Citation
Lizzie Hepburn, or, Every cloud has a silver lining

Material Information

Title:
Lizzie Hepburn, or, Every cloud has a silver lining
Added title page title:
Every cloud has a silver lining
Creator:
Evans, Edmund, 1826-1905 ( Engraver )
Thomas Nelson & Son ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
London
Edinburgh
New York
Publisher:
T. Nelson and Sons
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
248, [25] p., [3] leaves of plates : ill. (some col.) ; 18 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Christian life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Brothers and sisters -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Children and death -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Orphans -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Cousins -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Laziness -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Kindness -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Publishers' catalogues -- 1874 ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1874
Genre:
Publishers' catalogues ( rbgenr )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
Scotland -- Edinburgh
United States -- New York -- New York
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Plates printed in colors and engraved by E. Evans.
General Note:
Publisher's catalogue follows text.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
ALH3686 ( NOTIS )
60551810 ( OCLC )
026852516 ( AlephBibNum )

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Full Text
Be NR ASET EN

sine ee EET
cae.





The Baldwin Library

University
of









LIZZIE HEPBURN;

oR,

EVERY CLOUD HAS A SILVER LINING.









LIZZIE HEPBURN;

oR,

EVERY CLOUD HAS A SILVER
LINING.



LONDON :

THOMAS NELSON AND SONS,
EDINBURGH AND NEW YORK,

1874,






CONTENTS.

I.—Tze Tremere a
Ii.—Tuz Sea Voyacz ..
III.—Wesrwazp ., ve
IV.—Tae Vittace Scxoon
V.—Cuanazs o
VI.—New Ferenps ee
VII.— Maran ‘ os
VIII.—Tuer SappaTu-scHoon
IX.—Taz Lams Foupep
X.—Pavu
XI.—An Onn AcauaInTrANcE
XII.—Tue Praczrot Fou
XITI.—ConFEssion .. oe
XIV.—Tue Enemy

XV.—DIsaPPoINTMENT .,

oe

108
lil
121
1380



vi Contents.

XVI.—Heren ,

. ee ee

XVIL.—Luizzm’s Drive

XVITI.—Jesstz,. oe .
XIX.—A Harp Scnoon .
XX.—VisiTors .. ae .
XXI—TuEe Weppine ., S
XXII.—Trovusie at tHe Farm...
XXTTI.— Restitution oe os

XXIV.—Surprises oe
XXV.—Tue Manvuscrirtr ee

oe



LIZZIE HEPBURN,

CHAPTER I.

THE TEMPLE,

freshingly through the open window, laden

Mi} with the fragrance of the orange groves,
swaying the light draperies from the bed with a gentle
motion: it brought a flush of relief to the wasted
cheek of the invalid. She had been propped up with
large pillows all this long, hot day; her thin, white
fingers, busy giving the final touches to a miniature
temple which now stood finished upon the table at her
side.

Fashioned from her own pretty design, in the
fragrant woods natural to the Southern clime, she had
covered it with minute delicately-coloured shells, the
foundation for the fanciful groups she had arranged
upon it. A casket of mother-of-pearl was inclosed
within the inner portion of the temple. About the
tiny pillars, which supported the temple, were twined
festoons of leaves and flowers, wrought from many-

Sh x B





2 Lisste Hepburn.

tinted shells and corals, completely hiding the casket
from view on the three sides. A narrow pavement
was laid in transparent plates of cameo, the slight
pinnacles formed from curious spirals, and the
dome covered with valves, light and beautiful as
snowflakes.

It now stood complete before her, and a look of
satisfaction almost drove the weariness from her face,
as she regarded the work of her skilful fingers, uncon-
scious, all the while, that the hectic was burning
deeper upon her cheek, and that this delightful task
had taxed too severely the waning powers of her life.

At this moment, the vines, that had been trained to
shade the window from the glare of the sun, were sud-
denly parted, and a child, nine or ten years of age,
bounded in noisily, followed by a great dog, with a
shaggy, black coat. Her cheeks were glowing with
health, and her large, black eyes flashing with the fun
and excitement of her romp with Rover in the garden.
The burning eyes of the mother welcomed the child
with an expression of intense love, while the hasty,
impulsive kiss was returned with impassioned caresses.
The eyes of the restless little girl soon fell upon the
temple of shells, and she turned eagerly towards it, ex-
claiming, “ Oh, mamma! what is that? How beauti-
ful! oh, how beautiful !”

“A temple for my darling. It is yours, Lizzie, all
yours, and always yours.”

“ And did you make it for me, you dear mamma?”
demanded the child, throwing one arm about her |
mother’s neck, but without removing her eyes from
her new treasure,



The Temple. | 3

Ves, dear, I made it for you; the last thing that I
can ever do for you, I fear, my child.”

“Oh, mamma, don’t talk so, please. You look so
much better to-day!” said Lizzie, kissing her mother
with more tenderness. “The new doctor will make
you well soon, I’m sure.”

“No, Lizzie, I shall never be well again,” replied
her mother ; “and there are some things I wish to say
to you while I have strength. So get your little chair
and sit close to the bed, for you must pay close atten-
tion to all I say to you to-day.”

“In a minute, mamma,” said Lizzie, diverted by the
dog, who was eager for another frolic. “ Here, Rover,
lie down, sir! I cannot play with you for such a long
time, I guess. You dear old fellow! Go io sleep,
Rover! There, now, mamma, I’m all ready.”

“Do you remember these beautiful shells, Lizzie ?”
asked her mother, taking the temple carefully in her
hands.

“Why, those are the ones papa brought me,
mamma?” :

“Yes, dear; and I have made them into this temple
so that you may always keep them to remind you of
his love for you. He brought them home when you
were a little one; and he used to like to see your baby
fingers playing with them as you tossed them about the
floor.”

“And did he give me that pretty box?” asked
Lizzie, pointing to the casket.

“No; that was his present for me; but it’s yours
now, dear. ‘here is a little secret spring to open the
cover. Press that small dark spot, Lizzie.”



4 Lissie Hepburn.

Lizzie obeyed, and the cover instantly flew open.
Quite delighted, she closed and opened the box re-
peatedly, her mother bidding her to be sure and never
forget the spot by which alone the casket could be
unlocked.

“Now, Lizzie,” said her mother, opening a small
cabinet at her side, “I will place in this casket some
very precious gifts from which I wish you never to
part. This locket holds a bit of your father’s hair and
of mine. These small portraits, that you may never
forget the faces of your father and mother. This ring,
which he placed upon my finger when I became his
wife.”

The mother held the plain band a moment, fondly
slipping it upon her finger, while memory recalled that
bright day in her history, and all the successive links
of time which connected that past with the painful
present. She was aroused from her reverie by the
impatient demand of her restless child.

“Ts-that all, mamma? May I shut the box now?”

“Wait a moment, Lizzie. I have one more gift to
place in your casket, then you may close it.” And she
produced a roll of papers closely written over by her
own hand.

“Qh. a story, mamma! Please read it to me first !”
exclaimed Lizzie, eagerly.

“No, dear, not now. Some day, when you are
older, you will read for yourself the story your mother
has written for you. But you may place it in the ;
casket now and shut the cover. Now hand me that
bit of pearly shell, which will be the door of your
temple,”



The Temple. 5

Placing the shell in its proper groove and carefully
sealing it, she hid the seams with the same devices
that adorned the other sides, and placed the pretty toy
in the hands of her child, who had watched her with
eager curiosity.

“Oh, thank you, dear mamma!” she exclaimed.
. “T never saw anything half as pretty as that little
temple! It’s just splendid !”

“Tam glad you like it so much, Lizzie, and I wish
you always to remember, that wherever you go, you
are never to part with your little temple. Always
keep this last gift of your mother, and let it serve to
remind you of your father and of me, and of our love
for our only darling child.”

*“Tndeed, I will always keep my temple,” Lizzie
readily promised. “But must I never open it,
mamma?”

“Not until you are at least sixteen years of age,
And never reveal to any one the secret of the pearly
door. Promise me that you will obey me, my child.”

“Tl mind you, mamma. T’ll never tell any one,
I’m sure, what is hidden in my pretty temple,” said
Lizzie.

“You know I have often told you, dear,” said the
mother, softly drawing Lizzie to her side, “that I must
soon leave you alone. Our dear Father in heaven has
called for me, and your mother must soon go to join
your dear papa, Lizzie. We shall there wait togethec
for our darling.”

“Oh, mamma,” said the child, quieted by her
mother’s earnestness, “you must not die! Who will
take care of me? How can I live without you?”

”



6 Liszste Hepburn.

“ God avill care for you, my darling. And Jesus
will restore us to cach other in His good time. “ He
will be your Saviour as He has been ours. I am sure
of it, Lizzio. Trust in Him, and He will never forsake
you.”

These words, fraught with such deep and holy
meaning, made, at this time, but a slight impression
upon the blooming little girl, full of health and viva-
city. For many months she had been accustomed to
her mother’s pale face and wasted frame, and she could
not think she was to die, nor did she know how deso-
late the wide world was to an orphan. She had in-
deed received her mother’s tender words with a sudden
fit of weeping, but with the buoyant elasticity of child-
hood, her tears were soon dried, and kissing her
mother back to smiles, she roused old Rover and re
sumed her noisy games with him. The weary invalid
was forced at length to ring for the nurse, and to bid
Lizzie good night. She soon sank into a heavy slum-
ber, which deepened, as the late hours of the night
came on, to a stupor from which she was never
aroused. The mother’s “good morning” to her
orphaned daughter will be in eternity.

The elegant house of Dr. Hepburn was about three
miles from one of the large cities in the South. Em-
bowered in luxuriant groves of orange and magnolia-
trees, it was adorned within and without with all that
a cultivated taste could devise and moderate wealth
procure. Here, with his wife and their only child;
Lizzie, he spent the years succeeding his return from
Europe in the unrivalled enjoyment of a home where
love reigns supreme. That love, which possessing God



The Temple. 7

as its highest object, thence shed its benign beams
; upon all within its hallowed influences.

For several years they had been permitted to enjoy
almost unalloyed happiness, finding a mutual delight
in cultivating the opening mind of their daughter, and
in displaying before her the treasures of knowledge as
she was able to comprehend them. And until the
period when our story opens, they had been able
almost wholly to occupy the ever-contested ground of
the human heart with influences for good. From the
earliest recollections, Lizzie had known the precicus
name of Jesus, and to her young mind the story of His
love had become an unquestioned fact.

The preceding summer had been a terrible one. All
day long and for many days the blazing sun had
poured its rays fiercely upon the scorched earth, which
had opened in deep seams like parched mouths plead-
ing for water. The springs failed, and the streams
either dried away, or were hidden beneath a dark,
heavy scum, full of malaria, ready to breed the dreaded
fever, which, in the Southern States, often gives so .
rich a harvest of human souls tc the Reaper Death.

Indeed, the dread report soon reached the cottage of
Dr. Hepburn that the plégue was already commenced
in the city. Those favoured ones who possessed suffi-
cient wealth, fled before it, panic-stricken, and sought
safe retreats in the North and West, until the glad
tidings of the first frosts should render it possible for
them to return ‘to their homes. Among the poorer
classes, the pestilence was sweeping like the besom of
destruction, and hundreds of the wretched people were
perishing miserably, with none to care for them, or to



8 Lissie Hepburn.

give them decent burial. A noble band of physicians
remained within the infected city, and by their side a
few devoted women, who braved death for themselves,
rather than desert their unfortunate fellows, leaving
them to struggle alone with their mortal agonies.

Among these Dr. Hepburn stood foremost. At the
first report, he bade his wife and child farewell, and
strong in the courage that “bravely dares the danger
nature shrinks from,” placed himself at once in the
front rank of those who were at work among the sick,
in infected alleys and miserable hovels, supplying their
wants, alleviating their sufferings, and pouring the
balm of sympathy into broken hearts. And here he
fell at his post, nor did many of that noble band
survive him.

Mrs. Hepburn, who had received daily messages
from her husband assuring her of his safety, was filled
with the most agonizing fears, when one long day
passed bringing her no tidings from him. Instantly
sending her child to a secure place in the country, in
charge of a trusty servant, with orders to remain until
she recalled them, she repaired to the city. She
found her husband at last, and, to her inexpressible
relief, was permitted to receive his last caress, his
directions as to her own future and that of their child ;
to close his eyes with her own hand, and to secure for
his precious dust a careful burial.

Mrs. Hepburn gave herself no time for the indul-
gence of selfish, passionate grief, but nobly standing
in the place where her husband had fallen, she
ministered to the bodies and souls of those about
her, who were now being “carried away as with a



The Temple. 9

flood,” until the pestilence lifted its dark wing from
over the desolated city, and peace was borne to it
upon the cool and healthful breath of the early frosts.
She escaped the infection, but the extraordinary
exposure and laborious efforts hastened the develop-
ment of the consumption, which had long lain hidden
in her system.

