as we may see by our modern
lancers. Nor was the huge steel battle axe, or hammer,
(martel, was its old name,) added by some to the ordi-
nary equipment of lance and sword, and which was
slung from their saddle-bow, other than an imposing
looking implement of destruction.

Then the horses were nearly as fine, and well de-
fended by plates of steel, as their masters. How puzzled
the poor animals must have felt, to be stalking about
in iron cases; and further, on high days and _ holidays,
with what one may call embroidered petticoats down
to their heels!



36 PASSAGE OF THE SOMME.

The man-at-arms—what we should now call the
cavalry soldier—though less brilliantly mailed than the
knight or noble, was not the less encased in good ser-
viceable metal, that would withstand sword stroke, or
spear-thrust. Indeed, we are told that prostrate knights
and men-at-arms, defying all penetrating weapons, have
had to be cracked like lobsters, by blows of the ham-
mer, before the death-dealing dagger could find its way
through their iron shells.

This man-at-arms with his little retinue of attendants
(for he was a great man in his way), formed a striking
group ; while the mounted aud mail-clad host were
varied by bodies of archers, in their loose, easy-fitting
dress: for we aid not, in those days, strap and buckle up
our soldiers as we do now. These stout fellows were
armed with the formidable bow and arrow of our old
English yeomen: bows as tall as themselves, wherein
the yard-long shaft was drawn by main strength of
body, not of arms merely, right up to the ear, before it
was discharged on its twanging, death-carrying errand.
Those yard-long arrows would pierce the stoutest
armour impervious to all ordinary weapons. As for
our Irish and Welsh fellow subjects, who now hold their
own in our armies as well as the best of us, making
men proud to enter their distinctive regiments; they
did not come out at all well in the days of Edward IIT.
and our wars in France. In fact they were a long way
behind the English in civilization ; so a big knife, or any



PASSAGE OF THE SOMME. 37

other awkward tool that was capable of doing mischief,
was thought quite good enough for them.

“Tell that” not “to the marines,” but to the Welsh
Fusiliers, and Connaught Rangers,

Of such was the small though effective army now
destined for the shores of France. We may imagine
low enthusiastically the fine, handsome lad, heir, not
only to the crown of England, but to that of the rich
country they were bound to win, would be received by
his noble, knightly, and yeomanly companions in arms.
Nor can we doubt that the wild Irish and Welsh infan-
try would brandish their knives, and shout him a wel-
come, In number this force did not exceed thirty
thousand, But we shall see what these could do against
the chivalry and countless hosts of Philip of Valois.

Southampton was the place appointed for the em-
barkation of the English army, and thence the fleet
sailed on the 24th of June, 1846. Edward left young
Lionel, his third son, to take care of things at home,
while he was away. This, of course, was a mere thing
of state, Master Lionel being only eight years old;
grave, bearded men, such as the lords Nevil and Percy,
and several bishops, were in reality entrusted with
the weighty cares of government. Nor did the war-
loving king forget the prudent defence of his realm, by
arms, as well as by wise heads; a sufficient military
force being appointed for its protection during his ab-

BeNCE,



38 PASSAGE OF THE SOMME.

The army which the king, his son, and some of the
greatest nobles and warriors of the time now commanded
for the conquest of France, was designed, as has been
said, to make its first attempt in the southern provinces.
Contrary winds, however, baffled that design, and on
the third day after their sailing from Southampton,
which they did merrily enough, drove them on their
own coast of Cornwall, instead of that of Gascony.
And here, after beating about for a while—nobody en-
joys coming back again, like a boomerang from its
mark—they were compelled to anchor, and suffer nearly
a weeks’ detention.

On board the king’s ship there was a French noble-
man, named Sir Godfrey de Harcourt, who, having
given offence at his own court, had run away to that of
England, where he was received with great favour.
During the time they were detained by foul winds on
the Cornish coast, this Sir Godfrey set himself to alter
Edward’s plan as to the place of landing. He advised
that the descent should be made upon Normandy ; that
northern province being very rich and fertile, and
having the further advantage of being quite out of the
way of the rough skirmishers who had turned the
south upside down. It was, therefore, quite unpre-
pared for defence, its knighthood, with their retainers,
being drawn off to the field of action. Its population,
too, were quiet and peaceable, occupied with the care of
their fields and flocks, and knowing nothing of sword,



PASSAGE OF THE SOMME. 39

lance, and cross-bow,—the cross-bow was that form of
the weapon chiefly used on the Continent, and it was
not considered so manly a one as the old English long-
bow,

The advice was sound, and Edward had sense enough
to take it. After having threatened the south, it was
good policy on his part to swoop down upon the com-
paratively defenceless north. Winds and waves fav-
oured him now, and speedily brought him and his
fleet to La Hogue, in Normandy, on the 10th of July.
If you look at the map you will see the little point
jutting out, almost opposite to the Isle of Wight.

The king was the first to leap ashore. But “ most
haste” is not always “ best speed.” Not looking before
heleaped, or making some other such simple blunder,
down came his Highness (for it was not “ Majesty” in
those days) fall length on the strand, with such force
as to set the royal nose a-bleeding. That looked bad;
and his superstitious nobles entreated him to return to
his ship, and not think of effecting a landing after so
unfortunate a beginning. Edward, however, was as
superior to those about him in good sense as he was
in military prowess, and he passed off his tumble with —
a jest, observing that the very ground itself was obvi-
ously longing for him.

The joke told; a good joke always will tell; and the
disembarkation at once took place. The prince, who
was aboard his father’s ship, set foot, for the first time.



40 PASSAGE OF THE SOMME.

on the territory that he hoped would one day be his,
Nobles, knights, men-at-arms, and everybody else, in-
cluding the wild Irish and Welsh, were duly got out
of the ships; and horses, armour, warlike stores, with
endless baggage, were all safely landed at last upon the
sandy beach, where they camped for that summer’s
night. Rich tents were pitched for royalty and my
lords; while his cloak, and the glittering star-lit sky
overhead, were shelter enough for the humbler warrior
of that resolute little band.

A few days rest was allowed upon this spot; while,
to qualify them duly for the coming struggle, the
prince, and some other young nobles, had the honour of
knighthood conferred upon them by the king. Then
a council of war was held to decide on the course to
be pursued ; and at this it was determined that the
Earl of Huntingdon, with about a hundred and twenty
men-at-arms, and four hundred archers, should remain
with the fleet, while the rest of the army moved on in
three divisions. One of these was under the command
of the king, with whom was his son, the new-made
knight, panting to do honour to his knighthood by
some signal feat of arms. Sir Godfrey de Harcourt
led the second ; the Earl of Warwick the third. The
order of march was, for the king’s division, or main
body, to move on in the centre; the Earl of Warwick’s
division extended itself on the right ; and that of Sir
Godfrey, which was a little in advance, acted upon the





KNIGHTING THE BLACK PRINCE

EDWARD



PASSAGE OF THE SOMME. 4]

left. The fleet followed their course along the coast,
all uniting in one object,—that of plundering, burning,
and destroying everything that came in their way.

They met with little opposition, for the simple
country folks, who, as has been said, knew nothing
of soldiers and battles, took to their heels and fled be-
fore the English ; the knights and men-at-arms who
should have protected them from these cruel invaders
bemg far away, fighting under the Duke of Nor-
mandy, So, between the fleet and the army,—spreading
itself like a pestilence—the English took many rich
towns, and acquired plunder to an enormous extent ;
gold, silver, and valuable merchandise, which they care-
fully packed up, sent on board their attendant ships,
and rejoicingly conveyed to England. Spoil was so
abundant that the very camp followers “turned up
their noses” at rich furred gowns, which, in those days,
were worn; and there was no lack of provision for this
locust-like swarm either, seeing that those who fled
could not take their well-stored houses and barns with
them.

King Philip meanwhile was not idle) When news
was brought him that the English had landed in Nor-
mandy, and were destroying that province at their
pleasure, he summoned every earl, baron, and knight,
who owed him service, to march with him against
them. The lords eagerly obeyed his command, but
some were so distant from the scene of action that they



42 - | PASSAGE OF THE SOMME.

could not attend the king in time to check the advance ~
of the enemy, who soon made their way to within a
few miles of Paris. The citizens were terribly frightened
when they found the English at their very gates ; the
more so that Philip was just setting out to St. Denis,
about four miles off; to join the lords who were
assembled there. Expecting to be swallowed at a
mouthful by those terrible islanders,—upon their knees
the poor citizens besought the king to stay and take
care of them, for if he did not, the English would cer-
tainly come upon them, and make themselves masters
of his fine city of Paris. — :

King Philip thought he should best protect his fine
city of Paris and its trembling inhabitants by joining
his army at St. Denis, and fighting the invaders. He
told the suppliants 80 ; and to cheer their hearts, de-
clared that the English would never touch them, nor |
their city either. This turned out quite true, as Hid-
ward, having burned some villages near its walls, passed -
on northwards, by Beauvais, where he hung twenty of |
his own people for having set fire to the abbey of St. -
Messien, contrary to his express ‘commands: that no
church or monastery should be injured. Beauvais was
attacked, but its inhabitants, with a good military
bishop at their head, showed fight so gallantly that the
English were beaten back. The people of Poix, a little
further on, either not being in a mood for fighting, or
not prepared for it, thought best to buy off the enemy



PASSAGE OF THE SOMME. 43.

A certain sum was agreed upon, on the faith of which the
town and its two fortresses were to be left untouched.
The king and the young prince slept there quietly that

night, and next morning withdrew the army to pursue
its march. No sooner, however, were they out of
the way than those excellent people of Poix recovered
from their fright, and plainly told the few English who
had been left behind to receive the ransom, that they
would not pay one penny of what they had promised ;
and so saying, they fell fiercely upon the little troop.
This was shabby. Fortunately for the English, who
defended themselves gallantly, their rear-guard was not
far off, and they hastily sent to it for succour. Lord
Reginald Cobham, and Sir Thomas Holland who com.
manded, hastened to the help of their comrades, with
loud shouts of “Treason, treason !” and speedily pun.
ished the townsmen’s bad faith by slaying great
numbers of them, burning their town, and pulling
down their castles to the very ground.

This was severe ; but faith ought to be kept, even
with an enemy. Those who break their word must
not complain if they suffer for 1t.

One of these castles, when the army first took pos-
session, was found to be garrisoned by two young
ladies, the beautiful daughters of its absent lord. They
were chivalrously protected from: the rude soldiery by
that glorious John Chandos, of whom we shall hear
again; and the Lord Basset, who brought them to the



44 PASSAGE OF THE SOMME,

king’s presence. Edward received the ladies with all
courtesy, asking them whither they would go, and
commanded that they should be safely conducted to
their chosen place of refuge.

Edward’s career, in the north-west of France, had so
far been highly successful. Still, in the neighbourhood
of Paris, it was materially checked by the French
having broken down the bridges over the numerous
rivers that intersect that part of the country, and from
which the district received its former name, of the /sle
of France. At Poissy, about twenty miles from the
capital, the English almost stuck fast; but the army
was extricated by a feint on the part of its leader.
Edward made as though he were going off in the op-
posite direction, then returned hastily, patched up the
bridge, and got, for that time, out of the way of Philip
and his avenging host. But though he escaped here,
he soon found that the net was being drawn closer
around him. Broken bridges stopped him on every
hand, while those hundred-thousand angry Frenchmen
were almost upon his heels. It seemed the turn of the
English to be swallowed up now, for they were finally
placed between the bridgeless Somme and the French
army, eager to avenge, upon the king of England and
the beardless boy his son, the injuries inflicted by
them upon the French nation.

Many English heads had been laid low, spite of the
triumphant character of their inroad, so that the origi-



PASSAGE OF THE SOMME. 45

nal odds of thirty thousand against one hundred
thousand, were fearfully increased at this juncture,
Fighting or starving seemed the only alternatives
offered to the English, and they were not inclined to ac-
cept either. In this dilemma Sir Godfrey de Harcourt
and the Earl of Warwick, with a couple of thousand
men-at-arms and archers, were sent down stream to see
whether bridge or ford, of some kind or other, could
not be discovered. The search was fruitless ; and when,
on their return to the army, they had communicated
the result of it, the king, who was full of thought and
care, ordered immediate preparations to be made for
decamping, as King Philip was already within six
miles of them. There really seemed to be nothing now
but a run for it.

Those iron-clad and iron-hearted men of the four-
teenth century prayed as well as fought. Before the
sun had risen upon the dispirited little army, there was
heard not only the trumpet-sound for breaking up the
camp, but the quiet voice of the priest imploring mercy
from the God of heaven, and blessing the kneeling wor-
shippers. What a heart-felt “Good Lord, deliver us !”
would ascend from that imperilled band! and who shall
say that those prayers were not heard ?

In stern military order the march commenced : men-
at-arms, archers, and their shaggy comrades with the
big knives, streamed out of Airaines; and even the
hindermost files, those whom loitering or business had



46 PASSAGE OF THE SOMME.

thrown into the veriest rear, had cleared it for a good
two hours, before the French vanguard, in equal mili-
tary order, entered the town. The enemy had escaped
them, that was plain... So, instead of exchanging blows
with the English, their only revenge was to sit down
and eat up the good things that were, of necessity, left
behind. There were barrels of wine; joints on the spit,
just ready for roasting ; bread and pastry half-baked
in the ovens ; and tables, vainly spread for the nobles
and knights now careering away in the distance ; com-
pelled to fly, and yet not so disheartened as to be in-
capable of attacking a little town that stood in their
way, knocking it all to shivers, and then taking up
their lodging in it for the night.

King Philip fixed his quarters at Airaines, and,
doubtless, the excellent cheer thus provided for them
by the retreating foe, was (without any fear of the usual
consequence of things going down the “ wrong throat ”)
heartily enjoyed by his followers. We cannot for a
moment suppose that his Highness of France would
condescend to eat any of these English “leavings !”

At Oisemont, a town between Airaines and Abbeville,
King Edward afresh held a council, and ordered the
prisoners, whom his troops in their skirmishing about
the country had seized, to be brought before him, that
he might question them as to the possibility of getting
over the river. He asked these, very courteously, if
they knew of any ford below Abbeville where he and



PASSAGE OF THE SOMME. 47

ais army might cross the Somme, adding, that to him
who would conduct him to such a place he would give
his liberty, and that of any twenty, whomsoever he
might choose, of his companions.

Liberty is sweet; and, thereupon, up spoke a common
fellow (named Gobin Agace) to this effect :—

“Sir,—I promise you, under peril of my life, to
guide you to a place where you and your whole army
may pass the river without hurt. There are certain
fords where twelve men a-breast may cross twice in the
day, and not have water above their knees; but when
the tide is in, the river is so full and deep that no one
can cross it. When the tide is out, the river is so low
that it may be passed on horseback, or on foot with-
out danger. The bottom of this ford is very hard, of
gravel and white stones, over which all your carriages
may safely pass, and from thence it is called Blanch-
taque. You must, therefore, set out early, so as to be
at the ford before sunrise.”

Overjoyed at such good news, the king readily pro-
mised the speaker a round sum of money, in addition
to his liberty, provided his statement, as to this ad-
mirable ford, proved correct.

Gobin, as it happened, was a true man—to his own
interest ! We must say nothing of his king and coun-
try. Some people would sell the whole world, if they
only saved their own precious necks thereby. This was

precisely Gobin’s condition.



4% PASSAGE OF THE SOMME.

After two or three hours of anxious, uneasy rest, king,
prince, knights, and meaner men alike, arose. Mid-
night though it was, the trumpets were heard sounding
loudly for the march; and by break of day all were
moving on, under the leadership of the illustrious
Gobin, to the ford of Blanchtaque. The brightening
sunbeams of an early August morning played upon the
broad waters of the river; for, alas! the Somme was a
tidal stream, and, by the time the faithful Gobin had
brought up his royal and military train, the tide was
at its height. To make bad worse, at the other side of
the swelling flood appeared Sir Godemar du Fay, a
great Norman baron, to whose especial care it had
been committed to baffle the King of England at this
point. Sir Godemar was at the head of a large force
of men-at-arms and infantry, backed by the burly,
well-armed townsmen of Abbeville, and a zealous
swarm of country-folks in their smock-frocks. What
sort of weapons was wielded by these good fellows in
the smock-frocks, historians do not tell us. Most
likely they snatched up their pitchforks and goads ;
which, rude enough considered as instruments of war,
were yet capable, when poised by such brawny arms,
of inflicting very ugly wounds on any of the enemy
unfortunate enough to come within their range. The
pass leading from the ford was well manned by a posse
of Genoese cross-bowmen.

Fhe brimming river, and the armed host upon its



oats
rahe aay
re

Ty



ENGLISH ARMY CROSSING THE SOMME



PASSAGE OF THE SOMME. 49

opposite bank, formed a rather disheartening prospect.
But it was a case of “nothing venture, nothing win ;”
though an experienced commander, such as the still
young monarch of England, was not going to do any-
thing rashly. The river had to be crossed, and those
threatening Frenchmen on the other side had—in
school-boy phrase—to be “ thrashed” before his brave
followers were free from peril. The tide at length
turned, as the highest tide will do ; and, eagerly watch-
ing its slow retreating course, the keen eye of our
Edward at once marked out the precise time when he
must dash forward and dare everything.
the stream became possible, and then, in the name of
“God and St. George,” the horsemen, king, prince, and
all, leaped into the shallowing water. And on the op-
posite bank, making the air ring with shouts of “God
and St. Denis,” in sprang the French men-at-arms;
quite as ready (observes an old writer) for a tilting
match in the water, as on dry land. Fierce blows and
thrusts were exchanged, as they plowtered in the stream ;
and the sword of the young prince, it is said, was then
first stained with blood.

It must, from that time have assumed a very differ-
ent aspect in his eyes. Before, it was the mere glitter-
ing plaything of a boy; henceforth, it was the terrible
death-dealing weapon of a man !

The forcing of this passage over the Somme was no

easy matter. French, against English valour was, that
(3) 4



50 — PASSAGE OF THE SOMME.

day, well matched. The English archers, however, at
last turned the day in favour of their countrymen.
Their fearful storm of arrows compelled even the
bravest of the French knights to give way; and the
English fairly won the opposite bank, driving their
opponents before them in all directions. In the hot
pursuit which followed, terrible slaughter was done
upon the flying enemy. Knights, men-at-arms, fat

_ . burghers from Abbeville, and simple peasants fresh

from their flocks and fields, found, that day, one com-
mon doom, from sharp English lances and swift-winged
English arrows. | |

The river was crossed. But it was only just in time,
seeing that some of the hindmost were set upon, and
slain by, the light cavalry of the advancing French
army.

King Philip was not particularly pleased when he
found that his prey had escaped him. Nor did it add
to his satisfaction, on his own arrival at the river’s
bank, to perceive that the tide was already flowing
back again, so as to leave him no chance, save that of
going round to the bridge at Abbeville. In his first
paroxysm of rage he bethought him of hanging Sir
~ Godemar Fay, for not having better disputed the pas-
sage committed to his keeping; but the intercession of
his brothér knights saved that nobleman from so dis-
graceful a fate. | |
Honest. Gobin—well, he was honest to his new



PASSAGE OF THE SOMMER, 51

master, though a little treacherous to his old one—
duly received the promised reward, and a good horse
into the bargain, His service was worth paying for
handsomely. Then solemn thanks were returned by
the English to God who had delivered them from so
pressing a danger. *With that baffled French host, on
the other side of the now flowing tide, the English
must have felt somewhat as did the Israelites when
the returning waves of the Red Sea, over which they
had passed dry-shod, rolled in again upon “ Pharaoh and
his horsemen,” swallowing them up in its triumphant
waters.

The deliverance of the English however, great and
thankworthy as it was, was yet but a temporary one.
Philip, speeding away over the round-about bridge at
Abbeville, was soon heard of again in their rear; and
then a stand, to meet him, and fight for it, was made,
near Crecy in Ponthieu. For “now,” said Edward,
‘“T am on my mother’s lawful inheritance, given as her
marriage-portion, and I am resolved to defend it against
Philip of Valois,”

















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m - Ve i
|

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ON SSR ROR OA

wh % ek SED NS .

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S aS NY te a ays Wy ~~ ar * *
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IV.

G@bhe Hattle of Creep.

jeg iE celebrated battle-field of Crecy lies about
@asi eight miles north of Abbeville. Edward’s

army here drawn up, was much smaller



Pe RSE



than that of the enemy. As has been said, it is pro-
bable that it fell considerably short of its original
thirty thousand; while the French—if rumour did not
exaggerate their numbers—amounted to a hundred and
twenty thousand, As things turned out, we might
afford to make them a present of the odd twenty
thousand ; and believe that it was only one hundred
thousand gallant Frenchmen and their allies that our
mere handful destroyed on that memorable day.

The comparative insignificance of the English, how.
ever, made it all the more important that they should
be posted as advantageously as possible ; the Earl of
Warwick and Sir Godfrey de Harcourt, therefore, rode
over the ground, noticing, with keen practised eyes,
how every yard of it might be turned to the best ac-

count. That business settled, they were in pretty good



56 THE BATTLE OF CRECY.

heart about the matter. Provisions were plentiful in
the country ; and even had they not been, their own
stores were far from being exhausted. So, having first
ascertained that Philip had no intention of giving battle
immediately, they pitched their tents that night in the
plain.

There, all was soon eager preparation for the antici-
pated struggle of the next day. Arms were examined.
A faulty lance-shaft might have brought destruction
upon the knight who wielded it, a weather-rotted bow-
string would have rendered one arrow useless; and
with their inferior numbers, not one lance, nor one grey-
goose-winged arrow could they afford to throw away.
Then there was a great clattering and overhauling of
armour. Cuirasses, cuisses,—the pieces that protected
the legs—helmets or gauntlets, wanting a strap here, or
a buckle there, had to be made “right and tight,” and
polished up into the bargain. These were the per-
sonal cares of squires, and men-at-arms ; the squires
waiting upon the knights their masters, the men-at-
arms waiting upon themselves. The king and prince
were occupied in giving a great supper to the leaders
of their brave troops, and at that entertainment no
fears of to-morrow’s clash of arms spoiled their knightly
appetites, They ate well, they drank well, and then
retired from the royal presence to tent or cloak, as

each one best pleased, with the determination of fight-
ing well next morning.



Bee)

LAY aN



PREPARATIONS ON THE, ENE Ob Gat Tt

BESTS
pag &@ 46



THE BATTLE OF OCRECY. 57

The cares and hospitalities of the day ended, the king,
in his solitude, first kneeled down in devout prayer to
God, that He would give him victory in the forthcom-
ing battle, and then, like the rest, threw himself upon
his bed about midnight.

Early next morning, August 26th, he and the prince
joined in prayers, and received the Holy Communion.
The greater part of his army did the same; and then
the trumpets sounded to arms, and for each division of
the army to take the ground marked out for it.

There were three of these divisions. The first was
commanded by the Prince of Wales; and under him
were some noble and knightly warriors, whose descend-
ants—if there be any of the old blood still remainng—
may well be proud of their ancestors at Crecy. There
were the Earls of Warwick and Oxford, Sir Godfrey de
Harcourt, the Lords Reginald Cobham, Thomas Holland,
Stafford, Mauley, Delawarre, Bartholomew, Burghersh,
Robert Neville, Thomas Clifton, Bourchier, Latimer,
Sir John Chandos, and other knights notable in their
day, but whose very names are now extinguished.
The brave boy was bravely supported. This division
numbered about eight hundred men-at-arms, two thou-
sand archers, and one thousand Welshmen. All at
once moved on in good order, to their appointed post ;
each lord displaying his banner and pennon,—the pen-
non was a forked streamer attached to the upper part
of the lance,—and marching in the centre of his men.



B8 THE BATTLE OF CRECY.

The second division was commanded by the Earls of
Southampton, and Arundel; the Lords Roos, Wil-
loughby, Basset, St. Albans, Lascels, Multon, Sir Lewis
Tufton, and many others. It comprised eight hundred
nren-at-arms, and twelve hundred archers.

The king himself headed the reserve, or third
division, of about seven hundred men-at-arms, and two
thousand archers. The men-at-arms (as was some-
times the custom, like that of our old-fashioned
dragoons), were dismounted, and prepared to fight on
foot. The baggage of the entire army, with the
waggons and horses, was placed in the rear within an
enclosure, to which there was but one entrance, and
that, we may believe, was well guarded. Trenches
were hastily dug on both sides as an additional protec-
tion to the little army; and in front were placed a few
cannon, then a novel invention, used, perhaps for the
first time, during Edward’s previous wars in Scotland.

His forces being thus marshalled in battle-array, the
king, wearing neither helmet nor coat of mail, but
simply his usual hood and dress, mounted his riding-
horse, or hackney as it was called; the. magnificent
charger being reserved for the battle-field; and passing
at a foot’s pace through their ranks, with his marshals
on either hand, addressed his men, encouraging them
to guard the honour of their sovereign, and defend his
right to the throne of France. His cheerful looks, and
still more cheering words, went straight to the hearts



THE BATTLE OF CRECY. _ 59

of his stalwart fellows, who drew fresh courage from
his animating appeals. For, if truth must be told,
some of them were becoming a little down-hearted ;
the numbers against them being so terribly overpower-
ing as somewhat to damp the confidence inspired by
previous successes.

As by this time it was near ten o’clock (the usual
dinner-hour of that period), the king ended by bidding
his men eat and drink heartily ; and then he retired to
his own post. Advice so agreeable was instantly acted
upon; and after they had eaten and drunken to their
heart’s content, they packed up their pots, barrels,
dishes, platters, and such things in the waggons, and
then sat down on the ground with their helmets and
arms beside them, that they might be the fresher when
the enemy came up. And so they prepared to meet
the formidable Philip of Valois.

That same Saturday morning the King of France
also rose betimes ; and as soon as he and his army had |
had prayers, they moved on towards the English. When
within four miles of Abbeville, they too were formed
in order of battle, and then continued their march; the
infantry in front, to keep out of the way of their own
cavalry. Four knights whom Philip had sent forward
to reconnoitre, now returned, bringing him word that
they had caught sight of the English, drawn up as we
have described them, on the sloping ground near
Cregy ; and they advised him to halt his troops for the



60 THE BATTLE OF CRECY.

night, where they were, for if they went on, they would
certainly be too tired to attack the English with any
advantage. Upon this, the order was given to “halt
banner, in the name of God and St. Denis.” St.
Denis was the patron saint of the French, as St.
George was of the English. Those in front halted
accordingly. But they who were in the rear, vowed
they would not halt, till they were as forward as the
front. And with that they kept pushing on.

Oh, what mischief came of this piece of stupidity !
By the pressure from behind, spite of the efforts of the
king and his generals to stop them, the front ranks
were driven on until, in utter disorder, they came with-
in sight of the enemy. The appearance of Edward’s
well-ordered battalions rather checked their ardour;
and they fell back, in a confused manner, upon the
rear, to whom they communicated their own panic;
panics being eminently catching. Some few did what
all might have done had they chosen, and made their
way to the front; but the greater part hung back.
There was unaccountable confusion and disorder
throughout the whole French army; so that: their vast
numbers did them more harm than good. An attempt
was made to rally them; and at last, on they went,
but in a sad pell-mell sort of fashion, hither and
thither, as each lord, baron, or knight thought fit.

Seeing them advance, the English rose from the
ground where they were sitting, and fell into their



TUE BATTLE OF CRECY. Gl

ranks. All was calmness and order here; and the
boy-prince, whose division was to bear the first brunt
of battle, took the post that had been assigned to him.
His archers were in the van, his men-at-arms in the
rear. ‘The Earls of Northampton and Arundel, were
stationed so as to support the prince, in case of need.
The king formed his division on a height at a little
distance, where he could overlook the field, and bring
up his reserve, or not, as the battle might turn. He
himself stood by a windmill, which, not long ago, was
sald to be still remaining on this memorable spot.

The attack was made by the French about three
o’clock in the afternoon. Their first line consisted of
fifteen thousand Genoese cross-bowmen; and these the
king bade his marshals order forward, “in the name
of God and St. Denis,” to begin the battle. The
Genoese, however, were in no condition for doing so.
They had had a long day’s march on foot, heavily
armed; and were so worn out with fatigue, that they
plainly told the constable they were not fit for any-
thing. The Earl of Alengon, who commanded the
second division, hearing this, exclaimed in a pet,—
“This is what one gets by employing such scoundrels,
who fail us when most wanted.” And, among them,
they managed to drive the poor, tired, drenched
Genoese (for there was a heavy thunder-storm at the
time) on towards the English. The storm, which added
to their confusion, soon, however, cleared off, and the



62 THE BATTLE OF CRECY.

sun shone out bright, but full in the faces of the French,
so dazzling and blinding them, that it was even worse
than the rain.

At length, spurred on by their commanders, the
Genoese prepared for action, and sprang with a shout
towards the English, who stood firm, never minding
their noise. Again they leaped forward with a great
cry as before; but the English, with that boy at their
head, stirred not a foot. It was plain there was
no frightening them with mere noise. A third time
there was a bound and a cry, and then—not noise
alone—thousands of bolts from their cross-bows, fell
upon the enemy. Now was the time for the boy to
prove himself a man. The word of command was
given; and, advancing one step, the English archers
poured in, among the foe, such a shower of arrows
that, as an old writer says, it was like a snow-storm :
keen, stinging arrows, for soft snow-flakes. The
Gencese could not stand this. Heads, arms, legs,
broad chests, pierced by the long, sharp shafts,—they
fled in dismay; cutting their bow-strings, already
weakened by the rain, and throwing down their useless
weapons, aS they turned their ignominious backs
upon the English yeomen.

Philip, in a rage at their flight, called out to his
mounted men-at-arms to “kill those rascals.” And, no-
thing loth, the horsemen rode in among their wearied,
discomfited comrades, cutting them down without



THE BATTLE OF CRECY. 63

mercy ; while still, amid the mingled mass of men
and horses, hot and thick fell the merciless English
arrows; hottest and thickest wherever the press was
createst. Into that wounded, writhing heap, too,
plunged sullenly the clumsy stone balls of those new,
and alarming great guns in front; whose noise, to un-
accustomed ears was, we are told, as “though God
thundered!’” Down went men and horses among the
baffled Genoese, one overthrowing another; and he
who was once down, had no chance of rising again.
Then, when the rout and disorder was at its height,
was the time for the Irish and Welshmen. Passing
through the ranks of their own men-at-arms and
archers, their great knives, if not very military wea-
pons, proved fatal, to many a gaily accoutred prostrate
horseman. No distinction of rank was there. Noble
and squire alike were remorselessly slain by these
rough soldiers, whose zeal was anything but pleasing
to their own knightly sovereign. King Edward could
not abide such wholesale slaughter. Possibly (for
meaner motives will sometimes mingle with generous
ones), he regretted the loss of the abundant ransom,
which such prisoners as those who had perished under
the cruel knives of his half-savage infantry, would have
furnished. For, according to the custom of the times,
knights and gentlemen, when taken prisoners, were
allowed to purchase their freedom by sums of money
proportioned to their rank and wealth.



64 THE BATTLE OF CRECY.

It was here that the brave, blind old king of Bohemia,
who marched under Philip’s banner, met his fate. Un-
able, through blindness, to make his own way into the
fight, he bade two faithful knights lead him on, that he
might strike at least one good sword-stroke at the
enemy. They placed him between them, fastened their
horse bridles to his, that they might not be separated
in the throng, and then, in all three dashed, fought
valiantly, and all fell on the battle-field, where next
morning their bodies were found on one spot; their
three horses still linked together, standing quietly. by
them. The Lord Charles of Bohemia, son to the king,
was bringing up a force to aid the French; but per-
celving, when at a little distance that the battle was
going against them, he discreetly turned aside and went
his way.

The young prince meanwhile was so hard pressed by
the French second line, under the Earl of Alencon,
which had advanced to back the flying rabble of
Genoese, that the Earls of Arundel and Northampton
moved up their division to support him. The battle
was terribly hot here, and the king of France himself,
hovering on their skirts, was eagerly looking for an
opening to lead his third division in among them. The
English archers, however, formed an impenetrable wall
against him, that he vainly endeavoured to break
through; and the struggle lay chiefly between the
prince’s force and that under Alencon. The young



THE BATTLE OF CRECY. 65

fellow was sorely put to it; and fearing for so precious
a lite, the Earl of Warwick sent off a knight, post haste
to the king, entreating him to bring up the reserve, to
rescue his son from so imminent a danger,

“Is my son dead, or wounded, or unhorsed?” was
the king’s answer to this urgent request.

“No,” replied the knight, “but he is so hardly
matched that he cannot long hold out without you.”

)

“Sir Thomas,” was the rejoinder, “go back to your
comrades, and tell them they must not send to me for
help so long as my son is alive. He must this day
win his spurs, and I am determined, if God will, that
the glory of this day shall be his own, and that of those
who are with him.”

The knight galloped back again with his message,
which seemed to put fresh life into the princely lad
and his brave companions. Fiercer blows were dealt,
hotter and more strenuous was the attack, till, ere long,
the unruly multitude of French knights, and squires,
and men, began to give way before them. The Earls
of Flanders and Alengon, who had turned the flank of
the prince’s archers, were slain, together with many of
their best knights; and the entire first and second
French lines were forced back. Philip made a vigorous
effort to turn the fortunes of the day; but it was of ne
use; the whole French army was utterly routed and
driven off the field in confusion. The royal standard

narrowly escaped capture. Its bearer was struck down
(3) 5



66 THE BATTLE OF ORECY.

in the fight, but while French and English eagerly con-
tended for so glorious a prize, the one to seize, the
other to rescue it, a French knight hastily with his
sword, cut the banner from its shaft, wrapped it round
his body, and rode off with it. King Philip himself
was wounded, his horse was killed under him by an
arrow, and as he sprang on another, Sir John de Hain-
ault snatched at the reins, and forced him off, telling
him by way of comfort, that if he had lost one battle,
he might gain another. And away they both swept to
Amiens, with a retinue of only sixty knights and men-
at-arms, in place of the splendid array of the morning.

It was a murderous and cruel battle; for the
desperate English gave no quarter, nor would they
ransom any. At night-fall, as the noise died away,
they looked upon the field as their own, and lighted up
torches and great fires, intending to bivouac where they
stood ; for in their circumstances they dared not venture
on immediate pursuit. The king, who had never even
put on his helmet, then descended from his post of
observation, and leading forward his battalion, which
like himself, had looked on only, throughout that hard-
fought day, advanced to meet his son. He folded him
in his arms, and kissed him lovingly, saying, in the
quaint language of those times, “ Sweet son, God give
you good perseverance! You are indeed my own son,
for very valiantly have you this day acquitted yourself.
You are worthy to be a king!”



THE BATTLE OF CRECY. G7

Such words, from such a father, fell pleasantly upon
the ear of the panting, battle-stained boy. Most
modestly was the loving commendation received, and
then he fell upon his knees, to beg his father’s blessing.
That, we may be sure, was heartily given.

The rejoicings of the English on this eventful night
were orderly rejoicings, for the king had utterly for-
bidden all noise or riot. And they were fittingly
mingled with many thanksgivings to God, who had
given them so wonderful a victory. Their losses were
trivial. Those of the French were immense. Clumsy
stone cannon balls, lance, sword, sheaves of unerring
arrows, and even those big knives, had done their work
upon kings, princes, nobles, knights, and common men,
to the number of forty thousand. There, as the old
poet has sung,—

‘Sceptre and crown
Had tumbled down,

And in the dust were equal laid,
With the poor crooked scythe and spade! ¥

The next morning which was Sunday, proved so
fogey that none could see twenty yards before him,
and this circumstance threw another considerable body
of French into the hands of the English. Edward had
ordered out a strong detachment of five hundred lances,
and two thousand archers, under his two marshals, who
were directed to scour the neighbourhood, lest any of
the enemy should be collecting again to make a fresh



68 THE BATTLE OF CRECY.

stand against him. French troops, ignorant of the
total overthrow of their army, had that morning left
Abbeville and St. Riguier to join Philip at Creey; and
these in the mist, taking the English for their own
friends, were almost among them before they discovered
their fatal mistake. The encounter between the two
was short, but sharp, and ended in the slaughter of
great numbers of the French, not one of whom would
have escaped, had not the fog (which had betrayed
them to their discomfiture) favoured the flight of a few,
who thus saved themselves. A second, well-appointed
party of French, under the Archbishop of Rouen, and
the Grand Prior of France, met with the same fate from
the marshals’ detachment, who cut them almost all to
pieces, including their right reverend leader. Others,
found wandering in the fields, where they had lain all
night, were also savagely put to the sword. In short,
it is said that more were slain on that Sunday morn-
ing, than had fallen in the battle itself.

The returning marshals informed the king, who was
just coming from prayers, of their successful and san-
gulnary proceedings. And then, as there was no fear of
a second army to be encountered, by his command,
heralds, attended by their secretaries, slowly traversed
the field to take account of the dead. The name and
rank of the slain knights could only be ascertained by
their coats of arms, emblazoned upon the shield, or
surcoat ; and when this sad task was ended, by Edward’s



THE BATTLE OF CRECY. 69

order, the chiefest of them were reverently laid to rest
in consecrated ground attached to the monastery of
Montenay, close at hand. The king himself, with his
great lords, all clad in black, took part in the solemn
ceremony, by way of doing honour to his brave, though
unfortunate enemies. Three days’ truce was granted
for burying the dead. It is said to be from this time
that the Prince of Wales, who, young as he was, had
shown himself so terrible at Crecy, was known among
the French by the titlk—now so familiar to our ears
—of the Black Prince.

Flot from their fierce, but brilliant encounter at Crecy,
Edward, on the following Monday, August 28th,
marched bis brave Britons straight to the siege of
Calais, It was a four days’ march, and they did a little
curning and plundering by the way.












ea st Ny ’
rin; m7 a P Sf Cae

AK THE SIEG








Vy.

Che Siege of Calais.

weerea ITE governor of Calais was a brave Burgundian



knight, named Sir John de Vienne; and
other valiant knights with squires to match,
but whose names are scarcely worth preserving, served
under him. The town was strongly fortified, and these
grim men in iron cases, were determined to hold it
against the King of England, and his victorious son.
That king, however, and that son had equally deter-
mined to take it; and therefore—in military phrase—
“sat down” (which means something like, standing up !)
before Calais, on the Ist of August, 1846. They did
this with all calmness and order, as though they could
afford to take their time about it. The camp was
marked out, tents were pitched; and even a sort of
town composed of huts, thatched with straw, or broom,
soon sprang up under those marvellous English hands,
impertinently close to the walls of the besieged city.
Markets were established here for all comers; and in
them, fish, flesh, fowl, bread, clothing—all sorts of



74 THE SIEGE OF CALAIS.

things, either from the surrounding country, or from
over seas, might be had for money. As for those who
had -no money, it is to be presumed that they would
have been as ill off in the king’s market before Calais,
as In any other. From this comfortable kind of settle-
ment the English made frequent sorties (that is another
military phrase, and literally means—going out), doing
much mischief in the neighbourhood, and picking up
spoil for themselves; occasionally, it must be owned,
though not often, getting the worst of it. They made
no attempt to storm the town. They had neither men,
nor engines of war enough for that. Their grand object
was to compel the surrender of the garrison by cutting
off their supply of provisions. This is called, blockad-
ing a place. If he failed to starve the defenders of
Calais into submission, Edward hoped that at any rate
their sufferings would draw the King of France thither
to attempt their relief, and that would afford him
another opportunity of beating Philip.

The blockade was strict, and so experienced a com-
mander as John de Vienne, at once saw that he must
make diligent preparation to baffle the well-laid plans of
the two Edwards. If provisions could not be brought
into the town, it was plain that they must make what
they had go as far as possible, by reducing the number
of consumers. The less meat, the fewer mouths ; that
was how the difficulty must be met. Of course,
soldiers who could fight, were to be retained at any .



THE SIEGE OF CALAIS. 70

cost; and the rich inhabitants whose wealth had
enabled them to lay in store of eatables and drinkables,
or to purchase the good things that were occasionally
at great risk smuggled in, spite of the English, were at
liberty to stay if they liked. As for those who could
neither fght, nor contribute to the general stock, they
must troop, and the sooner they were got rid of, the
better.

Prompt execution followed resolution. It was a
hard thing, but military necessity is harder still; so
one Wednesday morning, seventeen hundred of those
who were of no use in the defence—who had only
craving mouths, instead of the soldiers, trained right
hand, or the merchant’s money bags,—were driven out
of the town, weeping and wailing, to await the mercy
of the English camp, through which they must pass.
Poor men, women and children,—it was a strange
sight, that stream of miserable, forlorn, human beings,
from grey-heads to infants, unconscious of their troubles,
in their mother’s arms; and the staring English, in
utter astonishment, asked what in the world they meant
by thus coming right into the midst of the enemy;
why had they left the town ?

The answer was simple enough: “ Because they had
nothing to eat.” The English were enemies, bent,
spite of all the Frenchmen that Philip of Valois could
scrape together, on taking his strong town of Calais.
But they were also men, and their good, honest hearts,



76 THE SIEGE OF CALAIS.

were touched by the distress of these unhappy people,
mercilessly turned out by their countrymen to perish.
To permit them to pass on, unharmed, to a place of
refuge, was much ; but it wasnot all. That noble King
Edward, in addition to this, ordered the poor wretches
a hearty dinner; and then, when the hungry “ enemy”

had been “ fed,” (we know Who has bidden us do that!)
“he gave to each of them two pence—worth more than
as many shillings in these days—to carry them on
their doleful journey. That man deserved to take
Calais. No wonder that many fervent prayers were
offered up by these unfortunate French men and
women for their benefactor ; English invader and claim-
ant of their Philip’s crown though he was. It was
indeed a good work that Edward did that Wednesday.
“ Blessed is he that considereth the poor and needy.”
To such, a recompense is surely promised.

The character of this great king and that of his
great son, warlike as they both were, was one of general
humanity; and this beneficence to the poor, helpless
wretches driven out of Calais, was an illustrious example
of it. War is a cruel trade; but there are two ways of
carrying it on: Like men and like wild beasts.

The siege of Calais was protracted. Blockading is
slow work; and as more men, more money, more every-
thing was wanted, the young prince was despatched
to England to seek fresh succours. These, thanks to
the liberality of parliament, were abundantly obtained;



THE SIEGE OF CALAIS. 77

for Englishmen, to their very heart’s core, enjoyed the
successful contest with France, and did not much care
what they paid for it.

During the course of this tedious eleven months’
siege, an incident occurred which is worth recording,
as an interesting exhibition of the knightly manners of
the time. |

It has been named that the Duke of Normandy,
eldest son of the French king, was engaged at the
other end of the country laying siege to Aiguillon, a
town in Edward’s French possessions, where all the
fighting had been going on, until Godfrey de Harcourt
suggested Normandy. From this place the duke was
recalled by Philip, who required all the forces he could
gather to resist that formidable father, and no less
formidable son, who had been carrying everything
before them in the north. The siege was accordingly
raised, aS it is termed—that is, given up; and the
celebrated Sir Walter Manny, who commanded in the
town, making a dash after the retreating French, took
a handful of good prisonérs, whom his people brought
back with them to the castle. Among these prisoners
was a Norman knight, a very important personage
indeed ; and as Sir Walter longed to be with his
countrymen before Calais, he cleverly contrived to join
them by means of this same prisoner, whom he cour-
teously bade fix his own ransom. The sum named by
the knight was a large one. Great men did not like



78 THE SIEGE OF CALAIS.

to be let off too cheaply on these occasions, because
that looked as if they were worth little. And in reply,
Sir Walter told him, that if he would procure per-
mission for his captor and twenty others to ride straight
through France to Calais, without stopping by the
way or conducting themselves otherwise than as ordin-
ary travellers, he would let him go without any ransom
at all, and thank him into the bargain. If the knight
failed to procure this safe-conduct, he was to return to
his prison within one month.

The terms were tempting. Off set the Norman
knight after his duke, got the required passport, and
posted back again with it to Sir Walter, who gave him
his freedom as he had promised.

Sir Walter then with twenty horsemen took the road
to Calais. He went to work frankly; told every one
who he was; and wherever he stopped for the night,
on showing his safe-conduct, was allowed to proceed
next morning. On arriving at Orleans, however, there
was a change. No respect was in that city shown to
the duke’s permission for him to pass free; nay, he
was even arrested and sent immediately to Paris, where
he was thrown into prison.

The Duke of Normandy, of course, heard of the con-
tempt with which his safe-conduct had been treated,
and of the usage to which so renowned a knight had
been subjected. He was terribly put out by it. It
was contrary to all the laws of knighthood, and he



THE SIEGE OF CALAIS. 79

hastened to the king his father, urgently pleading for
the liberation of the prisoner, otherwise, as he said,
people would think he had granted the safe- conduct
solely for the purpose of betraying Sir Walter.

The king’s answer to his son was not very consola-
tory. He simply replied that he intended putting Sir
Walter Manny to death, as he considered him one of
the most important of his enemies.

The indignant duke’s rejoinder was, that if any
harm was done to the knight, neither he nor any of his
people should ever again bear arms against the king
of England. And with that, father and son quarrelled
violently—the duke at last flinging out with a renewed
declaration that he would not serve in the king’s armies
so long as Sir Walter Manny was kept in prison.

Things remained in this state for some time; but at
leneth the king became ashamed of his discourteous
behaviour, allowed Sir Walter to go free, and reim-
bursed him the expenses to which his shameful impri-
sonment had put him. He went further, and, by way
of plastering the wound which he had himself inflicted,
even invited Sir Walter to the royal dinner-table,
pressing upon him rich gifts and jewels, which the
knight accepted, subject to the pleasure of his own
sovereign ; for he did not know whether Edward would
like him to keep them. Edward did not choose that
a knight of his should receive presents from the enemy.
So, right royally saying to him, “Sir Walter, we have



80 THE SIEGE OF CALAIS.

enough, thank God, both for you and for ourselves,”
he bade him return them to their donor; intimating
to Sir Walter, that the faithful servants of the King of
England must look to their own master, not to the
King of France, for their reward. Sir Walter accord-
ingly sent back the jewels by a cousin of his, who was
ouly too glad to keep them himself, when Philip bade
him do so. |

The siege of Calais still held on its slow course,
according to the manner of sieges ; its monotony being
varied, towards the close of the year, by the arrival in
camp of Queen Philippa and her son the prince.
Philippa had had her hands full during the absence of
her lord—the hard battle of Neville’s Cross, in Dur-
ham, in which the King of Scotland was taken prisoner,
having been fought under her own eyes. Her recep-
tion in the camp was one befitting both her rank and
the heroic courage she had recently displayed; and as
she brought in her train many great ladies of the
court, there were brave doings, in the way of feast
and tournament, to celebrate so agreeable a visit.

The King of France was not disposed to give up
Calais quietly, but his attempts to relieve it proved
fruitless. _He raised an immense army, far outnum-
bering that of the enemy, for this purpose; but the
English were so skilfully intrenched by their great
leader, that Philip could not get near the town. It
was in vain that he invited Edward to “come out and



THE SIEGE OF CALAIS. 81

fight ;” Edward knew better, and told him so, than
to sacrifice the advantages which had cost him so much
time and treasure. So this vast French army, after the
citizens had admired its numerous banners fluttering
in the moonlight, decamped, leaving the people of
Calais, who sorrowingly watched its departure, to do
the best they could for themselves.

Bad was the best, for the blockade had been so strict
that their provisions were well-nigh expended. Yea,
horses, dogs, cats, and viler creatures, had been already
eaten by the wretched inhabitants, who could no longer
endure starvation. So they entreated John de Vienne,
their governor, to mount the walls and make signs that
he wished a parley with the besiegers. That word
parley is a French word, bodily imported into our
English, with the slight alteration of our spelling it with
a y, instead of a z, and really means, talk! So Sir
John reluctantly did as they would have him; for he
was a brave knight, and would rather have held out
the town to the last.

The governor’s summons was answered by Sir Wal-
ter Manny and Lord Basset, to whom he spoke man-
fully, saying that the king his master had entrusted
the defence of Calais to him and his companions,
and they had done their duty till they were now
near famishing with hunger; and he prayed that
the King of England would be content with posses-

sion of the castle and town, in which he would find
(3) 6 |



82 THE SIEGE OF CALAIS.

great store of riches, letting the garrison depart unmo-
lested.

Sir Walter had no very agreeable answer to this
entreaty. He assured John de Vienne that the King
of England his master was so enraged at the loss of
men, time, and money, which this siege of Calais had
cost him; that he would offer the garrison no terms
save those of unconditional surrender ; for him to put
to death whom he pleased, and admit to ransom whom
he pleased.

The spirit of the governor was roused by this cruel
declaration, and he told Sir Walter that he and his
eompanions had only done what English knights and
squires in similar circumstances would have done—
held out as long as there was a stick or stone standing,
and a mouthful of food for any one. But still, famish-
ing as they were, they would endure much more,
rather than that the meanest horse-boy in the place
should fare worse than they. And he besought Sir
Walter to represent their hard case to the King of
England, of whose knighthood he had so high an
opinion, that he could not believe he would deal so
harshly with them as he had threatened.

The king, however, was really as angry as man could
be, and he told Sir Walter that the garrison of Calais
must take his first terms or none, Sir Walter expos-
tulated with him, that if he dealt such hard measures

to his conquered enemies, his own knights would rather



THE SIEGE OF CALAIS. «B83

unwillingly go out on dangerous service, expecting, if
taken by. the French, to be put to death, just as he, if
he did not relent, put to death the brave fellows who
had so long held Calais against him. It would cer-
tainly be death for death, if the fortunes of war turned
against them. |

Edward softened somewhat at this view of the case,
which was strongly urged by others of his nobles. So,
by way of mending matters, he dismissed Sir Walter
with his last requisition, which was, that six of the
principal citizens of Calais, carrying the keys of the
town and castle, should present themselves before him,
bare-headed, bare-foot, and with ropes round their necks,
and that he should do what he pleased with them;
hang them, or not, as the humour took him; the rest
of the inhabitants being permitted to go free.

It was a hard measure, but there was no help for it;
and back went that generous soul de Manny with this
last proposal, of which, no doubt, he was a little
ashamed. On his arrival, the governor caused the
town’s bell to be rung, collected all the citizens in the
public hall, and then communicated to them the final
answer of the inplacable monarch. Loud lamentations
and wailings broke forth from the assembled throng when
the king’s will was made known to them; and even the
hardy knight de Vienne, wept at the sight of their dis-
tress. For awhile there was a gloomy silence through-
out the multitude: life was sweet, and each one feared



84 THE SIEGE OF CALAIS.

to lose it. At length patriotism, and a sense of duty
prevailed even over the loveof life; and oneof the richest
merchants of Calais, named Eustace de St. Pierre, rose
up, saying, “Sirs, it would be great pity to suffer so
many people to die of famine, if by any means it could
be prevented, and it would be well-pleasing in the eyes
of our Saviour, if such misery could be averted. I
have such faith and trust in finding grace with God if
I die to save my townsmen, that I offer myself as first
of the six.”

Bravely spoken Eustace de St. Pierre! That man’s
name deserves to come down to posterity.

As for the assembled crowd, they rose up, and as an
old writer tells us, “almost worshipped him ;” many
throwing themselves, weeping, at his feet.

Another citizen, also wealthy and in great repute
with his fellow townsmen, then offered himself to be
the second. This was John Daire. Others followed,
till the required number was complete ; and Eustace de
St. Pierre, John Daire, James and Peter Wisant, and
two more whose names have perished, though the
memory of their heroic deed endures, agreed to give
themselves up to death to save the lives of the famish-
ing people of Calais. The six were merchants, members
of a class little esteemed by the knighthood of that
day. But, merchants though they were, they were
indeed noble men.

John de Vienne then collecting together his little



THE SIEGE OF CALAIS. 85

sacrificial band, mounted a small pony, (for his wounds
disabled him from walking), and conducted them in the
prescribed humiliating manner—bare-foot, bare-headed,
and with ropes round their necks—to that gate of the
town which opened on the English camp.
followed them to the gate, weeping and lamenting;
and when it was opened, the seven passed through to
the English barriers, where Sir Walter Manny was
waiting to receive them. ‘The six citizens were
delivered up to him, in due form, with an earnest
request that he would intercede with his sovereign for
their lives; and then de Vienne, with a heavy heart,
turned back again to the miserable town.

When brought into Edward’s presence, the prisoners,
upon their knees, gave up the keys of the castle and
town, praying the king to spare their lives. This,
Edward at first did not seem at all disposed to do; the
people of Calais had done him so much mischief by sea
in times past, that he was now quite in a mood to cut
off a few of their heads, by way of punishing them for
it. And, accordingly, spite cf the pitying looks and
entreaties of the great lords and knights around him,
he straightway gave command that the heads of the six
should be stricken off. It was in vain his gallant
followers interceded for the voluntary captives; he
would not hear a word on their behalf De Manny,
and even the prince himself pleaded unavailingly, though
they reminded him that a charge of cruelty, such as no



86 THE SIEGE OF CALAIS.

true knight ought to incur, would certainly rest upon
him, if he carried out his fierce purpose.

What was denied to the entreaties and remonstrances
of his son, and of his nobles, Edward was, however,
forced to grant to the prayers of his queen whom he
tenderly loved, and who, having just crossed the seas
to join him, after her victorious encounter at Neville’s
Cross, deserved some boon at his hands. On her knees,
weeping, she prayed him for Christ’s sake, as well as
for his love to her, to have pity on these unfortunate
citizens of Calais.

The king for awhile, and in silence, looked at the
weeping, kneeling figure; and then gently telling
Philippa he wished she had been anywhere, rather than
where she was at that moment, for he could not refuse
her request, bade her do with the six as she pleased.
Nothing loth, she carried them off in triumph to her
own tent, had those horrible ropes taken from their
necks, clothed and fed them; and then, with a supply
of money for their journey, commanded them to be
safely conducted out of the camp.

It was in August 1347, after an eleven months’ siege,
that the strong town of Calais surrendered to the king
of England. Edward, accompanied by his queen and
son, took possession of it in state, having first ordered
his officers to imprison a portion of the garrison, and -
drive all the inhabitants bodily out of the town, which
he was resolved to convert into a thoroughly English



TUE SIEGE OF CALATS. 8?

one, by filling it with his own subjects, The king made
Calais his residence for some little time, during which
the prince, at the head of a strong detachment, made a
sort of foray into the neighbouring country, which he
burned and ravaged as far as the Somme, and then
returned laden with spoil.

After this, as the one kingdom found fighting ruinous,
and the other found it costly, a truce was agreed upon
between the two; and Edward, having appointed a
favourite Italian knight of his, named Sir Americ de
Pavie, governor of Calais, set sail for England with the
queen, the prince, and his little daughter Margaret, who
had been born in the captured city. After being well
tossed about on his own seas (he complained that winds
and seas always favoured him when he went to France,
but were dead against him on his return), he landed at
Sandwich, then a considerable port, on the 28th of
September.

Sir Americ de Pavie, the newly appointed governor
of Calais, happened to be something of a rascal; and
we shall hear of him again.

















VI.

@reacbery at Calats,




eee tails young Prince of Wales was now a youth
E84 OE of seventeen ; tall, handsome, strong, valiant,
distinguished for his deeds of arms, as well
as for the other knightly qualities of courtesy, modera-
tion, and gentleness. He, and his illustrious parents,
were received with acclamations by the English people,
whose heads were nearly turned by those wonderful
doings in France. In great state the three entered the
city of London—for at that date, the city was a “ gen-
teel” place, and not as now, wholly given up to mer-
chandise. Merchants, tradesmen, and artisans certainly
exercised each one his calling, or craft there. But
there also the great nobles had their dwellings, whose
faded splendours may still be discerned in the ware-
houses and offices of modern times; bales of goods
crowding the halls within which lords and ladies were
wont to show their stately presence, and brisk clerks,
scribbling away as 1f for their very lives, in the room
of those who wielded the sword—the power of those



99 TREACHERY AT CALAIS.

days—and cased their limbs in steel, instead of broad
cloth.

Royal feastings and tournaments celebrated the
recent prowess of the new-made royal knight. And
that young, muscular form, and stout heart distinguished
itself in this mimicry of war, as it had done in the
grim reality of it in France.

The tournament was the chosen diversion of knights
and ladies of the fourteenth century. In it, companies
of knights, armed as if for battle, save that lance and
sword were puintless, spurred furiously against each other,
squadron against squadron, till broken lances, knights
unhelmed, or some of them lifted bodily out of their
saddles by the shock, terminated the contest, and the
one or the other was proclaimed victor. The ground
enclosed for the purpose was called the lists; and it
was surrounded by galleries for spectators, among whom
ladies were conspicuous; for they as well loved to look
upon these rough trials of skill, as the combatants
themselves loved to enter upon them. Occasionally
the excitement of these warlike games became so great
that battle in play was converted into battle in down-
right earnest; and men were maimed, and lives lost
within the gaily decorated lists, and under the unshrink-
ing eyes of the high born dames surrounding them.

If only two knights engaged, the one against the
other, it was called a joust.

At Canterbury, then a city of more importance than



TREACHERY AT CALAIS. 93

it is now, and Eltham, where at that time stood a royal
palace, whose great hall has long ago been turned into
a barn, these festivities were held in notable style.
People’s notions about being handsomely dressed vary
at different times and different places. Here, at
Eltham, the extraordinary equipments of two of the
knights who levelled lance at each other, have been
handed down to us by admiring chroniclers; and
when we read in their dusky pages that over the
armour of these same cavaliers—armour, no doubt, of
most exquisite finish, after the fashion of tilting
armour—they wore hoods of white cloth, buttoned
with large pearls, and embroidered with figures of
dancing-men dressed in blue, we must admit that they
were magnificent according to their notions, and
supremeiy ridiculous according to ours. We should
dress up a Merry Andrew in such guise. With them
it was the sumptuous apparel of noble and gallant
soldiers ; and for this special piece of finery the two
gentlemen, we are told, were indebted to the king’s
wardrobe. Five centuries hence, perhaps the people
of England may laugh at our modern notions of how
nobles and warriors should be habited.

Rejoicings and festivities, however, were not to last
long. The stalwart youth upon whom the affection of
all England rested was to have more work—real work,
not pretence—found for him through the medium of
Sir Aymeric de Pavia, who, it has been said, was some-



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Drelace.

Berean wars of Edward III. in France are
Yate, sometimes spoken of as though they
were mere wars of aggression. To



this view of them I cannot give an unqualified
assent, ‘The law of succession, though pretty
well ascertained, was not so strictly observed in
those days as to prevent all controversy upon
the subject. And seeing that, in his peculiar
case, others, beside Edward himself, thought that
he had a claim to the crown of France, I am
disposed to look upon his French wars as spring-
ing from an honest determination on his own
part, and that of his people, to rectify, by force
the wrong which, as he conceived, had been
done him by the French nobles, in assigning the
throne to Philip of Valois.

I do not affirm that he was in the right; but
lV PREFACE.

I do think he had sufficient grounds for sup-
posing himself to be so. The circumstances of
the case were undoubtedly such as to leave room
for honest difference of opinion about it. Nor
do I think that any one of us, who had as
colourable a claim to a great estate as had
Edward III. to the French crown, would leave
any stone unturned in our efforts to get pos-
session of it. Of course we should not fight;
that is the ultimate process of nations. But
not a single law court should we leave unvisited,
carrying up our appeal step by step, until we
gained our cause, or were barred by the final
adverse decision of the highest court of all: as
Edward was ultimately barred by the final
adverse decision, unmistakeably expressed by
successes In arms, of the French nation.

Much, however, as men may differ as to the
merits of his claim, all must unite in unbounded
admiration of the courage, fortitude, judgment,
and generosity, displayed by our great monarch,
and his greater son, in thosé marvellous en-
counters between the few and the many, which
have, for five long centuries, made Crecy and
Poitiers names of pride throughout England.
And the present seems a pecvliarly suitable
PREFACE, v

time for recalling in detail the far-off glories
of the two Edwards; seeing that “wars and
rumours of wars” have, since 1854, been almost
incessantly around us; and we, the few, as we
were on those old battle-fields, are sometimes
disposed to look anxiously upon the many that,
as we apprehend, may be against us. But
Norman fire, grafted upon Anglo-Saxon endur-
ance, is still our inheritance; and should war,
either at home or abroad, be thrust upon us,—
with a just cause, and, above all, with “God”
for “ our Hope and Strength,” we may with con-
fidence look to come out of it as triumphantly
as did the little imperiled band that followed
Kdward into France, and with more permanence
of success than was awarded to them.
Englishmen still pray, as well as fight!

M. dg.

Lonpon, September 11, 1863.




Contents.

. The Childhood of the Black Prince, ees
. Origin of the Wars in France, aes
. Passage of the Somme, . eee
. The Battle of Crecy, ase see
. The Siege of Calais, ...

. Treachery at Calais,

. The Prince’s Expedition from Bordeaux,

. The Battle of Poitiers, ees

. The English again invade France,

» The Prince’s Court in Aquitaine,

. The Prince’s Spanish Campaign,

. Troubles in Aquitaine, oes

. Treaty of Peace broken by the French, ...
. Incidents of the War—Death of Chandos,
. The Sack of Limoges—The Prince returns to England,
. The Death of the Prince, eee



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I.

The Childhood of the Black Prince.

Fp LE French wars of our great Edward III., and

his greater son, Edward the Black Prince,
afford a wonderful example of what stout
English hearts and hands can achieve, even in the
face of overwhelming numbers. Those wars have
made Crecy and Poitiers household words in England,
and we now propose to tell, in detail, their story; to-
gether with that of the gallant leader under whom the
English name became terrible in France. We shall
find the narrative present us with admirable pictures
of fortitude, humanity, and generosity, as well as of
warlike skill and daring.

Edward, the Black Prince, the heroic son of Edward
III. of England, was born at the old royal palace of
Woodstock, on the 15th of June, 1330. His mother
was Philippa, daughter of William, Count of Hainault.
In 1327, when she was a mere girl of fourteen, the



princess, attended by a brilliant train of knights
12 THE CHILDHOOD OF THE BLACK PRINCE.

and gentlemen, came over to England to marry its
young monarch, who was only two or three months
older than herself. The marriage proved a happy one;
more so than usually falls to the lot of royal person-
ages: for Philippa was gentle and good, and sincerely
attached to her husband ; and he, in return, gave her,
throughout their long life, the affection she so well
deserved. The birth of their boy was a great delight
both to them and the whole nation; and in the glad-
ness of his heart the king munificently rewarded the
bearer of such welcome tidings, assigning him a liberal
yearly pension in money, till he could settle lands
upon him to the same value.

We do not know much about the royal nursery in
those days. One thing, however, we do know, that the
first year or two in that apartment are spent very
much alike, whatever may be the centuries compared.
Whether the date be 1800 or 1300,—kicking, crawling,
squalling, and eating porridge, equally engrosses the
young occupant, be he prince or be he peasant. This
may not be very dignified, but we cannot help that.
The further process of shortening those interminable
long tails to their petticoats, with which it is the cus-
tom to endow very young babies, also passes upon a
Prince of Wales, irrespective of the date of his birth.
While in his first attempts to walk, the tumbles and -
knocks upon the head, encountered by the heir-apparent
of our day, have certainly been shared by that. stalwart
TILE CHILDHOOD OF THE BLACK PRINCE. 13

child whom we see so dimly through the mist of five
receding centuries. For both, the same mother’s heart
has beaten ; and, tender as was that of Philippa for her
first-born, we may not believe that it was more tender
than that of her whom we English of this day love to
call our sovereign.

One would certainly have liked to know something
of the childhood of one who was destined to fill so im-
portant a part in our own history, and in that of our
neighbours across the channel, as does the Black |
Prince. But though we have gossip five centuries old,
it is not gossip about babies. For grave historians to
record that Joan of Oxford was his nurse; that Mistress
Matilda Frampton had the honour of rocking the royal
cradle ; and that, in his third year, he was created
Karl of Chester; is not telling us much: it is the boy
himself we want to hear about. But the nursery door
is close shut upon its little princely inmate, and how-
ever precocious or stupid he may have been, to us it is
all a blank.

At the age of six, however, we get a glimpse of our
Edward of the olden time; for his father then created
him Duke of Cornwall, a title that is still borne by the
Prince of Wales. In those days, the creation of a peer
was a ceremony; not as now, when a slip of paper con-
verts a banker into a lord ; and the ceremony, in this
case, must have been a sight worth seeing. A title
meant something then. It carried with it power and
14 THE CHILDHOOD OF THE BLACK PRINCE.

authority, and the symbols of these were formally de-
livered to him who received it. Perhaps it was because
the prince was such a very little fellow that all the
usual formalities were not gone through on this occa-
sion. His rights over the duchy of Cornwall were,
ceremoniously, conveyed to him simply by girding his
tiny waist with a sword; the other usual ensigns of
authority—the ring and the staff—were not transferred
to him. The new-made duke, the first that England
had ever known, immediately proceeded to show that
the distinction conferred upon him was no empty one.
Bestowing knighthood was one of the powers attached
to it, and twenty gallant youths that day received it
from his hand. By this time, too, we find that the
small man was minding his book, with grave Dr.
Burley for his tutor, and a group of youngsters to
learn lessons with him, instead of being left in
stately solitude to con them over by himself. Among
these associates, Simon Burley afterwards became
one of the prince’s favoured and most distinguished
knights, |

King Edward’s French wars, of which we shall speak
presently, carried him much abroad; and his Highness
of Cornwall (he was not Prince of Wales yet), was,
in his father’s absence, appointed Lieutenant of the
kingdom. Hig lieutenancy was no mere pretence,
not a name only; for this child of eight years old
actually held a parliament for his father at Northam p-
THE CHILDHOOD OF THE BLACK PRINCE. 15

ton, in 1338. for, under the young duke’s presidency, it voted large
supphes for carrying on the popular war with Philip
of Valois and his friends.

Here, again, those tiresome old chroniclers do not
tell us how the prince got through his important busi-
ness, nor even how much of it fell to his share. But
at the mature age of eight, he would certainly get on
better than did James VI. of Scotland, who, (at three
or four years old), having to perform a regal duty of
the same kind, wound up his address to Lords and
Commons, by remarking, in the same breath, that
there was a hole in the roof of the parliament-
house. We cannot for one moment suppose that
our Edward made such “a hole” in his manners as
this !

The promise of the young prince’s babyhood—for he
really was a fine child—was now being fulfilled. He
grew up a handsome, strong-limbed, intelligent lad ;
and at the age of nine, when his father, who was busy
preparing for his contest with the French, sent for him
to the castle of Louvain to keep Christmas with him-
self and his queen, one of the Christmas amusements
of that “noble and royal” assembly was to propose a
-inarriage between the boy and the little daughter of
the Duke of Brabant, the young lady being then four
years old. The match went no further than those

Christmas conversations by a blazing log-fire; one of
‘16 THE CHILDHOOD OF THE BLACK PRINCE.

the prince’s own countrywomen, celebrated for her
beauty as the “Fair Maid of Kent,” being destined
for the wife, not of a hopeful boy, but of a man re-
nowned throughout Christendom as the hero of Crecy,

Poitiers, and Najara.


)




II.

Origin of the Wars in France,

c< ea T the time that King Edward III. came to the
Ying) throne, the English had considerable pos-



sessions in the south of France, which had
been brought by Queen Eleanor, wife of Henry IL. as
her marriage portion. For these possessions the kings
of England had been accustomed to do homage to the
kings of France, as (what was called) their feudal su-
periors. This ceremony did not at all affect their in-
dependence as sovereigns of England. It only related
to their lordship over those French duchies, in relation
to which they were not quite so supreme as was the
monarch of France, and as they themselves were at
home: they owed to the French king, so far as these
French dominions were concerned, a limited sort of
obedience, in compliance with what was called the
feudal law.

The feudal system, of which this law was a part,
was a relic of the old conquering times when he who
had won lands by his sword—-as William the Norman
20 ORIGIN OF THE WARS IN FRANCE.

did in England—portioned them out among his fol-
lowers, on condition that their swords should help him
in case of need: the amount of military service, thus
rendered, being in proportion to the extent of lands
bestowed. Other independent sovereigns, besides
those of England, though none of such importance and
grandeur as they, were in the same position as Edward:
owning feudal obedience to some one who, in that par-
ticular, was greater than they. But, saving this mere
feudal obedience, it would not have been wise for any
feudal lord, however high and mighty, to require more
from them. In such a case, they would have flown in
the face even of his Highness of France as readily as
in that of a neaner potentate.

This sort of feudal obedience, then, had been rendered
by our monarchs, on account of their portion of the
kingdom of France. But on the death of Charles the
Fair, King of France, in 1328, our Edward IIT, as his
nephew, considered that he was the next heir to the
throne, and therefore, as supreme lord, had a right to
the whole kingdom. The great lords and peers of
France thought otherwise, and gave the crown to Philip
of Valois, cousin to the late king. Their reason for
preferring a more distant relation than Edward, was
that as (according to the custom of France, which does
not suffer a woman to reign), Queen Isabella of Eng-
land could not succeed to the crown herself, neither
could her son inherit through her. Edward and his
ORIGIN OF THE WARS IN FRANCE. 21

friends were, however, confident in their view of the
case. Indeed, there was room for dispute in the
matter; and most probably the real reason why Philip
was chosen instead of Edward, was, not so much out of
regard to the Salic law, as to the circumstance of
Philip’s being a Frenchman, one of themselves, while
Edward was an English king.

There was only one way of deciding such a quarrel,
that is, by fighting; and to this the English king, with
the hearty concurrence of his people, and the pur-
chased help of his allies, speedily resorted.

Believing himself to be the rightful heir to the
French throne, it was not particularly agreeable to
Edward, in the first flush of youth and sovereignty, to
be called upon to go over to France, and perform that
customary homage of which we have been speaking,
for a mere corner of the kingdom. The whole belonged
to him, as he thought; why then should he go down
upon his knees to return thanks for the limited owner-
ship of a part of it? King Philip had already been
erowned a twelvemonth, and all his other feudatories—
as those who acknowledged him for feudal superior,
were called—had done homage to their lord in the
manner prescribed. The mode of doing this was for
the feudatory or vassal, to kneel bareheaded, un-
belted, and unarmed before his lord, between whose
hands he placed his own, vowing the customary
obedience ; or, in other and old words, promising
22, ORIGIN OF THE WARS IN FRANCE.

to become his “man.” The lord then bestowed a
kiss upon the kneeling knight, and the ceremony was
at an end,

It was, as has been said, excessively disagreeable to
Edward, as King of England, thus to humble himself
to his neighbour. Young as he was (he was only seven-
teen), he was already distinguished, not only as sove-
reign of a realm that might vie in importance with
that of France, but for the energy and valour which he
had displayed in his contests with the fierce, rude
warriors of Scotland. And his high spirit, high both
from his position, and from his personal merit, re-
volted from the ceremonial submissiveness required
from him. According to the custom of that age, how-
ever, he could not absolutely refuse it when summoned,
unless he had been prepared ai once to go to war
about the matter.

Accordingly, when Philip’s messengers requiring the
accustomed duty from the English king, presented
themselves at Windsor,—which had, even then, for
more than two centuries been a royal palace,—they
were received with all the courtesy due to their own
rank, and that of their master. But, with the same
punctilious politeness, they were informed that the
king must consult with his council, before he could
engage to perform the homage demanded from him.
Edward forthwith came up to town, and assembled
his trusty councillors at Westminster. Before them
ORIGIN OF THE WARS IN FRANCE, 23

the messengers laid their credentials, and then with-
drew, while the knotty question, to pay homage or
refuse it—in other words, peace or war—was discussed.
Discretion is said to be the better part of valour, and
the council possessed this valuable quality; for, seeing
that the nation was not, just then, in a condition to back
their king, with “bills and bows,” if he declined com-
pliance with the French king’s demands, they decided
that he should obey Philip’s bidding. The messengers
were then again summoned before that stately assem-
blage; and by the msuth of the Bishop of London (in
those days bishops were often leading statesmen), were
duly informed that the king, their master, would forth-
with pass over into France to render the homage re-
quired by his cousin Philip.

So far all seemed smooth. Edward kept his word,
and on the 26th of May 1329, set out on this unplea-
sant errand, attended by a fitting train of nobles,
bishops, and knights. His suite comprised a thousand
horse, and he was received by Philip, with correspond-
ing magnificence, at Amiens; where the homage was
paid in presence of three kings—those of Bohemia,
Navarre, and Majorca, and a crowd of nobles, drawn
together to do honour to the new liegeman. Never
was bitter pill more brightly gilded. But it was a
bitter pill, that Edward at first made some difficulty
about swallowing in the prescribed fashion. He made
his appearance in the Cathedral of Amiens (where his
24 ORIGIN OF THE WARS IN FRANCE.

“lord” sat in a chair of state), armed and royally
robed ; nor was he disposed either to strip himself of his
regal and knightly insignia, or to do the kneeling part
of the business. Both, however, were relentlessly ex-
acted of him; and, in a terrible temper, Edward of
England, avowed himself vassal—for Guienne—to
Philip of France; whom, in his secret soul, he wished
at Jericho.* Fifteen days were afterwards passed in
feasting, tournaments, and grave conferences, between
the politicians of that brilliant congress; and then
Edward returned to his young wife at Windsor, well
pleased with his reception at the French court, however
much he might dislike that part of the performance
in which he had been the leading actor.

Among the nobles of France who had assisted in
placing the crown upon the head of Philip of Valois,
was his brother-in-law, Count Robert of Artois. He was
a particularly great man, and stood so high in Philip’s
good graces, that almost everything in the kingdom
was guided and ordered by my Lord Robert. Ere long,
however, Philip’s violent liking for his brother-in-law
turned, as is not uncommon, to an equally violent
hatred of him. The count’s moral character was cer-
tainly nothing to boast of. Indeed, it is said that he
was guilty of the shabby vice of forging title deeds, in
order to mend his claim on certain lands in France.

* It has been denied that Edward performed his homage in the humiliats
ing manner described. But some old authorities take this view of it.
ORIGIN OF THE WARS IN FRANCE. 25

On account of this, Philip was strongly inclined to cut
off the count’s head, if he could only catch him! and
after having hunted his intended victim out of several
states, to which, in succession, he had fied from the
axe and block prepared for him, Robert was at last
fairly driven to England, for the shelter denied him
elsewhere,

Philip had much better have let his brother-in-law
stay quietly at home, and keep his cunning head on
his broad shoulders; for, once in the court of England,
he diligently employed all the influence which a man
of his reputation possessed, in urging upon the king the
justice of his claim to the French throne, and in inciting
that young, valorous spirit to plead his cause with the
sword. Such a mode of upholding it could not but be
agreeable to one yet glowing with successful fight
against those, over whom his grandfather had so long
ridden, rough-shod, that he began at last to think he
really had a right to do it. The Frenchman accom-
panied Edward in his expedition against the Scots,
and while in the field plied him well with arguments
for flying at higher game. He further comforted the
soul of the young monarch by assuring him that his
claim was held good by several lawyers.

Count Robert was reckoned a man of great sagacity.
He was also of royal descent. No wonder that the
king began at last to yield to his persuasions, and to
hold many anxious conferences with his council, as to
856 ORIGIN OF THE WARS IN FRANCE,

whether he should, or should not, carry bis steel-clad
host from the bare heaths of Scotland, which they had
already trampled down, to try their fortune on the fair
fields of France. The knights of those days, be it said,
rather preferred fighting in France, to fighting in
Scotland; as the former country afforded them more
luxurious quarters.

Edward’s council were well enough disposed that
the king should advance his claim to the French
crown, and prosecute it by arms, if need were. The
resources of his own kingdom were not, however, at
the time adequate to do this; and to do it effectually
he must seek aid from his friends and allies on the
continent, They, therefore, advised that he should
send ambassadors to his gallant and gouty father-in-
law, the Earl of Hainault, to ascertain what could be
done in that quarter. To these ambassadors, the earl
and his brother, the Lord John, gave all that was in
their power to give, that is, advice; a very good thing
when nothing better is to be had. And acting upon
their counsel, Edward contracted alliances with the
lords, and small sovereigns of the Low Countries ; who,
some for love, more for money, and others, won by the
cheaper means of flattery and promises, agreed to aid
him in his grand enterprise.

One of Edward’s allies in this business was, it is
true, neither sovereign nor lord, though he was as
powerful and important as though he were both the
ORIGIN OF THE WARS IN FRANCE, 27

one and the other. This ally was Jacob van Arteveld,
who, having retired from the brewing business, which
he had carried on with great success, next took up
that of governing the Flemings, in a style rather more
imperative than had ever been adopted by their lawful
sovereign, the Earl of Flanders. From the earl they
had thought proper to revolt; but whether they liked
the brewer any better, after they had got him, may be
questioned, for Jacob had an awkward habit of killing
off, without the slightest ceremony, any one to whom
it pleased him to take a dislike. Further, as is fre-
quently the case, when men of low birth are raised to
power and wealth, he was much more extragavant—
with the money of the Flemings—than the earl had ever
been, who was born to these two good things. He
taxed the Flemings heavily ina variety of ways. They
had both indirect, and direct, exceedingly direct, taxation;
for after he had spent the accustomed duties, no one
knew, nor dared to ask, how, he would proceed to
what he called borrowing large sums from the citizens ;
his borrowing, being the next best, or worst thing to
demanding, seeing that no one who had any regard for
his own safety, felt at liberty to say—no! Indeed,
whenever he thought fit to tell them he wanted more
money, it was always best to take his word for it, and
let him have it. In short, Jacob played King Stork
among his new subjects with a vengeance!

To this amiable individual King Edward addressed
28 ORIGIN OF THE WARS IN FRANCE.

himself so effectually, that the stout, sturdy Flemings, fat-
tened and strengthened on such beer as Jacob had been
wont to brew, were joined in his cause, with the more
sprightly cavaliers of the empire; that is, of Austria
and Germany. When Edward’s own forces were united
to these, there was a gallant army under his direction,
or that of his lieutenants, who, with various fortune,
kept fighting a little here, and a little there, for the next
eight years. Amid their skirmishing we may notice
that Count Robert came to his end; and finally found
a quiet resting-place in the choir of our old St. Paul’s.
The din of the city, teeming with mercantile life, per-
chance even now roars around the ashes of that turbu-
lent warrior. His death was lamented in England, for
he had qualities to win admiration in those far off days ;
and according to the fashion (more heathen than Chris-
tian), of the times, Edward swore to take a terrible re-
venge for it.

Towards the close of this period of skirmishing, that
is in 1343, when the young Edward was thirteen years
old, his father, with all solemnity, conferred upon him
the title of Prince of Wales. The king also thought
that with the help of Jacob the brewer, the revolted
Flemings might be persuaded to accept the young prince
as their sovereign. But the earldom of Flanders was
not to be added to the rest of his titles and possessions.
Van Arteveld was heartily willing to dv all that Edward
wished from him. It was very pleasant to patronize a
ORIGIN OF THE WARS IN FRANCE. 29

king. But he soon found that he had promised more
than he could perform. He condescended to consult
with his turbulent Flemings, on the question of this con-
templated transfer of their allegiance; but it seems that
by this time they were tired of Jacob and his iron rule.
They murmured loudly at the proposal, declaring that,
with God’s help, they would never disgrace themselves
so far as to disinherit their “natural lord, in favour of
a stranger.” And they whispered, one to another, that
Jacob was carrying things with rather too high a hand ;
and they would not endure it any longer. Nor did
they ; for forthwith the mob fell upon the unfortunate
brewer, and killed him.

Edward, who, attended by the prince, and a stately
retinue, had come over to Sluys in Flanders, and was
there anxiously awaiting the result of Jacob’s negotia-
tions, was not easily pacified after this destruction of
his hopes. He immediately took his son home again,
vowing vengeance against the Flemings, and all belong-
ing to them. Those discreet people, however, soon
patched up a peace with him; and though they begged
to be excused from any attempt to deprive their young
Earl Lewis of his rights, they adroitly insinuated that,
as the king had a daughter, Flanders might very pos-
sibly be ruled by his family after all, through her mar-
riage with their lord.

And so the poor brewer, whose mangled remains were
scarcely cold in their unhonoured grave, was forgotten
30 ORIGIN OF THE WARS IN FRANCE.

as speedily as possible, and every one was quite com-
fortable.

Jacob’s fate was sad; but his violence had merited
it, He had taken “the sword,” and he “perished”
by it.





, ta) re

“E : 8 , \



Ii.

Passage of the Sonne.

Bee 2 DWARD'S disappointment at the loss of the
press, carldom of Flanders, which he had hoped to

secure for his son, was not merely for the



loss of title and territory. We know how he longed to
gain possession of what he considered his rightful in-
heritance; how this longing had led him to court the
brewer of Ghent; and might have induced him to culti-
vate even more ignoble acquaintance, could they have
served him in the matter. The reason for his wish to
gain the Flemings was his having entertained the hope
of making Flanders his key to unlock that beautiful,
fertile France, out of which (with the exception of his
own hereditary portion) he was kept, as he thought, so
unjustly. And now that roaring raging mob in the
peaked and gabled streets of Ghent, had put an end
to his fine scheme. But for this, itis to be feared that
the slaughter of a dozen brewers, instead of only one,
would not have disturbed his tranquillity.

But there were other roads into France besides those

(3) 3
34 PASSAGE OF THE SOMME.

through Flanders, and King Edward was soon to find
them. For two years or more his lieutenants in the
south of France, where he was “at home,” and no one
denied it, had been as busy as possible in dealing out
hard knocks to their neighbours—the less loved that
they were such near neighbours. His cousin, the Karl
of Derby, (not of the house of Stanley, but a royal
Plantagenet), was driving all before him in Gascony
where he had met with little opposition ; for to carry on
war successfully requires plenty of money; and money
was just the thing that Philip of Valois wanted. In
the early part of 1346, however, Philip contrived to
get so far out of his difficulties as to raise an army of
a hundred thousand men, who, with lords and knights
almost innumerable, marched into Gascony, under the
command of the Duke of Normandy, and set them-
selves, so steadily, and successfully, to the retaking of
the Earl of Derby’s conquests in that province, that
the thing soon became serious. Sir Walter Manny, who
had, a few years before, come over to England in the
train of the good Queen Philippa, was with the com-
paratively small body of English who were thus fiercely
attacked in southern France; and though he was in him-
self a host, his skill and bravery, with that of other
knights, also brave and skilful, did not prevent the
fortune of war from going sadly against them.

In this strait Edward proposed going himself to the
assistance of his faithful, but harassed followers, His
PASSAGE OF THE SOMME. ao

people ucartily seconded him. Men and arms, and ships
for their transport, were soon collected, and the young
prince, now in his sixteenth year, was to have his first
experience of actual war among them.

Masses of soldiers, armed and accoutred for their
deadly, though necessary function, form a picturesque
spectacle even in our own days. But, in comparison
with the very olden time of which we are writing, war
is now shorn of almost all its strange, outside beauty.
There were the knights glittering in plate armour, hel-
meted, crested, plumed, with each one his bright shield,
throwing off sunbeams as he moved along; while their
satin and embroidered surcoats were fit for the train of
a duchess on drawing-room days. The surcoat was a
flowing sort of robe, thrown over the armour. ‘The
lance, with its little fluttering pennon, was an exceed-
ingly picturesque weapon, as we may see by our modern
lancers. Nor was the huge steel battle axe, or hammer,
(martel, was its old name,) added by some to the ordi-
nary equipment of lance and sword, and which was
slung from their saddle-bow, other than an imposing
looking implement of destruction.

Then the horses were nearly as fine, and well de-
fended by plates of steel, as their masters. How puzzled
the poor animals must have felt, to be stalking about
in iron cases; and further, on high days and _ holidays,
with what one may call embroidered petticoats down
to their heels!
36 PASSAGE OF THE SOMME.

The man-at-arms—what we should now call the
cavalry soldier—though less brilliantly mailed than the
knight or noble, was not the less encased in good ser-
viceable metal, that would withstand sword stroke, or
spear-thrust. Indeed, we are told that prostrate knights
and men-at-arms, defying all penetrating weapons, have
had to be cracked like lobsters, by blows of the ham-
mer, before the death-dealing dagger could find its way
through their iron shells.

This man-at-arms with his little retinue of attendants
(for he was a great man in his way), formed a striking
group ; while the mounted aud mail-clad host were
varied by bodies of archers, in their loose, easy-fitting
dress: for we aid not, in those days, strap and buckle up
our soldiers as we do now. These stout fellows were
armed with the formidable bow and arrow of our old
English yeomen: bows as tall as themselves, wherein
the yard-long shaft was drawn by main strength of
body, not of arms merely, right up to the ear, before it
was discharged on its twanging, death-carrying errand.
Those yard-long arrows would pierce the stoutest
armour impervious to all ordinary weapons. As for
our Irish and Welsh fellow subjects, who now hold their
own in our armies as well as the best of us, making
men proud to enter their distinctive regiments; they
did not come out at all well in the days of Edward IIT.
and our wars in France. In fact they were a long way
behind the English in civilization ; so a big knife, or any
PASSAGE OF THE SOMME. 37

other awkward tool that was capable of doing mischief,
was thought quite good enough for them.

“Tell that” not “to the marines,” but to the Welsh
Fusiliers, and Connaught Rangers,

Of such was the small though effective army now
destined for the shores of France. We may imagine
low enthusiastically the fine, handsome lad, heir, not
only to the crown of England, but to that of the rich
country they were bound to win, would be received by
his noble, knightly, and yeomanly companions in arms.
Nor can we doubt that the wild Irish and Welsh infan-
try would brandish their knives, and shout him a wel-
come, In number this force did not exceed thirty
thousand, But we shall see what these could do against
the chivalry and countless hosts of Philip of Valois.

Southampton was the place appointed for the em-
barkation of the English army, and thence the fleet
sailed on the 24th of June, 1846. Edward left young
Lionel, his third son, to take care of things at home,
while he was away. This, of course, was a mere thing
of state, Master Lionel being only eight years old;
grave, bearded men, such as the lords Nevil and Percy,
and several bishops, were in reality entrusted with
the weighty cares of government. Nor did the war-
loving king forget the prudent defence of his realm, by
arms, as well as by wise heads; a sufficient military
force being appointed for its protection during his ab-

BeNCE,
38 PASSAGE OF THE SOMME.

The army which the king, his son, and some of the
greatest nobles and warriors of the time now commanded
for the conquest of France, was designed, as has been
said, to make its first attempt in the southern provinces.
Contrary winds, however, baffled that design, and on
the third day after their sailing from Southampton,
which they did merrily enough, drove them on their
own coast of Cornwall, instead of that of Gascony.
And here, after beating about for a while—nobody en-
joys coming back again, like a boomerang from its
mark—they were compelled to anchor, and suffer nearly
a weeks’ detention.

On board the king’s ship there was a French noble-
man, named Sir Godfrey de Harcourt, who, having
given offence at his own court, had run away to that of
England, where he was received with great favour.
During the time they were detained by foul winds on
the Cornish coast, this Sir Godfrey set himself to alter
Edward’s plan as to the place of landing. He advised
that the descent should be made upon Normandy ; that
northern province being very rich and fertile, and
having the further advantage of being quite out of the
way of the rough skirmishers who had turned the
south upside down. It was, therefore, quite unpre-
pared for defence, its knighthood, with their retainers,
being drawn off to the field of action. Its population,
too, were quiet and peaceable, occupied with the care of
their fields and flocks, and knowing nothing of sword,
PASSAGE OF THE SOMME. 39

lance, and cross-bow,—the cross-bow was that form of
the weapon chiefly used on the Continent, and it was
not considered so manly a one as the old English long-
bow,

The advice was sound, and Edward had sense enough
to take it. After having threatened the south, it was
good policy on his part to swoop down upon the com-
paratively defenceless north. Winds and waves fav-
oured him now, and speedily brought him and his
fleet to La Hogue, in Normandy, on the 10th of July.
If you look at the map you will see the little point
jutting out, almost opposite to the Isle of Wight.

The king was the first to leap ashore. But “ most
haste” is not always “ best speed.” Not looking before
heleaped, or making some other such simple blunder,
down came his Highness (for it was not “ Majesty” in
those days) fall length on the strand, with such force
as to set the royal nose a-bleeding. That looked bad;
and his superstitious nobles entreated him to return to
his ship, and not think of effecting a landing after so
unfortunate a beginning. Edward, however, was as
superior to those about him in good sense as he was
in military prowess, and he passed off his tumble with —
a jest, observing that the very ground itself was obvi-
ously longing for him.

The joke told; a good joke always will tell; and the
disembarkation at once took place. The prince, who
was aboard his father’s ship, set foot, for the first time.
40 PASSAGE OF THE SOMME.

on the territory that he hoped would one day be his,
Nobles, knights, men-at-arms, and everybody else, in-
cluding the wild Irish and Welsh, were duly got out
of the ships; and horses, armour, warlike stores, with
endless baggage, were all safely landed at last upon the
sandy beach, where they camped for that summer’s
night. Rich tents were pitched for royalty and my
lords; while his cloak, and the glittering star-lit sky
overhead, were shelter enough for the humbler warrior
of that resolute little band.

A few days rest was allowed upon this spot; while,
to qualify them duly for the coming struggle, the
prince, and some other young nobles, had the honour of
knighthood conferred upon them by the king. Then
a council of war was held to decide on the course to
be pursued ; and at this it was determined that the
Earl of Huntingdon, with about a hundred and twenty
men-at-arms, and four hundred archers, should remain
with the fleet, while the rest of the army moved on in
three divisions. One of these was under the command
of the king, with whom was his son, the new-made
knight, panting to do honour to his knighthood by
some signal feat of arms. Sir Godfrey de Harcourt
led the second ; the Earl of Warwick the third. The
order of march was, for the king’s division, or main
body, to move on in the centre; the Earl of Warwick’s
division extended itself on the right ; and that of Sir
Godfrey, which was a little in advance, acted upon the


KNIGHTING THE BLACK PRINCE

EDWARD
PASSAGE OF THE SOMME. 4]

left. The fleet followed their course along the coast,
all uniting in one object,—that of plundering, burning,
and destroying everything that came in their way.

They met with little opposition, for the simple
country folks, who, as has been said, knew nothing
of soldiers and battles, took to their heels and fled be-
fore the English ; the knights and men-at-arms who
should have protected them from these cruel invaders
bemg far away, fighting under the Duke of Nor-
mandy, So, between the fleet and the army,—spreading
itself like a pestilence—the English took many rich
towns, and acquired plunder to an enormous extent ;
gold, silver, and valuable merchandise, which they care-
fully packed up, sent on board their attendant ships,
and rejoicingly conveyed to England. Spoil was so
abundant that the very camp followers “turned up
their noses” at rich furred gowns, which, in those days,
were worn; and there was no lack of provision for this
locust-like swarm either, seeing that those who fled
could not take their well-stored houses and barns with
them.

King Philip meanwhile was not idle) When news
was brought him that the English had landed in Nor-
mandy, and were destroying that province at their
pleasure, he summoned every earl, baron, and knight,
who owed him service, to march with him against
them. The lords eagerly obeyed his command, but
some were so distant from the scene of action that they
42 - | PASSAGE OF THE SOMME.

could not attend the king in time to check the advance ~
of the enemy, who soon made their way to within a
few miles of Paris. The citizens were terribly frightened
when they found the English at their very gates ; the
more so that Philip was just setting out to St. Denis,
about four miles off; to join the lords who were
assembled there. Expecting to be swallowed at a
mouthful by those terrible islanders,—upon their knees
the poor citizens besought the king to stay and take
care of them, for if he did not, the English would cer-
tainly come upon them, and make themselves masters
of his fine city of Paris. — :

King Philip thought he should best protect his fine
city of Paris and its trembling inhabitants by joining
his army at St. Denis, and fighting the invaders. He
told the suppliants 80 ; and to cheer their hearts, de-
clared that the English would never touch them, nor |
their city either. This turned out quite true, as Hid-
ward, having burned some villages near its walls, passed -
on northwards, by Beauvais, where he hung twenty of |
his own people for having set fire to the abbey of St. -
Messien, contrary to his express ‘commands: that no
church or monastery should be injured. Beauvais was
attacked, but its inhabitants, with a good military
bishop at their head, showed fight so gallantly that the
English were beaten back. The people of Poix, a little
further on, either not being in a mood for fighting, or
not prepared for it, thought best to buy off the enemy
PASSAGE OF THE SOMME. 43.

A certain sum was agreed upon, on the faith of which the
town and its two fortresses were to be left untouched.
The king and the young prince slept there quietly that

night, and next morning withdrew the army to pursue
its march. No sooner, however, were they out of
the way than those excellent people of Poix recovered
from their fright, and plainly told the few English who
had been left behind to receive the ransom, that they
would not pay one penny of what they had promised ;
and so saying, they fell fiercely upon the little troop.
This was shabby. Fortunately for the English, who
defended themselves gallantly, their rear-guard was not
far off, and they hastily sent to it for succour. Lord
Reginald Cobham, and Sir Thomas Holland who com.
manded, hastened to the help of their comrades, with
loud shouts of “Treason, treason !” and speedily pun.
ished the townsmen’s bad faith by slaying great
numbers of them, burning their town, and pulling
down their castles to the very ground.

This was severe ; but faith ought to be kept, even
with an enemy. Those who break their word must
not complain if they suffer for 1t.

One of these castles, when the army first took pos-
session, was found to be garrisoned by two young
ladies, the beautiful daughters of its absent lord. They
were chivalrously protected from: the rude soldiery by
that glorious John Chandos, of whom we shall hear
again; and the Lord Basset, who brought them to the
44 PASSAGE OF THE SOMME,

king’s presence. Edward received the ladies with all
courtesy, asking them whither they would go, and
commanded that they should be safely conducted to
their chosen place of refuge.

Edward’s career, in the north-west of France, had so
far been highly successful. Still, in the neighbourhood
of Paris, it was materially checked by the French
having broken down the bridges over the numerous
rivers that intersect that part of the country, and from
which the district received its former name, of the /sle
of France. At Poissy, about twenty miles from the
capital, the English almost stuck fast; but the army
was extricated by a feint on the part of its leader.
Edward made as though he were going off in the op-
posite direction, then returned hastily, patched up the
bridge, and got, for that time, out of the way of Philip
and his avenging host. But though he escaped here,
he soon found that the net was being drawn closer
around him. Broken bridges stopped him on every
hand, while those hundred-thousand angry Frenchmen
were almost upon his heels. It seemed the turn of the
English to be swallowed up now, for they were finally
placed between the bridgeless Somme and the French
army, eager to avenge, upon the king of England and
the beardless boy his son, the injuries inflicted by
them upon the French nation.

Many English heads had been laid low, spite of the
triumphant character of their inroad, so that the origi-
PASSAGE OF THE SOMME. 45

nal odds of thirty thousand against one hundred
thousand, were fearfully increased at this juncture,
Fighting or starving seemed the only alternatives
offered to the English, and they were not inclined to ac-
cept either. In this dilemma Sir Godfrey de Harcourt
and the Earl of Warwick, with a couple of thousand
men-at-arms and archers, were sent down stream to see
whether bridge or ford, of some kind or other, could
not be discovered. The search was fruitless ; and when,
on their return to the army, they had communicated
the result of it, the king, who was full of thought and
care, ordered immediate preparations to be made for
decamping, as King Philip was already within six
miles of them. There really seemed to be nothing now
but a run for it.

Those iron-clad and iron-hearted men of the four-
teenth century prayed as well as fought. Before the
sun had risen upon the dispirited little army, there was
heard not only the trumpet-sound for breaking up the
camp, but the quiet voice of the priest imploring mercy
from the God of heaven, and blessing the kneeling wor-
shippers. What a heart-felt “Good Lord, deliver us !”
would ascend from that imperilled band! and who shall
say that those prayers were not heard ?

In stern military order the march commenced : men-
at-arms, archers, and their shaggy comrades with the
big knives, streamed out of Airaines; and even the
hindermost files, those whom loitering or business had
46 PASSAGE OF THE SOMME.

thrown into the veriest rear, had cleared it for a good
two hours, before the French vanguard, in equal mili-
tary order, entered the town. The enemy had escaped
them, that was plain... So, instead of exchanging blows
with the English, their only revenge was to sit down
and eat up the good things that were, of necessity, left
behind. There were barrels of wine; joints on the spit,
just ready for roasting ; bread and pastry half-baked
in the ovens ; and tables, vainly spread for the nobles
and knights now careering away in the distance ; com-
pelled to fly, and yet not so disheartened as to be in-
capable of attacking a little town that stood in their
way, knocking it all to shivers, and then taking up
their lodging in it for the night.

