Citation
Trots' letters to her doll

Material Information

Title:
Trots' letters to her doll
Creator:
Bromfield, Mary E
Thomas Nelson & Sons ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
London ;
Edinburgh ;
New York
Publisher:
T. Nelson and Sons
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
138, [6] p. : col. ill. ; 19 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Dolls -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Letters -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Mothers and daughters -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Sailing -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Publishers' catalogues -- 1875 ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1875
Genre:
Publishers' catalogues ( rbgenr )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
Scotland -- Edinburgh
United States -- New York -- New York
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Added title page and frontispiece printed in colors.
General Note:
Publisher's catalogue follows text.
Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
Statement of Responsibility:
by Mary E. Bromfield.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026605871 ( ALEPH )
ALG2996 ( NOTIS )
21323837 ( OCLC )

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TROTS LETTERS TO HER DOLL.

BY

MARY E. BROMFIELD,

ye

TILE OLD GIG,” ‘THE THREE PHOTOGRAPHS,”
&., &e.

AUTHOR OF “ DADDY DICK,



LONDON:

T. NELSON AND SONS, PATERNOSTER ROW;
EDINBURGH ; AND NEW YORK,

. 1875,







Cy

My PEAR G@OD-DAUGHTER,
(MARY VIRGINIE,)

MY MOST WILLING AND INDULGENT CRITIC,

THESE LETTERS ARE DEDICATED.



G@Jontents.

—+

I. “SO NICE,” .. . o . o oe . 9

Il. “FOUND DROWNED,” o o. - oe . 32
III. “MIDSHIPMAN LUCY,” oo oe oo . 5Y
IV. “SHIPWRECK BAY,” .. wee oe . . oo 84

V. “BOUNCE,” .. . . . . a 17











TROTS LETTERS TO HER DOLL.

a

L

“SO NICE”




‘¢ Y Dearest ERMELINDA,—I was so
% very sorry, when mamma said you
"y mustn’t go with us to the sea; for,
te my poor dear, you had been looking
forward to it so long, and you and I had
talked about it so many times before we
went to sleep of a night, that I knew how
disappointed you would be.

But mamma said, you know, that I might
only take one of you, and just the common
everyday clothes you had on, for that she



1¢ CLORINDA AT THE SEA-SIDE.

didn’t believe that you would want any-
thing else at the sea-side. And mamma was
quite right; for do you know that Clorinda
has had a very dull time of it, as she was
put in a closet when we first came, and there
I believe she will stay.

I took her, you know, because since I tried
the water-cure for her she has looked so
pale and ill, that I thought perhaps sea-air
might bring back her roses. But, poor
Dolly ! I think she has often wished herself
at home again: so let this be a lesson to
you, my dear (mamma bids me say), never
to set your heart too much upon anything,
for you are almost sure to be disappointed.
And I believe, Ermelinda, that is a very
good maxim for dollies—though not for
me, for I can’t help wishing for things I like.
It is half the fun of it.

So now [ll tell you the reason why -
Clorinda is left in the closet. The truth is,



TROTS DESCRIPTION OF THE SEA. 11

we have such fun without her, that we
don’t take her out lest she should be in the
way.

The very morning after we arrived we
ran down to the beach for a few minutes
before breakfast with our papa. Oh, it was
so nice! The waves were coming racing
in one after the other, seeing which could
reach the shore soonest ; and the sun was
shining brightly on the water just like
gold, and the sand was all gold too. My
dear Ermelinda, I wish you knew what the
sea is like, it is so jolly! The pond at the
end of the lane at home is something like,
except that it’s so dirty, and dark, and still;
or my bath, before it’s soapy. But, no! the
sea is so big ; and it goes dancing and shin-
ing as if it were alive.

And then there’s the sand. How can I
describe it? It’s the colour of your hair ;
and it’s all stuff like what comes out of you



12 AN OLD ACQUAINTANCE.

when you're pricked, only ever so much
finer, and there’s enough of it even here to
fill all the dolls in the world. You see,
Ermelinda, that I’m obliged to describe it
by something that a doll like you can under-
stand, and that’s so difficult.

Well, when we got on the sands, papa
said, “ Now, after breakfast, you may come
down and build castles. I used to do it
here myself when I was a boy.—Ah, Mrs.
Weekes, is that you? Ive come to the
‘dear old place again, and haven’t I brought
a goodly tribe to be dipped? You shall
have them all by-and-by. You remember
dipping me, Betty, don’t you?”

“Ah! that I do, Master John; and a
good pair of lungs you had, the first time.
To be sure—bless their little hearts '—there
be a many of them.”

“Well, I hope you won't have’ much
squealing among them, Betty ; at all events



CASTLE-BUILDING. 18

they shall come down after breakfast and
try.”

Well, Dolly, by this time we were getting
hungry, so we went home to breakfast ;
papa first taking us into a shop and buying
each of us—Sissy, and Arty, and Lucy, and
Edie, and Trots (that’s me)—a spade apiece.

After breakfast we all went down again
to the sands and began digging ; and papa
came very soon and showed us how to make
a castle, with walls and a ditch round it.
And didn’t we have fun! It was so large
that we could all get inside and dig deeper
and deeper. But while we were digging, we
never noticed that the water was getting
nearer and nearer, till at last one big wave
came and made a hole in our wall, and
frightened us so that we all scrambled out
and ran away; and before we came back
again, another and another wave had come
and nearly swept our poor castle away.



14 TROTS SECRET,

And now, dear Dolly, I am going to tell
you something that did make me feel very
much ashamed of myself. I write it to you
because I want to tell it to somebody, and
I’m quite sure that you won’t tell it again ;
and also because Nurse said that it had
better be an example to the little ones, that
it was no use trying to shirk one’s duty ; so,
Dolly, don’t you forget that! That very
same morning, about eleven o'clock, Nurse
came and told us to leave off castle-build-
ing and to come home, which we did, and
there had a cup of milk and a bit of bread
each ; and then mamma told us all to be
good children, and Nurse and Sarah took a
great roll of towels, and down we all came
to be dipped.

I must say that as I walked along I got
very shivery and cold down the back, and
wished very much it was over, but I knew
it was no use saying so ; and, besides, Arty



THE BATHING-MACHINES. 15

kept saying all along, “Oh! it’s so jolly,
Trots !

Isn’t it nice ?
You'll be dipped in a trice.”

While poor little Edie kept squeezing my
hand very tight, and didn’t like it any
better than I did.

When we came to where the bathing-
machines were, Arty ran off to bathe with
papa; and as there were two bathing-
machines standing empty, side by side, old
Betty Weekes said that we’d better come
at once.

So Sissy and Lucy went into one machine,
and Sarah and Nurse took darling baby, and
Edie, and me (that’s Trots), into the other.

They are such nasty damp places, Erme-
linda, like that old summer-house at the
bottom of the green walk, if it were put on
wheels ; and there was a very old musty
bit of carpet that everybody had made wet,



16 READY TO BE DIPPED.

and sand and stones down on the floor, and
I began to shiver worse than ever. And
then Sarah began to undress me (and oh! it
did feel so cold), and she said, ‘ Why, Miss
Trots, your lips are quite blue ;” and at last,
when even my shoes and stockings were off,
she put a little short blue frock on me,
which felt very cold and shivery, and she
said, ““ Now, then, you're ready, my dear.”

And all the time we were being undressed
they kept moving, moving the machine
into the water ; and as it went grating and
bumping down the beach, Sarah and Nurse
couldn’t stand, and we children had to cling
on to them to prevent falling down.

However, when I was in my little blue
tunic, Sarah opened the door of the machine ;
and there, Ermelinda, was the water quite
close up to the machine, and it made me
shiver worse than ever.

But just then, Dolly, I saw Sissy come to

(455)



A STRANGE-LOOKING OLD WOMAN. 17

the door of the other machine, in her nice
blue dress, looking so pretty, with her fair
hair hanging all over her shoulders, and her
little bare white feet; and I said, “Oh,
Sissy, Sissy, ain’t you cold?” And she said,
“ Not a bit, Trots,—

Oh, it’s so nice !
You'll be dipped in a trice.

Come, Mrs. Weekes, make haste, make
haste !”

And then that old woman papa had
talked to in the morning came bustling up,
looking like a great fat bundle of the same
blue stuff we had on, only quite faded and
stained, and with an old battered, black
bonnet on her head, and a little bag hung
round her neck to keep her sixpences dry ;
and she said, “ Ah, missy, many and many’s
the time that I’ve dipped your papa, and
the Cap’n that’s in India, and poor Miss

Sophy, as married the parson, when they
(455) 9



18 “OH, IT’S SO NICE!”

was all littler than you.” And then, Erme-
linda, why then I heard-a splash, and in a
moment Sissy came up from under the
water with her hair all dripping, and
panting and laughing and rubbing the
water out of her eyes; and as soon as she
could speak she said, “ Oh, it’s so nice! it’s
so nice! Another dip, Betty ; it’s delight-
ful.” -

And then came Lucy’s turn, and she
seemed to like it just as well; and they
began to dance about in the water, and bob
down their heads under the big waves ;
while Mrs. Weekes kept saying, “ Well, you
be the best of all my young ladies to bathe,
that you be, to be sure.’

But, Dolly, I kept shivering, and I hardly
heard Sissy and Lucy calling, “ Make haste,
Trots, and come to us, it is so nice ;” till at
last that nasty wet Mrs. Weekes came up
to our machine, and said, “ Now, then, my



NAUGHTY AND SILLY. 19

pretty little lady, come along ; you'll like it
so much.” And then, Ermelinda, I couldn't
help it indeed, but I cried out that “I
wouldn't ! Iwouldn’t! I wouldn't! I didn’t
want to be bathed; and that mamma
wouldn't make me if she were here.”

“Come, come! Miss Trots,” said Nurse,
“don’t be naughty and silly; it must be
done some time. Now, would you like to
see baby dipped first?” And could you
believe it, Dolly, but I said that I should,
and that I’d try and be good if dear darling
baby were dipped first. Oh, wasn’t I a
coward, Dolly, to want baby to do what I
daren’t do myself?

So first Edie was dipped, and she was
such a good little thing that she never cried
a bit, though they put her quite under;
and then darling baby, and he came up
crowing and laughing, and calling out,
“ More, more ; ’gain, ’gain.”



20 UNDER THE WATER.

Then old Mrs. Weekes took him for Sissy
to hold, and gave Edie to Lucy, while she
came back for me.

“And now, Miss Trots,’ said Nurse,
“youll be a good child!” But oh, Dolly,
I forgot all my promises, and I clung to
Nurse and said, “I won’t be good! I won't
be bathed!” and (O Ermelinda, I am so
ashamed !) I kicked at Mrs. Weekes, and I
kicked at Sarah, till at last, in the middle
of a great struggle and scream, I suddenly
went down deep, deep under the water ;
and when I came up again (which I thought
I never should), I was choking and gasping,
with the salt water pouring down my throat.
And before I could get my breath to scream
again, there was Mrs. Weekes thumping my
back, and I could hear Lucy calling out,—

“ Oh, isn’t it nice
To be dipped in a trice?”

That made me so angry that I began to kick



DIPPING AND RUBBING. 21

and scream again ; while Mrs. Weekes said,
“Now don’t, my dear.” But as I did, she
dipped me again right down till I was
choked again.

“There, that will do now,” said Mrs.
Weekes; “why, you're worse than your
own papa was the first time; but he soon
got over it. Now, then, dance about and
keep warm.” And then she took baby and
Edie and rubbed them all over, and dipped
them again, while Lucy and Sissy tried to
make me jump about with them; but I was
cross and wouldn’t, for I didn’t like Nurse
to keep on saying, “ Well, you were a silly
little girl, Miss Trots; if you’d kept your
mouth shut the water wouldn’t have got
in.’ And I thought it very unkind of Lucy
to keep saying,—

“ Oh, isn’t it nice
To be dipped in a trice?”

At last Mrs. Weekes looked at me and



22 A CROSS LITTLE GIRL,

said, “Nurse, that child is so blue that
you'd better have her out at once.” So I
was lifted out, and my dripping blue gown
was taken off, and Sarah dried me in a
great hurry with a very rough towel, and
kept scolding all the time, and saying that
I was a very cross little girl And do you
know, Ermelinda, it isn’t at all pleasant to
stand and be scrubbed with a very hard
towel, and to have your shoes and stockings
put on in a hurry, without having the sand
taken off one’s feet, and all the time to be
called a naughty silly child, and to be told
how much better baby and Edie had be-
haved! And all the time to know down in
your heart that you deserve it all; and
worse still, dear Dolly, to feel sure that if
it were to happen again, you'd do just the
same, and scream as bad as ever. Oh, Erme-
linda, it’s a very bad feeling.

And so you may imagine that I did not



DOWN AT THE SANDS. 23

feel very happy all the day, especially as
Arty would keep running up to me all day
long and screaming out,—

“O Trots, isn’t it nice

To be dipped in a trice 2”
And tiny Edie caught it up, and said after
him,— ;

“Oh nice ! ina trice ! Oh nice !”

So when I went to bed I determined that
it shouldn’t happen again, for I wouldn’t
be bathed any more.

And so, dear Dolly, it came to pass that
the next morning we brought our luncheon
down with us to the sands, and built castles
and dug rivers just the same as before,
till about eleven o’clock, when old Mrs.
Weekes came up to Nurse and said, “ Now,
then, Nurse, bring your flock ; we have got
the two machines empty now, and you'll just
have time before the little Miss Mowbrays.
and their nurses come down to bathe.”



24 RUNNING AWAY.

Well, Nurse had baby in her arms, and
little Edie close to her; and Sarah ran to
call Lucy, who was some way off; and I
slipped away without any one seeing me, and
ran as fast as I could along the sands, and
up the royal steps, till I had no breath left.

Then I felt rather safer, and went slower
and slower along Carlton Row, thinking
what I should do if I met papa or mamma,
or if the hall door were shut. How lucky I
thought myself, Dolly, when I found it
standing open !

Now, I thought to myself, I can creep
past the dining-room door on tip-toe, for I
know mamma, is out, and so get safely up
into the nursery ;. and nobody will know
anything about it.

I never thought, Dolly, what would hap-
pen when Nurse and the others came home;
but then the bathing would be over for the
day, and all would be right.



FOUND OUT. . 25

So I crept by the dining-room as gently
as a mouse; but it was no use. Before I
got past the door, a voice said, “ Who's
there ?”

O Dolly, you don’t know how I love my
papa! but it did frighten me to hear his
voice then.

I trembled, and I said very low, “ It’s me,
papa ; it’s Trots.”

And he said, “Come in here. Mary,”
he said—and when he didn’t say “ Trots,”
I knew how angry he was—“ Mary, what
brings you here ?”

O Dolly, how I wished then that Mrs.
Weekes had got me safely in the blue dress,
ready to dip me! But I said, “I don’t like
being dipped, papa ; the water chokes me.”

“ And so you think the wisest plan is to
run away. Mary, I am ashamed of you.
Go and sit upon that chair.”

Then I sat down very quietly, Dolly, cry-



26 “WHERE'S TROTS ?”

ing, on that rough horse-hair chair, opposite
my papa, who never spoke or looked at me
once. Oh, how I wished that I might get
down and tell him I was sorry, but I didn’t
dare; and I had to sit there for more
than an hour, and he never spoke to me
once.

At last I heard voices coming nearer and
nearer, and then a scufiling of feet; and
then Sissy, and Lucy, and Edie came in,
rosy and laughing, and calling out, “Where's
Trots ?”

“Oh, isn’t it nice
To be dipped in a trice ?”

While Nurse came panting in with baby in
her arms, saying, “ Have you seen Miss
Mary, sir?”

- And there I sat, Ermelinda. And papa
never looked at me even then, but he said:
“Nurse, there is that silly, naughty little
girl, who thought she could escape from



A VERY SAD DAY. 27

what she disliked by running away. Don’t
let her come downstairs at all to-day, and
send her to bed at six o'clock.”

That was a very sad day, Dolly. I stayed
upstairs all the time except for an hour,
when Sarah took me for a walk along the
road, and then brought me in for tea; and
directly afterwards it struck six o’clock, and
mamma came into the nursery.

“Good-night, Mary,” she said. “ You
may go and say ‘ Good-night’ to your papa
in his dressing-room.”

He was just going out for a long walk
with mamma, and Arty, and Sissy, and
Lucey. I should have gone too, if I’d been
good. :

“Good-night, Mary,” said my father. “I
am sorry that you were so foolish and
naughty to-day. Don’t you like being
bathed ?”

“ No, papa.”



28 TROTS AND HER FATHER,

“ But mamma and I think it will do you
good ; so you must try and like it.”

“T never shall, papa,’ I said. “I can’t
help screaming, and the water runs down
my throat and chokes me. Oh dear, oh
dear! what shall I do? Please, don’t let
me be bathed again, papa.”

“Indeed I must,” he said; “and you
must try and not scream, Mary.”

“Indeed I can’t help it, papa,” said I;
“it makes me shiver, and something comes
in my throat, and I can’t help screaming.”

“Can't is a hard word, Mary.”

“T can’'t—indeed, I can't,’ I said again.

“ T know it’s difficult,” he said; “ but does
my little Trots want to please her father ?”

“Yes, papa,” I said very gently.

“Then my little girl will remember that
papa wishes her to bathe, and will be very
sorry if she is so silly as to scream. You

{??

will try for papa’s sake, Trots



AGAIN IN THE WATER. 29

O Dolly, I covered his face with kisses,
but I didn’t promise ; and then he let me say
my prayers to him, and carried me into the
nursery to bed before they all went for their
walk.

Well, Ermelinda (I have nearly finished
this long letter), the next day was rainy,
and we did not bathe; but the day after
that, it was very warm and bright, and the
time came when I was standing once more
in my little blue gown at the door of the
machine, waiting to be dipped.

T can’t tell you how I felt while Sarah
was undressing me; and I shivered so much,
that Nurse said, “ Just look at that child!”
But just as Mrs. Weekes took me and
ducked me under, I managed to squeeze
my lips very tight together, and kept saying,
deep down in my heart, “O papa! papa !
papa!” And do you know, Ermelinda, not
one drop of water got down my throat ; and



80 TALKING IT OVER.

kind old Mrs. Weekes only dipped me once,
and said I was a brave little girlk And
then I had such fun with Lucy and Sissy.

And, Ermelinda, that evening, when we
were all out walking, my papa sat down —
on a bank while the rest were gathering
flowers, and called me to him and said,—

“ Trots, you didn’t scream this morning.”

“No, papa.”

“ How did you manage ?”

Then I told him how I squeezed my lips
tight together, and kept saying to myself,
“O papa! papa! papa!”

And he didn’t laugh, as I thought he
would ; but he said softly, “ And that made
it easy to my little girl, because it was her
father’s wish.”

“ Not easy, papa,’ I said. “I did almost
scream.”

“T know, Trots,” he said. “I find it as
difficult to do a great many things. Some



THE LETTER ENDED. 31

are so difficult that I could not do them, if
I did not know it was my Father’s will. -
You know who I mean, Trots.”

“Yes, I do know quite well, though I am
but a little child.”

But I couldn’t make you understand that,
for you are only a dear silly Dolly, so I won’t
write a word more.

So give my love to Maria, Jane, and
Cookie, and the Puss, and tell them we are
all very happy at the sea.

Your affectionate little mistress,
TRots.













‘TI.

“FOUND DROWNED.”



{Y Dearest Dotiy,—I am so thank-
ful, dear, that you are safe and well
4 in your closet at home, for poor Clo-

om rinda has had a terrible accident,
and has made me very unhappy. And poor
little Lily ! (Edie’s doll). Ah, why did we
ever bring them to the sea! But I must
tell you the whole story, for who ought to
think so much about them as all of you in
the nursery cupboard, who have been left
safe and happy (though, perhaps, rather
dull) at home.

Mrs. Mowbray, who called on mamma on
Wednesday, said that the young people of



AT THE BAR ROCKS. 33

the present day all thought that to be quiet
and to be unhappy meant the same thing,
and that dulness was the worst fault in
their eyes. Ermelinda, my dear, I hope
you don’t think that in the nursery closet.
I didn’t quite understand her; but then
she talked very slow, and mamma only
laughed a little bit, and said it was the
nature of the young to be stirring.

Mrs. Mowbray is very stout, Ermelinda.
It was the day before yesterday that papa
and mamma, and Arty, and Sissy, and Lucy
went to the Bar Rocks. Papa had pro-
mised to take them. They say it is a funny
place ; that you can land on it when it is
fine, and get a few strange shells and plants;
but it is very small (I mean the one you Can
land on), with steep cliffs, and rather dan-
gerous.

They went in the Wild Swan, Thomas
Hedge’s boat.

(455) Q
oO



34 LEFT BEHIND.

Nurse went too. Mamma had said she
should go some day, and I think she was
glad to take her there to help to look after
the children ; though I am sure Arty, and
Sissy, and Lucy are quite big enough to
take care of themselves.

But Nurse said she thought “ Missus
didn’t like going there over much ; it was
rather a dangerous kind of place.” I don’t
know, Dolly, but they all came back quite
safe at six o'clock. Lucy said it wasn’t a
very jolly place to go to.

I wanted to go, and it made me cry a
little at breakfast because I wasn’t let ; but
papa looked at me and said, “Mary.” And
then I knew it was no use. So [ left off.

It was dull being left with Sarah, and
Edie, and baby. I didn’t like it. Do you
think, Ermelinda, I am like one of “the
young ladies of the present day ”?