After her return home, the disease made such rapid
progress that she soon realized her days were numbered.
For her child she pleaded long and earnestly to be spared.
But when she could no longer doubt that the command
had gone forth that she must die, she began, with the
resignation of a chastened Christian, to “set her house
in order.”

The sweet home, in which had been spent the
happiest hours of her life, was disposed of at a price,
indeed, far below its value, for all real estate near
the city had greatly depreciated during the prevalence
of the pestilence. Everything that could affect the
future interests of her child was attended to with the
greatest care. Toa brother of her husband, a stranger
to her, but their only relative, who resided in the
North, she committed her daughter, requesting him
to come at once, that he might receive from her own
hands the orphan child of his brother, whom he was
to rear with his own children in his distant home.

An abundance of clothing was prepared for Lizzie,
and packed under the careful supervision of her mother.
Ample instructions were given to the faithful nurse,
who had promised to accompany Lizzie as far as
New York. With every heart-string throbbing with
yearning love for the child so soon to be left to



io Lissie Hepburn.

meet the stern realities of an unknown future alone,
Mrs. Hepburn felt that she should, indeed, sink
beneath the trial, but for the assurance that around
her were the “Everlasting Arms,” and under her
trembling feet was the Rock,—that Rock which ever
firmly upholds the sinking pilgrim, however deep and
dark the waves of sorrow, which may overflow, but
can never submerge it.

The construction of the miniature temple of shells
and the writing of the manuscript were the last efforts
‘the loving heart demanded of the failing hand. Robert
Hepburn arrived the morning after the decease of his
sister-in-law. As he found all business matters had been
arranged satisfactorily, he deemed it best to return
home immediately after the funeral solemnities had
been attended. Moreover, he felt almost powerless
before the heart-rending grief of the child Lizzie, and —
thought he might best divert her from it by the change
and pleasure incident to their long journey. In a few
days, therefore, Lizzie was carried one evening, while
sound asleep, on board the steamer which was to con-
vey her to her new home and friends,



CHAPTER I.
THE SEA VOYAGE.

WISH I knew! Oh, how I wish I knew !”

This sudden ejaculation fell from Lizzic’s

é i] lips, as she was left the following morning
in charge of her uncle, to amuse herself upon the deck
of the steamer, as the bright rays of the sun were gild-
ing the ever-restless waves of the occean. Robert
Hepburn soon became quite oblivious of the presence
of the child, being absorbed in the perusal of a paper,
which he had taken from his pocket.

Left to herself, Lizzie had drawn a low seat near the ,
guards, and sat quietly watching the new and glorious
scene before her, her arms clasped tightly over a large
doll in an unconscious embrace. Suddenly a strange
yearning darkened her eyes, and she exclaimed eagerly,
“T wish I knew! Oh, how I wish I knew!”

Then, rushing impulsively across the deck to the
easy chair where her uncle sat, she seized his arm, and
said : “I wish I knew! Uncle Robert, please tell me !”

“Tell you what, Lizzie?” said her uncle, good
humouredly.

_ “Ts that the way to heaven?” and the little hand





12 Lisste Hepburn.

pointed to the distant line, where the sky seemed to
rest upon the sea.

“The way to heaven!” exclaimed Uncle Robert,
aroused to something like animation by the strange
demand of the little girl. “ What a question! Why,
Lizzie, what put such an idea into your head?”

“Why, just look, Uncle Robert! Away out there
the clouds rest upon the water, don’t they? And if
we sailed right on it would bring us so near that we
could easily go to heaven, and then I could see my
mamma again,” said Lizzie, earnestly.

“You are talking nonsense, child,” said her uncle.
“ You will know all about this when you are older, so
don’t trouble your little head about things you cannot
understand just now. Go play with your dollagain, I
want to read.”

“T donot want my doll! I want to know now!
Papa always told me things when I asked him! I
want to know now, I say!” And the eyes flamed with
excitement, as Lizzie dashed the doll upon the deck
and burst into a passion of tears.

Completely bewildered by this encounter with the
strange child whom he was now to regard as his own,
Robert Hepburn was at a loss what course to pursue.
Summoning a little energy, he ordered her to go at
once to her nurse in the cabin, and resumed his
paper. He soon forgot both her and her troublesome
questions in a quict doze into which he quite naturally
fell. ‘

Not at all disposed to obey her uncle, Lizzie returned
to her seat near the guards, and, leaning over there,
she soon became interested in watching the little



Lhe Sea Voyage. 13

white caps as they chased cach other from the far
distant horizon, and broke into a gentle dash and
pleasant murmur against the vessel. Diverted by
the frolic of the waves, she ceased her angry sobs,
and smiles soon chased away the frowns that had
disfigured her face. But presently her attention was
again arrested by the meeting of the clouds and the
waters, and it seemed so real and so near!

The longing came back to her heart, and she mur-
mured, but sadly now, “I wish I knew! oh, how I
wish I knew!”

“What is it that you wish to know, little one?”
asked a pleasant voice quite near her.

Lizzie was somewhat startled when her eye met that
of astranger. But she was too much in earnest to
hesitate to speak, and she said, simply, “I wish to
know if that is the way to heaven! Can you tell
me, sir?”

This unexpected question brought a smile to the face
of the young man. Indeed, he would have laughed’
outright had not the earnest eye of the child been fixed
full upon him and checked his mirth.

Drawing a chair for himself close to her low seat, he
said, in a winning tone, “ We will talk a little about
that, my dear, but first you must tell me your name.”

“ Lizzie Hepburn,” said the child.

“And mine is Carl Wahlmar. You will call me
Carl, because that will be easier for you, and I will
call you Lizzie. Now then, we are introduced and shall
be very good friends, I think. ‘Will you tell me why
you asked such a very odd question?”

“ Because my papa and mamma are both dead and

—



14 Lissie Hepburn.

gone to heaven. Mamma said they would wait
there for me. And when I looked over there it
seemed so near and so easy to go to heaven. I
thought if we sailed right on I should see them again-
I am so lonely since mamma died !” added Lizzie with
a quivering lip. ‘I want to see her so much!”

Touched as he was by this sad complaint of the
orphan child, Carl did not check a scornful smile that
swept over his handsome features, and a wicked resolve
lent a startling energy to his voice, as he replied, “You
are too old, Lizzie, for such nonsense to be taught you
any more. There is no such place as heaven :”

Bewildered by this astounding answer to her ques-
tion the child sprang from her seat and stood motion-
less before him, her eye riveted to his with a frightened
expression that amused him. He sought to divert her
from the first effect of his words by explaining in a
pleasant manner the rotundity of the earth and the
natural causes for the apparent meeting of the clouds
and waters, assuring her, that, though they should sail
right on, the line would still appear far in the distance.

“But where are my papa and mamma then?” sud-
denly interrupted the child.

“You said they were dead, Lizzie.”

“ Yes, their bodics are dead, I know. But mamma
said our souls would never die. She said she would
wait for me in heaven, and that when it was best, Jesus
would send for me, too.”

* Your mamma told you that, I suppose,” said Carl,

‘so that you should not grieve so much when she was
gone. But it is not true, Lizzie. When people die,
that is the last of them. But dear, I do not like to



The Sea Voyage. ts

talk about dying. We are too young to think of such
gloomy subjects. There will be time enough for that
when we are older. You and I, and all who are young
and well, ought to be happy, to laugh and dance and
sing, anything rather than to be gloomy. At least,
Lizzie, we will not talk about these things now, they
make me angry sometimes.”

Lizzie seemed almost afraid of Carl. She made no
reply to him, but took her seat again with a look of
disappointment upon her young face, which he sought
to drive away by cheerful talk.

“ Away. over this blue water, Lizzie, is a country
called Germany. It is my fatherland, and there dwell,
in a great pleasant house, my father and mother and
little sister Katrine. She is just about your age, I
think, and a dear little girl I hope you may know
her some day.”

Carl forgot that he was presenting in his pleasant
talk, objects to the faith of this child, just after he had
‘struck it such a staggering blow, and he would have
felt deeply insulted had any one questioned the truth
of his assertions, or insinuated that he had told her
these, to him undoubted facts, simply to make her
happier at present.

“Some day,” he continued, “I will sail right on
over this great water, and it will bring me to my
father and mother and my little sister, and we shall
be happy together once more. But you have not told
me, Lizzie, with whom you are to live.”

“With my Uncle Robert over there,” at once said
Lizzie, pointing to the easy-chair and its sleeping
occupant, :



16 Lissie Hepburit,

“ And will you have cousins to play with?”

“ Yes, two; a boy older than I, named James, and
a girl just as old as I am, named Helen.”

“Ah! I expect you will have fine times together.
The boys and girls in the North are great romps.”

“ But I had a great deal rather not go,” said Lizzie,
wearily. “I had much rather stay in my home, or
keep on sailing on this beautiful ocean.”

“Have you never seen the ocean before, Lizzie?”

“No, they brought me here while I was asleep last
night, and when I awoke this morning and came upon
the deck, I thought there could be nothing so beautiful
as the ocean.”

“I think I could tell you some things about the
ocean that you would like very much, shall I, Lizzie?”

“Tf you please, Carl,” said Lizzie, with some degree
of returning animation.

Carl was interested in his little companion, and
could not understand why his words should have
affected her so deeply. He did not realize that to
doubt the truthfulness of her parents, or to question
the instructions they had given her, was a demand too
startling and too shocking for her to recover from at
_ once. He had unloosed, with daring hand, the little
boat from its secure moorings, and then marvelled that
it should tremble and shrink from entering the dark-
ness looming before it with no ray of light to guide its
journeyings.

But he resolved to try to win Lizzie back to smiles
again. So he talked to her of the wonders of the
ocean. He told her of the great fish that sported in
its waters, and of the dolphins, and of the pretty tales



The Sea Voyage. 17

the poets sing of their changeful hues when about to
die. Then he spoke of sea-mosses and ferns, and of
the vast coral reefs down deep beneath the waves. He
told her of their wonderful formation by myriads of
tiny creatures, who patiently and slowly mould into
flowers and leaves and delicate tendrils the gardens of
the deep, until, reaching the surface, they uprear the
strong foundations for the green islands which dot the
ocean.

Then he spoke of the great frozen seas of the North,
with their floating mountains of ice; of their long,
dark winter days and nights resplendent with auroral
magnificence. He told her of the dark, mysterious
open sea about the Pole, whose awful stillness has
never been broken, but by the song of birds; and
of the slow march of the huge icebergs towards the
South to their own detonating music, louder than the
most startling thunder, as they part their vast frag-
ments through the influence of the rays of the sun
above them, and the warm current of the Gulf-stream
beneath.

Lizzie listened to all these marvels of Nature with a
degree of interest, but in silence, which Carl felt to
indicate great indifference. Lizzie could not have
explained, had she been asked, why these truths had
failed to move her soul, as they would have done, if
they had been presented to her by her parents. It
was like offering to her the empty shell, after care-
fully removing all the nutriment and bidding her be
tilled and satisfied. He had presented to her mind
bright pictures of the wonderful works of God, then
marred them by a scornful denial of their great Author.

¢



18 Ligsie Hepburn.

Impatient, at length, at the continued silence of the
little girl, Carl suddenly resolved to deepen, if he could
not remove, the impression he had made upon her
mind. “The occan is very beautiful to-day, Lizzie,”
he said.

“Oh yes, very beautiful,” said Lizzie, enthusiasti-
cally. “Those little white waves chase each other
from away off there as if they were trying to see
which would reach us first. I lke to wateh them,
they sparkle so in the sun, and I like to hear their
music.”

“ And yet the ocean is sometimes a terrible monster,
Lizzie,” said Carl, in such an altered voice that the
child raised her eyes to him in surprise. “ Those little
white caps,” he continued, “which to-day are sparkling
and dancing about everywhere, will sometimes swell
into huge waves. Then the winds, with fearful
roaring, will catch them up, and toss them about
with great fury, and dash them with awful force upon
frail ships like this one upon which we are so quietly
sailing to-day. And then they go down! down!
down !

“T tell you, Lizzie, underneath these waves there lie
the white bones of men, women, and little children,
who sank out of sight in some awful tempest, vainly
shrieking to God for help! Poor souls! shrieking to
a God whom they called good for help, and yet sink-
‘ing down into the cold waves, with no.eye that could
pity them or arm that could save them!”

Carl’s face darkened as he proceeded: “There is no
God, or He would have helped them in their agony!
There can be no God who is not good. Even I, who



The Sea Voyage. 19

am not good, would have saved them, had I the power
of a God. I tell you, Lizzie,” Carl said, grasping the
arm of the child with almost painful violence, “there
is no God, no heaven, no Jesus. Never believe it
again. These dead ones are at peace beneath the
waves; their agony is over, and that is the last of
them! It is the last of them, I say, and when you
and I die it will be the last of us!”

