Citation
The Merrie heart

Material Information

Title:
The Merrie heart : a collection of favourite nursery rhymes
Creator:
M. E. G., fl. 1872-1879 ( Author, Primary )
Crane, Walter, 1845-1915 ( Engraver )
Cassell, Petter & Galpin ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
London
Publisher:
Cassell, Petter, and Galpin
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
[1], 225, [1], 16 p., [7] leaves of plates : ill. (some col.) ; 18 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Nursery rhymes ( lcsh )
Children's poetry ( lcsh )
Nursery rhymes -- 1875 ( rbgenr )
Children's poetry -- 1875 ( lcsh )
Publishers' catalogues -- 1875 ( rbgenr )
Baldwin -- 1875
Genre:
Nursery rhymes ( rbgenr )
Children's poetry ( lcsh )
Publishers' catalogues ( rbgenr )
non-fiction ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Date of publication from inscription.
General Note:
Color plates bear Walter Crane's rebus.
General Note:
Publisher's catalogue follows text.
General Note:
Includes index of first lines.
Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
Statement of Responsibility:
by M.E.G.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026778146 ( ALEPH )
ALH0441 ( NOTIS )
60884073 ( OCLC )

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THE HOUSE THAT JACK BUILT.



THE

MERRIE HEART:

A Collection of Favourite Nursery Rhymes.

BY

MEL G.

LONDON:
CASSELL, PETTER, AND GALPIN,

BELLE SAUVAGE YARD, LONDON, E.C.





INDEX OF THE: FIRST LINES.

Seep

. PAGE
A carrion crow sat on an oak - - - - - - 28
A fair little girl sat under atree - - - - 145
A hoggie dead ! a hoggie dead! a hogpie dead} Lot - - 109
A little cock sparrow [sat on a green tree] - - - 200
A little man and I fell out [how shall we bring, &e] - - 96
A little man and J fell out [T’Il tell you, ee ] - - - 96
A rainbow in the morning - - . . - - 122
A titty mouse sat in a witty to se - - x - rh,
A wasanapple pie - - - - - - - 155
A’ the nicht ower and ower - - - - - - - 205
All the months of the year - - - - - - - I21
Amo, amas, J love a lass - - - - - - 83
Annan, Tweed and Clyde - - - - - - - 225
An old woman was sweeping her pous - - - = 2136
April fool, April fool - - - - - - - 124
April showers : - - - - - - A eT
As I came in by Glenap - - - : - - - 210
As I was going to St. Ives__ - - - - - - - 115
As I was going up Pippin Hill - - - - - - 22
As the day lengthens - - - - - - 121
As Tommy Snooks and Becey Bepoks - - - - - 89
Ba, ba, black sheep — - - - - - - - - 117
Bea good child - = - - - -, = - : 201
Bell-ell-ell - - - 2 a : £ < - 61
Blow the fire, plocteciaith - ae ge : : : - 84
Blow, wind, blow ; and go, mill, go : : - : - 2ir
Blue [is ihexrs true] - - > : - * - 129
Blue is beauty, red’s a token - - 3 3 - 129

Boys and girls, come out to play - - - - - ot 5 OF



li INDEX OF THE FIRST LINES.

PAGE
Can you make me a cambric shirt ? - - - - - 93
Cock, cock, I have la-a-a-yed - - - ~ < - 132
Cousin, cousin, how do you do? - - - - - - 98
Cross patch - - - - 7 - - - : - 175
Cuckoo, cherry tree - - - - - - 7 - 126
Cuckoo, cuckoo - - : - - 2 : 2 - 126
Dickery, dickery, dock - - : 7 7 2 - 79
Ding, dong, bell - - - - - - - - - I6r
Dusty was the coat - - - - 2 - - 2573
Early to bed, and early to rise - - - - - - 103
Elizabeth, Elspeth, Betsy, and Bes - - - - - 110
Every lady i in this land - - . - S : - I16
For every evil under the sun- -— - - - - - - 214
Formed long ago, yet made to- coe : - : - - 114
Four and twenty tailors - - - - : - 160
Four corners to this bed - - - - - - - 135
Gang and hear the gowk yell - : - - - - 192
Gay go up, and gay go down : : - - : 7S:
Gin ye be for lang kail - - - : - - - = 25175
Glasgow for bells - - - - - - - - - 222
God bless the master of this house - - - - - 124
Good-day, now, bonnie robin - - - - - 2 217
Good-morning, good fellow - - - - - - - 176
Goosie, goosie, gander - - - - - - - - 108
Great A, little a - - - - - - 5 - 192)
Green cheese, yellow laces - : - - - : Seer
Grey-eyed, greedy - 7 : - i - . = 2103
Happy the man who belongs to no party - : - - 89
Hee O, weeO - ‘ © : = - 5 A OS
Here am I, little jumping Joan - - - - - se yO
Here comes a lusty wooer - : - - - ey aly
Here comes a poor woman from Babylon - - - - 206

Here goes my lord - : - - 7 Fi 2 2662



INDEX OF THE FIRST LINES.

ill



Here stands a fist - - - - - - -
Here’s to you and yours - - - - -
He who tills the fairies’ green - - - -
Hey, diddle, diddle_ - : - - : -
Higgledy, piggledy [Here we lie] - - - -
Humpty Dumpty sat ona wall - - - -
Hush-a-bye, baby, ona tree-top - - - -

I doubt, I doubt - - - - - :
If all the world was apple pie - - - -
If Candlemas Day be dry and fair - - -
If I’d as much money as I could spend - - -
If New Year’s Eve night wind blow south -

If the cock crows on going to bed - - -
I had a dove, and the sweet dove died - - -
I had a little hobby-horse_ - - - - -
Thad a little husband - - - - - -
I had a little moppet - - - - - -
I had a little pony - -
I had a little sister, they called her Peep: peep -
I lay me down upon my side- - -
I love sixpence, pretty little sixpence - - -
I saw a peacock with a fiery tail - - - -
I saw three ships come sailing by - - - -
I won’t be my father’s Jack - - - oe :
I would if I could - - - - - -
I'll sing you a song [Nine verses long] - : -
Dll sing you a song [The days are dene) - -
Pll tell you a story - - -
In dock, out nettle - - - - - -
In-fir-tar-is, in-oak-none-is - - 7 7 :
Is John Smith within? - - - - - -
It was a frog ina well - - - - - -

Jack and Gill = - - - - - -
Jack Sprat would eat no fat - - : - -
John, come sell thy fiddle - = -
John Cook had a little grey mare, Be; haw, ee -
John Smith, fellow fine - - -
Johnnie Armstrong hada calf = - - - -

22U
100
197
126
112
113

59

143
IIo
121
174
I2I
122
65
45
go
15
44
129
135

212
71
99

210

68

34
143
113
197
194

26
89
43

42



iv INDEX OF THE FIRST LINES.



Ladybird, ladybird, fly Bvey homme - - - - - 116
Lang and lazy - : - s - 131
Little Boonen has lost her sheep - - - - - - 185
Little Boy Blue - : : 2 - 222
Little Brown Betty lived at the Golden Can” - - - 14
Little Jack Horner - - - - - - : - 34
Little Jack Jingle - - - - - 32
Little Jenny Wren fell sick upon a “ane” - - - 20057.
Little lamb, who made thee? - - : j - 177
Little maid, little maid, whither goest thou? 2. - - 2 2077
Little Tom’ Tucker - - - - : - 7 - 95
London Bridge is broken down - : - - - 8&7
Madam, Iam come to court you - - - : - - 92
March borrowed from April - : - - é < - 122
March said to April - - - - - : - - 215
Merry, merry sparrow - - - - i - : - 199
Mist in May, and heat in Jane - - - - - - 122
Mistress Mary - - - - 7 3 a - 98
Mony a frost, and mony a thowe - - - - - - 216
Mony haws, mony snaws_— - - - : - - - 222
Moorachug and Meenachug went out to gather fruit —- - 186
Multiplication is vexation = - - - - - - 116
My dear, don’t you know — - mir apis : - : - 66
My Lady Wind, my Lady Wind - : : - - - 63
Needles and pins, needles and pins - : - - saga:
Nievie, nievie, nicknack : yas - - - - 174
Oh, dear ! what can the matter be? - - - - 60
Oh, mother, I’m to be married to Mr. Panehinens - - 96
Oh that I was where I would be - - - - - - 100
Old King Cole was a merry old er - - - - - 38
Old Mother Hubbard - = - = a 3 ely
Old woman, old woman, shall we - a-shearing? - - - 76
Once I saw a little bird - - < + - - - 56
Once I was a monarch’s daughter - - - - - seh?
One a penny, two a penny, hot cross buns) - - - 124

One little, two little, three little Indian - : - - 214



INDEX OF THE FIRST LINES. Vv

>=



One ran away - - - - : as - 214
One, two, three, four, ae : “ - rs é - 68
One ’s sorrow, two’s mirth - - = - 131

One’s unlucky - - - - - - = 3 - 130
On Saturday night - - - - - 83

On Tintock tap there isa mist = - - - - 225
Our wean ’s the most wonderfw’ wean e’erI saw - - - 165
Pease porridge hot, pease porridge vey - - - - Ill
Peese-weep, peese-weep - - - - - - 168
Pillycock, pillycock, sat on a hill - - - - - - 56
Piping down the valleys wild - - : - - - 209
Please toremember = - - - - - - - - 216
Poor old Robinson Crusoe - - - - - - - 210
Proud Preston = - - - : - - - - - 215
Purple, yellow, red, and green - - - - - - 220
Pussie cat, pussie cat, [Where have you been?] _ - - - 102
Pussie cat, pussie cat, wilt thou be mine? - - - - 102
Pussie, pussie, baudrons - - - - - - 219
Put your finger in the corbie’s hole - - - - - 198
Rainie, rainie, rattlestone - - - - - - - 222
Rain, rain - - - - - - 123
Riddle me, middle: me, rok, ae tot - - - - - 116
Ride a cock horse [To Banbury or - - : - 61, 197
Robin and Richard - : - - - - 24
Says Robin to Jenny, ‘‘If sos will be mine” - - - 191
See saw, sacradown~ - - - - - - - 62
Seventeen, sixteen, fifteen - - - - - - - 77
Shoe the colt - - - - : - - - - 221
Simple Simon met a pieman - - - - - - - 33
Sing a song of sixpence, a bag full of rye - - - - 64
Snail, snail, come out of your hole - - : : - 113
Snail, snail, put out your horns - - - - : - 113
Snail, snail, shoot out your horn - - - - : - 123
Sneel, snaul - - - - - - - - - - 109
Solomon Grundy - - - - - : - - - 35
Sunny, sunny shower - - - - - - - 222
Swing ’em, swang ’em, bells at Wrangham - - - - 68



vi INDEX OF THE FIRST LINES.



Taffy was a Welshman - - - - - - - - 213
The bonnie, bonnie bairn, wha sits poking in the ase - - I51
The cattie sits in the kiln-ring - - - - : - 207
The cock doth crow - - - - - - - - 131
The cuckoo comes in April - - - - - - - 125
The cuckoo isa fine bird —- - - - - - - 125
The doggies gaed to the mill - - - - - - 198
The evening red and the morning grey - - - - - 122
The first day of Christmas - - - - - - - 140
The herring loves the merry moonlight - - - - - 167
The King of France, with forty thousand men — - - - 42
The King of France, with twenty thousand men - - - 44
The king sent his lady on the first Yule day - - - - 147
The lion and the unicorn [Fighting for the crown] - - - 162
The lion and the unicorn were fighting for the crown - - 162
The little priest of Felton - - - - - - - 26
The man in the moon - - - - - - - - 41
The men of the East - - - - - - - 123
The merle and the piecpid - - - - - - 169
The north wind doth blow - - - - - - - 134
The old man in the wilderness asked me - - - - I2
The Queen of Hearts - - - - - 196
The robin redbreast and the wren [Are God Almighty’s

cock and hen] - - - - 129
The robin redbreast and the wren [Cast ‘oie - - - enh
The rose is red, the violet’s blue - - - - - - 80
The rule of the road is a paradox quite - - - - IOI
The wind blows cold - - - - - - - - 214
Them that gant - - - Ss - - 99
There was a crooked man, wd he went a crocs mile - - 26
There was a frog lived ina well - : - - 52
There was a jolly miller once lived on the river Dee - - 36
There was a king met a king - Be eS
There was a little guinea-pig e " - 46
There was a little man [And he had a little ial - - - 154
There was a little man [And he wooed a little maid] - ae
There was a maid went to the mill - . - = - 193
There was a man in Thessaly - - - - = - 38
There was an old crow - - - - - 58
There was an old man [And he had a calf] - - - - 22
There was an old man, and he lived ina wood - - 25

There was an old man in a velvet coat - - - . - 15



INDEX OF THE FIRST LINES. vii





There was an old man of Derby - - - - - - 15
There was an old man of Tobago - - - - - - 14
There was an old woman [Lived under a hill] - - - 10
‘There was an old woman [Lived under a hill] - : - 27
There was an old woman, and, what do you think? - - 12
There was an old woman, as I have heard tell - - - 48
There was an old woman, called Nothing-at-all - - - 12
There was an old woman had three sons - - - - 28
There was an old woman in Surrey - - - - - II
There was an old woman sat spinning - - - - - 81
There was an old woman was tossed in a blanket - - - It
There was an old woman who lived in a shoe - - - 29
There was a piper had a cow : : ‘ - - - 153
There was a wee bit mousikie - - - - - - 51
There was a wife that had a bonnie bush o’ berries - - 156
There were a little boy and a litue girl - - - - - 178
There were three jovial Welshmen - - - - - 13
There were three sisters in a hall - - - - - - TIS
There were two birds sat onastone — - - - - - 50
There were two blackbirds sat upon a hill - - - - 51
Thirty days hath September - - - - - - - 120
This is the house that Jack built - - - - - - 30
This is the man that brake the barn - - - - - 221
This is the way the ladies ride - - - - - 173
This little pig went to market - - - - - - 215
Thomas a Tattamus took two T’s - - - - - - II
Though a lass be ne’er so fair - - - - - - 82
Three blind mice - - - - - - - - 58
Three children sliding on the j ice - - - - - - 16
Three wise men of Gotham - - - - - - - 220
To make your candles last for aye - - - - - - 100
Tommy Trot, a man of law - - - - : - - 144
Tom Thumb, the piper’s son - - - - 74
To talk of the weather is nothing but folly - - - - 123
To-whoo! to-whoo! - - - - - - 132
Trip upon trénchers, and dance upon dishes - - - - 60
Tweed said to Till - - - - - - - - 225
Twinkle, twinkle, little star - - - - - - - 69
Two legs sat upon three legs - - - - 199

Up hill and down dale - - - - - : - - 78



viii INDEX OF THE FIRST LINES,



Up hill ride me not - - . *s % é = - 102
Up the hill take care of me - 2 S : < i ~ 102
We will a’ gae sing, boys - - “ - - 179
Wee Willie Winkie rins through the town - - - - 71
‘“‘ We'll go a-shooting,” says Kobin to Bobbin - - ~\\ 202
We're all dry with drinking on’t - - - - - =|) 95
What care I how black I be a, Se < - |} «81
When April blows his horn - - - - : - 122
When good King Arthur ruled this land - - eS 3s 9
When the pea’s in bloom - - - - - - 144
When the voices of children are heard on nn the green - - 211
Where are you going, my pretty maid? = - - - -, 91
Where the scythe cuts and the sock rives - - - - 197
Who killed Cock Robin? - . - 104
Who’s that knocking at ny goon Katherine Nipsy ? ? - - 170
Who’s there? - - - - 99
Will you buy syboes? - : - - 2 ‘ : ota
Yankee Doodle came to town - - - - Be:

You know that Monday is Sunday’s prothes - - - - 101





THE: MERRIE HEART.



WHEN GOOD KING ARTHUR RULED
THIS LAND.

Wye good King Arthur ruled this land—
VS ;

He was a goodly king—
He stole three pecks of-barley meal
To make a bag pudding.



10 Tae Merrie HEART.



A bag pudding the Queen did make,
And stuffed it well with plums,
And in it put great lumps of fat
As big as my two thumbs.

The King and Queen did eat thereof,
And noblemen beside :

And what they could not eat that night, 4
The Queen next morning fried.



THE OLD WOMAN WHO LIVED UNDER
A HILL.

THERE was an old woman
Lived under a hill ;
And if she’s not gone,
She lives there still.



Worrvinc Orv Woman in SuRREY. U1



THE OLD WOMAN WHO WAS TOSSED
IN A BLANKET.

THERE was an old woman was tossed in a blanket,
Seventeen times as high as the moon ;

And where she was going no mortal could tell,
For under her arm she carried a broom.

“Old woman, old woman, old woman,” said I,
“Whither, ah whither, ah whither so high?”
“To sweep the cobwebs from the sky,
And I'll be with you by-and-by.”





THE WORRYING OLD WOMAN IN
SURREY.

*“-.. THERE was an old woman in Surrey,
Who was morn, noon, and night, in a hurry,
Called her husband “a fool,”
Drove her children to school,
This worrying old woman in Surrey.



Worrvinc Orv Woman in SuRREY. U1



THE OLD WOMAN WHO WAS TOSSED
IN A BLANKET.

THERE was an old woman was tossed in a blanket,
Seventeen times as high as the moon ;

And where she was going no mortal could tell,
For under her arm she carried a broom.

“Old woman, old woman, old woman,” said I,
“Whither, ah whither, ah whither so high?”
“To sweep the cobwebs from the sky,
And I'll be with you by-and-by.”





THE WORRYING OLD WOMAN IN
SURREY.

*“-.. THERE was an old woman in Surrey,
Who was morn, noon, and night, in a hurry,
Called her husband “a fool,”
Drove her children to school,
This worrying old woman in Surrey.



12 THe Merrre AHearz.



THE SURPRISING OLD WOMAN.

THERE was an old woman, and, what do you think?
She lived upon nothing but victuals and drink ;
And tho’ victuals and drink were the chief of her diet,
This plaguy old woman would never be quiet.

She went to the baker’s, to buy her some bread,
And when she came home, her old husband was dead ;
She went to the clerk, to toll the bell,

And when she came back, her old husband was well.







NOTHING-AT-ALL.

THERE was an old woman called Nothing-at-All,
Who rejoiced in a dwelling exceedingly small ;

A man stretch’d out his mouth to its utmost extent,
And down, at one gulp, house and old woman went.



12 THe Merrre AHearz.



THE SURPRISING OLD WOMAN.

THERE was an old woman, and, what do you think?
She lived upon nothing but victuals and drink ;
And tho’ victuals and drink were the chief of her diet,
This plaguy old woman would never be quiet.

She went to the baker’s, to buy her some bread,
And when she came home, her old husband was dead ;
She went to the clerk, to toll the bell,

And when she came back, her old husband was well.







NOTHING-AT-ALL.

THERE was an old woman called Nothing-at-All,
Who rejoiced in a dwelling exceedingly small ;

A man stretch’d out his mouth to its utmost extent,
And down, at one gulp, house and old woman went.



Tue Turee Foviat WetsHMEN. 13



iss THREE JOVIAL WELSHMEN.

i rERE were three jovial Welshmen,
x As I have heard them say,

ae “And they would go a-hunting
Upon St. David’s Day.

All the day they hunted,
And nothing could they find,
But a ship a-sailing,

A-sailing with the wind.

One said it was a ship,
The other, he said “ Nay ;”
The third said it was a house,
And the chimney blown away.



14 Tae Merrie HeEarr.



And all the night they hunted,’
And nothing could they find,

But the moon a-gliding,
A-gliding with the wind.

One said it was the moon ;
The other, he said “ Nay ;”
The third said it was a cheese,

And half o’t cut away.

ang Par

LITTLE BROWN BETTY.

LITTLE brown Betty lived at the “Golden Can,’
Where she brewed good ale for gentlemen ;

’

And gentlemen came every day,
Till little Brown Betty, she hopped away.

ag Pere

THE OLD MAN OF TOBAGO.

THERE was an old man of Tobago,
Who lived on rice gruel and sago ;
Till, much to his bliss,
His physician said this :—
“To a leg, sir, of mutton you may go.”



14 Tae Merrie HeEarr.



And all the night they hunted,’
And nothing could they find,

But the moon a-gliding,
A-gliding with the wind.

One said it was the moon ;
The other, he said “ Nay ;”
The third said it was a cheese,

And half o’t cut away.

ang Par

LITTLE BROWN BETTY.

LITTLE brown Betty lived at the “Golden Can,’
Where she brewed good ale for gentlemen ;

’

And gentlemen came every day,
Till little Brown Betty, she hopped away.

ag Pere

THE OLD MAN OF TOBAGO.

THERE was an old man of Tobago,
Who lived on rice gruel and sago ;
Till, much to his bliss,
His physician said this :—
“To a leg, sir, of mutton you may go.”



My Lirrte Morrer. us



WHAT AN OLD MAN DID.

THERE was an old man in a velvet coat,
He kissed a maid, and gave her a groat ;
The groat was cracked, and would not go,
“ Ah, old man, d’ye serve me so?”

®
pag Pere

THE OLD MAN OF DERBY.

THERE was an old man of Derby,
And how do you think he served me?
He took away my bread and cheese,
And that is how he served me.

eed PR

MY LITTLE MOPPET.

I HAD a little moppet,
I put it in my pocket,
And fed it with corn and hay ;
There came a proud beggar,
And swore he would have her,
And stole my little moppet away.



My Lirrte Morrer. us



WHAT AN OLD MAN DID.

THERE was an old man in a velvet coat,
He kissed a maid, and gave her a groat ;
The groat was cracked, and would not go,
“ Ah, old man, d’ye serve me so?”

®
pag Pere

THE OLD MAN OF DERBY.

THERE was an old man of Derby,
And how do you think he served me?
He took away my bread and cheese,
And that is how he served me.

eed PR

MY LITTLE MOPPET.

I HAD a little moppet,
I put it in my pocket,
And fed it with corn and hay ;
There came a proud beggar,
And swore he would have her,
And stole my little moppet away.



My Lirrte Morrer. us



WHAT AN OLD MAN DID.

THERE was an old man in a velvet coat,
He kissed a maid, and gave her a groat ;
The groat was cracked, and would not go,
“ Ah, old man, d’ye serve me so?”

®
pag Pere

THE OLD MAN OF DERBY.

THERE was an old man of Derby,
And how do you think he served me?
He took away my bread and cheese,
And that is how he served me.

eed PR

MY LITTLE MOPPET.

I HAD a little moppet,
I put it in my pocket,
And fed it with corn and hay ;
There came a proud beggar,
And swore he would have her,
And stole my little moppet away.



16 _ Tre Merrre Hears.





aHE SONG OF THE THREE CHILDREN. °’

ton

eh
§ HREE children sliding on the ice,
Upon a summer’s day ;

Shy a
. “As it fell out, they all fell in;



The rest, they ran away.

Now had these children been at home,
Or sliding on dry ground,
Ten thousand pounds to one penny,
They had not all been drowned.

You, parents, that have children dear,
And eke you, that have none,

If you will have them safe abroad,
Pray keep them safe at home.



Orv Moruer Husearp. 1





§ LD Mother Hubbard

— Went to the cupboard,

To get her poor dog a bone;
But when she got there

The cupboard was bare,
And so the poor dog had none. |






She went to the baker’s,
To buy him some bread ;

But when she came back,
The poor dog was dead.

She went to the joiner’s,
To buy him a coffin ;
But when she came back,

The dog was laughing.



18 Tue Merrre HEaRz?.



She took a clean dish,
To buy him some tripe ;
i) And when she came back,








He was smoking his pipe.

She went to the fishmonger’s,
To get him some fish;

And when she came back,
He was licking the dish.

She went to the ale-house,
To get him some beer ;
© And when she came back,
x The dog sat in a chair.
= She went to the tavern,

* For white wine and red :
And when she came back,

The dog stood on his head.

She went to the hatter’s,
To get him a hat ;

= And when she came back,

He was feeding the cat.

She went to the barber’s,
To get him a wig;

= And when she came back,

a He was dancing a jig. ©

S



Pages
19 - 20
Missing

From
Original



Ozrp Moruer Husearvn. 21



She went to the fruiterer’s,
To get him some fruit ;

And when she came back,
He was playing the flute.

She went to the tailor’s,
To get him a coat ;

And when she came back,
He was riding a goat.

She went to the cobbler’s,
To buy him some shoes ;

And when she came back,
He was reading the news.

She went to the sempstress’,
To buy him some linen ;
And when she came back,
The dog was spinning.
She went to the hosier’s,
To buy him some hose ;
And when she came back,
He was dressed in his clothes.

The dame made a curtsey,
The dog made a bow;

The dame said, “ Your servant !”
The dog said, “ Bow wow!”





22 THE Merrre Hearr.



THE OLD MAN AND HIS CALF.

THERE was an old man,
And he had a calf,
And that’s half;
He took him out of the stall,
And put him on the wall,
And that’s all.



PIPPIN HILL.

As I was going up Pippin hill,
Pippin hill was dirty,
There I met a pretty miss,
And she dropped me a curtsy.
Little miss, pretty miss,
Blessings light upon you!
If I had half-a-crown a-day,
I'd spend it all upon you!



22 THE Merrre Hearr.



THE OLD MAN AND HIS CALF.

THERE was an old man,
And he had a calf,
And that’s half;
He took him out of the stall,
And put him on the wall,
And that’s all.



PIPPIN HILL.

As I was going up Pippin hill,
Pippin hill was dirty,
There I met a pretty miss,
And she dropped me a curtsy.
Little miss, pretty miss,
Blessings light upon you!
If I had half-a-crown a-day,
I'd spend it all upon you!



A Lirrte Mary's Answer. 23



A LITTLE MAID’S ANSWER TO
A LITTLE MAN.





WDromad :
h G ®HERE was a little man,
F And he woo'd a little maid,

UISSa
3
EOS

Y X And he said, “Little maid, will you wed, wed, wed?
iS I have nothing more to say,
j Than will you, yea or nay,

For least said is soonest mended, ded, ded, ded.”



The little maid replied,
Some say, a little sighed,
“But what shall we have for to eat, eat, eat ?
Will the love you are so rich in
Make a fire in the kitchen?
Or the little god of Love turn the spit, spit, spit ?”

B 2







24

THe Merrre Hearr.

ROBIN AND RICHARD.

RoBIn and Richard

Were two pretty men ;
They lay in bed

Till the clock struck ten.

Then up starts Robin,
And looks at the sky:

“Oh, brother Richard,
The sun is very high.

“You go before,

With your bottle and bag,
And I will come after

On little Jack Nag.”





New Brooms! O! 25

NEW BROOMS! O!

THERE was an old man, and he lived in a wood,
And his lazy son Jack would snooze till noon ;
Nor followed his trade, although it was good,
With a bill and a stump for making of brooms,
Green brooms, -
With a bill and a stump for making of brooms.

One morn in a passion, and sore with vexation,
He swore he would fire the room,
If he did not get up, and go to his work,
And fall to the cutting of broom,
Green broom,
And fall to the cutting of broom.

Then Jack he arose, and slipped on his clothes,
And away to the wood very soon,
Where he made up his pack, and put it on his back,
Crying, “Maids, do you want any brooms?
Green brooms ?”
Crying, “Maids, do you want any brooms?”