King Philip fixed his quarters at Airaines, and,
doubtless, the excellent cheer thus provided for them
by the retreating foe, was (without any fear of the usual
consequence of things going down the “ wrong throat ”)
heartily enjoyed by his followers. We cannot for a
moment suppose that his Highness of France would
condescend to eat any of these English “leavings !”

At Oisemont, a town between Airaines and Abbeville,
King Edward afresh held a council, and ordered the
prisoners, whom his troops in their skirmishing about
the country had seized, to be brought before him, that
he might question them as to the possibility of getting
over the river. He asked these, very courteously, if
they knew of any ford below Abbeville where he and
PASSAGE OF THE SOMME. 47

ais army might cross the Somme, adding, that to him
who would conduct him to such a place he would give
his liberty, and that of any twenty, whomsoever he
might choose, of his companions.

Liberty is sweet; and, thereupon, up spoke a common
fellow (named Gobin Agace) to this effect :—

“Sir,—I promise you, under peril of my life, to
guide you to a place where you and your whole army
may pass the river without hurt. There are certain
fords where twelve men a-breast may cross twice in the
day, and not have water above their knees; but when
the tide is in, the river is so full and deep that no one
can cross it. When the tide is out, the river is so low
that it may be passed on horseback, or on foot with-
out danger. The bottom of this ford is very hard, of
gravel and white stones, over which all your carriages
may safely pass, and from thence it is called Blanch-
taque. You must, therefore, set out early, so as to be
at the ford before sunrise.”

Overjoyed at such good news, the king readily pro-
mised the speaker a round sum of money, in addition
to his liberty, provided his statement, as to this ad-
mirable ford, proved correct.

Gobin, as it happened, was a true man—to his own
interest ! We must say nothing of his king and coun-
try. Some people would sell the whole world, if they
only saved their own precious necks thereby. This was

precisely Gobin’s condition.
4% PASSAGE OF THE SOMME.

After two or three hours of anxious, uneasy rest, king,
prince, knights, and meaner men alike, arose. Mid-
night though it was, the trumpets were heard sounding
loudly for the march; and by break of day all were
moving on, under the leadership of the illustrious
Gobin, to the ford of Blanchtaque. The brightening
sunbeams of an early August morning played upon the
broad waters of the river; for, alas! the Somme was a
tidal stream, and, by the time the faithful Gobin had
brought up his royal and military train, the tide was
at its height. To make bad worse, at the other side of
the swelling flood appeared Sir Godemar du Fay, a
great Norman baron, to whose especial care it had
been committed to baffle the King of England at this
point. Sir Godemar was at the head of a large force
of men-at-arms and infantry, backed by the burly,
well-armed townsmen of Abbeville, and a zealous
swarm of country-folks in their smock-frocks. What
sort of weapons was wielded by these good fellows in
the smock-frocks, historians do not tell us. Most
likely they snatched up their pitchforks and goads ;
which, rude enough considered as instruments of war,
were yet capable, when poised by such brawny arms,
of inflicting very ugly wounds on any of the enemy
unfortunate enough to come within their range. The
pass leading from the ford was well manned by a posse
of Genoese cross-bowmen.

Fhe brimming river, and the armed host upon its
oats
rahe aay
re

Ty



ENGLISH ARMY CROSSING THE SOMME
PASSAGE OF THE SOMME. 49

opposite bank, formed a rather disheartening prospect.
But it was a case of “nothing venture, nothing win ;”
though an experienced commander, such as the still
young monarch of England, was not going to do any-
thing rashly. The river had to be crossed, and those
threatening Frenchmen on the other side had—in
school-boy phrase—to be “ thrashed” before his brave
followers were free from peril. The tide at length
turned, as the highest tide will do ; and, eagerly watch-
ing its slow retreating course, the keen eye of our
Edward at once marked out the precise time when he
must dash forward and dare everything.
the stream became possible, and then, in the name of
“God and St. George,” the horsemen, king, prince, and
all, leaped into the shallowing water. And on the op-
posite bank, making the air ring with shouts of “God
and St. Denis,” in sprang the French men-at-arms;
quite as ready (observes an old writer) for a tilting
match in the water, as on dry land. Fierce blows and
thrusts were exchanged, as they plowtered in the stream ;
and the sword of the young prince, it is said, was then
first stained with blood.

It must, from that time have assumed a very differ-
ent aspect in his eyes. Before, it was the mere glitter-
ing plaything of a boy; henceforth, it was the terrible
death-dealing weapon of a man !

The forcing of this passage over the Somme was no

easy matter. French, against English valour was, that
(3) 4
50 — PASSAGE OF THE SOMME.

day, well matched. The English archers, however, at
last turned the day in favour of their countrymen.
Their fearful storm of arrows compelled even the
bravest of the French knights to give way; and the
English fairly won the opposite bank, driving their
opponents before them in all directions. In the hot
pursuit which followed, terrible slaughter was done
upon the flying enemy. Knights, men-at-arms, fat

_ . burghers from Abbeville, and simple peasants fresh

from their flocks and fields, found, that day, one com-
mon doom, from sharp English lances and swift-winged
English arrows. | |

The river was crossed. But it was only just in time,
seeing that some of the hindmost were set upon, and
slain by, the light cavalry of the advancing French
army.

King Philip was not particularly pleased when he
found that his prey had escaped him. Nor did it add
to his satisfaction, on his own arrival at the river’s
bank, to perceive that the tide was already flowing
back again, so as to leave him no chance, save that of
going round to the bridge at Abbeville. In his first
paroxysm of rage he bethought him of hanging Sir
~ Godemar Fay, for not having better disputed the pas-
sage committed to his keeping; but the intercession of
his brothér knights saved that nobleman from so dis-
graceful a fate. | |
Honest. Gobin—well, he was honest to his new
PASSAGE OF THE SOMMER, 51

master, though a little treacherous to his old one—
duly received the promised reward, and a good horse
into the bargain, His service was worth paying for
handsomely. Then solemn thanks were returned by
the English to God who had delivered them from so
pressing a danger. *With that baffled French host, on
the other side of the now flowing tide, the English
must have felt somewhat as did the Israelites when
the returning waves of the Red Sea, over which they
had passed dry-shod, rolled in again upon “ Pharaoh and
his horsemen,” swallowing them up in its triumphant
waters.

The deliverance of the English however, great and
thankworthy as it was, was yet but a temporary one.
Philip, speeding away over the round-about bridge at
Abbeville, was soon heard of again in their rear; and
then a stand, to meet him, and fight for it, was made,
near Crecy in Ponthieu. For “now,” said Edward,
‘“T am on my mother’s lawful inheritance, given as her
marriage-portion, and I am resolved to defend it against
Philip of Valois,”











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IV.

G@bhe Hattle of Creep.

jeg iE celebrated battle-field of Crecy lies about
@asi eight miles north of Abbeville. Edward’s

army here drawn up, was much smaller



Pe RSE



than that of the enemy. As has been said, it is pro-
bable that it fell considerably short of its original
thirty thousand; while the French—if rumour did not
exaggerate their numbers—amounted to a hundred and
twenty thousand, As things turned out, we might
afford to make them a present of the odd twenty
thousand ; and believe that it was only one hundred
thousand gallant Frenchmen and their allies that our
mere handful destroyed on that memorable day.

The comparative insignificance of the English, how.
ever, made it all the more important that they should
be posted as advantageously as possible ; the Earl of
Warwick and Sir Godfrey de Harcourt, therefore, rode
over the ground, noticing, with keen practised eyes,
how every yard of it might be turned to the best ac-

count. That business settled, they were in pretty good
56 THE BATTLE OF CRECY.

heart about the matter. Provisions were plentiful in
the country ; and even had they not been, their own
stores were far from being exhausted. So, having first
ascertained that Philip had no intention of giving battle
immediately, they pitched their tents that night in the
plain.

There, all was soon eager preparation for the antici-
pated struggle of the next day. Arms were examined.
A faulty lance-shaft might have brought destruction
upon the knight who wielded it, a weather-rotted bow-
string would have rendered one arrow useless; and
with their inferior numbers, not one lance, nor one grey-
goose-winged arrow could they afford to throw away.
Then there was a great clattering and overhauling of
armour. Cuirasses, cuisses,—the pieces that protected
the legs—helmets or gauntlets, wanting a strap here, or
a buckle there, had to be made “right and tight,” and
polished up into the bargain. These were the per-
sonal cares of squires, and men-at-arms ; the squires
waiting upon the knights their masters, the men-at-
arms waiting upon themselves. The king and prince
were occupied in giving a great supper to the leaders
of their brave troops, and at that entertainment no
fears of to-morrow’s clash of arms spoiled their knightly
appetites, They ate well, they drank well, and then
retired from the royal presence to tent or cloak, as

each one best pleased, with the determination of fight-
ing well next morning.
Bee)

LAY aN



PREPARATIONS ON THE, ENE Ob Gat Tt

BESTS
pag &@ 46
THE BATTLE OF OCRECY. 57

The cares and hospitalities of the day ended, the king,
in his solitude, first kneeled down in devout prayer to
God, that He would give him victory in the forthcom-
ing battle, and then, like the rest, threw himself upon
his bed about midnight.

Early next morning, August 26th, he and the prince
joined in prayers, and received the Holy Communion.
The greater part of his army did the same; and then
the trumpets sounded to arms, and for each division of
the army to take the ground marked out for it.

There were three of these divisions. The first was
commanded by the Prince of Wales; and under him
were some noble and knightly warriors, whose descend-
ants—if there be any of the old blood still remainng—
may well be proud of their ancestors at Crecy. There
were the Earls of Warwick and Oxford, Sir Godfrey de
Harcourt, the Lords Reginald Cobham, Thomas Holland,
Stafford, Mauley, Delawarre, Bartholomew, Burghersh,
Robert Neville, Thomas Clifton, Bourchier, Latimer,
Sir John Chandos, and other knights notable in their
day, but whose very names are now extinguished.
The brave boy was bravely supported. This division
numbered about eight hundred men-at-arms, two thou-
sand archers, and one thousand Welshmen. All at
once moved on in good order, to their appointed post ;
each lord displaying his banner and pennon,—the pen-
non was a forked streamer attached to the upper part
of the lance,—and marching in the centre of his men.
B8 THE BATTLE OF CRECY.

The second division was commanded by the Earls of
Southampton, and Arundel; the Lords Roos, Wil-
loughby, Basset, St. Albans, Lascels, Multon, Sir Lewis
Tufton, and many others. It comprised eight hundred
nren-at-arms, and twelve hundred archers.

The king himself headed the reserve, or third
division, of about seven hundred men-at-arms, and two
thousand archers. The men-at-arms (as was some-
times the custom, like that of our old-fashioned
dragoons), were dismounted, and prepared to fight on
foot. The baggage of the entire army, with the
waggons and horses, was placed in the rear within an
enclosure, to which there was but one entrance, and
that, we may believe, was well guarded. Trenches
were hastily dug on both sides as an additional protec-
tion to the little army; and in front were placed a few
cannon, then a novel invention, used, perhaps for the
first time, during Edward’s previous wars in Scotland.

His forces being thus marshalled in battle-array, the
king, wearing neither helmet nor coat of mail, but
simply his usual hood and dress, mounted his riding-
horse, or hackney as it was called; the. magnificent
charger being reserved for the battle-field; and passing
at a foot’s pace through their ranks, with his marshals
on either hand, addressed his men, encouraging them
to guard the honour of their sovereign, and defend his
right to the throne of France. His cheerful looks, and
still more cheering words, went straight to the hearts
THE BATTLE OF CRECY. _ 59

of his stalwart fellows, who drew fresh courage from
his animating appeals. For, if truth must be told,
some of them were becoming a little down-hearted ;
the numbers against them being so terribly overpower-
ing as somewhat to damp the confidence inspired by
previous successes.

As by this time it was near ten o’clock (the usual
dinner-hour of that period), the king ended by bidding
his men eat and drink heartily ; and then he retired to
his own post. Advice so agreeable was instantly acted
upon; and after they had eaten and drunken to their
heart’s content, they packed up their pots, barrels,
dishes, platters, and such things in the waggons, and
then sat down on the ground with their helmets and
arms beside them, that they might be the fresher when
the enemy came up. And so they prepared to meet
the formidable Philip of Valois.

That same Saturday morning the King of France
also rose betimes ; and as soon as he and his army had |
had prayers, they moved on towards the English. When
within four miles of Abbeville, they too were formed
in order of battle, and then continued their march; the
infantry in front, to keep out of the way of their own
cavalry. Four knights whom Philip had sent forward
to reconnoitre, now returned, bringing him word that
they had caught sight of the English, drawn up as we
have described them, on the sloping ground near
Cregy ; and they advised him to halt his troops for the
60 THE BATTLE OF CRECY.

night, where they were, for if they went on, they would
certainly be too tired to attack the English with any
advantage. Upon this, the order was given to “halt
banner, in the name of God and St. Denis.” St.
Denis was the patron saint of the French, as St.
George was of the English. Those in front halted
accordingly. But they who were in the rear, vowed
they would not halt, till they were as forward as the
front. And with that they kept pushing on.

Oh, what mischief came of this piece of stupidity !
By the pressure from behind, spite of the efforts of the
king and his generals to stop them, the front ranks
were driven on until, in utter disorder, they came with-
in sight of the enemy. The appearance of Edward’s
well-ordered battalions rather checked their ardour;
and they fell back, in a confused manner, upon the
rear, to whom they communicated their own panic;
panics being eminently catching. Some few did what
all might have done had they chosen, and made their
way to the front; but the greater part hung back.
There was unaccountable confusion and disorder
throughout the whole French army; so that: their vast
numbers did them more harm than good. An attempt
was made to rally them; and at last, on they went,
but in a sad pell-mell sort of fashion, hither and
thither, as each lord, baron, or knight thought fit.

Seeing them advance, the English rose from the
ground where they were sitting, and fell into their
TUE BATTLE OF CRECY. Gl

ranks. All was calmness and order here; and the
boy-prince, whose division was to bear the first brunt
of battle, took the post that had been assigned to him.
His archers were in the van, his men-at-arms in the
rear. ‘The Earls of Northampton and Arundel, were
stationed so as to support the prince, in case of need.
The king formed his division on a height at a little
distance, where he could overlook the field, and bring
up his reserve, or not, as the battle might turn. He
himself stood by a windmill, which, not long ago, was
sald to be still remaining on this memorable spot.

The attack was made by the French about three
o’clock in the afternoon. Their first line consisted of
fifteen thousand Genoese cross-bowmen; and these the
king bade his marshals order forward, “in the name
of God and St. Denis,” to begin the battle. The
Genoese, however, were in no condition for doing so.
They had had a long day’s march on foot, heavily
armed; and were so worn out with fatigue, that they
plainly told the constable they were not fit for any-
thing. The Earl of Alengon, who commanded the
second division, hearing this, exclaimed in a pet,—
“This is what one gets by employing such scoundrels,
who fail us when most wanted.” And, among them,
they managed to drive the poor, tired, drenched
Genoese (for there was a heavy thunder-storm at the
time) on towards the English. The storm, which added
to their confusion, soon, however, cleared off, and the
62 THE BATTLE OF CRECY.

sun shone out bright, but full in the faces of the French,
so dazzling and blinding them, that it was even worse
than the rain.

At length, spurred on by their commanders, the
Genoese prepared for action, and sprang with a shout
towards the English, who stood firm, never minding
their noise. Again they leaped forward with a great
cry as before; but the English, with that boy at their
head, stirred not a foot. It was plain there was
no frightening them with mere noise. A third time
there was a bound and a cry, and then—not noise
alone—thousands of bolts from their cross-bows, fell
upon the enemy. Now was the time for the boy to
prove himself a man. The word of command was
given; and, advancing one step, the English archers
poured in, among the foe, such a shower of arrows
that, as an old writer says, it was like a snow-storm :
keen, stinging arrows, for soft snow-flakes. The
Gencese could not stand this. Heads, arms, legs,
broad chests, pierced by the long, sharp shafts,—they
fled in dismay; cutting their bow-strings, already
weakened by the rain, and throwing down their useless
weapons, aS they turned their ignominious backs
upon the English yeomen.

Philip, in a rage at their flight, called out to his
mounted men-at-arms to “kill those rascals.” And, no-
thing loth, the horsemen rode in among their wearied,
discomfited comrades, cutting them down without
THE BATTLE OF CRECY. 63

mercy ; while still, amid the mingled mass of men
and horses, hot and thick fell the merciless English
arrows; hottest and thickest wherever the press was
createst. Into that wounded, writhing heap, too,
plunged sullenly the clumsy stone balls of those new,
and alarming great guns in front; whose noise, to un-
accustomed ears was, we are told, as “though God
thundered!’” Down went men and horses among the
baffled Genoese, one overthrowing another; and he
who was once down, had no chance of rising again.
Then, when the rout and disorder was at its height,
was the time for the Irish and Welshmen. Passing
through the ranks of their own men-at-arms and
archers, their great knives, if not very military wea-
pons, proved fatal, to many a gaily accoutred prostrate
horseman. No distinction of rank was there. Noble
and squire alike were remorselessly slain by these
rough soldiers, whose zeal was anything but pleasing
to their own knightly sovereign. King Edward could
not abide such wholesale slaughter. Possibly (for
meaner motives will sometimes mingle with generous
ones), he regretted the loss of the abundant ransom,
which such prisoners as those who had perished under
the cruel knives of his half-savage infantry, would have
furnished. For, according to the custom of the times,
knights and gentlemen, when taken prisoners, were
allowed to purchase their freedom by sums of money
proportioned to their rank and wealth.
64 THE BATTLE OF CRECY.

It was here that the brave, blind old king of Bohemia,
who marched under Philip’s banner, met his fate. Un-
able, through blindness, to make his own way into the
fight, he bade two faithful knights lead him on, that he
might strike at least one good sword-stroke at the
enemy. They placed him between them, fastened their
horse bridles to his, that they might not be separated
in the throng, and then, in all three dashed, fought
valiantly, and all fell on the battle-field, where next
morning their bodies were found on one spot; their
three horses still linked together, standing quietly. by
them. The Lord Charles of Bohemia, son to the king,
was bringing up a force to aid the French; but per-
celving, when at a little distance that the battle was
going against them, he discreetly turned aside and went
his way.

The young prince meanwhile was so hard pressed by
the French second line, under the Earl of Alencon,
which had advanced to back the flying rabble of
Genoese, that the Earls of Arundel and Northampton
moved up their division to support him. The battle
was terribly hot here, and the king of France himself,
hovering on their skirts, was eagerly looking for an
opening to lead his third division in among them. The
English archers, however, formed an impenetrable wall
against him, that he vainly endeavoured to break
through; and the struggle lay chiefly between the
prince’s force and that under Alencon. The young
THE BATTLE OF CRECY. 65

fellow was sorely put to it; and fearing for so precious
a lite, the Earl of Warwick sent off a knight, post haste
to the king, entreating him to bring up the reserve, to
rescue his son from so imminent a danger,

“Is my son dead, or wounded, or unhorsed?” was
the king’s answer to this urgent request.

“No,” replied the knight, “but he is so hardly
matched that he cannot long hold out without you.”

)

“Sir Thomas,” was the rejoinder, “go back to your
comrades, and tell them they must not send to me for
help so long as my son is alive. He must this day
win his spurs, and I am determined, if God will, that
the glory of this day shall be his own, and that of those
who are with him.”

The knight galloped back again with his message,
which seemed to put fresh life into the princely lad
and his brave companions. Fiercer blows were dealt,
hotter and more strenuous was the attack, till, ere long,
the unruly multitude of French knights, and squires,
and men, began to give way before them. The Earls
of Flanders and Alengon, who had turned the flank of
the prince’s archers, were slain, together with many of
their best knights; and the entire first and second
French lines were forced back. Philip made a vigorous
effort to turn the fortunes of the day; but it was of ne
use; the whole French army was utterly routed and
driven off the field in confusion. The royal standard

narrowly escaped capture. Its bearer was struck down
(3) 5
66 THE BATTLE OF ORECY.

in the fight, but while French and English eagerly con-
tended for so glorious a prize, the one to seize, the
other to rescue it, a French knight hastily with his
sword, cut the banner from its shaft, wrapped it round
his body, and rode off with it. King Philip himself
was wounded, his horse was killed under him by an
arrow, and as he sprang on another, Sir John de Hain-
ault snatched at the reins, and forced him off, telling
him by way of comfort, that if he had lost one battle,
he might gain another. And away they both swept to
Amiens, with a retinue of only sixty knights and men-
at-arms, in place of the splendid array of the morning.

It was a murderous and cruel battle; for the
desperate English gave no quarter, nor would they
ransom any. At night-fall, as the noise died away,
they looked upon the field as their own, and lighted up
torches and great fires, intending to bivouac where they
stood ; for in their circumstances they dared not venture
on immediate pursuit. The king, who had never even
put on his helmet, then descended from his post of
observation, and leading forward his battalion, which
like himself, had looked on only, throughout that hard-
fought day, advanced to meet his son. He folded him
in his arms, and kissed him lovingly, saying, in the
quaint language of those times, “ Sweet son, God give
you good perseverance! You are indeed my own son,
for very valiantly have you this day acquitted yourself.
You are worthy to be a king!”
THE BATTLE OF CRECY. G7

Such words, from such a father, fell pleasantly upon
the ear of the panting, battle-stained boy. Most
modestly was the loving commendation received, and
then he fell upon his knees, to beg his father’s blessing.
That, we may be sure, was heartily given.

The rejoicings of the English on this eventful night
were orderly rejoicings, for the king had utterly for-
bidden all noise or riot. And they were fittingly
mingled with many thanksgivings to God, who had
given them so wonderful a victory. Their losses were
trivial. Those of the French were immense. Clumsy
stone cannon balls, lance, sword, sheaves of unerring
arrows, and even those big knives, had done their work
upon kings, princes, nobles, knights, and common men,
to the number of forty thousand. There, as the old
poet has sung,—

‘Sceptre and crown
Had tumbled down,

And in the dust were equal laid,
With the poor crooked scythe and spade! ¥

The next morning which was Sunday, proved so
fogey that none could see twenty yards before him,
and this circumstance threw another considerable body
of French into the hands of the English. Edward had
ordered out a strong detachment of five hundred lances,
and two thousand archers, under his two marshals, who
were directed to scour the neighbourhood, lest any of
the enemy should be collecting again to make a fresh
68 THE BATTLE OF CRECY.

stand against him. French troops, ignorant of the
total overthrow of their army, had that morning left
Abbeville and St. Riguier to join Philip at Creey; and
these in the mist, taking the English for their own
friends, were almost among them before they discovered
their fatal mistake. The encounter between the two
was short, but sharp, and ended in the slaughter of
great numbers of the French, not one of whom would
have escaped, had not the fog (which had betrayed
them to their discomfiture) favoured the flight of a few,
who thus saved themselves. A second, well-appointed
party of French, under the Archbishop of Rouen, and
the Grand Prior of France, met with the same fate from
the marshals’ detachment, who cut them almost all to
pieces, including their right reverend leader. Others,
found wandering in the fields, where they had lain all
night, were also savagely put to the sword. In short,
it is said that more were slain on that Sunday morn-
ing, than had fallen in the battle itself.

The returning marshals informed the king, who was
just coming from prayers, of their successful and san-
gulnary proceedings. And then, as there was no fear of
a second army to be encountered, by his command,
heralds, attended by their secretaries, slowly traversed
the field to take account of the dead. The name and
rank of the slain knights could only be ascertained by
their coats of arms, emblazoned upon the shield, or
surcoat ; and when this sad task was ended, by Edward’s
THE BATTLE OF CRECY. 69

order, the chiefest of them were reverently laid to rest
in consecrated ground attached to the monastery of
Montenay, close at hand. The king himself, with his
great lords, all clad in black, took part in the solemn
ceremony, by way of doing honour to his brave, though
unfortunate enemies. Three days’ truce was granted
for burying the dead. It is said to be from this time
that the Prince of Wales, who, young as he was, had
shown himself so terrible at Crecy, was known among
the French by the titlk—now so familiar to our ears
—of the Black Prince.

Flot from their fierce, but brilliant encounter at Crecy,
Edward, on the following Monday, August 28th,
marched bis brave Britons straight to the siege of
Calais, It was a four days’ march, and they did a little
curning and plundering by the way.






ea st Ny ’
rin; m7 a P Sf Cae

AK THE SIEG


Vy.

Che Siege of Calais.

weerea ITE governor of Calais was a brave Burgundian



knight, named Sir John de Vienne; and
other valiant knights with squires to match,
but whose names are scarcely worth preserving, served
under him. The town was strongly fortified, and these
grim men in iron cases, were determined to hold it
against the King of England, and his victorious son.
That king, however, and that son had equally deter-
mined to take it; and therefore—in military phrase—
“sat down” (which means something like, standing up !)
before Calais, on the Ist of August, 1846. They did
this with all calmness and order, as though they could
afford to take their time about it. The camp was
marked out, tents were pitched; and even a sort of
town composed of huts, thatched with straw, or broom,
soon sprang up under those marvellous English hands,
impertinently close to the walls of the besieged city.
Markets were established here for all comers; and in
them, fish, flesh, fowl, bread, clothing—all sorts of
74 THE SIEGE OF CALAIS.

things, either from the surrounding country, or from
over seas, might be had for money. As for those who
had -no money, it is to be presumed that they would
have been as ill off in the king’s market before Calais,
as In any other. From this comfortable kind of settle-
ment the English made frequent sorties (that is another
military phrase, and literally means—going out), doing
much mischief in the neighbourhood, and picking up
spoil for themselves; occasionally, it must be owned,
though not often, getting the worst of it. They made
no attempt to storm the town. They had neither men,
nor engines of war enough for that. Their grand object
was to compel the surrender of the garrison by cutting
off their supply of provisions. This is called, blockad-
ing a place. If he failed to starve the defenders of
Calais into submission, Edward hoped that at any rate
their sufferings would draw the King of France thither
to attempt their relief, and that would afford him
another opportunity of beating Philip.

The blockade was strict, and so experienced a com-
mander as John de Vienne, at once saw that he must
make diligent preparation to baffle the well-laid plans of
the two Edwards. If provisions could not be brought
into the town, it was plain that they must make what
they had go as far as possible, by reducing the number
of consumers. The less meat, the fewer mouths ; that
was how the difficulty must be met. Of course,
soldiers who could fight, were to be retained at any .
THE SIEGE OF CALAIS. 70

cost; and the rich inhabitants whose wealth had
enabled them to lay in store of eatables and drinkables,
or to purchase the good things that were occasionally
at great risk smuggled in, spite of the English, were at
liberty to stay if they liked. As for those who could
neither fght, nor contribute to the general stock, they
must troop, and the sooner they were got rid of, the
better.

Prompt execution followed resolution. It was a
hard thing, but military necessity is harder still; so
one Wednesday morning, seventeen hundred of those
who were of no use in the defence—who had only
craving mouths, instead of the soldiers, trained right
hand, or the merchant’s money bags,—were driven out
of the town, weeping and wailing, to await the mercy
of the English camp, through which they must pass.
Poor men, women and children,—it was a strange
sight, that stream of miserable, forlorn, human beings,
from grey-heads to infants, unconscious of their troubles,
in their mother’s arms; and the staring English, in
utter astonishment, asked what in the world they meant
by thus coming right into the midst of the enemy;
why had they left the town ?

The answer was simple enough: “ Because they had
nothing to eat.” The English were enemies, bent,
spite of all the Frenchmen that Philip of Valois could
scrape together, on taking his strong town of Calais.
But they were also men, and their good, honest hearts,
76 THE SIEGE OF CALAIS.

were touched by the distress of these unhappy people,
mercilessly turned out by their countrymen to perish.
To permit them to pass on, unharmed, to a place of
refuge, was much ; but it wasnot all. That noble King
Edward, in addition to this, ordered the poor wretches
a hearty dinner; and then, when the hungry “ enemy”

had been “ fed,” (we know Who has bidden us do that!)
“he gave to each of them two pence—worth more than
as many shillings in these days—to carry them on
their doleful journey. That man deserved to take
Calais. No wonder that many fervent prayers were
offered up by these unfortunate French men and
women for their benefactor ; English invader and claim-
ant of their Philip’s crown though he was. It was
indeed a good work that Edward did that Wednesday.
“ Blessed is he that considereth the poor and needy.”
To such, a recompense is surely promised.

The character of this great king and that of his
great son, warlike as they both were, was one of general
humanity; and this beneficence to the poor, helpless
wretches driven out of Calais, was an illustrious example
of it. War is a cruel trade; but there are two ways of
carrying it on: Like men and like wild beasts.

The siege of Calais was protracted. Blockading is
slow work; and as more men, more money, more every-
thing was wanted, the young prince was despatched
to England to seek fresh succours. These, thanks to
the liberality of parliament, were abundantly obtained;
THE SIEGE OF CALAIS. 77

for Englishmen, to their very heart’s core, enjoyed the
successful contest with France, and did not much care
what they paid for it.

During the course of this tedious eleven months’
siege, an incident occurred which is worth recording,
as an interesting exhibition of the knightly manners of
the time. |

It has been named that the Duke of Normandy,
eldest son of the French king, was engaged at the
other end of the country laying siege to Aiguillon, a
town in Edward’s French possessions, where all the
fighting had been going on, until Godfrey de Harcourt
suggested Normandy. From this place the duke was
recalled by Philip, who required all the forces he could
gather to resist that formidable father, and no less
formidable son, who had been carrying everything
before them in the north. The siege was accordingly
raised, aS it is termed—that is, given up; and the
celebrated Sir Walter Manny, who commanded in the
town, making a dash after the retreating French, took
a handful of good prisonérs, whom his people brought
back with them to the castle. Among these prisoners
was a Norman knight, a very important personage
indeed ; and as Sir Walter longed to be with his
countrymen before Calais, he cleverly contrived to join
them by means of this same prisoner, whom he cour-
teously bade fix his own ransom. The sum named by
the knight was a large one. Great men did not like
78 THE SIEGE OF CALAIS.

to be let off too cheaply on these occasions, because
that looked as if they were worth little. And in reply,
Sir Walter told him, that if he would procure per-
mission for his captor and twenty others to ride straight
through France to Calais, without stopping by the
way or conducting themselves otherwise than as ordin-
ary travellers, he would let him go without any ransom
at all, and thank him into the bargain. If the knight
failed to procure this safe-conduct, he was to return to
his prison within one month.

The terms were tempting. Off set the Norman
knight after his duke, got the required passport, and
posted back again with it to Sir Walter, who gave him
his freedom as he had promised.

Sir Walter then with twenty horsemen took the road
to Calais. He went to work frankly; told every one
who he was; and wherever he stopped for the night,
on showing his safe-conduct, was allowed to proceed
next morning. On arriving at Orleans, however, there
was a change. No respect was in that city shown to
the duke’s permission for him to pass free; nay, he
was even arrested and sent immediately to Paris, where
he was thrown into prison.

The Duke of Normandy, of course, heard of the con-
tempt with which his safe-conduct had been treated,
and of the usage to which so renowned a knight had
been subjected. He was terribly put out by it. It
was contrary to all the laws of knighthood, and he
THE SIEGE OF CALAIS. 79

hastened to the king his father, urgently pleading for
the liberation of the prisoner, otherwise, as he said,
people would think he had granted the safe- conduct
solely for the purpose of betraying Sir Walter.

The king’s answer to his son was not very consola-
tory. He simply replied that he intended putting Sir
Walter Manny to death, as he considered him one of
the most important of his enemies.

The indignant duke’s rejoinder was, that if any
harm was done to the knight, neither he nor any of his
people should ever again bear arms against the king
of England. And with that, father and son quarrelled
violently—the duke at last flinging out with a renewed
declaration that he would not serve in the king’s armies
so long as Sir Walter Manny was kept in prison.

Things remained in this state for some time; but at
leneth the king became ashamed of his discourteous
behaviour, allowed Sir Walter to go free, and reim-
bursed him the expenses to which his shameful impri-
sonment had put him. He went further, and, by way
of plastering the wound which he had himself inflicted,
even invited Sir Walter to the royal dinner-table,
pressing upon him rich gifts and jewels, which the
knight accepted, subject to the pleasure of his own
sovereign ; for he did not know whether Edward would
like him to keep them. Edward did not choose that
a knight of his should receive presents from the enemy.
So, right royally saying to him, “Sir Walter, we have
80 THE SIEGE OF CALAIS.

enough, thank God, both for you and for ourselves,”
he bade him return them to their donor; intimating
to Sir Walter, that the faithful servants of the King of
England must look to their own master, not to the
King of France, for their reward. Sir Walter accord-
ingly sent back the jewels by a cousin of his, who was
ouly too glad to keep them himself, when Philip bade
him do so. |

The siege of Calais still held on its slow course,
according to the manner of sieges ; its monotony being
varied, towards the close of the year, by the arrival in
camp of Queen Philippa and her son the prince.
Philippa had had her hands full during the absence of
her lord—the hard battle of Neville’s Cross, in Dur-
ham, in which the King of Scotland was taken prisoner,
having been fought under her own eyes. Her recep-
tion in the camp was one befitting both her rank and
the heroic courage she had recently displayed; and as
she brought in her train many great ladies of the
court, there were brave doings, in the way of feast
and tournament, to celebrate so agreeable a visit.

The King of France was not disposed to give up
Calais quietly, but his attempts to relieve it proved
fruitless. _He raised an immense army, far outnum-
bering that of the enemy, for this purpose; but the
English were so skilfully intrenched by their great
leader, that Philip could not get near the town. It
was in vain that he invited Edward to “come out and
THE SIEGE OF CALAIS. 81

fight ;” Edward knew better, and told him so, than
to sacrifice the advantages which had cost him so much
time and treasure. So this vast French army, after the
citizens had admired its numerous banners fluttering
in the moonlight, decamped, leaving the people of
Calais, who sorrowingly watched its departure, to do
the best they could for themselves.

Bad was the best, for the blockade had been so strict
that their provisions were well-nigh expended. Yea,
horses, dogs, cats, and viler creatures, had been already
eaten by the wretched inhabitants, who could no longer
endure starvation. So they entreated John de Vienne,
their governor, to mount the walls and make signs that
he wished a parley with the besiegers. That word
parley is a French word, bodily imported into our
English, with the slight alteration of our spelling it with
a y, instead of a z, and really means, talk! So Sir
John reluctantly did as they would have him; for he
was a brave knight, and would rather have held out
the town to the last.

The governor’s summons was answered by Sir Wal-
ter Manny and Lord Basset, to whom he spoke man-
fully, saying that the king his master had entrusted
the defence of Calais to him and his companions,
and they had done their duty till they were now
near famishing with hunger; and he prayed that
the King of England would be content with posses-

sion of the castle and town, in which he would find
(3) 6 |
82 THE SIEGE OF CALAIS.

great store of riches, letting the garrison depart unmo-
lested.

Sir Walter had no very agreeable answer to this
entreaty. He assured John de Vienne that the King
of England his master was so enraged at the loss of
men, time, and money, which this siege of Calais had
cost him; that he would offer the garrison no terms
save those of unconditional surrender ; for him to put
to death whom he pleased, and admit to ransom whom
he pleased.

The spirit of the governor was roused by this cruel
declaration, and he told Sir Walter that he and his
eompanions had only done what English knights and
squires in similar circumstances would have done—
held out as long as there was a stick or stone standing,
and a mouthful of food for any one. But still, famish-
ing as they were, they would endure much more,
rather than that the meanest horse-boy in the place
should fare worse than they. And he besought Sir
Walter to represent their hard case to the King of
England, of whose knighthood he had so high an
opinion, that he could not believe he would deal so
harshly with them as he had threatened.

The king, however, was really as angry as man could
be, and he told Sir Walter that the garrison of Calais
must take his first terms or none, Sir Walter expos-
tulated with him, that if he dealt such hard measures

to his conquered enemies, his own knights would rather
THE SIEGE OF CALAIS. «B83

unwillingly go out on dangerous service, expecting, if
taken by. the French, to be put to death, just as he, if
he did not relent, put to death the brave fellows who
had so long held Calais against him. It would cer-
tainly be death for death, if the fortunes of war turned
against them. |

Edward softened somewhat at this view of the case,
which was strongly urged by others of his nobles. So,
by way of mending matters, he dismissed Sir Walter
with his last requisition, which was, that six of the
principal citizens of Calais, carrying the keys of the
town and castle, should present themselves before him,
bare-headed, bare-foot, and with ropes round their necks,
and that he should do what he pleased with them;
hang them, or not, as the humour took him; the rest
of the inhabitants being permitted to go free.

It was a hard measure, but there was no help for it;
and back went that generous soul de Manny with this
last proposal, of which, no doubt, he was a little
ashamed. On his arrival, the governor caused the
town’s bell to be rung, collected all the citizens in the
public hall, and then communicated to them the final
answer of the inplacable monarch. Loud lamentations
and wailings broke forth from the assembled throng when
the king’s will was made known to them; and even the
hardy knight de Vienne, wept at the sight of their dis-
tress. For awhile there was a gloomy silence through-
out the multitude: life was sweet, and each one feared
84 THE SIEGE OF CALAIS.

to lose it. At length patriotism, and a sense of duty
prevailed even over the loveof life; and oneof the richest
merchants of Calais, named Eustace de St. Pierre, rose
up, saying, “Sirs, it would be great pity to suffer so
many people to die of famine, if by any means it could
be prevented, and it would be well-pleasing in the eyes
of our Saviour, if such misery could be averted. I
have such faith and trust in finding grace with God if
I die to save my townsmen, that I offer myself as first
of the six.”

Bravely spoken Eustace de St. Pierre! That man’s
name deserves to come down to posterity.

As for the assembled crowd, they rose up, and as an
old writer tells us, “almost worshipped him ;” many
throwing themselves, weeping, at his feet.

Another citizen, also wealthy and in great repute
with his fellow townsmen, then offered himself to be
the second. This was John Daire. Others followed,
till the required number was complete ; and Eustace de
St. Pierre, John Daire, James and Peter Wisant, and
two more whose names have perished, though the
memory of their heroic deed endures, agreed to give
themselves up to death to save the lives of the famish-
ing people of Calais. The six were merchants, members
of a class little esteemed by the knighthood of that
day. But, merchants though they were, they were
indeed noble men.

John de Vienne then collecting together his little
THE SIEGE OF CALAIS. 85

sacrificial band, mounted a small pony, (for his wounds
disabled him from walking), and conducted them in the
prescribed humiliating manner—bare-foot, bare-headed,
and with ropes round their necks—to that gate of the
town which opened on the English camp.
followed them to the gate, weeping and lamenting;
and when it was opened, the seven passed through to
the English barriers, where Sir Walter Manny was
waiting to receive them. ‘The six citizens were
delivered up to him, in due form, with an earnest
request that he would intercede with his sovereign for
their lives; and then de Vienne, with a heavy heart,
turned back again to the miserable town.

When brought into Edward’s presence, the prisoners,
upon their knees, gave up the keys of the castle and
town, praying the king to spare their lives. This,
Edward at first did not seem at all disposed to do; the
people of Calais had done him so much mischief by sea
in times past, that he was now quite in a mood to cut
off a few of their heads, by way of punishing them for
it. And, accordingly, spite cf the pitying looks and
entreaties of the great lords and knights around him,
he straightway gave command that the heads of the six
should be stricken off. It was in vain his gallant
followers interceded for the voluntary captives; he
would not hear a word on their behalf De Manny,
and even the prince himself pleaded unavailingly, though
they reminded him that a charge of cruelty, such as no
86 THE SIEGE OF CALAIS.

true knight ought to incur, would certainly rest upon
him, if he carried out his fierce purpose.

What was denied to the entreaties and remonstrances
of his son, and of his nobles, Edward was, however,
forced to grant to the prayers of his queen whom he
tenderly loved, and who, having just crossed the seas
to join him, after her victorious encounter at Neville’s
Cross, deserved some boon at his hands. On her knees,
weeping, she prayed him for Christ’s sake, as well as
for his love to her, to have pity on these unfortunate
citizens of Calais.

The king for awhile, and in silence, looked at the
weeping, kneeling figure; and then gently telling
Philippa he wished she had been anywhere, rather than
where she was at that moment, for he could not refuse
her request, bade her do with the six as she pleased.
Nothing loth, she carried them off in triumph to her
own tent, had those horrible ropes taken from their
necks, clothed and fed them; and then, with a supply
of money for their journey, commanded them to be
safely conducted out of the camp.

It was in August 1347, after an eleven months’ siege,
that the strong town of Calais surrendered to the king
of England. Edward, accompanied by his queen and
son, took possession of it in state, having first ordered
his officers to imprison a portion of the garrison, and -
drive all the inhabitants bodily out of the town, which
he was resolved to convert into a thoroughly English
TUE SIEGE OF CALATS. 8?

one, by filling it with his own subjects, The king made
Calais his residence for some little time, during which
the prince, at the head of a strong detachment, made a
sort of foray into the neighbouring country, which he
burned and ravaged as far as the Somme, and then
returned laden with spoil.

After this, as the one kingdom found fighting ruinous,
and the other found it costly, a truce was agreed upon
between the two; and Edward, having appointed a
favourite Italian knight of his, named Sir Americ de
Pavie, governor of Calais, set sail for England with the
queen, the prince, and his little daughter Margaret, who
had been born in the captured city. After being well
tossed about on his own seas (he complained that winds
and seas always favoured him when he went to France,
but were dead against him on his return), he landed at
Sandwich, then a considerable port, on the 28th of
September.

Sir Americ de Pavie, the newly appointed governor
of Calais, happened to be something of a rascal; and
we shall hear of him again.





VI.

@reacbery at Calats,




eee tails young Prince of Wales was now a youth
E84 OE of seventeen ; tall, handsome, strong, valiant,
distinguished for his deeds of arms, as well
as for the other knightly qualities of courtesy, modera-
tion, and gentleness. He, and his illustrious parents,
were received with acclamations by the English people,
whose heads were nearly turned by those wonderful
doings in France. In great state the three entered the
city of London—for at that date, the city was a “ gen-
teel” place, and not as now, wholly given up to mer-
chandise. Merchants, tradesmen, and artisans certainly
exercised each one his calling, or craft there. But
there also the great nobles had their dwellings, whose
faded splendours may still be discerned in the ware-
houses and offices of modern times; bales of goods
crowding the halls within which lords and ladies were
wont to show their stately presence, and brisk clerks,
scribbling away as 1f for their very lives, in the room
of those who wielded the sword—the power of those
99 TREACHERY AT CALAIS.

days—and cased their limbs in steel, instead of broad
cloth.

Royal feastings and tournaments celebrated the
recent prowess of the new-made royal knight. And
that young, muscular form, and stout heart distinguished
itself in this mimicry of war, as it had done in the
grim reality of it in France.

The tournament was the chosen diversion of knights
and ladies of the fourteenth century. In it, companies
of knights, armed as if for battle, save that lance and
sword were puintless, spurred furiously against each other,
squadron against squadron, till broken lances, knights
unhelmed, or some of them lifted bodily out of their
saddles by the shock, terminated the contest, and the
one or the other was proclaimed victor. The ground
enclosed for the purpose was called the lists; and it
was surrounded by galleries for spectators, among whom
ladies were conspicuous; for they as well loved to look
upon these rough trials of skill, as the combatants
themselves loved to enter upon them. Occasionally
the excitement of these warlike games became so great
that battle in play was converted into battle in down-
right earnest; and men were maimed, and lives lost
within the gaily decorated lists, and under the unshrink-
ing eyes of the high born dames surrounding them.

If only two knights engaged, the one against the
other, it was called a joust.

At Canterbury, then a city of more importance than
TREACHERY AT CALAIS. 93

it is now, and Eltham, where at that time stood a royal
palace, whose great hall has long ago been turned into
a barn, these festivities were held in notable style.
People’s notions about being handsomely dressed vary
at different times and different places. Here, at
Eltham, the extraordinary equipments of two of the
knights who levelled lance at each other, have been
handed down to us by admiring chroniclers; and
when we read in their dusky pages that over the
armour of these same cavaliers—armour, no doubt, of
most exquisite finish, after the fashion of tilting
armour—they wore hoods of white cloth, buttoned
with large pearls, and embroidered with figures of
dancing-men dressed in blue, we must admit that they
were magnificent according to their notions, and
supremeiy ridiculous according to ours. We should
dress up a Merry Andrew in such guise. With them
it was the sumptuous apparel of noble and gallant
soldiers ; and for this special piece of finery the two
gentlemen, we are told, were indebted to the king’s
wardrobe. Five centuries hence, perhaps the people
of England may laugh at our modern notions of how
nobles and warriors should be habited.

Rejoicings and festivities, however, were not to last
long. The stalwart youth upon whom the affection of
all England rested was to have more work—real work,
not pretence—found for him through the medium of
Sir Aymeric de Pavia, who, it has been said, was some-
«O94 TREACHERY AT CALAIS.

thing of a rascal; and being one, soon showed him-
self.

There was a French knight, Sir Geoffrey de Chareny,
in command of St. Omer, who was what in England
would have been called Lord Warden of the Marches.
He was charged with the protection of the French
frontier, and with the duty of keeping a sharp eye on
the doings of their troublesome English neighbours
in the north. Now, as old chroniclers tell us, this
Sir Geoffrey bethought him that Lombards were not
only poor, but money-loving; and as de Pavia was
a Lombard, this consideration suggested how he should
be dealt with for the interest of Philip of Valois. So
Sir Geoffrey entered into communication with the
Italian governor of Calais, and by degrees—we know
not how he went to work—succeeded in persuading
that honourable knight to sell Calais to him for twenty
thousand crowns—about £10,000 of our money. It
was a shabby transaction, but the story is quite true.
A man high in command agreed to give up his trust
to the enemy, in return for a sum of money! The
affair was so snugly arranged, that it was thought no
one could possibly know anything about it, and that
the abominable bit of treachery would be consummated
in perfect safety. | : |

It was not so. King Edward loved and trusted the
Lombard, but still took measures for ascertaining
whether his affection and confidence were well bestowed
TREACHERY AT CALAIS. 95

and so it came to his ears how the town of Calais, the
winning of which had cost him so dear, was to be sold
to its former owners by the governor whom he had
placed over it.

Sir Geoffrey and Sir Aymeric were a couple of clever
fellows, but Edward was a match for them both. He
at once despatched a messenger to Sir Aymeric, de-
siring him to come over to Westminster immediately
—a command that was cheerfully obeyed, for it never
entered the Italian’s head that his roguery had been
found out by his master. Doubtless he fancied some
fresh mark of royal favour was about to be bestowed
upon him! On presenting himself before the king, he
was coolly informed of his treachery, and that he de-
served to die forit. Down on his knees dropped the
astounded knight, praying for mercy, assuring Edward
there was plenty of time even yet for him to break
faith with Sir Geoffrey, and earnestly begging that he
might be allowed to expiate one act of treachery by
another. The king was disposed to make use of him ;
the fellow had still the power of being serviceable ;
and therefore, instead of hanging him for his vile
huckstering about the city of Calais, sent him back
again, with full instructions how to undo what he had
already done in the matter.

Only too happy this time to take in his friend Sir
Geoffrey, in place of the King of England whom he had
failed to entrap, the baftled. Italian returned to his
96 TREACHERY AT CALAIS.

governorship—not saying one word, good, bad, or in-
different, to the knight of St. Omer, who thereupon
thought all was right, and took his measures accord-
ingly.

The time for the completion of the treason was at
length fixed. It was to be the last night of the year,
1348, and Sir Aymeric immediately sent his brother over
to England to tell the king.

Upon receipt of this news, Edward, who was keep-
ing Christmas gaily at the queen’s palace of Havering
in Essex, collected a small force of three hundred men-
at-arms and three thousand archers, and embarking
with them and the prince at Dover, got into Calais so
quietly, that no one except a few of his principal
officers knew anything about it. It was his will that
de Manny should have command of the enterprise—
king and prince, in plain armour to conceal their rank,
both fighting under him. The soldiers were placed in
ambuscade in different parts of the castle; and then
all was ready for Sir Geoffrey when he came with his
money.

Sir Geoffrey accordingly, on the 31st of December,
approached the town about midnight, having a good
force with him; and then halting to let his rear come
up, sent forward two of his squires to ask Sir Aymeric
if it were time for their master to advance. The Italian
said that it was; and immediately on hearing this, Sir
Geoffrey marched his men in battle array over the
TREACHERY AT CALAIS. 97

bridge of Neuillet, sending forward twelve of his knights
with a hundred men-at-arms, to take possession of the
castle—for he thought that if he had that, the town
would easily follow. To one of these knights, Sir
Odoart de Renty, was entrusted the price of the town
and castle, as agreed upon with the governor.

The little party plodded on in the dark, till they
reached the castle, where the accommodating de Pavia
nad already let down the draw-bridge for them; and
after they had passed over, Sir Odoart gave him the
bag of money. De Pavia took it, and, saying “he
had not time to count it, but supposed it was all
there,” flung it into a room, which he immediately
locked up, telling the Frenchmen he would lead them
to the great tower that they might the sooner be mas-
ters of the castle.

The wicked Italian! In that very tower were the
king and prince, with two hundred followers, who, the
moment de Pavia pushed back the bolt, rushed out
upon the bewildered French, with the cry, “ de Manny
to the rescue! What! do these Frenchmen think to
take the Castle of Calais with a handful of men?”
And with that they laid about them with their swords
and battle-axes in such a style as speedily satisfied
their French friends that now was the time for discre-
tion rather than valour. Resistance was evidently
useless, so they at once yielded themselves prisoners.
They were politely handed into the tower whence the

(3) q
98 TREACHERY AT CALAIS.

English had issued; the key was turned upon them ;
and, leaving them strongly guarded, the English cava-
liers sprang upon their horses, and sallied forth to find
Sir Geoffrey.

Sir Geoffrey had drawn up the remainder of his
little army in the plain, and there awaited the signal
to advance and take possession. He was in a fidget:
those twenty thousand crowns already handed over to
the treacherous Italian, and yet no gates thrown open
for him to march into Calais, as agreed upon! Sir
Geoffrey was fidgetty; he was also cross, grumbling
out to one near him that if the Italian were “ much
longer about opening the gate, they should all die
of cold.” And, indeed to stand thus in their ranks,
mounted and under arms, in the middle of a De-
cember night, was a freezing sort of thing. The
knight to whom he spoke answered sneeringly, that as
the Lombards were a strange people, possibly Sir
Aymeric was all this time counting the money, and
examining it lest there should be any bad coin among
it. Cold and vexed, of course both were rather spite-
ful. And yet they did not think half badly enough
of Sir Aymeric de Pavia.

Vexed they were destined to remain, but not cold ;
warm work was at hand in place of freezing in their
saddles. The two Edwards, with barons, and knights,
and fluttering banners, were advancing in the grey
morning, and with shouts of “Manny to the rescue!”
TREACHERY AT CALAIS. 99

suddenly presented themselves to the enemy. “If we
fly,” exclaimed Sir Geoffrey at this sight, “all is lost!
Let us fight it out!” “By St. George, you are right,”
replied some of the English who were near enough to
overhear him; “shame upon him who thinks of re-
treating!” |

There was nothing for it now but to accept the
challenge thus given; and the two parties prepared to
do their best and worst at each other. Sir Geoffrey
placed his men a little in the rear of his first position ;
and dismounting, that the battle might be on foot, they
drove their horses out of the way. They then planted
themselves in close order, with their lances, shortened
to five feet, held in such a manner as to present a
phalanx of sharp points towards the enemy. The
English were also on foot—king and prince under
de Manny’s banner; and the contest was fierce be-
tween these two gallant companies. How the prince
fared we know not; but the king, we are told, matched
himself with a brave French knight, Eustace de Ribeau-
mont, who twice struck him down on his knees, but
was at last forced to surrender to the king, of whose
rank he was utterly ignorant. The English were
victorious in all directions. Such of the Frenchmen
as could catch their horses, rode off as fast as they
could, out-distancing the English, who had only their ©
own legs on which to pursue them; and Sir Geoffrey
de Chargny ended this little business of buying Calais
100 TREACHERY AT CALAIS.

from its untrustworthy governor, by being himself,
along with many others, carried prisoner within the
walls which he had expected to enter as lord and
master.

Not till they were brought into the presence of their
captors did the Frenchmen know to what illustrious
foes they had been opposed. Those two simple knights,
under the well-known de Manny, were actually the
English king and his son, who most courteously re-
ceived their crest-fallen and unwilling visitors. As it
was New Year’s-day, the king would have them all to
supper with himself; when, like a good host, he con-
trived to make them enjoy themselves, notwithstanding
the disasters of the night. The French knights were
his guests, and sat at the royal table. They were
waited upon by the prince and his English knights, who
afterwards quietly got their own supper at another table.

The king had a kindly word for every one except
poor Sir Geoffrey, in whose teeth he could not help
flinging, how that he had thought to get Calais more
cheaply than it had been bought, and how he had been
disappointed of it. To Sir Hustace, who had fought
him more hardly, as he said, than any other knight
with whom he had ever contended, he gave a rare
circlet of pearls, and as much praise as that gallant
gentleman could conveniently swallow. And so all
ended politely, if not agreeably to some of the parties
concerned,
TREACHERY AT CALAIS. 101

Sir Aymeric was of course displaced from the office
which he had so unworthily occupied; the governor-
ship of Calais was bestowed upon Sir John Beauchamp,
and the king and prince then returned to England.

But it was not to rest that the warlike king, and
his son, growing up in his father’s warlike image, came
back again to their own island :—

‘* Fair jewel, in bright silver set!’*

Fighting, fighting, fighting was the order of the day five
centuries ago; and after having fought and beaten the
French, they had to fight and beat the Spaniards. To
do the former the Black Prince and his father had had
to go to France. The Spaniards came to them to fight,
and be beaten signally.

It was in 1350, the year but one after that false
Italian and scheming Frenchman had conspired to
cheat Edward out of his dearly-bought acquisition of
Calais, that the Spaniards thought proper to come and
try the metal of the English in their own seas. They
had better have stayed at home. We English consider
the seas circling our island as our very own, and on this
occasion we proved them so to the utter discomfiture
of the invaders. The Spaniards came, sailing con-
fidently enough, perhaps it should be said impertinently
enough, along the Sussex coast, until what came of it
was distinctly visible, the day being clear, from the
hilly sea-side margin of that county.
1G2 TREACHERY AT CALAIS.

_ The Spaniards had forty large ships, laden not only
with merchandise from Flanders, but with more offen-
sive stores in the shape of cannon and cross-bows,
with ammunition to match, for the benefit of the
English. Large stones and bars of beaten iron were
also among their missiles, for the purpose of being
pitched into vessels alongside to sink them. A simi-
lar plan is still occasionally adopted in modern naval
warfare ; cold shot, as it is called,—that is, balls heaved
overboard instead of being discharged from a gun,—
being thrown into small boats, with this design.

The king, being tired of the mischief done by the
Spaniards to his merchant vessels, had made up his
mind once for all to put an end to it. His design
was seconded with all their hearts by his lords and
other great men, so that a handsome fleet was readily
equipped, and kept cruising between Dover and Calais
to catch the Spaniards as soon as they made their ap-
pearance. The Prince of Wales commanded one divi-
sion of the fleet. His young brother, the Earl of
Richmond, afterwards known as the celebrated John
of Gaunt, was also on board. Not that a lad of nine
years old could be of any use, but that he was such
a pet with his father that he would have him.

They had not to wait long for the Spaniards, and
when they met, the appetite for hard fighting was —
equally good on both sides. The king inmediately
ordered his ship to be laid alongside the first Spaniard
TREACHERY AT CALAIS. 103

that bore down upon them. The two came together
with a crash that broke the Spaniard’s mast, and canted
out of its upper works those who were stationed aloft
to hurl down the large stones and iron bars spoken
of ; while at the same time the force of the concussion
cracked the English vessel like a walnut, causing her
to leak till she was near sinking. But for all that the
two crews fought madly, and the English, leaving their
own sinking ship, scrambled on the deck of the Spa-
niard, whose crew they threw overboard.

The prince and his division had their hands equally
_ full elsewhere, for it was no ignoble foe to whom they
were opposed. A huge hulk of a Spaniard came down
upon his vessel, and grappling it fast, knocked them
about to some purpose. The storm of cross-bow bolts,
stones, and lumps of iron raged there, as it had done
upon the king’s ship, and as stoutly was it met; but
meanwhile, between the straining timbers water poured
in at such a rate that it was almost more than the
crew could do, by incessant baling, to keep themselves
afloat. They fought the more desperately for this, for
it was—Conquer, or be drowned! At last they were
rescued from inevitable destruction by the Duke of
Lancaster, who, seeing the prince’s extreme danger,
made his vessel fast to the other side of the Spaniard,
so as to hug her between them, and effected a diversion
by the fierceness of this new attack. Two to one pre-
vailed; the Spaniard struck his flag, and the prince,
104 TREACHERY AT CALAIS.

with his followers, climbing up her tall sides from their
own sinking tub of a boat, which instantly went down,
took possession, flinging the crew, to a man, into the
sea: perhaps by way of expressing thankfulness for
their own preservation! We don’t do such things
now-a-days. SO |

Throughout the whole fleet the battle raged horribly
for some hours, but victory eventually declared for the
English. Fourteen Spanish vessels were sunk or taken,
the rest sheered off, and then the battered English
flotilla came to anchor about dusk between Rye and
Winchelsea. Thence the king and his two sons has-
tened to the monastery where Queen Philippa had
spent that anxious day, tormented by reports from her
household, who, posting themselves on the hills over-
looking the watery battle-field, conveyed to her most
alarming accounts of the number and size of the enemy’s
ships. She was greatly comforted by seeing the two
Edwards and her boy, who had “smelled powder” for
the first time, all safe and sound. And feasting and
merriment succeeded to the din of battle and the de-
spairing cry of drowning Spaniards.

In this same year occurred an entertaining instance
of the high esteem in which the King of England was
held by foreign powers. Two knights, an Italian, John
de Visconti, and a Frenchman, Sir Thomas de la Marche,
fighting under the banner of the Kings of Armenia and
Cyprus, against the Turks, had a violent quarrel. Vis-
TREACHERY AT CALAIS. 105

conti accused de la Marche of taking a bribe to betray
the Christian army into the hands of its infidel enemies.
De la Marche told him that he lied; and as after this
there was nothing for it but a duel between them, it
was decided by their friends that the two should come
over to England to refer the matter to Edward as the
most heroic and honourable monarch in Christendom,
and, after the manner of the times, to fight a solemn
duel before him, the result of which was supposed to
prove the guilt or innocence of the accused party.

Visconti and de la Marche accordingly sailed to
England, and presenting themselves before the king,
delivered to him letters (signed by their royal and
noble leaders in the crusade), in which was set forth
the ground of their dispute, and that further prayed
him to suffer the two knights to settle it by single
combat before him. After delivering these letters,
Visconti formally accused de la Marche of the de-
grading treason mentioned in them, and threw down
his gauntlet in token of willingness to prove his accu-
sation by force of arms. De la Marche as stoutly took
it up, to signify his readiness to prove his innocence
in the same manner.

The king accepted the office of umpire between them,
and appointed a day whereon, at Westminster, the
cause should be thus strangely tried before himself,
the prince, and the whole court. At the time fixed the
combatants made their appearance, mounted and in
106 — TREACHERY AT CALAIS,

complete armour. The trumpets sounded for the
charge, and they spurred: their coursers against each
other with all the vehemence of men who have given
and received the lie; but both spears being broken in
the first. encounter without either of the knights being
unhorsed, they sprang from their saddles and renewed
the combat on foot with their swords. They struck
hard and long until these at last were useless, and then,
like a couple of tiger-cats, they flew at each other with
their hands and arms, tugging and wrestling, till down
they both tumbled in the lists. They might have
_ kicked and struggled, and rolled over on the ground
long enough, cased as they were in steel, had not de
la Marche furnished himself with weapons that gave
him what to our notions, seems a shabby advantage
over his adversary. The joints of his gauntlets’ had
sharp spikes, called gadlings, fixed in them, and striking
these between the bars of his antagonist’s helmet,
Visconti, who had trusted, like a gentleman, to the
_ ordinary weapons of such combats, was obliged to cry
out for mercy, and own himself vanquished. The king
upon this, throwing down his warder, proclaimed that
the fight was at an end, and as de la Marche was
victor, adjudged him gultiess of the crime laid to his
charge.

The successful knight, who did not feel at all ashamed
of the manner in which he had gained his victory (for,
even in those chivalrous days, such things were per-
TREACHERY AT CALAIS. 107

a

mitted by the law of arms), then made a donation of
his vanquished foe, who was his prisoner, to the prince,
to be dealt with as he pleased. As we might expect,
the captive was instantly liberated, and after receiving
kindly courtesies from his owner, was permitted to
return home at his leisure.

De la Marche further, in all the pride of proved in-
nocence, dedicated his suit of mail (gadlings included,
we suppose) to St. George, the patron saint of England,
and devoutly hung it up in St. Paul’s Cathedral for
the acceptance of that mythological personage.

His venturing to try this cause in presence of the
King of England, instead of settling it at home, is said
to have cost him his life after his return to his own
country.

It was amid the rejoicings after Edward’s return
from Calais that our English Order of the Garter was
instituted by that monarch; the Black Prince being one
of its first, and most illustrious knights.







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HIULIP of Valois died on the 22d of August
1350, a few days before Edward’s naval vic-




tory over the Spaniards, and was succeeded
by his son John, a prince of many virtues, but not a
particularly clever king. The truce between the two
kingdoms still continued in name, but it was perpetually
broken in little paltry ways, or smart skirmishes. In
truth, the English and French did not love each other ;
at all events, not when the English were on French
ground; and they could not help flying at each other
whenever they came in contact. Perhaps, had each
stayed on his own side of the channel, they might have
been the best friends in the world. The English com-
plained that the French broke the truce, and doubt-
less the French brought the same charge against the
English. Being ourselves English, we are inclined to
believe that we did keep it a little better than they.
Indeed historians tell us that at this period Edward was
incerely desirous of being at peace with his neighbours.

seth
112 THE PRINCE'S EXPEDITION FROM BORDEAUX.

But though Edward offered to resign his claim on
the French crown provided he might hold his paternal
possessions in that country free from the customary
homage and also retain his much prized conquest of
Calais, John resolutely declined to bargain with him
on those terms.

In consequence of this, early in 1355, as the truce
was to expire that year, the English king made vigorous
preparations for setting to work again so soon as his
engagement to be quiet had come to an end. His par-
liament, as usual, were liberal in finding him money
for so popular a war; and the Prince of Wales, now
in his twenty-fifth year, was sent into the west of Eng-
land to rouse the martial ardour of the gentry and com-
monalty of that part of the country. This was done
so effectually that, on the 10th of September, he
sailed from Plymouth with a fleet of three hun-
dred sail, having on board a gallant array of lords
and knights, with their numerous retainers,—a force
that, on his arrival at Bordeaux, was swelled by
the enthusiastic natives of the English province of
Guienne to the number of sixty thousand. Certainly
here were—

‘* Enough to fight, enough to fall, and enough to run away.”

Hitherto the fortunes of the Black Prince and his
father have been so mingled that, following the one,
we have of necessity followed the other. Now the in-
THE PRINCE'S EXPEDITION FROM BORDEAUX. 113

dependent action of the prince began, and we shall see
what he could do alone.

The short autumn was spent in ravaging Languedoc,
—a southern province containing more than half-a-dozen
of the present departments of France,—burning, de-
stroying, and making great numbers of prisoners, not-
withstanding the presence in the province of a much
larger French army, who appeared to think it best to
let the prince have his own way. Five hundred vil-
lages are said to have been burned during this foray,
beside many fortified towns, before the prince. thought
fit to retire to winter quarters. His father was busy
doing similar mischief in the north of France, where
King John was, like his army in the south, engaged
in watching him, till Edward found it expedient to
go home and defend his own territories against the
Scots. a

The summer of the coming year, 1356, was destined
to see more important results, achieved too with a
far smaller force. On the 6th of J uly the prince. left
Bordeaux, the seat of his government, with a small
army of two thousand men-at-arms and six thousand —
archers, only a part of whom were English, and pene-
trating the centre of France in a north-easterly direc-
tion, ravaged the country in a most awful manner.
For some time, strangely enough, as before, there was
no one to oppose him, and plunder and destruction

went on at his pleasure. Whenever that desperate
(3) og a
114. THE PRINCE'S EXPEDITION FROM BORDEAUX.

band of English and Gascons entered a well-provisioned
town, there they took their ease for a few days, and
when they departed, that no one else might do the
same, they destroyed all the food and drink that was
left. O what a scene was there, over and over again,
of wheat and oats burning, wine casks dashed to pieces,
their contents streaming in all directions, and other
wreck and waste of God’s good gifts to his thankless
creatures! Of course the embarrassment of the enemy
is the object of all such dreadful work as this, which
still finds a place in our own wars, and perhaps it may
be needful to use even such means of preventing battles
having to be fought twice over. But there is something
very shocking in wilful destruction of the fruits of the
earth, produced as they are by long toil and patience of
the husbandman, with God’s blessing upon it, and whose
reproduction must require at least another twelve-
months’ toil and patience. Pulling down houses and
castles seems a trifle in comparison. They are man’s
work. ‘The fruits of the earth are peculiarly God’s
work, for we might dig and delve till we were tired,
and yet never have a blade of corn did not He give it.

Vierzon, in the ancient province of Berri, now divided
into the departments of Cher and Indre, was the limit
of this terrible expedition; for while stopping there to
take breath, news was brought to the prince of the
French king’s being ready for him at Chartres, about
sixty miles to the north of him, with an army at least
THE PRINCE'S EXPEDITION FROM BORDEAUX. 115

six times the size of his own. Further advance was
impossible, as, in order to get at the French king (even
had it been discreet to fight him), the English would
have been obliged to cross the Loire, whose various
passes were so strongly guarded that it was out of the
question to think of forcing them. In such a state of
things, going back again was the only course to be
pursued. A council of war held by the prince, decided
that this should be done; and, after wrecking and
ruining Vierzon—for which they had no further use—
the English and Gascons wheeled round, and set out
on their return-march to Bordeaux.

The retreat—for so it must be called—was con-
ducted in so orderly a manner, that for six days a
French force of three hundred lances (that included a
much greater number of men) hung upon their heels,
without finding a chance of attacking them. ‘This
was disappointing ; so, on drawing near the town of
Romorantin, the Frenchmen took a roundabout course
which placed them in advance of the English, for
whom they then waited in ambuscade, in a spot com-
manding a very narrow pass through which the latter
must proceed to reach the town. That very day, a
company of two hundred horsemen, under some of the
most distinguished lords and knights in the prince’s
army, had pushed forward before the main body,
and coming up to this pass, rode safely through it.
The moment that they had cleared it, however, the
116 THE PRINCE'S EXPEDITION FROM BORDEAUX.

French, who were well mounted, struck spurs into
their horses, and galloped after them, lance in hand.
The English, hearing the ring of the horses’ hoofs,
turned round and instantly halted to receive the foe.
They opened their ranks as they did so, and the
French, charging full speed, dashed through them,
overturning not more than five or six of the English.
As soon as that whirlwind of men and horses had passed
through, the ranks were closed up, and, charging in
their turn, the English did terrible damage to the
French rear. Down went knights, and squires, and
common men under the impetuous shock, and hand to
hand the two companies fought, till it was long uncer-
tain to which side victory would incline. At this
juncture the vanguard of the English army came in
sight, skirting a wood ; and then the French retreated
full speed, closely followed by the English troop, who
pursued them with much slaughter into the town of
Romorantin. Of it they took easy possession, while
the pursued got safe into the castle, where they shut
themselves up.

The prince himself arrived in time to find how brisk
an encounter his little squadron had sustained ; and
when he entered the town he found it crowded with
his own people, all anxious to attack the castle. He
at once sent Sir John Chandos to hold a parley with
those who commanded in it. These were a knight be-
longing to the neighbourhood, and an ecclesiastic ; for
THE PRINCE'S EXPEDITION FROM BORDEAUX. 117

clergymen in those days were sometimes as clever in
military science as in theology. Sir John accordingly
advanced to the barriers, and making signs that he
wished to speak to some one, the lord of Boucicault,
and the hermit of Chaumont, came to meet him. Sir
John, with all courtesy, then delivered the prince’s mes-
sage, which was to require the surrender of the castle,
promising in that case, good terms to its garrison.

The lord of Boucicault and his clerical friend replied
to Sir John that they were not at all disposed to ac-
cept his master’s invitation to surrender; nay, that
they had made up their minds to fight it out to the
last, if he thought proper to attack them. This was
explicit, and Sir John Chandos and the Frenchmen
returned to their respective quarters, little the better —
for their conference at the barriers.

The prince meant to have the castle, and hearing the
ill success of his envoy in persuading its defenders to
give it up, prepared to take it. Next morning a’
general assault was made upon the fortress, the Eng-
lish archers, like riflemen, being stationed in the
ditches, and delivering their shafts with such precision
that scarce a man dared to show himself upon the
walls. Then, upon hurdles, and doors hastily torn
down, anything in short, that would float, others
eagerly crossed the ditch, and began undermining the
walls with pickaxes and mattocks, heedless of the huge
~ stones and pots of hot lime flung down upon them by
118 THE PRINCE'S EXPEDITION FROM BORDEAUX.

the besieged. In this manner for a whole day the
fierce work went on, without any decided advantage on
either side, until night for a while separated the com-
batants. The English then retired to snatch a few
hours’ sleep, which might recruit them for a fresh
attack in the morning. This renewed attempt was
headed by the prince in person, and was as stoutly
made as it had been on the preceding day. Amid the
storm of missiles one of the prince’s squires was slain
by a great stone hurled from the castle, and this only
made him the more resolute to have the fortress, cost
what it might.

Some of the wiser heads among that soldierly set at
length began to think that lances and arrows had not
much chance against stone walls. So they got up
some of the clumsy engines of war used in those days;
(O, how different from our Armstrong guns!) and from
them, bullets, and, what was still worse, Greek fire—a
terrible composition that burned quite as well under
water as above it—was shot into the castle. It was
soon in a blaze; and, burned out, and smoked out, the
only chance for its defenders was to yield themselves
to their assailants. They surrendered accordingly on
the 4th of September. Great numbers of the garrison
were mercifully set at liberty by the prince, and after
having pulled down the castle, he pursued his route,
carrying with him a couple of lords and the hermit as
his prisoners. |
THE PRINCE'S EXPEDITION FROM BORDEAUX. 119

The taking of the castle of Romorantin was a spirited
little affair, and doubtless put the English in heart for
what was to follow ; for Poitiers, whose name has for
five centuries past rung in our ears like the blast of a
trumpet, was now close at hand.

The prince (as he had sworn “by the soul of his
father,” his most solemn oath!) had taken this same
castle of Romorantin ; but he had lost some precious
time in doing so—precious, at least, if he desired to
keep out of the way of John of France, with his sixty
thousand Frenchmen. That vast army, composed of
the best blood and the best sinews in France, having
poured across the Loire at various points, was now
rapidly gaining upon him—a circumstance that the
increasing scarcity of forage led the prince to suspect ;
and it was needful to decide upon some course of
action. Determined to know the worst, he sent out a
detachment of sixty men, well armed and mounted, to
look about for the enemy ; and these getting among
some heath and wood in the neighbourhood, came by
accident in sight of a small party of French who were
straggling along that way to reach their main body.
There were about two hundred of them, and as soon
as their quick eyes had made out the English troop,
they donned their helmets, unfurled their banners, and
setting lance in rest, spurred after them. The Kng-
lish, having the prince so close behind, had a mind to
lect themselves be pursued, in order to draw the French
120 THE PRINCE'S EXPEDITION FROM BORDEAUX.

into a trap. So they turned round, and made briskly
for the rugged road that led through the wood. The
invitation thus given was too tempting to be declined ;
and away after them clattered the whole squadron,
shouting and hallooing, to what they supposed the fly-
ing enemy, till all at once, in their headlong haste, they
found themselves right upon the prince’s own banner.
The skirmish that ensued was very hot and fierce.
Almost all the Frenchmen were either slain or taken
prisoners ; and from the latter the prince learned that
the king of France, with his whole army, was so near
at hand that it would be impossible to avoid a battle.

This was serious ; but the spirit of the lion-hearted
Plantagenet still glowed in the bosom of his descendant,
and suitable preparations for the inevitable contest were
immediately made. Stragglers were recalled, and com-
manding, on pain of death, that none should break the
ranks, whatever might be the temptation to a separate
tilting match with the enemy, the prince that Saturday
gave his men a seven hours’ march before halting in
the plains of Maupertuis, a few miles from Poitiers.
Here, in a strong position, surrounded by vineyards
and hedges—small, teezing, but very effectual obstacles
in the way of the enemy’s horse—he camped for the
night. |

The prince had no sooner halted his banners than he
detached a squadron of two hundred well-mounted
men-at-arms for the purpose of reconnoitring. This
THE PRINCE’S EXPEDITION FROM BORDEAUX. 121

party was under the command of several knights,
among whom was Sir John de Greilly, Captal de
Buche, one of the great fighting men of those days.
That title, Captal, was an old and very rare one of
southern France, and is equivalent to the one of count.
They soon came upon the rear of the French, whose
horsemen were swarming over the plain, and, making
a rush at them, knocked many out of their saddles,
besides taking some prisoners. This attack upon their —
rear, threw the whole main body of the French into
commotion ; and news of it being carried to the king,
he turned back from the city of Poitiers, which he was
just entering, pitching his tents in the field instead.
And very late indeed was it, we are told, before those
startled Frenchmen got to bed that night !

The return of the captal and his companions made
the prince fully aware of the danger of his situation,
and the impossibility of escape. “God help us,” was
his exclamation after hearing their report, “then we
must see how we may best fight thein !”

The prince, however, knew that God helps those who
help themselves, and he at once set about strengthening
and fortifying the well-chosen position which he had
taken up. His troops were posted, as has been said,
on a little sloping plain surrounded by woods and vine-
yards, hedges and ditches, and open to attack in front
only. To reach them even that way the assailants must
approach through a narrow lane, in which four horse-
122 THE PRINCE'S EXPEDITION FROM BORDEAUX.

men could scarcely ride abreast. The hedges on each
side this lane were now lined with archers, so that any
troops entering would be placed between a cross fire of
arrows—worse one thinks than a cross fire of rifles, for
each of those keen arrow-heads had a yard-long tail
attached to it, which must have added horribly to the
pain and embarrassment of the poor wretches whose
bodies were pierced by them. At the end of the lane,
where it opened on the ground occupied by the English
army,—if such a name as army may be given to a small
body of eight or ten thousand men,—another company
of archers was drawn up, and these were backed by
dismounted men-at-arms. Behind these the remainder
of this terribly inadequate force was disposed in three
lines; the Earl of Warwic commanding the van, the
prince himself heading the main body, while the Earls
of Suffolk and Salisbury took care of the rear. chosen body of troops, led by the captal, was sent, under
cover of night, round a hill that stood to the prince’s
right in order to flank the enemy in case of an engage-
ment. Such entrenchments as the nature of the ground
permitted were rapidly thrown up: and thus he pre-
pared to receive the French in the renowned battle of
Poitiers, .

The King of France had been no less busy ordering
his huge battalions for the coming struggle. The Eng-
lish were few in number, but past experience told him
they were not to be despised on that account.
THE PRINCE'S EXPEDITION FROM BORDEAUX. 123 |

Karly next morning,—it was Sunday,—after prayers
in his tent, and receiving the Holy Communion with his
four sons, he also prepared for the battle by arranging
his army according to what we may call the “rule of
three,’—that is, in three divisions, like those of the
prince except in size, for each one of these contained
twice as many men as were in the whole English army.
The van was under the leadership of his brother, Philip
of Orleans, the main body was commanded by the
Dauphin, his eldest son, with whom were his brothers
Lewis and John, and some renowned commanders to
take care of the boys! The rear was under the king
himself; his youngest son Philip, a boy of fourteen,
being with his father. It was a fine sight, whether
under the rich rays of a September sun, or thrown into
dead dense masses bya lowering sky,—historians do not
tell us what kind of day it was,—and the innumerable
banners and pennons that flickered over the heads of
this mailed host proclaimed the presence of the noblest
chivalry of France.

While the army was being formed in order of battle,
the king sent Sir Eustace de Ribeaumont,—he who had
received the pearls from our Edward as the prize of
superior valour,—and some other knights to examine
how the English had disposed themselves. During
their absence on this errand, he addressed his army,
reminding them how they had been in the habit of
boasting what they would do to the English if they
124 THE PRINCES EXPEDITION FROM BORDEAUX.

could only get at them, and that now, with the enemy
in sight, was the time to make good their vaunts. This
address was cheerfully responded to, thousands vowing
that, with God’s help, they would that day show them-
selves true men. At that moment up came Sir Eustace
and his companions, who, after having informed the
king of the numbers of the English army, and the ex-
cellent manner in which it was drawn up, advised that
a body of three hundred of their own best armed and
mounted gentlemen should first force the passage of
the lane, and beat down the archers at the other end
of it, and then that the battle should take place on foot ;
the entrenchments of the English and their natural
fortifications of hedge and ditch being such as to im-
pede the action of cavalry except in this first instance
of clearing the way. | |
This advice was acted upon. The army was formed
as for battle, each lord under his own banner ; and all
alike, knights, squires, and men-at-arms dismounted.
They were ordered to take off their spurs, which might
have tripped them up had they been left on their heels ;
and to shorten their lances to five feet that they might
be the more manageable in close combat.
The two armies were on the point of engaging when |
a peace- -maker appeared on the scene. ‘The Pope had
- more than once endeavoured to settle the quarrel be-
‘tween the kings of France and England, and now by ©
his mission, one of his cardinals, de Perigord, made a
THE PRINCE'S EXPEDITION FROM BORDEAUX. 125

fresh attempt to prevent bloodshed. Coming full gal-
lop to the king, as he stood there armed from head to
foot, he entreated him, for the love of God, to stay a
moment and suffer him to go to the prince with such
terms as might induce a brave man to retire from what
the French deemed a hopeless contest.

The king was impatient to begin the battle, but he
could not for very shame refuse this request of the
cardinal, who forthwith rode off to the English camp.
There, on foot, in the midst of a vineyard, he found the
prince, who most courteously received his visitor. The
cardinal entreated that he might be permitted to make
peace between him and King John, and the prince re-
plied that he would willingly listen to any reasonable
terms, such as would neither touch his own honour nor
injure his army. For, with seven to one against him,
he thought it as much the part of a good general to
treat with the enemy as to lead on his slender force to
a heroic but most probably fatal contest. Rashness
and bravery are two different things, though they are
sometimes confounded. The prince was brave ; hence,
seeing himself so vastly outnumbered by an army in-
cluding all the greatest warriors of France, he was ready
to treat on honourable terms. Had he been rash, he
would have insisted upon fighting without more ado.
Finding the prince thus disposed to an accommodation,
if it could be brought about, the cardinal ambled back
again, and prevailed upon the king to agree to a truce
126 THE PRINCE'S EXPEDITION FROM BORDEAUX.

till next morning in order to give opportunity for ar-
ranging a cessation of hostilities. He had some diffi-
culty in persuading him to this, for, in truth, John
wished the cardinal and his peace-making far enough!

All that Sunday did the good cardinal hurry back-
wards and forwards between the French and English
armies, vainly urging these two princes to put fighting
out of their heads, All his pains were fruitless, and
that they were so was entirely the fault of King John,
who fancied the English were so completely in his
power that he might do as he pleased with them. The
prince was so fully aware of his hazardous position that
he even offered to give up all his conquests in the re-
cent expedition, the castle of Romorantin included, to
set free the whole of his prisoners without ransom, and
further, to engage not to take up arms against France
for the next seven years. But when John, in addition,
insisted that the prince and one hundred of his knights
should yield themselves his prisoners, else he would
fight, the thing became preposterous; and indignantly
declaring that his countrymen should uever have to
pay his ransom, the prince threw the whole negotiation
overboard, and prepared toe defend himself as he best
could.

It was sad folly on John’s part, as we shall see. He
was just like the boy with the filberts; grasping too
much, he lost all.

During the interval occupied by the cardinz.l’s amiable
THE PRINCE'S EXPEDITION FROM BORDEAUX. 127

but unavailing exertions, various knights from the
two armies rode out to have a look at the enemy, and
criticize his plan of operations. Chandos on the one
side and de Clermont on the other were among these,
and meeting in the plain, a very amusing but very
brisk little quarrel sprang up between them. As these
two redoubted warriors drew near each other, they per-
ceived, to their mutual disgust, that each had precisely
the same coat of arms embroidered on his surcoat.
Now, in those days, for one gentleman to assume the
armorial bearings of another was considered about as
deadly an offence as could possibly be given: accord-
ingly de Clermont called out fiercely,—“ Chandos,
since how long is it that you have taken upon you to
wear my arms?” With equal fierceness Chandos re-
torted that it was de Clermont who had stolen his.
This was met by a flat denial from the Frenchman ;
with the addition that, but for the truce existing be-
tween them, he would soon show, by force of arms,
who had the best right to the disputed coat. Chandos,
in return, angrily bade him prove that next day in the
field; and when the Lord de Clermont had relieved
his feelings by a sneer at the English, who, being un-
able to invent anything new, were always ready enough
to help themselves to the “ handsome” devices of their
neighbours, the two knights parted in high dudgeon.



~
i

PO

ATTLE OF

(

(3)


VIEL.
Che Wattle of Wortiers.

of September 1356,—that was to decide
whether the English were to be swept out



of France, or King John taught a lesson of moderation
in dealing with a valiant enemy.

The prince, before engaging, briefly addressed his
brave fellows, reminding them that though they were
but a small company, yet victory depended, not upon
numbers, but upon the will of God, Who gave it as He
pleased. He therefore besought them, for God’s sake,
to do their best that day, as he, their prince, with God’s
help, would also do. And few as they were, that
‘small company” were in high spirits for the coming
battle.

The specially well-armed and well-mounted body of
French gentlemen, of whom we have already heard,
began the attack by endeavouring to force the passage
of the lane leading to the ground occupied by the
English army. Their gallant steeds stalked statelily
132 THE BATTLE OF POITIERS.

between the two hedges; but once fairly in, from both
sides of the way came a shower of arrows, directed
chiefly at the horses, that set them a-plunging and
capering till their riders found it impossible to control
them. Smarting with wounds, the frightened animals
at last turned right round, jerking the heavily-armed
knights and squires out of their saddles in all direc-
tions; those who were thrown being speedily trampled
under foot. Some few spurred their horses over or
through the hedges, and so came upon the archers
posted at the end of the lane, by whom they were soon
cut to pieces. Seeing the discomfiture of their cavalry,
a large body of dismounted men-at-arms, under the two
French marshals, de Clermont and d’Andreghen, threw
themselves into that deadly lane, and for awhile pressed
forward desperately. But they fell thick and fast
under the snow-like storm of arrows (for the archers
of Poitiers were those of Crecy) that flanked them, and
such as struggled through, spent and disordered, were
an easy prey to the English men-at-arms. One of
their leaders was slain, d’Andreghen was taken prisoner,
and finally the greater part were fairly beaten back, so
that, pressing upon the troops behind, they not only
impeded their advance, but frightened many so terribly
that they ran off to their horses, and rode away as fast
as they could.

Galled by a continued and thick flight of arrows, the
entire first battalion of the French gave way. At this
THE BATTLE OF POITIERS. 133

juncture the captal and his horse came thundering
round the hill, and fell upon the division of the Dauphin ;
which, already in confusion through the rout of those
in front, was thrown into utter disorder by this im-
petuous attack of cavalry, supported by archers, who,
as an old chronicler tells us, “ shot so thickly and well,
that the French did not know which way to turn them-
selves to avoid their arrows.” Seeing the battalion
waver, the English, who had hitherto fought on foot,
sprang on their horses, which were ready at hand, and
led by the prince, dashed in among the Frenchmen
with loud shouts of “ St. George for Guienne.” “ Mont-
joye St. Denis,’ was the answering cry, as the pon-
derous mailed men and horses came clashing against
each other, and were at once plunged into a very whirl-
wind of battle. The life-blood of many a lord, and
knight, and squire that day streamed over the gay
armour whose steel-plates were riven by stout English
lance-thrusts, or those intolerable arrows. The French-
men were brave, no one doubted that, but somehow
panic and fright got among them, and once in, there
was no getting rid of it. The noble lords to whom
King John had committed the guardianship of his
three eldest sons, by way of taking care of the youths,
discreetly ran away with them; and in their company
galloped off eight hundred lances,—that is, as many
knights, with their followers,—for whom the distant sight
of the combat had been more than enough. Pell-mell,
134 THE BATTLE OF POITIERS.

hither and thither rolled and raged that fearful battle,
some flying, some fighting fiercely, but with horrible
loss on the part of the French.

The third division, under the king, stood its ground
better than the other two; and had all fought as did
John himself, the defeat which his sixty thousand
suffered from eight thousand would have been less
crushing. But his personal valour, together with that
of the spirited boy at his side and a devoted few who
had gathered round them, could not retrieve the fortunes
of that fatal day. Three hours’ bloody work swept
the French host off their own plains, leaving the Black
Prince and his heroic few, undisputed masters of the
field. Such a defeat seems inexplicable : and yet so it
was; showing that victory, as the prince had said, is
not a mere matter of numbers, but that it falls to those
to whom God wills to give it.

It was indeed He who gave it to this handful of |
English and Gascons, who, the very day before, had
been insultingly required to deliver up their best and
bravest leaders as prisoners to the now vanquished
enemy.

The battle seemed already at an end, and yet John,
spite of wounds, and having lost his helmet in the
struggle, was still dealing around him heavy strokes
with his battle-axe, in a sort of despairing attempt to
cut his way out of the throng of English and Gascons
that were pressing around him, with loud shouts to
THE BATTLE OF POITIERS. 135

surrender “or he was a dead man.” There was no
escape for him; and pulled to and fro by his eager
captors, he anxiously inquired for the Prince of Wales,
_that he might give himself up to one of equal rank
with himself. But the prince was ina distant part of
the field; and the king was at length compelled to.
throw down his gauntlet, in token of surrender, to Sir
Denis de Morbeque, a French knight in the English
service, who had shouldered his way through the crowd
to get at him.

While this extraordinary scramble for a king was
taking place, the prince, worn out with heat and fatigue,
was implored by Sir John Chandos (who had never
left him the whole day, and whose practised eye saw
that the day was their own), to take breath and rest
awhile, now that his work was done. That experienced
commander advised that the prince’s banner should be
displayed on a little eminence at hand, to serve as a
rallying point for such of his forces as had been car-
ried away in their wild pursuit of the flying enemy,
who were slaughtered up to the very gates of Poitiers.
This was done, and a tent being pitched, the prince
took off his helmet to cool himself, and pour some
wine down his parched throat, while trumpets and other
instruments of music rang out joyous notes of victory.
The number of knights around him was continually
increasing, as one and another returned from the chase
bringing his prisoners with him. From some of these
136 THE BATTLE OF POITIERS.

the prince inquired whether anything was known of
King John; and as none knew what had become of
him, save that he was certainly killed or taken, as he
had never quitted the field, the Earl of Warwic and
Lord Cobham were sent to seek him out.

They immediately mounted their horses, and making
for a small hillock, where they might overlook the
whole plain, saw a crowd of dismounted men-at-arms
coming slowly along, and evidently in great commotion.
The unfortunate King of France and his son were
the centre of this unruly group, and in no little danger
from the over-anxiety of each one to make good his
claim to so distinguished a prisoner. They pushed
and pulled him about, bawling, “It was I that took
him;” “No, no, it was I;” and some were ready
brutally to settle the dispute, by killing the subject of
their rude contention. The king entreated them to
take him and his son covrieously to the prince their
master; assuring his rival captors that there was no
need to quarrel about him, seeing he was able to
enrich them all by his ransom. But they gave no
heed to his remonstrances; the fellows could not take
a step without breaking out into new brawls about
their prisoners; and it was well that at this juncture
Warwic and Cobham caught sight of the party. Con-
jJecturing from their violent excitement, that they had
got some one of importance, the two lords spurred
among them in a moment, and asking wiat was the
THE BATTLE OF POITIERS. 137

matter, were told that they had captured the King of
France, and that more than ten knights and squires
were contending for him, each one protesting that the
king was his prisoner.

My Lords Warwic and Cobham settled that question
upon the spot. Pushing through the crowd, whom
they unceremoniously drove right and left, they com-
manded every one to keep his distance, on pain of
death; then, with all reverence, taking possession of
the king’s person themselves, they respectfully con-
ducted him to the prince.

During their absence on this errand, the prince’s
next inquiry was about the Lord James Audley ; one
of the most renowned of his knights, who, before the
battle began had earnestly requested that he might be
foremost in the attack, in compliance with a certain
vow which he had made; a thing not unusual in those
strange old days. His petition being granted, he
placed himself with his four squires, far in advance of
the first division of the army, to be ready for the
enemy. The names of these squires have come down
to us, and they deserve a place in our record. They
were Dutton of Dutton, Delves of Doddington, Fowle-
hurst of Crew, Hawkstone of Wainehill; perhaps even
after the lapse of five hundred years they may still
have descendants,—in blood, if not in name. This
little company did wonders that day, beating down all
before them, or chasing them off the field, without
138 THE BATTLE OF POITIERS.

stopping to make prisoners. Glory, which in this
instance was self-defence, was their object; not gain,
from large ransoms. Those who give hard blows, how-
ever, may chance to receive them, and the gallant
Audley’s headlong career at Poitiers was ended by
wounds innumerable, which, before the close of the
- engagement, compelled his squires to drag him aside,
strip off his armour, and be his surgeons to the best
of their ability. All this was told the prince, and
also that the wounded man was lying in a litter (a sort
ef hand carriage), hard by.

The good-natured prince, grieved to hear of the
brave knight’s condition, sent some of his people to
see whether Audley were in a fit state to be brought
to him ; as, if he were not, he would himself go to him.
A pleased and proud man was the bruised, battered,
and slashed Lord James when this condescending
message was brought him, and calling eight of his
servants he bade them carry him, litter and all, to his
master. The prince leaning over the wounded man,
embraced and thanked him for his services, commend-
ing his prowess in terms of such princely graciousness
as were more than a balm for the knight’s aching
wounds. Nor did he confine himself to praise alone ;
on the spot he conferred upon his faithful friend a
yearly pension of near £4000, of our present money ;
a royal gift which the Lord James (after gratefully
acknowledging it to the donor), subsequently bestowed
THE BATTLE OF POITIERS. 139

upon his four squires, whose good swords had that day
helped him to win so much glory.

There was a strange simplicity about the fighting
men of those days. To ensure the validity of this gift
to his squires, the Lord Audley summoned several
English nobles, relations of his, to his tent; and in their
presence, whom he called upon to bear witness to it,
formally made the donation to the four. These stern
warriors were deeply moved by his generosity, and as
they glanced one at another, there broke from them
the response: “ May the Lord God remember you for
this! We will bear witness to this gift whensoever
and wheresoever we may be called upon to do so.”
The prince hearing afterwards that his grant had been
handed over to my lord’s squires, was so far from being
offended, that he replaced the pension by one of much
larger amount. |

Just as the wounded knight was being borne away,
Warwic and Cobham were seen approaching with their
royal prisoner. The prince went forth to meet them ;
and when they met, bending as reverentially before
John, as though the king were still in the height of
his power, he conducted him to his tent, with such
soothing, kindly words as only the heart of a thorough
gentleman could, at such a moment, have prompted.
With his own hands he presented refreshments to the
discomfited and toil-worn monarch, in so amiable a
manner as could not but take off the sharp edge of his
140 . THE BATTLE OF POITIERS.

sore calamity. There was no triumphing over a fallen
foe, nor even wounding slight, of one who not twenty-
four hours before had proposed such insolent terms to
those whom he reckoned at his mercy, but in whose
hands a sudden reverse had now placed his own fate.
Had there been either the one or the other, scarce any
could have wondered at it. But the young conqueror
was master of hemself; a mastery which some do not
attain throughout a long life; and spite of temptations
to the contrary, on this occasion fully carried out the
golden rule: to do to others, as we would that they
should do to us. John was touched by a generosity
which he well knew how to appreciate; though, in the
hour of his own fancied superiority, he had suffered
himself to be carried away by feelings of an opposite
nature; and in few, kingly, heartfelt words, paid to
the prince’s goodness and valour, the tribute they so
well deserved.

There was now leisure to examine into the results of
this famous Battle of Poitiers. It was crushing to the
French. The chief of their nobility and knighthood
were either slain or taken prisoners, thousands were
lying dead on the plains of Maupertuis, while to crown
their misfortunes their king himself, with his son, was
in the hands of the victors. To the.English it was
deliverance from destruction, cheaply obtained, for, as
before, their loss was inconsiderable. The prisoners
that they had made outnumbered their own army two-
THE BATTLE OF POITIERS. 141

fold; so that, ere the day was over, the work of ransom
went briskly on. Both English and Gascons were very
liberal in this matter, no larger ransom than a man
could conveniently pay being exacted from him, and
many were at once liberated on their own promise to
bring the amount agreed upon to Bordeaux the next
Christmas. They could afford to be liberal, seeing their
prisoners were at the rate of two to a man. And
further, those vain-glorious French, taking for granted |
they were going to drive the English—to Jericho! had
come to the field as splendidly armed as though it
were to a tournament, and furnished as if for a festival.
So that, beside ransom money, vast quantities of
jewels, gold and silver plate, and rich holiday vest-
ments, fell to the share of their fortunate conquerors.
But there was more than liberality shown to the
prisoners on this occasion; there was kindly courtesy
also, for the humane conduct of the prince had its
influence upon every one under his command. Doubt-
less also their own unlooked for escape from what
appeared inevitable ruin, had had its effects in soften-
ing their hearts.

Sir Denis de Morbeque, though he took a king, was
in danger of coming worse off than any of his compan-
ions, who had picked up more ignoble prey; for the
ransom of a king, in those days, was fixed at so large
a sum, that, according to the law of arms, no private
knight might receive it. None but the rival sovereign
142 THE BATTLE OF POITIERS.

was allowed to pocket such illimitable cash. Sir
Denis, however, had great glory thereby, and in due
time a very satisfactory gift from his own prince, to
make amends for the ransom he had lost.

It was late in the evening before all the English
were collected in camp again, after their pursuit of the
enemy. _ Business being then ended, there was leisure
for refreshment, and the duties of hospitality. The
prince had a magnificent supper prepared in his own
tent, for the king, his son, and such of his nobles as
were of sufficient rank to partake in the entertainment.
The said supper was furnished out of the captured French
baggage-waggons ; for, in addition to danger from the
enemy, the English had, the day before, been in some
risk of starving; food being so scarce in the camp,
that many of the poor fellows had scarcely tasted bread
for three days. No fear now of an empty larder! The
king and his son, with half-a-dozen of his very greatest
lords, were placed in state at a table a little higher
than those at which the rest of the captive company
were seated; and upon him the prince himself waited,
with all courtesy. His prisoner-guest would fain have
urged him to take a seat at his own table; but the
prince modestly declined doing so, saying he was not
worthy of the honour, of sitting down in the presence
of so puissant a monarch, and so valiant a knight, as
John had that day shown himself. He then prayed
the king not to make the worse cheer because God
THE BATTLE OF POITIERS. 143

had withheld victory from his arms ; assuring him that
from the King of England he would receive such
honourable and friendly treatment, as would in all
likelihood restore peace between the two kingdoms.
And he delicately commended the bravery of the
French king, while he endeavoured to console him
under his misfortunes.

John was moved to tears by the generosity of his
conqueror, and a murmur of applause arose from the
French nobles, who declared, that if God gave him life,
the young Englishman would be one of the most gallant
princes in Christendom.