Lizzie shivered with terror, and clung to the arm
of the young man, affrighted at his fearful words and
the vehemence of his manner. It was well that the
summons to dinner aroused Uncle Robert at this
moment from his nap, and that he led the: child
away.

Lizzie refused that night, for the first time in her
life, to repeat the little prayer her mother had taught
her, nor would she give any reason to the nurse, who
anxiously endeavoured to persuade her to perform the
accustomed duty. She could give no reason, for she
knew not why herself. The first dark drop of unbelief
had disturbed the placid waters of the child’s mind,
hitherto so carefully shielded from it. And who can
tell when its baleful influence will cease, or whither it
will tend?

That very night, one of the sudden and violent
storms common to that latitude at this season of the
year, swept down upon the ocean. The embattled
hosts of the storm-king rushed with wild shrieks
through the air, and the ship shook fearfully beneath
the tremendous strokes of the huge waves.

Within the cabin all was consternation and distress.
The affrighted passengers rushed from their state-rooms,



20 Liszie Hepburn.

and forbidden to go upon the decks, they filled the
spacious saloon with their cries of alarm and wild
prayers for help.

Carl, whom the unsteady light of the single lamp
revealed, supporting himself with one arm thrown
around a pillar, alone maintained a perfect silence. A -
smile of cold contempt rested upon his face as he
listened to the wild prayers of his fellow-passengers.

A single cry burst from the lips of the child
Lizzie, aroused from her deep sleep by the confusion
in the cabin, and the noise of the tempest. She was
found by her half frantic uncle and nurse, after
the storm had partially abated, her face white with
terror, pressed against the darkened window, vainly
endeavouring to catch a glimpse of the wild scene
without.

The nurse, much alarmed at her appearance, but
little dreaming of all the causes for it, carried Lizzie
back to her bed, and sat by her side, soothing her with
the songs she had heard her mother sing to her, until
the lids closed over the weary eyes, and the excited
little girl fell asleep. She did not awake until the
morning sun was shining clear and bright upon the
ocean, now calm and smiling again.

A few pleasant days followed, undisturbed by any
accident or incident worth noting. Lizzie shrank in-
stinctively from any further intercourse with Carl,
spending most of her time with her nurse, who made
an especial effort to amuse her during the remainder of
the voyage.

In New York Lizzie parted from Carl with a simple
good-bye ; but she clung with a passionate embrace to



The Sca Voyage. 2r

her kind nurse : her little heart being inexpressibly sad
at this separation from the last person who had helped
to make her life hitherto so pleasant and happy. The
railway cars soon bore the reluctant child and her
uncle to their new home.



CHAPTER III.

WESTWARD.




SA REAK ! Crank! Crash!

“There she goes! The thing’s broke at
Seen} ast !”

“What's the matter, John ?”

“Matter enough, I reckon. That for’ard wheel’s
broke to smash! Thats all.”

“Wheel broken! That’s bad. What's to be done,
John?”

«We'll have to camp out where we are for the night.
The roads is awful, and we're dead broke, sure. So
there’s no help for it. Here we must stay to-night.”

“But there’s no shelter on this open prairie, John,
and there’s a storm coming.”

“J know that, I reckon. Can’t be helped, though,
T tell you. Couldn’t go fur on three wheels over roads
like these, you bet. You and Jim ’ud better jump out
and help me rig up something for a shelter before yon
cloud breaks over us. A storm on the prairie, whether
wind or rain, is no joke, youll find. So hurry up!”

The white curtains of the vehicle, well known at
the West as a “prairie schooner,” were parted at this



Westward. 23

announcement, and Robert Hepburn leaped heavily to
the ground, followed by his son, and presently by his
wife. Two young faces peered out from the waggon,
watching the rapidly gathering darkness of the coming
storm, and the hasty preparations for their protection
from it, A tent was quickly constructed and secured
as well as their means and time allowed, under the
direct supervision of Lizzie’s aunt, Mrs. Hepburn, and
the family gathered under its shelter just as the storm
burst upon them in all its fury.

The little girls, Lizzie and Helen, sat near Uncle
Robert in the centre of the tent, conversing together in
low, frightened tones, whenever the lull of the storm
permitted their words to be heard. James assisted John
and his mother in holding and bracing the tent from
the violence of the wind, Mrs. Hepburn being the most
calm and self-possessed of all the group.

She was a tall, square-shouldered, angular woman,
with stern eyes, whose blue depths were often darkened
by an imperious temper, and rarely lightened by the
softer emotions which belong to her sex. She had a
loud, coarse voice and laugh, such as are sometimes
found in women, but are always suggestive of some
mistake in nature, and affect us as will a discordant
note in music when we are expecting perfect harmony.

Mrs. Hepburn was a self-reliant woman, full of that
rough sort of energy considered essential to constitute

-a thorough business character. She had a determined
will, before which all in her realm was forced to yield.
Any resistance to her will was sure to arouse a temper
which was both cruel and unrelenting. She had effec-
tually crushed out, if she ever possessed them, the



24 Lizzie Hepburn.

tender elements of affection and sweet sympathies,
ordinarily found in the character of a woman.

She was married, rather late in life, to Robert Hep-
burn. He was a quiet, little man, of whom his neigh-
bours said he was too indolent to care for himself, nor
could he keep awake long enough to make any business
profitable. He seemed, indeed, either physically or
mentally unfitted to assume or retain his proper posi-
tion as head of the family, and easily yielded the reins
to his wife. Mrs. Hepburn, comprehending the situa-
tion at once, assumed the sole management of their
affairs, and thenceforth exercised an absolute authority
in their household that he never ventured to oppose.

For her children Mrs. Hepburn had a sort of affec-
tion, which prompted her to provide for their physical
wants and to shield them from injury or insult from
others, as the wild animal will care for its young. The
sweet mother-love in all its holy meaning had never
blessed them in their early childhood, nor did it soften
the stern discipline which she now considered especi-
ally essential for their proper training.

James, who had inherited both her strong will and
energy, was already manifesting a restiveness under the
despotic authority of his mother, that bid fair ere long
to emancipate him from its yoke. In the meantime,
however, he exercised his own love of power by various
petty tyrannies over his sister Helen, and was already
attempting the same with his pretty and very spirited
cousin.

Helen resembled her father in her heavy features
and large, dull eyes, and seemed also to have inherited
both his physical infirmities and his indolence. But



Westward. 25

she was not in any respect a bad-tempered little girl
Exceedingly averse to work of any kind, and forced
to its performance by the inflexible commands of her
mother, she had, unfortunately, learned to avoid her
tasks by a variety of cunning deceits, by which her
regard for truth had become sadly blunted.

This, then, was the family, and these the home-
influences which were to surround Lizzie for several
years. Heretofore. she had been carefully shielded from
contact with such characters. Now they were to be
her daily companions and teachers. Removed from the
atmosphere of love in which she had been so tenderly
nurtured, deprived of all the elevating and refining
influences that had surrounded her in her own home,
and forced to intimate association with the coarse and
tude elements in this family, the conflict of the evil
with the good was to be carried on, with the chances
of success largely in favour of the former.

Robert Hepburn was a carpenter of average ability.
But he had pursued his calling with such small
success, that their accumulations had, thus far, been
exceedingly moderate. On his return from the South,
he proposed to invest the money in his possession, the
property of his orphan niece, for her especial benefit,
in accordance with the wishes of his deceased sister-
in-law, Lizzie’s mother.

This plan met the most decided opposition from
Mrs. Hepburn, who demanded that the money should
be submitted entirely to her disposal. After a feeble
attempt at resistance to this unlawful proceeding,
Robert Hepburn yielded, as usual; and, from that
time asked no questions, nor gave himself any concern



26 Lissie Hepburn.

about its disposal. He seemed to have forgotten the
whole transaction.

Mrs. Hepburn had long wished to emigrate to the
West, where, she believed, their prospects for the
future might be materially improved. She had been
prevented from realizing this wish hitherto by the
want of sufficient funds. When, therefore, the neces-
sary amount of ready cash was at her disposal, she
decided at once to carry out her long cherished plan,
and to invest Lizzie’s money in a farm, which she
knew she could make quite comfortable under her own
efficient management, if she owned the land herself.
This illegal appropriation of money that was not her
own. caused her not the slightest uneasiness. She was
well aware that there was no person living who could
offer the slightest interference to her proceedings, ex-
cept her own husband, from whom she had nothing to
fear, and her conscience was too thoroughly asleep at
this juncture to annoy her in the least.

With her accustomed energy, therefore, she pro-
ceeded to complete her arrangements. A neighbour,
well versed in the difficulties and dangers of overland
travel, was engaged to remove them to Minnesota, the
State she had chosen as their future home. She relied
upon her own sharp tact to choose the proper location,
after their arrival in some of the border towns of that
State. é

Their small property was soon disposed of, or securely
packed in the white-covered heavy waggon, in which
they were to make their journey. Every arrangement
had been completed but the examination and disposal
of Lizzie’s large trunk, which had until now remained





Westward. 29

unpacked. In order to be quite undisturbed in this
business, she granted the children the unusual indul-
gence of a day in the woods with their young com-
panions.

As Jane Hepburn rifled the trunk of its stores of
fine, neatly made clothing, sufficient for Lizzie’s use for
several years, she decided at once that they were not
suitable for her future life on a farm. Accordingly,
_ they were placed in a basket and condemned to be
sold, she being well aware that from the proceeds both
Lizzie and Helen could be fitted out in an abundance
of coarser clothing.

A variety of costly toys and trinkets, useless lumber
for the waggon, she decided to dispose of in the towns
- through which they were to pass, as she might need
the money they would bring. A small, well-stocked
writing desk, and a few richly-bound books, were for a
more immediate sale. At length her eyes fell upon the
miniature temple of shells, so beautifully wrought, and
they glistened with avaricious delight. Deciding at
once that the money she could get for so valuable a
toy would be of great advantage to her, she stopped
not a moment to consider how precious it might be to
the orphan child now thrown upon her care, but looked
about her for a purchaser for it.

Just then she bethought her of Mr. Stevens, who
lived in the handsome house upon the hill; and as ©
there was ample time before the return of the children
to offer it to him, she hastened to do so. Assuring
him that it was a gift from her husband to herself on
his return from the South, she had no difficulty in
persuading him that it was unfit for transportation to



28 CO Lissie Hepburn.

the West, and to induce him’ to purchase it for his
invalid daughter.

With some difficulty she managed, while Lizzie was
asleep at night, to dispose of her clothing to different
persons, to prepare some coarser garments, and to repack
the trunk, keeping the child in profound ignorance of
the entire proceeding,

Mrs. Hepburn congratulated herself that her affairs
had been most adroitly managed when she was seated
in the uncomfortable vehicle ready to begin her west-
ward journey, in less than two weeks after Lizzie’s
arrival, which had given her the means to accomplish
her purpose. From the child there had been as yet no
open outbreak of the spirit of rebellion, which she
often surmised might be raging within the young heart
of ber new subject. Lizzie had good reason to fear
that the heavy hand of her aunt would be laid upon
her if she manifested the slightest symptom of resist-
ance to her will, and suffered herself to be disposed of
quietly until the day came when their journey was to
begin. But when she was arrayed in a dark calico
dress and apron, and some thick shoes and coarse stock-
ings were fastened upon her feet,.her curls gathered
into a net and covered with a huge Shaker sun-bonnet,
her eyes blazed with pent-up wrath. She dashed the
bonnet and net upon the floor and stamped them with
her feet, and would have torn the dress from her, had
it not been made of the best material and securely
sewed, and ended by rushing from the house in a
passion of tears,

Mrs. Hepburn, who walked with perfect unconcern
over quivering heart-strings, straightened the abused



Westward. 29

bonnet, and coolly awaited the return of the sobbing,
excited little girl. Taking no notice of the swollen
eyes and flushed face that appeared before her an hour
after, she simply replaced the net and bonnet; but
there was something in her look and manner that
warned Lizzie that she stood ready instantly to quell
any further resistance to her will.

Regarding work as a very efficient means of “ break-
ing in” the wills of children, as she termed it, she
employed the long days of their slow journey in teach-
ing the inexperienced fingers of the child Lizzie the
mysteries of coarse sewing and the shaping of a stock-
ing. Distasteful as this was to Lizzie, she was not
capable of imitating the deceit with which she saw her
cousin Helen sometimes succeed in evading the tasks
imposed upon her by her mother. So, while her work
was completed with tolerable neatness and despatch,
her little heart was in a tempest of concealed wrath
and discontent during nearly all their journey. From
this, however, she was pleasantly diverted, at times,
by the varied and beautiful landscapes presented to
their view, and for which she had a cultivated and
appreciative eye. ,

They had nearly reached their destination when the
accident befell them, the breaking of the forward wheel
of the vehicle. For some time they were in imminent
peril in their nearly defenceless condition. Several
days were lost in repairing their damages, so that the
fine month of October was nearly gone before they
reached the little settlement which bore the euphonious
name of Monona, where Mrs. Hepburn had decided to
remain for the winter.



