Citation
The Burgomaster's daughter and other stories

Material Information

Title:
The Burgomaster's daughter and other stories
Creator:
Kingston, William Henry Giles, 1814-1880
Shipley, Mary E ( Mary Elizabeth ), b. 1842
Crockford, Gertrude
Hogg, John ( Publisher )
Evans, Edmund, 1826-1905 ( Engraver )
Bayes, Alfred Walter, 1832-1909 ( Illustrator )
J.S. Virtue and Co ( Printer )
Place of Publication:
London
Publisher:
John Hogg
Manufacturer:
J.S. Virtue and Co., Limited
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
285, [2], 32 p., [9] leaves of plates : ill. (some col.) ; 19 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Youth -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Children's stories ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1890 ( lcsh )
Publishers' catalogues -- 1890 ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1890
Genre:
Children's stories ( lcsh )
Publishers' catalogues ( rbgenr )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Approximate dates according to Brown, P. A. London publishers and printers, p. 209: Virtue (J.S.) & Co., Ltd. was located at 26 Ivy Lane & 294 City Road between 1881-99.
General Note:
Some illustrations engraved by E. Evans and some drawn by A.W. Bayes.
General Note:
Publisher's catalogue follows text.
Statement of Responsibility:
by W.H.G. Kingston, M.E. Shipley, Gertrude Crockford, and others ; with three coloured plates, six full page woodcuts, and twenty-one illustrations in the text.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
ALG3257 ( NOTIS )
60654455 ( OCLC )
026612129 ( AlephBibNum )

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BURGOMASTER’S DAUGHTER

AND OTHER STORIES

BY

W. H. G. KINGSTON, M. E. SHIPLEY,
GERTRUDE CROCKFORD,

AND OTHERS

WITH THREE COLOURED PLATES, SIX FULL-PAGE WOODCUTS, |
AND TWENTY-ONE ILLUSTRATIONS IN THE TEXT



' LONDON:
JOHN HOGG, 13, PATERNOSTER ROW



LONDON ;:
PRINTED BY J. S. VIRTUE AND CO., LIMITED,
CITY ROAD.



CONTENTS.

PAGE

THE BURGOMASTER’S DAUGHTER. . . . . Oo
In Hight Chapters. By W. H. G. Kinasron. |

MOFFAT, THE MISSIONARY . . . 2 . 53

Chapter I.—Colonists and Natives.
», L1.—The First Missionary to the Hottentots.
», III.—The Hottentot Chief.
», IV.—Africaner and the Missionaries,
V.—A Chapter of Travelling.
», WI.—A Hottentot Village.
»,- WII.—Another Aspect.
», VIIT.—Incidents of Travel.
5, IX.—Return to Cape Town.
ys X.—Conclusion.

THE GIANT’S GRAVE . . . , , , , . 101
In Four Chapters. By M. E. Surerey.

THE CHILDREN AND THE SAGE . . . . . 145

Part I.—The Children.
», I.—The Sage.

FRITZ . . . . . ; , . , ; . 191
By GrertrupE Crockrorp.

Chapter I.—All that was Saved. —
», LI.—The Likeness.
», III.—The Crowd.



1V CONTENTS.

PAGE

THE SHIP AND THE ISLAND. . . . .. . 239

Chapter I.—The “Bounty” sails for Tahiti—Collecting the
Bread-Fruit Plants—The Mutiny.

», LI.—The Boat-Party land at Tofoa—Attacked by
the Natives—Perilous Voyage—Extreme Suf-
ferings—Relief at New Holland—Return to
England.

», III.—The Mutineers at Toobouai—Return to Tahiti—
For Pitcairn’s Island—The Ship burned—
Quarrels, and their Fatal Consequences.

», iLV.—Further Disasters—Occupations and Improve-
ments.

» V.—The Island becomes known—The Natives—
Their Manners and Customs — Death of
Adams—Conclusion.

we eee



THE BURGOMASTER’S DAUGHTER.

BY WILLIAM H. G. KINGSTON.

0-05.92 0.0——ame

CHAPTER I.

CAVALIER, habited in a light suit of
armour, with breast-plate and back-piece,
a velvet cap and a waving plume on his
—_ssaa head, with a jewel-hilted sword by his side,
suspended by a rich scarf, was riding through the
streets of the ancient city of Antwerp. He was
followed by two stout men-at-arms, carrying sword,
and lance, and heavy pistols in their holsters. The
cavalier was young and handsome; the light moustache
on nis lip, and his beardless chin, showed that he
had only just entered manhood. His bearing, how-
ever, was bold and free, and a fire burned in his bright
blue eye as he gazed around, which showed that he
was capable of daring and noble deeds.

The sun was already sinking low, as was seen by
the deep shadows cast even across the wider places of
the city through which he rode. He was approaching
a handsome house, from the open windows of which ~
sounds of revelry proceeded. As he drew near,
the heads of several persons were protruded. One,
especially, who had a wine-cup in his hand, which
he quaffed off catching sight of him, exclaimed—

“What! Do my eyes deceive me? Marnix of





6 THE BURGOMASTER’S DAUGHTER.

Tholouse! You in Antwerp? Stay! stay! I pray
thee! Stay! I command thee. Come in hither and
drain a cup to our noble cause.”

The young cavalier at these words drew rein and
looked up at the window. The speaker, however,
to enforce his arguments, had already quitted it; and
while Marnix was gazing up, wondering what had
become of him, he found his horse’s head seized by
the former, who had at that moment issued from the
portal.

“IT rejoice to see you, my friend,” exclaimed
the gentleman who had just come out of the house ;
“TI thought you were still at college, going over the
dry tomes of the schoolmen, which I could never
abide. Come in, I say ; there are many friends who
will greet you, and you can tell us at the same moment
the cause of your appearance in this city.”

“Nay, Count Brederode, but that may not be
altogether what I desire to do,” answered the young
cavalier. ‘TI have an engagement, too, which I wish
to keep, and already the evening is drawing to a
close, and it is time that I should be at my hostelry.
However, I will tell you that I left college because I
consider that at the present time, those who love
their country ought to be preparing to use their swords
rather than their books and pens.”

“A noble sentiment, and worthy of you, Marnix,”
answered Count Brederode.

The last speaker was a man considerably more
advanced in life than Marnix of Thoulouse. Hard
living had already marked its lines on his countenance,
which was even now heated by the wine-cup. His
figure was tall and commanding, while a bold reckless
air and a loud hearty voice were the chief charac.
teristics of the man.



THE BURGOMASTER’S DAUGHTER. a

“Nay, I would not detain you many minutes,” he
continued, still holding Thoulouse’s bridle. “ Come but
for an instant and show yourself among our friends.
Quali but one cup, it will clear your brain rather than
confuse it, and then go your way and perform your
engagement. ‘To-morrow I hope to see you here;
we have matters of importance to discuss, and your
clear head and unbiassed opinion will be of value.”

The young cavalier, won over by the flatteries and
pressing invitation of his friend, called to one of his
attendants to take his horse, and, led by Count
Brederode, entered the house. He found himself
in another minute at the entrance of a banqueting
hall, in which a number of gaily-dressed cavaliers were
seated at along table, with wine-flasks and cups and a
dessert of numerous rich fruits placed before them.

«Welcome, Marnix of Thoulouse ! welcome !” cried
several, rising from their seats and warmly shaking
him by the hand. “ You have come to join us, as
your gallant brother has already done. We wish he
were here to welcome you also. We want more of
the young and noble blood of the land, since so many
of the older ones stand aloof, or look coldly at the
cause of liberty.”

© Priends,” said the young nobleman, “I am ready
to devote my sword, my heart, my very life’s blood to
the cause of my country! Though I do not remain
with you now, it is from no want of heartfelt sym-
pathy. J am one with you in any gallant work which
can tend to set our country free from the thraldom
which oppresses it.”

“Well said ! a noble sentiment!” exclaimed several
of the guests. “ We drink to your health, brave
Marnix.” The cups were filled, and the guests
rising, emptied them as they spoke.



8 THE BURGOMASTER’S DAUGHTER.

Young Marnix took a golden eup which Count
Brederode handed him, and holding it up answered,
“I thank you, gallant seniors, for the honour you do
me. Life is sweet, but yet I once more gay, that life
I will willingly sacrifice for the good of my country !
Again I thank you from my heart.” Saying this, he
put the cup to his lips and drained it slowly, re-
placing it on the table. His attitude was graceful
and gallant. “I now bid you farewell,” he added,
bowing as he spoke, and in spite of the appeals of the
count that he would stop and quaff another cup, he
retired from the room, and, remounting his horse,
continued his way through the city.

The period of which we are speaking, was the year
1565. Philip of Spain, at one time husband of Queen
Mary of England, ruled over not only Spain, but the
Netherlands and Low Countries; his sister, Margaret
of Parma, acting as Regent for him in the Netherlands.
Protestant principles had made great progress through-
out the latter part of King Philip’s dominions, and he
had come to the resolution of stamping them out by
sword and fire, and every means in his power. The
means he took were not such as to win the hearts of
his people, or indeed to gain his object. One of those
means was the establishment of the Inquisition, the
directors of which had power to seize any man,
woman, or child in the country, and to consign them,
with a mere mockery of trial, to death, either at the
stake, by drowning, or strangulation. These and other |
acts of the most cruel tyranny, had at length aroused
the spirits of a large portion of the population of all
degrees, Although a few of the greater nobles with
their followers still remained loyal to the king, a con-
siderable number of the lesser nobles, soon after this,
formed a League, by which they had bound themselves



THE BURGOMASTER’S DAUGHTER. 9

to sacrifice their properties and their lives, in an
attempt to restore liberty to their country. The docu-
ment which the members of the League had signed,
was known as the Compromise. They had, however,
taken the name of the Beggars, in consequence of a
remark made by a certain Count Berlaymont to the
Regent, when the Compromise was first presented,
“Is it possible that your Highness can entertain
fears of these Beggars, or Gueux?” He spoke thus
contemptuously of the confederates, because many
of them were the younger sons of noble families, and
others were men who were already nearly ruined by
extravagance. ‘I'he circumstances we are now describ-
ing, however, somewhat preceded that notable event.

Marnix hastened his pace—almost unconsciously—
his eye brightening, and a look of eagerness coming
over his countenance, as headvanced. Before him, on
one side of the Mere—a broad street in the centre of
the city—was a richly-ornamented house, at the deep
portal of which stood an armed man with halberd on
his shoulder, his buff coat showing that he was one of
the burgher-guard.

Marnix of Thoulouse drew up before the door, and
one of his attendants immediately riding up to his side,
he dismounted, “Go to the ‘Red Lion,’” he said,
“and order an apartment for me. I will sleep there
to-night, and should my brother or any other friend
come for me, say that I expect to be at the hostelry at
nine o’clock.”



CHAPTER ILI.

“Wao seek you here?” said the sturdy burgher-guard,
placing his halberd across the entrance.



10 THE BURGOMASTER’S DAUGHTER,

“The Burgomaster, Antony Van _ Straalen,”
answered Marnix.

“He is from home, and will not be back this
evening,” said the man-at-arms.

Marnix hesitated.

“I would pay my respects to his daughter, then,
the Lady Julie,” he said, and his voice trembled some- _
what as he pronounced the name. -

The guard eyed him from head to foot. |

“YT will call the Major-domo then,” he said; “I
can let no one pass without his permission when the
Burgomaster is from home.” |

The soldier rang a bell, which was answered by
a portly-looking personage, the usual porter of the
house. His eye brightened as he caught sight of
the young nobleman.

“Ts the Lady Julie in?” asked Marnix.

‘“ Ay, she is, for she seldom goes abroad,” answered
the porter; “I will call Master Cornelius. I do not
think he will refuse you admittance, although we are
obliged to be very particular at these times. We know
not what 1s going to happen. Reports of all sorts are
flying about, as thick as snow in December.”

“Well, my good friend Peter,” said Marnix,
“hasten, I pray thee, and get the required permission.”

The old porter toddled away as fast as his some-
what bulky lees could carry him, and meantime Marnix
paced impatiently up and down the hall. He was
rewarded, however, at length, by the appearance of
Master Cornelius, who, though not quite as stout as
Peter, was still of bulky proportions. The Major-domo
beckoned him upstairs through the door which Peter
had thrown open.

‘The young man sprang up the steps with a rapidity
which soon left the old steward behind. He appeared





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THE BURGOMASTER’S DAUGHTER. Il

to require no guide indeed. He took his way along
a& passage, at the end of which was an open door,
through which he passed into a handsome apartment
hung with rich damask. Vases of flowers stood on
the marble tables at the side between the silk-covered
seats which surrounded the room. At the further end
appeared a lady, tall and graceful, young, and fair as
any youth might wish to look on. Her light auburn
hair escaped in ringlets from beneath the golden band
which surrounded her head, while her costume was of
the richest and most elegant description. She had
risen from her seat as the footsteps of the young noble-
man had been heard on the stair, and she now advanced
across the room holding out her hands to meet him.
There was no coyness nor timidity in her manner ;
indeed, had any spectator been present, it would have
been seen that a thorough understanding existed already
between the youth and the maiden. It would have
been difficult indeed to have found a couple of more
attractive personal appearance, or more suited to each
other. The Lady Julie was probably a year or two
younger than Marnix, but had already attained the
perfection of womanhood—in his eyes, at all events
--and those eyes kept looking into hers with an
expression which showed his devoted love and admira-
ion.

Thus they sat for some time, talking of matters of
deep interest to themselves, whatever the world at large
vight have thought of them.

“The Burgomaster is as kind as he is generous
and noble,” said Marnix. “ He will not, on account
of the troubles which have overtaken our country,
object to our marriage at the time we had hoped.
You will plead for me, will you not, Julie? The
feeling that. I have you to fight for, and the right to



12 THE BURGOMASTER’S DAUGHTER.

protect you, will nerve my arm and give wisdom to my
mind, should I be called to join the counsels of the
patriots.”

“Yes, I will plead,” answered Julie; “ for truly, so
occupied in the affairs of State is my father, that he has
but little time for my society ; and I will tell him that
he will find far more assistance from a son, than a
daughter can hope to afford.”

It had been proposed that the marriage of the
young people should take place a short time from the
period of which we are speaking ; but the Burgomaster
had of late shown an anxiety to put it off, on the plea
that the state of the country was not suitable for
marrying and giving in marriage. It had not, indeed,
hitherto been made known, except to the immediate
relations of the family.

The kind-hearted Burgomaster was not likely,
however, his daughter well knew, to resist her
appeals, though he would rather have selected for
her, if not a more wealthy, an older and more
experienced husband than the young Marnix of
Thoulouse. Still, the gallant bearing, the generosity,
and intelligence of the young nobleman, had won upon
his affections, and already he had begun to regard him
as his son. The young people, therefore, parted in the
evening without any serious apprehension that their —
marriage would be deferred.

On reaching the ‘ Red Lion,” Marnix found his
brother, Philip of St. Aldegonde, a man considerably
older than himself, and one of the most accomplished
persons of his age. He had already gained renown ag
a poet of much imagination, and as a prose writer
whose style was unsurpassed by any of his contem-
poraries. ‘Trained to arms from his earliest youth, he



THE BURGOMASTER’S DAUGHTER. =~18

was an accomplished soldier, and at the same time
an ardent patriot.

* Congratulate me, my dear brother,” said Marnix,
as he greeted him. “My happiness will soon be
secured, and with Julie mine, I feel capable of en-
countering all the foes of our country.”

The elder brother smiled at the enthusiasm of the
younger.

“I rejoice with you,” he said, “ but—— ”’

“Nay, but have no buts, brother,” said Marnix;
“it is an expression I would were banished from the
language of mortals. Shall you be at the meeting
to-morrow with Brederode ? ”

“Yes; but I would advise you, Marnix, to avoid
associating too closely with that man. He is honest, I -
grant you, but he has no judgment, and he is more
likely to lead others into useless danger and difficulty,
than to advance the cause he so loudly advocates.”

“ But I thought, my dear brother, that you your-
self were closely united with him. He surely is one of
the most conspicuous supporters of the Compromise,
which you yourself are said to have drawn up.”

“Yes, because we are not in a position to decline
the services of even so boisterous a supporter,” said
Philip ; “but I would warn you rather to avoid any
private enterprise he may propose. Of the great public
object we all advocate, there is no doubt.”

The young Marnix promised to be cautious. It
would have been well-for him had he been so.

The next morning the two brothers attended a
meeting of the confederates at the house where Count
Brederode had taken up his abode during his residence
at Antwerp.

Marnix waited impatiently till it was over, that he
might repair to the house of the Burgomaster. He



14 THE BURGOMASTER’S DAUGHTER.

entered without being announced, as the servants had
had the acuteness to discover that he was a welcome
guest. He was met, however, on the top of the stair by
Master Cornelius—the steward—whose countenance
wore a look of embarrassment.

“There is a cavalier here,” he said, ‘a Spaniard
by his appearance, and his name—Don Alberic Lodron.
He is even now in the presence of the Lady Julie, and
our lord the Burgomaster. What is object is, I do
not know for a certainty, but I have been told that he
has watched the Lady Julie on several occasions when
she has ridden out, and cast looks of deep admiration
at her. He has come to the house more than once
without being admitted; and I know not why, but I
fear that something unpleasant may occur. I know
what these Spaniards are—very fierce and revengeful
if their wishes are opposed, and I tell you it is through
affection and respect for you, my dear young master,
that you may be prepared.” Much more to the same
effect the old steward uttered, till, indeed, he some-
what tried the temper of Marnix.

“Fear not for me, nor for your young mistress,”
answered the young nobleman. “I care little what
the audacious Spaniard may threaten or do. I beg
that you will announce me, that | may meet him face
to face.”

Somewhat unwillingly, therefore, the steward led
che way into the reception hall, where, on a high-
backed, richly-carved chair, sat Julie, the picture of
modest reserve. On one side sat her father—a digni-
fied, portly man of middle age, his handsome counte-
nance indicative of benignity and intelligence; while
on the other, holding his feathered beaver in his hand,
was a handsomely-dressed cavalier, who was at this
moment earnestly addressing the young lady. Her



THE BURGOMASTER’S DAUGHTER. 15

eye brightened as she saw Marnix, and rising from
her seat, she advanced almost involuntarily towards
him. Then beckoning him to a chair near that of her
father, she returned to her seat. The Spaniard cast an
inquisitive and somewhat angry glance at the young
people.

‘Your brother, I presume?” said the Spaniard, in
a tone which sounded particularly impertinent in
Julie’s ear.

“No, but a friend I esteem, Don Alberic,”?
answered the young lady, somewhat scornfully.

“Don Alberic has come to invite my daughter and
me to a tournament, which is to take place at Brussels
in a few days, in honour of the marriage of the Prince
Alexander and Donna Maria of Portugal; but I know
not whether she is disposed to go. For myself, my
duties are so onerous, that in spite of the honour done
me by the invitation, it may be difficult for me to
accept it.”

- “But surely the young lady, with so gallant a
cavalier as the gentleman I see before me to attend on
her, will be able to come,’”’ said the Spaniard, bowing
towards the Lady Julie.

“We are not ungrateful for your courtesy, Don
Alberic,” said the young lady, “and as I have never
seen such a spectacle, I may possibly, with the attend-
ant you propose, be able to be present.”

Don Alberic cast an inquiring glance towards the
Lady Julie, as if he could not clearly understand the
meaning of her remark. He, however, was too much
a man of the world, not to be aware that it was
time for him to bring his visit to a close. Rising,
therefore, and making numerous bows, he began to
retire along the room towards the door, followed by
the Burgomaster, who in courtesy attended him to the



16 THE BURGOMASTER’S DAUGHTER.

foot of the stairs. The young people laughed heartily
at the way the Spaniard had been mystified. They
were little thinking of the evil feelings which had
been aroused in his heart.

“Tt will be truly, Marnix, a pleasant excursion
to see this grand tournament. Will you take me
there?” said Julie.

‘ Marnix promised to do so, for it was to occur some
short time after their proposed marriage; and now, as
young people are apt to do, they looked forward with
eagerness to that happy event.

CHAPTER III.

Tue marriage of Marnix of Thoulouse and the fair
daughter of the Burgomaster of Antwerp took place,
according to the Lutheran form, in the house of the
bride’s father. Julie was always lovely; she looked
more lovely still; and though her bridesmaids were
among the fairest of the fair daughters of the
principal inhabitants of Antwerp, none equalled her
in beauty.

The gallant young noble looked forward to a
life of unalloyed happiness in the company of his
beautiful bride. Happy it is for man that he does
not know what is in store for him. Marnix thought
not at the moment of the troubled state of the country,
nor that he himself was pledged to draw his sword in
its defence, and that when the sword is drawn, no
man can tell in whose bosom it may be sheathed.

The Burgomaster, on second thoughts, had resolved
to attend the tournament, knowing that on account of
his religious principles his loyalty might be suspected,



THE BURGOMASTER’S DAUGHTER. 17

and wishing, therefore, to show all due respect to tho
family of his sovereign.

Three days before the tournament, the Burgo- ©
master, accompanied by his daughter and son-in-law,
with several attendants, all handsomely attired, as
became his position as chief magistrate of the important
city of Antwerp, set out for Brussels.

Brussels was then, as now, a fine city, containing
many magnificent palaces, and surrounded by forests
full of game. : ) |

The lists were formed in the great market-place
of the city; here all the principal persons then in
the Netherlands were present. Nothing could exceed
the magnificence of the arrangements. Seats covered
with damask formed a vast amphitheatre, while the
banners of the various knights and their retainers
were planted on either side. At one end, marked by
the richness of the banners. the judges of the jousts
took their seats. They w »the Duke of Parma, the
Duke of Aershot, and Cc.mt Eemont. In their midst
sat the lady of the lists, from whose fair hands the
winners of prizes were to receive their rewards.

Where there were so many great and noble people,
the Burgomaster of Antwerp and his family took but
a comparatively humble place, yet it was sufficiently
conspicuous to be seen from the lists, the Lady Julie
being seated between her husband and father. From
the richness and fashion of her dress it might have
been suspected that she was married, although her
- wedding had been so quiet that the event might pro.
bably not have been known in Brussels. Spectators
were thronging to their seats through the various en-
trances, while every window, and every spot whence a
view could be obtained from the surrounding houses,
were crowded with eager gazers. Now the trumpets

B



18 THE BURGOMASTER S DAUGHTER.

sounded, and the knights, in gorgeous armour, rode
into the lists. Among the most conspicuous was the
Count Louis of Nassau, the brother of the Prince
of Orange. Though of slight figure, and somewhat
small of stature, he bore himself with grace and
elegance on horseback, having complete command
over his steed. Count Bossu appeared in a dark suit
of armour; stout of limb, and with fine proportions,
he appeared well able to do battle in the lists. Then,
too, came Philip de Lannoy, Seigneur de Beauvoir,
the commander of the Duchess’s body-guard in
Brussels. He had already gained renown in arms,
and was a champion few but the most dextrous would
have wished to encounter. Count Mansfield rode
into the lists accompanied by his son Charles, acknow-
ledged among his compeers as one of the most
expert knights in the use of lance and sword.

There were Spanish as well.as Flemish knights.
Among the most gallant m appearance was Don
Alberic Lodron, accompanied by his friend, Don
Sancho de Lodrono; indeed, on this occasion, men
of very opposite parties assembled to encounter each
other, some, perhaps, anxious to meet on a more
bloody and desperate field, in the work of real
warfare. The Seleneur de Beauvoir made the most
splendid appearance, with his jewelled armour and his
attendant squires.

Now the trumpets sounded, and Count Mansfield
and his son challenged one and all who might choos
to engage in the mimic combat. Two knights
answered the challenge. Again the trumpets sounded,
and both the parties dashing forward the Count and
his son unhorsed their opponents. Among the Spanish
knights, Don Alberic Lodron bore himself g allantly,

Hach knight was desirous to select ® lady, for



a Yr Aa —o ’ 3 f
THE PURCOMASTER’S - DAUGHTER, 19

the superiority of whose charms he was ready to do
battle. As the knights were seen riding round the lists,
gizing up towards the fair ones who were witnesses
or their gallantry and hardihood, Don Alberic drew
up his horse in front of the seats occupied by the
Burgomaster and his family. Bowing low, the Spanish
knight presented her with a bouquet, expecting in
return to receive her glove that he might fasten
ij in his helmet. She declined, however, taking: it
off, acknowledging his salutation only with a formal
bow.

Anger and annoyance were depicted on his coun-
tenanco—the visors of the knights were raised for the
occasion, it should be said. Waiting for a moment,
as if to ascertain that ho was not mistaken, he spurred
on his charger, and continued his course round the
lists.

The single combats having been brought to a con-
clusion, Count Charles of Mansfield being declared the
most successful, Count Louis of Nassau and Count
Bossu being but little behind him, preparations were
mace fora general combat, in which all the knights
were to arrange themselves in two parties, under
respective leaders. More than once during the fights
Marnix had with difficulty kept his seat.

“T would that I were among those gallant gentle-
men,” he could not help exclaiming; “and yet, after all,
it is but a mimic fight, and except to gain experience,
it may be folly to exhaust one’s strength when it may
be required for the real work of war.”

Julie smiled on her husband, “Tam afraid that I
am the cause of your being a spectator instead of an
actor on the scene,’ she said,

‘ No, no, indecd,” he answered; “TI have had bub
little practice in such work, and I fear, Julie, you



9() THE BURGOMASTER’S DAUGHTER.

would not have cause to be proud of the prowess of
your true knight. Iam happier far by thy side; still,
I own I should like to have broken a lance with that
haughty Spaniard who seemed so indignant just now
that you would not honour him by selecting him as
your true knight.” |

While they were speaking, the trumpets again
sounded, and the two parties of knights, each consist-
ing of about thirty, one led by Louis of Nassau, the
other by Count Bossu, drew up on opposite sides. The
Seigneur de Beauvoir and Don Alberic had arranged
themselves under the banner of the Count of Bossu,
while Count Charles of Mansfield supported his friend
Count Louis of Nassau. Once more the trumpets
sounded, and the knights met in the centre of the
lists with a shock which made the very ground shake,
and amid clouds of dust caused by the horses’ hoofs,
they were seen struggling desperately ; some unhorsed,
lay on the ground, others with spears broken were
waving their swords, which rung against the shields of
their opponents. The most conspicuous for his activity
was the gallant Count Louis of Nassau. His spear
had been broken in unhorsing his first opponent, and
now he was wheeling in and out, and dashing here and
there like a meteor, dealing blows which hurled many
of the opposite party to the ground. As blunt weapons
only had been used, and the swords were pointless, no
desperate wounds had been inflicted, although many of
the knights were more or less bruised or otherwise hurt
by their overthrow.

The young bride was thankful when the sports
cametoan end. They were, in truth, notin accordance
with her taste. She had not expected to sce so serious
a struggle as was taking place. The exhibition,
indeed, brilliant and exciting as it was, was too much



TUE BURGOMASTER’S DAUGHTER. 21

like a svene of real warfare to afford pleasure to a
sensitive mind. The combats, however, were very
different to those of former years, when sharp swords
and pointed lances were used, and many a knight lost
his life in the strugele.

A grand supper was given by the city of Brussels
in the Hotel de Ville on that evening, in honour of the
royal marriage, when the prizes gained at the tourna-
ment were bestowed on the successful knights. The
Burgomaster and his family were of course among the
guests. Nothing could exceed its magnificence, but
amid all the apparent hilarity, many hearts ached
when thoughts of the unhappy state of the country
would unbidden arise.

CHAPTER IY,

Next morning, the Burgomaster, accompanied by
Marnix and Julie, returned to Antwerp. They had
proceeded some distance on their way, when the
sound of horses’ hoofs were heard behind them, and
a party of cavaliers was seen coming along the road.
Ihe travellers drew up a little way on one side, to
allow the more active-moving cavaliers to pass, when
aloud, hearty voice proceeded from one of them :—

“What! Marnix! Is it true, then, that you have
become a Knight of St. Benedict? Introduce me, I
pray, to your fair lady, and to her honoured father,
who, I conclude, I see before me.”

It was Count Brederode who spoke. Marnix went
through the usual ceremony, the companions of the
Count at the same time doffine their plumed beavers
in token of respect.



22 TILE BURGOMASTER’S DAUGHTER.

“You are indeed a fortunate fellow,” said Brede-
rode, as he rode up alongside Marnix, in a voice
sufficiently loud, however, for Julie to hear. “ You
will, L fear, be less inclined than before to join the
ranks of the patriots.”

. “Qn the contrary, I have more to fight for,”
answered Marnix. ‘lam loyal toa right cause, and
hope that nothing will seduce me from it.”

Probably the Burgomaster would have been glad
to be rid of his new companion, but without disconr-
tesy he could not either drop behind and bee them to
proceed at a faster pace, or avoid them altogether.
Thus, towards evening, the whole party rode into
Antwerp, and the intimacy of the Burgomaster with
the plotting, boisterous Count Brederode was remarked
by many. Jt was indeed an anxious time for Antony
Van Straalen. He knew well all that was taking place
in the country, and felt very sure that ere long there
would be afearful outbreak.

The young couple, however, for a short time en-
joyed unmitigated happiness. They were well aware
that disturbances were likely to break out, but, with
the sanguine temperament of youth, they hoped that
the clouds would quickly be dispersed, and the sun
shine forth again on their native land. ‘Thus, when-
ever they spoke of the future, they allowed their fecl-
ings to colour it with bright and beautiful tints. Stall,
to thoughtful minds, the present was truly dark and
depressing. T'o worship God according to the dictates
of conscience is one of the chief rights of man. Of that
right Philip had been using every effort to deprive
his subjects inthe Netherlands. The fearful Inquisi-
tion, as has been said, had been established throughout
the country, and, though occasionally its ministers



THE BURGOMASTER’S DAUGHTER, 88

seemed to relax in their labours, every lull was stro
to be followed by a still fiercer persecution.

Prohibited from worshipping in the churches, the
people had sought the fields and open country, where
they might hear the preachers whose opinions they
followed, and where they might praise God and pray
as they were disposed. At those meetings, which
many thousands of persons attended, most of the men
were armed, to defend themselves against any attacks
of the officers of government. Even in the very
neighbourhood of Antwerp these camp gatherings were
held, when preachers of great power and ability ad-
dressed them. ‘To these mectings, Marnix, on several
occasions, took his bride, and they tended not a little
to increase his enthusiasm, and to inspire her with the
same love of the truth and hatred of tyranny which
animated his bosom.

At length an event occurred at Antwerp which
was sure to draw down upon the inhabitants the
fury of the ruling powers. ‘The mob arose, and
breaking ito the churches, a small body of the
most determined attacked the images and ornaments
with which they were crowded, breaking them in
pieces, or utterly defacing them. Meantime the
League was gaining strength and numbers, and the
whole country seemed ready to rise in arms in defence
of its hberties. The Prince of Orange had for long
been watching with a calm and sagacious eye the
current of events. No more true patriot existed in
the country, but it had appeared to him that the time
of action had not yet arrived. There was indignation
and excitement enough, but union was wanting among
the people, and their oppressors were powerful. ‘This
the latter soon showed by recommencing the system
of persecution. Once more, men, women. and even



24 HE BURGOMASTER’S DAUGHTER.

children, were dragged from their homes, and, being
accused of heresy, were put to death by the authori-
ties of the Inquisition in the most cruel manner. The
preachers had to fly the country or to go into hiding.
Vast numbers of persons who could manage to escape,
left their native shores and went to England. The
‘larger proportion were manufacturers and artisans,
who took their talents and their arts to the country
which gave them an asylum, and there established
those manufactures which have contributed so much
to make England great, powerful, and free. There
were weavers in linen, in wool, and silk, paper manu-
facturers, workers in iron and all sorts of metals, who
not only practised the trade themselves, but instructed
the English in their own arts; so that not only were
the articles which England required produced in the
country, but she was able to supply foreign nations,
which had hitherto been furnished with those manu-
factures from the Netherlands. ‘The Prince of Orange
already began to see that the time was fast approach.
ing when, if he would save his country from utter
destruction, he must draw the sword in its defence.
Other less cautious, or more enthusiastic persons,
began to take up arms. Among the foremost was
Count Brederode. The larger part of the population
of Antwerp was in a state of violent commotion, and the
Regent, fearful of a general outbreak, had entreated
the Prince of Orange to go to the city and endeavour to
quell it. Count Brederode had been scouring the neigh-
bouring country to collect an army, eager to be the
first in the field to oppose the Imperial forces. Already
he had assembled some thousand men, but they had
to be disciplined, and arms and ammunition were to be
collected. Their immediate object was to march to
the relief of the town of Valenciennes, ‘That city,



THE BURGOMASTER’S DAUGHTER. 95

pleasantly situated in a fertile valley, with the Scheldt
Howing through its centre, near the border of France,
was surrounded with strong fortifications and deep
moats. Here Guido de Bray, and Peregrine de la
Grange, two celebrated preachers, had been the means
of bringing the larger part of the population to the
Protestant faith. The government had insisted on
their receiving a garrison, which the inhabitants had
refused doing. It was therefore invested by an army
under Count Hemont and the Duke of Aershot, who
threatened utter destruction to the inhabitants for
their rebellion and heresy. Marnix of Thoulouse had
been longing to take a part in the struggle which was
about to commence. Again Count Brederode made
his appearance at Antwerp. Julic herself had become
as enthusiastic as her young husband. ‘The cruelties
daily perpetrated on her countrymen had filled her
gentle breast with indignation. |

“T must attend a meeting to-night at Count Bre-
derode’s residence,” said Marnix to her; “and, Julie,
if [ am called upon to draw the sword, I can no longer
refuse. You would not wish me to do so, even though
I must thus be parted from you.”

“Go, my husband,” said Julie, “I would that
women were more calculated to fight than they are,
for I would thankfully accompany you to the field.
My heart will go with you; my prayers will follow
rou.”

The meeting at Count Brederode’s was attended
by most of the more ardent patriots then at Antwerp.
‘They each wore a rough leathern wallet, with a wooden
bowl and spoon attached to a belt at their sides, to
show that they belonged to the “ Gueux,” or
“ Beggars,’—a title given to the patriots by their
haughty oppressors, and which they had voluntarily



Of VE MoT ATOR NE sq 4 oy pis TRE
me QD THE CURGOMASTER 5 DACGITT Lee

adopted. One and all agrecd that the time for action
had arrived.

‘I tender my sword and the best services I can
render to the cause,” said Marnix, rising from his seat
after numerous enthusiastic speeches had been mado
by the assembled members of the confederacy.

A few urged that they should wait until the Prince of
Orange was prepared to put himself at their head.

“He is so slow-moving and over-cautious, that
the time of action may have passed before he will
tleclare himself,’’ exclaimed Brederode. “If we wait
till he sets the example, we may wait in vain. Let us
march at once on Valenciennes, and then returning
victorious, we may dictate our own terms to the
Regent at Brussels. Marnix of Thoulouse, to you I
will commit the charge of our first recruits. Although
young in years, you will soon, I am sure, show that
you not only possess courage, but wisdom and fore-
thought.” |

he other speakers uttered similar expressions,
and Marnix agreed to take command of the first body
of insurgents which had been collected. ‘The meeting
now broke up. Marnix was among the last to leave
the hall. Count Brederode had taken no precautions
to guard against treachery. He remained at the
entrance of the house for some time, detaining Marnix,
and explaining more fully to him the plans he had
formed.

“IT see, my noble young friend, you must be my
heutenant, my second in command, when once we
unfurl the standard of freedom. In a short time I
trust we may sweep our tyrants from the land. We
have too long submitted to their cruelties and in-
Justice.”

While they were speaking, Marnix caught sight of



for Dave 5 c mq $ ~ ~ . °
THE BURGOMASTER’S DAUGn TER, 97

& porson stealing across the entrance of the hall. He
was evidently, from his movements, anxious to escape
ebservation, Marnix was on the point of springing
back into the hall to seize the man, when he darted by
him; and though he and Count Brederode instantly
made chase, the spy, if such he was, escaped them.

“Tt matters not,’ said Brederode. “Once in
arms with our forces collected, we may care little if
all the world knows our proceedings. And now, my
friend, you must be prepared to-morrow morning to
accompany me to the rendezvous I have appointed for
our recruits.”

The parting between the young hero and his lovely
bride can be better supposed than described. |

At an early hour the next morning, Marnix accom-
panied Count Brederode. They proceeded some way
down the banks of the Scheldt, till they arrived at- a
spot where a vessel was waiting for them. On board
were a number of recruits, under the command of
a gentleman named Van der Aa, who had, a short
time before, been compelled by the Prince of Orange
to leave the city, in consequence of his activity in
collecting men for the proposed rebellion.

Van de Aa reported that several other vessels with
recruits were waiting a short way down the river, and
Brederode at once proposed, that when all were
collected, they should make a dash at the cities of
ilushing and Middleburg, in the island of Walcheren,
possession of which would greatly forward their cause.
hey soon reached the expected vessels, which num-
bered about twenty small craft, and found that their
force amounted to about fifteen hundred men. They
were, however, without discipline, none of the officers
having had experience in actual warfare. Still, their
numbers gave them confidence, and they proceeded on



28 THE BURGOMASTER’S DAUGHTER.

to Flushing. The citizens, however, had received
notice that Count Hemont, with a strong force, con-
templated advancing on the island of Walcheren.
_ ‘They therefore, through fear, refused to receive the
liberators. Middleburg behaved in the same manner,
from a like cause, and at length it was determined that
the expedition should return up the Scheldt, and land-
ing in the neighbourhood of Antwerp, there await the
arrival of numerous other levies which were expected.



CHAPTER V.

Ir was of serious consequence that Marnix and Count
Brederode did not overtake the person they had
pursued, whom they saw escaping from their place
of meeting. He was a Fleming, one Bertram,
employed by Don Alberic Lodron as a spy on the
patriots. He hastened to his master, who had come
over to Antwerp in secret to ascertain what was
taking place. All the plans of the Count were thus
made known to Don Alberic. |

“Ti is well,” said the Spaniard, “I can now wreak
my vengeance on the head of one whom I have causo
so heartily to hate. Do you, Bertram, join yourself to
the rebels, and make your escape as soon as you have
more important information to bring me. Come to
Brussels, where I will await you. Here are these gold
pieces for the present, but you shall receive a more
ample reward should you bring me information of
importance of which I can take advantage.”

“‘ Don’t fear me, Seigneur,” answered the traitor;
and after some further arrangements had been made
he returned to his home, while, the next morning, Don
Alberic in careful disguise set off for Brussels.



THE BURGOMASTER’S DAUGHTER, 29

Meantime, while Count Brederode was engaged
in recruiting throughout the neighbouring country,
Marnix and his followers, proceeding up the Scheldt,
landed in the neighbourhood of Antwerp, at a little
village called Ostrawell, within sight of the city. The
young general, though without experience, had the
eye of a soldier, and selected his position with great
judgment. In his rear he had the broad Scheldt
and its dykes, which afforded ample protection from
any attacks likely to be made on him; on his right
and left, were other dykes as well as the village;
while he immediately ordered his men to throw up
a breastwork in front of the position, and to sink: a
deep trench. |

“We may here bid defiance to any foes who may
come against us, Count,” said Van der Aa, who was
acting as his lieutenant. “The Spaniards will scarcely
dare to attack so strong a place; and if they do, our
brave followers will drive them back with disgrace.”

“Qur followers sadly want training though,” said
Marnix ; “we must lose not a moment in getting them
into discipline.” |

This judicious resolve was instantly put into execu-
tion, and those few who had seen service among them,
were appointed as drill officers. Jt was hard work,
though, as many of the recruits were scarcely ac-
quainted with the use of firearms. Numbers, too,
came flocking daily into the camp, so that in the
course of a few days three thousand men had placed
themselves under the young Count’s standard.

If any one by individual courage and energy could
have inspired his followers with enthusiasm, Marnix
of Thoulouse would have done so. Pointing to the
standard of revolt which he now hoisted, le addressed
them in eloquent and fiery words. He reminded them.



30 THE BURGOMASTER’S DAUGHTER.

of the treachery and falsehood of King Philip, of his
bigotry and cruclties, and the fearful sufferings to which
their country had been so long subjected.

“We have now drawn the sword, my friends,” he
added ; ‘‘ we must never sheath it till our just and holy
cause has been gained. We must be ready to sacrifice
‘our fortunes, our time, our strength, and our lives to
the attainment of that noble object.”

Loud shouts burst from the throats of his followers,
and one and all vowed to fight bravely for the cause,
and never to yield while hfe remained. Among those
who made themselves most conspicuous, was a man
of middle age, somewhat small of stature, whose torn
doublet and the general faded appearance of his costume
bespoke his poverty. Noone seemed to know from
whence he had come, but his tongue showed that he
was a Fleming, while by his language it might be
supposed that he was an ardent patriot. On presenting
himself before Marnix, he stated that he had seen some
service, and hoped that he might be employed in drilling
the recruits. It was evident, from the way he set to
work, that in that respect he was no pretender. Having
thus shown his talent, he requested that he might be
appointed an officer. Veteran soldiers being scarco,
Marnix, without hesitation, granted his request.

“T regret,” he added, “ that I am not able to pre-
seni you with a habit more suited to your rank.”

‘‘That matters little,’ was the answer. ‘* We are
all beggars here, and we may hope ere long to have an
opportunity of supplying our need from the spoils of
the enemy.”

In a few days he had contrived to worm. himself
into the confidence of Van der Aa, though the young
general himself was too acute an observer of his fellow
men to trust him altogether, There was something

Ohi



THE BURGOMASTER’S DAUGHTER. 81

in the countenance of the man, and hig constant profes-
sions of patriotism, which made him doubt his honesty.
By untiring energy Marnix had at length got his
followers into something like discipline; but still,
as he reviewed them, he could not help feeling that
they possessed enthusiasm alone to make up for their
yet great want of that necessary qualification of
soldiers. All this time, although so near the objec
of his deepest affections, he had not ventured to leave
his camp. At length, however, unable to restrain his
feelings, he resolved to pay his beloved wife a brief
visit, leaving his lieutenant in charge, with orders to
maintain the strictest discipline, to send out scouts to
give timely warning of the approach of an enemy, and
to let no one leave the camp. Throwing a plain cloak
over his shoulders, and a hat which concealed his
features, as soon as darkness came on, he hurried away
towards Antwerp. His departure, however, had not
been unobserved, and in spite of the vigilance of Van
der Aa, one man at all events was found to have left
the camp, and though a party was sent after him, he
managed to elude them. :
‘The Lady Julie was seated in her boudoir. Her
embroidery lay untouched by her side, her eyes were
resting on a book, bu& the page before her conveyed
no meaning to her mind, Her thoughts were away at
the camp ‘at Ostrawell. Care and anxiety were at her
heart. She had heard accounts of the threatened dis-
turbances in the city. ‘The inhabitants of all ranks,
but especially the populace, were taking up arms. The
Prince of Orange was in command, a post he had
assumed as hereditary Burgrave of Antwerp. Those
who knew him best were aware that he had already
resolved to support the cause of liberty, but the people
generally did not fully trash him, a



39 THE BURGOMASTER’S DAUGHTER,

Count Hoogstraaten, a brave and generous young
nobleman, who had like the prince become a Protes-
tant, and who for some time before had been acting
as governor of the city, was now associated with him
in the command. They together were doing their
utmost to tranquillize the minds of the inhabitants,
‘and were ably supported by the Burgomaster, Van
Straalen, and other magistrates of the city.

Julie’s quick ear caught a footstep on the stair.
She rose from her seat, and as she reached the door,
she found herself in the arms of her young husband.

“‘T have been able to steal but a few moments from
my duties,’’ he exclaimed, as he embraced her tenderly,
‘and believe me, Julie, it has been a sore trial to keep
away from you solong ; but you I know, my sweet wife,
sympathize thoroughly with me, and have shared my
feelings.”

“T would not ask you to desert your duty, * said
Julie, looking into his face, “but I would that our
prince would give you more support, and allow the
many brave men who are anxious to join you to leave
our gates.” |

“QOne glorious victory gained, Julie, will decide
him,” answered Marnix. “ lor that we must earnestly
pray.”

Brief was the conversation of the young couple.

“T promised myself but a few moments of hap-
piness,” said Marnix at length. “I must leave you
now, Julie, and hasten back to the camp. I do not
wish my absence to be known, nor will I communicate
with any one in the city, not even with your father.”

“Going so soon?” Julie could not refrain from
saying. ,
“It may be but for a few short days,” answered
her husband. ‘“‘ Brederode hopes soon to join me wit?



THE BURGOMASTER’S DAUGHTER. 23

a force of six thousand men, and together we may
then march forward to the relief, of Valenciennes, and
afterwards to dictate a glorious peace at Brussels.”

Marnix impressed an ardent kiss on his wife’s
_ cheek, and unwilling longer to delay, with a weight at
his heart at being thus compelled so speedily to leave
her, he hastened from the house, and hurried back to
the camp. Still greater would have been his grief
had he known what was about to occur.

Scarcely had he returned, when his lieutenant
reported to him that the recruit who had been so
active in drilling the men was nowhere to be found,
and that it was supposed he had quitted the camp.
So in truth hehad. He was no other than Bertram—
the spy employed by Don Alberic. The traitor made
his way, as fast as a horse he had in waiting could
carry him, to Brussels. He soon found his employer,
who seemed highly pleased with the information he
had brought him.

“If the camp were unexpectedly attacked, the
defenders, in spite of their enthusiasm and boasts,
might be speedily overcome,” said Bertram. “If
taken by surprise, those ill-trained bands will be
unable to stand a moment against the disciplined
troops of Spain.”

Don Alberic, on receiving this information, hastened
off with it to the Seigneur de Beauvoir. ‘It is well
thought of,’ said De Beauvoir.

The latter officer at once went to the Duchess,
who was at the moment in consultation with Count
Kgmont. The Regent listened to the proposal with
no little trepidation. ‘“ If our troops are defeated, the
whole province will be up in arms,” she answered.

“Defeat shall be made impossible!” replied De
Beauvoir. “lIask but for four hundred of the body-

C



34 TIE BURGOMASTER’S DAUGHTER,

guard, and an equal number of Count Egmont’s
veteran Walloons. With them under me, victory will
be certain !’”

No time was lost. De Beauvoir selected some of
his most experienced officers, under whose charge were
placed the helmets, bucklers, arquebuses, corselets,
spears, standards, and drums of the troops, and by
them were conveyed in waggons, supposed to contain
stores of provisions, to the Abbey of St. Bernard,
within a league of Antwerp. The men, meantime,
were sent off in small bodies, to avoid suspicion, armed
only with sword and dagger. Before daybreak they
had assembled at the abbey, where their commander
and his officer met them. They were here refreshed,
and received their accoutrements. De Beauvoir then
addressed them :—

“My brave soldiers, true sons of the church,
victory is certain; the heretics will be destroyed.
Understand that you are to march forward with furled
banners, and without beat of drum. Not till you can see
the faces of the foe, is an arquebus to be discharged.
The foremost section will then deliver its fire, and,
retreating to the rear, load; while the next section
will take its place. If these commands are obeyed,
our success 18 secured, and the wretched rebels anni-
hilated.””

CHAPTER VI.

Tue small army of Marnix of Thoulouse was in high
spirits. Information was brought that the govern-
ment in Brussels were in dismay, and that the whole
population of Antwerp were rising to join the patriots,



THE BURGOMASTER’S DAUGHTER. OO

Many more recruits came to the camp, and the work
of diseiplining them went on with unbated energy.

The young general had just stepped out of the
hut which served as his abode, although the dawn of
that March morning had not yet broken, when suddenly
an arquebus was fired by one of the sentries. It was
followed by others along the line.

“'T'roops are approaching !”? exclaimed Van der Aa,
hastening up to Marnix.

“They must be, then, I trust, a detachment of
Brederode’s army,” he exclaimed; “we will welcome
them joyfully.” As he spoke, the trumpets of the
advancing force brayed loudly forth, while sudden
shouts rent the air.

The garrison hastened to their entrenchments to
return the supposed greeting. “ Welcome to our
friends ! welcome!” was shouted along the line.

In a short time, however, the grey light of the
early dawn revealed the serried ranks of well-armed ©
men, while above them waved their banners, just then
unfurled, with crosses emblazoned on them.

“They are the Spaniards; they are our foes!”
cried the young general. ‘ My brave followers, fight
like men. You fight for everything we hold sacred.
Defend our breastworks, and we shall soon beat back
the hated foe. Wait till they are so close that not a,
shot can miss its aim.’

With these and similar words Marnix flew along
the lines, endeavouring to inspire his followers with
the noble enthusiasm which animated his own bosom.

They came, some ata rapid pace, others lagging
a little, up to the lines, but the hearts of many began
to quail at the unexpected appearance of the well-
disciplined foe. Instead of firing deliberately, as their
general had urged them to do, many fired wildly over



36 THE BURGOMASTER’S DAUGHTER.

the heads of their assailants, whose bullets, aimed too
well, struck them down immediately they appeared.

On came the Spaniards and Walloons in compact
order. The ditch was reached. The veteran troops
dashed across it, and now, with stern shouts, charged
over the breastwork.

In vain the patriots struggled, in vain Thoulouse
and his officers, setting an heroic example, attempted
to defend the fort. Many fought bravely ! desperately !
but what is bravery without discipline ? The bodies of
those who fell served as a rampart for the survivors.
Still the assailants advanced, keeping each foot of
ground they won. Backwards the raw levies were
driven by the Spaniards and Walloons, who, as they
advanced, mercilessly cut down all whom _ they
encountered.

During that morning, the 13th of March, 1567,
a wild tumult was prevailing in Antwerp. Already
ten thousand men were up in arms. Suddenly, while
the shades of night were still lingering in the city, the
inhabitants were aroused by the sound of drums and
trumpets, the sharp rattle of fire-arms, and the shouts
of men engaged in furious combat.

They hurried to the ramparts overlooking Ostra-
well, whence the sounds proceeded. Some climbed
to the roofs of houses, others to towers of churches,
till every spot was occupied whence a view of the
scene of action could be obtained. Lxcited men
thronged the streets, armed with lance, spike, or
arquebus. Some bore huge hammers, others had the
partisans, battle-axes, and huge two-handed swords
of the previous century. They were rushing towards
the Red Gate, that towards Ostrawell having been
destroyed the night before by the command of
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THE BURGOMASTER’S DAUGHTER. OV

Shouts and cries came from the spectators on the
walls. Soon they broke into mournful wails. “ Our
friends are giving way! In vain they strive! The
hated foe are gaining the victory. On they arch,
The patriots are flying. Alas! alas! fearml is the
slaughter.” These cries told too truly what was
taking place.

Meantime, a lady, young and graceful, was seen
moving amid the furious crowd.

“Friends! townsmen! our countrymen are being
overpowered! Who among you, with the hearts of
men, will refuse to hurry to their assistance? I will
lead you! My noble husband is striving for the
cause of freedom! Your very existence depends on
the struggle !” |

It was the young wife of Marnix of Thoulouse
who spoke. Hervery nature seemed changed. Rising
suddenly from her couch at the sound of battle, and
hastily robing, she had hurried to the ramparts, and
there, with aching eyes, witnessed the commencement
of the fight. Her hair escaping from confinement
was waving in the morning breeze. ‘Takmg a sword
from a bystander, she descended from the ramparts
and flew from street to street, imploring her co-
religionists to save their perishing brothers, or avenge
their deaths. Many eagerly obeyed the call, but when
they reached the Red Gate, they found it shut.

As true a patriot as ever breathed, with a wisdom
and courage unsurpassed, issued the order prohibiting
any of the inhabitants from leaving the city. He had
observed what was taking place at Ostrawell. He
knew too well that the day was lost, and that the most
devoted heroism could not retrieve it.

The vast mob, indignant at being opposed, were
crying out for vengeance on the head of their truest

~



88 THE BUBGOMASTER’S DAUGHTER.

friend, declaring him a traitor to the cause of liberty.
When the tumult was at its height, two men of noble
mien rode into their midst; the one was the Prince of
Orange, the other his brave colleague, Count Hoog-
straaten. |

“ Dic, traitorous villain !”’ cried a furious citizen
from among the mob, levelling an arquebus full at his
breast. “Thou art the cause that our brethren have
perished thus miserably in yonder field !””

The trigger was pulled, but another hand in the
mob struck up the weapon, and the missile, intended
to deprive the prince of life, flew wide of the mark.

Unmoved by the circumstance, the prince now
addressed the mob, with words calm and full of dignity;
and at length appeased, they consented to obey his
orders. A band of five hundred, however, sallied
forth to oppose the enemy. Their appearance caused
the death of many hundred prisoners whom De Beau-
voir had taken, for immediately ordering his soldiers
to shoot them, he advanced towards the city with
drums beating and colours flying.

The patriot citizens seeing themselves outnumbered
by the victorious enemy retreated, and De Beauvoir,
advancing close up to the city moat, planted the banners
of the unfortunate Thoulouse on its margin. No attack,
however, was made on him, and he marched away in
triumph. | |

What words can picture the anguish of the Lady
Julic! In vain she entreated to be allowed to go out
and search for her husband; but her father, with kind
force, restrained her, and at length, when it was
ascertained that the enemy had finally taken their de-
parture, a party were despatched to learn the truth.
They returned bearing a mangled corpse. It was that
of the brave young soldier who had thus fallen on his

} >



THE BURGOMASTER’S DAUGHTER, og

first field, hewa almost to pieces by his barbarous
assailants. |
as “8 oS % os *k is *

For some days the city remained in a state of the
most fearful disturbance, the larger part of the popula-
tion having taken up arms to destroy the Romanists
and all who might oppose them.

At one time, indeed, it seemed impossible that a
terrible scene of bloodshed could be averted. By
the boldness and discretion of the Prince of Orange,
however, at length the minds of the population were
tranquillized, and those who a short time before
had been thirsting for each other’s blood, were now
exchanging friendly greetings.

The Calvinists, Lutherans, and Romanists laid
down their arms, and the artillery and other weapons
they had taken from the arsenals were returned. The
city was once more in quiet.

CHAPTER VII

Nearty a year had passed; grief had dimmed the
Lady Julie’s eye, and paled her cheek, yet hope sus-
tained her. She looked forward to meet her husband
in another and better world, where strife, and the
miseries which sin has produced, are no more to be
found; where those once united can never part. She
had lived on with her father, and she found in the
exertions che made to support and comfort him in his
sorrow for the miseries and sufferings of his country,
» solace for her own anguish.

Hivents of importance had occurred. Valenciennes
had fallen when most of its inhabitant= were bar-



40 THE BURGOMASTER’S DAUGHTER.

barously butchered. Count Brederode had retired
from the confederacy, and was dying, it was said, of
disappointment and hard drinking, an event which
shortly afterwards took place. Many of the other
leaders had been captured and executed, and in every
city and village of the Netherlands, executions of
uumbers considered obnoxious to the government were
daily taking place.

The Duke of Alva, destined to be the scourge of
the country, had arrived at Brussels accompanied by
a strong body of veteran warriors, trained to commit
every atrocity which warfare can produce. Hope
might have deserted the breast of the most sanguine,
had not William of Orange at length come forward as
the champion of freedom, and he now, assisted by his
eallant brother Louis of Nassau, by Hoogstraaten, by
the noble St. Aldegonde, and others, was collecting
forces to oppose the persecutors of his country.

The young widow was seated by the side of her
father, Antony Van Straalen, when a visitor was
announced. A. flash of annoyance passed over her -
countenance when Don Alberic Lodron entered the
apartment. Headvanced with an air of confidence and
assumption, which yet further increased her indigna.
tion; yet the father and daughter were too courteous
not to receive the guest, even though an unwelcome
one, with propriety, and rising, they begged Don
Alberic to be seated.

“To what circumstance am I indebted for the
honour of a visit?” said the Burgomaster, finding
that the Spaniard did not commence the conver-
sation.

“TY wish to pay my respects to one whose beauty
and accomplishments merit them,’ answered Don
Alberic, bowing low to Lady Julie,



THE BURGOMASTER’S DAUGHTER. Ad

“Don Alberic Lodron might be aware, that one
who has lately suffered a heavy affliction, cannot desire
to see strangers, except on matters of importance,”
answered the young widow, in a cold manner.

“To me it is a matter of importance,” said the
Spaniard, with a boldness which he would not have
ventured to use unless he had supposed that those to
whom he addressed himself were in his power.

“T must request you, my father, to entertain this
gentleman,” said the Lady Julie, rising. “ Such words
-as he speaks annoy me, and I would avoid hearing
them.” And bowing stiffly to the Spaniard, she glided
from the room.

“T have always been led to believe that the
Spaniards are a courteous nation,” said the Burgo-
master. ‘I cannot, therefore, suppose that you would
willingly annoy a lady who has sufliciently expressed
her sentiments towards you.”

“A father has power to induce his daughter to act
as he may think fit!’ exclaimed the Spaniard. “I
must hold you responsible, Mynheer Van Straalen, if
my expectations are thwarted.”

*“ Kven had I ever wished to exercise undue paren-
tal authority over my daughter, I should not do so
now that she is a widow,” answered the Burgomaster.
*“T must therefore entreat you, as a cavalier of honour,
not further to mention the subject. She has already
expressed her sentiments, and I have reason to know
that they will not alter.”

At length, indignant at the refusal he had received,
where he had presumptuously expected success, Don
Alberic left the house, and not long after returned to
Brussels, with information on various matters which
he had contrived to gainin Antwerp. A short time
after this, the Burgomaster received a summons from



49 THE BURGOMASTER’S DAUGHTER.

the Duchess of Parma, to repair to Brussels on impor-
tant matters of business. |

“Oh, my father! I dread your going there,” said
his daughter; “rather sacrifice your fortuncs and
position in this city, than be ensnared by those—
treacherous foes. I‘ar better would it be to cscape
to Hngland, the land of freedom, than fall into the
power of the enemies who hate us.”

The Burgomaster, however, would not listen to the
advice of his daughter. “Surely,” he said, ‘ except
that I am a Protestant, I have committed no act of
which the government can complain. The Duchess
has sent for me in a friendly spirit, and were I to show
distrust it would go far to prove my guilt.”

“Then let me go with you, my father,’ said Julie ;
you will very likely at all events have troubles and
annoyances, and I may tend to soothe your care if I
can do nothing else.”

Lhe Burgomaster was resolved to go, and forthwith
gave orders for his travelling equipage to be got ready.
His coach, though equal to any of that day, was somo-
what large and heavy. After sallying forth by the
Brussels gate, he, with Julie by his side, proeceded
towards his destination.

“Things will go well, father,” said his daughter ;
“T knownot why [was alarmed. I have become timid
oflate. Ithink I might even start at my own shadow.”

They had proceeded some way, when, reaching an
open heath near which no human habitations were to
be found, suddenly the coachman pulled up, uttering
an exclamation of terror.

“What is the matter?” inquired the Burgomaster
putting his head from the window.

“A band of horsemen are approaching, Burgo-
master,” was the answer.



THE BURGOMASTER’S DAUGHTER. 43

“Oh, fly! my father, fly!” cried the Lady Julie;
“they are enemies! My worst forebodings are fal-
filled ! ”

The coavhman turned his horsés’ heads and galloped
back towards Antwerp. As they were whecling round ;
Lady Julie looked from the window. |

** Alas!” she said, “TI see at their head Don Alberie
Lodron ; I feared when he quitted us that his intentions
were evil, and now I know it too well.”

The carriage had proceeded but a short dis-
tance when another party of horsemen were seen in
front.

“They are Spaniards by their dress,” exclaimed
the coachman. ‘ We are lost! Burgomaster, we are
lost!”

The open country on every side precluded the
possibility of flight.

“We must sit still, my daughter, and submit to
our fate, whatever that may be,” said the Burgomaster.
“For you, my daughter, I grieve the most, but Heaven
will protect you.”

Scarcely had he spoken when the horsemen sur-
rounded the carriage. In the leader of one of the
parties, he recognized Don Alberic, and in the other
Don Sancho de la Lodrono, who had been one of the
combatants in the tournament at Brussels.

“Yield your self, Antony Van Straalen, as a pr isoner,
in the name of King Philip, your lawful sovereign,’
said Don Alberic.

‘‘An authority I have never disputed,” answered
the Burgomaster with dignity. “But, sir, I appeal
to you as a cavalier, and request that you will allow
my daughter to return to her hone.”

“‘ A request made by a prisoner I cannot accede to,”
answered Don Alperic. ‘My orders are to convey



44 THE BURGOMASTER’S DAUGHTER.

you, Antony Van Straalen, and all who accompany
you, as prisoners to Brussels.”

“Oh, let me accompany you! let me accompany
you!” exclaimed the Lady Julie; “I would not be
parted from you, whatever may be the annoyances to
which I may be subjected.”

Once more the horses’ heads were turned towards
Brussels, and the unwilling coachman was compelled
to drive them along with a strong escort on each side.
Don Alberic several times rode up to the coach-window
endeavouring to engage the Lady Julie in conversation,
but the scornful silence with which she treated him,
compelled him at length to desist. On reaching the
neighbourhood of Brussels the carriage was again
stopped.

“ Antony Van Straalen, you must accompany me,”
said Don Sancho; “ you will not be permitted to com-
municate with any member of your family. The lady
can remain in the carriage if she so wishes.”

In vain the young widow entreated to be allowed
to accompany her father. The Spaniards declared
that their orders were peremptory; and at length,
Don Sancho, losing patience, seized the Burgo-
master’s arm, and was about to drag him from the
carriage. ,

“T submit,” said the magistrate in a dignified
tone; and embracing his daughter, he descended from
the carriage, and mounted the horse which had been
prepared for him.

The Lady Julie, on her own account, was some-
what relieved when she saw that only four horsemen
were left as an escort for the carriage, and that both
the Spanish officers were accompanying her father.
Still, nothing could mitigate her anxiety for him. For
herself she cared not, The coachman drove but



THE BURGOMASTER’S DAUGHTER. 45

slowly; more than once the Spanish soldiers urged
him to greater speed.

‘* My horses are weary,” he answered, “and unless
you choose to change, and put your horses in, the
carriage cannot move faster.”

Evening was rapidly coming on. Lady Julie had
lost sight of the calvacade which escorted her father.
At length one of the horses fell. The Spaniards
abused the coachman.

** It was no fault of mine,” he answered.

“ Dismount now, and assist in getting the beast up
again.”

While thus engaged, the Spanish soldiers abusing
the coachman, and the coachman returning their com-
pliments, their voices grew louder and louder. Sud-
denly there was a loud shout, and three of the horses,
the reins of which they had unwisely let go, flinging
out their heels, galloped off. The next instant a body
of men sprang out from a copse close at hand, with
reiterated shouts of “Vive les Gueuwx.’? The Spaniards
drew their swords, and endeavoured to defend them-
selves; but unable to parry the blows aimed at them,
those on foot were struck down. The fourth soldier
mounted his horse, and though many attempted to
stop him, with a blow of his sabre he clove the head
of one man, and cutting another across the shoulders,
escaped towards Brussels.

“Come, come, Peter’”’—for Peter the porter was
acting the part of coachman on this occasion,— ‘‘ up
with your horse! Is the Burgomaster in the car-
riage f ”’ asked the leader of the party.

“Alas! no, but his daughter is; and if we cannot
save him, we must save her,” was the answer.

The fallen horse was not so much injured as Peter
had pretended, and was quickly on its legs again, and



46 THE BURGOMASTER’S DAUGHTER.

a number of Beggars running alongside at full-speed,
accompanied the carriage back towards Antwerp.

“Stop! Peter. Stop! my friends. I would de-
sire to accompany my father,” said Julie at length,
finding the direction in which they were going.

“Tmpossible ! lady,” answered one of the leaders
of the Beggars. ‘ You will not be allowed to com-
municate with him, and your own life will be placed
in peril. Those savages care not on whom they inflict
punishment.”

In vain Julie pleaded.

They had proceeded some distance, when they
came toa wood where the roads branched off. Instead
of continuing back on the direct road to Antwerp,
they turned off on one side.

* After what has occurred, it would be dangerous
for you to go back to the city,” said the leader. ‘We
are about to proceed down the river to join a vessel
which is to proceed to Brill, where you will be secure.
We had intended to convey.your father thither, had
we been successful in rescuing him from the hands of
the Spaniards. Your brother-in-law, St. Aldegonde,
is now there, and you can place yourself under his
protection. We are very sure that, in thus acting,
we are fulfilling the wishes of the Burgomaster, Van
Straalen.” |

Although Julie was still anxious to endeavour to
rejoin her father, even in prison, yet she was unable to
resist this proposal; indeed her somewhat rough pro-
tectors were evidently resolved not to listen to any
argument to the contrary. The carriage now pushed
on at a rapid rate. In a few hours the Scheldt was
reached, and she found herself conducted on board a
vessel, -

“ Farewell, my good steeds!” said Peter, looking



THE BURGOMASTER’S DAUGHTER. 47

at his horses, “ but as I have no wish to hang or burn,
rather than remain with you, I will accompany my
young mistress.” ,

The wind was fair, and the vessel rapidly proceeded
down the river. Brill was safely reached, and St.
Aldegonde did his utmost to console his sister-in-law.
The news soon reached them of the capture of the
Counts Egmont and Horn, and shor tly after, of their
cruel and impolitic execution.



CHAPTER VITI.

Notwit.s?anping@ the advice of St. Aldegonde, Julie
resolved to visit her father, and to attempt to obtain
his hberation. She took Peter into her counsels.
Although he knew well that he ran the risk of losing
his life, he was perfectly ready to assist his young
mistress.

He obtained, by Julie’s directions, the dress of a
female peasant for her, and that of an old countryman
for himself. Julie was to pass as his daughter, and
she hoped, thus disguised, to be able to reach Brussels.

Peter heard of a vessel about to proceed to Antwerp.
The night was dark, the wind blowing strong and
rain falling heavily. Notwithstanding the strife of the
elements, Julie and her faithful attendant issued from
the house, and making theirway down tothe quay, got
safely on board the vessel. ‘The captain, who had been
largely bribed through Peter, immediately got under
weigh. Though the voyage was boisterous, the vessel
roached Antwerp j in safety. It was dark when Julie
and her faithful attendant landed. To her father’s house
she dared not go. She had, however, several wealthy
friends in the city on whom she could rely. Still



48 THE BURGOMASTER’S DAUGHTER.

fearing that should she appear in her peasant’s dress
at one of their houses, suspicion would be aroused,
she resolved to go to the more humble abode of her
old nurse.

Peter knocked at the door.

«Who are you?) What do you want at this hour
of the night?” exclaimed the good woman from within.

“Tet us in, kind Margaritte, and we will tell you,”
answered Peter. “We crave a night’s lodging, and
you will not refuse it when you see us.”

Julie, seeing none near, ventured to add a few
words of entreaty. The bolts were quickly withdrawn,
but when the old woman’s eyes fell on the seeming
peasant girl, she started back.

“Why, I thought it was ——,” she exclaimed,
gazing at her visitors.

« And you are right,” answered Julie, as she hur-
ried into the house.

“What does it all mean?” exclaimed the old
woman. Then, recognizing the young lady, she put
her finger on her lips, and beckoned them into a room
on one side of the passage.

“ T have lodgers,” she whispered. * They will over-
hear us.”

Julie, ina few words, explained her object in re-
turning to Antwerp. |

“Protect you, I will, while I have life,” said the
old woman. ‘ But oh, my dear young mistress, what
a fearful risk you are running ;”

‘Not greater than the object deserves,” answered
Julie. ‘ Had I the meansI would proceed to Brussels
this very night.”

Dame Margaritte, however, persuaded Julie to take
some rest.

“You shall lie down in my bed, and I will watch

a



THE BURGOMASTER’S DAUGHTER. 49

over you as I have done many a time when you were a
little child,” she said; “and since you must go, Peter
will to-morrow try and find a conveyance for you to
Brussels.”

Before daybreak Peter went out, leaving her still
resting, with old Margaritte seated by her side.

The dame’s lodgers had gone out to their daily
avocations before Peter returned. His muddy shoes
showed that he had had a long walk.

“IT thought my old horses would find their way back
to their accustomed meadows, and I was not mistaken,”
he observed, as he sat down to eat the breakfast placed
before him ; “IT had some work to catch Old Longtails,
but I have cropped him, so that I should scarcely know
him myself again, and obtained a pillion from a friend
on which the Lady Julie may ride without fear behind
me,”?

Poor Julie, bidding dame Margaritte farewell,
sallied forth with the old man, and proceeded through
the streets of Antwerp. They at length reached the
outskirts of the town, where they found a boy holding
a horse, with a pillion on its back.

‘Now, daughter, mount, and we will be on our
way,’’ said Peter, giving the boy a small coin.

At length Brussels was reached. The most difficult
part of Julie’s undertakings was now to begin. She
had only one acquaintance in the city on whose dis-
cretion she could rely. She resolved to visit her,
pretending that she and the old man had come up
about some business connected with their little plot of
land, and were anxious to obtain the interest of her
husband, who was a lawyer.

As soon as the servant had left the room, Julie
made herself known to her friend, who promised to
assist her by every means in her power.

D



£6 HITE BURGOMASTER’S DAUGUTER.

‘My husband knows the jailer of the prison im
which the Burgomaster is confined,” she said. ‘ He
has, I know, a “daughter. If by any means she could
be induced to let you take her place, you would then
have an opportunity of visiting your father.” |

Julie’s heart beat quickly at the suggestion. Her
friend forthwith sent for the young girl to her house,
and explained the object to be attained. She was for-
tunately of a romantic and generous disposition, and
though not ignorant of the risk she ran, promised her
assistance. Julie, furnished with a suitable costume,
which still however disguised her sufficiently, set out
for the prison with the jailer’s daughter.

The shades of evening were closing over the city
when they arrived. The jailer was about to go his
last round for the night, to see that all his prisoners
were safe before the watch was set. Julie had just
time to change dresses with her new friend.

“Do not be alarmed,” said the latter, “ my fathor
will not speak to you, and he is to suppose that ibis I
who am accompanying him.”

Poor Julie’s limbs trembled as she followed tho
jailer through the long gloomy arched passages of the
prison. After opening and shutting several iron-
plated doors, he arrived before one, which, after can-
tiously glancing up and down the passage, he opened.
Julie gazed m. On a trestle-bed, covered with a few
heaps of straw, she beheld her beloved father. She
sprang in, forgetting her assumed character; but the
jailer took no notice. She was not aware that her
generous friend had conveyed a purse of gold, and
had promised another, to assist in blunting his faculties,
The door was closed, and the father and~ his daughter
were in each other’s arms. ‘The particulars of the in-
terview cannot be described.



THE DURGOMASTER’S DAUGHTER. 5]

In vain, Julie entreated that she might be allowed
to plead with the Duke for his life. He strictly for-
bade her,

“No, Julie,” he said, you have ever been a duti-
ful danghter, and for my sake I must enjoin you to
leave this unhappy place without delay. If the Duke
has resolved on my death, no power on earth can avert
my fate; but I am in the arms of One more powerful
than man. Go back, my beloved daughter, and again
place yourself under the care of the generous St. Alde-
gonde. When I know that you are safe, then the
thoughts of once more having beheld you, will bring
joy to my heart, and you must rest satisfied that you
have acted as a brave and loving child.’’

Ihe old man and his daughter were not aware how
rapidly those precious moments had flown by, when
the door again opened, and the jailer beckoned to
Julie to accompany him.

We must hurry on with our tale.

In obedience to her father’s commands, the next
morning, having resumed her peasant’s dress, Julie
set off for Antwerp, and at length, escaping numerous

risks, arrived at Brill. St. Aldegonde, admiring’ her
courage and filial love, uttered no words of reproach,

but received her as if he had himself fully sanctioned
her undertaking.

livery day news came of the continuance of the
hanging, burning, drowning, ahd beheading of persons
of all ranks throughout the country. But why dwell
on this dreadful subject? At length a messenger
arrived with the sad news that four persons of distinc-
tion were condemned to be beheaded. The most
worthy of them was the distinguished Burgomastcr of
Antwerp. It was said, however, that even the Blood
Council, in sending the case to Alva for his sentence,



52 THE BURGOMASTER’S DAUGHTER.

had felt some compunction at the impending fate of so
meritorious and excellent a man, and had recommended
him to mercy. In vain. It fell unheeded on the
tyrant’s ear, and after having been subjected to fearful
torture on the rack, to elicit information, the venerable
magistrate was bound upon a chair, being unable to
stand, and with his companions was thus carried to
the scaffold, where all four were beheaded.

St. Aldegonde broke the information as gently as
he could to Julie. For some time he dreaded lest she
would sink under the blow, but though heart-broken,
the consolations of religion supported her. A vessel
was about to sail for England, with two ladies, whose
husbands had suffered on a previous occasion. St.
Aldegonde persuaded his sister-in-law to embark with
them, knowing the danger to which she would be
exposed should she return to Antwerp, and believing
that a total change of scene would alone restore her to
tranquillity of mind. Numerous Flemings, who had
escaped from the persecutions of King Philip and his
ready instruments, had already taken refuge in that
country. Among them the Lady Julie found sym-
pathizing friends, and there she passed the remainder
of her life, engaged in assisting, with the wreck of
her father’s fortune, which had been secured for her,
those of her countrymen who, ruined by the tyranny of
their oppressors, had escaped with their lives alone to
the land of freedom, and where, under the wise and
beneficent rule of Queen Elizabeth, they had found
protection and liberty.





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MOPRAT THE MISSIONARY.





MOFFAT, THE MISSIONARY,

CHAPTER I,
COLONISTS AND NATIVES.

Caen NE or ten thousand miles, as the ship sails,
ital or at the distance of a twenty days’ voyage
from England, is the Cape of Good Hope,
in South Africa. Here there is a European
colony, called Cape Colony, and a town called Cape
Town, which were founded about two hundred y cars
ago by the Dutch, but which have been since given up
to the British Government; though a great many of
the present inhabitants are descendants of the old
Dutch colonists. These are principally farmers: they
are called Boers, and most of them still speak the
Dutch language. |
Within the present century a good many people have
gone from Great Britain to Cape Colony as emigrants ;
for the country has a fine climate and rich soil. So
there are English and Scotch farmers as well as Dutch.





o4 MOFFAT, THE MISSIONARY.

There are towns also in different parts of the colony,
besides Cape Town, having much the appearance of
thriving towns in England. But it is of other matters
than these that I have to write.

When the Dutch began to colonize this country, they
very easily obtained their first lands from the natives,
in exchange for beads and other trinkets; and as soon
as they felt they had the power, I am sorry to say they
began to behave very unjustly and cruelly to the poor
Hottentots, as those native inhabitants were called.
They took possession of the best part of the Hottentot
country, robbed the natives of their cattle, and either
drove the poor people from their homes, to take refuge
in distant deserts, or made slaves of them.

And a terrible life these poor slaves led; for the
Boers came at last to have so many of them that they
were thought of little value as scrvants, and were
treated more like brute beasts than human beings.
They were made to go almost naked ; and their food
was little better than carrion. All the wages they had
for their labour was a few strings of glass beads in the
year; and if, by any means, any of these poor wretches
happened to possess a few cattle, it was a great chance
if his master, the Boer, did not contrive some means
of getting rid of him, and keeping the cattle for his
own. If a Hottentot offended his master or mistress,
he was tied up to a waggon-wheel, and cruelly fogged
with a horrid whip made of rhinoceros hide. Or if a
Boer took a serious dishke to any one of these unhappy
slaves, it was no uncommon thing to send him out on
some pretended message, and then ¢ to follow, and shoot
him on the road. And when thus put cut of the way,
his poor Hottentot fmends and relations durst not
make any inquiry about him, lest they too should be
severely punished, or perhaps murdered,



MOFFAT, THE MISSIONARY, Oo

Tt was well for the badly-used Hottentots when

Cape Colony became a part of the British Empire ;
for though, at first, their condition might not be much
mended, 1t became better by degrees, until at length
they were delivered from their cruel bondage. But
they did not get back the lands which had been taken
by force from their fathers.
_ The Dutch colonists used to speak and-write about
the Hottentots in such a way as to make people believe
that they had no more sense or feeling than brutes, and
that it was next to impossible to civilize them. Now,
if this had been true, it would have been no excuse for
their ill-treatment of the poor natives: but it was not
true. Certainly, the Hottentots were ignorant and
debased ; but they were capable of receiving instruc-
tion, and of proving themselves to be thinking and
intelligent beings. Before they had the misfortune
to become acquainted with Huropeans, they were a
numerous people, divided into tribes, and governed by
chiefs, as is the way with most uncivilized nations.
they did nof cultivate the land, and their only steady
occupation was the care of their flocks of sheep aud
herds of cattle, of which they had abundance. As
they hved in a warm country, they did not need much
clothing or shelter. A mantle of shcep-skins, sewed
together with threads of sinews, and made soft and
pliable by sicuon. served for a garment by day anda
blanket by night. A hut, framed of a few boughs or
poles covered with rush mats, which con!d be carried
from place to place on the backs of oxen, was a
sufficient protection from the weather. A bow and
poisoned arrows, anda light spear, were their only arms,
and were used alike for war and the chase,

Besides these, were tribes of wandering natives,
who were considered and treated by the Hottentots as



o6 MOFFAT, THE MISSIONARY.

inferior to themselves. Very poor they were, and
wretched: they had neither flocks nor herds, but lived
upon what they could take in hunting, and on raw
roots, grubs, insects, and snakes. These Bushmen,
as they are called, are supposed to be the earliest re-
maining aborigines of South Africa, having been in
possession of the country prior to the Hottentots, and
long prior to the Caffres. They resemble the Hotten-
tots in some respects, as in colour and features, but in
others, and these more important, they differ from them.

These Bushmen have always been the terror of the
farmers of Cape Colony; for having been deprived
of their possessions, they soon became desperate and
revengeful; and, from being treated as wild beasts,
they became like wild beasts in habits and disposition.
A missionary, who lived among them some time, has
given a sad account of their character. He suys, ‘Their
manner of life is extremely wretched and disgusting ;
they delight to besmear their bodies with the fat of
animals mingled with ochre, and sometimes with grime.
They are utter strangers to cleanliness, as they never
wash their bodies, but suffer the dirt to accumulate, so
that it will hang a considerable length from their
elbows. ‘Their huts are formed by digging a hole in
the earth, about three feet deep, and then making a
roof of reeds, which is, however, insufficient to keep
off the rains, Here they lie close together hke pigs
in a sty. They are extremely lazy, so that nothing
will rouse them to action but excessive hunger. They
will continue several days together without food, rather
than be at the pains of procuring 1t. When compelled
to sally forth for prey, they are dexterous at destroy-
ing the various beasts which abound in the country ;
and they can run almost as fast as ahorse. They take
no great care of their children, and never correct them



MOFFAT, THE MISSIONARY, 57

except in a fit of rage, when they almost kill them by
severe usage. In the quarrel between father and
mother, or the several wives of a husband, the de-
feated party wreaks his or her vengeance on the child
of the conqueror, which in general loses its life. The
Hottentots seldom destroy their children, except ina
fit of passion; but the Buskmen will kill their children
without remorse, on various occasions; as when they
are iul-shaped, when they are in want of food, when
the father of a child has. forsaken its mother, or when
obliged to flee from the farmers cr others, in which
case they will strangle them, smother them, cast them
away in the desert, or bury them alive. There are
instances of parents throwing their tender offspring to
the hungry lion, who stands roaring before their cavern,
refusing to depart till some peace-offering be made to
him.” |

This is a terrible picture of human nature; and as
these Bushmen are not, of course, more compassionate
towards those whom they consider their enemies than
they are towards their own children ; and as, besides
their cruelty, they are daring robbers, we may readily
conclude that they cannot be safe or pleasant neigh-
bours. But it must not be forgotten that it was the
oppression of the white men that helped to make them
what they are ; and that if they have given the colonists
much reason to dislike them, they themselves have quite
as good reason to dislike the colonists, who, in former
times, at least, have not scrupled to hunt and kill them
whenever they had opportunity.

Beyond the Hottentot country, and hundreds of
miles from that part of the colony which lies near the
Bea, are many nations of Africans, such as the Caffres
or Kafirs, the Bechuanas, and the Damaras. These
are of a race differing quite from the Hottentots and



08 MOFFAT, THE MISSIONARY.

Bushmen; but in one particular there is much resem-
Llance among them all, aud that is, their ignorance and
superstition. In general, Africa may be described as
one of those “dark places of the earth’? which “are
full of the habitations of cruelty.” I shall have occa-
sion to say more of this presently.

As this part of the world is exposed to the fiercer

rays of the sun, the natives are dark-skinned. Some
of the tribes are almost black, and others are very
brown. The Hottentots are not so dark as those who
live more in the interior of the country, but they are
very different in appearance from Europeans, both in
complexion and features.
_ There is also much difference with regard to the
country itself. In some parts, the land 1s fertile, and
the vegetation very beautiful, while in others the gicund
is rocky and dry, so that for miles and miles not a blade
of grass or a green leaf can be seen. And sometimes
the finest parts of the country are scorched up for want
of rain, so that even the beds cf riversaredried. Then,
when rain falls, it often falls in destructive torrents,
accompanied by fearful thunder-storms. ‘Thus, the
farmers in Cape Colony have many risks to run, and
are exposed to great losses; and the poor natives are
obliged to wander from one part of the country to
another mm search of water and food for themselves and
their cattle.

There arc cangers, too, in Africa, from fierce ani-
mals, such as lions, tigers, panthers, hyenas, and other
beasts of prey, which attack men as well as cattle and
sheep, especially the hons. Other wild animals also
‘abound, such as elephants, giraffes, buffaloes, rhino-
ceroses, and deer of various kinds,—all of which furnish
rare sport to any person who is skilful and daring
enough to hunt them. Snakes aud poisonous reptiles





MOFFAT, THE MISSIONARY. 09

there are, too, in great numbers ; and swarms of locusts
which, wherever they come, eat up every green thing,
and are, in their turn, eaten by the natives. In the
rivers are crocodiles; and the sea-cow, as the hippo-
potamus is sometimes called, haunts their banks, while
the ostrich roams in the wide deserts. In short, there
isno part of the world in which so many wild animals
are to be found as in Africa,

But wilder and fiercer are the natives themselves
when their bad passions rouse them to make war on
each other. ‘Then are seen some of the darker shades
of the African character, in the savage cruelties which
are exercised, not only by the warriors upon each
other, but also upon helpless and unoffending women
and children.









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60 MOFFAT, THE MISSIONARY.

CHAPTER II.
THE FIRST MISSIONARY TO THE HOTTENTOTS.

Notwitustanpinc all that the Dutch colonists said
about the Hottentots and Bushmen, there were somo
persons who pitied them, and believed that 1f they were
stupid and ignorant and vicious, there was the more
need to attempt their instruction ; and also that there
were better ways of instructing them than by tying
them toa waggon-wheel and flogging them. &o,imthe
year 1786, which was more than eighty years after the
colony was founded, a good German, named George
Schmidt—or Smith, as he would have been called in
England—left his native country, and went among the
wild Hottentots, at a place which is now known as
Genadendal, or the Vale of Grace, but which then went
by the name of Bavian’s Kloof, or the Glen of Baboons.
This place was a secluded valley, a good distance from
Cape Town; and here George Schmidt built himself
a hut, cultivated a garden, and, by kindness, won the
affections of the ignorant natives.

You may fancy how scornfully some of the Dutch
colonists would look upon a man who had come all that
way from home for no other purpose but to teach the
Hottentots; and how, if they ever met with him, they
would tell him he might as well try to make reasonable
beings of baboons. But Schmidt did not regard this.
He built a school for Hottentot children, and, though
he was ignorant of their language, he preached to the
older people by means of an interpreter. And it was
not lone before they began to look upon him as their
friend, More than this, many of the poor despised



MOFFAT, THE MISSIONARY. 61

Hottentots listened to his instructions; and when he
told them of the love of God, in sending His dear Son
to be the Saviour of the world, their hearts were melted
with love and gratitude: by the grace of God they be-
came Christians.

George Schmidt lived among the Hottentots seven
years, with no one to encourage or assist him in his
loving and self-denying work. At the end of that time
he was obliged to go back to Europe, not intending to
remain there, however. But the Dutch colonists had
taken great offence at his having been successful in
teaching the natives. They saw that he was making
men of them, as well as Christians; and they did not
wish them to be men; it suited their purposes better
that they should remain as ignorantas beasts. So they
sent word to Holland that Schmidt had done great
mischief in the colony by his teaching and preaching ;
and when he was about to return to Africa he was not
allowed to proceed on his journey. Thus this first
Christian mission to the Hottentots was wickedly put
an end to.

It was fifty years afterwards, and when George
Schmidt had been long dead, that three travellers from
Europe landed at the Cane of Good Hope, and were
not long in finding their way tnrough the colony to the
Vale of Grace. They were ‘missionaries, like Schmidt ;
and they wished to know if he was still remembered
there. They found the little village he had raised
almost deserted; there were ruins of cottages, in which
the Christian Hottentots had lived; and a part of the
walls of Schmidt’s house was yet standing, with several
fruit trees, which he had planted, yet flourishing be-
side it.

Was this all? No; they found, living near, a poor
old Hottentot woman, who wept for joy when she was



62 MOFFAT, THE MISSIONARY,

told that those strangers were friends of her good
teacher, who had lived so many years ago at the Vale
of Grace, and that they were Christians—for she too
was a Christian. And besides poor old Magdalena—
for that was her name—were many other Hottentots,
who either remembered Mr. Schmidt with affection, or
had heard of him: and very glad they were when they
found that missionaries were come to live among them
again.

After this, other missionaries went out to different
parts of Southern Africa from “Europe, especially from
Great Britain, after Cape Colony became a British
colony ; and there are now a great number of mis-
sionary stations, not only among the Hottentots and
Bushmen of the colony, but in the countries beyond.



MOFFAT, THE MISSIONARY, G3

CHAPTER IIT.
THE HOTTENTOT CHIEF.

Tr you look on a map of Africa for Cape Colony, you
will find it quite at the lower part of that great conti-
nent,—a little corner, as it may seem, compared with
the whole of the map. Small as it appears, however,
it is nearly twice as large.as the whole of Great
Britain. On the right hand side of this colony is the
country of the Caffres, between whom and the English,
as you may have heard, a sad war was for many years
carried on; and higher up on the map, beyond the
colony, is a large country called Namaqua-land, inha-
bited by different tribes of Hottentots. It isin general
a wretched country, for want of water; and it was to
the deserts of Namaqua-land that numbers of the poor
‘Hottentots were driven by the cruelties of their Dutch
masters. I will give you a short history of one of these.
AFRICANER was the chief of a Hottentot tribe; and
in former days, he and his brothers “ roamed on their —
native hills and dales, within a hundred miles of Cape
Town; pastured their own flocks, killed their own
game, drank of their own streams, and mingled the
music of their heathen songs with the winds which
burst over the Wilsemberg and Winterhoek mountains,
once the strongholds of their clan.” But the Dutch
came and took possession of Africaner’s pastures, and
compelled him to remove. Some of his people were
destroyed, others deserted, and others were made
‘slaves by the Dutch, till at last, far from the land of
his forefathers, the Hottentot chief, and the remainder
of his tribe, were compelled to become servants to a



64. MOFFAT, TILE MISSIONARY.

Boer. Here he and his diminished clan lived for a
number of years, and were faithful to their master, who
in return seemed to take a mean and cruel pleasure in
provoking and oppressing them. At length Africaner
saw that there was no relief to be gained from this con-
stant tyranny, but that his people were dwindling away
in number, while their wives and daughters were abused
and their infants murdered, and he himself—once their
proud chief-—had to subsist on a coarse and scanty
pittance, which, in the days of his independence, he
would have scorned to give to the meanest of his fol-
lowers. Then he asked permission of the Boer to leave
his service, and to remove to some distant part of the
country, where they might live in peace and quiet.
But, instead of granting this request, the haughty Boer
let Africaner know that he looked upon him and all his
people as slaves; and began to treat them more
_ tyrannically than before.

This was more than the poor Hottentots could
endure. They refused any longer to obey the com-
mands of their master. Ovder after order was sent
down to the huts of Africaner and his people to no
purpose—they sat still brooding over their multiplied
wrongs. :

“It was eventide, and the farmer, exasperated to
find his commands disregarded, ordered them, the
Hottentot slaves, to appear at the door of his house.
This was to them an awful moment, and though accus-
tomed to scenes of barbarity, their hearts beat hard.
It had not yet entered their minds to do violence to the
farmer. |

“They moved slowly up to the door of the house.
Titus, the next brother to the chief, dreading that the
farmer, in his wrath, might have recourse to desperate
measures, took his gun with him, holding it behind his



MOFFAT, THE MISSIONARY. 65

back. When they reached the front of the house, and
the chief had gone up the few steps leading to the door,
to state their complaints, the Boer rushed furiously
upon him, and with one blow precipitated him to the
bottom of the steps. At this moment, Titus drew from
behind him his gun, and fired on the tyrant, who stag-
gered backwards and fell.

“They then entered the house, and the wife having
witnessed the death of her husband, implored for mercy.
They told her not to be alarmed, for they had nothing
against her; but demanded all the guns and ammuni-
tion that were in the house, and charged her not to
leave the house during the night, for if she did, the
other slaves, over whom Africaner had no control,
might kill her.

“The poor wife obeyed this command; but two of
her children, overcome with terror, escaped by a back
door, and were slain by two Bushmen, who had long
been looking out for an opportunity of revenging
injuries they had suffered. The mother afterwards
escaped to the nearest farm.”

After this, you may be sure, Cape Colony was no
safe place for Africaner. Without loss of time he got
together the remnant of his people, and escaped to
Namaqua-land, beyond the danger of pursuit, whero
he soon became known and feared as a terrible robber.

All this occurred long after missionaries had begun
bo teach the gospel to Hottentots and Bushmen in dif- |
ferent parts of the colony; but it does not appear that
Africaner had ever received such instruction, or indeed
heard of that mild and merciful revelatica of God to
man, which tells of One who loved his enemies, and
gave his life for them, and which teaches us to bless
them that curse us, to do good to them that hate us,
and pray for them that despitefully use us and perse-

E



66 MOFFAT, THE MISSIONARY.

cute us. And we need not wonder that Africaner had
never heard of the Bible, when we consider how far
distant the missionaries were then from each other
in that wide country. As to the Boer, who was
Africaner’s master, and who came to the miserable end
Thave described, it is not likely that the poor Hotten-
tot slaves learned much of Christianity from him.

Well, as I said, Africaner’s name spread terror far
and wide in Namaqua-land. The cclonists who lived
nearest to that country, feared to sleep in the night
lest he should fall upon them, rob them of their cattle,
and perhaps murder them; and the natives around
him looked upon him as a dangerous neighbour and
their enemy. One plot after another was laid, both by
Boers and Namaqua Hottentots, against his hfe. But
he was watchful and brave, and had around him his
brothers and faithful followers, so that he always ma-
naged to escape from his enemies.

He had narrow escapes, however. Once he and
his men were unexpectedly attacked by a large party
of Namaquas, under the command of a chief named
Berend, with whom Africaner was at feud; and, after a
desperate conflict, the Namaquas drove offall Africaner’s
cows and oxen, leaving nothing behind, except a few
calves. The Hottentot chief was not likely to sit down
quietly under this injury. He and his followers re-
turned home, and having slaughtered the calves which
were left them, rested a couple of days im order to dry
the flesh in the sun. Then, for several days they
pursued their enemy, and having found out their re-
treat, which was on the opposite side of the Orange
River, without being themselves discovered, they
swam over in the dead of the night, with their clothes
and ammunition tied on their heads, and their guns on
their shoulders, “ The little force thus prepared, not



MOFFAT, THE MISSIONARY, 67

unlike that of Bruce at Bannockburn, seized their op-
portunity, and, when all the enemy were slumbering in
fancied security, fell upon the encampment, and not only
regained possession of their own cattle, but marched
off victoriously with all belonging to the marauders.
This is but one of the many adventures of Africa-
ner’s hie at this time; and it is one in which certainly
the right was on his side. I dare say he was not
always in the right, and that his enemies had great
eason to dread him. Many years afterwards, when
Africaner became a Christian, and was seen and heard
entreating some who were on the point of fighting, to
forgive and love, and live at peace with each other,
a Namaqua chief said—‘‘ Look, there is the man, once
the lion, at whose roar even the inhabitants of dig.
tant hamlets fled from their homes! Yes, and I have,
for fear of his approach, fled with my people, our
wives and our babes, to the mountain glen, or to the
wilderness, and spent nights among beasts of prey,
rather than gaze on the eyes of this lion, or hear hig
roar.”



68 MOFFAT, THE MISSIONARY,

CHAPTER IV.
AFRICANER AND THE MISSIONARIES,

Whitt Africaner was thus getting himself a great
name, but not a good one, a little party of missionaries
went to Namaqua-land. They had great reason to
dread the robber-chief; but he did not at first molest
them, though it would have been easy for him to do so.
Instead of this, he went to see them soon after their
arrival, and behaved in a very friendly manner.

“ As you are sent by the English,” he said, to the
wife of one of the missionaries, ‘‘ l welcome you to the
country ; for though I hate the Dutch, my former op-
pressors, I love the English ; for I have always heard
that they are the friends of the poor black man.”

And afterwards, though the missionaries were a
long distance from Africaner’s kraal or village, he and
his people used sometimes to go and listen te their
instructions. |

But this kindly feeling did not, at this time, last
long. Some one told the Hottentot chief that the mis.
sionaries were plotting against him with some of hig
enemies. ‘l'his was a false report; but Africaner be-
lieved it, and he was filled with rage, and declared that
he would put an enc to their preaching and teaching
in Namaqua-land, and would take vengeance on the
people who harboured them. |

You may be sure that this was a very distressing
threat to the missionaries and their wives, who had
seen enough of Africaner to know that he was capable
of almost any enormity when his passions were
roused. They had no place of refuge, and were more



MvFFaT, THE MISSIONARY. 69

than two hundred miles from the abodes of civilized
men. or a whole month they waited in terror, ex-
pecting the threatened attack; and could devise no
better plan for security than to dig deep holes in the
ground, in which they might take shelter from the
shots of the robbers. Then, they thought it better to
remove and return to the colony. |

It was well that they did this; for soon afterwards
the robber-chief and his men came to the station ,



— oa
ws

A eal

THE MUSICAL GRAVE.

havine spread devastation around him on all the road.
And when it was found that the missionaries were
gone, his band. began to search the premises for any-
thing of value that might be hidden. Presently one of
the men, who had wandered into the burying-ground,
stepped over what seemed to be a newly-made grave,
and much to his surprise and terror, heard soft notes
of music, which seemed to rise from the ground be-
scath his feet. He stood motionless, gazing over his



70 MOFFAT, TITE MISSIONARY.

shoulder, with mouth and eyes wide open, hesitating
whether to stand still and see the dead arise—which
he had heard the missionaries preach about—or take
to his heels. Presently, the poor heathen, seeing no
signs of anything wonderful, and hearimg no more of
the sounds, plucked up courage to leap again on the
rame spot, and again he heard the awful music. ‘This
was enough: without again losking back, he darted
off to the camp, and told his chief that there was life
and music in one of the graves.

Ibe chicf, fearless of the living or the dead, was
not to be scared, even by the supposed spectre of the
tomb. He arose, and ordered his men to follow him
to the spot. One jumped, and another jumped, and
at each succeeding leap succeeding notes of the softest
music vibrated on the ear from beneath.

“Die,” said the chief; and they dug, till very
soon the mysterious cause of the sounds came to light.
Tt was a pianoforte, which the wife of one of the mis-
sionaries had brought with her from London, and
which, being too large and heavy to be taken away
in the rapid flight, had been hastily buried in the dry
soil, It was very soon broken to pieces as you may
suppose.

After having well searched the mission premises,
the robbers burned them to the ground, and then
departed.

As to the missionaries who were thus driven from
their wilderness home, they had to pass through many
sufferings in their flight; and the lady to whom the
pianoforte had belonged did not live to return. But
you will be glad to know that the mission to Namaqua-
land was not given up. And you will not, I am sure,
be sorry to hear, though it may surprise you, that
the bold robber-chief, whose very name, for years



MOFFAT, TIE MISSIONARY. 71

and years, had been such a terror to the country
for hundreds of miles around, not only made peaca
with the missionaries, but invited them to settle
in his own village; and, better still, repented of his
former lite of violence—showing by his conduct that
his heart was indeed changed, that his repentanco
was sincere, and that he was indeed and in truth.
what he professed to be—a believer in the Lord Jesus
Christ.

I shall have to tell of this presently, and you will
see how true it is that-

* When once the love of Christ is known,
It breaks and melts the heart of stone»
There tenderness and mercy dwell,
4nd peace, and joy—and all is welh”



42 MOFFA!, THE MISSIONARY.

CHAPTER V.
A CHAPTER OF TRAVELLING.

In the year 1817, a waggon, drawn by a dozen oxen or
more, might be seen day after day slowly dragging
along the rough roads of Cape Colony—now climbing a
steep and rugged mountain, now rolling along in a fer-
tile valley, and now fording a shallow river—the oxen
wading and swimming, until reaching the opposite
bank, they make a desperate plunge and scramble to
tread again on dry ground.

This waggon is attended by I know not how many
Hottentots, who in their strange language are urging
on the oxen to make haste. But the oxen are some of
them lazy, and some of them obstinate, and all of them
very tired, so they get along rather slowly.

The waggon is not at all like an Enelish waggon ;—
such an awkward, heavy, clumsy thing has not been
scen in England for many a long day; and the harness
that fastens it to the oxen. and that keeps the oxen
together, is awkward and clumsy too. But travellers
must not mind trifles; and perhaps this Cape Colony
waggon 18 a better conveyance than we may at first
imagine, for such a country of rough roads and no
roads at all.

It does not do, however, to be in a great hurry.
Our travellers have some hundreds of miles to go ; and
the oxen do not travel many miles a-day: sometimes
the road is so bad, or the mountain side so steep and
dangerous, that it takes an hour or two to get over a
few yards of ground: and when any difficulty arises,



MOFFAT, THE MISSIONARY. 73

same of the beasts lie down and won’t goa step farther
without more help.

