Citation
Katie Summers

Material Information

Title:
Katie Summers : a little tale for little readers
Creator:
Hall, Charles ( Author, Primary )
Marcus Ward & Co ( Publisher )
Thomas Nelson & Sons ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
London (67 Chandos Street)
Publisher:
Marcus Ward & Co.
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
133 p. : ill. ; 14 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Honesty -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Girls -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Children's stories ( lcsh )
Juvenile literature -- 1875 ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1875
Genre:
Juvenile literature ( rbgenr )
fiction ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
United States -- New York -- New York
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Published simultaneously by Thomas Nelson and Sons, New York.
Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
Statement of Responsibility:
by Mrs. Charles Hall.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
024170583 ( ALEPH )
23897648 ( OCLC )
AHN4388 ( NOTIS )

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Full Text
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The Baldwin Library

_—
UD we.









KATIE SUMMERS











KATIE SUMMERS

A LITTLE TALE FOR LITTLE READERS

BY
MRS. CHARLES HALL



London:
MARCUS WARD & CO., 67, CHANDOS STREET
NEW YORK: THOMAS NELSON AND SONS
1875







CONTENTS.



CHAP. PAGE
J.—PLEASANT ANTICIPATIONS, . . vgeD
Il.—Tuer BirrH-Day, . A 6 : 15
Ill.—Grance Farm, : 5 0 eo
IV.—Fatry IsLanp, ; 42
V.—Tur Enp oF A Happy Day, . , . 63
VI.—TuHE Broken VASE, 0 si 5 72
VII.—Prr Mice, % - 84
VIlI.—Tue FatsEHoop DiscovERED, ; S 93
IX.—A DaneErous ADVENTURE, . 6 . 107

X.—Tue Litre ORPHAN, . ° ° 123



dllustrations,

—e

Kartig AND Harry (p. 18),

FANNY, , si ;
Harry AND ROVER,

“‘@upss wHAT I’vE Got” (See Cover),

Katie anp Lucy,

Frontispiece.
PAGE

6

94

. 107

123





KATIE SUMMERS.



CHAP. I—PLEASANT ANTICIPATIONS.

mx
€)* E afternoon, as they sat quietly playing
76- on the lawn, Katie Summers said to her

brother, “Harry, do you know to-morrow is
Fanny’s birthday, and Aunt Mary has asked
mamma to let us have a holiday, and we are to
spend the day at the farm? Isn't that delight-
ful ?”

“Yes” said Harry, “I do like going to Aunt



10 Katie Summers.



Mary’s; there’s always such lots of fun there.
What do you like doing best ?”

“T don’t quite know. It’s great fun playing
at hide-and-seek in the shrubbery, and I like
going into the farmyard and feeding the chickens
and pigeons, and seeing the cows milked; and
then the boat! Oh, I think I like the boat
best of all, when old James goes with us, and
rows us as far as the Fairy Island !”

“T wonder if we shall go there to-morrow,”
said Harry. “I like the boat the best, too, but
next best to that is the hay-field. You can’t
think how jolly it is to get on the very top of a
great cart-load of hay, or else to ride on one of
the horses !”

“ Ah, yes!” answered Katie; “but then, you
know, Aunt Mary doesn’t like me to do that;
gne says it isn’t proper for little girls to do all
that boys do; but she doesn’t mind my playing
with the hay in the field, and that is very plea-
sant. I’m so glad it is haymaking time now.”



Pleasant Anticipations. 11



“T hope it will be fine,” said Harry, looking
anxiously up into the beautiful blue sky; “ it
would spoil all the fun if it was wet.”

“Not all,” said Katie, “because there would
be the dear old house to play in, and Fanny has
such a lot of toys.”

“Yes,” answered Harry, in a scornful tone;
“dolls, and cradles, and things of that sort.
They are all very well for girls, but boys can’t
play with those stupid things.”

“No, I suppose not,” answered Katie, slowly ;
“at least, when they do they always break them.
IT remember one day Fanny had a beautiful doll
given her, with real hair all in curls, and wax
arms and legs, and it opened and shut its eyes ;
and one day Tom got hold of it when Fanny
was out, and spoiled its hair, and cut open its
head with a large pair of scissors, because he
wanted to see how it was its eyes opened and
shut! Aunt Mary was very angry with him.
She said it was very unkind of him to break



12 Katie Summers.

Fanny’s toys, and he wouldn’t like it if Fanny
had broken his soldiers or cut open his drum,
or anything of that kind. Tom was very sorry
for it afterwards; and do you know what he
did? He saved all his money until he had
enough to buy a new head for the doll! Wasn’t
that kind of him; and he did it all out of his
own head ; nobody ever told him to do it. Ido
love Tom, he is always so good-natured ; and if
he does do any mischief, he is always so sorry
for it afterwards, and tries to make up for it in
some way or other.”

“ And what did Fanny say when she found
her doll all spoilt ?” asked Harry.

“Qh! she was in a great rage, and slapped
Tom’s face, and called him names, and said she
would never forgive him. Aunt Mary came in
just then, and said how dreadful it was to say
such a thing and to get into such a passion, and
she sent Fanny away to her room to be quiet
and think over it all; and Tom was punished



Pleasant Antecipations. 13



too; but I didn’t hear any more, because
mamma came and took me home. But some
time after I saw Fanny’s doll looking quite new
again, and then she told me about Tom buying
it a new head.”

At that moment their mamma called to them
from the open window to come in, and they
jumped up at once and ran in-doors.

And now I must tell you a little more about
Katie and Harry Summers. They were the
only children of Mr. and Mrs. Summers, and
they lived in a pretty cottage covered all over
with roses and jessamine. There was a large
garden at the back of the house, and the win-
dows opened out on to the lawn. They each
had a beautiful little donkey to ride—not like
those poor, rough, half-starved creatures you see
on the common, who can’t do anything but
walk, no matter how much their cruel masters
beat them. No; the donkeys belonging to
Katie and Harry could trot and gallop almost



14 Katie Summers.

as fast as a pony, and their coats were smooth
and soft, for William, the gardener, took great
pride in them, and brushed them well every day.

At the time this story begins Katie was eight
years old and Harry was seven. They were
both very good little children, and loved each
other very dearly, as brothers and sisters should
do.

Mrs. Summers’ brother, Mr. Marchwood, and
Aunt Mary his wife, lived at Grange Farm,
about five miles from Myrtle Lodge, the home
of Mr. and Mrs. Summers. They had four
children—Tom, who was the same age as Katie ;
Fanny, who was a year younger; Lucy, who
was four years old; and a little baby boy who
was not yet quite two. The family at the farm
were very fond of the young folks at Myrtle
Lodge, and the greatest possible treat to Katie
and Harry was to spend a long day at the farm,
and that was what they were looking forward
to on the morrow.





CHAP. Il.—THE BIRTH-DAY.

MYEEXT morning, at six o'clock, Katie was

UN: awake, and, jumping out of bed, ran to
the window to see what sort of a day it was.
As she pulled aside the curtain she saw the sun
shining across the lawn, and the sky was blue,
and the birds were singing sweetly. Then she
ran to the door of Harry’s room and tapped
gently, and called to him, “ Harry, Harry, make
haste and get up; it’s such a lovely day, and I
want to go and gather some flowers to take with
us to-day to the farm.”



16 Katte Summers.



“ All right,” answered Harry, “Il be ready
as soon as you are;” and away went Katie to
dress herself, for she was a handy little girl,
and could dress herself with very little help
from Sarah.

As soon as the children were ready they went
down stairs, and Sarah gave them each a cup of
fresh milk and a piece of bread and butter, and
each taking a basket they started off to pick the
sweetest flowers they could find.

“T wish I could reach that piece of jessa-
mine,” said Katie ; “ none of these pieces down
lower are nearly so large, and Aunt Mary is so
fond of it.”

“Oh, I'll soon get it,” said Harry, and off he
started to the dining-room, but soon came back
looking very angry.

“What is the matter, Harry ?” said Katie.

“That Sarah is a nasty, horrid, disagreeable
old thing, and I hate her,” said Harry, angrily.
“T wanted her to let me have a chair to stand



The Birth-day. 17



on to reach the jessamine, and she wouldn't let
me have it, nasty old thing.”

“Oh, don’t say that, Harry, dear,” said Katie,
going up to him and putting her arm lovingly
round his neck. “You know mamma doesn’t
allow those chairs to be brought into the garden,
so of course Sarah couldn’t let you have it;
and I’m sure she isn’t cross, for she is always
ready to do all she can to please us. Never
mind the jessamine, I will pick all I can reach;
though it isn’t so large as the other, it smells
just as nice; and I’m sure Aunt Mary would
rather be without it than that we should get it
by doing what is wrong.”

“That’s right, my little woman,” said a voice
behind them, and, turning round, they saw their
papa. They ran to him for their morning kiss,
and then each taking a hand they walked beside
him. “I am glad to see, my little Katie, that
you have sense enough to give up cheerfully
what you cannot obtain, and that you see it is



18 Katie Summers.



better even to disappoint a person than to do
what is wrong in order to get something that
will please them. But come, let me see if I can
reach this flower that grows so inconveniently
high.” So saying they moved to the spot, and,
by the help of a stick, Mr. Summers managed
to reach the coveted flower. “There, you see,
Harry! even if Sarah had let you take the chair
you wouldn’t have been able to reach the flower ;
so you would have made Sarah do wrong, and
displeased your mamma, just for nothing. And
because she did her duty you called her names.”

“Oh, papa, ’m so sorry. Ill go this minute
and beg her pardon.”

“Do, my boy; and in future always try and
remember to be civil and kind to those who
wait upon you and serve you.”

When they had picked as many flowers as
their baskets would hold, they went to the stable
to see their donkeys, “Sandy” and “ Mops,” and
Mr. Summers gave William orders to have the



The Birth-day. 19



pony chaise ready by nine o'clock, saying that
he would himself drive the children to the
Grange.

“Oh, how delightful!” they both exclaimed,
for a drive with papa was a great treat; he
always had so much to tell them, and could
answer their questions so much better than
William.

The children then stroked and patted their
donkeys, and the affectionate creatures rubbed
their noses against their little master and mis-
tress, and seemed quite pleased to see them.

“Oh, papa,” said Katie, “ I’ve quite forgotten
to save them a piece of my bread. May I go
and get some now?” And as her papa gave her
leave to do so, off she darted, and soon returned
with a slice, half of which she gave to Harry
for Sandy.

After Mops and Sandy were fed, they went
to the dogs’ house, and Mr. Summers opened
the door, and out bounded the great dogs Lynn

B



20 Katie Summers.

and Brann and Beauty and Hero; and the two
little dogs from the house, hearing the barking,
came frisking out to join the fun, and a fine
game of romps they all had, poor little Dot and
Pussy getting rolled over and over by the big
dogs; but they were not hurt at all, for the big
dogs were only in play, and took care not to
tread on or bite the little ones. When they
were all tired out the dogs were sent back to
their house, and Mr. Summers and the children
went in to breakfast. They found mamma
down in the dining-room waiting for them.

“ How rosy and bright you look, my darlings,”
she said, kissing them. “There is nothing like
early rising and fresh morning air for putting
roses into little people’s faces; and for making
them hungry, too, I daresay,” she added, smiling,
as she placed before them each a basin of bread
and milk. Although Mrs. Summers did not
allow constant chattering at meal times, yet
Katie and Harry were not forbidden to speak



The Birth-day. 21



if they had anything they wished to say; but
this morning they seemed in too great a hurry
to be off to care to speak, and they had soon
finished their breakfasts. Being well behaved
little children, they did not, as I have seen some
children do, jump down from their seats as soon
as they had finished, but waited patiently until
they had permission to do so.

“You may run away now, my dears,” said
Mr. Summers; “I see you are eager to be off,
and I want to speak to your mamma.”

The children gladly ran upstairs to their play-
room, and taking down their money boxes,
began counting out their money to see how
much they could afford to spend ; for they would
pass through a little town on their way to the
Grange, and Mr. Summers had promised that
they should stop to buy what they wanted.

“T have three shillings,” said Katie, “and T
want to buy a hat and pair of shoes for Fanny’s
doll as a birthday present, and then I want te



22 Katie Summers.



buy a new table and chairs for my doll’s house.
J wonder if I shall have enough money.”

“What shall I give her?” said Harry. “Tve
only got one shilling and sixpence. I spent
nearly all my money the last time I went to
Hamley with William.”

“You might get Fanny a little needle-book
for her workbox, or a yard measure; she wants
both those things, I know,” answered Katie.

Putting their money carefully into their
purses, they hastened to get ready for their
drive. The chaise was brought round to the
door as they came down stairs. The baskets of
flowers were carefully stowed away under the
seat. Then the children, after kissing mamma,
jumped in and took their places.

“Oh, papa, let me drive till we get to the
town,” said Harry.

“Very well, my boy,” answered his papa ;
“change places with me ;” and Harry, with great
delight, took the reins



The Birth-day. 23



The pony was a very steady-going old fellow,
and the children were often allowed to drive
when papa or William was beside them.

It was a splendid day ; the sun shone brightly,
and the hedges were covered with wild roses,
honeysuckle, and other wild flowers. The air
was sweet with the scent of them and of the
new-mown hay, and birds were singing in every
bush and tree.

“Oh, how beautiful everything is!” exclaimed
Katie. “I wish.it was always fine like this.”

“ A very foolish wish, my child ; for if it was
always fine we should not have all these flowers
and the freshness which isso pleasant. In very
hot places, where there is rain only at a certain
season, everything gets dried up and parched.
The people are not able to go out of their houses
except in the very early morning, for fear of
getting killed by the heat of the sun; and in the
hottest part of the day everybody is obliged to
lie down and keep quite still.”



24 Katie Summers.

“T shouldn’t like that,” said Katie; “it must
be dreadful to be so very hot.”

«There are other places not so hot as India
where they have more fine weather than we have
in England; but even there the people suffer from
the heat during the summer, and those who are
not born there get idle and weak from it.”

They soon arrived at the little town of Hamley.
The chaise was stopped at the door of a toy
shop, and the children went in to make their
purchases. The hat and shoes were chosen and
paid for, and the needle-book, too, but Katie
couldn’t get the things she wanted for her doll’s
house, so they left the shop, and were going to
ask their papa to take them to the other toy
shop, when they saw a poor woman they knew
standing talking to their papa.

“He's about as bad as he can be, sir,” they
heard her say. “The doctor says he can’t live
many days now; and indeed I can hardly wish
it, dreadful as it is to part with my darling; for







The Birth-day. 25

he is nothing but a bag of bones, and he suffers
very much.”

“Ts there anything he wants?” asked Mr.
Summers, kindly; “any nourishing things—
wine, or jelly, or anything of that sort ?”

“No, sir, thank you kindly,” said Mrs. Thomp-
son, drying her eyes, “he has everything he can
want. The parson and his lady are very kind,
and let him want for nothing; but he had a
wish just now for strawberries, so, as I had to
come to Hamley, I thought I would get him a
few; I’ve got threepence here on purpose.”

Katie waited to hear no more, but ran into a
greenerocer’s shop which was next to the toy
shop, and asked the price of a basket of straw-
berries.

“Sixpence and eightpence a basket, miss,”
answered the woman. “These are quite worth
twopence more,” she added, taking down a basket
of the finest, and showing them to the little girl.

And, indeed, they were; they looked so



26 Katie Summers.

sweet and fresh, and smelt so nice, that Katie
looked rather sadly at her shilling, which was
all she had left.

“They do look nice,” she said, “and poor
little Johnny would enjoy them so much. I
should like to get him two baskets, for there are
not many strawberries in one; but I’ve only a
shilling.”

“Bless your sweet face,” said the woman;
“then you shall have the two for a shilling.
And who is little Johnny ? is he your brother?”

“No,” said Katie, “he is a little boy in our vil-
lage, and he is very, very ill, and longs so much
for some strawberries ; and his mother was going
to buy him some, but she is poor, and could
only spare threepence. Oh, thank you very
much,” she added, as the woman handed her the
baskets of fruit neatly tied up in paper; and,
putting her shilling down on the counter, she
ran back to the chaise, where she found Mrs.
Thompson still talking to Mr. Summers. Katie



The Birth-day. rh



put the parcel into her hands and said, “ They
are for Johnny, with my love, and I hope he
will like them.”

“God bless you, my dear little lady, for your
kindness. Johnny will, indeed, be pleased.
Thank you kindly, miss.”

With a kind good-bye to the poor woman,
Mr. Summers drove on.

“Papa,” said Katie, “wasn’t it kind of the
woman in the shop to let me have the fruit for
a shilling when it ought to have been one
shilling ‘and fourpence? I told her I had only
a shilling, and that I wanted the strawberries
for a poor sick little boy, and she let me have
them.”

“Yes,” answered her papa, “it was kind of
her, and I am very pleased to think that my
little girl was so thoughtful for others, and gave
up her own wishes to provide for those of a sick
ehild.”

“ But, papa, I liked best to give the fruit to



28 Katie Summers.

Johnny, because I can do without the things for
the doll’s house. Dolly won’t know that the
table is shaky and the chairs are broken,” said
Katie, with a merry laugh.

Mr. Summers smiled, pleased and thankful to
find his little girl so thoroughly unselfish and
land.

Harry looked grave and thoughtful.

“What is the matter, my boy?” said his papa,
kindly.

“YT was wishing, papa, that I had done like
Katie, but I never thought of it. Ive only six-
pence left.”

«And what are you going to-do with it?”
asked Mr. Summers.

“TI was going to buy a whip, but if I can get
anything to please Johnny instead I would
rather.”

“He is very fond of flowers,” said Katie.
“Couldn't you get him a little rosebush in a pot?
He could have it to stand on the little table



The LBirth-day. 29



near his bed, and I think he would be pleased
with that.”

““What a girl Katie is!” exclaimed Harry,
with admiration; “she always thinks of every-
thing. I expect that is the very thing he would
like, for I remember the last time I saw him he
had some flowers in a little glass on his table,
and he said what a pity it was that they died
so soon when they were picked. But can I get
a rosebush for sixpence ?” said Harry.

“We will see,” said his papa; and they drove
to a nursery garden.

There was nothing nice to be got under a
shilling, and one very pretty rosebush with two
or three roses in bloom and plenty of buds about
it was one shilling and sixpence.

“Oh, papa, I should so like that one,” said
Harry, his face flushing with eagerness.

Katie crept up to her papa and whispered to
him, “Do let him have the money, papa dear.”

But Mr. Summers did not think that would



30 Katie Summers.



be good for his little boy, and he wanted him to
practice self-denial; so he said, “How much
did you give for the present you bought for
Fanny ?”

“A shilling, papa,” he answered.

“Well, give me the needle-book, and I will
pay you a shilling for it; then you will be able
to buy the rose, and I will give the needle-book
to Fanny.”

Harry hesitated a minute. He thought
Fanny would think him mean if he didn’t give
her a present on her birth-day; but then he
thought of poor sick Johnny, and of how he
would enjoy having the beautiful rose; so he
said, “Thank you, papa, I should like to have
the rose ;” and he gave his papa the little paper
parcel containing the needle-book. Harry then
gave the gardener his sixpence, and Mr. Sum-
mers paid the shilling. The rose was handed
to Harry, who carefully placed it in the chaise,
and they drove off.





CHAP. TII.—GRANGE FARM.

‘Ke DRIVE of half-an-hour now brought them
AK in sight of Grange Farm. Tom, who was
having a swing on the gate of the farmyard, was
the first to catch sight of the chaise as it drove
up the lane leading to the house. He ran to
meet them, and they all alighted; and, while
one of the farm servants led the pony to the
stable, they walked up to the house. Aunt
Mary was at the door, ready to give them a
hearty welcome.

“We have brought you some flowers, Aunt



32 Katie Summers.



Mary,” said Katie, as she and Hog 4 “handed the
baskets to their aunt.

“Thank you, my dears, how thoughtful and
kind of you. You know I always think the
flowers from Myrtle Lodge are sweeter than
any others. They are as fresh as if they had
been just gathered; see, some of them are still
quite moist with or Ah! there is some of
my favourite jessamine; how sweet it smells!
But come inside and rest ;” and she led the way
into the cool, old-fashioned dining-room, where
the table was laid with sweet cake and dishes
of fresh-gathered strawberries.

Fanny now came in, and her uncle kissed her,
and wishing her many happy returns of the day,
eave her the little needle-book and a large
brown paper parcel.

“Many happy returns of the day, Fanny
dear,” said Katie, as she thrust her littie present
into her cousin’s hand.

And then came Harry’s turn, and as he kissed



Grange Farm. 33

her and gave her his good wishes, he turned
very red. “Iam sorry I haven’t got a present
for you, Fanny,” he said; “but I spent all my
money.”

“Oh, never mind,” answered his cousin; “I
have had such a lot of presents ;’ and she pro-
ceeded to open the parcels she had just received.
What a beautiful hat for Julia! (that was her
best doll’s name); and shoes, too! Oh! thank
you, Katie dear; they are the very things she
wants. Ob, uncle, how well you have guessed
what I wanted; the needle-book is the very
thing, for I am always losing my needles.”

“T think you must give Katie the credit for
choosing the right thing,” said her uncle ; “ for
it was she who thought of the needle-book.”

“JT wonder what is in this big parcel,” said.
Fanny, as she proceeded to untie the string.
“Oh, uncle, how lovely !’ she exclaimed, as, on
taking off the paper, she saw two pretty wicker-
work baskets fitted up, one with a doll’s tea-



34 Katie Summers.



service, and the other a dinner-service. Inside
one was a little note from her aunt wishing her
every happiness, and hoping she would like the
present she sent her.

The little girl’s delight at the sight of the
beautiful things was unbounded ; and certainly ©
the toys were very pretty. The tea and dinner
services were all of plated ware, and shone
brightly as they lay softly nestled in white wad-
ding; the spoons and knives and forks were
gilded, and were fitted into the lids of the
baskets. The baskets themselves were very
pretty, and altogether the present was one that
might well satisfy any little girl.

“Oh, papa,” said Katie, “how clever of you
to keep it quite a secret! I had no idea you
had anything for Fanny except the needle-
book.”

After the presents had all been admired again,
they were put aside, and the party sat down to
lunch.



Grange Farm. 35

“T thought you would be glad of something
to eat,” said Aunt Mary, as she helped the
children to strawberries and cake; “for you
have had a drive since your breakfast, and I
know you are as early folks as we are, and for
that reason I expected you an hour ago. What
made you so late ?”

“We started early enough,’ replied Mr.
Summers, “but we stopped some time in
Hamley. These little people wanted to do
some shopping, and then we met poor Mrs.
Thompson, who seemed in great trouble about
her little boy. He is very ill, and she doesn’t
seem to think he will recover. He is her only
child, which of course makes it all the harder
for her to part with him. However, I trust it
is not quite so bad as she fears ; and I shall call
and see Dr. Hare on my way back, and see what
he thinks of the child’s state.”

“Poor little Johnny !” said Mrs. Marchwood ;

“T am sorry to hear such a bad account of
Cc



2
le

od.

36 Katie Summers.



him; he was a dear, bright little fellow. IfI
can do anything for him in any way be sure
you let me know.”

“Yes, I will,” replied her brother, rising.
“ And now I must be off.”

“What! can’t you stay with us to-day ?”
said Aunt Mary. “I had quite counted on
your company.”

“T am sorry to disappoint you; and it would
be quite a treat to me to remain,” said Mr.
Summers; “but I have some business I must
attend to.”

“Tn that case,” answered his sister, “I know
it is useless to press you to remain. I will send
the children home this evening by eight o’clock.
Nichols shall drive them in the close carriage,
so there will be no fear of their taking cold if
they should fall asleep on the way.”

Mr. Summers then said good-bye to them all,
and bid Harry and Katie be good, and not give
any trouble to their aunt.



Grange Farm. 37



“Shall I take your rosebush home, Harry ?”
he asked. “I think it would be safer.”

“Yes, please, papa; and will you take it to
Johnny ?”

“No, my dear, you shall take it to him your-
self to-morrow. JI would not deprive you of
the pleasure of seeing his face brighten up at
the sight of the pretty flower. Once more,
good-bye, all of you, and may you have a very
pleasant day.”

“And now,” said Aunt Mary, “Tom and
Harry had better go and see if Nichols is ready
with the boat; and, Fanny, you can take Katie
upstairs with you while you get ready.”

Out rushed Tom and Harry ready for any
fun, and the little girls went upstairs to the
nursery.

“A kiss for me, baby!” cried Katie, ag the
little fellow ran toddling up to her.

“Oh, Cousin Katie, said little Lucy, “look at
my poor dolly; she tumbled down off the high



38 Katie Summers.



chair, and her nose is all broken. I don’t think
it hurt her, though, for she didn’t ery !”

“No,” said Katie, laughing, “ I don’t suppose
it did; but give her to me, I think I can make
her look a little better;’ and Katie smoothed
the doll’s hair, and washed off some of the dirt
from her face, and in a few minutes dolly looked
quite smart again, in spite of her broken nose.

“Come, Miss Lucy,” said nurse, “I want to
dress you, for you are to go out in the boat with
all the others.”

“Oh, what fun! what fun!” cried little Lucy,
clapping her hands, and dancing about with
glee. “And is baby coming too ?”

“No,” said nurse, “not to-day ; baby can go
some other time, when there are not quite so
many going.”

And now Fanny and Lucy being ready they
all went down stairs. Mrs. Marchwood was
ready waiting for them at the door.

“Come, my dears, it’s time we started,” she



Grange Farm. 39



said. “Fanny, my dear, you must carry this
basket; and, Katie, will you take this one 2”

“JT want one too, mamma,” said little Lucy.

“Tam afraid you could hardly be trusted to
take one,” said her mamma; but she added,
seeing her little girl looked disappointed, “you
shall help me to carry mine,” and she held it
down so that the little girl could hold one of the
handles.

They walked down the garden, at the bottom
of which ran a river, and there they found
Uncle John and the two boys. Two pretty
boats were drawn up to the steps which led
down to the water, and Uncle John was busy
putting hampers and shawls into one of
them.

“Now, then, jump in,” he cried—“ mamma,
Katie, Fanny, Lucy, and Nichols in this one,
and Harry, Tom, myself, and the hampers in the
other. You go first and we will follow. Now,
guess, where are we off to ?”



40 Katie Summers.



“The Fairy Island! the Fairy Island!” they
all cried at once.

“Right,” said Uncle John, “we are going to
the Fairy Island; and what’s more, we are going
to have dinner there, and I shouldn’t wonder if
the good fairy of the place gave us tea too; eh,
mamma ?”

“ Perhaps, if we behave very well,” said Mrs.
Marchwood.

“Ts there a real live fairy there?” said Lucy,
opening wide her blue eyes. “Oh, mamma! I
should like to see her; perhaps she could mend
my dolly for me.”

The children all laughed.

“Why, you little goosie,” said Katie, “ don’t
you know that your mamma is the good fairy of
Fairy Island? Tue island is Uncle John’s very
own, because he bought it; and we call Aunt
Mary the good fairy, because she is always
giving us such nice treats there.”

“But she hasn’t got wings and short frocks



Grange Farm. 41



and a pretty stick with a star on the top, like
the fairy in my picture-book,” said Lucy, still
quite puzzled as to how her mamma in a
long frock and bonnet and shawl could pos-
sibly be a fairy.

“ Ah! but your fairy lived a great while ago,”
said Fanny, “and the fairies who live now don’t
dress as they used to do then.”

It was very pleasant that warm summer
morning to sit quietly in the boats as they
glided gently along. The children let their
hands hang over the side of the boat into the
cool water. The trees on each side of the stream
dipped down into it, and gave a pleasant shade,
and the water lilies rocked gently as the tide
and wind passed along ; the banks were covered
with forget-me-nots; but Mr. Marchwood did
not allow the boats to be stopped for the
children to gather them, as there were plenty in
Fairy Island, and numbers of other wild flowers
too.





CHAP. IV.—FAIRY ISLAND.

‘Yc FTER rowing for about half-an-hour a sud-
WX: den bend in the river brought them in sight
of the landing-place ; and a lovely spot it was—a
small green island in the middle of the stream,
thickly wooded with trees and bushes, and
cheerful with the songs of birds, while bright.
coloured flowers peeped up through the ferns
and moss which covered the island. . The water
near the shore was so clear that you could
watch the little fish darting about, and could
see the smooth pebbles at the bottom, Mr.



fairy [sland. 43



Marchwood had caused some landing-steps to
be placed in a convenient spot, and there the
boats were made fast, and all the party got out.
The hampers were then landed and carried up
to a place that seemed to have been made on
purpose for a picnic, as Katie said. The grass
was as smooth as velvet, and there were no ups
and downs, and the trees arched overhead, leav-
ing here and there little peeps of the beautiful
blue sky.

“Now, then, to work,” said Mrs. March-
wood; and while Uncle John opened the hampers,
she and the children began to spread the cloth.
What a wonderful fairy it was who had packed
those hampers; she seemed to have forgotten
nothing—the knives and forks and glasses were
all there, and the pepper and salt and mustard
and sugar. There was a pigeon-pie, and fowls,
and ham, a-currant and raspberry tart, and a
cherry tart, a bottle of cream, and a custard ;
some nice home-made wine and some raspberry



44 Katie Summers.

vinegar, all ready mixed with water; and
baskets of strawberries and cherries. It was,
indeed, a feast ! and the little folks sat down to
it with good appetites.

When dinner was finished, Mr. Marchwood
called Nichols to come and get his share, and
Mrs. Marchwood and the three little girls
wandered away further into the island to
gather wild flowers and moss, while Mr.
Marchwood and the boys went off in another
direction.

“Oh, auntie, auntie!” cried Katie, “do come
here ; see what I have found!” and Mrs. March-
wood, coming up to her little niece, found her
bending over a little bird, which, though it
seemed rather frightened and fluttered, didn’t
fly away.

“Tt is a thrush,” said her aunt, taking it up
very gently. “Ah! poor little thing, its leg is
broken. John, John!” she called; and her
husband hearing her came back quickly. “See!



Fatry Island. 45



here is a poor bird with its leg broken; can you
do anything for it ?”

“ Yes, I think I can manage that,” said Uncle
John ; and he made some tiny splints and bound
them on to the broken leg with some fine grass,
and then made all tight with some threads Mrs.
Marchwood took from the fringe of her shawl.

Mrs. Marchwood then made a little basket
soft with moss and leaves, and laid the thrush
in it; and Katie ran and fetched some crumbs
of bread and a fine ripe strawberry, and put
them down beside the bird in the basket; but
though Master Dick seemed quite to understand
how kind they had all been, and gave faint little
chirps to show his gratitude, I suppose, still he
didn’t attempt to eat.

“Ah! I think I know what he would like
better even than crumbs and strawberries,” said
Uncle John, and taking his gardening knife out
of his pocket he began to dig up the earth.
Presently he found a little worm. “Here, old



46 Katie Summers.



fellow,” he said, holding it half-an-inch from the
bird’s mouth. The temptation was too great to
be resisted, and the thrush stretched out his
neck, opened his beak, and down went the worm.

“You will do now, my fine fellow,” said Uncle
John; “I see you are not dying;” and witha
warning to the little girls to keep him quiet and
not frighten him, Uncle John went off to the
boys.

« And now, my dears,” said Aunt Mary, when
the little girls were tired of gathering flowers,
“if you will come and sit down by me and rest
yourselves, I will read you a little story I have
brought with me.”

“Qh, that will be nice!” cried the children,
and they settled themselves to listen.

“Ts it a story you wrote yourself?” said Katie,
as her aunt drew a roll of neatly-written manu-
script from her pocket.

“No, my dear, it was written by a dear sister
of mine many, many years ago; and in looking



fairy Island. AT



over an old desk of hers yesterday I found it,
and I thought it would be the very thing to
bring here to-day to amuse you when you were
tired of play.”

“THE HISTORY OF MAC AND MURIEL, TWO LITTLE
SOFT, FLUFFY, TABBY KITTENS.

“T can’t say I remember much of my very
early days, or of the place where I was born
(and this is not surprising, for I was quite blind
for nine days, and could only grope about in the
dark and mew) ; but my mistress has often told
me that I was born in a cupboard in the kitchen
of a house in Pelham Crescent, Hastings. The
first thing I can recollect was being taken up
by the neck much less gently than my mother
used to take me, and being carried up a long,
long flight of stairs to a large room where some
ladies were sitting. It seemed quite a long
journey to me then, for it was the first time I
had been even outside the kitchen cupboard,



48 Katie Summers.



and everything looked so strange I couldn’t
make it out at all. My eyes were only just
open, so I had seen very little even of the
kitchen, and there was so much to look at in
this big room that I grew quite giddy and stupid
as I looked round. My only comfort was that
my dear brother Mac was with me. He was a
good deal bigger than I was, although we were
just the same age ; but he was always considered
a very fine handsome fellow, whereas I was
quite an ordinary kitten.

“ But to return to my first visit to the draw-
ing-room—as I afterwards found the big room
upstairs was called—where I had many a merry
game of play with my dear Mac.

“The two young ladies who were sitting in
the drawing-room jumped up when we were
carried in, and came and stroked and kissed us,
calling us ‘darlings’ and ‘lovely kittens’ and
‘beauties,’ till I really think I was beginning to
feel vain, when one of the young ladies said, as



fairy sland. 49
she stroked my brother, ‘This 7s a fine fellow ;
he is far prettier than the other, and more lively,
too ; we'll keep him.’

“ There was a little discussion then about us.
The other lady thought my face was prettier
than Mac’s, but my coat was not so well marked.
It was at last agreed that we should go up and
see the ladies every day, and that they should
choose one of us when they knew us better. It
ended, however, in their keeping us both, for
they grew so fond of us they didn’t like to part
with either. After this first event in our lives
we spent many happy days ; we were no longer
shut up in the dark cupboard, but were allowed
to run through the kitchen, and scamper about
in the passages ; and it was only when we were
hungry or tired out with play that we went
back to the cupboard, where we were sure to
find our dear, good, patient mother waiting for
us, ready to feed and wash us and purr us to
sleep. Then every day we were sent for by the



50 Katie Summers.



ladies in the drawing-room, and that was the
pest fun we had in the whole day. We used ‘to
have such games up there, and we were always
sure to get something nice to eat or some milk,
and then we were petted and fondled, and that
is very nice when there is not too much of it.
Mac used to like playing best, but I used to like
lying cosily in the sunshine in the big bay win-
dow looking out at the sea. I was rather a quiet
kitten, and that is why I was called Muriel, I
have heard. I never could understand why,
though; and it must be a peculiar name, for I
have never met another cat of the same name.

“T remember there was a great discussion about
our names. They talked of Tom and Tim, and
Muff and Fluff, and a dozen other names; but
at last I was called, as I have said, Muriel, and
my brother was called Mac, after the young
lady who took such a fancy to him. She was
Scotch, and her name began with Mac, as a
great many Scotch names do.



fatry Island. 51



“J think I had better describe Mac. He was
certainly a very fine, handsome kitten; every
one who saw him admired him. He had large
dark-blue eyes (as a kitten nearly all kittens
have blue eyes, but they change afterwards to
yellow or green); his coat was very dark, soft,
and beautifully marked ; his tail was splendid—
so long and bushy and glossy. He was very
lively, and full of fun and mischief; and he had
such graceful, pretty ways, one couldn’t help
loving him. I have often heard it said that I
was pretty, and affectionate, and gentle, for our
friends used to talk about us in our presence,
never thinking that perhaps it might not be
good for us to hear so much praise, and that we
might perhaps become vain; but I don’t think
that either Mac or I ever cared much for our
good looks, though no one can help feeling that
it is more pleasant to be called pretty and nice
than ugly and disagreeable.

“The ladies were very kind to us, and used
D



52 Katie Summers.



to give us plenty of playthings—balls and reels,
and many other things. But our games of hide-
and-seek were the best fun of all. There was a
large round table in the middle of the room,
with three legs and large brass claws at the end
of each, and these made first-rate hiding-places.
Then there was a large old-fashioned sofa, very
comfortable for a snooze, and underneath it was
a beautiful place for hiding. The window cur-
tains, too, were first-rate. Oh! it was fun to get
into them and roll oneself round and round in
them until it was quite difficult to get out again.
I used to hide, and Mac would come and look
for me; then when he had found me out we used
to scamper after each other round and round the
room, dodging under the legs of the big table,
and in and out through every place where we
could squeeze ourselves; and when at last Mac
caught me, we would roll over and over each
other till we were quite tired out, and then we
would jump into a nice, large, soft arm-chair,



Lary Island. 53



where we soon fell fast asleep. Mac was much
bolder than I was, and would often jump on the
table and bite the pens when one of the young
ladies happened to be writing, or would sit on
her shoulder watching her pen, and then would
suddenly make a dart at it. Sometimes he got
into trouble over it, for he would smudge the
wet writing with his paw or his tail, and then
he generally got a little pat on the head, and
was sent down on to the floor.

“One day, I remember, Mac got into dreadful
trouble. The house was an old-fashioned one;
and instead of the bells being rung by a little
handle fixed into the wall, as I have since seen
them, they were rung by pulling a bell-rope
which hung down from the ceiling nearly to the
floor. Well, on this day of which I am speak-
ing Mac was in a very mischievous mood, so he
said to me, ‘Wouldn’t it be fun to have a
swing on the bell-rope? I think Pll try’

“«Oh, don’t, Mac,’ I said ; ‘you know if you



54 Katie Summers.



hang on to it you will ring the bell; for I had
heard the young ladies say that the least little
pull made it ring.

“<«Well, and if it does, I don’t care,’ said Mac.

“T tried to persuade him not to do it, for I
was afraid he would get into trouble; but he was
determined, so he jumped up and caught hold
of the tassel with his two paws, and had such a
beautiful swing. We couldn’t hear the bell
ring, because it was right down in the kitchen,
and the doors were all shut; but presently the
servant tapped at the door and opened it.

“ thing ?’ she said.

“* No, thank you, Ann, answered the young
lady we knew as‘ Aunt Fanny,’ looking rather
surprised.

“Mac thought it fun, and went and had
another swing. Presently Ann came to the
door again and waited as if for orders.

“


Fairy Island. 55



“*Didn’t you, miss; then I suppose it was
the front door, but I certainly thought it was
this bell that rang ; and down went Ann again.

“T begged Mac not to do it again; but he
would, and up came Ann again, looking very
cross. Mac and I hid ourselves under the sofa.

«¢Please, miss,’ said Ann, ‘I looked at the
bells particular this time, and the one marked
“ drawing-room ” rang again just this minute.’

“Indeed! said Aunt Fanny ; ‘ well, J didn’t
ring it ;’ and, looking up, she saw the bell-rope
still swinging a little.

“¢QOh, I see what it is,’ she said, laughing; ‘ it’s
those naughty little kittens; they have been
swinging on the bell-rope. I am sorry they
have given you so much trouble, Ann. I must
punish them, or they will be doing it again.’

“Mac made me hide away behind the curtain,
for he said he wasn’t going to let me be whipped
for his fault; and then when I was quite hidden
he bid me keep quite quiet, no matter how



6 Katte Summers.

or



much Aunt Fanny called me; and then he went
up to her and rubbed himself against her; and
then, when she noticed him, he darted off to the
bell-rope as if he was going to ring the bell
again.

«“« Ah! she said, ‘so it was you, was it, Mac,
who rang the bell; I thought most likely it
wasn’t that quiet little Muriel; she hasn’t so
much mischief in her. Well, I’m very sorry,
but I must beat you to prevent your doing it
again.’ So saying, she took him up and showed
him the bell-rope, and then gave him a good
hard smack.

“Mac cried out, and I couldn’t bear to hear
him, so I rushed out from my hiding-place, and
came and mewed too, and licked him, and we
went away into a quiet corner, where I tried to
comfort him; and after he had cried a little, he
curled himself wp, and I purred him to sleep.

« After some weeks we heard that the young
ladies were going up to London, and were going



fairy Island. 57

to take us with them. They stroked us, and
told us that though they were not going to keep
us themselves they would often come and see us,
and we should be sure to be happy, because the
lady to whom we were going was very good and
kind, and was fond of cats. This lady had one
cat already, but she wanted another to keep him
company. We did not much like the idea of
going to strangers at first; but the thought of
seeing more of the world pleased Mac, and
where Mac went I was glad to go too.