The next morning, after public thanksgivings for
this signal victory, the camp was broken up, and the
army, laden with spoil, and carrying with it the royal
prisoners, resumed its march to Bordeaux. An ad-
vanced guard of five hundred men-at-arms preceded it
to see that the way was clear, but such was the con-
sternation spread throughout the country that none
dared to oppose them. Their progress was slow, owing
to the vast quantity of heavy baggage which they
carried in their train ; but Bordeaux was at last gained,
and thrown into a tumult of joy by the prince’s good
fortune. The royal party took up their abode in the |
monastery of St. Andrew—the king and his son occu-
pying one side, and the prince the other. There the
winter was spent in much feasting and merriment; the
English and Gascons throwing about them in all direc-
144 THE BATTLE OF POITIERS.

tions the gold they had so abundantly won at the
battle of Poitiers.

The rejoicings in England were no less vivid, for in-
deed the prince’s victory had laid the kingdom of
France almost at Edward’s feet. Solemn thanksgivings
in churches, with bonfires in every town and village,
testified the public joy; and such knights and squires
as had been in that famous battle, held up their heads
higher than ever when they returned to their native
country.

Early in the spring of 1357, the prince prepared to
leave Bordeaux for England, carrying King John and
his son with him. But his Gascon lords were very un-
willing to lose sight of so illustrious a prisoner, whom
they had, as they said, helped to take; and they told
the prince, quietly, that it was not their intention to
permit his being taken away from them. The king—
they thanked Heaven for it—was in excellent health,
the city of Bordeaux was quite good enough for a royal
residence, they felt themselves perfectly equal to keep-
ing guard over him, and therefore it was their will that
he should remain where he was. Things were taking
an awkward turn now. Two or three dozen great
barons making up their minds that they would not
allow a certain thing to be done, was enough in the
middle ages to make even a monarch hesitate. Pos-
sibly they might do now ; but in those days they were
apt to take rougher ways of carrying their point.
THE BATTLE OF POITIERS. 145

The prince had already sought to propitiate these
gentlemen by deputing them to high and honourable
offices in the province during his absence, as well as by
promising them “ great rewards and profits,” which, as
a malicious old writer remarks, “are all that a Gascon
loves or desires ;” and yet, like Oliver, they were
“asking for more!” In reply, he politely admitted
the cogency of what they had said, but added that the
king his father had a strong desire to see so notable a
prize of the late battle, and indeed to have possession
of it himself! And again he thanked them for their
loyal service, and promised them suitable rewards.

Neither flattery nor promises moved the sturdy
Gascons from their purpose. At length Chandos and
Cobham, who, being better acquainted with them than
the prince was, knew at what these lords were aiming,
whispered to him, “ Sir, sir, offer them a handsome sum
of money, and you will soon find they will do whatever
you please.” The prince took the hint, and proposed
sixty thousand florins as the price of their submission.
This was rejected; and as he perceived it was simply
because he had not bid high enough, he raised his offer
to one hundred thousand, which they thought proper
to accept; giving him, in return, permission to set out
on his travels as soon as he liked !

This important point settled, the prince and his
prisoners took ship on the 24th of April. The fleet
that conveyed them was large and strongly armed, fot

(3) 10 |
146 THE BATTLE OF POITIERS.

there were alarming reports of those well-beaten French
having raised two large armies, and posted them so
that they might readily fall upon the English as they
sailed up the channel, and rescue the king. They
proved mere reports, the only dangers of the voyage
were those from weather, and all disembarked, safe and
sound, at Sandwich on the 5th of May. Two days’
rest was enjoyed here, and then the calvalcade took its
slow way, by Canterbury, Rochester, and Dartford, to
London, where, by the king’s command, extraordinary
preparations had been made to give the prince and his
illustrious captives a fitting reception.

Never surely, either before or since, was Lord Mayor
in such a turmoil and worry of anxiety as was Sir
Henry Picard, who at that time filled an office of rather
more importance than it is in our days. A Lord
Mayor, five centuries ago, was somebody ; not as now,
when he “stands, the shadow of a name ;” and Sir
Henry had to pay the penalty of greatness. His cares
and fatigues in doing the honours of his own domain,
_ were, however, well rewarded by the success of the
pageant got up by this zealous dignitary to dazzle the
eyes of the fallen monarch, while it exhibited the
wealth and greatness of his captors. At Southwark
the prince and his train were met by a thousand
citizens on horseback, dressed in their best, and by
them conducted over London Bridge into the city ;
Joln, robed as became a king, mounted on a magnifi-
THE BATTLE OF POITIERS. 147

cent white charger, while the prince, plainly apparelled,
ambled by his side, on a small black horse. On enter-
ing the city the throng of sight-loving Englishmen was
so great that they had some ado to make their way
through it; leaving them ample time to admire all the
fine things brought out by the inhabitants to do their
visitors and themselves honour—houses, shops, win-
dows, balconies, on either side were all a-glitter, not
only with plate and tapestry, but with the sterner. wares
of arms and armour. Shields, helmets, corslets, breast
and back pieces, coats of mail, gauntlets, swords, spears,
bows and arrows, battle axes, and costly horse furniture
of polished mail, were displayed in picturesque pro-
fusion. And seven mortal hours were consumed in
passing along these decorated streets before the long
procession reached its journey’s end. As it approached
Westminster a train of clergy, in the sumptuous robes
of that period, came forth to meet their prince, chant-
ing as they walked the solemn melodies of the Church.
And thus, accompanied by civil, military, and ecclesi-
astical dignities, the heir of England entered West-
minster Hall, where his father, on a throne of state,
awaited him. Edward rose to receive his royal visitor
as though that reluctant visitor had been a friend
rather than a captive; and, after courteously saluting
him, embraced and thanked his son amid the thunder-
ing acclamations of the vast concourse around,

King John was that night royally entertained by his
148 THE BATTLE OF POITIERS.

brother of England, and then had the palace of the
Savoy, a noble building belonging to the Duke of Lan-
caster, assigned to him and his son for their residence.
The king and queen frequently visited them. It was
not long afterwards exchanged for Edward’s own
palace of Windsor Castle, where John and Philip went
about hunting, and hawking, and diverting themselves
according to their tastes, very much as though they
had been at home!





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IX.
Che English agai Inbade France.

El et HE kingdom of France was reduced to a most
Asti miserable condition by the fatal battle of



Poitiers. Its monarch a captive, its noblest
and most valiant slain,—all its affairs fell into the
utmost confusion. The dauphin, a youth of eighteen,
assumed the government, but he was too young to have
much authority in such troublous times. Things were
quite above his hand. So the chief of the remaining
nobles, the clergy, and the citizens, met together at
Paris, and decided that thirty-six of their number,
chosen equally from each class, should govern the
country in the absence of its king. But this govern-
ment also was one that had little weight; and spite of
it, disorder, misery, and bloodshed, filled the land.

In one department of France, the peasantry rose in
insurrection with the avowed intention of killing all
the nobility and gentry, whose use in the kingdom they
professed themselves incapable of seeing. Having
selected for their chief one whose pre-eminence in bad-
152 THE ENGLISH AGAIN INVADE FRANCE.

ness had pointed him out for that distinction, they
dubbed him Jacques Bon-homme, (a name whence this
insurrection takes its title of the Jacquerie), and under
his leadership they outrageously attacked the upper
classes, purposing to exterminate every man of them.
If it had been men alone upon whom they wreaked
their vengeance, it would not have been so bad ; but
these wretches also murdered women and children with
incredible ferocity. The horrid cruelties of which they
were guilty make one’s blood cold but to read of; and
people fled before them in all directions, recklessly ab-
andoning their fine houses and castles, with the rich
and costly furniture of them, to the fury of the rebels ;
too happy if themselves, with their wives and children,
might escape with their lives: better be houseless and
homeless than torn to pieces by such demons as were
the followers of Jacques Bon-homme. Among those
who thus fied for their lives, were the Duchess of Nor-
mandy, and more than three hundred other ladies, who
shut themselves up in the city of Meaux, under the
protection of the Duke of Orleans. They fancied they
should be safe here, but would have found themselves
wofully mistaken had it not been for the chivalrous
gallantry of an enemy—the Captal de Buch, and his
cousin, the Count of Foix—who, hearing of their dis-
tress, (for the people of Meaux had opened their gates
to the rebels), hastened to the rescue.

The captal and his friend were only just in time—
THE ENGLISH AGAIN INVADE FRANCE. 153°

nine thousand of the insurrectionary mob had marched
upon the town, which they were entering, when these
‘two good knights, with a slender retinue of horsemen,
came upon them. They met in the market-place; and
fearful, as well as deserved, was the execution done by |
sword and lance on the ill-armed, ferocious throng of
peasants. They had shown no mercy, and assuredly |
now they found none. Dead and dying, they were
flung into the river by wholesale, while those who fled
were pursued and struck down until seven thousand of
the nine were destroyed. This terrible vengeance put
an end to the Jacquerie. |

The Parisians, under their provost, had also taken
advantage of the distresses of their country to get up a
revolt in the capital itself, and no little trouble did its’
suppression cost the unfortunate Duke of Normandy.

All these things made the French still more desirous
that peace should be concluded between them and the
English. eo

A truce (that j is, a cessation of hostilities) for three
years had indeed been agreed upon during the time
King John was at Bordeaux ; and that gave both parties :
time to think over the matter, and consider whether
they might not do better than continue working each
other all the mischief in their power. King John,
however, had been in captivity nearly three years’ be-
fore a treaty of peace could be arranged. At length, a
few months before the expiration of the truce, he and
154 THE ENGLISH AGAIN INVADE FRANCE.

the Lord James de Bourbon, one of his nobles, together
with King Edward and the Prince of Wales, proposed
certain terms of peace, including three hundred thou.
sand crowns for the king’s ransom, and one million for
that of his nobles who were prisoners with him ; Ed-
ward, on his part, engaging in return to renounce his
claim to the French crown. ‘This treaty was sent over
to the dauphin for his acceptance; but, acting by the
advice of his council, that young prince rejected it.
They said the terms were too hard, and that, rather
than submit to them, they would not only endure the
distress in which they then were, but leave their king
to his fate.

King John was not particularly pleased with this
answer. In it he thought he detected the influence of
his old enemy the King of Navarre, whom the dauphin,
in his distraction, had taken into his confidence, and
whom John knew to be capable of deceiving forty such
innocent youths as his eldest son. As for King Ed-
ward,—why, as the French declined the peace he offered
them, he at once prepared to go to war with them more
formidably than ever.

Meanwhile, that pleasure might go hand in hand
with business, he entertained himself and his royal
prisoners—for King David of Scotland shared the
captivity of his brother of France-—with the diversion,
best loved in those days by knights and gentlemen, of a
tilting match. Smithfield, a name associated in our
THE ENGLISH AGAIN INVADE FRANCE. 155

ears alone with sheep and oxen, was one of the fashion-
able places for amusement of the sort; and, to give
the greater zest to this particular display of arms, the
king caused it to be published that the Lord Mayor,
the two sheriffs, and the aldermen, would keep the
field against all comers. Even in those days, when
Lord Mayors and aldermen were much more important
personages than they are now, this announcement pro-
duced no little surprise and speculation. But the fact
was that the king, with his four sons and nineteen of
his nobles, played mayor and corporation on the occa-
sion ; and bearing the city arms on their shields and
surcoats, unhorsed or unhelmed, or otherwise damaged
their apparently more aristocratic opponents. Great
was the delight of the kings, and lords and ladies, who
looked on during these three days’ sport. But greater
still, if possible, was the delight of the good citizens at
the royal and princely condescension thus exhibited in
personating their more plebeian selves.

The termination of the truce, so eagerly looked for,
at length arrived, and King Edward summoned his
barons, and knights, and men of war of all kinds, to
attend him on his new expedition for the subjugation
of France. So large and well ordered an army never
before left the shores of England. Such was the
eagerness of all to engage in this fresh attempt to crush
their huge neighbour, that, as an old writer tells us,
“There was not knight, squire, nor man of honour,
156 THE ENGLISH AGAIN INVADE FRANCE.

from the age of twenty to sixty, that did not go.”
There were a hundred thousand of them in all; and,
_ making the very air ring with shouts of “God and St.

George,” they embarked at Sandwich, with Edward the
Black Prince and three of his brothers, on the 27th of
October, 1859, Eleven hundred vessels were required
to carry over this immense force to Calais, where a
miscellaneous gathering of Gascons and Flemings,
under the Duke of Lancaster, awaited them. The duke
had much ado to keep together these needy Gascons
and Flemings; but by dint of giving them money, and
taking them out on little mischief-making and plun-
dering excursions, he preserved their zeal and valour
from evaporating before the much longed-for arrival of
the English army.

The transit to Calais was rapidly performed, the fleet
casting anchor there in the evening of the day on which
it sailed. But the disembarkation was a work of time as
well as of labour, and it was four or five days after its
arrival at Calais before the army was in condition to
begin its. march into the country. |

That march must have been a sight worth seeing ;
full of terrible beauty to those who, like the war-horse .
of Scripture, “smelled the battle afar off,” and rejoiced
in it!

First came, slow tramping along, five hundred steel-
clad knights, well armed with sword and lance, and the
heavy death-dealing battle-axe. A thousand archers
THE ENGLISH AGAIN INVADE FRANCE. 157

were in their rear, preceding the king’s own battalion,
which consisted of three thousand men-at-arms, and
five thousand archers. Immediately behind the king’s
battalion came the long, long baggage train, extending
more than four miles; as we may well believe when we
find that it included five thousand waggons, containing
not only the usual stores of an army in the enemy’s
country, rough enough however plentiful, but the added
luxuries of handmills to grind their corn, ovens to bake
bread, and other things to match. Formerly they had
trusted to chance for a supply of these necessaries.
Now, campaigning was beginning to be reduced to a
system. Further, on board these waggons was a
number of small boats made of boiled leather, each one
large enough to hold three men, and these were to be
employed in fishing lakes or streams to provide food
during Lent, which in those days was strictly kept as
a time of meagre diet. For diversion by the way, the
king had with him a train of thirty falconers with their
hawks, and sixty couple of hounds: a royal example
that was duly followed by many of his lords and other
great men, who also carried with them their hawks
and hounds. |

The battalion of the prince, with whom rode his
three brothers, followed the baggage-train. His was
composed of full three thousand men-at-arms, admir-
ably mounted, and glittering in all the military finery
of the day. Such surcoats, such scarfs, such tokens
158 THE ENGLISH AGAIN INVADE FRANCE.

from lady-loves! or, in the fourteenth century, it
was the fashion to wear scarfs of ribbon, or a knot, or
precious glove, purloined from some fair damsel whom
the knight professed to admire, and in defence of whose
superior beauty he was willing to run a tilt against all
comers. ‘Tilting matches of this kind, even between
cavaliers of opposing armies, not unfrequently took
place to beguile a pause in the fierce encounter of real
battle. Five hundred pioneers, with spades and axes
to cut down trees and hedges, and level roads, accom-
panied this array, which marched in such close order
as to be ready to engage at a moment’s notice, and so
watchfully, that not even the meanest lad belonging to
the camp was left behind. Woe betide the laggards on
that march, for such delayed the whole body, and
doubtless would “catch it” for so doing.

The foreign lords were highly gratified by this grand
display of military strength, not only because it was
admirable in itself, but because having spent all their
money, and even some of them pawned their horses and
armour while awaiting the king’s arrival, the sight of
such enormous wealth inspired them with a comfortable
hope of his proving a good pay-master, now that he
was really come. And they gently intimated as much
to the king. Asking for money, however, is always
reckoned a terrible test of friendliness, and so it proved
on this occasion. The zeal of these lords to serve him
(and get plenty of French plunder !) was, of course, very
THE ENGLISH AGAIN INVADE FRANCE, 159

delightful to the monarch, but—oh, how many fine
things that but has spoiled !—he begged to inform
them that in truth he could not afford to pay them for
it; adding graciously that if they chose to remain
with him and share his fortunes, they should receive a
liberal share of the spoil. For Edward was now fully
bent on either totally subduing France, or inflicting
upon it so severe a chastisement as should enable him
to dictate his own terms of peace.

If a wet blanket had been rudely thrown over all
these noble Gascons and Flemings, they could not have
been more thoroughly dashed and damped than they
were by this royal speech. Some were so disgusted by
it, that they went straight home, bidding adieu to all
visions of glory and plunder; others were content to
remain, and take their chance of both.

The advance of the army was in a south-easterly
direction, through the old province of Picardy, at that
time a waste desolate country, seeing that for three
years past the ravages of war had stopped all cultiva-
tion of the soil. Even its wretched inhabitants would
have perished, had not supplies of grain been sent from
more fortunate districts of unfortunate France, so that
of course there was nothing for the invaders to pick up.
Edward had been aware of this beforehand, hence that
ample baggage-train, which was now verily a friend in
need. Pursuing their route into Champagne, things
somewhat mended ; there was more food to be found
160 THE ENGLISH AGAIN INVADE FRANCE.

on the spot, but as for the weather,—well, it “rained
cats and dogs and swords with their points downwards,”
on these intrusive Englishmen, who were excessively
uncomfortable in consequence. They might there, had
they been musically disposed, with great appropriate-
ness have sung in chorus their old country song of—

‘The rain, it raineth every day.”

But spite of wind and weather they fought and plun-
dered their way on to Rheims, the city in which the
kings of France were usually crowned, and where Ed.
ward, regarding himself as King of France, had a great
mind to be crowned also. The city, however, was
strongly held by the French, under one of their arch-
bishops, who was as clever at fighting as at his own
more proper professional duties ; and as before being
crowned within it, it was first needful to take it, Rheims
was invested in due form.

The king took up his quarters at St. Waal, a few
miles from the city; the prince had his at St, Thierry,
and each kept his court in grand style. A good part
of the winter was spent here, not very pleasantly ; for
as Edward was unwilling to risk the storming of so
well fortified a place, little could be done towards pro-
moting his much wished for coronation at Rheims.
The besiegers, however, diverted themselves meanwhile
by making, with various success, occasional forays into
the neighbouring country.
THE ENGLISH AGAIN INVADE FRANCE. 161

Lhe capture of the garrison of Cormicy was so neatly
efiected on one of these occasions, that we must stop
to relate it. A brave English knight, Sir Bartholomew
Burghersh, had his quarters at this place, where the
French had so strong and well-defended a castle that
they never dreamed of their unpleasant neighbours
attacking it. That idea, however, had presented itselt
to Sir Bartholomew, who examined the fortress
thoroughly; and the result of his examination being
but to convince him of the hopelessness of taking it by
assault, he resolved to try what mining would do for
him. To work went his miners with a will, and keep-
ing at it day and night, soon burrowed their way right
under the great tower, which they propped up with
timber, and then told their lord that they only awaited
his signal to throw the whole concern down. Sir
Bartholomew, accompanied by his comrade, John de
Guistelles, then rode to the castle, and made signs that
he wished to have a parley with the governor, Sir
Henry de Vaulx. Sir Henry, from the battlements,
accordiugly bade him say what he wanted. “I want

?

you to surrender,” returned the knight, “or you will
all be destroyed.” On this Sir Henry, who knew
nothing about the mine, began to laugh, and asked
how it was to be done,—they were perfectly supplied
with means of defence, and certainly were not going to
surrender simply because the English asked them to do

a?

so,” “Indeed,” said Sir Bartholomew, “if you only
©) 11
162 THE ENGLISH AGAIN INVADE FRANCE.

knew your situation, you would surrender without
more ado.” “ Why, what 2s our situation,” demanded
the impatient governor. “Come out, and I will
show you,” was the reply. On assurance of his safety
Sir Henry and three others came out to the two
English knights, who immediately conducted them to
the mine, and showed them their great tower held up
alone by beams of wood.

That sight worked wonders in the Frenchman’s
mind. With many thanks to the English knight for
not miserably destroying them all, as he might have
done, he instantly gave up himself and his garrison as
prisoners. They were removed from the castle, and
after the last had left it, the timber in the mine was
set on fire, splitting the tower in two, and bringing
the whole down with an awful crash. The governor,
who stood with the English looking on, could not,
when he saw this fearful spectacle, refrain from again
expressing his sense of Sir Bartholomew’s noble con-
duct in saving himself and his people from destruc-
tion ; “ For,” said he, “ had our own countrymen of the
- Jacquerie, who formerly overran this country, had the
same advantage over us, they would not have used it
so generously.”

This was a spirited episode, and a very pleasing one.
But as for King Edward and the prince, seven weeks
of such stupid work as “sitting down” before: Rheims,
looking and longing, was quite enough for them ; the
THE ENGLISH AGAIN INVADE FRANCE. 163

more so that their horses were beginning to die off for
want of provender. So they gave up the siege of
Rheims, and moved on in the same compact vigilant
order as before, ravaging and destroying the country,
until, on the last day of March, they had advanced
within a few miles of Paris.

The aim of the dauphin in defending himself against
this alarming invasion had been to avoid coming to any
engagement with the enemy, and so to leave him to
waste his strength.

This sort of passive resistance, taught him by the
disastrous consequences of former pitched battles with
those indomitable islanders, did not at all please the
English, who, on camping before Paris, sent heralds to
invite the dauphin to come forth from behind his pro-
tecting gates and walls, and do battle on the open
field. The duke, however, was not to be driven
from his game; to this invitation he returned a very
decided, ‘“‘ No, thank you ;” an answer which vexed the
king still more. It was as bad as firing at a mud fort,
to be always hunting an enemy who would not come
out and fight. So, as the dauphin would not come to
them, some of the more spirited of the English deter-
mined to go to him. The king made a number of
new knights, and these together with a few old ones,
who were tired of letting their arms rust, set out, under
the leadership of Sir Walter de Manny, to attack the
barriers of the city. They dashed forward, and had
164 THE ENGLISH AGAIN INVADE FRANCE.

some satisfactory skirmishing between the bars, and se
on; for though there were numbers of French knights
who longed to ride out and exchange blows with the
‘English, the dauphin’s orders against it were impera-
tive, and they were obliged to be content with poking
and cutting at each other through the barriers. Thrust
of lance and stroke of sword, however, even under
these disadvantages, let out some noble lives; so, as has
been said, all were well satisfied.

The last day spent by Edward’s immense army,
almost beneath the walls of Paris, was signalized by
this brisk encounter. The next morning the king
moved away, intending to spend the summer in Brit-
tany, and return in the autumn again to try his hand
at taking the city of Paris.

The French meanwhile had kept making proposals
of peace, to which Edward would not listen, until
moved to it by his cousin, the Duke of Lancaster.
A violent storm of thunder and lightning, which fright-
ened the English nearly out of their wits, backed
the duke’s arguments effectually. Edward began to
think that heaven itself was offended by his implacable
spirit, and at once he avowed his willingness to come
to terms.

A treaty was therefore arranged between the two
powers on the 8th of May 1360, at Bretigny. Accord-
ing to this, Edward undertook to renounce his claim to

the throne of France, in return for several provinces
THE ENGLISH AGAIN INVADE FRANCE. _ 165

ceded to him, and a ransom of £1,500,000 for the
king. - This treaty was negotiated by the prince and the
dauphin, in the name of the two kings; and, after each
_ had signed it, each, during the time of divine service, .
ratified it by oath: the dauphin at Paris, the prince at -
Normandy. Approaching the altar, after these words _
had been thrice repeated,—“O Lamb of God, that
taketh away the sins of the world, grant us thy peace |”
—each one laid his right hand upon the consecrated
communion bread, and his left upon the holy Gospels,
solemnly swearing to observe the treaty. The cere-
mony ended, the English army was withdrawn from
France, leaving, we may presume, few to regret its
absence. The king’s division was shipped at Calais;
he himself joined the prince at Harfleur, where they
embarked, and landed at Rye in Sussex on the 18th
of May. | | , |

All the difficulties in the way of King John’s return
being thus removed, the prince took him over to Calais
in July. The French, however, were not ready with ©
the money part of the agreement at that time, so that
it was the 26th of October before the king was really
free. Before parting, Edward, who had joined them at
Calais, gave a magnificent entertainment to his brother
of France. The princes of England and some of the |
chiefest nobility waited bare-headed on their illustrious
guest, and then the two kings graciously bade each
other farewell. John took his departure from Calais
166 THE ENGLISH AGAIN INVADE FRANCE.

on the 28th of the month, the prince, who had courte-
ously entertained him during his delay in that city,
escorting him to Boulogne. Edward himself accom-
panied his late prisoner for one mile out of Calais;
when anew they parted with apparently friendly feel-
ings in their hearts, hostile as had been their acquaint-
ance,

The prince, on his return to Calais, left France with
his father, and arrived at Dover on the last day of
October. They were welcomed joyfully, for the Eng-
lish were not only very proud of the results of the war,
but, seeing it had cost so much, they were very glad
that it was at an end. The king and prince brought
with them forty hostages for the due fulfilment of the
French treaty, and it was the king’s special command
to all his officers that these noblemen should be
courteously treated. A command so faithfully obeyed
that my lords went in and out as they pleased; hunt-
ing and hawking when they were so disposed ; or,
in quieter mood, making themselves agreeable to the
English ladies,

Our Black Prince, about this period, contrived to

es

make himself so agreeable to his cousin Joan, called,
on account of her beauty, the Fair Maid of Kent,
that the two were married on the 10th of October
1361.

They were neither of them young—the prince was
thirty-one; and the lady, who was a widow, was a
THE ENGLISH AGAIN INVADE FRANCE. 167

little older. The story goes that the prince was plead-
ing the cause of a friend who loved the countess, until
she, tired with his importunities, told him that when
she was young she had been disposed of in marriage
by others, but that now, having come to years of dis-
cretion, and being her own mistress, she would please
herself, and certainly would not marry beneath the
royal rank which she inherited from her grandfather
Edward I.

There was something either in what the lady said,
or in her manner of saying it, that at once made the
prince understand that if he asked for himself instead
of his friend, he should not plead in vain. Upon this
hint he acted, found that his conjecture was quite cor-
rect, and they were right royally married at Windsor
Castle.

Christmas was spent at the prince’s own manor, or
palace of Berkhampstead in Hertfordshire, about one-
and-twenty miles north-west of London. This estate
had been given to him and “ his heirs for ever” when
he was created Duke of Cornwall; and with its well-
wooded park of more than twelve hundred acres,
abounding with fine fat deer to hunt and to eat, and the
more than princely magnificence with which his house-
hold was conducted, it is to be hoped that the prince,
together with the lady his wife, spent their time plea-
santly.

The prince’s town-house, as we should now call it,
168 THE ENGLISH AGAIN INVADE FRANCE.

was in the then fashionable neighbourhood of Bil-
lingsgate.

King Edward was much pleased with this marriage
between his son and the beautiful heiress of Kent, and

it proved a happy one.





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X.

the treaty of Bretigny. But there were
others, who had never been taken into the
account, who were very much displeased with it. These
were the French inhabitants of the provinces ceded to
the English, who were grieved to their heart’s core



when they found they must withdraw their allegi-
ance from their own native sovereign, and yield it to a
stranger. Some of them boldly contended that the
king had no power thus to transfer them, and they
quoted old charters of the Emperor Charlemagne, against
this new treaty of King John’s. Others, more sub-
missively, wrote pathetic letters to the king, entreating
him, “for the love of God,” not to do this thing, for
they would rather be taxed every year to the half of
their property than be turned over to the English. The
necessity, however, was too pressing for John to yield
either to the solicitations or remonstrances of his dis-
tressed people. All he could do was to send soothing
172 THE PRINCES COURT IN AQUITAINE.

messages to them, and remind them that compliance
was inevitable, otherwise the treaty would not stand.
So they were obliged to give way. “Since our king
will have it so,” said the people of Rochelle, one of the
cities to be given up, “we will do homage to the
English. But our hearts are still French.”

One pities these unfortunate Frenchmen. Only
think, if we were obliged to swear allegiance to the
Emperor of the French! How ill that would go
down. Yet it would not be quite so bad as their case,
seeing they were obliged to kiss the hand that had so
frequently, since the field of Crecy, smitten them so
heavily. We have never endured such degradation
from our neighbours,

The governor chosen by Edward for his newly-
acquired and newly-confirmed possessions, did honour
to his sovereign’s choice. Sir John Chandos was the
very model of knighthood in the best days of chivalry.
“He was,” says Froisart, “a most sweet-tempered
knight, benign, amiable, courageous, prudent, and sin-
cere in all his dealings.” Higher praise could scarcely
be bestowed upon man, and we cannot wonder to hear
that “none was more beloved and esteemed than he.”
His establishment as Lord of Aquitaine, Poitou, Guines,
and the other ceded provinces in the south, was princely,
and he so carried himself as to win the affections of his
reluctant subjects, But well as he was liked, the great
folks of Aquitaine thought it would be more dignified
THE PRINCE'S COURT IN AQUITAINE. 173

for them to be governed by the prince in person, who
had been recently created Prince of Aquitaine, in addi-
tion to being Prince of Wales. At this very juncture
also it occurred to the English parliament, busied in
finding ways and means for their glorious but costly
monarch, that if the prince were to reside on his rich
French inheritance, they should have one less of the
king’s sons to provide for. So, between the two, it fell
out that about a couple of years after the cessation of
hostilities, our prince was appointed to govern the
English possessions in Southern France, in room of
the splendid John Chandos.

Great preparations were made for this event; and,
after taking leave of the king and queen at the
prince’s own palace of Berkhampstead, where several
days had been passed together, the prince and princess
sailed for their new home in February 1563, intending
to take up their residence in Bordeaux. A four days’
sail landed them “high and dry” at Rochelle, one
of the towns that had been so unwilling to be handed
over to new masters, and in which this feeling had
run so high that for a twelvemonth no Englishman
was suffered to enter it. The great Englishman
that now presented himself was, however, cordially
received, Sir John Chandos, with a stately retinue
of nobles and knights, met him there, and four days
were spent in festivities. On the fifth, the prince

departed for Poitiers, visiting various towns In
174 THE PRINCE'S COURT IN AQUITAINE.

the principality before establishing himself in Bor-
deaux.

His court there was a very magnificent one, at which
the prince received his new subjects most graciously.
Sir John Chandos he made constable of the principality,
and Sir Guiscard d’ Angle his marshal. Other English
knights of less note were also placed in office; who, at
a distance, followed their master’s example, and kept
up more state than altogether pleased the people of the
country. Perhaps they had a suspicion that they should
have to pay for it!

Sir John Chandos, though after the prince’s arrival
he was no longer chief, was yet, next to his master, the
greatest man in the province. An old writer gives an
amusing instance of this. Chandos, with other nobles
and knights, was one day being entertained at court,
when wine was served to the constable immediately
after the prince, and before any one else. The Earl of
Oxford was offended at this; being of higher rank
than Sir John, he thought he ought to have been served
before him ; so, when Chandos’ squire brought him
the cup, he angrily bade the young man give it to his
master. ‘The squire, who possibly had as good blood
in his veins as my lord of Oxford, was quite equal to
this emergency. “Why should I do that,” said he
fiercely, “seeing he has already drunk? Drink your-
self, since it is offered you, for, by St. George, if you
do not, I will throw it in your face!” In very fear
THE PRINCE'S COURT IN AQUITAINE. 175

that this bold squire would do as he threatened, the
earl drank, or pretended to drink, and there the matter
ended for the time. But, when the prince had retired,
Sir John, who had noticed what passed, came up and
administered a quiet but most stinging rebuke to the
presumptuous earl. “ What,” said he, “are you dis-
pleased that I drank first, who am constable of this
country! I may well take precedence of you, seeing
iny sovereign chooses to have it so. It is true you were
at the battle of Poitiers, but since the lords present
know not how that came to pass I shall tell them, that
it may not be forgotten. You came back from France
without leave, contrary to the king’s commands, who,
when he saw you, ordered you instantly to return
thither to your duty under pain of forfeiting life and
lands. And that is how you came to be at the battle,
where you commanded only forty lances, while I had
sixty. Bethink you then whether I do not well to take
precedence of, and drink before you.”

The poor foolish earl was so confounded by this
terrible setting down, that he had not a word to say,
and as our historian relates, wished himself anywhere
but where he was.

There was still great difficulty in getting the French
treaty properly executed. The Duke of Anjou, son of
King John, had been one of the hostages given to
King Edward for its due performance ; and this young
prince disgracefully broke his parole, or word of hon-
176 THE PRINCE'S COURT IN AQUITAINE.

our not to escape. He had obtained permission to be —
removed from London to Calais, pretending that his
being there would facilitate the settlement of affairs ;
but once in Calais, he was soon off home again. King
John was deeply offended by this act of his son’s, and
determined on returning to England himself, partly to
excuse his son, partly in the hope that he and King
Edward together might make provision for ending
these troubles. His counsellors were strongly opposed
to such a measure. They did not care whether the
treaty were scrupulously fulfilled on their part or not,
and, in plain terms, they told him that he would be
very foolish if he again put himself in the power of
the English king. But John’s high sense of honour
could not brook that any fault should rest upon him;
and telling his counsellors that though good faith
were banished from the rest of the world, it should
still be found in the breast of kings, he took ship, and
arrived in London about Christmas 1363. He was
received with all honour, as such a man deserved.
Indeed, there appeared to exist a very cordial feeling
between King Edward and himself. Edward, who was
with his queen at his fine palace of Eltham, sent a
retinue of knights to Dover to welcome his royal
visitor and bring him to the palace, where he arrived
on the Sunday afternoon. They did not keep Sunday
in those days as we do now; for we are told they
entertained themselves with singing and dancing, in
THE PRINCE'S COURT IN AQUITAINE. 177

which one of the young French lords particularly dis-
tinguished himself, until supper-time.

On entering London, the citizens came out with
much reverence to meet John, and bring him to his
former residence of the Savoy. There, throughout
the winter, the royal family visited him in the most
friendly manner; and there, unhappily, this chivalrous
monarch, being seized with illness, breathed his last,
in about a year after his leaving France: sincerely
mourned by king, queen, and the princes of England.
His son, the Dauphin Charles, succeeded to his crown.
The body of John was embalmed, carried to France,
and there solemnly interred in the cathedral of St. Denis.
The ceremony ended with a magnificent dinner!

The Prince led a stately and quiet life in his princi-
pality of Aquitaine. Here, attracted by his fame, came
Peter, king of Cyprus and Jerusalem, to see with his
own eyes the hero with whose praises all the civilized
world rang. Peter, who had done battle valiantly
against the Turks in Palestine, had been making a rov-
ing sort of tour through Europe, for the purpose of
urging its various monarchs to assume the Red Cross,
and join him in a fresh crusade in the East. He was
well received by all, and had promises from some—fine
speeches from others. By the King of England and
his queen he was welcomed with uncommon magnifi-
cence. Such dinners, such suppers, such entertain-
ments were provided in his honour! But as for going

(3) 12
178 THE PRINCE'S COURT IN AQUITAINE.

on crusade, Edward said he was too old for that,—too
discreet, he very likely meant; though he readily
granted permission to such of his knights as desired it,
to go to Peter’s assistance. The King of Cyprus
would also fain have had the Prince’s help for his cru-
sade, Till he had seen him, he said, he had done
little; so he crossed over, and the Prince, who then
kept his court at Angouléme, hearing of his arrival at
Poitiers, sent Chandos, with a handsome retinue, ta
meet and bring His Majesty of Cyprus to him. The
king was just in time for a grand tournament, held in
celebration of the birth of the Prince’s eldest son,
Edward, and altcgether was treated with great distinc-
tion; but the Prince, like his father, declined going
a-crusading with him. Still Peter was delighted with
his host; delighted also to find that, though he could
not prevail on the Prince to take up arms with him,
he was free to enlist for this holy war as many of the
English and Gascon knights in the province as he
liked.

But though the Prince refused to measure his
strength against infidels in the East, quiet and he
were not long to be acquainted. It suited neither
mind nor body. Work of his own sort was_pre-
sently found him, and it came about in this way :-—
During King Edward’s long wars in France, vast num-
bers of mere soldiers of fortune had banded themselves
together—men who would fight for either party that
THE PRINCE'S COURT IN AQUITAINE, 179

would pay them best. A rascally sort of thing; but it
must be owned that there were some fine fellows
amongst them, especially among their leaders, who
were chiefly English and Gascons. The peace of Bre-
tigny might have thrown these men out of employment,
but that the King of Navarre—him whom John had
suspected of giving bad advice to the dauphin—quar-
relled with his old friend Charles after the latter came |
to the throne, and a teazing little warfare was kept up
between them, which found employment in the fighting
line for those who wanted it; while at the same time
there was the old chronic contest going on, to decide
whether the Lord Charles of Blois, whom the French
had always backed, or the Earl of Montfort, for whom
the English as pertinaciously stood up, should have
the duchy of Brittany. But Navarre and France at
last patched up their quarrel. The aunt and sister
of the former king had the merit of bringing this
about. And as it had been settled, by hard blows,
that the Earl of Montfort should henceforth be Duke
of Brittany, the difficulty then was to know how to
dispose of the tools with which this stern handicraft of
fighting had been carried on; for these soldiers of for-
tune, or Free Companions, as they called themselves,
finding their occupation gone, became a terror to the
inhabitants, whom they pillaged and plundered with-
out mercy. Their old marauding habits so clung to
them that they could not throw them off. Indeed,
180 THE PRINCE'S COURT IN AQUITAINE.

they said that France was their own domain, and they
would live by pillage. The Pope was good enough to
excommunicate them, but they did not care a fig for that;
and as there were nearly fifty thousand of them scour-
ing the country, seizing towns and castles, and thence
laying the neighbourhood under contribution, the evil
was a serious one, that exceedingly puzzled French
statesmen to remedy. The King of England had
covenanted with the King of France to assist him in
putting down these pillagers, who resolutely refused
to disband when bidden to do so; but Edward, in his
zeal, got ready so large a force for this purpose, that
Charles, in a fright, hastened to decline his help. He
had no notion of letting so many fighting Englishmen
enter his dominions, whatever might be the pretext;
so he undertook to get rid of them himself.
Fortunately for him, in 1366 an opportunity occurred
of finding occupation in Spain for these unquiet spirits
and restless bodies. Pedro, king of Castile, called the
Cruel, (a name that he well deserved,) had for his mis-
deeds been deposed, and his kingdom bestowed upon
Don Henry, who was called his brother. But not
being himself disposed to acquiesce in this transfer of
his property, he took up arms to defend his rights.
Henry did the same to maintain his claim, and the
French determined to aid the latter by sending him a
great batch of these insupportable Free Companions.
For money they would have gone to fight in the moon,
THE PRINCE'S COURT IN AQUITAINE. 181

had there been any way of getting there; so they
made no difficulty about crossing the Pyrenees, It
cost a good deal to send them out, but it was indeed
building a bridge of gold for a retreating enemy, which
is always reckoned geod policy; and the French did
not grudge the price. The only stipulation made by
the Companions was, that they should not be employed
against the Prince of Wales in Aquitaine. Some of
them had served under his banner, and his chivalrous
character must deeply have impressed even these hire-
lings, seeing that though they were ready enough to |
take service with another, they were unwilling to
bear arms against one so good and so great as our
Prince.

Sir Bertrand du Guesclin, one of the greatest war-
riors that France ever produced, led the Companions
into Spain. He took them by way of Avignon, where
the Pope was, and demanded, first, that his fellows
should be released from the excommunication pro-
nounced against them; secondly, that the Pope should
furnish him with a large sum of money. ‘There was
no difficulty about granting the first request; the
second was altogether a different affair. But as Du
Guesclin assured the Pope that the second was much
the more important of the two—absolution they could
do without, but money was indispensable—he was
obliged to give them both. So they went on their way
rejoicing ; their prowess (for they could fight) soon con-
182 THE PRINCES COURT IN AQUITAINE.

firming Don Henry on his throne, and driving Don
Pedro out of the country.

Pedro, however, was not going to take the matter
quietly. The fame of the Prince of Wales had spread
far and wide—fame, not only for valour and military
genius, but for his other knightly qualities of generosity
and goodness. So this horrible Pedro, who was an
utter wretch, finding himself deprived of his kingdom,
wrote a piteous letter, recounting his misfortunes to the
Prince, and praying him, “for the love of God,” to
help him in the recovery of his dominions, from which
the Pope, his own brother, and the Free Companions
had driven him.

The humane and generous temper of the Prince was
touched by this appeal. Perhaps we may also believe
that his military ardour was roused by the prospect of
fresh fields to be fought and won; for with him fight-
ing and winning had ever been one. But he was too
prudent a man to do anything hastily. King Pedro’s
letter and supplications were placed before two of the
prince’s counsellors, and these two wise heads, having
laid themselves together, came to the conclusion that
the prince would do well to grant Pedro’s request, and
march forthwith into Spain for his help. Others of
his counsellors, equally wise and wary, were, however, _
of a different mind; and thus they advised their
prince :—“ My Lord, it is true that you are one of the
most notable princes in the world, and are, God be
THE PRINCE'S COURT IN AQUITAINE. 183

thanked! at peace with every one. It is also well
known that, for repute of your knighthood, no king
dare anger you. You ought, therefore, to be content
with what you have, and not seek for enemies. This
Don Pedro is a man cruel, proud, and ill-disposed,
who has done so much evil in his kingdom that there-
fore his people have driven him away. He has done
grievous wrong to his neighbours, and, moreover, it is
commonly said that he murdered the young lady his
wife, your cousin, daughter of the Duke of Bourbon.
It were therefore well to bethink you before you suc-
cour him; for what he now endures are chastisements
from God, who orders them that kings and princes
of this world may therefore learn not to commit like
wickednesses.”

The prince was not particularly pleased with this,
and, in reply, told his lords that he was perfectly
acquainted with all Don Pedro’s ill deeds; but still,
spite of them, it was neither decent nor proper that
one who was not really his brother, though called so,
should take his crown from him; and no king’s son
ought to suffer it. Further, his father and King Pedro
had been allies, and that was another reason why he
should render the aid requested of him.

His lords were still of the same mind,—that he should
stay at home, and leave King Pedro and King Henry
to fight it out between themselves. But not a bit
could they prevail with the prince, who every day be-
184 THE PRINCE'S COURT IN AQUITAINE.

came more eager to set out on this expedition to
Spain. King Pedro, meanwhile, had followed his
letter, bringing his three daughters with him; and,
hearing of his arrival, the prince rode out from Bor-
- deaux to meet him, escorting him to that city with
all honour and courtesy; for, in addition to his mili-
tary renown, the prince had that of being the best-
bred gentleman of his time. In conversation, Pedro
backed his request by so many promises of what he
would do in return, as were enough to tempt any ©
ambitious man. The prince’s son was to be made
king of Gallicia, in Spain; while such unheard-of
riches were to be showered, both upon the prince and
his followers, as set both English and Gascons a-long-
ing to go and do battle for this same Pedro.

In an evil hour the prince had his own way, and
began to make preparations for carrying an army into
Spain. About twelve thousand of the most noted
Free Companions were invited to join his standard,
and even those who had served in Spain against Don
Pedro gladly prepared to change sides and fight for
him. Over and above his own followers, four hun-
dred English men-at-arms and archers joined the
prince, under his brother the .Duke of Lancaster.
Flemings and Germans he might have had in plenty,
had he cared for them; but he did not wish to have
strangers about him. Money, the sinews of war, had
also to be provided in large quantity; for the prince
THE PRINCE'S COURT IN AQUITAINE. 185

had undertaken to pay the cost of the expedition, on faith
of Pedro’s promise to re-imburse him. A portion of the
late French king’s ransom became due at this time, quite
opportunely, and to swell the amount the prince, by
the advice of Chandos and Sir William Felton, melted
down and coined his gold and silver plate. It was a
pity to take such pains and expense for so hopeless a
villain as Don Pedro.

Securing men, money, and other munitions of war
consumed much time ; so that it was the 10th of
January 1367 before the prince left Bordeaux on his
way to fight Don Pedro’s quarrels. His. second son,
Richard, afterwards king of England, was born only a
few days before the prince entered upon this Spanish
expedition.

One of the fine promises by which Pedro tempted
the prince to his aid, and which he thought important
enough to be confirmed by a legal document, makes one
smile. It was, that if at any time the King of Eng- |
land, the prince, and their successors, kings or princes
of England, should have a fancy for fighting, under
the banner of His Majesty of Castile, against the in-
fidels—that is, Turks or Moors—the said king and his
three eldest sons should have the chief command of
the vanguard—the post of honour—in preference to
any other princes of Christendom. And in case they
did not feel disposed to avail themselves of this graci- —
ous permission to serve under him, the English stan-
186 THE PRINCE'S COURT IN AQUITAINE.

dard should be set up in the same place, by way of
asserting their pre-eminent dignity in the army !

But in those days the Turks were a power in Europe,
not a name only; the Moors held large possessions in
Spain; and as Mohammedans they were reckoned the

common enemies of Christendom.





XI.

Che Prince's Spanish Campaign.




Reap WuFORE setting out for Spain, the prince had
i Gp ‘ bargained with the King of Navarre for a
free passage through his dominions. But
as the army slowly advanced on its route, such alarm-
ing reports of the king’s bad faith (which his past
character led them to believe) were made to its com
manders as induced some of them to bring things to a
point by attacking him. Sir Hugh Calverly, a distin-
guished leader of the Free Companions, pressed for-
ward and took two towns belonging to Navarre, and
this brought the king himself, in a rage, to confer with
the prince. The result of their conference was, that
the previous stipulation of a free passage was con-
firmed; and that fine army of thirty thousand men,
under the most renowned commander of the age, be-
gan streaming through the various defiles in the Pyre-
nees, which give France access to Spain.

Passing the Pyrenees, however, in the winter season
is no trifling matter, especially for armies, with their
190 THE PRINCE'S SPANISH CAMPAIGN.

cumbrous baggage waggons. It is true there was no
enemy to oppose them,—in those mountain passes a
handful of men might have kept a whole army at bay,
—but there were natural difficulties to contend with,
and to meet these, so far as was possible, the entire
force was divided into three bodies, one of which was to
march through them each day. The vanguard, amount-
ing to twelve thousand cavalry, passed on the Monday.
It was commanded by the Duke of Lancaster, with whom
was the brave Chandos, at the head of his own com-
pany of twelve hundred lances, all bearing the knight’s
arms on their pennons. On Tuesday the prince’s divi-
sion of ten thousand horse scrambled through, with
bitter wind and snow in their teeth chilling them to
the very bones. With him was Don Pedro, together
with the King of Navarre, who, in the excess of his
complaisance, was now doing the honours of his own
country to the prince. They halted at Pampeluna,
where the king treated his travel-worn friends to a
good supper. Wednesday saw the remainder of the
army safe through the defile, and then the whole
camped for several days’ rest inthe valley of Pampe-
luna, where food for man and horse was abundant.

In this land of plenty the Free Companions, falling
into their old habits, made themselves rather more free
than welcome. It had been arranged between the
king and prince that provision for the army should be
found on payment for it; but these rovers very much
‘THE PRINCE'S SPANISH CAMPAIGN, 194

preferred snatching it to acquiring it in so tame a man-
ner as by purchase. Pillaging came so naturally to
them that, in truth, they cowld not refrain; and the
- King of Navarre was nota little vexed with himself
for permitting such vagabonds free entrance into his
country. However, there they were, and all that he
could do was to entreat them to be a little better be-
haved, which they graciously promised.

On marching further into the country the advanced
guard of the prince’s army came in contact with some
of King Henry’s troops, and a little skirmishing took
place between the two: Henry himself sent his anta-
gonist a formal challenge to battle, and his boldness
rather pleased the prince than otherwise. “ He must
be a valiant gentleman,” said he, “to write me such a
letter ;” and awaiting an attack from him, the army
was drawn up in order of battle, with banners and
pennons waving, at Vittoria, where, near five centuries
later, another English hero was to gather one of his
many laurels. During this pause the honour of knight-
hood was conferred on many of the prince’s followers.
Among those advanced to this dignity were his own
step-son, Sir Thomas Holland (the fair Joan, it will be
remembered, was a widow when the prince married
her) and the worthless Don Pedro; three hundred new
made knights in all were that day waiting, with all
the impatience imaginable, to show that they had de-
- served their spurs. |
192 THE PRINCE'S SPANISH CAMPAIGN.

They waited in vain, however. King Henry, hourly
expecting reinforcements, both from Arragon and under
Du Guesclin,—the latter was bringing him four thou-
sand men,—hung fire till it was too late to do anything.
And though the prince was quite in a mood to fight
had the chance been offered him, yet he was not dis-
pleased that the day passed over quietly, as his rear
division of more than six thousand men had not yet
come up. When night fell his people all returned to
their quarters, the order being, that when the trumpet
sounded next morning, they were to form in the same
order as before. The enemy, however, was beforehand
with them! At peep of dawn next day six thousand
well mounted, well armed Spaniards, under the king’s
brothers Dons Tello and Sancho, rode forth to make
an early visit to the English camp. As the sun rose
on their long glittering files, they fell in with a body
of Companions belonging to Sir Hugh Calverly, which
they attacked and defeated, carrying off their baggage,
and forcing Sir Hugh to fly post haste to the Duke of
Lancaster's division, whose vanguard was next set
upon by.the victorious Spaniards, with loud shouts of
“ Castile,” “Castile.” The attack was so sudden and
impetuous that down went tents, huts, and everything
before it, and the whole division was drawn out to
meet the enemy as hastily as the disorder into which
it was thrown would permit, the rest of the army get-
ting into motion after it. The Spaniards, who had no
THE PRINCE'S SPANISH CAMPAIGN. «198

notion of fighting so many, retreated in good order
when they saw the extensive preparations for receiving
them, but meeting on their way an advanced guard of
about two hundred English and Gascons, under Sir
William Felton, they ventured to charge them. Six
thousand against two hundred left no doubt as to the
result, though it cost the swarming Spaniards some
hours’ hard fighting before the last of that valorous —
little company was slain. Their leader, Sir William, was
among the first, for, after having drawn up his troop on
a slight eminence, he dashed, lance in rest, full gallop
into the midst of the enemy, running one of their
knights right through the body, armour and all, and
then flinging him dead out of the saddle. The Spa-
niards instantly closed round the gallant Englishman,
but though his strong arm dealt around such blows as
that few required a second stroke, he was overpowered
and at last killed. A few boys alone escaped, by the
swiftness of their horses, to carry this disastrous news
to their prince.

King Henry was exceedingly delighted when his re-
turning troops narrated to him the brisk doings of the
day; and in the joy of his heart, he received their suc-
cess as an omen of the easy and entire destruction of —
the English army. An old French commander, how-
ever, who was present and knew better, stopped the -
king, assuring him that when he came to meet the
prince in person, he would then find “tough and hardy”

(3) 13
{94 THE PRINCE'S SPANISH CAMPAIGN.

knights, men who would die where they stood sooner
than think of flying. He therefore entreated him not
to risk a battle with the prince, but rather starve him
out by guarding all the passes and defiles so strictly
that no provision could reach him; in which case he
would soon be obliged to take himself off home again.

But the king was not to be persuaded. He thought
of his overpowering numbers,—a hundred thousand
well armed and determined men,—and of the glory of
beating (as he intended doing) so renowned a com-
mander as the Prince of Wales, and he took his reso-
lution accordingly. “By the soul of my father,” said
he, “I have such a desire to see this prince, and try
my strength with him, that we will never part without
a battle.” And so the old Frenchman was silenced.

After some marching and manceuvring, amid wind,
rain, and snow, and such scarcity of provision in the
prince’s camp that a small loaf was sold for a florin,
the two armies came in sight of each other between
Navarretta and Najara, in Old Castile, on the 2d of
April 1367, and each was drawn up in order to be
ready for battle on the morrow.

The bright armour of these glittering battalions was
a beautiful sight when the sun rose upon them next
day. The prince, with some of his officers, ascended a
rising ground, and seeing the enemy marching upon
them, formed his own line in the plain, and then halted.
The Spaniards, perceiving what he was about, did the
THE PRINCE'S.SPANISH CAMPAIGN. - 195

same, and then each man tightened his armour for the
combat.
_ While they thus stood facing each other, Sir John
Chandos advanced in front of the English, with his
banner in his hand ; for, after the manner of those times,
in presence of the enemy he was to have the rank of
a knight-banneret conferred upon him. This was a
very high dignity, since he who received it must not
only be a valiant soldier, and ordinarily a gentleman
by birth, but was also required to have such an extent
of landed property as to have gentlemen by birth for
his vassals, who, in time of war, ranged themselves
under his banner. John Chandos was both a valiant
soldier and of gentle birth, and he could bring into
the field knights enough to meet the third qualification.
The ceremony was performed in this manner :—Pre-
senting his banner to the prince, “ My lord,” said he,
“here is my banner, which I offer you that I may dis-
play it in such manner as may best please you; for I
have sufficient lands to enable me to do so, and main-
tdin the rank which it ought to hold.” The prince,
taking the banner, cut off the point to make it square,
—for in those days a square banner was a peg higher
in dignity than a pointed or swallow-tailed one,—and
then returned it to its owner, saying,—“ Sir John, I
return your banner; God grant you strength and
honour to preserve it.” | |

The newly docked banner was received with accla- -
196 THE PRINCE'S SPANISH CAMPAIGN.

mation when Sir John went back with it to his com-
pany. Every man among them felt that he was a step
higher in the world than before, and vowed that, with
God’s help, he would worthily defend it. A vow that,
before sunset, was as worthily performed.
The two armies now began to move towards each
other, but before they met, the prince, raising his eyes
and hands towards heaven, uttered aloud this devout
prayer :—“ God of truth, the Father of Jesus Christ,
Who hast made and fashioned me, grant through Thy
grace that the success of this battle may be for me and
amy army; for Thou knowest that in truth I have been
solely emboldened to undertake it in the support of
justice and reason, to reinstate this king on his throne,
who has been disinherited and driven from it, as well
as from his country.” And with that, taking Don
Pedro by the hand,—“ Sir King,” said he, “ you shall
this day know whether you have anything in the king-
dom of Castile or not.” Then crying out,—** Advance
banners in the name of God and St. George,” the two
armies came clashing together in mortal combat.
The battalion of Lancaster and Chandos first engaged

with that under du Guesclin, and the old French mar-
shal who had advised starvation instead of fighting ; and
a tough fight those veterans made of it. Neither would
give way, and they got terribly mixed up together, in .
the struggle each to force back the other. The prince’s
division charged another body of Spaniards, one of
THE PRINCE'S SPANISH CAMPAIGN, 197

whose leaders (he who, with his thousands, had at last
destroyed those poor two hundred English and Gascons)
took fright, and rode straight off the field with two
thousand of his horsemen. The remainder were soon
disposed of, and then the prince fell upon the division
commanded by King Henry himself, in which there
was at least forty thousand horse and foot. Here the
battle began in good earnest. In addition to sword,
lance, and axe, some of these troops were armed with |
slings, from which they hurled stones with so much
violence as to break through the steel helmets of their
adversaries. English arrows came deadlily among them
in return, and the plain resounded with cries of,—
“ Castile for King Henry,” “St. George for Guienne.”

Sir John Chandos did honour to his new banner ;
but pressing forward too eagerly, he was surrounded,
unhorsed, and would have been slain by a huge Cas-
tilian, who bore him to the ground, but for a knife that
he carried in his bosom, with which, as he lay under
his antagonist, he stabbed him to death in the back
and sides, and then threw him off. He afterwards
rejoined his own people, who had made their way to
the spot where he had fallen; and the capture, among
others, of the celebrated du Guesclin, was the splendid
trophy of the new banneret’s arms.

The English and Gascons fought bravely, and so did
some of the Spaniards; but panic possessed so many
of them that it was in vain for King Henry to rally
198 THE PRINCE'S SPANISH CAMPAIGN.

his troops. Thrice he checked their flight, and brought
them again to the charge, but it was in vain; the
prince, with his thirty thousand, was more than a
match for the Spanish king’s hundred thousand, who
fled in all directions ; Don Henry himself at last mount-
ing his horse, and galloping off with the runaways.
They were closely pursued as far as Najara, which
the English entered pell-mell with them; and in that
headlong chase numbers fell, slain by the enemy, or
drowned in the river, into which they leaped in hope
of escape from the murderous weapons behind, and
whose current was tinged with the blood of men and
horses. This town of Najara yielded a rich spoil to
the first comers, in the shape of plate and jewels be-
longing to Don Henry and his nobles,

The defeat, which was accomplished before noon of
that April morning was total and deadly; and as the
enemy was swept away, the prince fixed his banner
upon a bush hard by as a rallying point for his men,
who gradually drew up around him in fine order, even
after so hardly fought a battle. |

Pedro, hot from the pursuit, galloped up on a black
courser, but seeing the prince, dismounted, approached
him on foot, and would have kneeled while he thanked
his deliverer, had not the prince prevented him.
Taking the king by the hand,—* Cousin,” said he,
“give thanks to God, for to Him belongs the praise;
the victory comes from Him, and not from me.”
THE PRINCE'S SPANISH CAMPAIGN. 199

A monarch, one who, for his genius, his grandeur,
and the strange vicissitudes of his life, was one of the
most remarkable that ever reigned, said between three
and four thousand years ago,—“ The help that is done
upon earth God doeth it Himself!” Edward, Prince
of Wales and Acquitaine, the victor of three well fought
fields, knew this, and had the moral courage to avow
it to that reprobate Don Pedro.

The ample provision of King Henry’s camp, all of
which he left behind him in his Aight, furnished a wel-
come refreshment for the prince’s hungry army. It
was not the first time that his troops had been indebted
to the vanquished for a meal; nor need we wonder at
being told that they enjoyed their supper. Under
King Henry’s deserted tents they made themselves
comfortable for the night, and spent the next day,
which was Palm Sunday, in needful rest. By six
o'clock on that morning the prince was up and re-
ceiving such of his officers as waited upon him. Among
them came King Pedro, who was most graciously wel-
‘comed, but who more than startled his princely host
by courteously requesting that the prisoners should be
given up to him that he might cut their heads off!
This was rather too much. The prince paused a mo-
ment, and then told the king that he also had a request
to make, which he entreated, for the sake of their friend-
liness, might not be refused. The king, who could deny
nothing to the man who had just restored his crown te
200 THE PRINCE'S SPANISH CAMPAIGN.

him, cheerfully promised to grant it whatever it might
be. So the prince made his request, which was that
Pedro should pardon all his rebellious subjects, with
the exception of one flagrant offender, with whom he
might do as he pleased.

It was very disappointing to Pedro the Cruel not to
be allowed to cut off so many heads when they were in
his power. But as he was obliged to comply with the
prince’s wish, he swallowed his vexation, and, like a
sensible man, did what was required of him as though
he liked doing it. Nay, more, when the prince deli-
vered up the prisoners to him, he kissed his brother,
Don Sancho, who was one of them (Don Henry and
Don Tello were neither of them there to be kissed), and
to all save the excepted one (who was instantly be-
headed outside the tent), promised forgiveness of the
past if they would only do better in future. The
prince’s humanity that day saved many lives; nor did
he forget to show kindly courtesies to the Spanish
nobles who had been his captives.

Don Pedro with his suite then rode off to Burgos,
the capital of Old Castile, leaving the prince and his
army still in camp. Next day after evening prayers,
the camp was broken up, and he marched after the
king to Burgos, which he entered in state, with his
brother the Duke of Lancaster and other nobles. His
army lay in the surrounding plains, the prince being
entertained in the city; though his tent was pitched
THE PRINCE'S SPANISH CAMPAIGN. 201

in the midst of his brave fellows whom he visited
every day.

News of this, the prince’s third great victory, speedily
passed into France, England, Germany, and other
European countries, where it added vastly to his re-
nown, Some of his enthusiastic admirers declared
that such a prince as he, was worthy of governing the
whole world. By his countrymen this astounding feat
of arms of settling a disputed succession by one blow,
was celebrated with much feasting and pageantry.
But in France there was mourning and lamentation,
for their many warriors fallen in the battle, and for
their greatest of all, du Guesclin, who was an unran-
somed prisoner.

Rather more than three weeks were spent at Burgos,
and then, seeing that the rebellion was crushed, and
Pedro secure on his throne, by the renewed allegiance
of his subjects, the prince thought proper to put him
in mind of their agreement, before setting out from
Aquitaine. So he begged that the money which he
had advanced for the expedition might be repaid him
as speedily as possible, that they might yet them gone,
otherwise he feared his men-at-arms might begin to
help themselves. ‘The king assured him that he would
faithfully fulfil all that he had promised, but, unfor-
tunately, at that moment, he had no money. He
would go immediately to Seville, and there procure
enough to satisfy the prince’s army, which he recom-
902 TIE PRINCE'S SPANISH CAMPAIGN.

_mended should be meanwhile marched into the fertile
country about Valladolid, where, by Whitsuntide at
latest, he would himself join them, with the needful
funds,

This sounded so fair that the prince and his council
were content. Off set Pedro in one direction seeking
money, and off set the prince in another, to find good
quarters for his men.

The English kept wearily waiting at Valladolid, the
Companions beguiling their tedium by a little pillaging,
according to their wont; but no Pedro made his
appearance, neither did he think it worth while to send
word why he did not come. Perplexed and annoyed
at this, the prince, by the advice of his council, de-
spatched three knights to the city of Sevile, (almost at
the other side of the country, and where Pedro was all
the time,) to demand the reason of this non-fulfilment
of his promise. The king pretended to be exceedingly
delighted to see these knights, and he told them
politely how very sorry he was that he had been unable
to do as he promised his good friend the prince. He
had himself remonstrated with his subjects, and set
others to do the same, on their slowness in bringing in
supplies, but his people excused themselves by saying
it was impossible to collect any money so long as the
Free Companions were in the country. These vagabonds
had, as he declared, already killed three or four of his
officers, who were actually on their way to the prince
_ THE PRINCE'S SPANISH CAMPAIGN. 2038

with money; and he therefore begged that the prince
might be entreated, from him, to be good enough to
send those wicked Companions right away home, and
leave some of his knights, to whom the amount due
should be scrupulously paid. And with this he bade
the prince’s messengers farewell.

They returned to their master with the answer they
had got; and its delivery perplexed and annoyed him
still more, for he now began to suspect that Pedro
meant to shuffle out of his engagements. The cunning
Castilian had, according to the French proverb, sucked
the orange, and was now preparing to throw away the
rind. The prince was deeply wounded; to a man of |
his high sense of honour such shabbiness was inex-
pressibly offensive, and he had the further mortification
of reflecting that it was for such a one that he had so
freely poured out blood and treasure, and thrown away
his own strength in that destructive climate. For the
four months that he had spent about Valladolid, were
the four hottest months of that hot portion of the
Continent; and prince and people were alike all wasting
under it. The army was in haste to leave so unhealthy
a country; indeed, it appears that in those days the
English had a great dislike to the climate of Spain.
Castile, they complained, was full of barren rocks and
mountains, the rivers were angry, brawling streams,
and its inhabitants were beggarly. While as for
Spanish wines, of which we, in our day, make so much
204 THE PRINCE'S SPANISH CAMPAIGN.

account, the being obliged to drink them was another
of the grievances attending service in Spain. They
sald these wines were so strong and fiery, that they
disordered their heads, and consumed their lungs and
liver; so that, between hot suns and hot wines,
Englishmen, “who in their own country were sweetly
nourished” with good meat and ale, and who made a
tolerable shift to live in the pleasant country of France,
were in Castile, “burnt within and without.” “Rough-
ing it” on a bottle of port with their beef-steak, was
evidently opposed to the notions of these grumbling
Englishmen. ‘Then the nights were so overpoweringly
hot, that they could not bear any bed-clothes, while the
extreme cold of early morning came on so suddenly,
that all unclothed as they were, it threw them into
fevers and other maladies. Altogether Spain was not
to their mind; especially now that the ungrateful Pedro
was going to leave them to their own resources, spite
of his solemn engagements to the contrary. There was
another reason why they should get back againas quickly
as possible. King Henry when he fled, had hastened
into France, where, by the connivance of the Duke of
Anjou, he was now threatening Aquitaine, of which the
Princess of Wales, in the absence of her lord, had been
left guardian. And though the French king with
whom the English were at peace, had peremptorily for-
bidden Henry’s attacking the prince’s dominions, it yet
was time for him to be at home and take care of himself.
THE PRINCE'S SPANISH CAMPAIGN, 205

Orders were therefore issued for the immediate
return of the army. The King of Majorca, who had
been a brave comrade of the brave prince, was too
ill in bed to be removed when they departed, so they
were obliged to leave him behind. The prince would
fain have had some of his people stay to protect his
friend, but even that, the self-denying monarch refused,
for he said he knew not how long he might be confined
there by illness. So tents were struck, baggage-waggons
piled, and those whom war and climate had spared,
began their march homewards ; conquerors, yet sufferers.

There had been difficulties in getting into Spain.
There were now difficulties in getting out of it, for
some of the mountain-passes on the borders of Arragon
were closed against them; by the evil influence of
that bad King of Navarre, as it was said; and this
caused a whole month’s detention of the army, on its
route, while negotiations were carried on with the King
of Arragon, for passage through his share of the
Pyrenees. In truth it was not the fault of the King of
Navarre that these passes were not open; but he was
so very bad and untrustworthy a character, that if any-
thing went wrong where he was at all concerned,
people took for granted that it was his doing. He
made his appearance, however, as soon as the King of
Arragon had consented to let his kingdom be turned
into a thoroughfare for a while, waited respectfully
upon the prince, and by way of not being outdone in
206 THE PRINCE'S SPANISH CAMPAIGN.

courtesy by his brother of Arragon, offered a free
passage through his own kingdom of Navarre, (which
was a much shorter route than that through Arragon)
to the prince, the Duke of Lancaster, and some other
knights. The rest of the army might, for him, get
home as they liked, and when they liked. The prince
gladly accepted this offer for himself and his friends ;
and such was his influence with the king that he finally
induced him to extend his permission to the entire
army.

They marched as quietly as possible through Navarre,
for that was in the covenant, and the king himself
attended them to the borders of his kingdom; partly,
it may be supposed, to do honour to the most notable
prince in Europe, partly, no doubt, to see that their
engagements to keep the peace and pay honestly for
such things as they required, should be respected by
the English and Gascons under his command. At
Bayonne, the frontier town of his own possessions, the
prince halted to give a few days’ rest to his weary and
weakened frame; for this expedition to Spain had
given him his death-blow; and then he pursued his
route to Bordeaux. His reception there was stately,
befitting the return of a victorious ‘monarch. But it
was loving also; for the wife who had been so sad at
thought of his going away, came out to meet him,
bringing with her his little son Edward, then a child
of three years old.


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XI.

Troubles in Aquitaine.




Fated 11S Spanish expedition brought great glory
34 ORG to the prince; and that was all. The injury it
did him was incalculable. His health was
utterly broken; some supposed that slow poison had
been secretly administered to him by his enemies; but
his illness was more probably the result of climate and
hardships. And thanks to the worthless Pedro, he
brought back with him from Spain a load of debt that,
as we shall presently see, ultimately led to the destruc-
tion of English power in southern France. That was
a heavy price to pay for the world’s plaudits,

The prince’s first care on reaching home, was to dis-
perse the remains of his army. The great men of it
took care of themselves; the Gascon lords with their
retainers returned to their own castles, the English
knights to their various offices in the province; and
those from over seas followed their leader, the Duke of
Lancaster, to England. But the Free Companies still
remained to be disposed of. They would not disperse

(3) 14
210° TROUBLES IN AQUITAINE.

until they had received their pay; and as Don Pedro’s
promise to pay had been found worse than valueless,
the prince was obliged to pledge himself to them for
payment, and meanwhile suffer them to make themselves
’ at home in Aquitaine. For he said, that though Don
Pedro had broken faith with him, it would ill become
him to act in like manner towards those who had
served him so well. These dangerous visitors were
therefore to remain where they were until he could
raise money enough to satisfy their demands. This
was no easy matter ; the Spanish expedition had com-
~ pletely impoverished the prince, and as the Companions,
amounting to six thousand men, presently began to
meet the difficulty by living at free quarters upon the
indignant inhabitants, he had no resource but to beg
them to take themselves out of his dominions, as for
the present he could do nothing for them.

Strange to say, these rude, unprincipled men did as
they were requested. They had no objection to living
by plunder, nay, as has been said, they liked it; but
for his very valiancy and goodness, they preferred not
to plunder their old master, provided they could be

equally well served elsewhere. And as France, their
— “own domain” was open to them, they trooped thither,
to the great satisfaction of the prince’s subjects, and
the extreme dismay of those of King Charles. So this
danger was staved off for awhile.

‘The prince’s Spanish and French prisoners had been
TROUBLES IN AQUITAINE. 21]

duly ransomed, and had gone home, with the exception
of the brave du Guesclin, who still remained in bondage.
He was thought so essential to the defeated King
Henry, that the prince’s advisers were unwilling to let
him go, before Don Pedro had paid his long bill, for
fear of another Spanish contest, in which, with no
Prince of Wales to contend against, the Frenchman
and his master would certainly have the best of it.
So he was left to chafe and fret, and get on as he best
could in this enforced idleness.

During his captivity, the prince one day, good
humouredly, asked du Guesclin how he was. “Never,
better, my lord,’ was the answer, “I cannot be other-
wise than well, seeing I am the most honoured knight
in the world.” The prince did not exactly see that,
and bade him explain himself. In reply he was told
that throughout France and Spain, it was said that the
reason why du Guesclin was left a prisoner was that
the prince was so afraid of him, that he dared not set
him at liberty. And that, the knight ventured to
think, was paying him a very high compliment. The
prince could not stand this. It might be a joke, or it
might be earnest; but not for one moment could he ~
endure the idea of anybody’s thinking that he feared
living man. “By St. George,” was his prompt re-
joinder, “it is not so.” And he told the knight, that
on payment of a ransom, amounting to about ten
thousand pounds, he should immediately be free. It
212 TROUBLES IN AQUITAINE.

is supposed that the prince thought du Guesclin could
not command so large an amount, and therefore that
he should hear no more about his ransom. But he was
mistaken. Du Guesclin, who knew his own value,
and how his countrymen rated him, snapped at the
offer, thanking the prince for putting so high a price
upon him; a price which he declared would be raised
if every old woman in France had to contribute the
produce of her spinning-wheel towards it.

The prince’s counsellors blamed him very much for
suffering himself to be thus trapped into liberating the
most formidable of his opponents, before Don Pedro’s
coin was forthcoming; and they advised him to break
his word with the prisoner. But though vexed enough
at himself the prince could not do that. He had
“promised,” certainly to “his hurt,” but “changing,”
on that account, was a thing not to be thought of.
Du Guesclin was accordingly liberated on his parole,
and, by the help of the King of France and the Duke of
Anjou, within one month paid the large sum demanded
of him. As had been feared, the knight immediately
returned to the aid of Don Henry; who taking up
arms a second time against the detested Pedro, over-
threw, and murdered him with his own hand.

The worn-out frame of the prince required rest, now
that he was at home. But instead of rest he was
plunged into cares and vexations. The death of Pedro
put an end to all chance of payment of his large debt,
TROUBLES IN AQUITAINE, 213

if indeed there had been any chance before. And as
the prince considered himself responsible, to those who
had fought under him, for the satisfaction of their just
claims, it was incumbent upon him to provide money
in one way or other. Pedro might defraud him, but
it was impossible for him to defraud others. The only
way in which it appeared to him that he could raise
the requisite funds, was by imposing a heavy tax upon
his subjects. This tax was called the Fouage; it was
literally a tax upon every chimney or house-fire in the
province ; and it excited the liveliest discontent among
the inhabitants of the whole principality. A parliament
was summoned at Niort, to whom the prince’s chancellor
announced the impost, explaining how it was to be
levied, and that it was not designed to last more than
five years, or at any rate, no longer than until the debt
caused by the campaign in Spain was discharged.
Some members assented to it; but a number of the
greatest barons protested against it; saying that when
assuming the lordship of Aquitaine, the prince had
sworn to maintain all the rights and privileges of its
nobles, who when they were vassals to the King of
France had no taxes, or duties to pay, nor were they |
going to do it now, —they would fight first. Nevertheless,
for peace’ sake, they were willing when they returned
home, to give further consideration to the subject,
and take counsel concerning it with their neighbours.
Nothing more could be obtained from these resolute
214 | TROUBLES IN AQUITAINE.

barons of Gascony, for it was they, who were the dissen-
tients ; so the parliament was broken up, to reassemble
on a certain day named by the prince. The more peace-
able feelings of its insubordinate members, however,
evaporated by the time they reached their own castles
and fortresses, at whose grim walls many a glance was
doubtless cast, as their sturdy owners thought how they
might, in case of need, hold them out against their
lord. Pay the tax they would not,—those old castles of
theirs should smoke sooner than that ; neither would they
return to the parliament, catch them doing that. But
there was one thing they would do, and this was, walk off
straightway to the King of France, tell him their troubles,
and appeal to him, as their sovereign lord, against the
oppressive doings of the Prince of Aquitaine.

Now this talk of appealing to the King of France
was a downright mistake of theirs. According to the
treaty of Bretigny, King Charles was no more sovereign
lord to them, than he was to the English nobles. In
it all right and jurisdiction over them had been for-
mally given up. But in their anger it was not con-
venient to remember this, and Charles, to whom they
posted, was much too well bred to tell them they were
altogether in the wrong about it. Of course he, in
his secret soul, was well pleased with so charming an
opportunity of picking a quarrel with the prince, and
having the prince’s own lords to back him in it. But
neither did he tell this to the Gascons, He told them
TROUBLES IN AQUITAINE. 215

blandly that the prince’s attempt to encroach upon
their rights and privileges, was most probably the
fault of ill-advisers in his court; nevertheless, all that
he himself could with propriety do for them should be
done willingly; he had sworn, as his father had done,
to several articles of peace with the King of England,
all of which, of course, (speaking off hand,) he could
not remember; but he would have them looked into,
and all the rights and privileges of the Gascon nobles, as
there established, he would readily help them to main-
tain. With that heroyally bowed them out; so well satis-
fied with their answer, that they did not care to return
home. They preferred remaining at Paris with so gra-
cious a monarch, into whose willing ear they might pour
their complaints of the prince’s pride and presump-
tion; and their assurances of his perfect competence
to settle the matter, spite of that formidable individual.

If the prince was displeased at the point-blank
refusal of these Gascon noblemen to pay the tax im-
posed upon the province, he was still more so at their
referring the subject of dispute to one who had really
nothing to do with it. It was a positive insult to
himself, They had no right of appeal; that, as has
been said, was given up when the twice-beaten French
were forced to surrender so large a portion of their
broad lands to the English; lands over which he now
ruled, subject only to his own father, as sovereign lord.
The hearth-tax he made up his mind to have; he was not
216 TROUBLES IN AQUITAINE,

to be baffled by these insubordinate barons, nor that
meddling French king. Such was the prince’s mood.

Chandos, who was a wise, as well as a valiant man,
and whose gray hairs had brought him greater experi-
ence in matters of state, than his valiant master could
boast of, opposed the prince’s persistence in this tax.
He foresaw the dangers of it, and would fain have
avoided them. Unfortunately the prince was not to
be moved, and finding his interference useless, Sir
John judged it best to retire from the court for awhile ;
that he at least, might not have the blame, of what he
had done his best to prevent. So to give colour to
his departure, he made the excuse of wishing to visit
his estate of St. Sauveur, le Vicomte, in Normandy,
(conferred upon him, for his great services, by King
Edward,) which he had not seen for three years. And
with Sir John out of the way, the prince went on
demanding the tax, from the more manageable portion
of his subjects, who were willing to pay it; rejoicing
no doubt that he was at last carrying his point, spite
of Chandos, and his over caution, and the insolent
doings of those intolerable Gascons.

Those Gascons meanwhile, were still besieging the
French king with their entreaties that he should judge
between them and their prince; entreaties which they
now enforced by threats of carrying their case else-
where, to some other sovereign, if he refused them
help. Charles, as we are aware, was all the time
TROUBLES IN AQUITAINE. 217

longing to do as they wished him; but as he very well
knew that such a proceeding on his part would almost
inevitably end in war with England, he was obliged to
proceed very warily; not only in order to give some
appearance of right to what he did, but on account of
one of his brothers, the Duke de Berri, being still a
hostage in that country. |

In this difficult and dangerous state of affairs, there
was not wanting a mischief-maker (one rarely is, where
he is least required,) to make ill worse. The Earl of
St. Pol, one of the French hostages in England, having,
like his Grace of Anjou, distinguished himself by
breaking his parole, and sneaking away home, was
filled with an uncommon hatred of those whom he had
treated so shabbily, and of course was correspondingly
anxious to do them all the injury in his power. With
this amiable motive (knowing full well that if the
prince were summoned to Paris, in character of a
vassal, it would inevitably produce a war,) he busied
himself in urging upon the French king a compliance
with the Gascon lords’ request. Others joined him in
this, including the Duke of Anjou, who, as has been
said, was in the same discreditable predicament as
himself, that of a breaker of his word. Knights and
gentlemen held the keeping of their word, as one of
their most sacred duties; the breaking of it, as one of
the most dishonouring crimes of which they could be
cuilty. Hence it is pretty plain that though they
218 TROUBLES IN AQUITAINE.

might be nobles, these two individuals were neither
gentlemen, nor good knights. However, such were
among the king’s advisers; and all together, word-
breakers, and those not so disgraced, did their best to
persuade Charles of what he was very willing to be-
lieve,—that he was still feudal lord of the prince, and, as
such, had a right to summon him to plead before him.
They further made a fuss about the ill conduct of the
English since the peace was signed; and the result of
their advice and persuasions was the calling of a solemn
council to examine the various documents concerning the
treaty, and to deliberate on the best mode of action.

The prelates and nobles who composed the council
read, and re-read these documents, and thought, and
better thought over their contents, till they came to
the desired conclusion :—that the rights of the King of
France were invaded in Aquitaine, and that the English
had behaved so badly, that he would be justified in
making war upon them. |

This opinion of his council was so agreeable to
Charles, that he received it very graciously, and deter-
mined to act upon it, as soon as it was safe for him to
do so. Accordingly, spinning out the time by telling
his impatient Gascon clients that though he should be
exceedingly sorry to drive them to any foreign lord to
seek the justice which they required at his hands, yet
such affairs called for much prudence and deliberation,
he set to work quietly, to sound these gentlemen as to
TROUBLES IN AQUITAINE, 219

whether they were able to support him with any
adequate force in case of war with the English. And
as, beside paying the cost of their twelvemonth’s resi-
dence in Paris, he also gave them presents of rich
Jewels (which gentlemen wore in those days, as well
as ladies), we cannot be surprised at their vowing that
they both could and would stand by him. In addition
to these Gascons, some of the northern folks also pro-
tested that they hated the English (as well they might,
seeing the English had so often ridden rough-shod
over them), and were quite ready, if the opportunity
were given them, to return to their old allegiance, and
prove stanch Frenchmen.

So far so good. The train was being gradually laid,
that was to blow the English to the moon,—or, at any
rate, out of France. The next step in the process was
now to be taken. A document was drawn up, as an
appeal from the Gascon lords, to Charles, king of
France, against the oppressions of the Prince of Wales,
and praying the king that they might have justice
done them. The wording of a document like this,
which was to throw two kingdoms into a blaze, was
rather a nice matter. Much scratching out, and inter-
lining, and preparation of very rough drafts, took place
before it was ready to be fairly copied, and sent to the
prince, with an intimation that he must present him-
self in Paris, to answer the appeal before his lord of
France, and abide judgment upon it.
220 TROUBLES IN AQUITAINE.

Tt was done at last, and by way of giving it due
effect, an “eloquent lawyer,” and a “noble knight,”
were appointed to carry this impertinent document,
and still more impertinent message, to the victor of
—Crecy, Poitiers, and Navaret. |

The twain set out on their errand, and as, wherever
they came, they announced themselves as the king’s
commissioners to the Prince of Wales and Aquitaine,
they had no lack of civility on their journey. When
they reached Bordeaux, where the prince and princess
were then keeping their court, it was too late to seek
an interview that day. So they remained for the night
at their inn, going next morning to the Abbey of At.
Andrew’s, which was the prince’s residence when. in
his capital city. |

Finding they were messengers from the King of
France, the courtiers received them very kindly; and
when their lord was informed of the arrival of these
envoys, he courteously ordered them to be at once
conducted to his presence. After making their best
bows to the prince, and opening their credentials, they
respectfully delivered the impudent message with which
they were charged; and which ended by bidding him
use no delay in obeying the summons, but to set out
to Paris, to have sentence pronounced upon him, as
speedily as possible. It was dated at Paris, the 25th
of January, 1369.

The prince heard it out quietly, and was silent for
TROUBLES IN AQUITAINE. 221
awhile. Then came his calm answer to this outrageous
insult: “We shall willingly come to Paris, since the
King of France desires it, but,—it shall be with our
helmet upon our head, and sixty thousand men at our
back!” |

Down upon their knees dropped the two Frenchmen,
at this alarming reply, and began to beg and pray the
prince, for God’s sake, to have mercy upon them.
They found out they had indeed put themselves into
the lion’s den, and feared that in another moment they
should be gobbled up. Tremblingly, they assured him
they meant no offence ; they had only carried a message,
as any of his subjects would do for him, and they en-
treated that no responsibility of it might be thrown
upon their unfortunate shoulders. The prince hastened
to assure them that he was not in the least angry with
them,—such small game was beneath his notice,—but
he was exceedingly angry with those who had sent
them on such an errand. ‘The king, he said, had been
ill-advised thus to meddle where he had no business.
Charles had nothing to do with quarrels between him
and his barons. It was at his own peril that he had
thrust himself into them, and he should soon find out
that when Aquitaine was given up to the King of
England, all rights, and jurisdiction over it, were given
up at the same time, so that there was no appeal, save
to him. If it cost a hundred thousand lives, the King
of France should be made to understand that, and
222 TROUBLES IN AQUITAINE.

turning on his heel, he left them, thunderstruck by the
explosion they had provoked.

Standing planted there, in stupid astonishment, some
of the English knights present told them, in a friendly
manner, that they had executed their commission very
well, but they had better go home, for they would get
no other answer than the one they had received. So
the “eloquent lawyer,” and the “noble knight,” re-
turned to their inn, not a little crest-fallen with their
morning’s adventures. Fright, however, had not taken
away their appetites, for the historian has thought it
worth his while to leave on record that they got their
dinner, before packing up, and setting out back again
_ with the tremendous answer they had received.

The prince had acted with becoming spirit in dealing
with this insult from the French court; but it occa-
-sioned him much uneasiness, foreseeing, as he did, that
war was its ultimate design; and that he, the old
scourge and terror of France, was no longer the brilliant,
vigorous leader of his brave bands, but a disease-stricken
man, slowly sinking into his grave. Such considera-
tions were enough to fill him with painful anxiety ;
and his feelings were shared by those about him. To
their dull wits no better plan suggested itself than that
he should have the “eloquent lawyer” and the “noble
knight” put to death, by way of suitable recompense
for the impertinence of which, poor wretches, they had
been the medium. The hot zeal of these gentlemen,
TROUBLES IN AQUITAINE. 223

however, found no countenance from the prince, who
yet was so incensed against the messengers, as well as
their master, that when he heard they had left Bor-
deaux, on the road to Thoulouse, where the Duke of
Anjou was, he inquired whether they had had any
passports given them. Understanding that they had
none, he desired that they should be followed, brought
back, and thrown into prison for their pains; for, on
re-considering the matter, he could not regard them as
envoys from the King of France, but from his own
rebellious vassals, and as such, of course, they had no
privileged character. Above all, he could not endure
that they should go straight to his old enemy the
Duke of Anjou, and tell him how they had insulted
the prince to his face.

Sir William le Moine, who was despatched on this
errand, made such haste that he soon came up with
the travellers; and, fancying, no doubt, that he was
vastly improving upon his master’s directions, instead
of arresting them in the prince’s name for bringing
defiant messages from his rebellious vassals, he, to
their utter horror, accused them of horse-stealing; as
he pretended, on the complaint of the innkeeper with
whom they had lodged. There was a pleasant thing
for a couple of French gentlemen, who had just had
the enjoyment of treating the great Prince of Wales
and Aquitaine, as though he were any ordinary baron,
to have so vulgar a crime as that of stealing a horse—
224 TROUBLES IN AQUITAINE.

aninnkeeper’s horse, too—laid to their charge! Of course
it was of no use for them to say that they had not done
it. They were forthwith clapped into prison, some of
their people being permitted to continue their journey,
and tell the Duke of Anjou, if they thought fit, how
the French king had dealt with the prince, and with
what contempt his messengers had been treated.

Both king and prince now began to make prepara-
tions for war, and in the course of them sundry knights
and nobles changed sides; some who had formerly
served the prince now tendering their allegiance to the
King of France, and some of his liegemen turning heart
and soul to the English cause. The Free Companions
were also divided, one party selling their hireling
valour to the prince, while others had secretly made
merchandise of themselves to the French. The first
blood spilled in what was destined to be a long, and to
the English, disastrous war, was by the refractory
Gaseons; who in revenge for the imprisonment of the
king’s messengers, (or rather, as the prince had said, of
their own,) took up arms, and set upon a small troop
of the prince’s followers, under his High Steward, Sir
Thomas Wake. It was a safe little adventure; the
Gascons, numbering three hundred lances, were in
ambuscade, so that the rout of sixty unsuspecting
horsemen, was no very wonderful affair, though doubt-
less they plumed themselves upon it.

The prince was in a rage when he heard that the
TROUBLES IN AQUITAINE. 225

Gascon lords had dared to attack his high steward;
and he vowed to inflict severe punishment for the
offence. With this view he recalled Sir John Chandos,
from the quietude of his Norman estate, and that
valiant knight was soon in the saddle at the head of a
large company of men-at-arms and archers. With him
was the Captal de Buch, as well as other nobles; and
many hard blows were exchanged between them and
the Gascon lords, sometimes to the advantage of one,
sometimes to that of the other.

King Edward could scarcely believe that Charles in-
tended fighting, and so did not take as much care as he
might have done of his northern French possessions.
While to gain a little more time, things not being quite
ready for the grand crash, Charles sent envoys to Eng-
land, to lodge all sorts of complaints against Edward
and his son the prince. They managed to employ two
whole months in this agreeable work, holding many
conferences with the king, whom they sometimes put
in a passion with their unreasonableness ; but, of course,
they did not come to any settlement of the quarrel,
that not being their object.

At length when the King of France was aware that
the war had already broken out in Gascony ; that in
the north, certain of Edward’s subjects were only await-
ing a convenient opportunity of betraying him ; and
that he himself had a numerous army, not only ready,
but eager for war with the Prince of Wales; he thought

(3) 15
226 TROUBLES IN AQUITAINE.

the time was come for him to throw off the mask.
The mode which he adopted for doing this was to send
a formal declaration of war to the English court; but,
either from impudence or ignorance, he actually sent
this important document by his own valet. It was a
dreadful blunder, and Edward and his council were not
a little offended at so gross an impropriety as sending
a declaration of this nature by such hands. ‘They said
(and they were quite right) it was not decent that war
between two such great monarchs as those of France
and England, should be declared by a common servant.
Some man of rank, prelate or baron, would have been
more fittingly employed upon the errand.

It was well the poor valet had not to suffer for his
master’s indiscretion. But he was civilly dismissed after
he had delivered his letters (of whose contents he pro-
tested his ignorance), and got away home with all speed.

King Charles, however, did a worse thing than even
this of offering an unworthy insult to his great rival.
After sending off his shabby messenger to the English
court, he sent that shabby St. Pol, and Sir Hugh de
Chatillon to Abbeville, which had been secretly won
over to the French, and whose gates being opened to
them, gave an example of defection which was speedily
followed by the whole province of Ponthieu, before the
reinforcements, ordered from England for the protec-
tion of the county, could arrive.



XIIL
Creaty of Peace broken by the French.

| Bo ee N old historian tells us that King Edward was
(BRA YNg| «in a “mighty passion” when he heard of
these things. And. certainly if anything



can justify people’s being in “a mighty passion,” the
craft, the successful craft, of King Charles was ample
excuse for an utter loss of temper on the part of our
ereat Edward. It was enough to provoke any one who
had suffered and fought so hard for conquest, as he had,
to have the fruit of that conquest stolen from him.
Had Ponthieu been again the prize of him whe could
hit hardest and longest,—however ill it had befallen
him in the contest, Edward could have borne 1% better.
As the treaty was now broken by the French, he again,
by advice of Parliament, assumed the title and arms of
King of France,—a title and shield which have only of
late years been erased from our coin. Till that period,
every shilling and sixpence, handed over the meanest
shopkeeper’s counter in England, bore testimony to the
‘ron hand with which, from time to time, we English
230 TREATY OF PEACE BROKEN BY THE FRENCH.

have stricken our neighbours over the channel in main-
tenance of a right claimed over them. With the hearty
support of his Parliament, he further made preparations
for a tough struggle with that treaty-breaker, Charles
of France. A military force under his third son the
Duke of Lancaster, and the Earl of Pembroke his son-
in-law, was at once ordered to the assistance of the
Prince of Wales; and thanks to the Duke of Brittany,
whose quarrels as Earl of Mountfort the English had
long espoused, permission was obtained to land these
troops at St. Malo, and march them through his
dominions to the seat of war.

A numerous body of those rough and ready fellows,
the Free Companions, was also brought to the prince’s
aid by Sir Hugh Calverly; and being immediately ap-
pointed to execute summary justice on the leading
Gascon mal-contents, executed their commission in the
most satisfactory manner to their employer,—by plun-
dering, burning, and otherwise destroying the lands of
these noblemen. Thus England and France were once
more at war. ‘The monarchs of those two countries, it
should be added, not only fought but preached against
each other! That is, they set their clergy to do it, and
on both sides the water these exerted themselves, in
their way, by “long and fine” sermons, setting forth
the justice of the quarrel, as actively as did the fight-
ing men. The exhortations of the clergy had much
influence on the French king’s success. In addition to
TREATY OF PEACE BROKEN BY THE FRENCH. 23)

preaching up the justice of the war, which both kings
required from their clerical subjects, Charles went so
far as to go in solemn procession with his ecclesiastics,
praying for the success of his arms. And as, after the
custom of those times when extraordinary devotion was
intended, he walked shoeless and stockingless on these
occasions, doubtless a still happier result was antici-
pated from his exertions.

Had Charles kept faith with the English, we might
have felt more respect for his prayers. But while we
reprobate word-breaking, either by monarch or subject,
it must be admitted that the temptation to free so large
a number of his people from a foreign yoke, and him-
self from a continual humiliation, was very great; and
those of us who never yield to temptation, even when
it is most enticing and most convenient, are, perhaps,
the fittest to pour unmeasured censure on the French
king’s doings. Yet, with all our allowance for the
vehement temptation presented to this sovereign, (or
to any one else who proves false, when remaining true
would injure him), we are not to forget that promises
must be kept. Had the morality of the Prince of
Wales been of as loose a character as that of his op-
ponent, the war might not have taken place; for, as we
have seen, it was brought about solely by the imposi-
tion of that hearth-tax, which was forced upon the
prince by his determination not to break faith with
those to whom he had pledged his word.
232 TREATY OF PEACE BROKEN BY THE FRENCH.

_ Charles was not content with attacking and under-
mining the English in France. He also fitted out an
immense fleet, which, under the command of his
brother, the Duke of Burgundy, was designed to invade
and utterly destroy England. Not Napoleon himself,
when he talked of driving us English into the sea,
contemplated a more entire destruction of those terrible
islanders than did he. Both, however, were doomed to
| disappointment in their glowing anticipation of victory.
Between brisk preparations made for his reception on
the other side the channel, and fresh work cut out for
his troops by the arrival of the Duke of Lancaster in
the north, Charles thought it best to give up his plan
of attacking his old enemies upon their own shores ; so
that his fine fleet was of no use to him, the troops who
should have gone on board it finding quite enough to
do in watching the duke’s army. Fighting they did
not attempt, though far superior in number; being
warned, by past experience, that pitched battles with
- the English did not agree with their constitution.

The first success of the French in this long, and to
the English disastrous, contest, it has been said, was

gained by craft. But it must be owned that when

blows decided the matter (and some very hard ones
were struck on both sides) they still had the best of it.
Our time was come. Perhaps we.had no business in
France!. And then there was no longer the Black
Prince to,meet:the enemy in the field. He was too ill
TREATY OF PEACE BROKEN BY THE FRENCH. 233

even to mount his horse; had he not been, Charles and
his people would scarcely have ventured to stir in the
matter. The prince, like Aisop’s sick lion, was com-
pelled, in his feebleness, to endure indignities which
in health and strength none would have dared to offer
him.

While the Dukes of Lancaster and Burgundy in the
north were thus watching each other, as a cat would a
mouse, things were going on more briskly in the south,
to which we must now turn our attention. There
small battles were fought, and castles besieged with
varying success as fortune favoured, now the French
and then the English. Chandos, the captal, Lord
Audley—the Audley of Poitiers—and Sir Robert
Knolles, were the principal leaders in this part of the
country. Grief for the death of his son, however,
caused Audley to retire from active service ; and then
Chandos, who was a tower of strength to his master,
succeeded that nobleman as Seneschal of Poitou.. In
this character Sir John got together a strong body of
English and Poitevins, with which he purposed making
an excursion into Anjou to beat up the quarters of the
French in that province; and as the young Earl of
Pembroke was in garrison with two hundred lances at
Mortagne-sur-mer, he sent for him to join the expedi-
tion, There was nothing that the earl would have
liked better; but some mean souls about him suggest-
ing that if he, who was but a young knight, went out
234 TREATY OF PEACE BROKEN BY THE FRENCH.

in company with so old and experienced a commander
as Chandos, the latter would have all the credit of the
enterprise, his ardour cooled down rapidly, and he was
easily persuaded that so great aman as he ought to act
by himself, in order that all the world might know
what a very clever fellow he was. So he declined Sir
- John’s invitation, who consequently was obliged to go
without him.

Sir John marched into Anjou, where, pitching his
quarters in the plains, he sent out light divisions in all
directions to destroy the neighbouring country, in
which, during the fifteen days they remained there,
they did “infinite mischief,” as one may well believe.
When there was no more mischief to be done, they
set out on their return to Poitou. On arriving at
_ Chauvigny, about eighteen miles from Poitiers, informa-
tion was brought Sir John of the near neighbourhood
of a large body of men-at-arms under de Sancerre,
Marshal of France; and as he wished to attack him,
he sent a second time to Pembroke, begging him to
bring up his men. The foolish earl again refused,
though the herald who carried the message found him
mustering his men, as if for service; and as without
him Sir John had not force sufficient to meet the
marshal, he was reluctantly obliged to give up his
purpose, and go straight to Poitiers where his followers
dispersed.

As soon as Pembroke heard that Sir John had dis-
TREATY OF PEACE BROKEN BY THE FRENCH. 233

banded his troops, he thought that now (when he could
have all the glory to himself) was the time for him to
show of what sort of stuff he was made. So at the head
of three hundred men-at-arms, whose numbers were in-
creased by others as they passed along, he sallied out
of Mortagne, and made his way into Anjou, apparently
for the purpose of gleaning, where Chandos had been so
ruthlessly shearing. Of course it was very pleasant
for the little, great man to go about doing mischief on
his own account, rather than at the bidding of the knight
of Poitou. The mischief was his own, his very own; no
chance of Sir John’s getting the least bit of credit for it.
But, alas! pride had a fall. The French did not think
quite so highly of my lord as he thought of himself;
Chandos they knew and feared, but the insolent young
knight, whose vanity would not allow him to serve
under that veteran, (they had heard the whole story),
they thought they might manage to overthrow. To
this end several of the French commanders laid their
heads together, and concerted for the discomfiture of
the brisk young earl. Collecting their troops they ac-
cordingly came stealthily on his track, and just as the
earl’s party had re-entered Poitou, and settled them-
selves, comfortably as they thought, in the village of
Puirenon, in, about supper time, dashed the French-
men, making the dusky streets resound with cries of,
“ Our lady for Sancerre,” and tilting away at every one
they met. The uproar soon reached head-quarters, and
236 TREATY OF PEACE BROKEN BY THE FRENCH.

the earl and his friends, arming in haste, came along
with such of their people as they could get together to
see what was the matter. But unluckily for them the
French had, in this sudden manner, so completely got
possession of the place as to render it impossible for
the whole company to assemble. Separated, they were
easily cut off, and, after many of them had been killed
or taken prisoners, Pembroke and a few others were
driven to take shelter in an ill-fortified house belonging
to the Knights Templars, where they just contrived to
save their precious selves; all the earl’s plate being
left behind as a trophy for the French.