We didn’t bathe that morning. And Edie



OUT WITH THE DOLLIES. 35

and I said that, as the dollies had been
kept in so much lately, we thought that it
would be a good day to take them down on
the sands. And so I dressed Clorinda, and
Edie wrapped Lily in a little old neck-hand-
kerchief of Lucy’s for her shawl. And Sarah
said we would go off, the moment she had
“done” the nursery, as far as we could
along the shore, and then sit down and
play. She said we might take one of
our play-books, and our luncheon in our
pocket.

We got into such a nice place, Ermelinda,
under the rocks, far away from the bathing-
machines and all the people!

So then we said that we would hear the
children their lessons for a little while, and
then they should be bathed. There was a
delightful pool of water just there, close to
where we were sitting. After that, we
would all have our luncheon.



36 HEARING THE LESSONS.

So Edie had the book first, while I made
Clorinda count on her fingers. Lily was
quite good over her letters ; but then, you
know, Edie doesn’t know them, so she
couldn’t correct her, and she had to pre-
tend that they were all right.

That’s a capital plan.

Edie never will allow that Lily is naughty.
Clorinda is almost always.

She wasn’t over her counting, though
when she got to twenty-nine she couldn’t
tell what to say next, and I didn’t remem-
ber just then ; but I couldn’t punish her for
that, for you know she is very young to be
able to count to twenty-nine.

But when Edie gave me the book, and
I began to hear her her letters, she
wouldn't say them. She wouldn’t try
even to tell me the letter that came be-
tween P and R. I told her Q ever so
many times, but she wouldn’t say it after



CLORIND\'S OBSTINACY. 37

me. I boxed her ears, Ermelinda, but it
was no good.

Then Sarah said, “Take care, Miss Trots,
take care.” And she was so kind that she
offered to help dolly ; but I said, “No; it
was all her obstinacy.”

And Sarah said, “ But, Miss Trots, doesn’t
your mamma say sometimes that the best
way with an obstinate child is not to take
any notice of it?”

And I said, “That may be all very well
for some children, but not for Clorinda:
she is so very obstinate that I must take
notice of it, and punish it. And you know,
Sarah,” I said, “that if it is not obstinacy
it’s very great disobedience. Now, isn’t it,
Sarah ?”

And Sarah said it was; but “mightn’t
she help poor Clorinda this once?” So she
did; and when I asked her next, Sarah
helped her, and she did say Q. But then



38 PUNISHING DOLLY.

Sarah had to go and pick up baby, who'd
rolled over a little stone, and she wouldn’t
say it by herself; so then I said it was
no use trying to help her, and she must be
punished.

But Edie begged hard I wouldn’t whip
her. And so I said, “Very well, I
wouldn’t, as her Aunt Edith asked for her
so kindly ; but that I couldn’t bear to see
such a bad child, and so she should go and
sit behind a rock all by herself, where she’d
be out of my sight.” So I carried her there,
scolding her all the way, and telling her
if she only knew the pain it gave me when
she was naughty, shed try and behave
better.

Lucy says I like scolding my dolls.

Before long we thought it was time to
bathe them: we could use my handker-
chief for a towel, we thought ; so I fetched
Clorinda, and I told her she would have to



PLAYING AT BATHING. 39



go back afterwards,—that though she had
been so naughty, her health must be at-
tended to.

Then we began to undress them. Lily
is only a wooden doll, and she is a poor,
battered old thing. Sarah said she thought
it wouldn’t do her any harm to bathe her,
perhaps it might do her a little good ; but
she said it certainly wouldn’t do Clorinda,
good.

She was rather a pretty doll once, you
know, Ermelinda, with a wax face and
arms, and pretty pink cheeks. I loved her
dearly then; but she isn’t near so good
now.

Sissy says, if she’s grown naughty, she
is afraid it must be my fault, for not setting
her a good example ; but I don’t see how
that can be, for ’m always scolding and
punishing her.

Well, I told Sarah she didn’t know



40 ILLNESS OF CLORINDA.

anything about it, and that I should
certainly bathe her, however much she
screamed ; but when I came to undress her,
I found a great hole upon her back that
the bran came out of. So that made it
different, and so I said that she shouldn’t
bathe till I had taken her to the great
London doctor (that’s mamma, you know,
with her needle and thread), who would
soon put her to rights. “So, Clorinda,” I
said, when I had dressed her again, “you
will go back to your corner instead of bath-
ing.”

Then Sarah said, “Poor child, I think
she shouldn’t be punished when she’s so ill
as that.”

And I said, “Sarah! you would spoil
any children, teaching them to make such
excuses. Is a child to be naughty because
she is ill?” And I spoke very severely to
Clorinda, and took her back to her rock.



DIPPING LILY. 41

Then Edie asked me to dip Lily, because
she couldn’t reach.

So I did, and she screamed ever so loud
the first time. So I dipped her again,
and she screamed again. So I dipped her
a third time. (You know, Ermelinda, it
was only pretence.)

Then Edie said, “ Please, don’t, don't,
Trots, any more ; I can’t bear it.”

So I said, “ Of course I won't, if you don’t
wish it, Edie. You're her mamma; but
it’s the only way to make a child like bath-
ing; but you must punish her by-and-by.”

But Edie said she didn’t want to punish
her, Lily was always good with her, and
she took her and kissed her and cuddled
her up, and called her a “darling child.”
Edie is so foolishly fond of her dolly.

So I told her that she would quite
spoil her, and that instead of making her-
self so silly over the child, she’d much better



42 BREAD AND HUNGER SAUCE,

dry her and dress her before she got quite
cold.

So then we dried Lily on my pocket-
handkerchief, and dressed her. And then
I said, “Edie, she had better go and sit
beside Clorinda.”

“No,” said Edie ; “please, Trots, no.”

And I said, “Indeed, Edie, I am sur-
prised at you. If you don’t punish her to-
day, she will do just the same the next
time.” So then Edie let me take Lily and
put her behind the rock close beside Clor-
inda, and then I told them both that they
were not to speak a word to one another
all the time.

And then we had our luncheon. It was
a piece of bread ; but we were very hungry,
and it was very nice. Lucy used to laugh
and say we had capital luncheons on bread
and hunger sauce.

We hadn’t finished, and I had just asked



THE MOWBRAY BOYS. 43

whether we should keep a piece for the
dolls, and Edie had said, “Lily is quite
good now, and hungry,” when we heard a
shout, and somebody say, “ What a game,
Ned!” When we looked, there were two
boys who had hold of Clorinda and Lily,
laughing at them. They were two of those
Mowbray boys.

“ Put down our dollies,’ I said. ‘“ You’ve
no business to touch them.”

But Frank Mowbray said, “Who's to -
prevent us? Now then, Ned, we will have
agame. Have you got a bit of string?”

What did they mean to do to our dollies ?
They'd come down there to sail a great big
boat from the rocks. Why couldn’t they
leave us alone, and go and play by them-
selves ?

“Give me back my doll!” I said.

“Come, little one,” said Frank ; “ you are
the one they call Trots, ain’t you? And a



44 A PROPOSED SAIL.

very nice, sensible little Trots you are.
Now look here, we only want to have a bit
of fun with your dolls.”

But I said, “ Give me my doll ;” and Edie
began to cry, and baby too, and Sarah said,
“Put the dolls down, young gentlemen,
and leave my children alone.”

“Don’t be in such a hurry,” said Frank ;
and then he held Clorinda and Lily high
up—as high as he could reach—and then
he said, “ Now, Trots, listen to me. We
only want to put Clorinda and Lily on board
our boat; they'll enjoy it excessively, and
the sail will do them no end of good. Look
here ! we’ve a good thick string to our ship,
and we'll tie the dolls in ever so tight, so
that they can’t be lost or wetted, and then
we'll send them for a sail. Now, say Yes!”

Poor little Edie began to cry. “Please —
give me Lily—give Edie her doll.”

But I stood thinking.



THE “ WATER WITCH.” 45

“Trots,” he said, “it would be such fun
just to send them a little way, only a little
way; and you and Edie can see them all
the time ; and it’s such a fine ship, it’s called
the Water Witch. Now just say Yes.”

Then I said, “I think it would be great
fun! Edie, shall we?”

But Edie said, “ Lily will be drownded !”

“Oh no, Hdie,” said Frank, coaxingly,
“they won't be drowned. Look here ! it is
such a large ship; why, there would be
room for you or Trots. I say, Ned, shall
we send Edie to sea in the Water Witch ?”

But poor little Edie didn’t wait for Ned
to answer, she ran and hid herself behind
Sarah ; and Frank said, “ Well, Edie shan’t
go. May the dolls? Say Yes, Trots.”

And I did say Yes, Ermelinda, for I
thought it would be fun.

So first they tied Clorinda in very tight
to one mast, and there she sat, looking, oh!



46 THE DOLLIES ON BOARD.

so miserable, with the string round her in
the middle, and her poor head all hanging
down; and oh! my dear, I didn’t care,
though she did look unhappy. And then
they tied Lily all quite flat on the deck,
because they couldn’t make her sit even as
well as Clorinda ; for you see poor Lily was
very lame, for one of her legs had been
broken, and Arty had mended it with a
hammer and nail.

“ Now, see,” said Frank, “they can’t get
even their clothes wet; see how comfort-
able they look, Edie ;” and poor little Edie
was satisfied, and came running back to
watch them.

Then, while Frank held one end of the
string, Ned clambered out along the rocks
to put the Water Witch into deep water.

Ah, you don’t know how pretty she
looked! She had two masts, and lots of
sails, and she went so nice and upright (at



KNOCKED ABOUT. 47

first), and the dolls looked all right upon
her deck; and little Edie and I stood by
Frank’s side and helped to hold the string.

Then, after a little while, she began to
dance about a great deal, and a wave came
and almost knocked her on one side of her-
self, And Frank said, “I hope that Clor-
inda and Lily will not be sea-sick.” And
then she got up straight again; and then ~
came another wave and over she went, and
Edie squeezed my hand very tight and said,
“Oh!” And I asked Frank to make her
come back, but he didn’t answer me. Soa
great many times she got upright and got
knocked down again, but still I could see
Clorinda sitting against the mast with her
head lower and lower.

“They will get wet, I know, Frank,” I
said ; ‘do make them come back.” But I
couldn’t walk as fast as Frank was obliged
to walk now, for the waves were carrying



48 ON THE ROCKS,

the Water Witch further and _ further
away.
At last Ned shouted out, “ Pull her in !
pull her in, Frank! she’s going fast round
the rocks !”

But the sea was very rough there, and it
carried the boat on and on, so that Frank
could hardly keep up with it.

“Pull her in! pull her in! Gently,
Frank, she’s on the rocks !”

And Frank did pull, but she wouldn’t
move. There she was, stuck against a rock
so far out that neither Ned nor Frank could
get at her. It was quite deep all round.

“Try again, Frank ; a little to the left,”
shouted Ned.

And so Frank did try, first on one side,
and then on the other, but it was no use:
there she lay, till at last, giving a great
pull, the string came loose, and Frank
wound it allup; but the Water Witch didn’t



OUT TO SEA, 49

come with it. It had thumped itself away
from the string, and in one moment a great
wave came and carried the Water Witch
away from the rock, and all upright and
beautiful she sailed right, right away quite
into the sea.

And there we all stood watching her, and
never said one word.

At last Edie began to cry, and sobbed,
“T want my doll.”

“ Don’t bother,” said Frank ; “ who cares
for your scrubby old dolls? Come along,
Ned, we must get Larkins to go after her ;”
and both the boys ran away and left us
watching the Water Witch, with Clorinda
and Lily on board, sailing away to France.

We didn’t know what to do; we couldn’t
believe they were quite gone. We thought
(for she looked so beautiful and grand) that
very soon she would turn round, just as the
real ships do, and bring Clorinda and Lily

4

(455)



50 THE COASTGUARD MAN,

back to shore. So there we watched her
till she was quite a tiny speck.

Then Edie began to cry very much for
poor Lily, and just then old Allen (that’s
the coastguard man we all know) came by.

“Well, what’s the matter now?” he said ;
“can’t I help you?”

“Oh, go after them, man,” sobbed Edie.
“Please go !” |

“Who must I go after?”

“Lily and Clorinda,” I said. “Oh, Mr.
Allen, Mr. Allen! they're gone away to
France.”

“Oh the naughty hussies,” he said ; “ they
ought to be ashamed of themselves.”

“Tt wasn’t their fault,” I said, very angry
with him; “it was Ned and Frank.”

“Who made them go?” said stupid old
Allen. “Oh, oh!” and he shook his head.

I don’t know why he shook his head.
“Tt wasn’t their fault,” I kept saying to



“GONE FOR GOOD.” 51

him. And then Sarah told him all about it,
and how Ned and Frank had tied them on
the ship, and how the ship had got away,
and was sailing over to France ever so fast ;
and. how the boys had gone off, she thought,
to get Larkins to go after the Water
Witch.

And Allen said he was “afeard she was
gone for good, for Larkins was gone out
with a party.”

“And Dolly will never come back no
more,’ sobbed Edie.

“Don’t ’e ery, little one,” said Mr. Allen 3
and then he took his great long spy-glass,
that he can see ever and ever so far with, and
he looked through it, and he said, “ Ah,
I have her! Well, she is a gallant little
craft! How she scuds before the wind.”

“Are Lily and Clorinda all right?” I
asked.

“Ah, well, yes! I think so,” he said; and



52 THE CHILDREN’S GRIEF.

then he said quite low to himself, “It’s a
pity they can’t make all tight on deck in
this breeze, and stow away the passengers.
If I were skipper, I’d soon clear the decks,
and batten down the hatchways.”

“Do you think they're very wet?” said I.

“Tm afraid so, little one,” he said ; “and
rather sea-sick too.”

“Oh dear!” said Edie. And I said,
“Have they turned back, Mr. Allen?”

But he said they hadn’t ; and then Edie
and I began to get quite frightened, and we
both said, “ Won't they ever, Mr. Allen?”
And then he said, “If this breeze last,
they'll never stop till they get to France,
unless they go to the bottom.”

“To the bottom of the sea?” I asked in a
very low voice ; and then I began to cry,
and Edie cried too. Oh, why had I punished
Clorinda and Lily! And now they were all
by themselves in the middle of the sea.



LOST AT SEA. 53

And it made Mr. Allen unhappy when he
saw us crying.

“ Now don’t ’e, don’t ’e cry, dears!” he
said. “I can’t abear it, and all for a doll!
Why, I lost a little lad at sea once. Come,
dry up your tears; who knows, perhaps the
dollies will get safely over to France, and
some little, kind French child will find them
and take them home, and cuddle them up,
and love them! There, there, stop crying,
and let me carry you home.”

So then he took Edie up on one strong
arm, and carried her as if she’d been a dolly
herself. But I had forgotten all about
Clorinda, and I stole round to the other
side, and I put my hand into his and stroked
it, and said, “ Poor Mr. Allen, tell us about
your boy.” And that made us all cry,
Sarah and all; but I shan’t tell you, Erme-
linda. ,

Mamma says that perhaps when the next



54 TWO DAYS LATER.

parcel comes from home, she will send for
you and for Edie’s baby that her god-
mamma sent her. No more has been heard
of the Water Witch, and mamma was very
sorry about our poor dollies; and Arty
wrote on a bit of paper, and said he should
have it put in the 7%mes,—* Lost at sea, the
schooner Water Witch, with all hands on
board.” Oh, my dear, ain’t you glad that
youre coming? But I’m not sure yet.

Two days later.—Youre not coming,
Ermelinda. Edie does not want her baby ;
and if you ave dull, I think that you are
safer and better where you are. What do
you think happened last night? We older
ones went along the shore with papa and
mamma. We hadn't been on the beach
all that morning, for there had been quite
a cold wind blowing, which brought the
spray up quite far, and blew the sand up,



A GREAT SURPRISE. 55

so that it came into our eyes if we walked
anywhere near the sea, so mamma sent us
into the lanes ; but in the evening the wind
lulled, and papa said it would be very plea-
sant, and that perhaps we should find some
good shells and sea-weed washed up. And
so we did, and stones, and bits of wood ;
and I found a nut, that papa said had come
from some foreign country.

And while we were hunting about,
Arthur suddenly gave a great shout, and
called out, “Papa, Trots, all of you, look
here !”

And what do you think it was? It was
the wreck of the Water Witch. The sea had
washed her up on the beach again ; but ali
her pretty masts and sails were gone, only
a few of them matted together with sea-
weed, and stones, and sand. Arty said he
shouldn’t have known what it was, but for
a little bit of Clorinda’s red petticoat that



56 A SAD SIGHT.

stuck out of it all; for, could you believe it,
when the ropes, and the masts, and the sea-
weed were cleared away, there were the
two dolls still fastened on the deck ; only,
Ermelinda, poor Lily had no arms or legs,
only a body, and nothing of her face but
her nose, and all the paint gone. And they
wanted to leave her on the shore, only I
said that I knew quite, quite well that
Edie would rather have her like that than
not have her at all.

' But when they had unfastened Clorinda,
oh dear! I couldn’t bear to see her. She'd
all been washed out of that hole, so that
there was nothing left but her skin ; and all
the colour was gone, and her two eyes were
gone, only the holes left, Ermelinda. And
her hair was gone, and there was an oyster
shell fastened tight on her shoulder. And
I had to try not to cry. So papa said that
he thought we had much better dig a large



NEWS FOR EDIE. 57

hole in the sand and put Clorinda in ; and
we did. Wasn't that a sad end for Clo-
rinda ?

Papa said he was very pleased that we’d
found the Water Witch, and that her hull
was not at all damaged ; a little fresh paint
and fresh rigging would put her to rights.
I’m glad too, though I don’t think that
Frank and Ned deserve it; only Nurse says,
if we only got our deserts that we should
be badly off. I wonder what she means!

Little Edie was in bed when I ran up-
stairs calling out, “Edie, Edie, you can’t
guess what I’ve got!” But she knew Lily
directly, though she’d only got her nose ;
and she didn’t say one word, but she gave
a great cry, and then she cuddled her up
in her little arms ; and all the time I was
undressing I heard her saying softly, “ Poor
Lily! poor, poor! Did the ’ittle French
child love ’ou! Hush, Lily! hush, hush.”



58 GOOD-BYE.

And very soon she hushed herself to sleep.
But the first thing I heard in the morning
was Edie kissing her doll. I think she
loves her much better now than when she
was new.

This has been a sad letter for you, Erme-
linda. Good-bye, my dear.

Your loving little mistress,
TRots.









Il.

“MIDSHIPMAN LUCY.”




TY Dearest ERMELInDA,—Sissy has
* been away for the last two or three
“days staying with that kind Miss
Staines at Nettleton—the same that
sent you to me, my dear. It is so near this
place that mamma, did not like to say No,
and yet they did not like to spare her (I
heard them say so at breakfast); and I’m
sure that we don’t, for it isn’t half so nice
when Sissy is away. She is so kind, and
always ready to help us little ones. Lucy
is rather rough, and thinks us in the way ;
and though it’s great fun to play with Lucy
sometimes, yet I very often get into scrapes



60 WHAT LUCY WISHED.

with Lucy, while Sissy always seems to
keep us all good, as if it had been mamma.

You see Lucy doesn’t like girls, and is
always saying that she wishes she’d been a
boy. And now, Ermelinda, as I know you
won't laugh, I'll just tell you how the other
day she had her wish, and was a boy for a
little while.

I wonder whether it is quite right to
want to be a boy as much as Lucy does.
She says they are braver and stronger than
girls, and can play at cricket all their lives,
while she can’t even now without Miss Jones
telling her that she’s unladylike and a tom-
boy. Then she says she wishes she were a
boy. Is that right, Ermelinda’? ' wish T ~
knew. Arty says, “Of course it isn’t, for it’s
humbug to wish for what isn’t possible.”
Little Edie went and asked papa if he
wouldn’t have Lucy christened into a boy ;
but he only laughed, and said he could not



AN INVITATION. 61

spare one of his little daughters, they'd be
useful some day ; and mamma said she only
wanted her Lucy to be christened into a
gentle, modest little girl, contented in that
station of life to which God had called her.
Sissy said that in the Catechism last Sun-
day, so if it’s there it can’t be right of Lucy
to wish anything different. Can it? Well,
now, I'll begin my story.

Last Thursday morning, the day after
Sissy went, there came a letter to ask if
papa and mamma would bring three of us
to see Mr. and Mrs. Selby at Nethercotes
that very same day. They said that they
had only got two children, boys of seven and
nine, and that they would be charmed
with some young companions ; and that we
could stay and play in the garden while
papa and mamma and Mr. and Mrs. Selby
went off to see Captain Seaford, their old
friend and Lucy’s godpapa, whose ship was



62 AT NETHERCOTES.

lying for two or three days just off High-
ness. Sissy being away, Lucy and Arty
and I were the three to go, and we set off
at eleven o'clock by the train. Lucy tried
hard to persuade papa to take her on board
the ship with them. She said she did so
want to see a man-of-war; but papa said
No, and wasn’t pleased with Lucy for
going on asking so many times.

When we got to Mr. Selby’s house, about
twelve o’clock, we found them all outside
waiting for us. And after we'd had some
wine and strawberries in the house, we
children were sent out into the garden to
play at croquet, or anything we liked, till it
was time for the early dinner. Lucy and
James Selby played against Arty and
Hdward, and a capital game they had ;
while I sat and watched them, and made a
very long daisy chain.