Well, help is at hand. There are some spare oxen
in attendance, with Hottentots riding on their backs
Of jump the Hottentots, and fasten their loose oxen
to the foremost pair of the team, cracking their long



TRAVELLING IN AFRIUA,

whips, and shouting with their harsh voices, till the
perverse beasts rise up lazily, and pull away again, but
with no good will to their hard labour, I think. Some-
times twenty or even thirty oxen are needed to drag the
heavy waggon up a mountain side.



74: MOFFAT, THE MISSIONARY

As there is alady in the waggon, besides other
travellers, we will not be so rude as to draw aside its
thick canvas tilt or covering, but will merely guess
that it is pretty well filled with almost all sorts of
stores for housekeeping, as well as with baggage, and
Ironmongery, and tools of different sorts, with two
or three guns, perhaps more, and a quantity of gun-
powder, shot and bullets. ‘The travellers are going
far away into the deserts beyond the colony; and if
they have forgotten anything in the housekeeping
way, they must learn to do without it, for they will
have no shops to go to. ‘They need tools, for they
must be their own mechanics ;—and guns, for they
are going where wild beasts are plentiful, and game
is not scarce. Perhaps they will have by-and-by to
depend upon their skill as marksmen, for a dinner of
meat. |

Not at present, however, for following the waggon
is a little flock of sheep, stopping every now and then
to nibble the grass that falls in their way. Behind
them is a person trying to keep them from straying.
He is a white man and young. He has a gun on his
shoulder, and a broad-brimmed straw hat on his head,
to keep off the hot sun. He looks tired, and well he
may be, for he is not much used to driving sheep, and
just now the loud howl of a hyena was heard, which
set the sheep scampering off as fast as they could run,
some one way and some another; and the white man
had to scamper after them, among the thorny bushes
which scratched his face and tore his legs; and it was
a long time before he could get the flock together
again.

That white man is a missionary, who a few months
ago said good-bye to his home and friends in Scotland;
and, after spending some time at Cape Town in leari-



MOFFAT; THE MISSIONARY. 75

ing the Dutch language, is going with another mis«
sionary, and that missionary’s wife, to a station in
Little Namaqua-land, which is betwcen Cape Colony
and the Orange River. After that, he will have to go
alone, bey on -d the river, into Great N amaqua-land,
Mis name is Roperr Morrar.

Now and then, as they pass through the colony,
the travellers step at farm-houses, where they are very
kindly treated. But when the farmers ask Mr. Moffat
where he is going, and he tells them, they tell him
he must be mad to think of such a thing.

“ You are going to Africaner’s country,” they say;
“that evil-minded robber. You will never come back
alive.”

“IT hope I shall, if God pleases,” thinks Mr,
Moffat: ‘but perhaps I shall not come back at all. I
am going to live ¢ among the people of Great Namaqua-
land. I am even going to the village of Africaner
himself.”

“Did anybody ever hear such madness ?” thinks
the farmer, who has heard enough about Africaner to
hate to hear his name mentioned. “ Why,” he says,
“when you get there, Africaner will set you up as a
mark for his boys to shoot at.’

** He will strip off your skin,
make a drum of it to dance to.”

“ He will cut off your head,” says a third, “and
make a drinking-cup of your skull.”

“ Ah!” exclaims a kind, motherly lady, the wife of
ancther farmer, at whose house the tired travellers are
resting for a little while, ‘if you were an old man, it
would not matter, for then you. must soon die, whether
or no: but youare young; and to think of your going
to be a prey to that—that monster, Africaner!” and
she wiped the tears from her eyes as she spoke.

’ says another, “ and



76 MOFFAT, THE MISSIONARY.

39

ig,” says the
young missionary. ‘He has been very wicked and
violent, it is true; but he is converted, and is now a
Christian, and will not harm any one.”

But no, no! they will not hear this; they don’t
believe anything about Africaner having become a
Christian. No, no; the thing is impossible—it can-
not be!

If Mr. Moffat does not say it—and perhaps he
does—at least he remembers that there is a text in
the Bible that tells us, “ With God all things are
possible.” So he is not much discouraged by what he
hears; and on and on the travellers go, till the colony
is left behind, and they get into the deserts of Little
Namaqua-land.

Dangerous travelling now, and very fatiguing.
livery day the sun scorches them, and the poor oxen
pant, and hang out their tongues as they drag along
the heavy waggon. Sometimes they have to travel
miles over sands and stones, so hot that they can
scarccly bear it; and the oxen low and sheep bleat with
pain and weariness. Water becomes scarce, too, and
weary as they all are, they must keep moving till they
reach the next stream or pool, or they will all perish
with thirst. And when they reach it, it 1s dirtier than
English puddle water. Never mind, it 1s very refresh.
ing and acceptable for all that.

Every night, when they stop, they must kindle a
ereat fire to keep off the lions and hyenas, which they
can hear roaring and growling and howling, not far
off. I think they smell the sheep and oxen, and skulk
about the travellers, hoping to get a good meal; and
woe to the poor animal that strays in the night from
the protecting fire! There will be nothing but bones
left of it in the morning.

“But you do Africaner great wrong



MOFFAT, THE MISSIONARY, a4

CHAPTER VI.
A UOTTENTOT VILLAGE,

I must tako you now to a Hottentot villave or kraal,
as itis called. Jt is not much like an Hnglish village.
There is no particular high road, leading in at one end
and out at the other: there are no neat cottages with
garden plots around them—no village church, and
parsonage-house, and squire’s mansion—no cultivated
fields around. Nothing of the sort.

Fancy yourself on a wide wild moor, scattered over
with great rough rocks, bare and weather-beaten, with
patches of coarse, scanty herbage growing where there
is soil enough for it to take root, and here and there
clumps of trees, which throw a pleasant shadow be-
neath: fancy, again, a gipsy encampment on this wild
moor, with women and children in abundance, black,
and grimy, with filthy tattered sheep-skins hanging
about them for clothing; some wandering about,
shrieking, scolding, quarrelling; others lazily rolling
on the ground; others cooking at fires, outside the
huts; dogs prowling about also, half-starved and
ugly; then cast your eyes round and see, in the dis-
tance, herds of oxen and a few sheep and goats pick-
ing up a poor meal off the scanty grass, under the
care of black, woolly-headed, half-naked savages,
while others, having nothing to do, are stretched at
full length, or idly lounging about the camp. [ancy
all this, and you may, if you please, suppose yoursclf
to be in a Hottentot kraal,



a
CPO

MOFYAT, THE MISSIONARY,

| Tho huts are not very complicated in their archi-

tecture. Draw a circle on the ground; stick long
poles into the ground, just outside this circle; pull
them together at the top, and fasten them with strips
of cow-skin; then cover over this frame with anything
you may happen to have—shcep-skins, bullocks’-hides,
or mats made of long grass—and you have a Hottentot
hut complete. :

You must not expect your hut to keep out all the
rain that falls upon it; nor yet to stand very firm
against a hurricane: but it keeps off the sun, and, if
blown down, it is soon put up again; and what rain
soaks through you must bear patiently, or fasten an
extra mat over the leaky part of the roof. There 1s
this advantage, at any rate, in your hut—when you
are tired of one spot, you can easily move ib to
another.

Let us stroll outside the village, beyond the huts,
and under the shade of yonder clump of trees. Why,
but what do we see? A waggon that surely was never
made by the builders of yonder huts. It 1s broken
and crippled, but it looks wonderfully like the waggon
we saw months ago, toiling over the mountains and
and through the valleys of Cape Colony, I know not
how many scores of miles away.

Truly, there is no mistake about it. It is the same
wagoon—Mr. Moffat’s travelling carriage. It has had
some rough work since we saw it last; and so has its
owner: but they, both of them—the missionary and
his waggon—reached their destination at last. This
is Africaner’s village.

Ah! poor Mr. Moffat! and was he set up as a
mark for the boys to shoot at ?—they look as if they
would not scrupie to shoot at a missionary if thoy
had tho chance, Or did Africaner make a dram



MOFFAT, THE MISSIONARY, | 19

of the missionary’s skin? or a drinking-cup of his
skull?

Well, no; he did none of these things; but as soon
as the young missionary arrived he had a hut built for
him; and though fifty years old, and a great chief
among his people, he came daily to that hut to receive
instruction like a little child.



80 MOFFAT, THE MISSIONARY.

CHAPTER VIL
ANOTHER ASPEOT.

Tr is very lonely for Mr. Moffat in the Hottentot vil-
lage. Heis the only white man there. He has left
behind him almost all the comforts of civilized hfe.
Ile cannot even get bread to eat; for the people do
not grow any kind of grain; and he is obliged live as
he can on any game he can kill with his gun, with
sometimes a bit of mutton or goat flesh, or beef, but
this not often; and then he must eat his meat without
bread, or vegetables of any kind, or salt. Once, a
friendly missionary in Little Namaqua-land, sent him
a bag of salt; but when it was opened, it was so mixed
with sand that he couia not relisn it; so he quietly
hung the bag up in his hut, and there it remains
untouched.

fle has milk to drink, however, for Africaner has
given him two cows. They do not yield much, it is
true, but they often save him from a hunery night.
So the young missionary lives on meat and milk, some-
times for weeks together on milk alone, which, by way
of change, he drinks at one time swect and fresh, at
another time sour, and at another curdled.

But sometimes his milk fails, and he has no meat
either: what shall he do then? He cannot buy, for
there are none to sell, and if there were, alas! he has
no money. He does not lke to ask for food of the
poor Hottentots, who are as hardly driven as himself,
though, without asking, he now and then discovers
that some unknown friend has slipped a piece of meat
into his hut when he has been absent—so he throws



MOFFAT, THE MISSIONARY. 81

his gun on his shoulder, and rambles out on the plain,
or on to the mountains beyond, in search of something ~
to eat. He cannot always find it; and then he returns
to his hut half-starved, to go to rest, in hopes that
there will be something in store for to-morrow.

He has no prospect of faring better than this in
time to come; for though he may have as much land
to cultivate as he pleases, the ground is so dry and
barren, and there is rain so seldom, and water is so
scarce, that digging and sowing would be of no use—
there would be no reaping.

As there is no society of his own countrymen for
the young missionary, and no one of whom to ask
advice, or to speak to about his difficulties and trials
among the poor ignorant Hottentots, he sometimes
feels his heart sinking within him, and he thinks of
the happy home and kind friends he has left behind, in
his native land, till he almost wishes himself back
again. But then he remembers why he left his home
—that it was not to get money, nor to obtain a fine
farm, but to show the way to Heaven to the dark-
minded heathen; and he remembers, too, that if he
is a faithful servant of God, God will be with him
to help him and comfort him; and this cheers hig
mind, and he can go, when evening is drawing on,
and can sing praises with a joyful heart to his God and
Saviour all by himself, among the rocks outside the
village. |

After all, there is something—and not a little—to
encourage Mr. Moffat at Africaner’s kraal, which is
become a favourable specimen of Hottentot villages.
Before he went there, another teacher had been among
them, who had prepared the way for our young mis-
sionary by giving religious instruction. Indeed, there
is now a little congregation of Christians there ; and

E



sy MOFFAT, THE MISSIONARY.

among them are to be reckoned Africaner himself,
the redoubtable robber—-but a robber no longer—but
Christian Africaner, as he is now willing to be called ;
and his brothers, David and Jacobus. ‘Titus Africaner
too, who you remember shot the Boer, their former
master, and who has been, in his time, a fiercer tiger
in human form than his brother, and who had hated
the former missionary, and set a terrible example of
wickedness to all Africaner’s people—even he is be-
come the steady friend of Mr. Moffat, and is lke a_
different being. | | |

Mr. Moffat has plenty of employment at Africaner’s
village. He has a service at his hut every morning
and evening, to which he invites as many of the
natives as like to come, when he reads and explains
to them some part of the Scriptures, and joins with
them in prayer. Then three or four hours every day
are spent in teaching the Hottentot children to read ;
and in this he is greatly assisted by the two brothers
of the chief, David and Jacobus.

Christian Africaner, himself, is not very ready at
reading, but he improves every day; and the New
Testament is his constant companion. He may be
often seen, for hours together, sitting under the
shadow of a rock, reading those words of life which,
you know, are able to make us wise unto salvation
through faith which is in Christ Jesus, and which,
while they bring salvation, teach us also, that denying
ungodliness and worldly lusts, we should live soberly,
righteously, and godly in the present world.

Sometimes, when all his people are gone to rest,
Africaner sits with the young missionary on a great
stone at the door of his hut, and talks till the dawn of
next day about the wonders of creation and redemp-
tion. A new world is opened to his mind, and he



MOFFAT, THE MISSIONARY. 83

cannot be satisfied. He is like a bee gathering honey
from every flower. - Then, after asking a great number
of questions, he exclaims, rubbing his head—“ I have
heard enough for this time. I feel as if my head were
too small, and as if it would swell with these great
subjects.”

No more thieving and fighting excursions for Afri-
caner and his men, you may be sure.

“ What have I now of all the battles I have fought,
or the cattle I took,’’? he asks, “ but shame and re«
morse??? And when he hears of those around, who
are at variance with each other, he goes and begs them
to be reconciled.

Our Hottentot village, as well as becoming more
peaceful, is getting cleaner and neater. One day, for
instance, Mr. Moffat thinks it would be a good thing
if the children—and there are a good number of them,
about a hundred and twenty—who come to the school,
were to undergo a little purification at the fountain
which supplies the cattle with water. Does not Afri-.
caner think so too ?

Yes, Africaner has not much doubt about it, for
since he has become a Christian, he has not been so
contented to live in the midst of filth as he used to be.
So he persuades the people to suffer their children to —
be washed; and then, having washed their bodies
clean, our two reformers get them to wash their dirty
sheepskin garments. They don’t like it much at first;
for they have been so used to dirt, that washing is
like stripping off a skin; but they begin to feel more
comfortable, and before long, you would have to travel
long and far before you would meet with such bright-
looking Hottentots as are to be found at Africaner’s
kraal,



84. MOFFAT, THE MISSIONARY,

CHAPTER VIIL

INCIDENTS OF TRAVEL,

I wave told you that a great part of Namaqua-land is
desert country; and Mr. Moffat had not been many
months at Africaner’s kraal before great distress came
upon the people through want of water. No rain had
fallen for weeks, and all around scarcely a blade of green
grass could be seen, so that most of the cattle had to
be driven to distant pastures to feed.

On one of the hot cloudless days of that summer,
there was an unusual bustle in the village. All the
people who remained in the place were flocking towards
the missionary’s broken waggon, and gathering round
the missionary himself, who, for the first time in his
life, had turned blacksmith.

The job he had undertaken, which was none other |
than the repair of his broken waggon, was a difficult
one, especially as his tools were not very suitable for
his work. Jor an anvil he had a block of stone; his
blacksmith’s bellows he had manufactured himself, and
his hammer and tongs were never made for welding
iron. Nevertheless, he persevered in his work, and
the poor Hottentots thought it wonderful; though all
the while the inexperienced workman was wishing
them at a greater distance, lest he should burn his
fingers and they should laugh at his misfortunes.

Success, however, crowned his efforts at last, and
amidst the shouts of the assembled villagers, the
crippled waggon was restored to soundness, and pro-
nounced fit to start afresh upon its travels; while the



MOFFAT, THE MISSIONARY. 85

poor Hottentots were more than ever persuaded that
their white friend must be a very clever man.

A day or two later and the village was again in con-
fusion. Oxenwere harnessed to the waggon; and the
missionary, attended by the Hottentot chief, and thirty
picked men, active and willing, were making the last
preparations for a long journey of many weeks to the
farther borders of Namaqua-land. At length these
preparations were completed, and amidst the confused
noise of shouting Hottentots, lowing oxen, and barking
dogs, the waggon and its attendants moved on, and
soon Africaner’s kraal was left in the distance, almost
deserted, except by women and children.

There had been a time, no doubt, when a band of
thirty of Africaner’s men, led on by that terrible free-
booter himself, would have struck dismay into every
Hottentot kraal near which it passed. The villagers
would have expected nothing less than to have their
huts burned over their heads, their poor wives and
children murdered, and their cattle driven off. But
Africaner’s expedition was, now, a very peaceable one.
He had no idea of molesting any one; and if he had
a large party with him, it was only as a precaution
against the many dangers of the long journey he had
undertaken.

And that journey was not without an object. The
chief had found that the barren wilderness in which he
had, many years before, fixed his village, was better
calculated for the residence of lawless robbers, such as
he and his people had once been, than for the home of
quiet, God-fearing Christians. It was his wish to live
thenceforward honestly and ixdustriously; and hav-
ing heard that, on the farther borders of Namaqua-
land there was a country, well-watered with many
fountains, and more fertile, which he would be at



86 MOFFAT, THE MISSIONARY.

liberty to occupy, he had proposed to the missionary
to visit it. And he was accompanied by Mr. Moffat,
to be assisted with Ins judgment, as well as that the
gospel might be preached to the poor heathen natives
whom they might meet with on their way.

For many days, after leaving Africaner’s kraal, the
travellers passed over a dry and barren country. The
plains were sand—the hills were sand—almost all
around them was sand. It was difficult to find food
for the oxen as they went on; and when their small
stock of water was gone, they had to travel for hours
before they reached a fountain where they could quench
their thirst.

Bounding along the desert around them, the mis-
sionary and his friends saw troops of zebras and wild
asses; herds of stately giraffes, sometimes as many as
thirty or forty together; great numbers of elks and
antelopes ; and now and then a solitary rhinoceros.
All these were welcome sights; for the travellers had
to depend for subsistence upon the game they might
meet with in the course of the journey. Mr. Moffat
was a good marksman, and so was Africaner, and so
were many of the men; though none of them could
equal Titus, who was one of the party, and who had
~ been known to take his gun in the dead of the night,
enter an immense deep pool in the Orange River, swim
to the centre, take his seat on a rock just above the
surface of the water, and wait the approach of a hippo-
potamus, which he would shoot just as it opened its
monstrous jaws to seize him.

So, having plenty of powder and musket-balls, and
a good number of guns, the travellers managed to
obtain a tolerable supply of food in the desolate regions
through which they were slowly passing. Nothing
eame much amiss to them, for their appetites were too



MOFFAT, THE MISSIONARY. 87

keen to allow them to be very dainty; and Mr. Moffat
found that even zebra’s flesh was not to be despised,
though a young fat giraffe was to be preferred. When
they killed a large animal, they generally halted a day
or two, at some convenient spot, to cut the meat into
thin pieces and dry it in the sun. It was then stowed
away in the waggon for future occasions, and, when
eaten, had to be put under hot ashes, and then pounded
between two stones to loosen its fibres.

Sometimes even this hard fare failed, and, being
unsuccessful in procuring fresh food, the travellers had
to fasten leathern thongs tightly round their stomachs
to prevent the gnawing of hunger.

One day the whole party narrowly escaped being
poisoned. They saw before them a beautiful valley,
as it appeared, clothed in lively green; and hoping to
obtain food for their oxen, they hastened to it. But
when they reached the spot, they found that what
looked so lovely and inviting, was nothing but a bitter ©
plant which the cattle would not eat, and which only
impeded their progress. They were faint themselves
with hunger, and the oxen were worn oué with fatigue,
when some of the party found honey in the clefts of
the rocks. This was a welcome treat, and they all ate
heartily. Presently, however, one complained of a
burning heat in his throat, and then another, and
another ; then a native came up, and said, “ You had
better not eat the honey of this vale. Do you not see
the poison-bushes from which the bees get honey and
poison too ?”

You may be sure the travellers did not feel very
comfortable after that. Every one had recourse to the
little water that remained in the vessels, for the inward
heat was terrible; but the water instead of allaying
only increased the pain. It was well that no more



88 MOFFAT, THE MISSIONARY.

serious consequences followed; but it was several
days before they got rid of the effect of the poisoned
honey.

Sometimes they came to a Namaqua village; and
then the missionary got the inhabitants together and
told them of the glad tidings of the gospel. And it is
pleasant to think of Africaner, the dreaded robber, as
he had been, standing beside Mr. Moffat and inter-
preting to his poor Hottentot brethren the message of
peace and good-will to men which he delivered.

At one of the villages Mr. Moffat met with a
Hottentot conjuror or sorcerer, who pretended that he
had entered into a lion which, the night before, had
alarmed the village and killed the cattle. But when
the missionary invited him to try his power again,
he declined, saying that the missionary himself must
be a white conjuror, from the strange doctrines he
taught.

At this village the journey outward came to a close,
for the wild Namaquas, as they were called, were
jealous of the visit, and were preparing to oppose the
travellers. It would have been easy for Africaner and
his men to have forced their way; but the chief him-
self proposed to return rather than shed blood.

So the waggon was turned southwards, and the
travellers began to retrace their weary steps to Afri-
caner’s kraal.

On their journey they were often exposed to danger
from lions. One evening, on their way homewards,
when they were quietly resting for the night beside
a pool of water, and were just closing their evening’
worship, a terrible roar was heard close by, and, in
the next instant the weary oxen who had been peace-
fully chewing the cud, rushed madly over the fire,
round which the travellers were seated, and scattered,



MOFFAT, THE MISSIONARY. 89

in wild confusion, fire and men, huts, hymn-books,
guns, and Bibles—disappearing, as rapidly as they had
come, in a cloud of dust and sand.

A shout was raised—* A lion !—a lion! ?? and A fri-
caner, Jumping up, grasped a firebrand, and followed
by his men, rushed down a dark and gloomy ravine
after the terrified oxen. Probably the lion was scared
with the shouting and the fire, for no more was heard
of him through the night, and the oxen were recovered.
This was a better ending to the alarm than might have
been expected; for often, in spite of shouting and fire.
brands, a hungry hon will break in upon a night
encampment, and bound off with its prey ; and some-
times will prefer a man to an ox,

I must tell you of only one other adventure which
befell our travellers on this journey, to show you what
~ heathenism is, and how much need there is for Chris-
tian missionaries in heathen lands. _-

Mr. Moffat and his companions had travelled all
day over a sandy plain, and passed a sleepless night
from extreme thirst and fatigue. Rising early the
next morning, and leaving the people to get the
waggon ready to follow, the missionary and one of the
men went forward in search of game.

After passing a ridge of hills, and advancing into
the plain beyond, they saw a little smoke rising from
a few bushes; and animated by the sight, they started
forward, hoping to meet with some one who could
direct them to a fountain. When they had arrived
within a few hundred yards of the spot, they were
startled at the fresh marks of lions. They had no
ouns, and hesitated a moment whether to proceed ;
but thirst urged them on, so they advanced cautiously,
keeping a good look out at every bush they passed.

On reaching the spot, the mystery of the smoke



90 MOFFAT, THE MISSIONARY.

was disclosed. Seated by a smouldering fire was an
aged woman—a living skeleton, so weak and helpless,
that when, terrified by the appearance of a white man,
she tried to rise, she sunk back again to the earth. —

“ Fear not, mother,” said the missionary, “ we are
friends, and will do you no harm, How came you
hero? and who are you?”

“Tam a woman,” she replied; “I have been here
four days; my children have left me here to die.”

«Your children ? ”

“Yes,” said the poor Hottentot woman, raising
her hand to her shrivelled bosom; “ my own children

uw = SiR is ss il me aie
Y yh Mae RT Gebel fied 3
SY Sd
ERR
4 cs



cil +
Uh aay
We lta

Spe OR
Bee ZL NN
CEPT TO DIE.

—three sons and two daughters. They are gone to
yonder blue mountains, and have left me here to die.”

«And pray why did they leave you?” asked Mr.
Moffat, kindly.

The old woman spread out her hands :—“‘I am
old, you see, and am no longer able to serve them.
When they kill game, I am too feeble to help in carry-
ing home the flesh. I am not able to gather wood to
make fire. I cannot carry their children on my back
as I used to do.” :



MOFFAT, THE MISSIONARY. 91

The missionary was much affected. At length he
said, he wondered she had escaped the lions, which
seem to have been near.

“‘] hear the lions,’ she answered; “but there is
nothing on me that they would eat. See here ;”
and she raised the skin of her arm, which hung loose
upon it. There was indeed no flesh—nothing but
bone and skin.

At that moment the waggon drew near. This
greatly alarmed her; she seemed to think it an animal.
Assuring her that it would do her no harm, Mr. Moffat
offered to put her into it, and take her with him. But.
the thought of this struck more terror into her than
the expectation of death.

“Tf you take me with you to another village,” she
sald, “they will do the same thing again. It is our
custom. lam nearly dead; I do not want to die
again.” |

It was useless to reason with her, and to have
attempted to move her by force would have hastened
her death. The poor oxen were raging with thirst,
and the travellers were nearly delirious. To have
remained would have been fatal to them; but before
they left the poor outcast, they collected a quantity
of fuel, gave her a good supply of dry meat, some
tobacco, and a knife, and telling her to keep up her
courage and a good fire, lest the lions after all should
come upon her and destroy her—they promised to
return as speedily as possible.

In a day or two they performed the promise, but
found the old woman and everything gone; and, on
further examination, the fresh footmarks of men were
discovered near. Several months afterwards the mis-
sionary was told that the sons, seeing from a distance
the waggon halt at the spot where they had left their



92 MOFFAT, THE MISSIONARY.

mother to perish, returned, expecting to find only her
mangled remains. But finding her still alive, and
supphed with food, and on hearing her tell of the
strangers’ kindness, they were alarmed, and dreading
the vengeance of the great chief, as they supposed the
white man to be, they took her home, and afterwards
provided for her with more than usual care.



IT have not time to tell how, after this, the travellers
were again nearly perishing with thirst ; but how they
reached Africaner’s kraal safely at last, and found that
the business of the mission had been going on pros-
perously while they were away. I should like to tell
also, but must not, for want of space, how Mr. Moffat,
some time afterwards, took a long scamper—on horse-
back this time—across the deserts of Namaqua-land
in another direction, to look for another station for his
friend Africaner and himself: and of the adventures he
met with :—how he was made very ill, and nearly lost
his life, by drinking water from a fountain which the
natives had poisoned—how he and his attendants lost
their way more than once; and how they suffered from
cold, hunger, and thirst—the narrow escapes they had
from lions and hyenas; and once from a hippopotamus
—and how the white man was, on one occasion, when
wandering from the rest of his party, threatened by a
troop of ugly, grinning, impudent baboons—how, also,
he met with unexpected kindness from the poor Bush-
men of the desert, for whom few people have willingly
a good word to give—and how at length they once
more returned to Africaner’s village.

I should like to tell you too, if I had room, which
I have not, how Mr. Moffat went from village to village,



MOFFAT, THE MISSIONARY. 93

all around Africaner’s kraal, and preached to the poor
Namaqua Hottentots; and how his heart was cheered
with believing that God was blessing his labours, so
that he thought little of the hardships he had to
endure, but thanked God again and again for having
put it into his heart to become a missionary.

Kispecially in Africaner’s kraal, and among his
tribe, was there such a difference to be seen, that you
would not have believed them to be the same place and
people.

CHAPTER IX.
RETURN TO CAPE TOWN,

Azout two years after the journey into Namaqua-
land, of which I have told you in a former chapter,
a wageon, drawn as usual by a number of oxen, was
seen slowly winding through a pleasant valley in Cape
Colony; and by the direction it was taking, 14 was
plain that the travellers, whoever they might be, were
proceeding towards Cape Town. |

Ona hill at a short distance was a pleasant farm-
house; and the sight of the waggon had drawn the
farmer and his wife and children to the door. Wemay
suppose therefore that many travellers were not in the
habit of passing that way.

Presently the waggon stopped, and the farmer’s
attention was drawn to a nearer spot in the same direc-
tion, by the approach of a sun-burnt stranger in the
dress of a European, but who had not much the ap-
pearance of a colonist.

“Who can he be?” thought the farmer, who was
a good, kind-hearted, and hospitable man—a descen-
dant of one of the old Dutch colonists—* but whoever



