Citation
The Zoological gardens

Material Information

Title:
The Zoological gardens hyænas, stag, jaguar, fox, otter, camel
Series Title:
Aunt Louisa's London toy books
Creator:
Frederick Warne and Co ( Publisher )
Kronheim & Co ( Printer )
Place of Publication:
London
Publisher:
Frederick Warne & Co.
Manufacturer:
Kronheim & Co.
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
1875
Language:
English
Physical Description:
6 leaves : ;

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Animals -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1875 ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1875
Genre:
Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Publishers' advertisements ( rbgenr )
non-fiction ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Cover title.
General Note:
Includes publisher's advertisement.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
AJE8902 ( notis )
26099766 ( oclc )
027517158 ( alephbibnum )

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Full Text
Aunt Loursa’s LONDON TOY ane se or Mounted a:



hey. Ww ips

rea” py 5 — i



PTE 12
Oe ara he

Kronheim & Co., London, Manchester, and New York,



THE EY ATNAS.



HERE are two kinds of Hyzenas, the Striped and the Spotted.

They are found both in As‘a and Africa, and live in woods and

caves, and come out chiefly at night in search of prey. They will eat

anything —dead bodies, garbage, or living creatures; and they are of

great use in the towns of savage nations, where they act as scavengers,
and eat up all remains of dead or putrid flesh..

The Hyena has strong teeth, intended rather for grinding than

cutting, and very powerful jaws, by means of which it can li‘t a prey

g,
of great weight. Its tongue is rough, like the leopard’s, and its claws
are short and strong, meant rather for digging than for tearing its food.

The Hyeena is a very cowardly animal, and never attacks man
willingly. It prefers flesh in a state of decomposition to that which is
fresh and good; but when it cannot find dead animals, it attacks living
ones, and often carries off the cattle of the natives in African villages.

The cry of the Hyzena is singularly disagréeable.

The Spotted Hyzena is found in Barbary, as well as in all South
Africa. It can be tamed by kind treatment, and made as useful as a
dog; but ill usage renders it dangerous.

The Striped Hyzena is so named from the black lines which run
across its yellowish-grey coat. It is found in Asia, as well as in North
Africa.

There are specimens of both these animals in the Zoological

Gardens.

The Baldwin Library

RmB

University
of
Florida







ELE 2S AG,



J “HE Stag is the most beautiful of European animals. It is about

the size of a small horse. The Stag has every year a new set

of horns; it is very timid and gentle, and flies when it hears or sees
any one coming towards it.

The Stag loves to be alone, lying in the thickest parts of forests and
woods, under the great old trees. Its food is grass, leaves, fruits, and
buds; when winter comes, and it can get none of these, it eats lichens,
moss, and heath, or, when these are covered in snow, the bark. of
trees.

Stags are bold with any animal except man. Many years ago,
George the Fourth’s brother, the Duke of Cumberland, caused a tiger
and a Stag to be shut up in one place; and the Stag, when attacked
by the tiger, made such a brave defence with his horns and hoofs, that
the tiger was beaten, and crouched ata distance; but it was a very
cruel trial of the Stag’s strength.

‘The Doe is very fond of her young one, called a “ Fawn,” but takes
care to hide it away in very secret places, for the Stag is a cruel father,

and ‘would kill it if he found it.

The flesh of the Deer.is called “venison,” and is a very nice food.
The skin is useful, and the horns make knife-handles, &c.

Stags are hunted for sport in England, but are not killed (generally)
at the end of the chase, but reserved to be hunted again, for the

amusement of those who keep them.
2





\

NN
)





LAE: iO X:



“SHE Fox is an animal well known to us all. He makes his

home in a burrow in the ground: it is called his “earth,” and

is divided into three rooms. Out of the first he slyly peeps to watch

his prey or his enemies; in the second he keeps his food; in the third
or farthest one he lives, and here his mate rears her young.

The Fox is a very cunning, clever animal. He goes out at night
to seek for prey, and steals fowls from the hen-roost if he can get in;
he digs rabbits out of their burrows, and robs the nests of partridges
and other game birds of eggs, eating the birds too if he can catch them.
He is also very fond of grapes and honey. He robs the poor bees of
their honest earnings, and when they fly on him to sting him, he rolls
on the ground, and thus crushes them. In fact, he isasad thief He
has been seen hunting hares, and springing at an otter to seize its fish.

The Fox is hunted every year, and the hunt is a favourite sport of
Englishmen.

He is a playful animal, and is often seen running after his own tail,
—which is called a “ brush,’—like a kitten. In cold weather he wraps
it about his nose. The female is a very good mother.

The Fox is not easily tamed, and can never be cured of his habit
of stealing.

“Cunning as a Fox” is a proverb you have heard. The Fox has

been the type of cunning and knavery from very early times.
3



»



oy, rh! 2) \

oe

a eras

jh EMER, Ti

E MS oe
NAR el -:

AN gi pipiin 2s
TO

511









THE JAGUAR.



HE Jaguar is the Leopard of America, and is nearly as strong

and bold asa tiger. It can both climb and swim, and as it feeds

on flesh and fish, it kills both monkeys in the trees, and fish in the

rivers. It is a terrible animal to meet in the forests. One might get

out of the reach of a lion by climbing a tree; but a Jaguar will come

after one. It can break a horse’s back by a single blow of its great
and powerful paw.

I have read a story, told by Humboldt, the great traveller, of two
little children being seated at play out of doors in an Indian village
near a forest, when a Jaguar came out of it and joined them. It began
to jump about and play like a cat; till suddenly it scratched the face
of one of them, a little boy: he began to cry, and the other child—a
tiny girl—struck the Jaguar with a stick she held; but it did not mind
the blow, luckily; and before it grew cross, or became angry, and recol-
lected that its little playmates were good to eat, the Indian hunters
came home; and as soon as it heard them it ran off into the woods.

The good Gop thus kept the helpless children safe from the anger
of this ravenous creature.

We ought to be very thankful that there are no wild beasts in our
country, except in the Zoological Gardens, in London, where it is a
pleasure: to look at them, as we know that they cannot get at us to
hurt us.

At sunrise and at sunset the Jaguar utters two cries, well known to
the hunters, and by which they can find his haunt, where they attack
and kill him for his valuable skin.