Lucy got praised for her playing, and



JAMES AND LUCY. 63

_ James Selby said she played just like a boy,
—much better than any girl he had ever
played with ; she never changed the direc-
tion of her ball, and took such a straight
aim. “TI say, you'd be a stunning hand at
cricket, Lucy,” he said.

I can tell you, Ermelinda, that Lucy was
pleased ; and she and James kept talking
together, and he took her to see his pony
and his rabbits, and all his things

I found it very dull, Dolly, after Lucy was. -
gone away with James, for Arty and Edward
began another game together, and took no
notice of me ; so after a little while I crept
away and looked for mamma, and stood by
her side in the drawing-room, while she was
talking to Mrs. Selby.

“Your Lucy and my boy James seeru
great friends,” Mrs. Selby was saying. “I
often wish they had a sister,—it is a very
good thing for them.”



64 ON THE BEACH, —

Well, at one o’clock came the early dinner,
and I sat next mamma, Dolly, and was very
happy; but soon afterwards papa and mam-
ma went away with Mr. and Mrs. Selby in
a boat to see their old friend, Captain Sea-
ford, in his ship the Prince of Wales.

We children went down to the beach to
see them off, and I heard Lucy saying
several times to James, “I wish we were
going too. Wouldn’t it be fun if Captain
Seaford would send for us by-and-by?”
Mr. and Mrs. Selby had said that we could
stay and play on the beach if we liked, and
would take care not to get into any mischief.
And we all liked playing there much better
than going back to the garden

It wasn’t like the beach at Tormouth at
all, but very rocky and pebbly, with large
slippery stones all about that had rolled
down from the cliff, and got covered with
sea-weed ; and the stones ran far out into



HARE AND ILSUNDS, 65

the sea, even now when it was low-water ;
and there were great pools of water amongst
them full of sea-weed and sea-anemones.
We thought it much jollier than Tormouth.

Mr. Selby’s old gardener had come down
with us, and after a little while I got
frightened at following Lucy about the
slippery stones, so she brought me back to
where he was sitting smoking his pipe, and
showed me how I could make little boats
of bits of wood that were lying about, and
sail them in a pool of water. I was very
happy there, but every now and then I
looked up to see what the others were
doing. They were playing at hare and
hounds, and seemed to be having capital
fun jumping from one large stone to another,
and laughing whenever anybody tumbled
down on the slippery sea-weed.

Lucy was a capital runner, and had on
thinner boots than the boys, so that her

(455) 5



66 LUCY IN TROUBLE.

feet could keep better hold of the rocks,
and so she very often caught the others
and was hare; and then she took such
jumps, and went so far out on the rocks,
that the old gardener kept calling to her,
“Take care, missy ; come back.” But Lucy
hardly listened to him.

At last, when she was being chased, and
I think beginning to get a little tired, and
when Arty and James were very nearly up
to her, she took a long jump off one great
stone on to another that was covered with
sea-weed, and her feet slipped, and in one
minute down she was head over heels into a
pool of water. She came up in one moment,
looking so white, Dolly—for the water
seemed to have taken the colour out of her
cheeks, just as it did out of Clorinda’s—and
spluttering and dripping—oh! so wet !—
her frock and her cape—yes, even her Sun-
day hat—quite wet.



WHAT THE NURSE SAID. 67

But she didn’t seem to mind it much—for
indeed she is very brave—and she was up
before either of the boys or old Sparkes
could get to her, and wanted to go on with
the game; but he wouldn't hear of that, and
insisted upon her going up to the house to
have her clothes dried.

He called the old servant, who had been
the boys’ nurse when they were little.
“Goodness gracious !” she said, “why, the
young lady is inamess! Oh, you naughty
children, how did it happen? Why, she'll
catch her death of cold.”

And then Lucy said it didn’t matter, salt-
water never gave anybody cold.

But nurse said she must take off all her
things, and have them dried and ironed
before she’d be fit to be seen ; and that she
must go to bed meanwhile, which was much
the best place for her, looking so white as
she did.



68 THE HOUSEMAID’S PLAN,

But Lucy begged hard not to be sent to
bed, and the boys said it was a great shame
to spoil their treat, for they should have no
fun without her ; and so at last the house-
maid, who was very kind, said to the old
nurse, “ Why shouldn’t the young lady put
on Master Edward’s Sunday clothes? I
think they'd fit her; and I don’t believe
missus would make any objection.”

Nurse couldn’t quite make up her mind,
but they all begged and prayed that she
would, and said that they should be very
quiet when they went out again, and not
go jumping about any more. And so first
of all she went and got a glass of wine and
made it warm over the fire, and put some
water and sugar to it, for Lucy to drink, lest
she should catch cold ; and though Lucy had
hardly ever tasted wine before, she drank
this all off now, and said it was very good.

Then nurse put on her Edward’s suit of



LUCY IN A STRANGE DRESS. 69

black velvet jacket and knickerbockers, and
let her have his Scotch cap with a jay’s
feather in it. And, Ermelinda, she did look
like the prettiest boy you ever did see; for,
you know, she was ill in the winter, and
her short brown hair was curling all over
her head ; and she looked so pleased, and the
wine, I suppose, had brought such a pretty
colour into her cheeks.

I was almost sorry myself that she wasn’t
a boy, only I don’t think mamma would
have bought her a velvet suit. James said
she looked stunning; but Edward said she’d
much better have stayed in bed, and that
she was a jay in peacock’s plumes. I don’t
think he liked her wearing his clothes; and
I think he was very unkind to say that,
though I don’t know what he meant; and
Arty said if she was anything, she was a
peacock in jay’s feathers.

So when she was dressed, nurse said we



70 BOY OR GIRL ?

were to stay in the garden; but they none
of them liked that at all, and promised that
they would be very quiet and not run about
on the rocks any more, if only they might
go back to the beach.

So at last nurse consented, making Lucy
promise not to do anything to hurt Edward’s
clothes, and telling old Sparkes he was not
to let us out of his sight for a moment.

At first it was quite fun enough for them
all laughing at Lucy, and saying she made
a capital boy, and seeing whether she could
double up her fist like a boy; and James
praised her because she didn’t stick out her
thumb like a girl (as he said). And then
they began to try which could hop and
jump the furthest, till Edward said she
shouldn’t behave like a tomboy in his
clothes ; and then they began quarrelling.
And, O Ermelinda, then I got frightened, for
Lucy wasn't like herself, and was so cross, and



A BAD, RUDE BOY. 71

she was the colour of a rose, and old Sparkes
said that the wine had got into her head.

But it was much worse when another
boy came whose name was Tom Weston ;
and he quite thought Lucy was a boy, and
began chaffing her for being so grand in her
velvet, and asked her where she went to
school, and who taught her. And when
she said “ Mother,” he laughed at her for
being tied to her “mammy’s” apron-strings.
He was a very bad, rude boy, Ermelinda ;
I know he was. Then he asked her how
far she’d got in Latin, and she was obliged
to say she didn’t do Latin at all.

And then Arty said, “ You'd better just
tell him, Lucius, that you know—

Hic, haec, hoc,

Lay him on the block ;
Hujus, huic,

Prepare for the strike.

And that if he doesn’t look out, he had
better prepare for one too.”



72 MORE TROUBLE FOR LUCY.

“Oh, I’m quite prepared,” said Tom. “TI
don’t think Master Lucius’ hands look as
if he were so good at fighting as at Latin
grammar.” And then he seized hold of
Lucy’s little white hand, and gave it sucha
squeeze that it made her call out; and he
said, “There’s a jolly hand for a boy!”

Just then Edward came up behind Lucy
and whispered, “Don’t you make a good
boy, and no mistake?” And Lucy looked so
angry that I ran up to her and said, “Do
come away, Lucy.” But that only made
her more angry, and she told me not to
interfere, and she gave me a push (it was
quite a gentle one, Ermelinda) which made
me stumble up against a rock ; and in one
moment that great stranger boy Tom gave
her a blow on the face, and said, “ You’d
best bully the little one, you coward !”
And, O Dolly! the blood came spurting out
of Lucy’s nose.



“MISS LUCIUS.” 738

Then I (Trots) pushed at him and kicked
him as hard as I could, and I said, “You
shan’t hit our Lucy! Oh Lucy! Lucy!”
And poor Lucy sat down on the ground,
and I put my arms round her that he
shouldn’t hurt her ; while Sparkes put Arty
on one side—who wanted to fight Tom—
and then took the naughty boy by the
shoulders and told him to go away at once,
or he’d give him a thrashing.

But as he went away, he called out, “A
nice boy you are! Much more like a girl!
Good-bye, Miss Lucius.”

And that cross Edward came up and
whispered again, “ Don’t we make a capital
boy ?”

But kind James and Arty filled their
pocket-handkerchiefs with water, and held
them to poor Lucy’s face, and managed to
get the stains pretty well off Hdward’s
velvet clothes.



74 A BOAT FROM THE MAN-OF-WAR.

While all this was going on, we hadn't
noticed that a boat had come round the
rocks rowed by four men in blue shirts and
white trousers, with black silk ties round
their throats, quite loose, and ribbons on
their hats, on which was written in letters
like a book, Prince of Wales.

I told you, Ermelinda, that our papa and
mamma, with Mr. and Mrs. Selby, had gone
to see Captain Seaford on board his ship.
Perhaps they had told him how anxious
Lucy and the rest had been to see a man-
of-war. And wasn’t it kind of him !—he
had sent a boat to fetch us all on board.

There was a nice old man come for us,
who was something like old Sparkes, but
dressed like that doll Lucy had brought her
from the bazaar, that Arty calls “ Boat-
swain;” and he came up to us and said that
we were all to come with him on board
ship.



WHAT IT HAD COME FOR, 75

Then Lucy said at once, “Oh, I can’t go !
Please, I can’t go !”

But the old gentleman said, “I am under
orders, young gentleman; the Cap’n he
says to me, ‘Jones, fetch my godchild, and
all of them.’ ”

“That’s you,” said Ito Lucy, “andso you
must come.”

Then poor Lucy didn’t say another word ;
and indeed she hadn’t time, for the old
gentleman took me up in his arms, and
took Lucy by the hand, and he says to old
Sparkes, “ Please to tell them at the house
that they are not coming home to dinner,
and that I’ve taken the young ones on
board.”

Then he lifted me into the boat very
gently, and says he, “We must take great
care of you, little miss, amongst all of us
men and boys.” And when he lifted Lucy
in, he touched his hat with a little smile,



76 IN SIGHT OF THE SHIP.

and said, “ Beg pardon, young gentleman,
but you looks a delicate little chap. As
youre the Cap’n’s godson, perhaps some
day we'll get better acquainted, for I
always sails with him.”

I hardly think Lucy heard him, for she
sat very still and white, squeezing my hand
all the time.

It wasn’t long, Dolly, before we saw the
ship, which was lying just round the “ Ness.”
And I was frightened, Dolly, when we got
alongside ; for the ship looked so very, very
high, and the water all round her looked
so black and deep. And there were
several funny windows and holes in her
side, and out of one there was a boy look-
ing, with gold about him, not so very much
bigger than James, who called out, “I say,
old Touch, you’ve done it nicely! You've
brought the wrong lot! There were to be
two little girls.”



A FUNNY PLACE. 7

But our old gentleman didn’t answer
him; and in another minute I was standing
with Lucy’s hand clasped ever so tight in
mine, and I heard him say to her, “I ex-
pect, young gentleman, you'll learn some
day to come over a ship’s side in rather
a different fashion.”

I think he was a stupid old man, not to
know that Lucy was a girl.

Well, Dolly, I had hardly time to look
round at the funny place I was in—very
large; but oh, not near so high even as
Betsy’s attic, and where there seemed a
constant buzz of people coming, and going,
and talking—before the old gentleman had
led us up to a door where a soldier was
standing, and then in a moment we were
all in a funny room full of people.

But I didn’t feel frightened any more; for
at the other end, though there were such
lots of gentlemen, I could see one dear face,



78 “WHICH IS MY GODCHILD?”

and that was mamma’s. And so in one
moment I had slipped my hand out of the
old gentleman’s, and had run up safe under
her arm; while poor Lucy had done the
same, but she didn’t come in front, only
cowered down frightened behind mamma’s
chair.

And then the old gentleman touched his
forehead, and said, “ Please, sir, ?ve brought
the young people.” And, Dolly, everybody
stopped talking.

“Bring them up here, J ones,” said the
captain, in a loud, clear voice. “ Which is
my godchild ?”

So then old Mr. Jones picked up poor
trembling Lucy from behind mamma’s
chair, and stood her close up to the captain,
where everybody could see her. And after
a moment the captain spoke,—

“Why, Mrs. Fenton, how’s this? I
thought my godchild was a girl, and, lo,



TROTS EXPLANATION. 79

he’s a boy! We'll make a middy of
him.”

And mamma got very red, Dolly, and
she said,—

“Oh, Captain Seaford, I am ashamed !
She zs a little girl !”

And the captain said,—

“You ought to know best, madam.”

What a stupid man he was! And then,
Ermelinda, I (Trots) jumped up and tried
to pull her hands from her face, where she
kept them tight ; and I said,—

“She is a little girl, She’s our Lucy.
But she tumbled in the water, and they
put Edward’s Sunday clothes on her. A
bad boy hit her, and made her nose bleed ;
and she didn’t want to come, and old Mr.
Jones would make her,—and everybody’s
unkind.

“ Hush, Trots,”’ said mamma.

And then how Captain Seaford laughed,



80 MIDSHIPMAN LUCY.

and everybody laughed too; and he got
hold of Lucy’s hands and held them tight,
though I tried to pull them away from him
very hard.

“Tl let her go in a minute, Trots,” he
said, “if she really is a girl; but I don’t
think that’s true, so you'll all of you please to
drink the health of my new godson, ‘ Mid-
shipman Lucy.’ Here, Jones, I think you
must drink that health;” and he filled a
glass of wine for Mr. Jones,

O Dolly, I thought him so unkind! And
then they all drank Lucy’s health, and
nodded to her; but she couldn’t see them
as I did, for she hung her head down
quite low, and her eyes were quite full of
tears.

So then he did let go her hand, and poor
Lucy flew by and crouched down close to
mamma, and hid her face in mamma’s
dress. And then, Dolly, dear mamma put



THE WONDERS OF THE BIG SHIP. 81

a shawl that she had with her right over
Lucy’s velvet clothes, and let her lie hiding
there. And oh, I was so glad when they
all began to talk of something else.

So then I sat between the captain and
mamma. And we had for dessert straw-
berries and cream, and cake, and some
sweet things that he’d brought from the
West Indies. And when he’d finished, he
said,—

“ Now, Trots, shouldn’t you like to go and
see the ship, the big guns, and the funny
beds that the men sleep in, and the cow
and its calf?”

“ Are they in a field?” I said.

And he laughed, and said I should see
the farm-yard.

O Dolly, what lots of things I shall have
to tell you when I get home!

Then he said, ‘““Where’s my godson?” But

' when he went to lift Lucy up, there she
(455) 6



82 NEXT MORNING.

was, fast, fast asleep, keeping tight hold of
mamma’s gown.

“ Poor little child,” he said, as he put her
into papa’s arms. “ Here, don’t wake her,
Fenton ; lay her down on my bed in here,
and let her have her sleep out. After all,
Trots, I do believe that she’s a girl.”

So we went round the ship; and Lucy
slept on, and hardly opened her eyes even
when her godpapa carried her to the boat
in his own arms, and the men rowed us
back in the pretty bright moonlight to the
beach. Then we started for home directly,
and didn’t get back till past eleven.

But the next morning I was woke by
Lucy coming into my bed, and covering
me with kisses, and saying, “O Trots, I was
cross to you yesterday ; please forgive me,
but I was so miserable! Oh, I don’t want
to be a boy! Please tell me all about it.
Did I knock you down, Trots?”



ANOTHER LETTER ENDED. 83

“No, no, Lucy,” I said; and then I had
to tell her all, for she had nearly forgotten
everything except how unhappy she’d been.
“What a black mark that is on your hand,
Lucy,” I said ; “that was where that bad
boy squeezed you.”

But, Ermelinda, this letter is so long, that
I’m sure you'll never read it. So good-bye
for the present.

Your loving little mistress,

Trots.









IV.




coming back to-day, and we are all
, : going to the station, by-and-by, to
ee meet her; so, meanwhile, I shall
write a letter to you.

I am sitting by my dear mamma while she
is working, so that sometimes I can ask her
about my letter. One day I wanted her to
read it all; but she laughed, and said,“ Why,
dear Trots, it is only a scribble, and I’m not
clever enough to read that.” But yow are,
Dolly ; you can read my writing every bit
as well as the best, and I can write so much
faster this way than if I spelt every word.



THE RESULT OF DISOBEDIENCE, 85

We are very glad that Sissy is coming
back, though Lucy is so dear and kind, and
we all love her so much.

Since I wrote to you last, Dolly, we have
had a great trouble and a great fright ; and
it didn’t make it any better that it came
from our own disobedience: for though
Lucy says I had nothing at all to do with
it, yet still I think I had; and, besides,
what happens to one seems to belong to
us all, and that we are good or naughty
together.

Ah, Ermelinda, you are only a doll, so
you can’t be naughty, which is a good
thing for you! But then you can’t know
either what it is to love our papa and
mamma as we do, and to feel that they
have forgiven us, and will trust us again.

It was only yesterday morning, Dolly,
before all this had happened. Nurse had
been dressing us rather quickly, for she



86 A LETTER FROM CAPTAIN SEAFORD.

was going to spend the day with her old
father and mother, who live not far from
here. Mamma had given her leave, and
she had written to say that she was coming.
“Won't father and mother be looking out
for me!” she had said two or three times
during the morning. :

But when we came down to breakfast (I
have my breakfast down-stairs, not with
Edie and baby in the nursery), papa and
mamma were talking over a letter that
they had just received. It was from Cap-
tain Seaford, proposing that they should
come on board the Prince of Wales to lun-
cheon, and then go with him into the dock-
yard to see a great ironclad launched.

Mamma was saying that she thought, as
Nurse was going out for the day, she must
stay at home ; for there were too many of
us to be left with Sarah only, especially as
Sissy was away.



NURSE’S PROPOSAL. 87

Nurse came in just as mamma was say-
ing this. You know she has lived with
papa and mamma ever since Sissy was a
tiny baby, so they always tell her all about
things; and when she heard what it
was about, she said, “Oh dear, what a
pity! I could have gone just as well any
other day, if I hadn’t written to mother ;
but she would be frightened now if I
don’t go! What a pity, ma/am, you
should miss seeing the big ship! And
master, too, he won’t enjoy himself half
as much if you don’t go! Oh, it is a
pity !”

After a minute, she said, “Now, don’t
you think, ma’am, if I were just to take
dear baby along with me, that Sarah could
be left with the others? My father and
mother would be pleased to see the dar-
ling, and the rest ain’t much trouble when
they’re good. I’m sure they’ll do their best



88 MAMMA’S ADVICE.

so that you may go, ma'am. Now, you
wouldn't be afraid ?”

And we all said in a chorus, that we'd
be very, very, very good ; but mamma must
go.

So the end of it was that mamma said .
she would go, and that she would trust us
to be quite good and obedient to Sarah,
and not to quarrel amongst ourselves.

And we promised we would be good, and
then she said she would go quite happily,
and not feel uneasy about us at all. And
then she said, “ What I should advise
would be, that you all stay quietly in the
garden or on the beach till tea-time, which
can be quite early, and then you can go for
a good walk, and take a basket with some
buns and cherries, and eat them before you
come home. That will be a kind of picnic.”

We all thought this a capital arrange-
ment,—and we talked a good deal about



OUR PLANS FIXED. 89

going to Berryman’s Bay, which was a very
favourite place ; but afterwards we settled
among ourselves that we would go to Fair-
light Beach, and look for shells. You get
lots of small ones there, and we wanted
some for Sissy, who was coming home the
next day ; and, besides, we couldn’t go any
further, because Edie’s perambulator had
been left at home.

We asked papa when high-water would
be, and he said, “Oh, not till twelve
o’clock,”—when he hoped we should be all
safe in our beds ; and that it would be very
low water just at six o'clock. So we
thought that would do capitally, and made
up our minds to get a good supply. So
at ten o'clock Nurse set off with baby,
begging Sarah to be very careful, and to be
back by eight o’clock, as that would be
quite time for Miss Edie to be in bed. Then
at eleven o'clock we went to bathe as usual,



90 AN AFTERNOON IN THE GARDEN.

and at twelve o’clock papa and mamma
went away by the train, and Edie went to
bed for an hour, and I (Trots) lay down too,
for it was very warm.

Then we had such a nice afternoon in the
garden, with Sarah working, and all of us
polishing stones, and talking about the
things we should have to take home with
us, and about the little shells we were going
to get for Sissy. Lucy was very kind, and
let me help her. There wasn’t one word of
quarrelling, for whenever Lucy was at all
cross, Arty would say, “ Remember our
promise, Lucy,” and Lucy the same to him.
Only once, when Arty would have the
snake-stone before Lucy had done with it,
and said it wasn’t fair of her keeping it
so long, and she said, “ Remember, Arty,”
he declared that she only said so that she
might keep it, and “that some promises
were like pie-crust, made to be broken.”



SHIPWRECK BAY. 91

But when Sarah said, “ For shame, Master
Arthur,” and I said, “ Not to our papa and
mamma,” do you know, Ermelinda, he was
good and kind directly! Only Lucy had
given him the snake-stone first.