“ At last everything was packed up, and the
day arrived for us to start. Mac and I were
put into a basket, just as if we had been so
much luggage. We did not like it at all, and
were very troublesome on our way to the station.
There was a great noise there, and we hardly
knew what to do with ourselves for fright, so
we thought the best thing was to remain as quiet
as possible. As soon as the train started our
basket was opened, and, as the young ladies had



58 vatie Summers.



the carriage all to themselves, we were allowed
to roam about and examine everything. We
thought it was a very funny place, and there
was a great noise, and the carriage shook so
much we couldn’t stand still. All at once there
was a dreadful noise like a shriek—I believe
they call it a whistle ; I was just preparing to
make a spring at Mac when we heard it, and
all of a sudden it became quite dark! I was
dreadfully frightened, but as nothing horrible
happened, I supposed it was all right, and I lay
quite still and shut my eyes. I don’t know how
long we were in the dark, but it must have
been a long time; and before we reached the
end of the tunnel my fright was nearly over, and
the next tunnel we came to didn’t frighten me
nearly so much, though the shriek the train
gives just before it goes into the dark is certainly
very startling.

“The rest of the journey was very pleasant ;
but before we reached London one of the young



Fairy Island. 59



ladies, whom we knew as ‘ Mary,’ got out, and
Aunt Fanny was left in charge of us two
kittens; and a nice task she had, too, for the
noise at London Bridge was so great, and there
were such a crowd of people, that Mac and I
were terrified, and struggled and scratched to
get out of the basket, though what we should
have done if we had escaped I’m sure I don’t
know.

“As we were going along, a man asked Aunt
Fanny for our tickets. Aunt Fanny had none
for us, and said so. ‘They are not dogs; they
are only cats. I never heard of taking a ticket
for a cat before,’ I heard her say; and she laughed,
for the man didn’t really mean it, I found out
afterwards. I must say I felt very much hurt
at being spoken of as ‘only a cat, as if a cat
wasn’t as good as a dog!

“Well, we got into a cab, and, after a long
drive, we arrived at a nice, cosy-looking little
house ; and the mistress, whose name was Lucy,



60 Katie Summers.



took us out of the basket, and stroked and car-
ressed us, and called us beauties, and then she
gave us some milk and a little meat, and put us
into a cupboard where there was a nice soft
little mat for our bed. We were very tired, and
glad to lie down, but we missed our dear mother’s
pretty song that she always used to sing to us
when we went to bed. We comforted each
other as well as we could, and Mac was very
kind, and tried to purr me to sleep; but he
couldn’t help feeling sad, and didn’t purr halfas
well as he generally did.

“The next morning, as soon as we awoke, we
washed ourselves, for our mother had taught us
to be clean, and then we went into the kitchen
to look about us. We found a big cat there,
and were rather frightened for him at first;
but he was very kind, though rather grave and
quiet. He asked us our names, and then he
told us his. It was ‘Winkles.’ I couldn’t help
laughing, for I thought it was the funniest name



Fairy [sland. 61
I had ever heard. After a time he grew very
fond of me because I was quiet; but he and
Mac were never good friends, because Mac was
so noisy and saucy, and would wake old
Winkles up out of his sleep and play with his
tail, and do all sorts of things that Winkles
didn’t like.

“ Our life in London was very quiet and plea-
sant: we had plenty to eat and drink, and were
liked by every one in the house. All went on
smoothly and well for some months. Mac
erew more handsome every month, and was ad-
mired by every one who saw him. One day he
didn’t come home to dinner. We thought he
must have gone to see a friend, or had gone for
alone walk. When tea-time passed and bed-
time came we were all very anxious about him,
and Lucy and I went all over the house and
garden calling for him, but he didn’t come,
and I had to go to bed without him. Oh, how
sad I felt! 1 couldn’t go to sleep for a long



62 Katie Summers.



time. At last, after mewing a great deal, I
dropped off to sleep.

“The next day we had another hunt, and the
day after; but Mac never came back, and to
this day I have never seen my dear brother
again. I only hope he has found a happy home
like mine.”

“There,” said Mrs. Marchwood, “is the end
of the history of the two little soft, fluffy, tabby
kittens.”

“ And is that really quite the end ?” said little
Lucy. “ Didn’t the poor pussy who was lost
ever come back again ?”

“Tm afraid not,” said her mamma. “I expect
he wandered away too far from his home, and
some one, seeing what a beautiful cat he was,
took him and kept him. But here comes papa
and the boys. I expect it is time we began to
think about tea.”





CHAP. V.—THE END OF A HAPPY DAY.

“YYYHERE, mamma!” cried Tom, throwing
down a big bundle of dry sticks; “those
are to make the water boil for tea.”

Mr. Marchwood and the boys began to fix up
some large sticks, gipsy fashion, to hang the
kettle over the fire; and then they put the small
dry sticks underneath, and set light to them,
and before long the water was boiling, ready for
making tea. Mrs. Marchwood and the girls
spread a cloth, and laid out the cake and fruit,
and they all sat down to tea; and then the



64 Katie Summers.



boys began to tell how they had been em-
ployed.

“We first went to a place at the other end of
the island,” said Harry, “where Uncle John
said he thought we should see some squirrels ;
and after keeping very quiet for a little while,
sure enough we saw a little brown creature
poking his nose out of a hole in a large tree,
Presently he came right out and ran along a
branch of the tree ever so fast, and then out
came another squirrel, and they played about for
a long while, until they saw us, and then they
darted back to their hole. Then we went with
Uncle John to the ford, and helped to put down
such beautiful big flat stepping-stones. I think
even Lucy will be able to go across alone now.”

“What have you been doing?” asked Tom of
his sister.

“First, we went and picked flowers, and then
mamma read us such a pretty story about two
dear little kittens.”



The End of a Happy Day. 65



“Kittens!” said Tom, rather scornfully ; “T
like stories about dogs and horses best.. When
I’m a man I intend to keep ever so many.”

“ How is my little patient?” asked Mr. March-
wood of Katie.

“Oh, he is very quiet,” said Katie, looking
into the basket; “but he doesn’t look very
happy.”

“TJ daresay not,” answered her uncle, smiling ;
“and I don’t suppose you would either if you
were alittle prisoner with a broken leg; but if
only he will keep quiet he will soon be well.”

Tea being finished, they left Nichols to pack
up the remains, and went to the other end of
the island to see the new stepping-stones at the
ford. They all went across, and agreed that the
new stones were very much better than the old
shaky ones, which were very slippery and almost
round.

They then walked slowly back to the boats,
where they found all was ready for starting, and,



66 Katie Summers.



taking their places as before, the happy party
returned to the farm.

There were still two hours before the time
fixed for Katie and Harry to return to their
home, but there was plenty for them to do in
that time. There were the ponies to visit, and
the cows and pigs, and a favourite old owl of
Tom’s, which sat up on a rafter in the barn and
blinked his eyes at the children. And while
Tom and Harry were amusing themselves about
the farmyard, the little girls went up to the
nursery to see Fanny’s dolls and their house,
and all the other toys which were to be found
in that delightful room.

But the happiest day must have an ending
and all too soon the carriage was at the door
Harry and Katie bid good-bye to their kind
aunt and uncle and cousins, and were put into
the carriage.

' “Take care of the invalid, Katie,” were her
uncle’s last words to her as Nichols drove off.



The End of a Happy Day. 67

“Oh,” said Harry, throwing himself back,
“T’m so tired; but what a jolly day we have
had !”

“ Ves,” answered his sister, “I don’t know
when I have enjoyed myself so much, and we
just did the very thing we wanted to. It was
so kind of aunt and uncle to take us all to the
Fairy Island. Poor little Dickey,” she added,
peeping into her basket; “if we hadn’t gone
there I shouldn’t have found you, and then per-
haps you would have died; but you mustn’t
die now, you must get strong and well, and I
will take great care of you; and when you are
quite strong you shall fly away if you like, but
T hope you won't.”

“Perhaps it won't,” said Harry; “for I re-
member hearing papa say one day that a man
once found a poor dog in the road, and he had
a broken leg, and the man took him home and
nursed him and made him quite well; and then,

as he didn’t want the dog, he gave him away to
E



68 Katie Summers.

a man who lived a long way off; but the dog
found his way back again, and wouldun’t be sent
away ; and so his master kept him. And one
day his master’s little child fell into the water
and would have been drowned, only the dog
jumped in after it and saved it.”

“That is a very pretty story,” said Katie.
“How fond his master must have been of the
dog after that. I shouldn’t think he would
ever want to part with him again. Buta bird
isn’t like a dog; and I expect when Dickey gets
well he will soon fly off, and I shall never see
him again.”

About a quarter of a mile from the house
they met their mamma and papa; and Mr.
Summers told Nichols that he need not come
any further, as the children could walk home
with him.

They had much to tell their parents of the
happy day they had spent, and Katie showed
the poor little wounded thrush. As soon as



The End of a Happy Day. 69



they reached home Mr. Summers hunted up an
old parrot’s cage, and Katie made a soft bed at
the bottom of it and laid the bird on it, and
when she had given it food and drink she left it
in a dark corner of the room so that it might go
to sleep.

“Oh, mamma, I have had such a very happy
day,” said Katie, as her mamma came to give
her her good-night kiss after she was in bed.

“Tam very glad to hear it, my darling,” said
her mamma, “because I’m quite sure you must
have been a good little girl, for only those who
are good are really happy ;” and with another
fond kiss her mother left her, and in a very few
minutes the happy, tired little girl was fast
asleep.

And J will tell you why it was that Katie
was always such a happy child: she was always
trying to please others, and to do what she
knew to be right. Arid she didn’t often fail,
because she didn’t trust to herself; but every



70 Katie Summers.

morning when she knelt down to say her prayers,
she asked God to help her to do what was right,
and not to let her forget that even if no one else
was near to see her, yet that God could see and
hear her always.

The next day the children went with their
mamma to see little Johnny Thompson, and
Harry took the rose-bush to give to him. They
found the poor little boy in bed, propped up with
pillows. He looked very thin, but his face was
flushed.

“Thank you, miss,” he said to Katie, “for the
beautiful strawberries you sent me yesterday—
they were so nice and cool and fresh. I have
still some of them left.”

Harry then put the pot with the rose-bush on
the little table by the boy’s bed, and said, “ Here
is a rose-tree for you, Johnny. Katie said you
would like that better than anything else I could
get for you.” .

“Indeed, Master Harry, you are very, very



The End of a Happy Day. 71



kind, and it’s just beautiful,” said the little fel-
low. “ Mother, dear, would you please hold it
quite close so that I can smell it well. Oh, it’s
beautiful! it’s so much better than flowers in a
glass, because they die soon; but this will live
a long while, perhaps longer than I shall.”

They soon bade him good-bye, for the poor
child was very weak and soon tired, and talking
made him cough.

About a week afterwards Johnny died, gently
and calmly ; and his mother, though she grieved
for the loss of her boy, felt comfort in thinking
he was happy, and would suffer no more pain.







CHAP. VI—THE BROKEN VASE.



wi OT many days after the visit of Harry and
ANG Katie to Grange Farm, Mrs. Marchwood
came to spend the afternoon with Mrs. Summers,
and brought Fanny with her. The day was hot,
and the two litle girls, soon finding it too hot
to play in the garden, came indoors to play
quietly with their dolls. Katie was busy mak-
ing a new frock for her doll out of an old piece
of silk her mamma had given her. Fanny sat
idly back in her chair and watched her.

“ What a pretty work-box !” she said to Katie.



The Broken Vase. 73



“Yes,” said her cousin ; “ papa brought it from
‘London for me, because he said I read so much
better than I did a little while ago. That was
because I got up half-an-hour earlier every
morning and read aloud to myself. I wanted
to get on with my reading, because it is so nice
to be able to read story-books to myself when
mamma is too busy or is out. And papa was
so pleased at my doing this, that he promised
to bring me a present from London. And when
he came home he gave me a parcel done up in
brown paper, and then in thin white paper ; and
when I had opened them, I found this lovely
box. Mamma showed me how to make a cover
for it; so when I am not using it I put the cover
on, and then it doesn’t get scratched.”

“TJ should like to iook at it,” said Fanny.

“Of course you may,” said Katie; and she
pushed it toward her cousin.

Fanny turned it over, looking at the scissors,
needle-case, bodkin, and all the things which go



74 Katie Summers.



to fit up a work-box. Then she lifted out the
tray, and underneath she found pieces of ribbon,
lace, silk, and muslin, which Katie’s mamma
had given her at different times for her doll.

“What a pretty piece of ribbon!” said Fanny,
taking up about a yard of bright blue ribbon,
which had never been used. “I wish I had a
piece like that; it would make such a beautiful
sash for Julia.”

Now, Katie had been storing up that piece of
ribbon very carefully for some time, and she had
intended to trim the new white muslin frock
she was going to make for her doll with it. She
quite understood from the way Fanny spoke
that she would like to have it; but Katie,
though she was an unselfish little girl, could
not make up her mind to part with the ribbon.

“ Did auntie give you this ribbon ?” continued
Fanny.

“Yes,” said Katie, “and I am going to trim
my doll’s new muslin frock with it.”



The Broken Vase. 75



“T wish it was mine,” said Fanny, enviously.
“See, Katie,” she added, drawing a pretty little
sweetie-box out of her pocket, and opening it—
“here are six chocolate creams, and you shall
have them all, if you will let me have the
ribbon.”

This was a great temptation to Katie, for she
was very fond of chocolate; but her mamma
didn’t like her to eat sweeties, so Katie, wisely,
would not even look at them. “No, Fanny,”
she said, “I mustn’t have the sweeties, because
mamma has forbidden me to eat them ever since
Harry was so ill with eating some nasty things
Freddy Brown gave him; she said they were
often coloured with poison, and all sorts of bad
things were mixed up inthem. When old Mrs.
Dewdney comes round, mamma buys some from
her, because she knows they are quite good,
for Mrs. Dewdney makes them herself. But
mamma wouldn't like me to take yours; so I'd
rather not, please, Fanny.”



76 Katie Summers.



“Well, you are very selfish,” said Fanny,
crossly ; and she moved away to the other end
of the room.

Katie thought this very unkind and unjust of
Fanny, for she didn’t see why she should give
up her treasured piece of ribbon just because
Fanny wanted it. She went on working quietly
for a few minutes, and then she said, “See,
Fanny, I will give you half; that will make a
nice sash for Julia, and then I can make my doll
a sash with the other half, perhaps it will look
as pretty as the trimming; anyhow, it doesn’t
much matter,” she added, with a little sigh, as
she thought how much she should have liked to
trim the frock all round the bottom.

Not getting an answer from Fanny, she looked
up, and saw her at the further end of the draw-
ing-room, standing on tip-toe in front of a
marble slab, over which there stood a large
looking-elass. Fanny was placing a rose under
the ribbon on her hair, and turning first one







The Broken Vase. ae



side and then the other to see how she looked;
presently she rested her elbow on the marble
slab, and bent over to get a better view of her-
self in the glass; and moving suddenly, her arm
touched one of the beautiful vases which stood
on the slab, and down it fell on the ground, and
was broken into a thousand pieces!

“Oh, Fanny! what have you done?” ex-
claimed Katie, running to her. “Mamma will
be so sorry; she is so fond of those vases, and
never lets me go near them, for fear I should
break them.”

Fanny burst into tears. “ What shall I do 2”
she cried ; “auntie will be so angry, and mamma
will be angry, too. Can’t we say it tumbled
down itself ?”

“Oh, no!” exclaimed Katie, shocked at the
idea of telling such a falsehood. “That would
be worse than breaking the vase.”

“T suppose you will go and tell auntie that I
did it,” said Fanny, angrily.



78 Katie Summers.

“No,” said Katie; “I shan’t tell her, but I
think you ought to tell her at once.”

At this moment the big dog, Lynn, came
bounding into the room through the open
window, and, seeing something was the matter,
came snuffing at the broken vase, and then
dashed off again, and came right against Mrs.
Summers, as she and Mrs. Marchwood came
slowly in from the garden.

“Gently, Lynn, gently; what business have
you in the drawing-room ?” said his mistress, as
she stroked his fine head. “That’s forbidden
ground to a great rough fellow like you. Ah!
he’s done some mischief, I fear,” she added, as
she stepped into the room, and saw the broken
vase, with the two little girls standing near.
Oh, dear! how did this happen?” she asked.

Fanny replied hastily, “ Lynn came jumping
into the room, and all at once we heard the
smash, and there was the vase on the floor !”

Mrs. Summers never doubted the truth of





The Broken Vase. 79



this, for Lynn had more than once done mischief
by bounding wildly about a room. He was a
great big staghound, much too large to come
into any room with safety; and he was young
and full of wild spirits, which made him still
more unfit for a drawing-room visitor.

Poor Katie blushed painfully as Fanny told
the untruth, but she did not like to say any-
thing. Fanny, too, blushed; but I am sorry to
say it was not with shame, but with fear lest
she should be found out.

Though Mrs. Summers did not doubt the
truth of what Fanny had said, her mamma did,
for she knew that her little girl was not a truth-
ful child, and she had several times been grieved
to find that she could not trust her. She did
not, however, say anything at the time, hoping
that if Fanny had indeed told a falsehood, she
would confess it of her own accord.

There was no more enjoyment for the little
girls that afternoon. Katie was miserable at



80 Katie Summers.



the thought of the story Fanny had told, and
feared she was herself to blame in having
known it was a falsehood and kept silence ;
and yet she did not like to tell on her cousin.
Fanny was uncomfortable, partly at the untruth
she had told, and still more because she feared
her mamma might somehow find it out.

Before very long Mrs. Marchwood said she
must be going, and told Fanny to get ready.
As soon as the children were upstairs Katie
burst into tears.

“ Oh, Fanny, dear! I do wish you had told the
truth, and said you broke the vase.”

“T daresay,” said Fanny, angrily. “I sup-
pose you want me to be punished. I don’t see
that it matters to you at all, and nobody got
blamed instead of me, not even Lynn; and
mamma will never know if you don’t tell her.”

“Oh!” said Katie, “but you told a story all
the same, and, whether auntie knows it or not,
God knows it. Dear Fanny, do—do tell auntie.



The Broken Vase. 81



I don’t think she will be very angry if you tell
her yourself; but if she is, I shouldn’t mind
that half as much, if I were you, as having her
kind to me, while all the time I was deceiving
her.”

“J shan’t do anything of the kind,” said
Fanny. “I think you are very disagreeable to
say such things.” So saying, she turned crossly
away, and went down stairs.

The pony chaise was brought round, and Mrs.
Marchwood drove away with her little girl.
The drive home was by no means pleasant to
Fanny. Her mamma talked a great deal about
the broken vase.

“Tt seems to me,” she said, “that it was a
very strange thing for Lynn to knock down that
vase. I can’t understand how he did it.”

“Oh, mamma! you know he is so rough and
so big; he is always doing some mischief or
other.”

“ Did you see him do it?” said her mamma,



82 Katie Summers.



“No,” said Fanny, “I didn’t see him do it;
but I heard it fall, and Lynn was close beside it.”

“Well, I confess I don’t understand it,” said
Mrs. Marchwood. “It’s very provoking, for the
vases are very valuable, and cannot easily be
replaced.”

Katie, in the meantime, had gone back with
her mamma into the drawing-room, and was
helping to pick up the broken pieces of the vase.

“Tam afraid,” said Mrs. Summers, “that it
is past mending. It is very annoying, for,
besides the vase being a very valuable one, it
was precious to me because your uncle Harry
sent me the pair just before he died. I must
take some means to prevent Lynn from getting
into the house, he is so dreadfully wild. How
did he do it? He must have put his paws up
on to the slab to be able to reach; he could
never have knocked that heavy vase down with
his tail, Did you see him do it, my dear ?”

Poor Katie turned very red. “No, mamma,



The Broken Vase. 83



I did not; but, please, if you don’t mind, I
would rather say nothing about it.”

Mrs. Summers looked at her little girl in
astonishment, and, seeing her look so confused
and uncomfortable, she began to guess a little at
the truth of the affair. She thought that Fanny
could not have told her quite the whole truth,
though she did not imagine she had altogether
invented a lie.

Mrs. Summers knew her little Katie too well
to suspect her of having any part in the accident.
She knew that if her little girl had had any-
thing to do with it she would at once have
owned to it. So, seeing Katie was uncomfort-
able about it for some reason, and guessing a
little of the truth, she would not press her to
tell on her cousin.

“Very well, my dear,” she said, “I think I
understand it now; but there is no need for you
to make yourself unhappy about it. You must

not blame yourself for the faults of others.”
EF





CHAP. VII.—PET MICE.

“ AMMA,” said Katie one day, “I met Mary
Jones to-day when I was out, and she
asked me if I would like to have some little
tame mice. She has two, and she wants to get
rid of them, because she is going to school.”
“Well, my dear, I have no objection to your
having them,” said her mamma, “only you must
remember they will want looking after, and you
already have a good many pets to attend to,
besides your dolls. By-the-by, how is the
thrush getting on ?”



Pet Mice, 85
“Oh, beautiful, mamma ; he hops about quite
nicely now. Papa took the splints off his leg
this morning, and Bustle—that’s to be his name
—seemed so pleased. I lett the door of his cage
open, and he camé out-and perched about, but
didn’t attempt to fly away. Papa said it would
be cruel to keep him shut up in a cage, because
he’s always been accustomed to be free; but if
he is so tame that he doesn’t care to fly away,
it will be very nice, won’t it?”
“Yes, it will,” answered her mamma; “but
what made you give him such a funny name ?”
“ Because he’s always in such a hurry about
everything, and pokes and fusses about in such
a funny way,” answered Katie. “ May I go this
afternoon and tell Mary I may have the mice ?”
“Yes, dear; and if Sarah ean go with you she
ean bring them for you. I suppose they are
kept in acage? Are they dormice ?”
“No, mamma ; one is quite black, with such
a lovely shiny coat—his name is Dandy; and



86 Katte Summers.



the other is grey, with little white tips to its
paws—her name is Dot. They are such pretty
little things, and so tame.”

“J will tell you a story about a mouse,” said
her mamma, “if you like.”

“Oh, do, please, mamma. Is it a true one?”

“Yes, quite true,” answered Mrs. Summers.
“When I was a girl of eighteen I was living
alone with my dear mother, who was a widow.
We always spent the morning in the sitting-
room, which faced the south, and so we got the
morning sun on it. My mother was a great
worker, and I was equally fond of writing, so
our mornings used generally to pass very quietly.

“One day,as I was sitting at my desk with
my pen in hand, thinking, I heard a little scratch,
scratch. ‘That sounds like a mouse,’ I said, and
listened again. There it was again—scratch,
scratch. A mouse, of course, it must be. So I
went to the cupboard, and taking out a biscuit,
I broke it up, and put it close by the place





Pet Mice. 87



where the sound had appeared to come from.
All was quiet then. No doubt mousie had
heard me moving.

“The next morning, before settling to my
writing, I put the crumbs of biscuit down, and
soon we heard mousie hard at work. This
happened for two or three days, and then one
morning, to my great delight, I found there was
a hole just large enough for a mouse to get
through, and all the crumbs which had been
near the place the day before were gone.

“Now, then, I thought, I shall soon have the
pleasure of seeing the little creature. I put
down the biscuit as usual, and went to my desk.
Soon I saw a tiny nose poking through the hole,
then two bright eyes appeared, and at length
the whole body of mousie came in view. He
looked round timidly, and then began nibbling
at the biscuit. After he had had enough he
went back to his hole. For more than a week
this went on, mousie getting bolder and bolder.



88 Katie Summers.



He would run all over the room, and appeared
to look at everything. He did not start as
at first, and run back to his hole if my mother
or I spoke. One day I tempted him to my
side with a piece of cheese. After that he
always came to me, and one day, to my great
amusement and delight, he ran up my dress and
got on to the table, and perched himself on the
top of my desk, just where a beam of sunlight
shone. This became a favourite place of his.
At eleven o'clock [ always used to take a little
lunch—a biscuit and cheese, and a glass of water;
and mousie used to take his share of the food,



and then dip his little nose into the glass of
water. I erew very fond of my pet mouse, and
he seemed tu be equally fond of me. He would
run up my sleeve aud nestle there, and some-
times perch hiiusclf on the top of my head, or
on my shoulder.

“One day a triend ef my mother’s called and
pressed us very much to go and stay a little



Pet Mice. 89
while with her in the country. The invitation
was accepted, and as our servant’s mother was
not well, we thought it would be a good oppor-
tunity to send Mary home to her mother for a
fortnight, and we could shut up the house.
When the time arrived for leaving, I arranged
as much as possible for the comfort of my little
mouse. I left my desk open, and put on it
two large biscuits and a saucer of water. This,
I thought, would last him till our return.

“We remained at our friend’s for a fortnight,
and enjoyed our visit very much. I often
thought of mousie, and wondered if he missed
me. We arrived at our home in the afternoon ;
so I knew there was no chance of seeing my pet
that day, as he never came except during the
two or three hours in the morning that I spent
in writing. I suppose he had his family to look
after; at all events, he never came but in the
morning.

“My first visit was to the sitting-room,



90 Katie Summers.

anxious to see if there had been food enough
for him during my absence. The first thing I
saw was mousie sitting in his old place on my
desk! I sprang towards him—he never moved.
I then touched him; he was stiff and cold.
Mousie was dead! I was so grieved that I
burst into tears.

“The biscuits were untouched, and there was
water in the saucer, so he had not died of
hunger or thirst. Though he was cold and stiff,
he could not, from the state he was in, have
been dead very long. Poor little mousie! very
likely he had come there day after day, hoping
to find me, and at last he must have died of grief.”

“Oh, mamma! what a sad ending to your
pretty story. How sorry you must have been
that you went on that visit.”

“Yes, I was,” replied Mrs. Summers ; “though,
of course, I couldn’t always remain at home for
the sake of poor mousie. However, it was no
use fretting about it; but I missed my little



Pet Mice. 91



companion very much for a long time. And
now, my dear, run and put on your hat, and go
with Sarah to fetch yournew pets beforetea-time.”

Katie soon returned with a little cage, in
which were the two mice; they were pretty
little creatures, and very tame. They did not
rush about frightened when Katie put her hand
into the cage, but let her stroke them and
take them out. They were clever little mice,
too, and learnt to do many pretty tricks. Some-
times Mr. Summers would take off his ring
and hold it a few inches up from the table,
and then he would call the mice by their names,
and they would jump through the ring one after
the other, as fast as possible.

One day, after they had been playing about
the room, Katie wanted to put them back to
their house, and called them. Dot came run-
ning up to her little mistress, but Dandy was
nowhere to be found, though Katie called and
called to him, and hunted for him in every place



92 Katte Summers.



she could think of. She was in great trouble
about him, fearing some cat must have caught
him. Poor little Dot, too, seemed sad at the
loss of her companion.

The next day Katie went to a cupboard where
she kept the food for her little pets, and there
in a big jar of meal she found Master Dandy.
He had, I suppose, scrambled in the day before
when the cupboard was open, and Katie, never
thinking that he was there, had put the cover
back on the jar, and shut up the cupboard.

What a guy he was, to be sure. His coat,
instead of being black and shiny, was a sort of
dirty white, and this made his bright black
eyes look brighter and blacker than ever. He
seemed very much ashamed of himself, and
rushed off at once to his cage, and, sitting up
on his hind legs, began to wash himself. Dot
seemed delighted to see him again, and began
licking him, and trying to help him to clean him-
self. After this Dandy never strayed away again.





CHAP. VIIIL—THE FALSEHOOD DISCOVERED.

“{\H, mamma! I can’t do this sum. I’ve tried

ever so many times, and it won’t come
right,” said Harry, as his mamma handed him
back his slate for the fourth time, the sum still
being wrong.

“No, Harry, I think you are not quite correct
in saying that you have tried to do it. Itisa
very simple sum, and just like the one you did
yesterday without much trouble. But little boys
who sit staring out of the window cannot expect
their sums to come right. Now, suppose you



94 Katie Summers.



come and sit here beside me, and turn your back
to the window, and give all your attention to
your sum; I think then you won’t find that it is
a difficult one.”

Harry did as his mother bade him, and very
soon he handed her his slate again.

“ Quite right this time,” she said. “Now you
see, Harry, I was right. The sum wasn’t really
too difficult for you, when you gave your whole
attention to it. Always try, my boy, to do
everything heartily. And now you may run
away and play, and I think I may say very
certainly that you will enjoy your game much
more now that you have conquered your diffi-
culty, than if I had let you put away your sum
unfinished.”

“Oh yes, mamma, I’m sure I shall,” he
replied at once; and, giving her a hearty kiss,
he bounded off, and was soon seen playing at
soldiers with Rover, the good-natured old dog,
who seemed to enjoy the fun as much as Harry.







The Falsehood discovered. 95

One day Mr. Summers, having heard of the
accident that had happened to the vase, and sup-
posing that it was Lynn who had broken it, said
to William, “ You must manage so that Lynn is
never allowed outside the dog’s house, excepting
when you are at hand to see that he does no
mischief. He rushed into the drawing-room
some days ago and broke a very valuable vase.”

William looked at his master quite astonished.
“Do you mean, sir, that vase that stood on the
little marble table,” he said, ‘that was broke a
week ago ?”

“ Yes,” answered Mr. Summers.

« Well, sir, you are quite mistaken in think-
ing Lynn broke it. It was Miss Fanny who did
it. I saw it all, for I was outside the window
trimming the rose and creepers on the house,
and I saw her stand on tip-toe before the glass
sticking a rose or something in her hair, and
somehow she knocked her elbow against the
vase, and it fell down smash. I saw it all, sir, I



96 Katie Summers.



assure you; and after a few minutes Lynn came
running up, and he went into the drawing-room.
I was just going to call him out, when cook came
and told me she wanted some vegetables cut at
once, and I went off and thought no more about
it.”

“Ah!” said Mr. Summers, “then there has
been some great mistake ;” and he went in and
told Mrs. Summers about it.

“ T ouessed there was something not quite true
about Fanny’s story,” she answered. “ Poor
Katie looked so very uncomfortable and un-
happy that I thought Fanuy had kept some-
thing back, but I did not imagine she could
have told such a deliberate untruth as that.
How grieved her mamma will be; for, of course,
I must tell her of this.”

In the afternoon Mrs. Summers drove over to
the Grange, and told her sister of what Mr.
Summers had learnt from William.