4







TE OTTER.



TTERS were created by Gon for seeking their prey in water,
therefore He has given them webbed feet, with which they can
swim like a fish, flattened heads, and nostrils furnished with a valve or
covering, which opens and shuts, so that they can keep out the water
when beneath the surface. The tail is flat and moveable, and serves
as a rudder to steer them, and they have strong nails, with which they
burrow in the banks of rivers. Their fur is valuable, and they are
hunted for it by men with dogs. They live in deep holes in the banks
of rivers, and feed on fish.

Otters are found in every part of the world, but are most common
in Europe and America. ;

They can be tamed, if taken when quite young, and can be made
to fish for their masters. A tame Otter has been known to catch
eight or nine salmon a day. It is rewarded with part of the fish ‘it
catches.

It is a pity this animal has not been made use of for the purpose;
but the cases of its being employed by men in fishing are very few—
only enough to show that it was intended for the use of man. But its
fur is so valuable that the animal is being gradually destroyed, and will
doubtless be at length exterminated... —

Otters destroy a great many fish, as they kill more than they eat,
for they only bite a mouthful or two from the back of each fish taken.

The Sea-Otter has a bright, smooth, black coat, which is one of
the most valuable furs. It is found on the coast of the North Pacific
Ocean.






THE CAMEL,

HE Camel is the gift of Gop to the poor people who live on
the hot barren sands of Asia and Africa, where there are no
trees and grass, and where the springs of water are far apart. Gop
has formed the Camel for the work he is wanted to do in these
lands. He is provided with four stomachs, in the first of which are a
number of hollow places called cells, where he can store up enough
water to last him for several days. Then his feet are covered with
hard wide soles, so that he can walk on sand easily; his eyes have
double eyelids, to screen them from the sand; and he can see and
hear at a great distance. He is content with very little food: a few
balls of meal, or the sharp prickly thorns of the desert, fully satisfy
him. He is very patient, and will carry great weights of merchandise
or baggage. In order to allow the drivers to load him, he will kneel
down on the sand; but he will not let them put a heavier burden on
his back than he can well bear: he strikes with his head and utters
sad cries if such a wrong is intended him. The Camel is sometimes
very savage, and he never forgives an injury till he has punished his
enemy. When he is kindly treated, however, he is a good and faithful
servant.
The Bactrian Camel—this is one in the picture—has two humps;
the Arabian Camel, or Dromedary, only one.
The Camel would be quite useless in any other country but its
native land. Its broad feet, cushioned for walking on sand, slip about

on muddy ground, and are hurt by rocks or stones.
6









WARNES NURSERY LITERATURE.



AUNT LOUISA’S LONDON TOY BOOKS.

With Large Original Pag~ Plates by the First Artists, in the very
best style of Colour Printing, with Letterpress Descriptions.

In Demy 4to, 1s. each, picture covers; or, Mounted on Linen, 2s.

. THE RAILWAY ABC

_ A, APPLE PIE

. NURSERY RHYMES

. CHILDHOOD’S HAPPY HOURS

. NURSERY SONGS

. THE LIFE OF A DOLL

. EDITH AND MILLY’S HOUSEKEEPING

. JOHN GILPIN (THE STORY OF)

. THE SEASIDE

. THE ROBIN’S CIIRISTMAS EVE

. COUNTRY PETS

. PUSSY’S LONDON LIFE

. HECTOR, THE DOG

. DICK WHITTINGTON

. UNCLE’S FARMYARD

. LONDON ALPHABET

. COUNTRY ALPHABET

. GAMES AND SPORTS

. HOUSEHOLD PETS

. THE BIRTHDAY PARTY

. KING, QUEEN, AND KNAVE OF HEARTS

. COCK ROBIN’S COURTSHIP, MARRIAGE, DEATH, AND
BURIAL

32. CHILDRENS’ LULLABIES

33. THE NURSERY ALPHABET

34. GOOD CHILDREN

35. BRUIN THE BEAR

36. DAME TROT AND HER CAT

37. HOME FOR THE HOLIDAYS

38. PUNCH AND JUDY

39. MY CHILDREN

40. JACK AND JILL

41. THE FAITHFUL FRIEND

42. TEN LITTLE NIGGERS

“NEO OY Rm Ot oe

(OS I od So od ed oe ol
KF OOM WDH NW RK DWNRA OM



AUNT LOUISA’S SUNDAY BOOKS,

In Demy 4to., Picture Covers, One Shilling each; or mounted
on Linen, Two Shillings.

JOSEPIL AND HIS BRETHREN

. THE PROVERBS OF SOLOMON

. KING DAVID (THE STORY OF)

THE WONDERS OF PROVIDENCE

THE PARABLES OF OUR LORD
CHILDREN OF THE OLD TESTAMENT
. CHILDREN OF THE NEW TESTAMENT
THE CHILDHOOD OF CHRIST

Smo wR oO NP

WARNE’S NATIONAL NURSERY LIBRARY.

In pott 8vo, price 1s. each, picture boards ; or cloth gilt, 1s. 6d.
THE RED RIDING HOOD VOLUME
THE CINDERELLA VOLUME
THE NURSERY RHYMES, TALES, AND JINGLES VOL.
*,* Each Book contains 40 Illustrations and Five
Nursery Tales.



WARNE’S VICTORIA TOY BOOKS.

SPECIALLY DESIGNED FOR CHILDREN, WITH COLOURED PLATES
AND LETTERPRESS,



One Shilling the Packet. Three Distinct Packets.

PACKET No. 1. Contains Twelve Nursery Stories, with 84
Coloured Illustrations.

PACKET No. 2. Nursery Stories and Alphabets.

PACKET No. 3. Alphabets only.

Ditto. Mounted on Linen, ls. 6d. each packet, (2 varieties.)



WARNE’S PICTURE PUZZLE TOY BOOKS.

Printed in Colours by Kronheim, and full Descriptions.
Demy 4to, 18s. each, stiff Fancy Wrappers.