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describe
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31a105b37645e4ec1c4aa334721470b1
a1fd17ebfef56e59a9241a567f90a52cf2078a9f
'2012-05-27T21:21:24-04:00'
describe
'32579' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJCU' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
c39ca59a3f6e5bd3ccfe6bb2380f79b8
fb631bc4cd767e133e252c856636786aca65cc6e
'2012-05-27T21:22:30-04:00'
describe
'34728' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJCV' 'sip-files00280thm.jpg'
8efa865a61122119247f2aab78316544
0aae7f1fb65089942f3c1560b842e0db1d6dc86e
'2012-05-27T21:19:49-04:00'
describe
'43872' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJCW' 'sip-files00034.pro'
0488f746e2ec5825236db8be7c9fe27a
ecc025ae3833039661cc092cb47d75121e990d37
'2012-05-27T21:22:08-04:00'
describe
'1704800' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJCX' 'sip-files00093.tif'
c24ad5ba4a5e6a8d8988e4181b7f5a4f
c930d00db8f9754fea5173e1d860ea57fc0678c6
'2012-05-27T21:23:02-04:00'
describe
'31338' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJCY' 'sip-files00241thm.jpg'
77d4349674ebe649420125be72d5c6ef
7b2f849e23f2057e6373570b9ef199c4744252d7
'2012-05-27T21:20:13-04:00'
describe
'47130' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJCZ' 'sip-files00177.pro'
c6fbf3049343a6887c124da8c9a99817
ff0dd7ea26d20fd7b73955b0ad19094f795a255b
'2012-05-27T21:30:18-04:00'
describe
'31938' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJDA' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
536ed6330024c30c57e0b7a398fa5a61
e129237b48905d9560d09cccca617b149acb8c33
'2012-05-27T21:29:38-04:00'
describe
'46750' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJDB' 'sip-files00088.pro'
26b1be7ff1a5c9009b657792e1f7fe98
b7e8f06d9cbc03f8fb459ddffde3e4d8b72e75f5
'2012-05-27T21:31:15-04:00'
describe
'250156' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJDC' 'sip-files00200.jpg'
b2c5b656df13f8b6eccf11592538a6e2
12acb7fc3e8b9b15e26c69f27d9040e1829633a7
'2012-05-27T21:21:37-04:00'
describe
'1704900' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJDD' 'sip-files00042.tif'
e0fef6ad57cfdd2361c20889ae1fa46f
7866c40ce4bb8f04d6055a948370b790bf8d0b50
'2012-05-27T21:25:39-04:00'
describe
'1701108' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJDE' 'sip-files00247.tif'
1767144d80a52f88460cda7cabfdc33e
53aa41fd33789bd89d01ee6444c3c5bdab59d984
'2012-05-27T21:26:32-04:00'
describe
'1705348' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJDF' 'sip-files00091.tif'
e968699ee63e85e690bf6d7a71baffa2
dad6025d684dcf575bf830ae49bf58be17598549
'2012-05-27T21:20:27-04:00'
describe
'1704992' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJDG' 'sip-files00147.tif'
7c2a340f559645a9abf9dc598a034ecf
4642b8121a73e47b6148eae11b1fae148ccfcdb5
'2012-05-27T21:27:29-04:00'
describe
'33924' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJDH' 'sip-files00252thm.jpg'
59290ac6496aaf3e5f6b317af85c6457
097a3f6ca7288213fc575fa5ffa34a0070bfc4a5
'2012-05-27T21:25:36-04:00'
describe
'94135' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJDI' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
f3ab3eb3858a3df6a01ae3407e5a9693
1f36f77eaebb0d1e12a50a2c222dab8811734c38
'2012-05-27T21:18:40-04:00'
describe
'87662' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJDJ' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
72093dd940dd1d20a75bcafdee295cf5
9ec02b27e6f733afc0f2998194ecdbe09c41298e
'2012-05-27T21:31:40-04:00'
describe
'1704700' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJDK' 'sip-files00039.tif'
f1f06d4347a8443257871296d81d0617
135c6d75a410428a1229dc178d938cfffdfe8f7c
'2012-05-27T21:18:20-04:00'
describe
'34937' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJDL' 'sip-files00262thm.jpg'
41a054ce34fbc43327c2dc290864184b
ba6287a210a83e38475a5e5bc5da0e5f44c1e4d5
'2012-05-27T21:22:19-04:00'
describe
'1705820' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJDM' 'sip-files00118.tif'
1836bd9bb97046c7b625cb6ad1287a34
4909942fcdab307e1dca286323578483e279d849
'2012-05-27T21:22:04-04:00'
describe
'95953' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJDN' 'sip-files00308.QC.jpg'
100c8654a5a0c3b7200efff6240051c6
ea0f89aa54b452d03483c702392da26e41bf8834
'2012-05-27T21:21:33-04:00'
describe
'257417' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJDO' 'sip-files00148.jp2'
c62e80a309ef5735a428d21ee8e336f8
4aebea05fdb9faa4065a9f73356d9d06c54123a2
'2012-05-27T21:28:35-04:00'
describe
'46485' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJDP' 'sip-files00224.pro'
c06173be3a31e9bc0086b76eb84bd2ff
324ff3436c52c9c35e643ce04e918de856ffd4ae
'2012-05-27T21:21:36-04:00'
describe
'96488' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJDQ' 'sip-files00312.QC.jpg'
8130f433edcd240841236035b1ecd979
aceb055907b860da35cd6e8208b2f4d9b2b99e9e
'2012-05-27T21:27:47-04:00'
describe
'266220' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJDR' 'sip-files00183.jp2'
0c3b3966ce4c7a1895bb0fe068887109
239a36161d27cfc48291c0040a3f68b858b97223
'2012-05-27T21:19:53-04:00'
describe
'82109' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJDS' 'sip-files00152.QC.jpg'
58ac8cc015c98206d133f9bd51bde265
435833a86c1e8619eaa12d0e0b612d1a2a553f24
'2012-05-27T21:20:49-04:00'
describe
'34786' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJDT' 'sip-files00276thm.jpg'
cecca322deb900975509a07880a4199e
47e25fdf6ef0098e6711e1b8f2f21b8548f5a569
'2012-05-27T21:23:55-04:00'
describe
'1705104' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJDU' 'sip-files00109.tif'
45146eb179838d3a5ff0a2dcc3dd7a3a
5ad7ed224b863531bc31fa3fb0cf65af4ca70414
'2012-05-27T21:30:11-04:00'
describe
'1705932' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJDV' 'sip-files00190.tif'
04f71e58e625c85c378d74087406b63b
268a6aebb76dfc192f0d098e934175b60544a420
'2012-05-27T21:30:30-04:00'
describe
'253447' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJDW' 'sip-files00173.jp2'
4d45b476984878059919a9fa014f5567
de1c6a837ad263e0d18229a7e79661c8f51a9502
'2012-05-27T21:20:45-04:00'
describe
'1705568' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJDX' 'sip-files00204.tif'
d59771db187e193adba01bd580197e93
e28c06ab901c0b4f8d240a8a4053805ae7877c62
'2012-05-27T21:26:08-04:00'
describe
'1705424' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJDY' 'sip-files00265.tif'
b6e005202aa71073c3579e1f1439f8e1
1167215ed29f2fe2e987dfb4cfe9444455edc0be
describe
'1892' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJDZ' 'sip-files00271.txt'
93723c5a0146a9c685b2be3eb7b88087
9359b461fba22bb208fe241ee95b2fbcc91c943d
'2012-05-27T21:19:58-04:00'
describe
'262488' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJEA' 'sip-files00284.jp2'
b78f94ba9c9d9137c314a23dbcfa9ac4
68aea541423f632ac9786bab2a068a5aabf2df2b
'2012-05-27T21:30:06-04:00'
describe
'997' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJEB' 'sip-files00008.txt'
dcb95c454743f59a5bf656b86e8edc11
8ba295e4690e065e5e080f556a80c6408c7ac7eb
'2012-05-27T21:23:32-04:00'
describe
'1705464' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJEC' 'sip-files00140.tif'
7e6adf42dd0a8dfeb1b76b2a8f6b70bf
2578dd6f9e70f1c9309667c88366795fe19c3bb9
'2012-05-27T21:18:49-04:00'
describe
'4744' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJED' 'sip-files00116.pro'
a3706bff809c87b961b120ef256d380f
338d29468b6f12160b2f13f8357f0e572df44abb
'2012-05-27T21:24:17-04:00'
describe
'213191' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJEE' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
cca7d5a5c72f62dbc3b7919dd96cfe77
c5be04d712d2bd0320cda4dbf63151689b5f55b0
'2012-05-27T21:32:02-04:00'
describe
'292782' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJEF' 'sip-files00319.jpg'
0909d496d802e4b7f1e35b12e19e33cc
9b7667bf57e4a0b267fbd19d69910e6d9ff2c1a7
'2012-05-27T21:27:31-04:00'
describe
'1825' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJEG' 'sip-files00025.txt'
c011294562e8af0be0975becaff2e6ba
278dda9e92359872066b3b78717ac8d94cdd6b16
'2012-05-27T21:26:27-04:00'
describe
'82219' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJEH' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
42de41d088074f99b375a18564cf7fa6
2842f89e47f6ea10bd3dabfa3530b0288e1a7d03
'2012-05-27T21:19:45-04:00'
describe
'256374' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJEI' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
e2e542a7b09992c037f77eee0232d04d
25475a892dbbb47a699a559e76f65d3123b0aa87
'2012-05-27T21:26:23-04:00'
describe
'234754' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJEJ' 'sip-files00244.jpg'
b7afbb26e7cc9ae220aec5814d5e6ae8
f030c3f389698a92178a30e120006089a6c87fd3
'2012-05-27T21:22:13-04:00'
describe
'231823' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJEK' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
d162702964147c4093356c0e58a6c66b
0c646af8629ddede331d0b328d3f90bb2e05dd6b
'2012-05-27T21:28:24-04:00'
describe
'33411' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJEL' 'sip-files00142thm.jpg'
5fa153c6f73274897d3234d8991c5a04
5d57f29ffe2f33662eeddc92ab1ad8851ce84189
'2012-05-27T21:27:32-04:00'
describe
'51088' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJEM' 'sip-files00182.pro'
2a6990e730b08e4b011d397e23e3c1e9
7a7eb712159721b1dc15dd5ce500af88457960f6
describe
'273110' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJEN' 'sip-files00329.jpg'
c0064af6863f0eecebb4a66403a92e95
ef14f9ebd627b2bf1956b7075056d1754f825b05
'2012-05-27T21:21:28-04:00'
describe
'46636' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJEO' 'sip-files00242.pro'
5e3078baba06c100a550dc7767147d77
9e8b855e6a5efdb86e18ddc79ef947088b123288
'2012-05-30T08:53:20-04:00'
describe
'11333' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJEP' 'sip-files00306.jpg'
551268893ad7552ad91c7cc8aa18f351
b0c6803f238bdb78797c9bd6eb67eec5a63dbad3
'2012-05-27T21:29:17-04:00'
describe
'90694' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJEQ' 'sip-files00302.QC.jpg'
119f80095dc0ee91aff6d243f728b06e
44f904164848b164b00ea034984479ce84dcca8c
'2012-05-27T21:24:30-04:00'
describe
'235858' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJER' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
238f39a945d85628e64c80830ff98b93
37533bee4aefc56b44d03d35026ff401bd6f7291
'2012-05-27T21:20:11-04:00'
describe
'1704696' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJES' 'sip-files00286.tif'
05602f560d372c463f15f8a33c04b6ee
0fd4579a2324de7d3118aacf401b813a572d60fa
'2012-05-27T21:24:08-04:00'
describe
'31761' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJET' 'sip-files00186thm.jpg'
2d9bb4cbdc7e66281f2bf6eced5314ee
1ce0cfa7ab3e1fd6b7963d32066ea25391175f64
'2012-05-27T21:31:16-04:00'
describe
'1704076' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJEU' 'sip-files00103.tif'
43847ddce0e3e0f646b5eb20ed5d8c59
f3d68ecbf5903e524f5c55662e3b50905c3ef325
'2012-05-27T21:31:55-04:00'
describe
'1860' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJEV' 'sip-files00172.txt'
0ae2000413342250e42c0f75b8a9c1e5
700c4981c214665ba4b88daa6a22d9bdc9424932
'2012-05-27T21:29:09-04:00'
describe
'1705292' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJEW' 'sip-files00088.tif'
d7d657aca8d3ab0ed819f0c1ea10994f
7305e1df97e54456c2e14129cbeb7c8b23805f1a
'2012-05-27T21:28:39-04:00'
describe
'228921' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJEX' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
240fdb4b622f0bd26a83bd20cb816448
6807fe89ebda77e9d468f7f55599f8adaabae244
'2012-05-27T21:28:06-04:00'
describe
'22992' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJEY' 'sip-files00004thm.jpg'
28d950129633fef1bee8fa65bab64818
a22f7cc64b87b2c24c1203a4b4e6515f7a6bf230
'2012-05-27T21:23:05-04:00'
describe
'32606' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJEZ' 'sip-files00173thm.jpg'
f7aa78655db8b331b240c371fbf54dfb
84d876558ec2f7d9f17a10f04cefb065eef29ea9
'2012-05-27T21:29:20-04:00'
describe
'1876' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJFA' 'sip-files00147.txt'
0c88c27d681415608bb179868f1647f5
2c944e829303d679389a12569eeb49f7c3767e4c
'2012-05-27T21:19:55-04:00'
describe
'330974' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJFB' 'sip-files00310.jp2'
84cd7fddf4cbfa4276014f506c98e7f6
81523a96fc94e21d1189688b6924a763ad9fd6e6
'2012-05-27T21:23:51-04:00'
describe
'255578' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJFC' 'sip-files00293.jpg'
5e60304f906484f0808de4137598d5cc
f91bee49989bb294e095b04554ff37c8aec71e6e
describe
'50991' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJFD' 'sip-files00164.pro'
49afad6c003149f316bd59ff7e64d9fe
6deff84f453de45e9d52866a10831831442eb0ef
'2012-05-27T21:18:44-04:00'
describe
'42282' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJFE' 'sip-files00108.pro'
48ba70ac7d63ccad9cfd239a1d3dea24
97f79d8ad2da01731ac3d2a76dfcaa3d14456db0
'2012-05-27T21:18:58-04:00'
describe
'232928' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJFF' 'sip-files00222.jpg'
b0ef31038a0303b5bf9c2090654ea07b
9e47cd4a10cbe3c73db5675b820c17d24e45b0cf
'2012-05-27T21:19:41-04:00'
describe
'86328' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJFG' 'sip-files00219.QC.jpg'
334dad5a7a3354b05f4cc28b31bf1ba6
2b58d3fa247c530d498534fb43f8e3272fc2d66c
'2012-05-27T21:21:18-04:00'
describe
'93534' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJFH' 'sip-files00295.QC.jpg'
6ae8fc7cf23d6f69cb49e6166ef0d981
cb57a701770e2bb85f6a3329afc9878300b7bbb8
'2012-05-27T21:26:43-04:00'
describe
'91049' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJFI' 'sip-files00156.QC.jpg'
69792901eb1a47858085235ffc7485d7
73fb86ee9fcc321fccf7ffc65b1d7cd021c08096
'2012-05-27T21:31:37-04:00'
describe
'50818' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJFJ' 'sip-files00012.pro'
0d8cc2315c4250fc124c034c15078d15
af557e6310fcf9264511548dfd3803f5091cea71
'2012-05-27T21:30:07-04:00'
describe
'234033' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJFK' 'sip-files00253.jpg'
d8b16c742a2122f45031f9db22705d18
df7ec9fe73e0814c965eda98d2d3bb72fcd12de9
'2012-05-27T21:20:14-04:00'
describe
'78555' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJFL' 'sip-files00005.jpg'
f45073c9daa0983e1c8f0bdc4e778392
f9624ad1f70fee0a5ae02b99523c04c3e3ece42e
'2012-05-27T21:28:29-04:00'
describe
'32625' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJFM' 'sip-files00197thm.jpg'
b5c8b2ba2bb4e32a83d537ed7270ed5e
c620eb777ab351c065f4bff81534c4587b528fc1
'2012-05-27T21:27:35-04:00'
describe
'40633' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJFN' 'sip-files00040.pro'
94a140458692ffb106b99cdf97382a61
66e7595b2a3d0f9dda8c6ba13043b35dd476b6a8
'2012-05-27T21:31:36-04:00'
describe
'1906' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJFO' 'sip-files00276.txt'
e1b21cfee2d4c77f81f7425a8ef87460
dd020b8c72aadb2439f3c1610d35babafd617d14
'2012-05-27T21:28:12-04:00'
describe
'50723' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJFP' 'sip-files00174.pro'
dffbbef2664a59e7ddf892a583543497
82ec51229ab8320e6d5f80c772e2e764aac22ff5
'2012-05-27T21:31:33-04:00'
describe
'1684' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJFQ' 'sip-files00215.txt'
3e6a34d4695dc20dbd89172ce303fdd3
4a54f31b1cebb32ed27754fe69bdc4cc2135adb9
describe
'32381' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJFR' 'sip-files00201thm.jpg'
4e043f3b7f66f0cf89100e7d0630c5c9
6a1757e47833e6a68927bdc0c74d4974894c5165
describe
'33529' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJFS' 'sip-files00111.pro'
6bcd0b782700421b4ed32a6bea1bde78
418ca7bd631428c4c8226f36e0e2c2e223ba4107
'2012-05-27T21:21:34-04:00'
describe
'258446' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJFT' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
d9e04b3a22b2e663ece7b56a1f94e6fb
cb6ce3c58ec086c67820b2bc5decb9982a286206
'2012-05-27T21:24:00-04:00'
describe
'254772' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJFU' 'sip-files00155.jp2'
f060c2710fe95447e57cb9fb6af33d61
3bcb915028d435538c40909154063f1924a77cab
'2012-05-27T21:27:00-04:00'
describe
'384753' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJFV' 'sip-files00161.jp2'
8d6badd2ae262b6527bf9016383c3b35
23e95dddef7409463e90bbd9992af235b9ad1e33
describe
'91503' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJFW' 'sip-files00148.QC.jpg'
1833eafe4c1206fc8326aa543e5b8b72
89fc91e3994feb510416fe9a00ff79fa39a6ee59
'2012-05-27T21:27:52-04:00'
describe
'28451' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJFX' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
b9a3f1bcc334a9c83cb753c5a351e9ac
a29f1a182b5cfd8e4d66e93892d6775c732cdd3b
'2012-05-27T21:29:56-04:00'
describe
'33074' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJFY' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
cf9a12c258b79514eafc22d479abf032
5707420965896030f3da2e2e4b20eb442a163048
'2012-05-27T21:30:59-04:00'
describe
'93431' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJFZ' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
6efaa5d57e350517b8a30d121cddcce9
2a4509b95aa500fee55cb981dc0ab8598b2a61b9
describe
'245241' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJGA' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
48c52e6583506538a756ca93d8d6cb01
5816c630afed2af4d10c45d58fb5d06ad5452de3
'2012-05-27T21:25:56-04:00'
describe
'242772' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJGB' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
03d65698cd0ebb91f891e2899140aae8
7502f43a16142b15e2d2afe8e194a6b224bf20b4
'2012-05-27T21:32:03-04:00'
describe
'1751' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJGC' 'sip-files00235.txt'
72c6b85fa506ecd40c651a665c3e024a
e09383c48e6cbaf3ec0c0eb9cafbad042d33aeb8
'2012-05-27T21:20:43-04:00'
describe
'87862' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJGD' 'sip-files00201.QC.jpg'
da01c274489e24ffd955bbb8880fc88a
0c5236f87279287023ae72c3571386c3faa22d77
'2012-05-30T08:53:21-04:00'
describe
'13513828' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJGE' 'sip-files00335.tif'
a18e322cecff46d0e3b2b731e19ee295
64af3ffe87dcd34f7b542eb178516a63b119b8ee
'2012-05-27T21:31:41-04:00'
describe
'97874' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJGF' 'sip-files00311.pro'
af526bd0eeccdc9eef68157e2187d2c9
257a8ef5348c8733535b0810436fcab6ef96358b
describe
'45398' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJGG' 'sip-files00134.pro'
12bac32d46982cae4d6e966d41fe313a
dd8c4ff964bae37cba3f8218778f21036e379ccb
'2012-05-27T21:22:56-04:00'
describe
'69968' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJGH' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
b5b0e5f29ed7a0f34867da3afc7203b6
15d6f5386fc0abfbcaceadea3181aa6791255279
'2012-05-27T21:18:30-04:00'
describe
'243758' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJGI' 'sip-files00298.jpg'
a743bac4b49b0a6ffb2e8bf16ef9dadd
38c8c5d59feb31a181402a497748b019ba0315a8
'2012-05-27T21:24:16-04:00'
describe
'248135' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJGJ' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
22edab8eaf484b5fc055eb0fcd2cf3ca
2d27d9b75907b49db97b61b4c67dbf5379a05228
'2012-05-27T21:24:42-04:00'
describe
'237807' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJGK' 'sip-files00201.jpg'
bb3cf82d35f73990073d780e49e55cae
7a273060887a4b2ccbe9818583f052fd825e3299
'2012-05-27T21:19:35-04:00'
describe
'31954' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJGL' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
981fef93d73429bf51bbd01e1e66911f
d4a233a2552b7d8846919ab6cff0edfcd37baa3d
'2012-05-27T21:29:35-04:00'
describe
'1838' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJGM' 'sip-files00229.txt'
f8546cd2b8bc05852f3ce649e98cac9b
599932f2179589d1f7517506b54d9ab079b4efa6
'2012-05-27T21:25:19-04:00'
describe
'372' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJGN' 'sip-files00192.txt'
d3a40da73c56e4ed846c464ce8ffb3bf
521858099a896768312dea85e79d07d45fb57b92
'2012-05-27T21:27:24-04:00'
describe
'234274' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJGO' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
4c0965a693440b86cc9ead0dbb5d9b92
c01bc3739be45ee591378836d5167c39803c3f59
'2012-05-27T21:31:48-04:00'
describe
'1705868' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJGP' 'sip-files00178.tif'
92d2870d8ecb654f0fb36e96f83e41ec
38628853c610b2cd0e6821d823546d97545e0756
'2012-05-27T21:30:22-04:00'
describe
'238506' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJGQ' 'sip-files00194.jpg'
4390ddbe48bdf2677384765f71feb5ec
7ec098d19ad435cb40d28be3e0a6cbf816f9d3e4
'2012-05-27T21:21:44-04:00'
describe
'32757' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJGR' 'sip-files00219thm.jpg'
b123fc677b03b3207182affb34a54d19
77f5234f2b4a3470160c7b130771c73762e23809
'2012-05-27T21:26:28-04:00'
describe
'35804' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJGS' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
3a747903939d73c9ab0de802e30aa5b1
54cb29a5a544c3e753d76645e8246c0fef3392d5
'2012-05-27T21:31:47-04:00'
describe
'262514' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJGT' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
f4c1e5a4222915dcd6751a99b94e6e1b
bacdbb554115bdb2098322c9c9e2ff1e25f9bc28
'2012-05-27T21:25:24-04:00'
describe
'15926' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJGU' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
484418bcff50bffe558eefb18f7ca70c
ffe90ee81cab137736ea69f1bcd9610d9666766d
'2012-05-27T21:28:16-04:00'
describe
'32361' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJGV' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
84cd80ba4fa7223d42b75d62aca56aed
2a4f75aa208fb2d5cb0b706b93f1689736373e2f
'2012-05-27T21:21:03-04:00'
describe
'89613' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJGW' 'sip-files00194.QC.jpg'
b4d00d9bd734a2b6be531cd81d3c7a5c
81da6e983692db6c17034d5ef0c71701f5954447
'2012-05-27T21:28:01-04:00'
describe
'241636' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJGX' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
68646d3f1c745fe82da6b8e4d2137740
06a91e00bed9e6506ca9323d6e9e19ca6f466c8f
'2012-05-27T21:18:57-04:00'
describe
'217770' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJGY' 'sip-files00250.jp2'
fd57ea54ad7b4df5a3d74d1063f5c0b8
e4825957255f5c8ebd7ea6e2bdd27a802f3026ae
'2012-05-27T21:25:30-04:00'
describe
'1924' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJGZ' 'sip-files00165.pro'
94438fe24801814ab96bb8555274f2df
382c52d53d75962a996aa2d66e84c137374356a8
'2012-05-27T21:29:02-04:00'
describe
'116579' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJHA' 'sip-files00192.jpg'
9164c09c1963210decbb3392f95b2ad8
f4a3da67cec815ec0737a0d10ff295fd7d1bad44
'2012-05-27T21:23:00-04:00'
describe
'251730' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJHB' 'sip-files00287.jpg'
4c01929e99808c3d5a3c24c52429740f
811fe759d3087b2b6eb3a37a7e141ee9cd73510f
'2012-05-27T21:32:17-04:00'
describe
'1706868' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJHC' 'sip-files00328.tif'
19985b488c1a8e651e6e7db46931a850
ccc5eeb795ace0ac397a1b8aec6c37ee6417100a
'2012-05-27T21:25:50-04:00'
describe
'1704784' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJHD' 'sip-files00153.tif'
14efcef7437b4ecdfaee401fd9b60f50
01151f4f77e34b9ecaf1d798e5dbfa19ab4224c9
'2012-05-27T21:27:37-04:00'
describe
'243813' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJHE' 'sip-files00222.jp2'
8db84dd39e09fda4a6ae51867cfdb26d
8e7661745fbd922c23414bb8dbfe1021563962e8
'2012-05-27T21:30:51-04:00'
describe
'49423' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJHF' 'sip-files00058.pro'
e5f87c95e734dfb7e098bff887295743
af52d23b3ec93edbe016fedeaa951290e79f2256
'2012-05-27T21:27:39-04:00'
describe
'100998' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJHG' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
26734c3179bc2c8ec3e3cb64d680a43c
cbf7ba0262ab1dbd904f7d43137140f004935f28
describe
'1907' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJHH' 'sip-files00274.txt'
af9ccc38c6a18913be6845f74b6eb61c
315dcdc88af0b5901411384fd073206b5f3f13b9
'2012-05-27T21:28:37-04:00'
describe
'229784' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJHI' 'sip-files00226.jpg'
2a0fbac1d8e62d401b0d447f648d426e
8ea310e8b20a2347fd29443519f207347f5ef2dd
'2012-05-27T21:27:25-04:00'
describe
'3063' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJHJ' 'sip-files00338.txt'
5470eeb391c8b278df43766316f10a55
c205f4d91e2f950ebc1b8275734be8a4768dcd1c
describe
'325' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJHK' 'sip-files00209.txt'
7f26eae09cdba66b241741be9a540d4c
5dd2a7735f41f948cab2a00d57d71b8e358207eb
'2012-05-27T21:20:15-04:00'
describe
'3289' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJHL' 'sip-files00343.pro'
79c19405077fcaf4ad59f8c13cff337e
362dc8e36c26b03a8b961276f538520a803304b5
'2012-05-27T21:30:05-04:00'
describe
'210303' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJHM' 'sip-files00238.jp2'
3080c286aed82e50c07bf1af70b99237
8c9ce98347e357359b709b142eed9b279180c722
'2012-05-27T21:21:05-04:00'
describe
'85791' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJHN' 'sip-files00171.QC.jpg'
7795e3c1e8c612495d6f120920c12659
fc1c8021363957b84a261b5cf61a36b2736018b7
'2012-05-27T21:29:36-04:00'
describe
'236262' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJHO' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
0d9b364f4968876bf68609cce9c69afa
cb0c52ca87e6d2ecdba14318ec73b3e9ff93c836
describe
'47827' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJHP' 'sip-files00230.pro'
dd3231697a654ce4677d44fad4127d1b
09ab3e26f95b3893700a3605d30fff79a5cd13d8
'2012-05-27T21:26:55-04:00'
describe
'215504' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJHQ' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
85b7e289d1aa7415a75cd96ea7fee5bf
95277bf9b78a9883b35be78e015f7e73820b3eb4
'2012-05-27T21:20:55-04:00'
describe
'252708' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJHR' 'sip-files00261.jpg'
813abe827e315b9b679d7a09800e4310
13b86da20b8e081975c843a5710ff4ac9002d5d4
'2012-05-27T21:27:07-04:00'
describe
'251169' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJHS' 'sip-files00280.jpg'
042c3ac2a9e78fed5fddc569622875e2
ddda0df575437de3a596e8edafc58f21e5b18a4e
'2012-05-27T21:22:52-04:00'
describe
'364127' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJHT' 'sip-files00002.jpg'
88c836ad7a03859c48dbf716a4ada6f8
9f64d47d18a64dc00c54837a991df2c7cbbae150
'2012-05-27T21:20:39-04:00'
describe
'261378' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJHU' 'sip-files00279.jpg'
0c03d8a65d0fd446a9efe263ff9f21a0
238a8d8954878c63e222a3bcbd39a07bc85ec639
'2012-05-27T21:19:36-04:00'
describe
'311838' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJHV' 'sip-files00332.jpg'
0038500352c49ea22ce74b5fab343f01
20d99bffe006ae9e3250f1e5109e41af49e77131
'2012-05-27T21:24:55-04:00'
describe
'267425' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJHW' 'sip-files00163.jp2'
a88efee5585a5d38b92bda912a255bbb
e55955bfc94a05ca1cf3b3ca5ba9998d444818af
'2012-05-27T21:18:46-04:00'
describe
'33678' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJHX' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
ac2a6202afabb91e6374ea3ddee094e6
ef7b90928c9c1c6a476dd6a474a62f7801f102c9
'2012-05-27T21:20:59-04:00'
describe
'222939' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJHY' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
8cb9a6a95e0e12a16d5985127f564e06
86269b01e7e7eb11c9dfa331242024e2470ae3ae
describe
'1887' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJHZ' 'sip-files00097.txt'
b3b3dc158f35d17649b07959539bfd3f
1f7cd08ec4f6e40f87774e0fdb5899a6523bcb07
'2012-05-27T21:32:09-04:00'
describe
'29443' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJIA' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
ecdc5bb72b6a413b72aa70bb3168ba74
6ae4310b7b5ad2252ebf65e8622e785a3a20fa08
'2012-05-27T21:23:26-04:00'
describe
'58828' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJIB' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
b73e51e0df326daada4408d00681f7e7
4654c70992d868d04e184486508b7fe3f5dffbd3
describe
'1706124' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJIC' 'sip-files00277.tif'
35a68e696978962712f5c2adb42dbbfe
e5f76ca726b48476c28b27c0f20fe1e70c4cffc3
'2012-05-27T21:22:43-04:00'
describe
'1715' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJID' 'sip-files00154.txt'
a32640645af43cb06b30ec89b8f18c82
8d55f80a4ce11477b608f9eb911e4eaf002b4447
'2012-05-27T21:24:02-04:00'
describe
'47249' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJIE' 'sip-files00255.pro'
0411e009e01ce8eb0af192d30a6570e1
40cd97ef6f94c4ec7111517b9930990cb905808a
'2012-05-27T21:29:43-04:00'
describe
'65002' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJIF' 'sip-files00207.QC.jpg'
4c1c82053f2458861fc1fb44bf91c3d0
7dc6fbf20866506021956ae8e5c5d7f125ea8eea
'2012-05-27T21:19:50-04:00'
describe
'186798' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJIG' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
235dc499bfefc88e218c7c7c00966377
9df814e775d6019a60a12881618cd704f9b62bad
describe
'8908' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJIH' 'sip-files00306.QC.jpg'
4ca8655a09f7257e9e35880acb3abb5c
264c96941a098bf8916fb231de0e10bad794186d
'2012-05-27T21:26:17-04:00'
describe
'3239' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJII' 'sip-files00328.txt'
f25b43328fa4027fc202e524362c667b
ccde7ef926cc275064e751ad9740ab585a029bf8
'2012-05-27T21:27:30-04:00'
describe
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Invalid character
'1704904' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJIJ' 'sip-files00064.tif'
ff7e63911e3c34244091aee626e1571d
4716d1c9d77aae1d7b53c8b7963e643a1d9530f0
'2012-05-27T21:21:42-04:00'
describe
'32448' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJIK' 'sip-files00291thm.jpg'
eeff06f8b73b8ccee4d94024166d2e87
4491aede590f595d4c761cd8eeb36ac8b0aacc16
'2012-05-27T21:22:32-04:00'
describe
'2748' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJIL' 'sip-files00209.pro'
e64b5e999c198b9b7bd6c9139b9ab7e1
b67e11c0a569687ccdf10d3c5118945159f8b454
'2012-05-27T21:29:49-04:00'
describe
'1868' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJIM' 'sip-files00219.txt'
0b3926cac4b5bae02b093ddf180d8890
b12e887651bb660df59ace5b2332e7c9e7e2788d
'2012-05-27T21:27:42-04:00'
describe
'33326' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJIN' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
6994cc232bfe7e6a83629865ef95bf51
02d18313ed4efa2df4e2620fc29f127b053b84af
'2012-05-27T21:30:25-04:00'
describe
'214096' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJIO' 'sip-files00257.jpg'
59411e80273ebbcb4f80b32396c69699
9335e0a51c40427fc02cc32d6e94449458683704
'2012-05-27T21:27:28-04:00'
describe
'225668' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJIP' 'sip-files00218.jpg'
e9081fb76e18df1f73d31fd94ad2765a
c64a27971367b58a013fbec725fab158b014c785
'2012-05-30T08:53:27-04:00'
describe
'84031' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJIQ' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
3bb631d61e7841adfd0560aa1efffc6d
547d01eaf534a9696353174833708f60a0da9bce
'2012-05-27T21:24:28-04:00'
describe
'81286' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJIR' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
4d1dcc846decdaef231b0d5457c380be
124dab5dedfa9d6c268865bed19258f6bacf7e11
'2012-05-27T21:19:27-04:00'
describe
'263830' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJIS' 'sip-files00297.jp2'
81bc746bc37fce6dea7541743b8b2918
bfd95251035e99192a6d881603e38489945c3516
'2012-05-27T21:18:27-04:00'
describe
'98077' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJIT' 'sip-files00279.QC.jpg'
7002dfac230e09742d5c86ea3edda5f7
3aa80c7bb6a586009e0bedb6b99572362f0c5354
'2012-05-27T21:18:52-04:00'
describe
'1705056' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJIU' 'sip-files00251.tif'
2f7bf5e87535c58c30e7413a540714a7
5cc4a5770a16f83679fbdb78166567e493e639c4
'2012-05-27T21:22:40-04:00'
describe
'246715' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJIV' 'sip-files00221.jp2'
de5039a55dbe4b01cd52016ef8cd8a52
49e10a237031a527434380e0d13b4c89848198f4
'2012-05-27T21:31:35-04:00'
describe
'48106' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJIW' 'sip-files00028.pro'
537fc44c2bfd4ac0123febdf42b51990
6ed6c8d2ea28d12d8a6a2278c26d7c885953161c
'2012-05-27T21:31:24-04:00'
describe
'1824' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJIX' 'sip-files00132.txt'
7fdbd02b0a78e5b584d17f276f05e510
99f94580eccedf598c85fc33add2b5802045b9aa
'2012-05-27T21:27:36-04:00'
describe
'1687559' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJIY' 'sip-files00333.jp2'
22f02373fbd8e453c2ac9ff4c4cfcb9e
a771a97d84c1e023a36787f70617c51939476859
describe
'211624' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJIZ' 'sip-files00232.jpg'
9d0fc250abda2980cf1fb43a8b01391b
a9d3d9eede5559bed2abdd64f4f7d7dc16b5b26b
'2012-05-27T21:26:37-04:00'
describe
'1705620' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJJA' 'sip-files00246.tif'
3380ec3e2a1955b2d0bef54808268129
c46b3f1f3ac5348c289064fce95d3d6810d55aa3
'2012-05-27T21:22:57-04:00'
describe
'369071' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJJB' 'sip-files00312.jp2'
f690ebe5565e43ad84abc6216402d798
22a65e7dd3209193ecde77ac3bca37e0be1987db
'2012-05-27T21:22:49-04:00'
describe
'276105' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJJC' 'sip-files00314.jpg'
c772e2332c085ddc2bb754bc9dcd838b
3fcc51641d9af2d73df241fc22d46a5dfee87a52
'2012-05-27T21:31:59-04:00'
describe
'237992' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJJD' 'sip-files00204.jpg'
b7b9ce5e12809c1bf1d3ee8c5df23c99
b7925ddfaf985349b37d445cc67b828f81216705
'2012-05-27T21:19:57-04:00'
describe
'44283' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJJE' 'sip-files00126.pro'
01dc574c3add122a4baf665ddf739996
173294abf13575e749d40587cad0f9f47f30c8d3
'2012-05-27T21:21:22-04:00'
describe
'249713' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJJF' 'sip-files00262.jpg'
0fa03bc4e0da0f7cb8b64be5f988987c
9d4f1015aaf0f162ae0250d3c397c7d870a48306
'2012-05-27T21:29:01-04:00'
describe
'2282' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJJG' 'sip-files00342.pro'
1d14b253375f4cfb64f2954203352cc3
ed0c7364e8dd7b58f3f3577704fb415341db5fdb
'2012-05-27T21:19:11-04:00'
describe
'1451' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJJH' 'sip-files00198.txt'
b7e0e0ae5be18543c78fc0d240e24ce8
ebdb16d83bad64ada71c9dadff31cd88640d224c
'2012-05-27T21:20:32-04:00'
describe
'1705236' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJJI' 'sip-files00026.tif'
927f2a257283b86a5955b7ed3d36c307
01c39a0c60f27515d322c01ca6c0598368fc29dd
describe
'252221' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJJJ' 'sip-files00168.jp2'
ce66d1559a5e4d80fb347539f07a36e1
a070d5c6c892b53e49696712b0ec6c44a562927c
'2012-05-27T21:23:27-04:00'
describe
'1812' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJJK' 'sip-files00230.txt'
333bb003901c7b7190f467e8e51640b0
3ddba29457343bde3fe739e8d52318a9a60cd99e
'2012-05-27T21:23:25-04:00'
describe
'80713' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJJL' 'sip-files00238.QC.jpg'
e6e021c2463b02e6bb14b98c4e7f9afe
3a89a7fc3c0d0be3da22524b0e47b444896b5880
describe
'1705404' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJJM' 'sip-files00179.tif'
aff20ff042352a0717fa920b5d4c1c4d
48155e79d2d046a0d829b0a52c253bfc0e5b7810
'2012-05-27T21:24:46-04:00'
describe
'1761' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJJN' 'sip-files00018.txt'
ff1c08f309de03d499bfb04a7dc8f706
c1e625b1ddef0665bc90ab4b6e6d4cf8e549838d
'2012-05-27T21:22:48-04:00'
describe
'49008' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJJO' 'sip-files00199.pro'
cae6182f8f77f19997194bc44bae173a
c5bedb0eb09e5088a9fd2afe453200a4e2509c68
'2012-05-27T21:28:45-04:00'
describe
'93826' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJJP' 'sip-files00267.QC.jpg'
42b6e6104d830d1cd224b59706a99666
32911d221590beca5500a6f94a74e61c58b1900e
'2012-05-27T21:30:49-04:00'
describe
'49050' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJJQ' 'sip-files00075.pro'
f305e2e2c25780fef59e9e44481f06a3
a32db2c00fe83b523524e26b8c96e8ecd0b61f49
'2012-05-27T21:30:36-04:00'
describe
'1706436' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJJR' 'sip-files00336.tif'
5cf607b506c06ab1e8f46a780c3ef230
de8a474d7abcd13e3a0c77425924bb21ccd4f2d6
'2012-05-30T08:53:10-04:00'
describe
'224663' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJJS' 'sip-files00257.jp2'
5aa7532d0beaeb28655fc0745a84655d
02a76abf30ce821414c2aeae637c3adc21906cd2
describe
'1699460' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJJT' 'sip-files00005.tif'
aa96af27d0f2bbb3dce736e3d0f1a40a
2c239739ccfe63ff1a0a4b857d8a929582f2fabe
'2012-05-27T21:26:02-04:00'
describe
'49342' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJJU' 'sip-files00190.pro'
6be8b634cc9ac5e75666bc828eca062b
e6e6a0987720f32be4338a790e045af7722b2f5b
describe
'122854' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJJV' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
fe190be941042dfeafe95406cfef7654
8939fb8626288f1f2af443bd9dd7367900bffd3c
'2012-05-27T21:28:00-04:00'
describe
'1705264' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJJW' 'sip-files00169.tif'
8043893f81184cb5252f338dcf90a400
86e12c5f2f8636a2d948516d60e4be13fec8b7d0
describe
'1712' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJJX' 'sip-files00142.txt'
25fb5fe039f63215582a94ab0300484b
487ef1b469f374785b03d729d97fc84aa47069fc
'2012-05-27T21:26:35-04:00'
describe
'48066' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJJY' 'sip-files00244.pro'
9b4653e88e91eb2fd7a538feb8b60888
af515b93273a5ab85c7d42fc7370ec003d950796
'2012-05-27T21:30:03-04:00'
describe
'1705332' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJJZ' 'sip-files00253.tif'
8bf4a8a73a600cb0e9e3dadedfae312f
0863ceef68e95f843273910123839ada2c62686c
'2012-05-27T21:18:26-04:00'
describe
'223522' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJKA' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
10b3802d2bd104123434013782a0c97c
35d73d2942fe58f7c35acff67547ec88168e46f8
'2012-05-27T21:19:24-04:00'
describe
'233746' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJKB' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
21c72bf418f79cae3a64c0af9dcdc4c5
e05019cf32f7e4eb533978df2e5b9ceb16221779
'2012-05-27T21:31:45-04:00'
describe
'13513468' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJKC' 'sip-files00321.tif'
adcd4a03db17136f39fb083c9e876f16
5bc18b4d69be952f47eff0adfcb05331aefa70a3
'2012-05-27T21:24:41-04:00'
describe
'1705364' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJKD' 'sip-files00020.tif'
d9c0fb3bfad0718d193d6b320c582bc9
1f4b6c66b9dbfabd6498e6e72a9d621546b67c8f
'2012-05-27T21:20:17-04:00'
describe
'80768' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJKE' 'sip-files00234.QC.jpg'
deeae2e727244f0902e39bddeea6fd52
92ffc708cad34c9d34879b9231c1c904ea899b08
describe
'32176' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJKF' 'sip-files00234thm.jpg'
f7728942b0cb698cfb61023ebfdc5303
0a797ae9c1cea0ae4f29cf7566b255b6578e1d36
'2012-05-27T21:22:55-04:00'
describe
'255784' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJKG' 'sip-files00242.jp2'
79c74029c8122c67289225a18e0fccea
34f4b3fb69f37039172a955d347ad716d0129bea
'2012-05-27T21:29:57-04:00'
describe
'47805' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJKH' 'sip-files00118.pro'
bc2402a80a71a94a74ca67d86c5d4fa3
78273f18b4e37989c0e8a9611ca572e8b0a9c8cd
'2012-05-27T21:28:23-04:00'
describe
'273761' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJKI' 'sip-files00316.jpg'
e9bd7d7efcca820fdd2d50a928e82520
6c54ce7c395803950249c5c1dded4e79e62c7813
describe
'277269' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJKJ' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
8d35046940fb252ffbb3fa5910949133
310391273dccc927e6630ef8f214172d4d55a894
describe
'33203' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJKK' 'sip-files00009.pro'
920ad4de4ef59c801c25049525617778
2fbbd109411447e120eaf8527a557afe1c746f32
'2012-05-27T21:26:21-04:00'
describe
'254021' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJKL' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
39423974de3964fe373071653167e37f
067e3c427cff850b4fc94e90519219eaec22f14c
'2012-05-27T21:28:50-04:00'
describe
'50954' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJKM' 'sip-files00280.pro'
7e335d8f97fa2e9683c90ca1519b39bb
adc13c3b84f20ef909310363e18a2dfb238d5353
'2012-05-27T21:22:20-04:00'
describe
'13513332' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJKN' 'sip-files00192.tif'
4174eaa35b7af51c7c14a7e94c82312c
2440b362e96672f65e8d5acdfc3174b04776ce9a
'2012-05-27T21:32:11-04:00'
describe
'263897' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJKO' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
8ea52d283988d989ba1fda1ece4c3312
f4d1feadef79915276ff221e56630ac39d306161
'2012-05-27T21:28:56-04:00'
describe
'203504' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJKP' 'sip-files00286.jpg'
daebd9f77e0faa6d1ee634457913cca7
295c13af448ccff61d22a67a3b0e12b40d9d2f25
describe
'77651' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJKQ' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
1159d1d6a5c0900329917ad89a3dd452
8ca83473c0c9635c762785a418b899bc651ac18c
'2012-05-27T21:26:50-04:00'
describe
'199815' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJKR' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
6483004022fc080876fe2b6df0f0be36
4e62ecc214c73528f19a1dd63b67625122c6862c
'2012-05-27T21:20:06-04:00'
describe
'33095' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJKS' 'sip-files00212thm.jpg'
dee96ccc2d5ff005e6c6020861e78a15
cbc6b4d547b18d28bb8ad2d8c0efec40a3ae0137
'2012-05-27T21:30:14-04:00'
describe
'224786' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJKT' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
53e2b544d0d80e28c931b583009307f8
792807db06c2500e1f4b6ddbc73c7dbb7d5a2222
'2012-05-27T21:24:06-04:00'
describe
'1704960' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJKU' 'sip-files00213.tif'
991e31ca34553d5f82c471cfa9b960ad
1604208475193ef345ff0fe7e347c4c77e5e2c2f
'2012-05-27T21:30:47-04:00'
describe
'32337' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJKV' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
754c75d847e01a74bf64b95b137b679d
b0cd2dad59ca6cb42aec60cdca3a0c5f5a3d4d54
'2012-05-27T21:31:29-04:00'
describe
'1809' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJKW' 'sip-files00185.txt'
f6a2beaef237656dcbd3b9f826c5a054
cf4a12240a3d25c870a9484eadc23e5118c75eaf
describe
'1641' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJKX' 'sip-files00051.txt'
3b4a01d0e22fc71def1607d483c66dc1
cf9104a491a4f04d5fd504e9b7225e06521a8f7a
'2012-05-27T21:21:57-04:00'
describe
'1704616' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJKY' 'sip-files00028.tif'
161e04e63a008ead1f12e02f5ca4a24d
20bc4145fa8a887266e4459170d6ff52f3e2d940
'2012-05-27T21:25:06-04:00'
describe
'282063' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJKZ' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
f774c86d3fbee4027a58c45bb5260a10
1cc6b9debae26f61ada6720e37b2b6bb7c4403ae
'2012-05-27T21:18:35-04:00'
describe
'86426' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJLA' 'sip-files00167.QC.jpg'
a5c2e3a5ddaef0344e9bb58e5bf104dd
ea21f59d1266c92b2b8e12ce87d6a918d2b56ba4
'2012-05-27T21:31:57-04:00'
describe
'262377' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJLB' 'sip-files00189.jp2'
744aaf7210e4a99309a22394894f8bfa
715f69ca03284baba4b28fc1ae929d1fdc1dc162
'2012-05-27T21:23:34-04:00'
describe
'2349' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJLC' 'sip-files00329.pro'
d8df2bc9027a7a7601a6126acbbcc15c
e07f3b503c0c7e459ca5fdfa91306dcd91e927da
'2012-05-27T21:29:03-04:00'
describe
'246670' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJLD' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
d8c17def9d3f53206c671c3433543e64
ca7468208a1552da62f9f4a8983cf8b7bb1ecc8f
'2012-05-27T21:29:29-04:00'
describe
'263011' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJLE' 'sip-files00272.jp2'
5bb8e938105f7d55630da89928ddfd4c
a787321716047bc7d3612058f83ad25573563262
'2012-05-27T21:20:47-04:00'
describe
'90195' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJLF' 'sip-files00189.QC.jpg'
3704511731ffa52181d3eac3a6eba0b0
0470ff9cbdec3fbe4124a47ace5ca267e4d5e0a2
'2012-05-27T21:24:59-04:00'
describe
'2948' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJLG' 'sip-files00341.pro'
07c2b10238f1153dd0439ee8419b04a0
e2e33caccd0e38986a3974d87dd5d8578a97186e
'2012-05-27T21:19:10-04:00'
describe
'310756' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJLH' 'sip-files00311.jpg'
94c5375943c9ee0cc54b9ff8fce517f8
d134fbea534fa2b8a845728be2a1500a3fc77f4b
'2012-05-27T21:29:26-04:00'
describe
'1565' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJLI' 'sip-files00040.txt'
526e4b7ba17e7b8779c803d94964e896
72632cc1104cb5a40df4e2c26369e89c28d8f40c
'2012-05-27T21:30:33-04:00'
describe
'81056' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJLJ' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
ed0fa49712d70102f5071d899feaaa19
5573c7c99435cb8bc542142a180ca85fe0cae626
'2012-05-27T21:21:39-04:00'
describe
'29376' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJLK' 'sip-files00333thm.jpg'
b35f6d7158bfc6306c150c9ed1c02a2e
0c104ad9112e150df046fe6aad4474c37273dc48
'2012-05-27T21:22:29-04:00'
describe
'236064' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJLL' 'sip-files00228.jpg'
cbd423b84d995d1ed3d684febf194690
fa9f700dc63cdac69646926eac10a1e02df34729
'2012-05-27T21:21:47-04:00'
describe
'103409' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJLM' 'sip-files00342.QC.jpg'
4866fe5cbabf5874bec2361fe8f58f7e
3a51bb671524a0a955ad75a80f0042807025da4d
'2012-05-27T21:21:12-04:00'
describe
'33236' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJLN' 'sip-files00214thm.jpg'
21d287734db8093ed152c31054e79f35
4ff38f2c2350bafe6763b4252dc8bfedb4858ffd
'2012-05-27T21:20:21-04:00'
describe
'1705120' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJLO' 'sip-files00056.tif'
57e2339d57776051ad80b2c4de849602
c4565716ec206c8fdfe5f27212fc4ed589f8a7bd
'2012-05-27T21:29:48-04:00'
describe
'49950' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJLP' 'sip-files00178.pro'
21d728bff7f83682a8bfad2cfda591a6
525eeff8d2e87d186a94ac0e493d09c2c07f5f0f
'2012-05-27T21:22:00-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJLQ' 'sip-files00233.tif'
b46b61ab4a4b3c9348c1427d10524a7e
84518cd26c07d5a105fe463b0cedbdb9a626203f
'2012-05-27T21:19:29-04:00'
describe
'33476984' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJLR' 'sip-files00002.tif'
c68fda0ab69f7968c35e461c63df4e60
f0768434d590220ae8369bd9aac3d7f5f7ff6111
'2012-05-27T21:28:53-04:00'
describe
'1663' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJLS' 'sip-files00149.txt'
993110f0db209ecdef99b92deb875e24
de3dddb8aceaad8abbabeac9abcc8531e28d59bc
'2012-05-27T21:23:17-04:00'
describe
'1705688' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJLT' 'sip-files00260.tif'
9d2a723b81e1461da8fcef33f88e53f0
e607748da79c6ba23f6b161bc428d09225b73e95
'2012-05-30T08:53:24-04:00'
describe
'265031' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJLU' 'sip-files00296.jpg'
259a06e6d6431d664443caf86f4f7d0a
7ab42f8c8a45be990992de5bd6e098811676ba7b
'2012-05-27T21:18:22-04:00'
describe
'251240' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJLV' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
e1d13342311394d3ac7fa58c1ca300a4
0bc0688e4b1071e768de609c5861da92dfafa705
'2012-05-27T21:24:24-04:00'
describe
'82574' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJLW' 'sip-files00250.QC.jpg'
23ca910aa6927116cd8d92e30e1569be
174f759c46e7a0b5d0bc27721b43f32d7ec7da38
describe
'196380' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJLX' 'sip-files00207.jp2'
406f8a6c6e30aa53c3ffc829f7f4a124
2abca3b0bbaa4e9b7b50cc3ecee8b3530cae09a3
'2012-05-27T21:25:26-04:00'
describe
'4187' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJLY' 'sip-files00327.txt'
1f1bf7bb4325fbd6521102855201bf54
8c10f159764accbafc749775cf0115dc1b4104ce
'2012-05-27T21:25:17-04:00'
describe
'82905' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJLZ' 'sip-files00188.QC.jpg'
5ea0132d3d137bdbe57a77a4e8e22d18
d852e494c76c5f4b669d129dcefadd2405e742fb
'2012-05-27T21:20:01-04:00'
describe
'83883' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJMA' 'sip-files00315.pro'
28b862131fab5342c0339cd1e95b7325
29e391af8c21fb830901839ea37114c9a86871e8
'2012-05-27T21:23:57-04:00'
describe
'1644' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJMB' 'sip-files00146.txt'
6a6bdebf5e7b2fb8b1712daef1c48c8e
26244f5edd9a723c30a8092a50be3ac2f587d1b3
'2012-05-27T21:28:11-04:00'
describe
'202424' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJMC' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
344e63cbfedced2a985b4e37227dc025
f04ae22289a21a9118a165763b6f37794f141f72
'2012-05-30T08:52:51-04:00'
describe
'1698416' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJMD' 'sip-files00008.tif'
e2a5b53cd8f9d6f55b76a26cb4abac72
05d2a7d1bf0ff6278e27eb4e4fbd9b417ac22b0f
describe
'272759' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJME' 'sip-files00263.jp2'
8ad01eabf6e1320f09f66124d1d11c4b
e08459cc6a270573317eb19df54be04bbde0db84
'2012-05-27T21:20:35-04:00'
describe
'218591' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJMF' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
0f4b67ccbf0137daa317a3766cec65b4
317dd73d053cf940402fd7c9bef8f547133d4a3b
'2012-05-27T21:27:05-04:00'
describe
'202078' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJMG' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
f831ae94f661c0059a1a08cf4755c375
dc2af880785e8f2daeb9e4a2c02b75cb50a06da5
'2012-05-27T21:19:13-04:00'
describe
'35027' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJMH' 'sip-files00303thm.jpg'
76597c8b5940cf8d410d018c2940c925
8f207c3b8301a0a317b1c78fa2c9e35984754c38
describe
'31862' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJMI' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
98b1f25fd9c9bdfd53f6932ed3639896
3968b40be570bd1bfac11cb5e2e9ac7c4aed4ff8
'2012-05-27T21:29:41-04:00'
describe
'1687604' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJMJ' 'sip-files00329.jp2'
6e170a12876b8b2fc3bb8eeb7eb46a45
1b2069c273b0d31fc04f421bf97f1b578b9ba83a
'2012-05-27T21:27:16-04:00'
describe
'238412' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJMK' 'sip-files00199.jpg'
d8019823f645508b182b686318e496be
a910e8a2b3f7e33d65f686235e118c5a691733e7
'2012-05-27T21:31:20-04:00'
describe
'242591' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJML' 'sip-files00226.jp2'
94705960dd93407329861b675b8b573d
3ff83ec482fa735347e77b21a0329a359ef37bd2
'2012-05-27T21:31:14-04:00'
describe
'13514272' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJMM' 'sip-files00319.tif'
512bda660ebf858a3e83647466053b16
77bef267993403ff5e3bc19464dd38d4b2a5a422
'2012-05-27T21:22:38-04:00'
describe
'83161' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJMN' 'sip-files00265.QC.jpg'
5bb5b93f6002e0493900eaffffef1ad1
9bc80ec4e011b3cc01c23ce3641f5a7c735dd16d
'2012-05-27T21:29:06-04:00'
describe
'280122' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJMO' 'sip-files00308.jpg'
a0d5fe420657193061d7e858b6d1eecd
df53a1a902193e9e1307ce379fb98d13d8022f1f
describe
'1705592' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJMP' 'sip-files00046.tif'
356f713fd4740ddfd67caaf18297a535
f65af4054aa21c9f57aaae14586ce04895354a98
'2012-05-27T21:22:01-04:00'
describe
'268176' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJMQ' 'sip-files00295.jp2'
3a66da85803a408b13cef445bf6a3337
d1f91909865a7d4785887bee2f04f36caad6f666
'2012-05-27T21:30:39-04:00'
describe
'1471' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJMR' 'sip-files00121.txt'
c2a57d88a0201da4a41473aa936687da
c5531c82db9a09527c3a6bdbe5abd332dcade96c
describe
'752' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJMS' 'sip-files00342.txt'
4b44c24a70d0d65328342c9896419202
1df98dcb0c0df6dd16d504f55bee859631bd3ae1
'2012-05-27T21:23:29-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'49079' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJMT' 'sip-files00284.pro'
94320b5e2be14124f8573c7da5615c73
d544224e1c32f339979f38f46a3bd443f4812bfc
'2012-05-27T21:27:48-04:00'
describe
'259177' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJMU' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
3a38917107b264685c30942a33fbc8b5
8d90ac7e35b1ce3d25f624e7d20514b2eea91896
describe
'215912' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJMV' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
6f7242782992fe9038949705c1d4d5cf
23e087503741673499a9ae79c64072bedb37897d
'2012-05-27T21:20:34-04:00'
describe
'263152' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJMW' 'sip-files00246.jp2'
4c3cc111b41dd4c9cc3ce04cbb6f8fdd
f9dbbb8d92dec63fec01e0356a7c0f816f2fc66b
'2012-05-27T21:26:45-04:00'
describe
'1705644' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJMX' 'sip-files00138.tif'
ca8b46dcb5cb7b95865611113f1135d3
fb77c44b8ef83db40324b51be0875c59af4186e7
describe
'1886' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJMY' 'sip-files00294.txt'
089fa99dca27e7b6f1b333f551faed73
d58f91b6fbfd934cca221c759362078d050a5f6c
'2012-05-27T21:20:12-04:00'
describe
'2787' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJMZ' 'sip-files00334.txt'
a259120237900b1eff2ae62edc25733a
19a964aed4f8e70f698befda44fa20548078b9bc
describe
'225166' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJNA' 'sip-files00167.jpg'
d0b4c3381b51f90c6f614859f23a3c9b
793c3c682c95fb6d03b313f921902b015cddf378
'2012-05-27T21:27:12-04:00'
describe
'33232' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJNB' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
cd960f95f835936b52c0210b3926d69e
0bf4198df3d0ba623ccabce6e6a76961ef3b1fd9
'2012-05-27T21:22:07-04:00'
describe
'1831' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJNC' 'sip-files00170.txt'
21d5ba4210a9ea52e3b448f2af162391
d1c1038c5da328673461cec63d99ebbff638032d
'2012-05-27T21:30:10-04:00'
describe
'95522' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJND' 'sip-files00280.QC.jpg'
d7124c798f9509cb086703dc13eab56b
821dcd52c8051c83b90acbb0a6c00f86ecea9ff7
describe
'251766' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJNE' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
6daa82c1cd8d892e0a3d910d4069092c
16e36421ffe972514ff394faa02b3b9f562b245b
'2012-05-27T21:21:50-04:00'
describe
'48796' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJNF' 'sip-files00099.pro'
7af937700433bd7cfde0414434800f17
1a245363195a33cac898f151d3eb3c77d0a5f24d
'2012-05-27T21:22:53-04:00'
describe
'44393' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJNG' 'sip-files00243.pro'
8ef81522d6318449679ac3a5e6685eed
59dd09d72324cb882b089a0985fe8c9a076a4604
describe
'1705012' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJNH' 'sip-files00018.tif'
ba89bc2a75f12dada013b2e0d35b1080
63a72b735715f1980389496a747a9a235c6e6497
'2012-05-27T21:28:31-04:00'
describe
'271127' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJNI' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
229384b85ef826414cbc74c55b832a24
35fdaa597e2381fee0d6958e5e9cbacc63afb086
describe
'16163' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJNJ' 'sip-files00008.pro'
be5e477af74cc2cb9a3dccc6ce353213
c7dad271b1193ee297d9eb04117f19c9e1d5269d
'2012-05-27T21:18:48-04:00'
describe
'1628' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJNK' 'sip-files00108.txt'
e88b9ce89117e3fc81a05559ce876f77
f6eedb90e7135bd27caea4e9373540cadc441348
'2012-05-27T21:21:23-04:00'
describe
'49734' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJNL' 'sip-files00117.pro'
3977532f76cd51af95993380bda459b7
6456a323fae59547fc5a58498ec4a994af1fd43b
describe
'81939' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJNM' 'sip-files00211.QC.jpg'
ab8da420e02e3ea316a66652dadf6ae3
9a0ea94237920fb097867b93b42a349d24d49261
'2012-05-27T21:30:57-04:00'
describe
'32526' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJNN' 'sip-files00171thm.jpg'
8478c261fe6581cb868dc59d91bd1292
8973eeb95391440c08cbeac78c8c089c69121f83
'2012-05-27T21:20:18-04:00'
describe
'31776' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJNO' 'sip-files00177thm.jpg'
3ff664fedcabe7ce88b2ae20a445cc22
b79b9ede28ccc6775c5df7f6addbd8e08e9ae271
'2012-05-27T21:26:24-04:00'
describe
'78863' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJNP' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
151627f6300cd21b86ca994acb0d5d88
f504af0e4a1622cd6171dc7c29943a400f5468e3
'2012-05-27T21:27:55-04:00'
describe
'2203' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJNQ' 'sip-files00318.txt'
e0c15d859c3eea53b4f0f1b126e7c2be
9e4b6d74ba589cd2b766f6f9f51913fbd6c2b78e
'2012-05-27T21:25:40-04:00'
describe
'3' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJNR' 'sip-files00344.txt'
bc949ea893a9384070c31f083ccefd26
cbb8391cb65c20e2c05a2f29211e55c49939c3db
describe
'90157' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJNS' 'sip-files00244.QC.jpg'
31e35f3ac91d501c1b1da71a2a66512d
c25d614411caad28900ec16a42edc877503b4e13
describe
'1880' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJNT' 'sip-files00270.txt'
bd89c04bf04980e776ff0b58807cc187
afe90f9826a96b46c651c640ba236e4f00fa34be
describe
'32223' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJNU' 'sip-files00176thm.jpg'
06d99cf33a51c2ec964f8fc60cf0965c
e832c9f3f481e70f516cbd223c358053224fdd97
describe
'29941' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJNV' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
3040cb574414b6e1f46a256d35660776
60123b043f107b531d48428f904270b9643a01d7
describe
'1704476' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJNW' 'sip-files00291.tif'
c902ebaf255d427d37984fe4778a7469
92b1599c3ef3dbd9943de3d2da2ce15de7773dba
'2012-05-27T21:23:40-04:00'
describe
'87446' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJNX' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
24cf77969bbcb91661df33273823c0a0
594edc22f589de3701f186ac7ef787667267b57e
describe
'49646' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJNY' 'sip-files00204.pro'
961aa41eb31c3ade90d7f1932f0fb09a
e65e92ef08608805ea8a58741a06a7451cfeb7b7
'2012-05-27T21:26:05-04:00'
describe
'4308' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJNZ' 'sip-files00240.pro'
961367570890fa96c8cc52a0716545bc
efc48001ae034de9a07cb0b23c6eb8aa07f00048
'2012-05-27T21:19:48-04:00'
describe
'75845' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJOA' 'sip-files00335.QC.jpg'
f31e41006d24bc52a777b6c9afb8d30c
8cd0f2128ac2539512007d95c6fa590be9ca7c30
'2012-05-27T21:23:18-04:00'
describe
'46257' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJOB' 'sip-files00153.pro'
eabc320a88a0e622562e23f8d92a6a64
b3165624401cb493203c71b08a77e32dff6d6e36
'2012-05-27T21:26:54-04:00'
describe
'40' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJOC' 'sip-filesprocessing.instr'
c2c23c73e074dbe7b2c987a6a980e9af
ed3de0ab55dc0d5e1cab9d7cfc37c9add35b5372
'2012-05-27T21:31:32-04:00'
describe
'84165' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJOD' 'sip-files00147.QC.jpg'
036654cdbe80652c67ddea6181e36e9c
2083435312d80d93488f85aca896f2e3d34db511
'2012-05-27T21:24:49-04:00'
describe
'243640' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJOE' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
c2fe1986f827e9d70c7fa02874b0361a
722a5d03fc7c5d71f2bb8691b8643591222459c6
'2012-05-27T21:26:41-04:00'
describe
'1681' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJOF' 'sip-files00055.txt'
52c29e83d2e32f7dcfaf7cf7a3498140
038c1aeef087be45ebac0e0789ad1919bcc6f183
describe
'36028' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJOG' 'sip-files00264thm.jpg'
dc1f6252b0d63c7f62c12fb3f7be6645
555d91494fe06f66bd09c0ad940af8da12a2d872
describe
'245319' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJOH' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
ebdffcee9e7a237d730608f85245cf6c
22d84790c4fc66559fc9d3469608ef9e69aadac5
'2012-05-27T21:18:36-04:00'
describe
'42962' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJOI' 'sip-files00215.pro'
fcd4acbaa333aaebd0bf8ee6515d8698
2b4e14cb466c8a73e6affd8b7168eac212f38cbb
'2012-05-27T21:30:13-04:00'
describe
'6127' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJOJ' 'sip-files00258.pro'
8c760b57f7ff7f806e8db53cc1dc4ac4
b1586c65eefeb7e1fa46fff4ba5fec0229dd9355
'2012-05-27T21:24:37-04:00'
describe
'91183' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJOK' 'sip-files00260.QC.jpg'
98c57e3a55df38ac8b46831b7567241a
f3a72aa0b0349854c7aeed70eeb9a995bd02e491
describe
'1747' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJOL' 'sip-files00217.txt'
71c13c535adcaa550f4ae667a65e5b68
0903dead08c583c32be3750de930724651efa8af
'2012-05-27T21:29:27-04:00'
describe
'43747' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJOM' 'sip-files00278.pro'
398ec0f8faa69c30f41c94e8302dc02c
0954e14ab07d0ceb8092642f96ec6b9d47d4b133
'2012-05-27T21:27:44-04:00'
describe
'196581' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJON' 'sip-files00225.jp2'
6eb1c79adf959f1cc79e9f1256b17ade
30e020dbc10fcb499554e33601bb7dfa2073b33b
'2012-05-27T21:24:57-04:00'
describe
'1738' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJOO' 'sip-files00093.txt'
bc3c47a8cfa17c589309721a66e56dc2
5075e0dcffe9fd9379d67478d37e1d68101e68e6
'2012-05-27T21:22:10-04:00'
describe
'33562' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJOP' 'sip-files00284thm.jpg'
189923fde96832d648fb1f3778615b86
4299743560e64117a8fa15d7194fd21e21d26a06
'2012-05-27T21:28:19-04:00'
describe
'33333' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJOQ' 'sip-files00224thm.jpg'
9dc368b3f89604dd7a37b0896234607f
1533a048ee205673f5c7ccac054e8abd2ce1bd43
describe
'235075' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJOR' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
77ee321a0bf4a123981f5f1ee735e058
077dd2fba71b14e60b6841b8350d8eb492b43e63
'2012-05-27T21:21:54-04:00'
describe
'30854' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJOS' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
f71ac4bc8e5e78d51ece3e53eb936643
4d83b7c435db0dd4cc9b59bfeebd4d8e13e2d998
'2012-05-27T21:26:31-04:00'
describe
'245639' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJOT' 'sip-files00288.jpg'
7f7a0af4bc3dc212609ce5758eafeebe
a6109e0ea1819e666db497113d2fd6776ba92223
'2012-05-27T21:23:06-04:00'
describe
'250967' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJOU' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
2bfb0dca4414fc5fcdbd06873b9ce3e3
8720d67b1cd009ecdaaf976b03e5dae5fab47866
'2012-05-27T21:23:31-04:00'
describe
'1914' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJOV' 'sip-files00280.txt'
ef28684bf89506ebd2b34be49b5c4e25
e152caa07760ab727bef413d470b1cb58ba6a10c
'2012-05-27T21:18:53-04:00'
describe
'220162' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJOW' 'sip-files00215.jp2'
e043404a6d630c42c7ef3c2a7dce22ff
9e9d57f2a5aa57a8793e34ec8fafe0c5cba1e8a5
'2012-05-27T21:30:52-04:00'
describe
'258634' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJOX' 'sip-files00254.jp2'
ecb40206a0a9dfa306c32a0b2f11db42
b4d858242bd43a196caf959d74dc97818cb9b83b
'2012-05-27T21:19:03-04:00'
describe
'381870' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJOY' 'sip-files00313.jp2'
0062a55372cfd4ef351285a3191b14b2
5448451e8bdb91282ce81cd5e815f629252b2d0d
'2012-05-27T21:24:12-04:00'
describe
'2644' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJOZ' 'sip-files00330.txt'
a0cac0a26831dc0e569119e4855f883c
a2916b222e8017f58ac92ca24c45ef6c0d0f1301
'2012-05-27T21:21:40-04:00'
describe
'40764' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJPA' 'sip-files00027.pro'
795025526cbefb92aa18cf78dfea93e2
133e81c27e9f4bfa7cfac140aaa1ac8e96683b71
'2012-05-27T21:20:30-04:00'
describe
'1705416' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJPB' 'sip-files00080.tif'
4e1850c00a03fbcc620ca3a024ea264e
7c82ad67ac036833945c746aa7fdd26338a27aa3
'2012-05-27T21:22:33-04:00'
describe
'88381' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJPC' 'sip-files00202.QC.jpg'
b4700ca5544c11427979e634ad9c6baa
a729f9140c05e5d334f33cb5a5634dfc7439df91
'2012-05-27T21:24:32-04:00'
describe
'50930' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJPD' 'sip-files00189.pro'
b53b383a38b13a64288ca242e2dadeb7
48fa2b9da0009be1c18ee8f505c2819dc66ab713
'2012-05-27T21:32:19-04:00'
describe
'217355' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJPE' 'sip-files00211.jpg'
9f32412a668d0b1a5ea43c1432af6aad
d5ad226a5be3ab6cc2502f513000b15ef12b0a6b
'2012-05-27T21:21:02-04:00'
describe
'88480' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJPF' 'sip-files00168.QC.jpg'
62f8bb46861201d538c083b6b1c7dbce
fc5f4ce7d207a0d5873cf0d77726c64adf3cfcd3
'2012-05-27T21:20:41-04:00'
describe
'223849' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJPG' 'sip-files00149.jp2'
4da43b3c3322119e70502599040213e1
91967b526ab864055499e36307249d24f9dd3048
'2012-05-27T21:25:14-04:00'
describe
'225045' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJPH' 'sip-files00231.jpg'
2391d1bd9467d5fb92ef36e8278e3a06
d8fd2cce6aa94e3b90325b57e83cbe2e674d9395
describe
'50234' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJPI' 'sip-files00287.pro'
5b5b4f3d1790ccb7d015ee5eb50f1493
462044b78ee34c2a5a024fc3abaa56c5cd30b463
'2012-05-27T21:19:15-04:00'
describe
'1704976' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJPJ' 'sip-files00155.tif'
3e46ec31a4b79d9586d94bb98df9f7a8
fe5d24a5cc93278fff0eadd30149f51f34ab6351
describe
'1703' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJPK' 'sip-files00104.txt'
4187ac9cab713abafe79717b2dfbf32c
654effedf28ef078e70f7643ff906f76d5eb0a46
'2012-05-27T21:21:59-04:00'
describe
'104075' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJPL' 'sip-files00343.QC.jpg'
d4f21b3cbcb3ec8858284c848f7972b1
6d5fed1e676b9e1447d368f0b47a3f8c4305bf2a
'2012-05-27T21:28:26-04:00'
describe
'890' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJPM' 'sip-files00296.txt'
211ab2d6baebf8687cacb3731ebf2753
de9ce5e7ead077fe51febf5002e1e7246bb2f803
'2012-05-27T21:25:54-04:00'
describe
'36725' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJPN' 'sip-files00343thm.jpg'
395d5311746666676151d974948fc2e0
b614dc20949b341d78e66fdef6fd437799c84cb8
'2012-05-27T21:24:23-04:00'
describe
'270325' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJPO' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
51fcef4e9122b76ddb5c068fbb3f52fd
7217040bd74096d5094f780033627603711f8757
describe
'46815' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJPP' 'sip-files00135.pro'
8176e645018b5865f28a5d2b67f8d45d
782598426288235f54701c019c487690dc8cfeac
'2012-05-27T21:21:58-04:00'
describe
'50796' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJPQ' 'sip-files00336.pro'
c75a2f888396f49f3bf2c2f136668f06
90b922ef68245bab45f2c7af3cb614d21588715f
'2012-05-27T21:29:34-04:00'
describe
'234361' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJPR' 'sip-files00281.jpg'
a85cb2fe0381269a7862a689729f2dd4
96847023a5e2d1790e6ec9640b798f9507c8d55d
'2012-05-27T21:21:27-04:00'
describe
'213019' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJPS' 'sip-files00266.jpg'
169ddd0a00280bb623c59744f8cf18d1
31a92efebc8a5cf65742def2026d84ce67361a28
describe
'32736' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJPT' 'sip-files00278thm.jpg'
80f657544c1044b366c765db034384b4
4dc6a754db71511c7b658a26220885fe8fde59ef
'2012-05-27T21:21:53-04:00'
describe
'241986' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJPU' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
e99b73a420773706f6eca2d2002f00a7
37439ed242432cfa0df7957a0e43de900e1f6755
'2012-05-27T21:26:49-04:00'
describe
'47353' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJPV' 'sip-files00156.pro'
66ae20740db774dea525f742bf7090a2
12b56580c44c1910b332790af52318996e321cc6
'2012-05-27T21:25:47-04:00'
describe
'1705612' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJPW' 'sip-files00200.tif'
e3c706bcf2b4c907d540a115d0605d3f
65c9a9a39e5362d2427f91878263e0238342d6f7
'2012-05-27T21:25:05-04:00'
describe
'1705132' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJPX' 'sip-files00038.tif'
21274f06320b42eb1db181afc76ad460
9c86ed2f5e16506c17d72151aeee78b988f6b622
'2012-05-27T21:20:56-04:00'
describe
'45093' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJPY' 'sip-files00340.pro'
3fe69d40a74b66c04da4e52c17eb99f0
d0459ed6d762e36a7a507f34ec2de3fdfceb2144
'2012-05-27T21:21:25-04:00'
describe
'195976' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJPZ' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
14193c6c72128658c8898ecbfd0abeea
d199f20d70e4d69183ac975ba184b454a6bc5819
describe
'214229' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJQA' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
877156702afec723ee3a621dd46f05d0
2dfaf4eed1a5db5123d4ae0a0f8421e7cccb542a
describe
'1767' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJQB' 'sip-files00242.txt'
c443f3a5cae6332c45f6525ee4e51cc0
6c3dae228625554b4679c5aed2b72f987b372312
'2012-05-27T21:22:47-04:00'
describe
'1846' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJQC' 'sip-files00284.txt'
ea46c29912efe2024cc1e47b52c1cc55
79e09f9d0c19bace3d2ad4e6dab0d745719297fb
describe
'233576' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJQD' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
6ca603bf17ce63c7c502b594c796add4
3cb7c17ef265b4723c319435009031a33b738d57
describe
'233830' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJQE' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
3e1618396e764399a439ffdeb3415a23
e8069bb785082431dbcccd3dbcf802f095e38b41
'2012-05-27T21:19:59-04:00'
describe
'33726' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJQF' 'sip-files00318thm.jpg'
e3b4b1277aedc5278d2381bb84c04b66
a3702595324f00268b76d1faed4b654a682786fb
describe
'29766' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJQG' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
9a650cfcd8e79eb8d59e6ccd85e39d2e
5be5ba04650fb49626c193280de44c8797f93ab5
describe
'90310' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJQH' 'sip-files00282.QC.jpg'
7eb8066ba66a090fdad8e6e0d88d75bf
340dda769e90bf43d9d05760e00a4ecf12ef27ed
'2012-05-27T21:21:10-04:00'
describe
'57591' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJQI' 'sip-files00206.QC.jpg'
63167eb6822039e5425ccfb91a10333e
af5201d5a33d5bc253b6a733f4c6f9d9079cf43c
'2012-05-27T21:24:01-04:00'
describe
'73652' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJQJ' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
7d3a73b9494457b0d9ad276bd8921f50
08bc37abf48ea2e2e22e50726d6d7a9e8e06d9bc
describe
'3518' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJQK' 'sip-files00160.pro'
e0785013739bde60db0e779a2b0ca06b
aba351e0477becee90f0b1d6c4c4b8c586ff506c
describe
'49621' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJQL' 'sip-files00295.pro'
1d4f45560fa287e96ea4c25d0c796cac
bbc94406289ca9390f8f812e529079042ef28a80
'2012-05-27T21:26:29-04:00'
describe
'1704668' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJQM' 'sip-files00198.tif'
cd176b7d1e0761123893b1a6a420021b
323c795576eaa2ff23cb566eaf52c18c97217ceb
'2012-05-27T21:28:07-04:00'
describe
'227479' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJQN' 'sip-files00232.jp2'
041f12c1ce22ba825a8ecac3c27e1baf
f69ed2e171cf4267df316a968640b818c0615449
'2012-05-27T21:25:31-04:00'
describe
'125009' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJQO' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
d32806dd8f984ce9b1c2316bf672eca0
8491f2ac67bb7c6a152695394c1a72c35cacefb3
describe
'197462' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJQP' 'sip-files00141.jp2'
585637a9826c663ac8310173ef80f6e4
6944cf5f50ea84e5504a602f2ef00013118cfbeb
'2012-05-27T21:24:27-04:00'
describe
'693' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJQQ' 'sip-files00259.txt'
22c30c0098bec2c29e1e4e49103b63cb
6ae24292fce34ceed8137c800ab7b6ebd1fa12e1
describe
'37056' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJQR' 'sip-files00121.pro'
f6fd2f84edc854256264b264001c6eec
22978168819bd3a29df2dc139a1e193265c25134
describe
'213' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJQS' 'sip-files00344.pro'
0596a05bfe756c10bde1d851304405a9
8b20ba08b748c1d33b191dc870073585ebd53528
'2012-05-27T21:20:16-04:00'
describe
'81375' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJQT' 'sip-files00007.jpg'
bf16ef705a5dcb14c2f46a971abd10b6
f4c3e90be19bdc0f9e8fee44c487c9246be5e657
'2012-05-27T21:19:51-04:00'
describe
'66947' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJQU' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
b4e04a6fd786d14e0e65061695d6d72e
c7634f5c1aafbba50b85d3165c7342942fc563f1
'2012-05-27T21:19:30-04:00'
describe
'45826' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJQV' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
e401743d0e84cb53dd65b4e10171ffbf
ffd991580431a22c4c5a992e2a9e5552214ed185
'2012-05-27T21:24:31-04:00'
describe
'239337' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJQW' 'sip-files00175.jpg'
7ea2768254a224752f087049f6beefde
049ab253ddf857ccf2a21b2c9b4b684e2d6c004c
'2012-05-27T21:29:53-04:00'
describe
'30131' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJQX' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
446cbeca7aba7fdd85b15801b04a70e0
75bd6312b26b1003738be740efc7b4d4bee2f65b
'2012-05-27T21:22:51-04:00'
describe
'18242' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJQY' 'sip-files00083.pro'
0bbead56936d31e23955192927c59d68
a0c4adad34781d75b46830f0899338b8e1a844a9
describe
'31141' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJQZ' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
87f3e853f3c6c50347bf6587be7268c7
8261a850bff31f53c1b7b3756eb61763e0ce36f0
describe
'47704' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJRA' 'sip-files00214.pro'
644867c12265d114d4242f7d3f53da48
492a893eabc51855531a17a1daeaa73589552184
'2012-05-27T21:18:43-04:00'
describe
'2175' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJRB' 'sip-files00062.txt'
db1ca505978266f777b3af7e631914f5
35318af6df226efb10ed6fca44c4d0e1fdbb9a87
'2012-05-27T21:18:29-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'1704508' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJRC' 'sip-files00031.tif'
70a4676ef993d73c9719d009527abba6
20e54141f87483115a0afbe1ea6be1b397ee4fdd
'2012-05-27T21:23:19-04:00'
describe
'261748' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJRD' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
c2eecc3d328860f8142b97be83594202
478dcb8eb6332cf0d55385bb3dee2271fbf07515
'2012-05-27T21:25:00-04:00'
describe
'47537' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJRE' 'sip-files00136.pro'
1d5883c66cb218807fc194556d991da7
2db5604f402fab544cd13f3d9402237b63d171cf
'2012-05-27T21:27:02-04:00'
describe
'89404' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJRF' 'sip-files00220.QC.jpg'
b05b86d8b815108beca876c0c1cf5103
c478ec870fa38357e4298d504d96f67cde44f9b9
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJRG' 'sip-files00011.txt'
b67b20a8f8da2d7f10a021f77f07ee96
5f033c6800e159d2403582f86437eb1dde58cae2
'2012-05-27T21:25:32-04:00'
describe
'188433' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJRH' 'sip-files00141.jpg'
5a66d7d815edf1329dd7544bf4c870b2
8b6dbc8e03a2870f2e2ac21972da8bc0a5193010
'2012-05-27T21:30:01-04:00'
describe
'278085' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJRI' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
3a8c757efe972c66512a745f80c12686
83753be4602f5ef4741728d1b8df4c3115f0bc3f
'2012-05-27T21:28:18-04:00'
describe
'83711' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJRJ' 'sip-files00176.QC.jpg'
ef01d4543020aef25275204b01f6b271
747c1bf64778ae319bef7a4982fbb3c44b0282fd
describe
'37462' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJRK' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
385cd9b43b867dcba80ba7255ff8e998
dee84c319139a596d31dfb600fe45c90687831ce
'2012-05-27T21:21:17-04:00'
describe
'22692' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJRL' 'sip-files00331thm.jpg'
7544e298786d46ce12d2715b55dc6fba
362d18239acecbae96df065a30aea3cde0fd94cf
'2012-05-27T21:18:37-04:00'
describe
'106503' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJRM' 'sip-files00327.pro'
be1bbeff1ff6cdb6c5c01a0a80161168
495ed292c48c2e02cfacfc3ad7ac174efa53361d
'2012-05-27T21:22:28-04:00'
describe
'45447' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJRN' 'sip-files00053.pro'
12e44aaece14550ff68497d74bd1bb5b
c10a8c532ca883b0eb64101716efda22dd0585d3
describe
'295674' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJRO' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
3d56246455cc5bed52df0fd1bd0de9fa
4383f260bc46ee140148f8c4232bfb898e092cd6
'2012-05-27T21:31:06-04:00'
describe
'33047' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJRP' 'sip-files00189thm.jpg'
9c9dc8de4fec56b94593c905b3ba7f9a
363369d85266d0bb1df1c82ec72796cac5d7ea67
'2012-05-27T21:22:24-04:00'
describe
'84685' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJRQ' 'sip-files00243.QC.jpg'
cbd5c5c0a86ef3b93d39a5b17fb3a67c
63e55dbcf227e69936b6cb428d5458122b9e24b5
'2012-05-27T21:20:58-04:00'
describe
'256409' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJRR' 'sip-files00282.jp2'
182c21578a59ef7601297b2dc577434c
efb67cb0cab2a24ae0cc01db23527f0354484894
describe
'255706' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJRS' 'sip-files00268.jpg'
122bf4d6b73b71300d4dbb64d1461f61
07a5696b8bfc3066a76d1b9396d50646897913c7
describe
'260848' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJRT' 'sip-files00301.jp2'
dd41ee60ee583f139fe64cb7b0b6da78
cdb579dd999597925dd7c2a404d4245cbb59ad4a
'2012-05-27T21:29:15-04:00'
describe
'1704080' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJRU' 'sip-files00067.tif'
6ceec9e2d7c8c2eb947c1c6b55e7d2a8
66debb7d2984df6dce0dc2358934fcecb2455a99
describe
'254066' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJRV' 'sip-files00249.jp2'
8be895f75e6d954bffccf02972af29d6
c40a61f157676c476fab7d2f9a1157df9f2d6afb
'2012-05-27T21:24:58-04:00'
describe
'236008' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJRW' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
8985e164d36f04992ac560aabbe6c4fc
9b1a8d55d5b71945349fa3d6d7760735025d4c23
'2012-05-27T21:24:44-04:00'
describe
'199891' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJRX' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
20641d7bbfe772da64b70f0c4112d59b
f8924243d7dc331674e8303bbc32994e8b83df08
'2012-05-27T21:25:21-04:00'
describe
'92123' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJRY' 'sip-files00298.QC.jpg'
2bbd381c83ed3de6bcfed8aac64c928e
c14b777e05c3bb06656ff699d322e06b388c6b1e
describe
'95078' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJRZ' 'sip-files00301.QC.jpg'
3fa988173b7dc267cb0de4c87c8c46ab
24ac22d56c4128cba3e906a2e6f7349bb162f2b6
'2012-05-27T21:22:11-04:00'
describe
'31001' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJSA' 'sip-files00237thm.jpg'
edce47251b49ff3394ee95ca139b6cfa
36da19418b83fe1a84739be79b57c053c4f40901
describe
'29507' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJSB' 'sip-files00203thm.jpg'
3ca3958a84ea723a1a5217819a7b75b2
6f61a595e9af4b1a65bda1b24b0d125c1e33adde
'2012-05-27T21:31:02-04:00'
describe
'34721' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJSC' 'sip-files00272thm.jpg'
9af2605887aa7e812459fb8531ff9734
4c20e01339e56a9f2e88a243dd331986495375ad
describe
'1935' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJSD' 'sip-files00263.txt'
d60d204d830d3482e1125d65bc516392
979a77146d95b8a8fad011922be1036b447b5e8a
'2012-05-27T21:28:20-04:00'
describe
'31937' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJSE' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
b25267bd28754cd341308725b237068a
98dfa32db2451589a0ee4645662ebaa5e1ee7439
'2012-05-30T08:53:19-04:00'
describe
'1704692' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJSF' 'sip-files00023.tif'
2f0b673ab96ae725d795573e53c3a3a0
c6778f4a3c7605a3de14ddeca9f66bbcc33f4f0e
'2012-05-30T08:53:00-04:00'
describe
'32499' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJSG' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
e4f8c1d8894443ac9cad50ea21bc3783
2764894be5bfda130db90961e8d88deb302dd117
describe
'1687484' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJSH' 'sip-files00331.jp2'
64b8ff586fb77a9b8bf2b3fee3b9db26
606a51d46f4b888a6d754cac4a1df08b05736126
describe
'1706032' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJSI' 'sip-files00316.tif'
4a10f48c5eac778f02e857616b4a2f05
22768e0143c722b9868eb3ce472f46bf50335f9d
describe
'93119' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJSJ' 'sip-files00292.QC.jpg'
6909130df3beee198c9d763cbdacc3c5
f32d3082fd22d8fbba49a5c990f3f6690f4acf0d
describe
'25040' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJSK' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
327a7112c7ba59ec7718704b6a6adea3
354ccf622e14d3e7948f21609f4c537ede5426af
'2012-05-27T21:26:48-04:00'
describe
'206740' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJSL' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
711215b190823ffba32032240b781234
9c30354412aad64735171da959b94f99c58d2abc
'2012-05-27T21:30:27-04:00'
describe
'1794' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJSM' 'sip-files00145.txt'
5b2d803c45ad55e69f4e8f9d05f7003d
fdd97465fd1600c636c471989158f13eca110c5d
'2012-05-27T21:24:22-04:00'
describe
'46942' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJSN' 'sip-files00302.pro'
b69b8a35d5ad83225da70111e6828bdf
cc87da1e13aa16a38e58fb422715814c1ed7714c
describe
'22513' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJSO' 'sip-files00296.pro'
3f24337c663ebe0d797dec5f86041e26
346a9c6fd69e0e7d9bd77bf2f0e5549b76dbfab1
'2012-05-27T21:27:43-04:00'
describe
'37224' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJSP' 'sip-files00327thm.jpg'
e7d7c74f2ae746a1b30c217a27161108
fade2e3b700985dd70f734a8e413051b7cec7f96
'2012-05-27T21:23:56-04:00'
describe
'229443' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJSQ' 'sip-files00340.jpg'
7bc8bd9c1f7ffd37f178522e637d2552
69d52efee873cb0a55d7146209d6934848c68c50
'2012-05-27T21:30:41-04:00'
describe
'273769' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJSR' 'sip-files00203.jp2'
e92a58bd12917f7de40891b3aeded266
22aeccdc299b6ae4212638607cf4771b2c7e19c2
describe
'92825' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJSS' 'sip-files00174.QC.jpg'
cea619b159d55e2050ba5555b51df96f
e98d0e6c886a3ccb0636d1acf4d3a1b9389f9983
'2012-05-30T08:52:59-04:00'
describe
'49036' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJST' 'sip-files00221.pro'
ea372dd30eabbc80bca9672fc0a95ff0
c9d4fb4ebd5687d949f7242ea215bb6ff86b7069
'2012-05-27T21:19:38-04:00'
describe
'95628' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJSU' 'sip-files00303.QC.jpg'
008296c780caaee6791a813b5d7d2517
d0f56356ae4775bda0e0c8e3a29b8d88b360d39f
'2012-05-27T21:27:03-04:00'
describe
'1785' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJSV' 'sip-files00098.txt'
4959cc735c1e3dc0f40769a2493f531e
94b76ed5628137cd9c140d4d079386378be132e3
describe
'1807' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJSW' 'sip-files00024.txt'
30082269492ed623cc30b53b3c9ce971
a24f8823ddb495aa35626eee808ec5db56f8a1e0
describe
'251675' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJSX' 'sip-files00166.jp2'
a9acd15ccbca0d23a687eace95aa9c92
8b1bb51eaac3f16441320501e97b75cba6ae065d
'2012-05-27T21:25:25-04:00'
describe
'1701924' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJSY' 'sip-files00063.tif'
28529f8d31e08f4af1883f049c5d9b19
ff91c2ab2e8f613120e5a052944b7a636115f7b2
describe
'304617' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJSZ' 'sip-files00334.jp2'
d770a4775ebfc10763460d7e6e1316dd
4a70c8f1bb619cd440d8c092c71a3097b8acea32
'2012-05-27T21:23:59-04:00'
describe
'34641' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJTA' 'sip-files00340thm.jpg'
132d8cec26c0a561ce520b476480d15f
11709f577f31f72feec3e2e2cfa8c5f5926f4d3e
describe
'675' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJTB' 'sip-files00187.txt'
9277399369d4307807d8ee3dc6a105e2
f457b6b05e28c6a78a0db0d2cc77d7582ac55038
'2012-05-27T21:19:56-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'1704980' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJTC' 'sip-files00014.tif'
9007aa4b847a2b429adae2ae1f92e6cb
c22d1fdaee55dac9db87e51c46cbe3894cc8fb8a
describe
'31883' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJTD' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
d98f98c83518dfa05168b3615bf5bd89
c4e3213d0630e8af1a806455bce2327e3354f40a
describe
'1704856' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJTE' 'sip-files00221.tif'
486fe4f45d2264dcc335530fc97e28ca
2cb739cc91e482433c4ce9e697963ac856567b57
'2012-05-27T21:19:22-04:00'
describe
'49236' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJTF' 'sip-files00172.pro'
b518588555c04e38c59d9a44f4430d2b
429ce94634e3e08b2bb953d55c09684a8b65fee7
'2012-05-27T21:18:55-04:00'
describe
'240606' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJTG' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
fa325b83ac90928eba822eb3a82c9f20
716d4201e25953b3a4378a572dd5c9df6282fc51
'2012-05-27T21:31:50-04:00'
describe
'267513' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJTH' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
0a90c8782f55d6256682034cde3b750a
8d28a3e26b05d129b725317ce1f13ba8854e1fea
describe
'83603' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJTI' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
1205a783f740d93f57fb2e8687e4a373
e9a5b05ad710c6944a08637d39ced1d3874f75c1
describe
'269722' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJTJ' 'sip-files00261.jp2'
c1810383a8f1988af51c19e33694629f
c7e07b62f143cb57a0a91e841a4d26ea9122d91a
'2012-05-27T21:25:18-04:00'
describe
'81863' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJTK' 'sip-files00223.QC.jpg'
ce9c2bd70ac54d06dcd0941f99ed54f9
f7358ac142a2e6c528ce5eaae91795b7a64b3e5a
'2012-05-27T21:20:36-04:00'
describe
'96024' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJTL' 'sip-files00293.QC.jpg'
6999496503f4878197ff2128fabf3e21
86e3c3fb71d229c6fb9fff137f02feb09f11da3d
'2012-05-27T21:19:54-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJTM' 'sip-files00099.tif'
0b2ba0d1dc30456a10a20020014852dd
42d340e7c8714f90bbf1931955f1c35a9be6ec38
'2012-05-27T21:26:11-04:00'
describe
'261137' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJTN' 'sip-files00270.jp2'
a730cba8d8e291950e25bc0c54a4263b
bddb63fb1f452a6dce1bf722f7d3b2dfb9cd1ca7
'2012-05-27T21:28:08-04:00'
describe
'208090' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJTO' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
a1bbbdd8d988a8f94cf343424f51165e
88da0d8654d341c7ea4926122d8ecdd0384fd8a9
'2012-05-27T21:28:33-04:00'
describe
'1750' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJTP' 'sip-files00085.txt'
e8853e5872e6068a5fecb4116ad8b890
5595c468330a897cdbcb932fc10d6c30f9798fcd
'2012-05-27T21:25:29-04:00'
describe
'241280' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJTQ' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
7244ebd39d26c2bdf6196396b01968cc
0e9c1d5dd24d00737203e27fc622e1dc82c485d5
'2012-05-27T21:25:37-04:00'
describe
'33036' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJTR' 'sip-files00222thm.jpg'
8d2cf99faefe435d72f4f18e4b590ea7
b323e0688cb0f53363d7fd76645d8a903836708f
'2012-05-27T21:22:54-04:00'
describe
'48209' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJTS' 'sip-files00071.pro'
b8f83923f851ce5f7babd672182b49f6
a9d2bae352526d7f85666ac74dac9ebb6c57334d
describe
'252651' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJTT' 'sip-files00169.jp2'
5a12f85daedc10266da6c38a7f535f56
abc0bd4a5406be55961ea4ac8ffb180695429e84
'2012-05-27T21:18:28-04:00'
describe
'36433' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJTU' 'sip-files00062.pro'
34b26920360bfdb4e02b8bc9412e8580
d162aa2c7ed59db8a3779f23e6bf7c22cd94778e
'2012-05-27T21:27:14-04:00'
describe
'51453' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJTV' 'sip-files00030.pro'
765b81a195ae1aa3c63b2ceda63c82e4
33f00ece33090983aa4ff79aee8c5b7bce51d332
'2012-05-27T21:28:13-04:00'
describe
'1872' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJTW' 'sip-files00169.txt'
4a3776833a3098d839eb4eeae8cf3d48
be3d143cbc9392ecaa576304dd6f332451423b17
'2012-05-27T21:25:11-04:00'
describe
'102101' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJTX' 'sip-files00345.jp2'
cfdfdca1a7e7ca350370c5aaa3cc49ab
ec0d03b3b95369bc406b22ea4b4129b6292fd127
'2012-05-27T21:30:21-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJTY' 'sip-files00095.tif'
330358c83008b11fcb79bb8d26b9b9db
5f0197f5e62ac5d5923a8991cfa67cd0cb3fd443
'2012-05-27T21:23:28-04:00'
describe
'1706212' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJTZ' 'sip-files00315.tif'
74f47efa72d72e83e32b1c4af5d45bde
e88f13785046f7bc3257fa8de2ce002e124a873f
'2012-05-27T21:22:46-04:00'
describe
'236111' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJUA' 'sip-files00255.jpg'
ba12a6134e97d8bba63e894226a8f356
7b2cc622ee29b5350759f8b220252021d3010471
'2012-05-29T18:38:57-04:00'
describe
'18005' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJUB' 'sip-files00006.jpg'
59981e3e505a0a01e5ca8f4fcbacce80
f6c5fcacf5bc955476681515c254f434d4a64c35
'2012-05-27T21:27:56-04:00'
describe
'226298' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJUC' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
4d55b70ab0d71af15a0aaf6e87033d6d
2e70ba2ef91b3eb1d9bb57a5934a79aab32e9497
'2012-05-30T08:52:56-04:00'
describe
'31376' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJUD' 'sip-files00286thm.jpg'
51b5b3f6c53ef636c7951f16106458d3
e0b12701188fa3fe660109efdf75032ccf7f6919
describe
'29897' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJUE' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
c9d37f09ba152b57044999172e042d82
a0586e37bef5799af4b9df531ca8af102cfbf63b
'2012-05-27T21:29:07-04:00'
describe
'218384' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJUF' 'sip-files00186.jpg'
2fa56af3863f67d4ad5a8e950d49a4e1
e2612ec52af7bc6f9db2f6fe8f4bc7d2864cc7e2
'2012-05-27T21:23:39-04:00'
describe
'1705996' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJUG' 'sip-files00122.tif'
ad7ce85882fee1a00aa8d2b351737102
d2a0b2b42c3182b5e37cf5b4c1d8835ecd2a4f0f
'2012-05-27T21:28:02-04:00'
describe
'85874' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJUH' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
71da71b4dd6efe7072577d16c1035af6
de2ccbb4b9cc8255dd28ccc715b2ab9d4714b585
'2012-05-27T21:29:39-04:00'
describe
'1704376' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJUI' 'sip-files00040.tif'
34bd9b878e8cc9621f6c2ad2c8ba55c9
8fd4dea46b0b76829f021bc3c5c98696b3a0f9f6
describe
'15127' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJUJ' 'sip-files00002.txt'
9313f8a5dbf3e0bd7cc08fd6ca71aaff
e00cdf8fc06b8879341f6607d9dd34d73fa2430a
'2012-05-27T21:26:33-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'49424' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJUK' 'sip-files00269.pro'
bce2ac64fd2cf654e74867398f3d358f
473ad9d76d9ce4d76591a56b5ff0cb69f875fe64
describe
'234119' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJUL' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
4251cce7da2c89e9453e59522086b288
a8ef0960ff07ba33a4f4fd2b00fc29dda760e3dd
'2012-05-27T21:29:54-04:00'
describe
'255545' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJUM' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
464c87801981eeee1355cd7a6196be94
992b7cc61deed51963dbf0dbd7798cd560c18b76
describe
'25591' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJUN' 'sip-files00195thm.jpg'
523051829d9780520efdaaa6fa02c9bb
4bb3a4a727bffdce25ff4bb05a95a72cc9463aca
'2012-05-27T21:22:23-04:00'
describe
'47921' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJUO' 'sip-files00031.pro'
d5501b65d8e03882f3d47258d9bff7ba
1ee28dff9fd4922dcc820f6dd549109b8c439e0b
'2012-05-27T21:25:43-04:00'
describe
'296737' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJUP' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
a6006f230d2a0cf5bc91adc2c5a516f9
c4393627470ceaf267b3b0b37748ae5dbff87c77
'2012-05-27T21:19:25-04:00'
describe
'1705952' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJUQ' 'sip-files00293.tif'
ae04c041241f0ff3cf157aa973e9ff51
0881ee2e896d5599388ca57efaba0a93bca64a58
'2012-05-27T21:19:33-04:00'
describe
'1697808' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJUR' 'sip-files00258.tif'
b6f1ad02d5393ada2443839be46986f9
7a2cb7c0495ad5ab3053ee86656a4ee85f506cc1
describe
'250874' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJUS' 'sip-files00220.jp2'
557f6cb6c02516c7b3dfc70f91ac469a
fa6529a22458e677f057ff4c7fcf463958b33858
describe
'1771' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJUT' 'sip-files00088.txt'
619e6f1109006c609d28816e5561a512
a972dde4bf8f8b2e0217ac0606d1a68a926bd15b
'2012-05-27T21:24:25-04:00'
describe
'49991' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJUU' 'sip-files00270.pro'
d0aecf3a213508592f15e30a4db255d0
ccd2a31d9ebacc15bf4d060e076338f900e22155
'2012-05-27T21:22:16-04:00'
describe
'1704460' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJUV' 'sip-files00223.tif'
281fbbba488de2002903ac9aa0f26143
ae1b0227ca295beac3b46b76f8d2ef5e7a000377
'2012-05-27T21:29:45-04:00'
describe
'210164' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJUW' 'sip-files00241.jp2'
29e7e2c74b26bc68f4313988e7a62267
351f3bc50c750d8ba5195965c7838478dca7431b
'2012-05-27T21:26:38-04:00'
describe
'1706060' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJUX' 'sip-files00264.tif'
809bd8d3b5cbe2d1da2c03eeff6c84b5
83020a47dd9bb79fb549f92d38273048145c9757
'2012-05-27T21:28:14-04:00'
describe
'88676' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJUY' 'sip-files00140.QC.jpg'
b1b6096a444294d550d66e5a61330132
4e250ee12bee9215849c9b6d77c503981dbdf21a
'2012-05-27T21:31:19-04:00'
describe
'1706688' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJUZ' 'sip-files00311.tif'
185977b92795e3c48b2b193d39ebdb87
c38b24f2ea1f679e3d9fb6c002c643107bc0246c
'2012-05-27T21:23:14-04:00'
describe
'242432' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJVA' 'sip-files00177.jp2'
e35904a573a80e261705cf02725384d2
014baec11f75cc1d4c088735647aaa26fb190454
'2012-05-27T21:24:04-04:00'
describe
'1864' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJVB' 'sip-files00194.txt'
2097f42a21e77ab10832f31286eb3345
d0a35b40b697bf4730f5a00525dd41a3ec9cf7a0
describe
'80667' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJVC' 'sip-files00232.QC.jpg'
62ff7ac4d9b965ec26fdf30783e973b6
9621123cf1aab02581a18af40b391b06e0f3f4d2
describe
'275711' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJVD' 'sip-files00279.jp2'
e891dba174718ca7c79e2f2a1dcec586
df9ecfddefafca15a21547bc397a3408ea202952
describe
'279915' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJVE' 'sip-files00277.jp2'
894f0d63e40ab74c4a7981962854f0b9
15031a08242d10d194cd0dfba91e14a4d70c24e0
'2012-05-27T21:20:22-04:00'
describe
'47192' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJVF' 'sip-files00231.pro'
1205ed9f0dab79349260b80533c136ba
25d8e51c77595adbaa0ca2d662f5e104e8990155
describe
'1593' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJVG' 'sip-files00094.txt'
3f6225d243fb09aee84ba130a30f8939
4bd6c780d5faa6f93ca0dfe51b43d3ed6aa81815
'2012-05-27T21:26:53-04:00'
describe
'245211' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJVH' 'sip-files00147.jp2'
0d28e742d1f404a08f57242eab4409a6
4d113f197150a85d64e222ff0dc97d3c89303cfc
'2012-05-27T21:28:09-04:00'
describe
'90059' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJVI' 'sip-files00253.QC.jpg'
a4ba10f71a66a92294839769e024c54e
e9eade2bfc2d639b7cb89b0358f413ee3acaeced
'2012-05-27T21:29:52-04:00'
describe
'1704732' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJVJ' 'sip-files00216.tif'
ffd0886b28be90fb3cb21c1b4b806cfc
91b9a979f59ba9c7432a4e3a80b70d1fc748faa0
'2012-05-27T21:31:49-04:00'
describe
'1799' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJVK' 'sip-files00228.txt'
fc0321e70412ce41be27410a5d5284c8
dfaae5f9e0e0bfc21cc56521f5ba4ed20ea8f8fc
describe
'33404' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJVL' 'sip-files00204thm.jpg'
dde2c70a244e72dfc0d82139cda2b96c
3ad16450782eeaea3dcdc426261b383be47a058d
'2012-05-27T21:19:05-04:00'
describe
'242023' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJVM' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
a3e26a77233bbf15439f0de46a11a018
aebb13c713591c62b2a77b63fe583d3e32f49608
describe
'33178' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJVN' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
f7823696413b8f7f8e77932aa5c41455
6c2fe941df0cfeac079877ee2e5e495881306e26
'2012-05-27T21:20:33-04:00'
describe
'82162' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJVO' 'sip-files00266.QC.jpg'
3e883a36638c5ad1a405846073f16228
df19032baa9d02921b57456b37027ac9bb668f3a
'2012-05-27T21:25:58-04:00'
describe
'1705724' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJVP' 'sip-files00136.tif'
fff328540bbcd768e078bc97c5d6bd2c
3e0809226a644d90df3e97f789b659839ebf8f8e
'2012-05-27T21:23:23-04:00'
describe
'1346' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJVQ' 'sip-files00290.txt'
946ad4eb7e3629badbef66c3d84678fd
cd2105ec2dbbf014b6824a8181418347a8f79385
describe
Invalid character
'32083' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJVR' 'sip-files00079.pro'
3a5318e849737cafee0d5456651cd094
85f362c413c58d14aca98cf0afed5b32aa0964aa
'2012-05-27T21:22:36-04:00'
describe
'50872' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJVS' 'sip-files00297.pro'
878cb8f83ce7e29ce4e715694b0fe5bc
c69753b3fa3919133e08c905c02012ca5e20a93f
describe
'89024' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJVT' 'sip-files00252.QC.jpg'
a8511d76720a52bb845e759c9125842b
c72bc2c7079bef09e615f817dd159be8747dc1b6
describe
'18337' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJVU' 'sip-files00005thm.jpg'
b4b6e75b0de5b32554c095b000d35249
18977913e78afe49f3a165353fcd6585d0ecccff
describe
'87649' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJVV' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
aa646327e66f164052432879aef14dd1
b6e54b04a3e7515cb9ac9b4b60804f30a4e92803
'2012-05-27T21:23:50-04:00'
describe
'296334' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJVW' 'sip-files00327.jpg'
18abce58541f57590beece32323676c8
5cdac0dcc7470da250b4aec7876325aaf9ced986
describe
'33866' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJVX' 'sip-files00172thm.jpg'
f49d404a97ddd348158f5f7c167373e5
5b90fbbdc0843ec8505b19180ced607343af6ad2
'2012-05-27T21:30:50-04:00'
describe
'271096' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJVY' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
198b950151f3b4fc0bdc013a726ff949
134a8da1214b39c9629b4ec5996a8b650a084a4b
describe
'1982' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJVZ' 'sip-files00303.txt'
81af942de7a7d36e565e8427443f2230
bf5fdb9ec0304226b785d950cc13979ec8237bcd
'2012-05-27T21:31:54-04:00'
describe
'1823' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJWA' 'sip-files00231.txt'
6e5559048d4eeb0bfc17b93642078b31
4c9864edfc69db67999a996bd67d878f436a31fe
describe
'1782' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJWB' 'sip-files00156.txt'
35d7e644c82709912fb06fd57e1e8dbb
df9d4d89109e64006385dc64136bc6566256f2d6
'2012-05-27T21:26:22-04:00'
describe
'45857' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJWC' 'sip-files00021.pro'
682dd98d60fb2cf5e88ae2fae53e7435
560275f3769de877fce4636367eb8328e329f862
'2012-05-27T21:28:15-04:00'
describe
'1705008' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJWD' 'sip-files00133.tif'
5bfa49c5dac7ede4c7fb4a72b18ae1ea
5abeb5bbdc6f54a859bf21a91d64a8c62d9a765d
describe
'93438' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJWE' 'sip-files00304.QC.jpg'
0ccfc1938c2183ec752610da5d47e5d8
5a33f4f2bf2b0565fec82a137903e5a51c4a7b2c
describe
'221663' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJWF' 'sip-files00243.jpg'
eeac1e12508c0003e26c42f769917294
bd2755f0184c4430667aa2bb99338c99753643c7
describe
'52136' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJWG' 'sip-files00066.pro'
b22129020bf399b9dc69eb9e040ce4e4
67a8bbf43509e0714df1de1acf0c7196382ea37d
describe
'76264' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJWH' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
a556150df5fa5792e9976b1e7b323bb3
e9062d5dc112d7a3e191cb65ddafdc7a75d47dbc
'2012-05-27T21:23:03-04:00'
describe
'88308' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJWI' 'sip-files00187.jpg'
46d62b130374912056bc4a3951128ce9
c49f81d05b23ee260e14945688d0f50d99fcc112
describe
'231666' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJWJ' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
c8fb468679de6685922b4b93784cf438
ecbdf53e88e008909bf6da806c424918c96e4cfc
'2012-05-27T21:19:04-04:00'
describe
'33466' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJWK' 'sip-files00179thm.jpg'
4a64e3ba5b82ab7bbca12350421c21d6
72bc339a9e79dc5b661afeb6e8fefd743a802179
describe
'262161' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJWL' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
c6cb6da0094be6a28286ac71fe75846c
93394ca5598b8351718de1cfecf977ef48f4a8f1
describe
'71874' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJWM' 'sip-files00209.QC.jpg'
f1839e0c8f00f7d1c7cb965eb5b2b913
ccb2aefa965f97eeab057dd8271b9a037f0775ad
'2012-05-27T21:19:46-04:00'
describe
'47418' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJWN' 'sip-files00127.pro'
0aadce0bc6c216431b531f6ae239ddb4
1d61219e26b88a7cd37c282dc48380c73f61ec14
'2012-05-27T21:30:08-04:00'
describe
'1879' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJWO' 'sip-files00295.txt'
c4b77bd435b26125c748f50f32d78474
da530b455a8670124d3163d162a27983c56af084
'2012-05-27T21:29:37-04:00'
describe
'110701' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJWP' 'sip-files00313.pro'
e5e82f9d06a36cdf773074936b04e342
77179aec3e1710ee450099f015b9cb74eefadd9a
describe
'1706068' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJWQ' 'sip-files00269.tif'
6c699d65f4fac159b3b3a835f05bf9a9
434c0cc8fec9e3efc5b72070edf778a11343fe83
'2012-05-27T21:22:25-04:00'
describe
'239209' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJWR' 'sip-files00170.jpg'
41cccb4545ee1695c5352ff60a54716c
ba24a84423112c4e8f93dfc3ab99d81106f8d739
'2012-05-27T21:21:07-04:00'
describe
'220832' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJWS' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
c43813711dc3c49a944d823b3a7a807f
48069852e9c86055f098c52bcc61ea5beb8aec2b
'2012-05-27T21:30:45-04:00'
describe
'85988' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJWT' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
dea987e69a08a53f58f0df9dd14ad538
a5726b007f075758c811daffea6a29b1d43f5d34
describe
'33622' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJWU' 'sip-files00253thm.jpg'
40dddcdefd557ba5c4450b9d00f106e8
41e9405aaf236c2869144cee163033a52ce821a2
'2012-05-27T21:26:01-04:00'
describe
'220037' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJWV' 'sip-files00256.jpg'
583fc1a6d373992038c279e5de98c444
8c94d13a3304ea4f2f3d9c648dda6f8b93e33663
'2012-05-27T21:24:07-04:00'
describe
'61121' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJWW' 'sip-files00195.QC.jpg'
f131a8c40ac57a43c16883c3fe42704c
b5a5450028bebfa9af1c3ed8a1dd393eab3de342
'2012-05-27T21:22:37-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJWX' 'sip-files00294.QC.jpg'
cb536dbf0dc7d19dd8ed2fe1f5266122
fa0bbc44598fcbbb00bcb8e803c821f60162cd1e
'2012-05-27T21:24:18-04:00'
describe
'72970' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJWY' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
3929b1f6c3fdd0f3da6c315d5058940c
96aeb82fb4d6d97b2f1d2b93e28002096aa81e79
'2012-05-27T21:30:26-04:00'
describe
'1705976' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJWZ' 'sip-files00132.tif'
8313ac0b329b84d08ced4bacf61399c2
68423dfbcd4fac7d3fcb8019be7aed346f25e8bf
'2012-05-27T21:20:31-04:00'
describe
'24043' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJXA' 'sip-files00206thm.jpg'
2128f022a25302f5edd5c8075bb30026
bee444b43395f330d9c238f9226d2a6c6ce61e2c
'2012-05-27T21:25:02-04:00'
describe
'51080' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJXB' 'sip-files00064.pro'
9e79debf809ead028f3ed438b7854f6a
9a8d0ad37d221b9af682bd2e395d5dbdd912f41f
describe
'2447' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJXC' 'sip-files00339.pro'
05a2fc30084379f7fbea1315010c241e
c5c93b559f51e2b72bf55a63484df7d082600066
'2012-05-27T21:19:44-04:00'
describe
'192961' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJXD' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
9caa70176044ac8f4cb4335443abc088
b467dc96f9f61ae7ca0d1ab3baa8b22b3449a795
describe
'1818' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJXE' 'sip-files00125.txt'
cde11f0effd512b88c849b8d4debdc91
77abb6ba0ccc146645e72c6766e790fc645687da
describe
'33141' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJXF' 'sip-files00243thm.jpg'
ff5c63f45a29a58d10f4b91c3f362439
ff9841820bd0e0fa60932b2b941d8c4d83abda64
describe
'1705020' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJXG' 'sip-files00125.tif'
000507c0505d4bb2cfb2c7e11ead3f9d
480777995d43022257b23ff168dd21b566925124
'2012-05-27T21:27:41-04:00'
describe
'43698' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJXH' 'sip-files00124.pro'
b27c2bec0d94e3a2989be67567f3ddf0
ac3bf78ab78f4d4aee5d4f77a50565b28b3757cf
'2012-05-27T21:27:15-04:00'
describe
'1843' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJXI' 'sip-files00017.txt'
e5ef73efce73296ab52d0ed9cc3fc9f8
557d9275105140da5abb23f43b8d7c0cd6b77dad
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJXJ' 'sip-files00126.tif'
457b9f2330f8537e9dc80c1cef237179
7149dc71591635b49adc44e98e3a788c0c3752bd
'2012-05-27T21:21:30-04:00'
describe
'273660' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJXK' 'sip-files00264.jp2'
604181d974de1f60380e459d389379e9
2fafbc45fa566c6b001d900557c22e0a247c2630
describe
'81892' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJXL' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
3359ce8f06ce54c41e91047ebea7ce94
cdc57b7f34054f24a7989b2065772e11daee3336
'2012-05-27T21:25:33-04:00'
describe
'1705300' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJXM' 'sip-files00191.tif'
d184dfe70a74b5e3a6846bba98dcc2ba
f5c81a96416777b3eb25ce3f2f2ac316c028c020
'2012-05-27T21:20:26-04:00'
describe
'31040' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJXN' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
9e7d2a254e3a03240271fccdc0e7bdbb
e3a1701ab70752b409ef148891fe412869f08b2e
'2012-05-27T21:18:41-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJXO' 'sip-files00285.txt'
78629083dc337dc21ccdc752861b859f
a25eb61415fb5d8f0404aac09ec56519d0c3d867
'2012-05-27T21:28:27-04:00'
describe
'50251' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJXP' 'sip-files00261.pro'
bdd8046ede49f5bf5dc93ecf2bd29ef2
73aaed8f174f3a39e34170ce3753b533f2eebdea
'2012-05-27T21:31:43-04:00'
describe
'1701872' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJXQ' 'sip-files00206.tif'
377720510d6499c48ffbcbfa6cefb4c7
5cf47c1f2ab99cd6ce6738a255de7d260d8012ce
'2012-05-27T21:28:30-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJXR' 'sip-files00030.tif'
52c2a87bd71c0b4f0e53c3da66b0d1b8
11c882210f7cb345e2de7db03455c171baef6fe6
'2012-05-27T21:29:16-04:00'
describe
'49259' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJXS' 'sip-files00271.pro'
ed08919bbbf463490bc71a8c1b1c5b45
dbf9681bc441dec51eff1189da33389cd09b47d6
'2012-05-27T21:24:52-04:00'
describe
'50406' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJXT' 'sip-files00263.pro'
47464ed36681bc1acda0e02e565b1615
2e2b87b248b33eb696dc03ba46d03120c281b951
describe
'47914' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJXU' 'sip-files00155.pro'
fc7e49544404897857c9021e4f199cd6
4e369ce1c169ca212e6cf21822de23654c9b5bed
describe
'32983' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJXV' 'sip-files00146thm.jpg'
b0e39798d0ab943b3f40ee6e6d3b2f77
3108f5237264a376b2908cdae56a446db2f2de20
describe
'1705344' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJXW' 'sip-files00010.tif'
17741ae2fca1d352b9b983749ae1fac7
88cf499ffb885084c84e6c99f31026413e81aa0f
'2012-05-27T21:23:24-04:00'
describe
'1705356' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJXX' 'sip-files00236.tif'
3998873ffac811f41d777f895d04b31d
25dd0766373346215453d3d2d1d4f8a3c5a36713
'2012-05-27T21:22:09-04:00'
describe
'217503' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJXY' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
236ada42dd03703a53f67a4b42291e3f
06b6f75f4ee69e3081c2cc3385da0e2b2fbceeef
describe
'95749' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJXZ' 'sip-files00287.QC.jpg'
df99dfe801bcd2ee781b16aaa4825a56
5e2795201802267e35baef063c7c3f222a519d70
'2012-05-27T21:22:15-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJYA' 'sip-files00250.txt'
559aa29b25b078c54a8337ab7f6f876c
e228f5b10f08eb9b375da193c07b8ea044853656
'2012-05-30T08:53:23-04:00'
describe
'1964' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJYB' 'sip-files00183.txt'
6ae9aaeba92886324e3903243c049cc6
95330f035775ac71bddfc2e3bb783b3c72978db8
'2012-05-27T21:25:46-04:00'
describe
'1345' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJYC' 'sip-files00207.txt'
e72960b76b5948e8de8e7a43ec5d291c
a1f454217a3687bd989bbc9f99938619264bea83
'2012-05-27T21:24:39-04:00'
describe
'286251' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJYD' 'sip-files00337.jpg'
8504035fcc569286ffb0397e3042ac42
e9fc1afd4be4156b1ba3b678be2ee0b96341b294
'2012-05-27T21:24:56-04:00'
describe
'225501' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJYE' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
cbb6c8af2144b83bb477a772e5dabb62
dfa79ca3e0a1069609617357a172f2a114db1759
describe
'1705492' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJYF' 'sip-files00252.tif'
c1dbc87c1477645b8058e785bc4190bb
4c3759be973c441e5d3eb31d50a7d5008e93f2e7
describe
'1741' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJYG' 'sip-files00050.txt'
9f5480db122b9f9dce5a7ce0f4fc3300
73a25e93f5865b7f1dee3bb75e4683b5f9ed47cd
'2012-05-27T21:27:06-04:00'
describe
'24799' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJYH' 'sip-files00107.pro'
a0e543eac5b40553fc8546a986588397
54e7adf9cbd81c7187c8519d1b6ba4af90f37680
'2012-05-27T21:26:58-04:00'
describe
'81656' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJYI' 'sip-files00257.QC.jpg'
3af410ec56abf54af8db0c474be87236
362655c88403d4501adb5b6ab579d836e7f0c152
'2012-05-27T21:24:29-04:00'
describe
'233315' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJYJ' 'sip-files00140.jpg'
e17c801cc0691ed15dea66747c3ff542
d1c19d701bbdbaa9d126e87b34104d07265edb36
'2012-05-27T21:21:51-04:00'
describe
'240421' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJYK' 'sip-files00169.jpg'
97ad3745781202376a111bcbfdde7845
a2e315b70f1148f4f4c98e342fd492c9fed3bd1d
'2012-05-27T21:20:40-04:00'
describe
'34356' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJYL' 'sip-files00267thm.jpg'
3000e54c06c0937050e22c1d206ce424
a9b06e81421bfc16675a94b4f534008a385dead3
'2012-05-27T21:22:45-04:00'
describe
'1706732' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJYM' 'sip-files00332.tif'
4eab1f14b278e908a2f4fc05c18a54b4
ceb4e023a603bee52b0567f74777ff784eb23e18
describe
'32071' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJYN' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
725a0b68a061a9bb427919bcb121fa01
f12533be42e03ea57b024bb64f412402ebf63255
'2012-05-27T21:32:20-04:00'
describe
'51730' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJYO' 'sip-files00175.pro'
f29a2fa62177546e0c5bb9a9c39ed220
b04c824b1296c8e81f1c52ccea7ace999524aacb
describe
'46856' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJYP' 'sip-files00140.pro'
63a82811cec3dc2475ec0ab761cc657d
1736bb5aabd1ff22cc0b42d656430f1ef228d018
describe
'1705096' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJYQ' 'sip-files00281.tif'
323730943212df43d41d5059d234ff71
92fe7c8326f41758b8ac3723eb7aa01e8221a162
describe
'47372' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJYR' 'sip-files00025.pro'
41a87dd1b61f9cfe593b6679926e46d0
21d78cfff9ab0e9ea64c9d264e47952346c1742e
describe
'264221' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJYS' 'sip-files00276.jp2'
95c488db69abb9cc9933c1ce54f47b1a
305b0cd439b67fe28337c512f49b51ba8805236e
'2012-05-27T21:25:08-04:00'
describe
'85130' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJYT' 'sip-files00231.QC.jpg'
666b5ebe4d7573f2088e431e092af31f
40b46fe6746841751866ca0cc1cd26e3d37a38cc
'2012-05-27T21:31:56-04:00'
describe
'222398' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJYU' 'sip-files00278.jpg'
29feda468d18ff32dfe317338fb81d25
c03d66e6dba3dad71b08d5bc7a0b3196a2f1aff1
describe
'33490' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJYV' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
6d1086b0e2b1ddc0c2edb9a696f7d41f
a34c7d0480bfcbb082e58608947d56db5552cbe9
describe
'1702360' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJYW' 'sip-files00195.tif'
67f3572f4dc6f49a945217c1769a027a
cee8307c36f042d7fd58f3546d60e959171bc46c
'2012-05-27T21:19:52-04:00'
describe
'198543' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJYX' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
f1c74137319e867bfe12ac70146288d5
5694d6510a29b4b566d9bc59a04d36cece73b9d2
'2012-05-27T21:28:51-04:00'
describe
'79074' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJYY' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
ee344c0874ff85571ed175cd5d6e7ecd
52aed8fdad973d57d220ba98b6c2a0a099ff83fa
'2012-05-27T21:22:39-04:00'
describe
'480' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJYZ' 'sip-files00321.txt'
4164d8087b2ff68d57e61e7befa96c85
f90de5cdca914bf7b75d59760df573464d75b8be
describe
'1793' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJZA' 'sip-files00136.txt'
92b743db98142d0f56cdba301a14134f
2cf9056b3548cd6183d1269676373ef20c580e5d
'2012-05-27T21:32:08-04:00'
describe
'1705500' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJZB' 'sip-files00244.tif'
c046f11f67f358edc87676feb5c6e65c
3809929f8f947207721600f50fc97b52a2e48810
'2012-05-27T21:25:28-04:00'
describe
'236088' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJZC' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
03564b2f956d737dcd6553712d3c0a32
fd4a421695191f90b13035a3eb62c87378a4b270
describe
'79562' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJZD' 'sip-files00319.QC.jpg'
c1f01bbc45486821354ef12186aee23a
84853f2aafd633265c161538f68d088a970b06a3
'2012-05-27T21:24:20-04:00'
describe
'262862' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJZE' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
2f0fe92fb464e89108394da050e28578
d23e280fa795513ab082c6f913d979f3fb2a8db5
describe
'1908' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJZF' 'sip-files00180.txt'
d7e32b3aacdc780788525f5491c5c4d4
920e89fc7021456d473ce7b85ecd1a826c5c2edd
describe
'52244' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJZG' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
5c776f234152607cddce3b2c68997e37
0ae5a14aa6ddf5724506c42956fe900072febe18
'2012-05-27T21:25:13-04:00'
describe
'51736' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJZH' 'sip-files00267.pro'
3e1ed55aa9ee11d304e73f650609e0d0
79759a7efe31c22fb3b8ac1c6d4e4bd513250820
describe
'94270' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJZI' 'sip-files00271.QC.jpg'
b1777ac98e4d8d85fa919ca48811126b
75fd627e99f595552946603fa53cc67405b7657b
'2012-05-27T21:30:38-04:00'
describe
'86073' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJZJ' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
081148b98a1bdf5b42b614049c69a71a
fc9183cf683c48f1564f15d4a75f811cb1223813
describe
'1704676' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJZK' 'sip-files00193.tif'
86800af51316e9b0294080cf4d0b75c4
dc2a486d577860b0a5e4d59116862e8875e1e678
'2012-05-27T21:25:15-04:00'
describe
'33897' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJZL' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
f3012a7ce36d4472ada613e072e333c8
939d5845f22448f58079d79cffddc3dded5dd0f0
'2012-05-27T21:27:13-04:00'
describe
'21888' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJZM' 'sip-files00305.pro'
f1743922ce2a36bd2c370d359bccec23
fad634ab86cdce4d49c9af2cf2671ba0a1fa9e8d
'2012-05-27T21:32:22-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJZN' 'sip-files00214.txt'
147f3a3eeb752b4d56cafcec1a7b734c
12255207c6cfd622f3c390346f75ff33315acba1
'2012-05-27T21:25:12-04:00'
describe
'31149' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJZO' 'sip-files00157thm.jpg'
8b7073c2d5fd1702326d700293e4af49
a50a3e829d32037d629bb627a939810c361ee079
'2012-05-27T21:22:21-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJZP' 'sip-files00262.tif'
d5ef6e170720266d0fca0168ff92aa7f
22709541450685b747cb5fbcce85caa2479ecb05
describe
'1704864' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJZQ' 'sip-files00266.tif'
5894f3273e3a8ae1bb596c4f61f3a13f
a3ae3bfd1453127e97f70e211a196c2d7337ae0a
'2012-05-27T21:24:10-04:00'
describe
'47944' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJZR' 'sip-files00202.pro'
d887c26b0bcd730db7323558c8fa266b
154468721f5b7ac5c70c3ffefd5c273f0f8a8603
'2012-05-27T21:21:20-04:00'
describe
'86335' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJZS' 'sip-files00214.QC.jpg'
3391ebb3aa3f33f35023ea054658ead0
0f7a5f141c896a3e41d522389d2c783663f5b4a5
'2012-05-27T21:26:46-04:00'
describe
'1703908' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJZT' 'sip-files00053.tif'
8e0d5167f10309c555850795ae11ae69
4c1783dc2f4b8c92161cfe28f07403464098bbc0
'2012-05-27T21:24:50-04:00'
describe
'1774' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJZU' 'sip-files00102.txt'
cd9086abff94cfa4049e5a7a78f0ae40
76f68835e87f5921984db1ada200a7b7687b18fa
describe
'92992' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJZV' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
ecd1f68449781a2e4852fadba68e924c
e44844c3be3bd2e15505297373d34cbed82c5624
describe
'239592' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJZW' 'sip-files00284.jpg'
937052af2121e74e51811d3213f0f64b
99db4d3fe196972c017e45dd56f2f83bd22350d9
describe
'233347' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJZX' 'sip-files00214.jpg'
8e33c1856a6c28c7b6070420a51325fb
869432ca571644b9787405f8c44600ec6bd31d31
describe
'81510' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJZY' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
f10748c2c205905d7cd2b82de37a7fec
f0406b3ddfad356a5c0ca3f6da1c06a21cf74d9d
'2012-05-27T21:31:22-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAJZZ' 'sip-files00131.txt'
f80cc8bb2256420f07e1193cbfdf53eb
d71686ced7365e2a992e86a498e49bd7c28d38e9
'2012-05-27T21:32:15-04:00'
describe
'44943' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKAA' 'sip-files00032.pro'
f131fe6c63a6cc553454d992ea975c94
e06514e83dd70c70b749eade5d24cac2cf699e04
describe
'1705380' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKAB' 'sip-files00205.tif'
f6793c8966773082eb63b53751402b3a
c724b1e782cc21f39d547c2e91563d14d73fa0c4
'2012-05-27T21:20:28-04:00'
describe
'1703820' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKAC' 'sip-files00059.tif'
5a6b557b8ab7fa45edf91a9fb1d33546
d0c17b0e0421ae43ff4ac032360d03cb08c7fafd
describe
'1702740' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKAD' 'sip-files00207.tif'
4e2f2f356b24212d0801a49d13f58dca
1f3382faefc7b9e5d687998c71144d1871a28050
'2012-05-27T21:20:20-04:00'
describe
'31459' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKAE' 'sip-files00223thm.jpg'
33df2beb74afce467ab6ff610e6d789d
9fbb656934bea8f744ae31d3a689fe92b6dee90c
'2012-05-27T21:21:29-04:00'
describe
'255973' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKAF' 'sip-files00197.jp2'
609d1a3346fe87d6da14c1bea5ffeea6
d31aae5747386a9e0b3b85c3d074fdacdce8f9ec
'2012-05-27T21:30:56-04:00'
describe
'87640' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKAG' 'sip-files00226.QC.jpg'
cb7fd50c4c6edd3be63293e8a0c43462
8d17dc4410697033c1df1fe350e5cafc50c61402
describe
'1669' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKAH' 'sip-files00070.txt'
1ed111e338f5b3be345381d828194284
6fb70193c4fc9c82751dfbab8e07ccaeeb5fa140
'2012-05-27T21:29:13-04:00'
describe
'147923' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKAI' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
a68c19d15abb24d493b372703d516e81
6b6c4adeb5b55a7049187942c6679130d8acc6cb
'2012-05-27T21:32:18-04:00'
describe
'272625' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKAJ' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
196b852af4774a45be5e0bdda857ccbc
0fa10944e4aa9f4fd44ff50385af8766b63ed772
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKAK' 'sip-files00078.txt'
cda756d05fd8f7c025c6a035a3a354b4
26ca58e3db0b10e9c52b7a43b42bf5b8269ef12a
describe
'3913' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKAL' 'sip-files00324.txt'
76b0e504fefa97e823d9d2f683a5f547
60c5fde4be5a096fd458176bb85b78ea7788e9f1
describe
'269394' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKAM' 'sip-files00194.jp2'
f81bd484d39c5b663f52595d9bc29c60
36fcfd35ceda571e0f143038d50445ebd6c8ff1f
'2012-05-27T21:23:42-04:00'
describe
'267294' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKAN' 'sip-files00292.jp2'
e4995a41ddb91a3b080408fe0417f868
a63759e7561762549bc677be9e8e596f45c31744
describe
'32203' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKAO' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
1804b6ee43ce4039188f8601d086c125
1bb74396476eb9cf79efea1357ef3787968522cb
'2012-05-27T21:23:38-04:00'
describe
'296622' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKAP' 'sip-files00259.jp2'
9de1f5c3f9dc07cf1efd61d4a768b653
4485bf3a85563457df6e8b09c6c48921bc07bc5e
'2012-05-27T21:19:20-04:00'
describe
'37897' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKAQ' 'sip-files00225.pro'
d7c7ee5dd5dc95c15ac5968760e12d62
0a003e7df6c96cad2bfe31e211f8bbd8fc277fb8
describe
'1038' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKAR' 'sip-files00107.txt'
0bf1a104f375bb4fc9711108f1621d36
5ce28dd8715789bcb8075c4364951aa0ce5bf890
'2012-05-27T21:23:01-04:00'
describe
'272660' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKAS' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
317a899725c73c0a43a45cceb113ea49
63f13fd235248a37e26243b4604e44190e695308
describe
'224407' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKAT' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
f6449cc30f8bf5049660076485e18ee4
aa5c4af0553f7fecfe8a09777910f344cb8c4dc9
'2012-05-27T21:20:57-04:00'
describe
'34030' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKAU' 'sip-files00180thm.jpg'
347be50f69f3266d74a0b50bbbe28ef6
d88e7290418db46227b391d11d9ecbb35cb0e95b
'2012-05-27T21:25:48-04:00'
describe
'33845' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKAV' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
ae2c41ef45eb9f78e84f94d349f3ecbc
1f5bcf9120019d76daedd8ddb11e42e42c09b5aa
'2012-05-27T21:23:36-04:00'
describe
'199459' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKAW' 'sip-files00241.jpg'
a00d7901a87233ed2706142d14374f8d
9f3766093fd0c6ab1aeb588257a5337581609fd1
'2012-05-27T21:27:26-04:00'
describe
'243016' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKAX' 'sip-files00148.jpg'
4c97ed3ed988af46c1006c33b1561cf9
448b38b48918f8cacfe7ac9e56ddb2f46054cb64
describe
'3186' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKAY' 'sip-files00322.txt'
52ba8a4fe4949a8140d77a87e701aa81
2f7dd47ed907d9a1f8b6130583bcd4a65bfba7fb
describe
'1703892' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKAZ' 'sip-files00090.tif'
f4d92dcabe5e96bc0d10ebcc20c4b3cd
4713e096f0cd37ff9862f782daeb55a500cfa102
'2012-05-27T21:19:26-04:00'
describe
'91090' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKBA' 'sip-files00285.QC.jpg'
2ace5859f677b1494413804ccada5f0e
a6f28a24d4f9b438d49057fd6198d1edec859da7
describe
'1703332' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKBB' 'sip-files00225.tif'
5bc5ee82c845abbce9e51412476d1bfd
608ed36e6630d76bc74033dd0231de96aaa8dbc8
describe
'1827' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKBC' 'sip-files00148.txt'
5782d356b75c340696b9338cbddcc546
41b4a6cd99a8aa868718aa8c48f553d2fdf542d9
'2012-05-27T21:21:16-04:00'
describe
'1578' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKBD' 'sip-files00150.txt'
8018db688c1f66841edccc41a10afff2
2e3ee0df0b9c15ea325864c77cc0b831c42dbbcf
describe
'277' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKBE' 'sip-files00341.txt'
ddcd8d683d0fcc644c069db1b3d94669
677370cbea06bb86c65d925485bb2865496d8d46
'2012-05-27T21:31:51-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'1877' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKBF' 'sip-files00262.txt'
ee028c35e3eaa41c42dea9d6cf110ddc
5eb3a220b4aa97781fde8e0f014b8bf59cc5f87d
describe
'252478' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKBG' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
71621a1d2c52f90741586aecaa92d281
3c28b4537ff2a08d8c3818e26846f46115f23ad1
'2012-05-27T21:20:52-04:00'
describe
'214382' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKBH' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
f6c6775581958c22c09f16d0be785bd5
13e7bf7f696a93b78b1fb5d1f50f36f777e8cb78
'2012-05-27T21:28:38-04:00'
describe
'86129' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKBI' 'sip-files00181.QC.jpg'
5cca27c4addab015b265f6522c90f397
5c20636248d63f45fa82e500846350c3bb4f6a2b
'2012-05-27T21:31:44-04:00'
describe
'1706616' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKBJ' 'sip-files00334.tif'
d8d959bdabd557cc3bb33f1598301ec8
a5e945c5f572b855b8a9add0e2afd8544b2b0876
'2012-05-27T21:25:52-04:00'
describe
'83444' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKBK' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
7f4503fdcf6ead74d59f0fd098c2827e
0b14933e6e8d86967ee0b87150f386aa882f488e
describe
'319814' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKBL' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
837913b4e1a44491d9e2dd1a1d20b4bb
f55d10c0cf1add425c44c63f8eb5d0f5c8ec87b0
describe
'72340' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKBM' 'sip-files00329.QC.jpg'
313c8e351fb1ff9c59e70fec4f6ca022
21d7f51ba3c1e0aed6bf7744dae99fbcc68ab5fc
'2012-05-27T21:31:31-04:00'
describe
'51652' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKBN' 'sip-files00200.pro'
5e9e6209a18cedf9ca3ce3094cc3a1b1
5cc286c4a689b63cba39704c62a508908bc819e0
'2012-05-27T21:27:01-04:00'
describe
'32835' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKBO' 'sip-files00227thm.jpg'
9e9522cc9d00e41f72035d28941ff931
7f69cb12620faca39419dac25938ca8fa3df161c
'2012-05-27T21:24:19-04:00'
describe
'45183' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKBP' 'sip-files00167.pro'
3c110943e8374795b94f4c7aeb45a77f
d7a028940efc431b036072cb16db6f894665e0bd
'2012-05-27T21:20:00-04:00'
describe
'88183' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKBQ' 'sip-files00296.QC.jpg'
e07aff433e3ceb609c058c064907d2ee
846d0313cc5aeafb18feb267e877cf4e1f2f434e
'2012-05-27T21:30:00-04:00'
describe
'30672' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKBR' 'sip-files00339thm.jpg'
20c5350ae865fc9bbd4d646a37a9d644
a50b201c4decdd2a65e2943482368031aa488535
'2012-05-27T21:26:42-04:00'
describe
'310073' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKBS' 'sip-files00333.jpg'
f4c98aafb7e20d8e011644197fcc08e7
ba85d5cd889a472439cd9f420f95552890adf2b0
'2012-05-27T21:28:58-04:00'
describe
'83374' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKBT' 'sip-files00177.QC.jpg'
bfe0da4a3e78717443125a30200754cf
ea2b204efd8782f86749e792389532630e316951
describe
'50028' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKBU' 'sip-files00037.pro'
6fffc249cdab6dded13d1367eca52c93
ac3bae72c8d4c8c2ac10b0f58f74f83267681d7c
'2012-05-27T21:19:28-04:00'
describe
'250171' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKBV' 'sip-files00289.jpg'
f2ef2d5a094ae69dcb485db924c93319
8092b6faa086729d31d5866ee7423105ccb26fba
'2012-05-27T21:18:24-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKBW' 'sip-files00176.tif'
d4c8d5105481e7846e4fd83071175c9b
e18b7a8cf4946b0872c15f11400254c64d6f1fa8
'2012-05-27T21:23:54-04:00'
describe
'236135' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKBX' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
498a2c04462789a198363e48330deab5
aaa4fdd20b29883054f6a8c9257af4887cdb0236
'2012-05-27T21:23:58-04:00'
describe
'294334' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKBY' 'sip-files00323.jpg'
297e8c822262ae18ed0a2c40e29ed475
bbffeedef1bb20ac56b4b4f97dbe5e6c24f41193
'2012-05-27T21:28:34-04:00'
describe
'1704244' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKBZ' 'sip-files00094.tif'
9ccdd81b79de5abd5bbbeccd4eb28932
8c7cc134068e31dab21a5058c01f575b4518129f
'2012-05-27T21:26:16-04:00'
describe
'19861' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKCA' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
9e412da62f3ac149b2771fb9e9d47ecb
b31fdd8dfb3b855947475ec6e4e2a6d02acf8909
describe
'13513916' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKCB' 'sip-files00116.tif'
723c3ffa79148175352546c3a50e0128
1f616a6757e7b1fd8885e9633e686f59b1f3ba16
'2012-05-27T21:30:58-04:00'
describe
'34158' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKCC' 'sip-files00163thm.jpg'
45b07978479730a66e67d39b44d61c63
9f4f3826aa5be0648c93fcf76700710acaa5ae9a
'2012-05-30T08:53:14-04:00'
describe
'72904' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKCD' 'sip-files00141.QC.jpg'
f78166a105b8257a496489594bceb1b5
74681ca375c7748860820a2aacba1a1eda41484c
describe
'91365' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKCE' 'sip-files00163.QC.jpg'
2ab559273fc3aa3c1eedf5d4a48eea67
21a48a6c1a03f0ef52861ea7b9785a4b35ca449f
'2012-05-27T21:20:29-04:00'
describe
'1918' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKCF' 'sip-files00182.txt'
d2045df309b4dd7a6674921d188f8d85
33b3ca5d97fbc3b036e0c458bf8665734f4e5d2b
'2012-05-27T21:31:08-04:00'
describe
'274767' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKCG' 'sip-files00303.jp2'
99d408e97e23b867b5a5d0c596215ec6
7dd6744f02e00dfa838280a654699bd1b8f180bb
'2012-05-27T21:32:16-04:00'
describe
'48520' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKCH' 'sip-files00246.pro'
ed5143445f323ae6d911402ae954b399
6ee4dac7a7764419892895053cdf1bda42ae8d66
describe
'15665' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKCI' 'sip-files00345thm.jpg'
0bb3ad546ffdc545fae66fd0db161865
3c6192a5e9061d7ed2b50dc087aff31f08bad068
describe
'220998' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKCJ' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
74ca2c37cf528b733f0484091f2a7ca9
ae2f51050fec937d321b466c11244362d532f1b7
describe
'91055' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKCK' 'sip-files00005.jp2'
4c7a9cc7f33ffeade06b517a3bf39897
054e286b0fd8b5eb21dbbad3c30b21c31f208f81
describe
'48585' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKCL' 'sip-files00148.pro'
4b4a7a60c595986ee0573d022f5a4a32
91356bc4b20b30316dbd7cbad6408d259d94a64e
describe
'1980' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKCM' 'sip-files00191.txt'
ec246c73e4d7c0c754980dd3ed81b808
1f1f71f0142d2883e5dd303b304f63a2f7e030d2
'2012-05-27T21:19:18-04:00'
describe
'31924' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKCN' 'sip-files00232thm.jpg'
01562fdbf3a3705db96fd3f5964f0945
8e65c0408ca9610141aa0551b9dbe1fde4cb5870
'2012-05-27T21:30:40-04:00'
describe
'305046' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKCO' 'sip-files00316.jp2'
6e1d804976e8482ba041e3f11a7e6cad
2aee54bba63a87f84159545ade53e45fbbd22490
'2012-05-27T21:21:43-04:00'
describe
'83484' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKCP' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
ab016c1eaa7833ec315806f0c668f1b4
ddd16e26c99d3df5f94de1fb2c8d4abcc1c216af
'2012-05-27T21:29:33-04:00'
describe
'86802' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKCQ' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
c9f6eb4bcf3b70665db0453f7703e3f7
fbcac700ceae6e16aac6e5ca96195bcdf39509e6
'2012-05-27T21:28:04-04:00'
describe
'226972' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKCR' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
4da6aa106821ca869e0d0132c2738057
d9cb34293ed933b6818fcdfe2abf019e0347a7e4
describe
'82412' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKCS' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
41c7a5d1d06fcff078d416c1c32a6179
6325f7016e5c3c845005489d50ac3d6ba3b7955e
describe
'32048' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKCT' 'sip-files00147thm.jpg'
c3160731a07b772bec19310fe738ac67
c7a02e20a4613e484cf4604d761180b679060c55
'2012-05-27T21:26:34-04:00'
describe
'1010' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKCU' 'sip-files00069.txt'
f74cf7102fa5c149a875d9f8fef528e7
30ecbaa5e5623e09f2bb16e2827a87030f6e3a85
describe
'1706000' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKCV' 'sip-files00271.tif'
0244c7c8a5e619a2cf24d9ba1958b299
5ebc8e16fa83472a4787a5bd1ab8d2c8a55e940e
'2012-05-27T21:18:32-04:00'
describe
'1734' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKCW' 'sip-files00134.txt'
a54bf99967799e41dd92e372a10fcb72
e244b3b226d6baa32fd31b787decdf26d0c789dc
'2012-05-27T21:27:34-04:00'
describe
'1704328' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKCX' 'sip-files00100.tif'
c15979a6904d54971fa948d66a3d9475
7f5cf44acab37dc26f83ac774a9af4b3a00be580
'2012-05-27T21:27:33-04:00'
describe
'36457' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKCY' 'sip-files00315thm.jpg'
6a6edb9f1ea7954c7d6856aa3d197e48
06d547f40877f1ec41b582bd5ba6a6f9719037b2
describe
'88325' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKCZ' 'sip-files00187.jp2'
9931d09ab0645b9905862e7ce2b3cc85
e9a8c4eb6afd15c82e919f58a08898da7133105b
describe
'3790' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKDA' 'sip-files00323.txt'
5700e8c85314f9368bd61b25f3e51533
2f0f2803c61a6257f29541e62965b914e4364ca1
describe
'1706520' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKDB' 'sip-files00330.tif'
18fcb100a2c7d7fc078e13b0e53a51b8
276a06934cba9f00b76e1963fb482a1d415b0359
'2012-05-27T21:31:01-04:00'
describe
'155074' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKDC' 'sip-files00344.jpg'
1c4f2b38fac89b97908d442864c5715f
2ae366ed73aa5ff9544a51bb4a5e7f810df3799e
'2012-05-27T21:24:38-04:00'
describe
'60130' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKDD' 'sip-files00259.QC.jpg'
30176ea1eec4bc932f65bb38c914753d
d6e40709e078432335499cdfb0d5a5202eeb6ae2
describe
'48571' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKDE' 'sip-files00130.pro'
d10286f6aa091fc43d033b5e13ae0a0c
e1ea05c1851c70257548d5bcba835c0e69352e71
describe
'34509' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKDF' 'sip-files00304thm.jpg'
baea5987c2bc40cecc8f55499c63661d
e08ceb9d9ee6d3b7bcc43b618e0751ce692c156b
'2012-05-27T21:20:25-04:00'
describe
'45633' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKDG' 'sip-files00085.pro'
4a78ee8e7f75ed4343e48f6c9d896f3d
24cecc016f1e09e956521e2ccb1748437307819a
describe
'1705732' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKDH' 'sip-files00298.tif'
f04a9250bda8a5a42f5e4fdbbbb6dd53
1a8149344cf4016b02a0e9045558058269c76a50
'2012-05-27T21:24:34-04:00'
describe
'32671' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKDI' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
59d9534c9b32af6ed6613e65f3a36ef1
f12df49aa74c808986906305564b604fdc134b4c
'2012-05-27T21:27:51-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKDJ' 'sip-files00194.tif'
2174829c7765aa6681e4150dd281010d
5ac275b6c4322677e4c74692d9ed0f6e3d277b87
describe
'1705028' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKDK' 'sip-files00201.tif'
d59c535de0a4758250668db5e8da6093
a4c445ba7928ef565d5b1613ddb09820db309fed
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKDL' 'sip-files00168.tif'
9e14169747332df6029b8fdaa5b6742e
db8bb5ad9c0e543eef9178d4cb7eb2b392c06a68
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKDM' 'sip-files00152.jp2'
873889589e38272e5c2a010699c96f19
ffc1e54f83e260df84c1abc661d1230974d67aaa
'2012-05-27T21:28:44-04:00'
describe
'1705744' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKDN' 'sip-files00180.tif'
2320a889040d53265a0272fa9cbeecab
d6949ccac41d5a13efc197e5bc18442406fe9319
describe
'35404' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKDO' 'sip-files00277thm.jpg'
49bd91fad153242ad1392ae997449395
774701b9dab79356ec89fd1ab9fe0e06fea79a36
'2012-05-27T21:24:26-04:00'
describe
'49997' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKDP' 'sip-files00262.pro'
eeb001111371edcb3f865e942d4f9eec
c4db684200b8cb303afdcbdbe8305dafdd51ba59
'2012-05-27T21:24:43-04:00'
describe
'2943' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKDQ' 'sip-files00314.txt'
6fb61d67f8efd55affdf9893704685da
e6da6277f124af60c48a5336d394be5fcba90d13
describe
'1932' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKDR' 'sip-files00249.txt'
538b88960ff631694feb006fb45c4c51
6e6f88b8736b4616ee5920638e303f7bf66251bc
describe
'1702728' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKDS' 'sip-files00290.tif'
85fc58e5bb2d6c0deaa73c7be7d3e4f5
c53579988358f7c772b5237bf55c50037dca6894
describe
'96220' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKDT' 'sip-files00338.QC.jpg'
55173df29e7b4294e882cfa34959b3a2
e052d4fc9c34c230599955b43a180106191247e0
'2012-05-27T21:19:37-04:00'
describe
'204530' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKDU' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
57af222a5e607e386808194194775591
ebdd3e52ea337b5abdcefa82713d7da836b71fe8
describe
'90361' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKDV' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
9166cc47e041534c2e885a7dfccb5e06
c2edba8b1aaee215f1fc39a14941df71cc437215
'2012-05-27T21:25:44-04:00'
describe
'1704932' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKDW' 'sip-files00219.tif'
696f480cadde78332e97b45b9a1f0277
28062ef98ddb973d3635ca5b1908d6290790a598
describe
'83588' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKDX' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
ed8fa301e01a847af5d973e7e3a7799b
db2047d269af19944c3a0e3780d40a7f7ce33847
describe
'184482' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKDY' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
8821e316794699267506c8dc9660383b
708c9684f731d86c5fcd23797494cab07582ad8a
'2012-05-27T21:26:40-04:00'
describe
'261604' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKDZ' 'sip-files00165.jpg'
7c65bbe5cd2e5776e12ce44b9e684590
330d71310e0a663151c18c8296b0abdfeb8d2afa
describe
'32537' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKEA' 'sip-files00231thm.jpg'
03ac6388e121802b3479b4baf6a9302e
923af407b45ea47af4030400f8bfcba202603015
describe
'6802' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKEB' 'sip-files00306.jp2'
3d9e533b58a8f8ace4cff6c268d1d211
a4b0289901791964f3cc0fc0d9ce2b8463cb6d75
describe
'1695640' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKEC' 'sip-files00306.tif'
73595518ed41e754621ee6d6c8638b01
2e949426f07954c1e33265b5a68df7e9ae6affaa
describe
'359234' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKED' 'sip-files00320.jp2'
2075b097426852774275153b152b230c
3444f0c0f8af06df26e88d8ef80e62caaccb4030
'2012-05-27T21:31:26-04:00'
describe
'97088' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKEE' 'sip-files00327.QC.jpg'
94456905fd5235418e2eb6237690109d
ab56de288ea8820dc567a59690cc6a55e1ea4d73
describe
'1705764' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKEF' 'sip-files00300.tif'
670c230cf2ab09eb0b9582d3c4b4354a
e66e62580d4786fcf44156ba068c30ed49cc7a5e
'2012-05-27T21:21:04-04:00'
describe
'1705192' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKEG' 'sip-files00222.tif'
48276b68cc9e4dc4cde5bbeee1a2036f
c8289247b67e47b0309f444eb17fda37a192ddce
'2012-05-27T21:29:40-04:00'
describe
'44308' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKEH' 'sip-files00142.pro'
b55d442809b5ba6efea622c9ca505f2d
574101c7575ffb5b542b1027cef17137bf5af876
describe
'34624' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKEI' 'sip-files00182thm.jpg'
024dc4d84a10ca128b260ef1bcf519d2
cd9b2595c5b6fa38a8f749d446ef42326a34199a
'2012-05-29T18:26:31-04:00'
describe
'1705184' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKEJ' 'sip-files00131.tif'
8122b32ef21e3f2e67d83923cb13fb98
c7c424097237ccdfc7a48f992d6fcfb250d66b74
'2012-05-27T21:29:42-04:00'
describe
'89963' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKEK' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