26 Tue Merrre Hear.

A PRETTY TRICK.

JACK SPRAT would eat no fat,
His wife would eat no lean;

Was not that a pretty trick
To make the platter clean ?

sag Pee

A CROOKED STORY.

THERE was a crooked man, and he went a crooked
mile,

And he found a crooked sixpence against a crooked
stile.

He bought a crooked cat, which caught a crooked
mouse,

‘And they all lived together in a little crooked

house.
and Pare

THE COURAGEOUS LITTLE PRIEST OF
FELTON.
THE little priest of Felton,
The little priest of Felton,
He killed a mouse within his house,
And ne’er a one to help him.



26 Tue Merrre Hear.

A PRETTY TRICK.

JACK SPRAT would eat no fat,
His wife would eat no lean;

Was not that a pretty trick
To make the platter clean ?

sag Pee

A CROOKED STORY.

THERE was a crooked man, and he went a crooked
mile,

And he found a crooked sixpence against a crooked
stile.

He bought a crooked cat, which caught a crooked
mouse,

‘And they all lived together in a little crooked

house.
and Pare

THE COURAGEOUS LITTLE PRIEST OF
FELTON.
THE little priest of Felton,
The little priest of Felton,
He killed a mouse within his house,
And ne’er a one to help him.



26 Tue Merrre Hear.

A PRETTY TRICK.

JACK SPRAT would eat no fat,
His wife would eat no lean;

Was not that a pretty trick
To make the platter clean ?

sag Pee

A CROOKED STORY.

THERE was a crooked man, and he went a crooked
mile,

And he found a crooked sixpence against a crooked
stile.

He bought a crooked cat, which caught a crooked
mouse,

‘And they all lived together in a little crooked

house.
and Pare

THE COURAGEOUS LITTLE PRIEST OF
FELTON.
THE little priest of Felton,
The little priest of Felton,
He killed a mouse within his house,
And ne’er a one to help him.



Orv Woman, Mouse, AND MILLER. 27



Wile’. yn ees
PELLMAN wey eran py won ity



THE OLD WOMAN, THE MOUSE, AND
THE MILLER.

HERE was an old woman
8 Lived under a hill ;
She put a mouse in a bag,
And sent it to the mill.
The Miller did swear
By the point of his knife,
He never took toll
Of a mouse in his life.







28 THE Merrie Heart.

JERRY, JAMES, AND JOHN.
THERE was an old woman had three sons:
Jerry, James, and John.

Jerry was hung; James was drowned ;
John was lost, and never was found ;
And that is the end of the three sons,
Jerry, and James, and John.



A BRIEF TALE OF A’ TAILOR WHO
MISSED HIS MARK.

-A CARRION crow sat on an oak,
Watching a tailor shape his cloak.
“Wife,” cried he, “bring me my bow,
That I may shoot yon carrion crow!”
The tailor shot, and missed his mark,
And shot his own sow through the heart.
“Wife, bring me some brandy in a spoon,
For our old sow is in a swoon.”



28 THE Merrie Heart.

JERRY, JAMES, AND JOHN.
THERE was an old woman had three sons:
Jerry, James, and John.

Jerry was hung; James was drowned ;
John was lost, and never was found ;
And that is the end of the three sons,
Jerry, and James, and John.



A BRIEF TALE OF A’ TAILOR WHO
MISSED HIS MARK.

-A CARRION crow sat on an oak,
Watching a tailor shape his cloak.
“Wife,” cried he, “bring me my bow,
That I may shoot yon carrion crow!”
The tailor shot, and missed his mark,
And shot his own sow through the heart.
“Wife, bring me some brandy in a spoon,
For our old sow is in a swoon.”



Orp Woman wHo LIVED INA SHOE. 29





THE OLD WOMAN WHO LIVED
IN A SHOE.

THERE, was an old woman who lived in a shoe,

She had so many children she didn’t know what
to do;

She gave them some broth without any bread,

Then whipped them all soundly, and sent them to
bed.



30 Tue Merrie Heart.





THE HOUSE THAT JACK BUILT.

THIS is the house that Jack built.

This is the malt, that lay in the house that Jack built.

This is the rat, that ate the malt, that lay in the
house that Jack built.

This is the cat, that killed the rat, that ate the
malt, that lay in the house that Jack built.
This is the dog, that worried the cat, that killed
the rat, that ate the malt, that lay in the

house that Jack built.

This is the cow with the crumpled horn, that tossed
the dog, that worried the cat, that killed the
rat, that ate the malt, that lay in the house
that Jack built.



THe FHlouse roar Fack Built. 31

This is the maiden all forlorn, that milked the cow
with the crumpled horn, that tossed the dog,
that worried the cat, that killed the rat, that ate
the malt, that lay in the house that Jack built.

This is the man all tattered and torn, that kissed
the maiden all forlorn, that milked the cow
with the crumpled horn, that tossed the dog,
that worried the cat, that killed the rat, that
ate the malt, that lay in the house that Jack
built.

This is the priest all shaven and shorn, that married
the man all tattered and torn, that kissed the
maiden all forlorn, that milked the cow with
the crumpled horn, that tossed the dog, that
worried the cat, that killed the rat, that ate the
malt, that lay in the house that Jack built.

This is the cock that crew in the morn, that waked
the priest all shaven and shorn, that married
the man all tattered and torn, that kissed the
maiden all forlorn, that milked the cow with
the crumpled horn, that tossed the dog, that
worried the cat, that killed the rat, that ate
the malt, that lay in the house that Jack
built,



32 THE Merrie Heart.



This is the farmer sowing his corn, that kept the
cock that crew in the morn, that waked the
priest all shaven and shorn, that married the
man all tattered and torn, that kissed the
maiden all forlorn, that milked the cow with
the crumpled horn, that tossed the dog, that
worried the cat, that killed the rat, that ate
the malt, that lay in the house that Jack built.



LITTLE JACK JINGLE.

LITTLE Jack Jingle,
He used to live single ;
But when he got tired of this kind of life,
He left off being single, and lived with his wife.



Sele SIMON.



mi
SIMPLE SIMON.

SIMPLE SIMON met a pieman,
Going to the fair ;

Says Simple Simon to the pieman,
“Let me taste your ware!”

Says the pieman to Simple Simon,
“Show me first your penny.”
Says Simple Simon to the pieman,

“Indeed, I have not any!”
Simple Simon went a-fishing,
For to catch a whale,
And all the water he had got
Was in his mother’s pail.



34 LHe Merrie Hearr.



JACK A NORY.
PLL tell you a story,
About Jack A Nory,—
And now my story’s begun.
Pll tell you another,
About Jack his brother,—
And now my story’s done.

“ens 2.



YANKEE DOODLE.

YANKEE DOODLE came to town,

And how do you think they served him ?
One took his bag, another his scrip,

The quicker for to starve him,

mene poe
LITTLE JACK HORNER.

LITTLE Jack Horner
Sat in a corner,
Eating a Christmas pie ;
He put in his thumb,
And pulled out a plum,
And cried, “ What a good boy am I!”



Sozomon GRUNDY. 35





SOLOMON GRUNDY.

SOLOMON GRUNDY,
Born on a Monday,
Christened on Tuesday,
Married on Wednesday, =
Took ill on Thursday, SL)
Worse on Friday,
Died on Saturday,
Buried on Sunday.
This is the end

Of Solomon Grundy.





36 Tue Mere Heart.











Sol
8
Me
we He danced and he sang from morn till
Â¥ night, no lark so blithe as he,
] And this the burden of his song for ever
used to be,
“T care for nobody, no, not I, if nobedy cares for me!

“T live by my mill: God bless her! She’s kindred,
child, and wife,

I would not change my station for any other in life ;

No lawyer, surgeon, or doctor, e’er had a groat from
me—

I care for nobody, no, not I, if nobody cares for
me!” ;

x



THe Forty Micrer. au)



The reason why he was so blythe
He once did thus unfold—
“The bread I eat my hands have earned ;
I covet no man’s gold.
I do not fear next quarter day,
In debt to none I be;
I care for nobody, no, not I,
If nobody cares for me.

“A coin or two I’ve in my purse,
To help a needy friend ;

A little I can give the poor,
And still have some to spend.

Though I may fail, yet I rejoice,
Another’s good hap to see ;

I care for nobody, no, not I,
If nobody cares for me.”

So let us his example take,
_And be from malice free ;

Let every one his neighbour serve,
As served he’d like to be.



38 LHe Merrie Hearr.

OLD KING, COLE:

OLD King Cole was a merry old soul,

And a merry old soul was he ;

He called for his pipe,

And he called for his bowl,

And he called for his fiddlers three.

Every fiddler had a fiddle,

And a.very fine fiddle had he—

. Twee, tweedle dee, tweedle dee, went the fiddlers.

Oh, there’s none so rare
As can compare

With King Cole and his fiddlers three !

Pad Per

THE MAN IN THESSALY.

THERE was a man in Thessaly,
And he was wond’rous wise,

He jumped into a quickset hedge,
And scratched out both his eyes ;

And when he saw his eyes were out,
With all his might and main

He jumped into a holly bush,
And scratched them in again. _



38 LHe Merrie Hearr.

OLD KING, COLE:

OLD King Cole was a merry old soul,

And a merry old soul was he ;

He called for his pipe,

And he called for his bowl,

And he called for his fiddlers three.

Every fiddler had a fiddle,

And a.very fine fiddle had he—

. Twee, tweedle dee, tweedle dee, went the fiddlers.

Oh, there’s none so rare
As can compare

With King Cole and his fiddlers three !

Pad Per

THE MAN IN THESSALY.

THERE was a man in Thessaly,
And he was wond’rous wise,

He jumped into a quickset hedge,
And scratched out both his eyes ;

And when he saw his eyes were out,
With all his might and main

He jumped into a holly bush,
And scratched them in again. _



$ Ca] Ae. | ( | mt
aE, =| fi f CH p
ty Ga c RAS LY - =

ey
m5 A CS
= b

=



OLD KING COLE,







THE Man in THE Moon. 4t



























THE MAN IN THE MOON.

THE man in the moon
Came tumbling down,
And asked his way to Norwich ;
He went by the south,
And burnt his mouth,
Whilst supping hot pease-porridge.
CeZ



42 Tue Merrie Hearr.



thE WEePING OF THEsGALE.

JOHNNIE ARMSTRONG had a calf,
Peter Henderson got the half,
Willie Wilkinson got the head :
Ring the bell! the calf is dead.

asd Rae



THE WARLIKE DOINGS OF THE KING
OF FRANCE AND HIS MEN.

THE King of France and forty thousand men,
They drew their swords and put them up again.



42 Tue Merrie Hearr.



thE WEePING OF THEsGALE.

JOHNNIE ARMSTRONG had a calf,
Peter Henderson got the half,
Willie Wilkinson got the head :
Ring the bell! the calf is dead.

asd Rae



THE WARLIKE DOINGS OF THE KING
OF FRANCE AND HIS MEN.

THE King of France and forty thousand men,
They drew their swords and put them up again.



THe Last Witt AND TESTAMENT. 43





qHE VAST WILL SAND isi NT soe
THE GRAY MARE.

JOHN Cook had a little gray mare, he, haw, hum,
Her back stood up and her bones were bare, he,
haw, hum;

John Cook was riding up Shuter’s bank, he, haw,
hum,
And there his nag did kick and prank, he, haw, hum.

John Cook was riding up Shuter’s hill, he, haw, hum,
His mare fell down and made her will, he, haw, hum ;

The bridle and saddle were laid on a shelf, he, haw,
hum ;

If you want any more, you make it yourself, he, haw,
hum.



44 THe Merrie Hearr.

THE KING OF FRANCE AND THE KING
OF SPAIN.

THE King of France, with twenty thousand men,

Went up the hill and then came down again ;

The King of Spain, with twenty thousand more,

Climbed the same hill the French had climbed
before !



DAPPLE GRAY, THE PONY.

I HAD a little pony,
They called it Dapple Gray ;
T lent it to a lady
To ride a mile away.
She whipped it, she lashed it,
She drove it o’er the brae ;
I will not lend my pony more,
Though all the ladies pray.



44 THe Merrie Hearr.

THE KING OF FRANCE AND THE KING
OF SPAIN.

THE King of France, with twenty thousand men,

Went up the hill and then came down again ;

The King of Spain, with twenty thousand more,

Climbed the same hill the French had climbed
before !



DAPPLE GRAY, THE PONY.

I HAD a little pony,
They called it Dapple Gray ;
T lent it to a lady
To ride a mile away.
She whipped it, she lashed it,
She drove it o’er the brae ;
I will not lend my pony more,
Though all the ladies pray.



Tue Movs&t AND THE Car. 45



DAPPLE GRAY, THE HOBBY HORSE.

I HAD a little hobby horse,
His name was Dapple Gray ;
His head was made of pea-straw,
His tail was made of hay.
Eee aes
THE MOUSE AND THE CAT.

A TITTY-MOUSE sat in the witty to spin,

Pussy came to her, and bade her “ Good e’en :”
“Oh, what are you doing, my little ’oman ?”

“A spinning a doublet for my gude man.”

“Then shall I come to thee and wind up thy thread ?”
“Oh, no, Mistress Puss, you'll bite off my head.”





Tue Movs&t AND THE Car. 45



DAPPLE GRAY, THE HOBBY HORSE.

I HAD a little hobby horse,
His name was Dapple Gray ;
His head was made of pea-straw,
His tail was made of hay.
Eee aes
THE MOUSE AND THE CAT.

A TITTY-MOUSE sat in the witty to spin,

Pussy came to her, and bade her “ Good e’en :”
“Oh, what are you doing, my little ’oman ?”

“A spinning a doublet for my gude man.”

“Then shall I come to thee and wind up thy thread ?”
“Oh, no, Mistress Puss, you'll bite off my head.”





46 THe Merrie Hearr.







THE MIRACULOUS GUINEA PIG.

G HERE was a little guinea pig,

AG Who, being little, was not big ;
He always walked upon his feet,
And never fasted when he ate.

aan



LOR,

When from a place he ran away,
He never at that place did stay ;

And while he ran, as I am told,

He ne’er stood still for young or old.

He often squeaked, and sometimes vi'lent,
And when he squeaked he ne’er was silent ;
Though ne’er instructed by a cat,

He knew a mouse was not a rat.

One day, as I am certified,

He took a whim, and fairly died ;
And, as I’m told by men of sense,
He never has been living since.



THe Sxorr CourrsHie.



ERE comes a lusty wooer,
es My a dildin, my a dildin ;
g I




eo)

* Here comes a lusty wooer,
Lily bright and shine a’.

“Pray, who do you woo?”
| My adildin, my a dildin ;
“Pray, who do you woo?”

Lily bright and shine a’.

“For your fairest daughter,”
My a dildin, my a dildin ;
“For your fairest daughter,”
Lily bright and shine a’.
“Then there she is for you,”
My a dildin, my a dildin ;
“Then there she is for you,’
Lily bright and shine a’.



48 THe Merrie HeEary.





THE OLD WOMAN, THE PEDLAR,
AND THE LITTLE DOG.

THERE was an old woman, as I’ve heard tell,
She went to the market her eggs for to sell ;
She went to the market, all on a market-day,
And she fell asleep on the king’s highway.

There came by a pedlar, whose name was Stout,
He cut her petticoats round about ;

He cut her petticoats up to the knees,

Which made the old woman to shiver and freeze.



THe Orv Woman. 49



When this old woman first did wake,

She began to shiver, and she began to shake ;
She began to wonder, and she began to cry—-
“Lawk a mercy on me, this is none of I!”

“But if it be I, as I do hope it be,

I’ve a little dog at home, and he’ll know me;
If it be I, he’ll wag his little tail,

And if it be not I, he'll loudly bark and wail.”

Home went the little woman, all in the dark,
Up got the little dog, and he began to bark;
He began to bark, so she began to cry—
“Lawk a mercy on me, this can’t be I!”



A CRUEL FLY CATCHING CHILDREN ON THE WINDOW-PANES.



50 THE Merrre Heart.





THE SONG OF THE TWO BIRDS.

THERE were two birds sat on a stone,
Fa, la, la; la, lal, de;
One flew away, and then there was one,
Fa, la, la; la, lal, de;
The other flew after, and then there was none,
Fa, la, la; la, lal, de;
And so the poor stone was left all alone,
Fa, la, la; la, lal, de.



THE MovusE AND THE CHEESE. 51





THE TWO BLACKBIRDS.

THERE were two blackbirds sat upon a hill,
The one named Jack, the other named Gill ;
Fly away Jack, fly away Gill;

Come again Jack, come again Gill,

tg Pate

THE MOUSE AND THE CHEESE.

THERE was a wee bit mousikie,
That lived in Gilberlaty, O!
It could not get a bit of cheese
For cheetie poussie cattie, O!
It said unto the cheesikie—
“ Oh, fain would I be at ye, O!
If it were not for the cruel paws
Of cheetie poussie cattie, O!”



THE MovusE AND THE CHEESE. 51





THE TWO BLACKBIRDS.

THERE were two blackbirds sat upon a hill,
The one named Jack, the other named Gill ;
Fly away Jack, fly away Gill;

Come again Jack, come again Gill,

tg Pate

THE MOUSE AND THE CHEESE.

THERE was a wee bit mousikie,
That lived in Gilberlaty, O!
It could not get a bit of cheese
For cheetie poussie cattie, O!
It said unto the cheesikie—
“ Oh, fain would I be at ye, O!
If it were not for the cruel paws
Of cheetie poussie cattie, O!”



52 THe Merrie Hearr.





THERE WAS A FROG LIVED IN A WELL.

THERE was a frog lived in a well,
Kitty alone, Kitty alone ;

There was a frog lived in a well,
Kitty alone and I.

There was a frog lived in a well,

And a farce* mouse in a mill,
Cock me cary, Kitty alone,
Kitty alone and I.

* Merry.



THERE WAS A FROG. 53



This frog, he would a-wooing ride,
Kitty alone, Kitty alone ;

This frog, he would a-wooing ride,
Kitty alone and I.

This frog, he would a-wooing ride,

And on a snail he got astride,
Cock me cary, Kitty alone,
Kitty alone and I.

He rode till he came to my Lady Mouse’ hall,
Kitty alone, Kitty alone ;

He rode till he came to my Lady Mouse’ hall,
Kitty alone and I;

He rode till he came to my Lady Mouse’ hall,

And there he did both knock and call,
Cock me cary, Kitty alone,
Kitty alone and I.

Quoth he, “Miss Mouse, I’m come to thee,”
Kitty alone, Kitty alone ;

Quoth he, “ Miss Mouse, I’m come to thee,”
Kitty alone and I.

Quoth he, “ Miss Mouse, I’m come to thee,

To see if you will fancy me,”
Cock me cary, Kitty alone,
Kitty alone and I.



34

THE Merrie Hearr.

Quoth she, “ Answer I'll give you none,”
Kitty alone, Kitty alone ;

Quoth she, “ Answer I’ll give you none,”
Kitty alone and I.

Quoth she, “ Answer I’ll give you none,

Until my Uncle Rat comes home,”
Cock me cary, Kitty alone,
Kitty alone'and I.

And when her Uncle Rat came home,
Kitty alone, Kitty alone;

And when her Uncle Rat came home,
Kitty alone and I.

And when her Uncle Rat came home,

“Who's been here since P've been gone ?”
Cock me cary, Kitty alone,
Kitty alone and I.

“Sir, there’s been a worthy gentleman,”
Kitty alone, Kitty alone ;

“Sir, there’s been a worthy gentleman,”
Kitty alone and I.

“Sir, there’s been a worthy gentleman,

That’s been here since you've been gone,”
Cock me cary, Kitty alone,
Kitty alone and I.



THERE WAS A FROG. 55



The frog he went whistling through the brook,
_ Kitty alone, Kitty alone ;
The frog he went whistling through the brook,
Kitty alone and I.
The frog he went whistling through the brook,
And there he met with a dainty duck,
Cock me cary, Kitty alone,
Kitty alone and I.

The duck she swallowed him up with a pluck,
Kitty alone, Kitty alone ;

The duck she swallowed him up witha pluck,
Kitty alone and I.

The duck she swallowed him up with a pluck,

So there is an end of my history book,
Cock me cary, Kitty alone,
Kitty alone and I.





56 THe Merrre Heart.





ONCE I SAW A LITTLE BIRD.

ONCE I saw a little bird
Come hop, hop, hop ;
So I cried; “ Little bird,
Will you stop, stop, stop ?”
And was going to the window,
To say, “How do you do?”
When he shook his little tail,
And far away he flew.

tg Pa
PILLYCOCK.

PILLYCOCK, Pillycock, sat on a hill,
If he’s not gone, he sits there still.



56 THe Merrre Heart.





ONCE I SAW A LITTLE BIRD.

ONCE I saw a little bird
Come hop, hop, hop ;
So I cried; “ Little bird,
Will you stop, stop, stop ?”
And was going to the window,
To say, “How do you do?”
When he shook his little tail,
And far away he flew.

tg Pa
PILLYCOCK.

PILLYCOCK, Pillycock, sat on a hill,
If he’s not gone, he sits there still.



THE RoBin AND THE WReEn. 57



JENNY WREN'S “SICKNESS .AND

RECOVERY.

qj JTTLE Jenny Wren fell sick upon a time,

‘1% When in came Robin Redbreast and
brought her sops and wine ;

“Eat, Jenny; drink, Jenny: all shall be
thine!”

Then Jenny she got better, and stood
upon her feet,

And said to little Robin, “I love you not a bit!”

Then Robin he was angry, and flew upon a twig,

“ Hoot upon thee, fie upon thee, ungrateful chit !”



weg Pate

THE ROBIN AND THE WREN.
‘THE Robin Redbreast and the Wren
Cast out about the porridge pan ;
But ere the Robin got a spoon,
The Wren she had them all done.
D2



THE RoBin AND THE WReEn. 57



JENNY WREN'S “SICKNESS .AND

RECOVERY.

qj JTTLE Jenny Wren fell sick upon a time,

‘1% When in came Robin Redbreast and
brought her sops and wine ;

“Eat, Jenny; drink, Jenny: all shall be
thine!”

Then Jenny she got better, and stood
upon her feet,

And said to little Robin, “I love you not a bit!”

Then Robin he was angry, and flew upon a twig,

“ Hoot upon thee, fie upon thee, ungrateful chit !”



weg Pate

THE ROBIN AND THE WREN.
‘THE Robin Redbreast and the Wren
Cast out about the porridge pan ;
But ere the Robin got a spoon,
The Wren she had them all done.
D2



58 THe Merrie Heart.



THREE BLIND MICE.

THREE blind mice—see how they run!

They all ran after the farmer’s wife,

Who cut off their tails with a carving knife ;

Did ever you hear such a thing in your life ?
Three blind mice.

Pad Pere

A SHORT SONG,

THERE was an old crow
Sat upon a clod ;

There’s an end of my song—
That’s odd! j



58 THe Merrie Heart.



THREE BLIND MICE.

THREE blind mice—see how they run!

They all ran after the farmer’s wife,

Who cut off their tails with a carving knife ;

Did ever you hear such a thing in your life ?
Three blind mice.

Pad Pere

A SHORT SONG,

THERE was an old crow
Sat upon a clod ;

There’s an end of my song—
That’s odd! j







HUSH-A-BYE, BABY.

HUSH-A-BYE, baby, on a tree-top ;

When the wind blows, the cradle will rock ;
When the wind ceases, the cradle will fall,
And down will come baby and cradle and all.



60 THe Merrie HeEarr.

OH, DEAR! WHAT CAN THE MATTER BE?

OH, dear! what can the matter be ?

Dear, dear! what can the matter be?

Oh, dear! what can the matter be ?
Johnny’s so long at the fair.

He promised he’d bring me a basket of posies,

A garland of lilies, a garland of roses,

A little straw hat to set off the blue ribbons,

That tie up my bonny brown hair.
Oh, dear, &c.
ered Ea
TRIP UPON TRENCHERS.

TRIP upon trenchers, and dance upon dishes,

My mother sent me for some barm, some barm ;
She bade me tread lightly, and come again quickly,

For fear the young men should do me some harm.

Yet didn’t you see, yet didn’t you see,
What naughty tricks they put upon me?
They broke my pitcher,
And spilt the water,
And huffed my mother,
And chid her daughter,
And kissed my sister instead of me.



60 THe Merrie HeEarr.

OH, DEAR! WHAT CAN THE MATTER BE?

OH, dear! what can the matter be ?

Dear, dear! what can the matter be?

Oh, dear! what can the matter be ?
Johnny’s so long at the fair.

He promised he’d bring me a basket of posies,

A garland of lilies, a garland of roses,

A little straw hat to set off the blue ribbons,

That tie up my bonny brown hair.
Oh, dear, &c.
ered Ea
TRIP UPON TRENCHERS.

TRIP upon trenchers, and dance upon dishes,

My mother sent me for some barm, some barm ;
She bade me tread lightly, and come again quickly,

For fear the young men should do me some harm.

Yet didn’t you see, yet didn’t you see,
What naughty tricks they put upon me?
They broke my pitcher,
And spilt the water,
And huffed my mother,
And chid her daughter,
And kissed my sister instead of me.



To BansBury CROss. 61





TO BANBURY CROSS.

RIDE a cockhorse to Banbury Cross,

To see an old woman get up on her horse ;
Rings on her fingers, and bells at her toes,
And so she makes music wherever she goes,



62 THe Merrre Hearr.



RIDING EXERCISE.

HERE goes my lord,
A trot! a trot! a trot! a trot!
Here goes my lady,
A canter!! a canter!! a canter!! a canter!!
Here goes my young master,
Jockey-hitch!!! jockey-hitch!!! jockey-hitch!!!
jockey-hitch !!!
Here comes my young miss,
An amble!!! an amble!!! an amble!!! an amble!!!
The footman lags behind to tipple ale and wine,
And goes gallop!!! a gallop!!! a gallop!!! to
make up his time!



SEE SAW:
SEE saw, sacradown,
Which is the way to London town ?
One foot up, and one foot down,
That is the way to London town.



62 THe Merrre Hearr.



RIDING EXERCISE.

HERE goes my lord,
A trot! a trot! a trot! a trot!
Here goes my lady,
A canter!! a canter!! a canter!! a canter!!
Here goes my young master,
Jockey-hitch!!! jockey-hitch!!! jockey-hitch!!!
jockey-hitch !!!
Here comes my young miss,
An amble!!! an amble!!! an amble!!! an amble!!!
The footman lags behind to tipple ale and wine,
And goes gallop!!! a gallop!!! a gallop!!! to
make up his time!



SEE SAW:
SEE saw, sacradown,
Which is the way to London town ?
One foot up, and one foot down,
That is the way to London town.



Lapy Wrinp. 63



LADY WIND.

My Lady Wind, my Lady Wind,

Went round about the house to find
A chink to put her foot in ;

She tried the keyhole in the door,

She tried the crevice in the floor,
And drove the chimney soot in.

And then one night, when it was dark,
She blew up such a tiny spark,

That all the house was pothered ;
From it she raised up such a flame,
As flamed away to Belting Lane,

And White Cross folks were smothered.