THE HOUSE WE LIVE IN OUR KINGS AND QUEENS
THE NURSERY PLAY-BOOK THE DOLL anp HER DRESSES
OUR HOLIDAYS | THE BOOK OF TRADES
HOLIDAY FUN | ‘THE HORSE

These Toy Books, consisting of Six Pages of Coloured Illustrations,
with Key Plates embodying 200 figures, will occupy the attention of
Children for days, the figures in the key plates having to be cut out and
inserted in their proper places in the illustrations, forming an endless
amount of instruction and amusement.

WARNE’S CHILDREN’S MUSIC BOOKS,

WITH APPROPRIATE WORDS, HYMNS, &c.





In demy oblong, price 18. each, sewed.

1. THE CHILDREN’S HOUR.
Ones, set to Music ; with a Morning and Evening Hymn.
by Mrs. G. H. Currets.

2. SONGS FOR OUR LITTLE FRIENDS.
E. R. B. Twelve Nursery Ditties.

3. THE CHILDREN’S MUSICAL GEM.
Ditties. Edited by Madame Borrant.

4. THE NURSERY NIGHTINGALE. Ditties for the Children.
Set to Music by Madame Borrant.

Demy Ato. cloth, price 5s., gilt and gilt edges.

THE CHILDREN’S MUSICAL COMPANION.
Comprising Books 1, 2, 3, and 4, bound in One Volume.

Twelve Songs for the Little
Edited

Set to Music by

Fourteen Nursery

eee tenet tenet teagett tant Sense" tama ogee teyee nay tay yet Sag get Non gett tag geht tngen in oot

LONDON:—FREDERICK WARNE & CO., BEDFORD STREET, COVENT GARDEN.

NEW YORK:—SCRIBNER, WELFORD, AND ARMSTRONG.















Full Text


Aunt Loursa’s LONDON TOY ane se or Mounted a:



hey. Ww ips

rea” py 5 — i



PTE 12
Oe ara he

Kronheim & Co., London, Manchester, and New York,
THE EY ATNAS.



HERE are two kinds of Hyzenas, the Striped and the Spotted.

They are found both in As‘a and Africa, and live in woods and

caves, and come out chiefly at night in search of prey. They will eat

anything —dead bodies, garbage, or living creatures; and they are of

great use in the towns of savage nations, where they act as scavengers,
and eat up all remains of dead or putrid flesh..

The Hyena has strong teeth, intended rather for grinding than

cutting, and very powerful jaws, by means of which it can li‘t a prey

g,
of great weight. Its tongue is rough, like the leopard’s, and its claws
are short and strong, meant rather for digging than for tearing its food.

The Hyeena is a very cowardly animal, and never attacks man
willingly. It prefers flesh in a state of decomposition to that which is
fresh and good; but when it cannot find dead animals, it attacks living
ones, and often carries off the cattle of the natives in African villages.

The cry of the Hyzena is singularly disagréeable.

The Spotted Hyzena is found in Barbary, as well as in all South
Africa. It can be tamed by kind treatment, and made as useful as a
dog; but ill usage renders it dangerous.

The Striped Hyzena is so named from the black lines which run
across its yellowish-grey coat. It is found in Asia, as well as in North
Africa.

There are specimens of both these animals in the Zoological

Gardens.

The Baldwin Library

RmB

University
of
Florida

ELE 2S AG,



J “HE Stag is the most beautiful of European animals. It is about

the size of a small horse. The Stag has every year a new set

of horns; it is very timid and gentle, and flies when it hears or sees
any one coming towards it.

The Stag loves to be alone, lying in the thickest parts of forests and
woods, under the great old trees. Its food is grass, leaves, fruits, and
buds; when winter comes, and it can get none of these, it eats lichens,
moss, and heath, or, when these are covered in snow, the bark. of
trees.

Stags are bold with any animal except man. Many years ago,
George the Fourth’s brother, the Duke of Cumberland, caused a tiger
and a Stag to be shut up in one place; and the Stag, when attacked
by the tiger, made such a brave defence with his horns and hoofs, that
the tiger was beaten, and crouched ata distance; but it was a very
cruel trial of the Stag’s strength.

‘The Doe is very fond of her young one, called a “ Fawn,” but takes
care to hide it away in very secret places, for the Stag is a cruel father,

and ‘would kill it if he found it.

The flesh of the Deer.is called “venison,” and is a very nice food.
The skin is useful, and the horns make knife-handles, &c.

Stags are hunted for sport in England, but are not killed (generally)
at the end of the chase, but reserved to be hunted again, for the

amusement of those who keep them.
2


\

NN
)


LAE: iO X:



“SHE Fox is an animal well known to us all. He makes his

home in a burrow in the ground: it is called his “earth,” and

is divided into three rooms. Out of the first he slyly peeps to watch

his prey or his enemies; in the second he keeps his food; in the third
or farthest one he lives, and here his mate rears her young.

The Fox is a very cunning, clever animal. He goes out at night
to seek for prey, and steals fowls from the hen-roost if he can get in;
he digs rabbits out of their burrows, and robs the nests of partridges
and other game birds of eggs, eating the birds too if he can catch them.
He is also very fond of grapes and honey. He robs the poor bees of
their honest earnings, and when they fly on him to sting him, he rolls
on the ground, and thus crushes them. In fact, he isasad thief He
has been seen hunting hares, and springing at an otter to seize its fish.

The Fox is hunted every year, and the hunt is a favourite sport of
Englishmen.

He is a playful animal, and is often seen running after his own tail,
—which is called a “ brush,’—like a kitten. In cold weather he wraps
it about his nose. The female is a very good mother.

The Fox is not easily tamed, and can never be cured of his habit
of stealing.

“Cunning as a Fox” is a proverb you have heard. The Fox has

been the type of cunning and knavery from very early times.
3
»



oy, rh! 2) \

oe

a eras

jh EMER, Ti

E MS oe
NAR el -:

AN gi pipiin 2s
TO

511



THE JAGUAR.



HE Jaguar is the Leopard of America, and is nearly as strong

and bold asa tiger. It can both climb and swim, and as it feeds

on flesh and fish, it kills both monkeys in the trees, and fish in the

rivers. It is a terrible animal to meet in the forests. One might get

out of the reach of a lion by climbing a tree; but a Jaguar will come

after one. It can break a horse’s back by a single blow of its great
and powerful paw.