8fe36ef576cdabd96ed2c8364260058b
553dd912b77bc133ded3182bde4ff5bdee9ac5c3
'2012-05-27T21:28:41-04:00'
describe
'1705528' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKEL' 'sip-files00289.tif'
80e41f90e20af7c42ddc65f665542590
a0f7b4034321ea7349a55e82274393f256381cd2
describe
'183782' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKEM' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
d4f0733dbd822bdb8ad363f758b5aef5
2b6e055389c345dfce73bcd005028ee6dc0e4cdb
'2012-05-27T21:26:30-04:00'
describe
'1704216' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKEN' 'sip-files00149.tif'
3a4483e3806dc308ed2fdd358e0ea16e
dfc7e70a2df7147b858a6064a91bd00804e42517
describe
'15927' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKEO' 'sip-files00187.pro'
5e229c68927411462098ea89c11aa450
0c7ab92b23b8fd4b96ac0e0af93dc3beeb35c732
describe
'1392' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKEP' 'sip-files00186.txt'
a6d7674d66bebe9b77e8fb80ea97d6fb
a4b3843d7f103759c6151297853425f281c9782a
'2012-05-27T21:26:39-04:00'
describe
'13514084' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKEQ' 'sip-files00317.tif'
0024e7fdef3cbde3b61db0d8a71dd65e
400964b27e54a2e4200a3a791ffc6203d36fd905
describe
'76829' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKER' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
622cfb8d3c63343b55c3d32fcae7c1ea
887965d6c0b720cce5419b56fa5a9680502e40fe
describe
'33268' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKES' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
5083ebb81523f801a1c36efcb70e2191
b5403b51298d51ba9a8488f7b0cad6d5f666ffb0
'2012-05-27T21:20:46-04:00'
describe
'32001' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKET' 'sip-files00235thm.jpg'
b51d34acf2d057bf1cd6b23b3c70cf80
0dd68e1432a0a0db1376a8c612fb01114f3f2d79
describe
'40519296' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKEU' 'sip-files00342.tif'
4f1342cdee1d1aae242c4913e1105208
af50cb30e53505f54e4bdc5a7729d828c885f099
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKEV' 'sip-files00172.tif'
bfd706bcfa94ca3ed11daf897b2d1d40
c9e1fbe3a3b8a3932b82ac0137278234ad90448c
'2012-05-30T08:52:57-04:00'
describe
'1705136' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKEW' 'sip-files00243.tif'
e74468c652c1c9974e43a6ed24c444ff
9b6dee5a537fc1b4d007b819e2ccd295b895c43b
'2012-05-30T08:52:50-04:00'
describe
'48421' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKEX' 'sip-files00020.pro'
33e3914065f4806557752f2c8fbc2a62
08b63ddac2044606d3c0961f70c701a7808b6b81
'2012-05-27T21:22:58-04:00'
describe
'85651' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKEY' 'sip-files00142.QC.jpg'
dcb56115b65b1b3e00d52f908d8dab07
aa9e079de45aee464a00b551fceee4cd86de3f33
describe
'134725' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKEZ' 'sip-files00247.jpg'
d79d81ecf00790797bcec1f1dcaf2f6a
95cbb8644ed79dc0b92b073ac694a484774d4175
describe
'182' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKFA' 'sip-files00006.txt'
e3ea0bb29c5b98fdc0dd436b3da0372c
7467946e151996a051d039af1da0bfcb8899efa3
describe
'1270' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKFB' 'sip-files00281.txt'
93883dda1bf84888dca62eaf12b12998
5ccf8162a9072f61c1e809bf13bcf0c4eb2ead4b
describe
Invalid character
'76586' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKFC' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
108f636bd91df4d8e6b7ab58f82cebad
49d5c5b76f174a4e88832538bf3e01d095ecfd8f
describe
'48741' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKFD' 'sip-files00029.pro'
5e8ed89e53e3aea184236d20a080be37
1092dc2e6efdf33916a9a7d80a8b715e183a324e
'2012-05-27T21:28:54-04:00'
describe
'91100' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKFE' 'sip-files00205.QC.jpg'
6445fd081221110f05503a4e3b34d655
76ff8ff6eb9115a2bf25abf291a8fc6c445ad77a
'2012-05-27T21:21:48-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKFF' 'sip-files00152.tif'
68b5b4635b67421e637daf01dfbada3e
ebd04a009fbfe0defb4ee72f5c35d5ff791d0733
'2012-05-27T21:20:37-04:00'
describe
'46692' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKFG' 'sip-files00151.pro'
f2a01debcde852a66de675d60aa6e2c9
ef1bdab7a45d06f9b084002e28be2d29b27908b7
describe
'233547' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKFH' 'sip-files00242.jpg'
596dd6348c490a5e7a0dce4b51ad37cc
48f07283d9a7913450f4848c2f0a81cbf80e4ea3
'2012-05-27T21:30:04-04:00'
describe
'279124' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKFI' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
433faaa2cea03fc691c8f70638e6e947
17b4b74d11fb837a019baa019990544ba04b13a1
'2012-05-27T21:21:49-04:00'
describe
'266698' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKFJ' 'sip-files00288.jp2'
3da9d1106e5b5e6ec596c26fc37c18bb
42b73397a07ee122cbd156976b87b23cbd599cb1
describe
'260922' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKFK' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
8debe5297d5d6fb541472b81b924abe1
e3956c56b379799b49c736dd2c570b98dbba7613
describe
'49675' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKFL' 'sip-files00201.pro'
174e0bc099f3a2deee2b38c3d2c9ddbc
a8361b71cec0ec425df8981c9673d99cb3e76963
describe
'87969' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKFM' 'sip-files00222.QC.jpg'
57536cd5bc173ebb601d52bc78e8743d
31191344ae79178941ce0910383703ae30767cd5
'2012-05-27T21:21:08-04:00'
describe
'33740' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKFN' 'sip-files00282thm.jpg'
846416ec0392b6296a415aee9db396c1
3876cf4ff1481a0ceb4b21242e28502f34cafccc
'2012-05-27T21:27:38-04:00'
describe
'48285' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKFO' 'sip-files00254.pro'
c4aca99ab889db9eba7f2f1a51178531
0ad5df9a4a05f95909a6fbaccfb01f6b7d9625ba
'2012-05-27T21:28:59-04:00'
describe
'1274714' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKFP' 'sip-files00001.jp2'
a1dce79f9548282dfd73c1f60fafecb2
5fb15ef7c0bdbc4f9707cd601f00fc71a496d829
describe
'231482' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKFQ' 'sip-files00171.jpg'
278ae0dec6c53d451ca87c2d39743c59
f47c7cd513e122a2deb96cd1bcbbebc4b47af79f
describe
'88190' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKFR' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
1fdad6cf512144a2b336552d1d0f1931
e786b649f34a7cbabf9141346d8e7071ef5c0541
describe
'49628' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKFS' 'sip-files00289.pro'
948d1d1b593bff1a029b438dedcdf128
123edc206e78f53bb496f891305bc118f86db075
describe
'231053' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKFT' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
30c9a3d6908a88f5042702c4f37497eb
216c63231dc9f6ffa9e658e7c7e633eca9c64499
describe
'1705372' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKFU' 'sip-files00212.tif'
ebd1e8c3aeff781ef7342ad63d4fdbaa
e62d8d53cde929cb5056da601f5648403e148e3c
'2012-05-27T21:21:06-04:00'
describe
'30316' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKFV' 'sip-files00001thm.jpg'
8f233582b75c9f1431d03f4cd1abeb14
020a89979f59a9d55581ff99af48d804c0318ad2
'2012-05-27T21:20:53-04:00'
describe
'247619' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKFW' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
2987b14e92d531874a6ab8e1f98406f8
8859c0436350ac4c8ce7023bb61256a2b010136c
describe
'31542' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKFX' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
9f0a416dd19c02593de2c0269241cf89
cadb286c5fdfa6d788ac659e0258ed0245439049
'2012-05-27T21:30:28-04:00'
describe
'1704912' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKFY' 'sip-files00129.tif'
710585d8f9ef9c6fb9a4e0acf75d10f7
3766105562bbebf0342370532b89dee851189db4
describe
'30543' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKFZ' 'sip-files00149thm.jpg'
e1e650da9c54615a84b327a7d4be7584
1c10e193a23ebc3569905a4c6e924efbaa0063f5
'2012-05-27T21:20:02-04:00'
describe
'1705' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKGA' 'sip-files00126.txt'
40bd10f4ac37a7affa7353e5c2ae5b05
2078ad800605385fb5ec66c41a58bb6594a8a1b2
describe
'67459' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKGB' 'sip-files00290.QC.jpg'
02e67005a2d1a5cfdb9c7f6831687893
e86283ea6e5a7b15a5c315806d2c1e0e95e7eb06
'2012-05-27T21:28:22-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKGC' 'sip-files00037.tif'
afcb87e8510ff288a4afeae1986f2800
1e6ade98a44b99d76153c3b1d0eb3cc3664f4c65
describe
'1704880' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKGD' 'sip-files00128.tif'
ad7a19e1014e009f583b010c98b02057
6cc89ff1a412fbfa1f9a0e8de46cc55e70e9e8af
'2012-05-27T21:23:30-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKGE' 'sip-files00339.jp2'
8da19c6bd44637c537f7fff925a443bb
9982dd6f8679c459bc1a085b102065ef7a11aa02
'2012-05-27T21:31:34-04:00'
describe
'1704928' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKGF' 'sip-files00123.tif'
fe5f3e08cb9ee790bc2ab6c89007ab26
a002fcf0abba56fe5bb17dc3067c44075102e6d1
describe
'266106' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKGG' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
b58c5650aef167d1fbe3e5241fabdcf7
178b7535264d6626b8d82e2aa514245af4b20b30
'2012-05-27T21:19:07-04:00'
describe
'1731' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKGH' 'sip-files00032.txt'
a0d9e79f4d4de2a9a9f2eeb36d1920bb
ab7fd3a8d62aac68164ffb796ad5556839df0071
describe
'90592' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKGI' 'sip-files00255.QC.jpg'
1ce4408d51d39370e54f0142b6294952
df46bb047ec0ede77c00761a780f7e7741184024
describe
'1705296' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKGJ' 'sip-files00068.tif'
a09548185b5ef89b04b3a8c43ed26e9b
2ce67782f7c364a91a9e084820693890d1dbd4ed
'2012-05-27T21:30:44-04:00'
describe
'219764' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKGK' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
43bbfdf4ebf9ffc7588e27909da9112e
7828c31568f6bd1da8afb47860eb2739c05b36df
describe
'2002' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKGL' 'sip-files00277.txt'
43229d4eaed0736d3811323163a9f660
398c3b70fd2879c1a14642777dff3cd8f3704d05
describe
'1705088' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKGM' 'sip-files00161.tif'
34a2c5f169b6cda77890181c68fff5de
10c0f6740aa02b9b2ed469aac669ef323fef031a
describe
'30852' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKGN' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
67f8b23289a8c378070bfca5172e5528
9669f397fa15af2abe3c8c3e9e5b635cf70bc5ab
describe
'1705024' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKGO' 'sip-files00135.tif'
4b8011bfd07fa9745cff24f20450a2a8
7b7785dd209ba73a735448aa656362a564a8c18b
'2012-05-27T21:26:09-04:00'
describe
'1704844' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKGP' 'sip-files00229.tif'
a311133d4837499e29b200d1fc88e7ad
63f757d0c29e632c9bfdb65eda612f7b4b01e75a
describe
'234197' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKGQ' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
b2f35fc6238fef3f646c42c686cece13
3c283e704d63f03d5b76a650ba865274f32c35ee
describe
'232608' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKGR' 'sip-files00230.jpg'
b0cb04b6db6ba255cdf61dabb81e6a77
de9dddf5949380aff2dc82f28f373e41505ff619
'2012-05-27T21:19:42-04:00'
describe
'3831' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKGS' 'sip-files00326.txt'
9573518a6e1b144db8324d3560b5e6e9
bee901dd43e182380996c2d98bb42b755a481146
'2012-05-27T21:29:58-04:00'
describe
'221079' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKGT' 'sip-files00307.jpg'
f328ee6306c307113e927871abb0fcb5
d60fad53714f00bdfc489a561c575b65b85c4f28
'2012-05-27T21:31:00-04:00'
describe
'340' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKGU' 'sip-files00258.txt'
4cb8ff82f39af6dfcd881972de41a31f
3c9de955531cd549061971488091d3523ef255e1
'2012-05-27T21:27:08-04:00'
describe
'86243' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKGV' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
53238b8e41e7919b70c581499046f5b5
af0324f6345d1b38fbd0edcb02f4b9d0df076b1a
'2012-05-27T21:25:04-04:00'
describe
'239684' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKGW' 'sip-files00176.jpg'
54c504086bba01be7fb6777e26163f68
9cf0cb9069526cfeeb8e5667a54b896ab9efa667
'2012-05-27T21:31:52-04:00'
describe
'6867' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKGX' 'sip-files00005.pro'
afbbd6059dde79010263ef53de1f9dbf
53539689025853ed5edf14d3d14f8125c3bbae68
describe
'1830' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKGY' 'sip-files00254.txt'
caea8841c22cbf4edc104aeddd1eddd0
62e6ab27f6a9ff1c89bcd29afd50c0abb02a2958
describe
'32667' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKGZ' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
fded4306167d6dc37dde4271c36d9ba0
41ecceed85ceee6c2f1f5715b3f0aa21d1f02c05
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKHA' 'sip-files00245.tif'
53b01ec70c18d44ebbe7e07e13eff145
f210e5c8c6cc391787a783c2c0481ad2e94f2ebc
'2012-05-27T21:30:55-04:00'
describe
'1706332' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKHB' 'sip-files00310.tif'
78f16cc621244b6fbc20ebce937838da
aa164090f5bee55438d076deb186570fc6a4093e
'2012-05-27T21:23:13-04:00'
describe
'1842' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKHC' 'sip-files00020.txt'
e6182f12247fcfcecb78b4c489a821c7
654a343b8fa05138bba0da990226ae818b13e0c8
'2012-05-27T21:30:34-04:00'
describe
'84362' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKHD' 'sip-files00145.QC.jpg'
40e60f3adc86392f8430a76b61490b5b
bc7b0bc5d80fd356799032f19662084b99cac82b
describe
'45593' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKHE' 'sip-files00223.pro'
8ac8cf9485c668f7de19d5bc706a0f55
9cf84df4e53e5a9923f6e9274153447760a7baa9
describe
'170106' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKHF' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
630b79d21674e79592ea5ca9e8ff1a07
f0b6c8dbbac9e9270d0fe5b80b248e4d4a123091
describe
'41147' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKHG' 'sip-files00241.pro'
4d75f742a86a7ba46fadc23c7c29b1e9
d01b269f4503d5f17af2af37a5522140ed1e88ce
describe
'55975' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKHH' 'sip-files00258.jpg'
de7357fff9a6db65f05a773f9c32d01f
e36002484397b7d190918e74de3b11b9bd6c7d68
describe
'222558' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKHI' 'sip-files00177.jpg'
447432ce4c0aa06a72b0afc61ee6a7ad
795f97ce11fe73a9afeb0be50ff130c0398db8bf
describe
'218152' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKHJ' 'sip-files00188.jpg'
c002e5eca3f3e9241479254f343e9236
62e90bf187159d0048cc2d07943eb74a5b47d385
describe
'1687501' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKHK' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
f8906f0490735cdce0a771e7a7805046
7213188453463f4709fa04cdde19ba7d4342fb7d
'2012-05-27T21:19:39-04:00'
describe
'1790' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKHL' 'sip-files00059.txt'
043b959e70194df54e91b7520a302a37
d5497dc5134750caf6eeaf533fed23ed574a90ff
describe
'1705596' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKHM' 'sip-files00214.tif'
4c7f095c4a36a1f537776741a9c5e2fe
a3af161e4bdc8e86b3faccd59987e23b85d5f1f8
describe
'215229' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKHN' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
d075ea23e6c3b79a19cc899bc268737c
def2f6d72708de2e1359367b6d63ed768004df11
describe
'1704884' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKHO' 'sip-files00054.tif'
8da288ed7ad8b146dfac56ff13cd89bf
17a95f91e8fba160b316fc8867deef1adfe08b54
describe
'48097' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKHP' 'sip-files00035.pro'
e017ddffcddaf1bc700ecad53ac91d9d
e6470d4c9085ae0052cac8657aeff291478f2e8d
'2012-05-27T21:20:23-04:00'
describe
'42143' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKHQ' 'sip-files00090.pro'
e0c9500f18707be462bb62747e25461d
1ace4d55ed99fb08763a1c60f84cb14377b10cbf
describe
'1746' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKHR' 'sip-files00236.txt'
d7ce24d44229bcea6f9d124fc06cb518
cd15c6a16875a02382046f73e2832347d01d26fa
'2012-05-27T21:30:15-04:00'
describe
'168731' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKHS' 'sip-files00207.jpg'
aab8bb058433226c30bb414f8fbbd9a0
e949bb08f59e4794afc9bd478a2fdaa0464c5322
describe
'29847' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKHT' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
b1d2834255edae168e3b35ca9a09055c
f2c2bc30c71e9d9b47cdd348901fc71fdee58c71
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKHU' 'sip-files00140.txt'
d81c5a0707920b657fe44d1d3056ef7b
d85b1d84d583cbfee27f73b7792082816eadd5c5
describe
'132600' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKHV' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
fc54bda26087ab863e135d368b887812
7fb4e5e849395047dc8c9662fe0a4c458a35d6a1
'2012-05-27T21:30:12-04:00'
describe
'1121' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKHW' 'sip-files00265.txt'
ced93cb7200a13345aa9c179fbc4f65f
97487a6bcd85fd3be8a7b99f2d999b421f399874
describe
'89586' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKHX' 'sip-files00169.QC.jpg'
65f19d25223b6f3f6745b07591b2d0d6
8e353ef178c7b1ac38a19ce2ca6dd01d5416d00c
describe
'1705608' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKHY' 'sip-files00299.tif'
57565a7c4371397072a4fc0c122809f3
e9bb5601b666557e3359b9461851ed4f8bbaf60a
'2012-05-27T21:20:50-04:00'
describe
'33551' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKHZ' 'sip-files00148thm.jpg'
ec331733cdf455e606205e1665867d4b
7f82b3e4b7a04868d3581a51072bcdecaf826c2b
describe
'86655' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKIA' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
27f24b75f665467b432398e172852c70
4cb210c38ffacab130172816f7fa96a34bcd7a3c
'2012-05-27T21:20:42-04:00'
describe
'67133' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKIB' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
8ff83546869cbca38bdbc20dfc56bbe1
209363ae0bca4fa3d583fff7dc3445aaae30ff05
describe
'13513500' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKIC' 'sip-files00268.tif'
8f5383ec555875b995db901c74dceb8c
0a68c139e43b5dbc852547b63fdd195743b1e27f
describe
'23829' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKID' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
53f1f71bb44bb756ec50b0bd69e2a87f
e1b2ce5fbba6f56f3b5880c52c8d5a7caa4e9ac3
describe
'1900' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKIE' 'sip-files00076.txt'
c914dfc278c47c945ff370d8dea8bd92
262580ff1e0d73f2936abeefa519323c4c357b6b
'2012-05-27T21:29:55-04:00'
describe
'248670' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKIF' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
21c4d6aa114430a697d5e274cba696cd
a6afdf3ffb62c4e2c49bc8c2d937a48314e84a99
describe
'87085' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKIG' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
575f2f301a452f6a6a00bb59f6f889dd
88a92251946aa63bd6f220b13c85dbddc698b5a8
describe
'261389' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKIH' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
940bd89d75addb3ec288e122674b9960
5352b8134a01e3fc8f8222f59f24979fa813c812
'2012-05-27T21:23:20-04:00'
describe
'1706176' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKII' 'sip-files00294.tif'
a5f48f6587baffea8a5ebc135c1c1e95
1d4eed970059dd88db0fcc52fc82994843268d5f
describe
'13513704' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKIJ' 'sip-files00209.tif'
96938047d142b36e86febd9d660f804b
ffdea9aa249be43059d6e13e4d924a5bc52e4751
'2012-05-27T21:25:16-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKIK' 'sip-files00097.tif'
a90b1cd97defc008795efdb5254013c9
b4d180190226dce4859afce960e8060998613dd1
'2012-05-27T21:24:05-04:00'
describe
'13514712' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKIL' 'sip-files00339.tif'
e665132540181649bc36cfa3661c7b11
a90e080f6f93022ff1a0ff862c7982bf68798f92
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKIM' 'sip-files00217.jpg'
80c43244ee4120bb467e387d882d95b2
59e554e7ce28bb881c0815c2b05beb1c9f43abf5
'2012-05-27T21:30:31-04:00'
describe
'247923' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKIN' 'sip-files00191.jpg'
1345710ce86718dc9e8ffaf7d47c21a7
81b612c5489ad33499d604bcfced2d6384337e3d
describe
'1828' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKIO' 'sip-files00130.txt'
0b6c55d49acd9baf489592d8ab4ba281
b8ffa8eb4087e65c10dabf6739e1755e73d37e11
describe
'1784' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKIP' 'sip-files00302.txt'
a53f14fffa4376518bdc99e10ca55c7f
216d0e9b72d27eb378b786f74345b485b568f121
'2012-05-27T21:20:08-04:00'
describe
'22990' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKIQ' 'sip-files00069.pro'
e73a4d17753730e2a404f1154fa278ca
d49c454dd45b7e42f36d9b1b8e6b7ca32df16683
'2012-05-27T21:25:03-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKIR' 'sip-files00250.tif'
b7cde250dc243b3934758057c622e396
7f391e4fd6aae40d4e33fc4a76046e1b4dfb1cc7
'2012-05-27T21:30:42-04:00'
describe
'1700364' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKIS' 'sip-files00072.tif'
e9ef163df9258e2fbfd12c845d170b00
8f3f32fff55a13e423a34545f2f0013baf6b815e
describe
'1376' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKIT' 'sip-files00079.txt'
2d29d60fa520a22daa2c88272b57c178
d06ddd382c9c8ba6fbf97d2aa9de228d7b5af9b1
describe
Invalid character
'48657' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKIU' 'sip-files00170.pro'
e18e57814742baf9d1b822e3d20457e1
c0bd4c7b6c063cd48555e0fbc2e06b147a754fd7
describe
'230305' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKIV' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
275906b1dfd54b22bccfb3f7c2a22f90
65d09445a2d2dcc49abdaa6cef6c2242b54016aa
'2012-05-27T21:29:05-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKIW' 'sip-files00114.tif'
fbd4058b2785f6370eb222210c85f869
521462c18e78c0d669fa1d4678ed407ffa5eea39
'2012-05-27T21:20:44-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKIX' 'sip-files00163.tif'
77c49201112d4392d21771e0206878a9
b6273a4580cb6275510b2ef8ac84db8fc510ddb7
'2012-05-27T21:30:09-04:00'
describe
'90333' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKIY' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
45a5fd328146d3537aa1e01f49be5f2d
2d2852b9183081ee9fb335b2b61f1cc7e47556a5
describe
'214520' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKIZ' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
9f7240194ded07993f93b77e8f17f5d9
6d8756049cd4856d053313e37540b34785fa65c9
'2012-05-27T21:26:26-04:00'
describe
'28742' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKJA' 'sip-files00265.pro'
095c84beb7f4f576db118bba5f598b4d
79f813648b746e9463ec5bb3f0e0ce06394be43b
'2012-05-27T21:28:17-04:00'
describe
'45164' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKJB' 'sip-files00154.pro'
34722c226e361d7af11aeba67729b559
efe9bf5008773c83511ff4257aca9f148f9be929
'2012-05-30T08:53:22-04:00'
describe
'32860' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKJC' 'sip-files00265thm.jpg'
4c1c45479b7bb955be053e893e9bfe4d
04d4867d645d8368bdd9de455aa0e58fad35ce0d
'2012-05-27T21:27:59-04:00'
describe
'218839' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKJD' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
7a3d4519ba764d562c710304accad16b
47a04046f526cc10a49a5810d141bb25b483cfe1
describe
'1862' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKJE' 'sip-files00199.txt'
802a6744fe0eeb8b735051312b35d39f
dd4b863738eaf65373c6d406c8c020d26864db2a
describe
'34048' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKJF' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
746861be12928757fe6cff873bed2216
5c421d85232a703b25ca94cccc6ab27978f80fd1
describe
'1358' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKJG' 'sip-files00009.txt'
a810a387cf87445468419c4729a262d1
8dc3f3d69c000e6c4bc42d3d58ed2f95fb4177a2
describe
'40030' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKJH' 'sip-files00286.pro'
506a484fcc915d4bcc31fc3e1056243e
7cab5a14243673e2d88fefd983799ea6c31d8125
describe
'1946' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKJI' 'sip-files00179.txt'
407543dbd0c5e6f0f33399da0d9ec76e
6422b97f3a081ced5ee07f5dca0b8889dd034210
'2012-05-27T21:31:12-04:00'
describe
'50264' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKJJ' 'sip-files00065.pro'
07cbb205ec741e3a6f08b1b5a0e1239d
124e955565f247612f5e62248adb35dfde47e06b
'2012-05-27T21:24:21-04:00'
describe
'13623' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKJK' 'sip-files00158thm.jpg'
15735c127f184a6241d629396a9b6b26
368ab94d11ac4d497fb5d9cc3252ac9dfa48aed5
describe
'230943' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKJL' 'sip-files00142.jp2'
133c5734a13b2d5981cf3862b6f1eda2
5c566dd3b92ce3e73f774faf98289d59608b9920
'2012-05-27T21:29:19-04:00'
describe
'26141' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKJM' 'sip-files00329thm.jpg'
80485579a7527ce8a08029d81bf82957
1d7b19962ca1e9b0dccaa457d37edc9f256fb609
describe
'1704716' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKJN' 'sip-files00177.tif'
c1206a02c98915d949ce4e25182244e7
269acba6a5a1d4d42d62a12580ae80206e480193
describe
'1704688' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKJO' 'sip-files00011.tif'
2677e0307ce8d57e2651fd4c8bdcf475
c107088fb3d27ed938babee0de45582027df7816
'2012-05-27T21:19:47-04:00'
describe
'48480' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKJP' 'sip-files00084.pro'
8360ed3276078df2280cf0690ae0bb62
7bfa82c3249c565052b819fc8383c2790fbdd332
describe
'1704484' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKJQ' 'sip-files00248.tif'
4f4636be61c634e3bd58124b398adbfa
df7b92830cb8aeccf43f2fb8d4fa17b039db56a6
describe
'1929' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKJR' 'sip-files00030.txt'
d49ecded814c268ac6265c2db90c7fd7
810975bb65e762ca5edaed6428762bb55c9bd351
describe
'47091' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKJS' 'sip-files00227.pro'
64e0af082a9cb805b5e150539eb44bb4
fae79faac9653d6898db3b1c0d6be33f99f31236
describe
'33020' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKJT' 'sip-files00218thm.jpg'
076f276b67932afc68e7cf85ac972afd
6aa484e6dfca8c6bee9d048a3000270f70696735
'2012-05-27T21:31:05-04:00'
describe
'215788' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKJU' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
4820d5650d3a647af217b6192342d320
e8aeed066079470f68e259294f0f025cfe3db83a
'2012-05-27T21:19:16-04:00'
describe
'371266' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKJV' 'sip-files00332.jp2'
4d3c35ec95f826f20e2385b70a8269dc
5c4a2daf18fb37a8c4e6cc8da3bfb1cbebaf961d
describe
'36758' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKJW' 'sip-files00198.pro'
dade637739973054ea75f8b6f5465de4
6acc8e51226497f7bb257a40cf4c84a1dbe0f000
describe
'232012' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKJX' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
30d7ddae71027d7d0b308c3e45e63e73
449433e1d37900257f938235091453021a0dbd7b
describe
'1705572' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKJY' 'sip-files00297.tif'
37f1b222cf995f3ad45d78cd39f99d77
d55b36e998f2ac596ca81fb0f33bbb4ec0950803
'2012-05-30T08:53:05-04:00'
describe
'260990' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKJZ' 'sip-files00196.jp2'
96fb36317d3cbd2c487cbcb5aed9b3b2
13e2902b17f831d42b0a169f0d39ac6d8ab4cb89
describe
'226301' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKKA' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
09b89f22d162fe703afad4690b99fe00
b5c260017944345fb64425721237c8534dcd76df
describe
'76938' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKKB' 'sip-files00325.QC.jpg'
4db006c978305de36d9b7d0b8da8d1ae
9b355c119b8f279fea4db993bdde69ae261476d5
describe
'245541' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKKC' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
494e7f7e2410c00bde36afe1c7d8be73
3a13f82ee1b98866b147ef49c708cfaf144146e3
describe
'1705628' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKKD' 'sip-files00154.tif'
a375d9a208e6c59ea6412fed79dda8d0
93ac9b8b7d56262956efb33bca228202635015e0
'2012-05-27T21:19:09-04:00'
describe
'245508' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKKE' 'sip-files00184.jpg'
3daf708baf9a8cdc60c16c57570ce9c5
4f6b63d7608c8d97a338bbc53aabd636d3f97687
'2012-05-27T21:20:54-04:00'
describe
'248240' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKKF' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
a1dfb26f42ef63c5a49632e8351847b0
0f0762b68d072045ae046ececa79654f2a6ebe26
'2012-05-27T21:22:44-04:00'
describe
'3886' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKKG' 'sip-files00311.txt'
36493bb40be1a752ef4fda571f732e04
3d06007717b22772edcc7f5d1bb055dab65fd344
describe
'30936' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKKH' 'sip-files00281.pro'
bc3755902e3282222bdb4eae84b1e8ca
65b3f8842f6f59a972e08afdcaf628ad9cdad2b9
describe
'41817' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKKI' 'sip-files00234.pro'
854b6f0030f4654fef33853af209e9ef
0d6f1a5de4df5af6fbed0ba87ca6d2f578be4e46
'2012-05-27T21:27:46-04:00'
describe
'31546' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKKJ' 'sip-files00176.pro'
c297ace2d7bf13c5c53b49f747ee3838
53c68cfafa15be7b0ce4da6b9d0585b8cf4c1771
describe
'23327' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKKK' 'sip-files00247.pro'
dec80feef92c166053569b592cd9003b
efdd8d1081403f2af3524aff449d49d62bc60769
'2012-05-27T21:30:19-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKKL' 'sip-files00217.tif'
a5c90d582f50f6b0ec8f2fa3c864deed
8cd29b775880607e262a44c29cfc355e885ba98c
describe
'199860' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKKM' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
78b9001438dfb2cae4cc06949f905d81
75a481b56b54999dcdfd1611da7ff95b4898761b
describe
'33208' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKKN' 'sip-files00208thm.jpg'
1183221209aa5443153da87f8e4d3ce8
b869f2269743d3e8f95f6aee51babc34a3c47e2c
describe
'49287' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKKO' 'sip-files00285.pro'
02a2f9199441a14810eb060156ca5375
9ea8a0fd974ea863abbe4cef6575cf77a20c9bbf
describe
'33050' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKKP' 'sip-files00131thm.jpg'
3b4fede03661b0373ad229f0c9adfdbb
e2d275b68f7bdfdadcb2d3ffa1011319e9445bf6
'2012-05-27T21:24:09-04:00'
describe
'1865' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKKQ' 'sip-files00252.txt'
df2b9038b8c5042ece82e62fcd1e74b4
2b688db50ace7ae23820302bca03e7849889720f
describe
'93740' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKKR' 'sip-files00297.QC.jpg'
58137af4b194203dd8f492af4f20ab9a
6972f32335153859594b18cd8619b2d45afd4d0f
describe
'32509' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKKS' 'sip-files00145thm.jpg'
50b5103d8edf3e6a98174d411cd64006
2ababd3735599d867799691f46dda6159690315e
'2012-05-27T21:27:10-04:00'
describe
'32196' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKKT' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
1098ae5368539701d91ed81bdfd51084
011031e1deac40f96e200a18b7fe3e337d232054
'2012-05-27T21:28:40-04:00'
describe
'237106' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKKU' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
48cc94dccb22ba5257afdc3327622b8d
f97be2d14534b3194ce813f148a127132eda7f08
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKKV' 'sip-files00245.txt'
653b8ff64d8104b754e1ae1f928415d8
609b838b0d47768f537a1ab8d31513ef7845a715
describe
'1895' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKKW' 'sip-files00119.txt'
40543c0025e190e26ebb3fb9b6d25528
70cd15f33210d0a9ca9b41817613b71875098b17
'2012-05-27T21:32:12-04:00'
describe
'1703308' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKKX' 'sip-files00027.tif'
c9272597cdb7f89d894652ad883ce7a5
b35f672887c2e546e18fe64641ced7f6cfc2144e
describe
'47745' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKKY' 'sip-files00024.pro'
59e466f73161215df92120e3a7c6cb5b
0189d4a6fdb6bc9b72044124f690ae068d31d011
'2012-05-27T21:25:51-04:00'
describe
'1706580' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKKZ' 'sip-files00296.tif'
34e815b9591232b499a2941ac5ea8e08
2b346d3905a189ab062a38294934b0c048fbdc38
'2012-05-27T21:30:02-04:00'
describe
'1848' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKLA' 'sip-files00109.txt'
2d43ae38a65408b29fff8d7decc5791f
dbf0655f31069f30bea6bf5ad3cc9518be08d571
describe
'3165' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKLB' 'sip-files00016.pro'
16a22e3c93447a6db7a69f845179266a
f99a5a133dbfd01aa63f3995d0a99bbdd205bf61
describe
'2060' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKLC' 'sip-files00336.txt'
5852a905a0a2186f70f48841f89c6d24
6498022e8ac56b17bf2aacde2688b11bcfad3ae0
describe
'41702' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKLD' 'sip-files00248.pro'
44d8871e3268632430504288f9d805c5
f4808611abe17beece09a6bdbfb70bed1c867555
describe
'236865' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKLE' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
2963aa933a310ff44ffc3a4d877129b6
46f27d6f7e5e930211b679567395b6f416e99a10
describe
'1717' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKLF' 'sip-files00052.txt'
b055e136f5ed758631d4e434a1966cc1
d8fb13effa4c7288e609da2047fa2b91163c56b5
'2012-05-27T21:19:19-04:00'
describe
'33462' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKLG' 'sip-files00196thm.jpg'
99f50f22ed332f1f2ee50d14eae896d7
88299988af8ab8de0921d5698462936b825046b7
'2012-05-27T21:27:11-04:00'
describe
'221693' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKLH' 'sip-files00291.jpg'
e24cedc73b019ed3eb7901a7e5e5d4d7
016abb598e9b804d8c7c54a7f7dd1518057516a2
describe
'1889' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKLI' 'sip-files00298.txt'
64ca12c734be335d84eb856956ff3fc1
6b8b879d77800b7fba46c98a92ff8cba0d2ea5c1
describe
'1705468' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKLJ' 'sip-files00228.tif'
17125f205a32fcaab8541d34769fc373
e9f2846af28fdbe1bf8cf9c19bce7f20455ed48f
describe
'86497' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKLK' 'sip-files00193.QC.jpg'
2153f26dc4ac7ff453a41b0a6fefbf89
61303218a9cdedde9647d0d6a5b7371ddaf68ad8
'2012-05-27T21:24:11-04:00'
describe
'45411' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKLL' 'sip-files00131.pro'
5134257d3221a115d806e840c097d571
495a9dc7c4260a6a43b59f6bd6e91f704fb038ef
describe
'80466' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKLM' 'sip-files00337.QC.jpg'
8c16695f40db4094f663df103c4c7518
29c9c74623c978bfc1e7d42d7d142ed48399934b
describe
'30089' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKLN' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
1656b5d1e179308a10d84db3ef70ce94
0b6b064746d230ed55f338ed8ae6177b7349343c
describe
'237865' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKLO' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
9c492b5503bfc837175a44e0ee51f773
b1df932bad96ce882d9b044b5f0675ecdd5331b8
'2012-05-27T21:30:35-04:00'
describe
'13513312' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKLP' 'sip-files00329.tif'
ea3e7a84984da23ba7c791236ee0885d
a67027b38e49bc4c17000dd39972e7c7af46d6b1
'2012-05-27T21:32:06-04:00'
describe
'23345' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKLQ' 'sip-files00063.pro'
cebf163b57b3403ec295cc953ac2e18e
e573ea75ee88ea183a6b0b2983b97e9bb110b23f
describe
'1589' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKLR' 'sip-files00266.txt'
66f988761d2a5e0a9ec0c03224bbe66f
8753972bb168aa434ea25ef85ad65bbfb965598a
'2012-05-30T08:52:44-04:00'
describe
'326859' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKLS' 'sip-files00339.jpg'
7a66c025c65d07b017b40d26806953b4
3f30645a34bad50ab386fd4d63dac29c10807da4
describe
'1705212' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKLT' 'sip-files00238.tif'
8367a03af66c0c1e4640be87a3fd7db0
7660e07cce2bd8201b1d0cc6846d7ad74fc6746d
'2012-05-27T21:26:15-04:00'
describe
'310215' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKLU' 'sip-files00313.jpg'
2bf85a7e74544aefb3f11a61a0cc1d8b
b1a55834afbbd588a6e1db2f52d1265807f77e13
'2012-05-27T21:23:11-04:00'
describe
'46709' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKLV' 'sip-files00041.pro'
9f28c74785f939233117f51e3e1fc87f
99d5dc1c7470dd8f3e08ab7ea4d9414d182b08f1
'2012-05-27T21:27:27-04:00'
describe
'247786' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKLW' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
fad6627c4daae2131af8df0f0a56b947
98649de79919facc271fa5134cc37bf17d759a6a
describe
'250847' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKLX' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
0f855c6b2a8998781fb7fe085ca38d14
eb453e62408f697517ce0acbf58c5918d21b16aa
describe
'30097' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKLY' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
513edde33f8cc105725686431fca7d4a
c87cebf60bc57c276277fcb5673cc08c302589a0
describe
'263627' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKLZ' 'sip-files00175.jp2'
92a9fb72dfaef4d9061bfbcc71783af8
cd10d82e0175299b8b01dd5d29b061b9db837f49
describe
'46826' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKMA' 'sip-files00086.pro'
665511694274ae343e87d6f8ec098ca8
78f91528b6396ba52135742ce5461fcc6e2c4537
'2012-05-27T21:31:04-04:00'
describe
'26829' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKMB' 'sip-files00160thm.jpg'
7ff9396e8f4565845889f4622efa37bc
bfb083b33d7d6cffd93260f3d6d3a93fec7ea9ec
'2012-05-27T21:25:41-04:00'
describe
'40664' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKMC' 'sip-files00238.pro'
ea8bc91b2e2cbed832f6519204fe505d
3f8d9a064f708308d18ff1865059253cf3e25957
'2012-05-27T21:23:48-04:00'
describe
'1704040' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKMD' 'sip-files00065.tif'
6e85d5321fa540ed2ab061c54cf43156
90e9bc53a8d467010101b77989119c868f146318
describe
'33102' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKME' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
2cbc3bcad0e7b922fa8d0fe953ec36c1
3b8ff924b06b96ff4a6089acf139beaab54e728f
describe
'66430' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKMF' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
3a5876c0f0a568bdb7c6023154fd1836
8110506e5795fd7255fa9fa37e9916690d912a25
describe
'1888' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKMG' 'sip-files00213.txt'
7b996f45d4bdf851fd80682cd8e54206
9f7b8553a920d9fc7e05a4b14d7fd7792ab084bc
describe
'31488' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKMH' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
3c14b009aad45ca338555c366fa40966
d4fa7d50fdbf13f7af146f2535015aa5489f70e7
'2012-05-27T21:26:03-04:00'
describe
'46819' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKMI' 'sip-files00125.pro'
243ae2b35049d20cd86d0d41b3a3a238
e262959cd9f6ce360a492b51f9a80a34d78340d2
describe
'95845' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKMJ' 'sip-files00277.QC.jpg'
ebe371558e0fb5f9e171d8ef1293d8a5
9e4a4bef5ac965bc88b1360ae85be3386f169cc4
describe
'13514444' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKMK' 'sip-files00144.tif'
fa7097d480bb29c7479cd352d0ec885b
d0628723f11cda038224f8f4044f91ca24480bab
describe
'1904' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKML' 'sip-files00264.txt'
336bfcb936fbfdcc57b6d0580c8c6959
aa935452968fbbb866dbce0ceb3bcbcd787f3f9e
describe
'34860' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKMM' 'sip-files00297thm.jpg'
f20f61ad7b1b008cd187b1192c483266
779ad805247656e13c1f52eb1649fad7e442b7b9
describe
'36681' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKMN' 'sip-files00141.pro'
1766c7a147fb120b60a052e5d35df2cc
105ba63dc7ede029ff01ee6f0244f51b5f8b27e1
describe
'85271' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKMO' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
4062d121738c00c0ac3a5e7998bf5d19
fc3f52e11261474e58644b2509e27cf4a0e03f94
'2012-05-27T21:28:25-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKMP' 'sip-files00184.tif'
9173c293d23ba0d689e424a2347f193c
ee1e9b3c4761352b56ed05536838662467e01144
describe
'85555' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKMQ' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
5f03e3d004c0b33f81df21ef027f5c1d
882f7fceac45eb9f0bdf4f984321bdffe376d644
describe
'222675' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKMR' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
d3af3363a22f4a8d7f613629277e838a
c2e314f88fab756c77bb77c5c864afada81bd436
describe
'30695' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKMS' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
2bb519261f653350593d0472be704611
46033635339bc079df3896e4340a05f9c4ee637c
'2012-05-27T21:21:09-04:00'
describe
'217730' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKMT' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
1dfe920e33daa276998020d2a432ac6f
5bc58971352d4477ecfb7cd1f1e66970aa174445
'2012-05-27T21:29:21-04:00'
describe
'216684' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKMU' 'sip-files00248.jp2'
d15faaf1e988af4e84463ed893383865
b8ac134aa3603457f1c1e32699b74170753137c5
'2012-05-27T21:19:17-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKMV' 'sip-files00012.txt'
9f2dc1961dfa68c35e3e4c6d6f74d081
20de12e7def681e217a27d0ab4f379ac173218c2
describe
'1705412' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKMW' 'sip-files00202.tif'
e8e3dbdcd00b4b9ea628cddbd1ac0c73
59a1649ff28bb2f9a57d140f884aa05864678164
describe
'966' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKMX' 'sip-files00063.txt'
5a960723fb1cad6e929b896484ba57f3
9f71767b03c594bcb4a01e5c779bb5538b03c10c
describe
'1772' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKMY' 'sip-files00218.txt'
d26bd0d890d2463cbfb8a23704af8fa9
c110ca18506c69fd15afe4fa3d20f59ee8e59beb
describe
'39644' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKMZ' 'sip-files00251.pro'
a392178e89c974f4a79b02159e97447d
f62b2291dd0a1ea639582e1297d377e3542f07b9
describe
'93509' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKNA' 'sip-files00310.QC.jpg'
0df95bf61556ce2dc1c60aeb69df44d4
c58f33c9443e69f72b4cb126888e8da57b780194
describe
'242791' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKNB' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
3d6cb9df7ca81e9eeca55f1737eef339
a25e7017056bd54037967693d7b085ed832300b2
describe
'258236' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKNC' 'sip-files00228.jp2'
55765f3ad85a58f750698cf5c59861f1
583d97d63073769ac9130d22daccf4038fad84a7
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKND' 'sip-files00065.txt'
f37513ea92b10eb7e6770dd67908377d
a661c1f98338486bd6bb87e48dd92f5bcb5c36b6
describe
'1150' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKNE' 'sip-files00100.txt'
8ade141ba7a09afc13baadbbdfdb1380
df740253ea6a9ca319467aced42984fcd28ee0fa
describe
'33729' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKNF' 'sip-files00260thm.jpg'
5d5638a28f779c2afc3d4101351b563f
7b544eee9b893f6335eae612d18c64b0fee9660c
describe
'393086' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKNG' 'sip-filesUF00028162_00001.mets'
527f5900cb5dd6465ef5f89934993797
e961e48dc16bbb518f9a4cc27e4f565a272e0a4d
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-06T17:14:20-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'250487' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKNJ' 'sip-files00001.jpg'
ad197ea84e201f3bca562e8c4b0c7b24
0af5f51a60b1a143f6d84e665af184825ee2ffe8
describe
'63857' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKNK' 'sip-files00003.jpg'
4476f6fb33c8b1af51dc5681677829cd
f8f16e70afcc56d0649587812bf5b0d7ae6af298
describe
'104452' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKNL' 'sip-files00004.jpg'
159a490c7bf9ba0c7331470ae8e9e228
6e7bdb54af6c829b90de7b91b6a2f0db8f703985
'2012-05-27T21:28:55-04:00'
describe
'172220' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKNM' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
c658e519763175df6d002f0761ebd091
7bdc1bc8bbef85409d40cd2a0a1187cc11809c6a
describe
'224136' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKNN' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
b2124f6e6d0f708b3e80c8d26e42fffe
31e057922cbbd6544790d7ee3778c1c4ee08e64f
'2012-05-27T21:21:13-04:00'
describe
'245736' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKNO' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
639e4abf2d3f85d50f97f34b3020542f
de8cee84932f7e79be90263b8d94709b3cb32e54
'2012-05-27T21:30:16-04:00'
describe
'215799' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKNP' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
257f59df7f28f4b298e0ccc2f30fab47
15f871b64d7bc877b40091d7bb3c6f98fc73bc3e
'2012-05-27T21:22:50-04:00'
describe
'238976' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKNQ' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
75cd72aaa4a985b28b83155afce7c090
fdd1c3f82904b0f211b51e7e0e74a2f9ec71d31e
describe
'231134' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKNR' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
56cf742b16e941b60ed39d7577d81656
77c0b897a37797c30ababf72a20abda78b82117a
describe
'223922' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKNS' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
7cb415e1551e03285e4d9a5e9ab0fc7c
1f1ba2ad72abe6753579691bfc6cc1c70612b7a6
describe
'235505' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKNT' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
0d725955734e28b62a8b46c8ad2cb6ae
12bd38ed820cb0605f568081ca0b7027d72d3590
describe
'204204' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKNU' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
591eac6209189550b28c0ddff33ae1e6
67f5cc27e7d56b1373a92e99bd79fc104043f940
describe
'232337' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKNV' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
82ef409ce4052cb8869b16a499b88814
4ee91766819eedeeb29753716da0bd284a942fb4
describe
'222299' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKNW' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
f8350928981b7a82456b3b7a4c1a3604
9eda107088f5d3169fc5c7bb1c1f90b37e9332fa
describe
'216837' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKNX' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
143db57c7f4a3e6d4dcdd3ed8d5f3f3b
517d49fd76d20c6903dce3887cd92404930625f2
describe
'222089' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKNY' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
a710999f791e6399db1c67d5db5537d6
31c1c749ec9449501c312dcfca57f18a6e30db01
describe
'224010' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKNZ' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
88de36d5f27c1778131e6604ad6ce088
3845ff24498549fd5ee630a717e4b1b3e1604833
'2012-05-27T21:25:59-04:00'
describe
'220772' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKOA' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
b241f94b62e99d25ce01c299cb1c52d4
d82b622fd2d4df9a39ec019a69fa4d6362afbd7a
describe
'216298' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKOB' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
9daa26eb6468955985b163747d304c6a
d3caab4ee34668f8e3d7be6fed68e5ab9f1963c9
describe
'232992' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKOC' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
0fee95a1c29883f536cfc326f24e3a7e
977f61fc4987e55f9fd5a2c095a256b65d0b9f35
describe
'182250' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKOD' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
1b7da931c9541f28046f340fcd0fa7ac
8d03029a72c83a857ac16140fe59a532b1ef4cc9
describe
'222841' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKOE' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
446a7afcbc6d6c1fd39aa8607f71f9e7
afbe407ac94c3233f1df8f415f97e464bfbfb587
'2012-05-27T21:27:49-04:00'
describe
'214779' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKOF' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
992ebd788115014b55a66b2a49f4bac3
fb09cb880d2cc4139cfd5dd9e52460fb56e85731
'2012-05-27T21:23:53-04:00'
describe
'215341' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKOG' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
13425eec5787d5aca364119ab982acae
17cb524c2fce3a6a5bf64eb07008ee2638aeda8f
'2012-05-27T21:26:07-04:00'
describe
'195557' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKOH' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
6488b8ff40933128e4c17e274800e121
0aa05d358ebb3c5baac64b047fa15ce361a5a824
'2012-05-27T21:18:45-04:00'
describe
'221664' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKOI' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
331394728c0802911a5571552f52b450
ec43e036a4963eb9097cff4a1750bda43c55772a
'2012-05-27T21:21:31-04:00'
describe
'207053' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKOJ' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
18e081318952688b750a9903affcf323
93053ea4ef3d9d2510024667b20448ff11d24837
'2012-05-27T21:28:32-04:00'
describe
'224290' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKOK' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
c060f98d38705c8fb2f9c822e1f70081
8d062b17dae7cd86e0083bd5f1708ebe63712a2c
describe
'210005' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKOL' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
144e5513a9953cc838e5621da0ed0b9d
88f812224ee23da92ef6a13442b5b3614fd4e944
describe
'238425' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKOM' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
a6467f0813c30f9a97c62fd7e972ed75
e7af54b739c525aa794b2527482a0c639734bbb3
'2012-05-27T21:22:59-04:00'
describe
'214492' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKON' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
af952ebe5e5331454d338d312d645934
2901d4c5bdf446ad97852be22bf3b4990d46db1b
describe
'144383' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKOO' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
c6bf0bb9975a77346327719ff6d0674a
a5c61089ea73d68c3299de677eda394795ac4392
describe
'248400' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKOP' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
3e2ad946b3141a4c447488e72d0113e5
74f09f3f4212e92f8c104cd03cc41feff1a315d3
'2012-05-27T21:19:23-04:00'
describe
'222290' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKOQ' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
8ecd3cf0b49ea1c84381d9c75c0051c2
c951fd33b969cebfd40dc841f3f44f509d389985
'2012-05-27T21:24:33-04:00'
describe
'211509' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKOR' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
c5758fc1c60863e3372a5cd4b46b9439
a6eb0797b2a74ed8b97a01096689a60dc902b541
'2012-05-27T21:30:23-04:00'
describe
'113853' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKOS' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
c769ac1b78fc59214a67e7718106bd61
d61dc54ca109177b48704932db7e3847b5e6b302
describe
'232891' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKOT' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
f5164862927fb2be7ae76696a0aad195
c033be32121fc7e4d3799a118a986c31ceb1f11b
'2012-05-27T21:23:41-04:00'
describe
'234283' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKOU' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
e0e21bb38fdc242c0b22f140f3d4cb53
54bcb25fa5b2c9d01b66a95a5471d75f6fce90ed
'2012-05-27T21:28:47-04:00'
describe
'151846' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKOV' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
39827eda6ba5e4cb1ab73954ad3e958f
5c29d1de6df51bd7f2ce55d055d2c18b71d8502e
describe
'157858' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKOW' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
ac15246257ee596d4a907fa199838863
eeb35260904a2cbfec65303d42c9e016194a2e45
describe
'200164' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKOX' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
aa153f343b98392b4fa1cb092fe95a93
5f75cb0042ec31e7ce7112fa6a9a3726fa96742c
'2012-05-27T21:25:34-04:00'
describe
'224339' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKOY' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
66aac88768bfe3641cb83828fc291a89
37da687fcf46890d78c84f34ebbb296fa524bdce
'2012-05-27T21:31:28-04:00'
describe
'191231' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKOZ' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
82f62595097a536c6a0f62e37bf2aa25
5934599cd9766d76fe0b63f436bd1b4fd7836a5f
describe
'227221' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKPA' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
a9c3e60dfa63be7b9a8f212094fb2401
36c73c311839d7ef1558d9806612bad3ebd03d31
describe
'57258' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKPB' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
34e4933724c84208cfa3e2a942a36515
35766de5aa505abca5d32eb4fe0387dd45c52c73
'2012-05-27T21:24:13-04:00'
describe
'238085' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKPC' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
cdaeb1a02ab898ea880e138e48ce21ee
7aa736ae53a826c3830815ec71727112d639d1a8
'2012-05-27T21:27:50-04:00'
describe
'218987' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKPD' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
2b860779e6ad5f6025674e0f46318dcb
7175600aa70fe7eeac2348e0159ec1e62315a739
describe
'207356' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKPE' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
56c8180c4e033ba48d89b1e002435e00
3698b910c703acdef9de64d0ef4e7b7b22121058
describe
'232137' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKPF' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
de56af178c46f443c8d766648ab3a685
083c168da98d3789d1e9b4993ab82f221d5476dc
'2012-05-27T21:25:10-04:00'
describe
'236173' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKPG' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
d208046adb1d6b9c769613338247e9dc
d9caa7e089d200ac5e70df7c45be5759a4e12f18
describe
'204036' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKPH' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
a4eff8f03459aaf6fc7dd47455384f8d
4668529004d1aec8e10d1548c2a3aab7197174f7
describe
'217385' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKPI' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
1763c9e0119aac6c90176d811f49182b
717145563bd76c5e9b4b011fbd768b887de6be9a
'2012-05-27T21:22:35-04:00'
describe
'199978' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKPJ' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
297e2476e73ea99fc93eeb9be333783f
a33d77d80fc94037c449b03fb22599967ea10cba
describe
'209871' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKPK' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
99dfcd88375445c69e20b362ab54677d
9c4ef592fc8102abe99f13a430cdc5a3d7971312
describe
'216034' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKPL' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
1eed124afa68f414680f400330875c6e
d08a0da201810ce4a9d2eda692629eba9a66e116
describe
'174250' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKPM' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
b9b5622719bdc9fb0720f553befac0db
c05edf623cd72e85ff81a56fc133d6c1446219be
describe
'228298' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKPN' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
326579fcdb91970e558bf3bd3d381aeb
35d0743ac199386bbabf127426c69fb4b60a7ae7
describe
'224890' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKPO' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
1ad42be9d0f91efe3b2989d4ed0c63e8
3737912d2cf78c71d7f41607a9755e943e729ff0
describe
'281802' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKPP' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
538ba49a0521c30b38b241f554e482ac
52042a044a71168a49e000509c488985fdfd036d
'2012-05-27T21:31:27-04:00'
describe
'233785' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKPQ' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
874ce90f503a881b66ad6a08e1d54b1b
85dacdc953b8c3130ace0e16b86be867656b6578
'2012-05-27T21:26:57-04:00'
describe
'242248' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKPR' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
b6af1eea132aba56cba3182acadd614a
b2e8a1b07316416df0b70686236aec298d2a83ae
describe
'221449' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKPS' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
ff96187a7695df970d96393c96d930ca
4ec399cf47c539cdc3655a3ef92cec5d48210b0e
'2012-05-27T21:29:12-04:00'
describe
'246058' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKPT' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
34e13d6bb040cac25e54f4d2d86844c6
2ebeb74622fa6196e3f418ef485963a4f045e498
'2012-05-27T21:26:25-04:00'
describe
'221742' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKPU' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
8767cec03231eeca51182bf747e6f1e3
81d62f1b21af360dcfd78c769436c06922940fb9
describe
'227391' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKPV' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
02475e759092aa3db35e45aad7770ed7
f6252b11e72f23751bed2a7a807752ca64bbe693
'2012-05-30T08:53:15-04:00'
describe
'232149' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKPW' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
a35b3c3ee8a7e2ddab40623da5785d6c
2b851261e8c19c35703631ff25f691c2efdac558
describe
'218006' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKPX' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
af802567c4941cbacee24ea321b399f1
60535d70fbbbd36a6e893e91158c4e5a8cac92cf
describe
'220413' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKPY' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
a1ccf8e20dad8e649c00a730b5f19de5
5cb9a7e1aa3ec5534883817d6e1c635c1f6cf972
describe
'226421' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKPZ' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
12b10d0fa40951b7cbb93efc4e161967
c058bdf4d983b57103922a7cf30564349059cb37
describe
'244107' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKQA' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
1fe7044772863e59ab8a310c1018af8d
ba7847c497fcaddf9df0c49fe7a857f10ad3c3d2
describe
'229618' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKQB' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
1e3c9179aa3f0fcf3f3fd33a499c4fb1
818c8c4cead64cfa6a25d3ae56bfd47cb5a78cc6
'2012-05-27T21:26:20-04:00'
describe
'222963' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKQC' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
49bac5836a1bf9fe6cfc9a5f59bcfc93
e89ccb975555dffafac507e6034b081b1a6ff82d
'2012-05-27T21:29:14-04:00'
describe
'232524' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKQD' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
ec00ddf09ddd48010a9ecadde6055adf
936b9498b07db63519ac46c471caddf4842a0c4c
'2012-05-30T08:53:11-04:00'
describe
'236571' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKQE' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
248dc3c05d7760f80cdefa01a90f6860
98a970720938a06866b184c273981276094fcf0d
'2012-05-27T21:26:00-04:00'
describe
'220870' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKQF' 'sip-files00142.jpg'
eda1556fbbcbf9174cba137f8c3a9aac
a8b7f245bb7a49fcdee6a986bab4d5b5f867dd9e
describe
'294402' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKQG' 'sip-files00144.jpg'
9fbd68bffdcc14c1dd83564a521f0492
e8a432be2271225d4add01e76fef294e7aca9197
describe
'223087' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKQH' 'sip-files00145.jpg'
6cc7487d907d8660494c8cc642beaab8
10c950b131372c638389c10da2c24137baa3f885
'2012-05-27T21:31:23-04:00'
describe
'221692' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKQI' 'sip-files00147.jpg'
13a5aed6ecd3b875a036026651d279c6
eb88204cb50a87d6c5c66a924daddacf79590014
describe
'208461' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKQJ' 'sip-files00149.jpg'
bd7ee543f282bab90b28c95084ae2227
632dbc2eaebd25ea45ebe1a44fd02480fd48bcb0
describe
'203022' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKQK' 'sip-files00150.jpg'
b1924050ded294ecf9113767de0c8d54
d55cf6a71311556a38171df7d40d6f7511a58c4e
describe
'226568' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKQL' 'sip-files00151.jpg'
d67f87a8fd3e131fbe17d43d35c1d327
e974cf2e5b9cdddeb961d24467620c671cca9296
describe
'209988' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKQM' 'sip-files00152.jpg'
2b555eace12b54f107d0994a817c6ef9
ff4910f2161d326e5651b1b4e2162e40411e1021
describe
'220799' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKQN' 'sip-files00153.jpg'
dd39c39144bd165ea5a577f2c5a216ec
4c8dc77cdfe43c82a7e65ce248476ef1dbf07020
describe
'228666' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKQO' 'sip-files00154.jpg'
52127fd66cef6539a0904d226ef3007f
83a58c8b3caa0ca463a74256aa315623fcca9ef7
describe
'239367' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKQP' 'sip-files00156.jpg'
12d0ed2970a04caf835c0f5450529f21
726c43562dad1692be8f9ca4f76c5a6ad1f8f6d2
'2012-05-30T08:53:04-04:00'
describe
'206172' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKQQ' 'sip-files00157.jpg'
d2772906b337b29bf1531c8f48f16484
2d7edbb2d1d501ad8399910e1784e24725e40438
describe
'47672' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKQR' 'sip-files00158.jpg'
9f662578682a65f7c653e8d559cec2c8
12c12d18f7c52f7c3d1178e9994859f82a9aa00c
describe
'135914' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKQS' 'sip-files00160.jpg'
159d379d8bff4ce62b5cb2a8793df9de
77cac87d5875d92362ae1411c56fccfe2edd8e46
'2012-05-27T21:32:00-04:00'
describe
'233583' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKQT' 'sip-files00161.jpg'
7eff5fe7a45c542c183d837d44a9cf61
3d8636dbdf16f09b2515b7aad5c5d62641df39c1
'2012-05-30T08:52:58-04:00'
describe
'242141' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKQU' 'sip-files00162.jpg'
1366cc755696029596bd766c9dfe75ed
06997125f96987507045b539334ca64e3319e6b3
describe
'244418' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKQV' 'sip-files00163.jpg'
0c4e18cfb864dda1262b44b8cab11502
98a6935eba0a84218dfd81eb1542f8c6886ceec6
describe
'237999' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKQW' 'sip-files00164.jpg'
d60b09a2e96ebea9131c5b60b98e1ffe
0f528151117f11e4de5a66b7e90d8f28560489d7
'2012-05-27T21:21:41-04:00'
describe
'223479' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKQX' 'sip-files00166.jpg'
fe9be6e6e3f08166006d82d8f04c7f4e
5ba6f5ba30a6c8de77ce228486c727be30693ae1
describe
'237194' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKQY' 'sip-files00168.jpg'
4f6f4441be838a9b87dd7d1ebe224fbb
00a06fd924022fbbbb63408885819d80668ea548
'2012-05-29T18:38:27-04:00'
describe
'239115' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKQZ' 'sip-files00172.jpg'
c8d967186c65a329ec76b250f61c6e2a
60f1a6a0eb85ecfd204cfa03d1733a86c245e1f9
describe
'236823' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKRA' 'sip-files00173.jpg'
eaa89ae9fca628b5b5eeb6d11bda5515
8470d679472edf10b4787629a1988ff00e6675c2
describe
'249603' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKRB' 'sip-files00174.jpg'
ace2c2609fe0df1e311fd873b7747339
4c5695d1d6bc6abbe98e6a0233f9b7de5631f168
describe
'244103' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKRC' 'sip-files00178.jpg'
28e3eaa79fa5b0fce0b96b915e115302
6100d9d0a2448f693b1a9e7e4e9ac368822566cf
'2012-05-27T21:29:47-04:00'
describe
'243177' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKRD' 'sip-files00179.jpg'
11a9cfb941542485b82d07ab96c5bcf8
94db2bee2e23e9f92833198f004e469588e053ce
describe
'247688' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKRE' 'sip-files00180.jpg'
6539121f0039572ec43a35f60ec73b09
65494426cba614ba5dea7340a8301bb23a278a35
describe
'234872' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKRF' 'sip-files00181.jpg'
9fbb770a7e732c9c04e1a6d840af23d7
1f410ec8710f69b41eb539b0e212612a5e95d312
describe
'253252' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKRG' 'sip-files00182.jpg'
3a18ff908d9f52eb755e628a1bf9a8cf
0518a27e28f95bae1c384bdf6efa7577b01ad496
'2012-05-27T21:23:04-04:00'
describe
'246019' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKRH' 'sip-files00183.jpg'
598c20895440e4169f805f914d003cd7
98ba8cc1ffddd848638580faea65b8376bd02c24
describe
'231533' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKRI' 'sip-files00185.jpg'
5e2fa9152cf67b1242dbcd4237a191cc
45b0780d17b0c000a99fcd83727a3e3c557ab086
'2012-05-27T21:18:56-04:00'
describe
'241642' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKRJ' 'sip-files00189.jpg'
80302b34a53200af63d91fe4b0915db5
f4d0150aae7d9b21a01b11b1c16395760122f26f
describe
'246040' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKRK' 'sip-files00190.jpg'
33f487e422b8e38040ebf07d3b869b60
b742237a877b86b7dd036be07ad00f54d7cd78c3
'2012-05-27T21:23:43-04:00'
describe
'236681' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKRL' 'sip-files00193.jpg'
c20012ebe75e1d7c837546c8887a8467
8f4402267a08a431c44a6cc149bfcc6a8ed7d155
'2012-05-27T21:30:20-04:00'
describe
'162774' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKRM' 'sip-files00195.jpg'
a467cb59b29ed6a58087665fcc9f2551
c03df58c60f373db2c0793290ae6287bcaa02817
describe
'238628' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKRN' 'sip-files00196.jpg'
e6c5dcf59d6ffe0e9e4601cc5410e4e3
a82a5662351251d87b3607ff88453269b1d584ce
'2012-05-27T21:31:18-04:00'
describe
'235892' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKRO' 'sip-files00197.jpg'
fed2764d576eb8991c42f29de61d3e5a
30aec0ded4b0024543b484ac8784ac181f08b001
describe
'217587' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKRP' 'sip-files00198.jpg'
479dd82eb950187f6a96f154f38cc367
9b98a0871212f8a175bfaafcc7e3e20a690d022c
describe
'234271' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKRQ' 'sip-files00202.jpg'
6fcf288814987443795625ee99a7d043
531e7b8d9e2d9b674dd43c6c95cb2eff6ea2f0e0
describe
'207293' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKRR' 'sip-files00203.jpg'
b70db395923694e2f6274e2ce67436b0
8695932215e6d1dac50acf15598df89f9b406791
describe
'240200' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKRS' 'sip-files00205.jpg'
b71f0e667368f9fcacf1b196f4dc60da
223539083361b29b7822d67b42f059e9a28e490b
'2012-05-27T21:20:03-04:00'
describe
'177589' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKRT' 'sip-files00206.jpg'
e0532ba377f7308ad259ecb34242b3ac
6a65ebadd1a00d45c36f792dec1ef7d6f0c65bca
describe
'237625' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKRU' 'sip-files00208.jpg'
b33adcba1a986afe7550e36a398959b1
9347d7aa40ac5c410537b00c7bb01e505fd54e09
'2012-05-30T08:52:48-04:00'
describe
'225826' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKRV' 'sip-files00212.jpg'
f24ad3e2f0d5bb37f57f95477fceab1e
c729da2b8907c031c9f74f6735b6db9b87c81477
'2012-05-27T21:22:14-04:00'
describe
'231886' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKRW' 'sip-files00213.jpg'
8d8e9a3cd227f78e611ca66584b9cf28
5c6f043325a25f030397c189a340b251d4d65e13
describe
'207789' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKRX' 'sip-files00215.jpg'
02c4d1840402cc2cbdd79688169fa71c
6e0a20588235fcec9a543300bce5b6fc50d3da6d
describe
'201954' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKRY' 'sip-files00216.jpg'
0d8ad57efc8cd116099174cbae4c22e8
dcc0acd1151396bd6151142a532c72052952240d
describe
'235544' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKRZ' 'sip-files00220.jpg'
7034858ab9ef5318a073b93a9382db1f
769050626ed30fa5e65a25131f7806e448ae1286
describe
'230940' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKSA' 'sip-files00221.jpg'
f3f7dc9cbc230fb02ab83a30b3d52c12
d185be7c07288be1b1fc153c5604d8e39fd19602
describe
'218072' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKSB' 'sip-files00223.jpg'
86a898ef60ef49cfd86222c5f5e7e033
05a894001495674fbfb74e47cee5ac2d62a07475
describe
'231804' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKSC' 'sip-files00224.jpg'
faba3ff827da9c62c455b2e3da7f1ada
5d7439ae1b904b76f2b32d41d1823bad74903ae2
describe
'182350' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKSD' 'sip-files00225.jpg'
a833334f840b9555fb84e9764e588390
89ccaa5a8cf55dcac2bf85bc564d2b8169c4da2f
'2012-05-27T21:29:25-04:00'
describe
'226469' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKSE' 'sip-files00227.jpg'
8e5da983ece9fdb2e7937cdfb3e8dee5
077e239c14821e0e5ea11edac4c67063ce5e5f88
'2012-05-27T21:21:00-04:00'
describe
'229570' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKSF' 'sip-files00229.jpg'
b5086055cde6d77c20c8ed17af0e808a
80026e3e18e001672cdb36bc7399727a033cbecf
'2012-05-27T21:20:24-04:00'
describe
'198319' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKSG' 'sip-files00233.jpg'
4a3cc969acce273fceb967e4ded728ec
b63c7d2c64da4a1b8abfd5c36ff80426aa7c3983
'2012-05-27T21:25:22-04:00'
describe
'211873' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKSH' 'sip-files00235.jpg'
ebe07f1de44f5fd3527ec083c6471735
3e09c50338494bcaeab419f34f3b4fd2734414d4
describe
'225242' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKSI' 'sip-files00236.jpg'
99414a2ac53f7543ec7817a132b014c1
ecd9f06e93f8912ed57065e3e7fc00be89d28422
'2012-05-27T21:29:23-04:00'
describe
'227160' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKSJ' 'sip-files00237.jpg'
bdf675c5bfbd95b9e3be568e77729bb7
d68b074ecb249527ce5535bc7c2d18a3e1126501
'2012-05-27T21:29:46-04:00'
describe
'203093' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKSK' 'sip-files00238.jpg'
c5d7caa15e0aaffb77e29c8fe1142e86
51b7b53ee7149ee803ce5974b5612b63fc70fe1e
describe
'250073' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKSL' 'sip-files00240.jpg'
58affca0e00c84df2fec0fc09cfba459
859fb3b60c4e98e39819457bdaf2beeb7d88f2d5
describe
'233204' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKSM' 'sip-files00245.jpg'
7ecf476ff9532cc66f2519cd927e341f
fb1468b0a64a244a5c4771e546488367b25c6a1d
describe
'240953' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKSN' 'sip-files00246.jpg'
06a9dec9bfe13ce26c18ac43df535341
f59de770d0b1d6c4b56ea0ea9cf5c90c3caa8044
describe
'209974' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKSO' 'sip-files00248.jpg'
9eb0d53216c2ecd52c55d76296321d22
6fcb25e16523d584287b0b0be28421f70733c7d7
describe
'241750' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKSP' 'sip-files00249.jpg'
74bdacc9ae8099d677c4c42486fa3df1
8e999baa0e7e5e7097cd29855e3631188ca79194
describe
'209983' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKSQ' 'sip-files00250.jpg'
1e3e81fffbaf97f0539f4921f7d420a0
8b75a88b99c3d8f6dfc8f0298fc806e217b4f016
'2012-05-27T21:28:28-04:00'
describe
'200678' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKSR' 'sip-files00251.jpg'
c39214b444cd83473573339e1a82aab6
2d4c6910ffe0d3ca32cdfca661f6f4a876bad9b1
'2012-05-27T21:29:10-04:00'
describe
'236503' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKSS' 'sip-files00252.jpg'
87d2ed56a1d264adea19f1399a21a3fb
6882cae558fef61465586831481d3fe44efc8126
describe
'238434' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKST' 'sip-files00254.jpg'
3ea394df1adb01d98e3b00cf20efbe17
b1f6ccc3b0e0c28fca74df6fb308595d55b77c9c
'2012-05-27T21:26:47-04:00'
describe
'169885' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKSU' 'sip-files00259.jpg'
eedb3b84d3ee2e88a209e9a445650b3d
725f14a359d20d8bfd217365bdd3f5b5228478b7
describe
'242263' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKSV' 'sip-files00260.jpg'
6b5655330af48bb3e76c13b4a65769a2
dafd716565360623ff4f6d93688a45e5c7701fa8
'2012-05-27T21:29:30-04:00'
describe
'253524' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKSW' 'sip-files00263.jpg'
e057f9e21bc800d84d4469339c53b9a0
7a3f33f364ea479ef5bb56a2c499b3fa26ba6866
describe
'258052' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKSX' 'sip-files00264.jpg'
978bb786a44a4c5ed3399d78b0674c0f
757ea2922ab9c8082730f5867bb7c8c08edbe118
'2012-05-27T21:22:03-04:00'
describe
'235587' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKSY' 'sip-files00265.jpg'
1a20905a0f3df6d15f79b51ecfce4d37
f5a9e8b417c607eabd79967c7eea77a056e436b6
describe
'254298' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKSZ' 'sip-files00267.jpg'
c5aa9f58324ed1d26940623c2b3054e6
d319ea2d674717624163b565fb2e15f9960c20d7
'2012-05-27T21:27:17-04:00'
describe
'246238' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKTA' 'sip-files00269.jpg'
21901706e48f45508dd8a06cc72ee703
4328d4e3ffe12bb2af6998e687203671a4a3e9aa
'2012-05-27T21:25:45-04:00'
describe
'242268' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKTB' 'sip-files00270.jpg'
778e7884185e3823dc6099cd0f6dff8e
052628302c72d2a1052115a7b38b00670bff0063
'2012-05-27T21:30:43-04:00'
describe
'246657' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKTC' 'sip-files00271.jpg'
f1860dc7b5754215c0aab08218b04a39
4c7feac1344a305e6ff1f8a665ee288dbbe40eed
'2012-05-27T21:29:11-04:00'
describe
'247484' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKTD' 'sip-files00272.jpg'
bd9ba2a6891daa880c3ec7478b171b26
b3eae806cf190a224068cd9dc4c119f5fda05c41
'2012-05-29T18:28:28-04:00'
describe
'253168' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKTE' 'sip-files00273.jpg'
9845e1eab1184882fbe91c61670745c8
6cf552d676fd5a88c149c2a1aabb70eef0a19de0
describe
'247415' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKTF' 'sip-files00274.jpg'
ad5978c4adb652969181a248526742fb
6052472981eec249ff02471b76777e2f29cdaadd
describe
'253638' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKTG' 'sip-files00275.jpg'
4a4f817c6099bd22f4c8ea714507c4d8
39146ab5ea251f271fd1f1a01c4cedf8bf6cab3d
describe
'250592' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKTH' 'sip-files00276.jpg'
4dc4d3a901ca6077f9c0361cad5b1098
cb5469f1445a2cc91c609b68b90054f26b52b5d5
describe
'259734' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKTI' 'sip-files00277.jpg'
ac173b791d6ea5bf730f8fa9510b2b38
751a83974e1980fb8555e961474e4890b0efe471
describe
'235195' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKTJ' 'sip-files00282.jpg'
028e54c7b5f77ddd2a029d7dd2508b04
52dddd39f40e04d551bfff84efd5c46f52a23771
describe
'229687' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKTK' 'sip-files00283.jpg'
cd72766f26d372cacf494e3590cd5715
abfea8efcd686cc696c3316b5eb0a0c535fa6481
describe
'240480' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKTL' 'sip-files00285.jpg'
0b603f77f734e7f8cd350f26be964cbd
c37d74426fc619a45ee798517a7aca32ccd471f6
describe
'174606' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKTM' 'sip-files00290.jpg'
6e65dcd6ddbd4a224d3c2149de113e24
18c7a3b9f8bf2e8ad1606512001a6dd2c18119d5
describe
'246669' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKTN' 'sip-files00292.jpg'
69e48e1bbf3a2ceb9d2118ffdaa1b46d
4baa9185d54ed637eeb8aa4fca7203341d51ff92
'2012-05-27T21:19:02-04:00'
describe
'253856' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKTO' 'sip-files00294.jpg'
fd67da766054ac5f65c93db9a36aacc8
6766c865514985c5a333dba31bfb41e4cfe705ef
'2012-05-27T21:29:18-04:00'
describe
'248258' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKTP' 'sip-files00295.jpg'
7b72158daf373eb3e1cc57b4f9cf077a
c33382a8f9d7db9483b3d43c8813a1ed6d155a4e
describe
'252322' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKTQ' 'sip-files00297.jpg'
c9cc47e72db3135b8699ff05e37ffb74
49bd167a41e957ecc5af57ca43f3811f037925bc
describe
'248266' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKTR' 'sip-files00299.jpg'
d6c5b621ca7962a259603f5b4b7c79f7
308caba9e73052356509cc2cd5fc79e406d7ff34
describe
'251070' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKTS' 'sip-files00300.jpg'
89726ffd7646ddc42085d985281b9411
c6a634fa8e09e1868ae9fb1ea89d8c52d0891e3a
'2012-05-27T21:28:49-04:00'
describe
'249346' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKTT' 'sip-files00301.jpg'
6c94c2e22002b22a4c32c689cf8eff3a
54ea4242b4d83f62510d3b56b4c031deba50908e
describe
'234267' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKTU' 'sip-files00302.jpg'
71be40f58c6970e43960ec99ae8a8509
121631c6a431298040be37410a4427c59252cddb
describe
'257118' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKTV' 'sip-files00303.jpg'
47df38555baca4f63f98f4e894130c0e
59729a485eb72f06aaa8e11bcda0e8620564784d
describe
'243261' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKTW' 'sip-files00304.jpg'
d4ab79fd77012bc89f15dcd1b6a49b40
6f17238fc82ac9135dfbd572ef28159025bc2d3f
'2012-05-27T21:31:11-04:00'
describe
'119341' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKTX' 'sip-files00305.jpg'
7252b8408d7d935b64f422d7bcf32e8e
2b6d8740ab9614175c6421644b98730468105904
describe
'192403' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKTY' 'sip-files00309.jpg'
047b79bd9c9b1422f0c0c7e55b53c19c
e3b4a2973d0bde801fc3a6dc449d5c52783aa7ee
'2012-05-27T21:28:21-04:00'
describe
'274277' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKTZ' 'sip-files00310.jpg'
6b229414df7604d42c209965c4e02fb8
a653b3f3ea96bc24bd451990cd23d666f401ef55
'2012-05-27T21:20:09-04:00'
describe
'298360' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKUA' 'sip-files00312.jpg'
d97cc1e83f583c03d0424917ef9a7292
1eb29f67ea281396a9d1fb6ff7c3b2ec861fa724
'2012-05-27T21:18:19-04:00'
describe
'270990' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKUB' 'sip-files00315.jpg'
4a7487e99946d0e0b3697a595676b9ba
f00276b42314eb88d3f70f07627dcb16f50abff6
describe
'299383' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKUC' 'sip-files00317.jpg'
ce189e75084f4a1d97752f293bf68056
d03350a1d188cbe94e225b1f67bac76b941951e2
describe
'219498' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKUD' 'sip-files00318.jpg'
736e9c280d943ead47c68dcc3558d1eb
a518634bf4e8ca4dc380663b9fdae776a4a3a7c8
describe
'293749' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKUE' 'sip-files00320.jpg'
af53189b526e19ba9a5215dd4748b7d6
a35122c53ae14a1a870b81ab106cc75032a6e4a0
describe
'293671' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKUF' 'sip-files00321.jpg'
4ff76af88928360e04928d81eab45322
a7f52e039c426ff9c7959d5ef400db496c21140f
'2012-05-27T21:21:45-04:00'
describe
'276543' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKUG' 'sip-files00322.jpg'
4b655ca3a074362e06370491f2760358
aaeb2250771dd1c1ba27f5c6648beb4e51a38b81
describe
'291995' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKUH' 'sip-files00324.jpg'
2d416ed0830e42080634fe78303fb7a7
a1fb8987c3589a7e29fdf03b6fbdbed7781209fa
describe
'299744' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKUI' 'sip-files00325.jpg'
546ab7ca3c7dfdcbb8eb5b82b20eb991
ca6b25d15f207481a8bc53dd471ac41b9d98c486
'2012-05-30T08:53:26-04:00'
describe
'292744' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKUJ' 'sip-files00326.jpg'
c3cd8f2b5de8856effae5f439c1b503a
94ecb64d78346635eff2089c9d18d7933a17f720
describe
'292730' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKUK' 'sip-files00328.jpg'
77340a2758f5628b9646fc0e11c72008
9c62adb0d74cb607b75b634b0b73e763f2496356
describe
'268337' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKUL' 'sip-files00330.jpg'
ebca16a796efbd8d27da8c178fc18421
bdd9d52e37fbe5e979231f1d27efae00bc4f9444
'2012-05-27T21:24:03-04:00'
describe
'224690' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKUM' 'sip-files00331.jpg'
ffa9b2da4308e1a79b7247898bc0930c
027c65cc7039c9dfb22e1994233fc7aa5a01696b
'2012-05-27T21:23:45-04:00'
describe
'274530' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKUN' 'sip-files00334.jpg'
a9ae1d68af87aa9f64fc62b313cde0c9
69cd1d79450b14d95c02f29014c29b64cc2a2612
'2012-05-27T21:24:48-04:00'
describe
'266603' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKUO' 'sip-files00335.jpg'
f4295d2d83531c227cc3139051e077d3
436739ba359c149cd9e2f83c2f3b740835bd8323
'2012-05-27T21:30:17-04:00'
describe
'255654' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKUP' 'sip-files00336.jpg'
08b445261c866825b81d5ead6d09e4d5
8afe2461aa8258e4863fa6060dee1aabaeff3bdc
'2012-05-27T21:32:01-04:00'
describe
'289394' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKUQ' 'sip-files00338.jpg'
480f93d83b5e9be883bcce979aec7033
1b361b54cef555251c613df35f6c7ca495dc54aa
'2012-05-27T21:31:46-04:00'
describe
'35163' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKUR' 'sip-files00341.jpg'
6437c1330ca6f4cef32f4b2ccaaadd48
de6a19392ad216f8962a77e6ca1afb7cbdd0db93
describe
'364828' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKUS' 'sip-files00342.jpg'
e076ef24eb692ee103f0dc7b544127a3
9474ebc306837e3865e8216a4bf79142d21b6449
describe
'375604' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKUT' 'sip-files00343.jpg'
f8e7ee639b1945d92bf0d8ec38baf246
af098d26f8545fddb5fd1509c9beffb136145bc0
describe
'91803' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKUU' 'sip-files00345.jpg'
4f61fe3f65e0085e0309820d2e322d74
bc0185bc9be1778f543045b096321a02bdf03fb7
describe
'1394210' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKUV' 'sip-files00002.jp2'
d390ed3da8fcd48ba04cd52aefb2a026
fa3a69c49cd2d2fe4c86b735c6a63a53e60b0b5c
describe
'96906' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKUW' 'sip-files00003.jp2'
a9f087dd271a6808f02daacfe4f4081a
94e61068de8eba041aa9ef291a8f95c049349959
describe
'1578957' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKUX' 'sip-files00004.jp2'
26a8ea41a3ed5510290038a2ba840641
8adad3e2dece17149ad05bd7ad60d03279bde5c2
describe
'14766' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKUY' 'sip-files00006.jp2'
2203cb9ec8c844c5e7e5ec19e2eb4888
620551c01bbdd3887976cf3c35d2f7f8aea6b16f
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKUZ' 'sip-files00007.jp2'
19f9b5c302c7cdcc362f3c50f96910f5
896d5b74ae2c98c359dbea2867455323ae8ee3bd
describe
'75487' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKVA' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
d24e9fea23c2609b74fb93127df36d42
6934b95955e9afb5983d15dfa1581a078c62a468
describe
'185975' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKVB' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
1d100086370080788231a1ffb43b03af
09e72cf52fe4bab82bed44df917e8f2a9149708d
describe
'247951' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKVC' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
4d4b9680464a21907922ed64cfdb15c9
7eaa7267e2ae552e8160e1005cde663b6df0f363
describe
'264129' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKVD' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
07c3e5171042666c3d3e6f2d4025a639
90bbcf64d63d0f02958483c17a6ca1e541433173
describe
'1687585' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKVE' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
6496fb314363d3d04a9fc98a257fec06
fddbb0cef455c1f155a35cef989601209940d1e8
describe
'253561' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKVF' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
be7bc186523cd5e51caccb53b4285f8c
648270bc8eacf8875ec0907ea219da16feb0fb2c
describe
'243250' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKVG' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
d77c1bf8a1d9ba862ff648b38bcd6ba6
f1b869eb9b4a3560a9901d3bf5a5942959e985e5
describe
'228263' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKVH' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
cbceab49c086332275314bb8a90c9cc7
92c9c267cded0db9486f63068cfa7bdcab13cb34
describe
'272396' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKVI' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
358b97105eb627b6212de3161d79bf5c
0dac55159692abf20fbd6c236779befddac8439c
describe
'215077' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKVJ' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
23c57afe0e75eb8f7ac6f594f7e94762
58c065e08eb7f80b1c0fb9b8541a5ca218dec0db
describe
'279610' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKVK' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
a2b7d157806bcefa1e71d0329288028a
b3936e8bbc9e217fac2886a4ca076efcaa80ea35
describe
'250916' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKVL' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
486b2584a6387ee1fb296e70276e3c12
517a5104d912c333d8b9db1068642bc985917568
describe
'266054' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKVM' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
1dfbd18c1551d78adfebe7ee9e5effad
3c46e1327f9b3809fde7dd4152de81d40bd686db
describe
'239619' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKVN' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
6a1501db05df98e6de3b39e0fd1de053
4a38d3432072aeececc564bb83f1963d5b75c1e0
describe
'303107' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKVO' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
6ae291a6738f3b3b764fd0e78e7661e0
25de5d4bab2c4dcbaa5b66e292c3221312d9e232
describe
'283516' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKVP' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
9360f908d73b55d9e3e184560d166ce5
b0dbfe6acf392c438dc6831b0ae5d6088a52389f
describe
'225716' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKVQ' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
f133e4bbad987e7ae2bb813b482ec851
7c4bf6c61e2cc0d3c12eb08be1d5ee0606094d01
describe
'248408' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKVR' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
e7decdf29e012b4db7203ecd951634da
ab75f27ad6685a65a5afe51cc39293c31354877b
describe
'257577' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKVS' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
3fd650e3c90dda7a5047187d7b8446af
1e181da17aa1fd0053144be50df2e193c93e117d
'2012-05-27T21:28:43-04:00'
describe
'254831' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKVT' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
5fa6e8ba83b64f626277a92caab89308
40950cb06d6541404bafbd07ebde501d493d4922
describe
'245558' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKVU' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
1eca79cac85b7ca67f955f59fb694dd2
72a7e2550e97712f61626f345ae20cbd02e5aca9
describe
'230418' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKVV' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
edc87fee9338bb1d0f70d62c152291bd
db978176f25ed2888f0ce088c3c260f874e1202a
describe
'239713' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKVW' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
f579bbd5e627f0eaca782bfc22a16b32
a4f90b861e951479b44ecda06bb7531c5627bb88
describe
'253411' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKVX' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
51d0521a9b119b93a9ffd9d3e7c2fd8a
f3e73c5a251467f7c9b8e3beadbacb591d7e0b4c
describe
'248587' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKVY' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
bb803454f134d0d1ea402234b3b558bf
f4fa49a995810faf8ce4429f75a43f1f377849ae
describe
'268327' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKVZ' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
b3389d62fea1e663f3f4b298f892c2fd
0b68aaf4fb8d577c0e781fe77638b6e7a5cd91ac
'2012-05-27T21:19:06-04:00'
describe
'282529' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKWA' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
4e3e04cce5980bb443bfcb2c91abba5f
b1633c942aa121e4aab4e90404fc82a9451f1df6
'2012-05-30T08:52:46-04:00'
describe
'323859' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKWB' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
466b89c8fb61681553dfa60c4fb62913
fd694542beb9cdbe17fc0c3471050369b32914d5
'2012-05-27T21:20:19-04:00'
describe
'244709' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKWC' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
2b6b9c191ee9d3dccc721c5a5bfcf1bb
c0a5f87f27487d183da08217591aa33371f3040e
describe
'248538' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKWD' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
3c9e048288332d099d14b5ad0b35ff74
a00585e8d896a9e2af613bb86500e46a1490fa48
describe
'247459' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKWE' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
fe04a4a07354c6db3b286c632a0668e4
2c59aa47b9e178487e2e118afcd9628b758f8a64
describe
'297400' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKWF' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
e39cc2ed66231e02f6a75c625ebde3e0
fa7994cd2e01d60bdf7019d8f572cf0724ec2a5f
describe
'225842' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKWG' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
da87d834a75f587d0fc95bd4e3e059fd
6e5597d2c9e22aca9b590657a64f7e21a088229c
'2012-05-27T21:26:10-04:00'
describe
'1687551' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKWH' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
9781d2fcdeb0b6b21287f1c2c0509d92
7cbc0fe963a3e9666c9e099caa7548024232a1cf
describe
'267642' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKWI' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
f3ad0edc2912d2e08199c47d30b8906e
382fc1159be0ec32b90546843b9782d62b3f1932
describe
'251762' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKWJ' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
c5e08be31ef18472e7a4ac3036bbde7c
e99f952221e851d9011d9ba7b4df852bea4df296
describe
'213198' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKWK' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
103d6661259de5324d58cfed18df6725
45767f81b0dfa8c0b2e087e7e5a61e0dc72d0ca3
describe
'225532' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKWL' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
efbbff00fc1ceaa76121fb7c6ac638ef
e590a423de3d91ad4406a310fff32135a840bc30
'2012-05-27T21:27:04-04:00'
describe
'268540' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKWM' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
89de6d2b5aa994292ebf75acf41b09be
4fb92e45cd8a1ad08bfecaab0aaedc1de28f3fdc
describe
'238155' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKWN' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
b1078470dbdac358397628c13b2c9198
6dfceee718beb1f381691699c1c4e884088324dc
describe
'234825' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKWO' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
f02d88ffc802ad10aab6be0d82062482
b7bfdcee38c68f418ad0013b473d358e905d53b1
'2012-05-27T21:26:12-04:00'
describe
'267796' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKWP' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
e892f7dbc8c95a290483ebca28941d73
2a88d3283caca6c5b052d2e20cdb4accbf6c5047
describe
'265673' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKWQ' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
91be386adb235dc7761c6b95deb71f2f
41312ca68dc00620aef78df4b094b6f7b92c8e76
describe
'260560' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKWR' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
782587b4fd3c9c3eeebdc8fc3c2f909c
c02bb6bf3fbddafc9059b1fd542774847e5351d6
describe
'227596' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKWS' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
cfc8f4a75157e0cabbdd507227d4d142
17a41ae83234beb8e0f7550287514e7a27225e15
describe
'242461' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKWT' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
6bd3755e02079b5cfffcdfb998581357
3ebc2333e9fbcba298aaf18b22f1b3b5e3dabf80
describe
'302725' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKWU' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
24bfc9eeb472d4b14d4f912431736dcb
6a59f0ebfcbf850e434991e78a45b7f67de4f76b
describe
'245995' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKWV' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
537062b1a3b589d8f3fa465bfed835ea
a7d508ab11874a43406ddedc4335ad6778ebe090
describe
'266214' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKWW' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
136d801efa67826c5681edc3e5b6f328
496720b03f74a4cf6783212dff521da1f4e45601
describe
'1687583' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKWX' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
e2180056ac94ee3b9abbbb3dd43178e2
99539472e441a06ae600d83c95027ef84e1262cd
'2012-05-27T21:30:24-04:00'
describe
'259395' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKWY' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
869a869e6b62223f35fca03a92e395b6
9aff80ec066464d39142b3cf9a122e25582ef61a
'2012-05-27T21:22:22-04:00'
describe
'262191' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKWZ' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
a8d69b4c55e958b484988ab30baaa730
5703d21fb7b96ed7d5e563ca77262d3d6db7019c
'2012-05-27T21:23:33-04:00'
describe
'276085' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKXA' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
daa064d22fb62014791d4ea10551ab4d
45bf53e83ce37cd50e1f5c22c06fbaeba06d6b49
describe
'256177' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKXB' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
bfc55b770d0dafaae0535eab41aa3dd1
6540d7a434110e7c59007614093d31dd5b04c4b7
describe
'240570' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKXC' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
852989bf23108ed761211a5bf65da1fc
fd28adf5ed06c124f49c8832061f8ac83a8d8af1
describe
'247207' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKXD' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
52309f7e96f5e6addee8367f536b5d4d
f8cfd9bb7019ddb47a48f48bf4519570c969aeac
'2012-05-27T21:31:10-04:00'
describe
'249164' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKXE' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
a466b0fa370dd6bd589f1b050fcccfae
fdc8a0e45ddfc5cdfb323fe1dc5bd8af5fc745cf
describe
'265555' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKXF' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
258114c9ac93d5f82f0764f0efa32c03
1ad4a35f406a2375a3d25edf7dfc8c245e9da017
describe
'240240' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKXG' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
b69334e88844ceb62b85b2f3f787af64
ed5c59fee7921a1236f6d28eda86ea76f5d1fbed
'2012-05-27T21:24:14-04:00'
describe
'240831' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKXH' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
5180476a779f001c4cb7304ef3eed0af
273ed21d4b2bd3fb4e18f79a72d8759373c81bbe
describe
'253832' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKXI' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
8a15a2d929f0195f4bbfd13e812aad43
41dcacef958f9ca21b6e4de57b60f0005a4a3f21
describe
'236717' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKXJ' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
5f4ba44b9000b8dde863ee97ef908e97
ab6e5caba6c15a0da79fe1915bf8f7f00570396a
'2012-05-27T21:26:44-04:00'
describe
'246099' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKXK' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
7bee4c2b0b8ddc08858af1591f967745
87d6ebfd5ff7432ad111fa9ffc04541e534e27dd
describe
'253420' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKXL' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
89ec5e48494cc9cfdf4df84b6b70f5ef
25072f40870bba30058e5ffa5b2e1f883cbc7a7b
'2012-05-27T21:24:45-04:00'
describe
'253835' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKXM' 'sip-files00140.jp2'
1294163c5ed4fb7e6fd9785bfd333567
a63f22cdf94f105881b5a26f28d886cd9e5bea39
'2012-05-30T08:53:03-04:00'
describe
'1687539' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKXN' 'sip-files00144.jp2'
38a70a98f0c541123f880a556729267e
3fbeff21a09677519e165c964b0f8649488c6569
describe
'236737' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKXO' 'sip-files00145.jp2'
17b8e5cb40ab3def92e7130181600ce8
3a2ef54bdd225d26e043cc56347a794f320f0dcf
describe
'226993' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKXP' 'sip-files00146.jp2'
c4a1bac2dbbadc57460e8ef565c5b583
c4c9812e0d690fb81a3187689a3ea4723f4b3b94
describe
'214700' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKXQ' 'sip-files00150.jp2'
5db7dd1af64d9a803e82cc0f6d0ce57a
c45149ab3169b4969c217124ddf4c23073f6035e
describe
'243532' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKXR' 'sip-files00151.jp2'
83e36c6fef65a6efe6e3cc4d44437e63
def253f8373d42974f8fc29a0cc5b3a666feb1af
describe
'237247' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKXS' 'sip-files00153.jp2'
4ccc2b7e28fa88a87591d13eca425c70
1e8bdc15876fe3b0e5b6884218971d59a8767072
describe
'245830' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKXT' 'sip-files00154.jp2'
a82fd8e7c5c8a2bac38bf95a881eb01f
ebedc01cc88b4b177dc76cb645192b568cda8f66
describe
'256149' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKXU' 'sip-files00156.jp2'
dfa6cb92a16cd1595d45ffef6db9b01c
cf79fb461a7f4efda5cfda317b5d2bc43656e36c
'2012-05-27T21:24:53-04:00'
describe
'219415' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKXV' 'sip-files00157.jp2'
9b6664e74e1b3f5bb3959a8f7d220a57
eba98a458fe0905ed80288ff4e728e06b625e21c
describe
'49061' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKXW' 'sip-files00158.jp2'
cf49c7bcbf6086a62328a0b60d50ac5c
ba5dde288fef8c8b7be57b1f1204d1e666daf2f1
describe
'1650567' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKXX' 'sip-files00160.jp2'
d4c670097b5bf45463b7910dc51748d8
93ac4050da1121d2a4509c178ec0a427b0410405
describe
'267086' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKXY' 'sip-files00162.jp2'
809ad03279189f6d8cb90be23f8d0b12
4aebd5f9626c1858ae33373e89938b64bf4b0c11
describe
'260162' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKXZ' 'sip-files00164.jp2'
8d6e4558d9f5b781e1ce2463323efacf
b68436e60e1b8ab844b7ab9b5c22fb94433e3796
describe
'1687586' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKYA' 'sip-files00165.jp2'
e18012fb9ef0991e604696228a245618
af44a0b85479dae504a76aa513946a3158caffc1
describe
'241657' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKYB' 'sip-files00167.jp2'
9498481ad3e25e80ef09d8760f109055
6b207f98065ebc51c9928a683eb52af13361cf8e
'2012-05-27T21:27:54-04:00'
describe
'257377' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKYC' 'sip-files00170.jp2'
79ae817bb1b01b06e35994f3d571de03
2120c3931017018ad548974620e4dad7542e0d48
describe
'247346' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKYD' 'sip-files00171.jp2'
2dcfcc16544351a12d679e2c62f3acc0
b321f653907d47c4a7b5aa0f97f089ce39049d71
'2012-05-27T21:23:16-04:00'
describe
'251931' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKYE' 'sip-files00172.jp2'
23f44a04b767ab6d66e1b61a50e24b7e
0408c26b4b7f72696e63c497278d5bb3fa9f5960
describe
'268694' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKYF' 'sip-files00174.jp2'
9c87989541a43f2ee266ebfc23105fbf
c667f964aac065043a01e09c9d6b552ad101f4fe
describe
'331594' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKYG' 'sip-files00176.jp2'
bf77e46d560e637de3e71fcf2b9a4185
5ea0a53831fa631bd862b50273bdc2d5f9bbaf40
describe
'258657' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKYH' 'sip-files00178.jp2'
040672ba9e3020e4b9a88d5ab784af70
8a2f05e9e5ef2f8b8db29214238378443dceeb63
describe
'262100' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKYI' 'sip-files00179.jp2'
6609362368bb07adf819ff6478c2289c
5715d38541fa3be928b5590a836c74d6649d71f4
describe
'267716' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKYJ' 'sip-files00180.jp2'
034eb83f7a849bcd7f891f5c88000cad
62691eb45b99d69c1b570f1c8149512d92e9e4cf
describe
'264849' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKYK' 'sip-files00181.jp2'
4788a48ac1780d7dac859296e99cb9ef
a3dc5b8fe5e4d96c01875d16edd7ca3389e6e529
describe
'270816' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKYL' 'sip-files00182.jp2'
39c877519f4bfd4e1b217d33bcd8fe0b
edfd206cd81775e05ed32009605c51cfdeec5572
describe
'264072' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKYM' 'sip-files00184.jp2'
5c13c0cf2ee8cb57b37a577b750c2044
b5e255c6b549d3f480eab9ffac7ebf24d4dbcf22
describe
'247341' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKYN' 'sip-files00185.jp2'
9b5c56a2814d284c76037a56548560e4
e4f932179eaad68f1940c17a4d079ff0968e7e2a
describe
'257380' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKYO' 'sip-files00186.jp2'
f63ea2148a75851806739741ca85c05d
0df0c680f16fe959669a7c19f21e34e7d7e7a58a
describe
'232754' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKYP' 'sip-files00188.jp2'
d1aec08ad91b3df9c21db08e0ccd452b
1ad742c3c13111a30fe0b81d4f4ae90e738f1d6c
describe
'260308' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKYQ' 'sip-files00190.jp2'
22cee2e93320ff253c8aeb5a5804efb3
7377fd434f5d1ba4cfba9d21faca33feb876e065
describe
'267904' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKYR' 'sip-files00191.jp2'
f5aec199fc2cd6a279bf5db0594da555
b50529df82f077e2d00e9bbc3c75429186bca61c
describe
'1687563' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKYS' 'sip-files00192.jp2'
4a33238be333e101d24b9a45c50a0b46
b09133e318d128a14608f96958f94abe1ddd65b8
describe
'264052' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKYT' 'sip-files00193.jp2'
0c41b402a519e2f157a44aa79aec3428
12f0071b26a0eb5fbb17247b35703eaf571bc817
describe
'223933' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKYU' 'sip-files00195.jp2'
18a3bf20cf0d0cada2780e741b503d3d
04642ccd67f66c0a83c1ea24c726df1ad5221007
describe
'318334' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKYV' 'sip-files00198.jp2'
c547e895381fd01605359415ed654629
488b504b3c7ce3aedafb386089543e903aca5c7c
describe
'266931' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKYW' 'sip-files00199.jp2'
0d883c45fff1382ae2d52e67c646aadf
e9347f81f6c3ca17e1e6badcb8ad7546355d583c
describe
'270150' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKYX' 'sip-files00200.jp2'
4b881884af932bdf19d09c23935cd958
7d6e4b28ded8ab6f793cb6b3e8e7b0d87ce6a22a
describe
'256188' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKYY' 'sip-files00201.jp2'
425477de38706ae5accd99c861d2e05a
9c8759553e06531119316e9d610a8ad5d80d395f
'2012-05-27T21:19:21-04:00'
describe
'264679' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKYZ' 'sip-files00202.jp2'
0200a7c486aa50ef3422c7bc6a9e52e5
302e807a2678df40c19591caa84cfdcc945c3ff9
describe
'255691' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKZA' 'sip-files00204.jp2'
504cba8db8695ee4d3984efe5d09f27d
5e6eae23cb95c64ec385b141993f2a2b34eb0e12
describe
'261958' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKZB' 'sip-files00205.jp2'
47c374a29241a0c652512afd7f86c353
b08d19af25833c13dd822f1b5623eb32632667e5
describe
'378170' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKZC' 'sip-files00206.jp2'
8afe82e0a7ec8518c4a9ec267cb02f73
e4db568c9f453412a865b6538881c09f9f93698b
describe
'256464' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKZD' 'sip-files00208.jp2'
303159ad0094ddc251927a650b4977af
6e336a4661b24dd39f105c543737106c0ccf173e
'2012-05-27T21:21:21-04:00'
describe
'1687576' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKZE' 'sip-files00209.jp2'
95003549a56745341fcbf1499513ec78
4f14a42e677145e39c9a87dd95dc1efb5e23e7e7
describe
'225673' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKZF' 'sip-files00211.jp2'
08265a72dadf1ac5a634eb5d640c1523
d6641e3fe89d0d0842947bf64caee3de0dce5641
describe
'240693' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKZG' 'sip-files00212.jp2'
653ca13d8de480a46b4e8416a96df319
7baf6592c128d633b8ce945dbc2799afe31e4efa
describe
'244546' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKZH' 'sip-files00213.jp2'
91661095b20043594b669b0be93d07f3
65727d2966ac78621c3707c425bee9df106993aa
'2012-05-27T21:19:34-04:00'
describe
'245962' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKZI' 'sip-files00214.jp2'
05b894b2ab59ed2db9e50b891789aaf8
3975dc1d3e54feaf9c4231ddbc49d775671691cc
describe
'215674' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKZJ' 'sip-files00216.jp2'
800560f6bfdd1961e3849ce0a0d67015
ed48c0fddab1a5de5536bd3d99e00061e054cd52
describe
'221372' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKZK' 'sip-files00217.jp2'
8a229e089c450ac3b01b03eb3fee4fdf
e26dca3e25b84b030de40b0d4d0c77df1a931eee
describe
'233644' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKZL' 'sip-files00218.jp2'
d737ae96eae9c52e75ae192c25ce1c1c
70f6bdceaeeca79435a29e5e8540f456bd301f13
describe
'243497' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKZM' 'sip-files00219.jp2'
949809283888c3b9e9206d013ac9b984
9ba1f7321de270d5241e92d576f8e5567fe17d09
'2012-05-27T21:27:18-04:00'
describe
'232957' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKZN' 'sip-files00223.jp2'
fa311f13976b8f6e24f72f7b27bf725e
cb60405f3d0ae1d0cbd8a239257320bbbcd7c83b
describe
'248560' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKZO' 'sip-files00224.jp2'
c881181e14b71ee41b6eb41d812fe697
27ca770680294cec0a985327672332922f681f52
describe
'245079' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKZP' 'sip-files00227.jp2'
f6a23a7be55b2cf69e13bfbcc8152ab3
90ccbc83985b8fc1ceb63cde99353a68614f014e
describe
'246330' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKZQ' 'sip-files00229.jp2'
bf379d1642a1d64466b91a3d046cbd13
fd65c4f1097c554115b915323143c291140ad9d1
'2012-05-27T21:31:07-04:00'
describe
'248683' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKZR' 'sip-files00230.jp2'
83645098b1de850684164dd61a5fc583
2d92b03958fb55b764c273ac33285092260304e5
describe
'241556' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKZS' 'sip-files00231.jp2'
0775366c68ad7bc91b7cd5a9f1b55fa0
5917a7168ac0a84390f73dac552813174bd7f71f
describe
'223993' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKZT' 'sip-files00233.jp2'
8681e6c4ced99b225eed6fdc3cb71b3c
cb6d360ca2030f8c8b4daae76b652f1bf1ecfa48
describe
'216523' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKZU' 'sip-files00234.jp2'
adde6bb0702e32c6230bff98a88cadf1
d4c42c44152c951aef3d7fd4e2091f0f6a7fa6d8
describe
'229195' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKZV' 'sip-files00235.jp2'
379662f033d47c27480df904dda84083
d32bdc838cd4bd2a29314079d8cf3928e512dd83
describe
'246285' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKZW' 'sip-files00236.jp2'
4b99f1734e600802c97f4dd6821fa21c
98c214aa1529c115860818cf1d92714368f78d8b
describe
'256774' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKZX' 'sip-files00237.jp2'
1de872e3b68897e5dc37805f278d6a3f
936355a8f1c5bc794c09b6090c4c60d36c5ddf9b
describe
'1687598' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKZY' 'sip-files00240.jp2'
2e764d2cb0a12c4a1f9fb16f45bec02a
11fdef81a9ade29c7d79a1391eca220756e6ace1
'2012-05-27T21:22:34-04:00'
describe
'240369' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAKZZ' 'sip-files00243.jp2'
d86b32b5b669f5dc8fbeabe237ea5aa1
730752b8830f035cf7dcdd33e8dc461f7139a268
describe
'247236' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALAA' 'sip-files00244.jp2'
3624f23e699941a2879c0a11b2b594f8
4c956ed57637746daa8f797594494984a2c7ec46
describe
'246531' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALAB' 'sip-files00245.jp2'
e7c81f805d537f1fdfdaf7cb80359437
71646fe549aebd33692076258cdabbe4ef59c72e
describe
'142017' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALAC' 'sip-files00247.jp2'
4552b7a0c89fb6bc1005424a40a619ec
178f9488c79eb42fb6c21b1921f0050e64b865f8
describe
'215151' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALAD' 'sip-files00251.jp2'
387803eea9b55ca14c9842ac2eb1a001
7229106b1974da0605c688e9c7024044eb7caeb8
'2012-05-30T08:53:18-04:00'
describe
'246557' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALAE' 'sip-files00252.jp2'
5a3803805785305369786512cbf7fc61
1f2b0ffa3326ccea48ff1a6b42135ea1337a9020
describe
'246623' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALAF' 'sip-files00253.jp2'
4a3fb24ef0c36ba6dc18fc402291518b
fb82e92035188eb6ac02e12688989554456efd38
describe
'249439' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALAG' 'sip-files00255.jp2'
f9381c79bc22c40a19e108b4024c784a
7abdc110bee3e36c9b19a1edc9f2093830ddfa95
'2012-05-27T21:25:20-04:00'
describe
'230420' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALAH' 'sip-files00256.jp2'
06bf5d636ea552f1c2d2211aa8a04e3b
058d891dea7e7c49d27b080888feb7ab076f77ce
describe
'62798' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALAI' 'sip-files00258.jp2'
5d95486effe8f0ec6552e083290c5b6d
473c2003386711ee4e7201868576a1faf820b7a4
describe
'255803' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALAJ' 'sip-files00260.jp2'
25ad3dbb2310d63c0159b847ffff6c88
3bdb4a5d347b42a6bfd23fa71f4b2cd57bd2bd9f
describe
'269107' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALAK' 'sip-files00262.jp2'
20365b9020f5050ea7971744023399a1
c4777890e56dd7a78474c2dcb7318e9a73dbc32a
describe
'358756' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALAL' 'sip-files00265.jp2'
beebd6c9862a432cd5553a4b95a596b5
99d78b8e3688c7e32b1fb4fb9b3e3d4a366650f0
describe
'224175' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALAM' 'sip-files00266.jp2'
31b1c2b856718b34abe03ee58e699d73
649ce1818303e15bc9e155328ddebbf48a079955
'2012-05-27T21:24:40-04:00'
describe
'276936' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALAN' 'sip-files00267.jp2'
7ce68403827650ff6c2c344f7065e4a6
7e414cc82a76f4a536122a7371bf341f7745f515
'2012-05-27T21:24:54-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALAO' 'sip-files00268.jp2'
2cd5c103b0bf492b644c19e9f848dfab
9217aba43399f02911711c847210c8b4621dc092
'2012-05-30T08:52:47-04:00'
describe
'259124' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALAP' 'sip-files00269.jp2'
2aca888738aa3b741a11e28d92a9f7c2
4d5555b34902dd028c428d47452f8c0502231a26
describe
'262810' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALAQ' 'sip-files00271.jp2'
5f6593d7b7c0c62c71d95e4ea0d33518
b4d362f10d7c4c85aa0ca2522bc7a1ad80fae123
describe
'269235' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALAR' 'sip-files00273.jp2'
aa6d2f0b08f21a340e36822c9a89827e
71dd9034ed6976f85f613bbe2e5d0a972d547565
describe
'266362' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALAS' 'sip-files00274.jp2'
23338d0240186d2f1eb8217b494cba51
1e70f5832c63e3dc307324465c1b27f2791aae9c
describe
'273743' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALAT' 'sip-files00275.jp2'
82bb4220ec212f313f234329592912a3
67db9b36648b6096b6b9b50b24d720c6795b4412
'2012-05-29T18:29:30-04:00'
describe
'235727' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALAU' 'sip-files00278.jp2'
dc1458d2650e5ce4abc56d0882d11c29
fd4fb387b83017e98d5d2b4d9cf83c407a13840c
describe
'265176' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALAV' 'sip-files00280.jp2'
b18da47cba1a5643bc0ea64d80797c7e
371fede4473a8ba389d4c0c0821c0dc69268be39
describe
'370379' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALAW' 'sip-files00281.jp2'
3f73e6b7f554a0438acebf72369760e1
e99b9d986e2bd6fb6afb4b03a61d87cb62ae0e31
describe
'244561' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALAX' 'sip-files00283.jp2'
a24b382dcf3041074df457f1de57a396
80386f878716fc529cf671af152496ce5efde872
'2012-05-27T21:31:53-04:00'
describe
'261866' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALAY' 'sip-files00285.jp2'
040ec3eee374ad605855cffe2daf9cab
89e892473f6ef3e3aaeaa08e569609144f10383a
describe
'213867' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALAZ' 'sip-files00286.jp2'
eb78bc6898b7b2847a75872f92351ed7
b0be34da1c380fb7efbd717ab067ea94612ab196
describe
'267313' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALBA' 'sip-files00287.jp2'
c9211296d1fc64c4fab499531b854035
6c20702f7882ac3d2b813bb4161badfec1a70c92
describe
'265854' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALBB' 'sip-files00289.jp2'
306f0dad06c3d8df1ded86119c66f517
b136e51f5d42c894a6e0c1da444fb6906e0f4a8a
'2012-05-27T21:26:52-04:00'
describe
'183598' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALBC' 'sip-files00290.jp2'
771aa9f4c62c31dcca1474368cf168aa
d53ffa07cb4119e31bc37437dfce343453c9798e
describe
'237328' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALBD' 'sip-files00291.jp2'
386daaff51260550194984ce37e28597
1bcf04a3b9bccb5f82c5ba26099d60156993a0b6
describe
'270549' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALBE' 'sip-files00293.jp2'
e6ddb9393947716f0ff19a806eca66ce
a4be1de94b22218e799cab09333160b8f9c30c1d
describe
'266852' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALBF' 'sip-files00294.jp2'
861f8dc1afc4f7b9fb8b82680a04859b
21f7590d7373ad6b1762bdc498aa60604bcdaf30
'2012-05-27T21:28:03-04:00'
describe
'452410' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALBG' 'sip-files00296.jp2'
6b1e097dedbe2cf99cfb489f16a578a1
5d4a443b3062e928fb82c59bf46263deb7c2ee25
describe
'262954' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALBH' 'sip-files00298.jp2'
57a4971978a44a19d485ca3082dcece1
0ea9b955371b46d349a5d0b963c1398675a44bc7
describe
'268701' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALBI' 'sip-files00299.jp2'
278797eafbd4aae4f709a39e69276758
6f371be6d132f33e36b301db8ae7ac8dd17fa12b
'2012-05-27T21:23:47-04:00'
describe
'262466' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALBJ' 'sip-files00300.jp2'
aad9f7a340d8a0c2e7cc1171d86f217d
2bad420ac6cbfcccf5fc1bcd1f4c8d724b7042ef
describe
'252438' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALBK' 'sip-files00302.jp2'
fc0cb5403b8a8f49888dc652a70ea9b4
840e28bd80b06212521846b9f99baf6a2bcb2e98
describe
'253821' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALBL' 'sip-files00304.jp2'
861cead5a14906ec026def50984d727e
778d502f1849e22b591daf011e03aa57d4580ede
'2012-05-27T21:21:01-04:00'
describe
'120974' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALBM' 'sip-files00305.jp2'
954b2a5c573b78d82e9df17ce3136330
25d0eaa20315edf10b368d5352a1001678099a8e
describe
'248389' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALBN' 'sip-files00307.jp2'
e0f4785f6de2edc565b38e46a886d445
44e819b0edab1c6d4c704eb8d716a7125e5de5ba
describe
'308967' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALBO' 'sip-files00308.jp2'
1a34357286b4034d200ca46ce4a8beac
4cada74ec46a9ba220b575f836debb8ea42f26e9
describe
'209468' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALBP' 'sip-files00309.jp2'
0af8ee1d7fecf72cdeb0206f07f2e424
4f4c138fa96cb80f0327c613a1d86bc516d868b3
describe
'380905' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALBQ' 'sip-files00311.jp2'
069a9213290c33e861aed28cfff63e38
0f84726dc43d18f031cb61eb688c878279c4380a
'2012-05-27T21:30:29-04:00'
describe
'308530' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALBR' 'sip-files00314.jp2'
2f6b14a81a14cf176667ea82204542de
cd0e52d59fc2f1d27feeac77fd526656024f181e
describe
'324996' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALBS' 'sip-files00315.jp2'
6b8dc9160d9ba7387c802ad3030c16bd
30972497aa38a420a8c87844a0ffe333ea6df923
'2012-05-30T08:52:52-04:00'
describe
'1687597' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALBT' 'sip-files00317.jp2'
bd7bf97669104dfa0bd2f27f52bf74cc
2af5cd9504422c8f8d58050f113ab47500fff31c
describe
'235995' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALBU' 'sip-files00318.jp2'
41b3b311bb2f598d7c949d8745acba9e
cdbc1cab7fa6567c9873344c7bdc748cbe34c28b
describe
'1687575' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALBV' 'sip-files00319.jp2'
ec070ab9f1be80df14f0b1304d1c71c9
3bbb9695538d1b72490f881ca243cc68f1c21ea7
describe
'1687422' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALBW' 'sip-files00321.jp2'
eb4bd8b6cfacdd04266b834b658613e1
dfd357c0723e4192546663e60b8fe140f4a79427
'2012-05-27T21:27:58-04:00'
describe
'319106' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALBX' 'sip-files00322.jp2'
5e178fa559845ba54c910057d1b1874b
3238000ac43634dcc8fa6e6316728967557e656b
describe
'356499' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALBY' 'sip-files00323.jp2'
bfac9b147f7f01e810577c0128bc95eb
8a6ca078b6d1b114a836966ded47025b11ebdd7e
describe
'368072' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALBZ' 'sip-files00324.jp2'
417f4856abb565976a2c0ffe3336c592
af01522c02c9c06ea94d35b89ecb5a2150c101e7
describe
'1687569' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALCA' 'sip-files00325.jp2'
30393dc53028803983b24a77937862be
144f31768c34d3a8200b88ff002ca8f9396a2c36
describe
'358195' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALCB' 'sip-files00326.jp2'
75455820f24c3184b8e719d074ff22c7
633a1f73fd61f0df4b76bee9dfa005fc9999cf36
describe
'369394' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALCC' 'sip-files00327.jp2'
f078d40fd5045a3014b3cff0c7045c72
3697718bf5fb27d0b8ed6ad6e711e75642aad02f
describe
'349665' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALCD' 'sip-files00328.jp2'
97e3287e8ecfc76721fbf1a28876d365
ea7218240b4a896e6e9b4309ef09f594ba238f4a
describe
'288005' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALCE' 'sip-files00330.jp2'
fbe334bbca9d068bbe543fb5d58d2c45
a1ecc88f6678660da33f477e6ebb1f752ec4e697
describe
'1687609' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALCF' 'sip-files00335.jp2'
9310abfeb95552e461302363298db7e9
b89bcaf7378eaae00d4decae9bb2ee7205dcb773
describe
'255456' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALCG' 'sip-files00336.jp2'
2fae040d5e40ffe5dbf81e4daa90b945
cdb02cbdd08e7273d74a52ba9fccc870fb057fe7
'2012-05-27T21:31:58-04:00'
describe
'1687601' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALCH' 'sip-files00337.jp2'
b20cb7af2c884e08201c10f161073879
efc4e67d1b2df1328812e9b553c1b7020b8b76df
'2012-05-27T21:23:12-04:00'
describe
'328295' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALCI' 'sip-files00338.jp2'
c985f96d56b44541141382b6b6ded71e
941924c3db335f65e47aad093e6a7cfe73c4022c
describe
'234678' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALCJ' 'sip-files00340.jp2'
40de220a242158f87b240ee8fc9f4e31
8071fcf119c6ce2822afe107c2d05af4562c4553
describe
'42104' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALCK' 'sip-files00341.jp2'
72445f10d43e4d6a4c922b2bc11d29c3
38dce160486db5876da1712386ba3a72194272db
'2012-05-27T21:23:07-04:00'
describe
'1687588' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALCL' 'sip-files00342.jp2'
b1072c8ab2569b51f16af7ebb1dd59e0
4d76ad2f7902ba485b2225f31c0513e92e3ef80e
'2012-05-27T21:21:46-04:00'
describe
'1395901' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALCM' 'sip-files00343.jp2'
d50230c70f5808eae0bc7a7e16e7bc17
f6ce43f10a1161ca70269374b538a2058379435b
describe
'1229432' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALCN' 'sip-files00344.jp2'
4755ff6b7c8d92cdcb4ca7869f1c6cb0
834eec4dbcece693e3286cec296c498f0029ddc7
describe
'30607924' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALCO' 'sip-files00001.tif'
386271faeb7cc5b41487de99c2b5a611
58c1fc76d5fa04fc0b89b6beb69e9765d29fdd0a
'2012-05-27T21:30:54-04:00'
describe
'1698664' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALCP' 'sip-files00003.tif'
1e4cd49cc4c6a07a57821509ab4a9ca8
9b0a2bead2a8b3e6cfccff1bce09f0e53613649e
'2012-05-27T21:21:19-04:00'
describe
'1696016' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALCQ' 'sip-files00006.tif'
5d3201a0c457212b332e6a065fde2ae2
e78e4743ff97d2d80ff7a2d91c3d5efcc653c9ae
'2012-05-30T08:52:53-04:00'
describe
'1698988' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALCR' 'sip-files00007.tif'
ec7f9f8c7229967816412a56dc4315e2
6ddc69fc2315f0d4c65fba00174b02dde7c829c2
describe
'1702940' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALCS' 'sip-files00009.tif'
f2b7a1f622364d42071ce1569293874d
a9a9ec2aa90acac67e7830657047097e7449e1f1
describe
'1705160' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALCT' 'sip-files00012.tif'
dd4682865914fa064401e6c1b554cf2c
82e539f80fb16359a97d905389b1b6a41b5f8711
describe
'1704036' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALCU' 'sip-files00013.tif'
0cb82764430643ca7e22f542c7789f50
1fbf03f6f176929fdb526bd945dba7dcfbbd4da1
describe
'13513088' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALCV' 'sip-files00016.tif'
b2785e7d7e2e99b5290574893c17e7e3
e379ad2729b88d030f03735af75f2730f28d1fcf
'2012-05-27T21:21:38-04:00'
describe
'1704792' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALCW' 'sip-files00017.tif'
8aa49be96b9ef67cbbd569dccc4730be
16b59045cd9a29f1fa1cf1c2ef30cd29d44e33e5
describe
'1704620' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALCX' 'sip-files00019.tif'
c76bdded0f23552b58e265242543bfd0
649c111e3bf7ad2e8564d3d73b5c1cbab1aa0f2c
'2012-05-27T21:23:35-04:00'
describe
'1704596' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALCY' 'sip-files00021.tif'
4eba79661c908e84e06512edc8b667ac
6a40e86b97a1aecbf2804d76e1bfc0c88a2c0016
describe
'1704664' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALCZ' 'sip-files00022.tif'
559b4f96c8c2af2ee750ee80c21cdf6c
87b0cf6900e32d4eb1fd709788c15fcaf62bc933
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALDA' 'sip-files00024.tif'
30bab38fa475844ae5281f6e456b74e2
a602ba7bcb33c2ded4cdc49b68300d12ec4a3a0c
describe
'1704172' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALDB' 'sip-files00025.tif'
a6ff1adaf05b9cba1f7405583a4a8ca8
f17957cee65f1853440847d1cdfc00ca92526316
describe
'1704308' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALDC' 'sip-files00029.tif'
0f2b6fa46841b84643458854c3853123
b7fb665d776262f46238512b4a549b55312387e4
describe
'1705072' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALDD' 'sip-files00032.tif'
995fe44855b7869ec57fb61c3c91baea
658843d84f7b9d32e0c5c15dfc84263c96ff1e29
'2012-05-27T21:23:49-04:00'
describe
'1704168' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALDE' 'sip-files00033.tif'
0838c959e40ad09f3bf9425ec926f43f
05376bac8a2ffcde84a37af9662fa1957d61c6e7
describe
'1704568' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALDF' 'sip-files00034.tif'
0797f81cbbce8bc4d44e03817bf0c8e4
8f3382585a9d6def5d359f6a0e2565f10cdd48c0
'2012-05-30T08:53:09-04:00'
describe
'1704360' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALDG' 'sip-files00035.tif'
56df478dfd908499a26749a700a8707c
ab552a79763670a07540146a4254c004874e7cfb
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALDH' 'sip-files00036.tif'
2504f9fa8bf50ab27f25ba9e3442bbf8
9a28609d83efe5322212e82e0b98b2bb3954f8a4
'2012-05-27T21:18:51-04:00'
describe
'1704196' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALDI' 'sip-files00041.tif'
73ff1959955355555e3c92d631b68b30
4c52d0495482c622170bcee9a9b801340c8aa552
'2012-05-27T21:26:19-04:00'
describe
'13513016' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALDJ' 'sip-files00044.tif'
f07654fd94330e0e1b11404d122296c7
d76b6abb553dbe3af2176bf8acfead5c198c477c
'2012-05-27T21:26:13-04:00'
describe
'1704636' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALDK' 'sip-files00045.tif'
b05bb0d48934e0312f51d76bc35e7467
1b1e8ef921c5dd61cb806d3c6f5e9fa8abd1f71c
'2012-05-27T21:23:52-04:00'
describe
'1703252' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALDL' 'sip-files00047.tif'
0199ed19020d3aba675db6a684b8c98e
4cd366184bae8f26e9b1a0469b6c9c8c84b6ba79
'2012-05-27T21:20:51-04:00'
describe
'1705040' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALDM' 'sip-files00048.tif'
9508a11e66ee8c4386806de8f1a1652a
ebfefed60dd8663909f9e63731d90deab5a0debf
describe
'1703788' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALDN' 'sip-files00049.tif'
aeb6fc01726ba6c7bc567abba71a0ed7
3040e46d1e7ce2ce0dd01ea8fe0dffebbfd0a567
'2012-05-27T21:26:04-04:00'
describe
'1704572' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALDO' 'sip-files00050.tif'
eeecaaac2c43841c1c51f1b4b74690b3
b3cb0ccd3ac587696d562b2e211102e24d857069
describe
'1704020' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALDP' 'sip-files00051.tif'
4a9931356327ffdfd429a2c3e075e43c
36fe81c804584d07e0a118c7ba2f431c672116fd
'2012-05-27T21:30:37-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALDQ' 'sip-files00052.tif'
3079d1f7fa5c10a2d18ad431dcf68e56
194e526ed63568f536377909db543d906031c8cb
describe
'1703524' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALDR' 'sip-files00055.tif'
e247cd61d560b5fc910db51d339b44f2
bd03ccd0fb1ca560e103039b16bddac56d7607fa
describe
'1703996' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALDS' 'sip-files00057.tif'
e8474b60271ace1bde443c780a330ebc
ab11e1a427452357635871379b9b03192e351b40
describe
'1705248' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALDT' 'sip-files00058.tif'
1ae2d1883125e95647f6710ad62be9b0
db2f7ca038d84d9e4f7a116a15ffa40d26124f81
'2012-05-27T21:23:09-04:00'
describe
'1704356' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALDU' 'sip-files00060.tif'
919f68321a069f943dc7fc510be65def
5cab6e40767083aaf7771ee2eeecee2d443044da
describe
'40203860' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALDV' 'sip-files00062.tif'
d79c18736f33e93a19218d03124e8574
07f4d1c3f32d8dfb57f90f0ecffb645432b31d48
'2012-05-27T21:29:32-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALDW' 'sip-files00066.tif'
8dc048308a1255f928d824158ce5acfd
6942d45487e1b4353ca21560e5021e5b8d8b27c5
describe
'1703264' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALDX' 'sip-files00069.tif'
866452c751a984e7df30e1d4c174a182
90e115651bb28c30a63deaaed0fca898c00c43bc
'2012-05-27T21:23:15-04:00'
describe
'1704136' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALDY' 'sip-files00070.tif'
186b4f9acbe21de9ef9a4b353afc907d
48e3097bb007b40dab2d878950bc636430bf9823
'2012-05-27T21:30:32-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALDZ' 'sip-files00071.tif'
38b480cbbb8dd391363339f9ebd67be2
2442ee40ef9f1f2445d4f7b9072c332a2635b224
describe
'1703800' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALEA' 'sip-files00073.tif'
73186de0f0364808d84dd39483dd7a13
82ef2b93aee072c2de49ae56d94df043f2a21d36
'2012-05-27T21:26:51-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALEB' 'sip-files00074.tif'
f1e1a605df7dc9e9b24c0c42d0086ac7
f7793439b3c3e96b969eb7a8654225f6511d5036
describe
'1705168' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALEC' 'sip-files00075.tif'
ab7c7330d643c05e4d3ebe41388b003d
6912b2f6932ef4938fb8e180a06d9b6a9d1cf8d2
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALED' 'sip-files00076.tif'
c72c1b8f2eadd38a27c8497d3a21af37
1265898e98b70090dc367b1bbe56ba69df62dcf2
describe
'1701184' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALEE' 'sip-files00077.tif'
29594680770d74afac25402f9412fc19
ad6777b5acd709c8dffa60cafd22fdf36dc91a06
describe
'1703932' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALEF' 'sip-files00078.tif'
624aa95ba2b3cb9db112ad2d6ee2d07d
ece61300881e2a7ba425e1682229a228a0b07b75
describe
'1908000' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALEG' 'sip-files00079.tif'
e950cdb74699b2ef5cf3a148eb571d71
a8f432e8828888e64056032c69ecdba4e5e64ab7
describe
'1699352' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALEH' 'sip-files00081.tif'
f2e280f7179df20670a23dc43731c0fd
89cbdca549e20dcd4262030f9b04da6981b08224
describe
'1703612' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALEI' 'sip-files00082.tif'
be56437ab6ae2481940c5a61612babef
f99b0a5c73679dbca4bd05af573a8007a0827e3c
'2012-05-27T21:28:05-04:00'
describe
'13512704' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALEJ' 'sip-files00083.tif'
8cab8a054aad59530dbaeb88deec2001
0f304824ae06cd8ba376e7ff138d4968b41b57e9
'2012-05-27T21:29:22-04:00'
describe
'1705668' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALEK' 'sip-files00084.tif'
be09b579472d5075b3904bcdec3b6a12
787bf0a066c3d48eb23655b4f8d2635dc0b7cfe1
'2012-05-27T21:22:05-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALEL' 'sip-files00085.tif'
bfdf97e6ef0b23fa09e925236a28f65f
ae484742bde92fa5184dd91b50c994c5dc1ab090
'2012-05-27T21:27:57-04:00'
describe
'1704948' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALEM' 'sip-files00086.tif'
c20be9270efcea2a42c56d51631aed1e
3d12cdc5b6fe7dd6c669b227e4f3be57c500f3d0
'2012-05-27T21:20:04-04:00'
describe
'1703096' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALEN' 'sip-files00087.tif'
b3d4f52455094f2e119778992857dabc
b8c530b3fa9fc99f10fb9a8d858af9a0f2621cff
describe
'1697804' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALEO' 'sip-files00089.tif'
3726ea534a410494d1f98463eb7bf282
0ea3a82cee5450bdf3c861354a47674cb112dc80
'2012-05-27T21:27:09-04:00'
describe
'1705912' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALEP' 'sip-files00092.tif'
c3c6b56cdbb9f6c598154e6da9616233
8183fc659d162ba5e0762ea5bc449b5494602667
'2012-05-27T21:24:15-04:00'
describe
'1705816' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALEQ' 'sip-files00096.tif'
5ee013e1989ef67ad3ff8bf7230212a1
ea502797ba3980311ed0f574cee4db884154d614
'2012-05-29T18:28:07-04:00'
describe
'1705716' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALER' 'sip-files00098.tif'
0883a0c1845ffeaeb87b473c60c3e664
b191481d9f425ae96b105effbcab62f3f3c77e9a
describe
'1705000' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALES' 'sip-files00101.tif'
66af1d0cfa6910f7654b9bb25ffdd743
3d8b72c8a286de77b54923aea20308ef71aa02f8
describe
'1704580' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALET' 'sip-files00102.tif'
074c1ce27233a6cdc00c255e0c2d1437
f5196e3825a9f28fe57b7f70b0bc54b4511e203e
describe
'1705812' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALEU' 'sip-files00104.tif'
e7dad36459d3c93b1e7cba86a9d1b3f4
876b50ae89abae8344139d421a79f7e114bcc509
describe
'1704828' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALEV' 'sip-files00105.tif'
c3f84eaf83def9aeba16eefb4fa68b66
0d6d79e3e5acafe136fc006322d278214c1f333d
describe
'1704408' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALEW' 'sip-files00106.tif'
1c1fa17680ce4430ea22d5d0e1ccb0c3
31dd97d3203956da380d8eb2d1d3747959d52d9e
describe
'1701088' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALEX' 'sip-files00107.tif'
5359a3807064e701f2655688094f896b
dc27ff24ac2c02ba8f06a17d4c9133588437e11f
describe
'1704968' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALEY' 'sip-files00108.tif'
f30893580185b68d248b09131e48ce42
ecc327c053cd915975a1e12bb5242c3639929795
describe
'1703408' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALEZ' 'sip-files00110.tif'
0e1bf509d696d6978b189063eae1a3df
c4f414d01901ba4b30e7ca1eae2764571d42f577
describe
'1702828' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALFA' 'sip-files00111.tif'
e891fe923f4c9fc3d09d5a95d32b30d5
ea9564aed9ee4dfa0aa78808fa9edb0f001bc5bf
describe
'1705560' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALFB' 'sip-files00112.tif'
d563c2b21aad29797909d8ccb673ff09
21c594675e58ce8f1ce7cc32e63ce433d86a9384
describe
'1705052' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALFC' 'sip-files00113.tif'
155179318b0326dd63d4b5b1ec6a98f8
1f9db56db8db8a06369ae8dad27b367965865e88
'2012-05-27T21:19:40-04:00'
describe
'1704944' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALFD' 'sip-files00117.tif'
d1051a9532e4d2a95bfc9350bb2d0f41
5cfc82486e519095798609085fd3678987857880
'2012-05-27T21:21:14-04:00'
describe
'1705080' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALFE' 'sip-files00119.tif'
da85cb2bff7430bca81448ddb4e97dbf
fd556e701c7b7aa378cd7eb70dd363772c9ba8bc
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALFF' 'sip-files00120.tif'
2794d974dee78a54361f873c0c4e0eef
a9eec5d0499fce52e1cf7ba5bd1cec879e235a20
describe
'1703920' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALFG' 'sip-files00121.tif'
036a2dc02a003c6778179f47c4c92bd5
afa484fd80aeefe09a5bb54482fa846a81dd75e9
'2012-05-27T21:31:03-04:00'
describe
'1705452' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALFH' 'sip-files00124.tif'
de777649564767cf5e4711cf5db0f3eb
793b09c2dd7ad7c4ccf90d1f7075b3ce0c082164
describe
'1706020' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALFI' 'sip-files00130.tif'
f39f14b4427249213f32b01417591cd0
f6aa9add6eadf73d6d7c79fb836a31e01ddfc0cc
'2012-05-27T21:25:53-04:00'
describe
'1705752' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALFJ' 'sip-files00134.tif'
437efa8a00b671386ff1cb067425aa85
634b6fd2b091cc13556022b1c6934ea6ffc697e3
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALFK' 'sip-files00137.tif'
1c8f76197093af8c9e5a156e4580d4f5
73ea14ad1e3b05ada6a1210b3ecc53d145571a72
'2012-05-27T21:26:06-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALFL' 'sip-files00139.tif'
2fcc8133d955a1977ece5a116e6e7870
fabeb33c20c62f5a3b0df7d9b26f4bd63e801462
describe
'1703872' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALFM' 'sip-files00141.tif'
74d41e22964344be46fb83f7a4e76172
6a7448e6071b7ce6a194ff1d529be9417671d48d
describe
'1705392' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALFN' 'sip-files00142.tif'
0e87e7c29969117dab03c47aaa1b6a32
6b85a8b674ef99cc6126226de8bd19205bc32cd9
describe
'1704872' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALFO' 'sip-files00145.tif'
d7a561dadf48686bf7be094a57b64280
1e17f1ae6423c00fc4926d0d7ad987d90f55a8c1
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALFP' 'sip-files00146.tif'
e736453ae2306e3d2dfde9765da881a0
93df91393149eefac6970692fa3df0d4cb21111b
describe
'1705832' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALFQ' 'sip-files00148.tif'
6b0040b51c8630eeca1deead46138687
c441538c0011a8d49d734311c61a8b94cc001417
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALFR' 'sip-files00150.tif'
bbb8e232f34a61a4f99dc425a41b72ab
ec9f6c36ecba7617dc5726cf0da2b01d9e8c69e9
describe
'1704788' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALFS' 'sip-files00151.tif'
4cf286efb02c5fe7490528ceac2c683c
24777d1d22cf8aa1c0d01d0ab44428686b731398
'2012-05-30T08:53:17-04:00'
describe
'1705792' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALFT' 'sip-files00156.tif'
a9f4fd72261b223201bef9e7147f5728
7d076b536d20d7cba292610adb4fa62e0587150d
describe
'1704236' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALFU' 'sip-files00157.tif'
a17cb4d0ff2649f3965861b8383d98b5
1733497673f52ba0f7923cc30095a34d274ef342
describe
'1697752' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALFV' 'sip-files00158.tif'
4054c3f0b54cb4bb17e42c468c99dd1b
e0052343f1886b20de6952faf711b7ed778374dd
describe
'39630320' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALFW' 'sip-files00160.tif'
eb97d1cfddb045086d0306c1ae76cad6
511ce4a9300a6ef1c8609f8049534baafeb181b7
describe
'1705768' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALFX' 'sip-files00162.tif'
e9baf1c832f3392fea7bf39b1a23cb01
41b532e8e1babe8ea8d1e5db3a8855ce7e3578c8
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALFY' 'sip-files00164.tif'
ce9ed448ffebe2b606e91a406cbbf9ae
22a02c015afb4910557e212c9f7c03997b8c43e7
describe
'13513132' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALFZ' 'sip-files00165.tif'
d2b58297d2a35d4573aacf81f61c3c12
4466380607bd57b7771e20074508f4c9198f2cb2
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALGA' 'sip-files00166.tif'
b2cd433c26cb68ec4d4040b92743a0da
9ecf348bf8aad8236092b5f8b0c031506b1f24f3
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALGB' 'sip-files00167.tif'
e1492954fc15205debb22750cd6433df
bcd97960450523501e789b40af2fbef6a8a9cc57
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALGC' 'sip-files00170.tif'
40c4ccac175359cc191a81e1bea3d666
cbff6f5e885500fe9e030aa400fa709c32f8c387
describe
'1705032' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALGD' 'sip-files00171.tif'
4ba0e5e3e82676c67c98ee6f99dba9f8
28242ad7d3222169ec25e81521a44e34181c0576
describe
'1705108' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALGE' 'sip-files00173.tif'
54ec8ef65acff3d6ddfc8c001af79280
25917d7b2d0fe1046c4c1132a56aeab656bc1174
describe
'1705772' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALGF' 'sip-files00174.tif'
090f6a85e23f5acdb1b7eb2f7b8d5cca
54a25e12ed4591405d3180652e09e556e4235f95
'2012-05-27T21:21:35-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALGG' 'sip-files00175.tif'
3c9d5cfa4af332bfd90c6946b13952ff
ecc3fa2a758e40d1efce790cfd788799a4af07ee
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALGH' 'sip-files00181.tif'
b4b5e01b6f8ae8303bae1ccdbb4b6b3b
1802e739da88c007a87d182913bcea42cb2c7f5b
'2012-05-27T21:22:31-04:00'
describe
'1705916' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALGI' 'sip-files00182.tif'
eb072ca20ea4c47f0c7e448ec376860a
3d1010a066f1a81cd9b6f1228f11af71143e4cb7
describe
'1705324' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALGJ' 'sip-files00183.tif'
404d0cbf106fde2a7bcfe5a1c5cd3c13
1134b2d2d41d8b578a86e9e67a03881b994a7b47
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALGK' 'sip-files00185.tif'
e5bebb61d1bf05f2597e18555b03b632
ffdbcc2e732850826902fd85011d1da9d7c9eaa7
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALGL' 'sip-files00186.tif'
296efb7a71d0117e8d7d76600bae5592
dabab2fdfadc33f37df2313d50a3359291e509d0
describe
'1699052' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALGM' 'sip-files00187.tif'
47b745bf20e0c28f767e9cdc192fef20
0b7b95ca185ea445074ff6d08631407cf60dabc8
describe
'1704740' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALGN' 'sip-files00188.tif'
26330e7569c5d25c49044b8ee5f6284a
058c3f9a603f9b9dd08a6850cc83c3a8241353b7
'2012-05-27T21:18:47-04:00'
describe
'1705152' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALGO' 'sip-files00189.tif'
4559b4b106091a7bce36d887434d58fb
a6e926cddf4f0c32b9b62253599b21e15a745cfd
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALGP' 'sip-files00196.tif'
a53abf32b380bfcc178d51ff16d71732
3c166cf871bcf79cf4ded1ce933380db47176a78
'2012-05-27T21:27:40-04:00'
describe
'1705140' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALGQ' 'sip-files00197.tif'
c3130078e574328cf5ffcca2b6b91fa7
968fa86834be666608759d3b7c567b3d2e1ff1da
'2012-05-27T21:25:07-04:00'
describe
'1704956' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALGR' 'sip-files00199.tif'
5bda5f292a1dd18bd732632566e8ebde
53eb2bc8daab60b91fe2a9688504c4c90e8ac1e5
'2012-05-27T21:30:46-04:00'
describe
'1704116' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALGS' 'sip-files00203.tif'
2a05969c5752c604150520b3a808c6df
0bf9229faae22863e4bc02d9f6779a7cdfdc5b47
'2012-05-27T21:29:59-04:00'
describe
'1705408' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALGT' 'sip-files00208.tif'
a58f35e32b318f3ca191c72129205d36
5a9ca30de7aabdfb0797f1b52b7de2213c403356
describe
'1704532' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALGU' 'sip-files00211.tif'
e61b3658e37aa4cd990f0415aff2eb1a
e8ee7f418fefed71978d06069f46f11b7304be6e
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALGV' 'sip-files00215.tif'
b4cde4d1bf9476d4015ec2ce46bedfb8
f6ecbee69af1c592cfeb6bc7c9d3ab3c2498b795
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALGW' 'sip-files00218.tif'
b79ef5dbd383d106fa94b3249677d9b1
586761e8cf6d7f17965f3c9eb26a0e5bcbcb00dd
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALGX' 'sip-files00220.tif'
90c39d863535524885e100803205c982
d20e8c1a7abe7357603eb81ddefa03d5c923b579
'2012-05-27T21:32:13-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALGY' 'sip-files00224.tif'
bf7343287871bc0da4288961f3765d6b
4d09316f3edcf2a0b43d111c77c9627413f01efd
describe
'1705384' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALGZ' 'sip-files00226.tif'
c465a14088460ae03a7e18b7b2ab8788
7bfbc0db8823e8df314553bdf065b3e9b21a07d2
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALHA' 'sip-files00227.tif'
76b91cbfd1d0f20c0e4e40730e3e9faa
5f5dcd623e535dbfeeaffad4e5ea6a9754f0e199
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALHB' 'sip-files00230.tif'
ab9c084e6936348ea494bc443ad91868
14784348a3c856e641b0e86fdef36a602be571c0
describe
'1704920' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALHC' 'sip-files00231.tif'
3ae12899ac4706be94f0dc43b8f002c5
07c2f94e3037b71d699348de553203d470e32121
'2012-05-27T21:24:51-04:00'
describe
'1704940' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALHD' 'sip-files00232.tif'
45f6ef9897e9f1893c6acd729efc31ae
2758f8246f0bfddc1543f1a3c21a838b01823ce3
describe
'1704936' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALHE' 'sip-files00234.tif'
17b2d087c32ef0a37a25db15c8cfcb35
8b05dc0b2d2069ea845765d51c59adfe8c10fc9c
describe
'1704516' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALHF' 'sip-files00235.tif'
a683ea609b31650844cccda576222a63
63fa2b2686cfc1dcbf31fd40180b624ba3c5fd5d
describe
'1704624' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALHG' 'sip-files00237.tif'
7a54e52b0ece0d66b4dc418fa6d7af3e
a5287e02fecf992adf4d49d4beb1214a4fd2977d
'2012-05-27T21:25:42-04:00'
describe
'13513416' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALHH' 'sip-files00240.tif'
f097159f3198500781e5cd5ee64609ef
27f1032b3499b4cd5e87ff68f631af5d1d097258
'2012-05-27T21:23:22-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALHI' 'sip-files00241.tif'
334abce61a5b4cb4013639785652642d
1b08dae3c1e46a43a7e488e17d554db8fcf35415
describe
'1705472' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALHJ' 'sip-files00242.tif'
8a39f7a33c7a20e3983ba38e50115f51
6955b0c7843e584f629e1052bbac70b1d2ad3bcd
describe
'1705564' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALHK' 'sip-files00249.tif'
0d89c945f210f1757ba7192111cccc01
6ec55cc7b80db72bd88f0326c1baae70a30ac779
'2012-05-27T21:29:44-04:00'
describe
'1705648' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALHL' 'sip-files00254.tif'
50abb40ea16691b4271edbc6d12176e6
ba922e192bcccd92d09d9a12e4e570b13a98d51a
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALHM' 'sip-files00255.tif'
f94055ef4adb777319bb404db595876d
aeeaa1950fcef81b6aec82d1207b89451682d182
describe
'1705580' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALHN' 'sip-files00256.tif'
c06f8b5e6b4edb1c3875f7fb45f9820c
dc53d7746cceba80dd64bdd8a67d48c52b1633da
describe
'1705044' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALHO' 'sip-files00257.tif'
864a9bba74111b02e347a9543b0400f6
1bed17617eb0ba52446767439c8ed3193540c176
'2012-05-27T21:31:39-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALHP' 'sip-files00261.tif'
18ffcc3db16622212b981c74f725645a
324001ec1f8436d61264179c10cb248a3a65ccaa
'2012-05-30T08:53:02-04:00'
describe
'1706076' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALHQ' 'sip-files00263.tif'
083c114bda95637934ae4df7abbfb2db
d796a5188a56a4226dc0f5cc5de648bf027bcf42
'2012-05-27T21:22:27-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALHR' 'sip-files00267.tif'
