Citation
The Catskill fairies

Material Information

Title:
The Catskill fairies
Creator:
Johnson, Virginia W ( Virginia Wales ), 1849-1916
Davis, John Parker, 1832-1910 ( Engraver )
Bobbett, Albert, ca. 1824-1888 or 9 ( Engraver )
Harper & Brothers ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
New York
Publisher:
Harper & Brothers.
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
1876
Language:
English
Physical Description:
163, 4 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Storytelling -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Grandfathers -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Loneliness -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Fairies -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Children's stories ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1876 ( lcsh )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1876 ( rbgenr )
Fantasy literature -- 1876 ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1876
Genre:
Children's stories ( lcsh )
Publishers' advertisements ( rbgenr )
Fantasy literature ( rbgenr )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- New York -- New York
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Illustrations engraved by Bobbett and Davis.
General Note:
Publisher's advertisements follow text.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Virginia W. Johnson ; illustrated by Alfred Fredericks.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
ALH2654 ( NOTIS )
04877358 ( OCLC )
026828164 ( AlephBibNum )

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Full Text






The Baldwin Library









fee CATSKILL FAIRIES.











if ii iH | i
ER

MAU





THE

SAISKILIG FAIRIES.

By VIRGINIA W. JOHNSON,

AUTHOR OF

“JOSEPH THE JEW,” “A SACK OF GOLD,” “THE CALDERWOOD SECRET,” “KETTLE
CLUB SERIES,”’ &c., &c.

ILLUSTRATED BY ALFRED FREDERICKS.

NEW YORK,

HARPER & BROTHERS, PUBLISHERS,
FRANKLIN SQUARE,

1:3, 7.6,



Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1875, by
HARPER & BROTHERS,

In the Office of the Librarian of Congress, at Washington.



CON EWS,

PAGE

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WE OLDs CLOCK HELLS * A OTORV w= 48 root ahr oe ia Sine ders eee ee
INDVENTURES: OF (A SEA] SHELE “25-5 ar (yf cay Ve ape a sea see ae 2
HOW? BIORN:} DISCOVERED “AMERICA? of 3,00 a he 0
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phe HIRST: COCOAINUT wee, finn ee ee ee et ee ee GS









THE CATSKILL FAIRIES.





ALL ABOUT FOB.

“Are you afraid to stay alone?”
asked Grandfather, drawing the
buffalo-robe over his knees, and



taking the reins.
“Not a bit afraid,” said Job,
sturdily, with all a boy’s indigna-

tion at the charge of cowardice.



12 The Catskill Fazirtes.

“You are twelve years old, and almost a man! Well—take
care of the cow, and don’t forget the fowls. I shall be back by
noon, mebbe.”

Then the old wagon creaked away down the hill, moving as
if it had rheumatism in all its joints, the white horses jogged off
soberly, the rim of Grandfather's hat disappeared, and Job was
left alone.

The boy was half afraid all the same. There was not a living
soul left on the mountain besides Job, after Grandfather had
gone. When one is only twelve years old, and is left in this
way, one must feel rather queer at first—at least Job did, and
that is all we can know about it. He stood in the road until
the last sound of the wagon had died away in silence, and at
that moment a little shiver of loneliness crept down his back,
and he did not know whether to laugh or cry. Something
white and soft brushed against him; it was the Angora cat.
You must not suppose that she was an every-day sort of tabby,
such as is found in all farm-houses: she was very different from
common animals, as we shall presently see. At that moment
the cow lowed in her shed, in a friendly way. Job laughed in-
stead of crying.

“He’s gone,” said the lad aloud. “Now, Kitty, let us have
our supper.”

He decided to prepare the evening meal just because he did
not know what else to do. The cat was placed in a chair,
while he spread the board; and as her table manners were very
elegant, she merely sat there winking sleepily instead of trying
to dab her paws into the dishes.

“This is better than living in the woods—isn’t it, puss,” said



Shutting-up for the Night. re

Job, pouring some milk in a saucer. “How cold you looked
that September morning, after the frost, when I found you on
the edge of the ravine.”

“Miouw!” replied the Angora cat.

“ Yes, indeed,” continued Job, as he cut a slice of bread for
himself. “If you had not come to me, Tom Smithers would
have caught you, and carried you down the mountain to all his
brothers and sisters—and a nice life they would have led you.
The baby would have pulled off your tail the first thing, and
how would you have looked without your tail? There! eat
your milk.”

It really seemed as if the Angora understood every word
that Job said, for she gave a little leap in the air, purred vio-
lently, and proceeded to eat daintily. After that the cow was
made comiortable for the night, the hen-house barred securely,
so that no stray fox might steal in, and fresh wood brought
from the wood-pile for the fire. There was nothing more to
be done before going to bed, and Grandfather as well as Job
was usually asleep as soon as the chickens—but then the earli-
est cock that crowed did not catch them napping in the morn-
ing. Before closing the house door, he paused one moment to
look at the sky, which was flooded with gold from the setting
sun. Job was a very ignorant child, but he knew that far
away down the path of shining Hudson River was a great city
and the sea. This city he had never seen, which was not very
strange, since a great many grown people living back among
those Catskill Mountains were equally unlearned. It was the
last of December ; summer had faded, but the autumn had been
long and mild. The mountains towered up blue and grand



14 The Catskill Fairies.

against the heavens, and it seemed as if the snow would never
come from the bleak North this year. Here and there the hills
had a white line on their slopes, as if they had trimmed their

robes with ermine, yet the peaks were still uncovered.



Far down in the shadowy hollow was the spot where Rip
Van Winkle had slept for twenty years, according to the le-
gend. All through the leafy Junes, the glowing Octobers, when
the woods burned in scarlet and crimson, and the cold, silent
winter, Rip must have slumbered. No wonder he was stiff
when he awoke at last. Job had been to the very spot, and
tried to feel sleepy also. Grandfather said the story was all
nonsense, yet somehow Job believed it. Yes, and far away,
over on the brink of a distant precipice, was the hotel, now de-
serted and gloomy, where the gay people flocked in the warm
weather. Job would hide behind the bushes, like a ‘shy, wild



Fob’s Portrait. 15

animal, and watch these strangers, wondering much that they
cared to gather the wild flowers and mosses which he never
noticed. What fun it would be if a bear should come up the
path, only all the bears were gone. There was not even a
rabbit to be seen. If a pedler should pass, Job would invite
him to stay and rest. dry-goods store is to a city boy.

He went into the house, bolted the door, and crept into bed,
where he soon fell fast asleep, with the Angora cat curled up
comfortably beside him.

Now we must paint our hero’s portrait, because we can feel
but little interest in the hero, if, in these days of photography,
we do not know exactly how he looked. Job was a strong,
active boy, and his face was as brown, his cheeks as red, as the
sun and the wind could make them. He wore a battered hat,
when he remembered to put it on, and a jacket made of Grand-
father’s old plum-colored coat, with the tails cut off: Grand-
father being a tailor after his own fashion. When spring came
he tossed his heavy shoes into a cupboard, and ran about bare-
footed, until the frost compelled him to seek them once more.

He had been sent to the little red school-house three miles
away, where he learned to read and write. Nobody knows
what strange fancies came into his head about the clouds and
the moon, living up there alone with Grandfather. This may
seem rather a sad, dreary life to the little men who were born
in merry, crowded nurseries, yet it is astonishing how much
Job found to amuse him. Indeed, he seldom played with other
children, and did not miss them.

There ‘was the early breakfast to get, and the dishes to clear



16 The Catskill Fatrees.

- away afterwards; then the cow must be driven to the pasture,
where the mountain grass made her yield such sweet milk.
After that Job could run wild among the rocks all the
morning, setting snares for birds, searching for hidden nests,
and fishing for trout in the clear brooks, which leaped from
stone to stone with gleeful music. Nor did his resources fail
him in winter, when the wild storms kept him in-doors. Then
he listened to Grandfather's stories about Indians and rattle-
snakes, or read the few tattered volumes their library boasted.
Better still was it to retreat to the store-room, where their pro-
visions were kept as carefully as if they were in a besieged
city, and draw figures on the door with a bit of charcoal for a
pencil. These crooked, wavy lines meant to the young artist
the horses and people of the city.

Grandfather was a bent, wrinkled old man, ‘iis smoked a
pipe, and grumbled—but he was kind for all that. Job did not
take scoldings to heart, for he knew very well that Grand-
father was fond of him as the only relative left him in the
world. When one lives in a small house alone on a mountain,
one has to learn to do everything: Grandfather sewed, r ade
famous bread, and churned the butter. If Job had been used
to any other housewife, he must have found it very funny to
see Grandfather sweep the rag-carpet with his spectacles on;
but to the boy this was the most natural thing in the world.

The mildness of December had tempted Grandfather to
make one more visit to the village, for when the storms came
they were cut off completely from all intercourse with the val-
leys by the deep snow-drifts. He went to buy some food, and

to cross the river to Germantown, where a farmer owed him a



The Snow-Storm. 17

little money. These dollars must be got, and hidden away in
an old pocket-book for the time when Job would be a man.
If Job had gone as well, who would have taken care of the
cow and the fowls?

Next morning Job was awakened by the Angora cat. Pussy
had jumped on his breast, and was licking his cheek with a lit-
tle red tongue. The fact of the matter was, she had been up
a long while, and was becoming very much bored, as well as
hungry. Job sprang out of bed, and ran into the kitchen.
Something strange had happened! The old clock ticked
solemnly in the corner, pointing a hand, as if in reproof, at
the hour of ten. Yes, it was ten o’clock, and Job had never
slept so late before. The kitchen looked just the same. There
was the little table by the window, where Grandfather's large
Bible lay, and the shelf above, with the conch-shell on it. The
fire was out, and it was dreadfully cold. Job pulled aside the
curtain, and peeped out. All the world had grown white. It
was snowing. While he slept the storm had come, filling the
ravines, covering the low shrubbery, and crowning the mount-
ains with fleecy masses. Job was not afraid of the snow; he
was used to it. He kindled a fire, and both he and the cat
warmed themselves. Next he tried to open the house door,
and found it already banked up by a drift. Job’s face grew
very long. How should he reach the cow? There was food
and wood enough in the house to keep him alive, but the cow
must not starve. The cottage was small and poor, consisting
of two rooms, and an attic above. Job ran up-stairs, and looked
out of the attic window. He there saw a gray sky, the air
misty with falling flakes, and the wide sheet of snow below.

B



18 The Catskill Fairies.

At the back of the house the snow was not equally deep, the
building being an obstacle to the growing mass. What do
you suppose he did? He went down-stairs again, put on his
boots, wrapped his neck in a woollen comforter, took the shovel,
and jumped out of the window to make a path to the cow-shed.
The poor cow, supposing that she was never to have her
breakfast, mooed dismally. Job worked with all his might.



Sometimes the cat sprang on the window-ledge to watch him,
but she took very good care not to wet her dainty paws by
skipping out-ofdoors. At last the path was finished, and Job
fed the hungry animal. As he did so he heard the flapping
of wings, and the cocks crowed dolefully in the dark hen-
house, where they supposed it was still night. He had forgot-

ten them until that moment. Dear me! what was to be done?



The Old Clock Bewitched. 19

Job could not leave the poor biddies to die, when he had seen
every one of them come from the egg—wee bundles of down.
The hen-house was more difficult to reach than the cow’s
residence. Job’s arms ached, and his feet were cold, yet he
took up the shovel valiantly, and began to dig again. What
with running to and fro, back to the house to thaw numb
fingers at the fire, getting meals, and continuing to make paths,
it was late in the afternoon before Job had finished his labors.
He was able to throw corn to the chickens only by climbing
on a snow-mound, and scattering it through the small window
of the hen-house. The fowls did not know what to make of
it; they cocked their heads sideways to catch a glimpse of day-
light. While at work Job had been quite happy; when it
was over he began to feel frightened. The storm was in-
creasing, the wind commenced to moan. Grandfather could
not force his way back up the mountain while it lasted, and
that Job very well knew. The boy sat down in Grandfather's
chair, and burst into tears.

“You are too old to cry,” said a grave voice.

Job dried his eyes on his sleeve, and looked up.

“ Who are you?” he asked, curiosity conquering fear.

“Tam the clock. You should know me by this time.”

There it stood in the corner, with a brass ship above the
dial that rocked when the pendulum swung.

“T didn’t suppose you could talk,” laughed Job.

“T usually make enough noise, and I am always on the
minute, I hope. I don’t mind telling you what you will find
out sooner or later—to-night I am bewitched,” said the clock,

: ee
in a rattling way.



20 The Catskill Fairies.

The Angora cat yawned, curled her whiskers in a military
fashion with both her fore-paws, and added, “ Yes, we are be-
witched.”

“What has bewitched you, I should like to know?” said Job,
now quite at his ease, and wishing to understand matters
thoroughly.

“ The sea-shell,” replied the clock.

Job turned to look at the shell as it lay on the shelf; it
glistened in the dim room like a beautiful pearl. “We are to
talk this evening,” murmured the shell. “ After all, a little boy
might spend a more lonely night than here with a clock, a cat,
and a shell.”

“ All great travellers,” said the clock, proudly.

“ And foreigners by birth,” said the cat, whisking her tail.
“ Besides, I have invited company, and you are to have a pres-
ent before you go to bed.”

“ Oh, what is it?” cried Job, with sparkling eyes. “ How can
company get here in all the storm when Grandfather can’t
come ?”

“We shall see,” returned Puss, walking to the window, and
listening with her ear to the crack.

“We have no legs to carry us about like the cat,” sighed the
clock, half enviously. ‘“ Every one in his place, though.”

“The wind brings a message to say that they will be here
in an hour,” said the cat, returning to the fire. “We must
try to amuse ourselves until they come.”

“Who are ¢hey ?” asked Job.

“We shall see,” said Puss again. “One can live anywhere,
I suppose.” This she uttered in a dignified way, as if she were



A Cat of Expertence. 21

used to much better things, and indeed that was what she de-
sired every one to think. “ The Esquimaux dwell in the snow
and ice—even their houses are built of snow; thousands of
people crowd together in damp cellars of great cities; and
away off in hot countries the natives would not leave their
sandy deserts for any thing. I must be contented here.”

“How did you come to know so much?” inquired the old
clock, very impertinently.

“IT am a cat of experience,” said the Angora in a genteel
manner.

Then the clock knew that it had done something amiss, and
clattered away, sounding the hour to cover up the blunder; only
it grew embarrassed, and struck full fifteen times, like the silly
old clock it was.

“Tam sorry to make so much noise, but when I am ready I
cannot help it. My little hammer rises up, you know, and
will fall again.” Having finished this duty, the time-piece was
prepared to be more agreeable, and immediately proceeded to
tell the following story.



22 The Catskill Fatrtes.

THE OLD CLOCK TELLS A STORY.

“Tue first sound you ever heard, Job, was the








ticking of my pendulum, and the very first ob-
ject your baby eyes noticed was my brass ship
rocking, always rocking, as it did years before you
lived, and has done ever since. Babies are some-
times born out on the ocean and in strange places,
but I think that the top of a mountain is a droll
place for a cradle. I will tell you
all about it. I am really very an-
cient—quite a grandfather clock,
as you may see from my wooden
case. I was sent over from -Lon-
don in my youth, and once I was
mended here in America by the
grandson of the clock-maker who made me. He knew me
directly, and said, ‘ Here is my grandfather’s work. At first I
lived in New York, where I was for sale in a shop, until I was
bought by a man who had me placed on a sloop to be taken
up the Hudson River. It was a long voyage in those days,
I promise you, and we were one week on board of the sloop
before we reached our destination. Now the great steamboats
make the same journey in a few hours. I could tell you the
exact time if I were placed on the ‘ Daniel Drew’ in running



e

Unexpected Vesztors. 23

order, and not laid on my back with my pendulum tied. How-
ever, I have no reason to complain. I was purchased by your
grandfather, Job, to place in the new house where he would
bring his bride.

“ Dear, dear! It seems only yesterday when the newly mar-
ried couple stepped across the threshold hand in hand. Their
hair was golden, their cheeks like ripe apples, and outside the
door the damask roses bloomed in the sunshine. So long, long
ago, little Job—as you may tell by my worm-eaten case and
rusty works.

“J remember very well that we had unexpected visitors up
here the day before you were born. There had been no living
soul here for years besides the old man: his wife was dead, and
his only daughter gone away. Well, the door stood open, and
I saw a wagon drive up with two women in it. The younger
one rose, and stretched out her hands to Grandfather, who
stood shading his eyes, and looking at her.

“*Father ! she said, and began to cry.

“*She would come up the mountain to-day,’ said the elder
woman.

“The last speaker was Grandfather's sister, and the younger
one was your mother, Master Job.

“The visitors were made comfortable. The girl promised to
be good, and return to the farm with her aunt next day, after
she had seen her father once more. She had been wilful, and
married a handsome sailor against her parent’s wishes. Now
the sailor was wrecked, and she had come all this weary way
across the seas to beg forgiveness.

“The wind blew fresh about the lonely house. I struck



24 The Catskill Fairies.

twelve, and before I had ceased the angels had brought you
here to live. What do you think of that?”

“Tt is very funny,” said Job. He had never thought of be-
ing much smaller than he was then.

“Yes,” said the clock. “ But when the angels brought you
they carried away your mother. You never saw her after-
wards. You were a sturdy little fellow, and the aunt did
everything for you. She had a goat brought up here, for you
to drink the rich milk. The goat behaved very well, although
it did not like the quarters much. When the aunt wished to
take you away home, Grandfather shook his head. If he was a
clumsy nurse, you thrived. Bless you! babies thrive anywhere ;’
and if you don’t expect them to live, they are sure to do so.

“You had a wee face—I don’t suppose your face will ever
be as large as mine —and bright eyes, and you used to sit
on the floor with your thumb in your mouth staring at my
ship. You never cried much, and soon learned to trot around,
climbing as nimbly as a squirrel. So you see the good God.
sent you as a gift to Grandfather, who lived all alone, and he
has toiled for you day and night. I have watched him many
a time sitting up long after you were sound asleep to sew your
coat or carve a toy. The very least you can do, in return, is
to be a good boy, for he is growing old.”

Job had never given the matter a moment’s reflection. He
could not decide whether he had been a good boy or not.
Now the old clock’s words made a deep impression on his
mind, and he formed a resolution.

“He shall never saw all the wood again!” he exclaimed.

“ Sometimes I forget, you know.” -
get, y



The Sea-Shell Speaks. 25

“ That is right,” said the clock, heartily.

“You will always be glad if you are thoughtful of others,”
said the sea-shell.

“ Grandfather is a good man; he gives me tender morsels,”
said the Angora cat gratefully.

The old clock had finished its story, and for a few minutes
nothing was heard in the room but the slow, steady ticking of
the long pendulum as it swung back and forth, and the quiet
purring of the Angora cat. Job was thinking of what the
clock had told him, when the silence was again broken by the
sea-shell.



26 The Catskill Fairies.

ADVENTURES OF A SEA-SHELL.

“Eacu one may tell what he
knows,” said the sea-shell, in a
soft, liquid voice.

“Where did you come from?
I mean, where did you grow?”
asked Job, eagerly.

A sweet little laugh came

gurgling from the depths of the



shell as water bubbles out of a
clear spring hidden among the moss of the woods.

“Where did I grow? You speak as if I was plucked from
the branch of a tree like fruit. Do you not know that a little,
soft, defenceless animal—a mollusk—built me for a strong
castle to protect it from foes? Then, being something of an
artist in its own tiny fashion, the mollusk painted and decorated
its house, lining it with pearl, as you see, and adding turrets to
the roof. Yes, and the very best of it was that it had only to
close the door firmly, and no enemy could come in; even the
rough waves might toss the house about with no harm to the
inmate.”

“ Where did you live ?” persisted Job.

“T was only the strong castle remember. The mollusk lived

away off in the tropical waters of the Indian Ocean. Above



The Islands of Spice-Trees. a4

the sea bloomed the rich islands where the spice-trees grow,
and cruel pirates lurked along the shore to attack foreign ves-
sels. The pirates, in their swift boats, were like the small
sword -fish that dart forth to attack the whale, wounding the

huge creature on all sides.





















“Chinese junks came there, too, in search of the swallow
nests, built in the rock caverns, which they sold in their markets
for the famous bird-nest soup. Down at the bottom of the
ocean crawled the sea-cucumber, a slow creature, with a trans-
parent body, and pretty, feathery tentacles, like plumes, waving
about the mouth, to draw in food. Even the cucumber was
not safe from the sharp Chinese eyes. Whirr! a prong was
hurled through the water, striking the poor thing with unerr-
ing aim, and up came the cucumber to the surface, to be



28 The Catskill Fairies.

packed as the ‘trepang’ of commerce. If we hide in the
deepest waters, we do not escape; nothing is safe from man.
I left my home one day, with a sudden jerk, just as the tre-
pang did. The mollusk soon died, out of the sea, even as you
would die if your head was held under water. I was left, be-
ing only a shell, and since then I have been a great traveller.
Your mother brought me here in a box. First I was carried
off by a sailor as a gift for his sweetheart at home; yet I never
saw the sweetheart, for the cabin-boy stole me long before we
reached port. The cabin-boy treated me very ill: he traded
me for a gay neck-tie, when I would have really brought him
money if sold for a cabinet. Silly fellow! Then we sailed up
north; I could tell you all about the cold countries.”

“It is cold enough here,” yawned the Angora cat.

“T changed owners half-adozen times among sailors. We
were in the Baltic Sea, and I had been left on deck careless-
ly, when a gull came swooping down on me, made bold by
hunger.

“«VYou are as tough as a Tartar, said the gull, pecking at
me to judge if I was good to eat.

“¢What is a Tartar? I inquired.

“«Don’t be tiresome,’ said the gull, pettishly. ‘My grand-
father knows everything: ask him.’ Then it flew away. I
was glad to have the ship lurch just then, and roll me against
the bulwark out of sight. Presently the gull returned, hopping
along cautiously in the hope of stealing a morsel.

“« Where is your grandfather?’ I asked.

“*Holloa! Are you still there, Mr. Shell?’ cried the gull,

cocking its head over its shoulder.



Grandfather Gull. 29

“*]T will make a bargain with you, I said. ‘If you carry me
to your grandfather, I can tell you where to find food.’

“*« But you are so heavy,’ he objected.

“But you are so hungry,’ I said, quietly.

“*T know it, groaned the gull. ‘I will try to find the old
gentleman instead,

“ Then it flew away again, returning with the grandfather gull,
and I kept my word by showing the birds where they could
obtain food near the cook’s galley. The old gull said he did
not know what the young one meant about Tartars, but he
would tell me a story, if I would excuse his standing on one
leg while speaking, for he had the gout badly in his right
claw. He told me the following tale.



30 Lhe Catskill Fatries.

HOW BIORN DISCOVERED AMERICA.

““Tue Northern nations were a roving people long before
their existence was known in Southern Europe. The Goths
crossed the Baltic Sea in three ships, to grow into a mighty
race capable of subduing Rome; the Swedes were rulers on
the ocean, strong in arms and numbers; the Danes boldly
attacked the English coast, and, after being held in check by
Alfred the Great, established four Danish princes on the
throne. A Scandinavian king ruled in Dublin; early con.
quests were made of the Shetland Isles and the Hebrides;
Scotland was visited by them, when Duncan defeated the in-
vaders, the Scots being commanded by Macbeth and Banquo.

“* The country was too small for all the families to be fed and
lodged, so it was agreed that a certain number of children to
each household should go abroad in search of a living. There
were too many birds in the home nest. The father drove out
his sons when they grew to manhood—except the eldest son,
who was heir to the estate. The sea-kings, or vikings, spread
their sails to discover new lands. Naddod, a Norwegian pirate,
saw one day a dreary looking country, which he named Snow-
land; then Gardar Svarfarson, a Swede, found that it was an
island, and called it Iceland instead, because of its forbidding
aspect. His companions liked the island, and a Norwegian
Jarl took refuge there, founding a colony.



Biorn’s Stormy Voyage. ar

“*Then the sea-kings sailed on, and other shores were found
in the Western Atlantic. In the year 982 a Jarl of Norway
went to Iceland, with his son Eric the Red, and Eric left Ice-
land to roam still farther to the south-west, where he espied a
country which he named Greenland, and made his home at
Eric’s Fiord. Heriolf, one of these early colonists, was a trader,
sailing from place to place in partnership with his son Biorn.

“* Now we shall hear! Biorn, who was a sort of salt-water
pedler, had agreed to meet his father at a certain spot, but
missed him on the open ocean. Lo! a terrible gale arose,
driving Biorn’s vessel like a feather before the wind. The
little craft bounded lightly over the heaving billows, through
sleet and foam—sent far away from the shelter of Greenland,
until the sailors expected that her prow would touch the end
of the world. At last they saw land, a wide region, thick-










































ly wooded. It was a northern cape
of the Gulf of St. Lawrence.
“*What do you suppose this stupid



32 The Catskill Fairtes.

Biorn did? He just drifted around the promontory, looked
at it, and, without setting foot on the shore, spread his sails
before a fresh west wind, the storm having abated, and re-
turned to Greenland, where he found his father Heriolf safely
harbored.

“«That is the way Biorn discovered America, quite ignorant
that he was the first European to touch the strand of a won-
derful New World. This happened long before Christopher
Columbus saw the tropical palm-trees and crystal waters of
the West Indies. Biorn went back, and told the story at least.
Eief, a son of Eric the Red, set sail with thirty-five men, reach-
ed the American coast, and steered along it until he found an
inviting anchorage. The region was delightful: fruits and
berries were ripe, and there was salmon in the river. The
Northmen landed, built huts, and called the spot Vinland,
because of the quantities of grapes they found. Lief spent
a winter in Vinland, then sold his vessel to his brother Thor-
wald in the spring, who stayed another year, exploring the
land. The natives came in canoes to oppose him, and Thor-
wald was killed. The other Northmen remained a third win-
ter. The natives were like the Esquimaux, already known in
Greenland.

«Tn 1007 a rich Greenlander, Thorfin, emigrated to Vinland
with sixty followers and his wife Gudrida. The ships carried
all kinds of animals and food. Gudrida was the first Euro-
pean woman to see the New World, and her son Snorro, born
at Vinland, was the first child of foreign parents in America.
Thorfin’s expedition prospered. The native tribes came in

great numbers to trade in furs, yet Thorfin went home again.



Puss and the Mouse. 33

“*At the mouth of the St. Lawrence traces of these early
settlers have been found. The savages there were different
in aspect, and they knew the cross when the Jesuit mis-
sionaries showed it to them.’

“T have told you the truth, whatever else you may hear to-
night,” concluded the shell.

“So did I tell the truth,” said the clock. “I don’t know
what the cat may do.”

“Speak for yourself, then,” said Puss, quite in a huff. “I
have had no chance to tell my story yet, if you please; and it
seems to me that both of you are fond of hearing yourselves
talk —Oh !”

A little mouse had crept out of its hole; the cat pounced on
it like a flash.

“T can’t imagine why you like those mice,” said the clock.
“It makes me tremble in all my wood-work only to see one,
they have such frightfully sharp teeth, and gnaw such dreadful
holes.”

The Angora cat was terribly excited; her eyes were large,
her whiskers bristled, and she held the poor little mouse be-
tween her paws. One could see how much she was like: those
great relations of hers, the tiger and lion, when they gloat over
their prey.

“What have you got to say for yourself,” growled Kitty.

“Mercy!” squeaked the little mouse, rolling its eyes towards
Job.

“Let Mousey go. You have had your supper,” said Job.

“ Ask me nicely, mouse, and perhaps I will,” said the wicked
cat, enjoying the fright of her captive.

C



34 The Catskill Fairtes.

o

So the little mouse sat on its hind-legs, and crossed its fore-
paws piteously.

“Tam very young to die. I ran away from the nest behind
the beam of the cellar just to see life. Oh! please don’t look
at me like that!” it said faintly.

“JT will not eat you if you tell a story,” said Puss.

“Oh, dear!” piped the little mouse. “How can I tell a
story? I have no ideas, and I have never been even to a
mouse school yet. I am really a baby. To be sure, we have
gnawed a great many books and papers; still we do not read
the print—we only make nests.”

“Do you stay in the corner of the hearth and think of a
story,” said the cat. “If you try to run away I will eat you
in one mouthful. There! I don’t mind your being a baby
mouse at all; your bones will be all the more tender on that
account.”

So the little mouse had to sit in the corner, and make the
best of it. When the cat looked at it, the mouse closed its
eyes, pretending to nap, for it wished to appear very much at
ease, but it trembled in every limb for dread of those terrible
jaws and gleaming eyes.

It was now the cat’s turn to tell a story.

e



Puss begins a Story. 35

ONE OF A CAT’S LIVES.

“IT Know very well that I was born in a palace—that is, a
palace in comparison with this cottage,” said the Angora cat,
stretching herself comfortably on the warm hearthstone.

“What was it like ?” asked Job, glancing around the kitchen.

“Well, it must have been a palace, because there was a
lawn and a park, with winding avenues and flowers. Then
the house was beautiful, large, and spacious, with soft carpets
and velvet cushions. The old lady who lived there owned
twenty cats, and people said she was crazy on the subject of
pets. The cats had an easy life. Each morning a servant
bathed the Angora family, combed our fur, and tied a fresh
ribbon about our necks. How much we were caressed! One
day I was taken to the drawing-room for some visitors to ad-
mire my flossy coat, when I saw an ugly face peering in at
the window, and I hid beneath the dress of my mistress. The
butler told the beggar to go away. ‘I’m hungry,’ said the
man. Now I had never been hungry in my life. After the
visitors left I curled myself up for a nap on the best em-
broidered cushion. Two dirty hands seized me, the ugly face
peered in the window again, and I was hurried away, hidden
from sight beneath the beggar’s ragged coat. In vain I
struggled; he held me firmly until we had crossed the road
behind a hedge, and he took me out to shake mé angrily.



36 The Catskill Fairies.

“« You are always fed, if the children do starve,’ he muttered,
fiercely.

“ He did not kill me, though I was half dead with fright by
the time he reached the miserable hovel where he lived. The
children were hungry, but I was made to rob them of their
scanty portion of milk, because I was to be taken to town and
sold for my beauty. .

“ Fortunately some dear, kind ladies bought me, paying the
man a good price, and I hope that he took the money to the
poor children.

“ Wherever the ladies went on their travels, I was carried in
a basket, and people were warned not to hurt Kitty. At this
strangers smiled, but they were all good to me. We crossed
the ocean in a large steamship, and in the summer we came
up to these mountains. When parties rambled in the woods
I was allowed to go, for there were too many children in the
hotel for my comfort. They play strange pranks with the
most superior cats. When the ladies had a picnic I was at-
tracted by a bird that hopped near in search of crumbs. -I
gave chase, the bird flew away, and when the people called
me I hid behind a rock. I was tired of being petted, so I de-
cided to become a hunter, searching for my own food in the
woods. This served very well until the frost came. Then you -
found me, Job. I made a great many acquaintances in the
woods during my rambles, as you will presently see.”

“Crickets and grasshoppers?” said Job.

“No such thing,” replied the Angora cat. “ Here they are!”

Job could scarcely believe that he was still in his senses,

for in a moment the place was full of Fairies. The wee



The Fairtes Arrive. 37

people came through the keyhole, down the chimney, and
forth from the blazing logs of the fire, with a soft rustle of
wings and a murmur of tiny voices that sounded like the pat-
ter of rain-drops among forest leaves. The boy winked sev-
eral times to make sure he was awake.

At first these visitors looked all alike: their pinions were
spangled like those of a butterfly, and their little forms twin-
kled and hovered about in restless motion; but by degrees they
settled down like fallen blossoms, some on the hearth, others
on the chimney-piece, and two perched on the seashell. The
little mouse moved an inch to run; Puss clapped a paw on it.
Then the Fairies formed a ring around the animal by joining
hands, and danced to their own music. The mouse shivered
with terror; but by degrees it grew brighter, and began to
dance also, hopping on one hind-leg, and nodding its head in
time to the song. That was a droll sight !

Job now saw that the Fairies on the hearth were very plump
and pretty. They wore little petticoats of red rose-leaves, while
their caps and aprons were made from the white rose’s petals.

“T am Queen Puff, and we come from the Lowlands,” said
one, nodding to Job. “You must excuse us if we keep on
with our work while we pay our visit, because we are busy
housewives. Besides, this is Christmas-eve.”

With that two of her maidens brought her spinning-wheel
to Queen Puff, and then all her court took their knitting.
Such a spinning-wheel as that was! The frame was a rose-
thorn, the wheel made of horse-hair, and the distaff wrapped
in a tangle of cobweb, which the Queen spun off in fine silk
threads.



38 The Catskill Fairies.

“ What is it for?” asked Job.

“ These threads make children’s dreams,” replied Puff. “ Of
course there must be a great supply of dream-thread on Christ-
mas-eve for the children of America alone.”

Another group was clustered on the handle of the tongs.
These were clad in pale satin.

”

“We are the Fairies of the Mountain Laurel,” they said.
“You will find us in June on the overhanging banks, where
the ferns and mosses drape the rocks, and the rivulets flow ~
down hill. Then we live in our lovely pink houses; but when
our flowers fade we hide beneath the leaves.”

“T know you right well, and how glad I am to see you in
the spring,” said Job.

On the window-sill, where Jack Frost had made the panes
like ground glass, a number of delicate forms rested, their robes
of snow-flakes, and their helmets of gleaming ice.

“ We are the Winter Fairies, and dare not approach the fire,”
they murmured. “ We live in marble palaces made by our
king, and there are no jewels so splendid as the icicles with
which we hang our halls.”

“We are the Summer Fairies,” said a race that had sprung
from the burning log. They were so radiant that one could
not look at them long; they changed in hue from emerald
green to red and purple, and the flame shone through them.
The Summer Fairies were as unlike Queen Puff’s court as
possible, for their faces were brown, their hair dark like the >
Indians’.

“Where is the Fairy of the Waterfall?” inquired the cat.
“She was to bring Job’s gift.”



The Fairy Pedler. 39



“ Winter has made her a prisoner; but she will beg leave to
come, if the king is in a good-humor. Sometimes he melts.”

“ These are friends I made in the woods last summer,” said
the Angora, proudly.

Just then a queer little form dashed down the chimney, up-
set Queen Puff’s spinning-wheel, and flew into the cat’s face as
a beetle blunders into the candle-flame.

“Gracious! I hope that I’m not late,” said the new-comer.

“Where are your manners?” cried Queen Puff, putting her
cap straight.

“ Beg your pardon, ma’am. I was in a hurry to see Job.”



40 The Catskill Fazrves.

Then he winked at our hero, and began to laugh. This was
Fairy Nip from the Berkshire Hills across the river, and his
garments were made entirely of pumpkin-blossom cloth. He
carried on his back a pack—for he was a fairy pedler—which
he unstrapped and opened.

“ Perhaps I may have something to please you, ladies. Here
is the latest thing in jackets—fly-wings trimmed with dandelion
down ; the effect is quite as good as real lace. My jewelry is
cheap; this set of spider’s eggs, necklace, bracelet, and ear-
drops, I will sell for a mere song. Want any patent medi- ~
cines? Try the Mountain-dew Tonic to make lazy people
work, or the Strawberry-seed Cordial for the appetite. As
to cosmetics, I can make the plainest fairy beautiful in five
seconds by using this Bee Powder.”

The Fairies were very much excited; they crowded around:
the tiny pedler, who sold his wares like wildfire. Queen Puff
left her spinning-wheel, and the Winter Fairies ran great risk-
of melting because they mas¢ peep at the pretty things. The
Summer Fairies showed the greatest fondness for finery, as
they were Indians. They bought mantles of scarlet poppy,
and strutted about to be admired; while of the spider-egg
chains they could not get enough.

When Nip had emptied his pack, he cut a caper, winked
again at Job, and climbed on the mouse’s back, which was -
a soft, velvet couch. The mouse looked like an elephant to:
Nip.

The Sprite of the Mountain Laurel began to speak:

“There are fairies in the New World just as much as in _
the Old, and it is time we should be known, Surely nature



The New World Fairy Homes. 41

has given us quite as beautiful homes as those of our sisters
across the seas; we can hold revels in the heart of forests
where man seldom comes; we may wrap ourselves in the
rainbow mist of the waterfall; and if we wish to live in water
mansions, there are plenty of majestic rivers. What sprite
could desire a more beautiful home than our dear Hudson
yonder? People are stupid, and will not see us.”

“ They are too busy, I guess,” said Nip. “Many a time a
farmer has all but crushed me beneath his foot in my beauti-
ful yellow coat, or I have peeped out of a flower-cup under the
very nose of a man who was too busy thinking about money-
making to see either the flower or Nip. These are the sort
of people who tell the world that there are no fairies.”

The Laurel Queen said she had a story to tell.



42 Lhe Catskill Fairtes.

1HE OAK-TREE SPRITE.

“Ar the foot of these mountains an oak-tree once waved
its long branches, and towered above the grass bank which
sloped away to the brink of a little brook. The brook sang
sweet songs to itself all day long, as it rippled about large
rocks, then flowed smoothly among rushes and marsh flowers.
The birds trilled delicious music overhead; but the oak-tree
had no ear for music, although it had lived beside the brook
for years, and might certainly have learned something from
association by this time.

“«The summer breeze rustles among my leaves, and the
winter storms clash my branches together,’ said the tree. ‘Is
not that enough noise ?’

“*That amounts to just nothing at all,’ replied the brook,
the sunshine dimpling its surface with golden sparkles as it
hurried on to swell the broad Hudson, and roll still further
onward to the sea.

“At last something happened.
the poor cottage; the Doctor came with his medicine-box, and
the parents hovered anxiously about the cradle. When morn-
ing dawned the house had grown still, for in the early hours,
before the sun brought returning warmth and brightness to
the glad earth, a little soul had risen on snowy wings to the
gates of heaven—the child was dead.



The Fairy Carpet-Bag. 43

“Then the father made a tiny grave beneath the oak-tree’s
shade, and flowers soon bloomed, tended by loving, caretul
hands.

“One morning a tall poppy shot up, the
petals unfolded, and from this little red
house out stepped a sprite dressed in the
oak-tree’s livery of green. You might
easily have mistaken him for a grasshop-
per or a locust at a short distance. In
his hand he carried a carpet-bag, stitched
together neatly out of bits of oak-leaf, and
on his head he wore the small end of an
acorn, fashioned into a cap. Altogether
the sprite had a very brisk manner, and
as he came out of the poppy mansion he
gave it a kick, very ungratefully.

“JT am just born, and I belong to you,’



he said, making a low bow to the oak-tree.

“The tree was delighted with the little
man.

“«Shelter yourself in my trunk from the cold, and dance
among my leaves,’ it said, cordially.

“*What am I to do for you in return?’ asked the sprite.

“« You will be my voice,’ replied the tree. ‘The birds shall
teach you to sing,

“«Capital! laughed the sprite. ‘I will hang up my carpet-
bag in a safe corner; I must take good care of that, whatever
happens.’ »

“« Why ? inquired the oak-tree, much interested.



44 The Catskill Fazrves.

“« Because it is a fairy gift.’

“© A fairy carpet-bag—eh ?’ and the tree chuckled.

“ The sprite was charmed with the fresh, beautiful world into
which he had been born. He roamed all over the great oak-
tree, which was a long distance for him to travel, and he was
never lonely, as he found no end of delightful society. There
were the ants and spiders to chat with about their own affairs,
and the stupid caterpillars to poke, for the sprite loved his
pranks as well as older children.

“The oak-tree had very sensible ideas about education ;
the sprite must not play all the while.

“ Soon the news spread that the oak-tree wished to have its
sprite instructed, and all the creatures came flocking to dis-
cuss the matter, as the tree was a general favorite.

“«T can teach the sprite to growl,’ said the black bear.

“« Thanks! said the tree. ‘He is such a tiny fellow it does
not seem necessary that he should do anything besides laugh.’

“«T can teach him to burrow in the ground, or to steal
chickens,’ said a little fox.

“*T can teach him to swim,’ croaked a frog.

“¢ And I to dive below the surface, added a water-rat.

“ Now came the beautiful birds, fluttering in a bright cloud
to perch on the branches, ruffling their soft feathers, cocking |
their pretty heads about as they hopped jauntily from twig to
twig. The sprite stroked the birds with his little hands, and
they chirped gayly.

“©The oak-tree has sheltered us so often that we will gladly
render a service,’ said a swallow.

“« Dear little birds! teach me to sing, begged the sprite.



The Birds give a Music-Lesson. 45

“« Ves, certainly, replied a robin. ‘We must begin at once,
and give you some notes to practice while we are off hunting
our breakfast. Listen to me—tra-la-la !’

“ The other birds set up a clamor before the sprite could re-
peat the notes which had swelled pure and sweet from the
robin’s tiny throat.

“« The robin is no singer,’ piped a saucy wren.

“*J will show you the way to use your chest notes,’ said the
thrush.

“* Bob-o-link ! bob-o-link ?

“* Peet-tweet !

“¢ Chip, chip, chee !

“* The loudest voice is the best,’ screamed a handsome crow.
‘Caw! caw?

“The oak-tree plainly saw that the sprite would be unable
to make anything out of all this noise, so it shook its trunk so
violently that the birds had to take wing, or tumble to the
ground.

“*Qne at a time, if you please,’ said the tree, politely. ‘ The
sprite is so young that he is easily confused.’

“Then each bird hopped out and sang a song.

“* All the songs are so sweet that I like one as well as the
other, said the wise and prudent sprite.

“The birds were offended—each wished to have its song
preferred to that of the rest; so they all flew away as sud-
denly as they came, leaving the sprite to repeat, ‘Caw, caw,
peet-tweet, bob-o-link,’ quite out of tune, because his head was
giddy after the lesson.

“One day the sprite noticed a different music. There had



46 The Catskill Fazirtes.

been a storm, and the brook, swollen by mountain torrents,
rushed along noisily, instead of rippling calmly, and the break
of the waters seemed to the sprite the finest melody he had
ever heard. Day by day he listened as the flood gradually
subsided, and quietly sang to himself as the brook sang.

“ This delighted the oak-tree beyond measure.

“*Now we have music in ourselves, said the tree, joyously.
‘We shall always be happy.’

“ The tree spoke too soon. Ever since its roots had struck
into the soil it had stood there on the bank, and it naturally ©
supposed that matters would never be changed.

“ Dull blows were heard, and many stately trees toppled over
to the ground.

“* What is it? said the sprite, pausing in his play.

“* The wood-cutters,’ said the oak-tree, trembling with fear.
‘You will have no home, little sprite, if they fell me.’

“The sprite ran quickly, and hung his magic carpet -bag
around his neck. Soon a party of wood-cutters approached,
with their sharp axes over their shoulders, and they paused
before our oak-tree because it was the finest they had seen.
They girdled the brave trunk, and then began their work,
each stroke of the cruel steel cutting deeper into the heart
of the wood, as well as the heart of the sprite, who wept as he
clung to the branch from which he must soon be torn. A
shudder of all the leaves, a slow rocking from side to side, and
the oak sank down upon the green bank never to rise again.

“The sprite, with his bag about his neck, which made him
invisible, sorrowfully watched the men at their labor, while they
stripped the boughs, and cut the trunk into logs, so that there



The Sprite Clings to the Oak. 47



was nothing left but a pile of wood. When they moved these
logs, the sprite took his carpet-bag in his hand and trudged
after. He decided never to leave his dear tree while a stick of
it remained. One of the wood-cutters saw the little man, who
was visible when he took his bag in his hand like a traveller.

“* Ffalloo! is that a grasshopper?’ cried the man.

“Instantly the sprite jumped into the grass, and hung the
bag around his neck again. From the lumber-yard to the
mill, where sharp saws smoothed and polished the logs, did
the sprite follow the tree, and at last they reached the shore,
where the firm, stout oak was to build a ship. The sprite saw
a great deal of the world in those busy places, and learned
more than’ the brook or the birds could ever have taught
him.



48 The Catskill Fazrves.

“«T was only a baby then, he thought. ‘Now I must be
grown up.’

“ He roamed everywhere while the ship was building, with
the magic bag to protect him. He crept into the old fruit-
vender’s pocket and spilled her snuff; he peeped into the tin
pails which the children brought for their fathers at noon; and
he clambered about the workmen whose hammers kept time
on the ship’s sides—rat-a-tat-tat.

At last the vessel was finished, and the people gathered to
see her launched. The sprite was on board before any one
else, however, and perched on the bow when the ship slid
gracefully down into the water. There was nothing for the
sprite but to become a sailor, now that the dear oak-tree was
prepared to follow the sea. He enjoyed himself beyond meas-

ure, and he was soon at home in every nook except the medi-



cine-chest. Down in the hold he met the rats, and they were
sharp fellows enough.
“«Ha, ha!’ laughed the rats. ‘We like new ships, too, so

we just skipped on board when all was ready.’



Life on board Ship. 49

“Some of the rats had already made voyages, and these
called themselves ‘Jolly Tars, and other funny names. They
told the sprite what to do in case of shipwreck; nor did their
good services end in mere empty advice, for they brought him
any dainty in the ship’s stores which their sharp noses could
be poked into, and thus he fared very well.

“When tired of the rat company he went to the captain’s
cabin, where a lamp swung all night, and the table had its legs
chained to the floor, to keep it from running away in rough
weather. Here he found a respectable old cat, that told him
there were no rats on board, as it was a new ship, therefore
she need do nothing but doze on a rug all day. The sprite
laughed in his sleeve, for the cat was so old that her whiskers
were gray, and she disliked springing about after the nimble rats.

“The captain was a kind-hearted man, and never inflicted
suffering on his crew. The mate was harsh and stern, using
the rope’s-end or his heavy boot, whenever the captain was
out of sight, to vent his illhumor. The sprite tormented the
wicked mate, and the rats helped him. The sprite stuck pins
into him, pulled his hair, tweaked his nose, tripped him up on
the deck, and tied him in the chair with fine threads, until the
mate feared that he was bewitched.

“The little cabin-boy was homesick. He had run away,
without the consent of his parents, because he fancied that he
should like the sea. Now he discovered how sadly mistaken
he had been. He must work hard and receive many blows
from the surly mate.

“Our sprite pitied the cabin-boy, and when he slept at night
in the close forecastle, the elf took off the top of the little lad’s

D



50 The Catskill Fazries.

head, as you would raise the lid of a tea-pot, and wove dream-
pictures in the sleeper’s brain. Then the sprite, after stocking
thought with bright-colored ideas enough to last through the
next day, just closed the lid of the boy’s head, and marched
off about other business. By this means the cabin-boy grew
happy, and whistled as he worked.

“The ship sailed on, miles and miles, into warm latitudes,
where the soft breeze grew fragrant with the breath of flowers,
and the sea gleamed rosy and green at night like sparkling
showers of diamonds. Land could be seen in the distance,
looming like a faint cloud on the horizon.

“«What a beautiful world! said the sprite, climbing the
rigging to admire the clear sky and tranquil water. ‘That
is the shore over yonder, and soon we shall see strange roofs
and towers, the narrow streets built to shade the people from
a hot sun. The rats told me, and they know.’

“ The sprite was not as near the curious towns as he thought,
for soon he noticed a cloud rising rapidly, and spreading dark
masses over the whole heavens. The sprite scampered down
from the rigging as the tempest came rushing along, heaping
up the waves into mountains, and washing over the deck. The
surly mate was hurled from the bulwark far out into the heav-
ing waters, and no one heard his death-cry, while the ship
plunged and swayed helplessly from side to side.

“The sprite was terrified; he cowered down in the hold,
and the rats nestled close to him, for they had lost their fine
spirits, too. Suddenly a grinding crash announced that the
vessel had struck on a reef, and was at the mercy of the

breakers.



Tossed up by the Sea. 51

“*Every one for himself, cried the sprite, catching a splinter
of wood for a float, and throwing himself overboard. This
was what the rats advised in case of wreck, but not one of
them succeeded in reaching shore. The waves bore our hero
along safely—he was as light as a feather on his oak float;
and finally he was tossed up on the shore more dead than
alive, as a shipwrecked mariner always is, whether sprite or
mortal.

“When the suh rose next morning the brave ship was gone,
and all the crew had perished. A little sprite and a bit of
wood alone remained.

“* Ah, if we were only rooted in our home beside the brook,’
sighed the bit of wood.

“« Are you my tree? cried the sprite.

“Yes; I have brought you to land, and now you must give
me a decent burial on this foreign shore,’ said the last splinter
of the once grand tree.

“So the sprite found a spot high above the waves, and com-
menced to dig a grave with his tiny hands; but he got along
very slowly.

“*T have no patience with such clumsiness!’ said a Mother
Carey’s chicken that happened to be strolling past. Then the
bird would have helped to make the grave by scraping the
sand with its claws.

“*No, no!’ cried the sprite. ‘I must bury my own tree
alone.’

“The bit of wood was dragged to the hole, and a pebble
placed as a head-stone to mark the spot. |

“* The oak-tree is dead,’ sobbed the sprite over the grave.



52 The Catskill Fazries.



“«That can’t be helped,’ said Mother Carey’s chicken, peck-
ing at the carpet-bag, which the sprite had laid out to dry.
The sprite put it around his neck, and disappeared before the
bird’s round eyes; then appeared again, laughing; until Mother
Carey’s chicken did not know what to make of it all. They
got along well together, however, as the sprite had a cosy way
which won friends.

“What part of the world is this?’ he inquired.

“*World? If you ask such hard questions I must take you
to the mussels. They know all sorts of things, which are
brought them by the tide. I have no time for such nonsense,
as I have my living to get.’

“They went to the mussels on a steep cliff jutting out into
the sea, where the waves were running so high that when the
mussels opened their mouths to answer the sprite they only
seemed to gurgle instead of speak.

“* What do they say?’ asked the sprite.

“« They say that you are a great way from your home,’ re-
plied the bird, as he could understand the mussel language

much better than the sprite could.



Mischievous Nop. 53

“ The friendly chicken brought the sprite all sorts of things
to eat, such as made his own supper, but the delicate stranger
could not touch the food.

“«T will call on you in the morning again. With that the
bird flew away.

“The last prank the sprite ever played was to try on the
magic carpet-bag before the amazed Petrel. When the bird
returned at sunrise, an oak-leaf lay on the grave of the tree,
and the sprite had faded from life.”

When the Laurel Queen ceased speaking, some of her fairy
audience clapped their hands politely.

“ Poor little sprite,” said Job.

“TI knew the oak-tree well,” said a Winter Fairy. “ How
many times we hung its branches with icicles. It was years
ago, to be sure—but fairies never grow old; the children who
believe in us become men and women, and forget us. We are
always the same.”

“ Will somebody please make Nip behave ?” asked the clock,
in an injured tone. “I know that he is trying to make mis-
chief with my works by the way he spies through the keyhole
of my case. If he pokes me I shall run down, or come to a
dead-lock in my machinery, and that has never yet happened
to me.”

Nip, who had been capering around the kitchen while the
Laurel Queen told her story, now assumed the most innocent
look.

“Dear me, how touchy you are, Clock! I was only trying

to see how you were made. Perhaps I shall invent a time-



54 The Catskili Faztrces.

piece myself one of these fine days. It’s not uncommon where
I come from,” he said.

“Tf you don’t go away I shall strike, and that will put me
out of order. Be off with you!” said the clock.

“Come here, Nip,’ coaxed Job, holding out his hand. So
Nip flew up and sat in the palm of Job’s hand, crossing his
legs like a Turk. If Job closed his fingers gently over the
saucy elf, he seemed to hold a velvet insect.

The little mouse still crouched in the corner, not daring
to say its body was its own while the Angora cat’s eye was
fixed on it.

“It is my turn to tell a story,” said one of the Summer
Fairies, walking up and down the hearth, wrapped in the red
poppy cloak.










The Elfin Banquet. 57

RAPP, THE GNOME KING.

“ Many years ago, before the white race came to live on the
banks of our Hudson, a certain Elf King decided to give a tea-
party on one of these very mountains, and to invite a great
prince. He chose a peak over yonder. Do you see the high
hill on the right now covered with snow? Well, there the Elf
gave his banquet.

“Now the guest was no less a person than Rapp, King of
the Gnomes; and if you never heard of him before, it is quite
time he was made known to you. In the first place, he was a
dwarf, with green eyes, a red nose, yellow hair of spun gold,
and a face of copper. His kingdom was in the depths of the
earth ; sometimes he lived in the Rocky Mountains, and again
in the Andes. He did not mind stepping from one continent
to the other in the least. The volcanic fires such as burst
forth from the summits of Vesuvius and Etna were fed by his
subjects, and his domain extended over the rocks which are
richly veined with gold and silver.

“When Rapp felt illhumored he liked to bury himself in
some remote cavern, and the earth then rumbled with his
anger; but he also enjoyed appearing in the upper world oc-
casionally, to see what every one was about. He graciously
accepted the Elf’s invitation to tea. The clever Elf people had

been very busy with the mountain-peak to make it elegant for



58 The Catskill Fazirves.

that day. They smoothed the rough, sharply pointed rocks
into slender pillars draped in vines; a fountain gushed in spark-
ling jets of spray, and a carpet of velvet moss sloped from the
brink of the fountain, fit for the dainty feet about to trip over
it. A grotto of pure crystal reflected the light in a thousand
glittering pendants, so that it resembled transparent ice. In
this grotto was spread a feast of delicious fruits—golden or-
anges, ruddy apples and pears in silver vases, crimson peach-
es, and pyramids of amber honey.

“«T hope everything is in order, said the Elf King. He was
very small, but he wore a red smoking-cap on his head, and
slippers on his feet, crochetted by the Queen out of milkweed
flax. He wished to appear at his ease before the great Rapp,
yet he was terribly flustered for fear of a blunder being made
in the entertainment. The Queen was pretty and delicate; her
apron had for pockets two wings of the lady-bug.

“¢ Tet us dance, cried the young elves.

“ and you must be ready to make your best bow or courtesy.’

“ The little Elf ladies spread their gauzy skirts, and bowed
low as Rapp and his Gnomes appeared. Lapp, being in a very
good-humor, winked at them, and one cannot expect more no-
tice than that from a prince.

“Tt was droll to see the Elf King and Queen seated opposite
to him at table, he was so much larger than they were. The
Elf waiters were obliged to climb silk ladders, which they did
as nimbly as spiders.

Rapp was full of his jokes; he told stories at which the

,merry elves laughed, like the tinkle of bells, and then he rolled



Ln the Charmed Circle. 59

a peach across the board, which knocked the Elf King off his
seat.

“A child’s voice was heard to join in the mirth this oc-
casioned. Yes, it was a human voice, just beyond the bushes.
The elves looked at each other in dismay; Rapp became ter-
ribly enraged: his copper face glowed with wrath, his gold
hair bristled on end like gilded spikes, and his green eyes
flashed fire.

“* What mortal is here?’ he cried.

“Then a little girl crept out of the ferns, and stood trem-
bling before him. She had entered a charmed circle without
knowing it, and had since watched the elves. She was not
like the little girls one sees here now. Her skin was bronze
in color, her hair hung down her back straight and black, her
feet were shod in moccasins. You only find children like her
in the far West—she was an Indian.

“*Why do you disturb our feast, child of man? asked
Rapp, very fiercely. ‘I have only to strike the earth, and my
servants will carry you away to my palace underground for a
hundred years.’

“The child began to cry at this threat, and the elves caught
her tears to sprinkle them over the Gnome King’s hands, and
thus try to soften his heart, which was in reality made of iron.

“«This is my kingdom,’ said the Elf King, with dignity.
‘You are my guest, King Rapp. The little girl shall not be
hurt.’

“< Tell us your story,’ said the Queen, kindly.

“*A story! a story!’ cried the elves, clustering about the
stranger, while Rapp leaned back in his seat, and shut one eye.



60 The Catskill Fatrtes.

“Then the Indian girl told them all about her life. She
lived with her tribe down in the valley. Her father had been
killed in the chase, and her mother also was dead, so she stayed
in the wigwam with her grandmother on the edge of the wood.
The chief did not like the hunter’s children; he took away the
boys to train them for warriors, and he frowned at the girl, so
that the old grandmother hid her when the chief stalked past,
his feathers and war-paint giving him a savage appearance.
Perhaps he did not like the children because their father had
been called Big Chief. The old grandmother gathered herbs
and simples; she was called to the sick as often as the medi-
cine-men.

“The brothers rode off to earn their first scalp, as they
could not be considered heroes until they had killed an enemy ;
and one day the girl sat weaving her mat in the door of the
wigwam, for the Indian women are very industrious. The old
grandmother came quickly.

“«Run to the forest, she whispered. ‘The chief is in a
bad humor, and, now your brothers are gone, he sends for
you.’

“ The girl was in a great fright, the chief was so cruel, and
she ran to the forest without once glancing back. Soon she
was lost in the cool, green twilight made by the lofty trees ;
here and there the sunshine shot golden arrows down on her
path, revealing mossy nooks where she discovered berries, ripe
and dewy, among tangled vines. The flutter of a bird rising
from its nest or the crackling of a branch made her heart
jump, so much did she dread seeing one of her own people.
If one had met her he must carry her back to the chief, or



The Magic Pool. 61



perhaps suffer death himself. She climbed the mountain to
get farther away, her only thought being flight. At last she
reached a pool of clear water, high on the mountain-side, where
his highness Rapp was taking tea, and she stooped to bathe
her face. No sooner had the crystal drops sprinkled her fore-
head than she sank down on a bed of grass fast asleep. Then
the ferns spread their delicate sprays over her, and screened
her from sight. She never knew how long her nap might have
been had not Rapp’s gruff voice aroused her to peep through
the foliage at the tea-party in the grotto.

“The little people were interested in the girl’s misfortunes.
Rapp pretended not to notice, and caught flies, but he really
meant to assist her.

“Go down to my winter palace,’ he said to a favorite



62 The Catskill Fatries.

Gnome servant, ‘and in my dressing-room you will find a
winged jacket. Bring it to me.’

“The Gnome servant bowed low, and dived into the earth
as a bather dips in the ocean wave. Presently he returned
with the winged jacket, which the girl put on.

“* Now listen to me, said King Rapp. ‘You can fly like a
bird in that jacket. If you wish to come into my presence at
any time, you have only to clap the wings thrice, like Chanti-
cleer before crowing, and you will be met by a Gnome, who
will conduct you to my kingdom. You must go to my cham-
ber, and knock on the steel shield at the head of my bed.
Wherever I may be I will answer the summons.’

“The Indian girl thanked the terrible Rapp, and dried her
tears. Then the tiny Elf Queen gave her her apron, which
grew larger and seemed made of the finest silk.

“Whatever article you desire can be had, if you wish with
your hand in your pocket,’ she said.

“ Now the Elf King did not choose to be considered behind
the others in kindness, so he took off his slippers, and placed
them on the child’s feet, which they fitted perfectly.

“* The Queen can make me another pair,’ he said, capering
about barefooted. ‘You can run miles in those shoes without
feeling weary, and the best of it is that they will carry you
over the water dryshod.’

“ The Indian bid them all farewell, and stepped outside the
enchanted circle. Instantly the grotto, the murmuring fount-
ain, the flower-carpet vanished.

“ The sun had set, and dark shadows spread along the forest
paths as the girl hastened home. She would creep into the



A Strange Apparition. 63

Jd

grandmother’s wigwam in the darkness, and tell her of the
fairy gifts she had received. The cruel chief need not be
feared when she was the owner of a winged jacket and the elf
slippers. If the grandmother thought best, she would go away in
the morning, and find another tribe that would treat her kindly.

“ When she reached the valley where the Indian settlement
was situated it was already night, and so dark that she could
not find her wigwam, while she feared to arouse the sleeping
natives. Down on the river-bank she saw little lights, bright
stars that twinkled, some moving on the water, and others re-
maining still on the land. This sight puzzled her, and she
dreaded to approach near enough to learn what they actually
were. While she was wondering, a great boat passed down
the river, sparkling all over with colored flame which did not

burn, and it panted as it moved like some monster breathing













































































































































64. The Catskill Fairies.

heavily. It was as large as one hundred canoes put together.
The girl held her head in both hands, and crouched down on
the ground.

“ More wonderful still! On the other side of the river an-
other terrible creature moved quickly along, with a grinding,
jarring sound. This one was like a serpent, with links to its
body, and it glided over a shining track. The water-demon
only puffed as it moved, this other one uttered a shriek that
startled all the echoes. The Indian girl hid her face on the
bank. She had seen a steamboat and a train of cars.

“ These strange sights decided her not to go beyond the
edge of the woods until daylight. So she wished for a tent
in which to pass the night by putting her hand into the apron
pocket. A tent immediately sprang up in the ravine, and
when she had entered it she began to feel hungry.

“«T should like a pot of hominy,’

“Lo! a caldron stood before her smoking with the most
delicious hominy, and tasting as if the grandmother had just
taken it from the camp-fire. Then she lay down on the
ground and slept soundly, until the first beams of the rising
sun awakened her.

“The village people were much surprised to see an Indian
girl approach, wearing a curious jacket with little wings on the
shoulders, and glittering slippers on her feet. She was equally
astonished by their white faces and houses. Where was the
lodge of the cruel chief? Where were the patches of maize
tended by the women? Where was the grandmother ?

“*Have my people gone away? Who has conquered them?

“ But the villagers did not know what she said, and the rude



The Toad Family. 65

boys formed a ring around her, shouting,‘ You are a witch-
child! Let’s catch her.’

“She sprang high in the air with one bound, spread her
wings, and flew away before their eyes.

“The people were greatly excited; they ran about gazing
up at the little bird-like form in the sky much as we now
look at a balloon; then they ran to the ravine where the beau-
tiful white tent still stood. While they observed it the tent
vanished.

“ «She is an Indian witch, cried the boys.

“«Tt is all Rapp and his Gnomes,” said an old woman.

“ The boys flung burning brands on the spot where the tent
had stood, and the witch-child watched the flames kindle as she
hovered far above. There was nothing to be done further with
the old home; she must search for her own people, and follow
them wherever they had gone. She swept along through the
air with a delightfully easy motion, and did not mind traversing
miles any more than steps on the ground.

“At a great distance from these mountains a toad family
lived at the root of an elm-tree. They were yellow and brown
and ugly, but according to their own ideas the young lady-
toads were quite beautiful. They came forth in the evening
to take the air.