It was rather humiliating for my lord, just as he
was rejoicing in having got rid of the overwhelming
superiority of the great Chandos, to find himself thus

caught like aratinatrap. But his worst humiliation
was yet to come, as we shall see; and, however un-
patriotic it may be thought, we cannot after all, help
enjoying the troubles of this presumptuous young
soldier,

As the French had no mind to be deprived of their
- prey, when it appeared to be within their grasp, they
marched up to the house where our friends had taken
refuge, and after examining it pretty closely, determined
to attack it. Scaling ladders were accordingly brought,
fixed against the walls, and, holding their shields over
their heads to ward off stones and arrows from above,
some bold fellows struggled up. But, as an old writer
TREATY OF PEACE BROKEN BY THE FRENCH. 237

says, when they had done that, they had not done
much, for on reaching the top of the wall, they met so
brisk a reception from the beleaguered knights, as sent
them to the bottom again, much quicker than they had
mounted ; while such flights of arrows were poured in
upon those below, as made even that anything but a
comfortable post.

Time after time were these attempts made and re-
pulsed, until the deepening gloom of evening rendered
it impossible to renew them. Sounding their trumpets
for the retreat, the French then sheared off, in remark-
ably good spirits, saying they had done enough for one
day, but would try again on the morrow. For fear
lest the birds should be flown before morning,
they placed a strong guard in front of the house,
which they were determined to have, either by assault
or by starving out its garrison; and then they re-
tired to their quarters where they “made a night of
it.”

Being ill supplied with provisions as well as artil-
lery, my Lord Pembroke and his friends were by no
means in so cheerful a frame of mind as that enjoyed
by the confident Frenchmen. They could, of course,
make shift to fast for awhile, but still after all, hunger
added to danger is anything but enlivening. And yet,
even this was better than what my lord had to come
to at last. It was very mortifying, after riding his
high horse with the veteran of Poitou ; but in his pre-
938 TREATY OF PEACE BROKEN BY THE FRENCH.

sent strait there was no help for it; Chandos must he
sent for to help him out of the difficulty, into which
his own obstinate folly had got him. So the belea-
guered party managed to smuggle one of their number
out at the back door, with injunctions to ride for his
life to Poitiers, and entreat Sir John to come to their
assistance. It was midnight when the messenger was
despatched, in hope of bringing Chandos to them by
next day’s noon; but being unacquainted with the
country, he wandered about until it was broad daylight,
before he even found the road to Poitiers. Meanwhile,
at peep of dawn, the French were at work again, climb-
ing up their ladders, and getting the benefit of a wake-
ful night spent by the earl and his friends in adding
to their means of defence against these persevering
assailants, Great stones and even ponderous benches
had been carried to the roof of the house, and thence
were now liberally bestowed upon the heads of the
besiegers below; while as before—the fight, hand to
hand, with such as scaled the wall, was as obstinate as
it possibly could be.

As the morning wore on, anxious glances were cast
on the road leading to Poitiers, in hopes of catching some
signs of the knight’s approach for their rescue. Not
even Bluebeard’s sister-in-law “sister Anne,” looked
out more eagerly for her brothers, than did those
English knights, under the unlucky leadership of Lord
Pembroke, for the advancing banner of Chandos. But
TREATY OF PEACE BROKEN BY THE FRENCH. 2389

no welcome “cloud of dust,” announced that deliver-
ance was at hand! |

Between six and nine o’clock the French, tired of
climbing up their long ladders only to be knocked on
the head, or pitched to the bottom again after they got
to the top, sent off for pickaxes, mattocks and such
like tools, for the purpose of undermining the walls,
pressing some of the sturdy villagers around, into their
service for this congenial occupation. The earl was
alarmed (and hungry) before, but he was in a regular
fright now, for this was by far the most dangerous
trick the enemy had yet played him; and to hasten
Chandos to his aid, he sent off another squire, post
haste, out at the back as before, with his own ring as
a token, by way of convincing the old knight that it
was really he himself who wanted him. By this time,
however, the first messenger, who had wandered about
the whole night before finding the road to Poitiers, had
arrived in that city on his jaded steed; and hearing
that Sir John was at prayers (for, as we have said,
those warriors of the olden time, prayed as well as
fought), at once rushed in to him, dropped upon his
knees, and besought his speedy interference on behalf
of the young earl and his companions.

Sir John was justly piqued at Pembroke’s double
refusal to join his expedition, so he took the matter
very coolly. “It was,” he said, “almost impossible
to get to Puirenon time enough to serve the earl,
240 TREATY OF PEACE BROKEN BY THE FRENCH.

)

as prayers were not yet ended;” and so saying,
he calmly went on with them again. When service
was over, the tables were covered for dinner, and
just as the seneschal was about to sit down, in
came squire the second, who, like his predecessor,
kneeling before the great man, presented his token,
with an urgent request that Chandos would hasten to
help the earl out of his pressing danger. Sir John
took the ring, examined it closely, and seeing that it
really was the earl’s signet, remarked as before, very
gravely, that if the danger were as imminent as de-
scribed, it would be impossible for him to get to
Puirenon in time; and therefore he ordered dinner to
be served.

Oh, that the earl could but have seen the quiet con-
tempt with which Sir John treated his petitions,
instead of only feeling the consequences of it!

The stately household sat down to table, wondering,
as they ate and drank, what possessed their master ;
but by the time the second course was brought up, Sir
John began to think he had inflicted sufficient punish-
ment upon the vain boy shut up in the Templars’
house at Puirenon. Raising his head from his plate,
they must have been dull who could not perceive the
kindling glance of his eye, as he told them that the
Karl of Pembroke, son-in-law of their lord, the King of
England, entreated him for help so courteously that. it
behoved them at once to mount and be gone—if it
TREATY OF PEACE BROKEN BY THE FRENCH. 241

were possible to arrive in time. Pushing the table
from him as he spoke; he rose, saying: “Gentlemen,
I am determined to go to Puirenon!”

The call to “boot and saddle,” as the trumpets rang
out their shrill note, was a joyful sound to his fol-
lowers, who were soon armed and riding away with
their master to Puirenon. News of this approaching
succour speedily reached the French, who, little as
they cared for Pembroke, were not (after some hours’
hard fighting that day) particularly anxious to come
in collision with the Seneschal of Poitou. “ Dear
lords,” said some of their scouts, “look well to your
selves, for Sir John Chandos with two hundred lances,
is coming from Poitiers with great haste, and greater
desires to meet you.” This piece of information
settled the matter. They came to a unanimous con-
clusion that they had best be off with the spoil and
prisoners, before worse came of it; and with trumpets
sounding the retreat they retired, bag and baggage,
from the siege of my Lord Pembroke and his com-
panions.

The earl and his knights seeing their tormentors
retire, took for granted that Chandos was on his way to
their help, and that intelligence of his advance had
reached the enemy. So they hastily took horse to go and
meet him, some in their eagerness riding double. It was
“hail fellow, well met!” when they came up with the
seneschal; only Sir John was vexed at not being in

(3) 16
242 TREATY OF PEACE BROKEN BY THE FRENCH.

time to fight the French after all. And then, as there
was nothing more to be done, they departed to their
several quarters; the earl carrying his crest much
lower than he did before he was obliged to beg and
pray a simple knight to come to the rescue of so high
and mighty a lord as himself.

The prince loved his brother-in-law Pembroke; but
we may safely conclude that when that nobleman next
presented himself at Angouleme, where the court then
was, he received a satisfying portion of the royal
invalid’s best thunder and lightning, in return for
the public exhibition of his own folly and incom-
petence, which he had chosen to make on this occa-
sion,

The prince, languishing under mortal illness, had at
this time other griefs additional to those of seeing his
hard-won territories wrested from him; while he, in
his disabled state, was forced to employ such prigs as
Pembroke in their defence. His mother, the “ good
Queen Philippa,” the loving wife and parent, as well
as the heroine, who, in her husband’s absence, could
defend his kingdom for him, was now lying upon her
death-bed. Her character appears to have been
altogether admirable; one that, apart from natural
affection, must have commanded the affection and
esteem of such a man as Prince Edward. We may
believe the old historian, who tells us that her death
was “right piteous to the king, her children, and the
TREATY OF PEACE BROKEN BY THE FRENCH. 243

whole realm.” She was taken ill at Windsor, and her
sickness continuing so long and heavily that, as the
same writer says, it presently appeared there was no
remedy for it but death, she summoned the sorrowful
king to her bedside that she might make some requests
of him.

Putting her trembling hand from out her coverings
she took his within it, and reminding him how happily
and prosperously they had lived together for more than
forty years—from early youth to age—she prayed that
now she was about to leave him, he would fulfil her
last wishes, which (after providing for her servants, her
religious benefactions, and some other matters) were
that, when he too should quit this changeful life, he
should be laid by her side in the cloisters of Westminster.
The king, with tears, promised all that she desired;
and soon after, having commended him and_ her
youngest son Thomas (who, poor boy, stood crying by
her side) to God, she devoutly yielded up her soul into
His hands; a soul which, as the same old historian relates,
he firmly believes was, with joy, carried up to heaven
by the holy angels, for her whole life had been pure,
charitable, and good. She died on the 15th of August,
1369, in the fifty-seventh year of her age, and her re-
mains were interred in Westminster Abbey; where, in
due time, as she had desired, her weary, worn-out lord
found his last resting-place by her side. The parti-
cular spot, close by the shrine of Edward the Confessor,
244. TREATY OF PEACE BROKEN BY THE FRENCH.

had been marked out by himself, ten years before, as
that in which his bones should be laid.

The death of Queen Philippa was greatly lamented
| at home, and it was a sad day when intelligence of it
reached her people and children in France. But they
did not suffer grief to disarrange their grim battle
array !





XIY.

Inewdents of the dlar—Death of Chandos.

Pe ED SSeS

a tiH war still dragged on its slow length. No-




thing decisive was done, the tactics of the
French being still to avoid general engage-
ments; while in the skirmishing, and attack, or defence
of towns and fortresses, that occupied several campaigns,
though victory sometimes inclined to the French, some-
times to the English, yet in the main, the English
cause continued steadily declining.

The death of Sir John Chandos, who, about this
| time, was killed in a skirmish, was a heavy blow to
the English interest in France. Sir John had been
excessively irritated by the loss of St. Salvin, a town of
Poitou, which had been treacherously given up tc the
enemy; and in his anger that such a thing should
have happened in his own province, vowed he would
have it again, by some means or other, and make its
inhabitants pay dearly for the insult they had put upon
him. Scheme after scheme for the recapture of the
town did he devise, but the vigilance of its new
248 INCIDENTS OF THE WAR.

governor, Sir Louis de Julien, who was not to be
caught napping, proved too much even for the genius
and bravery of Chandos. Though baffled, however, he
was not discouraged ; and resolving to make one more
desperate attempt to regain it, he summoned the
Poitevin nobles and knights, by whom he was much
beloved, to attend him at Poitiers, on New Year’s Eve,
1370. They came trooping at his call, and at the
time appointed, he left that city at the head of three
hundred lances; none, save the principal lords in his
company, knowing what was the object of the expedi-
tion. ‘They marched towards St. Salvin, and on arriv-
ing there about midnight, it was explained to them
that their cold ride was for the purpose of retaking it.
Dismounting, and giving their horses to their grooms,
they descended silently into the ditch of the fortress
and prepared to plant the scaling ladders which they
had brought with them. All went right, and they
would soon have made their way into the fort, among
the sleepy and unsuspecting Frenchmen, when, as ill
luck would have it, there came such a blast from the
warder’s horn, as made them suddenly pause in their
- proceedings, taking for granted that they were dis-
covered. This, as it turned out, was a mistake; but
believing it, and the success of the attack depending
upon its being a surprise, there was nothing left for
them, but to crawl out of the ditch again, as quietly as
they could, mount their horses and ride off.
INCIDENTS OF THE WAR. Q49

On arriving at Chauvigny, five or six miles distant,
as nothing more was to be done, the greater part of the
discomfited troops returned home, leaving their com-
mander, with about a hundred lances in that town.
Sir John, who was too vexed to go straight back again,
was disposed to make a halt here, and as he stood, grim
and gloomy, warming himself at the kitchen fire of the
inn, Lord Thomas Percy, who had remained behind,
asked his leave to ride out with his men in search of
adventures. Permission was granted, but he had not
been long gone when word was brought to Chandos that
the French had taken the field, and were on their road
to Poitiers. Sir John did not at first much mind about
it; he was too thoroughly out of humour with his dis-
appointment to care for a brush with them, and as he
thought his people could put them down without him,
he was not for stirring. Second thoughts, however,
which in his case were not “the best,” led him to change
his purpose, and mounting his horse he left Chauvigny
with about forty lances ; for at any rate he must return
to Poitiers, and might as well do it then as later.

They pursued their route leisurely by the river until,
as the day broke, they came within sight of their friends,
under Percy, and the French, dismounted, and lance in
hand, prepared to dispute the passage of the bridge at
Lussac which it was necessary for the latter to cross.

Riding up to the French, of whom he made very
light, Sir John, who was by no means amiable that
250 INCIDENTS OF THE WAR.

morning, began rating them soundly: “Do you hear,
you Frenchmen,” said he, “you area rascally set, going
about as you please, night and day, taking towns and
castles in Poitou, as though the country were your
own.” And then, his passion rising as he spoke, “ Sir
Louis, Sir Louis, you and Carnet, (the French leaders)
are too much masters. Here I have been seeking you
this year and a half, and now I have found you, we will
see which is the stronger. You say you have often
wanted to see me. Here I am, look at me well, I am
John Chandos, and if God please, I will now see what
you are made of.”

While Sir John was thus scolding a-main, one of
the Frenchmen drew his sword, and setting upon an
English squire named Dodenhale, gave him some such
severe strokes that he knocked him off his horse.
Hearing the noise behind him Sir John turned, and
seeing Dodenhale on the ground, with several of the
French laying upon him as hard as they could, was in
a greater rage than ever. Angrily asking his men what
they were about to suffer their comrade to be slain in
that fashion, he lept from his horse, bidding them “ dis-
mount, dismount.” Ina trice they followed his example,
the squire was rescued, and the battle began.

Sword in hand, with his banner displayed, Sir John
advanced towards the French, who, seeing the mood he
‘was in when he came up, had at once drawn close to-
gether, and prepared to engage. But alas, alas! that
INCIDENTS OF THE WAR. 251

January morning the ground was slippery with frost, and
the knight, trammelled with his flowing surcoat, slipped
on its glassy surface. Just at that moment a French
squire, James de St. Martin, levelled a lance at his blind
side, (Sir John had lost an eye while hunting five years
before) and the visor of his helmet being unfortunately
open it entered his face below the eye. ‘The thrust was
made with a strong arm, and in stumbling, Sir John
bore upon the cruel weapon with such force that it
penetrated the very brain before it was wrenched out
again. He fell without a word, for it was his death-
blow, turning over once or twice in the extremity of
his agony. Seeing him down, his followers pressed for-
ward like madmen to avenge their leader. De St.
Martin was soonrun through both legs by one of Chan-
dos’ squires, while his uncle, Sir Edward Clifford, be-
striding the body of his valiant nephew, dealt around
him such lusty sword-strokes as effectually shielded it
from the enemy who were struggling to carry it off the
field. But spite of the furious bravery with which they
fought, the English were overpowered by the superior
force to which they were opposed, and most of them
were taken prisoners, Clifford still standing over, and
refusing to quit the dying man, whose almost lifeless
body he had so well defended.

If the French had only been able to mount at once,
they would now have carried off their prisoners, and
made a successful affair of it. But unluckily for them,
952 INCIDENTS OF THE WAR.

their servants who were holding their horses in the rear,
taking fright at first glance of the advancing banner of
Chandos, had ridden away with them, anxious to pro-
tect their own valuable persons, though at the expense
of their masters, who were left in the lurch. The
Frenchmen were sorely put out when they discovered
this, for they knew that in that hostile district it would
never do for them, wearied as they were with battle,
to attempt to carry off their prisoners, and their own
wounded, a-foot. |

So they sent off two or three of their number to
hunt up the horses and servants. While awaiting the
return of these, what should they see but a body of
more than two hundred Poitevins, who had turned out
on purpose to seek them, and were coming up with
flying banners, under the leadership of some of the great
lords of the province. The tables were turned now with
a vengeance. Without horses, toil-worn, encumbered
with wounded and slain, beside their own prisoners,
they had no chance of resisting this fresh troop. There
was small time for deliberation, but in that brief space
their resolution was formed. Pointing out the advanc-
ing knights to the English whom they had taken, they
promised these their liberty on condition of their ac-
cepting their recent captors as prisoners, and defending
them against the new comers: for some reason or other
the Frenchmen very much preferred falling into the
hands of the English, to being in the power of their
INCIDENTS OF THE WAR. 253

own countrymen of Poitou. The English willingly
consented to this bargain; so when the Poitevins gal-
loped up, lance in rest, the Frenchmen, backing a little
out of the way, shouted to them, “ Holla ! stop my lords,
we are prisoners already.” Thenewly released English
confirming this, down sunk those threatening lance-
points, and the owners, finding their work done to their
hand, at once became peaceable.

But when they saw their seneschal lying there
speechless and wounded to death, their grief broke forth
in bitter lamentations: crying out, “Oh, Sir John
Chandos! cursed be the forging of the lance that
wounded thee, and perilled thy life, thou flower of
knighthood!” They wept, they wrung their hands,
especially his own servants, as they thus tenderly be-
wailed him ; while the wounded knight, though sensible,
could only answer them with his groans.

His armour was removed very gently by his servants,
and then, supported upon the shields of his knights, he
was slowly carried to Mortemer, a fort not far from the
spot where this unhappy encounter had taken place.
It was an unhappy encounter for the English, for though
they brought back good store of French prisoners, that
was not to be set in the balance against the loss of
Chandos, who survived but one day and night that
terrible lance-thrust from a mere squire.

Thus fell, in a pitiful skirmish, one of the best and
bravest knights that England ever produced.
254 INCIDENTS OF THE WAR.

His death was universally mourned. When the sor-
rowful news was made known, the prince and princess,
and indeed all his countrymen, were sad at heart, saying
that now they had lost all. Even some of the most
renowned French nobles lamented for him; for though
they feared him, they honored him as a knight who,
like their own Bayard of after years, was “ without fear,
and without stain.” And had he but been made
prisoner instead of being piteously slain, they had such
reliance on his wisdom, and the esteem in which he
was held by his lord, that they doubted not he would
have made peace between France and England. That
- hope was at an end, now that he was in his grave at
Mortemer, and there was nothing for it but “war to
the knife.”

The King of England, indeed, made an attempt at
mediation by publishing letters, in which, having re-
cited the oppressions complained of by the Gascon lords,
he, as superior lord, declared his will that amends should
be made them ; and that a full pardon should be granted
to such as having taken part with the French should
now return to their allegiance. By way of balancing this
act of grace for the insurgents, it was further set forth
that any complaints which the prince or his people had
to make against them should be equally redressed. But
Edward was not successful in his peace-making; the
wound was too deep to be healed by such remedies.
Great part of the population were too thoroughly French
INCIDENTS OF THE WAR. 255

at heart to care for being the prince’s subjects at any
price, and the tide of French conquest swelled still
higher and higher against him.

About this time the castle of Belleperche, belonging
to the Duke of Bourbon, was seized by the Free Com-
panions belonging to the English ; and as it was a most
desirable stronghold, whence they might ravage the
Bourbonnois, in which it was situated, at their leisure,
they settled themselves here. It had the further re-
commendation of containing a most valuable prisoner ;
for as at the time they took possession of it the duke’s
mother (who was also mother of the French queen)
made it her residence, the old lady, as well as the old
walls, fell into their hands; and though it was not con-
sidered correct, in those days, to make prisoners of
ladies, whether old or young, the Companions were too
lawless a set to feel themselves bound by the rules of
polite warfare. So they stuck to the old duchess like
wax, as well as to her fine castle.

Both king, queen, and duke were excessively annoyed
at having their mother a captive, and in such hands;
but they were obliged to submit to it for a while, until
the increasing success of the French arms enabled the
duke to raise a large body of troops with which he
hastened to her relief.

He “sat down” before the castle in due form, build-
ing a sort of strong wooden fortress for the shelter of
his men at night, while the day was spent in skirmish-
256 INCIDENTS OF THE WAR.

ing with the garrison. Among the weapons of offence,
provided by the duke on this occasion, were several
large machines, the artillery of those days, for hurling
huge stones and logs of wood; and with these he kept
up such a pelt, night and day, against his own walls as
nearly frightened his mother out of her senses. With
towers falling and roofs crashing in around her, it was
no wonder that the poor old lady’s nerves should be
somewhat shaken by her son’s strenuous efforts for her
deliverance. And to such an extent was this the case
that she sent repeated messages, begging him not to
knock down the castle about her ears in this fashion,
for she could not stand it; but to get her out in some
less alarming manner. The duke was sorry for his
mother, of course he was; but he was much too good
a son to give the slightest heed to her entreaties, know-
ing full well that if he spared his mother’s nerves it
would be at the cost of her liberty ; so he kept thunder-
ing on as hard as ever.

The garrison at length began not to like it; nay, they _
found themselves so harassed by this persevering duke
that they were obliged to implore succour from their
friends further south. As the castle was too important
a one to be lightly given up, the prince ordered a rein-
forcement, under the Earls of Cambridge and Pembroke,
to. march at once for its relief. On their arrival at
Belleperche, these camped opposite the besiegers, who, in
their turn, invited aid from all such knights and squires
INCIDENTS OF THE WAR. 257

of their own party, as were anxious to distinguish them-
selves by deeds of arms; an invitation that added con-
siderably to their numbers,

The two armies remained looking at each other for
fifteen days, and then the English commanders, tired of
doing nothing, sent a herald to the Duke of Bourbon,
inviting him to a pitched battle at any place he might
choose to name. This the duke, point-blank, refused,
sending word in reply that he was not going to fight just
to please them, neither would he quit his post until he
had retaken his castle of Belleperche. The rejoinder was
that since he would not fight he should, in three days’
time, between nine and twelve o’clock in the morning,
see his lady-mother placed on horseback, to be carried
off, and he might rescue her if he could. But not even
this threat moved the duke from his purpose. “ Tell
your masters,” said he, “that they wage a disgraceful
war when they seize an ancient lady from among her
servants, and carry her away prisoner; such a thing
was never before known.” He went on to say that it
would certainly be very unpleasant to him to see his
mother carried off in that way; but they must do it if
they thought fit, and he must rescue her as soon as he
was able. The castle, however, they could not take
away with them, and that he would have. He would
fight them fifty against fifty if they liked, and the vic-
tors should have the castle.

The English were no more disposed to accept the

(3) ly
258 | INCIDENTS OF THE WAR.

duke’s proposal than he had been to close with theirs.
So, as they had said, on the third-day, at nine in the
morning, the poor old duchess was set upon a hand-
somely caparisoned horse, and together with her ladies
and servants, marched off in company of the whole
army ; which, with trumpets sounding and banners
flaunting in the air, returned to Limousin, where their
prize was detained for some time by the Companions
who had first taken her and her castle.

An angry man was the duke when he saw his mother
led off in this manner. And an angry man was the
prince also with the whole affair. He did not wage war
upon women, he said. It was a disgrace to his chivalry
that he could not forgive, and never would have suffered
on the, part of his own people. Had they taken the
duchess, she should instantly have been set at liberty.
But those rovers, the Free Companions, were too little
under control for him to interfere authoritatively in the
case. Ungovernable, however, as they were, their re-
gard for the prince led them speedily to accede to his
scheme for ridding himself of the shame of keeping a
noble lady in captivity. This was to exchange the
duchess for Sir Simon Burley, one of his own knights,
and the school-fellow of his early days, who had fallen
into the hands of the French. So the duke got both
his mother, and his castle back again; for he marched
into the latter, as soon as the Companions marched out
of it. |




















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XV.
Che Sach of Limoges—The Drinee
returns to England.

HE death of Chandos, whose great name and
great deeds had hitherto held the prince’s



disaffected subjects in awe, led to the falling
away from their allegiance of several more of the
Gascon and Poitevin lords. And as this necessitated
increased efforts on the part of the English, to keep
their heads at all above water, Sir Robert Knolles was
summoned to England, to advise with the old king as
to what was best to be done.

Sir Robert was joyfully received at Windsor, and
one result of the anxious consultations held there was
the raising of a large army, which, under the command
of Sir Robert, was to land at Calais, and thence march
through the country to the assistance of the prince,
who was also to be joined by a tolerably respectable
body of men-at-arms and archers, under his brother,
the Duke of Lancaster.

The army under Sir Robert amounted to thirty
262 THE SACK OF LIMOGES.

thousand men. They landed in safety at Calais; and,
alter a few days’ rest in that neighbourhood, took their
road southwards, plundering and destroying the coun-
try, or else despoiling the inhabitants by making them
pay smartly to be spared. So terrible were Sir Robert’s
doings, that for many a long year afterwards the pin-
nacles and gable ends of ruined churches and houses ~
in the district which he had laid waste, were known,
in bitter jest, as “ Knolles’ mitres.” In this style he
marched along, until his destroying host made their
appearance before the gates of Paris. The king, with
the Constable of France, and a throng of nobles and
knights, was in the city at the time; but, follow- |
ing his old successful policy of avoiding an engagement,
he looked coolly on, while the fire and smoke of the
enemy’s ravages were daily visible to the affrighted
citizens. It was not an easy thing for these French
knights to lie there inactive, while all this destruction
was going on; but the king’s orders were imperative, -
and there was no contravening them. Charles was
encouraged in his passive resistance by the Lord de
Clisson, one of the most influential of his counsellors.
“Sir,” said he, “why should you employ your troops
against these madmen? Let them go about their
business ; they can’t deprive you of your kingdom, nor
drive you out of it by smoke.”

De Clisson was quite right. There was no driving
Charles out of his own France, either by smoke or any-
THE SACK OF LIMOGES. 263

thing else; and, finding that he could not by such
means proyoke a battle, Sir Robert was forced to pass
on his way towards the south.

Just as the English were breaking up their camp,
and had, by way of leave-taking, set fire to as many
villages round about as were yet unburned, there
occurred one of those incidents that are so strikingly
illustrative of chivalric notions in the middle ages. One
of the English knights, tired out with having no op-
portunity afforded him of showing his prowess in arms,
made a vow that he would, at any rate, advance as far
as the barriers of the city, and strike them with his
lance, as a parting insult to those intolerably forbearing
Frenchmen. Accordingly, lance in hand, target slung
round his neck, and completely armed, save his helmet,
which, as customary, was carried by his squire, he rode
towards the gates. On approaching them his helmet
was laced on, and then, striking spurs into his good
steed, he went prancing and curvetting right up to
them. As they were open, it was thought he meant to
enter the town ; but that was not his purpose. Deal-
ing the timbers a hearty blow with his lance, his vow
was accomplished, and he then turned to rejoin his
friends. The French lords and knights clustered about
the walls looking on, applauded his spirit and courage,
at the same time bidding him get away as fast as he
could, for they were unwilling so “ plucky ” a fellow
should come to any harm. But, though they gener-
264 THE SACK OF LIMOGES.

ously let him alone, this adventure cost the knight his
life, and that by very vulgar hands.

Riding back through the suburbs carelessly enough,
for he had no thought of danger, he was met by a sturdy
fellow of a butcher, who—with a heavy axe which he
carried, one, doubtless, for knocking down oxen—struck
the knight so violent a blow between the shoulders as
sent him flat on his horse’s neck. Just as he was re-
- covering himself, a second blow on the head, cut
through helmet and skull, causing him to drop sense-
less out of the saddle; while his terrified horse galloped
off at once to the spot where the squire was awaiting
their return. Seeing the horse come back riderless,
the man set off in alarm to look for his master, whom
he found lying there, with four fellows pounding away
at him as though they were hammering an anvil,
and who soon beat out of him what little life had been
left by the butcher’s axe. At this sight, the squire,
frightened for himself, fled as fast as he could, and the
poor knight, whose foolhardiness had brought him to
his end, being killed outright in this horrible fashion,
received honourable interment from the French lords,
by way of testifying their admiration of his boldness ;
for in those days such rash and foolish deeds were
held in great esteem—valour was honoured for its own
sake: people did not always stop to inquire whether it
was tempered by discretion. The knight’s English
friends were, of course, angry enough; not at their
THE SACK OF LIMOGES. 965

comrade’s folly, but at their losing him by the hands
of a pitiful butcher. It was in their eyes anything but
a respectable end for so valiant a knight; and so it
must be owned is it in ours!

Leaving Paris behind him, Sir Robert pressed on
towards the prince, but with diminishing forces ; for
some of the lords and knights under his banner took
to quarrelling among themselves, and with their brave
commander also, because, forsooth, they were much
too great men to serve under a simple knight. The
truth was that Sir Robert, who was of mean parentage
in Cheshire, had raised himself from the ranks,—as we —
should phrase it in these days,—having entered the
army as a common soldier during King Edward's
French wars ; and that illustrious monarch, who knew
a good soldier when he met with one, had advanced
him, solely on account of his valour, to his present de-
servedly high position. There was among these cap-
tains one special mischief-making gentleman, who, it
is supposed, had been bought by French gold ; and he
ended his grumbling by deserting with a large body of
men: a piece of treachery that afterwards cost him his
head. This was a severe blow to Sir Robert’s army,
but a worse was to follow. Du Guesclin, who had
been fetched from Spain and created Constable of
France, collected a large force, which he led out to that
part of the country where the army of the north was
moving about, with the intention of fighting, when they
266 THE SACK OF LIMOGES.

two met. Sir Robert, hearing of his approach, thought
it best to be beforehand with him, and as his companies
were scattered, sent orders to their various captains to
join him that he might attack the constable. Unfor-
tunately, before the junction could be effected, du
Guesclin fell in with one of these detachments, and a
sharp engagement ensued, in which, though the Eng-
lish stood their ground valiantly, they were entirely
defeated, every man of them being either killed or
made prisoner. |

His army being thus broken up, it was impossible
for Sir Robert to reach his destination in the south.
The only thing left for him was a retreat to the friendly
province of Brittany, where his people dispersed in
different directions, some taking service with other
commanders, while the remainder, whose zeal for com-
bating the French had evaporated, went quietly back
again to England. What sort of reception they met
there, we are not told. It may be supposed not to
have been a very enthusiastic one.

Du Guesclin treated his brave prisoners very courte-
ously, allowing them to go at large, on parole, until
they could procure their ransoms. He was a brave
man himself, and therefore knew how to respect valour
in others.

While these things were going on in the north, the
poor sinking prince was stung into a last effort to
grapple with his enemies in the south. The Dukes of
THE SACK OF LIMOGES. | 267

Berri, and Anjou, brothers of the French king, with
each of them a formidable army at his back, marched
towards Aquitaine, with the ultimate intention of join-
ing their forces, and besieging the prince himself in
Angouléme. They moved onwards, each in his route,
taking cities and castles on their way, until the whole
country was alarmed, and the prince, vowing his
enemies should never find him shut up in town or
fortress, but that he would, as of old, meet them in
the open field, determined to give them battle in per-
son. rom far and near his loyal subjects were sum-
moned to attend him; and the rendezvous being fixed
at Cognac, on the Charente, he proceeded thither with
the princess, and their second son Richard, then a child
of five years old.

Meanwhile the Duke of Anjou had advanced as far as
Linde, a town situated on the Dordogne, and occupied
by a strong garrison under a Gascon knight, named
Sir Thomas de Batefol. The duke, who had a mind
to take this town, ordered his forces before it, planted
his battering machines, and prepared to besiege it in
due form: Linde, he vowed, he would have, he would
not stir a foot until he had made it his own. At the
same time he contrived to make the inhabitants under-
stand that if they submitted to him quietly, it would
be decidedly the more comfortable plan for all parties.
The people of Linde were anxious to follow the example
of the other revolting towns, and as the duke’s fine
268 THE SACK OF LIMOGES.

promises to them were backed by still finer ones of
handsome bribes to the governor, who was to have
so much down and a pension for life, the whole
affair was very neatly arranged between them: the
gates were to be opened, and the duke was to take
peaceable possession of the town.

If a secret, however, be communicated to many per-
sons (as this shameful one had, of course, to be), it is apt
to ooze out; and so it was in the matter of the treacher-
ous surrender of the good town of Linde. It is not
known who was the leaky individual, but the fact is that
the whole arrangement was made known to the Earl of
Cambridge, who commanded at Bergerac, about three
miles off, the very night before it was to be carried out.

The news came like a thunder clap ; but there was
just time to disappoint the contracting parties. The
captal, and Sir Thomas Felton, who were with the earl,
declaring they would be present at the surrender of
the town, immediately set off thither with a consider-
able body of troops. Arriving at day-break, they com-
manded one of the gates to be opened, and riding right
through the town, never drew bridle till they reached
the opposite one, before which the French were already
crowded, awaiting its being thrown open by that dis-
reputable Sir Thomas, who was there to admit them.
The traitor had made a good bargain for himself,
but he did not live to enjoy it. The captal, springing
- from his horse, sword in hand, fell upon the knight,
THE SACK OF LIMOGES. 269

and, sternly telling him he should commit no more
treason, ran him through the body with such force that
the point of his weapon came out on the other side.
The French fled at sight of the captal and Felton, and
the town was saved for the time. The inhabitants
were, of course, dreadfully frightened lest they should
suffer for their share in the transaction ; the speedy
justice done on their governor, who lay there a dis-
honoured corpse, leading them to apprehend the worst
for themselves. But as they made a profusion of
apologies, and threw the whole blame upon the dead
man, who, of course; could not answer for himself, they
got off better than they deserved; though the captal
and Felton judged it expedient to remain in the town,
to secure their good behaviour, as long as the Duke of
Anjou camped in the neighbourhood.

It was just at this time that the French leaders be-
came aware of the prince’s design to take the field
against them in person ; and, feeble as he was known to
be, such was the terror inspired by his mere name, that
even the great du Guesclin advised that they should,
for the present, be content with what they had done,
and retire, leaving garrisons in the numerous towns
that had already transferred themselves to the French,
or been seized by them. The prince, it was thought,
could not last long, and when he was gone, they might
have their own way of it.

As the Duke of Anjou entered the prince’s territories
270 THE SACK OF LIMOGES.

by the way of Toulouse and Agen, the Duke of Berri
brought his troops into the Limousin, where, after
doing much mischief, he laid siege to the city of
Limoges. The Bishop of Limoges was one in whom
his lord, the prince, placed great confidence, of which,
as it afterwards turned out, he was utterly unworthy ;
for, while the Dukes of Berri and Bourbon were lying
before the city, he secretly entered into a treaty to
deliver it up to them. This was easily effected, as,
owing to the prince’s trust in the bishop, a very small
force of English, under Sir Hugh Calverly, had been
deemed sufficient to garrison Limoges; and the inhabi-
tants, being joined by their treacherous prelate, soon
overpowered Sir Hugh and his men. The gates were
then opened to the French, who marched in with much
parade, rested themselves for three days, and then, as
the Duke of Anjou had done, beat a retreat, retirmg
each one to his own post, and leaving a hundred men-
at-arms, under three French knights, to guard their
new and important acquisition.

The prince was in a rage when he heard of the trick
his friend the bishop had played him; and he swore by
the soul of his father—his most solemn oath—that he
would have Limoges back again, the very first thing
he did, and punish its slippery citizens severely.

Fair means were tried to begin with. The prince
sent heralds to the delinquents, with his commands that
they should return to their duty, and deliver up the
THE SACK OF LIMOGES. 971

bishop to him. But, trusting to their strong fortifica-
tions and garrison, the citizens contemptuously refused
to do either the one or the other. A more peremptory
summons was next conveyed to them, accompanied by
a threat of pulling their city down to the very ground,
and putting all its inhabitants to the sword, in case of
disobedience. But this had no better effect than the
former—nay, the herald himself, a privileged person,
was treated with insult, and his master was set at
defiance. Upon this the prince immediately left Cognac
with a large body of cavalry, archers, and other foot
soldiers, having a grand array of lords and knights with
him, among whom were his brothers, the Duke of Lan-
caster, and the Earl of Cambridge. His brother-in-law,
Lord Pembroke, was also one of the party.

The prince, still so weak that he could not sit on
horseback, was carried in a litter during this march.
On camping before the guilty city, he vowed he would
never quit his ground until it was at his mercy; and
seeing the determination of their powerful enemy, the
bishop and his friends began to repent very heartily of
having got themselves into such a scrape. Repentance,
however, came too late; they had not now the power,
if they had the will, to deliver up the city, for the
Frenchmen were masters of it, and they made very light
of the fears both of bishop and people; assuring them
they would undertake to deal with the prince who, spite
of his threats, should do no manner of harm to Limoges.
272 THE SACK OF LIMOGES.

It was all very well for them to talk largely in this
way; but they sang a different tune before long.

A careful examination of the city and its defences,
convinced the besiegers that they had little chance of
carrying it by storm. So far the garrison were right;
their fortifications were strong enough to keep out the
prince. But there are other ways of getting behind
stone walls, beside clambering over them, or beating them
down; and the prince, in whose warlike expeditions, a
strong corps of those useful fellows, we moderns call
‘‘sappers and miners,” was always to be found, decided
to attempt its capture by mining.

For a month or more, the miners kept steadily at
work. The prince would not even be tempted into
skirmishing with the hostile troops; that would have
been agreeable enough to the knightly feelings of both
sets of combatants, but it would not have contributed
to the end he had in view, which was to lay that
insolent city at his feet. For this purpose, humble pick-
axe and mattock were better adapted than more
chivalrous weapons; and the prince, who was a great
general, as well as a brave soldier, was not to be led
astray by brilliant achievements which conduced nothing
to the final result of his campaign. Self-denial is one
of the essential qualities of a good soldier. Such fool-
hardiness as that of the knight who rai all sorts of risk
in fulfilment of his vow to strike the barriers of the city

of Paris, is a military vice, not a military virtue.
THE SACK OF LIMOGES. 273

The prince was busy, and the garrison was not idle ;
but spite of their countermining (for mining is a game
that two can play at), at the end of the time mentioned,
his men had got on so well that they reported their
readiness to throw down a large portion of the wall,
whenever their commander thought fit to have it done.
1x o’clock next morning was the time fixed upon ; and
at that hour, the combustibles with which the mine was
filled, being set on fire, down toppled so great an extent
of grim stone wall, that the ditch was filled with it.
This formed a capital causeway for the English troops.
They strode rapidly over it, and passing through the
breach, soon beat down the gates and barriers with
their heavy and sharp axes.

The suddenness of the attack added to its success.
The besiegers, headed by the prince, his brothers and
other commanders, rushed into the town, and as he had
sworn, took terrible vengeance on the affrighted inhabi-
tants. It was a sad business; the once humane and
generous prince was indeed now “cruel,” as he had
always been “courageous as a lion,” and heedless of
entreaties for mercy, three thousand men, women, and
children paid with their lives for the crime of their
treacherous bishop.

How the prince should have so changed is inexplic-
able ; but changed he was, fearfully, when he could
sanction this horrid slaughter. He had been keeping
bad company, with Pedro the cruel, of whom this evil

(3) 18
274 _. HE SACK OF LIMOGES.

deed was more worthy.than of him who had stayed the
hand of that monster, after the battle of Najara.
Excuse for the prince there is none, nor do we care to
seek it. Possibly the irritation of long continued, dis-
gqualifiying illness, at a time when he must have been
panting to be in the saddle, once more leading his
valiant few to victory, against the swarming armies of
France, added to indignant anger at the base conduct
of the bishop and citizens of Limoges, may in some
degree account for this unwonted outbreak of the evil
passions of our human nature. And it must not be
forgotten that, five centuries ago, death, and human
suffering were much more lightly thought of than they
are now. | |
One party. of the besiegers hastened to the epis--
copal palace, and seized the prelate, the real cause of all
‘these horrors. He was dragged with little ceremony
before the incensed prince, who flashing his angry
eyes upon him, answered his prayers for mercy by
assuring him he should lose his head for his pains;
and. so saying, he at once ordered the culprit from his ©
presence.
The three French knights whom the Duke of Anjou
had left to-defend the city, seeing the state of affairs,
drew up their men in good order, with an old wall at —

"their backs to protect their rear, and resolved, like



brave soldiers, to sell their lives as dearly as possible.



*- “Phey were attacked heartily by the prince’s brothers,
THE SACK OF LIMOGES. 275

Lancaster, Cambridge, and Pembroke ; who advancing
on foot set upon them so stoutly that notwithstanding
the gallant defence of the Frenchmen, their men were all
slain ortaken, The three royal brothers matched them-
selves singly against the three French knights, and the
fight between them was so well maintained that the
prince himself (who was still borne in a litter), drew
near to watch the combat, for pure love of feats of
arms,

Personal valour, however, was now unavailing to
retrieve the day’s disasters, and having done enough for
honour, the Frenchmen gave up their swords in token
of surrender. But though they could not rescue the
doomed city, their gallantry had its reward; for the
prince, who had been looking on, was so delighted with
the prowess of these knights, that for their sakes he
stopped the murderous work that was going on in the
city. Limoges, was of course, given up to plunder ;
and when the English had pillaged it to their heart’s
content, they set it on fire, drawing off afterwards, with
their spoil and prisoners, to Cognac again.

The guiltiest man in that unfortunate town, fared the
best. The bishop did not lose his head, as the prince
had promised him, and as he verily deserved to do.
His escape is said to have been owing to the friendli-
ness of the Duke of Lancaster, who asked his brother
to place the prisoner in his hands, under pretence of
seeing execution done uponhim. Instead of that, how-
276 THE PRINCE RETURNS TO ENGLAND.

ever, the duke suggested to the pope that he should
intercede for the bishop’s life; and as a request from
the pope could not well be refused, the prince ordered
that the offender should be given up, though, it is
said, at the same time he regretted that the prelate’s
head was not off before the arrival from Rome, of this
unpleasant “begging-letter.”

As winter now approached, the time for campaigning
was at an end ; so the prince’s army was disbanded, and
sent into quarters for that useless season.

The siege of Limoges was our hero’s last campaign.
His next battle was to be with an enemy that never yet
was known to spare; and who finally bears down the best
and the bravest : Death had been menacing the prince
in the distance, and was now gradually drawing nearer
and nearer, for the final struggle. Before striking
down the gallant father, however, his cold hand closed
upon the innocent son; or rather let us say, God,
Whose servant death is, took that innocent child to
himself.

In a few months after his return from Limoges, worn
and exhausted with battle, and saddened doubtless by
the unwonted cruelty into which his angry feelings had
betrayed him—cruelty so unlike him—the prince lust
his eldest son Edward, a boy of seven years old. The
poor child died at Bordeaux, in the early part of the
year 1371, to the great affliction of his parents and the
whole court.
THE PRINCE RETURNS TO ENGLAND. 277

ihe prince now took the advice of his physicians to
return to England on account of his health, as his
native air might, it was thought, restore him. Previous
to his setting sail from Bordeaux, he gave up the poor
remains of the once stately province of Aquitaine, to
the care of his brother, the Duke of Lancaster. All
the barons and knights of the principality who con-
tinued faithful to their allegiance were summoned to
Bordeaux to take leave of their prince, and do homage
to his successor. Being assembled in the hall of
audience, the prince told them that so long as his
health had permitted him, he had striven to be a good
lord to his vassals, and to defend them from all their
enemies. Now he was compelled to leave them, and
he besought them to be as loyal and obedient to his
brother, as they had been to him. They willingly
pledged themselves to this, and in token of their fealty
(as was the manner of those times), kneeling before the
duke, placed their hands between his, and kissed
him.

The fleet that was to convey the prince to England
was now awaiting him in the Garonne; and he went
on board as soon as this Important ceremony was at an
end. His wife, and now only son Richard, were with
him, as well as his two step-sons ; and favourable winds
speedily landed them in safety at Southampton. Two
days’ rest for the invalid were needful here; and then
his stalwart knights and attendants taking horse, while
278 THE PRINCE RETURNS TO ENGLAND.

he himself was obliged again to have the unwonted in-
dulgence of a litter, the cavalcade moved on to Windsor,
where the king received his great son very tenderly.
After a short time had been spent there, the prince
took up his residence at his Manor of Berkham-
stead.





cite anasto 7 ty ge 7 AP
‘ " Far ’
i

NG





XVI.

Che Meath of the Drince.

oy FFATRS went on from bad to worse after the
GRAY! prince’s departure from Aquitaine. Skilful



commanders, valorous knights, stout men-
at-arms, were all in vain; there was no stemming the
current of popular opinion, which flowed on steadily,
in favour of converting that English principality into
a French province. It is no easy matter to crush out
nationality ; and this was the task that King Edward
had set himself to perform in the south-west of France,
and in which he was thus signally discomfited. One
after another the Gascon lords who had sworn allegiance
to the prince’s brother, as his deputy, quietly trans-
ferred that allegiance, together with their own lands,
to the French king, and there was no power to punish
their bad faith. These things were by no means ex-
hilarating to the princely invalid in his retirement at
Berkhamstead. That under such circumstances he
could entirely refrain from chafing and fretting over
his own enforced inactivity, was not to be expected;
282 THE DEATH OF THE PRINCE.

and his anxiety and vexation contributed to disappoint
the hopes that had been entertained of the beneficial
effects of a return to his own country. Sweet English
air could not counteract their influence.

The Duke of Lancaster, had been left behind in
Aguitaine, but he presently got tired of his post, and
threw it up. He had meanwhile married the eldest
daughter of the late King Pedro, being advised by his
courtiers that it would be a charitable act on his part
to “conifort” the princess in this particular fashion ;
advice which he took, seeing that in return for his
“compassionate” deed, he acquired a claim to the throne
of Castile, when King Henry could be got out of the
way. The Earl of Pembroke was appointed governor
of Aquitaine in the duke’s place. He had made him-
self liked in the province, spite of his nonsense about
that expedition of John Chandos’, and great things
were expected from him when he came to rule the
turbulent Gascons. Like many other great expectations,
however, they were doomed to be disappointed. When
the earl’s fleet had arrived off Rochelle, on the 22d of
June 1372, he found the port blocked up, by a large
naval force, which, ostensibly belonging to the Spaniards,
had in reality been sent thither by the King of France,
acting in concert with Henry of Castile, who, no doubt,
greatly enjoyed thus plaguing his old enemies, the
English.
for the Spaniards were numerous, and the English.
THE DEATH OF THE PRINCE. 283

though few, were full of spirit. But neither spirit nor
obstinate valour could avail against superior strength,
and the use of a new and terrific means of destruction.
Fire-ships, it is said, were first used in this sea-fight;
by their agency thirteen of the largest English vessels
were burnt, and after two days’ hard work of it, the
English were totally defeated, the earl himself, together
with many of his best knights being taken prisoners.

The state of feeling in the prince’s town of Rochelle,
may be understood from the eireumstance of its in-
habitants looking quietly on while this fatal battle was
being fought, and never attempting to render the least
assistance to their fellow subjects, though earnestly
urged to do so by the governor, and some other brave
knights who were with him. After this, we cannot be
surprised to find the Rochellers presently transferring
themselves and their city, in a formal manner, to
Charles of France, having first had the precaution to
make particularly good terms for themselves.

The Spaniards were so set up with having managed
to beat the English, and at sea too, that they were
perfectly riotous in their joy, during the day or two of
their remaining at anchor before Rochelle. Then, on
the afternoon of the 24th, when the tide was at flood,
with colours flying (pennons floating frem their mast-
heads, of such length, that they sometimes dipped in
the undulating waters), and a prodigious “row” of
drums and trumpets, they sailed off to their own coast
284 THE DEATH OF THE PRINCE.

of Galicia, carrying with them the earl, and their other
unfortunate prisoners, who, according to the barbarous
Spanish custom of that day, were chained like criminals
as soon as they were put on shore. The earl was sub-
sequently ransomed, but died on his way home.

King Edward was almost overwhelmed when news
of the destruction of his armament, and the capture of
Pembroke, reached England. It was more vexation
also for the prince, who had already had the grief of
losing the captal; that gallant commander being taken
prisoner in a skirmish before the castle of Soubise, to
which the French had laid siege. The captal, as con-
stable of Aquitaine, was the prince’s right hand; and
the French greatly rejoiced when once they had got
him strictly guarded within the walls of the temple at
Paris. Misfortunes, it is said, never come single.
They were “thick and threefold” just now, for in
addition to these two serious ones, a third provoking
humiliation fell to the lot of the English monarch and
his son. Evan, of Wales, supposed to be son of one
of the Welsh princes whom Edward had put to death,
entered heart and soul into the service of the French
king, in order to revenge his own losses of parent and
territory. At the head of four thousand Frenchmen,
he attacked the English in Guernsey, beat them soundly,
and would have damaged them still further had he not
been recalled by Charles to more important service in
France.
THE DEATH OF THE PRINCE. 985

Towards the end of August in this same year there
was so much amendment in the prince’s health that he
resolved to join a new expedition, which the king was
fitting out against the obstinate Gascons and their
abettors. He was growing desperate, and vowed, that
he would now either retake all that he had lost,
whether it was by treachery, or honest fighting, or lose
all that remained.

The immediate occasion of this expedition was the
condition of a considerable number of the king’s faithful
subjects, who being besieged in Thouars, by du Gues-
clin, were reduced to such straits as compelled them
to promise to surrender, if after communicating their
distress to King Edward, he should be unable to
succour them before a certain time, Michaelmas in that
year. The army got together for this purpose was a
very large one; a special summons being issued, com-
manding that all persons throughout the kingdom,
capable of bearing arms, should present themselves,
properly equipped at Southampton, where four hundred
vessels were moored to carry them across the seas.
Previous to embarkation a solemn assembly was held
at Westminster, where Richard of Bordeaux, the infant
son of the prince, was duly acknowledged as successor
to King Edward, in case, (as was too likely) the prince
should die before his father.

The king, his sons, then the great barons of the
realm, swore to maintain the rights of young Richard,
286 THE DEATH OF THE PRINCE.

and the love that the whole people of England had for
the prince, caused this to be a very popular measure.

This weighty business settled, the king and his sons
went on board, and the fleet left Southampton, for
Rochelle, where it was intended to land the army.
But there was now no break in King Edward’s ill
fortune. Those propitious winds that were wont to
carry him over to the shores of France no longer filled
his sails; amd after beating about for nine weeks, they
were reduced to the humiliating necessity of sailing
back to England without striking one stroke in defence
of the few possessions in France that still remained to
the English, They had a spanking breeze to take
them home again! Oh, if it had but blown in the
right direction !

The army was disbanded on reaching shore, for it
was now of no use; and Edward grumbled out that
there never was a king who had fought so little as
Charles of France, nor one who had ever given him
more trouble. The “passive resistance” system had
served Charles well.

After this unlucky termination of the expedition,
the French king required the fulfilment of their pro-
mise from the knights pent up at Thouars; and they
had no excuse for refusing it. |

It might have been expected that the Duke of
Brittany, whose quarrels the English had espoused
zealously, and with so much success, would have proved
THE DEATH OF THE PRINCE. 287

a valuable ally to them during their declining fortunes
in France. The duke would fain have been so, he
would have liked to help them, actively, instead of
passively only. Gratitude impelled him to this course,
for he said, that “such as he was, the English and their
king had made him, he owed everything he had to
King Edward.” But his people were so thoroughly
French, that he dared not stir in favour of his old patrons.
In fact his nobles, in the most polite and friendly
manner in the world informed him, that if he sided
with the English, they would throw him overboard
immediately ; so their “dear lord,” as they called him,
had to keep quiet, and swallow his vexation as he best
could. |

This fruitless voyage to Rochelle, is almost the last
glimpse that we have of the Black Prince. Hopeless of
ever regaining health and vigour enough for active duty,
he formally resigned the principality which his father
had conferred upon him, and which was rapidly slipping
away from under English rule. He was too feeble even
to take any conspicuous part in home affairs; though
there, as well as abroad, were disorders, which he, in
his better days, might and would have remedied, and
which must sorely have oppressed his spirit in the melan-
choly seclusion of his Hertfordshire home. The old
king, doubtless in his dotage, did things that not only
lowered him in the esteem and affection of his subjects,
but also excited their strong discontent, which parlia-
288 THE DEATH OF THE PRINCE.

ment took the liberty of expressing pretty plainly. His
ambitious son, John of Gaunt, the Duke of Lancaster
of this story, took advantage of the king’s failings to
lay hold of more power than fairly fell to him, and
this again added to the public uneasiness ; while the
prince, who might have ruled all hearts in his father’s
dominions, was obliged to look, helplessly, on, capable
only of suffering, not of acting. Once only the expir-
ing flame leaped up, and the prince, spite of his over-
whelming malady, repaired to Westminster to see
justice done on some of his brother’s creatures who had
abused the king’s authority entrusted to them, to the
oppression of his subjects. One of these gentlemen,
not knowing with whom he had to deal, thought to bribe
the prince with a thousand pounds, concealed in an
innocent looking fish-barrel, But it was indignantly
sent back; with an intimation that the offender must
bear the consequences of his misdeeds: as “he had
brewed so he must drink.” |

The end came at last; not such an one as might
have been expected for the hero of Crecy, Poitiers, and
Najara. Death on the battle-field, so coveted by the
knights of that period, as the most glorious that could
befall a soldier, was not the fate of him, the best
soldier of them all. Consumed by relentless disease,
he was to meet, and succumb to, his last enemy on
that sorrowful couch at Westminster, and the time was
immediately at hand. On the 7th of June, of the
THE DEATH OF THE PRINCE. 289

same year, 1376, in which, spite of increasing illness,
he had made himself a terror to the evil doers, who
had imposed upon the old king’s imbecility, a fresh
accession of his malady put an end to all hope for his
important life, and compelled his attendants to apprize
their master of his rapidly approaching doom. The
announcement was one for which he was not unpre-
pared ; his sufferings had been patiently, and religiously
endured, and now he sedulously addressed himself to
the last duties of a Christian man. His worldly affairs
were first set in order, in a manner that showed his
appreciation of those who had faithfully served him;
and this occupied much of the short remaining time of
him to whom time was about to be no more. The
next day was Trinity Sunday, a festival which the
prince had always been accustomed to observe with
especial solemnity; and he broke out into a pathetic
prayer that as he had ever loved that holy day, and
caused others to celebrate it with him to the honour
of the Blessed Trinity, he might now be at once called
to his rest to keep the festival in Heaven with Him to
Whose glory it was dedicated. Tokens of good will
were then distributed to those around him, and a
solemn charge given to his little son, soon to be King
of England, that he should see his father’s will in these
matters religiously respected.

A painful incident followed. The prince feeling
his last hour draw near, had commanded that his door

(3) 19
290 THE DEATH OF THE PRINCE.

should be closed to none, not even to the meanest
page of his household; and among the sad and sorrow-
ful throng who presented themselves, came one whose
motive for entering that awful chamber, it would not
be easy to divine. This was Sir Richard Stury, one of
those evil doers for whose just punishment the prince
had thrown off the lethargy of mortal illness, but who
knew right well that though already condemned for
his misdeeds, he need fear no penalty when once the
ghastly form before him was motionless upon his bier.

The prince was at this time in his death-agony, yet
seeing the villain advance, he bade him draw near to
behold that which he had long desired to see; and
when Stury vehemently affirmed that he had never
desired the death of the prince, the dying man repeated
his charge, adding that the fellow’s own conscience
assured him that so long as the prince lived, his evil
deeds would never go unpunished; now his righteous
avenger was going whither God called him, and to Him
he remitted the wrong doer, praying that He would
put an end to his “evil deeds.”

Stury, penitent or rather perhaps over-awed for the
moment, wept and prayed the prince to pardon him.
But the latter too well knew the value of his peniten-
tial tears: “God that is just,” said he, “reward thee
accord:ng to thy deserts; I will not that thou trouble

me any longer; depart forth of my sight not hereafter
to see my face again !”


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DEATH OF THE BLACK PRINCE
page 291
THE DEATH OF THE PRINCE, 291

The agitation of this cruel disturbance of his last
moments shook out the few remaining sands of the
prince’s life. Seeing him near his end, the Bishop of
Bangor earnestly exhorted him to forgive his enemies,
and to crave pardon alike from God and man for all
his offences against them; but, faint and breathless,
the prince could but respond by a feeble “I will, I
will,” often repeated. With well-meant, but pitiless
pertinacity, the bishop told him that was not sufficient,
he must deliberately express his forgiveness, and hope
of mercy for himself. For one short moment the
deathly languor passed away; and then, with folded
hands and eyes raised to heaven, the prince solemnly
gave thanks to God for all His mercies, beseeching Him
to pardon his offences, and desiring forgiveness of all
men whom he had himself offended.

They were his last words; his morning prayer was
granted, and before the close of that Trinity Sunday
his spirit had passed away to keep, as we may well
believe, more high and holy festival in the immediate
presence of that glorious Trinity Whom he had hon-
oured upon earth.

Edward, the Black Prince, was but in his forty-
sixth year when he thus died, to the inexpressible grief
of the whole nation which had once looked forward to
the wise, just, and glorious reign of one, renowned for
valour and goodness, throughout the known world ; and
on whose manhood there rested but that sole stain of
292 THE DEATH OF THE PRINCE.

the Sack of Limoges. A stain it was, and a deep one.
No excuse can be found for it. Perhaps, as has been
said, it may be accounted for, by his own peculiar
circumstances of intense provocation, and the long con-
tinued irritation of disqualifying illness during a period
which imperatively called for the most vigorous exertion
both of mind and body.

He lay in state for some days at the palace, where
vast numbers flocked to take a last look of one, so be-
loved and honoured, that even in France, by royal
command, a solemn funeral service for him was per-
formed in presence of the king and his chief nobility.
His funeral finally took place, with much pomp and
real mourning, in Canterbury Cathedral; the long,
attendant train passing, sad and slow, through the city
where, nineteen years before, the glittering cavalcade
that welcomed the victor of Poitiers, had held its
triumphant march. A stately marble monument still.
existing, was erected over his remains. There may be
seen the recumbent mailed figure of this mighty prince,
with the hands, according to the touching fashion of
the olden time, meekly joined as if in prayer; while
around it are displayed the helmet, coat of mail, gaunt-
lets, shield, and sheath of the sword, that once gleamed
so terrible in battle to hostile Frenchman and Spaniard. |
The inscription, in old French, tells us that:—“Here
lieth the noble prince, the Lord Edward, eldest son
of the very noble King Edward IIL, late Prince of
THE DEATH OF THE PRINCE. 293

Aquitaine and Wales, Duke of Cornwall, and Earl of
Chester, who died on Trinity Sunday, the 8th of J une,
in the year of grace, 1376. On whose soul God have
mercy! Amen.”

“The good fortune of England,” says an old writer,
“as 1f it had been inherent in his person, flourished in
his health, languished in his sickness, and expired at
his death, with whom died all the hope of Englishmen.
During his life they feared no invasion of the enemy,
nor encounter in battle; for he assailed no nation but
he overcame, and besieged no city that he did not
take.” |

It may give us some notion of the way in which our
ancestors of five centuries ago viewed things, when we
mention that it was commonly thought at the time,
that the peculiar position of two planets, Saturn and
Jupiter, had something to do with the prince’s
lamented death. But nobody doubted that a huge
bearded comet (one with a tail perhaps as long as the
glorious one of 1858), which was seen in the heavens
the year preceding his decease, predicted it, if it did
uot actually cause it !

The captal, who was still ungenerously detained in
prison at the time of the prince’s death, did not long
survive him. Grief for the loss of his master is said
to have shortened the life of this gallant Englishman,
who died in captivity. He might have had his liberty,
had he been willing to take an oath never again to
294 THE DEATH OF THE PRINCE.

bear arms against France. Death in prison was pref-
erable to liberty on such terms; and the name of
John de Greilly, Captal de Buch, ought to be had in
lasting honour by his countrymen, as patriot as well as
hero.

After the death of his renowned son, King Edward
retired, mourning and breaking his heart, to his palace
at Eltham where, in about a twelvemonth, he too died ;
it is said, forlorn, friendless, forsaken by every one
save a priest, who, bending over the dying man, spoke
words of heavenly consolation in his ear, fast closing
to all earthly sounds. Humbly did the royal penitent
acknowledge his errors; and, with that mighty Name
upon his lips, which can alone assure sinful men of
pardon, for His sake Who bought it upon the bitter
cross, the great Edward yielded up his weary spirit.

Those splendid victories in France, which marked
the reign of King Edward and his heroic son, were like
a dream of conquest; for when his grey head was laid
low, by the side of loving Philippa, the last fragment of
them had disappeared, with the exception of Calais;
whose loss was destined to break the already more than
half-broken heart of one of his most unhappy successors.

The Princess of Wales, the once beautiful Joan, sur-
vived her lord for some years. She, too, was honoured
and loved by the English people. In one of the fierce
outbreaks of the citizens of London, the populace
THE DEATH OF THE PRINCE. 295

sacrificed their murderous resentment against the Duke
of Lancaster (who had given them violent offence), to
her intercession ; contenting themselves instead, with
hanging his coat-of-arms upside down in the streets, by
way of intimating that they considered him a dishon-
oured knight. And on another occasion she stood be-
tween him and the wrath of her son King Richard ;
earning for herself the blessing bestowed upon the
““ peacemakers,” by painfully travelling from the one to
the other, until she had reconciled the two : thus avert-
ing the horrors of a civil war which was on the point
of arising out of their quarrel.

Not even her virtues and popularity, however, could
shield her from insult and violence at the hands of Wat
Tyler’s vagabond host during their famous insurrection.
Marching upon London from Kent, they fell in with the
princess and her ladies returning from a pilgrimage to
Canterbury,—one of the acts of piety of that day,—set
upon her carriage, treated herself with base insolence,
and after frightening them all almost out of their lives,
suffered them to make their escape to the Tower, where
they hoped to find safety with the king. but while he
went to meet the rebels at Mile End, the Tower was
surprised by others of them who had remained in
the city to do mischief. These wretches rushed hither
and thither, killing and slaying without mercy, broke
into the apartments of the princess, and smashed even
her bed, so that she was carried out fainting ; in which
296 THE DEATH OF THE PRINCE.

state she was got away, by the river, to another of the
king’s palaces, where she remained, half dead with
terror, until the insurrection was subdued, and the king
himself hastened to comfort his mother with the good
news. _ Her death, nine years after that of the prince,
is said to have been caused by grief for the apprehended
fate of her son, the Earl of Huntingdon (the son of her
first husband), who having, in a fit of passion, killed
Lord Ralph Stafford, was, spite of the pleadings of his
mother, threatened with capital punishment for his
crime : a doom which, however, he eventually escaped.

The Black Prince left but one child, a son, after-
wards Richard II. Of his fate none can speak cer-
tainly, for the walls of Pontefract Castle still keep their
melancholy secret. He died childless; so that, literally,
in the “next generation,” the “ posterity ” of the hero
of Cregy and Poitiers was “destroyed,” and “his name”
“blotted out !”

** Deus judex est. Hune humiliat, et hunc exaltat !’’—Ps, Ixxv.


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the late Rev. W. K. Tweepiz, D.D. With Hight Tinted Plates.
Extra foolscap 8vo, cloth, gilt edges. Price 3s.



EZ xperiences of hristia XX ork.

ASTOR’S SKETCHES ; or, Conversations with Anxious
Inquirers on the Way of Salvation. By the Rev. J. 8. SPENCER,
D.D. Price 3s. 6d.
IGHT AT EVENING TIME; or, Missionary Labour
amongst the Sick. Post 8vo. Price 2s. 6d.

HE CHRISTIAN TEACHER IN SUNDAY
SCHOOLS. By the Rev. R. Sreere, D.D., Author of “Doing
Good.” Post 8vo. Price 2s. 6d.



T. NELSON AND SONS, LONDON, EDINBURGH, AND NEW YORK.
Flethe “ Sichonberg-Gfotta” Sserics.

Crown 8vo. Cloth, 6s. 6d. each.



HRONICLES OF THE SCHONBERG - COTTA

FAMILY.
THe Times.—“ The book is thoroughly Protestant, in the highcst

and best sense of the word.... We are confident that most women will
read it with keen pleasure, and that those men who take it up will not
easily lay it down without confessing that they have gained some pure
and ennobling thoughts from the perusal.”

HE VICTORY OF THE VANQUISHED. A Story
of the First Century.

ATHEN ZuUM.—‘‘ The authoress keeps up in the present story the
characteristics which have marked its predecessors; and the care shown
in reproducing the manners of the first century does not render the per-
sons either stiff or unnatural.”

TARY OF MRS. KITTY TREVYLYAN: A Story of
the Times of Whitefield and the Wesleys.

MNHE DRAYTONS AND THE DAVENANTS: A Story
of the Civil Wars.

N BOTH SIDES OF THE SEA: A Story of the

Commonwealth and the Restoration.

A\VINIFRED BERTRAM, AND THE WORLD SHE
LIVED IN.

HE MARTYRS OF SPAIN AND THE LIBERA-
TORS OF HOLLAND ; or, The Story of the Sisters Dolores and
Costanza Cazalla.

NS RETCHES OF CHRISTIAN LIFE IN ENGLAND
IN THE OLDEN TIME.

pA8Y OF BROTHER BARTHOLOMEW, WITH
OTHER TALES AND SKETCHES OF CHRISTIAN LIFE
IN DIFFERENT LANDS AND AGES.

W ANDERINGS OVER BIBLE LANDS AND SEAS.

With Panorama of Jerusalem.

PoEMS by the Author of ‘‘Chronicles of the Schonbere-
Cotta Family. ” CONTENTS :—The Women of the Gospels—The
Three Wakings—Songs and Hymns, &. Crown 8vo, gilt edges.

HE VOICE OF CHRISTIAN LIFE IN SONG; or
Hymns and Hymn Writers of Many Lands and Ages,



T. NELSON AND SONS, LONDON, EDINBURGH, AND NEW YORK
HOME BOOKS OF EXAMPLE AND ENCOURAGEMENT,



ILLING TO BE USEFUL; or, Principle and Duty.

Illustrated in the Story of Edith Alison. With Coloured

Frontispiece and Vignette, and Six Tinted Plates. Extra foolscap 8vo,
cloth, gilt edges. Price 3s.

IND WORDS AWAKEN KIND ECHOES; or, Ilus-

trations of the Power of Kindness. With Coloured Frontispiece

and Vignette, and Six Tinted Plates. Extra foolscap 8vo, cloth, gilt
edges. Price 3s.

HRISTIAN PRINCIPLE IN LITTLE THINGS. A

Book for Girls. Foolscap 8vo. With Coloured Frontispiece and

Vignette, and Six Tinted Plates. Extra foolscap 8vo, cloth, gilt edges.
Price 2s. 6d.

CHOOL-BOY HEROES: The Story of Maurice Gray
and Carl Adler. By the late Rev. J.W. ALEXANDER, D.D. With

Coloured Frontispiece and Vignette, and Six Tinted Plates. Extra
foolscap 8vo, cloth, gilt edges. Price 3s.

HRISTIAN CHARACTER. A Book for Young Ladies.
By the Rev. H. NEwcoms. With Eight Tinted Plates. Extra
foolscap 8vo, cloth, gilt edges. Price 3s.



LESSONS FROM GREAT LIVES FOR YOUNG READERS,

HED-TIME AND HARVEST; or, Sow Well and Reap

Well. By the late Rev. W. K. Twiepiz, D.D. With Coloured

Frontispiece and Vignette, and Six Tinted Plates. Extra foolscap 8vo,
cloth, gilt edges. Price 3s.

OUTHFUL DILIGENCE AND FUTURE GREAT-

NESS. By thelate Rev. W. K. Tweepize, D.D. With Coloured

Frontispiece and Vignette, and Six Tinted Plates. Extra foolscap 8vo,
cloth, gilt edges. Price 3s.

UCCESS IN LIFE: What it is, and how Attained. A
Book for Young Men. With Coloured Frontispiece and Vignette,

and Six Tinted Plates. Extra foolscap 8vo, cloth, gilt edges. Price 3s.
(PIADES OF THE BOYHOOD OF GREAT PAINTERS.
By Lapy Jervis. With Coloured Frontispiece and Vignette,

and Six Tinted Plates. Extra foolscap 8vo, cloth, gilt edges. Price 3s.



Wew BWemperance Prize Wales.

RANK OLDFIELD ; or, Lost and Found. By the Rev.
T P. Wriuson, M.A., Rector of Smethcote. With Five Engrav-
ings. Post 8vo, cloth. Price 3s. 6d.

IWS TROUBLES; or, Triedand True. By M. A. Pau
| With Five Engravings. Post Svo, cloth. Price 3s. 6d.



tT NELSON AND SONS, LONDON, EDINBURGH, AND NEW YORK.
THE PRIZE LIBRARY OF TRAVEL AND ADVENTURE.
—
Price TWO SHILLINGS Eacu.
EXTRA FooLscap, CLOTH. COPIOUSLY ILLUSTRATED.

FAR IN THE FOREST;; or, Pictures of Life and

Scenery in the Wilds of Canada. By Mrs. Traruu, Author of

“‘The Canadian Crusoes,” &c. With Coloured Frontispiece and Vig-
nette, and Twenty-two Engravings.

ICTURES OF TRAVEL IN FAR-OFF LANDS. A
Companion to the Study of Geography.—CENTRAL AMERICA.
With Fifty Engravings. |
ICTURES OF TRAVEL IN FAR-OFF LANDS. —
SoutH AMERICA. With Fifty Engravings.

ReEXD THE WORLD. A Story of Travel Compiled
from the Narrative of Ida Pfeiffer. By D. Murray SMITH.
With Tinted Frontispiece and Vignette, and Thirty-Five Engravings.

RULNED CITIES OF BIBLE LANDS. By the late
Rev. W. K. Twreepiz, With Tinted Frontispiece and Vignette,
and Sixty Engravings.
HE VALLEY OF THE NILE: Its Tombs, Temples,
and Monuments. By W. H. DavENPoRT ADAMS. With Forty-
two Engravings.

OCTOR KANE, THE ARCTIC HERO. A Narrative

of his Adventures and Explorations in the Polar Regions. By
M. Jones. With Coloured Frontispiece and Vignette, and Thirty-five
Engravings.

| OME AMID THE SNOW; or, Warm Hearts in Cold
Regions. By Caprain CHARLES EDr, R.N. With Tinted Fron-
tispiece and Vignette, and Twenty-eight Engravings.

io AND TRAVEL IN TARTARY, THIBET, AND
CHINA. Being a Narrative of the Abbé THuc’s Travels in the
Far Hast. By M. Jones. With Coloured Frontispiece and Vignette,
and Fifty Engravings.
N INEVEH AND ITS STORY. By M. Jones. With
Coloured Frontispiece and Vignette, and Fifty Engravings.
UADRUPEDS: What They Are, and Where Found. A
Book of Zoology for Boys. By CAPTAIN Mayne REID. With
Coloured. d Frontispiece and Vignette, and Nineteen Page-Engravings.
rn ne

LOWER STORIES AND THEIR LESSONS. A Book
for the Young. With Coloured Frontispiece and Vignette, and
Thirty Illustrations.

WONDERS OF THE PLANT WORLD; or, - Curiosities

of Vegetable Life. With Notices of Remarkable Plants, Trees,
and Flowers. With Eighty Engravings.



T NELSON AND SONS, LONDON, EDINBURGH, AND NEW YORK.