834636acb7d8261daf2f8400ad1404d7
ff66a0f0d843bc091362f8eaf13f49c382d2d621
describe
'1705208' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALHS' 'sip-files00270.tif'
3bd55540891ea33dbf7e31557e14db51
6c2e86efdff48a72f6ef6eebd5815bcce0a18440
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALHT' 'sip-files00272.tif'
50950fdbc5a583b441b8dce816d53e2f
0c412e2d81a8edf773417f89c6b90e5e57fc19d7
'2012-05-27T21:19:08-04:00'
describe
'1705624' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALHU' 'sip-files00274.tif'
141bc1074f0091cc6bc17bc9586e0443
40fa5824d693b82ac670d8be2aceedc28616c315
describe
'1705848' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALHV' 'sip-files00275.tif'
13e6850b69635f478f60128ae8e2c5bd
c9b7b6dd2119cd3557f7a1c252f6e176b21b1887
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALHW' 'sip-files00276.tif'
bd279a953c5744cb5c7688e654b1120b
3a1b9f302b3340e3e85dd08d6b710c45ed511ce4
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALHX' 'sip-files00278.tif'
c795eae7e5690cc7dfea66a29677e2d4
ffdc8cd33086977920cf2652b15e7f1fbaf311e8
describe
'1706308' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALHY' 'sip-files00279.tif'
f5879e678633dc9d150ba2cd0f0f9082
1f2bf82ef84640984d008bfc67e2a7e7e4ef7fb2
describe
'1705964' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALHZ' 'sip-files00280.tif'
bf5385622663663c7a5d76294adab8f0
7959f57506a6f82ea29a6bd074ce8aa3246ddc55
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALIA' 'sip-files00282.tif'
2766ef8a71365ee4c954c2b8b8810941
b457db861396ae9e403d428be51c25e0a90de205
'2012-05-27T21:31:09-04:00'
describe
'1705576' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALIB' 'sip-files00284.tif'
13d793e50e0860539b9d8ebb5d4f692c
a9cfb9d99546f1e006fa688d600888cf45afb68b
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALIC' 'sip-files00285.tif'
fb9b638267612ef83a8d21a3547a6222
8faae7594efdca61f7d4d434346a61a06564eec2
describe
'1706156' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALID' 'sip-files00287.tif'
54c35b7262e37db3b1c8386facd47c5f
5445559041406e9e368074cac9ff982cdad477c7
describe
'1705788' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALIE' 'sip-files00288.tif'
036292c4b41173f1ce2b434f63305541
ab709babbf3568421857428e3ca13047c10128bb
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALIF' 'sip-files00292.tif'
984cfb54c1cb68e5aaa29577ef2dec61
47dbf8fe30e0945c8eaee30674d9be234a859eaf
describe
'1706224' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALIG' 'sip-files00295.tif'
a17da429eb9dedc709b8009796830b7e
0c14170b5ab8e59394d310d4a288f271f50e8cdd
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALIH' 'sip-files00301.tif'
5e5d3d744bd2748888072392ddb08fce
b51df5125fefea13d154c6ad54853d4b1d643089
'2012-05-27T21:31:17-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALII' 'sip-files00302.tif'
0deec316cd5d57007aa4848170032ec5
1bd990b5f8499760416b488a18f863948428f2b8
describe
'1705928' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALIJ' 'sip-files00303.tif'
58e5637c1c063c9764d8449e78601f36
dade896a36c6d7cc9eb045bcaffa105e62b3148b
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALIK' 'sip-files00304.tif'
d7d93b4a49a1b812e1db573f2d2e17ad
f33698e58930c04aa38de8fe13772fac0532e136
'2012-05-27T21:21:26-04:00'
describe
'1700404' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALIL' 'sip-files00305.tif'
673a119a97aa2ac96bc0ced317aa7955
7ff91c7a315e9fde001bd7e6342c5f605aea5cea
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALIM' 'sip-files00307.tif'
5711d219264465aeafe59310a9e93ce1
8f5011da4279d5fa87b418582ad83c71ee5a1bf1
describe
'1706420' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALIN' 'sip-files00308.tif'
b124c7c216ad54eebec53a9601d4281a
aed14d27140b4ea5b9f0d32eaa01669e73a8b0c4
describe
'1704352' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALIO' 'sip-files00309.tif'
387db93260d428a608fd38c0d830675d
9d9e58ba6a8fc9df39fb8f075cee5ed313673bac
describe
'1706528' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALIP' 'sip-files00312.tif'
0601148d242dc3f23333e1e405bdc7c0
cf8d368e8612bd1da4173a4619f9244bcbd8ce04
'2012-05-27T21:23:10-04:00'
describe
'1706692' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALIQ' 'sip-files00313.tif'
ca911128b76eaf7a94229e9f9bcc72d7
0cb49aa2161277fe00f05fe88f40d59f45a16a1e
describe
'1706456' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALIR' 'sip-files00314.tif'
1e9ea163563efa763dad89eada8b0d71
7fe4a1efac85fb8e16ca801126c51cacbf325d3f
describe
'1705220' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALIS' 'sip-files00318.tif'
9b72f8bd9cac3817348750ce86d8349e
231274efbdaef03bd1892675c128681a619a4877
describe
'1706480' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALIT' 'sip-files00320.tif'
b0373adc09ad956f52fbabbf394028a2
cf1bcce902f4bcf2c76bd655b84de278efc86e04
'2012-05-27T21:30:48-04:00'
describe
'1706016' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALIU' 'sip-files00322.tif'
5dc1aba2925c8f6924d40f13475d2c5a
f38b0c2fc02727888792008d13592a53816e6601
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALIV' 'sip-files00323.tif'
a2097a39bec5579cc4c5e42a5676739a
de0cadfd9f8e093f2a6b0548a89ecb6601e05b05
describe
'1706364' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALIW' 'sip-files00324.tif'
b1dcc726f330c5ec720fa53ba3b072a1
e8bed9074d2bd16fc84bce39edb539042511350c
describe
'13513760' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALIX' 'sip-files00325.tif'
59e95a08c3588147c49ae7bc477fc46f
59039222e251924a4088f6d637a3ab1c3a885789
describe
'1706476' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALIY' 'sip-files00326.tif'
8dd02de1ea9b3afffa7eea3caf82993e
11494ea621737ed8edfc253e34de33b6d564f062
describe
'1706548' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALIZ' 'sip-files00327.tif'
7c7e477c1b7a7cf6db93f021ff687723
ddcc1b1e5da2d4c3952ba08f25d0ae390e243c2f
'2012-05-27T21:19:01-04:00'
describe
'13512132' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALJA' 'sip-files00331.tif'
1240ada4df67fddae0f421ace9612a61
fefff1a92b2305fdb707dd2a2484323c6d4f6f82
'2012-05-27T21:32:05-04:00'
describe
'13514388' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALJB' 'sip-files00333.tif'
8b3a6d614e7f545876dcef70162e4dc3
2aa9c546e4bc786bfdea11f153699afd9f901a29
'2012-05-27T21:32:07-04:00'
describe
'13514352' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALJC' 'sip-files00337.tif'
35480f084af8525cef4035f9d0303d3f
0e8f314e15796b38829d4e89a84bf39fef5de7f5
'2012-05-27T21:31:38-04:00'
describe
'1706504' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALJD' 'sip-files00338.tif'
a52b35ffb8f85f5faaba0ad5571f093f
02ea77caf49afa337e7879060de2980a05a64e7d
describe
'1705504' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALJE' 'sip-files00340.tif'
fb857e065794ba9826566f7838b6a56b
4b1ac733bca7fd725c30d2f93e52f0e5107c9314
describe
'1696736' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALJF' 'sip-files00341.tif'
2dc10fbc7d5824bb548df8973d146c74
53eba86293fb1f94d91448e86c67f0be6cb987f2
describe
'33519448' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALJG' 'sip-files00343.tif'
50eb240a26caeabe223d6bb88cc7c9e7
233ae1842af0a1b325f6486b6e634622fd37af92
'2012-05-27T21:29:51-04:00'
describe
'29517784' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALJH' 'sip-files00344.tif'
ad45c95dfc2c8738150e07ae1ebdae30
8ac15bfd4e38f95a303cc97843225b7bc9982260
'2012-05-27T21:26:59-04:00'
describe
'2455760' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALJI' 'sip-files00345.tif'
b404189dbf9df5a21fb1c79ac046c456
878cb85b37a87f4b80979ed74323733d401ad1c8
'2012-05-27T21:25:55-04:00'
describe
'356390' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALJJ' 'sip-files00002.pro'
c6204a5d48a50371def33398e3bf54dd
301fce7c9a19392e2b7bbf6e1d306735c9c68766
describe
'4394' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALJK' 'sip-files00003.pro'
8bace505a4414aa802d36860868e55a1
93d9b6b02b5abdda95d7f84becd12e69bdf218d8
describe
'4299' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALJL' 'sip-files00004.pro'
5ce2472d55d068121b04a9a48153a8d1
622c70384e2e24b20867b9053a08300dba24bf28
describe
'1850' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALJM' 'sip-files00006.pro'
31ff9f030a282c2b8613167413238eb9
f0d62ef004aae38402af337adde2f55b29322af5
describe
'22187' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALJN' 'sip-files00007.pro'
11523fc42e3f5d64cbadad896e518097
a6f5aefaaf23234475df3565cbc01cd10240977b
'2012-05-27T21:27:22-04:00'
describe
'45774' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALJO' 'sip-files00010.pro'
1d4ab3eb9efe6cb23886e0c699a00ada
48435457d0a9f7388d9fff7c8d36fb836efdaae5
describe
'47700' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALJP' 'sip-files00011.pro'
5b9d78766536ce05eeec30910690801d
9f151318cfe5a859ffe847a76363b2b2b6e5b742
describe
'42649' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALJQ' 'sip-files00013.pro'
9c11549c619c74f7786659b73508c9ed
3c838d7b2ccb68c2db7d6d08b316966bfda34d2a
describe
'43732' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALJR' 'sip-files00014.pro'
e39c42c3b6c0cca45c1c4170212b32b9
23929ea06ef8a5ce82ecd16e8f40f26d61d3469c
describe
'48577' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALJS' 'sip-files00017.pro'
8307810eb943c358eec66085a9960e43
132cbc8d5c9bb5d08fa3b1e7224569a2b16ab5e5
describe
'46420' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALJT' 'sip-files00018.pro'
826611a3e3c44f0bca9717bde6eb184e
d65d9194fdde7c579955a50936fc7b6b925b2f52
describe
'45208' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALJU' 'sip-files00019.pro'
bfbbe634e60d71897ee19f67343b69eb
c94926f7d11e8492e879e0240a6277d626300f91
describe
'40584' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALJV' 'sip-files00022.pro'
b10f0bdb0f5441147e2b24fb8b289a99
ad03089c00e3dbb33876cadc4d05a3270607a992
'2012-05-27T21:27:45-04:00'
describe
'48450' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALJW' 'sip-files00023.pro'
ab9ba9fafcb70cafdb1197fd173ffd8d
8cf78179ccfc079f1c5baf3f54a83bc07d1228cc
describe
'49364' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALJX' 'sip-files00026.pro'
1a3909d8cd9f58e1d82762fbf2970a0c
02aaffaf51b145c479d27e5465fdf69a0cfce9b0
describe
'48885' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALJY' 'sip-files00033.pro'
de1548a60e0c38826a070ae8499f6ae2
ce0fea09e4edc599ab2d20f32c0f579affbc82dd
'2012-05-27T21:27:23-04:00'
describe
'49509' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALJZ' 'sip-files00036.pro'
2e8f565f7a22c0837084e50ba8378653
eb1b0a9651504d6f170bf37ad77010cff571e1c5
describe
'45111' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALKA' 'sip-files00038.pro'
325609a0a8b43b39caee4f4818c04bde
5eb8b488c8cede076d7ded956c18537a2edc76ba
describe
'47118' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALKB' 'sip-files00039.pro'
42aeb0ad21207daa180c6c3d1b55c17b
4d1737c712a0d9e7e11673303038a4ab34b3d6b2
describe
'46439' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALKC' 'sip-files00042.pro'
d558c43e0f482a176850bc0b3ea99c96
f6f5842a0bf8ca849efb60a00855c2a4b10959c3
describe
'2150' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALKD' 'sip-files00044.pro'
1d167e6a6174cc1d87aefee510595557
73b9a8140fba1d4b5e6cdd59b47f0728db3c06d1
describe
'46757' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALKE' 'sip-files00045.pro'
009115d55b2bfcc71b0cf993e1c6ed8b
7b78360cba848c38cbbc272865d65bc18fe65c5e
describe
'47925' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALKF' 'sip-files00046.pro'
e572be4e8004f7a15ffdbdfa49b38168
e8f1c42a4ec5a6be8c09d297185e934a57d8171a
describe
'38766' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALKG' 'sip-files00047.pro'
827995b89bc147ba37afbc54328abde7
1bafaa7a90d994b15631459ab44d7d4e2f829806
describe
'45978' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALKH' 'sip-files00048.pro'
c83251b40bba8ba2ce530a213df107c0
5631eb2bfdfa97420bc45de3bf3a248d336facb9
describe
'47302' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALKI' 'sip-files00049.pro'
42bd4f56d339da559ba5845e11ec9f6c
6be98c66acc85dafaa01d0f0a395b6947b8125a2
describe
'45608' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALKJ' 'sip-files00050.pro'
7da549c01f4b4f793372ffd861e7f167
3217b14cddaf9ff15a2dedd5dc0773daf70e7246
describe
'42327' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALKK' 'sip-files00051.pro'
31179f6c4da218a79dfe5cb454d79270
a85c179c4b166307fc68d220a5d3ffa1162ee389
describe
'44881' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALKL' 'sip-files00052.pro'
a96cdf050e75046cbe5e1f26a9c4a404
7ee13c9c9483ad93502fa715ec3cc54383e50260
describe
'45443' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALKM' 'sip-files00054.pro'
cf3d0ba2b71c184c4e8b4723037af71b
f049a307be1b3f6f1bce8ab10923abe68f4eb4e6
describe
'43779' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALKN' 'sip-files00055.pro'
87b1055355c1ebdb1e156e88bb4128ba
2647d9d4c55c741b45d677699bc5843d501d7394
describe
'40219' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALKO' 'sip-files00056.pro'
30ef9a4de8205602216ecf84fad67bb5
a7cbbc198192163bbe681ddf1d372515dbc24d11
describe
'46293' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALKP' 'sip-files00057.pro'
805f57b657fef26b6a7e12f8a8baa125
23367fd232a1e17e48eda3167b4e054f47dadefe
describe
'46965' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALKQ' 'sip-files00059.pro'
03d65c0c55e5acfc12ab04090213cfeb
0475e6f63ad068de242f62a377e6dfb93ffb3e57
describe
'42886' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALKR' 'sip-files00060.pro'
50fc712da821ea0e0b42b1a745d51db3
57ffa8266a22b30248264a31a99fb78f6e87aee1
describe
'50402' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALKS' 'sip-files00067.pro'
528d119e1dd794a706e0642562d58dd6
79b64d647c6a11fcfeb559d349660488eac90188
describe
'50310' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALKT' 'sip-files00068.pro'
8e1060fbf4f063e456ba1c9d58fada98
bbfa999ffe43f9307557ee600a258654866d229d
describe
'43798' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALKU' 'sip-files00070.pro'
0e8fe1f8ba015a4133222a88098a5d61
f56615af408f47822612ec4c74e557cabb6fc8f9
describe
'20381' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALKV' 'sip-files00072.pro'
1ad4c62afcc4470b3f79a62098856fb1
519ee2b64540417916f7c86e11cad6d07a41aebd
describe
'44343' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALKW' 'sip-files00073.pro'
7b85bf68f994b7189b2a4472e123486e
f2abd01be1e194e1f2773d1da19f551e5d8f3845
describe
'48394' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALKX' 'sip-files00074.pro'
22fd16aad581176edce3f9bf7296ecb8
5c49602004d84e044e8b7784d6f26a9e3908f2b5
describe
'50648' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALKY' 'sip-files00076.pro'
b5f8c4af1507a751d32704790a7956f7
8b5a8d8f80a27ead78b4e93c5859e02b69670073
describe
'29391' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALKZ' 'sip-files00077.pro'
6350b5f8fb352423acf822fdb06e4f68
1dff8e5fb2df7392a238fdccc8c6a01ed8eb47c4
describe
'42088' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALLA' 'sip-files00078.pro'
e15e56da18a13c7c6fa242ff5eb49933
c5be2ce58553019d16af34460d9baf3b896e9518
describe
'47504' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALLB' 'sip-files00080.pro'
c36ab7b9fe9035c3593736415a0f9897
145a1c178515b9e75aa925ba530867bcf3cbcdf8
describe
'18246' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALLC' 'sip-files00081.pro'
44906debeff6c7e481c2e4a42437dcbe
3fcdca13eb37785175803e9dfe4c51a1457af1c7
describe
'40199' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALLD' 'sip-files00082.pro'
390175296b83b7d5ed5561f36694f320
c404382df1637c0358cfa0c5e163e12b9201875b
describe
'39994' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALLE' 'sip-files00087.pro'
dd3b6a0082475003b85e1016a1e71553
f520c4e8ed4a03adf8d82d03785e70f0824d5818
describe
'48813' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALLF' 'sip-files00091.pro'
8645b6505ca6c2c749acdc74f7d4bc36
21e28520360d7d9be72a5c64c40852ed1b8a0356
describe
'49006' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALLG' 'sip-files00092.pro'
cbdf71479335956d27bc3bf648c2ef49
196506fdfb30d6cc56779dc835a08200bc54974f
describe
'45597' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALLH' 'sip-files00093.pro'
03322e40edd1c5cbd1f9ba66801edcc9
bcff5f4446593699feb9e99e2ab3870e65f3f9e3
describe
'41402' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALLI' 'sip-files00094.pro'
eaab5cd29cddd69c9972a1bc9f3fb65b
a2fcd8cfe0f13001af5b68c3cbcce85014105515
describe
'49650' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALLJ' 'sip-files00095.pro'
4df2361868420da7ae8f5759d942653d
29b5c2397aa466d108764d721532a0bc04c86199
describe
'49145' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALLK' 'sip-files00096.pro'
a7dddb4acbc6f1e46f2add811323c1c3
e7def561cd23c37fd53144e1c5fa8d407d3ba401
describe
'49638' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALLL' 'sip-files00097.pro'
809fcc4952e713505f0baf822913e8a6
960c917b7704b918b3ffc1c97708bf83cb6b1f07
describe
'47253' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALLM' 'sip-files00098.pro'
9a4e56687f4a69baedbba1ac11bcbc5e
ccc1d90fbe13a32b46e5419922d8c24028433980
describe
'28435' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALLN' 'sip-files00100.pro'
576fe0263ccd747feaa2face9db470aa
f07884f224ff0ba9e3c6e36908a8e5cf6dc82a97
describe
'45789' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALLO' 'sip-files00101.pro'
754ff41199d9655d9139db566ddc53a3
bf83d7f18d1a621982623d11d17816072835b684
describe
'47064' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALLP' 'sip-files00102.pro'
0c5db19b752614c68972cb8708c03c6f
8d4014e99b941ed100411b9463b026c7f04cb5b5
describe
'41126' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALLQ' 'sip-files00103.pro'
59c7afd0f12bce0f5a900bc7ca7cce1b
524de4f698c7271a0c2add2abd2d4009ded36d90
describe
'44538' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALLR' 'sip-files00104.pro'
2fff7c19b9ac0ebeae329c67c16f92e7
37a4361fdb63ce3ea7dbbf867bb0bbdbb84b011c
describe
'45779' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALLS' 'sip-files00105.pro'
c7eaa0bd4d0ee21656f09c43d1030587
2907ef0e9b2332f16d726b6798d1f94961ce768c
describe
'28649' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALLT' 'sip-files00106.pro'
69fd2f9f44f2dced56b937be58793ae2
0f36edb8b4941893a9d85cd22f42901203b134f5
describe
'48539' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALLU' 'sip-files00109.pro'
6cba48b7291491040c190fe0023c06b6
9e124c74b9d07aa25defbb5711af287e58b79d42
describe
'34918' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALLV' 'sip-files00110.pro'
4fa31eb8b434d6ac6b9a2dcd591ba17b
1cf056be4c40be6c126592d964e5e672ea11f111
describe
'49588' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALLW' 'sip-files00112.pro'
70f227aa8ffd958e7652817bec1305e5
a5207525d18161e7d5d56c18470ca8110ed0fb74
describe
'47289' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALLX' 'sip-files00113.pro'
293e68df2b794ecd4e77ac6e7c0efeb6
f7d29868bd1d5b2a7b07809c9fdf6155b66643d8
describe
'45327' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALLY' 'sip-files00114.pro'
d1ee70c53c1adf810dbf7c50c0e9bd25
350221e90b79b4f34b7d8963ab418227fbba089d
describe
'48836' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALLZ' 'sip-files00119.pro'
8b604895277d3beae1af1f81686fa6e0
5aebb6f4052e2ce96c033e16c75063dbbe3f9475
describe
'44255' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALMA' 'sip-files00120.pro'
df40aaeadcde939cde5855b9ac091783
ddf47e924beb82e3e6a5c9a97637848f3665c0a3
describe
'48596' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALMB' 'sip-files00122.pro'
95436dc39d52852b7d829f89c209b3db
a5a285371cb162439c5cab2d4a188eb14f8e0dee
describe
'47894' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALMC' 'sip-files00123.pro'
3bc37d1b024f71152c33380efef4f189
55db52507513c44680f9bdc969e58d278ffa0aa3
'2012-05-27T21:32:23-04:00'
describe
'42033' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALMD' 'sip-files00128.pro'
5566576bcde01456a51c76918582558f
156fe09ef06b3b7f918e84f5cc6c1c92d0f6a58f
describe
'46169' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALME' 'sip-files00129.pro'
c741ddeecb2c81a663b35a602b71a974
08d3610d2854061f65f1f4f9d839eb02f2ef9d71
describe
'47978' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALMF' 'sip-files00132.pro'
bc04265bb47919577d7ec4154cff6b62
066ac8d0737aee331c0634529b3a8f0dfbc78767
describe
'48889' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALMG' 'sip-files00133.pro'
12b55ed3b1e3d6271c99617f8d672e1d
ac43c55e6d524ff4dee51a26f0540510fde0cecf
describe
'46564' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALMH' 'sip-files00138.pro'
387003663476e3f728b5afb7cfd423d0
79cda12279c8365a432570dbd587aebca93bed12
'2012-05-27T21:20:38-04:00'
describe
'49319' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALMI' 'sip-files00139.pro'
cdfddb72ba2bed0fe8ae03c3fc74f8d3
d3045640c673a9bd1dcbb618d1c2ecf21aeebd5a
describe
'2198' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALMJ' 'sip-files00144.pro'
31222a9ac56e3b0d4312918a93f0cce6
4f7f82ba6a9b483bb13f51953f485173084fcfe4
describe
'45719' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALMK' 'sip-files00145.pro'
f375a4b36d1b55580255c5345ab27d99
8bad867c74071e282cd39911631cf98f44ee0341
describe
'42487' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALML' 'sip-files00146.pro'
24e168fc6f3de186d10fb73ea56b308b
27575fad2e230f7023e6594428a108f1cdd3aa94
describe
'47174' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALMM' 'sip-files00147.pro'
1e15962180bfdd370328bae95ec5214a
894de177e1879b10af791deece3809d622521ac7
describe
'43261' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALMN' 'sip-files00149.pro'
b934ac505959fd648f4bc9fa309464de
62c99874ab2f85c764b4cee38bbaa1bdc97c2b78
describe
'39884' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALMO' 'sip-files00150.pro'
720cc5c05a2906d42328fbe01cebe77d
722d8c92da88bbaf102bff7134f813631ab95e2e
describe
'41992' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALMP' 'sip-files00152.pro'
8c278317041c0cf13acc26e280b5adee
61397d847df121b329003c75b726ad2de2633a3a
describe
'41894' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALMQ' 'sip-files00157.pro'
7d18da8fa4cfc886183c05d9fa402bfc
630a300e33be9d43d1bd2b793a46712c08c7f23e
describe
'5856' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALMR' 'sip-files00158.pro'
bb1dae5ba6127df2a0080bb208370889
0e772ecf9e0bc3aabf353be3c0e3f94b50752f5d
describe
'51178' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALMS' 'sip-files00162.pro'
8c4b96dbd952b0b9bbc4c005eb407397
f899e0dbe0028457f8551c11ae21b1c43d87b4a7
describe
'49700' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALMT' 'sip-files00163.pro'
825f73220d91dbb1256dd0dc2d8f2f05
a123dd49d632fc3801df29967521b8d9c8fa28e5
describe
'48943' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALMU' 'sip-files00166.pro'
42b785998960f24beb2de4d63b1c794e
db6329b8cc8fdff5590487345c267e3feaf04109
describe
'48893' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALMV' 'sip-files00168.pro'
9375692183fa5cd268f6f1a599f8c28c
38a55659c7c75014119dd6615c1809739b8796d6
describe
'48887' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALMW' 'sip-files00169.pro'
d25ba6eebdea20106ebc8576d9cab095
28d5502c7522fbd1b7213a69f57ab92f50272e8a
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALMX' 'sip-files00171.pro'
89f21c944daf6cf414a0e2943dd2b293
23276d35565c26c2622e22859c1d0f5671983c52
describe
'50202' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALMY' 'sip-files00173.pro'
0d838adbb54c6ef69008a2e4b0242e12
a95fed784c34218ef526baeca62f8db15b2e31cf
describe
'50739' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALMZ' 'sip-files00179.pro'
aa65210b7ff08df96f6ee52709ba56e3
dd377d18def3f74f8dd0ee814f45b836cb9936ca
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALNA' 'sip-files00180.pro'
c654f2b08cb517d8f44e9d139b449e03
d875d0a6a1d1758c8c518df4cee65835660dbd8e
'2012-05-27T21:31:30-04:00'
describe
'49730' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALNB' 'sip-files00181.pro'
4e106f49fec5a2850d9607c74d2f3fe7
8114f527a894bb6421720167d9855db8fe5c2c34
describe
'51975' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALNC' 'sip-files00183.pro'
27a2e1314b480381b4573be36b7535df
fe1b9542e8433a683c49880ddda1e3ac20b8630c
describe
'50825' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALND' 'sip-files00184.pro'
a740f79ec471752bebcdcd8e47c02874
7e56c39828f623abacccae6a1ce47c2c57b5364b
describe
'47472' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALNE' 'sip-files00185.pro'
77f0ae97c81816784b4cc188a2752fa3
237f2e047377c14e23d297a2a23f7f70214bfc44
describe
'36290' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALNF' 'sip-files00186.pro'
64326af29014b26c57e75db47e478edd
2b75c5645ff05a3b7434cb1e2734d34752d8a6ea
describe
'43728' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALNG' 'sip-files00188.pro'
f76d493e90e9f75f23e2006808ef8911
5df27e0c3626a770d798784fbf8fbe2b17ff1d56
describe
'52341' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALNH' 'sip-files00191.pro'
b51830f565881034b2d5387ca8b4d5b2
83d9b6f98325139f0624effad8a0102213064040
describe
'4150' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALNI' 'sip-files00192.pro'
c43b971be24e9bbcb2581be0c54952d7
4dcd3854a9b91b522d48a8ee0f3c514147ec026a
describe
'51404' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALNJ' 'sip-files00193.pro'
a6d1accde66b928d8e0f232b084df1e5
3caa11ca24049a49e049d280d7c5f1b8397ae7e6
describe
'49640' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALNK' 'sip-files00194.pro'
a245513ac030a55f017edfd1f024e817
d5901c0b37f3b8f9c1a1bf6dc493cafe6f0cc657
describe
'24586' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALNL' 'sip-files00195.pro'
80d893675ad10ed6c1232334c017eac8
a1e5fdec29566a5df1fd6c05819071bcead18a97
describe
'48856' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALNM' 'sip-files00196.pro'
a64ec545b15f9411eab39bcd7a99aee4
a5081caac3cd89167970ab890070087f02057ff1
describe
'49618' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALNN' 'sip-files00197.pro'
446f3d2c7a4106c27b881021009ec9b7
273e1a70a4c54c59eb8e266dba5f341ee369f451
describe
'34316' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALNO' 'sip-files00203.pro'
40b706a7d5f72b6525d05161e69d9f50
bb4f1f276c2578ae7c594abe382b82e5741f786c
'2012-05-27T21:22:02-04:00'
describe
'50694' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALNP' 'sip-files00205.pro'
5b7516767debbb51410404f3867817b6
71311f2ec7e995710801b352435b69bb6fbf5377
describe
'10759' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALNQ' 'sip-files00206.pro'
a1a8685b68a3490c13ac5a7c4f82e89f
d8c6f996a5cd2abc67ffe38f7349208ef2f94782
describe
'33155' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALNR' 'sip-files00207.pro'
5a8f9d5ff3d27689d3f03c80cfa447ea
bfd84cde93897e73f3fecd8b9ca067235a2e9fd0
'2012-05-30T08:53:12-04:00'
describe
'48661' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALNS' 'sip-files00208.pro'
9e508206eb00f0900abf8bec952aa547
dfe281628ba1a2b748d0e0107ca48898fa7d3d7c
describe
'45456' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALNT' 'sip-files00211.pro'
98119889006c7ac96ca0801c52590648
40af5c94373d35b0b2666c8dd5a32ccca2846c31
describe
'46279' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALNU' 'sip-files00212.pro'
a4f563dc4756c0662da70ddb1f346f86
f8d97b2b6f5ed0e9f2bc0c2c5fc8a4646d162fb1
describe
'48515' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALNV' 'sip-files00213.pro'
041a817f287d3acc0a63890e049a60b8
7317c60c06325eaaa22822c80fd3cd2b9ecd4f85
describe
'40744' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALNW' 'sip-files00216.pro'
621146f21014e31340b0db82fdc430c7
29b2770314d8a8c9c3f45f729caf32dee58212ba
describe
'46520' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALNX' 'sip-files00218.pro'
316197cd01b386d16e77e93397a8185b
cafea409485f299c64703025011c89180cf28b70
describe
'48949' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALNY' 'sip-files00219.pro'
cba3ff6aa4d71f603c8b1b2c4d1b076b
8234b0de88fae4210922844c04682acfad698140
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALNZ' 'sip-files00220.pro'
1c69c4edcdad1835e2dcc04103d0aa9a
7632527867b5b8c6e140591ce5c1c07c25b19dbf
describe
'47731' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALOA' 'sip-files00222.pro'
6c115ff1ba100de0865460149291ee6f
fc89d1f085867f7404455c6684b6436e18ecf001
describe
'47354' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALOB' 'sip-files00226.pro'
44b92f81cdbf5cb9e38727decd10e56a
ce8286de3dce76ba790e22c11fb3b450b4707a8e
describe
'47300' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALOC' 'sip-files00228.pro'
adc849b0711c908b98767b10d6aae0ff
41c9a8368ef5917a9ca71a0d0a74d27eaa4097ae
describe
'47744' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALOD' 'sip-files00229.pro'
418fa6b44fca5b24db05f9894306649a
5199554591f387d0a6d6c727730cdbd350ce5e68
'2012-05-27T21:18:33-04:00'
describe
'42604' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALOE' 'sip-files00232.pro'
20bfae42133bb3ffa6a526e19ab3eb70
8a6a9d9968614bf54dda74a59089d51e941165c7
describe
'42110' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALOF' 'sip-files00233.pro'
1f32922dfa9961d6f1ec99579c876719
e932419ad8dc085453282b3a2b971fb3310d79d0
'2012-05-27T21:24:47-04:00'
describe
'45089' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALOG' 'sip-files00235.pro'
a9f6383bd3e4021f8d7ee5f63ae9a08f
1e63538e16fcd5b1b171d6c9e7846918b8e43038
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALOH' 'sip-files00236.pro'
3598b66f0af3bb57efe93b1d5864d00d
d46d2129425c0cc2ade814c812eea1e45ac58f80
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALOI' 'sip-files00237.pro'
c5ea9926041d08e79de516adb8ebfb15
94ee4242e69f60d806ebb05c8f19a9a3162f1a35
describe
'47425' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALOJ' 'sip-files00245.pro'
b19c6569ac36c94e1f38a27cbb52aa7a
19a6e272ea9d5606f26c960a5c26bb23f6ae3e87
describe
'49482' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALOK' 'sip-files00249.pro'
acff34f218ae1851e8ddd4340a98cd39
0588df493fc2c82f57b6d071ef72cdfffa5c834c
describe
'40454' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALOL' 'sip-files00250.pro'
94eb999deea2a2d65a15b863e0f1c092
c39a0f814d6993f08388242c414b4b1abbb7d3bd
describe
'48187' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALOM' 'sip-files00252.pro'
7640cb8efcc01ddb54cd662620e90e6a
cfd52e350af16b173f3f030a5aeed98b26313b5f
describe
'47662' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALON' 'sip-files00253.pro'
ef7fd036d95b49f35e7a8fe959949257
295fffe6b5acba133911bb53b38f2687a0f871a2
describe
'43977' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALOO' 'sip-files00256.pro'
a44891e364e3b0f12b6c09b391e0d3c0
bf671485767f2997672cf5194ac82546da859b54
describe
'43064' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALOP' 'sip-files00257.pro'
79af34d7aeb4087dc51a77d1e1d57790
bf42753f8f67121e422d07e83b353ced8a13d9fb
describe
'13524' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALOQ' 'sip-files00259.pro'
1f19aca99bed8288d7aa913c9a3eb907
d887473471ebcb48a5353984c5c2f5ade12f1cf0
describe
'48504' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALOR' 'sip-files00260.pro'
e82a9237e842fcb32c139c1c0c2e7819
8bdffca46314e1a890aef3cab978cafd907709b2
describe
'50857' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALOS' 'sip-files00264.pro'
8063facd0609609c9cbf0cd0d53ec0a9
c2f3de048a227dc0b995a848dff9102146df802a
describe
'41133' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALOT' 'sip-files00266.pro'
9f0f906b381c58a57a7c1f5b0f67c119
ec1af20b51118ad105864773775615a024ae6bd3
describe
'10576' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALOU' 'sip-files00268.pro'
c7a68eb4e347cec8842b8aa740675b8f
325a69dd687a0691348ee28cd331a94410b990ed
describe
'50060' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALOV' 'sip-files00272.pro'
0481698faeeeb75e827cb2c89f8a8a5a
51ff70eb563161677252b9133bccff531077ef65
describe
'50508' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALOW' 'sip-files00273.pro'
0cafba59f18eda8f3d8bfe5a234a7564
8a9d0019022710de76dd3b6a438931d431451967
describe
'50858' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALOX' 'sip-files00274.pro'
745ffbc39f625b83c5479f3c39c7e354
55fd933b17563d3853a6cb73eda33222062bd722
describe
'50910' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALOY' 'sip-files00275.pro'
1b98d21ee9f0ae811277e1644cc44a64
8734ef14dc4dd186918b952bd50562450fe309a9
describe
'50756' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALOZ' 'sip-files00276.pro'
18e816c347007c2774b919741eca7fb8
6798b441b147824387eff62889cf9585b87be22c
describe
'51485' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALPA' 'sip-files00277.pro'
d57cd04315d3bfe651f7d91d683bb6b6
4a8da1129cfe63d60a0d8bb67da63763935a6e92
describe
'51903' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALPB' 'sip-files00279.pro'
43526adad43ee11baed8c96311d3e0d8
fbc9c4982bcbd60eb09ecda6f6fd282342d81cf6
describe
'48792' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALPC' 'sip-files00282.pro'
a7e8d8efea324166f20ad6e9b0696c31
16bd8888b16422c7c366d1590f246b0132586144
describe
'45911' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALPD' 'sip-files00283.pro'
c9ef3fb54f7ea98fffd8408f815cc8df
a0708898fac5ddfd0b0daeaa9451621bcbdf49fe
describe
'50749' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALPE' 'sip-files00288.pro'
993bfc8a7bf63f26d883655d75edd3d1
1d9d6e800cea23f702a896bd3f29c820c957d17f
describe
'34461' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALPF' 'sip-files00290.pro'
9b9e3e2e4ea4b6c076ae98ca534cc889
d4defe42dfde207791aab783774cba8b924eb84a
describe
'44217' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALPG' 'sip-files00291.pro'
ad310180b4df4776e79b50c1f2574526
8a1d85ea9189627973fa95892419ad786ab8becf
describe
'49512' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALPH' 'sip-files00292.pro'
36eb38e4ccbe767d3886de2a85d8260d
d23c8e82a2528499aa9e33e31f476b95411f6090
describe
'50822' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALPI' 'sip-files00293.pro'
89511d1330a9edf4fe3a8c8b2dafb46f
a7673dda618cb894c61c95158990092285ecf5cd
describe
'50163' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALPJ' 'sip-files00294.pro'
0f545b788cbf2608f7adcc98638a0758
4bf90ab4a0c44f8db03b25ddf1dc3b4081eb1628
'2012-05-29T18:24:47-04:00'
describe
'49906' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALPK' 'sip-files00298.pro'
87f27eccd9c37eb414c689e1d7ea9515
a2c4bda2c177cb636ae593dfd64da368ef25843b
describe
'49776' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALPL' 'sip-files00299.pro'
9458f475c8dcba3816d0bd83ac1ca098
a77ac79b524c417638b7ac463d7b29ef8c712763
describe
'50377' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALPM' 'sip-files00300.pro'
356a924a168181713024da11f3cf126e
2f273a7c2e565bf55b9cef2beca2d442c005a73a
describe
'51604' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALPN' 'sip-files00303.pro'
de4b829929421af7518a9f29a4af5ae0
918f51c9e05574e38f878bc8195f7da583eb6e4b
describe
'49100' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALPO' 'sip-files00304.pro'
ef0f9a87391e384ae2fbc933a95dfe1a
8feaf557a2008adea792155d205e16fd8774e64d
describe
'284' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALPP' 'sip-files00306.pro'
75a113576765fc114a2c6dfac55d0b1a
ec6a2e9aa13b2065aa6aa7a0dcf9a7d34e800496
describe
'51961' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALPQ' 'sip-files00307.pro'
49a087df211b2d4195343a60cf38cfbb
1db38cc6fec9f75c058d07a453321f43eebb2e0b
describe
'72682' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALPR' 'sip-files00308.pro'
beb734320e074f8773f9a497d6bcdb8e
2c4da23d4994015c28bb84cc4255aa62ab1e3990
describe
'31356' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALPS' 'sip-files00309.pro'
261f55cad3e0a8527fd848b0108d889b
9434ce315791ac5f9984319e1d791590f7d45a5d
describe
'122715' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALPT' 'sip-files00310.pro'
352ca38576095c555f493613c41635d3
945df2956aad0b36cdc406eb1773262eec067fde
describe
'106552' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALPU' 'sip-files00312.pro'
ecb2435b1af1042cdbb22279ed12b91e
f51ea6c603c93b2f5f4d1c6e3035082bcdc3e30a
describe
'72924' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALPV' 'sip-files00314.pro'
32f37153ac27409a916ea2c69f213fc6
c054b8d93b1f3e63a6c77760b15460dabf3f67fd
describe
'71042' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALPW' 'sip-files00316.pro'
fc685abb5c410dcbe7e07f0ca66b2da6
fc77ceb880ab50b8b8a5e56be3ab4be979ad1c7e
describe
'4367' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALPX' 'sip-files00317.pro'
b793beddd62e8c2002b184d6fdb8da34
597d9a246c39302499b4d167ab8f2906b9885970
describe
'52099' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALPY' 'sip-files00318.pro'
e956824cd637e41f5f3589a1e0fbd0d8
f85cd98d1888e44b83b34864e0eb5332469f7690
describe
'2620' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALPZ' 'sip-files00319.pro'
879b56d1f3cd35e983a0ae0a3beb891c
66151e965bafaec6bb8166a63f321a0ddd92543c
describe
'94769' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALQA' 'sip-files00320.pro'
e950dce678779a15de86c3e95f3523a8
59d95885123bc5106f3a9e8643a06019f6cade08
'2012-05-27T21:23:21-04:00'
describe
'3362' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALQB' 'sip-files00321.pro'
06776bec3da5a014d6332a9223ccca83
ac184211d7da9e531a88944b473ccd36cca3db87
describe
'80193' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALQC' 'sip-files00322.pro'
8a6cf718ed90e558c6e6a0bdc5e97101
1ed68ee967d2398f2d5b75af9f75bebb3efa02ed
'2012-05-29T18:39:17-04:00'
describe
'94803' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALQD' 'sip-files00323.pro'
8421dc07298f9a8dc5dad73d71468b2c
d9ed7611b2af153d77c399cf122e7f1a6b4e8709
describe
'99318' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALQE' 'sip-files00324.pro'
090bed7a848771d02de1564610578498
ec475f82242cc7600c252bd446ba09acce2342f2
describe
'1658' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALQF' 'sip-files00325.pro'
b5018bda9ea27bb8e981f1039c7abc9f
49c0e3095937cdbd60bde8c57061b4b18f87547b
describe
'98034' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALQG' 'sip-files00326.pro'
3bfced4dc337356bf083845b6b537797
2b765c0366edd2125434eb47af9c21f3df3a13f0
describe
'80940' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALQH' 'sip-files00328.pro'
8be557646e2ad37be9374eb1c5c65a27
a1706b258091c0a7fc5fbac8bbcc65e837847581
'2012-05-27T21:18:23-04:00'
describe
'65836' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALQI' 'sip-files00330.pro'
5a572dee8d5786b2cd96f5e28df0e2fb
279bff47bd71df6e1349c5557b92c820aa370acc
describe
'7264' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALQJ' 'sip-files00331.pro'
6cd87f884bec77d3f7d2793f82ec8ea3
c4331d78d3d380abe9f83cdba0f370400c42b99a
describe
'95289' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALQK' 'sip-files00332.pro'
f69d37aaa8dbdc6da7c532f52d539683
e8b6fdb42edde7f08e20e949112cf682d0b7f7ed
describe
'1605' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALQL' 'sip-files00333.pro'
ccf8d276ae1b734faefbf535338d03a9
fc07c76a8471aa08b31befaf06e3d963e623d7f9
describe
'69865' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALQM' 'sip-files00334.pro'
7cbc8b3d07b8c810643b2daa024d1c5d
dbb2f59aec0a49decd483694055ac0dbf9c5f767
describe
'2234' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALQN' 'sip-files00335.pro'
2652b769d546fa0aa4a91e6ef2abb60f
db02ab89cec5453397aec0ec1c9b406a7c97b448
describe
'2517' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALQO' 'sip-files00337.pro'
61e43ed4625e63e38814c3d63946ad7e
8035b4ee604354379406836cfcb94ccbf9837662
describe
'76015' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALQP' 'sip-files00338.pro'
4b46aa4b072ce52128659c12384fe596
9e9f0a7be136c5effa437dbeb72e3de5f354884a
describe
'590' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALQQ' 'sip-files00345.pro'
4c6f89d0840edb8c5e8705dbab570a7b
f8185854d9fa3e41ffb61fbfe915d5316c40f026
describe
'72' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALQR' 'sip-files00001.txt'
ab57c5dacb6155915dfbd21c11125d2d
c9d27e1b20e5c71f2e9ebca0913fbde9dc5479d7
describe
'320' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALQS' 'sip-files00003.txt'
62ae20c19bebc7588dd7a4af6d2f5b05
f8ee6bc9be52613077f08ef024353ee19eb8d897
describe
Invalid character
'505' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALQT' 'sip-files00004.txt'
04291ea7a5c56776020f6783f94bc7e3
2b6091525656df995bbc6f1f3ff153df67c7d37a
describe
Invalid character
'402' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALQU' 'sip-files00005.txt'
ab9a8628959600cc26461ad5ec8efe95
f6a1e3134f1f92ee329fcf2fb097a190d773ad88
describe
'1082' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALQV' 'sip-files00007.txt'
2780c7a62e857ec47c34bb1c34921efd
88800fe619643e3d200f50dc88c94d9e43499c18
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALQW' 'sip-files00010.txt'
d6718531213deb2a2c520091d0a15bf1
4d6a9de92717d9acec0cfec7da57600aea183a36
describe
'1653' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALQX' 'sip-files00013.txt'
8deb0ef5fe83fa4f1b83e8187df3808f
ca22417ba6ffdc9cdba970ac290accd28def095d
describe
'1704' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALQY' 'sip-files00014.txt'
13c33145493a21d8e77a79c344b5f9b1
76448d543fe6fb81662f0d9ce10a751491a00d59
describe
'314' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALQZ' 'sip-files00016.txt'
0e95cbe0db38eb8b2c52ed2d26eda5ac
18c90bac5f2445c75224ade0ed4a610bc3e5af41
describe
'1743' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALRA' 'sip-files00019.txt'
9b7e34601397d898cb98d740f541808e
5e2be6c73f508b8e3f1f16090c2c47eee0e54957
'2012-05-27T21:18:31-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALRB' 'sip-files00021.txt'
af2e681a8333c81b306057b4f1142af3
3b6c84762ca843821cea4408ca95d79b6d0d74ef
describe
'1554' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALRC' 'sip-files00022.txt'
bea8f6169e5f1cc1b31ee8aecedaa694
79324118ef6d73d6b5b63fcb6addc973538131af
describe
'1884' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALRD' 'sip-files00023.txt'
0db37531c4e9ca8f6bab0fe3c22757f4
367a6283bc378c4c781bb1c63a01bb9d9a5e7af4
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALRE' 'sip-files00026.txt'
40ea7bc03aac757f28124bdb4abc7138
98be04879eddf95b7cd7b0ebe568178dab214523
describe
'1583' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALRF' 'sip-files00027.txt'
51883996b11744470f719c003e90621c
b948b23f70956ea9f12f481eb7dc0ae9c6994ad8
describe
'1833' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALRG' 'sip-files00028.txt'
87e360df208ee6f4e99a71a957e89483
33cc98cc2ad61ccfb591792f9265a4306c123733
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALRH' 'sip-files00029.txt'
5b626c5cab7cd05b25f37c70992a80a4
06573217acf0fd2304ba20ddc18f91d860cf8e22
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALRI' 'sip-files00031.txt'
2a87b0130e8438e34f95fa8a8c52e3bc
926ef711e44de28c770ea91962342a85997dd3e9
describe
'1882' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALRJ' 'sip-files00033.txt'
3d92c4d0333d049db3bab88fbd70721b
a94833182064aa8562786e01b3033c7c5f2f9fab
describe
'1670' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALRK' 'sip-files00034.txt'
c747d258c6fe3e78fb052d9fb09367b3
7d7b48007c202022b7a679ccf3c9ed1950e4adf0
describe
'1832' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALRL' 'sip-files00035.txt'
ae36ae27e005f2fa147d4a925899c78f
a2240e6b76ac0b4d098bb2c3daf4dae61a44e9c4
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALRM' 'sip-files00036.txt'
fa1403f7b5629fbe529571a4d65178ea
fa33e0b6a27e3ba467073f9b6307c6ce752bcc6e
'2012-05-27T21:19:00-04:00'
describe
'1928' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALRN' 'sip-files00037.txt'
87f77acf301881f8a1ba14818d3e47bd
81b564cd1372a9e5104aa4ef387539e90e0659cb
describe
'1733' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALRO' 'sip-files00038.txt'
1b3508c080d882281e4e0d13d65a56ed
06b6a098273438d97cca43db86c3087e65267994
describe
'1871' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALRP' 'sip-files00039.txt'
02bdf29ff4ba4ea9ce0ed271ac600e72
cbb290fe0fcecc9c31c16c6c05ae0493e0d860ff
describe
'1789' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALRQ' 'sip-files00041.txt'
15ba32d782fd90306b159dc26da50d2f
3ff2c05283ec0068b21af3061fa9acec17bbfeb0
describe
'1757' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALRR' 'sip-files00042.txt'
858a49ef6137ba149df2ee8695236362
599b8eca66f27104b1e65e778b43ea1a92eeac08
describe
'239' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALRS' 'sip-files00044.txt'
62ba0b99fd7001e44fcd9c0d99903519
51a32b24568ce36a2a2b534dbaf687d8a5bc7753
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALRT' 'sip-files00045.txt'
debad6e95492e8783cae85e66b7993f9
c035bfbecbfbf6be205ea0af6292abc347c521e9
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALRU' 'sip-files00046.txt'
cb5cff3c4b3b0396e0be926fb2e6219d
366e79c2546b33ae3650d7d87703cb1e51525667
describe
'1511' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALRV' 'sip-files00047.txt'
536b706efb37b2fc2ce9d076c2be711f
948f8e388601c57284d5ef532e3a99cd5af3f211
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALRW' 'sip-files00048.txt'
fd34138ab3d437fa2fe22e00ec9529e5
ddcacd5ec4e553d517393379e16d5e10a12b5181
describe
Invalid character
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALRX' 'sip-files00049.txt'
76bd1920b418f3e53489ea1cceaa0c7d
439b7f71c290bf04fc7c6a1fcf4cd912d85da407
describe
'1749' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALRY' 'sip-files00053.txt'
72fbaa709a22ea270a36568dd29c2b67
accc8c4ee8a2845aeecbd1ad20007766609901c5
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALRZ' 'sip-files00054.txt'
f6d5385eb3475a79ac0ab6442367ff26
b2363e480d3681fa51518b928641087712aacee6
describe
'1585' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALSA' 'sip-files00056.txt'
8f649bb894f59575ef0044f6e5e4d7a6
fa3d53cc7270e57a5e17ea07c9aad7dedc5653c0
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALSB' 'sip-files00057.txt'
3145d4fc7ceeb14a17f33b024fb3f086
4615b2424efe16db1a808096f12373f06a8000eb
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALSC' 'sip-files00058.txt'
239eda4896d7a1ddce990e16be1bdc30
48230a72571b54a8debca3654f68445940eef39d
describe
'1626' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALSD' 'sip-files00060.txt'
b63a55ad6532f5855f3be8ebf3bc63f6
4e2e36e2a18b36622d02b05b419a7ff9f992b069
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALSE' 'sip-files00064.txt'
f1e5c25310f5d08f5909ad230de15cdb
b55f7d4c3932e44ece14921c0195589575312cd8
describe
'1951' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALSF' 'sip-files00066.txt'
4f5376903922c84c40737eb60e2a4e77
f969b9e26e7fa90af570e2f4b0196da1d3754313
describe
'1911' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALSG' 'sip-files00067.txt'
46520916fff3986e8d01d595c419ac4f
c1c4e7db13eeee750b6cb67dd5d02c865960adfc
describe
'1919' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALSH' 'sip-files00068.txt'
a28c42c851df77047860221ca6e0a5cf
15f7c706bd36491f2aa44601d19a9d5280d02b60
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALSI' 'sip-files00071.txt'
b223a9b0c2c69ded32868e727711a487
ba77a67f99ce91331e874e5a97b5a4633f05f9f0
describe
'797' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALSJ' 'sip-files00072.txt'
ea65b1d27b6d7c441d9147f3ebbaf2dd
3e77c4ad2207b6945132a989e99a459bdfcf2a7a
describe
'1728' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALSK' 'sip-files00073.txt'
408e8b59c479d8e5926fd12cf66f37c6
4d832d424666170f5c826a58d9aceeee4cb83145
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALSL' 'sip-files00074.txt'
37fb2cb092d6bceaefdac18c13081d73
f9eeb0acb962b411bb3aec68c15e5bca7e50f2eb
describe
'1899' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALSM' 'sip-files00075.txt'
0eb9f5ca9ac4b24412dbd6676a3c0f23
7ee84dffbe1ef8b69f2cbb089ada01f45201692c
describe
'1795' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALSN' 'sip-files00080.txt'
56f58f74fa436423294d83f21430a69f
4f7e84d87088139a7d8687ecc75819425560ad93
describe
'786' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALSO' 'sip-files00081.txt'
8890304c68ca61e88b8e1bfcd323277d
c67b574b53a3e0d9dbec524bd3fb447a693ebae1
describe
'1556' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALSP' 'sip-files00082.txt'
498376ae1463efb97029e8290049d6aa
2d7db5fe7006e76453eea49844cb29c34b25d769
describe
'825' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALSQ' 'sip-files00083.txt'
8eafe0a9270a056a6ac76485b6b19f0a
320f50506146cb0e79ad5bcd073465c1e3b88727
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALSR' 'sip-files00084.txt'
3c3a83b750ff74f21c8bb817c8de8581
716659f8a4029fa3cad334ee9bc5b2b86521a9a1
describe
'1779' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALSS' 'sip-files00086.txt'
1de3a238aa1f2c3db20a68c3bb78abb2
bb9d08842fbe863b765108fbcab16034f78c66e1
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALST' 'sip-files00087.txt'
aad522f9108ec4f6571f8665ae3a3d15
4a0f11d3d1ac8b19a6f7fb9c2be00075bf1db80a
describe
'1618' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALSU' 'sip-files00090.txt'
b2c25d7d502497fc838b6826c8ba50f3
decb91bf49be4113e4559dd731f12425d87dfb51
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALSV' 'sip-files00091.txt'
f42e85dfeb22fec9c06fb6508e0b5bae
fef9bb59eb4b1484027f07a0fc024b1442028260
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALSW' 'sip-files00092.txt'
0740e1b828c4bfac196724c8bbc174d9
b64ae55de000b4c8035fe72c594086aca3235873
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALSX' 'sip-files00095.txt'
4e63f535aae7e4686317352c77f6b838
70e510143324f26d69639b8fcc740dac0c68f220
describe
'1854' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALSY' 'sip-files00096.txt'
85ff231ea41ab50a585e1d48097225a5
1789032a46e03a4c1f4e33a90d5e147ca38b03d5
'2012-05-30T08:52:54-04:00'
describe
'1863' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALSZ' 'sip-files00099.txt'
2da000adc8644a8fc8edd3a45f287e6f
2fb5348e3428c702df049e0398471e346aca4e2a
describe
'1755' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALTA' 'sip-files00101.txt'
3f500494effb08e7cb1bd2f33c69bd10
05058669965bf2fcc4594dee63c3f3fc8d20a47c
describe
'1601' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALTB' 'sip-files00103.txt'
7382b7984abaf3687b307ede8b64fe73
e1e35575a208a142cdbfd524b48ad2c19aa36313
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALTC' 'sip-files00105.txt'
1fed1ff885cf6245b03784195364e7c8
8277f17669e2e3fdece6d802b66625ba038a6065
describe
'1175' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALTD' 'sip-files00106.txt'
412aa0f9ff113ba16d3625ad4b549956
b2cabf55100d040ff912ad9eb981022f8d2fd3a0
describe
'1415' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALTE' 'sip-files00110.txt'
20c19c31d48bf926afe49d756ed0c914
1973cffa0da5f3ce84423f15fe10b2179406c48c
'2012-05-27T21:28:42-04:00'
describe
'1347' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALTF' 'sip-files00111.txt'
e467898568ae8b520b75637a720ff0e8
21002df8edd94f0ef0399902dc3e04d7d7d61bb7
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALTG' 'sip-files00112.txt'
09b9e512a77e3ab753753b4347b0e83b
b7781968eabd808194feae4f330ee8f4f03fe365
describe
'1802' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALTH' 'sip-files00113.txt'
48d1f2a5afc0e2b94ddec008e9dda08d
2c39d60f3f2ac5868fccb0598ac900c315a49bea
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALTI' 'sip-files00114.txt'
20bf7beac5a82c549eee68877a90669d
2564ca6ab9f38f0397ac8166b2d755e68b8fb85d
describe
'625' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALTJ' 'sip-files00116.txt'
9796633a5f8559e8ebb48c126e849a00
92afe27183b7e6eb4a6f6c8e4bada9881a8e36ae
describe
Invalid character
'1896' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALTK' 'sip-files00117.txt'
f23a3436e9f67a5346496c0ce3d30db7
380616803f3d60e0f7e5ed457449c86066281fc7
'2012-05-27T21:25:23-04:00'
describe
'1813' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALTL' 'sip-files00118.txt'
5cb3fec48e7a439941624ac222c54852
49eda72bf08c73f3457bbed6494c2b2cd2171fcb
describe
'1688' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALTM' 'sip-files00120.txt'
4f96612fef03139cabce39f06375c097
4117f544e09ed8075f04176173755c86ca2cbf7b
describe
'1834' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALTN' 'sip-files00122.txt'
e3867e4cd919f06df7700b9648b46163
dde7a2cca95bea1287a3929623172ffef3783093
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALTO' 'sip-files00123.txt'
0456fc84e2e5cc5105d01b2c78663f10
c08f29a2061e6a161dee523f098c25a809908467
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALTP' 'sip-files00124.txt'
e323bec007095b9c4badf4cc12ce31e3
794282355020cd82a3ccc70c752553336f47dba3
describe
Invalid character
'1836' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALTQ' 'sip-files00127.txt'
39b451d9b02c30f384be6f9173ca027e
b5fca04b73dc835f6bad16b8ddf72d4ad31b3d15
describe
'1615' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALTR' 'sip-files00128.txt'
4baa4739d2cb27614c7bf566baa9745b
9363f141b73f8d1bb0aa10e94fe2e9ed8105b334
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALTS' 'sip-files00129.txt'
a04683907b7a10961d72b174f1c731a8
971d09dd1f340baaa62dc9cdc737c10fced2b098
'2012-05-27T21:31:42-04:00'
describe
'1857' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALTT' 'sip-files00133.txt'
8e15828a9f5a10f8189dfc4aace10566
e2f378094392629557f6a8a667eaba4a6cb75e0e
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALTU' 'sip-files00135.txt'
7d6498351eceebb7a8cf56b6342f617d
984fc8f6f36b14f7756c147468ffff7acb9eb702
describe
'1776' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALTV' 'sip-files00137.txt'
fce860d73c96fbf7a9d1ee9b299e3c02
ba31fb1d7edc2418eddb3e03d0454df2e8ef4650
describe
'1765' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALTW' 'sip-files00138.txt'
e0a3e3570e08a0a6db419d996318aeb7
27fdbf7edd9572104d36044598900ba0d26aa87f
describe
'1881' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALTX' 'sip-files00139.txt'
b4a2aa2c4efb7ee7d9c1f6cf611c0cbc
08f08a354732fc684f423781cc25d6e7da59caa2
describe
'1533' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALTY' 'sip-files00141.txt'
820b3c4e25ed4e106cafb76bbe396fe1
6ada641ae471d2096e4d8a52c5fc7b79f06fddb7
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALTZ' 'sip-files00144.txt'
a8915277223ba3cab1e9c49323694384
9947e6fd8e3df5a4cb0c5836f4834376a4d802a9
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALUA' 'sip-files00151.txt'
7dc916275946463beae6d1bd7c394081
9f1482982f2f00e1fdd8c1d3c137aa87e720cb11
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALUB' 'sip-files00152.txt'
0d9ff944ce8013047eac9111d5e7cfeb
e03526ccd8d72ef088b816661356e9178c4a2ae7
describe
'1766' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALUC' 'sip-files00153.txt'
d89fc28de21ae2f9658ad614130b2b4a
13157e65b5aa941d333b04e7df82cf0b9f4ffe2f
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALUD' 'sip-files00155.txt'
90c442e372fd4ba2e4599ba06942a9d0
ea5900c1e08ca8c5ebf311a15fb4c4fcab4c3823
describe
'1616' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALUE' 'sip-files00157.txt'
1f32b15ad35e7e82bc655525d806c5d3
2825dd11997ed986891304afaa8e3c47b6ea28b8
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALUF' 'sip-files00158.txt'
89f61ccae316a05502193aea57262ac6
fc2c2a48003a40ebfed4b0b8787b6daf43cd57cf
describe
'233' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALUG' 'sip-files00160.txt'
292175394411e8158e36173ce8f8479b
714029111c41ea3110f00a40218c42d5c9dce3f7
describe
'784' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALUH' 'sip-files00161.txt'
0644f55cad98ed668757e2b039a081ed
f2163670cf06e5d42a630dfcecdeaf58ce33bf66
describe
'1916' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALUI' 'sip-files00162.txt'
965a75580a178c3f9d85b8272a464160
95d2e63b52680bb47025659cbc3f5a7c75ec32a6
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALUJ' 'sip-files00163.txt'
966a0eb91e03a8bf0fcc251c1c3c07b0
b04d8632faedf5aec3c5ee99f520edc6d25074b4
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALUK' 'sip-files00164.txt'
95472444d87d13cbeac4009b6050b877
ca4dda30c554172a5d0ead9a287190f558de5e2f
describe
'173' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALUL' 'sip-files00165.txt'
7480e649ed34ae266047254792d907e3
7fbd30bdf1e5bdda5952dd22844f0cbcd861e6dc
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALUM' 'sip-files00166.txt'
27c6bae3612e220027bc9468cb4b8bcb
ffcdcff17b3dd463a397e4e108803987e9b2c96f
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALUN' 'sip-files00167.txt'
f6b63713d6c0d99205b0bb388586235c
5a085663f03bfa67e63304b072830697f9c5c3f3
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALUO' 'sip-files00168.txt'
64ba914a892f5392c3fac371260b37c5
162ee9c66dd8b90feb11c0e319011d897ac2631b
describe
Invalid character
'1822' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALUP' 'sip-files00171.txt'
f4e6551e38e000e98868671759010f60
b45fb4af2e066b677e7f54d77aa22f15c9b972f4
describe
'1934' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALUQ' 'sip-files00173.txt'
8aa77a3ca8a4290daf5a0ba2c2faa716
e4d4e17bb02596e17a4b012c889c215ab6bab77d
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALUR' 'sip-files00174.txt'
3774aa21e805b8b5c99ca07b290233d8
bc8013df6b57cae9ac886b0548004be1ec5af980
describe
'1217' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALUS' 'sip-files00176.txt'
09316bd104564de54e5abbf71b3241b0
364bc9c3732c2ba95b0fe3927d9c31bef674723a
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALUT' 'sip-files00177.txt'
18b6e8e2789fac39b497159e15072695
6e1e0efe4925b94d00ac063d678681a96fd0bacc
describe
'1873' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALUU' 'sip-files00178.txt'
e136d0ac488218327c3a945e3da41b91
017f95d240328575a72f07f7b829cd1330140610
describe
'1909' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALUV' 'sip-files00181.txt'
a3e8ea4642c7e9372521f90317a9995b
0bff0a5787bfaf6432b8b58e393c71884b656678
describe
'1905' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALUW' 'sip-files00184.txt'
38e887f66f28b93d449f2f0c5fcbc540
f6c9d42cbd00430a1bb72cfb09e937a55583a6d8
describe
'1683' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALUX' 'sip-files00188.txt'
5aba08f430d7d67ae64ca07aee16bdb8
42aba23fdb3e88f557cf18890373e0c4fd0ecc14
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALUY' 'sip-files00189.txt'
d11f2f39035b935f7ad38e2093c80494
36d7e32f1ae19a88df439a81a1b543dfb070bbf2
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALUZ' 'sip-files00190.txt'
fda6581f4cc7212fb24561508ecdaff5
3634df073a585bedf82697c45e5977c8897441cc
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALVA' 'sip-files00193.txt'
625649f4c2fcac59105f7426184843ac
aebf166a1feb1db52335798745bb29e465e93981
describe
'984' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALVB' 'sip-files00195.txt'
1d183d6d8f085ea66a062787678b89a5
a3b5f88a8339dfcd610a9bd86f440435a9a9f6c2
describe
'1840' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALVC' 'sip-files00196.txt'
2535f474accba4b462625b437aebf8f4
48a625f445de6170de031a05e058480380d0300b
describe
'1883' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALVD' 'sip-files00197.txt'
69ed420e0261dd40504a887ee5eb78e2
12b9a5b84437cf10054f9d99f50f0b0420b403ec
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALVE' 'sip-files00200.txt'
12df232c3ce27841d204586be8dc1a8e
0bc884a0886103fc7cf298ed8601f6457bbb3cc0
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALVF' 'sip-files00201.txt'
3312cb1d7596f06e61dcd944201445aa
08b81dfc5b5d5de652f49b8bf101c2470ac70a29
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALVG' 'sip-files00202.txt'
0742cd92b58c64150c908a66a22fb59f
4786e22ba87ea8217ce3d320a941ed24ff0f2892
describe
'1354' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALVH' 'sip-files00203.txt'
a1073a4d8397207ec80692703c17cf55
ad77e6a5cb35c3edf6278da2ead508d1e7508424
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALVI' 'sip-files00204.txt'
9daf2ba166a36f13812fac01dacfebea
e2f0c334206d82af13717a3f04508ba7a790f0ef
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALVJ' 'sip-files00205.txt'
3f49b35b0114eab9b88affafdd82703e
a5b0e8a6f8430c470ec301262a6538eeb13442cb
describe
'424' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALVK' 'sip-files00206.txt'
081c97c40a7fb050260e828e2b136fce
b0c2f9dc434a15631b5013b66d1a0a76f999a7bc
describe
'1851' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALVL' 'sip-files00208.txt'
3f1e963fe3a88273458c067ca419c88c
fe8cbbe85ae87ecd99ba2d302d949cf88275e2ba
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALVM' 'sip-files00211.txt'
607e7a3cc5e6644983c1eb90d593f1d9
49d812ecde5ad663ea83f7d9f8ef14ba87cbe77b
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALVN' 'sip-files00212.txt'
a88645f31df386e78c4d9a1fd60eb257
658839822db723629627cb188206f73a6d96fb41
describe
'1596' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALVO' 'sip-files00216.txt'
abf35a550ab04e4cf7ea39909edae4b1
ca69cce60d3e8eca8b65e30a422f75ffef9482c6
'2012-05-27T21:26:14-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALVP' 'sip-files00220.txt'
01a113153a0867da46fdc994549de21a
84e1a4d55d6d7c0e7e5977f5d9033afd9909d829
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALVQ' 'sip-files00221.txt'
cd39e6e7e1ec35f343bba620b655013f
c33035d129c894f06cca67a05641c034e1de9b12
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALVR' 'sip-files00222.txt'
d146ca492d9877e479ce4e3fe4d36ab3
3b043ffdcecaf05fab44db1cc329e55fe366b7b9
describe
'1758' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALVS' 'sip-files00223.txt'
aba00d20eba64c44eb247d2291009583
428a25e0513dfea64f04ecd41ba9ff603a1db404
describe
'1764' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALVT' 'sip-files00224.txt'
4e8cbdb83049a4560742f27f986da74f
e20d31fd20e0b237e1a8f3e6ed317c6ac02e9fb0
describe
'1510' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALVU' 'sip-files00225.txt'
2a56de7e586777f6a1e1af00c30afdef
92bfc0f6d7762ee0edde90b9aa3dc28aee7a40d0
describe
'1798' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALVV' 'sip-files00226.txt'
34a1d8a5a9e5901b3260827a52121c8a
3108c0c533aa9b19f2137557a7e930685d0294c5
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALVW' 'sip-files00227.txt'
931c6ed3b67f864faf0bd7a4c4c2a378
fd6f3a06355d330ca0de15ca0ab4d93bbaf1bb22
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALVX' 'sip-files00232.txt'
1c8eee9e1094db773859282e709ee7bd
2f5dee681f65c0505e603f9d154d7a2a12bc243e
describe
'1645' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALVY' 'sip-files00234.txt'
f3ff8139451a847e9f4d756653f3fd71
a0fdab757d9b5d9db491201c4c028c1ba35e3639
describe
'1602' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALVZ' 'sip-files00238.txt'
9a197cf18570a0c9ae1d8cbbb310fa53
ef6d49f6906c598e17d5c7f2f6ccc59bf4f7c0e3
describe
'606' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALWA' 'sip-files00240.txt'
981e33d55d805514c7d5ee9d09c7afcc
eab781d82e9aa756076a14654b4a012df3ada8cc
describe
'1620' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALWB' 'sip-files00241.txt'
65ab29d8b6c5ec4659f4958c5fed8ca3
e9599bc3b31af684860514015132d3332223a062
describe
'1689' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALWC' 'sip-files00243.txt'
5ef0ec4863c85bf29315ecbe41e5a509
b94dfa581107a073315662219a2f5860ee2855cd
'2012-05-27T21:23:44-04:00'
describe
'1811' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALWD' 'sip-files00244.txt'
775be795e6d0d0722dc2eed90b63fe8d
a23884a1a93afed1a12995c611ea2536ad32dbd8
describe
'1816' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALWE' 'sip-files00246.txt'
f730a57cf03821f645c721029051ac22
3bf4a6de471d16a112c8473d6b1c53487f1a4c0a
describe
'963' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALWF' 'sip-files00247.txt'
ae0d6783aeb32028e3c754ddc3ba91b9
31b36a6b1a54a87f513ea8418429a869194769b3
describe
'1609' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALWG' 'sip-files00248.txt'
df463b9ff6fb2ee2a017848cc433cdca
726ffa90e897b9e0499d9b11b97eeae0690368bf
describe
'1567' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALWH' 'sip-files00251.txt'
8e447fe89d18ae41b494eba2dbe5a1a6
21b34ac922cc010e1333fa984df208af0e345eeb
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALWI' 'sip-files00253.txt'
d175279354d34c2df49d6b97bde916be
991673fb7f1f2fe534899a146bb59e318dd60a78
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALWJ' 'sip-files00255.txt'
b12b5ccd5cf06f533a41c7b21a6b6df7
a1c21d6197b8a5d4d1bd56eb296fad645b9584a7
describe
'1687' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALWK' 'sip-files00256.txt'
b217ca4af3211c3420f9ee6ac5ddb4ff
49fcf50d1f93f855c04b8a03930db2a727ba8647
describe
'1667' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALWL' 'sip-files00257.txt'
7ce86c1d33ba9f365a12c2739fcfb4f1
4024a50116d7a1edc45df53a1d015f9638c9fc4a
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALWM' 'sip-files00260.txt'
3a37f5311cae70d3196fe5b9b61b9407
28a5a9d0f747da3ca8cda876e8fe3dc858e17f70
describe
'1923' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALWN' 'sip-files00261.txt'
3bc42d37b3777bcb5ba3c8925d02d869
b05355b00892bc3f7d9967516451f35070d1109b
describe
'1983' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALWO' 'sip-files00267.txt'
ba78fb27d693c83b7cd37c2f1a6d50bb
61b0aabe241f1d27c608b3555e98d454dc98f995
describe
'468' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALWP' 'sip-files00268.txt'
f17addc035a97666b2c9f523090f321a
b236e7e5580a2cec9acf0ebab8944543369a70e1
describe
Invalid character
'1898' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALWQ' 'sip-files00269.txt'
5b3b018c1bd8e56e47bea3c6f8a348e4
48cd997f2d3c7f9405b8aa5a320989d43d045279
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALWR' 'sip-files00272.txt'
362459a3cf4d55a4b9616ab22b03858f
cb6ea9516ee8888f9b7d6ebd989d2a7662d78b2f
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALWS' 'sip-files00273.txt'
530bd6705b491de57316f33713d6ca46
72306a9b56450fc5c3c507e538489809d8383057
describe
'1954' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALWT' 'sip-files00275.txt'
68835ae20c977746c53f590f7a5e8b6a
efa3f1c67dcca139c4b9a765b7b51409fc3fff2d
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALWU' 'sip-files00278.txt'
5f22a3a28148125eb702e34fcfe64899
cc1843bcc63900fe34bca53d0d67f34a174e1850
describe
'1988' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALWV' 'sip-files00279.txt'
03f77cc3f67894a813fa47979dff01e9
ccbb3a0c2a3329cadfeeb9fceae62b7bceea7d65
describe
'1901' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALWW' 'sip-files00282.txt'
0a2d196feb573aa5f96517a6010190e0
491d77bfb3b2f837a401d49b8e3256ddeab83ead
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALWX' 'sip-files00283.txt'
ba0d7bca875f0cb1433c085ea93d2efe
5917a860e45247f851c381752da2b1fa640f5f72
describe
'1527' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALWY' 'sip-files00286.txt'
817ff5c9933748444df9c4c01bd502f8
b747d0afede760f5469f0075a620ddcd59e37691
describe
'1926' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALWZ' 'sip-files00287.txt'
348e459f08495f024e4d4bbe30354d98
b214092d24ab67322410b52773001d15126aac69
describe
'1913' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALXA' 'sip-files00288.txt'
5678ee6d815cda5f8a24e5bf13be36b8
5c5fe4c3be7f6bc522e9b22dcee5be2ebb9da1f1
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALXB' 'sip-files00289.txt'
42e3f7aab31e2a8a8c2405e3909c0dce
940b4c6c3c8ba2ce6546ed6b1a65d3fd23b0a1e2
describe
'1692' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALXC' 'sip-files00291.txt'
e0362f3792e799c4ed37ecba21898fe5
37a86082f1c0662a615473ef87b019efe6289676
describe
'1855' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALXD' 'sip-files00292.txt'
e294bb8a873652a3c72da8bb9127b2d2
88de544ffae94d30ec8218b83f67e1832522dcb0
'2012-05-27T21:26:36-04:00'
describe
'1952' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALXE' 'sip-files00293.txt'
127f6ec68c6f3431da6eb5f2fe3876bf
8ee490cafd869e61c0ba8a8a0ab534f06a864b00
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALXF' 'sip-files00297.txt'
7332791dd6a1d26a01a542c8597a5218
f9edb881543198c51e44a2b749ea5a3b8e94ade1
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALXG' 'sip-files00299.txt'
7d6a3b7048089215ebd1f58f433f23c0
321659467eac59fb99eb599e8b864356cadde862
'2012-05-27T21:25:49-04:00'
describe
'1894' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALXH' 'sip-files00300.txt'
36c7a1574315907023e8987393127644
5d94b1303f2a5cedf216edb4600d925e568206d6
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALXI' 'sip-files00301.txt'
dbd327390ead7cf5a16b54ce96f5dde7
922a3e1d034716dec1403ef9aeed98536ad4372e
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALXJ' 'sip-files00304.txt'
5866e262e447398e1dc0c707023bbb6f
3748c5fcd3d32605ae6458fed8814cbee93ef4ae
describe
'865' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALXK' 'sip-files00305.txt'
56eab2845747cdaa280a78ed5157f2fc
040b0114915ee122315a9b0dee708adda778c5e7
describe
'174' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALXL' 'sip-files00306.txt'
115b63904e98c543f518f3e285a6adf8
6fd559aff6ca8f8b377e09af3a6f4a8b6de78857
describe
'2194' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALXM' 'sip-files00307.txt'
6bb6d25148de2573e4fea40bb6a3cc52
1dbe250b21cdebb5cd1fe350bad7d80a83085e49
describe
'2921' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALXN' 'sip-files00308.txt'
cce16f6b1ca298b5f9ec87fd83d71ffe
375c363bd3ff86fe9287b05cf64a45a07622f821
describe
Invalid character
'1310' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALXO' 'sip-files00309.txt'
4028378da4f516c1a6dc3fdc9a5808b5
e2c2dfab9e74958131aa4afb1e4c11bd18a3958d
describe
Invalid character
'5001' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALXP' 'sip-files00310.txt'
f50ec806d6b257702b3280b38ba9aec3
8321a5281993628f7ea7b0fd020ed51d78e02549
describe
'4225' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALXQ' 'sip-files00312.txt'
7d4332ceff3cdbda8c75e92e3a8461db
8d91ae6243f85fbfea3fb99870cd86376b164c4a
describe
'3298' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALXR' 'sip-files00315.txt'
fd6746788fb08d92c15d343d6a104456
bac8a526665ea7422b884e40fde1f8096bfac4a0
describe
'2908' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALXS' 'sip-files00316.txt'
8626a1b310f813d298535eff68b17970
ee1c53e78fb4159f89a03e0d39f382f91a900c5c
describe
'438' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALXT' 'sip-files00317.txt'
8159f4cf2026d0dec9ea76178e49309c
f1c2971de8c330db0ffac214672311dfb880c687
describe
'273' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALXU' 'sip-files00319.txt'
bd36f4a9aedd5fb19d15f20ac6453239
70d891373d76b7f40b742c05c480253f0d1d9b16
describe
'3780' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALXV' 'sip-files00320.txt'
36651d5563faee13ff88426bdba66119
0cd702d6a5bbf5d7a8d22b1f25ca982169d63344
describe
'267' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALXW' 'sip-files00325.txt'
e91eb58b0d1bcbddd1760ab54512f637
033c7e707a0c0b8bd371c06b8f8275ac965df79f
describe
'315' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALXX' 'sip-files00329.txt'
2d5068f25582bc36f5498ff9cc1efff2
ad66d724716e7d19769290e75922ae7a61d53935
'2012-05-29T18:26:34-04:00'
describe
'627' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALXY' 'sip-files00331.txt'
45b4e4d39dac89ae8636b3a031d8eb8c
3c68c5c923f6e781c5c51dc999a1517a7ef07cf4
describe
Invalid character
'3787' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALXZ' 'sip-files00332.txt'
b5a12ff7d999e1834f7ff34cdd5e7edc
f860983024835d20eb00ac3daa8b65a655f6c941
describe
'196' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALYA' 'sip-files00333.txt'
1c9ccc91dfdd600f9de51adf22b6d4ac
298e58ce4b81145d9086485975d48876e3b035bf
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALYB' 'sip-files00335.txt'
9835bed9dc3a91a5e4a81ca8dede5c4e
2b6a2ea8307cf6b29928f7cb5c588cb4fb91e64b
describe
'297' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALYC' 'sip-files00337.txt'
3d7e8e399eff31a4cac9b3e0da27cdcc
8b6062a7a9a9f0a5ec69b02cce2bded7ea17e563
describe
'228' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALYD' 'sip-files00339.txt'
4de72886568ed62bbd934a6e61f58bfb
5c3ec668080af4adee2b949231e70a309dac751b
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALYE' 'sip-files00340.txt'
9bd00198f91ffd8d7c46968f39adac8b
85a4b9c2f7d7f3a4b786741b08319f112f35bbbd
describe
'310' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALYF' 'sip-files00343.txt'
bf5fa9ce157b47d04e24946c642cd7fb
d51578b48173f3a63906141384764c6cf7e90d96
describe
Invalid character
'35' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALYG' 'sip-files00345.txt'
9b1bb659cc0237e57069ddf0539e30c9
fe0144e66174aed1e6b7875b148bfc3e6a6d0af1
describe
'33503' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALYH' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
b07572d95f41858ef13898bc2cc89b95
22fe3d5cd009b986a63846a8fc7e85bdc83fe682
describe
'92450' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALYI' 'sip-files00315.QC.jpg'
e7dd0f3d3ed20da4c3b7fa04b57e5c1a
743a219fc241f8a1a66987c9c13402678f104520
describe
'88668' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALYJ' 'sip-files00164.QC.jpg'
28712a91dea78290425a3d27ca36f209
146f54eaecb680ebfb748625d42bbc225e73ac23
describe
'33861' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALYK' 'sip-files00138thm.jpg'
fa34be75c990497972f118e8b6b095a5
9b856f3501de4e08ab431f878975c0c6032f2bf0
describe
'30287' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALYL' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
fb1f9f00b678ede1d714774c9807fce8
232d50b989672974a06826555ceded355eec73ed
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALYM' 'sip-files00309thm.jpg'
d565d6c5ac95473799be2882fd56d508
e4c3cf27fa1abc13738ced4a0747f73816a4ade3
'2012-05-27T21:31:21-04:00'
describe
'30448' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALYN' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
9e20abd3b8b65d9ed3084f393ca8edc3
96e326abc8b1057b7f25f3d84fa3b1f4b06f56aa
'2012-05-29T18:26:37-04:00'
describe
'91304' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALYO' 'sip-files00246.QC.jpg'
26e006c76c1ac6c36e3083c2bf4c1026
048d5c02bc0f962b560c3920e07d5289c6ec6ba4
describe
'93196' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALYP' 'sip-files00288.QC.jpg'
eba1303f550c1a60fdeae2ae616f115f
56f8d4f3d42866ff6891b82f45bdb2c3e429f07b
describe
'93319' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALYQ' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
c16fbf7730fa90a85c4264fe0e49447b
2b84e8dcd7e5b4fb1c217fcd1e3296c21be12435
describe
'32037' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALYR' 'sip-files00281thm.jpg'
f8030e8f9284b6d87725576845caf50d
514386efc4cf6e337ca78b787aeeb350be1a1007
describe
'34342' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALYS' 'sip-files00178thm.jpg'
8aebbb2fb97136ab2674a37eb5f05185
a78d995a4e10741cc395b7ca6f72fd8b46b693ac
describe
'34183' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALYT' 'sip-files00288thm.jpg'
5495006e7ea434251d75987a74c3e1b4
3bd46efbcf9be298c10aa04830c74e12f34ee904
describe
'34174' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALYU' 'sip-files00249thm.jpg'
9e0cdadc6a9c8488285d3c239872262f
83c19538ee33fe1f6f89a9278cbf1ab2bf16e6ba
describe
'35238' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALYV' 'sip-files00263thm.jpg'
4af8b1abac8c0468b19951564960e7d5
57bc9355e152e0a208222acb53c2a3ae49a34b5a
describe
'86810' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALYW' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
1a847fda279f73cd7285afaf81fb27b9
ec589e19029945a65a1a8ebf10a2b96e87f03126
describe
'61130' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALYX' 'sip-files00331.QC.jpg'
3086b75b353bbab48a3122d050a24d54
4483b46870ad9a071ff2a71072d08acb037680a2
describe
'70311' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALYY' 'sip-files00240.QC.jpg'
e35e0d82068b71fd9f366abbd329c83c
fe10af6deaa5d2de5a0cbf5f1bf81ce2cf4de447
describe
'33255' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALYZ' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
9ac0322affcac8b5f87de3abdd8d1c7e
9c2bf1b96b6540768796151cef29d5f14805d322
describe
'34258' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALZA' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
7b6cdb36325a73ca8784b41b87973867
e72bb962ad5457d71ee4fbedac5009466d58833e
describe
'89210' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALZB' 'sip-files00154.QC.jpg'
633f8620fb8b6e79f9c5b99094158fc8
df8f9ea1d4c2117f68cfd5b250f548f5c8edb936
describe
'84058' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALZC' 'sip-files00333.QC.jpg'
ecb6cd207827f3bb2afb7d326f363607
361c3987725a430e5968a80922796b4aa361aacc
'2012-05-27T21:26:18-04:00'
describe
'27925' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALZD' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
423494d760ebc3784ba92d0231483af0
b459687a77d183d853bcc9bbd2baa59fe49ccc6c
describe
'76664' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALZE' 'sip-files00161.QC.jpg'
b5121d6ff0786f4ae0180a68da45282a
bdeca904a0493b637311e5a52fb8afd903a84cfe
describe
'19339' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALZF' 'sip-files00192thm.jpg'
d30d85c52046c398198d00e69df418f8
86ef7ec019fea4607872d781594b8b3d854d6f22
describe
'90051' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALZG' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
c2e931bcec7e5e9595a84f596ca33544
5b0e7ee9c40a40d38c5b2517f87fb556dad820c5
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALZH' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
c755e9b7a79d41e86081db106c88c3f8
895d1fdbbd33cbcb4c4e56e545e24a2241ee1b5c
describe
'35402' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALZI' 'sip-files00287thm.jpg'
b770b2324a493e1414522b37ae4d748e
109d5fe429657ea48ce5e56c99ca50879d2c7d97
'2012-05-27T21:18:34-04:00'
describe
'84603' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALZJ' 'sip-files00229.QC.jpg'
c3219bc5ec53327595a822ea27383f38
b5d85e1a3679d1f5857f54ff22d15ec2550f2174
describe
'33187' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALZK' 'sip-files00164thm.jpg'
47a60437f89aef4b156cd73b60d01f5f
dc423fecde4f1942522735519f038807c32b8827
describe
'45175' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALZL' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
facc47a9b925d59b97eb52e5a6fc5806
1b181a6c13844643f1bc7a61efca3222ea36e180
describe
'36391' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALZM' 'sip-files00324thm.jpg'
7d5b12ab9c4baa6415b58d4860a898cd
58ab604fab2ba25bdc3afed618a46f993481aa82
describe
'31420' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALZN' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
92987d2b20eb468eb922b3c8a5891626
5fcb66801fb75109fe6ac0e2ebb81b164244b179
describe
'81775' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALZO' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
48edf5b1c7dcef843f6c17197640a90e
ed2814ba4c098c26550cfb350cf8c7a5a3becc5b
describe
'83170' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALZP' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
769d8496d62235f7f3b3f8e157ddaadc
5b993ace2def7dade4d0828a2b971b3959144509
describe
'100032' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALZQ' 'sip-files00328.QC.jpg'
fa4ee221ec00f8f9e685d89a747a2933
64408964e80ffaf9a831d859ee8b4ff7ca4d110f
describe
'35101' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALZR' 'sip-files00301thm.jpg'
d810a9556b25f07cc3f8d0f2778b0f2d
5a23ccb80099bef532f292e508802b979b1da60b
'2012-05-27T21:26:56-04:00'
describe
'37180' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALZS' 'sip-files00338thm.jpg'
7a2260190ec31096fa39cc524019ade0
4537514e34a3c8adfcbe1eb5873b3fd052d5679a
describe
'33791' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALZT' 'sip-files00285thm.jpg'
a2127cead0e6cee9fd4fa5cce7d96c40
1cf6a56d11fddae6976c8e75c9e90a09fa34a24c
describe
'75190' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALZU' 'sip-files00321.QC.jpg'
e590f69f36640258628cd27f7a4c7cbd
90ea47e852e184d6c6d46060b4263636f8bf138e
describe
'32771' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALZV' 'sip-files00230thm.jpg'
72b80eccd0f5c9ebd0ea92536174340d
0f28f892c206119a2d11afc0e247253d52c5ba49
describe
'99518' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALZW' 'sip-files00311.QC.jpg'
c086d41e3d3522d16d33eef8f559ebae
7c6c04f6ffca318517ea25c56035e9b765d3ee6f
describe
'80584' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALZX' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
e98523187de32386d05c12ed02d47081
3ca7b29fdb169a1392b78f4bea4350d2267e2b9e
describe
'88403' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALZY' 'sip-files00339.QC.jpg'
b53db0c79aa3e37b9434e2967402299b
967e93dcba565dd8b61a3d0cccfe7ed7657228bc
describe
'81727' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAALZZ' 'sip-files00307.QC.jpg'
5d492026124c830885ac9b04b46872e3
93f3a2776ec7b1e068a27ea9db4e48384380428b
describe
'35051' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMAA' 'sip-files00294thm.jpg'
87305059e9a24f43cb8c2766dff9b123
a48230a5a4d1facf9c645b5ad7aaee5652b8d7bb
describe
'90332' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMAB' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
df6cecd11ef17c318c4054794f2ae745
0570fe73c519c7814a1c905ab5f930feb1ce7bab
describe
'33282' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMAC' 'sip-files00005.QC.jpg'
bcc2a25720a4dc8314c54cab4d6190d6
438af243f9baf5ae43a4a2aca7a79e9da6cd054f
describe
'34710' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMAD' 'sip-files00271thm.jpg'
32996c76a2e2af4c83594f67ba844984
d4e76b1a12c1f5ef02024b4002ff4f0321ee19ce
describe
'94254' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMAE' 'sip-files00262.QC.jpg'
668bd47cfd2167c6bb2b1a2b42f9a8d2
8a932eb094a1d22a49b96d8fe2592d456e26f22a
describe
'31873' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMAF' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
a64e52de1f057edfee6987296aacd32e
5dca972b90f260ed0c2be93862bc7256b6b74be9
describe
'33637' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMAG' 'sip-files00245thm.jpg'
ac835411771def56d51c183f3112e828
7ae22406cc28130f7587cdd77ec275845a3b558f
describe
'91777' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMAH' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
d2db1c6a323cd9d692008c0c824bd1a7
dd72765de72e1f55a7b60031aa911c5694a3b938
describe
'87148' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMAI' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
25d6d4e7e0d52b6ac98951b482adfffc
332136af998bd552a30ff9c46c572d10e410c61c
describe
'94264' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMAJ' 'sip-files00275.QC.jpg'
254d43465d9a4edfd2039aa09f98a86a
29e44eec278ee3272257952e2b9ac527903900a3
describe
'28770' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMAK' 'sip-files00319thm.jpg'
edbd075d1cb0a22484a4ebd4e30db93b
4df7000112a27b4c1ecd3b7b2507f1b3c2ff2187
describe
'75783' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMAL' 'sip-files00233.QC.jpg'
18429728abfbdf85434b6a66a2d56df5
226a094dad20561d76347bdb1ff97fad3c9f0421
describe
'34732' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMAM' 'sip-files00295thm.jpg'
2401dbf635ad8743d2e755f84693a46e
d7de59087aa2db22310dd94395e8d82b8e936c33
describe
'79097' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMAN' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
d292c6863e9e93353ae8707590fab7bf
e7ca3fde18ec1ef13954491994af19c62ca0fd9a
describe
'33450' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMAO' 'sip-files00200thm.jpg'
78403474d4b69fb19e8a9c04d7c21278
20c3579f660707b401bbef4cce045b93f0999b1e
describe
'22354' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMAP' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
5de75c7773f1fc51ecd180def88964e1
52329ed508b3d76f7fb8a1dca320dba863e28d60
describe
'92251' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMAQ' 'sip-files00316.QC.jpg'
8cd1233928ca57743bdddc3edf68d9e8
c5b65fd59067856fcde9980d344cbb9a12682f6c
describe
'88719' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMAR' 'sip-files00175.QC.jpg'
a70d9c364675555a3836f8dba9f6a3b8
39bb81a40139348a9e6c44c16c0b9f3cf046de35
describe
'85672' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMAS' 'sip-files00340.QC.jpg'
71bb57ddbdc6377723626e407dfa938b
f0a404ad2191905f3747ac41bc6090c35cdc5437
describe
'33181' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMAT' 'sip-files00228thm.jpg'
a795c339029a31e203a5d24ebf5c7760
90654cd1ea3f3bbadbb4d8b3665d06235640efaf
describe
'33053' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMAU' 'sip-files00137thm.jpg'
0ce3c7609bbfa93dc29e2395fbeed6bb
a1e7f4c175451c1e4e9ffdee1e75440852e2218b
describe
'35390' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMAV' 'sip-files00002thm.jpg'
e1498a76a6f07c11a8544b0321f6e045
1a4e9e172224cd24b435eb027e2e25cd14e45c46
describe
'33296' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMAW' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
b2945368d0dfdf905320af08461da0f0
539b405393461d9dec0688bebc9b7740bb77343f
describe
'87907' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMAX' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
a08fd0ccef3c8c997e4e9222a8cb1460
8176e704f33852b17043c98a0e489d375d4ba503
describe
'31798' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMAY' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
24d17781f1b27bf891007610f7ff891c
28524859f978e3eb439521c3bea98d38e133d693
describe
'79303' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMAZ' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
d88c6935dcdf678f5250bf380d79a408
32671ec30365040d0afa517bcf06e4c15309a954
describe
'28304' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMBA' 'sip-files00225thm.jpg'
80136362e4c7240ac0f136f28e25b2f2
c45f58a56e4d1ee8cd1330ff910259022525b170
describe
'37344' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMBB' 'sip-files00187.QC.jpg'
b9435a35ee7b12428745e5bef907d60f
51de376c60aac5999a092af38b3cff346eb16c15
describe
'84804' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMBC' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
45229a628985762d79f77fa098c95677
709a08dde42de007feb4592dec2925714c65943a
describe
'36957' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMBD' 'sip-files00312thm.jpg'
ada6fa7ca978aa1c15552aabd7ae6103
1861eb5807e0e374905b99536d33e911a3f81d58
describe
'26798' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMBE' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
ab51f60fbf890369645b8884a6e1909f
7352637a76748ccbef12e2512fd35c3c109006c8
describe
'31122' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMBF' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
3f6e7e3c92bfc2dce7a0eab17f653005
ffa8910a868b23fd2cb3253ec9d06e9ffddcf4d2
describe
'82861' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMBG' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
f6fc2f974b8b3b9d977cf084fab91472
1408d7f39cda1e00b9f9fce3e96c64841a0d356f
describe
'100401' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMBH' 'sip-files00332.QC.jpg'
02d31170f3350b8302e3a03e05ca2c4a
2f9a9ddcdc8b2f59b8dd4d8223862a4cf2a30765
describe
'31621' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMBI' 'sip-files00193thm.jpg'
348e17605cffeb81588364b5f927aa32
6c5a9d9bf6635ae2fd6c89bebbd3b1dc1bb2b542
describe
'29586' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMBJ' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
5b8c53612a8efb99b030ddfe946665d0
ab6114828cb6d337dd7c1888b84e24609c4e9c9b
describe
'95183' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMBK' 'sip-files00273.QC.jpg'
bdd413215ea50b70cbda951cc0120b48
eb12125d7d4edb4505352d86faf09402d51bd62d
describe
'30120' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMBL' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
86e8176a22062abd3376fc377cbc4cd2
3350860e532666afcc64304527dd8c7f7a157729
describe
'37525' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMBM' 'sip-files00332thm.jpg'
dd727457129b3a9c0b3a46c135b2fa4f
f9b0f813060c7220c6a5db612be4a8dcdf44059d
describe
'28124' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMBN' 'sip-files00317thm.jpg'
8641da3bf8a1f57792f70c80b2ab36fe
295660b2e1de345ade0019d9a70669808019547d
describe
'30164' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMBO' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
b906f620f6b53c8eb57784962abecdbf
861880bb738a99c39090614c66359596e8513653
describe
'78236' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMBP' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
ede9bef8dce3335fbeb6ac8bac834761
bec82057774be8b6c9956cdf1c99edb8e2c9ae0a
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMBQ' 'sip-files00181thm.jpg'
5ac0678afe1bf297d3a38480dbcb8a64
9c2ebb2c9d1353cade7f08566ee74a4b8791eae9
describe
'33024' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMBR' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
b27f3d3fae58653f7e53cec42d4eac68
dc81663148e1adbf2cbfe3f7db29b29ec2bc6f5b
describe
'83379' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMBS' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
801d55905d29d0f1ea24aaea931091be
fafaf3e248300984e25b8972220355bbac4013ad
describe
'31034' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMBT' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
481b6c1b9ce10ae34db106fd15716317
d2ea7005d03ff59c22ca541361ffac4a6b4a70ec
describe
'33559' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMBU' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
d3d23d19e5f331992cd7432fb27fa28e
365c3af8e449f196dc167425be010f399c5307a8
describe
'32444' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMBV' 'sip-files00152thm.jpg'
bfbb0999e5bfe3858c14296ced0390de
14b4f81b912c6417afa512ed4951d62ad04c6d2b
describe
'77345' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMBW' 'sip-files00241.QC.jpg'
1740293f808793ee5529535500c0f1c9
3bafd4fa2e1485aaabf0f186913cf64f4a162587
describe
'79409' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMBX' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
819380574a12ae04dbd0093ec642c914
4c473eed3925af70f028d8ca74a3dc55866c546d
describe
'33170' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMBY' 'sip-files00270thm.jpg'
c3563cd6ab49a3833f736277393d8794
fed923699965d8111493f117c3c92179cb5518ff
describe
'33881' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMBZ' 'sip-files00167thm.jpg'
ac2167dfaf4b9b2b87338e0b27863876
8dc31dc7efaa45e30af5aed16394f0d18370aeb7
describe
'68214' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMCA' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
6150fb0c6d0eafb5a1830f1cdcece35d
7b0e23232f5c8e2f3d41ac391a0672014b3293f2
describe
'99997' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMCB' 'sip-files00313.QC.jpg'
902b7051d0d2ab5b38fef3f8af8b3714
a3b8f9935b6c917f44943c30b9ffa6190e1dd52f
describe
'26206' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMCC' 'sip-files00165thm.jpg'
763145c7668856ecd4f703117dd644e7
f3d56e8dac86502b8f9e18e6831c800d7f6e6a53
describe
'31878' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMCD' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
430fb00a41d63c1122510f1144c9e7a0
080bd2700236321b966ff6ab1fb270842f13feb5
describe
'81723' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMCE' 'sip-files00281.QC.jpg'
c612f75269d5a0142a709e4a61eb5fc6
a3e9c3671a7f8921164b9ca4001e0692ae19ad45
'2012-05-27T21:19:31-04:00'
describe
'100978' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMCF' 'sip-files00002.QC.jpg'
ed050e2c4769238bda6f5eec0a338769
0779f96569afee46a13603b6a6bea6c9411a7a0f
describe
'81102' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMCG' 'sip-files00144.QC.jpg'
e22f4deeeb4794bc47149a26fed4125d
d48ed9edf4cf7db48e94f779dd8cb7495f120598
describe
'81759' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMCH' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
4f97c32489c7d13f1fc67e91f9409deb
cb690f59d794252e4706fa80c0a759d78c529249
describe
'33445' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMCI' 'sip-files00140thm.jpg'
a9ef6aaa0a29d62547b9b2fe9fb49c61
17ffe4d0450787d3707d093c2c60010ef9c94dc0
describe
'33088' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMCJ' 'sip-files00194thm.jpg'
152081c816e246fcc9fc55098a31a371
529bd2f4ab30e1218b08e53065b154754f759e85
'2012-05-27T21:18:50-04:00'
describe
'34021' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMCK' 'sip-files00162thm.jpg'
9768c230d415368c05efd877e345dba0
2c3240fdb544d057d35c946c1cd4fe0c252904c1
describe
'39938' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMCL' 'sip-files00344.QC.jpg'
450cade1239a0f4d887e69fdf01dca00
5754c5a4adc1ef29ffb32fb8647df798db2fc639
describe
'33117' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMCM' 'sip-files00191thm.jpg'
a2e38deb7948b5090144c7d88ccc7792
56e3b319f5c19b201bcfb51aca99d93a99d41a6e
describe
'34695' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMCN' 'sip-files00296thm.jpg'
71acf40fb5453a6b5dc62df155280468
2a4119014dfab85bde06643e9589971020210919
describe
'33132' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMCO' 'sip-files00226thm.jpg'
24b1141ed48d160685646473ba7553c1
8cf462e91a5887da31302d28fb71e49836e3ed78
describe
'94828' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMCP' 'sip-files00314.QC.jpg'
801b5964ef078df3695c2040d6cb3492
19cb61cff861ffb4a11a5680ffcb3ec5f7df88ee
describe
'26977' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMCQ' 'sip-files00209thm.jpg'
90179a1c27745babf003fbb65da6dd46
cb0d1d5b4e13901d1fff8d43de87f5ba2efed66f
describe
'80143' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMCR' 'sip-files00149.QC.jpg'
92fc3069047c68f946bb3a51cb1c33d6
a3d8b09dc398ef57f654a2cf09692a12145f076c
describe
'33636' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMCS' 'sip-files00254thm.jpg'
2867a0b5730d2e17fdeb041c6050d17b
d9591ca720cdbd76a5797823e2a7bdb7b8cf0eef
describe
'70844' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMCT' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
3bec2b6bdda2b64d277f79e7745c90a1
42f0212f2bcc32e95980c625fe404771043263e1
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMCU' 'sip-files00289thm.jpg'
e0f33cbea71c27b69410dd61ffc92d7b
9426361e8f07dc26562435afa74085d46cf2322a
describe
'35239' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMCV' 'sip-files00293thm.jpg'
ac4fe89ba5c7332ae919f814e6fa43cf
30a0b1d255a29e1ea5a9ba20deb72638c82d42f3
describe
'32925' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMCW' 'sip-files00155thm.jpg'
574e32aaa5c37071db18d3acaa9b93c8
71a273922ded2ad31a15cce6377b36f158e5bf8d
describe
'26494' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMCX' 'sip-files00290thm.jpg'
1c5f05baf3021e908385d4ce6bc0a788
01cf606b09a7762ea82f576b5149ef22bb5cf144
describe
'29802' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMCY' 'sip-files00141thm.jpg'
fa64ec6bebab99af3f9749da298490c1
915273b3fe8dacb4e1b7fcc83b476118922b29ea
describe
'32886' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMCZ' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
ab1b43f98cf131e3ee9ae59a0ce727c5
8e9cb7cef60a3760240d1dcd2527557a7ec03543
describe
'74989' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMDA' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
40595526392d23157a2ef3a529f21ccc
84e7a2d281453d208b138e6433e1f900018da4e3
describe
'93673' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMDB' 'sip-files00269.QC.jpg'
bbe0e2d0f4dc37ad85087ed1fdd5cc9a
a11952af8bc160ae030e190d11826ebbfecc5744
describe
'93264' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMDC' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
e828da769ac4f83c6dbf34793db2bd8f
f77ca594a6b734e1effc76ec9652845720bd6d84
describe
'94790' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMDD' 'sip-files00261.QC.jpg'
6e6b9a2b51acf66d9ec11536ae4781e3
945fdf44bf0389df1e56f5f4b9487fe86782bce6
describe
'80562' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMDE' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
7a29c6adbb9830a2dbe3253da82640ee
59c91bd975cb77b31a8ca721932ee6738841697f
describe
'84295' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMDF' 'sip-files00153.QC.jpg'
22f9f79b7cd05b07091f51ba0026e964
be5f28f5a77c8a14da85ad1281f1e09e58ee3dd6
describe
'50013' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMDG' 'sip-files00160.QC.jpg'
0dbf384387535b9bc111641c23aaa39b
acfeab7eed35e29c92163f7a65b75fefdfd4c7ed
describe
'93093' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMDH' 'sip-files00299.QC.jpg'
b862a46eae3ef7174f5b0cd79b0771b4
bb2f22a09706262a072ff5a2d1885fab94aed570
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMDI' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
f92553d19368b94191ba9ad1471a7ae0
4d87bdc612af857ca6d36aa6177c103285540554
describe
'32772' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMDJ' 'sip-files00220thm.jpg'
348e2dae6b27f8d3dc1a42abad1ac244
f41b11e26499c53d768517ea0e706b32824e03a7
describe
'90761' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMDK' 'sip-files00284.QC.jpg'
ac14bd0ab3e16b1d7b7d54027e7d73c4
14b0f9182d08d48bded9300fd334102c36049555
describe
'30499' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMDL' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
49d0a26e3b4d35fe46d65050c54314eb
b779a153c0eabea54b5e9c2cc633df64c7efa19c
describe
'31448' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMDM' 'sip-files00211thm.jpg'
b19e84693fc4d58691fa5e0897820656
c263ec3ee10e6d1de8606b70e9491c25048cd64b
describe
'85076' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMDN' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
670b5e164968291e95da2310cd5108eb
7508c1ea1cd76501b87bdf812f204c54a29215db
describe
'33060' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMDO' 'sip-files00236thm.jpg'
ac5ab1cc5acaa4d654935c5128d239e7
25cb2be0ab8b870582de449e8b51ff4c9b18b87a
describe
'84970' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMDP' 'sip-files00278.QC.jpg'
22cbd43d3f207e122d7162a5577bef97
9497fd14db5ed6957e1efb1bdf6d0168070f7beb
describe
'80015' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMDQ' 'sip-files00248.QC.jpg'
8f812ed0fa6eb474328de0665cff51f6
f19bb4a54e8728daed634de7517dd98d71fe8894
describe
'78123' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMDR' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
f829c087d3cb09898e2a367f80d40db6
260da54b198519f2d33b9b50591e5079ce6cb335
'2012-05-27T21:24:36-04:00'
describe
'26075' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMDS' 'sip-files00240thm.jpg'
f1ee9dd3258f6e3e017f1a277c76d39c
d45b302e4217d207debd2f524acd14a37f3819f2
describe
'37400' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMDT' 'sip-files00334thm.jpg'
981b219848c58b64de255aad3ac97eef
4f9a02176d6edd2bca3143233bababa075590d9d
describe
'90013' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMDU' 'sip-files00204.QC.jpg'
1d6daa12cb24b1a85c0a8979f51d084a
96d1d68e0c0a6057265769ac26f8822d42891fd0
describe
'36736' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMDV' 'sip-files00323thm.jpg'
be19a949af98f1104d44db664a8f4762
d3444fd5d7a87dd0540494b20dc1dbd08569ec62
'2012-05-27T21:32:04-04:00'
describe
'31340' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMDW' 'sip-files00233thm.jpg'
8dd1b719d3091b9ab00ca380bbc9fc9e
5a681a3a29745631f401170b03f069d7fb679929
describe
'91780' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMDX' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
a523d2e2ee939c5d7b5861f7faef8190
2d481166a6a45e07629d3e5ad9648b3495882779
describe
'73677' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMDY' 'sip-files00309.QC.jpg'
01092afbd7f6f34c45e8a80d77852e5d
084ec6e79926f1c10189f1e464b488f07bd36040
describe
'31391' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMDZ' 'sip-files00188thm.jpg'
a997357986ea56f48139d34a844f711b
96a37774d88c5ee512e9d5c53a111a117fe885ba
describe
'75960' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMEA' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
73b9ba66e9045b0e54eb264796d95d2b
58151b76c5ade63264b27418178db4e6e215de1d
describe
'85733' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMEB' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
8da316c43881e922c478035ad8e1ea3e
c4e1b28aff61f66a4e774c50642fb74be62a5a7a
describe
'33715' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMEC' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
6c75b2df8a163bf06392d0249d0fec7e
c9bd870d458062be0bb494a279e4c42f153c0540
describe
'79319' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMED' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
47e7fe9faeb5d369be40c59379bbdc9b
8ee5650b12318b1440c1027f51af2429634e55d3
describe
'28417' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMEE' 'sip-files00345.QC.jpg'
4921f1b7ddee8c94bc0620258368ea5b
eb9dfdd38b1e6b3ddda21ae324ad4854bf0b2bb3
describe
'36099' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMEF' 'sip-files00279thm.jpg'
1d28efa2b3759d297babed9474d25d46
7f3825d44c6c3cb3b127a5eae534f747dbc40a90
describe
'95469' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMEG' 'sip-files00263.QC.jpg'
9281698d0f207a9dddd92750a4783e1e
7ba97e6a529dcebdad2489865763a20a5d3eb88b
describe
'84755' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMEH' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
94ef8865413508a1932e3a7f3cdbd2f8
75d7237127c37b1c977a15576e14c2f14320215d
describe
'87046' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMEI' 'sip-files00221.QC.jpg'
d387be7bbf673a672c3155403b2e046b
669af30880d92282266865875eae8645c8b245a0
describe
'28930' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMEJ' 'sip-files00144thm.jpg'
35872f3df3f4943a2cc768416d41cfd8
9e7d2fc3c820f25f44b542621d9da4c425cfd253
describe
'32382' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMEK' 'sip-files00199thm.jpg'
9bc5a6c67ada0eea30e6133d7d4c9626
97d40e818b00247db018b310ff99f4d765a97931
describe
'32015' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMEL' 'sip-files00151thm.jpg'
81d9b35b1a2a9b0488a258e4e50bf25d
823d2b2c638cfeb766bea2973deca4ba333fd512
describe
'35825' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMEM' 'sip-files00316thm.jpg'
0c98a89bf76d7a191a7520300df99a15
b976936da600bb3f3b9bfda76c5822c5092e0ad2
describe
'32462' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMEN' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
6171b1ca47a17b89308a1e51c40d23fa
99496f17596a88e566d1857197b1e54c7d9d898c
describe
'85914' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMEO' 'sip-files00151.QC.jpg'
8c1397a923375e64e0de4bb48de8ebae
b711a4bff70c0f753b9dc9a9a595c3a2a4ebb17f
describe
'96442' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMEP' 'sip-files00334.QC.jpg'
455f5efbb3c9f9cf5e92928f405cd117
d82fd3563b03753b17ca33f73b99ec7cda9c31a8
describe
'87147' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMEQ' 'sip-files00242.QC.jpg'
410433ac829f6758e84f3edf0d3e2a59
387743ffabaf1f96665a86f1ae1e252d25fbd49c
describe
'24275' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMER' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
c4abff17fd5bc8b3aadbc00ae77bb860
46cb21fb5080831182d2c1109a7b20888dbe4004
'2012-05-30T08:53:06-04:00'
describe
'32215' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMES' 'sip-files00229thm.jpg'
834e4b08af9e7a8129e31269f7f98edd
3804558e21b7ac191aa58c74a384294dcab7462c
describe
'93371' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMET' 'sip-files00322.QC.jpg'
515e6a0ffa199e489eb119dc05308775
ed0004ef7e37865efe8e73b3ea631a000ed8a3f3
describe
'70284' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMEU' 'sip-files00001.QC.jpg'
1d4a1f7a6dd897e03aba2110eb089fdc
21369cad8a77d1af7b7c08c8da9c5217553e06f8
describe
'81929' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMEV' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
3b197067cf6fb14c8a9d19077345547b
cd9db7beee924233097cdbebb68e64f694740f02
describe
'33423' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMEW' 'sip-files00244thm.jpg'
9c0f003f1c3594480f3bee77eee0612b
a5986535c7714893efd380f7198d2e89c2c46ceb
describe
'32844' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMEX' 'sip-files00238thm.jpg'
0d6758b9821726718da68c0949a55473
d7494d28c677d0c186ea3338d14a5ee9598f0bda
describe
'22950' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMEY' 'sip-files00158.QC.jpg'
1c52884ee22346774e10bfd1c030feca
d04e5e3daa0e1b17e920a2f61450d5dfb1dcf652
describe
'27675' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMEZ' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
a9e419509cf9a20153262189d725422a
533d65a097c07bdc531e4e4f0590c98c481dec0b
'2012-05-27T21:29:28-04:00'
describe
'55062' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMFA' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
0b4f4546d10c17159a88992f4f2a3668
4d91ed2cad6dd0b887f6ca00f000e8ab960b3231
describe
'37192' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMFB' 'sip-files00336thm.jpg'
9014b7a59fc19c79a7f444cdd611dd75
8463c9f0860a79a477985dfbc02ae03da05cf6ef
describe
'17668' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMFC' 'sip-files00007thm.jpg'
3d080220ccab4e510a1e94da7f2825b9
e7bbca87c46a1c2f4ea43c26ac712b27747b27ea
describe
'33917' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMFD' 'sip-files00136thm.jpg'
3bb0927237d25830f253e7b539bc4840
2f67faa4e4254bb83995ae459ce6f765a42cfe6e
describe
'9377' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMFE' 'sip-files00006thm.jpg'
71790a4bdb563b5e97ef0608517ed1fc
5d7859336724203e57846fd5160bfe164ce34604
describe
'83154' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMFF' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
b865ac9d749faa0516c591dda0678e13
daf0a3e51eab35d0d44e16181173b34632722941
describe
'32266' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMFG' 'sip-files00257thm.jpg'
d217c3d18b138c891d93a1c2624f55bc
4ff171ca8e2688195b6b21646109c87e694dc0e9
describe
'28605' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMFH' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
022ff91c72f553508c9b5a3f2c02ae4f
53183aebee77ce1a1cc58307b4565a2978f19c70
describe
'87638' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMFI' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
68098a01b3264da33f480309aac98e19
6a0cb59a7615d61f386087a0421b17dc733120b4
describe
'86704' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMFJ' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
e570f3de2f17341bae3e30881274db8c
4da060c68358fa368e4695397ae974fc1c4d6d23
describe
'26254' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMFK' 'sip-files00207thm.jpg'
318e0e5ecb2df3f5d8d0bbdbac7a4e68
bac666c3a856015980fef432b1b118d72419d2a6
describe
'31371' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMFL' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
2b4bbb147498c694d7314693991e0b5e
87f6e12a6d51d3a7cb8ecf208ce17e964a9389e4
describe
'34987' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMFM' 'sip-files00132thm.jpg'
91092ee898d7dd6729ad42c5cee1b0b0
68950930c7970cc89bf46be61ff8c181142e78a0
describe
'91934' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMFN' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
0d889baefccb37488a8716169b31890b
4048273d0171bc12da562a0d1bbfd8b448eb20a2
describe
'88402' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMFO' 'sip-files00228.QC.jpg'
db393ca05574ca5898bdbf9ab0bda075
57163558e599822ffdfdc10d7ba9aff20de6363e
describe
'80329' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMFP' 'sip-files00215.QC.jpg'
4f5db2fa0c5124880edb0e6a754169fd
a11071f46ac437b5acfa9bc32d6050f259ff6d4f
describe
'33186' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMFQ' 'sip-files00205thm.jpg'
45625f760263b3dd7a49da1d97e24e16
dcc4e8990168143dea309fa9224071ecabf0e54a
describe
'84465' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMFR' 'sip-files00146.QC.jpg'
e01da92a47c41d3a76158fc4bb0f6858
2d03d4635076e8b4f1b681bb664eb9f672771088
describe
'89641' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMFS' 'sip-files00254.QC.jpg'
500f573bf0f58d78a56c8136d8f4cfbd
8b908e2506b3314795baf053ef211be792b6de4f
describe
'27023' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMFT' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
ba3d2b863108993a4d353ebac4648923
8342a3b56646d286920d4e2bd1fa0e23df58696f
describe
'85755' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMFU' 'sip-files00218.QC.jpg'
a391c4a69234d336064442abe568a1cb
582f651d9d38652dd72c85b35da3ba9bca5f1a5d
describe
'94307' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMFV' 'sip-files00272.QC.jpg'
9073fbb5addfec2c19657d4aa7f6abf1
28b422a59f4829917932188de5404bbadd5c679f
describe
'34559' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMFW' 'sip-files00190thm.jpg'
eb09df590660e8c138f3dc0c85872cb4
3d21f709f9c47ea20030b21c0b32886baf6e5db1
describe
'89877' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMFX' 'sip-files00270.QC.jpg'
630db9f559e9d2042fcf1f0c0cf93877
166504f32957fa6e07e84c3d92ae0c673e252349
describe
'34737' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMFY' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
ad32c1ac5e1a10a621d80504ade20ff2
abee7f60ad7a5095fe29e55d5ef0931a147072b8
describe
'88273' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMFZ' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
a0c42cecde7baa8c4253870927e28927
4270b148acebe5203b366adbba24a4e0455a7f43
describe
'35707' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMGA' 'sip-files00322thm.jpg'
6bd638566d84c68bfa77c2771095eb88
977e53e57764672406e006ef445d389eb8fea4cb
describe
'90148' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMGB' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
8434c50082f2239a6de11cb93f80d27b
c2952f9e9aecd26e3b65f601b780552a8b351bd5
describe
'33590' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMGC' 'sip-files00242thm.jpg'
8b2ea05b6f5b9d0a84fdffce4d6c35e6
1c3be8e3e2bc7c6ce12857e767255cc7b30d98c6
'2012-05-27T21:25:57-04:00'
describe
'31931' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMGD' 'sip-files00150thm.jpg'
3f39c76528e7fdc7cfdabb4de20cb236
7d480d3b464599b40a826d314817cac7fbf3222c
describe
'68697' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMGE' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
9e08ea7d06bc11e2fa9a6dd1db638481
42d8a8764f0a52fcd46174b904de8eda4389eac5
describe
'88670' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMGF' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
e3983d13dcff685016ffb592b62c8cb2
d3c8cba919d0f1feff9d6fcceb02c9f1adf555c0
describe
'33658' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMGG' 'sip-files00156thm.jpg'
bb564fd382eaef13da417604d54e32cc
2851458a2813482b004b46b2f5f556a360a2f6f4
describe
'32508' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMGH' 'sip-files00221thm.jpg'
3448283a5fe9f34d5a6554c07e67cd7f
02301d9412a4844fd4bcd3d70e8d1d97371df047
describe
'82857' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMGI' 'sip-files00318.QC.jpg'
733bd5fac6bfb73bdb1da2e9ad92bd2c
a8c03e496bf253ad7d6bc36284d77b3bffb790c0
describe
'32288' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMGJ' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
6cc7465c50d503ad8af4076cefe0ccb7
c277395ce8cc7a532237f6053a36ebaf12d37183
describe
'33862' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMGK' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
cfc4d2f528fbc090bb38aaa73d0071c1
657f2f40c47a7f16ef2bc880af89a97a1d4b895e
describe
'30648' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMGL' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
8a28d068d2bc694cf7fcb0ebdef2c933
062b8209835b76bad5384936dedb203859bf20f9
describe
'84868' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMGM' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
e26d9c4f1d3eb165cbcd5eec585f15b2
cb6a746ea2d543c933cb239b9912478453c41d54
describe
'36578' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMGN' 'sip-files00320thm.jpg'
927aea56e9270893926e58b28e865256
b9025b76eaef071115298d4fe32d7e6241d95888
describe
'27460' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMGO' 'sip-files00325thm.jpg'
8db521b762a73f421d5d3adb9c6babf7
b51d2b4898ed6eb39df5c8de076f42afc0641783
describe
'33264' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMGP' 'sip-files00256thm.jpg'
3d84e1c7e98cdd1c0ac43475af874738
396a3e27a33474b1884a90ebe1e840a819da35d9
describe
'73509' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMGQ' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
decb150262ad1a0115620a1002670a85
95bb08120b14e535380c046c4f6a76f782dfad43
'2012-05-27T21:22:06-04:00'
describe
'92566' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMGR' 'sip-files00200.QC.jpg'
0307a13b96df48b2a8376b980861eadc
ea85cb8088ea6f41b4089bd08845223c555aa996
describe
'25541' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMGS' 'sip-files00258.QC.jpg'
24f512b24176461265a8ec9dd09d0c1f
f8b88d9e6bb4b455c7be4c10b0a36925a1f2f808
describe
'78900' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMGT' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
750525b5e1e32d914f991c4dbad54a74
3ba6927b64a51ee55285a60a4faba939f9bd03c6
describe
'88851' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMGU' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
58d2f63f3cea0debb2f79ccac0f27dbd
d0cc5ec62020dbab46c93c283b23cb071ddaa9da
describe
'81521' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMGV' 'sip-files00235.QC.jpg'
ceab8d4bed45610cb6f3caf87c4e971f
2de786b55764246eb76f311f38d36eabb175b931
describe
'57340' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMGW' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
0822beeecbdd84b23140532efeb552b6
4d1a53a194d08d0efb6d4daaefc78c9ab5510254
describe
'74198' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMGX' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
03a2b4192b8d8d65ea0b2d7a10d622e2
467a6648908898211ce8b1ae6b4ac1567989c339
describe
'86263' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMGY' 'sip-files00213.QC.jpg'
9c6398aedff0a7332833c035b197f682
f64fb458c6bf21b0c4fc36de4fd84f52ff90b993
describe
'31429' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMGZ' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
46e708f0ce56b09c87d8ee29033cafff
f218b6ad26cf1be67b5114f2fdb3f91baa0f127f
describe
'34950' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMHA' 'sip-files00299thm.jpg'
a486c0bddf51d3d5815a272b9f389eb0
6c268b4efbc2f2da90deabc3ae075d522cbc4016
describe
'89642' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMHB' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
abdec7ee3d3de102f77e4513482624c2
b481b72ff4cd6bca6f1a8958c2a6f1ce7774ef20
describe
'32099' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMHC' 'sip-files00185thm.jpg'
5b3ea6b93aac68003020657c63af7a6b
22d71b3658978f7710ccec408c10fa534dac2576
'2012-05-27T21:27:53-04:00'
describe
'32330' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMHD' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
a324aada0b3e2ebfca1323b468c69ab1
1317d212714075bd5b4ba7741006eaeefa668a1d
describe
'31993' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMHE' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
57a75fb510e19e5cfee9ca079509e174
68602a1fbb50ce021e1c99fb5699457548a1825d
describe
'84724' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMHF' 'sip-files00185.QC.jpg'
9c7996f4e2f7c18def029e8a628820da
6d8a886a824d2827f079920adee772411d52c74c
describe
'25640' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMHG' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
567f5715cf4eb40405a27f12d4839f44
ec6c7e17da82045e816c0f010f48065799684fce
'2012-05-27T21:25:35-04:00'
describe
'85431' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMHH' 'sip-files00227.QC.jpg'
e9fe337c405a6464923f71ad0b3c63cb
43b176de1c70cf7836213009f75cbb6ccc7b32b1
describe
'72325' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMHI' 'sip-files00165.QC.jpg'
b833e82f3a7aef7a96a3301c670de53e
f50fb8a6ba73af43eef3213e7fedc76161cf1ac5
describe
'32412' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMHJ' 'sip-files00251thm.jpg'
c60e35d2085d6f2545e8ca1eca01c948
58eb9416fd20ac4aa5e8993c7f203f4b65390db1
describe
'16986' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMHK' 'sip-files00003thm.jpg'
ea530421ad05e3479ea4f0e8fbe77773
302567d65410db7dd119ab7019fd58c353547416
describe
'33116' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMHL' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
bd951687459e5aa25baca3ad395afcc8
c358b557dde4885f80ab900eec739c44150cade8
describe
'80175' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMHM' 'sip-files00251.QC.jpg'
b6e6321db827d8c17ee3d270e24a3ab3
59de332be390b321131ec0a3357d3c02e482506b
describe
'32129' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMHN' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
c0820e4ea2a21a167614f170be8d105d
6b305e422001377f1e291af8fde5347443feded5
describe
'76047' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMHO' 'sip-files00203.QC.jpg'
c35320a263960b0ec0a0c281fb606c6b
88a5e13af391e0c1768a7e4d60ae8592c5be6726
'2012-05-30T08:53:13-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMHP' 'sip-files00326thm.jpg'
15890a89de54c58904d05e9fc7180f7c
6c86e57335402d0ea00c39ea50623aaaeb6069aa
describe
'68419' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMHQ' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
f82cab7135e746adfcb02720c6dff124
226b115dba5930a70499be618fbeae165fe27487
describe
'72094' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMHR' 'sip-files00268.QC.jpg'
b3182e088b9d7aca2b1699088a3840f2
3e99b410e5936bcf600d4ab5a54220f54d479f55
describe
'85737' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMHS' 'sip-files00135.QC.jpg'
f6234f69d66271b6332e615418ea9094
470f297a5e70a2e097d7ee8bd3a6c4cc3a74eef1
describe
'39735' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMHT' 'sip-files00004.QC.jpg'
5c425f6492fdb8867bf7ec60137a1d2b
586c9e4db5409c9d768fe01ba1869a7de1bafbdd
describe
'35422' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMHU' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
20444f70cbc2a8a0dadf13ec976373b6
ebae3b9e8e990c5413265ceb991be68780427107
describe
'89686' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMHV' 'sip-files00208.QC.jpg'
bad9c2c990f3f2a39b421d21a20649d2
311f0569b8f598d36b38d0b2a6f1db7a109992f9
describe
'30029' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMHW' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
25c6662133d4bb8bcb32785f252cb5f7
1219357f9614a3d93184c813e273ed899fdf968e
describe
'31925' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMHX' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
15b164e0b05bc379e60dcdfffc96c80c
6ffa26781c97ee094f81331279a7d836f2edc1ef
describe
'32646' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMHY' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
07b65308257f62f6c576fe8117e3bd39
5c7ef0d0ccd66f0faa12f2190c99fe76c77f4b4c
describe
'78654' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMHZ' 'sip-files00286.QC.jpg'
ab961ca0eec91395880063a1ed818dbf
8a64b5cfb65a83a6e598da5ebdf97e3718231006
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMIA' 'sip-files00246thm.jpg'
49b78e367b1cdff915ac8a730b0b1618
74b7550209998bf767fa88a71b732de21fc91bee
describe
'91450' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMIB' 'sip-files00184.QC.jpg'
c9c6c53835e749312e113c806f25873c
fd4014a573158409d962d5ef66109789690dbfbb
describe
'27838' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMIC' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
702316d956bd6420e98b6cd45fc23e72
76cd15f2c736005bc90973629eccecf205e74f99
describe
'54263' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMID' 'sip-files00247.QC.jpg'
8c1f64f7def08131bef624926bcc5c03
e212bd1a0865adc5a5f4b39b89edc7255f3052ee
describe
'30705' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMIE' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
68bed8d81e1e8461e92c6afaf4dad21a
dc2e10b23c1bd4e7c1e39fe0f2b70ded6f6a3268
describe
'19324' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMIF' 'sip-files00344thm.jpg'
9cf7cbc87b6397fbceb41d89bbba31f0
a294ca6df513193e6454502947d824e7b21a4ed8
describe
'88971' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMIG' 'sip-files00224.QC.jpg'
c1043b2012a545e7c5aa0f1292a576c8
53a1fe571db126c9f348b9982df4f9ef9841bb56
describe
'32991' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMIH' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
47b67d552d21af411e06d3d26a794bbd
804f857ee817ab05d44d93351d3061f6f876c5fe
describe
'25496' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMII' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
2f51fc77310fa96148af3837ee66d66c
fe61dc0ca2be53cd1fa63fda36c98e4549a3e8ec
describe
'32786' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMIJ' 'sip-files00166thm.jpg'
28e375caa632a58dbdf7b0ef5c7a88a2
6964f3c6ac9748ee3d9635dc806189526b22b136
describe
'29037' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMIK' 'sip-files00337thm.jpg'
90d91cdd49543fde2c39702057016877
085a2f5dd4a22c097bd08832baa400b46f24cb70
describe
'31995' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMIL' 'sip-files00153thm.jpg'
697bfe1fc0b41a11c316feb65654cbdc
7ceef00edb2fcc1bec7a19e592e7ed946c806a31
describe
'78257' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMIM' 'sip-files00198.QC.jpg'
d6c643f6130b307a4e3f405a6357cacc
4032533c6f2c7567ced16d697b7710c6b4021c9f
describe
'32483' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMIN' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
20ce6055891e63cd012a35c7f4e167c1
d9debaa1000a87cb96488b3942d27671a01b316e
'2012-05-30T08:52:45-04:00'
describe
'33526' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMIO' 'sip-files00255thm.jpg'
20e0ba52193406bc770447f222a40699
f29a7cb40becb869ac9c6964b78ab15d77f8c45b
describe
'31455' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMIP' 'sip-files00216thm.jpg'
f22fd7f7e35ffc2e4fec9591c8ab415a
c871cde84532d190cfc43daa8cef5f0a2150d0b6
describe
'94058' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMIQ' 'sip-files00336.QC.jpg'
aa5f8e7e51d401b5c794c28994ae7b76
0db8bfbb0511dd0d90fa216d4ed3a0faa1c88d17
describe
'81891' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMIR' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
b609b8165b7588468956875370d1f225
4045ca2dd89a430c01b4fc13f9ce0a9b0fc9d256
describe
'88770' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMIS' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
1c17687fd26aae738e039329d866cd5c
3b7505c1c3bc8e7fb0e1a9dec681789212361908
describe
'37357' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMIT' 'sip-files00308thm.jpg'
61cb171f705191c00ff77f21f2ca41c8
f8966a3f0ca4199ca2cb2d6237333828a755a999
describe
'30573' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMIU' 'sip-files00248thm.jpg'
edf1e418e0548efe573685fbc7b71cf7
cac69f5a153ac5c4f3193411f47e17eadec59719
describe
'30154' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMIV' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
af8e6f5336667228e4beacb55e87f8ee
558417fa2c8ac0faf80713c8ce08eb3316e5d56c
describe
'88595' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMIW' 'sip-files00155.QC.jpg'
a9a9730a0bb62d65eeb5e13c570d62b0
2a434315e9694c31f0a56bbe11f4a27d061010be
describe
'33352' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMIX' 'sip-files00154thm.jpg'
2182bc58ff689ef41b0ea74a7b20a09e
62313962fdfb51dc644a079d45ad3608f6d04baa
describe
'83003' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMIY' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
e5d53823762fcc5541a8cf6ea25b5672
38a296d1a54f5491d73eb4d8b1c36988ceed29f7
describe
'82579' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMIZ' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
587239c0674210aa0fec6cc97fec8d0c
bf0c47504f7342d68fbd3fc0094c68d8c8203a85
describe
'33621' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMJA' 'sip-files00307thm.jpg'
0edabf211efb478fa9f5f9f070e4909d
c77f0276e3b9d5188559f8c19caddf3581f6f7cf
describe
'32593' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMJB' 'sip-files00175thm.jpg'
e96246b036b71a8b3ae17983697ddc46
8f07d9305da6bac9c3f893a7f8438b20fddd32ca
describe
'25523' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMJC' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
a69e6dfd0b0d57a271230d7314c2ddb6
7b2176d575dd15573e855cb0d49ce8cacb512810
describe
'84817' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMJD' 'sip-files00256.QC.jpg'
72d5738e3bf432ab28670bc10b882387
a5af0e162084ac2bdcde80ba1b28af83aa39fd2a
describe
'85804' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMJE' 'sip-files00236.QC.jpg'
c4ca77ae146cf2b3ffe030b21e25dc91
8d21d2621c4529c4a45b7c534ee6da8dad1813b8
describe
'35936' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMJF' 'sip-files00310thm.jpg'
06a1a6a552962ad2678cf3df22d14cab
b6f6e2624a6cfc310d6db7d99d9f100c05e0c2ca
describe
'88889' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMJG' 'sip-files00172.QC.jpg'
0e2e8bc59e3a92bb8e90d4800db93630
1913f5a644ca1d1afd6836abead8cd4fe283df29
describe
'33416' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMJH' 'sip-files00183thm.jpg'
e8082e8ca5e1513669e4a1c1d6da0b11
c61e59ca5758bf60b6f4f37336524c34a8333cd3
describe
'30699' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMJI' 'sip-files00198thm.jpg'
5ab8940ffd1c57c57a7a5d9febc50e29
c2472cac3fb945106aa4b5c77818c6a574739533
describe
'27662' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMJJ' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
952f6506bc4f4dc03b41056ca3a77512
fcafece27a0a0bed5d311652aa65935e25008e8b
describe
'86455' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMJK' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
77f59a54f525e915f29e833ae531a09f
5c4d0e200210b584aed60c4febbb9bdfe67ff0e7
describe
'34179' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMJL' 'sip-files00170thm.jpg'
52a29032d81928db98468ff0e86866f6
3a8813197412d379ecc3859c4f2bd9906c5b2cc2
describe
'78001' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMJM' 'sip-files00317.QC.jpg'
7fcfe693e556368c41ea665049845ebc
3ed669f91fce366486f2159acbd22652c085290a
describe
'69207' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMJN' 'sip-files00225.QC.jpg'
e44a6f3020f3d73353982c29b4f79f58
2d4af6bec0e714549d435943588f5a358365a674
describe
'86170' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMJO' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
db1979000d9206a84b68cfacf66d2054
2f4197d09b8eec053f894548ab36c4567255ab2f
describe
'87080' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMJP' 'sip-files00199.QC.jpg'
56d71898648e651c4d188c2a8883f513
3963cbe3765d2b52b8cecac4e48049d538bb8a59
describe
'93549' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMJQ' 'sip-files00300.QC.jpg'
56949c9bde96bb778923c3b8e84936c5
ab05d55df5ae8da85e5cace8f4d61dbeef73ea8d
describe
'14062' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMJR' 'sip-files00258thm.jpg'
e76cb00ec140c5806382f591f97c239d
280ca2be1fdc7e17eeef6cb9a6aeffad4a1173c7
describe
'17236' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMJS' 'sip-files00187thm.jpg'
ce429c3c4365c89a40146a184585a98e
b405e18940f1206c2aa8e1e9ea0140ad268e46bc
describe
'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMJT' 'sip-files00168thm.jpg'
530a31ae9303c1f4ef55458bd4d74da0
ae02222e236a1fc66231ee9873c64c9ca7f22228
describe
'35043' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMJU' 'sip-files00261thm.jpg'
957395ad106a9350963dfa188c7a53ac
e811c5c4e41057fb21dc7c97f9d11dfac0b11bdb
describe
'86469' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMJV' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
6db8ebe5d414f579b657bc9cb0da5860
3a7c3480486263d83ea5bb103750cc48f0419dcd
describe
'84591' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMJW' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
b98b421b7432dd87e05b9b797c55f5bf
0d8401d4a76577d584364aa21ddcbd45f26555bc
describe
'87700' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMJX' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
9e88bdcd048816940da914bf9e9bbe8f
8653c53474970a3f6aca059e3413639a18bad5eb
describe
'38745' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMJY' 'sip-files00192.QC.jpg'
e968072e8a18caa80b8282a3994a1cce
4f9ebc21808dae5345a0a1e7217b2bf8bae25b06
describe
'32657' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMJZ' 'sip-files00135thm.jpg'
f35d36c320aea1d097d118a93a74d489
a141252d78d47c5f90618f33e14e54064dff98d2
describe
'95045' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMKA' 'sip-files00276.QC.jpg'
ff1139ac6df14b1a8e5113bec128b2e9
fa9ff2101eb848af9c57b5d53ba0047712322412
describe
'87635' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMKB' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
b2b01f256079a0dd5f65e48e9e95e2c8
91c83e570846321fb197351ef947f251586460e6
describe
'79293' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMKC' 'sip-files00150.QC.jpg'
2e5fc430c58cb1db728af41a8d1135cb
e40d11f9217ff7f7f2ef177a231af30042ae3e69
describe
'96992' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMKD' 'sip-files00264.QC.jpg'
bdc245bef009e9dd355a33df98e2ff14
f3a2b4f0804f2dba573557b365aadd7cb8a2d7b0
'2012-05-30T08:53:08-04:00'
describe
'35622' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMKE' 'sip-files00273thm.jpg'
066519110f3446fa8389aa19dde4eb92
a631f20b26bdbff788a9669bb64bd6d94e62cd48
describe
'96434' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMKF' 'sip-files00320.QC.jpg'
c9565d4f64bb7dabbb83a5bafd16da77
46b887ae28960691acd92b39d987650e21f652db
describe
'34323' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMKG' 'sip-files00283thm.jpg'
9b3975fcd42c61f92fb3a68b04675051
63dc371815c8cfdbc56d6afc009798f086565450
describe
'34043' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMKH' 'sip-files00274thm.jpg'
faf861aa13b5e6bcb19293fe3f24bbf8
a91aae569ef34b1e044a33dbb08f526d4c56d294
describe
'29147' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMKI' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
0b316c794955a3f14327a06d478820a4
01419eb2d2c044c41a27557a9b6c5cfd903002ab
describe
'85268' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMKJ' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
2a3543fd5f0cd36b517537f746eedeeb
44828f2f4b62af8c722a20aee163814d00f124cd
describe
'31980' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMKK' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
2cb4a91a7707037dfc986ea6d8d3d32b
83954c8fdcca0659653958b9c5de08e74d4bd4ac
describe
'91534' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMKL' 'sip-files00191.QC.jpg'
89a7d68f544720d4c6b7d4f3c6ccf94a
5e3589f2b407fdfba25326a6e3f98fd7bb6f04ba
describe
'27795' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMKM' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
720cee32286f8f602a841385dedcfeff
eb987167167f4fbdc68fd735468156885d184951
describe
'95841' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMKN' 'sip-files00326.QC.jpg'
4121d1461c8e79e071a2e4c13f1f5ca5
568f69d25d1761bee041c74ccee9609f6c7113e8
describe
'79090' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMKO' 'sip-files00217.QC.jpg'
c43a0223849f3defbf3431f9b60262f9
5003c6d41e23257218d459ba53e1e1b46fdedba4
describe
'31327' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMKP' 'sip-files00161thm.jpg'
a3a046e9500fcf5f67cd92f99930529c
ca161850fed2231c295a947012c311adf4fc4139
describe
'34963' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMKQ' 'sip-files00300thm.jpg'
a67e7084c12227e0b46cba01188b30a0
89865a8f27cdaf2a7785f0177b70bf3e1945c743
describe
'34015' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMKR' 'sip-files00134thm.jpg'
3fd2aabc98f864195bdd5cbd3b15c989
6a7a2cff358298c9cdae244ab7a8ba5f3d4727ef
describe
'95747' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMKS' 'sip-files00324.QC.jpg'
08a70aea5c6ee7aea41d2cb2096f705f
1ca332d4a7330c270eb1035a7e26c40fc2fcdab6
describe
'80132' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMKT' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
dcd7163fca5275c69916fa836cf4e4d5
709b10f08837de178cd2d66751b4fee4328c18da
describe
'94434' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMKU' 'sip-files00182.QC.jpg'
1e8aa2fd0b1439f73fdc5cac17e96d30
0b8314936e8024ef52fe7ec65d17a3ec1f413cf8
describe
'34193' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMKV' 'sip-files00174thm.jpg'
53c0b1d5429b104365f6feda474ad5a6
43b7fda357b34770a2611971e61bc36b73a2cd5a
describe
'91455' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMKW' 'sip-files00170.QC.jpg'
4738fe94d24c8e44da5e2fdca2a9fdbb
0af553d3e33366c170265d787b396e3eebee117b
describe
'76443' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMKX' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
d5c3c2f4044120118f1dcdd1122ea91e
edc14aa8f1dafbcf8d3e6f6d84296cf165959d02
describe
'31818' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMKY' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
fdd8faf059a1bfae3eeea174a9b3c259
a7e4c37b85251bbd61b9473903a921b9e38b9d78
describe
'94335' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMKZ' 'sip-files00330.QC.jpg'
e46057b989ef5f4061847ed0ca40c9a5
112bba3bbde0da8e47cc242a8231d84438c99de1
describe
'29215' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMLA' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
0bf06c4bc35ba55ba4023a9411eef59f
5d35512393aaf59a1736e315f69a23a9862ff69d
describe
'31574' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMLB' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
83134a1c30f06f809e659ea11e4598fa
2a7ec58f8f04727c0befc5bd69fd4277edcb7ee5
'2012-05-30T08:52:55-04:00'
describe
'33045' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMLC' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
453e235c2b5f4e17038166604fa460b8
26993e6df1e4920744a9262ebc1daf9f3546c563
describe
'86508' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMLD' 'sip-files00166.QC.jpg'
2dd13ad79a09516754355d1bfbe9780c
c7814e0f02559056cdb2ccb7c57fb094070dae6e
describe
'90405' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMLE' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
d8c00dbfa968cbc6a3f572c8a313be3b
9ccbd9b898204b0f851a8fa40d3ed9e199a9b095
describe
'48644' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMLF' 'sip-files00305.QC.jpg'
a9266ada25cadcfe9a9ec34ffdb66814
b1ed0e82de746f5ce25453094225c00fb0f1fdd2
describe
'88633' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMLG' 'sip-files00283.QC.jpg'
2aff513a90401025e2208abc7646a6dc
79daf161123d9274cc201a587c58ab1d6ea92f0a
describe
'18678' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMLH' 'sip-files00341.QC.jpg'
61218343b34c35f64076f6fafebcd123
2491b09004cd9d5f08b0d4a606a22d83d82910d1
describe
'80462' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMLI' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
05c4fdfce53c002a51ca848dd48f4b2b
6436c8861f59e96c8a9ae82c138d8acb35125325
'2012-05-30T08:53:07-04:00'
describe
'32787' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMLJ' 'sip-files00139thm.jpg'
5f7a617121b12d8dac1453d300cd4ae9
f32ee2a9185f50bc753f2b6b542a1cb048457185
describe
'71750' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMLK' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
330f59cfa8e7f87f8f67d99efb19cfac
e67f7844f86012ce21d44d8ab25c356df37d7f74
describe
'22813' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMLL' 'sip-files00247thm.jpg'
856b30ac8ce4457db91ed20f25d0d24c
799fbe61069c7ee11e7effd2d8992cf19b502956
describe
'29315' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMLM' 'sip-files00003.QC.jpg'
192336d9ccc424984d7691176336563b
b10ecaa7525e0d197659cd5f2bc9b7a699eba1d3
describe
'31763' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMLN' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
7b624b257a4ef106173df9aaf0222dae
f46df046024c6bb755c33d2989c86f15cb6ee7f2
describe
'37036' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMLO' 'sip-files00314thm.jpg'
bb607a9df22c693726f883e21dc91faf
f2b3d44c5a576a6e5e6fcbc86a8e5cb89c19adde
describe
'92487' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMLP' 'sip-files00162.QC.jpg'
a98b36a387693179a977cb20509021c3
09b4b313a6cd5dcd48678aa7ab37dad4776d88cf
describe
'94387' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMLQ' 'sip-files00323.QC.jpg'
f30c03e0c052fe3db7d41a754366b44a
988b5de4295b07abbe4b7301029677750be4c40c
describe
'84040' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMLR' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
ebea3b405526c3b209796ab845d21cf0
842fa0179c370734358366edd6ec4c542fa0e1b9
describe
'26909' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMLS' 'sip-files00259thm.jpg'
d75eb0336035cb2dc981d800597774ca
c7a4a415ae80b807c11df82605e17dba6d9b212c
describe
'82736' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMLT' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
4dc10c77af9b430687ab2fcac14e8c54
8cfc7a05280b9c0404b769a8d52dbdd579513f3e
describe
'26607' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMLU' 'sip-files00268thm.jpg'
fcc895ae3e4f0fb97c9f98c8eb150b54
001af5c758ed040e655301c2242ade6d3a7aed96
describe
'77177' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMLV' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
8730d4c2677f25e79ade1a8211e8c107
0c36def82ba386ee3e8dfe80882c887957a140ce
describe
'85025' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMLW' 'sip-files00212.QC.jpg'
47d38c644ec865941510340a953a8579
c02ff753d3ff9b538177719b5a8a27640a633307
describe
'88790' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMLX' 'sip-files00230.QC.jpg'
952de808e60d524f97f2cd519d5f702a
145e2ba4f2871613564ce996f6191290eb71f91e
describe
'33884' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMLY' 'sip-files00302thm.jpg'
9f25123ff702246232ff538d7824fdec
18952fadca73468fc5fcbb55f065c621d50a2e4c
describe
'34914' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMLZ' 'sip-files00275thm.jpg'
7c5f009a1b5fd38be1df5facd9e13767
1073f5ae60cfed4f3678f200a85ea09258814bab
describe
'92394' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMMA' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
bfac6ac76fd7c8ae849fdd885ec809cb
e403457da2c204e741a74cc7d01ef9fdcab53357
describe
'84381' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMMB' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
748ca0399e43c1839702c05e2198a86c
d3cc7afb1ef64fc9b3182a170ec680091c46deca
describe
'8199' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMMC' 'sip-files00306thm.jpg'
b2f1014028a064cd7263370e4ae5b797
33e42aa150ae927e7808cf95b73b21c0df6fd8b1
'2012-05-30T08:53:01-04:00'
describe
'12135' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMMD' 'sip-files00006.QC.jpg'
0d1593531dd4aa3c280b304ec6eb396a
2ed7c71156dacfce02ef0ad6b0588bff5e2f1b7d
describe
'86827' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMME' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
6341416cea853df97cc935697f1a314f
4c07365a6d2540151e6b5aecd71fcb8742248e8a
describe
'79255' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMMF' 'sip-files00157.QC.jpg'
58bfe6c29982ce5eb17877b4aacfdd73
58968935d394dfb78e86498b8cc7666d8d9a3357
describe
'31875' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMMG' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
66f0a6d6670647129d26fc3892f8f7f3
4b1c220c442e870fcc5294a3ee9d6441633e29c8
describe
'80116' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMMH' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
25a3aa27908efb43152d393a59b5bec9
81fc989ac00ef92b76ef016273715a9ad0763e98
describe
'36542' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMMI' 'sip-files00342thm.jpg'
80a27a4d763bb11e23db8ae6fb2bfe9c
3a2a1f6f95212ceba92730fb61af81c25ac0585b
describe
'92849' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMMJ' 'sip-files00289.QC.jpg'
3d3c4f9a9ebd4eb9480b8c62960c7bab
fdcca1de6e9134555054f6b6b72f95d73edc47d1
describe
'35079' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMMK' 'sip-files00269thm.jpg'
148770eea907f9257977f60a6b86fdfc
2d1616e2ef582f90d9b6e492f0afd7ff1d2ead59
describe
'17674' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMML' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
f352dec3325ea5e20c553d5d3023a9d0
60f9703c96c1547a7b8c71271962280afddd830c
describe
'87656' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMMM' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
0f1d342f409882ae383d427b209bf352
9f8409de38156f70ae16c821a813aa51413f0758
describe
'33745' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMMN' 'sip-files00184thm.jpg'
9067475355ed5c3c53af9b4fc614066b
70eb3ee461862c47e539490fe917bedefd987b8a
describe
'30386' 'info:fdaE20100408_AAAAAMfileF20100408_AAAMMO' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
b75226262fca9cc0429718387161e038
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describe
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BURGOMASTER’S DAUGHTER