“Why is it, Arty,” she said by-and-by,
“that papa won't let us go further by our-
selves than Fairlight Beach? I like Ship-
wreck Bay so much, it’s prettier than Fair-
light ; and, do you know, when papa took
us in the other day, there were such pretty
shells there! Why won't he let us go al-
ways?”

“Oh, because at high-water you can’t get
out.”

“But you could climb up the cliffs
then.”

“No, you couldn’t ; there isn’t one place
in the whole bay.”

“ And why is it called Shipwreck Bay?”

“Because once on a time a great big East



92 TEA AND SHRIMPS.

Indiaman went ashore there, and almost
every one was lost !”

“ Were they all drowned ?” said I (Trots).

“ All drownded ?” said little Edie.

“ Almost all,” said Arthur; “but you
needn’t look so melancholy about it,—that
was twenty years ago.”

Well, we had our tea, Ermelinda, at four
o'clock. Wasn’t that fun to have it so
early? But Sarah said we might if we
liked, and then we should be ready to start
all the sooner. And we had shrimps for
tea.

So we started at five o’clock, and Sarah
carried Edie till we got out of the town,
-while Arty carried the basket; and then in
the lanes Sarah put Edie down, and took
the basket herself.

We had gone that way because Sarah
said it would be nice and cool while the
sun was high, and that we should come



ON THE WAY. 93

back by the shore. And it was very plea-
sant; and we went slowly, and Arty and
Lucy got all sorts of flowers, and stuck
them into Edie’s hat and mine, and they
made Sarah put some in her bonnet.

Then we gathered a great bunch of honey-
suckle, and vetch, and roses, and all sorts
of things. And Sarah said it was almost a
pity, for the poor things would die before
we got them home; but Lucy said she
would keep them fresh till we were ready
to start, by putting them in a pool of water
among the rocks.

Then Arty said she was a muff, to think
of keeping her flowers alive in sea-water.

But Lucy said that she had once seen
mamma put a pinch of salt into the water
when she was doing the flowers; and she
wasn’t a muff at all. And her voice sounded
a little cross.

Then Edie looked very grave, and said,



94 AT FAIRLIGHT BEACH.

“Remember ;” and just at that moment
we met all the little Mowbrays going home
very orderly to tea.

We don’t much like the little Mowbrays ;
and they stopped and laughed at us, and
said we looked like a lot of gipsies. Which
was rather rude.

When we got down upon Fairlight Beach,
the sea looked very, very far off, as if it
never could come back at all. And Arty
said it was the lowest tide that we should
have while we were at Tormouth. So it
was a lucky day to have come shell-hunting.

But he didn’t understand what had be-
come of Shipwreck Bay, for it didn’t look
like a bay at all; and it was a minute or
two before we could make it out. There
was a big rock which we thought the bound-
ary of the bay on our side, and called the
Crocodile’s Head, because of its funny shape ;
or sometimes (when we were playing at



THE CROCODILE’S HEAD. 95

“desert islands,” as we often did) Danger
Rock. This big rock, I say, which gener-
ally had the water coming close up to it,
was now quite far away.

“Tf you hadn’t known better,” Arty said,
“you wouldn’t have said there was a bay
at all.” In fact, he didn’t know where Ship-
wreck Bay began.

But Sarah said we knew very well that
we were not allowed to go beyond the Cro-
codile’s Head, and that was enough for us.

Then Arty said it was absurd not to
go a little further, when the sea was miles
away, and that Sarah liked being tyrannical
when she had a chance.

That wasn’t fair of Arty, was it?

But Sarah said she didn’t want to be
tyrannical. Only she knew master’s orders,
let the sea be where it might.

And Lucy said cheerfully, “Come along,
and don’t lose any more time.”



96 HUNTING FOR SHELLS.

You must know that here and there round
the big stones that lie on the sand on Fair-
light Beach, there are hundreds and hun-
dreds of tiny shells, washed up by the tide,
that have lodged safely against them, and
so not been swept away again by the water.
And now we each of us knelt down by a
big stone, and began hunting up the tiny
shells, and securing them in a corner of our
pocket-handkerchiefs. We found some
great treasures, and went on hunting for a
long, long time. Presently Arty got tired,
and got up, and said, “ Shouldn’t we have
our buns?” And Sarah said, “Oh yes.
It will soon be time to go home again, so
we'd best.”

We were a long time eating our buns
and cherries; and after. that Sarah said
she thought it must be past seven o’clock,
and so in a very few minutes it would be
time to go home.



PAST DANGER POINT. 97

Then Arty said he wanted to get a few
more of those tiny thin pink shells for Sissy,
who was making a box covered with them;
and he would just go ever such a little way
towards Shipwreck Bay,—not further than
the Crocodile’s Head, because he found the
most that way.

So Sarah said, “Don’t go far, Master
Arthur ;” and off he ran. He groped about
among the rocks for a little while with his
face towards Shipwreck Bay, till he had got
past Danger Point, and then he began to
pick up shells here and there along the
sand. So he called out, “ Lucy, Lucy! do
come,—there are such beauties!” And
Sarah called to him several times, “ Come
back, Master Arthur ;” and he kept saying,
“T’m coming in one minute. Lucy, Lucy!”
But Lucy wouldn't go.

And still he went on and on, picking up

shells every now and then, till he had got
(455) 7



98 SARAH’S ALARM,

quite far from us, and Sarah could hardly
make him hear.

“Oh, Miss Lucy,” she said, “ the tide is
coming in; do run after him and tell him
to come back.”

And Lucy just said, “Had I better,
Sarah?” But she wanted to go, and so off
she ran.

She soon came up to him, and we saw
her pull him by the sleeve, and try to make
him come back ; but he opened his hand-:
kerchief, and showed her some quite new
shells he had found, and said (so he told
us afterwards), “Let us get just one or
two first, Lucy ;-I won't go back without
one or two more.” And she began to help
him to look; and on and on they went,
with their faces turned away from home.
They didn’t know how fast the minutes
went by. But poor Sarah kept saying,
“Oh dear! oh dear! Master Arthur !



TROTS AND EDIE. 99

Miss Lucy!” But they seemed not to
hear her voice.

At last she said, “ Miss Trots, just you
take Miss HEdie’s hand, and stand _ here.
Don’t move a bit till I come back, and
I will run very quickly and fetch them.
There’s nothing to be frightened at, dear.
You will see me all the way, and I will be
back directly.”

And I said, “Oh, we shan’t be frightened.
Edie won't be frightened to stay with
Trots.”

And darling Edie said,’ “Trot’s quite
big girl. Edie stay with her.”

So away ran Sarah, and we stood look-
ing after her, hand in hand. It seemed such
a long time while Sarah was running after
them over the heavy sand, and they keep-
ing on and on all the time without once
looking back.

Poor little Edie clung very tight to me,



100 “SARAH, ITS COMING.”

and kept looking at the waves, which were
coming back very fast now; and she kept
saying, “Oh, the water, Trots! Oh, it’s
coming, it’s coming.” And, Ermelinda,
indeed, I didn’t get frightened. But when
she began calling, “Sarah, Sarah! it’s
coming,” I couldn’t help calling too, as loud
as I could, “ Sarah, it’s coming.” |

And in a minute she said, “ Let’s run,
Trots! Run.” And she set off, pulling at
my hand all the time ; and so I didn’t stop
her, as I ought; but I ran too. We ran
after Sarah into Shipwreck Bay.

And Sarah looked back and saw us run-
ning, and she stopped and turned back, and
ran towards us. And then she stopped
again, and looked out at the water coming
racing in very fast, and she turned once
more and ran as fast as ever she could after
Lucey and Arty.

Poor Sarah, she didn’t know what to do.



Full Text





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TROTS LETTERS TO HER DOLL.

BY

MARY E. BROMFIELD,

ye

TILE OLD GIG,” ‘THE THREE PHOTOGRAPHS,”
&., &e.

AUTHOR OF “ DADDY DICK,



LONDON:

T. NELSON AND SONS, PATERNOSTER ROW;
EDINBURGH ; AND NEW YORK,

. 1875,




Cy

My PEAR G@OD-DAUGHTER,
(MARY VIRGINIE,)

MY MOST WILLING AND INDULGENT CRITIC,

THESE LETTERS ARE DEDICATED.
G@Jontents.

—+

I. “SO NICE,” .. . o . o oe . 9

Il. “FOUND DROWNED,” o o. - oe . 32
III. “MIDSHIPMAN LUCY,” oo oe oo . 5Y
IV. “SHIPWRECK BAY,” .. wee oe . . oo 84

V. “BOUNCE,” .. . . . . a 17








TROTS LETTERS TO HER DOLL.

a

L

“SO NICE”




‘¢ Y Dearest ERMELINDA,—I was so
% very sorry, when mamma said you
"y mustn’t go with us to the sea; for,
te my poor dear, you had been looking
forward to it so long, and you and I had
talked about it so many times before we
went to sleep of a night, that I knew how
disappointed you would be.

But mamma said, you know, that I might
only take one of you, and just the common
everyday clothes you had on, for that she
1¢ CLORINDA AT THE SEA-SIDE.

didn’t believe that you would want any-
thing else at the sea-side. And mamma was
quite right; for do you know that Clorinda
has had a very dull time of it, as she was
put in a closet when we first came, and there
I believe she will stay.

I took her, you know, because since I tried
the water-cure for her she has looked so
pale and ill, that I thought perhaps sea-air
might bring back her roses. But, poor
Dolly ! I think she has often wished herself
at home again: so let this be a lesson to
you, my dear (mamma bids me say), never
to set your heart too much upon anything,
for you are almost sure to be disappointed.
And I believe, Ermelinda, that is a very
good maxim for dollies—though not for
me, for I can’t help wishing for things I like.
It is half the fun of it.

So now [ll tell you the reason why -
Clorinda is left in the closet. The truth is,
TROTS DESCRIPTION OF THE SEA. 11

we have such fun without her, that we
don’t take her out lest she should be in the
way.

The very morning after we arrived we
ran down to the beach for a few minutes
before breakfast with our papa. Oh, it was
so nice! The waves were coming racing
in one after the other, seeing which could
reach the shore soonest ; and the sun was
shining brightly on the water just like
gold, and the sand was all gold too. My
dear Ermelinda, I wish you knew what the
sea is like, it is so jolly! The pond at the
end of the lane at home is something like,
except that it’s so dirty, and dark, and still;
or my bath, before it’s soapy. But, no! the
sea is so big ; and it goes dancing and shin-
ing as if it were alive.

And then there’s the sand. How can I
describe it? It’s the colour of your hair ;
and it’s all stuff like what comes out of you
12 AN OLD ACQUAINTANCE.

when you're pricked, only ever so much
finer, and there’s enough of it even here to
fill all the dolls in the world. You see,
Ermelinda, that I’m obliged to describe it
by something that a doll like you can under-
stand, and that’s so difficult.

Well, when we got on the sands, papa
said, “ Now, after breakfast, you may come
down and build castles. I used to do it
here myself when I was a boy.—Ah, Mrs.
Weekes, is that you? Ive come to the
‘dear old place again, and haven’t I brought
a goodly tribe to be dipped? You shall
have them all by-and-by. You remember
dipping me, Betty, don’t you?”

“Ah! that I do, Master John; and a
good pair of lungs you had, the first time.
To be sure—bless their little hearts '—there
be a many of them.”

“Well, I hope you won't have’ much
squealing among them, Betty ; at all events
CASTLE-BUILDING. 18

they shall come down after breakfast and
try.”

Well, Dolly, by this time we were getting
hungry, so we went home to breakfast ;
papa first taking us into a shop and buying
each of us—Sissy, and Arty, and Lucy, and
Edie, and Trots (that’s me)—a spade apiece.

After breakfast we all went down again
to the sands and began digging ; and papa
came very soon and showed us how to make
a castle, with walls and a ditch round it.
And didn’t we have fun! It was so large
that we could all get inside and dig deeper
and deeper. But while we were digging, we
never noticed that the water was getting
nearer and nearer, till at last one big wave
came and made a hole in our wall, and
frightened us so that we all scrambled out
and ran away; and before we came back
again, another and another wave had come
and nearly swept our poor castle away.
14 TROTS SECRET,

And now, dear Dolly, I am going to tell
you something that did make me feel very
much ashamed of myself. I write it to you
because I want to tell it to somebody, and
I’m quite sure that you won’t tell it again ;
and also because Nurse said that it had
better be an example to the little ones, that
it was no use trying to shirk one’s duty ; so,
Dolly, don’t you forget that! That very
same morning, about eleven o'clock, Nurse
came and told us to leave off castle-build-
ing and to come home, which we did, and
there had a cup of milk and a bit of bread
each ; and then mamma told us all to be
good children, and Nurse and Sarah took a
great roll of towels, and down we all came
to be dipped.

I must say that as I walked along I got
very shivery and cold down the back, and
wished very much it was over, but I knew
it was no use saying so ; and, besides, Arty
THE BATHING-MACHINES. 15

kept saying all along, “Oh! it’s so jolly,
Trots !

Isn’t it nice ?
You'll be dipped in a trice.”

While poor little Edie kept squeezing my
hand very tight, and didn’t like it any
better than I did.

When we came to where the bathing-
machines were, Arty ran off to bathe with
papa; and as there were two bathing-
machines standing empty, side by side, old
Betty Weekes said that we’d better come
at once.

So Sissy and Lucy went into one machine,
and Sarah and Nurse took darling baby, and
Edie, and me (that’s Trots), into the other.

They are such nasty damp places, Erme-
linda, like that old summer-house at the
bottom of the green walk, if it were put on
wheels ; and there was a very old musty
bit of carpet that everybody had made wet,
16 READY TO BE DIPPED.

and sand and stones down on the floor, and
I began to shiver worse than ever. And
then Sarah began to undress me (and oh! it
did feel so cold), and she said, ‘ Why, Miss
Trots, your lips are quite blue ;” and at last,
when even my shoes and stockings were off,
she put a little short blue frock on me,
which felt very cold and shivery, and she
said, ““ Now, then, you're ready, my dear.”

And all the time we were being undressed
they kept moving, moving the machine
into the water ; and as it went grating and
bumping down the beach, Sarah and Nurse
couldn’t stand, and we children had to cling
on to them to prevent falling down.

However, when I was in my little blue
tunic, Sarah opened the door of the machine ;
and there, Ermelinda, was the water quite
close up to the machine, and it made me
shiver worse than ever.

But just then, Dolly, I saw Sissy come to

(455)
A STRANGE-LOOKING OLD WOMAN. 17

the door of the other machine, in her nice
blue dress, looking so pretty, with her fair
hair hanging all over her shoulders, and her
little bare white feet; and I said, “Oh,
Sissy, Sissy, ain’t you cold?” And she said,
“ Not a bit, Trots,—

Oh, it’s so nice !
You'll be dipped in a trice.

Come, Mrs. Weekes, make haste, make
haste !”

And then that old woman papa had
talked to in the morning came bustling up,
looking like a great fat bundle of the same
blue stuff we had on, only quite faded and
stained, and with an old battered, black
bonnet on her head, and a little bag hung
round her neck to keep her sixpences dry ;
and she said, “ Ah, missy, many and many’s
the time that I’ve dipped your papa, and
the Cap’n that’s in India, and poor Miss

Sophy, as married the parson, when they
(455) 9
18 “OH, IT’S SO NICE!”

was all littler than you.” And then, Erme-
linda, why then I heard-a splash, and in a
moment Sissy came up from under the
water with her hair all dripping, and
panting and laughing and rubbing the
water out of her eyes; and as soon as she
could speak she said, “ Oh, it’s so nice! it’s
so nice! Another dip, Betty ; it’s delight-
ful.” -

And then came Lucy’s turn, and she
seemed to like it just as well; and they
began to dance about in the water, and bob
down their heads under the big waves ;
while Mrs. Weekes kept saying, “ Well, you
be the best of all my young ladies to bathe,
that you be, to be sure.’

But, Dolly, I kept shivering, and I hardly
heard Sissy and Lucy calling, “ Make haste,
Trots, and come to us, it is so nice ;” till at
last that nasty wet Mrs. Weekes came up
to our machine, and said, “ Now, then, my
NAUGHTY AND SILLY. 19

pretty little lady, come along ; you'll like it
so much.” And then, Ermelinda, I couldn't
help it indeed, but I cried out that “I
wouldn't ! Iwouldn’t! I wouldn't! I didn’t
want to be bathed; and that mamma
wouldn't make me if she were here.”

“Come, come! Miss Trots,” said Nurse,
“don’t be naughty and silly; it must be
done some time. Now, would you like to
see baby dipped first?” And could you
believe it, Dolly, but I said that I should,
and that I’d try and be good if dear darling
baby were dipped first. Oh, wasn’t I a
coward, Dolly, to want baby to do what I
daren’t do myself?

So first Edie was dipped, and she was
such a good little thing that she never cried
a bit, though they put her quite under;
and then darling baby, and he came up
crowing and laughing, and calling out,
“ More, more ; ’gain, ’gain.”
20 UNDER THE WATER.

Then old Mrs. Weekes took him for Sissy
to hold, and gave Edie to Lucy, while she
came back for me.

“And now, Miss Trots,’ said Nurse,
“youll be a good child!” But oh, Dolly,
I forgot all my promises, and I clung to
Nurse and said, “I won’t be good! I won't
be bathed!” and (O Ermelinda, I am so
ashamed !) I kicked at Mrs. Weekes, and I
kicked at Sarah, till at last, in the middle
of a great struggle and scream, I suddenly
went down deep, deep under the water ;
and when I came up again (which I thought
I never should), I was choking and gasping,
with the salt water pouring down my throat.
And before I could get my breath to scream
again, there was Mrs. Weekes thumping my
back, and I could hear Lucy calling out,—

“ Oh, isn’t it nice
To be dipped in a trice?”

That made me so angry that I began to kick
DIPPING AND RUBBING. 21

and scream again ; while Mrs. Weekes said,
“Now don’t, my dear.” But as I did, she
dipped me again right down till I was
choked again.

“There, that will do now,” said Mrs.
Weekes; “why, you're worse than your
own papa was the first time; but he soon
got over it. Now, then, dance about and
keep warm.” And then she took baby and
Edie and rubbed them all over, and dipped
them again, while Lucy and Sissy tried to
make me jump about with them; but I was
cross and wouldn’t, for I didn’t like Nurse
to keep on saying, “ Well, you were a silly
little girl, Miss Trots; if you’d kept your
mouth shut the water wouldn’t have got
in.’ And I thought it very unkind of Lucy
to keep saying,—

“ Oh, isn’t it nice
To be dipped in a trice?”

At last Mrs. Weekes looked at me and
22 A CROSS LITTLE GIRL,

said, “Nurse, that child is so blue that
you'd better have her out at once.” So I
was lifted out, and my dripping blue gown
was taken off, and Sarah dried me in a
great hurry with a very rough towel, and
kept scolding all the time, and saying that
I was a very cross little girl And do you
know, Ermelinda, it isn’t at all pleasant to
stand and be scrubbed with a very hard
towel, and to have your shoes and stockings
put on in a hurry, without having the sand
taken off one’s feet, and all the time to be
called a naughty silly child, and to be told
how much better baby and Edie had be-
haved! And all the time to know down in
your heart that you deserve it all; and
worse still, dear Dolly, to feel sure that if
it were to happen again, you'd do just the
same, and scream as bad as ever. Oh, Erme-
linda, it’s a very bad feeling.

And so you may imagine that I did not
DOWN AT THE SANDS. 23

feel very happy all the day, especially as
Arty would keep running up to me all day
long and screaming out,—

“O Trots, isn’t it nice

To be dipped in a trice 2”
And tiny Edie caught it up, and said after
him,— ;

“Oh nice ! ina trice ! Oh nice !”

So when I went to bed I determined that
it shouldn’t happen again, for I wouldn’t
be bathed any more.

And so, dear Dolly, it came to pass that
the next morning we brought our luncheon
down with us to the sands, and built castles
and dug rivers just the same as before,
till about eleven o’clock, when old Mrs.
Weekes came up to Nurse and said, “ Now,
then, Nurse, bring your flock ; we have got
the two machines empty now, and you'll just
have time before the little Miss Mowbrays.
and their nurses come down to bathe.”
24 RUNNING AWAY.

Well, Nurse had baby in her arms, and
little Edie close to her; and Sarah ran to
call Lucy, who was some way off; and I
slipped away without any one seeing me, and
ran as fast as I could along the sands, and
up the royal steps, till I had no breath left.

Then I felt rather safer, and went slower
and slower along Carlton Row, thinking
what I should do if I met papa or mamma,
or if the hall door were shut. How lucky I
thought myself, Dolly, when I found it
standing open !

Now, I thought to myself, I can creep
past the dining-room door on tip-toe, for I
know mamma, is out, and so get safely up
into the nursery ;. and nobody will know
anything about it.

I never thought, Dolly, what would hap-
pen when Nurse and the others came home;
but then the bathing would be over for the
day, and all would be right.
FOUND OUT. . 25

So I crept by the dining-room as gently
as a mouse; but it was no use. Before I
got past the door, a voice said, “ Who's
there ?”

O Dolly, you don’t know how I love my
papa! but it did frighten me to hear his
voice then.

I trembled, and I said very low, “ It’s me,
papa ; it’s Trots.”

And he said, “Come in here. Mary,”
he said—and when he didn’t say “ Trots,”
I knew how angry he was—“ Mary, what
brings you here ?”

O Dolly, how I wished then that Mrs.
Weekes had got me safely in the blue dress,
ready to dip me! But I said, “I don’t like
being dipped, papa ; the water chokes me.”

