Citation
Alice Leighton, or, A good name is rather to be chosen than riches

Material Information

Title:
Alice Leighton, or, A good name is rather to be chosen than riches a tale for the young
Portion of title:
Good name is rather to be chosen than riches
Creator:
Cupples, George, 1839-1898
Thomas Nelson & Sons ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
London ;
Edinburgh ;
New York
Publisher:
T. Nelson and Sons,
T. Nelson and Sons
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
1874
Language:
English
Physical Description:
72 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 17 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Pride and vanity -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Grandparents -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Orphans -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Brothers and sisters -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Christian life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Prize books (Provenance) -- 1874 ( rbprov )
Bldn -- 1874
Genre:
Prize books (Provenance) ( rbprov )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
Scotland -- Edinburgh
United States -- New York -- New York
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Frontispiece printed in colors.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Mrs. George Cupples.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
ALG5289 ( NOTIS )
50514290 ( OCLC )
026660569 ( AlephBibNum )

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ALICE AND HER GRANDPAPA





ALICE LEIGHTON;

A GOOD NAME IS RATHER TO BE CHOSEN
THAN RICHES.

A Tale for the Powrg.

BY

Mrs. GEORGE CUPPLES,

99 6b

AUTHOR or “THE STORY OF OUR DOLL,
ETC., ETC.

THE LITTLE CAPTAIN,”



LONDON:
T. NELSON AND SONS, PATERNOSTER ROW;
EDINBURGH; AND NEW YORK.



1874.












ALICE LEIGHTON.



ei LICE LEIGHTON was about to leave
SX ~=her home for the first time in her life ;



and though she was going to live ina
beautiful house in the country, at a
season when. it is most delightful, she
could scarcely keep from erying when
she thought of it.. Alice’s father had just died ;
and having lost her mother a year before, she and
. her brother Willie were to be separated, and sent
to live with strangers. Willie was going to a
boarding-school, and Alice to her maternal grand-
papa and grandmamma. She had never seen
them; for Mrs. Leighton had married against
her father’s wishes, and they had had little
intercourse with her afterwards, and lived at



6 DULL DAYS.

a great distance away in the north of Eng.
land.

“T wish I could stay with you always, dear,
kind Aunt Emily,” said Alice to her Aunt Leigh-
ton, who had kept house for them since their
mother’s death.

“And so do I, darling,” replied Aunt Emily,
trying to appear cheerful. ‘“ You know how glad
Uncle Charles would have.been to have you with

us; but when grandpapa wrote, he wished you
* to stay with him. We thought it would be far
more to your advantage to go there. Grandpapa
is a rich man, you know, dear, and Uncle Charles
has a hard struggle to get ends to meet, with his
: large family. My poor child, I feel the separa-
tion as much as you can do—it is hard to part
with you.” And Aunt Emily laid her face against
Alice’s and wept bitterly. |

“But, Aunt Emily, God, who lives everywhere,
will be with us still) See how his star is shin-
ing down upon us!” said Alice, pointing to the
evening star. ‘Come, don’t cry, aunty. Every.
night we shall look out at the moon and stars and
think of each other, But won't you come to see
me sometimes, Aunt Emily?”

“T can’t say, dear. You know grandpapa was



MAMMA’S SORY. 7

angry with mamma for marrying papa, and he
may not like me to come near you.”



ALICE AND HER AUNT.

“Yes,” said Alice; ‘mamma used to tell me
the story. How grandpapa wished her to marry
Mr. Clare, who afterwards married Aunt Lucy.
You see the estates joined, and so mamma would
have been very rich. But she chose papa instead,
though he was then only a curate; and I think
it was very noble of her, though I daresay she
felt very sorry to be forced to disobey her parents.
I am sure mamma could not have been happier if



8 GOOD ADVICE.

Uncle Clare had got her instead of Aunt Lucy,
for papa was so good and kind. And, Aunt
Emily, do you know that mamma, after she. had
told me the story, wrote in my Bible, under my
name, the verse from Proverbs xxii. 1, ‘A good
name is rather to be chosen than riches, and lov-
ing favour rather than silver and gold.’ I’m sure:
dear papa was better than all the gold in the
world ; and though he had no money, everybody
loved him.”

“Well, dear, I hope that you will always keep
that verse in remembrance, and show your grand-
papa that though poor papa could not give you
riches, he has instructed and led you to look after
the better riches that can never be taken from
you.”

“T suppose it will be some time before Willie
returns, aunt,” said Alice; “might I go over to
the mill to see nurse ?”

“Certainly, my dear,” replied Aunt Emily ;
‘and if you like to stay there to tea, I shall send
Willie over when he comes home.”

“Oh, that will be indeed delightful,” said Alice.
“Martha promised to show me the new poultry
her father, the miller, brought home last week.
She offered to give me a pair of chickens, aunt, of



A VISIT TO THE OLD MILL. 9

her new brood, but I suppose I couldn’t take
them with me.”

“No, dear,” replied Aunt Emily, “you had
better not take any more pets. Grandmamma
has been very kind in allowing you to keep
Watch, and your kid Jumper.”

“Oh dear, wouldn’t it have been dreadful if
we had had to part with Watch? He would
have broken his poor heart, I feel sure; and as
for Jumper, I really think he would have missed
me very much.”

“Perhaps Martha would take care of your pet
chickens for you,” said Aunt Emily. “ After you
have been with your grandmamma for a little,
she may allow you to have them; and I am sure
the miller or some of the men about will take the
trouble to send them to you.”

‘“‘T am so glad you think so,” said Alice ; “and
I am certain dear Martha will take very good
care of them. I cannot help crying every night
in my bed, when I think I shall never see my
dear chickens again. The going away is not such
a dreadful affair now ; it was so at first, though.
I sometimes think I never can go away; that I
shall have to be taken to the station by main
force,” i:



10 ALICE’S LOVE FOR HER PETS.

“That would be rather unreasonable, I must
say,” said Aunt Emily, laughing. “Poor Uncle
Charles was terribly distressed to witness your
burst of grief when he read your grandmamma’s
letter. I think he had half a mind to write and
say No to the invitation.”

“JT wish he had,” said Alice; “for though it
_ does not look quite so bad now, Fd rather live
with you and dear Uncle Charles, even if I had
to give up keeping every one of my pets.”

“Well, then, be off with you now,” said Aunt
-Emily, giving her niece a hearty embrace. ‘‘If
_you stand chatting there all day, what is to be-
come of the packing ?”

When Alice reached the mill, she found the
miller busy at work, but learned from him that

her friend Martha had gone to the spring for
water. Alice was not long in running down,
the bank at the back of the mill where the spring’
was, and, as she expected, found Martha leaning
against a rock, evidently in what is called a brown
study. The jar was running over, but she paid
no attention to it; and it was only when Alice
came close up to her, and touched her on the
shoulder, that she became aware of her presence.

“Why, what are you dreaming about now,



IN A BROWN STUDY. 11

Martha?” said Alice, laughing at the start of sur-
prise Martha gave.



IN A BROWN STUDY.

“Oh, what a fright you have given me, miss!”
said Martha; “and yet I was doing nothing but
thinking of you and Master Willie.”

“And what were you thinking about?” said
Alice, seating herself on the bank, while she made
room for her friend.

“Well, you see, miss, ever since mother came
home and told me you were going away, I just
‘can’t believe it, that I can’t, and I keep turning
over in my mind all sorts of plans to prevent you
going away.”

“Now, I know you look for a fairy in every



12 WATCHING FOR A GOOD FAIRY.

ce

harebell and lily,” said Alice, laughing, “and
have all sorts of stories made up in your head,
and look upon me as an ill-used princess, and my
grandmamma and grandpapa as the ogres. Now
confess, Miss Martha, I have guessed right.”

“Tm not going to tell you what I think,” re-
plied Martha, laughing also.

** Well, don’t let us waste another moment on
the subject of my going away,” said Alice.
“ Aunt says we may stay to tea if your mother
will have us, and Willie is coming in a few
minutes.”

When they reached the cottage-door they found
Willie had arrived, and was busity engaged teach-
ing their dog Watch to go through some military
exercise. Willie had put his cap on the dog’s
head, and placed a stick between his paws, and
was in the act of hanging his coat round the
animal, when. the girls came up.

“Oh! you funny creature,” said Alice, dropping
down on her knees before Watch, who seemed
quite pleased with himself, “you shall have a
nice drink of milk for being so obedient. But,
Willie, don’t keep him in that position long, in
case it tires his old legs.”

“Well,” said Willie, “since you have behaved



A FIRST-RATE SOLDIER. 13



WATCH BEING TAUGHT.

so well this time, I’ll let you off, old dog;” and
the moment Watch was released he bounded away



14 WATCIL PREFERS TO BE A DOG.

barking and yelping. ‘Ah, Master Watch,” said
Willie, laughing, ‘‘it’s easy to be seen you prefer
to be a dog to a soldier, you foolish fellow.”

“And don’t you think Watch is right, sir?”
said Martha. “It must be a terrible thing to be
a soldier!”

“T don’t see why it should be terrible,” said
Willie; ‘but that is perhaps because I am a boy,
and mean to be a sailor some day; and sailors
run just. as much risk of their lives as soldiers.”

“Heyday,” said a voice from the open parlour
window, “ what's this about soldiers and sailors ?
come away in, hinny, and let me hear all about it.”

‘Oh, never mind, nurse dear,”’ said Alice ; ‘‘it’s
only some nonsense of Willie’s. We are to stay
to tea, if you please, and I want Martha to show me
the new cow before we come in; please, may she?”

“Certainly, my dear,” said Mrs. Cursom, the
miller’s wife, and Alice’s foster-mother; ‘run
away now, and the tea will be ready on your
return.”

Mysie the cow was in the act of munching up
some nice sweet vegetables when the children |
found her, and she was so tame that she allowed
Alice and Martha to clap and stroke her ever so
often, and ate the grass they pulled for her out



STAYING TO TEA. 15

of their hands. When they had tired her quite
out with their kindness and attention, she lay
down, and refused to eat another particle till she
had duly digested what she had already eaten ; so
there was nothing left for the children to do but

leave her to chew the cud in peace.



MARTHA’S COW.

There was no end to the amusements about the
old mill, however. Martha’s new chickens were
visited, and the basket with the three newly-arrived
kittens in the barn, and then the millitself. It was
always, and had ever been, the most favoured spot
to the two children, and Martha their companion. .
How often they had played in and about it, watch-
ing the wheel revolving round so steadily, if lazily,
and the flour coming sifting, sifting down, like a



16 IN AND ABOUT THE OLD MILL.

brooding snow-storm, Alice felt ready to cry
when she realized for the first time that this was
really her last visit to the dear old place, and she
felt thankful when Mrs. Cursom’s cheery voice
called them from the doorway to come in, for the
tea was ready.



THE OLD MILL.

Alice could not help saying to her aunt that
night, she wished the day for their going away
would either never come at all, or that it would
arrive and find her so very sound asleep that she
would not know when she had said good-bye.
“Tt is so dreadful, aunt, to think we are looking
at the old places for the last time, perhaps, and
saying good-bye to all our dear friends who were

so fond of mamma and papa.”
(337)



THE TAME THRUSH. 17

When Alice was dressed next morning, she
opened her window, when there hopped in, just
as she had expected, a tame thrush that her
brother Willie had brought home one day. It
was then a mere fledgeling, and had fallen from
its nest, but Alice was very careful of it, and

al i
il

any th
i

ith



ALICE’S PENSIONER,

watched over it constantly till it was able to fly.

Some of her companions said it was very foolish

of her to give it its liberty after taking so much

‘trouble with it; but Alice knew that a thrush

could not, like a canary, make itself happy ina
(337° 2



18 KINDNESS REWARDED.

cage, and it pained her to see how it fluttered
against the wires, trying to make its escape; so
one day, when she was quite certain its wings
were strong, she opened the window, and away it
flew up into the bright sunshine, and was soon
lost to sight amongst the trees that surrounded
her father’s vicarage. Alice could not help feel-
ing sorry to part with it, and a little hurt at its
gladness to escape after she had done so much to
make it happy; but the next morning, what was
her surprise to find it tapping at her window with
the greatest impatience for admittance! No one
after that could doubt that her thrush was grate-
ful; and every morning he paid her a visit, and
for an hour at a time would keep flying in and
out, and perched on her hand, and be carried
down-stairs to breakfast. On this particular
morning, Alice had a good cry before going down,
when she thought how disappointed poor little
Billy would be when he found her away ; but,
remembering how she had promised her Uncle
Charles the night before to be brave for her kind
Aunt Emily’s sake, she bathed her eyes, and ran
out to look after her poultry and her numerous
pets.

It was a pretty sight to see her as she stood



“OP IN TILE MORNING WARLY.” 19



ALICE FEEDING HER POULTRY.

among the eager, hungry fowls, some flying upon
the basket of grain she carried, and pecking con-



20 PAPA’S PET.

fidently out of it. So thought her Uncle Charles,
at least, as he paused from taking his morning
stroll, and leaned over the poultry-fence to ex-
change a good-morning greeting with his little
niece.

“Now, I call that too bad,” he said, smiling—
“to have favourites. What must be the feelings
of the others at this moment to see that impu-
dent hen so highly favoured ?”

‘But this is Nell, uncle,” said Alice, laughing.
“None of the hens would ever dream of being
jealous of Nell.”

“ And why should they not be jealous of Nell,
pray?” inquired Uncle Charles.

“Because, uncle, she was papa’s pet,’ said
Alice, the tears rising almost unconsciously to .her
eyes, as she recollected how fond he was of it,
and how the fowl returned his attention by
coming daily to his room window, and into the
room when she could, strutting about in perfect
confidence that she was a welcome visitor. Uncle
Charles changed the subject as quickly as pos-
sible, and seemed glad when Willie called his
attention to something in another direction.

As there was still more than an hour before
breakfast would be ready, Alice strolled away



ALICE HELPS THE OLD DAME. 21

into the wood,. where she met an old woman
gathering dead branches. She was called Dame
Adams; she kept a little school in the village,
and had been a particular favourite with Mr.
Leighton.

“Tet me help you, Goody,” said Alice, seeing
how it pained the old woman to stoop down.

“Ah, you are just your father’s child, surely,”
said the dame, laying her hand on Alice’s bright
curls, ‘Always ready to help the poor body,
was the parson. But is it true, honey, that you
are going far away from us?”

“Ves, dame; I am going to live with mamma’s
father and mother, in the very north of England,
and that is a great many miles from here; and
Willie is going to a place near London to school ;
and Aunt Emily is to keep Uncle Charles's
house,—so that we shall all be scattered over Eng-
land.”

“Thank you, dearie,’
“Folks like to hear the news about those they

?

said the old woman.—

are fond of; but what sort of people are your
mother’s friends? I have heard they have plenty
of money



as much as the squire here.”
“Oh yes; grandpapa is very rich,” said Alice,
feeling for the first time proud of her rich rela;



22 MONEY SOMETIMES PROVES A SNARE.

tions. “Mamma used to say that grandpapa’s
house was a great deal larger than our squire’s,
and that he had far more money; and Uncle
Clare, my Aunt Lucy’s husband, has even more
money than grandpapa still.”

“Ay, sure, my dear young lady,” said Daime
Adams ; ‘‘ but now, do see that these grand friends
of yours don’t make you turn from the narrow
path your dear papa walked in. Money is very
useful, but it often brings a snare for the unwary,
and is apt to fill the heads of the young with
feelings of pride and vanity.” Then, when she
had thanked Alice for her kind assistance with
the bundle of sticks, she bade her good-bye, and
Alice ran off home just in time for breakfast.

After breakfast, Aunt Emily, saying she and
their uncle would be busy, advised the children to
take their books out into the wood, as the weather
was so hot, and amuse themselves till she called
them.

“Very well, auntie; we will go down to the
brook,” said Alice,—‘‘it is so cool there.”

Willie flung himself down on the grass, but
did not seem inclined for reading; and after a
while, Alice too Jaid her book away, and ‘sat
watching the water as it slowly glided along, or



WILL WE EVER SEL THIS PLACE AGAIN ! 23



IN THE WOODS.

listened to the sound of the birds and the hum
of the numerous insects.

“Oh dear, I wonder if we shall ever see this
place again!” said Alice.



24 BUILDING AIR-CASTLES.

‘Of course we shall,” replied Willie, stealthily
drawing his arm across his eyes, for he too had
been thinking of the pleasant home he was to
leave so soon, ‘' We will have to see it in our
dreams for the present,” he added, trying to
laugh. ‘Sailors, you know, often see their old
homes in their dreams; and so we shall do it too,
perhaps. But when I’m a man, I mean to come
back again and see the old place.”

“Oh dear, what a long time that will be!”
said Alice. ‘Must we really have to wait till
you are a man and lama woman? Why, no-
body will know us, and all the old people will be
dead, and everything will be changed.”

‘‘ Nonsense,” said Willie; “it won’t be long at
all; I shall be a man very soon, for I mean to
learn my lessons very fast, and be done with
school. ‘Then, you know, when I have no more
lessons to learn, I shall be a man, of course.”

“T don’t know if I should like to come back
only to see the place,” said Alice. ‘There will
be strangers in the vicarage then.”

“Why, don’t you know that our cousin, Robert
Leighton, means to have it when he is a man?”
said Willie, who was apt to think, if any one
simply intended to do such and such a thing, it



GOD CARES FOR ME. 25

was a settled matter. ‘“ We all know that Robert
is at the top of his classes in everything.”

Willie was always so hopeful, that Alice never
liked to bring forward her own gloomy thoughts
to damp his spirits; and at that very moment,
as if to cheer her, a lark rose from the ground
opposite to where they were seated, and mounted.



THE LARK.

up into the blue sky, with a gush: of song that
sounded very like as. if it meant to say, ‘“‘ God
cares for me; and why should you be sad !”

“T wonder if the larks sing as sweetly at our
new home,” said Alice

‘““They’re much the same, I should think, all the
world over,” replied Willie. “It’s not many I will



26 LOOKING AT TILE BRIGIT SIDE.

hear at school, though. I wonder if the boys ever
get leave to go into the country.”

“Oh, I should think so,” said Alice. ‘ Why,
don’t you remember Cousin Robert telling us of
the happy holidays, when the teacher went with
them exploring expeditions ?”

‘But that is different. Robert’s school is in
‘the country ; now the one I am to go to is ina
town.”

“Oh, don’t let us indulge in gloomy thoughts,
dear,” said Alice. ‘“ You know aunt often tells
us it is wiser to look on the bright side of the
picture. Let us enjoy ourselves as much as we
can while we are together, and I daresay we shall
find that our new homes are not so bad after all.
I wish I was going to school; I know it would
be such fun to have girls to play with. But
there is aunt calling us. We must say good-bye
to the brook for the present.”

The day for them to leave the vicarage arrived
at last, but as they were not to set out till the
evening, Uncle Charles proposed that the two
children should go with him for a last ramble
along the sea-beach, a little more than a mile off;
and as Aunt Emily thought the plan an excellent



A WALK WITH UNCLE CHARLES, 27

one, they set out immediately after breakfast.
Uncle Charles had always some amusing story to
relate ; and so, in spite of the near prospect of
their separation, Alice and Willie were soon laugh-
ing as merrily as if school and grandpapas had



AT THE SEA-SIDE,

never been heard of. The weather was really
charming, and the beach was strewn with such
a variety of shells and other sea-side objects,
that the children could not resist the tempta-
tion of gathering them, though Willie said



28 DISAGREEABLE DUTIES.

he could not understand why they picked them,
as Aunt Emily had filled up every corner of the
boxes long ago. They then sat down to rest,
and to watch a small yacht that was sailing past.

“JT mean to be the captain of a great ship,”
said Willie, poking the sand with his stick.

“Do you indeed,” said his uncle, laughing at
his grave face. ‘ Well, there is nothing like
making up one’s mind in time, certainly; but
before one can be a captain, there are a great
many disagreeable steps to climb. How would
you like to get up in a dark morning and scrub
down decks, and clean out the pig and sheep pens,
and other disagreeable duties ?”

“Have sailors to do that sort of thing?” asked
Willie, with a look of disgust. ‘Surely they
would never ask a gentleman’s son to do such
dirty work ?”

“Ah but, I beg your pardon, they would.
Were any one to bring such an excuse forward at
sea, I am afraid Jack Tar might take a pleasure
in laying on a little extra work, to knock the fine
gentleman out of him. But, seriously speaking,”
continued Uncle Charles, putting on a grave face,
“you are not thinking of trying what the life of
a sailor really. is, my boy ?”

¢



WANTING TO BE A SAILOR. 29

Willie hung his head for a moment, then looked
up into his uncle’s face manfully. ‘“‘ Yes, uncle,
Ido; Alice knows how I want to go to sea. I
hate the thought of going to that school; and if
I don’t like it, I mean to—”

“Not to run away, surely ?” said Uncle Charles,
with a comical look about his mouth. ‘“ We
Leightons take a pride in thinking ourselves brave
fellows. I never heard of a cowardly Leighton
yet, and surely my nephew Willie is not going to
be the first. What! run away because school is
disagreeable! I’m thinking, if you went to sea
to escape from that sort of thing, you would feel
yourself out of the frying-pan into the fire, as the
saying is.”

“But I want to be a sailor so much, uncle,”
said Willie.

“Well, my boy, so you shall; but there is no
occasion to run away from school. To be a cap-
tain, you must have education ; and were you to
run away just because you disliked your lessons
and teachers, why, you would be running away
from everything ever after. No, my boy; come
to me or to your grandpapa three years after this,
and tell your wishes openly, and we shall see that
you get a good ship. You are only ten now;



30 BIDDING GOOD-BYE.

when you are thirteen, with grandpapa’s influency
you could perhaps be admitted into the navy, but
never if you ran away. But come, we are for-
getting how time passes, and if we don’t hasten,
Aunt Emily will be thinking we have run away
without bidding her good-bye.”

When they reached the gate they found Aunt
Emily just preparing to set out in search of them ;
and after a hasty dinner, the carriage arrived that
was to take them to the station, and they were
whirled away. Alice discovered afterwards that
Uncle Charles had kept them out late on pur-
pose, so that there would be little time to think
of parting with Aunt Emily, who was not to
leave till the next week.

Alice stayed in London the next day and night,
till Willie had been placed at school; and then
Uncle Charles, after going with her part of the way,
left her in charge of one of her grandpapa’s servants,
who had been sent-with a carriage to meet her ;
and after driving for many miles, she reached ‘‘ the
Hall,” where her grandpapa lived. Alice felt, now
that she had got to the end of her journey, as if it
was all a dream; and she sat down by the open
window of her little room, that she was told was her
own, and tried to realize that she was really never



THINKING OF THE PAST. 3t

to see the dear vicarage again, and that this beau-
tiful place was now'to be her home, as it had
been her mamma’s.

She was sitting watching the lovely sunset, and
the boats on the river that flowed through her
grandpapa’s property, and thinking how sorry her



ALICE IN HER NEW HOME.

mamma must have felt never to have seen it
again, when she was interrupted by hearing the
door open, and turning round, she saw an old lady
standing looking at her. Both her grandpapa and
grandmamma, she had been told, were out when



32 GRANDMAMMA.

she arrived, but the moment she looked round she
knew that this was her grandmamma ; and there
was such a kind expression in her eyes, that Alice
sprang at once from her seat, and running towards
her, was soon clasped in her arms.

“My poor child, my Alice’s little girl!” said
Mrs. Garnet, sitting down and taking Alice on
her knee. ‘ How was it you'knew me, my
darling?” ,

“Because you are so like my dear mamma, I
knew you must be grandmamma.”’

“And were you very glad to come and live
with grandpapa and me, my darling?” said Mrs.
Garnet, pressing Alice closely to her.

Alice had been taught to speak the truth in a
straightforward manner, and while many little
girls would have said, “Oh yes,” Alice felt that
this would have been a piece of deception on her
part, for she had been really sorry instead of
glad to come to her grandmamma. She there-
fore simply said, “No, dear grandmamma,; I felt
sorry to come, for I had to part with Aunt
Emily, who has been so good to us; and then
there was Willie, and my birds and poultry.
But now that I have seen you, I am very glad I
have come.”



PAYING A VISIT. 33

“T understand your feeling quite well, my
dear,” said Mrs. Garnet; “but I hope you will
like us as well as you do your father’s relations.
Now we must go down and see what grandpapa
has to say to his little grand-daughter.”

Mr. Garnet was sitting in his favourite little
study, surrounded with book-shelves, filled with
books of all sorts and sizes. His chair was
drawn close to the fire, and he was wrapped in a
large cloak, as if it had been the middle of
winter, and he seemed so cross at being inter-
rupted, that Alice clung closer to her grand-
mamma’s hand, and wished herself safely out of
his presence. ‘This is your little grand-daughter
come to pay you a visit,” said Mrs. Garnet, in a
cheerful voice, as if to encourage Alice.

“Ah, I supposed so,” said Mr. Garnet.
“What's your name, girl? I have forgotten
it, if I ever heard it.”

When Alice had told him, fee turned his face
away with a frown, as if the mention of her
mother’s name seemed to recall. some unpleasant
recollection. In a few minutes Mrs. Garnet took
Alice away to her own parlour, where she told
her, that though her grandpapa did not seem

glad to see her, he was really very happy to
(337) 3



34 GRANDMAMMA’S KIND PROPOSAL.

have her there, only he was not accustomed to
children, and was fretful, owing to his late ill-
ness.

?

“And now, my dear,” said her grandmamma,
“perhaps you would like to go out before dinner
and see the grounds.”

“J should like to go and see my kid Jumper,
grandmamma, please. I fear he and Watch will
feel lonely without me,” said Alice, the tears
coming to her eyes.

“Oh, that will be a very good plan,” said
Mrs. Garnet. ‘You run across the lawn to
where Dickson the gardener is working, and he
will show you where your kid has been placed.
But what was that you said about some pet birds
and poultry ?”

“JT had to leave them at the mill,” said Alice,
beginning to feel more and more at home with
her grandmamma. “Aunt Emily said it was so
kind of you to allow me to have Jumper and
our dog Watch, that we had better give up some
of our pets, lest it should be inconvenient for you
to have them.”

“That was very sensible of your aunt,” said
Mrs. Garnet; ‘“‘but, notwithstanding, we must*
have all the pets brought here. I was very fond



NAUGILY JUMPER. 35

of having all sorts when I was a little girl, and
indeed am as fond of my pet poultry as ever.”

“Thank you, grandmamma, very much,” said
Alice. “Shall I write to Martha to-morrow? her
father said he could send them by the coach
quite safely. I have some very lovely young
chickens, and then there is dear Nell, the tamest .
and the prettiest hen you can imagine.”

“Very well, then, that question is settled; we
shall have the fowls brought as soon as possible,”
said Mrs. Garnet, stroking her grandchild kindly
on the head. ‘‘Meanwhile,”’ she continued,
laughing, “you had better run off and see if
that naughty kid is behaving himself. I am
told he is rather unruly.”

Alice was not Jong before she had found out
where Watch’s kennel had been placed, and, after
his excitement had somewhat abated, she un-
fastened his collar, and they ran off together to
look for Dickson. He was a very kindly dis-
posed person, and took Alice to the paddock
where Jumper had been secured.

“T hope you won’t think we’ve been uncivil
to the poor animal, miss,” said Dickson; “ but
we had to do it, for he seemed determined to eat
up every shrub and bush about the place.”



36 A SCAMPER IN TIE NUT-GROVE.

“Now, Jumper, I think that was very naughty
of you,” said Alicé, sitting down beside the kid,
while Dickson returned to his work; but the kid
seemed so glad to see her, and kept poking his
nose into her hand for the piece of bread she
generally had for him, that she soon saw a scold-
ing was quite thrown away. She gathered some
nice, pretty flowers and twined them round his
neck, while Watch lay at her side feeling a little
jealous of so much attention being paid to Mr.
Jumper; but in a little, when that naughty
animal had not only eaten up the flowers on his
own neck, but had insisted upon devouring those
his mistress had twined round her head, they
left him to his own meditations, and had such
a fine scamper in the nut-grove, that Watch
quite forgot his ill-nature. It did feel so strange,
though, to be playing without Willie, and Alice
was quite indignant at herself for being so happy
and appearing to have forgotten him so soon.