I have read a story, told by Humboldt, the great traveller, of two
little children being seated at play out of doors in an Indian village
near a forest, when a Jaguar came out of it and joined them. It began
to jump about and play like a cat; till suddenly it scratched the face
of one of them, a little boy: he began to cry, and the other child—a
tiny girl—struck the Jaguar with a stick she held; but it did not mind
the blow, luckily; and before it grew cross, or became angry, and recol-
lected that its little playmates were good to eat, the Indian hunters
came home; and as soon as it heard them it ran off into the woods.

The good Gop thus kept the helpless children safe from the anger
of this ravenous creature.

We ought to be very thankful that there are no wild beasts in our
country, except in the Zoological Gardens, in London, where it is a
pleasure: to look at them, as we know that they cannot get at us to
hurt us.

At sunrise and at sunset the Jaguar utters two cries, well known to
the hunters, and by which they can find his haunt, where they attack
and kill him for his valuable skin.

4

TE OTTER.



TTERS were created by Gon for seeking their prey in water,
therefore He has given them webbed feet, with which they can
swim like a fish, flattened heads, and nostrils furnished with a valve or
covering, which opens and shuts, so that they can keep out the water
when beneath the surface. The tail is flat and moveable, and serves
as a rudder to steer them, and they have strong nails, with which they
burrow in the banks of rivers. Their fur is valuable, and they are
hunted for it by men with dogs. They live in deep holes in the banks
of rivers, and feed on fish.

Otters are found in every part of the world, but are most common
in Europe and America. ;

They can be tamed, if taken when quite young, and can be made
to fish for their masters. A tame Otter has been known to catch
eight or nine salmon a day. It is rewarded with part of the fish ‘it
catches.

It is a pity this animal has not been made use of for the purpose;
but the cases of its being employed by men in fishing are very few—
only enough to show that it was intended for the use of man. But its
fur is so valuable that the animal is being gradually destroyed, and will
doubtless be at length exterminated... —

Otters destroy a great many fish, as they kill more than they eat,
for they only bite a mouthful or two from the back of each fish taken.

The Sea-Otter has a bright, smooth, black coat, which is one of
the most valuable furs. It is found on the coast of the North Pacific
Ocean.
THE CAMEL,

HE Camel is the gift of Gop to the poor people who live on
the hot barren sands of Asia and Africa, where there are no
trees and grass, and where the springs of water are far apart. Gop
has formed the Camel for the work he is wanted to do in these
lands. He is provided with four stomachs, in the first of which are a
number of hollow places called cells, where he can store up enough
water to last him for several days. Then his feet are covered with
hard wide soles, so that he can walk on sand easily; his eyes have
double eyelids, to screen them from the sand; and he can see and
hear at a great distance. He is content with very little food: a few
balls of meal, or the sharp prickly thorns of the desert, fully satisfy
him. He is very patient, and will carry great weights of merchandise
or baggage. In order to allow the drivers to load him, he will kneel
down on the sand; but he will not let them put a heavier burden on
his back than he can well bear: he strikes with his head and utters
sad cries if such a wrong is intended him. The Camel is sometimes
very savage, and he never forgives an injury till he has punished his
enemy. When he is kindly treated, however, he is a good and faithful
servant.
The Bactrian Camel—this is one in the picture—has two humps;
the Arabian Camel, or Dromedary, only one.
The Camel would be quite useless in any other country but its
native land. Its broad feet, cushioned for walking on sand, slip about

on muddy ground, and are hurt by rocks or stones.
6






WARNES NURSERY LITERATURE.



AUNT LOUISA’S LONDON TOY BOOKS.

With Large Original Pag~ Plates by the First Artists, in the very
best style of Colour Printing, with Letterpress Descriptions.

In Demy 4to, 1s. each, picture covers; or, Mounted on Linen, 2s.

. THE RAILWAY ABC

_ A, APPLE PIE

. NURSERY RHYMES

. CHILDHOOD’S HAPPY HOURS

. NURSERY SONGS

. THE LIFE OF A DOLL

. EDITH AND MILLY’S HOUSEKEEPING

. JOHN GILPIN (THE STORY OF)

. THE SEASIDE

. THE ROBIN’S CIIRISTMAS EVE

. COUNTRY PETS

. PUSSY’S LONDON LIFE

. HECTOR, THE DOG

. DICK WHITTINGTON

. UNCLE’S FARMYARD

. LONDON ALPHABET

. COUNTRY ALPHABET

. GAMES AND SPORTS

. HOUSEHOLD PETS

. THE BIRTHDAY PARTY

. KING, QUEEN, AND KNAVE OF HEARTS

. COCK ROBIN’S COURTSHIP, MARRIAGE, DEATH, AND
BURIAL

32. CHILDRENS’ LULLABIES

33. THE NURSERY ALPHABET

34. GOOD CHILDREN

35. BRUIN THE BEAR

36. DAME TROT AND HER CAT

37. HOME FOR THE HOLIDAYS

38. PUNCH AND JUDY

39. MY CHILDREN

40. JACK AND JILL

41. THE FAITHFUL FRIEND

42. TEN LITTLE NIGGERS

“NEO OY Rm Ot oe

(OS I od So od ed oe ol
KF OOM WDH NW RK DWNRA OM



AUNT LOUISA’S SUNDAY BOOKS,

In Demy 4to., Picture Covers, One Shilling each; or mounted
on Linen, Two Shillings.

JOSEPIL AND HIS BRETHREN

. THE PROVERBS OF SOLOMON

. KING DAVID (THE STORY OF)

THE WONDERS OF PROVIDENCE

THE PARABLES OF OUR LORD
CHILDREN OF THE OLD TESTAMENT
. CHILDREN OF THE NEW TESTAMENT
THE CHILDHOOD OF CHRIST

Smo wR oO NP

WARNE’S NATIONAL NURSERY LIBRARY.

In pott 8vo, price 1s. each, picture boards ; or cloth gilt, 1s. 6d.
THE RED RIDING HOOD VOLUME
THE CINDERELLA VOLUME
THE NURSERY RHYMES, TALES, AND JINGLES VOL.
*,* Each Book contains 40 Illustrations and Five
Nursery Tales.



WARNE’S VICTORIA TOY BOOKS.