AND OTHER STORIES

BY

W. H. G. KINGSTON, M. E. SHIPLEY,
GERTRUDE CROCKFORD,

AND OTHERS

WITH THREE COLOURED PLATES, SIX FULL-PAGE WOODCUTS, |
AND TWENTY-ONE ILLUSTRATIONS IN THE TEXT



' LONDON:
JOHN HOGG, 13, PATERNOSTER ROW
LONDON ;:
PRINTED BY J. S. VIRTUE AND CO., LIMITED,
CITY ROAD.
CONTENTS.

PAGE

THE BURGOMASTER’S DAUGHTER. . . . . Oo
In Hight Chapters. By W. H. G. Kinasron. |

MOFFAT, THE MISSIONARY . . . 2 . 53

Chapter I.—Colonists and Natives.
», L1.—The First Missionary to the Hottentots.
», III.—The Hottentot Chief.
», IV.—Africaner and the Missionaries,
V.—A Chapter of Travelling.
», WI.—A Hottentot Village.
»,- WII.—Another Aspect.
», VIIT.—Incidents of Travel.
5, IX.—Return to Cape Town.
ys X.—Conclusion.

THE GIANT’S GRAVE . . . , , , , . 101
In Four Chapters. By M. E. Surerey.

THE CHILDREN AND THE SAGE . . . . . 145

Part I.—The Children.
», I.—The Sage.

FRITZ . . . . . ; , . , ; . 191
By GrertrupE Crockrorp.

Chapter I.—All that was Saved. —
», LI.—The Likeness.
», III.—The Crowd.
1V CONTENTS.

PAGE

THE SHIP AND THE ISLAND. . . . .. . 239

Chapter I.—The “Bounty” sails for Tahiti—Collecting the
Bread-Fruit Plants—The Mutiny.

», LI.—The Boat-Party land at Tofoa—Attacked by
the Natives—Perilous Voyage—Extreme Suf-
ferings—Relief at New Holland—Return to
England.

», III.—The Mutineers at Toobouai—Return to Tahiti—
For Pitcairn’s Island—The Ship burned—
Quarrels, and their Fatal Consequences.

», iLV.—Further Disasters—Occupations and Improve-
ments.

» V.—The Island becomes known—The Natives—
Their Manners and Customs — Death of
Adams—Conclusion.

we eee
THE BURGOMASTER’S DAUGHTER.

BY WILLIAM H. G. KINGSTON.

0-05.92 0.0——ame

CHAPTER I.

CAVALIER, habited in a light suit of
armour, with breast-plate and back-piece,
a velvet cap and a waving plume on his
—_ssaa head, with a jewel-hilted sword by his side,
suspended by a rich scarf, was riding through the
streets of the ancient city of Antwerp. He was
followed by two stout men-at-arms, carrying sword,
and lance, and heavy pistols in their holsters. The
cavalier was young and handsome; the light moustache
on nis lip, and his beardless chin, showed that he
had only just entered manhood. His bearing, how-
ever, was bold and free, and a fire burned in his bright
blue eye as he gazed around, which showed that he
was capable of daring and noble deeds.

The sun was already sinking low, as was seen by
the deep shadows cast even across the wider places of
the city through which he rode. He was approaching
a handsome house, from the open windows of which ~
sounds of revelry proceeded. As he drew near,
the heads of several persons were protruded. One,
especially, who had a wine-cup in his hand, which
he quaffed off catching sight of him, exclaimed—

“What! Do my eyes deceive me? Marnix of


6 THE BURGOMASTER’S DAUGHTER.

Tholouse! You in Antwerp? Stay! stay! I pray
thee! Stay! I command thee. Come in hither and
drain a cup to our noble cause.”

The young cavalier at these words drew rein and
looked up at the window. The speaker, however,
to enforce his arguments, had already quitted it; and
while Marnix was gazing up, wondering what had
become of him, he found his horse’s head seized by
the former, who had at that moment issued from the
portal.

“IT rejoice to see you, my friend,” exclaimed
the gentleman who had just come out of the house ;
“TI thought you were still at college, going over the
dry tomes of the schoolmen, which I could never
abide. Come in, I say ; there are many friends who
will greet you, and you can tell us at the same moment
the cause of your appearance in this city.”

“Nay, Count Brederode, but that may not be
altogether what I desire to do,” answered the young
cavalier. ‘TI have an engagement, too, which I wish
to keep, and already the evening is drawing to a
close, and it is time that I should be at my hostelry.
However, I will tell you that I left college because I
consider that at the present time, those who love
their country ought to be preparing to use their swords
rather than their books and pens.”

“A noble sentiment, and worthy of you, Marnix,”
answered Count Brederode.

The last speaker was a man considerably more
advanced in life than Marnix of Thoulouse. Hard
living had already marked its lines on his countenance,
which was even now heated by the wine-cup. His
figure was tall and commanding, while a bold reckless
air and a loud hearty voice were the chief charac.
teristics of the man.
THE BURGOMASTER’S DAUGHTER. a

“Nay, I would not detain you many minutes,” he
continued, still holding Thoulouse’s bridle. “ Come but
for an instant and show yourself among our friends.
Quali but one cup, it will clear your brain rather than
confuse it, and then go your way and perform your
engagement. ‘To-morrow I hope to see you here;
we have matters of importance to discuss, and your
clear head and unbiassed opinion will be of value.”

The young cavalier, won over by the flatteries and
pressing invitation of his friend, called to one of his
attendants to take his horse, and, led by Count
Brederode, entered the house. He found himself
in another minute at the entrance of a banqueting
hall, in which a number of gaily-dressed cavaliers were
seated at along table, with wine-flasks and cups and a
dessert of numerous rich fruits placed before them.

«Welcome, Marnix of Thoulouse ! welcome !” cried
several, rising from their seats and warmly shaking
him by the hand. “ You have come to join us, as
your gallant brother has already done. We wish he
were here to welcome you also. We want more of
the young and noble blood of the land, since so many
of the older ones stand aloof, or look coldly at the
cause of liberty.”

© Priends,” said the young nobleman, “I am ready
to devote my sword, my heart, my very life’s blood to
the cause of my country! Though I do not remain
with you now, it is from no want of heartfelt sym-
pathy. J am one with you in any gallant work which
can tend to set our country free from the thraldom
which oppresses it.”

“Well said ! a noble sentiment!” exclaimed several
of the guests. “ We drink to your health, brave
Marnix.” The cups were filled, and the guests
rising, emptied them as they spoke.
8 THE BURGOMASTER’S DAUGHTER.

Young Marnix took a golden eup which Count
Brederode handed him, and holding it up answered,
“I thank you, gallant seniors, for the honour you do
me. Life is sweet, but yet I once more gay, that life
I will willingly sacrifice for the good of my country !
Again I thank you from my heart.” Saying this, he
put the cup to his lips and drained it slowly, re-
placing it on the table. His attitude was graceful
and gallant. “I now bid you farewell,” he added,
bowing as he spoke, and in spite of the appeals of the
count that he would stop and quaff another cup, he
retired from the room, and, remounting his horse,
continued his way through the city.

The period of which we are speaking, was the year
1565. Philip of Spain, at one time husband of Queen
Mary of England, ruled over not only Spain, but the
Netherlands and Low Countries; his sister, Margaret
of Parma, acting as Regent for him in the Netherlands.
Protestant principles had made great progress through-
out the latter part of King Philip’s dominions, and he
had come to the resolution of stamping them out by
sword and fire, and every means in his power. The
means he took were not such as to win the hearts of
his people, or indeed to gain his object. One of those
means was the establishment of the Inquisition, the
directors of which had power to seize any man,
woman, or child in the country, and to consign them,
with a mere mockery of trial, to death, either at the
stake, by drowning, or strangulation. These and other |
acts of the most cruel tyranny, had at length aroused
the spirits of a large portion of the population of all
degrees, Although a few of the greater nobles with
their followers still remained loyal to the king, a con-
siderable number of the lesser nobles, soon after this,
formed a League, by which they had bound themselves
THE BURGOMASTER’S DAUGHTER. 9

to sacrifice their properties and their lives, in an
attempt to restore liberty to their country. The docu-
ment which the members of the League had signed,
was known as the Compromise. They had, however,
taken the name of the Beggars, in consequence of a
remark made by a certain Count Berlaymont to the
Regent, when the Compromise was first presented,
“Is it possible that your Highness can entertain
fears of these Beggars, or Gueux?” He spoke thus
contemptuously of the confederates, because many
of them were the younger sons of noble families, and
others were men who were already nearly ruined by
extravagance. ‘I'he circumstances we are now describ-
ing, however, somewhat preceded that notable event.

Marnix hastened his pace—almost unconsciously—
his eye brightening, and a look of eagerness coming
over his countenance, as headvanced. Before him, on
one side of the Mere—a broad street in the centre of
the city—was a richly-ornamented house, at the deep
portal of which stood an armed man with halberd on
his shoulder, his buff coat showing that he was one of
the burgher-guard.

Marnix of Thoulouse drew up before the door, and
one of his attendants immediately riding up to his side,
he dismounted, “Go to the ‘Red Lion,’” he said,
“and order an apartment for me. I will sleep there
to-night, and should my brother or any other friend
come for me, say that I expect to be at the hostelry at
nine o’clock.”



CHAPTER ILI.

“Wao seek you here?” said the sturdy burgher-guard,
placing his halberd across the entrance.
10 THE BURGOMASTER’S DAUGHTER,

“The Burgomaster, Antony Van _ Straalen,”
answered Marnix.

“He is from home, and will not be back this
evening,” said the man-at-arms.

Marnix hesitated.

“I would pay my respects to his daughter, then,
the Lady Julie,” he said, and his voice trembled some- _
what as he pronounced the name. -

The guard eyed him from head to foot. |

“YT will call the Major-domo then,” he said; “I
can let no one pass without his permission when the
Burgomaster is from home.” |

The soldier rang a bell, which was answered by
a portly-looking personage, the usual porter of the
house. His eye brightened as he caught sight of
the young nobleman.

“Ts the Lady Julie in?” asked Marnix.

‘“ Ay, she is, for she seldom goes abroad,” answered
the porter; “I will call Master Cornelius. I do not
think he will refuse you admittance, although we are
obliged to be very particular at these times. We know
not what 1s going to happen. Reports of all sorts are
flying about, as thick as snow in December.”

“Well, my good friend Peter,” said Marnix,
“hasten, I pray thee, and get the required permission.”

The old porter toddled away as fast as his some-
what bulky lees could carry him, and meantime Marnix
paced impatiently up and down the hall. He was
rewarded, however, at length, by the appearance of
Master Cornelius, who, though not quite as stout as
Peter, was still of bulky proportions. The Major-domo
beckoned him upstairs through the door which Peter
had thrown open.

‘The young man sprang up the steps with a rapidity
which soon left the old steward behind. He appeared


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THE BURGOMASTER’S DAUGHTER. Il

to require no guide indeed. He took his way along
a& passage, at the end of which was an open door,
through which he passed into a handsome apartment
hung with rich damask. Vases of flowers stood on
the marble tables at the side between the silk-covered
seats which surrounded the room. At the further end
appeared a lady, tall and graceful, young, and fair as
any youth might wish to look on. Her light auburn
hair escaped in ringlets from beneath the golden band
which surrounded her head, while her costume was of
the richest and most elegant description. She had
risen from her seat as the footsteps of the young noble-
man had been heard on the stair, and she now advanced
across the room holding out her hands to meet him.
There was no coyness nor timidity in her manner ;
indeed, had any spectator been present, it would have
been seen that a thorough understanding existed already
between the youth and the maiden. It would have
been difficult indeed to have found a couple of more
attractive personal appearance, or more suited to each
other. The Lady Julie was probably a year or two
younger than Marnix, but had already attained the
perfection of womanhood—in his eyes, at all events
--and those eyes kept looking into hers with an
expression which showed his devoted love and admira-
ion.

Thus they sat for some time, talking of matters of
deep interest to themselves, whatever the world at large
vight have thought of them.

“The Burgomaster is as kind as he is generous
and noble,” said Marnix. “ He will not, on account
of the troubles which have overtaken our country,
object to our marriage at the time we had hoped.
You will plead for me, will you not, Julie? The
feeling that. I have you to fight for, and the right to
12 THE BURGOMASTER’S DAUGHTER.

protect you, will nerve my arm and give wisdom to my
mind, should I be called to join the counsels of the
patriots.”

“Yes, I will plead,” answered Julie; “ for truly, so
occupied in the affairs of State is my father, that he has
but little time for my society ; and I will tell him that
he will find far more assistance from a son, than a
daughter can hope to afford.”

It had been proposed that the marriage of the
young people should take place a short time from the
period of which we are speaking ; but the Burgomaster
had of late shown an anxiety to put it off, on the plea
that the state of the country was not suitable for
marrying and giving in marriage. It had not, indeed,
hitherto been made known, except to the immediate
relations of the family.

The kind-hearted Burgomaster was not likely,
however, his daughter well knew, to resist her
appeals, though he would rather have selected for
her, if not a more wealthy, an older and more
experienced husband than the young Marnix of
Thoulouse. Still, the gallant bearing, the generosity,
and intelligence of the young nobleman, had won upon
his affections, and already he had begun to regard him
as his son. The young people, therefore, parted in the
evening without any serious apprehension that their —
marriage would be deferred.

On reaching the ‘ Red Lion,” Marnix found his
brother, Philip of St. Aldegonde, a man considerably
older than himself, and one of the most accomplished
persons of his age. He had already gained renown ag
a poet of much imagination, and as a prose writer
whose style was unsurpassed by any of his contem-
poraries. ‘Trained to arms from his earliest youth, he
THE BURGOMASTER’S DAUGHTER. =~18

was an accomplished soldier, and at the same time
an ardent patriot.

* Congratulate me, my dear brother,” said Marnix,
as he greeted him. “My happiness will soon be
secured, and with Julie mine, I feel capable of en-
countering all the foes of our country.”

The elder brother smiled at the enthusiasm of the
younger.

“I rejoice with you,” he said, “ but—— ”’

“Nay, but have no buts, brother,” said Marnix;
“it is an expression I would were banished from the
language of mortals. Shall you be at the meeting
to-morrow with Brederode ? ”

“Yes; but I would advise you, Marnix, to avoid
associating too closely with that man. He is honest, I -
grant you, but he has no judgment, and he is more
likely to lead others into useless danger and difficulty,
than to advance the cause he so loudly advocates.”

“ But I thought, my dear brother, that you your-
self were closely united with him. He surely is one of
the most conspicuous supporters of the Compromise,
which you yourself are said to have drawn up.”

“Yes, because we are not in a position to decline
the services of even so boisterous a supporter,” said
Philip ; “but I would warn you rather to avoid any
private enterprise he may propose. Of the great public
object we all advocate, there is no doubt.”

The young Marnix promised to be cautious. It
would have been well-for him had he been so.

The next morning the two brothers attended a
meeting of the confederates at the house where Count
Brederode had taken up his abode during his residence
at Antwerp.

Marnix waited impatiently till it was over, that he
might repair to the house of the Burgomaster. He
14 THE BURGOMASTER’S DAUGHTER.

entered without being announced, as the servants had
had the acuteness to discover that he was a welcome
guest. He was met, however, on the top of the stair by
Master Cornelius—the steward—whose countenance
wore a look of embarrassment.

“There is a cavalier here,” he said, ‘a Spaniard
by his appearance, and his name—Don Alberic Lodron.
He is even now in the presence of the Lady Julie, and
our lord the Burgomaster. What is object is, I do
not know for a certainty, but I have been told that he
has watched the Lady Julie on several occasions when
she has ridden out, and cast looks of deep admiration
at her. He has come to the house more than once
without being admitted; and I know not why, but I
fear that something unpleasant may occur. I know
what these Spaniards are—very fierce and revengeful
if their wishes are opposed, and I tell you it is through
affection and respect for you, my dear young master,
that you may be prepared.” Much more to the same
effect the old steward uttered, till, indeed, he some-
what tried the temper of Marnix.

“Fear not for me, nor for your young mistress,”
answered the young nobleman. “I care little what
the audacious Spaniard may threaten or do. I beg
that you will announce me, that | may meet him face
to face.”

Somewhat unwillingly, therefore, the steward led
che way into the reception hall, where, on a high-
backed, richly-carved chair, sat Julie, the picture of
modest reserve. On one side sat her father—a digni-
fied, portly man of middle age, his handsome counte-
nance indicative of benignity and intelligence; while
on the other, holding his feathered beaver in his hand,
was a handsomely-dressed cavalier, who was at this
moment earnestly addressing the young lady. Her
THE BURGOMASTER’S DAUGHTER. 15

eye brightened as she saw Marnix, and rising from
her seat, she advanced almost involuntarily towards
him. Then beckoning him to a chair near that of her
father, she returned to her seat. The Spaniard cast an
inquisitive and somewhat angry glance at the young
people.

‘Your brother, I presume?” said the Spaniard, in
a tone which sounded particularly impertinent in
Julie’s ear.

“No, but a friend I esteem, Don Alberic,”?
answered the young lady, somewhat scornfully.

“Don Alberic has come to invite my daughter and
me to a tournament, which is to take place at Brussels
in a few days, in honour of the marriage of the Prince
Alexander and Donna Maria of Portugal; but I know
not whether she is disposed to go. For myself, my
duties are so onerous, that in spite of the honour done
me by the invitation, it may be difficult for me to
accept it.”

- “But surely the young lady, with so gallant a
cavalier as the gentleman I see before me to attend on
her, will be able to come,’”’ said the Spaniard, bowing
towards the Lady Julie.

“We are not ungrateful for your courtesy, Don
Alberic,” said the young lady, “and as I have never
seen such a spectacle, I may possibly, with the attend-
ant you propose, be able to be present.”

Don Alberic cast an inquiring glance towards the
Lady Julie, as if he could not clearly understand the
meaning of her remark. He, however, was too much
a man of the world, not to be aware that it was
time for him to bring his visit to a close. Rising,
therefore, and making numerous bows, he began to
retire along the room towards the door, followed by
the Burgomaster, who in courtesy attended him to the
16 THE BURGOMASTER’S DAUGHTER.

foot of the stairs. The young people laughed heartily
at the way the Spaniard had been mystified. They
were little thinking of the evil feelings which had
been aroused in his heart.

“Tt will be truly, Marnix, a pleasant excursion
to see this grand tournament. Will you take me
there?” said Julie.

‘ Marnix promised to do so, for it was to occur some
short time after their proposed marriage; and now, as
young people are apt to do, they looked forward with
eagerness to that happy event.

CHAPTER III.

Tue marriage of Marnix of Thoulouse and the fair
daughter of the Burgomaster of Antwerp took place,
according to the Lutheran form, in the house of the
bride’s father. Julie was always lovely; she looked
more lovely still; and though her bridesmaids were
among the fairest of the fair daughters of the
principal inhabitants of Antwerp, none equalled her
in beauty.

The gallant young noble looked forward to a
life of unalloyed happiness in the company of his
beautiful bride. Happy it is for man that he does
not know what is in store for him. Marnix thought
not at the moment of the troubled state of the country,
nor that he himself was pledged to draw his sword in
its defence, and that when the sword is drawn, no
man can tell in whose bosom it may be sheathed.

The Burgomaster, on second thoughts, had resolved
to attend the tournament, knowing that on account of
his religious principles his loyalty might be suspected,
THE BURGOMASTER’S DAUGHTER. 17

and wishing, therefore, to show all due respect to tho
family of his sovereign.

Three days before the tournament, the Burgo- ©
master, accompanied by his daughter and son-in-law,
with several attendants, all handsomely attired, as
became his position as chief magistrate of the important
city of Antwerp, set out for Brussels.

Brussels was then, as now, a fine city, containing
many magnificent palaces, and surrounded by forests
full of game. : ) |

The lists were formed in the great market-place
of the city; here all the principal persons then in
the Netherlands were present. Nothing could exceed
the magnificence of the arrangements. Seats covered
with damask formed a vast amphitheatre, while the
banners of the various knights and their retainers
were planted on either side. At one end, marked by
the richness of the banners. the judges of the jousts
took their seats. They w »the Duke of Parma, the
Duke of Aershot, and Cc.mt Eemont. In their midst
sat the lady of the lists, from whose fair hands the
winners of prizes were to receive their rewards.

Where there were so many great and noble people,
the Burgomaster of Antwerp and his family took but
a comparatively humble place, yet it was sufficiently
conspicuous to be seen from the lists, the Lady Julie
being seated between her husband and father. From
the richness and fashion of her dress it might have
been suspected that she was married, although her
- wedding had been so quiet that the event might pro.
bably not have been known in Brussels. Spectators
were thronging to their seats through the various en-
trances, while every window, and every spot whence a
view could be obtained from the surrounding houses,
were crowded with eager gazers. Now the trumpets

B
18 THE BURGOMASTER S DAUGHTER.

sounded, and the knights, in gorgeous armour, rode
into the lists. Among the most conspicuous was the
Count Louis of Nassau, the brother of the Prince
of Orange. Though of slight figure, and somewhat
small of stature, he bore himself with grace and
elegance on horseback, having complete command
over his steed. Count Bossu appeared in a dark suit
of armour; stout of limb, and with fine proportions,
he appeared well able to do battle in the lists. Then,
too, came Philip de Lannoy, Seigneur de Beauvoir,
the commander of the Duchess’s body-guard in
Brussels. He had already gained renown in arms,
and was a champion few but the most dextrous would
have wished to encounter. Count Mansfield rode
into the lists accompanied by his son Charles, acknow-
ledged among his compeers as one of the most
expert knights in the use of lance and sword.

There were Spanish as well.as Flemish knights.
Among the most gallant m appearance was Don
Alberic Lodron, accompanied by his friend, Don
Sancho de Lodrono; indeed, on this occasion, men
of very opposite parties assembled to encounter each
other, some, perhaps, anxious to meet on a more
bloody and desperate field, in the work of real
warfare. The Seleneur de Beauvoir made the most
splendid appearance, with his jewelled armour and his
attendant squires.

Now the trumpets sounded, and Count Mansfield
and his son challenged one and all who might choos
to engage in the mimic combat. Two knights
answered the challenge. Again the trumpets sounded,
and both the parties dashing forward the Count and
his son unhorsed their opponents. Among the Spanish
knights, Don Alberic Lodron bore himself g allantly,

Hach knight was desirous to select ® lady, for
a Yr Aa —o ’ 3 f
THE PURCOMASTER’S - DAUGHTER, 19

the superiority of whose charms he was ready to do
battle. As the knights were seen riding round the lists,
gizing up towards the fair ones who were witnesses
or their gallantry and hardihood, Don Alberic drew
up his horse in front of the seats occupied by the
Burgomaster and his family. Bowing low, the Spanish
knight presented her with a bouquet, expecting in
return to receive her glove that he might fasten
ij in his helmet. She declined, however, taking: it
off, acknowledging his salutation only with a formal
bow.

Anger and annoyance were depicted on his coun-
tenanco—the visors of the knights were raised for the
occasion, it should be said. Waiting for a moment,
as if to ascertain that ho was not mistaken, he spurred
on his charger, and continued his course round the
lists.

The single combats having been brought to a con-
clusion, Count Charles of Mansfield being declared the
most successful, Count Louis of Nassau and Count
Bossu being but little behind him, preparations were
mace fora general combat, in which all the knights
were to arrange themselves in two parties, under
respective leaders. More than once during the fights
Marnix had with difficulty kept his seat.

“T would that I were among those gallant gentle-
men,” he could not help exclaiming; “and yet, after all,
it is but a mimic fight, and except to gain experience,
it may be folly to exhaust one’s strength when it may
be required for the real work of war.”

Julie smiled on her husband, “Tam afraid that I
am the cause of your being a spectator instead of an
actor on the scene,’ she said,

‘ No, no, indecd,” he answered; “TI have had bub
little practice in such work, and I fear, Julie, you
9() THE BURGOMASTER’S DAUGHTER.

would not have cause to be proud of the prowess of
your true knight. Iam happier far by thy side; still,
I own I should like to have broken a lance with that
haughty Spaniard who seemed so indignant just now
that you would not honour him by selecting him as
your true knight.” |

While they were speaking, the trumpets again
sounded, and the two parties of knights, each consist-
ing of about thirty, one led by Louis of Nassau, the
other by Count Bossu, drew up on opposite sides. The
Seigneur de Beauvoir and Don Alberic had arranged
themselves under the banner of the Count of Bossu,
while Count Charles of Mansfield supported his friend
Count Louis of Nassau. Once more the trumpets
sounded, and the knights met in the centre of the
lists with a shock which made the very ground shake,
and amid clouds of dust caused by the horses’ hoofs,
they were seen struggling desperately ; some unhorsed,
lay on the ground, others with spears broken were
waving their swords, which rung against the shields of
their opponents. The most conspicuous for his activity
was the gallant Count Louis of Nassau. His spear
had been broken in unhorsing his first opponent, and
now he was wheeling in and out, and dashing here and
there like a meteor, dealing blows which hurled many
of the opposite party to the ground. As blunt weapons
only had been used, and the swords were pointless, no
desperate wounds had been inflicted, although many of
the knights were more or less bruised or otherwise hurt
by their overthrow.