“ And so you think the wisest plan is to
run away. Mary, I am ashamed of you.
Go and sit upon that chair.”

Then I sat down very quietly, Dolly, cry-
26 “WHERE'S TROTS ?”

ing, on that rough horse-hair chair, opposite
my papa, who never spoke or looked at me
once. Oh, how I wished that I might get
down and tell him I was sorry, but I didn’t
dare; and I had to sit there for more
than an hour, and he never spoke to me
once.

At last I heard voices coming nearer and
nearer, and then a scufiling of feet; and
then Sissy, and Lucy, and Edie came in,
rosy and laughing, and calling out, “Where's
Trots ?”

“Oh, isn’t it nice
To be dipped in a trice ?”

While Nurse came panting in with baby in
her arms, saying, “ Have you seen Miss
Mary, sir?”

- And there I sat, Ermelinda. And papa
never looked at me even then, but he said:
“Nurse, there is that silly, naughty little
girl, who thought she could escape from
A VERY SAD DAY. 27

what she disliked by running away. Don’t
let her come downstairs at all to-day, and
send her to bed at six o'clock.”

That was a very sad day, Dolly. I stayed
upstairs all the time except for an hour,
when Sarah took me for a walk along the
road, and then brought me in for tea; and
directly afterwards it struck six o’clock, and
mamma came into the nursery.

“Good-night, Mary,” she said. “ You
may go and say ‘ Good-night’ to your papa
in his dressing-room.”

He was just going out for a long walk
with mamma, and Arty, and Sissy, and
Lucey. I should have gone too, if I’d been
good. :

“Good-night, Mary,” said my father. “I
am sorry that you were so foolish and
naughty to-day. Don’t you like being
bathed ?”

“ No, papa.”
28 TROTS AND HER FATHER,

“ But mamma and I think it will do you
good ; so you must try and like it.”

“T never shall, papa,’ I said. “I can’t
help screaming, and the water runs down
my throat and chokes me. Oh dear, oh
dear! what shall I do? Please, don’t let
me be bathed again, papa.”

“Indeed I must,” he said; “and you
must try and not scream, Mary.”

“Indeed I can’t help it, papa,” said I;
“it makes me shiver, and something comes
in my throat, and I can’t help screaming.”

“Can't is a hard word, Mary.”

“T can’'t—indeed, I can't,’ I said again.

“ T know it’s difficult,” he said; “ but does
my little Trots want to please her father ?”

“Yes, papa,” I said very gently.

“Then my little girl will remember that
papa wishes her to bathe, and will be very
sorry if she is so silly as to scream. You

{??

will try for papa’s sake, Trots
AGAIN IN THE WATER. 29

O Dolly, I covered his face with kisses,
but I didn’t promise ; and then he let me say
my prayers to him, and carried me into the
nursery to bed before they all went for their
walk.

Well, Ermelinda (I have nearly finished
this long letter), the next day was rainy,
and we did not bathe; but the day after
that, it was very warm and bright, and the
time came when I was standing once more
in my little blue gown at the door of the
machine, waiting to be dipped.

T can’t tell you how I felt while Sarah
was undressing me; and I shivered so much,
that Nurse said, “ Just look at that child!”
But just as Mrs. Weekes took me and
ducked me under, I managed to squeeze
my lips very tight together, and kept saying,
deep down in my heart, “O papa! papa !
papa!” And do you know, Ermelinda, not
one drop of water got down my throat ; and
80 TALKING IT OVER.

kind old Mrs. Weekes only dipped me once,
and said I was a brave little girlk And
then I had such fun with Lucy and Sissy.

And, Ermelinda, that evening, when we
were all out walking, my papa sat down —
on a bank while the rest were gathering
flowers, and called me to him and said,—

“ Trots, you didn’t scream this morning.”

“No, papa.”

“ How did you manage ?”

Then I told him how I squeezed my lips
tight together, and kept saying to myself,
“O papa! papa! papa!”

And he didn’t laugh, as I thought he
would ; but he said softly, “ And that made
it easy to my little girl, because it was her
father’s wish.”

“ Not easy, papa,’ I said. “I did almost
scream.”

“T know, Trots,” he said. “I find it as
difficult to do a great many things. Some
THE LETTER ENDED. 31

are so difficult that I could not do them, if
I did not know it was my Father’s will. -
You know who I mean, Trots.”

“Yes, I do know quite well, though I am
but a little child.”

But I couldn’t make you understand that,
for you are only a dear silly Dolly, so I won’t
write a word more.

So give my love to Maria, Jane, and
Cookie, and the Puss, and tell them we are
all very happy at the sea.

Your affectionate little mistress,
TRots.










‘TI.

“FOUND DROWNED.”



{Y Dearest Dotiy,—I am so thank-
ful, dear, that you are safe and well
4 in your closet at home, for poor Clo-

om rinda has had a terrible accident,
and has made me very unhappy. And poor
little Lily ! (Edie’s doll). Ah, why did we
ever bring them to the sea! But I must
tell you the whole story, for who ought to
think so much about them as all of you in
the nursery cupboard, who have been left
safe and happy (though, perhaps, rather
dull) at home.

Mrs. Mowbray, who called on mamma on
Wednesday, said that the young people of
AT THE BAR ROCKS. 33

the present day all thought that to be quiet
and to be unhappy meant the same thing,
and that dulness was the worst fault in
their eyes. Ermelinda, my dear, I hope
you don’t think that in the nursery closet.
I didn’t quite understand her; but then
she talked very slow, and mamma only
laughed a little bit, and said it was the
nature of the young to be stirring.

Mrs. Mowbray is very stout, Ermelinda.
It was the day before yesterday that papa
and mamma, and Arty, and Sissy, and Lucy
went to the Bar Rocks. Papa had pro-
mised to take them. They say it is a funny
place ; that you can land on it when it is
fine, and get a few strange shells and plants;
but it is very small (I mean the one you Can
land on), with steep cliffs, and rather dan-
gerous.

They went in the Wild Swan, Thomas
Hedge’s boat.

(455) Q
oO
34 LEFT BEHIND.

Nurse went too. Mamma had said she
should go some day, and I think she was
glad to take her there to help to look after
the children ; though I am sure Arty, and
Sissy, and Lucy are quite big enough to
take care of themselves.

But Nurse said she thought “ Missus
didn’t like going there over much ; it was
rather a dangerous kind of place.” I don’t
know, Dolly, but they all came back quite
safe at six o'clock. Lucy said it wasn’t a
very jolly place to go to.

I wanted to go, and it made me cry a
little at breakfast because I wasn’t let ; but
papa looked at me and said, “Mary.” And
then I knew it was no use. So [ left off.

It was dull being left with Sarah, and
Edie, and baby. I didn’t like it. Do you
think, Ermelinda, I am like one of “the
young ladies of the present day ”?

We didn’t bathe that morning. And Edie
OUT WITH THE DOLLIES. 35

and I said that, as the dollies had been
kept in so much lately, we thought that it
would be a good day to take them down on
the sands. And so I dressed Clorinda, and
Edie wrapped Lily in a little old neck-hand-
kerchief of Lucy’s for her shawl. And Sarah
said we would go off, the moment she had
“done” the nursery, as far as we could
along the shore, and then sit down and
play. She said we might take one of
our play-books, and our luncheon in our
pocket.

We got into such a nice place, Ermelinda,
under the rocks, far away from the bathing-
machines and all the people!

So then we said that we would hear the
children their lessons for a little while, and
then they should be bathed. There was a
delightful pool of water just there, close to
where we were sitting. After that, we
would all have our luncheon.
36 HEARING THE LESSONS.

So Edie had the book first, while I made
Clorinda count on her fingers. Lily was
quite good over her letters ; but then, you
know, Edie doesn’t know them, so she
couldn’t correct her, and she had to pre-
tend that they were all right.

That’s a capital plan.

Edie never will allow that Lily is naughty.
Clorinda is almost always.

She wasn’t over her counting, though
when she got to twenty-nine she couldn’t
tell what to say next, and I didn’t remem-
ber just then ; but I couldn’t punish her for
that, for you know she is very young to be
able to count to twenty-nine.

But when Edie gave me the book, and
I began to hear her her letters, she
wouldn't say them. She wouldn’t try
even to tell me the letter that came be-
tween P and R. I told her Q ever so
many times, but she wouldn’t say it after
CLORIND\'S OBSTINACY. 37

me. I boxed her ears, Ermelinda, but it
was no good.

Then Sarah said, “Take care, Miss Trots,
take care.” And she was so kind that she
offered to help dolly ; but I said, “No; it
was all her obstinacy.”

And Sarah said, “ But, Miss Trots, doesn’t
your mamma say sometimes that the best
way with an obstinate child is not to take
any notice of it?”

And I said, “That may be all very well
for some children, but not for Clorinda:
she is so very obstinate that I must take
notice of it, and punish it. And you know,
Sarah,” I said, “that if it is not obstinacy
it’s very great disobedience. Now, isn’t it,
Sarah ?”

And Sarah said it was; but “mightn’t
she help poor Clorinda this once?” So she
did; and when I asked her next, Sarah
helped her, and she did say Q. But then
38 PUNISHING DOLLY.

Sarah had to go and pick up baby, who'd
rolled over a little stone, and she wouldn’t
say it by herself; so then I said it was
no use trying to help her, and she must be
punished.

But Edie begged hard I wouldn’t whip
her. And so I said, “Very well, I
wouldn’t, as her Aunt Edith asked for her
so kindly ; but that I couldn’t bear to see
such a bad child, and so she should go and
sit behind a rock all by herself, where she’d
be out of my sight.” So I carried her there,
scolding her all the way, and telling her
if she only knew the pain it gave me when
she was naughty, shed try and behave
better.

Lucy says I like scolding my dolls.

Before long we thought it was time to
bathe them: we could use my handker-
chief for a towel, we thought ; so I fetched
Clorinda, and I told her she would have to
PLAYING AT BATHING. 39



go back afterwards,—that though she had
been so naughty, her health must be at-
tended to.

Then we began to undress them. Lily
is only a wooden doll, and she is a poor,
battered old thing. Sarah said she thought
it wouldn’t do her any harm to bathe her,
perhaps it might do her a little good ; but
she said it certainly wouldn’t do Clorinda,
good.

She was rather a pretty doll once, you
know, Ermelinda, with a wax face and
arms, and pretty pink cheeks. I loved her
dearly then; but she isn’t near so good
now.

Sissy says, if she’s grown naughty, she
is afraid it must be my fault, for not setting
her a good example ; but I don’t see how
that can be, for ’m always scolding and
punishing her.

Well, I told Sarah she didn’t know
40 ILLNESS OF CLORINDA.

anything about it, and that I should
certainly bathe her, however much she
screamed ; but when I came to undress her,
I found a great hole upon her back that
the bran came out of. So that made it
different, and so I said that she shouldn’t
bathe till I had taken her to the great
London doctor (that’s mamma, you know,
with her needle and thread), who would
soon put her to rights. “So, Clorinda,” I
said, when I had dressed her again, “you
will go back to your corner instead of bath-
ing.”

Then Sarah said, “Poor child, I think
she shouldn’t be punished when she’s so ill
as that.”

And I said, “Sarah! you would spoil
any children, teaching them to make such
excuses. Is a child to be naughty because
she is ill?” And I spoke very severely to
Clorinda, and took her back to her rock.
DIPPING LILY. 41

Then Edie asked me to dip Lily, because
she couldn’t reach.

So I did, and she screamed ever so loud
the first time. So I dipped her again,
and she screamed again. So I dipped her
a third time. (You know, Ermelinda, it
was only pretence.)

Then Edie said, “ Please, don’t, don't,
Trots, any more ; I can’t bear it.”

So I said, “ Of course I won't, if you don’t
wish it, Edie. You're her mamma; but
it’s the only way to make a child like bath-
ing; but you must punish her by-and-by.”

But Edie said she didn’t want to punish
her, Lily was always good with her, and
she took her and kissed her and cuddled
her up, and called her a “darling child.”
Edie is so foolishly fond of her dolly.

So I told her that she would quite
spoil her, and that instead of making her-
self so silly over the child, she’d much better
42 BREAD AND HUNGER SAUCE,

dry her and dress her before she got quite
cold.

So then we dried Lily on my pocket-
handkerchief, and dressed her. And then
I said, “Edie, she had better go and sit
beside Clorinda.”

“No,” said Edie ; “please, Trots, no.”

And I said, “Indeed, Edie, I am sur-
prised at you. If you don’t punish her to-
day, she will do just the same the next
time.” So then Edie let me take Lily and
put her behind the rock close beside Clor-
inda, and then I told them both that they
were not to speak a word to one another
all the time.

And then we had our luncheon. It was
a piece of bread ; but we were very hungry,
and it was very nice. Lucy used to laugh
and say we had capital luncheons on bread
and hunger sauce.

We hadn’t finished, and I had just asked
THE MOWBRAY BOYS. 43

whether we should keep a piece for the
dolls, and Edie had said, “Lily is quite
good now, and hungry,” when we heard a
shout, and somebody say, “ What a game,
Ned!” When we looked, there were two
boys who had hold of Clorinda and Lily,
laughing at them. They were two of those
Mowbray boys.

“ Put down our dollies,’ I said. ‘“ You’ve
no business to touch them.”

But Frank Mowbray said, “Who's to -
prevent us? Now then, Ned, we will have
agame. Have you got a bit of string?”

What did they mean to do to our dollies ?
They'd come down there to sail a great big
boat from the rocks. Why couldn’t they
leave us alone, and go and play by them-
selves ?

“Give me back my doll!” I said.

“Come, little one,” said Frank ; “ you are
the one they call Trots, ain’t you? And a
44 A PROPOSED SAIL.

very nice, sensible little Trots you are.
Now look here, we only want to have a bit
of fun with your dolls.”

But I said, “ Give me my doll ;” and Edie
began to cry, and baby too, and Sarah said,
“Put the dolls down, young gentlemen,
and leave my children alone.”

“Don’t be in such a hurry,” said Frank ;
and then he held Clorinda and Lily high
up—as high as he could reach—and then
he said, “ Now, Trots, listen to me. We
only want to put Clorinda and Lily on board
our boat; they'll enjoy it excessively, and
the sail will do them no end of good. Look
here ! we’ve a good thick string to our ship,
and we'll tie the dolls in ever so tight, so
that they can’t be lost or wetted, and then
we'll send them for a sail. Now, say Yes!”

Poor little Edie began to cry. “Please —
give me Lily—give Edie her doll.”

But I stood thinking.
THE “ WATER WITCH.” 45

“Trots,” he said, “it would be such fun
just to send them a little way, only a little
way; and you and Edie can see them all
the time ; and it’s such a fine ship, it’s called
the Water Witch. Now just say Yes.”

Then I said, “I think it would be great
fun! Edie, shall we?”

But Edie said, “ Lily will be drownded !”

“Oh no, Hdie,” said Frank, coaxingly,
“they won't be drowned. Look here ! it is
such a large ship; why, there would be
room for you or Trots. I say, Ned, shall
we send Edie to sea in the Water Witch ?”

But poor little Edie didn’t wait for Ned
to answer, she ran and hid herself behind
Sarah ; and Frank said, “ Well, Edie shan’t
go. May the dolls? Say Yes, Trots.”

And I did say Yes, Ermelinda, for I
thought it would be fun.

So first they tied Clorinda in very tight
to one mast, and there she sat, looking, oh!
46 THE DOLLIES ON BOARD.

so miserable, with the string round her in
the middle, and her poor head all hanging
down; and oh! my dear, I didn’t care,
though she did look unhappy. And then
they tied Lily all quite flat on the deck,
because they couldn’t make her sit even as
well as Clorinda ; for you see poor Lily was
very lame, for one of her legs had been
broken, and Arty had mended it with a
hammer and nail.

“ Now, see,” said Frank, “they can’t get
even their clothes wet; see how comfort-
able they look, Edie ;” and poor little Edie
was satisfied, and came running back to
watch them.

Then, while Frank held one end of the
string, Ned clambered out along the rocks
to put the Water Witch into deep water.

Ah, you don’t know how pretty she
looked! She had two masts, and lots of
sails, and she went so nice and upright (at
KNOCKED ABOUT. 47

first), and the dolls looked all right upon
her deck; and little Edie and I stood by
Frank’s side and helped to hold the string.

Then, after a little while, she began to
dance about a great deal, and a wave came
and almost knocked her on one side of her-
self, And Frank said, “I hope that Clor-
inda and Lily will not be sea-sick.” And
then she got up straight again; and then ~
came another wave and over she went, and
Edie squeezed my hand very tight and said,
“Oh!” And I asked Frank to make her
come back, but he didn’t answer me. Soa
great many times she got upright and got
knocked down again, but still I could see
Clorinda sitting against the mast with her
head lower and lower.

“They will get wet, I know, Frank,” I
said ; ‘do make them come back.” But I
couldn’t walk as fast as Frank was obliged
to walk now, for the waves were carrying
48 ON THE ROCKS,

the Water Witch further and _ further
away.
At last Ned shouted out, “ Pull her in !
pull her in, Frank! she’s going fast round
the rocks !”

But the sea was very rough there, and it
carried the boat on and on, so that Frank
could hardly keep up with it.

“Pull her in! pull her in! Gently,
Frank, she’s on the rocks !”

And Frank did pull, but she wouldn’t
move. There she was, stuck against a rock
so far out that neither Ned nor Frank could
get at her. It was quite deep all round.

“Try again, Frank ; a little to the left,”
shouted Ned.

And so Frank did try, first on one side,
and then on the other, but it was no use:
there she lay, till at last, giving a great
pull, the string came loose, and Frank
wound it allup; but the Water Witch didn’t
OUT TO SEA, 49

come with it. It had thumped itself away
from the string, and in one moment a great
wave came and carried the Water Witch
away from the rock, and all upright and
beautiful she sailed right, right away quite
into the sea.

And there we all stood watching her, and
never said one word.

At last Edie began to cry, and sobbed,
“T want my doll.”

“ Don’t bother,” said Frank ; “ who cares
for your scrubby old dolls? Come along,
Ned, we must get Larkins to go after her ;”
and both the boys ran away and left us
watching the Water Witch, with Clorinda
and Lily on board, sailing away to France.

We didn’t know what to do; we couldn’t
believe they were quite gone. We thought
(for she looked so beautiful and grand) that
very soon she would turn round, just as the
real ships do, and bring Clorinda and Lily

4

(455)
50 THE COASTGUARD MAN,

back to shore. So there we watched her
till she was quite a tiny speck.

Then Edie began to cry very much for
poor Lily, and just then old Allen (that’s
the coastguard man we all know) came by.

“Well, what’s the matter now?” he said ;
“can’t I help you?”

“Oh, go after them, man,” sobbed Edie.
“Please go !” |

“Who must I go after?”

“Lily and Clorinda,” I said. “Oh, Mr.
Allen, Mr. Allen! they're gone away to
France.”

“Oh the naughty hussies,” he said ; “ they
ought to be ashamed of themselves.”

“Tt wasn’t their fault,” I said, very angry
with him; “it was Ned and Frank.”

“Who made them go?” said stupid old
Allen. “Oh, oh!” and he shook his head.

I don’t know why he shook his head.
“Tt wasn’t their fault,” I kept saying to
“GONE FOR GOOD.” 51

him. And then Sarah told him all about it,
and how Ned and Frank had tied them on
the ship, and how the ship had got away,
and was sailing over to France ever so fast ;
and. how the boys had gone off, she thought,
to get Larkins to go after the Water
Witch.

And Allen said he was “afeard she was
gone for good, for Larkins was gone out
with a party.”

“And Dolly will never come back no
more,’ sobbed Edie.

“Don’t ’e ery, little one,” said Mr. Allen 3
and then he took his great long spy-glass,
that he can see ever and ever so far with, and
he looked through it, and he said, “ Ah,
I have her! Well, she is a gallant little
craft! How she scuds before the wind.”

“Are Lily and Clorinda all right?” I
asked.

“Ah, well, yes! I think so,” he said; and
52 THE CHILDREN’S GRIEF.

then he said quite low to himself, “It’s a
pity they can’t make all tight on deck in
this breeze, and stow away the passengers.
If I were skipper, I’d soon clear the decks,
and batten down the hatchways.”

“Do you think they're very wet?” said I.

“Tm afraid so, little one,” he said ; “and
rather sea-sick too.”

“Oh dear!” said Edie. And I said,
“Have they turned back, Mr. Allen?”

But he said they hadn’t ; and then Edie
and I began to get quite frightened, and we
both said, “ Won't they ever, Mr. Allen?”
And then he said, “If this breeze last,
they'll never stop till they get to France,
unless they go to the bottom.”

“To the bottom of the sea?” I asked in a
very low voice ; and then I began to cry,
and Edie cried too. Oh, why had I punished
Clorinda and Lily! And now they were all
by themselves in the middle of the sea.
LOST AT SEA. 53

And it made Mr. Allen unhappy when he
saw us crying.

“ Now don’t ’e, don’t ’e cry, dears!” he
said. “I can’t abear it, and all for a doll!
Why, I lost a little lad at sea once. Come,
dry up your tears; who knows, perhaps the
dollies will get safely over to France, and
some little, kind French child will find them
and take them home, and cuddle them up,
and love them! There, there, stop crying,
and let me carry you home.”