30 Lizsie Hepburn.

The only available house, a single log-room, with a
loft, received them and their goods, and here they were
quickly settled to await the long winter of this northern
latitude. And while Mrs. Hepburn looked about her
for some plans for the opening of spring, she decided,
in order to get them out of her way, to send the
children to school, Uncle Robert enjoyed the quiet
and rest from his daily tasks. He could doze and sleep
quite undisturbed, content that all arrangements for the
care of his family were in abler hands than his own.



CHAPTER IV.
THE VILLAGE SCHOOL.

aU NT Jane,” said Lizzie, one morning shortly
| after their arrival, “where are all the
pretty clothes that mamma made for me?”

“Tf you mean all the trumpery that you brought
with you, they are sold,” was the brief reply. “You
will find all you need in the trunk, and you and Helen
can unpack it and hang your clothes in the loft.”

“We have done so, Aunt Jane,” said Lizzie, “but I
cannot find the pretty temple mamma made for me.” ©

“That is sold too !” was the laconic reply.

“Oh, Aunt Jane!” exclaimed poor Lizzie, trembling
with excitement, ‘youdo not mean that you sold that,
do you? Mamma made that for me, and said it should
always be mine. Papa gathered the shells for me, and
she told me always to keep it, and I promised her
I would. Oh, please, Aunt Jane, buy back my
temple for me,” pleaded the child, her eyes filling
with tears.

“Your temple was not fit to bring out West with
us,” replied her Aunt, coldly. “It was sold before we
left Chester. You will never see it again, so think no





32 Liasie Hepburn.

more about it,” she added, motioning the child away
from her.

“T say I did not want my temple sold !” screamed
Lizzie, striking at her aunt in a wild passion. “It
was bad and wicked in you to sell it, and to steal all
my pretty clothes and make me wear these mean old
things. They were not yours,” she sobbed, stamping
her little foot furiously, “ you had no right to sell my
things, and I'll never love you as long as I live !”

“Go it, Liz!” shouted James, with a loud laugh ;
“but won't you get a licking, though !”

“ James, leave the room,” ordered his mother, as she
rose to quell the rebellion of her new little subject.

“Like to stay and see the fun, if you’ve no objec-
tions,” replied James ; but obeying, the next moment,
a look from his mother’s eye, he left the room and
stationed himself near a window where he could observe
the “fun,” as he termed it.

For the first time in her life the rod was laid upon
Lizzie’s shoulders in quick, hard blows by the strong
hand of her aunt, the only reply vouchsafed to the
demands of her wounded sense of justice. She screamed
with pain and terror, and was answered by a derisive
laugh near the window. ° Mrs. Hepburn then led the
child smarting with her punishment, and almost suffo-
cated with anger and grief to the table, where stood
the breakfast dishes still unwashed.

“Liz,” said Mrs. Hepburn, who used this abbre-
viation chiefly because it was distasteful to the child,
“wash these dishes, and hereafter consider that your
work.”

“Good!” chuckled Helen, as she glided from the

















The Village School. 33

table, glad that her disagreeable task was assigned to
her cousin. “I hate dish-washing,” she added, as she
joined her brother out of doors.

Poor Lizzie! used all her life to be waited upon by
servants, made hard work of her unaccustomed task.
She scalded her hands, and cut her fingers and scorched
her apron, while tears of pain and vexation continually
blinded her eyes. But there was no love or sympathy
for her sore little heart in the hard eye fixed upon her,
or in the short, sharp commands that directed the
performance of her work.

“Ho! cry-baby !” said James, who ventured to open
the door sufficiently to point a finger at her, and then
ran away unrebuked by his mother.

“When the dishes are washed, Lizzie, you may go
to school with Helen and James,” said Mrs. Hepburn ;
and Lizzie knew that there would be no repeal of this
order, which filled her with renewed terror.

She had never had any other tutors than her fond
parents, and she shrank from mingling with the boys
and girls of the settlement, with whose uncouth
manners and rough language she already had an un-
pleasant experience in their intercourse with her cousins.
Her previous education and associations had quite un-
fitted her for these rough exigencies of pioneer life at
the West. But Mrs. Hepburn was firmly resolved
that Lizzie should go to school. Partly because she
had nothing else for the child to do, and partly, indeed
mostly, because she had conceived a dislike for tho
child—a dislike quite natural for one to feel towards
another whom one has wronged and has determined to
wrong—she wanted to get her out of the way.

D



34 Lissie Hepburn.

Fortunately James and Ielen ran off to school
without her, Lizzie going alone, happily relieved from
their taunting words and teasing laugh.. She was soon
seated upon the hard uncomfortable wooden bench in
the small poorly ventilated log school-house, where
were assembled the representatives of nearly every
family in the settlement..

The teacher, a young woman of very moderate
abilities, however well-qualified she considered her-
self to teach the alphabet and easy readings to the
other children under her charge, was not at all fitted to
guide and instruct a mind like Lizzie’s, whose attain-
ments she perceived at once to be superior to her own.
The first half day passed wearily to Lizzie. She read
and spelled, not only to the satisfaction, but quite to
the astonishment of her teacher. She was ordered to
her seat, and told to “do sums,” until school “ took
up” for the afternoon. Puzzled to know how this
strange order was to be accomplished, she sat in her
seat listlessly doing nothing, but watching the faces of
her new companions, until the children were dismissed
to partake of their noon luncheon.

Lizzie felt no desire to eat hers, and the rude play of
the children was not at all in accordance with her feel-
ings, so she quietly withdrew from the school-house,
and wandered off alone. There was a gentle roll of
the prairie near the school-house, running back to some
bold bluffs, which were crowned by a pretty grove.
The trees were gay with the gorgeous hues of autumn,
and looked particularly inviting beneath the nazy
atmosphere of the Indian summer, In general Lizzie
was attracted and soothed by a pretty landseape, but





Lhe Pitle te. Sehe }



a

this day it failed to divert her from the grief of the
morning. She sought now a quict place, where she
might relieve her aching little heart by a good cry,
unobserved by any one.

The eruel events of the morning came freshly back
to her mind, and, most cruel of all, the hopeless loss of
her beautiful temple, the last gift and work of her
mother, for whose love she now yearned so ardently.
She remembered well that bright evening in her beau-
tiful home, when she received the gift fresh from her
mother’s hands; and she almost seemed to hear the
words, “It is yours, Lizzie, always yours, all yours.”
Now it was lost, and she could never hope to reecive
back the precious gift, with its treasures so cunningly
hid within it. Perhaps some other hand would find
the secret spring, and reveal the contents to be
appropriated by strangers, who could not know their

value. Lizzie threw herself upon the ground, weep-

ing bitterly, and exclaiming aloud, “ Oh, mamma!
how could you leave me alone! Why did TI not die
too |”

Was it the ministering spirit of that dead mother
that soothed at this moment the wild grief of the child,
and breathed the dear name of Jesus in the ear of her
soul?

Was it a dark spirit of evil, that at the next moment
stirred the foul drop of unbelief left in her memory by
the words of Carl, and made her refuse to love that
dear name, and to pour her sorrows into His ever-
sympathizing ear?

Ah, who shall tell! Shall we ever know here the
conflict waged hy the powers of good and of evil for





35 Lisste Hepburn.

the possession of every human soul purehased by the
blood of Jesus ?

“What are you doing, Lizzic.” The voice was a
gentle one, and aroused Lizzie, who lay with her hot
face pressed against the cool wet leaves on the ground.
She raised her head quickly, and met the gaze of a
girl some three or four years older than herself, whose
large, soft black eyes had attracted her that morning
more than any other's in the school. Lizzie was longing
for companionship just then ; so she welcomed the girl
with a smile, as she answered,

“Tam doing nothing in particular just now, but if
you are willing, I would like to take a walk with you
before the bell rings for school.”

“Where shall we go?” asked Nellie.

“To the woods yonder, if you please. The trees are
very beautiful now, and this morning early they glittcred
with frost, like silver. I never saw anything like that
before, did you?”

“Oh yes! many times. But why have you never
seen them?”

“ Because we lived in the South. We had beautiful
flowers and trees there, but if the frosts came at all,
they never stay long enough, I guess, to sparkle in the
sun as these did this morning.”

“What made you ever come way up here, Lizzie?”

“Oh, my papa and mamma are both dead!” and
Lizzie began to weep again passionately, exclaiming
between her sobs, “Oh, I don’t know where they
are! I wish I did! I wish I was dead too! I
don’t like to stay here a bit! I hate my aunt
and cousins! They are so unkind to me, you don’t



The Village School. 37

know! Oh, I wish I could go to my own home
again |”

Nellie was startled at this outburst of stormy grief,
and stood silently regarding Lizzie with a puzzled look
upon her faee. At length she ventured to say gently,
“ Don’t ery so hard, Lizzie. I am away from my home,
too, and from my father and mother.”

“ Are they dead, Nellie?” asked Lizzie, a little con-
soled by the thought that perhaps her friend could
sympathize with her trials, from a similar experience.

“No, they are not dead, Lizzie, but 200 miles from
here, away to the north-west. It is a great deal colder
there than it is here, and there are very few houses,
for the land is covered with thick woods. And there
are very few white people around my home.”

“ What sort of people are they, Nellie? Negroes ?”

“ No, they are Indians.”

“Oh, Nellie! Aren't vou a bit afraid of Indians?”

“Not a bit! My mother is an Indian woman, but
iny father isa white man. And oh, he’s so splendid !”
and Nellie’s face lighted up with the warm glow of
her loving young heart.

“Ts he tall and handsome?” asked Lizzie, deeply
interested.

“ Yes, indeed ; a beautiful officer in the army! We
live in the Fort, and my father has the command of
the soldicrs stationed there. Nearly all the officers
and soldiers have Indian wives, and live without much
trouble from the tribe. But sometimes the Indians
from other tribes get angry with the whites, or drink
too much whiskey, and then my father has to fight
them with euns and cannon!”



38 Lissie Hepburn,

“Oh, Nellie! tell me all about it, will you?” said
Lizzie, eagerly.

“ Once,” chatted Nellie, “the Indians came around
the Fort in great numbers, and they were awful angry.
‘They shot their arrows into the Fort nearly as thick as
2 vain-storm, and they yelled horribly all the time.
One of my little brothers—that one that sat back of
me in school this morning—was fastened out of the
Fort before any one knew the Indians were coming, or
that he was not inside. But my father went right out
among them, snatched away my brother, just as an
ugly old Indian had raised his hatchet to kill him, and
brought him safely into the Fort! But there were
three arrows sticking in his arms and breast, and they
made great sores. You can see the scars yet. Now
isn’t my father a grand, brave man, Lizzie?”

“Yes, indeed!” exclaimed Lizzie, enthusiastically.
These stirring incidents of pioneer life, so new and
strange to her, interested her deeply, and quite diverted
her trom her own self.

“ But why don’t you live with your futher, Nellie?”
she asked.

Because they have no schools there, and my mother
cannot read or write, so she could not teach us, and my
father has no time. So he brought my brother Horace
and me down here to attend school, and we live with
my aunt, father’s sister.”

“Do you hate your aunt?” asked Lizzie, suddenly.

“Why, no, Lizzie! My aunt is very kind, and so
are my uncle and cousins, and I love them all very
much. We are very happy here.”

“ But were you not lonely when your father left yout”



The Village Schovl. 39

“Yes, very lonely for a while, until we became
better acquainted with our cousins. When father went
away, he took us in his arms and kissed us a great
many times, and only think! my brave, good father
cried when he bade us good-bye! So you must know
he loves us very much indeed.”

“But what will your mother do while you are
gone?”

“Oh, she will feel very badly, for mother loves us,
too, ever so much. When we came away, she came
down with us to the river, and when father pushed off
our little boat, she screamed and threw her blanket
over her head, and fell on the sand, and was there as
long as we were in sight. We had to leave her, for
we were in the current of the river, so we could not go
back.” ;

“Wow strange-it all seems!” said Lizzie. “ And
did you come down the river in an open boat?”

“Yes, and father rowed it with only one man to
help him. We slept on a great package of furs, which
he took afterwards to St. Louis, and sold for ever so
much money. Sometimes it rained, and we would get
wet ; but we did not mind that much, for when the
sun shone out we could get dry again. Once, I
remember, I was asleep when the rain began to fall,
and when I awoke I found that father had been hold-
ing a large tin wash-basin over my face, so that the
rain should not disturb me.”

Lizzie was much amused at the picture her friend
had drawn of this, to her, novel way of navigating tho
Mississippi.

“When father went home,” continued Nellie, ‘le



40 Lizste Hepburn.

took our pictures for mother. And then he bought a
red silk dress, and a yellow silk shawl, and a blue silk
bonnet for presents to her, because he knew these
would please her more than anything else. The
Indian women who marry white men are very proud,
and like to dress in bright colours, so as not to be like
the other women of their tribe.”