The young bride was thankful when the sports
cametoan end. They were, in truth, notin accordance
with her taste. She had not expected to sce so serious
a struggle as was taking place. The exhibition,
indeed, brilliant and exciting as it was, was too much
TUE BURGOMASTER’S DAUGHTER. 21

like a svene of real warfare to afford pleasure to a
sensitive mind. The combats, however, were very
different to those of former years, when sharp swords
and pointed lances were used, and many a knight lost
his life in the strugele.

A grand supper was given by the city of Brussels
in the Hotel de Ville on that evening, in honour of the
royal marriage, when the prizes gained at the tourna-
ment were bestowed on the successful knights. The
Burgomaster and his family were of course among the
guests. Nothing could exceed its magnificence, but
amid all the apparent hilarity, many hearts ached
when thoughts of the unhappy state of the country
would unbidden arise.

CHAPTER IY,

Next morning, the Burgomaster, accompanied by
Marnix and Julie, returned to Antwerp. They had
proceeded some distance on their way, when the
sound of horses’ hoofs were heard behind them, and
a party of cavaliers was seen coming along the road.
Ihe travellers drew up a little way on one side, to
allow the more active-moving cavaliers to pass, when
aloud, hearty voice proceeded from one of them :—

“What! Marnix! Is it true, then, that you have
become a Knight of St. Benedict? Introduce me, I
pray, to your fair lady, and to her honoured father,
who, I conclude, I see before me.”

It was Count Brederode who spoke. Marnix went
through the usual ceremony, the companions of the
Count at the same time doffine their plumed beavers
in token of respect.
22 TILE BURGOMASTER’S DAUGHTER.

“You are indeed a fortunate fellow,” said Brede-
rode, as he rode up alongside Marnix, in a voice
sufficiently loud, however, for Julie to hear. “ You
will, L fear, be less inclined than before to join the
ranks of the patriots.”

. “Qn the contrary, I have more to fight for,”
answered Marnix. ‘lam loyal toa right cause, and
hope that nothing will seduce me from it.”

Probably the Burgomaster would have been glad
to be rid of his new companion, but without disconr-
tesy he could not either drop behind and bee them to
proceed at a faster pace, or avoid them altogether.
Thus, towards evening, the whole party rode into
Antwerp, and the intimacy of the Burgomaster with
the plotting, boisterous Count Brederode was remarked
by many. Jt was indeed an anxious time for Antony
Van Straalen. He knew well all that was taking place
in the country, and felt very sure that ere long there
would be afearful outbreak.

The young couple, however, for a short time en-
joyed unmitigated happiness. They were well aware
that disturbances were likely to break out, but, with
the sanguine temperament of youth, they hoped that
the clouds would quickly be dispersed, and the sun
shine forth again on their native land. ‘Thus, when-
ever they spoke of the future, they allowed their fecl-
ings to colour it with bright and beautiful tints. Stall,
to thoughtful minds, the present was truly dark and
depressing. T'o worship God according to the dictates
of conscience is one of the chief rights of man. Of that
right Philip had been using every effort to deprive
his subjects inthe Netherlands. The fearful Inquisi-
tion, as has been said, had been established throughout
the country, and, though occasionally its ministers
THE BURGOMASTER’S DAUGHTER, 88

seemed to relax in their labours, every lull was stro
to be followed by a still fiercer persecution.

Prohibited from worshipping in the churches, the
people had sought the fields and open country, where
they might hear the preachers whose opinions they
followed, and where they might praise God and pray
as they were disposed. At those meetings, which
many thousands of persons attended, most of the men
were armed, to defend themselves against any attacks
of the officers of government. Even in the very
neighbourhood of Antwerp these camp gatherings were
held, when preachers of great power and ability ad-
dressed them. ‘To these mectings, Marnix, on several
occasions, took his bride, and they tended not a little
to increase his enthusiasm, and to inspire her with the
same love of the truth and hatred of tyranny which
animated his bosom.

At length an event occurred at Antwerp which
was sure to draw down upon the inhabitants the
fury of the ruling powers. ‘The mob arose, and
breaking ito the churches, a small body of the
most determined attacked the images and ornaments
with which they were crowded, breaking them in
pieces, or utterly defacing them. Meantime the
League was gaining strength and numbers, and the
whole country seemed ready to rise in arms in defence
of its hberties. The Prince of Orange had for long
been watching with a calm and sagacious eye the
current of events. No more true patriot existed in
the country, but it had appeared to him that the time
of action had not yet arrived. There was indignation
and excitement enough, but union was wanting among
the people, and their oppressors were powerful. ‘This
the latter soon showed by recommencing the system
of persecution. Once more, men, women. and even
24 HE BURGOMASTER’S DAUGHTER.

children, were dragged from their homes, and, being
accused of heresy, were put to death by the authori-
ties of the Inquisition in the most cruel manner. The
preachers had to fly the country or to go into hiding.
Vast numbers of persons who could manage to escape,
left their native shores and went to England. The
‘larger proportion were manufacturers and artisans,
who took their talents and their arts to the country
which gave them an asylum, and there established
those manufactures which have contributed so much
to make England great, powerful, and free. There
were weavers in linen, in wool, and silk, paper manu-
facturers, workers in iron and all sorts of metals, who
not only practised the trade themselves, but instructed
the English in their own arts; so that not only were
the articles which England required produced in the
country, but she was able to supply foreign nations,
which had hitherto been furnished with those manu-
factures from the Netherlands. ‘The Prince of Orange
already began to see that the time was fast approach.
ing when, if he would save his country from utter
destruction, he must draw the sword in its defence.
Other less cautious, or more enthusiastic persons,
began to take up arms. Among the foremost was
Count Brederode. The larger part of the population
of Antwerp was in a state of violent commotion, and the
Regent, fearful of a general outbreak, had entreated
the Prince of Orange to go to the city and endeavour to
quell it. Count Brederode had been scouring the neigh-
bouring country to collect an army, eager to be the
first in the field to oppose the Imperial forces. Already
he had assembled some thousand men, but they had
to be disciplined, and arms and ammunition were to be
collected. Their immediate object was to march to
the relief of the town of Valenciennes, ‘That city,
THE BURGOMASTER’S DAUGHTER. 95

pleasantly situated in a fertile valley, with the Scheldt
Howing through its centre, near the border of France,
was surrounded with strong fortifications and deep
moats. Here Guido de Bray, and Peregrine de la
Grange, two celebrated preachers, had been the means
of bringing the larger part of the population to the
Protestant faith. The government had insisted on
their receiving a garrison, which the inhabitants had
refused doing. It was therefore invested by an army
under Count Hemont and the Duke of Aershot, who
threatened utter destruction to the inhabitants for
their rebellion and heresy. Marnix of Thoulouse had
been longing to take a part in the struggle which was
about to commence. Again Count Brederode made
his appearance at Antwerp. Julic herself had become
as enthusiastic as her young husband. ‘The cruelties
daily perpetrated on her countrymen had filled her
gentle breast with indignation. |

“T must attend a meeting to-night at Count Bre-
derode’s residence,” said Marnix to her; “and, Julie,
if [ am called upon to draw the sword, I can no longer
refuse. You would not wish me to do so, even though
I must thus be parted from you.”

“Go, my husband,” said Julie, “I would that
women were more calculated to fight than they are,
for I would thankfully accompany you to the field.
My heart will go with you; my prayers will follow
rou.”

The meeting at Count Brederode’s was attended
by most of the more ardent patriots then at Antwerp.
‘They each wore a rough leathern wallet, with a wooden
bowl and spoon attached to a belt at their sides, to
show that they belonged to the “ Gueux,” or
“ Beggars,’—a title given to the patriots by their
haughty oppressors, and which they had voluntarily
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adopted. One and all agrecd that the time for action
had arrived.

‘I tender my sword and the best services I can
render to the cause,” said Marnix, rising from his seat
after numerous enthusiastic speeches had been mado
by the assembled members of the confederacy.

A few urged that they should wait until the Prince of
Orange was prepared to put himself at their head.

“He is so slow-moving and over-cautious, that
the time of action may have passed before he will
tleclare himself,’’ exclaimed Brederode. “If we wait
till he sets the example, we may wait in vain. Let us
march at once on Valenciennes, and then returning
victorious, we may dictate our own terms to the
Regent at Brussels. Marnix of Thoulouse, to you I
will commit the charge of our first recruits. Although
young in years, you will soon, I am sure, show that
you not only possess courage, but wisdom and fore-
thought.” |

he other speakers uttered similar expressions,
and Marnix agreed to take command of the first body
of insurgents which had been collected. ‘The meeting
now broke up. Marnix was among the last to leave
the hall. Count Brederode had taken no precautions
to guard against treachery. He remained at the
entrance of the house for some time, detaining Marnix,
and explaining more fully to him the plans he had
formed.

“IT see, my noble young friend, you must be my
heutenant, my second in command, when once we
unfurl the standard of freedom. In a short time I
trust we may sweep our tyrants from the land. We
have too long submitted to their cruelties and in-
Justice.”

While they were speaking, Marnix caught sight of
for Dave 5 c mq $ ~ ~ . °
THE BURGOMASTER’S DAUGn TER, 97

& porson stealing across the entrance of the hall. He
was evidently, from his movements, anxious to escape
ebservation, Marnix was on the point of springing
back into the hall to seize the man, when he darted by
him; and though he and Count Brederode instantly
made chase, the spy, if such he was, escaped them.

“Tt matters not,’ said Brederode. “Once in
arms with our forces collected, we may care little if
all the world knows our proceedings. And now, my
friend, you must be prepared to-morrow morning to
accompany me to the rendezvous I have appointed for
our recruits.”

The parting between the young hero and his lovely
bride can be better supposed than described. |

At an early hour the next morning, Marnix accom-
panied Count Brederode. They proceeded some way
down the banks of the Scheldt, till they arrived at- a
spot where a vessel was waiting for them. On board
were a number of recruits, under the command of
a gentleman named Van der Aa, who had, a short
time before, been compelled by the Prince of Orange
to leave the city, in consequence of his activity in
collecting men for the proposed rebellion.

Van de Aa reported that several other vessels with
recruits were waiting a short way down the river, and
Brederode at once proposed, that when all were
collected, they should make a dash at the cities of
ilushing and Middleburg, in the island of Walcheren,
possession of which would greatly forward their cause.
hey soon reached the expected vessels, which num-
bered about twenty small craft, and found that their
force amounted to about fifteen hundred men. They
were, however, without discipline, none of the officers
having had experience in actual warfare. Still, their
numbers gave them confidence, and they proceeded on
28 THE BURGOMASTER’S DAUGHTER.

to Flushing. The citizens, however, had received
notice that Count Hemont, with a strong force, con-
templated advancing on the island of Walcheren.
_ ‘They therefore, through fear, refused to receive the
liberators. Middleburg behaved in the same manner,
from a like cause, and at length it was determined that
the expedition should return up the Scheldt, and land-
ing in the neighbourhood of Antwerp, there await the
arrival of numerous other levies which were expected.



CHAPTER V.

Ir was of serious consequence that Marnix and Count
Brederode did not overtake the person they had
pursued, whom they saw escaping from their place
of meeting. He was a Fleming, one Bertram,
employed by Don Alberic Lodron as a spy on the
patriots. He hastened to his master, who had come
over to Antwerp in secret to ascertain what was
taking place. All the plans of the Count were thus
made known to Don Alberic. |

“Ti is well,” said the Spaniard, “I can now wreak
my vengeance on the head of one whom I have causo
so heartily to hate. Do you, Bertram, join yourself to
the rebels, and make your escape as soon as you have
more important information to bring me. Come to
Brussels, where I will await you. Here are these gold
pieces for the present, but you shall receive a more
ample reward should you bring me information of
importance of which I can take advantage.”

“‘ Don’t fear me, Seigneur,” answered the traitor;
and after some further arrangements had been made
he returned to his home, while, the next morning, Don
Alberic in careful disguise set off for Brussels.
THE BURGOMASTER’S DAUGHTER, 29

Meantime, while Count Brederode was engaged
in recruiting throughout the neighbouring country,
Marnix and his followers, proceeding up the Scheldt,
landed in the neighbourhood of Antwerp, at a little
village called Ostrawell, within sight of the city. The
young general, though without experience, had the
eye of a soldier, and selected his position with great
judgment. In his rear he had the broad Scheldt
and its dykes, which afforded ample protection from
any attacks likely to be made on him; on his right
and left, were other dykes as well as the village;
while he immediately ordered his men to throw up
a breastwork in front of the position, and to sink: a
deep trench. |

“We may here bid defiance to any foes who may
come against us, Count,” said Van der Aa, who was
acting as his lieutenant. “The Spaniards will scarcely
dare to attack so strong a place; and if they do, our
brave followers will drive them back with disgrace.”

“Qur followers sadly want training though,” said
Marnix ; “we must lose not a moment in getting them
into discipline.” |

This judicious resolve was instantly put into execu-
tion, and those few who had seen service among them,
were appointed as drill officers. Jt was hard work,
though, as many of the recruits were scarcely ac-
quainted with the use of firearms. Numbers, too,
came flocking daily into the camp, so that in the
course of a few days three thousand men had placed
themselves under the young Count’s standard.

If any one by individual courage and energy could
have inspired his followers with enthusiasm, Marnix
of Thoulouse would have done so. Pointing to the
standard of revolt which he now hoisted, le addressed
them in eloquent and fiery words. He reminded them.
30 THE BURGOMASTER’S DAUGHTER.

of the treachery and falsehood of King Philip, of his
bigotry and cruclties, and the fearful sufferings to which
their country had been so long subjected.

“We have now drawn the sword, my friends,” he
added ; ‘‘ we must never sheath it till our just and holy
cause has been gained. We must be ready to sacrifice
‘our fortunes, our time, our strength, and our lives to
the attainment of that noble object.”

Loud shouts burst from the throats of his followers,
and one and all vowed to fight bravely for the cause,
and never to yield while hfe remained. Among those
who made themselves most conspicuous, was a man
of middle age, somewhat small of stature, whose torn
doublet and the general faded appearance of his costume
bespoke his poverty. Noone seemed to know from
whence he had come, but his tongue showed that he
was a Fleming, while by his language it might be
supposed that he was an ardent patriot. On presenting
himself before Marnix, he stated that he had seen some
service, and hoped that he might be employed in drilling
the recruits. It was evident, from the way he set to
work, that in that respect he was no pretender. Having
thus shown his talent, he requested that he might be
appointed an officer. Veteran soldiers being scarco,
Marnix, without hesitation, granted his request.

“T regret,” he added, “ that I am not able to pre-
seni you with a habit more suited to your rank.”

‘‘That matters little,’ was the answer. ‘* We are
all beggars here, and we may hope ere long to have an
opportunity of supplying our need from the spoils of
the enemy.”

In a few days he had contrived to worm. himself
into the confidence of Van der Aa, though the young
general himself was too acute an observer of his fellow
men to trust him altogether, There was something

Ohi
THE BURGOMASTER’S DAUGHTER. 81

in the countenance of the man, and hig constant profes-
sions of patriotism, which made him doubt his honesty.
By untiring energy Marnix had at length got his
followers into something like discipline; but still,
as he reviewed them, he could not help feeling that
they possessed enthusiasm alone to make up for their
yet great want of that necessary qualification of
soldiers. All this time, although so near the objec
of his deepest affections, he had not ventured to leave
his camp. At length, however, unable to restrain his
feelings, he resolved to pay his beloved wife a brief
visit, leaving his lieutenant in charge, with orders to
maintain the strictest discipline, to send out scouts to
give timely warning of the approach of an enemy, and
to let no one leave the camp. Throwing a plain cloak
over his shoulders, and a hat which concealed his
features, as soon as darkness came on, he hurried away
towards Antwerp. His departure, however, had not
been unobserved, and in spite of the vigilance of Van
der Aa, one man at all events was found to have left
the camp, and though a party was sent after him, he
managed to elude them. :
‘The Lady Julie was seated in her boudoir. Her
embroidery lay untouched by her side, her eyes were
resting on a book, bu& the page before her conveyed
no meaning to her mind, Her thoughts were away at
the camp ‘at Ostrawell. Care and anxiety were at her
heart. She had heard accounts of the threatened dis-
turbances in the city. ‘The inhabitants of all ranks,
but especially the populace, were taking up arms. The
Prince of Orange was in command, a post he had
assumed as hereditary Burgrave of Antwerp. Those
who knew him best were aware that he had already
resolved to support the cause of liberty, but the people
generally did not fully trash him, a
39 THE BURGOMASTER’S DAUGHTER,

Count Hoogstraaten, a brave and generous young
nobleman, who had like the prince become a Protes-
tant, and who for some time before had been acting
as governor of the city, was now associated with him
in the command. They together were doing their
utmost to tranquillize the minds of the inhabitants,
‘and were ably supported by the Burgomaster, Van
Straalen, and other magistrates of the city.

Julie’s quick ear caught a footstep on the stair.
She rose from her seat, and as she reached the door,
she found herself in the arms of her young husband.

“‘T have been able to steal but a few moments from
my duties,’’ he exclaimed, as he embraced her tenderly,
‘and believe me, Julie, it has been a sore trial to keep
away from you solong ; but you I know, my sweet wife,
sympathize thoroughly with me, and have shared my
feelings.”

“T would not ask you to desert your duty, * said
Julie, looking into his face, “but I would that our
prince would give you more support, and allow the
many brave men who are anxious to join you to leave
our gates.” |

“QOne glorious victory gained, Julie, will decide
him,” answered Marnix. “ lor that we must earnestly
pray.”

Brief was the conversation of the young couple.

“T promised myself but a few moments of hap-
piness,” said Marnix at length. “I must leave you
now, Julie, and hasten back to the camp. I do not
wish my absence to be known, nor will I communicate
with any one in the city, not even with your father.”

“Going so soon?” Julie could not refrain from
saying. ,
“It may be but for a few short days,” answered
her husband. ‘“‘ Brederode hopes soon to join me wit?
THE BURGOMASTER’S DAUGHTER. 23

a force of six thousand men, and together we may
then march forward to the relief, of Valenciennes, and
afterwards to dictate a glorious peace at Brussels.”

Marnix impressed an ardent kiss on his wife’s
_ cheek, and unwilling longer to delay, with a weight at
his heart at being thus compelled so speedily to leave
her, he hastened from the house, and hurried back to
the camp. Still greater would have been his grief
had he known what was about to occur.

Scarcely had he returned, when his lieutenant
reported to him that the recruit who had been so
active in drilling the men was nowhere to be found,
and that it was supposed he had quitted the camp.
So in truth hehad. He was no other than Bertram—
the spy employed by Don Alberic. The traitor made
his way, as fast as a horse he had in waiting could
carry him, to Brussels. He soon found his employer,
who seemed highly pleased with the information he
had brought him.

“If the camp were unexpectedly attacked, the
defenders, in spite of their enthusiasm and boasts,
might be speedily overcome,” said Bertram. “If
taken by surprise, those ill-trained bands will be
unable to stand a moment against the disciplined
troops of Spain.”

Don Alberic, on receiving this information, hastened
off with it to the Seigneur de Beauvoir. ‘It is well
thought of,’ said De Beauvoir.

The latter officer at once went to the Duchess,
who was at the moment in consultation with Count
Kgmont. The Regent listened to the proposal with
no little trepidation. ‘“ If our troops are defeated, the
whole province will be up in arms,” she answered.

“Defeat shall be made impossible!” replied De
Beauvoir. “lIask but for four hundred of the body-

C
34 TIE BURGOMASTER’S DAUGHTER,

guard, and an equal number of Count Egmont’s
veteran Walloons. With them under me, victory will
be certain !’”

No time was lost. De Beauvoir selected some of
his most experienced officers, under whose charge were
placed the helmets, bucklers, arquebuses, corselets,
spears, standards, and drums of the troops, and by
them were conveyed in waggons, supposed to contain
stores of provisions, to the Abbey of St. Bernard,
within a league of Antwerp. The men, meantime,
were sent off in small bodies, to avoid suspicion, armed
only with sword and dagger. Before daybreak they
had assembled at the abbey, where their commander
and his officer met them. They were here refreshed,
and received their accoutrements. De Beauvoir then
addressed them :—

“My brave soldiers, true sons of the church,
victory is certain; the heretics will be destroyed.
Understand that you are to march forward with furled
banners, and without beat of drum. Not till you can see
the faces of the foe, is an arquebus to be discharged.
The foremost section will then deliver its fire, and,
retreating to the rear, load; while the next section
will take its place. If these commands are obeyed,
our success 18 secured, and the wretched rebels anni-
hilated.””

CHAPTER VI.

Tue small army of Marnix of Thoulouse was in high
spirits. Information was brought that the govern-
ment in Brussels were in dismay, and that the whole
population of Antwerp were rising to join the patriots,
THE BURGOMASTER’S DAUGHTER. OO

Many more recruits came to the camp, and the work
of diseiplining them went on with unbated energy.

The young general had just stepped out of the
hut which served as his abode, although the dawn of
that March morning had not yet broken, when suddenly
an arquebus was fired by one of the sentries. It was
followed by others along the line.

“'T'roops are approaching !”? exclaimed Van der Aa,
hastening up to Marnix.

“They must be, then, I trust, a detachment of
Brederode’s army,” he exclaimed; “we will welcome
them joyfully.” As he spoke, the trumpets of the
advancing force brayed loudly forth, while sudden
shouts rent the air.

The garrison hastened to their entrenchments to
return the supposed greeting. “ Welcome to our
friends ! welcome!” was shouted along the line.

In a short time, however, the grey light of the
early dawn revealed the serried ranks of well-armed ©
men, while above them waved their banners, just then
unfurled, with crosses emblazoned on them.

“They are the Spaniards; they are our foes!”
cried the young general. ‘ My brave followers, fight
like men. You fight for everything we hold sacred.
Defend our breastworks, and we shall soon beat back
the hated foe. Wait till they are so close that not a,
shot can miss its aim.’

With these and similar words Marnix flew along
the lines, endeavouring to inspire his followers with
the noble enthusiasm which animated his own bosom.

They came, some ata rapid pace, others lagging
a little, up to the lines, but the hearts of many began
to quail at the unexpected appearance of the well-
disciplined foe. Instead of firing deliberately, as their
general had urged them to do, many fired wildly over
36 THE BURGOMASTER’S DAUGHTER.

the heads of their assailants, whose bullets, aimed too
well, struck them down immediately they appeared.

On came the Spaniards and Walloons in compact
order. The ditch was reached. The veteran troops
dashed across it, and now, with stern shouts, charged
over the breastwork.

In vain the patriots struggled, in vain Thoulouse
and his officers, setting an heroic example, attempted
to defend the fort. Many fought bravely ! desperately !
but what is bravery without discipline ? The bodies of
those who fell served as a rampart for the survivors.
Still the assailants advanced, keeping each foot of
ground they won. Backwards the raw levies were
driven by the Spaniards and Walloons, who, as they
advanced, mercilessly cut down all whom _ they
encountered.

During that morning, the 13th of March, 1567,
a wild tumult was prevailing in Antwerp. Already
ten thousand men were up in arms. Suddenly, while
the shades of night were still lingering in the city, the
inhabitants were aroused by the sound of drums and
trumpets, the sharp rattle of fire-arms, and the shouts
of men engaged in furious combat.

They hurried to the ramparts overlooking Ostra-
well, whence the sounds proceeded. Some climbed
to the roofs of houses, others to towers of churches,
till every spot was occupied whence a view of the
scene of action could be obtained. Lxcited men
thronged the streets, armed with lance, spike, or
arquebus. Some bore huge hammers, others had the
partisans, battle-axes, and huge two-handed swords
of the previous century. They were rushing towards
the Red Gate, that towards Ostrawell having been
destroyed the night before by the command of
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Shouts and cries came from the spectators on the
walls. Soon they broke into mournful wails. “ Our
friends are giving way! In vain they strive! The
hated foe are gaining the victory. On they arch,
The patriots are flying. Alas! alas! fearml is the
slaughter.” These cries told too truly what was
taking place.

Meantime, a lady, young and graceful, was seen
moving amid the furious crowd.

“Friends! townsmen! our countrymen are being
overpowered! Who among you, with the hearts of
men, will refuse to hurry to their assistance? I will
lead you! My noble husband is striving for the
cause of freedom! Your very existence depends on
the struggle !” |

It was the young wife of Marnix of Thoulouse
who spoke. Hervery nature seemed changed. Rising
suddenly from her couch at the sound of battle, and
hastily robing, she had hurried to the ramparts, and
there, with aching eyes, witnessed the commencement
of the fight. Her hair escaping from confinement
was waving in the morning breeze. ‘Takmg a sword
from a bystander, she descended from the ramparts
and flew from street to street, imploring her co-
religionists to save their perishing brothers, or avenge
their deaths. Many eagerly obeyed the call, but when
they reached the Red Gate, they found it shut.

As true a patriot as ever breathed, with a wisdom
and courage unsurpassed, issued the order prohibiting
any of the inhabitants from leaving the city. He had
observed what was taking place at Ostrawell. He
knew too well that the day was lost, and that the most
devoted heroism could not retrieve it.

The vast mob, indignant at being opposed, were
crying out for vengeance on the head of their truest

~
88 THE BUBGOMASTER’S DAUGHTER.

friend, declaring him a traitor to the cause of liberty.
When the tumult was at its height, two men of noble
mien rode into their midst; the one was the Prince of
Orange, the other his brave colleague, Count Hoog-
straaten. |

“ Dic, traitorous villain !”’ cried a furious citizen
from among the mob, levelling an arquebus full at his
breast. “Thou art the cause that our brethren have
perished thus miserably in yonder field !””

The trigger was pulled, but another hand in the
mob struck up the weapon, and the missile, intended
to deprive the prince of life, flew wide of the mark.

Unmoved by the circumstance, the prince now
addressed the mob, with words calm and full of dignity;
and at length appeased, they consented to obey his
orders. A band of five hundred, however, sallied
forth to oppose the enemy. Their appearance caused
the death of many hundred prisoners whom De Beau-
voir had taken, for immediately ordering his soldiers
to shoot them, he advanced towards the city with
drums beating and colours flying.

The patriot citizens seeing themselves outnumbered
by the victorious enemy retreated, and De Beauvoir,
advancing close up to the city moat, planted the banners
of the unfortunate Thoulouse on its margin. No attack,
however, was made on him, and he marched away in
triumph. | |

What words can picture the anguish of the Lady
Julic! In vain she entreated to be allowed to go out
and search for her husband; but her father, with kind
force, restrained her, and at length, when it was
ascertained that the enemy had finally taken their de-
parture, a party were despatched to learn the truth.
They returned bearing a mangled corpse. It was that
of the brave young soldier who had thus fallen on his

} >
THE BURGOMASTER’S DAUGHTER, og

first field, hewa almost to pieces by his barbarous
assailants. |
as “8 oS % os *k is *

For some days the city remained in a state of the
most fearful disturbance, the larger part of the popula-
tion having taken up arms to destroy the Romanists
and all who might oppose them.

At one time, indeed, it seemed impossible that a
terrible scene of bloodshed could be averted. By
the boldness and discretion of the Prince of Orange,
however, at length the minds of the population were
tranquillized, and those who a short time before
had been thirsting for each other’s blood, were now
exchanging friendly greetings.

The Calvinists, Lutherans, and Romanists laid
down their arms, and the artillery and other weapons
they had taken from the arsenals were returned. The
city was once more in quiet.

CHAPTER VII

Nearty a year had passed; grief had dimmed the
Lady Julie’s eye, and paled her cheek, yet hope sus-
tained her. She looked forward to meet her husband
in another and better world, where strife, and the
miseries which sin has produced, are no more to be
found; where those once united can never part. She
had lived on with her father, and she found in the
exertions che made to support and comfort him in his
sorrow for the miseries and sufferings of his country,
» solace for her own anguish.

Hivents of importance had occurred. Valenciennes
had fallen when most of its inhabitant= were bar-
40 THE BURGOMASTER’S DAUGHTER.

barously butchered. Count Brederode had retired
from the confederacy, and was dying, it was said, of
disappointment and hard drinking, an event which
shortly afterwards took place. Many of the other
leaders had been captured and executed, and in every
city and village of the Netherlands, executions of
uumbers considered obnoxious to the government were
daily taking place.

The Duke of Alva, destined to be the scourge of
the country, had arrived at Brussels accompanied by
a strong body of veteran warriors, trained to commit
every atrocity which warfare can produce. Hope
might have deserted the breast of the most sanguine,
had not William of Orange at length come forward as
the champion of freedom, and he now, assisted by his
eallant brother Louis of Nassau, by Hoogstraaten, by
the noble St. Aldegonde, and others, was collecting
forces to oppose the persecutors of his country.

The young widow was seated by the side of her
father, Antony Van Straalen, when a visitor was
announced. A. flash of annoyance passed over her -
countenance when Don Alberic Lodron entered the
apartment. Headvanced with an air of confidence and
assumption, which yet further increased her indigna.
tion; yet the father and daughter were too courteous
not to receive the guest, even though an unwelcome
one, with propriety, and rising, they begged Don
Alberic to be seated.

“To what circumstance am I indebted for the
honour of a visit?” said the Burgomaster, finding
that the Spaniard did not commence the conver-
sation.

“TY wish to pay my respects to one whose beauty
and accomplishments merit them,’ answered Don
Alberic, bowing low to Lady Julie,
THE BURGOMASTER’S DAUGHTER. Ad

“Don Alberic Lodron might be aware, that one
who has lately suffered a heavy affliction, cannot desire
to see strangers, except on matters of importance,”
answered the young widow, in a cold manner.

“To me it is a matter of importance,” said the
Spaniard, with a boldness which he would not have
ventured to use unless he had supposed that those to
whom he addressed himself were in his power.

“T must request you, my father, to entertain this
gentleman,” said the Lady Julie, rising. “ Such words
-as he speaks annoy me, and I would avoid hearing
them.” And bowing stiffly to the Spaniard, she glided
from the room.

“T have always been led to believe that the
Spaniards are a courteous nation,” said the Burgo-
master. ‘I cannot, therefore, suppose that you would
willingly annoy a lady who has sufliciently expressed
her sentiments towards you.”

“A father has power to induce his daughter to act
as he may think fit!’ exclaimed the Spaniard. “I
must hold you responsible, Mynheer Van Straalen, if
my expectations are thwarted.”

*“ Kven had I ever wished to exercise undue paren-
tal authority over my daughter, I should not do so
now that she is a widow,” answered the Burgomaster.
*“T must therefore entreat you, as a cavalier of honour,
not further to mention the subject. She has already
expressed her sentiments, and I have reason to know
that they will not alter.”

At length, indignant at the refusal he had received,
where he had presumptuously expected success, Don
Alberic left the house, and not long after returned to
Brussels, with information on various matters which
he had contrived to gainin Antwerp. A short time
after this, the Burgomaster received a summons from
49 THE BURGOMASTER’S DAUGHTER.

the Duchess of Parma, to repair to Brussels on impor-
tant matters of business. |

“Oh, my father! I dread your going there,” said
his daughter; “rather sacrifice your fortuncs and
position in this city, than be ensnared by those—
treacherous foes. I‘ar better would it be to cscape
to Hngland, the land of freedom, than fall into the
power of the enemies who hate us.”

The Burgomaster, however, would not listen to the
advice of his daughter. “Surely,” he said, ‘ except
that I am a Protestant, I have committed no act of
which the government can complain. The Duchess
has sent for me in a friendly spirit, and were I to show
distrust it would go far to prove my guilt.”

“Then let me go with you, my father,’ said Julie ;
you will very likely at all events have troubles and
annoyances, and I may tend to soothe your care if I
can do nothing else.”

Lhe Burgomaster was resolved to go, and forthwith
gave orders for his travelling equipage to be got ready.
His coach, though equal to any of that day, was somo-
what large and heavy. After sallying forth by the
Brussels gate, he, with Julie by his side, proeceded
towards his destination.

“Things will go well, father,” said his daughter ;
“T knownot why [was alarmed. I have become timid
oflate. Ithink I might even start at my own shadow.”

They had proceeded some way, when, reaching an
open heath near which no human habitations were to
be found, suddenly the coachman pulled up, uttering
an exclamation of terror.

“What is the matter?” inquired the Burgomaster
putting his head from the window.

“A band of horsemen are approaching, Burgo-
master,” was the answer.
THE BURGOMASTER’S DAUGHTER. 43

“Oh, fly! my father, fly!” cried the Lady Julie;
“they are enemies! My worst forebodings are fal-
filled ! ”

The coavhman turned his horsés’ heads and galloped
back towards Antwerp. As they were whecling round ;
Lady Julie looked from the window. |

** Alas!” she said, “TI see at their head Don Alberie
Lodron ; I feared when he quitted us that his intentions
were evil, and now I know it too well.”

The carriage had proceeded but a short dis-
tance when another party of horsemen were seen in
front.

“They are Spaniards by their dress,” exclaimed
the coachman. ‘ We are lost! Burgomaster, we are
lost!”

The open country on every side precluded the
possibility of flight.

“We must sit still, my daughter, and submit to
our fate, whatever that may be,” said the Burgomaster.
“For you, my daughter, I grieve the most, but Heaven
will protect you.”

Scarcely had he spoken when the horsemen sur-
rounded the carriage. In the leader of one of the
parties, he recognized Don Alberic, and in the other
Don Sancho de la Lodrono, who had been one of the
combatants in the tournament at Brussels.

“Yield your self, Antony Van Straalen, as a pr isoner,
in the name of King Philip, your lawful sovereign,’
said Don Alberic.

‘‘An authority I have never disputed,” answered
the Burgomaster with dignity. “But, sir, I appeal
to you as a cavalier, and request that you will allow
my daughter to return to her hone.”

“‘ A request made by a prisoner I cannot accede to,”
answered Don Alperic. ‘My orders are to convey
44 THE BURGOMASTER’S DAUGHTER.

you, Antony Van Straalen, and all who accompany
you, as prisoners to Brussels.”

“Oh, let me accompany you! let me accompany
you!” exclaimed the Lady Julie; “I would not be
parted from you, whatever may be the annoyances to
which I may be subjected.”

Once more the horses’ heads were turned towards
Brussels, and the unwilling coachman was compelled
to drive them along with a strong escort on each side.
Don Alberic several times rode up to the coach-window
endeavouring to engage the Lady Julie in conversation,
but the scornful silence with which she treated him,
compelled him at length to desist. On reaching the
neighbourhood of Brussels the carriage was again
stopped.

“ Antony Van Straalen, you must accompany me,”
said Don Sancho; “ you will not be permitted to com-
municate with any member of your family. The lady
can remain in the carriage if she so wishes.”

In vain the young widow entreated to be allowed
to accompany her father. The Spaniards declared
that their orders were peremptory; and at length,
Don Sancho, losing patience, seized the Burgo-
master’s arm, and was about to drag him from the
carriage. ,

“T submit,” said the magistrate in a dignified
tone; and embracing his daughter, he descended from
the carriage, and mounted the horse which had been
prepared for him.

The Lady Julie, on her own account, was some-
what relieved when she saw that only four horsemen
were left as an escort for the carriage, and that both
the Spanish officers were accompanying her father.
Still, nothing could mitigate her anxiety for him. For
herself she cared not, The coachman drove but
THE BURGOMASTER’S DAUGHTER. 45

slowly; more than once the Spanish soldiers urged
him to greater speed.

‘* My horses are weary,” he answered, “and unless
you choose to change, and put your horses in, the
carriage cannot move faster.”

Evening was rapidly coming on. Lady Julie had
lost sight of the calvacade which escorted her father.
At length one of the horses fell. The Spaniards
abused the coachman.

** It was no fault of mine,” he answered.

“ Dismount now, and assist in getting the beast up
again.”

While thus engaged, the Spanish soldiers abusing
the coachman, and the coachman returning their com-
pliments, their voices grew louder and louder. Sud-
denly there was a loud shout, and three of the horses,
the reins of which they had unwisely let go, flinging
out their heels, galloped off. The next instant a body
of men sprang out from a copse close at hand, with
reiterated shouts of “Vive les Gueuwx.’? The Spaniards
drew their swords, and endeavoured to defend them-
selves; but unable to parry the blows aimed at them,
those on foot were struck down. The fourth soldier
mounted his horse, and though many attempted to
stop him, with a blow of his sabre he clove the head
of one man, and cutting another across the shoulders,
escaped towards Brussels.

“Come, come, Peter’”’—for Peter the porter was
acting the part of coachman on this occasion,— ‘‘ up
with your horse! Is the Burgomaster in the car-
riage f ”’ asked the leader of the party.

“Alas! no, but his daughter is; and if we cannot
save him, we must save her,” was the answer.

The fallen horse was not so much injured as Peter
had pretended, and was quickly on its legs again, and
46 THE BURGOMASTER’S DAUGHTER.

a number of Beggars running alongside at full-speed,
accompanied the carriage back towards Antwerp.

“Stop! Peter. Stop! my friends. I would de-
sire to accompany my father,” said Julie at length,
finding the direction in which they were going.

“Tmpossible ! lady,” answered one of the leaders
of the Beggars. ‘ You will not be allowed to com-
municate with him, and your own life will be placed
in peril. Those savages care not on whom they inflict
punishment.”

In vain Julie pleaded.

They had proceeded some distance, when they
came toa wood where the roads branched off. Instead
of continuing back on the direct road to Antwerp,
they turned off on one side.

* After what has occurred, it would be dangerous
for you to go back to the city,” said the leader. ‘We
are about to proceed down the river to join a vessel
which is to proceed to Brill, where you will be secure.
We had intended to convey.your father thither, had
we been successful in rescuing him from the hands of
the Spaniards. Your brother-in-law, St. Aldegonde,
is now there, and you can place yourself under his
protection. We are very sure that, in thus acting,
we are fulfilling the wishes of the Burgomaster, Van
Straalen.” |

Although Julie was still anxious to endeavour to
rejoin her father, even in prison, yet she was unable to
resist this proposal; indeed her somewhat rough pro-
tectors were evidently resolved not to listen to any
argument to the contrary. The carriage now pushed
on at a rapid rate. In a few hours the Scheldt was
reached, and she found herself conducted on board a
vessel, -

“ Farewell, my good steeds!” said Peter, looking
THE BURGOMASTER’S DAUGHTER. 47

at his horses, “ but as I have no wish to hang or burn,
rather than remain with you, I will accompany my
young mistress.” ,

The wind was fair, and the vessel rapidly proceeded
down the river. Brill was safely reached, and St.
Aldegonde did his utmost to console his sister-in-law.
The news soon reached them of the capture of the
Counts Egmont and Horn, and shor tly after, of their
cruel and impolitic execution.



CHAPTER VITI.

Notwit.s?anping@ the advice of St. Aldegonde, Julie
resolved to visit her father, and to attempt to obtain
his hberation. She took Peter into her counsels.
Although he knew well that he ran the risk of losing
his life, he was perfectly ready to assist his young
mistress.

He obtained, by Julie’s directions, the dress of a
female peasant for her, and that of an old countryman
for himself. Julie was to pass as his daughter, and
she hoped, thus disguised, to be able to reach Brussels.

Peter heard of a vessel about to proceed to Antwerp.
The night was dark, the wind blowing strong and
rain falling heavily. Notwithstanding the strife of the
elements, Julie and her faithful attendant issued from
the house, and making theirway down tothe quay, got
safely on board the vessel. ‘The captain, who had been
largely bribed through Peter, immediately got under
weigh. Though the voyage was boisterous, the vessel
roached Antwerp j in safety. It was dark when Julie
and her faithful attendant landed. To her father’s house
she dared not go. She had, however, several wealthy
friends in the city on whom she could rely. Still
48 THE BURGOMASTER’S DAUGHTER.

fearing that should she appear in her peasant’s dress
at one of their houses, suspicion would be aroused,
she resolved to go to the more humble abode of her
old nurse.

Peter knocked at the door.

«Who are you?) What do you want at this hour
of the night?” exclaimed the good woman from within.

“Tet us in, kind Margaritte, and we will tell you,”
answered Peter. “We crave a night’s lodging, and
you will not refuse it when you see us.”

Julie, seeing none near, ventured to add a few
words of entreaty. The bolts were quickly withdrawn,
but when the old woman’s eyes fell on the seeming
peasant girl, she started back.

“Why, I thought it was ——,” she exclaimed,
gazing at her visitors.

« And you are right,” answered Julie, as she hur-
ried into the house.

“What does it all mean?” exclaimed the old
woman. Then, recognizing the young lady, she put
her finger on her lips, and beckoned them into a room
on one side of the passage.

“ T have lodgers,” she whispered. * They will over-
hear us.”

Julie, ina few words, explained her object in re-
turning to Antwerp. |

“Protect you, I will, while I have life,” said the
old woman. ‘ But oh, my dear young mistress, what
a fearful risk you are running ;”

‘Not greater than the object deserves,” answered
Julie. ‘ Had I the meansI would proceed to Brussels
this very night.”

Dame Margaritte, however, persuaded Julie to take
some rest.

“You shall lie down in my bed, and I will watch

a
THE BURGOMASTER’S DAUGHTER. 49

over you as I have done many a time when you were a
little child,” she said; “and since you must go, Peter
will to-morrow try and find a conveyance for you to
Brussels.”

Before daybreak Peter went out, leaving her still
resting, with old Margaritte seated by her side.

The dame’s lodgers had gone out to their daily
avocations before Peter returned. His muddy shoes
showed that he had had a long walk.

“IT thought my old horses would find their way back
to their accustomed meadows, and I was not mistaken,”
he observed, as he sat down to eat the breakfast placed
before him ; “IT had some work to catch Old Longtails,
but I have cropped him, so that I should scarcely know
him myself again, and obtained a pillion from a friend
on which the Lady Julie may ride without fear behind
me,”?

Poor Julie, bidding dame Margaritte farewell,
sallied forth with the old man, and proceeded through
the streets of Antwerp. They at length reached the
outskirts of the town, where they found a boy holding
a horse, with a pillion on its back.

‘Now, daughter, mount, and we will be on our
way,’’ said Peter, giving the boy a small coin.

At length Brussels was reached. The most difficult
part of Julie’s undertakings was now to begin. She
had only one acquaintance in the city on whose dis-
cretion she could rely. She resolved to visit her,
pretending that she and the old man had come up
about some business connected with their little plot of
land, and were anxious to obtain the interest of her
husband, who was a lawyer.

As soon as the servant had left the room, Julie
made herself known to her friend, who promised to
assist her by every means in her power.

D
£6 HITE BURGOMASTER’S DAUGUTER.

‘My husband knows the jailer of the prison im
which the Burgomaster is confined,” she said. ‘ He
has, I know, a “daughter. If by any means she could
be induced to let you take her place, you would then
have an opportunity of visiting your father.” |

Julie’s heart beat quickly at the suggestion. Her
friend forthwith sent for the young girl to her house,
and explained the object to be attained. She was for-
tunately of a romantic and generous disposition, and
though not ignorant of the risk she ran, promised her
assistance. Julie, furnished with a suitable costume,
which still however disguised her sufficiently, set out
for the prison with the jailer’s daughter.

The shades of evening were closing over the city
when they arrived. The jailer was about to go his
last round for the night, to see that all his prisoners
were safe before the watch was set. Julie had just
time to change dresses with her new friend.

“Do not be alarmed,” said the latter, “ my fathor
will not speak to you, and he is to suppose that ibis I
who am accompanying him.”

Poor Julie’s limbs trembled as she followed tho
jailer through the long gloomy arched passages of the
prison. After opening and shutting several iron-
plated doors, he arrived before one, which, after can-
tiously glancing up and down the passage, he opened.
Julie gazed m. On a trestle-bed, covered with a few
heaps of straw, she beheld her beloved father. She
sprang in, forgetting her assumed character; but the
jailer took no notice. She was not aware that her
generous friend had conveyed a purse of gold, and
had promised another, to assist in blunting his faculties,
The door was closed, and the father and~ his daughter
were in each other’s arms. ‘The particulars of the in-
terview cannot be described.
THE DURGOMASTER’S DAUGHTER. 5]

In vain, Julie entreated that she might be allowed
to plead with the Duke for his life. He strictly for-
bade her,

“No, Julie,” he said, you have ever been a duti-
ful danghter, and for my sake I must enjoin you to
leave this unhappy place without delay. If the Duke
has resolved on my death, no power on earth can avert
my fate; but I am in the arms of One more powerful
than man. Go back, my beloved daughter, and again
place yourself under the care of the generous St. Alde-
gonde. When I know that you are safe, then the
thoughts of once more having beheld you, will bring
joy to my heart, and you must rest satisfied that you
have acted as a brave and loving child.’’

Ihe old man and his daughter were not aware how
rapidly those precious moments had flown by, when
the door again opened, and the jailer beckoned to
Julie to accompany him.

We must hurry on with our tale.

In obedience to her father’s commands, the next
morning, having resumed her peasant’s dress, Julie
set off for Antwerp, and at length, escaping numerous

risks, arrived at Brill. St. Aldegonde, admiring’ her
courage and filial love, uttered no words of reproach,

but received her as if he had himself fully sanctioned
her undertaking.

livery day news came of the continuance of the
hanging, burning, drowning, ahd beheading of persons
of all ranks throughout the country. But why dwell
on this dreadful subject? At length a messenger
arrived with the sad news that four persons of distinc-
tion were condemned to be beheaded. The most
worthy of them was the distinguished Burgomastcr of
Antwerp. It was said, however, that even the Blood
Council, in sending the case to Alva for his sentence,
52 THE BURGOMASTER’S DAUGHTER.

had felt some compunction at the impending fate of so
meritorious and excellent a man, and had recommended
him to mercy. In vain. It fell unheeded on the
tyrant’s ear, and after having been subjected to fearful
torture on the rack, to elicit information, the venerable
magistrate was bound upon a chair, being unable to
stand, and with his companions was thus carried to
the scaffold, where all four were beheaded.

St. Aldegonde broke the information as gently as
he could to Julie. For some time he dreaded lest she
would sink under the blow, but though heart-broken,
the consolations of religion supported her. A vessel
was about to sail for England, with two ladies, whose
husbands had suffered on a previous occasion. St.
Aldegonde persuaded his sister-in-law to embark with
them, knowing the danger to which she would be
exposed should she return to Antwerp, and believing
that a total change of scene would alone restore her to
tranquillity of mind. Numerous Flemings, who had
escaped from the persecutions of King Philip and his
ready instruments, had already taken refuge in that
country. Among them the Lady Julie found sym-
pathizing friends, and there she passed the remainder
of her life, engaged in assisting, with the wreck of
her father’s fortune, which had been secured for her,
those of her countrymen who, ruined by the tyranny of
their oppressors, had escaped with their lives alone to
the land of freedom, and where, under the wise and
beneficent rule of Queen Elizabeth, they had found
protection and liberty.


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MOPRAT THE MISSIONARY.


MOFFAT, THE MISSIONARY,

CHAPTER I,
COLONISTS AND NATIVES.

Caen NE or ten thousand miles, as the ship sails,
ital or at the distance of a twenty days’ voyage
from England, is the Cape of Good Hope,
in South Africa. Here there is a European
colony, called Cape Colony, and a town called Cape
Town, which were founded about two hundred y cars
ago by the Dutch, but which have been since given up
to the British Government; though a great many of
the present inhabitants are descendants of the old
Dutch colonists. These are principally farmers: they
are called Boers, and most of them still speak the
Dutch language. |
Within the present century a good many people have
gone from Great Britain to Cape Colony as emigrants ;
for the country has a fine climate and rich soil. So
there are English and Scotch farmers as well as Dutch.


o4 MOFFAT, THE MISSIONARY.

There are towns also in different parts of the colony,
besides Cape Town, having much the appearance of
thriving towns in England. But it is of other matters
than these that I have to write.

When the Dutch began to colonize this country, they
very easily obtained their first lands from the natives,
in exchange for beads and other trinkets; and as soon
as they felt they had the power, I am sorry to say they
began to behave very unjustly and cruelly to the poor
Hottentots, as those native inhabitants were called.
They took possession of the best part of the Hottentot
country, robbed the natives of their cattle, and either
drove the poor people from their homes, to take refuge
in distant deserts, or made slaves of them.

And a terrible life these poor slaves led; for the
Boers came at last to have so many of them that they
were thought of little value as scrvants, and were
treated more like brute beasts than human beings.
They were made to go almost naked ; and their food
was little better than carrion. All the wages they had
for their labour was a few strings of glass beads in the
year; and if, by any means, any of these poor wretches
happened to possess a few cattle, it was a great chance
if his master, the Boer, did not contrive some means
of getting rid of him, and keeping the cattle for his
own. If a Hottentot offended his master or mistress,
he was tied up to a waggon-wheel, and cruelly fogged
with a horrid whip made of rhinoceros hide. Or if a
Boer took a serious dishke to any one of these unhappy
slaves, it was no uncommon thing to send him out on
some pretended message, and then ¢ to follow, and shoot
him on the road. And when thus put cut of the way,
his poor Hottentot fmends and relations durst not
make any inquiry about him, lest they too should be
severely punished, or perhaps murdered,
MOFFAT, THE MISSIONARY, Oo

Tt was well for the badly-used Hottentots when

Cape Colony became a part of the British Empire ;
for though, at first, their condition might not be much
mended, 1t became better by degrees, until at length
they were delivered from their cruel bondage. But
they did not get back the lands which had been taken
by force from their fathers.
_ The Dutch colonists used to speak and-write about
the Hottentots in such a way as to make people believe
that they had no more sense or feeling than brutes, and
that it was next to impossible to civilize them. Now,
if this had been true, it would have been no excuse for
their ill-treatment of the poor natives: but it was not
true. Certainly, the Hottentots were ignorant and
debased ; but they were capable of receiving instruc-
tion, and of proving themselves to be thinking and
intelligent beings. Before they had the misfortune
to become acquainted with Huropeans, they were a
numerous people, divided into tribes, and governed by
chiefs, as is the way with most uncivilized nations.
they did nof cultivate the land, and their only steady
occupation was the care of their flocks of sheep aud
herds of cattle, of which they had abundance. As
they hved in a warm country, they did not need much
clothing or shelter. A mantle of shcep-skins, sewed
together with threads of sinews, and made soft and
pliable by sicuon. served for a garment by day anda
blanket by night. A hut, framed of a few boughs or
poles covered with rush mats, which con!d be carried
from place to place on the backs of oxen, was a
sufficient protection from the weather. A bow and
poisoned arrows, anda light spear, were their only arms,
and were used alike for war and the chase,

Besides these, were tribes of wandering natives,
who were considered and treated by the Hottentots as
o6 MOFFAT, THE MISSIONARY.

inferior to themselves. Very poor they were, and
wretched: they had neither flocks nor herds, but lived
upon what they could take in hunting, and on raw
roots, grubs, insects, and snakes. These Bushmen,
as they are called, are supposed to be the earliest re-
maining aborigines of South Africa, having been in
possession of the country prior to the Hottentots, and
long prior to the Caffres. They resemble the Hotten-
tots in some respects, as in colour and features, but in
others, and these more important, they differ from them.

These Bushmen have always been the terror of the
farmers of Cape Colony; for having been deprived
of their possessions, they soon became desperate and
revengeful; and, from being treated as wild beasts,
they became like wild beasts in habits and disposition.
A missionary, who lived among them some time, has
given a sad account of their character. He suys, ‘Their
manner of life is extremely wretched and disgusting ;
they delight to besmear their bodies with the fat of
animals mingled with ochre, and sometimes with grime.
They are utter strangers to cleanliness, as they never
wash their bodies, but suffer the dirt to accumulate, so
that it will hang a considerable length from their
elbows. ‘Their huts are formed by digging a hole in
the earth, about three feet deep, and then making a
roof of reeds, which is, however, insufficient to keep
off the rains, Here they lie close together hke pigs
in a sty. They are extremely lazy, so that nothing
will rouse them to action but excessive hunger. They
will continue several days together without food, rather
than be at the pains of procuring 1t. When compelled
to sally forth for prey, they are dexterous at destroy-
ing the various beasts which abound in the country ;
and they can run almost as fast as ahorse. They take
no great care of their children, and never correct them
MOFFAT, THE MISSIONARY, 57

except in a fit of rage, when they almost kill them by
severe usage. In the quarrel between father and
mother, or the several wives of a husband, the de-
feated party wreaks his or her vengeance on the child
of the conqueror, which in general loses its life. The
Hottentots seldom destroy their children, except ina
fit of passion; but the Buskmen will kill their children
without remorse, on various occasions; as when they
are iul-shaped, when they are in want of food, when
the father of a child has. forsaken its mother, or when
obliged to flee from the farmers cr others, in which
case they will strangle them, smother them, cast them
away in the desert, or bury them alive. There are
instances of parents throwing their tender offspring to
the hungry lion, who stands roaring before their cavern,
refusing to depart till some peace-offering be made to
him.” |

This is a terrible picture of human nature; and as
these Bushmen are not, of course, more compassionate
towards those whom they consider their enemies than
they are towards their own children ; and as, besides
their cruelty, they are daring robbers, we may readily
conclude that they cannot be safe or pleasant neigh-
bours. But it must not be forgotten that it was the
oppression of the white men that helped to make them
what they are ; and that if they have given the colonists
much reason to dislike them, they themselves have quite
as good reason to dislike the colonists, who, in former
times, at least, have not scrupled to hunt and kill them
whenever they had opportunity.

Beyond the Hottentot country, and hundreds of
miles from that part of the colony which lies near the
Bea, are many nations of Africans, such as the Caffres
or Kafirs, the Bechuanas, and the Damaras. These
are of a race differing quite from the Hottentots and
08 MOFFAT, THE MISSIONARY.

Bushmen; but in one particular there is much resem-
Llance among them all, aud that is, their ignorance and
superstition. In general, Africa may be described as
one of those “dark places of the earth’? which “are
full of the habitations of cruelty.” I shall have occa-
sion to say more of this presently.

As this part of the world is exposed to the fiercer

rays of the sun, the natives are dark-skinned. Some
of the tribes are almost black, and others are very
brown. The Hottentots are not so dark as those who
live more in the interior of the country, but they are
very different in appearance from Europeans, both in
complexion and features.
_ There is also much difference with regard to the
country itself. In some parts, the land 1s fertile, and
the vegetation very beautiful, while in others the gicund
is rocky and dry, so that for miles and miles not a blade
of grass or a green leaf can be seen. And sometimes
the finest parts of the country are scorched up for want
of rain, so that even the beds cf riversaredried. Then,
when rain falls, it often falls in destructive torrents,
accompanied by fearful thunder-storms. ‘Thus, the
farmers in Cape Colony have many risks to run, and
are exposed to great losses; and the poor natives are
obliged to wander from one part of the country to
another mm search of water and food for themselves and
their cattle.

There arc cangers, too, in Africa, from fierce ani-
mals, such as lions, tigers, panthers, hyenas, and other
beasts of prey, which attack men as well as cattle and
sheep, especially the hons. Other wild animals also
‘abound, such as elephants, giraffes, buffaloes, rhino-
ceroses, and deer of various kinds,—all of which furnish
rare sport to any person who is skilful and daring
enough to hunt them. Snakes aud poisonous reptiles


MOFFAT, THE MISSIONARY. 09

there are, too, in great numbers ; and swarms of locusts
which, wherever they come, eat up every green thing,
and are, in their turn, eaten by the natives. In the
rivers are crocodiles; and the sea-cow, as the hippo-
potamus is sometimes called, haunts their banks, while
the ostrich roams in the wide deserts. In short, there
isno part of the world in which so many wild animals
are to be found as in Africa,

But wilder and fiercer are the natives themselves
when their bad passions rouse them to make war on
each other. ‘Then are seen some of the darker shades
of the African character, in the savage cruelties which
are exercised, not only by the warriors upon each
other, but also upon helpless and unoffending women
and children.









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60 MOFFAT, THE MISSIONARY.

CHAPTER II.
THE FIRST MISSIONARY TO THE HOTTENTOTS.

Notwitustanpinc all that the Dutch colonists said
about the Hottentots and Bushmen, there were somo
persons who pitied them, and believed that 1f they were
stupid and ignorant and vicious, there was the more
need to attempt their instruction ; and also that there
were better ways of instructing them than by tying
them toa waggon-wheel and flogging them. &o,imthe
year 1786, which was more than eighty years after the
colony was founded, a good German, named George
Schmidt—or Smith, as he would have been called in
England—left his native country, and went among the
wild Hottentots, at a place which is now known as
Genadendal, or the Vale of Grace, but which then went
by the name of Bavian’s Kloof, or the Glen of Baboons.
This place was a secluded valley, a good distance from
Cape Town; and here George Schmidt built himself
a hut, cultivated a garden, and, by kindness, won the
affections of the ignorant natives.

You may fancy how scornfully some of the Dutch
colonists would look upon a man who had come all that
way from home for no other purpose but to teach the
Hottentots; and how, if they ever met with him, they
would tell him he might as well try to make reasonable
beings of baboons. But Schmidt did not regard this.
He built a school for Hottentot children, and, though
he was ignorant of their language, he preached to the
older people by means of an interpreter. And it was
not lone before they began to look upon him as their
friend, More than this, many of the poor despised
MOFFAT, THE MISSIONARY. 61

Hottentots listened to his instructions; and when he
told them of the love of God, in sending His dear Son
to be the Saviour of the world, their hearts were melted
with love and gratitude: by the grace of God they be-
came Christians.

George Schmidt lived among the Hottentots seven
years, with no one to encourage or assist him in his
loving and self-denying work. At the end of that time
he was obliged to go back to Europe, not intending to
remain there, however. But the Dutch colonists had
taken great offence at his having been successful in
teaching the natives. They saw that he was making
men of them, as well as Christians; and they did not
wish them to be men; it suited their purposes better
that they should remain as ignorantas beasts. So they
sent word to Holland that Schmidt had done great
mischief in the colony by his teaching and preaching ;
and when he was about to return to Africa he was not
allowed to proceed on his journey. Thus this first
Christian mission to the Hottentots was wickedly put
an end to.

It was fifty years afterwards, and when George
Schmidt had been long dead, that three travellers from
Europe landed at the Cane of Good Hope, and were
not long in finding their way tnrough the colony to the
Vale of Grace. They were ‘missionaries, like Schmidt ;
and they wished to know if he was still remembered
there. They found the little village he had raised
almost deserted; there were ruins of cottages, in which
the Christian Hottentots had lived; and a part of the
walls of Schmidt’s house was yet standing, with several
fruit trees, which he had planted, yet flourishing be-
side it.

Was this all? No; they found, living near, a poor
old Hottentot woman, who wept for joy when she was
62 MOFFAT, THE MISSIONARY,

told that those strangers were friends of her good
teacher, who had lived so many years ago at the Vale
of Grace, and that they were Christians—for she too
was a Christian. And besides poor old Magdalena—
for that was her name—were many other Hottentots,
who either remembered Mr. Schmidt with affection, or
had heard of him: and very glad they were when they
found that missionaries were come to live among them
again.

After this, other missionaries went out to different
parts of Southern Africa from “Europe, especially from
Great Britain, after Cape Colony became a British
colony ; and there are now a great number of mis-
sionary stations, not only among the Hottentots and
Bushmen of the colony, but in the countries beyond.
MOFFAT, THE MISSIONARY, G3

CHAPTER IIT.
THE HOTTENTOT CHIEF.

Tr you look on a map of Africa for Cape Colony, you
will find it quite at the lower part of that great conti-
nent,—a little corner, as it may seem, compared with
the whole of the map. Small as it appears, however,
it is nearly twice as large.as the whole of Great
Britain. On the right hand side of this colony is the
country of the Caffres, between whom and the English,
as you may have heard, a sad war was for many years
carried on; and higher up on the map, beyond the
colony, is a large country called Namaqua-land, inha-
bited by different tribes of Hottentots. It isin general
a wretched country, for want of water; and it was to
the deserts of Namaqua-land that numbers of the poor
‘Hottentots were driven by the cruelties of their Dutch
masters. I will give you a short history of one of these.
AFRICANER was the chief of a Hottentot tribe; and
in former days, he and his brothers “ roamed on their —
native hills and dales, within a hundred miles of Cape
Town; pastured their own flocks, killed their own
game, drank of their own streams, and mingled the
music of their heathen songs with the winds which
burst over the Wilsemberg and Winterhoek mountains,
once the strongholds of their clan.” But the Dutch
came and took possession of Africaner’s pastures, and
compelled him to remove. Some of his people were
destroyed, others deserted, and others were made
‘slaves by the Dutch, till at last, far from the land of
his forefathers, the Hottentot chief, and the remainder
of his tribe, were compelled to become servants to a
64. MOFFAT, TILE MISSIONARY.

Boer. Here he and his diminished clan lived for a
number of years, and were faithful to their master, who
in return seemed to take a mean and cruel pleasure in
provoking and oppressing them. At length Africaner
saw that there was no relief to be gained from this con-
stant tyranny, but that his people were dwindling away
in number, while their wives and daughters were abused
and their infants murdered, and he himself—once their
proud chief-—had to subsist on a coarse and scanty
pittance, which, in the days of his independence, he
would have scorned to give to the meanest of his fol-
lowers. Then he asked permission of the Boer to leave
his service, and to remove to some distant part of the
country, where they might live in peace and quiet.
But, instead of granting this request, the haughty Boer
let Africaner know that he looked upon him and all his
people as slaves; and began to treat them more
_ tyrannically than before.

This was more than the poor Hottentots could
endure. They refused any longer to obey the com-
mands of their master. Ovder after order was sent
down to the huts of Africaner and his people to no
purpose—they sat still brooding over their multiplied
wrongs. :

“It was eventide, and the farmer, exasperated to
find his commands disregarded, ordered them, the
Hottentot slaves, to appear at the door of his house.
This was to them an awful moment, and though accus-
tomed to scenes of barbarity, their hearts beat hard.
It had not yet entered their minds to do violence to the
farmer. |

“They moved slowly up to the door of the house.
Titus, the next brother to the chief, dreading that the
farmer, in his wrath, might have recourse to desperate
measures, took his gun with him, holding it behind his
MOFFAT, THE MISSIONARY. 65

back. When they reached the front of the house, and
the chief had gone up the few steps leading to the door,
to state their complaints, the Boer rushed furiously
upon him, and with one blow precipitated him to the
bottom of the steps. At this moment, Titus drew from
behind him his gun, and fired on the tyrant, who stag-
gered backwards and fell.

“They then entered the house, and the wife having
witnessed the death of her husband, implored for mercy.
They told her not to be alarmed, for they had nothing
against her; but demanded all the guns and ammuni-
tion that were in the house, and charged her not to
leave the house during the night, for if she did, the
other slaves, over whom Africaner had no control,
might kill her.

“The poor wife obeyed this command; but two of
her children, overcome with terror, escaped by a back
door, and were slain by two Bushmen, who had long
been looking out for an opportunity of revenging
injuries they had suffered. The mother afterwards
escaped to the nearest farm.”

After this, you may be sure, Cape Colony was no
safe place for Africaner. Without loss of time he got
together the remnant of his people, and escaped to
Namaqua-land, beyond the danger of pursuit, whero
he soon became known and feared as a terrible robber.

All this occurred long after missionaries had begun
bo teach the gospel to Hottentots and Bushmen in dif- |
ferent parts of the colony; but it does not appear that
Africaner had ever received such instruction, or indeed
heard of that mild and merciful revelatica of God to
man, which tells of One who loved his enemies, and
gave his life for them, and which teaches us to bless
them that curse us, to do good to them that hate us,
and pray for them that despitefully use us and perse-

E
66 MOFFAT, THE MISSIONARY.

cute us. And we need not wonder that Africaner had
never heard of the Bible, when we consider how far
distant the missionaries were then from each other
in that wide country. As to the Boer, who was
Africaner’s master, and who came to the miserable end
Thave described, it is not likely that the poor Hotten-
tot slaves learned much of Christianity from him.

Well, as I said, Africaner’s name spread terror far
and wide in Namaqua-land. The cclonists who lived
nearest to that country, feared to sleep in the night
lest he should fall upon them, rob them of their cattle,
and perhaps murder them; and the natives around
him looked upon him as a dangerous neighbour and
their enemy. One plot after another was laid, both by
Boers and Namaqua Hottentots, against his hfe. But
he was watchful and brave, and had around him his
brothers and faithful followers, so that he always ma-
naged to escape from his enemies.

He had narrow escapes, however. Once he and
his men were unexpectedly attacked by a large party
of Namaquas, under the command of a chief named
Berend, with whom Africaner was at feud; and, after a
desperate conflict, the Namaquas drove offall Africaner’s
cows and oxen, leaving nothing behind, except a few
calves. The Hottentot chief was not likely to sit down
quietly under this injury. He and his followers re-
turned home, and having slaughtered the calves which
were left them, rested a couple of days im order to dry
the flesh in the sun. Then, for several days they
pursued their enemy, and having found out their re-
treat, which was on the opposite side of the Orange
River, without being themselves discovered, they
swam over in the dead of the night, with their clothes
and ammunition tied on their heads, and their guns on
their shoulders, “ The little force thus prepared, not
MOFFAT, THE MISSIONARY, 67

unlike that of Bruce at Bannockburn, seized their op-
portunity, and, when all the enemy were slumbering in
fancied security, fell upon the encampment, and not only
regained possession of their own cattle, but marched
off victoriously with all belonging to the marauders.
This is but one of the many adventures of Africa-
ner’s hie at this time; and it is one in which certainly
the right was on his side. I dare say he was not
always in the right, and that his enemies had great
eason to dread him. Many years afterwards, when
Africaner became a Christian, and was seen and heard
entreating some who were on the point of fighting, to
forgive and love, and live at peace with each other,
a Namaqua chief said—‘‘ Look, there is the man, once
the lion, at whose roar even the inhabitants of dig.
tant hamlets fled from their homes! Yes, and I have,
for fear of his approach, fled with my people, our
wives and our babes, to the mountain glen, or to the
wilderness, and spent nights among beasts of prey,
rather than gaze on the eyes of this lion, or hear hig
roar.”
68 MOFFAT, THE MISSIONARY,

CHAPTER IV.
AFRICANER AND THE MISSIONARIES,

Whitt Africaner was thus getting himself a great
name, but not a good one, a little party of missionaries
went to Namaqua-land. They had great reason to
dread the robber-chief; but he did not at first molest
them, though it would have been easy for him to do so.
Instead of this, he went to see them soon after their
arrival, and behaved in a very friendly manner.

“ As you are sent by the English,” he said, to the
wife of one of the missionaries, ‘‘ l welcome you to the
country ; for though I hate the Dutch, my former op-
pressors, I love the English ; for I have always heard
that they are the friends of the poor black man.”

And afterwards, though the missionaries were a
long distance from Africaner’s kraal or village, he and
his people used sometimes to go and listen te their
instructions. |

But this kindly feeling did not, at this time, last
long. Some one told the Hottentot chief that the mis.
sionaries were plotting against him with some of hig
enemies. ‘l'his was a false report; but Africaner be-
lieved it, and he was filled with rage, and declared that
he would put an enc to their preaching and teaching
in Namaqua-land, and would take vengeance on the
people who harboured them. |

You may be sure that this was a very distressing
threat to the missionaries and their wives, who had
seen enough of Africaner to know that he was capable
of almost any enormity when his passions were
roused. They had no place of refuge, and were more
MvFFaT, THE MISSIONARY. 69

than two hundred miles from the abodes of civilized
men. or a whole month they waited in terror, ex-
pecting the threatened attack; and could devise no
better plan for security than to dig deep holes in the
ground, in which they might take shelter from the
shots of the robbers. Then, they thought it better to
remove and return to the colony. |

It was well that they did this; for soon afterwards
the robber-chief and his men came to the station ,



— oa
ws

A eal

THE MUSICAL GRAVE.

havine spread devastation around him on all the road.
And when it was found that the missionaries were
gone, his band. began to search the premises for any-
thing of value that might be hidden. Presently one of
the men, who had wandered into the burying-ground,
stepped over what seemed to be a newly-made grave,
and much to his surprise and terror, heard soft notes
of music, which seemed to rise from the ground be-
scath his feet. He stood motionless, gazing over his
70 MOFFAT, TITE MISSIONARY.

shoulder, with mouth and eyes wide open, hesitating
whether to stand still and see the dead arise—which
he had heard the missionaries preach about—or take
to his heels. Presently, the poor heathen, seeing no
signs of anything wonderful, and hearimg no more of
the sounds, plucked up courage to leap again on the
rame spot, and again he heard the awful music. ‘This
was enough: without again losking back, he darted
off to the camp, and told his chief that there was life
and music in one of the graves.

Ibe chicf, fearless of the living or the dead, was
not to be scared, even by the supposed spectre of the
tomb. He arose, and ordered his men to follow him
to the spot. One jumped, and another jumped, and
at each succeeding leap succeeding notes of the softest
music vibrated on the ear from beneath.

“Die,” said the chief; and they dug, till very
soon the mysterious cause of the sounds came to light.
Tt was a pianoforte, which the wife of one of the mis-
sionaries had brought with her from London, and
which, being too large and heavy to be taken away
in the rapid flight, had been hastily buried in the dry
soil, It was very soon broken to pieces as you may
suppose.

After having well searched the mission premises,
the robbers burned them to the ground, and then
departed.

As to the missionaries who were thus driven from
their wilderness home, they had to pass through many
sufferings in their flight; and the lady to whom the
pianoforte had belonged did not live to return. But
you will be glad to know that the mission to Namaqua-
land was not given up. And you will not, I am sure,
be sorry to hear, though it may surprise you, that
the bold robber-chief, whose very name, for years
MOFFAT, TIE MISSIONARY. 71

and years, had been such a terror to the country
for hundreds of miles around, not only made peaca
with the missionaries, but invited them to settle
in his own village; and, better still, repented of his
former lite of violence—showing by his conduct that
his heart was indeed changed, that his repentanco
was sincere, and that he was indeed and in truth.
what he professed to be—a believer in the Lord Jesus
Christ.

I shall have to tell of this presently, and you will
see how true it is that-

* When once the love of Christ is known,
It breaks and melts the heart of stone»
There tenderness and mercy dwell,
4nd peace, and joy—and all is welh”
42 MOFFA!, THE MISSIONARY.

CHAPTER V.
A CHAPTER OF TRAVELLING.

In the year 1817, a waggon, drawn by a dozen oxen or
more, might be seen day after day slowly dragging
along the rough roads of Cape Colony—now climbing a
steep and rugged mountain, now rolling along in a fer-
tile valley, and now fording a shallow river—the oxen
wading and swimming, until reaching the opposite
bank, they make a desperate plunge and scramble to
tread again on dry ground.

This waggon is attended by I know not how many
Hottentots, who in their strange language are urging
on the oxen to make haste. But the oxen are some of
them lazy, and some of them obstinate, and all of them
very tired, so they get along rather slowly.

The waggon is not at all like an Enelish waggon ;—
such an awkward, heavy, clumsy thing has not been
scen in England for many a long day; and the harness
that fastens it to the oxen. and that keeps the oxen
together, is awkward and clumsy too. But travellers
must not mind trifles; and perhaps this Cape Colony
waggon 18 a better conveyance than we may at first
imagine, for such a country of rough roads and no
roads at all.

It does not do, however, to be in a great hurry.
Our travellers have some hundreds of miles to go ; and
the oxen do not travel many miles a-day: sometimes
the road is so bad, or the mountain side so steep and
dangerous, that it takes an hour or two to get over a
few yards of ground: and when any difficulty arises,
MOFFAT, THE MISSIONARY. 73

same of the beasts lie down and won’t goa step farther
without more help.

Well, help is at hand. There are some spare oxen
in attendance, with Hottentots riding on their backs
Of jump the Hottentots, and fasten their loose oxen
to the foremost pair of the team, cracking their long



TRAVELLING IN AFRIUA,

whips, and shouting with their harsh voices, till the
perverse beasts rise up lazily, and pull away again, but
with no good will to their hard labour, I think. Some-
times twenty or even thirty oxen are needed to drag the
heavy waggon up a mountain side.
74: MOFFAT, THE MISSIONARY

As there is alady in the waggon, besides other
travellers, we will not be so rude as to draw aside its
thick canvas tilt or covering, but will merely guess
that it is pretty well filled with almost all sorts of
stores for housekeeping, as well as with baggage, and
Ironmongery, and tools of different sorts, with two
or three guns, perhaps more, and a quantity of gun-
powder, shot and bullets. ‘The travellers are going
far away into the deserts beyond the colony; and if
they have forgotten anything in the housekeeping
way, they must learn to do without it, for they will
have no shops to go to. ‘They need tools, for they
must be their own mechanics ;—and guns, for they
are going where wild beasts are plentiful, and game
is not scarce. Perhaps they will have by-and-by to
depend upon their skill as marksmen, for a dinner of
meat. |

Not at present, however, for following the waggon
is a little flock of sheep, stopping every now and then
to nibble the grass that falls in their way. Behind
them is a person trying to keep them from straying.
He is a white man and young. He has a gun on his
shoulder, and a broad-brimmed straw hat on his head,
to keep off the hot sun. He looks tired, and well he
may be, for he is not much used to driving sheep, and
just now the loud howl of a hyena was heard, which
set the sheep scampering off as fast as they could run,
some one way and some another; and the white man
had to scamper after them, among the thorny bushes
which scratched his face and tore his legs; and it was
a long time before he could get the flock together
again.

That white man is a missionary, who a few months
ago said good-bye to his home and friends in Scotland;
and, after spending some time at Cape Town in leari-
MOFFAT; THE MISSIONARY. 75

ing the Dutch language, is going with another mis«
sionary, and that missionary’s wife, to a station in
Little Namaqua-land, which is betwcen Cape Colony
and the Orange River. After that, he will have to go
alone, bey on -d the river, into Great N amaqua-land,
Mis name is Roperr Morrar.

Now and then, as they pass through the colony,
the travellers step at farm-houses, where they are very
kindly treated. But when the farmers ask Mr. Moffat
where he is going, and he tells them, they tell him
he must be mad to think of such a thing.

“ You are going to Africaner’s country,” they say;
“that evil-minded robber. You will never come back
alive.”

“IT hope I shall, if God pleases,” thinks Mr,
Moffat: ‘but perhaps I shall not come back at all. I
am going to live ¢ among the people of Great Namaqua-
land. I am even going to the village of Africaner
himself.”

“Did anybody ever hear such madness ?” thinks
the farmer, who has heard enough about Africaner to
hate to hear his name mentioned. “ Why,” he says,
“when you get there, Africaner will set you up as a
mark for his boys to shoot at.’

** He will strip off your skin,
make a drum of it to dance to.”

“ He will cut off your head,” says a third, “and
make a drinking-cup of your skull.”

“ Ah!” exclaims a kind, motherly lady, the wife of
ancther farmer, at whose house the tired travellers are
resting for a little while, ‘if you were an old man, it
would not matter, for then you. must soon die, whether
or no: but youare young; and to think of your going
to be a prey to that—that monster, Africaner!” and
she wiped the tears from her eyes as she spoke.

’ says another, “ and
76 MOFFAT, THE MISSIONARY.

39

ig,” says the
young missionary. ‘He has been very wicked and
violent, it is true; but he is converted, and is now a
Christian, and will not harm any one.”

But no, no! they will not hear this; they don’t
believe anything about Africaner having become a
Christian. No, no; the thing is impossible—it can-
not be!

If Mr. Moffat does not say it—and perhaps he
does—at least he remembers that there is a text in
the Bible that tells us, “ With God all things are
possible.” So he is not much discouraged by what he
hears; and on and on the travellers go, till the colony
is left behind, and they get into the deserts of Little
Namaqua-land.

Dangerous travelling now, and very fatiguing.
livery day the sun scorches them, and the poor oxen
pant, and hang out their tongues as they drag along
the heavy waggon. Sometimes they have to travel
miles over sands and stones, so hot that they can
scarccly bear it; and the oxen low and sheep bleat with
pain and weariness. Water becomes scarce, too, and
weary as they all are, they must keep moving till they
reach the next stream or pool, or they will all perish
with thirst. And when they reach it, it 1s dirtier than
English puddle water. Never mind, it 1s very refresh.
ing and acceptable for all that.

Every night, when they stop, they must kindle a
ereat fire to keep off the lions and hyenas, which they
can hear roaring and growling and howling, not far
off. I think they smell the sheep and oxen, and skulk
about the travellers, hoping to get a good meal; and
woe to the poor animal that strays in the night from
the protecting fire! There will be nothing but bones
left of it in the morning.

“But you do Africaner great wrong
MOFFAT, THE MISSIONARY, a4

CHAPTER VI.
A UOTTENTOT VILLAGE,

I must tako you now to a Hottentot villave or kraal,
as itis called. Jt is not much like an Hnglish village.
There is no particular high road, leading in at one end
and out at the other: there are no neat cottages with
garden plots around them—no village church, and
parsonage-house, and squire’s mansion—no cultivated
fields around. Nothing of the sort.

Fancy yourself on a wide wild moor, scattered over
with great rough rocks, bare and weather-beaten, with
patches of coarse, scanty herbage growing where there
is soil enough for it to take root, and here and there
clumps of trees, which throw a pleasant shadow be-
neath: fancy, again, a gipsy encampment on this wild
moor, with women and children in abundance, black,
and grimy, with filthy tattered sheep-skins hanging
about them for clothing; some wandering about,
shrieking, scolding, quarrelling; others lazily rolling
on the ground; others cooking at fires, outside the
huts; dogs prowling about also, half-starved and
ugly; then cast your eyes round and see, in the dis-
tance, herds of oxen and a few sheep and goats pick-
ing up a poor meal off the scanty grass, under the
care of black, woolly-headed, half-naked savages,
while others, having nothing to do, are stretched at
full length, or idly lounging about the camp. [ancy
all this, and you may, if you please, suppose yoursclf
to be in a Hottentot kraal,
a
CPO

MOFYAT, THE MISSIONARY,

| Tho huts are not very complicated in their archi-

tecture. Draw a circle on the ground; stick long
poles into the ground, just outside this circle; pull
them together at the top, and fasten them with strips
of cow-skin; then cover over this frame with anything
you may happen to have—shcep-skins, bullocks’-hides,
or mats made of long grass—and you have a Hottentot
hut complete. :

You must not expect your hut to keep out all the
rain that falls upon it; nor yet to stand very firm
against a hurricane: but it keeps off the sun, and, if
blown down, it is soon put up again; and what rain
soaks through you must bear patiently, or fasten an
extra mat over the leaky part of the roof. There 1s
this advantage, at any rate, in your hut—when you
are tired of one spot, you can easily move ib to
another.

Let us stroll outside the village, beyond the huts,
and under the shade of yonder clump of trees. Why,
but what do we see? A waggon that surely was never
made by the builders of yonder huts. It 1s broken
and crippled, but it looks wonderfully like the waggon
we saw months ago, toiling over the mountains and
and through the valleys of Cape Colony, I know not
how many scores of miles away.

Truly, there is no mistake about it. It is the same
wagoon—Mr. Moffat’s travelling carriage. It has had
some rough work since we saw it last; and so has its
owner: but they, both of them—the missionary and
his waggon—reached their destination at last. This
is Africaner’s village.

Ah! poor Mr. Moffat! and was he set up as a
mark for the boys to shoot at ?—they look as if they
would not scrupie to shoot at a missionary if thoy
had tho chance, Or did Africaner make a dram
MOFFAT, THE MISSIONARY, | 19

of the missionary’s skin? or a drinking-cup of his
skull?

Well, no; he did none of these things; but as soon
as the young missionary arrived he had a hut built for
him; and though fifty years old, and a great chief
among his people, he came daily to that hut to receive
instruction like a little child.
80 MOFFAT, THE MISSIONARY.

CHAPTER VIL
ANOTHER ASPEOT.

Tr is very lonely for Mr. Moffat in the Hottentot vil-
lage. Heis the only white man there. He has left
behind him almost all the comforts of civilized hfe.
Ile cannot even get bread to eat; for the people do
not grow any kind of grain; and he is obliged live as
he can on any game he can kill with his gun, with
sometimes a bit of mutton or goat flesh, or beef, but
this not often; and then he must eat his meat without
bread, or vegetables of any kind, or salt. Once, a
friendly missionary in Little Namaqua-land, sent him
a bag of salt; but when it was opened, it was so mixed
with sand that he couia not relisn it; so he quietly
hung the bag up in his hut, and there it remains
untouched.

fle has milk to drink, however, for Africaner has
given him two cows. They do not yield much, it is
true, but they often save him from a hunery night.
So the young missionary lives on meat and milk, some-
times for weeks together on milk alone, which, by way
of change, he drinks at one time swect and fresh, at
another time sour, and at another curdled.

But sometimes his milk fails, and he has no meat
either: what shall he do then? He cannot buy, for
there are none to sell, and if there were, alas! he has
no money. He does not lke to ask for food of the
poor Hottentots, who are as hardly driven as himself,
though, without asking, he now and then discovers
that some unknown friend has slipped a piece of meat
into his hut when he has been absent—so he throws
MOFFAT, THE MISSIONARY. 81

his gun on his shoulder, and rambles out on the plain,
or on to the mountains beyond, in search of something ~
to eat. He cannot always find it; and then he returns
to his hut half-starved, to go to rest, in hopes that
there will be something in store for to-morrow.

He has no prospect of faring better than this in
time to come; for though he may have as much land
to cultivate as he pleases, the ground is so dry and
barren, and there is rain so seldom, and water is so
scarce, that digging and sowing would be of no use—
there would be no reaping.

As there is no society of his own countrymen for
the young missionary, and no one of whom to ask
advice, or to speak to about his difficulties and trials
among the poor ignorant Hottentots, he sometimes
feels his heart sinking within him, and he thinks of
the happy home and kind friends he has left behind, in
his native land, till he almost wishes himself back
again. But then he remembers why he left his home
—that it was not to get money, nor to obtain a fine
farm, but to show the way to Heaven to the dark-
minded heathen; and he remembers, too, that if he
is a faithful servant of God, God will be with him
to help him and comfort him; and this cheers hig
mind, and he can go, when evening is drawing on,
and can sing praises with a joyful heart to his God and
Saviour all by himself, among the rocks outside the
village. |

After all, there is something—and not a little—to
encourage Mr. Moffat at Africaner’s kraal, which is
become a favourable specimen of Hottentot villages.
Before he went there, another teacher had been among
them, who had prepared the way for our young mis-
sionary by giving religious instruction. Indeed, there
is now a little congregation of Christians there ; and

E
sy MOFFAT, THE MISSIONARY.

among them are to be reckoned Africaner himself,
the redoubtable robber—-but a robber no longer—but
Christian Africaner, as he is now willing to be called ;
and his brothers, David and Jacobus. ‘Titus Africaner
too, who you remember shot the Boer, their former
master, and who has been, in his time, a fiercer tiger
in human form than his brother, and who had hated
the former missionary, and set a terrible example of
wickedness to all Africaner’s people—even he is be-
come the steady friend of Mr. Moffat, and is lke a_
different being. | | |

Mr. Moffat has plenty of employment at Africaner’s
village. He has a service at his hut every morning
and evening, to which he invites as many of the
natives as like to come, when he reads and explains
to them some part of the Scriptures, and joins with
them in prayer. Then three or four hours every day
are spent in teaching the Hottentot children to read ;
and in this he is greatly assisted by the two brothers
of the chief, David and Jacobus.

Christian Africaner, himself, is not very ready at
reading, but he improves every day; and the New
Testament is his constant companion. He may be
often seen, for hours together, sitting under the
shadow of a rock, reading those words of life which,
you know, are able to make us wise unto salvation
through faith which is in Christ Jesus, and which,
while they bring salvation, teach us also, that denying
ungodliness and worldly lusts, we should live soberly,
righteously, and godly in the present world.

Sometimes, when all his people are gone to rest,
Africaner sits with the young missionary on a great
stone at the door of his hut, and talks till the dawn of
next day about the wonders of creation and redemp-
tion. A new world is opened to his mind, and he
MOFFAT, THE MISSIONARY. 83

cannot be satisfied. He is like a bee gathering honey
from every flower. - Then, after asking a great number
of questions, he exclaims, rubbing his head—“ I have
heard enough for this time. I feel as if my head were
too small, and as if it would swell with these great
subjects.”

No more thieving and fighting excursions for Afri-
caner and his men, you may be sure.

“ What have I now of all the battles I have fought,
or the cattle I took,’’? he asks, “ but shame and re«
morse??? And when he hears of those around, who
are at variance with each other, he goes and begs them
to be reconciled.

Our Hottentot village, as well as becoming more
peaceful, is getting cleaner and neater. One day, for
instance, Mr. Moffat thinks it would be a good thing
if the children—and there are a good number of them,
about a hundred and twenty—who come to the school,
were to undergo a little purification at the fountain
which supplies the cattle with water. Does not Afri-.
caner think so too ?

Yes, Africaner has not much doubt about it, for
since he has become a Christian, he has not been so
contented to live in the midst of filth as he used to be.
So he persuades the people to suffer their children to —
be washed; and then, having washed their bodies
clean, our two reformers get them to wash their dirty
sheepskin garments. They don’t like it much at first;
for they have been so used to dirt, that washing is
like stripping off a skin; but they begin to feel more
comfortable, and before long, you would have to travel
long and far before you would meet with such bright-
looking Hottentots as are to be found at Africaner’s
kraal,
84. MOFFAT, THE MISSIONARY,

CHAPTER VIIL

INCIDENTS OF TRAVEL,

I wave told you that a great part of Namaqua-land is
desert country; and Mr. Moffat had not been many
months at Africaner’s kraal before great distress came
upon the people through want of water. No rain had
fallen for weeks, and all around scarcely a blade of green
grass could be seen, so that most of the cattle had to
be driven to distant pastures to feed.

On one of the hot cloudless days of that summer,
there was an unusual bustle in the village. All the
people who remained in the place were flocking towards
the missionary’s broken waggon, and gathering round
the missionary himself, who, for the first time in his
life, had turned blacksmith.

The job he had undertaken, which was none other |
than the repair of his broken waggon, was a difficult
one, especially as his tools were not very suitable for
his work. Jor an anvil he had a block of stone; his
blacksmith’s bellows he had manufactured himself, and
his hammer and tongs were never made for welding
iron. Nevertheless, he persevered in his work, and
the poor Hottentots thought it wonderful; though all
the while the inexperienced workman was wishing
them at a greater distance, lest he should burn his
fingers and they should laugh at his misfortunes.

Success, however, crowned his efforts at last, and
amidst the shouts of the assembled villagers, the
crippled waggon was restored to soundness, and pro-
nounced fit to start afresh upon its travels; while the
MOFFAT, THE MISSIONARY. 85

poor Hottentots were more than ever persuaded that
their white friend must be a very clever man.

A day or two later and the village was again in con-
fusion. Oxenwere harnessed to the waggon; and the
missionary, attended by the Hottentot chief, and thirty
picked men, active and willing, were making the last
preparations for a long journey of many weeks to the
farther borders of Namaqua-land. At length these
preparations were completed, and amidst the confused
noise of shouting Hottentots, lowing oxen, and barking
dogs, the waggon and its attendants moved on, and
soon Africaner’s kraal was left in the distance, almost
deserted, except by women and children.

There had been a time, no doubt, when a band of
thirty of Africaner’s men, led on by that terrible free-
booter himself, would have struck dismay into every
Hottentot kraal near which it passed. The villagers
would have expected nothing less than to have their
huts burned over their heads, their poor wives and
children murdered, and their cattle driven off. But
Africaner’s expedition was, now, a very peaceable one.
He had no idea of molesting any one; and if he had
a large party with him, it was only as a precaution
against the many dangers of the long journey he had
undertaken.

And that journey was not without an object. The
chief had found that the barren wilderness in which he
had, many years before, fixed his village, was better
calculated for the residence of lawless robbers, such as
he and his people had once been, than for the home of
quiet, God-fearing Christians. It was his wish to live
thenceforward honestly and ixdustriously; and hav-
ing heard that, on the farther borders of Namaqua-
land there was a country, well-watered with many
fountains, and more fertile, which he would be at
86 MOFFAT, THE MISSIONARY.

liberty to occupy, he had proposed to the missionary
to visit it. And he was accompanied by Mr. Moffat,
to be assisted with Ins judgment, as well as that the
gospel might be preached to the poor heathen natives
whom they might meet with on their way.

For many days, after leaving Africaner’s kraal, the
travellers passed over a dry and barren country. The
plains were sand—the hills were sand—almost all
around them was sand. It was difficult to find food
for the oxen as they went on; and when their small
stock of water was gone, they had to travel for hours
before they reached a fountain where they could quench
their thirst.

Bounding along the desert around them, the mis-
sionary and his friends saw troops of zebras and wild
asses; herds of stately giraffes, sometimes as many as
thirty or forty together; great numbers of elks and
antelopes ; and now and then a solitary rhinoceros.
All these were welcome sights; for the travellers had
to depend for subsistence upon the game they might
meet with in the course of the journey. Mr. Moffat
was a good marksman, and so was Africaner, and so
were many of the men; though none of them could
equal Titus, who was one of the party, and who had
~ been known to take his gun in the dead of the night,
enter an immense deep pool in the Orange River, swim
to the centre, take his seat on a rock just above the
surface of the water, and wait the approach of a hippo-
potamus, which he would shoot just as it opened its
monstrous jaws to seize him.

So, having plenty of powder and musket-balls, and
a good number of guns, the travellers managed to
obtain a tolerable supply of food in the desolate regions
through which they were slowly passing. Nothing
eame much amiss to them, for their appetites were too
MOFFAT, THE MISSIONARY. 87

keen to allow them to be very dainty; and Mr. Moffat
found that even zebra’s flesh was not to be despised,
though a young fat giraffe was to be preferred. When
they killed a large animal, they generally halted a day
or two, at some convenient spot, to cut the meat into
thin pieces and dry it in the sun. It was then stowed
away in the waggon for future occasions, and, when
eaten, had to be put under hot ashes, and then pounded
between two stones to loosen its fibres.

Sometimes even this hard fare failed, and, being
unsuccessful in procuring fresh food, the travellers had
to fasten leathern thongs tightly round their stomachs
to prevent the gnawing of hunger.

One day the whole party narrowly escaped being
poisoned. They saw before them a beautiful valley,
as it appeared, clothed in lively green; and hoping to
obtain food for their oxen, they hastened to it. But
when they reached the spot, they found that what
looked so lovely and inviting, was nothing but a bitter ©
plant which the cattle would not eat, and which only
impeded their progress. They were faint themselves
with hunger, and the oxen were worn oué with fatigue,
when some of the party found honey in the clefts of
the rocks. This was a welcome treat, and they all ate
heartily. Presently, however, one complained of a
burning heat in his throat, and then another, and
another ; then a native came up, and said, “ You had
better not eat the honey of this vale. Do you not see
the poison-bushes from which the bees get honey and
poison too ?”

You may be sure the travellers did not feel very
comfortable after that. Every one had recourse to the
little water that remained in the vessels, for the inward
heat was terrible; but the water instead of allaying
only increased the pain. It was well that no more
88 MOFFAT, THE MISSIONARY.

serious consequences followed; but it was several
days before they got rid of the effect of the poisoned
honey.

Sometimes they came to a Namaqua village; and
then the missionary got the inhabitants together and
told them of the glad tidings of the gospel. And it is
pleasant to think of Africaner, the dreaded robber, as
he had been, standing beside Mr. Moffat and inter-
preting to his poor Hottentot brethren the message of
peace and good-will to men which he delivered.

At one of the villages Mr. Moffat met with a
Hottentot conjuror or sorcerer, who pretended that he
had entered into a lion which, the night before, had
alarmed the village and killed the cattle. But when
the missionary invited him to try his power again,
he declined, saying that the missionary himself must
be a white conjuror, from the strange doctrines he
taught.

At this village the journey outward came to a close,
for the wild Namaquas, as they were called, were
jealous of the visit, and were preparing to oppose the
travellers. It would have been easy for Africaner and
his men to have forced their way; but the chief him-
self proposed to return rather than shed blood.

So the waggon was turned southwards, and the
travellers began to retrace their weary steps to Afri-
caner’s kraal.

On their journey they were often exposed to danger
from lions. One evening, on their way homewards,
when they were quietly resting for the night beside
a pool of water, and were just closing their evening’
worship, a terrible roar was heard close by, and, in
the next instant the weary oxen who had been peace-
fully chewing the cud, rushed madly over the fire,
round which the travellers were seated, and scattered,
MOFFAT, THE MISSIONARY. 89

in wild confusion, fire and men, huts, hymn-books,
guns, and Bibles—disappearing, as rapidly as they had
come, in a cloud of dust and sand.

A shout was raised—* A lion !—a lion! ?? and A fri-
caner, Jumping up, grasped a firebrand, and followed
by his men, rushed down a dark and gloomy ravine
after the terrified oxen. Probably the lion was scared
with the shouting and the fire, for no more was heard
of him through the night, and the oxen were recovered.
This was a better ending to the alarm than might have
been expected; for often, in spite of shouting and fire.
brands, a hungry hon will break in upon a night
encampment, and bound off with its prey ; and some-
times will prefer a man to an ox,

I must tell you of only one other adventure which
befell our travellers on this journey, to show you what
~ heathenism is, and how much need there is for Chris-
tian missionaries in heathen lands. _-

Mr. Moffat and his companions had travelled all
day over a sandy plain, and passed a sleepless night
from extreme thirst and fatigue. Rising early the
next morning, and leaving the people to get the
waggon ready to follow, the missionary and one of the
men went forward in search of game.

After passing a ridge of hills, and advancing into
the plain beyond, they saw a little smoke rising from
a few bushes; and animated by the sight, they started
forward, hoping to meet with some one who could
direct them to a fountain. When they had arrived
within a few hundred yards of the spot, they were
startled at the fresh marks of lions. They had no
ouns, and hesitated a moment whether to proceed ;
but thirst urged them on, so they advanced cautiously,
keeping a good look out at every bush they passed.

On reaching the spot, the mystery of the smoke
90 MOFFAT, THE MISSIONARY.

was disclosed. Seated by a smouldering fire was an
aged woman—a living skeleton, so weak and helpless,
that when, terrified by the appearance of a white man,
she tried to rise, she sunk back again to the earth. —

“ Fear not, mother,” said the missionary, “ we are
friends, and will do you no harm, How came you
hero? and who are you?”

“Tam a woman,” she replied; “I have been here
four days; my children have left me here to die.”

«Your children ? ”

“Yes,” said the poor Hottentot woman, raising
her hand to her shrivelled bosom; “ my own children

uw = SiR is ss il me aie
Y yh Mae RT Gebel fied 3
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4 cs



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CEPT TO DIE.

—three sons and two daughters. They are gone to
yonder blue mountains, and have left me here to die.”

«And pray why did they leave you?” asked Mr.
Moffat, kindly.

The old woman spread out her hands :—“‘I am
old, you see, and am no longer able to serve them.
When they kill game, I am too feeble to help in carry-
ing home the flesh. I am not able to gather wood to
make fire. I cannot carry their children on my back
as I used to do.” :
MOFFAT, THE MISSIONARY. 91

The missionary was much affected. At length he
said, he wondered she had escaped the lions, which
seem to have been near.

“‘] hear the lions,’ she answered; “but there is
nothing on me that they would eat. See here ;”
and she raised the skin of her arm, which hung loose
upon it. There was indeed no flesh—nothing but
bone and skin.

At that moment the waggon drew near. This
greatly alarmed her; she seemed to think it an animal.
Assuring her that it would do her no harm, Mr. Moffat
offered to put her into it, and take her with him. But.
the thought of this struck more terror into her than
the expectation of death.

“Tf you take me with you to another village,” she
sald, “they will do the same thing again. It is our
custom. lam nearly dead; I do not want to die
again.” |

It was useless to reason with her, and to have
attempted to move her by force would have hastened
her death. The poor oxen were raging with thirst,
and the travellers were nearly delirious. To have
remained would have been fatal to them; but before
they left the poor outcast, they collected a quantity
of fuel, gave her a good supply of dry meat, some
tobacco, and a knife, and telling her to keep up her
courage and a good fire, lest the lions after all should
come upon her and destroy her—they promised to
return as speedily as possible.

In a day or two they performed the promise, but
found the old woman and everything gone; and, on
further examination, the fresh footmarks of men were
discovered near. Several months afterwards the mis-
sionary was told that the sons, seeing from a distance
the waggon halt at the spot where they had left their
92 MOFFAT, THE MISSIONARY.

mother to perish, returned, expecting to find only her
mangled remains. But finding her still alive, and
supphed with food, and on hearing her tell of the
strangers’ kindness, they were alarmed, and dreading
the vengeance of the great chief, as they supposed the
white man to be, they took her home, and afterwards
provided for her with more than usual care.



IT have not time to tell how, after this, the travellers
were again nearly perishing with thirst ; but how they
reached Africaner’s kraal safely at last, and found that
the business of the mission had been going on pros-
perously while they were away. I should like to tell
also, but must not, for want of space, how Mr. Moffat,
some time afterwards, took a long scamper—on horse-
back this time—across the deserts of Namaqua-land
in another direction, to look for another station for his
friend Africaner and himself: and of the adventures he
met with :—how he was made very ill, and nearly lost
his life, by drinking water from a fountain which the
natives had poisoned—how he and his attendants lost
their way more than once; and how they suffered from
cold, hunger, and thirst—the narrow escapes they had
from lions and hyenas; and once from a hippopotamus
—and how the white man was, on one occasion, when
wandering from the rest of his party, threatened by a
troop of ugly, grinning, impudent baboons—how, also,
he met with unexpected kindness from the poor Bush-
men of the desert, for whom few people have willingly
a good word to give—and how at length they once
more returned to Africaner’s village.

I should like to tell you too, if I had room, which
I have not, how Mr. Moffat went from village to village,
MOFFAT, THE MISSIONARY. 93

all around Africaner’s kraal, and preached to the poor
Namaqua Hottentots; and how his heart was cheered
with believing that God was blessing his labours, so
that he thought little of the hardships he had to
endure, but thanked God again and again for having
put it into his heart to become a missionary.