And thus when once, my little dears,
A whisper reaches itching ears,

The same will come, you'll find ;
Take my advice, restrain the tongue,
Remember what old nurse has sung

Of busy Lady Wind !



64° THe Mere Heart.



THE SONG OF SIXPENCE.

Sing a song of sixpence, a bag full of rye,

Four-and-twenty blackbirds baked in a pie;

When the pie was opened, the birds began to sing:

And was not that a dainty dish to set before the
king?

The king was in the parlour, counting o’er his
money ;

The queen was in the kitchen, eating bread and
honey ;

The maid was in the garden, laying out the clothes,

Up came a blackbird and bit off her nose,



TxeE Dove. 65



THE DOVE.

BY JOHN KEATS.

I HAD a dove, and the sweet dove died!

And I have thought it died of grieving:

Oh, what could it grieve for? Its feet were tied
With a silken thread of my own hands’ weaving.
Sweet little red feet! why should you die—’
Why would you leave me, sweet bird! why ?
You lived alone in the forest tree ;

Why, pretty thing! would you not live with me?
I kissed you oft, and gave you white peas ;
Why not live sweetly, as in the green trees ?





66 THe Merrre HEarr.



THE BABES IN THE WOOD.

My dear, don’t you know
How, a long time ago,

Two poor little children,
Whose names I don’t know,
Were stolen away
On a fine summer’s day,

And left in a wood,

As I’ve heard people say ?

And when it was night,
So sad was their plight ;

The sun it went down,
And the moon gave no light ;
They sobbed, and they sighed,
And they bitterly cried,



Txe Bases in THE Woop. 67



And the poor little things
They lay down and died.

And when they were dead,

The robins so red
Brought strawberry leaves,

And over them spread :

And all the day long

They sang them this song—-
“Poor babes in the wood,
Poor babes in the wood ;”
And don’t you remember
The babes in the wood ?





68 ‘THe Merrre Hearr.



POCAUGHT A HARE “ALIVE:

I, 2, 3; 4, 5
I caught a hare alive ;

GO; 7,48)00; 310;
T let her go again.
eed hee
THE WOODCOCK, THE SPARROW, AND

THE LISLE DOG,
TLL sing you a song,
The days are long ;

The woodcock and the sparrow;

The little dog he has burned his tail,

And he must be hanged to-morrow.

aww gi Pew
WRANGHAM BELLS.

SWING ’em, swang ’em, bells at Wrangham,
Three dogs in a string, hang ’em, hang ’em.



68 ‘THe Merrre Hearr.



POCAUGHT A HARE “ALIVE:

I, 2, 3; 4, 5
I caught a hare alive ;

GO; 7,48)00; 310;
T let her go again.
eed hee
THE WOODCOCK, THE SPARROW, AND

THE LISLE DOG,
TLL sing you a song,
The days are long ;

The woodcock and the sparrow;

The little dog he has burned his tail,

And he must be hanged to-morrow.

aww gi Pew
WRANGHAM BELLS.

SWING ’em, swang ’em, bells at Wrangham,
Three dogs in a string, hang ’em, hang ’em.



68 ‘THe Merrre Hearr.



POCAUGHT A HARE “ALIVE:

I, 2, 3; 4, 5
I caught a hare alive ;

GO; 7,48)00; 310;
T let her go again.
eed hee
THE WOODCOCK, THE SPARROW, AND

THE LISLE DOG,
TLL sing you a song,
The days are long ;

The woodcock and the sparrow;

The little dog he has burned his tail,

And he must be hanged to-morrow.

aww gi Pew
WRANGHAM BELLS.

SWING ’em, swang ’em, bells at Wrangham,
Three dogs in a string, hang ’em, hang ’em.



&

THE STAR. 69







THE STAR.
from “ Rhymes for the Nursery,” by A. $. Taylor and others.



Sole
ae twinkle, little star,

le A

16
s3°8 Up above the world so high,
ESS

How I wonder what you are!




Like a diamond in the sky.

When the blazing sun is gone,
When he nothing shines upon,
Then you show your little light,
Twinkle, twinkle, all the night.

Then the traveller in the dark,
Thanks you for your tiny spark ;
He could not see which way to go,
If you did not twinkle so.

In the dark blue sky you keep,

And often through my curtains peep ;
For you never shut. your eye

Till the sun is in the sky.



ae

THe Merrre Hear.

As your bright and tiny spark
Lights the traveller in the dark ;

Though I know not what you are,

Twinkle, twinkle, little star.

iS

(=

a,

mm





L Love Sixpence. 71



I SAW THREE SHIPS COME SAILING BY.

I saw three ships come sailing by,
Sailing by, sailing by ;

I saw three ships come sailing by,
On New Year’s Day in the morning.

And what do you think was in them then,
In them then, in them then ?

And what do you think was in them then,
On New Year's Day in the morning ?

Three pretty girls were in them then, ,
In them then, in them then ;

Three pretty girls were in them then,
On New Year’s Day in the morning.

And one could whistle, and one could sing,
The other could play the violin;
Such joy there was at my wedding,
On New Year’s Day in the morning.
mend Pate

I LOVE SIXPENCE.

_ I LOVE sixpence, pretty little sixpence,
I love sixpence better than my life ;
I spent a penny of it, I spent another,
And took fourpence home to my wife.
E



L Love Sixpence. 71



I SAW THREE SHIPS COME SAILING BY.

I saw three ships come sailing by,
Sailing by, sailing by ;

I saw three ships come sailing by,
On New Year’s Day in the morning.

And what do you think was in them then,
In them then, in them then ?

And what do you think was in them then,
On New Year's Day in the morning ?

Three pretty girls were in them then, ,
In them then, in them then ;

Three pretty girls were in them then,
On New Year’s Day in the morning.

And one could whistle, and one could sing,
The other could play the violin;
Such joy there was at my wedding,
On New Year’s Day in the morning.
mend Pate

I LOVE SIXPENCE.

_ I LOVE sixpence, pretty little sixpence,
I love sixpence better than my life ;
I spent a penny of it, I spent another,
And took fourpence home to my wife.
E



72

THe Merrre Hearr.



I love fourpence, pretty little fourpence,
I love fourpence better than my life ;

I spent a penny of it, I spent another,
And I took twopence home to my wife.

I love twopence, pretty little twopence,
I love twopence better than my life ;

I spent a penny of it, I spent another,
And I took nothing home to my wife.

I love nothing, pretty little nothing,
What will nothing buy for my wife ?
I have nothing, I spend nothing,
I love nothing better than my wife.







Wa
he

yy ‘






AN IDLE DOG TYING A SAUCEPAN TO A SCHOOL-BOY’S TAIL.



Wrz ve Buy Sysoes ? aa

THE DUSTY MILLER.

Dusty was the coat,
Dusty was the colour,
Dusty was the kiss
Of my charming miller.

If I had my pockets

Full of gold and siller,
I would give it all

To my charming miller.

If I had, &c.

Pav g parc

WILL YE BUY SYBOES?

“WILL ye buy syboes ?
Will ye buy leeks ?

Will ye buy my bonnie lassie
Wi the red cheeks ?”

“T winna buy your syboes,
I winna buy your leeks ;
But I will buy your bonnie lassie
Wi the red cheeks.”
Be2



Wrz ve Buy Sysoes ? aa

THE DUSTY MILLER.

Dusty was the coat,
Dusty was the colour,
Dusty was the kiss
Of my charming miller.

If I had my pockets

Full of gold and siller,
I would give it all

To my charming miller.

If I had, &c.

Pav g parc

WILL YE BUY SYBOES?

“WILL ye buy syboes ?
Will ye buy leeks ?

Will ye buy my bonnie lassie
Wi the red cheeks ?”

“T winna buy your syboes,
I winna buy your leeks ;
But I will buy your bonnie lassie
Wi the red cheeks.”
Be2



Full Text
CP MI CaN,



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THE HOUSE THAT JACK BUILT.
THE

MERRIE HEART:

A Collection of Favourite Nursery Rhymes.

BY

MEL G.

LONDON:
CASSELL, PETTER, AND GALPIN,

BELLE SAUVAGE YARD, LONDON, E.C.


INDEX OF THE: FIRST LINES.

Seep

. PAGE
A carrion crow sat on an oak - - - - - - 28
A fair little girl sat under atree - - - - 145
A hoggie dead ! a hoggie dead! a hogpie dead} Lot - - 109
A little cock sparrow [sat on a green tree] - - - 200
A little man and I fell out [how shall we bring, &e] - - 96
A little man and J fell out [T’Il tell you, ee ] - - - 96
A rainbow in the morning - - . . - - 122
A titty mouse sat in a witty to se - - x - rh,
A wasanapple pie - - - - - - - 155
A’ the nicht ower and ower - - - - - - - 205
All the months of the year - - - - - - - I21
Amo, amas, J love a lass - - - - - - 83
Annan, Tweed and Clyde - - - - - - - 225
An old woman was sweeping her pous - - - = 2136
April fool, April fool - - - - - - - 124
April showers : - - - - - - A eT
As I came in by Glenap - - - : - - - 210
As I was going to St. Ives__ - - - - - - - 115
As I was going up Pippin Hill - - - - - - 22
As the day lengthens - - - - - - 121
As Tommy Snooks and Becey Bepoks - - - - - 89
Ba, ba, black sheep — - - - - - - - - 117
Bea good child - = - - - -, = - : 201
Bell-ell-ell - - - 2 a : £ < - 61
Blow the fire, plocteciaith - ae ge : : : - 84
Blow, wind, blow ; and go, mill, go : : - : - 2ir
Blue [is ihexrs true] - - > : - * - 129
Blue is beauty, red’s a token - - 3 3 - 129

Boys and girls, come out to play - - - - - ot 5 OF
li INDEX OF THE FIRST LINES.

PAGE
Can you make me a cambric shirt ? - - - - - 93
Cock, cock, I have la-a-a-yed - - - ~ < - 132
Cousin, cousin, how do you do? - - - - - - 98
Cross patch - - - - 7 - - - : - 175
Cuckoo, cherry tree - - - - - - 7 - 126
Cuckoo, cuckoo - - : - - 2 : 2 - 126
Dickery, dickery, dock - - : 7 7 2 - 79
Ding, dong, bell - - - - - - - - - I6r
Dusty was the coat - - - - 2 - - 2573
Early to bed, and early to rise - - - - - - 103
Elizabeth, Elspeth, Betsy, and Bes - - - - - 110
Every lady i in this land - - . - S : - I16
For every evil under the sun- -— - - - - - - 214
Formed long ago, yet made to- coe : - : - - 114
Four and twenty tailors - - - - : - 160
Four corners to this bed - - - - - - - 135
Gang and hear the gowk yell - : - - - - 192
Gay go up, and gay go down : : - - : 7S:
Gin ye be for lang kail - - - : - - - = 25175
Glasgow for bells - - - - - - - - - 222
God bless the master of this house - - - - - 124
Good-day, now, bonnie robin - - - - - 2 217
Good-morning, good fellow - - - - - - - 176
Goosie, goosie, gander - - - - - - - - 108
Great A, little a - - - - - - 5 - 192)
Green cheese, yellow laces - : - - - : Seer
Grey-eyed, greedy - 7 : - i - . = 2103
Happy the man who belongs to no party - : - - 89
Hee O, weeO - ‘ © : = - 5 A OS
Here am I, little jumping Joan - - - - - se yO
Here comes a lusty wooer - : - - - ey aly
Here comes a poor woman from Babylon - - - - 206

Here goes my lord - : - - 7 Fi 2 2662
INDEX OF THE FIRST LINES.

ill



Here stands a fist - - - - - - -
Here’s to you and yours - - - - -
He who tills the fairies’ green - - - -
Hey, diddle, diddle_ - : - - : -
Higgledy, piggledy [Here we lie] - - - -
Humpty Dumpty sat ona wall - - - -
Hush-a-bye, baby, ona tree-top - - - -

I doubt, I doubt - - - - - :
If all the world was apple pie - - - -
If Candlemas Day be dry and fair - - -
If I’d as much money as I could spend - - -
If New Year’s Eve night wind blow south -

If the cock crows on going to bed - - -
I had a dove, and the sweet dove died - - -
I had a little hobby-horse_ - - - - -
Thad a little husband - - - - - -
I had a little moppet - - - - - -
I had a little pony - -
I had a little sister, they called her Peep: peep -
I lay me down upon my side- - -
I love sixpence, pretty little sixpence - - -
I saw a peacock with a fiery tail - - - -
I saw three ships come sailing by - - - -
I won’t be my father’s Jack - - - oe :
I would if I could - - - - - -
I'll sing you a song [Nine verses long] - : -
Dll sing you a song [The days are dene) - -
Pll tell you a story - - -
In dock, out nettle - - - - - -
In-fir-tar-is, in-oak-none-is - - 7 7 :
Is John Smith within? - - - - - -
It was a frog ina well - - - - - -

Jack and Gill = - - - - - -
Jack Sprat would eat no fat - - : - -
John, come sell thy fiddle - = -
John Cook had a little grey mare, Be; haw, ee -
John Smith, fellow fine - - -
Johnnie Armstrong hada calf = - - - -

22U
100
197
126
112
113

59

143
IIo
121
174
I2I
122
65
45
go
15
44
129
135

212
71
99

210

68

34
143
113
197
194

26
89
43

42
iv INDEX OF THE FIRST LINES.



Ladybird, ladybird, fly Bvey homme - - - - - 116
Lang and lazy - : - s - 131
Little Boonen has lost her sheep - - - - - - 185
Little Boy Blue - : : 2 - 222
Little Brown Betty lived at the Golden Can” - - - 14
Little Jack Horner - - - - - - : - 34
Little Jack Jingle - - - - - 32
Little Jenny Wren fell sick upon a “ane” - - - 20057.
Little lamb, who made thee? - - : j - 177
Little maid, little maid, whither goest thou? 2. - - 2 2077
Little Tom’ Tucker - - - - : - 7 - 95
London Bridge is broken down - : - - - 8&7
Madam, Iam come to court you - - - : - - 92
March borrowed from April - : - - é < - 122
March said to April - - - - - : - - 215
Merry, merry sparrow - - - - i - : - 199
Mist in May, and heat in Jane - - - - - - 122
Mistress Mary - - - - 7 3 a - 98
Mony a frost, and mony a thowe - - - - - - 216
Mony haws, mony snaws_— - - - : - - - 222
Moorachug and Meenachug went out to gather fruit —- - 186
Multiplication is vexation = - - - - - - 116
My dear, don’t you know — - mir apis : - : - 66
My Lady Wind, my Lady Wind - : : - - - 63
Needles and pins, needles and pins - : - - saga:
Nievie, nievie, nicknack : yas - - - - 174
Oh, dear ! what can the matter be? - - - - 60
Oh, mother, I’m to be married to Mr. Panehinens - - 96
Oh that I was where I would be - - - - - - 100
Old King Cole was a merry old er - - - - - 38
Old Mother Hubbard - = - = a 3 ely
Old woman, old woman, shall we - a-shearing? - - - 76
Once I saw a little bird - - < + - - - 56
Once I was a monarch’s daughter - - - - - seh?
One a penny, two a penny, hot cross buns) - - - 124

One little, two little, three little Indian - : - - 214
INDEX OF THE FIRST LINES. Vv

>=



One ran away - - - - : as - 214
One, two, three, four, ae : “ - rs é - 68
One ’s sorrow, two’s mirth - - = - 131

One’s unlucky - - - - - - = 3 - 130
On Saturday night - - - - - 83

On Tintock tap there isa mist = - - - - 225
Our wean ’s the most wonderfw’ wean e’erI saw - - - 165
Pease porridge hot, pease porridge vey - - - - Ill
Peese-weep, peese-weep - - - - - - 168
Pillycock, pillycock, sat on a hill - - - - - - 56
Piping down the valleys wild - - : - - - 209
Please toremember = - - - - - - - - 216
Poor old Robinson Crusoe - - - - - - - 210
Proud Preston = - - - : - - - - - 215
Purple, yellow, red, and green - - - - - - 220
Pussie cat, pussie cat, [Where have you been?] _ - - - 102
Pussie cat, pussie cat, wilt thou be mine? - - - - 102
Pussie, pussie, baudrons - - - - - - 219
Put your finger in the corbie’s hole - - - - - 198
Rainie, rainie, rattlestone - - - - - - - 222
Rain, rain - - - - - - 123
Riddle me, middle: me, rok, ae tot - - - - - 116
Ride a cock horse [To Banbury or - - : - 61, 197
Robin and Richard - : - - - - 24
Says Robin to Jenny, ‘‘If sos will be mine” - - - 191
See saw, sacradown~ - - - - - - - 62
Seventeen, sixteen, fifteen - - - - - - - 77
Shoe the colt - - - - : - - - - 221
Simple Simon met a pieman - - - - - - - 33
Sing a song of sixpence, a bag full of rye - - - - 64
Snail, snail, come out of your hole - - : : - 113
Snail, snail, put out your horns - - - - : - 113
Snail, snail, shoot out your horn - - - - : - 123
Sneel, snaul - - - - - - - - - - 109
Solomon Grundy - - - - - : - - - 35
Sunny, sunny shower - - - - - - - 222
Swing ’em, swang ’em, bells at Wrangham - - - - 68
vi INDEX OF THE FIRST LINES.



Taffy was a Welshman - - - - - - - - 213
The bonnie, bonnie bairn, wha sits poking in the ase - - I51
The cattie sits in the kiln-ring - - - - : - 207
The cock doth crow - - - - - - - - 131
The cuckoo comes in April - - - - - - - 125
The cuckoo isa fine bird —- - - - - - - 125
The doggies gaed to the mill - - - - - - 198
The evening red and the morning grey - - - - - 122
The first day of Christmas - - - - - - - 140
The herring loves the merry moonlight - - - - - 167
The King of France, with forty thousand men — - - - 42
The King of France, with twenty thousand men - - - 44
The king sent his lady on the first Yule day - - - - 147
The lion and the unicorn [Fighting for the crown] - - - 162
The lion and the unicorn were fighting for the crown - - 162
The little priest of Felton - - - - - - - 26
The man in the moon - - - - - - - - 41
The men of the East - - - - - - - 123
The merle and the piecpid - - - - - - 169
The north wind doth blow - - - - - - - 134
The old man in the wilderness asked me - - - - I2
The Queen of Hearts - - - - - 196
The robin redbreast and the wren [Are God Almighty’s

cock and hen] - - - - 129
The robin redbreast and the wren [Cast ‘oie - - - enh
The rose is red, the violet’s blue - - - - - - 80
The rule of the road is a paradox quite - - - - IOI
The wind blows cold - - - - - - - - 214
Them that gant - - - Ss - - 99
There was a crooked man, wd he went a crocs mile - - 26
There was a frog lived ina well - : - - 52
There was a jolly miller once lived on the river Dee - - 36
There was a king met a king - Be eS
There was a little guinea-pig e " - 46
There was a little man [And he had a little ial - - - 154
There was a little man [And he wooed a little maid] - ae
There was a maid went to the mill - . - = - 193
There was a man in Thessaly - - - - = - 38
There was an old crow - - - - - 58
There was an old man [And he had a calf] - - - - 22
There was an old man, and he lived ina wood - - 25

There was an old man in a velvet coat - - - . - 15
INDEX OF THE FIRST LINES. vii





There was an old man of Derby - - - - - - 15
There was an old man of Tobago - - - - - - 14
There was an old woman [Lived under a hill] - - - 10
‘There was an old woman [Lived under a hill] - : - 27
There was an old woman, and, what do you think? - - 12
There was an old woman, as I have heard tell - - - 48
There was an old woman, called Nothing-at-all - - - 12
There was an old woman had three sons - - - - 28
There was an old woman in Surrey - - - - - II
There was an old woman sat spinning - - - - - 81
There was an old woman was tossed in a blanket - - - It
There was an old woman who lived in a shoe - - - 29
There was a piper had a cow : : ‘ - - - 153
There was a wee bit mousikie - - - - - - 51
There was a wife that had a bonnie bush o’ berries - - 156
There were a little boy and a litue girl - - - - - 178
There were three jovial Welshmen - - - - - 13
There were three sisters in a hall - - - - - - TIS
There were two birds sat onastone — - - - - - 50
There were two blackbirds sat upon a hill - - - - 51
Thirty days hath September - - - - - - - 120
This is the house that Jack built - - - - - - 30
This is the man that brake the barn - - - - - 221
This is the way the ladies ride - - - - - 173
This little pig went to market - - - - - - 215
Thomas a Tattamus took two T’s - - - - - - II
Though a lass be ne’er so fair - - - - - - 82
Three blind mice - - - - - - - - 58
Three children sliding on the j ice - - - - - - 16
Three wise men of Gotham - - - - - - - 220
To make your candles last for aye - - - - - - 100
Tommy Trot, a man of law - - - - : - - 144
Tom Thumb, the piper’s son - - - - 74
To talk of the weather is nothing but folly - - - - 123
To-whoo! to-whoo! - - - - - - 132
Trip upon trénchers, and dance upon dishes - - - - 60
Tweed said to Till - - - - - - - - 225
Twinkle, twinkle, little star - - - - - - - 69
Two legs sat upon three legs - - - - 199

Up hill and down dale - - - - - : - - 78
viii INDEX OF THE FIRST LINES,



Up hill ride me not - - . *s % é = - 102
Up the hill take care of me - 2 S : < i ~ 102
We will a’ gae sing, boys - - “ - - 179
Wee Willie Winkie rins through the town - - - - 71
‘“‘ We'll go a-shooting,” says Kobin to Bobbin - - ~\\ 202
We're all dry with drinking on’t - - - - - =|) 95
What care I how black I be a, Se < - |} «81
When April blows his horn - - - - : - 122
When good King Arthur ruled this land - - eS 3s 9
When the pea’s in bloom - - - - - - 144
When the voices of children are heard on nn the green - - 211
Where are you going, my pretty maid? = - - - -, 91
Where the scythe cuts and the sock rives - - - - 197
Who killed Cock Robin? - . - 104
Who’s that knocking at ny goon Katherine Nipsy ? ? - - 170
Who’s there? - - - - 99
Will you buy syboes? - : - - 2 ‘ : ota
Yankee Doodle came to town - - - - Be:

You know that Monday is Sunday’s prothes - - - - 101


THE: MERRIE HEART.



WHEN GOOD KING ARTHUR RULED
THIS LAND.

Wye good King Arthur ruled this land—
VS ;

He was a goodly king—
He stole three pecks of-barley meal
To make a bag pudding.
10 Tae Merrie HEART.



A bag pudding the Queen did make,
And stuffed it well with plums,
And in it put great lumps of fat
As big as my two thumbs.

The King and Queen did eat thereof,
And noblemen beside :

And what they could not eat that night, 4
The Queen next morning fried.



THE OLD WOMAN WHO LIVED UNDER
A HILL.

THERE was an old woman
Lived under a hill ;
And if she’s not gone,
She lives there still.
Worrvinc Orv Woman in SuRREY. U1



THE OLD WOMAN WHO WAS TOSSED
IN A BLANKET.

THERE was an old woman was tossed in a blanket,
Seventeen times as high as the moon ;

And where she was going no mortal could tell,
For under her arm she carried a broom.

“Old woman, old woman, old woman,” said I,
“Whither, ah whither, ah whither so high?”
“To sweep the cobwebs from the sky,
And I'll be with you by-and-by.”





THE WORRYING OLD WOMAN IN
SURREY.

*“-.. THERE was an old woman in Surrey,
Who was morn, noon, and night, in a hurry,
Called her husband “a fool,”
Drove her children to school,
This worrying old woman in Surrey.
12 THe Merrre AHearz.



THE SURPRISING OLD WOMAN.

THERE was an old woman, and, what do you think?
She lived upon nothing but victuals and drink ;
And tho’ victuals and drink were the chief of her diet,
This plaguy old woman would never be quiet.

She went to the baker’s, to buy her some bread,
And when she came home, her old husband was dead ;
She went to the clerk, to toll the bell,

And when she came back, her old husband was well.







NOTHING-AT-ALL.

THERE was an old woman called Nothing-at-All,
Who rejoiced in a dwelling exceedingly small ;

A man stretch’d out his mouth to its utmost extent,
And down, at one gulp, house and old woman went.
Tue Turee Foviat WetsHMEN. 13



iss THREE JOVIAL WELSHMEN.

i rERE were three jovial Welshmen,
x As I have heard them say,

ae “And they would go a-hunting
Upon St. David’s Day.

All the day they hunted,
And nothing could they find,
But a ship a-sailing,

A-sailing with the wind.

One said it was a ship,
The other, he said “ Nay ;”
The third said it was a house,
And the chimney blown away.
14 Tae Merrie HeEarr.



And all the night they hunted,’
And nothing could they find,

But the moon a-gliding,
A-gliding with the wind.

One said it was the moon ;
The other, he said “ Nay ;”
The third said it was a cheese,

And half o’t cut away.

ang Par

LITTLE BROWN BETTY.

LITTLE brown Betty lived at the “Golden Can,’
Where she brewed good ale for gentlemen ;

’

And gentlemen came every day,
Till little Brown Betty, she hopped away.

ag Pere

THE OLD MAN OF TOBAGO.

THERE was an old man of Tobago,
Who lived on rice gruel and sago ;
Till, much to his bliss,
His physician said this :—
“To a leg, sir, of mutton you may go.”
My Lirrte Morrer. us



WHAT AN OLD MAN DID.

THERE was an old man in a velvet coat,
He kissed a maid, and gave her a groat ;
The groat was cracked, and would not go,
“ Ah, old man, d’ye serve me so?”

®
pag Pere

THE OLD MAN OF DERBY.

THERE was an old man of Derby,
And how do you think he served me?
He took away my bread and cheese,
And that is how he served me.

eed PR

MY LITTLE MOPPET.

I HAD a little moppet,
I put it in my pocket,
And fed it with corn and hay ;
There came a proud beggar,
And swore he would have her,
And stole my little moppet away.
16 _ Tre Merrre Hears.





aHE SONG OF THE THREE CHILDREN. °’

ton

eh
§ HREE children sliding on the ice,
Upon a summer’s day ;

Shy a
. “As it fell out, they all fell in;



The rest, they ran away.

Now had these children been at home,
Or sliding on dry ground,
Ten thousand pounds to one penny,
They had not all been drowned.

You, parents, that have children dear,
And eke you, that have none,

If you will have them safe abroad,
Pray keep them safe at home.
Orv Moruer Husearp. 1





§ LD Mother Hubbard

— Went to the cupboard,

To get her poor dog a bone;
But when she got there

The cupboard was bare,
And so the poor dog had none. |






She went to the baker’s,
To buy him some bread ;

But when she came back,
The poor dog was dead.

She went to the joiner’s,
To buy him a coffin ;
But when she came back,

The dog was laughing.
18 Tue Merrre HEaRz?.



She took a clean dish,
To buy him some tripe ;
i) And when she came back,








He was smoking his pipe.

She went to the fishmonger’s,
To get him some fish;

And when she came back,
He was licking the dish.

She went to the ale-house,
To get him some beer ;
© And when she came back,
x The dog sat in a chair.
= She went to the tavern,

* For white wine and red :
And when she came back,

The dog stood on his head.

She went to the hatter’s,
To get him a hat ;

= And when she came back,

He was feeding the cat.