“OQ dear Willie,” she cried, suddenly drop-
ping down on the grass, ‘how selfish of me to
be playing and running about with Watch, when
you are so far away, and perhaps unhappy !”

Watch put his paw on her knee and licked her
face most affectionately, and did everything he



ALICE AND HER FRIENDS. 37



JUMPER AND WATCH.

could to show his affection for her, and his an-
xiety to cheer her solitude. She had been trying



38 WATCLL AND IIS MISTRESS.



A FOUR-FOOTED COMFORTER.

not to cry all day, thinking if her grandmamma
caught her with red tear-stained eyes, she might
fancy she was very unhappy ; but this demonstra-



THINKING OF WILLIE. 39

tion on the part of poor Watch overcame her, and
she wept bitterly. ;

“Hollo!” said a voice at her ear, and look-
ing up, there stood her grandpapa, who had been
taking his usual walk before dinner, attended by
his servant. ‘Heyday! and what’s the matter
now?” he said a little sternly, and bringing his
stick down sharply on the ground. ‘“ Has the
dog hurt you? or what is it?”

“Oh no, grandpapa,” said Alice, forcing her
tears back bravely; ‘‘ Watch wouldn’t hurt me
for the world. I was just stupid, and began to
think about my brother, and wondered if he was
missing me, or if he was unhappy.”

“T daresay, if we could see him at this
moment,” said Mr. Garnet, in a less stern tone of
voice, “he would be engaged in a game of cricket
or football, and not thinking of you at all.”

“Oh, I hope he is, sir,” said Alice, brightening.

“Hope he is what?” said Mr. Garnet ; “ play-
ing at cricket, or thinking about you—which ?”

“Playing at cricket, grandpapa,” said Alice,
her blue eyes looking up confidingly into his.
“Willie is of rather a gloomy, desponding dis-
position, and I would rather he was playing at
some nice game than thinking of me; because



40 PRETTY EYES WERE NEVER MADE FOR TEARS.

then all the other thoughts will be sure to come
back, and he will be very miserable.”

‘What other thoughts?” inquired her grand-
papa, looking less stern than before.

“Thoughts about our dear old home, and papa,
and Uncle Charles, and aunt, and about Martha,
and all the people who were good to us, and—
and— ;’’ but here Alice began to cry afresh, and
buried her face in Watch’s neck, who, thinking
his mistress was being ill-used, growled at Mr.
Garnet rather fiercely.

“Come, come,” said the old gentleman in a
very kind tone, “we must have no more crying ;
such pretty eyes were never made for tears. Come
along and take a walk with me; and James,” he
added, turning to his servant, “will get you some
of the ripest nuts to be found—nothing like nuts
for chasing away the megrims.”

By the time dinner was announced, Alice had
made wonderful progress with her grandpapa,—
though, as time passed, she found that it was
only on very rare occasions he allowed himself to
be so friendly as he was that first day of their
acquaintance.

A month having passed away very pleasantly,
Alice being a great deal with her grandmamma,



A PLEASANT PROSPECT. 41

and seeing very little of her grandpapa, a letter
arrived from Willie’s schoolmaster, to say that
fever had broken out in the school, and it would
be necessary to send him home for a short time
to avoid the risk of infection. Alice was wild
with excitement when she heard that she was to
see her brother Willie so soon, and she wished
her grandmamma had not invited her young
cousins, the Clares, to spend a week or two with
them. She had only seen them twice for a short
time; but they did not appear to be very agree-
able children, and seemed to consider themselves
of so much consequence. The only one she liked
was Lucy, a girl of her own age, who had re-
proved her sisters and brothers for laughing when
Alice said she could not ride, that her papa had
never kept a pony for her, or a horse for himself
either, Alice was afraid that Willie might get
into mischief with his cousins, for he was easily
led, and they seemed to be very tricky boys.
When Willie arrived, however, Alice had him
to herself for three whole days, during which,
while they wandered over the beautiful grounds
together, she had many opportunities of advising
him to be careful of his behaviour when their
cousins came. Willie was very fond of his sister,



42 NEW PLAYMATES.

and had always been accustomed to be guided by
her, so that he readily promised to do his best to
keep out of mischief; for, as he said, “I don’t
want to get into disgrace with grandpapa; he
looks cross enough now, and might turn out a
regular Bluebeard if he were provoked.”

There were five of the little Clares—three
girls and two boys—and along with Alice and
Willie they made a goodly company. Tom and
Charles were really handy fellows, and, having
got permission from their grandmamma, fastened
a thick rope to two great trees in the orchard,
where they went to swing every morning after
breakfast. Alice would have enjoyed the plea-
sure of having so many young companions, but
they were constantly quarrelling amongst them-
selves about who was to have the next swing;
and often they would join amongst themselves to
make ill-natured remarks about Alice’s former
home, and what they were pleased to style her
poor relations, meaning her dear Aunt Emily and
Uncle Charles. When they had questioned her
closely about her former life, she had no idea
they would ever be so rude as to turn it all into
ridicule; but seeing at last they did it with the
intention of provoking her, she remained quite



A SOFT ANSWER TURNETH AWAY WRATH. 43

quiet, and bore it so sweetly, that in the end her
cousins began to feel ashamed of themselves, and



THE SWING IN THE ORCHARD.

lett her alone. Willie, however, did not bear it
so quietly, but would retaliate with much spirit,



44 EVIL COMPANIONS CORRUPT GOOD ONES.

and distressed his sister by losing his temper, and
offering to fight them both, one after the other.
“Don’t speak to me, Alice,” he would say; ‘‘I’m
determined to fight them—I know I could do it
easily ; I shall not stand their taunts about our
poor relations much longer. Though Uncle Charles
is not rich, isn’t he a gentleman? and I should like
to know if Dick and Robert Leighton would tease
a fellow as these Clares do. I tell you what, they
re nothing but cowards, with all their riches.”

Whether this was true or not, Alice could not
say ; but she generally managed to appease Willie’s
wrath in some way, and seemed to think it would
be better to leave him alone.

Another thing that vexed her, they were never
done teasing Jumper the goat, and had taught
him to butt at people; so that her grandmamma
was seriously annoyed, and spoke of having him
sent away if he did not turn over a new leaf
and mend his manners. One day when they were
in the wood, Jumper, having gnawed the rope
that was fastened to his collar, made his escape,
and found his way to where they were all playing
in the wood. ‘Oh dear, how has he got off?”
cried Alice, holding out her hand to catch him; but
Jumper was so determined to enjoy his liberty,



TRYING TO CATCH THE TRUANT. 45

now that he had secured it, that he whisked
away and trotted off further into the wood.



TRYING TO CATCIL JUMPER.

Away ran the children in different directions
to catch the truant; but the faster they ran, the
faster went Jumper, making off into a new quarter
just when they thought they had him secure.
Twice Charles had firm hold of him ; but Jumper
pushed him with his horns and made his escape,
leaving that young gentleman in a very bad
temper. Alice was close to him on the last oc-



46 ‘‘ MIND YOUR OWN BUSINESS.”

casion, and said she was sorry Jumper had been
so rude.

“Rude!” replied Charles; “that is a pretty
word. He’s a horrid brute, and that’s what he is.
If I get hold of him, Pll kill him!”

At that moment his eyes fell upon a nest with
several egos in it, half hidden under the root of a
tree. But Alice had seen it too, and she darted
forward and caught hold of his arm, crying out,
“Oh, please, Cousin Charles, spare the poor birds;
it is so cruel to take the eggs from them.”

“You just mind your own business,” said
Charles rudely. “Pll take the nest if I like, and
smash the eggs if I like, and do just as I please
about it.”

“Oh, but you mustn’t, really,” said Alice, hold-
ing him firmer than ever ; “it is so wicked. God
will be angry with you if you doit. Mind the
birds are his; and papa often said God must be
angry if we harm the poor birds.”

“Stuff and nonsense!” said Charles. ‘“ You
let me alone, and mind your own business,” And
saying that, he tried to push her back, while he
_ attempted to stamp on the nest with his foot.

“No; you must not do it,” said Alice, clinging
to him, for at that moment she overheard a plain-



A BRAVE STRUGGLE. 47

tive ‘tweet, tweet,” and knew that this was the
poor anxious bird watching over the fate of her
pretty eggs.

“But I say I shall,” said Charles in a great
passion, turning fiercely round upon his cousin.
“ Keep off; let go my arm, else Pl make you.”

4
sn kAR
aN



his
A BRAVE STRUGGLE.

As Alice was as determined as he was, she
paid no attention to his threats, and again
entreated him not to be a cruel-hearted boy.
“What. has the bird done to you that you should
be so cruel?”’ she said. ‘‘ Do let it alone, else I
must tell grandmamma.”



48 A SAD ACCIDENT.

“Oh yes, Miss Tell-tale, you will be ready
enough to do that,” said Charles; and with a
great swing of his body and a push he thrust
Alice away, who fell with a crash into a prickly
bush, which scratched her face and arms most
severely. That was not the worst, for when she
tried to get up she found her foot was badly hurt,
and go painful, that she feared it was broken.
When Charles saw that he had hurt her severely,
he began to whimper and cry, “ You'll be telling
grandmamma upon me, and getting me into a
fine scrape. But look here, Alice, I didn’t mean
to do it, and if you'll only not tell on me, Pl
promise never to harm another bird or touch with
its nest. Oh dear, how white you are getting !
What am I to do?”

“Tf you could help me to rise, and let me lie
down on the grass, there,” said Alice, though
scarcely able to speak, “‘and then run for some-
body to help me home.”

Charles lifted her up as carefully as he could,
and managed to carry her to the place she
pointed out; but she was so pale, and seemed to
be suffering so much pain, that he did not like
to leave her alone; but she assured him it was
the only plan.



A ILAPPY ENDING. 49

“Tl run the whole way,” said Charles ; “and
V'll get Dickson to come with the wheel-barrow.
And, I say, Alice, will you not tell upon me this
time ?- I’m sorry,—lI really am.”

Alice gladly promised ; and when he was fairly
off, she lay and watched the two birds hopping
quietly out and in, tweet, tweeting in the greatest
delight to find their nest and precious eggs
secure and safe. ‘I’m so glad he didn’t break
them,” said Alice. ‘“‘ Poor birdies!”

When Charles returned with Dickson and the
wheel-barrow, Alice was asleep, and feeling much
better. Her foot was sprained, but not so bad
as she thought it was. After Dickson had
wheeled her home, and she had ‘got it nicely
bandaged by the housekeeper, the pain had greatly
subsided, and though she could not run about
for some days, she was always able to be out of
doors, and join in any quiet game. To Charles’s
great delight, she did not tell how the accident
happened, and was so kind about it, and so frank
and pleasant to him, notwithstanding what had
passed, that he declared she was a jolly girl, and
worth half-a-dozen of his own sisters, who never
would have kept it secret.

One morning their grandmamma called them

(336) 4



b0 A TREAT WITH GRANDMAMMA.

into her room, and asked them how they would
like to make a short excursion with her to the



ASLEEP IN THE WOOD.

wood at the foot of the park. This was a great
treat, for it was not often that their grandmamma



OUT IN THE Woops. 51

felt strong enough to walk so far; and grandpapa,
it seemed, had expressed a wish to come and
meet them, which was certainly an extraordinary
thing for him to do.

When they reached a part of the wood that
was shady, and had selected a soft mossy bank
for their grandmamma to sit on, the children
flung themselves: down on the grass at her feet
to listen to one of her nicest stories, while Tom
and Charles, who preferred hunting for a rabbit
they had started, ran off after it. They were
away so long that their grandmamma began to
be afraid they had got into some mischief, and
might not be back in time to meet their grand-
papa, and Willie was just preparing to go in
search of them, when they came running round
the corner, holding up their hands and shouting
as if something dreadful was coming after them.

“What's the matter? what is it?” cried
Willie, running forward, while Mrs. Garnet and
the girls rose up in the greatest terror, fancying
a bull had escaped from the park, or some-
thing equally alarming was the matter. When-
ever the boys saw the state of terror every one
had. been thrown into, they flung themselves
down on the grass, laughing and screaming with



52 A PRACTICAL JOKE,

delight at the capital joke they had played upon
them. Mrs. Garnet was really very angry at



OUT IN THE WOODS.

their deception, and said that they had not only
taken away all her pleasure in their little ex-



ANOTHER PRACTICAL JOKE. 53

cursion, but she could never trust them alone
with the girls. “My dear boys,” said Mrs,
Garnet seriously, “a joke is all very well in its
way, but a practical joke, played for the purpose
of frightening people, is not only cowardly, but
may cause the greatest mischief. There are many
instances of this having happened, and I shall
certainly speak to your papa if ever I hear of
your doing such a thing again.”

“Oh, we often play practical jokes at home,
erandmamma,”’ said Tom, laughing. “ Papa
never forbids us. Don’t you remember, Charlie,
how we dressed ourselves in a white sheet and
stood in the corner of the staircase, intending to
frighten nurse, when who should come up but
old Mrs. Brownlow, who happened to be staying
with us atthe time. My, didn’t she scream! and
down she went on her knees, and then rolled over
and over to the bottom of the stair.” ’

“Yes; how we did laugh when we got to our
own room,” said Charles. ‘ But the best of the
joke was, nobody knew who did it. Mrs. Brown-
low insisted it was a real ghost; but nurse said
she knew it was Tom, only I declared he had
never left the nursery. Mrs. Brownlow believed
nurse’s story, and because papa would not punish



54 COWARDLY ACTIONS.

us, she packed up her boxes, and off she went in
the greatest state of indignation.”

“And did you never tell her you did it, and
beg her pardon?” said Willie.

“Of course not,” replied Tom. ‘Beg her
pardon! what an idea; why, Mrs. Brownlow is
as poor as a church mouse, and was very glad to
be invited to stay with us, I can tell you. As
papa said afterwards, she would be the greatest
loser ; and such a poor creature had no business
to give herself such airs.”

“It really distresses me to hear you speak in
that way of one of my oldest friends, and a good
woman,” said Mrs. Garnet. “My dear boy,
every one cannot be rich, but they can be good ;
and if you are not good, all the riches in the
world will never make you happy. I am certain
your papa must have been much grieved at this
annoyance to his guest, for she was an old friend
of his mother’s, as well as mine.”

“But we did not mean to frighten her,” said
Tom; ‘‘and though she did tumble to the foot
of the stairs, she only scratched her old nose a
little, and tore that: black silk of hers that she
seems to have worn for ever.”

They were interrupted by their grandpapa



ON FORBIDDEN GROUND. 55

coming up sooner than was expected; and as
their grandmamma felt rather unwell with the
fright she had got, she proposed going home
at once; but the day being still early, the
three boys were permitted to go off by them-
selves for a ramble into the wood, while the
girls walked home, gathering flowers as they
went.

The three boys, after scrambling through the
wood, came upon an open field; and they deter-
mined to cross it and enter the wood at the
other side, instead of going through the wood
itself. This was Willie’s proposal; but he did
not know that this field belonged to a farmer,
and not to his grandfather, and that Farmer
Nubbs was a very peculiar man, and would prose-
cute any one found trespassing. The two Clares
were well aware of this, but it made the project
all the more delightful to them; and, as Tom
whispered to Charles, the blame would fall upon
Willie, for he asked them to do it. When they
had got to the other side of the field their progress
was stopped by a wooden fence that had been
newly put up round a small orchard. On look-
ing for a place to climb over, they came upon an
apple-tree, laden with the most beautiful apples



56 TEMPTATION.

imaginable, the branches of which leant over into
the field in a most tempting manner.

“Well, there is a beauty,” said Willie; ‘“ but
isn’t it strange that grandpapa should have an
orchard so far from home? I suppose we may
take a few?”

“Of course we may,” said Charles, swinging
himself up into the tree. ‘We are allowed to
take apples from the home orchard, you know ;
and if we weren’t, who’s to miss them from such
a thick tree as this! Here goes; hold your cap,
Willie.”

Willie pulled off his cap, and held it out for
the fruit as Charles pulled it; but when they
were filling the third one, a man popped his
head round the corner. Tom, who saw him first,
cried out to Charles; and taking hold of Willie’s
arm, dragged him across the field. “Why do
you run away?” asked Willie in astonishment.
And when Tom had explained the true state of
affairs, Willie turned deliberately back, saying
that he would explain to the man the mistake
they had made, and. give him back the apples.

“What a muff you are,” said Charles, catching
hold of him by the arm. “The man will never
believe you, but will take you to grandpapa and



‘(WE ILAD NO BUSINESS HERE.” 57

have you punished. We had no business here at
all; grandpapa has often warned us never to go
near Farmer Nubbs’s field.”



CAUGHT IN THE ACT.

“But I knew nothing of this; why did you
not tell me?” said Willie.

“Well, that is a good joke,” said Tom, with a
sly wink to Charles; “we did tell you, but all
we could say or do you would not believe us, and
persuaded us to follow you. No; my advice is
to deny we ever were near the field.”

“Yes, that’s the best way,” said Charles.



58 GETTING OTHERS PUNISHED.

“Don’t you remember the scrape we got into:
before with Farmer Nubbs, and how we collared
two of the village boys who happened to be in the
wood at the time!”

“Yes,” said Charles, laughing. ‘ Will you ever
forget how they yelled when the farmer brought
his cane down on their backs? I couldn’t help:
feeling sorry for them; but it was better to see
the strokes coming on their backs, than to feel
them on ours.”

“T can’t understand you,” said Willie. “You
first declare you told me I knew about this field
being a farmer’s, and now you say you allowed
two boys to take a thrashing instead of you.
You surely are not such downright liars as
that!”

“Come, sir, give us none of your names,’
Charles angrily. “The fellows were poor boys,
and we gave them a shilling a piece after to pay
for the drubbing. There isn’t the slightest harm
in telling a lie to escape from a thrashing.”

“Then all I’ve got to say is, that you are not
only a liar, but the biggest coward I ever met
with; and in case you get somebody else into

?

said

the same scrape again, I shall at once go over to
the man, who is still looking over the fence, and -



CRUEL PLANS. 59

tell him all about it. As Uncle Charles says, a
cowardly Leighton was never seen yet.”

“The idea of him being proud of his name,”
said Tom. ‘These beggarly Leightons, as I’ve
heard grandpapa call them often. But let me
tell you that we shall never open our lips to you
again if you get us into disgrace. A fellow de-
pendent on his grandpapa giving himself such
airs!”

Willie ran off at.once, and paying no attention
to his cousins’ cries, was soon seen talking with
the farmer. Tom and Charles thought it best to
make their escape at once, planning as they went
along how they could throw the entire blame on
to Willie’s shoulders.

After reaching home, Alice and Lucy took their
grandmamma’s dog Fido out for a walk by the
river, where Willie found her lying under a shady
tree listening to Lucy reading. When Willie
came up Alice saw at a glance that something
was wrong, and making an excuse to Lucy, she
beckoned to him to follow her. When they were
in her own little bed-room, Willie told her all
that had happened, and further, that the farmer
would not believe his story, but said he would
come over and speak to


60 IN A DILEMMA.

afternoon. ‘‘And so you see, Alice,” said Willie,
“if Tom and Charlie insist that they told me not



ALICE AND LUCY.

to go, grandpapa may believe them, aud [ shall
be punished.”



HONESTY THE BEST POLICY. 61

“But, Willie dear, you are surely not afraid of
the punishment,” said Alice, stealing her arm
round his neck. ‘You remember what papa
used to say about telling the truth under any cir-
cumstances. I would rather be punished for
telling the truth than for telling a lie. It is
quite true what Dame Adams said, that riches
often make people proud and overbearing.”

“Yes,” said Willie, with a shake of the head ;
‘these Clares are overbearing enough, and what’s
more, they are downright cowards, besides being
low and mean-—telling me I was poor, as if I
could help it. Well, I would rather be what I
am, than rude and mean, like them.”

“Hush, dear,” said Alice, trying to soothe him.
“We can’t help having little money; but, you
know, a good name is better than riches. Come,
let us go to grandpapa’s room and tell him all
about it ; I’m sure that will be the best way.”

It was not such an casy matter telling his
story to his stern-looking grandfather ; but with
Alice holding his hand to encourage him, it was
told at last, and in such a way that his cousins
were screened as much as possible. When Mr.
’ Garnet asked Willie if his cousins were with him,
he answered that he would rather not speak of



62 A PIECE OF NEWS.

them, because they might think him a tale-
bearer; he only wished to say that he was sorry
he had trespassed, but he did it in ignorance.
His grandpapa simply said, ‘“ Very well; I shall
have you all up when the man comes.” But
when they were about to leave the room, he
called them back and said, “By the way,
William, I mean to send you to another school
next week; it won’t do for you to be losing
your time.”

Had Willie heard this piece of news in the
morning, he would have felt very sorry to leave
his grandpapa’s pleasant house, but now it was a
great relief to escape from his cousins; and being
a proud-spirited boy, the words they had used
had sunk deep into his heart, and he determined
not to be dependent on his grandfather longer
than was necessary.

“You don’t seem sorry at the idea of going to
school,” said his grandpapa, rubbing his chin, as
if he were trying to hide a smile.

“Yes, I am sorry, grandpapa,”’ said Willie ;
“ut I ain also glad to go.”

“And how is that? Don’t you get on with
your cousins? I hope you have all been good
friends,”



‘A BEGGARLY LEIGHTON.” 63

“T want to get back to school to finish my
‘education, so that I may go to sea. Uncle
Charles said you would perhaps help me to be a
captain if I worked hard. Then Alice could stay
with me, and nobody could call her a beggarly
Leighton then.”

“And who calls her by such a name now ?”
said Mr. Garnet, with a deeper frown than usual.
But seeing that Willie did not want to answer, he
added—-‘‘ You may go now; but come back ‘here
with grandmamma after dinner.”

When they reached the terrace—where they
went to have a quiet talk till dinner-time—a poor
beggar-boy came up the walk, stealthily turning
his head from side to side, as if he was afraid
somebody would jump out upon him from one of
the bushes. Alice, seeing how frightened he was,
called to him to come forward ; and searching in
her pocket, she brought out a sixpence, and held
it out towards him, asking him at the same time
what he was afraid of. The boy then told them
that his mother had sent him to ask for a little
more ointment for her sore leg; but he was afraid
of meeting the young gentlemen, as they always
flung stones at him. And the boy showed the
mark of a deep cut he had got the week before



64 BEING KIND 'TO THE POOR.

from a stone thrown by the biggest of the
boys.



















THE POOR BEGGAR-BOY,

Alice made him sit down while she ran to look
for her grandmamma; and as the boy seemed to
be very much afraid of the Clares, Willie stayed
to protect him. In a minute or two after, Tom
and Charles came running round the corner; and
seeing the boy sitting on the stone-seat, they
made a rush towards him, crying out now they
had caught that young pauper who threw stones



A COUNCIL. 65

at them. Willie told the boy not to be afraid,
but to sit quite still; and when Charles came
close upon them, Willie ran against him with all
his might, and. sent him tumbling down the steps
of the terrace, where he lay yelling and screaming
as if he had been murdered. Tom for a moment
looked as if he intended to fight Willie there and
. then; but seeing that his cousin was quite ready
for him, he ran off screaming for somebody to
come and help his brother.

Mr. Garnet’s window looked out upon this
part of the terrace, and he had been a witness of |
the whole affair. Calling out to Charles to hold
his tongue, he bade him bring his brother up to
his study; and desired Willie to follow, after he
had conducted the poor boy to the housekeeper’s
room. In Mr. Garnet’s room they found Farmer
Nubbs, who had just arrived: and Willie was
requested to repeat his story, which he did, in
almost the same words, without hesitation ; and
“none looking at his brave, open face could have
doubted that he was telling the truth. His
cousins were then asked what they had to say
for themselves; when they stoutly denied being
there at all, saying that Willie had made the

acquaintance of two of the village boys in the
(336) 5



66 TUE GOLD CHAIN.

wood, and had gone off with them. Both of
them insisted that this was true, and that they
had told Willie not to go near that part of the
wood, but he just laughed at them.

“Well, young master,” said Farmer Nubbs,
turning to Tom, ‘“‘if your story be true, this little.
gold chain must belong to the village boy who
was up the tree. I saw your cousin holding the
cap, which he doesn’t deny; but I’m very blind
indeed if you weren’t the same that pulled my
apples.”

Tom and Charles stared at the chain in sur-
prise and dismay, for they knew that their grand-
papa would at once recognize his last birth-day
gift. So, seeing that they were found out, they
began to whimper and cry, making such ridicu-
lous excuses for themselves, that their grandpapa
_ became so angry with them he ordered them, not
only out of his presence, but to return home
immediately.

When Willie was in his room, after his cousins
were gone, he could not help thinking what a
blessed thing it was for him he had such a good
sister. On locking out of the window, a bird
hopped upon a branch close to where he stood,
and began to sing very sweetly ; and Willie



THE RESULT OF GOOD ADVICE. 67

listened to it, for it seemed to sing, A good name
is rather to be chosen than riches. And he
felt, oh, so glad! that he had followed Alice’s
advice in going to his grandpapa at once to own
his fault.



WILLIE AND THE BIRD.

That evening Alice and Willie found their
grandpapa seated in Mrs. Garnet’s parlour instead
of being shut up in his study; and after telling
Willie how very much pleased he was with him
for telling the truth, even when he did not know
if his word would be believed, he opened a large



68 GRANDMAMMA’S SECRET.

scrap-book, and entertained the two ehildren
with a view of the contents till bed-time.

From that time Mr. Garnet became very fond
of his two grandchildren. And after Willie went
back to, school, he proposed that Alice should
become his pupil; and nothing seemed to please
him better than to sit in the little arbour, with
Alice on a low stool at his feet, explaining to her
a picture of some foreign country, and answering
her numerous questions,

A great happiness was in store for Alice ; some-
thing she did not expect, or ever fancied would
happen. :

“JT wonder if you could keep a secret,” said
her grandmamma one day, smiling.

“Oh yes, I think I could,” said Alice eagerly.
“T know papa used to trust me with a secret
sometimes, and I always kept it.”

“ Very well, then,” said Mrs. Garnet, “T think
I shall venture to try you. We are going to
have a visitor here in a few days—somebody that
you love very dearly.”

“Oh, grandmamma,” exclaimed Alice, clasping
her hands, while her eyes fairly gleamed with
excitement, “who is it? Aunt Emily? Uncle
Charles? or—”



AN UNEXPECTED PLEASURE. 69

But here Alice suddenly stopped, for it came
to her recollection that her grandpapa disliked all
her father’s relations, and she blushed and was
covered with confusion.

“Well, my dear, you needn’t be so agitated,”
said Mrs. Garnet kindly, ‘for you have guessed
correctly. It is your Aunt Emily; and when
Willie returns from school. during the holidays,
grandpapa says we may invite your cousins, the
Leightons, to spend some of the time with you.”

’ “Oh dear, how happy Iam!” said Alice. “I
feel inclined to laugh, and dance, and cry, and
sing; and I don’t know what to do first. Aunt
Emily coming to see me! Is it true, grand-
mamima-—quite, quite true?”

“Yes, my dear, it is quite true,” said Mrs.
Garnet, laughing. “There is the answer she has
sent to grandpapa’s invitation ; for it was he who
invited her.”

“To-morrow!” exclaimed Alice; “is it to-
morrow she is coming? Then I must get up
and dance, else my head will burst.”

“Come, come!” said Mrs. Garnet; “ we must
be sober. I wouldn’t have let the cat out of the
bag if it hadn’t been I want you to help me
to put the blue-room in order for our expected



70 PREPARING THE BLUE-ROOM.

guest. Grandpapa wishes it to be very nice, for he
has formed a high opinion of your papa’s sister.”

“ Indeed she is very good,” said Alice, begin-
ning to cry as she said she must do. “ Aunt
Emily is-just the dearest, sweetest, and best aunt,
that anybody ever had; and I know you will be
very fond of her, grandmamma, and so will she
be of you.”

The blue-room was in the perfection of order
when Aunt Emily arrived ; and it did seem
pleasant to have the dear face bending over her
once more. And that night, when they retired
together to the blue-room—Alice having been
permitted to ‘sleep there with her aunt—it did
feel like home to kneel at the old familiar knee,
and repeat her prayers as she had done in her
childhood.