“«Bless my spectacles! cried the toad mother. ‘Here is a
witch-child in a winged jacket. Be very pleasant in your man-
ners, children. We shall see if my Lord Rapp is always to
have his own way!’

“ Then she hopped to the stranger's feet, she having alighted
for the night, and said blandly:

E



66 The Catskill Fairtes.

“« You must be very tired, my dear. Have you come far?’

“«Ves, Can you tell me where to find my people ?”

“ We are only toads, but we have a guest-chamber.’

“The toad family were so kind that the Indian told
them her story; she so much desired to find her own tribe
again.

“The toads blinked and nodded their heads. The toad
mother, after going to the snail which lay in the path, and
tapping on its closed door, presently returned.

“« The snail is a hermit; it does not go out into society, but
likes to stay shut up in its own house. However, it will ask
the night moths, and tell you in the morning. Now go to bed,
darling, she said.

“ The toad guest-chamber was cool and pleasant, for it was
the grass around the tree. They took off the visitor’s slippers
and apron for her, and tried to coax her out of her jacket as
well, but this the witch-child kept on her back. She was no
sooner asleep than the toad mother waddled out to whisper to
the little garden-snake :

“«Run to Mulkgraub as fast as you can, and tell him to
meet me at the toadstool turnpike to-morrow.’

“«T never run—I glide,’ said the snake.

“« Fiddle-de-dee, and don’t be silly. Hurry! said the toad.

“When the witch-child awoke her lovely slippers and apron
were gone, and the toads had also vanished.

“ Searching everywhere she came to the marsh.

“« What is the matter?’ croaked a frog, dressed in green.

“« The toads have stolen my magic shoes,’ she replied.



A very Mean Trick. 67

“*That is like a toad. You would not catch a frog at such
mean tricks. Besides, Mulkgraub pays them,’

“© Who is Mulkgraub ? inquired the Indian,

“* An enemy of King Rapp,’ said the frog,

“« Where can I find my people?’ said the child.

“* Ask the eagle, if you are not afraid, returned the frog.

“« An Indian is never afraid of bird or beast; it’s only those
pale faces that change everything,’ she said, proudly.

“ Then she sought the eagle.

“*Go toward the setting sun—always westward,’ said the
eagle. ‘Mind that Mulkgraub does not catch you.’

“* Where does he live? inquired our witch-child.

“* He lives in the water, and he cannot go very far on land.
He loves to pour floods over the earth and into Rapp’s mines.
They are enemies, because Rapp can quench Mulkgraub with
fire, so that he becomes a vapor-steam.’

“The witch-child thanked the great eagle and flew on.

“In the meanwhile the ugly old toad mother met Mulk-
graub at the toadstool turnpike, and gave him the slippers
and apron.

“One would not have believed him so wicked, for he was
fair and handsome, with a crown of rushes on his head, and
drops of water flowed from his mantle.

“* Perhaps I may drown out Rapp yet, if the rain only helps
me,’ he said, and swallowed the slippers and apron as if they
had been pills.

“He proinised to give a wedding outfit to the toad daughter
that married first, and the mother hopped home well satisfied,
like the mean old toad she was.



68 The Catskill Fairies.





“The second evening the witch-child found a beautiful lady
sitting on the border of a lake. She was robed in leaves, and
her long hair was also green; but she was altogether lovely,
even if her look was sad. She seemed very glad to see the
witch-child, and made her sit down beside her, while she held
her hand.

“*T am chained beneath the waters, and can only rise to the
surface of the lake, she said. ‘I lived on the mainland very
happily until Mulkgraub carried me off in a great storm.’

“*Tet me see your home,’ urged the witch-child, curiously.

“* Mulkgraub might come and find you,’ hesitated the lady.

“«T am not afraid while I wear my jacket.’

“*Then you must be prepared to live in the water, or the
first breath you draw will strangle you.’ So saying the lady



The [sland Lady's Preson. 69

drew from her girdle a golden clam-shell closed in the form of
a bottle, which contained a perfumed liquid. With this she
bathed her companion’s face, and they dived together into the
lake, where the Indian found that she could breathe as easily
as in upper air.

“ Nothing could exceed the beauty of the prison where the
lady lived ; certainly Mulkgraub had given her a handsome resi-
dence, if he was harsh in other respects. It was a large glass
box, with a bell-shaped roof; a broad hall extended from one
entrance to the other, but there was not a dark corner in the
place where one could hide from the King’s searching eye.

“«He is coming,’ cried the lady, hiding the witch-child in the
folds of her robe. Then, as Mulkgraub entered one door, she
darted out of the other, and rising to the lake surface as far
as her chain would allow, placed the Indian on shore safely.
Once out of harm’s way the witch-child began to think of re-
leasing the lady from prison. She must ask King Rapp about
the matter. Accordingly she clapped her wings thrice, and a
Gnome stood at her elbow.

“Is King Rapp well?’ she asked, politely.

“*Of course,’ said the: Gnome, gruffly. ‘He is made of
metal.’

“Then he stamped on the ground, and away they went down
dark passages, through caves, past silent pools where the sun
never shone—down, down, until it ‘seemed as if they must
come out the other side of the world. Here she peeped into
vast treasure-houses of rich ore; there she paused before walls
of. mineral salt; and finally they reached the Gnome palace,

where the atmosphere was hot enough to bake one.



70 The Catskill Fairies.

“ A spacious garden surrounded the palace, with winding
paths, arbors, and fountains, and gorgeous birds flitted from
tree to tree. All was fresh and sparkling, but even the trees
and the fruit on the branches were carved from metals or
jewels. The walls of the palace were jasper and malachite,
while the floors were solid gold, polished like glass.

“On they went, through the gates and into the palace, com-
ing to the Gnome King’s chamber, which had a ceiling of dia-
mond stars, and a bed of silver, fringed and embroidered with
pearls. At the head of the bed hung the large shield, and the
witch-child tapped on it. Rapp appeared immediately, his eyes
greener, his carbuncle nose redder, and his face more like a
burnished copper kettle than ever.

“«T want to help the lady chained in the lake.’

“She is an island, said Rapp. ‘When the lake overflowed
it made her an island by separation from the mainland.’

“«Mulkgraub is very wicked to keep her a prisoner against
her will, said the witch-child. ‘Please assist me to set her
free from his bondage.’

“As to that, we are sworn enemies ; my weapon is volcanic
fire, and his floods of water. Mulkgraub would make you a
slave, if he could, because I helped you; still, you must remem-
ber that he does a great deal of good in the world, as well as
some harm.’

“«What good can he do?’ inquired the witch-child.

“*He works hard for man, carrying vessels, pushing rafts,
and turning mill-wheels. If it were not for my precious metals,
he would be of more service than I am. As for this lady isl-

and, we must see.’



Big Wi
gn

i

oH
fyi is

fies



IOS ATA







The Magic Herb. 7%

“Rapp stroked his beard in profound reflection a moment,
then struck the steel shield seven times. A peal of thunder
seemed to roll over the palace, and a Giant appeared, whose ar-
mor resembled dragon scales, with a helmet of brass on his head.

“«T obey your call, King Rapp, he said, in a deep voice.

“«What can restore the island lady to her home? asked
Rapp.

“ of coffee that will make Mulkgraub sleep, I will bring my
brother, Fire, to dry the water between her and the mainland,
her former home,’ said the Giant.

“« How can the drink be obtained ? demanded Rapp.

“«Send a Gnome to the meadow beyond the brook for the
herb which has a scarlet flower and blue leaves. Put this into
a bottle, which the witch-child will give the prisoner. When
Mulkgraub sleeps, the Indian must spring twice over the top of
the pine-tree, calling Fire, softly. I will answer. With this
advice the Giant thundered away again.

“Rapp sent for the herb with a scarlet flower and blue
leaves, the liquid was distilled into a bottle, and the witch-
child once more stood on the ground in the daylight. There
was the sad island lady dragging her chain, and wishing her-
self home on the mainland. She was given the bottle, and
quickly told what to do when Mulkgraub came to her glass
box for his evening coffee.

“The witch-child hid on the shore, and watched for the sig-
nal which was to assure her that Mulkgraub slept. At last the
lady rose to the surface and waved her hand. Up sprang the

witch-child over the top of the pine-tree, touching the ground



74 The Catskill Fazrtes.

on the other side, and rebounding again like an India- rubber
ball. ‘Fire! fire! she called very softly, under her breath.
Lo! the earth opened and two giant heads emerged; but if
Wind, already seen by the girl, was terrible, Fire was more
so, for a ruddy glow came from his body, and the grass with-
ered before him. The Giant stood on the bank, and hurled a
burning torch into the lake, between the shore and the place
where the island was chained, and the torch devoured the
water, which rose in a cloud of steam, so that the lady stepped
dry-shod back to the mainland.

“ Then there was great rejoicing over her return among the
rocks and trees, and the witch-child received much praise for
her conduct.

“« There is a storm coming, shouted Wind. ‘I go to share
the sport—uprooting trees and whisking off steeples and chim-
neys.’

“« As for me, work is never done in the earth, said Fire.

“ Mulkgraub awoke after the mischief was accomplished ;
the glass box exploded like a soap bubble.

“This is your turn, Rapp, he said. ‘ Wait until the spring
freshets help me to repay you!

“ Always seeking her tribe and never finding them, the witch-
child flew on toward the West. Far below she saw lakes, riv-
ers, and cities; then the wide expanse of prairie became visible,
like a sea of waving grain.

“«This must be the end of the earth, she thought, and
paused.
and the little prairie dogs were sitting on

“It was evening,

top of their mounds to see what was going on, for they were



Always Westward. 75

very curious. When the Indian girl paused to observe them,
they gave a shrill bark, and dived out of sight in their burrows.

“«Can you tell me where to find my people ?’

“ At that all the prairie dogs put out their little noses, and
one answered—

“«The red man has gone beyond; you will find him farther
on.’

“« Always farther on,’ sighed the Indian, wearily.

“Perhaps you will tell me something I should very much
like to know, said the prairie dog, again perching on his
mound. ‘If you made a burrow for yourself and family, would
you enjoy having a white owl and a rattlesnake come to live
with you whether invited or not?

“<«T should not, replied the witch-child.

“*Look here, then, and the prairie dog showed her the hole
in the ground where it dwelt, and where the owl and the snake
would lodge too.

“«There is room for us all, said the owl, in a comfortable
way, as if the prairie dog’s words did not hurt much.

“The witch-child walked forward. The sky seemed to meet
the horizon in a flat line before her; shadows rippled over the
ripening acres of corn. She very well knew that her race
never planted these fields; a patch to last one summer satisfied
them, and the next year they might select another spot to till.
Not a human being was visible; all the scene was very calm
and still.

“ At length she reached a stream bordered with cottonwood-
trees, and paused to drink. Hither filed a herd of buffalo to
slake their thirst.



76 The Catskill Fairies.

“«We know your people well,’ they said. ‘They hunt and
slay us in great numbers. We may be quietly browsing with-
out thought of danger, when the Indians rush down on us like
the wind, and hurl arrows at us before we know well what we
are about.’

“Where shall I find them?’ the girl asked, eagerly.

“«Farther to the west.’

“ The buffaloes thrust their muzzles in the cooling waters,
and the witch-child also held her brown hands in the stream.

“¢Mulkegraub, I begin to love you, she whispered. ‘ Here
you are no longer terrible and mischievous, but give life and
refreshment to all creatures. Then she saw Mulkgraub’s fair
face laughing up at her from the clear depths, and the next
moment her Elf slippers were tossed on the bank. These she
put on and ran so swiftly that she seemed a sunbeam chased
along the grass by the god of day.

“An emigrant train passed, the white wagons loaded with
household furniture; the mothers and infants riding while the
fathers and sons walked before, on the watch for enemies. The

route was long and full of danger.



































“The witch-child presently heard cries of distress, and
mounted on her wings to see what had happened. The

emigrants had paused to search for one of their number, a



The Little Papoose. 7

boy who had strayed away. Nothing can be more terrible
than to be lost in such a place. If savages find the wanderer,
it may be to scalp him or make him a prisoner; hunger and
death come sooner than the savages.

“As soon as she discovered what was the matter, the witch-
child flew back, and saw the boy trying to find the path. He
felt a hand placed on his shoulder which guided him in the
right direction, until he could again behold the white wagons
of the emigrants.

“Once more mounting into the sky, the witch-child came to
a region of furze, sage, and wormwood, with lofty peaks be-
yond. She noticed a smoke as of many fires, and her heart
bounded with the hope that she had found her tribe at last.
Here were lodges and tents, dried venison, and a few horses
near; but the fires came from smouldering ruins of an en-
campment. There had been a battle between warring tribes,
and the place surprised. The witch-child approached sadly,
and what do you suppose she found? A little papoose lying
in a folded blanket unharmed. She took it up to kiss, and
the baby crowed and smiled. What was she to do with it?
Carrying it on her back, Indian fashion, she climbed the first
slopes of the Rocky Mountains, one of King Rapp’s homes.

“Tt was well that she had recovered her Elf slippers, the
baby was so heavy she could not fly. Those were happy days!
She fed the little thing with berries, and sang it to sleep, de-
lighted with the pretty brown face and bright eyes.

“One night she reached a house, a lonely ranch of the bor-
der settler. You would have mistaken her for a thief to see
her steal past the watch-dog into the chamber where the chil-



78 The Catskill Fairtes.

dren slept. Beside these white children she laid the Indian
baby, the last of its tribe, and went away as noiselessly as she
came.

“ Fortunately this was a good home for her charge. Next
day as she rested at noon, the loud report of a rifle startled
her, and a wounded mountain- goat came tumbling down into
the valley. She took to her wings in fright; but as she darted
up into the air, the sportsman aimed at her, supposing she was
some strange specimen of bird. Bang! went the weapon, and
she fell. The sportsman hastened to the spot, but found noth-
ing.

“What do you think became of the witch-child? I believe
that King Rapp opened the earth as she sank down, and that
she lives with him in the Rocky Mountains to this day.”

The Summer Fairy glowed and faded in the radiance of the
hearth.

“The witch-child was, the last Indian seen in these hills,”
rustled the other Summer Fairies. “ We must always remain
as the summer of the year, ranking first in the season, even as
the red man came first among human beings here.”

“ Mousey, I think it is your turn to speak,” said the Angora
cat, wickedly, and stretched out a paw to the captive.

The little mouse hopped in fear as it answered :

“Tt is such a strain on my mind to try to think of a story
that I shall have a nervous headache for the rest of my life.”

“Tut! tut! Remember how sharp my teeth are, and how
very unpleasant it is to have one’s head nipped off,” said the
cat.

This made the mouse desperate; never before had it been

.



Nip Intercedes for Mousey. 79

required to do anything but nibble cheese and bacon rind, and
now the cruel cat would force it to tell a tale, or be eaten alive.
Nip had sat quietly in Job’s hand while the Summer Fairy

was talking,

and pretended to doze, with his little head sway-
ing on one side, like a flower-bell. Now he skipped down,
and clasped his arms around the mouse’s neck, whispering in
its ear.

“ Give the mouse time to think,” said Nip.

“TJ give time,” interposed the clock, striking violently.

The clock liked none of the company to use the word time
besides itself, as it was old and cranky in its ways.

“What change will half an hour make in the mouse’s wits ?”
growled the cat, and she must have been feeling hungry.

As for Job, he was so much amused by his companions
that he could do nothing but look and listen.

“T will tell a story myself, if Queen Puff will stop spinning,
so that I may hear myself speak,” said Nip.



80 The Catskill Fatrves.

NIP’S STORY.

“ Asout the good year 1620 the West Wind stood on her
cloud throne, her fair brow wreathed with ivy tendrils, her clear
gaze brilliant with untold promises, her stately form erect and
instinct with a splendid vitality. She was gazing out over the
sea.

“The waves dashed in clouds of spray against granite head-
lands, and a dark line of forest extended inland as far as eye
could see, unbroken by town or any trace of human life. What
was the West Wind looking at? A tiny vessel tossed like a
cockle-shell on the billows, and steering timidly across the wide
waste of waters. This was the cradle of the queerest baby
ever seen.

“ Of course, the West Wind knew all about it—this found-
ling was to be cast on her care and protection. He had no
space to grow in the crowded nursery where he was born on
the opposite shore of the ocean. The baby’s godfather was a
great king, but he said, ‘Let him go, for he is not like the
other children, and will make trouble when he is a big boy.’

“Do you remember the story about the large, ugly duck-
ling among the little ducks and geese of the barnyard that
would one day become the beautiful swan? Have you ever
heard, Job, that the cuckoo’s egg, if allowed to remain in the

55)
nest of the hedge-sparrow, crowds out the other nestlings ?”



The Wonderful Baby. 81

“ Yes, I know that,” said Job. “Grandfather says”—

“Never mind what Grandfather says,” interrupted saucy
Nip, reclining on his velvet couch—the mouse’s back. “I only
intended to make a comparison between the large duckling
and the cuckoo and my hero. Well, the king godfather was
quite right, for this baby was destined to become a giant, and
would have pushed the other children about had it remained
at home in the nursery.

“ Nearer and nearer came the cradle-vessel while the beauti-
ful West Wind watched. Now there was peril of wreck on
the sharp rocks of that stern coast, but the West Wind cast
a silk cable and drew it safely to shore. The landing was not
too gentle: the infant was drenched in spray, and, emerging
gasping from the cold bath, felt a new life tingle in every vein.
That was the West Wind’s baptism of her charge. Next she
smiled and showed him the gifts stored in her mantle, which
were to be earned, not given away.
soms fell softly on the scented air, like a mist of pink snow;
then he saw sheaves of golden grain, then a cluster of purple
grapes, with crimson autumn leaves. The infant wanderer,
treading for the first time with tender baby feet the soil
of a rugged coast, and extending feeble little hands towards
these treasures, realized. vaguely the greatness of his own
destiny.

“ How the baby throve, to be sure! The cold winds swept
in from the Atlantic, freezing the spray into icicles to festoon
the granite cliffs; Winter seemed to frown on the stranger, yet
he grew.

“Greatest danger of all! Stealthy forms hovered in the dim,

E



82 The Catskill Fairies.



shadowy forest, and glared with looks of hatred at him. Their
faces were dusky in hue—not at all like the baby’s fair race—
and they wore gay feathers nodding above their long, black
hair, while their step was as light and swift as that of the shy
wild animals they pursued in the chase. Yes, and these dark
people were not content with frightening the baby by scowling
at him; they gave shrill whoops and cries, and, twanging their
bows, shot arrows at him which pricked smartly. The West
Wind had a cure for these wounds, the balm of courage and
hope.

“T am speaking about the Indians. Perhaps the Summer



Who was the Baby? 83

Fairies may not like it, but I must tell my story, and they
certainly received the baby very rudely.”

“ How did the baby treat them?” cried the Summer Fairies.

“We will ask Job’s opinion. What if some men came up
the mountain and took your house, saying, ‘We want to live
here; you can go away.’ What would you do ?”

“T would fight ’em,” said Job, promptly.

“ That is just what the Indians did,” said the Fairies.

“ But who was this baby?” asked Job.

“Don’t be in such a hurry. The world was not made in
a minute,” rejoined Nip. “In spite of the Indian enemies,
the cold and storms, this sturdy chap flourished, for he was
made of the best flesh and blood. The forest cleared a
spot here and there, yielding to the strokes of his axe,
where the spring blossoms began to bloom on the fruit-
trees and shower the grass below instead of remaining hid-
den in the folds of the West Wind’s mantle, and planted
grain to ripen under the summer sun for the harvest. The
strangest part of it was that the baby was never idle, and his
play was always work, building houses out of bits of wood,
and making bridges and roads.

“* Let those play who come after me,’ he said, cheerfully.

“So the forests thinned, the dark enemies retreated as the
bright daylight followed the path he made, chasing away the
gloom of solitude.

“ Forward he marched, always following the West Wind, who
beckoned him on to fresh: exertions, and growing from infancy
to childhood as he went on.

“« Now we will have a city, I guess, planned the baby. He



84 The Catskill Fatrves.

began to guess in his very babyhood, and well he might, with
a whole new continent before him—all guess-work.

“The West Wind nodded approval, and he built a crooked
little town, with narrow, winding streets. How the baby archi-
tect enjoyed making the buildings climb steep hills, and then
spared fine trees to shade wide avenues, bordered with green
turf in the heart of all the crowded town. ‘We must have a
bit of country here. So the city was laid out, and the West
Wind beckoned him on to build towns and villages, but he
cherished his first city with a pride that he never felt in any
other, and trotted back, every now and then, to beautify and
improve it, which he has continued to do until the present day.
The baby grew strong and large—one could see that he would
be a towering giant by and by—and his work only grew with
him. As he strode on he left Industry spinning many-colored
threads in his wake, hammering at forge and anvil, turning
great wheels to stir the tranquil rivers, and before him the
forests thinned, admitting the sunshine, and the dark enemies
melted away, like night shadows, at his approach.

“No obstacle could daunt or discourage him; the rough
path. often wounded his feet, his limbs grew very weary, yet
where the West Wind led he followed. When he came to
broad streams he spanned them with bridges; he linked miles
of space together with an iron band of railway, and then he
looped magnetic wires over hill and valley along which thrilled
messages as rapidly as the lightning flashes.

“* Progress !' whistled the locomotive to the earth, and all
Industry’s wheels turned quicker at the sound ; but the locomo-
tive could not overtake the West Wind or her charge.



Nip Plays a Cunning Trick. 85

“ Forward! ever forward! The giant youth saw lakes, and
launched boats on the clear waters, and then he came to the
plains.

“ Forward! ever forward! The Wind daughter led the way
in her chariot of sunset clouds, so that he might hew a path
through the wilderness, and earn the treasures she would scat-
ter broadcast. Through deserts of wormwood, beyond crags
and cliffs mantled in snow, the giant fought his resolute
way, sowing seeds of future growth, finding precious metals,
until he reached the shores of another ocean and the Golden
Gate.

“In the full radiance of the present, behold him! He is a
giant, but he is not at all handsome ; his features are sharp; he
cares nothing about his dress, or the color of his necktie. He
talks through his nose, besides. What name did the West
Wind give him? Not a pretty one, but suited to him —

Vankee.”

“You are a Yankee, yourself,” said Queen Puff, starting her
wheel again.

“IT am proud of being one. You are a Dutchman,” said
Nip.

Queen Puff laughed at being called a Dutchman.

“Tt is true, and I came from Holland in a tile,’ she con-
fessed. |

“JT am tired. Take me to ride around the room, Mousey,”
said Nip.

“T don’t know about that,” said the cat, suspiciously.

“Only a little ride,” urged Nip, looking very roguish all the



86 The Catskill Fatrtes.

while. “If you Fairies will make a ring, we can perform circus
tricks, mouse and I, equal to those of the Hippodrome.”

The others were quite ready for the sport, and soon there
was a fairy ring formed on the floor, with Job and the old
clock to look down on it. Nip was to have his own way in
everything ; they must leave an avenue for the mouse to gal-
lop into the circle in style. “I am clown, ring- master, and
rider, all in one. I should like somebody to hold bits of news-
paper for hoops for me to jump through, and I will borrow
a poppy cloak to leap over. Do I need spurs to make. you
gop”

“ No, no,” hastily squeaked the mouse.

It did Job good to see Nip perform. The mouse went
around the circle, with the Fairy dancing on his back, now
popping through the paper hoops, now springing over the
cloak. At last they paused to rest.

“Let us breathe awhile, and I will show you a trick worth
seeing,” said Nip.

“ Oh, what is it, Nip? Tell us—do,” cried the Fairies.

Nip stood up on the mouse’s back once’ more, and started
around the circle, faster and faster, until with one bound they
darted out of the ring, and the mouse was safe in its hole be-
fore the Angora cat could wink.

“What do you think of that? I told you it was the best
trick of all. Oh, you needn’t make big eyes at me, Madam
Cat, and curl your whiskers, I am not afraid of you, and the
dear little mouse is safe,” said Nip.

“Tf the mouse will join us again, I will promise not to eat

it,” purred the cat, mildly. -











The Winter Fatries. 89

“Thank you, I will just watch what happens from my hole,”
replied the mouse, gayly, poking out its head.

“Tf it is our turn to speak, we will begin,” said the Winter
Fairies from their perch on the window-sill.

“Yes, do tell me something,” said Job, who wished to learn
all that the Fairies could impart. “Only I should like to know
when my present is to be given.”

’

“ Patience,” advised the Angora cat.
Then the first Winter Fairy, leaning against the frosted pane,

began—



go The Catskill Fawries,

THE GREEN BELT.

“ Far away in the backwoods, where the lumber comes from,
a poor widow once lived, with her seven sons, the eldest being
eighteen, and the youngest, Peter, a lad of ten years. Peter
was born with a caul drawn over his head, like a funny little
cap, and the old women said he must meet with great good-
fortune in life on this account.

“The father was a hunter, who trapped the beavers and
otters, but he had been killed by a fall down a precipice.
The winter was very severe, and daily the snow-drifts were
piled higher and higher, hedging in the poor cottage from the
nearest neighbor, who lived two miles distant.

“One night when a violent hailstorm was dashing torrents of
icy musketry upon the roof and against the windows, the fami-
ly gathered around the fire—there would always be fuel with
the forest so near at hand.

“<«Tt is a great deal to be warm, children, said the mother,
spreading her fingers to enjoy the blaze. ‘I must tell you
plainly that the meal-chest is nearly empty, and there is but
one sack of potatoes left.’

“The children pulled on very long faces; they began to feel
pinched under their jackets with hunger. Just then a distinct
tap, tap, was heard on the door.



A Wonderful Gift. gI

“*Can any poor soul be out such a night?’ exclaimed the
mother.

“She unbarred the door, and a gust of hail rushed into the
room, but on the threshold stood a little old woman shivering
with cold. The widow led her to the fire, and at once began
to prepare some hot porridge.

“In the meanwhile the children stared at the stranger with
eager curiosity. She wore a cloak made of squirrel fur, tied
about her throat by the fore-paws; her face was like a puck-
ered lemon, and her eyes two diamonds, so rapidly did they
flash and glitter about the place.

“ Peter advanced to her side fearlessly.

“* Your slippers are dry, he said.

“«That is because my shoemaker fits me with pure ice, my
dear,’ replied the old lady; then she patted him on the head.
‘You are clever because you are a seventh child,’ she added ;
but Peter did not understand one word of such talk.

“The good mother offered the stranger her own bed, the
best she had, and the old woman declared that her fur cloak
was a famous couch as she spread it down in one corner, and
soon the whole family were asleep. In the morning the old
lady had vanished away, and little Peter lay snugly wrapped
in the soft fur, with a green belt beside him. Of course, this
green belt must be a wonderful gift, and the old lady a fairy ;
the family at once decided that to be a fact, yet the belt was
so dingy and faded as to seem useless and only fit to hang on
a peg behind the door, where it was speedily forgotten. The
fur cloak did not vanish away, as they feared it would, and it

was afterwards used by Peter for a bed.



92 The Catskill Fazrtes.

“ The snow rose higher and higher, and the sun could not
warm the keen air. At last there were no more potatoes left
in the cottage, and the poor widow was forced to seek some
help from her neighbors, even if the way was blocked with
deep drifts.

“ Night came on, and the mother did not return. She had
lost her way, and frozen to death in the bitter cold before she
reached the first house. The children watched and waited,
then went to bed supperless. It was very sad that the mother
must perish thus; but such things happen in the winter every
year, especially in the backwoods of which we write.

“ Next morning a pretty squirrel rapped on the window-pane
with one paw, and when the casement was open hopped into
the room quite tamely.

“«T believe that I will skin and eat you, said the eldest
son, trying to catch the animal.

“Not so fast, chattered the squirrel, leaping nimbly up to a
high beam. ‘I can do you more good alive I am thinking.
Why don’t you go out into the world for yourselves ?

“¢T will? cried the eldest brother, and sprang through the
door.

“ A bridge of ice reached from the cottage quite to the heart
of the forest, and when he stepped on it he found it firm as
marble. He soon returned, carrying a beautiful little bird in
his hand, which he had found in the path. The bird had a
crest of scarlet feathers on its head, while the wings were vel-
vet black.

“*Tf you make a nest for the bird, it will lay a pearl egg

every day,’ said the squirrel.



The Silver Gridiron. 93

“«Tet me see what I can do,’ said the second boy, encour-
aged by his brother’s success; so, crossing the ice-bridge, he
disappeared.

“When he came back he carried a copper porridge - pot,
which was so brightly polished that it resembled gold. The
hungry children found a handful of meal, and made porridge
in the new vessel. When they poured out the porridge, the
pot was again full.

“«Tt will always be filled whenever emptied,’ said the squir-
rel, also tasting the dish daintily.

“¢* Hurrah! We shall never be hungry after this, said the
second son, hugging the pot in his arms.

“ Then the third son crossed the ice-bridge, and in less than
five minutes appeared with a silver gridiron.

“Who would like a cake baked on my gridiron? he asked.

“ No sooner was one cake taken, crisp and brown, from the
fire than another lay in its place, and the gridiron did not cease
from cooking until the children were well filled. It must have
taken a great many cakes to make a boy say he had eaten
enough !

“Then the fourth boy said, ‘I will try my luck ;’ and crossed
the bridge as the others had done.

“He found a tiny cask made of rough iron, but it was al-
ways filled with rare, sweet wine, and the supply could never fail.

“The fifth son in his turn found nothing but a delicate white
cloth hanging upon a tree. He entered the cottage with a dole-
ful face and slow step. His portion was only a cloth, when his
brothers had found a bird that would lay pearl eggs, a porridge-
pot always full, a silver gridiron, and a cask of wine.



94 The Catskill Fatrtes.

“Spread the cloth on the table,’ said the squirrel.

“Fancy their astonishment when a grand feast appeared on
the magic cloth. Ducks and turkeys dressed with flowers, de-
licious confectionery in sparkling heaps, and tempting fruits.
The fifth boy’s gift was not so poor a one after all.

“ Then the sixth son walked out, and directly before him lay
a beautiful gold trumpet. He blew a loud blast, and immedi-
ately all animals responded to the summons—bears, monkeys,

jaguars, moose, and deer, even wild cats.



“*Fat us up, if you like, or do anything with us; we are
your slaves, growled the animals together.

“Yes, he had control over all beasts for any service he might
require.

“ shouted the brothers, beside themselves with delight.

“The pretty squirrel sitting up on the beam with its tail
curled over its back was the fairy all the while.

“What am I to own? asked Peter, in dismay.

“The seventh son went out across the ice - bridge and



The Green Belt. 95

searched every path, gazing eagerly up into the trees; but he
found just nothing at all. The brothers, in their own joy,
scarcely noticed poor Peter’s disappointment.

“«T must seek my fortune out in the wide world,’ said the
eldest, taking the scarlet bird in his hand; then with a careless
good-bye he was gone.

“ The others quickly followed, until Peter was left alone.

“ The little squirrel leaped down, and nestled close beside
the weeping child.

“Dry your tears; you are the seventh child, and therefore
the most fortunate of all. Here is the caul with which you
were born, to hang about your neck, and that will bring good
luck. The green belt is your gift

“The squirrel had the same clear diamond eyes that the
old woman possessed who visited their cottage on the stormy
evening.

“Peter took the belt from the peg where it had hung, and,
behold! it was bright in color, and bore these lines—

‘You shall have power to change your shape,
To Lion, Tiger, Dog, or Ape ;
To help the good, torment the bad,

To make some gay, and others sad.’

“Peter danced for joy, and the squirrel skipped also on its
hind feet to keep him company.

“*Put the caul on your head, and you will see just what
your brothers are doing, wherever they go,’ said the squirrel.

“Peter held the dried skin-cap over his head, and shut his
eyes. The first son travelled far, still holding the scarlet bird



96 The Catskill Fawrves.

in his hand. He entered a city in the East, where there were
mosques with glittering domes, palaces, and bazaars. In the
harbor queerly shaped boats darted about, and the stately ships
had the flags of all nations floating from their masts.

“ The first son crossed the court of a magnificent building,
led by black slaves in gorgeous turbans and robes, and entered
a marble-paved hall adorned with pillars and sparkling fount
ains, where a prince sat on his throne, and he bowed low be-
fore him. The prince admired the little scarlet bird, as a
prince has a right to admire a new toy, and he gave to the
owner ten chests of gold coins, a house to live in, and three
trained Arabian horses from the royal stables in exchange
for it.

“*My eldest brother will pass his days in idleness and ease,’
said Peter. ‘He will doze on velvet cushions, be refreshed
with delicate perfumes, and smoke a pipe mounted with gems
and amber. His raiment will be the finest linen, the softest
satin and damask. He will forget entirely that he was ever a
poor boy living in the woods.’

“¢So much for him. Now for the next one.” The squirrel
fairy was very polite in listening to the history, although it
knew already everything that would happen, Peter must
learn to like his gift the best, and so he was to see his broth-
ers first.

“The second son was walking along the road where the
hedges were in bloom and the fields ready for the harvest.
He was ruddy and strong-limbed, as well he might be, for the
porridge -pot never failed. At the farm-house door stood a
pretty maid, as the crimson sunset turned every object to



The Fairy Gifts. 97

red and gold. She was calling the harvest-laborers to their
supper by blowing through the horn; and the second son,
coming among the rest, loved her for her sweet smile and
light footstep as she waited on the table.

“«Tt will be love in a cottage,’ said Peter. ‘ They need never
suffer from hunger while they keep the porridge-pot.’

“* Who comes next?’ inquired the squirrel.

“The third and fourth brothers were together in the city of
Paris, one with his silver gridiron and the other with his table-
cloth, which was always covered with dainties. That was a
famous partnership! They had a cook-shop, called a café, with
tables and waiters. Even great noblemen came to taste of the
cakes baked on the gridiron; and where the nobility lead, com-
mon people must follow the fashion, like one sheep after an-
other.

“The fifth son, no less fortunate than his brothers, drew
sweet wine from the tiny cask, and built a warehouse in which
to store his barrels. The fame of his wine went everywhere,
the flavor was so delicate, because it was made from fairy
grapes, and no one could tell the vintage.

“ The sixth son went to the South American pampas, where
he gathered immense flocks, for all he had to do was to blow
through the trumpet, and cattle followed the sound.

“«T would not choose the place of any of them,’ said Peter,
and the squirrel fairy was pleased with this decision. They
left the cottage to visit the Fairies, and in the depths of the
forest the snow had melted away like magic, as if for the tiny
people to hold their sports. The squirrel here became a fairy
lady no longer than one of Peter’s fingers, and her companions,

G



98 The Catskill Fairies.

dressed in green, so that they resembled moving leaves, wel-
comed her back cordially.

“JT was the old woman and the squirrel too,’ she laughed.
‘I take those forms for travelling about.’

“«Vour eyes are still diamond clear,’ said Peter, and then
he thanked her for all the kindness she had shown to his
family.

“«We trained the bird and made all the other gifts,’ cried
the Fairies. ‘ Then we placed them in the path’

“Peter seated himself on the grass to watch the Fairies

dance; they spun around in giddy circles without losing their



breath, until it made the boy’s eyes ache to look at them. The
fairy music was wonderful, the wee musicians being ranged
around a toadstool upon which stood the leader, and they blew

‘through dandelion stems for instruments.



The Flousehold Sprite. 99

“When they ceased dancing they all clustered about Peter,
and the squirrel fairy sat on his shoulder. One little sprite
had a tiny broom made of thistle, and a dust-brush under one
arm, with which she dusted and swept the flowers surrounding
the fairy circle, until not a speck of dust remained. This
sprite had a sharp nose and a prim little waist. One could
plainly see that she was set in her ways.

“«T am a household spirit, and my name is Pucker. I steal
through the keyhole of the silent houses at night, and if I find
the rooms untidy, I nip the housemaid in her sleep until she
is black and blue. I am very severe on housekeepers. If I
discover the dishes improperly washed, or egg-shells and bones
lying about in the humblest cottage, I tweak the good wife's
nose, and box her ears soundly. Every one can be clean, and
they must be happier for neat homes. I stand no nonsense’
—and the brisk little Pucker began to dust the flowers again
with renewed energy, until the roses and pinks blushed a
deeper red from sheer anger.

“* Will you let our beautiful faces alone?’ they exclaimed.

“«My name is Gull, said a merry, romping fairy, dancing on
a spider-web bridge. ‘I love to play tricks better than to work.
I steal cream and sugar from the closet, and whisk away the
glass of water just as a body is about to drink—that is capt
tal fun P

“*«T am Grim,’ said a short, stout elf with a droll face. ‘I
pull the master’s beard, and throw him into ditches by the
roadside when he comes home from the public-house at
night. He may lie there until morning, yet I give him no

rest; he is pricked with nettles, pounded with sharp stones,



100 The Catskill Fatrtes.

and his boots filled with cold water—that is the way to cure
drunkards.’

“ Peter rose at last.

“«T could stay with you forever, dear Fairies, but I must start
on my travels.’

“ Leaving the forest, he saw three graceful horses in a mead-
ow, now prancing forward with manes and tails streaming on
the wind, now bounding high in the air to vault over the
boundary wall.

“«T should like to be a horse,’ thought Peter. Immediately
he began to prance too—his coat of the softest black color, his
limbs delicately rounded, and his hair like spun silk. A golden
bridle hung over his arched neck, and his hoofs were also shod
with shining gold. The young farmer who owned the meadow
saw the horse nibbling grass, and apparently as tame as a kit-
ten. Although so rich and owning already many steeds, he
was always envious of other people and their possessions.

“«Who has a horse so much more beautiful than any of
mine?’ he inquired, frowning angrily.

“ He advanced towards Peter, and, as no one seemed to claim
the animal, he determined to have it at all hazards. He just
touched the golden bridle, when Peter shook his head saucily,
and danced away. The farmer ran faster after the stranger
horse, bewitched by its beauty, and Peter played all kinds of
pranks. At last he stood still, and the farmer, overjoyed at
such unexpected docility, mounted, when away dashed Peter as
swift as an arrow shot from a bow, the rider clinging to his
back. Peter enjoyed the race; but when he reached the bank
of a river he determined to punish the envious farmer still fur-



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The Baldwin Library



fee CATSKILL FAIRIES.





if ii iH | i
ER

MAU


THE

SAISKILIG FAIRIES.

By VIRGINIA W. JOHNSON,

AUTHOR OF

“JOSEPH THE JEW,” “A SACK OF GOLD,” “THE CALDERWOOD SECRET,” “KETTLE
CLUB SERIES,”’ &c., &c.

ILLUSTRATED BY ALFRED FREDERICKS.

NEW YORK,

HARPER & BROTHERS, PUBLISHERS,
FRANKLIN SQUARE,

1:3, 7.6,
Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1875, by
HARPER & BROTHERS,

In the Office of the Librarian of Congress, at Washington.
CON EWS,

PAGE

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THE CATSKILL FAIRIES.





ALL ABOUT FOB.

“Are you afraid to stay alone?”
asked Grandfather, drawing the
buffalo-robe over his knees, and



taking the reins.
“Not a bit afraid,” said Job,
sturdily, with all a boy’s indigna-

tion at the charge of cowardice.
12 The Catskill Fazirtes.

“You are twelve years old, and almost a man! Well—take
care of the cow, and don’t forget the fowls. I shall be back by
noon, mebbe.”

Then the old wagon creaked away down the hill, moving as
if it had rheumatism in all its joints, the white horses jogged off
soberly, the rim of Grandfather's hat disappeared, and Job was
left alone.

The boy was half afraid all the same. There was not a living
soul left on the mountain besides Job, after Grandfather had
gone. When one is only twelve years old, and is left in this
way, one must feel rather queer at first—at least Job did, and
that is all we can know about it. He stood in the road until
the last sound of the wagon had died away in silence, and at
that moment a little shiver of loneliness crept down his back,
and he did not know whether to laugh or cry. Something
white and soft brushed against him; it was the Angora cat.
You must not suppose that she was an every-day sort of tabby,
such as is found in all farm-houses: she was very different from
common animals, as we shall presently see. At that moment
the cow lowed in her shed, in a friendly way. Job laughed in-
stead of crying.

“He’s gone,” said the lad aloud. “Now, Kitty, let us have
our supper.”

He decided to prepare the evening meal just because he did
not know what else to do. The cat was placed in a chair,
while he spread the board; and as her table manners were very
elegant, she merely sat there winking sleepily instead of trying
to dab her paws into the dishes.

“This is better than living in the woods—isn’t it, puss,” said
Shutting-up for the Night. re

Job, pouring some milk in a saucer. “How cold you looked
that September morning, after the frost, when I found you on
the edge of the ravine.”

“Miouw!” replied the Angora cat.

“ Yes, indeed,” continued Job, as he cut a slice of bread for
himself. “If you had not come to me, Tom Smithers would
have caught you, and carried you down the mountain to all his
brothers and sisters—and a nice life they would have led you.
The baby would have pulled off your tail the first thing, and
how would you have looked without your tail? There! eat
your milk.”

It really seemed as if the Angora understood every word
that Job said, for she gave a little leap in the air, purred vio-
lently, and proceeded to eat daintily. After that the cow was
made comiortable for the night, the hen-house barred securely,
so that no stray fox might steal in, and fresh wood brought
from the wood-pile for the fire. There was nothing more to
be done before going to bed, and Grandfather as well as Job
was usually asleep as soon as the chickens—but then the earli-
est cock that crowed did not catch them napping in the morn-
ing. Before closing the house door, he paused one moment to
look at the sky, which was flooded with gold from the setting
sun. Job was a very ignorant child, but he knew that far
away down the path of shining Hudson River was a great city
and the sea. This city he had never seen, which was not very
strange, since a great many grown people living back among
those Catskill Mountains were equally unlearned. It was the
last of December ; summer had faded, but the autumn had been
long and mild. The mountains towered up blue and grand
14 The Catskill Fairies.

against the heavens, and it seemed as if the snow would never
come from the bleak North this year. Here and there the hills
had a white line on their slopes, as if they had trimmed their

robes with ermine, yet the peaks were still uncovered.



Far down in the shadowy hollow was the spot where Rip
Van Winkle had slept for twenty years, according to the le-
gend. All through the leafy Junes, the glowing Octobers, when
the woods burned in scarlet and crimson, and the cold, silent
winter, Rip must have slumbered. No wonder he was stiff
when he awoke at last. Job had been to the very spot, and
tried to feel sleepy also. Grandfather said the story was all
nonsense, yet somehow Job believed it. Yes, and far away,
over on the brink of a distant precipice, was the hotel, now de-
serted and gloomy, where the gay people flocked in the warm
weather. Job would hide behind the bushes, like a ‘shy, wild
Fob’s Portrait. 15

animal, and watch these strangers, wondering much that they
cared to gather the wild flowers and mosses which he never
noticed. What fun it would be if a bear should come up the
path, only all the bears were gone. There was not even a
rabbit to be seen. If a pedler should pass, Job would invite
him to stay and rest. dry-goods store is to a city boy.

He went into the house, bolted the door, and crept into bed,
where he soon fell fast asleep, with the Angora cat curled up
comfortably beside him.

Now we must paint our hero’s portrait, because we can feel
but little interest in the hero, if, in these days of photography,
we do not know exactly how he looked. Job was a strong,
active boy, and his face was as brown, his cheeks as red, as the
sun and the wind could make them. He wore a battered hat,
when he remembered to put it on, and a jacket made of Grand-
father’s old plum-colored coat, with the tails cut off: Grand-
father being a tailor after his own fashion. When spring came
he tossed his heavy shoes into a cupboard, and ran about bare-
footed, until the frost compelled him to seek them once more.

He had been sent to the little red school-house three miles
away, where he learned to read and write. Nobody knows
what strange fancies came into his head about the clouds and
the moon, living up there alone with Grandfather. This may
seem rather a sad, dreary life to the little men who were born
in merry, crowded nurseries, yet it is astonishing how much
Job found to amuse him. Indeed, he seldom played with other
children, and did not miss them.

There ‘was the early breakfast to get, and the dishes to clear
16 The Catskill Fatrees.

- away afterwards; then the cow must be driven to the pasture,
where the mountain grass made her yield such sweet milk.
After that Job could run wild among the rocks all the
morning, setting snares for birds, searching for hidden nests,
and fishing for trout in the clear brooks, which leaped from
stone to stone with gleeful music. Nor did his resources fail
him in winter, when the wild storms kept him in-doors. Then
he listened to Grandfather's stories about Indians and rattle-
snakes, or read the few tattered volumes their library boasted.
Better still was it to retreat to the store-room, where their pro-
visions were kept as carefully as if they were in a besieged
city, and draw figures on the door with a bit of charcoal for a
pencil. These crooked, wavy lines meant to the young artist
the horses and people of the city.

Grandfather was a bent, wrinkled old man, ‘iis smoked a
pipe, and grumbled—but he was kind for all that. Job did not
take scoldings to heart, for he knew very well that Grand-
father was fond of him as the only relative left him in the
world. When one lives in a small house alone on a mountain,
one has to learn to do everything: Grandfather sewed, r ade
famous bread, and churned the butter. If Job had been used
to any other housewife, he must have found it very funny to
see Grandfather sweep the rag-carpet with his spectacles on;
but to the boy this was the most natural thing in the world.

The mildness of December had tempted Grandfather to
make one more visit to the village, for when the storms came
they were cut off completely from all intercourse with the val-
leys by the deep snow-drifts. He went to buy some food, and

to cross the river to Germantown, where a farmer owed him a
The Snow-Storm. 17

little money. These dollars must be got, and hidden away in
an old pocket-book for the time when Job would be a man.
If Job had gone as well, who would have taken care of the
cow and the fowls?

Next morning Job was awakened by the Angora cat. Pussy
had jumped on his breast, and was licking his cheek with a lit-
tle red tongue. The fact of the matter was, she had been up
a long while, and was becoming very much bored, as well as
hungry. Job sprang out of bed, and ran into the kitchen.
Something strange had happened! The old clock ticked
solemnly in the corner, pointing a hand, as if in reproof, at
the hour of ten. Yes, it was ten o’clock, and Job had never
slept so late before. The kitchen looked just the same. There
was the little table by the window, where Grandfather's large
Bible lay, and the shelf above, with the conch-shell on it. The
fire was out, and it was dreadfully cold. Job pulled aside the
curtain, and peeped out. All the world had grown white. It
was snowing. While he slept the storm had come, filling the
ravines, covering the low shrubbery, and crowning the mount-
ains with fleecy masses. Job was not afraid of the snow; he
was used to it. He kindled a fire, and both he and the cat
warmed themselves. Next he tried to open the house door,
and found it already banked up by a drift. Job’s face grew
very long. How should he reach the cow? There was food
and wood enough in the house to keep him alive, but the cow
must not starve. The cottage was small and poor, consisting
of two rooms, and an attic above. Job ran up-stairs, and looked
out of the attic window. He there saw a gray sky, the air
misty with falling flakes, and the wide sheet of snow below.

B
18 The Catskill Fairies.

At the back of the house the snow was not equally deep, the
building being an obstacle to the growing mass. What do
you suppose he did? He went down-stairs again, put on his
boots, wrapped his neck in a woollen comforter, took the shovel,
and jumped out of the window to make a path to the cow-shed.
The poor cow, supposing that she was never to have her
breakfast, mooed dismally. Job worked with all his might.



Sometimes the cat sprang on the window-ledge to watch him,
but she took very good care not to wet her dainty paws by
skipping out-ofdoors. At last the path was finished, and Job
fed the hungry animal. As he did so he heard the flapping
of wings, and the cocks crowed dolefully in the dark hen-
house, where they supposed it was still night. He had forgot-

ten them until that moment. Dear me! what was to be done?
The Old Clock Bewitched. 19

Job could not leave the poor biddies to die, when he had seen
every one of them come from the egg—wee bundles of down.
The hen-house was more difficult to reach than the cow’s
residence. Job’s arms ached, and his feet were cold, yet he
took up the shovel valiantly, and began to dig again. What
with running to and fro, back to the house to thaw numb
fingers at the fire, getting meals, and continuing to make paths,
it was late in the afternoon before Job had finished his labors.
He was able to throw corn to the chickens only by climbing
on a snow-mound, and scattering it through the small window
of the hen-house. The fowls did not know what to make of
it; they cocked their heads sideways to catch a glimpse of day-
light. While at work Job had been quite happy; when it
was over he began to feel frightened. The storm was in-
creasing, the wind commenced to moan. Grandfather could
not force his way back up the mountain while it lasted, and
that Job very well knew. The boy sat down in Grandfather's
chair, and burst into tears.

“You are too old to cry,” said a grave voice.

Job dried his eyes on his sleeve, and looked up.

“ Who are you?” he asked, curiosity conquering fear.

“Tam the clock. You should know me by this time.”

There it stood in the corner, with a brass ship above the
dial that rocked when the pendulum swung.

“T didn’t suppose you could talk,” laughed Job.

“T usually make enough noise, and I am always on the
minute, I hope. I don’t mind telling you what you will find
out sooner or later—to-night I am bewitched,” said the clock,

: ee
in a rattling way.
20 The Catskill Fairies.

The Angora cat yawned, curled her whiskers in a military
fashion with both her fore-paws, and added, “ Yes, we are be-
witched.”

“What has bewitched you, I should like to know?” said Job,
now quite at his ease, and wishing to understand matters
thoroughly.

“ The sea-shell,” replied the clock.

Job turned to look at the shell as it lay on the shelf; it
glistened in the dim room like a beautiful pearl. “We are to
talk this evening,” murmured the shell. “ After all, a little boy
might spend a more lonely night than here with a clock, a cat,
and a shell.”

“ All great travellers,” said the clock, proudly.

“ And foreigners by birth,” said the cat, whisking her tail.
“ Besides, I have invited company, and you are to have a pres-
ent before you go to bed.”

“ Oh, what is it?” cried Job, with sparkling eyes. “ How can
company get here in all the storm when Grandfather can’t
come ?”

“We shall see,” returned Puss, walking to the window, and
listening with her ear to the crack.

“We have no legs to carry us about like the cat,” sighed the
clock, half enviously. ‘“ Every one in his place, though.”

“The wind brings a message to say that they will be here
in an hour,” said the cat, returning to the fire. “We must
try to amuse ourselves until they come.”

“Who are ¢hey ?” asked Job.

“We shall see,” said Puss again. “One can live anywhere,
I suppose.” This she uttered in a dignified way, as if she were
A Cat of Expertence. 21

used to much better things, and indeed that was what she de-
sired every one to think. “ The Esquimaux dwell in the snow
and ice—even their houses are built of snow; thousands of
people crowd together in damp cellars of great cities; and
away off in hot countries the natives would not leave their
sandy deserts for any thing. I must be contented here.”

“How did you come to know so much?” inquired the old
clock, very impertinently.

“IT am a cat of experience,” said the Angora in a genteel
manner.

Then the clock knew that it had done something amiss, and
clattered away, sounding the hour to cover up the blunder; only
it grew embarrassed, and struck full fifteen times, like the silly
old clock it was.

“Tam sorry to make so much noise, but when I am ready I
cannot help it. My little hammer rises up, you know, and
will fall again.” Having finished this duty, the time-piece was
prepared to be more agreeable, and immediately proceeded to
tell the following story.
22 The Catskill Fatrtes.

THE OLD CLOCK TELLS A STORY.

“Tue first sound you ever heard, Job, was the








ticking of my pendulum, and the very first ob-
ject your baby eyes noticed was my brass ship
rocking, always rocking, as it did years before you
lived, and has done ever since. Babies are some-
times born out on the ocean and in strange places,
but I think that the top of a mountain is a droll
place for a cradle. I will tell you
all about it. I am really very an-
cient—quite a grandfather clock,
as you may see from my wooden
case. I was sent over from -Lon-
don in my youth, and once I was
mended here in America by the
grandson of the clock-maker who made me. He knew me
directly, and said, ‘ Here is my grandfather’s work. At first I
lived in New York, where I was for sale in a shop, until I was
bought by a man who had me placed on a sloop to be taken
up the Hudson River. It was a long voyage in those days,
I promise you, and we were one week on board of the sloop
before we reached our destination. Now the great steamboats
make the same journey in a few hours. I could tell you the
exact time if I were placed on the ‘ Daniel Drew’ in running
e

Unexpected Vesztors. 23

order, and not laid on my back with my pendulum tied. How-
ever, I have no reason to complain. I was purchased by your
grandfather, Job, to place in the new house where he would
bring his bride.

“ Dear, dear! It seems only yesterday when the newly mar-
ried couple stepped across the threshold hand in hand. Their
hair was golden, their cheeks like ripe apples, and outside the
door the damask roses bloomed in the sunshine. So long, long
ago, little Job—as you may tell by my worm-eaten case and
rusty works.

“J remember very well that we had unexpected visitors up
here the day before you were born. There had been no living
soul here for years besides the old man: his wife was dead, and
his only daughter gone away. Well, the door stood open, and
I saw a wagon drive up with two women in it. The younger
one rose, and stretched out her hands to Grandfather, who
stood shading his eyes, and looking at her.

“*Father ! she said, and began to cry.

“*She would come up the mountain to-day,’ said the elder
woman.

“The last speaker was Grandfather's sister, and the younger
one was your mother, Master Job.

“The visitors were made comfortable. The girl promised to
be good, and return to the farm with her aunt next day, after
she had seen her father once more. She had been wilful, and
married a handsome sailor against her parent’s wishes. Now
the sailor was wrecked, and she had come all this weary way
across the seas to beg forgiveness.

“The wind blew fresh about the lonely house. I struck
24 The Catskill Fairies.

twelve, and before I had ceased the angels had brought you
here to live. What do you think of that?”

“Tt is very funny,” said Job. He had never thought of be-
ing much smaller than he was then.

“Yes,” said the clock. “ But when the angels brought you
they carried away your mother. You never saw her after-
wards. You were a sturdy little fellow, and the aunt did
everything for you. She had a goat brought up here, for you
to drink the rich milk. The goat behaved very well, although
it did not like the quarters much. When the aunt wished to
take you away home, Grandfather shook his head. If he was a
clumsy nurse, you thrived. Bless you! babies thrive anywhere ;’
and if you don’t expect them to live, they are sure to do so.

“You had a wee face—I don’t suppose your face will ever
be as large as mine —and bright eyes, and you used to sit
on the floor with your thumb in your mouth staring at my
ship. You never cried much, and soon learned to trot around,
climbing as nimbly as a squirrel. So you see the good God.
sent you as a gift to Grandfather, who lived all alone, and he
has toiled for you day and night. I have watched him many
a time sitting up long after you were sound asleep to sew your
coat or carve a toy. The very least you can do, in return, is
to be a good boy, for he is growing old.”

Job had never given the matter a moment’s reflection. He
could not decide whether he had been a good boy or not.
Now the old clock’s words made a deep impression on his
mind, and he formed a resolution.

“He shall never saw all the wood again!” he exclaimed.

“ Sometimes I forget, you know.” -
get, y
The Sea-Shell Speaks. 25

“ That is right,” said the clock, heartily.

“You will always be glad if you are thoughtful of others,”
said the sea-shell.

“ Grandfather is a good man; he gives me tender morsels,”
said the Angora cat gratefully.

The old clock had finished its story, and for a few minutes
nothing was heard in the room but the slow, steady ticking of
the long pendulum as it swung back and forth, and the quiet
purring of the Angora cat. Job was thinking of what the
clock had told him, when the silence was again broken by the
sea-shell.
26 The Catskill Fairies.

ADVENTURES OF A SEA-SHELL.

“Eacu one may tell what he
knows,” said the sea-shell, in a
soft, liquid voice.

“Where did you come from?
I mean, where did you grow?”
asked Job, eagerly.

A sweet little laugh came

gurgling from the depths of the



shell as water bubbles out of a
clear spring hidden among the moss of the woods.

“Where did I grow? You speak as if I was plucked from
the branch of a tree like fruit. Do you not know that a little,
soft, defenceless animal—a mollusk—built me for a strong
castle to protect it from foes? Then, being something of an
artist in its own tiny fashion, the mollusk painted and decorated
its house, lining it with pearl, as you see, and adding turrets to
the roof. Yes, and the very best of it was that it had only to
close the door firmly, and no enemy could come in; even the
rough waves might toss the house about with no harm to the
inmate.”

“ Where did you live ?” persisted Job.

“T was only the strong castle remember. The mollusk lived

away off in the tropical waters of the Indian Ocean. Above
The Islands of Spice-Trees. a4

the sea bloomed the rich islands where the spice-trees grow,
and cruel pirates lurked along the shore to attack foreign ves-
sels. The pirates, in their swift boats, were like the small
sword -fish that dart forth to attack the whale, wounding the

huge creature on all sides.





















“Chinese junks came there, too, in search of the swallow
nests, built in the rock caverns, which they sold in their markets
for the famous bird-nest soup. Down at the bottom of the
ocean crawled the sea-cucumber, a slow creature, with a trans-
parent body, and pretty, feathery tentacles, like plumes, waving
about the mouth, to draw in food. Even the cucumber was
not safe from the sharp Chinese eyes. Whirr! a prong was
hurled through the water, striking the poor thing with unerr-
ing aim, and up came the cucumber to the surface, to be
28 The Catskill Fairies.

packed as the ‘trepang’ of commerce. If we hide in the
deepest waters, we do not escape; nothing is safe from man.
I left my home one day, with a sudden jerk, just as the tre-
pang did. The mollusk soon died, out of the sea, even as you
would die if your head was held under water. I was left, be-
ing only a shell, and since then I have been a great traveller.
Your mother brought me here in a box. First I was carried
off by a sailor as a gift for his sweetheart at home; yet I never
saw the sweetheart, for the cabin-boy stole me long before we
reached port. The cabin-boy treated me very ill: he traded
me for a gay neck-tie, when I would have really brought him
money if sold for a cabinet. Silly fellow! Then we sailed up
north; I could tell you all about the cold countries.”

“It is cold enough here,” yawned the Angora cat.

“T changed owners half-adozen times among sailors. We
were in the Baltic Sea, and I had been left on deck careless-
ly, when a gull came swooping down on me, made bold by
hunger.

“«VYou are as tough as a Tartar, said the gull, pecking at
me to judge if I was good to eat.

“¢What is a Tartar? I inquired.

“«Don’t be tiresome,’ said the gull, pettishly. ‘My grand-
father knows everything: ask him.’ Then it flew away. I
was glad to have the ship lurch just then, and roll me against
the bulwark out of sight. Presently the gull returned, hopping
along cautiously in the hope of stealing a morsel.

“« Where is your grandfather?’ I asked.

“*Holloa! Are you still there, Mr. Shell?’ cried the gull,

cocking its head over its shoulder.
Grandfather Gull. 29

“*]T will make a bargain with you, I said. ‘If you carry me
to your grandfather, I can tell you where to find food.’

“*« But you are so heavy,’ he objected.

“But you are so hungry,’ I said, quietly.

“*T know it, groaned the gull. ‘I will try to find the old
gentleman instead,

“ Then it flew away again, returning with the grandfather gull,
and I kept my word by showing the birds where they could
obtain food near the cook’s galley. The old gull said he did
not know what the young one meant about Tartars, but he
would tell me a story, if I would excuse his standing on one
leg while speaking, for he had the gout badly in his right
claw. He told me the following tale.
30 Lhe Catskill Fatries.

HOW BIORN DISCOVERED AMERICA.

““Tue Northern nations were a roving people long before
their existence was known in Southern Europe. The Goths
crossed the Baltic Sea in three ships, to grow into a mighty
race capable of subduing Rome; the Swedes were rulers on
the ocean, strong in arms and numbers; the Danes boldly
attacked the English coast, and, after being held in check by
Alfred the Great, established four Danish princes on the
throne. A Scandinavian king ruled in Dublin; early con.
quests were made of the Shetland Isles and the Hebrides;
Scotland was visited by them, when Duncan defeated the in-
vaders, the Scots being commanded by Macbeth and Banquo.

“* The country was too small for all the families to be fed and
lodged, so it was agreed that a certain number of children to
each household should go abroad in search of a living. There
were too many birds in the home nest. The father drove out
his sons when they grew to manhood—except the eldest son,
who was heir to the estate. The sea-kings, or vikings, spread
their sails to discover new lands. Naddod, a Norwegian pirate,
saw one day a dreary looking country, which he named Snow-
land; then Gardar Svarfarson, a Swede, found that it was an
island, and called it Iceland instead, because of its forbidding
aspect. His companions liked the island, and a Norwegian
Jarl took refuge there, founding a colony.
Biorn’s Stormy Voyage. ar

“*Then the sea-kings sailed on, and other shores were found
in the Western Atlantic. In the year 982 a Jarl of Norway
went to Iceland, with his son Eric the Red, and Eric left Ice-
land to roam still farther to the south-west, where he espied a
country which he named Greenland, and made his home at
Eric’s Fiord. Heriolf, one of these early colonists, was a trader,
sailing from place to place in partnership with his son Biorn.

“* Now we shall hear! Biorn, who was a sort of salt-water
pedler, had agreed to meet his father at a certain spot, but
missed him on the open ocean. Lo! a terrible gale arose,
driving Biorn’s vessel like a feather before the wind. The
little craft bounded lightly over the heaving billows, through
sleet and foam—sent far away from the shelter of Greenland,
until the sailors expected that her prow would touch the end
of the world. At last they saw land, a wide region, thick-










































ly wooded. It was a northern cape
of the Gulf of St. Lawrence.
“*What do you suppose this stupid
32 The Catskill Fairtes.

Biorn did? He just drifted around the promontory, looked
at it, and, without setting foot on the shore, spread his sails
before a fresh west wind, the storm having abated, and re-
turned to Greenland, where he found his father Heriolf safely
harbored.

“«That is the way Biorn discovered America, quite ignorant
that he was the first European to touch the strand of a won-
derful New World. This happened long before Christopher
Columbus saw the tropical palm-trees and crystal waters of
the West Indies. Biorn went back, and told the story at least.
Eief, a son of Eric the Red, set sail with thirty-five men, reach-
ed the American coast, and steered along it until he found an
inviting anchorage. The region was delightful: fruits and
berries were ripe, and there was salmon in the river. The
Northmen landed, built huts, and called the spot Vinland,
because of the quantities of grapes they found. Lief spent
a winter in Vinland, then sold his vessel to his brother Thor-
wald in the spring, who stayed another year, exploring the
land. The natives came in canoes to oppose him, and Thor-
wald was killed. The other Northmen remained a third win-
ter. The natives were like the Esquimaux, already known in
Greenland.