So then he took Edie up on one strong
arm, and carried her as if she’d been a dolly
herself. But I had forgotten all about
Clorinda, and I stole round to the other
side, and I put my hand into his and stroked
it, and said, “ Poor Mr. Allen, tell us about
your boy.” And that made us all cry,
Sarah and all; but I shan’t tell you, Erme-
linda. ,

Mamma says that perhaps when the next
54 TWO DAYS LATER.

parcel comes from home, she will send for
you and for Edie’s baby that her god-
mamma sent her. No more has been heard
of the Water Witch, and mamma was very
sorry about our poor dollies; and Arty
wrote on a bit of paper, and said he should
have it put in the 7%mes,—* Lost at sea, the
schooner Water Witch, with all hands on
board.” Oh, my dear, ain’t you glad that
youre coming? But I’m not sure yet.

Two days later.—Youre not coming,
Ermelinda. Edie does not want her baby ;
and if you ave dull, I think that you are
safer and better where you are. What do
you think happened last night? We older
ones went along the shore with papa and
mamma. We hadn't been on the beach
all that morning, for there had been quite
a cold wind blowing, which brought the
spray up quite far, and blew the sand up,
A GREAT SURPRISE. 55

so that it came into our eyes if we walked
anywhere near the sea, so mamma sent us
into the lanes ; but in the evening the wind
lulled, and papa said it would be very plea-
sant, and that perhaps we should find some
good shells and sea-weed washed up. And
so we did, and stones, and bits of wood ;
and I found a nut, that papa said had come
from some foreign country.

And while we were hunting about,
Arthur suddenly gave a great shout, and
called out, “Papa, Trots, all of you, look
here !”

And what do you think it was? It was
the wreck of the Water Witch. The sea had
washed her up on the beach again ; but ali
her pretty masts and sails were gone, only
a few of them matted together with sea-
weed, and stones, and sand. Arty said he
shouldn’t have known what it was, but for
a little bit of Clorinda’s red petticoat that
56 A SAD SIGHT.

stuck out of it all; for, could you believe it,
when the ropes, and the masts, and the sea-
weed were cleared away, there were the
two dolls still fastened on the deck ; only,
Ermelinda, poor Lily had no arms or legs,
only a body, and nothing of her face but
her nose, and all the paint gone. And they
wanted to leave her on the shore, only I
said that I knew quite, quite well that
Edie would rather have her like that than
not have her at all.

' But when they had unfastened Clorinda,
oh dear! I couldn’t bear to see her. She'd
all been washed out of that hole, so that
there was nothing left but her skin ; and all
the colour was gone, and her two eyes were
gone, only the holes left, Ermelinda. And
her hair was gone, and there was an oyster
shell fastened tight on her shoulder. And
I had to try not to cry. So papa said that
he thought we had much better dig a large
NEWS FOR EDIE. 57

hole in the sand and put Clorinda in ; and
we did. Wasn't that a sad end for Clo-
rinda ?

Papa said he was very pleased that we’d
found the Water Witch, and that her hull
was not at all damaged ; a little fresh paint
and fresh rigging would put her to rights.
I’m glad too, though I don’t think that
Frank and Ned deserve it; only Nurse says,
if we only got our deserts that we should
be badly off. I wonder what she means!

Little Edie was in bed when I ran up-
stairs calling out, “Edie, Edie, you can’t
guess what I’ve got!” But she knew Lily
directly, though she’d only got her nose ;
and she didn’t say one word, but she gave
a great cry, and then she cuddled her up
in her little arms ; and all the time I was
undressing I heard her saying softly, “ Poor
Lily! poor, poor! Did the ’ittle French
child love ’ou! Hush, Lily! hush, hush.”
58 GOOD-BYE.

And very soon she hushed herself to sleep.
But the first thing I heard in the morning
was Edie kissing her doll. I think she
loves her much better now than when she
was new.

This has been a sad letter for you, Erme-
linda. Good-bye, my dear.

Your loving little mistress,
TRots.






Il.

“MIDSHIPMAN LUCY.”




TY Dearest ERMELInDA,—Sissy has
* been away for the last two or three
“days staying with that kind Miss
Staines at Nettleton—the same that
sent you to me, my dear. It is so near this
place that mamma, did not like to say No,
and yet they did not like to spare her (I
heard them say so at breakfast); and I’m
sure that we don’t, for it isn’t half so nice
when Sissy is away. She is so kind, and
always ready to help us little ones. Lucy
is rather rough, and thinks us in the way ;
and though it’s great fun to play with Lucy
sometimes, yet I very often get into scrapes
60 WHAT LUCY WISHED.

with Lucy, while Sissy always seems to
keep us all good, as if it had been mamma.

You see Lucy doesn’t like girls, and is
always saying that she wishes she’d been a
boy. And now, Ermelinda, as I know you
won't laugh, I'll just tell you how the other
day she had her wish, and was a boy for a
little while.

I wonder whether it is quite right to
want to be a boy as much as Lucy does.
She says they are braver and stronger than
girls, and can play at cricket all their lives,
while she can’t even now without Miss Jones
telling her that she’s unladylike and a tom-
boy. Then she says she wishes she were a
boy. Is that right, Ermelinda’? ' wish T ~
knew. Arty says, “Of course it isn’t, for it’s
humbug to wish for what isn’t possible.”
Little Edie went and asked papa if he
wouldn’t have Lucy christened into a boy ;
but he only laughed, and said he could not
AN INVITATION. 61

spare one of his little daughters, they'd be
useful some day ; and mamma said she only
wanted her Lucy to be christened into a
gentle, modest little girl, contented in that
station of life to which God had called her.
Sissy said that in the Catechism last Sun-
day, so if it’s there it can’t be right of Lucy
to wish anything different. Can it? Well,
now, I'll begin my story.

Last Thursday morning, the day after
Sissy went, there came a letter to ask if
papa and mamma would bring three of us
to see Mr. and Mrs. Selby at Nethercotes
that very same day. They said that they
had only got two children, boys of seven and
nine, and that they would be charmed
with some young companions ; and that we
could stay and play in the garden while
papa and mamma and Mr. and Mrs. Selby
went off to see Captain Seaford, their old
friend and Lucy’s godpapa, whose ship was
62 AT NETHERCOTES.

lying for two or three days just off High-
ness. Sissy being away, Lucy and Arty
and I were the three to go, and we set off
at eleven o'clock by the train. Lucy tried
hard to persuade papa to take her on board
the ship with them. She said she did so
want to see a man-of-war; but papa said
No, and wasn’t pleased with Lucy for
going on asking so many times.

When we got to Mr. Selby’s house, about
twelve o’clock, we found them all outside
waiting for us. And after we'd had some
wine and strawberries in the house, we
children were sent out into the garden to
play at croquet, or anything we liked, till it
was time for the early dinner. Lucy and
James Selby played against Arty and
Hdward, and a capital game they had ;
while I sat and watched them, and made a
very long daisy chain.

Lucy got praised for her playing, and
JAMES AND LUCY. 63

_ James Selby said she played just like a boy,
—much better than any girl he had ever
played with ; she never changed the direc-
tion of her ball, and took such a straight
aim. “TI say, you'd be a stunning hand at
cricket, Lucy,” he said.

I can tell you, Ermelinda, that Lucy was
pleased ; and she and James kept talking
together, and he took her to see his pony
and his rabbits, and all his things

I found it very dull, Dolly, after Lucy was. -
gone away with James, for Arty and Edward
began another game together, and took no
notice of me ; so after a little while I crept
away and looked for mamma, and stood by
her side in the drawing-room, while she was
talking to Mrs. Selby.

“Your Lucy and my boy James seeru
great friends,” Mrs. Selby was saying. “I
often wish they had a sister,—it is a very
good thing for them.”
64 ON THE BEACH, —

Well, at one o’clock came the early dinner,
and I sat next mamma, Dolly, and was very
happy; but soon afterwards papa and mam-
ma went away with Mr. and Mrs. Selby in
a boat to see their old friend, Captain Sea-
ford, in his ship the Prince of Wales.

We children went down to the beach to
see them off, and I heard Lucy saying
several times to James, “I wish we were
going too. Wouldn’t it be fun if Captain
Seaford would send for us by-and-by?”
Mr. and Mrs. Selby had said that we could
stay and play on the beach if we liked, and
would take care not to get into any mischief.
And we all liked playing there much better
than going back to the garden

It wasn’t like the beach at Tormouth at
all, but very rocky and pebbly, with large
slippery stones all about that had rolled
down from the cliff, and got covered with
sea-weed ; and the stones ran far out into
HARE AND ILSUNDS, 65

the sea, even now when it was low-water ;
and there were great pools of water amongst
them full of sea-weed and sea-anemones.
We thought it much jollier than Tormouth.

Mr. Selby’s old gardener had come down
with us, and after a little while I got
frightened at following Lucy about the
slippery stones, so she brought me back to
where he was sitting smoking his pipe, and
showed me how I could make little boats
of bits of wood that were lying about, and
sail them in a pool of water. I was very
happy there, but every now and then I
looked up to see what the others were
doing. They were playing at hare and
hounds, and seemed to be having capital
fun jumping from one large stone to another,
and laughing whenever anybody tumbled
down on the slippery sea-weed.

Lucy was a capital runner, and had on
thinner boots than the boys, so that her

(455) 5
66 LUCY IN TROUBLE.

feet could keep better hold of the rocks,
and so she very often caught the others
and was hare; and then she took such
jumps, and went so far out on the rocks,
that the old gardener kept calling to her,
“Take care, missy ; come back.” But Lucy
hardly listened to him.

At last, when she was being chased, and
I think beginning to get a little tired, and
when Arty and James were very nearly up
to her, she took a long jump off one great
stone on to another that was covered with
sea-weed, and her feet slipped, and in one
minute down she was head over heels into a
pool of water. She came up in one moment,
looking so white, Dolly—for the water
seemed to have taken the colour out of her
cheeks, just as it did out of Clorinda’s—and
spluttering and dripping—oh! so wet !—
her frock and her cape—yes, even her Sun-
day hat—quite wet.
WHAT THE NURSE SAID. 67

But she didn’t seem to mind it much—for
indeed she is very brave—and she was up
before either of the boys or old Sparkes
could get to her, and wanted to go on with
the game; but he wouldn't hear of that, and
insisted upon her going up to the house to
have her clothes dried.

He called the old servant, who had been
the boys’ nurse when they were little.
“Goodness gracious !” she said, “why, the
young lady is inamess! Oh, you naughty
children, how did it happen? Why, she'll
catch her death of cold.”

And then Lucy said it didn’t matter, salt-
water never gave anybody cold.

But nurse said she must take off all her
things, and have them dried and ironed
before she’d be fit to be seen ; and that she
must go to bed meanwhile, which was much
the best place for her, looking so white as
she did.
68 THE HOUSEMAID’S PLAN,

But Lucy begged hard not to be sent to
bed, and the boys said it was a great shame
to spoil their treat, for they should have no
fun without her ; and so at last the house-
maid, who was very kind, said to the old
nurse, “ Why shouldn’t the young lady put
on Master Edward’s Sunday clothes? I
think they'd fit her; and I don’t believe
missus would make any objection.”

Nurse couldn’t quite make up her mind,
but they all begged and prayed that she
would, and said that they should be very
quiet when they went out again, and not
go jumping about any more. And so first
of all she went and got a glass of wine and
made it warm over the fire, and put some
water and sugar to it, for Lucy to drink, lest
she should catch cold ; and though Lucy had
hardly ever tasted wine before, she drank
this all off now, and said it was very good.

Then nurse put on her Edward’s suit of
LUCY IN A STRANGE DRESS. 69

black velvet jacket and knickerbockers, and
let her have his Scotch cap with a jay’s
feather in it. And, Ermelinda, she did look
like the prettiest boy you ever did see; for,
you know, she was ill in the winter, and
her short brown hair was curling all over
her head ; and she looked so pleased, and the
wine, I suppose, had brought such a pretty
colour into her cheeks.

I was almost sorry myself that she wasn’t
a boy, only I don’t think mamma would
have bought her a velvet suit. James said
she looked stunning; but Edward said she’d
much better have stayed in bed, and that
she was a jay in peacock’s plumes. I don’t
think he liked her wearing his clothes; and
I think he was very unkind to say that,
though I don’t know what he meant; and
Arty said if she was anything, she was a
peacock in jay’s feathers.

So when she was dressed, nurse said we
70 BOY OR GIRL ?

were to stay in the garden; but they none
of them liked that at all, and promised that
they would be very quiet and not run about
on the rocks any more, if only they might
go back to the beach.

So at last nurse consented, making Lucy
promise not to do anything to hurt Edward’s
clothes, and telling old Sparkes he was not
to let us out of his sight for a moment.

At first it was quite fun enough for them
all laughing at Lucy, and saying she made
a capital boy, and seeing whether she could
double up her fist like a boy; and James
praised her because she didn’t stick out her
thumb like a girl (as he said). And then
they began to try which could hop and
jump the furthest, till Edward said she
shouldn’t behave like a tomboy in his
clothes ; and then they began quarrelling.
And, O Ermelinda, then I got frightened, for
Lucy wasn't like herself, and was so cross, and
A BAD, RUDE BOY. 71

she was the colour of a rose, and old Sparkes
said that the wine had got into her head.

But it was much worse when another
boy came whose name was Tom Weston ;
and he quite thought Lucy was a boy, and
began chaffing her for being so grand in her
velvet, and asked her where she went to
school, and who taught her. And when
she said “ Mother,” he laughed at her for
being tied to her “mammy’s” apron-strings.
He was a very bad, rude boy, Ermelinda ;
I know he was. Then he asked her how
far she’d got in Latin, and she was obliged
to say she didn’t do Latin at all.

And then Arty said, “ You'd better just
tell him, Lucius, that you know—

Hic, haec, hoc,

Lay him on the block ;
Hujus, huic,

Prepare for the strike.

And that if he doesn’t look out, he had
better prepare for one too.”
72 MORE TROUBLE FOR LUCY.

“Oh, I’m quite prepared,” said Tom. “TI
don’t think Master Lucius’ hands look as
if he were so good at fighting as at Latin
grammar.” And then he seized hold of
Lucy’s little white hand, and gave it sucha
squeeze that it made her call out; and he
said, “There’s a jolly hand for a boy!”

Just then Edward came up behind Lucy
and whispered, “Don’t you make a good
boy, and no mistake?” And Lucy looked so
angry that I ran up to her and said, “Do
come away, Lucy.” But that only made
her more angry, and she told me not to
interfere, and she gave me a push (it was
quite a gentle one, Ermelinda) which made
me stumble up against a rock ; and in one
moment that great stranger boy Tom gave
her a blow on the face, and said, “ You’d
best bully the little one, you coward !”
And, O Dolly! the blood came spurting out
of Lucy’s nose.
“MISS LUCIUS.” 738

Then I (Trots) pushed at him and kicked
him as hard as I could, and I said, “You
shan’t hit our Lucy! Oh Lucy! Lucy!”
And poor Lucy sat down on the ground,
and I put my arms round her that he
shouldn’t hurt her ; while Sparkes put Arty
on one side—who wanted to fight Tom—
and then took the naughty boy by the
shoulders and told him to go away at once,
or he’d give him a thrashing.

But as he went away, he called out, “A
nice boy you are! Much more like a girl!
Good-bye, Miss Lucius.”

And that cross Edward came up and
whispered again, “ Don’t we make a capital
boy ?”

But kind James and Arty filled their
pocket-handkerchiefs with water, and held
them to poor Lucy’s face, and managed to
get the stains pretty well off Hdward’s
velvet clothes.
74 A BOAT FROM THE MAN-OF-WAR.

While all this was going on, we hadn't
noticed that a boat had come round the
rocks rowed by four men in blue shirts and
white trousers, with black silk ties round
their throats, quite loose, and ribbons on
their hats, on which was written in letters
like a book, Prince of Wales.

I told you, Ermelinda, that our papa and
mamma, with Mr. and Mrs. Selby, had gone
to see Captain Seaford on board his ship.
Perhaps they had told him how anxious
Lucy and the rest had been to see a man-
of-war. And wasn’t it kind of him !—he
had sent a boat to fetch us all on board.

There was a nice old man come for us,
who was something like old Sparkes, but
dressed like that doll Lucy had brought her
from the bazaar, that Arty calls “ Boat-
swain;” and he came up to us and said that
we were all to come with him on board
ship.
WHAT IT HAD COME FOR, 75

Then Lucy said at once, “Oh, I can’t go !
Please, I can’t go !”

But the old gentleman said, “I am under
orders, young gentleman; the Cap’n he
says to me, ‘Jones, fetch my godchild, and
all of them.’ ”

“That’s you,” said Ito Lucy, “andso you
must come.”

Then poor Lucy didn’t say another word ;
and indeed she hadn’t time, for the old
gentleman took me up in his arms, and
took Lucy by the hand, and he says to old
Sparkes, “ Please to tell them at the house
that they are not coming home to dinner,
and that I’ve taken the young ones on
board.”

Then he lifted me into the boat very
gently, and says he, “We must take great
care of you, little miss, amongst all of us
men and boys.” And when he lifted Lucy
in, he touched his hat with a little smile,
76 IN SIGHT OF THE SHIP.

and said, “ Beg pardon, young gentleman,
but you looks a delicate little chap. As
youre the Cap’n’s godson, perhaps some
day we'll get better acquainted, for I
always sails with him.”

I hardly think Lucy heard him, for she
sat very still and white, squeezing my hand
all the time.

It wasn’t long, Dolly, before we saw the
ship, which was lying just round the “ Ness.”
And I was frightened, Dolly, when we got
alongside ; for the ship looked so very, very
high, and the water all round her looked
so black and deep. And there were
several funny windows and holes in her
side, and out of one there was a boy look-
ing, with gold about him, not so very much
bigger than James, who called out, “I say,
old Touch, you’ve done it nicely! You've
brought the wrong lot! There were to be
two little girls.”
A FUNNY PLACE. 7

But our old gentleman didn’t answer
him; and in another minute I was standing
with Lucy’s hand clasped ever so tight in
mine, and I heard him say to her, “I ex-
pect, young gentleman, you'll learn some
day to come over a ship’s side in rather
a different fashion.”

I think he was a stupid old man, not to
know that Lucy was a girl.

Well, Dolly, I had hardly time to look
round at the funny place I was in—very
large; but oh, not near so high even as
Betsy’s attic, and where there seemed a
constant buzz of people coming, and going,
and talking—before the old gentleman had
led us up to a door where a soldier was
standing, and then in a moment we were
all in a funny room full of people.

But I didn’t feel frightened any more; for
at the other end, though there were such
lots of gentlemen, I could see one dear face,
78 “WHICH IS MY GODCHILD?”

and that was mamma’s. And so in one
moment I had slipped my hand out of the
old gentleman’s, and had run up safe under
her arm; while poor Lucy had done the
same, but she didn’t come in front, only
cowered down frightened behind mamma’s
chair.

And then the old gentleman touched his
forehead, and said, “ Please, sir, ?ve brought
the young people.” And, Dolly, everybody
stopped talking.

“Bring them up here, J ones,” said the
captain, in a loud, clear voice. “ Which is
my godchild ?”

So then old Mr. Jones picked up poor
trembling Lucy from behind mamma’s
chair, and stood her close up to the captain,
where everybody could see her. And after
a moment the captain spoke,—

“Why, Mrs. Fenton, how’s this? I
thought my godchild was a girl, and, lo,
TROTS EXPLANATION. 79

he’s a boy! We'll make a middy of
him.”

And mamma got very red, Dolly, and
she said,—

“Oh, Captain Seaford, I am ashamed !
She zs a little girl !”

And the captain said,—

“You ought to know best, madam.”

What a stupid man he was! And then,
Ermelinda, I (Trots) jumped up and tried
to pull her hands from her face, where she
kept them tight ; and I said,—

“She is a little girl, She’s our Lucy.
But she tumbled in the water, and they
put Edward’s Sunday clothes on her. A
bad boy hit her, and made her nose bleed ;
and she didn’t want to come, and old Mr.
Jones would make her,—and everybody’s
unkind.

“ Hush, Trots,”’ said mamma.

And then how Captain Seaford laughed,
80 MIDSHIPMAN LUCY.

and everybody laughed too; and he got
hold of Lucy’s hands and held them tight,
though I tried to pull them away from him
very hard.

“Tl let her go in a minute, Trots,” he
said, “if she really is a girl; but I don’t
think that’s true, so you'll all of you please to
drink the health of my new godson, ‘ Mid-
shipman Lucy.’ Here, Jones, I think you
must drink that health;” and he filled a
glass of wine for Mr. Jones,

O Dolly, I thought him so unkind! And
then they all drank Lucy’s health, and
nodded to her; but she couldn’t see them
as I did, for she hung her head down
quite low, and her eyes were quite full of
tears.

So then he did let go her hand, and poor
Lucy flew by and crouched down close to
mamma, and hid her face in mamma’s
dress. And then, Dolly, dear mamma put
THE WONDERS OF THE BIG SHIP. 81

a shawl that she had with her right over
Lucy’s velvet clothes, and let her lie hiding
there. And oh, I was so glad when they
all began to talk of something else.

So then I sat between the captain and
mamma. And we had for dessert straw-
berries and cream, and cake, and some
sweet things that he’d brought from the
West Indies. And when he’d finished, he
said,—

“ Now, Trots, shouldn’t you like to go and
see the ship, the big guns, and the funny
beds that the men sleep in, and the cow
and its calf?”

“ Are they in a field?” I said.

And he laughed, and said I should see
the farm-yard.

O Dolly, what lots of things I shall have
to tell you when I get home!