A clear ringing laugh burst from Lizzie over these
gorgeous presents, and then she asked, “ Will you ever
go back to live in the Fort?”

“Yes, in a few years. And then I mean to teach
my mother to read and write, and my little sisters too.
I think if my mother could read she would be much
happier. When I go home, I mean to take her a nice
Bible for a present, and teach her how to read in it.
We never learned anything about Jesus or heaven, as
the Bible tells us, until we came here, and my aunt
taught us. She gave me a Bible the other day to be
my own, and I am so anxious to be able to read it
myself.”

“Do you believe there is a God, and a Jesus, and a
heaven, Nellie ?” replied Lizzie, timidly.

“Why, ” yes exclaimed Nellie, astonished at this
question, ‘‘of course I believe these things. Aunt
taught me about them from the Bible. Don’t you, too,
Lizzie?”

“‘T do not know,” replied Lizzie, sadly. “ Mamma
used to read stories to me from the Bible, and told me
a great deal about Jesus and heaven. But when I was
on the steamer, a man named Carl told me these things
were not true at all, and that I must never believe
them again as long as I live.”



The Village School. 41

“T should think you would believe what your father
and mother told you,” said Nellie, simply, “ because
they loved you better than any one else could.”

“J always did until then, but now I do not know
what to think, I have never seen a Bible since I came
here. Ido not think that my uncle and aunt believe
these things, for they never talk to us about them.”

Nellie did not know what more to say to her com-
panion, who had all her life thus far basked in the
light, whose rays were just dawning upon her untu-
tored mind. Her simple faith had received the in-
structions of her aunt with unquestioning alacrity ;
and that any one could doubt these truths filled her
with wonder.

The two girls walked towards the school-house arm-in-
arm but quite silently, each busy with her own thoughts.
Awarm friendship had already sprung up between them,
and they were pleased to be allowed to share each other's
desk for the remainder of the winter. The maturity,
gentleness, and good sense of Nellie made her an agree-
able and suitable companion for the impulsive and pas-
sionate Lizzie, whose circumstances at present would
rather strengthen than correct these traits in her cha-
racter,

The afternoon school passed much more pleasantly
to Lizzie. Her tasks were easily and quickly performed,
and she found time to assist her friend, who, being in
the rudiments of learning, was patiently plodding her
way through easy readings and spelling. When the
day’s lessons closed, the two girls walked homeward
together, chatting quite merrily.

Their attention was suddenly attracted by loud shouts



42 Lizsie flepburn.

and peals of laughter from the ‘school-boys a short
distance in advance of them. Hastening to the spot,
they saw Horace, Nellie’s brother, who bore a much
stronger resemblance to the Indian race than she did,
in a fierce conflict with a young racoon, which he had
succeeded in chasing down, and was determined to
make his prisoner,

The black eyes of the boy fairly blazed with excite-
ment and wrath, as he returned the spiteful bites of
his little foe with energetic kicks and cuffs, by which
he steadily gained the advantage over the animal. The
battle between the erect little Indian brave and the
no less brave racoon, however, was well contested.
But it ended by Horace carrying off his prize trium-
phantly, entirely unmindful of the blood trickling from
his wounded fingers, to the great delight of his boyish
companions, whose acknowledged leader le at once
became.

Lizzie almost unconsciously joined in the shout that
greeted the little victor, for she had been an excited
spectator of the scene. When she parted from Nellie,
soon after, and drew near her home, she was happier
than she had been for several weeks. Why, she did
not know. Work, hard and disagreeable, awaited her,
she knew, as she entered the little cabin, and she could
expect no soothing influences of love to make her
willing and happy in performing her tasks. Still, she
had not the usual reluctance in entering her home that
night.

Her evening tasks were performed so willingly
and cheerfully, that her aunt congratulated herself
that she had pursued a wise and judicious course



The Village Schevt. 43
thus far in “ breaking in” the. rebellious little girl of
the morning. She knew not that it was the gentle
tones of Nellie’s voice still vibrating upon Lizzie’s ear,
and the entrance of this new love into her lonely little
heart, that had made her cheerful and directed her from
painful thoughts, and the memory of the morning
trouble.



CHAPTER V.

CHANGES.




KY IZZIE'S first winter at the North passed away
2) not altogether unpleasantly or unprofitably
@ to her. Her little frame expanded health-
fully, and her round, rosy cheeks and clear, bright eyes
attested to the good effects, physically, of her plain
food, and the work to which she was becoming daily
better inured. She advanced but little, indeed, in
mental acquirements, but she was learning, quite
unconsciously to herself, some important lessons in the
hard school at home.

Here her trials were unchanged; but she was be-
coming more adroit in avoiding the rudeness of James ;
was generally quietly submissive to her aunt’s authority
and she had even learned to entertain a sort of friendly
liking for the indolent, good natured Helen.

But this was only her outward behaviour; for
secretly Lizzie cherished a deep-seated hatred of her
aunt and of James, and a contempt for her weak uncle.
And she often gave way, when alone, to outbursts of
passionate temper, all the more furious because so long
and so closely pent.

Her soul, this winter, was left in the mazes of



Changes. 45

darkness, without a ray of truth to gnide it. She
rarely talked with the meek, kind Nellie upon these
subjects. Mrs. Hepburn, though often urged to do
go, never permitted Lizzie to visit Nellie, as it was
considered too great a waste of time. Thus she failed
to receive the benefit of the religious instructions of
Nellie’s aunt, Mrs. Cook.

As the Bible and religious books were considered
useless lumber by Mrs. Hepburn, the only reading she
allowed her family was such as they could glean from
a weekly paper, filled with sensational stories and poor
poetry. Unfortunately Lizzie acquired a taste for this
reading, and formed the evil habit, almost inseparable
from the constant perusal of this kind of literature, of
indulging in the most extravagant flights of imagina-
tion. This habit strengthened greatly during the next
few years, while the seeds of truth, so carefully sown
by her mother, lay dormant within her heart.

The succeeding spring Mrs. Hepburn purchased a
farm; about two miles from the settlement. She ap-
propriated Lizzie’s money for this purpose, without the
least compunction, reasoning with herself—her only
counsellor—that, as she had the trouble and expense of
the child, it was only just that she should be paid for
it. She made an excellent bargain, and the farm,
under her efficient management, satisfied her as to
the wisdom of her plan in emigrating to the West.
The farm promised to become, not only a means of
present support, but a valuable investment of her
money.

The succeeding seven years brought their round of
busy cares and hard work, in which all the family took



405

(
4



Lissie Hepburn.

their part. No time was allowed the children to
attend school, except during the winter months, and
this was frequently interrupted by the heavy snows,
which made the walk to the settlement quite impos-
sible. Most of the summer months and until late in
tho fall were occupied by Lizzie and Helen, as they
grew older, in herding the sheep. In this, as in their
other tasks, the larger share of the labour fell, as
usual, upon the former.

But she soon came to enjoy this employment. She
loved the timid creatures, who learned to know the
names which she gave them, and would come at her
call. In leading them to their pasturage or to the
springs for water, her inherent love of nature was con-
stantly gratified and stimulated by the panoramic dis-
play of rolling prairies and wooded knolls, the rocky
bluffs in the distance, and the small lakes and clear
streams which were to be found by easy walks, in
almost any direction. It was her peculiar delight,
while her bleating charge reposed during the heat of
the-day, beneath the branching trees, and Helen en-
joyed her coveted nap after luncheon, to find some
secluded, pretty spot, where she could indulge her
roving fancies undisturbed.

Seven years brought many changes in Monona. It
is one of the remarkable characteristics of our western
towns, that they are subjected to what is termed a
“floating population.” Emigranis enter government
lands, erect rough cabins, raise a little grain, keep a
few cows, pigs, and chickens, spending most of their
time hunting, fishing, and idling. In the meantime,
however, they are watching for the favourable oppor-



Changes.



tunity, and, when it comes, they sell oul, remove
further west, to repeat an operation which, if not
always conducive to prosperity, gratifies a certain rest-
lessness induced by this very mode of life.

Their farms and town property ave generally puz-
chased by a better class of settlers, some of whom come
with the intention of remaining permanently, and of
making homes for their young families in the land of
promise. These are known in after times as the “old
families” of the town, and form the material froin
which petty offices are filled, and they give the general
tone to society. Gradually, better schools are pro-
vided, chwrehes are erected, Sabbath-schools esta-
blished, a weekly paper published, offering -space for
the embryo talent of the village; railroads, either
actual or prospective, give an impetus to the business
interests of the town, and inducements offered to a
still more intelligent and valuable emigration. These
pwehase the property of the second class, many cf
whom by this time are ready to follow the lead of the
first, and to push farther on.

And, with a celerity that astonishes the sleepy old
towns of the East and South, the stirring West is sown
thickly with scttlements, which shortly assume the
pretensions of incorporated cities, with their full com-
plement of mayor and aldermen, and rejoice in well-
paved, shaded streets, great business blocks, elegant
residences, street cars, and gas !

Seven years, therefore, wrought many changes in
Monona. For, situated wpon the great river, with a
beautiful and excellent farming country back of it,
and with every facility for manufacturing interests, its



48 Lisste Hepburn.

bracing, healthful climate and fine location attracted
many new and valuable citizens to the place, and
families that promised, in time, to develop and elevate
the mental and moral status of its society. And, as is
often the case, there were life-histories in some of these
families more filed with events of startling interest,
than any that could be gleaned from the pages ot
fiction.

One of the most desirable sites in Monona was pur-
chased by an English widowed lady, who was, by com-
mon rumour, represented as belonging to the nobility
of that country. She, and her son, a young man of
about twenty years of age, without assuming any pre-
tensions of this kind, however, quietly proceeded to
erect a house, lay out and adorn the grounds, in a
manner suggestive of the sweet homes of England.

The cottage was tasteful in design and finish, and
the occasional glimpses afforded by the swaying of the
draperies from the low windows, revealed a cultivated
and tefined taste in the arrangement and harmony of
the moderately expensive carpets and furniture. About
the grounds the skilful disposal and luxuriant growth
of the flowers and shrubbery attested the care and
taste of the lady, who, in a suitable dress and shading
hat, assisted her son, through the summer, as he re-
deemed the fertile but uncultivated soil from weeds
and grass, causing it, literally, to blossom as the rose.
Indeed “ Rosedale,” as the lady appropriately named
their home, became one of the most attractive spots in
the village, and, ere long, a centre from which were to
radiate elevating and refining influences—influences
which were to have a quiet but healthful effect upon



Changes. 49

the strangely-mingled population of this thriving
town.

Lizzie had now reached the age of sixteen years.
She was a well-developed and perfectly healthy girl,
giving fair promise of a truly beautiful womanhood.
Her ill-fitting garments had not prevented the develop-
ment of a naturally fine figure, or interfered with the
grace of step and motion appropriate to her youth.
Her coarse face had not injured her fine complexion or
diminished the lustre of her eyes, while her life out of
doors, though frequently exposing her to winds and
storms, had not made her rough or uncouth in manner
or language. By some means our little shepherdess
had been preserved from losing the refinement which
was natural to her, or from assimilating to the vulgar
tastes and habits of those with whom her daily life
was associated.

When Lizzie was permitted to attend the village
school she made some advancement, although her
teachers were usually a succession of poorly-paid and
ill-qualified persons, who left her no wiser at the close
of the winter term than they had found her at its
beginning. Her early friendship for Nellie had
ripened into a strong love, and the intercourse afforded
her with the young girl during the sessions of the
winter school, was the most coveted pleasure she could
enjoy.

Nellie had advanced during these years quite
rapidly in knowledge, for she had eagerly profited by
the instructions she had received both at home and in
the school. She had become a gentle, womanly girl,
whose quick sympathies and kind offices made her a

E



59 Lissie Hepburit.

valuud member of her aunt’s family, and amply repaid
the care that had been bestowed upon her.

‘The last of these seven winters at school, and the
last Lizzie should be permitted to enjoy, her aunt had
said, was saddened, towards its close, by the whispered
announcement that letters had been received from
Nellie’s father; and that he was coming to Monona
towards the spring, and would take his children back
with him to their home in the far North, early in the
summer. This news caused Lizzie the most sincere
grief. For very tender and precious had been the
companionship of these young friends during this win-
ter, especially. Never, since her mother’s death, had
Lizzie felt the sweet influence of the love of Jesus,
drawing her to Himself so powerfully as now, when it
shone forth in the unquestioning faith and gentle
virtues of Nellie, His humble disciple. Often, when
comparing her conduct and her words with her own,
she had expressed an honest desire that she might
know for herself what it was that made Nellie so good
and so happy.

and to lose Nellie seemed to blot out at once every
bit of sunshine for her, and to quench any desire for a
better and holier life. She could not repress the tearful
exclamation, “ Oh, Nellie, how,can I live without you?”

“You will find new friends, dear,” was Nellie’s com-
forting rejoinder.

“ But none I shall love one-half as well as I do you,”
guid Lizzie, with her usual impulsiveness.