“Tt seems like a dream,” said Alice, when
they were in bed. “I half expect, when I awake
in the morning, to find it so.”

“ Does that feel like a dream?” said Aunt
Emily, slyly tweeking Alice’s ear. “You go
to sleep, miss: you will find that I am some-
thing more substantial, and don’t evaporate quite
so easily——My precious darling,” she suddenly
exclaimed, “how thankful I was to hear from



A GOOD ACCOUNT. 71

your grandpapa such a good account of you and
Willie! It has made him wish he had not been
so harsh to your dear papa. How glad Uncle
Charles will be to hear it!”



ALICE,

One day, when Alice was sitting learning her
verse out of her Bible to say to her grand-
mamma, her grandpapa took it out of her hand,
and turning to the fly-leaf, read the verse from
Proverbs her mother had written there. Laying
it gently down with a sigh, he made Alice very
happy by saying, —



72 CONCLUSION.

“Your mother’s writing. Yes, she was right.
‘A good name is rather to be chosen than riches;’
and I am glad she has taught her children to feel
that this is true.”

“Grandpapa,” said Alice, “I often think, when
I am sitting watching the white fleecy clouds in
the sky, that I see mamma’s face smiling out of
them ; and Iam almost sure the next time I do see
it that she will smile more sweetly—if, that is to
say, she has heard your words. She was very
sorry she left you, grandpapa, but you know she
loved dear papa very, very much.”

“There were faults on both sides, child,” said
Mr. Garnet hurriedly. ‘One cannot recall the
past, mind you that, so be careful how you do
wrong.” Then, after sitting silent for a few
minutes, he said again, “Yes, Alice was right,—
‘A good name is rather to be chosen than riches,’ ”’



