“ Ah!” she said, “I felt quite sure that Fanny



Full Text
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FILES
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'SHA-1' ba8ab5a0280b953aa97435ff8946cbcbb2755a27
EVENT '2012-01-14T16:56:39-05:00' OUTCOME 'success'
PROCEDURE describe
'2012-01-14T16:53:51-05:00'
redup
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfile1' 'sip-files00145.txt
81051bcc2cf1bedf378224b0a93e2877
ba8ab5a0280b953aa97435ff8946cbcbb2755a27
'2012-01-14T16:56:00-05:00'
describe
'2012-01-14T16:53:53-05:00'
redup
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfile2' 'sip-files00146.txt'
81051bcc2cf1bedf378224b0a93e2877
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'2012-01-14T16:55:03-05:00'
describe
No printable characters
'2012-01-14T16:53:55-05:00'
redup
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' No printable characters
No printable characters
'246662' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAHXN' 'sip-files00001.jp2'
791afbfe7c3842fec49e8e67169df9f9
21112c45be3d2e689c8ca361a4ebe51f151e11d1
'2012-01-14T16:55:36-05:00'
describe
'424130' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAHXO' 'sip-files00001.jpg'
2c4bb39151d797c0a990b6548366d214
a27cb6074a34bf57ca61caf7931e254a5dad7b5b
'2012-01-14T16:56:37-05:00'
describe
'209' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAHXP' 'sip-files00001.pro'
18df6047f4b6c8cad571df0f07149534
9ca57f607ea2bd924c6a5464d53adedce408e42b
describe
'110665' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAHXQ' 'sip-files00001.QC.jpg'
301db790e1fd2f8fcb78852d2b618d24
78b1530fa9be7974675fd050c83171592c10505f
'2012-01-14T16:54:34-05:00'
describe
'5940208' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAHXR' 'sip-files00001.tif'
30ab1ef9e58f3959f4391fb662f4defc
63393b6e7cc98ade1ca6a12f5579d727855c1e26
'2012-01-14T16:56:42-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAHXS' 'sip-files00001.txt'
81051bcc2cf1bedf378224b0a93e2877
ba8ab5a0280b953aa97435ff8946cbcbb2755a27
'2012-01-14T16:56:34-05:00'
describe
No printable characters
No printable characters
No printable characters
'31182' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAHXT' 'sip-files00001thm.jpg'
d70ab2778cc48f312c8f2a22d72a0005
0392582e3db621699630231c966b73319aaf55b5
'2012-01-14T16:56:13-05:00'
describe
'241464' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAHXU' 'sip-files00002.jp2'
db410b086db9b498c59462b66ba4cfbf
5569156abf91ad2bd5aa7ef1c61bdb3ad7964714
'2012-01-14T16:55:07-05:00'
describe
'282880' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAHXV' 'sip-files00002.jpg'
59b57f979bb0b6700785b6900e4012b4
01411d5c88ddf5327bf6807f86ea7962dfb268d6
'2012-01-14T16:55:12-05:00'
describe
'1408' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAHXW' 'sip-files00002.pro'
06ea80c3dab97d1dd254941982a650ce
f274bf8456836323b5b5896c6d6a60bad0c32f8e
'2012-01-14T16:56:19-05:00'
describe
'70938' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAHXX' 'sip-files00002.QC.jpg'
558e89bbe94405a9a044ee1be6a652f9
2c7543a6643654aba2ab3e69f7dffb9df44f8353
'2012-01-14T16:54:16-05:00'
describe
'5803100' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAHXY' 'sip-files00002.tif'
2f58946d4a211fbe1c07bbc1f6c18c79
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'2012-01-14T16:54:22-05:00'
describe
'145' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAHXZ' 'sip-files00002.txt'
db42161c1f7fa029b029d24266257d1d
b88faf795039ec1a4a5fb267c4291c29467e4685
describe
'201266' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAHYA' 'sip-files00003.jp2'
079fdc4f9667116e48f8534f5963e09c
5b747a903058dc842e2d1cc392281a1cd6bd42e3
'2012-01-14T16:54:26-05:00'
describe
'228110' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAHYB' 'sip-files00003.jpg'
7c6f1a1476369056c7e2f3be4b230f8c
0215229a8f5fa3495de9aa65c84d15fa9e0a9716
'2012-01-14T16:55:29-05:00'
describe
'621' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAHYC' 'sip-files00003.pro'
a8b65a42387a45982440f9247fa02e96
8beea10b672a61362e94ebbb9edb93a65db3f4a3
'2012-01-14T16:55:05-05:00'
describe
'54729' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAHYD' 'sip-files00003.QC.jpg'
3b0f8bb97ab2bd860e72bf3559db67de
e5bc299fad28bb6dae3ca9f52aead36677d3ba43
'2012-01-14T16:55:40-05:00'
describe
'1621060' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAHYE' 'sip-files00003.tif'
b3a1a49939a7bc6ae437251a310faa20
61d4feb31ee6f755944dc32d4f0f6753c48c4ad2
'2012-01-14T16:55:34-05:00'
describe
'138' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAHYF' 'sip-files00003.txt'
709548eff40f25c9efca18fa131b97ce
7f1b1f37ab95833719c093913a5a8ee3e24cb8cf
'2012-01-14T16:55:42-05:00'
describe
'197943' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAHYG' 'sip-files00005.jp2'
169eb68923d41b703c229945e1ba6599
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'2012-01-14T16:54:45-05:00'
describe
'203541' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAHYH' 'sip-files00005.jpg'
0bb61195dc5aca566d817fc9ab31b34d
d5f4f292f90c550bb6d82f908047c6f2acebe248
'2012-01-14T16:54:37-05:00'
describe
'599' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAHYI' 'sip-files00005.pro'
5837f466f46387a508d2980c87f89e95
3e971b8efbaef59ecc621ff016b036e2c86ec7e1
'2012-01-14T16:56:24-05:00'
describe
'45465' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAHYJ' 'sip-files00005.QC.jpg'
fb2aababafd036ba55e253735c0829f4
f38bbc80dd888da635711b7894d5661526314ea0
'2012-01-14T16:56:22-05:00'
describe
'1593736' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAHYK' 'sip-files00005.tif'
f97b7a6040d14c95fe99df897bea27ab
eff75552e8c84ec987d5a40162df5efbfb5eb475
'2012-01-14T16:56:25-05:00'
describe
'45' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAHYL' 'sip-files00005.txt'
b5b470e03da81bda38d754477bd94796
a5174c948726d3e3067bab8a70ed2b3952a8dd6c
'2012-01-14T16:56:48-05:00'
describe
'196875' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAHYM' 'sip-files00006.jp2'
3d6036869c4977ea104e2fca873d9cb7
ffbec7e2a3c8c81d3e2c028894b68436907bf58a
'2012-01-14T16:54:36-05:00'
describe
'204725' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAHYN' 'sip-files00006.jpg'
d920e87f91e775653a82274d40fe49bd
d139603310af9f3d4c9548b022fb70aac0fac7f4
'2012-01-14T16:54:41-05:00'
describe
'326' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAHYO' 'sip-files00006.pro'
4f67049e10448042a682730dd5a30cdd
c97837c26b0309080d7a555a9ddc86cb3e6ede57
'2012-01-14T16:54:11-05:00'
describe
'45414' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAHYP' 'sip-files00006.QC.jpg'
d9b846a31f02407f984f4892c1816d18
6af02fa0356ba166492456d8464102de62b31106
'2012-01-14T16:57:21-05:00'
describe
'1583440' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAHYQ' 'sip-files00006.tif'
0ac488ffde48201eb2f3c5b6bb9d0e56
63e6f70606165034e49e4190eb282565fda378ad
'2012-01-14T16:56:53-05:00'
describe
'121' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAHYR' 'sip-files00006.txt'
331d9836105a1c2a995821958f63ba4e
43391d589e63cd9f063bdf462f86de80bd8f4b83
'2012-01-14T16:57:05-05:00'
describe
'186912' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAHYS' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
908d1c83b0d787747e27920c96c75567
1c3b4b4f0e462a841d0907846cab7b4ab5aef5cb
'2012-01-14T16:54:43-05:00'
describe
'387700' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAHYT' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
e7a97014b7a8173eecacbf4efece5f59
dc93d489be171ede6e88c8fa30ee46a4f9c62254
'2012-01-14T16:55:02-05:00'
describe
'1422' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAHYU' 'sip-files00008.pro'
34775eb94500dd1d76e0d08590c4c1c8
576d06cc2a9f12059db7260f9a3478ad7fa7251a
'2012-01-14T16:54:23-05:00'
describe
'99448' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAHYV' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
ac7ee77bd626ff8140275ba7a9620a96
6e1aa2e1035078a863d65a9f3a79813affa0a99c
'2012-01-14T16:56:26-05:00'
describe
'4502964' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAHYW' 'sip-files00008.tif'
f4e3d78804b27484b37f723e51bad2d8
e48319fd0eed4b807915049df2a177e7012d574d
'2012-01-14T16:56:36-05:00'
describe
'195' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAHYX' 'sip-files00008.txt'
cdab92ff3929ec0f977fda710880e227
3f6bb2e1fe8338dc24995dab17d5eb344eb120ef
'2012-01-14T16:56:47-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'195126' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAHYY' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
40e43a3562aff2436d0bc19d3f6b1ba9
edceb8841fe5bd21e6735d299c80931934836f60
describe
'276810' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAHYZ' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
e33cac685ee90d98747daa318b3c7608
223b1cff9dded728d42564ca51117861b0f9596c
describe
'4257' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAHZA' 'sip-files00009.pro'
68bf9e85215445db0a4e341666b8170c
deb82bdb54ea7caac4a0e78a8190d8bf4f62a542
describe
'71703' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAHZB' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
c7f7d335c7236964acc9da66577c7175
c42554a08d0824aa1c38ad300242be5d35d9f4df
'2012-01-14T16:57:04-05:00'
describe
'1573416' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAHZC' 'sip-files00009.tif'
1b30ff9ccd332d7ee7a1ac268396f314
355cf9fc6708c3d17706496298b90f99bf9a6600
'2012-01-14T16:55:20-05:00'
describe
'208' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAHZD' 'sip-files00009.txt'
937e427e78e138b1e3b1194b6798ce98
aa562d495126c367fd397d05f345c88e47628b26
'2012-01-14T16:56:15-05:00'
describe
'187070' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAHZE' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
91a01e30859eda53ff0b1adf2b21009d
e8fac35bf620a227ae88602f068f9fccf40a57e3
'2012-01-14T16:54:44-05:00'
describe
'200403' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAHZF' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
77a368b6bc09a82b7617555c9b3072b8
0f044470f196cc3c2a83219f19455207589e070f
'2012-01-14T16:56:45-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAHZG' 'sip-files00010.pro'
d8671bda3088466af78a3419cd2eaa4e
7696842a94aa8ff14e4743a8009ca2d067fd20cb
'2012-01-14T16:55:41-05:00'
describe
'42581' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAHZH' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
7dc64edfe5c6b31ba188211443a0f718
de3e8ee6e9fa2b2ea0f2a9b6561f1afedfac8bc8
'2012-01-14T16:54:10-05:00'
describe
'1506504' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAHZI' 'sip-files00010.tif'
0271528d0a4cf5fd3ed6fb934f8ab61d
faeb29b8263ade477d29b894c20d69034edab78a
describe
'207289' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAHZJ' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
352b857ee2febd926b54f895e3422629
bf5c98b98b1b40756e37f5990cd67b716a1f5929
'2012-01-14T16:55:00-05:00'
describe
'248613' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAHZK' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
46455ac5e756614b18f06d8628b68c16
cc95a4240a720730556e401f303494d5ffb69a73
'2012-01-14T16:57:03-05:00'
describe
'11228' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAHZL' 'sip-files00011.pro'
ad4d171ff271585dab261726956291f6
94843a16971d5b41f6bb8a942dfc06f28eab2079
describe
'65745' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAHZM' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
5d7669cffacf5939f5f567afde15c0e8
e02e9f33937c3d31afc74622f24a72e1272837c8
'2012-01-14T16:54:20-05:00'
describe
'1671200' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAHZN' 'sip-files00011.tif'
65c8fa63c9e72a96059ec7925d089c28
9be4bbd2e0f98a206964418443fe2696599abdd7
'2012-01-14T16:56:28-05:00'
describe
'556' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAHZO' 'sip-files00011.txt'
8561c33850147aa3617d8121ce34a2db
cfc23aaaf30b597cec457e8977f8ced15b4715ab
describe
'195290' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAHZP' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
ed23510b28209156a4edfe8917a9397a
6b1861aae9eaa4b68e52e9a06f20544345893849
'2012-01-14T16:56:12-05:00'
describe
'243877' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAHZQ' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
f7a47bd1081902058f35f08f7d0dd2a9
af41d95d561378940c4f578b56dbfb7dfc4fad41
'2012-01-14T16:56:46-05:00'
describe
'4259' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAHZR' 'sip-files00012.pro'
5d4dca684d38f64f63e566d0a21592b5
cc7633dec93f8a7236b68d0039402b0e845a3478
'2012-01-14T16:56:56-05:00'
describe
'58818' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAHZS' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
bd9b896154cc89c2c63a42740e775332
8a50998137378af3e31c575e61875ae7b9ecaced
describe
'1573612' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAHZT' 'sip-files00012.tif'
370b9eaffd9605c1bdd98d6ebdd1fe76
e1d2220f19b6bc91f727ec6859d1501ca14ea2c2
describe
'237' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAHZU' 'sip-files00012.txt'
1780a80de7360875d38d9bcf35b514b8
57ea1d2115db19f52699a54fa38403e9b0d9242c
'2012-01-14T16:54:39-05:00'
describe
'200122' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAHZV' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
f751678ceac2120477cc18116e575538
811dc52348bbc73c39cdc35213cec3167eb6f033
'2012-01-14T16:54:02-05:00'
describe
'356610' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAHZW' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
495d947dd3c06a85390dfcd73267349c
cc8e3e726e477f0a3ef27754492617e61ea8f6f4
'2012-01-14T16:55:45-05:00'
describe
'9524' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAHZX' 'sip-files00013.pro'
827523289dca93636e7365080b94fd4d
7bb1054d2e09796072ae37c263fa140243c959d9
'2012-01-14T16:56:11-05:00'
describe
'96217' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAHZY' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
57d19b10331882afe570d7a54d55ac77
6be83e47bdbdfe207d1a11ab4fb299d437eabe0b
'2012-01-14T16:55:23-05:00'
describe
'1613952' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAHZZ' 'sip-files00013.tif'
4786c8490d63614e9d444bd526d3a888
28a6a3536c28e6903ffba7842640de093ba6eac2
'2012-01-14T16:54:07-05:00'
describe
'429' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIAA' 'sip-files00013.txt'
934cdf42f0cfc77a8488b84fb6a9465f
c5011573bfa320bba4277af080977466ee210302
'2012-01-14T16:54:06-05:00'
describe
'192234' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIAB' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
03835af08de56d557999848bff4f4adc
57d660a840a59edf821a5a59c8250a346e3fc583
'2012-01-14T16:54:15-05:00'
describe
'375378' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIAC' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
596b7e990e220c14ed9fdd25a6644b8e
bad80e6786015b283c86371b112fd30e2b897c4a
describe
'24608' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIAD' 'sip-files00014.pro'
5305c70b15078f79b624cb3c05c81c71
bb0e229ea389434efde4876889768950288bbe65
describe
'108456' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIAE' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
43006c0be7d95190a460527126e519e1
3cbd7be98f5919c724da201a7fc2b6392d9616b9
'2012-01-14T16:56:52-05:00'
describe
'1552384' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIAF' 'sip-files00014.tif'
4de6e2dce0a8f287bb9a50d2ffaa7582
abe6c9134b599b0b4162a178aec8427bc21ca928
describe
'978' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIAG' 'sip-files00014.txt'
e7016b740874848e6b3f1cea0bb31a1f
ca99b3edb7ea8e9003ccb0a9e422fe77b4403a32
'2012-01-14T16:54:59-05:00'
describe
'198977' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIAH' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
665715beb0f0f60fd62d9b13af03b166
325f50927a77cbbdc778642155c09ebfb4383845
'2012-01-14T16:54:38-05:00'
describe
'369440' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIAI' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
f2b3696a1552540720c484f954c39ff5
e85fb0c520d756ab6f45d8482a0e341d6943393b
'2012-01-14T16:55:33-05:00'
describe
'24810' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIAJ' 'sip-files00015.pro'
686f05ca844c0ed162201eb3d06908c5
9c0332346137d9e392f441f542337355ea7812c8
'2012-01-14T16:54:42-05:00'
describe
'108346' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIAK' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
1b454688a0ed0c56532ce253a2cae103
1f435c0764c8d35462c3059127f26dad4ba50e29
describe
'1606744' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIAL' 'sip-files00015.tif'
60b7610d5b3327b408795bb1595b0dae
f3c431917e346fab6a3c4b204334e581a51207fd
'2012-01-14T16:54:24-05:00'
describe
'991' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIAM' 'sip-files00015.txt'
fe46086056a84189e16056fd94e14d46
e80315c0741b26c3bc1daba5938bd231f9fc2c69
'2012-01-14T16:54:14-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'176445' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIAN' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
c9c0e1b2811d67946e3c053449610b8e
ad296e2f102bbe13f4241214d982ec94b35a9e2a
'2012-01-14T16:56:02-05:00'
describe
'406471' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIAO' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
91ae4d540f7f8479d3c22585aa29eea8
0c3e68f3952764c633390d308ceb401e98ff867f
describe
'24589' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIAP' 'sip-files00016.pro'
f8018ecf0449b63bcda23b847adbe5ab
a2584b8cf30dd2f19248773aa2a64ba559199b4f
describe
'124295' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIAQ' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
fc3923a77d38239f0e1b2d5f63b229d3
c12b78a35e9705a6f6fdde30afc25d62d1528424
'2012-01-14T16:56:10-05:00'
describe
'1426424' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIAR' 'sip-files00016.tif'
dce3e78b7e08f6916aade84b28c45ce0
946e51ac20f9e5c9ac509bfcb008d140acfdd503
'2012-01-14T16:55:43-05:00'
describe
'982' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIAS' 'sip-files00016.txt'
426c18de2541ae0cdf98df11f9e23f1a
2aff37ac7e80d04c41e250be3513b8e9e61c168c
describe
'200576' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIAT' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
90fa0ba6751272d031b4edf4c11fd6b6
344e663507438b2b7da4696b907bd4fbf69c7b70
describe
'367537' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIAU' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
af663d8e263b0686822dd85d8ee30777
217ca9760674ea5336206310b9691e522727f4be
'2012-01-14T16:55:14-05:00'
describe
'23950' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIAV' 'sip-files00017.pro'
d04117edba23bf1c075d77c3651247cc
29c39c1fa3614cc0949a576b9ab5f92e27d54cd1
describe
'106946' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIAW' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
4d58793a385756b6e91e1f4bfefc56c7
ab30e99af459d581f80c62c6bd889837553350b4
'2012-01-14T16:56:50-05:00'
describe
'1618716' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIAX' 'sip-files00017.tif'
a16de0c257e6dfd231d5dfcd5629c8f1
a1fb49ec4a59c124531dc4878331727a5bd940ad
describe
'967' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIAY' 'sip-files00017.txt'
cc580678b83375f92f669cb1bfa8567f
14469c56f4b457551218d7464239d1b655993b5d
'2012-01-14T16:57:12-05:00'
describe
'195255' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIAZ' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
5da923d795a153e45d6843e34ce2798b
243d2b0a9a3755243ac6f9e6cf0a026ffbc0681e
describe
'363021' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIBA' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
a2d1e30393bec8979a17daac9bd19058
6f07275a2a07ef8e50abffbf3c97f5278988a7db
describe
'23711' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIBB' 'sip-files00018.pro'
c4b9315585ef7e3db35d6d955d1c4604
9987956ce4fd43023622b2871f3240a914b659ec
describe
'105128' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIBC' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
8ef369da1ecffb26c72974a688afffc4
c5fea63186ab3f8f59bc2c8d94b103750a5679e7
'2012-01-14T16:57:18-05:00'
describe
'1576540' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIBD' 'sip-files00018.tif'
9d0ba6d97634cb0073921a467ca5bb99
0c3714faf862098915dd4998c75547ab69324063
describe
'940' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIBE' 'sip-files00018.txt'
eebfeefb476794355a1c17e010f6eed8
fbf6f49afed371f7a7f9e475d98fce7f91108ba7
describe
'189183' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIBF' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
d297c7c0e61553db5cb37a78431e0146
a4d7a90c6486701c29522662b13645e7c0ec462e
describe
'376003' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIBG' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
4fc298b6c26db47e2b2d2f292e4a7dfd
e972f78affd1da047c2b9d36df8bdfb61c19a62a
'2012-01-14T16:54:40-05:00'
describe
'13263' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIBH' 'sip-files00019.pro'
d4ddb7de18eaf4ac026d3bea1c261e43
94f0c4c5ad007599cfa270cbbe89dbc8fc10b44b
'2012-01-14T16:56:27-05:00'
describe
'104173' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIBI' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
39c49a1a8af10e87512fe2aad9a2a08c
4a5841585d1c80dbb9f98e9039922e1bceae10d6
'2012-01-14T16:56:55-05:00'
describe
'1527404' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIBJ' 'sip-files00019.tif'
1e94d405119b11e818ef696725149a61
5cdf83e688b708354c1f64a696ad89a838c0022b
'2012-01-14T16:55:59-05:00'
describe
'550' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIBK' 'sip-files00019.txt'
462ddc41c5cef4e0099aa5b0db5b3918
7d7c6dbfa20e981bc46d93b8d00e3f84c09c4dfd
describe
'199834' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIBL' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
9b0a155f805d3e93bb0cd0b5858a6d3a
b8cc9713420b528e611d1d8c626ccb77b8653f9d
'2012-01-14T16:55:17-05:00'
describe
'361225' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIBM' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
0fb97bd625891e618face22bd10690d7
63df2b0b4f63e9bc0db685befc0a3b50ab89f310
describe
'23377' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIBN' 'sip-files00020.pro'
2fdfd5730e388013cc037fa5e7a748f7
65cf31242b84a6ff31cd1d5666e5037e8a384e05
'2012-01-14T16:55:28-05:00'
describe
'105065' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIBO' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
a3c3fa9fce73468ce13f278491cb061a
7ddd3540faae4bda8ba2ec5618d52d04c31f84a0
describe
'1613028' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIBP' 'sip-files00020.tif'
afdd74407b762a56409ac2dc355b14b7
cc2b1d42e11be7ab35809b6c6ba3a863b62d82ff
describe
'938' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIBQ' 'sip-files00020.txt'
44285b90aa79dd85f6e5ddedc90b0c3a
8e91466a228890d813dbf125d61652a79ccc3bab
'2012-01-14T16:57:13-05:00'
describe
'194858' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIBR' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
b34e2da1e01bb04b299825b316c842f2
25272c82261f0329e1961f4192e3bc7b28d2a577
'2012-01-14T16:54:48-05:00'
describe
'382871' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIBS' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
3d9b7694b809d9856296288228349440
4b83e3271309b81c723f7e17f1cb9212c61d76cf
'2012-01-14T16:56:07-05:00'
describe
'24914' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIBT' 'sip-files00021.pro'
a34f139d4c1440c25eb602c9a2c55c5e
63a1b84db2c15db65d5da14af32b0749b4ff5b91
'2012-01-14T16:57:14-05:00'
describe
'111485' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIBU' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
dbebe3e06b07991fe097b82b5c70660e
3e59d2484379dc2376c0c1c00991292ab3d33143
'2012-01-14T16:55:51-05:00'
describe
'1573000' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIBV' 'sip-files00021.tif'
7f5d1179e1c7fc6e46a5f6452d5111df
9047dc090c8c197c29d71107f9e2e8a82038eb24
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIBW' 'sip-files00021.txt'
0e1c7ffcb974c5d962a03624774739bc
390bf8685fa9ad212c181fc061dfb0915ea65605
describe
'190387' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIBX' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
aac0f09c73b2ebd82af51c8b7543ceb0
ccb692e5dc651074c896eeecccdddf0bd38c6ac5
'2012-01-14T16:56:20-05:00'
describe
'377628' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIBY' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
8e1963cc62c9526db2f02a1dd1e9d3ec
bb8cde66aecbf8668d5a5d73ea0a8b0ed8826647
'2012-01-14T16:55:19-05:00'
describe
'24544' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIBZ' 'sip-files00022.pro'
3c7c5b2e8d3a83c3be60214a34334b80
08f817512aeb80cfd7d2c2002b4345166bcd3b37
'2012-01-14T16:54:55-05:00'
describe
'110240' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAICA' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
d9ba63cdcf4927a70c8fdfc065de4dd7
212824526213ef7df34c90d505878ee98a7c46f7
'2012-01-14T16:54:03-05:00'
describe
'1538148' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAICB' 'sip-files00022.tif'
c26f36e9403281005668f42c01fac525
810c9fe5b0891e20c4e4480639f00c5a6f34fb4f
'2012-01-14T16:54:32-05:00'
describe
'972' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAICC' 'sip-files00022.txt'
a4f6ed8be7cc378c0b0e70c512e10b1a
9bc309edaae97e8780f86cac5bc71cf6bd0e99da
describe
'190680' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAICD' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
04ea1b164813e9c4ba03e9de1c655bb7
afab6a6907936dc1a5ce03b52a8af4aaa69d31ba
'2012-01-14T16:55:57-05:00'
describe
'359839' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAICE' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
f5a4ca9a7597fa10e732d49ffaaa05f5
ca0ef3cf58b4cf8a1f0ecf56e79011c2fa786f57
'2012-01-14T16:56:17-05:00'
describe
'22297' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAICF' 'sip-files00023.pro'
a895730fda3a5ccf2c2d7287690ca346
498c26c9fcb47efd4e1878a92b887b5222340a1b
'2012-01-14T16:54:27-05:00'
describe
'105340' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAICG' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
b5bb539b7cebd7f3421782b4e6b6f7ca
e3d5286e85a679ec6d72bffe7aa49874cbe2df8e
'2012-01-14T16:54:09-05:00'
describe
'1540044' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAICH' 'sip-files00023.tif'
223c5ae20ee73cba2aef1474fc6b16c6
bc19cf4a503c11063f0e58ab83306e3397c20637
'2012-01-14T16:55:38-05:00'
describe
'893' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAICI' 'sip-files00023.txt'
f4260363fdfd61fee02ef46cbd350345
de1d21e5e9650acb6a54a5dafed1fa1a462ffc3b
describe
'191413' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAICJ' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
15c1ac48ac23e01ebd360ae8be948c9e
924edff41020dde21321bf70ac383f52bebdbfd4
'2012-01-14T16:55:53-05:00'
describe
'378040' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAICK' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
3db5ef7d906721dfd205d0c1c7429318
0886d43392e00579687dfd343c50c5a23717bef3
'2012-01-14T16:56:58-05:00'
describe
'25675' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAICL' 'sip-files00024.pro'
19e2c279d367f7a5c931ed27614dd46d
51af880de92d4d9a85f77853795899fba953f68f
describe
'110321' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAICM' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
dbef3ad1beb2746f0f490d725b270992
0cd51c72ce9481b1725c5598b012735ea7bd24b8
'2012-01-14T16:55:50-05:00'
describe
'1545416' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAICN' 'sip-files00024.tif'
273c637c2134e98cc234020cc2380ea1
1a8b42e714b9f5e3e3d4f1e011e87023e07987f0
'2012-01-14T16:55:22-05:00'
describe
'1012' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAICO' 'sip-files00024.txt'
0d9bc36736e4ddfd727ceeef2c10d788
26491cb0ac84093e163ad714bbc27a0f542c72e2
'2012-01-14T16:54:57-05:00'
describe
'197872' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAICP' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
14f4767a7c324f186656f30d244b1b37
0b643a9fc3dd682df633de4144287d9ac9f6043a
'2012-01-14T16:54:21-05:00'
describe
'366883' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAICQ' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
4a7eb913627edfeaf1070c12251fe0c6
605fba9113341ae46dc3a019da37fd2487ea7eb0
'2012-01-14T16:55:32-05:00'
describe
'24743' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAICR' 'sip-files00025.pro'
93d722d70aa1399034b85c2806c3ff64
086cb080f8ba3a8ab669d4aaf977fc2306c257f2
'2012-01-14T16:54:54-05:00'
describe
'107099' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAICS' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
a6fe3bae1f525c55940d99f6658e43bd
55c91c1c9fb15a49416c2ebc6f5700a7f34c8e1d
describe
'1596976' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAICT' 'sip-files00025.tif'
f4ba285a91639f8d049005a9a37953ca
f8ba676bb7cea3d9b6400b2b10a13bcb7f71735e
describe
'987' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAICU' 'sip-files00025.txt'
f4c6e9720a765d12759dc11f6df6dbc6
35a8b650e30a706fdbe05b527d8bd6fb6ac5e981
'2012-01-14T16:54:58-05:00'
describe
'194678' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAICV' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
0c41c48f7df016beafe92f7a885cb02b
bf0c57256915c95cc5cb9487084c0cc16fd5fde9
'2012-01-14T16:55:24-05:00'
describe
'355479' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAICW' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
61b3734e7fd643f2ffab506ebc457df3
ad5482edae5c0b66a1560327b954d4867e3957d5
'2012-01-14T16:54:19-05:00'
describe
'22803' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAICX' 'sip-files00026.pro'
c9df755597544a46def12a26f3f0bdf9
cb9db7469b66bb733d158c997aea22920609c241
describe
'103215' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAICY' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
cd68e8f6f7cf688be57f08a42f7576b8
38ff742a9b4105a772bff4dc2fb3d6d4e7116cfd
'2012-01-14T16:55:10-05:00'
describe
'1571120' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAICZ' 'sip-files00026.tif'
7ae30160d5c1ada294fac3d751689011
20badd6753b97c24f1552b891e0bd5ff9fe2919a
'2012-01-14T16:54:28-05:00'
describe
'911' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIDA' 'sip-files00026.txt'
fc87b7362e59a0cf638c0e5b03b56d28
a453876ff3ef883fed0ed66585217447d748a0cf
describe
'195893' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIDB' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
0a406c275dc5449f4aa0212747fe02c0
0bc11c90d6bec7400a5cb4564797d9191450d87c
describe
'371708' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIDC' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
fde82252fb34654afb843f1187580f78
34efe11423e240bcbc4e42233626c1eea0f4d3b9
'2012-01-14T16:54:53-05:00'
describe
'24918' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIDD' 'sip-files00027.pro'
138cf1a6c37370fd8329d0d88afeef9c
d5b8fbac85e84bdb1e3597355159e420fce5f2d4
describe
'108824' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIDE' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
4160da76d2604c96522335b18730755d
03eaf8686d698acba8bf9c494376039060df37ff
describe
'1581604' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIDF' 'sip-files00027.tif'
bb41b365eb69e72db3d1114537f8bb18
b3444db0f710ca6daf13d9ad49674af962ac7b36
describe
'1014' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIDG' 'sip-files00027.txt'
d4ac24a7c2305be100b3cc6d9bd95e87
6760bea212db7d538b5a322547f29708a6b10a13
describe
'199596' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIDH' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
e508d18801bdea4052893fb705bc0d26
a5644f37d61a41242961cb052bced300737c434d
describe
'369381' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIDI' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
25c70f011029e3f646178f71b185901f
b944f658e63291b33c655ec1b82c02ce314434e6
'2012-01-14T16:55:52-05:00'
describe
'25229' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIDJ' 'sip-files00028.pro'
3f51203020fc67c2990f3b5fabd05f60
50321f45d2e0de6acd31c3ab139e64b0666ed5a0
'2012-01-14T16:56:09-05:00'
describe
'106876' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIDK' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
1347d90a12ab74b5ccf48b45d8e81314
4bbe478a01653cdc9f38bbc4c4a9e8aab42484de
'2012-01-14T16:56:54-05:00'
describe
'1611000' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIDL' 'sip-files00028.tif'
66b78542a20c6dd6a79fe78c59958d64
225c2a557d8fbe38d73e2b9952befd2d123f3119
describe
'999' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIDM' 'sip-files00028.txt'
aafe75f0aa6c1b837926cc3ef5a23d33
fcf8878489cdc4949c3f8db4791bcd04b1b1f9fb
'2012-01-14T16:54:33-05:00'
describe
'198770' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIDN' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
197806268727bdec84b299654e342622
fe710ae87196cbc8514261715065bd074c28c78c
'2012-01-14T16:57:07-05:00'
describe
'366412' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIDO' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
ff113ebc9b9d970dc1b852a4fd552cbd
19c92267a1b08bb9cb331de8d5d3abadb941519c
describe
'23638' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIDP' 'sip-files00029.pro'
3365ed4272453e66118dea0bd82d1ffb
2a1172a6cf205754d909bf7d0fe86875998b3e6b
describe
'105858' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIDQ' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
4c19ff3ff0260381f6fb8126a2e2cfd5
a4dd5e62b6a63966432dc502b232b0d99ec22c66
'2012-01-14T16:56:32-05:00'
describe
'1604208' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIDR' 'sip-files00029.tif'
846d026a97e843ff06a594636edd40da
9d2f7207d73183b510a4f1d9997a8a0cee2a8668
describe
'964' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIDS' 'sip-files00029.txt'
d44c68405dc76771f10f63c7c485414d
5d1b916d499f36c79785d2e023e008071baea0c4
'2012-01-14T16:55:18-05:00'
describe
'201074' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIDT' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
51c060fc45a5481bec63427e72df2991
7e45ac0bd92111cca9a3807cabfc40c1a3827c7d
describe
'357145' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIDU' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
df5102d5c40fed62dae7a7d2f28c06e0
3a5772ee9c63f6d83172e7636310b05c6759f190
describe
'24263' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIDV' 'sip-files00030.pro'
efb44972eb58b26767f3b7feb6d69e33
a8cd954742f994f145fbbbe59ab06441793537b6
describe
'104618' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIDW' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
1aeef35809fe0ce7f658840d4312ab0e
dd21609cebc4ef3bb48528673dd4afaf26adc9c3
'2012-01-14T16:54:25-05:00'
describe
'1622508' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIDX' 'sip-files00030.tif'
c4be857bc78306d00be8c201e44fac25
dbcd7807b4143d45b07390860091ac29bafd63de
describe
'969' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIDY' 'sip-files00030.txt'
5a37c8b29f6b093d50158425342ad5ff
749b4bca558ed66857c3203494558d751e18817a
'2012-01-14T16:56:59-05:00'
describe
'197047' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIDZ' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
45f8014666f638b5a3a43e8bcfca96fd
f3ee2259538e432c85996291745dc7209b884e10
describe
'349272' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIEA' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
64a8f4afae587a85d0259fd01307115b
acd763794154ae2d83222f45643b6c23d506442f
describe
'21777' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIEB' 'sip-files00031.pro'
a6794ec7c02c3dcc5999b1d8c95506f5
ccf284b88f56278cebc175a8824e7cebac580c4e
'2012-01-14T16:55:31-05:00'
describe
'101904' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIEC' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
c4d9a00f64eba105fe3c542927b07025
204bc8d6f41589aae4eca3fc260c1f3ada132153
'2012-01-14T16:56:01-05:00'
describe
'1590792' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIED' 'sip-files00031.tif'
40649fbe6aeb0c82c3c4d29b91c05ac0
efdb7f28b769a9aecb33b372c3b093900262f962
'2012-01-14T16:54:13-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIEE' 'sip-files00031.txt'
98f087c4629435fe4f9eccbe2f6a6cff
efe996f59b0a63524894f74f730453c1298cb295
describe
'199758' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIEF' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
60c49cd0aa95f0439ca5d5a3dcd15844
b96aa365c1563dfd0b5cc295adb97a5280a7ee5a
'2012-01-14T16:55:25-05:00'
describe
'332504' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIEG' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
264e8f9c48d39a67d20efa31cf551f0f
7282e5e94113bac10a6eb67c51e53933ff726b1b
'2012-01-14T16:55:30-05:00'
describe
'20571' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIEH' 'sip-files00032.pro'
1d7f18c24a24f92c12f8152eb8682147
c4124da209458839db9ebb960efb962ac16b2c12
describe
'95095' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIEI' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
789c4685357f7c76cbffa132282b5c2f
07c8462f89654242268e643528f200090ec0c260
describe
'1611960' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIEJ' 'sip-files00032.tif'
c6d80e9679db0d0ae4bf2888f952ddbe
62f9c503a3849216f00c53b042cffb6d9a8db892
'2012-01-14T16:56:40-05:00'
describe
'831' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIEK' 'sip-files00032.txt'
2be9ec1f0877e1191f1fae0da632ec1a
1ef0fa9c74724c81974d3e2f7b560368a0fde12b
'2012-01-14T16:55:15-05:00'
describe
'204051' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIEL' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
0c54f148a33de2f1af77749680a915ac
468ffa4c37e44e00c8d6481975f6b98096e3e0fd
'2012-01-14T16:56:14-05:00'
describe
'357157' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIEM' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
1a0fcc04f49797df5088249181f6fafc
73783fc5464a0b8430f6b0c783d849917cd01945
'2012-01-14T16:57:17-05:00'
describe
'23623' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIEN' 'sip-files00033.pro'
38d76fe8e942b2e4e133d0bd26200cf3
5192ce9bca7a1d1ad05f065e91f010eca6232409
'2012-01-14T16:53:57-05:00'
describe
'102110' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIEO' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
4e6b1b7c026c39c29762ce147cadc56b
444a753fc2335e4d362ea500b66a8c412b489ecf
describe
'1646616' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIEP' 'sip-files00033.tif'
86d8e10e1bc3790572b17471c76b43e3
c3f30f8f88e7c7c40630414bfba610fd5a12202f
describe
'965' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIEQ' 'sip-files00033.txt'
3b13e3bae04fb00ac424f73a8940e2be
46e2991db8124b794b6385ff6174895d482b8143
'2012-01-14T16:55:08-05:00'
describe
'203883' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIER' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
959ec5904ed24d692850150a7a3be37c
b2cd4e0254e0b3ae11436a5e7dc574e1cb3ffc5f
describe
'348140' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIES' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
ee6847e01e8cd0c1b7e72d970ad40860
0fe8e40757a8f4f939d0b9e8f290d63f05a9734a
'2012-01-14T16:54:18-05:00'
describe
'22645' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIET' 'sip-files00034.pro'
c05c5d292b1ebe5c127bbd5a8f99df5c
0f6126a25e62d7e6538596b707723b512b4258db
describe
'98980' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIEU' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
36227b3482173e28e7650a3569738416
b5f39a412a61b22d477b750d6055b886c1c2e9c5
describe
'1644756' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIEV' 'sip-files00034.tif'
f7a2d9fb8290a3097d68822bf97b6a5d
49af8258ddde6a2a65763e7d0a56bc7f1fc165e7
describe
'904' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIEW' 'sip-files00034.txt'
30a7c9fafc2c13d7f638fa266e95613d
0ebc533c0aeb532b946385f743eb992e40667dd8
describe
'209186' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIEX' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
578efda3d0e490b1cc4c7f52653e93f7
0f3d6ab5240ca1fede35461895b1572e291a9728
describe
'341533' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIEY' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
9aa4ce660dc1f21422e9a70d3d7b2524
d07c207803e5884c7bd6058d655bdd23c753631e
'2012-01-14T16:55:13-05:00'
describe
'12898' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIEZ' 'sip-files00035.pro'
0ba7f6c351510820b8f1769af1d714af
cda1f7ceba179bd55c37edc851608bac77df659a
'2012-01-14T16:57:15-05:00'
describe
'93672' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIFA' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
b9b0959cc95032500f2cfb15ef7328dd
d41cdad25aa334cf7e3c9c4655cb85f4a2777173
describe
'1687008' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIFB' 'sip-files00035.tif'
65c57a7110286a6540672152b7fd3ccd
82ccf540cd797fcc83a612e30cad542375622aea
describe
'535' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIFC' 'sip-files00035.txt'
67a9499a9698ebc164ff15884ada9aa3
b1bc5b3560449002e8348eace135172da7e4403e
describe
'203420' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIFD' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
e9e67539914691a8c2f164e58fe20e7a
bc8f630c444f6bb8d7873725e105e67a09b372ee
'2012-01-14T16:55:39-05:00'
describe
'350763' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIFE' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
7355f6f59d6cd2d013f6c1360b5b2dc8
cefcece7f34cb44164be6d7986190f9209925bc8
describe
'23206' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIFF' 'sip-files00036.pro'
e9a0c760b174270e7c99b977e37ad12e
d5faa817665af0cf30bced5d2771243d3f7f7cc1
'2012-01-14T16:55:26-05:00'
describe
'100396' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIFG' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
0c2880954d8eb0181fe4f7326be5b16f
cdd1439b64441807a05fbcf638ea69f03cc8652e
describe
'1640720' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIFH' 'sip-files00036.tif'
1a150651c95e9338d6f3d7ee0ff1c593
10c44a2a5491e7cee44b151231fbe49f92718c81
describe
'932' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIFI' 'sip-files00036.txt'
83ac97d0263d1acb623a5222e0750fd8
2431e46ab94a2e8a90af45c327ddca0e4f695aa0
describe
'200644' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIFJ' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
a5fb4d88c21b905e384c1a7b2306bb4a
977b2bc16450f4c9767a336c69f9e1ad7ad70917
describe
'358061' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIFK' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
b7c29d2647981152db7ac3da4057e540
62065a70dabe9b6b417b38f5855581c7fac9695f
'2012-01-14T16:56:31-05:00'
describe
'24676' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIFL' 'sip-files00037.pro'
da5e34d87c1f31215127cfacab3decae
36f41a7fe6310da16ea76d2633b63788e8a45e04
'2012-01-14T16:57:06-05:00'
describe
'104143' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIFM' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
09320650595975cff8ee11f4fda9121b
568c55d96dfddfea6a31dd4b14839b0096b510de
describe
'1619372' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIFN' 'sip-files00037.tif'
66dfba70f1ecc4d4dd93ce294b828ab3
94d523d8f398f97d36f6ffdf09381f0ea9f3390d
'2012-01-14T16:54:52-05:00'
describe
'981' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIFO' 'sip-files00037.txt'
5b2deca7e7f5784316eb1799b88a58d6
d055231d0ec1991a71576b887a0039c4325339b4
'2012-01-14T16:56:05-05:00'
describe
'200211' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIFP' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
1044bcb9a4e32b285f29da14a767df7e
00b8a7816824eb93f2a0c846af800c140264a1a9
describe
'355542' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIFQ' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
5620c47f90bdb586e93a359ace6de74c
0f7f3b9bccc43b6f6fdd3904a6c56bc7e66a5ecf
'2012-01-14T16:56:23-05:00'
describe
'22961' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIFR' 'sip-files00038.pro'
dfd53391747d41bacb301bc8b8770bbc
cd8c0ebcba16a55ffc578a54b9642b54824e4946
describe
'101497' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIFS' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
c46ebdaf9a076cd98887d5d6f64a372a
d2490e013ada68a483eee790e7e5c0a86e3df27e
'2012-01-14T16:57:20-05:00'
describe
'1615052' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIFT' 'sip-files00038.tif'
24c069af041de03b9656bfb443b2ffa2
9d9437455b2d74f31f28a00a6a86f39b36272304
describe
'919' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIFU' 'sip-files00038.txt'
037236c4f8db9c7b1281e7a46d57c92b
f83e90bbfc062b2dfd8b91aeec460a8b2e01c677
describe
'199747' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIFV' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
e9a4f2db5e258e1b734b7ff0cca153e2
94d63552d6ca5a4f8d32c22a69e49db14d482c6d
'2012-01-14T16:56:29-05:00'
describe
'354435' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIFW' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
1a38cf6db82c19cec7756775c41b4ff3
d1670bebd5af6144dfb1d70952f64738cfbf49ff
describe
'24219' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIFX' 'sip-files00039.pro'
e613faed1cc7afdad9019681a4fedb66
ef5467714273c0bc1cdc636a00e04adf60ee847b
describe
'101968' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIFY' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
3df29facf8917a09ea353029001b7d5a
b30173ca01084223fedf3da8dfcfbbde4a580775
'2012-01-14T16:56:16-05:00'
describe
'1611780' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIFZ' 'sip-files00039.tif'
72328cef37de832bf5fd4220bc3e65c8
faee447d4f033dab0663d1ec2a3954b9ebe7bc95
'2012-01-14T16:54:29-05:00'
describe
'1019' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIGA' 'sip-files00039.txt'
e77039da7fe36da897d43b0d62fb43fa
537cf79fb2cd6007fcd5bd92dcc17b11ec9b1db5
describe
'198756' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIGB' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
f20d71f1482b47c0d910c744f6303e7c
47391a54867f142b7a8bd4e8043e050da223be3b
'2012-01-14T16:56:41-05:00'
describe
'367263' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIGC' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
2cd1511207633cbad2ee05bc1624f6b7
2e2436cc3a375b68c3d7f94ad9a3f536984a3f5d
'2012-01-14T16:54:46-05:00'
describe
'21896' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIGD' 'sip-files00040.pro'
7251be77917de1ef87b746aa78fd9841
16ff54a4bbac53664668ac7eba13c53ca648392e
'2012-01-14T16:56:51-05:00'
describe
'104879' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIGE' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
5a9c3bae60dfeb74d219f7cbf38086d1
9d62ef16659539092d6fe63fd55d4c761c44ea07
describe
'1604360' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIGF' 'sip-files00040.tif'
2aac8e64d86e851c505fe7d5726fc1d4
b23510bc7f3d4a3f1be06a7d6ad7020ccf419635
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIGG' 'sip-files00040.txt'
aac099492ccb28a815934aef6cc4322c
8ceb1e39982f86d6cc338f61959b8580d899e98f
'2012-01-14T16:54:50-05:00'
describe
'200366' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIGH' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
58538fe202a77808c1cf32000f5baf0e
1c89ee0ac5ec0e57f30c280c28a04df4dc973aef
describe
'366774' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIGI' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
f378b42c0bde057a7576d3fb4855c4f6
f973ae92bd03689a305ac158817562698c74bf47
describe
'22151' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIGJ' 'sip-files00041.pro'
f66d342bb62bee0d9b2adb16f6ddd7c0
0207d930c2f55a91dc4435e10a79cfff28fcb292
'2012-01-14T16:55:56-05:00'
describe
'104805' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIGK' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
c5353643eabeb3aaa1d70fb790cb33b6
489962690b9da117814196bcadf923eaafaca548
describe
'1616952' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIGL' 'sip-files00041.tif'
48c90137887efd8f38e30767b5e11e38
3824e99042f15e7a328eead8cd70618169e8c6a9
'2012-01-14T16:57:11-05:00'
describe
'917' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIGM' 'sip-files00041.txt'
e46c71b72813cfa42838929eeede051e
9ae056cc8002e121d9bae3d9a2423f34c65475b0
'2012-01-14T16:53:58-05:00'
describe
'201447' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIGN' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
1924712bbf184f102942c82d64800547
ce81243a309911f61a5ae3c0985a45d960df7cf2
describe
'371555' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIGO' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
24e4da699bcd2b05912435e8ac7fae01
f838d820b0655add6a17da15e0edce9717f3788a
'2012-01-14T16:54:00-05:00'
describe
'23501' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIGP' 'sip-files00042.pro'
ad1ec02fecd7b8dd6f9d6fede43b2789
fc7582bba59e0e4dc5bb97919048feec4620b2b9
describe
'104441' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIGQ' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
1caca9763b82e3d50084eb45a5d3577a
a4c2d55752f9d24f3fddee0d63e2fa4995e5a631
describe
'1624664' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIGR' 'sip-files00042.tif'
a107eb67a1fb1d48a60b39f3dbdba020
cbcd8c787e06ce4716b319c6f5efb108bb98b5ae
describe
'947' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIGS' 'sip-files00042.txt'
bd5e661f273fa87e40ce568e894fb2ba
3f81bf7408d56adb8c71b113a64f56c9e6cd0838
describe
'207071' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIGT' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
7381782c3e655fe4e635beabb0fb6ffa
f84466c5e58887b7dc7992affd3190039f0c28cd
describe
'363981' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIGU' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
a1f59b4695c1c73aac690e24631d3428
087a98049bb9e7331083ce2eca38232825cca1d3
describe
'22681' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIGV' 'sip-files00043.pro'
b60aa4cf6a4bdb4aa6d058a7a194d274
a77f4b48884732e6e68cf8ced3540f158c1afe4a
describe
'102630' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIGW' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
01a712e36e9118c48ed91526158d5dc6
a568fa246a14caa2ecf599a317ef4aa7bb8104e1
'2012-01-14T16:57:01-05:00'
describe
'1670168' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIGX' 'sip-files00043.tif'
c885af0d6ccb851f7a0c24b5f46b5bfd
72ca3f3748d4e1a88488cd3243bfab6e63b7de7d
describe
'928' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIGY' 'sip-files00043.txt'
9f0c655909b6d35eb23a598341d73a73
5d1b5c92be53300d33de48c5529e16f31b961adc
'2012-01-14T16:55:37-05:00'
describe
'204643' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIGZ' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
c604eed289086d2184803a3e7c558b5d
1dd62b7771c9bbc81be806a4878356acb9b6e463
describe
'366267' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIHA' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
86ba4109f4a58ff678e1346e1eb147a9
2b333230bd09532666684e08428be31ea64de815
'2012-01-14T16:56:21-05:00'
describe
'21637' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIHB' 'sip-files00044.pro'
d7c069d2d7df9800c91c460a6cf16d24
0d4c6b55bc6855f7ac77816028b5aff02b86306b
describe
'103116' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIHC' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
35be547d0b79e7fee3ebcd20ccdba70d
03c0267972ae624562a8049ba91a914bd6f5d66d
'2012-01-14T16:56:30-05:00'
describe
'1650888' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIHD' 'sip-files00044.tif'
97cef95a2a8d084b3353e60e5834f124
116f13c1ea483410c84e95f97971847ed75ae2de
describe
'866' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIHE' 'sip-files00044.txt'
c0ac137a8d0d225ab4e29db5b60fa4b0
8bab8adcf29295da2478bb9df0f0235c29ec818e
describe
'204575' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIHF' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
0e0dd3326f4b47b93b989e64ef8383f7
119f7cf1c1ebc4c53f4aac568d5a9c46a972ae60
describe
'362909' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIHG' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
2fa84e97e99a69753ef13991d27c9a2a
33f28b612af356e56afa3c8e6bcd3f84fe88ab9f
describe
'23536' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIHH' 'sip-files00045.pro'
bd2b05543864138b1197651792bd978f
fb27c1e78a12c7e5e1d9656e8d999369d9c01717
'2012-01-14T16:55:21-05:00'
describe
'102594' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIHI' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
2188bc70fed809c5e9077b7924af2295
a31ef3c6a0c60dab0f8cb37b6ab14b7e89c3336f
describe
'1649900' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIHJ' 'sip-files00045.tif'
760326fd39d05e90bf33c2b638d062eb
ee622508781a6e8f1e37afd1f3bd16495c623051
describe
'954' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIHK' 'sip-files00045.txt'
d0ef9adf0ca8576045f3cb4d717145ec
994adaa7a5606a7c4b562141e5439e542d297b17
'2012-01-14T16:55:48-05:00'
describe
'195109' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIHL' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
ab05a334654c08181585fa8e9fb84e41
af453ab090749961dec5352ade1dad7b7fdff46d
'2012-01-14T16:55:11-05:00'
describe
'383117' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIHM' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
8dfab0d070185946f512a986cada399c
acc25d62d9df1c1bef7be4bbcbb775ab8ec4de01
describe
'13417' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIHN' 'sip-files00046.pro'
173a35568379e31224317238fc69a484
09d2db6dad8975a0b6fd43c6aaf037080a57644a
'2012-01-14T16:56:35-05:00'
describe
'103073' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIHO' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
734d23e84b31d0fc981d03c0a21af41e
1d96d53d479236c1a4ed332d121605c21ab79d9f
describe
'1574332' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIHP' 'sip-files00046.tif'
494f538dc38cb7b00af68727d4797208
2ddf3407847e4c8219820cb2ba074f0b7c9ed929
'2012-01-14T16:56:18-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIHQ' 'sip-files00046.txt'
13479a05290018b65f347f0f65ebb092
63a57353777c39f4796a8f51d2b96cb53d9837e3
'2012-01-14T16:54:35-05:00'
describe
'205038' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIHR' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
7e44cad57e540a1fff058404d6fdad59
a769eb685aefda1a8d72539ed5b8f1de64e76bf5
describe
'374508' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIHS' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