She went to the barber’s,
To get him a wig;

= And when she came back,

a He was dancing a jig. ©

S
Pages
19 - 20
Missing

From
Original
Ozrp Moruer Husearvn. 21



She went to the fruiterer’s,
To get him some fruit ;

And when she came back,
He was playing the flute.

She went to the tailor’s,
To get him a coat ;

And when she came back,
He was riding a goat.

She went to the cobbler’s,
To buy him some shoes ;

And when she came back,
He was reading the news.

She went to the sempstress’,
To buy him some linen ;
And when she came back,
The dog was spinning.
She went to the hosier’s,
To buy him some hose ;
And when she came back,
He was dressed in his clothes.

The dame made a curtsey,
The dog made a bow;

The dame said, “ Your servant !”
The dog said, “ Bow wow!”


22 THE Merrre Hearr.



THE OLD MAN AND HIS CALF.

THERE was an old man,
And he had a calf,
And that’s half;
He took him out of the stall,
And put him on the wall,
And that’s all.



PIPPIN HILL.

As I was going up Pippin hill,
Pippin hill was dirty,
There I met a pretty miss,
And she dropped me a curtsy.
Little miss, pretty miss,
Blessings light upon you!
If I had half-a-crown a-day,
I'd spend it all upon you!
A Lirrte Mary's Answer. 23



A LITTLE MAID’S ANSWER TO
A LITTLE MAN.





WDromad :
h G ®HERE was a little man,
F And he woo'd a little maid,

UISSa
3
EOS

Y X And he said, “Little maid, will you wed, wed, wed?
iS I have nothing more to say,
j Than will you, yea or nay,

For least said is soonest mended, ded, ded, ded.”



The little maid replied,
Some say, a little sighed,
“But what shall we have for to eat, eat, eat ?
Will the love you are so rich in
Make a fire in the kitchen?
Or the little god of Love turn the spit, spit, spit ?”

B 2




24

THe Merrre Hearr.

ROBIN AND RICHARD.

RoBIn and Richard

Were two pretty men ;
They lay in bed

Till the clock struck ten.

Then up starts Robin,
And looks at the sky:

“Oh, brother Richard,
The sun is very high.

“You go before,

With your bottle and bag,
And I will come after

On little Jack Nag.”


New Brooms! O! 25

NEW BROOMS! O!

THERE was an old man, and he lived in a wood,
And his lazy son Jack would snooze till noon ;
Nor followed his trade, although it was good,
With a bill and a stump for making of brooms,
Green brooms, -
With a bill and a stump for making of brooms.

One morn in a passion, and sore with vexation,
He swore he would fire the room,
If he did not get up, and go to his work,
And fall to the cutting of broom,
Green broom,
And fall to the cutting of broom.

Then Jack he arose, and slipped on his clothes,
And away to the wood very soon,
Where he made up his pack, and put it on his back,
Crying, “Maids, do you want any brooms?
Green brooms ?”
Crying, “Maids, do you want any brooms?”
26 Tue Merrre Hear.

A PRETTY TRICK.

JACK SPRAT would eat no fat,
His wife would eat no lean;

Was not that a pretty trick
To make the platter clean ?

sag Pee

A CROOKED STORY.

THERE was a crooked man, and he went a crooked
mile,

And he found a crooked sixpence against a crooked
stile.

He bought a crooked cat, which caught a crooked
mouse,

‘And they all lived together in a little crooked

house.
and Pare

THE COURAGEOUS LITTLE PRIEST OF
FELTON.
THE little priest of Felton,
The little priest of Felton,
He killed a mouse within his house,
And ne’er a one to help him.
Orv Woman, Mouse, AND MILLER. 27



Wile’. yn ees
PELLMAN wey eran py won ity



THE OLD WOMAN, THE MOUSE, AND
THE MILLER.

HERE was an old woman
8 Lived under a hill ;
She put a mouse in a bag,
And sent it to the mill.
The Miller did swear
By the point of his knife,
He never took toll
Of a mouse in his life.




28 THE Merrie Heart.

JERRY, JAMES, AND JOHN.
THERE was an old woman had three sons:
Jerry, James, and John.

Jerry was hung; James was drowned ;
John was lost, and never was found ;
And that is the end of the three sons,
Jerry, and James, and John.



A BRIEF TALE OF A’ TAILOR WHO
MISSED HIS MARK.

-A CARRION crow sat on an oak,
Watching a tailor shape his cloak.
“Wife,” cried he, “bring me my bow,
That I may shoot yon carrion crow!”
The tailor shot, and missed his mark,
And shot his own sow through the heart.
“Wife, bring me some brandy in a spoon,
For our old sow is in a swoon.”
Orp Woman wHo LIVED INA SHOE. 29





THE OLD WOMAN WHO LIVED
IN A SHOE.

THERE, was an old woman who lived in a shoe,

She had so many children she didn’t know what
to do;

She gave them some broth without any bread,

Then whipped them all soundly, and sent them to
bed.
30 Tue Merrie Heart.





THE HOUSE THAT JACK BUILT.

THIS is the house that Jack built.

This is the malt, that lay in the house that Jack built.

This is the rat, that ate the malt, that lay in the
house that Jack built.

This is the cat, that killed the rat, that ate the
malt, that lay in the house that Jack built.
This is the dog, that worried the cat, that killed
the rat, that ate the malt, that lay in the

house that Jack built.

This is the cow with the crumpled horn, that tossed
the dog, that worried the cat, that killed the
rat, that ate the malt, that lay in the house
that Jack built.
THe FHlouse roar Fack Built. 31

This is the maiden all forlorn, that milked the cow
with the crumpled horn, that tossed the dog,
that worried the cat, that killed the rat, that ate
the malt, that lay in the house that Jack built.

This is the man all tattered and torn, that kissed
the maiden all forlorn, that milked the cow
with the crumpled horn, that tossed the dog,
that worried the cat, that killed the rat, that
ate the malt, that lay in the house that Jack
built.

This is the priest all shaven and shorn, that married
the man all tattered and torn, that kissed the
maiden all forlorn, that milked the cow with
the crumpled horn, that tossed the dog, that
worried the cat, that killed the rat, that ate the
malt, that lay in the house that Jack built.

This is the cock that crew in the morn, that waked
the priest all shaven and shorn, that married
the man all tattered and torn, that kissed the
maiden all forlorn, that milked the cow with
the crumpled horn, that tossed the dog, that
worried the cat, that killed the rat, that ate
the malt, that lay in the house that Jack
built,
32 THE Merrie Heart.



This is the farmer sowing his corn, that kept the
cock that crew in the morn, that waked the
priest all shaven and shorn, that married the
man all tattered and torn, that kissed the
maiden all forlorn, that milked the cow with
the crumpled horn, that tossed the dog, that
worried the cat, that killed the rat, that ate
the malt, that lay in the house that Jack built.



LITTLE JACK JINGLE.

LITTLE Jack Jingle,
He used to live single ;
But when he got tired of this kind of life,
He left off being single, and lived with his wife.
Sele SIMON.



mi
SIMPLE SIMON.

SIMPLE SIMON met a pieman,
Going to the fair ;

Says Simple Simon to the pieman,
“Let me taste your ware!”

Says the pieman to Simple Simon,
“Show me first your penny.”
Says Simple Simon to the pieman,

“Indeed, I have not any!”
Simple Simon went a-fishing,
For to catch a whale,
And all the water he had got
Was in his mother’s pail.
34 LHe Merrie Hearr.



JACK A NORY.
PLL tell you a story,
About Jack A Nory,—
And now my story’s begun.
Pll tell you another,
About Jack his brother,—
And now my story’s done.

“ens 2.



YANKEE DOODLE.

YANKEE DOODLE came to town,

And how do you think they served him ?
One took his bag, another his scrip,

The quicker for to starve him,

mene poe
LITTLE JACK HORNER.

LITTLE Jack Horner
Sat in a corner,
Eating a Christmas pie ;
He put in his thumb,
And pulled out a plum,
And cried, “ What a good boy am I!”
Sozomon GRUNDY. 35





SOLOMON GRUNDY.

SOLOMON GRUNDY,
Born on a Monday,
Christened on Tuesday,
Married on Wednesday, =
Took ill on Thursday, SL)
Worse on Friday,
Died on Saturday,
Buried on Sunday.
This is the end

Of Solomon Grundy.


36 Tue Mere Heart.











Sol
8
Me
we He danced and he sang from morn till
Â¥ night, no lark so blithe as he,
] And this the burden of his song for ever
used to be,
“T care for nobody, no, not I, if nobedy cares for me!

“T live by my mill: God bless her! She’s kindred,
child, and wife,

I would not change my station for any other in life ;

No lawyer, surgeon, or doctor, e’er had a groat from
me—

I care for nobody, no, not I, if nobody cares for
me!” ;

x
THe Forty Micrer. au)



The reason why he was so blythe
He once did thus unfold—
“The bread I eat my hands have earned ;
I covet no man’s gold.
I do not fear next quarter day,
In debt to none I be;
I care for nobody, no, not I,
If nobody cares for me.

“A coin or two I’ve in my purse,
To help a needy friend ;

A little I can give the poor,
And still have some to spend.

Though I may fail, yet I rejoice,
Another’s good hap to see ;

I care for nobody, no, not I,
If nobody cares for me.”

So let us his example take,
_And be from malice free ;

Let every one his neighbour serve,
As served he’d like to be.
38 LHe Merrie Hearr.

OLD KING, COLE:

OLD King Cole was a merry old soul,

And a merry old soul was he ;

He called for his pipe,

And he called for his bowl,

And he called for his fiddlers three.

Every fiddler had a fiddle,

And a.very fine fiddle had he—

. Twee, tweedle dee, tweedle dee, went the fiddlers.

Oh, there’s none so rare
As can compare

With King Cole and his fiddlers three !

Pad Per

THE MAN IN THESSALY.

THERE was a man in Thessaly,
And he was wond’rous wise,

He jumped into a quickset hedge,
And scratched out both his eyes ;

And when he saw his eyes were out,
With all his might and main

He jumped into a holly bush,
And scratched them in again. _
$ Ca] Ae. | ( | mt
aE, =| fi f CH p
ty Ga c RAS LY - =

ey
m5 A CS
= b

=



OLD KING COLE,

THE Man in THE Moon. 4t



























THE MAN IN THE MOON.

THE man in the moon
Came tumbling down,
And asked his way to Norwich ;
He went by the south,
And burnt his mouth,
Whilst supping hot pease-porridge.
CeZ
42 Tue Merrie Hearr.



thE WEePING OF THEsGALE.

JOHNNIE ARMSTRONG had a calf,
Peter Henderson got the half,
Willie Wilkinson got the head :
Ring the bell! the calf is dead.

asd Rae



THE WARLIKE DOINGS OF THE KING
OF FRANCE AND HIS MEN.

THE King of France and forty thousand men,
They drew their swords and put them up again.
THe Last Witt AND TESTAMENT. 43





qHE VAST WILL SAND isi NT soe
THE GRAY MARE.

JOHN Cook had a little gray mare, he, haw, hum,
Her back stood up and her bones were bare, he,
haw, hum;

John Cook was riding up Shuter’s bank, he, haw,
hum,
And there his nag did kick and prank, he, haw, hum.

John Cook was riding up Shuter’s hill, he, haw, hum,
His mare fell down and made her will, he, haw, hum ;

The bridle and saddle were laid on a shelf, he, haw,
hum ;

If you want any more, you make it yourself, he, haw,
hum.
44 THe Merrie Hearr.

THE KING OF FRANCE AND THE KING
OF SPAIN.

THE King of France, with twenty thousand men,

Went up the hill and then came down again ;

The King of Spain, with twenty thousand more,

Climbed the same hill the French had climbed
before !



DAPPLE GRAY, THE PONY.

I HAD a little pony,
They called it Dapple Gray ;
T lent it to a lady
To ride a mile away.
She whipped it, she lashed it,
She drove it o’er the brae ;
I will not lend my pony more,
Though all the ladies pray.
Tue Movs&t AND THE Car. 45



DAPPLE GRAY, THE HOBBY HORSE.

I HAD a little hobby horse,
His name was Dapple Gray ;
His head was made of pea-straw,
His tail was made of hay.
Eee aes
THE MOUSE AND THE CAT.

A TITTY-MOUSE sat in the witty to spin,

Pussy came to her, and bade her “ Good e’en :”
“Oh, what are you doing, my little ’oman ?”

“A spinning a doublet for my gude man.”

“Then shall I come to thee and wind up thy thread ?”
“Oh, no, Mistress Puss, you'll bite off my head.”


46 THe Merrie Hearr.







THE MIRACULOUS GUINEA PIG.

G HERE was a little guinea pig,

AG Who, being little, was not big ;
He always walked upon his feet,
And never fasted when he ate.

aan



LOR,

When from a place he ran away,
He never at that place did stay ;

And while he ran, as I am told,

He ne’er stood still for young or old.

He often squeaked, and sometimes vi'lent,
And when he squeaked he ne’er was silent ;
Though ne’er instructed by a cat,

He knew a mouse was not a rat.

One day, as I am certified,

He took a whim, and fairly died ;
And, as I’m told by men of sense,
He never has been living since.
THe Sxorr CourrsHie.



ERE comes a lusty wooer,
es My a dildin, my a dildin ;
g I




eo)

* Here comes a lusty wooer,
Lily bright and shine a’.

“Pray, who do you woo?”
| My adildin, my a dildin ;
“Pray, who do you woo?”

Lily bright and shine a’.

“For your fairest daughter,”
My a dildin, my a dildin ;
“For your fairest daughter,”
Lily bright and shine a’.
“Then there she is for you,”
My a dildin, my a dildin ;
“Then there she is for you,’
Lily bright and shine a’.
48 THe Merrie HeEary.





THE OLD WOMAN, THE PEDLAR,
AND THE LITTLE DOG.

THERE was an old woman, as I’ve heard tell,
She went to the market her eggs for to sell ;
She went to the market, all on a market-day,
And she fell asleep on the king’s highway.

There came by a pedlar, whose name was Stout,
He cut her petticoats round about ;

He cut her petticoats up to the knees,

Which made the old woman to shiver and freeze.
THe Orv Woman. 49



When this old woman first did wake,

She began to shiver, and she began to shake ;
She began to wonder, and she began to cry—-
“Lawk a mercy on me, this is none of I!”

“But if it be I, as I do hope it be,

I’ve a little dog at home, and he’ll know me;
If it be I, he’ll wag his little tail,

And if it be not I, he'll loudly bark and wail.”

Home went the little woman, all in the dark,
Up got the little dog, and he began to bark;
He began to bark, so she began to cry—
“Lawk a mercy on me, this can’t be I!”



A CRUEL FLY CATCHING CHILDREN ON THE WINDOW-PANES.
50 THE Merrre Heart.





THE SONG OF THE TWO BIRDS.

THERE were two birds sat on a stone,
Fa, la, la; la, lal, de;
One flew away, and then there was one,
Fa, la, la; la, lal, de;
The other flew after, and then there was none,
Fa, la, la; la, lal, de;
And so the poor stone was left all alone,
Fa, la, la; la, lal, de.
THE MovusE AND THE CHEESE. 51





THE TWO BLACKBIRDS.

THERE were two blackbirds sat upon a hill,
The one named Jack, the other named Gill ;
Fly away Jack, fly away Gill;

Come again Jack, come again Gill,

tg Pate

THE MOUSE AND THE CHEESE.

THERE was a wee bit mousikie,
That lived in Gilberlaty, O!
It could not get a bit of cheese
For cheetie poussie cattie, O!
It said unto the cheesikie—
“ Oh, fain would I be at ye, O!
If it were not for the cruel paws
Of cheetie poussie cattie, O!”
52 THe Merrie Hearr.





THERE WAS A FROG LIVED IN A WELL.

THERE was a frog lived in a well,
Kitty alone, Kitty alone ;

There was a frog lived in a well,
Kitty alone and I.

There was a frog lived in a well,

And a farce* mouse in a mill,
Cock me cary, Kitty alone,
Kitty alone and I.

* Merry.
THERE WAS A FROG. 53



This frog, he would a-wooing ride,
Kitty alone, Kitty alone ;

This frog, he would a-wooing ride,
Kitty alone and I.

This frog, he would a-wooing ride,

And on a snail he got astride,
Cock me cary, Kitty alone,
Kitty alone and I.

He rode till he came to my Lady Mouse’ hall,
Kitty alone, Kitty alone ;

He rode till he came to my Lady Mouse’ hall,
Kitty alone and I;

He rode till he came to my Lady Mouse’ hall,

And there he did both knock and call,
Cock me cary, Kitty alone,
Kitty alone and I.

Quoth he, “Miss Mouse, I’m come to thee,”
Kitty alone, Kitty alone ;

Quoth he, “ Miss Mouse, I’m come to thee,”
Kitty alone and I.

Quoth he, “ Miss Mouse, I’m come to thee,

To see if you will fancy me,”
Cock me cary, Kitty alone,
Kitty alone and I.
34

THE Merrie Hearr.

Quoth she, “ Answer I'll give you none,”
Kitty alone, Kitty alone ;

Quoth she, “ Answer I’ll give you none,”
Kitty alone and I.

Quoth she, “ Answer I’ll give you none,

Until my Uncle Rat comes home,”
Cock me cary, Kitty alone,
Kitty alone'and I.

And when her Uncle Rat came home,
Kitty alone, Kitty alone;

And when her Uncle Rat came home,
Kitty alone and I.

And when her Uncle Rat came home,

“Who's been here since P've been gone ?”
Cock me cary, Kitty alone,
Kitty alone and I.

“Sir, there’s been a worthy gentleman,”
Kitty alone, Kitty alone ;

“Sir, there’s been a worthy gentleman,”
Kitty alone and I.

“Sir, there’s been a worthy gentleman,

That’s been here since you've been gone,”
Cock me cary, Kitty alone,
Kitty alone and I.
THERE WAS A FROG. 55



The frog he went whistling through the brook,
_ Kitty alone, Kitty alone ;
The frog he went whistling through the brook,
Kitty alone and I.
The frog he went whistling through the brook,
And there he met with a dainty duck,
Cock me cary, Kitty alone,
Kitty alone and I.

The duck she swallowed him up with a pluck,
Kitty alone, Kitty alone ;

The duck she swallowed him up witha pluck,
Kitty alone and I.

The duck she swallowed him up with a pluck,

So there is an end of my history book,
Cock me cary, Kitty alone,
Kitty alone and I.


56 THe Merrre Heart.





ONCE I SAW A LITTLE BIRD.

ONCE I saw a little bird
Come hop, hop, hop ;
So I cried; “ Little bird,
Will you stop, stop, stop ?”
And was going to the window,
To say, “How do you do?”
When he shook his little tail,
And far away he flew.

tg Pa
PILLYCOCK.

PILLYCOCK, Pillycock, sat on a hill,
If he’s not gone, he sits there still.
THE RoBin AND THE WReEn. 57



JENNY WREN'S “SICKNESS .AND

RECOVERY.

qj JTTLE Jenny Wren fell sick upon a time,

‘1% When in came Robin Redbreast and
brought her sops and wine ;

“Eat, Jenny; drink, Jenny: all shall be
thine!”

Then Jenny she got better, and stood
upon her feet,

And said to little Robin, “I love you not a bit!”

Then Robin he was angry, and flew upon a twig,

“ Hoot upon thee, fie upon thee, ungrateful chit !”



weg Pate

THE ROBIN AND THE WREN.
‘THE Robin Redbreast and the Wren
Cast out about the porridge pan ;
But ere the Robin got a spoon,
The Wren she had them all done.
D2
58 THe Merrie Heart.



THREE BLIND MICE.

THREE blind mice—see how they run!

They all ran after the farmer’s wife,

Who cut off their tails with a carving knife ;

Did ever you hear such a thing in your life ?
Three blind mice.

Pad Pere

A SHORT SONG,

THERE was an old crow
Sat upon a clod ;

There’s an end of my song—
That’s odd! j




HUSH-A-BYE, BABY.

HUSH-A-BYE, baby, on a tree-top ;

When the wind blows, the cradle will rock ;
When the wind ceases, the cradle will fall,
And down will come baby and cradle and all.
60 THe Merrie HeEarr.

OH, DEAR! WHAT CAN THE MATTER BE?

OH, dear! what can the matter be ?

Dear, dear! what can the matter be?

Oh, dear! what can the matter be ?
Johnny’s so long at the fair.

He promised he’d bring me a basket of posies,

A garland of lilies, a garland of roses,

A little straw hat to set off the blue ribbons,

That tie up my bonny brown hair.
Oh, dear, &c.
ered Ea
TRIP UPON TRENCHERS.

TRIP upon trenchers, and dance upon dishes,

My mother sent me for some barm, some barm ;
She bade me tread lightly, and come again quickly,

For fear the young men should do me some harm.

Yet didn’t you see, yet didn’t you see,
What naughty tricks they put upon me?
They broke my pitcher,
And spilt the water,
And huffed my mother,
And chid her daughter,
And kissed my sister instead of me.
To BansBury CROss. 61





TO BANBURY CROSS.

RIDE a cockhorse to Banbury Cross,

To see an old woman get up on her horse ;
Rings on her fingers, and bells at her toes,
And so she makes music wherever she goes,
62 THe Merrre Hearr.



RIDING EXERCISE.

HERE goes my lord,
A trot! a trot! a trot! a trot!
Here goes my lady,
A canter!! a canter!! a canter!! a canter!!
Here goes my young master,
Jockey-hitch!!! jockey-hitch!!! jockey-hitch!!!
jockey-hitch !!!
Here comes my young miss,
An amble!!! an amble!!! an amble!!! an amble!!!
The footman lags behind to tipple ale and wine,
And goes gallop!!! a gallop!!! a gallop!!! to
make up his time!



SEE SAW:
SEE saw, sacradown,
Which is the way to London town ?
One foot up, and one foot down,
That is the way to London town.
Lapy Wrinp. 63



LADY WIND.

My Lady Wind, my Lady Wind,

Went round about the house to find
A chink to put her foot in ;

She tried the keyhole in the door,

She tried the crevice in the floor,
And drove the chimney soot in.

And then one night, when it was dark,
She blew up such a tiny spark,

That all the house was pothered ;
From it she raised up such a flame,
As flamed away to Belting Lane,

And White Cross folks were smothered.

And thus when once, my little dears,
A whisper reaches itching ears,

The same will come, you'll find ;
Take my advice, restrain the tongue,
Remember what old nurse has sung

Of busy Lady Wind !
64° THe Mere Heart.



THE SONG OF SIXPENCE.

Sing a song of sixpence, a bag full of rye,

Four-and-twenty blackbirds baked in a pie;

When the pie was opened, the birds began to sing:

And was not that a dainty dish to set before the
king?

The king was in the parlour, counting o’er his
money ;

The queen was in the kitchen, eating bread and
honey ;

The maid was in the garden, laying out the clothes,

Up came a blackbird and bit off her nose,
TxeE Dove. 65



THE DOVE.

BY JOHN KEATS.

I HAD a dove, and the sweet dove died!

And I have thought it died of grieving:

Oh, what could it grieve for? Its feet were tied
With a silken thread of my own hands’ weaving.
Sweet little red feet! why should you die—’
Why would you leave me, sweet bird! why ?
You lived alone in the forest tree ;

Why, pretty thing! would you not live with me?
I kissed you oft, and gave you white peas ;
Why not live sweetly, as in the green trees ?


66 THe Merrre HEarr.



THE BABES IN THE WOOD.

My dear, don’t you know
How, a long time ago,

Two poor little children,
Whose names I don’t know,
Were stolen away
On a fine summer’s day,

And left in a wood,

As I’ve heard people say ?

And when it was night,
So sad was their plight ;

The sun it went down,
And the moon gave no light ;
They sobbed, and they sighed,
And they bitterly cried,
Txe Bases in THE Woop. 67



And the poor little things
They lay down and died.

And when they were dead,

The robins so red
Brought strawberry leaves,

And over them spread :

And all the day long

They sang them this song—-
“Poor babes in the wood,
Poor babes in the wood ;”
And don’t you remember
The babes in the wood ?


68 ‘THe Merrre Hearr.



POCAUGHT A HARE “ALIVE:

I, 2, 3; 4, 5
I caught a hare alive ;

GO; 7,48)00; 310;
T let her go again.
eed hee
THE WOODCOCK, THE SPARROW, AND

THE LISLE DOG,
TLL sing you a song,
The days are long ;

The woodcock and the sparrow;

The little dog he has burned his tail,

And he must be hanged to-morrow.

aww gi Pew
WRANGHAM BELLS.

SWING ’em, swang ’em, bells at Wrangham,
Three dogs in a string, hang ’em, hang ’em.
&

THE STAR. 69







THE STAR.
from “ Rhymes for the Nursery,” by A. $. Taylor and others.



Sole
ae twinkle, little star,

le A

16
s3°8 Up above the world so high,
ESS

How I wonder what you are!




Like a diamond in the sky.

When the blazing sun is gone,
When he nothing shines upon,
Then you show your little light,
Twinkle, twinkle, all the night.

Then the traveller in the dark,
Thanks you for your tiny spark ;
He could not see which way to go,
If you did not twinkle so.

In the dark blue sky you keep,

And often through my curtains peep ;
For you never shut. your eye

Till the sun is in the sky.
ae

THe Merrre Hear.

As your bright and tiny spark
Lights the traveller in the dark ;

Though I know not what you are,

Twinkle, twinkle, little star.

iS

(=

a,

mm


L Love Sixpence. 71



I SAW THREE SHIPS COME SAILING BY.

I saw three ships come sailing by,
Sailing by, sailing by ;

I saw three ships come sailing by,
On New Year’s Day in the morning.

And what do you think was in them then,
In them then, in them then ?

And what do you think was in them then,
On New Year's Day in the morning ?

Three pretty girls were in them then, ,
In them then, in them then ;

Three pretty girls were in them then,
On New Year’s Day in the morning.

And one could whistle, and one could sing,
The other could play the violin;
Such joy there was at my wedding,
On New Year’s Day in the morning.
mend Pate

I LOVE SIXPENCE.

_ I LOVE sixpence, pretty little sixpence,
I love sixpence better than my life ;
I spent a penny of it, I spent another,
And took fourpence home to my wife.
E
72

THe Merrre Hearr.



I love fourpence, pretty little fourpence,
I love fourpence better than my life ;

I spent a penny of it, I spent another,
And I took twopence home to my wife.

I love twopence, pretty little twopence,
I love twopence better than my life ;

I spent a penny of it, I spent another,
And I took nothing home to my wife.

I love nothing, pretty little nothing,
What will nothing buy for my wife ?
I have nothing, I spend nothing,
I love nothing better than my wife.







Wa
he

yy ‘






AN IDLE DOG TYING A SAUCEPAN TO A SCHOOL-BOY’S TAIL.
Wrz ve Buy Sysoes ? aa

THE DUSTY MILLER.

Dusty was the coat,
Dusty was the colour,
Dusty was the kiss
Of my charming miller.

If I had my pockets

Full of gold and siller,
I would give it all

To my charming miller.

If I had, &c.

Pav g parc

WILL YE BUY SYBOES?

“WILL ye buy syboes ?
Will ye buy leeks ?

Will ye buy my bonnie lassie
Wi the red cheeks ?”