«Tn 1007 a rich Greenlander, Thorfin, emigrated to Vinland
with sixty followers and his wife Gudrida. The ships carried
all kinds of animals and food. Gudrida was the first Euro-
pean woman to see the New World, and her son Snorro, born
at Vinland, was the first child of foreign parents in America.
Thorfin’s expedition prospered. The native tribes came in

great numbers to trade in furs, yet Thorfin went home again.
Puss and the Mouse. 33

“*At the mouth of the St. Lawrence traces of these early
settlers have been found. The savages there were different
in aspect, and they knew the cross when the Jesuit mis-
sionaries showed it to them.’

“T have told you the truth, whatever else you may hear to-
night,” concluded the shell.

“So did I tell the truth,” said the clock. “I don’t know
what the cat may do.”

“Speak for yourself, then,” said Puss, quite in a huff. “I
have had no chance to tell my story yet, if you please; and it
seems to me that both of you are fond of hearing yourselves
talk —Oh !”

A little mouse had crept out of its hole; the cat pounced on
it like a flash.

“T can’t imagine why you like those mice,” said the clock.
“It makes me tremble in all my wood-work only to see one,
they have such frightfully sharp teeth, and gnaw such dreadful
holes.”

The Angora cat was terribly excited; her eyes were large,
her whiskers bristled, and she held the poor little mouse be-
tween her paws. One could see how much she was like: those
great relations of hers, the tiger and lion, when they gloat over
their prey.

“What have you got to say for yourself,” growled Kitty.

“Mercy!” squeaked the little mouse, rolling its eyes towards
Job.

“Let Mousey go. You have had your supper,” said Job.

“ Ask me nicely, mouse, and perhaps I will,” said the wicked
cat, enjoying the fright of her captive.

C
34 The Catskill Fairtes.

o

So the little mouse sat on its hind-legs, and crossed its fore-
paws piteously.

“Tam very young to die. I ran away from the nest behind
the beam of the cellar just to see life. Oh! please don’t look
at me like that!” it said faintly.

“JT will not eat you if you tell a story,” said Puss.

“Oh, dear!” piped the little mouse. “How can I tell a
story? I have no ideas, and I have never been even to a
mouse school yet. I am really a baby. To be sure, we have
gnawed a great many books and papers; still we do not read
the print—we only make nests.”

“Do you stay in the corner of the hearth and think of a
story,” said the cat. “If you try to run away I will eat you
in one mouthful. There! I don’t mind your being a baby
mouse at all; your bones will be all the more tender on that
account.”

So the little mouse had to sit in the corner, and make the
best of it. When the cat looked at it, the mouse closed its
eyes, pretending to nap, for it wished to appear very much at
ease, but it trembled in every limb for dread of those terrible
jaws and gleaming eyes.

It was now the cat’s turn to tell a story.

e
Puss begins a Story. 35

ONE OF A CAT’S LIVES.

“IT Know very well that I was born in a palace—that is, a
palace in comparison with this cottage,” said the Angora cat,
stretching herself comfortably on the warm hearthstone.

“What was it like ?” asked Job, glancing around the kitchen.

“Well, it must have been a palace, because there was a
lawn and a park, with winding avenues and flowers. Then
the house was beautiful, large, and spacious, with soft carpets
and velvet cushions. The old lady who lived there owned
twenty cats, and people said she was crazy on the subject of
pets. The cats had an easy life. Each morning a servant
bathed the Angora family, combed our fur, and tied a fresh
ribbon about our necks. How much we were caressed! One
day I was taken to the drawing-room for some visitors to ad-
mire my flossy coat, when I saw an ugly face peering in at
the window, and I hid beneath the dress of my mistress. The
butler told the beggar to go away. ‘I’m hungry,’ said the
man. Now I had never been hungry in my life. After the
visitors left I curled myself up for a nap on the best em-
broidered cushion. Two dirty hands seized me, the ugly face
peered in the window again, and I was hurried away, hidden
from sight beneath the beggar’s ragged coat. In vain I
struggled; he held me firmly until we had crossed the road
behind a hedge, and he took me out to shake mé angrily.
36 The Catskill Fairies.

“« You are always fed, if the children do starve,’ he muttered,
fiercely.

“ He did not kill me, though I was half dead with fright by
the time he reached the miserable hovel where he lived. The
children were hungry, but I was made to rob them of their
scanty portion of milk, because I was to be taken to town and
sold for my beauty. .

“ Fortunately some dear, kind ladies bought me, paying the
man a good price, and I hope that he took the money to the
poor children.

“ Wherever the ladies went on their travels, I was carried in
a basket, and people were warned not to hurt Kitty. At this
strangers smiled, but they were all good to me. We crossed
the ocean in a large steamship, and in the summer we came
up to these mountains. When parties rambled in the woods
I was allowed to go, for there were too many children in the
hotel for my comfort. They play strange pranks with the
most superior cats. When the ladies had a picnic I was at-
tracted by a bird that hopped near in search of crumbs. -I
gave chase, the bird flew away, and when the people called
me I hid behind a rock. I was tired of being petted, so I de-
cided to become a hunter, searching for my own food in the
woods. This served very well until the frost came. Then you -
found me, Job. I made a great many acquaintances in the
woods during my rambles, as you will presently see.”

“Crickets and grasshoppers?” said Job.

“No such thing,” replied the Angora cat. “ Here they are!”

Job could scarcely believe that he was still in his senses,

for in a moment the place was full of Fairies. The wee
The Fairtes Arrive. 37

people came through the keyhole, down the chimney, and
forth from the blazing logs of the fire, with a soft rustle of
wings and a murmur of tiny voices that sounded like the pat-
ter of rain-drops among forest leaves. The boy winked sev-
eral times to make sure he was awake.

At first these visitors looked all alike: their pinions were
spangled like those of a butterfly, and their little forms twin-
kled and hovered about in restless motion; but by degrees they
settled down like fallen blossoms, some on the hearth, others
on the chimney-piece, and two perched on the seashell. The
little mouse moved an inch to run; Puss clapped a paw on it.
Then the Fairies formed a ring around the animal by joining
hands, and danced to their own music. The mouse shivered
with terror; but by degrees it grew brighter, and began to
dance also, hopping on one hind-leg, and nodding its head in
time to the song. That was a droll sight !

Job now saw that the Fairies on the hearth were very plump
and pretty. They wore little petticoats of red rose-leaves, while
their caps and aprons were made from the white rose’s petals.

“T am Queen Puff, and we come from the Lowlands,” said
one, nodding to Job. “You must excuse us if we keep on
with our work while we pay our visit, because we are busy
housewives. Besides, this is Christmas-eve.”

With that two of her maidens brought her spinning-wheel
to Queen Puff, and then all her court took their knitting.
Such a spinning-wheel as that was! The frame was a rose-
thorn, the wheel made of horse-hair, and the distaff wrapped
in a tangle of cobweb, which the Queen spun off in fine silk
threads.
38 The Catskill Fairies.

“ What is it for?” asked Job.

“ These threads make children’s dreams,” replied Puff. “ Of
course there must be a great supply of dream-thread on Christ-
mas-eve for the children of America alone.”

Another group was clustered on the handle of the tongs.
These were clad in pale satin.

”

“We are the Fairies of the Mountain Laurel,” they said.
“You will find us in June on the overhanging banks, where
the ferns and mosses drape the rocks, and the rivulets flow ~
down hill. Then we live in our lovely pink houses; but when
our flowers fade we hide beneath the leaves.”

“T know you right well, and how glad I am to see you in
the spring,” said Job.

On the window-sill, where Jack Frost had made the panes
like ground glass, a number of delicate forms rested, their robes
of snow-flakes, and their helmets of gleaming ice.

“ We are the Winter Fairies, and dare not approach the fire,”
they murmured. “ We live in marble palaces made by our
king, and there are no jewels so splendid as the icicles with
which we hang our halls.”

“We are the Summer Fairies,” said a race that had sprung
from the burning log. They were so radiant that one could
not look at them long; they changed in hue from emerald
green to red and purple, and the flame shone through them.
The Summer Fairies were as unlike Queen Puff’s court as
possible, for their faces were brown, their hair dark like the >
Indians’.

“Where is the Fairy of the Waterfall?” inquired the cat.
“She was to bring Job’s gift.”
The Fairy Pedler. 39



“ Winter has made her a prisoner; but she will beg leave to
come, if the king is in a good-humor. Sometimes he melts.”

“ These are friends I made in the woods last summer,” said
the Angora, proudly.

Just then a queer little form dashed down the chimney, up-
set Queen Puff’s spinning-wheel, and flew into the cat’s face as
a beetle blunders into the candle-flame.

“Gracious! I hope that I’m not late,” said the new-comer.

“Where are your manners?” cried Queen Puff, putting her
cap straight.

“ Beg your pardon, ma’am. I was in a hurry to see Job.”
40 The Catskill Fazrves.

Then he winked at our hero, and began to laugh. This was
Fairy Nip from the Berkshire Hills across the river, and his
garments were made entirely of pumpkin-blossom cloth. He
carried on his back a pack—for he was a fairy pedler—which
he unstrapped and opened.

“ Perhaps I may have something to please you, ladies. Here
is the latest thing in jackets—fly-wings trimmed with dandelion
down ; the effect is quite as good as real lace. My jewelry is
cheap; this set of spider’s eggs, necklace, bracelet, and ear-
drops, I will sell for a mere song. Want any patent medi- ~
cines? Try the Mountain-dew Tonic to make lazy people
work, or the Strawberry-seed Cordial for the appetite. As
to cosmetics, I can make the plainest fairy beautiful in five
seconds by using this Bee Powder.”

The Fairies were very much excited; they crowded around:
the tiny pedler, who sold his wares like wildfire. Queen Puff
left her spinning-wheel, and the Winter Fairies ran great risk-
of melting because they mas¢ peep at the pretty things. The
Summer Fairies showed the greatest fondness for finery, as
they were Indians. They bought mantles of scarlet poppy,
and strutted about to be admired; while of the spider-egg
chains they could not get enough.

When Nip had emptied his pack, he cut a caper, winked
again at Job, and climbed on the mouse’s back, which was -
a soft, velvet couch. The mouse looked like an elephant to:
Nip.

The Sprite of the Mountain Laurel began to speak:

“There are fairies in the New World just as much as in _
the Old, and it is time we should be known, Surely nature
The New World Fairy Homes. 41

has given us quite as beautiful homes as those of our sisters
across the seas; we can hold revels in the heart of forests
where man seldom comes; we may wrap ourselves in the
rainbow mist of the waterfall; and if we wish to live in water
mansions, there are plenty of majestic rivers. What sprite
could desire a more beautiful home than our dear Hudson
yonder? People are stupid, and will not see us.”

“ They are too busy, I guess,” said Nip. “Many a time a
farmer has all but crushed me beneath his foot in my beauti-
ful yellow coat, or I have peeped out of a flower-cup under the
very nose of a man who was too busy thinking about money-
making to see either the flower or Nip. These are the sort
of people who tell the world that there are no fairies.”

The Laurel Queen said she had a story to tell.
42 Lhe Catskill Fairtes.

1HE OAK-TREE SPRITE.

“Ar the foot of these mountains an oak-tree once waved
its long branches, and towered above the grass bank which
sloped away to the brink of a little brook. The brook sang
sweet songs to itself all day long, as it rippled about large
rocks, then flowed smoothly among rushes and marsh flowers.
The birds trilled delicious music overhead; but the oak-tree
had no ear for music, although it had lived beside the brook
for years, and might certainly have learned something from
association by this time.

“«The summer breeze rustles among my leaves, and the
winter storms clash my branches together,’ said the tree. ‘Is
not that enough noise ?’

“*That amounts to just nothing at all,’ replied the brook,
the sunshine dimpling its surface with golden sparkles as it
hurried on to swell the broad Hudson, and roll still further
onward to the sea.

“At last something happened.
the poor cottage; the Doctor came with his medicine-box, and
the parents hovered anxiously about the cradle. When morn-
ing dawned the house had grown still, for in the early hours,
before the sun brought returning warmth and brightness to
the glad earth, a little soul had risen on snowy wings to the
gates of heaven—the child was dead.
The Fairy Carpet-Bag. 43

“Then the father made a tiny grave beneath the oak-tree’s
shade, and flowers soon bloomed, tended by loving, caretul
hands.

“One morning a tall poppy shot up, the
petals unfolded, and from this little red
house out stepped a sprite dressed in the
oak-tree’s livery of green. You might
easily have mistaken him for a grasshop-
per or a locust at a short distance. In
his hand he carried a carpet-bag, stitched
together neatly out of bits of oak-leaf, and
on his head he wore the small end of an
acorn, fashioned into a cap. Altogether
the sprite had a very brisk manner, and
as he came out of the poppy mansion he
gave it a kick, very ungratefully.

“JT am just born, and I belong to you,’



he said, making a low bow to the oak-tree.

“The tree was delighted with the little
man.

“«Shelter yourself in my trunk from the cold, and dance
among my leaves,’ it said, cordially.

“*What am I to do for you in return?’ asked the sprite.

“« You will be my voice,’ replied the tree. ‘The birds shall
teach you to sing,

“«Capital! laughed the sprite. ‘I will hang up my carpet-
bag in a safe corner; I must take good care of that, whatever
happens.’ »

“« Why ? inquired the oak-tree, much interested.
44 The Catskill Fazrves.

“« Because it is a fairy gift.’

“© A fairy carpet-bag—eh ?’ and the tree chuckled.

“ The sprite was charmed with the fresh, beautiful world into
which he had been born. He roamed all over the great oak-
tree, which was a long distance for him to travel, and he was
never lonely, as he found no end of delightful society. There
were the ants and spiders to chat with about their own affairs,
and the stupid caterpillars to poke, for the sprite loved his
pranks as well as older children.

“The oak-tree had very sensible ideas about education ;
the sprite must not play all the while.

“ Soon the news spread that the oak-tree wished to have its
sprite instructed, and all the creatures came flocking to dis-
cuss the matter, as the tree was a general favorite.

“«T can teach the sprite to growl,’ said the black bear.

“« Thanks! said the tree. ‘He is such a tiny fellow it does
not seem necessary that he should do anything besides laugh.’

“«T can teach him to burrow in the ground, or to steal
chickens,’ said a little fox.

“*T can teach him to swim,’ croaked a frog.

“¢ And I to dive below the surface, added a water-rat.

“ Now came the beautiful birds, fluttering in a bright cloud
to perch on the branches, ruffling their soft feathers, cocking |
their pretty heads about as they hopped jauntily from twig to
twig. The sprite stroked the birds with his little hands, and
they chirped gayly.

“©The oak-tree has sheltered us so often that we will gladly
render a service,’ said a swallow.

“« Dear little birds! teach me to sing, begged the sprite.
The Birds give a Music-Lesson. 45

“« Ves, certainly, replied a robin. ‘We must begin at once,
and give you some notes to practice while we are off hunting
our breakfast. Listen to me—tra-la-la !’

“ The other birds set up a clamor before the sprite could re-
peat the notes which had swelled pure and sweet from the
robin’s tiny throat.

“« The robin is no singer,’ piped a saucy wren.

“*J will show you the way to use your chest notes,’ said the
thrush.

“* Bob-o-link ! bob-o-link ?

“* Peet-tweet !

“¢ Chip, chip, chee !

“* The loudest voice is the best,’ screamed a handsome crow.
‘Caw! caw?

“The oak-tree plainly saw that the sprite would be unable
to make anything out of all this noise, so it shook its trunk so
violently that the birds had to take wing, or tumble to the
ground.

“*Qne at a time, if you please,’ said the tree, politely. ‘ The
sprite is so young that he is easily confused.’

“Then each bird hopped out and sang a song.

“* All the songs are so sweet that I like one as well as the
other, said the wise and prudent sprite.

“The birds were offended—each wished to have its song
preferred to that of the rest; so they all flew away as sud-
denly as they came, leaving the sprite to repeat, ‘Caw, caw,
peet-tweet, bob-o-link,’ quite out of tune, because his head was
giddy after the lesson.

“One day the sprite noticed a different music. There had
46 The Catskill Fazirtes.

been a storm, and the brook, swollen by mountain torrents,
rushed along noisily, instead of rippling calmly, and the break
of the waters seemed to the sprite the finest melody he had
ever heard. Day by day he listened as the flood gradually
subsided, and quietly sang to himself as the brook sang.

“ This delighted the oak-tree beyond measure.

“*Now we have music in ourselves, said the tree, joyously.
‘We shall always be happy.’

“ The tree spoke too soon. Ever since its roots had struck
into the soil it had stood there on the bank, and it naturally ©
supposed that matters would never be changed.

“ Dull blows were heard, and many stately trees toppled over
to the ground.

“* What is it? said the sprite, pausing in his play.

“* The wood-cutters,’ said the oak-tree, trembling with fear.
‘You will have no home, little sprite, if they fell me.’

“The sprite ran quickly, and hung his magic carpet -bag
around his neck. Soon a party of wood-cutters approached,
with their sharp axes over their shoulders, and they paused
before our oak-tree because it was the finest they had seen.
They girdled the brave trunk, and then began their work,
each stroke of the cruel steel cutting deeper into the heart
of the wood, as well as the heart of the sprite, who wept as he
clung to the branch from which he must soon be torn. A
shudder of all the leaves, a slow rocking from side to side, and
the oak sank down upon the green bank never to rise again.

“The sprite, with his bag about his neck, which made him
invisible, sorrowfully watched the men at their labor, while they
stripped the boughs, and cut the trunk into logs, so that there
The Sprite Clings to the Oak. 47



was nothing left but a pile of wood. When they moved these
logs, the sprite took his carpet-bag in his hand and trudged
after. He decided never to leave his dear tree while a stick of
it remained. One of the wood-cutters saw the little man, who
was visible when he took his bag in his hand like a traveller.

“* Ffalloo! is that a grasshopper?’ cried the man.

“Instantly the sprite jumped into the grass, and hung the
bag around his neck again. From the lumber-yard to the
mill, where sharp saws smoothed and polished the logs, did
the sprite follow the tree, and at last they reached the shore,
where the firm, stout oak was to build a ship. The sprite saw
a great deal of the world in those busy places, and learned
more than’ the brook or the birds could ever have taught
him.
48 The Catskill Fazrves.

“«T was only a baby then, he thought. ‘Now I must be
grown up.’

“ He roamed everywhere while the ship was building, with
the magic bag to protect him. He crept into the old fruit-
vender’s pocket and spilled her snuff; he peeped into the tin
pails which the children brought for their fathers at noon; and
he clambered about the workmen whose hammers kept time
on the ship’s sides—rat-a-tat-tat.

At last the vessel was finished, and the people gathered to
see her launched. The sprite was on board before any one
else, however, and perched on the bow when the ship slid
gracefully down into the water. There was nothing for the
sprite but to become a sailor, now that the dear oak-tree was
prepared to follow the sea. He enjoyed himself beyond meas-

ure, and he was soon at home in every nook except the medi-



cine-chest. Down in the hold he met the rats, and they were
sharp fellows enough.
“«Ha, ha!’ laughed the rats. ‘We like new ships, too, so

we just skipped on board when all was ready.’
Life on board Ship. 49

“Some of the rats had already made voyages, and these
called themselves ‘Jolly Tars, and other funny names. They
told the sprite what to do in case of shipwreck; nor did their
good services end in mere empty advice, for they brought him
any dainty in the ship’s stores which their sharp noses could
be poked into, and thus he fared very well.

“When tired of the rat company he went to the captain’s
cabin, where a lamp swung all night, and the table had its legs
chained to the floor, to keep it from running away in rough
weather. Here he found a respectable old cat, that told him
there were no rats on board, as it was a new ship, therefore
she need do nothing but doze on a rug all day. The sprite
laughed in his sleeve, for the cat was so old that her whiskers
were gray, and she disliked springing about after the nimble rats.

“The captain was a kind-hearted man, and never inflicted
suffering on his crew. The mate was harsh and stern, using
the rope’s-end or his heavy boot, whenever the captain was
out of sight, to vent his illhumor. The sprite tormented the
wicked mate, and the rats helped him. The sprite stuck pins
into him, pulled his hair, tweaked his nose, tripped him up on
the deck, and tied him in the chair with fine threads, until the
mate feared that he was bewitched.

“The little cabin-boy was homesick. He had run away,
without the consent of his parents, because he fancied that he
should like the sea. Now he discovered how sadly mistaken
he had been. He must work hard and receive many blows
from the surly mate.

“Our sprite pitied the cabin-boy, and when he slept at night
in the close forecastle, the elf took off the top of the little lad’s

D
50 The Catskill Fazries.

head, as you would raise the lid of a tea-pot, and wove dream-
pictures in the sleeper’s brain. Then the sprite, after stocking
thought with bright-colored ideas enough to last through the
next day, just closed the lid of the boy’s head, and marched
off about other business. By this means the cabin-boy grew
happy, and whistled as he worked.

“The ship sailed on, miles and miles, into warm latitudes,
where the soft breeze grew fragrant with the breath of flowers,
and the sea gleamed rosy and green at night like sparkling
showers of diamonds. Land could be seen in the distance,
looming like a faint cloud on the horizon.

“«What a beautiful world! said the sprite, climbing the
rigging to admire the clear sky and tranquil water. ‘That
is the shore over yonder, and soon we shall see strange roofs
and towers, the narrow streets built to shade the people from
a hot sun. The rats told me, and they know.’

“ The sprite was not as near the curious towns as he thought,
for soon he noticed a cloud rising rapidly, and spreading dark
masses over the whole heavens. The sprite scampered down
from the rigging as the tempest came rushing along, heaping
up the waves into mountains, and washing over the deck. The
surly mate was hurled from the bulwark far out into the heav-
ing waters, and no one heard his death-cry, while the ship
plunged and swayed helplessly from side to side.

“The sprite was terrified; he cowered down in the hold,
and the rats nestled close to him, for they had lost their fine
spirits, too. Suddenly a grinding crash announced that the
vessel had struck on a reef, and was at the mercy of the

breakers.
Tossed up by the Sea. 51

“*Every one for himself, cried the sprite, catching a splinter
of wood for a float, and throwing himself overboard. This
was what the rats advised in case of wreck, but not one of
them succeeded in reaching shore. The waves bore our hero
along safely—he was as light as a feather on his oak float;
and finally he was tossed up on the shore more dead than
alive, as a shipwrecked mariner always is, whether sprite or
mortal.

“When the suh rose next morning the brave ship was gone,
and all the crew had perished. A little sprite and a bit of
wood alone remained.

“* Ah, if we were only rooted in our home beside the brook,’
sighed the bit of wood.

“« Are you my tree? cried the sprite.

“Yes; I have brought you to land, and now you must give
me a decent burial on this foreign shore,’ said the last splinter
of the once grand tree.

“So the sprite found a spot high above the waves, and com-
menced to dig a grave with his tiny hands; but he got along
very slowly.

“*T have no patience with such clumsiness!’ said a Mother
Carey’s chicken that happened to be strolling past. Then the
bird would have helped to make the grave by scraping the
sand with its claws.

“*No, no!’ cried the sprite. ‘I must bury my own tree
alone.’

“The bit of wood was dragged to the hole, and a pebble
placed as a head-stone to mark the spot. |

“* The oak-tree is dead,’ sobbed the sprite over the grave.
52 The Catskill Fazries.



“«That can’t be helped,’ said Mother Carey’s chicken, peck-
ing at the carpet-bag, which the sprite had laid out to dry.
The sprite put it around his neck, and disappeared before the
bird’s round eyes; then appeared again, laughing; until Mother
Carey’s chicken did not know what to make of it all. They
got along well together, however, as the sprite had a cosy way
which won friends.

“What part of the world is this?’ he inquired.

“*World? If you ask such hard questions I must take you
to the mussels. They know all sorts of things, which are
brought them by the tide. I have no time for such nonsense,
as I have my living to get.’

“They went to the mussels on a steep cliff jutting out into
the sea, where the waves were running so high that when the
mussels opened their mouths to answer the sprite they only
seemed to gurgle instead of speak.

“* What do they say?’ asked the sprite.

“« They say that you are a great way from your home,’ re-
plied the bird, as he could understand the mussel language

much better than the sprite could.
Mischievous Nop. 53

“ The friendly chicken brought the sprite all sorts of things
to eat, such as made his own supper, but the delicate stranger
could not touch the food.

“«T will call on you in the morning again. With that the
bird flew away.

“The last prank the sprite ever played was to try on the
magic carpet-bag before the amazed Petrel. When the bird
returned at sunrise, an oak-leaf lay on the grave of the tree,
and the sprite had faded from life.”

When the Laurel Queen ceased speaking, some of her fairy
audience clapped their hands politely.

“ Poor little sprite,” said Job.

“TI knew the oak-tree well,” said a Winter Fairy. “ How
many times we hung its branches with icicles. It was years
ago, to be sure—but fairies never grow old; the children who
believe in us become men and women, and forget us. We are
always the same.”

“ Will somebody please make Nip behave ?” asked the clock,
in an injured tone. “I know that he is trying to make mis-
chief with my works by the way he spies through the keyhole
of my case. If he pokes me I shall run down, or come to a
dead-lock in my machinery, and that has never yet happened
to me.”

Nip, who had been capering around the kitchen while the
Laurel Queen told her story, now assumed the most innocent
look.

“Dear me, how touchy you are, Clock! I was only trying

to see how you were made. Perhaps I shall invent a time-
54 The Catskili Faztrces.

piece myself one of these fine days. It’s not uncommon where
I come from,” he said.

“Tf you don’t go away I shall strike, and that will put me
out of order. Be off with you!” said the clock.

“Come here, Nip,’ coaxed Job, holding out his hand. So
Nip flew up and sat in the palm of Job’s hand, crossing his
legs like a Turk. If Job closed his fingers gently over the
saucy elf, he seemed to hold a velvet insect.

The little mouse still crouched in the corner, not daring
to say its body was its own while the Angora cat’s eye was
fixed on it.

“It is my turn to tell a story,” said one of the Summer
Fairies, walking up and down the hearth, wrapped in the red
poppy cloak.

The Elfin Banquet. 57

RAPP, THE GNOME KING.

“ Many years ago, before the white race came to live on the
banks of our Hudson, a certain Elf King decided to give a tea-
party on one of these very mountains, and to invite a great
prince. He chose a peak over yonder. Do you see the high
hill on the right now covered with snow? Well, there the Elf
gave his banquet.

“Now the guest was no less a person than Rapp, King of
the Gnomes; and if you never heard of him before, it is quite
time he was made known to you. In the first place, he was a
dwarf, with green eyes, a red nose, yellow hair of spun gold,
and a face of copper. His kingdom was in the depths of the
earth ; sometimes he lived in the Rocky Mountains, and again
in the Andes. He did not mind stepping from one continent
to the other in the least. The volcanic fires such as burst
forth from the summits of Vesuvius and Etna were fed by his
subjects, and his domain extended over the rocks which are
richly veined with gold and silver.

“When Rapp felt illhumored he liked to bury himself in
some remote cavern, and the earth then rumbled with his
anger; but he also enjoyed appearing in the upper world oc-
casionally, to see what every one was about. He graciously
accepted the Elf’s invitation to tea. The clever Elf people had

been very busy with the mountain-peak to make it elegant for
58 The Catskill Fazirves.

that day. They smoothed the rough, sharply pointed rocks
into slender pillars draped in vines; a fountain gushed in spark-
ling jets of spray, and a carpet of velvet moss sloped from the
brink of the fountain, fit for the dainty feet about to trip over
it. A grotto of pure crystal reflected the light in a thousand
glittering pendants, so that it resembled transparent ice. In
this grotto was spread a feast of delicious fruits—golden or-
anges, ruddy apples and pears in silver vases, crimson peach-
es, and pyramids of amber honey.

“«T hope everything is in order, said the Elf King. He was
very small, but he wore a red smoking-cap on his head, and
slippers on his feet, crochetted by the Queen out of milkweed
flax. He wished to appear at his ease before the great Rapp,
yet he was terribly flustered for fear of a blunder being made
in the entertainment. The Queen was pretty and delicate; her
apron had for pockets two wings of the lady-bug.

“¢ Tet us dance, cried the young elves.

“ and you must be ready to make your best bow or courtesy.’

“ The little Elf ladies spread their gauzy skirts, and bowed
low as Rapp and his Gnomes appeared. Lapp, being in a very
good-humor, winked at them, and one cannot expect more no-
tice than that from a prince.

“Tt was droll to see the Elf King and Queen seated opposite
to him at table, he was so much larger than they were. The
Elf waiters were obliged to climb silk ladders, which they did
as nimbly as spiders.

Rapp was full of his jokes; he told stories at which the

,merry elves laughed, like the tinkle of bells, and then he rolled
Ln the Charmed Circle. 59

a peach across the board, which knocked the Elf King off his
seat.

“A child’s voice was heard to join in the mirth this oc-
casioned. Yes, it was a human voice, just beyond the bushes.
The elves looked at each other in dismay; Rapp became ter-
ribly enraged: his copper face glowed with wrath, his gold
hair bristled on end like gilded spikes, and his green eyes
flashed fire.

“* What mortal is here?’ he cried.

“Then a little girl crept out of the ferns, and stood trem-
bling before him. She had entered a charmed circle without
knowing it, and had since watched the elves. She was not
like the little girls one sees here now. Her skin was bronze
in color, her hair hung down her back straight and black, her
feet were shod in moccasins. You only find children like her
in the far West—she was an Indian.

“*Why do you disturb our feast, child of man? asked
Rapp, very fiercely. ‘I have only to strike the earth, and my
servants will carry you away to my palace underground for a
hundred years.’

“The child began to cry at this threat, and the elves caught
her tears to sprinkle them over the Gnome King’s hands, and
thus try to soften his heart, which was in reality made of iron.

“«This is my kingdom,’ said the Elf King, with dignity.
‘You are my guest, King Rapp. The little girl shall not be
hurt.’

“< Tell us your story,’ said the Queen, kindly.

“*A story! a story!’ cried the elves, clustering about the
stranger, while Rapp leaned back in his seat, and shut one eye.
60 The Catskill Fatrtes.

“Then the Indian girl told them all about her life. She
lived with her tribe down in the valley. Her father had been
killed in the chase, and her mother also was dead, so she stayed
in the wigwam with her grandmother on the edge of the wood.
The chief did not like the hunter’s children; he took away the
boys to train them for warriors, and he frowned at the girl, so
that the old grandmother hid her when the chief stalked past,
his feathers and war-paint giving him a savage appearance.
Perhaps he did not like the children because their father had
been called Big Chief. The old grandmother gathered herbs
and simples; she was called to the sick as often as the medi-
cine-men.

“The brothers rode off to earn their first scalp, as they
could not be considered heroes until they had killed an enemy ;
and one day the girl sat weaving her mat in the door of the
wigwam, for the Indian women are very industrious. The old
grandmother came quickly.

“«Run to the forest, she whispered. ‘The chief is in a
bad humor, and, now your brothers are gone, he sends for
you.’

“ The girl was in a great fright, the chief was so cruel, and
she ran to the forest without once glancing back. Soon she
was lost in the cool, green twilight made by the lofty trees ;
here and there the sunshine shot golden arrows down on her
path, revealing mossy nooks where she discovered berries, ripe
and dewy, among tangled vines. The flutter of a bird rising
from its nest or the crackling of a branch made her heart
jump, so much did she dread seeing one of her own people.
If one had met her he must carry her back to the chief, or
The Magic Pool. 61



perhaps suffer death himself. She climbed the mountain to
get farther away, her only thought being flight. At last she
reached a pool of clear water, high on the mountain-side, where
his highness Rapp was taking tea, and she stooped to bathe
her face. No sooner had the crystal drops sprinkled her fore-
head than she sank down on a bed of grass fast asleep. Then
the ferns spread their delicate sprays over her, and screened
her from sight. She never knew how long her nap might have
been had not Rapp’s gruff voice aroused her to peep through
the foliage at the tea-party in the grotto.

“The little people were interested in the girl’s misfortunes.
Rapp pretended not to notice, and caught flies, but he really
meant to assist her.

“Go down to my winter palace,’ he said to a favorite
62 The Catskill Fatries.

Gnome servant, ‘and in my dressing-room you will find a
winged jacket. Bring it to me.’

“The Gnome servant bowed low, and dived into the earth
as a bather dips in the ocean wave. Presently he returned
with the winged jacket, which the girl put on.

“* Now listen to me, said King Rapp. ‘You can fly like a
bird in that jacket. If you wish to come into my presence at
any time, you have only to clap the wings thrice, like Chanti-
cleer before crowing, and you will be met by a Gnome, who
will conduct you to my kingdom. You must go to my cham-
ber, and knock on the steel shield at the head of my bed.
Wherever I may be I will answer the summons.’

“The Indian girl thanked the terrible Rapp, and dried her
tears. Then the tiny Elf Queen gave her her apron, which
grew larger and seemed made of the finest silk.

“Whatever article you desire can be had, if you wish with
your hand in your pocket,’ she said.

“ Now the Elf King did not choose to be considered behind
the others in kindness, so he took off his slippers, and placed
them on the child’s feet, which they fitted perfectly.

“* The Queen can make me another pair,’ he said, capering
about barefooted. ‘You can run miles in those shoes without
feeling weary, and the best of it is that they will carry you
over the water dryshod.’

“ The Indian bid them all farewell, and stepped outside the
enchanted circle. Instantly the grotto, the murmuring fount-
ain, the flower-carpet vanished.

“ The sun had set, and dark shadows spread along the forest
paths as the girl hastened home. She would creep into the
A Strange Apparition. 63

Jd

grandmother’s wigwam in the darkness, and tell her of the
fairy gifts she had received. The cruel chief need not be
feared when she was the owner of a winged jacket and the elf
slippers. If the grandmother thought best, she would go away in
the morning, and find another tribe that would treat her kindly.

“ When she reached the valley where the Indian settlement
was situated it was already night, and so dark that she could
not find her wigwam, while she feared to arouse the sleeping
natives. Down on the river-bank she saw little lights, bright
stars that twinkled, some moving on the water, and others re-
maining still on the land. This sight puzzled her, and she
dreaded to approach near enough to learn what they actually
were. While she was wondering, a great boat passed down
the river, sparkling all over with colored flame which did not

burn, and it panted as it moved like some monster breathing










































































































































64. The Catskill Fairies.

heavily. It was as large as one hundred canoes put together.
The girl held her head in both hands, and crouched down on
the ground.

“ More wonderful still! On the other side of the river an-
other terrible creature moved quickly along, with a grinding,
jarring sound. This one was like a serpent, with links to its
body, and it glided over a shining track. The water-demon
only puffed as it moved, this other one uttered a shriek that
startled all the echoes. The Indian girl hid her face on the
bank. She had seen a steamboat and a train of cars.

“ These strange sights decided her not to go beyond the
edge of the woods until daylight. So she wished for a tent
in which to pass the night by putting her hand into the apron
pocket. A tent immediately sprang up in the ravine, and
when she had entered it she began to feel hungry.

“«T should like a pot of hominy,’

“Lo! a caldron stood before her smoking with the most
delicious hominy, and tasting as if the grandmother had just
taken it from the camp-fire. Then she lay down on the
ground and slept soundly, until the first beams of the rising
sun awakened her.

“The village people were much surprised to see an Indian
girl approach, wearing a curious jacket with little wings on the
shoulders, and glittering slippers on her feet. She was equally
astonished by their white faces and houses. Where was the
lodge of the cruel chief? Where were the patches of maize
tended by the women? Where was the grandmother ?

“*Have my people gone away? Who has conquered them?

“ But the villagers did not know what she said, and the rude
The Toad Family. 65

boys formed a ring around her, shouting,‘ You are a witch-
child! Let’s catch her.’

“She sprang high in the air with one bound, spread her
wings, and flew away before their eyes.

“The people were greatly excited; they ran about gazing
up at the little bird-like form in the sky much as we now
look at a balloon; then they ran to the ravine where the beau-
tiful white tent still stood. While they observed it the tent
vanished.

“ «She is an Indian witch, cried the boys.

“«Tt is all Rapp and his Gnomes,” said an old woman.

“ The boys flung burning brands on the spot where the tent
had stood, and the witch-child watched the flames kindle as she
hovered far above. There was nothing to be done further with
the old home; she must search for her own people, and follow
them wherever they had gone. She swept along through the
air with a delightfully easy motion, and did not mind traversing
miles any more than steps on the ground.

“At a great distance from these mountains a toad family
lived at the root of an elm-tree. They were yellow and brown
and ugly, but according to their own ideas the young lady-
toads were quite beautiful. They came forth in the evening
to take the air.

“«Bless my spectacles! cried the toad mother. ‘Here is a
witch-child in a winged jacket. Be very pleasant in your man-
ners, children. We shall see if my Lord Rapp is always to
have his own way!’

“ Then she hopped to the stranger's feet, she having alighted
for the night, and said blandly:

E
66 The Catskill Fairtes.

“« You must be very tired, my dear. Have you come far?’

“«Ves, Can you tell me where to find my people ?”

“ We are only toads, but we have a guest-chamber.’

“The toad family were so kind that the Indian told
them her story; she so much desired to find her own tribe
again.

“The toads blinked and nodded their heads. The toad
mother, after going to the snail which lay in the path, and
tapping on its closed door, presently returned.

“« The snail is a hermit; it does not go out into society, but
likes to stay shut up in its own house. However, it will ask
the night moths, and tell you in the morning. Now go to bed,
darling, she said.

“ The toad guest-chamber was cool and pleasant, for it was
the grass around the tree. They took off the visitor’s slippers
and apron for her, and tried to coax her out of her jacket as
well, but this the witch-child kept on her back. She was no
sooner asleep than the toad mother waddled out to whisper to
the little garden-snake :

“«Run to Mulkgraub as fast as you can, and tell him to
meet me at the toadstool turnpike to-morrow.’

“«T never run—I glide,’ said the snake.

“« Fiddle-de-dee, and don’t be silly. Hurry! said the toad.

“When the witch-child awoke her lovely slippers and apron
were gone, and the toads had also vanished.

“ Searching everywhere she came to the marsh.

“« What is the matter?’ croaked a frog, dressed in green.

“« The toads have stolen my magic shoes,’ she replied.
A very Mean Trick. 67

“*That is like a toad. You would not catch a frog at such
mean tricks. Besides, Mulkgraub pays them,’

“© Who is Mulkgraub ? inquired the Indian,

“* An enemy of King Rapp,’ said the frog,

“« Where can I find my people?’ said the child.

“* Ask the eagle, if you are not afraid, returned the frog.

“« An Indian is never afraid of bird or beast; it’s only those
pale faces that change everything,’ she said, proudly.

“ Then she sought the eagle.

“*Go toward the setting sun—always westward,’ said the
eagle. ‘Mind that Mulkgraub does not catch you.’

“* Where does he live? inquired our witch-child.

“* He lives in the water, and he cannot go very far on land.
He loves to pour floods over the earth and into Rapp’s mines.
They are enemies, because Rapp can quench Mulkgraub with
fire, so that he becomes a vapor-steam.’

“The witch-child thanked the great eagle and flew on.

“In the meanwhile the ugly old toad mother met Mulk-
graub at the toadstool turnpike, and gave him the slippers
and apron.

“One would not have believed him so wicked, for he was
fair and handsome, with a crown of rushes on his head, and
drops of water flowed from his mantle.

“* Perhaps I may drown out Rapp yet, if the rain only helps
me,’ he said, and swallowed the slippers and apron as if they
had been pills.

“He proinised to give a wedding outfit to the toad daughter
that married first, and the mother hopped home well satisfied,
like the mean old toad she was.
68 The Catskill Fairies.





“The second evening the witch-child found a beautiful lady
sitting on the border of a lake. She was robed in leaves, and
her long hair was also green; but she was altogether lovely,
even if her look was sad. She seemed very glad to see the
witch-child, and made her sit down beside her, while she held
her hand.

“*T am chained beneath the waters, and can only rise to the
surface of the lake, she said. ‘I lived on the mainland very
happily until Mulkgraub carried me off in a great storm.’

“*Tet me see your home,’ urged the witch-child, curiously.

“* Mulkgraub might come and find you,’ hesitated the lady.

“«T am not afraid while I wear my jacket.’

“*Then you must be prepared to live in the water, or the
first breath you draw will strangle you.’ So saying the lady
The [sland Lady's Preson. 69

drew from her girdle a golden clam-shell closed in the form of
a bottle, which contained a perfumed liquid. With this she
bathed her companion’s face, and they dived together into the
lake, where the Indian found that she could breathe as easily
as in upper air.

“ Nothing could exceed the beauty of the prison where the
lady lived ; certainly Mulkgraub had given her a handsome resi-
dence, if he was harsh in other respects. It was a large glass
box, with a bell-shaped roof; a broad hall extended from one
entrance to the other, but there was not a dark corner in the
place where one could hide from the King’s searching eye.

“«He is coming,’ cried the lady, hiding the witch-child in the
folds of her robe. Then, as Mulkgraub entered one door, she
darted out of the other, and rising to the lake surface as far
as her chain would allow, placed the Indian on shore safely.
Once out of harm’s way the witch-child began to think of re-
leasing the lady from prison. She must ask King Rapp about
the matter. Accordingly she clapped her wings thrice, and a
Gnome stood at her elbow.

“Is King Rapp well?’ she asked, politely.

“*Of course,’ said the: Gnome, gruffly. ‘He is made of
metal.’

“Then he stamped on the ground, and away they went down
dark passages, through caves, past silent pools where the sun
never shone—down, down, until it ‘seemed as if they must
come out the other side of the world. Here she peeped into
vast treasure-houses of rich ore; there she paused before walls
of. mineral salt; and finally they reached the Gnome palace,

where the atmosphere was hot enough to bake one.
70 The Catskill Fairies.

“ A spacious garden surrounded the palace, with winding
paths, arbors, and fountains, and gorgeous birds flitted from
tree to tree. All was fresh and sparkling, but even the trees
and the fruit on the branches were carved from metals or
jewels. The walls of the palace were jasper and malachite,
while the floors were solid gold, polished like glass.

“On they went, through the gates and into the palace, com-
ing to the Gnome King’s chamber, which had a ceiling of dia-
mond stars, and a bed of silver, fringed and embroidered with
pearls. At the head of the bed hung the large shield, and the
witch-child tapped on it. Rapp appeared immediately, his eyes
greener, his carbuncle nose redder, and his face more like a
burnished copper kettle than ever.

“«T want to help the lady chained in the lake.’

“She is an island, said Rapp. ‘When the lake overflowed
it made her an island by separation from the mainland.’

“«Mulkgraub is very wicked to keep her a prisoner against
her will, said the witch-child. ‘Please assist me to set her
free from his bondage.’

“As to that, we are sworn enemies ; my weapon is volcanic
fire, and his floods of water. Mulkgraub would make you a
slave, if he could, because I helped you; still, you must remem-
ber that he does a great deal of good in the world, as well as
some harm.’

“«What good can he do?’ inquired the witch-child.

“*He works hard for man, carrying vessels, pushing rafts,
and turning mill-wheels. If it were not for my precious metals,
he would be of more service than I am. As for this lady isl-

and, we must see.’
Big Wi
gn

i

oH
fyi is

fies



IOS ATA

The Magic Herb. 7%

“Rapp stroked his beard in profound reflection a moment,
then struck the steel shield seven times. A peal of thunder
seemed to roll over the palace, and a Giant appeared, whose ar-
mor resembled dragon scales, with a helmet of brass on his head.

“«T obey your call, King Rapp, he said, in a deep voice.

“«What can restore the island lady to her home? asked
Rapp.

“ of coffee that will make Mulkgraub sleep, I will bring my
brother, Fire, to dry the water between her and the mainland,
her former home,’ said the Giant.

“« How can the drink be obtained ? demanded Rapp.

“«Send a Gnome to the meadow beyond the brook for the
herb which has a scarlet flower and blue leaves. Put this into
a bottle, which the witch-child will give the prisoner. When
Mulkgraub sleeps, the Indian must spring twice over the top of
the pine-tree, calling Fire, softly. I will answer. With this
advice the Giant thundered away again.

“Rapp sent for the herb with a scarlet flower and blue
leaves, the liquid was distilled into a bottle, and the witch-
child once more stood on the ground in the daylight. There
was the sad island lady dragging her chain, and wishing her-
self home on the mainland. She was given the bottle, and
quickly told what to do when Mulkgraub came to her glass
box for his evening coffee.

“The witch-child hid on the shore, and watched for the sig-
nal which was to assure her that Mulkgraub slept. At last the
lady rose to the surface and waved her hand. Up sprang the

witch-child over the top of the pine-tree, touching the ground
74 The Catskill Fazrtes.

on the other side, and rebounding again like an India- rubber
ball. ‘Fire! fire! she called very softly, under her breath.
Lo! the earth opened and two giant heads emerged; but if
Wind, already seen by the girl, was terrible, Fire was more
so, for a ruddy glow came from his body, and the grass with-
ered before him. The Giant stood on the bank, and hurled a
burning torch into the lake, between the shore and the place
where the island was chained, and the torch devoured the
water, which rose in a cloud of steam, so that the lady stepped
dry-shod back to the mainland.

“ Then there was great rejoicing over her return among the
rocks and trees, and the witch-child received much praise for
her conduct.

“« There is a storm coming, shouted Wind. ‘I go to share
the sport—uprooting trees and whisking off steeples and chim-
neys.’

“« As for me, work is never done in the earth, said Fire.

“ Mulkgraub awoke after the mischief was accomplished ;
the glass box exploded like a soap bubble.

“This is your turn, Rapp, he said. ‘ Wait until the spring
freshets help me to repay you!

“ Always seeking her tribe and never finding them, the witch-
child flew on toward the West. Far below she saw lakes, riv-
ers, and cities; then the wide expanse of prairie became visible,
like a sea of waving grain.

“«This must be the end of the earth, she thought, and
paused.
and the little prairie dogs were sitting on

“It was evening,

top of their mounds to see what was going on, for they were
Always Westward. 75

very curious. When the Indian girl paused to observe them,
they gave a shrill bark, and dived out of sight in their burrows.

“«Can you tell me where to find my people ?’

“ At that all the prairie dogs put out their little noses, and
one answered—

“«The red man has gone beyond; you will find him farther
on.’

“« Always farther on,’ sighed the Indian, wearily.

“Perhaps you will tell me something I should very much
like to know, said the prairie dog, again perching on his
mound. ‘If you made a burrow for yourself and family, would
you enjoy having a white owl and a rattlesnake come to live
with you whether invited or not?

“<«T should not, replied the witch-child.

“*Look here, then, and the prairie dog showed her the hole
in the ground where it dwelt, and where the owl and the snake
would lodge too.

“«There is room for us all, said the owl, in a comfortable
way, as if the prairie dog’s words did not hurt much.

“The witch-child walked forward. The sky seemed to meet
the horizon in a flat line before her; shadows rippled over the
ripening acres of corn. She very well knew that her race
never planted these fields; a patch to last one summer satisfied
them, and the next year they might select another spot to till.
Not a human being was visible; all the scene was very calm
and still.

“ At length she reached a stream bordered with cottonwood-
trees, and paused to drink. Hither filed a herd of buffalo to
slake their thirst.
76 The Catskill Fairies.

“«We know your people well,’ they said. ‘They hunt and
slay us in great numbers. We may be quietly browsing with-
out thought of danger, when the Indians rush down on us like
the wind, and hurl arrows at us before we know well what we
are about.’

“Where shall I find them?’ the girl asked, eagerly.

“«Farther to the west.’

“ The buffaloes thrust their muzzles in the cooling waters,
and the witch-child also held her brown hands in the stream.

“¢Mulkegraub, I begin to love you, she whispered. ‘ Here
you are no longer terrible and mischievous, but give life and
refreshment to all creatures. Then she saw Mulkgraub’s fair
face laughing up at her from the clear depths, and the next
moment her Elf slippers were tossed on the bank. These she
put on and ran so swiftly that she seemed a sunbeam chased
along the grass by the god of day.

“An emigrant train passed, the white wagons loaded with
household furniture; the mothers and infants riding while the
fathers and sons walked before, on the watch for enemies. The

route was long and full of danger.



































“The witch-child presently heard cries of distress, and
mounted on her wings to see what had happened. The

emigrants had paused to search for one of their number, a
The Little Papoose. 7

boy who had strayed away. Nothing can be more terrible
than to be lost in such a place. If savages find the wanderer,
it may be to scalp him or make him a prisoner; hunger and
death come sooner than the savages.

“As soon as she discovered what was the matter, the witch-
child flew back, and saw the boy trying to find the path. He
felt a hand placed on his shoulder which guided him in the
right direction, until he could again behold the white wagons
of the emigrants.

“Once more mounting into the sky, the witch-child came to
a region of furze, sage, and wormwood, with lofty peaks be-
yond. She noticed a smoke as of many fires, and her heart
bounded with the hope that she had found her tribe at last.
Here were lodges and tents, dried venison, and a few horses
near; but the fires came from smouldering ruins of an en-
campment. There had been a battle between warring tribes,
and the place surprised. The witch-child approached sadly,
and what do you suppose she found? A little papoose lying
in a folded blanket unharmed. She took it up to kiss, and
the baby crowed and smiled. What was she to do with it?
Carrying it on her back, Indian fashion, she climbed the first
slopes of the Rocky Mountains, one of King Rapp’s homes.

“Tt was well that she had recovered her Elf slippers, the
baby was so heavy she could not fly. Those were happy days!
She fed the little thing with berries, and sang it to sleep, de-
lighted with the pretty brown face and bright eyes.

“One night she reached a house, a lonely ranch of the bor-
der settler. You would have mistaken her for a thief to see
her steal past the watch-dog into the chamber where the chil-
78 The Catskill Fairtes.

dren slept. Beside these white children she laid the Indian
baby, the last of its tribe, and went away as noiselessly as she
came.

“ Fortunately this was a good home for her charge. Next
day as she rested at noon, the loud report of a rifle startled
her, and a wounded mountain- goat came tumbling down into
the valley. She took to her wings in fright; but as she darted
up into the air, the sportsman aimed at her, supposing she was
some strange specimen of bird. Bang! went the weapon, and
she fell. The sportsman hastened to the spot, but found noth-
ing.

“What do you think became of the witch-child? I believe
that King Rapp opened the earth as she sank down, and that
she lives with him in the Rocky Mountains to this day.”

The Summer Fairy glowed and faded in the radiance of the
hearth.

“The witch-child was, the last Indian seen in these hills,”
rustled the other Summer Fairies. “ We must always remain
as the summer of the year, ranking first in the season, even as
the red man came first among human beings here.”

“ Mousey, I think it is your turn to speak,” said the Angora
cat, wickedly, and stretched out a paw to the captive.

The little mouse hopped in fear as it answered :

“Tt is such a strain on my mind to try to think of a story
that I shall have a nervous headache for the rest of my life.”

“Tut! tut! Remember how sharp my teeth are, and how
very unpleasant it is to have one’s head nipped off,” said the
cat.

This made the mouse desperate; never before had it been

.
Nip Intercedes for Mousey. 79

required to do anything but nibble cheese and bacon rind, and
now the cruel cat would force it to tell a tale, or be eaten alive.
Nip had sat quietly in Job’s hand while the Summer Fairy

was talking,

and pretended to doze, with his little head sway-
ing on one side, like a flower-bell. Now he skipped down,
and clasped his arms around the mouse’s neck, whispering in
its ear.

“ Give the mouse time to think,” said Nip.

“TJ give time,” interposed the clock, striking violently.

The clock liked none of the company to use the word time
besides itself, as it was old and cranky in its ways.

“What change will half an hour make in the mouse’s wits ?”
growled the cat, and she must have been feeling hungry.

As for Job, he was so much amused by his companions
that he could do nothing but look and listen.

“T will tell a story myself, if Queen Puff will stop spinning,
so that I may hear myself speak,” said Nip.
80 The Catskill Fatrves.

NIP’S STORY.

“ Asout the good year 1620 the West Wind stood on her
cloud throne, her fair brow wreathed with ivy tendrils, her clear
gaze brilliant with untold promises, her stately form erect and
instinct with a splendid vitality. She was gazing out over the
sea.

“The waves dashed in clouds of spray against granite head-
lands, and a dark line of forest extended inland as far as eye
could see, unbroken by town or any trace of human life. What
was the West Wind looking at? A tiny vessel tossed like a
cockle-shell on the billows, and steering timidly across the wide
waste of waters. This was the cradle of the queerest baby
ever seen.

“ Of course, the West Wind knew all about it—this found-
ling was to be cast on her care and protection. He had no
space to grow in the crowded nursery where he was born on
the opposite shore of the ocean. The baby’s godfather was a
great king, but he said, ‘Let him go, for he is not like the
other children, and will make trouble when he is a big boy.’

“Do you remember the story about the large, ugly duck-
ling among the little ducks and geese of the barnyard that
would one day become the beautiful swan? Have you ever
heard, Job, that the cuckoo’s egg, if allowed to remain in the

55)
nest of the hedge-sparrow, crowds out the other nestlings ?”
The Wonderful Baby. 81

“ Yes, I know that,” said Job. “Grandfather says”—

“Never mind what Grandfather says,” interrupted saucy
Nip, reclining on his velvet couch—the mouse’s back. “I only
intended to make a comparison between the large duckling
and the cuckoo and my hero. Well, the king godfather was
quite right, for this baby was destined to become a giant, and
would have pushed the other children about had it remained
at home in the nursery.

“ Nearer and nearer came the cradle-vessel while the beauti-
ful West Wind watched. Now there was peril of wreck on
the sharp rocks of that stern coast, but the West Wind cast
a silk cable and drew it safely to shore. The landing was not
too gentle: the infant was drenched in spray, and, emerging
gasping from the cold bath, felt a new life tingle in every vein.
That was the West Wind’s baptism of her charge. Next she
smiled and showed him the gifts stored in her mantle, which
were to be earned, not given away.
soms fell softly on the scented air, like a mist of pink snow;
then he saw sheaves of golden grain, then a cluster of purple
grapes, with crimson autumn leaves. The infant wanderer,
treading for the first time with tender baby feet the soil
of a rugged coast, and extending feeble little hands towards
these treasures, realized. vaguely the greatness of his own
destiny.

“ How the baby throve, to be sure! The cold winds swept
in from the Atlantic, freezing the spray into icicles to festoon
the granite cliffs; Winter seemed to frown on the stranger, yet
he grew.

“Greatest danger of all! Stealthy forms hovered in the dim,

E
82 The Catskill Fairies.



shadowy forest, and glared with looks of hatred at him. Their
faces were dusky in hue—not at all like the baby’s fair race—
and they wore gay feathers nodding above their long, black
hair, while their step was as light and swift as that of the shy
wild animals they pursued in the chase. Yes, and these dark
people were not content with frightening the baby by scowling
at him; they gave shrill whoops and cries, and, twanging their
bows, shot arrows at him which pricked smartly. The West
Wind had a cure for these wounds, the balm of courage and
hope.

“T am speaking about the Indians. Perhaps the Summer
Who was the Baby? 83

Fairies may not like it, but I must tell my story, and they
certainly received the baby very rudely.”

“ How did the baby treat them?” cried the Summer Fairies.

“We will ask Job’s opinion. What if some men came up
the mountain and took your house, saying, ‘We want to live
here; you can go away.’ What would you do ?”

“T would fight ’em,” said Job, promptly.

“ That is just what the Indians did,” said the Fairies.

“ But who was this baby?” asked Job.

“Don’t be in such a hurry. The world was not made in
a minute,” rejoined Nip. “In spite of the Indian enemies,
the cold and storms, this sturdy chap flourished, for he was
made of the best flesh and blood. The forest cleared a
spot here and there, yielding to the strokes of his axe,
where the spring blossoms began to bloom on the fruit-
trees and shower the grass below instead of remaining hid-
den in the folds of the West Wind’s mantle, and planted
grain to ripen under the summer sun for the harvest. The
strangest part of it was that the baby was never idle, and his
play was always work, building houses out of bits of wood,
and making bridges and roads.

“* Let those play who come after me,’ he said, cheerfully.

“So the forests thinned, the dark enemies retreated as the
bright daylight followed the path he made, chasing away the
gloom of solitude.

“ Forward he marched, always following the West Wind, who
beckoned him on to fresh: exertions, and growing from infancy
to childhood as he went on.

“« Now we will have a city, I guess, planned the baby. He
84 The Catskill Fatrves.

began to guess in his very babyhood, and well he might, with
a whole new continent before him—all guess-work.

“The West Wind nodded approval, and he built a crooked
little town, with narrow, winding streets. How the baby archi-
tect enjoyed making the buildings climb steep hills, and then
spared fine trees to shade wide avenues, bordered with green
turf in the heart of all the crowded town. ‘We must have a
bit of country here. So the city was laid out, and the West
Wind beckoned him on to build towns and villages, but he
cherished his first city with a pride that he never felt in any
other, and trotted back, every now and then, to beautify and
improve it, which he has continued to do until the present day.
The baby grew strong and large—one could see that he would
be a towering giant by and by—and his work only grew with
him. As he strode on he left Industry spinning many-colored
threads in his wake, hammering at forge and anvil, turning
great wheels to stir the tranquil rivers, and before him the
forests thinned, admitting the sunshine, and the dark enemies
melted away, like night shadows, at his approach.

“No obstacle could daunt or discourage him; the rough
path. often wounded his feet, his limbs grew very weary, yet
where the West Wind led he followed. When he came to
broad streams he spanned them with bridges; he linked miles
of space together with an iron band of railway, and then he
looped magnetic wires over hill and valley along which thrilled
messages as rapidly as the lightning flashes.

“* Progress !' whistled the locomotive to the earth, and all
Industry’s wheels turned quicker at the sound ; but the locomo-
tive could not overtake the West Wind or her charge.
Nip Plays a Cunning Trick. 85

“ Forward! ever forward! The giant youth saw lakes, and
launched boats on the clear waters, and then he came to the
plains.

“ Forward! ever forward! The Wind daughter led the way
in her chariot of sunset clouds, so that he might hew a path
through the wilderness, and earn the treasures she would scat-
ter broadcast. Through deserts of wormwood, beyond crags
and cliffs mantled in snow, the giant fought his resolute
way, sowing seeds of future growth, finding precious metals,
until he reached the shores of another ocean and the Golden
Gate.

“In the full radiance of the present, behold him! He is a
giant, but he is not at all handsome ; his features are sharp; he
cares nothing about his dress, or the color of his necktie. He
talks through his nose, besides. What name did the West
Wind give him? Not a pretty one, but suited to him —

Vankee.”

“You are a Yankee, yourself,” said Queen Puff, starting her
wheel again.

“IT am proud of being one. You are a Dutchman,” said
Nip.

Queen Puff laughed at being called a Dutchman.

“Tt is true, and I came from Holland in a tile,’ she con-
fessed. |

“JT am tired. Take me to ride around the room, Mousey,”
said Nip.

“T don’t know about that,” said the cat, suspiciously.

“Only a little ride,” urged Nip, looking very roguish all the
86 The Catskill Fatrtes.

while. “If you Fairies will make a ring, we can perform circus
tricks, mouse and I, equal to those of the Hippodrome.”

The others were quite ready for the sport, and soon there
was a fairy ring formed on the floor, with Job and the old
clock to look down on it. Nip was to have his own way in
everything ; they must leave an avenue for the mouse to gal-
lop into the circle in style. “I am clown, ring- master, and
rider, all in one. I should like somebody to hold bits of news-
paper for hoops for me to jump through, and I will borrow
a poppy cloak to leap over. Do I need spurs to make. you
gop”

“ No, no,” hastily squeaked the mouse.

It did Job good to see Nip perform. The mouse went
around the circle, with the Fairy dancing on his back, now
popping through the paper hoops, now springing over the
cloak. At last they paused to rest.

“Let us breathe awhile, and I will show you a trick worth
seeing,” said Nip.

“ Oh, what is it, Nip? Tell us—do,” cried the Fairies.

Nip stood up on the mouse’s back once’ more, and started
around the circle, faster and faster, until with one bound they
darted out of the ring, and the mouse was safe in its hole be-
fore the Angora cat could wink.

“What do you think of that? I told you it was the best
trick of all. Oh, you needn’t make big eyes at me, Madam
Cat, and curl your whiskers, I am not afraid of you, and the
dear little mouse is safe,” said Nip.

“Tf the mouse will join us again, I will promise not to eat

it,” purred the cat, mildly. -


The Winter Fatries. 89

“Thank you, I will just watch what happens from my hole,”
replied the mouse, gayly, poking out its head.

“Tf it is our turn to speak, we will begin,” said the Winter
Fairies from their perch on the window-sill.

“Yes, do tell me something,” said Job, who wished to learn
all that the Fairies could impart. “Only I should like to know
when my present is to be given.”

’

“ Patience,” advised the Angora cat.
Then the first Winter Fairy, leaning against the frosted pane,

began—
go The Catskill Fawries,

THE GREEN BELT.

“ Far away in the backwoods, where the lumber comes from,
a poor widow once lived, with her seven sons, the eldest being
eighteen, and the youngest, Peter, a lad of ten years. Peter
was born with a caul drawn over his head, like a funny little
cap, and the old women said he must meet with great good-
fortune in life on this account.

“The father was a hunter, who trapped the beavers and
otters, but he had been killed by a fall down a precipice.
The winter was very severe, and daily the snow-drifts were
piled higher and higher, hedging in the poor cottage from the
nearest neighbor, who lived two miles distant.

“One night when a violent hailstorm was dashing torrents of
icy musketry upon the roof and against the windows, the fami-
ly gathered around the fire—there would always be fuel with
the forest so near at hand.

“<«Tt is a great deal to be warm, children, said the mother,
spreading her fingers to enjoy the blaze. ‘I must tell you
plainly that the meal-chest is nearly empty, and there is but
one sack of potatoes left.’

“The children pulled on very long faces; they began to feel
pinched under their jackets with hunger. Just then a distinct
tap, tap, was heard on the door.
A Wonderful Gift. gI

“*Can any poor soul be out such a night?’ exclaimed the
mother.

“She unbarred the door, and a gust of hail rushed into the
room, but on the threshold stood a little old woman shivering
with cold. The widow led her to the fire, and at once began
to prepare some hot porridge.