b0290b23e38f0d9078061b735da4ccd2
2005ace464a7543aa31a21b913f2698b02cce211
'2012-01-14T16:55:01-05:00'
describe
'23977' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIHT' 'sip-files00047.pro'
664096be92d68613115ceb19ff6a2f56
9bc085ad86232012ae489150b2c048bca33dd2f2
describe
'106166' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIHU' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
a2908ae2d54138d04c7f168f2027ddbd
0869e0442ea83cfc46475a3f31f09a9ea4bd42dd
describe
'1653988' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIHV' 'sip-files00047.tif'
86364b41a736ebac42c3e8df2f0e5304
c53c79d76bd4147f85a2d62dbad5cbc696859aa3
'2012-01-14T16:56:44-05:00'
describe
'1004' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIHW' 'sip-files00047.txt'
16df37cf3c53a999a254bceac2f16128
e786b76e00e42e8cb407eb3361b34db1b4138e1e
describe
'199470' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIHX' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
421e63f193e9234c78ea6485aec86db0
bbdb16de5dd8e32aaae70ae23b0bfa81de6fea84
describe
'370151' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIHY' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
309d20ee9ca8f10bb9572e8a0e0822e0
50a006ed5120ea15479cea184ef755198fbddce8
describe
'23124' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIHZ' 'sip-files00048.pro'
a1bb7f77108d4a0c5893b3b77e471ec3
a1ea41362df08dd14efc75188bbc132e07ba93d0
describe
'105399' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIIA' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
1802a998984a13d65a8654f851066340
4bc6111eed4fad8baff81e0db0e0c7fb8f2772e9
describe
'1609640' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIIB' 'sip-files00048.tif'
683ae868dfbc15f14fe08adfcd0fbf73
96abff2b4fb4bdb9139c820a8128fc08ad69b3f3
'2012-01-14T16:54:31-05:00'
describe
'925' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIIC' 'sip-files00048.txt'
d5bd8fc818d0c3f73e34d28fe42648ba
44a48977a7d7e9aad99b78000bbf012b67824291
'2012-01-14T16:54:47-05:00'
describe
'209691' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIID' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
5c81ea14917d9ac2d05bc3894de611c8
29ee41c26f05170d45d4a19220062c8e48246229
describe
'364864' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIIE' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
a9c332c83e28af35ddc18c45caf69358
c7cbd9adf8dae101847a686d1322d5bbff834e6f
'2012-01-14T16:56:06-05:00'
describe
'24563' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIIF' 'sip-files00049.pro'
5f2e6e5fee065742a422b11785c630b6
8c5bb57799e25d5d9b37c0d63ce167240e8522ab
describe
'102832' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIIG' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
a9e7b8d05d0bdcf8839037246a3e5fe2
79468571ac204946e373dc5d3d0ce7b8a0ded0e6
describe
'1691288' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIIH' 'sip-files00049.tif'
b2b5f456651f5f05fe7b9fc8cb4dc42d
9333c809a67c79d01addaab6b702f1ac51c1d5f0
'2012-01-14T16:55:27-05:00'
describe
'974' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIII' 'sip-files00049.txt'
edd15d05485e6307baad20a6516d1eaf
021a6469d5fae9e062d2c05a8cd1e35f9f98e0f4
describe
'204792' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIIJ' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
e36669af82aae764e9d1c5b551ae0231
65403d5e862244453a257fdd9fce722e4f6b578c
describe
'378818' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIIK' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
1f5864a58aac3c2cf47a414464cca83c
aa35c7e7479df63daaa9e70451bb37812c6c6892
'2012-01-14T16:54:49-05:00'
describe
'23945' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIIL' 'sip-files00050.pro'
7189c0e73d3b58a9a027c927907f14d4
8e5e2ecbeb2c7ed4866f6230d77c072025653a62
'2012-01-14T16:55:47-05:00'
describe
'106251' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIIM' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
f8acce412675c2190501263a3d151dad
9cb50a21e1e1a3f80c6043b990f37f8e30b937fe
describe
'1651736' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIIN' 'sip-files00050.tif'
a03da6089530e0cf1050eaea03d85b04
b272db92c5b0cfa63286b7280ab9086e5763636f
describe
'959' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIIO' 'sip-files00050.txt'
e928c498e36d2bbea96e90979171d1c9
a8e76208b95b4095467c26c836684cb138f633b4
describe
'204207' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIIP' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
9add722ccf2a51f63c6d113f3980a81a
ea3739dbc949a140fc3c3f93840e072070b62f44
'2012-01-14T16:54:04-05:00'
describe
'361911' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIIQ' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
f73767259b2c5d17c6705fb3f4504854
d61f3845d47c50edadfaa615c5f9d62dc57c9090
describe
'23167' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIIR' 'sip-files00051.pro'
af1839e21b5e6c9b8132e0a75f670012
dacb3d64f2fe4e6f6d779c56621c8acbd4396907
describe
'102060' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIIS' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
d3b1d852d21c38209455230bc467a7fc
c53ed4daecb4522816e26783068316c2416095ea
describe
'1647340' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIIT' 'sip-files00051.tif'
e0e3257e85b0145797a4d65ff25b3747
c83a9818579639dc999c8aed97396c109f465c8c
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIIU' 'sip-files00051.txt'
2c79043d11d69776d55a2a19b544173b
d84164e6c522a70cb7f751038486dbecc320cc49
'2012-01-14T16:55:55-05:00'
describe
'200892' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIIV' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
e20283d9c75629f8e140f6a0ee78c018
b544150ae16527bcdc393ef7e455770e292d1094
describe
'380802' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIIW' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
22ec4e2ac25c98fae58db6133aad96ab
8364e70fa0202fe52a160e67587beb1db1c46eaa
describe
'24575' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIIX' 'sip-files00052.pro'
30efd4e088e5d9d7cf186ffdc6044760
90244f8ec37d5e795b5673c7fa684bda2432820c
'2012-01-14T16:56:04-05:00'
describe
'108609' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIIY' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
258322e8c22c1acd6cf1b9ec0f936bcc
3bb2599eec977d751ef061a727a02da6d2211ace
describe
'1620896' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIIZ' 'sip-files00052.tif'
b19d14cdd337763b3b4fb192e7c86d19
37538463e57893a2d440c6a9e3661c2f302395eb
describe
'971' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIJA' 'sip-files00052.txt'
b14135941c27d78774bc220ce2dcd21d
a9f596fe8ba1dc3c75c03fafe02c851e1fab1a65
describe
'206937' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIJB' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
8feceb695e26221e8b650405f0907c04
b033b3412379b6b41b3fb760c8cc5260f7dcd901
'2012-01-14T16:56:03-05:00'
describe
'368834' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIJC' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
38018d7d20cbf03b513ceefafc0c83ad
a8c46d08d73bbebe790fd721b538aa1795fd3935
'2012-01-14T16:55:58-05:00'
describe
'25563' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIJD' 'sip-files00053.pro'
23169cfa52076a46d33dff144e2250b0
ecff0eceebbbff3227d6f706d6a9c1b1e4e64933
describe
'105169' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIJE' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
7f6626f0e8c6243190d8acffff4c93e1
fb7d4125ae3391df744faaaa002925794b681113
describe
'1668968' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIJF' 'sip-files00053.tif'
a20eabf49e43610cd3ccc81d4dd3097e
32211a81c97ef90b7f254b850fb52b0f5c0e5bcd
describe
'1032' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIJG' 'sip-files00053.txt'
d45888f1685a61a154f907b4f3f08590
0627f481100ab15ade2850caf92ff1997168eeed
describe
'195449' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIJH' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
6d0af992d0423912467eb7738378705d
405be67e33a21d00ee6a8fa7bb486ff117bf1f5e
describe
'394106' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIJI' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
f361d4017e509e523514f0bbd669ef33
b4a948aa1ebfeacd4b5accea564c9a7ac1bc5fe2
describe
'25290' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIJJ' 'sip-files00054.pro'
5a86a5d08022c9d2c1169250562f2927
cb8a31fce6f97f8f146233ec15645b14dc6b3de0
'2012-01-14T16:54:01-05:00'
describe
'112436' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIJK' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
3d1f8edce7173f01f7106209b1388808
214d5f2903458269a8d1ac70379456dfbe77d4cb
describe
'1577616' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIJL' 'sip-files00054.tif'
3da53dc53894c39893d020b65a2f4e48
39c9a1615f1cf7d2093e2741a9474bf4665b9714
'2012-01-14T16:55:54-05:00'
describe
'1006' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIJM' 'sip-files00054.txt'
2b33a799bb91177777e663a28211a13b
11b9f2a1b24aa31def77add04e3a2d5917b966c7
describe
'205011' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIJN' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
c21c66b3324bf741d3760577db015b35
5e2a18bf651bcf02a9cfb4852efc9707fd3c3c0a
describe
'375814' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIJO' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
d00a8b90e73148efba0bcd6470e4dda5
b0c237a4cc42ea47747544e5098309edd3fb4089
'2012-01-14T16:56:33-05:00'
describe
'25532' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIJP' 'sip-files00055.pro'
fdc66558fd75269b420df43efb7b0883
ede647e4ac95c624574762de38610522d92eaab3
describe
'106737' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIJQ' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
f2486f0520b7f623863331c2aae6cbf9
2485d7a3d39c0d69210b9118833fc5d089549e04
describe
'1654180' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIJR' 'sip-files00055.tif'
b958723e53d39378b3b3c59a9db237b5
faff9682a3b37f3ae80e3d604bba5640430d4233
describe
'1074' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIJS' 'sip-files00055.txt'
befb482b09de5a265728372364a9db64
877bb813c66b1d15d061fbffe07c332dc74529f2
describe
'201169' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIJT' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
ad82ec6308571cb5b5e9ec4933a41b18
0a0feafbe71c5d1b465368542760c2b55083228d
describe
'388418' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIJU' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
78932430c9f8bcb820c3277234f86eee
8359701fdd13526ee6a29298ed5aa1b53305f31a
'2012-01-14T16:55:06-05:00'
describe
'26444' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIJV' 'sip-files00056.pro'
de8f7697b09e7f2d6852cd210ef8ff43
23c784ed0a9efd8ae4630d015d090ae4187fa1e8
describe
'109186' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIJW' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
7d2a7f9cc569ba96f367a55741eea750
e9322b563aa6eeea509a7340de43b4ed37085ce4
describe
'1622932' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIJX' 'sip-files00056.tif'
4e9a6d0eee39d0f2842aa80db5f68514
b2572f23d0b3226fa02ccae62140bdb2edb9bc7e
'2012-01-14T16:54:51-05:00'
describe
'1041' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIJY' 'sip-files00056.txt'
f20463e5d057b1cdd6a2b25640a9adfb
c70cca96d7ca5fd98782a4df260856a390430e25
describe
'204289' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIJZ' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
cfd72fbe2ae3c47203d2932e701d6e93
f96b0e6362a1f9a9fb3e796c6e01efb1d93d4651
describe
'370407' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIKA' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
852249f929396edd65947855c935b5c2
1225f526eec3575ce7b8c8ce029716c2a259f77d
describe
'25411' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIKB' 'sip-files00057.pro'
f61c16b0480cf29bbcba8e0f5a26bf16
eaf28c85212c4f320f53e7f0ff36b9cb8c4456c1
describe
'103859' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIKC' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
89d52ffb0a630f2bdcb12d4313b56ce4
c2fd4d67f530698587859e7f0e290176037996b3
describe
'1648404' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIKD' 'sip-files00057.tif'
0c76d408ca55833528f52c608855e06a
9c41cd3c0db98eb98c56e6d6b11cf77590e59a61
describe
'1027' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIKE' 'sip-files00057.txt'
44a6c95685929965fdc04d9074f79d19
605d06c2e59313fab895c156745e1067294b3b3c
describe
'207063' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIKF' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
26b62a9db8d4d0b740cc0dd62bafffce
942c9b4035a5de35c8971e766a035b4ac63bb871
describe
'363046' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIKG' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
24fe1c3c5fe71d3306e66c6b30cce428
e376c6cb5404fdffc3a7d36d206173fb292cb216
describe
'23170' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIKH' 'sip-files00058.pro'
00c3346f03938db06908617e8d639c83
cbac03e260bedc35f9ba21d89a6f23ecaa8dea99
'2012-01-14T16:56:49-05:00'
describe
'101880' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIKI' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
56f06c9347e57913527eb54c0cd3cd4f
0afe5c06a329e521c9a9a51920b73b6b80c5fa45
describe
'1670520' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIKJ' 'sip-files00058.tif'
6be883941dcfe90aa0108a4494e7e0f4
18c0b8baa8596845339fa01300959bf261580a46
describe
'931' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIKK' 'sip-files00058.txt'
deae4e997671105cdf12d408c8e36d61
0aa5dd45f0ba4baccc01d5f0b437d2f9be5d26eb
describe
'208641' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIKL' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
5aed6459739e5da03ba15fa09ba60583
bc985a3c41ca93b4a5eb915f6cc05fb8f91fb229
describe
'369028' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIKM' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
75682070de79e4a887d7cfac4b215485
bb06e2b176f2edba0a1f91a65cfb21e2d3e9849e
describe
'25177' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIKN' 'sip-files00059.pro'
effb31df275ceae8b8e3f6a33f3b552d
83c3bf994f189aa16318f23fa24e2b18bbe2329b
describe
'103735' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIKO' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
60de945ff88c876672ff84efb171f518
43d2f3b7052814e0aa6bece3797ed7f8b8ac33ff
'2012-01-14T16:55:49-05:00'
describe
'1682616' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIKP' 'sip-files00059.tif'
a6b6f05d84e341f59fd6715e67359083
1c5a1fb9535e883dd1c72a91843d5c8f23516f28
describe
'1024' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIKQ' 'sip-files00059.txt'
00f0d35ceca64ccf1b6b8ea7d3e9ed5f
999af1eaaba694cda5eef543df0050c423220345
describe
'197775' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIKR' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
44271fb601b0c912542e7bfc3e3c0e45
5af7b17247639d01f0103937ab2b31d40ba19f64
'2012-01-14T16:54:05-05:00'
describe
'377766' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIKS' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
5ebb8c63a4a9bd4a4a784b379016ab46
4748c2b3d13353ac92e3fe53d65d741462462f9a
describe
'23973' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIKT' 'sip-files00060.pro'
f22a38aec78c13ac447041122d93f74c
d116e35bc9334002017da789890d905c0c2dc34d
'2012-01-14T16:55:44-05:00'
describe
'107344' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIKU' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
1cc473dc1e7d941882b1779c5e21d85b
4c3b042f2295452ff499a575c2b31e1eed9639f5
describe
'1595884' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIKV' 'sip-files00060.tif'
1cd6212b4ccf8966046c84b882b7e5d8
5fe7d4a41fff6c666e907b360b9f54cd7e6485b0
describe
'957' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIKW' 'sip-files00060.txt'
70203f214ddad5b72d215d26a27a563d
2ae368ffd9376384077d43e04b46ecc570bbc7ef
describe
'201278' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIKX' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
a3a0a458b89f73827d3f08addd14375e
f99b27c3cd35c01e1199943acef310c23c419111
describe
'377753' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIKY' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
40c70adc365d27b7cef274c1bba7d92a
06da18e6b52331f98ccfb8b2b87cb82a9d02c40f
describe
'25432' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIKZ' 'sip-files00061.pro'
4d93bcce5f45041811761f570acb5f7d
891e7f7925abf1bacf2083ff09274fba6f07783f
describe
'106595' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAILA' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
19340720e36492528d078b460baf5a3d
c42cd6960960ade87efa8baa394d841cbec11808
'2012-01-14T16:57:10-05:00'
describe
'1623988' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAILB' 'sip-files00061.tif'
1df70041bd6e3a88e96dc3dec43f04bf
6bcf13ecd0e7c539520f77063d016741e6ea5619
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAILC' 'sip-files00061.txt'
26b86f0262dff2b5760a725d7b7d2235
e8c7ba86338ded3311ecab098604a3a8cd148042
'2012-01-14T16:57:08-05:00'
describe
'203728' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAILD' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
f86bf43c6a13b1c44b79c8c4b7758336
bec909e62a54de99c85c883140888542e1a08f77
describe
'383717' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAILE' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
3b97f2c85f4d80ba81c62903e41c147e
91bfddb1c846f2e19e052e8ae60bd40fa1dbd833
describe
'24983' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAILF' 'sip-files00062.pro'
ff0233a043b9f44b9db19ce4fc1cff68
bf7e8407541239205845f5542887afa1eb29ea8b
describe
'108039' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAILG' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
ec167be970b000e00735c228959ec3b4
120444bdbe5eff6d9ee95d493217f1e1cdfffaa2
describe
'1643888' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAILH' 'sip-files00062.tif'
2545aeef76ea1a64eb6eb594ef21befc
0a193421051758ba434f171db08b20b7263c5d0c
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAILI' 'sip-files00062.txt'
b2e622501cf094fef1dced55419d3836
4b62124a8ac712b791eae45cc756c8e81f8f624c
describe
'203817' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAILJ' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
0f000051ea336ffbae35f84c2032457e
15f8d924920b10e4b9b75afdcdb29b15bf3fc2e5
describe
'365047' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAILK' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
8c62d4e011a19d60ab6231095a9623a3
0caf15befd9d1947153e261fa06337e903244415
describe
'24283' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAILL' 'sip-files00063.pro'
5f57100c248a247ceb0455e369a5addf
1bdda4edf622561000f3c8feb5fa92a0b32396ac
describe
'103927' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAILM' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
4118711b97b0446b452a54a0ef74be22
55cd62fbe1eb1e858a0add4424f4bd2dacbe16df
describe
'1644664' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAILN' 'sip-files00063.tif'
6eaa369a2ffac501f371726fccdd5d11
5ae04a8873f032c3dc8cb71a214f12c8756d409a
describe
'984' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAILO' 'sip-files00063.txt'
3df1b9f36670223bcddf2dc56bbeac16
72a7626a7a1544ab7cb48725dffb38c661a29f7e
describe
'206028' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAILP' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
1c3161431ed1791016ed214fcb71696b
28f54906bb7e3c058187b2bd6f4b95ccd5149be8
describe
'379483' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAILQ' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
404e903af83c6fec1a6ea181f2c61f93
245fe1f55bb0621d9e51548683dfb94df8259be2
describe
'25488' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAILR' 'sip-files00064.pro'
2b9aa01a82cba722501a5c3b40d02cbb
1b8a91bd1ce774a9ff3c516164d12a5a78c8023a
describe
'106526' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAILS' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
5c64c6bc862b7c1207c0eabfaa406ff4
9452901525f7a251dab16fe0a1ac31b562b69e09
describe
'1661084' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAILT' 'sip-files00064.tif'
f8847cb302213908cf99d58e6d2b9b2a
9936d6c566f23d045e4ffa7a6d1d5d5c0df84776
describe
'1007' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAILU' 'sip-files00064.txt'
e643e5faae27ecf2bf6783da9c8de55c
702cf89af720582ca0c7d66543f164209a6301e6
describe
'205830' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAILV' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
d9ff425bac787fb50bb24df3c0583380
2b9a8248d4e41e6b544335a8d3f2b57c6dc16627
describe
'364771' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAILW' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
39e8c6ebc35b0159baa7b66a5041fd68
f11c44a245ae5b97f6d958e0625f50190ea72e70
describe
'24177' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAILX' 'sip-files00065.pro'
57aa96e78f5836daccca1f13579c9b67
99cd79016e015dc3ec60953db68574f0249c4bd8
describe
'102342' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAILY' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
e882530a807066e0039244d6e1c34c66
124943bc1b9cee9a4bf0a9278e99bf3d95938f75
describe
'1660360' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAILZ' 'sip-files00065.tif'
34061c3a51a31e37e6f4775b9c44cc30
57cca79564beae6dd3ad76c01aad6b5d6e9fa268
describe
'979' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIMA' 'sip-files00065.txt'
f75b0c3e5c5ce216dc333543a5b4c2d4
a904ddd5fecd9b7863dfa732d4fc1f1f371ca7fb
describe
'203267' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIMB' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
0b8a14caa8b64628609167cdd7aa65e0
39e5fcf90611273eac13282b944d3d5337ea462b
describe
'358507' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIMC' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
31c21e3a6c69553c2376f1a8f90dc986
8067f07ee7f50db311e0d35b9874a1d8f1a5967a
describe
'19332' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIMD' 'sip-files00066.pro'
f39766ec08194f9bd71d1a5b3b3aac67
d887f67821cda74ba15c3131ac52c855d2314c5e
describe
'100765' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIME' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
e674b479db4775cf8801766a6cc68526
197bb88084d1833ced70b8ec3983ba371665d612
describe
'1639548' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIMF' 'sip-files00066.tif'
226eab5dbca71ce8877ff4bf8283eba7
06441c339f43f0dd9fdfeec48b6921c36c16f468
describe
'773' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIMG' 'sip-files00066.txt'
02bc545bc2bf8bcc221b545579689cf1
f20e7141e1c7190a8bbd25a5e5a7e82bc37b0a41
'2012-01-14T16:54:12-05:00'
describe
'206881' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIMH' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
6acde0f569b598c301cfa5e8823ff94d
8847f8d50b72c8df184af428443117951bf4b0fe
'2012-01-14T16:56:38-05:00'
describe
'362758' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIMI' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
9111f655c7c44b880ad68ffebf746fe3
f23f85069657bcc94b7ff1e62601ad7b47cbff77
describe
'13282' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIMJ' 'sip-files00067.pro'
a5b8bbef3d4b21dffe830ba2bc823b99
c1dcdb99c1142e1ef450771bf5ec2a41d73eb5f6
describe
'98844' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIMK' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
ce072d6a4453d3a857596da5dde8ad6d
0c9f731006bc0f899d1c1abff5e68133d70ebf09
describe
'1669820' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIML' 'sip-files00067.tif'
b175711515458692d4939adf6df0acf8
164e36e2965eb19a2e5030e1027765bf0d39f8f9
describe
'570' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIMM' 'sip-files00067.txt'
3d878c24d5223005485f48fefde5c6de
31716f7b4a692d1d4890819bf8950b4d5e2e3af6
describe
'204174' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIMN' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
24e96021a89f060499901a68b1641098
5df610e775a844e7c080e2eeefcd0f958129189b
describe
'365883' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIMO' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
5ad908d121b632cb8e2010e1cf9a9081
f081f65107d8afa0dbde91fb5fa4f847ed7b6e38
describe
'23326' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIMP' 'sip-files00068.pro'
de861a8ee95ef97a35bf90302114bb29
c3d9ec68b47152f91d315deab2c92eaf033de992
describe
'102576' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIMQ' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
f2b1cf788d691d0898e6a98468e9f436
3a3bab44ff4d4e08bb2bf7c6a63a198381ed5205
describe
'1647328' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIMR' 'sip-files00068.tif'
4612cdd3e49afafc2dfa6ded0eae10b7
e22ef56384e49e66d472ac07d520a9440037cb0e
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIMS' 'sip-files00068.txt'
99fc437aeda0db7b26c04ad41eefb722
ab977e3cd277548f8831d4196b8176c83c8d48a0
describe
'206687' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIMT' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
9bf76ea123e49f50a9170cbdbe028c65
4eaba98c8c2c3d0043e88be5e4a2ee760c1d9791
describe
'364272' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIMU' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
6b4d94670f8b45a6189fbc71c3eae2df
e3ac686293f199746725c4ccb55e493ef6529ceb
'2012-01-14T16:54:08-05:00'
describe
'23263' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIMV' 'sip-files00069.pro'
3f37d148e409dc4ed3039219c4f4048b
ad2286bcda3cb5ebea78495b53c587af455304b0
describe
'102696' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIMW' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
a708a9fb356c36ab2db02a96f45c93b1
75b4c3b6174ecdcb3e2a334a4b65550417d490be
describe
'1667708' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIMX' 'sip-files00069.tif'
d1c0d1b7a34e910eb1f6d44c6087c336
4acaf36dee5b6dd06356452e2dd9ccfd0f2eefd8
describe
'946' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIMY' 'sip-files00069.txt'
496f2567b40e5c58da2e07bd18476b44
4d73f99366414d26988c364c724dce8c15754656
describe
'207682' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIMZ' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
d3d4353fe793d74875b3037b68c7b383
6299094b8574442784838f848c5fdc04b4ce8d4d
describe
'370942' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAINA' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
da1e333125d34f9e0231b1bc3f5ce4c1
a530e02154a8a5b651a79e7dfdf31a50125f2c75
describe
'23691' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAINB' 'sip-files00070.pro'
9bccfea43fde2f030f0e83177c5ff807
8ade68bbec577561c4eef64b3166a697a1c2f32d
'2012-01-14T16:55:35-05:00'
describe
'104623' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAINC' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
f2e4fce92e2e27c8ceaeee6913e7987a
669f10233e622b2c9a1fcb2253e6dc07ab4285c7
describe
'1675312' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIND' 'sip-files00070.tif'
4b2d1e100f755bb5640fb5dc92209aa5
b815d7082d313cd8aef69f7da0a76c1ef54ae6e8
'2012-01-14T16:56:08-05:00'
describe
'942' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAINE' 'sip-files00070.txt'
130715a66c1cb09ab5cb806cdce4e780
4eadd4bab938c848aa078c4615ec95ca4c85059f
describe
'206233' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAINF' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
5c6e0c0dce64a21928afa2a11faa26c2
a478c8e23c3c64b4d47607a58978856f9e26196c
describe
'369020' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAING' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
3ec93733230b9fa3d4f77d440e017547
ee20614534afadaf7d438750ffe988c24a098b39
describe
'23858' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAINH' 'sip-files00071.pro'
d9037f820d3e959bbba21f115372829f
62ce8aec0f3a7a247a40da8ff78543003e50fe7a
describe
'105608' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAINI' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
a4f3c0ca39ef8d08f0e46f24b676f74b
a633742524fa2d2eca9dbf7d40e48993d974a8c5
describe
'1663756' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAINJ' 'sip-files00071.tif'
bf04464cfda1ae43c7869b4b6598edfc
9e66ee9882c56d731d9f03140d8127fa50189daf
describe
'960' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAINK' 'sip-files00071.txt'
595eb9be73c013e96898159caa6f4a81
bbd690be045f049191592b6d7adb156a3f4520d4
describe
'209373' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAINL' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
f1d1a56d57667319017ac782858b23ad
b51b872faaa94d79cb687e1a7f23cc17212545e7
describe
'367678' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAINM' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
5e69dc5e383ed12f12ddc3cc404dd40f
813c03f57d1b23065c21d22a916862df12628958
describe
'23027' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAINN' 'sip-files00072.pro'
e9e9db3f48f81b5ac7e3ba4c3d44fc8f
37b2fe0e783d2b40d2933de26ff9433723f3bd01
describe
'103730' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAINO' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
1658d196e34493da14ab5ae26194ae93
035c3514e5f8c9e8ad05c8284c8949894e36c211
describe
'1688224' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAINP' 'sip-files00072.tif'
8ab11fbeebd24fad3bbd16ba7d3368e9
908c09630398c6648fca8d0f08312139e918e7d2
describe
'918' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAINQ' 'sip-files00072.txt'
7d416e14687c490805f22b821a26dfec
060032f2d5a13e748f07b2f97593734d6bb609dc
describe
'204694' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAINR' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
3f565a0e0f4bb52fb3f69a4ad3ab1bdb
5b629a23e4c8f0f2f798afb1ffaffe331e3ee1ad
describe
'366931' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAINS' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
7c06f83d38f78a2f4b5e2e8d400d96a9
6bfeac4174cff1ff3e3e869bf9d3da2334595905
'2012-01-14T16:57:16-05:00'
describe
'24139' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAINT' 'sip-files00073.pro'
e5c080e0d64b14c5f525cf28bb8febc1
0d9abc8d98e000a9316ea72dd3bce5cfa931a680
describe
'103161' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAINU' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
915f6cb5d007fb8d2754275c70a90ad6
2e6b5bd697a1c68a090b323cbae3568649d9cdcd
describe
'1652128' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAINV' 'sip-files00073.tif'
6f8c82a6fb4cf48a5d547f2d0bf3ed1e
219e5b3c7f80510cae2a116a3a63ce658fea9cbb
describe
'973' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAINW' 'sip-files00073.txt'
76eb3d764be2c26e986f9db040770c0c
5c9d9a83e84de471caba49bb4b2a20283a28205c
describe
'200610' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAINX' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
6c47915fc48a71fc63c5e19684144ec0
c83d81b74e40dc681372259083c9d36735668bed
describe
'374575' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAINY' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
76fe0d91f005bc250f87d0e619c8701a
b260b7cf35f47a1db749a845ea84fdb7f7ce5b80
'2012-01-14T16:54:17-05:00'
describe
'23164' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAINZ' 'sip-files00074.pro'
f9170f36af307ef094f1f59a5705d425
d2485d4ba68313459f6c7eb9a1b3694a5bc097f0
describe
'105055' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIOA' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
161c6a49cfa6f737f4d2aa8cf2ca87aa
d1bd62511896ac8240258191aa59cd381e8adb34
describe
'1618360' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIOB' 'sip-files00074.tif'
0466b61526fc9bf497742fb3b63aea8c
db3dbee7d6376056fb3e6d16f526aaa2cd36c166
describe
'922' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIOC' 'sip-files00074.txt'
e010bd6f529a443b7a71a94d4d3e2091
134a56da4801212a43adbc2bb45ec66d0f303a89
describe
'207516' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIOD' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
778e874af8fc7d21bf78413af24cead6
e9caf87c165a64837db9fb1f9310b1d9668bf6f7
describe
'334403' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIOE' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
70a77db4bed099d95b2b5a47527eea65
f9157571c937d9d177795a7395558adb27f61270
describe
'16385' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIOF' 'sip-files00075.pro'
4ace30b982f012b5bacd6279a91c0c0c
668413b94705bdb2dbf14fadfe7131313eb36b47
describe
'90384' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIOG' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
41c7100146cbc27d26ab947b07cab3b5
9e95ae0e51946b2629420794945b6c1421d1babf
describe
'1673224' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIOH' 'sip-files00075.tif'
4a2e886331ee4a9bd0372a517f8c5d13
c099f306febfb66e16f17f27a78a07323925e923
describe
'683' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIOI' 'sip-files00075.txt'
a7bace221734dd7685644197497c904e
ee11846abb2c003ac8696b70510893ddd49d506d
describe
'205515' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIOJ' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
8b56f9b19f4dbda2e1ff162b61bfb64a
803e24b804987fa699337bc4cae011a9257e52b5
describe
'376063' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIOK' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
5f261f7ab24e9d0c8975741f24fe9cb2
6240a47e026591cab31d61b518c927be1d11f52f
describe
'13917' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIOL' 'sip-files00076.pro'
84f4bae675da2f45703490df26f015c6
0fa91b67a8406213086d6098d27669b72f7bfd69
describe
'102237' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIOM' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
5e2e8161f2cd1b16ffa7dc932662621e
04fc50cc1cbf2ba98e72cb8bc81b5b922fa87b24
describe
'1657608' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAION' 'sip-files00076.tif'
f2ab7efded1f2825e25e29f6e1fcac8e
35fa87f895a21920e3348802a7c18eb2c4d9bcad
describe
'582' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIOO' 'sip-files00076.txt'
65b3985565f9cb807f6eb8d5494d713f
360615aaf762ef69028a8e74c15bafe71f09b128
describe
'209105' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIOP' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
2e7a47f5a8087d914f56613e41da5ea7
c87c86b0e7a27fb51449493d24e155d7af83f083
'2012-01-14T16:57:19-05:00'
describe
'373560' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIOQ' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
d78efa689ab300e6ae06ab6a9cddecc0
9379d886996baa74825c4ae80a5b2914dfbdea40
describe
'25100' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIOR' 'sip-files00077.pro'
8600aa0ac2d7af970db02764c6d12fc5
337776749433671b8753633549086270ca4153e8
describe
'104847' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIOS' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
b3a9ce20daf8ca7cb610b2de7c3ce7ce
e12986f126656a086bf4d71f715a89f8d056429a
describe
'1686360' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIOT' 'sip-files00077.tif'
ae2c51024f96fe2a0166ef21461da7b6
2b756bd77ed324dda4882da49c9d31f6d3e45bfc
describe
'1016' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIOU' 'sip-files00077.txt'
0958bae98884057695075c0b3a17c1f1
8741fab81771c020a41a269abf5f020915f201bf
describe
'206136' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIOV' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
79c6e7202f4d0af34d0c50016523d26b
065188914acf970b893f32a1ed1c8f9507a7a07b
describe
'374324' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIOW' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
aaf4ee15d1a8f293a3e5cb335c831cbb
8360dee9762fbf778784e0e7b5163ffddfe2f07c
describe
'23867' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIOX' 'sip-files00078.pro'
5d9139b79f842ab89b2863ae806df5a7
c4def4a0f18791eb8b3a844e6461535865acfc59
describe
'105720' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIOY' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
eeb2953229764164d8dab0868dc91953
3d231b8f71d1f504292774cb878718fbb3f9ad61
describe
'1663392' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIOZ' 'sip-files00078.tif'
72a8a33b4d8ad4151cdba752590fd85d
90f7451fc85d357668f6ad2a7178c6cc1eebd3e4
describe
'952' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIPA' 'sip-files00078.txt'
582d3c538ff340705d76fae3d11d8166
b062b1f7758fc3be512228b52163fcdeb60a03c0
describe
'205301' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIPB' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
1049881b4b42673f63b72e8644da19e4
d4994978afc661e691a7bccdf6f13d5972c28c1b
describe
'375938' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIPC' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
7353d9e9fc95946e886116671c5e7e20
5d0cc5c9b30ecffdf2ec02785d05cbc79b918401
describe
'24218' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIPD' 'sip-files00079.pro'
08fb20547509f651a61300a66ee9008e
f59f6cbb8f6c2f5de2609f967586e2999dff85f4
describe
'106144' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIPE' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
f78f424141bf954955574e37e42fe497
5de2b449f75806ffe91c4ea9331864eeb1cecd95
describe
'1656236' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIPF' 'sip-files00079.tif'
3dd37d777e92a344e8eaff92de546e5e
4ad2a6a3c765137d87d377ec15598247c5296b39
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIPG' 'sip-files00079.txt'
1e7a4a8b9106a43d9436fdd3dc8c17c7
5ea1822d1b89e91a450bd914d193f67e04d396bc
describe
'204503' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIPH' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
281b2451b7ec2b82bd9be5f6b0937319
67c4ad4c41bc502a353f20e72e2a21044b7db55c
describe
'384815' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIPI' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
d89118373556d8e3935999668ba5f630
213e94578dc04e29ab98af1f76d066c111f79a44
describe
'24827' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIPJ' 'sip-files00080.pro'
c6b8ae35dd804c30e8a1299b2cb561ab
d3d66ad9c8e57bdfec631dbf9aac159d73d79cc3
describe
'108854' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIPK' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
112eb2a6b6a7cf62d19289a46a95529c
782d1fcbc361433d846ca49832f036357b213b57
describe
'1650228' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIPL' 'sip-files00080.tif'
51da640ccb80911755420877acc8ab2a
d7d989c2f66f164ce85c8e19a612773aa0c9452f
describe
'986' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIPM' 'sip-files00080.txt'
797b232477e52d0af496b64cfaf3ca2b
8055fc06e112e68e4327dd3632b0ee04fa6ce6c2
describe
'212176' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIPN' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
fb6892d56d671ba4709b5bcca2b24843
ca000438000fe469530d5fcf54d20eecbd60667b
describe
'379829' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIPO' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
1100a080b62428005b59d6d419dbde47
9fb65b5ebf29baf5840c210dabd9fb6bce0c7432
describe
'1193' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIPP' 'sip-files00081.pro'
f9cd75cb1b15e3ccadd2779f508ac447
0a28f1b31225f60c7684cb77fd00bc150547b2eb
'2012-01-14T16:54:56-05:00'
describe
'98903' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIPQ' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
63864cef0829856519484c57b04754ec
1bc928f782d389a580adeb9b55486de274b0d759
describe
'5102676' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIPR' 'sip-files00081.tif'
ca3e69e3beb2475564efaa1619d24711
ba4a9b730cf35ba45fa6d65eaaa8531dde841101
describe
'84' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIPS' 'sip-files00081.txt'
b356206a383e88a5d6da724750f7d15f
91dc6e7b10f9de6a1915d25373251bffb44b8d0b
describe
'204972' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIPT' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
2f5081f8a7270b7d5f772bf9ae2fd461
cc2a6c24fd85de8de28809af15076328b4cd11f5
describe
'365281' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIPU' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
e50910e3c8fdc243f2eb5af748d4570b
ee5dac83395a3f5ef90e9be4cb9beb7bd22d4e63
'2012-01-14T16:55:04-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIPV' 'sip-files00082.pro'
c79c89c04e0999a58f183000e4dcf6bf
d345ea418c31a5471cad2caf4dc6e6acdd2a417b
describe
'104485' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIPW' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
199730aa6401b752bb4b5218a775eaa7
5474d5a16f79bb74f4f09f8bc7f3af5bb9ba30bf
describe
'1655760' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIPX' 'sip-files00082.tif'
76d0768099939dc3b828603eadc81c9b
e56eae089302c0a5547c18970d35e6774dbfea41
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIPY' 'sip-files00082.txt'
8124f996a2de78f2a9af2e8ff33eb485
b9405bbdda0114059efe26c8a07d4c7aa6200c79
describe
'206397' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIPZ' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
7953e601e0029e7c4901faa1020ce45e
9e673332f3620165d4b65689fc3c4279772fa406
describe
'376517' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIQA' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
9e6b94926af39e01054b71aaeb3a810e
c423097c03116065bddd9c66704c27740b62c596
describe
'24371' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIQB' 'sip-files00083.pro'
4be7a6dfe78725b8825650e4899b0f76
97d6cee70b4a7aa169716ab1c32af294e9da69a6
describe
'106478' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIQC' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
609aea50b686b1e06654ba138f36adc4
27d3745b746a5dc51106211dc846fcd0c16c2672
describe
'1665716' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIQD' 'sip-files00083.tif'
e091e97067c946a6d0f427d088f7693e
1f09630cd780aba02c58ee77a706b1ec9790c50f
describe
'977' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIQE' 'sip-files00083.txt'
eadd8854485c56b7cf246f7752da0fdd
f2fcdb65ad0770049173ff7b3f7ed61d2a494301
describe
'205661' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIQF' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
185fa418ffa2d164ae1c5c641d43f624
3d4666ad3361bc47554f640a36315002c8981f79
describe
'362367' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIQG' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
e33bc09ca80f05488c403cc4c16b566f
673e39dd08b8de140e0b5ce2096c70ab70805e0e
describe
'24684' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIQH' 'sip-files00084.pro'
91d62cfe372a9f04993228778be277d3
73fc5df6bf34f9278b50b1134b18c9936447a675
describe
'104430' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIQI' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
0cd1b26dec0441bde2d39747f14aca36
a6a66e54221c025f671aded820fb24146bc58d02
describe
'1659432' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIQJ' 'sip-files00084.tif'
095025a5af7b10edfd34ccd525b607de
712680fe1e9f09f6fedaa9410a9c10cf72ad6dc8
describe
'1001' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIQK' 'sip-files00084.txt'
7fef3188a862540130654f4ca40535cd
d8fea99e2d2face32122334ca0a8a6a3be53cad7
describe
'207345' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIQL' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
335ce819a25c3146b053ae907beecb02
ebd9bf8341c01cbcca3ac13d044b256c16e46d67
'2012-01-14T16:55:16-05:00'
describe
'373551' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIQM' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
86b3ee678d5a6d4da73372b0419594c8
ff787a7a010f2549820e04f07272c9dcf42a631f
describe
'24165' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIQN' 'sip-files00085.pro'
fef239afdb675a2896048db8f52e108a
fef0029ddaac6174f2c78dc537ffa865647f9bef
describe
'105324' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIQO' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
d758df003f11acc2923351e7046289ac
9be721d02663639f2a43c7b70cc2bef4aa9e6de9
describe
'1673092' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIQP' 'sip-files00085.tif'
2e10d845f013ad30cb0135d3dec186aa
f2a5c54a9c5c8022111c5da1b2ce0b869c55a3a9
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIQQ' 'sip-files00085.txt'
30891b894347208de512fa559134a17b
a44647b7269ed6aca68239aaac1b83565a7153df
'2012-01-14T16:57:09-05:00'
describe
'202964' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIQR' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
fb74cd05ba71413c5e5886aa74ad6f61
a930d79ee18fd0d0bbae245c78eb393d1881f3ec
describe
'358505' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIQS' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
fa0a036d6fc45bb1d1d7c152ce7a1436
1801db96927dffded052a3f7e082e86f1ab5b30d
describe
'21781' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIQT' 'sip-files00086.pro'
51948bda006d990e537a2ae32191c4af
d3243850c98d7087976710909efd988a6c6bd1de
describe
'101712' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIQU' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
3d228c909e059109f9b42a811a4d29f7
e038d3bb122f00645127f8c23d59c1be3f3d8846
describe
'1637496' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIQV' 'sip-files00086.tif'
da6adab6d99105224f6184010ac0eef3
0ac9da1afb382bff84d683a1a73c2fb14268bb29
describe
'876' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIQW' 'sip-files00086.txt'
131b6c47f7c589a5b7d4a94249a88a06
7c6083a6b6a3f2f46cdf44cfebea1bc48318723d
describe
'206645' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIQX' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
98be3ea4b384e76647019b7a202ca441
60d24a424ebd8c696b4aff455ce7605713287267
describe
'374677' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIQY' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
fb6e224edb21816a341ac25b2726a3c4
1d6ad906abf6cd585578ee47d591aa8764c90a50
'2012-01-14T16:55:46-05:00'
describe
'24428' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIQZ' 'sip-files00087.pro'
f508ec3e9d825e888d736fde84559bde
4d96cdb11021ddcbbb08a32082f105b8f31f798e
describe
'106396' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIRA' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
e78af5054cd8557d4543f244cb8a1062
ece7e4e577cad25ffa6fa34ac4213e02cc08a403
describe
'1667232' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIRB' 'sip-files00087.tif'
b8dec1698774351747a709ff790de793
25ae348b2a75ad7c7c20229b8a41c1d68e1343ed
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIRC' 'sip-files00087.txt'
d459469b001196ce17e6ad2d47506578
9fbc9ea9f79b886fbdd32b9ad6f5650ab86ce497
describe
'208527' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIRD' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
581412570aa279f87a9014ce62d032ed
67bba06f27bf546add8cd95bbfedfe5d42720b83
describe
'366815' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIRE' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
f93f1fb71b32652feee738dd5584a5f4
7a1c04d906695123ff927b8ba2418e2efc690baa
describe
'24193' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIRF' 'sip-files00088.pro'
074a0d486e43bb495ec641d3eb7b7f04
fcfb95e819d7afc4adfa65e65e39a5f40f9a5177
describe
'103136' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIRG' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
fbff33e0ea2c9e8de6b732e5b7b96d2f
6b525bf5e7b68243a8610f9b060fee0756452ea8
describe
'1682032' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIRH' 'sip-files00088.tif'
7a00b43cc3b6141e14766382354410e9
7fdbabcecdd5480e6bbc75b6334e8141a5860cd2
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIRI' 'sip-files00088.txt'
f2c5a4dd6e0a4b86f42c598238fc0196
ce5d9d4a7d124ab5786d814cc021ccb95aa2478f
describe
'212372' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIRJ' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
f79bfea6d429dc9a9c6d9330cc75953e
de020437b1152184217b6b2cf0f9c5a9ef791d46
describe
'366779' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIRK' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
1e4a05751b65327e7909d1af0923d6f8
3a3651efcea8a852bd41c57a47896bba99479079
describe
'12997' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIRL' 'sip-files00089.pro'
fa0ef66e1f0158250efb2491f8bd5f43
60441ad0964985ccef4e309df32d8633af674b14
describe
'99178' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIRM' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
ff4658e50375a60f3adc923c1e527c52
0a091161cc2bb52f1ba91227211c86bf424eb80d
describe
'1712964' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIRN' 'sip-files00089.tif'
c67e237a49c5532ce181f28b35be2872
868a3216ff1dac7627d22a1c7c964dbff5fd1f3b
describe
'553' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIRO' 'sip-files00089.txt'
06f20fe713765466449a6878b1aef0e4
0b93fa534af765ab4c5aa64ef5d07361df30f6c8
describe
'205212' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIRP' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
b2a2f6922c2df0461f0be6d04c8e1e74
04039c1af08bd56a9f73ba0a194e30fd8f0d5d29
describe
'370907' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIRQ' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
ee78e5c746f1e175b258203c854d7ef9
b2f1ca494ec3998c1d9f293ac62ea80d2ceaaed4
describe
'24981' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIRR' 'sip-files00090.pro'
1143eabd4aacf78476512577aa1ba604
bbe51d235eff604bcc5eebabd18db90c79952e7f
describe
'105506' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIRS' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
05cba04db90cb7c3c720862504d981ef
9887b92ff8d63ad24a26941b5a4169f48456c925
describe
'1655312' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIRT' 'sip-files00090.tif'
e13485d326f184cd93fe12748ad0f57d
c5280c0f53edf9eba32ce2817c96b61fc249ba59
describe
'1021' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIRU' 'sip-files00090.txt'
85ad84b9955f65c2d1bed8bd14189062
c2abb0ca1d8ef27b67e557fa9ad2a5741b0aa768
describe
'207250' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIRV' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
92f8610b6e51f542e53485632ac50c61
3fb867b4ebbbf4c99f1edd5dde4ed8a4dbf987d8
describe
'371448' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIRW' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
93e931323eaee978adae4f255e2d29f6
4dce6ddc7f4cc9419e668e6bfc257bf4a10a8ed8
describe
'24734' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIRX' 'sip-files00091.pro'
0ac96e111a58ac0d6315bf7f62ad3cd2
6c1763d4a27e28e678f30a090abd47a1fbc5563f
describe
'104766' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIRY' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
4a4e90c6a955fdafad65e6b1a62e714a
e33d305c00f27c24c2953c6b64cb4937c842e832
describe
'1671888' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIRZ' 'sip-files00091.tif'
1f27f606a65eb8f083fc538923acfd11
3e7b0c6e7eadd7e6e16a8c8d93fa898ad53686cb
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAISA' 'sip-files00091.txt'
f1b80a11e4bce58b010e0091fff81252
d9280509ea8d1e584f4c5258150ade6df80a1fb0
'2012-01-14T16:53:59-05:00'
describe
'208391' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAISB' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
250a855662253015e36416719c112c58
89b9089a4718aa7be98c1db879d954567139f7d9
describe
'366764' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAISC' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
6d9992433a7c57d35a737a681e4a530f
3ec4c394d3a5ac7672c34eea80ee4075129edadc
describe
'24294' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAISD' 'sip-files00092.pro'
ef9bb7a975b019426e7b2f9221e6d6bd
ede32d48cd4b9d2b67f01cf2259fbdfdafcbf1fe
describe
'104081' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAISE' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
e3560353dc10c04908de214b19302107
359a55d2a3978b186f318fe1c541cda06cf6eae7
'2012-01-14T16:57:02-05:00'
describe
'1680884' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAISF' 'sip-files00092.tif'
b821c096aa08f96f5b53aeba9c84b85c
71b536b7a6fc0159459bc9e61cbe4e6f099c233b
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAISG' 'sip-files00092.txt'
b6ee66eda6333d4562ed3318f42ea5fa
800325ddb4bbfd3af799fe4e2bdedf8a9e898b74
describe
'204839' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAISH' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
4c2b3c8a7b1c68440884ee17f42b4eb9
683f653588701ae9523a4b7425e1eea6091370ca
describe
'371538' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAISI' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
ef326faeb6d1a9c8d41b0c100b68241c
9b5764df4abe1b9e5f212b3efc3b244c2aa6b41b
describe
'25203' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAISJ' 'sip-files00093.pro'
6ae60cf31b5e9b3ebcfbba934ef1e8b5
69ad54da95b037caac6aad0a4353f3f4052361b9
'2012-01-14T16:55:09-05:00'
describe
'103926' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAISK' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
d6476ebceced507028fdf0c9bf9d5345
cd39c2fef9fa4fd1d80a12fcd7a0aa72c02807e6
'2012-01-14T16:56:43-05:00'
describe
'1652612' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAISL' 'sip-files00093.tif'
d408cf9b3f4798e384c212aacaa85d96
5dfca314eee3318098cccbb936e4a04871d59172
describe
'1002' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAISM' 'sip-files00093.txt'
b132c75ebdbd82f726e869f3c089ca2b
0871765c31a978d236ca439f9b865a2ee556e367
describe
'207025' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAISN' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
b5d81b8c02bba370b4072dc0ae7669ff
e26001ad17b0ff6e8c297cf61eee1684f2cbdcda
describe
'363986' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAISO' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
f6b732fe54de10b4c852a90ae5e0e5f9
fca65f0f8cb2ba1a9c326f5f65aaa83c2fba3d7e
describe
'24599' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAISP' 'sip-files00094.pro'
0d31124eaa8eeca2df72378340787e5f
75817245f89a50a6ddddc7a7bdcd648edf1e2d66
describe
'103970' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAISQ' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
4eb7024f8a21625aefd95f378c5dc63f
a5f7d8d7f45ed9d900b91fa6523ea97b0f5e507c
describe
'1670088' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAISR' 'sip-files00094.tif'
1e2a2061ef3d9fe8a359167eae3ab2e4
a4b576d0ea863bdcaa1936bda304ec7e0bd48c9a
describe
'1000' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAISS' 'sip-files00094.txt'
cbab49d61d3782cc85ac91aa056edacb
b029e3516097170f510b677b3e308d83e36f44f3
describe