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23d6a8a25baf4deff9555054517f0ebf9627d6c8
'2012-05-25T18:02:14-04:00'
describe
'414252' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIEU' 'sip-files00146.jpg'
81539a4a6a6ede4431fb4d32f6f60326
b5efe18843ca1a8afdf7f84b97660e0782a2013d
'2012-05-25T18:04:19-04:00'
describe
'173707' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIEV' 'sip-files00179.QC.jpg'
e9797308ef5ac2a587acdb58bf8e2664
a837a36bfafe4f1a9d54b1c408aacf15f72b7700
'2012-05-25T18:02:13-04:00'
describe
'405196' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIEW' 'sip-files00219.jpg'
ea1b4de955cf29a64529b46af8fed514
20229e0773572856666d313ab0dee220d6bdc822
'2012-05-25T18:02:55-04:00'
describe
'56591' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIEX' 'sip-files00313thm.jpg'
76a55e4549cd83397cde1bc63366edc2
529a51b6f51cb0648841235f48f93959637bb678
'2012-05-25T18:04:58-04:00'
describe
'2524' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIEY' 'sip-files00313.txt'
c6395e2c791529775f796dc2f3881684
b748b177e706a717172982c02d0fb827a9781a6e
'2012-05-25T18:09:35-04:00'
describe
'218' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIEZ' 'sip-files00001.pro'
a4d1c4b515466791778deee999ac3a18
e9f8c0ffdca30c6409f9bb83923dfbf5c6407dee
'2012-05-25T18:10:05-04:00'
describe
'1591' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIFA' 'sip-files00175.txt'
2f6d82b9e6a7cd3df122ec8e5e70292f
91dc1f6a3cd9bd8b8922c16cec9f4ef11d809f23
describe
'39683' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIFB' 'sip-files00089.pro'
4090b7bb42df79b8691c3197ef16636b
5d1ae405debc7f866fed2dde66648968e8333527
'2012-05-25T18:00:08-04:00'
describe
'1697268' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIFC' 'sip-files00273.tif'
a9db672b9d6505116482cd5cf2bc339c
681f9007ba0121a6099481c0cf1caf1738f9d5ed
'2012-05-25T18:09:56-04:00'
describe
'1524' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIFD' 'sip-files00077.txt'
bd659fface2814285fec0f3579506037
27b64de947eafd8347d2ce4437d89086ddf241d8
'2012-05-25T18:06:51-04:00'
describe
'1526' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIFE' 'sip-files00233.txt'
4f5e5f7fe871dbb7e71027ef5a5ca3ee
76cbbd05084adc017142fb3054f9f07c1102f622
'2012-05-25T18:05:51-04:00'
describe
'395593' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIFF' 'sip-files00234.jpg'
ec89dff81041070889563618609c51e2
55084256d1d91f4d7a2ebd12d62bdfbc5d6b5860
'2012-05-25T18:02:23-04:00'
describe
'1509' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIFG' 'sip-files00089.txt'
911ec4f1466af39294bd24da67a105fc
3939e10edfd1b6553a31c9b52a0bbd2584318dba
'2012-05-25T18:03:22-04:00'
describe
'11297' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIFH' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
d4507d23bcb38e8c0687ab731e16127e
d0094c23065dddcd09c13869937cc7e510fc4df3
'2012-05-25T18:03:36-04:00'
describe
'422397' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIFI' 'sip-files00155.jpg'
ad6ee5a02de2b74e36e5c6e707abd836
0df035e9101c98b0372a833dbaa6431cddb3a815
'2012-05-25T18:00:35-04:00'
describe
'9455' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIFJ' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
611fded545ae4a3c0458aba3d712ca95
5f67e28401bfb86ff707637c3912436177f037be
'2012-05-25T18:02:26-04:00'
describe
'404412' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIFK' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
4d94cd0b4a0d9090b5e150d81af38c13
31d196650263a891066e0815aa6bb34cc6319616
'2012-05-25T18:03:04-04:00'
describe
'53050' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIFL' 'sip-files00311thm.jpg'
0a501d84fb49e58c121c7485e62efca9
d6146555a96d1130a53b8c643cd0b74deff51af2
'2012-05-25T18:01:12-04:00'
describe
'203424' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIFM' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
0b956a37dd465836abe42ca8dbb5e404
e2d3825fde70ad8dc6d7203b40621abfab59f667
'2012-05-25T18:11:08-04:00'
describe
'54360' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIFN' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
2f0c69731982e14d88cf06842c30be04
bf8f099a17a62ed15acb543a52265c69b8643aec
'2012-05-25T18:05:49-04:00'
describe
'53858' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIFO' 'sip-files00280thm.jpg'
48f9d2873488e441394765465c8a7e5a
7bd4e88906ab096681583ede23b78ca791aa3bf1
'2012-05-25T18:04:55-04:00'
describe
'40055' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIFP' 'sip-files00034.pro'
4d0ed7caed6b95c1cd00d6dc4c3bfe03
b98a59d3576fa042764b6805bbc59e34d21a1218
describe
'1704212' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIFQ' 'sip-files00093.tif'
26bfc254fa2f445bd6bbbbb193473eb4
77b0a1335e95432346b11b372f6cb3b6e54a0069
'2012-05-25T18:11:04-04:00'
describe
'20809' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIFR' 'sip-files00241thm.jpg'
14dcb50fe949504a160040e41e72217d
c079a35c4da4a833a84f4d0ccfa8aff37c94f9eb
describe
'39866' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIFS' 'sip-files00177.pro'
1ff904ea031e5afb9a833d650fb0dbdb
c942e988c09942cf0ab2668a5305bcec4ea04f1f
'2012-05-25T18:07:37-04:00'
describe
'54693' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIFT' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
550deb6481ee32e1c58a1b0b4f1249b6
970109335b1b0361cdc8576d7d294271b2ac591b
'2012-05-25T18:04:01-04:00'
describe
'41553' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIFU' 'sip-files00088.pro'
cec24df831d63ec63fb770179ab24333
e5534698ecd584c3429f11e21c80544a6cf5edfe
'2012-05-25T18:03:34-04:00'
describe
'135948' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIFV' 'sip-files00200.jpg'
a8c64a8ab4af624f723fb121818573e6
db2ad4d61883f2aac38f50422abc2c0808278773
'2012-05-25T18:10:43-04:00'
describe
'1704432' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIFW' 'sip-files00042.tif'
60b08d0b4a57f8a590bd6bf1e59fe9a5
61331bc54df7122ec6dbafee4a91ecd2a491c16e
'2012-05-25T18:04:31-04:00'
describe
'1627416' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIFX' 'sip-files00247.tif'
d4a1c00e67f3011a96c0f004cd176f8c
821aac0badf1584c38a8df4f6632e55c6e312a38
'2012-05-25T18:11:20-04:00'
describe
'1689656' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIFY' 'sip-files00091.tif'
fd76bc15f6dccd3a464f89317cee4b31
3c5add8bcef3c955dba394f70fec6cff9cf0cb7b
'2012-05-25T18:09:39-04:00'
describe
'1705448' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIFZ' 'sip-files00147.tif'
7c2844b9726a0434f262cbd58f24164d
a4a03bb47fa326a7524b6f0243720bf027a9a6e9
'2012-05-25T18:06:00-04:00'
describe
'59076' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIGA' 'sip-files00252thm.jpg'
86bbd7d3c80c5a422c508a58e321a879
50206455cfcb6ee17858dc85dff9dc13980865b8
'2012-05-25T18:09:01-04:00'
describe
'156664' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIGB' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
1f89ebf625bdd577811525c1db6b3d93
de20cb4909571644bbce3faff5a458f9e0dd5698
'2012-05-25T18:09:59-04:00'
describe
'160326' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIGC' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
676475518c9b0d9fce97dcdf20fd4d45
531553499f09b202b7343dfb1b2830fbe3cabc26
'2012-05-25T18:11:23-04:00'
describe
'1697220' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIGD' 'sip-files00039.tif'
b1ce1856814cc3b6d594128160b354e4
a5dc227ba437b9f4759244b5780bbc84cbd3aa65
'2012-05-25T18:10:16-04:00'
describe
'59449' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIGE' 'sip-files00262thm.jpg'
75d609f387cda2a5e6586bb4c3c0f38a
76c9cace055764f486991713b7aca6fbbfda66d6
'2012-05-25T18:07:51-04:00'
describe
'1705676' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIGF' 'sip-files00118.tif'
ea53d051da920f6174e830a1edf2f892
546ac36f191117ef9a4c363c9f82361928f9cd84
'2012-05-25T18:08:40-04:00'
describe
'166728' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIGG' 'sip-files00308.QC.jpg'
36daebd4632b8caca7b4739723bbdb09
dbddd191fefc93fc45f905e1a42c1e58f5550b35
'2012-05-25T18:06:43-04:00'
describe
'218726' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIGH' 'sip-files00148.jp2'
d8fde3f259c6bc046974f8ea5d30021c
c605135b4fb6a7b9da29840051c841e5e05ff0db
describe
'40656' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIGI' 'sip-files00224.pro'
a1399b2454f2dd64ef86743a1eeaf4db
ce3e3b589eb37e946a95137b85e9db0371157eba
'2012-05-25T18:10:01-04:00'
describe
'125472' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIGJ' 'sip-files00312.QC.jpg'
d377eb69a022c732fc159e0a2b084250
70a256876c5a72051fbf4a889860949bbfc7a326
describe
'98505' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIGK' 'sip-files00183.jp2'
34273b72711511a86f70677579ec517b
5fbb0d3bbea93ce18b124e166d1de87ebd76b902
describe
'169375' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIGL' 'sip-files00152.QC.jpg'
52886406720e9b048abd04cdaa17cde1
32aa5f24739e83e968a52792cd55b23a6f08992c
'2012-05-25T18:08:30-04:00'
describe
'56549' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIGM' 'sip-files00276thm.jpg'
6c102d29c5dd6f7a8512c1273f289951
44cbd6bb4d02780c8ebe0eb9d850ec6130df6e50
'2012-05-25T18:06:22-04:00'
describe
'1704056' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIGN' 'sip-files00109.tif'
6d0b71356a53cc3c20fb0741edf0efaa
e5288b95c32dd042b6c13250f2b5a6a40cd73c3d
'2012-05-25T18:07:05-04:00'
describe
'1705644' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIGO' 'sip-files00190.tif'
c1ca93eeb9a5073f89a30c5c1d998b2e
d31396fe4d98e615cfa5056ed3f8b1cb56b390c8
'2012-05-25T18:05:53-04:00'
describe
'229597' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIGP' 'sip-files00173.jp2'
040692ad55dd0581e71fe0dc093fe152
d4db9bf6a3773e35ef8ff4de4fa3b32ea33de714
'2012-05-25T18:08:24-04:00'
describe
'1705500' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIGQ' 'sip-files00204.tif'
6f6727773529b946a3fb5d103e8f828c
fa09b4dfd63215e9196f3d97d0b53a0655a76147
'2012-05-25T18:01:50-04:00'
describe
'1705084' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIGR' 'sip-files00265.tif'
bbb3573c415fc2546b4a5f3ec6d37a9d
41f996b0a0bad972ea1dff8a5dc59b7f4f689ad0
describe
'1582' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIGS' 'sip-files00271.txt'
d2f3dc8895e6742fdb2b2fb4428871f5
76480e10f11cb80b51c9a3f1949ec59d7a1b8e3b
'2012-05-25T18:02:53-04:00'
describe
'211979' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIGT' 'sip-files00284.jp2'
aba77f445e8587e866e385259739771a
7033bc5ec941d402b34593b1eb58f6b0a5dc5319
'2012-05-25T18:09:52-04:00'
describe
'408738' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIGU' 'sip-files00239.jpg'
cb938d13059ea766144320784c2c10d6
d4c4cc4fb845d186614319bad2ba4426275ff799
'2012-05-25T18:05:22-04:00'
describe
'763' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIGV' 'sip-files00008.txt'
e942312d413974bc37909740f5a4ba07
dde269154ef029648d85cdfd66dbfb711dc32c24
'2012-05-25T18:00:19-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'1704880' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIGW' 'sip-files00140.tif'
064ceec44017ff886523f664ff1cba46
608118c874c5a0f29c1bd2adbc9323326f47c6b2
describe
'40625' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIGX' 'sip-files00116.pro'
103d6488628559a6b102d47f1a70d349
bb5f19497d590e4c096be68319da3fee58ea57ef
'2012-05-25T18:05:40-04:00'
describe
'427391' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIGY' 'sip-files00319.jpg'
30899879e0f33672da070c22d220443d
519a44475d19eb1c86dbec4ecd7ef85e85362e7a
'2012-05-25T18:00:39-04:00'
describe
'137' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIGZ' 'sip-files00025.txt'
75d0d49457e9d6606d7e39795805a0ae
de6b3ee00db2cfe1cb575c337534defc5133f9b8
'2012-05-25T18:05:37-04:00'
describe
'140700' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIHA' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
784a7c76b0f73594d58dfa7d4358255a
5cdf1d531e188c5457a8c2fd1f6bc14a0cec7ac7
describe
'207326' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIHB' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
d7e87814810de861ba81893fcb88c222
479851d60438d86afd60769f145a3545d14b5176
'2012-05-25T18:05:27-04:00'
describe
'418982' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIHC' 'sip-files00244.jpg'
a52fa8af74407bf4ae69be85527be713
85461eabf590963ef2a9a689bf39f530b4b675a3
'2012-05-25T18:10:30-04:00'
describe
'424359' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIHD' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
26374dbbc03a75ad1db770bf9bc487eb
2a7bd560e2b691d1b48c637ad5e92b00ab15e373
'2012-05-25T18:10:06-04:00'
describe
'9391' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIHE' 'sip-files00142thm.jpg'
e95597a071795625ca3f16528d5ac50c
d8f79d1d495665253cb0bef25339d88afee0d53d
'2012-05-25T18:04:08-04:00'
describe
'6319' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIHF' 'sip-files00182.pro'
52ed380c9208798ba042e318ce7d6044
5109a6bf6014364cd5ad8872d50a59b6a24f0905
'2012-05-25T18:09:33-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIHG' 'sip-files00242.pro'
af0abe44cd2b0c96aa9351dc56029461
259e7f456af3e64e87a745a86517b58041abea97
'2012-05-25T18:07:59-04:00'
describe
'167636' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIHH' 'sip-files00302.QC.jpg'
40725d438fbaff16b25a37860acae0de
9fb1bab3f0bef5d08ea6eebfcee4ea8fc51f5203
'2012-05-25T18:04:35-04:00'
describe
'380514' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIHI' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
a18befdf4ecd4f45b5240a98bbdd5f51
e4f947f29ee51d57c8448f941bab663c23ca3245
'2012-05-25T18:11:24-04:00'
describe
'1705048' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIHJ' 'sip-files00286.tif'
d764aed813645e9bbb040efc283dbc93
a2b8400281aec8cda22a5cf28d997f50ca4c4a20
'2012-05-25T18:02:32-04:00'
describe
'56197' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIHK' 'sip-files00186thm.jpg'
f617908874153ed2147cb08b62809c28
cd9da750a828dd34de12caada10af81c828f4bd6
'2012-05-25T18:10:18-04:00'
describe
'1697284' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIHL' 'sip-files00103.tif'
d8a51c4c37d8fc7d36a9fded79953f61
d826ab2dd2c221af3879ead3c7ccd7ed8a8a091d
'2012-05-25T18:03:43-04:00'
describe
'1579' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIHM' 'sip-files00172.txt'
09e1b6500fbcecd588fb09aae3c13014
dd2eae19e9fe58a9fe11b21308337bcf5d76452e
'2012-05-25T18:09:00-04:00'
describe
'1704968' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIHN' 'sip-files00088.tif'
67dfdd915e642dc4acac198f1f384adc
9021939a3608eddf71db61332956788d4f04ccf3
'2012-05-25T18:01:47-04:00'
describe
'390653' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIHO' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
b4a93943d498f6ac2e6be0ac42415175
0d92c7671fe6c46565d91645d749412a27131ed8
'2012-05-25T18:08:42-04:00'
describe
'56056' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIHP' 'sip-files00173thm.jpg'
5420e6e6057cc469084de395e0d43e59
9336878fd49d4304a5023102e477f1854c40f462
'2012-05-25T18:03:12-04:00'
describe
'40648' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIHQ' 'sip-files00239.pro'
cd0c0d1fef79b18cc42d32b29c96a165
d8218330f24725f95697ed470a2515c8f95fa0a0
'2012-05-25T18:06:46-04:00'
describe
'1575' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIHR' 'sip-files00147.txt'
a313ffe0db235f1d9344a769b0d3674f
d49a15d6d105d79c91eefcb3f782065b8da2a36f
'2012-05-25T18:04:45-04:00'
describe
'217170' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIHS' 'sip-files00310.jp2'
a709856b0f177643c013bbb01d5544be
6d001770dbf791e7dbdee35ca71805932d0ab5e6
'2012-05-25T18:01:42-04:00'
describe
'110692' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIHT' 'sip-files00293.jpg'
b78c9fc5bd1961ce6a5becda843b64a0
b0f235622f1908c4e8cd644df0d63adf9caa50a4
'2012-05-25T18:03:45-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIHU' 'sip-files00164.pro'
57d6076e73a1b0cbb50cdda340f589f4
cb9e35c6350bcf1fdce97e4a0d3f49103dfaa88a
'2012-05-25T18:03:02-04:00'
describe
'38317' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIHV' 'sip-files00108.pro'
b9d469b88185a9dd1bdb5007ad993bdd
4e0009eb6ca49e6c5acd8fc33c9771c4d27498b1
'2012-05-25T18:00:24-04:00'
describe
'18482' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIHW' 'sip-files00222.jpg'
c919dbd270ed57abb6e8b264f91ff1dd
bb0b5bd83016a6c1f9cceff25104d2d8ca8c87e5
'2012-05-25T18:10:38-04:00'
describe
'159688' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIHX' 'sip-files00219.QC.jpg'
130f022e43ff31dff8e3de72c6387d3c
3a1e81c2264e74725653bdcef70063f93b866cd8
describe
'137450' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIHY' 'sip-files00295.QC.jpg'
01d97460d84c9e548ea6192dfd75bbef
42008d06efb6f0e6de3263335ba626547326c708
'2012-05-25T18:03:13-04:00'
describe
'168207' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIHZ' 'sip-files00156.QC.jpg'
eefafa8e336f16450e83f3fdfe0ee704
2dab9fdef51196d2b72733c8c792a6c2bb771b40
'2012-05-25T18:09:17-04:00'
describe
'33296' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIIA' 'sip-files00012.pro'
cdacdbf0bbedfb80f2e9f53ec6f001b2
ce122981e35851d9f989e597f8641c1f1246c41e
describe
'408443' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIIB' 'sip-files00253.jpg'
897f546e12f4a7d38b24ecad5222d5b8
1e150816baf51be8b7eddfe99246fe50761c177e
'2012-05-25T18:06:29-04:00'
describe
'102001' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIIC' 'sip-files00005.jpg'
d66c302750ec863b51238b7aa2868b49
c7fdc742cd2070fa1b336f008c1369f1cc11c600
'2012-05-25T18:04:52-04:00'
describe
'54104' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIID' 'sip-files00197thm.jpg'
8dd863c6e2af3fcd7e5b157a3587027d
fbb67356e946d40f0760de925264c5785a72eb13
'2012-05-25T18:09:05-04:00'
describe
'1625' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIIE' 'sip-files00040.pro'
a08e8e7cafc24ca9940957be8185768c
b4d26833d7f6d9ce033aeb3cc86ed658cd780bd2
'2012-05-25T18:03:55-04:00'
describe
'1549' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIIF' 'sip-files00276.txt'
fed975cd493b1d6097c6dbb828794056
0e92241f958e0652aa9160aa4d7f05a91a87545f
'2012-05-25T18:10:44-04:00'
describe
'38669' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIIG' 'sip-files00174.pro'
aa99604769f778e991a61ac849db525a
41d8aecff5e62c53f1de598e5bd85290d128de89
'2012-05-25T18:07:36-04:00'
describe
'1548' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIIH' 'sip-files00210.txt'
88dcbb643f3a2fba28cce689a67b427d
4900644203a94f0b2619e4925b76ee197eb9653d
'2012-05-25T18:08:48-04:00'
describe
'1498' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIII' 'sip-files00215.txt'
7c9004a1a5323efb2a97acf8fc24a13c
14f8af5d241eb8644b6550fafccd11c37cedd71e
'2012-05-25T18:03:38-04:00'
describe
'17652' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIIJ' 'sip-files00201thm.jpg'
03bd684b55fece91ac7e3cff1e281cdb
3ecf9f891f459af045dbd5bc6e5d828f0060432e
'2012-05-25T18:10:49-04:00'
describe
'40356' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIIK' 'sip-files00111.pro'
ada2fb96576e8e2e13f49dd5b581e891
08cad1f908e5b47aaed060df21765288ed68a33e
'2012-05-25T18:00:10-04:00'
describe
'214064' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIIL' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
f959fc564a16ff456641d70fb816dc80
0fbdef4ddb5109aefd4e822dc98c9a7c2f7ffe52
'2012-05-25T18:04:05-04:00'
describe
'215746' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIIM' 'sip-files00155.jp2'
ed2da8912aeb5610bb4119a670fa7cf3
807502fe8178e16d0031688167c2d412bda8dd02
'2012-05-25T18:04:47-04:00'
describe
'226285' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIIN' 'sip-files00161.jp2'
77729ededa77ffa5d0c752e416ffe55f
dffcf03f6681026cc1cd745b18c688e8e137158d
'2012-05-25T18:07:21-04:00'
describe
'159017' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIIO' 'sip-files00148.QC.jpg'
f07b25309aefea0fb5b84083e3302c3c
b02734cad097d69030baa2bc7d5c722b94929289
'2012-05-25T18:00:41-04:00'
describe
'54439' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIIP' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
d2a1eed9c85ece8e0e5189053944bbac
7d2cbae946a833c901c1cdd8a4f0ec9a4118641c
'2012-05-25T18:08:36-04:00'
describe
'55747' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIIQ' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
4e1817e212b5640a4fd14ed586af24eb
8f848ea787c1b8966350d9c4fd4b38c93a5ad16a
'2012-05-25T18:10:34-04:00'
describe
'11357' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIIR' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
f06c6d527bc7207a57bdb365fd9d385a
c33bccec20ed07069ab4b931f1574f6a20d15181
'2012-05-25T18:08:53-04:00'
describe
'76851' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIIS' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
d1909793e37cef8db6c548e7ef0f9c0a
8fe8dec6df40e8e8b634238b8c12ed23e982e5d1
'2012-05-25T18:04:24-04:00'
describe
'381950' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIIT' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
12f0adda104dca8f40877953af7034ca
6105b079f50a9b6eecb021018dbe251813cc737c
'2012-05-25T17:59:52-04:00'
describe
'1517' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIIU' 'sip-files00235.txt'
f767ea888f96622475aa3d351001bf42
6b893cb69ee374bcf7b6956ae84988092c3baf2e
'2012-05-25T18:00:36-04:00'
describe
'38599' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIIV' 'sip-files00201.QC.jpg'
e8bf7ae713e9926cffe73ad571d48196
1c4c832922c0268e44cec4fc4629b280243ce56a
'2012-05-25T18:06:01-04:00'
describe
'41984' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIIW' 'sip-files00311.pro'
87d838f8caa12153c73764b3cc7410d2
d5dff4270501b289b9b8de4a395bae308ae6c2d9
'2012-05-25T18:02:38-04:00'
describe
'40955' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIIX' 'sip-files00134.pro'
3fb85790fc1651a4b74851932d80e039
7a87f51456ddf758cc18d158683bf6bc5919c3ed
'2012-05-25T17:59:29-04:00'
describe
'685449' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIIY' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
57deb968f214c6ad4c2764b01ced5149
670115ca720d4276c4af9d773403665ea4e54124
'2012-05-25T18:01:14-04:00'
describe
'412364' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIIZ' 'sip-files00298.jpg'
99973e8978251bcf548fd82855b2f422
60e80d92da362a9073b1afe5dd842ee10c5c0c75
'2012-05-25T17:59:57-04:00'
describe
'380190' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIJA' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
f8a74ed8c21337ef7a8cb864ba0bb285
113e63597a96f8a6a62abb6774c26bef3f50cb52
describe
'110344' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIJB' 'sip-files00201.jpg'
cee589d87943cf385f153ae7bfe9cf8a
43b9459acb0e2c9306d3c393616b20cc038372dc
'2012-05-25T18:10:02-04:00'
describe
'9342' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIJC' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
4afb6291c6f72ba84ae8905af3161ec9
bb05a6350b6af9dc34f4486594799cd6e74014be
'2012-05-25T18:01:37-04:00'
describe
'1609' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIJD' 'sip-files00229.txt'
74c6de3d804744169b5220d7bbe8a93e
a292708dccb7c6d0ff2370e97c835800154c9b50
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIJE' 'sip-files00192.txt'
e60dbf3ec713961a953f0b85ab5fe3fb
924ab59edadd6c61dce5aabf48bc3a7961313b03
'2012-05-25T18:05:17-04:00'
describe
'4517' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIJF' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
7a148bef5c62998f91ca79a12e21c98d
092907fec3c4c9daff24bc1fbb63ccdd3c5c4a9d
describe
'1704604' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIJG' 'sip-files00178.tif'
afe903cf5f569fb3f282342b03c400a1
af9e1c8fc68a1245e30a7f9ca1772a3073ce126d
'2012-05-25T18:02:56-04:00'
describe
'421465' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIJH' 'sip-files00194.jpg'
a50e45c8d73919c94fa865435c258ef4
756ddc10a030de7418f7d9c3c627387dcca6c86e
'2012-05-25T17:59:43-04:00'
describe
'54409' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIJI' 'sip-files00219thm.jpg'
d95c49159f0406f92b4cd4f042f78bc0
6c06ab481063b7a986f8e745c208725b12724222
'2012-05-25T18:02:44-04:00'
describe
'56233' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIJJ' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
fa094b6538b99c662f453cc5f7139cb2
49abe52ac2a840a723689334b8e7d8f3303adc0f
'2012-05-25T18:00:30-04:00'
describe
'222153' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIJK' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
e8bfebe788265be9b0dc9acf19a070a4
6e3a69e9a88aec5fda7294ab87b9ff342b1cb10b
'2012-05-25T18:06:03-04:00'
describe
'64829' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIJL' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
9a9be4de2aee7cc57ce1f399dd64a5a6
190716c672fdf7bd0991c86fac872d16a8d4a431
'2012-05-25T18:01:49-04:00'
describe
'9309' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIJM' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
8b9122ef22872ad6f06afb04268811c8
42c697a3f168f36706604e07e94134ed4ffb19f1
'2012-05-25T18:11:27-04:00'
describe
'168421' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIJN' 'sip-files00194.QC.jpg'
d149b552cd233e825c69ce502caad0ab
e8d01c53427ee0343b1ba3101b98b4e6f1037413
'2012-05-25T18:03:33-04:00'
describe
'222548' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIJO' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
03f7f342564cda596e50c9f1061fa874
f64a4bf4ab076ebe33d27f3d2f49896d85a9b491
'2012-05-25T18:04:28-04:00'
describe
'218613' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIJP' 'sip-files00250.jp2'
5f7af9deeaf0ca82f59ebc631f7257b0
a4919a7ad2f39f0f6052bf793b546db96af086b8
'2012-05-25T18:09:09-04:00'
describe
'28666' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIJQ' 'sip-files00165.pro'
6cea294f9ef198c0d807357ea7d559cc
3309cdc302ce01f302a4c44b58591fdafcc37c79
'2012-05-25T18:06:53-04:00'
describe
'405678' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIJR' 'sip-files00192.jpg'
4966302562fef7165c46cadea570e37a
c61ff3044c7ca9d9c3c841d5cb30f2e5412929d9
'2012-05-25T18:09:43-04:00'
describe
'392648' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIJS' 'sip-files00287.jpg'
2b55d253589d7c63b651b02a6f6f9d91
9f8893bae99dfbd7fca021e1c3e7ab557f5d40b7
'2012-05-25T18:03:35-04:00'
describe
'1705616' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIJT' 'sip-files00153.tif'
2e8b199b416c12b36b993391ef59792e
3a9ed47b5f35bbdce62eda20e84eb1bf9362204c
'2012-05-25T18:08:15-04:00'
describe
'4551' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIJU' 'sip-files00222.jp2'
103a059a767f6b8e0a80778546f1ab6b
bd3360eea12575723cbf0f9dbb0ae295c5f3d3e0
'2012-05-25T18:03:14-04:00'
describe
'39886' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIJV' 'sip-files00058.pro'
885c77c67e5ade4ead41f13eb977a030
6a9785753d9bd2d1ff171125707cfeb98e9c3460
'2012-05-25T18:00:53-04:00'
describe
'195840' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIJW' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
2919d096ceff52b314c7a179ce4e8867
997b73eb4dc1fb18f97ca3180d4c4e1436b1a6ab
'2012-05-25T18:09:27-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIJX' 'sip-files00274.txt'
81051bcc2cf1bedf378224b0a93e2877
ba8ab5a0280b953aa97435ff8946cbcbb2755a27
'2012-05-25T18:03:06-04:00'
describe
No printable characters
No printable characters
No printable characters
'416346' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIJY' 'sip-files00226.jpg'
d689b3008be67b790e41f63ec817b9ea
d72c8a973910f204d58c51ae3b62ae4f1addeaf6
'2012-05-25T18:05:50-04:00'
describe
'1493' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIJZ' 'sip-files00209.txt'
724697300a505daac34dafbfbc3aea01
b79e3b54ade790a293eaa662220645d76d23794f
'2012-05-25T18:07:04-04:00'
describe
'215455' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIKA' 'sip-files00238.jp2'
7e946d7f50222fdaa592856a8e2ea005
1f2495e031469d1ed6aee934b38839291ebd2b6a
'2012-05-25T18:09:23-04:00'
describe
'164461' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIKB' 'sip-files00171.QC.jpg'
1fda4952d91dfeaaf7d1cefc415d1be5
62d65fb944cef6337e09fd64ef7019779fbecaa8
'2012-05-25T18:00:51-04:00'
describe
'408396' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIKC' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
ad91c77b5b8f379a7a969c10c275afa5
fabcafbea10f6f80668e01d11e20655d7617a987
'2012-05-25T18:06:58-04:00'
describe
'40964' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIKD' 'sip-files00230.pro'
52eb08aa0601877851acd557a408e563
130c49ec2cf90140d242a7a223bacfac74a530ca
'2012-05-25T18:00:34-04:00'
describe
'380099' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIKE' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
c3cfaf2fb6973a389671c234243f623b
b4db890b433b12a3dc39111ec750e4244be17658
'2012-05-25T18:05:24-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIKF' 'sip-files00239.tif'
14a7a698a09754afedb8f210fc2a81ac
d0f36057cd3b29f53d3ff165d3534f23613c730b
'2012-05-25T18:07:03-04:00'
describe
'393201' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIKG' 'sip-files00261.jpg'
29b11a0a3a6d4d903db733dde9592edd
58b12d38466185a5d2f0740c43db0dcf5074c9a5
describe
'386023' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIKH' 'sip-files00280.jpg'
0aa04bc90634f3d52d7450563958de92
b6ac49e8b08527b57b7e28b4f8fe049534974194
describe
'375831' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIKI' 'sip-files00002.jpg'
941f10de6ec945f0a015514857087bc5
b7d9de6a867ef550aa0bc3ddf9037a7795b395b5
'2012-05-25T18:00:06-04:00'
describe
'386874' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIKJ' 'sip-files00279.jpg'
e90011425c5cdf4beee50ae35c9f8ce8
53cc15af7d18f4ba850bde4cccd0588f64348a61
'2012-05-25T18:10:50-04:00'
describe
'55807' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIKK' 'sip-files00239thm.jpg'
90b85cc0557e24078b54393737c4d70e
95432d5767816dc7bb73dc3e27a55dea21e8a8a4
'2012-05-25T18:03:44-04:00'
describe
'88105' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIKL' 'sip-files00163.jp2'
3a9c4918a3d029e725c67742fb506006
c92f0ac57c89dfd32e830b1e015386ad3467e2f0
describe
'54223' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIKM' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
023acb462c081328718393d7eff43cfa
d586d3d88d89c0a7ee70374dd0cb1e9349eed064
'2012-05-25T18:08:59-04:00'
describe
'174278' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIKN' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
2d1d2d212fbcd2035e5b71c6ea89e1d0
c9d0b6428287be5d2b1228ff167f81d7ecebabb1
'2012-05-25T18:05:19-04:00'
describe
'1553' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIKO' 'sip-files00097.txt'
f00c6fdfbc51b2f33f952ad36f32b40b
80ee58c7fc1e7795bf0add70f523f20113f493ac
'2012-05-25T18:08:58-04:00'
describe
'39955' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIKP' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
e24a2bed20ec57282b0e75ffa7de9382
4420523fcfd409ecf1a39ce20ca8aa12954fb1dd
'2012-05-25T18:08:22-04:00'
describe
'213516' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIKQ' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
60421be2f770e0874ea3502cb6add28b
fd6647bbc036a0c97c4b33e0de3b8a4fe591c49b
'2012-05-25T18:03:42-04:00'
describe
'1704244' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIKR' 'sip-files00277.tif'
8e67bc9d45bab71ecd32e18df90484fd
8eb1ab5cffc979ddc156d87855b158b620e07a25
'2012-05-25T18:00:23-04:00'
describe
'1529' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIKS' 'sip-files00154.txt'
214eefb7eef3be8a116d435d8730ffcf
4c8b26e1c16dcf75ef8e4065c5ed44243e4ed216
'2012-05-25T18:03:57-04:00'
describe
'40451' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIKT' 'sip-files00255.pro'
db613add18a0bf83f6ae6d5773b157d9
e58a883f60262fbc48a5691bf7e7c0b22864b330
'2012-05-25T18:09:10-04:00'
describe
'174040' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIKU' 'sip-files00207.QC.jpg'
23291f2ab6baab2e8ef0dfeeab418c20
e9beb2fb89ee550b80680cd6f98029d1bc6060e2
'2012-05-25T18:00:49-04:00'
describe
'373938' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIKV' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
1a9b201a5f966cebb70b6fad044bf7d8
7f737ba734add4d60d6e481b7a6282c22c732b34
'2012-05-25T18:07:35-04:00'
describe
'1695628' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIKW' 'sip-files00064.tif'
08a6225fb69c23d80c1c1e981b39cf49
2abda6869887c753710d10fe3176dba9b91146a9
'2012-05-25T17:59:44-04:00'
describe
'53443' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIKX' 'sip-files00291thm.jpg'
c0c4f51a78ef4cfffd3ddc4585120f80
f73a559b92940fba866918a33523654ad8cb57dc
'2012-05-25T18:06:16-04:00'
describe
'39465' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIKY' 'sip-files00209.pro'
0da6b0075a0a0d0c1423449daa6cc455
9579558f8fbd8d48df44da72f14a20971964c5fd
'2012-05-25T18:10:03-04:00'
describe
'1562' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIKZ' 'sip-files00219.txt'
9c1a7d2af87ec60db402a721c0c3b0c6
9a7574ac7823c2e00613c176d36d86e703abffbd
'2012-05-25T17:59:48-04:00'
describe
'53254' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABILA' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
7a60374d7b0764a1a32c4da5e5a3c4fa
965daace03b51d83ff316095582803323b071656
'2012-05-25T17:59:34-04:00'
describe
'421439' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABILB' 'sip-files00257.jpg'
230eea96c6b85ba336135e3d05ae3f9e
456ffbba1a216abf7a14a409c4aec5d95bf21ead
describe
'435523' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABILC' 'sip-files00218.jpg'
aee57098c08ecd62cde72853a92a487a
c0b6d0853a5cee7fcb62ceb9983761532a18452a
describe
'137116' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABILD' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
578fa329a810c495c07a29227fcc2c1b
af54eb07fe686b943c3df45fc5f799c3777903fc
describe
'153713' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABILE' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
24db828db34d4cb3902201efd60502c9
2e847d680b5ac8cbc9b9f2e0fa6ecd0662bdaec5
'2012-05-25T18:03:20-04:00'
describe
'227108' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABILF' 'sip-files00297.jp2'
3c9b5483c1624c0ac9adb9e9bcd66698
c49440621c061a381922c0379002bc62394ceac8
'2012-05-25T18:08:17-04:00'
describe
'154023' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABILG' 'sip-files00279.QC.jpg'
4b9e82cb2d7a327c7311217650fcdc6e
db82507812f7ae7c0b1dcf9b1f38e76eaae02051
'2012-05-25T18:10:48-04:00'
describe
'1705380' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABILH' 'sip-files00251.tif'
1ddd00759d73c41acf7ec79ea6a7cb1e
2b0c5d932b670b1d8b80bcb039a870945e96949b
describe
'100423' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABILI' 'sip-files00221.jp2'
31d8b14c950329a1c959e1f2eaa81da4
86d220663d67361a6cdbd1e5c0c3bebbf44dd04b
'2012-05-25T18:06:59-04:00'
describe
'41179' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABILJ' 'sip-files00028.pro'
71c2e1890302737ca139962fde708e48
4d0505caf6be409714c4a8c674fbed7de92ff9e4
'2012-05-25T18:06:05-04:00'
describe
'1488' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABILK' 'sip-files00132.txt'
51c6a111b6e52e78d8efdd2b3be11763
2d6b122394a7f4e60d3b874caae58d00c801250b
'2012-05-25T18:05:46-04:00'
describe
'426754' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABILL' 'sip-files00232.jpg'
d95c4a82f8919752bba688ba624f61cc
2bbfb3c48fb8e1ddcfaa8e577ff5e95101484373
'2012-05-25T18:03:07-04:00'
describe
'1660912' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABILM' 'sip-files00246.tif'
e641a3e60dfe1a13516d163af162b7cc
9c69ac1bf00d2a03d5f5203dd198afe0e29fb125
'2012-05-25T18:09:12-04:00'
describe
'180711' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABILN' 'sip-files00312.jp2'
e774b5d3528ff382f8eb99eba6b6b3bb
82b7841e4f522022d1fbb47ec522f9c85f4742fe
'2012-05-25T18:03:00-04:00'
describe
'479165' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABILO' 'sip-files00314.jpg'
dac3bcd6521e94c963e028552800a3d4
3f978070e4950ab49af81054c421a438dc5a6885
'2012-05-25T18:09:24-04:00'
describe
'427968' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABILP' 'sip-files00204.jpg'
9f4f3208f52571a80db01bcc6b79d76c
fd1ec4aafbfeef831307150a9280b79fee10b90a
describe
'37882' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABILQ' 'sip-files00126.pro'
d51a6c19f9ba5816d2160b7916f50ce2
373d534005208c91d280522f9a58e02078c9f338
describe
'423170' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABILR' 'sip-files00262.jpg'
57b8b98660d8b4a7a703bf680c2de50c
64f5560cdcdfc7e192d25c48b2036f0d194ad026
'2012-05-25T18:09:19-04:00'
describe
'1501' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABILS' 'sip-files00198.txt'
1c3e9178cdc68a5720877f60364985d7
143a1bd2aaeaa482eb2dcc33e67f7c94ab4fcd8a
'2012-05-25T18:05:55-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABILT' 'sip-files00026.tif'
73c5cc7447a7ebac89cc21f6d87ed5c8
52a41231d519098a2155d9a742b20a49ff4dcea6
describe
'224876' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABILU' 'sip-files00168.jp2'
ff6e7d2066b736e03c95bec7400f50e7
3903f11598c01980b0648eecaae266bb517c9047
'2012-05-25T18:08:18-04:00'
describe
'1556' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABILV' 'sip-files00230.txt'
2bbed9033e18cee5ff15e5290b4f55e3
9413208b033393103590d6e5fd26abc86d13a87d
'2012-05-25T18:09:53-04:00'
describe
'160829' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABILW' 'sip-files00238.QC.jpg'
c5bb488f49434c84e5ed8730751da475
b4d3182ca3fac4b660e0ce24d0a756a6137aa9b6
'2012-05-25T18:05:57-04:00'
describe
'1667192' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABILX' 'sip-files00179.tif'
93be78a307d6209253c116e5ce0c957c
aafd1f52f8cee31d9c8635869bbf4b04746aa45d
'2012-05-25T18:11:06-04:00'
describe
'120913' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABILY' 'sip-files00143.jpg'
344616fa0c8746b58c8f639ddfb06120
71e4a1e35e71a927bb38b8b9166628407574610c
'2012-05-25T18:10:57-04:00'
describe
'39811' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABILZ' 'sip-files00199.pro'
b1992b974d521ed93c3ba57c01ca4b2b
d34d760ce7fb3b1a1fc5636bbbd0bbef2d9c0588
describe
'169592' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIMA' 'sip-files00267.QC.jpg'
19bc6808372c373a79b02136812c167b
c9b543ef08d003bed0d99fca621ac7db2bea1ff3
describe
'41007' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIMB' 'sip-files00075.pro'
899065ab284834f056773ace77afd4e4
842a6d580fc1427a98b6b16465a7b8b288e5b393
describe
'231124' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIMC' 'sip-files00257.jp2'
a857368c7b40c4089be4fa1e2f793131
de23422ea536b1d7dfc37d049f73dc7458c2d8f3
'2012-05-25T18:01:30-04:00'
describe
'1697208' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIMD' 'sip-files00005.tif'
36c3a6892c78453070e512250ee87aa2
e645456802a69a64d131a896f11bdbb12fa6b2e3
'2012-05-25T18:11:40-04:00'
describe
'41219' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIME' 'sip-files00190.pro'
8095177ae28041bb96bbc3fb0e2748e9
9321a538d9cf62aac3b5d3b7c7f37f66bff607e7
describe
'391380' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIMF' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
899290830a33f965f7e9e7a37a483f8b
417b163f729f438a6f9cf1015befb13c2aa32be6
'2012-05-25T17:59:31-04:00'
describe
'1705368' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIMG' 'sip-files00169.tif'
ef9abc9ed37884ec12782f84a817724b
846cfbafba7f3e77ed70fcc8c81eabc04f43a7df
'2012-05-25T18:10:35-04:00'
describe
'41525' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIMH' 'sip-files00244.pro'
3543fb1ecd6d4c15c43e2f0de8e5ff73
6fa180ad55582fe509f30bba5291efdac7a91bb2
'2012-05-25T18:09:34-04:00'
describe
'1705160' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIMI' 'sip-files00253.tif'
aa371a8edf14e60d55658e3712b4f86b
44fef7f44d3a14e01993438e0bab9c1c3dc449c2
describe
'386907' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIMJ' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
5d3db9ce014749ffd2fa61d836e4eae1
eaa81224956220c5adbeb7bac130aedd912e9de5
'2012-05-25T18:04:07-04:00'
describe
'236708' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIMK' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
adb1eb11c965465e9e88e28af2b336e8
4841dd58a9d7947c6df3bf2e3b6b944ebd8b9e03
describe
'1704064' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIML' 'sip-files00020.tif'
e8cd2d6217c98f6494404257b07f93f0
350703fd6346c292f9b96b828154990b300730cb
'2012-05-25T18:09:26-04:00'
describe
'41943' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIMM' 'sip-files00143.QC.jpg'
336903e8b0a3a48015005608ddd50d63
c4bb521b04d9b3bee2fb4292241dd7c5d4d891bb
'2012-05-25T18:02:43-04:00'
describe
'161558' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIMN' 'sip-files00234.QC.jpg'
a90e8b97e7cbc07f4f57eb822bd80c97
a24b713cc9649fa1c8036ba7fa50017799b4a21a
'2012-05-25T18:08:35-04:00'
describe
'55315' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIMO' 'sip-files00234thm.jpg'
7a1ce099619c4831ec2fbf47976194e1
1451922e4c9ccad374f9741169804cc90ee5dae6
'2012-05-25T18:06:33-04:00'
describe
'5349' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIMP' 'sip-files00242.jp2'
8e860b95d7a05df06f4c246e98585c3f
89708c202cd5211c10d68d2b24d41964f0ed9707
describe
'40173' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIMQ' 'sip-files00118.pro'
0ed5626994612851f9440bf07ff4629f
fdfe760eb05358257f34237f2b9f1d227b9a19d4
'2012-05-25T18:02:42-04:00'
describe
'547135' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIMR' 'sip-files00316.jpg'
13a6ec69e9ac875aa840cc2b618c9050
5da18f664c5368ea8bf07181ea6196d57769ad6f
'2012-05-25T17:59:50-04:00'
describe
'214829' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIMS' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
396d4ef601172305579c87ace20ec9e7
51f814e44b59a587b9dc2c3fdb4607cafab949b7
'2012-05-25T18:11:21-04:00'
describe
'4388' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIMT' 'sip-files00009.pro'
c38cfdae94b6229779b232212080fd2c
93278945b4a8c33ca1474b217aa56671cceae5a5
'2012-05-25T18:00:29-04:00'
describe
'228325' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIMU' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
b696bb10921ab209c6d855d4f5e03b49
5c294fadb64165ebd3a35634615d817db3c9c0b6
describe
'38762' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIMV' 'sip-files00280.pro'
ae9fd3c59760eebf61b388b9831e0246
56f3f98f15995d44af141be81b59e21282e57d0c
describe
'1705308' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIMW' 'sip-files00192.tif'
731073b3c90f6b5d7ce478b7d83f7868
4cfd5e9d4fd9fec8f7d47f04a8436771ab7c0ddc
'2012-05-25T18:01:15-04:00'
describe
'237156' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIMX' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
d9b63526e6c36203e7eb2a573a98d662
f668be41a8b23cfa4aa6909f348f9e55cabb7929
'2012-05-25T18:11:05-04:00'
describe
'407971' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIMY' 'sip-files00286.jpg'
f97ccf3585fef8fbe712c92ca83c149f
bcbb1acaf73c3750ad0a3b0f5704992ae971f7cb
describe
'162137' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIMZ' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
6938a89140d0d7cad6cf52823e6d0fc7
3811397d113e25a68b3ef4b3a2bfd2137a4e29ee
describe
'173309' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABINA' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
d20672288ccf6b2d2adc54dd69161e69
0610a5669d6b3d6d7bf4ef6a03b78991db67e344
'2012-05-25T18:11:17-04:00'
describe
'58327' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABINB' 'sip-files00212thm.jpg'
dda8e4ebd4be4681a22c4bd13e0829bd
a5ab8e873a61646d2dd15e76ee856a1bfc8726b6
'2012-05-25T18:03:01-04:00'
describe
'213455' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABINC' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
274863483773cfe96b21f04401d54402
d1ab161ef0ac663520bcca62a38c5933cd89f746
'2012-05-25T18:06:57-04:00'
describe
'1651728' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIND' 'sip-files00213.tif'
20b926f6a63e1cd3a32db2d34a07d5a7
dc8d075ef2c9731b072974d7f837c6b9969eeae4
describe
'19874' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABINE' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
83d5c1a889bfec037c87be121968cb6f
a9150fc0b105735c6e70141b886ee6b61c7ff947
'2012-05-25T18:11:14-04:00'
describe
'1106' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABINF' 'sip-files00185.txt'
348db20025862e7300734d1d03cc96d7
998c31524e1fa0209f331cdb201b31f7fe680962
'2012-05-25T18:09:38-04:00'
describe
'1516' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABING' 'sip-files00051.txt'
7f576981043e249d884339161a116755
f2c1548a44037ccbe67bda7cf9c49a8215705daa
'2012-05-25T18:03:03-04:00'
describe
'1721488' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABINH' 'sip-files00028.tif'
8c30ef6b6e8a00f883ad56b26fb14954
bc3bcc225acbcc7d32112518a92dfab66a06d3a6
'2012-05-25T18:08:21-04:00'
describe
'4575' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABINI' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
b4e0dcac47579e30398fe000bb43a12f
726966115878c6b83effc5044c7851fbfcea1db4
'2012-05-25T18:09:21-04:00'
describe
'168305' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABINJ' 'sip-files00167.QC.jpg'
1b3f5a65fb529bafb2861993bd483e82
fcb5ec85bd4753e88947e1b1af2e780183340c84
'2012-05-25T18:08:52-04:00'
describe
'221040' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABINK' 'sip-files00189.jp2'
fa4494719119fb8186df5227ac3d9494
4ed703c195e2ad72a7f2e1499f2ac46bc69c8dd6
'2012-05-25T18:00:05-04:00'
describe
'366439' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABINL' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
2ea109829e78d2720af16b389001af31
7ca21ab7c6b83f7ef85169ccb14e76bac3f445e3
'2012-05-25T18:07:16-04:00'
describe
'217143' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABINM' 'sip-files00272.jp2'
200d86712c438a3bafb9623ab55e74ee
f359c3e2c4b6f7b9833b8d4b5081421ac03b62bd
'2012-05-25T18:01:40-04:00'
describe
'161747' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABINN' 'sip-files00189.QC.jpg'
a0c3156191e66155721d59f7864f0cc9
7d4086dd5b04c4993568abb26b5726e393c37666
'2012-05-25T18:01:41-04:00'
describe
'398923' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABINO' 'sip-files00311.jpg'
63593f7a2aa0d636ae5cac2aff4c71ae
41c714e52f277a314b2d79c0b43b47a0caa9855d
'2012-05-25T18:09:29-04:00'
describe
'469' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABINP' 'sip-files00040.txt'
b15f0b2f1220ef22baeba6718ba59ee5
131bcd4676c9a80226b80017a53ff0f7c8e68d02
describe
Invalid character
'11316' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABINQ' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
9883d512729239c3b24bc469c0c0812f
9e7c3b77c403c11f4a6444840b8ade2a23a2541c
'2012-05-25T18:04:43-04:00'
describe
'110656' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABINR' 'sip-files00143.jp2'
4b0360de06b9e7cf4ef4d82d8c277468
119054e55d9409f8112871b70d78c6924842ea84
'2012-05-25T18:07:12-04:00'
describe
'437811' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABINS' 'sip-files00228.jpg'
61b9370fb2ee750f7f4bee1e0e16c86f
d7ea58b31f2a969778a995b93afd1d4a371b3701
'2012-05-25T18:08:39-04:00'
describe
'57405' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABINT' 'sip-files00214thm.jpg'
3ad064a6893d30186a48ee15dd52f4ab
d3ff856af2cdf7da3b82204c0d297bced72ce312
describe
'1704108' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABINU' 'sip-files00056.tif'
6d9e9b751c5b8a28711ee688ce507baf
c4aa98da3b9587e3b26ed2eb12177884815c3cf9
'2012-05-25T17:59:28-04:00'
describe
'38903' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABINV' 'sip-files00178.pro'
76f145a25d62f33bfe83cf71fddafb37
d3ceea6563e3a6a972378be40ef635b4e911bb42
'2012-05-25T18:03:27-04:00'
describe
'1705024' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABINW' 'sip-files00233.tif'
224491072e0b59075c55c141f0e9672f
a0d646da6c845c4519413f855db41719cc0a126f
'2012-05-25T18:04:09-04:00'
describe
'35666932' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABINX' 'sip-files00002.tif'
305de2a3e057c0b013c0df113718f32b
91d3d35e949c4a7e172334269b9c8fb6194e5da6
'2012-05-25T18:06:12-04:00'
describe
'1532' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABINY' 'sip-files00149.txt'
86f90e327a49cff47786f42f363d830e
f235a4600b3c627fa71f4a9b111f67b89ade8007
'2012-05-25T17:59:45-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABINZ' 'sip-files00260.tif'
f461d9caf057e61a09eedb564c956191
32a38355d8d4d070239ba4b4f3ba76d15322e9ee
'2012-05-25T18:08:56-04:00'
describe
'427079' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIOA' 'sip-files00296.jpg'
748346594c6017d1c4f70424921b5143
458a205eeb5dd36c1261410f2c9b9bdebc4f96eb
'2012-05-25T18:04:49-04:00'
describe
'5041' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIOB' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
a786bd0cdd27343f67720f08a954c43d
0b7e7ab7b7791bf2af615a91f2922e1d3ddfe4e4
'2012-05-25T18:04:20-04:00'
describe
'174743' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIOC' 'sip-files00250.QC.jpg'
70063932ec95d060b814d6197146012d
81d7216200a5d9271ed2eaab3e2e167aa9ec340f
'2012-05-25T18:02:54-04:00'
describe
'229020' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIOD' 'sip-files00207.jp2'
2d488aabdf9638b8018f302cfccb1ade
8c1cd7154d71f0cd13edabb70f7e40df2d0477df
'2012-05-25T18:05:38-04:00'
describe
'163148' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIOE' 'sip-files00188.QC.jpg'
7a6b229e3b3b41b53719d4e29a6ebb4b
596a91adc8fb4933644be1093b2288669ca6e29b
'2012-05-25T18:11:16-04:00'
describe
'51422' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIOF' 'sip-files00315.pro'
19dc3a249c8c5f2e038ea9573e99b51a
a93292e2d9bff181d8e1ca9b93845c48e44746c1
'2012-05-25T18:10:46-04:00'
describe
'1545' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIOG' 'sip-files00146.txt'
aa89f5722fb13424a2657139d5712863
fe8386ff269c6a94bb389db203897ec6bb35b809
'2012-05-25T18:01:55-04:00'
describe
'1697512' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIOH' 'sip-files00143.tif'
cee4873ab32c7d5387993773bb58d18e
7af92377f354947833aa26a44c747738613f6776
'2012-05-25T18:02:08-04:00'
describe
'393003' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIOI' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
643cfd92b58757b64b9ea36816aa1831
3b645a11336fa048ca2d6ca4a2cd01c661cd50e9
'2012-05-25T18:09:25-04:00'
describe
'40518804' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIOJ' 'sip-files00008.tif'
bf6ca983a8548a50605d098e3c20faf9
1a29288e5b1dd4683ae4215f9b42bef46f74cd89
'2012-05-25T18:05:30-04:00'
describe
'246264' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIOK' 'sip-files00263.jp2'
87ce100b9d703d6001f271143be2d87a
a8ec1859b75b7c8e825bee4257e40ab5b03f884e
describe
'398007' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIOL' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
cacc057353d5d9d60331fa0ea12eaa06
32a1f3acdc376a9cf22e24a0f6fd536864123274
'2012-05-25T18:05:14-04:00'
describe
'402673' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIOM' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
f099f6bc7fde8f11766182d2efb7e93d
f84606c8affd76bc53191f1c253c785cebf23e44
'2012-05-25T18:10:47-04:00'
describe
'54204' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABION' 'sip-files00303thm.jpg'
779ebbeadf3a46720e00f8b0f016ddb7
2c63a743a500b97231bd10f0a3d8c7cc715ccd88
'2012-05-25T18:02:33-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIOO' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
e7ac833800b8cafc41b8be59069c373c
dbbbd280d87ec840ba24035639a158ebed958f1a
describe
'418260' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIOP' 'sip-files00199.jpg'
153b7b273df0b35c51966457b41b9844
4ea965090ce27ba4a0f040e2dc1b13d0966339d6
'2012-05-25T18:06:55-04:00'
describe
'221192' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIOQ' 'sip-files00226.jp2'
ffcfde4b8132ce48a3d1fa813928b10a
2fbb435b19f57e96131494aabc2f09cce1b11c66
describe
'1704388' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIOR' 'sip-files00319.tif'
2326fa25abd4a9c38edf70dafac52d07
148c2d13eeb8a38e705e4be63ec96b05c333060e
'2012-05-25T18:02:10-04:00'
describe
'164455' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIOS' 'sip-files00265.QC.jpg'
4c9e1f622106207fd58d1f5431a9833e
ea1ea39debd7cdef7d9791f94982b6d54c169e25
'2012-05-25T18:10:31-04:00'
describe
'427950' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIOT' 'sip-files00308.jpg'
6401f3ee04f56906813a1b0280754207
334ebc6ec1609fa55e06845dbf22c0419f2d9e90
'2012-05-25T18:04:15-04:00'
describe
'1704160' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIOU' 'sip-files00046.tif'
0fdd0c0c4a076a4d69045c48620490a2
8c02bf1fb2c1a43fb999ee196bad2794001ce9c2
'2012-05-25T18:04:54-04:00'
describe
'251108' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIOV' 'sip-files00295.jp2'
d3f35e13e21777191bcd51d4c01f0c6c
af91fb67d9d6bae57984f1713ba9fbed6b62a6e5
'2012-05-25T18:03:17-04:00'
describe
'1113' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIOW' 'sip-files00121.txt'
86767f82c48085da92a6b472ac697e88
9213b22b91cdf9001ddb93d82597ccd0cd7cd34b
'2012-05-25T18:07:02-04:00'
describe
'40752' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIOX' 'sip-files00284.pro'
c69b8d78b8c1d5e92fc7d0bc766514de
e0f78291071ea49e59d63eb4145c926860ff029c
'2012-05-25T18:01:22-04:00'
describe
'222677' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIOY' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
32e4246f3f10552c4c3a00f3415268a1
b1e978e96570d2773a00f0162acd60f1592c7650
'2012-05-25T18:02:01-04:00'
describe
'108710' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIOZ' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
c3e9e6a4d771242b4029f29876282891
db7c4d9e178d181b48ed74c08710860a2e53e45d
'2012-05-25T18:03:05-04:00'
describe
'225119' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIPA' 'sip-files00246.jp2'
05b9f27d3d40e1cf13ecd571eb07b6b9
f9f75e715952c62344d02576ee4272e383468d1f
describe
'1625756' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIPB' 'sip-files00138.tif'
454d970e7228c5598d609ba8a3223d4d
ce425831158709ec228b935695338c2c4e6ee7fb
'2012-05-25T18:07:15-04:00'
describe
'423652' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIPC' 'sip-files00167.jpg'
cfa234fb5d8c3ecbb41262d57d238bed
af211b41de7ef0711ff9b53b2ececa41d4dcc555
'2012-05-25T18:02:18-04:00'
describe
'53814' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIPD' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
e0939f7375ba14242133cd7acfad1987
2d640414f735370f4b560085979401da36144eac
'2012-05-25T18:06:19-04:00'
describe
'1486' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIPE' 'sip-files00170.txt'
e172ce8ee2bf7c8b482f922df3eb10cf
4d5c6df663f19c8bd160221d3022f299a24d9971
describe
'250375' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIPF' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
cd305fa8c343dabf9aaf10e4178942c8
da2768f5e5585c6a67019c2390dd0a276e24a6ba
describe
'155799' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIPG' 'sip-files00280.QC.jpg'
9ed0ca68081f911f89e833f6890bbac5
a21b2da8c9d5888627f9353f544b50f911ad5078
describe
'222602' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIPH' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
7fe9b87c3c2c8edafccf8595fd19ef45
ed46a7eb6d4aa73e5ef46ab84ffff55261c9f9cf
describe
'41014' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIPI' 'sip-files00099.pro'
463bd1bd374bf0f0e8dab14c9a93eb97
5bbcd32d46f6a4bdab6f195467f7e8d61a90a5ee
'2012-05-25T18:01:06-04:00'
describe
'29073' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIPJ' 'sip-files00243.pro'
2ab1aad405b64048c530129c4f13bd8c
c05041b050f590a3218e9072c1212352980f7b82
'2012-05-25T18:01:27-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIPK' 'sip-files00018.tif'
f5a416ae1a3730a8d0c164d0f800a584
63cd5ebf5c096ab8459297564ecc441cedf1d1df
'2012-05-25T18:05:07-04:00'
describe
'223111' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIPL' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
9870f7556be33404371df40dd2924e6f
86cfebf02f100b1736c7089b40db8157ccc0dc6b
'2012-05-25T18:05:45-04:00'
describe
'13689' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIPM' 'sip-files00008.pro'
a267b3536f511a79554a22af6cef90f4
0259d1b96824af6a0b527ce6d5e1805fcea17595
describe
'1443' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIPN' 'sip-files00108.txt'
08fd334d1219755617be9083d2d71918
3a50e728a5a2f451132bc65744881ef9bd1ed093
'2012-05-25T18:11:36-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'41605' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIPO' 'sip-files00117.pro'
3088c6f309b407feab45c96acc63f4ba
674ccb31c0a409624372a50f7195fc5bee8f04fc
'2012-05-25T18:01:59-04:00'
describe
'170850' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIPP' 'sip-files00211.QC.jpg'
de87bddd5588d66e27d2f9a4e1e60f6b
70555be416f4452befcb0ae31296519ec731484c
'2012-05-25T18:04:41-04:00'
describe
'56887' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIPQ' 'sip-files00171thm.jpg'
7f31c44353be4cc5f96a2f4c68c79f3a
ec77054a5e9bdf7c1c460d46af3e0df94d6fa79e
'2012-05-25T18:01:17-04:00'
describe
'57762' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIPR' 'sip-files00177thm.jpg'
a64ffaac7ab48ea8c02a8f17ef0286cd
575957bd8bb50412bb4c51f00e2e3ec57581594f
'2012-05-25T18:01:07-04:00'
describe
'154475' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIPS' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
46a6e50e5fd5a40f41d132e62a55cd57
b7102b6b43a190506266d81d3bfe18f1e737d3ee
'2012-05-25T18:04:17-04:00'
describe
'1799' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIPT' 'sip-files00318.txt'
c000582c94d5d9a4ebe78caca9ba13a9
588fc7a69344d013efbfd3a22c4b7445b2a5c048
describe
'165754' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIPU' 'sip-files00244.QC.jpg'
3979e9dad24bca2c5f002f31598fb6f0
c4e7e3983a981a3e8de1bf08ac72c0d3949bff10
'2012-05-25T18:01:31-04:00'
describe
'1570' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIPV' 'sip-files00270.txt'
17ad7dc225fd73a76664100822183ef4
16c18b83788c16076c2843091813310fac983626
'2012-05-25T18:06:28-04:00'
describe
'62284' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIPW' 'sip-files00176thm.jpg'
f7666a3567941bf70c3cc4a19649788c
ccaa874eacdcbbe9cbae10d7c54243b855290cbd
describe
'1704464' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIPX' 'sip-files00291.tif'
caf6bc67df68db1e8c43b2fec0425c09
6dba2b67dc6da8974ce25cee65b182abcdcdd9d6
'2012-05-25T18:08:28-04:00'
describe
'153481' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIPY' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
dea5c5021779abf51bb0ea7779800fd5
d12276f93196c5bf2fe7ad06dfd5a7817572a48d
'2012-05-25T18:11:35-04:00'
describe
'40978' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIPZ' 'sip-files00204.pro'
07ac7b8a9dcacf6d81aedd5fc9d4fa83
ee1de5606c234bf3d611c4acf40080575c75b14f
'2012-05-25T18:08:19-04:00'
describe
'39776' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIQA' 'sip-files00240.pro'
75f62aaf85c8fde232b15a04b25ee22e
06b9851398eddffb4f39a2b7e51a9d2882b28ca5
'2012-05-25T18:01:44-04:00'
describe
'55146' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIQB' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
1f4a47e821b365b64ce4658c8f63cb97
8e5c07e26c6559ff787e5c5ef6e8299a704c6a6f
'2012-05-25T18:02:28-04:00'
describe
'39619' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIQC' 'sip-files00153.pro'
1bcefa102fbc65310935940d4acb23e7
0ecfac20b3533a96f627e4bc1be65551f3c47b0f
'2012-05-25T18:03:30-04:00'
describe
'208' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIQD' 'sip-filesprocessing.instr'
10dcd66b87ecfa8717230bee3893bbca
da7b5495a85aaba44a00b63d3f2041f961b76b18
'2012-05-25T18:07:11-04:00'
describe
'169133' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIQE' 'sip-files00147.QC.jpg'
9058c1e697c52358a36e435ba64db722
60d308f87872923ff864b5436ea60eb091d52d46
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIQF' 'sip-files00055.txt'
f1e9d174ffa66f531b46a44826adfd2c
a147cf6fd7fa80cb13e0830be688275861498124
describe
'58716' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIQG' 'sip-files00264thm.jpg'
ac7223ba530e7d5de9d565e376469f6b
958017ff5d98bac33583f82e81319e0f560d891a
'2012-05-25T18:05:02-04:00'
describe
'393420' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIQH' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
7e5ff55d96dad79135ad4ca0c955e574
4dd3ddabcbcf7e51e8589ecf01426b181ea7e5e4
'2012-05-25T18:09:54-04:00'
describe
'39198' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIQI' 'sip-files00215.pro'
91d8c1bc875aa080b3ec7bfd0baaeea3
a463ecc5e0878a4df9fce9fb5e23c23b279ea2ee
'2012-05-25T18:00:21-04:00'
describe
'9524' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIQJ' 'sip-files00258.pro'
7fdaf9f885859b3b277125004748521d
ee57aaf4ae58671a2c30a624ae709aef5fcc1962
'2012-05-25T18:06:42-04:00'
describe
'11491' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIQK' 'sip-files00260.QC.jpg'
89c9585439271234a3925683ad802f01
e8afe1450399e26b5f06f437976097d8f7993ee9
'2012-05-25T18:03:48-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIQL' 'sip-files00217.txt'
558223ce3ffdeb09f2774f6083b1d266
d988db295f42e25dd790b8f58b99df3c1155c17f
describe
'41660' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIQM' 'sip-files00278.pro'
b275044056a1f9572c8ebfe0b616bbe5
860478d56bb76b0fe8cbf961de78a823dda5f3a8
describe
'209628' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIQN' 'sip-files00225.jp2'
e8c6016ef6151f25a0b4e0c403c45a68
0c3a9f08e04c1d7910d8439d3b72da4233fd0a90
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIQO' 'sip-files00093.txt'
16212af13077c26935e215bdb4513f0e
43ae8aef691fa2839d5f1352ae884b3e5c507f89
'2012-05-25T18:11:38-04:00'
describe
'55216' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIQP' 'sip-files00284thm.jpg'
a197c155604e71ce0e69c7dbbe56a8d5
2c90db7d8f6909eabf5ec11b26191a5f9a06197a
'2012-05-25T18:00:50-04:00'
describe
'383892' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIQQ' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
2e4888cb02258ea7ac07156e69bd9f28
9b83341df8ccef1d118182492cd2bfa46cab6156
describe
'60589' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIQR' 'sip-files00224thm.jpg'
c86e109970e300d5a2348e6b3339637c
1aa9d4a3012a8c98a69cee48414bc60af6b9678b
describe
'406168' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIQS' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
7a73cecaa10fa1b98ecce5050ca1408e
1ba84ccc9662629fc89673bb5312a8fc65a524e8
'2012-05-25T18:04:18-04:00'
describe
'427838' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIQT' 'sip-files00288.jpg'
0f34780904f37dec909dd60f8b7939eb
f31dc0b623717029bdcfda7e9ba58d266ec1d617
'2012-05-25T18:02:17-04:00'
describe
'242877' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIQU' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
178b0d07043569319a6e5ae79da32cb9
8cc593fe4108500383de8a796d549f4d67238525
'2012-05-25T18:07:42-04:00'
describe
'1462' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIQV' 'sip-files00280.txt'
a3217cd99d13bf5f4ffd21f6930cec5a
c4308a4b7e2b188d5c173e18400939704ca31e5c
'2012-05-25T18:09:41-04:00'
describe
'218661' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIQW' 'sip-files00215.jp2'
e4eea8268bbc1309fd864f7a76608184
f4789cb911b0d53c21e2f0f0d4e5e2c4ea831432
describe
'219539' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIQX' 'sip-files00254.jp2'
bc25532ddc381fae1ed639c65aaafed0
cb1a75cd54c92a9fabd25e7bbcd34a1df91eb517
'2012-05-25T18:02:49-04:00'
describe
'268015' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIQY' 'sip-files00313.jp2'
8916ea5694e8a38028c089f5faf8c339
e3edb26e9b87dcb1df5c857b4512ca7236d18fbf
'2012-05-25T18:03:50-04:00'
describe
'27089' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIQZ' 'sip-files00027.pro'
0360d5bfd357dac82eff99999f1d29ae
44061f962e5e0c448a8f09600e400718b5b31f58
describe
'1705124' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIRA' 'sip-files00080.tif'
bec3468a6f8df794acac8e94567faca7
a71f11a70664f7cee19fd0cac39e586f320e5845
'2012-05-25T18:00:59-04:00'
describe
'11585' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIRB' 'sip-files00202.QC.jpg'
42653c4f1200b324efe8dcf7eec4b423
6af005515a098712f71b7f57b06fa8c9ca0d86fd
'2012-05-25T18:02:41-04:00'
describe
'40324' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIRC' 'sip-files00189.pro'
6c2a47b856bfdff7503f4e858c2dbfc5
2a002e5ffa88a3094ba722509cb8b6ce5835e298
describe
'422563' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIRD' 'sip-files00211.jpg'
abbe33ebd4e08d16095b63f8d10b29e8
95b938785d82e06aceb4f4488199be77c87537b4
'2012-05-25T18:10:51-04:00'
describe
'167487' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIRE' 'sip-files00168.QC.jpg'
11eb326b8988fa1654ce20261b24c33f
763dcec9ad6cf198b53c0d104a6b82997180560d
'2012-05-25T18:11:28-04:00'
describe
'213534' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIRF' 'sip-files00149.jp2'
e7f5f2e1a37e7078f013fe39d2d480a7
f149b18569ae2fcc819e2c2015f7cafd9ede57c1
'2012-05-25T18:07:01-04:00'
describe
'383392' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIRG' 'sip-files00231.jpg'
a08bf2be65d88191202dc375942b9f6b
b40050cd440fd97b3c1dbf9cde014c5745e4f5db
describe
'40698' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIRH' 'sip-files00287.pro'
2c6403043b5c7d24813df399327bc363
329dc42fc5eeb7a2e5d0ec4dd0837e60a2f9aeae
'2012-05-25T18:00:56-04:00'
describe
'1656860' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIRI' 'sip-files00155.tif'
3db8de4e2f94ccce3e0c17411bab2c8e
c7e54dac4c5e819e045a2ce90042b3b17470bb34
'2012-05-25T18:08:01-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIRJ' 'sip-files00296.txt'
b58b886553198b2308849beda240c1e0
6e93d735ef57d945066b5ed7a3bfe4e98cb3fe62
'2012-05-25T18:10:04-04:00'
describe
'224441' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIRK' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
604b99b027f8d84970ee00e8c7abb46d
ea7f549b16681dfc5b548f758a677f670f555744
describe
'40988' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIRL' 'sip-files00135.pro'
4d775ec6b2a1c72632c3344fe908cd6e
d0c2e6a508b1781772e177e63ed511655da4a0f8
describe
'407939' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIRM' 'sip-files00281.jpg'
95ed56fabff9d89a70dacc7185eccbaa
5fcab919cfc72152c26b1299ef73a8c15abac9bd
'2012-05-25T18:10:26-04:00'
describe
'425622' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIRN' 'sip-files00266.jpg'
1bae16a1d34cd055530ce3e46fc7201d
86e71036db0ec553ee50f8808daa6cc0305b3388
'2012-05-25T18:00:45-04:00'
describe
'57149' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIRO' 'sip-files00278thm.jpg'
ec269b9934efecb7a36a50e32233b0bb
3d9be64a127c6deed976ccdb18076c029c169a11
'2012-05-25T18:04:30-04:00'
describe
'1687580' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIRP' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
dd4e1da88acf2b25682d245dab83a9f7
1d677fa76a57bb934e5d3f773ad9f013d5e6cc03
'2012-05-25T18:00:40-04:00'
describe
'41570' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIRQ' 'sip-files00156.pro'
fa30818410b0f90b9e2dbe4414dbb707
5bffede02757c74b313bfaaa63f83382eea4d390
'2012-05-25T17:59:37-04:00'
describe
'1698732' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIRR' 'sip-files00200.tif'
6e80e26dcaba90590f4cb8a49b78d0ab
460496ab773fa5dfb40d608f82eb67409108cb0b
'2012-05-25T18:00:17-04:00'
describe
'1697840' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIRS' 'sip-files00038.tif'
fd999327f77caeea4fc4d3b670202945
f4c857a290f95abe39ef1978a85698aaff96959e
'2012-05-25T18:01:57-04:00'
describe
'408221' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIRT' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
1a834f720be85d7e1e39b757146160c0
1664011bd5ec675a3e043780e60f12d666334130
describe
'107729' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIRU' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
13564ef536e67938cc9b6050752095cc
a78a13fff4feaab289a7a8b411a203692408ee30
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIRV' 'sip-files00284.txt'
e7056dd5d6600151c4ac774710430b59
c656f1f0e089cda65832ae5acce421aec889d0d5
'2012-05-25T18:00:03-04:00'
describe
'21013' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIRW' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
0c2f80c7fe6aa3ce4851bad03522ff5a
af2773b0d585464d3b86ba189386d93bea041cf7
describe
'219105' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIRX' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
ff7b17a59699b90adf60a57ff276b797
859969a9a1d04e5feb38cf6bcfe87b9ed8942e11
'2012-05-25T18:05:11-04:00'
describe
'26776' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIRY' 'sip-files00015.pro'
f1c25d7979a3251c638908a72e5d81c9
828f26347f453ac45e156b37e37d41ce13f22dba
'2012-05-25T17:59:30-04:00'
describe
'52777' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIRZ' 'sip-files00318thm.jpg'
91ec94c868d2bb13a21e64fec0345f3f
4367ed00b5b496b2a78674a0645d035784e4d885
'2012-05-25T18:01:24-04:00'
describe
'56501' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABISA' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
7986d4b89bdea432a5c6fb50d4c79d8e
228b5e81634bc1c5d3996bc19bac5a3669e3305d
describe
'172287' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABISB' 'sip-files00282.QC.jpg'
49de704f9a9e2b8227661909a0a9534c
7eaad53e83c0e855810aecb48c9a3204d27fe79b
describe
'170325' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABISC' 'sip-files00206.QC.jpg'
20def905d88dae8ec7ef73a1fb66e39e
85264bf5fd021e374c4147470d8a18786245e503
describe
'155763' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABISD' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
43ea5ee32af21aefc5937754a85946a4
5797a8026a1b66dc6cfd87228a31d8045f778391
describe
'40739' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABISE' 'sip-files00160.pro'
eccc207b90c7a9e4f658bafd48473789
0b86a087d778af8adfd1dba71ba677b41c77a9c4
'2012-05-25T18:04:26-04:00'
describe
'28535' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABISF' 'sip-files00295.pro'
2349ecdca50e8a26b40197b8e16e5592
37a0e8e8553c3f26fc59a16da835578a06378258
'2012-05-25T18:01:03-04:00'
describe
'1693620' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABISG' 'sip-files00198.tif'
4b992397eb383a2d47a5eff4318339ff
6db6c2d4e2aa2bef534415d009753ee2188bc694
describe
'224274' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABISH' 'sip-files00232.jp2'
dc02888d7364e00de68daf56e05ab656
b67e935201b1fd0bf8ce4af861e7d15ca6f4746b
describe
'224888' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABISI' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
90a9e1cbb10f276b5682bff3d37bc436
fae1e69ddeb374fedcfeabc8428d440314667a8a
describe
'215245' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABISJ' 'sip-files00141.jp2'
7d0417b2528fd5e2d51af5b3e8a1c3ff
5528782c969bdc310ff8fcbd06dd84627530317c
describe
'128' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABISK' 'sip-files00259.txt'
f36dda13d209412e54a4784644c7d3cb
1c6cb8f7d08c034fc4a16291839db7c9235405f5
describe
'27037' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABISL' 'sip-files00121.pro'
15b1b2739e26e1381bee9f0aa4f74d0e
b352f8607d0cbf896c060d0c5c55077d740f6ab4
'2012-05-25T18:11:32-04:00'
describe
'11267' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABISM' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
6fc6deba723f35ad032579256b98a59b
7a4d7ae673d17bae384e5815ac5293016952e23d
'2012-05-25T18:02:57-04:00'
describe
'154963' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABISN' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
c7d2c4f3b07f4c3f73c5e7bd6ca97507
cf3e073363a7dbb0022e5dff2903ab1a572e47d1
'2012-05-25T18:10:58-04:00'
describe
'397806' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABISO' 'sip-files00175.jpg'
64d85b198a98c0ae6be59749085d87a5
da7aa8763b6a8c7892ae23fa9cc140a938926901
'2012-05-25T18:00:07-04:00'
describe
'54801' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABISP' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
3797ade6eb0db7c57024645393d1a26b
5a86d5a110659f7c9a85aaedcae9e6f570d8ecba
'2012-05-25T18:11:29-04:00'
describe
'22255' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABISQ' 'sip-files00083.pro'
e9dd59ced6ddfc00ef31fadac906be11
e934d5ed4ae55312d2ef44649f317e7abef0738c
describe
'54787' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABISR' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
3993dd39fcc90cbb4c3de7b760ebef61
683c16f0eaddfd9830f01dd03ca66d63e6eb82f5
'2012-05-25T18:01:02-04:00'
describe
'40101' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABISS' 'sip-files00214.pro'
4905a0239cdd038c3061f1c6fcee0f80
1c30aa1b18cb87848413d5dae31c61649f0b67ca
'2012-05-25T18:10:52-04:00'
describe
'1419' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIST' 'sip-files00062.txt'
77c17f73971e5331798ee79d913675dd
6899f9fde680689a3feb91f9126d55bf283e27cb
'2012-05-25T18:10:22-04:00'
describe
'1599300' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABISU' 'sip-files00031.tif'
10141ab500f5f205b0127db74f8617eb
5258020eb777e3972a1666820ade80c682c9b8ab
'2012-05-25T18:01:51-04:00'
describe
'217665' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABISV' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
f6a318ef5aefafdca413dbafdd293844
d9ee51bb92654ae50cc9a0fa3e56d8d1a773c6c2
describe
'40863' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABISW' 'sip-files00136.pro'
7d3c488554bdfced4675bcb177e555dc
a88f536f346873f65c945b358fda4386f590b6d9
'2012-05-25T18:05:47-04:00'
describe
'157896' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABISX' 'sip-files00220.QC.jpg'
f59c3cbfec52589ce929fbd670db6fc6
51289f2c34620818309e549093f4b36e653540a8
describe
'826' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABISY' 'sip-files00011.txt'
2636da131fdf3badb20f98d3efe0ea89
48c0a705cf7462af802f13971d60e6b1ed853463
'2012-05-25T18:10:54-04:00'
describe
'375518' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABISZ' 'sip-files00141.jpg'
daa3ddd95f33873ab4ddce0639cf9a65
d00123fac8483616746f1d8e53334e52fa6b3b66
describe
'216636' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABITA' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
68a79887ceec5680c81cc4dddbb48d0a
cfa81fe737ce14ac947aef118b24e3cebf333b48
'2012-05-25T18:05:35-04:00'
describe
'179044' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABITB' 'sip-files00176.QC.jpg'
324df2e9521861ed9d69591e26959462
8574b6fd533411b30e9740a972bb0e535beb0207
'2012-05-25T18:02:50-04:00'
describe
'139831' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABITC' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
44d9cd8a40603353525f651258a794dc
b72004e93aa81453fb746e8a0527d3e3c94293f1
'2012-05-25T18:06:37-04:00'
describe
'40359' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABITD' 'sip-files00053.pro'
a83bdd065c4b9672c046f5b7e6af8e5a
2c98d0d79ab7e63b7a476e60cc51ba34ee9d0feb
describe
'219383' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABITE' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
8603bda3c8b7293951dd428d90c09b83
557d0a94db248709a5f9f9d729322466e80db6b4
describe
'55432' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABITF' 'sip-files00189thm.jpg'
8142b667bb9b65b9c8d434c3b853599e
9d526fbc07ac1a0138c85903be70f791c7e4414d
describe
'149565' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABITG' 'sip-files00243.QC.jpg'
d8d7e3f3d4b17adbb2c9876236e9323c
8d5dd36d68d3498cd7c9306f0edc260e09ebc22d
'2012-05-25T18:07:23-04:00'
describe
'215583' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABITH' 'sip-files00282.jp2'
2ffb5f8949dd380a3e9bb97ca62d57c8
828fcf30b7a603a18364220d400482f3475a4bf0
describe
'419701' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABITI' 'sip-files00268.jpg'
6d84c37059bf5624213f42320ea4bcc3
0df22aaa79de994bb8bd9f38d7d07d798032c806
'2012-05-25T18:08:34-04:00'
describe
'222885' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABITJ' 'sip-files00301.jp2'
4fd71aea0acd5a19df666b471a6f7ebc
9ac4a309b6fab9b838ce7797055d011d6a4c8e7c
describe
'1703124' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABITK' 'sip-files00067.tif'
70aeae947a4e8ff3cca784d2bfe17fc9
b021ff090927e5895b68e1007ee622165a2daabe
'2012-05-25T18:07:24-04:00'
describe
'231517' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABITL' 'sip-files00249.jp2'
4311c8a43cfa8ae910fd4afc2729cdf3
5717751d2d5747eb7bba5f4f2dede9afe66d86a2
describe
'18726' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABITM' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
e170a56c09c7c3bdc49f0b2d7863cc74
e22c3acac707f9c7f8218f34bf90f82178616470
describe
'190431' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABITN' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
e82586ef823a4d225822b61d2fdb8011
d6e245f5a28f1fecd5428d5ecc510d1d838eed1f
describe
'164833' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABITO' 'sip-files00298.QC.jpg'
d503f88a22c1bc473c0939fae8a7419f
b19c51b0f9a452e491086eca7c8530e46fe56fca
'2012-05-25T18:00:28-04:00'
describe
'157342' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABITP' 'sip-files00301.QC.jpg'
088d7278f83e23820c65cd2ffd07eb40
bd66bffe5bef79bb5ee3578edd30826f9bb03d1a
'2012-05-25T18:01:28-04:00'
describe
'54824' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABITQ' 'sip-files00237thm.jpg'
192987932f245ac166fbd677ee1ac3c8
a073aeddf19abae9c617cdaa25b170f4cb8b65cd
describe
'50769' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABITR' 'sip-files00203thm.jpg'
2fcd55b954a8a9dac02cbca69c8fdb2e
c50b1003de3a678f10d678f2e5f022861f7da650
'2012-05-25T18:08:14-04:00'
describe
'59458' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABITS' 'sip-files00272thm.jpg'
caef30768ddf642f420bc1c7ff2f5492
3985a090e4602f5dec8bff1523a8d188dfc9965c
describe
'1593' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABITT' 'sip-files00263.txt'
7e33efa3ccf2a31a52d4f2db79d12a64
72d07173498e1df7e4565c99c1b27cf4c348a905
describe
'54524' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABITU' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
d35569fe4805fc7ed558cdefd9ff4b32
97832d24222b27e32f27bb2a6221fa2f18c0fe4d
'2012-05-25T18:09:30-04:00'
describe
'1705080' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABITV' 'sip-files00023.tif'
144876c540f93b6160beb23253352afb
4c7fedc680207e39c634edbda91d9c5df0bd7315
'2012-05-25T18:09:46-04:00'
describe
'55535' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABITW' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
122e0080e9b01ede2ceb46bd5fac8feb
5e1161c9f3fbd389a52dc69ba809928d59c36f58
describe
'1705104' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABITX' 'sip-files00316.tif'
9d44284455bf59887b7a30dac650a4de
f66b6284e45d28171166aea109017599a46e295b
'2012-05-25T18:02:09-04:00'
describe
'52709' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABITY' 'sip-files00292.QC.jpg'
ce14695edd3db768c711c15acbbfc5ab
43a846e4e00e4fcd89511628691d763f11dd0707
'2012-05-25T18:07:28-04:00'
describe
'54535' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABITZ' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
e64a82b35178d6274709805fa93841de
7a5d40c1fc3e1a9ce765c2f4fccb9559e83bbd59
'2012-05-25T18:04:44-04:00'
describe
'296654' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIUA' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
5e9fd99687ae347658cde3cab6f405db
82559f52a1402a154d2a51f9c05b1b6e71ab952b
describe
'1042' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIUB' 'sip-files00145.txt'
f501540a3483dabdc1bc7d57af211186
c2c921b81cae176efc612a483fb72cf50b6fa2c0
'2012-05-25T18:06:23-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'40999' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIUC' 'sip-files00302.pro'
c3070a2fadf2a57145909442f16227e6
dbc584fc60ec40f844e777c7a5877cc3852e4676
'2012-05-25T18:01:25-04:00'
describe
'41524' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIUD' 'sip-files00296.pro'
68d6f201ca092a38c43c8ba7079aa066
05b290de4918d71b3288c6934e7119bbfcb8b180
describe
'245439' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIUE' 'sip-files00203.jp2'
56465d75ec0d52aed1bcf1b27c10c4e1
edf0f058261bc182a4d7f6b24140e1bffb0a603a
'2012-05-25T18:07:34-04:00'
describe
'157330' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIUF' 'sip-files00174.QC.jpg'
a99eab0d015729d5f80670e8457062f5
85b1313876327bc219d5b6742da170bd78a443a9
describe
'1253' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIUG' 'sip-files00221.pro'
3d0e6bcd6ee6289e45c239f58e094353
395e190f1ce701d646b397a4ae315924249e003a
describe
'157560' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIUH' 'sip-files00303.QC.jpg'
c4bcb03d590b1704f860acad23b51f2c
8a08b57f2aa7620ac0d654c3ac8ccba9c010739d
describe
'1480' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIUI' 'sip-files00098.txt'
b382483f860fc1681efd350b1c8bfc7d
7fbd7ec3df3fd1393b7602a6c47f76c6072eecf2
'2012-05-25T18:06:48-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'288' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIUJ' 'sip-files00024.txt'
26a9ea72e1b3ae33829b6c86f2b1d4ea
8b0d068e5245021b63578a705896d44c1bdd6b2e
'2012-05-25T18:04:03-04:00'
describe
'1704612' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIUK' 'sip-files00061.tif'
1895eeae8c90936b8a48c1d469e0ce78
63578cdd760e3fc4eccecd0867298ba19b36ac16
'2012-05-25T18:07:56-04:00'
describe
'231749' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIUL' 'sip-files00166.jp2'
512fdd7956b7303987a8d4deb7ef9c81
32cef86fe7b1c7f3d7d1be42e11ceb3c981196be
'2012-05-25T18:08:02-04:00'
describe
'1702444' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIUM' 'sip-files00063.tif'
321612397111e6402230c897873e2580
fccbbf791b1740101c0348570d389ae7b45ba893
'2012-05-25T18:11:33-04:00'
describe
'1540' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIUN' 'sip-files00187.txt'
f01da7d6dbfe4ca875f8659883236f42
7836303a2b6db16def9e52f5b8a13d4e8d2a045c
'2012-05-25T18:08:41-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIUO' 'sip-files00014.tif'
28d5332bf785ad89d4269deea30f3ea4
68e49f9a141c78f6381b687be47b9bb72a30c27e
describe
'54737' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIUP' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
b07f46d18e7f21a8771f307ee3325a53
34bacca9ddd080e5f10cd46411091a79c791e437
'2012-05-25T18:10:10-04:00'
describe
'1697372' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIUQ' 'sip-files00221.tif'
13931fd6edddb3efc2fd786e09462285
3cf065875b58fd183890b61e0affc513d8f7b070
'2012-05-25T18:04:16-04:00'
describe
'42275' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIUR' 'sip-files00172.pro'
3e8089f128fe2567b00609d5ddccaf57
aee68b001e726268df2e5a390575ac41849f3d8a
describe
'195561' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIUS' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
03e1b088d1d76a4ca5e07e02af2cdd88
87d35411f4c3ca0e70999d080979012a9dc80aca
'2012-05-25T18:04:53-04:00'
describe
'219876' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIUT' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
33bb65d60482153fe472a4a918e0c3f6
0ab8f1871eac385f7ddbee4bcae7fbf9feef513f
describe
'156225' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIUU' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
c504c67cf1fa46c56a5fa368b69bc870
8ad042bb018f11a138f32061023ba887f5ee979a
'2012-05-25T18:06:40-04:00'
describe
'255089' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIUV' 'sip-files00261.jp2'
fa13d2ddfc7148d9c126f284a5fb837d
62162a10cc5744f63c4d487a8014d138096f39ea
describe
'139985' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIUW' 'sip-files00223.QC.jpg'
2aa3fa9a0b81e909806e71fdfbe7781a
607e50b3787f6eef337ed59762cc07f9d0361ebe
'2012-05-25T18:02:37-04:00'
describe
'39438' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIUX' 'sip-files00293.QC.jpg'
dce79d086f61d3776d6b4114385e0fa5
d159b8a9357636f8c201278fc0a985dfe243c16e
'2012-05-25T18:09:13-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIUY' 'sip-files00099.tif'
86579f7c3e01ba20d0b5acce8c91604d
5dfba6bde660d334018e0bee6e00511fd2b19ab4
'2012-05-25T18:00:42-04:00'
describe
'228908' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIUZ' 'sip-files00270.jp2'
b7531253acefec7bd423ff1207a9acc7
58da29a31205a7a42c5b015461682cf6ead59062
'2012-05-25T18:04:02-04:00'
describe
'405871' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIVA' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
2b7fa5c16023403e5838e9fc9a6adc07
abc3a81170b55f84dae6bad6c999e0f2ffee7d75
'2012-05-25T18:05:59-04:00'
describe
'58' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIVB' 'sip-files00085.txt'
26a7173edc87ca72438815d17c15a109
4cc4295d15199d002866a628065ad8d425ee379d
describe
'212668' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIVC' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
644ac8bc76d5c1ea4d9e7b13eed35714
b4a0ddfdb2a48b33fa242dd20b8e6fbc17a8728b
describe
'9344' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIVD' 'sip-files00222thm.jpg'
21905c0a6f42c1b8f1befc5e1aff5868
4e8a06e0203800d9a038d29f096eee1e58532faf
describe
'40459' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIVE' 'sip-files00071.pro'
3084858f064f9384c4ac2e3ed9dad633
9420747cd17db0bb7c88b7c152c949643696ed7b
'2012-05-25T18:02:24-04:00'
describe
'230415' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIVF' 'sip-files00169.jp2'
b38fdcc530cfd95356be5b2b7b6d7f42
8486263eedcfce5cec705d7e45fdd65a059f2c64
describe
'37505' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIVG' 'sip-files00062.pro'
e59841f268b7e976c27a98fcccd2c206
29ef529f813e445e815ee4ea46f12588b78a5b18
'2012-05-25T18:04:36-04:00'
describe
'38689' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIVH' 'sip-files00030.pro'
2ce8ca591abdd819b42e5aafeebd136f
56997bc1ce0630e2d631cf0cfcf2a4ac32394818
describe
'1571' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIVI' 'sip-files00169.txt'
8f15d7580754bf20d4e5908381d59377
2938d25fe2e2176ff0c33841536e4042385c6ad2
'2012-05-25T18:05:33-04:00'
describe
'1704184' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIVJ' 'sip-files00095.tif'
bfd5ee1f701d4afba4d30be7040f9957
7fb7cce26be43ef7f2ccb7aa568d5b59cae2ef9d
'2012-05-25T18:05:56-04:00'
describe
'1704508' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIVK' 'sip-files00315.tif'
c5748b9e34168da6472d63a088c16dd0
f701aad51472ba4a598c4579c5e243b0821ed22f
describe
'406489' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIVL' 'sip-files00255.jpg'
9645ea47c0d871c92ab40b1c7ea5aa73
e5e5426e3475bc0a62314be88a71412e42547423
'2012-05-25T18:04:37-04:00'
describe
'420234' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIVM' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
83ad1dfb40ce6c2ce71593023933688d
6c55ade839bba0bfe057c12c9cf650f5f1220af6
describe
'54499' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIVN' 'sip-files00286thm.jpg'
2e32984cd074c680370a74dce1784289
2c639d30a3c40775612deb574b11057ef40bd24b
'2012-05-25T18:02:03-04:00'
describe
'44032' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIVO' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
1748b2e3960a5187b0f3cc43882fe3b1
a9371bad5d4ee801287ba5bfaa80ee592e57cac1
describe
'404532' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIVP' 'sip-files00186.jpg'
1e20636fb95bf8a329fed79bc327c3c6
d9b5affa22a2f29ff9e3bb91ebfdb00d0ada20b4
'2012-05-25T17:59:38-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIVQ' 'sip-files00122.tif'
6bdb5ff5ce6aaf39915a004bc08af7b9
5313caba0129816e5c471fd4baf5a0e2b2821b39
'2012-05-25T18:08:00-04:00'
describe
'162661' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIVR' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
1e8e8185b158616ecedeb1b50d1a7e78
a921baeb32bc1b07f94e0d19a2df2404c0450909
describe
'1695752' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIVS' 'sip-files00040.tif'
ae0e843fd1fc99d92344ae3fcdcf92e0
41fd640fa886e2806b641f52dfd53d2b08eb4678
describe
'80' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIVT' 'sip-files00002.txt'
6aa120fb49477d7b29cee000e2a69db7
17f22a6f8ea0d29b44d1d96788f85f7bf22cf274
describe
'40517' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIVU' 'sip-files00269.pro'
0c59d55475115211706c74fdf50a0e58
20946c9afa76e56020b44492fd30d393b2b283e2
describe
'388705' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIVV' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
d7f397cc9c881b83b9d8e41035b4ae5f
15008be25178da61e280c79a98c4c9815e8d7b28
'2012-05-25T18:02:59-04:00'
describe
'217237' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIVW' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
293439ef42927aba032842a1617c22a8
19ca59eef129f4e28b3d90cc0527b6b863ab0a37
describe
'57901' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIVX' 'sip-files00195thm.jpg'
48a9a071ba04f7d85f32cfa2b7c44468
8ce804f41ab9bc700f9360e8ce8c479df957f194
'2012-05-25T18:06:50-04:00'
describe
'1703700' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIVY' 'sip-files00115.tif'
47021d8cd12700009da63aa1b8a5c9bf
0d1fe4931e6200660eb688aa61fbad382c3f4d67
describe
'40899' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIVZ' 'sip-files00031.pro'
a8a72ca82fe783bc01e11bcf7976d9b7
039891534c5de8b31b01ec132ba86032baee77cf
'2012-05-25T18:06:17-04:00'
describe
'82501' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIWA' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
d2b2181e5655cc5a63bce0afd7677319
234528ea741a2fb073be02282a9fae1e6ed3c73d
'2012-05-25T18:02:22-04:00'
describe
'1697328' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIWB' 'sip-files00293.tif'
25dd36f7818592d281ea8203a7754b2e
69e9bf199ee14a306304284361e1da0e3ce3f30c
'2012-05-25T18:07:43-04:00'
describe
'1698708' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIWC' 'sip-files00258.tif'
798772c0c28852f87b3b1296fad81098
d0a71cca5f4a791fd906b6760faafc10a993fdef
'2012-05-25T18:05:31-04:00'
describe
'215208' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIWD' 'sip-files00220.jp2'
a4ad4c8861d99ff4f249985bf2b38273
82567443f8321d3435dd9a30725dc5d475cd02b0
'2012-05-25T18:10:19-04:00'
describe
'1564' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIWE' 'sip-files00088.txt'
4ff3400b9db9b61f6f7543c1309a81ad
15c2276239a9fd31bafee1e77efaa8350b2ec0ff
'2012-05-25T18:03:24-04:00'
describe
'41998' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIWF' 'sip-files00270.pro'
875ed81f8169d80baa32fbd3951fa13e
b0a52d4acec4c9b12093a3b10f2c8384c18b3760
'2012-05-25T18:05:42-04:00'
describe
'1703844' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIWG' 'sip-files00223.tif'
7627ad72a377dbe0554b4ac8c5d2f427
3eddb1635c7ecdaaed1590ebfc1a845682f348b8
describe
'107777' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIWH' 'sip-files00241.jp2'
59da7e48d27674b82a876db3723be9ca
e8a4b3da78d200fb980e354d0a7569e79b573d9f
describe
'1705712' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIWI' 'sip-files00264.tif'
6067155dd75914bab693f26918dbacfe
1259143ef3731a6168e9354b70191e2c690308c3
'2012-05-25T18:03:59-04:00'
describe
'161606' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIWJ' 'sip-files00140.QC.jpg'
67a51ccb7523fdfffcfd817aac3a313b
41233ef7815e5f484a0cdda7b3352f4e672f4008
'2012-05-25T18:04:04-04:00'
describe
'1704136' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIWK' 'sip-files00311.tif'
aff676cb5e35ba0cb37658365a47ee65
5ad94dc872fc026fb5769ab012f23355786f816f
describe
'212139' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIWL' 'sip-files00177.jp2'
58d05bc7b0fb98ae18b6db0c1f53bab4
3c2a79cdff818c76eaea8b0c5ef5e8dee5823981
describe
'1561' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIWM' 'sip-files00194.txt'
320ad79ef294b294a7ddf9f81f62f2fc
62f114f22c84242c14e07421a3ddcc7a4330e766
'2012-05-25T17:59:35-04:00'
describe
'171939' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIWN' 'sip-files00232.QC.jpg'
83b0dee28afeed3925d6289da794ccc9
81405af852d26e39cc1101e7f7eddebe93051d05
'2012-05-25T18:00:16-04:00'
describe
'223368' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIWO' 'sip-files00279.jp2'
e2b1423be7f5bc52fd1bf2bba40ba4a1
7960312a4695c2e00fd5190f83b4b0e6534865d6
'2012-05-25T18:05:28-04:00'
describe
'220216' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIWP' 'sip-files00277.jp2'
e87db34568c34f8cdd8a7db2bb1952ce
3f782b5a1ea61fc4f9db2c7b3da2b786e32b3f0d
'2012-05-25T18:11:09-04:00'
describe
'40699' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIWQ' 'sip-files00231.pro'
6d2f808a9add6686757a8c51fc87172a
989377e0ea0ff002a14e9eda834a41d99498ce8b
'2012-05-25T18:01:34-04:00'
describe
'1504' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIWR' 'sip-files00094.txt'
232f39903d6763ede62c5194800b107d
ef31754a2819ec5fe5a06e003df3e61cb20de7eb
'2012-05-25T18:10:29-04:00'
describe
'242672' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIWS' 'sip-files00147.jp2'
95fd3f36f1cede9ebe21f60d0e0f4920
77736c92cac80a5fc8bd7fef7e316ecb8cb7c1c1
'2012-05-25T18:02:11-04:00'
describe
'164618' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIWT' 'sip-files00253.QC.jpg'
d940c287783dd92dd58b9a655b920567
292858fba62b8a37815078f2d6206de8270847aa
'2012-05-25T18:07:13-04:00'
describe
'1705352' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIWU' 'sip-files00216.tif'
b78f384c8a0c239bafe916dc8f759aff
6795a742fa6ec7af30eb733b4cb9f3968988a8b1
describe
'1583' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIWV' 'sip-files00228.txt'
f950c9833864dcccd3936c074a3ba78d
332cf24ad3a2b64bbcad5089ac5d724861994ae9
describe
'57956' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIWW' 'sip-files00204thm.jpg'
7f4133afe9595599eb722f37a2918904
5c2136a4e1a95c1fcc32b568dfe4f38c2c65548f
describe
'100691' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIWX' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
e126be5529caf59ec9c2f53258e90be5
764dccc9f9fe335045559fbb001a10b9eaca2c47
describe
'53014' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIWY' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
307cabe885f79631ecb7176e4fa81d84
62cc3c445738984883fd5dc722fceabcab7c6c02
'2012-05-25T17:59:41-04:00'
describe
'167232' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIWZ' 'sip-files00266.QC.jpg'
7eace8c84468f626706bcf25d4e353f4
98f88c22b5b51b028e5ee1404efe8ea90bec3b2a
describe
'1705072' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIXA' 'sip-files00136.tif'
603ff9414a93619f4d38781c257b3bc0
99b9b7f6ddcde7fa8d39ba0d0b1787ea1f20499b
describe
'1477' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIXB' 'sip-files00290.txt'
3eb288049db59cd05121ff3921c8901f
ff3dd32b98c2238fd2063fb6e7831f2dc9478f85
'2012-05-25T18:04:56-04:00'
describe
'40643' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIXC' 'sip-files00079.pro'
fae35c86a0329bccdc62991119dc95f4
4feb2bce5e81f53a521b509f2f5dbdd3a0e191a1
'2012-05-25T18:00:33-04:00'
describe
'42503' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIXD' 'sip-files00297.pro'
f021865f3518887a1b6e634cc2c91633
117827e68cf79b03841d161710c332f00437eebe
'2012-05-25T18:05:16-04:00'
describe
'170610' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIXE' 'sip-files00252.QC.jpg'
0fea441301dc40fc808c1e2b2e9a666a
192bbdb427712d2064e2142c1f962b425b210fd6
'2012-05-25T18:06:30-04:00'
describe
'17260' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIXF' 'sip-files00005thm.jpg'
3dab912e5b10443e6cd6dac18ae7048e
af65b214996588a9abb430b3bf1defc799c1a63a
'2012-05-25T18:04:59-04:00'
describe
'154637' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIXG' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
e41c608d8ade45f2f8969f06401b36c5
4af7fec7f5ab760fbddbe463615f3f095859ffdd
'2012-05-25T18:10:21-04:00'
describe
'60090' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIXH' 'sip-files00172thm.jpg'
40045dd71363fe06fefe98c1de4496ef
b3ffde5124ae12bef4ec5f2ee1462482f5a42ebc
'2012-05-25T18:03:21-04:00'
describe
'6732' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIXI' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
c6079b06c8d3d059f92c4b28e41d904b
063220a2244cbd5266d60f00d9764f61fe3f23dd
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIXJ' 'sip-files00303.txt'
d9037aa429a5aba98e03de1dba0ec4a9
40ed96b184062ae01ac5a1a6970f6310779d8de6
'2012-05-25T18:00:52-04:00'
describe
'1543' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIXK' 'sip-files00231.txt'
5f475baa1c9703843c3089cc56c8d620
784e27432090d6098a93b942e1b60db9b0d785b0
'2012-05-25T18:04:39-04:00'
describe
'1552' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIXL' 'sip-files00156.txt'
54d9e5488d824163c62af0bb090e4600
2fb8ca9e618b22e2389c28946e68a86f8467751b
'2012-05-25T18:08:05-04:00'
describe
'40445' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIXM' 'sip-files00021.pro'
08e46527a143dd5fcd8348a0efc16f2b
df06338dd6ae81fa3d9c3755afd27d5c95417108
describe
'1704356' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIXN' 'sip-files00133.tif'
4eb8c8e6dfac8e1545a3640a348082a7
893d37a3fa4777e89828ef858918e1661fb9f2e0
'2012-05-25T18:01:18-04:00'
describe
'167464' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIXO' 'sip-files00304.QC.jpg'
f2cbc0900523341b72a880b404b6b7f6
182e23d2670d22011c0338659deef63e30c95700
'2012-05-25T18:04:42-04:00'
describe
'394563' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIXP' 'sip-files00243.jpg'
b9fb3bcc4e5d62e472f37cc57a5d473d
0cb3e855493e612f4d560c51439606e48420000c
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIXQ' 'sip-files00066.pro'
1d830e8cebf84d6a6da1abc1c847a1f9
3eb6225605aa1e6516cbe8ed07ea558c4a85e1e7
'2012-05-25T18:02:15-04:00'
describe
'159137' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIXR' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
202995c48dfe553050a6d7b8b4f67269
ba56fc0bf686a3178e51b3b5b80598e80dc42cfc
describe
'395647' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIXS' 'sip-files00187.jpg'
f35cf3fb4b61558ffd7d921c3553f458
579b7263bc4ddcbb64d6d5ace2f58768681ac34a
describe
'213144' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIXT' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
b2a70e8978a636a2fe886642a5c6e11d
17ce23f878318d3b1bbe0ed315abb10653b7250b
'2012-05-25T18:08:45-04:00'
describe
'59293' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIXU' 'sip-files00179thm.jpg'
2e1745949611180ae6226a8fd04a6a63
09d543fdd5d0b155d333dde3c01830cc0a54101d
'2012-05-25T18:08:38-04:00'
describe
'5563' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIXV' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
9c4b90992756a88bf9677517dddb6f39
950c62f3979e3a622c6045a8992415d14af58ce7
'2012-05-25T18:03:54-04:00'
describe
'161349' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIXW' 'sip-files00209.QC.jpg'
da7d11a5a2fbf563a20e5d78dfdcac7f
813a3e9e04634ab5acffc15de5d8238170aca0f5
'2012-05-25T18:05:26-04:00'
describe
'39620' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIXX' 'sip-files00127.pro'
1b779455883fc43b6ca0acb366af075e
6f268ae0342ac620955993e2c8a31454a1144c9e
'2012-05-25T18:01:01-04:00'
describe
'1132' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIXY' 'sip-files00295.txt'
8c0484b637f68fff97b5380872df5460
73c59a8793b3efad64df62a0e043af59302267cf
'2012-05-25T18:09:20-04:00'
describe
'63148' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIXZ' 'sip-files00313.pro'
0a6c465e2457028912990ec5fd37bac7
70919415f9a55979acc95a7f12d465fc0d4881f6
'2012-05-25T17:59:49-04:00'
describe
'1704812' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIYA' 'sip-files00269.tif'
44f043ded46e834471b0c9e7a209ab09
a6fdb75c9b89c381652407333378692808be78ae
'2012-05-25T18:10:53-04:00'
describe
'419309' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIYB' 'sip-files00170.jpg'
913be1b2fdf85913713988a31c233874
b6ae7b2410b441763f5bf30027c636b756082444
'2012-05-25T18:02:51-04:00'
describe
'353778' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIYC' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
459b3fc287224d0e0ff6e64b89927d31
f7abfbeea45aae383023e7e1de75c3085200d8df
'2012-05-25T18:04:51-04:00'
describe
'138684' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIYD' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
70b41f7797d7d48aba09bb146a3ad955
88a7c9851f2736dcd292bbdd98613aaba59da1f8
describe
'56848' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIYE' 'sip-files00253thm.jpg'
1afb20b599e7ccef62eeae0bd7b1e033
dd2aa205ffd1ab38db99a5721c0690446411efc9
describe
'412559' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIYF' 'sip-files00256.jpg'
ccb56041bed337b3f0a8dd4cf8b85a87
1505bc318abcba32e91f96c15c82674c18f649bb
'2012-05-25T18:10:42-04:00'
describe