“In the meanwhile the children stared at the stranger with
eager curiosity. She wore a cloak made of squirrel fur, tied
about her throat by the fore-paws; her face was like a puck-
ered lemon, and her eyes two diamonds, so rapidly did they
flash and glitter about the place.

“ Peter advanced to her side fearlessly.

“* Your slippers are dry, he said.

“«That is because my shoemaker fits me with pure ice, my
dear,’ replied the old lady; then she patted him on the head.
‘You are clever because you are a seventh child,’ she added ;
but Peter did not understand one word of such talk.

“The good mother offered the stranger her own bed, the
best she had, and the old woman declared that her fur cloak
was a famous couch as she spread it down in one corner, and
soon the whole family were asleep. In the morning the old
lady had vanished away, and little Peter lay snugly wrapped
in the soft fur, with a green belt beside him. Of course, this
green belt must be a wonderful gift, and the old lady a fairy ;
the family at once decided that to be a fact, yet the belt was
so dingy and faded as to seem useless and only fit to hang on
a peg behind the door, where it was speedily forgotten. The
fur cloak did not vanish away, as they feared it would, and it

was afterwards used by Peter for a bed.
92 The Catskill Fazrtes.

“ The snow rose higher and higher, and the sun could not
warm the keen air. At last there were no more potatoes left
in the cottage, and the poor widow was forced to seek some
help from her neighbors, even if the way was blocked with
deep drifts.

“ Night came on, and the mother did not return. She had
lost her way, and frozen to death in the bitter cold before she
reached the first house. The children watched and waited,
then went to bed supperless. It was very sad that the mother
must perish thus; but such things happen in the winter every
year, especially in the backwoods of which we write.

“ Next morning a pretty squirrel rapped on the window-pane
with one paw, and when the casement was open hopped into
the room quite tamely.

“«T believe that I will skin and eat you, said the eldest
son, trying to catch the animal.

“Not so fast, chattered the squirrel, leaping nimbly up to a
high beam. ‘I can do you more good alive I am thinking.
Why don’t you go out into the world for yourselves ?

“¢T will? cried the eldest brother, and sprang through the
door.

“ A bridge of ice reached from the cottage quite to the heart
of the forest, and when he stepped on it he found it firm as
marble. He soon returned, carrying a beautiful little bird in
his hand, which he had found in the path. The bird had a
crest of scarlet feathers on its head, while the wings were vel-
vet black.

“*Tf you make a nest for the bird, it will lay a pearl egg

every day,’ said the squirrel.
The Silver Gridiron. 93

“«Tet me see what I can do,’ said the second boy, encour-
aged by his brother’s success; so, crossing the ice-bridge, he
disappeared.

“When he came back he carried a copper porridge - pot,
which was so brightly polished that it resembled gold. The
hungry children found a handful of meal, and made porridge
in the new vessel. When they poured out the porridge, the
pot was again full.

“«Tt will always be filled whenever emptied,’ said the squir-
rel, also tasting the dish daintily.

“¢* Hurrah! We shall never be hungry after this, said the
second son, hugging the pot in his arms.

“ Then the third son crossed the ice-bridge, and in less than
five minutes appeared with a silver gridiron.

“Who would like a cake baked on my gridiron? he asked.

“ No sooner was one cake taken, crisp and brown, from the
fire than another lay in its place, and the gridiron did not cease
from cooking until the children were well filled. It must have
taken a great many cakes to make a boy say he had eaten
enough !

“Then the fourth boy said, ‘I will try my luck ;’ and crossed
the bridge as the others had done.

“He found a tiny cask made of rough iron, but it was al-
ways filled with rare, sweet wine, and the supply could never fail.

“The fifth son in his turn found nothing but a delicate white
cloth hanging upon a tree. He entered the cottage with a dole-
ful face and slow step. His portion was only a cloth, when his
brothers had found a bird that would lay pearl eggs, a porridge-
pot always full, a silver gridiron, and a cask of wine.
94 The Catskill Fatrtes.

“Spread the cloth on the table,’ said the squirrel.

“Fancy their astonishment when a grand feast appeared on
the magic cloth. Ducks and turkeys dressed with flowers, de-
licious confectionery in sparkling heaps, and tempting fruits.
The fifth boy’s gift was not so poor a one after all.

“ Then the sixth son walked out, and directly before him lay
a beautiful gold trumpet. He blew a loud blast, and immedi-
ately all animals responded to the summons—bears, monkeys,

jaguars, moose, and deer, even wild cats.



“*Fat us up, if you like, or do anything with us; we are
your slaves, growled the animals together.

“Yes, he had control over all beasts for any service he might
require.

“ shouted the brothers, beside themselves with delight.

“The pretty squirrel sitting up on the beam with its tail
curled over its back was the fairy all the while.

“What am I to own? asked Peter, in dismay.

“The seventh son went out across the ice - bridge and
The Green Belt. 95

searched every path, gazing eagerly up into the trees; but he
found just nothing at all. The brothers, in their own joy,
scarcely noticed poor Peter’s disappointment.

“«T must seek my fortune out in the wide world,’ said the
eldest, taking the scarlet bird in his hand; then with a careless
good-bye he was gone.

“ The others quickly followed, until Peter was left alone.

“ The little squirrel leaped down, and nestled close beside
the weeping child.

“Dry your tears; you are the seventh child, and therefore
the most fortunate of all. Here is the caul with which you
were born, to hang about your neck, and that will bring good
luck. The green belt is your gift

“The squirrel had the same clear diamond eyes that the
old woman possessed who visited their cottage on the stormy
evening.

“Peter took the belt from the peg where it had hung, and,
behold! it was bright in color, and bore these lines—

‘You shall have power to change your shape,
To Lion, Tiger, Dog, or Ape ;
To help the good, torment the bad,

To make some gay, and others sad.’

“Peter danced for joy, and the squirrel skipped also on its
hind feet to keep him company.

“*Put the caul on your head, and you will see just what
your brothers are doing, wherever they go,’ said the squirrel.

“Peter held the dried skin-cap over his head, and shut his
eyes. The first son travelled far, still holding the scarlet bird
96 The Catskill Fawrves.

in his hand. He entered a city in the East, where there were
mosques with glittering domes, palaces, and bazaars. In the
harbor queerly shaped boats darted about, and the stately ships
had the flags of all nations floating from their masts.

“ The first son crossed the court of a magnificent building,
led by black slaves in gorgeous turbans and robes, and entered
a marble-paved hall adorned with pillars and sparkling fount
ains, where a prince sat on his throne, and he bowed low be-
fore him. The prince admired the little scarlet bird, as a
prince has a right to admire a new toy, and he gave to the
owner ten chests of gold coins, a house to live in, and three
trained Arabian horses from the royal stables in exchange
for it.

“*My eldest brother will pass his days in idleness and ease,’
said Peter. ‘He will doze on velvet cushions, be refreshed
with delicate perfumes, and smoke a pipe mounted with gems
and amber. His raiment will be the finest linen, the softest
satin and damask. He will forget entirely that he was ever a
poor boy living in the woods.’

“¢So much for him. Now for the next one.” The squirrel
fairy was very polite in listening to the history, although it
knew already everything that would happen, Peter must
learn to like his gift the best, and so he was to see his broth-
ers first.

“The second son was walking along the road where the
hedges were in bloom and the fields ready for the harvest.
He was ruddy and strong-limbed, as well he might be, for the
porridge -pot never failed. At the farm-house door stood a
pretty maid, as the crimson sunset turned every object to
The Fairy Gifts. 97

red and gold. She was calling the harvest-laborers to their
supper by blowing through the horn; and the second son,
coming among the rest, loved her for her sweet smile and
light footstep as she waited on the table.

“«Tt will be love in a cottage,’ said Peter. ‘ They need never
suffer from hunger while they keep the porridge-pot.’

“* Who comes next?’ inquired the squirrel.

“The third and fourth brothers were together in the city of
Paris, one with his silver gridiron and the other with his table-
cloth, which was always covered with dainties. That was a
famous partnership! They had a cook-shop, called a café, with
tables and waiters. Even great noblemen came to taste of the
cakes baked on the gridiron; and where the nobility lead, com-
mon people must follow the fashion, like one sheep after an-
other.

“The fifth son, no less fortunate than his brothers, drew
sweet wine from the tiny cask, and built a warehouse in which
to store his barrels. The fame of his wine went everywhere,
the flavor was so delicate, because it was made from fairy
grapes, and no one could tell the vintage.

“ The sixth son went to the South American pampas, where
he gathered immense flocks, for all he had to do was to blow
through the trumpet, and cattle followed the sound.

“«T would not choose the place of any of them,’ said Peter,
and the squirrel fairy was pleased with this decision. They
left the cottage to visit the Fairies, and in the depths of the
forest the snow had melted away like magic, as if for the tiny
people to hold their sports. The squirrel here became a fairy
lady no longer than one of Peter’s fingers, and her companions,

G
98 The Catskill Fairies.

dressed in green, so that they resembled moving leaves, wel-
comed her back cordially.

“JT was the old woman and the squirrel too,’ she laughed.
‘I take those forms for travelling about.’

“«Vour eyes are still diamond clear,’ said Peter, and then
he thanked her for all the kindness she had shown to his
family.

“«We trained the bird and made all the other gifts,’ cried
the Fairies. ‘ Then we placed them in the path’

“Peter seated himself on the grass to watch the Fairies

dance; they spun around in giddy circles without losing their



breath, until it made the boy’s eyes ache to look at them. The
fairy music was wonderful, the wee musicians being ranged
around a toadstool upon which stood the leader, and they blew

‘through dandelion stems for instruments.
The Flousehold Sprite. 99

“When they ceased dancing they all clustered about Peter,
and the squirrel fairy sat on his shoulder. One little sprite
had a tiny broom made of thistle, and a dust-brush under one
arm, with which she dusted and swept the flowers surrounding
the fairy circle, until not a speck of dust remained. This
sprite had a sharp nose and a prim little waist. One could
plainly see that she was set in her ways.

“«T am a household spirit, and my name is Pucker. I steal
through the keyhole of the silent houses at night, and if I find
the rooms untidy, I nip the housemaid in her sleep until she
is black and blue. I am very severe on housekeepers. If I
discover the dishes improperly washed, or egg-shells and bones
lying about in the humblest cottage, I tweak the good wife's
nose, and box her ears soundly. Every one can be clean, and
they must be happier for neat homes. I stand no nonsense’
—and the brisk little Pucker began to dust the flowers again
with renewed energy, until the roses and pinks blushed a
deeper red from sheer anger.

“* Will you let our beautiful faces alone?’ they exclaimed.

“«My name is Gull, said a merry, romping fairy, dancing on
a spider-web bridge. ‘I love to play tricks better than to work.
I steal cream and sugar from the closet, and whisk away the
glass of water just as a body is about to drink—that is capt
tal fun P

“*«T am Grim,’ said a short, stout elf with a droll face. ‘I
pull the master’s beard, and throw him into ditches by the
roadside when he comes home from the public-house at
night. He may lie there until morning, yet I give him no

rest; he is pricked with nettles, pounded with sharp stones,
100 The Catskill Fatrtes.

and his boots filled with cold water—that is the way to cure
drunkards.’

“ Peter rose at last.

“«T could stay with you forever, dear Fairies, but I must start
on my travels.’

“ Leaving the forest, he saw three graceful horses in a mead-
ow, now prancing forward with manes and tails streaming on
the wind, now bounding high in the air to vault over the
boundary wall.

“«T should like to be a horse,’ thought Peter. Immediately
he began to prance too—his coat of the softest black color, his
limbs delicately rounded, and his hair like spun silk. A golden
bridle hung over his arched neck, and his hoofs were also shod
with shining gold. The young farmer who owned the meadow
saw the horse nibbling grass, and apparently as tame as a kit-
ten. Although so rich and owning already many steeds, he
was always envious of other people and their possessions.

“«Who has a horse so much more beautiful than any of
mine?’ he inquired, frowning angrily.

“ He advanced towards Peter, and, as no one seemed to claim
the animal, he determined to have it at all hazards. He just
touched the golden bridle, when Peter shook his head saucily,
and danced away. The farmer ran faster after the stranger
horse, bewitched by its beauty, and Peter played all kinds of
pranks. At last he stood still, and the farmer, overjoyed at
such unexpected docility, mounted, when away dashed Peter as
swift as an arrow shot from a bow, the rider clinging to his
back. Peter enjoyed the race; but when he reached the bank
of a river he determined to punish the envious farmer still fur-
A Friend in Need. IOI

ther, so he plunged into the stream, wished himself a fish, and
slid away from under the rider, leaving him floundering in
deep water.

“* Perhaps that will teach him a lesson, said Peter, watching
the farmer climb the bank again.

“Then he swam to the opposite shore, and became a boy,
with his green belt around his waist.

“Presently he came to a house, where all was silent except
the cackling of the fowls in the barn-yard. The door stood
wide open, and on the step lay the dog winking lazily in the sun.
Peter boldly entered, and in the corner he found a young girl
sitting alone, with a pile of flax on the floor and her spinning-
wheel before her.

“* Why do you stay in the dark corner?’ asked Peter.

“* Because every one has gone to the county fair, and left me
alone, sobbed the girl. ‘My mistress said I could not leave
until my work was done, and she very well knew that I could
not finish it before nightfall. Oh! I want to see the fat cattle
and the big vegetables, the bedquilts and prize bread, so much!

“ Peter just stepped forward and kissed her on both eyelids,
and she fell asleep.

“*T want the Fairies,’ whispered the boy.

“ Through the window they fluttered like a cloud of brilliant
butterflies. No need to tell them what to do; for Pucker set to
work on the wheel, which whizzed around without making the
least noise, and the threads were wound off by no less nimble
fingers. Fairy Grim, having no drunken men to trip up, began
to sort the flax, and Fairy Gull dressed the sleeping girl by

changing her cotton gown to cashmere, and twining bright rb-
102 The Catskill Fatries.

bons in her hair. How surprised she was when she opened her
eyes five minutes later to find the work neatly finished, herself
gayly dressed, and a donkey standing before the door, with a
saddle of red leather trimmed with bells on his back, ready to
carry her to the fair!

“This donkey was our friend Peter; and when the poor girl
had mounted his back, away he trotted as fast as his four little
legs would carry him. He did not allow himself to show any
ugly donkey tricks, such as lying down to roll in the dust, or
shying at a stream of water. When they reached the borders
of the town, he left the girl to go on alone, and became a boy,
as he did not like the donkey character much,

« After that Peter became a madcap, if ever there was one. He
blew out the farmers’ pipes, overturned the hay-mounds, tied the
dairymaids to the cows’ tails, and set all the dogs crazy. Then
he went to a city, where he was one day a chimney-sweep, scram-
bling through the flues and sprinkling soot down to make peo-
ple sneeze, and an organ-grinder the next. He pretended to be
a beggar with one leg; he pulled door-bells and ran away; he
laid traps for thieves, so that the police seized them. All this
Peter called seeing life; yet he soon grew weary of it. He went
back to the forest to see the squirrel fairy; and when he entered
the familiar path she ran to meet him gladly. Although Peter
had been gone many years, the squirrel was as young as ever,
with the sparkling diamond eyes.

“ tell you what to do—you should win glory as a soldier, and
there will soon be a war across the seas.’

“So Peter went across seas; and he had no sooner set foot in







































































































Wine
i BYE








An Army of Carrot Soldters. 105

a foreign land than he heard that the Emperor of the country
had declared war on a neighboring Prince. Peter bought a
field of carrots, and when they were ripe he changed them into
an army of splendid soldiers, and placed himself at the head in
a gold uniform to match the yellow colors of the regiments.

“«We serve under the Emperor,’ he said, drawing up his
men before the Imperial Palace.

“«Will you charge the enemy now? asked the Emperor.

“The sooner the better, returned the brave Peter. ‘The
troops will not wither then; and if they do fall, they are only
vegetable men after all, he added to himself.

“Peter and his carrot soldiers attacked the enemy with tre-
mendous vigor, so that they were driven at the point of the bay-
onet into the river, their only choice being to jump into the wa-
ter or become spiked on the weapons like cockchafers.

“ After the engagement the carrot troops retired into the for-
est, where they died, and the Fairies buried them in considera-
tion of their valiant deeds.

“ Peter was created commander-in-chief of the Imperial forces,
as he was flesh and blood instead of carrot. Of course he could
not be made commander-in-chief without stepping into some
other man’s shoes. General Rub-a-dub did not like the change
at all. He declared that if the Emperor would only have given
him time he could have dug trenches about the enemy, attacked
them by flank movements and other military tactics, until they
were safely bagged, every soldier of them, instead of giving
Peter all the glory.

“«Where are your troops?’ asked General Rub-a-dub, before
the Emperor himself.
106 The Catskill Fairies.

“«They disbanded in the woods,’ said Peter.

“<«T saw nothing but a pile of carrots, retorted General Rub-
a-dub. ‘I believe your soldiers were nothing but carrot men.
after all.’

“*Nonsense!’ cried the Emperor, growing purple in the face
with wrath at the idea of his empire being defended by an
army of carrots. ‘If I believed half that you say, Rub-a-dub, I
would command that every carrot in my dominions should be
pulled up by the roots, and no more be planted for one while.’

“«T will execute the wise order, if it please your majesty,’ Gen-
eral Rub-a-dub hastened to reply. ‘Without his carrots, you
will find that your new commander-in-chief is not much of an
officer.’

“ Peter was at his wits’ end; but a wasp flew past, and buzzed
in his ear:

“<«We will use beets.’

“ The neighboring Prince gathered new forces, and marched
into the Emperor’s territory, blowing trumpets under his maj-
esty’s nose. General Rub-a-dub drilled his men, and watched
Peter quite fiercely, twirling his mustache. At the very last mo-
ment, when the enemy was preparing to besiege the Imperial
city, Peter stole softly out to the Fairies, and they employed
countless numbers of owls and bats to pull up all the beets in
the kingdom, and bring the vegetables to the edge of the wood.

“ When the next morning’s sun rose, Peter turned all the beets
into soldiers, and marched to join the Emperor’s army. The
beet soldiers were infinitely more splendid in appearance than
the carrots had been; they were glowing crimson not only in

uniform, but their faces were of the same hue, and their caps
The Beet Soldters. 107

were green, with nodding plumes. Peter wore a costume of
crimson velvet to match his troops, studded with rubies, and
- his sword-hilt was incrusted with the same jewels.

“Peter told the Emperor that he believed in sudden action
and quick movements, like Napoleon. He knew well that the
vegetable men could not press the siege, as they would wither
by sundown, if exposed to intense heat.

“* General Rub-a-dub is an old fogy in his ideas,’ whispered
Peter in the Emperor's ear, and the Emperor nodded his
head.

“Tf the carrot soldiers had fought well, the beet men did ten
times better; and when they were slashed down, they shed real
blood-beet juice. The enemy was again driven back with ter-
rible. slaughter, and the beet men dragged themselves to the
wood, where the Fairies buried them. Rub-a-dub was not sat-
isfied. Peace was, indeed, restored to the country; still it was
all done through the tricks of the new commander-in-chief, he
declared.

“«There is not a ripe beet left in the kingdom,’ complained
this general. ‘Your last army was beet men.’

““How! cried the Emperor. ‘Shall I be deprived of my
favorite salad because the beets are gone?’

“Peter was again bewildered. The wasp buzzed in his
ear—

“«We must use radishes next time.’

“So when the warlike Prince, having been twice defeated, in-
duced two other Princes to join him in fighting against the
Emperor, Peter brought an overwhelming force of radishes,
some in scarlet jackets and others in bright yellow, to the
108 The Catskill Fairies.

rescue. The radish troops were more spirited than the carrots
or beets had been, perhaps because radishes are so peppery. Pe-
ter charged at their head, this time using a silver sword, with an
edge like a razor, and a shield against which blows fell harm-
less. The three Princes fled before the valiant radishes; but
the latter withered in the hot sun, after the victory, before they
could seek the forest shade, and lay in rows along the highway
—nothing but wilted radishes.

“«They were radishes,’ said General Rub-a-dub, scornfully.
The Emperor patted the commander’s shoulder graciously.

“ without loss of human life, I shall always employ them. I im- .
plore you not to use beets in the future, and deprive me of my
favorite salad. I make you chief for life.’

“<«Tf it please your majesty, I must now return home,’ said
Peter, bowing low before the throne. ‘ Your army can be made
of real men by General Rub-a-dub.’

“Then Peter crossed the seas once more, and lived in the
very cottage where he was born. He hung the green belt on

the peg behind the door; and if
you had happened to pass the
place, you would have seen a
quiet old man, with a squirrel
perched on his shoulder. The
_squirrel had diamond clear eyes.”

The Winter Fairies clustered

against the frosted pane like



snow-flakes.
Fob's Picture-Gallery. 109

“ All the same, I should like my present,” said Job. “When
well the Fairy of the Cascade come?”

“You must not be so impatient,” rejoined the Angora cat.
She had shown her good-breeding by turning her back on the
mouse’s hole, and behaving as if she had forgotten all about
it, although the mouse’s nose did look tempting.
~“ What do you suppose the gift is?” asked Queen Puff.

“T can’t guess,” said Job, staring at the fire with bright eyes,
and nursing his knee. “Is it a top?”

“ No.”

“A ship?”

“ No.”

“Oh, oh !—A kite?”

-aOe

Something very odd happened. After his circus pranks with
the mouse Nip had been flying around the room. At last he
came to Job’s picture-gallery. Now I suppose you imagine that
Job was too poor to have a picture-gallery; but he owned a
very good one. The previous summer he had stood by the
roadside when a Mountain House coach came down the hill,
crowded with people, and a golden-haired little girl nodded to
Job in a friendly way—* Would you like a paper, boy?”

Before he could reply the golden head vanished, the coach
lumbered on, and he held a “ Harper’s Weekly” in his hand.
What delight the pages afforded simple Job! He ran home
and cut out the pictures with Grandfather’s shears, then fast-
ened them on the wall with large crooked pins. There were
four big prints, and ever so many little ones, which afforded a
good variety for a gallery. Here was a queer old negro mend-
110 The Catskill Fairies.

ing a shoe at the door of his shop; there a beautiful lady,
with a high satin ruff about her neck and pearls in her dark
hair. The gems of the collection were the two largest wood-
cuts, according to Job’s ideas, and one of these was a palace,
with gables and pointed roof, and the other a beach, where a
fisherman’s wife waited for the boats to come in.

Nip had bewitched these pictures, and he now sat on the pin
that held the palace to the wall.

The old negro cobbler in the shop door began to work—tap,
tap sounded his hammer; while the parrot in the cage above
scolded a monkey that was slyly stealing its food.

Then the beautiful lady smiled, showing her white teeth, and
unfurled her large fan—one could see that she was a Spaniard ~
from the grace with which she used it. As for the fisherman’s
wife, she took several steps along the beach, shading her eyes
with her hand, and the white sails gleamed off the bar. The
fishing fleet was coming in safely after the storm.

“Now look at the palace,” said Nip, from his seat on the

large brass pin.
The Old Palace Tells a Story. III

THE HOUSE THAT FACQUES BUILT.

“J am very old,” said the Palace in the picture. ‘“ There are
no such strong walls and towers built nowadays, because there
are no robber bands to plunder as they did when I was erect-
ed; and great armies are not as likely to besiege and destroy
cities.

“Yes, I am very old, as I said before, and Jacques Coeur
built me after the quaint fancy of his own mind. I suppose
there never was a palace with as many odd twists and turns
in it as I have.

“Do you know who Jacques Cceur was? He lived in France
a great many years ago, and he was called the merchant prince
of his country. He was a good and wise man, but his king
was weak and cruel, and made him suffer for his prosperity.
Those were the days when Joan of Arc saved France, but
Jacques Coeur helped with his money.

“He built his home in the old city of Bourges, which had
narrow, winding streets, where the tall buildings seemed - to
touch overhead, and a grand cathedral stands now just as it
did in Jacques Cceur’s day.

“Here you see the front of the palace, which opens on the
street. The wall is richly carved, and the massive gateway has
a large knocker on the door, with a hammer that strikes on a
heart. To the left is a pointed tower, evidently belonging to
I12 The Catskill Fairies.

the kitchen. Over the kitchen door funny little figures are
carved of cooks and scullions busy with brooms and pots, just
like cooks at the present time.

“The rear of the building is like a fortress, with a rampart
and moat, and no windows. There is a round tower overlook-
ing the moat, where Jacques Coeur had an office; and above the
office was a vaulted strong room, secured by an iron door, and
a wonderful lock, that still works after centuries of use. There
he kept his money-bags. There were no safes or police then,
and the burglars were armed bands of rude soldiers.

“More than four hundred years ago Jacques Cceur stood in
this little office, looking through the narrow window out on the
roofs and chimneys, which were ornamented with gilded cockle-
shells and statues of monks. His thoughts must have wander-
ed beyond the moat and the level meadows of the province of
Berri to the blue Mediterranean, where every breeze was waft-
ing along his ships freighted with wealth from the rich ports
of the East. He would serve his king, Charles VIL, faithfully ;
but the wicked monarch would pay the debt by arresting the
merchant and casting him into prison.

“Jacques Coeur belonged to the people. His father was a
merchant before him, but the son had greater industry. He
sent out travellers in every direction; he regulated the mint of
Paris; he went on a mission to the Pope. When he erected
this palace, he said to himself:

“* This house shall be my tomb, and tell the story of my life
and age. I have earned my gold by working hard—yet it is not
safe for me to be rich; so I must make iron doors and secret

passages, as well as drawing-rooms and chapels, decorated by
Nip begins a Story. 113

Italian artists. Every one shall know that here lived a great
merchant, with wife, sons, and a daughter. He loved Bourges,
and Bourges loved him, for he paid his workmen well. My
motto is a good one—“ To a brave heart nothing is impos-
sible.”’

“Here I stand and still tell the story,” said the picture, and

became silent.

Queen Puff was working with all her tiny might.

“Dear Job, I must finish the children’s dreams for Christ-
mas Eve,” said the good little thing. “I have a story to tell
when I get through with the thread.”

“Take your own time,” interposed Nip, swinging his heels
on the pin, as if it had been a cross-bar. “I will give you
some of my own experience. I went last year to see a fairy

regatta, and will tell you all about it.”
H
114 The Catskill Fazrtes.

THE FAIRY REGATTA.

“J serieve that you are all aware of my place of residence.
I live in the Berkshire Hills, behind a blackberry-bush; and
you may always leave word if I am wanted with the grasshop-
pers near by, for my trade as pedler naturally keeps me ab-
sent a good deal.

“Well, I thought I knew the country pretty well, but ji
summer I made a discovery. To tell the truth, I had been
teasing a blackbird, and I told him if I could discover his nest
I would frighten his wife into fits. This was only talk, as my
heart is in the right place, after all; still I must peer about
in search of the nest, to torment the bird.

“ Suddenly I found myself at the mouth of a cave—that was
my discovery. I never saw the cave before. The entrance
was so high and wide that it seemed as if a ship might pass in
without touching the lofty arches. I walked in and soon found
that the cavern narrowed more and more; at the farther ex-
tremity there was a mere crack, through which I siipped, and
groped my way onward. It was very dark until a turn in the
passage showed a ray of light in the distance, and I also heard
the murmur of water trickling along a rocky bed beside me.
The light increasing, I soon found myself on the brink of a
small lake, and on the margin where the rushes grew was

moored a little boat of silver, with two oars just large enough
On the Enchanted Lake. 115



for my grasp. Could anything have been more delightful!
The boat seemed waiting for me. Whether it was or not, I
lost no time in jumping aboard, and pushing off from the shore.
I have a great deal of curiosity, and I like to see every place
with my own eyes. No guide-books of travel for Nip, if you
please !

“The radiance resting on the lake was like moonlight, and
as my boat floated along I noticed that the water was quick-
silver, and the lilies on the surface large pearls with emerald
leaves. I rowed swiftly in one direction, and then concluded
to change my course; but when I attempted to turn the boat
around, I discovered that it was drawn straight on as a steel
obeys the magnet. This surprised me, but I was not afraid.
‘I suppose I must be going to the opposite shore for some
116 The Catskill Fairtes.

good purpose, whether I wish to or not,’ I reflected. The boat
was borne along by the current to an island in the middle of
the lake, where stood a single tree covered with scarlet blos-
soms of great beauty. Out I skipped to examine the strange
tree, and immediately my boat vanished. A winding staircase
of polished brass led around the trunk of the tree, and I climbed
it, as there seemed nothing else to do. When I gained the top,
one of the scarlet blossoms unfolded into a red-velvet arm-
chair; and I had no sooner seated myself in it than the whole
island began to sink slowly below the surface of the lake, car-
rying me down miles into the depths of the earth. When we
stopped, the scarlet blossom puffed me away with a breath of
wind like a feather, and I landed on my feet. Here was an-
other cave, only one altogether splendid, for the walls were
veined with rough gold ore, and a diamond chandelier sparkled
in the dome. Purple-velvet curtains, fringed with gold, shaded
the entrance, and two curious vases stood on each side. I was
greeted by an old magician, with a white beard, who had a
skull-cap on his head.

“«T own all this region, he said. ‘Have you come to join
in the Fairy Regatta, little man?

“*T suppose so, since I am here,’ I replied. ‘I can never win,
though, I fear.’

“*We shall see; and the magician led me away from the
cave down to the bank of a stream, where a multitude of little
boats were darting about, some fashioned like swans, others like
dolphins and crabs, guided by the Nixies’ tiny water-spirits.

“«The Nixies have an annual regatta at this spot, explained

the kind magician. ‘Their Queen is seated under a rose-leaf
Lhe Dragon-Fly Boat. 117



pavilion over yonder, and she will give as a prize the magic
drum.’

“He then took from his snuff-box a boat made in the form
of a dragon-fly, with outspread wings, which was cut from a
single sapphire. He launched me in this boat, first giving me
three grains of snuff to use if I found it necessary. Away I
sped in my lovely dragon-fly boat to form in line with five oth-
ers; and the Nixy boatman could not object to my trying my
luck with the rest, as the powerful magician had sent me to

join in the race.
118 The Catskill Fairtes.

“ The first boat was a ruby grasshopper, on the wherry model;
the second, a pearl snail-shell, of the dory style; the third, a
crystal spider; the fourth, a miniature ebony shark; and the
fifth, a goldfish.

“The Nixy Queen, seated beneath her rose-leaf pavilion,
bowed to the magician on the opposite shore, and gave one tap
on the magic drum, as a signal for the race to begin. Away
shot the little boats, the oars flashing through the water, and
made for the goal, a cork anchored in mid-stream for a buoy.

“The grasshopper boat was named the Dauntless, and its
colors were green.

“The pearl snail-shell was christened Vzxven, with a white
badge.

“The crystal spider had A/ermazd written on the stern, and
sported pink.

“The ebony shark was Sea Foam, with dark blue.

“ As for my dragon-fly, | dubbed it Wp the Second, with or-
ange colors, as I am so fond of yellow.

“ At the tap of the magic drum we got off in good order, the
Dauntless leading, Mermaid second, Vixen and Sea foam in
line. The Nixies showed good training, and their Queen was
delighted with their fine appearance. As for me, it was plainly
to be seen that they considered me of no great account, and
not likely to prove a rival. I thought, ‘It is a good old prov-
erb that says let him laugh who wins.’

“The Dauntless had got the lead, which is an advantage,
and meant to keep it; but I made a fine spurt, and drew along.
side of the Nixy fleet. I could never have kept pace with them
had I not scattered the three snuff-grains given me by the ma-
Nip Wins the Match. 119

gician. This had a very curious effect on my companions—
each Nixy rested on his oars, bowed his head, and sneezed.

“T pulled away while this happened, and gained the cork in
advance of the Dauntless by two boats’ length. That was a
victory! And the contest was most exciting.

“T received the magic drum, which was no larger than a
thimble, and could be slung over the shoulder with a chain.
What do you suppose I did with it? Why, I beat one smart
tune on it, and sold it to the Nixies, who were anxious to keep
it in their possession. Heigh! I almost wish that I had kept
it, for I believe I could have got more for it above ground, if
only as a curiosity.

“T went back to the magician, who entertained me very
handsomely, for he was pleased with my success. He wish-
ed me to remain with him down there in the gold cave, and
promised to tell me half of his secrets, which were written on
parchment in a great book fastened with a steel lock; but |
missed my dear home behind the blackberry-bush. I sang
‘Home, sweet home,’ to the magician; and after that he made
no objection to my departure, partly because I sang it out of
time, I believe.

“He took his large pipe with the porcelain bowl, and when
he had lighted it he told me to step into the pipe, and he
would blow me up to the earth’s surface.

“«T am afraid of getting burned,’ I objected.

“*T would not hurt you for the world,’ said the magician; and
I must say, he was as good as his word.

“ He rubbed some sweet ointment over me to keep my skin

from scorching, and while he was doing it he picked my pocket
120 The Catskill Fatrtes.

of the sum I had received from the Nixies for the magic drum.
I did not discover this until I was home; but I call it mean,
as it was a fair trade. So I was popped into the porcelain bowl
of the pipe, the magician blew a cloud of smoke, and away I

went up to the earth’s surface and daylight again.”

Job was much amused at the idea of Nip rowing a match.

“Do you believe you would have won without the snuff?”

“I daresay I could with practice,” said Nip. “You should
have seen the Fairy Regatta in line, though!”

“T wish you had kept the drum,” said Job.

“So do I. Perhaps I will go to the match next year. I
don’t mind telling you that I practice every spare moment in
a walnut-shell which I keep in the horse-trough.”

Fairies may have plans for the future, just as mortals say
“JT will go to a new school in the spring.” Queen Puff had
finished her dream-thread by this time, and set aside her wheel.

“ The last of it will serve for morning dreams just before the
children awake to look into their stockings,” she said, smooth-
ing her apron and folding her hands in her lap.

Then all kept silence while she told the following story.
Queen Puff begins a Story. 121

THE DOVE MAIDEN.

“ A LITTLE boy and girl were
trudging home from school,
swinging their luncheon bas-
ket between them. The little
girl’s face was pretty and good-
humored; the boy had an ugly
habit of frowning and shutting
his mouth firmly when any-

thing did not please him. The



sister had only to find the larg-
est slice of buttered bread in
the luncheon basket to bring this ugly scowl; and the good
schoolmistress said that Otto would make neither a kind nor
generous man if he did not mend that troublesome temper of
his own.

“The evening was clear and beautiful. You never saw a coun-
try like that through which these children walked, Job. The
land was very level, and protected by dikes from the overflow
of the sea. The meadows were rich with grass and wild flow-
ers, where large herds of sleek cattle fed; and canals wound in
and out among these fields, with barges floating along on their
clear waters. If you were not an ignorant boy, Job, you would

know at a glance that this country was Holland, where the first
122 The Catskill Fatrtes.

Dutch settlers of New York came from, even as Nip’s Yankee
giant landed on the coast of New England. ‘The boy and girl,
Otto and Sophia Snyder by name, had entered the wide
meadow which alone separated them from their home.

“«TLet us rest awhile, said Otto, throwing himself on the
ground; and Sophia followed his example.

“ The grass rose like a green sea all about them. Over against
the sky was the neat village where they lived, the red-roofed
houses shaded by willow-trees. Otto knew Aunt Katrine would
expect him to feed the hens and pigs, as well as to drive the
cows home; still he sat in the grass.

“ They talked about the beetles toiling at their feet, the bus-
tling, hurrying ants, and Otto tried to catch a pretty field-mouse
that darted past him to hide in the ground.

“¢Tf T could find the nest, what fun it would be to take the
baby mice! exclaimed the boy, crawling along on his hands
and knees to the spot where the mouse had disappeared.

“Three storks were roaming by the water-side, among flags
and osiers, in search of frogs.

“«Oh, Otto! look up there! cried Sophia, pointing to the sky.

“ Otto forgot the hunted mouse in a moment, and sprang to
his feet to gaze in the direction indicated by his sister. High
up in the air were two doves, with feathers of dazzling white-
ness, that soared along unconscious of danger. A large black
hawk was winging its swift flight in keen pursuit of the pretty
doves. At last the birds seemed to become aware of their peril,
for the hawk darted above them, prepared to swoop down on
the helpless mates. The children, who had watched their move-

ments with breathless interest, now saw them circle nearer and


The Hawk and the Doves. 125

nearer to the earth in their terror of the cruel enemy in pur-
suit.

“*Dear little birds, I will shelter you, cried Sophia, holding
out her apron in her eagerness to save them.

“The doves sank into the apron, exhausted with fatigue and
fear, and the girl clasped them in her arms. The hawk dashed
down until his sharp beak and glittering eyes were close to
Sophia’s face; and she screamed with terror, but she did not
drop the doves.

“ Now came the ugly frown on Otto’s face; he seized a stick,
and aimed a blow at the bold hawk.

“«The doves belong to us! Let me see you touch them!’ he
shouted, angrily.

“The hawk gave a hoarse shriek of rage and disappointment,
then rose slowly in the air, and flew away in search of other
game. The children cautiously uncovered the birds to admire
them, and Otto held one while Sophia carried the other. Never
were such lovely birds seen! Their plumage was snowy on the
wings, and shaded to crimson and emerald green on the breasts.
Around each slender neck was fastened a gold chain studded
with jewels, which flashed in the sun like a circlet of fire.

“The captives were restless to resume their flight after the
danger was over; but the children had no idea of losing such
charming pets, so they carried them home in spite of their fran-
tic efforts to escape.

“ The village was as clean as constant scrubbing by the tidy
housewives could make it. You should have seen Aunt Ka-
trine, rain or shine, polish the door-step, just as they do still
in the city of Philadelphia. The village people were already
126 The Catskill Fairtes.

drinking tea, after the day’s labors, and the children passed
open doors, which afforded glimpses of tables, shelves, and
earthenware, all spotlessly pure.

“ Aunt Katrine was surprised to see the prizes the children
had captured at the expense of being late to supper. She put
on her spectacles, and held up her hands. ‘I never saw doves
with chains around their necks,’ she declared.

“«T shall take mine off, said Otto, resolutely.

“He untwined the chain, and the dove immediately changed
to a little girl, with soft brown hair, her dress of some delicate
fabric, like a cobweb, embroidered with silver stars, with silver
shoes on her feet, and a cap of silver on her head. She was
unlike any one that Aunt Katrine had ever scen, and the
children thought her an angel.

“ The other dove no sooner beheld the transformation of its
mate than it gave a loud note of alarm, and, slipping through
Sophia's fat fingers, soared high in the air. Sophia was staring
so earnestly at the stranger child that she did not recover her
wits until her pet was out of reach.

“The dove child, remaining below, gazed about wonderingly
for a moment, then sprang up into the air, and tried to snatch
the chain from Otto’s grasp. She nearly succeeded in doing
so, but the boy was larger and stronger, and held it in his grasp.

“This belongs to me, and you do, too, he said, frowning.
‘When I am a man I shall take the chain to Rotterdam, and
sell it for a pot of money.’

“Aunt Kate and Sophia were very kind to the stranger.
They stroked her fair hair and admired her dress, while greedy
Otto ran away to hide the precious chain in a particular nook
The Dove Child. r23

behind the beam, where he kept a bird-trap and fishing-rod.
When supper was served, the dove child pecked daintily at the
coarse bread, but she could not talk beyond making little coo-
ing sounds quite like a dove.

“Aunt Katrine took off her star-spangled robe, and laid it
away carefully for holidays; then she was dressed just like So-
phia in a woollen petticoat and apron, yet she seemed a prin-
cess beside the honest little peasant lass; and you could have
made nothing else of her, she was so delicate and pretty. The
children both learned to love her after their own fashion. Otto
considered that he owned her, and he scolded her as he did
Sophia when she displeased him; yet he would not allow
others to be rude to her, especially in the school, where all
the village children met together.

“A long time passed, and the dove child appeared to have
grown quite contented with her new life; she never tried to
find the chain which Otto had concealed so cleverly. One day
she paused in the meadow, and the other dove hovered down
to alight on her hand. She received it with delight, cooing
over it in her own tongue, just as if she had never learned
another language.

“Otto found them talking together, and bade her catch the
dove; but this she would not do, so the bird flew above the
boy’s reach.

“*Tf it comes again I will shoot it with a gun, cried Otto,
shaking his fist angrily.

“Then the dove child wept, and told her mate what the
naughty boy had said; and the dove went away, not daring
to return. The little girl begged Otto to restore her chain.
128 The Catskill Fatries.






i by 3
| ye :

“No, indeed,’ said he. ‘Your father must be a great king
or prince from your appearance. When he comes to take you
away in a gilded chariot drawn by splendid horses, he must
give me ten chests of silver to make me rich. Then he may
have you, and the chain also.’

“The dove child looked at him sadly.

“*You seem to care more for money already than your own
good.’

“«T wish to have my own way,’ cried Otto. ‘Yes, and I will

have it always!’
Aunt Katrine Finds the Chain. 129

“She ran to Aunt Katrine, who always petted and soothed
her, entreating her with many tears to find the chain which
Otto had concealed so long ago.

“«What strange enchantment binds you, poor child?’ asked
the good woman, hoping to hear a story of magic. The stran-
ger only shook her head sorrowfully, and looked away into
the clear sky where the other dove had flown. After this
she grew discontented and unhappy. Often would she watch
for her mate, but the other never dared to appear, for fear
Otto’s bullet should pierce its tender breast.

“Aunt Katrine decided to find the chain, and release the
child, whatever the result might be. She was an amiable old
lady, and she rather dreaded Otto’s illtemper, so she asked
him nothing about the matter, because she feared he would
only hide the chain somewhere else. Besides, he was already
growing to be a tall, stout lad, and would soon become master
of the house. Accordingly, she chose an hour when the baking
and sweeping were done for the day, the children away at
school, and, putting on her spectacles, deliberately began the
search. :

“ First she examined the chamber where Otto slept, but there
she found nothing besides a few playthings. Then she remem-
bered that the boy came down the ladder from the attic after
he had run away with the chain on the day when the dove
child was found; so up the creaking ladder went Aunt Katrine,
and it was not long before she placed her hand directly on the
chain as it lay coiled up snugly on the beam behind the bird-
trap. She returned to the kitchen with the treasure, and, seat-
ing herself by the open window, admired the delicate chain, pol-

I
130 The Catskill Fazrtes.

ishing the jewels on her sleeve the while, just to make them
sparkle and glitter.

“A tiny black dwarf crept through the window like a spider,
and perched on the back of Aunt Katrine’s chair, without her
being aware of his presence. The dwarf ncdded and chuckled
as he peered over her shoulder. After a while he drew a bit
of folded paper from his girdle, which grew in size to a large
fan, ornamented with strange figures and smelling of sweet per-

fume, and began gently to fan Aunt Katrine. The perfume was



thus wafted from the paper, and presently she bobbed her head
twice, and sank back in the chair fast asleep. Oh, dear! she
had done more harm than good with the best intentions. Down
hopped the dwarf to the floor, and snatched the chain from
her lap. She opened her heavy eyes’ just as he reached the
Matkcious Skinp. 3a

door, where he took the chain in his mouth; then wings un-
folded from his sides, and he flew away in the shape of the
large black hawk which had first pursued the doves.

“There was no end of mischief done! Aunt Katrine wrung
her hands over her folly in taking the chain from the safe hid-
ing-place, and now some evil fairy had made off with it.

“ The children were crossing the meadow at that moment.

“«See the hawk up yonder with something in its mouth,’
said Sophia.

“«Tt must be a frog or a snake,’ returned Otto, not dreaming
that the precious chain was gone.

“Aunt Katrine said not a word, like the cowardly old body
she was. What was the use? Otto would sulk for a month,
and the dove child weep herself to death to think that she could
never be restored to her own people, wherever they might be.

“Now the hawk was a wicked fairy, Skimp by name, who
felt malice towards every one. When the fairy king’s third
wife died, leaving him an interesting widower, Skimp expected
to be asked to marry him. Instead of that he chose her young
maid-of-honor, and Skimp’s temper was soured; so she went
about in many shapes, not only tormenting the other fairies,
but any chance mortal besides. In this way she made the
acquaintance of all the giants and hobgoblins in the universe.

“* Before I hide the chain where it cannot easily be found, I
must do a trifle more mischief, she thought, and paused near a
great city where the smoke could be seen curling up from the
chimneys, and the church spires were outnumbered by the masts
of the shipping in the harbor. Here she changed her hawk
dress to the costume of a country girl; a broad hat shaded a
R32 The Catskill Fairies.

rosy, innocent face; she carried herself shyly and awkwardly ;
and no one could have believed that the simple lassie was
shrewd, wicked Skimp, so perfect was her disguise.

“She entered a dingy building, where young men were busy
counting money and writing in books. She wished to see their
master the broker, and soon she was showing the wonderful
chain, which she declared she desired to sell. Of course the
broker wanted it; he would give his head for the diamond
clasp alone; but he did not say so—oh no, he only shut one
eye, and sighed that he could not offer more than two gold
pieces for it—such a trifle! Skimp had been inside his brain,
and whisked around twice to discover his thoughts, although she
seemed to stand opposite all the while—a simple country girl.

“<*T will take twenty gold pieces,’ she said, firmly.

“The broker shook his head in horror; he would give four
gold pieces, and no more. Then the fairy led the greedy broker
a merry dance. Twice she gathered up the chain, and went
out the door prepared to leave without completing the bargain,
and twice the broker called her back, adding another coin to
the pile on the counter. Finally he paid the full sum, pre-
tending to shed tears at his own folly; and all the clerks
paused with quills behind their ears to cry also, because
their great employer did.

“Skimp departed with the money, leaving the broker delight-
ed to have obtained the chain so cheaply.

“Fairies have no need of real money, so Skimp hid oe by
the steps of a cathedral, where a good man found it and dis-
tributed the gold to the poor, which the broker would never

have done.
Another Theft of the Dove Chain. ¥33

“ That night a large rat, with bright eyes like two beads, crept
into the chamber where the broker slept. He had the chain
in a stout oak box beneath the bed, and his door was barred,
as he feared robbers. He could not keep out a rat, especially
when that rat was Madam Skimp.

“She gnawed up a quantity of bank-notes to a soft pulp,
which she had adroitly slipped from between the leaves of a
pocket-book. With this she rolled two little balls, and popped
them into the sleeper’s ears, so that he could hear nothing.
Then she attacked the box under the bed; gnaw, gnaw, went
her sharp teeth until a tiny hole was made, through which she
dragged the dove chain, and away she went with it.

“«That was well done, said Skimp, changing into a hawk.

“We must now return to Aunt Katrine’s house. The chil-
dren all grew up. Sophia, a blooming maiden of eighteen, mar-
ried a wealthy mill-owner, and went away. |

“The dove child was tall and fair in appearance. She had
long since outgrown the star-spangled robe and tiny shoes she
first wore. The dove mate had never returned to visit her.

“Otto did not miss the chain from the hiding-place, for soon
after Aunt Katrine had lost it the cottage caught fire from a
smoking chimney, and the whole building was destroyed. Otto
carried out the furniture, but he supposed the chain must have
been lost in the flames. Aunt Katrine still kept silent, but she
was very kind to the dove child, trying to repair the injury she
had done her.

“« After all, she is better off here in a Christian home,’ thought
poor Aunt Katrine, and then she looked at the spangled dress,

wondering where the dove maiden really had lived.
134 The Catskill Fairies.

“Otto had grown to be a handsome young man. He was
faithful, industrious, and honest, and rebuilt the cottage with his
own hands. Still he must always have his own way. He
wished to marry the dove maiden. Aunt Katrine thought the
girl could not do better—after she died there would be no one
left to care for her unless she married Otto. So the dove
maiden went into the new cottage as Otto’s wife, although she
wept many tears that this should be her lot instead of finding
her dove companions once more. Aunt Katrine still scrubbed
and polished, for in that lay her chief happiness, and the dove
maiden was too delicate for such hard work. One fine morn-
ing the good aunt put on her spectacles to admire a pretty
baby which lay in the cradle, as white as milk, with sapphire
eyes. Otto made a good husband enough, and he was proud
of his wife and child, but he was surly and ill-tempered if any

little matter went wrong, even with them. The dove maiden


The Dove Maiden’s Story. 135

was now cheerful and happy; she called the child Snowdrop,
and they gathered flowers together in the meadow, while Aunt
Katrine scrubbed. When the little girl had grown sufficiently
large she was dressed in the star-spangled robe, shoes, and sil-
ver cap which her mother had worn before her. Aunt Katrine
was very much pleased with Snowdrop in this becoming cos-
tume. The dove maiden led her to the meadow, where she
loved to sit near the spot where she had been captured. The
Snyders had never heard a word of her story, but now she de-
cided to tell it to Snowdrop, who listened with bright, intelli-
gent eyes.

“«T dreamed. about my sister last night, she said. ‘ Per-
haps if we wait patiently here she will come and pay us a visit.

“*But how will she come?’ asked Snowdrop.

“«She will fly here with her beautiful white wings, just as I
did, returned the dove maiden with a sigh. ‘ Attend, my child,
while I tell you about your grandfather and relatives in the
East. The King of Selgrobia is my father. He has a brilliant
court thousands of miles away from here, where the palm-trees
grow. I have a brother who is a Crown Prince, and will some
time be king. My sister and I were the only daughters, and
we were twins. We were born with little gold chains about our
necks, studded with jewels, and clasped with a diamond button.
These were gifts of the fairy king at our birth, and would en-
able us to become doves whenever we wished to fly away. The
Queen, our mother, considered this a very dangerous gift; and,
fearing we would avail ourselves of the chance thus granted us,
she carefully hid the two chains away in a casket. We were
brought up in the palace, yet seldom visited the state apart-
136 The Catskill Fairies.

ments. Ah, that was a happy life! We played in rose-gardens
with our maids, and bathed in marble fountains.

“One day there was a grand reception, in which a Prince
of Ethiopia, black as ebony, and wearing a turban of yellow
satin wound with chains of pearls, was presented to the King.
The Crown Prince, our brother, was present at the ceremony;
but we were too young, although our maids ran away to peep
through the lattice at the wonderful stranger. Left alone, we
rambled into our mother’s magnificent apartments, and began
to examine every rare, costly article of furniture with childish
curiosity. Presently we found a casket in an alcove which con-
tained our chains, and we at once recognized the fairy gifts.

“««T et us go out on the balcony,” urged my sister.

“«So we stepped out, disobeying our mother, and tried our
wings as doves. We flew into the audience-hall, where the
King sat in royal robes, and that was the last time I ever saw
him. We sped up into the clear sky, and after a journey of
many days reached this place. It is a cold region after my
home.’

“ As the mother ceased speaking, the dove sister came dart-
ing down to visit them. The dove maiden caressed the bird,
shedding warm tears of joy upon its snowy feathers, and even
Snowdrop stroked it with her fat little hands.

“«T have been to the fairy king, said the dove. ‘He says
that the workman who made the chain is dead, and the art
died with him, so we can never have another... The fairy sent
this pearl ring to your daughter. No one can take it from her
finger, and it will grant her wishes.’

“The mother and child returned to their humble home,
Snowdrop Takes a Fourney. ie7

where Otto no sooner beheld the pearl ring than he tried to
wrench it off; but the ring held as firmly as steel.

“ I will have it, he scolded.

“The dove maiden was afraid he would hurt the child, and
secretly made up her mind to send her away in search of her
grandfather’s kingdom. When Aunt Katrine saw the ring she
was much excited, wishing to know where it came from; and
little Snowdrop told her that a beautiful dove brought it from
the skies. Then the old lady told the dove maiden the truth
concerning the disappearance of the dove chain on the day
when she had taken it from Otto’s hiding-place under the eaves.

“«Never let him know,’ she said, earnestly; and the dove
maiden promised.

“ her mother. ‘Then we can travel to the beautiful country you
have told me about.’

“So the mother kissed Snowdrop; and the little girl, wearing
the silver cap and the ring, started forth in search of the dove
chain. She tripped along, humming a gay song to herself.
She had left her dear mamma and Aunt Katrine looking sadly
after her, yet she would soon return. A little robin flew on a
twig, and sang—

“* Don’t get into the boat.’

“*What do you say? asked the child, puzzled.

“Then a toad hopped across the path, and croaked —

“«Don’t get into the boat.’

“«T do not know what you are talking about, laughed Snow-
drop, and found herself on the brink of the canal. Directly be-
138 The Catskill Fazrves.

fore her was a boat, with gilded bows, the inside a soft pink-
and-cream color, like the lining of a conch-shell, and the sail
was like fine white silk. Of course, the little girl forgot the
words croaked by the toad and sung by the robin, as warning,
and stepped into the boat.

«JT will not move the anchor; I can just pretend to be sail-
ing on the canal—that is all, she said.

“ A large white hand glided along under the boat, and slipped
the chain which held it fastened to the shore. Snowdrop was
delighted; the boat slid along
without the sail being hoisted.
Had she but known it, two large
white hands were pushing it
steadily away from the bank.

“She enjoyed the sail, and
she was also a trifle frightened,
the current of the river seemed

to be so very strong. A hawk



came skimming close to the
boat, holding a crystal bubble in its beak, which the bird drop-
ped on Snowdrop’s head. Crack went the bubble, scattering
fine fragments all about, like diamond splinters, and a fragrant
liquid flowed over the little girl’s face. This bath made the
young voyager feel exceedingly queer; she rubbed her eyelids
wearily, her arms drooped, and she sank down into the bottom
of the boat asleep.
“The hawk had a famous trick of putting people to sleep, as
we have seen.
’ “The motion of the boat rocked her gently, like the softest
A City under the Sea. 139

cradle, as she glided along more rapidly than ever. The two
strong white hands pushed her past towns and hamlets straight
onward; and if Snowdrop had been awake to peep over the
side she would have seen not only the hands, but two fair arms,
and a head covered with long, floating hair, like tangles of sea-
weed.

“«T have caught a pretty mouse—a new toy, gurgled a soft
voice down under the waves.

“When the little girl awoke and raised her head to gaze
about her, there was wide, rolling sea extending from one side
of the sky quite around to the other. The frail cockle-shell of
a boat was tossed high in the air by the rough billows, and
Snowdrop shrieked with terror every time she mounted a crest
to plunge down the other side. Oh, how silly it was to get into
the boat, and go to sleep! How she wished she was safe at
home with her dear mamma and Aunt Katrine! She never
once thought of her fairy ring, although it was on her finger
all the time.

“ A large wave towered high before the frightened child; the
boat was upset, and she was caught in the white arms waiting
to receive her, then borne swiftly and safely through the rush-
ing waters.

“ Before the bewildered traveller knew what she was about,
she stood at the gates of a city. What surprised her most
was the fact that her starry dress and silver cap were perfectly
dry, although she was in the water all the while. This would
not have been the case had not her fairy ring been on her
finger.

“ At first the city seemed to be precisely similar to cities on
140 The Catskill Fatrtes.

land: there were shops, squares, and palaces; and the wall was
thickly crusted with oysters and barnacles, like a ship which has
been in the water a long while. On closer inspection Snow-
drop discovered the difference: the avenues were sand, the rows
of buildings large shells. It would be easy to find the residence
of a friend here if one was a stranger. There was a street com-
posed wholly of cowries, another of clam-shells, another of scal-
lops, a fourth of periwinkles, and so on, through all the king-
dom of shells. Snowdrop was not surprised, therefore, to read
on sign-boards—* Clam-shell Terrace,” “ Cowry Place,” or “ Peri-
winkle Avenue.” She walked dry-shod through the streets, but
she noticed that the inhabitants darted about swiftly and noise-
lessly, for they all had fish-tails. The city was very bright,
almost as if illuminated with gas, and Snowdrop discovered that
this light was shed from a sun-fish hung on a pole in a large
park of sea-weeds. The sun-fish was phosphorescent, and at
night the watchman was obliged to draw a blind over it, in
order that the people should sleep a wink.

“In the centre of this sea-weed park was a building made of
the bell of a jelly-fish, which was like the most beautiful crystal,
or blown-glass, with pink-and-blue tints on the walls. Snow-
drop could see people moving about inside this palace, and she
approached it. Two sword-fish policemen hovered about the
entrance.

“« This is a prison,’ they said, very fiercely.

“Snowdrop ran up the steps, and entered the first hall, where
a group of mermaids were playing on coral harps with draped
sea-lettuce. One of these took Snowdrop’s hand—‘I caught

you, little maid, and I shall keep you for a pet” The second
Queen Kornor. 141

hall was spacious and beautiful; at the farther end was a throne
of rock, upon which sat a woman who was turned to stone, ail
except her head, and bound with iron chains to her seat.

“ Before her were open coffers and curious relics of all sorts,
with piles of silk fabrics, jewels, bars of gold, and coins, such as

are lost in shipwrecks.



“A number of young men and maidens, robed in dazzling
white, who were evidently her subjects, sorted the treasure into
chests; but the Queen did not seem to find any amusement
in their employment.

“ Snowdrop approached, and was kindly received.

“«Have you seen my mother’s dove chain?’ asked the child.

“*T am Queen Kornor, said the lady. ‘This large city was

once located on a beautiful plain, surrounded by hills. The
142 The Catskill Fatrves.

Giant Drubb became angry with me because. I neglected to
invite him to a Christmas dinner, and he made an earthquake
to sink us beneath the sea, while I was chained to the rock.
Nothing but a blow from his iron dagger will release me.’

“«T may be able to help you, said Snowdrop.

“ the mountain-side, and she must know all about the dove chain.
The Giant Drubb lives on the borders of the Arabian Desert.
Pause by the well under the palm-tree.’

“Tt was not easy to escape from the mermaid who had caught
Snowdrop. She wished to present her to Neptune, she said,
and she could not afford to lose her. Then Snowdrop clasped
her arms about the neck of the lovely mermaid and kissed her,
entreating that she might be released.

“«T must find the dove chain for my mother, who is watch-
ing for me all this long time,’ she pleaded; and the mermaid
made not another word of objection, but carried her up to the
shore. The mermaid was only frolicsome.

“ How astonished the dove mother would have been to see
her child carried in a mermaid’s arms, with her star-robe crisp
and dry!

“ For the first time Snowdrop remembered to use her ring
by wishing herself at the palm-tree, and she found herself there
sooner than any steamboat could have taken her. She saw
nobody, and looked down into the well. A rose-colored bubble
came up to the surface from the cool depths.

“«Don’t pause to eat in the grove, said a voice, and the
bubble sank.

“ Next a blue bubble appeared.





fff S55




Blinding Giant Drubo. 145

“¢Throw water over Drubb’s heads,’ and the second bubble
sank,

“ Then up came a green bubble.

“Carry the enchanted waters of this well.’

“ «What shall I carry it in?

“«In me,’ replied the green bubble, and popped out of the
well upon the grass—a beautiful flask.

“Snowdrop walked through the grove, thinking she would
soon finish the matter. Stately trees arched overhead to form
a cool, green vault; the turf was velvet smooth, and along the
paths were spread tempting fruits.

“ Snowdrop recalled the words of the rosy bubble, and walked
on, turning neither to the right nor left.

“Giant Drubb was seated in an immense arm-chair, hewn
out of granite, which commanded a fine view of the surround-
ing country, so that he should know what was going on. Just
as Snowdrop crept near, an ostrich ran in front of the giant
and paused. Drubb stared at the ostrich with all the eyes in
all his heads, because it was unusual to see an ostrich there.

“«Come a step nearer, and I will catch you in my hand.
You would make me a dainty breakfast,’ cried Drubb.

“Snowdrop climbed behind him, and sprinkled his first two
heads on the right with the enchanted water. This blinded his
eyes; and always hiding behind the heads already sprinkled,
she contrived to anoint the whole ten.

“«Dear me !—is it night?’ growled Drubb. ‘I thought the
sun was still hours high. How short the days are growing!’

“Snowdrop slipped the dagger from its sheath at his side,
and wished herself away from the terrible monster. The mer-

K
146 The Catskill Fazrtes.

maid had waited for her on the shore, amusing herself by sing-
ing sweet songs to bewitch the fishermen.

“ Down they went through the rushing waters, and this time
Snowdrop was not afraid. It was an easy matter to use
Drubb’s dagger on the cruel chain which bound the lady, but
Snowdrop was surprised when the whole city rose to’its place
on the blooming plain, the houses marble and stone, instead of
clam-shells and cowries.

“You see Giant Drubb had made a sort of off-hand earth-
quake to immerse the city; no one ever heard of a town
coming back that had been swallowed by a real, terrible earth-
quake. The Queen was very grateful. She lost no time in
leading Snowdrop up the steep path to the wise woman on
the mountain. They found her in a hut perched on a crag,
where a goat might climb—and, indeed, she was as nimble
and sure-footed as any goat. She liked to live near the stars,
where the thunder crashed and the lightning seemed to leap
from rock to rock.

“The visitors entered her hut, where an owl was perched on
one side of the hearth, and an eagle on the other.

“¢Who have we here?’ she muttered, peering at Snowdrop.

“¢T will give you my ring if you tell me where the dove
chain is,’ said Snowdrop, eagerly.

“ The wise woman smiled, and smoothed the little girl’s hair.

“*T live nearer the clear heavens than those below. The
stars are my jewels,’ she said.

“¢This dear child has rescued me from prison, and in re-
turn she desires to find her mother’s dove chain,’ said Queen

lkornor.
The Wise Woman. 147

“*Yes, yes—I know. Madam Skimp did all that mischief
because she could not marry the fairy king; and it was his
gift. I hear all the news from my two friends here.’

“*T saw Skimp fly away with the chain in the form of a
hawk,’ said the eagle.

“ The wise woman sprinkled some dried herbs on a brazier,
and a white cloud rose in the hut, so that the two visitors could
not see her at all. When the smoke cleared, she shook her
head.

“*Go to the fairy king. Perhaps Skimp will tell you, aft-

er all.


148 The Catskill Fazrtes.

“The eagle offered to carry the guests down the mountain
on his back, and they found the ride very pleasant. Snowdrop
could only think of her lonely mother now, who must watch
anxiously for her return, and so decided to seek the fairy realm
at once.

“ Everything was in confusion; the fairy queen had been
stung by a gnat, which caused her death, and the king was
again a widower.

“* That comes of marrying beneath his rank. She was only
Skimp’s maid of honor, cried the gossips.

“Snowdrop heard them, for she stood behind the bluebell
in which they were swinging.