“T winna buy your syboes,
I winna buy your leeks ;
But I will buy your bonnie lassie
Wi the red cheeks.”
Be2
74: THE Merrie Flearr.





THE THIEF.

Tom THUMB, the piper’s son,

Stole a pig, and away did run,

The pig was ate, and Tom was beat,
Till he ran crying down the street.

ag Par

WHEN A MAN MARRIES.

NEEDLES and pins, needles and pins,
When a man marries, his trouble begins.
THE Sone or THE Piper. 75



UP HILL AND DOWN DALE.

UP hill and down dale,
Butter is made in every vale ;
And if Nancy Cock

Is a good girl,

She shall have a spouse,
And make butter anon,
Before her old grandmother
Grows a young man.



THE SONG OF THE PIPER AND THE
FIDDLER’S WIFE.

WERE all dry. with drinking on’t,
We're all dry with drinking on’t ;
The piper kissed the fiddler’s wife,
And I can’t sleep for thinking on’t.
76 THe Merrie Hearr.



LITTLE JUMPING JOAN.
HERE am I, little jumping Joan:
When nobody’s with me,

Tm always alone.

sad bere

THE DEAF OLD WOMAN.

“ OLD woman, old woman, shall we go a-shearing ?”

“Speak a little louder, sir; I’m very thick of.
hearing ?”

“ Old woman, old woman, shall I kiss you dearly ?”

“Thank you, kind sir; I hear you very clearly.”
NUMBERS. : 77



“LITTLE maid, little maid, whither goest thou ?”
“Down in the forest to milk my cow.”

“Shall I go with thee?” “No, not now:

When I send for thee, then come thou.”

ead Pex
NUMBERS.
[Spoken rapidly.
17, 16, 15,
14, 13, 12,
Bi, PEO, / 2G}
8, 7) 6,
5, 4, 3-
The tenor of this tune plays merrily.
78 Tue Merrre Hearr.





THE MERRY BELLS OF LONDON.

GAY go up, and gay go down,
To ring the bells of London town.

“ Bull’s eyes and targets,”

Say the bells of St. Margaret’s.
“ Brick-bats and tiles,”

Say the bells of St. Giles’.

“ Halfpence and farthings,”
Say the bells of St. Martin’s.

“ Oranges and lemons,”
Say the bells of St. Clement’s.
THe Merry Berrs or Lonpon. 79



’ “Pancake and fritters,”
Say the bells of St. Peter's.

“Two sticks and an apple,”
Say the bells at Whitechapel.

“Old Father Baldpate,”
Say the slow bells at Aldgate.

“You owe me ten shillings,”
Say the bells of St. Helen’s.

“When will you pay me?”
Say the bells at Old Bailey.

“When I shall grow rich,”
Say the bells at Shoreditch.

“ Pray, when will that be ?”
Say the bells at Stepney.

“T am sure I don’t know,”
Says the great bell at Bow.


80 Tae Merrre Heart.



THE VALENTINE.

THE rose is red; the violet’s blue;
Honey’s sweet; and so are you.
Thou art my love, and I am thine,
I drew thee for my Valentine ;
The lot was cast, and then I drew,
And fortune said it should be you.
My Morzer’s Bouncine GAL. 81



THE SPINNER.

THERE was an old woman sat spinning,
And that’s the first beginning ;
She had a calf,
And that’s half;
She threw it over the wall—
And that’s all.
eg Mee

MY MOTHER’S BOUNCING GAL.

WHAT care I how black I be,
Twenty pounds will marry me;
If twenty won't, forty shall:
Iam my mother’s bouncing gal.




82 Txt Merrre Heart.





THOUGH A LASS BE NE’ER SO FAIR.

THOUGH a lass be ne’er so fair,
If she want the penny siller,
She may stand till ninety-nine,
Ere the wind blow a man till her.

Though a lass be ne’er so black,
If she hae the penny siller,
Set her up on Tintock tap,
The wind will blow a man till her.
On Saturpay Nicut. 83





—_— ~~ = oer ES

A SCHOOLBOY’S CONFESSION,

AMO, amas, I love a lass,
As a cedar tall and slender ;
Sweet cowslips grace her nominative case,
And she’s of the feminine gender,
sag Pere
ON SATURDAY NIGHT.
ON Saturday night
Shall be all my care,
To powder my locks,
And curl my hair.
On Sunday morning
My love will come in,
When he will marry me
With a gay gold ring.
84 THe Merrie Heart.



JACK AND 4GiLh,

JAcK and Gill
Went up the hill,
To fetch a pail of water ;
Jack fell down,
And broke his crown,
And Gill came tumbling after.

— ag Pere

BLOW THE FIRE, BLACKSMITH!

BLow the fire, blacksmith !
The sparks begin to fly.
Before I’d have an old man,

I'd lay me down and die.

-I’d sooner have a young man,
With an apple in his hand,
Than I would have an old man,

With all his house and land.

An old man comes grumbling in—
“I’m weary of my life ;”

A young man comes jumping in—
“Come, kiss me, my dear wife!”


JACK AND JILL.










Lonvon Brivce 1s Broxen Down. 87



THE CELEBRATED SONG OF LONDON
BRIDGE IS BROKEN DOWN.

LonDON Bridge is broken down,
Dance o’er my lady lee ;

London Bridge is broken down,
With a gay lady.

How shall we build it up again ?
Dance o’er my lady lee;

How shall we build it up again ?
With a gay lady.

Build it up with silver and gold,
Dance o’er my lady lee ;

Build it up with silver and gold,
With a gay lady.

Silver and gold will be stolen away,
Dance o’er my lady lee;

Silver and gold will be stolen away,
With a gay lady.

Build it up with iron and steel,
Dance o’er my lady lee ;

Build it up with iron and steel,
With a gay lady.
88

Tue Merrre Heart.



Iron and steel will bend and bow,
Dance o’er my lady lee ;

Tron and steel will bend and bow,
With a gay lady.

Build it up with wood and clay,
Dance o’er my lady lee;

Build it up with wood and clay,
With a gay lady.

Wood and clay will wash away,
Dance o’er my lady lee ;

Wood and clay will wash away,
With a gay lady.

Build it up of stone so strong,

Dance o’er my lady lee ;
Huzza! ’twill last for ages long !
With a gay lady.


Friopviine F oHN. 89







































































Happy the man who belongs to no party,
But sits in his own house and looks at Ben Arty!

ad Pere

LOVERS’ CONVERSATION.
As Tommy Snooks and Bessy Brooks
Were walking out one Sunday,
Says Tommy Snooks to Bessy Brooks,
“To-morrow will be Monday.”

avg Pete

FIDDLING JOHN.
“ JOHN, come sell thy fidd'e,
And buy thy wife a gown!”
“No, I’ll not sell my fiddle
For e’er a wife in town!”
gO

THe Merrre Hear.



ttt

\



MY LITTLE HUSBAND.
I HAD a little husband,
No bigger than my thumb,
I put him in a pint pot,
And there I bade him drum ;
I bought a little horse,
That galloped up and down,
I bridled him, and saddled him,
And sent him out of town ;
I gave him a pair of garters
To tie up his little hose,
And a little silk handkerchief
To wipe his little nose.
My Prerry Maz. gI





WHERE ARE YOU GOING, MY PRETTY
MAID?

“WHERE are you going, my pretty maid ?”
“Tm going a-milking, sir,” she said.
“May I go with you, my pretty maid ?”
“You're kindly welcome, sir,” she said.
“What is your father, my pretty maid ?”
“ My father’s a farmer, sir,” she said.
“Say will you marry me, my pretty maid?”
“Yes, if you please, kind sir,” she said.
“What is your fortune, my pretty maid ?”
“My face is my fortune, sir,” she said.
“Then I won’t marry you, my pretty maid !”
“ Nobody asked you, sir!” she said.

F 2
92 THE Merrie Hearr.











WOOING.

i ADAM, I am come to court you,

If your favour I can gain.”
soma Ah! ah!” said she, “you're a bold
aN fellow,

If e’er I see your face again.”



“Madam, I have rings and diamonds,
Madam, I have houses and land ;
Madam, I have a world of treasure ;
All shall be at your command.”

“T care not for rings and diamonds,
I care not for houses and land ;
I care not for a world of treasure,
So that I have but a handsome man.”

“Madam, you think much of beauty,
Beauty hasteneth to decay;

For the fairest of flowers that grow in summer,
Will decay and fade away.”
Tae CameBric SHIRT. 93



THE. CAMBRIC SHIRT.

“CAN you make me a cambric shirt,
Parsley, sage, rosemary, and thyme,

Without any seam or needlework ?
And you will be a true lover of mine.

“Can you wash it in yonder well,
Parsley, sage, rosemary, and thyme,
Where never sprung water nor rain ever fell?
And you will be a true lover of mine.

“Can you dry it on yonder thorn,
Parsley, sage, rosemary, and thyme,

Which never bore blossom since Adam was born ?
And you will be a true lover of mine.”

“ Now you have asked me questions three,
Parsley, sage, rosemary, and thyme;

I hope you will answer as many for me,
And you will be a true lover of mine.

“Can you find me an acre of land,
Parsley, sage, rosemary, and thyme,
Between the salt water and the sea sand?
And you will be a true lover of mine.
94 Tue Merrre Heart.



“Can you plough it with a ram’s horn,
Parsley, sage, rosemary, and thyme,
And sow it all over with one peppercorn ?
And you will be a true lover of mine.

“Can you reap it with a sickle of leather,
Parsley, sage, rosemary, and thyme,
And bind it up with a peacock’s feather ?
And you will be a true lover of mine.

“When you have done it, and finished your work,
Parsley, sage, rosemary, and thyme,

Come to me for your cambric shirt,
And you will be a true lover of mine.”



A NAUGHTY FOWL TEASING A LITTLE BOY.
Tom Tucker. 95



TOM TUCKER.

LITTLE Tom Tucker
Sings for his supper.
What shall he eat ?
White bread and butter.
How shall he eat it
Without e’er a knife?
How can he be married
Without e’er a wife?
96

THe Merrie HEART.



A LITTLE MAN AND I FELL OUT.

“A LITTLE man and I fell out:

How shall we bring this matter about ?”
“Bring it about as well as you can :”
“Get you gone, you little old man !”

te g Pee
HOW THE STRIFE BEGAN.

A LITTLE man and I fell out,

Tl tell you what ’twas all about :
IT had money, and he had none—
That is how the strife began.

and Bar

MR. PUNCHINELLO.

Ou, Mother, I’m to be married
To Mr. Punchinello ;
To Mr. Punch,
To Mr. Joe,
To Mr. Nell,
To Mr. Lo;
Mr. Punch, Mr. Joe,
Mr. Nell, Mr. Lo;
To Mr. Punchinello.
An Evenine Dirty. 97









AN EVENING DITTY.

Boys and girls, come out to play,

The moon doth shine as bright as day :
Come with a hoop, come with a call,
Come with a good will, or not at all.
Leave your supper, and leave your sleep,
Come to your playfellows in the street ;
Up the ladder, and down the wall,

A penny loaf will serve you all.
98 Tae Merrre Heart.



“€OUSEN, COUSIN, HOW DO YOU DO?”

“ COUSIN, cousin, how do you do?”
“ Pretty well, I thank you; how does cousin Sue do?”
“ She is very well, and sends her service to you,
And so do Dick, and Tom, and all who ever knew
you.”
sag bee

A “SONG;

I’LL sing you a song,
Nine verses long,

For a pin.
Three and three are six,
And three are nine ;
You are a goose,

And the pin is mine.
MISTRESS MARY.

MISTRESS Mary,
Quite contrary,
How does your garden grow?
With cockle shells
And silver bells,
And cowslips all a-row.
TZ oTHER Lirrte TUNE. 99

WHO'S THERE?

WuH0’s there?
A grenadier.
What do you want?
A pot of beer.
Where’s your money ?
Quite forgot.
Get you gone,
You drunken sot!

asd Pane
YAWNING.

THEM that gant,
Something want :—
Sleep, meat, or makin’ 0’.

sad Pere

TOTHER. LITTLE TUNE.
(A VERY PLEASANT SONG.)
I won’T be my father’s Jack,
I won’t be my mother’s Gill,
I will be the fiddler’s wife,
And have music when I will.
Tother little tune,
T’other little tune,
Pr’ythee, love, play me
T’other little tune !
100

THe Merrie HEearr.



A TOAST.
[Zo be spoken very rapidly.

HERE'S to you and yours,
Not forgetting us and ours ;
And when you and yours
Come to see us and ours,
Us and ours
Will be as kind to you and yours,
As ever you and yours
Were to us and ours,
When us and ours
Came to see you and yours,
agi bee
ADVICE GRATIS.
To make your candles last for aye,
You wives and maids, give ear, O!
To put them out’s the only way,
Says honest John Boldero.
eae
PHILOSOPHIC REFLECTIONS.
OH, that I was where I would be,
Then would I be where I am not;
But where I am I must be,
And where I would be I cannot!
THe Rure or THe Roap. IOI



7 —— S\\\ fh



J NS a en wn AL
A RHYME FOR A LAZY FELLOW.

You know that Monday is Sunday’s brother,
Tuesday is such another,
‘Wednesday you must go to church and pray,
’ Thursday is half-holiday,
On Friday it is too late to begin to spin,
And Saturday is half-holiday again.
sag perc

THE RULE OF THE ROAD.

THE rule of the road is a paradox quite,

And custom has proved it so, long ;

He that goes to the left is sure to go right,
And he that goes to the right must go wrong.
102 THe Merrie Hearr.

PiteokeBeH OF THE HORSE THAT
SPOKE TO HIS MASTER.
UP the hill take care of me,
Down the hill take care of thee ;
Give me no water when I’m hot,
On level ground spare me not.
eager

ANOTHER SPEECH BY THE SAME
HORSE.
UP hill ride me not,
Down hill gallop me not,
On level ground spare me not,
And in the stable forget me not.
eg Pere
THE CAT'S EXPEDITION TO LONDON.
‘“‘PUSSIE cat, pussie cat, where have you been?”
““T’ve been to London to look at the Queen.”
“ Pussie cat, pussie cat, what did you there ?”
“TI frightened a little mouse under a chair.”
edgier
A LOVING PROPOSAL.
PUSSIE cat, pussie cat, wilt thou be mine?
Thou shalt neither wash dishes, nor feed the swine ;
But sit on a cushion and sew a silk seam,
And eat fine strawberries, sugar, and cream,


THE WAY TO BE HEALTHY, WEALTHY,
AND WISE.

EARLY to bed, and early to rise,
Is the way to be healthy, wealthy, and wise.

d



EYES.

GREY-EYED, greedy ;
Brown-eyed, needy ;
Black-eyed, never blin,
Till it shame all its kin.
104 Tue Merrie Hearr.



THE DEATH AND BURIAL
OF COCK ROBIN.

“Wo killed Cock Robin ?”
“TT,” said the Sparrow,
“With my little arrow ;

IT killed Cock Robin.”

“Who saw him die?”
“T,” said the Fly,
“With my little eye ;

I saw him die.”

“Who caught his blood ?”
“T,” said the Fish,
“With my little dish ;

I caught his blood.”

“Who made his shroud ?”
“J,” said the Beetle,
“With my little needle ;

I made his shroud.”

“Who'll dig his grave ?”
“T,” said the Owl,
“With my spade and shoul ;
Pll dig his grave.”
“Who'll be the parson ?”
“T,” said the Rook,
“With my little book ;
Pll be the parson.”




Ll




Tue Merrre HEearr.

“Who'll be the clerk ?”
“J,” said the Lark,
“Tf it’s not in the dark ;
I'll be the clerk.”

“ Who'll carry him to his grave ?”
“TJ,” said the Kite,
“Tf it’s not in the night ;

Pll carry him to his grave.”

“Who'll carry the link ?”
“JT,” said the Linnet,
“Tl fetch it in a minute ;
Pll carry the link.”
“Who'll be chief mourner ?”
“T.” said the Dove,
“T mourn for my love ;
Vl be chief mourner.”

“Who'll bear the pall ?”

“We,” said the Wren,

Both the cock and the hen;
“We'll bear the pall.”
“Who'll sing a psalm ?”

“J.” said the Thrush,

As she sat in a bush ;

“Tl sing a psalm.”
Deatu AND Boriat oF Cock RosBin. 107








EG
Sa |
“ And who'll toll the bell 2”

“J,” said the Bull,

“ Because I can pull.”
And so, Cock Robin, farewell,
> All the birds in the air

Fell a sighing and sobbing,

When they heard the bell toll
=
SSS For poor Cock Robin.







108 Twe Merrmé Hearr.



GOOSIE, GOOSIE, GANDER.
GOOSIE, goosie, gander,
Whither shall I wander ?

Up stairs, down stairs,

In my lady’s chamber—
There you'll find a cup of sack,
And a race of ginger.


A Swart. ALARMED. 109



RAVEN’S CONVERSATION.

“A HOGGIE dead! a hoggie dead! a hoggie dead!”
“Oh, where ? oh, where? oh, where?”

“ Down i’’e park! down i’’e park! down i’’e park!”
“Ts't fat ? ist fat? is’t fat ?”

“Come try! come try! come try !”

ng Rate

A SNAIL ALARMED.

SNEEL, Snaul,

Robbers are coming to pull down your wall!
Sneel, Snaul,

Put out your horn,

Robbers are coming to steal your corn,
Coming at four o'clock in the morn!
110 THe Merrie Hear.



IF ALL THE WORLD WERE APPLE-PIE.

SS Ir all the world were apple-pie,
And all the sea were ink,
And all the trees were butter and cheese,
What should we have for drink ?



TRUANT FROGS PELTING STONES AT YOUNG BATHERS.

Pa Gg Pee
ELIZABETH.
ELIZABETH, Elspeth, Betsy, and Bess,
They all went together to seek a bird’s nest ;

They found a bird’s nest with five eggs in;
They all took one, and left four in.
PeASE Porripce Hor. III

~ THOMAS A TATTAMUS.

THOMAS A TATTAMUS took two T’s,

To tie two tups to two tall trees,

To frighten the terrible Thomas a Tattamus:
Tell me how many T’s there are in all THAT.

tg Pee



THREE CATS TAKING AWAY THE FOOD FROM ONE CHILD.

Sg Pee

\

= PEASE PORRIDGE HOT.
PEASE porridge hot, pease porridge cold,
_ Pease porridge in the pot, nine days old.
Spell me THAT in four letters.
112 Taw&é Merrre Hearr.

CURRANTS.
vy

HIGGLEDY, piggledy,
Here we lie ;
Picked and plucked,
And put in a pie.
My first is snapping, snarling, growling ;
My second’s industrious, romping, prowling.
Higgledy, piggledy,
Here we lie;
Picked and plucked,
And put in a pie.



Pag fa

THE OLD MAN IN THE WILDERNESS.

THE old man in the wilderness asked me :—
“ How many strawberries grow in the sea ?”
I answered him, as I thought good :—

“As many as red herrings grow in the wood.”
IN-FIR-TAR-IS. r13

TO A SNAIL.
SNAIL, snail, put out your horns,
I'll give you bread and barleycorns.
anedbeve
A SNAIL THREATENED.
SNAIL, snail, come out of your hole,
Or else I'll make you as black as a coal.
ee
THE SAD PATE (OF AN. EGG.
Humpty Dumpty sat on a wall,
Humpty Dumpty had a great fall ;
Three score men and three score more,
Cannot place Humpty Dumpty as he was before.
oe
os IN-FIR-TAR-IS.
(To be spoken quickly.)
IN-fir-tar-is,
In-oak-none-is,
In-mud-eel-is,
In-clay-none-is,
Goat-eat-ivy,
Can-a-mare-eat-oats ?
Era THe Merrre Heart.

















































j

7 ForMED long ago, yet made to-day,

Employed while others sleep ;
What few would like to give away,
Nor any wish to keep.
RELATIONSHIP. I15



AS I WAS GOING TO ST. IVES.

AS I was going to St. Ives,

I met a man with seven wives ;
Every wife had seven sacks,

Every sack had seven cats,

Every cat had seven kits.

Kits, cats, sacks, and wives,

How many were going to St. Ives?

RELATIONSHIP.

THERE were three sisters in a hall,
There came a knight amongst them all.
“ Good-morrow, aunt,” to the one,
“ Good-morrow, aunt,” to the other,
“ Good-morrow, gentlewoman,” to the third ;
“If you were my aunt,
As the other two be,
I would say, Good-morrow,
Then, aunts three.”

[What relation was the third lady tohim? Why,
mother, of course.]
116 THE Merrre HEarr.



~s THE WONDERFUL. LADIES.
EVERY lady in this land
Has twenty nails upon each hand
Five and twenty on hands and feet
All this is true without deceit. h
[As you will find, 7f you pause at the right places.] 2
f weed nae
RIDDLE ME, RIDDLE ME.
RIDDLE me, riddle me, rot tot tot,
om A little wee man in a red, red coat ;
A staff in his hand and a stone in his throat,
Riddle me, riddle me, rot tot tot. [A Cherry.] |
ted hate
LADYBIRD, FLY AWAY HOME!
LADYBIRD, ladybird, fly away home,
Your house is a-fire, your children all gone,
All but one that lies under a stone ;
Fly thee home, ladybird, ere it be gone!
— ng PR
ARITHMETIC.
MULTIPLICATION is vexation,
Division’s twice as bad ;
The Rule of Three it puzzles me,
And Fractions drive me mad!
Ba, Ba, Brack SHEEP.

BA, BA, BLACK SHEEP.

Ba, ba, black sheep,
Have you any wool ?

Yes, marry, have I,
Three bags full.

One for my master,
One for my dame,

But none for the little boy

That cries in the lane.
















118

THE Merrre Hearr.






a

ct

eA




SS





SS 2 aS =

THE MEETING OF THE KINGS.
THERE was a king met a king,



In a narrow lane;
Says this king to that king,
“Where have you been ?”
“Oh, Ive been a hunting,
With my dog and my dee.”
“Pray lend him to me,
That I may do so.”
“There’s the dog, TAKE the dog.”
“What’s the dog’s name?”
“T’ve told you already.”
“Pray tell me again.”
THe Story oF THE LEGs. T19





iii STORY “OF THE LEGS.

Two legs sat upon three legs,

With one leg in his lap ;

In comes four legs,

And runs away with one leg;

Up jumps two legs,

Catches up three legs,

Throws it after four legs,

And makes him bring back one leg.

[One leg is a leg of mutton; two legs a man;
three legs a stool ; and four legs a dog.]
120 Tue Merrre Hear.



THE MONTHS.

THIRTY days hath September,

April, June, and November ;

All the rest have thirty-one ;

Excepting February alone,

Which hath but twenty-eight days clear,
And twenty-nine in each leap year.


WeaTHER RHYMES. 121





WEATHER RHYMES.

Ir New Year's Eve night wind blow south,
It betokeneth warmth and growth;

If west, much milk, and fish in the sea;

If north, much cold and storms there will be ;
If east, the trees will bear much fruit ;

If north-east—flee it, man and brute !

AS the day lengthens
The cold strengthens.

ALL the months of the year
Curse a fair February.

Ir Candlemas day be dry and fair,
The half o’ winter’s to come and mair ;
If Candlemas day be wet and foul,
The half o’ winter’s gane at Yule.

H
122 THe Merrre Hearr.

WEATHER RHYMES—continued.

MARCH borrowed from April

Three days, and they were ill ;

The first of them was wind and weet,
The second of them was snow and sleet,
The third of them was such a freeze

It froze the birds’ nebs to the trees.

APRIL showers
Make May flowers,

WHEN April blows his horn,
It’s good for both hay and corn.

MIST in May, and heat in June,
Make the harvest right soon.

THE evening red, and the morning grey,
Will set the traveller on his way.

IF the cock crows on going to bed,
He’s sure to rise with a watery head.

A RAINBOW in the morning
Is the shepherd’s warning ;
A rainbow at night

Is the shepherd’s delight.
WEATHER RHYMES. 123



WEATHER RHYMES—continued.

RAIN, rain,
Go to Spain,
And never come back again.

THE men of the East,
Are picking their geese,
And sending their feathers. here away, there away.

SNAIL, snail, shoot out your horn,
And tell us if it will be a bonny day the morn.

To talk of the weather is nothing but folly,

For when it’s rain on the hill it may be sun in the
valley.



>
124 THE Merrie Hearr.



CHRISTMAS CAROL.

Gop bless the master of this house,
The mistress also ;

And all the little children
That round the table go ;

And all your kin and kinsmen,
That dwell both far and near,

I wish you a merry Christmas,
And a happy new year.

td Pee

ALL FOOLS’ DAY.

APRIL fool! April fool!
You learn nought by going to school.

“sag Pew

GOOD FRIDAY.

ONE a penny, two a penny, hot cross buns!

If your daughters do not like them, give them to
your sons ;

But if you should have none of these pretty elves,

You cannot do better than to eat them yourselves.
THE CUCKoo. 125

THE CUCKOO.

SPRHE Cuckoo is a fine bird,
He sings as he flies ;
He brings us good

sidings,





He tells us no lies.
He sucks little birds’
eggs
ov To make his voice
clear ;
And when he sings
mGuckoow

2 ; The summer is near.

THE Cuckoo comes in April,
Stops all the month of May,

Sings a song at midsummer,
And then he goes away.
126 THe Merrie Hearr.

MORE ABOUT THE CUCKOO.

Cuckoo, Cuckoo,
What do you do?

In April

I open my bill,

In May

I sing night and day,
In June

I change my tune;
In July

Away I fly.

CUCKOO, cherry tree,
Come down and tell me,
How many years I have to live!
agi ee
THE-SONG OF THE CAT AND? THE
FIDDLE.
Hey, diddle, diddle,
The cat and the fiddle,
The cow jumped over the moon;
The little dog laughed
To see such fine sport,
And the dish ran away with the spoon.
a

NY
IY

Â¥ z
7 a Ne



HEY DIDDLE DIDDLE.

A STAR. 129

COLOURS.

BLUE is beauty, red ’s a token ;
Green ’s grief, and yellow ’s forsaken.

BLUE

Ts love true ;
Green

Is love deen.*

wad Pare

THE ROBIN AND THE WREN.

THE Robin Redbreast and the Wren
Are God Almighty’s cock and hen ;
The martin and the swallow

Are the two next birds that follow.

~~ ag Pee

A STAR.
I HAD a little sister, they called her Peep-peep,
She wades in the water so deep, deep, deep;
She climbs up the mountains so high, high, high,
And, poor little thing, she has but one eye.

* Done.
130 Lxe Merrie Hearr.







CROWS.

ONE’s unlucky, Four is wealth ;
Two ’s lucky ; Five is sickness,
Three is health, Six is death.
PHYSIOGNOMY. 131



COCK-CROWING.,
THE cock doth crow,
To let you know,
If you are wise,
It’s time to rise.
ang Pee
MAGPIES.
ONE’S sorrow, two’s mirth;
Three ’s a marriage, four ’s death.

Sad Ree

PHYSIOGNOMY.

LANG and lazy;
Little and loud ;
Red and foolish ;
Black and proud.


132 THe Merrie Hearr.





THE OWL.
To-wHOO—to-whoo !
Cold toe—toe !

neg Pere

THE OWL'S STORY.
ONCE I was a monarch’s daughter,
And sat on a lady’s knee ;
But I’m now a nightly rover,
Banished to the ivy tree.