'165546' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIYG' 'sip-files00195.QC.jpg'
d53562884fe0ac959d3337a851b33fc4
8699bb904fe03e3b2ed15eeceff3a8ab52005a0f
'2012-05-25T17:59:54-04:00'
describe
'11363' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIYH' 'sip-files00294.QC.jpg'
e51b1443fbef97b5216582ffcea07083
ff319a6975520728c1f7e53be3bf3836ebe0eaa5
describe
'109778' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIYI' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
815ff26aed6d53942757cef56f85cd7d
f7452d1aaf83699f8a00e79f00d9c9318456e471
describe
'1658848' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIYJ' 'sip-files00132.tif'
671ed83e86da09c0489c3ab971191a6b
dd506e05e89327c6a3b614d00b7f30e0a2fe3dc3
'2012-05-25T18:03:47-04:00'
describe
'58460' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIYK' 'sip-files00206thm.jpg'
35a12a1347702c963453a0db2edf7c66
af0f81a10b16b4cfd1edd183b7d48a96dfa38f11
'2012-05-25T18:00:55-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIYL' 'sip-files00064.pro'
94ccb0ca140c80ff5787c7f00a54dcc2
de693f45e2f59190398c736a44581e28ba70d13b
describe
'222185' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIYM' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
1ebdd8a9f976407729c4ad2220d7773f
42a118653bb40c1198359a362da49a2562babb4d
describe
'1098' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIYN' 'sip-files00125.txt'
162a6a62f87a17fd27e7b8d780be6084
62cd6396d50d7e5dfc15a5d125e2d312b45b30f8
describe
'51879' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIYO' 'sip-files00243thm.jpg'
c164fbd7619259a541932f2b920002eb
46ab5e6dfa2ea51b1494a0d71cfc14344188dc65
describe
'1703608' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIYP' 'sip-files00125.tif'
a2b574ab872f5b9c7660fd87824d7145
9476ba3b228471c3626a6c3039b2c399345bee25
'2012-05-25T18:04:11-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIYQ' 'sip-files00124.pro'
5b2af2553f29592e482730f34048e44d
cc04db6b5db8ef873e9714a7100afc2f8a162501
describe
'212' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIYR' 'sip-files00017.txt'
9b3d233275e765c6e8dbb71659b3bdec
d67ccae125e29b5f3246a7b3deca0fe0d12e1f7b
describe
Invalid character
'1705224' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIYS' 'sip-files00126.tif'
bcc0ba02645a7d66d6c13fb49f4f8941
fe6c209bcd25a526f95b68801cfb5f33a73535f5
'2012-05-25T18:09:08-04:00'
describe
'224407' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIYT' 'sip-files00264.jp2'
b917adf883f5b19848ac9fd7c797b5df
eb9715215906d7e75d7be72dfed8fef4a013a9f4
'2012-05-25T18:11:13-04:00'
describe
'37669' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIYU' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
a303e8af7da6a789a91b9dd42132e5f6
a8c4bf86087f55083fab98d938f7c373e8f26545
'2012-05-25T18:09:28-04:00'
describe
'1705128' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIYV' 'sip-files00191.tif'
0826342e938ddac0875bc06bd2ff64c6
b76efa98c5f23201a6b45e88664b4c0df9805ac0
'2012-05-25T18:09:16-04:00'
describe
'59403' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIYW' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
46207bbe636d36e1a5667caefb604f61
842a9adc7eb827d64509801594e9981e0513d404
describe
'1594' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIYX' 'sip-files00285.txt'
a2d38e15df6f29318f4f38e64d07f6a6
5346aaab0f0f2ebe5353fe90b0181d3a087d57f6
describe
'28295' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIYY' 'sip-files00261.pro'
deb59eb21f33650ceedd66274c398ce2
15cab297519b21d8da6cf74487380fb05437635e
describe
'1705776' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIYZ' 'sip-files00206.tif'
9a9c219833db54673f8637a874a1bc6b
5ebad166c5167a4f5490c8c882858cc8c05a2237
'2012-05-25T18:00:18-04:00'
describe
'1748120' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIZA' 'sip-files00030.tif'
6689063c3e58058b016843ffda5fce37
8607ddf4e2e44d878ed2827a68faf3cc7f400f36
'2012-05-25T18:00:31-04:00'
describe
'41474' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIZB' 'sip-files00271.pro'
150200b658c29ccf3f4e3f7efa909f3c
02c2ec5fa831eb6a73d885431c72730122359541
describe
'42072' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIZC' 'sip-files00263.pro'
7052db8a310bf68fd299d43b860c4eec
efef0785e8c2560574da88d031e0cd3bb4714430
describe
'40446' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIZD' 'sip-files00155.pro'
f05aa5c7ef712641b673e76694e37cc5
04e9cd3403f0cdb208a84fb2f11f766576b1f289
describe
'57718' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIZE' 'sip-files00146thm.jpg'
4a230b688557555c8eef827e3f1e9845
63314ec155d980785faf079f728bfd8dbc72a9e7
describe
'1705348' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIZF' 'sip-files00236.tif'
cee82090ae315eb2f19ff26328548596
5341ea4563324f9ae2dead19b35c011ec3936406
describe
'227747' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIZG' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
2d5c266ca8565c4d267eec060571f453
04c47e54685e513abf5367a7c28e4639e22da3bd
'2012-05-25T18:10:27-04:00'
describe
'156181' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIZH' 'sip-files00287.QC.jpg'
8e41614c888bc56cea8f3e803108b621
f98374057ee35135206dce7b6ee4f4a1b07f6138
'2012-05-25T18:08:44-04:00'
describe
'1534' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIZI' 'sip-files00250.txt'
9fb0e8e0579c682fb58d3f445fd62d63
8d1ad0f4c6e608ef09c541fc63c2b134c5225ff0
describe
'422' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIZJ' 'sip-files00183.txt'
368f30a6305538c4a2cbc624063b1654
3b43caa1542c2399b71e624d5457df7d7605e6c0
'2012-05-25T18:01:11-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'1569' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIZK' 'sip-files00207.txt'
627bab3cf2ea9e4931a3c8413966e0e4
f08609c2bc47124bcdb0856ccc0ab41cfedd522b
describe
'399786' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIZL' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
e9db9f08ea68eaa146f8ab8414e7e4d2
b4c7a05628d9288990c06c77f05670c4f70b86a5
describe
'1705720' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIZM' 'sip-files00252.tif'
fad58fec72620f5f7983a2c2cc81881f
fe7649e4d5a76c3db10bd11bcc0815d3300d7a0c
describe
'40279' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIZN' 'sip-files00107.pro'
1c4c6e2f7322f4f83f2cbfe2eb9a4716
62f30d49e42610e3c342268bae069655571e3921
describe
'165184' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIZO' 'sip-files00257.QC.jpg'
e92e6c0ee0ca41c22cde8cb2486245a7
da541fd61f1b9aba8e6baa21abea8be5bbce1256
describe
'406546' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIZP' 'sip-files00140.jpg'
4536623fd4891198d447a073b1166a81
8eb0bc4c45d381272f396240464d716991cf2cfb
describe
'413570' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIZQ' 'sip-files00169.jpg'
ae3f9d3755121442107bb4510812b32d
b4f9d288401e19238268e620651595db0a617d04
describe
'56134' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIZR' 'sip-files00267thm.jpg'
67640a9f5f47b077ee169028b8e56844
3af25ee4f1c5420ae2f9d779f813ebb2b5b9f1d0
'2012-05-25T18:11:01-04:00'
describe
'54725' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIZS' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
663dcd44c1497cb48db3aa04c831a143
bae4347725ec60f7fcd5007deebce48d511d7faa
'2012-05-25T18:05:00-04:00'
describe
'41805' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIZT' 'sip-files00175.pro'
075bc36c8a2f15e96311c252aa17c736
6811fe7ff1e401d6357aba6a5ca5048531d40574
'2012-05-25T18:02:12-04:00'
describe
'40304' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIZU' 'sip-files00140.pro'
da1ff7aa174ca895448ceda405e7cf5a
5f03e2b8df0d2e73170b7a48f23654425d46f669
'2012-05-25T18:11:44-04:00'
describe
'1695464' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIZV' 'sip-files00281.tif'
74db06fc1421192d2371770a2c231cfe
8beb0ad505aa1f70b2969b9637d185d771d8509e
'2012-05-25T18:01:23-04:00'
describe
'1093' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIZW' 'sip-files00025.pro'
c6cd872d50cd9d09ba0e313db4777241
8907425088167c30c82aa8e8870858b25291ad80
describe
'220850' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIZX' 'sip-files00276.jp2'
a2d5162f34aabce924b9314aa8df7198
c9be07b438156dd6fa8a8c02b9656a16657784e0
describe
'153937' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIZY' 'sip-files00231.QC.jpg'
4f72f4d5ee90a4cf795d9498c7ab1adb
4d6344f2f5ce35648bd3bd437b9bc350c05e7180
describe
'412921' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABIZZ' 'sip-files00278.jpg'
6c008597f6c4fd151847cf14aa0951cb
07e16177082c42bb995e2e2661445d92737e17ed
describe
'9330' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJAA' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
1ddd6a9354ff4c173b526e122390ef16
0c4f5af81f2286153d53c5ce6fa471117b848e28
'2012-05-25T18:07:41-04:00'
describe
'1636032' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJAB' 'sip-files00195.tif'
2df5027876b3f86d41db324b64de9fe3
ed11df843a8145e7781589fe2817e27b2e3de45b
describe
'712975' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJAC' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
0f9e1c81dc870be24c45cc32654d9826
67656b20407df41ec6f3bbc3cc2484e5c4a2931c
'2012-05-25T18:10:59-04:00'
describe
'39549' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJAD' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
1943019fb62ea32f8d4036a110226174
3a4863206cc32b5c82624e61b83c8c39a8ea4072
'2012-05-25T18:11:41-04:00'
describe
'1527' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJAE' 'sip-files00136.txt'
4587c6426d1255fb8a03a5377d996c2f
90aa6e5416294d6f83ccacf67dd2725e6e8eff9f
'2012-05-25T18:01:56-04:00'
describe
'1705580' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJAF' 'sip-files00244.tif'
b2893253cc2f6776b44e1c0889a2816d
fef7fd2787faeb063f2e15ccecc7773d1e25b0c5
describe
'223854' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJAG' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
be7ddae75a3c50729706a7c8bbc3aaa7
89f6b4d74950a28adfa1689b569df060d7a1f18d
describe
'153681' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJAH' 'sip-files00319.QC.jpg'
28adf09c4a8ff974a728fbe9d1c91122
24af383403c78ea013ff1f6252c260e74cc68237
'2012-05-25T18:07:18-04:00'
describe
'208737' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJAI' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
94de6e14965477a6ba269b89bda99267
7c47938b476c19ac59bdb886da7499e59163c588
describe
'1427' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJAJ' 'sip-files00180.txt'
af0ff29efd2a44bd08c434c3ec0aa4b6
719baa3a9119ec6846332179af739a9db334512c
'2012-05-25T18:06:52-04:00'
describe
'151629' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJAK' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
246e75d91eb3ba6f85921f1720fd8c5b
6f95ed13857ca55b1ebf41df32b85c63e080061d
'2012-05-25T18:07:17-04:00'
describe
'40313' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJAL' 'sip-files00267.pro'
22b563c03de2b808b0b90025a62917b3
69be98f1238f464195f3da021ed62b238ba17158
'2012-05-25T18:00:38-04:00'
describe
'155236' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJAM' 'sip-files00271.QC.jpg'
d866c19cac7562f4ee9c6217f29f441d
835373f29fb941638e44fb486a64c12c5a0233c1
'2012-05-25T18:02:45-04:00'
describe
'1704948' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJAN' 'sip-files00193.tif'
f00995ff4d423f2d706a0e3ed35358d3
5b5d81531da69bd23dacb84be8498e15281f1e52
describe
'56443' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJAO' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
3634f54772547d133e360085f8e14fc5
21a87461daf091a9bd0e06516eaca88bd2525b6a
describe
'29607' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJAP' 'sip-files00305.pro'
c3098688dde45549d79908b1f38ad4ef
299b1c3a241691cf28f8708a4811c58dfd81c1cd
'2012-05-25T18:07:33-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJAQ' 'sip-files00214.txt'
69a9d58f0badd88ada65c53d996a5ea7
ad5b632f78e7479ade4734e5137d2d56dde55b5c
'2012-05-25T18:01:35-04:00'
describe
'55367' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJAR' 'sip-files00157thm.jpg'
127e6de3b4b20ff6f392263a7f859e0d
ecbc41f59f0c179bc907ed284016dafefc588be8
describe
'1705600' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJAS' 'sip-files00262.tif'
bbbee5e145dac3309465e39897003cdd
7565c3bf4dceeace561df6528fe93d567b0449ca
'2012-05-25T18:00:37-04:00'
describe
'1705528' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJAT' 'sip-files00266.tif'
f8fa1172b9c4f9f97ae924b2162193bb
91e1e2be0da96a643df8ef5667207e826f1a82be
describe
'285' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJAU' 'sip-files00202.pro'
de419bd674f241f5311a3406ee880c0d
2bd4bc7d009850661646421e995e071736b76a93
'2012-05-25T18:05:01-04:00'
describe
'167370' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJAV' 'sip-files00214.QC.jpg'
17b3359f9cb8d2cb096c3fe79e95f23b
10896c2da0a7f0dd1b3fb99e0a1a46be2c10db74
'2012-05-25T18:01:26-04:00'
describe
'1658252' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJAW' 'sip-files00053.tif'
1d6cd83bfadbb4f83552844685c42b2e
55ad5f1926cf6cf86bce3afbc5d4ca372b68562b
'2012-05-25T18:07:40-04:00'
describe
'168475' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJAX' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
f89f455e7e6de9755212f989de211ac0
6f9a11dee7efdfe9bab6bb8af88f772171951d26
'2012-05-25T18:03:11-04:00'
describe
'406988' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJAY' 'sip-files00284.jpg'
6e63887eab7de69c5606827dfc774584
eb47dd2411aa55fd2683d669491ef7c88a74ac54
'2012-05-25T18:05:48-04:00'
describe
'414718' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJAZ' 'sip-files00214.jpg'
b8a62943bc162c55b548af323913e01d
2170fca94a38e5611d3530a894027431c0c6ccb6
'2012-05-25T18:01:46-04:00'
describe
'133911' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJBA' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
21a355667033b0b52a1dbe64277be023
0b7aa31d69949ed72a440ef56ba00b453c6b5956
'2012-05-25T18:08:47-04:00'
describe
'1566' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJBB' 'sip-files00131.txt'
2abd09c5a57a0747d49e528605337bb4
a65df1e149a81dd53a603a490ccabcdca7c0aea0
describe
'42414' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJBC' 'sip-files00032.pro'
7f9e914c86be71d5e08b0e9223b61a07
f24c80171a4c0e4e3d6bab1b4a445295231991ac
'2012-05-25T18:07:26-04:00'
describe
'1662152' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJBD' 'sip-files00205.tif'
4b05b52b5c3eb203d64a4d971c5c18b9
38bc9eba6e1e176d32260f1fedba66cceb33a1ff
describe
'40513316' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJBE' 'sip-files00059.tif'
13972f4a1d8e32bc13e47c3268b43095
571dbdb6164ebc1c78ad3c8f22d69a17f6083daa
'2012-05-25T18:01:39-04:00'
describe
'1667548' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJBF' 'sip-files00207.tif'
beb10a9c56c7dcb3063bce4a709edf33
d91250c92385b3bba8fd4f300d337af8da54548b
describe
'50257' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJBG' 'sip-files00223thm.jpg'
ef8eef6cef53498d929b3825dedde984
32f5dd6051085f56b7f409a301955c2f416e8f79
describe
'213695' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJBH' 'sip-files00197.jp2'
8bdd18d4c361e33e53fdc5643d079bfe
2a57c0ca4d0d0fb55113626fa1d0afab5814d2bb
'2012-05-25T18:06:54-04:00'
describe
'167616' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJBI' 'sip-files00226.QC.jpg'
e93d70cf9b1e980a60da62c7e0ceff2e
646b37bc70e54a5d2a29faeb65a45f6d0523154b
'2012-05-25T18:08:06-04:00'
describe
'234326' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJBJ' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
1a3956e783cac7fbd1c452c178272f9d
0606aaae51583d854defcd49c3c4cf573a3c7fbf
describe
'220147' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJBK' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
d63c2efec0d6029f94b00fa547b716dc
4c84444493fae022800db3f57cc73c9183a96e2e
'2012-05-25T18:05:10-04:00'
describe
'1514' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJBL' 'sip-files00078.txt'
b235b20a8d416124f5689f0d052e356d
4885fc8b325e73ca11dd8365d848f48b03024a0d
'2012-05-25T18:03:23-04:00'
describe
'226675' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJBM' 'sip-files00194.jp2'
c46efd4411d68388843226945fc18dac
9de4c0f410621471b8f719237a666e49e6f90b6c
describe
'75672' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJBN' 'sip-files00292.jp2'
771c20790bfe70429d2fb7e7c42273eb
637093d9be5418fa099ee8136836426dc98dd069
describe
'53650' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJBO' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
58d7a0e8711bd3a3a4fb156107d4db65
fa2d5c39db7522c2d8758f3af17db43c697aa5d2
'2012-05-25T17:59:36-04:00'
describe
'95823' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJBP' 'sip-files00259.jp2'
3b98f2b8eb1285764361cf884a48a2e4
446a0eec9ebe1c1c68c7d1b8453903e47dc828c8
'2012-05-25T18:02:04-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJBQ' 'sip-files00225.pro'
d5196f09a9bfefd6668cc6570ed96e9c
5d099402d2355aa16a2b6a655a55474f532df563
'2012-05-25T18:02:52-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJBR' 'sip-files00107.txt'
6c417644a93f90ff33e5063df45f9291
cd8b117b7ae47a78173fa0fc1c6a11928bd5d4a9
describe
'223003' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJBS' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
aadd1249ec272afcf351263a64e5fe9f
7ccf61347e664e4fe52960b76a290a8ba8562c8c
describe
'397116' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJBT' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
1c5bc4c9c06337ed3bfac2d318c59258
3cd39d28e67bc3b96b079334dc0b2f5ec3b521ac
'2012-05-25T18:02:47-04:00'
describe
'54419' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJBU' 'sip-files00180thm.jpg'
5d0e40cf9c6bbe3b66e812a41f4291d3
8098c0bd8a82f81ea1572efb9e5057d871c7a754
'2012-05-25T18:06:10-04:00'
describe
'9447' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJBV' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
fbb9143ec34ef3606b175c73b67e76f0
ba18402b33a16daf968088d201ae97236f344054
describe
'137458' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJBW' 'sip-files00241.jpg'
e9d38fd767cad6da376554b2c3feb947
36e641589b6cff0a142d49136d50b6df87a49094
'2012-05-25T18:10:32-04:00'
describe
'398397' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJBX' 'sip-files00148.jpg'
9d7db4ab1df85a6e035f8d6b4eef3ee9
1195785fc2444bf7417eb015fe355d1ba651ff24
'2012-05-25T18:11:22-04:00'
describe
'1705096' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJBY' 'sip-files00090.tif'
ddcd25c07f786bc85376976e6f24134d
3c66c700c2fe313c417473be85abee09457d7847
'2012-05-25T18:00:44-04:00'
describe
'166876' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJBZ' 'sip-files00285.QC.jpg'
70ddb14e296dad3536e21099b095f745
dc1e65412bb767ed6fc968bf34928034c945050c
describe
'1637968' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJCA' 'sip-files00225.tif'
04d04177619669dc450f8a7e9741e609
12cca94469fad4654c955c19c7aee9983724dd45
describe
'1481' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJCB' 'sip-files00148.txt'
a187b0ec75f608891d6d9ffcb6170b49
afdf3b79b03bf64155ba396de6fbc1f762f34f0d
'2012-05-25T18:02:25-04:00'
describe
'1505' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJCC' 'sip-files00150.txt'
cf74215e8d131f478c927aa73c5c910c
f7e93f85cc07ea27172e80985c7eff9ce0158fec
'2012-05-25T18:08:27-04:00'
describe
'1542' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJCD' 'sip-files00262.txt'
fdd1aa852c3ba34cb82f4b4dfe7ccd5c
545e44e297c306deef329f8e448b672f7b1c77e4
'2012-05-25T18:02:07-04:00'
describe
'234156' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJCE' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
0d75925e0eb2181e26c88b6fc4fecf64
3042a44e88305c15725b324b78feb32a7299bbaf
describe
'223330' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJCF' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
cc42fcd516256d00c69381a6c4c21195
245d3f34b86e7ed1050e28d28fb8e7d9927acd23
describe
'149912' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJCG' 'sip-files00181.QC.jpg'
a0374f8b598f1d206ca26d41f149bb7c
1364434e662c5608ebcd4afecdfb59012e68f116
describe
'157818' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJCH' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
91f407ae50702caac6eb30baa332b4b6
e7fe23b2845639b9333a06220faa245de3e785be
'2012-05-25T18:08:37-04:00'
describe
'214324' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJCI' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
a8c14e15a695a4a626f0828ec96b296b
bebb7cc5087cb5845452d25d99d14f1ff8a44d56
'2012-05-25T18:08:20-04:00'
describe
'8777' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJCJ' 'sip-files00200.pro'
33c45f97470db661f1ffcdd2dbc00ead
2d9b206d7ad3f0497cc6d54cb61bc2602f0f7be9
describe
'1672676' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJCK' 'sip-files00159.tif'
b45dbdb9038239eb0056658e9bdd1201
7e924981f0093b269a4557fc06d783c871909880
describe
'53847' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJCL' 'sip-files00227thm.jpg'
699a2e7ff6ca75157b3b9fd0c656d2bc
fdafd4862342ba2db91da080efdc7a463d29dcc3
describe
'39913' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJCM' 'sip-files00167.pro'
53f49322c4589fc9491bcf6b7e3dac0c
01dd79842fce1b7e49feaf9bdc875d439549e5f2
describe
'167904' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJCN' 'sip-files00296.QC.jpg'
aa96d9fa5e1b94c4c61f87019be6f63d
6065c3e6ae42f1e66c32fa84f6bd461eb9e5022e
'2012-05-25T18:03:31-04:00'
describe
'165989' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJCO' 'sip-files00177.QC.jpg'
18db76069a17a831bc2e24c9a33e2a56
11cb4f81f2b07659d3283168b33efec4cc4ea65a
'2012-05-25T18:06:31-04:00'
describe
'40872' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJCP' 'sip-files00037.pro'
a85bae121dbb2110ed7dec08813b3457
793d4fc1198cb75d5580ed1a7c6c363b0f8185d7
describe
'51587' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJCQ' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
7ebb1ecf9a9a34687872c0f2b4b627f3
eeda286c90381a82ee496ac8b9f67865b11a2677
describe
'408632' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJCR' 'sip-files00289.jpg'
8a68c7b2d81677e9e359bb2160a3e44b
93ef28d8f2b9e1993a9c137b51219b9f079aafe0
'2012-05-25T18:00:54-04:00'
describe
'1631928' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJCS' 'sip-files00176.tif'
88445566bb0d48678ad6e7c437d5b864
96092414aae2c21d4afa1b3e06f62a32792bfcbe
describe
'218836' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJCT' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
f6f974a55d834ac412515687956a4424
6fb1cb675c02cd10cd9fa21d2f9a8cbc472b2d5a
'2012-05-25T18:11:15-04:00'
describe
'423619' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJCU' 'sip-files00323.jpg'
16d34e4939d2a8f5cc4ad30ae2ce1c81
2fb26f5c1359bcaaea180fc5798c6274b120d8c6
'2012-05-25T18:06:20-04:00'
describe
'1705068' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJCV' 'sip-files00094.tif'
3fecb656ea6fae8190c67f74e7c4b2fd
588a2ad4bb2c32ed7d2fb9976f807cbb6125cb19
'2012-05-25T18:11:25-04:00'
describe
'54638' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJCW' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
66a6fba9b7c665f1b998c7f9e074b40b
87d8b79a09f6070444ff94b87f2086f7528a1f55
describe
'1705212' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJCX' 'sip-files00116.tif'
f4a8fc230b658f13cf0a70d27a116418
ac5a1e511a4c74c58bbafa79813ed3659633c5b8
describe
'18228' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJCY' 'sip-files00163thm.jpg'
c3567bebba87982f5cfb4fc74d48e5f1
18b4667a257df08fdabb5ca1e2fe15b7035ba9a7
'2012-05-25T18:06:47-04:00'
describe
'149680' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJCZ' 'sip-files00141.QC.jpg'
1bdcaa5ca96d89ce5ae951340a21b678
c3ebf80b492d54073212d83298179ecd6dd8c348
describe
'39856' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJDA' 'sip-files00163.QC.jpg'
731177c4e0f09ffa7c6e62913eb0d466
1cf2e95f4b44e1766599628c39595c6b8ee8c3f6
describe
'306' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJDB' 'sip-files00182.txt'
459b8953b83c31e1b28c405fd6cdfda8
99794e25bbcceec509a3325c09c3341aaf6ada00
describe
'223806' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJDC' 'sip-files00303.jp2'
729d6bc83aadb11019c1e26026df3554
a775241d6bb1da3143bd3844ee21255098469fae
describe
'41587' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJDD' 'sip-files00246.pro'
0f1c38a2ea7005ff089309e17cecdf8d
d0a896120761d31e8f17985996b730628abef94f
'2012-05-25T18:06:44-04:00'
describe
'401740' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJDE' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
3dee4ae31789eb3b8d726c98167bf0d4
9dda86d3118db22ee885699aa04daad434f3472b
describe
'87346' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJDF' 'sip-files00005.jp2'
8858d043c4a264fe888f5daee3b8cc67
8835c4e7fc96281565fd6af37f0ef40af0c8691e
'2012-05-25T18:06:27-04:00'
describe
'39352' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJDG' 'sip-files00148.pro'
130fc6f6f037d63e33312f117f0df2a2
9ddff70bc137f3900bf8781bb3dade38f16171ed
describe
'1576' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJDH' 'sip-files00191.txt'
fd495d1a321508ef2b27fe45cf51ea46
6ddf56e10738e1e05c9c6c5fb6cc235f7ecf0aab
describe
'59611' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJDI' 'sip-files00232thm.jpg'
930326ec1a16a1afe1f9546a441f35df
3296828ced595462bbbada2618e1bf92d889c040
'2012-05-25T18:03:25-04:00'
describe
'334279' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJDJ' 'sip-files00316.jp2'
426e5a71fbdb1ecda9b5aca249bc7a01
19f7dd7ba90f08f50773080d7e5d7dc960301c93
'2012-05-25T18:07:57-04:00'
describe
'159411' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJDK' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
ae196c01aaf5941ca3bea25c5751fdb8
2d4c660d4b362becb5b85a6b91e9c7a36b06a110
'2012-05-25T18:03:08-04:00'
describe
'11623' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJDL' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
96b1d0ed687c50a7812ede5c41b9357b
b4363e3253dbc30e4f01854908383b9fad60562b
'2012-05-25T18:07:44-04:00'
describe
'401688' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJDM' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
8b34072a63358e1f4a27c6c67c671023
b1982dc06b89a03db81e242923e5722859ee0389
'2012-05-25T18:07:32-04:00'
describe
'162820' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJDN' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
b8ff46e6922e0bdd976b23ed835a1d79
57613cc1069e628711ed00ae43f1e8eff7af0431
'2012-05-25T18:04:38-04:00'
describe
'58539' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJDO' 'sip-files00147thm.jpg'
0c7392edeae27fb5ecfb98d23b5111fb
07564b2a5e385fb6af2fa975c4c6a03e87e0fe06
'2012-05-25T18:06:56-04:00'
describe
'631' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJDP' 'sip-files00069.txt'
db1e8436819fdcc9fdb05841eab796fa
2fd1cd2e8e7bc37310b0f3c078d2b418db058138
describe
Invalid character
'1704796' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJDQ' 'sip-files00271.tif'
d6a624e7f8e4ded63abf11732a2c4610
0679099a7a1b81511c96cf10338b429d6cfe916f
'2012-05-25T18:06:14-04:00'
describe
'471848' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJDR' 'sip-filesUF00028277_00001.xml'
c4c4bd97cafd15eef19af2d150b05609
6d9911e38f8b35962fd13eed1911da6257ea4b17
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-07T02:26:43-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'686248' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJDU' 'sip-files00001.jpg'
e6fd9469d6ff4a50244935684c2991ce
946e3f1b3c5f7a3f3607ef8da6f6681ea70401ed
'2012-05-25T18:09:14-04:00'
describe
'83955' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJDV' 'sip-files00003.jpg'
4197181818a37fc7f742255362f6c8e6
babfdba63b69bed260f7b858e1425af57cb1a982
'2012-05-25T18:10:20-04:00'
describe
'628627' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJDW' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
dc8ef5a5722cb05400ade09ddf05f041
e715f1d2398a9fbb207c08e59395eb3583898abb
describe
'367110' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJDX' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
30a49ee12f48ff6138c231fe22be2327
8bd8959fa189404a9ec111c49c8b3992349df66c
'2012-05-25T18:05:13-04:00'
describe
'18723' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJDY' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
d173d012fa009d4b69d89759bb41e480
77b0fc374e0fb456e26a764caecded5a27442cc8
describe
'18684' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJDZ' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
548604fb4f20c47524d9c16f29fc918e
ea34b2d5335639caf8b78f4ea30f9cbc1fdcca3e
'2012-05-25T18:09:11-04:00'
describe
'109384' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJEA' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
56ba6d828db1d1e3f27e936cd604183c
9750cf3c95c8346cf0ceaeb4e6e2a18609e3b3cc
describe
'18745' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJEB' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
80ff9e8141a19354bbc7765a2306d490
369a1a3c26508d34968866c5b75b5091246554c8
'2012-05-25T18:05:54-04:00'
describe
'375732' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJEC' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
587b6c916ca99b3cc8ef9dcd6e015e58
d89750042a1fa5e8d5b280f7c5e9eeacd95ed370
'2012-05-25T18:07:27-04:00'
describe
'388384' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJED' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
fd14945979ac083ecb9ce082135984de
6593a7ebdc05e41d5640e242afaf3c5bdee2e46f
describe
'385622' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJEE' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
31fcf586155d7fdd64b7911f2be1961d
091f24605153e3719ccb5562c839f0639c10e1f9
describe
'112968' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJEF' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
3d2c01f32524ea3d82d83fde605de0c8
8c5b31619a298eaf5ace29d40ebfd6359a54f1dd
describe
'429421' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJEG' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
1225d5ec1f25fa419ea718d4c35526bd
6959b5535c7ab0db7596770aece42c854632a9aa
describe
'392257' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJEH' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
1f6737ad67fa3937e7072578b41fb0a0
8756e6be7171e6dbf96103fc810ebe4bd3e5ca04
'2012-05-25T18:03:26-04:00'
describe
'407600' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJEI' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
a4adbc0b823ab032279617c94ffb754a
26e69cc9692bb09db29533b106398efc26acca2f
'2012-05-25T18:01:32-04:00'
describe
'410871' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJEJ' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
8530be88deba04679b99617ba42a3c7b
931bb07837b1cd594f51c13a746cc9d675a34ec6
'2012-05-25T18:08:03-04:00'
describe
'102391' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJEK' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
059d4024d63b9b2aca1e47b4733bab99
3e96947321968b0db307a6cf27619271fae66bd8
'2012-05-25T18:06:24-04:00'
describe
'28519' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJEL' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
8b64bb1bad6ff6bd2431e9cdb5316b82
173882212aede570ba9c96477bd23a4c21ed4d46
describe
'390722' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJEM' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
0ee5b355f57bc607e2e3033b14aa3c95
d06fbd80c644627aab5d63dd83683347d5f65e6d
describe
'389307' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJEN' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
1c6854741a77dc46e981d13e00eb429a
7c0a4fc68ed527f643650d80db329df3ac99e53d
describe
'389455' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJEO' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
03db5d70ba80029ff114e8a6578d7ed9
414c83c5f710ef153c1f2082e22ae3bffd6efa64
describe
'386645' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJEP' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
4c12b38e9b8ff4a8b83ba27b948aa282
e9db51f7d001387206e5b652da33f1422b216333
'2012-05-25T18:09:45-04:00'
describe
'384447' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJEQ' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
a588ab28dfc66cada785189f4576f35a
2c2ba5615001ccb3728190c5c58d2c10e9859a3c
describe
'397985' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJER' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
e063d5bc974ec554b94b885fddfec3c7
4d4012c66642ec50fe242be3dedd9d94bd70482e
'2012-05-25T18:07:50-04:00'
describe
'792867' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJES' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
88a5ac3dea3ea93a59e51b5fb47ae6f6
88aa8c4d2036012b73f0c70232f54639f60d5be8
describe
'382417' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJET' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
c4c0f32285203ea0fbe150d2f6966eb9
c8e1f75231700ea0f2ca4e444607de9c4830236c
'2012-05-25T18:04:50-04:00'
describe
'414611' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJEU' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
7336e268f956db9adf122f6b64857cca
96f069337fe986389f709fad383684704637706a
describe
'423360' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJEV' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
d659cadb6fdbcdcf5a3ed59c54d46c34
eda966a488897a21e274f11e732d355bcf243dcc
'2012-05-25T18:06:45-04:00'
describe
'394048' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJEW' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
92ba7d46ce9df0fff12e196a50dce0ee
1bf71761c37cce77bb964697b36a103c32b414b1
describe
'393565' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJEX' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
48e705b73090fdbe1487368bc0e52b08
9c51e898d89bc2edbd827f79da3affa9c7d2335e
describe
'376710' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJEY' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
e2dbfb7ed95fcae398674084593ac1b2
50a24ab875f5c2b7781df5856d073deb4f6b7768
describe
'389084' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJEZ' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
bbd900b6a13b11798049ac43f0de94df
dc319a40d2810173f8cd01bb9b1e98b511cefdf0
'2012-05-25T18:08:13-04:00'
describe
'751112' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJFA' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
18c7be71cb3ccc41a5612021cf793e11
a82d4eb8267249cf156d4d4810a4dbf56b2eb558
'2012-05-25T18:10:14-04:00'
describe
'401330' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJFB' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
e22aee4928393681770cddc4f7ebaf0d
d433dff889617591afc0e839ad5c7bbc97894c7b
describe
'311473' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJFC' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
025bb0cf489bef56ce80c2f5c9e00b19
567344dbaee213d61e7509f6a0c049e03c5fbd65
describe
'18738' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJFD' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
2f98639057ee0fd5a44c9965656df416
04424416d239345212a7bc2b685ad6b407fa16f7
'2012-05-25T17:59:58-04:00'
describe
'108564' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJFE' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
093ba5d91f1dfaf64137b56df9462c58
cb2d8ef72492e422d44237d7daa2b867dc0a37ed
'2012-05-25T18:01:13-04:00'
describe
'18869' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJFF' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
8274bef100f3e669085b17798e7e7d21
1f53d4e4b40a6617dd2116819d586581087eadc3
'2012-05-25T18:00:11-04:00'
describe
'361795' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJFG' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
5a50148cbfc46d95751058a37d849b7d
d290761e87e9a8c57d6c49ec53ae5c4150b8f9c1
describe
'395866' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJFH' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
b2639975e0af65959d83fabec32e6a02
016a03c900f1a8c878afbd5330c318193a681d42
describe
'396739' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJFI' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
4dc3e1ff861b312b6e230626ff1ef918
eb8a61b48c04da587c616c8007cc03564cfaa08b
describe
'398665' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJFJ' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
cccb618af92f972b90f4529e8155bb35
8c868a34fdab7598c649054f884da6883836f07d
'2012-05-25T18:11:30-04:00'
describe
'384762' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJFK' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
360b932534fde6afc2a59121cba8b9b5
bf26f5bab3b52b590f0f74adc5bca9b491938e60
describe
'399712' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJFL' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
ffea5f437bbe060b0eb545747d236efb
1b52e813356a28192ecba59f63ede316aee80445
describe
'382721' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJFM' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
e8331a89d5a1b0d99c1271192a70977c
2df174fa8e6dfa9786a0b288bc374f0da0062628
'2012-05-25T18:10:55-04:00'
describe
'408360' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJFN' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
733fa5b56c704e170d8a3a1536aacdd5
f789258503d14f6e912c75320348e651a9dd13e4
describe
'351052' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJFO' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
a5347915e117d251462d0576fb03b397
96e2c5c8149cceb86898508e269021f473467cb5
describe
'255407' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJFP' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
010a8f4c5632908c3f0c2090ff627836
f6b5f1e8c75f45148ab55a44400b772b6057eb1a
describe
'105064' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJFQ' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
0ac445a3f8ebb315ad6c43aa9dda4b04
2fc5811b5bfb93c6666bd1b295326a7c86ce1af9
'2012-05-25T18:08:29-04:00'
describe
'19144' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJFR' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
0c48bacea02a2fe30edc2d9a60d52446
53dfd25ee60e9e39b76bb93942ab2de3289e810b
describe
'366866' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJFS' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
e20d4e0548f3b2c2db1b626844a4fbbe
1ae91c8a3de87ec857a28b0d25c3f435193de465
'2012-05-25T18:00:15-04:00'
describe
'411957' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJFT' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
937c2b93fbadcd1411974c27a6e6d7bf
178a453db011ba58ecf32c7f60b45a46bae2147e
describe
'383886' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJFU' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
8916f64eb079401849bc340b1a8b723b
d1eb5cd27443a0908b3f3b5d6295bb83f4efcae1
describe
'386428' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJFV' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
09d957ac4b4a3cbd2b5323ba10cc8ac8
6f2ddd3f173862145b4e69aeb7629b3c35e6395a
'2012-05-25T18:08:12-04:00'
describe
'393836' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJFW' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
d4f66acbacbdcb696164657a972aeb42
d596fbbefc92424dd679ba0beed545a580e7744d
describe
'395000' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJFX' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
3d6d7da3e698dc5c26efc80589d9fd42
1866e9c1aa9b7bba9e5f3c4a9377f3b38b106c92
describe
'379196' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJFY' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
5d99ce54329e1cae98776be992b79e28
fbc84bc85b688060f853556ab95fbcc501820efa
'2012-05-25T18:06:41-04:00'
describe
'390677' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJFZ' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
0b3208be09fa8ee96158020423ac2deb
2ad0e90d08d445db8b49c5fa39cdb586445874cd
describe
'390517' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJGA' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
8507b44cf93a636f27db715f93e9ff92
f8c4b0672f111c35aef232c2cc9923a5d3abe4e9
describe
'309692' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJGB' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
554c0caa9df27ba4f2431a21fd927f0a
b94185adf7c65782fb165f429e4a11c1f732144f
'2012-05-25T18:01:16-04:00'
describe
'18950' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJGC' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
fb34d2f7519bf52dc52d4ba6110d499b
f6a617bbe5a005ecc73f27bd489a3a2692fed327
describe
'110944' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJGD' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
d6b7de9e18d9e5ec54709af67f19d793
b8bbe280020bec769379fad1176a38de5f92a4e8
'2012-05-25T17:59:53-04:00'
describe
'19691' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJGE' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
6b3a65beeefb79427244b0036a7e8435
c3ee303859d9353d4a1166a7c7b82eaa8f8092b4
'2012-05-25T18:07:08-04:00'
describe
'390930' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJGF' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
85659695814d76266f5e1455476e60e1
d9efd2c2ca65435a5a22ab873fbc66c84fd1326f
describe
'378688' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJGG' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
5d7efbf928ba5ce505eddd54d2d6bf51
4aa60a32c3d2d5e0a8c1ce6ffe71908e27a87844
describe
'386117' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJGH' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
9bbcfcb557cddd77815c35bb31ca0ba2
08f726f4cde80cc24a35b62a04499dc5698e055d
'2012-05-25T18:02:35-04:00'
describe
'377703' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJGI' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
772cbeef7449e239342c36433c1d3aca
be4c0a884f6891a1cad2b34065a8f9a2c9a03484
'2012-05-25T18:09:58-04:00'
describe
'384570' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJGJ' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
4630b16bae97e4220a7ce03a830ba7ec
f55d5da494031357d9ba737a28b46576c3c01b2a
'2012-05-25T17:59:46-04:00'
describe
'388731' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJGK' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
1e8371a26b4d7eb24113e516c3246038
faf148a9f84d126ec400ed37d4bbbb9e7e0cfa10
describe
'393438' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJGL' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
755cad14cdc0f6716827f67615405652
a55849e2646d5df99aeb13f5a816886e9ce7a8b2
describe
'400773' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJGM' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
224155561e10a5a781b37f0b7c8f97a8
4d19a6ba1047bb70bbeb3687e3d07fde2ea1a1b1
describe
'398226' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJGN' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
db497501f3fdf91d07ffba18439515aa
634b8295968f440aacc93e0ca0010daab4435436
'2012-05-25T17:59:47-04:00'
describe
'366178' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJGO' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
f5e3f24a163572c41ebfb9b0638d7a23
0a4a37446dc8f243334a6748cb9c43f8b7c2d93a
describe
'406011' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJGP' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
2817c3fa694d587f1b6eea6731c1bfe6
58d012aa502e4697818b5366ca2ca381a3437a11
describe
'405714' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJGQ' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
245e46a5c13caa144fcd4d93e3e45e1f
4ed0a36dddf192eeef6a4b9c5be05c685c128231
'2012-05-25T18:11:42-04:00'
describe
'416428' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJGR' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
9af61ef677992cd2b1d9e8fe68adf540
cabc720fef6973ece6e64fcccd8a7f6125a6b85d
'2012-05-25T18:05:44-04:00'
describe
'415402' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJGS' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
ce827ddce2f33ea14b89819658102c8d
ff6869735bf9e6c0aed0e5352e1afa34594de236
describe
'274083' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJGT' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
c8f79fa1dfcbf2bb5ae07d07aa413b86
8648914dcf9ed5197641ffb5bc1cea90784a485e
describe
'18749' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJGU' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
20357e29017b8b8520d47dc2102cbfa9
d9ce4b69fed88fe7fde9546069fc2571c36adf51
'2012-05-25T18:07:30-04:00'
describe
'18991' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJGV' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
22a570bf1492d149d45ade7d11c02cf7
3d865f9151cecb8e7053806d4300528e7a623ff1
'2012-05-25T18:04:23-04:00'
describe
'380153' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJGW' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
c8caba9de1e5fbc8285c7214c6d7dd9b
58774d820f479ef85906efac07487bb2b9e9beb4
describe
'379039' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJGX' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
a9b8cb4a425e83dbfe28ce38ca9335bd
bc415b3f080fb31e36eb6f0587550101d78572f4
describe
'368589' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJGY' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
ff30b19290421d2242eaf1ab928834b1
5529484dafcf37b7e172703fc24a68d874150725
describe
'426065' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJGZ' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
1326b3cad0800b6c11f44929131eeb58
9ecdd594331cfaa37d350365f30adef8cc2ac5c6
'2012-05-25T18:10:12-04:00'
describe
'399945' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJHA' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
db24f9990b85bae010133a4d1d57efd5
c9da2974a84b507a07b3fd955e7e3ad715493c26
'2012-05-25T18:10:17-04:00'
describe
'399642' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJHB' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
f375bc0c4e101fc67204955230b9b8d7
f9a7d0630486757153620ab7abd14c0f6c3a2631
'2012-05-25T18:05:15-04:00'
describe
'416669' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJHC' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
79093e08f3f720c8b459977830bfeb4a
66de0cd7cf6f21052287c024bdc048aa07f80ea9
describe
'410490' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJHD' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
5570c8487fafdfe527a035804b5af830
e3fe8d82a3029f76be60ed0e3cd33942a249e6c0
describe
'401595' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJHE' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
b23539d2adc8ae6053c3a6e3c0f2f215
c2fcc2decb056d336119a45b9a2f4f1ca70b3c0e
describe
'415079' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJHF' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
2ac9fc5d40ad7d3d20cc966da70f2447
74d725637734a3a1009097dfba03de5283998b63
describe
'404803' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJHG' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
a476a37c581b065f535da6f17f079306
604872e4e5f24ba5ba44cbddf7606e37a1d2278b
'2012-05-25T18:08:54-04:00'
describe
'445095' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJHH' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
8a36bd13d2c0249d2ed4ce93bc553c59
628a73daa4869e271ca6de01a9be292a73af5a46
'2012-05-25T18:07:55-04:00'
describe
'399402' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJHI' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
bdca3a65b63d48b6ddc93f3ff4acfb20
b054858ab736b678e1dc0d0900de2b107ff29c0c
describe
'18969' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJHJ' 'sip-files00142.jpg'
a8d02b34c4a4850d38bcd06dea7727de
296a852b952997c89741934bed58fe327a19f0e5
describe
'18791' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJHK' 'sip-files00144.jpg'
53866b4d88b998e92edd9ec2574b0aff
7c5065c39abe2baabf1963cb559b66291e721507
describe
'386985' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJHL' 'sip-files00145.jpg'
bec5ed94648b28f6b4b7646c80401d44
cf474f6fd1003782acf30ab33d2e2daddcd88d3c
describe
'426329' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJHM' 'sip-files00147.jpg'
1bded2c97e393c663189b4ef60509e6f
7ff1ba7a0123f6c59bec8ec5970cccf68860e5bf
'2012-05-25T18:09:42-04:00'
describe
'443681' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJHN' 'sip-files00149.jpg'
a70bb7da37a3a0c1e8b61078d3aff2e4
7a681943f1a9557f9848f39cf37678089e8e9a1c
describe
'407636' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJHO' 'sip-files00150.jpg'
415c9c7e59c60a559d7ba48dda885763
6c0b31319f43bcc597ddffe69ff63b1a4df1c274
describe
'394722' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJHP' 'sip-files00151.jpg'
e0fbf5dc360dd69efc8f9f451e0cc66e
b652dc8a7d6e3bc7b5bde637fe246b4e6f345c88
describe
'417604' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJHQ' 'sip-files00152.jpg'
7c20ef857273bc5fe67f395462a919de
9cb927d276510409b4d92ce28818281eb5168854
describe
'409925' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJHR' 'sip-files00153.jpg'
128f096e1523941f4214fbe18ee8f9e4
420c24b05a27423b28105b27dc9b5bf622dcd5c0
describe
'412539' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJHS' 'sip-files00154.jpg'
e2926fb09d41747474042518c2f1266e
59fdb6825c56f41865dc11976c5f303a39130fbc
describe
'418286' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJHT' 'sip-files00156.jpg'
7e71c99a7e226e1fb5f91b11e77f7119
380383f20dd19fb5843edfd97f77eb604bd40361
describe
'402066' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJHU' 'sip-files00157.jpg'
fce62f0e881e82ba79c6876ab444ab91
e19c43f37b7654e9d82a48aeb0fa587ec082cbf3
'2012-05-25T18:02:16-04:00'
describe
'398371' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJHV' 'sip-files00158.jpg'
50302b2b2847642690215b42135e242c
be37bd91ee83fc12a3e845e76c6be337e7bc9edc
describe
'429278' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJHW' 'sip-files00159.jpg'
e015f5f3d6c196722fc1e656a9b4bf22
22b1d62fab592238993a2e8b5f82f1b65f2b503d
describe
'430111' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJHX' 'sip-files00160.jpg'
f3ce2eb701ce52aa69561f1494576bfe
c3c90b8cbd27b4322def21d0740ea142712bc4d3
describe
'433233' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJHY' 'sip-files00161.jpg'
6daf32fc3543f669113a219f5afc0a1c
70b72bf755a48f1042c287aaf14ebdd92d6b775e
describe
'182293' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJHZ' 'sip-files00162.jpg'
9839dcb1d294b7fe754123efe93384f9
99dc654ec8a6b7ca64b22d10e51894457458c7e5
describe
'110259' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJIA' 'sip-files00163.jpg'
f46a15d84ea650a6ab5f937e49a2217d
bcf2deb7cae53fdd37a98570e7d0b70790ec809f
'2012-05-25T18:10:23-04:00'
describe
'18575' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJIB' 'sip-files00164.jpg'
dcbcf9ec4f985e6b372e816e1eb37f79
2ce380b779af78a709d45f75dfce108286c76ee9
'2012-05-25T18:00:12-04:00'
describe
'386998' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJIC' 'sip-files00165.jpg'
c4f552230377abf55d8248c0649f99f8
693566329df1b717dc37703cf1c0fc87cbbefa95
describe
'422726' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJID' 'sip-files00166.jpg'
92ce1cd333893d0a26a469f90fece800
b75db3f3cec890278e0ab339d798d9444342f4a0
describe
'416323' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJIE' 'sip-files00168.jpg'
9a5367657497b2343ffc065a94a578a2
94df8ac051275a34dff4a6abca8014f100938403
describe
'412023' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJIF' 'sip-files00171.jpg'
4e0028f2192621724cb0fb5059834e6f
dc2e9c7ed8c3aeb50e99d8ad8a6d886ff2298468
describe
'432994' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJIG' 'sip-files00172.jpg'
35e1aac5d275deb3c32181d42faf5648
a921cecab32be0126665fd4b0383b273fbfae296
describe
'415502' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJIH' 'sip-files00173.jpg'
bc1d54fcf051497fa444655650e6791f
9fa9a43bb156f02ecde6a29b34e94cc6e73a5b95
describe
'392107' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJII' 'sip-files00174.jpg'
d5e8d9eed5a28ff8792270bf26516b89
fab5a84fcd196ef96f95b50ac6efec47d0773996
describe
'426149' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJIJ' 'sip-files00176.jpg'
a2c8948494071db838885244dfabc9d7
e969f620ee45467bf7fe76ab89047df609b1eb37
describe
'414956' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJIK' 'sip-files00177.jpg'
105245e4da249b34a0d8861fb8176a52
f2711f6933920f0900fc33a5b96e5d0469353388
describe
'386033' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJIL' 'sip-files00178.jpg'
e43b6d155dea70aa54313b1122c34610
4b873bbc539068b66d498293125daf8ac5892eea
'2012-05-25T18:10:45-04:00'
describe
'435535' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJIM' 'sip-files00179.jpg'
7e23f080df3c8a3c677eeb75502a8bc3
964d614d1b176f0191a53bad387bdfaf4baf0cd5
describe
'380605' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJIN' 'sip-files00180.jpg'
186f655f8b207c23ee00224f5b2e4acb
72866b36f93736e9f0bf7c7e5b45689396eb6087
describe
'376983' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJIO' 'sip-files00181.jpg'
f1eab9e201faca3d2d76662ccd4c8ab8
969da5b410dc1d6545158970959eff45b69e1fa0
describe
'107416' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJIP' 'sip-files00182.jpg'
456cf00e70284f79939c3ec67c44ecd3
da268d0d90f1a83525441c534fba0f8874b001c6
describe
'107285' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJIQ' 'sip-files00183.jpg'
bc91dbe1a024cbf9a8345d293e74e7fc
413bc14764b81feb451a353bb1630acc7eeabd2a
describe
'19025' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJIR' 'sip-files00184.jpg'
bb0a1d55149d2a8b092efa043ee071b3
e8653cf7c4992039d85abc61619ab71251d4d89a
'2012-05-25T18:02:58-04:00'
describe
'385207' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJIS' 'sip-files00185.jpg'
6a1a516ad52c07be449739f640733927
16ca24d3d7485189459930f089abcf72433f4628
describe
'409572' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJIT' 'sip-files00188.jpg'
7ed08ffa26ded91ce5f260611affa3a1
204546e37be87f6a6eaf706cabbae986528cb400
describe
'401561' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJIU' 'sip-files00189.jpg'
5da8827d412d770962f75deb04a692bc
822f94452167b14a348f72d718e51b0e23ee3e03
describe
'418387' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJIV' 'sip-files00190.jpg'
a5d5c6a81b14f99e6a5855158eb1c83a
feb94edd55a4e99be87926f833aafe09e5d623fe
describe
'408148' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJIW' 'sip-files00191.jpg'
ee23bb445dc00565055b96bffa841873
8de3f004f31b67639a50a1254429fb3ec14d6e7f
'2012-05-25T18:09:47-04:00'
describe
'413834' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJIX' 'sip-files00193.jpg'
dbf1af8dd780c4495cdf5fd4b1eb0aef
3d1210d784987e754daf1a8d8f216bd1686932d4
describe
'420797' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJIY' 'sip-files00195.jpg'
94031ef598554868c1ec10d49c70b662
ffd16e2524ffa61cf77606487943fe2c119604ce
'2012-05-25T18:00:14-04:00'
describe
'411190' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJIZ' 'sip-files00196.jpg'
5059c74031228abb71bd3d8336a424ce
4f1032cacc06a9c974ca77576971a5ef8b6d3f81
'2012-05-25T18:06:38-04:00'
describe
'390848' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJJA' 'sip-files00197.jpg'
5488d98c7af799dedb7a96ef6e032115
e0afe7b0d2903ad622ceddc280aa2df5a59b20f2
describe
'427896' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJJB' 'sip-files00198.jpg'
87c83471ca6b36d0b3547830eee653a1
a51f08dee984575d91ef9be727edda9bea8b990e
describe
'19201' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJJC' 'sip-files00202.jpg'
141a8b1824f0ae576020ce38a48728c0
6dd6d9868465ac133d296e6ccf5dcd2e0c08e5e6
describe
'385344' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJJD' 'sip-files00203.jpg'
8570f4fff30b45c75368cc0910ffe401
45c26d6694194c5c37f4b9fbb5781a41d37684c1
describe
'424012' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJJE' 'sip-files00205.jpg'
18491446c9254c0870944da51a50505b
c9648292c3990245e4dc301098208163e14318d8
'2012-05-25T18:06:02-04:00'
describe
'430814' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJJF' 'sip-files00206.jpg'
dfc446fa98174cc1c51e476d51ddf957
ded28b8e7769be67d2014b690aa527a0bf9f5f95
'2012-05-25T18:05:23-04:00'
describe
'442028' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJJG' 'sip-files00207.jpg'
dc7f4b6d846b7d0f563855f3fd73a00f
c88c8f3bd11ff2fa1c650de7c06c17d6a7594ae3
'2012-05-25T18:02:30-04:00'
describe
'421036' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJJH' 'sip-files00208.jpg'
127b348f87d9f6f60b722ecbd50d31d2
1ea0386a87b4a28e4a9bca20828d490b2a0d0796
describe
'442169' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJJI' 'sip-files00210.jpg'
da3fe5430fa1f6be5582d9aa51b5732d
f765ac90a13db32c84097abda452b61a1267de2a
describe
'418498' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJJJ' 'sip-files00212.jpg'
4fdb5975e2d31ac148c8bebb08ecd715
d8e4b530de616041d1d74fb6b1b2b45333e6922b
describe
'423124' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJJK' 'sip-files00213.jpg'
c2df3cc9ea18a906709afc36b4d0226c
c3e588edf0a77b580eac6e95bbc6ab820ac139f0
'2012-05-25T18:08:25-04:00'
describe
'396657' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJJL' 'sip-files00215.jpg'
75b6f3e7ed4a46778e2537759e5a62aa
f79872ebf3ca10738027f8106d4299ee28da4c8f
describe
'404912' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJJM' 'sip-files00216.jpg'
1c862beab8b09f6ce778c8e6a04b66a0
0d1f6f9c13e357382d8a9027d67e1e474dcaa0f9
'2012-05-25T18:07:54-04:00'
describe
'430987' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJJN' 'sip-files00217.jpg'
a3f36f806a8b1d5afb7d9152366ac437
45d8060a8e55bcb419d47a7e077c58fa4da03604
describe
'403896' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJJO' 'sip-files00220.jpg'
20600a7029e5d700d904f4818ef3f4bc
90fa02f56f38e1e69642d9f5afb6108cd0f6e440
'2012-05-25T18:10:24-04:00'
describe
'115926' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJJP' 'sip-files00221.jpg'
e9b79e63b92c34fcbfe9ea8bab663d4f
8c9f69f9a2f9e2b9a20d973d0a5cf30cde532803
'2012-05-25T18:06:09-04:00'
describe
'381133' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJJQ' 'sip-files00223.jpg'
f879c5befcc696b9d9395db09980b26b
bbd5eea4b429f96e7223545748843fd3c88ae4da
describe
'437296' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJJR' 'sip-files00224.jpg'
5eb41fc3abfb8f6bf5fdca902be09954
6aa359d1153a0f2fb72ebb5710dabd3b597187b6
describe
'423163' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJJS' 'sip-files00225.jpg'
2c2ccab06e2cc4c392128811dad81703
00f5fafbbcdd66fc96f6ff66d6792627045e3337
'2012-05-25T18:10:08-04:00'
describe
'407633' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJJT' 'sip-files00227.jpg'
b2cb416a998184ba91d83b6f40bf6566
3a28f1a46a32b7f210c5ae704fe687e7748dd98a
describe
'407154' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJJU' 'sip-files00229.jpg'
110aed0634b4c1988d66e0341d97ee98
3f8723dd9fdb7d010e11e18deb04ab20c41d4000
'2012-05-25T18:04:57-04:00'
describe
'425853' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJJV' 'sip-files00230.jpg'
0a892e5429cd97f623763ec65aea2da5
c0f514ed9d77428f13d2ba26117bc0300820fd88
describe
'401157' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJJW' 'sip-files00233.jpg'
a83c765e9cdb148a4f29564cdc271918
7c85e7fb2da6e296206676bbfa68a89e791c777b
'2012-05-25T18:01:09-04:00'
describe
'404421' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJJX' 'sip-files00235.jpg'
e811dbec6007f986de41f481ad3fe85e
5ae7c4188f11d9c813faa5365cb79afe7e20dc75
describe
'418500' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJJY' 'sip-files00236.jpg'
dd48bc687f63e84472050dd54b486694
e58790643877bc2032fe7a7e78a268479d179da4
describe
'402505' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJJZ' 'sip-files00237.jpg'
89b0d393c20ae96ba0cebc82423948ac
5a5806ac2bb79bf8cb0f2a3b62b0de908a8e6442
'2012-05-25T18:11:02-04:00'
describe
'405806' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJKA' 'sip-files00238.jpg'
57725f5f0920c1e177f32c3e447c3340
c57fd7c3b46a6e42f4a02d031a0dadf45a6ace17
describe
'402932' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJKB' 'sip-files00240.jpg'
400df85aa7533c1e59772b251e9f033f
1dd94bfafe7e68ab408455f7e4e548f3d6060b96
'2012-05-25T18:06:36-04:00'
describe
'19093' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJKC' 'sip-files00242.jpg'
4d07cf598735cbd0c27e54e6f7fbe771
71099791c78c9014c6b555663f1743c04e8f431a
describe
'420202' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJKD' 'sip-files00245.jpg'
09214842ae6232c680eeae6693b256ef
85ebe7a092a99da773b042da48184ec9d8f87011
describe
'453377' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJKE' 'sip-files00246.jpg'
ec9add1dd5fa0f3e4a738e647fd6021e
5b0681d81616b2f1bb35e7b41ef75981a804f1b3
describe
'415456' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJKF' 'sip-files00247.jpg'
27e5ce7ff444b16312cbdfe630c34868
e184886b0006228c157f4583e7ac43aa0985b4cf
describe
'422203' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJKG' 'sip-files00248.jpg'
c6ebb5ea9ce8b928df58811a9ef6fb8e
b6d5ae54bbbce9c16713378e1aa1485d7be839d4
describe
'434289' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJKH' 'sip-files00249.jpg'
d10a953ce219217b760cc5f8fd3b69f0
2f8092250fa44f7303d60b0d25efcbe2e05b4ac9
describe
'431182' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJKI' 'sip-files00250.jpg'
e0ca69fdb35550595c11b75b97b16b5d
f00a1183e08e5deda89ecf7a1d4bd4980fac6d24
describe
'399173' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJKJ' 'sip-files00251.jpg'
e0b9874e6ee34b0c1b588d9e9b27d587
fbc2069c748aba654372824e8d9ea37dda726bfc
describe
'428486' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJKK' 'sip-files00252.jpg'
61369dffa86d4148ce6bb8cc9014c528
eba9054033cecf2af122b675086089f08b784981
describe
'409964' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJKL' 'sip-files00254.jpg'
af9a8fc66ebb3f766f0d6269d2d402e8
08766b6e2c7412268280dce5235c6967a4f9ecf9
describe
'138337' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJKM' 'sip-files00258.jpg'
8e86a6236ab17dcfa953f03f6cb64ffc
b12fc8ec0bacf7b11ae5f7f2d7e982eabdb604d2
describe
'111545' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJKN' 'sip-files00259.jpg'
05a16590dc57c157043e208f639758e7
e13e82895c36f1c1aaca9770e4b360620b733216
describe
'19046' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJKO' 'sip-files00260.jpg'
a238c45293b953e006507fd5cde0dea1
24eb5023b573955c89424e3252483fb0e9ef86e4
describe
'419386' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJKP' 'sip-files00263.jpg'
eb48e536b0506c6bc4eaff0e50a7d38e
ebbe00f4bd95ed2c1fe4191a618e97697473aaf3
describe
'421536' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJKQ' 'sip-files00264.jpg'
581c1828340f5c9240fbe922ce00ef6e
fff0c1a6fd07a8afe52bba60658325ab796f7bbe
'2012-05-25T18:06:18-04:00'
describe
'415827' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJKR' 'sip-files00265.jpg'
d0e32a23818b49b3eec57b55c63babf5
7438a05197ce08cf5d9fca584c6722cd494f62b7
describe
'420034' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJKS' 'sip-files00267.jpg'
215dbf40687cff19bcf58faf2aa8ec10
fbe281ac2b8d27c8f90b995120b2254caa48062a
'2012-05-25T18:05:09-04:00'
describe
'401869' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJKT' 'sip-files00269.jpg'
b26e0e38badf1d440dab013ef7a76bc6
9b7312a4af502cf6952d66f59bae9679eefcdecc
'2012-05-25T18:06:13-04:00'
describe
'420483' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJKU' 'sip-files00270.jpg'
c8e13cd717817a16756b9f4ee0b2af30
445d3c0c0304622f65b080423ec2d73d241816be
describe
'392521' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJKV' 'sip-files00271.jpg'
91a6742321b859e316f1a16ceeba00f5
a94a0b00989db4dfe5af4fdeb994d9fb0f7b5da3
describe
'423127' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJKW' 'sip-files00272.jpg'
f50125a3820644ccb71a95651dc45804
8c9a9530d3297c708a4a513fde581d742bbda190
describe
'107857' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJKX' 'sip-files00273.jpg'
b62d9de607223af4ddddfc49659150c2
d5ce29044e4f8c51fac328f740307bee7d458876
describe
'19108' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJKY' 'sip-files00274.jpg'
971c6bbdeec4394f3ffd03aa27f7c24f
b9481efe85457b8c38346d076e4bf740bdd8ee5c
describe
'368776' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJKZ' 'sip-files00275.jpg'
a2f20d3f990c52df927bcb0982526f9a
3b5defe696ae204e9cfd771c81b0132486a0dbd6
describe
'425231' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJLA' 'sip-files00276.jpg'
2c9ceb4f143ddc67a660543abce5195f
f79704e23259e4d0785389a6145e81acd9b14138
'2012-05-25T18:11:43-04:00'
describe
'396976' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJLB' 'sip-files00277.jpg'
38142c061d8f9074b2330d05ce8e5e9c
431bcbdf31153259aeeb83ac54d776b04c3863e9
'2012-05-25T18:10:11-04:00'
describe
'423771' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJLC' 'sip-files00282.jpg'
04b5afd26c814df042332a44846125b0
796d7ea43e873a67806fff327fd0a4fb85abcaad
describe
'407733' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJLD' 'sip-files00283.jpg'
bf75ed44fd40e4da2c37b6efb195e9b3
25f3a7ca27af56232919294d70fddb791c0e0d57
'2012-05-25T18:11:37-04:00'
describe
'416343' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJLE' 'sip-files00285.jpg'
eaf9f5894330c3203a3e56fbdbe2f859
ce44b435b36e3dcc400102c33b05a3b80df0608c
'2012-05-25T18:05:12-04:00'
describe
'394171' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJLF' 'sip-files00290.jpg'
496547242d06455cb91588c670663dcd
19fad13d803ff062fb082ba49b409913f66d4d93
describe
'390337' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJLG' 'sip-files00291.jpg'
3a208ba4d9cc95ffa1ba137aa1b2edc0
8d98b3b682c27f2ae767e24ed0c6e87021ab274c
'2012-05-25T18:04:25-04:00'
describe
'129838' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJLH' 'sip-files00292.jpg'
18be22c2b606898809b7a7a10125d19b
b07f138757b717e545da20abd8a1f9b503ee119a
describe
'19238' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJLI' 'sip-files00294.jpg'
08962d9b4394854acd2f05e33ca698d6
458db11c91a3ab993eff79884455b43e71971757
'2012-05-25T18:11:00-04:00'
describe
'373180' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJLJ' 'sip-files00295.jpg'
1eb2e0429a11966f403cd092c3067f47
fc1b1ec934d0a1c19d5e0634cdb1456793e5d620
describe
'404251' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJLK' 'sip-files00297.jpg'
07ec480393ec02b9b07a2cfb335c1d17
3afda53c87d2735ffd6c312bb5f2f9453828ec46
describe
'389092' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJLL' 'sip-files00299.jpg'
6ee1c4a8f09a1225c9d51f082b52343a
e90dda40604083bf17a2ef62f21bf3a41933bd9e
'2012-05-25T18:08:23-04:00'
describe
'393022' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJLM' 'sip-files00300.jpg'
1304c9a235971feb83090417afed7a0c
1398c039a30b2d2ced28ee101f7a0ee51bebfca8
'2012-05-25T18:01:54-04:00'
describe
'401755' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJLN' 'sip-files00301.jpg'
42487a1a8896b6718991b1b8d3a6031e
ba0251713b9e27ac62e79ce7d6951ffd1542c882
'2012-05-25T18:09:32-04:00'
describe
'420360' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJLO' 'sip-files00302.jpg'
8b32c609cc66fa12af58058e0abc560b
d85d2bb706025e77a70f3099000fbb44c742363d
describe
'396247' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJLP' 'sip-files00303.jpg'
16c66438e52f48b7b979fcf752d62da9
a0ed366bb63012df723588d23b13e538b9fe2a6a
describe
'413779' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJLQ' 'sip-files00304.jpg'
acbb74d4cc9eac291742be08c683ac3e
9c3bdd79a907df9fed15eec817a51d3710d6c9f9
describe
'764865' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJLR' 'sip-files00305.jpg'
c56c185997463bbbceda649888fb4caf
c5a2e1c63f769d15f81d9a8db15193e2dc45db07
describe
'388543' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJLS' 'sip-files00307.jpg'
275827a03b201d4904d6f382da8f8f47
cc28f32b3fde2cccfa4b1a30fdfc6fcf7252cdf9
'2012-05-25T18:07:29-04:00'
describe
'365284' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJLT' 'sip-files00309.jpg'
c64a42d67dac5d40fb48685394d69be3
4a1388fa80d2f472f043bc8e2573dd47068a5ba2
describe
'401025' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJLU' 'sip-files00310.jpg'
de10f7e843c024ce667b12275da652de
418dea1442d9486daaa94a64caa60930943e02e1
describe
'318296' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJLV' 'sip-files00312.jpg'
b4d744ac691907cc529098e2af2c9f6f
6061d6d07ad12ca7091237607235aeab156bd438
describe
'481139' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJLW' 'sip-files00313.jpg'
422b1904f29a743d440236ff9d56252f
c1d1ab4ea1f357dbc815efbb9c8052e237d280a5
'2012-05-25T18:10:33-04:00'
describe
'408741' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJLX' 'sip-files00315.jpg'
6d2322bfa0ad5689f26fd78a01f30d4f
f67a3146b3656fb28d6889e87b7e501d30048a76
describe
'434636' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJLY' 'sip-files00317.jpg'
0482c2ed24f9895adc62f54a8e77473c
8f105533120db6c18570c913dcf931a19fd01b6b
describe
'409726' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJLZ' 'sip-files00318.jpg'
a44c502e5d646909c2fa7bf86a247079
c742bfbe2b49eeafd7652c171ea3826761571069
describe
'464033' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJMA' 'sip-files00320.jpg'
aa0edfb87ec0c57a097f28c355e8f2c7
40b7504bc7540e84ace9cd8e036a3d97bf1f4a41
describe
'551649' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJMB' 'sip-files00324.jpg'
a2b0ebd2a40a3800d92981d076d3c9ff
e84bfe7811b0b65b8ebcfe59109e687ef56d41b8
describe
'261085' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJMC' 'sip-files00325.jpg'
8c293b2f707cf56b0cbc6b17587d94b7
5d436385656445c0ce5950cd560523198721060c
'2012-05-25T18:10:25-04:00'
describe
'1388991' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJMD' 'sip-files00001.jp2'
e7bab630ec486ba84817438c03f26bc6
92c895f400a78e5eecefccf50e26886f70251f8f
'2012-05-25T17:59:39-04:00'
describe
'1485810' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJME' 'sip-files00002.jp2'
bf67e64abeb336f8b282c2e85b622f4c
e642168d8d7956c3097f363c20c498583ef1198a
'2012-05-25T18:00:47-04:00'
describe
'51740' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJMF' 'sip-files00003.jp2'
43c042f167a4eb3e192370d63b9a3abd
14a232d224f440654887496f6aad1f8e4d04e3a9
describe
'1687591' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJMG' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
5e6de29d1569eaa1f718b9b7dceb6fa4
6ea239bc387d997603386fb9169def261f122b08
describe
'1687594' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJMH' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
1ce6827aadf44865cf04b26df1ac897b
0cd81efbf6b9d430f3a81d98c0f2ed32993511c9
describe
'201674' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJMI' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
e07afff37451fea1a3d1374eed41436d
5d32237f4da507459eff17be4cbf29de51afd829
describe
'208557' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJMJ' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
66b434fa1e592bff2d3386ec895f8fed
c92c0e3d7a0d880225926f76c763caf5e8d3d317
describe
'167791' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJMK' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
d3c10fbbe0607f815c6d58e09daa0f5a
f184ac7d2fa1311a2ad4f139d2f49c95793a94a5
describe
'5014' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJML' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
200b959ba346557a8b03d27abde1eef6
72b6c298b26c2492a18630c47fe7c9975fbe2fa6
'2012-05-25T18:08:55-04:00'
describe
'98820' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJMM' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
b0feffcfc827df93d61bfb047b8644f1
c8a79aebf3ade3673666638a77e890c9cb2347ea
describe
'4611' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJMN' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
ea0f6a2da4a1e99891e3ecf98980c60b
7550bf0eb41a925fcff84303fd0ff376baa775e9
describe
'214942' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJMO' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
8c027b055fb8bf16eb8989b834123bfc
8ab9d8c083ca142f9507c5bd3c4cc839d81bc0d2
'2012-05-25T18:05:21-04:00'
describe
'226327' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJMP' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
bc22c65d07ad66c32b047ce8a364ed0a
ebc19af6959416087177c25da41d974bc0c97659
'2012-05-25T18:03:56-04:00'
describe
'213817' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJMQ' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
62cf77a2ffed977fdc765fbb56d3ea1a
fd4aebb56d7611d0d819a79064139d8183f34b56
describe
'96416' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJMR' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
1d0527dd64ef3f1aab75e1df932c8697
79a3bab7a77270f54a2a80eb93a1ed8d687f78a9
describe
'243090' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJMS' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
07fe87ddcc900492b56b96526f718cc8
d4b6d1dab4c1622d30ce787091dc0c6377127231
describe
'229233' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJMT' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
6088baffaea184a276908da5c872e6fc
e03c5913914e3e894b9cb262a420d3d2efb289a4
describe
'222609' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJMU' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
36befdfcd4f834d99c3132994159c265
657fc97cc22514cc391f13c2387adc20702e88dc
describe
'207233' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJMV' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
d5970a7d9cfba5ab42891974ecc873b3
74ede71778fc6509bf27dde5ad8cf34571732db2
describe
'225246' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJMW' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
af4715b59879c1f8ccb726104bcfc3fc
b5e4e457f59285349ef328885e7cf7b176e66c78
'2012-05-25T18:05:18-04:00'
describe
'229332' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJMX' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
1dbdf5d5688a9f36efff51ec7e050565
d7220e5a2396dda0134257de99d6821e035ab169
describe
'219896' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJMY' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
a3092777e14cd117b38359af0bf832f0
2ba4af5efc7ac8e2d0671fee23c916a2845e9a7f
describe
'226986' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJMZ' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
6cf5d3103c7c16a37c5858ec203aa9f2
f20ef3a91cfda03aa1cd580119f8a25713062f5f
describe
'12752' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJNA' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
13d73d5c633d3c6b81c110c2ffcc85b5
b6a92de93d139cb4bf54c17543d0e45f6a3d633d
describe
'270603' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJNB' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
d6a2f4cc13e9b235096f5931a9a199f0
13fccc5915fb558a09a42a42fd030f591aabe6a5
describe
'236901' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJNC' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
0f599927e9e601f8dbaa3917529075ef
a1d47ede14bb85cc3066242cea2fe41d47e0117b
'2012-05-25T18:08:11-04:00'
describe
'219838' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJND' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
848e872fedfefd12382cd4533f6117e2
3a69b23821d60e9e9e56541c15b053c896a88ac3
describe
'211645' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJNE' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
93537aa3d55733c07a29154cbf3768bb
6f1397fb1c27e4d44e6dfd4418452feb06a0a2ea
describe
'218924' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJNF' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
b1d814cdbd3f2ec5437802d96be6b79b
8cc0540226efe9b57ea70de09b1cc5437385e31c
'2012-05-25T18:09:07-04:00'
describe
'226643' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJNG' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
db6bc87543ef71acc69e49ef983db000
eed999fe0f75a6045f00e361fefcb3e542c1ce51
describe
'220714' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJNH' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
f3219502a3aecfb254e13aef76f09c9f
047f22daf5860b9f103d828ccdd33d35833ccf09
describe
'1687552' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJNI' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
27f00751d49556c870410a6ae87ec2c8
6a00a940d03adc2d648b16891c035dcbf6daafc8
'2012-05-25T18:04:46-04:00'
describe
'224382' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJNJ' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
217791d3f328b8444a5cf3cd5ffb5755
2e6e3ec7e30c97868d8ea6f92bff959a9b4b40d0
describe
'74749' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJNK' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
9e553c26fbca60dc10228afd1e5bf619
2976d486b265679b403c9a732505f19d9bb03fdb
describe
'4797' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJNL' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
b2bd754e2c2d2b37f75f2052e5be810f
a039bbb3b9c1dfac656ef8b47a0ac7e4d338cf0b
describe
'1687501' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJNM' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
9aed0c006a454daaf18a51a2cc73b94a
b6a4b576fe7aa5dca4a85c77f20f3074ce8dce91
describe
'224533' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJNN' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
f53b141928a94104fe0ba22ea793ed8b
4526afcb78f79f9d3bb3d22747e293fe6a353bda
'2012-05-25T18:02:02-04:00'
describe
'207559' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJNO' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
0c1725d5835ea04ee9e698b3a345c9d2
91b57867674ec6f135c3b0ede4c55c5cc0428573
'2012-05-25T18:09:57-04:00'
describe
'215229' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJNP' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
68f9c60b105d90d5ac5c632c26d51f1b
9259835de8dc09a32b6b308994770ccfa412b0be
describe
'213559' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJNQ' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
5755bb4c0300bea9aa055fe2fc3411aa
3308a48944db937c1c5879af4dd50471c18354eb
describe
'233872' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJNR' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
682d8934749c2f7a3ebb2b90f90f54fb
670ea03caf009a4bb15595342dd85874aed309e5
describe
'162188' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJNS' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
6a9aaf4183b2236e47cabfb6e2ed58c9
3f5ad9bd5a295467c4fc395f9e400e96aab6132d
describe
'4173' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJNT' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
66a283c3fb0eb46639350cabeeff20e8
1a8df967e309ce062a2b66bc23000e652e963483
describe
'86333' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJNU' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
b377e172b3ca3486c61ecfb80f84d203
b896d85ca6076f28d4f0aed2332a3e5fdd770770
'2012-05-25T18:04:29-04:00'
describe
'262893' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJNV' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
9539f667c6fa34f8a4e620e8d399c4a2
3687c0203c5e451948f42d9e2656d58550366a00
describe
'227802' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJNW' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
b10d5e5eb83eddf1e62a06c457e038d2
5ca485664f89e2e6b215a0df2f243685dccc4308
describe
'212322' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJNX' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
6ec58a27633d185ce7fe8d2b31afc1f1
a4c6bca2f00310b696d5b4e099344cfe69017efc
describe
'218645' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJNY' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
139928b68e8acecb7ad5551fcc8a1225
33a081c62faf1621c9db3facc7b90b25780d5c56
'2012-05-25T18:05:39-04:00'
describe
'219571' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJNZ' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
4f38a0851718bd8d739b761973008857
354112ecbb81593bdfc498df28cceb2f35a3a9c8
'2012-05-25T18:01:08-04:00'
describe
'212253' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJOA' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
3f5ba4ff68380b8328eb00bf4410d483
2c0257b528f87a0dd305447d796d16ecc2ba4048
describe
'212307' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJOB' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
ecb069b5029f6f37c72cdf04f6dca8e7
bed322650902695ea728df3363ca5a4668364771
'2012-05-25T18:05:41-04:00'
describe
'213381' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJOC' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
dd37debbe8ea64aafca0bec437c6b8a4
2bf5bebe466c404be90092919a812860282930ea
describe
'222353' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJOD' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
d49aca525d1cac8538694c1f2067a54b
1227c3e8e63fb11bf36cdc95df20d99772caf580
describe
'93192' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJOE' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
cceb42853ac5b66e2e9616817ff85586
6dd971ee223c9bc3dcb3d3d25f98662f286eca4a
'2012-05-25T18:00:20-04:00'
describe
'6689' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJOF' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
3d43de9d8554ffbf1b3f7d5c3ea87601
7cb4a12bcf2c5d12c21aa9233ec0564157a9ca1d
'2012-05-25T18:00:58-04:00'
describe
'286269' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJOG' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
2c9e1169edebcad17b171e22cc984570
aa4716d9de1e17a916dafff552f84ff733654c35
describe
'217770' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJOH' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
690ebc672dcd4b22861196719d8de28c
5681f6044ad401988bb55725d946bf7e17e81f7d
describe
'217578' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJOI' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
d3f33d8a727a774fa13118304c2dc792
8134d595e618357365dc42d361fc76f54ad0dc0d
describe
'222759' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJOJ' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
eebd04e10411c7807ce2968e4d7e0f14
2b60acc4733e2e648798bd264ee40b8c85d1a14f
describe
'215679' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJOK' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
2f81835744e1594d1571bc51912ef402
d3b21a12edc26907ed7162b91ff3e9013df66152
'2012-05-25T18:02:39-04:00'
describe
'221189' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJOL' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
1a4734d7985d04d0c5515d427c76ea98
611a4e6236df729216498650915c83c18ff95306
describe
'210549' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJOM' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
7646ff391ad334f265c039d6329eef8c
201185496ade3945183ae48503316f35c71533f6
describe
'218950' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJON' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
5cb63a3100ffdcf80ee28998eb9a78c5
55d8d5a3af7aac6ef923aeadf7c6c84d441e9a21
describe
'211664' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJOO' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
aefbd1b7b1d314cbe8cf916f566e7bd1
e32415dcd73123888b2e89df94ee19dffe600414
describe
'237078' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJOP' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
7060841f82ab8fc60b4cd7061366299d
277a88ea0aaf648b8a01dd92f378cb22fe4e217c
describe
'212582' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJOQ' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
1b4cc23144b08d450d5db0c65a8aa7f4
cf4345436416ad7d7338a9c5b3d0f7d206cd9611
describe
'215799' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJOR' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
23d08666c5f72d2ab032d9d0734c1f79
b6058c3e975d34c67e42190e89bf5eef54d3f1eb
describe
'4565' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJOS' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
98fef3b1824915181f700b12efc66401
7f5e1f383027ebf3df42b3e225399197e5b15cdd
'2012-05-25T18:07:45-04:00'
describe
'109894' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJOT' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
df9aebd34a06a0b6ccc7eca837a4da7c
0aff991cbb00cac305e2139bdb4057c098e81b21
'2012-05-25T18:07:48-04:00'
describe
'5193' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJOU' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
b848bb45c596a36befdd45f633283449
7300031c1908c2f2480ef36be7e6c00ce08ac3cf
describe
'284685' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJOV' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
9893b10d68bd19646fe9df64923a5b2a
341f31ebcf0fffa86002a252c7e3f79c67fa6bb0
describe
'208063' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJOW' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
e0891a64640e6afbc2dcd07d14671062
3829340ff4f406591be3ea0821c6b1b9a1ac9d07
describe
'201078' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJOX' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
3ae0ced8878fa0c8582dff31df95b553
e8ad4fd3425b63a0c429a560a53b832b574d2666
'2012-05-25T18:08:16-04:00'
describe
'213920' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJOY' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
f919fcd0c05d52aeca8841e97b6c54c8
6f8f336ece32eb07e226e9076b628dd649dfc61e
describe
'211811' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJOZ' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
75cbb41bf24edbb7c9830c023bccb381
c875c6f671f851fbdf0422a1383729b08942a1ef
describe
'242951' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJPA' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
0206256c24146c8eb5de86befd61332c
29acc6de393c7aeb0595a6f2b8ef116759efb660
describe
'217116' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJPB' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
282b2fac837c5aa70c43ec095ea014de
1e3277d99279eb85fb523e21e08b63f625066384
'2012-05-25T18:10:07-04:00'
describe
'229783' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJPC' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
6969df7fccb587bfac1bf2aa84ed0076
aec65b836f4f6c081b2e006c0bea0d1831075ff3
'2012-05-25T18:10:41-04:00'
describe
'214712' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJPD' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
307e7ad135f8f5264006ee2659b52ac3
702d2a5d1651b7f028dcdec832efc60eea695d38
describe
'224607' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJPE' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
5d9503a74834840e8ee5add048699a8e
87abb7a48059138406722de0e0e37d9b4de4fab5
'2012-05-25T18:00:46-04:00'
describe
'259695' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJPF' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
3413e03f17ffefec444e10fd2ec713b5
680c6dd2c018d0b528c3606aa52bb20043284a72
'2012-05-25T18:07:07-04:00'
describe
'229076' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJPG' 'sip-files00140.jp2'
69c583363f92aa8369cf0a0c7f3c2fef
eff00df358fba9786b78dcc2da0b56e712787a0c
describe
'5200' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJPH' 'sip-files00142.jp2'
c4c407e57c7e5df6128ca2eaad3b62d3
7ca929042336f8a3d9624cccd7ec0367623819aa
describe
'4533' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJPI' 'sip-files00144.jp2'
98b843c25fd07157c552fba80074d974
46dda0e4bddd6dc0707670dacc3065ea236a5cb0
describe
'277305' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJPJ' 'sip-files00145.jp2'
d9e24629f16b82ec5d1dc6572e9673f8
c74fd13adb12c31c20fe47528388b0dd3e50b9d2
'2012-05-25T18:01:45-04:00'
describe
'241734' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJPK' 'sip-files00146.jp2'
f3c4093c7d3c06fc14aab17a727874b9
48efe38143b108613cad82b78556974fdf229ba6
describe
'236350' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJPL' 'sip-files00150.jp2'
72e491aeb6ddbb6c557e966a02d4922a
50b8484d4ffae79a444388929f6999bc33abfb01
'2012-05-25T18:02:34-04:00'
describe
'230005' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJPM' 'sip-files00151.jp2'
5ce3ee3decbe4439889c07bc089b43bd
3e338d26a49b63b9d12abfb21dd48fc050c58434
describe
'228254' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJPN' 'sip-files00152.jp2'
a5e4ee2231e1f97afecff78a92edd75d
6d83754b77dadbab79fd98b327b7369f6a438bf6
'2012-05-25T18:07:38-04:00'
describe
'214969' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJPO' 'sip-files00153.jp2'
15b6a5e21371194c8e6d70ca6c1b8158
5688e62d4b8eba4593ec86c3db22d2374f4ef75e
'2012-05-25T18:06:08-04:00'
describe
'238271' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJPP' 'sip-files00154.jp2'
07fc446ffa59fc7bc45197891367c264
8c0a37192393cc390116c1a5634e6dcb838504ac
'2012-05-25T18:09:15-04:00'
describe
'229443' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJPQ' 'sip-files00156.jp2'
4d59269e15324861ff8b3c6a4531bcc4
21584643620a81fc7d2df568b7654e8c90f2e0a0
'2012-05-25T18:09:02-04:00'
describe
'220520' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJPR' 'sip-files00157.jp2'
23da0e84de32de0f88290142ae5bb387
55192910d30a4c86f16cb9a53e616b90ab83afb7
describe
'223727' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJPS' 'sip-files00158.jp2'
1613a204b14d765cccab97e267725183
b4b9dae18992930d82143900a0c64593aadbe5d6
describe
'219672' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJPT' 'sip-files00159.jp2'
a0904b5b00361d9ccb898044b84d50c4
5f44e3a01c9ef4d029c1abdd7a9cc773e201a01c
describe
'222867' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJPU' 'sip-files00160.jp2'
1b380a2b168930a74ba4d5395cdb8256
a556fc2d3d3640abbee125e5f8dcfb8af51c916a
describe
'110162' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJPV' 'sip-files00162.jp2'
f3baaeb206ad8c56ac6f0e219339c79a
9d0a77693bd68c5ffba71d084fe17453337deb25
describe
'4434' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJPW' 'sip-files00164.jp2'
c33b6c9ed2865303ea9d375b512f90ac
db6c3d95a7060ea4c470892bf005c44f81ac2e4f
describe
'245619' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJPX' 'sip-files00165.jp2'
6ce7cd79d6192a8b9cb6306b4ea4c469
fefb57197af00d790f04515a8ad630f5749ce0ad
'2012-05-25T18:08:43-04:00'
describe
'215352' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJPY' 'sip-files00167.jp2'
fa7713a650db03245e204a43eefede34
071aee75342f4f229abc578b6e445833be5a1942
describe
'215602' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJPZ' 'sip-files00170.jp2'
b0f3c6f2e8d87f6a742649d76a4e3320
c0f52940a666f9ec12c00a5c23edbd03ca8af211
'2012-05-25T18:03:29-04:00'
describe
'231962' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJQA' 'sip-files00171.jp2'
5087f66d1b6160f20be6987af1f1b812
f74915e12c8c92b635252695e3d2060235be9da8
describe
'236719' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJQB' 'sip-files00172.jp2'
b95d8c2b4a12cc2c4786c5d787801276
e1e7f59517111e27d996f2df6b2c9050974ce526
'2012-05-25T18:06:07-04:00'
describe
'215227' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJQC' 'sip-files00174.jp2'
5ce83436791f1d416e02f40eb232c421
c490d83510a57ddfc7884cb7178f43efa723a12b
describe
'216588' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJQD' 'sip-files00175.jp2'
9cda6e1e9b81f5995929e403060dbdf6
3197d3752b88e5f73ba834f1accd32f01474ae15
describe
'214895' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJQE' 'sip-files00176.jp2'
2c9d9cb4137c4d56c9a0f3f450c21c60
5aec81b94652ebaa54e5840148d1ffa4d426d7a9
describe
'216215' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJQF' 'sip-files00178.jp2'
0157b6f60adfa7e5245c03d2f191f682
bcb37f5fbd9bd1f0634f72025b45adc3ac0dfd05
describe
'224156' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJQG' 'sip-files00179.jp2'
6b1a670677501b4e92ab1ea66ec3a2c3
84bfc930fd8fbe717ffb5b09b34bd3ea17970b63
describe
'207512' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJQH' 'sip-files00180.jp2'
0fc2a1ed0d6e64e5abb5e22d264c24de
f0d42fc1e9c517942147aef1260333ffe23efde1
'2012-05-25T17:59:42-04:00'
describe
'218083' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJQI' 'sip-files00181.jp2'
c7d708253bc5e0a6e0fc7fbcbaa3522a
440dfd7b3fb11425044eea09e04552279f6e201c
describe
'73566' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJQJ' 'sip-files00182.jp2'
27ac8350a09ed3943c7db6682ed01178
9ed40c1b6c6e7553422cbe6e86e3b2842cd490a8
describe
'5389' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJQK' 'sip-files00184.jp2'
59bfec8a9bcb35ceb8087145b370025e
e9abcaf966497a254dc2742b4bf16b897161655d
'2012-05-25T18:00:57-04:00'
describe
'262858' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJQL' 'sip-files00185.jp2'
203101334230b129abe24fb773d087e0
c233b1f1c9dfe145e8205384c0d04a1b74794c2c
'2012-05-25T18:10:39-04:00'
describe
'227006' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJQM' 'sip-files00186.jp2'
084a1eb23e2d8c8ed5f4b5251939397d
1a4c1c678f0dae076d1b6b001342d7082060c857
describe
'238742' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJQN' 'sip-files00187.jp2'
7e053bbaeac7efba747d53a2e20288ac
4903dfd35aaa142d892c0ee19269fd12de34e843
'2012-05-25T18:08:31-04:00'
describe
'217452' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJQO' 'sip-files00188.jp2'
b1fe819d1412d2deaece07499851b519
2ea31a63907432ba28c3f729f99ef8db1013df90
describe
'234492' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJQP' 'sip-files00190.jp2'
18cc709864b92505f87c90fb7b962d33
cff6efc2f296ee0fca5abca1f33317737c3d1e69
describe
'225373' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJQQ' 'sip-files00191.jp2'
b9181768f8d018b5941028ce9da42a7b
f4210433367a37a13fc3650c07ee4b48d0b81f5e
describe
'215051' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJQR' 'sip-files00192.jp2'
a108dec8e085a44181387700f318e24a
6b3f636c2015cbda1124b6481effc6b4dba1816c
describe
'229188' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJQS' 'sip-files00193.jp2'
4e8247112b32d096e5980aa7dc98c49d
fc35b9e219bd6a48b53986768bfda3502665b2c4
'2012-05-25T18:03:15-04:00'
describe
'217335' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJQT' 'sip-files00195.jp2'
50c6287cf51db167b64ff2c75b5ebcde
10e6fcef036a6bd2061e1dac048390d12857cc3b
describe
'219653' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJQU' 'sip-files00196.jp2'
5cd34f782c5e786ab4b44380b1162f71
52a597bff1724c06105dbce8fd6e89018a1a00ee
'2012-05-25T18:03:40-04:00'
describe
'218201' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJQV' 'sip-files00198.jp2'
fe8316b58aace6405f46daad42c017d8
49d063e610f3e45776388cfd91ad841ed9c8647f
'2012-05-25T18:01:36-04:00'
describe
'214109' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJQW' 'sip-files00199.jp2'
c4139070943bb52c2e8db701d8ae9408
862c81ae85d2a3821ad52986456e5197a6d9c207
describe
'89520' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJQX' 'sip-files00200.jp2'
da8ce2ba824aaf5ec0da2ee0daf9880f
ef5dcc03fd8fbfde1db9fbdeffc0cbab5e3223f5
'2012-05-25T18:07:53-04:00'
describe
'92663' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJQY' 'sip-files00201.jp2'
7035d351e29b7666ff3b3d762d83cac5
7602d7cb8161af3df6558b43ce69716168d84747
describe
'5714' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJQZ' 'sip-files00202.jp2'
c3b6e98dafcd9aa72e7e9f2dfb315562
423ee39c72591e831d3579c179a812bb8c0690fd
describe
'228880' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJRA' 'sip-files00204.jp2'
688b077efefef3d88c172cccfee9d91f
1136c9aa9949b3bdb668aa16508ad21f3d1fce3b
'2012-05-25T18:06:35-04:00'
describe
'217705' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJRB' 'sip-files00205.jp2'
92404a879f1aaec71a633c8a185a7e2a
fb946925232fb2b4eac5103f68c05cb1fcb8ae7a
describe
'228139' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJRC' 'sip-files00206.jp2'
243b6d906e73409c64da72b4cf2ec56e
f8e31ac5ce6f29e65f90e95e791baaf1b08535e9
describe
'221207' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJRD' 'sip-files00208.jp2'
f17571b98d83ec7109df2abd13cf6faf
0a13a5d21676af1ddf566ca854670ac922e91a81
describe
'210589' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJRE' 'sip-files00209.jp2'
b5dcb53ed7d3ecccf6e00c199d44a2e3
539b716dc8c2f7bbe9da6a9bf2910075e42b0881
describe
'221263' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJRF' 'sip-files00210.jp2'
a1a7e1d708850f86bb0b1fe8c457fec1
4d0b67c1668c92617899691b8ef75d421ee13d15
'2012-05-25T18:06:49-04:00'
describe
'219406' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJRG' 'sip-files00211.jp2'
f17e1716f4da86d93468f61b5084132c
ec1bb4cada82a0492c6fc737378b0fc59e384fdb
'2012-05-25T18:10:00-04:00'
describe
'227152' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJRH' 'sip-files00212.jp2'
cfba542e59a320e3b61187191d77b8cc
5e379a5f713ed12f7c11ea599ae437e5e231825c
describe
'216939' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJRI' 'sip-files00213.jp2'
9ecd908b19bb79322abb5f578f7469c9
64358f4a95bf2ae5325bc22583638c77bd87f377
describe
'214990' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJRJ' 'sip-files00214.jp2'
ab3f2e86ba6ea47cb24b5e08aeaa6af1
4b32fbcd98b36a222a1fc03104089243d5780882
describe
'216488' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJRK' 'sip-files00216.jp2'
2798ff6f5c476fee70409eb4bd6ecb64
71cf22ff25579f45c49895e092ca2c4ac211af88
describe
'223004' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJRL' 'sip-files00217.jp2'
57d3da5c8f2c8232685ca459c81f2ba4
6491dfce7344c8ce710e6699776c2363b6ed06fd
describe
'230200' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJRM' 'sip-files00218.jp2'
7ca78cc4f387e3efdd9bb4f4d20738c3
82dab884009c667bfc91bc7c82fc5de803119bcf
describe
'229887' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJRN' 'sip-files00219.jp2'
03e4b1f3e2ffbe1b39ba13efa2e62276
239a16619e0485950beb195fe90fa022c901e1d8
describe
'268911' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJRO' 'sip-files00223.jp2'
8c78cc25ecd14bb6dbd0c3cb6146fb1a
5cb23b809e6fbc98da7850aa087af270fc474f81
describe
'219045' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJRP' 'sip-files00224.jp2'
cd0ce707c70ee7acef450cc24f4f60e5
7acf6040cf5e769ecd097448e94c56931a9493ba
describe
'222357' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJRQ' 'sip-files00227.jp2'
d9c6ee9ef29586ecd9b7f568b7c9602f
8cbf864c97c36874b1b00f86b25b7addd977d099
describe
'231246' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJRR' 'sip-files00228.jp2'
217f31918df01867501aba250e883f38
045b44c04e5c20738eed3cb977883c67ebb44047
describe
'220628' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJRS' 'sip-files00229.jp2'
b9bf51e2fb265de7d660fb3e75f2be9d
408a4c9021baa8b6cb85ecdab10d126257e059f8
describe
'227491' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJRT' 'sip-files00230.jp2'
67d5dbc515b457b11424fcbdf02c9660
a5514041e4e8264b844312b8b5903b0979db502b
'2012-05-25T18:03:46-04:00'
describe
'213847' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJRU' 'sip-files00231.jp2'
a65f84eb90683b4cd6955a4e80babe5a
b691aabb09a7135ff5b35104f588a745b17325d6
'2012-05-25T18:00:26-04:00'
describe
'216008' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJRV' 'sip-files00233.jp2'
17f63bb5829bce617ddfc897123c8a3d
018dc8156d1b64e1a994158199854d9a840a7c68
'2012-05-25T18:11:10-04:00'
describe
'208582' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJRW' 'sip-files00234.jp2'
92ffc86e28be9fd85ae919a637a492f4
ef0184bd8c63dc3832823ee3de019dfbe95e65c4
describe
'230609' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJRX' 'sip-files00235.jp2'
21bac0bf9f0bb3f620f90c0a3544fe84
ca9c20130cdbdf36827df99fbabfa133cd1def93
'2012-05-25T18:00:22-04:00'
describe
'217998' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJRY' 'sip-files00236.jp2'
dfaf15c2f89e9a4480332f6de80922db
cd7b43781a0f3430a6b5ad423d23632365a2092f
describe
'219207' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJRZ' 'sip-files00237.jp2'
ffe96122dd71dd40c38c91d19afaf882
547568fa537c0e1ad43f5b6fbef63b66c8387de9
describe
'227250' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJSA' 'sip-files00239.jp2'
49fda757f3af7cad6191fb6c0a8275ed
bf23f42f8f2b417b93604d4e3df9ed0c5106a182
describe
'209926' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJSB' 'sip-files00240.jp2'
8fa93c86d5789347a7855387e5534460
35c2d6e10f17c2aa8277160173b184ee59a4c47f
'2012-05-25T18:10:40-04:00'
describe
'247691' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJSC' 'sip-files00243.jp2'
0b07d7b523619aa35db2d611d03ab605
4e9d990f808c73c50470829010c8519f12bd5e8a
'2012-05-25T18:03:53-04:00'
describe
'220188' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJSD' 'sip-files00244.jp2'
d485581218953b48193ab456382705b4
43dfa59d35610bcffcb82a5104909241be220d2e
describe
'217426' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJSE' 'sip-files00245.jp2'
2d02de6fdce045e8cbc8a4e47031921c
ea48043e0652094ebec5e51ae57cea12a63867d2
describe
'210965' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJSF' 'sip-files00247.jp2'
111b45025a2dc2f30253322f94a99882
5042670ed09448dd606847fe7a9df9af0a74d494
describe
'212437' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJSG' 'sip-files00248.jp2'
cc862b5ad19ed51ccee34e6c13e5448e
3795f93646e6bafc84b4320f972f563454f2d446
'2012-05-25T18:03:51-04:00'
describe