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'2012-05-30T18:35:53-04:00'
describe
'2000616' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDSZ' 'sip-files00026.tif'
d8ad4b74fd8c91f8451a3ce7f48c1586
7f0871d4d2bdd4cd3e20fc47c5c4aad5ed8eb03c
'2012-05-30T18:34:48-04:00'
describe
'204927' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDTA' 'sip-files00005.QC2.jpg'
b73ac1b099a6e9eed6ebb370d6e51635
4c81b7211b2de2a57fff6e0e047f6845a9520573
'2012-05-30T18:32:33-04:00'
describe
'1216' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDTB' 'sip-files00018.txt'
ec8c8d786587ac6ef43465f59bcfc0bd
1ff1e95ac96a76719dd4786ce0cb961525f8b787
'2012-05-30T18:37:05-04:00'
describe
'30144' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDTC' 'sip-files00075.pro'
e8a90d69d3cda114969542a388198ab4
e075c1e9cf169a96646336a212aae932e5cb2853
'2012-05-30T18:35:10-04:00'
describe
'1959180' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDTD' 'sip-files00005.tif'
057bf540dd6c4393174c5b2487200ad2
101271f4cfbb6dd8a5d69d9ba8ec455a2fa134b3
'2012-05-30T18:34:01-04:00'
describe
'409319' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDTE' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
4569c496097dd977f456b6914572901f
ff9439c1969195c9632b29d9ab933aeef067328e
'2012-05-30T18:34:00-04:00'
describe
'342742' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDTF' 'sip-files00074.QC2.jpg'
c7f71497e067e08dd1f48b3d97238e77
48cc1511db702c9333bdf7fbccd504944e0c2ae2
'2012-05-30T18:37:34-04:00'
describe
'365174' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDTG' 'sip-files00044.QC2.jpg'
a9793665aa391b1ee8d245b11d97023f
d683864074ab149c39c475bca645a95f1955f31a
'2012-05-30T18:36:23-04:00'
describe
'1929728' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDTH' 'sip-files00020.tif'
70ba5cdda5fdfc51d0b4848eb10c0a34
4fd34df94840691213fa0b05916c3340730d3e54
'2012-05-30T18:37:30-04:00'
describe
'398193' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDTI' 'sip-files00042.QC2.jpg'
6b90038e53f415c1ab211a68390e11f0
e77337e313ac60f333bd5d079f86dbd22fc99045
'2012-05-30T18:37:54-04:00'
describe
'243791' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDTJ' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
bda4e1a5dcee989761e9200207d405ce
10e38ece240cd21ce252a0868c25a17018e7b3e1
'2012-05-30T18:35:35-04:00'
describe
'6878' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDTK' 'sip-files00009.pro'
914cee9ff7d14d45002f2020dfababe4
23005a6ceaf0733d7b6a07bc513cad20bf583f16
describe
'245100' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDTL' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
1f755a58bb78081101aaa0b06bc6c156
eb440c954a51092a340e23684da249a169c54814
'2012-05-30T18:32:15-04:00'
describe
'253688' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDTM' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
58cd21eca3bb99f6440266637be01338
36ce1f102ebf53c502dba81fb7f8dbfd0279a275
'2012-05-30T18:32:56-04:00'
describe
'52601' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDTN' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
a6cd78b9fd319317f22ea2ab69531767
65166b38d7e2c96b565e80b2a3a29dcb62ba128b
'2012-05-30T18:37:52-04:00'
describe
'623' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDTO' 'sip-files00051.txt'
d59c781eb5a854f6bcd09b9205680a43
2a7a9077967b096012388446c13ad5be2a81f2aa
'2012-05-30T18:32:37-04:00'
describe
'2039868' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDTP' 'sip-files00028.tif'
433ef57cf56c36db387236d03ca77ddf
df5c8b7f4457b4f317f11aa786cca193d08af07e
describe
'254855' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDTQ' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
f66ceec4ff46fcb234195a5ce1cf4bfe
3bba8f62e48e61ab83c54281abe0dba5cb0772e4
'2012-05-30T18:37:21-04:00'
describe
'438288' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDTR' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
93c0e38cd45004ee9ef1922685318c60
b105ac409828951b957ac7c08df26f61eeda937c
'2012-05-30T18:37:09-04:00'
describe
'1140' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDTS' 'sip-files00040.txt'
846e0a6d42f4a3268a1c278e5a943ea4
29f42f2804c641d9c85d656a9411dfd9c0859478
'2012-05-30T18:36:41-04:00'
describe
'2002140' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDTT' 'sip-files00056.tif'
2e01ec3c00c9f463f8860ea153713a88
6d56b275c55bbbac54f3ac973b857dce61c4e1ae
describe
'7022828' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDTU' 'sip-files00002.tif'
05471545ba69d2f2282511337f01daa8
39254096756f2d83b836b33a691b818b9483fb13
'2012-05-30T18:33:38-04:00'
describe
'370287' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDTV' 'sip-files00049.QC2.jpg'
eb4d2ddcc6f0e10487a90c597f5b7445
024c3ac939ad51cc3386d4249d15ea3c06b19f03
'2012-05-30T18:37:27-04:00'
describe
'455651' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDTW' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
1e9cc86504601f650042ab953a15f7f3
09077bd6b6b578d096d4746cafa07a66c73c5b5d
describe
'6061620' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDTX' 'sip-files00008.tif'
41490346552297f3fc4c62f09dea48ff
0a5c56ec8985955db7e150459c0729c6d286d9e3
'2012-05-30T18:37:08-04:00'
describe
'460649' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDTY' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
e80c14951689988d7240893b26ede714
9138007cef84e4c2169d4a16ccbcd28193974dcb
'2012-05-30T18:37:22-04:00'
describe
'377060' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDTZ' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
c984d0baddd7043d9f51be54560c6808
27e01e1f47eda1eb3734c1a1b9b8b1a467b3ebb7
'2012-05-30T18:33:26-04:00'
describe
'51924' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDUA' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
23e397f74d4005c1602470b2ce1e55fe
f33218d2b3271cb71ad1e738af7b0c42acfef543
'2012-05-30T18:37:56-04:00'
describe
'1991084' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDUB' 'sip-files00046.tif'
83c4852b4537e492808039fc2d9a9e51
a1e6758969e4bbf69c311f1075cfd05294815980
'2012-05-30T18:35:54-04:00'
describe
'431445' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDUC' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
26c7bdb731bcc128649a4130029a27f8
483490f433cb22ec96b5e70b49d2e8205ecfc857
describe
'445441' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDUD' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
45d8ba112fb7141f6e0220da64735e51
ceb1ab6496aafd7aa66d54f9f66ed4dff034f048
'2012-05-30T18:36:42-04:00'
describe
'248742' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDUE' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
c3b048d4a2f6c2d14c2e5ea6c75755cf
67109d65e917a03241d6f27863e75183764bd48f
'2012-05-30T18:37:04-04:00'
describe
'1957496' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDUF' 'sip-files00018.tif'
50908e7cc98cfa6b0ce761efd085a1f1
eb623cb0dd7a7a15aa8d13061a72d427d0cf9ce7
'2012-05-30T18:34:27-04:00'
describe
'1681' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDUG' 'sip-files00008.pro'
f2be14d1060e89d38b681d7f7490da68
18c3445e97bf17eaa5eb3008d6cf9be7360d5bd8
describe
'149578' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDUH' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
bad09ecfc87bccf3dc26aa2daf0644fa
3e73955c413b9e96ac60201aef8ae7c78d95a09c
describe
'52273' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDUI' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
c8b328476faa13d57050aa3ab23dc77a
fcc7cf1993756b5f59392571d95aa8fd17851e51
'2012-05-30T18:36:39-04:00'
describe
'53804' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDUJ' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
3f2e5b159867b17b4be92a3117a07087
8b573f7782b09a71926973de864c16ec6d68bfe5
'2012-05-30T18:32:11-04:00'
describe
'40' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDUK' 'sip-filesprocessing.instr'
2f33b14aebf1701579318adc8a1d0bae
4854eec1e2b35637fde59896f102374e339ef294
'2012-05-30T18:32:32-04:00'
describe
'240873' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDUL' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
30a6e25eda5c38761184ce767724c0f5
01933ade713bd813d506b40f0376692dcde8e0e2
'2012-05-30T18:33:52-04:00'
describe
'1308' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDUM' 'sip-files00055.txt'
0b3b8b207de4dc77afa378328439c262
a04672c703628dae37a0c7b6ebba1dfd959e1586
'2012-05-30T18:34:49-04:00'
describe
'484773' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDUN' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
c44fc665d4d2b504d9119f8af65bb6c3
3237110167fc9afd3e71d90b4dc4d462c2d2c9d4
'2012-05-30T18:32:58-04:00'
describe
'452678' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDUO' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
3f9a6a8451b9fd0fb19ab3ad06261a17
010ecd1ee3e25877e3e09dcd56d6657a575a011d
'2012-05-30T18:32:28-04:00'
describe
'335743' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDUP' 'sip-files00058.QC2.jpg'
a5123d1666b0586555531fb1d325aee2
ddd640f773f4d03e6789d4a405ee4b29fcb98edc
'2012-05-30T18:32:27-04:00'
describe
'54281' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDUQ' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
e57488b491a4ccea70826a81e35ca3cc
d1f5f7cd68a34bb78556d0a893584c1450222ca1
'2012-05-30T18:32:29-04:00'
describe
'244530' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDUR' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
ac602a0f60a3606b3a8c5581131016cc
2219c1fb1fdf1ef3f5ce4a258f94336bb394a783
'2012-05-30T18:34:29-04:00'
describe
'28705' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDUS' 'sip-files00027.pro'
0f476eb278516d0d0fe498db7b6ba175
3c9cee13da0db2f85f57449618f6959677538177
'2012-05-30T18:35:15-04:00'
describe
'2042160' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDUT' 'sip-files00080.tif'
852b2cec716e33fe37c7710fe7f2e255
c4d015f0ea93ba8df0d0af0aa5b0fb2468c51e7d
'2012-05-30T18:32:44-04:00'
describe
'317943' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDUU' 'sip-files00066.QC2.jpg'
08daf342db185ab6aacfabbd14a296cb
5eecc4bfc1f8701221a07bb000e3446082773f9a
'2012-05-30T18:36:19-04:00'
describe
'247145' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDUV' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
7559812ec125bedcf8ffcda8b33b26e0
82d4297bae327dbe38890f3fdc0d7a5fd6cbbec1
'2012-05-30T18:37:03-04:00'
describe
'254544' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDUW' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
0ab2ec27e9ee4120a376d63f26c76536
6742371ec77b8ff80f4601f83e1e2e906b731e92
describe
'1955912' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDUX' 'sip-files00038.tif'
42013e6b56ef6ef4e90a48fa9ed8905d
cbd63dd5126c7d4a72fd23f6cb4d2b538c0e39b4
describe
'598328' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDUY' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
08c6723542cc5e3d30eea51789aae6f0
2e95829b7f979d98bbde117982e0c385354f26ea
'2012-05-30T18:37:42-04:00'
describe
'522920' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDUZ' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
3ee249e5747d2e0d353b3b4b87934841
c63219af53462dfabf5a259a221ab8b671a65cb8
'2012-05-30T18:33:34-04:00'
describe
'450016' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDVA' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
96dc1cfb2e01d11654c935e129c8a335
4dcd39c4efe2cb2900e4f7537dd495af7c760a48
'2012-05-30T18:33:07-04:00'
describe
'250088' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDVB' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
455ff104ed06f438d59eb7d0d4f494b1
e317b31de83f4ece108997b1edcdfb890a443d5d
'2012-05-30T18:32:21-04:00'
describe
'28299' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDVC' 'sip-files00015.pro'
72bccab52f9db4205b72fdccbf7c2521
601579cebbaefffb7ba1a2d4bbefa5fb3e7eb45c
'2012-05-30T18:37:35-04:00'
describe
'47999' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDVD' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
a4674171e113f3784555bd445f761462
a9a5b3793224333682a888df6feb7dffcb4a0198
describe
'162342' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDVE' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
c49d2e0ed8dabdac42cdf3b6c63d2dc3
53f84e0d20fa3fdc0a21e618236c20be6535bc4e
'2012-05-30T18:37:11-04:00'
describe
'243611' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDVF' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
32b8fbd4bca9b82c5b1c63f7fdf4c0c7
0e0e49d7f11a34dc435b0ef285f2a39ee8ed6bb2
'2012-05-30T18:32:59-04:00'
describe
'157272' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDVG' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
3b2a79b0d951b58f49b52c3b0ef124fb
b9ef32021724155e6a2a1e0f5aca90d25b38fb7b
'2012-05-30T18:37:32-04:00'
describe
'155627' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDVH' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
ed530dd955facdc83a485af84fa54ea7
d93237432bae5c83193f84903737613f1614a9cd
'2012-05-30T18:32:22-04:00'
describe
'45864' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDVI' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
1a5d5413907d120f974ffaf388afdd57
5389a0696335526b0c50ca9ac8afb7c32898e03c
describe
'49919' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDVJ' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
779feb1a8a108dce801c6e96ef91b1bd
f71b030ecfb3322263daf616ef902b078969d861
'2012-05-30T18:37:18-04:00'
describe
'1215' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDVK' 'sip-files00062.txt'
cd828f2cbd13b3b0cbb79ee5f6b3d93e
21fe977f1f126e3833e34d965667c3cfec827774
'2012-05-30T18:37:17-04:00'
describe
'540553' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDVL' 'sip-files00082.QC2.jpg'
3556627b78e723074f622c036cba90f0
32e38279e40b17a774cb4f3812a8746dac0905d9
describe
'2031368' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDVM' 'sip-files00031.tif'
cbcb5fb5d7430074bc220db69b361990
5772c1203f1debcab0b129b95660b0bf15089d2f
'2012-05-30T18:34:20-04:00'
describe
'260136' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDVN' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
0cdca99a7a3a2aeb8cf4fb319dcae066
f0268294c758662c16ee2e016932a8f6a2d0c7b4
'2012-05-30T18:32:55-04:00'
describe
'837' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDVO' 'sip-files00011.txt'
edec564aa1bbb82755c7e48af38a2e80
d130114f7ca4fd68719467131760fdc5cb9baeb1
describe
'251111' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDVP' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
6e7a343bac9c20bdbc13b8e9329c6d2b
ecbf38de5b9a19e55dcd9b8efdc2c0b5230da95f
'2012-05-30T18:36:43-04:00'
describe
'100094' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDVQ' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
72f53e6e3c5a7224003b57c3a8cf9cff
7979fac75009bcc370f951f24b73611056ae2f6e
'2012-05-30T18:36:18-04:00'
describe
'14291' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDVR' 'sip-files00053.pro'
4c043a094b995e10fd9953488b1dcf8b
418f441ab5458b060e8ac9aab9ec4ff525581fa9
describe
'2049348' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDVS' 'sip-files00067.tif'
43dbe4f4d21204f90afc225b085ff1a2
70d45da00c89c6fddb80c56819cd7b4349bb820b
'2012-05-30T18:33:00-04:00'
describe
'261883' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDVT' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
5d9f8438979eba953d95c516bd2e2ae6
ad93cf6c853369faf968752cab2d9d675507f49d
describe
'346324' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDVU' 'sip-files00017.QC2.jpg'
68704ca3e99d4884fb2efc5af20533ac
5c3b1041db45dab42b144761b7739cdffcd38f83
'2012-05-30T18:33:24-04:00'
describe
'54400' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDVV' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
0986a70bc59b4d6e1c83e7c0d9a819e0
8bc39f9f771d4609dce681f78de2dca5a2e6673c
'2012-05-30T18:36:57-04:00'
describe
'1861272' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDVW' 'sip-files00023.tif'
fc919d5275e0e03bfc5e37efe48c289c
3242c0bc0c5dcb0821a7eca61b88537c8317796f
describe
'52495' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDVX' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
389fefff98cf493f5de02a6a771dbb06
b454e0719bb81aef4d20740fdd3198c483ca75bd
'2012-05-30T18:32:23-04:00'
describe
'429640' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDVY' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
8c560d1d11a8b03b9fb141a2b9a9a48c
afa6746af4507906e612fb5262cf92cc4419e9fc
'2012-05-30T18:34:17-04:00'
describe
'1274' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDVZ' 'sip-files00024.txt'
72673bef110c35cc16b6e9a535f69419
67f9ea0cd6f4fd2712d01c2b10126d82845219da
describe
'2022004' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDWA' 'sip-files00061.tif'
550cfabbe1f456e3509581e389664c82
00fe5494dd04e69fdd83b66dc794f926d75f05ef
'2012-05-30T18:34:11-04:00'
describe
'2108120' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDWB' 'sip-files00063.tif'
aae46fa5c5355693fde1efba74149a15
7f0474e5800a84fe8a03029ba984463d78c55730
'2012-05-30T18:35:26-04:00'
describe
'374991' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDWC' 'sip-files00032.QC2.jpg'
056ba6527c8f5cada2ed87430f1ee1eb
e807deb5f5085a37f8e8e9c49610c4a8c23cb99d
'2012-05-30T18:33:31-04:00'
describe
'381178' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDWD' 'sip-files00046.QC2.jpg'
cdc7326cfb910a3b8b7e4b5f5c34b48a
0925e4cf0a3149ee0649098c5b7ac827b3ca4756
'2012-05-30T18:37:39-04:00'
describe
'1916048' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDWE' 'sip-files00014.tif'
872cbf2ecaac1733ccae223e2ca0fd74
58a27aad82bf90f912b2fec62cca65960e36c52b
'2012-05-30T18:32:30-04:00'
describe
'52609' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDWF' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
aacbe0c1738d0e612de77d1006a7f8d2
34bba598da618ce432ee2c7647e935d63cb2dfd2
'2012-05-30T18:37:48-04:00'
describe
'253273' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDWG' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
f675bbf5a6381b59104058cb4552fef7
4901457b7d7bd6396a8eb572370b1c50792e9566
describe
'464466' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDWH' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
88af022a9e6dbe61d1678e5c6c34839c
8086bfbac7c0ce0f237f0fcbd33ea19525221406
'2012-05-30T18:32:53-04:00'
describe
'31233' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDWI' 'sip-files00071.pro'
15f7cdff26a5621af5e4702565574db1
48827e5a7df4b8fc9e4b66f9a0d3ecd94e94afaf
describe
'30005' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDWJ' 'sip-files00062.pro'
38dd7b6155304a0760a0fde5bfbaa9c4
6314df2aee515d7f8db7ace595ae0de7c6ec38ba
'2012-05-30T18:32:46-04:00'
describe
'30485' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDWK' 'sip-files00030.pro'
edf672b2ff172c1c35eeeb558831f4c0
7530e2782cdf6a62658b04a9943e44f1add088f1
'2012-05-30T18:35:19-04:00'
describe
'388124' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDWL' 'sip-files00073.QC2.jpg'
15fd95376270aa7c1633a0c416fa8540
85d254fe35765626586f882687ae77ba2cfef4f2
'2012-05-30T18:33:19-04:00'
describe
'47827' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDWM' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
df729699c0b41ec9a710b45bf6aa77c4
7c9e8b6f93febc7a66b9a76081b664268a5d83be
describe
'1963364' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDWN' 'sip-files00040.tif'
a800bb176ad8f310725d2515ce3813b4
8b4fe318cb121269ffbbe6d43d861c1ecec92135
describe
'182' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDWO' 'sip-files00002.txt'
72557d139fd459c6cec0b859e19b54d6
026754b764d79a0dfd7220da4ec69566c2637e21
describe
'256725' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDWP' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
55b1be2d925b0162e33756cc61007517
af93cee935a84737475922b739488d7704c9792a
describe
'17507' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDWQ' 'sip-files00031.pro'
cd6eeed918b87cd9633b36c1b436a047
bc4212bc77bb1e8d559eaeab396dfd2798a3d08b
'2012-05-30T18:32:50-04:00'
describe
'249787' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDWR' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
2f24d3843f531e240efa3b6e9695fdae
6f1151822dc30dfdd3c9f2cffaf01c08592d641d
'2012-05-30T18:32:19-04:00'
describe
'261731' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDWS' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
d7f4e76ec84440dd67c9bbc44f4e32a3
198e3a785196f21a753b567eefab106c4b2706a1
'2012-05-30T18:37:02-04:00'
describe
'55927' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDWT' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
0a14a679ba2ace695894f98c83d37c0a
68d7c61eb87e10e9b2fd7f3d35f98fdc5f97ebb7
'2012-05-30T18:37:26-04:00'
describe
'270' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDWU' 'sip-files00079.pro'
e6d879195410e11a58277e6a76d13c2f
f08121146bbea8b8cc9c06f5697f6d7ae95fa6e6
'2012-05-30T18:35:52-04:00'
describe
'24212' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDWV' 'sip-files00005thm.jpg'
ff37a568d2ffcbd707fcfdd1beac230a
4d3c9efae076f3dc45a647a74e3feea1f7722967
describe
'133072' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDWW' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
4c20670cf5a271540eb6983223b5fdd3
aec4df5e6e76f15ededf809742e99388ae2f7675
'2012-05-30T18:36:33-04:00'
describe
'248425' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDWX' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
f26c90dea7bbda62f234410302053792
6c6e9190da2748977c7a7e835ebd1cef42a7fec1
'2012-05-30T18:35:37-04:00'
describe
'20445' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDWY' 'sip-files00021.pro'
a48cbb3664e8a5363d4d15a4b509ad4c
53717580c6e8c577e6c285897ee5f470cbb73036
describe
'5253' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDWZ' 'sip-files00066.pro'
7a3cdfd2453ff7e8d0a77810fac7c384
5f829ac650d3fd97f8b8ad4ada9676c917a7fad0
'2012-05-30T18:36:58-04:00'
describe
'136227' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDXA' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
cedd46b5987f20d2d1e28f0c05370605
42e312132dbdf794dd547c12a2f89fa65f393a8e
'2012-05-30T18:32:52-04:00'
describe
'251591' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDXB' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
b9703cf8084788385a116c30877e130b
5be3bb7adc674e46590ba10f6d9cfe7c2c0ac074
'2012-05-30T18:35:16-04:00'
describe
'113954' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDXC' 'sip-files00010.QC2.jpg'
05ad883aaaa506c205323c85c725c6b8
7e86f8affef9594b65edf02f5422fe43a53a773f
describe
'446898' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDXD' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
ad6d632108349ddbf80c90df72a85ce8
ae2a017fa16ec89d402f976e5fbe2c523dde33f1
'2012-05-30T18:33:59-04:00'
describe
'320978' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDXE' 'sip-files00009.QC2.jpg'
4d36eab0ad0e07d75bd2748b4d932229
2568c3fc5b6742b6556387f14d2d0e347243a23d
describe
'29182' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDXF' 'sip-files00064.pro'
5f9b6735ed0e6ce9c98e381e58d542ed
5f123ddd0d977dcf0565cfc7c52b0d1c01959088
describe
'384751' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDXG' 'sip-files00027.QC2.jpg'
0ae580b450cd5cb0ea13337d5470d9df
e1b2f745a1e34e648516ebb71a9dc80e6d56e2af
describe
'711' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDXH' 'sip-files00017.txt'
9590b4fd0d9517e0eb4be14ed3755410
e848e765559dede0671c3ba5e54641c29a750a19
'2012-05-30T18:32:38-04:00'
describe
'48914' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDXI' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
dfdda345e36c6d1c9222c57ada1c0ff0
2ab8df2c8f86ed0e83a8a8f1aa54d9d75b5da0b9
'2012-05-30T18:32:20-04:00'
describe
'2084992' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDXJ' 'sip-files00030.tif'
9b8f23838b813199c98d46b237d900be
53c59faf2f67dff58ce3dd9eb15cb78f2142d7a1
'2012-05-30T18:35:55-04:00'
describe
'1935016' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDXK' 'sip-files00010.tif'
c8089d0541e83727ccaafe7891005ce6
e26a67041733a7aa20f2f088b401bf6ea82b5c9c
'2012-05-30T18:37:36-04:00'
describe
'248652' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDXL' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
9188477882af7d321a8432faa147ec39
26fe903891cd33a49a0fcba74b350a6e37665a25
'2012-05-30T18:35:14-04:00'
describe
'404785' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDXM' 'sip-files00026.QC2.jpg'
db336e20449dc1d8ca919b2a2574fafa
128c77e141252d48367f923f15e85d0fdf8f2965
describe
'470472' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDXN' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
5245b68f253f6d6aae98390284523b5d
7e48bf57346b8d7da859634f86c5efe680b6dab5
'2012-05-30T18:33:56-04:00'
describe
'1322' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDXO' 'sip-files00050.txt'
519c628f542ae85954441e54606fbc47
628cd3bdb918c4681d74180419d2fa2d928a95bb
'2012-05-30T18:32:13-04:00'
describe
'4820' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDXP' 'sip-files00025.pro'
82e59a5e48c49a1abc3c7f1642135ad1
b024be84716034853319ac985d22596eb42d5590
describe
'42803' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDXQ' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
9da4014c4f93824feae1e25d13d51cd7
7f4434f491b74f39f42c9cc3607cd4efa789d2e8
describe
'436218' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDXR' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
cf76e7077e0d9f830956c096db476b8b
e9b64f12008b8412e5ef35a7966929c2287fb0c7
'2012-05-30T18:33:14-04:00'
describe
'160533' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDXS' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
85587bc9ab7df03e109b869d0d544d48
19e26d7602368f75de9c33e7fa3c97d856142892
'2012-05-30T18:37:01-04:00'
describe
'251256' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDXT' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
2d58c6cb46382c639ef132e1e1235ba2
015d7df947fc1715685de4391ab6d8318a0af0b3
describe
'388880' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDXU' 'sip-files00016.QC2.jpg'
46a73bd33c7249740e6d1ba1cbb78d44
7aed813c3ffbaa82cb2e735369fac17eb143d980
'2012-05-30T18:32:35-04:00'
describe
'43832' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDXV' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
8c9bcc68534373e7a7a5d43263876732
a3a1241219a871ff77b0507ed821946a52135182
'2012-05-30T18:36:50-04:00'
describe
'2025052' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDXW' 'sip-files00053.tif'
0549318b31d9af3e890adf7a4be82a63
0be23009cc017a2196d7d895507599cfb2e2c064
'2012-05-30T18:33:47-04:00'
describe
'159468' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDXX' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
e4ba88004233ecfac9a367c51bfdc848
30941626a861e8af62c3bade32f88b2d2081d4c3
'2012-05-30T18:33:13-04:00'
describe
'29774' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDXY' 'sip-files00032.pro'
cbbbf4edcfad1d2f9716b7238c525fc6
c874afff62a15beefe6a25a9f2e54d13be42dedb
'2012-05-30T18:34:05-04:00'
describe
'2115492' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDXZ' 'sip-files00059.tif'
2511ce20a66094fe021d40b22b718929
022538ab006234b145a42379e2cae47eced3539d
describe
'602' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDYA' 'sip-files00070.txt'
1cf5480c505a7c32b644a82f1b1a8219
2fb7ba57757929d3fd262dff24abcfe5ea3f4991
describe
'98414' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDYB' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
93a291e12b5ae7fb4f07fd1fa42b8779
8795b58065d4b8b386c330a751dbfb0d7a721756
'2012-05-30T18:35:20-04:00'
describe
'935' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDYC' 'sip-files00078.txt'
098b8a0e07676492d026e3aaa37b95ce
c916d2cd4587e6dc20fe5da9288d8aaf732d9d4c
describe
'50991' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDYD' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
cafcf44142d7b384e7b8b3eb94fb29cd
8078cf9186218835bf84d779abf09636af9d4017
describe
'456088' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDYE' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
6dc73257de92ccd938f8ef4ebb40f550
bb04b3c0ae138561a03caeea4e76a25df420b2e2
'2012-05-30T18:34:57-04:00'
describe
'363435' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDYF' 'sip-files00059.QC2.jpg'
e866b44321d89f61e31a64e809e477c8
b7d009ea0414e7879824cbea3074e5ab9a09d55b
'2012-05-30T18:34:36-04:00'
describe
'254490' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDYG' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
81b10bf820fd2a6d8988524d55386748
c14658113001e8c3a97ee93f171e7ec3f4ea6cfd
'2012-05-30T18:33:04-04:00'
describe
'245050' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDYH' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
2561da021a8db0182a3efda90f36779a
b9a193950af4e37bea7ee6cb2ace88f847cea38e
'2012-05-30T18:36:16-04:00'
describe
'162619' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDYI' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
1b04561708406d8d115f7ab797cc53dd
de65aedf806860894fa2ae78203a21586ebf0ccd
describe
'194974' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDYJ' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
eb7a875e9a6634d6ca2b5a695757133a
c781d65c402994224a630fecac2a543ff8dfc222
'2012-05-30T18:36:03-04:00'
describe
'13647' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDYK' 'sip-files00037.pro'
aa6a8f81b70e6354ecdf444785fd514c
b96e55ca888d4405ed2ad8497a7ae847ac6caa0d
'2012-05-30T18:34:46-04:00'
describe
'357128' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDYL' 'sip-files00053.QC2.jpg'
e54445c032738c414c61bb630c68220c
c7a13a59b03f57e1cf93d3eb35a5d77e650d3e31
describe
'53589' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDYM' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
141f8056e7d3461a3541b7ca9b495da3
923186da90239a2924ff4fb4dce61bf0d396dd88
'2012-05-30T18:33:49-04:00'
describe
'427867' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDYN' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
8edd6b55bb89a1e14ab6157745e51924
c20219bc5962ba41b17c691b1bb007223135d6c2
describe
'243833' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDYO' 'sip-files00005.jp2'
011ef7611a1af3cce1531efe18ef8172
ebff56af58a555d3bad7ca9e44eb9c9e0510b990
'2012-05-30T18:32:57-04:00'
describe
'158120' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDYP' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
c2cab6cd5cd17256df342cb158bf4d9b
a52a3c5e779518f4e30ef99a677e2c2089fb13ee
describe
'483446' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDYQ' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
0d6cd4064700e61954aac3141d929b9d
818acacb3718653d7b816b6b1e063c8cfcdad947
'2012-05-30T18:32:41-04:00'
describe
'160226' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDYR' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
6d4688ba9171db967140578c13ce0c0d
6439bd88711fd3b6bea3389b4b51dc0eef315dd3
describe
'1266' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDYS' 'sip-files00069.txt'
9daaafc852f1a67cdd1c58069b6aea46
b6a280000ec5c98504585319c025b951260d0a26
describe
'381555' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDYT' 'sip-files00037.QC2.jpg'
200422f3e54b0cc5fd67423cf8168f97
698a7dd74bdaa82a320bfbc2b26d1e3a7537d871
'2012-05-30T18:34:28-04:00'
describe
'428376' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDYU' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
295f9ae0444e58f8c97729a83d6df6e5
2bcfa621228e5a06e3e997b4ae50d83bc4d0d3ff
'2012-05-30T18:37:33-04:00'
describe
'409296' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDYV' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
4770954a226bf0d94502768d49f399ee
dbb4f7072202b2e1f932f33dfa03624b12d5e869
describe
'256' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDYW' 'sip-files00043.txt'
ebd5a17e588bff5fc5318322af237b1a
a1b48c98f8c802b8e6ca3128b83b7f0de04f4205
'2012-05-30T18:33:54-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'337630' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDYX' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
2eb121369108085d53d2bb4369874424
70999a429694860da4edd10bf7a43f18c43ed21c
'2012-05-30T18:33:23-04:00'
describe
'30096' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDYY' 'sip-files00020.pro'
5ceab4f5379f338265b40a888d755fbd
349209daf8699bc2a106b0055f9e0067411e72bf
'2012-05-30T18:34:15-04:00'
describe
'418302' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDYZ' 'sip-files00024.QC2.jpg'
19bfb9c9abd653c877fe71cb21cbbf2b
8e5571e1ad1c0caa8356822ad414d0137305151b
'2012-05-30T18:32:47-04:00'
describe
'148393' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDZA' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
b944076f8cd6ace63cb0aa13f638002e
3bc8e26348ae35800c4fe1c09e8e45a54e70e34d
'2012-05-30T18:37:14-04:00'
describe
'5271' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDZB' 'sip-files00029.pro'
9d29baaa9565d8eddae92c9fca939fac
707ea35ef410496c01376be62d0df7d6139303bb
describe
'392551' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDZC' 'sip-files00029.QC2.jpg'
943b73a377d7310a8e5f6c86fb1bf0c9
cc7461f0b695b8b12e44131bbccf116123c23f34
describe
'300717' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDZD' 'sip-files00001.jp2'
522679407b6c9efd60b26d1bbbb40509
ba7502b8ca76f0a362e308abe4c506d247b46e93
describe
'389571' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDZE' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
88282ad1b0afe0b7375d91ab173f1d4f
c3b466e4be95d35496fc55ef875c354b71eed1b3
'2012-05-30T18:36:51-04:00'
describe
'57045' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDZF' 'sip-files00001thm.jpg'
0b47ee340a57dda5f054502141616696
6e8f1daa649bf110217ef3820b1bf5f59e36b9d5
'2012-05-30T18:37:28-04:00'
describe
'2034200' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDZG' 'sip-files00037.tif'
a32dc7a7d0b8bc6140b440884fce4f69
193ac27686de7eb6b2af15b20df8f90a5703abb2
'2012-05-30T18:37:23-04:00'
describe
'253075' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDZH' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
1b6132597d076d1fdd33ac5f58357d54
8eb9dbe78191f12d2c55b6c17785281c0110fd81
describe
'1204' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDZI' 'sip-files00032.txt'
a227ca729b99ee9cb6b2dfd8d27fd306
3f3e26efcc0172515ea3ee2a4c923a578346b687
'2012-05-30T18:33:11-04:00'
describe
'395018' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDZJ' 'sip-files00045.QC2.jpg'
f8d1a65358c84e78ef8cd6059972635c
a1789ee87e8dca3678098dd4aa6f2fdae7fea37d
describe
'1964188' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDZK' 'sip-files00068.tif'
21210f64b6e626663d80eda6f4ef11c7
c4744e16352777337a1d9f61b7fa0a5a1564b15e
describe
'431909' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDZL' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
740d1269fc84e05a5e5e631028d2dd05
30ea3528ff08262c9b959ac6063f295056e334b3
describe
'128016' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDZM' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
cb2acf28add2c6f6ddf9129c719769d0
88bd8677c4fd2a157123496a909fb4fd111215db
describe
'639' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDZN' 'sip-files00005.pro'
fc9ebb097f3d078fcf147fd6d86810e5
497212845b396aeca3c28f4dc185d6833686ee2a
'2012-05-30T18:37:40-04:00'
describe
'44512' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDZO' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
edfe697aeec476a00e0c007044a94d43
f697de2e7f229ebc67dc80abb21efa9383072eda
'2012-05-30T18:33:57-04:00'
describe
'1264' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDZP' 'sip-files00020.txt'
857606d799d2ef52c7017eeb86b43e53
216d37fd6586553d4b0bc974513e8513830d9f32
'2012-05-30T18:32:49-04:00'
describe
'254856' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDZQ' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
726b0c90dd84af023d1c27c0076eee4c
76d6cf62f43f29988670992d9a3684cc310900b6
'2012-05-30T18:34:54-04:00'
describe
'244814' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDZR' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
846b5f10a8e93fd0789acfce69cfae26
914c520bc44b7eefdb6a3fd637a2604c9b0291df
'2012-05-30T18:35:48-04:00'
describe
'1296' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDZS' 'sip-files00059.txt'
2e0f259109a5beb41209750dd00fb3d1
0874f1d1c817a8b04caf7180c19703d74b18a60b
describe
'362893' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDZT' 'sip-files00040.QC2.jpg'
e73fc56986c367ab961fd1b21139a2d1
c630b1bd9bed447a05de1e63dcba094538a17efe
describe
'517401' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDZU' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
d287cc0007fa48a7146c7ea2a725a899
5dd7add5ca5d55af402dc8a48f63081193eef8f2
describe
'2003812' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDZV' 'sip-files00054.tif'
1d7a9f125417bb97e54248a78b2ec15c
3fe20d0b51ed7783b46fd4e416c257bcba158a99
describe
'30673' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDZW' 'sip-files00035.pro'
fd0967b013fb86008e0db2c46b7d1d14
a3c1f8c31b30d69cc66129a924f10f05098fb666
describe
'47780' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDZX' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
24fe79cebb75646b830d9b0d17cb85d2
3e0a22d640678371c1de81f0754e8dbdd1bd30c7
'2012-05-30T18:33:05-04:00'
describe
'110764' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDZY' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
572707a98a3594fb9ba5eafe0330d120
7a2fe47d165aa14171a7d390253604b9b3800397
'2012-05-30T18:36:20-04:00'
describe
'46422' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABDZZ' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
c6677ced2f454955eea8d984f7588a75
a43e2a3647ab0af2345e834c4476d4b185838580
'2012-05-30T18:32:43-04:00'
describe
'1218' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEAA' 'sip-files00076.txt'
23481e2fb7377476a02ae168b22571b8
9b44517de2870eb85b70e69ca907772b9e8edf96
'2012-05-30T18:35:03-04:00'
describe
'158122' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEAB' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
c9571dcc7e3403c3fd714c07294724b4
a285837871c5c796462deac986fbfc4eba246b28
'2012-05-30T18:32:09-04:00'
describe
'239493' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEAC' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
6d095e420dbef83300afd533f2c63e92
206b5013a45535e21f49b70de9803768f985edd3
describe
'406978' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEAD' 'sip-files00018.QC2.jpg'
c407c2684c18c97cbe0216ea6c223e87
87d12d7e6b7f19d9c065b5192b07b5a40334f1a3
describe
'31099' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEAE' 'sip-files00069.pro'
5326b8eaad1d977c49c493ebc1245fb5
9905d17425f57c7f6d88818cabaa42e7349542a7
'2012-05-30T18:34:25-04:00'
describe
'1962788' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEAF' 'sip-files00072.tif'
63cd773d208edfadc46b6058c7ad7d95
eedafd4e24dbf9e6438ff61b10712d1ea9bcedbc
describe
'28' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEAG' 'sip-files00079.txt'
f0164abd084f4c3eafdf76d8723390d7
68bd05a66f9aa1cdf009f712415f5baa8f45a23e
describe
'404632' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEAH' 'sip-files00011.QC2.jpg'
f1da0b1b01809c424527677d35d6a3f1
60a80a9bc380a747c4e6f89f55780042919a711a
'2012-05-30T18:35:56-04:00'
describe
'157165' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEAI' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
52416678a018a7511efaca607e28831e
e900ef47a958d0ae03861f40e108c36f8a1788b2
describe
'469' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEAJ' 'sip-files00009.txt'
818b0653f9ea7564a23b272e55b9c021
bb6bcbb8c5ad12fa5cab95ddaead6d95cc4a354f
describe
'30632' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEAK' 'sip-files00065.pro'
2d1872dc0f7cf80f647ae16e6358529f
533d52fdcc82ef7056df7625f902f44babfbb48e
'2012-05-30T18:34:16-04:00'
describe
'2011980' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEAL' 'sip-files00011.tif'
e5e745b11629f2c535bfc30467c90a72
acdb53b4d42f87f2ebc99ed5d742fe2d982a8ab5
'2012-05-30T18:32:12-04:00'
describe
'1273' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEAM' 'sip-files00030.txt'
b9dcc870ca16b1e28afa060caf7aec3e
0652f9c89e59394a4328f0b58f720743b45e89de
describe
'242270' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEAN' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
e81c2ae8e946d110ff4dacabfdb9621f
5cc71c31b484eb04deb9dc22805c0abaf604e84b
'2012-05-30T18:33:09-04:00'
describe
'55974' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEAO' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
6fe545c9a283e5fad4cd1f65d3112109
6a0d5affa9a51910713c205f434f024dfd8281f7
'2012-05-30T18:32:45-04:00'
describe
'440831' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEAP' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
a63a0a9af111ac12db50e709aff54f9f
309d830c797b495c7cc791915ed614ee50ea619b
describe
'467834' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEAQ' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
a274038fdb5850e6f01dc6eacbe41765
76e23d030d293269a4337d66be53b1d74aed919e
describe
'355237' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEAR' 'sip-files00070.QC2.jpg'
24c1d54f904f36cdc6ff2377963407f4
1cb637ffd71dde0d709f490e7b48fa1016fb3521
describe
'54321' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEAS' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
385c1571c2af8b9b4ac14018a0f2522c
85e126adade1922b905e042674601a899439e4c8
describe
'2054196' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEAT' 'sip-files00027.tif'
2de1f224c06ecbd5bbddb8c06c1def83
05975188a04af9cbbcf5b66f183291f7370ab56a
describe
'32011' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEAU' 'sip-files00024.pro'
5b4ff3166e31c5b7a41b8c0c2f5d325c
12b85d98180e281fecfdad551167ddce3ae7c0f8
describe
'31292' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEAV' 'sip-files00016.pro'
f2a078fbee7b5a3773e51cbae3d30262
1b84f7ec733876784f655c65c6a42b4bb393ba1c
'2012-05-30T18:33:51-04:00'
describe
'1242' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEAW' 'sip-files00052.txt'
2cb63abf47300d4edf79773b5fc0f1f0
126274b347aeb995a198c13da0aae9f60cd0c3ca
'2012-05-30T18:32:18-04:00'
describe
'53096' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEAX' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
faecaf00517e1ee558122a51a732380d
d9a1f03bec4682636141b38ec4be2f059160186f
'2012-05-30T18:35:57-04:00'
describe
'410197' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEAY' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
036e3bec19570fd790b021a803534f4d
a9f6b93e588a1e956a42d5bc8eae364d2913426b
describe
'13310' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEAZ' 'sip-files00063.pro'
e51c00f0cc54717748f6d7f13014c7a1
b3b57c4f4519063d9c6ae4ae170b980921146248
'2012-05-30T18:32:51-04:00'
describe
'30841' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEBA' 'sip-files00041.pro'
935bf3bac3272f7490ccf14c77087bc8
14fbd7f8807b1f339c5bdbeac2c6a352f83a1775
'2012-05-30T18:37:50-04:00'
describe
'51744' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEBB' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
907656a287398bb350d02cfe61bbeacf
0fe2201454bcebba7e4fde125eecca23720a9482
'2012-05-30T18:33:21-04:00'
describe
'365455' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEBC' 'sip-files00077.QC2.jpg'
3b9d6281d3f0436d17a74dae19a2200f
2733cdeb139a37b9fb16ef61765bdcb379ab7349
describe
'389041' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEBD' 'sip-files00030.QC2.jpg'
0e132b49245572ca7993980df72e4451
7a498912fba355d78eafaf04af779d456a81f2f7
'2012-05-30T18:37:57-04:00'
describe
'376170' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEBE' 'sip-files00051.QC2.jpg'
d7c0b3e4c6f9297a7e71ee06d32b69ca
b5fb33110d3984b661d6d5f55d12ac4d66dde178
'2012-05-30T18:36:49-04:00'
describe
'1980052' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEBF' 'sip-files00065.tif'
b99f275188ab03e2050fe681c1fd8378
f15698f66011be7b939b8d73c61da2e7305d5a15
describe
'1257' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEBG' 'sip-files00061.txt'
86264a24a9c4561d59f07ef961b7ef55
598c4ebeaaffcb074f6b8082dae50ec23b3aad21
'2012-05-30T18:34:22-04:00'
describe
'156818' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEBH' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
b092d4e70e3519f8f558e8e94e2588bf
e1764a2313a7d9d1eff8b20f01b5fdeb3cd885dd
'2012-05-30T18:37:15-04:00'
describe
'386050' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEBI' 'sip-files00034.QC2.jpg'
5c137507048e3ab3aa4d47acb8b98e5e
ae72bde1bcf2eb84d3933ce940ea453826b9171c
describe
'430827' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEBJ' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
4bc209a4a6056746ccf67944d85e1301
3bcbc1e1d26988f3fb7293770accfd3c52a5b06a
'2012-05-30T18:33:10-04:00'
describe
'53082' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEBK' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
35fda99a4c7e666e33826948d7151b4d
ae0c81257b84081db468f5037714f2c57ef466e7
describe
'1185' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEBL' 'sip-files00012.txt'
216acabf0e3d4aabe05bb3b9422a400d
816ac84e7bf46411d09a492181a89d4891a4f3df
describe
'617' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEBM' 'sip-files00063.txt'
320dffca0a308b9295171bd01fe93ebb
5be30113b12063687b9b383d8c55896759b66422
'2012-05-30T18:33:17-04:00'
describe
'1251' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEBN' 'sip-files00065.txt'
1937d6ddb2bae7613f2deb4cc985c100
7f2e55a03b6c58af7f5a7ab29340854c9d65aef2
describe
'47372' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEBO' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
d5b4ee64c69b8f885484fcae9faf9701
fddc71b693f5c328121a87082ebf9d0e0f2619c2
describe
'441667' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEBP' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
5c3eebf4fc6b5ba7c4b9147fd2f2954b
6d95e02e8db3b7f6448f2423c091d33ab75eb20d
describe
'30450' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEBQ' 'sip-files00046.pro'
1f94404932accd23b24e237f0effbc04
ad3af8e9621a1b08c0d6a8779871b2e9b6dd5681
describe
'243726' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEBR' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
09f9e2227d0e87432ad3948083b33102
f12a24fef65b5c12eff12533695bd8efa654286a
describe
'1249' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEBS' 'sip-files00028.txt'
512cff5fe5220a7d6199b160740f8523
b18629020ecaa07e95263cc0ce72ca8b7eb9f71f
'2012-05-30T18:36:55-04:00'
describe
'1168' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEBT' 'sip-files00074.txt'
5d37bfafeb08eb797ec06b8f6e31f5ed
b5e3a72829d3881f098dbd87acdb21e22e0a84db
'2012-05-30T18:35:25-04:00'
describe
'254179' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEBU' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
de077a4dffa0c99e48839926837eb0f0
f4fc597ca4de94715cbd4b67fb97257550690140
'2012-05-30T18:32:54-04:00'
describe
'252904' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEBV' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
3ec847042a569f25e1ada60e04e1feb7
e361f8e150a7b0f266c219cdd64c88c789fbf8d7
'2012-05-30T18:37:31-04:00'
describe
'173920' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEBW' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
82fc9c15b892d598f8c8b5be6e2755b2
8a1916881cbc7b1abb0e53465e59971184863027
describe
'260813' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEBX' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
daee6d8e27ff1db004b00cbce927a028
fd7be6a65cc48535d239fb2310c6be664b9d66e6
describe
'252840' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEBY' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
c55b4f83d168b8bff2fc48cc9ee490d6
54cdbe38e4062e2c486a926d0efb7442d9d96b63
describe
'254735' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEBZ' 'sip-files00003.jp2'
f8e831d5d5b803e3512e2559985e5fa7
d96a73439e4cbeae11a609d97e0121baf757c341
'2012-05-30T18:37:19-04:00'
describe
'128766' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABECA' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
efb7c97746184d7b400961405e51fd5f
545511a0168a165d7c9414748889919c81e87f90
'2012-05-30T18:37:46-04:00'
describe
'32154' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABECB' 'sip-files00067.pro'
4bac71a7d233e532ce5220e6fbf56eda
64e0caabbd6248b609e6072e68f97d796aa01454
'2012-05-30T18:36:35-04:00'
describe
'2011976' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABECC' 'sip-files00024.tif'
49e21e0572d33381860400b6f10f8fdd
c9820d3db4c5e1dc588b97467b45ccff1810f117
'2012-05-30T18:37:12-04:00'
describe
'49421' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABECD' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
2eebb3c4469e4c951cb0a3850e0375cb
be20757c5f3df203226ae0448697b99799de6656
describe
'245314' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABECE' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
96b01b390774f70e829baaf0bc208420
3d3b9738c3f177a50f53cb8233dbec207b6c0301
describe
'413965' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABECF' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
bd71e274c58a0cea097dc18b2e8d47b9
89644f4c13a91d4956f155e0c663d6655468e58d
describe
'160516' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABECG' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
005b660c46f4577ae5008136a87622de
9457eb9f7f9a96dfa83c0184b04763d01f5d1737
describe
'7231464' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABECH' 'sip-files00001.tif'
9483cc9558db1b9293c06e1fc70ae4d4
7dbf71ac6ac8ba09d4e599548ae547e918d016fd
'2012-05-30T18:35:34-04:00'
describe
'453394' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABECI' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
55b7839aee9561631c14dc23ea858c6b
96ce9865031bfbf6176b9ba9b5e335b59f863003
'2012-05-30T18:36:29-04:00'
describe
'53155' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABECJ' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
6ce023b1fe34896550817c0e8b7d7fa4
e9d726a0731a9d74a1cfff41b033c84249bac7cf
describe
'254894' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABECK' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
66d25b88940d3f4c01fd3c3e46534745
2401a3bd072eea786fdafe3059b7fdc258d80cf3
describe
'2042884' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABECL' 'sip-files00013.tif'
089f402166c49be1badac245711ab06c
aedbf10b178facb4790ac8c60dc7f25aab69f5c6
'2012-05-30T18:32:42-04:00'
describe
'44958' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABECM' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
8d6a05254643bc603e1fd1e69cd86a88
7e2ce887baf52ece8bc871853f0b8b32dbe18030
'2012-05-30T18:36:46-04:00'
describe
'160381' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABECN' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
a3f6a36cf9c8990592bd8a970754b7e8
06125ecfcaf4daf57a9b62001d7cadbd26c4b4d8
describe
'98989' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABECO' 'sip-filesUF00027932_00001.mets'
62c138c761e0a2de680b8f4e9b8298f7
1eef501e73a6715208dd5b27adf38ab9b940d47c
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-10T13:09:07-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'637524' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABECR' 'sip-files00001.jpg'
64a85dbeda6647b220d78627b6612e77
3a0d18577749d1060a61c2ab6d6adaec59814380
'2012-05-30T18:36:53-04:00'
describe
'260448' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABECS' 'sip-files00003.jpg'
8b29560ae05495ffcd3dd3ca8db95466
8db3ad94e2a9d31e501072e5ac2ceac6d6e3194e
describe
'341926' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABECT' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
ca5f65c0623c7fdcec5e796e14e27232
9304e78b75a1b142b89410d5eabc2d035dbce22a
describe
'129111' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABECU' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
a85a6261e5fe70ae3231b9d951cfb705
528f98b77d1f361837c253378f4e2bc053ef32e6
describe
'454872' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABECV' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
058c519221f06895c9b269268b212742
bdc8ab98bad800a52b826fa0e6386feddf0cbdf1
describe
'383641' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABECW' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
2fa510a9af9076396bcaefa2d5b2a157
8db373a13f2407c41dc80b2f9f5c04078fd70755
'2012-05-30T18:36:44-04:00'
describe
'451983' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABECX' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
38f6d1f9eb6153f0cce205770e31a383
6b74652a7d6e1b90c3eca487af61f65f0be535f6
describe
'470773' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABECY' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
c8f3dfe6af21150c2fd2ae351719ec19
1c8f5130abd2d35130edebd7d853e08210019ee6
describe
'457931' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABECZ' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
28e2aea68f60f1531ac6386400da00a6
2a4eea9eac52cbe6efd3dfe96cd2a7bf0c5442c8
describe
'471397' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEDA' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
24d46601108239f789969e7ee74ec1e9
a912d18f536d7b1f04599bbcd3e505bc8c694c5b
describe
'427462' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEDB' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
44e09ea5bf355f7646eb1e69d2d53846
4bf20c65906d807063eba7fa99a59bf3e7b30cdc
'2012-05-30T18:33:41-04:00'
describe
'422858' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEDC' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
f4e11a1078dba778f66d402ccd72e812
11cea7e2b88a0e9048905014e5ca84676cded39e
describe
'437282' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEDD' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
33cb47023e49f9d7c427698f627a5dd2
15a075f8db2c5dce9e50b053e304de86be884db5
'2012-05-30T18:32:34-04:00'
describe
'435911' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEDE' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
170863cc9350591af9b3bd695425b0cb
dc3eb7ea2874aa5767a5819772182920b908cc36
describe
'436840' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEDF' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
293dba385526657763e1b995a169b6a6
f0529fc541c6e37cafd809bb4c3afe2a50403f0a
describe
'446558' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEDG' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
f2d681a8d8a1dc3ce626307bb6ac198c
875e1ec1cd17b5832f7b1609b877686a31e821e5
describe
'432663' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEDH' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
65805c5689f6720f7ffe8ba0f3899548
656ab7e4412973b1d8298e5419a0e36d2f765c30
describe
'458637' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEDI' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
949c90ed776ea39e8722a3c40d150692
f0e4f3acb40052d5edc7396da3f571a34937efbc
describe
'430735' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEDJ' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
b662ad02616ae18f3036e5847e930491
71ab80c8c2adaede6c8cccdec2ffa97ada32606b
describe
'443444' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEDK' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
e4beeae734b0926ac5d488aab5250ba8
2b46924d0834361edcd48fe0df1d917b060cf54a
describe
'447596' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEDL' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
948904a44dc73ef2670410d0497bfb5d
5e7e14df66b6c7a9775a6919ee6fd66277a2e04a
describe
'435943' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEDM' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
4f4779739c41f2c8604eb7b9b44bea16
86a683379dd75117f9f7be7b6bcb45d81ddc1b88
describe
'412081' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEDN' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
150e1b67ec343802ce189a7f5e044e6f
77971c51f223f54279eb320dd370a68be823fe8d
describe
'409691' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEDO' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
b185931dc406669ae8ddc103b63d572d
a69a0901f0820febbcf94ed648e7241d9265787b
describe
'417695' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEDP' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
a7199d7dd7c18c28195a063286388924
93865df2f2d63b02093a5e2f663fa065b93d4119
describe
'460136' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEDQ' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
e92ef86050c68839cb864366e5cf5e25
d3c6a5f8df7bfd3ef81877a728c1be2d76e0527f
describe
'422501' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEDR' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
bc9580ffcf52ba5a6c602df8cc156d02
ef44dfc17bbdeeb01612213f7d7c11241f6be16c
describe
'397964' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEDS' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
10188bcabfda1b13fbd9954fdfad9e0f
209f8529e1a7c1d11d672ac2c7afcaad8bf01c31
'2012-05-30T18:34:14-04:00'
describe
'389150' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEDT' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
e7bab76d30dcf862b41f5feda3de734d
1dffff60b9a2fabe676310fdad67fa274b2ac8a6