“Do vou suppose your aunt would allow you to
mike we one littl visit before I go?” asked Nelli,

ng her arm round Lizzi





Changes. 51

“Oh, Pm afraid not! How I wish she would!”
exclaimed Lizzie.

“ Ask her, any way, Lizzie. Auntie tells me that
we cannot do more than fail, and it is worthy a good
object to make an honest effort to attain it. I’m sure
thisis a good object, and perhaps, if you tell her that
I am going away for ever, she would let you come.”

“Well, Pl ask her, as soon as I know when you
are going to leave for your home,” said Lizzie, as tlie
whispered conference closed.

€



CHAPTER VI.

NEW FRIENDS,

a beautiful day in June a polite note reached
@) Mrs. Hepburn from Mrs. Cook requesting
ASA] the pleasure of a visit from Lizzie to her niece

ple o he
Nellie, who was about to leave them, probably not to
return.

“Who is this Nell?” demanded Mrs. Hepburn, who
delighted in abbreviated names.

“The best friend I have,” said Lizzie, whose eager
desire to accept the invitation from Mrs. Cook caused a
very perceptible tremor in her voice.

“Humph !” ejaculated her aunt. “That dark-skinned
girl you were so thick with last winter.”

“Yes,” said James, with a short laugh, “she’s a
nigger !”

“Indeed she is not, James,” said Lizzie, making a
strong effort to control the temper, which nothing
aroused so quickly as James’s vulgarity. ‘ Her mother
is an Indian woman,” she continued, turning to her
aunt.

“Well, I don’t care who her mother is,” said Mzs.
Hepburn, shortly. “Nigger’s good as Injuns, I



New Fricuds. 53

reckon. If I let you. go, who’ll do your work to
day ?”

“Praps Liz would let me mind the sheep for her
one day,” said James.

“ Oh, will you, James?” said Lizzie, eagerly, turning
to him with a pleased smile.

‘Makes you mighty pleasant to a feller, now, don’t
it?” he replied, tauntingly. ‘Guess I won’t though !
Catch me doing a girl’s work!” was his rude conclu-
sion as he went out, shutting the door with a bang.
“Better send my lady’s regrets, mother,” he shouted
back, as he left the gate.

The tears started to Lizzie’s eyes, for she could see
nothing but disappointment before her that day.

“Tl mind the sheep alone to-day, Lizzie,” said
Helen, good-naturedly.

“Will you, truly?” asked Lizzie, fearing lest Helen
should prove as treacherous as James.

“ Yes, I will,” said Helen.

“Oh, thank you, Helen! you are real kind. Now,
may I go, Aunt Jane?”

“Well, if the girl’s going away for good, I don’t
care so much. I should not allow such a piece of folly
again. Be sure to be home before sun-down, so’s to
‘tend the night chores,” was the reluctant permission
given at length.

Lizzie’s simple toilet: was soon made, and the walk of
two miles that beautiful day seemed short, and she
soon found herself in Mrs. Cook’s little parlour in
rapid and happy intercourse with Nellie and her aunt's
family. The hours of this pleasant day seemed to fly,
and Lizzie almost regretted the announcement that



A Ligste Hepburn.

uw

dinner was ready—it seemed to bring “sun-down” so
near. Towards the close of the afternoon, Nellie pro-
posed a walk, remarking, “You have never seen many
of the late improvements in Monona, have you, Lizzie?”

“No,” said Lizzie, “the new houses do not look
much better than the old ones in winter, and I am
always in a hurry to go home after school, so as not to
lose the short daylight. So I am only acquainted with
the old beaten track to and from the farm.”

“Well, then, I’ve something nice to show yon,”
said Nellie.

“You know I must start for home in good season,”
said Lizzie, suddenly remembering the last order from
her aunt.

“Oh, yes, I know, and Tll.go as far as the hill with
you,” said Nellie, “and that will make our walk the
longer.”

Lizzie took leave of Mrs. Cook and her family,
silently wishing that she might accept her kind invi-
tation for future visits, but simply thanking her for
the pleasure she had enjoyed. Nellie purposely
directed their walk, so that they should pass ‘“ Rose-
dale.” The place was now very attractive, with its
climbing vines, well-trained shrubbery and cultivated
“lowers.

“Oh, Nellie, how beautiful!” exclaimed Lizzie, the
memory of a pleasant picture of the past, lighting, for
a sweet moment, the harsh lines of her present life.
“Who owns this beautiful place?” she whispered,
fearing she might be heard by a lady whom she ob-
served busy among the flowers.

“Mrs, Winthrop and her son Paul, whom you see





+ poate
A ew Lien

ur
con

over there, tying up that vine,” said Nellic, dras ins
her arcund on another side.

They walked quietly along, but were observed by
Mrs. Winthrop. “Good afternoon, girls,” she said,
cordially. ‘I se you admire my flowers. Come in,
and my son will cut a bouquet for you.”

Paul Winthrop, hearing their voices, advanced with
a cordial smile to open the gate for the girls to cnter,
pushing his straw hat off from his forehead, wet with
his labour that hot afternoon, With an easy grace he
eut and arranged bouquets for them, chatting all ihe
while of the names and habits of the plants and flowers
from which he was selecting for them. Poor Lizzie
hoped he was unconscious of her painful embarrass-
ment, for she was sure that her dress must seem to
these people the coarsest and most unbecoming in
' the whole world, and her shoes the heaviest and most
clumsy.

“Now,” said Mrs. Winthrop, in the winning manner
quite natural to her, “after you have seen the flowers,
you must come in, and my son and I will give you
some music. I have rarely seen any one fond of
flowers who was not also fond of music. Paul will
show you in,”

Paul advanced to open the door, and Mrs. Winthrop,
who had slipped around the back way to remove her
garden-hat and gloves, stood ready to receive them in
her pleasant parlour. Nellie entered at once, with
gentle dignity,—ever the fruit of genuine humility,—
but Lizzie felt her face burning with shame on entering
the elegant parlour in the presence of so polished a lady
in a dress so unfit as hers,



55 Lissie Hepburn.

Mrs. Winthrop seated herself at the piano, and
mingled her clear voice with the deep tones of her son’s
rich bass. Such music Lizzie had never heard since
her early childhood, and her painful embarrassment
was lost in exquisite delight as she listened. She was

yen thankful for the huge proportions of her Shaker

gun-bonnet to hide the tears that were dropping rapidly
from her eyes. When the girls arose to go, Nellie
thanked Mrs. Winthrop in a modest, appropriate
manner for the pleasure she had given them. Lizzie
took the proffered hand, and raised her large eyes,
full of feeling, to the face of the kind lady, but was
unable to speak one word, although her heart was
full.

“Be sure and come and see me again, said Mrs.
‘Winthrop, kindly, leading the way to the door.

“T believe, young ladies, I shall beg permission to
accompany you in your walk for a short distance,” said
Paul; “I have a call to make which will be quite in
your way.”

“We shall be glad of your company,” said Nellie,
simply, as they bade Mrs. Winthrop good bye.

Paul entertained them so admirably with his cheer-
ful, chatty conversation, that Lizzie began to feel at
ease in his company. He told them of his home in
England, of the pleasant voyage across the Atlantic,
and how they had been led to make their home in
Monona, hoping that the delightful climate of Minne-
gota might prove beneficial to the delicate constitution
of his mother.

He then skilfully drew from the modest young
Nellie some stirring incidents connected with her life



New Friends. 7

ab the Fort, and soon the three were heartily laughing
over some of her wild adventures in the days of her
early childhood. ,

“But Miss Lizzie,” said Paul, suddenly turning to
the young girl clinging to Nellie’s arm, “you have not
told your story yet. We will be quiet now and let you
speak of your sheep. How do you spend your time on
the farm ?”

“T herd sheep !” said Lizzie, naively.

“ Ah, a shepherdess !” exclaimed Paul, gaily,

“who sits upon the grassy turf,
Inhaling healthful, the descending sun ;
While round your feet, the bleating flock
Of various cadence; and the sportive lambs,
This way and that convolved, in friskful glee,
Their frolics play.”

“Yes, Mr. Paul,” said Lizzie, eagerly, “that is just
the way. My sheep love me, and I love them. They
all know their names, and will come when I call them,
and even feed from my hand. Wherever I lead them,
they will follow.”

“ Your occupation is full of beautiful analogies, Miss
Lizzie,” said Paul. “Did you ever think of them?
You know Jesus makes frequent use of the most
striking objects in nature to teach us the sweetest
lessons of Himself. He says, ‘I am the good Shep-
herd and know my sheep, and am known of mine.’
You can readily perceive the force and beauty of that
comparison, can you not?”

“Oh yes, Mr. Paul. And I know if you or Nellie
should call my sheep, they would not come, even
though your voices were gentle and your hands full of



e3 Lissie Hepburn,
food for them. Quite likely they would run the other
way, In a great fright.”

“¢He calleth His own sheep by name, and leadeth
ihem out. He goeth before them, and the sheep follow
him, for they know His voice,” repeated Nellie,
timidly.

“* And a stranger will they not follow, but flee from
him, for they know not the voice of strangers,” added
Paul.

Lizzie was deeply interested, and wishing the con-
versation to continue upon a theme whose analogies
seemed so striking and familiar to her mind, she said,
«Whenever my sheep hear any unusual voice, they .
seem to fear an attack from a dog or a wolf; then
they will run to me and crowd about me ; and oh, how
plainly their eyes ask me to defend them! If I think
there is any real danger, I lead them home, and secure
them in the fold.”

“Even so, does Jesus care for us,” replied Paul.
“He says, ‘I am the good Shepherd : the good Shep-
herd giveth His life for the sheep. My sheep hear My
voice, and I know them, and they follow Me, and I
give unto them eternal life, and they shall never
perish, neither shall any man pluck them out of My
hand.”

«“¢The Lord is my Shepherd; I shall not want. He
maketh me to lie down in green pastures ; He leadeth
me beside the still waters,’” repeated Nellie ; a tone of
deep, quiet joy running through the words,

“* He shall feed His flock like a shepherd, He shall
gather the lambs with His arm, and shall carry them in
His bosom,’ ” added Paul, reverently. ?





New frici

“These aro beautiful words, Mr. Paul. Whore dil
you find them?” asked Lizzie.

“Have you never read them in the Lible,
Lizzie?” asked Paul, with astonishment.

“No, Mr. Paul,” replied Lizzie, with deep emotion ;
“T have never seen a Bible since my mother died. I
was too young then to recollect much that she taught
me. But I remember very well these words, almost
the last that she ever spoke to me, the very day before
she died: ‘Jesus is the Way, Lizzie. Go to Him, He
will be your Saviour, as He has been ows.’”

“ And have you never been to Him, Miss Lizzie?’
asked Paul, with deep interest.

“No, Mr. Paul, I never have,” said Lizzie.

“ Lizzie,” said Nellie, breaking the long silence that

ensued, “J will give you my Bible as a reminder of
me, when I am gone. Here it is; I intended it as my
parting gift. You will read it for my sake, I know,
and soon you will love it as I do,” she whispered
affectionately.
‘Lizzie received the plain moroeco-bound Bible with a
quivering lip and tearful eyes, and the silent pressure
of her hand upon the arm of her friend attested how
highly she prized this token of her love.

Their walk by this time brought them near a pleasant
house, recently erected by one of the new settlers in
Monona. }

“ Ah,” said Paul, “there are dear old Father and
Mother Pomroy enjoying the cool breeze of the after-
noon ;” and he bowed, in pleased recognition, to the
aged couple, who, in easy chairs placed beneath the
grateful shade of the forest trees left in the vard,



?

t



60 Lissie Hepburit.

were conversing together as the little party came in
sight.

Perfectly erect, with his iron-grey hair brushed
straight back from his forehead, Father Pomroy, as
he was reverently called, stood bravely up beneath
the burdens of nearly four-score years. He made it
his especial boast that, having discarded the use ot
spectacles when forty years old, he was able now, when
twice that age, to read both his Bible and newspaper,
without their aid, even by lamplight. His wife, who
was his junior by a few years, was much more feeble
and infirm, and was quite content to avail herself of
the usc of spectacles to assist her failing vision.
Both, however, were fine specimens of well-preserved
old age.

“Good. evening, good evening,” was the cordial
response he gave to Paul, and rising from his scat,
he said, “Come in, come in, Mr. Paul. Bring the
gitls in, too. We shall be happy, if you can give
us your company awhile this afternoon.”

“This is a fine evening, sir,” said Paul, grasping the
old man’s hand heartily, while Lizzie and Nellie fol-
lowed him up the walk and seated themselves in the
rustic porch, after being presented to the aged couple.

“J was thinking, sir,” continued Paul, “as I saw
you sitting here, that the bright close of this long day
bore a fine similitude to the beautiful evening of your
overlengthened life.”