'217314' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJSH' 'sip-files00251.jp2'
83ac1c0b40b098b2d0754b4fc325e649
eb139e5c39ac1990ff1cc1b9bdd55b86188bfbc2
describe
'227402' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJSI' 'sip-files00252.jp2'
6f988e1ca556ae6a13debfa127f70694
985b2b8fc685b34d374d3219d6f2ea337073d52a
describe
'227368' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJSJ' 'sip-files00253.jp2'
97b130e58bf9bd92b307cbfd2a356891
43933c50443973c521048e1b3598603cda68feb4
describe
'239658' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJSK' 'sip-files00255.jp2'
4e9e408833bb4e86086918afe1e3ef8d
197f0bd79f99dcad0bc0321252e1dc2d8ccd5d4a
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJSL' 'sip-files00256.jp2'
8a1d20529cc7a3ead6c79785dd5aa5c2
296ca695e72f4b52ba38d817d5a0ec48f2d2ae46
describe
'84409' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJSM' 'sip-files00258.jp2'
2d5b5c9a053fe34aa96bf706f9ec39a3
edc86494635d88a7255c8e2f27310d70785cf5d2
describe
'5723' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJSN' 'sip-files00260.jp2'
38a1e4ce55a23935b8467fa3d51271fe
7ca0bab10fc5de1e7a6e6521b685c1553437a2a3
describe
'224040' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJSO' 'sip-files00262.jp2'
7bc58f6139eef3c8f92a0f044d552859
b6db5972dbb1ddc15042d09c749becbc6bc921b2
describe
'223138' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJSP' 'sip-files00265.jp2'
0cee2d0b87d9b46c71132e4899dc9124
5c3a8fc5a9a0cb508eb4e48b4641529144ce30ee
'2012-05-25T18:06:39-04:00'
describe
'228889' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJSQ' 'sip-files00266.jp2'
b571f0f21f4ab58cb309f16df5c5a793
f175289712c752a3d511cb134e472dc7c8f868c6
describe
'219762' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJSR' 'sip-files00267.jp2'
0cffa3771b481abaf8bc02a8a689ccc0
cb6be8874cc0dd918f3dc043774d6ac1ec2fae27
describe
'225596' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJSS' 'sip-files00268.jp2'
22a045ceb349e6b1f1292f4da1984eea
919873a28692b5711929337485483587b3004948
'2012-05-25T18:09:49-04:00'
describe
'217565' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJST' 'sip-files00269.jp2'
698768d8be00010acd6fa23d21f00e91
3a39525af865d49700b167b62c78ff7f40a36102
describe
'215721' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJSU' 'sip-files00271.jp2'
3e81ff8675ce6b28013214086cd92089
a4d55b1ca9a438a261df76aa1c06543d3b4ad3b8
describe
'87010' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJSV' 'sip-files00273.jp2'
8107a10569422b1cef2d559d524c143d
2d55b098e4f4f3c713adc8861bcb53b47647b016
'2012-05-25T18:00:04-04:00'
describe
'5630' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJSW' 'sip-files00274.jp2'
4d1b360c43fc901ba9e0ad9e8369a4e0
713c3cf8e27d47f1ef58f42bef422be021052872
describe
'274108' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJSX' 'sip-files00275.jp2'
2ed7329171dcd7f5724982aa4de37345
9d6c07cf42d61be3e8e0da5783c695ac522e409b
describe
'223347' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJSY' 'sip-files00278.jp2'
c5316f232343e08ba2bc660774f3bc58
3ca54a8dc1f91a82a76c6cd51a29f7d00941889b
'2012-05-25T18:11:26-04:00'
describe
'206001' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJSZ' 'sip-files00280.jp2'
5fcaa93901369ef82fee5bdff6d3e4ac
0ad042094614887f61fb365a48ebf72c4ffb190a
'2012-05-25T18:05:20-04:00'
describe
'210135' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJTA' 'sip-files00281.jp2'
3bf38bbba3c3ecbae4a2ca1db49c5416
e7405d0d00db1190acd79eb13a441e942a79817e
describe
'208299' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJTB' 'sip-files00283.jp2'
d7b85935cd35de38d2d8a14768ebb826
092d1ee2391dc7c540c9e2312d6d86bd7161de31
'2012-05-25T18:03:28-04:00'
describe
'219169' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJTC' 'sip-files00285.jp2'
f5528c8b553a42b24e2a2ee37582049d
5b03a0a8c373e64947d0dce20400222da5512ae5
describe
'213410' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJTD' 'sip-files00286.jp2'
5cc6151b5297e21d4dd353ea30fc1ed3
912fc2fedb9bb7864f2deb694d051398cc4d2f64
describe
'219569' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJTE' 'sip-files00287.jp2'
0e4af40ae2da4aa9d85d2daeb2322467
d20cce67620a60061f940b3056a3a0d1b2999ad1
describe
'223562' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJTF' 'sip-files00288.jp2'
027da7700be96293f62ff6eda96a0c2d
10ce113f11aff37116db1770dd74d527c9c8be93
describe
'210577' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJTG' 'sip-files00289.jp2'
f28ee2d4c3ff6c8552b498cb0348db5c
bb7558bbc3ac61e2c69c6eda186a5f01292cab51
'2012-05-25T17:59:56-04:00'
describe
'208720' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJTH' 'sip-files00290.jp2'
2c1ca2eb20590c2410caa473d95483b1
94355bd79485f02296656ed300b2f98ff6e39500
describe
'215330' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJTI' 'sip-files00291.jp2'
74d2ba924a39c455451c9a98499b52cc
774eea56d17347d1849ac635833917f541ac1f59
describe
'97849' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJTJ' 'sip-files00293.jp2'
5821b71bee5ab090e7df29f287232a0c
bd22e4a3802e7003a4b1470256e2045b7ceaef0b
describe
'5710' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJTK' 'sip-files00294.jp2'
54d8d18546a7d793c060607833d3a78e
2cb5ffcdf64d9e27290db26aa21f53fdfae5bd9e
describe
'223357' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJTL' 'sip-files00296.jp2'
07f795fdea6d6a102cb8810134388770
d513017b363290e50b69e035d90ff162b0d4ca0a
'2012-05-25T18:05:05-04:00'
describe
'216940' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJTM' 'sip-files00298.jp2'
6baf0d2d40b8702021c17cbb25c9cb6b
3fc73b542045730dcee3354027fd32e0413456d8
describe
'218231' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJTN' 'sip-files00299.jp2'
16b088f042ac461245c14134c4e2ce5c
d3d91161bb4c391718f8ffba7740ed4676c7b0eb
describe
'210532' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJTO' 'sip-files00300.jp2'
c12927a2e28939deb71a07a8e96912e3
aa182e391bcae4d337cef614f3105fd48ffcfbb9
describe
'222561' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJTP' 'sip-files00302.jp2'
022897a5562eceeec60a2584ae28462e
dc837a5158b47843bde1e4bba1d41cc24e5fd9fc
describe
'217127' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJTQ' 'sip-files00304.jp2'
8164393a75a288ffb17953c43c11f422
91bc8363757061beea8272d48d532d4aa071704c
describe
'1687569' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJTR' 'sip-files00305.jp2'
32d4b4e64d8b201de8aa07761997ab8b
3f6e63cbc4df14cb759eb4e020c34d1c740532de
describe
'219820' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJTS' 'sip-files00307.jp2'
360b50186a452cd638a3db4f7cd8df46
ce51d691300cd4a559c2fa423432bc59d8f82880
describe
'222877' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJTT' 'sip-files00308.jp2'
18a8745ba304c29bb5911ce3876c3d07
18b3e357fd9103d3aa8ffc19095b7713cd7d8c41
describe
'205692' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJTU' 'sip-files00309.jp2'
92a775b3597fc36a545ed76c51a43110
a470caa8517661d56c5b89099153e8761e0b5668
'2012-05-25T18:06:26-04:00'
describe
'215775' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJTV' 'sip-files00311.jp2'
45ad6a522764b5d1a4b9a5e019f06875
fca13cf2019d072f09e44061aec1f826ec9e18e6
describe
'278018' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJTW' 'sip-files00314.jp2'
79ac8cca45755bdc2bbdbbd39fb64fd1
cd87aa4a61ea3ae336d12a7bc910643bfc52ee79
describe
'228684' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJTX' 'sip-files00315.jp2'
b390d167c68eb0d84cc4b59873a23ce5
840209813c1749a2f2878c2af5f7ccf2eb2e4b4e
describe
'248705' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJTY' 'sip-files00317.jp2'
417568a6f1f68c127602ba771a4a500e
c92b95b5cc4be7d55b235e251a28a7a8d0405732
describe
'225074' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJTZ' 'sip-files00318.jp2'
701cf54b51edd05464d676ce257f17e5
b9e2cea7d6756503f7984b7ff21ad7064cebe373
describe
'247577' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJUA' 'sip-files00319.jp2'
be2da7ca8340e3f5496a52b8eb5fcd17
415c0df570e12e9b574df2fee574fec11687d975
'2012-05-25T18:04:32-04:00'
describe
'253644' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJUB' 'sip-files00320.jp2'
5cfdcf50084ad7c118c30ab1daa096a3
d1621ff9276c71519c824678c0a4103ad9850fcf
describe
'1483435' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJUC' 'sip-files00323.jp2'
5dcfa3ed99a58865231f5a24a988a262
7ee931af5cac5736f27d3d9ad505d9fcf27ab3c6
'2012-05-25T18:08:33-04:00'
describe
'1476353' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJUD' 'sip-files00324.jp2'
e16f4fcb6316214093f512ff7381a75d
cda0a4620ff4a56b049392a58ce46c700fdf3068
describe
'107017' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJUE' 'sip-files00325.jp2'
65c84a13965021b567fe0c8ef9c12657
ed46541757ddd8ecfd7130e9b6ecb71ae5887d0d
describe
'33346884' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJUF' 'sip-files00001.tif'
a0b59508af1da790da933948b493fdfa
7afb061f71bf4b288dcfc9623b35f5b0e3268b7f
'2012-05-25T18:04:14-04:00'
describe
'1697552' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJUG' 'sip-files00003.tif'
774b4d0b1299cc66ee7164a139ef3bdc
78bb486c1982ee5401a9b6aeb1d31499ed830998
'2012-05-25T18:08:49-04:00'
describe
'40517952' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJUH' 'sip-files00009.tif'
abc1dc2c1ec51dc2baaf85d6c9690a08
06b4c2108ac1a60b6f33f576e586813476d1497e
'2012-05-25T18:02:20-04:00'
describe
'1703324' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJUI' 'sip-files00011.tif'
bbe881d127d1a9e4bdf9e869df9786f7
f2f4f5a698e048ad5617e915c7e9c64816e70f69
describe
'1703748' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJUJ' 'sip-files00012.tif'
16355e55567a202e8d396f98204a6c27
17deae5792e232755ee9c8a4a52084f3885f34ee
describe
'1702352' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJUK' 'sip-files00013.tif'
ba325f71c5fc882d87c4f8e616c944b9
ff06861de7c5bd2ee0e75f44c30dcf73a2b0c113
describe
'1700960' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJUL' 'sip-files00015.tif'
94d8d013a45a5869d5a48378b42a2f85
2a5839fa440caa56b352823d2c5b0ecb18e92bda
'2012-05-25T18:11:12-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJUM' 'sip-files00016.tif'
63bd935385f37ded7cb27807d02e1f92
0e888b084586648f400bb932153ed2cc54afc160
describe
'1697432' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJUN' 'sip-files00017.tif'
843e1c33e1646f93dd3254b2d3ecb473
6e5746aa66b8b92d58ee1827b23ed7f0cc97bad0
describe
'1662348' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJUO' 'sip-files00019.tif'
e8cde8caa1e78abdcbc795b664f3cdf0
b933db10f8e55e866c3a309f2f628a4bf5116c52
describe
'1744384' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJUP' 'sip-files00021.tif'
85a47cdf9f49b3a9b4d2375a7b12e73d
acd07571c7d32c2f8c5e5e59a7f4713cec254a61
describe
'1704524' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJUQ' 'sip-files00022.tif'
9567779eec4e0e80ab0cdae493019298
659bcb971913db50326145dcde963e527be4af8e
describe
'1697828' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJUR' 'sip-files00024.tif'
2e9f8dc2dca01f84f3fc1386373cdfb1
b0960f06a7cd76e5c6b8d58879ae0353a07c60a3
'2012-05-25T18:06:32-04:00'
describe
'1697312' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJUS' 'sip-files00025.tif'
6bd7e73f29edc05bd6911e9d722a7f88
ac5bc6f9c804558402e3eb26afcbe32518c7db81
describe
'1703824' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJUT' 'sip-files00027.tif'
6131eb1e744b45a35a054877d640533a
7505490bab50a550f850c8e2ff4a4c5ce9c68dfc
'2012-05-25T18:09:04-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJUU' 'sip-files00029.tif'
5d699922a0ee91ae3d8a22e681ab1f23
e897eb3023c7a340d425c08b1761722f1439efbe
'2012-05-25T18:05:32-04:00'
describe
'1704348' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJUV' 'sip-files00032.tif'
8a0b0ea1d646ea2c18f4a8001f4982e1
03e8d92a716c269038175ba69c3a6f7e6ec37ba6
describe
'1704840' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJUW' 'sip-files00033.tif'
152c9623b0e460b870680f1ff70ec82d
16242c295a66d84810862229afb5c5607c83bfa8
describe
'1704156' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJUX' 'sip-files00034.tif'
81430e56f8d57ed43faf1eabc921b255
37c7ac98ccad91bb674872328f4efed44a92f71b
describe
'1704692' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJUY' 'sip-files00035.tif'
47fcd769561c63ab27e2011274174640
378d6b9ac76a2c42d403734632ac32d9c9c129be
describe
'1704944' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJUZ' 'sip-files00036.tif'
2d6b811434f3d974e5996a3b00ecc37d
d6f1f305b56036e6192f3cf0e32a8dd0d0c289c2
describe
'1704700' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJVA' 'sip-files00037.tif'
7c5fa468f57f4da8dd2298868c7b90b7
de4418f03504d29ca708b003b5b4565a3785640e
describe
'1703652' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJVB' 'sip-files00041.tif'
543cf5e8b750a9da43e0a356eb68db02
9cc5c9d1216599953687552cdaee2f7e0188d7ac
describe
'1704336' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJVC' 'sip-files00043.tif'
54855100273d5f504693d9ccbc004ae7
5d3debba5d940ca9ecb31340f9c4fd36f7818d5e
describe
'1704308' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJVD' 'sip-files00044.tif'
ce757d3f596562c98113e344fdb51255
3048f60b4f7073bc60570ed09a27f0253517a8a7
describe
'1704380' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJVE' 'sip-files00045.tif'
b1f54d04939dfefe375cfd05b2c7a6b6
78cae2c220bd11ca36fe9ed288eb1c8f363ee325
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJVF' 'sip-files00047.tif'
58cc2d316c56a970aa759a7b86bc0a9a
9f71c2688140810496be5d3359cea246ca285270
describe
'1704548' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJVG' 'sip-files00048.tif'
a20ed25535e28e55a4a6a4863ce7a416
4d59489018da34594faac1cbde44148e733d66f6
describe
'40519224' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJVH' 'sip-files00049.tif'
f1f242ad95895e0288d4344a08c741d3
4f5d9c7e4bcdd4afe4aaba5e452d3575f768fb23
describe
'1703976' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJVI' 'sip-files00051.tif'
8cd9dee85f0f2728774b9f25c0d3c1e6
d0a24fed52e828b3f32a4b4339b676cf09efb14d
'2012-05-25T18:00:25-04:00'
describe
'1695560' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJVJ' 'sip-files00052.tif'
cf74f32fe7460d263d2588908ad29265
60a89a770316acc78a482df34eac8fa82a2fc901
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJVK' 'sip-files00054.tif'
b3cd8de675acd4a4d48e832c0b0b608a
d9991da1129d5b18c055c65e1d56a56afcc9f6c6
describe
'1704768' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJVL' 'sip-files00055.tif'
9fd43fd0c8a472e820504efeae1ae25f
766a2da841933f22abf221ef506e983a7b4870e9
describe
'1704360' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJVM' 'sip-files00057.tif'
fc17a990af0fd18eca3123b7598b3521
7a015629a2e959a63512b5423f94118c7ed7ed8c
'2012-05-25T18:05:43-04:00'
describe
'1704320' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJVN' 'sip-files00058.tif'
52d8000b2dcf85be49ab3f70fb5ccc59
aef6932d7e69224b558f124acff14964f135dc13
describe
'1700084' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJVO' 'sip-files00062.tif'
3c5e5248b93a647fa2cb8c75ef02fbb8
cb2cd8835ee8cf2c29ccef06a7d9d0d3b384ded0
describe
'1697212' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJVP' 'sip-files00065.tif'
949041170b2205ee850ef7219992f9ce
8d995dc4ea2e389b27fcf57a467f72b91d82ff8d
'2012-05-25T18:04:06-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJVQ' 'sip-files00066.tif'
3ef1f63ad7daae91ea4ad16b3ad20fed
d5d9bb2e43a99dc6437fa540db0107603b05858e
describe
'1704728' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJVR' 'sip-files00068.tif'
1b741c3491a47b945264c0bee56c9bf0
ff942d0d5d7bb84066e81b9a2fd3b1a67c089b53
'2012-05-25T18:06:04-04:00'
describe
'40514360' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJVS' 'sip-files00069.tif'
0e290d22a849681ecf3b54f45d6bd4d2
6a1c63b7c1c4a8b2fb1231a9d78290dda33fac91
describe
'1705388' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJVT' 'sip-files00071.tif'
f190690e0d31e1215c131110365f76e3
38462d5adfaf897eea1a631dc2c87738978aa9a4
describe
'1704660' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJVU' 'sip-files00072.tif'
473bb17f18ab5a2fb1eda2eaf757b5d0
90dc549345d8e1c0260f07a7d973083ac1bb0d4f
describe
'1690964' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJVV' 'sip-files00073.tif'
ccb2e526764a548b12e7366e37695c25
9399d83fe766d868e6c886e93e277b8ff589d3b2
describe
'1705052' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJVW' 'sip-files00074.tif'
527b02f9114d2bc8b6ed589e8a1d12f4
73975e8e75d0cd938b2669b6890b98926cc3f391
describe
'1704152' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJVX' 'sip-files00075.tif'
edea3b0149f9824c86ba925bde9760bc
52c8d2f4e1338dbbd18d338d215e3b8c8ba37324
describe
'1704832' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJVY' 'sip-files00076.tif'
623413e923d344157a5d508799297e79
edaf256f04e4a3ff3c164e73892148e410e4e3cc
'2012-05-25T18:09:03-04:00'
describe
'1695636' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJVZ' 'sip-files00077.tif'
6c13582b01ab63e0ea012550970d7f4c
b8173f51d274cf24e32844b329cdd87b11812be9
describe
'1704936' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJWA' 'sip-files00078.tif'
022a7565a93c2b6dfb0ed5948da51336
5cdc0e7f53d23e8f82b7a85e211ee51d9328d2cd
describe
'1704440' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJWB' 'sip-files00079.tif'
fb429a8acd95a3d3b5b5df5a4dc3b884
61ceb633c88aadfd97f461de200c25faa27c5ae3
describe
'1703308' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJWC' 'sip-files00081.tif'
2144d02bc1f37341832f776572d64094
a4585069ad07ab0b573ee4b142f0f6d23d7a4e2c
describe
'1704860' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJWD' 'sip-files00082.tif'
c6205573e29f64b433a6fdea79ac5b36
1daf13fa1ff961a3e11e9b8649a6919d84e6f540
describe
'1701100' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJWE' 'sip-files00083.tif'
ae476818210793821c76d2bc03e6bdd8
7bdb9bfee63d73b0b02392789acf2a41f17e54b3
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJWF' 'sip-files00084.tif'
fef5adc507c3bf0fb0650cebcd8e73b7
1114972c968937552bfc22f7854d6172f75af39b
'2012-05-25T18:07:58-04:00'
describe
'1697300' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJWG' 'sip-files00085.tif'
de400517e9690b599b496410cbec90d9
197619af86e42a1fdeaa2ad42913598c0fc91972
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJWH' 'sip-files00086.tif'
bec1ea322f32e41f307d946b243e6371
a0833902535718fe1f138f8fe326ee186e18de49
describe
'1703240' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJWI' 'sip-files00087.tif'
75e27b04f3c5d3f27a603f78ca35a34d
3648d4176e4aa4cd738ac11660b795ae59ab7102
'2012-05-25T18:04:00-04:00'
describe
'1704220' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJWJ' 'sip-files00089.tif'
2da825d702e24c8128a19c35c1bf8296
fcb1f4cccff2d58441a2729580c55b1b85c43dc2
'2012-05-25T18:11:19-04:00'
describe
'1704952' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJWK' 'sip-files00092.tif'
33e368e62df82adb43cd77a044aaa236
fe2d599b29c952edd72e85c0c0caf31e509915ca
'2012-05-25T18:00:00-04:00'
describe
'1704776' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJWL' 'sip-files00096.tif'
3da2bfe2b3402504bbe64ee0571a36a3
f1503a436076a48808c72ca2383147ee690ac29f
'2012-05-25T18:10:28-04:00'
describe
'1695404' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJWM' 'sip-files00097.tif'
f07184e3beec44d6a7dff33485d72a21
6aac126f80ad70b9144e82444dfee9c136eea021
'2012-05-25T18:09:36-04:00'
describe
'1704844' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJWN' 'sip-files00098.tif'
4801515051faacd5b223dd2a84949d40
2d5c36e9a842281538ad21aa32c58edecd04ca19
'2012-05-25T18:01:48-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJWO' 'sip-files00100.tif'
4a901298bfb3f7316ada2ea42a5acdcc
2fdaca49c2ea4631c185d862d7d9f19646fd6f7d
describe
'1702044' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJWP' 'sip-files00101.tif'
12f36395e25ffec8a5daa807882004b4
0d6abe2bc5ca7b6d6966d53481d6c0cc5455f39d
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJWQ' 'sip-files00102.tif'
ee738920f22eb0a18717682caf2d11b3
ac0f606a21cfb5615669d68cf20d149c702eb308
'2012-05-25T18:07:14-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJWR' 'sip-files00104.tif'
e5682d32a20925fce5dd4fee392b6d27
4801833a04726c6b7a386969c194fad398c28732
describe
'1703284' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJWS' 'sip-files00105.tif'
b2232ddd2c13fe1654b4d86d4a9dc4e5
6783c32efe817754fce2cc2b5306349ec035ae39
'2012-05-25T18:08:26-04:00'
describe
'1704716' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJWT' 'sip-files00106.tif'
64fa289bb0dec47f111efc70401053b3
460e0a1b841c309a78e7c9f3c6542f7cc8c358df
'2012-05-25T18:09:51-04:00'
describe
'1703828' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJWU' 'sip-files00107.tif'
c7ba3b64690979ef7f4c06218aeea0e4
cadb44fc253409438690e64dc6e3c8a26b60e66b
'2012-05-25T18:03:19-04:00'
describe
'1704988' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJWV' 'sip-files00108.tif'
59d8db80ee5dd8cb049318f887a8e053
f9b12470c8a94ae30880590a67827bb9b00c79fa
describe
'1704496' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJWW' 'sip-files00110.tif'
38d58c586039c472d0eb4e47deabb3bc
70aa611fb790ff9319c08866aa8193c3f70e9648
describe
'1704504' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJWX' 'sip-files00111.tif'
6942f0a148b420a474b56136b630c8ab
4d5a727713f9f78a3e6e15fbf718a50c20b62b45
'2012-05-25T18:09:37-04:00'
describe
'1705276' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJWY' 'sip-files00112.tif'
749d8143a4020754565dcf52b6dbcaf0
1d38c40eb3cafacc8f0114f442aaab1c60ac48f9
describe
'1671444' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJWZ' 'sip-files00113.tif'
e8542edb6e3fb83473c2d2a892524414
3e1d8245364efd0cb8fac04007599a3bdd404380
'2012-05-25T18:00:01-04:00'
describe
'1705004' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJXA' 'sip-files00114.tif'
dfca033221f6d6ebdc70764ee272ac97
23daeca5079ba6196602d0cf001bca758ae1dcf3
'2012-05-25T18:03:37-04:00'
describe
'1704900' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJXB' 'sip-files00117.tif'
41e959dc5090662b52c2ed0ad87870a8
f51dfe5e8b84ad9a532ee1c122d8e5b6539b5891
describe
'1663868' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJXC' 'sip-files00119.tif'
a501bfa641e062eb28e70a2be7913cda
9406b7b89524aed46f2e3a7ec7dd5d3107480da6
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJXD' 'sip-files00120.tif'
ed9e5794a779da3d7b74723c904e1632
d3bff00ebbfa3ae0c16f6528c1fee35205ad5139
describe
'1701752' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJXE' 'sip-files00121.tif'
31509e693137cdb2ee58c57c37bc2f9f
5daa7b92d298616948b1cdbaf643a65c0e205db4
'2012-05-25T18:09:18-04:00'
describe
'1697832' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJXF' 'sip-files00123.tif'
3040c0e9abea3264cbe541bb6b9923b4
887c9d254517933c6408645f0d62f8a371bae04b
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJXG' 'sip-files00124.tif'
e055a36372da40310c862aa64fecea27
d863883e6e69a3fee5360d232d3fdc66a1d4f6f3
describe
'1705556' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJXH' 'sip-files00128.tif'
f3d6c489b50507705d813d3604e2840e
57781506ad349ce479abd87d47820e8662535d9c
describe
'1690976' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJXI' 'sip-files00129.tif'
a37b65044ca71217e675473b4e7dfb91
6e137ed5ae9b4b0e4a8fe9314fa291779d87414e
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJXJ' 'sip-files00130.tif'
c1501dc33de340f7ce84943039e05607
2b747071f3e9c0418772411cb23714ec3b598eec
describe
'1667380' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJXK' 'sip-files00131.tif'
b2777361d4ffbb9f8ab42ac3f504dd89
47da663c6cd7329b21baf1d8d5c9ffd702dc6736
describe
'1705300' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJXL' 'sip-files00134.tif'
1cacdabd3f9a5b1831e2420c0f4794b3
fc51eede37dc4e1411a7b93a86cec1424d17b9d4
describe
'1641604' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJXM' 'sip-files00135.tif'
c9b82ff21b33377c0926b70e3b5df05a
00e1de7ca0b0ec32b650e067e1d9211c75540ba9
describe
'1683280' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJXN' 'sip-files00137.tif'
489a790ce6fc5236d30b2964b4b1465c
2fd51ffbfbe7767c354bc91e350819e29dc10720
'2012-05-25T18:07:52-04:00'
describe
'1704048' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJXO' 'sip-files00139.tif'
e4a772ff53190bb3864a84a2362d9d42
3b485cfb7681dbe6e036cf142ac2a57724e0ae42
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJXP' 'sip-files00141.tif'
919692f300c7da5981559291d6a0cdff
080e01183c375ef299620e45f9d2522bd1a2dcf1
'2012-05-25T18:09:44-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJXQ' 'sip-files00142.tif'
7efeab534c7b3b90a86cae2bb22292e9
af788af4a3a7fb76f5647becf2bbd9168cab9cb4
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJXR' 'sip-files00144.tif'
af8fd5efc8730def9aa799c31708ab03
a894dedbffc74dc6294feb27d47961bb682e4daf
'2012-05-25T18:08:10-04:00'
describe
'1704384' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJXS' 'sip-files00145.tif'
cf864d8915cd04009da99545d6b07fdf
185e6a5cddcdc0e5cc45c649dca46c35e1eaa7a4
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJXT' 'sip-files00146.tif'
01c704e170b6eb3d8fa162cef894d44a
189c4f78bb7dc4431ea6080b0b25b76b4de6d84c
describe
'1705476' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJXU' 'sip-files00148.tif'
f94a4d70a9b9ba0a6ae4cfd2e0db9f08
39d5f54526600c29e3f80effec7b70f3d602e0f2
'2012-05-25T18:07:49-04:00'
describe
'1622104' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJXV' 'sip-files00149.tif'
d4a54c2f8837e0c10a87532e893d477e
ea1ac5d5e3cf6b121ce60fd9975875b581429ced
describe
'1705416' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJXW' 'sip-files00150.tif'
65c4ceed2c15ebda787b44f8996d7e8e
20e7f7932c35f7798359b77d919b78e02dfdda29
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJXX' 'sip-files00151.tif'
5a7c516c7503e5ce26a70c05611a5066
c255727f056de2d04ac5a27ec766b26b1fcb4656
'2012-05-25T18:09:06-04:00'
describe
'1705560' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJXY' 'sip-files00152.tif'
f405208137e376e3e20841e03809c65d
d681382f543608073ad8d9828d7b3a9defeb1239
'2012-05-25T18:11:18-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJXZ' 'sip-files00154.tif'
f43a83ab551e6275f735b2398a8f616f
12d1d64a57e81001cccda1e3a6c73f5d427a16ac
describe
'1705588' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJYA' 'sip-files00156.tif'
b7ed9b727dbf2ee0df954cc12f578c6a
9abe9b4d36313a0faf61e606911f461641e88685
describe
'1705440' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJYB' 'sip-files00157.tif'
36c8ec9e9e3cfea739eb944f7ae02919
2fafa197483a0e38792be5a3e272050233bd7a66
'2012-05-25T18:01:33-04:00'
describe
'1704992' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJYC' 'sip-files00158.tif'
1b805271b4a084126f8b33dfd1706616
fd9db5828ff6b6f95091d78d1fe88ae878e1ffe5
describe
'1678296' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJYD' 'sip-files00160.tif'
867f676637362f91a861f70478ada10c
0f593d5475bb77b449b303719e4575194ea5b99c
describe
'1705684' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJYE' 'sip-files00161.tif'
a6ab907d78f703c05c6812af1717c886
eded446cb874a440bcc5d57d382368f940d6cb30
describe
'1699496' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJYF' 'sip-files00162.tif'
8465fe4342f0c77bcc3c349fae74e7a6
5fdc36424684e72fb262ba2e31e7379d85b087ad
describe
'1697468' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJYG' 'sip-files00163.tif'
f58cd752c43d831e00cdb3ee51880e8d
4a65a65c03337bfb4ec1aa7fe917dd018e3ce4bc
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJYH' 'sip-files00164.tif'
0481e666fee2eeb8a4ea3cd23958ad46
a48ea2f4be38e8fb17ca5cbe4d1639dbd105393c
describe
'1704052' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJYI' 'sip-files00165.tif'
8fe86d4a54f745991e318c3fc8a48431
9105fc78d81229ab4de6173df18cd6ffa4e2d1c4
'2012-05-25T18:09:40-04:00'
describe
'1731496' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJYJ' 'sip-files00166.tif'
2e904e47f67fa48e1461ac815dad0b50
ff804380e9ec1ad5a2413cfa3fe17052a5339cd7
describe
'1705836' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJYK' 'sip-files00167.tif'
b25181bad4d3c605cad7da745c239119
7ffdaf2010b3e50e06eb0dd22846b16502eea89f
describe
'1705320' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJYL' 'sip-files00168.tif'
0f9fda19f85f1d4ba8d15b218eb6183f
6988b5f4fa37f7109305473ab79adb5c3aecb2d3
describe
'1659184' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJYM' 'sip-files00170.tif'
0a094a6c629ae78d037f8e61146e6142
765d399d9362d0ecf6042496e43c6f65dbe40c20
describe
'1705196' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJYN' 'sip-files00171.tif'
17dfbaf9c69419df9d04b2cc0e152469
7961818c6a6225ee0adbcee249999825fdb1e5e1
describe
'1705608' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJYO' 'sip-files00172.tif'
5f34e18ac998659c9afdc37efab0abc3
59fa583b74664b96710672b0d9dab828ef483cb2
'2012-05-25T18:02:46-04:00'
describe
'1705372' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJYP' 'sip-files00173.tif'
23cc43c56814cb8eeb2976a30ba2ea18
979c21062a1770f0155704293b438134e26d2420
describe
'1705000' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJYQ' 'sip-files00174.tif'
d02904b02ab33d9577360080e5ce5cca
0e5b1ab2dfd8f5bd49d9e64e0c144621a6c117f7
'2012-05-25T18:07:46-04:00'
describe
'1704584' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJYR' 'sip-files00175.tif'
d023f15b856da28234ed95dea86b2030
945750abdf6bb449817f51a1bcb8afccdce60dc1
describe
'1657640' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJYS' 'sip-files00177.tif'
25cf18ec7b6fcf5eff5f9b3f6e5d01a3
4e7dd2f8676a180daed075ac3b9c1ce64afde2d2
describe
'1704664' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJYT' 'sip-files00180.tif'
60807cb9691c768be9ef674861bcdb6c
3fcc099dc46f5127ca2a8296cc5925bfe01bef0f
describe
'1704848' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJYU' 'sip-files00181.tif'
54130a2bf8fdd8107cf0626ec85902f6
893af7233eeeb790677708e05d547fd61b2c5e0f
describe
'1697876' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJYV' 'sip-files00182.tif'
dd0d211c2dcc16917107537ecf33e638
e9b852c88f411a447ac047e87132b6a7acae2996
describe
'1697188' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJYW' 'sip-files00183.tif'
94357385632ed4b9f478c804b245a16a
c4297faa8cdbcdca970274e84f10b4035471a50a
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJYX' 'sip-files00184.tif'
9b121330acebc3c53945d414c1e3d8b6
07d4d29422a91383c9ad2421e88489f1955053ed
describe
'1703980' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJYY' 'sip-files00185.tif'
43633c8d7b4b517a707e626ee805099a
92c2856185f4e9191b6e5f8bab542c974829ae20
describe
'1705140' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJYZ' 'sip-files00186.tif'
46b5554d98c5fdde7aa65d48237742c0
ed4a160c89b07012f5511079e7bad78cc5e847e1
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJZA' 'sip-files00187.tif'
daec7133619289910e79eaf9ae06b550
09c510ca357112fe7f1f313f415a6272f66bf46d
describe
'1705256' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJZB' 'sip-files00188.tif'
3d8d0c51e56ec1fa486a40c95f005b92
e60fb8d000eef65bf4e0f4b9ac7d2d85de498f7d
describe
'1705156' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJZC' 'sip-files00189.tif'
28acbeab8b510d486c0634d414b934ba
18d636186c14f8c253fecdde1ddee036c61ed609
describe
'1738600' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJZD' 'sip-files00194.tif'
054225b87453e2fc02719b2bc2a9ab74
7e002ad7e6eb81843df6b60b03eb4f4fe6c1bca1
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJZE' 'sip-files00196.tif'
188e9bb4cb8fbebb45be540f4c26a724
a85c56564f66dc40ea160066858ac22534dea23f
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJZF' 'sip-files00197.tif'
a0af0f674bd1a067f881b4867d7419f0
651699d4df9242f5a4ce271efd78279188aa9a39
describe
'1680120' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJZG' 'sip-files00199.tif'
81c47a8d476e158eb4d9fedce9492479
1b6eefc4128d00fda52f2bb922d895c98b18285e
describe
'1697320' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJZH' 'sip-files00201.tif'
d47bff55b58b389d5638da1e9afef7c6
d954359f36080915a346a7f9adb501ecb820d63e
'2012-05-25T18:09:22-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJZI' 'sip-files00202.tif'
ee3c2d95feff0e2405c9d81048830fae
dc051137b99be62f91db515af61fddd69a37ae96
describe
'1703948' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJZJ' 'sip-files00203.tif'
e043bc17da37669ea2ebe629274ad4a1
2a91337d5f09b759afb2b76397b341797143ccb5
describe
'1705656' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJZK' 'sip-files00208.tif'
980969611deaa37338650d5815908e75
e1562900c2de4703799ba6e7a3ec317594abf6a4
describe
'1663320' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJZL' 'sip-files00209.tif'
74b284d4bb79378a5a3f60ee5a909c30
9f7b1344f3659104fc94a3efd70b5c4e73272b68
describe
'1670328' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJZM' 'sip-files00210.tif'
0a6e681585a7a74f2e8b31ccbb646c0b
2c494351292b9e69588324b68e3b1ed93cc7b50a
'2012-05-25T18:02:29-04:00'
describe
'1678152' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJZN' 'sip-files00211.tif'
b63831b8dc718ba281bc0160060ced71
d7b9200fbd1ba5e0d07f7070f726d47fb6d68894
describe
'1705508' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJZO' 'sip-files00212.tif'
c1b5ae96533cbfe6eb6fee6a16f51aa7
1ee1507672d84ef0c953d3d5e6ab7d96ea5c4342
describe
'1705680' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJZP' 'sip-files00214.tif'
d9acd00adcc6ca1a63a7438b52a733f6
8e76296745efe9bd3d1348c705d16075a0d4a2a6
'2012-05-25T18:08:57-04:00'
describe
'1704800' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJZQ' 'sip-files00215.tif'
60eb27618cc54abf551d2bd7724de9ff
7b0ad23660d2546452ef2d3542bcacfe88536706
describe
'1664592' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJZR' 'sip-files00217.tif'
680a0c3041405eb6e82e6be379e3bf09
7807d2aeb7542a4c2216c9bcdeeb74d35258dcbb
'2012-05-25T18:07:09-04:00'
describe
'1705752' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJZS' 'sip-files00218.tif'
19208ac788b2dac327954e7b5323a9ae
35138e5511cffe30c005323ffcfb62fefe8a95de
'2012-05-25T18:07:47-04:00'
describe
'1704648' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJZT' 'sip-files00219.tif'
2a673d49ecfd5f0ea3160fc31b08dd53
52e3fce642b17f6278f2f9deb25285e42373649a
'2012-05-25T18:02:31-04:00'
describe
'1705092' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJZU' 'sip-files00220.tif'
3f1da9df522dbfdb95b01a7cdca61dd4
5468a4342ac2fad8acc0be1abedadc321d4ed05c
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJZV' 'sip-files00222.tif'
ca70f3b6e2743f4e5f24a6badee279c6
27f04f720588b7039239a938bc153f8de5b17fba
describe
'1663908' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJZW' 'sip-files00224.tif'
ef4696bed6520e0455961521210ccdc2
b511620336ff0e329df8af9dcdbc1f101e46c170
'2012-05-25T18:01:10-04:00'
describe
'1705424' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJZX' 'sip-files00226.tif'
b5c5eeaa6f67bb0f0b79564f4dafc6de
e809c271572c290fdf94f1de5f22b4f55e1ccd81
describe
'1704552' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJZY' 'sip-files00227.tif'
7d379f5aa51a0b68128e714f0d397893
cd0bceb9009374aeb7cfd0f44587554311d3ae5c
'2012-05-25T18:07:19-04:00'
describe
'1705692' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABJZZ' 'sip-files00228.tif'
aa988e98f059c888a0b3a231b1257676
20694bbe956164031d68526988dced63dd02edc7
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKAA' 'sip-files00229.tif'
8b6ae0394bb55983e8e63eb6f92ae489
463c8a1150c8f0262cef08e50ca0c372391cb96b
describe
'1705660' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKAB' 'sip-files00230.tif'
eff8816c49827ce14e7e43fe415021bf
01b12009857ec78ecf499a17dcc774fa8dd3b4d1
describe
'1704416' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKAC' 'sip-files00231.tif'
38b30367ffdf10e417ca8b6c2c0ea20b
c37ded64318d238bbfed7af64cf9c6686fb83651
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKAD' 'sip-files00232.tif'
eb22f4cb1eb3b3544fa1284ecc90dc86
d05e2a5ddf57245d099d5b29b1aaa7b971b674c9
describe
'1705216' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKAE' 'sip-files00234.tif'
51cf79ea08d52010c673ddd1ae45d102
31856a30b2880bf978d6cbf41100972477e5098c
describe
'1705288' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKAF' 'sip-files00235.tif'
ab5cd0b086e015e324ccbd1ec907ae9a
3e04b215cb51af691af408e0b1a5c876a85ccf55
describe
'1704712' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKAG' 'sip-files00237.tif'
007d24cf53df6557ded96da9301cf7d9
e2762bd4892f9de899fdb44381190083893a60c0
describe
'1704984' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKAH' 'sip-files00238.tif'
2b04f5ba5b2e54554cd5eabd1f2c734c
8d9de3df67ccd476440a42e4dbcaa26a245b7061
describe
'1704764' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKAI' 'sip-files00240.tif'
be4f2b597542c5ff3e16d50e4112626d
7f9c71fbded0de7c8f45ce03053ed6a1bba8acf3
'2012-05-25T18:01:43-04:00'
describe
'1697908' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKAJ' 'sip-files00241.tif'
e38001d10f5b7cb94b40809ce3bbfd39
575c6fe7fe02b9113c7f1512a2c01b554beaafd5
'2012-05-25T18:01:19-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKAK' 'sip-files00242.tif'
c2acf0abf905e4b0f5ec28b54a5108f6
234f1ddbd4e6084a35ceccbf2c5bcb4019f4f093
'2012-05-25T18:03:18-04:00'
describe
'1704140' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKAL' 'sip-files00243.tif'
5eb009a1dc2ab0d4d4e30e1a61ad5c36
768b563aaeca7cbf540edc1645be00e1449d6675
describe
'1649564' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKAM' 'sip-files00245.tif'
334f551bd866f7157d9c2494106be990
e1bf48f1906ef853594bc0ed52adefec16110353
'2012-05-25T18:06:34-04:00'
describe
'1696640' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKAN' 'sip-files00248.tif'
c883ffd2b35422238619ca627ce32c78
2e4c05f26c610f9e9a21a2b3f7381d2746f8255c
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKAO' 'sip-files00249.tif'
416b01fa4ea92e7c3a08387dccf69784
84ae4bee7d21eade7c0dae7029656a38dce01d35
describe
'1696692' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKAP' 'sip-files00250.tif'
0e5fd7da3d7bb27c751e0581da0501d3
49c75ce145a579e4caeb64f91f77c5590a34b8fc
'2012-05-25T18:08:04-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKAQ' 'sip-files00254.tif'
c4c663d45873b3ca928c1af16e7aa8da
9e749b456bb99bf92cfc09a772053988f2fcd5bd
'2012-05-25T18:03:58-04:00'
describe
'1705272' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKAR' 'sip-files00255.tif'
11bc1bde31c7c924bfb8067ea2d252d2
7835ca19364cf6696f14a00ac028b5e86043d6fc
describe
'1705812' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKAS' 'sip-files00256.tif'
418f4c202ef201b6d708790e69fce91e
2d3dd4ab8f806c3d8932ccc5bc9ad1eefc67c0a3
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKAT' 'sip-files00257.tif'
967490ac94cdba4e2d85ceb8b1bd1dbf
9ecc7339b4f9990929c835e8db9461d4003d9663
describe
'1704568' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKAU' 'sip-files00261.tif'
b61937634d7e39c7a6beb01bd1758cd2
14df4a1a13ea374a1cf16b00dabee160ce08655d
describe
'1705116' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKAV' 'sip-files00263.tif'
3eb466942c3197d20131c9dfb55c12b8
06c4a7a14bc16a5970ceb229e8ebdeaa6df71e6d
'2012-05-25T18:03:16-04:00'
describe
'1678076' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKAW' 'sip-files00267.tif'
f06ec59dbe8276610524ee0364e4b32a
9e6c49a926a94a028796b939f25ec88559492f38
describe
'1731244' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKAX' 'sip-files00268.tif'
ef18ac3b22731e6533c53929207b2ea0
11c63666f12d00924dbc8b329227400c243410e7
'2012-05-25T17:59:51-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKAY' 'sip-files00270.tif'
c841f792c92193611122ae44456d0480
a19a7e33fb336507105f0434120fac08a38bae38
describe
'1691588' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKAZ' 'sip-files00272.tif'
ae5e1e3e63d36eeadcdbb41d8229cc85
d4c80ba02bdbdf5a186cf5b7174a0f38ec870b0f
'2012-05-25T18:11:34-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKBA' 'sip-files00274.tif'
5f3b4b02dc6e03a9f6b4c3edde7ae75f
3fa1a65363100b67a65537366dbb620c68194fbf
'2012-05-25T18:02:27-04:00'
describe
'1703524' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKBB' 'sip-files00275.tif'
e6b9b7700ad83f371f9ff095118a6972
36bdfa2dbeb7a8f50e7d6fee73bb53b8d6375838
describe
'1696392' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKBC' 'sip-files00276.tif'
90b6e3c0c15b059686cae6d43a163bf0
8beaf84fc50a1c203a3f64dfc0facc6abeb1c3a8
describe
'1705260' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKBD' 'sip-files00278.tif'
5fefcbb563c5a3d04766b5cd91435540
e7fac1857f7b4c9124aff487cbae664040560523
describe
'1704188' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKBE' 'sip-files00279.tif'
d5cee0e85f8c3616e9577e1303dd65aa
5460ed8bb047acb0d34143062dbbbc9202044413
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKBF' 'sip-files00280.tif'
15c0b759a57f8c89234bff3bfdfb3445
949cf5a4da774fd5ecb63d7d44a5a369a7e4d1d0
describe
'1696232' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKBG' 'sip-files00282.tif'
f176bfd0c6bf62881b68122d703a7fdb
568ed7a912b9930a724c774cf693577f21092d80
describe
'1705316' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKBH' 'sip-files00284.tif'
455c143946be297f970beaedd57a782b
ce67c669dc64350b5b839cf2fe98fe7c18538c3b
describe
'1686764' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKBI' 'sip-files00285.tif'
1a577230029cad692847f8497f5d7c10
f85e28bc269a569cd65b21f26f58cfd8ea509a0a
describe
'1704816' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKBJ' 'sip-files00287.tif'
462f7c613ac04f0a8d653ac116e695f8
110a0bba00ac8a36f60c4cd7e4c460b730f8144c
'2012-05-25T18:05:06-04:00'
describe
'1654008' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKBK' 'sip-files00288.tif'
88d203af2d8d1d882ae89ce2638f85a1
57e8393325224dff8748ee03f2e328a057dd9ea4
'2012-05-25T18:05:36-04:00'
describe
'1673796' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKBL' 'sip-files00289.tif'
cb9e8b384df7adb73e7276dd9bf5bdd0
c9f4e85ce083f1925ce3efba4ed1634e188b3330
describe
'1705028' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKBM' 'sip-files00290.tif'
41c8e2d32b121ea244b8bd2095d7309d
2a49335c9074ea41bcb65eec051bbeee4b6f358a
describe
'1698616' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKBN' 'sip-files00292.tif'
2acdccfa966c1c3654aae9a6e7af60d6
b4728e8822afd4a89b4f973dbd67530f997b044a
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKBO' 'sip-files00294.tif'
0b9985682c435c3b9b7cd3e97dfe87bd
2775bc57c88aa4069da246b286b221c2d48ee341
describe
'1703384' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKBP' 'sip-files00295.tif'
d9478a12f85d20e08abf311bfdec30de
868cd6f7938ed0ea1f524ec1f000750812103b6f
'2012-05-25T18:01:52-04:00'
describe
'1705696' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKBQ' 'sip-files00296.tif'
9cfbfb2b3ca8c7e5d7fc30d9716c7c81
c7150617eb9afdfbe3c3f35efe0e424bb89a576f
describe
'1704400' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKBR' 'sip-files00297.tif'
1c94f235279504200fa724df9cef6b0b
903eb59c5824d268968b74a9f05665ab4a73dc7c
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKBS' 'sip-files00298.tif'
296f038970b9edf2629ee6d10b5eeda5
2a7deca64a4f92bc88160a898fe351b7f9c82d94
describe
'1703676' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKBT' 'sip-files00299.tif'
5f1dbf10ca1619f8f123f11aa8adef46
b169ecbf4fc52af4d251383c73e1e7466b50ea34
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKBU' 'sip-files00300.tif'
ef25a8f859e990deb80e5aa5f5448165
59d3a897f3dcc0903513744f080dcacf7ab16a77
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKBV' 'sip-files00301.tif'
c5cef8c2348384fabc848d066a3087d3
a889e583252c0d3b9661396cf3676da9d891aac1
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKBW' 'sip-files00302.tif'
b86c0b722798a1bb205c3d3e0752aa07
4f25f9c3bd0f249b55a335c34cfd8db25c599b71
describe
'1704528' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKBX' 'sip-files00303.tif'
e153f86ef61ada4f54a4bba60f5229d2
6908ff35f5b7aaee26de4ba0647409dd79e240e5
describe
'1705360' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKBY' 'sip-files00304.tif'
df662fe5be9cc60d1d9a477c621b0241
860bd422a9be32142215e448af91ed0005e6c929
'2012-05-25T18:05:08-04:00'
describe
'40514440' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKBZ' 'sip-files00305.tif'
eba092a47c31a4ca803cc41e70fa9191
ed9a9a09e4920b27507ef51a34579f15c4f392d8
'2012-05-25T18:03:10-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKCA' 'sip-files00307.tif'
eef1fbff2e505df69fad6e59f755c6c2
063432e9972847a415faff117e011f8db8338e85
describe
'1705760' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKCB' 'sip-files00308.tif'
48617a7cb8ea49fa6a31a376359b0d50
57d72953357bcb15ad09cfe776a256d11d4b0e4e
describe
'1704324' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKCC' 'sip-files00309.tif'
ca10dd410585e3efa94d30b36c8a39ce
f47690375ef360d3509cd9287955cc1512e96af2
describe
'1729664' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKCD' 'sip-files00310.tif'
a9af78d246c3f3aaa6f2e95ff7469d72
0ea7e4d96502c1d8485a627fa7e94cd8bcf77adc
'2012-05-25T18:02:48-04:00'
describe
'1702968' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKCE' 'sip-files00312.tif'
8c84769c4cb448cf67bc7dd1b17b54b4
cc6bfdb508bfea3aa8bcc49168a607e8c4d437db
'2012-05-25T17:59:33-04:00'
describe
'1673280' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKCF' 'sip-files00313.tif'
3c3123160275613cda12b015e8ab16a3
196e44d27c384fd0ca6a85627f3ffbe29a0f9ec9
'2012-05-25T18:05:52-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKCG' 'sip-files00314.tif'
cbed12944f783e4fe944398ffdc71cac
b07a9ca9cc0741150ce6c199723cd7524ff73081
'2012-05-25T18:05:58-04:00'
describe
'1703672' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKCH' 'sip-files00317.tif'
d2cff66236db25166c420537125634cd
c9b90b0761d573c53147b03bf01e2daea51038c4
describe
'1704368' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKCI' 'sip-files00318.tif'
95146bbd73dac7caf8f4b5e05f6b08a2
7369904b9da801e7ab37e101cfd88ee7fd79fbc7
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKCJ' 'sip-files00320.tif'
8538ae20b8782d74e94a048ee6262bf3
0fd68c0d13ab33c60f310c4d656333c9d24a6120
describe
'35614240' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKCK' 'sip-files00323.tif'
731a5a4e59b01bb9ee5ff43b641a650a
7d440713a0804ca11732d52d2aa5784f65c65900
describe
'35444060' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKCL' 'sip-files00324.tif'
a62eda02b51225e0495fb33a595bfaff
8ad084ee8188d3b5ce98dc0c9fea2f6a759e29ee
describe
'2573880' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKCM' 'sip-files00325.tif'
9b36bdedc4d4e14d744a21b1b4177faa
eb2d87ec00595fe04eea9def86e999be0a8d396a
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKCN' 'sip-files00002.pro'
e0fadeee385219ba0ac62c84e9f0c6a5
386839f13fc66fad89e601065a44849674f4c898
describe
'1048' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKCO' 'sip-files00003.pro'
04a66849543bf253a0ca1bef5632e2a3
fb7cbf8839ec45e627532ece88f1a7ef3a2d6461
describe
'994' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKCP' 'sip-files00005.pro'
f8ae55bc6e101a1e640cb08a515cb807
3a3c8ad0988ada5f9e1064a83e54c1f397e2ac7a
describe
'21038' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKCQ' 'sip-files00011.pro'
574e48a3d85be4d16ead70ff1e5452f9
dde1d0e6ca35be5e6d35a98fd14c6224dd90b262
describe
'22416' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKCR' 'sip-files00013.pro'
6b167702b07cfda5e0dd0da010807827
afa545b1c176efc1c3f6741f2341307c2e7551b4
'2012-05-25T18:10:09-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKCS' 'sip-files00014.pro'
dfb943de221b257925812910bafe5197
b84b51c12a50e6893eb9162c9899a99be7ef9616
'2012-05-25T18:02:40-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKCT' 'sip-files00016.pro'
537572c0469b198e7e529002babbfdfc
6be3b41b64bca73fa49639b963c0a2df6f54527e
describe
'2277' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKCU' 'sip-files00017.pro'
47f2202983c05155af6c888702ec734e
dce7a791b72aa26f444bb749b4427111a12a7c29
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKCV' 'sip-files00018.pro'
17f8c8c5aaaf0b206c2da59a35899912
3452113977edd4a418a5afaea98f99b574706065
describe
'25853' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKCW' 'sip-files00019.pro'
8caed21f68f8ef9095cf2ae9cc1b81b9
51bc02908d293dbca97b3c33a03f858213bb2e64
describe
'41222' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKCX' 'sip-files00020.pro'
2cd5ebc25b0c426ac65bca346c56c792
43664848f25bfc64684664f609aa3de7551499ed
describe
'39655' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKCY' 'sip-files00022.pro'
76a837892d5f1287ba367670340ee23e
79d3586e3b5a19485e6c84330d9d6ca99d0566c8
describe
'39074' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKCZ' 'sip-files00023.pro'
f8bdc6e80847244ee0e990ed644889cd
c2da7a7694283805ab2e86ed74757eb146b7e542
'2012-05-25T18:07:10-04:00'
describe
'7298' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKDA' 'sip-files00024.pro'
ebbe29262b33f36db0219002ab215534
7204623e371051a6c344e7b72b08123e71dd1c7c
'2012-05-25T18:03:41-04:00'
describe
'750' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKDB' 'sip-files00026.pro'
9b140966b5bf4884bf9b19ff417efbda
86cf8314734d81c5225809c0ddd4a637d949f508
describe
'39975' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKDC' 'sip-files00029.pro'
0c8fbbc1895a50390fc678126a2865c0
1adaa9758ee0d5a433a7823ced70a91531830266
describe
'40399' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKDD' 'sip-files00033.pro'
cc0bf2f45f73cd1a9d8c9aff0427a554
8788892610c62f5a96c83b4cdcc1c2897e659613
'2012-05-25T17:59:55-04:00'
describe
'41310' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKDE' 'sip-files00035.pro'
ef55bd1fc275fa2779b35dac3ad3f7e0
ce1378fb1192ccb33f11aabeb14befa685cb0f2b
describe
'42216' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKDF' 'sip-files00036.pro'
79d73d817d69327bf1b6e36d65e4c3c4
094c4c5b76e756287f4989646859648bb7edd7a1
describe
'5735' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKDG' 'sip-files00038.pro'
2e5ff0f50723b276e24760ae20382dcc
8226e20b5f25eab8e7a8e345bdb70ab63e40bf41
describe
'3168' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKDH' 'sip-files00039.pro'
f989e063ded2e0ec06a397eb47314c56
ddf16e2d073e3fa0af2a9f8b3a5dcf0e7e874728
describe
'28549' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKDI' 'sip-files00041.pro'
13d4739b964e6179ae71aefb9172c073
c43317aed6f47424061f25f9d974b8ca4304c233
describe
'41633' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKDJ' 'sip-files00042.pro'
e05fa79e61a193a1314f673a74f275ac
426c7c6e17f4d7f38287ca8a915997c5c49a02a7
describe
'40254' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKDK' 'sip-files00043.pro'
0013f1740c5e20345cc8347d489b15eb
cc902ae3bf9b07cec0d446c016ddc659d4dc698f
describe
'41533' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKDL' 'sip-files00044.pro'
230780b4c738703e460ce88b48da57b6
c1b5d55c299eb3dd443bb488788ebec8bef353f9
describe
'39403' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKDM' 'sip-files00045.pro'
b49ed7395f1aa42cb65afe2715f5627f
aeb263d4b5b196046dbb72d845ed06bceab4632b
describe
'40813' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKDN' 'sip-files00046.pro'
806122b461df30f1becb33602644192d
94d12dde13d357ad6dd46f5c65afb9c5b2634c62
describe
'39535' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKDO' 'sip-files00047.pro'
0b1843a3b47b2b555352e7e48871ad64
fb78f2674e3ab1e76c97ed07a56e6b2954907ef3
describe
'40561' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKDP' 'sip-files00048.pro'
b29dbb12da6201dfcb4289b4766b4992
cbeb869c1ed6a3d00df934ce8b2c984c9ab8669e
describe
'48208' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKDQ' 'sip-files00049.pro'
3d5e905874b14b19aa49fe8721f72078
1574b6d11eefd071284e6709ef9cfd96af73a330
'2012-05-25T18:04:40-04:00'
describe
'39719' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKDR' 'sip-files00051.pro'
cb0d756919cad3a691c301b5e2aa7eb8
a12c4d9c57ecc205b11f5a6d3130e7aecac5b03f
describe
'41301' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKDS' 'sip-files00052.pro'
22921affc4306d6a58ce3cf7d550e846
0d17444e58c9e5c908a68a466a8991d91a31af68
describe
'39995' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKDT' 'sip-files00054.pro'
13a22a7b938898cebcb5229d91c2d8ac
f5809d88d68eb6b2e25ff4ac10576b48713e0f9e
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKDU' 'sip-files00055.pro'
796063c343017432910b31444efec665
a4e556bcc8ffa7617f51b8ab4b3ba0921eeb5488
describe
'41518' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKDV' 'sip-files00056.pro'
94d2dc63b99f3f303c24006dc37652e3
45771c050280a63f22fa540413debcd75c46869c
'2012-05-25T18:06:21-04:00'
describe
'38725' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKDW' 'sip-files00057.pro'
40a2e2dc3d13edc4c42e7fbabfff6604
e16ec49be98ebbdf74711ff980f13b0ffb5f3c1f
describe
'27336' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKDX' 'sip-files00059.pro'
c546d129085dbd7a2474a9dbd0341a40
41bd215aa8be54592eba88842eb13a1979e1ba33
describe
'40807' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKDY' 'sip-files00061.pro'
50e81f99e869ad3b64702cb3501927f6
0e131288a7745e47aa3fface9c2f0d59dcd18a0d
describe
'28591' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKDZ' 'sip-files00063.pro'
e33c7cece45edfa8fcc188f5b477b35b
1f6322e38822182a6d4276a038a7cd40a9909226
describe
'1995' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKEA' 'sip-files00065.pro'
a0eb2b9140e2970606b13ff0427f3a83
51df0dd01e9a338ab7a53afec44a6672586774eb
describe
'27568' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKEB' 'sip-files00067.pro'
c623330c4d885d976e42c8038515b114
4f1ba5f070340d7f3296848098d0a112fe5578ad
describe
'40017' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKEC' 'sip-files00068.pro'
370ba86c6341709f663d6e4272bbfd7f
0624de59b535cc80442a2214b591132dcaf957ed
describe
'14626' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKED' 'sip-files00069.pro'
7e0ff2a012d3e0474e54cc1f84483387
28d16950341bdb431ca671be5a61b6f43f8cdb76
describe
'41210' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKEE' 'sip-files00072.pro'
f730c541ecfeb436635b9ca21b3bf830
1423385c3c633057521dd4a44706b84b99c08320
describe
'39730' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKEF' 'sip-files00073.pro'
003f3f7069a8da9a503700eb1765707f
f206b9dbdcbde74c57d9a0780766e076554540a0
describe
'40219' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKEG' 'sip-files00074.pro'
a0364c56c8c487ff03bfceb4a0d9ec51
15603fabce4cc37a58ab6ed77e6c489e5f80d15f
describe
'38886' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKEH' 'sip-files00076.pro'
10338b4dbc8aaee7efd7fab5d9a0c04a
bc0c74e6ed9c7b4ba8a804039928822d6de40531
describe
'40221' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKEI' 'sip-files00077.pro'
b107b6d759b37126928f5bdc641d40ee
e03cb653b2dcd489e69b0c26e6f9ef375e6b4ff9
describe
'40175' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKEJ' 'sip-files00078.pro'
117ce3d1bcc4331dacc596df151a17d3
a7c2e675a54e85f02bbdf5255d58b66b55888611
describe
'41190' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKEK' 'sip-files00080.pro'
928ee627d51e4db5e7284d307fc35ef2
da9c63438e496ad7dc25ea984774bf0aa1b0126e
describe
'37186' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKEL' 'sip-files00081.pro'
ea507ab873d7c7ecc9c68fc19dc9236f
7f84a7966af7a5adff505b94a7630f158f2cab57
describe
'41506' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKEM' 'sip-files00082.pro'
6fae26919bd9467fcabf6a40281da144
6bdf490d0517624c33877288e71cf36e8a91e47f
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKEN' 'sip-files00084.pro'
4201dfa64a087373d2a65b855dab5584
a01b018eb3a2b4aa53a241b39f102fa14aa347c7
describe
'807' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKEO' 'sip-files00085.pro'
6f2a9d472c65a779bd1c7902aced1cfc
4490629bf64446001eafeffba58f704bbb65e72e
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKEP' 'sip-files00086.pro'
290cb9c57b17095b8fd000efeb67f40f
811f97c5fc7b56b70028a0c5da89bb8cdd8b40e7
describe
'27941' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKEQ' 'sip-files00087.pro'
b062833a0913bb68aea1fcc5a10a46f6
ab5d83c354c3f35e284e22c1f2511b85b4249e46
describe
'40721' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKER' 'sip-files00090.pro'
e57b6a4ff05f65827e81a26fd949c070
7514772204d30ee1419000f1ac0a2a5ad4e72831
describe
'38878' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKES' 'sip-files00091.pro'
1e161a2a2204e664de3ac817f96694b5
75e160970f0156d1d67d477d368ed18d2a362322
describe
'39451' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKET' 'sip-files00092.pro'
a86652f366e0d92d9ab7aa983d07161e
af6b7a8ede75c1c9249ae18299da4c03ce932bce
describe
'40646' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKEU' 'sip-files00093.pro'
02c08b3d904d4c39462a404c22535e34
ecdba3720ebc9c1e471b2d639039dcf24c6ce17e
describe
'40154' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKEV' 'sip-files00094.pro'
0ab8797a4fc8fa71a4c4ba63b5690899
d7b2c3e4399add5e768c25b8f02366ce4b0e1e91
describe
'40170' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKEW' 'sip-files00095.pro'
278eca3ffe0ba0e40358ddc18cceb88f
b43452157dbda9226678d6e5662c32b90e60d678
describe
'38397' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKEX' 'sip-files00096.pro'
81964996b06dfdf68a2a994ac8e7175d
6469c166cafabae8149fbef9ffaccb6fe7acb2fa
describe
'40888' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKEY' 'sip-files00097.pro'
71e731fc2ab9ca618f0d9c6b01193e11
38b909a0244704184d4b5d4470467bc3fc7de15b
'2012-05-25T18:07:39-04:00'
describe
'39130' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKEZ' 'sip-files00098.pro'
0342494e69afdf21f137a57f1e3f0b9d
9317e1253b15a9769083a661b331f58ffde5280b
describe
'40570' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKFA' 'sip-files00100.pro'
1aa85aa0a66cdce365b8ffaaae0d50cf
ef772f375c5bfee10c12a704d8576f799ca5f60a
describe
'28865' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKFB' 'sip-files00101.pro'
05dfa1d89643a3cb8c06442aa2e6d0bf
844f5310078a1102d1c38b3e23388ed13c6b81b6
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKFC' 'sip-files00102.pro'
5634344c30c5c3b5bfbc190da3aea122
96c0a8aa92f3b12bf9ad866405127465142b6a91
describe
'1572' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKFD' 'sip-files00103.pro'
26eda7484abcc1c31850383b54ecd2a3
4647be32412acd29dbc8bd0e2f4adb90352c75eb
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKFE' 'sip-files00104.pro'
46d72659bdc447b885bfc07ceb6ebc02
11e9488134df928e4faf9df90fd57af9d1efeecc
describe
'28820' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKFF' 'sip-files00105.pro'
d9ea5a2fc01e661942bb25358e65bd5c
9eb5ffc357fe456c9b1c8019427a59db153f5454
describe
'39477' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKFG' 'sip-files00106.pro'
87e488854d2be97e6e9e537ff7b2ea77
969ad594fa87efbd18b00a62d1070a9c2c1d16a8
describe
'39787' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKFH' 'sip-files00109.pro'
ba9a925bf30e0629e137eb954d63e4c8
1f56ff50ec3ef063a041eb10fd33b5db385e6f24
describe
'38451' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKFI' 'sip-files00110.pro'
71afe41e224cbbc8175fc65210df3eef
2c29c9200ea801025bfd02db9d1999d3cb1a3729
describe
'38912' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKFJ' 'sip-files00112.pro'
890c8351fec86dc3d5f11deb233d9a12
ea7eddd438da6815b9e8d8ae6be1370a666aca08
describe
'40353' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKFK' 'sip-files00113.pro'
1476bda334a4b20aeb244520a0c147cd
28a40ebd520adf360b76a5ee2b9b0623a00f279d
describe
'38813' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKFL' 'sip-files00114.pro'
ba767d837152ccb300c4527819ab7430
150af31406125aa9ee88f6215e3bdd0568d168c2
describe
'38256' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKFM' 'sip-files00115.pro'
32afd7beebd94334f7f01c29351c2e46
41cec70bed066bd2b1b075a65c789bcf9ed268f4
describe
'40454' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKFN' 'sip-files00119.pro'
c912725f9e4c05042aef64c7fd5743c5
9bb8ace68357b238ae2f413525d86a294d047d83
'2012-05-25T18:02:05-04:00'
describe
'40407' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKFO' 'sip-files00120.pro'
de37eafb12683f9275bfbb5ae39766d1
0bfd2f865498396c8c3f5524b73751d3e0b72c8a
'2012-05-25T18:08:51-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKFP' 'sip-files00122.pro'
bae64a7d5e1ed93d1b67894b845a7959
fa24be2a096f91681cd6fbd2a950d0b388a6b31b
describe
'1255' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKFQ' 'sip-files00123.pro'
5065643cb171b99d9eb6f2d32e60e8f2
32e66256c7351be247ef437316efaf44aade77ee
describe
'27947' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKFR' 'sip-files00125.pro'
fc7cdf3c2896fab6d29435bfd1d012f5
b9e451a4683f2376591606324ea87407695f416d
describe
'42684' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKFS' 'sip-files00128.pro'
751bb9852a24795dad965245d926f926
22b87b3bfa5f195636f4d67809d7d1657da38613
describe
'40237' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKFT' 'sip-files00129.pro'
acf2a52038fd25cd94bf374b2988216a
e71074e36004d228fcb3ac64eae74e7dc518c57f
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKFU' 'sip-files00130.pro'
6fdeb0ae09fcb78e411d31b988fe8d69
6b986ecdacdd33b103523ac25dbac159db47645c
describe
'41501' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKFV' 'sip-files00131.pro'
620c429616237545ba180bc8a79a327b
3d7e92eb7a9650c478a3ea7204410c08909c0ee3
describe
'39833' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKFW' 'sip-files00132.pro'
ad1ddea21a2c79a3a3772e9834b6b9d0
30c95211e478d1aa91a8aa6f8b890c59d1a2774d
describe
'41111' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKFX' 'sip-files00133.pro'
1df733c9d9b7d1aa66891d93e20d4481
3eef84ec783998c30a9f2347ce46392c309b8c18
describe
'40985' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKFY' 'sip-files00138.pro'
0fce8f76d95df85c3fa9266c7ff9c630
dd4c546281dffb8ed8f5c8acdcf05ce47a10dbc7
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKFZ' 'sip-files00139.pro'
1d7f3a1c39aed55fe76e90ad1d18aff9
3b7a25c07252b833de4cb407afb0403c87e09347
describe
'38771' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKGA' 'sip-files00141.pro'
1a90539d93638e1c8ce298dd67dc67f4
55d1021c529c33bf21b20d49fa67a1bfd4ea6a15
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKGB' 'sip-files00142.pro'
fa93696bc47f6668cec3a94329616fed
33d50e34296986a33a255e29f7878873fa205cec
describe
'790' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKGC' 'sip-files00143.pro'
272b6a1c000417ce24d9c1b06a21ff46
3769a5f9f697f3c8a2b8f284887837476d3a1125
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKGD' 'sip-files00144.pro'
988ffc4fb0cffb0e2a0fc5783defaa69
507797eacdc9b14d51111ab1298b56d21f167830
describe
'26027' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKGE' 'sip-files00145.pro'
81c41d529b23eb1c9d7272fa581c367c
7be81f99e32f8cdaec1248fd10bd311f3d48957b
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKGF' 'sip-files00146.pro'
891921dff0fa854387de08375d5b2184
e0aac303735e5b451bedb0348ea6cace17d368f5
describe
'41726' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKGG' 'sip-files00147.pro'
c5243549c762a822632f3b6f5a92e1f5
d9dbcbccb4a119c1ff86ce19665e9ad87dfac4cf
'2012-05-25T18:08:46-04:00'
describe
'40371' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKGH' 'sip-files00149.pro'
73d67ac7767c095c9131340f2fffdbf6
a5157cb29c22522e86bbf9eef5b55bac6c012487
describe
'40183' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKGI' 'sip-files00150.pro'
864cf7703339f4496d9fadec4587f24c
acad074e033836ed46641ec0fda62e2308e1e2e9
describe
'39407' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKGJ' 'sip-files00151.pro'
0941427b22d8a237f33c45cbd76bc11d
543f91b62eeac3153aa206df138a4f23ad91e59a
'2012-05-25T18:05:03-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKGK' 'sip-files00152.pro'
a366f529a2ed6619f356b0665d069c8b
cba1e118205e997513b1add33989ee668cb7f61b
describe
'40853' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKGL' 'sip-files00154.pro'
4a900fbcb850e93d4e537e3346ab0cfa
d057edf32153a0eadedf6996389cf0c0a6d22f9c
describe
'39309' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKGM' 'sip-files00157.pro'
c8e0f42ee0498b29ce15e52c9a23cb28
468d726fd8ed26bd8af95b5109162ed160dd3782
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKGN' 'sip-files00158.pro'
3a77559cba260d17c2438de9cebad25e
bcf53718e20f0c5f5c0940bca96333b975bc9e57
describe
'41639' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKGO' 'sip-files00159.pro'
405241a0c9d663edfdb0f10f1c2f2f3a
41ad6decbda917fc3474fb6929652b3f620b198c
describe
'12913' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKGP' 'sip-files00162.pro'
14add54010430988364f71b0ddfce88c
bfa3a584f362ab8e51d7aecafc90408e91724833
describe
'1101' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKGQ' 'sip-files00163.pro'
60a5a8852838480e17659d2f1c68a210
6474d43a5326b5455956bedfe32333d24896e142
describe
'41685' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKGR' 'sip-files00166.pro'
f08b5d7d4974398fb42e141cb25b4a81
c6842c66474e711126dc8c9e5f30fbe3447f5ecd
describe
'39921' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKGS' 'sip-files00168.pro'
bafb72cb381df99893882a02b69e3645
0bdd343767ed42e4fafe1f4cb6d821844b23f04f
describe
'41798' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKGT' 'sip-files00169.pro'
5961629d7f95df4e9b15c83f5cc47c35
2018cf29a2a2b69561758733be05f21d9af57872
describe
'39469' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKGU' 'sip-files00170.pro'
6b20df6d436e6582888b87fd1f6665ff
9c7176e93c9e89d0969e2408829e9e3d0709c540
describe
'40751' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKGV' 'sip-files00171.pro'
df59bea2aa788881b619aabab5bff647
be362225920f258fdffe68d18f2f3c320dbc1935
'2012-05-25T18:00:09-04:00'
describe
'40940' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKGW' 'sip-files00173.pro'
e0779a55b11a63b5c6ec63151f26e6fe
eec26e9e6524cc2265a17f187b4af6e2ef1bad38
describe
'39144' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKGX' 'sip-files00176.pro'
688dd6642d64462617823d512ad44dff
8310023205a179a7fcfdd3391bec12b774915dd8
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKGY' 'sip-files00179.pro'
618fde88f92c8683504ff36ad345dede
624401054cdb8788cd70745f7caece1fd395f752
describe
'37526' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKGZ' 'sip-files00180.pro'
ed27995cecadd90076183c63da494396
5bbe8c3c9adf268bbfc4b2b9a2137820d605ab56
describe
'38352' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKHA' 'sip-files00181.pro'
4bedd5f6dabcb6412b00838c1566c12a
cda3b5b5ef0117dbf04c6853d90c653e8b96715a
describe
'7960' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKHB' 'sip-files00183.pro'
9cb0dc5cefead4054e6e7e495b452139
9c8103384a2a5ba7cb5487806833d498d38d4b9d
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKHC' 'sip-files00184.pro'
05b1b6a2e8d83fc62e2a18885bcdb0e6
f72730bd9192b4e9ad8a8c52269d5a7f6a8c7071
describe
'28697' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKHD' 'sip-files00185.pro'
0c0115f9726ca55df5946a08c34e7011
6eb843fbabb12ec35f0eab0e6d1155e9eab8d460
describe
'40616' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKHE' 'sip-files00186.pro'
cc42ac692b69f47bb7a04791c33df0c9
c713709df5bcddcae3fa2cddce9b39c09f16903d
describe
'40851' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKHF' 'sip-files00187.pro'
2bfb46dd878835b61f8b0736bddbfc2d
5df5f9bf43b7c6dda6b3215fadf8b9049dd9899a
describe
'40163' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKHG' 'sip-files00188.pro'
bbfacd22662c24190757fac261d35720
9ae55a484219424a56584888d242fd1662a0c89d
'2012-05-25T18:05:04-04:00'
describe
'41488' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKHH' 'sip-files00191.pro'
9ef3694d63865d1da5ac6586de430309
1c299277ddef6276828d0240d70fc226d8b3f970
describe
'39891' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKHI' 'sip-files00192.pro'
04b9b34f36f711d0d8cb4929218d9ef7
782aa6935200ad8c0896bcaa7f6901e11b863f94
describe
'41307' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKHJ' 'sip-files00193.pro'
d7b27400ad38dd4e08dcc33dc3b1e9a0
e403ec4849b27e2cf9f48d583494bee776946944
describe
'41655' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKHK' 'sip-files00194.pro'
1373c209f22ae68b16378571c81057c8
7af921c7907fafe398b9377c947c776a1da2ec18
describe
'39608' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKHL' 'sip-files00195.pro'
6a97c62537422caa835dc41860f97271
1b1610c7ef4aa2def326c3986d2727614f66476c
describe
'40046' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKHM' 'sip-files00196.pro'
4e43c89aefa27e41050194c2864bb9aa
97ed5b01923381a18c1db5af9083a242c619ea44
describe
'39822' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKHN' 'sip-files00197.pro'
cb3730360f79e9d8756232d8cfbf6230
5ba3cbf4713ace285bd8f083313cbafacc7d5e0b
describe
'40021' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKHO' 'sip-files00198.pro'
c14ca021c931ce6bdf9ab4153a368b5a
a1bb4c16beae28a86af6de38ac198f93467b5814
describe
'1589' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKHP' 'sip-files00201.pro'
d4507700f1085c5085303b956cf79b35
769d8e98330c28a90619779bc7528e9fc1a26df9
describe
'27191' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKHQ' 'sip-files00203.pro'
aedecaf50d690bdf58b966903d1237c6
b76b92225ed21908e9489c7e4c9d4e4dff87925e
describe
'40308' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKHR' 'sip-files00205.pro'
6d1ba3a23a580b3325fe408603d6e359
299564d9cbf1b9db3c16282917c5b657887799d3
describe
'41699' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKHS' 'sip-files00206.pro'
46f9d3dfbea5aab0b64dc080584c4e76
a7c6065a56b002b26a5a7436a638af3295ea4a9c
describe
'41159' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKHT' 'sip-files00207.pro'
94721a517172a5ca3d823426775d22d6
35be1c9b8a9b11d60b872353def502bf97d3eded
describe
'40781' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKHU' 'sip-files00208.pro'
5021feda2a094e9becd7e6908f001d28
6123e6c14f7243282a70e2a880bae9df52796e09
describe
'41283' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKHV' 'sip-files00210.pro'
5f129343efa81eb7f2f3d8d91973923d
438488435625a5d118c4d214c3ab6950ba770e66
describe
'40903' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKHW' 'sip-files00211.pro'
16a84a6835a24ca73e59e29b33a360b7
115d03eb326d2c7215307754e40735f8ad7d46da
describe
'39923' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKHX' 'sip-files00212.pro'
426657e6d1bf7b47545547a5809fdc8d
c8f72a3b521b2f767cf29bbdc6b1fb03f2ef4019
describe
'41096' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKHY' 'sip-files00213.pro'
f8c73382f5ee51f5beeec6bcf8589275
70bdce56ee43f2761b0c47058956a5d97c5c640d
describe
'40115' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKHZ' 'sip-files00216.pro'
25f63b58fbb54640fba8a9af2dc2515d
cd47b0203c4319e9422808d1ab9fde368e551c94
describe
'42055' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKIA' 'sip-files00218.pro'
274251399d3cae8dc1be19ec4afdbf2a
82e4f0bfa28a892ce8c27ba36a94137bf6d3bdb5
describe
'41363' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKIB' 'sip-files00219.pro'
ac9e649249be9edfb9319b15240689f0
cf184c061555e8d202b3879e02ed68b93aef8d0a
describe
'39147' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKIC' 'sip-files00220.pro'
1f00e3805ccc08d021a1eafbe7e8f4e4
7e7565915455279b36d7fc3596f19f88a3675938
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKID' 'sip-files00222.pro'
6ec2a692b9f6e66c42c67affd9e594f8
86c4969ce554248e0c80d882d5921bdfce95b7c4
describe
'28792' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKIE' 'sip-files00223.pro'
c0e861f97e574841e336c1cab51863e1
e4a9a689ecf42bc2c74d2d6e9d413335de7bbcdf
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKIF' 'sip-files00226.pro'
1e31c01c2d59e38ef850ad118b321af2
fadc7e205fff96c5e0e3d6be40a1cad99af1751d
describe
'42004' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKIG' 'sip-files00227.pro'
80b2a526b0f411b68386cbffa7497ec0
9059ac86db962fd939031673f7e1d9c71dfcca6d
describe
'42306' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKIH' 'sip-files00228.pro'
ec9bf2bae8e1a2684cd3e151a42f8dea
913b069ac92f297dcfea1432d047b34c8d21963f
describe
'42509' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKII' 'sip-files00229.pro'
19913cd5113528132c671a198dcb17aa
3bd082511ed55879fa447203e64d29f22e2bb302
describe
'41522' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKIJ' 'sip-files00232.pro'
62f8ddc35624b3941d38db5f51f4b2d3
5b4de492af2c12921bf167eda5d0a18c4654195d
describe
'40340' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKIK' 'sip-files00233.pro'
f4d32c2aed3c6bed5eea9b37f85a6098
23b2193381fca54b64c71e545ef81b1b71455d69
describe
'38588' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKIL' 'sip-files00234.pro'
4109c9506efe59d7f33928b63a5d9a88
4dc28a312a09e8ddb423f2f2541c9b9cfc017332
describe
'40156' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKIM' 'sip-files00235.pro'
0629c6704977ad2476a10c6e17282009
aaf1a07856e83b667c06729c340da428e0543061
describe
'41563' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKIN' 'sip-files00236.pro'
16f07363839c06940d1e3022dc6ed6d2
6277b014c16b65fb3571ad72f72920e0680059b2
describe
'40329' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKIO' 'sip-files00237.pro'
dd1db4c40361c7038c5f95b3581cc63b
2b515a1ccd1d2361a4e16949440eafa3e307c4b1
describe
'40947' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKIP' 'sip-files00238.pro'
0fe02acd8574f9ac8e878e06151520ce
e3e9c15877f74a482c184c7976379b3077eb8ccf
describe
'1415' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKIQ' 'sip-files00241.pro'
69a1bbad9cbd7f020a697db492878e1d
aa7695e74a5d12a5a6e313f7ba145e6e3ff4016f
describe
'41426' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKIR' 'sip-files00245.pro'
d4504fd8498707c861fc4dc952e74296
925a8925faa30ddd836f40d3d9a9eed03dfb8387
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKIS' 'sip-files00247.pro'
60a8b7550afa7d3a1e7a8da2b37eb905
3e27b771df5a3cbac6e5064ecaafb0efe2cb03b7
'2012-05-25T18:01:58-04:00'
describe
'39274' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKIT' 'sip-files00248.pro'
289ff6bf3e9c62021b52ffebceeeb9aa
be44e6d12f2bd6d6dc90d01304170e6d4898002c
describe
'42863' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKIU' 'sip-files00249.pro'
eb610aef822df9984e0a349c302f16ed
664008866ce01a4a8f693ef53c587b5844da4820
'2012-05-25T18:01:20-04:00'
describe
'40901' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKIV' 'sip-files00250.pro'
fa124cd8068af118e65679ae4e6a9996
30123638ecfedf6390a324a9bb4e13ce186153ca
describe
'39502' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKIW' 'sip-files00251.pro'
d81ac94fd7d15fb8410e48d39e605ff3
82ced8428f5f9c14d0132099ce958fdecfa19d64
describe
'41237' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKIX' 'sip-files00252.pro'
60b48c7e905c3050a4bf99af97bf7fdc
2be6ddca36b513b6dc7003a52c5174c5d85dae49
describe
'40494' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKIY' 'sip-files00253.pro'
c91195a94384382389e32111fe55aae4
a9969560d2e7ceec1c0b13176dd929a4e8ea6954
describe
'39863' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKIZ' 'sip-files00254.pro'
60fc9dac055e8e24f7582ad4c3f48dd0
b3cdbcdbe0dd1f9694c0f3758895e86e67d08e0f
'2012-05-25T18:00:48-04:00'
describe
'39349' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKJA' 'sip-files00256.pro'
07100219a211bbd06fdc048c0200a234
d43dc4fe3980e13e01999b6fda0b028b5749b3ca
describe
'41608' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKJB' 'sip-files00257.pro'
bf575cdfa236516d39f33dc007055bd7
b9f1e4743f215d18286b224b1c8a790d05bd8488
describe
'2057' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKJC' 'sip-files00259.pro'
1c34f9f33334abfcffbca4386ff87294
cf5bb92cdc6dd3d947aa05cc70774f59d7e7a5a1
'2012-05-25T18:08:50-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKJD' 'sip-files00260.pro'
3ea5cd2be408d20ad6d205ea64285b1e
ff8a562d622c3869018be1d83a28e020764dfd7b
'2012-05-25T18:06:06-04:00'
describe
'41233' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKJE' 'sip-files00262.pro'
6f77ebe9cb802a542252d0fa8faa485f
c510bce8589e3fc051815a9e684d8a42e40b176f
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKJF' 'sip-files00264.pro'
c4999fee4f25d38d77795dbec3eb1ddf
27c4b19cbce8bf9667f0a716398a3b35cce7c82c
describe
'41895' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKJG' 'sip-files00265.pro'
eb740fdf0c11990d3adb90fae86bd1ae
b295b216d7473e7bcf7550c83f7d8c375c0d6a36
describe
'41372' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKJH' 'sip-files00266.pro'
c319c77170ee696d26b3d92ed7e43bd7
aa07959330b2575ab5d4c15d855ef7f177738129
describe
'40747' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKJI' 'sip-files00268.pro'
ff4c515e47c8cd095c797d7d33c19126
f0e0112d6486f9c3ffb759865f3cde868fb403c6
describe
'40370' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKJJ' 'sip-files00272.pro'
5c2dfad58f777e4a9a0dec92b709c2b4
1897f7b2eecfbfa8dbb53de4cc1569a0d99f5e34
describe
'3494' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKJK' 'sip-files00273.pro'
b9a5d2949c6d3b98283738d549e0978d
4e55bd08241e1f2bfb9b340f40f89ce70a41599b
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKJL' 'sip-files00274.pro'
2f857862de26bae2846e735bf2743dad
b1f413d9c4d57eb23b12164126e588ec575802a0
describe
'26952' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKJM' 'sip-files00275.pro'
4d188ebee00d7424455a8844ed0eab34
b6b82344594bb533bd203872657f25606e95a86d
describe
'41278' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKJN' 'sip-files00276.pro'
6b24e289bb4f959ad30feea6bd79bdb3
e6418207a8e306ef4cb944efff8d2e583cc05e05
describe
'41030' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKJO' 'sip-files00277.pro'
240ea4c761e0a0c823700fa1002f88b4
d0cdce240ee975b2c45f6421e495322c296d7d0c
describe
'40523' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKJP' 'sip-files00279.pro'
24aae5bc3127bc2c5c46d9aa2cc7b694
173633ebee35b8126d9f60c85587b4efc52c0f77
describe
'40621' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKJQ' 'sip-files00281.pro'
8333f900b5ff4556fe0880e68f10439c
db8e3cb335bdfb5735319259063766e5f5f66658
describe
'41215' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKJR' 'sip-files00282.pro'
96778cdc0dc1637884753683644894c2
c6f2f7dc9724c11dc3c7fbed46c8ab0f08cba851
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKJS' 'sip-files00283.pro'
540331e58a35271d0407008881c9ebb2
549ae32713129084f498cd85e29d718ea22ee351
describe
'42129' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKJT' 'sip-files00285.pro'
04f08456c9e984ae734f4810d650afd8
7b08bef98f13da117f079cb5543c4a10ce73eac5
describe
'41851' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKJU' 'sip-files00286.pro'
678dcf449a6083bd6e5481b1577a35cf
7d33d5d196d5a1c8d309a74f57a63790369c1661
describe
'39488' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKJV' 'sip-files00288.pro'
8bfad1a516e7438e1e7f099df0c7e813
f9db68ae40c3180907e9e630b28f177e00908f03
describe
'40423' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKJW' 'sip-files00289.pro'
78c355ea00b08f78c45eea61c01249f5
ea6eeadc354d7e39ec90563619bd6544cf95476e
describe
'39026' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKJX' 'sip-files00290.pro'
c94137b13f0abd375088fa7510949b90
9add989d0c9368290ff1d670860ba98889a03c8d
describe
'40560' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKJY' 'sip-files00291.pro'
a9eb7ebd849d67e9257512fdbdc908b9
7b6da8a206453d9d7b21e26c5ff0468fc1f46963
describe
'8388' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKJZ' 'sip-files00292.pro'
63b3be8440ae1873fae1ff9416bea944
74ed684c27411113322518a3258f538254c60f04
describe
'827' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKKA' 'sip-files00293.pro'
2d5a6d837c593746d42a73626d281923
0d40df8ecc996eefdec4430c42d53247b0272479
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKKB' 'sip-files00294.pro'
ffa86dbf36d007ce88e6f42a4c7fc38f
3a83ca9e1f40e3cd69f3365d2d3c1e6b345de3cf
describe
'40395' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKKC' 'sip-files00298.pro'
eeda78aa68508c02de6e07c88ead64e0
756af238c41a43d4f53911ca78c297c026f709d8
describe
'39867' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKKD' 'sip-files00299.pro'
db395d3e1c58d4aace726140ca6f9ed2
e8314b156e9e5b71e8ea1b8a89a32bab5ebcd4e8
describe
'38286' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKKE' 'sip-files00300.pro'
f0a678fa8024d720d3b8fdee642a9483
962d80632fcd26e0ca494ea3b01c7f44ccbcbb05
'2012-05-25T17:59:27-04:00'
describe
'41420' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKKF' 'sip-files00303.pro'
e95c718180d1a1d53811c75b3b6b6a69
8218b4bb40e2acb5a0b3e08529e3f8f9793983de
describe
'40085' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKKG' 'sip-files00304.pro'
68f6120b0e61e707d3fbe6cf91553366
5825505ef1dcdfa1a41499ace7f2ff75fb49b141
describe
'40086' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKKH' 'sip-files00307.pro'
6acb7d972dd1af6dcb80e39580536929
2972782f75e36b6ff39d14d258737f8d571e3d72
describe
'41411' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKKI' 'sip-files00308.pro'
57580c84310720db91c092f51e99b0e0
2de2a30a432ee64fb9e20c67591cc622fb06839f
describe
'38780' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKKJ' 'sip-files00309.pro'
5f29429558b716a50b97898faa6e8cdd
30babc33ed48bd6f161e8520b4777e363d087440
describe
'39134' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKKK' 'sip-files00310.pro'
b1731bfe2d35b68c911d78a8274fe528
f10acbfeb169c0f2b20803f4e8f361386533db5d
describe
'28214' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKKL' 'sip-files00312.pro'
fdd8f0fa608ee3ad0d4924c75053193e
3f1d984a9f7719e1d27520e58572d7bf584a544a
describe
'67055' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKKM' 'sip-files00314.pro'
0866f9ab9aab56c47f391c27a07a8c51
52430be51b25bed2a3664843f4477b6820ef0dce
describe
'80838' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKKN' 'sip-files00316.pro'
8c7b4b0338d35d1dfcd3952f9ba608fc
fc6f7df2780392fc0456689c09bb598cb4551754
describe
'57849' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKKO' 'sip-files00317.pro'
7ee8bcd4dc48db977cbc059222a4eb9f
090da1e7e569a9055f2bf83f3e29d510bd914154
describe
'46152' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKKP' 'sip-files00318.pro'
40bbcdc266dbec98251c49cae3276727
d7abdc27d86ac8f686e60301dcf1596a8514fd53
describe
'57336' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKKQ' 'sip-files00319.pro'
33f55a8bebe492de847683115e485c1f
e3e9d9bad9c26eac8f130b3a18292992c192a321
describe
'56455' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKKR' 'sip-files00320.pro'
acf083e99f587b937684849cd0f18e68
dfb220901f5abc4be9f6778ae38c281d2ffe0424
describe
'3471' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKKS' 'sip-files00323.pro'
e394eb509a8f7b1adbd9ac196d514046
2a6aa4b89badbbaacb631114bdcbd83418d94b1c
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKKT' 'sip-files00324.pro'
6839a787a4ab04330917ed4073ed8817
bdfac0b5d86f6433ac90cd056400590d2197f1e8
describe
'598' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKKU' 'sip-files00325.pro'
cf905803e91566d988176637950f3b12
b043dcca95d83615f635b3bd9700189825918825
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKKV' 'sip-files00001.txt'
7215ee9c7d9dc229d2921a40e899ec5f
b858cb282617fb0956d960215c8e84d1ccf909c6
describe
'372' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKKW' 'sip-files00009.txt'
801a9f9915739df6d82cb4b57be2e7ab
63aca8253bd2640b0218983e7cb236a691f8fb4b
describe
'1256' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKKX' 'sip-files00012.txt'
3c5dd6f2745bb588d1cc01fcaf7be3b2
b1d18f2140e41a060f9f911936b938faac2e7d80
describe
'929' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKKY' 'sip-files00013.txt'
ca62c453527f96644bd783efaef52bad
65440ee25acf2c81b22cd557328d3f52cc8ec2b6
describe
'1166' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKKZ' 'sip-files00015.txt'
052ffc7a9a3f982e284122e458c427f6
47fcd42d2a0b9e43e1d682c6b418fe8ae164e792
describe
'1007' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKLA' 'sip-files00019.txt'
29ad6b67dfb62f034b36554626a3410d
1baced67d2f1f1b181d91625aeb3207d6b673600
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKLB' 'sip-files00020.txt'
9da8a2f6ff86a54d8034d16746db7afb
50e031a4d68ebcc446e3d68f7fd20066dfcf9d92
describe
'1522' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKLC' 'sip-files00021.txt'
1732f82c57ee61fb4abe31fdb1bf8adb
0b026bc4998472599020d423355eac47d934f5f5
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKLD' 'sip-files00022.txt'
623f58e261db81abb95bab79e27b999a
b7e0e6af3875efe8996b6f1c53521638551a02f0
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKLE' 'sip-files00023.txt'
3ab96cc4d5e8c02762d71c924fc32820
01f09927f551fb27cef4811d54a50014d6348c12
describe
'322' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKLF' 'sip-files00026.txt'
44f71d615a4e4c49b916850dbc27ece1
fb1dbaf94b390e9c9364df07f8fda7e0c9e31290
describe
'1073' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKLG' 'sip-files00027.txt'
9620dbf78e74fb225587c1ae273d5e36
04918177f46ebe2fa57a8f7e2777685a2e6c75fd
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKLH' 'sip-files00028.txt'
0657084b42006d816e28f52ed35c2d3e
fceaa3da552d705e50bf3337b68e385cc2b87094
describe
'1515' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKLI' 'sip-files00029.txt'
fac66351706e6e30b64c1e0fb8f69357
1fd4525e7bb7c8dbc659277f7cc3b5c881c9b697
describe
'1454' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKLJ' 'sip-files00030.txt'
280df3a717b60aaafef4d099d0b60a5c
6b31562501f35301b6a8500ca2fe5e90aa80784a
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKLK' 'sip-files00031.txt'
339bb14e2df30a735e85d7d6b592139d
3de8259e08216baacd2d4e7985866bfe96c8e5e5
describe
'1598' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKLL' 'sip-files00032.txt'
e02458544232225b8b1328c4ce19386e
89107177fc23571a6f5cf48cf1219a3a987f11ab
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKLM' 'sip-files00033.txt'
bcfb481eb4f99b4415dea26c82ecac81
e9d2eff9d6e0d800f4f215649f7c7d84e45f82c8
describe
'1511' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKLN' 'sip-files00034.txt'
a4d2666df944391b5e600f79290eba2e
c4c2a537b590ac8a392fbbe14bb788c735f21065
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKLO' 'sip-files00035.txt'
7961b88424466261f9dd96e2d68c4e97
6e24b5860a665530d2b451e904ca3d5404fcc2da
describe
'1584' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKLP' 'sip-files00036.txt'
e2a11312602a8d97e5e529ac39a0b8f3
796283e51d9fa67339e6e15601f0ebf62954f65d
describe
'1547' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKLQ' 'sip-files00037.txt'
8e1b69fd7541e07ea77515c48647a4e9
4fc18d800aeca5eb829bb157f12599afb0f73bbd
describe
'231' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKLR' 'sip-files00038.txt'
79e8b3d2cbadd5f60c08989328baaca9
a35934bf5ec7fca6be837461ada562073ecdbb1f
describe
'223' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKLS' 'sip-files00039.txt'
8b95225e67ddd8a65aaf61773cb91d9e
d57949ba8ea66e5d76ab120482eef5065fd18861
describe
'1151' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKLT' 'sip-files00041.txt'
34aa332c119d5e41a91bab017fd7ac21
c336fa3eaea445ab471e70e2e4c029276cac0435
describe
'1563' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKLU' 'sip-files00042.txt'
35f9e72de6d3b75787d468e21666d383
6aeb19112cd28ea3567ac4cef3e4673a601006c5
describe
'1531' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKLV' 'sip-files00043.txt'
2a40a5c5af530142c298882feec6bbc3
e91b1a2ac87f9171068d926f0288c2d966fabc2c
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKLW' 'sip-files00044.txt'
3aaa043a064a88e7072ec67b92c28af6
8f13d3508053d1c4f71773def11c00b2f937c895
describe
'1499' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKLX' 'sip-files00045.txt'
d98febfef1acd092d75ff0caeb398dd2
e47fa07e48ea90f68bff0e0feecc840b8a19d3f0
describe
'1533' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKLY' 'sip-files00046.txt'
3cc68a86fc88d52a3cd59875adbfa6da
69487327e1e0d68b3c92f930b7e4b5900973fb11
describe
'1506' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKLZ' 'sip-files00047.txt'
de85c58938af1b540c88ace96628d9ca
ab083a13b35eaac9063cb31986680c982dda1dbe
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKMA' 'sip-files00048.txt'
76d834d59454f1ff00a0721b59797b5e
f3e73f5cfa9ce44cfc50c864571706a1682ce6bd
'2012-05-25T18:09:48-04:00'
describe
'2735' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKMB' 'sip-files00049.txt'
018ef87563a5d985826881ae1e24d15a
ce7063868ae937ff771f512e0bcf658152f5f585
describe
Invalid character
'1551' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKMC' 'sip-files00052.txt'
e8f89699afa351acc9af86df9803eaa3
c4f7957826001cdb4e7a4d0a14cde8efe18b6fe4
describe
'1550' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKMD' 'sip-files00053.txt'
4668db5582e68fcd0e081c0cbaf43cfb
69b57b148be2157df2921b3e1b10d9e78fec270c
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKME' 'sip-files00054.txt'
f359b83da25b24dd50ba26bd81a5b54d
5253b2259655227dc9dd484c3d883a6110ab409e
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKMF' 'sip-files00056.txt'
223d2ba977e553e5c24377f9752cd022
c1fe642c326d4eeb857ea7865c5b50397e126695
describe
'1479' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKMG' 'sip-files00057.txt'
00569c4198e190b15d45cb2dbad157d0
079a91c5e825012ae7968961d0b9aec54a13cf60
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKMH' 'sip-files00058.txt'
5ac01829770fa90130e80b3492c14d4f
4cb3a9119c54c820c57b75743747419fd548947c
describe
'1239' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKMI' 'sip-files00059.txt'
1eecf2e29a415e5e115bea031223ead2
9ac26b0d41ce20b4ea3cc31d3138c4329f030f32
describe
Invalid character
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKMJ' 'sip-files00061.txt'
b979b578c3cf5b42702db5f8324af080
6dc87d6dc8bd5225e667330cba83c1e6b6420dbf
describe
'1108' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKMK' 'sip-files00063.txt'
0a875d87f73adaa7b4b2458bcbf6cdf3
6ae63025ec737eb8f0975ba56093d0370d4665b6
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKML' 'sip-files00065.txt'
6c09108d311fc414d493376673a9cc63
5ab4368beed6d72cab16c2ee6c63ce7df6e8c732
describe
'1097' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKMM' 'sip-files00067.txt'
569ca5c77dcad25b7f13964219a3389d
5eaf177239641a576202c5a8b833ca83db97fd09
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKMN' 'sip-files00068.txt'
018ae840fc37e81a6f16f7b3afcade91
5ace90171c090f32a71209b70e661f4348624565
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKMO' 'sip-files00071.txt'
4f91d6b01d7149f2d0c8a7bc2ed7de76
5c344088e46793b964b0addb95dd0582509aa227
'2012-05-25T18:01:04-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKMP' 'sip-files00072.txt'
45420f3680d83e529a84eedf2c7dbd7f
40a8539bee82276bd8df102d9bcb756423a3098e
describe
'1512' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKMQ' 'sip-files00073.txt'
cee4780d60814402182f8f0e0f94c24d
e2af686c40d61e00409c76123185b632d89bf73f
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKMR' 'sip-files00074.txt'
bebaa85da47e87e60159a63d44232684
02cc6e1e995998967eb2445bb78a4233a1f68b9f
'2012-05-25T18:00:43-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKMS' 'sip-files00075.txt'
8bfd4a995ca9036928f1ec5d33400e20
d473e3ff394788f185e2e4c707ed4a0e8ed80d19
describe
'1465' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKMT' 'sip-files00076.txt'
3766935ffdbfe848b9652125f8200443
7e08326019e5471f510525d41935cc141c984c96
describe
'1558' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKMU' 'sip-files00079.txt'
6d79dfc6cddac04ccda6f66852df7be6
4e8ab376659955d59975ff94143934666c87e854
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKMV' 'sip-files00080.txt'
4b4de1a642ee224122e1b1b4a19efba6
e78a22b2b6b4f4124238e63f35967ae277660349
describe
'1492' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKMW' 'sip-files00081.txt'
ba25a9775edceefac6dee2cb3d7f53aa
8ccaa99bb5698a2a46e629697122813afb2cb620
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKMX' 'sip-files00082.txt'
ea773f3a58c5e177eaf7362c1a2dbd6b
569561e5da591d1df85483e758cb9cb82fb62d23
describe
'881' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKMY' 'sip-files00083.txt'
e3349dae6a4a501cee1afa6ef46f6c87
156da9be1d897606c4c6600eb3f3f31b0639aed0
describe
'1123' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKMZ' 'sip-files00087.txt'
79c599db02c19074aeaa6cceb5ba9f06
94fcad85fe16bde5c763e0d410b59b1e2744bf16
describe
'1528' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKNA' 'sip-files00090.txt'
839282dc1644b1b31b18f1fb261d7733
79c568c748830e7b47411986bf2075bd9ff9d0e4
describe
'1478' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKNB' 'sip-files00091.txt'
d4d3cc8737aebec80d9b7e54adf8eebe
ad0e911739bfb68939559f4545ca0555796aaf69
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKNC' 'sip-files00092.txt'
3cdf28e8d210f815e378a12af1015c8d
ca2fb615394cd53f4565c8408bb1de58b8098c95
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKND' 'sip-files00095.txt'
3a915ceae21417349575e514b942f059
09ff7ec426e9b0016b9ed9c068a3ad3949fe8e6b
'2012-05-25T18:11:11-04:00'
describe
'1444' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKNE' 'sip-files00096.txt'
00e4de84cbeae5a69667e6feca464485
8aacfba72245b52fada7311f889cfcfdc6ec7490
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKNF' 'sip-files00099.txt'
58628c5ecd22f3a83edbbfa43c447c88
14b98893314f42e5c3f24a481567f8433160898c
describe
'1523' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKNG' 'sip-files00100.txt'
6103fa74e4fd5d2abc07876e7d04eaad
b1772b45a92b876bda81fdf4090d8e394ef5f426
describe
'1152' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKNH' 'sip-files00101.txt'
7408a76e017b7879e7a695f1bb259a7b
cbfd48ccbd79102f0586048cf4497ec94d49ba89
describe
'114' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKNI' 'sip-files00103.txt'
23708fd37cccb12d4492b235afe22995
12416184c82d8839e3929579b434a9883fe479fa
describe
'1145' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKNJ' 'sip-files00105.txt'
10f71e5b24fdc7c065c593bddcb04eab
f84a0804d4d6841981d8f278b188566459c3bad4
describe
'1489' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKNK' 'sip-files00106.txt'
7a8e379e02d66299d83e7a50e4eb4833
74c6ea4c9034952098188f5d1273f89269ba1875
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKNL' 'sip-files00109.txt'
d30f92e743bda6877941d4b40e92d20c
6de475d466fd8fbbf82ccf72e45db6b0382972c5
describe
'1464' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKNM' 'sip-files00110.txt'
5ced02a699cd60824f91bda8612e881e
5b929003dc6f58e3fd70d30c525547b17ab05f42
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKNN' 'sip-files00111.txt'
4ce5514d90ce19c9487207d3b063dd12
bc726bfef1f75f3bc319dfc72530b85dc828281c
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKNO' 'sip-files00112.txt'
e173121282b0572e4063c595d2cff206
acee348d7797f19932f4483aa3b55f4970391e61
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKNP' 'sip-files00113.txt'
f49f89a8ca79ba21017024f448b7a4c2
f2bf81d55639e637d4aaa888178bab4687b74b20
describe
'1458' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKNQ' 'sip-files00114.txt'
b15850553697b88815ca7f1479865408
6f6adcea924b1d5a73af59682a0aa2a48b8e0bfb
describe
'1485' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKNR' 'sip-files00115.txt'
b8f5e5d90709c1dfb7373c00fb170d5a
14b5e86a6c1be488ab748b7610ec03ea89d32479
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKNS' 'sip-files00116.txt'
cee260f98d97e2d742a51b73ab2acfad
0ebd5779eacb40e77415b7573f9cbd6c96242656
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKNT' 'sip-files00117.txt'
b0a5375e524ee86ff773161f38f126c6
5ac5af3f83e39b8dec979917dc9fd838d43eea90
describe
'1507' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKNU' 'sip-files00118.txt'
db22217d87a95b911cd1bfdcb1e49d2d
25cb6a0ade795c3d1e479bd659c07f4f4a688f62
describe
'1537' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKNV' 'sip-files00119.txt'
a9a2e3cd80f8a9c563e112519f908a88
a37ba525b85385e147381051cf02b3f9e12c65f4
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKNW' 'sip-files00120.txt'
e2850fba178f90da1b8e33569eeae0fd
5abe807b8a817d9738a46d52e1917c0360a55690
describe
'90' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKNX' 'sip-files00123.txt'
1fca9369bf945170e5893e8b4e5bd55f
fc7b18d8305cf23ce613cfb832f4dd5a8d22b08b
describe
'1436' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKNY' 'sip-files00126.txt'
91f564d680097a300bc581d5c102d7bd
8b3090d25054029877a83e41b4ffff4601b144ec
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKNZ' 'sip-files00127.txt'
c9d02ab3985762b723bae8fc80b70c13
aba80e50ee91a70589900184c2d5a50a17e49c03
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKOA' 'sip-files00128.txt'
180b0cac213c3e62683b1e3eed16e6ce
b6cd2aebe61bae02b3544c48c80d6dd25a8f7e6a
describe
'1513' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKOB' 'sip-files00129.txt'
1e426f75218365aea631c4106fd6a593
c58a1d74743ffa735809e4c0091db506c6f5003e
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKOC' 'sip-files00130.txt'
e005395f495cc7b9f841b68ba479097e
39d8d202701b08a46307e998a7ae0b45aa08f2a1
describe
'1546' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKOD' 'sip-files00133.txt'
6da5afe689ed523f8a8fee7e382edd5c
aa3cb2d447cf5e4a38fa6a96cac627cc3f3045d9
describe
'1535' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKOE' 'sip-files00134.txt'
4c718a7d3fc5f4a24d0fd000d99d6fc0
ceb88c39c8f852e075fe233427f14c69b5e484be
'2012-05-25T18:06:25-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKOF' 'sip-files00135.txt'
14f01a837ca79f6662568cd0cebf7763
2f390b2d78183d6b5c8b19c03441ad6cc5b35666
describe
'1530' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKOG' 'sip-files00137.txt'
1c79ffbfa1663d977e4f3ea7bb20a926
1662f6266c5fadbe4d77f9611f502cc82f8e7d77
describe
'1577' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKOH' 'sip-files00138.txt'
42b79b58b16833b3a21da0d20c1026ca
d0a76ba821c54e9cef3488187017a7dbd156adf3
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKOI' 'sip-files00139.txt'
5d105ff585d272c8a004c66d96c8619f
2a3cfd25a9ba2f7368d01d7ade075224c371e9a2
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKOJ' 'sip-files00140.txt'
acedbefb1cef2eed3e74f3772af9fea8
8f7914f0af9fbd43dbe194085bacdcfbd2f1622d
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKOK' 'sip-files00141.txt'
7452e23dc0f8913a4174a6c57911837b
dfae843dfa11bb7ba3120116e2d2b3aad49e16d5
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKOL' 'sip-files00143.txt'
13dcc733aa0e559dc264dbe4acb1663c
5d8323a5750777606c0d0c574f92bd30d11522d3
describe
'1494' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKOM' 'sip-files00151.txt'
4a931cbcf3976967ec9bb1c2beeac270
583a9ec63091ba58714d9931aaf4302c4cc8e79a
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKON' 'sip-files00152.txt'
cdc81e4884d7c31b540e0fe977a149cd
c21ec91ce54d591b2960deb5a43a528f7adba37e
describe
Invalid character
'1502' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKOO' 'sip-files00153.txt'
9e7c5015fe774018d38b4d26620933dc
b91139c875b1dc7453d566ce34b40a50b3eb42af
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKOP' 'sip-files00155.txt'
57f99a09c9b3a5e031cdba67ad577b0e
25bdab336112310ffdf0851c448c2bed92eb6895
describe
'1487' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKOQ' 'sip-files00157.txt'
7b147b14fc503facfc37010a4c3ed9cd
91cc3436157b9ff1df1a74fb5c0831345387e41f
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKOR' 'sip-files00158.txt'
6177472b61d852f99f322ae88bde02ba
c63ecc2a578adbf7c5e18e6dab0f74436932d1b1
describe
'1595' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKOS' 'sip-files00159.txt'
968f5f4946e531a06766a6784bc1e306
41a320a4113cdeb7e4b2d9d6d682a36c208a92d2
'2012-05-25T18:07:25-04:00'
describe
'1525' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKOT' 'sip-files00160.txt'
93cb83c6e065f0c8235930e858672902
d5367e22c418eb51aee7e2d794c468b4f55d4942
describe
'1600' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKOU' 'sip-files00161.txt'
2d4b7484e0966c05f107bb638970cf47
26a64aed2497c35ca0f844498f66b4c6efe6e30c
describe
'566' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKOV' 'sip-files00162.txt'
85c3f5690bd343443cde63e62c24996c
02e7c985842672a06d12f376fc7245c29241debc
describe
'78' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKOW' 'sip-files00163.txt'