Crying hoo, hoo; hoo, hoo; hoo, hoo ;
Hoo, hoo; hoo, my feet are cold;
Pity me, for here you see me
Persecuted, poor, and old.
sag bee
BARN-DOOR CONVERSATION.
fTen—Cock, cock, I have la-a-a-yed!
Cock—Hen, hen, that’s well sa-a-a-yed !
Hen—Although I have to go barefooted every
day-a-ay !
Cock (con spirito)—Sell your eggs and buy shoes!
Sell your eggs and buy shoes!
THE Ow, 133






134 THE Merrie Heart.



yp”

foe es
WA ee LG,
“Gy



THE ROBIN.

THE North wind doth blow,
And we shall have snow,
And what will poor Robin do then,

Poor thing ?
He'll sit in a barn,

And to keep himself warm
Will hide his head under his wing,
Poor thing !
Two Goop Oxrp EVENING PRAYERS. 135







TWO GOOD OLD EVENING PRAYERS.

I.

FOUR corners to this bed,

Six angels round me spread ;

Two to pray, two to wake,

Two to guard me till daybreak.
And blesséd guardian angels keep
Me safe from danger while I sleep.

IL.

I LAY me down upon my side,
And pray the Lord to be my guide
And if I die before I wake,

I pray the Lord my soul to take.

FSO
136 THe Merrre Hearr.

a

aA eT kh



TENEELE tes é
THE OLD WOMAN AND HER PIG.

AN old woman was sweeping her house, and
she found a little crooked sixpence. “What,” said
she, “shall I do with this little sixpence? I will
go to market and buy a little pig.” As she was
coming home she came to a stile: the piggie would
not go over the stile.

She went a little further, and she met a dog.
So she said to the dog, “Dog! bite pig. Pig won't
go over the stile, and I shan’t get home to-night.”
But the dog would not.

She went a little further, and she came to a
stick, So she said, “Stick! stick! beat dog. Dog
THE Otp Woman AND HER Pic. 137



won't bite pig ; pig won’t get over the stile ; and I
shan’t get home to-night.” But the stick would not.

She went a little further, and she came to a fire.
So she said, “Fire! fire! burn stick. Stick won’t
beat dog, dog won't bite pig, pig won’t get over the
stile, and I shan’t get home to-night.” But the
fire would not.

She went a little further, and she came to some
water. So she said, “ Water! water! quench fire.
Fire won't burn stick, stick won’t beat dog, dog
won't bite pig, pig won’t get over the stile, and I
shan’t get home to-night.” But the water would not.

She went a little further, and she met an ox. So
she said, “Ox! ox! drink water. Water won’t quench
fire, fire won’t burn stick, stick won't beat dog, dog
won't bite pig, pig won't get over the stile, and I
shan’t get home to-night.” But the ox would not.

She went a little further, and she met a butcher.
So she said, “ Butcher! butcher! kill ox. Ox won’t
drink water, water won’t quench fire, fire won't
burn stick, stick won’t beat dog, dog won’t bite pig,
pig won't get over the stile, and I shan’t get home
to-night.” But the butcher would not.

She went a little further, and she found a rope.
138 Tue Merrie Fearr.



So she said, “Rope! rope! hang butcher. Butcher
won’t kill ox, ox won’t drink water, water won’t
quench fire, fire won’t burn stick, stick won’t beat
dog, dog won't bite pig, pig won’t get over the
stile, and I shan’t get home to-night.” But the
rope would not.

She went a little further, and she met a rat. So
she said, “Rat! rat! gnaw rope. Rope won't hang
butcher, butcher won’t kill ox, ox won’t drink
water, water won’t quench fire, fire won’t burn
stick, stick won’t beat dog, dog won't bite pig, pig
won't get over the stile, and I shan’t get home
to-night.” But the rat would not.

She went a little further, and she met a cat. So
she said, “Cat! cat! kill rat. Rat won’t gnaw
rope, rope won’t hang butcher, butcher won't kill
Ox, ox won't drink water, water won’t quench fire,
fire won't burn stick, stick won’t beat dog, dog
won't bite pig, pig won’t get over the stile, and I
shan’t get home to-night.” And the cat said to her,
“Tf you will go to yonder cow, and fetch me a
saucer of milk, I will kill the rat.” So away went
the old woman to the cow.

And the cow said to her, “If you will go to
THE Orv Woman anv HER Pig. 139

yonder haystack and fetch me a handful of hay, I'll
give you the milk.” So away went the old woman
to the haystack, and she brought the hay to the cow.

As soon as the cow had eaten the hay, she gave
the old-woman the milk ; and away she went with
it in a saucer to the cat.

As soon as the cat had lapped up the milk, the
cat began to kill the rat ; the rat began to gnaw the
rope; the rope began to hang the butcher; the
butcher began to kill the ox; the ox began to
drink the water; the water began to quench the
fire; the fire began to burn the stick; the stick
began to beat the dog; the dog began to bite the
pig ; the little pig in a fright jumped over the stile;
and so the old woman got home that night.

ae —


140 THe Merrie Hearr.





CHRISTMAS GIFTS.

[The players, in this game, each repeat the gifts of one day—that
which falls to their turn—and are liable to a forfeit for every
mistake. ]

The first day of Christmas

My mother sent to me

A partridge in a pear-tree,

The second day of Christmas

My mother sent to me

Two turtle-doves and a partridge in a pear-tree.

The third day of Christmas

My mother sent to me

Three French hens, two turtle-doves, and a par-
tridge in a pear-tree.

The fourth day of Christmas

My mother sent to me

Four canary birds, three French hens, two turtle-
doves, and a partridge in a pear-tree.

The fifth day of Christmas

My mother sent to me
CurisTMAs GIFTS. 141





Five gold rings, four canary birds, three French
hens, two turtle-doves, and a partridge in a
pear-tree.

The sixth day of Christmas

My mother sent to me

Six geese a-laying, five gold rings, four canary
birds, three French hens, two turtle-doves, and
a partridge in a pear-tree.

The seventh day of Christmas

My mother sent to me

Seven swans a-swimming, six geese a-laying, five

' gold rings, four canary birds, three French
hens, two turtle-doves, and a partridge in a
pear-tree.

The eighth day of Christmas

My mother sent to me

Eight ladies dancing, seven swans a-swimming, six
geese a-laying, five gold rings, four canary
birds, three French hens, two turtle-doves, and
a partridge in a pear-tree.

The ninth day of Christmas

My mother sent to me

Nine lords a-leaping, eight ladies dancing, seven
swans a-swimming, six geese a-laying, five

ie
142 Tue Merrre Heart.



gold rings, four canary birds, three French hens,
two turtle-doves, and a partridge in a pear-tree.

The tenth day of Christmas

My mother sent to me

Ten ships a-sailing, nine lords a-leaping, eight ladies
dancing, seven swans a-swimming, six geese
a-laying, five gold rings, four canary birds,
three French hens, two turtle-doves, and a
partridge in a pear-tree.

The eleventh day of Christmas

My mother sent to me

Eleven ladies spinning, ten ships a-sailing, nine
lords a-leaping, eight ladies dancing, seven
swans a-swimming, six geese a-laying, five
gold rings, four canary birds, three French
hens, two turtle-doves, and a partridge in a
pear-tree.

The twelfth day of Christmas

- My mother sent to me

Twelve bells a-ringing, eleven ladies spinning, ten
ships a-sailing, nine lords a-leaping, eight ladies
dancing, seven swans a-swimming, six geese
a-laying, five gold rings, four canary birds,
for NETTLeE STINGS. 143



three French hens, two turtle-doves, and a
partridge in a pear-tree.





wasigi pew

MY LITTLE DAME.
I poust, I doubt,
My fire is out,
My little dame ain’t at home.
Come bridle my hog,
And saddle my dog,
And fetch my little dame home.
edi Pee

FOR NETILE STINGS.

In dock, out nettle,
Nettle has a-stinged me.
144 Tue Merrre Hearr.



A DEVOTED HUSBAND.

Tommy TROT, a man of law,
Sold his bed, and lay on straw ;
Sold the straw, and slept on grass,
To buy his wife a looking-glass.

saw gare

MUSSELS.

WHEN the pea’s in bloom
The mussel’s toom.
Goop NicuT 4nd Goop MorninG. 145



GOOD NIGHT AND GOOD MORNING.

BY LORD HOUGHTON.*

{ FAIR little girl sat under a tree,



res 1 Then ee her work, and foided it

‘



right,
And said, “Dear work! good night!
i good night!”

Such a number of rooks came over her head,
Crying, “Caw! caw!” on their way to bed ;
She said, as she watched their curious flight,
“ Little black things! good night! good night!”

The horses neighed, and the oxen lowed,

The sheep’s “Bleat! bleat !” came over the road ;
All seeming to say, with a quiet delight,

“Good little girl! good night! good night !”

She did not say to the sun, “ Good night!”
Though she saw him there, like a ball of light ;
For she knew he had God’s time to keep

All over the world, and never could sleep.

The tall pink foxglove bowed his head,
The violets curtsied, and went to bed ;
And good little Lucy tied up her hair,
And said, on her knees, her favourite prayer.

* By the author’s special permission.
146 THe Merrie Hearr.



And while on her pillow she softly lay,

She knew nothing more till again it was day,

And all things said to the beautiful sun :

“Good morning! good morning! our work is begun.”



‘GOOD NIGHT !”
THe Vure Days. 147



THE YULE DAYS.

[For the manner of playing this game, see Note to Christmas
Gifts, page 140. ]

THE king sent his lady on the first Yule day,

A papingo-aye :*

Who learns my carol and carries it away ?

The king sent his lady on the second Yule day,
Three partridges, a papingo-aye :
Who learns my carol and carries it away?

The king sent his lady on the third Yule day,
Three plovers, three partridges, a papingo-aye :
Who learns my carol and carries it away?

The king sent his lady on the fourth Yule day,
A goose that was gray,

Three plovers, three partridges, a papingo-aye :
Who learns my carol and carries it away?

The king sent his lady on the fifth Yule day,

_ Three starlings, a goose that was gray,

Three plovers, three partridges, a papingo-aye :
Who learns my carol and carries it away ?

* A peacock.
148 Tat Merrwe Hearr.



The king sent his lady on the sixth Yule day,

Three goldspinks, three starlings, a goose that was
gray,

Three plovers, three partridges, a papingo-aye :

Who learns my carol and carries it away ?

The king sent his lady on the seventh Yule day,

A bull that was brown, three goldspinks, three
starlings, a goose that was gray,

Three plovers, three partridges, a papingo-aye :

Who learns my carol and carries it away ?

The king sent his lady on the eighth Yule day,

Three ducks a-merry laying, a bull that was brown,

Three goldspinks, three starlings, a goose that was
stay,

Three plovers, three partridges, a papingo-aye :

Who learns my carol and carries it away ?

The king sent his lady on the ninth Yule day,

Three swans a-merry swimming, three ducks a-
merry laying, a bull that was brown,

Three goldspinks, three starlings, a goose that was
gray,

Three plovers, three partridges, a papingo-aye:

Who learns my carol and carries it away ?
LHe Vor! Davs. 149



The king sent his lady on the tenth Yule day,

An Arabian baboon, three swans a-merry swimming,

Three ducks a-merry laying, a bull that was brown,

Three goldspinks, three starlings, a goose that was
gray,

Three plovers, three partridges, a papingo-aye:

Who learns my carol and carries it away?

The king sent his lady on the eleventh Yule day,

Three hinds a-merry hunting, an Arabian baboon,

Three swans a-merry swimming,

Three ducks a-merry laying, a bull that was brown,

Three goldspinks, three starlings, a goose that was
gtay,

Three plovers, three partridges, a papingo-aye:

Who learns my carol and carries it away?

The king sent his lady on the twelfth Yule day,

Three maids a-merry dancing, three hinds a-merry
hunting, an Arabian baboon,

Three swans a-merry swimming,

Three ducks a-merry laying, a bull that was brown,

Three goldspinks, three starlings, a goose that was
gray,”

Three plovers, three partridges, a papingo-aye :

Who learns my carol and carries it away?
150 THe Merrre Hearr.



The king sent his lady on the thirteenth Yule day,

Three stalks o’ merry corn, three maids a-merry
dancing,

Three hinds a-merry hunting, an Arabian baboon,

Three swans a-merry swimming,

Three ducks a-merry laying, a bull that was brown,

Three goldspinks, three starlings, a goose that was
gray,

Three plovers, three partridges, a papingo-aye:

Who learns my carol and carries it away?





\
as NE ma
CASTLES IN THE AIR. I5I





CASTLES IN THE AIR.

BY PERMISSION OF MR. D. ROBERTSON, GLASGOW.

THE bonnie, bonnie bairn, wha sits poking in
the ase,

Glowering in the fire wi’ his wee round face ;

Laughing at the fuffing lowe, what sees he there ?

Ah! the wee dreamer’s bigging castles in the air.

His wee chubby face, and his touzie curly pow,

Are laughing and nodding to the dancing lowe ;

He'll brown his rosy cheeks, and singe his sunny
hair,

Glowering at the imps wi’ their castles in the air.

He sees muckle castles towering to the moon !

He sees little sodgers pu’ing them a’ doun!

World’s whomling up and doun, bleezing wi a flare—

See how he loups, as they glimmer in the air!

For a’ sae sage he looks, what can the laddie ken ?
He’s thinking upon naething, like mony mighty
men ;
152 THe Merrie Hearr.



A wee thing mak’s us think, a sma’ thing mak’s us
stare—

There are mair folk than him bigging castles in
the air.

Sic a night in winter may weel mak’ him cauld,

His chin upon his buffy hand will soon mak’ him
auld ;

His brow is brent sae braid—O pray that daddy
Care

Would let the bairn alane wi’ his castles in the air!

He'll glower at the fire! and he'll keek at the light !

But mony sparkling stars are swallowed up by
Night ;

Aulder een than his are glamoured by a glare,

Hearts are broken, heads are turned, wi’ castles in
the air.


Tue Piper's Cow. its 3



THE PIPER’S COW.

THERE was a piper had a cow,
And he’d no hay to give her ;

He took his pipes and played a tune,
“ Consider, old cow, consider.”

The cow considered very well,

For she gave the piper a penny,
That he might play the tune again
Of “Corn riggs are bonnie.”


154 Tue MERRIE












=

THE DUCK AND THE DRAKE.

THERE was a little man,
And he had a little gun,
And his bullets were made of lead, lead, lead.
He went to the brook,
And he saw a little duck,
And he shot it through the head, head, head.

He carried it home
To his old wife Joan,
And bid her a fire for to make, make, make,
To roast the little duck
He'd shot in the brook,
And he’d go fetch her the drake, drake, drake.
THE ALPHABET. 155



THE ALPHABET.
A was an apple-pie ;
B bit it;

C cut it;

D dealt it ;

E ate it;

F fought for it ;

G got it:

H had it;

J joined it;

K kept it;

L longed for it ;

M mourned for it;

N nodded at it;

O opened it ;

P peeped into it ;

Q quartered it ;

R ran for it ;

S stole it ;

T took it ;

V viewed it;

W wanted it;

X, Y, Z, and &—all wished for a
piece in hand.
156 THE Merrie Heart.







THE WIFE AND HER BONNIE BUSH
O’ BERRIES.

THERE was a wife that had a bonnie bush ©’
berries, and she wanted to pull them, but she could
not do that, unless she had somebody to keep
her house. So she went away to the kid, and said:
“ Kid, kid, come and keep my house, till I pull
my bonnie bush o’ berries.”

“Indeed, no,” said the Kid, “Ill not keep your
house till you pull your bonnie bush o’ berries.”

Then the wife went to the dog, and said: “Dog,
dog, bite kid; kid will not keep my house till I
pull my bonnie bush o’ berries.”

“Indeed,” said the Dog, “I will not bite the
kid ; for the kid never did me any ill.”

Then the wife went to the staff, and said:
“ Staff, staff, strike dog; for dog will not bite kid,
TveE Bonnte Busu 0 BERRIES. 157

and kid will not keep my house till I pull my
bonnie bush o’ berries.”

“Tndeed,” said the Staff, “I will not strike the
dog; for the dog never did me any ill.”

Then the wife went to the fire, and said:
“Fire, fire, burn staff; for staff will not strike dog,
dog will not bite kid, and kid will not keep my
house till I pull my bonnie bush o’ berries.”

“Indeed,” said the Fire, “I will not burn the
staff; for the staff never did me any ill.”

Wife: “Water, water, put out fire; fire will
not burn staff, staff will not strike dog, dog will not
bite kid, and kid will not keep my house till I pull
my bonnie bush o’ berries.”

“Indeed,” said the Water, “I will not put out
fire ; fire never did me any ill.”

Wife: “Ox, ox, drink water; water will not
put out fire, fire will not burn staff, staff will
not strike dog, dog will not bite kid, and kid will
not keep my house till I pull my bonnie bush o’
berries.” :

“ Indeed,” said the Ox, “I will not drink water ;
for water never did me any ill.”

Wife: “ Axe, axe, fell ox; ox will not drink

ee
158 Tue Merre Hearr.



water, water will not put out fire, fire will not burn
staff, staff will not strike dog, dog will not bite kid,
and kid will not keep my house till I pull my
bonnie bush o’ berries.”

“Tndeed,” said the Axe, “I will not fell ox ; for
ox never did me any ill.”

Wife: “Smith, smith, smooth axe; axe will
not fell ox, ox will not drink water, water will not
put out fire, fire will not burn staff, staff will not
strike dog, dog will not bite kid, kid will not keep
my house, till I pull my bonnie bush o’ berries.”

“Indeed,” said the Smith, “I will not smooth
axe; for axe never did me any ill.”

Wife: “Rope, rope, hang smith; smith will
not smooth axe, axe will not fell ox, ox will not
drink water, water will not put out fire, fire will not
burn staff, staff will not strike dog, dog will not bite
kid, and kid will not keep my house till I pull my
bonnie bush o’ berries.”

“Indeed,” said the Rope, “I will not hang
smith ; smith never did me any ill.”

Wife: “Mouse, mouse, cut rope; rope will
not hang smith, smith will not smooth axe, axe will
not fell ox, ox will not drink water, water will not
Tue Bonnie Buso 0 BERRIES. 159



put out fire, fire will not burn staff, staff will not
strike dog, dog will not bite kid, and kid will not
keep my house till I pull my bonnie bush o’ berries.”

“Tndeed,” said the Mouse, “I will not cut rope ;
for rope never did me any ill.”

Wife: “ Cat, cat, kill mouse ; mouse will not
cut rope, rope will not hang smith, smith will not
smooth axe, axe will not fell ox, ox will not drink
water, water will not put out fire, fire will not burn
staff, staff will not strike dog, dog will not bite kid,
and kid will not keep my house till I pull my
bonnie bush o’ berries.”

“Indeed,” said the Cat, “I will not kill the
mouse ; for the mouse never did me any ill.”

Wife: “Do it; and Pll give you mle and
bread,” ,

With that the cat to the mouse, and the mouse
to the rope, and the rope to the smith, and the
smith to the axe, and the axe to the ox, and the
ox to the water, and the water to the fire, and the
fire to the staff, and the staff to the dog, and the
dog to the kid, and the kid kept the wife’s house
till she had pulled her bonnie bush o’ berries.
160 THe WMerrre Hearr.





THE TAILORS’ HUNT.

FOuR and twenty tailors
Went out to kill a snail,
The best man among them
Durst not touch her tail.
She put out her horns
Like a little Kyloe cow:
Run, tailors, run,
Or she'll kill you all e’en now.


A Soreun Dirce. 161

A FAT SHEEP TO KILL!

BELL-ELL-ELL!
There’s a fat sheep to kill!
A leg for the provost,
Another for the priest ;
The bailies and deacons,
They'll take the neist ; *
And if the fourth leg we cannot sell,
The sheep it must live and go back to the hill.

A SOLEMN DIRGE.

DING, dong, bell,
The cat’s in the well.
Who put her in?
Little Johnnie Green.
What a naughty boy was that,
To drown poor pussie cat,
Who never did him any harm,
And killed the mice in his father’s barn.

* Next.
162 THe Merrie HEAR.



THE LION AND THE UNICORN.

THE lion and the unicorn were fighting for the
crown,

The lion beat the unicorn all round about the town ;

Some gave them white bread, and some gave them
brown,

Some gave them plum cake, and sent them out of
town.

THE LION AND THE UNICORN.

ANOTHER VERSION.

THE lion and the unicorn
Fighting for the crown ;

Off came the little dog,
And knocked them both down.

Some got white bread,
And some got brown,

But the lion beat the unicorn
Round about the town.


THE LION AND THE UNICORN.

Tae Wonverrut Wean. 165









THE WONDERFUL WEAN.

BY PERMISSION OF MR. D. ROBERTSON, GLASGOW.

OUR wean ’s the most wonderfw’ wean e’er I saw;

It would tak’ me a long summer day to tell a’

His pranks, frae the morning till night shuts his e’e

When he sleeps like a peerie, ’tween father and me.

For in his quiet turns siccan questions he’ll speir :

How the moon can stick up in the sky that’s sae
clear?

What gars the wind blaw? and whar frae comes
the rain?

He’s a perfect divert—he’s a wonderfu’ wean!
166 THE Merrre HeEArr.



Or who was the first bodie’s father ? and wha
Made the very first snaw-shower that ever did fa’?
And who made the first bird that sang on a tree?
And the water that sooms a’ the ships in the sea ?—
But after I’ve told him as well as I ken,

Again he begins wi’ his who? and his when ?

And he looks aye sae watchfu’ the while I explain—
He’s as auld as the hills—he’s an auld-farrant wean.

And folk who ha’e skill o’ the lumps on the head,

Hint there’s mair ways than toiling o’ winning ane’s
bread ;

How he'll be a rich man, and hae men to work for
him,

Wi’ a kyte like a baillie’s shug shugging before him ;

Wi? a face like the moon, sober, sonsy, and douce,

And a back, for its breadth, like the side o’ a house,

’Tweel I’m unco ta’en up wi’t, they mak a’ sae
plain—

He’s just-a town’s talk—he’s a by-ord’nar wean !

I ne’er can forget sic a laugh as I gat,

To see him put on father’s waistcoat and hat :

Then the lang-leggit boots gaed sae far ower his
knees,
LTERRING, MACKEREL, AND OYSTER. 167



The tap loops wi’ his fingers he grippit wi’ ease ;

Then he marched through the house, he marched
but, he marched ben,

Like ower mony mair 0’ our great little men,

That I laugh clean outright, for I couldna contain,

He was sic a conceit—sic an ancient-like wean !

But mid a’ his daffin sic kindness he shows,

That he’s dear to my heart as the dew to the rose ;

And the unclouded hinny-beam aye in his e’e,

Mak’s him every day dearer and dearer to me.

Though fortune be saucy, and dorty, and dour,

And gloom through her fingers, like hills through a
shower,

When bodies ha’e got ae bit bairn o’ their ain,

How he cheers up their hearts—he’s the wonderfw’

wean!
wag Pere

THE HERRING, THE MACKEREL, AND
THE OYSTER.

THE herring loves the merry moonlight,
The mackerel loves the wind ;
But the oyster loves the dredging song,
For he comes of a gentle kind.
168 THe Merrre Hearr.





WHAT WAD I DO WI? YOU.

HEE O, wee O!
What wad I do wi’ you? 2
Black is the life
That I lead wi’ you!

Ower mony o’ you,

Little for to gie you,
Hee O, wee O!

What wad I do wi’ you ?

ww i Pete

THE PEESE-WEEP.

PEESE-WEEP, peese-weep,
Harry my nest and gar me greet.*

* Weep.
Brros NAMES.



















BIRDS’ NAMES.

THE merle and the blackbird,
The laverock and the lark,

The gouldy and the gowdspink,
How many birds is that ?

The laverock and the lark,
The baukie and the bat,

The heather bleet, the mire snipe,

How many birds be that ?


170 THe Merrie Hearr.

KATHARINE NIPSY.

A PLAY TO BE PERFORMED WITH THE FINGERS.

SCENE: A house-door, represented by the first and
third fingers of the right hand, brought as close
together as possible (the hand being turned so as to
have the back down). THE ROBBER (represented
by the second finger) outside the door; within
are THE LaDy (represented by the thumb), and
KATHARINE Nipsy, “er servant (represented by
the little finger).

ROBBER knocks at the door.

Lapy: Who’s that knocking at my door, Katharine

Nipsy ?

KatTH. Nrpsy: Wha’s that chapping at my leddie’s

door ?

ROBBER: A poor friar, a poor friar.

Kartu. Nipsy: It’s a puir friar, my leddie.

Laby: Bid him come in ; bid him come in.

Lhe door parts in two, and the robber
advances, bowing.

ROBBER: Your servant, madam! your servant,

madam !

Lhe play here suddenly terminates, the
speaker of the dialogue adding, in

a low fearful voice,

And he worried them a’!
Wire WuInxie. 17a

WILLIE WINKIE.

BY PERMISSION OF MR. D. ROBERTSON, GLASGOW,

WEE Willie Winkie rins through the town,

Up-stairs and down-stairs in his nicht gown ;

Tirling at the window, crying at the lock,

“Are the weans in their bed, for it’s now ten
o'clock ?”

Hey, Willie Winkie, are ye coming ben?

The cat’s singing grey thrums to the sleeping hen ;

The dog’s spelder’d on the floor, and disna gi’e a
cheep,

And here’s a waukrife laddie! that winna fa’ asleep.

Onything but sleep, you rogue! glow’ring like the
moon,

Rattling in an airn jug wi’ an airn spoon;

Rumbling, tumbling, round about, crawing like a
cock,

Skirling like a kenna-what, wauk’ning sleeping folk.

Hey, Willie Winkie—the wean’s in a creel !

Wambling aff a body’s knee like a very eel ;

Rugging at the cat’s lug, and raveling a her
thrums—

Hey, Willie Winkie—see, there he comes!
172 Tue Merrre Heart.

Wearied is the mother that has a stoorie wean,

A wee stumpie stoussie that canna run his lane ;

That has a battle aye wi’ sleep before he'll close
an e’e—

But a kiss frae aff his rosy lips gives strength anew

to me.







Great A, little A;
Bouncing B;

The cat’s in the cupboard,
And she can’t see me.
fTORSE-SHOEING. ee

RIDING SCHOOL.

THIs is the way the ladies ride,
Jimp and sma’, jimp and sma’;
This is the way the gentlemen ride,
Trottin’ a’, trottin’ a’;
This is the way the cadgers ride,
Creels and a’! creels and a’!! creels and a’!!!
—~ aw bee

HORSE-SHOEING.
JOHN SMITH, fellow fine,
Can you shoe this horse o’ mine?
Yes, indeed, and that I can,
As well as any man!
There’s a nail upon the tae,
To make the powny speel the brae;
There’s a nail upon the heel,
To make the powny pace weel ;
There’s a nail, and there’s a brod,
There’s a horse weel shod,
Weel shod, weel shod, &c.
[Here imagination converts the nursery fireside into
a smithy, the nurse into a blacksmith, and her

young charge into a shoeless horse.]
K
174 Tue Merrme Heart.