“Mother and I were just speaking of that as you
came in sight,” replied Father Pomroy. “We have
journeyed together for over fifty years. But now the
day is nearly spent, and the night cometh—the short



New Fricnds. 61

night which will usher us into an eternal Day,” and
the old man bowed his head, reverently.

“Fifty years! A long, long journey,” said Paul.

“Yes, and our way has been beset with many and
sore afflictions which have made us nearly faint at
times. But the Lord has sustained us, and we are
brought hitherto by His great mercy.”

“ Yes,” joined in the voice of Mother Pomroy, “ we
have been afflicted, but we can truly say,

‘ E’en down to old age all His people shall prove
. His sovereign, eternal, unchangeable love.’”’

“JT have seen, somewhere, a beautiful idea. I cannot’
just now recall where it came from,” said Paul. “It
is this: that as the stones were fashioned for the
earthly temple in Lebanon, and then fitted in silence
and perfection to their appropriate place, so here we are
being made ready for. the spiritual temple in heaven.
One verse, I remember, was this:

“ From Nature’s quarries, deep and dark,

With gracious aim He hews

The stones, the spiritual stones,
It pleaseth Him to choose.

Hard, rugged, shapeless at the first,
Yet destined each to shine—

Moulded beneath His patient hand—
In purity divine.”

“hat expresses it, Mz. Paul,” said the old man,
delightedly. ‘The Lord never forsakes His people,
though He may hew and cut them, and even cast them
into the fire until their dross is consumed and they
made fit for His high and holier service.”



62 Lissie Hepburn.

“ And how long it takes us to learn to lie still and

receive His dealings quietly and submissively, since

Love directs every blow!” added his wife. “How
strangely we doubt His love !”

“Where is Miss Jessie this evening?” asked Paul,
after a little pause.

“Do you not hear the dear child, Mr. Paul, singing
like the home-bird that she is, while clearing away the
tea-table ?” demanded Father Pomroy, fondly.

“Ts Miss Jessie your only child, sir?” Nellie ven-
tured to ask.

“The only one spared to us, the youngest of a tlock
of seven,” replied Father Pomroy.

“What! are all dead 2” asked Lizzie.

“Yes,” replied Mother Pomroy ; “we left them all
sleeping in the cemetery near our old home. Three
boys and three girls.”

“Oh, how could you leave them, maam?” said
Lizzie. Ny

“Tt was a sad day for us. We had hoped to sleep wed
all together ; but we fancied that the same fatal disease
was fastening upon Jessie, and we cane here to seek a
healthier home for her.”

“ Miss Jessic seems entirely well now, sir,” said Paul.

“Yes, perfectly so; and we feel rewarded for the
sacrifice we made for her dear sake. She is truly the
stay and staff of our declining years.”

“ No child could be more dutiful and loving,” chimed
in the aged mother, fondly.

“T wished to see Miss Jessie a moment, about a
little matter of business,” said Paul; “but -anuther
time will answer, when she has more leisure.”



e

New Friends. 3

“Oh, dou't go just yet,” said a cheery vuice, and a
rosy-cheeked, bright-eyed young girl came to the door.
“Come in for awhile, won’t you?” she asked, after the
greetings were over. “I am afraid the air might be a
little too chilly for mother, but if you will come in we
should enjoy it very much.”

“Thank you,” said Lizzie, timidly ; “as I have quite
along walk before me, I must bid you good evening
and go.”

“T will go with you a little further, Lizzie,” said
Nellie, and the girls arose to take leave of their
pleasant acquaintances.

“ And as you two friends are so soon to part,” said
Paul, “ you will doubtless prefer to enjoy the remainder
of your walk alone; so I will take my leave of you
both now,” and he shook hands with them. Then bid-
ding all good evening, he sprang lightly over the fence
and took his way to the village, while Mother Pomroy,
leaning on the arm of her daughter, bade the girls
good-bye, cordially inviting them to come again, and.
followed her husband into the house.

Arm-in-arm Lizzie and Nellie pursued their walk
towards the farm. At the foot of the hill over which
stood the farm-house, Nellie silently opened her arms
and received Lizzie to them in a long, tearful embrace.
And thus they parted.

A few days afterward, Nellie and her brother accom-
panicd their father to their distant home. For several
years the paths of these friends will not run parallel
to each other, but the memory of each will retain the
most pleasant and tender remembrance of the other.

And He who “ guides with Ilis eye” the children



4 Lissie Hepburn.

whom He has redeemed, will regard this meek, faith-
ful disciple as she enters her rude home, and becomes
the patient teacher of her untutored sisters and mother.
He will note the steady burning of the light of her
lovely life, the only ray to enlighten the mental and
spiritual darkness of the minds both in and around the
Fort.

And when the sheaves are garnered in, doubtless it
will be said of Nellie, “Well done, thou hast been
faithful in a few things.” “She hath done what she
could.” “Come up higher.”



HAPTER VIL
MARAT.

Se ELEN was ordered to remain at home the
Yl following day, and Lizzie bidden to tend
etext! the sheep alone. It promised to be another
perfect day, and Lizzie was not sorry that she was
to be left alone to enjoy her own thoughts undis-
turbed. arly in the morning, while the green grass
was still sparkling with thé dew, she took her dinner-
basket and Nellie’s Bible, and started for the pasturage,

followed by the bleating flock.
' She intended to find a suitable place for the sheep
to feed, and then to open the Bible and search for the
verses which had fallen so sweetly on her ear the day
before. She expected to find a shady, pleasant nook,
where she could live over the scenes of yesterday, and
recall the words and tones of those whose talk and
friendship had made it a bright day for her. But, as
if to afford her a perfect contrast to that delightful day,
this one was destined to be filled with trials and dis-
appointments. :

Something possessed the sheep that day. Either
they were not particularly hungry, or did not relish

R





66 Lizzie Hepburn.

their food, for they wandered off into the forest, or
playfully bounded up and down the bluffs, filling their
. thick fleece with great burs, which Lizzie remembered,
must be carefully removed before the sheep-shearing,
now close at hand. She called them by name in the
most energetic manner, but only the staid old sheep,
that had for a long time eschewed the follies of the
young lambs, obeyed her voice. The others would
curve their pretty necks, and stand gazing at her ata
safe distance, with as mischievous a look as the faces
of sheep can assume, and then bounded away out of
sight in a moment.

Indeed, they were bent on having a frolic, and that
not upon the green grass of the open field, but in the
cool forest that opened so invitingly near them. And
Lizzie searched for them nearly all day, that none
might be lost. In and out of the wood, up and down
the bluffs, she toiled, panting and flushed with heat
and vexation. She tore her dress frightfully, scratched
her arms and hands with thorns, and cut holes in her
shoes, stout as they were, in her rough chase through
the almost unbroken wood.

She lost her dinner, for it was unceremoniously
pitched into the stream by a venturesome young lamb,
who tested the hardness of his head against her basket.
Her Bible, fortunately, had been more securely cared
for. To crown all, she was thoroughly drenched in
a thunder-shower, which, coming up suddenly and
rapidly, overtook her before she had succeeded in
securing her troublesome charge in the fold for the
night. ‘

Wet, weary and hungry, she turned towards the



Marah. 67

door of the house, her poor beart aching for one of the
many sweet words which had been music to her all the
pleasant yesterday. But alas! she was doomed still to
find the bitter.

“ Hallo, ragamuffin!” shouted James, with a loud
laugh at her forlorn appearance. ‘Been in a fight,
Liz?”

“ Oh, Lizzie, how you look!” and Helen joined in
the laugh of her brother.

“The sheep have been troublesome, and I was
caught in the rain,” replied Lizzie, hoping to avoid any
further contact with James.

“Guess your stuck-up friends would hardly like to
notice ‘our Liz’ just now?” said James. “Serves you

right! No business to be so grand! I saw you pink-
ing round with ’ristocrats yesterday, and shoughe you
would get a fall may be.”

“My friends are not aristocrats, sir,” said Lizzie,
angrily. “They are the best people that I ever saw !”

“Whew! and what a world of people you have
seen, to be sure. It’s so nice to eat humble pie with
big-guns, aint it, Liz? Then it’s so fine to come home
and talk to a poor fellow like me so grand about ‘my
friends,’ ‘the best people in the world,” said J: auTies;
mimicking her tones.

“Eating humble pie with good pase is certainly
more decent than to eat stolen fruit with thieves and

rascals,” said Lizzie.

“Took here, miss!” said James, rising to his ae in
anger, “you had better shut your mouth! I’m not to
be called a thief, or hear my friends called so, by any
tagged beggar like you!”



68 Lissie Hepburn.

“ The coat seems to fit you admirably, nevertheless ;
you are quite welcome to wear it,” retorted Lizzie.

“T told you to shut your mouth, miss!” James
shouted.

“And I do not choose to obey your orders, sir,”
replied Lizzie.

“Take that, then !” and James struck her a cowardly
blow, and strode from the rogm.

“iz!” said Mrs. Hepburn, at this juncture, “ you
may change your dress and eat your supper. After the
dishes are washed, you may iron those clothes in the
basket under the table.”

“Oh, I’m so tired, Aunt Jane!” Lizzie ventured to
remonstrate.

“ You seem to have spunk enough left yet! I guess
you can stand it! I was a fool to let you go off yester-
day. Folk’s no business to put notions in your head
that'll set you above your work.”

“They did no such thing, Aunt Jane!” exclaimed
Lizzie, who was extremely sensitive when her new
friends were attacked in this unjust manner. :

“Tt will not be well for you to give me any talk
back, Liz,” said Mrs. Hepburn, sternly. “That work’s
got to be done to-night, and the sooner you get about
it the better. P’raps it will take down your high
notions a little.”

“Tl wash the supper-dishes, Lizzie,” said Helen,
kindly, for she was really sorry for her cousin in her
miserable plight.

“Thank you, Helen,” said Lizzie, touched and
soothed by this unexpected act of kindness from her
indolent cousin. “Weary and disheartened, her work



“irarile 69

for the evening looked formidable. But she knew
there was no alternative, so spreading the ironing-table,
she began her task, and worked on in silence until the
late hour when it was finished and she was permitted
to retire to rest. Her aunt watched her with hard,
unsympathizing eyes, but there were no more words to
irritate and wound her already exasperated feelings.
She was especially glad to be relieved from James's
company. He had gone to the village to join a band
of hardened youth, with whom he was rapidly becom-
ing an adept in drinking, gambling, and kindred vices,
which seem to thrive remarkably in our new settle-
ments in the West. He did not return home until
long after Lizzie, full of bitter thoughts, had flung
herself upon the bed and sank into the heavy sleep
of the over-tasked.

Ah, how sweet would have been her rest, if the
mystic veil could have been withdrawn, and her eyes
beheld the good Shepherd, who even now was on His
_ way to seek and to save this sorely-tried lamb. Ah, if
we only knew, when treading the roughened path, that
Jesus loves and pities all !

“How every anguished pain and smart
Finds healing in that word!”



CHAPTER VIII.
THE SABBATH-SCHOOL.

OSE were pleasant little girls who called
here yesterday,” remarked Mrs. Winthrop
i to her son, the very day that brought so —
many trials to Lizzie.

“Yes, nice girls,” replied Paul. “We had a pleasant
talk together, during our walk, that evening.”

“JT was quite drawn to Lizzie, in particular,” said
Mrs. Winthrop.

“Yes, there is something remarkable about her,”
replied Paul. “I am quite sure she has not been
always used to her present rough life. There seems to
be a refinement about her superior to most of the other
children we have met.”

“ What a pity she cannot be placed in circumstances
more favourable to the development of her mind and
heart !”

“And she is not the only one who is growing up
in great ignorance in this village. You would be sur-
prised indeed to visit the school, which is of a poor
order, and see what a number of children there are





The Sabbath-school. 71

here, almost wholly in the rough, and with scarcely a
ray of religious instruction.”

“Something ought to be done, Paul,” said Mrs.
Winthrop, thoughtfully.

“Something must be done, and at once!” rejoined
Paul.

“ Have you devised any plan?”

“Partially. I propose to announce to the children
that a Sunday-school will be formed in that house as
early as next Sabbath, if possible. In the interval
between this time and that, I will visit the families as
generally as possible, and try to secure the attendance
of scholars, and see what material can be secured for
teachers.”

“That is a very good plan, thus far. Whom have
you for teachers? Oz, first, whom do you propose as
a superintendent for the school?”

“T talked the matter over with Father Pomroy,
and requested him to become superintendent, but he
declined.”

“Tt would be too much of a task for him, at his
great age.”

“Yes, but he promises to conduct the Bible-class
for adults, as long as he is able.”

“He would certainly be admirably adapted for that,
if you could succeed in forming such a class.”

“JT hope to do so, as there will be no other religious
service, at present, for them. I think Miss Jessie will
conduct the infant-class.”

“That is certainly a good choice. She is such a
cheery little body, and cannot fail to win the hearts of
the children,”



72 Ligsie Hepburi.

“T shall depend upon you and Mrs. Cook to teach
the older girls, and Mr. Cook and I must teach the
boys, until we can add to our corps of helpers.”