“«Bless me!’ exclaimed one, raising her eye-glass, which was
made of the eye-hole of a cambric needle set in steel; ‘who
comes here? It is Madam Skimp, and no other!

“Sure enough, it was Skimp, who had heard of the queen’s
death, and decided to return to the court, in hopes of winning
the seat on the throne beside the king.

“ Skimp was lovely. She had bathed her face in flower-dew ;
her robe was sewed out of gold leaf, with a boddice formed of
a single ruby, and trimmed with diamond dust. Her hair was
combed into a high waterfall; her hat was made of a beetle,
and her fan was dandelion down. Never was a more charming
toilet seen; the other fairy ladies nearly died of envy when
she minced along, waving her fan in a fashionable manner ;
and in kneeling before the king she showed two little gold
boots, with red heels, to great advantage.

“The king thought he had never seen Skimp look so pretty ;
and when he bade her rise from her knees, he proposed to drink
The Dove Chain Recovered. 149

her health in amber honey, which was served in beech-nut
cups. Although he was still dressed in mourning (a sable
moth’s cloak), as a token of respect for the departed queen,
he had not sipped all of the honey before he made Skimp an
offer of marriage. |

“The honey sweetened her temper wonderfully—that or pros-
perity—and she began to feel ashamed of her naughtiness.

“Snowdrop made her presence known, for the little people
were so much absorbed in their own affairs that they had
not noticed her.

“The king invited her to be seated on the soft moss, as his
chair was too small for a mortal; and you have no idea how
big and clumsy she appeared among the Fairies, quite as great
a contrast as Giant Drubb was to herself.

“*Dear, good Fairies, I have been all over the earth to find
my mother’s dove chain, and I need your assistance.’

“*T should be ashamed of my subjects if they did not help
you, replied the king. ‘Every fairykin must hold up a hand
in token of willingness to aid Snowdrop.’

“Each one held up a tiny fist, and Queen Skimp raised
hers with the rest. Why not? She was willing to restore the
chain since she had been sweetened with the honey.

“«Let by-gones be by-gones, she said. ‘If I was not the
fourth wife, I am the fifth.’

“She flew away on her gauze wings, and returned in a trice,
carrying the chain, which she gave to Snowdrop, and kissed
her in the bargain.

“ Snowdrop left the Fairies in the midst of wedding gayeties,
thankful that Skimp’s ambition had been at last gratified, since
150 The Catskill Fazrtes.

this had led her to give up the chain, as well as to become
a good sprite at last.

“ Danger was not over for the dove mother’s little daughter.
Scarcely had she quitted the fairy kingdom when she heard
behind her a rumbling like distant thunder. This sound was
caused by Giant Drubb, who was tramping after the bold girl
who had robbed him of his iron dagger to release Queen Kor-
nor from her enchantment under the sea.

“Snowdrop, with the aid of her ring, changed herself into a
lily, which held the chain in its cup securely, and the giant
strode on without noticing the flower trembling on its stalk.
Afterwards she resumed her journey, and walked behind the
giant, keeping out of range of his many eyes, that looked
in all directions.


Queen Puff ends her Story. 151

“When Snowdrop reached the canal and the meadow, Giant
Drubb was still striding forward, looking before him, like a
great many other big people; and perhaps he is still marching
around the world, for Snowdrop saw him no more.

“ How quickly she ran across the meadow to the village!
How gladly the dove mother and Aunt Katrine welcomed her !
Otto was still cross over Snowdrop’s long absence, of whom he
was fond in his way.

“ Next morning he went to his labor in the fields, and Aunt
Katrine stood all the copper pots of the kitchen in a row to be
freshly scoured. At that moment Snowdrop pulled her mother
gently away through the door. Hastily throwing the chain
around the dove mother’s neck, she wished to become a carrier-
pigeon at the same moment, and they rose in the air together.

“Otto was binding sheaves, and did not notice that two
birds hovered overhead. A ring fell before him, and he dis-
covered a pile of gold. He missed wife and child, but the pile
of gold remained.

“They then flew towards the sun and their kindred.

“Aunt Katrine and the village people thought that they

were dead, and had gone to heaven.”

Queen Puff was in high good-humor with herself and the
rest of the company when she had finished her story.

“It comes from the Old Country, and is all the better for
that, to my fancy. Let me hear what your Indian and Yankee
Fairies have to say after the ‘Dove Maiden,”

“ Hoighty-toighty! I could make up a better story with my

eyes shut,” retorted Nip.
152 The Catskill fairies.

Then Queen Puff grew quite red in the face, and was about
to reply, when the attention of all was diverted.

In Job’s picture-gallery there was a small print of an oasis
in the desert, where one slender palm-tree towered aloft, shad-
ing the well which afforded refreshment to a company of
Arabs and camels. This palm-tree began to rustle and sway
gently, as if disturbed by a breeze, as indeed it was—the breeze
of Nip’s influence.

“A great deal has been said about America this evening,”
said the tree. “Let me describe how the first cocoa-nut was

discovered,
The Affitcted Rajah. 153

THE FIRST COCOA-NUT.

“A Prince once lived in the East, who fell ill, just like the
poorest of his subjects. The Prince in those countries was
called a Rajah, which means much the same thing. There was
no help for it; disease had entered the Rajah’s house of stucco,
with the teak-wood balconies, as if he were a humble laborer,
living in a hut, and eating a handful of rice a day.

“What was the matter with him? Nobody knew, and wise
doctors came miles and miles to consult over the mysterious
malady and discover a remedy, but all to no purpose. The
wise doctors, as well as all the subjects, believed that Maha-
Laka, a great demon, had thus afflicted the Rajah because he
was a good man.

“There was really nothing more to be done, since the physi-
clans were at their wits’ end.

“ The Rajah did not forget to say his prayers, however great
his sufferings; so he went to the temple, offered a whole pyra-
mid of sweet flowers on the altar, according to the formula
of the Buddhist religion, and repeated the Buddha-Sarana.

“ Then he came home to the teak-wood palace, laid down on
his mat, and slept for seven days. Slaves hovered about him,
burning perfumes in braziers, and waving fans of peacock
feathers to cool the chamber, yet none dared to disturb his

slumbers.
154 The Catskill Fazrtes.

“ The Rajah was dreaming a wonderful dream all this while.
He saw a beach, and water beyond. Waves broke on the
strand, and a thousand dazzling lights shifted over the sparkling
blue surface. It seemed a curious fact that when the Rajah
dipped his hand into the clear, cool-looking water to drink, the
flavor was salt and disagreeable.

“ Gazing around on the strange scene, he discovered a grove
of trees, rooted on the very brink where land and water met
—the spray dashed over their trunks. These trees rose in slen-
der columns, like mine, with a crown of graceful foliage at the
top. Yes, it was wonderful! While the Rajah marvelled, a
cobra-de-capello, the snake sacred to the Buddhists, glided to
his side, raised its spectacled hood, thrust out its blue, forked
tongue, bowed its head three times, and lapped water from the
leaf reserved for the Prince’s private use. Then the cobra dis-
appeared in the jungle. This was proof enough of Buddha's
favor.

“A cloud gathered close about him, which the Prince tried
in vain to pierce, growing darker and darker until it was night.
He was afraid of this cloud, and fixed his eyes anxiously on a
rift which clove the vapor like sunshine. Out of this splendor
grew an old man, whose face was calm, like the moon, and he
sat on the mist with his feet crossed. The Rajah knew that
this must be Maha-Sarana, the father of Buddha; so he fell
on his face, pressing his forehead to the ground in the way
his own subjects did when approaching him.

“«This is a sacred tree,’ said the old man, pointing to the
grove by the sea. ‘You have failed, through ignorance, to
show it the respect due to all created things. See! The deeply
The Rajah’s Dream. 155

serrated leaf distinguishes it as the favorite of Buddha. The
snake was kind to Buddha while he was on earth, and there-
fore, since the cobra has drank from your leaf, you shall re-
cover health by obeying my commands.

“ dred hours will bring you to the trees seen by you in this
vision. Eat of the fruit, which must be your sole diet until the
Great Moon has twice given and refused her light. Disease
shall leave thee, but forget not sweet sacrifice to that Brahma
of all Brahmas to whom even demons pay homage. The fruit,
which is partly a transparent fluid and partly innocent food,
grows on the top; by fire alone can it be obtained.’

“A sound as of a thousand tomtoms broke on the Rajah’s
ear, and he awoke.

“The pious Prince at once arose, placed the palms of his
hands on his forehead, and bowed himself in prayer to Ossah
Pollah Dewyo, the ruler and creator of all gods and demons,
and of the flat earth besides.

“Next an offering of fruits, betel-leaves, and flowers was left
under a Bogaha-tree; and it was proclaimed that the invalid
would make a journey.

“ Forth came the retinue of warriors and slaves—forth came
the wife from her zenana, wrapped in shawls and veiled with
gauze, through which twinkled the jewels of a princess, attend-
ed by troops of dancing-girls and waiting- women.

“The Rajah climbed a silver ladder to the velvet howdah
on the elephant’s back; the Princess was seated in her litter
of ivory and fragrant woods, and the royal procession moved in

obedience to the command of the old man seen in the dream.
156 The Catskill Fatrtes.



“ Through rivers, forests, valleys, and the tangled jungle our
Rajah made his way to the South.

“ At last he saw the wide expanse of sea, the blue waters;
and on the margin the trees with slender pillars of trunk and
feathered crown. This crest served as a parasol to shade the
fruit from the vertical rays of the sun, and directly beneath
hung the purple and yellow clusters. No human being lived
on this wild shore; only leopards, elephants, lions, and sloths
roamed about. Who could climb the tree? No one, sure-
ly. The Rajah had a fire built; flames girdled and sapped
its life with intense heat, until the crown trembled, wavered,
and fell, Out ran innumerable creatures that had found a
home in its branches—large blue scorpions, brown centi-
pedes, black and green beetles, tarantulas, the polonga, and
rat-snake.

“ Descending from the elephant, the Rajah approached the
The Rajah’s Gratttude. 157

beach, and tasted the water. It was salt and bitter to the pal-
ate, like it had been in his dream.

“The first cocoa-nut was broken, and forth gushed the milk,
as pure and deliciously cool as crystal. The Rajah’s life was
saved by this food.

“In his gratitude he made known to all the world that he
had discovered a tree the fruit of which was renewed health,
the leaf adapted to making huts, mats, fans, and thread, the sap

a refreshing liquor, and the pith a nutritious meal.”

In the picture the Arabs watered their camels, and prepared
to cross the desert; but they got no farther in their move-
ments, because they were taken in those attitudes.

“T can’t make out all that you say,” Job remarked, looking
at the palm-tree. “Who was Buddha?”

“Tf you have heard of the heathen you know what I mean.
The Rajah was a heathen, and worshipped the god Buddha, as
a great many people do in the East. The missionaries go to
those lands to teach them better, and tell them about Christ.”

Then the palm-tree became part of the picture again.

The tiny visitors grew restless; as for Nip he appeared and
disappeared continually, now climbing among the old blue ware
of the open cupboard, now dancing on Grandfather’s spectacle-
case, now seating himself in the steel thimble on the shelf as if
it were a tub. However, Job and the Fairies did not expect Nip
to behave well. The Angora cat gave a leap in the air, and
came down with her fur standing on end.

“Jt must be time for the Fairy of the Cascade,” she purred.

“ Bang! bang!” went the old clock, as if in answer.
158 The Catskill Fatrves.

Then it seemed to Job that the kitchen wall melted away,
and he saw the fall, framed in the ravine, with the hollowed
space below where he had crept many a time to catch the
spray. The banks were crusted with snow, dazzling and pure;
every tree and shrub sparkled with frozen drops; and the water
did not leap over the crag as in summer, but formed a sheet of
ice, as if Nature had fashioned out of the rocks a great organ,
and these were pipes for the winds to play.

Two hands linked together by an ice chain opened the doors
of the cascade—it seemed the most ordinary thing possible to
Job just then—and he looked into the recesses of the hills.
There sat the lovely Fairy of the Cascade bewailing her im-
prisonment by cruel Winter.

“He says it does me good, and makes me value my free-
dom in the spring all the more,” she moaned. “How I love
the sun for coming to release me! At present he is busy
in other parts of the world, you know. Winter is the most
suspicious tyrant. He would not allow me to visit you with
the other Fairies, because he did not trust me that I would
not run away and make myself a new channel in some other
ravine.”

Job longed to ask for his present, but was too shy.

Then a little voice behind him—it sounded like Nip’s—
inquired :

“ Where is Job’s Christmas gift ?”

The Fairy looked kindly at the boy.

“My gift is the magic pole, to help one leap ravines and
over the largest rocks. I shall save it for some other child,

now, because you already own it.”
Voices from the Outside World. 159

“Oh, no I don’t—not even a stick,” protested Job.

“My dear Job, the magic pole is cheerfulness, which helps
mortals to jump over trials and sorrows, forgetting their own
selfish pleasure. This you already own.”

Job was puzzled beyond measure. The chained hands closed
the ice door of the cascade, and the wall of the kitchen was in
its proper place.

“Bless me! The children will not get their dream-thread
in time,” said Puff, bustling about.

“A merry Christmas to you, Job,” piped all the little
voices.

The Summer Fairies mingled with winter’s frosty elves ;
Puff and the Laurel Sprites rose in a brilliant cloud. It made
Job giddy to watch them—red and green and pink in circles
like a dissolving rainbow—until he shut his eyes tight to es-
cape the dazzling radiance. Hark! Who called?

Job was sitting in Grandfather’s chair, which was drawn up
to the hearth, where the log still flickered; and the friendly sun
was not only peeping in the window, but streaming across his
face. Evidently it was day
and Queen Puff? Gone.

The Angora cat stood at Job’s feet, staring at him with all



Christmas-day. Where were Nip

her eyes; the shell lay on the shelf, the clock ticked in its
corner.

Job roused himself, and went to the window. Snow had
ceased to fall; the sky was blue and clear. He raised the sash.
Outside a white field stretched almost unbroken by line of
fence or bush; the flakes had fallen all night.

“ Holloa!” came the sound again, echoed by all the hills.
160 The Catskill Fatries.



Job’s heart began to beat hard. They were calling him!
Was he to be dug out of the drift safely? He put his hands
to his mouth, shaped them like a trumpet, and sent a cheery
shout ringing back. Then he danced around the kitchen;
and, because he must do something in his joy at hearing
voices again, he snatched up the cat, and hugged her until
pussy yelled aloud with wrath.

How about the poor cow and the chickens? Job strove to
trace the path he had made with so much labor the day before,
but the snow had covered it. The cow must wait longer for
her breakfast than on the previous day. In the meanwhile Job
was a hero without knowing it. The night before news had
spread from the village to farm after farm that the boy was
alone on the mountain, and when the snow ceased all were
Grandfather's Arrival. 161

ready to turn out with sleighs and ploughs to force a way
through to rescue him.

Grandfather could neither sleep nor eat for thinking of what
evil might have befallen Job in his absence. Perhaps he had
left the shelter of his home to seek help at some distant house,
and had perished in the storm! The old man’s fears grew with
the drifts, as it were. Many hands make light work; the farm-
ers toiled with a will, and cheered up Grandfather. They found
an unexpected ally where the task seemed most difficult. The
still cold which nipped Job’s toes as the fire went down per-
formed for him a better service—it froze the crust of the snow
so that a sleigh could pass over it. This was the party whose
call Job heard.

There never was a boy quite so glad to see faces again as
Job was, and to have Grandfather among them too. All the
farmers laughed as if it were a great joke, and shook Job by
the shoulders; that was their way of expressing satisfaction.
Grandfather felt of the boy carefully to judge if he were frost-
bitten or hurt; then he sank down into his chair, and ex-
claimed :

“ Wal, this never happened to us afore !”

You may be sure that the cow and the chickens were
reached in a trice, with all those strong arms to clear the way ;
and by the time that was done the tea-kettle sang merrily,
the table was spread, and Grandfather was engaged in making
some of his famous pancakes. The neighbors stayed for a
while, and the Angora cat felt herself quite in the shade with
so many visitors.

Job stood at the window when the sky had assumed the

L,
162 The Catskill Fairies.

green tinge of a cold twilight. He was thinking of his fairy
visitors, and wishing that they would return.

The Lady of the Cascade was in her winter prison—one knew
exactly where to find her; but roguish Nip and busy Puff, with
her endless spinning, were gone.

“ The Fairies came to see me last night—because I was lone-
ly, I guess,” said the boy, gravely. “ They told me, oh, such
wonderful things, if I could remember ’em all.”

Grandfather looked at Job over the rim of his spectacles.
To tell the truth, he was afraid that his grandson was a little
cracked.

“There was Nip from the Berkshire Hills, and the Indian
Fairies who live here still—they told about the witch child,
and—”

“ Pooh !” interrupted Grandfather, looking down again at the
open pocket-book where lay the money he had brought. “ You
were asleep and dreamed it.”

Job was so astonished and indignant that he could not utter
one word. What did Grandfather know about it? Perhaps the
shell and the cat had not talked! He would be saying that
next.

After Grandfather had gone to bed, our hero stole into the
kitchen to see if there were an elfish company gathered around
the hearth. No, the fire blazed and flickered, and had the chim-
ney all to itself. That was all.

“You know about the Fairies, don’t you?” Job whispered to
the old clock.

“ Tick, tick, tick!” said the clock, which might mean any-
thing, or just nothing at all.
Conclusion. 163

“ Pussy, what did Nip say?”

The Angora cat lay curled in a white ball on the chair.
“Miouw!” she answered, blinking stupidly.

Job crept away slowly. Was Grandfather right, after all, when

he said it was a dream?

This is our story. If any little boy or girl who visits the
Catskills next summer will look for Job, not many miles from
the Mountain House, he may be found, shy and barefooted,
wearing the jacket made out of Grandfather’s old plum-colored
coat. If he should not be recognized by this description, the
chances are ten to one that the Angora cat will be close be-
side him.