'201136' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIST' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
5cd6ad9f7db31a6ff9f96c18065fb148
a62ad00fdc1e48d21d0f2aef4d3b3323e83a07eb
describe
'383841' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAISU' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
1a01b78314d439ced3b61140b858eafb
7eded8b80cb238de1e6d449a3c9eb90fca24cde8
describe
'24129' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAISV' 'sip-files00095.pro'
c0231d0f9a8ee4b5eb4bc33b9ad6d8d1
f892812c8e1f21264fda7af92f686d22b1bbc4d9
describe
'108845' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAISW' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
adab1f8901039e980a4486b47dc36645
7811635d3ad8075469438be5bbeb95f7e894b27f
describe
'1622660' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAISX' 'sip-files00095.tif'
e96f6fb61dd99d917999ee299cd42852
d56bb5008f35d081e39a0e83f2595a7a88a4a2c7
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAISY' 'sip-files00095.txt'
3b2af6ef6779577bfbed13571f019bf4
caa695e890d02d2116f5f1cdd9ba53a5011920b8
describe
'206806' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAISZ' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
f8580b2017cbbe75113f9420ef9a158f
b9abfe0cd3cca5f1c106fd8c72f4f35b7e18a333
describe
'374490' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAITA' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
c01d535d358d680ea7d34ac764a6b289
40018819cf327f4e370c9674d5e2bfb49dc95bcf
describe
'24793' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAITB' 'sip-files00096.pro'
d09315d618d27008795d0d23b799376b
5c542e94a2870128bb68bb1fdf9d9f1f2f6b4986
describe
'105948' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAITC' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
2f73224c1fc4e35b421ce3e56347f6f6
33557f6240e040e257c810d5725496e0feff8f36
describe
'1668484' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAITD' 'sip-files00096.tif'
e5cc4db7a1e90a09dab16f2c47872aca
d1eaaa2bb324f88e80471733bdf27f28325cfe60
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAITE' 'sip-files00096.txt'
4931c001eccc09be2a507e047c49ffbd
57f56b71ab81049f318da7a7809930ab95f9e6d4
describe
'208409' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAITF' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
264115e70e9dc7f6582c4ccba49aef2b
b2071ab5ebae30729d6e02a1bd91e48f41cf4868
describe
'382126' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAITG' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
abbbd3e598e200c681b7c1bd33ed877d
2a259e951c50e7589a21d298d015368e11dd8af7
describe
'25033' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAITH' 'sip-files00097.pro'
abf68252120c7fe108ba058ca2f2c0fc
8618eab296f8f0840c52b13ddca349872d92a1f7
describe
'107461' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAITI' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
36fe779020f8bd383e4ab02b21b2e9ae
24c8d6d71a69d3892fca410467548df5c9788672
describe
'1681312' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAITJ' 'sip-files00097.tif'
815b9b5e0c099ca38ff4436849852fc4
2ead0a7822d1a78af309bbe3ec8fe49f5f4db1e1
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAITK' 'sip-files00097.txt'
09a6caad64200a82c1683590cc80d25c
b69d17a14330acb7dc7d3d988480f20d41c353a6
describe
'208313' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAITL' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
37ba7b29807ed40a2279867776964502
b08ff47bc9869e194ace54ba9be2c8d21588b3dd
describe
'365729' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAITM' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
6fb3f5c6f404cf134f24d8ee4dfdc37b
c45e13866c014d56f01ca93aed3a5e9a23bc782c
'2012-01-14T16:54:30-05:00'
describe
'13419' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAITN' 'sip-files00098.pro'
d3b2bb2c7f5835e33ba6d9b449fd6d19
5c50e0f8a278805dc515426498856b501576b905
describe
'99010' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAITO' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
c10f4110b1afbc32f79194613a9f7d8a
e6a1b7af03d11585633607352d4c325fa8e50bac
describe
'1679972' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAITP' 'sip-files00098.tif'
d7faab22385a28db527385b7d273bede
3f4ef6fe429e276f86a8dcbfd051b185d8c513fc
describe
'564' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAITQ' 'sip-files00098.txt'
6720adf7dd365fa345eb237ff2fdc684
7fc7183294aa22b1673082ffb26b1d4c8723586b
describe
'205358' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAITR' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
32864abb05aa569254196146f4339f15
aabf19bd8de8ae066bcfe49a08ba634e86b9169e
describe
'376143' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAITS' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
eae8e7f160125b87e12f9eb90c6c5d60
a198ca2cb7deb5e6c3b0917f8f793fc00bc190c0
describe
'23619' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAITT' 'sip-files00099.pro'
193083a2130a69b4f5ed71e209129625
90174f7bb066912cacd68ff52745b9dc8a0d8a17
describe
'107599' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAITU' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
1a0bbbbaa06baad6ed7fdd630679bba9
b02342b606b41aa4dd0f936984b7aaa656ee6fa2
describe
'1657092' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAITV' 'sip-files00099.tif'
0a10fac5a5343f87cc360fbd041a32c5
d14ffebfeeaa857e87a27847eabdcde60696494d
describe
'935' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAITW' 'sip-files00099.txt'
e77cbf3a09900dd6f6881300597e9456
d40c71076abefcaf78cadc6427b4fb9392a135f1
describe
'201696' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAITX' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
037b7a2a85a69a85f6b51c1eebefb2e0
71aaefdd8b26794c6e29f29210f17b3836e7e61a
describe
'401338' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAITY' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
b1581852ea9e8272f5671200953c970b
4ea3c055f81a2a7f6fc5a33b1794892fbef71862
describe
'905' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAITZ' 'sip-files00100.pro'
376ad3e53ae89fb1bc9288a7fe98a818
8ea936ec37dc205b0d9f26f59b82ac2e16ebc9fc
describe
'102646' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIUA' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
c4d5b91ab357623cfcbc683176d6960d
20f0152d23d60083743f08ffe508247756a91e12
describe
'4851068' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIUB' 'sip-files00100.tif'
0ed6761e58fd2fe5cd86222b84a4d550
1cf16ba8de8a534075d78170091baf8257eb866b
describe
'60' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIUC' 'sip-files00100.txt'
68e34893d5d348c69cac988ff7967fef
e705dfb98b705528202efd6bc7d8b782037d2317
describe
Invalid character
'199456' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIUD' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
a618f696fe980baacdaf034def1ed485
bb3bab0f2f7310e7534a7eeee14e44af4ddfd492
describe
'377032' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIUE' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
7e499e64d7f4e8099f662c3d1dcead53
e46c1b258fea78174afd4d15cecc6ff38aae5ea7
describe
'24607' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIUF' 'sip-files00101.pro'
0435a811de86ddaba0ccc975f8bee8df
3187bb8edba48ee553486bb6cab19964f33d2512
describe
'108190' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIUG' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
8359e487a050a3b92c0e44edfd13d810
39334b42882158c4e6bf2faa6c2cf640202bbcaa
describe
'1609848' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIUH' 'sip-files00101.tif'
fab90609f6e931c073ff86f904c831ba
500a9124da69af6e0ae887e919350de39a868543
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIUI' 'sip-files00101.txt'
c9d0de86879d5198a343dace535ac110
3b8f128e14afb26b53ceb603d9c265dc95117710
describe
'202435' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIUJ' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
5118a8e46cc8f98c909ed6083fc507dc
90e644a45b3bbcd1a98a6bf87ebc10df12378c1d
describe
'380621' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIUK' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
01ff461b7188b63b9c63f21d4bb5ef48
c5a594b61095f35992758cc97a6fae810f16b3a3
describe
'23279' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIUL' 'sip-files00102.pro'
5043e94f006a24067819d8e0bedd0158
9061fd3faae87918097804fcad3783c60b0e607b
describe
'106924' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIUM' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
f6e5f4be7efb65b3eadcda2d09f0f407
a1f3c2ee1c423f4c3dd0c8ad57df944e073bfe98
describe
'1632916' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIUN' 'sip-files00102.tif'
a3ed30275e93acbbee8ad6e17f4e5aac
42aa22c652c89d4600e451954f6d2e1575590f41
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIUO' 'sip-files00102.txt'
a83cde110182a3ed02e50c386b9c8508
bf7a9b4d3bfbb1b05a0cf79e4342e4f19e0fdd81
describe
'205710' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIUP' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
9c09e3e58ef9f67fec938d37161a1caf
1b0c1c06d7fec6e5c35f4fe548def866fc564a85
describe
'364844' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIUQ' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
4bf277a9f542922da78c6cc7acc6a331
6b6fd8c3ff0cd75509a283716d501e9745d39f36
describe
'22443' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIUR' 'sip-files00103.pro'
e12c19e50438fd5a75e2a23cb6bf9928
348ab5ac5ea921ea28a8df9aa49cffaefb9b37d0
describe
'103672' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIUS' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
801e855d31bd07a0318da1c81c1bf35e
19fc7c2645795bf16b610fefea9c8f48688c859b
describe
'1659232' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIUT' 'sip-files00103.tif'
a5f45215f0d8262af95d480cdb7358fd
664cfa76b47ec6689451e799fe4080517e0a1bab
describe
'901' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIUU' 'sip-files00103.txt'
f5adbfb9068fbcb78bcc75a36f140212
658941d0cc30037a7dc32877b8d5408891f47505
describe
'203131' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIUV' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
f17c123a9a89e888a6af7371b6fc9f09
71fb430d67898af41a7cf08ae4d90dab4f366132
describe
'385250' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIUW' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
2f4fa885ad2f3eca94ca6765dae041d5
eb143d82685c77a1c04b7c1369ab0817c72dc6cb
describe
'25136' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIUX' 'sip-files00104.pro'
59d66b33c97ec2a2d822cd7eb15b950f
140652b446a2c7424b4b4a7c712efb474c815254
describe
'109070' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIUY' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
3777c0ced34221a134af729b02572b5b
92f28822600015a1d34fc71d0c3152d2af891927
describe
'1638400' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIUZ' 'sip-files00104.tif'
79609475c7208856df01751282bd84c8
6609b14a9935bb3c2a56126bd9ea61de3c24c2c7
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIVA' 'sip-files00104.txt'
0ac1f1e7ce9141232db093c28a12ccc6
cc68b50b2f7373441a8eb27f7164e41302ca6c65
describe
'206721' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIVB' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
3c1e3fd7746d340ae206fb03424d498e
2c2e3f71669544055a0747d91dc636c97ab06cd6
describe
'371784' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIVC' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
f7d0d07ec71b8f63e28c03b3b5baf5f6
5225d23adcc58f685a57e69b40c49e5cee1a9474
describe
'24295' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIVD' 'sip-files00105.pro'
ba530d7d4cee634d175bf73995d0b71f
0387ead326787aef7f2167f1c37ecda9b38e2844
describe
'105977' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIVE' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
b6c6878e5455b790518dc2ddceb82e94
bc4ed50f94c2ef378004c478ba98d757273e082a
describe
'1667744' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIVF' 'sip-files00105.tif'
dd045d8281d19bd084453fe8e3596083
8edcfd26020b69ff8f33fdfaf89a0969136b3581
describe
'975' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIVG' 'sip-files00105.txt'
bf8a8f2d55f85de82cbbd4a04203f454
2b150eadd0e57982db88468278ab7431b9917a3d
describe
'199789' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIVH' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
77dfa5cd33b1c081537fd7836ffd8afb
2d12c36674fb5aaed6663e878a57e88a204e9c75
'2012-01-14T16:57:00-05:00'
describe
'383108' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIVI' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
c2351be881811b3f0f956aebb82d6abf
c8fad42bf33f316fe82231172cd4c39d5218af60
describe
'25287' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIVJ' 'sip-files00106.pro'
2dbc16e65cbb70e57786455fd8d11b07
70677c9db189c3d8e3f1ce9bd3904dea421380a6
describe
'108028' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIVK' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
737d91a8411a04033029f0a03c69fda1
2b61d5e0c8293c214b246922fe3429740f6610c6
describe
'1611876' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIVL' 'sip-files00106.tif'
f0036ee70edc2c261c159056ff28d102
7adabda29150bc1f39a7740398f9bda4ff19cb12
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIVM' 'sip-files00106.txt'
1cd81cf7138247d202f8c1ae34148bf6
4975d0f8d66006b8d57f95dfade35577fd23d4d0
describe
'203712' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIVN' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
30651dfcb88b1bf714e3e9e0a546568c
155539b80b0be074a52c35ffd11c346125f3070a
describe
'373973' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIVO' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
7aaf507084d5d70333803bf3272c947d
b25801f974dc18b75acbf5c1c8db2df464ccd0e0
describe
'24868' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIVP' 'sip-files00107.pro'
07eb27e611ac211c52d476b4cec2d542
b0a33808745082150415f2c61ccae80ff8208c61
describe
'105870' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIVQ' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
d308beb064cbb9fd6ce6ad57c0552d59
9bf0a685857ebcce30e098774b75f728b6664aa4
describe
'1644612' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIVR' 'sip-files00107.tif'
7594098d913ae9173d9f0b5ff007c910
a544680f36aa81c72cb81ae4cc5e13addee37a79
describe
'985' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIVS' 'sip-files00107.txt'
0f4397f733059c3c119f901ecc1eba42
64bf66d7192dd2aae4c061cc648c091663626939
describe
'198622' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIVT' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
270ed0fa55ba3ce57be9bcc9508a08be
9846f73133bb1f47682b5b775d0955ac4c8019c0
describe
'382237' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIVU' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
30a556a33658a5e2f9706d1d3b16f601
a173244369050c4ad7858502fd8bf84a29f88488
describe
'25288' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIVV' 'sip-files00108.pro'
5b5aed26879d867c0bebf9a9ae5dd6ba
c3313dc66522b48e9851f9143a1a286499b04f2d
describe
'107922' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIVW' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
41563395868565422d9207001ecdef32
56b62c3cbe44b501e4a9facd52dc616bfb36f223
describe
'1603856' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIVX' 'sip-files00108.tif'
2294f65628b384f887eab6b0f5fbba55
d0234b6f78204800710008df5b746c61ff3b746f
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIVY' 'sip-files00108.txt'
6e0ce85ed8a36357c5c6f682895b5db6
49effd019e9bd77b025286e6f4e35680b0d85b6a
describe
'206584' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIVZ' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
32b1b49697fd27cc049bd032a809a480
c4054fbdbee51f03772a747ab1122d1e2797e205
describe
'376197' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIWA' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
f577ee528e45481b16487cdead14c1fd
f2105652f45cedad6a5697790f9a5f042349fe6a
describe
'25338' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIWB' 'sip-files00109.pro'
64d37c274358eaa8881479ab935d6a47
b315834a2bc2843d748356ce39a1de898ac7ba0f
describe
'105651' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIWC' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
4a64d831788975dd0417b400a1f483d4
af4f0c21b46dbab27df9a7cd34308d986e916957
describe
'1667336' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIWD' 'sip-files00109.tif'
3628195e4faaefe3cc8b8d2476a42740
ee551969718d040ba1d074826ca5dc70879d04ca
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIWE' 'sip-files00109.txt'
8259e281c662acc76cd2e3cb2c78fbb1
8b654e1a608c2131964355ec3e30bbd55d9416a5
describe
'195701' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIWF' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
a13b111dff7c7597ef87fc464243c30a
d5e3d358ccb12762c4d56cc81f7a40f02e6a97a0
describe
'392433' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIWG' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
6b8669fa73db448900680676b32b63fa
c04575efbfe722bf268e62cbdaff36de47f32423
describe
'25207' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIWH' 'sip-files00110.pro'
2d4a8437e130b902a0129f627e7551af
9a6a4f381cdb816355341c9d51ca01ef19ac8515
describe
'111247' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIWI' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
8eee92fcb2e6860c20a47c263f0f3b3b
e54cbac63c7ee55e7348150fc11c0013ea568a81
describe
'1579508' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIWJ' 'sip-files00110.tif'
205fa1cd947ecb7f6e5d3ddb491f3b6a
38fda182df6786e2902e850fd1447a887c02210a
describe
'996' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIWK' 'sip-files00110.txt'
8c5575def5f632e388c649fb3d03c410
d9cdb9cbe89e83179de5136ad4cfe81c81d08d85
describe
'203162' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIWL' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
b7e9d34149c6ac1d47283009ded6a1ab
802fd032bd82cfefed48bfd28e0981a0493a0991
describe
'381928' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIWM' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
1b2ee4b6e77aef3e4b3816ba127a45b5
1aab89c2ef59c371f7698b74bcbe26a3cf9cce4c
describe
'25528' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIWN' 'sip-files00111.pro'
dbbd346af4a30d9d7f045e13e4e4a073
62938a55da9893441c38f53f305b2355b255b61f
describe
'107559' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIWO' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
2c654df7156a5337800320a1366e3320
4be9ec4b8ea85523694871a71b5c2c89cf5abc4e
describe
'1639660' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIWP' 'sip-files00111.tif'
1e2afce4af30124b71b390ced0d77c36
8ca845b3ac657a7cf522762a311d91a022aac0c9
describe
'1013' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIWQ' 'sip-files00111.txt'
8c49639388506500beea4a2c5156d6e6
21937e0eff3acf8a592b55ab77be36bc2d7e63ad
describe
'199955' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIWR' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
95b6b1bf46f477e626386f2892cfaa5b
98271106e3ead443574b2bf292c1ad69e89a155e
describe
'374352' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIWS' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
742aa719dd6cf9b94c523365d2f2c10b
e58bbcc31a357e6408b8748573bb0533934220c9
describe
'21639' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIWT' 'sip-files00112.pro'
a13a20031b45e961074eb2daf483e49d
dd0c8c952c3adecb1e4cf55332709c352eddfeeb
describe
'105555' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIWU' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
87183f0e0fcc131b1fad9616b939bacb
330e5a63d8f934193b37503e9e310deac7256884
describe
'1614744' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIWV' 'sip-files00112.tif'
7037199a531c256f849458982dcad0ab
47b08f36a794b5746c93d770df65c7e74adda77c
describe
'859' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIWW' 'sip-files00112.txt'
e8ea38f910ff973ff6ef8532c9a62eb1
4ae6bb3509f78f2bcc3b8bd5ead52f4c36ce6d7b
describe
'199447' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIWX' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
6a7591c0aa2a41b991c9b57e87b9fbdd
3df5a1cc087a9ca6c0ca0e604bc6567d59c16b2d
describe
'375908' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIWY' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
f9fd82868ed85bf272322ad3251994ed
5f14ef44d99c52185d21f7b4c2463c47dafc21f7
describe
'12042' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIWZ' 'sip-files00113.pro'
0d8fa2f475f18bfdc3ecd963f9a65f76
2c0fe12ee5fd125daeb04b95c0c1d06315802c2e
describe
'101746' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIXA' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
f07f941d7a09ed1ba25847c48d1acdc1
d414329dc368b046332fb1d17363e6c991c5e38e
describe
'1609792' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIXB' 'sip-files00113.tif'
ce206556deaa981ddda28a3254e72a3e
a84737a38d01f39643a75c8281c50f1529f84c86
describe
'510' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIXC' 'sip-files00113.txt'
3221645d8ab632dc2dd688eebe6a586f
200f47d30e358a58b55eb893c413ea767f1a3d84
describe
'194467' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIXD' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
746f9d9dcc1510affe2893132032ede6
41f4c3ede1c54631faca4fda98e09a267341bbbf
describe
'382476' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIXE' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
0e1902fc6a20260c09e80700e6df54de
727b55f80975174b980d07f3420533530ac8d1b5
describe
'24389' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIXF' 'sip-files00114.pro'
1b8422ab25a62f6eb46d691d65338677
66f4c5fa31a1862521814e46b45dc88be67d2d4e
describe
'109411' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIXG' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
f2bcedc230340506ccc9abcf0b30695a
4b12b895ef930e7cc83a5eb50fdd97b93f9ee9be
describe
'1570196' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIXH' 'sip-files00114.tif'
5e8f96ade77b4e224b0cf958bbd28930
a38ed35a578589bc84daada6e521b14d6711ea01
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIXI' 'sip-files00114.txt'
1f54a5f7bd8085bf780db254dd5d1c22
aa603062c090f6271884c096c2ccfa0b8abccc64
describe
'200759' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIXJ' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
ddd51d2df4c924ae89de3a53e15256a6
77d5eff43e79138b871f2fd9eaa2566db1505e73
describe
'372293' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIXK' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
196fa5e385f4da8a0f187ef98b9dc4ab
66c0b1e3a175af8cbe684b4e3fc33566e28a0678
describe
'23673' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIXL' 'sip-files00115.pro'
1ec358bf80efdb698e1160fd6412e815
bfb55b2c18e60897ccb8d98666f682e73b6d2097
describe
'106890' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIXM' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
829ea1e75d2f11cf06867c524c1e38c2
ed7f88effd3855df198442dcc73a565f75eac207
describe
'1620248' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIXN' 'sip-files00115.tif'
87c47311bb4828437e6af99fedc71626
cc62b64d5e2848376b6bd444160353c86b0ab149
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIXO' 'sip-files00115.txt'
a0a6987e2de56f9cee414d59e33d6e6e
5f2c0d4fe200d0f4a90b7bf363c2dd45c915734e
describe
'203918' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIXP' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
0b1bb1e6a1bb94a66f49edb7b82d0891
f86d47d8d963d6f775dbbca1646c73925cc156fa
describe
'379109' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIXQ' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
ba11da08afc6a80f9ed129d556deebfe
90f35f7f9f32e68684092f64c40ae4ca0d4f527c
describe
'23824' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIXR' 'sip-files00116.pro'
672f81f12b830785789a10d2d01ce265
f4916f2bc57471660296f8f70ef74cf6f2230fd3
describe
'106853' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIXS' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
718f32c270d1cc832f373dbb21075178
328976683e33f4dd8d2e59990164b98b255b6460
describe
'1645052' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIXT' 'sip-files00116.tif'
7d6619ed5fdd575545275aa6d70276f5
91d576993cd6a228bf9e7bcb547516ca014f9f3c
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIXU' 'sip-files00116.txt'
0729e9c0c2951d3a55cbc4f148287945
93ec17e02cca738d6ff9d328aa8d1002c2d5f545
describe
'207106' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIXV' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
95f63e03e00954867f63fd162387e17e
d233e5a79ce7c11ffd2588d0d50272a6d5c57c7e
describe
'375405' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIXW' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
5ceb49bb1dbc6d8c49531d6970d8487c
a31f81f0577c82c135c67f3bd46975781905d43a
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIXX' 'sip-files00117.pro'
26452436ee19e38fc87bcd93ceb8b1ee
a097064d15180bcf6da4bf8040c53acaa9fe58b2
describe
'105423' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIXY' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
3431c9e69a5af14bcaae2ca6050accec
cfee3d334561162f97188f596540602957a3afe0
describe
'1670120' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIXZ' 'sip-files00117.tif'
92eb33683ac778471aee0c4247ef912c
34bd0cc65d009f80424470278aa44097323d1015
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIYA' 'sip-files00117.txt'
6bc14eeb86a5157f0e09c2bfeba1dde9
402dd6f2f08b65b657715243651398991cd84270
describe
'204765' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIYB' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
64eece47b19fdb1fef72881c625fab2d
9085570ba68e13126b7bec10f5f5948828e57b4a
describe
'384556' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIYC' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
43603706714328561ec3bc4c416d3d42
9c2b24bf18bef91f005356645f2e62cb252c2ab6
describe
'25706' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIYD' 'sip-files00118.pro'
94a68c6e5a801c956cdbc0698b629e22
c70dc7bfb522d19896103014ffce70286403bd59
describe
'109150' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIYE' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
5fa78b401453c4dbb5bfae7fb9118391
756dd6b9778e6a96e19d9260a60e63ed0393e6b1
describe
'1652708' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIYF' 'sip-files00118.tif'
120762800a2eb8e8fe0cbd1987611cb2
f1c1b7b6fdae375c097b8cda937d3787dc271c94
describe
'1011' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIYG' 'sip-files00118.txt'
c8bed4d027dedc6d5de23fa6401e8d7f
1cf90b4f500313878dae9ad86c12112bfd6b6cee
describe
'201005' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIYH' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
2d1ae44d819427b5251192f1876f8c54
5ceea7fae53dfd115f17c8eb2abf292c79ad69df
describe
'380317' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIYI' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
fdc3731f31fc30138270dc6ea5519b41
70ea8a94ff8f723324c0efefefa87fd8c74c3c33
describe
'25423' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIYJ' 'sip-files00119.pro'
80405ecede98cceee30ba8b69c47878c
3e7cf1de655bfca6e0675faf512322d8ede2d500
describe
'108306' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIYK' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
c206401505e957fecf7591633bf18332
2383f0d25c9a4eb72ce63c2809700f5869131706
describe
'1621760' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIYL' 'sip-files00119.tif'
bb9ad4326ceb3b768f0ac314f466ccd8
609c999afffde8db705d8c675352db50224fc9ab
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIYM' 'sip-files00119.txt'
5865f6039bba160dbc5877b715f3e7ca
64af3ba046a1831f5c26e2d7a986024636827d82
describe
'198386' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIYN' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
d47c01a3969be36cedd0284c363c1f59
50943d09f29540515d9dbaac8184ae5caa36efc3
describe
'384419' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIYO' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
c7ef042ca933789d7d88b8b26a738908
a0701fb1ea5c37bbf1e6043d7d230c15af69702c
describe
'24893' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIYP' 'sip-files00120.pro'
f4d55cf0db69488156e6b7531573c0f8
6d43c0e9a934b60098753173de340d0ae8f6ff53
describe
'109110' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIYQ' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
defdaba163b520458d17793b943e88fc
3113f1fe8667112fe374ae7ebc4b77aaa4c49b42
describe
'1602100' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIYR' 'sip-files00120.tif'
d5ac689c1888bc3a0db90d5a775b9575
dfdaa830f15b9bcf479202ebcce6ac7cc39ef484
describe
'983' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIYS' 'sip-files00120.txt'
b2e235149489b92bb46aaf18af7f3360
be0514b1c54414a865f5c92092afe0306ff4d479
describe
'194461' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIYT' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
41115be3abfc054bcd44898fff3b005b
bbddee0db8ed5bd0a573235a9534adb5b3b2b78a
describe
'387134' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIYU' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
44f4992f97c4719edac62c0119c3b381
f5ef034ac6ef87dea518f261ff7b90a694f0ec30
describe
'24946' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIYV' 'sip-files00121.pro'
5d594c5debec3298fc6f7566e2de2d37
6c907221eddc0df7534908047bb51968cd83dcf5
describe
'109396' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIYW' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
55d99fb5bdbe5f956e2ed938e550d0c7
db5a004b32269c5e47189e9d14cfd1c50527865e
describe
'1570556' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIYX' 'sip-files00121.tif'
ea6c0a29590659d238b21ba242f61f80
10ec58789f016c9fccc562b6cb2fc323683241a1
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIYY' 'sip-files00121.txt'
083086dd461af742b18ad178fcc2bdb8
e3da7613c7dcd09d351d69f8a03e77416dcd07eb
describe
'191380' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIYZ' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
a0964a89588267e58c145d792d030430
48687cad4d79ad8dd47aa30e338d7dbcf683d5f1
describe
'390723' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIZA' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
1d13e4c4b83ebe5c86239919fecebbeb
6bb5661a1a4a5037c6556fab0e52a2921a3fa667
describe
'24694' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIZB' 'sip-files00122.pro'
9d23a0ad1ad5f14950fffe11002c4d5b
1eae12409259f55c688e899e892a19f5024e8503
describe
'110724' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIZC' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
93b85ac077b839035ed269d343b5c28b
135e78be2a6c4e91349ab32bf3918c902adf994e
describe
'1545764' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIZD' 'sip-files00122.tif'
959b1b30b498d84a342c1ef71c69ab5d
e822bf8eca73cd77436315c4232b2aca6bd131ca
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIZE' 'sip-files00122.txt'
b77ef5a0e07c808094f5e312bf56926d
e6654b8dcb49a3025d079bac793dcb1fd4b560c4
describe
'205396' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIZF' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
accfcd1ab1f61d9f59c240f1bddfc3a8
31ab0d37c00c3c6fe80ca367e8357b0b201acef8
describe
'374747' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIZG' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
3cdb01a2a6800176cc3eff1686ffc93f
ff8abf5c1484cad0b96c87474a8ea150b1672e16
describe
'25003' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIZH' 'sip-files00123.pro'
70b30ea089cbfe37a9cebb1f529007b7
e6f31b336602b14b35b50a435d534c740fc89a37
describe
'106007' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIZI' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
b4b4d7a424c025fdcd2801fe210f6c98
f98ebf7ee92c81d716da56642d8d6fef6dce234e
describe
'1656496' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIZJ' 'sip-files00123.tif'
faeb4e8920fec3fab9528e1246552961
10964846bea6a58591aba357f720bd7ccb820ea1
describe
'997' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIZK' 'sip-files00123.txt'
856f74a401fa0f07016971c964912a04
2237b5a810932b5ed7766855e405e2ea57a60faa
describe
'194942' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIZL' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
17ea24466ac2f50f49be23b7326ddb09
8b15d04e635ce8bf783a20ed23328af2e8f35a14
describe
'393903' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIZM' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
4ba1bfe4d3c7fa9bc6add464d35173e3
ee9ad3786b5ac985cad95331ada15b0a774a5fee
describe
'25068' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIZN' 'sip-files00124.pro'
d808bdbc47e67c376aec6db919bc495b
5af11e67fc3d3d3932fcc674598e9bb5bc2aa52c
describe
'111339' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIZO' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
314b76337fd7cffcab1b222c6c7f2f06
7b73622c942c75a37d61b5477f179699ab948652
describe
'1573980' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIZP' 'sip-files00124.tif'
dd628f9ad17acc5d3f8905a12cf9a963
0d163e546b23b971eff4c1b8ef305b6151be8786
describe
'995' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIZQ' 'sip-files00124.txt'
804e8796ee76a6f04cf1101cbeb67303
81609caea34dd9825ffa48783f0bd1ef93f6937d
describe
'199080' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIZR' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
b865b501a2e3fa58ec2562ea891c3990
ec4380eb5cc0a78b1151c56936a32fb9c85b21a2
describe
'381280' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIZS' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
77a68ed500d4565c8e38646801ca5c37
0578eefeca9a42de282f20f7902b15d832081e8f
describe
'24178' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIZT' 'sip-files00125.pro'
fe9013c84e1deb11753f7f36aeeb41b9
349aa3af66e6f929b763c313c920e405638a0549
describe
'107507' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIZU' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
53fd3d54187ee094a07bae0e9251f8c3
f789f8d3d71724396962cb1aba97321e5f955d3a
describe
'1606404' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIZV' 'sip-files00125.tif'
3f15da3d43601696cfd6c939121d7e87
42e2c29df622cca3ce80463c5bceba1ef649114f
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIZW' 'sip-files00125.txt'
48c52d073c353e33d0712a3d74bba3b3
9db0d4089567adb17d0928b0bb4e6ee342b73c38
describe
'202865' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIZX' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
61dfe918b92e66db3d5ca6e29e8ba0d3
e8b40965734dd8f5ffa6a4c19826f4fc9ff18036
describe
'391991' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIZY' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
d680c625079d22ff2029e5b8b9bb4da3
db2c5283bcf2e98aa4c49d5dfa4f41d3f95ff71f
describe
'26716' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAIZZ' 'sip-files00126.pro'
9368450da1e9e9cb50bb1026b473be5b
0cb8924981be1438400d06fb36627bbe96bee4f2
describe
'109778' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAJAA' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
f986ba8de4a0aaf40c45301921e3603b
a31a0a2e01d42a23a324eedb4c81b77609d7564a
describe
'1636836' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAJAB' 'sip-files00126.tif'
7dede104f8f20b546769575863709cfb
cebd07433567778bde717080fcafb739848fe527
describe
'1054' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAJAC' 'sip-files00126.txt'
f088dc9f4610573d86554623f0ba69af
c2abbfa8d16d043ea74ebebf7936cb7289ef38a4
describe
'200965' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAJAD' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
9c350223ec950d31f72157dc8a27114c
c496cf2e60e3a4acc54fd823aa270190b4bcefff
describe
'384562' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAJAE' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
e6dbb2301718969b64e6b4d6d846872f
859401775d0cc39783824b608c43d91de9191f29
describe
'24270' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAJAF' 'sip-files00127.pro'
53f398ba7d3bd448b934bc8a5c54cbe7
cbea53248768c0dc83f096bffc34437a2b659662
describe
'109103' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAJAG' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
dfbbe550253935387a4e324fa150b624
77203c69a88df733f25f2c90d592dbd84d848a25
describe
'1621408' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAJAH' 'sip-files00127.tif'
a7aa6568b6f8267213a652f5b2aafd01
2696b77c09aec5e4fdb131e365733eab2a6f76eb
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAJAI' 'sip-files00127.txt'
0c0b63b4327e7146951daa7a135f93a6
061634c65a4abd627149d05abb2a162fee127251
describe
'206011' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAJAJ' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
4ab486e474e0d642974e1b51bc9da52d
a224188b964dae2696905903afa2e766a1910fd1
describe
'373778' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAJAK' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
56862197322852aa2005dd338569dacb
7f98fd3596183b75a8bc89aded34f8a9d8482a57
describe
'23262' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAJAL' 'sip-files00128.pro'
123f131fb3c4e383e04bbc536026131b
aaf77a5fa11d6147981e210e4cefca48cd6cfe89
describe
'105670' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAJAM' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
e9b9df4b998ce1cebc29427b927f0911
643ad125a0984d638933d99d3867d07ee80c6b38
describe
'1661972' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAJAN' 'sip-files00128.tif'
415453608160929bb6732be804dd2b92
0080e2fc8ad484baf918ae6cb07dfd23c75eac3f
describe
'930' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAJAO' 'sip-files00128.txt'
cd20100a97ab28ca902e0b44ff5b7e31
6948eff9bca971e978de75c00c36844731c4fea3
describe
'200478' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAJAP' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
06ed0bd1ee81279a1ffe5a5ac4140cba
7b316f603e941300477e9972b5cbe85f2b5c33c2
describe
'399013' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAJAQ' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
464d9954ad7d25e135da3ce7aa2b79ba
e8f3e2afcf2248a1cc99b40e91afb8acd7484b8c
describe
'1206' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAJAR' 'sip-files00129.pro'
11650118c8e7baf940f7a9e786510c19
00f33a97232da04cd3cef0d057020ec059295b28
describe
'102938' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAJAS' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
dfd88c96d1549854250dab2f31547741
b6810a7bf8517888711f25d3ac78505775ea1303
describe
'4828960' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAJAT' 'sip-files00129.tif'
11bfc081ebe09acb81ec2a20eb9c3c37
b3e93f7c17fd6bf745d7f07af34267a0f88c1b6a
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAJAU' 'sip-files00129.txt'
370224f9874b151277e447968873e595
81a9bb32f070bb3203c5c0097e7947781bfa02b0
describe
Invalid character
'204456' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAJAV' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
31f220ea2d3cf8064fe801beaef53259
16805497593827ba1cbb6c3b9e7b3a32a365aecd
describe
'387172' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAJAW' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
0f2ce384da5ef52d6dbe0bf2efebecae
b1cb23e474192c45e50bfd49e5ffc420fbb9cbd5
describe
'26031' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAJAX' 'sip-files00130.pro'
a26ba182cd3ce7d392c27609d0bc025a
a206cd7061c004012471ffdb3d3856e979a85ba1
describe
'109294' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAJAY' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
a15ac32dcacabea862db567f3002c643
d17da5e3a827681dcb987da8c0bfd7562ccac67d
describe
'1650108' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAJAZ' 'sip-files00130.tif'
a0917cd45033643943dc5ff7299661cb
35e51e00b9a3f0bd8bb1763b08f76fd36886c7a2
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAJBA' 'sip-files00130.txt'
16957d0ed3f1fef5f626b217af471a1f
a70eaf254a1fd334c778f704ad35591487a882aa
describe
'204384' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAJBB' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
859199a2abb5ea61960e95b2a300ecc0
1f60f2099e1b1cff91074d0725e108c1664144a5
describe
'353943' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAJBC' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
6c21d63637d12577aba0e035272954b4
0257f5bcb668f92a6e4c1cc735d07b999fc82ac1
describe
'20279' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAJBD' 'sip-files00131.pro'
6c9f9b6794a623e11295b9771fc8719d
3b99a95b3fdbf27f71289a05e6b17cf4cc643f19
describe
'99580' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAJBE' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
5a24dcf38bc974b34708564f9ab4f89c
b5ba2edd14c23199e02301cf5309028510ddeefc
describe
'1648104' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAJBF' 'sip-files00131.tif'
0f945966aad6897af8da52477a04d401
09ac33a116275630e52de03d842a0794d67814aa
describe
'800' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAJBG' 'sip-files00131.txt'
bb431e880008bd936c7421ce9c79695e
7ecb62e922251bdabecd332dd232f15a9dbfd79c
describe
'205442' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAJBH' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
8c41d73d4bc0a9161f27e16e6f6d904d
208a20f834da3267240d8a9db936086be4d27210
describe
'353908' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAJBI' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
8ad7cb72784a6909c3061958dd7bc7a1
85c43e59dbb8594386ef4c18a5e99cce20024cf5
describe
'11810' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAJBJ' 'sip-files00132.pro'
dd3d1294bf01dce5ec251f93c2b33d9c
f03038aec6ee012e4b34bcf232e966e0d7efeca7
describe
'94600' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAJBK' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
bbce4f138a40ac030d50d86f305dcbb0
c523e38e066a929eccc68adb0e78d2917ded1044
describe
'1656892' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAJBL' 'sip-files00132.tif'
3684c406c077fc85b7f0ad088dc8266f
90948db50357cb14e1c0b4efcf986554cff42923
describe
'499' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAJBM' 'sip-files00132.txt'
1d15b67576a75b215220c0284fd2b749
655d7921ecfefb07c28a8d0a381418d5345f0dc7
describe
'206482' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAJBN' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
d7fb19d2b2356cc4f71505a5bb09aabe
c5e1c443679b6c967c7f85ed70e617ab9c9d5756
describe
'361181' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAJBO' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
ed288082ded920f85e9e4f66d380dd6b
cd2e47542cf705f92710a5fa05280c0b9902d462
describe
'23225' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAJBP' 'sip-files00133.pro'
182ac41548a13e684976387ce4a16789
b18e711f01c15925bc7e7db36900aa2a841ac2c7
describe
'102422' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAJBQ' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
9df0354e43c9405ad422cdd175112c52
e79c94484e07de46a41b7001fbdc3fd70a72382b
describe
'1668004' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAJBR' 'sip-files00133.tif'
7e4a88c76f21831dad43a15f2debf8e3
ccddb676af7e7068afc0c78d791a638fd8015764
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAJBS' 'sip-files00133.txt'
a22f461acd4950865a4f9c8ecbd1d441
d7b997d82c619185cb1fce6aaea0a419a8bbb4ab
describe
'202071' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAJBT' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
884b6aab39c4e7128368d527685d973a
d679ea3e4f0f099b8a08ab923ff12fd5d81a6eb7
describe
'360412' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAJBU' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
87d5ad0fab78783368ca1e979a56fbd7
eac6b02d364e1b75ff0ac32d97268576c4bfddc0
describe
'23275' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAJBV' 'sip-files00134.pro'
31642a2a5a5863b0f2e7a8abafa36f2c
b0b65cb7eb1038aa9853b140af484a0edadd9bd7
describe
'102998' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAJBW' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
0bb0165ef694ac35c6d239e11206ed80
7cde1550f64775fa48c28ab5b0d647da79594b83
describe
'1632264' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAJBX' 'sip-files00134.tif'
b545d9d6d6c8168d486b0d1496487192
ba8535f3c3e68a4d95417153b08cc5e04f4c3c15
describe
'943' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAJBY' 'sip-files00134.txt'
c36ae5f6ea44dc3571b06125bb9b326a
7cb57952a665f235628ef967775e0cf8afa6f309
describe
'199603' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAJBZ' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
6185e079f9eb563ff8654e99aa913760
abf6651657a5f3cc59c20ad016f9954251746cbf
describe
'375929' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAJCA' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
ceadb279d8f3eb4715253a5af4f8fcc7
723ccc7bac9444b7de72274c318fbe31534003b5
describe
'24681' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAJCB' 'sip-files00135.pro'
f522e5f491d41f51aeeaf103602fcd4a
12d643425979ece303a5e9a31789eecf80c82ecd
describe
'106861' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAJCC' 'sip-files00135.QC.jpg'
99a56a1c432fe7dda4381168cc6e96b6
2f4af1c7e17d9306dc1b119df9b24d9ab3ef29be
describe
'1611316' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAJCD' 'sip-files00135.tif'
4eec819f2ed16e08d2bfabd4475aeefa
672bd15ae49ad656aec23127d368ae5660a70735
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAJCE' 'sip-files00135.txt'
0aaf6d7d9b255e03f49df0dc662b1ab8
782fe0e7a47f15a8f9ae6251563b2310bef1d4bc
describe
'206950' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAJCF' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
356082c6d76a1e08d7a7e7b9445cf001
57be72bfca13e36f1ae5020b7a276c506176dc39
describe
'364702' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAJCG' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
977819043d75135ae497d9b25004d654
dd9b2f92045b6bbc32c341368fdf86430e821096
describe
'24481' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAJCH' 'sip-files00136.pro'
24a77961aa7cb448fd5408d620d65f0d
ee99cae0c90182682ee194b30aa38df388eb58ed
describe
'103114' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAJCI' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
4b2cd235f5bcb7acdc3d2d840a344d46
a7a5bd2d61323bdc70733b87db45420b70dbd039
describe
'1669420' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAJCJ' 'sip-files00136.tif'
eb0ca61dbaafde7b3169bbe97d099210
1c66c11f1cd0105d0143a91c4165c8f4879c9d97
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAJCK' 'sip-files00136.txt'
3d7cb998b28b69d1440f8464887f71eb
af4f3486d2d75820b60efd4b43b3e74c610c7906
describe
'200627' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAJCL' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
83348c8d2fdf9f20d0bd9f9d56e3a218
9fa91c7229cf93a1007e223f6acecff95f1bba53
describe
'375854' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAJCM' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
b46cc033a397aa9e33687f745d7e7341
64d5ffbddeea532b9539924669070df8fce69fdd
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAJCN' 'sip-files00137.pro'
dd91180aa6dd2d26b506168d1625c386
5a8d9ebda98e38647fa93f9360f836ff57488f39
describe
'105461' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAJCO' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
fb0023d7888348f33d20e31f552f168e
f2c98215245b9650c349b1d74a8e4d1af811a54c
describe
'1618928' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAJCP' 'sip-files00137.tif'
6a0044d7e01075125692573e298cb390
ebd2aa98f0f6db5d075abb1a85f2a7a1c0608634
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAJCQ' 'sip-files00137.txt'
a1025c25bdbe12968d389060bf772601
bde73ec66d41b4a4f738f358e07ba9165625edd4
describe
'202139' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAJCR' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
d65c314d9080f46d29509af3a7d5b9bb
614dbfb59f669a007ee89b12b90cef5ad57320f3
describe
'372166' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAJCS' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
acd6959ab3af4c380fb863a4f6f8c104
36b27532cab706b29b0fb9e4f46883045553f6ff
describe
'25582' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAJCT' 'sip-files00138.pro'
afe247822b4681a723017eb85c933c7b
fa7ad8a121e6aeed9095efe154d75feecbf03480
describe
'106057' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAJCU' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
aae95004443a681d8b3b6daf5593080c
2c87aa50534565b5a7318eafa7afb482ec46fb13
describe
'1631876' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAJCV' 'sip-files00138.tif'
bb6ac1aa1e4530aae2f7aea273a4feea
c65b11b78d2931e14b1ec75e0ceefe5fcdd4326a
describe
'1030' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAJCW' 'sip-files00138.txt'
11fd103ffb881512c06bbce369c75e4e
391dc4589ee74f518c493b5fb2bb6221d96b0cb7
describe
'209678' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAJCX' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
be74a52f9eed36db7ee0e0c925b5b8e8
bd0a330aae26b289cb8f5c339802b22dc0e96894
describe
'367405' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAJCY' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
76dbf9ea318d3cbb1bd2a751cd331d8a
87761c9eb5a8db6c8aaf90915a2507ba575ceab4
describe
'25186' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAJCZ' 'sip-files00139.pro'
65179a11fba18e490a5cecac77887049
33b3c3577c960acc05f4e1a965edc28dc959d43c
describe
'102415' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAJDA' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
158cb68a00d4d086a553e4e56dec7b89
3208268172dff5cc4797c2b837e34a97503dedd7
describe
'1691424' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAJDB' 'sip-files00139.tif'
f0099f5cb9b1b15d2c32a91cabb202a7
cbb05706923f42fb6e9a145095a319bccbe0d8b6
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAJDC' 'sip-files00139.txt'
f12cc35b8584089cfceacea1313941e4
42b0b47486a918e948512cb2d33cdca93ce1c666
describe
'204481' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAJDD' 'sip-files00140.jp2'
dd43ae47b3c90cb1dcf7a992219a2c2a
443bfc58fd3aeec8130fee23ea9c2e61a9414c34
describe
'345958' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAJDE' 'sip-files00140.jpg'
58dc45121c6a513498543cd8a7a4ba71
ca451b1e72cf320e26f4fbbb51b0903a6e7e0c6f
describe
'19137' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAJDF' 'sip-files00140.pro'
29160af58c68fcf557c1654ddc79cf5d
9bce0a13e8a7696e089c2161746ee9a730c07934
describe
'96352' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAJDG' 'sip-files00140.QC.jpg'
745edd2460dcc5786ed50c44a981bfa2
d641e661b54b2fff6f7e3d7876e00fefc70eaf1f
describe
'1648452' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAJDH' 'sip-files00140.tif'
43b68d1ac4c21235104d4938cf0de76a
c955afb418d3b406d640de4c7e373f1dbe079d06
describe
'767' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAJDI' 'sip-files00140.txt'
a0022572b157be3b2e7104fe64552719
a1805f3b79adf101a1c550992789f61f10bb02a8
describe
'241355' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAJDJ' 'sip-files00144.jp2'
f22f172ce7ff78edf419be441df9f6b0
8d4aaed9bed60c1083c72fec86c0434136e25391
describe
'288634' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAJDK' 'sip-files00144.jpg'
ce466a5dd8433335604df69ac98d0608
700452982d2ff3e4dbc78c35175ec5971a24628a
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAJDL' 'sip-files00144.pro'
8da112f846400c2e38a0ed73d74c3e42
9fb705acab1568e79f5ed321deea2e7d25b755d9
describe
'71205' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAJDM' 'sip-files00144.QC.jpg'
2417b7bdfd66074a2fd1901d3396b18b
ba62fce622b5b0e728dc280c54088a9da973d215
describe
'5799600' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAJDN' 'sip-files00144.tif'
44e49b32b764e6a4075688d93cf95b98
1a3be3a4c3ec808da833cc0fa79e587db1e63e1d
describe
'131' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAJDO' 'sip-files00144.txt'
999f781e8ab74791361bc51864a21fb6
855705920512bad467efa3572ec37a9c2f50a681
describe
'251087' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAJDP' 'sip-files00145.jp2'
8de5d3c902442545b967ce3b963395c8
1fe7f1eb9ff01e50f9170f647ced0d5d9ca98047
describe
'425046' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAJDQ' 'sip-files00145.jpg'
0ad9bb013400f21345a5f75ba67aaf65
49986893fc08d55152bba01af439efc714af1de7
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAJDR' 'sip-files00145.pro'
2befaa3745b68894fbe44682f6f341bb
7eccd752de1315623872b31d73916cd1e3ef42e4
describe
'93606' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAJDS' 'sip-files00145.QC.jpg'
ad9bb70fecaa27876859002b284faf00
16f2abd7619ea37c2869bd31bbad0281d046981c
describe
'6031508' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAJDT' 'sip-files00145.tif'
9548a79ce11d04ad3d0a9cfe44ba87d1
a5a18fad226912dbffb0c0b546ab64b4bfe38934
describe
'52397' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAJDU' 'sip-files00146.jp2'
28e29a78a10e1782e559c546b2b2a6b6
1be079f2906936a27fc0e710acbb1f8194abd6f6
describe
'168333' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAJDV' 'sip-files00146.jpg'
7c6dc493c9e22b64d691ff3419f079f7
c47eb1e4be95aed9cca5c173437c92493b81bb6a
describe
'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAJDW' 'sip-files00146.pro'
638910dbb0be4eaa25f64c50aac527af
99f463b809c4fbb788f7163aa246910b6e376a2b
describe
'46497' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAJDX' 'sip-files00146.QC.jpg'
c2af2dc5ee6540771a79f8edfdd1accc
96695c1c7d1c975a9d9e01e64381cd80dd33caf1
describe
'1263864' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAJDY' 'sip-files00146.tif'
dd92c3e110b617ad060c029970f3ea10
7aa144670abed636b6ee06d419ebdeab74a78c6b
describe
'72' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAJDZ' 'sip-filesprocessing.instr'
91bf45e5ec8d5cac3d26d9a5222b4543
3b62560f00ed68bc800879879e59343c702bb077
describe
'238644' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAJEA' 'sip-filesUF00028213_00001.mets'
46a49c2263d2943454370326f3c8a756
0de4ae93996a558881aa34b773f251b6a4ac2d22
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-13T08:48:24-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'272283' 'info:fdaE20090314_AAAAASfileF20090314_AAAJED' 'sip-filesUF00028213_00001.xml'
67281da14163a9550dad97b1b2cccb4d
a875a00080556490c600ad0882edc611af6fb37b
describe
'2013-12-13T08:48:22-05:00'
xml resolution