Then he said, ‘““Where’s my godson?” But

' when he went to lift Lucy up, there she
(455) 6
82 NEXT MORNING.

was, fast, fast asleep, keeping tight hold of
mamma’s gown.

“ Poor little child,” he said, as he put her
into papa’s arms. “ Here, don’t wake her,
Fenton ; lay her down on my bed in here,
and let her have her sleep out. After all,
Trots, I do believe that she’s a girl.”

So we went round the ship; and Lucy
slept on, and hardly opened her eyes even
when her godpapa carried her to the boat
in his own arms, and the men rowed us
back in the pretty bright moonlight to the
beach. Then we started for home directly,
and didn’t get back till past eleven.

But the next morning I was woke by
Lucy coming into my bed, and covering
me with kisses, and saying, “O Trots, I was
cross to you yesterday ; please forgive me,
but I was so miserable! Oh, I don’t want
to be a boy! Please tell me all about it.
Did I knock you down, Trots?”
ANOTHER LETTER ENDED. 83

“No, no, Lucy,” I said; and then I had
to tell her all, for she had nearly forgotten
everything except how unhappy she’d been.
“What a black mark that is on your hand,
Lucy,” I said ; “that was where that bad
boy squeezed you.”

But, Ermelinda, this letter is so long, that
I’m sure you'll never read it. So good-bye
for the present.

Your loving little mistress,

Trots.






IV.




coming back to-day, and we are all
, : going to the station, by-and-by, to
ee meet her; so, meanwhile, I shall
write a letter to you.

I am sitting by my dear mamma while she
is working, so that sometimes I can ask her
about my letter. One day I wanted her to
read it all; but she laughed, and said,“ Why,
dear Trots, it is only a scribble, and I’m not
clever enough to read that.” But yow are,
Dolly ; you can read my writing every bit
as well as the best, and I can write so much
faster this way than if I spelt every word.
THE RESULT OF DISOBEDIENCE, 85

We are very glad that Sissy is coming
back, though Lucy is so dear and kind, and
we all love her so much.

Since I wrote to you last, Dolly, we have
had a great trouble and a great fright ; and
it didn’t make it any better that it came
from our own disobedience: for though
Lucy says I had nothing at all to do with
it, yet still I think I had; and, besides,
what happens to one seems to belong to
us all, and that we are good or naughty
together.

Ah, Ermelinda, you are only a doll, so
you can’t be naughty, which is a good
thing for you! But then you can’t know
either what it is to love our papa and
mamma as we do, and to feel that they
have forgiven us, and will trust us again.

It was only yesterday morning, Dolly,
before all this had happened. Nurse had
been dressing us rather quickly, for she
86 A LETTER FROM CAPTAIN SEAFORD.

was going to spend the day with her old
father and mother, who live not far from
here. Mamma had given her leave, and
she had written to say that she was coming.
“Won't father and mother be looking out
for me!” she had said two or three times
during the morning. :

But when we came down to breakfast (I
have my breakfast down-stairs, not with
Edie and baby in the nursery), papa and
mamma were talking over a letter that
they had just received. It was from Cap-
tain Seaford, proposing that they should
come on board the Prince of Wales to lun-
cheon, and then go with him into the dock-
yard to see a great ironclad launched.

Mamma was saying that she thought, as
Nurse was going out for the day, she must
stay at home ; for there were too many of
us to be left with Sarah only, especially as
Sissy was away.
NURSE’S PROPOSAL. 87

Nurse came in just as mamma was say-
ing this. You know she has lived with
papa and mamma ever since Sissy was a
tiny baby, so they always tell her all about
things; and when she heard what it
was about, she said, “Oh dear, what a
pity! I could have gone just as well any
other day, if I hadn’t written to mother ;
but she would be frightened now if I
don’t go! What a pity, ma/am, you
should miss seeing the big ship! And
master, too, he won’t enjoy himself half
as much if you don’t go! Oh, it is a
pity !”

After a minute, she said, “Now, don’t
you think, ma’am, if I were just to take
dear baby along with me, that Sarah could
be left with the others? My father and
mother would be pleased to see the dar-
ling, and the rest ain’t much trouble when
they’re good. I’m sure they’ll do their best
88 MAMMA’S ADVICE.

so that you may go, ma'am. Now, you
wouldn't be afraid ?”

And we all said in a chorus, that we'd
be very, very, very good ; but mamma must
go.

So the end of it was that mamma said .
she would go, and that she would trust us
to be quite good and obedient to Sarah,
and not to quarrel amongst ourselves.

And we promised we would be good, and
then she said she would go quite happily,
and not feel uneasy about us at all. And
then she said, “ What I should advise
would be, that you all stay quietly in the
garden or on the beach till tea-time, which
can be quite early, and then you can go for
a good walk, and take a basket with some
buns and cherries, and eat them before you
come home. That will be a kind of picnic.”

We all thought this a capital arrange-
ment,—and we talked a good deal about
OUR PLANS FIXED. 89

going to Berryman’s Bay, which was a very
favourite place ; but afterwards we settled
among ourselves that we would go to Fair-
light Beach, and look for shells. You get
lots of small ones there, and we wanted
some for Sissy, who was coming home the
next day ; and, besides, we couldn’t go any
further, because Edie’s perambulator had
been left at home.

We asked papa when high-water would
be, and he said, “Oh, not till twelve
o’clock,”—when he hoped we should be all
safe in our beds ; and that it would be very
low water just at six o'clock. So we
thought that would do capitally, and made
up our minds to get a good supply. So
at ten o'clock Nurse set off with baby,
begging Sarah to be very careful, and to be
back by eight o’clock, as that would be
quite time for Miss Edie to be in bed. Then
at eleven o'clock we went to bathe as usual,
90 AN AFTERNOON IN THE GARDEN.

and at twelve o’clock papa and mamma
went away by the train, and Edie went to
bed for an hour, and I (Trots) lay down too,
for it was very warm.

Then we had such a nice afternoon in the
garden, with Sarah working, and all of us
polishing stones, and talking about the
things we should have to take home with
us, and about the little shells we were going
to get for Sissy. Lucy was very kind, and
let me help her. There wasn’t one word of
quarrelling, for whenever Lucy was at all
cross, Arty would say, “ Remember our
promise, Lucy,” and Lucy the same to him.
Only once, when Arty would have the
snake-stone before Lucy had done with it,
and said it wasn’t fair of her keeping it
so long, and she said, “ Remember, Arty,”
he declared that she only said so that she
might keep it, and “that some promises
were like pie-crust, made to be broken.”
SHIPWRECK BAY. 91

But when Sarah said, “ For shame, Master
Arthur,” and I said, “ Not to our papa and
mamma,” do you know, Ermelinda, he was
good and kind directly! Only Lucy had
given him the snake-stone first.

“Why is it, Arty,” she said by-and-by,
“that papa won't let us go further by our-
selves than Fairlight Beach? I like Ship-
wreck Bay so much, it’s prettier than Fair-
light ; and, do you know, when papa took
us in the other day, there were such pretty
shells there! Why won't he let us go al-
ways?”

“Oh, because at high-water you can’t get
out.”

“But you could climb up the cliffs
then.”

“No, you couldn’t ; there isn’t one place
in the whole bay.”

“ And why is it called Shipwreck Bay?”

“Because once on a time a great big East
92 TEA AND SHRIMPS.

Indiaman went ashore there, and almost
every one was lost !”

“ Were they all drowned ?” said I (Trots).

“ All drownded ?” said little Edie.

“ Almost all,” said Arthur; “but you
needn’t look so melancholy about it,—that
was twenty years ago.”

Well, we had our tea, Ermelinda, at four
o'clock. Wasn’t that fun to have it so
early? But Sarah said we might if we
liked, and then we should be ready to start
all the sooner. And we had shrimps for
tea.

So we started at five o’clock, and Sarah
carried Edie till we got out of the town,
-while Arty carried the basket; and then in
the lanes Sarah put Edie down, and took
the basket herself.

We had gone that way because Sarah
said it would be nice and cool while the
sun was high, and that we should come
ON THE WAY. 93

back by the shore. And it was very plea-
sant; and we went slowly, and Arty and
Lucy got all sorts of flowers, and stuck
them into Edie’s hat and mine, and they
made Sarah put some in her bonnet.

Then we gathered a great bunch of honey-
suckle, and vetch, and roses, and all sorts
of things. And Sarah said it was almost a
pity, for the poor things would die before
we got them home; but Lucy said she
would keep them fresh till we were ready
to start, by putting them in a pool of water
among the rocks.

Then Arty said she was a muff, to think
of keeping her flowers alive in sea-water.

But Lucy said that she had once seen
mamma put a pinch of salt into the water
when she was doing the flowers; and she
wasn’t a muff at all. And her voice sounded
a little cross.

Then Edie looked very grave, and said,
94 AT FAIRLIGHT BEACH.

“Remember ;” and just at that moment
we met all the little Mowbrays going home
very orderly to tea.

We don’t much like the little Mowbrays ;
and they stopped and laughed at us, and
said we looked like a lot of gipsies. Which
was rather rude.

When we got down upon Fairlight Beach,
the sea looked very, very far off, as if it
never could come back at all. And Arty
said it was the lowest tide that we should
have while we were at Tormouth. So it
was a lucky day to have come shell-hunting.

But he didn’t understand what had be-
come of Shipwreck Bay, for it didn’t look
like a bay at all; and it was a minute or
two before we could make it out. There
was a big rock which we thought the bound-
ary of the bay on our side, and called the
Crocodile’s Head, because of its funny shape ;
or sometimes (when we were playing at
THE CROCODILE’S HEAD. 95

“desert islands,” as we often did) Danger
Rock. This big rock, I say, which gener-
ally had the water coming close up to it,
was now quite far away.

“Tf you hadn’t known better,” Arty said,
“you wouldn’t have said there was a bay
at all.” In fact, he didn’t know where Ship-
wreck Bay began.

But Sarah said we knew very well that
we were not allowed to go beyond the Cro-
codile’s Head, and that was enough for us.

Then Arty said it was absurd not to
go a little further, when the sea was miles
away, and that Sarah liked being tyrannical
when she had a chance.

That wasn’t fair of Arty, was it?

But Sarah said she didn’t want to be
tyrannical. Only she knew master’s orders,
let the sea be where it might.

And Lucy said cheerfully, “Come along,
and don’t lose any more time.”
96 HUNTING FOR SHELLS.

You must know that here and there round
the big stones that lie on the sand on Fair-
light Beach, there are hundreds and hun-
dreds of tiny shells, washed up by the tide,
that have lodged safely against them, and
so not been swept away again by the water.
And now we each of us knelt down by a
big stone, and began hunting up the tiny
shells, and securing them in a corner of our
pocket-handkerchiefs. We found some
great treasures, and went on hunting for a
long, long time. Presently Arty got tired,
and got up, and said, “ Shouldn’t we have
our buns?” And Sarah said, “Oh yes.
It will soon be time to go home again, so
we'd best.”

We were a long time eating our buns
and cherries; and after. that Sarah said
she thought it must be past seven o’clock,
and so in a very few minutes it would be
time to go home.
PAST DANGER POINT. 97

Then Arty said he wanted to get a few
more of those tiny thin pink shells for Sissy,
who was making a box covered with them;
and he would just go ever such a little way
towards Shipwreck Bay,—not further than
the Crocodile’s Head, because he found the
most that way.

So Sarah said, “Don’t go far, Master
Arthur ;” and off he ran. He groped about
among the rocks for a little while with his
face towards Shipwreck Bay, till he had got
past Danger Point, and then he began to
pick up shells here and there along the
sand. So he called out, “ Lucy, Lucy! do
come,—there are such beauties!” And
Sarah called to him several times, “ Come
back, Master Arthur ;” and he kept saying,
“T’m coming in one minute. Lucy, Lucy!”
But Lucy wouldn't go.

And still he went on and on, picking up

shells every now and then, till he had got
(455) 7
98 SARAH’S ALARM,

quite far from us, and Sarah could hardly
make him hear.

“Oh, Miss Lucy,” she said, “ the tide is
coming in; do run after him and tell him
to come back.”

And Lucy just said, “Had I better,
Sarah?” But she wanted to go, and so off
she ran.

She soon came up to him, and we saw
her pull him by the sleeve, and try to make
him come back ; but he opened his hand-:
kerchief, and showed her some quite new
shells he had found, and said (so he told
us afterwards), “Let us get just one or
two first, Lucy ;-I won't go back without
one or two more.” And she began to help
him to look; and on and on they went,
with their faces turned away from home.
They didn’t know how fast the minutes
went by. But poor Sarah kept saying,
“Oh dear! oh dear! Master Arthur !
TROTS AND EDIE. 99

Miss Lucy!” But they seemed not to
hear her voice.

At last she said, “ Miss Trots, just you
take Miss HEdie’s hand, and stand _ here.
Don’t move a bit till I come back, and
I will run very quickly and fetch them.
There’s nothing to be frightened at, dear.
You will see me all the way, and I will be
back directly.”

And I said, “Oh, we shan’t be frightened.
Edie won't be frightened to stay with
Trots.”

And darling Edie said,’ “Trot’s quite
big girl. Edie stay with her.”

So away ran Sarah, and we stood look-
ing after her, hand in hand. It seemed such
a long time while Sarah was running after
them over the heavy sand, and they keep-
ing on and on all the time without once
looking back.

Poor little Edie clung very tight to me,
100 “SARAH, ITS COMING.”

and kept looking at the waves, which were
coming back very fast now; and she kept
saying, “Oh, the water, Trots! Oh, it’s
coming, it’s coming.” And, Ermelinda,
indeed, I didn’t get frightened. But when
she began calling, “Sarah, Sarah! it’s
coming,” I couldn’t help calling too, as loud
as I could, “ Sarah, it’s coming.” |

And in a minute she said, “ Let’s run,
Trots! Run.” And she set off, pulling at
my hand all the time ; and so I didn’t stop
her, as I ought; but I ran too. We ran
after Sarah into Shipwreck Bay.

And Sarah looked back and saw us run-
ning, and she stopped and turned back, and
ran towards us. And then she stopped
again, and looked out at the water coming
racing in very fast, and she turned once
more and ran as fast as ever she could after
Lucey and Arty.

Poor Sarah, she didn’t know what to do.
THE CHILDREN’S DISOBEDIENCE, 101

But when we saw her turn away from us,
we both burst out crying. And so at last
Sarah caught them up; but she was so hot
and breathless that she couldn’t speak for
a minute, and only took hold of Arthur’s
arm, and tried to make him turn round.
But Arty got very angry with her, and said
he wouldn't be dragged back, and struggled
with her, and at last threw himself down
on the sand, and said she might carry him,
but he wouldn’t go for her. And do you
know that Sarah was so hot and tired that
she sat down on the sand and began to cry.
And that at last made them sorry, and
Arty got up and began to walk towards us,
and so did Lucy and Sarah. But they
hadn’t got far before he found that he had
dropped his pocket-handkerchief full of
shells, and Sarah begged him to leave them
behind, but he said he wouldn’t for all the
Sarahs in the world. He could see it a
102 THE TIDE COMING IN.

very little way back, and he would get
it.

She said he was very naughty, and that
only made him worse. He said he wasn’t
a baby, and could catch her up in a minute.

So Lucy went on with her. And in a
few minutes they came up to us; but oh,
we had run ourselves out of breath, and
were crying and sobbing with being so tired
and hot.

And, O Ermelinda, the sea was coming
racing in, and it was quite plain where
Shipwreck Bay began now, for no sand was
to be seen beyond the Crocodile’s Head,
and the water had come quite close up.

Sarah couldn’t run very fast now, for she
had Edie to carry ; but she told Lucy and
me to go on as fast as we could, and Arthur
too when he came up, and to get round the
point as quick as ever we could.

And so we did run very quickly; but
NO PASSAGE. 103

when we got up to the Crocodile’s Head,
the water was close up all round. Still,
Arthur said it couldn’t be deep; and he
said, “ Come on, girls ; never mind wetting
your feet.” And in he ran without waiting:
to take off his shoes and stockings ; but I
was frightened, and dragged at Lucy’s
hand to keep her back. And it was lucky,
for just at that moment (though the sea
had looked so calm before) a big wave
came, and knocked Arthur right down,
and went thump up against the Crocodile’s
Head.

It frightened me to hear it.

And Sarah, who had come up by this
time, wrung her hands and said it was
quite impossible to get by.

Then Lucy looked up into Sarah’s face,
quite scared, and said, “It is all our fault,
Sarah! It is our disobedience.”

And Sarah sat down upon the sand, and
104 ANOTHER TRIAL.

began to sob out, “ What will become of
us? we shall all be drowned !”

But we couldn’t be drowned when there
was all that sand in Shipwreck Bay, and
it was so bright and lovely there? Could
we? So Edie and I dried our eyes, and
looked at her in wonder.

Then Lucy and Arty began to climb up
the rocks behind the Crocodile’s Head, to
see if there was any way to pass there; but
there wasn’t.

Then they said: “ Let’s try to get past
holding hands. We'll take Trots between
us first of all, and then come back for Edie.
Come along! it’s no use waiting, Trots.
Now, now! directly after this wave.”

So we went all three together; but it
was of no use. We hadn’t gone far, before
there came a great wave and thumped us
all down, and we dragged ourselves back
all wetted through.
ON THE OTHER SIDE. 105

But Sarah was sitting crying all the
time.

Then Arty said: “ Quick, quick! perhaps —
we can get out the other side of the bay; it
won’t be much further home.”

“T won't go one step that way !” sobbed
Sarah.

But Lucy spoke quite like a woman to
her, and said: “Sarah, you must! We
_ two have been very naughty, and I am very
sorry ; but now we must try and do the
best we can; and as we can’t get round
this way, papa would wish us to try the
other. It was our fault, not yours, dear
Sarah,” she said very gently; “so please
come.”

And Sarah did what Lucy told her, and
so we went once more across Shipwreck
Bay ; but, O Ermelinda, on the other side
it was quite impossible to pass—the water
came right up to the steep high cliffs, and
106 LUCY’S BRAVERY.

even Lucy didn’t try to pass. Tor, Dolly,
by this time we had found out that Lucy
was very brave. She wasn’t frightened, as
Sarah and even Arty were; she didn’t ery
at all. She looked rather white, as she did
when she was going in the boat to the Prince
of Wales, but even her voice didn’t sound
frightened.

So, as she didn’t seem to mind, Edie and
I weren't frightened—not much, Erme-
linda.

And when Sarah and Arty both burst
out, and said we should be drowned, she
took Edie and me by the hand, and said:
“ It was silly to ery, for our father was sure
to come.”

And then she took us back with her,
slowly walking under those great high
cliffs ; sometimes, if there seemed a little
break in them, bidding us stand hand in
hand, while she tried to climb up. But
GIVING UP. 107

she couldn’t do it; there wasn’t one place
where even Lucy, who was such a good
climber, could get up. It took us a long
time to go all round ; and Sarah and Arty
tried too, but it was no use, and they gave
up at last. And Lucy said we must sit
down and wait for papa.

Then Sarah wanted to stay as near as
possible to the Crocodile’s Head, that we
might be ready to go away at once; but
Lucy said no,—that the water was sure
to come there very soon. So we had better
go back to the middle of the bay ; perhaps
it would leave us a little place to sit there.

And so she chose a place as high as ever
we could get on the beach, just behind a
big stone; and there we sat down quite
tired with walking up and down so
much. Then she cuddled Edie and me
in her arms, and told us we were good
little things not to cry, for we'd not’ been
108 MAKING ALL COMFORTABLE,

naughty like her, and that papa was sure
to come.

“Quite sure,” said Edie; and Lucy said,
“ As sure as sure.”

It was just as we sat down that the sun
went down into the sea the way towards
home ; and it was so very, very still, that
we heard the evening gun fired at Port-
ness.

So Lucy said it was just about nine o’clock,
when papa and mamma, and Nurse too,
would be coming home.

“ Perhaps they'll stay till the last train,”
said Arthur, with a great sob; but Lucy
said she thought not. And she told
Arty to sit just behind her, so that she
could feel he was quite close ; and then she
took her arm from round me for a minute,
and drew Sarah’s face round to hers—for
she was crying very bitterly—and she gave
her a kiss and said she mustn’t mind ; she
“OUR FATHER.” 109

hadn’t been disobedient like them, and she
was sure papa would come.

Little Edie hadn't got wet, and our
things were nearly dry—and it was quite
warm, as we sat all close together—but it
was long past her bed-time ; and in a few
minutes she said, “I s’eepie, Lucy.” And
then Lucy said : “ Will darling Edie say her
prayers and go to sleep?” And Edie put
her little hands together on Lucy’s knee,
and we all did the same ; and then we said
“Our Father” after Lucy ; but before she
had finished that, and had asked God to
make us good children, and take care of
papa and mamma and all of us, the dear
little thing was fast asleep.

Ermelinda, I would have liked to be at
home. But, do you know, it was very nice
sitting there with them all, particularly as
Sarah and Arty had left off crying, and the
moon was shining just along the sea like a
110 LUCY’S STORY.

path that led up to us, and the rippling
waves in the moonlight were like the pave-
ment. By-and-by Arty asked Lucy to
tell us a story; and when she began,—
“There was once a ship,” we said with a
great shiver, “ Not about the Hast India-
man, Lucy!” But she said it wasn’t about
that ship at all, but about another. Then
she told us of some one (I was getting
rather sleepy then) who came walking along
the sea as if it had been a pathway, and how
He wouldn’t let somebody who was fright-
ened be drowned ; and she said that He was
very near us now, and that He would take
care of us, even of her and Arty, who had
been so naughty. And I couldn’t help every
now and then looking up at the pathway
that the moon made, expecting to see Him
come along it to fetch us; and I suppose I
went to sleep, for I really did dream that
He or papa did come that way and call us.
THE DISOBEDIENT SON. 111

But now and then I woke up, and heard
Lucy and Arty still talking together.