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'2012-06-28T21:52:23-04:00'
redup
'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfile1' 'sip-files00014.txt
bc949ea893a9384070c31f083ccefd26
cbb8391cb65c20e2c05a2f29211e55c49939c3db
'2012-06-28T21:59:39-04:00'
describe
'2012-06-28T21:52:26-04:00'
redup
'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfile2' 'sip-files00059.txt
bc949ea893a9384070c31f083ccefd26
cbb8391cb65c20e2c05a2f29211e55c49939c3db
'2012-06-28T21:56:43-04:00'
describe
'2012-06-28T21:52:29-04:00'
redup
'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfile3' 'sip-files00076.txt
bc949ea893a9384070c31f083ccefd26
cbb8391cb65c20e2c05a2f29211e55c49939c3db
'2012-06-28T21:54:58-04:00'
describe
'2012-06-28T21:52:32-04:00'
redup
'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfile4' 'sip-files00092.txt
bc949ea893a9384070c31f083ccefd26
cbb8391cb65c20e2c05a2f29211e55c49939c3db
'2012-06-28T21:59:26-04:00'
describe
'2012-06-28T21:52:35-04:00'
redup
'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfile5' 'sip-files00107.txt
bc949ea893a9384070c31f083ccefd26
cbb8391cb65c20e2c05a2f29211e55c49939c3db
'2012-06-28T21:59:40-04:00'
describe
'2012-06-28T21:52:38-04:00'
redup
'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfile6' 'sip-files00127.txt
bc949ea893a9384070c31f083ccefd26
cbb8391cb65c20e2c05a2f29211e55c49939c3db
'2012-06-28T22:00:23-04:00'
describe
'2012-06-28T21:52:40-04:00'
redup
'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfile7' 'sip-files00147.txt
bc949ea893a9384070c31f083ccefd26
cbb8391cb65c20e2c05a2f29211e55c49939c3db
'2012-06-28T22:02:32-04:00'
describe
'2012-06-28T21:52:43-04:00'
redup
'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfile8' 'sip-files00177.txt
bc949ea893a9384070c31f083ccefd26
cbb8391cb65c20e2c05a2f29211e55c49939c3db
'2012-06-28T22:03:01-04:00'
describe
'2012-06-28T21:52:46-04:00'
redup
'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfile9' 'sip-files00178.txt'
bc949ea893a9384070c31f083ccefd26
cbb8391cb65c20e2c05a2f29211e55c49939c3db
'2012-06-28T21:59:30-04:00'
describe
'2012-06-28T21:52:49-04:00'
redup
'42041' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDGM' 'sip-files00161.pro'
26fbc481b5bd513f0714569d24d39cdb
9e455fedbf9ce39a1ff2c6928f7ec3fa96a103dc
'2012-06-28T21:58:47-04:00'
describe
'170381' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDGN' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
1bfc833eb462f2b4b4d5065632a34758
1d1099043fdef215e112a40cc9f4f0e40bdb6a9c
'2012-06-28T21:56:10-04:00'
describe
'44705' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDGO' 'sip-files00137.pro'
4791b995108034fe40d6713ffa80fc25
74192c8b8b8b960282fdb2baf7691d6b620b8d35
'2012-06-28T21:57:48-04:00'
describe
'4737712' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDGP' 'sip-files00127.tif'
8181155d8f1bd341fb145a837df2482d
3d5f782d81d6cda2b312f3b9f9e8ba631b5fa8d8
'2012-06-28T21:54:30-04:00'
describe
'170882' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDGQ' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
7b36862ba4274e2f189a86feff478faa
60ba6b2a84df95ea5b6843b6d104595158a29e67
'2012-06-28T22:00:21-04:00'
describe
'23939' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDGR' 'sip-files00133thm.jpg'
3954479bbe704adf6c627cbe6d6bfeae
4a9d10c56aa1b0685609b340ff5a2303bb03a323
'2012-06-28T21:58:54-04:00'
describe
'185187' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDGS' 'sip-files00146.jpg'
f8ffdc322fe48ebaf53ef0aba24def64
5b310723daebf59b2d444a14d18b0e70d0efa05c
'2012-06-28T22:00:12-04:00'
describe
'19656' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDGT' 'sip-files00179.QC.jpg'
dcfdda4bc471bca18b7c1e40d9b1d6b3
039366004340876b4719b5542f0fbc4d414f30b0
'2012-06-28T21:57:58-04:00'
describe
'640' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDGU' 'sip-files00001.pro'
2fc88024adfe6dfbc96a538a633f5aaf
20f708266415272aadfed05b060b6d8b69a3a0bf
'2012-06-28T22:00:38-04:00'
describe
'34835' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDGV' 'sip-files00089.pro'
e82c48361699b68d01cfabf0518f4534
a710831af9d4c2d2e695763a64dbf4d4d342bacd
'2012-06-28T21:52:55-04:00'
describe
'1720' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDGW' 'sip-files00077.txt'
a472ad45758d8a4bbebdb836fbd0920c
ddbec0b46fe4bb18cdf2e45b7a2c3211de732a51
'2012-06-28T22:03:16-04:00'
describe
'1407' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDGX' 'sip-files00089.txt'
1ef2433b2e8b168b758ba8e3fe572357
f439cf4a0b784267279a2fbc21ed7fd687aafe51
'2012-06-28T21:53:08-04:00'
describe
'58561' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDGY' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
cf96df9e059b2254a2392472caf7ee18
f2d74cbd7a647db442e76f7368a3c413f02d39a0
'2012-06-28T22:01:45-04:00'
describe
'165880' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDGZ' 'sip-files00155.jpg'
ab10d650372a43c9a432d46c0b3dcdfc
19dd3a96cbc06812abb382bf0f7d37ef5298f585
'2012-06-28T22:02:17-04:00'
describe
'24290' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDHA' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
547fa521b153ade48dcc05a020e09435
3e6203d7a4eaf92bef37a6667b1e51cd7634dad1
'2012-06-28T21:58:57-04:00'
describe
'172870' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDHB' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
fbfaba5a16b1f03aa49eb2c669f76033
721164fabf324648ca3ec56766555c19a010ee5c
'2012-06-28T21:56:48-04:00'
describe
'602165' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDHC' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
509dc0580bc821bd1db6309df538ad57
b6d4433b146327842f357fb55c267d55555700c0
'2012-06-28T21:57:17-04:00'
describe
'24683' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDHD' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
85bfd72bfb71af450320cf87dce90cf2
a8878f84d458d8d24f0eaeda4c38e4edf2650beb
'2012-06-28T22:00:37-04:00'
describe
'37130' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDHE' 'sip-files00034.pro'
0f71acdf16cc21b14c8ceaa337107de9
9e2ae5f24bacbef6ebc408ffe3f4a7485fe8fec2
'2012-06-28T22:02:20-04:00'
describe
'4745700' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDHF' 'sip-files00093.tif'
015e6a786d258e2104e41b931f5504b1
6b8320d9d79648fc1aced822102580538c2a3819
'2012-06-28T22:00:15-04:00'
describe
'211' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDHG' 'sip-files00177.pro'
0da14f4bf351d3fe0b0d56976cb77068
1cd125ee4a46526704cdad0dbd19bd463fdc6dd1
'2012-06-28T22:03:19-04:00'
describe
'25675' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDHH' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
578b88c68d3311b118c25c2a96d0c718
69bfcfc5a0aac44781f90bdd275b8cb130f2a538
'2012-06-28T22:01:10-04:00'
describe
'45670' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDHI' 'sip-files00088.pro'
0d43a1e319bbd75c2d9cc59ae0bf9a73
b844008d3901d9a6e5a60dc0756b00aee6f4edcb
'2012-06-28T22:01:08-04:00'
describe
'4244492' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDHJ' 'sip-files00042.tif'
914c910c547c97a212fc1473ab61253a
9f3931bcec79f2b1a9fc32b779fc12a9f4e8ed11
'2012-06-28T22:03:04-04:00'
describe
'4813592' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDHK' 'sip-files00091.tif'
c355f0107a86049a57ed57e01360dae2
e15b9407871ebe405c6fb1fb50a71da235181e4c
'2012-06-28T22:00:57-04:00'
describe
'4212252' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDHL' 'sip-files00147.tif'
16b4cc7805f2daa22ffc12d030dc1fc6
e176d5b91f714377c8e2a6ef71d4ce70abeb45f5
'2012-06-28T22:02:14-04:00'
describe
'63788' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDHM' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
ef800a1ef35874aac51c038423ff86d4
0cb017a8619a651ec3378a855f2c64a4a04f1d36
'2012-06-28T22:00:14-04:00'
describe
'59779' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDHN' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
88c85c1259c6b08980455bb43cb8c703
fceed08032ac3dfbada9b6374b09c78cc414af4c
'2012-06-28T21:54:34-04:00'
describe
'4756172' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDHO' 'sip-files00039.tif'
4066db0fb70a00f52868e52107c7541b
e67767ca8f16daedb5d2c673e3fcece18a6b6fb7
'2012-06-28T21:55:33-04:00'
describe
'4768016' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDHP' 'sip-files00118.tif'
d57f820dcbe2f8b9b29fed1ec75fd627
76998ae6ed9f738b60f8e998d3a5f621da2cd554
'2012-06-28T22:01:41-04:00'
describe
'478075' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDHQ' 'sip-files00148.jp2'
dedfa484873639df90b6488e84d1b0f3
0d8fe1a05b4eaf1c2d358d7e057614e9199e9f8d
'2012-06-28T22:01:14-04:00'
describe
'73990' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDHR' 'sip-files00152.QC.jpg'
789ae061fa4dfdbab40b51b223b184ed
ab5c196ad183a48b5bb6fbab06b12e7a9b902eee
'2012-06-28T22:02:47-04:00'
describe
'4819832' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDHS' 'sip-files00109.tif'
438cc0b6ad61ec5da504044b636486ab
7fdd7c5085eedfa97b4aeb6d5de82a2f31872532
'2012-06-28T21:59:54-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDHT' 'sip-files00008.txt'
bc949ea893a9384070c31f083ccefd26
cbb8391cb65c20e2c05a2f29211e55c49939c3db
'2012-06-28T22:02:30-04:00'
describe
'4682048' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDHU' 'sip-files00140.tif'
355ad0e1a89f38bfc927682b513e184f
7186cbad44143da8bfe32e1d649c65f554ec7161
'2012-06-28T21:58:23-04:00'
describe
'45247' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDHV' 'sip-files00116.pro'
c10d8f1ddd12453aeb7a85f8ff0aba93
e67c03c66979fa8d52277bce77247ffe5331554a
'2012-06-28T21:58:55-04:00'
describe
'187861' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDHW' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
564fd97bc1be1f16388e9018d18aa053
cde0d8110ff46c00a30b6c78851c20359c229820
'2012-06-28T21:57:02-04:00'
describe
'1081' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDHX' 'sip-files00025.txt'
6545b8d5d5c5fe9bd6c83bbaae56564a
eadd536bbd9784cd443bfa4070d7213c8e6918c0
'2012-06-28T21:58:01-04:00'
describe
'69205' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDHY' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
0a9e452438708dca1d5fef0fbe3e2302
c356f7187463b2ef24c27f5b4ac16810d365a5d9
'2012-06-28T21:58:33-04:00'
describe
'597174' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDHZ' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
4e19d3c42ab120ac24a80d22565b47b9
4b2fa433acabebbb092ca57eec8b7a68b20ad552
'2012-06-28T21:54:42-04:00'
describe
'168095' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDIA' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
a4e972041ca587968d322bd5f0ce202b
89a130fe36acf6609780f2540952719a502c7344
'2012-06-28T21:52:56-04:00'
describe
'24888' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDIB' 'sip-files00142thm.jpg'
b7afad2761e11a4dfb07b993c4c8710c
ff40510d8f2a2fbdc9269cfa4dc019855d7c5cf7
'2012-06-28T21:57:25-04:00'
describe
'177669' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDIC' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
d02e52a6601848da7f861bb85b77f675
5f74dcda71afb3b0555db63e026b37c4fb3261b2
'2012-06-28T21:59:49-04:00'
describe
'4796460' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDID' 'sip-files00103.tif'
781107dda19221e6ceaecc87c81b8baf
21def9f725311cc1be2e4c80000ade830fb20624
'2012-06-28T21:54:03-04:00'
describe
'7625' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDIE' 'sip-files00172.txt'
ace94bbc75164723915fb3cd484d8938
daa49017cf6eacf6664adf1ae2d29061ec781a5e
'2012-06-28T22:00:07-04:00'
describe
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Invalid character
'4771620' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDIF' 'sip-files00088.tif'
98f61d6af1cd5dcae8dd53944f31b835
647d213c00c8b75964f95628192627d8e209e3a4
'2012-06-28T21:57:30-04:00'
describe
'190728' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDIG' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
c886d8877b010acf23f990d775cbc036
b4f16e58cb796d7baaaf6873beb065f44affda42
'2012-06-28T21:57:42-04:00'
describe
'22335' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDIH' 'sip-files00164.pro'
eaf6f24712e3b80e4238b48d0743b78d
49f013aa3f5b6e9cbc76d5859c1e79defe84134a
'2012-06-28T22:02:54-04:00'
describe
'903' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDII' 'sip-files00108.pro'
a3a125896ba190e16c8582610ff095d7
653f39fb5d1685f926cb01f8b25d04f066df8a02
'2012-06-28T22:02:57-04:00'
describe
'36263' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDIJ' 'sip-files00156.QC.jpg'
0d1e842665389ee605a8fe0f76fefb97
0a0d70265db833d2f3ce8916594155d101ab1cbb
'2012-06-28T21:57:39-04:00'
describe
'3788' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDIK' 'sip-files00012.pro'
77e029753d1876cb238b43101fb424d9
300f3ad28b08a743b781b207a3132bfa3b3796f6
'2012-06-28T22:02:37-04:00'
describe
'41958' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDIL' 'sip-files00040.pro'
2f0c981ff2baae5218fd93eaff240375
f26994e13c33fad5776f9cd9e85d2bfa21f18862
'2012-06-28T21:55:50-04:00'
describe
'39973' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDIM' 'sip-files00111.pro'
d0308a00a8106eec7406337f1d636992
9f9bb75f6282bb230d61ffdc2b47506f215c69c1
'2012-06-28T22:02:09-04:00'
describe
'536968' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDIN' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
fd6302e4697b4a565656c71a1c2100e4
b2412cf0afc79f4e8bd79c3aa2df1b78da11bf2e
'2012-06-28T21:55:16-04:00'
describe
'591573' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDIO' 'sip-files00155.jp2'
0045bb37ae5a5d69b5bc562b9635bd9d
745b24796358efc9bf236f77b79af44f09a87a03
'2012-06-28T22:02:22-04:00'
describe
'591629' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDIP' 'sip-files00161.jp2'
84a68fb2e6f055627161d88694992abe
72379fdb8df605715596e2a47e88ced1bd6760f2
'2012-06-28T21:58:05-04:00'
describe
'60011' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDIQ' 'sip-files00148.QC.jpg'
62f7bf910cafb12d7fb42fc34e15e89f
e1a0215314b7b48efcc395c8de6ed7fe91c01219
'2012-06-28T22:02:39-04:00'
describe
'23185' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDIR' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
37a0aa1ad7274feb7270f875176b0693
1ac1890e5b47af10bbc2dfd7f6d816dc9f040398
'2012-06-28T21:53:20-04:00'
describe
'24819' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDIS' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
c6cde734d9219ac9f1c8b311839a6100
d7d51ad1241c7494b462946a5d71ae5979dae108
describe
'63073' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDIT' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
be74c2fc5c9a799065ee79dd7979cead
5bbd43869af072f3c949e800f5595318e49de891
'2012-06-28T21:55:52-04:00'
describe
'542689' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDIU' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
fef15a314b87c60029ba402e3aadd671
e0c8e7471d1ab28e0d27893e5a2cfd1db6f294d3
'2012-06-28T21:57:10-04:00'
describe
'170123' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDIV' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
5ae055f090202f1f82aa18e0158006fa
c1f4adaef45589e01cb91c32e93ba655a0ebd88f
'2012-06-28T22:00:58-04:00'
describe
'19398' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDIW' 'sip-files00134.pro'
740b2868ffc55a7483d3416aa8256d46
81ca2c41b600ecd583cc23ec24417cc4ec47ea10
'2012-06-28T22:01:59-04:00'
describe
'47894' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDIX' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
3e67f5c9111774078cd9fb54c3adf66f
74ab47e106447849ba81a05c3a4ae4725b775536
'2012-06-28T21:59:42-04:00'
describe
'46913' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDIY' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
4df75a47cd58779d036bf5afde3bd64c
aee9f4c1496914e1a1d56f620a5b0df86fed3006
'2012-06-28T22:00:27-04:00'
describe
'21538' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDIZ' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
6ca99339f36ceabdd6d4ae3e408c760b
bef516c129afffdbff25fa03d7418c8192eb0b2d
'2012-06-28T21:54:50-04:00'
describe
'573986' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDJA' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
b5885141648c073ca0af4b1f5cd6c83e
7ad0dd436f72d9e6d8e9208120534b360c639711
'2012-06-28T21:57:33-04:00'
describe
'15634392' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDJB' 'sip-files00178.tif'
7f5871fd1a9abd86fdf5d1b33696817f
517ee5f78d7a32071a67464b29b55513bbaef53e
'2012-06-28T21:57:23-04:00'
describe
'23998' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDJC' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
ebdfe64c52305521ad0e873b8dd3917a
c115a9486701ec0666cf986cef4da2a53336e16a
'2012-06-28T21:56:05-04:00'
describe
'539919' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDJD' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
74387f2e9dfa010180b7da4c3c301c55
67438844a08fac4b52d5c06897a0a87a51572851
'2012-06-28T21:56:56-04:00'
describe
'9774' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDJE' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
f6af27625f583247b5d88394282d21b6
3cca7c8bdff9d3f87b1b8d4c9b4353904a8fd464
'2012-06-28T21:57:59-04:00'
describe
'22886' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDJF' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
44a8067ec3becc417d78e83eac3260fd
1e08b13d0c6ad50aabb77a86209d434fbf3844e6
'2012-06-28T21:53:35-04:00'
describe
'592977' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDJG' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
d73a719a7ab137e361c1ed12eca22344
f2d05ecc12d13d3e0231cd45332c818a72e64719
'2012-06-28T21:56:31-04:00'
describe
'41645' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDJH' 'sip-files00165.pro'
b4e2760bc577e2191d5949d1139da4e7
68fb4c77a2824a8e80dd75394cd934f9ff240b5b
describe
'4133592' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDJI' 'sip-files00153.tif'
55490ce3c5b9f888c5b2507918b2d190
e71e651bb6aeb214f54283f8b2528b8c2510f56c
'2012-06-28T21:55:25-04:00'
describe
'18618' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDJJ' 'sip-files00058.pro'
c8ad50d5c91bc844ccd029405dd0106c
88d9f82640186021410a9320646f0a61a62a0d39
'2012-06-28T22:03:09-04:00'
describe
'519952' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDJK' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
109ed5d6a488337f52d4f37cd463ecca
a08d699702d6b57ba5e3058f1552f92c88156516
'2012-06-28T21:56:40-04:00'
describe
'78054' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDJL' 'sip-files00171.QC.jpg'
ad5498f050bd64d82de880f9471ff113
601d9492fb4dadbc89c301cee6e1ea858486b4c1
'2012-06-28T21:54:49-04:00'
describe
'165731' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDJM' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
9a12ecb70b97c498c6b3c047f7678d01
4143dd468c9ee2051e801c4cde79fa3c3d8defa4
'2012-06-28T22:01:26-04:00'
describe
'175848' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDJN' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
50ee52f79c8caa3e8ca669328d1a8b78
d490fb25037f2acc9d7387f3bdabac9510363ee7
'2012-06-28T22:02:34-04:00'
describe
'110936' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDJO' 'sip-files00002.jpg'
8e6ccdf77d9d0f762005a67fb89ed34e
aa22b076da6c5177c3695db422453917aa52dd41
'2012-06-28T21:56:30-04:00'
describe
'527527' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDJP' 'sip-files00163.jp2'
041199415a3f0d3726d081c811f33be9
241f74b62c5fa3364c5688908e8eedd9fc299c63
'2012-06-28T21:57:00-04:00'
describe
'10134' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDJQ' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
115bfc7bac04bdaf9b5cd184daf90539
00630039f027d412c93ddd1887278a14ca579670
'2012-06-28T21:54:25-04:00'
describe
'581623' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDJR' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
8c6ead98fa5579fd1b089473ced29a08
fa7da2037acb5b4493d327adecf838723d89a356
'2012-06-28T21:58:42-04:00'
describe
'1665' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDJS' 'sip-files00097.txt'
e2b8bc8e3a6fe965d19469f1e007d416
3a59f100d1e6fde65f21818ef263132b2bfca179
'2012-06-28T22:00:06-04:00'
describe
'20613' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDJT' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
895694a2333bbe7e5f43ca79bae98d40
4440369b6842392dbce7fd38f2ad9efaf54a6bbe
'2012-06-28T21:58:21-04:00'
describe
'602545' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDJU' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
2e7d7ec2b397e6f119a2610cde8a2406
cf0f296265e4829e1312105b2a4fda8506ba9c1b
'2012-06-28T22:02:36-04:00'
describe
'971' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDJV' 'sip-files00154.txt'
75dca9af63b931f2d592f1e696769fd9
c7bb8c54d70aea59c215c1a9bf4219c65c2190f9
'2012-06-28T21:53:15-04:00'
describe
'184796' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDJW' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
e31742ce536a0b34e8590d01281ba999
873a666ba3d5e69cc9ad277d04bea3766f02abf9
'2012-06-28T21:53:51-04:00'
describe
'4380144' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDJX' 'sip-files00064.tif'
3c242c41087a03cc0ae1ad6ffe6daa7a
61e3f48663fdfb549948f91c1d75f7a25ddd2e0a
'2012-06-28T22:01:04-04:00'
describe
'23299' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDJY' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
f61eaadb922b967ef412a79267aad342
2d5b18a43150b3230ecc064f03592be41b0bb34b
'2012-06-28T22:00:33-04:00'
describe
'30445' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDJZ' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
64834dd7bbc2b4e707afb134076247ea
4b52a34821ef1515cd8da1f61501326fc7706634
'2012-06-28T22:01:29-04:00'
describe
'62083' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDKA' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
169fac893d6688c08314d80286afaa99
b2e2b5a4177b8961bfb929de396e152664677a5e
'2012-06-28T21:54:20-04:00'
describe
'43037' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDKB' 'sip-files00028.pro'
46d03ee84cf049cb8475ca2202fd8a90
ddd8219ce81f3ddf227b4d07ca7401e3ba464927
describe
'571' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDKC' 'sip-files00132.txt'
d2019fae02e45c44adc2db82f250288c
20612ec1d9cc3dbe36ff4f7f5d4d04555ce2cddd
'2012-06-28T21:59:56-04:00'
describe
'44599' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDKD' 'sip-files00126.pro'
7993a275963db1c4a6cd151aaaf1be8f
c5dc02e5440e76cf50897ee862ca0d83e404cb89
'2012-06-28T21:54:37-04:00'
describe
'4229824' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDKE' 'sip-files00026.tif'
8b66aa6874f749df8a34f4c16a62e93b
acc1f45317339cd05642840de1da763f17437f51
'2012-06-28T21:59:25-04:00'
describe
'2669872' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDKF' 'sip-files00179.tif'
d6b3f1bc3e790f82d7375a2dd876f0d8
d1c9d1fd9b831df1e691a676f011b1f0dfab13fd
'2012-06-28T21:54:14-04:00'
describe
'1103' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDKG' 'sip-files00018.txt'
5e12e2d037d16052ffdea71c91ef8ae1
7a9b6c7dcb89e96d10fd16538440ff51bad35281
'2012-06-28T21:53:37-04:00'
describe
'173816' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDKH' 'sip-files00143.jpg'
859480f06dfea09ffe6f66537b4e3af9
c1b0a3fa0259a04ed93e2d56fdcd4a644db09d65
'2012-06-28T21:55:26-04:00'
describe
'5253' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDKI' 'sip-files00075.pro'
acc3fa3b8bcf3b63431bc5e8766b6242
782aef65aa2ffca13efc27fa3bd10e6c372fce4d
'2012-06-28T21:57:44-04:00'
describe
'163902' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDKJ' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
e73956801b419ba5f716d91dd4d0fec9
2897e7c6c533f2523d4568c8484eb408bdeab6d7
'2012-06-28T21:57:41-04:00'
describe
'4056992' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDKK' 'sip-files00169.tif'
fc3a02fb30dd5e1939a09dd6b2266eeb
a917c4020933ba2e29aa503e7c4a9f94f9895daa
'2012-06-28T21:59:43-04:00'
describe
'1740' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDKL' 'sip-files00142.txt'
b3a86306ed61f926e8612b921cefa925
6c3b3b91639a6c8de52f94e18108a1214fd5f9e7
'2012-06-28T21:55:29-04:00'
describe
'165448' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDKM' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
20557668a29e5b47e937dcf1437242c5
2775a0d78e1116783ff41dd4a438e6bb10e31b03
'2012-06-28T22:01:23-04:00'
describe
'540391' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDKN' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
ed7641396034a4158d89063601e770ae
9350b4473a24781fbb1e748bd14da0b87a8b5a4d
'2012-06-28T21:57:34-04:00'
describe
'4310348' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDKO' 'sip-files00020.tif'
eccf4a1c2ae0789163818e7b74cab1f7
6d0660b5703976680f8e5710dbfbf2e226eba56b
'2012-06-28T22:02:41-04:00'
describe
'62052' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDKP' 'sip-files00143.QC.jpg'
25b7d886bc184cecf8183d8b2cd34fab
1dcdfc8d74fa74c4acad85d4c69e96e343ebe790
'2012-06-28T21:54:38-04:00'
describe
'36570' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDKQ' 'sip-files00118.pro'
95f8f4ee71b5dfb665bffc715aff1873
f1a4648da7d907eeeb3cbcca83cc80fb917a028d
'2012-06-28T22:02:44-04:00'
describe
'544226' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDKR' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
0a38f0e27569878f2ee135231dda8aad
b74c1f2465e64b3f780e68cec95fe22dbb8a192b
describe
'528959' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDKS' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
2127ee19ccb2858be503d94388026642
2862806d846e182494b34ab7e087c05fc183f185
'2012-06-28T21:56:14-04:00'
describe
'592512' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDKT' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
11a4f0a10455d6193186e8c0c158f6dc
a440c727dca06178055f38242e4c9b4a69e11f05
'2012-06-28T21:52:58-04:00'
describe
'64878' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDKU' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
98dd2032b8c53fe381b108a99acc6740
14add7d0816abdc62169a3ad4770d455afe0b34f
'2012-06-28T21:58:20-04:00'
describe
'597170' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDKV' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
62f29df8d20ff25a813733ce0bc629a9
615ba95d019eb169413885e5b600bdda253c9993
'2012-06-28T22:01:02-04:00'
describe
'549440' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDKW' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
13bdd11f96c4e201a4d1d584b408a2c8
1710848e9a398d4ace6008bd8f7561f3c96e0a3c
'2012-06-28T21:54:45-04:00'
describe
'21620' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDKX' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
3a7c21022e46309b758bb9a26ba94600
6ce760dbe17a9b36e79887fdea83e11b7434028e
'2012-06-28T21:57:01-04:00'
describe
'946' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDKY' 'sip-files00051.txt'
7145ab3d312c518fb9e9e9e6255d09b0
77bc388a6012a82d1402ab75c9ea1239c2f1ef5c
'2012-06-28T21:54:31-04:00'
describe
'4575676' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDKZ' 'sip-files00028.tif'
04bf4a0d38dc21ce71b4071a325e27ba
77ec1c4b591c0df847568ede9bd2aa909adf133f
'2012-06-28T22:01:51-04:00'
describe
'545971' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDLA' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
d53c07f85dcf0f5e55118db6cb07836d
ffb7b658421583bf6ec48969faf7c1b04523da7c
'2012-06-28T21:52:54-04:00'
describe
'45924' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDLB' 'sip-files00167.QC.jpg'
62b8272b2a18725c465dfb2b1e829f71
d60d41e1cb0600107dece9e1e5d369299bb1b961
'2012-06-28T22:01:24-04:00'
describe
'172502' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDLC' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
1fd99aaa11e79330cb06103812c49c12
93b8eda34f882e3d4c54686d7e11038af8c8ea97
'2012-06-28T22:01:00-04:00'
describe
'1664' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDLD' 'sip-files00040.txt'
b960218cacf92d0ae10465028be97655
12c146822b15c1ed7edd98bfd9b92f91d1e6aed8
'2012-06-28T21:57:56-04:00'
describe
'53186' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDLE' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
e55dc1efccc9c26bfcc53f85225e36f1
edf84441f3093eaf9ce40dad6f356b62ed73383f
'2012-06-28T22:01:39-04:00'
describe
'597172' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDLF' 'sip-files00143.jp2'
fc85e5c4deb9ce64da4e9942cc50475e
4bcd242b1b09804ce7898af9023eb98d4c0b5767
'2012-06-28T21:55:24-04:00'
describe
'4619196' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDLG' 'sip-files00056.tif'
52929775b639b0da1b781b726c92691f
bcb5bd638b59436353f0687b089d108e421aeda5
'2012-06-28T21:55:31-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDLH' 'sip-files00178.pro'
b77ce2348d93b509ae995d3581890110
0e52c54cf513d0569227966caa1fafbb85a70c87
'2012-06-28T22:02:43-04:00'
describe
'15803884' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDLI' 'sip-files00002.tif'
477f982da3f6272c59a17a5a76c360c1
7cab55ee6ff28bf75c4671e4f6741c7275fa6fb0
'2012-06-28T21:57:11-04:00'
describe
'1669' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDLJ' 'sip-files00149.txt'
c3a11f550f6ebbb5a92b2e90657774c2
a154c6c129c513ffd12444b133f894c690292dd8
'2012-06-28T21:52:57-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDLK' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
0b77f9d48dc9b796f392873f39f8d931
07c401613138397282b09fdee7c65f31e85d0b26
'2012-06-28T21:54:23-04:00'
describe
'1623' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDLL' 'sip-files00146.txt'
57d60ac5a93a52feeff7039916f65213
5236d56ab0782915399126cbcf39217e012f56a2
'2012-06-28T21:58:03-04:00'
describe
'4789736' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDLM' 'sip-files00143.tif'
44010fe285c57cce801213f9e10721aa
bdce5236c5bbcba2371d9293880ef05552a21136
'2012-06-28T22:02:45-04:00'
describe
'152196' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDLN' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
d6250a1f1faaae3b1abfc40abe457e93
f88bc5cdc699d410f462606a8c21c5113ec7eae3
describe
'4470760' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDLO' 'sip-files00008.tif'
7f05dbea2a0eaed9183a9ab0b2585488
f6c4c5641b6f8b470b41c78a2dc8556d4c86af4f
'2012-06-28T21:58:30-04:00'
describe
'191191' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDLP' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
86a77d12dc386635b4ec2fb5b2a0557e
f22f23a54dadb8c91ad58708aa465768297b84a7
'2012-06-28T21:54:53-04:00'
describe
'170869' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDLQ' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
b6a371e1f1d64a6bbf8b957ad3aaa405
16b04241e60828b41e4e5e715da4d13b1f912341
'2012-06-28T21:59:14-04:00'
describe
'25220' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDLR' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
6835a7f4ab80cefe07c1ade3e023002f
55a50c11d3a16e033139d2d9165f865c66906bc9
'2012-06-28T21:57:16-04:00'
describe
'4760860' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDLS' 'sip-files00046.tif'
96e93bc88cafb7a497c9801abf0422ef
30ef2399ada6071ec6aa2867abc45b71ed273b76
'2012-06-28T21:56:35-04:00'
describe
'1032' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDLT' 'sip-files00121.txt'
b954024494c733f0138c50492a11bbda
8a7f240725879c4a116028fc51654831503047d6
'2012-06-28T22:02:38-04:00'
describe
'597150' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDLU' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
de4ce14abc75bddcec2f8e9970511391
16eb2f0d670ba866df1acd7647f255a04b832a30
'2012-06-28T21:55:21-04:00'
describe
'151270' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDLV' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
0a677d44d0a6a441931b3f3a77384b5a
b79c3363af08bd1c62265f9b3b734354da9506e2
'2012-06-28T21:59:37-04:00'
describe
'4681712' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDLW' 'sip-files00138.tif'
f099e926831563e6f84590371ec1161c
8d51895733d4795ebee68bdfb15982ca91fca503
'2012-06-28T21:53:27-04:00'
describe
'129881' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDLX' 'sip-files00167.jpg'
55c18d331358d46549fed407a8d1be88
d619a762d43f043893c7cef8256676c0024a2bca
describe
'24014' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDLY' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
fa76618e38677b60a2089036fb8f1402
28a190d93794e2287f3117dbd2e21776717b65f7
'2012-06-28T22:02:40-04:00'
describe
'7637' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDLZ' 'sip-files00170.txt'
4cdd032f6fa02cb60a185362653d3e0b
7ae2d88a86cc45bede2264238be4fde35d1b04bc
'2012-06-28T22:02:55-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'170647' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDMA' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
a7cb9c75506f1b8f3f67863a41f8014b
19598e456e684fcd27cebd04195bf56a149ed2ab
'2012-06-28T21:55:11-04:00'
describe
'597741' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDMB' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
09a89cc1cf9934530eff640d41b77543
c916554526bf04394a723b70a7af26c3415c8990
'2012-06-28T21:55:54-04:00'
describe
'37033' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDMC' 'sip-files00099.pro'
f7deec9930aefaf9093edd61622cc1d7
1358e500963bc5fccdce3e3513d0bcc869bff57d
'2012-06-28T21:54:12-04:00'
describe
'4767092' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDMD' 'sip-files00018.tif'
9cf35571db641d0ea82520ed462d3777
490fc03442fa8ad69fcc17d55dae97e031e2c8f1
'2012-06-28T21:55:18-04:00'
describe
'529086' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDME' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
8025a9b7a5262778db576b7dc4cd3d66
52686e380c4fe0d2c4b2bd01770d99268878ae27
'2012-06-28T21:55:22-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDMF' 'sip-files00008.pro'
2743de65892e01fd81fb16b08bb19b2a
e4209e4d6a90043e45e57c75d279993a715c5179
'2012-06-28T22:01:28-04:00'
describe
'122' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDMG' 'sip-files00108.txt'
4dbf3fbee18a24da07ccef290e350835
b6cfcfc80563b6cf25e6ccabc727a849c6a7734a
'2012-06-28T21:53:49-04:00'
describe
'20764' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDMH' 'sip-files00117.pro'
8a5baaabc411a349f7f4b9ffb4a6fe52
1974af4b708bd3874ebf61d286c4d5e69ad2ef84
'2012-06-28T21:57:54-04:00'
describe
'27798' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDMI' 'sip-files00171thm.jpg'
1619c43c4bace2e83e8f78a34075e3a5
b3ab5192d8fc916ff0736c30afd65d3e1b104e5f
describe
'11047' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDMJ' 'sip-files00177thm.jpg'
3b005848dc872498ec4ef0f1aac16a96
944bc42280e2f03d4ec7e84ce6aab9137fe4c08c
'2012-06-28T21:55:13-04:00'
describe
'57560' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDMK' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
d318d2a474ccd383ef8097371fe42add
2b5b7036fdbbaa753a34261496b68e1012118059
'2012-06-28T21:54:55-04:00'
describe
'23468' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDML' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
1d7aceed3e6049c465b821c221df53b1
0d9dbf46b59e015493254511e186bc1f3173ecee
'2012-06-28T21:58:45-04:00'
describe
'65752' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDMM' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
a1a4f2c3978eed74ee999b9309213959
a6ae7cbb04508851bdbf4c3dc2b23190a64c96d2
describe
'22985' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDMN' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
d50d0de6da09d5c571b789878b241cf5
7c4667d6f84c2f4a8a1b1ceb30cf612ee233c33d
'2012-06-28T22:01:33-04:00'
describe
'40780' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDMO' 'sip-files00153.pro'
03a957e7f35806d738ada913df6df28b
2a4d8d1dd280ded805457171699933928d94ef92
'2012-06-28T21:58:13-04:00'
describe
'144' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDMP' 'sip-filesprocessing.instr'
c4599dbae8da74ba886811d492eb998e
79a05f5a36fdd1a5fa0ac71e9389f7ba9df23d4d
'2012-06-28T21:56:28-04:00'
describe
'16339' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDMQ' 'sip-files00147.QC.jpg'
0687734d40e93984890933ea7e263d2e
81f9c1355d7066a38f15b6bd2a83e82a974a90fb
describe
'544981' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDMR' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
9bd71958c25bf7df0d2d4a491e13f4a1
4c9f12596c25c35b3f81c0812b658b541a28044f
'2012-06-28T22:01:32-04:00'
describe
'1517' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDMS' 'sip-files00055.txt'
32b83692796c20013a19515d30e20293
623b8fbe8a0a7471b1d55cfdb69fef652f05b8e1
'2012-06-28T21:59:27-04:00'
describe
'37139' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDMT' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
331587f02656612b02a7c81987fd5c4a
804faa89a3276e56901f139a976933c3aaa76bbe
'2012-06-28T22:01:34-04:00'
describe
'573' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDMU' 'sip-files00093.txt'
74ccf9b137abd57c8ebe5345b0a4549e
0517bae529a35c2e9c7059c4c4deee048fc80579
'2012-06-28T21:54:01-04:00'
describe
'140175' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDMV' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
a7cdd3960188ac7f918502e7db57f1d6
a419fea90ca9f1c7527f53af9cdd1056f3d4dcb2
'2012-06-28T21:55:47-04:00'
describe
'187441' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDMW' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
d05ce76a8cae4aca600e774779ed9c76
9c72344bfb3db9f0615c60d6b59f136664c97f51
'2012-06-28T21:53:43-04:00'
describe
'24372' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDMX' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
d03a25af403675ac75b29c79867936ad
d6a33f773749cda47910a19af37b81ef405cad23
'2012-06-28T21:57:28-04:00'
describe
'556104' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDMY' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
21d95e640b77adb893adcb08338f500d
8cc93a0dd4fe62e2420724670373dc5895693eb1
describe
'40248' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDMZ' 'sip-files00027.pro'
8f6209c8ddd051d881507b450b9a24c0
872efc4c894d2ae8e32e14b88a2ff1e7fe55f8e0
'2012-06-28T22:00:19-04:00'
describe
'4771516' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDNA' 'sip-files00080.tif'
fab625c1432b2e053315f78ea49976a9
825615d02fff6a921641a449e1c2803229f5acfa
'2012-06-28T21:59:58-04:00'
describe
'521861' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDNB' 'sip-files00149.jp2'
4df32f940721c15ee67694852cac07ea
5b524274e7456a7b76bdbb78a0b53038cfe3ff88
'2012-06-28T21:57:06-04:00'
describe
'4745208' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDNC' 'sip-files00155.tif'
e6c02544e27807f8915c1b72a0c834d4
069e8932ea0a5ca1e3073e881a290687700cbfc8
'2012-06-28T21:53:55-04:00'
describe
'1657' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDND' 'sip-files00104.txt'
76c2d9be12d9e989584e8ee82de01d8c
a429d9de7cf16c1160a75c6cac5dd139b49013f3
describe
'593676' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDNE' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
a9ba3b61d817a2a08513fc100665cd81
54e39b0b5442b15c4abb654f9cc643ff947a2c6a
'2012-06-28T21:53:56-04:00'
describe
'44154' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDNF' 'sip-files00135.pro'
b8d16071bb77db60c62061d8b787c9b9
52e55246f34c9739cc5be429c10c756a216cf0e2
'2012-06-28T21:56:09-04:00'
describe
'559513' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDNG' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
0af7db08caafa70d8eeeedd3db459bef
346df0f5a5bb533bb0bdbb8d9e5757ae41798931
'2012-06-28T21:58:34-04:00'
describe
'15778' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDNH' 'sip-files00156.pro'
66e8aee726ff6cf7d33a96c2d5b5cb9f
3794f7968f6d860eb2b47390b2f5b28f50d5838e
describe
'4353004' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDNI' 'sip-files00038.tif'
ae169a3d53c56b0af90270fbae0109d3
20afe3e45503eeaab889ca55eb5a3ad2a11b0249
'2012-06-28T21:55:36-04:00'
describe
'176971' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDNJ' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
2974df0bcd8c16363245dc3b85fe535b
0000bed44abafac9ea665ec3ac8feddb4b4295e1
'2012-06-28T21:58:50-04:00'
describe
'139145' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDNK' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
2cd58c19a9d86c5480962dff69e0ebc9
0980bbffd1eaafc7956cc925eec915cda3f81d87
'2012-06-28T21:56:04-04:00'
describe
'183563' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDNL' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
22b762a982f677a9e0774ff99b653f5f
44b61372b330735d773017cebec9ef325cacaee0
'2012-06-28T22:01:44-04:00'
describe
'594654' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDNM' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
b9cebe38aa03fe6ac2b20a349b6fe784
3fd5889330e73397c5428f33a23fb45236cbdfe5
'2012-06-28T21:52:52-04:00'
describe
'7047' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDNN' 'sip-files00015.pro'
cd8a9918cfaef904ec37b10f8582fbe4
b8165b02ab6d25ab89bfa4e28995f038c1f9ad7f
'2012-06-28T21:59:16-04:00'
describe
'22855' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDNO' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
a0766a4a777095a30b19d4ce4b255ec7
122570b56c4d9dc395c91d18db4d5b0639fcde5c
describe
'56887' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDNP' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
afef71cb96c3c03b73caf00082207dc3
d2df8c55947db1044d092c06e63a486e7965f5ff
describe
'25702' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDNQ' 'sip-files00160.pro'
8ecc4ac118f253853ee5d42f394e5350
f8f59aee6fb865086e06f6cdd9c03369ce82616f
'2012-06-28T21:57:53-04:00'
describe
'540795' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDNR' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
a82cc152662cce3dcb66817be359cbed
e5f62ebfe70aeeba823992ae21227c58afbfb286
describe
'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDNS' 'sip-files00141.jp2'
6ae4556690e1945d4051cdfe52ee4bfa
2b2be4a27839a8d12b830b618b14626c1430890c
describe
'21914' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDNT' 'sip-files00121.pro'
55f93dda24e03f8b6bcf0732f49c9985
c99767a28830d30a3d051837eb1f70e8173e2cc4
'2012-06-28T22:03:10-04:00'
describe
'59144' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDNU' 'sip-files00007.jpg'
b4864af1e8addbf0d47cd8369dcfa6cf
c16657bf4ee40bb8d22eb71b7e3d1ebd7f355da5
'2012-06-28T22:02:07-04:00'
describe
'69615' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDNV' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
56f317632ae42e876c6c777972606c89
5fc11ab9271a2fc2360518ae5fbe0317e383cb4c
'2012-06-28T21:54:15-04:00'
describe
'62359' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDNW' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
5d486484d405f12a604d0332c9a744d8
b8254bf4ccf18604e37733a4adb5575c9ca79eb6
'2012-06-28T22:01:30-04:00'
describe
'23574' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDNX' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
53798e6e446302d770a6d7d00e75bec6
7442531ce2b18a77910c25d6daad70ffc9862705
'2012-06-28T21:54:35-04:00'
describe
'24905' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDNY' 'sip-files00083.pro'
ece347b817f92dd9840230e354cc6d44
fbd36789979567710679ffbf45180df1fd50f080
'2012-06-28T21:58:25-04:00'
describe
'24492' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDNZ' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
653aa2ffac40d215f3c967bc57f4b28b
0f474cbff4fc794c794b7c099daf591c4b6f0c5a
'2012-06-28T22:00:05-04:00'
describe
'1757' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDOA' 'sip-files00062.txt'
0f377bbe6e9e1e219488a3f356040b59
a73e1d182fdfb8cf241fc5b9563f2a341eea6bac
'2012-06-28T21:56:19-04:00'
describe
'4375476' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDOB' 'sip-files00031.tif'
d21ecfd909f58980412c25cf2e4de27a
06004fd6cb447ca905763f0f7e8e6689da616369
'2012-06-28T21:54:19-04:00'
describe
'500975' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDOC' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
7214716937af877432d94da2bdec4bed
810596ca30b3f53e64f2bf936069567e4fd54596
'2012-06-28T22:00:09-04:00'
describe
'43736' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDOD' 'sip-files00136.pro'
b74083eb1753ebf4550c7ffbeeaded4f
770379a2598c2bb243c53554b518079d135f573e
'2012-06-28T22:02:50-04:00'
describe
'437' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDOE' 'sip-files00011.txt'
6b40748ea51378528a69a9fd3706ff61
a7c263bfdb86e8882793ab6d60b66b4bf661790b
'2012-06-28T21:59:15-04:00'
describe
'169748' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDOF' 'sip-files00141.jpg'
76c0d98a820093e8f8888caed060d179
50f90eca5f655803395012888d477504f0114885
'2012-06-28T22:00:04-04:00'
describe
'522515' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDOG' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
63b8084459902dfafafc083c76cd304f
92ffa83b6fd4d60ddebe34bc32649b091e16234a
'2012-06-28T21:56:46-04:00'
describe
'72210' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDOH' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
43dc6066b00ba8a16e9d23e8593562fb
2d9a0b331cb79810e49a8ea331d3afc5f1cabb5f
'2012-06-28T21:55:19-04:00'
describe
'44891' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDOI' 'sip-files00053.pro'
2ea4e78a8d912f716ad4f28e36f4f10e
a6747ba99488f4ca8cc5a62c2d0b738d40e8e060
'2012-06-28T21:59:34-04:00'
describe
'516238' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDOJ' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
96366a3d705934f2b49412ca47b3c68c
c3e26cc579ca311a60eba09042e492e09646f7b7
'2012-06-28T21:53:11-04:00'
describe
'4404096' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDOK' 'sip-files00067.tif'
55d4bab53ace64470609cfefd8d66edd
b2f3782914f1204fc957489eb413d7b2a0c1179f
'2012-06-28T21:53:39-04:00'
describe
'154206' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDOL' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
6b0f1c9190540007a2244abe0ba0c542
338a91f933aa2d560134692090fa9c6d8fe9bea1
'2012-06-28T21:59:09-04:00'
describe
'614043' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDOM' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
bdd55fea734d2e5f859f5b7969339d2e
15548e971a35088226a02e22a65573d8ff537d90
'2012-06-28T22:00:40-04:00'
describe
'26248' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDON' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
e4d1b9add350ddee0c292e903646d864
bb95b88c3db9e3e26d95e2bf2d5b88d5a99101fd
describe
'4308368' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDOO' 'sip-files00023.tif'
d9ee7380ae0079b533486aae91455fa6
90dbbe0ad0241054b5e358d8412aed9fe0ca3827
'2012-06-28T21:54:59-04:00'
describe
'17293' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDOP' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
ee58a7e10d6734d4339915b1bba4a947
dd181e124b899f76374f3f25df0babbfaeb209de
'2012-06-28T22:00:32-04:00'
describe
'23848' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDOQ' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
1090ef507eabbda67e823e32d86e1c19
1a18af13b6f5cae06724c78b5ea36ae4be0249c2
'2012-06-28T22:01:13-04:00'
describe
'90558' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDOR' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
bf0d952892dd27ae03a32850ea121e93
faad7f5a1a9b97dd8c534044cc870c7eeacfa0ae
'2012-06-28T22:01:35-04:00'
describe
'1105' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDOS' 'sip-files00145.txt'
f76f9c74eeeb3083544b0566f27e98ef
8b7fa19fde022c1e5c873499e8039bf4089e7137
'2012-06-28T21:58:08-04:00'
describe
'1148' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDOT' 'sip-files00098.txt'
0960e341e321e5c2ccac175df28811e1
b8ade9367fa5f09c1b49df75bc58a7e27817d0d4
'2012-06-28T21:55:17-04:00'
describe
'1525' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDOU' 'sip-files00024.txt'
e4502d19a4d842936444ca6e8dcc0eb7
131753eb16d00e1c0ae509fae16889e1f232c8ea
'2012-06-28T21:57:50-04:00'
describe
'4440504' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDOV' 'sip-files00061.tif'
cadf85d48843d51fcb41e224d05db13e
0f60432b383771238845c8c1af777a4d4f0648b6
describe
'521849' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDOW' 'sip-files00166.jp2'
c69af7255db203aa3eaffd273dbfae8f
2f0b40f687714d44be20e9c59dc01bfa191e93d3
'2012-06-28T21:58:29-04:00'
describe
'4924912' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDOX' 'sip-files00063.tif'
4bc272bf95b995fad52dc994722080f1
df57196b7b683d95fff7719a78ec61df0113ad9c
describe
'4601904' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDOY' 'sip-files00014.tif'
d976963035dd175f821d2e4e31790476
922b4c4d7c212f4f79479ff6a50912eb9639be0f
'2012-06-28T21:53:05-04:00'
describe
'24448' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDOZ' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
bf8e1c82f4ebb4c4dbe73f828f069db2
0f4c7fd5c7bb0a869087632ee304ffc6030af0c1
'2012-06-28T21:56:29-04:00'
describe
'179142' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDPA' 'sip-files00172.pro'
977697e391676c68e5a1dda259d497ad
30fe620549b04a8c51f70a07c419f0690c101ba6
'2012-06-28T21:59:50-04:00'
describe
'597878' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDPB' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
891e2fad05d1827a89a5420a3d93455d
692209799e3ae0473bdd3ae7c73293e8eef993c7
'2012-06-28T21:54:27-04:00'
describe
'570399' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDPC' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
902ffddff3aa2ea910261f3a20838db5
2298f7378249e2276dff9e099409af6a7bbbdb30
describe
'29740' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDPD' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
4be6b89116ed669f652b52012680d8b5
6739cf96b2461d80c15cc230613b314f5587241f
'2012-06-28T21:53:31-04:00'
describe
'4268200' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDPE' 'sip-files00099.tif'
a2e4d5089dab25b31d8234ea4affadd2
08dad9f13e8bb8ef5b264fe5e7c6d4e0a8c6dc6b
'2012-06-28T21:53:42-04:00'
describe
'187832' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDPF' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
bcc30075fc62ebe6b173628ac8cb0284
2ae8d5eee03b6f6c653774bced4b61ec3a9f904c
'2012-06-28T21:56:49-04:00'
describe
'1742' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDPG' 'sip-files00085.txt'
6d685d38d606bdb78e23be0fbf93e93e
2487359481cde13055277274cb535a248cbfe50a
'2012-06-28T21:55:45-04:00'
describe
'543851' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDPH' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
9becbf6361d0f1f731b4a1e9cec77db2
e0bd837a92062c07e2535fca01b0b4e53dfdaf36
'2012-06-28T21:56:52-04:00'
describe
'39135' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDPI' 'sip-files00071.pro'
74ba715a5b7814194da7e76a091520ca
ea21d0d5bdddfb137fcdeeadc36d5182d5f07227
describe
'505299' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDPJ' 'sip-files00169.jp2'
82b1f2c846e25d288df515b06e7cf6d6
57710eb21b13d3ebeed1ee111da28591acecaabc
describe
'44274' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDPK' 'sip-files00062.pro'
e5ea7dd298bc286f02a12a6ffbbd0358
03cf97429a9e92eace66b496b0fb73ef9333ef5b
'2012-06-28T22:02:16-04:00'
describe
'29709' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDPL' 'sip-files00030.pro'
6417aece4e738a87b1aa542167012e63
241cfb2642ede00b17a56981aa4f3f51e8feb8fd
'2012-06-28T22:02:13-04:00'
describe
'6349' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDPM' 'sip-files00169.txt'
c0cc6b57b4ac0a02be0a49106df9e899
d30c64c42012a12a00c4fb3ebc90024a9b9857a7
describe
'4244948' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDPN' 'sip-files00095.tif'
f62504975d371b4e86bfa0d86209d35b
20707f64176d73fe56b90d85c596e6a28b71bb77
describe
'184971' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDPO' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
2c9f2d291e9c13649b38957857e49fef
7f12510551ece8fd36acc16201e3ddd4a2cb401a
'2012-06-28T21:54:11-04:00'
describe
'15858' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDPP' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
d77ad1b2cccf811c6d6cac129c3bb6a2
19ff5aff634ae408320fe517a908de723f31fa67
describe
'4359068' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDPQ' 'sip-files00122.tif'
2579a01a715750664ad171e3fe827910
80392fc821d2fdd8e4cb63775ee157eb8ba481ee
'2012-06-28T21:56:12-04:00'
describe
'64977' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDPR' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
90171c19588852aa9817325ba7c23493
e9fdeae49ae2ac66c4f624085cc19326bb52b08f
'2012-06-28T22:03:21-04:00'
describe
'4371236' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDPS' 'sip-files00040.tif'
f268904b8e2f2b4f7fd9af282617663f
0f7a9318ad05a1e1b056afeae81808550c11fdf2
'2012-06-28T21:53:32-04:00'
describe
'169' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDPT' 'sip-files00002.txt'
7c47f6730474197ac7bba26fad91e1d3
3230a98f629bfed396e90f6ddf52737a3e48b2ce
describe
'183013' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDPU' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
45d6fb347e5e9427904274279d5eb44d
bb8063a0098e163343eceeff70910378ad64c1f3
describe
'535399' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDPV' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
32213b237e3df345122b81bd1223fd71
2eedf2700e1e5456b29f4f3b3672e3378f7e4bd6
describe
'4381504' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDPW' 'sip-files00115.tif'
41835d588bb407009e50778b1320470f
07ff2d7df34003a6f39d502fb950d187203268a1
'2012-06-28T21:56:55-04:00'
describe
'23916' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDPX' 'sip-files00031.pro'
14bb71587ec5e7cad2e7afd95d2cc016
507ab899db3be389d43a52ff5f86e39d33821217
'2012-06-28T21:56:44-04:00'
describe
'519958' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDPY' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
f6b895fcfce6424cf19956a8a8bc2359
b82515338398b527e83d59137b5369d419c2736a
'2012-06-28T21:58:49-04:00'
describe
'1797' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDPZ' 'sip-files00088.txt'
9915bb15c75a630ef64f0e0ae4272182
73f6b26495d2bd2d24b79003aa14e6c026a1c470
'2012-06-28T21:58:22-04:00'
describe
'65247' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDQA' 'sip-files00140.QC.jpg'
7e5d7d7bd2ebdab764ae335bb08ee4e1
e9715c45c9d12dcaf17c4b5f9ead7e39b8bc523c
'2012-06-28T21:58:26-04:00'
describe
'647893' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDQB' 'sip-files00177.jp2'
96f8cd75fa19ba33562992d2bd3205cc
dd21e84d25f97ac981af9aaaaedcec1ddfaa694d
'2012-06-28T22:00:39-04:00'
describe
'1339' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDQC' 'sip-files00094.txt'
5269d0363fc2ed0f33f777839c1da1bb
ec7d7fff9a5f314ad710a9153ed6877b1e378cc2
describe
'525455' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDQD' 'sip-files00147.jp2'
557525fdac9bbada0d44c1deb8bdf7e5
e33c1bed28f0eb0fe61a7779e074983cd425cf6b
'2012-06-28T21:56:51-04:00'
describe
'593032' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDQE' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
ab8efb937c9b4c0579eb956a038cc9c3
7298aa419f97ab9491e1a0af8c9257305ee56505
'2012-06-28T22:02:24-04:00'
describe
'26433' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDQF' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
066681a7e6e77e99c68d289ad74a849f
f0a8d65dbcc1c607b09f986c9b0221e17b23f2b0
'2012-06-28T21:54:36-04:00'
describe
'4681964' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDQG' 'sip-files00136.tif'
d41dda8bb63e21d198883867c5510dc6
af5a56690d001a3c9ef00bed095da6b31462957d
'2012-06-28T22:00:31-04:00'
describe
'39037' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDQH' 'sip-files00079.pro'
5ea1b754ed23dbe77064a9ef50f8fbc4
628214f3f4ebf2a48e5e540b8863bb0263960eea
'2012-06-28T22:02:19-04:00'
describe
'38255' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDQI' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
7ee6a1a0db1a73f5fb49110bce8aa5ed
68a907b41b7afbc2c3e2bdcf7c002161e80b2cd2
'2012-06-28T22:00:01-04:00'
describe
'29293' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDQJ' 'sip-files00172thm.jpg'
8615079c598d675e63c11946fa762899
e80d70bed1175a9be46683b4e0256edda1b49ee0
'2012-06-28T22:02:35-04:00'
describe
'527208' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDQK' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
6612a0465cb072fefa00c951b80ef5b6
6708f0cd12bc646a1c05a8e51f153c8846cec91e
'2012-06-28T22:00:44-04:00'
describe
'635' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDQL' 'sip-files00156.txt'
52a58152580c4f2b36ff4afe72368a18
2e393361588d36a1844458eadfbde696155ef06c
'2012-06-28T22:00:50-04:00'
describe
'45197' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDQM' 'sip-files00021.pro'
0d2afdd989a1eec77e3048f4e263f828
64909b7f28f6e61ac3af408928ec1ae17c701bab
'2012-06-28T21:53:45-04:00'
describe
'4789700' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDQN' 'sip-files00133.tif'
8f339126cf00f975b97bf0628eb00b1c
d0ff890358cb63c166d576072bd676212d97f75a
describe
'42161' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDQO' 'sip-files00066.pro'
67ec81d7add15b476fdc48b1c3dc1829
68b14d4e7797fc1909f62f508e7baca5ecd639cb
'2012-06-28T21:58:06-04:00'
describe
'60369' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDQP' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
4ecac437fe48a12af0a678f60dca8a66
0869c66b108299ed323a969114b3c25e9055b918
'2012-06-28T22:01:01-04:00'
describe
'544508' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDQQ' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
87599fe7fb13bca4873fa33b3ec4a7f6
6931877da1c765bebe7cd720dbed3da891418466
'2012-06-28T21:55:23-04:00'
describe
'12081' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDQR' 'sip-files00179thm.jpg'
249435c9983397a7b520f751c87a1bb6
36d1e4be65cb5d95729b7f86244b8a464a168d07
'2012-06-28T21:59:11-04:00'
describe
'594888' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDQS' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
a5ce6444ac35a992972d84ee583e1ed2
66b35a3eb3a41f8fd208171dbbe75d68e35261d2
'2012-06-28T22:01:56-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDQT' 'sip-files00127.pro'
57176d843b6e1748d4d3ed3fd8a583fa
890bfdb7dd8cdce0fd93855f98bd2bee7041160a
'2012-06-28T21:54:40-04:00'
describe
'253616' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDQU' 'sip-files00170.jpg'
4d28b90e91555820d7fb0c5301065dbf
084333874c2b57a408b28001a0610a01309104a1
'2012-06-28T21:53:38-04:00'
describe
'80724' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDQV' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
234bb651c763d6843991fb40682f5b78
1463805768e5e3b5b5a62ee6a75e9a0fea673606
'2012-06-28T21:55:15-04:00'
describe
'52863' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDQW' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
84473d58f08cbd92aafee8d8e168ae96
e72fa220e810df27897c32551be149db2b1e2650
'2012-06-28T21:58:15-04:00'
describe
'48858' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDQX' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
be0ea5bb22ab2664829c77efc45dbcc9
eed632cc4da472488c4ba4161e60e69b46d26642
'2012-06-28T21:53:04-04:00'
describe
'4680964' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDQY' 'sip-files00132.tif'
0f02086ce5cd40f558495b7b73ade088
e51f7f618bad02f43e03f5a2187e060c52eb5995
'2012-06-28T22:03:14-04:00'
describe
'43120' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDQZ' 'sip-files00064.pro'
e26af7d144826e7a50ca502e5587421f
862806f092a308bbec226e72bf6a26b4fea05f96
describe
'544085' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDRA' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
766addaef55b6235a95c1b5cd1dd704d
c35e57e00d6295595bb7bd1cd8dacfbb636018fb
'2012-06-28T21:58:40-04:00'
describe
'1499' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDRB' 'sip-files00125.txt'
7f610630d55621ec5a582a7a2a307b36
113306b03ddc6f4079193d69d41a58dc4295f229
'2012-06-28T22:02:48-04:00'
describe
'4788868' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDRC' 'sip-files00125.tif'
abbb4d8590e59e7f37dc20ae15165cb5
58f19e2fe5abdcda09b77f71311ba66ac3aefddc
describe
'30671' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDRD' 'sip-files00124.pro'
e37070ab894998b857e3a258ee49a814
657135f1d252d9d5356bdd65ff1cff629a88d73e
'2012-06-28T22:01:07-04:00'
describe
'1747' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDRE' 'sip-files00017.txt'
edc6e878a0392ee863801490e581128e
934af4d41ab4cf205f1a533f5b73af882c2fd9f9
describe
'4138672' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDRF' 'sip-files00126.tif'
aa0452959bf4dee919f04203aecdf399
c5ee0b60743e46ee5294906c2249100b18f48ec3
'2012-06-28T22:02:28-04:00'
describe
'66339' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDRG' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
c3aafb753be17e9657264d9ff338b9f2
62690e97767a3b18799ac8ada468e40c60c0571a
'2012-06-28T21:53:01-04:00'
describe
'25000' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDRH' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
1b83594b649ddc9a8454eab837e030e6
85d0e4f123eaf14b92dc2e00fab80ee5bbb4010f
describe
'4325568' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDRI' 'sip-files00030.tif'
dd0f0f89d9a28ccad7189deec59cf64e
b5265ea1e262fe3351985bd6dca7626cf7543045
'2012-06-28T21:56:54-04:00'
describe
'40099' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDRJ' 'sip-files00155.pro'
0b50cdb364de9ddf66f96576f85cc3f1
dd566512a395edbe25b9b11fc02118d85c94b7aa
'2012-06-28T21:56:42-04:00'
describe
'25437' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDRK' 'sip-files00146thm.jpg'
9ea5be573feb81724929f5a493d06624
d0c91a89bd5f81b83917b584ffb7997b588625ed
'2012-06-28T21:53:16-04:00'
describe
'4373160' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDRL' 'sip-files00010.tif'
f478b766d055ab06fa99fef6136fc602
6f26db93d78f844eed1c09b5280f57421fe3e24f
'2012-06-28T21:56:24-04:00'
describe
'575886' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDRM' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
1695e09561006c47e55fea5c9479d1d4
e9a01fc8f5b55c45e063b880d8b895d6fdcc3e46
'2012-06-28T21:53:53-04:00'
describe
'188994' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDRN' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
abd7ac4cb9e35c1d1caee69b4d66274e
593dd876836ac1d9a82350bb299d440ae3d607b4
'2012-06-28T21:54:54-04:00'
describe
'1743' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDRO' 'sip-files00050.txt'
fa7b00cb3519d5448d11521b2c4e7b71
36b9526e12f1a475560997bb302dc5285e8cebb1
'2012-06-28T21:56:11-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDRP' 'sip-files00107.pro'
4136f25fa2862c0c58b9e2653deb275c
1e44514aabc43de039cf90846dc345c5e8d47d76
describe
'182626' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDRQ' 'sip-files00140.jpg'
e11573131c7d470a3f82f6cc70ad9c50
f9e0748352970af751daaf24e6d7a673e34da60d
'2012-06-28T21:53:19-04:00'
describe
'260556' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDRR' 'sip-files00169.jpg'
fba7dc17741d3820301190a15fe47fe0
6a0bab86205b6d722bde935c1d2bf5f26cf3c47a
'2012-06-28T21:57:26-04:00'
describe
'24988' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDRS' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
28390b8d7211164a4c490c1de34880ab
3b5084d6217cc9897710b0d63d2771fd0f0e49c5
'2012-06-28T21:59:29-04:00'
describe
'43853' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDRT' 'sip-files00140.pro'
17b6701e55b1f7a211981d69c43fcf04
a7ff1b9d74e068f1efd969864f1aa6fb87a75a34
'2012-06-28T21:54:00-04:00'
describe
'26473' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDRU' 'sip-files00025.pro'
8e0b207212c05223ca95a9e14b46e8e6
9686d7aa9fce38402fb4d98468370052997e6c79
describe
'23771' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDRV' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
aef590420b6eb5fc87d2669ca14aa87e
97493cdf6d56f434523230265905022062fa123c
describe
'173959' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDRW' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
5bdb9431b1de17f8fe04691dd0e45f9c
b588085abc73704d613366ca8cedb73ffcfd66b4
'2012-06-28T21:57:14-04:00'
describe
'50163' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDRX' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
33c5d097235f3f40bddfbf7436b39326
5b1f6b0a5ed6b1fe525bcbc6da6cfc54f60fbe1a
describe
'1723' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDRY' 'sip-files00136.txt'
e779d8a5b3ac6a104cf58ff3ad42c780
6cb075f1c15b69c94b1f9fcc5a9942546ae8842b
describe
'575005' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDRZ' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
f716bf8058505cd23d0709625c9d8b5b
f2b449965076c1c529b81246abb9a6c33f5fe115
describe
'600063' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDSA' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
6fbe6ff3d001ecbde7310f6b08172dab
5739c8a0896a10e50b2a351434d003ba4fe6cb7f
describe
'14736' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDSB' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
8f83785ec8ab655aebed1df6ca9422c5
8233d8cbea1e1894dfd0e3c12f46ff2fd07cf81d
'2012-06-28T21:55:12-04:00'
describe
'57756' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDSC' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
32053cf07199ebb3893a8e0d686b906c
eddc38cbc29a75ce0643cc21177c4110bceee515
'2012-06-28T21:59:38-04:00'
describe
'25021' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDSD' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
80d6308676ce0fe6d43b2e2d685d5da3
be1a7d34073fdae6687b296f82abf405c7e866dc
'2012-06-28T22:02:25-04:00'
describe
'22053' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDSE' 'sip-files00157thm.jpg'
3abcc1f4e4e06dec85b25ed13ad8df89
2520270aa7922800dc9c16f5f7d13fd592968f88
'2012-06-28T22:02:52-04:00'
describe
'4369272' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDSF' 'sip-files00053.tif'
3cc76d8650c3dcbca18beb984b7b6b4f
68cf5ea4146b06e8796d088b695aa985d8be7d37
'2012-06-28T21:59:36-04:00'
describe
'1071' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDSG' 'sip-files00102.txt'
d54556ed78f063af1e2da8a649046cd9
0050b6088e41761f7d98a1f05e70d0c77f397bc8
describe
'43696' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDSH' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
98c69ab74cfead54f6f1b2cfd2a09722
3c8c0639da1206284f90e2f5cf4f70fd34ef0554
'2012-06-28T22:00:36-04:00'
describe
'62324' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDSI' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
daa963de062a566c9597828801e8b9ba
e3a59f8c69cdf33b242ecb1b20f0d5d7a3382ad3
describe
'1682' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDSJ' 'sip-files00131.txt'
bc51701738fa86c4ac4138830aa20af8
3059199814f0a9ea0dc19cfce760c3b231612cbe
'2012-06-28T21:59:59-04:00'
describe
'42183' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDSK' 'sip-files00032.pro'
93ecc8184415d67842a3f9523a0c6c33
38bd9a12f375679c735a108ec3ba4057b2e02a2a
'2012-06-28T21:54:09-04:00'
describe
'4764424' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDSL' 'sip-files00059.tif'
494012c368bffdb6e09ee5f77ccdd55f
4e0afbafc43539e264f2439062e2e326fc46874d
'2012-06-28T21:56:39-04:00'
describe
'1613' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDSM' 'sip-files00070.txt'
7d81f038cb355fd07eaa6ccee0f17740
568aa34a4605452f6717ae6b44d9230b9b55cfd6
'2012-06-28T21:56:20-04:00'
describe
'598010' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDSN' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
cf655eace7f2a36d250eae80a4b0c82f
5e59e136e21ff5cb62a8a5a2855fc8dfeda34f93
'2012-06-28T21:54:24-04:00'
describe
'594915' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDSO' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
2917d93adde9c7546783e79edb32084f
153a240c99a776aefd57567dc346fae2dd176265
'2012-06-28T21:55:27-04:00'
describe
'1593' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDSP' 'sip-files00078.txt'
936bb610b293a72ea965fb36bee2abe9
a8cd14c515aa5d2bb7a99266441d63c9fcbd413d
'2012-06-28T21:53:46-04:00'
describe
'25559' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDSQ' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
9d44b839e751645e23823fbab9eca1cc
1c4469d7fed9dbe2fdc54058a8a02268141c4f1e
describe
'594867' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDSR' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
88a797c8fa8ac285d726f79e60aa4003
aa89c2e1f460a6ee8cb3a731267fdf57b1700f19
'2012-06-28T22:00:22-04:00'
describe
'180986' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDSS' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
aa83e041e1e33604a7ac86ac59874d46
1c51bac8a4d2ad090fc58426f52071f701f19a5e
'2012-06-28T21:59:13-04:00'
describe
'23103' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDST' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
6a46d48524d84b8bed0adf24d84e2904
0b5057df25cba5b46831b5ba0ca9b418a49d87b6
'2012-06-28T22:03:18-04:00'
describe
'195088' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDSU' 'sip-files00148.jpg'
d834e624b1f7ea2414d6c9318116f009
0430fdd136503fdfbe8d1200e4994265b6f763e4
'2012-06-28T22:00:20-04:00'
describe
'4321724' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDSV' 'sip-files00090.tif'
d78a2dddb3f8c413344640e4fab82f59
5a37f72698fce6de47600effc5bf206fd4b49878
'2012-06-28T21:59:33-04:00'
describe
'160' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDSW' 'sip-files00148.txt'
cac6bdf29a5f2c7195f49bc99017fc09
43a2853a02314f2c5f75bcb923b8599714859cd9
describe
'1606' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDSX' 'sip-files00150.txt'
e87f87b9584102833e60761a4348e97f
dddf6d15d158f654763ff836cdbb814597cf27a9
'2012-06-28T22:02:31-04:00'
describe
'548932' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDSY' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
2240e6b04f92758ae9609792c35c1da9
79e2adea6aaf43a2fa1fe9ae6d613112335f566c
'2012-06-28T21:56:00-04:00'
describe
'575858' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDSZ' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
809099c89fae6d3f3f7c1e51836dcc95
b8b441a4150ee50b7d97558b5fb35a7b3093f89d
'2012-06-28T21:57:52-04:00'
describe
'68073' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDTA' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
96bcfbf61161e94f61c52343ff7dd3ee
d49a3ba1d10519786f81b81f4a7f6f28ff7680b4
'2012-06-28T21:55:39-04:00'
describe
'602567' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDTB' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
9e2f6d973ed54db086202e1a9305e90b
287f2e73273c21be7bb74cb3e9330a67fa168e66
'2012-06-28T21:56:50-04:00'
describe
'4211196' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDTC' 'sip-files00159.tif'
272aa496915845acbf731f9ae128694f
88ceca850bc9e3d680131f75c9258a6f7f114958
'2012-06-28T22:02:00-04:00'
describe
'17785' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDTD' 'sip-files00167.pro'
8dc8fc5b0c952ff77d33ca2280c26b4c
190a4269af3e9a1a2986a1931c4d3b450465b9ea
'2012-06-28T21:55:43-04:00'
describe
'23004' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDTE' 'sip-files00177.QC.jpg'
95634bcfe198f6618e56257c0d69a45d
c4495bb9ca821168eec1f5a1569ba2ea2a9d996c
'2012-06-28T22:00:55-04:00'
describe
'37030' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDTF' 'sip-files00037.pro'
56495b5833f11ea3ddf7c0078b815e41
0f797a72db2712dc6090548fc94ea9fce61400ce
'2012-06-28T21:54:10-04:00'
describe
'23006' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDTG' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
ef856d5594c372f93df31a8faf4caf6c
6b25c1b221d5ac7627626958a853fb2384584a8c
describe
'594565' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDTH' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
8ae5d5e1d523b131c63b47354f6e3be2
fcab3a580637969c81afd9fa23a6de86e570cc26
describe
'4740932' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDTI' 'sip-files00094.tif'
bb87caa8efe878be0a2b88d250a98fac
669be7fc6fdcf8fb8e5b70f321797435f2429e90
'2012-06-28T21:55:04-04:00'
describe
'24763' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDTJ' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
7777263b2c1588beb1e708a847ea2a37
f1337514c3ce3cb4a31622adb1d47ca0ad8b399c
'2012-06-28T21:53:14-04:00'
describe
'4768584' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDTK' 'sip-files00116.tif'
9899cbd7f80b8a85d196e49f22bfdded
2a2dece49365233299b70a7e54f874d181e1f93b
'2012-06-28T21:59:01-04:00'
describe
'25661' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDTL' 'sip-files00163thm.jpg'
f9ccf34f399651df246cbdf0ccc9d35e
6de45549f37b48e96fdff908926f9796e48c7170
'2012-06-28T21:57:18-04:00'
describe
'61976' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDTM' 'sip-files00141.QC.jpg'
6bc5e5322fdfffead67781e46c8e1616
1ec3b81890464b2d287b27dcca60fe914ab728f2
'2012-06-28T22:00:46-04:00'
describe
'65501' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDTN' 'sip-files00163.QC.jpg'
a70d60c885dc1cdc3eef4b854c1057fd
18b63c7dc35ca2339ef8e59a3a99bce53591f784
describe
'113220' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDTO' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
6b499c4bb2bfa6e37d501662a62b2fba
af0717953383a83f5934f43b341532bc5af86649
'2012-06-28T21:59:19-04:00'
describe
'1972' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDTP' 'sip-files00148.pro'
24025450543cfd118288e4d297f5ec18
baeea757535939224da28c5f0695cc1e358923d9
describe
'62612' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDTQ' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
21fccf29982bb48415991a3646f2fbcf
d2bb861237ffd1969a2a598ef2c5fefd87515594
'2012-06-28T21:55:46-04:00'
describe
'61794' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDTR' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
6abffd2019a4c9451bdc66e72c61f457
364e9e6f1ab39c313718a13bb7149e8f23841d4f
'2012-06-28T21:57:43-04:00'
describe
'99497' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDTS' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
0087944f417aa3b7e5aa3af89ff01a59
cb6f6189dca98245dcea8ae6f2646a7f80b805bb
describe
'64992' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDTT' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
491c6b4a08fa4bc8750c71daef03e578
35f1d1e14419993e2bd5ed81579c96e5849477d5
describe
'10129' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDTU' 'sip-files00147thm.jpg'
c328524bd26eca9daedb105456470285
ddc530a79db3e400be8ee9c6b503c4ad8142d5e9
'2012-06-28T21:56:59-04:00'
describe
'1633' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDTV' 'sip-files00069.txt'
915a533143f20203b3ca1fce31e49544
130865f4a75ee74103ead4f61add5a1c4a0badb7
'2012-06-28T21:53:26-04:00'
describe
'892' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDTW' 'sip-files00134.txt'
6836be2a835e8200900c831895c5ce51
c7b1b47f4448c39738aaac1a71e5c3859cf2b3ee
'2012-06-28T21:59:04-04:00'
describe
'4142704' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDTX' 'sip-files00100.tif'
be78e29ab70e62934065c50aa83af1ed
9776d4ece78226300140f83216ff7100d87b5033
'2012-06-28T21:58:56-04:00'
describe
'43991' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDTY' 'sip-files00130.pro'
9272e63581246ba01264b2132f3f018d
3173340fa29ae7e1f37a9ebc32289d0f705e7e0e
describe
'42825' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDTZ' 'sip-files00085.pro'
c6374bba74c36735e809a4b0942b23c2
df0832e327b5c0f48753e12a0474b510daaca71d
'2012-06-28T21:55:40-04:00'
describe
'21388' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDUA' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
a69f5bbd6264e711830c656507a57b56
bbbde47b9daaa10e5c2708f4bfb24bbfc95f66f5
'2012-06-28T22:01:55-04:00'
describe
'499824' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDUB' 'sip-files00152.jp2'
dd7b913ca2f3e39af9584ca78208f923
35c8673f14953efc49da9b664c92ea4d0bb97fee
'2012-06-28T21:55:30-04:00'
describe
'155883' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDUC' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
1a967c67b8e399deda7974fe20bab608
fa0f38915a39f0d7e54475a2e39a920a385b4f8a
'2012-06-28T21:57:24-04:00'
describe
'189360' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDUD' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
3b710a686479ae66c5682662ce8fe4cc
e202e92757aa39ae9ff640fbb60fad30992ef726
'2012-06-28T21:53:09-04:00'
describe
'69383' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDUE' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
6804a02488a0da5392af22f6601bec5c
e86728219a2b6ac14c9d8af73696ef8d160a4562
'2012-06-28T21:56:36-04:00'
describe
'52986' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDUF' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
b2e59c6946c55f6bf2e9363a37ec0fb1
bbe663ac7019d69e8a7b64ba2cbe5117da8d624d
'2012-06-28T22:02:51-04:00'
describe
'144881' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDUG' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
d53d80f137930596d7f889f73e48eb66
1d3e0692ad9fcd021f7498ea985ffb2d88f7a903
describe
'187170' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDUH' 'sip-files00165.jpg'
27176add30f0a961b128db315f3d6777
395312e232f5de39be78f77c46c857482429be27
describe
'762' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDUI' 'sip-files00043.txt'
4b34d466de6c6b9d45bf4e7ac8933203
7204cdf56d0b9d823600b5ce562398b8d223dcbf
'2012-06-28T21:58:12-04:00'
describe
'37448' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDUJ' 'sip-files00142.pro'
8c570a31691252691788976fd2417ad8
a9dd9e6562b24f94010b1e2358408eb96e8acd38
'2012-06-28T22:00:41-04:00'
describe
'4388952' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDUK' 'sip-files00131.tif'
3d4b44a2b97e08a4bd3c327b7fa1d481
9ab6231e4f820c0885dfb988fd94891c62872e1d
'2012-06-28T21:57:22-04:00'
describe
'195004' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDUL' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
3bec8a1709001ada975e2e117d574324
6a8504bd6fabe81c5bd251c6601108a42e5dd4bb
'2012-06-28T22:03:24-04:00'
describe
'165231' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDUM' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
be8532ee02e723aa925be8682ba67750
396f7736965b67a17c9dc7f1179a1c61dedef98f
'2012-06-28T21:58:48-04:00'
describe
'4187564' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDUN' 'sip-files00149.tif'
b13c26db96d09301dfd330dcef2e32e2
c78f6ca91081260752af14faa59a42f4887a33da
'2012-06-28T22:02:08-04:00'
describe
'64881' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDUO' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
5c7342f6532776f9833e76e4b136a026
8b0975ffdb8e50c05f5fc69c0f2782a3b945ceac
'2012-06-28T21:53:07-04:00'
describe
'23452' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDUP' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
5253b4ea102ea8d858197df912bddcd8
a81de013410d92c15b207975fc06d29e761ca9ee
describe
'3733620' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDUQ' 'sip-files00172.tif'
1ffdc1063cff091ee3cce94024e22d81
a639eed02925770f2934e1a3a21093d91bfe8f61
'2012-06-28T21:56:41-04:00'
describe
'46221' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDUR' 'sip-files00020.pro'
aaad66d53c504396763b41451caeb3e5
8761fe756e249b35dc2dc6f4ae5031e0b8e194db
'2012-06-28T21:56:34-04:00'
describe
'65255' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDUS' 'sip-files00142.QC.jpg'
710022b78e035e14143b72b67e4e9603