il

Fi a

x :

Se SONIA RON Nb
i r - ; S 8 >

iss

a
See add


The Baldwin Library

_—
UD we.



KATIE SUMMERS


KATIE SUMMERS

A LITTLE TALE FOR LITTLE READERS

BY
MRS. CHARLES HALL



London:
MARCUS WARD & CO., 67, CHANDOS STREET
NEW YORK: THOMAS NELSON AND SONS
1875

CONTENTS.



CHAP. PAGE
J.—PLEASANT ANTICIPATIONS, . . vgeD
Il.—Tuer BirrH-Day, . A 6 : 15
Ill.—Grance Farm, : 5 0 eo
IV.—Fatry IsLanp, ; 42
V.—Tur Enp oF A Happy Day, . , . 63
VI.—TuHE Broken VASE, 0 si 5 72
VII.—Prr Mice, % - 84
VIlI.—Tue FatsEHoop DiscovERED, ; S 93
IX.—A DaneErous ADVENTURE, . 6 . 107

X.—Tue Litre ORPHAN, . ° ° 123
dllustrations,

—e

Kartig AND Harry (p. 18),

FANNY, , si ;
Harry AND ROVER,

“‘@upss wHAT I’vE Got” (See Cover),

Katie anp Lucy,

Frontispiece.
PAGE

6

94

. 107

123


KATIE SUMMERS.



CHAP. I—PLEASANT ANTICIPATIONS.

mx
€)* E afternoon, as they sat quietly playing
76- on the lawn, Katie Summers said to her

brother, “Harry, do you know to-morrow is
Fanny’s birthday, and Aunt Mary has asked
mamma to let us have a holiday, and we are to
spend the day at the farm? Isn't that delight-
ful ?”

“Yes” said Harry, “I do like going to Aunt
10 Katie Summers.



Mary’s; there’s always such lots of fun there.
What do you like doing best ?”

“T don’t quite know. It’s great fun playing
at hide-and-seek in the shrubbery, and I like
going into the farmyard and feeding the chickens
and pigeons, and seeing the cows milked; and
then the boat! Oh, I think I like the boat
best of all, when old James goes with us, and
rows us as far as the Fairy Island !”

“T wonder if we shall go there to-morrow,”
said Harry. “I like the boat the best, too, but
next best to that is the hay-field. You can’t
think how jolly it is to get on the very top of a
great cart-load of hay, or else to ride on one of
the horses !”

“ Ah, yes!” answered Katie; “but then, you
know, Aunt Mary doesn’t like me to do that;
gne says it isn’t proper for little girls to do all
that boys do; but she doesn’t mind my playing
with the hay in the field, and that is very plea-
sant. I’m so glad it is haymaking time now.”
Pleasant Anticipations. 11



“T hope it will be fine,” said Harry, looking
anxiously up into the beautiful blue sky; “ it
would spoil all the fun if it was wet.”

“Not all,” said Katie, “because there would
be the dear old house to play in, and Fanny has
such a lot of toys.”

“Yes,” answered Harry, in a scornful tone;
“dolls, and cradles, and things of that sort.
They are all very well for girls, but boys can’t
play with those stupid things.”

“No, I suppose not,” answered Katie, slowly ;
“at least, when they do they always break them.
IT remember one day Fanny had a beautiful doll
given her, with real hair all in curls, and wax
arms and legs, and it opened and shut its eyes ;
and one day Tom got hold of it when Fanny
was out, and spoiled its hair, and cut open its
head with a large pair of scissors, because he
wanted to see how it was its eyes opened and
shut! Aunt Mary was very angry with him.
She said it was very unkind of him to break
12 Katie Summers.

Fanny’s toys, and he wouldn’t like it if Fanny
had broken his soldiers or cut open his drum,
or anything of that kind. Tom was very sorry
for it afterwards; and do you know what he
did? He saved all his money until he had
enough to buy a new head for the doll! Wasn’t
that kind of him; and he did it all out of his
own head ; nobody ever told him to do it. Ido
love Tom, he is always so good-natured ; and if
he does do any mischief, he is always so sorry
for it afterwards, and tries to make up for it in
some way or other.”

“ And what did Fanny say when she found
her doll all spoilt ?” asked Harry.

“Qh! she was in a great rage, and slapped
Tom’s face, and called him names, and said she
would never forgive him. Aunt Mary came in
just then, and said how dreadful it was to say
such a thing and to get into such a passion, and
she sent Fanny away to her room to be quiet
and think over it all; and Tom was punished
Pleasant Antecipations. 13



too; but I didn’t hear any more, because
mamma came and took me home. But some
time after I saw Fanny’s doll looking quite new
again, and then she told me about Tom buying
it a new head.”

At that moment their mamma called to them
from the open window to come in, and they
jumped up at once and ran in-doors.

And now I must tell you a little more about
Katie and Harry Summers. They were the
only children of Mr. and Mrs. Summers, and
they lived in a pretty cottage covered all over
with roses and jessamine. There was a large
garden at the back of the house, and the win-
dows opened out on to the lawn. They each
had a beautiful little donkey to ride—not like
those poor, rough, half-starved creatures you see
on the common, who can’t do anything but
walk, no matter how much their cruel masters
beat them. No; the donkeys belonging to
Katie and Harry could trot and gallop almost
14 Katie Summers.

as fast as a pony, and their coats were smooth
and soft, for William, the gardener, took great
pride in them, and brushed them well every day.

At the time this story begins Katie was eight
years old and Harry was seven. They were
both very good little children, and loved each
other very dearly, as brothers and sisters should
do.

Mrs. Summers’ brother, Mr. Marchwood, and
Aunt Mary his wife, lived at Grange Farm,
about five miles from Myrtle Lodge, the home
of Mr. and Mrs. Summers. They had four
children—Tom, who was the same age as Katie ;
Fanny, who was a year younger; Lucy, who
was four years old; and a little baby boy who
was not yet quite two. The family at the farm
were very fond of the young folks at Myrtle
Lodge, and the greatest possible treat to Katie
and Harry was to spend a long day at the farm,
and that was what they were looking forward
to on the morrow.


CHAP. Il.—THE BIRTH-DAY.

MYEEXT morning, at six o'clock, Katie was

UN: awake, and, jumping out of bed, ran to
the window to see what sort of a day it was.
As she pulled aside the curtain she saw the sun
shining across the lawn, and the sky was blue,
and the birds were singing sweetly. Then she
ran to the door of Harry’s room and tapped
gently, and called to him, “ Harry, Harry, make
haste and get up; it’s such a lovely day, and I
want to go and gather some flowers to take with
us to-day to the farm.”
16 Katte Summers.



“ All right,” answered Harry, “Il be ready
as soon as you are;” and away went Katie to
dress herself, for she was a handy little girl,
and could dress herself with very little help
from Sarah.

As soon as the children were ready they went
down stairs, and Sarah gave them each a cup of
fresh milk and a piece of bread and butter, and
each taking a basket they started off to pick the
sweetest flowers they could find.

“T wish I could reach that piece of jessa-
mine,” said Katie ; “ none of these pieces down
lower are nearly so large, and Aunt Mary is so
fond of it.”

“Oh, I'll soon get it,” said Harry, and off he
started to the dining-room, but soon came back
looking very angry.

“What is the matter, Harry ?” said Katie.

“That Sarah is a nasty, horrid, disagreeable
old thing, and I hate her,” said Harry, angrily.
“T wanted her to let me have a chair to stand
The Birth-day. 17



on to reach the jessamine, and she wouldn't let
me have it, nasty old thing.”

“Oh, don’t say that, Harry, dear,” said Katie,
going up to him and putting her arm lovingly
round his neck. “You know mamma doesn’t
allow those chairs to be brought into the garden,
so of course Sarah couldn’t let you have it;
and I’m sure she isn’t cross, for she is always
ready to do all she can to please us. Never
mind the jessamine, I will pick all I can reach;
though it isn’t so large as the other, it smells
just as nice; and I’m sure Aunt Mary would
rather be without it than that we should get it
by doing what is wrong.”

“That’s right, my little woman,” said a voice
behind them, and, turning round, they saw their
papa. They ran to him for their morning kiss,
and then each taking a hand they walked beside
him. “I am glad to see, my little Katie, that
you have sense enough to give up cheerfully
what you cannot obtain, and that you see it is
18 Katie Summers.



better even to disappoint a person than to do
what is wrong in order to get something that
will please them. But come, let me see if I can
reach this flower that grows so inconveniently
high.” So saying they moved to the spot, and,
by the help of a stick, Mr. Summers managed
to reach the coveted flower. “There, you see,
Harry! even if Sarah had let you take the chair
you wouldn’t have been able to reach the flower ;
so you would have made Sarah do wrong, and
displeased your mamma, just for nothing. And
because she did her duty you called her names.”

“Oh, papa, ’m so sorry. Ill go this minute
and beg her pardon.”

“Do, my boy; and in future always try and
remember to be civil and kind to those who
wait upon you and serve you.”

When they had picked as many flowers as
their baskets would hold, they went to the stable
to see their donkeys, “Sandy” and “ Mops,” and
Mr. Summers gave William orders to have the
The Birth-day. 19



pony chaise ready by nine o'clock, saying that
he would himself drive the children to the
Grange.

“Oh, how delightful!” they both exclaimed,
for a drive with papa was a great treat; he
always had so much to tell them, and could
answer their questions so much better than
William.

The children then stroked and patted their
donkeys, and the affectionate creatures rubbed
their noses against their little master and mis-
tress, and seemed quite pleased to see them.

“Oh, papa,” said Katie, “ I’ve quite forgotten
to save them a piece of my bread. May I go
and get some now?” And as her papa gave her
leave to do so, off she darted, and soon returned
with a slice, half of which she gave to Harry
for Sandy.

After Mops and Sandy were fed, they went
to the dogs’ house, and Mr. Summers opened
the door, and out bounded the great dogs Lynn

B
20 Katie Summers.

and Brann and Beauty and Hero; and the two
little dogs from the house, hearing the barking,
came frisking out to join the fun, and a fine
game of romps they all had, poor little Dot and
Pussy getting rolled over and over by the big
dogs; but they were not hurt at all, for the big
dogs were only in play, and took care not to
tread on or bite the little ones. When they
were all tired out the dogs were sent back to
their house, and Mr. Summers and the children
went in to breakfast. They found mamma
down in the dining-room waiting for them.

“ How rosy and bright you look, my darlings,”
she said, kissing them. “There is nothing like
early rising and fresh morning air for putting
roses into little people’s faces; and for making
them hungry, too, I daresay,” she added, smiling,
as she placed before them each a basin of bread
and milk. Although Mrs. Summers did not
allow constant chattering at meal times, yet
Katie and Harry were not forbidden to speak
The Birth-day. 21



if they had anything they wished to say; but
this morning they seemed in too great a hurry
to be off to care to speak, and they had soon
finished their breakfasts. Being well behaved
little children, they did not, as I have seen some
children do, jump down from their seats as soon
as they had finished, but waited patiently until
they had permission to do so.

“You may run away now, my dears,” said
Mr. Summers; “I see you are eager to be off,
and I want to speak to your mamma.”

The children gladly ran upstairs to their play-
room, and taking down their money boxes,
began counting out their money to see how
much they could afford to spend ; for they would
pass through a little town on their way to the
Grange, and Mr. Summers had promised that
they should stop to buy what they wanted.

“T have three shillings,” said Katie, “and T
want to buy a hat and pair of shoes for Fanny’s
doll as a birthday present, and then I want te
22 Katie Summers.



buy a new table and chairs for my doll’s house.
J wonder if I shall have enough money.”

“What shall I give her?” said Harry. “Tve
only got one shilling and sixpence. I spent
nearly all my money the last time I went to
Hamley with William.”

“You might get Fanny a little needle-book
for her workbox, or a yard measure; she wants
both those things, I know,” answered Katie.

Putting their money carefully into their
purses, they hastened to get ready for their
drive. The chaise was brought round to the
door as they came down stairs. The baskets of
flowers were carefully stowed away under the
seat. Then the children, after kissing mamma,
jumped in and took their places.

“Oh, papa, let me drive till we get to the
town,” said Harry.

“Very well, my boy,” answered his papa ;
“change places with me ;” and Harry, with great
delight, took the reins
The Birth-day. 23



The pony was a very steady-going old fellow,
and the children were often allowed to drive
when papa or William was beside them.

It was a splendid day ; the sun shone brightly,
and the hedges were covered with wild roses,
honeysuckle, and other wild flowers. The air
was sweet with the scent of them and of the
new-mown hay, and birds were singing in every
bush and tree.

“Oh, how beautiful everything is!” exclaimed
Katie. “I wish.it was always fine like this.”

“ A very foolish wish, my child ; for if it was
always fine we should not have all these flowers
and the freshness which isso pleasant. In very
hot places, where there is rain only at a certain
season, everything gets dried up and parched.
The people are not able to go out of their houses
except in the very early morning, for fear of
getting killed by the heat of the sun; and in the
hottest part of the day everybody is obliged to
lie down and keep quite still.”
24 Katie Summers.

“T shouldn’t like that,” said Katie; “it must
be dreadful to be so very hot.”

«There are other places not so hot as India
where they have more fine weather than we have
in England; but even there the people suffer from
the heat during the summer, and those who are
not born there get idle and weak from it.”

They soon arrived at the little town of Hamley.
The chaise was stopped at the door of a toy
shop, and the children went in to make their
purchases. The hat and shoes were chosen and
paid for, and the needle-book, too, but Katie
couldn’t get the things she wanted for her doll’s
house, so they left the shop, and were going to
ask their papa to take them to the other toy
shop, when they saw a poor woman they knew
standing talking to their papa.

“He's about as bad as he can be, sir,” they
heard her say. “The doctor says he can’t live
many days now; and indeed I can hardly wish
it, dreadful as it is to part with my darling; for




The Birth-day. 25

he is nothing but a bag of bones, and he suffers
very much.”

“Ts there anything he wants?” asked Mr.
Summers, kindly; “any nourishing things—
wine, or jelly, or anything of that sort ?”

“No, sir, thank you kindly,” said Mrs. Thomp-
son, drying her eyes, “he has everything he can
want. The parson and his lady are very kind,
and let him want for nothing; but he had a
wish just now for strawberries, so, as I had to
come to Hamley, I thought I would get him a
few; I’ve got threepence here on purpose.”

Katie waited to hear no more, but ran into a
greenerocer’s shop which was next to the toy
shop, and asked the price of a basket of straw-
berries.

“Sixpence and eightpence a basket, miss,”
answered the woman. “These are quite worth
twopence more,” she added, taking down a basket
of the finest, and showing them to the little girl.

And, indeed, they were; they looked so
26 Katie Summers.

sweet and fresh, and smelt so nice, that Katie
looked rather sadly at her shilling, which was
all she had left.

“They do look nice,” she said, “and poor
little Johnny would enjoy them so much. I
should like to get him two baskets, for there are
not many strawberries in one; but I’ve only a
shilling.”

“Bless your sweet face,” said the woman;
“then you shall have the two for a shilling.
And who is little Johnny ? is he your brother?”

“No,” said Katie, “he is a little boy in our vil-
lage, and he is very, very ill, and longs so much
for some strawberries ; and his mother was going
to buy him some, but she is poor, and could
only spare threepence. Oh, thank you very
much,” she added, as the woman handed her the
baskets of fruit neatly tied up in paper; and,
putting her shilling down on the counter, she
ran back to the chaise, where she found Mrs.
Thompson still talking to Mr. Summers. Katie
The Birth-day. rh



put the parcel into her hands and said, “ They
are for Johnny, with my love, and I hope he
will like them.”

“God bless you, my dear little lady, for your
kindness. Johnny will, indeed, be pleased.
Thank you kindly, miss.”

With a kind good-bye to the poor woman,
Mr. Summers drove on.

“Papa,” said Katie, “wasn’t it kind of the
woman in the shop to let me have the fruit for
a shilling when it ought to have been one
shilling ‘and fourpence? I told her I had only
a shilling, and that I wanted the strawberries
for a poor sick little boy, and she let me have
them.”

“Yes,” answered her papa, “it was kind of
her, and I am very pleased to think that my
little girl was so thoughtful for others, and gave
up her own wishes to provide for those of a sick
ehild.”

“ But, papa, I liked best to give the fruit to
28 Katie Summers.

Johnny, because I can do without the things for
the doll’s house. Dolly won’t know that the
table is shaky and the chairs are broken,” said
Katie, with a merry laugh.

Mr. Summers smiled, pleased and thankful to
find his little girl so thoroughly unselfish and
land.

Harry looked grave and thoughtful.

“What is the matter, my boy?” said his papa,
kindly.

“YT was wishing, papa, that I had done like
Katie, but I never thought of it. Ive only six-
pence left.”

«And what are you going to-do with it?”
asked Mr. Summers.

“TI was going to buy a whip, but if I can get
anything to please Johnny instead I would
rather.”

“He is very fond of flowers,” said Katie.
“Couldn't you get him a little rosebush in a pot?
He could have it to stand on the little table
The LBirth-day. 29



near his bed, and I think he would be pleased
with that.”

““What a girl Katie is!” exclaimed Harry,
with admiration; “she always thinks of every-
thing. I expect that is the very thing he would
like, for I remember the last time I saw him he
had some flowers in a little glass on his table,
and he said what a pity it was that they died
so soon when they were picked. But can I get
a rosebush for sixpence ?” said Harry.

“We will see,” said his papa; and they drove
to a nursery garden.

There was nothing nice to be got under a
shilling, and one very pretty rosebush with two
or three roses in bloom and plenty of buds about
it was one shilling and sixpence.

“Oh, papa, I should so like that one,” said
Harry, his face flushing with eagerness.

Katie crept up to her papa and whispered to
him, “Do let him have the money, papa dear.”

But Mr. Summers did not think that would
30 Katie Summers.



be good for his little boy, and he wanted him to
practice self-denial; so he said, “How much
did you give for the present you bought for
Fanny ?”

“A shilling, papa,” he answered.

“Well, give me the needle-book, and I will
pay you a shilling for it; then you will be able
to buy the rose, and I will give the needle-book
to Fanny.”

Harry hesitated a minute. He thought
Fanny would think him mean if he didn’t give
her a present on her birth-day; but then he
thought of poor sick Johnny, and of how he
would enjoy having the beautiful rose; so he
said, “Thank you, papa, I should like to have
the rose ;” and he gave his papa the little paper
parcel containing the needle-book. Harry then
gave the gardener his sixpence, and Mr. Sum-
mers paid the shilling. The rose was handed
to Harry, who carefully placed it in the chaise,
and they drove off.