SPECIALLY DESIGNED FOR CHILDREN, WITH COLOURED PLATES
AND LETTERPRESS,



One Shilling the Packet. Three Distinct Packets.

PACKET No. 1. Contains Twelve Nursery Stories, with 84
Coloured Illustrations.

PACKET No. 2. Nursery Stories and Alphabets.

PACKET No. 3. Alphabets only.

Ditto. Mounted on Linen, ls. 6d. each packet, (2 varieties.)



WARNE’S PICTURE PUZZLE TOY BOOKS.

Printed in Colours by Kronheim, and full Descriptions.
Demy 4to, 18s. each, stiff Fancy Wrappers.

THE HOUSE WE LIVE IN OUR KINGS AND QUEENS
THE NURSERY PLAY-BOOK THE DOLL anp HER DRESSES
OUR HOLIDAYS | THE BOOK OF TRADES
HOLIDAY FUN | ‘THE HORSE

These Toy Books, consisting of Six Pages of Coloured Illustrations,
with Key Plates embodying 200 figures, will occupy the attention of
Children for days, the figures in the key plates having to be cut out and
inserted in their proper places in the illustrations, forming an endless
amount of instruction and amusement.

WARNE’S CHILDREN’S MUSIC BOOKS,

WITH APPROPRIATE WORDS, HYMNS, &c.





In demy oblong, price 18. each, sewed.

1. THE CHILDREN’S HOUR.
Ones, set to Music ; with a Morning and Evening Hymn.
by Mrs. G. H. Currets.

2. SONGS FOR OUR LITTLE FRIENDS.
E. R. B. Twelve Nursery Ditties.

3. THE CHILDREN’S MUSICAL GEM.
Ditties. Edited by Madame Borrant.

4. THE NURSERY NIGHTINGALE. Ditties for the Children.
Set to Music by Madame Borrant.

Demy Ato. cloth, price 5s., gilt and gilt edges.

THE CHILDREN’S MUSICAL COMPANION.
Comprising Books 1, 2, 3, and 4, bound in One Volume.

Twelve Songs for the Little
Edited

Set to Music by

Fourteen Nursery

eee tenet tenet teagett tant Sense" tama ogee teyee nay tay yet Sag get Non gett tag geht tngen in oot

LONDON:—FREDERICK WARNE & CO., BEDFORD STREET, COVENT GARDEN.

NEW YORK:—SCRIBNER, WELFORD, AND ARMSTRONG.