4f7e76ee2e868d18a638462405277972155098d3
describe
'71154' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDUT' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
0868b9f1d90fda2a7ae9ce1a7ecbec09
99230593d79166ffc5197f2fdde14984ecab1418
describe
'159532' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDUU' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
b0aa7f6dba050b5cfb34dce43ed67fe9
9a731954f863962d106e947626dbb7ff32f8dcbd
'2012-06-28T21:57:19-04:00'
describe
'14822' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDUV' 'sip-files00029.pro'
d2465dfce89abcbba31311ffb9344785
bde992501214749b14c48b2a300e7b1e76c77103
'2012-06-28T21:56:08-04:00'
describe
'4010984' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDUW' 'sip-files00152.tif'
907b5000ff14fd74d9afd0684981bfef
4ab69119969cb608187b2f9d65856bbb354f96a7
'2012-06-28T21:58:38-04:00'
describe
'14785' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDUX' 'sip-files00151.pro'
7143a0be3ce4221858dc4854addc585e
9e7561564c32fea658f5e18e894cd6599234681b
'2012-06-28T21:57:03-04:00'
describe
'557265' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDUY' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
c5312e94c987527adeea77a05fa181ed
02d4e7d6803bd9bb68ad217c62a657aa7f58d193
describe
'550770' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDUZ' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
363ae050e12a4f9e576c4013cec2370e
d6eef51e1d604a7a2ce12bd5b3402eec8e1b267e
describe
'656606' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDVA' 'sip-files00001.jp2'
0bf11b4cebbda2207765c58c92afdaf7
921dfdfb2d62f6861d0bedd71cacef3aa0dbb0f9
describe
'185992' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDVB' 'sip-files00159.jpg'
0e8168d798497e655e00c80866064c5b
6197c7c31d8592a82b4606b91a61e1867d49b72b
'2012-06-28T22:00:13-04:00'
describe
'278888' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDVC' 'sip-files00171.jpg'
e08eb8d86357a3eb0137589bba8d3980
1460aaa6401ad0f06e7f829f9b06416f67e71415
describe
'65858' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDVD' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
23529548f787a640493ee4adaf46904e
c3c2e1e565e2223a84e7f7c1d6e3e0aabc781f91
describe
'178046' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDVE' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
6b615cb93e6274de315dc23fafc570a7
cbef8444939a850922ffbc523bd2212c339094a1
'2012-06-28T21:54:21-04:00'
describe
'21064' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDVF' 'sip-files00001thm.jpg'
aaeff64c81c89656175222ab3050ad8c
fe94222fff10f59d574ab75f9e7e00bdce458bf0
describe
'598011' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDVG' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
ce7314151aa2d4a3ad8209ae53aadf9c
27b0f1e329b7785aee680467f685881083ee48b9
'2012-06-28T21:58:36-04:00'
describe
'21903' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDVH' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
d3a4a04709d4dd2672ead2661f118da5
bfef0bb7ec0afaa0d81690d728e430aeec5e9e4a
'2012-06-28T21:57:12-04:00'
describe
'4363336' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDVI' 'sip-files00129.tif'
651bec5555845786864b7d3358893d8e
c5b8935968a7bb052dcdb786a8901885b3974455
'2012-06-28T22:00:56-04:00'
describe
'25762' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDVJ' 'sip-files00149thm.jpg'
f13ceb85c969cff35357dd9acea616b6
356a5fe1efa2355be4f5b48fb0cd7d265cb7c208
'2012-06-28T22:01:19-04:00'
describe
'1770' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDVK' 'sip-files00126.txt'
ae66db545d601052972f78a6701832d6
ceebe3078d99ec70b9ea909391b8a6c2b0cfc1e0
describe
'4756536' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDVL' 'sip-files00037.tif'
b5b8654687d4d7385a4af63188f14012
8346b391aa040b7255a95560fbe901b1cd72e977
'2012-06-28T21:55:41-04:00'
describe
'4335320' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDVM' 'sip-files00128.tif'
b3ce169b67997b65d6dc16ae7a6ecee0
2dc7c0311e10905f34d09767201cca07bb53d5dd
'2012-06-28T21:56:26-04:00'
describe
'4615068' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDVN' 'sip-files00123.tif'
37bd0b15e65ddb5ba6cb7f65b9abd76f
ada5f6658f128a82ae3a02cd10d85a1e4f2d2ed9
'2012-06-28T21:54:57-04:00'
describe
'581731' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDVO' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
9746be4ccb546205bc895945d72bdc93
8e1308de8ca927b012cf83d3edcff2c7d66525b5
'2012-06-28T21:57:32-04:00'
describe
'1679' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDVP' 'sip-files00032.txt'
01f4e4ae45c1b925e401c315cdea7e0b
3574280b696eb602af85d398371843ddf7fb8391
describe
'4366472' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDVQ' 'sip-files00068.tif'
a0d82e991735a243593f77522e2f8451
171a11c0c7cca615da2f9749c593034f18a1d5ac
'2012-06-28T21:59:07-04:00'
describe
'173757' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDVR' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
f0a428c29ea96699cc34ffec37aff8d0
6a9f3b8461a3df09c5bd462c2fc462dbc2394c88
'2012-06-28T21:55:59-04:00'
describe
'4745276' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDVS' 'sip-files00161.tif'
9305f2fd388da5fc1efd006720426501
0eb6c334a7807a702540be35a3a1b68cb164253b
'2012-06-28T21:56:06-04:00'
describe
'23659' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDVT' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
572aa6cb44d266b411dc98006a50dd34
24ae500e996ff73d86e0de60f29cb5ae527b6d60
'2012-06-28T21:55:57-04:00'
describe
'4789656' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDVU' 'sip-files00135.tif'
c711af2c8d44e79ad1bb5eabe8db0824
e67e290e6d25879c4648b1a724e82bc6cc1adbd2
'2012-06-28T21:54:17-04:00'
describe
'173306' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDVV' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
8abc98209867d64475f226662fdada8d
8e48593da966fc006516dbfabc9d70b8056c1266
describe
'64925' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDVW' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
aaaca5f7caeae75517d1a114f187110f
a5c6195854ab56f0a6ad2ca55e1d343971d453d9
'2012-06-28T21:57:51-04:00'
describe
'17429' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDVX' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
26cd061e558c081dcca38cdb9610f45d
551628567c599224aa595897e338a334797178e5
'2012-06-28T21:56:32-04:00'
describe
'26159' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDVY' 'sip-files00159thm.jpg'
b503fba61267b702774aedaef6e81f9a
c25d5645c5a0decef1c47ff9f71a4b54be36f361
describe
'1816' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDVZ' 'sip-files00020.txt'
910b78cc9098f5fe78e2f89fe47fbc56
0745b3af5160ba1bb40e8c3272d64c5d5a39f7c2
describe
'63532' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDWA' 'sip-files00145.QC.jpg'
11035cab32635fda38d18ad67b166300
3d3f69086007d374b235573d3c13eae6773289e3
'2012-06-28T22:02:02-04:00'
describe
'541227' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDWB' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
cacf19ce6a77f7df1a4f2dd9fb9939ee
555788e1f92a4f69b56b7194e04b48c483d80433
'2012-06-28T21:54:48-04:00'
describe
'79608' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDWC' 'sip-files00177.jpg'
60c294f161ca98d02e6a43cb4be566d2
c63c4c892ecfb258d6ecd3be475b83838c6763c8
'2012-06-28T22:01:31-04:00'
describe
'537743' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDWD' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
7ce5a1f089b4d28cc160ab7317440abe
fe3663c75c8db9019dfebd284bfa5d07415c0c00
'2012-06-28T22:03:02-04:00'
describe
'192933' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDWE' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
8f63f4f61c0b9584ad867990651472ec
54b5bd6152555cee7e55869ea2484354b9f78ef7
describe
'4794484' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDWF' 'sip-files00054.tif'
043d93dd5d529bb7bf65523229f385fd
a0c4fc2b8f17efa7aae5cdf7402f2cd34cfd7171
'2012-06-28T22:03:22-04:00'
describe
'28394' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDWG' 'sip-files00035.pro'
fa9ba1c95a4f55540f9b4842b087916c
a24b22c78b772e1aa2432a8098e0ee22233e5984
'2012-06-28T21:53:29-04:00'
describe
'40167' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDWH' 'sip-files00090.pro'
fddf2db3e368503b6d421521d1d1b056
6e5cb2c1a39867027af58bb3bb17f757b9f511a4
'2012-06-28T21:58:18-04:00'
describe
'17184' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDWI' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
12eae58b9969a74e3359829e8ada6b12
bb789703b74039262f33f61005b91957a5b393f9
'2012-06-28T22:00:29-04:00'
describe
'1729' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDWJ' 'sip-files00140.txt'
06cd8985ca9c81b718e8c38cf337508e
91bcffd4a1266fb4574b608b858fc2a681f9a9d7
'2012-06-28T21:53:52-04:00'
describe
'39216' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDWK' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
081c7b52ef3b4a922e26c2a5e4358662
68402a129a5098cdb5e8910087120842ac5c0013
describe
'75425' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDWL' 'sip-files00169.QC.jpg'
064d1bc76b2cd0642c30dac9695b53c3
431c8f1f7304b565b7122d57c485e05853c1ec04
'2012-06-28T21:53:06-04:00'
describe
'24528' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDWM' 'sip-files00148thm.jpg'
060385ed779a4635a6e6e5a9d9cb39c8
61d5f875efdb7c5230ac8ad59aecf457cd58a55b
'2012-06-28T21:52:53-04:00'
describe
'64941' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDWN' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
89107d5d629109659b08fd981a94621e
d6cf3553cfa3652dcf9aa3f43ffacd6f37c5a76e
'2012-06-28T21:53:30-04:00'
describe
'23459' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDWO' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
2c882ae5a1d6033a20577c6a39a8897f
8b0b95666381521c89c445d9d592ebe9db31fc52
'2012-06-28T22:00:35-04:00'
describe
'541904' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDWP' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
0e14673649f31fd32ab44a6f333ca924
0af72387bc45b9ee2d42e800bf95e1c1110602cc
'2012-06-28T21:59:53-04:00'
describe
'55340' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDWQ' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
98053cc95da8e1c15749a71f9f03ae7e
2308701b1a8e956cf3249a42bd78b6922a65a607
describe
'537209' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDWR' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
260c811ce8c78721aec5e7e36a4071aa
67d29bab58c72e23419c904042bd55f9919709ee
'2012-06-28T21:54:26-04:00'
describe
'4748392' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDWS' 'sip-files00097.tif'
bdeb1608949f36fa5ea25b03782fb30e
505d7fadad65f736b43b7e5cbc1d57eff02068a9
describe
'1746' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDWT' 'sip-files00130.txt'
f8cb48efdf36ba7c0b3ab1213f8cebef
12b85c3dc3962ffc1e4f58321b85d7b902cc7b94
'2012-06-28T22:00:17-04:00'
describe
'39785' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDWU' 'sip-files00069.pro'
6cbcf95ecf630343d2078fcf78da10d4
2b5443b718a6746964628ae91d13db298907453a
describe
'4338980' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDWV' 'sip-files00072.tif'
94aa3432e448758de45fe8bed6a3b3d5
f31c4704a07968e12424e41065e44da455b33125
'2012-06-28T21:53:57-04:00'
describe
'1576' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDWW' 'sip-files00079.txt'
1e73b2c5ba1384cfd94c621ff8b6f0ad
6b93a681df7dd478c5121c1f084abcdd37804702
'2012-06-28T21:56:13-04:00'
describe
'181879' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDWX' 'sip-files00170.pro'
15e823535c4e2d300dc62f5bd6c61666
350e2bcbd41f87944a7fb4f34a33544cba4e1883
'2012-06-28T22:01:22-04:00'
describe
'38515' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDWY' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
769a5d8e9007702532011ba3e0048204
5c5a9bdac5dd60bb87240396f2ba214342dd5d4e
'2012-06-28T21:54:33-04:00'
describe
'4346560' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDWZ' 'sip-files00114.tif'
17e1ffc38d528c12eda7d711f1a5c9ae
275f0520f38dbd6dce1417b2f89866f9001aab39
'2012-06-28T21:58:04-04:00'
describe
'4232952' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDXA' 'sip-files00163.tif'
ea36c0f662db58365c7e65b70db57476
b94ee3a66e67143bf4697b0942c897a0d89bf10f
describe
'60424' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDXB' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
af80b518d7545271977c922b3dd48cb7
b9d15edd6e0553a898f81345f67b423406592836
describe
'178661' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDXC' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
9df2b90ff971183d04ad5f0e2fd82d38
c42671352c1d8f0bc864f41a94c2a37bd8b21502
'2012-06-28T21:58:58-04:00'
describe
'21295' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDXD' 'sip-files00154.pro'
a09140a7900cbd74c2a4ed1aa0371379
bda9bfbca060c480b8d836e471f9618502e1b42d
describe
'175520' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDXE' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
1d4f36a84732a8bca2a5ecc2fb15dbba
a55dc8c6aa373abd3e8174259ce4242ad63fad0c
describe
'25347' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDXF' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
f8be4bd102f0c2f95313ca1d821d6067
7420a77cc035ca9b6b702f9978ff076620bfb50b
'2012-06-28T21:55:34-04:00'
describe
'120' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDXG' 'sip-files00179.txt'
6b6c5ad64ba7955bdd88ba2f0b9d0ccb
ac96c96f79f7165ae8060b38520942845dcf6dc9
'2012-06-28T21:58:46-04:00'
describe
'30076' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDXH' 'sip-files00065.pro'
7dde0732e484b34266def065a56107fb
5039fc8aeb84c5de35a42007f1afa057188c510a
describe
'24543' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDXI' 'sip-files00158thm.jpg'
14d08c893087e1c8605637ab67a2e4e0
a769f412511ef630b9b6359e26f123663913e383
'2012-06-28T22:03:23-04:00'
describe
'522522' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDXJ' 'sip-files00142.jp2'
04db504e3bae1fc6b5e26123a2a8e570
63585ea71561e1d8093b78ae053d47fb95cb5866
'2012-06-28T21:59:48-04:00'
describe
'15554868' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDXK' 'sip-files00177.tif'
390708ebd9c0f3af9adf0d03c88aff67
16066babef5d3c37daea0731d773702f6abedf3a
'2012-06-28T21:54:47-04:00'
describe
'4662840' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDXL' 'sip-files00011.tif'
0982c08de9ea5ff9f8a9a102bf352dbe
925b0cfb658072af4cbf71a6e5de130f54878a0c
'2012-06-28T21:55:07-04:00'
describe
'34998' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDXM' 'sip-files00084.pro'
cac7f5ba4553dbdcd14556a72edff3e2
be9f3972302d02e30bdcac3d3fc75b53c8f0530f
'2012-06-28T21:56:02-04:00'
describe
'1395' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDXN' 'sip-files00030.txt'
47f4b1c3c15c2e51c9026cdbdecdbd7b
317661c355ca38ac1b8bb80368d336fc7a68fb3c
'2012-06-28T21:55:08-04:00'
describe
'570381' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDXO' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
18d5f53980acc9dd937c2c9003efabd2
9f56969cf8577602114d9bed2beeb283d3994a16
'2012-06-28T21:54:56-04:00'
describe
'164438' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDXP' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
7d66c75c74ef87e3b816d02daeb9431f
088649cbd11b67c88f8cd4f12265e6f6bd844131
describe
'162935' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDXQ' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
973857f35c46b2dfbba424be562298a0
97ed5f03f6f634ad0b632b8a219eaee58af2e65f
'2012-06-28T21:53:28-04:00'
describe
'179007' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDXR' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
fbca5fcabc8f1d978e1e177c36e53531
4626b41e4ae0ed50a5f8922a62921fb7ac545ea0
describe
'4151752' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDXS' 'sip-files00154.tif'
ff61724220f67b965e8872c55b3958e6
265191ad3800bcb42e8a5651e2ad655de57d305f
'2012-06-28T22:03:06-04:00'
describe
'187718' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDXT' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
e0d9f212c059daf6ba817b195b14ffdf
7ce027c40176b62a92a81ee6b28efacfe33543c8
'2012-06-28T21:58:41-04:00'
describe
'154865' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDXU' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
9307f1c29751d53959e0853d3fab3192
889d60f421f6acb0cddc74a6a0cfcf57423aa4ad
'2012-06-28T21:56:37-04:00'
describe
'24956' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDXV' 'sip-files00131thm.jpg'
e5355d55382f3adbf10a13a648698b1a
e20728153d496d2d174d1a57289f03a10cfe52cc
describe
'24966' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDXW' 'sip-files00145thm.jpg'
77dedd6381a85aed068e84a66d8f0585
a87cb6508e7aae14b46b75495ac355a5dc79060d
'2012-06-28T21:53:47-04:00'
describe
'10749' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDXX' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
b56dc478307470e85984285081daa1f9
f28ce906fde4faf50a1e68a9491a1b33a36dd651
describe
'547013' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDXY' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
9ece91b0f0a372860fa85d151a3de8e1
e172d7d0ce34eef92e7b1a28c01ff5bcf8a9dfef
'2012-06-28T21:59:51-04:00'
describe
'1003' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDXZ' 'sip-files00119.txt'
2072f6aac891ab0a3d758f76132419df
d1546529ae963fb459a00defccb6e507013017b9
describe
'4316984' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDYA' 'sip-files00027.tif'
3674a61440ff3b6be20e24b7ae2872db
e856e19fa280a7190e5722a19d85bdfd5f6fdb20
'2012-06-28T22:02:01-04:00'
describe
'38030' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDYB' 'sip-files00024.pro'
00949370bf00d37fa4e771386eb34348
5272cc5d1f80ed6d0fd47fa59340e877c66ba6af
describe
'1733' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDYC' 'sip-files00109.txt'
1636e4f1adc0cd937953d21103f64940
d72ff7772ce0026cb24c987832b38eae226c0032
describe
'41591' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDYD' 'sip-files00016.pro'
7e8441208ba50e76cb950cf922674989
d3a2e66d9cc2f40afe1fbf2925eabfe9858cdd61
describe
'182310' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDYE' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
df13ae4a53a73897f56de0998dfb3745
8d689fb868d8033dd4558a8041cd8d8a2f6991de
'2012-06-28T21:53:03-04:00'
describe
'1110' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDYF' 'sip-files00052.txt'
88d7cb5b526fd60dd0061cd76d43882e
f6f09602c11eab473385b075b38e6e7c62061e83
describe
'41050' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDYG' 'sip-files00143.pro'
0207993a4254492641a1e95f5b04a71f
a311f67d9c28a539d19a7f0b9d209b603776205c
'2012-06-28T22:02:10-04:00'
describe
'41907' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDYH' 'sip-files00131.pro'
a2a37815fb1188d3468ecd8ffbf839f6
b61ca037c37bdb05ebcf4af1e089c848ade6a565
'2012-06-28T21:56:23-04:00'
describe
'24337' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDYI' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
e9536aba24a162e409221205c992b435
5c957803301fbbd2242944eeac09e9efa0e49229
'2012-06-28T21:57:57-04:00'
describe
'175033' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDYJ' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
5734b1e30fc5a3e6f29df758862655bb
004dd5500d10358c1ec87eebb1803e28ffb822a6
'2012-06-28T21:54:08-04:00'
describe
'40098' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDYK' 'sip-files00063.pro'
a05e3093d9a01deb14282b3b276e961e
03bc02341dc9f8e93260a672aab337c06e3499da
'2012-06-28T21:59:08-04:00'
describe
'43818' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDYL' 'sip-files00041.pro'
ee1a7417c11558ef7602e674691b42df
a2508865d2826c8895e3fb0ea96b60fadc818b4f
describe
'172427' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDYM' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
537d5f21e5bdeb38c2e22b6865184e5b
bbeb5fd2c3e11762dbf1097617b2bf8c54fc441e
describe
'560341' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDYN' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
214fc915c5abeae5367a58610a3d3a7a
fe334cc06ee32957a77da8c581876d192da6dffc
describe
'25555' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDYO' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
0e512743ba9d3826caa81b271ddbab69
199a7b561594dae344aa2ee1942ad99f9043a3dc
'2012-06-28T22:01:06-04:00'
describe
'19612' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDYP' 'sip-files00086.pro'
4c6ead01574071ccedc94a1656971a7f
bfef67c0a2c379c5622952830d5ba19ad7c82179
'2012-06-28T22:02:46-04:00'
describe
'22542' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDYQ' 'sip-files00160thm.jpg'
9b38fb55b53dcffa6c3a986c91003e01
6225d36b18bc57ec63540f0cc50207c2a8cc32d9
'2012-06-28T21:54:29-04:00'
describe
'4329056' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDYR' 'sip-files00065.tif'
7f3df3251176d1251d4a4f00e5d8f551
6ac5657ab3970c2a0763c0da2d7ed9f10751a53f
describe
'23381' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDYS' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
3ff29b8cb89e5e124d923fef18ceece9
fb808d17785c3b420474702fd939db9998e29d07
describe
'65403' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDYT' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
58609b03064e3b7ff9a05e5a85d1e29f
1317b8ae909fce47370812269dd1100b130fc36d
'2012-06-28T21:58:31-04:00'
describe
'1464' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDYU' 'sip-files00061.txt'
83d3da03d3c3fdea6ee7c7b3892aee3a
c8159196211526809eda77d832f5a5eaad8cda4e
describe
'27120' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDYV' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
c1b10d36cfbb95e003b7f3090db3f6f0
6bbef9e6713ec1aad23ae779df4968686abcefdf
'2012-06-28T22:00:24-04:00'
describe
'30529' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDYW' 'sip-files00125.pro'
0feb5c27daa03df67b0b94a73b452385
00e7ec6a9599b6bc74e18fdacfb68a0d2c13e402
describe
'4011872' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDYX' 'sip-files00144.tif'
9ed5b40590d0d7a79f515d3c599521bd
30449d5c871d78413369d9c1e1c69e74eea1164f
'2012-06-28T22:00:34-04:00'
describe
'40146' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDYY' 'sip-files00141.pro'
5b2a66c9895f84038b7b8c1425043539
8ead2bb9b8c32774e186a460132c0f814e7f824b
describe
'65203' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDYZ' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
7ce79f06017ae3bb017464940fd10554
36bb5c2b6fce2853ef452b70ea2d5fe4e09dc82c
describe
'54710' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDZA' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
40a4efb29d0b5352d055ba288270bf42
c3f4dc9ec5291126d1f0ac7e184d771ed3985ec5
'2012-06-28T22:03:00-04:00'
describe
'180136' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDZB' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
fd0541e739eb124db7627fa04d412836
f3625f9099af5f102b34c34cf1b845eebbc8fa5e
'2012-06-28T21:59:46-04:00'
describe
'25022' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDZC' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
3f8d5d8581a3b48186ac0e316d498cc6
b76389bedbe34387aa27226ecb02c0f9180c7c79
describe
'594571' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDZD' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
b13173101c726668c509de1133cc1212
ec5fcb3207b03ecbf4741d25f94b87fb38d39c9c
describe
'546189' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDZE' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
1be613a411a6149a7e754c293f30902e
5cdc663745c11a7793e4798513cde612a897dab9
'2012-06-28T21:59:22-04:00'
describe
'225' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDZF' 'sip-files00012.txt'
a6299b929523608d6e9ce7c3dcd33c4a
6852381c183d9956e50e4357a1478a86dc3dff76
'2012-06-28T22:01:38-04:00'
describe
'1620' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDZG' 'sip-files00063.txt'
c13e1ab76e16c42b8317a7b680da4a0d
af8a2e20136d87a226955d24c9a0edf22aee0589
describe
'515720' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDZH' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
75c2c62b6e1a1e6b8e24180d86f82922
1ac8773f164080007f44b901cdadbeec2dbffff8
describe
'1369' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDZI' 'sip-files00065.txt'
61d6849aa5fc0cd75c5deaae7f341474
a8c27101befe25b18246446e8aad2af4bc73ccc6
'2012-06-28T21:54:28-04:00'
describe
'1717' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDZJ' 'sip-files00100.txt'
3385fa2b2a39d50824179fb54e91bd02
0bb0e600923ca80ccff216e11defe6998e5ed8b7
'2012-06-28T21:54:04-04:00'
describe
'23270' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDZK' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
290e2e1646fce67477d31a5c73e1a773
3037a45e74cb93d3261ac67dc59a84e087934807
describe
'52497' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDZL' 'sip-files00164.QC.jpg'
7ff1eabd1fd2d34093c562bd3f3d76c6
e0e28638b0480e2fbe5de28e4fc8b0ff52b7399a
describe
'22267' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDZM' 'sip-files00138thm.jpg'
7c616627b3ab7a538be755dad20ffe41
a74fe8a24fadaa9c8bda33f91fda3ecfccc247f1
'2012-06-28T21:55:06-04:00'
describe
'1546' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDZN' 'sip-files00113.txt'
5c01e9c2f1086d37069a2d1a1be2b836
183c52ee4a4aadc2563bb9d6f75b76521a30288f
'2012-06-28T22:00:03-04:00'
describe
'1710' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDZO' 'sip-files00112.txt'
80a5ac4dedc8be14cf0e88d3abee0c70
c4b005ae55c3efed3324f7d0d94128b3462f0a40
'2012-06-28T21:59:52-04:00'
describe
'23331' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDZP' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
362d3275a43c11fa521fb2682daa679b
379b45c05b7d78da8dd536caaaf961ef44d7ca23
'2012-06-28T21:54:02-04:00'
describe
'524797' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDZQ' 'sip-files00159.jp2'
1a9da0a6dce7e3b6b514d663081f97c6
3507e25ccc708f78e49f8918c4292906d72ff7ab
describe
'583761' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDZR' 'sip-files00160.jp2'
eed326b8f9f5cc5360509dd4e980fa6a
2808e86726dae3adbd35c6f941c34e18ea821068
'2012-06-28T21:58:44-04:00'
describe
'1615' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDZS' 'sip-files00141.txt'
cd1d9b1d168abafae467e859a17f2f48
b80557f6c53098e5860e379ba7217f990f61144a
describe
'1182' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDZT' 'sip-files00138.txt'
230067709c76dbcb7b5d0337fc365c89
fa158aa4cb16b16652bb7f3b37812153489234bf
'2012-06-28T22:02:06-04:00'
describe
'194079' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDZU' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
4e116f50a352a74d7b473423ae430747
52112012f533fa364d373e31e7bd4f3459fca77e
'2012-06-28T21:53:50-04:00'
describe
'81087' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDZV' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
0849d1efac2e664841c5de53beddaa57
01c458cc0ccf8e21709965978c1cf339010a57ce
'2012-06-28T22:01:20-04:00'
describe
'886' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDZW' 'sip-files00117.txt'
19146155e2cdc8b546cca6c3aa5442e8
3d95f890b77b6abd1d7341f5943c5514beb09fb8
'2012-06-28T22:00:47-04:00'
describe
'4084212' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDZX' 'sip-files00167.tif'
5dbe4e210011187c1fe51f114f977690
c2022859d5f104b360354bd50b86b808b735df5a
'2012-06-28T21:55:49-04:00'
describe
'4176344' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDZY' 'sip-files00145.tif'
d14ba7b33e1e79410299dfab4de1b73f
c87682965b06b001d6cee0a8332011ef5438a3cc
'2012-06-28T21:54:06-04:00'
describe
'34152' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABDZZ' 'sip-files00046.pro'
8b1d9a6eacc2d92c4ae070b6168ea87b
6fea8e6544fe3afe018f42f65264d89ad2482278
'2012-06-28T21:57:15-04:00'
describe
'544821' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEAA' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
9ece755df7999dfa2053d4cdb7d7fc0f
6f3c41a1b2967dd9ccd479b15a6a7fd4ac54ae4f
describe
'1671' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEAB' 'sip-files00129.txt'
bfaef1d46b740a68c7c560f30a4e34ec
bf357a89eb3edb86775071ac3b3ba54705350865
'2012-06-28T21:58:39-04:00'
describe
'1701' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEAC' 'sip-files00028.txt'
8ddd0245ee5648db409174de8446de4a
1bbfe8aa9fd183ef5fa486fc2b5ae4bda0fb4afb
'2012-06-28T22:00:08-04:00'
describe
'173229' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEAD' 'sip-files00161.jpg'
439fbb9adceefc19a8bf148249a3e710
9e0e1144eb24aba449dc910ca29def5ac10225eb
'2012-06-28T22:02:03-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEAE' 'sip-files00074.txt'
838e21fbd49fce0db8e5563dc6891e29
dd496bed2479cd6de88b74757fe417a3fca49f44
describe
'601986' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEAF' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
134a17097acd03c930cc682af2658047
d4b7c668446998e6562497079eefb091233c014a
'2012-06-28T21:54:46-04:00'
describe
'537648' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEAG' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
bc5567dff696bb3d5b4215f3613316d1
036ae5cf73dfa5c9812b38fcd0ddf5bd1815c2e1
'2012-06-28T21:57:29-04:00'
describe
'15424' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEAH' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
58ea51288a25c8dc6c2033fbdf5cc46f
21c3f5709776f09d4505f3ceca4b3b4067671dd1
'2012-06-28T22:02:15-04:00'
describe
'4752356' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEAI' 'sip-files00130.tif'
d0239c638669b2120cd0b4247fad6f08
1afd1f5cbf990afc2482c2325b347170023dabee
describe
'582253' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEAJ' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
cabb7bf5a2cc65f1ae00bf1b76b51b35
0d034bb209534138df93b398565adcf5db0ab0b6
'2012-06-28T22:02:12-04:00'
describe
'594833' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEAK' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
6aacd822e54f76ab6add2a207c3c1b0f
a41427fe7c60191976f78cbbcaeda0060be3fdba
'2012-06-28T21:57:47-04:00'
describe
'151839' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEAL' 'sip-files00157.jpg'
c0f61145fd582976cb125f2571d77b5f
c2243779ef8cf1e3fe4c24612f76ba425413b374
describe
'557802' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEAM' 'sip-files00003.jp2'
52588f84702fe95e954c406dab0a59d9
61af78a445bf144ce59508376a00c7c14e7032a4
'2012-06-28T21:57:09-04:00'
describe
'62095' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEAN' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
2b2ef7b7ff6fba7436bdbad9fdaf438b
cc3d98fdc9e65b3169834d32a8a2e01f1c1ef00f
'2012-06-28T21:55:01-04:00'
describe
'25205' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEAO' 'sip-files00067.pro'
28f11d229ead5c5b88907a8ad714b2d8
73e8f89d4f8ed902f4065c21ca314f94e1db2d39
describe
'465005' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEAP' 'sip-files00172.jp2'
e1045f20bf4d592ddd533e3b29bf7b7a
4a0527e0b1554332ab23796005512c4379bc4eed
'2012-06-28T22:03:17-04:00'
describe
'4471012' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEAQ' 'sip-files00112.tif'
e4cc09aecf9d9ab0549bb9aee452408e
4145e2e79e54309b25f6233facc2e3c1f2475a2a
describe
'4173700' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEAR' 'sip-files00024.tif'
1ee042d7b08f533c9a7336c845a692ec
57ea3167c801e20df0ad4dde11c3a05f8fa05ac6
'2012-06-28T21:57:20-04:00'
describe
'21299' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEAS' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
e3ace9f4af9aaf47c1685eda225315b3
f26924597e792ec7a6a0c60f486145d92552102b
'2012-06-28T22:02:21-04:00'
describe
'11277' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEAT' 'sip-files00178thm.jpg'
94dd2923e734fa231e739655d2edba4f
060ec56000b5dca2a745d17d03c8586b081864ba
'2012-06-28T21:59:10-04:00'
describe
'542062' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEAU' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
e4e6ce447473319c61a480f19b416577
e5e50d4fb70c83bfc5fb29dde2dd71d3cd32bdaf
'2012-06-28T21:57:49-04:00'
describe
'44983' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEAV' 'sip-files00120.pro'
ec933a2861533bcf8cf14ff5449bf86f
53d1ea65895800db68699e1e9473a45c138943a7
describe
'597164' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEAW' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
fa2e134c89747b8211fa499ab3d14cbf
54170eeacee6cfab50564cb60a98810a6db88443
describe
'543335' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEAX' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
5423aa8d29e6a1cbd9826eb4666e81ad
089671b96f63ab72421bbfd3925ade8a4f979866
'2012-06-28T21:56:57-04:00'
describe
'91403' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEAY' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
f30cef06e672c51494c60884b6ccf358
85991869c60bca1bf010be1c5894133b2d386123
'2012-06-28T21:55:03-04:00'
describe
'14389' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEAZ' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
b0b46a9f302616e298f1b56fa76c15d2
be4acba2ff28cf5f907207d72d36955d14c69fcb
'2012-06-28T22:01:17-04:00'
describe
'53383' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEBA' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
14c2940276992669780ad4e511e8cc50
dd0e7ec908709175fff970c041a405efc8fb155e
'2012-06-28T22:00:52-04:00'
describe
'15765752' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEBB' 'sip-files00001.tif'
d80e2aaf6320947250f719be34f2551d
efabb478e01e225190b130bfa15aa15d878343b6
'2012-06-28T22:00:26-04:00'
describe
'4789444' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEBC' 'sip-files00141.tif'
406b4f6311421c0edc0e34b4b73b379e
8d8566f2ac23d78fac5ee020439002c958e8d690
describe
'57644' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEBD' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
bc58778e1155d5834ec498ccb23f60e6
bd318d26a39e1f58e008eb2756681967d95edcd6
'2012-06-28T21:59:17-04:00'
describe
'11228' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEBE' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
bd351404a9e5946832f9d03b03c0b986
9e31743bfa63c9ee1055779e4e27e71f0a59b21c
describe
'21793' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEBF' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
7a1cb6f056381485c58b8c113d1337cf
a66464f270d48ed6d66db24e4856260d8c90c50b
describe
'581634' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEBG' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
5a4c56ec788c1faa23fa9f6f0089125f
8820eb5dbc4c2a84a2fb016eada4ceadbd8c15b4
'2012-06-28T21:55:32-04:00'
describe
'55540' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEBH' 'sip-files00154.QC.jpg'
afdbe5d39620f485daaf8c80fd1be106
eac5e06b749e9956a4da4a50fe4acbefe62905c2
'2012-06-28T22:01:16-04:00'
describe
'492552' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEBI' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
838e3173ae1a645ac354f1fd83919a23
fd8bf6b3847a4064b9fe44365ef32d5f74a74706
'2012-06-28T21:58:28-04:00'
describe
'540' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEBJ' 'sip-files00091.txt'
85c632e31c0f24d96fa3e61de68d6b5e
f8e38b7bd9add134f29b29208375aba195e3801d
'2012-06-28T22:03:03-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'24028' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEBK' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
cbc7e815c91b92b01fbba3e75d44a11d
4ba79042e27f286a2f7157ae725bcbe7cde141dc
'2012-06-28T21:57:37-04:00'
describe
'4662700' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEBL' 'sip-files00013.tif'
f248ef08cb55c4b87da010c0e08b8131
3533961c43fa6a64c95c653dfe9589d265d33984
'2012-06-28T21:54:39-04:00'
describe
'33943' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEBM' 'sip-files00115.pro'
fa9d9f5860aea3da37f9a756b8b640e2
8c9b956aa27ac1cab9e8f443a31dd30c23f44b65
'2012-06-28T21:53:21-04:00'
describe
'62408' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEBN' 'sip-files00161.QC.jpg'
9f96743135fe2eca836b2656e87c039e
a1b586d64ae935164529ef6c4e84afc9d8e690ed
describe
'4788728' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEBO' 'sip-files00121.tif'
b8411673cc51ea8b03603f1b6987a346
c9c8414210b94ca129e376f091ba4b8f6b8ead96
describe
'57921' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEBP' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
b8f42cba6f134436e47f6a4e750df78f
6f936c102d1c82ff16212d3a0ee9131a2573eb5e
'2012-06-28T22:02:29-04:00'
describe
'25307' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEBQ' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
8862f31046013ef8297136fb01b4487c
a1f4f7cfe760032c4a83c3213ac22ff386a97806
describe
'21534' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEBR' 'sip-files00164thm.jpg'
e892843d9455d30ef4036bd582fa6336
91f2d13c12b34bea57bd2c23459ec0dd44b90fe4
describe
'152141' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEBS' 'sip-files00164.jpg'
e4643f1b49fa8ba290eeda34b51a67b7
16b4af6d324d08ffac8846e97f7547a61d58dfa9
'2012-06-28T21:55:38-04:00'
describe
'158958' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEBT' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
6587b6fe6a8181d9e39948130e1a9353
9ee09cd6d1489e29b5d7aa5ed378c8f50b20ada9
describe
'527052' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEBU' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
5517945d9483b656e5aa636ddde53e30
50df6e27da038da785a877d12c9624f93c36e6bd
describe
'64733' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEBV' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
51cdbac48189ff675cb471c4e83c0416
fcd28159369e405e8a6b152f94f93a7166af1b65
describe
'4040144' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEBW' 'sip-files00134.tif'
04ecc39d3b85b7745725ef7194fe42da
e2308ec48d1344e0bc1333c699bc40f740e246b7
'2012-06-28T22:00:00-04:00'
describe
'1612' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEBX' 'sip-files00111.txt'
046a8665156d60dec775879e2a5cffac
f304544a8ac1284669501efe4cbe275addd23d75
describe
'14881' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEBY' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
62ede0506fe3083190973c4e476e79a4
5cac7c89fe5f9b7e2ce8b9f339010f382f378992
'2012-06-28T22:00:59-04:00'
describe
'69979' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEBZ' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
7473d77f760374955237436832733832
9bc47de58f79e1f45bd22d1166a58914d287506e
'2012-06-28T21:56:47-04:00'
describe
'33494' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABECA' 'sip-files00026.pro'
59b77a4859dcf6127f11aa337e1565fe
6387698102450904f8713a4be2d5c3df451cf2f0
describe
'42074' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABECB' 'sip-files00044.pro'
7306c699741def378f24bad0e10e29de
e90e90f74dfeb79c21615827999e093c21ec06e7
'2012-06-28T22:01:27-04:00'
describe
'68726' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABECC' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
85c8c5cd26c37057aaba80c4a74f28b6
ce32ddf974a6101eb88a63610cd7f3d960437e0f
describe
'24977' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABECD' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
b9c2a94b6970d383d724ae6c6d8873b6
81d205e6e7aef5c0bedd202574dbfc7f0ab0662f
'2012-06-28T21:58:16-04:00'
describe
'1385' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABECE' 'sip-files00115.txt'
76cf363e3f65960b3061a4b96f62f731
eaa3c253e9748030d571622270b49a95a9a9b411
describe
'223263' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABECF' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
b8ea64c504f165a37c694d812362a0fb
44cc52ddbddb41147f1f0d8f6604158162733f96
describe
'594486' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABECG' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
87aab1cb831292f326634ec086da45f3
f81d7ad06e424ac7a079488190b7ad84f8cd24d4
describe
'23896' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABECH' 'sip-files00102.pro'
0c2cec71e512e37d0e115409f6293c1b
119563b95958807c1c69081ccc170ce14ad3f27d
describe
'6721' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABECI' 'sip-files00010.pro'
1e5f9086d8264076ac819e2e076d648e
ef9d19bb60c1ae1232ef0e42b1f120cefb92ac71
describe
'539195' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABECJ' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
a891d4c38f9c7aca411d6ad3ab97be37
bcbf80926ac9c83253e93ae52c1ea7cdda033978
describe
'597105' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABECK' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
e09f53e1359bd84b8426c77ee6ff5b04
a6ebf32d6e868187a2e960f08ed096819dbda82e
describe
'137245' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABECL' 'sip-files00178.jpg'
37fd01633b59374bdb4987aafdf5c3c1
7ef920106af6ad0e15a2f5a5e6a92aa29fbed1b6
'2012-06-28T21:59:28-04:00'
describe
'40102' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABECM' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
6f7a58cdccc60ef9d3bd56b7e8a7bde3
c0e85b5db5e35fd2ee49818b2d82baef3eea47d7
describe
'54277' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABECN' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
872df3eef04b6a83b7028e514dfa8070
03ac7e7c973c2ea1b9e57bd5576cf8b8e4fa4743
describe
'4737600' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABECO' 'sip-files00092.tif'
48213ebfc4a5d17200cc3caf806a14d4
077b5013a68990e3080eed15b403227e31125497
'2012-06-28T21:57:55-04:00'
describe
'1653' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABECP' 'sip-files00016.txt'
60bdff7a79f739dd2b5ef03da082eff6
45ca1df5665f76d0b41f4e3b8bb4e6d5280b5c03
describe
'594531' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABECQ' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
52a7997f641c30c180c82e9418a265e2
064ec6f9a402ad55d8f42ced51715950be02353c
'2012-06-28T22:03:07-04:00'
describe
'184190' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABECR' 'sip-files00150.jpg'
7b4526ce7cd5d3f5455d810538fb7963
d7c24481d90ba99503ae46291d6756c6f5c9e342
'2012-06-28T21:55:48-04:00'
describe
'546100' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABECS' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
4ece3c3783e044ae92ef323911a88053
e2878cfeebf1108d5d8796a32e88bc115bb34ab3
describe
'24409' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABECT' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
8bdf0d2450b49069180ef22622cdc848
7f173aa0f5006b261e3a0107a8a638c45713a127
describe
'134496' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABECU' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
58c9cc5e1482a7addbbaf38f4ecafbbd
a467c8efe86315c7a8bbfeedcb4cd9331f1123c5
describe
'18759' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABECV' 'sip-files00033.pro'
764615b8d1de5c2f3d0d13f16e000c4d
771c5cddfa4ce38c48476975b857a740a52b1e0a
describe
'168077' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABECW' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
50091fdcc4008b09a18f9fec145638f8
7b2cccf18da9ce39327cb234cdbcfea62735e43c
describe
'65832' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABECX' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
74671d0488be6ab85cf4a31aaf6cad27
a99efd54e2ef1ba3109c47b02e7c86ec023100be
'2012-06-28T22:03:05-04:00'
describe
'515105' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABECY' 'sip-files00153.jp2'
fb37a2374e81decfc3093d61e03b1cac
481f4d2c4b12a4d7049212541ea9d6f65184a0ab
'2012-06-28T22:00:53-04:00'
describe
'65849' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABECZ' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
9a6b7f8ac083c457452f0e40e702632b
d2b286d63fa14c15de24460a0760170c0482f18a
describe
'4134796' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEDA' 'sip-files00096.tif'
bc6ee752beb3a3de2edfd17a3047ebfa
a3288614789ce35ed702169bc3b401d0c3860f34
'2012-06-28T21:54:52-04:00'
describe
'182797' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEDB' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
c0b118c8df1a3ad453b8345316e7901d
7dacdcbd15b8ebd0d8f4a5265d9eb3928ee3dbf3
'2012-06-28T21:58:17-04:00'
describe
'1592' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEDC' 'sip-files00162.txt'
de73eae46e5c4f1e21be4a9a2116b0d6
e31d5eca6fefae28a474275a77f1ad670a816c9c
describe
'27624' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEDD' 'sip-files00138.pro'
25d8fd4dd941d15cca8b813e57bc1d8e
343e59872144f700e01fbfc937ad686812080e74
describe
'62121' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEDE' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
ecee0584d585109b738c8b599accf347
1ba208d15d8b00bb9b52173854be91d18adf43e8
'2012-06-28T22:01:47-04:00'
describe
'161194' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEDF' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
03fe6e5bff47979c8d13d73173630eb1
3d27192188c9af3c3ee1ef653fe2b7a3619d1ff2
'2012-06-28T21:56:03-04:00'
describe
'4461764' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEDG' 'sip-files00035.tif'
1e22deb27eefe3e9089a6a8b8dcb40ec
10a18d24cb48e0fd1c2d6aab09d02d5c1174a007
describe
'10120' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEDH' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
e9b7d31dba98b82d63e0106fc893118b
f28b0775612fedcc78c9edf559e99c854c7d793b
describe
'1558' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEDI' 'sip-files00026.txt'
ed28239a0264644b691fddef4332d7b3
ab79c37471930b7cb665f6844cb3e28c05dcceee
'2012-06-28T21:57:38-04:00'
describe
'23928' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEDJ' 'sip-files00137thm.jpg'
7c6ecce232787a5b0178a2a9332e91a0
b6c45563e645271c8eb9f5651a3edd6658240dac
describe
'13711' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEDK' 'sip-files00002thm.jpg'
435132e54ca6fbf480e9b6036e9dd98e
625d9c2c82098afd978efb631350e5daa949beca
describe
'20034' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEDL' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
a9c9d0d86462fad92a9b51ed7a25938e
9bebfd81e3626ab0f0f7dba4e7cda5df7ea71c4a
'2012-06-28T22:01:58-04:00'
describe
'68534' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEDM' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
72b1f5c197c2be3dd6849ea43d9218cc
3cb597843ca9b0c0024d4b4390e1068897524431
'2012-06-28T21:59:31-04:00'
describe
'575324' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEDN' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
60c77cf3ea0fce02fa6dfc96278db987
2d7533eb370a14c025bcd5b5892820f2a75d8a3c
'2012-06-28T21:58:35-04:00'
describe
'22861' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEDO' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
196ad1b4ff886c348bd12505221ce368
da2be9d9d6e98fd740fc795d5c6529261facb93c
'2012-06-28T22:02:04-04:00'
describe
'64270' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEDP' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
f1ee988fe3afeb9934c9d695517ee95d
c941da2b424d4ba9042dacc8a524086ce57828a6
describe
'4682472' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEDQ' 'sip-files00170.tif'
9f8a19986b401e0f85942ec81651c952
8735a16f01a08ed0764b5fd4c76e475b7b787964
'2012-06-28T21:58:52-04:00'
describe
'1778' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEDR' 'sip-files00116.txt'
982d999323be6c3d3648f5c666f6253d
a0628eefc6f553ba3f695188a01599061a90736c
'2012-06-28T22:03:11-04:00'
describe
'4682228' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEDS' 'sip-files00158.tif'
ed75619943ed8d77b9c631ef9918f6f7
ba05e2717f071b93a260cdc6eefd3ddb8a041b52
'2012-06-28T22:01:43-04:00'
describe
'1775' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEDT' 'sip-files00137.txt'
1809edc090ad49ee3c673a1e4e7cd752
8d7f41724f2f65bdd53fe93843a70cab5badbfe5
'2012-06-28T22:00:02-04:00'
describe
'581353' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEDU' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
88c4ad879508437c9c24468c73ca3387
e531dcaf204ef6404c342554c30bfd9836ab875b
'2012-06-28T21:57:45-04:00'
describe
'66351' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEDV' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
0e50700fb2eed68a2c8d2dd5138dec97
8f06461e36ce67d3461e616bb79f4de193d38f8e
'2012-06-28T22:03:25-04:00'
describe
'166426' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEDW' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
86384a5a1ba4be25b8a9e1723a35c658
f2ad10fbc8e6aefcfd3b5990a8380d554876d705
describe
'24617' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEDX' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
024d9131a0950c737b683abd8a3376e3
9747aae09f6066c74e1bfd3a55c7f56c4d0fa727
describe
'1131' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEDY' 'sip-files00160.txt'
ee800107dfdac92d771b64cccda1277e
49684256b7f66d317061c88bf2596b6d502fd8f4
describe
'24686' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEDZ' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
82603b54b38b925335425f4bbc8dea37
e868b4f1a514299ec940e90d40bce5477708889d
describe
'4469192' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEEA' 'sip-files00003.tif'
cd8a1cb4423db1edaaca91d9fc8a9d13
b6d411dd16cafe80b2188c476b968f9f7d3ffade
describe
'34362' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEEB' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
08c77b63a59341c28fac4b881f88ed80
c6fe0df56f706a36f92425f45dd4be63b838ce9c
describe
'192011' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEEC' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
60c43100370ed438138a16329de82e6f
adac186761f17329d021695785a9f24996bbd41a
describe
'4665332' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEED' 'sip-files00015.tif'
192b8c0d59397e974906c66014a35512
7a087e4e4e0a980e36ff37b6cdab7910462cc8be
'2012-06-28T21:56:16-04:00'
describe
'4182804' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEEE' 'sip-files00146.tif'
157f76173406c41946524cd1d681816c
16d04207968a8836ee6055e20b09c7744925f6c8
describe
'24811' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEEF' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
95aaec506032a7801d34a0522d2170ce
ccfdf261b1d32e0c134f501c4046d20265409bd6
describe
'25868' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEEG' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
b2f11a46812d8193e743b7be54b663f7
7af2e6ff6bcb1b500c4ef3613c9da45068987e3f
describe
'43981' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEEH' 'sip-files00050.pro'
b1758cd7931c858ddf806df38ea1be6c
a157946aa99fabae6085f6cc005fa7b1c006cba9
describe
'24805' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEEI' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
4a79eb724b8063e63689ca0bdd8e7ad5
101bd250bfaad1f1a99c6a6c881a00846ae59e00
'2012-06-28T21:59:00-04:00'
describe
'1754' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEEJ' 'sip-files00041.txt'
a74c2d70f97151c1b83769a77ec3eed0
cbd3aa204fe8f1d22a35cc09b59409f1674f473b
describe
'40995' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEEK' 'sip-files00087.pro'
ad489c9f44206d2aa50c555bac7fd778
039928afca82b1c7a925090b645ea3dcdc656bcf
'2012-06-28T21:53:40-04:00'
describe
'51368' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEEL' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
ebb3e2182e4cb6989745071d092dba1e
e63764e4c196250ba8a52fa54079f0c9c5969a52
'2012-06-28T22:03:12-04:00'
describe
'145593' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEEM' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
e8c3682f013bc2cb65cb307c1fc1535e
123aa34e74352c953084bc90aee03ee17bd3c6fa
'2012-06-28T21:55:09-04:00'
describe
'947' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEEN' 'sip-files00022.txt'
4ae1ebe7f057196494656fb68dde93f5
92ed06db582842641e1344dbc95d905c28fa062c
describe
'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEEO' 'sip-files00036.txt'
8c86ecd12c065febfa8cb5b6f5110b6a
9d1322985ad16b09971cb9c3424e9d6bdc14bc73
describe
'21922' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEEP' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
8c37e1a9ec120f19f23d346f230b3aba
3b6076d69c6d52347b5972093ee871a0697357d8
describe
'65167' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEEQ' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
650b25c69e7b63b481ea7ec5d83b0386
d9a99ff978cc97ac47da719ef847db37f6abc009
describe
'22887' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEER' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
da123edd2386e0951efc777b99b1105a
1d24cda2cc3df24f03265762b10dc79c6f1a1002
'2012-06-28T21:54:51-04:00'
describe
'193520' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEES' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
e612e5fa6f449e6a604eaef65a51f2a0
4e2d7b9cc9dc410d6e2ea4f5ebd126ca11bf434b
'2012-06-28T21:53:23-04:00'
describe
'42442' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEET' 'sip-files00023.pro'
3155f1293117afec0bc108196b7f6ff5
d0d53fe28b14985da64e94859a97977fa9f230d3
'2012-06-28T21:56:58-04:00'
describe
'21687' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEEU' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
bcef2898499c4f60eb2dbadb9aafe141
23a31dedf906789f4182dc285694c7ea821dd921
describe
'26831' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEEV' 'sip-files00152thm.jpg'
0236e92240705592609da454175594fb
e0eafbc4c00afba00452bfafc780511c1193844e
describe
'4226916' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEEW' 'sip-files00083.tif'
24a49fbed90c3d27a137c678a4c62511
2797f8787a346ebf6bb36aa8170195914f707edc
describe
'34429' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEEX' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
7b005566bc287fc632f79bc503ac634f
0352eb14bb86e7def1991569f431915511e16f89
describe
'19631' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEEY' 'sip-files00167thm.jpg'
e7e303113f86e115376adba9fb66ded3
9b9bc2f7f51a2ba5c34adb00667b546a342c00e5
'2012-06-28T22:02:05-04:00'
describe
'70617' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEEZ' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
87a0430851b22b68343b67cfe062556d
7f6d2649f545de80a2f942392ab7577144dc94e8
describe
'25756' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEFA' 'sip-files00165thm.jpg'
980a9cfb1a273cbcaeebe961edce91b1
e15560620d0db5a0c9a3f8e8c36675552f2e88d5
describe
'1666' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEFB' 'sip-files00044.txt'
899f5a98284cf2f866b7b26625a1e447
d163f05f9c57e8137d972df8b0dc4ff79c719d0f
describe
'688' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEFC' 'sip-files00151.txt'
ae14d2fd73069e1df58a2e1570572b73
b858ef4d1e2df367a664a7f5a1f6060eb8f11ce5
describe
Invalid character
'1018' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEFD' 'sip-files00083.txt'
bdb9bda2331820293c1374cc5432a28b
e287c44f52addc9b360f6592aa16232cbc7866f0
'2012-06-28T21:59:06-04:00'
describe
'25897' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEFE' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
b3d54ef01fb674cdbac59c8cd4457aed
9d0c8d90ffc6995d59135d45a18d19b024513e2f
describe
'901' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEFF' 'sip-files00045.txt'
ebf4210cf2f594af734910b97d4823ba
b3997a4010ca4c16f631067a5767a3a1f7d2934d
describe
'189300' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEFG' 'sip-files00145.jpg'
f8272e245524e0f04a9372a7d682ad1b
93ddc8645ad209b7d86108312e5f578fe88b5cb8
describe
'30514' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEFH' 'sip-files00002.QC.jpg'
cf161bcf240016dde490609bc08e66f0
40ec251c1c4ea0e13e156670059064b41d546a30
'2012-06-28T21:58:14-04:00'
describe
'75679' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEFI' 'sip-files00144.QC.jpg'
be81e0382968f8aba38dcb557951d7b9
eb968d3b58f918193c4fa6a7bcba7394b512487d
'2012-06-28T21:55:35-04:00'
describe
'68819' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEFJ' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
e65d180452835ce9b28a2293f63cc7de
2e8334631d2065feceebf0d9796374c4f7a4f478
'2012-06-28T21:58:27-04:00'
describe
'24029' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEFK' 'sip-files00140thm.jpg'
3efdaf779eb49d6db9717ebf1aa19667
ebcd3e46c4f281fb3d72d80bfc65b18e01a3cf97
describe
'182396' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEFL' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
dfc503c1fd794acd19eaff3c97433d85
cbda5bc7db468f93b7c20576ca8d91c01706ce60
'2012-06-28T21:57:04-04:00'
describe
'23287' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEFM' 'sip-files00162thm.jpg'
cae39a71abf6aa9048494dd6a32db2f0
5caf1f4892a9372f4f4e429844f323dfc9ec735b
describe
'1506' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEFN' 'sip-files00166.txt'
9f470b53cce408732617394971790f69
fb8a859259e055f4941bfe9f019f4c22c213d915
'2012-06-28T21:53:13-04:00'
describe
'536050' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEFO' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
605c6e79f68d3e6a101715a1c362e0a1
6cb6b72b1f439b589da15006e00fdc46664c2066
describe
'4796500' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEFP' 'sip-files00105.tif'
335417dfc36d9423b73379629f9712b0
c8b14d5c55d6dda11ab6179529d3827904240897
'2012-06-28T21:54:32-04:00'
describe
'259844' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEFQ' 'sip-filesUF00028240_00001.xml'
0ec85139ff3580f74938457b24ef4703
59489ce49a5589c07e962c971704b355c0110f25
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-10T02:40:03-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'225366' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEFT' 'sip-files00001.jpg'
155af1b5799bc01e2ea47f71135cac81
aa1faaf08e13535460895d2a4ddc50539095cb00
'2012-06-28T22:01:52-04:00'
describe
'82852' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEFU' 'sip-files00003.jpg'
ab3a573654ffd9895981d4dbccd5c8b4
26f83654e4b5f2a1051a744cc7cc77efd84ddedc
describe
'200229' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEFV' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
039230c3e219ef965cbd371f7333bfd9
9bd9c83229d66b42ec9f1f0b521f5960c9ecac76
describe
'60772' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEFW' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
32a1ed1b31454c49d37b4561697e1f80
3155396f8a88ae9ef8387ff8450362fd79b57d4f
describe
'181461' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEFX' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
fc0bdf56ff19fc2512a710900c432981
679c0d18a71d860e52e8536a61c8781ce9072470
'2012-06-28T22:00:45-04:00'
describe
'172662' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEFY' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
72816bd1062e7e8e95c5384488f4263c
df106fe2b0ca90cabd4dd9837b57982ef8c2da26
'2012-06-28T21:56:21-04:00'
describe
'209203' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEFZ' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
d485e9efe2fb301ceee4ef72a2267502
8a2512470df42d3abc74fa3c20e359039e3291f9
describe
'184090' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEGA' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
700c4de2487623c6715b7aede8191531
40bff948a352dff139334c69f0e60213422f7d08
describe
'186119' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEGB' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
77236965ef337f448dedc0a48ba32097
c3dcf087ff8678a91aed41ea1e07a3916277d2e1
describe
'186748' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEGC' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
232d38614d1bf3cbb852aaee35579c25
a2d7665f2a6c0e8e47c2e1986451d1e2883b7ecd
describe
'193603' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEGD' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
2f2dd54e06933262c8150bf247f3a516
85b5a57d5fad0ddc6c1012139c2b0bcdfc9b860d
describe
'148042' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEGE' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
209d6cba560163e2b079622058fa6bb0
9046da8ffb801195012fe4b4e5fef219b455b1ba
describe
'142906' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEGF' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
3434193063c66048b8d7b574d6bf5cf9
4213c73f0ce4aab8b502c5df88e34c8ce30b84a2
'2012-06-28T21:57:35-04:00'
describe
'108165' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEGG' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
1f24279f67f4feb97bfd9ee8ba67fd17
d646ebdb04b11498147fe96f3fcc11f51a55745a
describe
'151393' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEGH' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
e296bc23bbe6fcec87027c11bf14edb3
2afbcba8ada0b66ef196fdfdeca2ba7df4d48404
describe
'167287' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEGI' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
efa3dc4d0fca8f5fe3ecff301cfb27cb
046b9a67bcb5fec3e2d88790ff24e0d675811992
describe
'151840' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEGJ' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
d9320936d9a6e40167d164e317655d93
7e351a7c2ea029873d77a7f84a0916c65fb5ed8d
'2012-06-28T21:55:58-04:00'
describe
'176746' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEGK' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
e5d82e524cf8f0482bb18c4ad563b1fd
053d77cef112315c2a086a5f9ef509c6bc4bee54
describe
'154486' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEGL' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
50771a5f1b11977e3ea89a21d722a60b
231bd546184b71c959f7cdade8f8a406efd28154
'2012-06-28T21:55:51-04:00'
describe
'162937' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEGM' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
779033856a644bbffab7b65506bc6ba8
ea7cfe53f41e42eb0ad774d6317c745afab8b93f
describe
'181503' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEGN' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
9604d0455b07f24e02bf92e762b04383
82badd162136522a90fd4872b241ffdd6c8c4bd6
describe
'177321' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEGO' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
60cdfe5d5cdaa3c3a68cab1e1ce3536f
e2a8f5f72c11601a9124d67b7587b8f1f80d75b2
'2012-06-28T21:56:17-04:00'
describe
'144804' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEGP' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
906666405b4d74b80bc0f7bdf1433732
c5b5cc3d5a85ec9fa0ad3ff6bd0f9895a8d53415
describe
'161583' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEGQ' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
479098edb0e94213c6b7cc98026211cd
e8da9a5e73181c0311e17075fa514c62e1e34656
describe
'187249' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEGR' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
17a803a1f24795bb20c937ab82290bd7
c4c674e8b545b9b02ff5b46a3726c76795d31ad2
'2012-06-28T21:53:18-04:00'
describe
'184733' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEGS' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
1dc25943eb109db902fe0a7309930d18
58e2d9bac5f030d32857f0a65c5317700e651f7f
describe
'193341' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEGT' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
bd34009d4ce1fb517f018370e010a124
781180074e2d5f5a409aa8adc4e4acba36e8f22b
describe
'189116' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEGU' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
f0657e006c66800bacff006e3cac5694
6f6b4ba62d4cc0e679cc4a45478b5d3ff07dc537
'2012-06-28T21:56:38-04:00'
describe
'163951' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEGV' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
bd848350c85fe9eb464d0e64e78a07e7
486f9aab76644d7b29922be5a2df67431796c348
describe
'137126' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEGW' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
944fa46474d0a839e1eab0fbd62f3583
8243befffb286307a11c2b5b6abea8f5b1dae52d
'2012-06-28T21:56:27-04:00'
describe
'176621' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEGX' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
eef304cc462b218103f9ea8b40db0415
ee901f430ba7ae892292c95e3b30c47b8af6fe73
describe
'181805' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEGY' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
3bc19064612dc07533297567dafb58c1
370f1454cfe0e5514ed6593d014f29ab778877a7
describe
'135444' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEGZ' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
24c8e89d6dae9c25ab3692e4790c078b
0d5279fdb02dd59cb32a2ce8840278e99fe386af
'2012-06-28T21:58:32-04:00'
describe
'137702' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEHA' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
92ff29a82bc3fb8448664b29b18c2cc4
f24ed7f3cb354718d8f0c5dfe9532888b966b178
describe
'164995' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEHB' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
bf71485419213594acb41c05e7251d8f
940e50834f618dc9dec5c743f3a3ee50eceabdea
describe
'164926' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEHC' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
5be2d07ffbff40d3d7f65d82ae856fec
a663ffb3f256f0341ff6fe1bc95694f9d6729af6
describe
'182633' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEHD' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
98325dec495d64890baba8c094beef28
6bbe71cf11d0985464311f81a66b24fe029ac5da
'2012-06-28T21:57:27-04:00'
describe
'156124' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEHE' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
d699e0dc63f5a2dc644015767435e84b
7f353ba96eaa452e36efe715d7dbd1ff9d6baa5d
'2012-06-28T21:59:45-04:00'
describe
'174238' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEHF' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
2313a1c6d4316c84d44ce1565f75709d
fbd1e1408895ec38ce5c41944faab4b2e87d167f
describe
'172208' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEHG' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
0156362d2ee677d56800dcd30c3fd044
d8e09d4eadd91cfd1a4b468ae4da61ec4522b340
'2012-06-28T22:01:49-04:00'
describe
'237245' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEHH' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
4d2a2fcbdd161dc5e1b0e09cc1981fcd
01bbc8494cfe99091e0fba288a435ef7e4d774e7
'2012-06-28T21:58:19-04:00'
describe
'171852' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEHI' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
0062b123c0c53d0699c7ca3d9baa78aa
540939311fec625cd9ecbb9e1ab34bc04c0b83c6
'2012-06-28T21:54:07-04:00'
describe
'174390' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEHJ' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
26ed6909024a4ecef8e619f9f43fb48b
46f2bfd1a981128c5e6d7a2f042ec1f16732283d
'2012-06-28T22:00:18-04:00'
describe
'104680' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEHK' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
956aebc9830aaed19f6d351007f9786d
e8b2e269dd6ce8c775d6c40d2fd6127662714ef5
'2012-06-28T21:57:40-04:00'
describe
'149787' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEHL' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
573e1d62ad916b4039a69ffa3b0c5bfe
35f633344db67e16fc5ff8a8e404e2b990037a59
'2012-06-28T21:58:11-04:00'
describe
'173875' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEHM' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
763bf1e4d2e94ddaab49cd36dc106794
48d2c223c85e5a40ce84b9ef9c26a246edc8092c
describe
'143863' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEHN' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
db141e40f877b946231425439e603d8f
0e3ed3bb4c9809363a01aa0ab9dfd0d047900c0b
describe
'149253' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEHO' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
c4a26550b7befd136314333cab0106f8
d842824dc12aea1613fd19a3f1387b9cfc44adcb
describe
'182928' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEHP' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
54a85ce8a8b4583c841a063f2b853dd2
10ab5ab5625ec45466a0019e4ba2b084706b5526
describe
'164757' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEHQ' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
872a1034c9675c20264c9961f56c6b7e
5c22d6383b808c946ee45e24164581e20cfc618d
describe
'183317' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEHR' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
f0e663689c4bde5ebed09234e738c5c6
984b13267fa18ee4bba8bba628a8e967d5569667
describe
'129694' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEHS' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
a2e170119d9eeb9c99cf56c85695ca80
2e46a048f3043bc13a53bba784e6ce72f1f76cfe
describe
'188940' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEHT' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
55bd1e1bd4599ce458aaab157ca1d8c4
463c12e83d5775bff8bec3ab040e5354393234b2
'2012-06-28T21:59:41-04:00'
describe
'179384' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEHU' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
713cb324adedccabe2740a4d8c0c9292
5f5ad95e1c36c09cb9ca5f691ce94002feecd6cd
describe
'168870' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEHV' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
1c2ff4d09baf5a1ab6fcb0bd6750bfa2
8e1e5aeecef84012c36319d85e9b03d10ed7914e
describe
'186679' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEHW' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
0e484f3a92c0dc56c696c0ded88021f5
4a8eb8620b6c4cce7a3868e6b92a9d10bafe3fe8
describe
'180330' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEHX' 'sip-files00142.jpg'
147015eafdf37b50674c6221d08d2a2d
77f3203b163f827da9ad4968ded24942a02a89d2
describe
'207436' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEHY' 'sip-files00144.jpg'
28aa35d810a02a0a58065b6c3cea49a0
c7c25870da8e00256bbf7a80c169bbae7af4661a
describe
'51221' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEHZ' 'sip-files00147.jpg'
42382dd173f0499716ea4a16fa2adfdd
490b1edf0c462f1a2c4d6f8e01f9d457491fdeb3
describe
'191578' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEIA' 'sip-files00149.jpg'
cdb68593928c2ca583a6b4f1be095f27
f1ad56d4428a26fe1aa82a795ff327517e7dc6f3
describe
'167441' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEIB' 'sip-files00151.jpg'
9e77149301e6141a0fd152d8011907e0
898084c15877709c82feaf401826d945ba330773
'2012-06-28T22:01:57-04:00'
describe
'192203' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEIC' 'sip-files00152.jpg'
3911e44a979d3a2bb430657e1bacd5e8
63edfcd104fc0451fdd3221954369c54892551ea
'2012-06-28T22:01:15-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEID' 'sip-files00153.jpg'
14047b86a87d73109096660726e4d161
d41e493fe5e04b04c876fc3352b80a669d9e6164
describe
'160091' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEIE' 'sip-files00154.jpg'
c5e317b2c8d2578a07c8e3ed5a293dac
74407ae7877476b0519bfeec01d0f879a46cbc91
describe
'95833' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEIF' 'sip-files00156.jpg'
c2c00e5351c35aee1c98a827013dd342
b42e15c1051c0b11e58692093b06df9cd6d83f71
'2012-06-28T21:54:22-04:00'
describe
'178785' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEIG' 'sip-files00158.jpg'
abe6fb897447927c19f54fe8bbc77b86
5265a2f6d5c2c797104332e7e5b819a506333a57
'2012-06-28T21:53:48-04:00'
describe
'157761' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEIH' 'sip-files00160.jpg'
d8d2886a1c20f62ca5334a7ae96d0e37
517326016ff656eff4274f51d0081994b730da5f
'2012-06-28T21:57:05-04:00'
describe
'165057' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEII' 'sip-files00162.jpg'
9a3727ec8d37eed49e4e3037463e0eaf
18a0ad32254cfe5930bcdfa50fbeca619e4452e9
describe
'173231' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEIJ' 'sip-files00163.jpg'
11899f7d4e0dfd57000fd071c0eb6d40
c444c2400d68a30106fda39affc6fc553fbf1d48
describe
'174282' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEIK' 'sip-files00166.jpg'
b943dfb38573fec646aa98381de85aeb
c543470f20af3d4ec720b3d39d9d260861774471
'2012-06-28T22:01:05-04:00'
describe
'306328' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEIL' 'sip-files00172.jpg'
5b5877328329cd60699f4a051a0857b0
03636eacb91a529e77a9bfe141dee8514b5b77e8
'2012-06-28T22:00:42-04:00'
describe
'57332' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEIM' 'sip-files00179.jpg'
50298d2fed1b2411cd7501a0bb59562c
d94e35dc33ec9b41a221475a95f0ee46c3716a37
'2012-06-28T21:54:13-04:00'
describe
'658161' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEIN' 'sip-files00002.jp2'
55444adce973cfbb7a121d18d86159c7
62d3079ec75ca33703b2a195e1c8557bb0603543
describe
'557732' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEIO' 'sip-files00007.jp2'
b422f6ef09c0e6c065cf239dc69e24ce
a330e80cadfaf523194c620c19e9da0948985879
describe
'557557' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEIP' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
86a0d52718b04e89ce122f25d62a786b
f5fcaccec1877dd320087af8367742e4aa2b1cda
'2012-06-28T21:56:22-04:00'
describe
'536227' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEIQ' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
9410df01b992b0d62d5395f50624a97e
4deb93ac802159b373e8ad30e2ecd01248ce199a
describe
'581595' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEIR' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
c4cfccb712a8ace859f612863cdac8de
aa2fcc5f547d6765485da75fd13ccea3d9361643
'2012-06-28T21:55:56-04:00'
describe
'521347' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEIS' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
584b897abb67d590fd73d82971cb8f40
553e391567e62ccb77a9e72ce8ac72b83663d034
'2012-06-28T21:59:23-04:00'
describe
'594380' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEIT' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
aee453cd0765840112892f05649fe4dc
e52f30ff7a025abd01ab566ccd6ae39bf380e652
describe
'585907' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEIU' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
26fc5e0cf2d4a31211f29103f3736190
61b9e8a84bb333d250928b9677fb61d7edeb77cf
describe
'538058' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEIV' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
c5f3b07b3b2be83f35480fa5e2b6f2f2
053e61614c3182ec456b5de1dd0fac836f8fc5ca
'2012-06-28T21:56:15-04:00'
describe
'545328' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEIW' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
c42420b8a4152328cca2afbf274569c5
70ddf8efefcf4c2c3320fec157856ba52c72cadd
'2012-06-28T21:59:21-04:00'
describe
'553194' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEIX' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
24d5521b04ea2cc3b91c137ec1faf7ef
e55ed3dab33da0df5a7d92a57a996b0b5a6ca4e5
'2012-06-28T21:53:41-04:00'
describe
'576380' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEIY' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
5e5af541cfa4f1cdb06c28ecfccb6be9
d4fd44f88dbe3d2bc8c84ec26799d2d0cc0178eb
describe
'592983' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEIZ' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
8f398a00472a92ef283bf156496534e9
d372bc5c71ba11b85d92565b41ff82390b936902
describe
'593042' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEJA' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
655d12a9c1f2e08be92eae0249e8fc13
9e3ea2b0acdefd7ce4989fa193ca34b780d667a8
describe
'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEJB' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
cca6314220c80d5680ed1bc145c9fdac
8d9a1f2ae5a6aeabcf660b86f442331bce39e513
'2012-06-28T22:01:21-04:00'
describe
'593680' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEJC' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
5c796f833b1c61c69474d4cc431b55e0
4277e2d5664e3c2fbbecb3031b834cf3b52f4d57
'2012-06-28T21:58:02-04:00'
describe
'593679' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEJD' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
aa1675b113e7ab83c3079572c02d6e88
206689f2351b0df0fe3951737d47a1926e59e619
describe
'521376' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEJE' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
01b1b131090e6e0999ca535424a48437
6822c0eb7b85789128a84062deb79b619e5403a4
'2012-06-28T22:02:23-04:00'
describe
'604230' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEJF' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
d013b11584213255c237b7fdc50ef680
5bfedfa4a643620f1757ba54fe67da92b281242f
'2012-06-28T22:00:49-04:00'
describe
'593336' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEJG' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
757453518a37602afc10a67ff9755b49
a3ba349c9c81ed59942d733582cdb0f602f46cb6
describe
'553579' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEJH' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
4c988fd26543bb543edf907768ccdf97
48b6a60ced298be6c4ef61cdf40d553ec8dcfb16
describe
'539487' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEJI' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
f766501aaf94f0fc00db169be679ba63
86df0ca070830c161f0a6cc88f973a7cb670ed16
'2012-06-28T21:57:08-04:00'
describe
'602130' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEJJ' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
5b4fa580f02cdc9906c99f7aa4b86777
6b6baf68dd7693256ed3cca9a616617fcb39d850
'2012-06-28T21:57:07-04:00'
describe
'551989' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEJK' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
a537deb52b97fe6c617f344c3e15e08f
b6c6c21fa2900bc0290155da9675a18ecc0b0ba0
'2012-06-28T21:53:34-04:00'
describe
'597485' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEJL' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
f90b799fc2411730c16af05049546058
1ec371d8b369d4ee5f9f4d7587d622d6ae53c865
describe
'535695' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEJM' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
37a561c464c98a6c3e9b1f1ea4996b7d
273b312a17796a6702cfedbabfa7316dbedb0429
'2012-06-28T22:02:33-04:00'
describe
'594923' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEJN' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
6ffcf7f37b0e654ccbb93f40441fd09f
1aa6cc185a60fc6d0f56a31d970b0674507674a3
describe
'545979' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEJO' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
a2727650254ff77ff538fd56ae457105
a07dac251544a390706b5ed2107205f1dcbb461f
describe
'538685' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEJP' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
31514db8d6b5af8e41de15460bec3365
6d237e001661401ce844e2b19c240a4435b3c94c
'2012-06-28T21:56:33-04:00'
describe
'591166' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEJQ' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
457312e5cc0bd68a14f2f9d5d0ed89e3
5c8636962a2d9ed43d1a99e0b1fcca8be1707814
describe
'591952' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEJR' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
8091452d508550d771dec625a10f3a05
34548a2cf9a6d640707dfadda9e61e883fb3d910
'2012-06-28T22:02:53-04:00'
describe
'591210' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEJS' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
68d43765b7b978808450d32b7c129d9b
366926da3e47c6dbac12b8cd3c357305da2ee076
describe
'515296' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEJT' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
72a6f9946349889afe3c3a82a5bd3faa
67accbb6ca2ea99bd4b92ccfff454117ceca1865
describe
'592029' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEJU' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
efb9116fdb7a1d65e6150e6109264061