“Wasn't that a beautiful story,” she said,
“that we heard in church last Sunday,
about the son who was disobedient to his
father?”

“ Like me,” said Arty.

“ Like us both,” said Lucy softly ; “but he
was sorry, and went back.”

“Tm sure that I’m sorry,” said Arty.

“ But wasn’t his father kind ?” said Lucy.
“ He didn’t scold him at all. He was look-
ing for him when he was ever so far off.”

“Do you think papa is looking for us?”
said Arty.

“T am sure he is,” said Lucy. “ You re-
member the father came to meet him, and
he fell on his neck and kissed him, and said,
‘This my son was dead, and is alive again ;
he was lost, and is found.’ ”

Afterwards they were very quiet for some
112 HELP IN TIME OF NEED.

time; then Arty said: “I’m very sleepy,
Lucy. Wake me when our father comes.”

And do you know, Dolly, that Lucy says
we all went fast asleep, and that she sat
a long, long time, listening for papa; and
that it was so quiet, with no sound except
our breathing, and the water coming nearer
and nearer.

But all at once I felt her arm drawn
away, and she gave Sarah and Arthur a
great shake ; and she said in a voice that
wasn’t like her own :, “ He’s coming! shout,
Arty! shout, Sarah! it’s our father’s voice !”

And little Edie woke up and said, “ Which
father, Lucy?” But in a moment we heard
it again, and we all set up such a shout—
“Papa! papa!” And in one moment more
there came a boat right down the pathway
towards us; and then, Dolly, wasn’t it
funny? but Lucy burst out crying. And
the first thing she said to papa was—“ It
SAFELY HOME. 118

was our fault, papa. Sarah tried hard to
prevent us. It was all Arty and me!”

Ermelinda, she wasn’t, I’m sure, half as
bad as Arthur ; but she wouldn’t make any
excuses—she only said, “It was all my fault
and Arty’s.”

Why was it, Ermelinda, that when mamma
got us all safely home—which was just as it
struck twelve o’clock—she cried so very
‘much, and papa cried too? I never saw
them cry before. Was it because Lucy and
Arty had been naughty?

I don’t think they had been so very
naughty.

To-day Lucy is lying on the sofa. She’s
so tired. Papa says she caught cold last
night, and then sat such a long time with
her arms round Edie and me, without
moving.

He has been telling us that they almost

missed the train. They landed so late from
(455) 8
114 THE DAY AFTER.

the Prince of Wales that he wanted mamma
to stop; but she said she should like to be
home early, and they just managed to
catch it.

What would have happened to us, Dolly,
if they hadn’t ?

Then he said that he should have gone
to Berryman’s Bay, that we are so fond of ;
only, just as he was starting off, he had met
Mr. Mowbray, who said that his children
had mentioned at tea having met the little
Fentons in the lane leading down to Fair- -
light Beach ; so he got a boat instead, and
came that way.

“ What a chance !” said Arthur.

“ Not a chance, my boy !” said our father
gravely.

And Arthur said, “ No, papa ; I forgot.”

Then he turned to me and said: “I’ve
hardly heard my mouse’s voice all this
morning. Were you frightened, Trots?”
FATHERLY TRUST. 115

“Not after Sarah and Arty left off cry-
ing,” Isaid. ‘ We were very snug together,
and Lucy said you were quite sure to come.”

Papa put his hand upon Lucy’s head.
“My brave little daughter !” he said; “you
trusted your father. May we all learn to
trust as fully to that other Father, who sees
all we do, and whose love and power are
beyond all chance and change.”

Ah, Ermelinda, you can’t understand all
this, and I don’t like writing to people who
can’t understand ; so you mustn’t be vexed
if I don’t write to you any more—for you
are very dear and nice to play with, and
you never do anything that’s naughty, and
you must be satisfied with that. So give my
love to all at home. Say I hope the kit
won't have quite grown into a puss before
we come back.

Your loving little mistress,
TROTS.
116 TROTS POSTSCRIPT.

P.S.—Sissy is come, and we have all been
in a boat to Shipwreck Bay. Do youknow,
papa says the water had come up over the
place where we were sitting! We found a
great lot of shells to-night, for papa and
mamma sat there talking a long, long while.








“BOUNCE.”



\ ; PY Dearest Dotiy,—I didn’t mean
KE to write to you any more, but I
” must send just this short letter to

pe tell you that we are coming home.
Shall you be glad to see us, dear? I shall
be glad to see you; but still, oh, I do like
the sea! We shan’t have any more bath-
ing for a whole year ; that is a long time,
Ermelinda. I shall be nearly six years old
then. I like the bathing very much now.
Tell them all in the nursery-cupboard, and
_puss, too, and the little kit, that we’re to
be at home by tea-time, the day after to-
morrow. They won't expect to see Clorinda.
118 “ BOUNCE.”

You have told them her sad story ; but tell
them that I am going to bring home an-
other pet, that they must all love and be
very kind to. It is a real live thing. It
is a little, tiny brown dog, with curly hair,
and we call him “ Bounce,” and he is every
bit my own.

I don’t scold him as I used to scold you
and Clorinda, for he is alive, you know;
and when I scold him, he puts his tail
under him, behind, and runs away to a
corner, as if he really knew that he had
been naughty. But when he is good, he
bounces right up into my lap, and kisses
me; and I know he loves me. Do you
know how dogs kiss you? They lick you
with their tongues. It isn’t very nice, only
IT love him. It would be no use for you to
have a dog, for if it licked your face, Erme-
linda, the nice red would come off,—but
mine doesn’t.
NURSE AND THE DOG. 119

He isn’t always good, though (Arty will say
I shouldn't like him if he were), for yester-
day he wouldn't try to learn to beg when I
told him, so I shut him up in the closet in
the nursery while I was out walking in the
afternoon ; and when we came home, there
he was, curled up asleep in a corner. But
what do you think he had done? When
Nurse went to change Edie’s boots, she
found that Master Bounce had bitten the
heel of one of her shoes quite through,
and it had to go to be mended; so she
gave Bounce a little box on the ear, and
then he ran under my chair, and sat there
all tea-time. And I said, “ You shan’t beat
Bounce, Nurse ; he’s my dog.”

But she said, “I will have no mischiev-
ous dogs or children in my nursery, Miss
Trots.”

But I must tell you, Ermelinda, how I
got him.
120 THE DOG IN THE WATER.

We were all down on the beach one
morning by the Crocodile’s Head, watching
Ned and Frank sailing the Water Witch—
for she had been rigged over again, and she
was lovely and sailed so beautifully—and it
was a nice, smooth day, when, lo and be-
hold, we saw two little boys going out far
upon the rocks, with something in their
arms; and by-and-by they put it in,
throwing it ever so far away from them,
and down it sank in the water. And in a
minute we left off looking at it; but then
in one minute more, as we were watching
the ship sailing along, we saw something
dark come close to it, and it was a little
dog’s head. Oh, Ermelinda, it was trying
to save itself! and Frank said, “Oh, the
little wretch, it will get its paws into our
boat, and swamp her in one minute.” And
Ned took up stones, and began to throw
at it, that it mightn’t hurt the boat. And
HOW IT WAS RESCUED. 121

Sissy, and Lucy, and Arty, they ran up,
and they told him he was a cruel boy,—as
cruel as the boy who threw the poor little
dog in,—and he shouldn’t throw at it. And
he said he would; that they had drowned
it on purpose, and it wasn’t a bit cruel, and
he should.

And so, Ermelinda, while they were talk-
ing I looked at the little dog. It wasn’t
much bigger than Tiny’s kit, and it had a
dear little face ; and it tried to swim, and
then it tumbled up, and I thought it would
be drowned. And so I just took up my
frock as high as I could, and I ran into the
water, and I got to the little puppy, and I
got it safe. But it was so slippery, that I
nearly let it go again, and I had to drop
my frock while I got it; and then I took
it up in my arms, and it dripped and
made me quite wet. And when I got out
of the water, Nurse took hold of me and
122 TROTS IN DISGRACE,

shook me, and said I was a very naughty
little girl, always getting into mischief!
But I didn’t care,—I’d got it safe.

But Nurse was very angry. She said
the trouble she had with us children was
“wonderful; three clean frocks every week ;
and our mamma ruined in the washing.”
And she gave me another little shake (they
weren't hard shakes, Dolly, and I held
Bounce quite tight), and then she said,
“Sarah, you must run home at once with
this very naughty child, and change her
clothes, or she'll catch cold. I only wish
her mamma may send her to bed. Now,
take her at once.”

And nobody asked me for the dog, so I
hid it under my wet frock ; and then we
ran home, and I got very hot, we went so
fast. And it was a very heavy little dog,
and my arms ached; but I didn’t say
SO.
PUT TO BED. 123

And when we got in, papa and mamma
were out ; and while Sarah was taking off
her bonnet, I just managed to put Bounce
into my play-drawer. Oh, it was shivering
so; and I kissed him, and said, * T’ll warm
you in aminute, you darling.” And I just
put one of Clorinda’s old flannel petticoats
(which she hadn’t got on that day, because
it was so warm) over him.

And then Sarah said, “ Now, Miss Trots,
youll just get into bed while I’m down-
stairs airing some clean clothes for you.
You're a very tiresome little child.” And
she just put on my night-gown, and popped
me in my crib, and down she went to the
kitchen-fire.

And then, Ermelinda, I popped out of
bed, and ran into the next room, and opened
the play-drawer, and took out my poor,
shivering, little Bounce, and wrapped
him in Clorinda’s petticoat, and got into
124 MAMMA’S ARRIVAL.

bed again, and lay there with him in my
arms as still as still could be.

And as I got back, I heard my mamma
come up the stairs, and say, as she passed
the door, “Are any of the chicks at
home ?”

And I said, “I am, mamma.”

“Where?” she said, as she came in, for
she never thought of the crib. “Where
are you hiding, Trots ?”

And I said, “I ain’t hiding, mamma.
I’ve been naughty, and I’ve been put to
bed.” :

And she said, “How’s this, Trots?” quite
severely.

And I said they threw stones at it, and
it was drowned—nearly ; and I ran into
the water ; and Nurse shook me, and sent
me home with Sarah. And I hid it in the
play-drawer till she was gone, and then I
cuddled it warm in bed, and here it is.
EVERYTHING PUT RIGHT. 125

And then I showed her the little curly
brown head coming out of my arms.

And my mamma looked at me, and she
shook her head; but she smiled, and just
then Sarah came intothe room with my clean
clothes upon herarm. And she began tell-
ing mamma what a naughty child I had
been, and that Nurse thought I deserved to
stay in bed. And mamma said, “ Did Nurse
tell Miss Trots not to go into the water ?”

And Sarah said, “Oh no, ma’am; she
hadn’t time, for Miss Trots ran into the
- water as quick as light while we were all
talking.”

“Then,” my mamma said, “you may
dress Miss Trots at once, Sarah, and let
her come down to me. What, that very
old frock, Sarah !”

“Yes, ma'am,” said Sarah. “ Miss Trots
has her frocks changed so many times ;
she’s worse than any of the others, ma’am.”
126 “A DROWNED RAT.”

“O Trots! Trots!” said mamma, “we
must teach you to be more careful. Now,
make haste and come down. Give me the
little dog, Trots, and Ill see after it.—And,
Sarah, have these sheets dried before they
go on again,’—for, oh dear! Bounce had
made the sheets and my night-gown quite,
quite wet when I hugged him up.

And when Sarah saw the little dog,
she said, “Oh my! I didn’t know Miss
Trots had got him there. Ob, the ugly
little creature!” For, Ermelinda, he wasn’t
very pretty then. Papa said he was like
a “drowned rat.”

So mamma carried him away ; and Sarah
dressed me, and she didn’t scold me much—
and I didn’t mind, for mamma had taken
Bounce, and I knew she didn’t mind. And
in a few minutes I ran down to her, and
found her in the kitchen, rubbing poor
Bounce dry by the fire. And then she gave
BETTER TIMES FOR BOUNCE. 127

him some nice milk, and he was much
better, and licked it all up as if he was
hungry. And then she wrapped him in a
nice bit of flannel, and told Cook to let him
lie by the kitchen-fire while we were at
dinner.

And I said, when we went up-stairs,
“OQ mamma, mamma! may I have Bounce
for my very own ?”

But she said, “ We must see about that ;”
and then the others came in.

And Nurse said, “TI am surprised, Miss
Trots, that your mamma lets you come
down with that old frock on, and you with
so many nice ones, that are all dirty or in
the wash, and this only Thursday.”

And I don’t know what mamma said to
Nurse, for all the others came running in,
crying out, “Have you got him, Trots?
Where is he? Is he dead? O mamma,

mamma, it’s so sad !”
128 ALL ABOUT THE DOG.

“What's so sad?” said mamma. “ Not
the little dog, for he has just had a whole
saucerful of milk, and is as comfortable as |
possible.”

“Oh! but, mamma ”—and they all began
at once—“we saw the children, and they
were crying so.”

“What children?” asked mamma.

“Oh, the two boys who threw him in ;
they weren't naughty at all. They found
him in the street when he was very little,
and they took him home; and he lived in
little Nell’s bed, and they saved him their
dinners till their father said they'd too many
mouths to fill, and he must be drowned; and
his name’s Bounce.”

That is why we called him Bounce. Arty
wanted to call him something else, but
I said, “No; his name is Bounce as much
as yours, Dolly, is Ermelinda and mine is
Trots, and Bounce he must be.” |
LITTLE NELLY. 129

But mamma said, “Now tell me something
that I can understand, children. Who’s
the father ?”

“He’s a man !—he’s a man!” they all
began—“ we don’t know;” but Nurse said,
“ He’s some kind of a labouring man, ma’am,
and he lives in Mill Row, just behind the
old church ; and I take it he’s very poor,
for the boys were ragged indeed. I never
saw such little scarecrows.”

“And how did you come to know any-
thing about them?” asked mamma.

“Oh, the two little lads were crying as if
their hearts would break ; so we asked
them what was the matter, and they said
father had sent them to drown Bounce, and
they daredn’t go back to Nelly; and we
asked them who Nelly was, and they said,
their little sister who couldn’t walk,—and
Bounce had slept with her ever since they

found him. Poor little children,” said Nurse.
(455} 9
130 PLAYING WITH BOUNCE.

And mamma said, “ But what are their
names ?” |

“Jack, and Tom, and ee they all
said at once.

“But haven’t they got any other names?”
said mamma. And nobody knew, for they
hadn’t thought of asking. So just then the
dinner-bell rang, and mamma sent them all
away to get ready for dinner.

We had Bounce to play with in the gar-
den that afternoon, and he was such a
merry little dog; and we talked a great
deal about him and the children.

“What a shame of the father to make
them drown him,” said Arty.

“ Father wicked old man,” said Edie.

“Poor man!” said Nurse; “perhaps he
hadn’t food enough to give the children.”

“T never heard of a father who wouldn’t
give his children dinner yet,’ I said ; and
Nurse said, “Ah, Miss Trots, you'll hear of
TROTS REQUEST. 131

plenty such some day, the more’s the pity.”
Then I said, “ It must be a cruel, bad father
who won’t—and with poor little sick Nelly,
who cried for Bounce.” And Nurse gave a
great sigh and said, “ Ah, poor people! I
dare say it is a hard struggle.”

Well, just then mamma came into the
garden with her bonnet on, and I ran up
and said, “Oh! please, mamma, do say I
may have Bounce for my very own.”

But mamma said, “ But what about
the little sick child? Suppose she wants
Bounce ?”

“But they’ve no dinner for Bounce,” I said.

“But suppose papa gives them some-
thing to buy him some dinner.”

“Oh, mamma! mamma!” I said, “I
would like to keep Bounce always. Mayn’t
T, mamma ?”

“But what of that poor little sick child,
Trots ?”
182 GOING TO SEEK NELLY.

I thought a minute. Bounce came
jumping up to me.

“ He wants me to be his mistress,” I said.
“Mayn’t I, mamma?”

“Trots!” said mamma. And after a
minute she said, “Shall we go and see
whether we can find Nelly and all of them ?
Do you think you could carry Bounce so
far?”

“Oh, I’m sure I can,” I said. “I carried
him much further this morning. Oh, let
me come, mamma.

And so, what do you think? we did go,
only me (that’s Trots) and mamma. ‘“ How
shall we manage, mamma?” I said; “shall
you knock at every door and ask if little
sick Nelly, and Jack, and Tom live there ?”
And mamma said she didn’t know; we
must see when we got there.

And at last we did get to the old church,
and there we saw Mill Row, and it was a
STRANGE SIGHTS. 133

very funny place. There were poles outside
the houses, and lines something like what
Betsy Field has for her clothes; only, in-
stead of clothes on them, there were fish all
drying in the sun; and there were fish on
old boxes and chairs everywhere, and on
the windows and railings,—and very bad
smells of fish, too; and lots of children that
Nurse would have said were like scarecrows.
And I had Bounce in my arms; and
mamma said she was sorry she had brought
mewith her. Andwhenwe got a little further
all the dirty little children began to whisper
together, “That’s Bounce;” and directly he
heard his name he jumped out of my arms
in a minute and raced away, and never
stopped once till he’d raced into a dirty
cottage, and jumped upon a little old bed
not much bigger than Sissy’s doll’s bed, and
which hadn’t any curtains or anything.
And, Ermelinda, I never thought of any-
134 NELLY AND BOUNCE.

thing but catching Bounce; and I ran after
him as fast as I could into the dirty house,
and never stopped till I was close up to the
bed,—and there was little Nell. Nobody
told me, but I knew.

Ermelinda, did you know there were
rooms like that? Nothing but a little old
table, and a wash-tub for a chair, and a
cradle; and a poor, brown, ragged woman
washing something, and that was Nelly’s
mamma ; and then my pretty mamma came
in at the door.

Oh, Ermelinda, Nelly had got Bounce
in her little thin, small arms, and was
hugging him, and kissing him, and _lov-
ing him ; and I said, “ You shall have him
back, Nelly—I don’t want him! indeed
I don’t! and papa will give you some
dinner, and then your father won’t mind.”
And when I spoke Nelly looked up at me.

Ermelinda, I can’t tell you what I thought
THE SICK LITTLE GIRL. 135

as I stood and looked at Bounce and Nelly.
I hadn’t seen any one ill before except
Sissy, when we all had the measles, and
she was so long getting well ; but she looked
so pretty and white and comfortable, and
poor Nelly was so little and brown, and had
no sheets or blankets, only an old bit of a
cover; and she had two great blue eyes that
looked at me and wondered. Then I said,
“ Poor little Nell! poor little Nell! may I
kiss you, little girl?” And I clambered up
close to her, and poor little Nell let go of
Bounce, and put her arms round my neck
and kissed me; and then Nelly’s mamma
came and said,—

“Thank you, little lady, but please get
down ; your mamma wouldn’t like you to
do that.”

And I said, “She wouldn’t mind, I know,
for she lets Bounce kiss me.” And then I

ran to mamma and said, “ Oh, do let Nurse
136 WHY NELLY COULDN’T WALK.

come, and bring one of my night-gowns and
some clean sheets, and wash Nelly and
make her comfortable. But you haven’t
any basin !”

And then my mamma began to talk and
ask about Nelly, and how long she had been
ill. And Nelly’s mamma said that poor Jack
had dropped her when she was a tiny baby,
and she’d never been able to walk at all,
and always sat there ; but that she was so
good and patient, and minded the baby so
nicely, and was beginning to work quite
cleverly.

“How old is she?” said mamma; and
when she heard she said, “ Why, that is
just the age of my little girl here. ”

And Nelly’s mother said, “I wish my
little girl could run like yours, ma’am, but
I’m afraid she never will.”

Oh, Ermelinda, isn’t it sad to think of
Nelly, as old -as I am, and never to have run
PARTING WITH NELLY. 137

about, and that perhaps she’ll grow as old
as Arty, and perhaps even as old as Sarah
and my mamma, and never run about at
all? Oh, isn’t it sad ?

But Nelly and her mamma both said that
we must take Bounce home; they mustn’t
keep him, there were too many little mouths
to fill. They very seldom had bread enough,
Dolly (only dry bread), so they couldn’t
have Bounce too ; but Nelly cried, and said,
“T am so glad that my dear Bounce isn’t
drowned. Good-bye, Bounce. Bring him
once more to see me, little girl. Will you
give me another kiss?” And I did; and I
think mamma gave Nelly’s mamma two
half-crowns.

And as we walked home mamma said,
“You shall take Nelly a clean night-gown
the next time, Trots. Poor little child, I
wonder what we could think of to amuse
her!”
138 GOOD-BYE.

And then I whispered mamma a secret;
but I shan’t tell you yet, Ermelinda. I
wonder whether you'll like it! Sissy says
I couldn’t expect it of you, but I do. I
know you will; you'll feel as if you weren’t
only a dolly, if you can go and make that
little sick child happier,—and I shall have
Bounce.

Yes, I will, Ermelinda, and mamma says
I may. .So good-bye, my dear,:for two
more days, and then I shall see you again,
and you shall know what it is.

Your loving little mistress,
ees TRoTs.


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