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PROCEDURE describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Invalid character
'59762' 'info:fdaE20091104_AAAAEWfileF20091104_AACDII' 'sip-files00001thm.jpg'
11f56ed7658c6cf65b347a528e3052d8
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describe
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'2012-04-25T04:08:16-04:00'
describe
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'2012-04-25T04:07:48-04:00'
describe
'37873' 'info:fdaE20091104_AAAAEWfileF20091104_AACDIL' 'sip-files00002.pro'
d90587d5e04ab3fe521496f57be45bf4
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'2012-04-25T04:08:00-04:00'
describe
'127208' 'info:fdaE20091104_AAAAEWfileF20091104_AACDIM' 'sip-files00002.QC.jpg'
b0c8d6be7857c44381e5bdec3a3d53fe
734e7302e3beb24db98067724583e0bcb89e75f5
'2012-04-25T04:08:04-04:00'
describe
'8399204' 'info:fdaE20091104_AAAAEWfileF20091104_AACDIN' 'sip-files00002.tif'
70f31d85ed01d66e218bf756ce33efdd
eb221960f9e3d38c89eda3696aca45fac3d01fc2
'2012-04-25T04:08:08-04:00'
describe
'1666' 'info:fdaE20091104_AAAAEWfileF20091104_AACDIO' 'sip-files00002.txt'
cc2b46b0daf8c0feb57c1fdea8a4366f
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describe
'43161' 'info:fdaE20091104_AAAAEWfileF20091104_AACDIP' 'sip-files00002thm.jpg'
40f7021a285d1d35b0727b47129f8264
f7dc3e0e3b01a92523fc1527b2eaa2f6bee30379
'2012-04-25T04:08:02-04:00'
describe
'1048045' 'info:fdaE20091104_AAAAEWfileF20091104_AACDIQ' 'sip-files00003.jp2'
36e41dba788cc6bd933ed4c98167fd1f
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'2012-04-25T04:08:24-04:00'
describe
'620519' 'info:fdaE20091104_AAAAEWfileF20091104_AACDIR' 'sip-files00003.jpg'
46755c41dc56abe0356a717100c206e1
0e2c923c05631f57f070f659ecf4f6544dce9b32
'2012-04-25T04:08:13-04:00'
describe
'3823' 'info:fdaE20091104_AAAAEWfileF20091104_AACDIS' 'sip-files00003.pro'
0de572e710be682aa8a7f24fee0aa3b6
a270fcc4a689bbd8f08c1a83c9688adb204fcafa
'2012-04-25T04:07:52-04:00'
describe
'175918' 'info:fdaE20091104_AAAAEWfileF20091104_AACDIT' 'sip-files00003.QC.jpg'
2ab9c697ccc65346406040468a10a477
564e45477c40b405bd324991ac7554ad87811232
'2012-04-25T04:07:47-04:00'
describe
'25166036' 'info:fdaE20091104_AAAAEWfileF20091104_AACDIU' 'sip-files00003.tif'
1e88c87424cc1082df3d5bc17115cfff
5701b4d227785a51680cc5fa1efd0f4414a0bba5
'2012-04-25T04:08:21-04:00'
describe
'222' 'info:fdaE20091104_AAAAEWfileF20091104_AACDIV' 'sip-files00003.txt'
894b4c86742cc06d9aa613614c2825c5
57abab5b30a77bb7db0e4073cb4ffce0d48333d4
'2012-04-25T04:07:57-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
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8efa145ee3a2371d05f5f8e1671fd46e
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describe
'1038839' 'info:fdaE20091104_AAAAEWfileF20091104_AACDIX' 'sip-files00004.jp2'
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54c070e2fa505f1ac25e14d4260c22dc4d73361a
'2012-04-25T04:08:36-04:00'
describe
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'2012-04-25T04:08:11-04:00'
describe
'36555' 'info:fdaE20091104_AAAAEWfileF20091104_AACDIZ' 'sip-files00004.pro'
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'2012-04-25T04:08:09-04:00'
describe
'123080' 'info:fdaE20091104_AAAAEWfileF20091104_AACDJA' 'sip-files00004.QC.jpg'
7e79061a209c08af550c90f778adff19
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describe
'8323884' 'info:fdaE20091104_AAAAEWfileF20091104_AACDJB' 'sip-files00004.tif'
3643fc7a50174fd98156fe7cdb4362bf
908bb6c995a01b318d1dc19b60ce0b6e33e3053a
'2012-04-25T04:07:49-04:00'
describe
'1480' 'info:fdaE20091104_AAAAEWfileF20091104_AACDJC' 'sip-files00004.txt'
c169da54c9ece7a03efa01a6bb66aa1c
b0759ac0a041b2d29e9299fc9cc3d1b07c72ff23
'2012-04-25T04:07:56-04:00'
describe
'40913' 'info:fdaE20091104_AAAAEWfileF20091104_AACDJD' 'sip-files00004thm.jpg'
fcad5fbaca8a7c5fd12806511925a320
90fcbb8efd0029fc1e9f86e79db2e6220be28007
'2012-04-25T04:07:51-04:00'
describe
'1045540' 'info:fdaE20091104_AAAAEWfileF20091104_AACDJE' 'sip-files00005.jp2'
a10fc2ff428075a8d18dea0522795ea1
6a81da048ebb228ce026f688ba3fa85112b10bab
'2012-04-25T04:08:17-04:00'
describe
'581581' 'info:fdaE20091104_AAAAEWfileF20091104_AACDJF' 'sip-files00005.jpg'
a6ad19d2f85faddfc1e82939926ffebf
d6a2d04217382c2ebce3fb32fea7b869ec90b5d1
'2012-04-25T04:08:07-04:00'
describe
'2819' 'info:fdaE20091104_AAAAEWfileF20091104_AACDJG' 'sip-files00005.pro'
091e3ba2573006d92da4f138affd336a
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describe
'165781' 'info:fdaE20091104_AAAAEWfileF20091104_AACDJH' 'sip-files00005.QC.jpg'
a1e2da7b1cae82ef556e385ecf001af9
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'2012-04-25T04:08:27-04:00'
describe
'25105144' 'info:fdaE20091104_AAAAEWfileF20091104_AACDJI' 'sip-files00005.tif'
4456d76729bcd8135b0016812a1a7a56
991cfc77ab9bc03cb091a19b196cd9d08e2e7e88
describe
'160' 'info:fdaE20091104_AAAAEWfileF20091104_AACDJJ' 'sip-files00005.txt'
2fe2f1bd3d574c99ab8792b352b54fcd
991ab03d6e7928f6dd076078e8fcfa06b0bc9ce8
describe
Invalid character
'51567' 'info:fdaE20091104_AAAAEWfileF20091104_AACDJK' 'sip-files00005thm.jpg'
3b60a13b496a85a2dfea32d4cd822641
145a6a493dca1a4e32a7aa630a88587e61c45436
'2012-04-25T04:08:26-04:00'
describe
'1037094' 'info:fdaE20091104_AAAAEWfileF20091104_AACDJL' 'sip-files00006.jp2'
5426b3b81244aea140f7d3e067e860d3
8c4317feca122ad3376db6d0835d53b552022fc4
describe
'382749' 'info:fdaE20091104_AAAAEWfileF20091104_AACDJM' 'sip-files00006.jpg'
e43d612f1fbd6185d0981cb564d13979
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describe
'36479' 'info:fdaE20091104_AAAAEWfileF20091104_AACDJN' 'sip-files00006.pro'
0c26d2349d2515fd640a91c6ab54193f
999a4c414633e87472e7332c5e878c3e6fdac8af
'2012-04-25T04:08:01-04:00'
describe