describe
'433245' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEDU' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
306fb2ae6ff25368802c79aacb1551f6
e13fff7c45a0cc44ad27f32fde6a74408b6165bf
describe
'419424' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEDV' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
a2538c8b8d6a141203784267065de6f0
59a9cc9d5f05c321d6b533cfc7fce53b75604c17
describe
'422288' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEDW' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
6aaada5136396b044331b99120fef289
3f911c768d18d9c41ccec399ac4fe1a237d5e1e3
describe
'392798' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEDX' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
86521faf050f61a3d7987a998347d5f2
f557df4479b433c8f3d8cf8e4e1e7fdf10267341
describe
'425225' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEDY' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
d0b6b686ce67c7c8b73cb5e8fd229d5b
ea0a9fc7941a05768a8dc3c916bba63d790a4a47
describe
'406864' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEDZ' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
06f860f3bd299675a76f56b9e432726c
f2654e222ee08ffa27646238bbf7abccba5e90c3
describe
'97817' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEEA' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
ee44e6416fad28d0c4ead3f5f224ebc7
46519d0bfa89588158fc9ab2a61050537cb49871
'2012-05-30T18:33:39-04:00'
describe
'292207' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEEB' 'sip-files00002.jp2'
706c0c2623a17c39de8a0eb31ac2d5bd
0f1fd8d649deaef1a94be103c95e63d450a94926
'2012-05-30T18:34:45-04:00'
describe
'252014' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEEC' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
f881265fd86ba5a7d6a45e5b84de7865
4815aa579dc6ea8652c374cc92ae646c96b51069
describe
'241319' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEED' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
da69f79193cd6ce2323bc10927957b9e
10de11620fda786825cfb067910feb3950e7e7f1
describe
'249878' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEEE' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
75f794af9b56882308b6f03b72688ecd
76d135785ae77cbccf58d8ccb097ee03ff6a0430
describe
'253973' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEEF' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
ede1773e4a1c84ab9a99eeaf98c3a110
c29acf167dcf7c954ae941f4222c7acebf176c87
describe
'243360' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEEG' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
d997a222e17b21ada80f36a45207ce57
014ea4183917ac2ad7bac280009b808e33442d99
describe
'260653' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEEH' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
d32c77ff88400bcc5654be75368cf581
31a408b4ff470e4c067d18e48b9da6768269ddc4
'2012-05-30T18:36:52-04:00'
describe
'242961' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEEI' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
498dba7a6c8378083df3548686fa0394
9c5be5bd1a3fdd5b6a6ba396c1f64c3b9bb2c0dd
describe
'248158' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEEJ' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
392181cebd8091d81ffa18600d6d7ef2
dad90b3d9381e744284878cf1f8c16efed669819
describe
'255171' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEEK' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
2f13580fa80f6a5fd343ccd0609b8255
34f72cab64a6e3157b864ce41f3f381adcdd49ad
'2012-05-30T18:37:06-04:00'
describe
'258943' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEEL' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
b3f846674f96de8475b116e85ab8c750
2e5dcb5b3c9d6e77a7b972434cb74b4b807117a4
describe
'252308' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEEM' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
5593c633281b4968b031b5ef3c576f0f
2f6782eb80140b49e66b54f9350508ea42983483
describe
'256561' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEEN' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
c27f6ab2a72b8dd50bf1789e9be3c664
2cf3096d7265f9d4603a16208f5046d0c6648dfc
describe
'255557' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEEO' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
041bf83e76448fb0c8facb266f1c9715
93f0600530a1071e8f217601d1eaa306d211dab4
'2012-05-30T18:36:17-04:00'
describe
'252564' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEEP' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
f096d36a308063f4c0fca221392efd63
8a226be282efea2bffba20a914509e0d9d7517ba
describe
'247172' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEEQ' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
41c0e0e02004416b76af9679c5f5058b
cea8a5768a8f045f1bd04347e6863d5f7e9f0265
describe
'257327' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEER' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
beaf63c1e708f942475e53d4f0a81887
8f6deeaec4e48ca80d4614d9224e386a0f498006
'2012-05-30T18:35:47-04:00'
describe
'259874' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEES' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
884643f2fe2f33e7961d30d9c55a8b58
2b50852ed7f0f3b118b94911292281ce9865a7d7
'2012-05-30T18:37:43-04:00'
describe
'252703' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEET' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
0e5b022517c239779f9ef8ee35926fa4
c93ad3d2781e133a8b1a6c33b20bd37e54c84602
'2012-05-30T18:35:30-04:00'
describe
'258156' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEEU' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
405e7308f7dc63ce75c37424ab7ba923
6a0c4c74cb3c4a1447964aa63577173a2d18cf77
describe
'248190' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEEV' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
f73b738f7b424bdffc2404936d91a79c
5f17efaa11af8e1dc720609793e1cf88e3efbda7
describe
'253843' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEEW' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
6a521ffd21ba686c79a72de8ee42dc29
b795dc776ef8e6ec226857e2a6d8b39ff322ec1a
describe
'262769' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEEX' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
863944612499a041caff7b7db4497880
cacb63ae8390702bb141059dcd0b3f06f6b1a7dd
describe
'251022' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEEY' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
63d446f036ec814dd506fa0a888c968b
6539a1b1a22c307b7ef3a85544ab825da3c43db6
describe
'245830' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEEZ' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
b7054d5f014f325b758df667816ca675
37222459b446f75806865a64f8c90cfc1bbc9826
'2012-05-30T18:36:31-04:00'
describe
'258737' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEFA' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
e6ba9c45c340f9ddaff7fc98b62e03ba
da03e5bdc65009e62f5393735c5e08ece41e1d1b
describe
'252406' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEFB' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
49a480f768e1d4b509b93bec80431af3
0723cb9f90b6b4234e09562329211d11a4993e1a
describe
'255418' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEFC' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
208ea974245c6753ff40fdee9941dc49
a9505f7eeddeb012038e161f290779dd9eccf0a7
describe
'259014' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEFD' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
e5b8aa36520afbbeea231846731404d1
2645482f6780a4015872ce580a13ea83777a715d
describe
'297630' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEFE' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
ac2927aeafa9a1ad5571f5ff18e8d20b
5e25f31f1b0749494eeb0e41aeb9b3daea0efecc
describe
'2047412' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEFF' 'sip-files00003.tif'
ea60d2bd862203f088ca7a2416c1e133
00902029973b17757e7820f4c4fafa0d18246256
'2012-05-30T18:32:31-04:00'
describe
'1942532' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEFG' 'sip-files00009.tif'
93db731a732c5c48afffd49a3c7a0993
b19db39f32048be63848decbe2091f3041c2d4e7
'2012-05-30T18:37:38-04:00'
describe
'2045264' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEFH' 'sip-files00012.tif'
8c670877c59b7f473994651323a52fd8
b6fa61e7b667a0d5b3ae07086729218b7131cb02
describe
'1960592' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEFI' 'sip-files00015.tif'
6e465e1a02fb95a98b63b32c98486c80
78ead9bba513a2415b246ed7792d1b8e86e92096
describe
'2099536' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEFJ' 'sip-files00016.tif'
80dfed485efa78124e7e4c76b4ee5de0
2af48da29da7afee3b2373acc3174aad9a95ee81
'2012-05-30T18:34:30-04:00'
describe
'2051380' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEFK' 'sip-files00017.tif'
69a0caba5a7444758c5893a5c863811e
5fa7750bc515da45c88f2b97011fe22d41ad3148
'2012-05-30T18:32:36-04:00'
describe
'1998828' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEFL' 'sip-files00019.tif'
3adbb1610d77e9f1fde9a5162dbfdeed
8c3c667092fb18688fce9d08fba31c24cdfeded1
describe
'2023904' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEFM' 'sip-files00021.tif'
19889b33d27cb0e757e7e4eb564f29ed
2d0ef5c1f70be8360f7249f63585f9a65afc8c71
'2012-05-30T18:33:46-04:00'
describe
'1951208' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEFN' 'sip-files00022.tif'
9cf342441c6532bc3cdbb911076970ab
6dea67274f3e90e64b48fe754dfa51c18b633b8c
describe
'2038700' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEFO' 'sip-files00025.tif'
1763d69d8aaa513d148168afd0f6b243
2fe9ab2da7e913e4dfb152ae8e1efc056a7c36a3
'2012-05-30T18:35:11-04:00'
describe
'2037940' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEFP' 'sip-files00029.tif'
a04a234743bf8ee0aada9b888fefcc68
d1bb2d121985fb983372dead2cb16ec3367820de
'2012-05-30T18:35:58-04:00'
describe
'2067296' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEFQ' 'sip-files00032.tif'
baa180115fb1aa481e4d9544eb14f135
a20dda95763c789595b7b784e1f21d2face7a3f3
describe
'2065784' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEFR' 'sip-files00033.tif'
608ebeb53026902f94a82339628c3a82
7b797a44b6643e85176e86bbe7a5e67e14e75a31
describe
'2058504' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEFS' 'sip-files00034.tif'
a6225df6c03c2bb07c5c4f3b403a55c0
34e0b181354f6ca862bb5b7b14cbd50ab2e4213b
'2012-05-30T18:34:38-04:00'
describe
'1970308' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEFT' 'sip-files00035.tif'
b8ade689dea5e60a1afe9367908fa60b
28e41f69169bfe762c26143c791a137c1136fdbf
describe
'2100164' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEFU' 'sip-files00036.tif'
9ae1aa5611baa6d9924dd1d10b974324
fbaa20a136074df7b2751250125d0b1ee5b27a42
describe
'1991428' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEFV' 'sip-files00041.tif'
b3251364f3a4d61322ff9909d3793717
879a9fead85763ddef2445533d648d976ee77202
'2012-05-30T18:33:18-04:00'
describe
'2072612' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEFW' 'sip-files00043.tif'
86cefadb128de55ac6b0d28701894999
6770602c560483fe6c0caf234ccb287f5e7dbc3b
describe
'1972048' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEFX' 'sip-files00044.tif'
eb0dc35398c65945f3c267d131e2aad1
83d39661af1d7654488cfec38be0b2d20d21e632
describe
'1950472' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEFY' 'sip-files00045.tif'
4b360125d7289042966de5887cc48238
ed0783d5eda12d8fbffde27d0104c34c0fa17d76
'2012-05-30T18:37:53-04:00'
describe
'1974044' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEFZ' 'sip-files00047.tif'
a19df372dda24fe6eaf791564bc2adfa
20453001cc8d4c3087f6c020de43d3fd8d3ab594
describe
'2092516' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEGA' 'sip-files00048.tif'
157a2425fb082531798f8c135425be35
89f8cc02efaf237fd1316520de7af8aaad23c295
describe
'2049224' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEGB' 'sip-files00049.tif'
3ffe4b82772e7d601ce44ea967bf7bce
4df5fef90e043c28e244ee3876d395d3efedf6ca
'2012-05-30T18:33:35-04:00'
describe
'2035892' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEGC' 'sip-files00050.tif'
a2bb3a4a439884e2bd80f66d43feb234
8962713a388a9314a8a42a593a708973b7a6e278
'2012-05-30T18:34:51-04:00'
describe
'2042836' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEGD' 'sip-files00051.tif'
295dbbbcfdb87a9f1344fb10d793df50
7ed80d02a6fd0184af7a2b41312d319511df918f
'2012-05-30T18:33:37-04:00'
describe
'2078688' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEGE' 'sip-files00052.tif'
3574965fea9248d9fa196ae63728f926
1ab8167dcde105f988cb018e01e2902736979573
describe
'1998988' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEGF' 'sip-files00055.tif'
07c59f75b3026243aaa38002c6450016
276c6b12191020864ab91dc2b07f8f430f5deec1
'2012-05-30T18:36:54-04:00'
describe
'2044276' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEGG' 'sip-files00057.tif'
6bd98acfcf674a3957e94ded04660765
4ac222e295c77cdb77d6420c25bf72a6dd073c9a
describe
'2023280' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEGH' 'sip-files00058.tif'
dfbb86e03f2d57f741c72328d5b6b6b0
0a1db2e12229856288ceb7bc6bcceed5e1adcf52
'2012-05-30T18:36:59-04:00'
describe
'2047392' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEGI' 'sip-files00060.tif'
5b8f872ac8cdc315e37a7b910af12b83
21dc6cf46f083b6f575f588db6dfbfc521465fe3
describe
'1957104' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEGJ' 'sip-files00062.tif'
fe869e54bed2a9fbf8e8b537df76188c
e75312ea224553b6430686bb8544f768435b247b
'2012-05-30T18:35:41-04:00'
describe
'2082660' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEGK' 'sip-files00066.tif'
7f37a4e7b41b18c66f4ff52c584d29c2
956359639d7c726dd1df476451ed0e9c419bf7c4
describe
'2032996' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEGL' 'sip-files00069.tif'
c606a321f4b4287705ddc47a602e0110
5d7af22d6dfd62dd64380705db0de8243e8b2e22
'2012-05-30T18:35:13-04:00'
describe
'1975572' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEGM' 'sip-files00070.tif'
7f195d404644bc862141d70a83011abf
d4fd90c92ff5672bae41d0627d80beed9ede613d
describe
'2057044' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEGN' 'sip-files00071.tif'
11459010e57dbadf9ce432dbcbea9a33
014987e5c39eae3bcb9f312a43f64b446e4a8309
describe
'2086008' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEGO' 'sip-files00073.tif'
60253da05d76eb104498245aece254aa
88adabcaa57a0b20cacc3293e2228fd595229a26
describe
'2077264' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEGP' 'sip-files00074.tif'
a3afab797b411958e9f4cd251b3a717b
5c189b662107711b21ca4e02d19cd6c097409e21
'2012-05-30T18:34:37-04:00'
describe
'2094056' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEGQ' 'sip-files00075.tif'
fe8f4379de2f7a22d4fec37ab9fd5097
d37258d00b398f1f25ca9367833b33ddda06f8fc
'2012-05-30T18:34:10-04:00'
describe
'2036704' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEGR' 'sip-files00076.tif'
acd4746bc0d10f7be63fcd8a913c11e2
b00518d2f592d40dbab2ddb4d760b85d345a9782
describe
'2050684' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEGS' 'sip-files00077.tif'
f388b296b6cfa6410323363a0249dad9
1348224af5c4f85d396207dc5332b36dbe50521b
describe
'2012880' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEGT' 'sip-files00078.tif'
a634e99e4a57567012e97eae586fe2a5
610c9feb04edb94031a349ece59339e26ca60d59
'2012-05-30T18:37:24-04:00'
describe
'1941296' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEGU' 'sip-files00079.tif'
1700aa1b01a4b80c9a5aa76326658882
72cbb9b5c1c74a1654c62b45cacee944129a9cd0
describe
'7034844' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEGV' 'sip-files00081.tif'
439e0719c5415a92dd3199be93525311
8b2ec2bade864908d61593c6dfaf0efb2b83c0f3
describe
'7152184' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEGW' 'sip-files00082.tif'
78f99c1c3b6517a27b20e8082b8d32f5
dcfbb8f1d10e4bb5eefb4e70f267bf6968641d3f
'2012-05-30T18:34:39-04:00'
describe
'1323' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEGX' 'sip-files00002.pro'
c7923677891e434e124644c44eae1621
02af30c5aaaee381ba001cc943c0fb406d733464
describe
'334' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEGY' 'sip-files00003.pro'
7d230e54d71d89c53d36f6ee41b85037
40f0dd961991c74c1284c584b6bb5c636e3e27ef
describe
'209' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEGZ' 'sip-files00010.pro'
f2adbb503d230ad3131c742967bd6743
6a0ef6a69e475c39f26fd64759e2852d8aee7acd
'2012-05-30T18:36:11-04:00'
describe
'18311' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEHA' 'sip-files00011.pro'
83ce1873ec4eea2e0b20ea7d10c10635
298d18db23f15afb66e0b8be31eb8b5580678ea5
describe
'14713' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEHB' 'sip-files00013.pro'
37905681fa6c84b2df9aa74bcf2391e5
d53cf37ed392945803107795d173762a34323fa8
describe
'28720' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEHC' 'sip-files00014.pro'
b2a487a4aa7d122a41b691e2bba56033
6b53c6f8f5fbd8d3c6535d9ce261268665f12db7
'2012-05-30T18:35:46-04:00'
describe
'15742' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEHD' 'sip-files00017.pro'
fa1724ec9e171e28113d4e39f8bc6880
53aac3bfdcc415a76d99a2f7864101b37582061e
describe
'28994' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEHE' 'sip-files00018.pro'
7793427c14674f236f2de55090104927
43e0e6846406b711df92675d0f2c00c0418b7c9a
describe
'4066' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEHF' 'sip-files00019.pro'
d4606242811a521e38a22abe6cf1b966
bb033614e3e31e54bfef26be2e2440757feaae99
describe
'18809' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEHG' 'sip-files00022.pro'
33647771c42da46e030bd0eb3084779b
ecc4695dee0f93e323b300f6240d2ed742ef813b
describe
'15039' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEHH' 'sip-files00023.pro'
f691d50d9af3dc3353d2c7f9ed01990e
ad58d40b301dc244b431e23ffcf1a3270177550b
describe
'28614' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEHI' 'sip-files00026.pro'
27fcfac88b72fd3815f4ea896b21659d
b7a29908c9e4f743698f155c27a5d72ab90be386
describe
'14601' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEHJ' 'sip-files00033.pro'
4db3008fe5e0d542271fb47acf24090d
005ede35fc08179516d96381a50e1fd6535f8d2a
describe
'31646' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEHK' 'sip-files00036.pro'
697dbe6883e422a1520d4dbd9ac3d7fc
0ffb6d0cfa0fa65632d4f5a3e9703121af6a3a25
describe
'29112' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEHL' 'sip-files00038.pro'
695408b16a61344a6a95cdceb6ee3b99
04f1311b52b3c85269ed4586ef0f8eefd91590a6
describe
'31650' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEHM' 'sip-files00039.pro'
9764998979c5db0082d7121d56683075
dac5bae57d5fad78b66c88eec1b5cb72b24ab271
'2012-05-30T18:33:30-04:00'
describe
'32769' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEHN' 'sip-files00042.pro'
ac8ee64b82c7bad752abcd4260e5bf21
33a35a22fca8657c6403f641dd7b8b6ebc23b478
describe
'3162' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEHO' 'sip-files00043.pro'
df35589008031a0e5418613fcc30508b
18f973e4e7f5bee94e871345eda580d6f74fcb26
describe
'5657' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEHP' 'sip-files00044.pro'
d6910608c16423b6ad0a5ef22b8ad453
948730115e7948a2b442675249bb1090911e4448
describe
'30989' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEHQ' 'sip-files00045.pro'
3adc9f73528c08c235f1e25654b8cf94
046e4d9d45dc093becf603470d2cc28b4d950f3a
describe
'31563' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEHR' 'sip-files00047.pro'
9aa24fb42624efaf711067b06f3d47f3
4c8689af04f3345eca95eb055a7c3965b324a033
describe
'32161' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEHS' 'sip-files00048.pro'
585dc4967aa7fe8d1a5dc61038f235ca
2e351c9dda36fdc0977f5a418303689dc8baa807
describe
'8839' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEHT' 'sip-files00049.pro'
8d7eb266a6f9bdad6ade01d720d5c56f
79f7be687773c8e5b102b407e5b211c7dbfe2d2c
describe
'33220' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEHU' 'sip-files00050.pro'
d7c63017fa6f14b0471bda0001b2ce7f
d10b3ada9ed0f4abca62f1e69dce6f94476aa609
'2012-05-30T18:37:45-04:00'
describe
'13584' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEHV' 'sip-files00051.pro'
3928af4237388fff0405ce1cbe41056e
e7afeb8163f595400bd84139b8689030928e5ab9
'2012-05-30T18:36:32-04:00'
describe
'29664' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEHW' 'sip-files00052.pro'
b00468a5f7a858def289f5a4780f4c84
b173501216e56485311af618b4c0afeae359d989
describe
'29438' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEHX' 'sip-files00054.pro'
c50cad85923222132b894eb897539580
9420f03433ae675285a13cdb3228d18e6e77e02e
describe
'30531' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEHY' 'sip-files00055.pro'
35c2bb5343c84ca20a9cce3830754552
03789ed1601d70f08f5776c724633fd5d90798fd
describe
'6760' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEHZ' 'sip-files00056.pro'
33bbc97d7aece4ab43ec76f71aa38991
64dd144abe1a016846881ecfdbb8146e86d436a0
'2012-05-30T18:34:56-04:00'
describe
'31429' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEIA' 'sip-files00057.pro'
7e3b357192207dfa4bc76654c30a5456
1616500018c58b68fffd3235353b5c135c64290c
describe
'30859' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEIB' 'sip-files00059.pro'
c27529e4c601023366a95e15ca3b4a63
15e210f0b9301ce1dec5e16d1d43ae60323e8fc7
'2012-05-30T18:34:03-04:00'
describe
'30473' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEIC' 'sip-files00060.pro'
bfae2c9036a23e9fb66ef6998c6ab247
fe7fb495d11760300cf695e18a5950ca7022fb03
describe
'31102' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEID' 'sip-files00061.pro'
a58bd6444633cd6a93aa3b0837aaea83
a2b365b84d7666e14df503dc7579e0e05ac3aa3e
describe
'28486' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEIE' 'sip-files00068.pro'
2ee6c8234bfd0fa28d5cbd14e4342daf
f7885910e5096ecf1996f434409a446ce388dc59
describe
'12608' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEIF' 'sip-files00070.pro'
23f22ad82d17ea24524a369410c7b74c
ffdf1b8b3a7ac68f182b473fcb692e16c867310d
'2012-05-30T18:36:48-04:00'
describe
'30216' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEIG' 'sip-files00072.pro'
7ccded48a197ee43fae274a054631417
73105433f3bae6ecd8d962d03000669b086521cd
describe
'14109' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEIH' 'sip-files00073.pro'
dc8a95d2f37e34e9bbd42e79cef3e609
6453e3d2d7a0aea4c883adf8b3739ca16fa0d148
describe
'28830' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEII' 'sip-files00074.pro'
7abf348f8088e9afe3d345a46a07a68e
298132fbe32b7a796609085bff90b81c46f014eb
describe
'30113' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEIJ' 'sip-files00076.pro'
95ae2429971528f1d8816956a9214b07
5d5183539308d0c105b2098dc721ccc8d604ce53
describe
'13822' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEIK' 'sip-files00077.pro'
ec9641bad41ab7fae739d36d4f45a442
eccb8ef59c273545451b97c2ac6ae7617a7bec3a
describe
'21645' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEIL' 'sip-files00078.pro'
a4e75c1953e48af9c89d79d297a57906
6b12c25ede12f7311771c9b575b8c1f80fedf631
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEIM' 'sip-files00080.pro'
47c482afa01df369d7661fb40c76589b
7d3df6895ea505b23aeb2f2efc28d39db6e0844b
describe
'273' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEIN' 'sip-files00081.pro'
47f812d89444b96b22eadb6bdee7c71d
8ec244d705e01e146217e867582cdfb2bbf84964
'2012-05-30T18:36:26-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEIO' 'sip-files00082.pro'
55cf7000fe31a4fddd5fc924d61ac137
03b1a9327c9e239bcffca943c03645f233a50f48
describe
'59' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEIP' 'sip-files00001.txt'
f4e4c27b458e1e2d1e079d22a634ca9a
b269349fb1fcc02584d5e51d858611c40a1d661e
describe
'22' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEIQ' 'sip-files00003.txt'
57b55acf7831013df37178c4b1fe67f5
a2ed1bc19a550fd14b6d1654b922e9ab267254f1
describe
'54' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEIR' 'sip-files00005.txt'
19f029e2902ebc84af7c29737abea535
aa8ebe426986f58740b70418e236d884860ee725
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEIS' 'sip-files00010.txt'
bc949ea893a9384070c31f083ccefd26
cbb8391cb65c20e2c05a2f29211e55c49939c3db
describe
'705' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEIT' 'sip-files00013.txt'
b89c8d18d8e32cffcd11974e21773501
92562ad840e1765ece8f6ddf564ca744bd17ab8c
describe
'1205' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEIU' 'sip-files00014.txt'
40800700f455658fda38edfb7812720c
6fc412d87ffb6d9e731666e7d880d5388a07368f
describe
'1166' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEIV' 'sip-files00015.txt'
1dd470e262b7155c2c3219dfdb89ede5
5e2271f0633bbf789f4bab6ee537a7189eb25e01
describe
'1275' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEIW' 'sip-files00016.txt'
4f9ad7cc33d0f25a244dd6aa8a46378e
fdddb52391656afdd343a98011474011ceee4d98
describe
'268' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEIX' 'sip-files00019.txt'
0cbe4dd3d663204249f848f2dc2a1587
1144b0496b72d744dc82ed83137a5c62293c4fe8
describe
'900' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEIY' 'sip-files00021.txt'
d556ba2c17ac7f868f05402e8ffbffc8
b027d5b22e85e0980a85cad370c5cabcf8346342
'2012-05-30T18:36:02-04:00'
describe
'815' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEIZ' 'sip-files00022.txt'
cdc526686b4a2dc62f9de2566630ceb0
a13491115091b42ca2711d70b1afe5c095ec92a7
describe
'699' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEJA' 'sip-files00023.txt'
49e8ce068f01d35347781892ed368e04
f5d57299ea66b3bbc3af73503f6b5073519eb8d0
'2012-05-30T18:36:45-04:00'
describe
'1199' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEJB' 'sip-files00026.txt'
4462cca8cb3c14a24ec78fe68ea4f7de
14e8c7d9a89c5608345a95068fb0e42eae81a481
describe
'1214' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEJC' 'sip-files00027.txt'
42a7bf6ec98acc11ad208e168203a217
ba301666999e3263290adfbe1588d24fb40266f2
'2012-05-30T18:35:44-04:00'
describe
'310' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEJD' 'sip-files00029.txt'
69040361832bec5e0ddd5a3ea100563d
e72e737d6801ee07f8786c19b091194218ca10fa
describe
'781' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEJE' 'sip-files00031.txt'
1dde0acdd185c8ae5224ba68033e2494
5cc1077cfdbd66a4aa4b41f313fe7e7875cac81a
'2012-05-30T18:33:15-04:00'
describe
'730' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEJF' 'sip-files00033.txt'
4ee646d73f2e0f7d030e30ba99e02874
2ca0c5378348e79fc476fcd5629fa7ba8cda0e69
describe
Invalid character
'1255' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEJG' 'sip-files00034.txt'
faa317209626b46b90209ee5ca0c2aec
b9b89dfcac44926dcad6e475798604b8d9b1ebaf
'2012-05-30T18:35:17-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEJH' 'sip-files00035.txt'
8aee138a5e6f10366afdc702db043718
36bbd4b0073f031533591d81e328a32e1f2af55f
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEJI' 'sip-files00036.txt'
e8d6e7d80dc0840c7acde7d6b6581cf0
8619e04a34507fb2d6978481e4749f8c37f4a81c
describe
'643' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEJJ' 'sip-files00037.txt'
7cf018e87c09fe913ef557d7016d1d5d
59fefce7b5a5b7be5cf29ace84e291e00f4ac990
'2012-05-30T18:36:30-04:00'
describe
'1174' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEJK' 'sip-files00038.txt'
186bf94d83fa4458e4cf33fcf333f227
0dc29c947a00945aea09fb201919754fb57c9c3a
describe
'1309' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEJL' 'sip-files00039.txt'
f2f453568b88a746483dd0c1ff04155a
f4d55730d34ea504f991674ffe369b894c795d32
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEJM' 'sip-files00041.txt'
c6ad8563235bd3b7af4299c54e1cbf84
850dc08ac464fddbae7b6fca035563e53f438d79
'2012-05-30T18:33:16-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEJN' 'sip-files00042.txt'
fca3c027c8599db78653fd4159ea91f3
b2e319250b3413edab96474aa995cc2399ba8939
describe
'336' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEJO' 'sip-files00044.txt'
8ed8a080d9d7dc218ef1bbf5750dccb3
3ee04d5bb0e23b42b552740fca8fbbcb7847a1d3
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEJP' 'sip-files00045.txt'
b298f7589bdbfad3e1a9b3e70f2b4c55
04a51caf54e12fa647c90886cf1874277e1056fc
'2012-05-30T18:33:40-04:00'
describe
'1226' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEJQ' 'sip-files00046.txt'
6b34a13ed428154a1619553530d6050b
b4df305d113addd04b59499e3d97ff5f5499b3c2
describe
'1324' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEJR' 'sip-files00047.txt'
2c153ff3ceb26d9c8f0165abe8581575
f54cd6c050315a86d9d2a18f59c04304876e6d40
'2012-05-30T18:32:16-04:00'
describe
'1280' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEJS' 'sip-files00048.txt'
e6068b706ce7060b7aef193c3ae8d7e6
424646aaf41ae3f1832016c74a7e935ce98496f2
describe
'529' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEJT' 'sip-files00049.txt'
ff6a73b5a73ce077d23869106dcef681
893d8ff5eaea93f0e4df2c8a45c5922a3048233c
describe
Invalid character
'656' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEJU' 'sip-files00053.txt'
29b0e209a618eafdc8016a0e771dbbcf
01ff3f54f5920db8b21d1c535b72f9797bcd6ed7
describe
'1225' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEJV' 'sip-files00054.txt'
c060315e45913b82e5515f669e1574a0
417a6d893e13141d1f6612417de2907e17aeff46
describe
'392' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEJW' 'sip-files00056.txt'
8a7bac6e4a435289bc3fab16ecce0ee6
8395f4595ec0ecb69bbd65e38aefe9e82ba7677a
describe
'1279' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEJX' 'sip-files00057.txt'
884eb104d1dd93fbaa872c29fa91c237
2ea93de07cc882d732d7a7105eba8da86616be26
describe
'427' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEJY' 'sip-files00058.txt'
c3464731b785045c0fa1f532eb8c182c
178f3eeddfcf08a765c7da271e03d774c76b2ba4
describe
Invalid character
'1232' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEJZ' 'sip-files00060.txt'
1005df43c737e7c15bb04d4d01693824
acadadec648cc4509b0c2fb8f58084bb56d9b189
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEKA' 'sip-files00064.txt'
9de92592f7219385edd1ca353021d4d2
16f56a6d9a63e2541b0e823f584df8b3ea9e48ef
describe
'308' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEKB' 'sip-files00066.txt'
7f21bf831a6aa14809d1d7c7b486e7aa
6338a0748e1c741b71c83f2cd7e78cd6d2095a2f
'2012-05-30T18:35:05-04:00'
describe
'1306' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEKC' 'sip-files00067.txt'
07e9f4d1cff61c9b8804ce2d564929ef
41257fbe298fd07e8e0cf26940c7125203a1a843
describe
'1158' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEKD' 'sip-files00068.txt'
783eb96d9958b4e0e20fbfaf7d86d947
091d2381b113f0330471b64dc8c27aa48426ca5c
'2012-05-30T18:33:25-04:00'
describe
'1333' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEKE' 'sip-files00071.txt'
218e6aab88be225520374822c92f01dc
e6eab24ed2fb36356b5cfdf70f9283b89965b71d
describe
'1213' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEKF' 'sip-files00072.txt'
1cfaaa6db22a9e91816becc387a4435a
9cdf0238190dbbb2e02f7393258e86893e2f9d8e
describe
'642' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEKG' 'sip-files00073.txt'
d2d90d5f2fd6ea5b8ff7fad9ff4641d7
a9422494e85e68609e7898eb280bc67ba68c8911
'2012-05-30T18:37:29-04:00'
describe
'1231' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEKH' 'sip-files00075.txt'
a5ef6c89aad0b403a6e0e1e2301431c9
84d1fa05be38c81bc556c35b10d865277d77d617
describe
'10' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEKI' 'sip-files00081.txt'
c6c3fba0946fc5c068b5d4ed77037cbb
3894f643988664e4a1c3e50afc74404856170ae5
describe
'49389' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEKJ' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
86ae84873628c298e8efb4166b37afb6
3702954eeb05e18e76fa2ec1b7ee6dbb58fbcce8
'2012-05-30T18:37:44-04:00'
describe
'151300' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEKK' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
a811e8730e48a616833f2362f5f66a96
fe95244ea3d920cc44d31b7c08cfebbdf2f5c3f9
describe
'163343' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEKL' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
b357641bf550d2d50ab2297ed4083ba2
ea06ba71eaff657f8b0a8a9a48a26732aaed3877
'2012-05-30T18:33:20-04:00'
describe
'163664' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEKM' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
a3910badb9df7d2b66739228bfd73b81
981aa06d854e021ab0282f4c275e9582a0350bd7
describe
'70985' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEKN' 'sip-files00005.QC.jpg'
a59722fc068247a52ed6b758e61ac8ef
46ad0d6747b0181e991a7d7b2c960a467a16b9d3
describe
'53106' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEKO' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
da0d4ae9b36cc2f79d8527317374e333
3954dcd3b5551189bfcf00a55fcc92c5b2fa89f6
'2012-05-30T18:33:02-04:00'
describe
'149198' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEKP' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
7729b186f4ba4e4e2ef235415f7f1c59
a3a123313c98523fd98fdd5930ec4a11516cba45
describe
'37190' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEKQ' 'sip-files00002thm.jpg'
be83fc65a324dfa8648ddcfc8a2237fc
3203c807f59b5aadb907ab3b16dd4c1f2d8e37e6
describe
'146313' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEKR' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
d3e889bedce28393698eca31caea8f7d
98377343a41075d53178a3552a5bbd86ea36a900
describe
'48211' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEKS' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
ff917f846db40a066f84bfa58e0c2e73
ffaca80db5d02afd074e83e44ad01bf91e0a3a23
describe
'164840' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEKT' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
9a83eb32d99e0028229b18ed124ac3b4
2cd9d74832ab661e17eb3e3dbfaae47613b67b0a
'2012-05-30T18:34:21-04:00'
describe
'303761' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEKU' 'sip-files00081.QC2.jpg'
592abebb1af2d9c8fb5c7cc3d5012c92
769132d51c3b7aaff1a601dab3a7d60da5c599df
describe
'381397' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEKV' 'sip-files00039.QC2.jpg'
c1557080a6029d93b1da85d47613cf2a
4d65c1ac825c45d940e2c3a6085c6bacb0e5ef75
describe
'395511' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEKW' 'sip-files00036.QC2.jpg'
984a34db98da93dadd6b65d62ecc4146
9fe255d0eaec0004d3c84c8924968dc376c8619d
describe
'164506' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEKX' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
9812cd4fe6e64907a8ab6298156da905
ba113a91b343aebadf5dabb826b95598a4b66719
'2012-05-30T18:37:55-04:00'
describe
'52751' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEKY' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
e0387b5574fba3a85bea754d5443c3a3
d0abfc329dfd28284e449aa16fd28d179e32c329
'2012-05-30T18:35:43-04:00'
describe
'150242' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEKZ' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
c837615ffd6d1c4279614872c534f966
1153a93b38757da55018780db29bfc7a0cf72826
describe
'50028' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABELA' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
91c7bb7f672a64b74a674c6d2635dac8
c0e74e094ff383916d3e9b2195eb6944e1ba0ff8
describe
'45988' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABELB' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
dede7ce06bbb84524efa951b8691f10d
d5d186f4495a5497f022612dd69370c48e62a17f
describe
'47853' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABELC' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
c07942fd7d9a63a21502bfbc1fa0b5d6
2ecfdfa4d342de8cbaed9162157b8e315e1100fd
describe
'53689' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABELD' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
23526a719d76bc0bc5bb284bb9d15a99
336ec041500a1ad507c1cf8f25e7d832ae219172
describe
'154477' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABELE' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
3aa1baa62ad15962bb2ad759489e3285
050c63a64dce3f44bf9d0456fbcd55c4650188c0
describe
'52571' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABELF' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
2c9612db67677307a0c9adb6073cb1b0
95432def630e36fb90a1a79f63d2acabda3ad56f
describe
'142572' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABELG' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
949aa8fa5f19bda3e917851402c5732a
91ea289db92d0fbb485441ce29ec1616c8d7ce03
describe
'139507' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABELH' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
9cfec084379b32521c261c9615a76171
42c2ff3a3ed917ea0977a3a9339d6b55c609930c
describe
'387149' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABELI' 'sip-files00035.QC2.jpg'
d1f568632cbde8104ea7f5c3ecc3754a
6d90a60dcfa14a50cb735be58f6a9247b8198f78
describe
'55202' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABELJ' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
51250b6ed4e56f6fb88f7687f8d9ee49
f5eb0a3b5ce44ade3d7526a995ccc13024dd5899
describe
'403391' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABELK' 'sip-files00071.QC2.jpg'
1097f815981a4d6efefce420d0112ce1
a5d71319c07318c1a75f0888b09a727acb356361
'2012-05-30T18:33:32-04:00'
describe
'114109' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABELL' 'sip-files00002.QC.jpg'
d035cf2c17d35382e4797290aeeb40d6
75b9e872379bc96eca60dafe9bbfdc614467ee36
describe
'422448' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABELM' 'sip-files00020.QC2.jpg'
cf4227a85200a5beadaadc56cd3ba3fa
c564e2a1d735c6562452b8e8968b4c20e7baced1
describe
'401437' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABELN' 'sip-files00015.QC2.jpg'
ee1cd724aec7f1bc1ea68c529be079b1
e65d0811bdf3ad752ec6bfb868ed449ff2738ecc
describe
'154561' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABELO' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
021c3e615c02bc9fb370bb1a12402a9b
284efc32493f28c0741737c56d9e4bad562fd48c
describe
'418705' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABELP' 'sip-files00025.QC2.jpg'
54b2f168aa003a11e61f8217d32eb924
41dffa6e67c1865a11bdd8c52ad92150180f3d22
describe
'18137' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABELQ' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
e5897b67b80dc40041bbe69071271960
4e5028531622edc74d1e5bb256074c391139ea8b
'2012-05-30T18:36:25-04:00'
describe
'158583' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABELR' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
5a57702f7282d45b06530cf9d084ed3f
7a92a53934675eada6d6c1a3df0cf49de53f7113
describe
'373624' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABELS' 'sip-files00075.QC2.jpg'
797800e3eb42245c923cc4ef3776b40e
cccc0180ed0a344edae3c562221aff39e2a6b2e9
describe
'163062' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABELT' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
195591aa246943cf44d6524d7dd0bf6a
b5eb7b9419e1b0aeaef75d7f8ef9cc4e9349ed76
'2012-05-30T18:35:06-04:00'
describe
'158500' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABELU' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
08063439869a61c2b085e6644eb41698
49052be3f4ec04cfb90933630d168ba5c58c0370
describe
'143405' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABELV' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
118c5678be5ca8caac33e2bd51b412b8
11d01d98ccc71f9194c72ec1750b0a94ddb60d90
describe
'158944' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABELW' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
91f6a5ea8e2c2c8c6a85e8191150ba72
45c2487482edbcb3067add9cef21d00ecd821af6
'2012-05-30T18:37:20-04:00'
describe
'339053' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABELX' 'sip-files00068.QC2.jpg'
a6e3ea0969e88a05c6e0699fbdcd1505
e02f8ee3247ba2932ebfea9cc63ee0a0672bdf2c
describe
'359424' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABELY' 'sip-files00002.QC2.jpg'
a85e435bd4fb4e7498b08fd1e52f8276
192eb8d0398509d33ec97324bc8118de4dff5232
'2012-05-30T18:37:58-04:00'
describe
'408765' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABELZ' 'sip-files00012.QC2.jpg'
73b87231386b73196e7be22f60d7dacb
268d3540feb21e8fa050def473d1a1c1fae69182
'2012-05-30T18:36:07-04:00'
describe
'359441' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEMA' 'sip-files00052.QC2.jpg'
fb9764a89e7fda8f92629d44d823606d
a21dcb37a3ce7fd86d5100f87de3abf44aa3699d
'2012-05-30T18:34:59-04:00'
describe
'188430' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEMB' 'sip-files00001.QC.jpg'
5c1fac180a0d820edf2d379a9b3cba98
8c328adff858c2c76734b16d16aff6d3f2471009
describe
'144666' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEMC' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
63cad3aaad0658f814fdc2b30b61cf0c
9866b35f2dc03fac902f92efd07177bd32d7081c
describe
'0' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEMD' 'sip-filesvalid.txt'
d41d8cd98f00b204e9800998ecf8427e
da39a3ee5e6b4b0d3255bfef95601890afd80709
describe
Zero-length file
'53596' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEME' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
6d7194530db9103f85699295f88d1904
cf83f978fff42af3e86978d087de752b55f4d600
describe
'133996' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEMF' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
dad59cf0d0a2abd4ac0954eadab8e59c
c506d27d22e33c999bcc118bcf13a860a96083d4
'2012-05-30T18:33:12-04:00'
describe
'380077' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEMG' 'sip-files00069.QC2.jpg'
d1fcb8b890ea23492cf8eed9ee732995
5bdbd4a9b86eaf25ba8e90e442fece951730aa47
describe
'418129' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEMH' 'sip-files00023.QC2.jpg'
077dd40be59434a1d4d761e91a42c93f
64508018fe768ff2fa95367cbd48951f38b95796
describe
'45746' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEMI' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
e0a4c119279204dbf5a5a69d8b0de5cd
28eeae982c30e5c93210d63ca062fc58015087ae
describe
'23598' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEMJ' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
6b1c6bcff13e001742b3390b32b3d4fd
f686f697ace61ac54dba9990576446728255cbc4
describe
'161748' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEMK' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
1d88aeff6e32d1333455227148325570
67994c746a361bb239a989e38cd72ac2237bbf54
describe
'51646' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEML' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
ecfc5c7baf80c421ec403214fd38e3b5
227cf261a30b2dd60569dec319949f10957d716e
describe
'38089' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEMM' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
477723655934df11cd6b7ce23b13e63c
643dbb6ebb1b74e5d720031fbf221e40b824b842
describe
'166212' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEMN' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
a1da4ad11de88a25a5ea80d85e39426a
ac516c653a6b7283dec271bd982a774412eb571b
describe
'375787' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEMO' 'sip-files00067.QC2.jpg'
1ece872cfe37edba6a16f868c34c87f2
d160c9909d06dca128946cf35a3fbaba29bfb375
'2012-05-30T18:33:48-04:00'
describe
'51584' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEMP' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
42b1387a3b73a7d7b8066d4a1afa4f6d
ab3962593b59fdc3ca68af443268b4bce2879f1e
describe
'376034' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEMQ' 'sip-files00065.QC2.jpg'
c7c6ea0bb2229f5c0dd82e6b24a40127
b7dff3c183dd08e6dd1a03760549f4ab5b7bc2df
describe
'405074' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEMR' 'sip-files00055.QC2.jpg'
5f4ba49ac4f121c7b420b3826d8629b0
7bf23fd5831a572400502ffa63fcf833efd551d6
describe
'338037' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEMS' 'sip-files00078.QC2.jpg'
afaf26f38fae8ec820b2eb8a938d4b22
323bf03c1352b2f55b85b900c6cd580784da1fac
describe
'154187' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEMT' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
13e784cada7d5e2462330e99d94de06f
f4a356a4c1ff7a9783bd080c99a3ab24e8686d08
describe
'374319' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEMU' 'sip-files00013.QC2.jpg'
18bb5a2f9be40ba58287e7578a26f13e
0579302d81b66a204e80d8f326edf0f319cb4e6b
describe
'144175' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEMV' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
47d52a1c887a11b49ff1e1d3abf74f88
0124d47efc37b9dd538f4300b7ecdcefc45eebe4
describe
'142034' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEMW' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
21b1cbf0761a44e9bcaefecf116a53c4
73036693b5dc2e2678e481c4f539c3fc59de0139
describe
'134137' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEMX' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
b1405fa97825c67f15618c5b2addb760
ade27f55bb6b8bcf0463e96657d7561d7a02e10f
describe
'160883' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEMY' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
e7422d037f5f93ca8c27a19e0b3c7faa
c30bf5a6e859ba7788ede38e4a29e566b0731e29
describe
'54867' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEMZ' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
f6081e001caebac8a9eaa4c06be422a4
1a1c694bd5d238bcb9a54561a547ba0f43b29e8d
describe
'51965' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABENA' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
26c6b10db1afb3344c28cdb562f21670
ba07715bcdac0e5b807a7063259ea21d2db4a029
'2012-05-30T18:34:53-04:00'
describe
'27739' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABENB' 'sip-files00003thm.jpg'
94d5995b464e8e4199ebe7513f9edf34
9b94aaa96eccaa368082f5549728123c0464d137
describe
'407253' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABENC' 'sip-files00057.QC2.jpg'
eb7f900d5837d060f897fb8bf967b738
8e12c1c0ac3f7abf8f0d39916c4672968d252ef7
describe
'52786' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEND' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
b44f84dc45e31bcb38da407c160e7c6d
1f87f5b594ab9e3f48d8f4b6f86116b0f2175c50
describe
'394237' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABENE' 'sip-files00043.QC2.jpg'
ad174aaa64baadd1d5b5786cf6281ed5
c86ed23defe2b7a94021703a475591d2e1fa80d6
describe
'161416' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABENF' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
54d5d2d8d5a828a819d6fd453ec2c384
addb23611f1920029edeac685d0964265dfcd26e
describe
'51818' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABENG' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
bd7e714d4b0e842e237b1c669904c905
85701863e53210c9d9a99e4b0ac15d179ae0ecab
describe
'375838' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABENH' 'sip-files00031.QC2.jpg'
9b12aa364e72bff51439bb3c16baf6be
6fdd2df8af1c8c879f77fe44f771cfe131c65ab1
describe
'51286' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABENI' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
45fbcabc093489e60770c974b5abd63e
cfc2d81f94bfac0bef331ff20109240873da0675
describe
'48958' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABENJ' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
64d564d7e916adf97656585294f9ffd3
6734845fb4444da78b836e99af748236ae1109ec
describe
'50952' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABENK' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
d330191cf740b282624dd7ae0540f707
0a2354957597e3299bde3a0b0753d39c19c2dda2
describe
'52164' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABENL' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
7250ffecb20812d75b5529a44aa24905
a431deb03f4ece8f1295c60d6819fbac4ddacef9
describe
'13271' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABENM' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
bc305ba09f82e00e718067bb67897d3c
5cc7ce09521d8b0d323a1546387c9f05f3d9a873
describe
'153854' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABENN' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
b60444afca87c0751be77f10f7b2b6a9
f38e4f872992ba3301d2cdf42c04b17a5fd58645
describe
'166776' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABENO' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
766fbfeb7a1cae36bf75564409867a97
e58278633c54a239fcaba9c8127e9a8d1f995fa3
describe
'53366' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABENP' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
f86197a300521a303a42089ad3cb9c8a
9a83e62aac29c6e9bf4e6361578d66701934abe3
describe
'391160' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABENQ' 'sip-files00050.QC2.jpg'
8e2abccf6ba37aef5d80a2471d09bd73
a56877efcab264999075031915164d5dc6a3ab01
describe
'164887' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABENR' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
46bb875c32fe141446cc23e3f86befcf
0718d70ace6e90d3c5e2ad5775986ffb8ec5a960
describe
'16073' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABENS' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
b8cde7779110c85419316907e42d0d07
9d54e99d395c120a02b3fc6115635643809280a2
describe
'405143' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABENT' 'sip-files00028.QC2.jpg'
dd9873968ad0f3c77f1bf6704907f761
75d5ccfca44f970809f07d10ef92f7facdb61da0
describe
'408120' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABENU' 'sip-files00022.QC2.jpg'
87aaae25b5b32b0fb67600e7bfde0394
2530c97aaf56ec11a0128d6e3e4b2f342c763588
describe
'345801' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABENV' 'sip-files00060.QC2.jpg'
b79a106299dfde8034c7cbb33e8cb5ea
bcef364bb011e4a82206316a0c53fe0950cdcd02
'2012-05-30T18:34:23-04:00'
describe
'152865' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABENW' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
528053278b28ba924993624b4777edc8
b8dbfd91f33c59c64dcca48173424b7819db3c26
describe
'357263' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABENX' 'sip-files00062.QC2.jpg'
26fee7d3719453e4b97f681c5c77ff35
ee5372dce381b62803476aaed93ff331a8f6b27f
describe
'353927' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABENY' 'sip-files00064.QC2.jpg'
f2f042f76df637b8ea195e6e086bd86a
a57d80472ad0ab42dca6db1ba6fa8447941fcec5
describe
'335105' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABENZ' 'sip-files00063.QC2.jpg'
fe314825c982b4333a6caf9f547802ab
b70f10ffe423a50efadafc6f7615f92f16582fec
describe
'154832' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEOA' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
5f2d5c6d0adc4ffd7013df1cbf32fac8
6fcfe84773b01f6d5ae05e20d93fddd81b8c18db
'2012-05-30T18:35:24-04:00'
describe
'390840' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEOB' 'sip-files00038.QC2.jpg'
dcf32b3f13f2b9d339a8f32f89a2991a
f7b274f0f27f95b16ba0f3455e799c2ce7d49427
describe
'53461' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEOC' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
2c69007e4ba37d5cf0ec411b066b786a
c5895311fdf2f3c68fc7a65ae75da909b865d05c
describe
'151245' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEOD' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
8403c261c1260d39fe45b8d8e5056e05
abe948b0712c8ce28f8a6bc28e5c8ca0d7fa95b9
describe
'403979' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEOE' 'sip-files00021.QC2.jpg'
a1c50270e10b1345e4874504bf7341cf
bf2e269637d127ee7ac99a3f4861d75cff6e3e17
describe
'366675' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEOF' 'sip-files00033.QC2.jpg'
5c0b5661876b4364b705923d6db80127
545af7b2deff8f245dd0e9307c6a5c7a5e4a17bd
describe
'367990' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEOG' 'sip-files00072.QC2.jpg'
9ea4fc1a21982f1fef1b4c411cb46085
d37d8250e9dd46c6340b1a89aa9e8f69e69d6470
describe
'55252' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEOH' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
ea16b57e6d55fc7e64835ead0278d91e
187369536624fb836efb9cee58f16e4c8897ad7f
describe
'143443' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEOI' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
29e1aec35e6235ed1b18bd47d6ebae1a
244f7e9a5501fbcfd0df19df81802875e73a04e4
describe
'373275' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEOJ' 'sip-files00048.QC2.jpg'
4e99966aa804a739a8547c57b520487c
4daaacf3899a0e934049ee3b9ec48323a5152144
describe
'43741' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEOK' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
a9e75c0603c5860cfd2f1a7a9fea689a
db1adcc5590df0c09cb72b5bed61c73abef2f10d
describe
'51097' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEOL' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
920d091b9ab85ea3f759993ac6f43d5e
61c77a148df7654c0f32190da1fb4c88b3bdf782
describe
'160926' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEOM' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
780c24b39187b98b86b03df4e31e32f0
05d3f0350fadd2301f0c86c9695d125f354942f8
describe
'151686' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEON' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
2146c4e0826aff4957ad7c709ca17fa4
9bcd380a202ea383a290e15724240ba0e33c24a1
describe
'41356' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEOO' 'sip-files00080.QC2.jpg'
92c989bda2e18ade87b000145f84ded3
2dae770ea36eb4ae5c1eb44130d9ce2624a5b52f
describe
'541156' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEOP' 'sip-files00008.QC2.jpg'
480c19b92cf834b599ba13bbc4d7f21a
7ef7bf6990447b8cd8b81472cac2e158864044c8
describe
'263' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEOQ' 'sip-filestoc.txt'
98de3da4a084f0829a09df2cb3f4f6e7
7723095227f3df059bce49efc12a0f0ab1ed1756
describe
'82066' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEOR' 'sip-files00003.QC.jpg'
25d59955c84f7d31d57a4b4ae86d6fdf
11637cc3ff0906cbf932ed8c8b81dca441bc7eb1
describe
'50142' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEOS' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
b7a89213b6c4647ba2f2e15ef506d2a3
9554f298d6bb912e09ff34dfe5fbae10fd744eb2
describe
'151810' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEOT' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
7dfb79213215f9d3fe8b9cc77ee3171d
5c78e7d21ac2839cdcac9edf04dc15f1a4ed1f2f
describe
'149854' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEOU' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
29df5b80d463ff50115e3b2604e6dd5f
6b1bb5431bd5e28d06d9fd8bd2ea28d837a32057
describe
'153919' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEOV' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
3a8efdfb7f71e992a72b8c5ce09ed824
e69df8d12a2fc4136c96ab69c00f70b24a0ef8a7
describe
'85228' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEOW' 'sip-files00079.QC2.jpg'
ea55373cb4b4398718787b15a7932b46
88bb34feaa2aa02c278cbbaba1f33d5f66352f3b
describe
'137625' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEOX' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
0f2a639866dcf29d98d5c92ff0f07d30
8ecb2b560a8470ed60211e7eab59a11e0cc730af
describe
'249162' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEOY' 'sip-files00003.QC2.jpg'
a39b27d5d1ceaa2622626fdb7d8a33c3
81c8a0649407ee5ab3d2eb683f8ffbc7b98292da
describe
'433980' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEOZ' 'sip-files00019.QC2.jpg'
1e10f2e727768050489cc48239f45bea
01d20587138353ceef881b951c822340630c64f5
describe
'411086' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEPA' 'sip-files00014.QC2.jpg'
5b2be213a39e1efcaa5a4a40efe55794
9a06552b81818db9341e9db21bd21e04ce33e904
'2012-05-30T18:34:06-04:00'
describe
'166327' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEPB' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
36741385f0c8e04ca50f0cedba4c93be
6b33977aad7ac0f565762756d7b9949905aaa0e9
describe
'50165' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEPC' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
29b6619c44aed138913f757742a066e9
d6bab70f1439aecd7d0e5e3fe2b29e24bee1e242
describe
'143300' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEPD' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
3d14888ca7dc028744677402710ded6f
55f3de886f322f700296b1978f7837dfd84f9352
describe
'32691' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEPE' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
abf7409580a0ce6939106a4757951ff7
17f81464d7f0a5b93e6705d02984be017a01ed9b
describe
'53397' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEPF' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
6f8e97bec71d436c39166f8113c25b5d
66e54b79650e7a09004b61fc111bfcdaa94b9c6f
describe
'164770' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEPG' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
c4aae02481ce46a0eed380166cab8bba
d12b2d0687411b8da615a043faab75fc6d4509c4
describe
'52663' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEPH' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
e938253913ea4f6dad76cd31ba3db173
6d35be3394d2efa04bc1d57fb9d316abaf14d08c
describe
'138920' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAACAfileF20100203_AABEPI' 'sip-filesUF00027932_00001.xml'
d6a0181998ac7c0ce5a8945cd640c6cb
8899d9f47eea73d8caf2dbf94d9f51e42c1a8845
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
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TITLE: Alice Leighton, or, A good name is rather to be chosen than riches