CHAP. TII.—GRANGE FARM.

‘Ke DRIVE of half-an-hour now brought them
AK in sight of Grange Farm. Tom, who was
having a swing on the gate of the farmyard, was
the first to catch sight of the chaise as it drove
up the lane leading to the house. He ran to
meet them, and they all alighted; and, while
one of the farm servants led the pony to the
stable, they walked up to the house. Aunt
Mary was at the door, ready to give them a
hearty welcome.

“We have brought you some flowers, Aunt
32 Katie Summers.



Mary,” said Katie, as she and Hog 4 “handed the
baskets to their aunt.

“Thank you, my dears, how thoughtful and
kind of you. You know I always think the
flowers from Myrtle Lodge are sweeter than
any others. They are as fresh as if they had
been just gathered; see, some of them are still
quite moist with or Ah! there is some of
my favourite jessamine; how sweet it smells!
But come inside and rest ;” and she led the way
into the cool, old-fashioned dining-room, where
the table was laid with sweet cake and dishes
of fresh-gathered strawberries.

Fanny now came in, and her uncle kissed her,
and wishing her many happy returns of the day,
eave her the little needle-book and a large
brown paper parcel.

“Many happy returns of the day, Fanny
dear,” said Katie, as she thrust her littie present
into her cousin’s hand.

And then came Harry’s turn, and as he kissed
Grange Farm. 33

her and gave her his good wishes, he turned
very red. “Iam sorry I haven’t got a present
for you, Fanny,” he said; “but I spent all my
money.”

“Oh, never mind,” answered his cousin; “I
have had such a lot of presents ;’ and she pro-
ceeded to open the parcels she had just received.
What a beautiful hat for Julia! (that was her
best doll’s name); and shoes, too! Oh! thank
you, Katie dear; they are the very things she
wants. Ob, uncle, how well you have guessed
what I wanted; the needle-book is the very
thing, for I am always losing my needles.”

“T think you must give Katie the credit for
choosing the right thing,” said her uncle ; “ for
it was she who thought of the needle-book.”

“JT wonder what is in this big parcel,” said.
Fanny, as she proceeded to untie the string.
“Oh, uncle, how lovely !’ she exclaimed, as, on
taking off the paper, she saw two pretty wicker-
work baskets fitted up, one with a doll’s tea-
34 Katie Summers.



service, and the other a dinner-service. Inside
one was a little note from her aunt wishing her
every happiness, and hoping she would like the
present she sent her.

The little girl’s delight at the sight of the
beautiful things was unbounded ; and certainly ©
the toys were very pretty. The tea and dinner
services were all of plated ware, and shone
brightly as they lay softly nestled in white wad-
ding; the spoons and knives and forks were
gilded, and were fitted into the lids of the
baskets. The baskets themselves were very
pretty, and altogether the present was one that
might well satisfy any little girl.

“Oh, papa,” said Katie, “how clever of you
to keep it quite a secret! I had no idea you
had anything for Fanny except the needle-
book.”

After the presents had all been admired again,
they were put aside, and the party sat down to
lunch.
Grange Farm. 35

“T thought you would be glad of something
to eat,” said Aunt Mary, as she helped the
children to strawberries and cake; “for you
have had a drive since your breakfast, and I
know you are as early folks as we are, and for
that reason I expected you an hour ago. What
made you so late ?”

“We started early enough,’ replied Mr.
Summers, “but we stopped some time in
Hamley. These little people wanted to do
some shopping, and then we met poor Mrs.
Thompson, who seemed in great trouble about
her little boy. He is very ill, and she doesn’t
seem to think he will recover. He is her only
child, which of course makes it all the harder
for her to part with him. However, I trust it
is not quite so bad as she fears ; and I shall call
and see Dr. Hare on my way back, and see what
he thinks of the child’s state.”

“Poor little Johnny !” said Mrs. Marchwood ;

“T am sorry to hear such a bad account of
Cc
2
le

od.

36 Katie Summers.



him; he was a dear, bright little fellow. IfI
can do anything for him in any way be sure
you let me know.”

“Yes, I will,” replied her brother, rising.
“ And now I must be off.”

“What! can’t you stay with us to-day ?”
said Aunt Mary. “I had quite counted on
your company.”

“T am sorry to disappoint you; and it would
be quite a treat to me to remain,” said Mr.
Summers; “but I have some business I must
attend to.”

“Tn that case,” answered his sister, “I know
it is useless to press you to remain. I will send
the children home this evening by eight o’clock.
Nichols shall drive them in the close carriage,
so there will be no fear of their taking cold if
they should fall asleep on the way.”

Mr. Summers then said good-bye to them all,
and bid Harry and Katie be good, and not give
any trouble to their aunt.
Grange Farm. 37



“Shall I take your rosebush home, Harry ?”
he asked. “I think it would be safer.”

“Yes, please, papa; and will you take it to
Johnny ?”

“No, my dear, you shall take it to him your-
self to-morrow. JI would not deprive you of
the pleasure of seeing his face brighten up at
the sight of the pretty flower. Once more,
good-bye, all of you, and may you have a very
pleasant day.”

“And now,” said Aunt Mary, “Tom and
Harry had better go and see if Nichols is ready
with the boat; and, Fanny, you can take Katie
upstairs with you while you get ready.”

Out rushed Tom and Harry ready for any
fun, and the little girls went upstairs to the
nursery.

“A kiss for me, baby!” cried Katie, ag the
little fellow ran toddling up to her.

“Oh, Cousin Katie, said little Lucy, “look at
my poor dolly; she tumbled down off the high
38 Katie Summers.



chair, and her nose is all broken. I don’t think
it hurt her, though, for she didn’t ery !”

“No,” said Katie, laughing, “ I don’t suppose
it did; but give her to me, I think I can make
her look a little better;’ and Katie smoothed
the doll’s hair, and washed off some of the dirt
from her face, and in a few minutes dolly looked
quite smart again, in spite of her broken nose.

“Come, Miss Lucy,” said nurse, “I want to
dress you, for you are to go out in the boat with
all the others.”

“Oh, what fun! what fun!” cried little Lucy,
clapping her hands, and dancing about with
glee. “And is baby coming too ?”

“No,” said nurse, “not to-day ; baby can go
some other time, when there are not quite so
many going.”

And now Fanny and Lucy being ready they
all went down stairs. Mrs. Marchwood was
ready waiting for them at the door.

“Come, my dears, it’s time we started,” she
Grange Farm. 39



said. “Fanny, my dear, you must carry this
basket; and, Katie, will you take this one 2”

“JT want one too, mamma,” said little Lucy.

“Tam afraid you could hardly be trusted to
take one,” said her mamma; but she added,
seeing her little girl looked disappointed, “you
shall help me to carry mine,” and she held it
down so that the little girl could hold one of the
handles.

They walked down the garden, at the bottom
of which ran a river, and there they found
Uncle John and the two boys. Two pretty
boats were drawn up to the steps which led
down to the water, and Uncle John was busy
putting hampers and shawls into one of
them.

“Now, then, jump in,” he cried—“ mamma,
Katie, Fanny, Lucy, and Nichols in this one,
and Harry, Tom, myself, and the hampers in the
other. You go first and we will follow. Now,
guess, where are we off to ?”
40 Katie Summers.



“The Fairy Island! the Fairy Island!” they
all cried at once.

“Right,” said Uncle John, “we are going to
the Fairy Island; and what’s more, we are going
to have dinner there, and I shouldn’t wonder if
the good fairy of the place gave us tea too; eh,
mamma ?”

“ Perhaps, if we behave very well,” said Mrs.
Marchwood.

“Ts there a real live fairy there?” said Lucy,
opening wide her blue eyes. “Oh, mamma! I
should like to see her; perhaps she could mend
my dolly for me.”

The children all laughed.

“Why, you little goosie,” said Katie, “ don’t
you know that your mamma is the good fairy of
Fairy Island? Tue island is Uncle John’s very
own, because he bought it; and we call Aunt
Mary the good fairy, because she is always
giving us such nice treats there.”

“But she hasn’t got wings and short frocks
Grange Farm. 41



and a pretty stick with a star on the top, like
the fairy in my picture-book,” said Lucy, still
quite puzzled as to how her mamma in a
long frock and bonnet and shawl could pos-
sibly be a fairy.

“ Ah! but your fairy lived a great while ago,”
said Fanny, “and the fairies who live now don’t
dress as they used to do then.”

It was very pleasant that warm summer
morning to sit quietly in the boats as they
glided gently along. The children let their
hands hang over the side of the boat into the
cool water. The trees on each side of the stream
dipped down into it, and gave a pleasant shade,
and the water lilies rocked gently as the tide
and wind passed along ; the banks were covered
with forget-me-nots; but Mr. Marchwood did
not allow the boats to be stopped for the
children to gather them, as there were plenty in
Fairy Island, and numbers of other wild flowers
too.


CHAP. IV.—FAIRY ISLAND.

‘Yc FTER rowing for about half-an-hour a sud-
WX: den bend in the river brought them in sight
of the landing-place ; and a lovely spot it was—a
small green island in the middle of the stream,
thickly wooded with trees and bushes, and
cheerful with the songs of birds, while bright.
coloured flowers peeped up through the ferns
and moss which covered the island. . The water
near the shore was so clear that you could
watch the little fish darting about, and could
see the smooth pebbles at the bottom, Mr.
fairy [sland. 43



Marchwood had caused some landing-steps to
be placed in a convenient spot, and there the
boats were made fast, and all the party got out.
The hampers were then landed and carried up
to a place that seemed to have been made on
purpose for a picnic, as Katie said. The grass
was as smooth as velvet, and there were no ups
and downs, and the trees arched overhead, leav-
ing here and there little peeps of the beautiful
blue sky.

“Now, then, to work,” said Mrs. March-
wood; and while Uncle John opened the hampers,
she and the children began to spread the cloth.
What a wonderful fairy it was who had packed
those hampers; she seemed to have forgotten
nothing—the knives and forks and glasses were
all there, and the pepper and salt and mustard
and sugar. There was a pigeon-pie, and fowls,
and ham, a-currant and raspberry tart, and a
cherry tart, a bottle of cream, and a custard ;
some nice home-made wine and some raspberry
44 Katie Summers.

vinegar, all ready mixed with water; and
baskets of strawberries and cherries. It was,
indeed, a feast ! and the little folks sat down to
it with good appetites.

When dinner was finished, Mr. Marchwood
called Nichols to come and get his share, and
Mrs. Marchwood and the three little girls
wandered away further into the island to
gather wild flowers and moss, while Mr.
Marchwood and the boys went off in another
direction.

“Oh, auntie, auntie!” cried Katie, “do come
here ; see what I have found!” and Mrs. March-
wood, coming up to her little niece, found her
bending over a little bird, which, though it
seemed rather frightened and fluttered, didn’t
fly away.

“Tt is a thrush,” said her aunt, taking it up
very gently. “Ah! poor little thing, its leg is
broken. John, John!” she called; and her
husband hearing her came back quickly. “See!
Fatry Island. 45



here is a poor bird with its leg broken; can you
do anything for it ?”

“ Yes, I think I can manage that,” said Uncle
John ; and he made some tiny splints and bound
them on to the broken leg with some fine grass,
and then made all tight with some threads Mrs.
Marchwood took from the fringe of her shawl.

Mrs. Marchwood then made a little basket
soft with moss and leaves, and laid the thrush
in it; and Katie ran and fetched some crumbs
of bread and a fine ripe strawberry, and put
them down beside the bird in the basket; but
though Master Dick seemed quite to understand
how kind they had all been, and gave faint little
chirps to show his gratitude, I suppose, still he
didn’t attempt to eat.

“Ah! I think I know what he would like
better even than crumbs and strawberries,” said
Uncle John, and taking his gardening knife out
of his pocket he began to dig up the earth.
Presently he found a little worm. “Here, old
46 Katie Summers.



fellow,” he said, holding it half-an-inch from the
bird’s mouth. The temptation was too great to
be resisted, and the thrush stretched out his
neck, opened his beak, and down went the worm.

“You will do now, my fine fellow,” said Uncle
John; “I see you are not dying;” and witha
warning to the little girls to keep him quiet and
not frighten him, Uncle John went off to the
boys.

« And now, my dears,” said Aunt Mary, when
the little girls were tired of gathering flowers,
“if you will come and sit down by me and rest
yourselves, I will read you a little story I have
brought with me.”

“Qh, that will be nice!” cried the children,
and they settled themselves to listen.

“Ts it a story you wrote yourself?” said Katie,
as her aunt drew a roll of neatly-written manu-
script from her pocket.

“No, my dear, it was written by a dear sister
of mine many, many years ago; and in looking
fairy Island. AT



over an old desk of hers yesterday I found it,
and I thought it would be the very thing to
bring here to-day to amuse you when you were
tired of play.”

“THE HISTORY OF MAC AND MURIEL, TWO LITTLE
SOFT, FLUFFY, TABBY KITTENS.

“T can’t say I remember much of my very
early days, or of the place where I was born
(and this is not surprising, for I was quite blind
for nine days, and could only grope about in the
dark and mew) ; but my mistress has often told
me that I was born in a cupboard in the kitchen
of a house in Pelham Crescent, Hastings. The
first thing I can recollect was being taken up
by the neck much less gently than my mother
used to take me, and being carried up a long,
long flight of stairs to a large room where some
ladies were sitting. It seemed quite a long
journey to me then, for it was the first time I
had been even outside the kitchen cupboard,
48 Katie Summers.



and everything looked so strange I couldn’t
make it out at all. My eyes were only just
open, so I had seen very little even of the
kitchen, and there was so much to look at in
this big room that I grew quite giddy and stupid
as I looked round. My only comfort was that
my dear brother Mac was with me. He was a
good deal bigger than I was, although we were
just the same age ; but he was always considered
a very fine handsome fellow, whereas I was
quite an ordinary kitten.

“ But to return to my first visit to the draw-
ing-room—as I afterwards found the big room
upstairs was called—where I had many a merry
game of play with my dear Mac.

“The two young ladies who were sitting in
the drawing-room jumped up when we were
carried in, and came and stroked and kissed us,
calling us ‘darlings’ and ‘lovely kittens’ and
‘beauties,’ till I really think I was beginning to
feel vain, when one of the young ladies said, as
fairy sland. 49
she stroked my brother, ‘This 7s a fine fellow ;
he is far prettier than the other, and more lively,
too ; we'll keep him.’

“ There was a little discussion then about us.
The other lady thought my face was prettier
than Mac’s, but my coat was not so well marked.
It was at last agreed that we should go up and
see the ladies every day, and that they should
choose one of us when they knew us better. It
ended, however, in their keeping us both, for
they grew so fond of us they didn’t like to part
with either. After this first event in our lives
we spent many happy days ; we were no longer
shut up in the dark cupboard, but were allowed
to run through the kitchen, and scamper about
in the passages ; and it was only when we were
hungry or tired out with play that we went
back to the cupboard, where we were sure to
find our dear, good, patient mother waiting for
us, ready to feed and wash us and purr us to
sleep. Then every day we were sent for by the
50 Katie Summers.



ladies in the drawing-room, and that was the
pest fun we had in the whole day. We used ‘to
have such games up there, and we were always
sure to get something nice to eat or some milk,
and then we were petted and fondled, and that
is very nice when there is not too much of it.
Mac used to like playing best, but I used to like
lying cosily in the sunshine in the big bay win-
dow looking out at the sea. I was rather a quiet
kitten, and that is why I was called Muriel, I
have heard. I never could understand why,
though; and it must be a peculiar name, for I
have never met another cat of the same name.

“T remember there was a great discussion about
our names. They talked of Tom and Tim, and
Muff and Fluff, and a dozen other names; but
at last I was called, as I have said, Muriel, and
my brother was called Mac, after the young
lady who took such a fancy to him. She was
Scotch, and her name began with Mac, as a
great many Scotch names do.
fatry Island. 51



“J think I had better describe Mac. He was
certainly a very fine, handsome kitten; every
one who saw him admired him. He had large
dark-blue eyes (as a kitten nearly all kittens
have blue eyes, but they change afterwards to
yellow or green); his coat was very dark, soft,
and beautifully marked ; his tail was splendid—
so long and bushy and glossy. He was very
lively, and full of fun and mischief; and he had
such graceful, pretty ways, one couldn’t help
loving him. I have often heard it said that I
was pretty, and affectionate, and gentle, for our
friends used to talk about us in our presence,
never thinking that perhaps it might not be
good for us to hear so much praise, and that we
might perhaps become vain; but I don’t think
that either Mac or I ever cared much for our
good looks, though no one can help feeling that
it is more pleasant to be called pretty and nice
than ugly and disagreeable.

“The ladies were very kind to us, and used
D
52 Katie Summers.



to give us plenty of playthings—balls and reels,
and many other things. But our games of hide-
and-seek were the best fun of all. There was a
large round table in the middle of the room,
with three legs and large brass claws at the end
of each, and these made first-rate hiding-places.
Then there was a large old-fashioned sofa, very
comfortable for a snooze, and underneath it was
a beautiful place for hiding. The window cur-
tains, too, were first-rate. Oh! it was fun to get
into them and roll oneself round and round in
them until it was quite difficult to get out again.
I used to hide, and Mac would come and look
for me; then when he had found me out we used
to scamper after each other round and round the
room, dodging under the legs of the big table,
and in and out through every place where we
could squeeze ourselves; and when at last Mac
caught me, we would roll over and over each
other till we were quite tired out, and then we
would jump into a nice, large, soft arm-chair,
Lary Island. 53



where we soon fell fast asleep. Mac was much
bolder than I was, and would often jump on the
table and bite the pens when one of the young
ladies happened to be writing, or would sit on
her shoulder watching her pen, and then would
suddenly make a dart at it. Sometimes he got
into trouble over it, for he would smudge the
wet writing with his paw or his tail, and then
he generally got a little pat on the head, and
was sent down on to the floor.

“One day, I remember, Mac got into dreadful
trouble. The house was an old-fashioned one;
and instead of the bells being rung by a little
handle fixed into the wall, as I have since seen
them, they were rung by pulling a bell-rope
which hung down from the ceiling nearly to the
floor. Well, on this day of which I am speak-
ing Mac was in a very mischievous mood, so he
said to me, ‘Wouldn’t it be fun to have a
swing on the bell-rope? I think Pll try’

“«Oh, don’t, Mac,’ I said ; ‘you know if you
54 Katie Summers.



hang on to it you will ring the bell; for I had
heard the young ladies say that the least little
pull made it ring.

“<«Well, and if it does, I don’t care,’ said Mac.

“T tried to persuade him not to do it, for I
was afraid he would get into trouble; but he was
determined, so he jumped up and caught hold
of the tassel with his two paws, and had such a
beautiful swing. We couldn’t hear the bell
ring, because it was right down in the kitchen,
and the doors were all shut; but presently the
servant tapped at the door and opened it.

“ thing ?’ she said.

“* No, thank you, Ann, answered the young
lady we knew as‘ Aunt Fanny,’ looking rather
surprised.

“Mac thought it fun, and went and had
another swing. Presently Ann came to the
door again and waited as if for orders.

“ Fairy Island. 55



“*Didn’t you, miss; then I suppose it was
the front door, but I certainly thought it was
this bell that rang ; and down went Ann again.

“T begged Mac not to do it again; but he
would, and up came Ann again, looking very
cross. Mac and I hid ourselves under the sofa.

«¢Please, miss,’ said Ann, ‘I looked at the
bells particular this time, and the one marked
“ drawing-room ” rang again just this minute.’

“Indeed! said Aunt Fanny ; ‘ well, J didn’t
ring it ;’ and, looking up, she saw the bell-rope
still swinging a little.

“¢QOh, I see what it is,’ she said, laughing; ‘ it’s
those naughty little kittens; they have been
swinging on the bell-rope. I am sorry they
have given you so much trouble, Ann. I must
punish them, or they will be doing it again.’

“Mac made me hide away behind the curtain,
for he said he wasn’t going to let me be whipped
for his fault; and then when I was quite hidden
he bid me keep quite quiet, no matter how
6 Katte Summers.

or



much Aunt Fanny called me; and then he went
up to her and rubbed himself against her; and
then, when she noticed him, he darted off to the
bell-rope as if he was going to ring the bell
again.

«“« Ah! she said, ‘so it was you, was it, Mac,
who rang the bell; I thought most likely it
wasn’t that quiet little Muriel; she hasn’t so
much mischief in her. Well, I’m very sorry,
but I must beat you to prevent your doing it
again.’ So saying, she took him up and showed
him the bell-rope, and then gave him a good
hard smack.

“Mac cried out, and I couldn’t bear to hear
him, so I rushed out from my hiding-place, and
came and mewed too, and licked him, and we
went away into a quiet corner, where I tried to
comfort him; and after he had cried a little, he
curled himself wp, and I purred him to sleep.

« After some weeks we heard that the young
ladies were going up to London, and were going
fairy Island. 57

to take us with them. They stroked us, and
told us that though they were not going to keep
us themselves they would often come and see us,
and we should be sure to be happy, because the
lady to whom we were going was very good and
kind, and was fond of cats. This lady had one
cat already, but she wanted another to keep him
company. We did not much like the idea of
going to strangers at first; but the thought of
seeing more of the world pleased Mac, and
where Mac went I was glad to go too.

“ At last everything was packed up, and the
day arrived for us to start. Mac and I were
put into a basket, just as if we had been so
much luggage. We did not like it at all, and
were very troublesome on our way to the station.
There was a great noise there, and we hardly
knew what to do with ourselves for fright, so
we thought the best thing was to remain as quiet
as possible. As soon as the train started our
basket was opened, and, as the young ladies had
58 vatie Summers.



the carriage all to themselves, we were allowed
to roam about and examine everything. We
thought it was a very funny place, and there
was a great noise, and the carriage shook so
much we couldn’t stand still. All at once there
was a dreadful noise like a shriek—I believe
they call it a whistle ; I was just preparing to
make a spring at Mac when we heard it, and
all of a sudden it became quite dark! I was
dreadfully frightened, but as nothing horrible
happened, I supposed it was all right, and I lay
quite still and shut my eyes. I don’t know how
long we were in the dark, but it must have
been a long time; and before we reached the
end of the tunnel my fright was nearly over, and
the next tunnel we came to didn’t frighten me
nearly so much, though the shriek the train
gives just before it goes into the dark is certainly
very startling.

“The rest of the journey was very pleasant ;
but before we reached London one of the young
Fairy Island. 59



ladies, whom we knew as ‘ Mary,’ got out, and
Aunt Fanny was left in charge of us two
kittens; and a nice task she had, too, for the
noise at London Bridge was so great, and there
were such a crowd of people, that Mac and I
were terrified, and struggled and scratched to
get out of the basket, though what we should
have done if we had escaped I’m sure I don’t
know.

“As we were going along, a man asked Aunt
Fanny for our tickets. Aunt Fanny had none
for us, and said so. ‘They are not dogs; they
are only cats. I never heard of taking a ticket
for a cat before,’ I heard her say; and she laughed,
for the man didn’t really mean it, I found out
afterwards. I must say I felt very much hurt
at being spoken of as ‘only a cat, as if a cat
wasn’t as good as a dog!

“Well, we got into a cab, and, after a long
drive, we arrived at a nice, cosy-looking little
house ; and the mistress, whose name was Lucy,
60 Katie Summers.



took us out of the basket, and stroked and car-
ressed us, and called us beauties, and then she
gave us some milk and a little meat, and put us
into a cupboard where there was a nice soft
little mat for our bed. We were very tired, and
glad to lie down, but we missed our dear mother’s
pretty song that she always used to sing to us
when we went to bed. We comforted each
other as well as we could, and Mac was very
kind, and tried to purr me to sleep; but he
couldn’t help feeling sad, and didn’t purr halfas
well as he generally did.

“The next morning, as soon as we awoke, we
washed ourselves, for our mother had taught us
to be clean, and then we went into the kitchen
to look about us. We found a big cat there,
and were rather frightened for him at first;
but he was very kind, though rather grave and
quiet. He asked us our names, and then he
told us his. It was ‘Winkles.’ I couldn’t help
laughing, for I thought it was the funniest name
Fairy [sland. 61
I had ever heard. After a time he grew very
fond of me because I was quiet; but he and
Mac were never good friends, because Mac was
so noisy and saucy, and would wake old
Winkles up out of his sleep and play with his
tail, and do all sorts of things that Winkles
didn’t like.

“ Our life in London was very quiet and plea-
sant: we had plenty to eat and drink, and were
liked by every one in the house. All went on
smoothly and well for some months. Mac
erew more handsome every month, and was ad-
mired by every one who saw him. One day he
didn’t come home to dinner. We thought he
must have gone to see a friend, or had gone for
alone walk. When tea-time passed and bed-
time came we were all very anxious about him,
and Lucy and I went all over the house and
garden calling for him, but he didn’t come,
and I had to go to bed without him. Oh, how
sad I felt! 1 couldn’t go to sleep for a long
62 Katie Summers.



time. At last, after mewing a great deal, I
dropped off to sleep.

“The next day we had another hunt, and the
day after; but Mac never came back, and to
this day I have never seen my dear brother
again. I only hope he has found a happy home
like mine.”

“There,” said Mrs. Marchwood, “is the end
of the history of the two little soft, fluffy, tabby
kittens.”

“ And is that really quite the end ?” said little
Lucy. “ Didn’t the poor pussy who was lost
ever come back again ?”

“Tm afraid not,” said her mamma. “I expect
he wandered away too far from his home, and
some one, seeing what a beautiful cat he was,
took him and kept him. But here comes papa
and the boys. I expect it is time we began to
think about tea.”


CHAP. V.—THE END OF A HAPPY DAY.

“YYYHERE, mamma!” cried Tom, throwing
down a big bundle of dry sticks; “those
are to make the water boil for tea.”

Mr. Marchwood and the boys began to fix up
some large sticks, gipsy fashion, to hang the
kettle over the fire; and then they put the small
dry sticks underneath, and set light to them,
and before long the water was boiling, ready for
making tea. Mrs. Marchwood and the girls
spread a cloth, and laid out the cake and fruit,
and they all sat down to tea; and then the
64 Katie Summers.



boys began to tell how they had been em-
ployed.

“We first went to a place at the other end of
the island,” said Harry, “where Uncle John
said he thought we should see some squirrels ;
and after keeping very quiet for a little while,
sure enough we saw a little brown creature
poking his nose out of a hole in a large tree,
Presently he came right out and ran along a
branch of the tree ever so fast, and then out
came another squirrel, and they played about for
a long while, until they saw us, and then they
darted back to their hole. Then we went with
Uncle John to the ford, and helped to put down
such beautiful big flat stepping-stones. I think
even Lucy will be able to go across alone now.”

“What have you been doing?” asked Tom of
his sister.

“First, we went and picked flowers, and then
mamma read us such a pretty story about two
dear little kittens.”
The End of a Happy Day. 65



“Kittens!” said Tom, rather scornfully ; “T
like stories about dogs and horses best.. When
I’m a man I intend to keep ever so many.”

“ How is my little patient?” asked Mr. March-
wood of Katie.

“Oh, he is very quiet,” said Katie, looking
into the basket; “but he doesn’t look very
happy.”

“TJ daresay not,” answered her uncle, smiling ;
“and I don’t suppose you would either if you
were alittle prisoner with a broken leg; but if
only he will keep quiet he will soon be well.”

Tea being finished, they left Nichols to pack
up the remains, and went to the other end of
the island to see the new stepping-stones at the
ford. They all went across, and agreed that the
new stones were very much better than the old
shaky ones, which were very slippery and almost
round.

They then walked slowly back to the boats,
where they found all was ready for starting, and,
66 Katie Summers.



taking their places as before, the happy party
returned to the farm.

There were still two hours before the time
fixed for Katie and Harry to return to their
home, but there was plenty for them to do in
that time. There were the ponies to visit, and
the cows and pigs, and a favourite old owl of
Tom’s, which sat up on a rafter in the barn and
blinked his eyes at the children. And while
Tom and Harry were amusing themselves about
the farmyard, the little girls went up to the
nursery to see Fanny’s dolls and their house,
and all the other toys which were to be found
in that delightful room.

But the happiest day must have an ending
and all too soon the carriage was at the door
Harry and Katie bid good-bye to their kind
aunt and uncle and cousins, and were put into
the carriage.

' “Take care of the invalid, Katie,” were her
uncle’s last words to her as Nichols drove off.
The End of a Happy Day. 67

“Oh,” said Harry, throwing himself back,
“T’m so tired; but what a jolly day we have
had !”

“ Ves,” answered his sister, “I don’t know
when I have enjoyed myself so much, and we
just did the very thing we wanted to. It was
so kind of aunt and uncle to take us all to the
Fairy Island. Poor little Dickey,” she added,
peeping into her basket; “if we hadn’t gone
there I shouldn’t have found you, and then per-
haps you would have died; but you mustn’t
die now, you must get strong and well, and I
will take great care of you; and when you are
quite strong you shall fly away if you like, but
T hope you won't.”

“Perhaps it won't,” said Harry; “for I re-
member hearing papa say one day that a man
once found a poor dog in the road, and he had
a broken leg, and the man took him home and
nursed him and made him quite well; and then,

as he didn’t want the dog, he gave him away to
E
68 Katie Summers.

a man who lived a long way off; but the dog
found his way back again, and wouldun’t be sent
away ; and so his master kept him. And one
day his master’s little child fell into the water
and would have been drowned, only the dog
jumped in after it and saved it.”

“That is a very pretty story,” said Katie.
“How fond his master must have been of the
dog after that. I shouldn’t think he would
ever want to part with him again. Buta bird
isn’t like a dog; and I expect when Dickey gets
well he will soon fly off, and I shall never see
him again.”

About a quarter of a mile from the house
they met their mamma and papa; and Mr.
Summers told Nichols that he need not come
any further, as the children could walk home
with him.

They had much to tell their parents of the
happy day they had spent, and Katie showed
the poor little wounded thrush. As soon as
The End of a Happy Day. 69



they reached home Mr. Summers hunted up an
old parrot’s cage, and Katie made a soft bed at
the bottom of it and laid the bird on it, and
when she had given it food and drink she left it
in a dark corner of the room so that it might go
to sleep.

“Oh, mamma, I have had such a very happy
day,” said Katie, as her mamma came to give
her her good-night kiss after she was in bed.

“Tam very glad to hear it, my darling,” said
her mamma, “because I’m quite sure you must
have been a good little girl, for only those who
are good are really happy ;” and with another
fond kiss her mother left her, and in a very few
minutes the happy, tired little girl was fast
asleep.

And J will tell you why it was that Katie
was always such a happy child: she was always
trying to please others, and to do what she
knew to be right. Arid she didn’t often fail,
because she didn’t trust to herself; but every
70 Katie Summers.

morning when she knelt down to say her prayers,
she asked God to help her to do what was right,
and not to let her forget that even if no one else
was near to see her, yet that God could see and
hear her always.

The next day the children went with their
mamma to see little Johnny Thompson, and
Harry took the rose-bush to give to him. They
found the poor little boy in bed, propped up with
pillows. He looked very thin, but his face was
flushed.

“Thank you, miss,” he said to Katie, “for the
beautiful strawberries you sent me yesterday—
they were so nice and cool and fresh. I have
still some of them left.”

Harry then put the pot with the rose-bush on
the little table by the boy’s bed, and said, “ Here
is a rose-tree for you, Johnny. Katie said you
would like that better than anything else I could
get for you.” .

“Indeed, Master Harry, you are very, very
The End of a Happy Day. 71



kind, and it’s just beautiful,” said the little fel-
low. “ Mother, dear, would you please hold it
quite close so that I can smell it well. Oh, it’s
beautiful! it’s so much better than flowers in a
glass, because they die soon; but this will live
a long while, perhaps longer than I shall.”

They soon bade him good-bye, for the poor
child was very weak and soon tired, and talking
made him cough.

About a week afterwards Johnny died, gently
and calmly ; and his mother, though she grieved
for the loss of her boy, felt comfort in thinking
he was happy, and would suffer no more pain.




CHAP. VI—THE BROKEN VASE.



wi OT many days after the visit of Harry and
ANG Katie to Grange Farm, Mrs. Marchwood
came to spend the afternoon with Mrs. Summers,
and brought Fanny with her. The day was hot,
and the two litle girls, soon finding it too hot
to play in the garden, came indoors to play
quietly with their dolls. Katie was busy mak-
ing a new frock for her doll out of an old piece
of silk her mamma had given her. Fanny sat
idly back in her chair and watched her.

“ What a pretty work-box !” she said to Katie.
The Broken Vase. 73



“Yes,” said her cousin ; “ papa brought it from
‘London for me, because he said I read so much
better than I did a little while ago. That was
because I got up half-an-hour earlier every
morning and read aloud to myself. I wanted
to get on with my reading, because it is so nice
to be able to read story-books to myself when
mamma is too busy or is out. And papa was
so pleased at my doing this, that he promised
to bring me a present from London. And when
he came home he gave me a parcel done up in
brown paper, and then in thin white paper ; and
when I had opened them, I found this lovely
box. Mamma showed me how to make a cover
for it; so when I am not using it I put the cover
on, and then it doesn’t get scratched.”

“TJ should like to iook at it,” said Fanny.

“Of course you may,” said Katie; and she
pushed it toward her cousin.

Fanny turned it over, looking at the scissors,
needle-case, bodkin, and all the things which go
74 Katie Summers.



to fit up a work-box. Then she lifted out the
tray, and underneath she found pieces of ribbon,
lace, silk, and muslin, which Katie’s mamma
had given her at different times for her doll.

“What a pretty piece of ribbon!” said Fanny,
taking up about a yard of bright blue ribbon,
which had never been used. “I wish I had a
piece like that; it would make such a beautiful
sash for Julia.”

Now, Katie had been storing up that piece of
ribbon very carefully for some time, and she had
intended to trim the new white muslin frock
she was going to make for her doll with it. She
quite understood from the way Fanny spoke
that she would like to have it; but Katie,
though she was an unselfish little girl, could
not make up her mind to part with the ribbon.

“ Did auntie give you this ribbon ?” continued
Fanny.

“Yes,” said Katie, “and I am going to trim
my doll’s new muslin frock with it.”
The Broken Vase. 75



“T wish it was mine,” said Fanny, enviously.
“See, Katie,” she added, drawing a pretty little
sweetie-box out of her pocket, and opening it—
“here are six chocolate creams, and you shall
have them all, if you will let me have the
ribbon.”

This was a great temptation to Katie, for she
was very fond of chocolate; but her mamma
didn’t like her to eat sweeties, so Katie, wisely,
would not even look at them. “No, Fanny,”
she said, “I mustn’t have the sweeties, because
mamma has forbidden me to eat them ever since
Harry was so ill with eating some nasty things
Freddy Brown gave him; she said they were
often coloured with poison, and all sorts of bad
things were mixed up inthem. When old Mrs.
Dewdney comes round, mamma buys some from
her, because she knows they are quite good,
for Mrs. Dewdney makes them herself. But
mamma wouldn't like me to take yours; so I'd
rather not, please, Fanny.”
76 Katie Summers.



“Well, you are very selfish,” said Fanny,
crossly ; and she moved away to the other end
of the room.

Katie thought this very unkind and unjust of
Fanny, for she didn’t see why she should give
up her treasured piece of ribbon just because
Fanny wanted it. She went on working quietly
for a few minutes, and then she said, “See,
Fanny, I will give you half; that will make a
nice sash for Julia, and then I can make my doll
a sash with the other half, perhaps it will look
as pretty as the trimming; anyhow, it doesn’t
much matter,” she added, with a little sigh, as
she thought how much she should have liked to
trim the frock all round the bottom.

Not getting an answer from Fanny, she looked
up, and saw her at the further end of the draw-
ing-room, standing on tip-toe in front of a
marble slab, over which there stood a large
looking-elass. Fanny was placing a rose under
the ribbon on her hair, and turning first one

The Broken Vase. ae



side and then the other to see how she looked;
presently she rested her elbow on the marble
slab, and bent over to get a better view of her-
self in the glass; and moving suddenly, her arm
touched one of the beautiful vases which stood
on the slab, and down it fell on the ground, and
was broken into a thousand pieces!

“Oh, Fanny! what have you done?” ex-
claimed Katie, running to her. “Mamma will
be so sorry; she is so fond of those vases, and
never lets me go near them, for fear I should
break them.”

Fanny burst into tears. “ What shall I do 2”
she cried ; “auntie will be so angry, and mamma
will be angry, too. Can’t we say it tumbled
down itself ?”

“Oh, no!” exclaimed Katie, shocked at the
idea of telling such a falsehood. “That would
be worse than breaking the vase.”

“T suppose you will go and tell auntie that I
did it,” said Fanny, angrily.
78 Katie Summers.

“No,” said Katie; “I shan’t tell her, but I
think you ought to tell her at once.”

At this moment the big dog, Lynn, came
bounding into the room through the open
window, and, seeing something was the matter,
came snuffing at the broken vase, and then
dashed off again, and came right against Mrs.
Summers, as she and Mrs. Marchwood came
slowly in from the garden.

“Gently, Lynn, gently; what business have
you in the drawing-room ?” said his mistress, as
she stroked his fine head. “That’s forbidden
ground to a great rough fellow like you. Ah!
he’s done some mischief, I fear,” she added, as
she stepped into the room, and saw the broken
vase, with the two little girls standing near.
Oh, dear! how did this happen?” she asked.

Fanny replied hastily, “ Lynn came jumping
into the room, and all at once we heard the
smash, and there was the vase on the floor !”

Mrs. Summers never doubted the truth of


The Broken Vase. 79



this, for Lynn had more than once done mischief
by bounding wildly about a room. He was a
great big staghound, much too large to come
into any room with safety; and he was young
and full of wild spirits, which made him still
more unfit for a drawing-room visitor.

Poor Katie blushed painfully as Fanny told
the untruth, but she did not like to say any-
thing. Fanny, too, blushed; but I am sorry to
say it was not with shame, but with fear lest
she should be found out.

Though Mrs. Summers did not doubt the
truth of what Fanny had said, her mamma did,
for she knew that her little girl was not a truth-
ful child, and she had several times been grieved
to find that she could not trust her. She did
not, however, say anything at the time, hoping
that if Fanny had indeed told a falsehood, she
would confess it of her own accord.

There was no more enjoyment for the little
girls that afternoon. Katie was miserable at
80 Katie Summers.



the thought of the story Fanny had told, and
feared she was herself to blame in having
known it was a falsehood and kept silence ;
and yet she did not like to tell on her cousin.
Fanny was uncomfortable, partly at the untruth
she had told, and still more because she feared
her mamma might somehow find it out.

Before very long Mrs. Marchwood said she
must be going, and told Fanny to get ready.
As soon as the children were upstairs Katie
burst into tears.

“ Oh, Fanny, dear! I do wish you had told the
truth, and said you broke the vase.”

“T daresay,” said Fanny, angrily. “I sup-
pose you want me to be punished. I don’t see
that it matters to you at all, and nobody got
blamed instead of me, not even Lynn; and
mamma will never know if you don’t tell her.”

“Oh!” said Katie, “but you told a story all
the same, and, whether auntie knows it or not,
God knows it. Dear Fanny, do—do tell auntie.
The Broken Vase. 81



I don’t think she will be very angry if you tell
her yourself; but if she is, I shouldn’t mind
that half as much, if I were you, as having her
kind to me, while all the time I was deceiving
her.”

“J shan’t do anything of the kind,” said
Fanny. “I think you are very disagreeable to
say such things.” So saying, she turned crossly
away, and went down stairs.

The pony chaise was brought round, and Mrs.
Marchwood drove away with her little girl.
The drive home was by no means pleasant to
Fanny. Her mamma talked a great deal about
the broken vase.

“Tt seems to me,” she said, “that it was a
very strange thing for Lynn to knock down that
vase. I can’t understand how he did it.”

“Oh, mamma! you know he is so rough and
so big; he is always doing some mischief or
other.”

“ Did you see him do it?” said her mamma,
82 Katie Summers.



“No,” said Fanny, “I didn’t see him do it;
but I heard it fall, and Lynn was close beside it.”