OLD CHAIRS AND OLD CLOTHES.
Ir Pd as much money as I could spend,
I never would cry, Old chairs to mend,
Old chairs to mend, Old chairs to mend,
I never would cry, Old chairs to mend!

-

If P'd as much money as I could tell,
I never would cry, Old clothes to sell,
Old clothes to sell, Old clothes to sell,
I never would cry, Old clothes to sell!
eg pee
NIEVIE, NIEVIE, NICKNACK.
NIEVIE, nievie, nicknack,
Which hand will ye tak’ ?
Tak’ the right, or tak’ the wrang,
Pll beguile ye, if I can,
GROSS Ff ATCr, 175



LANG KAIL.
GIN ye be for lang kail,
Cow* the nettle, cow the nettle ;
Gin ye be for lang kail,
Cow the nettle early.

Cow it laigh, cow it soon,
Cow it in the month o’ June,
Just when it is in the bloom,
‘Cow the nettle early.

Auld wife, wi’ ae tooth,

Cow the nettle, cow the nettle ;
Auld wife, wi’ ae tooth,

Cow the nettle early.

— Pang Perc

CROSS PATCH.
CROSS patch,
Draw the latch,
Sit by the fire and spin:
Take a cup,
And drink it up,
Then call the neighbours in.
eeu
176 THe Merrre Hearr.

mht DADS fhthth bh th

Bone



A NEW-MARRIED MAN.

GooD morning, good fellow !

I’m no’ a good fellow; I’m a new-married man.

Oh, man, that’s good.

No’ sae good as ye trow.

What then, lad ?

I’ve got an ill-willy wife.

Oh, man, that’s bad.

No’ sae bad as ye trow.

What then, lad?

She brought me a good tocher and a weel-
plenished house.

Oh, man, that’s good.

No’ sae good as ye trow.

What then, lad ?

The house took fire, and burnt both plenishing
and gear.

. Oh, man, that’s bad.

No’ sae bad as ye trow.
What then, lad?

. The ill-willy wife was burnt in the middle o’t.”
THe Lame. ey



THE LAMB.

LITTLE lamb, who made thee ?
Dost thou know who made thee,
Gave thee life, and bid thee feed
By the stream and o’er the mead ;
Gave thee clothing of delight,
Softest clothing, woolly, bright ;
Gave thee such a tender voice,
Making all the vales rejoice ;
Little lamb, who made thee ?
Dost thou know who made thee ?

Little lamb, I’ll tell thee,

Little lamb, Ill tell thee.

He is called by thy name,

For He calls himself a Lamb ;

He is meek, and He is mild,

He became a little child.

I a child and thou a lamb,

We are called by His name.
Little lamb, God bless thee !
Little lamb, God bless thee !
r78 THE Merrie Heart.







THE LITTLE LOVERS.

THERE were a little boy and a little girl
Who liv’d in an alley:

Says the little boy to the little girl,
“Shall I, oh, shall I?”

Says the little girl to the little boy,
“What shall we do ?”

Says the little boy to the little girl,
“T will kiss you.”


Scorriso Sone or NumMBers. 179



mo oCOTTISH’ SONG OR NUMBERS.
WE will a’ gae sing, boys ;
Where will we begin, boys?
We'll begin the way we should,
And we'll begin at ane, boys.

Oh, what will be our ane, boys?
Oh, what will be our ane, boys?
My only ane she walks alane,
And evermair has done, boys.
Now we'll a’ gae sing, boys;
Where will we begin, boys?
We'll begin where we left off,
And we'll begin at twa, boys.

What will be our twa, boys ?

What will be our twa, boys?

Twa’s the lily and the rose,

That shine baith red and green, boys;
My only ane she walks alane, :

. And evermair has done, boys.’

We will a’ gae sing, boys,

Where will we begin, boys ?

We'll begin where we left off,

And we'll begin at three, boys.
180

THe Merrie Heart.



What will be our three, boys ?
What will be our three, boys?
Three, three thrivers ;
Twa’s the lily and the rose,
That shine baith red and green, boys ;
My only ane she walks alane,
And evermair has done, boys.
We will a’ gae sing, boys,
Where will we begin, boys?
We'll begin where we left off,
And we'll begin at four, boys.
What will be our four, boys?
What will be our four, boys ?
Four’s the Gospel makers.
[The rest to be repeated as Cefore.
We will a’ gae sing, boys, &c.
What will be our five, boys ?
What will be our five, boys ?
Five’s the hymnlers 0’ my bower, &c.

We will a gae sing, boys, &c.
What will be our six, boys?

What will be our six, boys?
Six is the echoing waters, &c.
Scorrise Song of NUMBERS. 181



We will a’ gae sing, boys, &c.
What will be our seven, boys ?

What will be our seven, boys ?
Seven is the stars of heaven, &c.

We will a’ gae sing, boys, &c.
What will be our eight, boys ?

What will be our eight, boys ?
Eight’s the table rangers, &c.

We will a’ gae sing, boys, &c.
What will be our nine, boys ?
What will be our nine, boys ?
Nine’s the Muses of Parnassus, &c.
We will a gae sing, boys, &c.

What will be our ten, boys?

What will be our ten, boys ?

Ten’s the Ten Commandments, &c.
We will a’ gae sing, boys, &c.

What will be our eleven, boys ?
What will be our eleven, boys?
Eleven’s maidens in a dance, &c.

We will a’ gae sing, boys, &c.
182 THe Merrre Hearv.



What will be our twelve, boys ?
What will be our twelve, boys ?
Twelve’s the Twelve Apostles ;
Eleven’s maidens in a dance ;
Ten’s the Ten Commandments; |
Nine’s the Muses of Parnassus;
Eight’s the table rangers ;

Seven’s the stars of heaven ;

Six is the echoing waters ;

Five’s the hymnlers o’ my bower ;
Four’s the Gospel makers ;
Three, three thrivers ;

Twa’s the lily and the rose,

That shine baith red and green, boys;
My only one she walks alane,
And evermair has done, boys.

[This may be played as a game in the same way as “ The
Christmas Gifts,” p. 140.]




LITTLE BO-PEEP.

Lorrre BooPeer. 185



EVMbet BO ORME

LITTLE Boopeep has lost her sheep,
And can’t tell where to find them;
Let them alone, and they'll come home,

With their tails behind them.

Little Boopeep fell fast asleep,
And dreamt she heard them bleating ;
But when she awoke she found it a joke,
For they were still a-fleeting.

Then up she took her little crook,
Determined for to find them:

She found them indeed, but it made her heart bleed,
For they’d left all their tails behind them.

It happened one day, as Boopeep did stray,
Into a meadow hard by,

There she espied their tails side by side,
All hung on a tree to dry.

She heaved a sigh, and wiped her eye,
Then went o’er hill and dale,

And tried what she could, as a shepherdess should,
To tack to each sheep its tail.
186 THe Merrre Heart.

MOORACHUG AND MEENACHUG.
A GAELIC TALE.*

MooRACHuG and Meenachug went out to gather
fruit, and as Moorachug would gather, Meenachug
would eat.

Moorachug went to seek a rod to lay on Meena-
chug, and she eating his share of fruit.

“What’s thy news to-day, O Voorachai ?” said
the Rod. “’Tis my own news, that I am seeking
a rod to lay on Meenachug, and she eating my
share of fruit.”

“Thou wilt not get me until thou gettest an axe
that will reap me.” He reached the axe. “ What’s
thy news to-day, O Voorachai?” “’Tis my own
news, that I am seeking an axe to reap rod, rod to
lay on Meenachug, and she eating my share of fruit.”

“Thou wilt not get me until thou gettest a stone
to smooth me.” He reached a stone. “ What’s
thy news to-day, O Voorachai?” said the Stone.
‘Tis my own news, that I am seeking stone to
smooth axe, axe to reap rod, rod to lay on Meena-
chug, and she eating my share of fruit.”

* Reprinted, by the kind permission of J. F. Campbell, Esq.,

from his ‘‘ Popular Tales of the West Highlands.” Edinburgh:
Edmonston and Douglas. 1860-2,
Mooracnuc AND Merenacuuc. 187



“Thou wilt not get me,” said the Stone, “ till
thou gettest water will wet me.” He reached the
water. ‘“ What’s thy news to-day, O Voorachai ?”
said the Water. “Tis my own news, that I am
seeking water to wet stone, stone to smooth axe,
axe to reap rod, rod to lay on Meenachug, and she
eating my share of fruit.”

“Thou wilt not get me,” said the Water, “ till
thou gettest a deer to swim me.” He reached the
deer. “What’s thy news to-day, O Voorachai?”
said the Deer. ‘’Tis my own news, that I am
seeking deer to swim water, water to wet stone,
stone to smooth axe, axe to reap rod, rod to lay
on Meenachug, and she eating my share of fruit.”

“Thou wilt not get me,” said the Deer, “until
thou gettest a dog to run me.” He reached the
dog. ‘“What’s thy news to-day, O Voorachai?”
said the Dog. “’Tis my own news, that I am
seeking dog to run deer, deer to swim water, water
to wet stone, stone to smooth axe, axe to reap rod,
rod to lay on Meenachug, and she eating my share
of fruit.”

“Thou wilt not get me,” said the Dog, “till
thou gettest butter to be rubbed to my feet.” He
reached the butter. ‘“What’s thy news to-day,
O Voorachai?” said the Butter. ‘“’Tis my own
188 THe Merrre Hearr.





news, that I am seeking butter te feet of dog, dog
to run deer, deer to swim water, water to wet
stone, stone to smooth axe, axe to reap rod, rod
to lay on Meenachug, and she eating my share of
fruit.”

“Thou wilt net get me,” said the Butter, “till
thou gettest a mouse will scrape me.” He reached
the mouse. “What’s thy news to-day, O Voora-
chai?” said the Mouse. “’Tis my own news, that
I am seeking mouse to scrape butter, butter to feet
of dog, dog to run deer, deer to swim water, water
to wet stone, stone to smooth axe, axe to reap
rod, rod to lay on Meenachug, and she eating my
share of fruit.”

“Thou wilt not get me,” said the Mouse, “ till
thou gettest a cat to hunt me.” He reached the
cat. “What's thy news to-day, O Voorachai?”
said the Cat. “’Tis my own news, that I am
seeking cat to hunt mouse, mouse to scrape butter,
butter to feet of dog, dog to run deer, deer to
swim water, water to wet stone, stone to smooth
axe, axe to reap rod, rod to lay on Meenachug,
and she eating my share of fruit.”

“Thou wilt not get me,” said the Cat, “until.
thou gettest milk for me.” He reached the cow.
“What’s thy news to-day, O Voorachai?” said the
Mooracwuc AND MEENACHUG. 189



Cow. “’Tis my own news, that I am seeking milk
for the cat, cat to hunt mouse, mouse to scrape
butter, butter to feet of dog, dog to run deer, deer
to swim water, water to wet stone, stone to smoth
axe, axe to reap rod, rod to lay on Meenachug,
and she eating my share of fruit.”

“Thou wilt not get milk from me, till thou
gettest a wisp from the barn gillie.” He reached
the barn gillie. “What's thy news to-day, O Voora-
chai?” said the Barn Gillie. “’Tis my own news,
that I am seeking a wisp for the cow, milk from
the cow to the cat, cat to hunt mouse, mouse to
scrape butter, butter to feet of dog, dog to run
deer, deer to swim water, water to wet stone, stone
to smooth axe, axe to reap rod, rod to lay on
Meenachug, and she eating my share of fruit.”

“Thou wilt not get a wisp from me,” said the
Barn Gillie, “till thou gettest a bonnach for me
from the kneading wife.” He reached the kneading
wife. “What’s thy news to-day, O Voorachai ?”
said the Kneading Wife. “’Tis my own news, that
I am seeking bonnach to the barn gillie, wisp from
the barn gillie to the cow, milk from the cow to
the cat, cat to hunt mouse, mouse to scrape butter,
butter to feet of dog, dog to run deer, deer to swim
water, water to wet stone, stone to smooth axe,
190 THe Merrie Hear.



axe to reap rod, rod to lay on Meenachug, and she
eating my share of fruit.”

“Thou wilt not get bonnach from me, till thou
bringest in water will knead it.”

“How will I bring in the water?’ “There is
no vessel but that sowan’s sieve.”

Moorachug took with him the sowan’s sieve. He
reached the water, and every drop he would put in
the sowan’s sieve it would go through. A hoodie
came over his head, and she cried, “Gawr-rag,
gawr-rag. (little silly, little silly)!” “Thou art
right, O hoodie!” said Moorachug. “Créah rooah
s’cOinneach, créah rooah s’cdinneach (brown clay
and moss)!” said the Hoodie.

Moorachug set créeah rooah s’coinneach (brown
clay and moss) into it, and he brought in the water
to the kneading wife, and he got bonnach from the
kneading wife to the barn gillie, wisp from the barn
gillie to the cow, milk from the cow to the cat, cat
to hunt mouse, mouse to scrape butter, butter to
feet of dog, dog to run deer, deer to swim water,
water to wet stone, stone to smooth axe, axe to
reap rod, rod to lay on Meenachug, and she eating
his share of fruit. But when Moorachug metered)
Meenachug had just—BuRsT!
MarrtaGeE oF Cock Rosin. IOI





THE MARRIAGE OF COCK ROBIN AND
JENNY WREN.

Says Robin to Jenny, “If you will be mine,
We'll have cherry tart, and drink currant wine.”
So Jenny consented—the day was named,

The joyful news the cock proclaimed.

Together came the Rook and Lark,

One was parson, the other clerk ;

The Goldfinch gave the bride away,

Who promised always to obey ;

The feathered tenants of the air,

Towards the feast gave each a share.

Some brought grain, and some brought meat ;
Some brought savours, some brought sweet ;
And as it was most pleasant weather,
The jovial party dined together ;
192 THe Merritz Hearr.



And long did Robin and his mate

Live in the happy married state,

Till, doleful to relate! one day

A hawk with Jenny flew away ;

And Robin, by the cruel Sparrow,

Was shot quite dead with bow and arrow.

tg hee

FORTUNE.

GANG and hear the gowk yell,

Sit and see the swallow flee,

See the foal before its mither’s e’e,
*Twill be a thriving year wi’ thee.






THE MAID AND THE MILLER.
THERE was a maid went to the mill,
Sing trolly, lolly, lolly, lolly lo ;
The mill turned round, but the maid stood still,
Oh, ho, ho! oh, ho, ho! oh, ho, ho! did she so ?
The miller he kissed her, away she went,
Sing trolly, lolly, lolly, lolly lo ;
The maid was well pleased, and the miller content,
Oh, ho! oh, ho! oh, ho! was it so ?
He danced and he sung, while the mill went clack,
Sing trolly, lolly, lolly, lolly lo ;
And he cherished his heart with a cup of old sack,
Oh, ho! oh, ho! oh, ho! did he so ?
L 2
198 THE Merrre Hearr.



THE DOGGIES GAED TO THE MILL.

THE doggies gaed to the mill,

This way and that way ;

They took a lick out o’ this wife’s pock,

And a lick out o’ that wife’s pock,

And a loup in the lead and a dip in the dam,

And gaed home walloping, walloping, walloping.
td Pate :

THE CORBIES’. HOLE.

PUT your finger in the corbies’ hole,
The corbie is not at home ;

The corbie is at the back door
Picking a bone.

[The reciter of these lines closes one hand into the form of a tube,
and holds two fingers of the other hand in readiness, at the end
of the tube, to pinch any finger that may be inserted.]
194

THe Merrie Heart.

THE MARRIAGE OF THE FROG AND

THE MOUSE.

IT was a frog in the well,
Humble-dum, humble-dum ;
And the merry mouse in the mill,
Tweedle, tweedle, twino.
The frog he would a-wooing ride,
Humble-dum, humble-dum ;
Sword and buckler by his side,
Tweedle, tweedle, twino.
When upon his high horse set,
Humble-dum, humble-dum ;
His boots they shone as black as jet,
Tweedle, tweedle, twino.

When he came to the merry mill-pin,
“Lady Mouse, be you within ?”
Then came out the dusty mouse :—
“Tam lady of this house !”

“ Hast thou any mind of me ?”

“T have e’en great mind of thee.”
“Who shall this marriage make ?”
“ Our lord, which is the rat.”
THE MARRIAGE OF THE FROG. 195



“What shall we have to our supper ?”
“ Three beans in a pound of butter.”
But when supper they were at,

The frog, the mouse, and e’en the rat,

Then in came Gib, the cat,

And caught the mouse e’en by the back.
Then did they separate ;

The frog leaped on the floor so flat.

Then in came Dick, our drake,

And drew our frog e’en to the lake ;
The rat he ran up the wall,

And now you have heard the end of all.


Tue Brossom. 199



THE BLOSSOM.

MERRY, merry sparrow,

Under leaves so green,

A happy blossom

Sees you, swift as arrow,

Seek your cradle narrow
Near my bosom.

Pretty, pretty robin,
Under leaves so green,

A happy blossom
Hears you sobbing, sobbing,
Pretty, pretty robin,

Near my bosom.


196 THe Merrie Hearr.





THE QUEEN, THE KING, AND THE
KNAVE OF HEARTS.

THE Queen of Hearts,
She made some tarts,
All on a summer's day ;
The Knave of Hearts,
He stole the tarts,
And took them clean away.

The King of Hearts
Called for the tarts,
And beat the Knave full sore ;
The Knave of Hearts
Bxought back the tarts,
And vowed he’d steal no more.
200 Tre Merrre Hearr.



THE LITTLE BOY AND THE COCK
SPARROW.

A LITTLE cock sparrow
Sat on a green tree,

And he chirruped, he chirruped,
So merry was he.

A little boy came,

With his wee bow and arrow,
Determined to shoot

This little cock sparrow.
— Youn Surru. 197



FAIRIES.
WHERE the scythe cuts and the sock rives,
Ha’e done with fairies and bee bykes!

HE who tills the fairies’ green,
No luck again shall ha’e ;
And he who spoils the fairies’ ring,
Betide him want and wae ;
For windless days and weary nights
Are his till his dying day.
ned Pew
TO BANBURY CROSS.
RIDE a cockhorse
To Banbury Cross,
To see what Tommy can buy ;
A penny white loaf,
A penny white cake,
And a twopenny apple pie.
ee ee
JOHN SMITH.
Is John Smith within ?
Yes, that he is.
Can he set on a shoe?
Ay, marry, two.
Here a nail, there a nail,
Tick, tack, too.
CoNnDUwCT. 201



Says he, “ You will make me
A nice little stew,

And your giblets will make me
A little pie too ;”

Says the little cock sparrow,
“T won’t bea stew ;”
So he flapped his wings,

And away he flew.



CONDUCT.

BE a good child,
Do what you're bid,
Shut the door after you,
And you'll never be chid.

Hold up your head,
Turn out your toes,

Speak when you’re spoken to,
Mend your clothes.
202 THe Merrre Hearr.



ROBIN, BOBBIN, RICHARD, AND JOHN.

“WE'LL go a-shooting,” says Robin to Bobbin ;
“We'll go a-shooting,” says Richard to John;
“We'll go a-shooting,” says John all alone ;
“We'll go a-shooting,” says every one.

“ What shall we kill?” says Robin to Bobbin ;
“ What shall we kill?” says Richard to John;
“What shall we kill?” says John all alone;

“ What shall we kill?” says every one.

“We'll shoot at that wren !” says Robin to Bobbin;
“We'll shoot at that wren!” says Richard to John;
“We'll shoot at that wren !” says John all alone ;
“We'll shoot at that wren !” says every one.

“ She’s down, she’s down !” says Robin to Bobbin ;
“ She’s down, she’s down !” says Richard to John;
“ She’s down, she’s down !” says John all alone ;

“ She’s down, she’s down!” says every one.

“ How shall we get her home?” says Robin to
Bobbin ;

“How shall we get her home?” says Richard to
John ;

““ How shall we get her home 2?” says John all alone;

“ How shall we get her home ?” says every one.
cm he
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ROBIN, BOBBIN, RICHARD AND JOHN,





we



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A’ rHe Nicxur OwER AND OWER. 205



“We'll hire a cart !” says Robin to Bobbin ;
“We'll hire a cart !” says Richard to John ;
“We'll hire a cart !” says John all alone;
“We'll hire a cart !” says every one.

“Then, hoist, boys, hoist!” says Robin to Bobbin ;
“Then, hoist, boys, hoist !” says Richard to John;
“Then, hoist, boys, hoist !” says John all alone ;
“Then, hoist, boys, hoist !” says every one.

So they brought her away, after each plucked a
feather,
And, when they got home, shared the booty
together.
tg Pa

A’ THE NICHT OWER AND OWER.

A’ THE nicht ower and ower,
And a’ the nicht ower again,

A’ the nicht ower and ower,
The peacock followed the hen.

The hen’s a hungry beast ;
The cock is hollow within ;
There’s nae deceit in a pudding ;
A pie’s a dainty thing.
A’ the nicht ower, &c.
206 THE Merrre HeEearr.



THE POOR WOMAN OF BABYLON.

A pleasant game, played by a ring of children, with

a girl (or boy) in the centre.

CHILDREN (dancing round).
Here comes a poor woman from Babylon,
With six poor children all alone;
One can bake, and one can brew ;
One can shape, and one can sew ;
One can sit at the fire and spin,
One can bake a cake for the king:
Choose but one and leave the rest,
And take the one you love the best.

[Zhe girl (or boy) tn the centre chooses a
boy (or girl) from the ring, and both
then stand together tn the centre.

CHILDREN (dancing round).
Now you're married we wish you joy,
Many a girl and many a boy,
Love one another like sister and brother,
And now, good people, kiss each other.

[They do so ; the child in the centre when
the game began goes into the ring, the
other remains in the centre, and the
game begins anew.
CATTIE SITS IN THE KILN-RING. 207



THE CAGE Sets tN CE GkeliEN-RING-
THE cattie sits in the kiln-ring,

Spinning, spinning,
And by came a little wee mouse,

Running, running.
“Oh, what’s that you're spinning, my loesome,

Loesome lady ?”
“T’m spinning a sark to my young son,”

Said she, said she.
“T soopit my house, my loesome,

Loesome lady ;”
‘Twas a sign ye didna sit amang dirt then,”

Said she, said she.
“Weel mat he brook it, my loesome,

Loesome lady ;”
“ Gif he dinna brook it weel, he may brook it ill,”

Said she, said she.
“T fand twall pennies, my winsome,

Winsome lady ;”
‘Twas a sign ye warna sillerless,”

Said she, said she.
“T gaed to the market, my loesome,

Loesome lady ;”
‘OTwas a sign ye didna sit at hame, then,”

Said she, said she.
208 THE Merrie HEART.



“T coft a sheep’s head, my winsome,
Winsome lady ;”
‘Twas a sign ye warna kitchenless,”

Said she, said she.

“T put it in my pottie to boil, my loesome,
Loesome lady ;”

‘Twas a sign ye didna eat it raw,”
Said she, said she.

“T put it in my winnock to cool, my winsome,
Winsome lady ;”

“Twas a sign ye didna burn your chafts, then,”
Said she, said she.

“By cam’ a cattie and eat it a’ up, my loesome,
Loesome lady ;”

“And sae will I you—worrie, worrie, gnash, gnash.”
Said she, said she.


THE CHILD AND THE PIPER. 209

THE CHILD AND THE PIPER.

PIPING down the valleys wild,
Piping songs of pleasant glee,
On a cloud I saw a child,
And he, laughing, said to me :—

“ Pipe a song about a lamb:”
So I piped with merry cheer.

“ Piper, pipe that song again :”
So I piped, he wept to hear.

“ Drop thy pipe, thy happy pipe,
Sing thy songs of happy cheer ;”
So I sang the same again,
While he wept with joy to hear.

“ Piper, sit thee down and write,
In a book that all may read”—

So he vanished from my sight :
And I plucked a hollow reed,

And I made a rural pen,
And I stained the waters clear,
And I wrote my happy songs
Every child may joy to hear.
210 Tae Merrie Hear.





Poor old Robinson Crusoe!
Poor old Robinson Crusoe!
They made him a coat,
Of an old Nanny goat—
I wonder how they could do so!
With a ring, a ting, tang,
And a ring, a ting, tang,
Poor old Robinson Crusoe!
eager
THE WITCH-WIFE.
As I came in by Glenap,
I met an aged woman ;
And she bade me cheer my heart up,
For the best of my coming days were.
wowed Pare
I WOULD IF I COULD.
I wouLp if I could ;
If I couldn’t, how could I ?
I couldn’t without I could, could I ?
You couldn’t without you could, could you ?
A Sonc ADDRESSED TO THE Winp. 211

NURSE'S SONG.
“WHEN the voices of children are heard on the greer,
And laughing is heard on the hill,
My heart is at rest within my breast,
And everything else is still.

“Then come home, my children, the sun is gone
down,
And the dews of night arise ;
Come, come, leave off play, and let us away
Till the morning appears in the skies.”
“No, no, let us play, for it is yet day,
And we cannot go to sleep ;
Besides, in the sky the little birds fly,
And the hills are all covered with sheep.”

“Well, well, go and play, till the light fades away,
And then go home to bed.”
The little ones leaped, and shouted, and laughed,
And all the hills echoéd.
ang Pee
A SONG ADDRESSEDITO FEE WIND:
BLow, wind, blow, and go, mill, go,
That the miller may grind the corn,
That the baker may take it,
And into rolls make it,
And send me hot rolls in the morn.
M 2
212 THe Merrre HEART.



MANY WONDERS.

I SAW a peacock with a fiery tail

I saw a blazing comet drop down hail

I saw a cloud wrapped with ivy round

I saw an oak creep along the ground

I saw a pismire swallow up a whale

I saw the sea brimful of ale

I saw a Venice glass full fifteen feet deep

I saw a well full of men’s tears that weep

I saw red eyes all of a flaming fire

I saw a house bigger than the moon, and higher
I saw the sun at twelve o'clock at night

I saw the man that saw this wondrous sight.


TAFFY. : are.





TAFFY.

pe





Reet

Sas * AFFY was a Welshman,
re Taffy was a thief,
e + Taffy came to my house
And stole a leg of beef.



Pe
a



Ce

I went to Taffy’s house,
Taffy was not at home,

Taffy came to my house
And stole a marrow-bone.

I went to Taffy’s house,
Taffy was in bed,

I took the marrow-bone
And broke Taffy’s head.
214 THe Merrie Herarz.



THE LITTLE INDIAN BOYS.

ONE little, two little, three little Indian,
Four little, five little, six little Indian, ©
Seven little, eight little, nine little Indian,
Ten little Indian boys.
std Pare
TOM BROWN’S TWO LITTLE INDIAN
BOYS.
ONE ran away,
The other wouldn’t stay,
Tom Brown’s two little Indian boys.
td Pare
SAGE COUNSEL.
FoR every evil under the sun
There is a remedy, or there is none.
If there be one, try and find it;
If there be none, never mind it.
tg Pew
THE WIND BLOWS COLD.
A NORTHAMPTONSHIRE RHYME.
THE wind blows cold
On Burton Wold.
Can you spell ¢ha¢ with four letters ?
I can spell z¢ with two.
Marcr and APRIL. Qn

LITTLE TOES.
Tus little pig went to market,
And this little pig stayed at home;
This little pig got roast beef,
And this little pig got none ;
And this little pig went wee, wee, wee,
-all the way home.
wd Pee

PRESTON.
PROUD Preston,
Poor people,
High church,
And low steeple.
rng Pete
MARCH AND APRIL.
MARCH said to April,
“T see three hoggs on yonder hill,
And if you'll lend me days three
Pll find a way to make them die.”
The first of them was wind and weet,
The second of them was snow and sleet,
The third of them was such a freeze
It froze the birds’ feet to the trees.
When the three days were past and gane,
The silly puir hoggs came hirplin hame.
216 THe Merrie Hearz.