5653396900fcb54261886189db13113f535dbc54
describe
'532005' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEJV' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
3dafeed3edf2fc5e4ba7eab652fb47d7
945ba8a0bf1ffe447f144610d9977dc976ffdf30
'2012-06-28T22:00:28-04:00'
describe
'597894' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEJW' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
2ff547c06bbb47c147a29088a4532cbb
6aa957b496d89262dcca46f5a15efa04dd10bf80
describe
'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEJX' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
a34b2d38031b372a42ea22e0cb0f9070
8ec9d2106fdebd908982f375184d15f81608dd48
describe
'600939' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEJY' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
ff576e6ee37254a96794dd58712bb35f
8b1603939210591e1efc00444eb239113c83e1de
describe
'597153' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEJZ' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
72eda122f9a28a2b4cfce0d91e182174
7d37b0a4bd0fa66031fff199f257bdcafc932c7a
describe
'594558' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEKA' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
f58ec6beb8e316b3e2b7fbae93d3c64c
fc6489fd04fe465bdb2aa9b6367627a73e1f26b9
describe
'503113' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEKB' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
1388239b7e974e0cb723e98bc7119418
660538ac3bdf8c680caa7964b7097207c28e310c
describe
'597130' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEKC' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
9d05387f75bdb75a5640246c60557d7a
5dd0a847e4fef574a8b9695743fd776de92d7932
'2012-06-28T21:52:59-04:00'
describe
'591209' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEKD' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
03f17a3ad0e4ba5d1091433640f1e313
51d1188d630fa42803129f5eaba7ee2c19af2db2
'2012-06-28T21:55:44-04:00'
describe
'583694' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEKE' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
adf24d3698b0f3d5193faf7a39dc7407
188df6f0672710207a7b4d66f33ecce8546df5de
describe
'503431' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEKF' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
d5830de677532d743234587665e46a5e
581e01906c36679971c234d0cfcfca906a2b3d6c
'2012-06-28T21:59:24-04:00'
describe
'583754' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEKG' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
ad415c84a4b446a2bc5f5e3a857267e2
b8eb9c209686002306b33928e36e18e4b4953434
describe
'597163' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEKH' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
7e7af8ab7018236152c937e3c47fbe6b
4d37eb7049129e3bf4049a00046e22098809e07e
describe
'583730' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEKI' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
d5c7c6b61e118f5256ba762bbcb20ee0
f84dcef0b03c2b90b27a04004cae378df0b1c273
'2012-06-28T21:53:10-04:00'
describe
'597100' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEKJ' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
9f610babdd030d52aef9a4e0340a5ecd
754153ecb642bc1e1047303c4dcbe85ca44770b8
'2012-06-28T21:53:00-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEKK' 'sip-files00140.jp2'
3096e1deb6e67b71b00029a30567f594
c73ed9e51ee0672335fa08dd0fd869d1fb692777
describe
'499889' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEKL' 'sip-files00144.jp2'
1cd4fd80122c6a7274e05a35680cd813
92316e5794d97b7ee3e9a90eb6cf661a6ed36da4
describe
'520470' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEKM' 'sip-files00145.jp2'
5731c522e323cd8f98b2ee6bdbd771cd
b503f97c1a6ddf6623ffa7a59f36ebeb053b1ead
'2012-06-28T22:01:46-04:00'
describe
'521284' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEKN' 'sip-files00146.jp2'
ab505b689ea847a2aa99efa707724a99
aaa70192965060c51f21a422aaeceda02a9985fb
'2012-06-28T22:01:50-04:00'
describe
'501308' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEKO' 'sip-files00150.jp2'
4c092d2548aedda93522eb158aec161a
e8f440b0640d9806dce24a101e60474aa014f12a
describe
'519643' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEKP' 'sip-files00151.jp2'
4d9cfc4fbf1793266c2c63becec265ca
62dd46d4232fc955b547f39becaf40a834efb386
describe
'517536' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEKQ' 'sip-files00154.jp2'
9bf72c1b84d27f41f057285634324b5a
c9d1ed96d8440efc3c74d91f8b3b7edfbff05117
describe
'527570' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEKR' 'sip-files00156.jp2'
b68f87548c5a3e9cc95976b278f835ad
c1665bf7d35c6a14e15d8f1b20ec09ae446c6bc8
describe
'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEKS' 'sip-files00157.jp2'
36e874fbaf443bccbe7a4427152179a4
9cc56d869802f783e69ff0c20fea029a5e96ffa0
describe
'583751' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEKT' 'sip-files00158.jp2'
e3551809f4fb062c136f68566f47a3f6
50326d04182444aa5f0fd74fbb63074c540824dc
'2012-06-28T21:55:10-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEKU' 'sip-files00162.jp2'
4770dbf99eefb90425437085344a26d7
106fdf5f3f658963eb68f7a6ab274be988b2a1f0
describe
'583757' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEKV' 'sip-files00164.jp2'
4f753b9cb46723f6664442a92947679f
ca3243c08eb628a753fa619fdd6088e81412f2fe
describe
'516050' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEKW' 'sip-files00165.jp2'
e67d6a138806d1b4e62b0df7f7523619
2ffd44ada1671b00a00a5344c4fb07f5642ed908
'2012-06-28T21:55:42-04:00'
describe
'509159' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEKX' 'sip-files00167.jp2'
e1e288ce645807800449ef6e72479f4f
7f65d02ea14043f91ea6b7422d3c5d8c43fac358
'2012-06-28T22:03:20-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEKY' 'sip-files00170.jp2'
44d5d40947deb95f4a8170f054c0b24d
6d7ae316fe3204924c297f0e1372300e5ed8713d
describe
'518230' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEKZ' 'sip-files00171.jp2'
6b2d9b4e766705bbc07aec18a30d4454
6098062c39d590448af98f01f6547606f6066197
describe
'651060' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABELA' 'sip-files00178.jp2'
3f373294820c49f87534b0ed59952e96
1ba4689623bf23c4ae56fe0e2888fa3d6b796707
describe
'111036' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABELB' 'sip-files00179.jp2'
e4fbf4a7369f0fb140d4b702962f764b
a29c052f7878576e2f6e3d6cb1a8f023f00c7dda
'2012-06-28T21:59:35-04:00'
describe
'4471396' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABELC' 'sip-files00007.tif'
9171419c4fd066df1d61f982090db42a
e98c33de59a008af8eb076cb821a3caa39bdcc4b
'2012-06-28T22:00:43-04:00'
describe
'4299332' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABELD' 'sip-files00012.tif'
73ade8c18aaf91eb3dfa3a02e4670c94
0134727f6f012e4cd6912815ac03e1372a8e7038
'2012-06-28T21:59:44-04:00'
describe
'4183216' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABELE' 'sip-files00016.tif'
f70799a91a139aefdb98122ef407b48e
0fe3cfeba7fbb5c8da2de4381feaad4e8b67bc8e
describe
'4665476' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABELF' 'sip-files00017.tif'
bd0224d3af595ea2e150b0f0a874e514
f7d00af9d4fd8618482134b6eea76b29e63806f3
describe
'4699916' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABELG' 'sip-files00019.tif'
ca7f599f82c373ccb1a02daf82531ae2
3886b4598fab8a408d06739f898369dd70a957f8
'2012-06-28T21:59:03-04:00'
describe
'4612736' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABELH' 'sip-files00021.tif'
7e29371a7a91c44154e9255f1ea2a9c8
a256789473b1fa854fff48a79ff22340c838811c
describe
'4575800' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABELI' 'sip-files00022.tif'
cbf0233293f930a30893f2c7ec7588ab
d6602bfcf5c09652bcf2b816f1fff7bbb83aaec3
describe
'4312216' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABELJ' 'sip-files00025.tif'
67159ead5432e54c5915274872b8c53a
926c8277fa4ff70b0aeda5c4b4819210b1409232
'2012-06-28T22:03:26-04:00'
describe
'4663528' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABELK' 'sip-files00029.tif'
0210925051e2b19f3e8f00f941f72825
0e1a9fbfef8f818a3c1e53807727008279793cb8
'2012-06-28T22:01:11-04:00'
describe
'4295728' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABELL' 'sip-files00032.tif'
7ecb0e6e1545e5538475b99bbf1f4fff
0358a689974c8d872ef6182e8e33a709124c28ca
describe
'4436248' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABELM' 'sip-files00033.tif'
b68d1b7abb7650c3d840bbb717834d71
fd0208cb17b78a79921df5e0496c27259cf73b92
describe
'4622680' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABELN' 'sip-files00034.tif'
b3ad1a15ddc70f7b0ac1d934cbfb8eb4
42105dedf195a15d9f9afea1770106a3152d491c
describe
'4670084' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABELO' 'sip-files00036.tif'
ce97e78ef9d6686c34c229c6f15e62a1
785e734d9c5de85ef559689e8d22ea09fb2994fe
'2012-06-28T22:01:54-04:00'
describe
'4756772' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABELP' 'sip-files00041.tif'
8b2aa0c8081920d668a6977b555861d2
8b4c027393e0d855bf3f471bd19adc537d2a4e35
describe
'4756168' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABELQ' 'sip-files00043.tif'
c575785a26175e6bb582afd4acca74b0
48289b752606d049b2912799b6be62b5a8edd0d5
describe
'4314380' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABELR' 'sip-files00044.tif'
7a524e7df260a558fe5b5a1766b1aca2
ecea04250155ee787ac95965eb268672f350bdae
'2012-06-28T22:02:49-04:00'
describe
'4754660' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABELS' 'sip-files00045.tif'
7a8af1cd7b9a8f8d87eef13b58f5584a
56853d6c7eccd81345ff6da733ed38d04e7a9378
'2012-06-28T22:02:59-04:00'
describe
'4619440' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABELT' 'sip-files00047.tif'
4f5072d5a183f22ff7aa81d39510951d
1598ec4cf8599121da5481dbdfa054def4fa56bf
'2012-06-28T21:53:12-04:00'
describe
'4761336' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABELU' 'sip-files00048.tif'
8603ea76eb999f8c90d6f8bfc4315b41
8d8720e431a3421a244188f5c074eb8410661b22
describe
'4488184' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABELV' 'sip-files00049.tif'
3714c2ec852f67de12a14357e01a0101
bcd6e6aaded1748cb72b7d059b09270dbdea7b47
'2012-06-28T21:53:17-04:00'
describe
'4761716' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABELW' 'sip-files00050.tif'
75327ab668e7752010c0a740052ab335
30cf4d873a796814a796ee16ab80c267d2fab3fd
'2012-06-28T21:58:07-04:00'
describe
'4407088' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABELX' 'sip-files00051.tif'
2c6d388c3360f475de45bdb657a0970c
2d17a2082c01aeb2631f1bf3629fc331bdf2913b
'2012-06-28T22:02:56-04:00'
describe
'4183468' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABELY' 'sip-files00052.tif'
517873af362bd4fc97d58a3c35f49321
a486385e32ecdaa54889aa4d4674e7e1bbc96d09
'2012-06-28T21:56:07-04:00'
describe
'4846004' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABELZ' 'sip-files00055.tif'
592785b9f1796aeed8d9565d65cd069a
97f824d2a2c5ad825f9ee5fe7768e32e208b35c3
'2012-06-28T21:56:18-04:00'
describe
'4758740' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEMA' 'sip-files00057.tif'
957bb1aef2b35143875398b671584e17
82a80fdeda48915cfbe208d4a5606fdf3cf65573
'2012-06-28T21:56:25-04:00'
describe
'4190428' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEMB' 'sip-files00058.tif'
88a5385fbea91149ff5f0baa6985751b
b1872535d2999c9f39608612a36cd2c81ab9e96f
describe
'4830120' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEMC' 'sip-files00060.tif'
4bac4f393139971b1f750ac07ed3cc4f
9c253187f60c5488158331f8ab388517edbbc59f
'2012-06-28T21:53:25-04:00'
describe
'4829616' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEMD' 'sip-files00062.tif'
5a466ee740baaf52860134c9d674b93a
8ced48ff4bd78655ad88966e6217002537742ac2
'2012-06-28T21:55:14-04:00'
describe
'4829648' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEME' 'sip-files00066.tif'
241364353981b4397acb16bac0651d68
a5e73413c6a824a6288c6de017d3b54b6a99d5b0
'2012-06-28T22:00:30-04:00'
describe
'4429468' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEMF' 'sip-files00069.tif'
6ba66b37dcd8392dbe2848154e5ac165
72f0cd9d523f68c2c82a392fc678f0d277a899b6
describe
'4348888' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEMG' 'sip-files00070.tif'
8bc9b37b36ac25d86ec5130b603fa7b3
837d2ca96d7693aff1124819224e8e9b7791d193
describe
'4791724' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEMH' 'sip-files00071.tif'
80d52c5067a4ea63892f24cbbb4c3f4d
036fd1841a188fbcf1db79ba0de586953e2386a5
'2012-06-28T22:02:26-04:00'
describe
'4381216' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEMI' 'sip-files00073.tif'
e974803dfaf0492a0dd277114a89b992
3d19e2560be17e50b28474e20a1656c1a57d5994
describe
'4331568' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEMJ' 'sip-files00074.tif'
58a10f2c85d2c9a2374423dba092fef3
91db712b0ad47609a39a2a39b549f6d8b9995106
describe
'4022244' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEMK' 'sip-files00075.tif'
4a1c395ecb99d3fde6d6ae557f68ed60
216267c0264ae3b00415ae9067e2a32105d11eed
'2012-06-28T21:53:54-04:00'
describe
'4767348' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEML' 'sip-files00076.tif'
7a3c8da2f59977a62ce2c0067cee8110
e432d41feb19e8f52916c0aaf6a8f0df5897f146
'2012-06-28T21:54:18-04:00'
describe
'4342764' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEMM' 'sip-files00077.tif'
bc0c0bcad2b17ea19f0c58f92b3fc6e4
cab3f64bf2069fb51fd1d3e2711dc0df6e32dbab
'2012-06-28T21:55:05-04:00'
describe
'4771612' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEMN' 'sip-files00078.tif'
488fd241f53fd3d176bcc33be55e1ee9
c22c75e82eb1ec187c90fb5a426bffc463116028
describe
'4832336' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEMO' 'sip-files00079.tif'
181587dad8f38a55ab11e917ee17f8fe
de6e0a836f172c47e2801883d740ab35bfce15b2
'2012-06-28T22:01:36-04:00'
describe
'4172392' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEMP' 'sip-files00081.tif'
d169a1ecbffcb4ffb16097b5eb6396b1
bb44474443fcf06f5df7611fd5edefaf21c66c36
'2012-06-28T22:00:48-04:00'
describe
'4297644' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEMQ' 'sip-files00082.tif'
7ab6c44470b98c2ff153ec5c5d56f973
1b315c867629b5833569c8971ed491a7cede62f4
describe
'4770796' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEMR' 'sip-files00084.tif'
215e45b0f9ab0510e2e12e0b189dee42
ca03f7f337a6e3ab570af02aa1004a44e4afe6a3
'2012-06-28T21:55:55-04:00'
describe
'4380824' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEMS' 'sip-files00085.tif'
93b05a7af284b56338f8231441e13151
3f28edb9f40188bf8fb8f18425611ecdc6e827ed
describe
'4771116' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEMT' 'sip-files00086.tif'
340a15f47b06fe84c0801d175f862d4c
8f4b3ade637648ea7d8a8c857ec164357f3fc08f
'2012-06-28T21:53:02-04:00'
describe
'4300984' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEMU' 'sip-files00087.tif'
089fca4d0c0c9da226dd5ef381317296
fe7801b9ff86ff7b12d52fa4481959992427e61f
describe
'4832776' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEMV' 'sip-files00089.tif'
3bc519bd60ba9f09a2e34e7f7cb89ea7
42793965de1e6f05b692fc216a2884e8a8608e56
describe
'4420240' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEMW' 'sip-files00098.tif'
2645582e393fa92a28ccdbf8b738039a
e9388306cefa2f9e548b9528836687572c20fb55
describe
'4796536' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEMX' 'sip-files00101.tif'
887c95966b84c0614f07fd88d7a4dafb
a0b18af3f49e058ca00e09d6c16eee00f5554ebc
describe
'4789432' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEMY' 'sip-files00102.tif'
960aa77c7cb0e108e65fcd64a4d36156
cc0eed757448bcbebf9ca467f85a4f468847c8f0
describe
'4789224' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEMZ' 'sip-files00104.tif'
13e41e5c5706fe12fe47c5d0caf6db45
ef7cdc4612bb253549d03bfdbcaad1354f1161ff
describe
'4789356' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABENA' 'sip-files00106.tif'
25861e71f9fa850f6ea4811d8b1c95aa
7ec0b52328b2c08dd6c96c3710c93d9b811980e1
'2012-06-28T22:01:12-04:00'
describe
'4792216' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABENB' 'sip-files00107.tif'
f3c05fbb762df23f9d02f9aa48206d76
e600803195d6142cc3aab400c024871dfb0fbfdd
describe
'3954792' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABENC' 'sip-files00108.tif'
752b9abfeb11fc5cdabacdd99173ec7a
bdab58cc4fea87640551a9dba44721b3b304a834
describe
'4768296' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEND' 'sip-files00110.tif'
527829a9d6a2deff2f00ef4263abd6d8
bff73bb7869cf9efa8db85f56467888f1f6649dd
'2012-06-28T21:53:36-04:00'
describe
'4364900' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABENE' 'sip-files00111.tif'
29b8e1da28b286f72dfd056e0d8d525f
4bb3697ba2c366ae46bb93e94bcff5a9419d9970
'2012-06-28T22:02:42-04:00'
describe
'4495160' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABENF' 'sip-files00113.tif'
809bc43d3a80e453a29b901ea82ccca1
03e917a8f97f5604a1dbfbb7f9e710dfcac25447
describe
'4787736' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABENG' 'sip-files00117.tif'
5eb4f3fcdc51b5b3b5dcd11b42954097
1fdb95d1f7ab5521daa72da495cbc0c00562bb27
describe
'4789676' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABENH' 'sip-files00119.tif'
53893bee66f51ca3253603eaf5b3de96
02436406e271e29c17e31d3ebd3a4563e6236128
describe
'4768532' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABENI' 'sip-files00120.tif'
5f8e58f49be86a5c4def33e13d86f33b
235345af3a883e6801a8171448a8b3b55117d5e8
describe
'4036380' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABENJ' 'sip-files00124.tif'
8146fea86a1087d129b82567339d59d8
dc18c66fa7382b21c9824dbaa03bc65a7493b817
'2012-06-28T22:00:54-04:00'
describe
'4789660' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABENK' 'sip-files00137.tif'
99fa94abc8f84a35939961b9cd189e3d
1e93a49b862d71a8069bc301b588d9fab2bcc15e
describe
'4789752' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABENL' 'sip-files00139.tif'
3a54f93a290084735489d8b334610172
cb5d735782e4b7b91f851ac5f26a3357c45a7e88
describe
'4193136' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABENM' 'sip-files00142.tif'
c7cae0b1ee56a7c0463994c9d4c877ae
72bdb05b278953902845b23c0e63b9997ece4c6a
'2012-06-28T21:55:53-04:00'
describe
'3837368' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABENN' 'sip-files00148.tif'
b9c985aeec96e1fed51b15bcdac86ece
04cbd35519f4f6f594ba68c616ccb16438113ee6
describe
'4022916' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABENO' 'sip-files00150.tif'
6f12038672fd71e924fd261f6cd8d1ad
a2dd5eeb9ed94fc267ee4250a7f6845ba973f614
'2012-06-28T21:53:58-04:00'
describe
'4169308' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABENP' 'sip-files00151.tif'
dbe83ffc9502367e3586160300d3abd4
4cbb822afd71c34178b4a950353c4b77f0270772
describe
'4232232' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABENQ' 'sip-files00156.tif'
a559672c7c6306f81e62fded03b6367d
7e9f5d8c502296f4bc90ff8a9b97b7ea3c74849f
'2012-06-28T22:01:37-04:00'
describe
'4744904' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABENR' 'sip-files00157.tif'
037e220a275bf659c0125a1ade1e7b50
42709836ef16055bbe8fcd1fca9a92a5a527998b
'2012-06-28T21:57:46-04:00'
describe
'4682080' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABENS' 'sip-files00160.tif'
9e91dea0805e1ba71edb014333fadabb
749b27a5651dd26007628455688787401a091da8
'2012-06-28T21:56:01-04:00'
describe
'4682116' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABENT' 'sip-files00162.tif'
3a406a602c03d5e5deccaaff4a446f89
b996c64941e7f332eb4abba0010656a51a97efb5
describe
'4681564' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABENU' 'sip-files00164.tif'
02633f3ad79227d7b7070c567a2a79d0
9e4b262ba56928623902d8af4d331894ce9a7f9a
describe
'4141188' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABENV' 'sip-files00165.tif'
84f0fa6434c44882476769e1601ac5a8
b1394fc07c4d53464d9a8b9551db203de780c4f3
describe
'4187256' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABENW' 'sip-files00166.tif'
0ee29addc33a748a955f125121725539
0e584f08ef331335d308248f63dcc8e78092724e
describe
'4159052' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABENX' 'sip-files00171.tif'
3efaafd84c1b3afe84005e73600dde75
e8fd29ed991d646cf33a6d077f1f39d4d956078b
'2012-06-28T21:54:05-04:00'
describe
'1458' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABENY' 'sip-files00002.pro'
d582d337fb0a374d60354a43d0fc72e9
ad5a23823b0b434ff4c626f7a1afbacd458133ac
describe
'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABENZ' 'sip-files00003.pro'
a61a570e4a54e37b75902b6d5a8d631e
04514958f5eb8bf94aac7738ca9f8c44ef6a0f5c
describe
'803' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEOA' 'sip-files00007.pro'
a466f45e9125b8cf2ceb06049572afbe
c65dd50f067098b31b1c69f60372a3e170171815
'2012-06-28T21:53:44-04:00'
describe
'6687' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEOB' 'sip-files00011.pro'
218b896371dfc0f439b69d4bdbd72fc4
018709a163f24b999610e0d8f9d0ac2a4a2d5063
'2012-06-28T21:57:21-04:00'
describe
'21939' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEOC' 'sip-files00013.pro'
2096a3e3104f8302b873998890c5ce02
119e309828ccc36cbe16d9412d5af81bfff9da87
describe
'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEOD' 'sip-files00014.pro'
2bb310bde751ad31a626130ed2c59133
d88bb3a59387f23da92678f80e4f163f1c5d4591
describe
'43970' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEOE' 'sip-files00017.pro'
29449c5ea3583fa902976952e37f36a7
0cbbe93420307d44235a4e0b8a274703b29d5fc7
describe
'25744' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEOF' 'sip-files00018.pro'
c09ccfd84bee9729a11d969370178d25
67d8adefe48f1de4793e71467b1e455a42536d84
'2012-06-28T21:58:09-04:00'
describe
'44485' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEOG' 'sip-files00019.pro'
3c0e906bd92a2bdd102332126c92c6be
d11ea0ea90b810f813fb9c53757ea2b7f49061e6
describe
'22512' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEOH' 'sip-files00022.pro'
df9697d6ec04726d1c6b6cc72c7dd81a
73f1395aa30d323d83a162b16d1d80a0e2b5bcc7
describe
'44227' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEOI' 'sip-files00036.pro'
06d42820157027cc05be03b5f3ca64d4
3db8a20051787e563158fe75841e27369d0618c1
describe
'30140' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEOJ' 'sip-files00038.pro'
a272185b4e4327278497abf4abe182eb
8958e99e769241068518a2d22a091309da1924ae
describe
'36853' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEOK' 'sip-files00039.pro'
4192e349b5c70a6644ce424e360419d7
0b055f6f43c2094b012a311c3235d162703ace08
'2012-06-28T22:01:09-04:00'
describe
'39673' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEOL' 'sip-files00042.pro'
f86796a9d717a4a99f21ecd4af36d903
3dda451cfdc155742d6c7af38c6eabaef99646dc
describe
'16415' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEOM' 'sip-files00043.pro'
ff82c544cdcbe66d1922a695b3d900be
af3735c85687c547e4749a88f514e0d8c90b26d4
describe
'22288' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEON' 'sip-files00045.pro'
836b8f490ee5dcfb15923cececcf70ef
335c56edd14238565c32c84bee7d488dfa246a88
describe
'33631' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEOO' 'sip-files00047.pro'
73fdc78a5b0250b52134b3a2c6c8e573
1b1d21330eef69ac1f96709a4d120a1b088e037f
describe
'41883' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEOP' 'sip-files00048.pro'
f5b8277b28a135b033a432d5bacf0aa3
8ba11b4a4cb69b22164b0c2e962978fe25d771f7
describe
'36391' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEOQ' 'sip-files00049.pro'
d9bc8016707d9a0845ab86aebcc8ea6a
88cbc797e02949dbeed7eee26f467460e4a65a4a
describe
'21667' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEOR' 'sip-files00051.pro'
f5cbd0faa864d68b60920a5f2a1c68e8
7757cecbc45f7d10356bacc0a60cef6cf6c7afeb
describe
'27136' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEOS' 'sip-files00052.pro'
5ec75a3a659f67f163f148df4b71d419
3705e189586259a61e80569e207b174fe9afa30d
describe
'43864' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEOT' 'sip-files00054.pro'
8f9a4649f0f0296ae2f1f911a0eb4a32
e156b88cd73da533909ca958459bc1a250484389
describe
'37592' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEOU' 'sip-files00055.pro'
1c1c78ed5725798fac30570705cbc6c6
7e30940c9f7fdc77efc3e3bc732eb2b85210fa45
describe
'28511' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEOV' 'sip-files00056.pro'
d74854128becbe824419a1f148d5975e
7e1b83b18e95cfd4e660d272b0319705f0416506
'2012-06-28T22:01:03-04:00'
describe
'36630' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEOW' 'sip-files00057.pro'
fca4d5efaf3d34208623bbbd094a7f90
08b288ef0a64576361e2787be79f5de05ceb1f8c
describe
'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEOX' 'sip-files00059.pro'
fc12f28ec8e2c610a8a627bcc3e7fe89
09f70309554342ab7cca8c16bc3281e80deb6dcf
describe
'6557' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEOY' 'sip-files00060.pro'
19d5f748ee2b1c4fabd55d9006f76bc1
00acde9cf0f004f364486bd8e859be7256cd48f5
describe
'35816' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEOZ' 'sip-files00061.pro'
87842120b96cde04c79a9d00a732ab46
631e2f880a504a57499b2b5a93c220b52e169a3e
describe
'42505' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEPA' 'sip-files00068.pro'
4a0079372449e29a504bcc3e8045724d
a5f546e35ab9ec5ab94c56418ebd46ce106b437b
describe
'40208' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEPB' 'sip-files00070.pro'
f2dd539705633d78cc1dc7de7733f389
e3659b55c50c2440e1f174ca03fc6ef4a6bda765
describe
'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEPC' 'sip-files00072.pro'
bbf6899441d761a9ccd0536a7648430b
d433ec967e045c47ef7b2ca8fec19264ad33528b
describe
'42851' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEPD' 'sip-files00073.pro'
112b6598ca3e0f9b3966352a6b9c814e
cd5ca6cbf602915ba5a6a82186d60f5018312729
describe
'42220' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEPE' 'sip-files00074.pro'
f3ea48279a187488c1b1b9a2265cea0e
8e0fe6315a4b1816cd187077e89d297f1762ec4d
'2012-06-28T22:02:18-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEPF' 'sip-files00076.pro'
5f9fd467dccd3e9e4ef5904599032294
246c621cd1769e62d7df11844009b83b9efbbe5a
'2012-06-28T21:59:05-04:00'
describe
'42762' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEPG' 'sip-files00077.pro'
4551168b329e59ba02d8e61e6a56b11d
90ad9728bf634ce4a32479da97a86e965ae3ee5b
describe
'40134' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEPH' 'sip-files00078.pro'
669517f93e77accdd3be2dae840b779d
79d403a61f16e738d9972b512d8528902ea1ddc4
describe
'33350' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEPI' 'sip-files00080.pro'
030390acaf7c236bed054565103ff25f
f9125a3940b9939528d31b24965d4aff99ce4dd5
'2012-06-28T21:55:28-04:00'
describe
'44153' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEPJ' 'sip-files00081.pro'
4a386d9f7a8863253e5b297536cda632
172106f0ef05cc9fcc5178be86f5f14ef95b5d94
describe
'40038' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEPK' 'sip-files00082.pro'
d3e441ef8abfa35225a65d2d297cd480
6bdb2555bec4e2217086a3c59e3bb4318d25ae06
describe
'10810' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEPL' 'sip-files00091.pro'
33a4172ccb875e8b97175899ed524b99
9ad223bf36cd1ca18ac2e377395b9c79d7c379d6
describe
'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEPM' 'sip-files00092.pro'
b02e817f73162054f188cad7b5ece564
8b15413880e66da4bb2c3b6a7d1a72de8f189e5c
describe
'13537' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEPN' 'sip-files00093.pro'
74117f088dec6bbdbd09357c1c944b80
181c009fbc4246f315e31277a515642809349c53
describe
'32847' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEPO' 'sip-files00094.pro'
63e31a5fc1b9cc6a8fae0bf7f163ab20
d9130e3eb1488db2f71b3e87530bc95799880b96
describe
'42197' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEPP' 'sip-files00095.pro'
211381700ab3778cb9b7fc60aad80894
c2e20053766538e7c2eb02db6a4e143f8843bb26
'2012-06-28T21:56:53-04:00'
describe
'39750' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEPQ' 'sip-files00096.pro'
58dd9eb5ee3dba7e57b55c7e22fe2d91
2be51beacc3d804b120f152b3d77e6f9a65b03c0
describe
'41467' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEPR' 'sip-files00097.pro'
73244cc649f575f44d993251ec9e9e7b
22bdc06d466eab3fec4f503fc6890182a73badbd
describe
'27457' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEPS' 'sip-files00098.pro'
e5a5b69dfcae9fa677c254e34abeffee
27f41861973fc1a22360cebe80265ce6d6a515cc
describe
'43124' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEPT' 'sip-files00100.pro'
dd4e8399ff5b341fd1efd082c533cfae
84ee6307323668111cb0795309d069b7b023f1a6
describe
'44090' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEPU' 'sip-files00101.pro'
3986842b9c2996319e558cd94544fac7
9c9a03601bfc1423d7daad3cc7ab66fd8c4c9400
describe
'44302' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEPV' 'sip-files00103.pro'
00cc4f5a7f9fa3fb2d88a24d0d54232e
eabb6942d7d2b6f8f19330c3eaa31dd7fd32c1a7
describe
'41986' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEPW' 'sip-files00104.pro'
59be42436876b630f41fe70143818d38
b56f30c7b897ae0e76455c158379b742e7e5843b
describe
'42381' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEPX' 'sip-files00105.pro'
f2b6513fbf92af09a067ebf01f7764c2
36f9d58d9d6997bcad39b4c062d44b962cbecf9f
describe
'45795' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEPY' 'sip-files00106.pro'
1261643d4ac246560091a4a61fc4a655
bc28ed25e3a50d4f03bfcecd5387d2ac932500bd
'2012-06-28T22:02:58-04:00'
describe
'43440' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEPZ' 'sip-files00109.pro'
9b411812bb9bc7f77fb369a9aa024ffa
77f63b990b18e70e0a8b8e5d05d93464a9d5fd48
describe
'42658' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEQA' 'sip-files00110.pro'
5c9ad282f0091c3d33dec53bceed7bd4
1f1153ae6d4b23832175351c4323f70f33f76af7
describe
'36510' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEQB' 'sip-files00112.pro'
0b81a58f361f051d757c646bb6232783
44476c99a85a525afa52eb868446be5a05f71365
'2012-06-28T22:01:18-04:00'
describe
'38248' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEQC' 'sip-files00113.pro'
c3576234167f297e6f5bf5c478c9c3a4
24f0b1e849b6eb9dd3c0746c1f3f147bafdefcf4
describe
'28494' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEQD' 'sip-files00114.pro'
b87b2bad0f8b6fcabb027931c29a9b48
2bff5f316329a6f63f9fbde0626ee6e627c489ff
describe
'22736' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEQE' 'sip-files00119.pro'
89fbdf55a76d6cdfd9c083fc77a4bf4f
04866641d125f35f9f2fdb37e4bde85e00c8687b
'2012-06-28T22:01:25-04:00'
describe
'40928' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEQF' 'sip-files00122.pro'
273cc01b873915204ba8c4ec5da40e3c
d90eac768e5c7c96006f5d2d29a4db074e88f139
describe
'42202' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEQG' 'sip-files00123.pro'
c385a96d625ec601b5b2c9501eb5eef3
ee3c9214a35c09bd91ac3d3e6abdb920fd017c08
describe
'5445' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEQH' 'sip-files00128.pro'
d94340855c7bc8a2cbc6359ab10bd7d6
ba4bb0b67479e392dd55851f7a9710a96beec97b
describe
'41647' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEQI' 'sip-files00129.pro'
5b3815272eb44841c3c888e7b1ed4cb4
05edac75a98c78124caf98ec1d1cc03aa35acc77
describe
'12727' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEQJ' 'sip-files00132.pro'
762e1c2cd842bcdd4a557e88cbd8095e
8e722436a48001afa7d24025e132cfb1815fcb19
describe
'44403' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEQK' 'sip-files00133.pro'
8e6e6671d40bc2a7ec906b05d3a9061d
c6852ab4288092e40ffe8142aa55b5ea3241989c
describe
'45894' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEQL' 'sip-files00139.pro'
27a7b4ac11cbd4e8a9f49cb7e77b144a
36c78c8d2400a2b30e38409f2676b43b6df29d4e
describe
'46016' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEQM' 'sip-files00144.pro'
c49028ffa8b990e8fc805df83dc27c0a
5954092d72b634e17c79539d30a04c8d03154c86
describe
'25927' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEQN' 'sip-files00145.pro'
d1ad12fe8daeedf9c6d2d22eb428b8c5
f7582ff378856399cfabb7e67b5c3b7cf9803035
describe
'40789' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEQO' 'sip-files00146.pro'
0654bea292ed1ba1da206903ceaa8366
3207b0a289d9e0aac882a97d3ec2d81d3903ab9d
describe
'209' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEQP' 'sip-files00147.pro'
abd9b895af1a6b113725d3e9ab44190b
df2a8bb73e0bdbfa922c25103d036dd9ec7af658
describe
'40373' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEQQ' 'sip-files00149.pro'
0e1c724b02c1122de2924d999ca3eaf9
8cc070d5ec8510a79e50af50fa50d821a6287a33
'2012-06-28T21:55:20-04:00'
describe
'40360' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEQR' 'sip-files00150.pro'
d153fa4166235d7d21a2d64d1ea0a808
a48c0e9926776fde67c3e823433153ee672ab286
describe
'41077' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEQS' 'sip-files00152.pro'
e31f5811d77a688240367ac31fc9e779
27599d5574159a973ac3d51c115f0d97032eb772
describe
'34419' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEQT' 'sip-files00157.pro'
e5c3c2bb5cfec15fb973e3a60a22e332
96431343d484d7643709a3b2bfefe7d8a605d3a5
'2012-06-28T21:58:37-04:00'
describe
'44924' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEQU' 'sip-files00158.pro'
63d2371c78d3c99648c412f77e07067a
3b3bc1e638dbf360e321c76b79fbc4546d4196dd
describe
'42638' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEQV' 'sip-files00159.pro'
edcf8f4af08235504b34b2fe27c65a50
00156179fdbf3c1ae874ca1919ddb5d366a5ced4
describe
'40149' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEQW' 'sip-files00162.pro'
2190df19ec5aed0e1eacb66f35240544
e35e2f2601372ae166d2d849c81ed3d693ff327f
describe
'39657' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEQX' 'sip-files00163.pro'
04fb2f6a63032dc7e491e4e52fbf37bd
fb940a7225f46653512534b1638be36875b01d97
describe
'37694' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEQY' 'sip-files00166.pro'
94a04e9f5a2afc19e5a125728912d24d
17faf0e500ddc10cc5c9510a03c6793dc3c6e460
describe
'147795' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEQZ' 'sip-files00169.pro'
19e9719713d63bc89244628c0015d0ae
c4c939fb0a96f19baf8192d84c36710b18b62ab1
describe
'180160' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABERA' 'sip-files00171.pro'
a9f0ceb638bdddaf5dee846a73b91608
4182b92e3c8b775d2b171eab5bb9693968a34b18
describe
'323' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABERB' 'sip-files00179.pro'
a68cfb7ba316e1a68bec227337aadc9b
26f11c9dfe4d60edd477eff791c80605bcf915a4
describe
'109' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABERC' 'sip-files00001.txt'
d300d12e02262d8eacb9c34b4e309899
b5b342e0a9a796d09b6198c7c6aaad6d76410064
'2012-06-28T21:53:59-04:00'
describe
'54' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABERD' 'sip-files00007.txt'
1aaac28200ce50fac619786707255ecd
270f12b69df95b209d59119b1897bc2ba035750b
describe
'569' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABERE' 'sip-files00010.txt'
f0346e1828c7eb99ebde6502e2737eb7
e01f32bc9a93b6295efc7d8a6b57fc00024d41c3
describe
Invalid character
'1055' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABERF' 'sip-files00013.txt'
8ff2a775730b27a583a52088a0f64c12
ae56348cea7a773265ee98b1e7a589edeee93350
describe
'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABERG' 'sip-files00015.txt'
c1f6e9d4598125266eb0f9b2305bc836
6ee3a40b07bdb66015c26ea852b56e443282daf0
'2012-06-28T21:58:24-04:00'
describe
'1779' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABERH' 'sip-files00019.txt'
735366b945010b9378199dee3ee38384
78951917e2944630e32d9a7845da514c0587602a
'2012-06-28T21:54:41-04:00'
describe
'1837' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABERI' 'sip-files00021.txt'
afe92ce7cea5190e0e5457d4a8ea9b0e
5e6abab4da1c392042d55dcf277058069c6592f5
describe
'1702' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABERJ' 'sip-files00023.txt'
bc3671606ece09ef8ba5c7df78774fa6
d8ed6d5ef1bf74638a9fcc59e62af2e78c2ae9c5
describe
'1628' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABERK' 'sip-files00027.txt'
03fb67cebab1b9ef63e3c247699b7a45
e0fb0888e8d28b0f50329293c08e9af0e25b0089
describe
'625' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABERL' 'sip-files00029.txt'
8f437dcf5fff24393c43ad006224defe
f6a68cc1cab957294cbb3872caeaaf55c76aad2c
describe
'957' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABERM' 'sip-files00031.txt'
035cb67fde99a2e09e69fb06084a3528
54e2c7754ae6515b6fa6b6b12ffef27ed90e3838
'2012-06-28T21:59:20-04:00'
describe
'779' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABERN' 'sip-files00033.txt'
2f2538db748e3e6166d6c78c4a969f9f
690c6a31e55597d80ce0b44416d3639da57a62b8
describe
'1487' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABERO' 'sip-files00034.txt'
321d8395058b1e9376927c8f24cb1726
12fb33c17a608a1d7ca84c7ec92e7a258a795a9a
describe
'1260' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABERP' 'sip-files00035.txt'
adf77d1ab3ee61c16dffa22e6a14f00b
6356834aab7dd962eed07c9f64d72d75cba72fca
'2012-06-28T22:00:10-04:00'
describe
'1532' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABERQ' 'sip-files00037.txt'
eb57b1e06e84dbe7ecf9ccda148b9126
b0826506be8e13768f6dea83ad12470e7fbdcdcb
describe
'1202' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABERR' 'sip-files00038.txt'
c929e5779c6edc4e1cce98748e5578bb
534c13932c74f44becddb889a97b5912069cfa33
describe
'1511' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABERS' 'sip-files00039.txt'
167233077c6920a7333ab3c8f8e1a58e
20fc0a9660771ef850a368f76baa79c6843984e8
describe
'1579' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABERT' 'sip-files00042.txt'
32c7b2489fd3781444501cd042bc077e
36a349b936d260b25137f779039e56dad64ed1da
describe
'1379' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABERU' 'sip-files00046.txt'
da1690e6f81053e7d6167727784b9f49
2a1549b3906e971c4b6a53711ee3cced2abd05d1
describe
'1392' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABERV' 'sip-files00047.txt'
6cbe448c8e863c7df57ef1a15f2dd73a
742bedd18a147028c1fc44b32d2d36c6c82e4811
describe
'1676' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABERW' 'sip-files00048.txt'
45d89b8306065d79627c076d9724e11c
9df01b5eea851ae3835c28ab482d8d350a6b35ca
'2012-06-28T21:54:44-04:00'
describe
'1477' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABERX' 'sip-files00049.txt'
f178877f218c524d5dd6a0472a043020
7aaae71388a4e59d1b614e209799097cf26e7375
describe
'1828' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABERY' 'sip-files00053.txt'
2152312c58656e33a6c98d9df5aff00a
66f9f8fe4786b978330952316347e791bb5d43ad
describe
'1730' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABERZ' 'sip-files00054.txt'
21e65bbd283370c28401eee4d3e7b7e7
8a2e0d9f4a3f4d853cc85235e50689f66750955c
describe
'1163' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABESA' 'sip-files00056.txt'
4158b7520ed23b53854d88298a024e82
7befbdf45f7289865b2924b3fb6440107835753b
describe
'1483' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABESB' 'sip-files00057.txt'
4c96862f19da84f306845f8ab72a7e27
cebd83c709c9259547b6814696d496c0cb82330e
describe
'751' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABESC' 'sip-files00058.txt'
4b5fcd34632dfd25e738067274252038
4815ba8848ea8b86c50deaafc924f2fb9930b816
'2012-06-28T21:59:32-04:00'
describe
'274' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABESD' 'sip-files00060.txt'
2dc7dd15444262ac14fd5150970bb763
7b909d097ae006c8a90e6d4fb0730c55318f0507
'2012-06-28T21:54:43-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'1705' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABESE' 'sip-files00064.txt'
341193acceb5c0c4ebe575b5ddd7331a
8e1bf29809a1c5346adbaa8d8580357edd3dfab3
'2012-06-28T21:59:18-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABESF' 'sip-files00066.txt'
91127b9112e80459ee4fb46fba4b56f5
9afb3043f6dcf74df2bc82730b4c4d0df683d867
describe
'1119' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABESG' 'sip-files00067.txt'
2bca200dd16423ee73ba3542fabe4354
d9eb3cdf6abbb9fb8f756919813f6e0e34962441
'2012-06-28T22:03:15-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'1693' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABESH' 'sip-files00068.txt'
f6f63d4e442220bc4f0cf5ccedf5856e
249c008c4ce5d65bc7821924f3b2f18df032447e
describe
'1585' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABESI' 'sip-files00071.txt'
e216fcee73dc2413d1cf4658ad6fbd5b
5a6b73641bce9ac7955dc444392930a893b0b43b
'2012-06-28T21:59:02-04:00'
describe
'914' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABESJ' 'sip-files00072.txt'
d74e8069530d1a1eb3a7cd868df200ff
a616c2a41e5242ac633352b46c40eaf182906f9d
'2012-06-28T21:53:22-04:00'
describe
'1713' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABESK' 'sip-files00073.txt'
d6a643d6c6d21cf73d9c2d9a92e0c5ac
63750f9038d9998bb24b58c07e84a798b7412c4a
'2012-06-28T21:59:55-04:00'
describe
'426' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABESL' 'sip-files00075.txt'
fdce6e8e9b90511029f83ec9db813b2a
47463fda2af32e7522fb809e39529deaf07b4c9f
'2012-06-28T22:02:11-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'1352' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABESM' 'sip-files00080.txt'
b37bcbe83aaf3260b1980255e39791da
dff4f6177afa17cf6f839ea14f02606ade87d1c1
describe
'1766' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABESN' 'sip-files00081.txt'
f1e0f88c1d1769f49303c68af0114fe9
16a2bb0198f54a7a5d025d17043f45f500062f4f
describe
'1596' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABESO' 'sip-files00082.txt'
bb085640655d63ce8e32b2395699bfe5
03a0c05dac65a52db41fa50ecb291a6ee4301fd8
describe
'1418' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABESP' 'sip-files00084.txt'
474cf50af46103d2602cd5bcb82b9a90
004c0a558d0a79c2d095c09cd41eacfdee30d733
describe
'870' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABESQ' 'sip-files00086.txt'
07225a0484f741112f5a6e6604d0223e
21741670da8b89e69b07c4a52ff4f6bc3dd690b0
describe
'1654' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABESR' 'sip-files00087.txt'
eabd6e1d21ad7bf2847f48aed4f2cefb
782f7ad37d7b32bd9fa18b7e3daf2fdf36088c0e
'2012-06-28T22:03:08-04:00'
describe
'1600' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABESS' 'sip-files00090.txt'
fc4a10289f97a561f61ed0d99ab9f2bb
b1653e867e32983a4190e2aef013bfad1697f79b
describe
'1695' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEST' 'sip-files00095.txt'
a16af2cd90f2ea5e6708eb57319a914c
57a2baf81262951507bf10995b494e87fa591277
describe
'1583' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABESU' 'sip-files00096.txt'
09967e19aa36d773afe8ad43999ce541
5a18de9b50f1962d0a6aee2494ce2c6d7e5b0878
describe
'1561' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABESV' 'sip-files00099.txt'
6dec328acbc2b8754a5e53d51ea3e46e
ecda09a1e17e3d8d9e6731c337edbe9d39d8ede3
describe
'1803' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABESW' 'sip-files00101.txt'
eeae519e64faab16c03a5ac2373c9701
bc7c414875e80a26958e1408a4a77e2a495bf867
describe
'1771' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABESX' 'sip-files00103.txt'
c14ccb5072b9c0ae5bfec5b9040f3f2b
668f843b7cce39bdd4d225da3b96b03f52f7e730
describe
'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABESY' 'sip-files00105.txt'
0f1adfea2edb590d1af9131fbe37dc93
249a700e07d8973862b7b788ea98aa70b64608ab
describe
'1800' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABESZ' 'sip-files00106.txt'
1b2517ae01d58aa258e42967014bc2fa
b39e7c20cdc189b2f059d6793ada0250e1fc8e68
'2012-06-28T22:01:40-04:00'
describe
'1685' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABETA' 'sip-files00110.txt'
88e2b272950a4f9eaa5cdb7300063e2e
0e34f169568a3e173837593eda48bed0261682a4
describe
'1137' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABETB' 'sip-files00114.txt'
365b05490754a3d200415f9a1a9241dc
e3a86436971c323bba59f6f65880bb109006cece
describe
'1467' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABETC' 'sip-files00118.txt'
0bd1d9acfaf95b136d6c5037cea89b86
0d765c89ab2c8c9d65515aa4764e143c2ed7f855
'2012-06-28T21:53:24-04:00'
describe
'1767' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABETD' 'sip-files00120.txt'
a2267ecedacc62296a09d11ff4c22ec9
d07750a02c88a31cebbe919fe77d3a0e0656b2ba
describe
'1625' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABETE' 'sip-files00122.txt'
90eef28fe093346c57c9eea3cda3aef0
f6598a0d36a112c7fd19380a30c73a7dab2a450e
describe
'1696' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABETF' 'sip-files00123.txt'
d9a5929c1f4450f90e984b3e1a29d84c
747a778547b089e16203540af04ce00f66e491d5
describe
'1235' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABETG' 'sip-files00124.txt'
e4d508415143af205016fb4769087604
4246798bad9ab1dd776a0847436e0ea207f8b1d1
describe
'519' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABETH' 'sip-files00128.txt'
290fba26cc908eb87c99526935f25e48
29a810644fc3a292cba15809d3763d9290459606
describe
Invalid character
'1795' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABETI' 'sip-files00133.txt'
8f60c5599e3fb633fd783dcafaf3b816
52a4668c929dccced4aea711dcb1c419482e565d
describe
'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABETJ' 'sip-files00135.txt'
178f36a143d557ef2a4bd66c34ef81e1
2c51ef084e0af70d48df45fdceeec8b13eaea23b
describe
'1820' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABETK' 'sip-files00139.txt'
b75b6932a5fd7287cfcd222b1347e90b
fe1f61ecdc4e8f2869945aeed43f87ba08b8b5a2
describe
'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABETL' 'sip-files00143.txt'
652903a5282801f7acf430222f2f3338
0eb5348909f6bc7a04358ba28ba85d3728c91ea7
describe
'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABETM' 'sip-files00144.txt'
01a71200d64fbfd9fe54d66d457f8abe
ef83e341a8ab4827db35481707d0eadb26f3764f
describe
'1637' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABETN' 'sip-files00152.txt'
6671f581d34539c7fc0367123aedf2df
d69ab1cb7dfb3010ddfd16ed089b60b56b7190bc
describe
'1644' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABETO' 'sip-files00153.txt'
7cf23055f93d817d00001c3e6c7fd05a
c68d5cf7397148fdff6ea36858a669c834175bce
describe
'1609' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABETP' 'sip-files00155.txt'
807e158e2f5a469c61c3c00948afc0d0
34058297376aa1cbb0b48a74f8cd878e5c1793df
describe
'1411' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABETQ' 'sip-files00157.txt'
efaf279c01dd936c926671bc326891b8
9813e81f3cf4cef6c4ba6af2a765289f5ad5d740
describe
'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABETR' 'sip-files00158.txt'
91c88dcb6d2a6c6c315a9b0fa2b19901
e3a31a941c01174d32b95300af520eaa5aa0093b
describe
'1714' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABETS' 'sip-files00159.txt'
4bb0b53ebb89e662d9f157e1a16b2233
a5a8b41c9d66b0a0f1ec8f320a36cd58903accb5
describe
'1689' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABETT' 'sip-files00161.txt'
a90913b9d8153b94fd8fc1e4e33e0de5
a7b53979d305f206617083aa2f2e8b31a47bea50
describe
'1599' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABETU' 'sip-files00163.txt'
734fd2a5eee0d3d8a121ca755abc4f50
c604c926d6912dcdd82c62349c59e47a676f48f5
describe
'944' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABETV' 'sip-files00164.txt'
b7f664fe1819bfc8204d84f8f8155923
52723cdca66044f9f49203030f25bb2d7d63df1e
describe
'1700' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABETW' 'sip-files00165.txt'
99be08ee0419a18e673ed4e6fe4e7cfe
a0360d1a8c39195561d570bc25ba7554c74611ab
describe
'857' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABETX' 'sip-files00167.txt'
008e0699ada963d8a8d01b2c26fa0d9f
97386d7849df322836074afc48b1d7d2632e83fb
describe
'7885' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABETY' 'sip-files00171.txt'
2f32f615397483ae661b32900e0d8e16
de4ffd28b133bb784510ced16fbc7a04647b9435
describe
Invalid character
'59567' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABETZ' 'sip-files00001.QC.jpg'
237d4884067d146098a4e5872d725c65
c0cfc934bc422c9e232b589f75111588e2559b1a
describe
'18866' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEUA' 'sip-files00003.QC.jpg'
d40f3000da249fe4c70c8e7e9b5103a7
55eaf0abe6c3b3c554b734a17e0650e2535cdc51
describe
'9113' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEUB' 'sip-files00003thm.jpg'
9f7ead22c34b8e657e6e8062084e4c06
19b8b326268a08a66c12f32e91aa57429b9025b4
'2012-06-28T21:58:51-04:00'
describe
'20409' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEUC' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
074d1259088af0d0549c90f99338d7c1
4144ff2f0ee10c099ec969946f0cbf4fd25faf04
describe
'12135' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEUD' 'sip-files00007thm.jpg'
67b3cf4ac76c7ac5ec4baf6917a44940
97da3121693dc26966b13857bc2d8f88a9566a36
describe
'23338' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEUE' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
b499ce5b4ac1eece2264a15a14d68444
08ab98c9cafac090df4c49b6b1b707be8831eab1
'2012-06-28T22:01:42-04:00'
describe
'19790' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEUF' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
a79d0932ca033e8d3e64c315a4cc6f11
3a12a9be3c0bccb73f3667f78f1a33bf88e6b4a6
'2012-06-28T22:03:13-04:00'
describe
'18308' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEUG' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
063206507f4fec717b5907cddab481aa
126ca6c98cc112aa74faaffc2673c29f278feaeb
describe
'22567' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEUH' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
620f811fab077cd67aeaefb94e875f19
2d6042c89b66eece973ec103f863995ac39622b9
describe
'25671' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEUI' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
5e6e502ff6e03a773a6cf7a8b6ede144
81d999d3d28f922c2f5bb8d174b8200e8b088a96
describe
'23977' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEUJ' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
5c480b9dd8cdcdd1fedc11cf674273ed
a0b702611c8e946df78a771f8d259339ae7e3473
describe
'24804' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEUK' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
06c2d974b0a1dbdc7bb2dc3d7eb8da8e
af8aeca3c09573c94546c01cc12f6088e217c6c3
describe
'75316' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEUL' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
38a0a9f8e7950468aa0717968fbeb86c
05c86b878b099d9d79709cd90341f91a6282cc8a
describe
'69352' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEUM' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
c5c5281ab12eda432d7258bb728f4185
165a9a0442a98faf932a51bc61136445db7f9a55
describe
'25106' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEUN' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
3f6938648d07d83014cf65bb836da450
e4fc966b8cb9defede7287e624e35336aa8f1650
'2012-06-28T21:55:02-04:00'
describe
'25622' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEUO' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
852302e4d26a036f9136bcb3f6e801f6
065e48870ab920094d8ee0b9eb0504b257ea875c
describe
'65777' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEUP' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
d3fca1faa313b241070fb2f8d095abee
101ecdbe0688da6929f72748cbb7bb9cbd8713b1
describe
'20137' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEUQ' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
3af2d49d95a30c18a2c6c4c4393b7580
c7c62dc87d54e1c2b5bf6c697dbf88c4ca039b18
'2012-06-28T21:53:33-04:00'
describe
'24581' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEUR' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
c592611aa7f173588d7f4ff439ae8f25
05d962e3b8ee6621e6dae8668d370d3b268317e1
describe
'66562' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEUS' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
216f141573986a0faef59b0ca065521a
526b1a9c9ae49c0af83510a000215710d2f40afb
describe
'25466' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEUT' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
c74593454b4f1be653b67e66010bf968
c8280b81ad6c2cf323eeecdff3bdcd9be400d9e8
describe
'15711' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEUU' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
b04091b0ef57dafe812eed9c18feef51
5e08227e3420de6e8831e3f8a8384bdcc62a1b1b
describe
'23631' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEUV' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
3e5478b3c0752c96b377a90b636dfb45
96b195a000757f8bd9de18dc08e9cc01d36cb9bd
'2012-06-28T21:57:13-04:00'
describe
'62534' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEUW' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
d4f90ceb92a4dfb8c15c311b562d17e7
ab12222357eb847b3127d9d6dc9d65968f2b3a22
describe
'25520' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEUX' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
51b404141a9f90183541579ddea1fb4c
169602f84195c71ce12862357643e2d095b0d9dc
describe
'39492' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEUY' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
bc3d674ed1dc4e321df08daeb6d6f771
4f1fd0c15bdd2530dfc87667bfd2bae936b67dce
describe
'66830' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEUZ' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
355f130863250429af6a0cee3c719508
abaa8606ebeb9c4fc883627c6865becb991f1fd1
describe
'57291' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEVA' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
abe77cd2b2a72fc8b383add657da8827
77f9a8edf1b080fceafac2613d8244e4f3afdb51
describe
'52720' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEVB' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
799074b44ce222d4b0c4001ed15d8412
76530c9da30934fda046e5888ce38bea960e17b1
describe
'57265' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEVC' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
910776ee4aba9ef5d6941c7ff03bf9bb
140f7fff90922b5654fd1e358f163c462a62702d
describe
'22244' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEVD' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
99c442a99e630223b4571b6f300ba15d
53060103f03371bb8802585865017627104bb0e3
describe
'64670' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEVE' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
ddbbd0fffdfc8b85200d6da9ca37a258
9a1e6f4356640b2184cfd854f78e0a0c76453de8
describe
'24274' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEVF' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
d3fce9c04de15a77f775fe91562222aa
9acd59574dab4ac8353f00520f3470e7f4832ee9
describe
'48338' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEVG' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
89b59f8ffb4f9e3996a9ce97e380c893
c3f72507790ddcbbbdc6fed4b87d8813001351e9
describe
'25715' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEVH' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
56504264d4b17950a2152c97e9783bb1
81a63c366fdf6b970895be451488d6acc1945b5d
describe
'17267' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEVI' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
fd9504d0335ff0f005fb5e3f1366c514
7ffbbdf0ccbd216a65ba3f11874684b4f3b52986
describe
'59297' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEVJ' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
b5058c841be3ca63078b8e158c66dbe9
811a4708d03bf67b2444320e8388f65c17a6bff4
describe
'24189' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEVK' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
d73c6f1954e3852c5bf99360b4032550
3641c6e71848d6c0e2b2a248d14bc093f62d1631
describe
'23548' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEVL' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
f44a09979a70770788215630ea25e825
943fc8e8b36076e1f315e828d1c1faaa51ef7b12
describe
'56359' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEVM' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
7786513bfcc59b3d523a759a83708f78
f1c0f254c6ccc5ad38cf5993a4f201ca1e6c1045
describe
'55463' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEVN' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
db6de618bbeec5b2a0f14056dbf59bd0
d0d6dc6bf1a4000e7099a42a95d294247ce160a9
describe
'21682' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEVO' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
a36023e73d4805f148fe339b327888e2
3874706253e974994cf8d33af89afe85f8657e0f
describe
'61587' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEVP' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
4835b2297ce132f3f004f2a9dc390dd2
6f87e19fdfab28c877d9d39a6b4819773a922b2f
describe
'24838' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEVQ' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
039cd02e4f9bdcba3b2b6344bb893e4e
738f0f8114b82f2ad5062c2abb9ab14f0df45c19
'2012-06-28T21:59:47-04:00'
describe
'69076' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEVR' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
7452dc2888c7c9fb6b184c82dc388462
d1a6c8a389e025ebd57d2d0abf710c2c06eba4cf
describe
'23444' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEVS' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
d7d455857fde26d54aff7aa261634864
ed81826f6f7b0f9ffed089f886ac21c4e3c33f6d
describe
'57646' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEVT' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
69e363c41ac85da67cce8df2a4fa3bf2
c83386ae3d068bd5b5a2c6214d20f0abd2e5501d
describe
'22913' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEVU' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
60826a11e44414457902848888535ee1
d7403ebd76f34af62312b0ffab2ede636f13f416
describe
'11895' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEVV' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
a128dde1fece8e1fd3cd81edc341dbad
4c92c2f1758cd321bc17ebcd128cd291a54e4654
describe
'9333' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEVW' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
e4439001fc3bebb0b4cdbbf1a1fce8a4
18826bc15d7fe8cf0e43fc15b858edf093aa4c5d
describe
'57139' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEVX' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
1d30cd2fd4d2ed16d46f557ecdfd4f1e
9020a6e82da230ee96319fce4b570c3506341e26
describe
'59132' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEVY' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
fb6754737b54267b773224d0520c2a98
acd4e6f779abd2fb4786104a1972330bd87bed89
'2012-06-28T21:55:00-04:00'
describe
'56332' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEVZ' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
30639760fc5c785d3616738a4afd4cb0
85d0383dc2a8ef6a67d9052ace01fb98b288250f
describe
'67578' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEWA' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
ebca585994cbfb2e44c61d36786661ed
90e402b5c458deb636c419bd1044f24829afc630
describe
'62432' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEWB' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
d0e949cd02cd8489b5a184086d0a9852
3af62f1c6b7967346499cddadc0e11f698b59d9a
'2012-06-28T21:58:10-04:00'
describe
'24495' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEWC' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
8a0c5d7b2fbea64806b4abb4b405d670
8435bd6ea7c1c13659cb8ad245f560cd5f7f79df
describe
'68907' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEWD' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
df807aa25a3753398b6538ecf96091ba
7aa542b1547b744fc8739fac085e10f5fa3956b5
describe
'62373' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEWE' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
239f3fe6b219da03619842f0662bfcaa
4d092ef7899da7639f7fe1df2385a141badf5175
describe
'24036' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEWF' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
756cdd33e9fa1e65efed0534ae5f8d57
342acaa80e72f936ab6c8727f1bf92010f5571b6
describe
'66883' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEWG' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
1b03078cec7864aa2fa66b0c24b042b6
ddf913ac7e5ebcc34c0e63acb017741a719894d6
describe
'59140' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEWH' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
8dfbe4927ef03fdc630b4a2b34ac9e1a
694bfa76f3b1fd023c13ae969381c1c7c447b5e6
describe
'22613' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEWI' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
35c6f10662a55dcca99349b8d8df83bb
73fbb74119440e1e168f78ec77f45a56a59d4675
describe
'67518' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEWJ' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
4e388219ff51dbbb79a8555f07aac4a0
94651acbee46e87fe78ed0780447304f58b27b16
describe
'64607' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEWK' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
e74607043dad387462199f2f4a0eb42d
25d58f4c44e9a0e5cefdac06cc78a97b412a5047
describe
'15773' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEWL' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
a59fe960a63b8bc29d192c933f2cc9ff
1c22fa6d7cd06ce30c02945e12f577beb717c648
'2012-06-28T21:58:00-04:00'
describe
'67298' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEWM' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
d654e2f5a1b60bb2523c58c86ce446d7
d64e0e5e14fc337e19358c30fa668dd7b0305af5
describe
'56445' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEWN' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
95779aaa83b99e98c03c2a6f392cb401
7df3e597ac0a94dc1edc1551516f472a53c81b27
describe
'22352' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEWO' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
e5e95530c15e03417b2197b7b3b53e4e
c262cb9072df70aa15e8c0e6b966f6427af85c78
'2012-06-28T21:56:45-04:00'
describe
'58347' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEWP' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
0a9cccc1270f277c5d255d3250a5b7d0
ed8463e2f38e39ad4d35e2a59b524069f6ea6e98
describe
'22897' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEWQ' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
1023afcc35ad59896f28bac16a94d524
0057340e984b4e12334f116f00258671da38b119
describe
'26074' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEWR' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
96f2f6de0185afac0d0227d4d6c76bfa
b58e289eff056b846a11843f1b938f0484d55efe
'2012-06-28T21:58:53-04:00'
describe
'63808' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEWS' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
3c7ec43b5ae55ba2db2c77b0140b03aa
a5d3864060b3e89f562ff113993dd50a7af1dd39
describe
'24433' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEWT' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
6d9820a7ff75a349f83a9968132c890b
72602f525186e81ae356d38a17ee14ec613ac9b0
describe
'48687' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEWU' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
06d16c79743f4e805858cec7eb9bba91
31d628dfb795aa96c12efa205f4a5def98906437
describe
'19321' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEWV' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
111c14ea0ea3bcdfd77ab5132834101f
c00e4ab97f6f60d5efd64314a34b98102f1e1e8a
describe
'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEWW' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
39bfb1d3108bfba4748e15bded74a7ff
bcda6c29d226da556d2af3c230685107418e77f1
describe
'24731' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEWX' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
0b4d2d6a9219a4998946426a580b1af2
4e468bbf6396bf802d73d246ba560b736d6a8dc0
'2012-06-28T21:59:12-04:00'
describe
'65455' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEWY' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
04c5d6a9dfb4998c70a2b42edb647cf3
78624727c139af0f147f3f18f8389418b5045c6d
describe
'24368' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEWZ' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
abcfa194cc33ee29649924577401250b
68514a79526b7135c27a1d1f0b5027564f2c3936
describe
'23930' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEXA' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
2fb749515d3091778219bbbf371cee24
c15f63240d09470a8e2d6b763514ba2bbcb63bb7
describe
'53110' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEXB' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
b9e51564969b5cb610468beefae4b4a0
4056fc4f42a5c60d2322d973db16567d1a95cf92
describe
'22456' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEXC' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
60f70b1695479ff5d06620bd9a03660b
bf3445f1b1439963db032fd0e56cf3d0769a6497
describe
'24531' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEXD' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
744b3d767a70abc61ff56bc34066c01b
d0065adf9a64f6d96a1afd3e55f2e50722352335
describe
'56940' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEXE' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
87e5b828a1e677d4c696987054b02904
8870f788ac6ac6073352a7b0d4d93f8f3f3b98b3
describe
'23735' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEXF' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
41c7cf1c1d7ab212c3aa455f450f0c4e
c1e661895fcc275833a134e0288bc9c6336a183e
describe
'13353' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEXG' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
7ee20e1260229bca5a23037a956d7901
66c76671d5c97919c1cca846e35d42ea89c1add0
describe
'9604' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEXH' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
32009435e58ed0df828200e3921c9472
dc31177139137b0851cf21f0099300d057ff6fbb
describe
'14364' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEXI' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
c5e92f08954f9f6f9d13cf5e21ba7059
e77db6e5ceec6779f740cb7dab364ba4fae5791e
'2012-06-28T21:54:16-04:00'
describe
'20709' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEXJ' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
e23ff6687930b837814160ffcadad02b
b488cc5e8ef9c924d3c66677fc2a0a54f67eb5b2
describe
'57765' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEXK' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
7917b14dae8d8f155dff8be13817e4ab
3342b4f6ea6d5e215cf1f24e6209719f08626515
describe
'60321' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEXL' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
c1707a7f8b42ca5f1cafaab2e10f6a4d
a0cbfee1eb152a775b4133eed14c74739efb5cd1
describe
'71222' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEXM' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
ab6d86e5e110e34de1846c5c61242dd9
44e724e7331c410c269ffdb4d76a13cbe0627ee7
'2012-06-28T21:57:36-04:00'
describe
'26278' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEXN' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
d09ee43cb81e958e3a520f008ca370c7
973abf3dd0d4056ab98f27d5e3b6d309b40dad6f
describe
'63120' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEXO' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
5b69254d9d64d8195b2be77a1abd16bf
e8458b61f4d5f852f38ab56a023dd553165339bd
describe
'23551' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEXP' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
34eaf8b8c45a8121b6d339ad5ed5a429
16c04b8703010d7943067782c1599316eb3559cf
'2012-06-28T22:01:53-04:00'
describe
'22738' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEXQ' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
dc8b62181b9714f2fa86c0a5dca5388e
8433e812aac75dd2f4503259f89ced3d31714403
describe
'63136' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEXR' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
4ceb84076264ba27e297acb1fd931bfe
a7caf7e430699d3dc693dcb0c538f7a3ee313992
describe
'23834' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEXS' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
d426adcef9bbdcc35bcd6a865d81e0c6
301fc37061a9a6a8e8adb83c0e99d03ba8548136
describe
'61663' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEXT' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
de31ca937efa66211a78d346746851a4
74828c7445d909239cc429874a7933e1a2ccc309
describe
'63572' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEXU' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
139387bbe4984702446fea68456fa75d
38a46bb3520ddb82149896531795a1f948718ef1
describe
'62925' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEXV' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
5720dfb0e0530fd5f24dcaea2916a0c1
85d78799166b30c4507cce79f09304a23f7095ab
describe
'23669' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEXW' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
c7bacfb3fc1be15f7870b8ee44a83e48
4133f05c22df11e7c41e151831b993e48e01ba64
'2012-06-28T21:57:31-04:00'
describe
'61524' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEXX' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
8d4144479260122ed9af9634e2631d97
fbb2e75e7324a4d2eae1ceadbd9c39371a710c37
describe
'63597' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEXY' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
b3d9d56a91904570c0b61ac14ccded39
31c76c7fb404ee27178f8fa48a7643bbcebfc0d7
describe
'60514' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEXZ' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
812367a8aea367a7199490277a6b9ca3
16e021f674f9ef512fc4de425656f46d41188ee6
'2012-06-28T21:58:43-04:00'
describe
'51014' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEYA' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
6edce9f7bbf0d71e6e0473254e119fb1
fefecb8e43a1806d9ece9e8c903fca55a80bb095
describe
'59083' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEYB' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
7ba2cbf7b845b37965448ec0c6a82453
4185b6da6afd7cbadfbadd83f3dda4195d48bf72
describe
'39067' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEYC' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
8e16298dd6a950052b45a5b586f86518
b157b1c7d2daae31e9f63df207898c9242e481ae
describe
'56738' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEYD' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
51be79c40a542b079cbf4fa3fec1ab1e
520c18cecd13838bf43e3a3678ef94e20ce256a6
describe
'57706' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEYE' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
ff0f8b0380d9f2238878ebdd0b156235
4ebe143216b0ee8683c9fbdf74944bb6d2a5eee0
describe
'23489' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEYF' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
702627e7320fafa7832cf4f235a9fd44
70aea4f31a144ec1f37d923fa5e8933a7756b593
describe
'62638' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEYG' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
3a2503a12265366b8c2b93ec80945c40
e7ec7903312b589fbcbdeae7bf86b30761baaae4
describe
'23865' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEYH' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
5b1a0cb1a076874afb6db66edf90bba8
0fe266d87740fba093c5222383547b4e3e96d8d8
describe
'24100' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEYI' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
66bc311309dcdab0db45674305693751
3a0724a260c9b44b6769252d1f2f51cc2ae60234
describe
'25446' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEYJ' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
2448bf9039790883d81460b01b5a2f42
a3f483eed39bc43207df2d23112e84012dab140c
'2012-06-28T21:55:37-04:00'
describe
'10044' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEYK' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
2cbcf5a7c8f8ce51629a8da4d9afe429
746f20a8007163577ff07ebf51f6c1da0c686833
describe
'50839' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEYL' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
95f6af641f08df581d2726c91d7632d2
62fee17d934563476c73af5fd8db31b612c00bc8
describe
'66843' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEYM' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
f2374d015e057ef11ad5a4b4dcef7e6d
233783d30ac7850e819922686325ab529ced3374
describe
'67979' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEYN' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
f0862a1a05d559542663a6f20d4fbcc7
d2ddeac96a73c6e42defbc4c74c680f38f5b1580
describe
'19268' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEYO' 'sip-files00132thm.jpg'
27ecd1f5cf2522c876e7d26ebf0a09cb
f4496b600e793d58722f3347c3cdc27b58b99398
'2012-06-28T22:02:27-04:00'
describe
'64355' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEYP' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
06d5df7e11db75611ff8ef7a18daa336
9f94e5a21946cccaa8c29e9a0a11be1827aa22ff
describe
'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEYQ' 'sip-files00134thm.jpg'
d1282bd89e5308ec15b1af4c9f16fed2
664ba016cf7743da452681a6eaadb949d2b43b51
describe
'65598' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEYR' 'sip-files00135.QC.jpg'
55e7d9579a95a8f91032b013ae80b65f
ef0d5a2595b09f809f1848faf5a8fa434e1d75cf
describe
'24245' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEYS' 'sip-files00135thm.jpg'
617999d6dfb8562b5f24c6f6d5596d35
d01cee5161741d09cacc43ab4badb9ff2220601b
'2012-06-28T21:58:59-04:00'
describe
'65575' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEYT' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
0fc7df63f4358cff0c11216380118062
ebf7dd22b6639f29214a3358e7261f43a4a833be
'2012-06-28T22:00:16-04:00'
describe
'23608' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEYU' 'sip-files00136thm.jpg'
fac45b2ea04f0127949146f7adc75436
3e1bf049f8c642f0f2c1080541bcb0d1bea5522f
describe
'64662' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEYV' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
f15e25c7d08335cf76b160782083f0b2
d6be59db06ce88ff7495397961466fb0aefa1d31
describe
'24115' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEYW' 'sip-files00139thm.jpg'
7eb4937ebda6d639e08f5c095c78c65f
fbad49564425f627fe2e169181ce351a44cb8a32
describe
'23027' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEYX' 'sip-files00141thm.jpg'
16c7e2433a116946c4db25c9b6321579
fa410649055db437f459087954d7e3bb88580e69
describe
'23874' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEYY' 'sip-files00143thm.jpg'
dfa75fb974c5502dd74ea58d5f3482e0
521a6d7b7414cabc22435a0feee0dc6030d36309
describe
'26942' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEYZ' 'sip-files00144thm.jpg'
204008e836d46552a2d82fdd995146f7
346b754f2292516bf3bdc15814a8cf06bad109d8
describe
'68978' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEZA' 'sip-files00146.QC.jpg'
1aed3666185b52b698f8c77fb6881316
e839a9384231b2e346ae3e74c27998ea9640b739
'2012-06-28T22:00:51-04:00'
describe
'69556' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEZB' 'sip-files00149.QC.jpg'
b840738ba2de4193d2e4849672599663
71d06a0c87a72a912ac5372af58ed9063671260d
describe
'71502' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEZC' 'sip-files00150.QC.jpg'
9c921b73d6439cc601ec43c08bdc7911
d8571652f6ecc455fffd1c508f365238e0688157
describe
'26383' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEZD' 'sip-files00150thm.jpg'
6806cf29b1e477594e4f916a81043023
d3e594e25e3414bb0ba20eb8f98d3ed4365c9a94
describe
'54941' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEZE' 'sip-files00151.QC.jpg'
70351869ac5b2c5d359475800ef16016
24e8b82f4a3384ab1709347af055e8f6370c4f92
describe
'22894' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEZF' 'sip-files00151thm.jpg'
c62636f0526e8376252c89a756450919
d6b599365ea8f056f42c7bbb265c63ab874e8779
describe
'70889' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEZG' 'sip-files00153.QC.jpg'
54e59da8793f6190ea4958ef3ec311b6
c6c33aeff17bf18ba784bd2f74c775dc98aee3bf
describe
'26855' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEZH' 'sip-files00153thm.jpg'
babaf80b55de34b05ecd4b46fbd18c51
69ff240507538ba46a77d781e35423338e93bfbf
describe
'22310' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEZI' 'sip-files00154thm.jpg'
86c01e531ece4166cb7294b88c820c20
d0fb255fa736b8338bdc09063a8760caa56147df
describe
'61835' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEZJ' 'sip-files00155.QC.jpg'
7863c742d059f3ad0b8dd5b96c4a0a72
2d5f70c1e32965e0dc988021063e03cb581fe150
'2012-06-28T21:59:57-04:00'
describe
'23598' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEZK' 'sip-files00155thm.jpg'
9c26dfe0af6cc06beedd608089286403
44bc675c566ba59e9dfefb76f63342fc8019b52a
describe
'16235' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEZL' 'sip-files00156thm.jpg'
b7e1d75f8dc98d94a8b7bb1b579ce725
5d18745f6268daa4f435361a2c8f607e16ad4708
describe
'56013' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEZM' 'sip-files00157.QC.jpg'
dbf53dd84d93908a7df56f37817636b4
6f5b979a45b5381949f61c2104735dfc4d7c35db
describe
'65934' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEZN' 'sip-files00158.QC.jpg'
91d9961e06ef23dcf4322913464ed41f
8b478a2f5d1beb16dae113824225f375b7645894
describe
'70464' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEZO' 'sip-files00159.QC.jpg'
1ae060e5f46ce4a8b1f6cf38f4a45f78
5694103bf4c968a4eaab1d71d48f895ef64715ae
describe
'56998' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEZP' 'sip-files00160.QC.jpg'
cb81e4e8b18aa34a7921000cc2d6b68c
8a63e4e398adf53f385a0f857dfa4c090c4ea561
describe
'23840' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEZQ' 'sip-files00161thm.jpg'
9dcdc8f234ae32ae6e6f2392dcc6f2b8
25b89969c239ec1c353241a213dc47059ba99f86
describe
'61541' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEZR' 'sip-files00162.QC.jpg'
e3b240275ff0a4e5f84a78078bf0ddc3
28451018858991905f2cc4b76876b42c59d91c0b
describe
'68985' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEZS' 'sip-files00165.QC.jpg'
fcffe6188aa2f09da9fb1f14643bf97a
5d4e0ac75c63abb729d1da21aaa9923517bf1688
describe
'68349' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEZT' 'sip-files00166.QC.jpg'
f069b8191a46867261e756d919ee929f
687bbb7d8dec18d040dfe97ac664b12ec409efb2
describe
'26020' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEZU' 'sip-files00166thm.jpg'
151857a1575c9043ea7e3fe483063893
899fd06ce243ef50ca1db74dbd8ff9aa6ee98f5f
describe
'28277' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEZV' 'sip-files00169thm.jpg'
658fc3c6d6eb47385f2c110ec2975702
1da67e655e24ba2d70552d272f25f087fa51bfbd
'2012-06-28T22:00:11-04:00'
describe
'70676' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEZW' 'sip-files00170.QC.jpg'
cf682a2a26ccd07de0776f1466042909
4f574b97572cfd61f5e3901f828e1a35227c3395
describe
'24986' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEZX' 'sip-files00170thm.jpg'
c067f35875aaa565a05740ee010cea87
39ac2d27ce46641257b3213864f8ba9888dfb469
describe
'85141' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEZY' 'sip-files00172.QC.jpg'
299ea9c25fbbbd033d07cfb4b971ed34
0abce861191e9f3c574764b9ece188a9bf3ba9bd
describe
'27731' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABEZZ' 'sip-files00178.QC.jpg'
7af61eac7f662cc5fa709c05c360b1d9
a4a57b3731b274f993c6a27e8b8f33ae386d918f
describe
'203384' 'info:fdaE20100527_AAAAEPfileF20100527_AABFAA' 'sip-filesUF00028240_00001.mets'
a041f84540e1c09a4bf966cd0e795575
99be45faf5c8de2bfc8e8ac6f79532bdc31acf9d
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-10T02:40:05-05:00'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.