'124510' 'info:fdaE20091104_AAAAEWfileF20091104_AACDJO' 'sip-files00006.QC.jpg'
580e006d55d990b485f68ae8e7f5e562
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describe
'8310356' 'info:fdaE20091104_AAAAEWfileF20091104_AACDJP' 'sip-files00006.tif'
4e21a4797b90e1624128b4671ad9736d
a285d46240dbae03166779ecf845dfb4e996da55
'2012-04-25T04:07:54-04:00'
describe
'1475' 'info:fdaE20091104_AAAAEWfileF20091104_AACDJQ' 'sip-files00006.txt'
2a4f7884bab65e72659e5114d0b8af74
251ecadeb65532c509dc57eab483f6304f729694
'2012-04-25T04:08:05-04:00'
describe
'42590' 'info:fdaE20091104_AAAAEWfileF20091104_AACDJR' 'sip-files00006thm.jpg'
c78002e9a74f766a29e11305af8c45ea
b072652979eee0a42fd5d083d6c49d0dbb0316dd
describe
'1042443' 'info:fdaE20091104_AAAAEWfileF20091104_AACDJS' 'sip-files00007.jp2'
4c813a3c3d804a2a8226a0bd01870431
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describe
'577070' 'info:fdaE20091104_AAAAEWfileF20091104_AACDJT' 'sip-files00007.jpg'
7e53c6c92d68e85c711ef673c0d776fa
682c749cbe2648f9ca0ccc0a6e4da974d5d671f2
describe
'3908' 'info:fdaE20091104_AAAAEWfileF20091104_AACDJU' 'sip-files00007.pro'
dddc678ed22f19868fd755cd638ce950
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describe
'162470' 'info:fdaE20091104_AAAAEWfileF20091104_AACDJV' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
104d5a5bd657d70230b4604bb574c1a8
0aa847283e0eb6f4e8fc73e36530e92ba829c20b
'2012-04-25T04:07:59-04:00'
describe
'25034388' 'info:fdaE20091104_AAAAEWfileF20091104_AACDJW' 'sip-files00007.tif'
4600fbfa1dd8de5e171562df98d0793e
8f7275209a93ca21bd2e220163a46de5d1f1e413
'2012-04-25T04:08:18-04:00'
describe
'292' 'info:fdaE20091104_AAAAEWfileF20091104_AACDJX' 'sip-files00007.txt'
075e6e3876966bbc77ab344cd625dcd5
4a936baac04466de60e85f859dce2adf276a7b26
describe
Invalid character
'51262' 'info:fdaE20091104_AAAAEWfileF20091104_AACDJY' 'sip-files00007thm.jpg'
d33002c991c01a3f4d2256178434fb33
fd704adb4d866a3078b4c2cb622f6af56457cf79
describe
'1024505' 'info:fdaE20091104_AAAAEWfileF20091104_AACDJZ' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
8d54e9e2cc71ffe44d52685c0bff6126
f91dd268f21507bb2cd74432c0df1b052676f47d
describe
'688756' 'info:fdaE20091104_AAAAEWfileF20091104_AACDKA' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
40fe3eae18f86f7bad121b8998ab2ffb
67282ebda13103024b8a4effcd8f8942da95dbeb
'2012-04-25T04:07:44-04:00'
describe
'4024' 'info:fdaE20091104_AAAAEWfileF20091104_AACDKB' 'sip-files00008.pro'
7e71b1b5064af59cae18017daf98451c
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describe
'195588' 'info:fdaE20091104_AAAAEWfileF20091104_AACDKC' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
c11017379a719f7710035ed89e43bd4d
99926145ad0aa971b37bf4efdb779be79ac0b426
describe
'24603280' 'info:fdaE20091104_AAAAEWfileF20091104_AACDKD' 'sip-files00008.tif'
4bfe78e2f8d15d0f6404e6453a86f017
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'2012-04-25T04:07:50-04:00'
describe
'540' 'info:fdaE20091104_AAAAEWfileF20091104_AACDKE' 'sip-files00008.txt'
11d1b8393070afbe6554a3b8aa836ff0
2696a6d501dad53e9d77e4b78f1110a519b1e42f
describe
Invalid character
'61130' 'info:fdaE20091104_AAAAEWfileF20091104_AACDKF' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
90bc149c14f039656d15e0f7af32b0f6
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describe
'1037430' 'info:fdaE20091104_AAAAEWfileF20091104_AACDKG' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
6d164e235e66f7d21b23935a8ff0a68c
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'2012-04-25T04:08:19-04:00'
describe
'396740' 'info:fdaE20091104_AAAAEWfileF20091104_AACDKH' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
a17b4c0c44c4facbd8219b6fbb4dbd0b
dfd428496e88b0fed478ae9068df0da992afb5ba
'2012-04-25T04:07:53-04:00'
describe
'41189' 'info:fdaE20091104_AAAAEWfileF20091104_AACDKI' 'sip-files00009.pro'
c1accb67eba368612f8efcbc784d5cd9
6a14fad0501908320bf5b3ec48fbae391378ab08
describe
'128672' 'info:fdaE20091104_AAAAEWfileF20091104_AACDKJ' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
39f019f2f34a528ea89c906aa9d89638
f32ab5fce774de243c79ed5d51023058ff4a12e7
describe
'8313036' 'info:fdaE20091104_AAAAEWfileF20091104_AACDKK' 'sip-files00009.tif'
306281bc4571f56edc32c60c4816db64
52b235a968f0235b0a0e84f16c450ff6a9b7d389
describe
'1623' 'info:fdaE20091104_AAAAEWfileF20091104_AACDKL' 'sip-files00009.txt'
a3dfd650e9ba222a3e64202f46be75ce
db5dac78e2bd4ad058a23b9b4a76e8e17fd0a35b
describe
'43267' 'info:fdaE20091104_AAAAEWfileF20091104_AACDKM' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
4f00e8cee7ca3f7b7db1e6f318f440e9
aaf31f1269593608ede6726aae2a5b50844b89e9
'2012-04-25T04:08:35-04:00'
describe
'1037922' 'info:fdaE20091104_AAAAEWfileF20091104_AACDKN' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
bc784fce5d1cdf31c1b1b5df82c5c601
8610bcd1dd7ee93c38ea072439bc03323b6c8227
describe
'572913' 'info:fdaE20091104_AAAAEWfileF20091104_AACDKO' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
e7e755fa4d5f654b807f3b423fa8534e
a43f6dd5a0d8dae5d165ae1a98de802751839f24
describe
'3641' 'info:fdaE20091104_AAAAEWfileF20091104_AACDKP' 'sip-files00010.pro'
8efaf4fed13e2f8501365b73d57eeb36
59394bc92e3675afca0dd0df80fb4d838c3618a0
describe
'161851' 'info:fdaE20091104_AAAAEWfileF20091104_AACDKQ' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
6cdd25dd9c4a82ca0dbf751c69b259ae
1f67b381a5355366b6c059d1b827fa127f43336b
describe
'24926384' 'info:fdaE20091104_AAAAEWfileF20091104_AACDKR' 'sip-files00010.tif'
10e317287f700419bc2af314d1c014b8
878e4833eb40a7719fef70a64ff16969066ceca3
describe
'350' 'info:fdaE20091104_AAAAEWfileF20091104_AACDKS' 'sip-files00010.txt'
3f7a0062d59535ffbda1ec0eeb484b06
d21ee64c31847ace935a5acb5c5d66b85fb690e4
'2012-04-25T04:07:55-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'50996' 'info:fdaE20091104_AAAAEWfileF20091104_AACDKT' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