c25504fb3f4fe827ca895b0294bc58d9
d5d8448ee5ef27076d1534de259c6e6c2e23adb4
describe
'1112' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKOX' 'sip-files00165.txt'
a42d23932e5c7165041c481895a4f8f9
aec78f219e5a46f842ec1a92debd02fdeeca1aa3
describe
'1557' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKOY' 'sip-files00166.txt'
bbc128b3f914c14f3c7b0540d6a97380
58b69d2014692c45797d6de6f19743c2737aebdb
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKOZ' 'sip-files00167.txt'
34d96616b6d2df4c952f3c9dd788f019
cda8d7544865133124c84dc3cd6722a932480478
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKPA' 'sip-files00168.txt'
7c9df581a27114e9577caee870a523ee
bce2cbca19b36a026d567b7051fb3188b3e99889
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKPB' 'sip-files00171.txt'
0ffa50a851a45474fd318c85f1eb3c78
e952ec913a17c2a717826593e16d41f6c47826bc
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKPC' 'sip-files00173.txt'
351f785ebe78678e6f5ae8132d8c1961
319a73c20088226b83908df5146ab7f0f174dcb5
describe
'1473' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKPD' 'sip-files00174.txt'
ca88fdcb9102630128082e92a8a80eb4
9b6b625dba1214f4defff9fbbc2d364562f37e5e
describe
'1474' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKPE' 'sip-files00176.txt'
3e06d52894d98665543d1551f542d2f7
c2401aab2eb629fac13f612601f366856867a903
describe
'1510' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKPF' 'sip-files00177.txt'
b92474386202d02d71cb252a7d598232
dc6af6a21cdc41456db0af3e26638e9fe4463cfd
describe
'1467' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKPG' 'sip-files00178.txt'
dc789e0aae6faa106e71dfbf40979b79
2c198334429b4a3b161a86f264ed7f6e68867dc9
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKPH' 'sip-files00179.txt'
1262ee695296548d71c4d8b79b52bc09
5f45e4a8babfc1d36e94f97314c16ca2c62885a2
describe
Invalid character
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKPI' 'sip-files00181.txt'
e661228cf2c2b82521428aa48f3b637b
98423b568de54c9d71ad9fd2ed73346867a741f2
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKPJ' 'sip-files00186.txt'
34068148142f2f5b34d871aa4a2095e5
5708909eb26e49a6f7342999b99e14c12fff169a
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKPK' 'sip-files00188.txt'
5267f44cef13fb36ab5393a7f69147fc
4d192b085ccdb197fd4083b106c6565a2a7a857e
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKPL' 'sip-files00189.txt'
4c2f6cf1b11192d51d3def134f3d7987
8054609e2cf52b44a7fed7302653b862aba399ca
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKPM' 'sip-files00190.txt'
5b05268c75efc545af703909203f2191
ef9625a34748c2dc2de011e4a316045bc06c0b6f
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKPN' 'sip-files00193.txt'
9a327fd3f5ebf4dee9576798cba6cb61
4439251f6a11f4ff788c39824d14405fe9d0ee64
describe
'1496' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKPO' 'sip-files00195.txt'
dd5f2a00014d6bb7f97acab55303fc4b
3d8cb17412c5a6310210bf38fd7073a38864f89d
describe
'1497' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKPP' 'sip-files00196.txt'
a3d6d76c29883cbe1b6e9ab9ded21a08
3133e07d20559f9b94edf861d1880b73dbc30796
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKPQ' 'sip-files00197.txt'
477ccae127f7a7d6140de50f3d228605
61d51edb18460af517de999b3164eda032db7ec8
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKPR' 'sip-files00199.txt'
c184d59013a9f30f345b51752c061733
54ec2c47e3cc7e65551010e7c08c11b14a8f62ec
describe
'347' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKPS' 'sip-files00200.txt'
59b3d8bf19e87915544fa83574225587
11be9ce638817c0050c846963e034cb02fe7f71b
describe
'154' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKPT' 'sip-files00201.txt'
51e76bbbc7bdcb1c657a0ea5cca96148
c39dbd6df9abe31974f3d4d31253574992418e59
describe
'51' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKPU' 'sip-files00202.txt'
4fa052f905a574262d7dabb6f112df5b
d39f7a52dde73271b6eb48611f813e687b46e507
describe
'1074' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKPV' 'sip-files00203.txt'
6eebe2d36d61eb207e211a99aec54e5c
60adb65b21a092e8149140dec9d95464c97364a0
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKPW' 'sip-files00204.txt'
4d448e042e87509548d5f8bac0fc865c
d7a0002576ca2c1ca1108512890de8e32122487c
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKPX' 'sip-files00205.txt'
e9a3f461b6c9bf9e9f6aef9ec8d0c704
5005f2cdc82c7f3b603a98d6fc3cabb00d227756
describe
'1559' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKPY' 'sip-files00206.txt'
075dc14e43182e0778abe58c7c3f8cdc
ce71617a5f3b6d475bbb13f59080959a5fe03b40
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKPZ' 'sip-files00208.txt'
a81ff21c8337d738ec07fb58ec3b1d5f
9017734ea81baa033b89a2c1cf5f3b7073fc197a
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKQA' 'sip-files00211.txt'
9dc305bc1d7e0f6590e3c7963aef17f1
c8b18c540cabf980292a54cfb10d2f5a4a8f5027
'2012-05-25T18:04:10-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKQB' 'sip-files00212.txt'
fcfc7af05be888e10e9c58831f5785f6
d3cd4042847dc157c1c25b9ace7274f4efc5f9ee
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKQC' 'sip-files00213.txt'
7621e6a0751e2f708fcd7a7cf108fd57
4c2d4e627dc22ce2433377d982421e87cc424b23
describe
'1503' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKQD' 'sip-files00216.txt'
6b602bde07c21eaea2314936f2e6f879
7616329b475ac9e0c9ba7aa9cb45d32edcc70d27
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKQE' 'sip-files00218.txt'
979af887dc4104ace9948e3c6bb3057a
0fdd6dfc1c34661bd6ca4fa38e1679ebe3c98626
describe
'1466' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKQF' 'sip-files00220.txt'
db78ffcc6acf3fcb046f0e4df52af3ea
05c380af826207e3b7bc4057fbf364dbe8cacaed
describe
'130' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKQG' 'sip-files00221.txt'
36650a511c3b69565638ce46d89ae04d
529915c763dd13d6abb45b3a2fdd255388f3afad
describe
'1158' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKQH' 'sip-files00223.txt'
ff9f98eaa7d9012d4a647c4b324da4b2
ad8941bd021d66cb59f084cb71ad697ac9d49153
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKQI' 'sip-files00224.txt'
57b53fc0887805265fed45ba994600bc
be7dfb2878892a23e9e346748d50e24148668a06
'2012-05-25T18:03:52-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKQJ' 'sip-files00225.txt'
964b4d43870f4df28de9e9f43c9d293d
096e3608043b2f750a4ccd682f4e6070ca5cceac
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKQK' 'sip-files00226.txt'
03015d2e93e5d9215c1b7cf41b972a77
e86a4d47abedf51c152410bd4e1042c655235aef
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKQL' 'sip-files00227.txt'
6384c3b042814bd98b915d7da9156d94
ef4b155a3aacdc43417041f389059980464123b4
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKQM' 'sip-files00232.txt'
df934fe24b4b196ff4e0218e3a752256
09b6513e07c772a6e8bbfdad4b15179886d27d1f
describe
'1450' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKQN' 'sip-files00234.txt'
e521d748cb14ac1313259f68fd87a129
920171acc5ee0a1228c4c5fde2768a53342350c7
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKQO' 'sip-files00236.txt'
c5ad61f037e5e2a546ad332c4f5ca36a
bf86cf0044f3f64bfe6f1cd6bcea53875cd0d6ab
describe
'1536' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKQP' 'sip-files00238.txt'
4b1ae76d10cef0e842617c42a7194329
d4c9aa627015ad128a43f2ebe3ab2ccdd3c0ae35
'2012-05-25T18:01:53-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKQQ' 'sip-files00239.txt'
634308e40223d0cc9bee7b95543edaf1
66e4fa2ad4ae8e1525889bc559f92b4d77635570
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKQR' 'sip-files00240.txt'
4ed78cf59eebdab103006504a4204349
522cb9be3a80bee08756fc5873fe862e9df8c5c2
describe
'159' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKQS' 'sip-files00241.txt'
a5cb127370dd8fcd3f606d292ab65ef0
0796fe2c79a2a3523007e181be6395062d29c527
describe
Invalid character
'1141' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKQT' 'sip-files00243.txt'
6e459c22e1344ebc4931ff9661fc448b
5d749f4f545a6a4a6f312c99a49525901bf8b55f
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKQU' 'sip-files00244.txt'
ec0ec9a60af7f60e48dc7121cb3bf500
bf49f82fcab34ad3f73f58c20f5e3dc540297873
describe
'1560' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKQV' 'sip-files00245.txt'
862013c05022bc999db7527258bf9f8f
914974ddaa1d66af00ee2193664b1b36d9968fb9
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKQW' 'sip-files00246.txt'
f1a9bca6f10d9c80c44946708b0a325a
9c3556e95469823c5189aeeea81f2bfdb60f162a
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKQX' 'sip-files00247.txt'
9c7566420a8db1ca4d6c1777fe36d007
0564dd4df05a24b648cffb2fd27046e491e3e88f
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKQY' 'sip-files00248.txt'
3514a29a22588b2221483dd2d741c8b2
d742e8225c30fd52e45dc1e0b1a1687848e9e7bb
describe
'1603' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKQZ' 'sip-files00249.txt'
14a95975afdad233ec5ced6af02ec798
bbf469128a6839494b7e71472f6ed77ebd1f8702
describe
'1490' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKRA' 'sip-files00251.txt'
069e48c5f06bd5aac70fbe05a908517e
73a66346694405792d5c9d5c16fbde14f22e581f
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKRB' 'sip-files00252.txt'
918b64ab49aebe9874516dd009c16b39
f88d8125e5acd08093c1e35670dbca4af5190e74
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKRC' 'sip-files00253.txt'
a1854643eb5062c3bdf0e88b0c590246
64fd2b4d297ce5dec090044bbee93541c12bfd85
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKRD' 'sip-files00254.txt'
e57abc41cb228be31592deb299dbc176
64d215db9c7996922a17d35ce4e8011109b626d2
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKRE' 'sip-files00255.txt'
aafa77d29789f9869359a087a6fd099e
df1f2eb408e6dc01fc86dd9b790521caf9aa2e78
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKRF' 'sip-files00256.txt'
35bbf8b0faaa83873afac2d32b6d0597
fded0f8503ba17fc63ad4de8e7aaf61eace6c753
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKRG' 'sip-files00257.txt'
673331219e15fd868375fa876285416a
8cd5b38ed9e9c5896fa6c4757198b703471a9f3b
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKRH' 'sip-files00258.txt'
2fd6772da9493884911061e0f975b2bc
e9a627b15707fa1541d64b3afb012c8de8f724f2
describe
'1114' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKRI' 'sip-files00261.txt'
c403d7aa6d0964472ff593df57d37274
df3f273092f411e9b4b782ea62857867856b4f85
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKRJ' 'sip-files00264.txt'
1a0007800a5ad20dcd79b3e2f340580a
8926c837a71e5106dc9e42efe7f64b5853e7676f
describe
'1585' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKRK' 'sip-files00265.txt'
30d69695abf4917da04fb78fbd6bd54c
f49198b7f9294cc3a740e9923bb2cdb71b712923
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKRL' 'sip-files00266.txt'
63c4ab733e4b770d2f210a64323c9b7b
11965c017a80ddfdda129ec59ce8be709b09d0ef
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKRM' 'sip-files00267.txt'
4200fe517c470b25cbc06e08ecfba643
4e9fa025a1847ccb8906649b347c64734ba02e0d
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKRN' 'sip-files00268.txt'
38327b83270f3983c9c39d65431ec1a2
b1403985902e5fd67d1934e97a77a63fdcc99610
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKRO' 'sip-files00269.txt'
a9788529230e67d487a30f887c49d645
04bd948659fae9be407f1e517a5f211ec45a6887
describe
'1518' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKRP' 'sip-files00272.txt'
fd75f1e35fbf16bf2cda50e7f4291afa
97625ed71639e6340d5b190ec6d32d394b8d5361
describe
'190' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKRQ' 'sip-files00273.txt'
0407c76c867cae3bb2c045bb0bb337af
5116801f7b305028b9e07b0596b4c3cb14b4bf2f
describe
'1126' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKRR' 'sip-files00275.txt'
de9f673d18155deb90d2037481ec6811
b8372f57693cfa211c959ee21acef5ee4a3e1377
describe
Invalid character
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKRS' 'sip-files00277.txt'
f8a836d76a330146f4b6e330919fd862
a1ebd4ea58e7f6210ed444714447c8bc3eb4ac40
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKRT' 'sip-files00278.txt'
66d0b3e6db5db45c94e144e3ca927e18
96d9da015d04531391d61424bfb692c79d66e8db
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKRU' 'sip-files00279.txt'
711e50a5b52cbd0c643e98673d367522
db611d50a096a58f9d3acdd6f6cbf95aabe6c279
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKRV' 'sip-files00281.txt'
1c65cdc024fba2ecceb1dc4dab3819c7
14b173d92ff39ffa26f72de829c42467f77eeff8
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKRW' 'sip-files00282.txt'
ce43438647e57d5245406e994e372fd5
52ac2766991b169634635a47be7c571bb0a8deeb
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKRX' 'sip-files00283.txt'
f186dfe002de7e16453768dfb14a1f0a
ced050cc5b667f766b2c95f4ea872d2ab5f35f16
describe
'1578' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKRY' 'sip-files00286.txt'
872e099fd0e565a541d70018f3c297c5
b7d4d6116f4e41c6133d763b74f6b863492e567f
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKRZ' 'sip-files00287.txt'
861880e698f8a8156cbe0a6daba3dd87
64ed579038f9968fd6c9b76330748fa0a8c5832c
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKSA' 'sip-files00288.txt'
d1860f1ae411ad8424371f5b2d803646
319343fd29a5d96c13b12526286678d1f2fafab6
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKSB' 'sip-files00289.txt'
a5df4dbd40109a60d356f965830fb896
244a8bc04b4e2009b9951f7ff67cea60952a5fab
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKSC' 'sip-files00291.txt'
cc56ffce59e31a8d6c4a3b62390e4dae
8d33c653a02b84c1aa0e869e25978c06c47baee8
describe
'330' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKSD' 'sip-files00292.txt'
60322d66dbf6c1b8fd273d1037084944
171c6dabae7243530316a3d5dce1ad149d34ee37
describe
'79' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKSE' 'sip-files00293.txt'
464ea0ddfdb8cce9081db2fb5cb8bc4b
3b8e0390bbdf91866092a5558ccd6872d6f81db8
describe
'1608' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKSF' 'sip-files00297.txt'
0c24ccc44d6151c1d02a8b83ed73e71e
bfdcd8f0d643e62dc7921b6d85c21408d59e99fc
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKSG' 'sip-files00298.txt'
2615bcfa89b649871ade41e885d2b67a
c61566067b3dbe21ef476c67e67ccedbebaa1eea
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKSH' 'sip-files00299.txt'
cd0a46b13b614f72ff245ee4d75fc84d
c8fcf9ddf2cf648c404e3fd514e3aca487f33be3
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKSI' 'sip-files00300.txt'
f6bc0964b5c746f2744a0eec5de5b864
5557aee6ebb6387b7a5779a6fa44bab2afbedf15
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKSJ' 'sip-files00301.txt'
4e4bc4d7c228c756222592abf4a5487f
6286eebdb17a06940b7caf1188ba25ebb965b8e5
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKSK' 'sip-files00302.txt'
3b649e37d114c60e36f7e742eb30ddf7
8644a8b3ec1c0326231dfe3ed6765537e960770f
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKSL' 'sip-files00304.txt'
2f6990055607a992e99449ac5994f016
cc8ddc1c917354d707f72b72147da3055b5cb500
describe
'1294' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKSM' 'sip-files00305.txt'
1c42c12192b7f7b9ff00011c9807fda1
77faa49eefea116f683cda2646cda116192b914a
describe
Invalid character
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKSN' 'sip-files00307.txt'
75de375bb1111efeddd3d775a63d9ac0
9a977c6253652e34591c052440bdbe4db747ddea
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKSO' 'sip-files00308.txt'
6b557570ef95989bff26be254d3ddea2
a08d1a19fe167009df4173736d1e062c1086ed30
describe
'1475' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKSP' 'sip-files00309.txt'
175abe933712169340181dcfe22744e2
52fa9d22c973df6662da917030a8cca21e1788a3
'2012-05-25T18:10:36-04:00'
describe
'1472' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKSQ' 'sip-files00310.txt'
f453a82479ceb9d53cfd958e71d0810a
2b7660de753bd185560a0620114ec1b2d7ecb6af
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKSR' 'sip-files00311.txt'
7456357bb6338e2c47ebbebd21566bcc
a14818ef5455a9ff1a287dd25887b3bee23c36da
describe
'1130' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKSS' 'sip-files00312.txt'
ed642cc2947dc23ba277dd7539c52a8f
e915375190bf81b2869ae5dc2a76d91c4298e410
describe
'2591' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKST' 'sip-files00314.txt'
4bc22f32dfdbf42b99be40d0454b683d
c80d32b8e9d00bf487ec79e6c935fb817f86a6be
'2012-05-25T18:01:05-04:00'
describe
'2005' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKSU' 'sip-files00315.txt'
72d0f2220e66a2e51f893bea5ccc41ff
264456fd099bbb2a6d620797c7300408158c0712
describe
'3096' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKSV' 'sip-files00316.txt'
0d28aa92ce3df6465f30163537951a90
3f984c1c2ea160b81481e3f61203efde0551c482
describe
Invalid character
'2272' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKSW' 'sip-files00317.txt'
7f9817262627b1ec586a4101f81540f8
613e91d8d6ccee35ac2782155f0498c5d0be4bef
describe
'2241' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKSX' 'sip-files00319.txt'
f64d4fce17237bd3253544cf7bccbd3e
c8eed7ec5e7a35222eabbda1af9e1170651185a1
describe
'2203' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKSY' 'sip-files00320.txt'
0800801466153543daa060b266ada624
0d82242df6fce82adec149235633866fc94c0ba3
describe
'335' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKSZ' 'sip-files00323.txt'
7c19fbd83a5d80521132c6284436f9bc
debee048360ae4a36f7432a54d98c1777179470b
describe
Invalid character
'115' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKTA' 'sip-files00325.txt'
1d8428d273bb6874eef93334cfbbc6a3
f8e1eccb574ee51eaeab9be648c7124a34633c69
describe
'51441' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKTB' 'sip-files00001thm.jpg'
104770b0a6726eb779f4786e8cc1fb92
f3fb796f23dd3128175c5dd8e82a756483f59550
describe
'183092' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKTC' 'sip-files00001.QC.jpg'
2c61b6009a8374e3abc10e1ae652012e
7a37850a40d732ed6f232ba3e8e9c5cc1b5b5b8b
describe
'107911' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKTD' 'sip-files00002.QC.jpg'
75f41e23db825828e846991eb7ae8d51
b4d34fc677215a7ff17a6037ebdf7cc951d0cbd5
'2012-05-25T18:08:09-04:00'
describe
'34384' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKTE' 'sip-files00002thm.jpg'
63ac0940f97f88f0ea8c086b966cd543
d9a5d22a0dc9a83a1a565ea5e7aeac4e0ceea20e
describe
'38257' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKTF' 'sip-files00003.QC.jpg'
c6a052ff0fa3d032282142a2b1748967
fc2a3f0cfc7d7fee8a7caaea62a521f37b3ed6cd
'2012-05-25T17:59:59-04:00'
describe
'19913' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKTG' 'sip-files00003thm.jpg'
9e232d9e3fca4cc6fb4f640f3024c0d5
bc0eb775b83e357c1ae39cffd73980f412cfcd7f
describe
'36879' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKTH' 'sip-files00005.QC.jpg'
352233b17f9333dd096c42b7c6a263d7
d7c4dbb84b8ad4b4afcd3fabec395b241f6af4df
describe
'199766' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKTI' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
d4190c73dfce2d1100fc3fd9a77a1d81
2f6589d5927bc13c66af600f257b0cee7dc08b4b
describe
'186180' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKTJ' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
2a5f637b55fc9e29303d0ec379c8d35c
790f193f182aa9d60f8afb4234af17b67b277bf1
describe
'60885' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKTK' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
497cc16a143ede6c92c99fa5f831a5ec
f0307268e198db52eeb7f78c4c74acd459fe7bee
describe
'47534' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKTL' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
8e7c93c659516764294e37649e84c49c
85853b1e61d177d03c6b0e29842de61918b4462a
describe
'147163' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKTM' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
ae11ef4274ed2b13f2a23006eb5c7d7c
e4aeaf0eda4829788834764ce673650bc1e74583
describe
'51777' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKTN' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
c794f48eba3c6f48922470b530c66219
ac38cb7c6cd71ed793fb4c54c38aac86471b9aa9
describe
'121752' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKTO' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
0bd5918af0b74c83bd64445b04b8a57c
e387438947e483b18887676d9fca97a1abb8a5a4
describe
'11293' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKTP' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
d347dc101254b51965b6795c79731840
1cf04239ff227a9b046d9984dd34997f8cb3c973
describe
'9329' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKTQ' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
f2a45f798e68079997f306c4d244b77c
ef81c9f677fb8f3f3a836fd0f2be8215a798dbcc
describe
'96411' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKTR' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
7287008174c41d485b06503d08df63a7
ae6891a5ea9ed48651788bdbe71e7d4b8fb85883
describe
'35154' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKTS' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
318614c9e0da02257a026b1087958448
a0706dc2efcc9bab1f1523a1f6b44bcdd06d057c
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKTT' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
fc1e63eca15b313f362717de08dfc619
ec93a11f8438ef05f4770b402a34c18241717640
describe
'39335' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKTU' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
58d9d915dfb2224b13537608b23b8411
8962e64fdaa16a149ba4b7faa4c4096cceb4d0f0
describe
'17685' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKTV' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
104ce4cabcc46c92ad3b55cd12a7fd74
615452cfdf5bfbd7e6576288cce36b8065fd75ff
describe
'52222' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKTW' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
2bf6491df481fe5b871981bd960239ec
7b93a8fd3ff70a1b90769b5687718e0a0d3bcf0d
describe
'156061' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKTX' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
99938eea4264aa46eacd011199b1762c
0f2fe8576ec8b435746194a0bf22f4fabb3498de
describe
'159148' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKTY' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
9097ad144da757ba65984fe450781c01
4ef5f2e15531652a08df61ce7b643fec410cb796
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKTZ' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
c317e4287ebcacc5e0d804c12e28173c
e5f2a84f63b64f876fcff9bb34ad606afb40cfc1
describe
'154878' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKUA' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
6e9eff6f4e94c1078f7bb36dd66fa98a
b53d519130388c2e0a8fd547a97ffb979f840d9e
describe
'161219' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKUB' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
18b16f00e99521dcc51e426a39a6497a
d7f7dd2e3b6c8551fb285ac89c4468d51fb617c0
describe
'57590' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKUC' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
cc622c7e6e55b30214fcb20ed20a3142
ce2a30ee2c00bea52f1987ee6e09335309f5bf24
describe
'46335' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKUD' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
f4ba78be81c78935d129bfa667690c25
168a9c9c3fa6f5e322395e4561603cc07ff15acb
describe
'20035' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKUE' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
6e6c572d3dd0815e779f887481493971
86a6d1ce14c48d932432e3fe7eedb840758038ed
describe
'18110' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKUF' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
ef04db7bceda438f40f518f3cc318ed2
5dd4e899b68cb5bbf6c76759650baafd3ddac94b
describe
'11949' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKUG' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
c4921748c8e065ca25777f1b03f0ea95
0c463213c5b7eaf23b1d137c6e33da83755c30c8
describe
'9596' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKUH' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
538143797cade0c87a98d8517c3e73d6
f8a311f76751979c25d4a75525bd13500f154a32
describe
'135272' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKUI' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
288c60076bcac7e5df969ada71fdb99c
c20d2ccb6393033cf22341ea7fcec06d833fc055
describe
'50954' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKUJ' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
687efd71e61d5b84ada8f863fb2358a1
56fe8de0e088a2073b7d9b210fab545b57a5b8d6
describe
'54597' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKUK' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
419366b2eca24e2a34c72ae747ca643e
17a2b038f62be7481d1ad12e5b07486c985d2d23
describe
'160580' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKUL' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
3ea283e1ba4fe30caf50a9f13b52485e
78dacb20e5c6c1f4031d16abdec3b898e362f74c
describe
'56452' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKUM' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
c1f00169e1f137dc21e198d745f05251
f770299484de60971c0ab1e4c043be498a1e4534
describe
'145847' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKUN' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
d61f23a1d735b62a9660c2a01a61f509
36a4065b5d8ff0f795eb3ad8b6d514ceb3d327af
describe
'50357' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKUO' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
4e42577ad6267d72e5943f6d0267cc98
3af701b2b8c8c6d26421ce83358a93eb77e4fc9c
describe
'174266' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKUP' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
b2f0d0590a64286c1aa86611b3c6678a
3c00c8b6617398a281d163ac8c1766a9b478bfdb
describe
'155630' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKUQ' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
8bfa6eb0642651a66667e29085cf1435
1c9dd170c167bff68b26fd27ec7c9de54607cdff
describe
'54307' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKUR' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
e392fe67b08389ed0eb1710b1bcc4fd0
2940adba891c6c05bd7f87c3ee1c2eff6ed1ae97
describe
'160813' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKUS' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
6d93671cce0b130f0765f9895e01f84b
a7b1c6ac90c63231510f164ba93412c55843a813
describe
'56268' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKUT' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
bcca41156614111a189c3da157754704
dd48170b020bd17cc72b6637fd659b29b992e513
describe
'53763' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKUU' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
aeaa0379ab818f7d69a7e035c360393f
930721433b8198f8b89a2d9723007624220fdfbd
describe
'56775' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKUV' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
3c772777211088230dcc540bdddc5f94
6519bb67617d134d8597ff2c947f7539a95b9dcf
describe
'161753' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKUW' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
328b7fd078e47ea2b46220e02a4fe49e
cf0c9e63492c01adc7eb5da89cbdb8d023be3bb3
describe
'162807' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKUX' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
bc9a32ac8357088607798a0eaefcd1f4
774452ba5b050cf3d8b1fcbe7c10764f3ad032b4
describe
'42233' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKUY' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
9d56b1375b78552585c3956ba1df7773
daae1f3545dbaec26e2a19a29304bb5f2d4b6060
describe
'37763' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKUZ' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
31844c9a190f114f6276cbbbc80733ac
a90bd5dff672fdd22fc3bcd3daf694360549d3be
describe
'17304' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKVA' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
6c1bf78e1fabdd3d1384ef23bd5461b6
fa35f30d80b9912e5ee66c99af1b327cd8d86086
describe
'13944' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKVB' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
c1697ba3f1f842e358ac880cb0cfeb4d
db1d78e2712212a056b8f361d5193ccec495d0cb
describe
'10280' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKVC' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
8b86e525e06862d4863bb158c0363e33
eebca4f53215021fe5ac65e52eef53396cbed688
describe
'144891' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKVD' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
b8d03a0e52317a4f63e2dc375549de85
441f838a8e21a57a247ff8580dae48e9d85e8151
describe
'50707' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKVE' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
9a2f587dcb21fefc82284e2db68400db
13e99c7ba87fa1b81e608090bd9bdce79374628d
describe
'157623' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKVF' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
24e8f122879b5f326ec5fb6cf6c2185d
66d0b60cd3ef660669e7f12caf7b4be953ad482e
describe
'154880' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKVG' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
8a04e8077b2a3dde46e1dffefc290349
ab346cb958461a9ed7b5a5b97f206da5582cb7cf
describe
'54443' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKVH' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
8c63dd885e20e1c27d1639b0bfabca28
1ef7157b2f53283660d372c9113982fdb0e37df2
describe
'155968' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKVI' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
a264e39fcf620a800f1bd057d12e6d18
124dafbc366f5cf04f28b9ae08168377961c9c2b
describe
'55189' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKVJ' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
25b0298a93b0ab75a514eff930cfc30e
e2c403c5ee1c462cdaf80fe31e44492ee4786d84
describe
'154431' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKVK' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
25ffaaba8cb9ee4d05cfe490f768896b
ce5463493f3292b913c580d50eee6a07ac4bea6e
'2012-05-25T18:01:29-04:00'
describe
'54220' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKVL' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
43fd89df7e9f77469aea009583ae77d6
030da7e02e035b19c30077adf19ea71c3359a883
describe
'152028' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKVM' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
6e51cc8e4121c6a186a1c0ac1dfcf62c
07791bb04a26cb52a1a27413c4de989de31d1888
describe
'52354' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKVN' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
1690ca62ab4fbbde1450409848e62f92
f6f43a27aa08d497a527efc39372a39ac53e78fd
describe
'152912' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKVO' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
8381df001fcc14006c9c7f76088cbab7
a1fb19217c0520f9fc2f65ae120e1777ef79999b
describe
'54154' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKVP' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
1efbca54fb0e06dc8d6f2b5593f0bdc8
c433429994900af0a0fce467bdaf49638bd327d4
describe
'57525' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKVQ' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
63ecfaf96cb9d4362c8654088d2fcc1b
749483127c4168092dcc3bc9b7bfaabec0c7c035
describe
'224223' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKVR' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
cc21252f51189ed797201ea7ecde85b5
aeb6f8ce4332bddfd2d8dabee044eac6bace5af7
describe
'70691' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKVS' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
e6bd08934d493492be07e86c5e1bc0aa
1360e0e30933c5eb8913143cdcf0c7cf86e81d8d
describe
'152484' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKVT' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
21a0dde7626debef46e63230f87ee926
a3c6a4334b66ed718fbc60f84578e5cb75ad9157
describe
'54358' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKVU' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
83caac2d87a055ba405916fb4f4cd8a4
2c026dd376f77cc3985eb707a90a0490402161d0
describe
'165109' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKVV' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
6f9bf28a0a8aa35863ed5c355a4e45b0
bcf3af6d9dfbe97627c21ff1aac3f0a19b8519bc
describe
'55798' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKVW' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
d1313b6b7a07dafb4cdc180b4dce7c8c
5184a875db004c143a80e01627ffc787b4f9b5f0
describe
'166798' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKVX' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
5cd7ca586e4636adc1bb21a1e0946191
5b9936428356c0305f0fd3412374728295cb2d6d
describe
'58015' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKVY' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
8dbec78857520463a1bba8bf171e3cfd
9022f00d0c7630ffd81528c786a1fed20c8acee4
describe
'152607' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKVZ' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
c2fff4eb5bfc123d0b58476adebf1410
1fa0d7025914efb1d9f4d4e43773f3afb03bf68a
describe
'52891' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKWA' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
523e04c5dbe3fc19f3fc1e6fb09750f3
ac87924f57b3162b3c42b1bd6b0094bc6ecc891c
'2012-05-25T18:03:32-04:00'
describe
'53502' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKWB' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
561a882c30186f9d31d2b4013bb48ae3
ede9264004d8772cf07e54f64483378b8c52c9b9
describe
'53356' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKWC' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
63ae8427564ac10678cc91a088ef8e9d
ca81b302f18e0c945c7ddea2a2c5ac8e5e51cf4c
describe
'146854' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKWD' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
a548919466807ce8ad5da1adee05171b
4bb222585ef9296a32c597a7d28272b7c9180e16
describe
'52095' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKWE' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
c04d247b712349a3db3407f8bbf2ace0
48e01e2e5f3c9a0837d1b29268027ff106147f00
describe
'53540' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKWF' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
b9a68916d0795af98bc12943594da1d1
4417f7007379b2e87a7098f2bc4b2e5482d4eb67
describe
'207684' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKWG' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
4ab7b9fc3e4500fdb00f035b4ec191f6
b32b46986a31000d29afcfb9724d38d7407bbf77
describe
'61098' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKWH' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
5596bf9106f0c1aa061c87af40c38044
512e8a6de2cd8b4a7f4fd4b476619707ef85fbe7
describe
'157350' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKWI' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
1cf0058db8786f97aa895b6bd00ec33a
c8cb794a840720e942ba0468d8d6e227a4e1f6a9
describe
'123490' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKWJ' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
faba59bd740f2454d07b900e2d870092
ea8557140272965108fc0d957de4ca573fd946db
describe
'44757' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKWK' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
9a536e9fb4ced196be1ab0a9af427e88
b27ab725ac18e814e994003e33ed7b8be93afa11
describe
'11221' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKWL' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
cc9fa8908b9bfb2247998a1c3fa60643
fd7d2baf33796fb044af39f6b38ef6e043cdaeb1
describe
'37832' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKWM' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
9a40efd0971f3faa541f713e1d7c7546
7e6409bc62d2da1731aa1fb7a00d475555c65240
describe
'17192' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKWN' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
86a8d21d3c1f39e6e530099843a4cd77
9515bb43b3f403f29ffcdf70d5443e70cc24c52c
describe
'11242' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKWO' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
cc4ce45b38e4de3a70a627278c4fecda
e80d4bc2228149c51363b864091fdd4faff7fcb0
describe
'48152' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKWP' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
18b94f06916e03af1cc26f801c81555d
c084ec7b673809df8f499ff149dc7a1307eda3cf
describe
'157959' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKWQ' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
31fa57e5ff00acd382b37c697ff3bd08
15354910ca827c0bde9653088f341dee131244e2
describe
'202539' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKWR' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
f6286dde5011a242520068e93a19a36e
77e30be2bdc1733003baf63ae09ae2e7bfd0ec70
describe
'61681' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKWS' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
eae5defab80dfb02361ef9355b11556b
11da121472ef52f7279a746c77fe9dd34367b34c
describe
'170397' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKWT' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
20e3572bfeb03329d382ad82d0754374
4537033e633c845a174c48350455038766fd7f04
describe
'59313' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKWU' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
fe573f59ef27c95822d98137ccc32de2
2d757a4763827e04e3e84d964e52150a079c707c
describe
'160245' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKWV' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
f54aacff5563e88249bb85ade9c2a774
ef3d38ebe2552f69541d083f142977c3308bb78b
describe
'161515' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKWW' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
7dd10bc174069aad0e9670225402dd4a
e308dbaffe47d7e4e8c4052245a97b9fea6fc694
describe
'56456' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKWX' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
d72e89a924117cde35d751d7676addf4
4fa13121921d85025ddb4865dff3b1648e3b3386
describe
'163112' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKWY' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
9c213398f870514e606008d55af12dc5
b61423c541f81c7ff8b78393f803117d152d40df
describe
'153392' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKWZ' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
8f00a62a17b48f9f3b44108db11afcc5
49ea7ffa57b511d328b5bce9e96bad5542a2e050
describe
'154730' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKXA' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
feb6283c4df6a7c2b31c476ab66f95a7
11f12b9f87720a8bb149b589848ebeca6caf27bd
describe
'159385' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKXB' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
64a7cfdbe675b5661262d9de9306daeb
9b96c2a10387d59374254a9f8df84c7ef902c3ad
describe
'55193' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKXC' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
b41e4f1f6dabc2bfcd66b18e21f026c5
40bc8a5e8da1ef49ba4b716b45255377ad3dc873
describe
'151859' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKXD' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
b4215567ad20480bb7903dd43ccbadf4
007ca8ca13ea23ddae0bf34130dff9b3aee9df11
describe
'54061' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKXE' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
2d06275362f7b6018322e10b03ef94fc
1dd40b9650a0680005bc42629301c24ede13c66c
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKXF' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
5b3f06f35556ae4699e36a3274bf54a6
95514b10ed9784c7b5f5622344f8757e5d268030
describe
'55889' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKXG' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
17983c355f2a2be92811dac8eafff9a2
1d768baf72623bd6d9e958847e05d496102037bd
describe
'47980' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKXH' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
af70f75c2d0b333208b7fbe98c34ded4
7bbd1a3bcda49d69439cd82a08bb3aa55f0fe934
describe
'163806' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKXI' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
f5f345d8d2c987d573752f893646f204
33769726a3eb516e5a2974910f3f4953df1d0a6d
describe
'55167' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKXJ' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
54b980548c1eac3c22da2ee4c5fdcbc7
6853387990e469f7dbca2ed8463ccbded983c888
describe
'99385' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKXK' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
8ca26cee98ba4e4815999274487c233e
810c418843acd0a39dea2ce1eb41782205caf7e0
describe
'37661' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKXL' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
e04dc57bbbbc51b1b0e1d673f92e48c0
ab022f103f09fe62bd0b64d696bc2efcdfe21661
describe
'11235' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKXM' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
95e44faa2e66952bc962721fdfeab856
4d1263dcb74ead6e08c5c80cc4cfcdea05dbc4ce
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKXN' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
dc526a56d006553c2b499ce4899686a1
aaeed8ae284f485cb2c1de9dc6d86d391e3e223b
describe
'17331' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKXO' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
551003e8a04bf9795241b43d57c4e3c9
c20b47cfb580238af097ff325d898425b65681bf
describe
'11503' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKXP' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
3562319ae6938e34cb35d86e480bb7aa
a0eff13c38b8a62b6da407e38ece3ba8415ac86b
describe
'136234' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKXQ' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
c959aebb89f6e986316de22833369d10
2c90489c374c912e6c5e4d823ebc39fc0d63c383
describe
'48960' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKXR' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
4ca41466a37ac595ce708efe72b5725e
fa404ed086e84f3014a807b24dc5dd108bb058bf
describe
'55976' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKXS' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
58222a7473d2a0eb30310989bc42a1d1
d8a9df509f27415ed376cf8cd56e6f4d13219f5a
describe
'149373' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKXT' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
f515f688f90df9f93e67c96b1d2026e7
a1523826cff447657531474fa9fa0b69570916ee
describe
'54248' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKXU' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
0feb7714a30aa646365992c0f93c5d7d
8d63e44838ca577e12806404d7310657efb90993
describe
'162586' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKXV' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
b8d1b8ca03fa6adb027766808bf274fa
ff8088d9c5a542f2d04fabaad7fb89437b5c344e
describe
'55901' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKXW' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
bbfae7055592e95f880d666ef2d5bf5f
b2be7ca2d7ff413405106d817fc8ef43309f7a01
describe
'153356' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKXX' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
74a18238a181f1bb0f802e8f63466e20
21a990ca9281aff7d7def0394acfd0b7ba77980c
describe
'54445' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKXY' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
f57ea6839e9d90560c6cb34a044cadd1
b140173cc105b105744509df8d009b493d828248
describe
'157475' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKXZ' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
61e5413943b62ede50c4a245879abaa4
4f8502cc24cc5aad6244b7d10a0412a916a564b0
describe
'54347' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKYA' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
6713c9d6f7e1c22b2bfbce935c7a2039
e61105b7df11cef8349dcfbc9ac993da4ca80407
describe
'53986' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKYB' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
42f430531f364487eef786fa1a6e72d8
134b0d8033d0e5cb95788c03f6a08d7863d5c8c1
describe
'155962' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKYC' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
5f5a5300be23739dba246f39d051e5b8
d3d6fae86e6948bfa282790213bf78c2b7714dc5
describe
'56527' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKYD' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
32f46761fe3691fc63489a23f10365eb
e287673226e1b99501aee1f50799e596510778f1
describe
'153119' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKYE' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
7157c15906ceb0f557e6fcf1c5034271
9590fd246aa8ec45af794fab64926336ffaefa99
describe
'52807' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKYF' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
fe1b4902b8a572b5b25d86c506fcabd7
f205176e55008f33250eb06b51d0333e6e918ed5
describe
'53893' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKYG' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
94471fa5668dbe73da24166bf0364884
c221d37f8e4c336814013d58938d5d30816308c7
describe
'150523' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKYH' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
809ebbb8c45c8245c95be693aa08643f
4660301a783c4b1e8710c6e65bb0197a32620353
describe
'152945' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKYI' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
c3d3833b964a913fddc6568bf9c8fa54
cb82dbd572b07e3f36793734952ebce20c661132
'2012-05-25T18:09:55-04:00'
describe
'157626' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKYJ' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
681e58f5309683465ffb3d131aeffc68
187258644f46361a69921347e839b1c6a01a429f
describe
'52654' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKYK' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
e46f405ba0dad845a58639603cfcc99c
95db55a9a544dbc6fef0ed78493173fdffbfef4e
describe
'116671' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKYL' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
ca6766433700c3d6a00bd461c78226c1
f2897d55622f7741b97b6cd8804dd39f9af2d5b1
describe
'43716' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKYM' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
555c5da14476bf642acaf3684695c0b3
151b98b2ce52daae1c369c26c9d9bc6f5410cfdb
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKYN' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
bb7b3b262302199efc48572334a86c55
796a76c4f973e3713051f6ef08acb961bc87ef82
describe
'38649' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKYO' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
df87c6d6362211075f836f7000159661
7f244fe1e99a737cc54a1f8fbbbe261f77e4f219
describe
'17654' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKYP' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
1e3547c304f74b68db3a9eae0ec8d6e8
82404e1dfae7fa6df32a65ee6537e50efea4da75
describe
'139318' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKYQ' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
bce103caab54217f16b20ba30cf07002
1e0fc4c7953006955804039b0a128a49b27e9aad
describe
'49406' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKYR' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
bb09b33eb3a209290c3b585ff920e7e4
a8fb3f3d1ad34390a53c80272c0beff79dc958e3
describe
'154985' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKYS' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
90f2eef4af90dcb513954b3ff2646aad
9ff194d8dfad0e75f82ee84cc755d8d9e5c0d878
describe
'53407' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKYT' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
2e42a689f7e4ffb5eaf5d5dd208fa2ff
a6ec861a72b0eadba8566e21d8d0cb5fd5ab279d
describe
'52043' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKYU' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
ab16be64f192341e12f2cdc6ccd234bd
66010525f1460fd0408d79e259d917a9a369e47f
describe
'155116' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKYV' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
b961e69032206960b45e37836043a5b4
bced05fb8381d26d8e630c773cae1a327cff4c51
describe
'54255' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKYW' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
92815186382b87073c31235ce7f5a00a
5469cf9925c9f938abc2a09a4da15417fa9de565
describe
'150941' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKYX' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
5435296415b63c14eb4f4c3b98533b9b
9bddef68edea2d63e934c97748f5d389be99c61b
describe
'51260' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKYY' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
caf64d677ef8dde3e7f421856c2ca0b0
0c4adea819aef58e2b299de59b55c0b7e98bb85f
describe
'154620' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKYZ' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
7fe67b446a526d4ff185640f3408eb4f
2e1af0f97417031e7c6d2a39a39f908cbc08f2d3
describe
'154613' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKZA' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
9f0e789745e3b25a9b8e0301781f1461
ad5cc524b2c892ae14c49dfca30799753b669ff7
describe
'53729' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKZB' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
d8fc8a8f9744e425ab5ff6993e1b671a
79417570902aabcf7e5f2373452a1d1c6ecf9c56
describe
'159799' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKZC' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
d11cd117feff39b6aa3054586a9cbba3
30b12cc610d0bf1c62257ff6b81406d2e342f09d
describe
'163805' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKZD' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
e24987bec58f6377150ef3cd4660601c
123b8685f0e2a90599de22153ffc4c18c494138e
describe
'55605' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKZE' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
138e8795fff6c57f8715d05805f810a9
92026d73710196fffcf69b4834149b4cffa32acd
describe
'156895' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKZF' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
564d5e6475a64c1a98dc3ff03aa14d28
dee4cb31c0457857aa7fcae9da832e28d133cbfd
describe
'53973' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKZG' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
1f7262400877256f318d42c8648f6d20
f2adad62e6a67df9d648fe2ae4373779614d8000
describe
'142888' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKZH' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
dd9b4114532ddaa1c6336367cc2f9d74
9d2fed9f88670f0bad9555a2269178dd68a5b2f5
describe
'56355' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKZI' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
f0203c61a3cc65ed43aece7be243d7a3
72c12bfd1ccf993cbd2825a91b22f5bf6cd6e28f
describe
'165025' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKZJ' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
042b0f2e95342dd4cdd6a6befd8e68fd
cc01a272dbb477ae103add27acd1e5e759b60bcb
describe
'162618' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKZK' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
6d2b662709275c96edd22e6d307572af
bca01c113b78abdccc8ded3d24bae1d539ca8bc7
describe
'57440' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKZL' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
b6ee23f230843990efae5b3d8e31c813
2dfc1f8b771b95fae58989b575a6846740e06023
describe
'162451' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKZM' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
899f360873f7464357ce839ae58238cb
3f99a3b43ce668923646b0725571daf45bf1f3ac
describe
'54584' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKZN' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
22384da8906a5f76fa83f80d9b45b06e
0fecda936878fb7cfd0c826c50a5439b1dda110a
describe
'164370' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKZO' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
36928565d62946588a5ef93ff58e3a9a
2ce6e7880a95d13e0e6a52ee6e02f25e387f8a40
describe
'57959' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKZP' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
25ca3435e1cd4a982a4c237df98231f5
67b792454277a906f9039a03370196d9bbbab54b
describe
'46700' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKZQ' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
241f82666b4184601fe63964f0f8d9e1
8d83d5de9d9a09ad562955b9fd6b2de326bb8726
describe
'20037' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKZR' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
13449ed059844033b6cc29fb363295ea
84ea849f0280868ba59758e7a8f213b640d001ad
describe
'11288' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKZS' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
6cb02c4377f88324d0bdabe0b1c51986
b4ed4656a3a5461c2184e9ab47039bf0f144b681
describe
'9468' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKZT' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
8626d70d131cae8aac0b182c6a838eea
631db71bfea481332f1b27432139a3f645ae2aaf
describe
'48987' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKZU' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
04655ea83eef1ee55a30f2b78d1a6b80
ac95fbbe3efcfa5570ea7157b44a6502056a5cdb
describe
'153162' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKZV' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
b2fba38f637fa631672f871da880cdff
43332668d1838a57ae2dbe2a4ecb414da040b38a
describe
'55238' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKZW' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
83e0077bc6c85484ef682bc3fc1cdd9e
5eebe2ddfda0b619e8b41b910bb5ca9fc31933a2
describe
'147833' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKZX' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
a3ba1964039fd6fe43bc26f210740d91
b3693bff4c3c63af32e19e891987c96e34a02ec2
describe
'51743' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKZY' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
04624f25dfb6545246894f5c3c34b9e6
db9363327cbaf71855d3df6b280fe58ba8b52f31
describe
'168029' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABKZZ' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
c04545713c7e8c0a3fb4c7b4863afbf6
80da1e154de2a45edf94a220623d7e509a86bb35
describe
'56814' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLAA' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
1476ce3e2b2c8bb0ff7987128d93fb03
49cc2d9df043de17a563a4faf15a362d693c11d7
describe
'162090' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLAB' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
82366d624804655924ab5aecfad94fbc
18bcdcc1e8df67067736d491b0b4bd5bde7a8871
describe
'164382' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLAC' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
6f6d2f3ebbf56d32fa734b7899e8e178
def9c506eb9eb8ddcc86aa86047487a221c04270
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLAD' 'sip-files00131thm.jpg'
eadc5e6e30818164f25fb85ae5ec79df
8ab6ec43796b187170f0354040085393377df8ce
describe
'58581' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLAE' 'sip-files00132thm.jpg'
0ad4412ceb97ea18469af5b8625e7efe
445c3cbb4baa432f611f3cdc1fcf0e7d7c559518
describe
'155541' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLAF' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
925dade73cb1a8ef3bdd6671b5f38ad5
5611e1ad62a318a191449522958f785924215927
describe
'158584' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLAG' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
232eb99bd7fa2c0a52f854798f73d3a0
c679490568d0ff72ccb39a712c4108561a1701c2
describe
'56427' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLAH' 'sip-files00134thm.jpg'
9810107bb36194789bab8921ec43829c
a3b509fbf94925d2d83d7c515ce619528f282cc2
describe
'167004' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLAI' 'sip-files00135.QC.jpg'
f80643eb8d2662cb5e920cb5cee24288
b0b27770fbbba20bf51b482eecf8b1039d45b70d
describe
'56014' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLAJ' 'sip-files00135thm.jpg'
cced2470f709abe1e41d511175baeb1e
4be6344cbfad217104ed90c0d08b3242da28746f
describe
'164703' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLAK' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
28252fa10b3ac3f1ca9408a9ad2b57ea
7d2c48ccea24e526dacea3a8bca11f647d6d19bc
describe
'57689' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLAL' 'sip-files00136thm.jpg'
a52115e9ab4ea164e10395f1127fb3b9
a789542111a402718c743417397597bb56c1f408
describe
'160852' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLAM' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
aa8dc15250c434992a9b0fe4578a4097
ddd6cb169fa0d825cc6068d28b6d8b2c6fa37f67
describe
'55379' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLAN' 'sip-files00137thm.jpg'
23dceb3cb2c4ecf8e636ae9fd3855421
dd09bd57784a068b52a9244038da1c512cc6736b
describe
'172872' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLAO' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
b2baec66f177a5159ec524d32918e541
f138de34c97fe3cae4e79e11c05cce8a578998e4
describe
'60600' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLAP' 'sip-files00138thm.jpg'
5e881dd0d5b1d6ec6e0d192538e06853
fe5f9883282001b792268651e4d1ec4b0091f274
describe
'155348' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLAQ' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
1ca29e1890b05c73f364e2d703e2a248
c3990c1d7bcb4bb70ee9b113240d385794e41bd9
describe
'53613' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLAR' 'sip-files00139thm.jpg'
9f59b449f3bf19e0620f5429cff7ab18
dd1efc20e9855a19900ec098d25f7a7fdd889073
describe
'55952' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLAS' 'sip-files00140thm.jpg'
5bdeb454030c3ec68a04cc69f3ec3f46
c53c5c43e8ad7d61307532b06a1e2976235df67e
describe
'50516' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLAT' 'sip-files00141thm.jpg'
584f7accf9b1c427a9eb270e8bffb2a2
1ae29b8fab7a1f0952f8282be459e6185db3fc94
describe
'11390' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLAU' 'sip-files00142.QC.jpg'
e5382000db285e91fb5f53df8007d9c7
06428777ca4fd4f03ee06e2a72808c127f4963f4
describe
'18580' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLAV' 'sip-files00143thm.jpg'
080c2e589d5126680142353f0b03b877
871d189f3a2f5a23ede34e4c0875f55313a80455
describe
'11416' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLAW' 'sip-files00144.QC.jpg'
6fdb033ee1e3b5f1f3a5f8517514c60b
a3e43858c677e659cbc13dee40b57cef245a4a5d
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLAX' 'sip-files00144thm.jpg'
07998b22c5c6f28951bf04d18c751028
b59956edbb23795854298f79bfd14ec4864b38db
describe
'142171' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLAY' 'sip-files00145.QC.jpg'
b15c7e4a3689e7136f64a870ade61066
d21e3bf79e107c0ce2e88c7355cf7c1b7a851cac
describe
'52151' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLAZ' 'sip-files00145thm.jpg'
21722a0d69b4b03071322ae5de58b3f1
78b513951d33600337706bb61a76e564e179ac4c
describe
'166349' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLBA' 'sip-files00146.QC.jpg'
0f6af4191a9d3a8154a2db6c0a8133df
3ffa8088c54e10ebaf1917ed45bb9a64c0a961d4
describe
'55831' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLBB' 'sip-files00148thm.jpg'
05201b8dfd5cbc583a0726ab6d27f7f3
59d29d2d82cfc47da5f76f25d6c9c650be2cea98
describe
'180607' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLBC' 'sip-files00149.QC.jpg'
f686e3d3328d246ebdeaf3bb24abe13c
1c873ea19076ee3602ccc3a37fb8fe8e85b9989f
describe
'60984' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLBD' 'sip-files00149thm.jpg'
aaad03c816fe236290d91a13fccc32fc
6926acb00a8689b2355bcf1a8255a98aeea46e4e
describe
'163799' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLBE' 'sip-files00150.QC.jpg'
5e9b63eba9fe57e98ebd09238ccdeb9a
958084b5910a330962f7ee16f2fddc1147499d9b
describe
'57682' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLBF' 'sip-files00150thm.jpg'
3da436dd8277d9a0efb57a952b784187
065ec07db550400627d3e7af14a5604a2bff43b6
describe
'158656' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLBG' 'sip-files00151.QC.jpg'
bbc819e0b042d6b1c4553cc6043193de
879850d7beea1440e285ed10cc7098a5a486e4fc
describe
'55491' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLBH' 'sip-files00151thm.jpg'
b5c3fca72ee2e385d2905d3f7eb9772a
6136439a84bbda1d5f94f1e8fdee32c5176288cb
describe
'58321' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLBI' 'sip-files00152thm.jpg'
89eba782df5ce58f2dba959ee38c241b
3a9caf70c2587a23001b5125c3a9af0aebe80e7a
describe
'163254' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLBJ' 'sip-files00153.QC.jpg'
50954b59b147b1f8bf69481542e6a57e
23818bde1ab6437edc98b802a94dc04e7b5f7b3f
describe
'56520' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLBK' 'sip-files00153thm.jpg'
9e14b449831ecf319fed57a855527cde
488c316b2e072d217baf9d19d1f9f2c11b707797
describe
'164124' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLBL' 'sip-files00154.QC.jpg'
89557252580d092381cbfc2afc3f62b3
f2ca9accdfe7970c05e0077676fd7acbfd758376
describe
'57308' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLBM' 'sip-files00154thm.jpg'
5f4bf08927a4ceaff6ba38275ab86107
e7c8b4e784f84543403db322e3d92b291569c30e
describe
'171587' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLBN' 'sip-files00155.QC.jpg'
bd6babe7e252fd4b7219a7d69685e12f
c7139a4934cf9165c91e51b77b2dcd33b42d1281
describe
'58791' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLBO' 'sip-files00155thm.jpg'
94ae261af43c7381b6fc0b5a3e557c40
33fc0fe4b94f23c515bd585f80c31024ae1b0b2a
describe
'58485' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLBP' 'sip-files00156thm.jpg'
39de9050ddc2643e19e33f5829e44260
34d306dd8ed8603cec5db088640031762425463e
describe
'161042' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLBQ' 'sip-files00157.QC.jpg'
82fd0ce6ac338935281ea43d7c818e81
f479ff7a62c628dd8682a2e669174dc5d1c96e91
describe
'159575' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLBR' 'sip-files00158.QC.jpg'
2e632f97cca0a00da02efb020dc5c8cb
cbc21f8c9796bd60c07efa815af97ee836d03643
describe
'55697' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLBS' 'sip-files00158thm.jpg'
640882b265a3a60f32643cad1fe039fa
00fb509a221d1c9469a36f3e9b07c36ef7d8ec3a
describe
'168992' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLBT' 'sip-files00159.QC.jpg'
4c856915b1a9cfaa8ffcdbfee7ae16e3
aa1f9a2c83c02dbcb8881680f0b34e8b75df47fa
describe
'58458' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLBU' 'sip-files00159thm.jpg'
adbb7dd672fb014bad951ad7569cd855
d2f68fc7064a603d303458881db2a6c6419ce3da
describe
'172857' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLBV' 'sip-files00160.QC.jpg'
58434ef596d4277f5729ea55a93ead67
cb3c4ee4d9368a24657a733a3bdfe0de4e7514ad
describe
'60447' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLBW' 'sip-files00160thm.jpg'
7995497eebcfb83ddf08a51c41b1ccda
8fb02fdb2fc9eeaec65f7b4d39bc7237f5696a30
describe
'171611' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLBX' 'sip-files00161.QC.jpg'
de3b1d605077c69b471d39fb2febf27c
f62f51601d29274d87adba83cdd5fbbf607f1079
describe
'57325' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLBY' 'sip-files00161thm.jpg'
9198707c3a05a1fc77484c7451d03f06
308646358876c461ab19c9802213ab816cbb057b
describe
'71337' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLBZ' 'sip-files00162.QC.jpg'
dd60175d2df0c8d530c2df7221541545
da5e05b56d87bbbcc7c425bf0f77051af1d97dbe
describe
'29301' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLCA' 'sip-files00162thm.jpg'
4608fe2d4416180f615f7be1d01af51e
5f6a6053f9375ccf1087381f78de9ddf17188a3d
describe
'11207' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLCB' 'sip-files00164.QC.jpg'
d4282c1c68a10e97e6e8341f6379538a
1361a63036bebd485ba4a3212ca0cc80aa813e56
describe
'9467' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLCC' 'sip-files00164thm.jpg'
f29b4f97b2a9b6388438169944036eba
416a4d917b9f0ed5fb406cdf6eb9a85647e674f4
describe
'144951' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLCD' 'sip-files00165.QC.jpg'
4604f2fbac2b48652c76abe30b717faf
5afdba1032c14f799b8269ab362a197207c0ad56
describe
'51719' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLCE' 'sip-files00165thm.jpg'
d856bd3390832d3c83b839a0c21cab84
1b7dcde682ab23dbcf443995ff897eafa19ed708
describe
'169260' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLCF' 'sip-files00166.QC.jpg'
4b8a3c9aa00219353baa69a77d8e7478
192d0ae5a57da9131610aa0038f7dfcec7056adb
describe
'58794' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLCG' 'sip-files00166thm.jpg'
dddf01233db2f18aaab0e9d9819522c1
3c0534194eb2f06689c760902b01d63c783ee479
describe
'56579' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLCH' 'sip-files00167thm.jpg'
ecbf833c5c2b31470838385c86bbb863
e13bcb02b404a5c44d06cf686d761379e0686f26
describe
'58670' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLCI' 'sip-files00168thm.jpg'
020943160a64e2bcdeacaba0bbf6b82c
50022f44f2ad76b2504a867dbd8961d4dc097e57
describe
'167185' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLCJ' 'sip-files00169.QC.jpg'
586eb57f04f0a39ad66e61b5f775741d
7057f4e1933d9c0f34b55cc6429decb6e8fabf29
describe
'55913' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLCK' 'sip-files00169thm.jpg'
2aaa275040b2ceb8263bb39699ae264a
277e37f2c429ee5c734c27a1e22f07ee7fe19c43
describe
'169598' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLCL' 'sip-files00170.QC.jpg'
f54db382558fbf51771186edeacac238
e3531dd4f1a962a07a84e5d5c82ec3d21d1b5bbd
describe
'59556' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLCM' 'sip-files00170thm.jpg'
6202393b2f2f704d3bdad34127e8bddc
1629c50cac58148b1516a7099669906633e54330
describe
'172950' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLCN' 'sip-files00172.QC.jpg'
e7d4c40feac02e8090842e568f2a5850
fb85a2f2988312d28d3b5f8acc4c8ea992daff33
describe
'168318' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLCO' 'sip-files00173.QC.jpg'
ebd748d379fbc2e7671928003a6866c7
b8dcd52d0a3e2f52fc4b52f4343fd2fc4f018eba
describe
'57417' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLCP' 'sip-files00174thm.jpg'
913e31d7f78e8eda7e3d1c1d2a433175
1ba96b455d29b70e8c8afac4ef24674fb2bdd323
describe
'157340' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLCQ' 'sip-files00175.QC.jpg'
fdad8f7aa812a5b810593522af47ea1d
8340ce4ac0e583593d0559d15939eb7e7a594eee
describe
'55721' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLCR' 'sip-files00175thm.jpg'
6d416055144d1987293c5fea5b093931
2dc39a1bd13a3b1b45a37d2d950e13cb66db0872
describe
'153740' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLCS' 'sip-files00178.QC.jpg'
a6154952b3d0990d36e7796848aac70c
2a4a61c1bc52cb6af947a3dce3be01b3a0a0414b
describe
'54156' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLCT' 'sip-files00178thm.jpg'
1f20f4a49d2d26fc1316a8fb55da0a0d
4154a6a82a76f3700a7d36f5f85c10587706c3e9
describe
'155549' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLCU' 'sip-files00180.QC.jpg'
223fcc9a209164ad410dfe6c983b9fed
4a7e660497b1dcf34b59a6b9582a841b4fe25bc0
describe
'52049' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLCV' 'sip-files00181thm.jpg'
ebc3aba3630976a8635969c2eb06a075
de14b1e69cf71f87e70126287d5c68cac1d531aa
describe
'44387' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLCW' 'sip-files00182.QC.jpg'
8c784c94ee228ed530b3ea5535860d62
9b1065967b4b7f1546c582c309f86c00c2c95bb5
describe
'20525' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLCX' 'sip-files00182thm.jpg'
83a2d1da32cf9c76a80dffb3146c592a
b229f61401509d26cb3684c449ccfe8fb7037724
describe
'38277' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLCY' 'sip-files00183.QC.jpg'
14fbf1151738fbc58ccdca4a4da36074
dbb2877592f019bed995754659ce5db54d103784
describe
'17379' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLCZ' 'sip-files00183thm.jpg'
a15b88d32a9d5fa0a9fb5c3f3b3b2832
726656f3c224e05aa5d0a1dbec58cab85cd9cff5
describe
'11489' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLDA' 'sip-files00184.QC.jpg'
703f3c2174bc74fb050f43349393113c
b2eb4db733dc90ed4259e112c6b3e7bf33857621
describe
'9390' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLDB' 'sip-files00184thm.jpg'
bf9ec7f8b6264db53617021ea3a9daba
5517960588f46039612228596f0ff4042d67c6e8
describe
'142299' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLDC' 'sip-files00185.QC.jpg'
b838b1ec07b77f8f2a84f77b66ec7b4b
36601006cb9470be7f4b4f6a50cfdbc11bbeb240
describe
'51047' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLDD' 'sip-files00185thm.jpg'
0724bac63c3fc78293def76aa05d11e1
62e3f054e4f7168f3c9134e9cec19649babfd793
describe
'159398' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLDE' 'sip-files00187.QC.jpg'
b701753127d4aa1f33891a4d049e417f
616e70c060ec9d38b4988035c505629bb97e26cb
describe
'54707' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLDF' 'sip-files00187thm.jpg'
dd9b84e0a2269fa45a4d7adb1adf31ce
587476741878ff617dc2a8ea735cf114e19531fd
describe
'54992' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLDG' 'sip-files00188thm.jpg'
50b7fa171418d837b6e71a9f874126b9
b3b7594f44d8bc1f4e1b747a3cc5a979f1bf11f9
describe
'166538' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLDH' 'sip-files00190.QC.jpg'
107dad6fa07642298cacbbb75c67cd0a
b79ab2a5303274ba01a2f831e80f600b2c00526b
describe
'56639' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLDI' 'sip-files00190thm.jpg'
73388ef75e5bf41ff0bd49a99b7eee70
51a9d45bf4488633e7c2ef2fdd847958219e0cc3
describe
'162982' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLDJ' 'sip-files00191.QC.jpg'
d2b8bf8453e364eff7bfbc32a8f7309f
3c21e4c3bf9855f6c6c4b7be43c2cf6803b66af4
describe
'54870' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLDK' 'sip-files00191thm.jpg'
cc2b6c036ec3588bfc4d4d449785cb42
4ade3582047737ba1149cf433a3126f51c9ae307
describe
'165273' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLDL' 'sip-files00192.QC.jpg'
1e04b99e7658b401147cbccbaedaab44
7f6b9638ef773b9a94112185161f68af7ba49d17
describe
'56282' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLDM' 'sip-files00192thm.jpg'
5672abc17b439617db9c8d21298b5b31
1b17c5a4484320627bc70d6a739a2caab5e30fe7
describe
'164484' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLDN' 'sip-files00193.QC.jpg'
6f482e09c65c3c44fb1dea3532852c2b
9cdb6d00afb3eeb0123660fe0fc714ae92692c56
describe
'55735' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLDO' 'sip-files00193thm.jpg'
abca0ec6a908356fe561ff393d4f6a70
e4151ac867ecfee4b2ff7e932e3e32b08514088d
describe
'58140' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLDP' 'sip-files00194thm.jpg'
ce23e0de0e570e278555e219fdaeb0a6
88729aa0b9308b537861a4096be07ae0e50e11a7
describe
'162642' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLDQ' 'sip-files00196.QC.jpg'
0ac2b61d1227e028f56de118173516d1
0de54fbea6d9dd529183c89bca3eb7561b2fb834
'2012-05-25T18:02:36-04:00'
describe
'55352' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLDR' 'sip-files00196thm.jpg'
e6787a806af4aa97f37e15c34437c03e
25b2993b5c7cf4366920181c36d89a0bc388f820
describe
'156954' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLDS' 'sip-files00197.QC.jpg'
4e7a5ecded1fd86882ed102b8b95be22
2c9f7aeb09bf171ed7fff21daed5effa17595239
describe
'173613' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLDT' 'sip-files00198.QC.jpg'
2ba92a05ac623a0e8da2543b3ec8ae9f
d07914ea0686d367f174d910561f2253195cf66b
describe
'59795' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLDU' 'sip-files00198thm.jpg'
894766bc389dcb1ad3bfb00004f93e82
a04f0e0e93204cf01adc231a921e922057918184
describe
'168015' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLDV' 'sip-files00199.QC.jpg'
5f2982c6ead6ebaa048333e29b521076
df5c6e9b35f272d26bfdc1d43b333f7015af91aa
describe
'57783' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLDW' 'sip-files00199thm.jpg'
7cdd57dca8ed49b0a136e17386e3b2ed
b53f3298181ab47c9b0a357053d61838d6662441
describe
'53040' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLDX' 'sip-files00200.QC.jpg'
5a21ec42e5408be33e301aea93ba5c2c
d5397dafde6237c86d4ea9fa662e17874a531bb1
describe
'23958' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLDY' 'sip-files00200thm.jpg'
ee17c0a974dd1753400b2313627d0682
18b341a5c257b5dcb462fa7de7480b7d4168d0dd
describe
'9359' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLDZ' 'sip-files00202thm.jpg'
28ea1b9fe55691dd0c3faf6fc3c7ab1d
98fe87049fa9d54993bd3dade8a66699df676f2b
describe
'146278' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLEA' 'sip-files00203.QC.jpg'
7b067c9ac58c9b1eb9a977a45ddbe608
de19de8d46483ff1011216cf0f005057a3fb5098
describe
'169104' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLEB' 'sip-files00204.QC.jpg'
107c13a7a437c856e142fe312fbe80d6
20eb3683f094c863b619cad2ef2d65353c48e805
describe
'170762' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLEC' 'sip-files00205.QC.jpg'
42f64a67f0f86641fd314b15cac7c017
c93bbcc9527822e59c17c7dd9480bdf478f170df
describe
'57780' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLED' 'sip-files00205thm.jpg'
c3a54c45e12d67ff57f2ac7017a81c2e
e2e8fba7cdffcbd8893575509b56050cae8192bb
describe
'57519' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLEE' 'sip-files00207thm.jpg'
737928f514c3909259cd76d9105f2f4d
923025c7f5086e2a90492e6b8dd49225584f11b1
describe
'169087' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLEF' 'sip-files00208.QC.jpg'
0e4a31c866b4ba221188a12a0d869fc8
d426e76373559412ffa77c3433519b565758441e
describe
'58242' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLEG' 'sip-files00208thm.jpg'
25581ef25086220a47292f1d3547a2d2
c50849b000742c340dccf97baeae23e10d203a26
describe
'55208' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLEH' 'sip-files00209thm.jpg'
d2a2354542e0a3fa8b948b0f4c69ed9c
c3baa74105ace845b62a0902775529c9c7003739
describe
'176464' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLEI' 'sip-files00210.QC.jpg'
6ca0cced8baddec8fb5cd19d1570d689
cdfff0360afc3a9a446692ee62bf5425c053e9fd
describe
'60389' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLEJ' 'sip-files00210thm.jpg'
992a6e69936374fed148db63c6f637ab
cb25f90259d246c3077891120e064f0e753be658
describe
'57280' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLEK' 'sip-files00211thm.jpg'
1a5ff4c991a8c4624cad7749bb47a717
36786f65d647017830d87312372b27e2ef329309
describe
'168764' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLEL' 'sip-files00212.QC.jpg'
4b814af2c12b8a4259389319aa489236
794b3c36ff73cb949da402a0f2d6fc81c1895106
describe
'169432' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLEM' 'sip-files00213.QC.jpg'
8a98c0b6f129171d438782b978d0277f
7bb50d0f4a6c544a2dfea8a14195feba36a4b643
describe
'57724' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLEN' 'sip-files00213thm.jpg'
3e9c36c7ed7e30dbff5bdeab1c8a92c9
510877237146a69aba26a3ae9eb4e2b1b3293403
describe
'161299' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLEO' 'sip-files00215.QC.jpg'
4f203a9b65e2a6d02b32ef2b67bad497
e59ce83b5af279b5c7acc9d7c1bdbe7d4ec63c1d
describe
'57027' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLEP' 'sip-files00216thm.jpg'
2f8438606ba862c66d20eb99511af22e
d475b59d8cbf8f6eb09a3ecff0155f83864c4ef7
describe
'172449' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLEQ' 'sip-files00217.QC.jpg'
2e459f82b0c25e296d9de1720a86420d
a7da014bb9c4e3cec961a6440d01e9361a43f177
describe
'59936' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLER' 'sip-files00217thm.jpg'
024662ccffcd7e131897ead3d49f7d09
76d4d88ce81f524641cd773e84d8ce10613aaa69
describe
'170072' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLES' 'sip-files00218.QC.jpg'
090fc3a527cfe09164d266d7ce2410e7
5a26da290b6a002895e7ef3267a3225a51ce32c3
describe
'57848' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLET' 'sip-files00218thm.jpg'
f4bf8c429f6c4128f6ec5490a3b6e50c
59708ae919fca64d2121dbcf771c3be3f1c68a1a
describe
'56955' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLEU' 'sip-files00220thm.jpg'
3a5074d7d5f7e1901ed118cfed00f834
6ea6e1f3fd1bd732be106a7be1ebd22bbb525973
describe
'39762' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLEV' 'sip-files00221.QC.jpg'
8b6d393cd9bf32f215ab735992299a82
fd83d1b8c9e37da28b2d9a8caf263681bb20e0a7
describe
'17841' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLEW' 'sip-files00221thm.jpg'
04bf46a7536a7bd061a188c627a7356c
634c8fdded7ec70072da67db0c7ffe91ca880d1f
describe
'11233' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLEX' 'sip-files00222.QC.jpg'
193ff56cfb620b42047aa9743b66f3e1
3db1e042c3430a36d450c802ef09eb0a74274fa1
describe
'172781' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLEY' 'sip-files00224.QC.jpg'
a82b4057866199397f29944078656ae0
495e5bd11216634aedd4acdd5217fc397feeb05e
describe
'167433' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLEZ' 'sip-files00225.QC.jpg'
5b92c9c2138e374294ff4e37b8a74ee2
a5a90c1d0a67ba52760bd1022c6176f8825214e6
describe
'57337' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLFA' 'sip-files00225thm.jpg'
632e5fb171220cbeb439ff8ce51738d3
69db234a5b76978ec0f69afe21ee921c52943780
describe
'57667' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLFB' 'sip-files00226thm.jpg'
249cb22349f6803931ab84e301e750e8
2609075ed390befaaff304a867e0c4b03a41ed40
describe
'162060' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLFC' 'sip-files00227.QC.jpg'
197262759ff7d2e17b112e976beaf778
d3b3d0c151206beb5dbd4a0496ba39fd3f139cdf
describe
'177315' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLFD' 'sip-files00228.QC.jpg'
83d5f41358151d18961a9bd341cf1d86
48406b6bf1118ee1b5600417e225ea8223102a42
describe
'59985' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLFE' 'sip-files00228thm.jpg'
deb1df2ac99718793161e1d387335514
5b1e4d5fbf16c37fb39f5d5c231dad0fb30fac53
describe
'165120' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLFF' 'sip-files00229.QC.jpg'
8cb6413f071cd2c61c59b6cd6c3777d7
d77e728f257c01c0b1eb83cea724be7fee1e08b8
describe
'55050' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLFG' 'sip-files00229thm.jpg'
06fb180c10cee9f3e43d2093bb19d169
add332ed48f7f099d61fb765b9cfa80105cfa074
describe
'171903' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLFH' 'sip-files00230.QC.jpg'
459c7413ef35bb39623aa7d5c3daae5d
47f47ffe0018fe1564bb4daa2fcb8e2d99207ca0
describe
'59341' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLFI' 'sip-files00230thm.jpg'
8d64edaf8e7bc08736f155f77c482f17
083fdd1eb056f422c936047c2242db3f449da252
describe
'53620' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLFJ' 'sip-files00231thm.jpg'
4bdc5860ea21b2f26677d9f235398ef0
a06d9af50285f94248d8964cff17f8c17fae1e6d
describe
'164250' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLFK' 'sip-files00233.QC.jpg'
5700e87ec25a45c89c22d0ddd04360f1
4b1e042ffe0df5061acdfe98245fde45697ff704
describe
'54705' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLFL' 'sip-files00233thm.jpg'
06801e59e7d00924d01fdb37a59866a0
60074061b9309bb1f324c04b541283004b3d722e
describe
'162889' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLFM' 'sip-files00235.QC.jpg'
a90d8f7cdf38b11c256a8b2778b33254
e713b0b1ac9cef03dccc40fbb00c814aaffc4953
describe
'55675' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLFN' 'sip-files00235thm.jpg'
1be7655744752c336e3a4ae723305662
733f8680f0f115d41ecc31acee67ff144de444cf
describe
'166918' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLFO' 'sip-files00236.QC.jpg'
1a1b8b7ffad18670bd2aa475087f10bb
c220fee1234677fe220080e812a0aa06a7f4338c
describe
'55331' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLFP' 'sip-files00236thm.jpg'
6b1e188ae5b2e0c3840b8984ce950aa7
d624f36bad7f0fd699deb92909fa0378a89feda1
describe
'158174' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLFQ' 'sip-files00237.QC.jpg'
ac016921605e1f3a3cd15335d91c39f6
bb2b447f8a516517b42a27ea612184aef9c199a0
describe
'55659' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLFR' 'sip-files00238thm.jpg'
d541553b6785e322ac9b57fe28e7efa6
09860e8a5b3ce660a6da59dc3cf9ce3e14e67606
describe
'160999' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLFS' 'sip-files00239.QC.jpg'
d2f0b42b9a1bede77d2eb67e370fe56b
ffd7910e9f51766a37b36a79f872d46d40a83140
describe
'160286' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLFT' 'sip-files00240.QC.jpg'
f8e86a46e80372d95057d491da5e7b25
1958aec1d85f5f6561ba20e93db8ddd6eb5b6619
describe
'55316' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLFU' 'sip-files00240thm.jpg'
af1842f5961adbe696d3b3f24f13ee91
a8406ea913b8105dd6a807940acc862b398eafbe
describe
'49048' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLFV' 'sip-files00241.QC.jpg'
893126226a951c48597c4faed9b05c10
98cbdaf82ec65ddc331728c672c6cadfbfef47f0
describe
'11278' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLFW' 'sip-files00242.QC.jpg'
4738ff723968fccb1a8dc9ec4af977f4
12583215dd14d70e6464e7430ebbc3feb981e1c9
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLFX' 'sip-files00242thm.jpg'
b1825e8c579b2822aa0c008287c8ab4f
31a4d42a3bd3014480b0173dee5719979351e6fc
describe
'57605' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLFY' 'sip-files00244thm.jpg'
da39e47278c06cf08c215ca00fffd905
cd4058c62a94e9b8e97b10af665165a66f125866
describe
'166331' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLFZ' 'sip-files00245.QC.jpg'
cb7fb843316021df8f01446e219371f7
b4e43431d6375aad3b5f5d468d069d95c9c1fb42
describe
'58083' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLGA' 'sip-files00245thm.jpg'
ee09e610d0a195670b80268aa570f36d
f410f84d1610b7cdf7296cb27e3bc53b1a473b45
describe
'175474' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLGB' 'sip-files00246.QC.jpg'
05d21206b908b47126811606b0751c25
3de0fbcdf491e8754c4c4c4ec8f72150ead69722
describe
'62868' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLGC' 'sip-files00246thm.jpg'
d4c6e3929a0b365b4b48488f45d8bab8
1a9175206683ecffb83cc439b8005e6ad248a0f3
describe
'169269' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLGD' 'sip-files00247.QC.jpg'
0eafb2e563e8bce0d65197a0626b01b5
e7bccba12290699c96516052e826c2d3d039eba7
describe
'58718' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLGE' 'sip-files00247thm.jpg'
bafa32d36e9c650ddd2705ad083600aa
880db65c04aaf50a51ef756c6673be1f40cbd732
describe
'171674' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLGF' 'sip-files00248.QC.jpg'
b6ea7a051171f3b4d41080aeb0a4fc20
9a2b25cb8735b7cf871af232715e6c7b690a07be
describe
'60684' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLGG' 'sip-files00248thm.jpg'
fb7c115746e9846f1fe4520bb8d8c250
3a72f20b41431fa163d7eef852d504500c1ba354
describe
'172524' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLGH' 'sip-files00249.QC.jpg'
680e11887de550c91a143c8d84259671
2353a7c256f32b576b47eb4de6e81653a6bffb0b
describe
'57548' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLGI' 'sip-files00249thm.jpg'
fd935eed455289b92a4309d66632adf9
db98b6746bed8c43eb8172dd9caf55cddc447c0f
describe
'59699' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLGJ' 'sip-files00250thm.jpg'
95eff68a90c0c14114578de3b309f600
7a9f02ac37272d641e5bc90085d28ec08ea0c965
describe
'159244' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLGK' 'sip-files00251.QC.jpg'
da1aa4d3d0d1effdd882cd359496c374
4d997ecad4aa756168e0537650065d41fcf32a6b
describe
'55984' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLGL' 'sip-files00251thm.jpg'
f15893dd1cdaca524c4fb5ffb952de49
5dcd1daa1faa79c7c6355f30ab3c67441b27040a
describe
'167683' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLGM' 'sip-files00254.QC.jpg'
40767c5af04016fd67c188477f1a85dd
8c0e049a3ce41f4756b08e37c4582c7fe708faa2
describe
'58356' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLGN' 'sip-files00254thm.jpg'
3236dd9ccb3e40d26ece6b4c45e4b9f4
b181fb4ad392d21481ccb6c1c303e95408ab689e
describe
'160816' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLGO' 'sip-files00255.QC.jpg'
14e09077fcad9287ef708dd3013c2853
3172aa81f31e34d4e1783d8580eaac267ea1ac54
describe
'54766' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLGP' 'sip-files00255thm.jpg'
729f9f3561d64ca13d7c061aa3d57cd7
be522c3bc8101922eaf3da0cc6936c9411071426
describe
'165954' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLGQ' 'sip-files00256.QC.jpg'
d142b9c8e40e8e44df36a607d63bc876
46ef8e281316feeb45740bc846f24ac92a46bce9
describe
'58291' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLGR' 'sip-files00256thm.jpg'
63589129ffc75de4dc3b80ca85cc0c67
92e6d42b7fc7526ea598b28dcc4a038d8a0f3a34
describe
'58282' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLGS' 'sip-files00257thm.jpg'
f26dac721348dafd4cf649475d0d1552
aa58d805d11e4c636d79a6db1891c1589de0f2ed
describe
'56180' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLGT' 'sip-files00258.QC.jpg'
b2756636f7773dfdc46e67463dcdb920
90b7ffbb968ac85319b02801c372a01c7561cccd
describe
'25094' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLGU' 'sip-files00258thm.jpg'
131391b713b297411d25d03730bf4013
16680f86675f6f47d5894b208ff5c9f7cd6b2b54
describe
'39318' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLGV' 'sip-files00259.QC.jpg'
d3faadb77da1ad6e205acb4f6fb00a6b
6f0387762451df70e925d8844f0ff71cef67d3cd
describe
'18055' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLGW' 'sip-files00259thm.jpg'
f71ed14c46b3ab085671406542247279
9f1db5561145aa16cf4ff491974d9a4e914f7636
describe
'9328' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLGX' 'sip-files00260thm.jpg'
b3302c1cee70b23481dba5433edae50a
917e575c266c934928d5bb7dc3e7c31500d9f422
describe
'148552' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLGY' 'sip-files00261.QC.jpg'
5206a9893e06026578f7948b953c36b3
3d1ad765c3d4988df029e9469f8d3d5d2aefb2dc
describe
'53084' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLGZ' 'sip-files00261thm.jpg'
fd6277b80ca4e3761bd987218ad432bc
f4bd14864d041a16315c065121fc567b6836a85a
describe
'170860' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLHA' 'sip-files00262.QC.jpg'
f1fdd8a48cb35d1e80d61cc41321a881
cd5d32199c22d151f71273ef8310936faf360915
describe
'166495' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLHB' 'sip-files00263.QC.jpg'
bd91062c9e44c96c9561ba7279863e99
b60702d153ddf194544803b4d325af2158bb2825
describe
'55257' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLHC' 'sip-files00263thm.jpg'
16cc9a9e1806b4a77f046deb7ae18684
6e7f7d6cdd4b461b0b0bc2124be047e8a6d563d5
describe
'166389' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLHD' 'sip-files00264.QC.jpg'
5ad243d5f2ad6bbced36d6c5b95fe276
c171534f21310704274ca3529ab060871cd0c4e0
describe
'54609' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLHE' 'sip-files00265thm.jpg'
16ec2e8debdde61a21bc21a6d9d5ed34
c72205981d359d51c671962908d854a8e629da1c
describe
'57631' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLHF' 'sip-files00266thm.jpg'
71f5a66bc422f5e8c10cdaf1afeb36bc
2eaeba62a7c5a95ea82b69d877ff50e3193e6300
describe
'167083' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLHG' 'sip-files00268.QC.jpg'
dd709d0357c20149d50c58ec4c4b396f
7381e1923100c71769f297f657406006eff6c748
describe
'56635' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLHH' 'sip-files00268thm.jpg'
ef39ca07cfb7b7539ba059ff08f0b135
bd03263f442979d276273f4843116320fee084b6
describe
'157552' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLHI' 'sip-files00269.QC.jpg'
d7f2cd9958e4ee353a2c87800feba22c
9fb1881a5a3f71aab8067b1876bfbf6de6e8a194
describe
'53771' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLHJ' 'sip-files00269thm.jpg'
8097d560bff652c9b1e54bad082b3bfb
3283d33a3d61d1a86a6c9dccb23acfaff4badadf
describe
'167372' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLHK' 'sip-files00270.QC.jpg'
bce47a9eb744af7b18eb3d1aa1f3102a
e72a21f56669eb021e3441e9e587b61323c6bbc5
describe
'56089' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLHL' 'sip-files00270thm.jpg'
39d6e78c594da3a65ee5dde27817de59
bdd2dfde415e08cf2caf1cf2f95349f06a154b4c
describe
'53896' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLHM' 'sip-files00271thm.jpg'
d2e2847facd7117cd8f309fce44ac5a7
cf6d16d3194375a7fc1ae1325533e853b9d17493
describe
'168482' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLHN' 'sip-files00272.QC.jpg'
f9ce6094f545e934524969545fccb06c
448d0cbc1f5a819e49082b39674c88921e1fdd41
describe
'37533' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLHO' 'sip-files00273.QC.jpg'
7e27c51276ab340bff8533b3dcc0dc2e
45c71877bf14820af13b8bcf76f1e9b3cff60e48
describe
'17483' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLHP' 'sip-files00273thm.jpg'
114f22f7792038157526ab50ecdc3937
c5090f528fc33bc651be617f037d517b31c22b5c
describe
'9384' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLHQ' 'sip-files00274thm.jpg'
7b445e722116ba535c983f967bfe79c9
5d23ab456e79344e01c893ab195b64d1f05070d4
describe
'133901' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLHR' 'sip-files00275.QC.jpg'
946d4132a438b555dcca188cd861b466
caf956d9507c299415fc207944dce717ded94573
describe
'48149' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLHS' 'sip-files00275thm.jpg'
742a37671b49acc4a2f5549b4224cad4
3497872ce8ed4558b280488120e2223fcfce66aa
describe
'168986' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLHT' 'sip-files00276.QC.jpg'
0fce1095866d1754910c28483936f44a
5992d950e9342421bb49188af06608e938473416
describe
'154644' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLHU' 'sip-files00277.QC.jpg'
492c34255c316640d1460b08b0d24f9c
10269279807b823778402329a4eec02777b01c15
describe
'54299' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLHV' 'sip-files00277thm.jpg'
b9631016eb3d6af6d8ad038209993a53
d683d53a0bd9b92a1d864daaf46e26967c71e453
describe
'166471' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLHW' 'sip-files00278.QC.jpg'
ac48ca61cadb8cf9199c831ed65e4377
4079143939fb5564fbc5b3f28a2c214cd3720bf2
describe
'52801' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLHX' 'sip-files00279thm.jpg'
62d5061f0d17eca9d623ddb0fda9b485
26f1ef29399176466096e12222ab74a65e2b9d6f
describe
'162692' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLHY' 'sip-files00281.QC.jpg'
02f2ba714b54c61781e3ddb8d798e2ad
ff3bc044a3cec9f01644122728bf4cae1f242e18
describe
'54297' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLHZ' 'sip-files00281thm.jpg'
d08f203eef6e30a261a5a3c36307f5aa
b8333308932d566a3e52860c814c8d5159e94730
describe
'58636' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLIA' 'sip-files00282thm.jpg'
fd948166f767f73638f460a40da5ae01
3f1cdd9c13e76b7816ec83793df3ca478e55353b
describe
'159559' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLIB' 'sip-files00283.QC.jpg'
eecca005c7e5f56a906113a9a41c6a9d
d9af55f908b7251e0d8149281ab7ccbd268c5a73
describe
'56102' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLIC' 'sip-files00283thm.jpg'
e2c76d6ff92adb9b87bf3a5cb77b9402
7f7846ca6ee14a2aca560eba2ee6dfcf7ba6004e
describe
'162365' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLID' 'sip-files00284.QC.jpg'
ec315c182af01056d0a94e1adb4491cb
f2a2f7307c875205fb0311c103a9ed4cba8b826a
describe
'56413' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLIE' 'sip-files00285thm.jpg'
f74b704bd2aba70480d9c53c6f79db34
96b5634466f7a7afd9d9ead93d36e9b45b5465d3
describe
'162128' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLIF' 'sip-files00286.QC.jpg'
66b7b14807cf9074de6eea357ca2a995
0f54ee7c5eca1b9abcda3e1fd8a378bf882271df
describe
'53012' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLIG' 'sip-files00287thm.jpg'
9b297208ee5809a9331739d79785a297
164c0851c6235dc1664f1cd93c477b0eca5a2490
describe
'172196' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLIH' 'sip-files00288.QC.jpg'
4acc7f9cd473d4db576c8dc31b16aeee
7c4bd4469dca3c8af968ae19af17edaf2c353782
describe
'59255' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLII' 'sip-files00288thm.jpg'
b596bf22351b91025d4f6eb6359e81c9
f060319735f7142f5526aaacc6ab8165e9ae435f
describe
'163996' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLIJ' 'sip-files00289.QC.jpg'
2fec65e95a58a72609ac7fbc79abbb29
3a3056faf9246ccd9894873b1af522495c4f6a80
describe
'56902' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLIK' 'sip-files00289thm.jpg'
022c0458f72f76215a8960f35edcfc6b
5455169a1a00548384d028d276bd721c769e5917
describe
'159451' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLIL' 'sip-files00290.QC.jpg'
12c2e3b6fafe737cc91e0247651d92f9
b2f4add00c759498ab5436ad6f992ab51c01205c
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLIM' 'sip-files00290thm.jpg'
03a2418ff140dc7b4bef2539b6aa0364
bd7e6f5b9fd3dccd26312064fab39e1ce5c6c3ac
describe
'154692' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLIN' 'sip-files00291.QC.jpg'
df10fe1f48f6ba94fa6246d30e3cf450
abaa8491e3f15bc50bbed345b8bb08e0619e5c84
describe
'23016' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLIO' 'sip-files00292thm.jpg'
725467b25176ed710b73c2b3b7948f9e
3523df6c812febf55d6087fa512d8d46f8a4cb2f
describe
'18049' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLIP' 'sip-files00293thm.jpg'
3053ebc459975fd05be91f5c5a586b92
91af05efd2c61e01a0280edd4d6ed51ee4b27dd1
describe
'9477' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLIQ' 'sip-files00294thm.jpg'
65e8996b2860fb164c469fb41683e525
76f6d34b0c1a8b6e2da61e1dc84896d0f0153cfa
describe
'49343' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLIR' 'sip-files00295thm.jpg'
a7f7a1a8d6937c5859fc011d6733ff7d
9eeeb6b6b000fed65932ae77ec6a19eb32a6ae83
describe
'57157' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLIS' 'sip-files00296thm.jpg'
7355f5f94111b5ccd09fbf3fcbaae965
5d7223660b65164eb60e86e405f572ec7019324f
describe
'156774' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLIT' 'sip-files00297.QC.jpg'
e5285470218f9169075bd23b63f20b01
3f688a8d494e24cfafe715a799e349b0f2da1737
describe
'53756' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLIU' 'sip-files00297thm.jpg'
73f94030486589b719d6cce7a8b9e5ea
b69f73e7df271e01f600ce8362510a04505ae6d0
describe
'56378' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLIV' 'sip-files00298thm.jpg'
07fab3316b045614c1bf939e182d575f
77f68f9a12b8f72ce39bd5b8f03e46d4887d4c90
describe
'152716' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLIW' 'sip-files00299.QC.jpg'
62ea08e8e31b0de65d6df048f04a447a
ccc44c7ac4f7c18bcffc4cc71f12639bde38ba90
describe
'52497' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLIX' 'sip-files00299thm.jpg'
4d33d349176d7417ee392537ac4b6315
fdb2333e069068a55c21b3aec02e1f3f027169fc
describe
'156699' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLIY' 'sip-files00300.QC.jpg'
af6d26632503c5caa4e2ea8342e0d6e5
ea8d7d657111e59240af88a0c6ab3937c6303a16
describe
'56667' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLIZ' 'sip-files00300thm.jpg'
e8f49f980aaaf100e5f7e298415ba02c
1931b0b38df7f82cb277c54454d2cb19fea6a283
describe
'53111' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLJA' 'sip-files00301thm.jpg'
d2965511488c942560dd0e4a7ae7dc4d
1444420c08ecd7a587675f8145cf6aaea7c0f914
describe
'55914' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLJB' 'sip-files00302thm.jpg'
047cebfaad304659b94a250abdc2091f
fc255c5c847280be498443b3ae64da52d842314f
describe
'57035' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLJC' 'sip-files00304thm.jpg'
6790138ea5e14ca40f517b8e6e13cad6
95323eeb0bf651e74175dcdeac21a529e4846364
describe
'213463' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLJD' 'sip-files00305.QC.jpg'
30622789e320faabb3176a18ecc2425e
ded9767eccb86b2fbcb0a55dbeba3cfc49426590
describe
'63926' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLJE' 'sip-files00305thm.jpg'
6b53606e10b6d99737eedc8f8fd289bd
246bf19fedf173639f2519b90df5c7a656ba4b14
describe
'154266' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLJF' 'sip-files00307.QC.jpg'
68067d9092ea57a583953a63c997f7dd
be88372d326a4a6ea162ac8439f302a9b06bcf83
describe
'55098' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLJG' 'sip-files00307thm.jpg'
97e1ddd18b5f923570b3877cf3893783
2cfacb7fe931c9e72837431e8de940e4fbda4e46
describe
'57832' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLJH' 'sip-files00308thm.jpg'
9f6f29928a75d07b359f52de1f605df7
1544a4b3e66f6286bc8eb4c3afaec3532af8e130
describe
'147739' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLJI' 'sip-files00309.QC.jpg'
94dff04019711fd035417ac7b1cc7cfc
36d76b78d30cb5de15c9474f236f4f6d8bde6105
describe
'51855' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLJJ' 'sip-files00309thm.jpg'
c9d8de06f7a11192846c98c4211f11b3
ea3a340c1370c8fdecc387b99d86651a86d9e029
describe
'159333' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLJK' 'sip-files00310.QC.jpg'
d28f2d8127aefa4e5331e2f04db4af65
fe80903e92ed29c2d7356568cfc51c8abbd9e78c
describe
'55920' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLJL' 'sip-files00310thm.jpg'
981b112ddfa287b636e9e3422adb8942
adf96ad27b1cf2d3157ff4d3862a56037aeb1876
describe
'156944' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLJM' 'sip-files00311.QC.jpg'
630e48bda84fc2baec7b772d97123e78
ef7aa089aabcb3d717bd85d0619e1e16a5126db9
describe
'45441' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLJN' 'sip-files00312thm.jpg'
7991646e54537e1655cbf67893d83318
7b0fc670024e009ee19f36da3581ef010e0a4b2f
describe
'160807' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLJO' 'sip-files00313.QC.jpg'
bd9469a309dd9544116ef3fb12069dd3
5f66b2a73c464b50a4b12004e7bbb4446172a425
describe
'163043' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLJP' 'sip-files00314.QC.jpg'
0a10e3902a6711e62295614b5c9e02b1
6d6471f324a00f4dc81da5d154c10f0f4ed9cc84
describe
'55619' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLJQ' 'sip-files00314thm.jpg'
937ebc65f0ed58214ad7d181d4557547
cd0811453c8c937138707744025795c2a7546c91
describe
'147407' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLJR' 'sip-files00315.QC.jpg'
5744271f1fedcf1cfe5fe86cc38f3d22
ac7f73e92e7effb78a30bbca9efd772d9fdebd3b
describe
'53375' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLJS' 'sip-files00315thm.jpg'
47fe09b09ec9689a2edc44f9a35d52b4
7fae81373b98e933c338c04773ec789e156bc017
describe
'173053' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLJT' 'sip-files00316.QC.jpg'
7c5a27ecdebeca167e3bf8ebbd0c6cc4
e78e71b4d1bf16713c8e09a7eb110aa8d6bad340
describe
'57409' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLJU' 'sip-files00316thm.jpg'
33f18853c313ba3bbe41faf4dd06e80a
877a2d3130a63330b1a6f54311338db6c8665926
describe
'150354' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLJV' 'sip-files00317.QC.jpg'
2112968211b035e41cc4f66296d4ca6f
5f53e9eb8c6e84a76a1338efe1c3bb29b1654e9e
describe
'52001' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLJW' 'sip-files00317thm.jpg'
fe9e17e443aeb020d7d8ceb85dbc312b
97a3855a9f692f569442aaf4556dce6e05084a98
describe
'143136' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLJX' 'sip-files00318.QC.jpg'
94843b69d59aa9c05e4ca5739da68bee
682ca2ca45e8bae8d113acc592044e36babb5dc5
describe
'53852' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLJY' 'sip-files00319thm.jpg'
334eca01641b9167d62f78c053246feb
e5ff80994dcd38785490060f32ad1b60e607647f
describe
'161647' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLJZ' 'sip-files00320.QC.jpg'
a25d063a1cd9642860456f9a18afb4d3
ae7825d75d10ae38a5984e2c95c4fb9efb8b4d3f
describe
'56291' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLKA' 'sip-files00320thm.jpg'
3a3a769c79eaef8799a46ec497edd775
077b673e591f3d484e37b6321addf40945ccc982
describe
'121074' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLKB' 'sip-files00323.QC.jpg'
dbe52216bb4b6423b1a8ef063f3df080
870d51714f40f65f2f614ae98706e9b9acae4752
describe
'40387' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLKC' 'sip-files00323thm.jpg'
ed1243ea749563e99e9e4b3b5c018f59
4f91232398ef69b44529413358b92aee04b008fb
describe
'150298' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLKD' 'sip-files00324.QC.jpg'
fca9b75569a01549a8735a79ba852214
828c61328e8121a9d144c2d3b4d5ce54c88b170a
describe
'46396' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLKE' 'sip-files00324thm.jpg'
dd73385af4b1195fd8533e0fb92e9c05
c46101a8f5ca79e97e0c8a3f90f71294dd748a73
describe
'77167' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLKF' 'sip-files00325.QC.jpg'
7708fd4e3df3e88af90224b2aa77e5b2
8411351f0de670e2500955da3cb7943206fbde54
describe
'33741' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLKG' 'sip-files00325thm.jpg'
3abbc7b027593901c25e2bbad7fd6536
29fdeb914dddb1776d7b791d9cbd4dd23d57f979
describe
'367590' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACEfileF20100203_AABLKH' 'sip-filesUF00028277_00001.mets'
47025ebb0842068aee37ce133a198a1b
f44b22569547b3a3b2ff8c6e1085a7f608244fdd
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-07T02:26:49-05:00'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.