Kispecially in Africaner’s kraal, and among his
tribe, was there such a difference to be seen, that you
would not have believed them to be the same place and
people.

CHAPTER IX.
RETURN TO CAPE TOWN,

Azout two years after the journey into Namaqua-
land, of which I have told you in a former chapter,
a wageon, drawn as usual by a number of oxen, was
seen slowly winding through a pleasant valley in Cape
Colony; and by the direction it was taking, 14 was
plain that the travellers, whoever they might be, were
proceeding towards Cape Town. |

Ona hill at a short distance was a pleasant farm-
house; and the sight of the waggon had drawn the
farmer and his wife and children to the door. Wemay
suppose therefore that many travellers were not in the
habit of passing that way.

Presently the waggon stopped, and the farmer’s
attention was drawn to a nearer spot in the same direc-
tion, by the approach of a sun-burnt stranger in the
dress of a European, but who had not much the ap-
pearance of a colonist.

“Who can he be?” thought the farmer, who was
a good, kind-hearted, and hospitable man—a descen-
dant of one of the old Dutch colonists—* but whoever
94 MOFFAT, THE MISSIONARY.

he is, if Ican do him a serviceI will.” And hestepped
forward to meet the stranger.

He was not quite a stranger either; at least he
knew the farmer’s name, and claimed his acquaintance,
by offering to shake hands with him, and by saying he
was glad to see him again.

But the farmer seemed to be in no haste to return
the friendly greeting. Indeed, he looked sadly puzzled
and troubled; and, instead of taking the offered hand,
he put his own behind his back to keep it from
being touched ; and asked, quickly and wildly, like a
frightened man,—‘‘ Who are you ? ”

‘““My name is Moffat,” replied the traveller; “I
wonder you have forgotten me. Did I not stop at
your house two years ago? And you treated me very
kindly, and gave me good advice.”

“* Moffat !7? exclaimed the farmer, stepping back-
wards in great trepidation; “Itis Moffat’s ghost! I
thought so.”

“e ‘Not a bit of it: Iam no ghost,” said the tr aveller,
laughing at his friend’s alarm.

“Don’t come near me!” cried out the farmer in a
tone of horror—“ Don’t ! You were long ago mur-
dered by Africaner.”’

“But, murdered or not, my good friend, Iam no
ghost Tassure you ;”’ and the cause of alarm rubbed his
hands together to show that he was good substantial
flesh and blood.

But this made little impression upon the farmer,
who was more and more terrified at the apparition:
Hverybody says you were murdered,” said he; “ and
a man told me he had seen your bones.”

All this time the farmer’s wife and children at the
farmhouse above them, as well as the people at the
waggon in the valley, were gazing with astonishment
MOFFAT, THE MISSIONARY. ~ 99

at the strange gestures and evident concern of the
farmer, who at length extended his trembling hand,
and asked Mr. Moffat when it was he had risen from
the dead? It seemed vain for the young missionary
to declare again that he never had been dead; and the
farmer was so certain that his wife would be as alarmed
as himself if he took Mr. Moffat to his house, that
he began to walk slowly and fearfully towards the
— waggon. |

By degrees, I suppose, the farmer’s confusion ‘of
mind and unbelief gave way to the evidence that a
living and breathing man was by his side, and he began
to talk about the dreadful robber, Africaner.

“ He isa truly good man,” said Mr. Moffat.

“IT can believe almost anything you say,’ responded
the farmer; “but I cannot believe that. There are
seven wonders in the world, and that would be the
eighth.”

The missionary reminded his obstinate friend that
God was able to soften the hardest heart ; and asked
him to think of Manasseh and Paul, of whom, you
know, the Bible tells us that they were at one time
exceedingly sinful and rebellious, but became, by the
grace of God, holy and obedient.

“Ah, but,” said the farmer, “ these were another
sort of men. Africaner is one of the accursed sons of
Ham ;” and he began again to talk of the enormities
of his past life. _

By this time they had reached the waggon: and,
seated on the ground by its side, was a pleasant-look-
ing native, dressed in a rough kind of fashion, and
having very little the appearance of a great man, any
way. His eyes twinkled good-humouredly when he
heard what the Dutch farmer was saying so energeti~
cally, and a smile played on his face. |
96 MOFFAT, THE MISSIONARY.

« Well,” continued the farmer, “if what you say
is true, I have just one wish, and that is, to see Afri-
caner before I die; and when you return I will go with
you to his village, though he did kill my own uncle
years ago.” |

«Then,”? replied Mr. Moffat, after a moment’s
hesitation, “you need not go so far as that, for—look
before you—there is Africaner ! ”

Yes, it was none other than the Hottentot chief,
who had been invited by Mr. Moffat to accompany —






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“BEFORE YOU I8 APRICANER.”
him to Cape Town, and who had adopted a kind of
disguise in order that he might not be readily recog-
nized. It was not without risk that he had ventured
thus into the colony, for besides the danger that some
of his former enemies might take vengeance on him if
they should discover he was travelling unprotected
through the country, he knew well enough that at one
time the Cape government had proclaimed him an

outlaw, and had offered a reward to any one who would
MOFFAT, THE MISSIONARY. | 97

kill him. But the missionary trusted to obtain his
pardon, and engaged that no harm should befall his
Hottentot friend.

You may easily guess how the farmer, when he
heard that the terrible freebooter was before him,
started afresh with amazement; and you will like to
know that when he was really convinced that Africaner
was no longer a robber, but a Christian, he frankly and
cordially welcomed him to his house, and hospitably
entertained the whole party.

Tam glad to tell you also that Mr. Moffat was not
disappointed when he reached Cape Town. The
Governor of the colony received Africaner very kindly ;
and said he was much pleased to see before him, as a
friend, one who had formerly been the scourge of the
country, and the terror of the border colonists. And,
as a testimony of his good feeling and regard, he pur-
chased an excellent waggon, and gave it to the Hotten.
tot chief

CTS COE we 86.
93 MOFFAT, THE MISSIONARY,

CHAPTER X,
CONCLUSION.

Mr. Morrat did not return to Namaqua-land as ae
intended. When he reached Cape Town he met Mr.
Campbell and Dr. Philip, who had been sent by the
London Missionary Society in England to examine
into the state of the African missions; and it was
proposed to Mr. Moffat to accompany them in their
travels through the country, and then to go as a mis-
sionary to the Bechuanas—a large nation of Africans
on the east of Namaqua-land. After much considera-
tion, Mr. Moffat thought it right to agree to this pro-
posal, but not till he had obtained Africaner’s consent.
{ndeed the Hottentot chief was, as we have seen,
himself anxious to remove his people from Namaqua-
land, and he hoped that he might be able to get some
land in Bechuana, and thus be still near to the mis-
sionary.

Africaner then said good-bye to his friend, and
returned to his distant village, having been furnished
by the Governor with a passport, to insure the friend-
ship and attention of the colonists, through whose
lands his road lay. He also undertook to convey Mr.
Moffat’s books and turniture across the country, from
Namaqua-land to Bechuana; and there, some months
afterwards, they once more met, and travelled for a
little while in company.

And there, also, Africaner met with an old enemy
of his, Berend-Berend—a native chief, with whom he
had had many a fierce and bloody battle. But they
did not meet as enemies. Berend, as wellas Africaner,
had become a Christian; and all former animosities
MOFFAT, THE MISSIONARY. - 99

had faded away. Both of them had learned to love
and practise that “new commandment” which the
Lord Jesus Christ has given to all his followers, that
they ‘ love one another.” |

After this, Mr. Moffat saw no more of his friend
Africaner, who, not long after his return to his village,
fell ill and died. You would like to know how he met
death, and whether he was sorry, at last, that he had
listened to the “ strange doctrines” of the missionaries.
I will tell you.

‘When he found his end approaching, he called
all the people together, and gave them directions as
to their future conduct. ‘ We are not,’ said he, ‘ what
we were—savages, but men professing to be taught
according to the Gospel. Let us then do accordingly.
Live peaceably with all men, if possible, and if imposs
sible, consult those who are placed over you before you
engage in anything. Remain together as you have
done since I knew you. Then, if another missionary
should be sent to you, you will be ready to receive
him. Behave to any teacher you may have sent,
as one sent of God, as I have great hope that God,
will bless you in this respect, when I am gone to
heaven. I feel that I love God, and that He has done
much for me, of which I am totally unworthy.

* My former life is stained with blood; but Jesus
Christ has pardoned me; and I am going to heaven.
Oh ! beware of falling into the same evils into which I
have led you frequently; but seek God, and He will
be found of you, to direct you.’ ”?

After the death of Africaner his people remained
together for some time, as he had directed. Then a
part of them—those who had never cordially loved the
missionaries, nor the Gospel which they preached—
went away and returned to their old practice of cattle
100 MOFFAT, THE MISSIONARY.

stealing. Among these, Iam sorry to say, was Christian
Africaner’s son. But the greater number remained,
and kept up the worship of God; and among them
were the brothers of the old chief—David, Jacobus,
and Titus. They did not remove their kraal, as
Africaner had wished; but after a time they were
again visited by missionaries ; and if you were now to
go to that part of the world you would be pleased to
find that of many of the poor Hottentots of Namaqua-
land it may be said—
Where Satan reigned in shades of night,
The Gospel sheds a heavenly light ;

Our lust its wondrous power controla,
And calms the rage of angry souls.

Lions and beasts of savage name,
Put on the nature of the Lamb ;
While the wild world esteems it strange,
Looks, and admires, and hates the change.”

Before Mr. Moffat began afresh his duties as a
wissionary, he married a young lady to whom he had
been engaged in England, and who ventured to Africa
to become the wife of a missionary. They settled at
Kuruman, in Bechuanaland, which became a centre of
Christian light and civilisation. There they remained
for over forty years, and there was born to them their
daughter Mary, who became the wife of the great
African missionary and traveller, David Livingstone.


THE GIANT’S GRAVE,
BY M. H. SHIPLEY.

ome OF6,00 seman

CHAPTER I,

which Constable has immortalized in many
a fair landscape and homely bit of wayside
am scenery very dear to the true lovers of
Nature. It is a county rich in cornfields and in wide
spreading woods, and has historical associations neither
few nor insignificant. J ive-and-twenty years ago
I used to hear a great deal about it; for my dear
friend Eleanor Seyton was engaged to be married
to Sir Godfrey Deane, who belonged to one of the
oldest families in the county, and many plans of future
visits to Deane Court were laid out between us—but
until five years ago, I never saw it. I was Hleanor’s
bridesmaid; and then quite suddenly, my only
brother, who was an artist, went abroad and I ac-
companied him. We were orphans and had no near
relations, and so for many years I did not see England
again; though with my dear old friend Lady Deane,
I kept up constant correspondence. I was so well
informed respecting the children that were growing up
around her, that sometimes I could scarcely believe I
had never really seen any of them. My brother and I
enjoyed our continental life thoroughly; fair sunny


102 THE GIANI’S GRAVE.

ncoks in France, grand Alpine views in Switzerland,
were not all we saw and delighted in—classic Italy
with her deep blue skivs and treasures of ruins,
this was our home for nearly six happy yeazs. From
place to place wo wandered, now at Venice, at Flo-
rence, at Naples—in sequestered villages 20 the vine-
clad Apennines, or within sight of Vesuvius and the
most exquisite bay so near it—little escaped us as
we sought out and traced the beautiful in nature and
art. Then at last we wintered in Rome. But I can-
not describe this winter, nor the countless objects of
interest which day by day we studied together in
“the Eternal City.” Such a winter, so far as positive
unshadowed enjoyment goes, I have never spent before
or since, but it was over and we were contemplating
another summer tour in Switzerland, when my brother
was taken ill. For ten days I watched beside him and
hoped ; on the eleventh, hope (so far as concerned this
world) was over, and he died. I saw him laid to rest
in a quiet village graveyard beneath the skies his
artist soul had delighted in, and then desolate indeed I
asked where should I gonext? Switzerland had been
in contemplation and we had friends at Lausanne, so
there I went, leaving behind me an existence full of
brightness, and the beloved form of him who had been.
my object in life for so many happy years.

I did not stay long in Switzerland—my friends
were kind, but all things had lost their charm, se
remembering that I had relations in England, and that
it was my fatherland, I packed up my belongings, and
with Lucia, my maid, came home. Alas! how little
like home it seemed ! |

My nearest relatives lived in Cheshire, and un-
decided where to make my abode, I took lodgings in
London, and thought I would give myself time to de-
THE GIANT’S GRAVE. 103

cide wisely before settling on any fixed abode. Life
had lost its great delight for me, my heart was
far away in that lonely Italian graveyard, and heaven
seemed to my crushed and doubting spirit immeasur-
ably far otf, and though I strove after resignation, I
rebelled exceedingly.

I had been in London a week, when among the
letters on my breakfast table, I found one from my
old friend Hleanor. She, too, had gone through
sorrow; for three years since she had been left a
widow, and it was with a confident expectation of
sympathy that I broke the seal, for I knew she was
one who could rejoice with them that do rejoice and
weep with them that weep.

The letter did not disappoint me. It was a cordial
welcome back to England, and an earnest request that
I would go to visit her at Deane Court, as soon as I
possibly could. It contained a postscript as an extra
inducement, ‘Godfrey comes home from Oxford early
next week, and then it will be holiday time for the
rest—come then and be comforted.”

IT made up my mind to go to Deane Court; there
was nothing to keep mein London, and a great deal in
this letter to tempt me away: so I rang for: Lucia and
sent out for a Bradshaw, and by that night’s post des-
patched a note of acceptance to Lady Deane, offering
to follow it in a few days.

It was about five in the afternoon of a elorious
June day, when a considerable slackening of the
train’s speed, gave me notice of its near “approach
to Sunborough, and almost immediately it stopped
nt the station. I had no time to wonder afresh if
any of the young ones would meet me, which was
what had occupied my thoughts greater part of the
last half-hour, for there, ready to hand me out, was a
104 THE GIANIT’S GRAVE.

tall, handsome youth, so ike my old friend Eleanor,
that I knew him at once. “ You are Godfrey,” I said,
as I gave him my hand.

“Yes; and you are Miss Rutherford; mamma
knows the secret of describing accurately ; I felt sure
it was you.”

“ All well at home ?”

“Yes, thank you; first-rate.”

He led me to a little pony carriage, and then left
me for a minute or two. As he seated himself beside
me, he said, “ Baldwin and your maid will see to the
luggage; he has the dog-cart. Now, are you all
right?’

We drove at a brisk pace, and my young friend
and I were at no loss for conversation. It was a
lovely evening; the air was balmy and pure, but the
roads were dusty, and | saw no spccial beauty in the
country through which we passed.

“ How far are we from Deane ?”’ I asked.

“Four miles; the scenery improves as we go on,”
_ he added, as if answering my thought.

And so it did. Presently we left the level gr ound,
and the pony slackened its pace as he went leisurely
up a winding hill with high irregular chalk banks on
each side, each crowned with thick trees, and the
rough and almost perpendicular sides, gracefully fes-
tooned with trailing ivy, wild rose and woodbine,
while near the roadsides great fronds of hart’s-tongue
fern drooped into the narrow, trickling stream below.
Then the descent began, and the chalk hill broke off
very abruptly to the left and disclosed a fair peaceful ©
view, most refreshing to look upon. Broad, bright
green meadows went down to the edge of a river, which
though rather narrow, still did not look insignificant,
for it wended its way asa river should, with a certain
















































































































































































































wile
Ee



A SWEET FAIR SCENE,

‘6 The Giant’s Grave.”
THE GIANT’S GRAVE. 105

calm grandeur, which no brook, however wide (still
less no canal), can ever approach. There were one or
two boats on it, andits banks were edged with willows
and broad flags and reeds,

There were meadows on the other side on rising
oround, and both on that side and on this, cattle were
feeding, and smoke rose up from cottages scattered
rather wide apart, which helped to make as pretty a
rustic picture as any I had seen. We were driving
slowly—lI believe on my account—for Godfrey, though
he made few remarks, had his eyes and senses wide
awake, as I found out afterwards, and did not fail to
tell me that that was the river I had seen at Sun-
borough, and that it could be seen from the Court.
The high chalk cliff was still on our right, and he told
me that those were the park palings at the top of it.
We could not often see them, for the brushwood was
thick, and an abundance of trees hung over the hill
and drooped their branches over it. Little streams
trickled out of the chalk and ran across the road,
falling with a soft murmur of music into a clear wide
stream on the left. A little farther on there was a
break in the hills, and between the two heights was a
piece of water, which iooked to me in a delightfully
wild state. ‘lhe opposite hill was in some parts covered
with trees, but there was a great, bare, white patch full
of dark holes, in and out of which birds were flying in
a bustling state of activity. The pond divided, or rather
at its narrowest part, the road was carried over it, and
when we reached the opposite side we came upon a
choice bit, which I felt sure I had seen before, most
probably in a painting.

To the left was a water-mill, moss-grown, and
delightfully old, the stream was wider now, and the
ponderous wheel, green and slippery, was turning
106 THE GIANT’S GRAVE.

round with a lazy dreamy motion, quite in character
with the soft summer’s day, and the white foam that
dashed everywhere near it in a shower of spray, looked
deliciously cool. The sunlight rested in soft patches
on the irregular roof and shone darkly green on the
velvety moss and stonecrop, which must have been
the growth of many years, so luxuriant it was. We
were quite close to the side of the stream, and lovely
forget-me-nots were shining among the grass and
weeds. Just by the mill was an old time-worn
thatched cottage, with a garden before it, gay with
summer flowers; the stream flowed on beyond into
the peaceful meadows where the cows were, and
farther on, I saw where it joimed the river. It was
a sweet fair scene, whether I looked on the wide pond
or the tree-crowned hill-sides, or the old mill and the
meadows—beauty surrounded me, and had Godfrey’s
mother been my companion, most probably my de-
light would have found utterance; as it was, I was shy
of talking sentiment to the youthful baronet by my
side, so that with a heart revelling in the soft rustic
landscape, all I could say was, ‘“ What a number of
jackdaws !”

“Yes; and an awful row they make too.”

I was glad I had ventured no more, and very soon
he touched up the pony, and we went on at a quicker
pace. The wooded height was still to our right hand,
and before long we came to some gates.

“Do those “lead to the house?” I inquired.

“Yes, to the back of it,” and soon after we had
passed them I turned at the sound of wheels in time
to see Lucia’s bonnet bent to avoid the overhanging
boughs as the dog-cart went in-at the gates.

Presently we made a little detour. Leaving the
hill-side, Godfrey drove through the meadows, down
THE GIANT’S GRAVE. 107

to the river, which we crossed by a rough wooden
bridge, and then gradually rose up the opposite slope,
when we turned to the right again. At first I could not
account for this freak, as it seemed, but when at length
we entered a broad white road between high hedges
and were descending again, I no longer wondered, for
a beautiful sight burst suddenly upon me. Imme-
diately before us, on an immense height, rising out
from the tops of thick trees in the full beauty of their
summer’s dress, was a stately grey mansion, in some
parts nearly covered with ivy and with tall narrow
latticed windows. It was a grand pile of buildings,
turret and tower, and gateway, all standing with a
proud majesty, and looking down into the valley as if
they had kept watch for centuries. Behind the Hall
were trees and hills, reaching, it seemed, to the soft
blue sky, and forming a most telling background ; to
the left, as we looked, were still trees and hills, but a
church tower and houses were visible, which I judged
rightly belonged to the neighbouring village. Down
below, close to the bridge which crossed the river,
were ruined arches and buttressed walls and old grey
buildings, with moss and wallflowers and snapdragon
beautifying their decay. Butit was not in detail that
the picture struck me, as we suddenly turned into the
downward road in front of it; what I saw was the
grandeur of the whole, and forgetting all my scruples,
I exclaimed rapturously, ‘ Oh, that is beautiful indeed!
Is that Deane Court ?”

“Yes, this is the finest view.” |

“Oh, thank you for bringing me to see it first,” I
said.

“We don’t as a rule take visitors to the back-
door,” he answered, smiling, “and the railway station
you came by gives you no chance of seeing the place
108 THE GIANT’S GRAVE.

as it should be seen if you follow the road, and I
thought when we stopped at the old mill that you
would not object to the extra distance.”

“No, indeed; but I really did not know we
stopped.”

“Yes, a good five minutes. I always make that
mill a test when I want to find out what people like;
it is not every one who goes in for old ruins and that
sort of thing. ”

“That sort of thing’ is very much 3 in my line,” I
said heartily.

“So I see; but what are our infantine relics to
you who have seen the Coliseum by moonlight ?”’

The remembrance of who had been with me when
I stood in silent awe last winter before Rome’s noblest
Tuin, came over me so forcibly that at first I could not
speak, but I said as well as I could, “If I am back-
ward in appreciating it will not be for lack of variety |
or for want of a guide.” |

“Oh, Ill take you anywhere you like. We have
no end of old books in the library—enough to send an
antiquarian mad, in fact; and as to ruins, why you can’t
walk three yards in the park, or out of it, without
treading ground that has some story belonging to it.
Look; there’s St. Margaret’s Well, down in that
hollow.”

“Qh yes, I see ; what a dear little archway !”

‘And that’s St. James’s Hospital to the left,’ point-
ing with his whip, as we passed what looked more like
a barn than anything else.

‘And those are the ruins of St. Mary’s, the old
abbey church,” he said as we came near the bridge,
that’s a first-rate stream for fishing; no end of trout
if a fellow has only patience to wait their time to
bite,” he added. “And that is the old cross,” as we
THE GIANT’S GRAVE. 109

passed a moss-grown stump close to the abbey
gates.

“The place seems indeed rich in ruins,’ I ventured
to remark, |

“Yes, and we have two ghosts at the Court and
a suspicion of another; and what do you think of a
giant’s grave in the park ?”

“ Are you in earnest?” I asked.

“ As you like to believe with regard to the ghosts;
as to the giant’s grave, seeing is believing, and it has
a legend belonging to it most instructive to read.”

‘* Really ??

“Truly ; but here we are ;” for we had driven up
the steep hill by this time and turned in at the lodge
gates; before long we rattled through the gateway
and over the paved court-yard, and very soon I was
in the drawing-room with the friend I had last seen ag
a bride, and who now met me a widow. a

CHAPTER II.

Our meeting was unwitnessed, for which I was thank-
ful, as we had passed through so much, both of joy
and sorrow, in the twenty years of our separation,
that at first we were greatly overcome. Presently
Lady Deane took me to my room, and when I came
down into the drawing-room I found the whole family
assembled. Godfrey, the eldest, who was between
eighteen and nineteen, had not been long at Oxford,
as I soon found out; Eleanor, a tall, fine-looking girl of
seventeen, reminded me very much of her father; and
the likeness was still stronger in Isabel, her next
110 THE GIANT’S GRAVE.

sister. As for. Beatrice, who was nine, I could, at first,
make nothing of her, she was soshy. After dmner we
strolled in the grounds and listened to the nightin-
gales, and when at last I closed my bed-room window
for the night, the scent of roses came in so sweetly on
the cool soft breeze, that I felt inclined to linger and
enjoy it. I did not sleep much ait first; the meeting
after so long an absence, combined with other engross-
ing thoughts, kept me awake till long after I heard the
clocks strike twelve.

How beautiful everything was when I looked out
next morning! My room was at the western angle
of the Court, and commanded an extensive view over
trees and meadows, with quiet farm-houses and
cottages, and the winding river streaking the green
pastures with a silver thread as it went on its way
towards the sea, which at some distance was plainly —
visible in a long blue line, forming a framework to
the picture before me. Just below my windows the
gardens lay spread in a soft variety of colour, with
broad green walks and terraces looking so inviting
that I dressed quickly and strolled out. Beatrice was
there before me, and was a very willing little guide;
and by the time I had explored the gardens, and been
introduced to her rabbits, a sage-looking old donkey,
and a venerable sleek cat, her shyness had entirely
vanished, and we were on very good terms indeed
when we entered the dining-room together. At
breakfast many plans were discussed for the day’s
enjoyment, which ended in my spending the morning
alone with Lady Deane, and talking to our heart’s
content; and though my first day at Deane Court was
certainly the quietest, 1s was by no means the leas

happy.
A week passed by, and I was daily finding out
THE GIANT’S GRAVE, 111

fresh objects of delight in the neighbourhood. Across
one part of the park was a double row of hawthorng,
leading to what had been a chapel many years ago;
there were old moss-grown tombs with scarcely dis-
tinguishable inscriptions still to be seen, and many a
grey old arch—

“With wreathed mullions proud,”

which the ivy and white bindweed had shrouded with
their graceful drapery. But picturesque as were the
many ruins of a day gone by, impressive as was the
old church with its hoary beauty without and its
quaint old tombs and monuments within, bright as
were the water lilies on the river, up which Godfrey
rowed us in the soft dreamy enjoyment of many a
golden afternoon, nothing had the charm for me that
I found by the old mill and the water near it. Godfrey
told me it was standing there in the time of Edward
the Confessor; and the truth of this assertion was
confirmed by an old book of records which he found
for me in the library. Dear old mill! in its old agre
still at work, so beautiful and pleasant to look upon ;
what could it not have told me, could it have spoken,
of the changes it had witnessed around it during an
existence of eight hundred years! Doubtless many —
a knightly train had passed by its busy wheel, for
more than one crusader lay in the old church beyond;
and in the long Wars of the Roses sons of the ancient
family were not wanting to uphold the king’s standard
on many a battle-field ; and later still, at Marston Moor,
there had fallen, while gallantly defending the Royal
cause, a noble warrior, whose portrait hung in the old
gallery of the Court above. I was never weary of
watching the water fowl as they darted in and out
amidst the sedges; and the busy jackdaws never
112 | THE GIANT’S GRAVE.

disturbed my musings as, bending over the old grey
lichen-covered rail, I gazed far down into the water’s
depths where the chalk at the bottom looked a bright -
emerald green, and the trout rose to the surface and
dived again, leaving ever-widening circles where they
had disturbed its placid calm. The place had such a
fascination for me that I had never wandered far into
the park, till one day when we were at breakfast
Godfrey asked me when I meant to visit the Giant’s
Grave.

‘Whenever you like. To tell you the truth, I am
rather sceptical on the point.” |
©€Tt igs quite true, I assure you,” said Isabel;
“there was an old knight who had his abode in the
old tower down by the moat. [I can show you the
ruins of it: it was years and years ago, of course, but
it’s quite true. The legend is in the library; how
does it begin, Godfrey ?—you know it and I don’t.”

Sir Walphe of the Bollowe was alwefully stoute, -
Aud Hyg face was fierce and qrimme,
An he had a Sotce like a belle manne’s shoute,
Anv was Wondrous stronge in ve limbe:
Anv iV rather habe mette with a score of beares,
Than ebher habe mette with hym.”

“ Now, please, Godfrey, don’t parody! ”’

“Now, please, Hleanor, don’t interrupt!” said her
brother, mimicking her tones so comically that we all
‘laughed.

1’ll show you the legend, Miss Rutherford,” said
Hleanor ; “ you can’t rely upon Godfrey.”

“Thank you, Eleanor; but how do you know the
legend is to be relied on ?” said her brother.

“Oh, of course it is—it’s tremendously old; bes
sides, there’s the grave to speak for itself.”
THE GIANT’S GRAVE. 113

“Well, please enlighten me,” I said, “for I am all
curiosity.”

“Whereupon Godfrey began: ‘Once upon a
time——”’ |

“Qh, do be sensible,” said Isabel despairingly ;
“we shall never hear the rights of it, if you begin
hike that.”

“Well, then—” but here an interruption came; a
servant brought in a message that Sir Godfrey was
. wanted, and he was off at once, only saying, “‘ Now
you can have it your own way, but make short work
of it; Jackson will not keep me long.”

Then I appealed to Hleanor, and she commenced
the story with the preface, “I am sure to blunder in
the details, but I can give it you in outline. This old
Sir Ralph was a giant, that is, so it says, a man of
enormous stature, very flerce and brave and warlike,
the terror of the country side, and wherever he fought
killing more than a dozen other men could. He built
a tower in the Dean—that is the hollow just at the
foot of the hill—it was a very high one, and reached
up high above the tallest trees on the height. There
he dwelt with his squire and men; and to this day
the old foundations go by the name of the Giant’s
Tower. Well, after many years, when he was grown
quite old, one evening he called his squire to him; he
was nearly blind and very shaky, and he felt his end
was near, so he made his last request, which was rather
a singular one. Taking out his spear, he drew his
fingers along the blade, and then gaid to his squire he
felt his day was over, but he wished with his last
strength to throw his spear from the tower as far as
he could, and where it was found there he wished to
be buried. So the squire promised, and then the giant
put forth all his strength and threw it, and that night
114 THE GIANT’S GRAVE.

he died. The next morning search was made, and
there, quite at the end of the valley—a mile off—they
found the spear; and so they dug his grave and
buried him there. And that is all I know about it,”
‘said Eleanor, as she finished; “but you must read the
old legend yourself.”

«Thank you; I must see this wonderful spot by
all means.” -

“Can we go to-day, mamma?” asked Beatrice,
who, instead of the shy little puss I had thought her
at first, had proved herself to be as thorough a little
romp as could well be met with.

‘Tt is as Miss Rutherford likes. I am afraid I
could not walk so far; but if you would excuse me,
Caroline, and would like the stroll, I do think it would
repay you.” :

« And oh! do let us take a basket, mamma, so
as not to be bothered with coming home to lunch;
wouldn’t that be nice, Miss Rutherford ?”

“Yes, very.”

So it was settled; and soon after ten we set out—
Godfrey, the two girls, Beatrice, and I. It was a

lovely morning, and as we parted with Lady Deane
at. the steep pathway leading from the back of the
garden into the hollow, my only regret was that she
could not accompany us.

We scrambled down the woodside and came out by
the rough uneven grass-grown mounds, which marked
the foundations of the Giant’s Tower. We were now
at the end of the piece of water farthest from the mill,
and very dark and solemn it looked, with the trunks
of half-decaying trees bending low down over it and
dipping their branches in among the weeds. There
was an island and one or two swans, and a little boat-
house, which Isabel told me was never used, though to
THE GIANT’S GRAVE. 115

the stump close by it an old weather-beaten boat was
moored, The wood to the left rose high above us, and
was matched by another on the opposite side. ‘Then,
leaving the pond and the Court behind us, we turned —
into the valley, and soon Eleanor was my only com-
panion, for Godfrey and the others were running on
before us. The grass was very soft and crisp, on
either side rose a hill, smooth and beautifully green,
gay with many a tiny starry blossom, and fragrant
with wild thyme. We strolled along, commenting
from time to time on the flowers and the birds and
the sweet pure summer sky, stopping to wonder now
and then that huge blocks of granite should be lying
about here and there. All at once there was a shout;
we walked on more quickly to where Godfrey and the
others were bending over something on the hill side.
““Come quietly, please,” he called out, as we came
nearer, and then he led me to a tiny plant, which
Beatrice was shielding as carefully as if she thought
it would fly away before I saw it. I bent down and
exclaimed at once, “ What a very tame bee! ”

“Remarkably so!”? said Godfrey, while Eleanor
smiled, and the others laughed outright.

“Ts it dead ?”’ I asked, venturing to touch it; and
then as I lightly stirred it with my finger a conviction
dawned upon me, and I said, “I do believe it is the
Bee Orchis ! ” |

“Oh, I’m so glad! to think of taking you in so
nicely,” said Beatrice; while Eleanor said, ‘It is the
Bee Orchis,” adding its Latin name, in a way which
at once told me she had not studied botany very long,
pr she would not have been so anxious to show her
learning. |

About the middle of the valley we came to a group
of cherry trees, into one of which Godfrey climbed;
116 THE GIANT’S GRAVE,

and there we rested and refreshed ourselves with the
fruit which he threw down upon the grass. Just to
the right, branching off from this, was another lovely
dale, the Inillsides more sloping than those which
sheltered the one we were in; half way up on one side
was an old yew tree, which stood quite by itself like a
grave old sentinel alone at his post. It was very
quiet, a herd of deer feeding very near us were not
disturbed as we sat and talked under the shady trees,
and turned round now and then to look at the towers
of the old Court rising above the trees. Then we
pursued our walk—keeping straight on—with a high
bare hill to the right, and one thickly covered with
trees to the left; we sauntered quietly along, till just
as the wooded shade began to grow sombre in its
depths as we neared it, and one or two deer which
had strayed from their companions held up their —
heads startled by the sound of our voices, Beatrice
suddenly sprang from my side and called out, “There
it is! there’s the Giant’s Grave!”

- CHAPTER III,

It was a solemn and beautiful spot at the extreme
end of the long straight valley, which here branched
off into two wide paths; one reaching up, and thus
dividing the hill on the right, and the other pursuing
its course through the dark wood, so thick and black
and shadowy, that spite of the warm summer day, I
shivered as I looked into it. At Beatrice’s shout, the
stray deer had joined the rest—there they were, bound-
ing up the hill with heads erect, and their branching
THE GIANT'S GRAVE, 117

antlers standing out against the sky for one moment,
before the herd disappeared over the brow of the hill.
And there at our feet was the grave, a very long
mound, its- width exactly in proportion, and except
for its enormous size, exactly like the grass-grown
graves of quiet English churchyards. It was plenti-
fully sprinkled over with the tiny flowers always found
on chalky soil, and the elegant brown quiver grass
bent gracefully to and fro over it, waving with every
breath of the soft, sweet breeze as we stood and
looked. Isabel was the first to break the silence.
“Are you convinced now, Miss Rutherford?” she
asked.

‘Tf it is an illusion, I have no wish to dispel it,” I
replied evasively, “it is a fitting place in which to
rest. IJ have no desire to doubt the legend, Isabel.”

“‘ Nevertheless, you do doubt it, I believe,’ said
Godfrey.

“Well, we must make allowances for the old bio-
grapher ; no doubt he looked into futurity and thought
that a yard or two more or less would never be
inquired into, by the unlearned in giants, of an age
to come, so I accept the legend with—with the usual
reservation in such cases,” I added, laughing.

“Cum grano salis,” said Hleanor quietly.

“Permit me to inquire how long you have been
studying the dead languages, Hleanor? that is the
second distinguishing mark of a scholar, I have been
permitted to observe to-day,” said Godfrey with a
mock bow, and his poor sister was annihilated at
once. Nor did she during the remainder of my visit
ever quote Latin again, which I was glad to notice,
for a tendency to conceit was, I thought, her great
failing.

«Well, that wood looks first-rate for hide-and-
118 THE GIANT’S GRAVE.

seek,” said Beatrice, and she ran off after Godfrey,
while Isabel followed, and Eleanor and I sat down by
the grave, and seeing that her brother’s speech had
rather damped her spirits, I remarked on the length of
the walk, regretting that her dear mother could not
be with us, and the conversation leading on to othet
home and family concerns, Eleanor told me much
about her papa, which I had never known, and it
seemed a fitting subject on which to talk with the
bright, blue, sunny sky above us, and the reverent
stillness around. And Eleanor showed herself, as she
really was at her best, earnest, and high-minded, and
affectionate, with a subdued tone in her voice as she
spoke of the blank her father’s death had caused, and
the hope they had of meeting him again, which told
me that she had already learned (what none of us can
- learn too early) that this life is only to be valued when
taken in connection with the life of the world to
come.

When the game in the dark wood was over, we
strolled up the hill-path to the place where we had
seen the deer disappear, and there, quite at the ex-
treme end of the park on that side, we sat down to
lunch. There was a charming bird’s-eye view, and
we counted no less than five churches in the valley,
and on the downs opposite, each with its circle of
trees, and houses, and barns. How still and quiet it
was! larks were singing and bees were humming, but
these were all the sounds which greeted us, as we sat
down on the soft, green turf, to do justice to the fare
which Godfrey’s basket disclosed, and for which our
walk had given us an excellent appetite.

“ What shall we do next?” asked Beatrice, who
could never sit still for long together.

“Go and see Mrs. Baker,” suggested Isabel.
THE GIANT’S GRAVE. 119

** Well spoken,” said Godfrey ; “what does Miss
Rutherford say ?”

“Oh, I am ready for anything; but who is Mrs.
Baker ?”

“She is the wife of one of the keepers,” said
Hleanor; “we generally look in upon her when we
come as far as this; her cottage is in that plantation
to the left.” |

““She’s a dear old woman,” said Beatrice, “ and
always ready to tell me a story. Oh! do let’s go.”

“ Shall you really like it?” asked Isabel and God-
frey in a breath, as I rose.

“Yes, above all things. I know very little of
English peasant life ; and if we come in for a story all
the better, so please lead the way.”

The plantation was not far off, and soon we came
to a narrow gate, which was locked; but Godfrey was
over it in a second, and back again with the key in
a wonderfully short space of time, and the large dog
we had heard barking, careered round Beatrice and
sprang upon her as if overjoyed to see her again.
It seemed very dark in the plantation at first, but a
few steps brought us to a clearing where the cottage
stood in the midst of a bright little garden. The
building was covered with bark, and had a high-
pointed thatched roof; there were plants in the two
lattice windows, and conspicuous among them a stately
white arum; at the door stood Mrs. Baker in her fresh
white cap and apron, a very charming old woman in-
deed, her looks quite justifying Beatrice’s opinion of
her, as she curtseyed and bade us welcome.

‘“This is Miss Rutherford, a friend of mamma’s,”
explained Hleanor, as we entered the little cottage.

“T am always glad to see any of my dear lady’s
friends,” said she, as she placed one of two Windsor

aon
120 THE GIANT’S GRAVE.

chairs near the door for me, while Beatrice brought
out a little three-legged stool from the chimney cor-
ner, and her sisters sat down one on each side of the
tall clock, which was solemnly ticking with a mono-
tonous one-two, which I should have thought too loud
to be pleasant, but which Mrs. Baker said kept her
company nicely while her husband was away.

“Is he quite well ?”

“Yes, Miss Isabel, thank you; he’s in the planta- |
tion somewhere. Sir Godfrey has gone to him, and
Dash was after him; no doubt there’s something to
see to.”

** Don’t you find this rather lonely at times ?”

“ Well, ma’am, in the spring and summer, I don’t
notice it much, for the flowers and the poultry, they
keep me company when my husband’s away, and now —
and then a friend comes up from the village; but in
winter-time it is rather dreary, to be sure; but the
trees keep us warm, and then I bring out my work
and get a deal done when we’re shut in for the night.”

“'We’ve been to show Miss Rutherford the Giant’s
Grave,” said Beatrice; “and I don’t think she quite
believes in the giant; do you, Mrs. Baker ?”

Well, my dear Miss Beatrice, a story like that
must have some foundation, but as to all they say
about it, I don’t know—folks add to and take from,
till it’s difficult to find the truth; but, my little lady, it’s
my belief there are a good many other giant’s graves
in the world than the one in the hollow.”

“ Oh, I wish you would tell us a story about pne,”
said Beatrice ; while Eleanor added, “We should solike
to hear it ;” and Isabel, who was stroking pussy’s back
as she sat purring contentedly in her lap, said, “ That’s
right ; we thought you would have a story for us.”

Mrs. Baker looked at me, and I assured her I
THE GIANT’S GRAVE. 121

should be quite as pleased as the young ones, so she
consented.

“ Perhaps you'll excuse me if I knit the whilo,
ma’am,”’ she said; “I can’t talk doing nothing.” So
out came a ball of grey cotton and a stocking in pro-
gress, and as soon as the needles were set in motion
the old lady began; and I have seldom seen so plea-
sant a picture as she made, sitting near the doorway.
the sunlight falling on her silver hair and shining
needles, as she worked and talked.

‘Tt was fifty years ago, Miss Beatrice, and I was
but two-and-twenty, when Miss Harriet—the lady I
was maid to—was engaged to be married. She and
her sister were orphans, and a lady lived with them as
companion and head of the house. It was a beautiful
place, over the hills someway, and my young mis-
tresses had everything that heart could wish, money
and health, and friends. There was one brother too,
Mr. Gregory—as fine a young man as I ever saw; his
sisters were handsome too, especially Miss Harriet;
they were all very kind to their servants, and to the
poor, and very hospitable, so that the house was never
dull; and though folks did say the family were proud,
that never affected me. I was very comfortable and
happy, and James (that’s my husband) and I were
engaged then, so that I had a home of my own to look
forward to, and that was always pleasant to think of.
Then Miss Harriet was engaged, and happy enough
she seemed, singing about the garden and riding
out with her lover when he came, and altogether
things looked very bright for them. The wedding
was fixed for the ninth of February. Oh! how well I
remember the day—I had been busy for weeks before,
helping to get Miss Harrict’s things ready, and the
last evening as I dressed her for dinner, I felt rather
122 THE GIANT’S GRAVE.

tired. It was a blowy night, and I much feared
the morrow wouldn’t be fine; but my young lady had
no such doubts; she was in high spirits, and as happy
as could be. The bridegroom was expected to dinner,
and more than once when the bell rang, I thought
he’d come, but he hadn’t, and he was not arrived
when she went downstairs. I stayed behind in her
room to finish what packing I could, and in the middle
of my work one of the other maids burst in, ‘Oh,
Jennings,’ she said, ‘Mr. Hdwardes is dead, and
Miss Elizabeth doesn’t know what to do with Miss
Harriet—do come!’

“Dead! How? what do you mean? I said, for
she’d taken my breath away.

“¢ Oh, he and Mr. Gregory had words about some-
thing—I don’t know what—and they had a duel
yesterday, and Mr. Gregory shot him.’ |

“¢ Does Miss Harriet know ?

« do come,’ she said, suddenly seeming to take fright,
for I didn’t seem to have power to move, and my head
swam.” .

“Oh!” interrupted Beatrice, “there’s sorrow in
the story ; I don’t like it.”

“ My dear litile lady,” said the old woman gravely,
as she laid down her knitting needles and looked at
Beatrice, “no life is worth anything that has not had
sorrow in it; and my story is a true one; but I won't
go on, if you’d rather not,”’ she said kindly.

Beatrice’s love of a story at all hazards, overcame
her objéctions, and Mrs. Baker proceeded.

“ Well, I got up and went into the drawing-room,
and there sure enough was Miss Harriet, looking as if
she was dead, and Miss Hlizabeth bending over her in
-gn.agony, and Mrs. Grantley looking pale and agitated.
THE GIANT’S GRAVE. 123

I did what I could, and by-and-by we brought her to;
she did not speak for some time, and when she did it —
was only to say the dreadful words, ‘I will never for-
give him,’

““*Qh, don’t say so, Harriet,’ said her sister, ‘ don’t
say so’; and well she might speak so, for the words
struck a cold shiver through me as I knelt by the
fire.

“Presently she sat up, and pushed back her hair,
and said to Miss Elizabeth, ‘Tell me again, for I can-
not believe it,’

“I moved to go, but Miss Elizabeth signed me to
stay, and I listened as she told the story. It seems
Mr. Edwardes and Mr. Gregory had had words (they
were both very fiery young men and soon offended);
and then Mr. Gregory sent a challenge. I dare say
he never thought—indeed I am sure he couldn’t—or
at such a time he would have acted different, for it
was so near the wedding-day ; but people in a passion
don’t think of consequences, or they’d be more care-
ful—and so—oh! I shall never forget Miss Elizabeth’s
voice; how clear and solemn it sounded, as she said,
“And when Gregory fired, George fell at once; there
was no hope of saving him; he was shot through the
heart.’ There was a dreadful silence for some minutes,
and then Miss Harriet said again in a strong deter-
mined tone, that hadn’t a shade of grief in it, ‘1 will
never forgive him.’

“Well, my dear young ladies,” said the old woman,
“a dreadful time followed—no power could change
Miss Harriet’s mind; poor Mr. Gregory, when he
came to himself, was overwhelmed with remorse, and
he came to the house to entreat his sister to forgive
him, but she wouldn’t see him—three times he came,
but it was no good, and last of all he went quite away,
124. THE GIANT’S GRAVE.

and no one heard of him for years. Miss Harriet was
changed altogether, a dreadful giant had taken posses-
sion of her heart, Miss Beatrice, and she was altered
to every one.”

“Was it Giant Despair, do you think ?” said the
little girl.

“Well, Miss Beatrice, I think it was Revenge—that
hard unforgiving spirit which spoils all that is good
and beautiful in the hearts people let him reign in,
and dries up all the sweet springs of affection, and
withors all the lovely flowers of kindness and love.
God help poor souls when they let Revenge in to be
their master, for surely never was a master so cruel
and hard as he. Miss Harriet before that dreadful
night had been the liveliest, brightest young thing,
and always ready to go to see the poor, and comfort
and help them, and busy always with her flowers,
or playing on the harp; but everything was altered
now,—the harp stood covered up im the corner, the
flowers died for lack of care, and as to the poor, she
never went near them, though she still worked and
made clothes for them, but oh! they weren’t half so
acceptable without the kind words she used to take
with them.

“So the years went on. Miss Elizabeth, she mar-
ried ; Mrs. Grantley stayed on, and often’s the time she
has talked about Miss Harriet to me, and we always
came to the same conclusion, that we could do nothing
except pray for her, for no one ever dare breathe Mr.
Edwardes’ name before her, and she never mentioned
him, Sometimes I used to hope when at church any
chapters were read that specially spoke of forgiveness,
or of our blessed Saviour’s sufferings, and how He
prayed for His enemies, she’d be touched; but she
never was ; hard and cold as stone, nothing seemed
THE GIANT’S GRAVE. 125

to move her; she scorned all sympathy, and shut her-
self up from all her friends, and oh! dear, oh! dear, it
was a dreadful time.”

“And how about your own lover?” I asked.

“Well, ma’am, somehow it seemed to be my duty
to stay with Miss Harriet, and so I spoke to James
and told him he was free if he liked; but he said he
should never marry any one else, and was content to
wait; and we bided our time.”’

‘And the poor brother ?”? asked Eleanor.

*“No one ever heard anything of him. He had
gone straight away, and was, so to speak, quite lost to
his friends, for no one knew where he was.”

“Oh, dear! didn’t she ever get sorry?” asked
httle Beatrice.

“Wait a while, Miss Beatrice, you shall hear,
Fifteen years had gone by, and Miss Harriet’s beautiful
black hair was as white as snow; but never a sign of
melting did she show for all she had suffered. But
then something happened. It was one evening in
autumn, and I was doing Miss Harriet’s hair for
dinner, when there was a ring at the door bell, and
presently Mrs. Grantley came in, and I went out for a
few minutes. Then she came back again into the
room where I was, and said, ‘Jennings, Mr. Gregory’s
little boy has come to see his aunt.’

“His little boy?’ I said, for I didn’t know he
was married; nor did Mrs. Grantley, it seemed, till
to-night. But he was, and he was at Crompton—the
city twenty miles off—with his wife, and very ill;
there were two other children, but this was the eldest,
and he, poor little fellow, had heard his parents speak
of his Aunt Harriet, so he had found out where she
lived, and walked all the way to see her, and beg she
would go back with him,”
126 THE GIANT’S GRAVE.

‘¢ What a nice little boy !”’ said Beatrice.

“When I went back to Miss Harriet she did not
say anything to me; but when she had gone down,
Mrs. Grantley came to me and said the little boy was in
the study, very tired and hungry, would I see to him,
and put him to bed in the little blue room near mine.
So I went into the study, and there the little fellow
was. He looked about ten, and had beautiful black
hair and eyes like his father before him, but he was
very thin, and his clothes were very shabby. I coaxed
up the fire, and made him have a nice cosy supper, and
then he told me, dear child, why he had come. He
said his papa was very ill, and they had no money,
and he had once heard his mamma say to his papa,
‘Oh, if your sister would but forgive you!’ and it
seems in her grief she had told the sad story to her
little- son. He said he did not tell them, but he
slipped away and had walked all the way from
Crompton, except .a ride in the butcher’s cart. And
then when he had finished his supper he said so
beseechingly, ‘Can I see my Aunt Harriet now?’
that, for the life of me, t could not help crying, for.
I felt how hopeless it was.’

There was a shake in the good old woman’s voice -

as she spoke now, which made me wonder if she could
finish her story.

But she went on—“I kissed the dear little boy,
and told him to go to sleep before he asked to see
his aunt; then I warmed his bed, and waited while
he knelt at his prayers, and then when I went to
tuck him up he said confidently, ‘I feel sure Aunt
Harriet will be kind and forgive papa; for mamma
says God always hears our prayers, and I have asked
Him.’

“I went straight from his room to mino and throw
THE GIANT’S GRAVE. 127

myself on my knees by my bed, and if ever I prayed
in my life I prayed then. I took no thought of time,
but over and over again I asked God to soften her
heart; and when at last I rose up, I did not feel
uneasy at all—something seemed to tell me my prayer
was heard. Strange enough, that night when we went
down to family prayers there came, in the course of
the evening’s reading, the words, ‘ Let all bitterness
and wrath, and anger and clamour, and evil speaking
be put away from you with all malice; and be ye kind
one to another, tender-hearted, forgiving one another,
even as God, for Christ’s sake, hath forgiven you.’

“I wondered how Mrs. Grantley kept her voice
from shaking, but she did, and then we all went to
bed. The ladies parted at Mrs. Grantley’s door, and
then Miss Harriet went on to the blueroom. The door
was ajar, and I saw her go across to the bed where
her little nephew was lying; she stooped over him
and drew the sheet closer to his sweet little face, and
when I saw her bend and kiss him, I thought I should
have dropped; but I had sense to go on quickly to
her room, and when she came in a minute or two after-
wards I was busy getting her things ready, for I
daren’t for the world show what I felt. 3 “

Beatrice drew along breath; “ Oh, it és getting
interesting now,” she said.

“Well, my mistress said nothing to me about the
little boy, and acted altogether just as if she knew
nothing about him; and so I left her and went to bed,
but not to sleep, for I lay awake praying nearly all the
night through, and only fell asleep just at dawn.

‘Quite contrary to custom, my mistress was dressed
when I went in answer to her bell. ‘Jennings,’ she —
said, ‘f am going to Crompton to-day; order the
carriage to be ready at ten.’? Then she went on to
128 | THE GIANT’S GRAVE.

the blue room, but what passed there I never knew ;
only this, we saw when she came down to breakfast,
she led the little boy in her hand, and just before they
set off for Crompton together, he put his little arms
round my neck and said, ‘ It’s all right, God did hear _
my prayer; she says she will forgive papa.’

“That’s been a lesson to me all my life since not
to doubt God’s willingness and power to help. I was
nearly beside myself with joy that day, and Mrs.
Grantley, dear old lady, could not speak without tears,
and over and over again she said, ‘ How wrong it 1s to
despair, Jennings.’

‘Miss Harriet came back alone, and she must
have cried all the way by her looks; but this I will
say, if she hated in earnest, she forgave in earnest too.
Mr. Gregory and his wife and children all came to the
house, and there they stayed, and he got well again in
time, but he was quite the old gentleman to look at,
so much had he gone through. Then Miss Harriet
remembered about James and me, and though I
wouldn’t leave her just at once, we settled the wed-
ding should be before long; and she took to visiting
the poor again, and when spring came she saw to the
garden and the flowers, and one evening just before I
left I heard her tuning the harp, so you may fancy she
had buried the giant then.”

“Oh yes,” said Beatrice, “and was she always
kind afterwards ?”

“Nothing could be kinder. The giant Revenge
had hardened her heart, but the angel Forgiveness
made it softer than ever, and love, and patience, and
meekness, and peace were the flowers that bloomed
on her giant’s grave.”

“Oh, thank you!’’ said Isabel, “ what a nice ends
ing; but what became of the little boy ?”
THE GIANT’S GRAVE. _ 129

“Do you know your Uncle Richard, Miss Bea-
trice ?”

“Uncle Richard Hamilton, who married Aunt
Tsabel—oh yes ; but is he the little boy ?”

“He was,” said Mrs. Baker, as she rubbed her
dear old eyes—‘‘ he was, Miss Beatrice, and it was my
lady who told me that she wished I would some day
tell you his story, so that you might think of him
with reverence, as the means his heavenly Father
used to bring back a wanderer to His fold, and bind
up more than one broken heart.”

** And Miss Harriet; is she alive still ??

“No, she died ten years since;” but here Mrs.
Baker rolled up her knitting, for Dash came bounding
in, and then Godfrey, followed by the keeper, and we
rose to go. So with many cordial thanks for her
story, and promises to come again, we turned home-
wards, well pleased with our visit to the Giant’s

Grave.



CHAPTER IV.

“T wonper if P’ve got a giant to bury,” said Beatrice
the next morning, as she sat with me in the arbour
by the part of the garden she called her own.

“ Can’t you think, Beatrice ?”?

“Oh dear, I don’t know, unless it is I forget things
and tear my frocks, and leave Dickie’s cage open, and
never know where my gloves are—but what to call
him, that the puzzle !”

“That is very easily settled; if you were to ask
me, Beatrice, I should say Thoughtlessness is your
giant’s name.”

I
130 THE GIANT’S GRAVE.

“ Well, but he isn’t a horrid savage giant like Re-
venge.”

“No, dear, but he may do as much harm, though
not with the same intention.

‘Evil is wrought by want of thought
s well as want of heart,’
and I would advise you, my little girl, to get rid of him
as fast as possible—you know how to do it.”

“Yes; I know; but oh dear, I wonder if every
one has a giant to fight.”

“I believe every one has in some shape or other,
Beatrice; but here comes Isabel—we are deciding
upon our giants, Isabel; and I think you can help
_ Beatrice to fight hers. Remind her when you see her
getting wild; that will be a great help.”

That I will gladly; only there is my own to
master,” and though I made no inquiries, I knew
very well what Isabel meant.

As to myself, conscience reminded me of several,
and foremost among them, Despondency, which had,
till the last ten days, made my life so dreary all the
time since my dear brother’s death. To slay this enemy
my kind friends seemed bent on doing their best, for
Lady Deane came into the garden to find me with her
mind full of a fresh scheme for my enjoyment.

“You seemed very interested in what Mrs. Baker
told you of Mr. Hamilton yesterday, Caroline; shall
_ wedrive over to lunch to-day ? we are sure of a wel-
come, and I should like you to see Isabelagain. They
have been staying at the sea-side during the last month
for the sake of the children, but I believe they are at
home now; at any rate, it would be a pleasant
drive.”

“Who else is going?” asked Beatrice eagerly, as
soon as I had signified my approval of the scheme.
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A PICTURE BY THE WAY.
Page 131,

“ The Giant's Grave.”
THE GIANT’S GRAVE. 13]

“‘T thought of driving Miss Rutherford in the pony
carriage: how would you like to ride ?”

“Oh, that is famous, mamma! I should like it very
much indeed. Can Eleanor and Isabel go too ?”

“ Yes, if they like.”

There was a rush and a scamper, and by ten o’clock
we were ready. Godfrey and his eldest sister well
mounted on two beautiful horses. Isabel and Beatrice
on the most charming little roan ponies, and my friend
and I in the carriage. “ Why we make quite a caval.
cade,”’ said Beatrice as we set off,

It was a beautiful morning and our road was one
of the best I had ever seen, being extremely smooth,
and for some distance kept very shady and cool by the
thick woods on each side; indeed, when about two
miles from the Court, it was rather too shady, so high,
and black, and thick, were the trees. ‘I would rather
not come this way at night,” I said.

“Tt is rather too lonely, certainly—there is but one
house within a mile, and my dear husband used to tell
the story of his grandfather being twice stopped by
highwaymen i in this very spot.” |

**T can imagine it.”

“Even in these days the country people are not
very fond of this road ; but they are obliged to use it,
because it is the high road to Crompton. We shall
soon be through the worst now.”

As we emerged from the thick shade, we turned
aside from the road into a grassy lane, and there we
came upon a gipsy encampment, the tilted cart,
ragged children, dark-haired women, and rough
ponies grazing, just what I had seen many a time
painted, but never in real English life before.

“Tam glad to have seen that,” I said as we drove
past ; “‘ what a free, charming life it seems.”
182 THE GIANT'S GRAVE.

“Yes; for those used to it, perhaps. Look at that
pale scabious on the bank, Caroline, how beautiful ib
is.

“Yes; and what a delicious wild rose.”

«Tl cannot tell you the treat it is to me to drive
here again; I used to come so often, but in the last
two years I have only been this way twice.”

“And you put your own feelings aside to give me
pleasure, Eleanor; I ought to be ashamed of myself
for grieving as / have grieved when I think of your
sorrow.’

“It is hard to bear often; but I try to keep up
everything as he would have liked it, and the children
are my great helps; besides ——”

“Yes, I know; but sometimes heaven seems very
far off.?

‘It 1s never so near as when we are most faithful
to duties on earth,” said Lady Deane, not as if preach-
ing to me, but as the simple statement of a fact she
had proved.

‘But it is very difficult to take up the thread
_ again just where it broke off.”

“Yes, [know itis. I really did not know what
to do at first, I felt I would gladly let everything go;
and when Mr. Hope used to come and ask me about
things he thought necessary with regard to the tenants
or other matters, it was really only the thought of my
boy that roused me to take interest in them.”

“Ah!” T said, “ you are happy in having some
one to live for; as for me—” and I could not go on.

“TI know, Caroline, and it is very sad; still it
seems to me a duty to make interests if we have them
not already. ‘Work, work, work,’ is an excellent
helper when one wishes to shake off despondent feel-
ings.”


THK GIANT'S GRAVE. 133

I did not reply, for something was telling me that
instead of trying to shake off, I was rather encourag-
ing such feelings; and so we talked no more on
personal matters during the rest of the drive.

Tt was a very pleasant one; and when we had
crossed the down and entered the valley beyond,
Boxford was before us—a cluster of white houses on
the slope, and high above them the rectory and
church, both green with ivy—just beyond, nearly
hidden by trees, was the Hall, When we reached it
we found that the young ones had arrived before us,
and on the steps stood Mr. Hamilton, whose black
hair, rather thickly sprinkled with grey, confirmed
one point, at least, of Mrs. Baker’s story; and I must
own that I studied his face with considerable interest,
By his side was a tall, stout lady, in whom at first I
had some difficulty in recognizing the slight, girlish-
locking Isabel Deane whom I had last seen at Eleanor’s
wedding. We were very warmly welcomed, and
spent a pleasant afternoon; indeed, we stayed till
past seven, having sent a message by a groom going
that way that we should not be home to dinner,
Just before we left, Beatrice came to me and, taking
my hand, led me into the library, where, over the fire-
place, hung a painting of a lady, very dark, and with ©
a haughty look on her handsome features

“Can you guess who it is?” said Beatrice.

“ Yes, I think so; but I hope, Beatrice, you have
not said anything.” |

“Oh, dear no! but I just came in here with my
cousin Harriet, and I asked who it was, and she told
me. Can’t you fancy it all, Miss Rutherford ? ”

“Yes; quite well.”

‘And isn’t Uncle Richard a darling ?”

“He is quite as nice as I expected to find him,

wat
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134. THE GIANT’S GRAVE.

and that is saying a good deal,’ with which expres-
sion of opinion his little niece had to content herself.

The drive home in the evening was even more
delightful than that in the morning had been; and
going through the lonely wood-shaded road Godfrey
and his sisters made noise enough to intimidate any
number of robbers if there had been any in conceal-
ment, which they considered a great achievement,
though I should have preferred a quieter company
as being more in accordance with the still, solemn
beauty of the time. ‘The moon was rising, and in the
west, stretching far into the north, was that long
amber glow which makes so much of the beauty of the
midsummer night sky. The nightingales were making
most delicious music, their liquid notes falling in
showers of melody from the trees as we drove along;
and on each side of the road we might have thought
the fairies had got up a special illumination for our
benefit, so many tiny lamps did the glow-worms light
for us. Godfrey secured three of the little creatures
for me, which I carried home in my hand and placed
among the leaves on a rockwork in the garden, and
every night so long as I remained at the Court when
I drew up my blind to look out the last thing, there
they were—three tiny stars shining with their pale
blue lustre among the leaves.

I did not leave my dear friends till September, and
then I went to visit my relations in Cheshire. They
were kind, and, on the whole, my visit was an agree-
able one; but they spoke rather strongly and satirically
about my leading a wandering life on the Continent,
and evidently considered Rome such a dreadful place,
that I said as little as possible about my stay there.

T believe they thought if I would remain near them
THE GIANT’S GRAVE. 185

they could find me plenty of occupation in their
country parish; but, after considering the subject, I
came to the conclusion that I was really not much
needed, and so about the middle of October I left,
intending to return to London; and Lucia, who had
drooped considerably since we left Deane Court, looked
her bright self again as we took our places in the
London train. |

We were about thirty miles from London when a
sudden jerk, a heavy scraping sound, and heads thrust
out of the windows, informed us that something was
wrong; and when the train coming to a stand, with
no station visible, I looked out, 1 saw the mischief at
once: one of the wheels had come off the engine, and
in another minute the guard came and requested us to
leave the carriages, as we were already behind time,
and the express train was coming quickly after us.
No one was hurt, nor had we time to be much
frightened ; nevertheless, I did not much like the idea
of continuing my journey that night, so I looked about
me, considering what to do. A crowd soon collected,
mysteriously it seemed to me, for I could see no house
nor any sign of a dwelling near, though at some little
distance, on a steep hill-side, was a fair number of red
brick houses, which looked to me like a small town.
A. tall, thin boy in the crowd, very much out at elbows,
came up in answer to my glance of inquiry, and,
touching his dingy cap, said, “Take yer luggage,
mum ? ”

“Ts that a town on the hill-side ? ”?

“Them red houses? ”

Yes.”

“That’s Hayling; want yer luggage took there,
mum ?”
136 THE GIANT’S GRAVE,

“I don’t know; are there any good inns?”

*There’s the ‘Swan,’ and the ‘Anchor,’ and the
‘Duke’s Arms’—that’s where the quality stays mostly.”

* How far is it?”

** A mile and a arf.”

“Have you a barrow? we have a good deal of
luggage.” :

‘*Y can borrer one, mum.”’

“Very well then, you may.”

The boy ran off, and in a very short space of time
returned with a capacious looking barrow, into which
he stowed our boxes with great aptitude I thought,
and then, turning to Lucia, I said, “ We ‘had better
follow him, Lucia.”

“The Signora will be much fatigued,” objected
Lucia, but owned almost immediately we could not
adopt a better plan; so we commenced our expedition.

Tt is not exaggerating to say that I enjoyed it
immensely. The road was by no means beautiful, but
the spice of adventure was very invigorating, and
Lucia’s spirits soon rose to the occasion. As we
entered the town by the back street, our guide pointed
out a dingy-looking public-house, redolent of tobacco
as we passed, and suggestive of people in the state
best described as more merry than wise. “ You can
go on,” I said, as our boy waited for orders.

» Then we went up a steep hill, and a comfortable-
looking inn held out the sign of an anchor before us
as we stopped to inspect. ‘ This looks comfortable,”
I said.

© Ay, mum, it do; but the ‘Duke’s Arms’ is better
nor this.”

“Well, you may go on.”

Five mmutes more brought us to the ‘Duke’s Arma,?
THE GIANT’S GRAVE. 137

which certainly wore an air of placid importance, and
looked inviting as we stopped before the entrance to
the paved yard, not knowing what to do next. The
boy, however, brought out a brisk-looking maid, and
when I stated my wants to her, I found nothing
remain ‘d but to pay and dismiss my boy, whose keen
blue eyes shone with pleasure as his dirty fingers
closed over the coin I put into his hand. “ Ain’t yer
made a mistake, mum?”

“No, it’s all right, thank you; and good night,”
and then I went into the inn,

The landlady was the picture of comfort, and I
told her how it happened we were there; and then,
as it was past five, ordered dinner, and spent my
evening in writing letters.

The next morning early, taking Lucia with me,
I went for a stroll. Descending the hill, I turned
out of the road into a field, crossing a new line of
railway which was being made, and soon came into a
rustic lane, its hedges overhung with blackberry
bushes—just the place for a gipsy encampment I
thought, for it was a brilliant October morning, and
the air was fresh and exhilarating, and the spirit of
adventure was within me still; and, added to every-
thing else, thankfulness for yesterday’s merciful escape,
and the enjoyment of the present moment was a sense
of freedom in having escaped the appropriating hands
of my Cheshire cousins. I soon changed my mind
about the gipsy encampment, for on turning a bend
in the lane we found ourselves before a long travelling
cart, hung and festooned with wicker baskets and
chairs loosely covered with tarpauling; two thin,
shabby-looking horses were grazing near, and crouch-
ing over the dying embers of a fire, on which she was
138 THE GIANT’S GRAVE.

holding a small iron pot, was a little girl of ten, who
raised a tear-stained face to mine when I asked her
what was the matter.

‘‘Oh, mother’s so ill,” she sobbed.

“Where is she ?”’

“Tn the cart,” she said, leading the way to ib;
and I mounted the little step-ladder and looked in.

A. woman, evidently suffering from fever, was lying
on a wretched bed, and though she looked up as I
entered, she seemed too ill to speak. ‘‘ Have you no
doctor ?”’ I asked the child.

“No; father’s out on his rounds—he’s bin gone
since Toosday (this was Friday)—and mother warn’t
so bad then, though she warn’t well either.”’

It did not take me long to ask Lucia to walk back
to the inn and inquire of Mrs. Garrett for the best
doctor in Hayling ; and she was hastening on her way
before the little girl had recovered from her surprise
at being taken notice of by strangers.

In about an hour Lucia returned with a tall, kind-
looking old gentleman, who, she informed me, was
Dr. Barrington, and who wasted no time, but after
exchanging a word or two with me, stepped into the
cart.

“Ts she very ill?”? I asked, as he came out.

Yes, poor soul, and will be worse too, I fear;
she is in the first stage of fever, and needs care.”

“She must not stay here,” I said; “1s there no
hospital to move her to?”

“The county town, where the infirmary is, is ten
miles off.”’

“ But is there no cottage-hospital in Hayling?”
I asked, for I was fresh from a well-ordered parish
near a well-to-do little town, and it being the first
YHE GIANT’S GRAVE. 139

English one with which I had become acquainted, I
imagined all similar places were as well provided
for.

Dr. Barrington shook his head, “We are behind
the times—Hayling is half asleep—and a cottage
hospital needs a founder and funds, and energy and
time. I fear we lack all but the last,’”’ he said.

“But surely there is some cottage. I should be
so glad to see to the poor woman;” and in a few words
I explained to him that my time was at my own dis-
posal, and I could stay at Hayling as long as I liked,
and should be glad to remain and do what I could for
the poor sufferer in the cart.

He thought a little, and then said—“TI have it;
there is an old cottage just outside the town, it is
empty I know: I could secure it for you;” and I
went with him to look at it, for it was only just across
the new railway line. It looked a tumble-down place
outside as I stood contemplating it, while the doctor
got the key from a neighbouring cottage, and sent
a boy for the man who had the letting of it. Inside
it had two rooms, the higher one leading from that on
the ground-floor by a narrow step-ladder. Both were
dreary-looking enough, bare as they were, but the
windows could be opened, and that was one good
thing, and the man in charge said I could have it at
once at so much a week; so I decided to take it, and
then before returning to the cart, I went on to the
town and ordered two little iron bedsteads and other
necessaries to be sent on at once.

Then Dr. Barrington rejoined me, and we returned
to our patient. On the way we stopped at the railway
line, where the men were resting and eating their
dinner, and going up to two stalwart fellows, he
140 THE GIANT’S GRAVE.

asked them to come to our assistance. They were
very kind and helpful, and lifted the poor woman out
of the cart very tenderly. Lucia had wrapped her in
some travelling rugs I had brought from the inn, and
the stout willing arms were not long m bearing her to
the cottage, where they laid her gently down on the
bed Lucia had prepared.

“Nay, mum, we don’t want pay for a job like
this,” they said; nor could I persuade them to take
anything for their trouble but hearty thanks, which
they seemed glad to receive.

_ The little girl had followed us to the cottage, and
seemed struck dumb by what had happened before her
eyes, till I asked her when she expected her father
back, and then she said, ‘‘ To-night or to-morrow.”

> © Well, you must tell him where your mother is;
but who will take care of you?”

“Oh, Polly—that’s my sister—she’ll be back
to-night; and Bill and Jem they’re out selling
blackberries—we shall do,” and with this assurance
I let the child go. Her father came that night and
gave a timid knock at the door about nine o'clock.
He was a tall, dark-haired man, a good deal subdued
“and worn I thought. He was very grateful for the
care taken of his sick wife, and when I told him
we meant to nurse her he seemed relieved, and said
he could take the children in the cart back to the
Buckinghamshire village where they spent the winter,
and come to fetch his wife when she was better, and
he left his name and address so that I might write to
him.

For three weeks the poor woman was very ill; and
at one time Lucia and I scarcely thought she could
recover; but Dr. Barrington was hopeful always, and
THE GIANT’S GRAVE. 141

at last we had the great pleasure of seeing a slight
improvement, and she recovered very satisfactorily at
last, and was ready to go home with her husband when
he came over one day late in November.
| We missed our occupation greatly, and it is impos-
sible to nurse any one for any length of time without
feeling a large amount of interest in the patient, and
throughout the poor basket-woman had been so gentle
and grateful for the least service, that we felt much
attached to her, and I promised to write to her and
tell her if we decided to stay at Hayling. This I was
strongly inclined to do, for during the daily walks I
had taken while Lucia was watching, I had made
myself well acquainted with the town and neighbour-
hood; and a very ugly red-brick house with staring
windows—on which the letters “To Let” were
glaringly visible—had taken my fancy because ot
its situation, which, nearly at the top of the hill on
which the town was built, commanded an extensive
view, to say nothing of its being in the midst of a
charming garden and shrubbery, old-fashioned and
exceedingly pleasant. Lucia liked it too, but I could
not quite make up my mind, and waited for something
to decide for me. |
It came. One of the kind navvies who had carried
the poor basket-woman to the cottage was badly hurt
while moving a heavy truck, three days after our
patient had left us, and two of his friends carried him
to the cottage, thnkmg I might be able to do some-
thing for him. His injuries were beyond my skill, so
I sent for Dr. Barrington: and when I found that
careful nursing for two or three weeks would set him
up again, I asked Dr. Barrington to send for a nurse
from the infirmary to attend to him, and then made
142 THE GIANT’S GRAVE.

inquiries about the ugly house which had taken my
fancy. No difficulties arose here, and in less than a
week I had taken possession, workmen were busy
papering and painting, the basket-woman’s eldest
daughter had come to be trained as housemaid, and
between buying furniture in the Hayling shops and
going in to look after my poor navvy, my time was
fully occupied. I sent to London for my treasured
pictures and curiosities, and Lucia and I worked hard
at arranging and making the house comfortable; and
the result quite rewarded our efforts, and New Year? s
Day found me full of hope for the future and far too
busy to be despondent. Our patient at the cottage
was now able to work again; but so many poor women
brought their children to me to be cured of trifling
ailments that I began to fear I was regarded as some-
thing uncanny, and did not quite like it. I had not
then lived long enough im a hittle country town to
know that small things have power to make a great
impression on the public mind.

‘As soon as my house was ready, I had several
visitors. First, Mrs. Barrington came with the good
doctor, and I can give her no higher praise than to say
she was worthy of her husband ; then others from the
town and neighbourhood, all very kind and friendly,
and when I had begun to feel quite at home, and the
February sun was gleaming on my bright crocus-
fringed borders and the snowdrops in their pure garb,
were rejoicing my eyes and heart together. I had a
scheme in view which my mind was much occupied ~
with, and taking Dr. and Mrs. Barrington into my
counsels, I asked if they thought it would be very
difficult to establish a cottage-hospital.

‘Funds are needed first,” he said-
3
THE GIANTS GRAVE. 143

Yes,” said his wife, “but I think we could find
subscribers.”

“ And the house?” I asked.

At tirst the doctor was sure there was not one to
be had, but presently he remembered one, that was not
far from the Dispensary, which he believed could be
rented; but “there must be a@ committee,” he
said.

Mrs. Barrington volunteered to help me, and we
soon found ladies who had sufficient time to devote a
little to the work, and to collect subscriptions; and
gifts, m the shape of beds and furniture, came from
numerous quarters: so that soon after Easter, the
hospital was opened under the care of an excellent
nurse, and the fact that there is always at least
one occupant proves to me that it was certainly
needed. |

To me, it is my great interest, and working so
much with the good people of Hayling has brought
me into contact with many warm, friendly hearts, and
last year I was able to give a welcome to my dear
friend Lady Deane and her daughters, who, on God-
frey’s marriage, came to live at Stoke, a village about
a mile off, easily seen from my windows. Previously
to that time, in the second year of my residence here,
Beatrice had come with her mamma to spend a few
days with me, and I suppose my busy life struck Lady
Deane, for she said to me one day, “ You look very
happy, Caroline; I need not ask where Despondency
has vanished.”

“To tell the truth, I had forgotten its ex-
istence; I trust I may never get into its clutches
again.”

“Oh, then you have buried your giant,” said
144. THE GIANT’S GRAVE.

Beatrice, scrambling out of her curtained corner of
the window-seat: ‘‘and is the Cottage Hospital his
grave?” |

“Yes, Beatrice,” said her mother, “and every
patient in it is a flower.” | |


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THE CHILDREN AND THE SAGE.


LOTTO AND THE SAGE.

THE CHILDREN AND THE SAGE,

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THE CHILDREN.

gecssmeeue TTQ has not heard of the country called Italy, |
YA RIN) =a beautiful and fertile land lying to the
south of the high mountains called the

mie} §~Alps? Who has not heard of its grapes
and oranges, its groves of olive-trees and myrtles, and
its fields of rice and maize; and who has not heard
too of the grand old cities of Italy with their beautiful
buildings and fine sculpture and paintings? All these-
things make it most interesting to visit and read about,
and it becomes still more so, when we remember that
in Italy much of the present civilization of the world
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146 THE CHILDREN AND THE SAGE.

was, as it were, begun; for not only were many arts
and sciences first practised and studied there, but also
many useful discoveries and inventions were made
there and brought to perfection, which have since been
highly useful to mankind. The great prosperity of
Italy, however, passed away, and through bad govern-
ment it was long very far behind many ‘other countries
of the world, so that while grapes and oranges still
grew and ripened there, and groves of olives and
myrtles were still to be seen, yet Italy was admired
chiefly for what it had been, and its cities were visited
in order to find the traces of what they once were in
the days of their prosperity and greatness. It ought
to be added, however, that Italy entered upon a new |
era of prosperity when it became a united kingdom
under Victor Emanuel, the father of the present King
Humbert.

And now we are about to tell a story of some things
that happened in one of these cities of Italy, after
what may be called its best days were past, Things
which concerned one of the greatest men of the time,
whose name is well known, and which happened also
to two children whose names have certainly never been
heard before, but who might have done and said all
that is related here,

It was in a famous city called Pisa, about three hun-
dred years ago, that there lived a man named Bertano,
who was celebrated at that time as a manufacturer of
glass. He had originally come from Venice, in which
city glass was first made in Italy, and which was very
celebrated for its looking-glasses and mirrors; and
when he settled at Pisa, glass was still quite a novelty
to the people, and only the rich had glass windows to
their houses, or drinking vessels of glass for their
tables, while a looking-glass was considered one of
the most curious and costly of ornaments; indeed it
THE CHILDREN AND THE SAGE. 147

was looked into almost with a feeling of awe, so wonder-
ful was it thought that a person’s face could be reflected
so accurately.

Bertano was not only a maker of glass for windows
and mirrors, but he was also acquainted with the art
of staining glass with rich and beautiful colours, and
at the time of our story was engaged in making some
beautiful coloured glass windows for a church in Pisa,
on which different scriptural subjects were represented.
He inhabited a large old house near one of the gates
of the city, and round a court-yard at the back were
workshops and furnaces, where, assisted by workmen,
he carried on his employment very industriously, and

earned much money.

_ Bertano had lost his wife before he came to Pisa,
and his family consisted only of two children, a boy
and a girl, who were taken care of by an old house-
keeper or nurse, who generally went by the name of
Dame Ursula. Now, the real names of the children
were Lancilotto aud Fiammina, but as these were
rather long even for the Italians to pronounce, the usual
names by which they were known at home were Lotto
and Mina, and such I shall always call them. How
different were the brother and sister! At the time I
am writing about, Lotto was a lively active boy of
twelve, while Mina at ten was a poor little sickly
cripple, moving each morning with difficulty from her
bed to a chair, and in the evening from her chair back
again to her bed. Lotto was here, there, and every-
where, seeing and hearing and meddling in everything;
Mina sat the long and weary day through, in the deep
recess of a window which looked across the street only
to the opposite house, and through which little light
and little air came. This window had to be sure a
casement of glass of small diamond-shaped panes,
148 | THE CHILDREN AND THE SAGE.

which her father had put in for her, but only a little
portion of it would open to admit the air, and it was so
high that there was little possibility of even getting a
peep from it down into the street to see the passers-
by; and only a little patch of blue sky could be seen
over the top of the opposite house, in which at night
Mina, as she lay on her bed, could sometimes see a
few stars twinkling, but never by any chance the sun
or moon. |

_ It would have been a weary life indeed for this
| little girl, being thus shut up a prisoner in one room,

and. seeing as she did only Dame Ursula at those times
when she had to be dressed or undressed, or have her
meals, and seldom seeing her father more than once a
day, if it had not been for Lotto. Happily for her,
Lotto was a good kind brother, and very luckily too
for her, Lotto was a great talker. In the midst of all
his occupations and amusements he never forgot his
sister Mina, and all he heard and saw was repeated
and described to her, so that Mina lived in the world
as it were through the eyes, and ears, and tongue of
Lotto, and had almost left off wishing that she could
see and hear for herself, so well did he describe and tell.

_ All that he could find likely to give her pleasure or
amusement would Lotto bring up to her little gloomy
room, so that Lotto’s visits often enabled her to fill up
well the time of his absence. The ripest melon to be
had in the market, or the most tempting bunch of
grapes, would be sure to find their way to her, while
the seasons were marked to her by the fresh bunches of
flowers that Lotto would gather for her in the fields
and woods around the city. Mina’s most favourite
playthings, however, were the scraps and fragments of
glass that Lotto collected for her out of his father’s ©
workshops. He was a favourite with the workmen, -
THE CHILDREN AND THE SAGE. 149

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GALILEIO WATCHING THE STARS.
150 THE CHILDREN AND THE SAGE.

and when not too busy they would mould him orna-
ments of glass and make him little coloured glass beads
to take to his little sick sister who lay ill up-stairs.
Mina had thus a large collection of pieces of stained
glass, with which she used to amuse herself in making
all kinds of devices and patterns on the table before —
her; and of threading necklaces and rosaries of coloured
beads, she was never tired. She had, however, other
employments of a more useful kind, for she could plait
straw very neatly, of which she made baskets and
mats, and could embroider very prettily in coloured
silks and wools, so that in spite of her imprisonment
she was seldom idle, and even when Lotto was with
her, her little fingers would be busy over some little
present or other for her friends.

Mina, as we have said, was generally the listener
when they were together, for living the dull life that
she did, it was very seldom that she had anything to
tell to Lotto. It happened, however, one day, that
when Lotto had come up to bring her some particularly
bright pieces of red and yellow glass that one of the
workmen had given him, it was Mina who had a piece
of news to tell.

“Do you know, Lotto,” gaid she, “that some one
has come to live in the house on the other side of the
street, and that I can see him very often at his window
teaching and studying. Dame Ursula tells me that
he is called the Doctor Galilei, and that he is a very
learned man indeed. Do you know that I almost
think he must be an astrologer, for last night after
I went to bed, I could see him out on his balcony
looking at the stars, and then going every now and
then back into his room to write at the table where his
lamp was burning.”

“An Astrologer! I should not wonder; and as-
‘THE CHILDREN AND THE SAGE, 151

trologers can tell the future, they say, by looking at
the stars. I should like to know whether the Doctor
Galilei could tell you, Mina, whether you would ever
get well, or tell me if I should ever go to Venice.
How I should like to ask him !”

Well, do you know, Lotto,” said Mina with a
sigh, “that I should not at all like to ask him either
of those questions. I should be so afraid that he
might say I never should be any better; and then I
don’t much think I should like him to say that you
would go to Venice, Lotto, for what should I do while
you were gone ?”

“Why you would have to expect me back again, to
be sure, Mina, and to think of all the pretty things I
should bring back from Venice, and all I should have
to tell you about that strange city. That would be
nice, would it not ?”

“Yes, nice when you came back again, but I
should not like your going away, and I always hope
that something will happen to prevent it.”’

“Ah, but I must go, Mina dear, you know. Father
always says I must go to Venice to learn the last new
way of making mirrors, before I am quite a man and
Degin to help him.”

“Well, that is a good way off at all events,” said
Mina, ‘‘ for you are only a boy now, Lotto, that is a
comfort. Butlook! There is the Doctor Galilei out
on his balcony, Lotto! Does he not look very wise
and good? I like his looks so much.”

“Yes, but see, Mina—what can he be about? J
do think he has dropped something—yes, a piece of
paper or parchment; and here it comes flying down
into the street.”

“Oh, run and fetch it, Lotto! Take it to him,
He would be so sorry to lose it, I dare say.”
152 THE CHILDREN AND THE SAGR.

Before Mina had finished speaking, Lotto was oif
like an arrow from a bow, and had sprung down the
great staircase, and was out in the street. It was
quite a long time before he came back again, and
Mina had grown quite impatient, and was almost
afraid that he had stayed to ask the Doctor about her
getting well, when Lotto burst into the room again.

“JT have seen him, Mina—I have seen and talked
to Doctor Galilei, and what will you say when I tell
you that he is coming here to see you!”

“Oh, Lotto, what can he want to sec me for? You
surely have not asked him.”

“ About the stars? Oh, no! and I don’t believe
he is an astrologer, Mina. Only a doctor who gives
physic to people to make them well. But let me tell
you first about the paper. I found it directly I got
into the street, for it had fallen just by our door;
and I picked it up, and was going to ring at the great
bell of the doctor’s house, when out he came himself;
and when I gave it him, he thanked me very kindly,
and said he had thrown it down on purpose, and that.
he was going to throw it down again from the bal-
_ eony, if I would be so good as to pick it up again and
bring it up to him.”

“Throw it down again! Why, Lotto, what could
that be for? How foolish of him to do that.”

“No, Mina, not at all foolish, but very wise, and
what ig more I know all about it, as I will tell you.
In the first place the doctor is trying to find out somce
thing about things falling through the air, he told mc;
and after letting the piece of paper fall from the bal-
cony spread open as you saw it, he went up again and
let it fall all crumpled up into a ball, and he found
that then it fell much quicker, because it could push
its way through the air, whilst before, when the paper
THE CHILDREN AND THE SAGE. 153

was spread open, the air supported it ; and this was
what he wanted to be sure of.”

And you picked his paper ball up for him, Lotto?”

“Yes, and I took it up to him, and went into his
house over the way, through the great hall and stair-
case up to the room where Dr. Galilei studies. Such
a room, Mina, as you never saw. All full of books
and papers, and such queer instruments and tools.
And the Doctor talked to me, and I said that you,
Mina, saw him first, and he said ‘ Who is Mina?’ and
then I told him. He said, ‘ What, the little girl with
the pale face that I see sitting at the casement?’ and
I said ‘Yes ;’ and then he said ‘ Why does she always
sit there all day long?’ and I told him how ill you
were, and how long you had been ill, and what was
the matter, and then—now don’t be frightened, Mina
——but then he said he would come to see you, for he
thought that perhaps he might be able to do you some |
good.”

But Mina was frightened, and she could not help
feeling terribly alarmed at the thought that she might
have to do something different from what she did
every day, or take some disagreeable medicine. She
had grown so accustomed to her present life that she
scarcely wished for any alteration, except that now
and then she had great pain in her legs and joints,
and this she would be very glad to lose. She had,
however, ceased to think it possible that any doctor
could cure her, for she had had several some years
before, and had taken much medicine; but as they
had done her no good, she had little hope of being
cured that way, but, according to the notions of those
times, she fancied, as did Dame Ursula too, that‘she
would only be well when she had been taken to the
shrine of some particular saint and kissed some par-
154 THE CHILDREN AND THE SAGE,

ticular relics which were supposed to have the power
of healing. And when Dame Ursula was told that day
all about the visit that was to be expected from the
Doctor Galilei, she shook her head and said, “ Ah, all
very weil, my good Lotto, all very well! The Doctor
is as everybody knows a very learned man, but still I
have no hope of his doing anything for our little Mina.
If your father would only let me carry her to Loretto,
to the chapel of our blessed Lady, and let her but
once kneel upon the steps of the altar, she would be
well again directly, and would be able to run about
and jump and dance as briskly as you, Lotto, can
do.”

But Loretto was a long way off, and, besides this, |
Bertano, Mina’s father, had no belief that going thero
would cure his little daughter ; on the contrary, he was
glad to know that Dr. Galilei would come and see her,
and begged Dame Ursula to do all that he should
recommend for the sick child.

Two or three days passed over, however, before the
visit of the doctor was paid, and Mina had begun to
hope and Lotto to fear that his new friend had for-
gotten them, when, as he was standing out on his
balcony one morning, he all at once looked down
towards Mina’s little window, and then seeming to
recollect her all at once, he nodded and made signs to
her that he would come over.

_ The visit was not nearly so terrible as Mina had
expected, for the good doctor talked to her a long
time about Lotto and her father, and asked to look at
the piece of embroidery she was doing, and admired a
pretty rosary of glass beads that lay on the table, all
before he began to question Dame Ursula, or examine
her knees and ankle joints. The medicine he recom-
mended, too, was only a drink made of a particular
THE CHILDREN AND THE SAGE. 155

herb which was to be found in the fields near Pisa,
and though she did not quite like the idea of having
her joints bathed so often with cold water as he
advised, yet that was better than the rubbing with
oils and salves that the other doctors had recom-
mended.

When Doctor Galilei however looked round the
little close room in which she sat, and found that only
avery small portion of the glass window was made to
open, he shook his head and said that she ought to
have more light and air. |

Have you no garden,” said he, “in which she
could sit every day in the air and sunshine? for that
would do her more good than anything.’ Dame
Ursula said there was a little terrace garden at the
side of the house, but it was never used; and she
added, that her little patient disliked being carried
about, so that they never attempted to remove her
from her room. |

Doctor Galilei said no more to them at that time,
and took his leave. When he went out, he found
Lotto on the stairs, waiting to catch a glimpse of him
as he passed down them, and no doubt hoping also to
be able to have a little talk with his new acquaintance.
To his surprise the doctor asked him to show him the
garden, which he understood was at the side of the
house. Now Lotto was accustomed sometimes to play
in this little garden, and could get into it out of the
court-yard by a steep flight of steps, for it was a sort
of raised terrace in the manner which is common in
southern countries, and being at the side of the house
you could look from it down into the street. It was
far from being a garden, like any such as we are
familiar with, and as for plants, it was at that time
little more than a tangled mass of trailing vines, among
156 THE CHILDREN AND THE SAGE.

which here and there stood a pomegranate or orangec
tree, with their scarlet and white blossoms. In the
middle of it was an old stone fountain, now choked up |
with grass and weeds and dead leaves, and many years
had passed since any water had flowed from it.

Aha!” said Doctor Galilei, when he’ had mounted
on to the terrace, and looked around him. “ This is
just what I expected. Why, this garden is the very
thing for thy little sister, my young friend. This is
where she ought to be sitting these sunny days instead
of being cooped up like a little bird in a cage in that
close room. Why, my good Lotto, how is it that thou
dost not bring her out here?”

“Oh, Doctor—Doctor Galilei,” said Lotto, “ you
don’t know Mina. Why, she would never let us bring
her up here—she would cry at the very thought of our
drageing her all down the great staircase, and through
the court-yard, and up these steep steps, all to get
here. I assure you, good Doctor, it would really hurt
her, for she is never accustomed to move.”’

“Well, but that is no reason why she should not
begin to move. ‘This little garden, too, is on a level
- with her little room, and surely there must be a door
into it through which she could come. See now, my
fine fellow, what is this here behind this great myrtle
bush? What is this but a door? Why not bring thy
little sister out this way ? It cannot be half a dozen
yards from her room.’

Lotto looked surprised that the Doctor who was
such a stranger to them should find out what he had
never seen before—a door opening from the house on
to the terrace. Where could his eyes have becn?
And now when he came to think about it, this very
door must be the one which he had so often seen,
locked and boited, at the end of the very gallery inte
THE CHILDREN AND THE SAGE. . 157

which Mina’s door opened. Still a look of doubt was -
on his face, as he thought of how Mina always cried
when they attempted to move her, even into the next
room, and he told the Doctor of his doubts.

“Well, my boy, say nothing to thy sister at pre-
sent about this garden. Set to work, and put ita
little to rights, and contrive her a place where she
may sit sheltered from the sun at noon-day, and leave
to me the rest.” And then the Doctor and Lotto had
a talk about where the hottest sun would fall, and
where the afternoon shade would come, and how best

she could sit so as to look down over the parapet into ~

the street, to amuse herself by seeing the passengers
go by; anda great deal was planned and suggested
by the good doctor, which Lotto was to manage to get
done by the next week, when he promised to call again
to see his patient. |

Tt was just as well that nothing was said to Mina
about going out into the open air, just at present, for
it happened that two or three showery days followed
after this visit of the Doctor Galilei, and it would have
made her shudder at the thought of going out into the
chilly damp air; and it was lucky that Lotto was too
busy to be tempted to let out the secret of the trial
that was coming on her. Never had Lotto been so
proud in his life, as he was in having something to do
all by himself; for Doctor Galilei had said to him,
“Thou art a stout strong boy, why shouldst thou not do
all thatis needful here thyself, in weeding and pruning
these plants and in making it look nice and pleasant
for thy little sister?’ So Lotto was determined to
have very little help from any one else.

Some grand schemes too came into his head directly
about making Mina a bower at the end of the little
terrace, and of getting the vine to trail over it, and
{58 THE CHILDREN AND THE SAGE.

then he thought whether it would be possible to get
the old fountain to play again and send up sparkling
water, which would both look and sound so cool. In
patching together some bits of trellis which were lying
about so as to make a bower, and in clearing out the
fountain, he had some assistance from one of his father’s
workmen, but all the rest he did himself.. It took no
little time and patience to get ali the rank grass and
weeds uprooted that had been growing unheeded and
unchecked for many a year, and the luxuriant vines
were difficult to get into anything like order, so long had
they been accustomed to have their own way. Besides
the grape vine, one long branch of a great gourd vine,
with its wide-spreading leaves, was coaxed, however,
over the top of the trellis which formed the arbour, and
Lotto contrived that the round green gourds or pump-
kins, should rest in places strong enough to support
them when they grew large and heavy. table were placed in the arbour ready for Mina when-
ever she should come; and Dame Ursula promised
some old velvet cushions when they should be wanted
io make the seat easy and soft.

And how about the fountain? The more Lotto
thought about it, the more he wished that he could
only get the water to come into it again, which would
be such a charming thing for Mina to watch as she sat
in her bower. No one could, however, tell him where
the cistern was from which the water ought to come,
and he looked in vain down the stone dolphin’s mouth,
out of which it must have gushed in former days so as
to fall again into the marble basin. He was one day
examining the fountain, and longing that he could
understand it better, when he heard some one calling
him by name. He looked around on every side, but
could see no one from whom the voice could come,
THE CHILDREN AND THE SAGE. 159

until at last, turning his eyes upwards, he perceived
that Dr. Galilei was in his balcony, and that he made
signs to him. Signsof what? Lotto could not under-
derstand, until as last he perceived that the Doctor
pointed to the roof of one of the buildings which stood
around the court-yard and were used as workshops.
The cistern from which the fountain was supplied must
be there—the Doctor could see it as he looked down
upon it all—and so it proved. He consulted his father,
and obtained his permission to have it all set to rights.
A great bird’s nest was found to have stopped the pipe
by which the cistern ought to have been filled from
the river; the water was made to flow into it, and then
through the pipes to the fountain. It came at last from
the dolphin’s mouth, at first only trickling slowly, and
then at last spouting freely up, fresh, bright, and clear.

“ Better, most certainly better,”? was the decision of
Dr. Galilei, as he saw Mina again about ten days after
his first visit. “And now, my little maiden, I must
see thee stand.” And after much hesitation and
alarm, Mina was actually persuaded to stand, and
even, when held tightly by the Doctor and with her
nurse on the other side, to walk two or three paces
across the room. Not that day, but the next was she
to be taken out into the garden, and partly from the
assurance of all that it was a very little way off, and
partly in the hope of seeing as they said all the people
coming into market with their fruit and vegetables
and flowers, she was induced to look forward to it with
something like pleasure. Dr. Galilei assured her, too,
that he should always be able to see her from his
balcony, and that she would see him when out there
noting down the movements of the sun, which he was
- accustomed to do each day, and she liked the thought
of seeing her xind new friend.
160 THE CHILDREN AND THE SAGE.

The great door at the end of the gallery had been
unbarred and unbolted, the soft cushions had been
placed ready on the seat in the arbour, and Lotto had
at last satisfied himself that the great vases which held
the orange-trees stood in the best possible place for
Mina to see and smell the blossoms, when he went to
assist in the important operation of carrying his sister
out from her dark room on to the terrace. It was a
fine warm sunny afternoon, and overhead was the clear
and deep blue sky for which Italy is so famous. The
myrtles and orange-blossoms sent out a sweet perfume,

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the flowers of the pomegranate shrubs and oleanders
were gay and bright, and the waters of the fountain
sparkled and shone like diamonds. No wonder that
the little sick girl’s eyes were dazzled and almost
blinded as she was all at once moved from the dark
and gloomy room amid these pleasant objects. It was
well for her, indeed, that Lotto had trained the vines
so well over the trellis that scarcely one ray of sunshine
—eould penetrate through the leaves, for when laid
quietly down on the bench, with her own little play-

yee
THE CHILDREN AND THE SAGE. 16]

things and work spread around her, the frightened and
startled looks of Mina changed gradually to those of
pleased surprise. |

“ Oh, Lotto, what beautiful flowers! What a beau-—
tiful fountain! You never told me about the fountain.
How brightly the water sparkles and how cool it looks!
What are those red flowers called? How sweetly the
orange blossoms smell! Will there be oranges by-and-
by? And grapes too! And shall I see them ripen ?”
And her little tongue ran on long with questions and
remarks, while Lotto was in great delight at all her
pleasure and surprise. :

“T did it all, Mina, very nearly all myself! Such
work I had with the grass and weeds, and such work
we all had with the fountain to make it play so well.
Doctor Galilei said you ought to come out here. He
says that air and sunshine are to be your physic. Nice
physic, is it not, Mina ?”

“Oh yes; andthen the flowers and the fountain ; I
do think, Lotto, it will do me good to smell the flowers
and listen to the fountain.” |

“And now that you are rested a little, Mina, only
just turn one little bit this way, and see how you can
look over this parapet here down into the street bebow.
And you can see all the people as they come in from
the country, and on festival days we shall have the pro-
cessions pass this way. Will it not be charming? ”

“And Doctor Galilei, Lotto—he said I should see
him. Where is his balcony ? ”

“Qh, up there—nowI see. And, look, he is coming
out—he nods to us, and smiles.” |

Mina was very happy at first, but it is not to be
wondered at that the pleasure and the surprise, and
the exertion of being moved, and looking at so many
new things should soon tire her, so that Lotto was

L
162 THE CHILDREN AND THE SAGE.

almost disappointed and frightened when her spirits
began to flag, and at some little annoyance from the
flies, she began to cry, and begged to be carried back
again to her own room.

The next day, however, early in the forenoon, she was
anxious to be taken to the terrace again, and there it
was she had her little mid-day meal of broth and rice.
The trellis bower soon became a little home to her, and
as the summer wore on, there were few days of which
a considerable portion would not be spent out there.
As Doctor Galilei had foreseen, she improved visibly in
health ; and before two months were over, colour had
come into her cheeks, and she could not only stand but
walk, |

It needed the encouraging voice and firm manner
of Doctor Galilei, however, to induce her to attempt to -
use her legs, and it was quite contrary to what she her-
self or Dame Ursula believed to be possible when,
assisted on one side by her good fricnd the Doctor,
and leaning on Lotto’s shoulder on the other, she
actually walked one day the whole way round the
fountain which stood in the middle of the terrace.
This first attempt proving successful, a certain amount
of walking was ordered by the Doctor for each day,
and it was not more than three months from her first
trial that she was able, with Lotto’s help only, to reach
the terrace from her own room and to return to it in
the evening back again. Nothing more was said by
Dame Ursula about the journey to Loretto; but there
were times when she threw out hints about Doctor
Galilei being something of a magician, and hoped that
she might not through his magic become just as quickly
ill again. Mina and Lotto, however, were not afraid
of anything Doctor Galilei might do; on the contrary,
they were full of gratitude to him for his kindness and
THE CHILDREN AND THE SAGE, 163

good advice. Mina especially loved him, as she said,
almost as well as she did Lotto or her father, and it
would have been a pleasure to her if she could have
expressed to him any part of the grateful feelings that
filled her heart. She was always so glad when she
could find anything to do for Doctor Galilei, or to give
to him, and many a time she would make Lotto take
up to their opposite neighbour some of the good things
that were brought as treats to herself, such as some
fine ripe figs, or some of Dame Ursula’s choicest cakes.
She embroidered for him the prettiest purse she had
ever made, and plaited some neat straw mats for his
table; and there was no night that she went to bed
without looking up to see if the good Doctor might
not be out on his balcony, that she might see him the
last thing before kneeling down to say her prayers, for
it seemed to her as if he ought to be thanked ag well
as God for her recovery. Something of this kind she
said to him, one day when he came to see her, but he
replied, “‘ Nay, my little maid, thou must thank and
praise alone the Lord of heaven for thy health and
strength ; for if I have given thee good counsel, still
my knowledge cometh but from Him. And the virtue
that is in the herbs of the field and in the fresh air and
warm sunshine—they are but blessed gifts of his to
man, which He hath given him power to use to his own
good.” |

Besides this feeling of thankfulness which he shared
in on his sister’s behalf, Lotto had begun to feel him-
self quite a person of importance ever since he had
taken a part in her cure, and been treated with confi-
dence by so learned a man as the Doctor Galilei, and
nothing he liked so much as having an opportunity of
paying him a visit on some pretext or other, so as to
see some of the curious things he had up in hig room,
164 THE CHILDREN AND THE S