e30434bef81a4f3e594b11d28aa4a73b
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describe
'1036790' 'info:fdaE20091104_AAAAEWfileF20091104_AACDKU' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
3d7f59809039abc1708c0f99479d04e3
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describe
'387525' 'info:fdaE20091104_AAAAEWfileF20091104_AACDKV' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
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describe
'39061' 'info:fdaE20091104_AAAAEWfileF20091104_AACDKW' 'sip-files00011.pro'
abd06cc1810a2a7a1ab1614737ad721b
9e12c1d1a8c491a298b139febf1af93fe6950f8b
describe
'124997' 'info:fdaE20091104_AAAAEWfileF20091104_AACDKX' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
84a40b4dba7b3bc6f078a9f2e32aeb09
3c2fe4103ceb52c4831a09f966df23f1ad7067ea
describe
'8309468' 'info:fdaE20091104_AAAAEWfileF20091104_AACDKY' 'sip-files00011.tif'
59c3b213edeec4d22728beab3c151c82
7e87af74e2e75491b8ca773c302220a6254cc0f6
'2012-04-25T04:07:58-04:00'
describe
'1544' 'info:fdaE20091104_AAAAEWfileF20091104_AACDKZ' 'sip-files00011.txt'
6c88a357ee96b801b2944fc742dc8e9c
3141ecafca117adf56a9bc41c93246f0d06ed91e
describe
'42195' 'info:fdaE20091104_AAAAEWfileF20091104_AACDLA' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
031073a2373230a0ac58a31c89ab024d
7cc090ecc8f4a63714d3b1bffbddfd18468adda4
describe
'1062421' 'info:fdaE20091104_AAAAEWfileF20091104_AACDLB' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
f7b105c735258d602e80f0d81e5ec6d4
931313336c34198cbe898f5649e0640546c7a75d
describe
'568876' 'info:fdaE20091104_AAAAEWfileF20091104_AACDLC' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
a26147825fc1001e65981aee8037ca95
a90427fd0e283f4c4ade5edb6c6a3fe55bca5ac3
'2012-04-25T04:08:44-04:00'
describe
'4355' 'info:fdaE20091104_AAAAEWfileF20091104_AACDLD' 'sip-files00012.pro'
73a3d7108cb71b60ecd14f150cfb7e59
c4b4a492662bb21973b7fb198ec8907c4790c3e9
describe
'161445' 'info:fdaE20091104_AAAAEWfileF20091104_AACDLE' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
0268d1b54a112ad3a140d07b6857e45b
3d57bc9bf0dde4c90bb5ef31f24778d66307c635
describe
'25510060' 'info:fdaE20091104_AAAAEWfileF20091104_AACDLF' 'sip-files00012.tif'
d1b40aaf1b6192cc4732f6ab29c2a8df
4ecaa699b096119f338b51eb34ef3862d2e72a03
describe
'412' 'info:fdaE20091104_AAAAEWfileF20091104_AACDLG' 'sip-files00012.txt'
b3e10769e4af82e345d407fd0d9593d2
25493ef299d11f3cb37483fced64f455df3c059e
describe
Invalid character
'50794' 'info:fdaE20091104_AAAAEWfileF20091104_AACDLH' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
95eb207937ca6fa58bb69704d189efa4
94a0de41376c5852298ab4ca5198596459644df0
describe
'1040720' 'info:fdaE20091104_AAAAEWfileF20091104_AACDLI' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
fa36cf73dee09cafa4f36c0e909edcac
bfe2b1ad254fa8a1248bdf23869068d23394e159
describe
'388640' 'info:fdaE20091104_AAAAEWfileF20091104_AACDLJ' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
5993f060b9b4b8db0e5443e0260772c8
05cc2343b7cbbb1f0d62049d5abefdd388cc634c
describe
'40528' 'info:fdaE20091104_AAAAEWfileF20091104_AACDLK' 'sip-files00013.pro'
1298079a59fd5fee9002419f502c3281
e154d00ea8c5946f810ba3b51565e131eeeea1f1
describe
'126693' 'info:fdaE20091104_AAAAEWfileF20091104_AACDLL' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
cb48c679520d91ff7bc0c70eae061982
3c3027a4247d6f144cde1de59642d6f13d6add2d
describe
'8339892' 'info:fdaE20091104_AAAAEWfileF20091104_AACDLM' 'sip-files00013.tif'
f46f909a6ea33027a9ba580c85c35bf2
363ef14e4e1cbf02c7439828b97189e168a55e37
describe
'1619' 'info:fdaE20091104_AAAAEWfileF20091104_AACDLN' 'sip-files00013.txt'
59b308bdf8804fa618cb09c8b1828032
8b1621d71ffa304ff56b87343d98b60f15447ae7
describe
'41215' 'info:fdaE20091104_AAAAEWfileF20091104_AACDLO' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
e1d6ae743594aef6267bc741c7495769
6d883ededf44ab63ab59c17630c563b02516ff4b
describe
'1034395' 'info:fdaE20091104_AAAAEWfileF20091104_AACDLP' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
bf14ffdcfc3272bee3f87e922af9689b
d748430a72806449ab57e7ff89ba63118dbce014
describe
'513005' 'info:fdaE20091104_AAAAEWfileF20091104_AACDLQ' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
c954663be2b0cf21f1444dad289d4403
b96cdbd99c6031fdc817c6d78a8c49951336c8ed
describe
'94595' 'info:fdaE20091104_AAAAEWfileF20091104_AACDLR' 'sip-files00014.pro'
a818e189c7b19ae245514c357484cbd4
c3c60349015a317b26931ad42aa007251e6eb97b
describe
'154330' 'info:fdaE20091104_AAAAEWfileF20091104_AACDLS' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
72fff17bbcba162c049fae3d70bafda5
6ca459a03dc89bf30131672c970f50d061e53b36
describe
'24838916' 'info:fdaE20091104_AAAAEWfileF20091104_AACDLT' 'sip-files00014.tif'
518774c4d9a6e863e6bbd85a4d352146
988d24004dae66a51a9430eda8613ff0012630a7
'2012-04-25T04:08:15-04:00'
describe
'4109' 'info:fdaE20091104_AAAAEWfileF20091104_AACDLU' 'sip-files00014.txt'
1970f91eb6e22ca43a02493f8908cd63
9c1823375ab7db6bf15cd135cac6acdfcf9bf51f
describe
'49711' 'info:fdaE20091104_AAAAEWfileF20091104_AACDLV' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
83264f3e7664bf5bf4f451c3b6876749
84bff4fb4220b17a2bdcdbc5f6ebb82fa404cccf
describe
'23953' 'info:fdaE20091104_AAAAEWfileF20091104_AACDLW' 'sip-filesUF00028219_00001.mets'
af861251c80975fb6d9038067587c4dd
bae7b58a6d410b21246fccc8593ac99a3b407d33
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-11T06:00:44-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'29190' 'info:fdaE20091104_AAAAEWfileF20091104_AACDLZ' 'sip-filesUF00028219_00001.xml'
e634d517d059637697f6f87409af43d8
b2c3f2b7da0e0b40ace26ada3fe84bda902603e3
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-11T06:00:45-05:00'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.