PROJECT: JUV



Front Cover

Front Matter

Half Title

Frontispiece

Title Page

Alice Leighton, A Good Name is Rather to be Chosen, Than Riches

Back Cover















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ALICE AND HER GRANDPAPA


ALICE LEIGHTON;

A GOOD NAME IS RATHER TO BE CHOSEN
THAN RICHES.

A Tale for the Powrg.

BY

Mrs. GEORGE CUPPLES,

99 6b

AUTHOR or “THE STORY OF OUR DOLL,
ETC., ETC.

THE LITTLE CAPTAIN,”



LONDON:
T. NELSON AND SONS, PATERNOSTER ROW;
EDINBURGH; AND NEW YORK.



1874.






ALICE LEIGHTON.



ei LICE LEIGHTON was about to leave
SX ~=her home for the first time in her life ;



and though she was going to live ina
beautiful house in the country, at a
season when. it is most delightful, she
could scarcely keep from erying when
she thought of it.. Alice’s father had just died ;
and having lost her mother a year before, she and
. her brother Willie were to be separated, and sent
to live with strangers. Willie was going to a
boarding-school, and Alice to her maternal grand-
papa and grandmamma. She had never seen
them; for Mrs. Leighton had married against
her father’s wishes, and they had had little
intercourse with her afterwards, and lived at
6 DULL DAYS.

a great distance away in the north of Eng.
land.