ANNIVERSARY OF THE GUNPOWDER
Pale Oils:

PLEASE to remember
The fifth of November,
The gunpowder treason and plot ;
I know no reason
Why the gunpowder treason
Should ever be forgot.

Mony a frost, and mony a thowe,
Soon make mony a rotten yowe [ewe].
Rosin REDBREAST’S TESTAMENT. 217

ROBIN REDBREAST’S TESTAMENT.

“GOOD day, now, bonnie Robin,
How long have you been here ?”
“Oh, I have been bird about this bush
This more than twenty year!

(Chorus)—Teetle ell ell, teetle ell ell,
Teetle ell ell, teetle ell ell,
Tee, tee, tee, tee, tee, tee, tee,
Tee, tee, tee, tee teetle eldie.

“But now I am the sickest bird
That ever sat on brier ;

And I would make my testament,
Gudeman, if you would hear,

“ Gar take this bonnie neb o’ mine,
That picks upon the corn,

And give ’t to the Duke o’ Hamilton,
To be a hunting-horn.

“Gar take these bonnie feathers o’ mine,
The feathers o’ my neb,

And give to the Lady o’ Hamilton,
To fill a feather bed.
218

THE Merrre Heart.



“Gar take this good right leg o’ mine,
And mend the brig o” Tay,

It will be a post and pillar good,
It will neither bow nor gae.

“ And take this other leg o’ mine,
And mend the brig o’ Weir,

It will be a post and pillar good,
It will neither bow nor steer.

“ Gar take these bonnie feathers o’ mine,
The feathers o’ my tail,

And give to the lads o’ Hamilton
To be a barn-flail.

“ And take these bonnie feathers o’ mine,
The feathers o’ my breast,

And give to any bonnie lad
That ll bring to me a priest.”

Now, in came my lady Wren,
With many a sigh and groan,

“Oh! what care I for a’ the lads
If my wee lad be gone ?”

Then Robin turned him round about,
E’en like a little king:
Pussré, Pusstzt BAUDRONS. 2G

“Go, pack ye out at my chamber-door,
Ye little cutty quean !”

Robin made his testament
Upon a coll of hay ;

And by came a greedy gled,
And snapped him a’ away.

1d Pewee

PUSSIE, PUSSIE BAUDEGNHS.

“ PUSSIE, pussie baudrons,
Where have you been ?”

“T’ve been at London,
Seeing the Queen.”

“Pussie, pussie baudrons,
What got you there ?”

“T got a wee mousie,
Running up a stair.”

“ Pussie, pussie baudrons,
What did you do wi't?”

“T put it in my meal pock,
To eat it with my bread.”
220 Tae Merrie HEearr.





















































THE THREE WISE MEN OF GOTHAM,
WHO WENT TO SEA IN A BOWL.

THREE wise men of Gotham

Went to sea in a bowl,

And if the bowl had been stronger,

My song had been longer.

eng Pare
A RAINBOW.

PURPLE, yellow, red, and green,
The king cannot reach it nor the queen ;
Nor can old Noll, whose power ’s so great,
Tell me this riddle while I count eight.
FINGERS. 221

SHOEING THE COLT.
SHOE the colt,
Shoe the colt,
Shoe the wild mare ;
Here a nail,
There a nail,
Yet she goes bare.

ag Pare

A BETTER MAN THAN YOU.
HERE stands a fist.
Who set it there ?
A better man than you.
Touch him, if you dare.

ne a ee

FINGERS.
THIs is the man that brake the barn,
This is the man that stole the corn,
This is the man that ran awa’,
This is the man that told a’,
And poor Perlie Winkie paid for a’,
Paid for a’, paid for a’!
222 THE Merrre HEART.

GLASGOW, LINLITHGOW, AND
FALKIRK.
GLASGOW for bells,
Lithgow for wells,
Falkirk for beans and peas.

neg eaere

LITTLE BOY BLUE.
“ LITTLE Boy Blue, come, blow me your horn,
The cow’s in the meadow, the sheep’s in the corn;
But where is the little boy tending the sheep ?”
“ He’s under the haycock fast asleep.”

sav rece

MORE WEATHER RHYMES.
Mony haws,
Mony snaws.

RAINIE, rainie, rattle-stone.
-Dinna rain on me.

Rain on Johnnie Groat’s house,
Far over the sea.

SUNNY, sunny shower,
Come on for half an hour.
ooo
eG



LITTLE BOY BLUE.

TINTOCR. O25,

TWEED AND TILL.
TWEED said to Till,
“What gars ye rin sae still ?”
Till said to Tweed,
“ Though ye rin wi’ speed,
' And I rin slaw,
Yet, whare ye droun ae man,
I droun twa.”
tdi Pee
ANNAN, TWEED, AND CLYDE.
ANNAN, Tweed, and Clyde,
Rise a’ out o’ ae hill side;
Tweed ran, Annan wan,
Clyde fell, and broke its neck
O’er Cora Lynn.
—adihowe
TINTOCK.
ON Tintock tap there is a mist,
And in that mist there is a kist,
And in the kist there is a caup,
And in the caup there is a drap ;
Tak up the caup, drink aff the drap,
And set the kist on Tintock tap.
LONDON :
CASSELL, PETTER, AND GALPIN, BELLE SAUVAGE WORKS

LUDGATE HILL, E.C.
SHEECTIONS

FROM

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Catalogue,

COMPRISIN' G

ILLUSTRATED GIFT BOOKS,

BOOKS FOR CHILDREN,

PRIMARY & TECHNICAL SERIES,
SLCHI SCS

EU DIGIA WE Ra Elen | O NED ON;

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A CASSELL, PETTER, AND GALPIN,



CASSELL’S
SHIELING STORY BOOKS:

Bound in cloth, gilt lettering, with Illustrations.

Lotties White Frock, and other Stories . . . . Is
Helpful Nellie, and other Stories . . . . . . Is

Only Fust Once, and other Stories : 5g te
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Little Content, and other Stories. By EDITH WALFORD 1s.
The Elchester College Boys. By Mrs. HENRY WooD . is,
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My First Cruise. By W.H. KINGSTON . , - (16h
Little Lizzie. By MARY GILLIES. And other Tales ers
Luke Barnicott, By WILLIAM HOWITT,. . . . 4g.
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The Boat Club. By OLIVER Optic. And other Tales. Is.
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1. HOW COCK SPARROW SPENT HIS CHRISTMAS.

z. THE ADVENTURES OF ROBINSON CRUSOE.

3. QUEER CREATURES, DRAWN BY ONE OF THEMSELVES.
ae ZESOP’S FABLES. (21 Eee

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SPAS ap to Catch a Sunbeam” Is. 6d.
flid in a Cave: A Story for the Young > tseGds
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Little Fables for Little Folks . . , 1 1562.

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Lr, Savory s Tongs. By LWO SISTERS. «+ 25
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Love and Duty. By Anna J. BucKLAND . . 2s.

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Labour Stands on Golden Feet. A Holiday Story,

for Sensible Apprentices, Journeymen, and Masters. Translated from the
German of HEINRICH ZSCHOKKE, by Dr. JOHN YEATs,

*,* This book contains the individual and social history of a family through three genera-
cass Dr. Yeats refers to it as including maxims and precepts ‘such as an old man of
seventy-five—a patriot, poet, philosopher, and historian—was willing and anxious to bequeath.”
The author assured Dr. Yeats that he believed many of his best thoughts upon the subjects
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wherever the industrial classes constitute the real strength ofa nation. If ever you have the

leisure, and see an opportunity, translate it, to help on the cause at which I have laboured,
now wellnigh half a century, uninterruptedly.”

The Wonders of the Microscope, and How to See

Them. By the Rev. W. Houcuton, M.A., F.L.S., Author of ‘Country
Walks of a Naturalist with his Children,” &c.



LUDGATE HILL, LONDON; anv 596, BROADWAY, NEW YORK.
CASSELL, PETTER, AND GALPIN, 5

Stortes of the Olden Time. Selected and Arranged
by M. Jonrs, Author of ‘‘ The Story of Captain Cook,” &c.

*,* A selection of some of the chief historical episodes from the chronicles of De Joinville
and Froissart. The object of the translator has been rather to retain the quaint force of the
original than to offer a paraphrase.

Truly Noble. A Story, by Madame Dr CHaTeLatn.
Autobiography of a Lump of Coal, a Grain of Salt,

&c. &c. By ANNIE CAREY.

*,* Intended to convey through the medium of Fairy Tale, information upon what may
be called Every-day Science. ‘Thus, “A Lump of Coal,” ‘A Grain of Salt,” “A Drop of
Water,” and several kindred subjects are treated of as though they had become temporarily
endowed with the power of asserting themselves, and of relating their views and experiences.

Loveand Lifein Norway. By BJoRNSTJERN BjorRNSON.
Translated from the Norwegian by the Hon. AucusTa BETHELL.

The Frshing Girl. By BjorNSTERN Byornson.
Translated from the Norwegian by AUGUSTA PLESNER,.

*,* These two stories are thoroughly representative of their author, and will enable
English readers to understand why he is so popular a writer in his own country. ‘They are
rendered into English by pens familiar with the work; so that the richness of the descriptions,
both of scenery and character, is very fully retained.

One Trip More, and other Stories. By the Author
of “ Mary Powell.”
*,.* This is a collection of those charming little stories for which this author is so justly
celebrated.

CLE BORE NeS iri be AREY.

NEW AND ORIGINAL WORKS.

Super-royal 16mo, bound in cloth gilt, with numerous Illustrations, price
3s. 6d. each.

The Children’s Sunday Album. By the Author of
““A Trap to Catch a Sunbeam.” With upwards of One Hundred Er
gravings . . : : cS ‘ 5 5 Se egsnods

*,* A companion volume to the ‘Children’s Album,” by Uncle John, of which 21,000
copies have been sold.

Lhe Story of Robin Hood. Illustrated with Eight

Plates printed in Colours . : - 6 Teegsaods

*,* The story of this popular hero is here for the first time presented in a readable and
connected form for young children. ‘The illustrations are in the best style of colour-printing
by Kronheim.



LUDGATE HILL, LONDON; anv 596, BROADWAY, NEW YORK,
6 CASSELL, PETTER, AND GALPIN,

The Merrie Hleart. A Collection of Nursery
Rhymes and Short Tales. Illustrated with Eight Coloured Plates from
Designs by WALTER CRANE, and numerous smaller Engravings by
J. Swain, from Drawings by ERNEST GrisetT, F. BARNARD, and
others ; 3 : ; , ‘ 7 « 3s. 6d.

*,* This aims at being the most complete and authentic collection of nursery rhymes extant,
and Includes many favourite Scotch rhymes not commonly known,

The True Robinson Crusoes. A Series of Stirring

Adventures. Edited by CHARLES RussELL. With ae full-page
Illustrations ¢ ‘ - 3s. 6d.

*,* This isa most interesting book for young folks, inasmuch as it gives the veritable facts
connected with the wonderful careers of numerous people, who have ‘undergone i in their per-

sonal experience vicissitudes rivalling in their romantic and startling character those of the
hero of De Foe’s immortal story, ‘ ‘Robinson Crusoe.”

Of to Sea. A Story for Boys. By W. H. G.
Kincston. With Illustrations printed in Colours . ‘ . 38. 6d.

*,* One of Mr. Kingston’s vivid and entrancing stories, containing, like all this author’s
works, sound moral teaching and practical advice for boys.

The Childrens Album. Containing nearly Two

Hundred beautiful Engravings, with Short Stories by UNCLE JoHN.
Third Edition, revised and scones Square crown 8vo, 368 pages,
cloth lettered . - 3s. 6d

Peggy, and other F les Fight {ihnstrations . 38. 6d.
Old Burchell’s Pocket. By Evinu Burritr . 3s. 6d.
Mince-Pie Island. By R. St. JoHN CorBeT . 3s. 64.
Cloudland and SEE: ay ds THACKRAY

BUNCE . i . . 3s. 6d.
The Queen of Hie Le ivan: : + oe. BRAG
Lily and Nannie at School: A Stony Jor Girls.

With Eight Illustrations by DALZIEL BROTHERS : . . 3s. 6d.
Crocker the Clown: A Story for Boys. By the

Editor of ‘* Kind Words” : : 3 . - 3 » 38. 6d.

The Magic of Kindness. By the Brotuers May-

HEW. With Eight Engravings after ALBERT DuRER by ve
CRANE. Cloth gilt . : 5 . F i - 38.



LUDGATE HILL, LONDON; A AND 596, “BROADWAY, NEW YORK,
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On a Coral Reef: A Sea Story for Boys. By

ARTHUR Locker, Author of ‘‘ Sweet Seventeen,” &c. - 3s. 6d.

King Gab’s Story Bag; and the Wondrous Tales

it contained. By Heracrirus Grey. With Illustrations after ALBERT
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Flours of Sunshine: A Series. of Poems for Chil-

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Will Adams: The Adventures of the Je; English-

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Working Women of this Century: the Teson of their

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Famous Regiments of the Been Api. With

Coloured Plate of Uniforms. By WM. H. Davenport ADAMS 3s. 6d.

The Angel of the Iceberg, and other Stories. By

Joun Topp, D.D. (New Edition.) ‘ 7 . « 38. 6d.
The Book of Drawing-Room Plays and Evening

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ONE-SYLLABLE LIBRARY.

The Rare Romance of Reynard the Fox, and the

Shifts of his Son Reynardine, in Words of One Syllable. By S, PHILLIPS
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The Pilgrim’s Progress, in Words of One Syllable.
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Evenings at Home, in Words of ‘One Syllable.
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LUDGATE HILL, LONDON; ann 596, BROADWAY, NEW YORK.
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Swiss Family Robinson, in Words of One Syllable.
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Coloured Illustrations. Handsomely bound in cloth gilt . . 3s. 6d.

s0p's Fables, in Words of One Syllable. With

Illustrations printed in Colours a! KRONHEIM. awe bound in
cloth gilt . . . . . 3s. 6d.

Sandford and Mee on Words of One Syllable.

With Illustrations printed in Colours Ey KRONHEIM. Handsomely
bound in cloth gilt . ‘ : : : 7 . 3s. 6d.

*% Other Volumes of this unique Series in active preparation.

THE

BELLE SAUVAGE LIBRARY.

A Series of Volumes for Family and Home Reading. Handsomely bound in
bevelled boards, red edges, 3s. 6d. per volume,

. Pulpit Table Talk. Containing Remarks and

Anecdotes on Preachers and Preaching. By Epwin B. Ramsay,
M.A., LL.D., F.R.S.E., Dean of Edinburgh.

2. The Search for the Gral. By Jutta Gopparp,

Author of ‘‘ Joyce Dormer’s Story,” ‘‘ Adriana,” &c. &c.

=

3. Sermons for Boys. By the Rev. Atrrep Barry,

D.D., Principal of King’s College, London, late Head Master of
Cheltenham Grammar School.

4. The Life of Bernard Palissy, of Saintes. By

Henry Mor ey, Professor of English Literature in University College,
London.

5. Lhe Young Man im the Battle of Life. By the
Rev. Dr. LANDELS, Author of ‘‘ Woman: her Position and Power,” &c.

*,%* Other Volumes in preparation.

LUDGATE HILL, LONDON; anv 596, BROADWAY, "NEW YORK.
CASSELL, PETTER, AND GALPIN, 9



THE LIBRARY OF WONDERS:

Crown 8yo, with many Plates, and Handsomely bound in a cover specially
designed for this series of Gift Books. 5s. each.

Wonders in Acoustics.
Wonderful Escapes.
Wonders of Animal Lnstinct.

“Certainly one of the best books upon the instinct of animals and insects which we have
seen.”—Standard.

Wonders of Architecture.

“©The little work before us is a great help to the formation of our tastes and the study of
a great science.” —Naval and Military Gazette.

Wonders of Bodily Strength and Skill.

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Wonderful Balloon A scents.

“Well illustrated, well got up, and well translated from the French.”—Literary World.

FIVE-SHILLING BOOKS.
The Story of Don Quixote. By Miss Martavx.

Re-narrated in a familiar manner, especially adapted for Younger
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*,* The story of Don Quixote is here told for the first time in language easily understood
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A Voyage to the South Pole. A New Story. By

W. H. G. Kineston. With upwards of Fifty Engravings. Crown 8vo.

*,* Mr. Kingston has written a most interesting account of this comparatively unknown,
region ; and the approach of the Transit of Venus, which is expected to take place in this
region shortly, lends a special interest to this perhaps the oly boy’s book on this subject.

Children’s Carols. The Music by Henry Les iz,
the Illustrations by J. E. MILLAIs. 4to.
*,* A companion volume to “‘ Little Songs for Me to Sing.”



LUDGATE HILL, LONDON; anp 596, BROADWAY, NEW YORK.
10 CASSELL, PETTER, AND GALPIN,



Flome Chat with our Young Folks. By Ciara
Martavux, Author of “The Story of Don Quixote,” &c. &e. With
about 120 Engravings. F cap. 4to . . : é : ; - 5S

aoe This chatty volume gives very much that is sure to be interesting without being dull’
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Scraps of Knowledge for the Little Ones. By

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*,* Under cover of a powerful escort of pictures, this book is intended to convey a large
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The Happy Nursery. By Euuis A. Davipson,
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Feap. 4to, with numerous Illustrations and Designs for Toys . + 5S.

*,* This book is divided into four parts :—1. An introduction, treating of the essentials of
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Picture Teaching for Young and Old: A Series of

Object Lessons, progressively arranged, so as to Teach the Meaning of
every Term employed. With more than 200 Illustrations. 4to, cloth,
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Picture Natural History: A Series of Plates, num-

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NEW STANDARD Di RAGES

OF POPULAR WORKS.
Esther West. By Isa Cratc-Knox. Imperial

16mo. Illustrated with Twenty-four Engravings. Cloth gilt . . 6s.

*,* This highly popular tale has been reprinted from the Qudver, and is published in this
cheap form with a view to an extensive circulation.



LUDGATE HILL, LONDON; anv 596, BROADWAY, NEW YORK.
CASSELL, PETTER, AND GALPIN, IL

Peoples of the World. By Besstze ParKxes-BELLoc.

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The Story of Captain Cook. By M. Jones, Author

of * Stories of the Olden Time.” Imperial 16mo, Illustrated with about
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Chefs-d’cuvre of the Industrial Arts. By PHILIPPE

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Daybreak in Spain. By the Rev. Dr. Wyttr.

Crown 8vo, with Twelve Illustrations . 6s.

. o«* The first account that has yet appeared of the extraordinary reformation now going on
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A Poet Hero. By Countess Von Botumer, Author

of ** Strong Hands and Steadfast Hearts,” &c. &c. 408 pp. Crown
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‘* The life and death of the German poet and soldier, Theodor Korner. . . .. The Countess
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attraction of an interesting character and of a touching national struggle.”—Daily News.

The Natural Hrstory of Commerce. By J. YEats,
LL.D. Cloth, lettered =. ; 7 : : j 7 : . 5S.

*,* This is the first of a series of practical volumes intended for the study of young
merchants, and is based on the system so successfully developed in Germany.



LUDGATE HILL, LONDON; anp 596, BROADWAY, NEW YORK.
12 CASSELL, PETTER, AND GALPIN,

~
The Transformations of Insect Life. By EmiILe
BLANCHARD. Translated by Dr. Duncan, Secretary of the Geological
Society, and Professor of Geology, King’s oe London, Profusely
Illustrated. Royal 8vo, cloth gilt . 7 : . 15Se

Pictures from English Literature. The Text by
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The Doré Gallery. Containing Two Hundred and

Fifty of the finest Drawings of Gustave Dorg, selected from the ‘‘ Doré
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and Paradiso, » © Atala,” ‘‘La Fontaine’s Fables,” ‘Don Quixote,”
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The Log of the Pontana: A Onis in Chinese

ieee By Capt. A. F. Linpiey. Illustrated with about Fifty En-
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*,* A handsome book of travels and daenties:

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- Being a Selection from the Holy Bible, in the Words of the Authorised
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by the best Artists of the Day. Cloth elegant, gilt edges . 3 (GE TSe
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Best morocco elegant or antique . : . a » £2 28.

“Eisops Fables. A New and carefully revised

Version of these Fables. By J. B. RUNDELL. Profusely Illustrated with
Original Designs by ERNEsT GRISET. Cloth gilt, out edges . £1 Is.



LUDGATE HILL, LONDON; anv 596, BROADWAY, NEW YORK.
CASSELL, PETTER, AND GALPIN, 13



fairy Realm. A Collection of the Favourite Old

Tales. Illustrated by Gustave Dort, and Told in Verse oo Tom
Hoop. Imperial 4to, cloth gilt, gilt edges . . 41 Is.

Lllustrated Travels. A Record of eee Geo-
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Extra gilt, gilt edges . 2 18s.
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ILLUSTRATED LIBRARY.

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Cassell’s Book of Sacred Poems. Edited by the

Rey. R. H. Baynes, M.A., Editor of ‘‘ Lyra Anglicana.”
Cassell’s. Illustrated Bunyan. The Pitcrim’s

ProcGress. Illustrated throughout.

Cassell’s Illustrated Bunyan. The Hoty Wak..

Illustrated throughout.

Cassell’s Illustrated Gulliver. GULLIVER’s TRAVELS.
By DEAN Swirr. Profusely Illustrated throughout by MORTEN.

Cassell’s Illustrated Robinson Crusoe. Beautifully
Illustrated throughout.



LUDGATE HILL, LONDON; anv 596, BROADWAY, NEW YORK,
14 CASSELL, PETTER, AND GALPIN,



Cassell’s Illustrated Readings. Conducted by Tom

Hoop. In Two Vols., each complete in itself.

Goldsmiths Works. The Vicar of WAKEFIELD and

PormMs. Illustrated throughout.

THCMNIGCAEA “SE RLES:.

CONSISTING OF A SERIES OF TWO-SHILLING VOLUMES,

Which contain all the essentials of a Technical Education.

Linear Drawing. By Evuis A. Davinson, Lecturer
on Engineering and Architectural Drawing in the City of London Middle-
Class Schools, contains the principles of Linear Drawing as adapted to:
Trade, Manufactures, Engineering, Architecture, and Design, with about

150 Illustrations, and six Whole- “Page nee of Working Drawings.
Cloth, limp . . . 2S

Orthographic and nse Pie. By the
same Author, treats of the Projection of Plans, Elevations and Sections
of Solids, and the Development of Surfaces, for Masons, Carpenters,
Builders, Architects, Metal-Plate Workers, Plumbers, and Artisans:
generally. Illustrated with about 40 Whole- -page a drawn on
Wood by the Author. Cloth, limp . : Sr A re + 286

Linear Drawing and Lo GeOUe whe Two Volumes.
in One. Cloth, lettered . : . . 3s. éd.

Building Construction, the Plsnients of, and Archi-
tectural Drawing, with 130 Illustrations drawn on Wood by the Author.
By Exiis A. Davipson, Author of “Linear Drawing,” ‘‘ Projection,”
‘Right Lines,” &c. Cloth, limp . 7 . : : : . 2S.
Systematic Drawing and Shading, giving Practical
Lessons on Drawing, showing its value, as well as the necessary connec-

tion between its various stages. By CHARLES Ryan, Head Master,
Leamington School of Art. Cloth, limp s 2 : ‘ + 2s.

LUDGATE HILL, LONDON; anp 596, BROADWAY, NEW YORK.
CASSELL, PETTER, AND GALPIN, 1s

Drawing for Carpenters and Foimers. By Ex.is

A. Davipson. Containing a Description of the Construction of the Sub-
ject of each Study, and the Method of Drawing it; with Elementary
Lessons in Free-hand and Object Drawing. With 250 Illustrations and
Drawing Copies. Double Volume. Cloth, lettered . * - 3s. 6d.

Practical Perspective. By Etzis A. Davinson.
Containing Perspective Projection of Simple Points, Lines, Planes, and
Rectangular Solids; Polygons, Prisms, Pyramids ; Circles, Cylinders,
and Arches, &c. With 36 Double-page Illustrations drawn on Wood by
the Author. Cloth, limp (nearly ready) . ° é 2, 72S:

Drawing for Machinists. By E..is a oo

With abundant Illustrations and OEE cy Double Volume.
Cloth, lettered (in the press) . ‘ ‘ » 38. 6d.

CASSELL'S
PICLNEALR SY “OF RES;

Elementary Arithmetic. With more than 1,100
Examples. Cloth, lettered, 4d. Key to ditto : 3d.

Elementary British History: A candencea racial of
the Principal Events of British History. Cloth, lettered 7 . 6d.

Elementary Geography: written in a staple terse
style. Illustrated. Cloth, lettered . . . 4d.

England at Home: An Hlemeaeany Text: Book of

Geography, Manufacture, Trade, and Commerce. Cloth, lettered . Is,

Our fTouses, and What they are Made of. . 1s.
Our Bodies: An Elementary Text-Book of Human

Physiology. Illustrated. Cloth, lettered . Is.
The Uses of Plants, in Food, AS, ant Comnbite.
With Illustrations. Cloth, lettered . 7 cs - Ise
Our First Grammar. Cloth, used Ae TS

LUDGATE HILL, ‘LONDON; AND 596, BROADWAY, NEW YORK.
x6 CASSELL, PETTER, AND GALPIN, r

Our Food: containing Lessons on the Production
and Uses of the various Articles of Food, &c. ‘Cloth, lettered . Is.

Right Lines. in ther Right Places; or, Eeometry

without Instruments. With lustrations

Lhe Boy's fest ee Bdapied to Standard Rs

Bon ead.
ae he Boy's Second Reader: Standard IL Cloth,
; lettered ‘ ; “Ad.
The Girl's Firs Reade. Adapted to Standard I.

Cloth . : : . 4d,

The Girl's oy Rite. cat ‘TT. = Cloth “aa.
The Boy's and on s - he eiteais Sad III.

Cloth, lettered . : oad.
The Boy's and Girt S Fourth Reader. Standard IV.
_ Cloth ettered = 5 29d.
The Poetical Ree Geta v. Cloth . eae.

The Explanatory Reader. Standard VI. Cloth 1s
The Animal Kingdom. With ehangent WP cg

Double Volume, cloth, lettered : 2s,
Vegetable FOE: in “Easy Lessons Cloth,
lettered . is . a Is. 6d,

Cassell’s Descriptive Catalogue, comprising a com-
plete List of all Works printed and published by Messrs. CAssELt,
PETTER, and GALPIN, including a compendious List of their numerous
Educational Works. This Catalogue is supplied gratis by all Booksellers,
and will be forwarded post free on request addressed to the Publishers.



LUDGATE HILL, LONDON ; anp §96, BROADWAY, NEW YORK.