“Well, I confess I don’t understand it,” said
Mrs. Marchwood. “It’s very provoking, for the
vases are very valuable, and cannot easily be
replaced.”

Katie, in the meantime, had gone back with
her mamma into the drawing-room, and was
helping to pick up the broken pieces of the vase.

“Tam afraid,” said Mrs. Summers, “that it
is past mending. It is very annoying, for,
besides the vase being a very valuable one, it
was precious to me because your uncle Harry
sent me the pair just before he died. I must
take some means to prevent Lynn from getting
into the house, he is so dreadfully wild. How
did he do it? He must have put his paws up
on to the slab to be able to reach; he could
never have knocked that heavy vase down with
his tail, Did you see him do it, my dear ?”

Poor Katie turned very red. “No, mamma,
The Broken Vase. 83



I did not; but, please, if you don’t mind, I
would rather say nothing about it.”

Mrs. Summers looked at her little girl in
astonishment, and, seeing her look so confused
and uncomfortable, she began to guess a little at
the truth of the affair. She thought that Fanny
could not have told her quite the whole truth,
though she did not imagine she had altogether
invented a lie.

Mrs. Summers knew her little Katie too well
to suspect her of having any part in the accident.
She knew that if her little girl had had any-
thing to do with it she would at once have
owned to it. So, seeing Katie was uncomfort-
able about it for some reason, and guessing a
little of the truth, she would not press her to
tell on her cousin.

“Very well, my dear,” she said, “I think I
understand it now; but there is no need for you
to make yourself unhappy about it. You must

not blame yourself for the faults of others.”
EF


CHAP. VII.—PET MICE.

“ AMMA,” said Katie one day, “I met Mary
Jones to-day when I was out, and she
asked me if I would like to have some little
tame mice. She has two, and she wants to get
rid of them, because she is going to school.”
“Well, my dear, I have no objection to your
having them,” said her mamma, “only you must
remember they will want looking after, and you
already have a good many pets to attend to,
besides your dolls. By-the-by, how is the
thrush getting on ?”
Pet Mice, 85
“Oh, beautiful, mamma ; he hops about quite
nicely now. Papa took the splints off his leg
this morning, and Bustle—that’s to be his name
—seemed so pleased. I lett the door of his cage
open, and he camé out-and perched about, but
didn’t attempt to fly away. Papa said it would
be cruel to keep him shut up in a cage, because
he’s always been accustomed to be free; but if
he is so tame that he doesn’t care to fly away,
it will be very nice, won’t it?”
“Yes, it will,” answered her mamma; “but
what made you give him such a funny name ?”
“ Because he’s always in such a hurry about
everything, and pokes and fusses about in such
a funny way,” answered Katie. “ May I go this
afternoon and tell Mary I may have the mice ?”
“Yes, dear; and if Sarah ean go with you she
ean bring them for you. I suppose they are
kept in acage? Are they dormice ?”
“No, mamma ; one is quite black, with such
a lovely shiny coat—his name is Dandy; and
86 Katte Summers.



the other is grey, with little white tips to its
paws—her name is Dot. They are such pretty
little things, and so tame.”

“J will tell you a story about a mouse,” said
her mamma, “if you like.”

“Oh, do, please, mamma. Is it a true one?”

“Yes, quite true,” answered Mrs. Summers.
“When I was a girl of eighteen I was living
alone with my dear mother, who was a widow.
We always spent the morning in the sitting-
room, which faced the south, and so we got the
morning sun on it. My mother was a great
worker, and I was equally fond of writing, so
our mornings used generally to pass very quietly.

“One day,as I was sitting at my desk with
my pen in hand, thinking, I heard a little scratch,
scratch. ‘That sounds like a mouse,’ I said, and
listened again. There it was again—scratch,
scratch. A mouse, of course, it must be. So I
went to the cupboard, and taking out a biscuit,
I broke it up, and put it close by the place


Pet Mice. 87



where the sound had appeared to come from.
All was quiet then. No doubt mousie had
heard me moving.

“The next morning, before settling to my
writing, I put the crumbs of biscuit down, and
soon we heard mousie hard at work. This
happened for two or three days, and then one
morning, to my great delight, I found there was
a hole just large enough for a mouse to get
through, and all the crumbs which had been
near the place the day before were gone.

“Now, then, I thought, I shall soon have the
pleasure of seeing the little creature. I put
down the biscuit as usual, and went to my desk.
Soon I saw a tiny nose poking through the hole,
then two bright eyes appeared, and at length
the whole body of mousie came in view. He
looked round timidly, and then began nibbling
at the biscuit. After he had had enough he
went back to his hole. For more than a week
this went on, mousie getting bolder and bolder.
88 Katie Summers.



He would run all over the room, and appeared
to look at everything. He did not start as
at first, and run back to his hole if my mother
or I spoke. One day I tempted him to my
side with a piece of cheese. After that he
always came to me, and one day, to my great
amusement and delight, he ran up my dress and
got on to the table, and perched himself on the
top of my desk, just where a beam of sunlight
shone. This became a favourite place of his.
At eleven o'clock [ always used to take a little
lunch—a biscuit and cheese, and a glass of water;
and mousie used to take his share of the food,



and then dip his little nose into the glass of
water. I erew very fond of my pet mouse, and
he seemed tu be equally fond of me. He would
run up my sleeve aud nestle there, and some-
times perch hiiusclf on the top of my head, or
on my shoulder.

“One day a triend ef my mother’s called and
pressed us very much to go and stay a little
Pet Mice. 89
while with her in the country. The invitation
was accepted, and as our servant’s mother was
not well, we thought it would be a good oppor-
tunity to send Mary home to her mother for a
fortnight, and we could shut up the house.
When the time arrived for leaving, I arranged
as much as possible for the comfort of my little
mouse. I left my desk open, and put on it
two large biscuits and a saucer of water. This,
I thought, would last him till our return.

“We remained at our friend’s for a fortnight,
and enjoyed our visit very much. I often
thought of mousie, and wondered if he missed
me. We arrived at our home in the afternoon ;
so I knew there was no chance of seeing my pet
that day, as he never came except during the
two or three hours in the morning that I spent
in writing. I suppose he had his family to look
after; at all events, he never came but in the
morning.

“My first visit was to the sitting-room,
90 Katie Summers.

anxious to see if there had been food enough
for him during my absence. The first thing I
saw was mousie sitting in his old place on my
desk! I sprang towards him—he never moved.
I then touched him; he was stiff and cold.
Mousie was dead! I was so grieved that I
burst into tears.

“The biscuits were untouched, and there was
water in the saucer, so he had not died of
hunger or thirst. Though he was cold and stiff,
he could not, from the state he was in, have
been dead very long. Poor little mousie! very
likely he had come there day after day, hoping
to find me, and at last he must have died of grief.”

“Oh, mamma! what a sad ending to your
pretty story. How sorry you must have been
that you went on that visit.”

“Yes, I was,” replied Mrs. Summers ; “though,
of course, I couldn’t always remain at home for
the sake of poor mousie. However, it was no
use fretting about it; but I missed my little
Pet Mice. 91



companion very much for a long time. And
now, my dear, run and put on your hat, and go
with Sarah to fetch yournew pets beforetea-time.”

Katie soon returned with a little cage, in
which were the two mice; they were pretty
little creatures, and very tame. They did not
rush about frightened when Katie put her hand
into the cage, but let her stroke them and
take them out. They were clever little mice,
too, and learnt to do many pretty tricks. Some-
times Mr. Summers would take off his ring
and hold it a few inches up from the table,
and then he would call the mice by their names,
and they would jump through the ring one after
the other, as fast as possible.

One day, after they had been playing about
the room, Katie wanted to put them back to
their house, and called them. Dot came run-
ning up to her little mistress, but Dandy was
nowhere to be found, though Katie called and
called to him, and hunted for him in every place
92 Katte Summers.



she could think of. She was in great trouble
about him, fearing some cat must have caught
him. Poor little Dot, too, seemed sad at the
loss of her companion.

The next day Katie went to a cupboard where
she kept the food for her little pets, and there
in a big jar of meal she found Master Dandy.
He had, I suppose, scrambled in the day before
when the cupboard was open, and Katie, never
thinking that he was there, had put the cover
back on the jar, and shut up the cupboard.

What a guy he was, to be sure. His coat,
instead of being black and shiny, was a sort of
dirty white, and this made his bright black
eyes look brighter and blacker than ever. He
seemed very much ashamed of himself, and
rushed off at once to his cage, and, sitting up
on his hind legs, began to wash himself. Dot
seemed delighted to see him again, and began
licking him, and trying to help him to clean him-
self. After this Dandy never strayed away again.


CHAP. VIIIL—THE FALSEHOOD DISCOVERED.

“{\H, mamma! I can’t do this sum. I’ve tried

ever so many times, and it won’t come
right,” said Harry, as his mamma handed him
back his slate for the fourth time, the sum still
being wrong.

“No, Harry, I think you are not quite correct
in saying that you have tried to do it. Itisa
very simple sum, and just like the one you did
yesterday without much trouble. But little boys
who sit staring out of the window cannot expect
their sums to come right. Now, suppose you
94 Katie Summers.



come and sit here beside me, and turn your back
to the window, and give all your attention to
your sum; I think then you won’t find that it is
a difficult one.”

Harry did as his mother bade him, and very
soon he handed her his slate again.

“ Quite right this time,” she said. “Now you
see, Harry, I was right. The sum wasn’t really
too difficult for you, when you gave your whole
attention to it. Always try, my boy, to do
everything heartily. And now you may run
away and play, and I think I may say very
certainly that you will enjoy your game much
more now that you have conquered your diffi-
culty, than if I had let you put away your sum
unfinished.”

“Oh yes, mamma, I’m sure I shall,” he
replied at once; and, giving her a hearty kiss,
he bounded off, and was soon seen playing at
soldiers with Rover, the good-natured old dog,
who seemed to enjoy the fun as much as Harry.

The Falsehood discovered. 95

One day Mr. Summers, having heard of the
accident that had happened to the vase, and sup-
posing that it was Lynn who had broken it, said
to William, “ You must manage so that Lynn is
never allowed outside the dog’s house, excepting
when you are at hand to see that he does no
mischief. He rushed into the drawing-room
some days ago and broke a very valuable vase.”

William looked at his master quite astonished.
“Do you mean, sir, that vase that stood on the
little marble table,” he said, ‘that was broke a
week ago ?”

“ Yes,” answered Mr. Summers.

« Well, sir, you are quite mistaken in think-
ing Lynn broke it. It was Miss Fanny who did
it. I saw it all, for I was outside the window
trimming the rose and creepers on the house,
and I saw her stand on tip-toe before the glass
sticking a rose or something in her hair, and
somehow she knocked her elbow against the
vase, and it fell down smash. I saw it all, sir, I
96 Katie Summers.



assure you; and after a few minutes Lynn came
running up, and he went into the drawing-room.
I was just going to call him out, when cook came
and told me she wanted some vegetables cut at
once, and I went off and thought no more about
it.”

“Ah!” said Mr. Summers, “then there has
been some great mistake ;” and he went in and
told Mrs. Summers about it.

“ T ouessed there was something not quite true
about Fanny’s story,” she answered. “ Poor
Katie looked so very uncomfortable and un-
happy that I thought Fanuy had kept some-
thing back, but I did not imagine she could
have told such a deliberate untruth as that.
How grieved her mamma will be; for, of course,
I must tell her of this.”

In the afternoon Mrs. Summers drove over to
the Grange, and told her sister of what Mr.
Summers had learnt from William.

“ Ah!” she said, “I felt quite sure that Fanny
The Falsehood discovered. 97



was not telling me quite the truth. This is
very sad, indeed.”

After a little more conversation about Fanny,
Mrs. Summers rose to go away. “Shall you be
able to go with us to the sea-side this week ?”
she asked.

“T think not,” replied Mrs. Marchwood. “T
do not wish to give Fanny any treat just now;
she must be punished for this fault, or, I fear,
she will soon forget all about it. So I shall
remain at home with her. John will be able
to go, and nurse and the children; so you will
be a large party.”

After Mrs. Summers had left, Mrs. March-
wood called Fanny to her, and told her what
William had said about the accident to the
vase,

Fanny burst into tears. “Oh, mamma! it’s
all true,” she said. “I did break the vase ; and,
indeed, I’m very, very sorry I told such a story.
I’ve been so miserable ever since, and I was so
98 Katie Summers.



ashamed, I didn’t like to tell you the truth
afterwards.”

“Tt was, indeed, a grave sin, my child, and
one you might well be ashamed of; and by not
confessing it, you only increased your sin. But
tell me all about it,’ she added, kindly. .

“ Katie and I were playing in the drawing-
room. Katie was making a frock for her doll,
and I was looking over her work-box; and she
had such a lot of pretty things in it, and one
nice piece of blue ribbon, and I wanted it for a
sash for my doll. Katie told me she was going to
trim her doll’s frock with it; and when I asked
her to give it to me, she said she wanted it so
much herself, and I thought she was very cross ;
so I walked away to the other end of the room,
and there were some roses on the table, and I
took one up and wondered if I should look nice
with it stuck in my hair; so I went to the
looking-glass and tried it, and then I put it in
the other side to see which way looked best,
The Falsehood discovered. 99
and then somehow I knocked my arm against
the vase, and it fell down and broke. I was so
frightened, I didn’t know what to do; and just
then Lynn came in, and I thought it would be
a good plan to say he did it, because no one
could scold him for it, and I thought you and
auntie would be so angry with me if you knew
I had done it. Katie begged me not to say
what wasn’t true, and when we went upstairs
she begged me to tell the truth, but I was too
frightened. And, oh, mamma! I have been so
miserable ever since,” and the little girl again
burst into tears.

“T am glad indeed, my child, to think that
you could not be happy with such a sin lying
"on your conscience. And now, let us go-back
to the beginning, and see what all this evil
sprang from. First of all, you were covetous.
Katie had a pretty ribbon, and you wanted it ;
and because she wouldn’t part with it, you were

cross with her.”
G
100 Katie Sunimers.



19

“Oh, mamma!” interrupted Fanny, “I quite
forgot to tell you that Katie offered to give me
half the ribbon; but then I was busy looking
at myself, and I didn’t answer her.”

“T’m sure it was very kind and unselfish of
Katie,” said her mamma. “Then, because you
gave way to your ill-temper, you fell into
another temptation—that of vanity. I have
often warned you, my dear child, of that sin.
Because you happen to have a pretty face,
surely that is no reason for being vain. It was
not you who made yourself beautiful, but God;
and though beauty is a thing to be thankful
for, it is a talent as much as wealth or clever-
ness or position, and should be used to God’s
service as much as any other gift. And see
what evil your vanity led you into: by going to
the glass to see how you looked with a rose in
your hair, you broke the vase, and the know-
ledge that the accident happened through your
having given way to vanity made you a coward,
The Falsehood discovered. 101



and prompted you to tell a lie. See, my dear
child, how much evil has resulted from one
sin, which, I daresay, you thought no sin at all
—I mean that of coveting your cousin’s things.
Try and guard against the beginning of evil-
doing. You cannot do this in your own
strength; but you know that God is always
near you, and ready to help you, if you will
but ask Him. I do believe that this will be a
lesson to you through life; but I think it is for
your good that you should have some punish-
ment to help you to remember it. Your papa
and the children are going to the sea-side on
Thursday for a little while with your aunt and
uncle and cousins; but I shall remain at home,
and keep you with me.”

Fanny was in such distress about her fault,
that the punishment, though severe, did not
seem to her so very dreadful then; but when,
two days after, the whole party, except her
mamma and herself, were packed into the car-
102 Katie Summers.



riage, with boxes and hampers, Fanny longed
very, very much to be of the happy party. She
bade them good-bye, and watched them drive off,
and then ran up to her room, and, throwing her-
self on her knees by her bed, she sobbed bitterly,
and then she prayed to God to help her to
conquer her faults. She rose from her knees a
happier child, and, drying her eyes, she went
down to her mamma, who told her to get ready
to go for a walk with her.

The fortnight passed quickly to the little
people at the sea-side, and, as the weather was
so beautiful, it was arranged that they should
remain another week. Mrs. Summers wrote to
her sister begging her to come to them for that
week ; and Katie, too, begged so hard, that Mrs.
Marchwood agreed to go. Fanny had been
behaving very well. She had not much temp-
tation to do otherwise, living alone with her
kind and watchful mamma, and Mrs. March-
wood was anxious to see if her good behaviour
The Falsehood discovered. 103



would stand the test of a week of freedom
with her brothers and sister and little cousins.
Fanny’s delight was unbounded, and she thought
how good and kind it was of her dear mamma
to allow her to have such a delightful treat.
She had not been at all unhappy during the
fortnight she was at home, for her mamma had
been very, very kind to her, and had made her
a little companion in all her employments, and
Fanny thought she had never before loved her
mother half so much as she did now; but still
the thought of seeing all the others again, and
the sea, and all the pleasures of the sea-side,
was indeed charming to her.

The next day they left home. The journey
in the train was delightful to Fanny. She liked
to look out of the windows and watch the trees
and fields as they flew quickly past them.

Three hours of travelling brought them to
Barbridge, and at the station they found a large
party to meet them, who welcomed them with
104. Katie Summers.



delight. The trunk was sent on by the omnibus
to the lodgings, and Mrs. Marchwood and Fanny
preferred to walk. The country round was very
pretty ; the corn and barley were waving in
the fields, and the hedges were full of sweet
wild flowers. Fanny felt very happy as she
ran along the lanes with her cousins, there was
so much to tell her of the delights of the fort-
night they had spent at Barbridee. At last
they came in sight of the beautiful sea, lying
blue and calm before them. The bay was
covered with small fishing and pleasure boats,
and they rocked gently up and down with the
motion of the tiny waves.

There was a nice sloping beach, and at low
tide there was a large belt of beautiful sand,
where all sorts of shells were to be found; and,
when the tide was quite at the lowest, there was
a long ridge of sand stretching out ever so far
into the sea, and there the best shells of all
were to be found. And the fun of it was that
The Falsehood discovered, 105
you had to wade through a shallow stream of
water to reach this ridge; so the children used
to take off their shoes and stockings, and paddle
across this strip of water, and then they would
fill their baskets with the delicate shells—pink
and white—and then come back to the shore for
their shoes and stockings.

There were some very high cliffs about a mile
further along the shore. There was only one
place where you could climb up them, and there
some rough steps had been cut out; but it was
a very dangerous place, and the children had
never been there without Mr. Summers. The
cliffs and rocks ran out some little distance into
the sea, and made quite a little bay. When the
tide was low it was easy enough to get round,
but when the tide was high it was impossible
to pass. But unless the weather was rough,
there was always, even at hich tide, a little
strip of dry beach close up by the cliffs.

But to return to the children. After tea, the
106 Katie Summers,



tide being low, Katie, Fanny, and the rest took
their spades and went on to the sands, and fine
fun they had. Harry and Tom, with the help
of their sisters, built a castle of sand, and made
a thick wall round it, and a trench beyond
that, and then they fetched water in their little
buckets and filled the trench. When it was all
finished it was a very grand affair indeed.
Then they played at soldiers, and one party was
to try and take the castle from the other, and
there was great shouting and laughing and
fun over this, but it ended in the castle being
knocked to pieces. Not that that mattered
much, as Katie said, when little Lucy began to
cry about it; for if they had not broken it down,
the waves would have done it when the tide
came up, and they could easily build up another
to-morrow.


CHAP. IX.—A DANGEROUS ADVENTURE.

“YYOM,” said Lucy one day to her brother, as

he was playing in the garden in front of
the house where they were lodging, “ just guess
what I’ve got in my pinafore ?”

Tom guessed apples or pears, for they looked
round.

“No,” said Lucy, “it’s something alive. Only
look here ;’ and she held her pinafore a little
way open for him to see what was inside. And
there were two dear little white kittens just
like snowballs.
108 Katie Summers.



“ What pretty little things,” said Tom ; “ where
did you get them ?”

“Mrs. Smith gave them to me; she said I
might have them for my very own if I liked,
and mamma would let me. I have been giving
them some bread and milk, and they can eat quite
nicely. Their mother is dead, so I am going to
take care of them.” mamma found her very busy with a little basin
of water beside her, and a piece of soap and a
towel ; she was preparing to wash the kittens.

“Lucy, my dear, what are you doing ?”

“Washing the kittens, mamma,” she answered,
at the same time plunging one poor little snow-
ball into the water.

The kitten kicked and scratched and tried to
escape. Mrs. Marchwood took it out of the
water and began gently to dry it. “But, my
dear little girl,” she said, “you mustn’t wash a
kitten; don’t you know that cats can’t bear
water? and so it’s very cruel to put them into it.”
A Dangerous Adventure. 109



“ But, mamma,” said Lucy, “their mother is
dead, and so she won’t be able to wash them ;
and Mrs. Smith said I must be their little
mother; and if I don’t wash them they will get
so dirty. I made the water nice and warm, so
that they should like it.”

Mrs. Marchwood could not help smiling.
“My dear,” she said, “I have no doubt you
intended to be very kind, but I assure you little
Kitty will think you very cruel; she will soon
learn to lick herself, and so keep herself white.”

A few days after Fanny had come down, Mr.
Summers had promised the children to take
them as far as the cliffs, but some unexpected
business called both him and Mr. Marchwood
up to town. The children were much disap-
pointed at not being able to have their promised
treat, especially as they were to remain only
one day longer at the sea-side.

“JT think they might go with nurse,” said Mrs.
Marchwood ; “I don’t like disappointing little
110 Katie Summers.

people if I can help it, and T’m afraid we shall
have a change in the weather. If they don’t go
to-day, they may be unable to go to-morrow.”

So it was arranged that the children should
go with nurse.

The little party set off in high glee. They
went by the beach, intending to return by the
cliffs. They stopped so often on their way to
pick up shells and seaweed, that it was later than
they imagined before they reached the bay.
They sat down and refreshed themselves with
the fruit they had brought with them.

“What shall we play at ?” said Fanny.

“Shall we build a grotto ?” said Katie ; “see,
there are such a number of shells about here.”

“T should like to climb over the rocks,” said
Harry, “ and see if we can find any shrimps or
shell-fish in the little pools.”

Nurse agreed to allow the boys to go on the
rocks, while the little girls busied themselves in
building a grotto.
A Dangerous Adventure. 111



This occupied them a long time, and all were
so busy that no one noticed the change in the
weather.

Suddenly a faint “ Hurrah !” caused them all
to look up. Harry and Tom were on the top of
the cliffs, looking like two little specks in the
distance, having gone along the beach as far as
the steps, and so got to the top. They did not
notice that the tide had risen, but shouted to let
the others see where they were.

Nurse saw at once the danger to herself and
the little girls; the waves had risen so as to
shut them into the bay completely. The sea
was still some distance from them; but the
wind had risen, and the sea, instead of being
smooth and blue as when they started from
home, was lead-coloured and very rough. Once
out of the bay they would be safe, but it was
impossible to climb the tall straight rocks and
cliffs which surrounded them.

Nurse shouted at the top of her voice to the
112 Katie Summers.



boys, telling them to run as fast as they could
to get help ; but they were so far off, and the roar
of the sea drowned her voice. At last they
seemed to understand the danger, and ran wildly
towards home. Mrs. Summers, alarmed at the
change of the weather, had sent a carriage by
the cliff road to bring the party home ; she little
thought of the danger which threatened them.
Harry and Tom rushed into the house breath-
less; but they soon explained the danger that the
others were in, and Mrs. Summers and her
sister hastened to the beach. Old Sam, their
favourite boatman, was there. Few words were
necessary to make him understand what was
wanted; and, putting the shawls that Mrs.
Summers gave him into the boat with a spare
rope or two, he and his partner launched their
boat, though with some little difficulty. Mrs.
Summers was anxious to go with them, but this
old Sam would not allow, saying she had better
go home and get warm water and beds ready.
A Dangerous Adventure, 113

In the meantime, the party in the dangerous
bay were dreadfully terrified. Poor little Lucy
cried bitterly to nurse to take her home to
mamma, and not to let the cruel waves come over
her and drown her. Katie, though very pale
and frightened, was quiet, and tried to calm her
little cousin, telling her that God was near and
could take care of them.

Nurse found a little ledge in the rock which
could hold two children, and Fanny and Lucy
were put up there, and nurse wrapped her
shawl round the. Fanny wanted Katie to go
up instead of her, but she would not, so she
stayed on the beach with nurse. Soon the rain
came down in torrents, and each wave as it broke
covered them with spray, and the foam rushed
up round their feet. Then nurse put her back
firmly against the rock, and made Katie sit on
her shoulder, and so lifted her out of the wet ; and
she prayed that the help which they knew must
be coming might come soon, or it might be too
114 Katie Summers.



late. They were all getting cold and stiff with
the wet, when—oh, joy !—there appeared a boat
in sight! They shouted at the top of their
voices, though they could not be heard by Sam ;
but he saw them, and ran his boat into the bay.
The children were wrapped up in shawls, and
tenderly placed in the boat; then nurse got in ;
and, not without great difficulty, the boat was
pushed off.

As soon as Katie was in the boat, she bent
her head on nurse’s shoulder and fainted. The
poor nurse was very much frightened at first,
but she soon found that it was only a fainting fit.

The rain ceased as suddenly as it began, and,
though the wind was still violent, by the time
they reached Barbridge the sun was: shining.
Mrs. Marchwood and Mrs. Summers were on
the beach watching eagerly for them. Old
Sam sprang out and lifted the children gently
from the boat. When Mrs. Summers saw Katie
lying in nurse’s arms, she feared her child was
A Dangerous Adventure, 115



killed; but Sam hastened to say, “She’s all
right, marm; she’s only fainted, and a little
brandy and warm fire will soon set her all right,
pretty dear.” And taking her from the nurse,
he carried her up to the house himself, laid her
down in front of the kitchen fire, and began rub-
bing her little hands and feet. She soon opened
her eyes, and seeing her mother bending over
her, she smiled and said she felt better. Mrs.
Summers then thanked old Sam again, and bid-
ding him good-bye, pressed some gold pieces
into his hand; but he put them down on the
table.

“Thank you kindly, marm,” he said, “but I
couldn’t take it anyway; I don’t want to be
paid for doing what any man would have done.
There weren’t no danger at all, you see, to me ;”
but he added, “ perhaps I didn’t ought to refuse
my partner’s share, so I'll take that and give it
to him, by your leave ; for Jim has a large family

to look after, and he is poor.”
H
116 Katie Summers.



“Take it all, my good friend,” said Mrs. Sum-
mers; “that was intended only for yourself; and
since you won’t take it, I must find some other
way of showing my gratitude.”

So saying, she put the money again into his
hand, and he thanked her, and went away.

All the children were put into warm baths
and taken to bed. The next day none of them
seemed the worse of their adventure, except
Katie, who was pale and languid, and she com-
plained of pains all over her body. Mrs. Sum-
mers was alarmed, and sent for a doctor, who
said he feared she might be on the verge of some
illness, and advised her mamma to take her to
her own home at once, as in a day or two she
might not be able to be moved. So everything
was packed up and all made ready, so that they
might return home the same afternoon. Mr.
Summers and Mr. Marchwood went down to old
Sam’s cottage to bid him good-bye.

They thanked him for having saved the
A Dangerous Adventure, 117



children’s lives the day before; and then Mr.
Marchwood said, “ You have a little grandson
who isa clever boy, I hear, and you would wish
him to be something else than a fisherman ?”

“ Ay, sir,” replied Sam, “he’s got too much
brains to be only a fisherman; he’s so fond of
his books that I should like to send him to
school; he has learnt all he can at the Dame’s
school, and we haven’t any other in our village.”

“Well,” said Mr. Marchwood, “let me have
him for a year; I will send him to the best
school in our place; and if at the end of the year
he has done well, I will see about keeping him
there until he is old enough to do something for
himself.”

“You. must allow me to join in this work,”
said Mr. Summers. “It will, I trust, be a good
thing for your little grandson, and will give us
an opportunity of showing our gratitude for the
great service you rendered to us yesterday.”

The old man was deeply grateful. He called
118 Katie Summers.



his grandson, and told him what the gentlemen
intended todo forhim. Little Sam was a bright-
looking boy of eight, with fair curly hair and
bright blue eyes. He at first hung his head
rather shyly ; but when Mr. Summers put his
hand on his shoulder and spoke kindly to him,
asking him if he was willing to go, he looked
up and said, “Indeed, sir, I am very much
obliged to you, and shall like very much to go
to school, and learn to be a clever man. I don’t
like leaving granny and grandfather, though,” he
added ; “ but ’11 make haste and learn, and then
Tl be able to work for them ; shan’t I, sir ?”

“ Yes,” answered Mr. Summers; “ that will be
something to look forward to.”

And so it was agreed that in a week’s time
Sam should be sent to Mr. Marchwood.

Before leaving the cottage, Mr. Summers made
the old granny accept two sovereigns, in order
that she might be able to get little Sam some
new clothes, and a box to pack them in.
A Dangerous Adventure, 119

The journey home seemed very long to poor
little Katie, but she didn’t complain, though her
head was aching, and she felt very ill and tired.

As soon as they arrived at Myrtle Cottage,
Mrs. Summers put Katie to bed, and sent for -
the doctor, and before night the poor little girl
was in a high fever.

For many sad days and nights Mrs. Summers
watched by her little girl’s bed-side anxiously.
At last there was a slight improvement. Mrs.
Summers was watching her as usual, when she
saw that Katie ceased to toss about, and fell into
a sound sleep. She slept for many hours, and
when she awoke she knew her mamma, whom
she had not known for days and days before.

Mrs. Summers would not let her talk much;
indeed, she was too weak; and after taking her
medicine and a little jelly, she dropped off to
sleep again.

From that day Katie began to get better, and
was soon able to be moved from her bed to an


120 Katte Summers.



easy chair. And how she did enjoy the first day
that she was allowed to sit up, wrapped in shawls,
at the open window, and smell the sweet roses
and jessamine that peeped in! She was soon
tired though, and glad to be moved back to her
bed, for she was still very weak; but every day
she grew stronger, and was able to sit up longer.

The first day she was carried down stairs and
laid on the drawing-room sofa was a happy day
forall. Harry had been quite wild with delight.
He was careful, though, not to make a noise for
fear of disturbing Katie. He picked the sweetest
roses he could find, and put them into a vase on
a little table by the sofa; and then he fetched
her favourite picture-books and her -best doll,
and laid them on the table. Then her cousins
were allowed to come in and kiss her, but were
told not to talk for fear of tiring her. Little
Lucy, however, ran in and kissed her cousin,
and then, thrusting a little soft white ball into
Katie’s lap, said, “ There, Katie dear, that’s for
A Dangerous Adventure. 121



your own self;” and before Katie could thank
her, she had run away, leaving her little kitten
“Snowball.” Katie was delighted, and she
thought how very kind it was of Lucy to give it
to her, for she knew it was a great pet of her
little cousins. Little Snowball took to her new
mistress at once (for Katie was always kind to
dumb animals), and nestled down by her on the
sofa; and often when Katie was tired of her
dolls and her books, she was amused by watch-
ing the little kitten’s funny pranks and pretty
ways.

As soon as Katie was well enough to drive
out, her aunt invited her to stay for a week at
the Grange, thinking the change would do her
good. Katie didn’t like the idea of leaving her
mamma and papa and Harry for a whole week ;
but her mamma wished her to go, and promised
that Harry should ride over on his donkey every
day to see her. And so Katie went for her
week’s visit to the farm.
122 Katie Summers.



All her old friends were so pleased to see her
again.

The gardener always had some of the finest
fruit for her whenever she went into the garden,
and cook made her little puddings, and the
dairymaid brought her a cup of warm milk
every morning when the cows were milked ; and
every one petted her, and, as her mamma said,
did their best to spoil her. But Katie was nota
little girl likely to be spoilt with kindness; it
only made her grateful and anxious in her turn
to do all she could to please others.

Lucy was very much delighted at having
Katie with her for a whole week, for she was
very fond of her cousin. Katie was never
unkind, and never too much occupied with her
own pleasures to be able to attend to the little
girl.

Lucy was a funny little girl, and, as nurse
said, it was one person’s work to look after her,
for she was always in some mischief or other.

A Dangerous Adventure, 123



She was very fond of going into her mamma’s
bedroom whenever she could slip away without
nurse seeing her, and there she would busy her-
self looking at all the pretty things on the
dressing-table; and one day she found her
mamma’s shawl and bonnet and muff on the
bed, and she got hold of them and dressed herself
up in them, and then strutted off to show her-
self to nurse! She was very fond of her little
baby brother; but unfortunately she often,
without intending any harm, led him into mis-
chief. In her mamma’s bedroom there was a
large looking-glass called a cheval glass. One
day nurse missed the two little children, and
hunted all over the place for them. At last she
found them in their mamma’s room. Lucy was
showing her little brother his reflection in the
large glass. The little fellow not understanding
it, and seeing another little boy, as he thought,
ran up to him; his foot slipped, and down he

fell, bruising his poor little forehead, and knock-
H
124 Katie Summers.



ing out one of his front teeth. This happened
while Katie was on her visit to the Grange.
Poor Lucy was in great disgrace with nurse for
having led her little brother into such trouble,
and she ran to Katie for comfort; and Katie
went to nurse and begged her to forgive the
little girl So nurse, who never could resist
Katie, forgave Lucy, who promised “ never, never
to do any more mistip,” as she called it; but I’m
sorry to say poor Lucy got into many more
scrapes before she was as old as her cousin
Katie.

The week that Katie spent at Grange Farm
was a very pleasant one; but she was not sorry
to return to her own home, it was so pleasant
to have her dear mamma and papa and Harry
all to herself again, and to go for her old rambles
with Harry.


CHAP. X.—THE LITTLE ORPHAN.

‘eS Katie and Harry were going out for a
WR walk one day, they saw at the gate.a poor
woman, with a little girl about six years old by
her side. The woman was sitting down with
her face buried in her hands ; the little girl was
crying bitterly.

“What is the matter ?” said Katie; “why do
you cry so, little girl?”

“Mother’s so ill,” said the child, “and I’m so
tired and hungry, and we haven't got anything
to eat.”
126 Katte Summers.



Katie ran in to her mamma.

“Oh, mamma!” she said, “there is a poor
woman at the gate with a little girl, and they
are hungry and tired, and the little girl says her
mother is ill!”

“T will come and see,” said Mrs. Summers.
She touched the woman gently on the shoulder,
and asked what was the matter; but there was
no answer. She then raised the woman’s head,
and found she had fainted.

“Run, Harry,” said his mamma, “and tell
William to come here; and you, Katie, go and
ask cook to bring a little brandy.”

When it was brought, Mrs. Summers poured
a few drops down the woman’s throat, and
loosened her shawl and bonnet; she then had
her carried into the house and laid on a sofa.
She was evidently very ill, and Mrs. Summers
seeing this sent for the doctor. He said she
must be moved at once to the infirmary ; and
as he had his carriage at the gate he took
The Little Orphan. 127



her at once. The poor woman was still un-
conscious.

“JT will take charge of the little girl,” said
Mrs. Summers, “until we can learn more about
them. She appears a very respectable woman,
though poor.”

“T’m afraid it’s a very sad case,” said the
doctor. “I fear the poor little girl will soon be
motherless.” And he was right, for the same
night the poor worn-out woman passed away
without becoming conscious again. And so they
did not find out who she was, or where she
came from.

All the little girl could tell them was that her
own name was Mary, and that she and her father
and mother used to live in a litle cottage not
far from a big town, and that it was a great long
way from where she now was. One day her
mother told her her father was killed, and then
they had not enough to eat; and so her mother
told her they must go a long way and see if they
128 Katie Summers.

could find somebody, but she didn’t remember
who it was. She couldn’t tell what her father’s
occupation was, but she said he used to write a
ereat deal; and sometimes he would go away
for a week, and then come back again, and bring
her a doll or some other toy. She didn’t know
what her mother’s name was, except Fanny.
Her father always called her Fanny, and nobody
ever came to see them, so she hadn’t heard her
called by any other name. And that was all
they found out from the little girl after many
questions.

“T can’t quite make it out,” said Mrs. Summers
to her husband; “the child speaks so nicely, and
in every way seems above the class she appears
to belong to. There must be some mystery
attached to her, I think. And the woman too;
did you observe what an exceedingly beautiful
and delicate face she had? Perhaps she has
some papers about her which will tell us who
she is.” However, nothing was found, except
The Little Orphan. 129



the mark on her clothes, “ F. H.;” and the child’s
were marked “ M. H.”

Mr. Summers advertised in all the papers,
but to no purpose; and so it was agreed that
little Mary should remain at Myrtle Lodge, and
be brought up with Katie; for Mrs. Summers
could not bear the idea of sending the delicate
little child, who had so evidently been her
mother’s pride and darling, to the workhouse.

The poor little thing cried bitterly at losing
her mother, and it was some weeks before she
was quite comforted.

Every day showed more and more that she
was no common child, her manners were so
pretty ; and when she recovered from her grief
at the loss of her mother, she was as merry and
playful as a little kitten. She had such pretty
brown eyes and long soft curling hair, and her
skin was rather dark ; but she had such a pretty
bright red colour in her cheeks; so that altogether
she was a lovely child. But what was better
130 Katie Summers.



than being pretty was that she was such a dear,
good little girl; and very soon all the family
were as fond of her as if she really belonged to
them.

Katie was very fond of teaching her all she
knew; and as Mary was a quick child she was
not far behind her little teacher.

One day, when Mary had been living at
Myrtle Lodge about six months, a handsome
carriage and pair drove up to the gate, and an
old gentleman got out and asked to see Mrs.
Summers. He proved to be the grandfather of
Mary, whose other name was then found to be
Hudson. He was a very rich old gentleman,
and had been angry with his son for marrying
a young lady who was very beautiful and ami-
able, but poor; and so he hadn’t seen his son
ever since his marriage ; and instead of helping
the young people, he had refused to give them
any money at all. His son had never been
accustomed towork for his living, and so he found
The Little Orphan. 131



it hard to get employed. At last he thought of
writing books, but he didn’t get very much
money by that means; and one day, when he
went to London to see about some new book, he
met with an accident, and was taken to an
hospital, where he soon died. His poor wife
was on her way to see her father-in-law, whom
she wanted to take charge of her little girl while
she earned a living as a governess, when she
became ill, and was found by Katie at the gate.

Old Mr. Hudson had seen the death of his
son in some paper, and then, too late, he repented
of his unkindness to him. He hastened to try
and find out his daughter-in-law, but for a long
time without success. At last, one day he
chanced to hear something which made him
fancy that the poor woman who died and left a
little girl with Mrs. Summers might be the person
he was hunting for; and he came to see Mrs.
Summers, and found that it was so. The great
sorrow and remorse he felt when his son was
132 Katie Summers.



killed had quite changed him, and he was now
as gentle as before he was stern.

He was delighted with his little grand-
daughter. Katie and Mary were both called
into the room at the same time to see him, and
he guessed at once which was Mary, from her
likeness to her mother and father.

Poor Katie was terribly grieved at the thought
of losing her much-loved little companion ; but
Mr. Hudson said he should be only too glad if
Mrs. Summers would still keep the little girl
with her, as he had no lady relation to whom he
would care to trust her. Mrs. Summers gladly
promised to keep her and educate her with
Katie, for she had grown very fond of the little
orphan child. And so it was arranged that
Mary should remain in her present happy home ;
and every week the little people went to spend
a day at Greystone Court, which was the name
of the beautiful place where Mr. Hudson lived.
They soon grew fond of the kind old gentleman
Yo
os

The Little Orphan. te



who was always taking so much trouble to give
them pleasure; and he, watching the happy
children at play, or gathering them round him

‘while he told them stories, seemed to grow
younger as well as happier.

And now we must take leave of our little
friends. I may tell you that Katie grew up
with the same amiable, truthful, unselfish dis-
position that she had as a child ; that Harry was
his papa’s right hand; that Mary was a bless-
ing and a sunbeam to her grandfather in his
last years; and that Fanny continued to strive
earnestly to overcome her faults, and set an
example to her younger brothers and sister.

And so we will say farewell to them all.



Marcus Ward & Co.. Printers, Royal Ulster Works; Belfast.

HR SS)



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