“T wish I could stay with you always, dear,
kind Aunt Emily,” said Alice to her Aunt Leigh-
ton, who had kept house for them since their
mother’s death.

“And so do I, darling,” replied Aunt Emily,
trying to appear cheerful. ‘“ You know how glad
Uncle Charles would have.been to have you with

us; but when grandpapa wrote, he wished you
* to stay with him. We thought it would be far
more to your advantage to go there. Grandpapa
is a rich man, you know, dear, and Uncle Charles
has a hard struggle to get ends to meet, with his
: large family. My poor child, I feel the separa-
tion as much as you can do—it is hard to part
with you.” And Aunt Emily laid her face against
Alice’s and wept bitterly. |

“But, Aunt Emily, God, who lives everywhere,
will be with us still) See how his star is shin-
ing down upon us!” said Alice, pointing to the
evening star. ‘Come, don’t cry, aunty. Every.
night we shall look out at the moon and stars and
think of each other, But won't you come to see
me sometimes, Aunt Emily?”

“T can’t say, dear. You know grandpapa was
MAMMA’S SORY. 7

angry with mamma for marrying papa, and he
may not like me to come near you.”



ALICE AND HER AUNT.

“Yes,” said Alice; ‘mamma used to tell me
the story. How grandpapa wished her to marry
Mr. Clare, who afterwards married Aunt Lucy.
You see the estates joined, and so mamma would
have been very rich. But she chose papa instead,
though he was then only a curate; and I think
it was very noble of her, though I daresay she
felt very sorry to be forced to disobey her parents.
I am sure mamma could not have been happier if
8 GOOD ADVICE.

Uncle Clare had got her instead of Aunt Lucy,
for papa was so good and kind. And, Aunt
Emily, do you know that mamma, after she. had
told me the story, wrote in my Bible, under my
name, the verse from Proverbs xxii. 1, ‘A good
name is rather to be chosen than riches, and lov-
ing favour rather than silver and gold.’ I’m sure:
dear papa was better than all the gold in the
world ; and though he had no money, everybody
loved him.”

“Well, dear, I hope that you will always keep
that verse in remembrance, and show your grand-
papa that though poor papa could not give you
riches, he has instructed and led you to look after
the better riches that can never be taken from
you.”

“T suppose it will be some time before Willie
returns, aunt,” said Alice; “might I go over to
the mill to see nurse ?”

“Certainly, my dear,” replied Aunt Emily ;
‘and if you like to stay there to tea, I shall send
Willie over when he comes home.”

“Oh, that will be indeed delightful,” said Alice.
“Martha promised to show me the new poultry
her father, the miller, brought home last week.
She offered to give me a pair of chickens, aunt, of
A VISIT TO THE OLD MILL. 9

her new brood, but I suppose I couldn’t take
them with me.”

“No, dear,” replied Aunt Emily, “you had
better not take any more pets. Grandmamma
has been very kind in allowing you to keep
Watch, and your kid Jumper.”

“Oh dear, wouldn’t it have been dreadful if
we had had to part with Watch? He would
have broken his poor heart, I feel sure; and as
for Jumper, I really think he would have missed
me very much.”

“Perhaps Martha would take care of your pet
chickens for you,” said Aunt Emily. “ After you
have been with your grandmamma for a little,
she may allow you to have them; and I am sure
the miller or some of the men about will take the
trouble to send them to you.”

‘“‘T am so glad you think so,” said Alice ; “and
I am certain dear Martha will take very good
care of them. I cannot help crying every night
in my bed, when I think I shall never see my
dear chickens again. The going away is not such
a dreadful affair now ; it was so at first, though.
I sometimes think I never can go away; that I
shall have to be taken to the station by main
force,” i:
10 ALICE’S LOVE FOR HER PETS.

“That would be rather unreasonable, I must
say,” said Aunt Emily, laughing. “Poor Uncle
Charles was terribly distressed to witness your
burst of grief when he read your grandmamma’s
letter. I think he had half a mind to write and
say No to the invitation.”

“JT wish he had,” said Alice; “for though it
_ does not look quite so bad now, Fd rather live
with you and dear Uncle Charles, even if I had
to give up keeping every one of my pets.”

“Well, then, be off with you now,” said Aunt
-Emily, giving her niece a hearty embrace. ‘‘If
_you stand chatting there all day, what is to be-
come of the packing ?”

When Alice reached the mill, she found the
miller busy at work, but learned from him that

her friend Martha had gone to the spring for
water. Alice was not long in running down,
the bank at the back of the mill where the spring’
was, and, as she expected, found Martha leaning
against a rock, evidently in what is called a brown
study. The jar was running over, but she paid
no attention to it; and it was only when Alice
came close up to her, and touched her on the
shoulder, that she became aware of her presence.

“Why, what are you dreaming about now,
IN A BROWN STUDY. 11

Martha?” said Alice, laughing at the start of sur-
prise Martha gave.



IN A BROWN STUDY.

“Oh, what a fright you have given me, miss!”
said Martha; “and yet I was doing nothing but
thinking of you and Master Willie.”

“And what were you thinking about?” said
Alice, seating herself on the bank, while she made
room for her friend.

“Well, you see, miss, ever since mother came
home and told me you were going away, I just
‘can’t believe it, that I can’t, and I keep turning
over in my mind all sorts of plans to prevent you
going away.”

“Now, I know you look for a fairy in every
12 WATCHING FOR A GOOD FAIRY.

ce

harebell and lily,” said Alice, laughing, “and
have all sorts of stories made up in your head,
and look upon me as an ill-used princess, and my
grandmamma and grandpapa as the ogres. Now
confess, Miss Martha, I have guessed right.”

“Tm not going to tell you what I think,” re-
plied Martha, laughing also.

** Well, don’t let us waste another moment on
the subject of my going away,” said Alice.
“ Aunt says we may stay to tea if your mother
will have us, and Willie is coming in a few
minutes.”

When they reached the cottage-door they found
Willie had arrived, and was busity engaged teach-
ing their dog Watch to go through some military
exercise. Willie had put his cap on the dog’s
head, and placed a stick between his paws, and
was in the act of hanging his coat round the
animal, when. the girls came up.

“Oh! you funny creature,” said Alice, dropping
down on her knees before Watch, who seemed
quite pleased with himself, “you shall have a
nice drink of milk for being so obedient. But,
Willie, don’t keep him in that position long, in
case it tires his old legs.”

“Well,” said Willie, “since you have behaved
A FIRST-RATE SOLDIER. 13



WATCH BEING TAUGHT.

so well this time, I’ll let you off, old dog;” and
the moment Watch was released he bounded away
14 WATCIL PREFERS TO BE A DOG.

barking and yelping. ‘Ah, Master Watch,” said
Willie, laughing, ‘‘it’s easy to be seen you prefer
to be a dog to a soldier, you foolish fellow.”

“And don’t you think Watch is right, sir?”
said Martha. “It must be a terrible thing to be
a soldier!”

“T don’t see why it should be terrible,” said
Willie; ‘but that is perhaps because I am a boy,
and mean to be a sailor some day; and sailors
run just. as much risk of their lives as soldiers.”

“Heyday,” said a voice from the open parlour
window, “ what's this about soldiers and sailors ?
come away in, hinny, and let me hear all about it.”

‘Oh, never mind, nurse dear,”’ said Alice ; ‘‘it’s
only some nonsense of Willie’s. We are to stay
to tea, if you please, and I want Martha to show me
the new cow before we come in; please, may she?”

“Certainly, my dear,” said Mrs. Cursom, the
miller’s wife, and Alice’s foster-mother; ‘run
away now, and the tea will be ready on your
return.”

Mysie the cow was in the act of munching up
some nice sweet vegetables when the children |
found her, and she was so tame that she allowed
Alice and Martha to clap and stroke her ever so
often, and ate the grass they pulled for her out
STAYING TO TEA. 15

of their hands. When they had tired her quite
out with their kindness and attention, she lay
down, and refused to eat another particle till she
had duly digested what she had already eaten ; so
there was nothing left for the children to do but

leave her to chew the cud in peace.



MARTHA’S COW.

There was no end to the amusements about the
old mill, however. Martha’s new chickens were
visited, and the basket with the three newly-arrived
kittens in the barn, and then the millitself. It was
always, and had ever been, the most favoured spot
to the two children, and Martha their companion. .
How often they had played in and about it, watch-
ing the wheel revolving round so steadily, if lazily,
and the flour coming sifting, sifting down, like a
16 IN AND ABOUT THE OLD MILL.

brooding snow-storm, Alice felt ready to cry
when she realized for the first time that this was
really her last visit to the dear old place, and she
felt thankful when Mrs. Cursom’s cheery voice
called them from the doorway to come in, for the
tea was ready.



THE OLD MILL.

Alice could not help saying to her aunt that
night, she wished the day for their going away
would either never come at all, or that it would
arrive and find her so very sound asleep that she
would not know when she had said good-bye.
“Tt is so dreadful, aunt, to think we are looking
at the old places for the last time, perhaps, and
saying good-bye to all our dear friends who were

so fond of mamma and papa.”
(337)
THE TAME THRUSH. 17

When Alice was dressed next morning, she
opened her window, when there hopped in, just
as she had expected, a tame thrush that her
brother Willie had brought home one day. It
was then a mere fledgeling, and had fallen from
its nest, but Alice was very careful of it, and

al i
il

any th
i

ith



ALICE’S PENSIONER,

watched over it constantly till it was able to fly.

Some of her companions said it was very foolish

of her to give it its liberty after taking so much

‘trouble with it; but Alice knew that a thrush

could not, like a canary, make itself happy ina
(337° 2
18 KINDNESS REWARDED.

cage, and it pained her to see how it fluttered
against the wires, trying to make its escape; so
one day, when she was quite certain its wings
were strong, she opened the window, and away it
flew up into the bright sunshine, and was soon
lost to sight amongst the trees that surrounded
her father’s vicarage. Alice could not help feel-
ing sorry to part with it, and a little hurt at its
gladness to escape after she had done so much to
make it happy; but the next morning, what was
her surprise to find it tapping at her window with
the greatest impatience for admittance! No one
after that could doubt that her thrush was grate-
ful; and every morning he paid her a visit, and
for an hour at a time would keep flying in and
out, and perched on her hand, and be carried
down-stairs to breakfast. On this particular
morning, Alice had a good cry before going down,
when she thought how disappointed poor little
Billy would be when he found her away ; but,
remembering how she had promised her Uncle
Charles the night before to be brave for her kind
Aunt Emily’s sake, she bathed her eyes, and ran
out to look after her poultry and her numerous
pets.

It was a pretty sight to see her as she stood
“OP IN TILE MORNING WARLY.” 19



ALICE FEEDING HER POULTRY.

among the eager, hungry fowls, some flying upon
the basket of grain she carried, and pecking con-
20 PAPA’S PET.

fidently out of it. So thought her Uncle Charles,
at least, as he paused from taking his morning
stroll, and leaned over the poultry-fence to ex-
change a good-morning greeting with his little
niece.

“Now, I call that too bad,” he said, smiling—
“to have favourites. What must be the feelings
of the others at this moment to see that impu-
dent hen so highly favoured ?”

‘But this is Nell, uncle,” said Alice, laughing.
“None of the hens would ever dream of being
jealous of Nell.”

“ And why should they not be jealous of Nell,
pray?” inquired Uncle Charles.

“Because, uncle, she was papa’s pet,’ said
Alice, the tears rising almost unconsciously to .her
eyes, as she recollected how fond he was of it,
and how the fowl returned his attention by
coming daily to his room window, and into the
room when she could, strutting about in perfect
confidence that she was a welcome visitor. Uncle
Charles changed the subject as quickly as pos-
sible, and seemed glad when Willie called his
attention to something in another direction.

As there was still more than an hour before
breakfast would be ready, Alice strolled away
ALICE HELPS THE OLD DAME. 21

into the wood,. where she met an old woman
gathering dead branches. She was called Dame
Adams; she kept a little school in the village,
and had been a particular favourite with Mr.
Leighton.

“Tet me help you, Goody,” said Alice, seeing
how it pained the old woman to stoop down.

“Ah, you are just your father’s child, surely,”
said the dame, laying her hand on Alice’s bright
curls, ‘Always ready to help the poor body,
was the parson. But is it true, honey, that you
are going far away from us?”

“Ves, dame; I am going to live with mamma’s
father and mother, in the very north of England,
and that is a great many miles from here; and
Willie is going to a place near London to school ;
and Aunt Emily is to keep Uncle Charles's
house,—so that we shall all be scattered over Eng-
land.”

“Thank you, dearie,’
“Folks like to hear the news about those they

?

said the old woman.—

are fond of; but what sort of people are your
mother’s friends? I have heard they have plenty
of money



as much as the squire here.”
“Oh yes; grandpapa is very rich,” said Alice,
feeling for the first time proud of her rich rela;
22 MONEY SOMETIMES PROVES A SNARE.

tions. “Mamma used to say that grandpapa’s
house was a great deal larger than our squire’s,
and that he had far more money; and Uncle
Clare, my Aunt Lucy’s husband, has even more
money than grandpapa still.”

“Ay, sure, my dear young lady,” said Daime
Adams ; ‘‘ but now, do see that these grand friends
of yours don’t make you turn from the narrow
path your dear papa walked in. Money is very
useful, but it often brings a snare for the unwary,
and is apt to fill the heads of the young with
feelings of pride and vanity.” Then, when she
had thanked Alice for her kind assistance with
the bundle of sticks, she bade her good-bye, and
Alice ran off home just in time for breakfast.

After breakfast, Aunt Emily, saying she and
their uncle would be busy, advised the children to
take their books out into the wood, as the weather
was so hot, and amuse themselves till she called
them.

“Very well, auntie; we will go down to the
brook,” said Alice,—‘‘it is so cool there.”

Willie flung himself down on the grass, but
did not seem inclined for reading; and after a
while, Alice too Jaid her book away, and ‘sat
watching the water as it slowly glided along, or
WILL WE EVER SEL THIS PLACE AGAIN ! 23



IN THE WOODS.

listened to the sound of the birds and the hum
of the numerous insects.

“Oh dear, I wonder if we shall ever see this
place again!” said Alice.
24 BUILDING AIR-CASTLES.

‘Of course we shall,” replied Willie, stealthily
drawing his arm across his eyes, for he too had
been thinking of the pleasant home he was to
leave so soon, ‘' We will have to see it in our
dreams for the present,” he added, trying to
laugh. ‘Sailors, you know, often see their old
homes in their dreams; and so we shall do it too,
perhaps. But when I’m a man, I mean to come
back again and see the old place.”

“Oh dear, what a long time that will be!”
said Alice. ‘Must we really have to wait till
you are a man and lama woman? Why, no-
body will know us, and all the old people will be
dead, and everything will be changed.”

‘‘ Nonsense,” said Willie; “it won’t be long at
all; I shall be a man very soon, for I mean to
learn my lessons very fast, and be done with
school. ‘Then, you know, when I have no more
lessons to learn, I shall be a man, of course.”

“T don’t know if I should like to come back
only to see the place,” said Alice. ‘There will
be strangers in the vicarage then.”

“Why, don’t you know that our cousin, Robert
Leighton, means to have it when he is a man?”
said Willie, who was apt to think, if any one
simply intended to do such and such a thing, it
GOD CARES FOR ME. 25

was a settled matter. ‘“ We all know that Robert
is at the top of his classes in everything.”

Willie was always so hopeful, that Alice never
liked to bring forward her own gloomy thoughts
to damp his spirits; and at that very moment,
as if to cheer her, a lark rose from the ground
opposite to where they were seated, and mounted.



THE LARK.

up into the blue sky, with a gush: of song that
sounded very like as. if it meant to say, ‘“‘ God
cares for me; and why should you be sad !”

“T wonder if the larks sing as sweetly at our
new home,” said Alice

‘““They’re much the same, I should think, all the
world over,” replied Willie. “It’s not many I will
26 LOOKING AT TILE BRIGIT SIDE.

hear at school, though. I wonder if the boys ever
get leave to go into the country.”

“Oh, I should think so,” said Alice. ‘ Why,
don’t you remember Cousin Robert telling us of
the happy holidays, when the teacher went with
them exploring expeditions ?”

‘But that is different. Robert’s school is in
‘the country ; now the one I am to go to is ina
town.”

“Oh, don’t let us indulge in gloomy thoughts,
dear,” said Alice. ‘“ You know aunt often tells
us it is wiser to look on the bright side of the
picture. Let us enjoy ourselves as much as we
can while we are together, and I daresay we shall
find that our new homes are not so bad after all.
I wish I was going to school; I know it would
be such fun to have girls to play with. But
there is aunt calling us. We must say good-bye
to the brook for the present.”

The day for them to leave the vicarage arrived
at last, but as they were not to set out till the
evening, Uncle Charles proposed that the two
children should go with him for a last ramble
along the sea-beach, a little more than a mile off;
and as Aunt Emily thought the plan an excellent
A WALK WITH UNCLE CHARLES, 27

one, they set out immediately after breakfast.
Uncle Charles had always some amusing story to
relate ; and so, in spite of the near prospect of
their separation, Alice and Willie were soon laugh-
ing as merrily as if school and grandpapas had



AT THE SEA-SIDE,

never been heard of. The weather was really
charming, and the beach was strewn with such
a variety of shells and other sea-side objects,
that the children could not resist the tempta-
tion of gathering them, though Willie said
28 DISAGREEABLE DUTIES.

he could not understand why they picked them,
as Aunt Emily had filled up every corner of the
boxes long ago. They then sat down to rest,
and to watch a small yacht that was sailing past.

“JT mean to be the captain of a great ship,”
said Willie, poking the sand with his stick.

“Do you indeed,” said his uncle, laughing at
his grave face. ‘ Well, there is nothing like
making up one’s mind in time, certainly; but
before one can be a captain, there are a great
many disagreeable steps to climb. How would
you like to get up in a dark morning and scrub
down decks, and clean out the pig and sheep pens,
and other disagreeable duties ?”

“Have sailors to do that sort of thing?” asked
Willie, with a look of disgust. ‘Surely they
would never ask a gentleman’s son to do such
dirty work ?”

“Ah but, I beg your pardon, they would.
Were any one to bring such an excuse forward at
sea, I am afraid Jack Tar might take a pleasure
in laying on a little extra work, to knock the fine
gentleman out of him. But, seriously speaking,”
continued Uncle Charles, putting on a grave face,
“you are not thinking of trying what the life of
a sailor really. is, my boy ?”

¢
WANTING TO BE A SAILOR. 29

Willie hung his head for a moment, then looked
up into his uncle’s face manfully. ‘“‘ Yes, uncle,
Ido; Alice knows how I want to go to sea. I
hate the thought of going to that school; and if
I don’t like it, I mean to—”

“Not to run away, surely ?” said Uncle Charles,
with a comical look about his mouth. ‘“ We
Leightons take a pride in thinking ourselves brave
fellows. I never heard of a cowardly Leighton
yet, and surely my nephew Willie is not going to
be the first. What! run away because school is
disagreeable! I’m thinking, if you went to sea
to escape from that sort of thing, you would feel
yourself out of the frying-pan into the fire, as the
saying is.”

“But I want to be a sailor so much, uncle,”
said Willie.

“Well, my boy, so you shall; but there is no
occasion to run away from school. To be a cap-
tain, you must have education ; and were you to
run away just because you disliked your lessons
and teachers, why, you would be running away
from everything ever after. No, my boy; come
to me or to your grandpapa three years after this,
and tell your wishes openly, and we shall see that
you get a good ship. You are only ten now;
30 BIDDING GOOD-BYE.

when you are thirteen, with grandpapa’s influency
you could perhaps be admitted into the navy, but
never if you ran away. But come, we are for-
getting how time passes, and if we don’t hasten,
Aunt Emily will be thinking we have run away
without bidding her good-bye.”

When they reached the gate they found Aunt
Emily just preparing to set out in search of them ;
and after a hasty dinner, the carriage arrived that
was to take them to the station, and they were
whirled away. Alice discovered afterwards that
Uncle Charles had kept them out late on pur-
pose, so that there would be little time to think
of parting with Aunt Emily, who was not to
leave till the next week.

Alice stayed in London the next day and night,
till Willie had been placed at school; and then
Uncle Charles, after going with her part of the way,
left her in charge of one of her grandpapa’s servants,
who had been sent-with a carriage to meet her ;
and after driving for many miles, she reached ‘‘ the
Hall,” where her grandpapa lived. Alice felt, now
that she had got to the end of her journey, as if it
was all a dream; and she sat down by the open
window of her little room, that she was told was her
own, and tried to realize that she was really never
THINKING OF THE PAST. 3t

to see the dear vicarage again, and that this beau-
tiful place was now'to be her home, as it had
been her mamma’s.

She was sitting watching the lovely sunset, and
the boats on the river that flowed through her
grandpapa’s property, and thinking how sorry her



ALICE IN HER NEW HOME.

mamma must have felt never to have seen it
again, when she was interrupted by hearing the
door open, and turning round, she saw an old lady
standing looking at her. Both her grandpapa and
grandmamma, she had been told, were out when
32 GRANDMAMMA.

she arrived, but the moment she looked round she
knew that this was her grandmamma ; and there
was such a kind expression in her eyes, that Alice
sprang at once from her seat, and running towards
her, was soon clasped in her arms.

“My poor child, my Alice’s little girl!” said
Mrs. Garnet, sitting down and taking Alice on
her knee. ‘ How was it you'knew me, my
darling?” ,

“Because you are so like my dear mamma, I
knew you must be grandmamma.”’

“And were you very glad to come and live
with grandpapa and me, my darling?” said Mrs.
Garnet, pressing Alice closely to her.

Alice had been taught to speak the truth in a
straightforward manner, and while many little
girls would have said, “Oh yes,” Alice felt that
this would have been a piece of deception on her
part, for she had been really sorry instead of
glad to come to her grandmamma. She there-
fore simply said, “No, dear grandmamma,; I felt
sorry to come, for I had to part with Aunt
Emily, who has been so good to us; and then
there was Willie, and my birds and poultry.
But now that I have seen you, I am very glad I
have come.”
PAYING A VISIT. 33

“T understand your feeling quite well, my
dear,” said Mrs. Garnet; “but I hope you will
like us as well as you do your father’s relations.
Now we must go down and see what grandpapa
has to say to his little grand-daughter.”

Mr. Garnet was sitting in his favourite little
study, surrounded with book-shelves, filled with
books of all sorts and sizes. His chair was
drawn close to the fire, and he was wrapped in a
large cloak, as if it had been the middle of
winter, and he seemed so cross at being inter-
rupted, that Alice clung closer to her grand-
mamma’s hand, and wished herself safely out of
his presence. ‘This is your little grand-daughter
come to pay you a visit,” said Mrs. Garnet, in a
cheerful voice, as if to encourage Alice.

“Ah, I supposed so,” said Mr. Garnet.
“What's your name, girl? I have forgotten
it, if I ever heard it.”

When Alice had told him, fee turned his face
away with a frown, as if the mention of her
mother’s name seemed to recall. some unpleasant
recollection. In a few minutes Mrs. Garnet took
Alice away to her own parlour, where she told
her, that though her grandpapa did not seem

glad to see her, he was really very happy to
(337) 3
34 GRANDMAMMA’S KIND PROPOSAL.

have her there, only he was not accustomed to
children, and was fretful, owing to his late ill-
ness.

?

“And now, my dear,” said her grandmamma,
“perhaps you would like to go out before dinner
and see the grounds.”

“J should like to go and see my kid Jumper,
grandmamma, please. I fear he and Watch will
feel lonely without me,” said Alice, the tears
coming to her eyes.

“Oh, that will be a very good plan,” said
Mrs. Garnet. ‘You run across the lawn to
where Dickson the gardener is working, and he
will show you where your kid has been placed.
But what was that you said about some pet birds
and poultry ?”

“JT had to leave them at the mill,” said Alice,
beginning to feel more and more at home with
her grandmamma. “Aunt Emily said it was so
kind of you to allow me to have Jumper and
our dog Watch, that we had better give up some
of our pets, lest it should be inconvenient for you
to have them.”

“That was very sensible of your aunt,” said
Mrs. Garnet; ‘“‘but, notwithstanding, we must*
have all the pets brought here. I was very fond
NAUGILY JUMPER. 35

of having all sorts when I was a little girl, and
indeed am as fond of my pet poultry as ever.”

“Thank you, grandmamma, very much,” said
Alice. “Shall I write to Martha to-morrow? her
father said he could send them by the coach
quite safely. I have some very lovely young
chickens, and then there is dear Nell, the tamest .
and the prettiest hen you can imagine.”

“Very well, then, that question is settled; we
shall have the fowls brought as soon as possible,”
said Mrs. Garnet, stroking her grandchild kindly
on the head. ‘‘Meanwhile,”’ she continued,
laughing, “you had better run off and see if
that naughty kid is behaving himself. I am
told he is rather unruly.”

Alice was not Jong before she had found out
where Watch’s kennel had been placed, and, after
his excitement had somewhat abated, she un-
fastened his collar, and they ran off together to
look for Dickson. He was a very kindly dis-
posed person, and took Alice to the paddock
where Jumper had been secured.

“T hope you won’t think we’ve been uncivil
to the poor animal, miss,” said Dickson; “ but
we had to do it, for he seemed determined to eat
up every shrub and bush about the place.”
36 A SCAMPER IN TIE NUT-GROVE.

“Now, Jumper, I think that was very naughty
of you,” said Alicé, sitting down beside the kid,
while Dickson returned to his work; but the kid
seemed so glad to see her, and kept poking his
nose into her hand for the piece of bread she
generally had for him, that she soon saw a scold-
ing was quite thrown away. She gathered some
nice, pretty flowers and twined them round his
neck, while Watch lay at her side feeling a little
jealous of so much attention being paid to Mr.
Jumper; but in a little, when that naughty
animal had not only eaten up the flowers on his
own neck, but had insisted upon devouring those
his mistress had twined round her head, they
left him to his own meditations, and had such
a fine scamper in the nut-grove, that Watch
quite forgot his ill-nature. It did feel so strange,
though, to be playing without Willie, and Alice
was quite indignant at herself for being so happy
and appearing to have forgotten him so soon.

“OQ dear Willie,” she cried, suddenly drop-
ping down on the grass, ‘how selfish of me to
be playing and running about with Watch, when
you are so far away, and perhaps unhappy !”

Watch put his paw on her knee and licked her
face most affectionately, and did everything he
ALICE AND HER FRIENDS. 37



JUMPER AND WATCH.

could to show his affection for her, and his an-
xiety to cheer her solitude. She had been trying
38 WATCLL AND IIS MISTRESS.



A FOUR-FOOTED COMFORTER.

not to cry all day, thinking if her grandmamma
caught her with red tear-stained eyes, she might
fancy she was very unhappy ; but this demonstra-
THINKING OF WILLIE. 39

tion on the part of poor Watch overcame her, and
she wept bitterly. ;

“Hollo!” said a voice at her ear, and look-
ing up, there stood her grandpapa, who had been
taking his usual walk before dinner, attended by
his servant. ‘Heyday! and what’s the matter
now?” he said a little sternly, and bringing his
stick down sharply on the ground. ‘“ Has the
dog hurt you? or what is it?”

“Oh no, grandpapa,” said Alice, forcing her
tears back bravely; ‘‘ Watch wouldn’t hurt me
for the world. I was just stupid, and began to
think about my brother, and wondered if he was
missing me, or if he was unhappy.”

“T daresay, if we could see him at this
moment,” said Mr. Garnet, in a less stern tone of
voice, “he would be engaged in a game of cricket
or football, and not thinking of you at all.”

“Oh, I hope he is, sir,” said Alice, brightening.

“Hope he is what?” said Mr. Garnet ; “ play-
ing at cricket, or thinking about you—which ?”

“Playing at cricket, grandpapa,” said Alice,
her blue eyes looking up confidingly into his.
“Willie is of rather a gloomy, desponding dis-
position, and I would rather he was playing at
some nice game than thinking of me; because
40 PRETTY EYES WERE NEVER MADE FOR TEARS.

then all the other thoughts will be sure to come
back, and he will be very miserable.”

‘What other thoughts?” inquired her grand-
papa, looking less stern than before.

“Thoughts about our dear old home, and papa,
and Uncle Charles, and aunt, and about Martha,
and all the people who were good to us, and—
and— ;’’ but here Alice began to cry afresh, and
buried her face in Watch’s neck, who, thinking
his mistress was being ill-used, growled at Mr.
Garnet rather fiercely.

“Come, come,” said the old gentleman in a
very kind tone, “we must have no more crying ;
such pretty eyes were never made for tears. Come
along and take a walk with me; and James,” he
added, turning to his servant, “will get you some
of the ripest nuts to be found—nothing like nuts
for chasing away the megrims.”

By the time dinner was announced, Alice had
made wonderful progress with her grandpapa,—
though, as time passed, she found that it was
only on very rare occasions he allowed himself to
be so friendly as he was that first day of their
acquaintance.

A month having passed away very pleasantly,
Alice being a great deal with her grandmamma,
A PLEASANT PROSPECT. 41

and seeing very little of her grandpapa, a letter
arrived from Willie’s schoolmaster, to say that
fever had broken out in the school, and it would
be necessary to send him home for a short time
to avoid the risk of infection. Alice was wild
with excitement when she heard that she was to
see her brother Willie so soon, and she wished
her grandmamma had not invited her young
cousins, the Clares, to spend a week or two with
them. She had only seen them twice for a short
time; but they did not appear to be very agree-
able children, and seemed to consider themselves
of so much consequence. The only one she liked
was Lucy, a girl of her own age, who had re-
proved her sisters and brothers for laughing when
Alice said she could not ride, that her papa had
never kept a pony for her, or a horse for himself
either, Alice was afraid that Willie might get
into mischief with his cousins, for he was easily
led, and they seemed to be very tricky boys.
When Willie arrived, however, Alice had him
to herself for three whole days, during which,
while they wandered over the beautiful grounds
together, she had many opportunities of advising
him to be careful of his behaviour when their
cousins came. Willie was very fond of his sister,
42 NEW PLAYMATES.

and had always been accustomed to be guided by
her, so that he readily promised to do his best to
keep out of mischief; for, as he said, “I don’t
want to get into disgrace with grandpapa; he
looks cross enough now, and might turn out a
regular Bluebeard if he were provoked.”

There were five of the little Clares—three
girls and two boys—and along with Alice and
Willie they made a goodly company. Tom and
Charles were really handy fellows, and, having
got permission from their grandmamma, fastened
a thick rope to two great trees in the orchard,
where they went to swing every morning after
breakfast. Alice would have enjoyed the plea-
sure of having so many young companions, but
they were constantly quarrelling amongst them-
selves about who was to have the next swing;
and often they would join amongst themselves to
make ill-natured remarks about Alice’s former
home, and what they were pleased to style her
poor relations, meaning her dear Aunt Emily and
Uncle Charles. When they had questioned her
closely about her former life, she had no idea
they would ever be so rude as to turn it all into
ridicule; but seeing at last they did it with the
intention of provoking her, she remained quite
A SOFT ANSWER TURNETH AWAY WRATH. 43

quiet, and bore it so sweetly, that in the end her
cousins began to feel ashamed of themselves, and



THE SWING IN THE ORCHARD.

lett her alone. Willie, however, did not bear it
so quietly, but would retaliate with much spirit,
44 EVIL COMPANIONS CORRUPT GOOD ONES.

and distressed his sister by losing his temper, and
offering to fight them both, one after the other.
“Don’t speak to me, Alice,” he would say; ‘‘I’m
determined to fight them—I know I could do it
easily ; I shall not stand their taunts about our
poor relations much longer. Though Uncle Charles
is not rich, isn’t he a gentleman? and I should like
to know if Dick and Robert Leighton would tease
a fellow as these Clares do. I tell you what, they
re nothing but cowards, with all their riches.”

Whether this was true or not, Alice could not
say ; but she generally managed to appease Willie’s
wrath in some way, and seemed to think it would
be better to leave him alone.

Another thing that vexed her, they were never
done teasing Jumper the goat, and had taught
him to butt at people; so that her grandmamma
was seriously annoyed, and spoke of having him
sent away if he did not turn over a new leaf
and mend his manners. One day when they were
in the wood, Jumper, having gnawed the rope
that was fastened to his collar, made his escape,
and found his way to where they were all playing
in the wood. ‘Oh dear, how has he got off?”
cried Alice, holding out her hand to catch him; but
Jumper was so determined to enjoy his liberty,
TRYING TO CATCH THE TRUANT. 45

now that he had secured it, that he whisked
away and trotted off further into the wood.



TRYING TO CATCIL JUMPER.

Away ran the children in different directions
to catch the truant; but the faster they ran, the
faster went Jumper, making off into a new quarter
just when they thought they had him secure.
Twice Charles had firm hold of him ; but Jumper
pushed him with his horns and made his escape,
leaving that young gentleman in a very bad
temper. Alice was close to him on the last oc-
46 ‘‘ MIND YOUR OWN BUSINESS.”

casion, and said she was sorry Jumper had been
so rude.

“Rude!” replied Charles; “that is a pretty
word. He’s a horrid brute, and that’s what he is.
If I get hold of him, Pll kill him!”

At that moment his eyes fell upon a nest with
several egos in it, half hidden under the root of a
tree. But Alice had seen it too, and she darted
forward and caught hold of his arm, crying out,
“Oh, please, Cousin Charles, spare the poor birds;
it is so cruel to take the eggs from them.”

“You just mind your own business,” said
Charles rudely. “Pll take the nest if I like, and
smash the eggs if I like, and do just as I please
about it.”

“Oh, but you mustn’t, really,” said Alice, hold-
ing him firmer than ever ; “it is so wicked. God
will be angry with you if you doit. Mind the
birds are his; and papa often said God must be
angry if we harm the poor birds.”

“Stuff and nonsense!” said Charles. ‘“ You
let me alone, and mind your own business,” And
saying that, he tried to push her back, while he
_ attempted to stamp on the nest with his foot.

“No; you must not do it,” said Alice, clinging
to him, for at that moment she overheard a plain-
A BRAVE STRUGGLE. 47

tive ‘tweet, tweet,” and knew that this was the
poor anxious bird watching over the fate of her
pretty eggs.

“But I say I shall,” said Charles in a great
passion, turning fiercely round upon his cousin.
“ Keep off; let go my arm, else Pl make you.”

4
sn kAR
aN



his
A BRAVE STRUGGLE.

As Alice was as determined as he was, she
paid no attention to his threats, and again
entreated him not to be a cruel-hearted boy.
“What. has the bird done to you that you should
be so cruel?”’ she said. ‘‘ Do let it alone, else I
must tell grandmamma.”
48 A SAD ACCIDENT.

“Oh yes, Miss Tell-tale, you will be ready
enough to do that,” said Charles; and with a
great swing of his body and a push he thrust
Alice away, who fell with a crash into a prickly
bush, which scratched her face and arms most
severely. That was not the worst, for when she
tried to get up she found her foot was badly hurt,
and go painful, that she feared it was broken.
When Charles saw that he had hurt her severely,
he began to whimper and cry, “ You'll be telling
grandmamma upon me, and getting me into a
fine scrape. But look here, Alice, I didn’t mean
to do it, and if you'll only not tell on me, Pl
promise never to harm another bird or touch with
its nest. Oh dear, how white you are getting !
What am I to do?”

“Tf you could help me to rise, and let me lie
down on the grass, there,” said Alice, though
scarcely able to speak, “‘and then run for some-
body to help me home.”

Charles lifted her up as carefully as he could,
and managed to carry her to the place she
pointed out; but she was so pale, and seemed to
be suffering so much pain, that he did not like
to leave her alone; but she assured him it was
the only plan.
A ILAPPY ENDING. 49

“Tl run the whole way,” said Charles ; “and
V'll get Dickson to come with the wheel-barrow.
And, I say, Alice, will you not tell upon me this
time ?- I’m sorry,—lI really am.”

Alice gladly promised ; and when he was fairly
off, she lay and watched the two birds hopping
quietly out and in, tweet, tweeting in the greatest
delight to find their nest and precious eggs
secure and safe. ‘I’m so glad he didn’t break
them,” said Alice. ‘“‘ Poor birdies!”

When Charles returned with Dickson and the
wheel-barrow, Alice was asleep, and feeling much
better. Her foot was sprained, but not so bad
as she thought it was. After Dickson had
wheeled her home, and she had ‘got it nicely
bandaged by the housekeeper, the pain had greatly
subsided, and though she could not run about
for some days, she was always able to be out of
doors, and join in any quiet game. To Charles’s
great delight, she did not tell how the accident
happened, and was so kind about it, and so frank
and pleasant to him, notwithstanding what had
passed, that he declared she was a jolly girl, and
worth half-a-dozen of his own sisters, who never
would have kept it secret.

One morning their grandmamma called them

(336) 4
b0 A TREAT WITH GRANDMAMMA.

into her room, and asked them how they would
like to make a short excursion with her to the



ASLEEP IN THE WOOD.

wood at the foot of the park. This was a great
treat, for it was not often that their grandmamma
OUT IN THE Woops. 51

felt strong enough to walk so far; and grandpapa,
it seemed, had expressed a wish to come and
meet them, which was certainly an extraordinary
thing for him to do.

When they reached a part of the wood that
was shady, and had selected a soft mossy bank
for their grandmamma to sit on, the children
flung themselves: down on the grass at her feet
to listen to one of her nicest stories, while Tom
and Charles, who preferred hunting for a rabbit
they had started, ran off after it. They were
away so long that their grandmamma began to
be afraid they had got into some mischief, and
might not be back in time to meet their grand-
papa, and Willie was just preparing to go in
search of them, when they came running round
the corner, holding up their hands and shouting
as if something dreadful was coming after them.

“What's the matter? what is it?” cried
Willie, running forward, while Mrs. Garnet and
the girls rose up in the greatest terror, fancying
a bull had escaped from the park, or some-
thing equally alarming was the matter. When-
ever the boys saw the state of terror every one
had. been thrown into, they flung themselves
down on the grass, laughing and screaming with
52 A PRACTICAL JOKE,

delight at the capital joke they had played upon
them. Mrs. Garnet was really very angry at



OUT IN THE WOODS.

their deception, and said that they had not only
taken away all her pleasure in their little ex-
ANOTHER PRACTICAL JOKE. 53

cursion, but she could never trust them alone
with the girls. “My dear boys,” said Mrs,
Garnet seriously, “a joke is all very well in its
way, but a practical joke, played for the purpose
of frightening people, is not only cowardly, but
may cause the greatest mischief. There are many
instances of this having happened, and I shall
certainly speak to your papa if ever I hear of
your doing such a thing again.”

“Oh, we often play practical jokes at home,
erandmamma,”’ said Tom, laughing. “ Papa
never forbids us. Don’t you remember, Charlie,
how we dressed ourselves in a white sheet and
stood in the corner of the staircase, intending to
frighten nurse, when who should come up but
old Mrs. Brownlow, who happened to be staying
with us atthe time. My, didn’t she scream! and
down she went on her knees, and then rolled over
and over to the bottom of the stair.” ’

“Yes; how we did laugh when we got to our
own room,” said Charles. ‘ But the best of the
joke was, nobody knew who did it. Mrs. Brown-
low insisted it was a real ghost; but nurse said
she knew it was Tom, only I declared he had
never left the nursery. Mrs. Brownlow believed
nurse’s story, and because papa would not punish
54 COWARDLY ACTIONS.

us, she packed up her boxes, and off she went in
the greatest state of indignation.”

“And did you never tell her you did it, and
beg her pardon?” said Willie.

“Of course not,” replied Tom. ‘Beg her
pardon! what an idea; why, Mrs. Brownlow is
as poor as a church mouse, and was very glad to
be invited to stay with us, I can tell you. As
papa said afterwards, she would be the greatest
loser ; and such a poor creature had no business
to give herself such airs.”

“It really distresses me to hear you speak in
that way of one of my oldest friends, and a good
woman,” said Mrs. Garnet. “My dear boy,
every one cannot be rich, but they can be good ;
and if you are not good, all the riches in the
world will never make you happy. I am certain
your papa must have been much grieved at this
annoyance to his guest, for she was an old friend
of his mother’s, as well as mine.”

“But we did not mean to frighten her,” said
Tom; ‘‘and though she did tumble to the foot
of the stairs, she only scratched her old nose a
little, and tore that: black silk of hers that she
seems to have worn for ever.”

They were interrupted by their grandpapa
ON FORBIDDEN GROUND. 55

coming up sooner than was expected; and as
their grandmamma felt rather unwell with the
fright she had got, she proposed going home
at once; but the day being still early, the
three boys were permitted to go off by them-
selves for a ramble into the wood, while the
girls walked home, gathering flowers as they
went.

The three boys, after scrambling through the
wood, came upon an open field; and they deter-
mined to cross it and enter the wood at the
other side, instead of going through the wood
itself. This was Willie’s proposal; but he did
not know that this field belonged to a farmer,
and not to his grandfather, and that Farmer
Nubbs was a very peculiar man, and would prose-
cute any one found trespassing. The two Clares
were well aware of this, but it made the project
all the more delightful to them; and, as Tom
whispered to Charles, the blame would fall upon
Willie, for he asked them to do it. When they
had got to the other side of the field their progress
was stopped by a wooden fence that had been
newly put up round a small orchard. On look-
ing for a place to climb over, they came upon an
apple-tree, laden with the most beautiful apples
56 TEMPTATION.

imaginable, the branches of which leant over into
the field in a most tempting manner.

“Well, there is a beauty,” said Willie; ‘“ but
isn’t it strange that grandpapa should have an
orchard so far from home? I suppose we may
take a few?”

“Of course we may,” said Charles, swinging
himself up into the tree. ‘We are allowed to
take apples from the home orchard, you know ;
and if we weren’t, who’s to miss them from such
a thick tree as this! Here goes; hold your cap,
Willie.”

Willie pulled off his cap, and held it out for
the fruit as Charles pulled it; but when they
were filling the third one, a man popped his
head round the corner. Tom, who saw him first,
cried out to Charles; and taking hold of Willie’s
arm, dragged him across the field. “Why do
you run away?” asked Willie in astonishment.
And when Tom had explained the true state of
affairs, Willie turned deliberately back, saying
that he would explain to the man the mistake
they had made, and. give him back the apples.

“What a muff you are,” said Charles, catching
hold of him by the arm. “The man will never
believe you, but will take you to grandpapa and
‘(WE ILAD NO BUSINESS HERE.” 57

have you punished. We had no business here at
all; grandpapa has often warned us never to go
near Farmer Nubbs’s field.”



CAUGHT IN THE ACT.

“But I knew nothing of this; why did you
not tell me?” said Willie.

“Well, that is a good joke,” said Tom, with a
sly wink to Charles; “we did tell you, but all
we could say or do you would not believe us, and
persuaded us to follow you. No; my advice is
to deny we ever were near the field.”

“Yes, that’s the best way,” said Charles.
58 GETTING OTHERS PUNISHED.

“Don’t you remember the scrape we got into:
before with Farmer Nubbs, and how we collared
two of the village boys who happened to be in the
wood at the time!”

“Yes,” said Charles, laughing. ‘ Will you ever
forget how they yelled when the farmer brought
his cane down on their backs? I couldn’t help:
feeling sorry for them; but it was better to see
the strokes coming on their backs, than to feel
them on ours.”

“T can’t understand you,” said Willie. “You
first declare you told me I knew about this field
being a farmer’s, and now you say you allowed
two boys to take a thrashing instead of you.
You surely are not such downright liars as
that!”

“Come, sir, give us none of your names,’
Charles angrily. “The fellows were poor boys,
and we gave them a shilling a piece after to pay
for the drubbing. There isn’t the slightest harm
in telling a lie to escape from a thrashing.”

“Then all I’ve got to say is, that you are not
only a liar, but the biggest coward I ever met
with; and in case you get somebody else into

?

said

the same scrape again, I shall at once go over to
the man, who is still looking over the fence, and -
CRUEL PLANS. 59

tell him all about it. As Uncle Charles says, a
cowardly Leighton was never seen yet.”

“The idea of him being proud of his name,”
said Tom. ‘These beggarly Leightons, as I’ve
heard grandpapa call them often. But let me
tell you that we shall never open our lips to you
again if you get us into disgrace. A fellow de-
pendent on his grandpapa giving himself such
airs!”

Willie ran off at.once, and paying no attention
to his cousins’ cries, was soon seen talking with
the farmer. Tom and Charles thought it best to
make their escape at once, planning as they went
along how they could throw the entire blame on
to Willie’s shoulders.

After reaching home, Alice and Lucy took their
grandmamma’s dog Fido out for a walk by the
river, where Willie found her lying under a shady
tree listening to Lucy reading. When Willie
came up Alice saw at a glance that something
was wrong, and making an excuse to Lucy, she
beckoned to him to follow her. When they were
in her own little bed-room, Willie told her all
that had happened, and further, that the farmer
would not believe his story, but said he would
come over and speak to 60 IN A DILEMMA.

afternoon. ‘‘And so you see, Alice,” said Willie,
“if Tom and Charlie insist that they told me not



ALICE AND LUCY.

to go, grandpapa may believe them, aud [ shall
be punished.”
HONESTY THE BEST POLICY. 61

“But, Willie dear, you are surely not afraid of
the punishment,” said Alice, stealing her arm
round his neck. ‘You remember what papa
used to say about telling the truth under any cir-
cumstances. I would rather be punished for
telling the truth than for telling a lie. It is
quite true what Dame Adams said, that riches
often make people proud and overbearing.”

“Yes,” said Willie, with a shake of the head ;
‘these Clares are overbearing enough, and what’s
more, they are downright cowards, besides being
low and mean-—telling me I was poor, as if I
could help it. Well, I would rather be what I
am, than rude and mean, like them.”

“Hush, dear,” said Alice, trying to soothe him.
“We can’t help having little money; but, you
know, a good name is better than riches. Come,
let us go to grandpapa’s room and tell him all
about it ; I’m sure that will be the best way.”

It was not such an casy matter telling his
story to his stern-looking grandfather ; but with
Alice holding his hand to encourage him, it was
told at last, and in such a way that his cousins
were screened as much as possible. When Mr.
’ Garnet asked Willie if his cousins were with him,
he answered that he would rather not speak of
62 A PIECE OF NEWS.

them, because they might think him a tale-
bearer; he only wished to say that he was sorry
he had trespassed, but he did it in ignorance.
His grandpapa simply said, ‘“ Very well; I shall
have you all up when the man comes.” But
when they were about to leave the room, he
called them back and said, “By the way,
William, I mean to send you to another school
next week; it won’t do for you to be losing
your time.”

Had Willie heard this piece of news in the
morning, he would have felt very sorry to leave
his grandpapa’s pleasant house, but now it was a
great relief to escape from his cousins; and being
a proud-spirited boy, the words they had used
had sunk deep into his heart, and he determined
not to be dependent on his grandfather longer
than was necessary.

“You don’t seem sorry at the idea of going to
school,” said his grandpapa, rubbing his chin, as
if he were trying to hide a smile.

“Yes, I am sorry, grandpapa,”’ said Willie ;
“ut I ain also glad to go.”

“And how is that? Don’t you get on with
your cousins? I hope you have all been good
friends,”
‘A BEGGARLY LEIGHTON.” 63

“T want to get back to school to finish my
‘education, so that I may go to sea. Uncle
Charles said you would perhaps help me to be a
captain if I worked hard. Then Alice could stay
with me, and nobody could call her a beggarly
Leighton then.”

“And who calls her by such a name now ?”
said Mr. Garnet, with a deeper frown than usual.
But seeing that Willie did not want to answer, he
added—-‘‘ You may go now; but come back ‘here
with grandmamma after dinner.”

When they reached the terrace—where they
went to have a quiet talk till dinner-time—a poor
beggar-boy came up the walk, stealthily turning
his head from side to side, as if he was afraid
somebody would jump out upon him from one of
the bushes. Alice, seeing how frightened he was,
called to him to come forward ; and searching in
her pocket, she brought out a sixpence, and held
it out towards him, asking him at the same time
what he was afraid of. The boy then told them
that his mother had sent him to ask for a little
more ointment for her sore leg; but he was afraid
of meeting the young gentlemen, as they always
flung stones at him. And the boy showed the
mark of a deep cut he had got the week before
64 BEING KIND 'TO THE POOR.

from a stone thrown by the biggest of the
boys.



















THE POOR BEGGAR-BOY,

Alice made him sit down while she ran to look
for her grandmamma; and as the boy seemed to
be very much afraid of the Clares, Willie stayed
to protect him. In a minute or two after, Tom
and Charles came running round the corner; and
seeing the boy sitting on the stone-seat, they
made a rush towards him, crying out now they
had caught that young pauper who threw stones
A COUNCIL. 65

at them. Willie told the boy not to be afraid,
but to sit quite still; and when Charles came
close upon them, Willie ran against him with all
his might, and. sent him tumbling down the steps
of the terrace, where he lay yelling and screaming
as if he had been murdered. Tom for a moment
looked as if he intended to fight Willie there and
. then; but seeing that his cousin was quite ready
for him, he ran off screaming for somebody to
come and help his brother.

Mr. Garnet’s window looked out upon this
part of the terrace, and he had been a witness of |
the whole affair. Calling out to Charles to hold
his tongue, he bade him bring his brother up to
his study; and desired Willie to follow, after he
had conducted the poor boy to the housekeeper’s
room. In Mr. Garnet’s room they found Farmer
Nubbs, who had just arrived: and Willie was
requested to repeat his story, which he did, in
almost the same words, without hesitation ; and
“none looking at his brave, open face could have
doubted that he was telling the truth. His
cousins were then asked what they had to say
for themselves; when they stoutly denied being
there at all, saying that Willie had made the

acquaintance of two of the village boys in the
(336) 5
66 TUE GOLD CHAIN.

wood, and had gone off with them. Both of
them insisted that this was true, and that they
had told Willie not to go near that part of the
wood, but he just laughed at them.

“Well, young master,” said Farmer Nubbs,
turning to Tom, ‘“‘if your story be true, this little.
gold chain must belong to the village boy who
was up the tree. I saw your cousin holding the
cap, which he doesn’t deny; but I’m very blind
indeed if you weren’t the same that pulled my
apples.”

Tom and Charles stared at the chain in sur-
prise and dismay, for they knew that their grand-
papa would at once recognize his last birth-day
gift. So, seeing that they were found out, they
began to whimper and cry, making such ridicu-
lous excuses for themselves, that their grandpapa
_ became so angry with them he ordered them, not
only out of his presence, but to return home
immediately.

When Willie was in his room, after his cousins
were gone, he could not help thinking what a
blessed thing it was for him he had such a good
sister. On locking out of the window, a bird
hopped upon a branch close to where he stood,
and began to sing very sweetly ; and Willie
THE RESULT OF GOOD ADVICE. 67

listened to it, for it seemed to sing, A good name
is rather to be chosen than riches. And he
felt, oh, so glad! that he had followed Alice’s
advice in going to his grandpapa at once to own
his fault.



WILLIE AND THE BIRD.

That evening Alice and Willie found their
grandpapa seated in Mrs. Garnet’s parlour instead
of being shut up in his study; and after telling
Willie how very much pleased he was with him
for telling the truth, even when he did not know
if his word would be believed, he opened a large
68 GRANDMAMMA’S SECRET.

scrap-book, and entertained the two ehildren
with a view of the contents till bed-time.

From that time Mr. Garnet became very fond
of his two grandchildren. And after Willie went
back to, school, he proposed that Alice should
become his pupil; and nothing seemed to please
him better than to sit in the little arbour, with
Alice on a low stool at his feet, explaining to her
a picture of some foreign country, and answering
her numerous questions,

A great happiness was in store for Alice ; some-
thing she did not expect, or ever fancied would
happen. :

“JT wonder if you could keep a secret,” said
her grandmamma one day, smiling.

“Oh yes, I think I could,” said Alice eagerly.
“T know papa used to trust me with a secret
sometimes, and I always kept it.”

“ Very well, then,” said Mrs. Garnet, “T think
I shall venture to try you. We are going to
have a visitor here in a few days—somebody that
you love very dearly.”

“Oh, grandmamma,” exclaimed Alice, clasping
her hands, while her eyes fairly gleamed with
excitement, “who is it? Aunt Emily? Uncle
Charles? or—”
AN UNEXPECTED PLEASURE. 69

But here Alice suddenly stopped, for it came
to her recollection that her grandpapa disliked all
her father’s relations, and she blushed and was
covered with confusion.

“Well, my dear, you needn’t be so agitated,”
said Mrs. Garnet kindly, ‘for you have guessed
correctly. It is your Aunt Emily; and when
Willie returns from school. during the holidays,
grandpapa says we may invite your cousins, the
Leightons, to spend some of the time with you.”

’ “Oh dear, how happy Iam!” said Alice. “I
feel inclined to laugh, and dance, and cry, and
sing; and I don’t know what to do first. Aunt
Emily coming to see me! Is it true, grand-
mamima-—quite, quite true?”

“Yes, my dear, it is quite true,” said Mrs.
Garnet, laughing. “There is the answer she has
sent to grandpapa’s invitation ; for it was he who
invited her.”

“To-morrow!” exclaimed Alice; “is it to-
morrow she is coming? Then I must get up
and dance, else my head will burst.”

“Come, come!” said Mrs. Garnet; “ we must
be sober. I wouldn’t have let the cat out of the
bag if it hadn’t been I want you to help me
to put the blue-room in order for our expected
70 PREPARING THE BLUE-ROOM.

guest. Grandpapa wishes it to be very nice, for he
has formed a high opinion of your papa’s sister.”

“ Indeed she is very good,” said Alice, begin-
ning to cry as she said she must do. “ Aunt
Emily is-just the dearest, sweetest, and best aunt,
that anybody ever had; and I know you will be
very fond of her, grandmamma, and so will she
be of you.”

The blue-room was in the perfection of order
when Aunt Emily arrived ; and it did seem
pleasant to have the dear face bending over her
once more. And that night, when they retired
together to the blue-room—Alice having been
permitted to ‘sleep there with her aunt—it did
feel like home to kneel at the old familiar knee,
and repeat her prayers as she had done in her
childhood.

“Tt seems like a dream,” said Alice, when
they were in bed. “I half expect, when I awake
in the morning, to find it so.”

“ Does that feel like a dream?” said Aunt
Emily, slyly tweeking Alice’s ear. “You go
to sleep, miss: you will find that I am some-
thing more substantial, and don’t evaporate quite
so easily——My precious darling,” she suddenly
exclaimed, “how thankful I was to hear from
A GOOD ACCOUNT. 71

your grandpapa such a good account of you and
Willie! It has made him wish he had not been
so harsh to your dear papa. How glad Uncle
Charles will be to hear it!”



ALICE,

One day, when Alice was sitting learning her
verse out of her Bible to say to her grand-
mamma, her grandpapa took it out of her hand,
and turning to the fly-leaf, read the verse from
Proverbs her mother had written there. Laying
it gently down with a sigh, he made Alice very
happy by saying, —
72 CONCLUSION.

“Your mother’s writing. Yes, she was right.
‘A good name is rather to be chosen than riches;’
and I am glad she has taught her children to feel
that this is true.”

“Grandpapa,” said Alice, “I often think, when
I am sitting watching the white fleecy clouds in
the sky, that I see mamma’s face smiling out of
them ; and Iam almost sure the next time I do see
it that she will smile more sweetly—if, that is to
say, she has heard your words. She was very
sorry she left you, grandpapa, but you know she
loved dear papa very, very much.”

“There were faults on both sides, child,” said
Mr. Garnet hurriedly. ‘One cannot recall the
past, mind you that, so be careful how you do
wrong.” Then, after sitting silent for a few
minutes, he said again, “Yes, Alice was right,—
‘A good name is rather to be chosen than riches,’ ”’