“Mr. and Mrs. Cook are very excellent people.”

“Most excellent. Indeed they have been the sols
- Christian element in the village, since its first settle-
ment until within the last few years.”

“Would he not make a suitable superintendent?”

“T think so, but he declines also. I believe I will
fill the office myself for the present. We cannot afford
to lose the time in seeking for a better man.”

“Well, your corps of workers will do very well for a
beginning. But a library, and papers, and singine-
books, and maps must be provided, for these children
must be attracted in some way, or we cannot retain
them long, I fear.”

“That is true. Mr, Cook leaves for St. Paul to-
morrow, and promises to return as early as Saturday
night with all these requisites,:if we can raise the
funds. I suppose that you and a few others will have
to make up the amount needed for the present emer-
gency. I will secure what I can from others, this
afternoon.” ‘ ,

Mrs. Winthrop immediately placed a generous sum
at her son’s disposal, promising, at the same time, her
co-operation in his efforts. A sufficient amount was
added by others to enable him to authorize Mr. Cook
to make the necessary purchases ; a commission very
acceptably performed, and in good season.

During the ensuing week Paul was industriously
occupied in visiting the families in the town and
near neighbourhood. His cheerful manners mado



The Sabbath-school. 73

him quite generally pleasing to the people, and he
secured, through his energetic, persevering efforts, the
promised attendance of nearly every child old enough
to come.

Lizzie was away with the sheep the morning that he
called upon her aunt. As a result of his visit, Mrs.
Hepburn informed her, at the close of Saturday. after-
noon, that a young man, calling himself Paul Win-
throp, had been there, and wanted “Jim” and Helen
and herself to attend a Sabbath-school, in town, the
next day.

“ What did you tell him, Aunt Jane?” asked Lizzie,
‘endeavouring to speak calmly, at the same time check-
ing a great throb of joy that caused the colour to
mount quickly to her forehead. “Jim spoke for him-
self,” said Mrs. Hepburn.

“Yes, and I told him, when I needed his teaching,
Td let him know !” said James, with a coarse laugh.

Lizzie coloured painfully, She felt ashamed that
Paul had been rudely treated in her aunt’s house.
Both Mrs. Hepburn and James saw and rather enjoyed
her confusion, Lizzie wisely refrained from provoking
him by any reply to his words.

“She said we might go, Lizzie,” said Helen.

“Oh, did you, Aunt Jane?” exclaimed Lizzie, eagerly.

“Yes; the youngster made such fair promises about
story-books which you should bring home each week,
and papers, for nothing, that I said, at last, that you
might go. But I expect they will be stupid things,
not worth house-room. But, remember, I'll have no
fine airs, or shirking of work! When it comes to that
yowll stay at home !”



74 Lizzie Hepburn.

“TJ should think .yowd had enough of Lizzie’s
going with them upstarts, by this time,” growled
James, s

“T have an easy way to manage that,” replied his
mother, ominously.

Ti was hard for Lizzie to hide the joy of her heart
from the cold, searching eye of her aunt. The even-
ing’s work was performed with alacrity, and she retired
to her room with a happier heart than for many days.
She had, indeed, no definite idea of what a Sabbath-
school was to be. But it would bring a welcome
release from her almost constant toil, and give her an
opportunity of seeing her new friends once a week, and
of hearing them speak of the subjects now possessing
so much interest for her.

The small school-house was filled in every part of it
the following morning. When Mrs. Winthrop entered
with her son, an impromptu choir was formed, and
some fine music rendered, which had been carefully
prepared the previous week. Quiet was instantly
- secured by this potent influence; for the rudest and
most ill-trained mind in the group could not but be
moved by the pleasing harmony of these voices, led by
Jessie’s clear soprano, and sustained by Paul’s rich
bass, the fine tenor of Mr. Cook, and Mrs. Winthrop’s
liquid alto.

The first half-hour was spent in singing, the children
learning quite rapidly to follow their patient and
accomplished leaders. After this a short lesson was
read from Luke, and explained in simple terms, and
a prayer offered by Father Pomroy. The venerable
appearance of the good old man secured respectful



The Sabbaih-school. 75

attention from this motley assemblage, most of whom
were wholly unused to the voice of prayer.

Classes were then formed as quietly as possible, the
bright, new books, cards, and papers distributed, the
lesson announced for the next Sabbath, and, after a
few appropriate remarks from the superintendent, the
children were dismissed, and allowed to go home.

Lizzie and Helen were both assigned to the class
taught by Mrs. Winthrop. Lizzie was delighted at
this, and inwardly resolved that her teacher should
never find her either absent from her place or with
her lessons imperfectly committed.

It was deemed best, by the band of teachers in this
Sabbath-school, to present at once to their pupils the
great themes of the Cross—

“That wonderful redemption,
God’s remedy for sin.”

These simple but sublime truths, the names and offices
of Jesus, and their wonderful adaptation to meet all
the wants and soothe all the woes of the human race,
were faithfully unfolded on each succeeding Sabbath
of this eventful summer. And fathoming lines were
dropped into the mysterious depths of that love, which
made it possible for God to be made like unto us, to
be “ manifest in the flesh.”

This precious seed, watered by the tears and nurtured
by the prayers of these few, earnest disciples, gave
promise, before the close of summer, that a harvest was
close at hand, The work increased rapidly upon their
hands. The school-house became too narrow for the
accommodation of the Sabbath-school, and the court-



76 Lizzie Hepburn.

room was secured for its use. Not only the children
came, but the Bible-class taught by Father Pomroy
attracted a large number of elderly people of both
sexes, who became greatly interested in the lessons and
general arrangements of the school.

After a few weeks, the solemn quiet that prevailed,
and the increasing interest of the pupils, betokened the
presence of the Holy Spirit moving upon their hearts.
A prayer-meeting was at once established for each
Sabbath afternoon. This also became thronged, and
there was soon abundant reason to believe that the
Lord was drawing near, and in great power.

It was now deemed advisable that Mr. Cook should
go again to St. Paul, to secure, if possible, some faithful
minister, who would come and break the bread of life
to these hungry souls. A wise and earnest man, the
pastor of one of the churches in the city, obtained
leave of absence for a few weeks to attend io this
Macedonian cry.

Meetings were begun at once. The way had been
most carefully prepared by a thorough work of religious
visiting performed by the teachers in the Sabbath-
school. No house, or hamlet, or haunt of vice was
passed by, but in every place men were urged, by the
most tender appeals, to come to Jesus and be saved
from their sins.

And then the work began. which the hand of God was so manifestly seen and
felt, that Christians could only wonder and adore while
they garnered the sheaves with songs of rejoicing and
glad triumph in the Lord, and the power of His grace.

There was not a family in the village or immediate



The Sabbath-school. 97

fe ehhouthood but felt, in some degree, the mysterious
influences of the Spirit upon their hearts. There were
those who utterly refused to hear his voice; there were
some, who run well for a season, and then turned
pack ; but there were many souls, w ho’ were permitted
to taste the sweet peace and to know the precious joys
which characterize the new birth.

A church of seventy members was organized as the
fruit of this glorious revival, and arrangements made to
erect a house of worship, and to secure a pastor. A
young but devoted labourer was found, willing to come
and take charge of this new enterprise. And while
they felt that they had secured a man after God’s own
heart in Mr. Hartwell, he regarded himself as peculiarly
blest in so promising a field, where his first labours in
the cause of Christ should be upon a soil still moist
from the recent gracious shower.



CHAPTER IX.
THE LAMB FOLDED,

ROM her first entrance into the Sabbath-school,
Lizzie became the subject of the stirrings of
the Spirit of God. Truth, presented to her
mind by her faithful teacher, Mrs. Winthrop, was
attractive, and soon became of absorbing interest to
her awakened mind. The opportunities for the study
of the Bible afforded her, while herding the sheep,
were generally very favourable, and she esteemed these
peaceful moments very highly. Many times she re-
solved to yield to the voice within her, wooing her to
Jesus and His love. But the hold of the enemy was
not to be yielded from this soul without a malignant
and determined struggle.

To Lizzie the miseries of her daily life at home
seemed never more painful and unendurable than now.
Her aunt, she was, quite sure, was never more harsh
and severe, constantly overtaxing her with work, and
keeping her harassed in body and in mind. James,
who was in constant ill-humour, when at home, vented
his malice upon her, subjecting her to a variety of petty






The Lamb Folded. "9

anhoyances and vexations which irritated and dis-
heartened her constantly.

With Helen, Lizzie was but little in sympathy. She
appreciated the general good nature of her cousin, which
prompted her at times to kindly help when most
needed. And she even suspected that Helen was really
interested in the themes that were now occupying her
own thoughts so constantly. But she never spoke to
Helen of these things, thinking that her sluggish mind
could not sympathize with the deep workings and
earnest stirrings going on within her own soul. Ah,
what mistakes we make in our pride and blindness!
Enwrapped in these, we are unable to perceive the
marks of our Redeemer’s presence, He, who so often
chooses the “weak things” of this world to show forth
His love and peace!

Thus, while the seeds sown in Lizzie’s tender mind
in early childhood began now to struggle into a feeble
life, they seemed likely to perish for want of that
shelter and culture they require for their growth and
perfection. And the foul seeds of unbelief, which,
strange as it may seem, find a favouring soil in the
human heart, began to rear their base heads more
boldly, threatening to crush out those tender exoties,
faith and love, from her soul.

Weary, perplexed and dispirited by these conflicts
within, and the outward trials of her life at home,
Lizzie was often bidden by the tempter, during these
days, to find rest and peace by cursing God and bidding
Him depart from her for ever! But He would not have
it so!

One fine day, near the close of the summer, Lizzie



80 Lissie Hepburi.

led her flock to their pasturage, and, while they were
quietly feeding, she sat upon the grassy bank near the
clear stream murmuring at her feet, and opened her
Bible, that she might prepare the lesson for the ensuing
Sabbath. It was from that wonderful armoury, whose
every polished shaft is aimed at the death of our arch
foe, Seur, the Sermon on the Mount.

Lizzie read aloud: “But I say unto you, love your
enemies, bless them that curse you, do good to them
that hate you, and pray for them that despitefully use
you and persecute you.” She finished the chapter, and
turned to the texts she had been. requested to commit
to memory by her teacher. ‘Let all bitterness and
wrath and anger and clamour and evil speaking be put
away from you, with all malice. And be kind one to
another, tender-hearted, forgiving one another, even as
God, for Christ’s sake, hath forgiven you. For if ye
forgive men their trespasses, your Heavenly Father
will also forgive you! But if ye forgive not men their
trespasses, neither will your Father forgive your
trespasses.”

The book fell from Lizzie’s hands, and she yielded
to the bitter reflections which filled her mind. She
thought of the hard life she had led since she entered
her aunt’s family. She remembered that everything
she had most valued. had been wrongfully taken from
her, and that she had been persistently thwarted in
every taste and desire natural to her. She had been
subjected to hard, thankless toil, coarse fare, unsuitable
and ill-fitting clothing, and shut out from all love and
sympathy that might have helped her, and made her
life less wretched. She had reached the age when she



The Lamb Folded. 81

painfully felt the lack of an education, for she had
advanced but little from where she had been left by
her parents. She was not permitted to attend the
prayer-meetings or the regular service of the church.
No opportunities were given her for rest and improve-
ment but the one short, precious hour in the Sabbath-
school.

And the future looked so dark! so hopeless! Was
it a good God who had snatched her from a beautiful
home, and the endearments of parental love, and all the
refining influences in which her childhood had been
nurtured, to cast her into a family from whom she had
received and should receive only bitter wrongs and
vexatious persecutions ?

“ And He requires me to forgive them, to love them
and‘to pray for them!” she murmured. “ Impossible!
I can never do that! The conditions are too hard !
’ Ecan never be a Christian! ‘There can be no God

who is not good! I tell you there is no God, no Jesus,
no heaven !’”

These words, uttered so long ago, rushed into her
mind at this moment with wonderful clearness and
force. Covering her face with both her hands, she
cried out in the anguish of her soul, “I believe it!
God is not good tome! There can be no God who is
not good! ‘There is no God!”

“A strange conclusion for you to come to, amid so
many evidences that there is a God, and that He is
good!” said a low, gentle voice near her. Lizzie knew
it was Paul’s voice, but she was too wretched now to
care, or even to wonder how he happened to be there.

“ He sendeth the springs into the valleys, which run

G



82 Ligsie Hepburn.

among the hills,” repeated Paul, in low, soothing tones.
“<«They give drink to every beast of the field. By
them shall the fowls of heaven have their habitation,
which sing among the branches. He watereth the
hills from His chanibers: He causeth the grass to grow
for the cattle, and herb for the service of men. O
Lord ! how manifold are Thy works! in wisdom hast
Thou made them all, the earth is full of Thy
riches !’”

Lizzie felt herself growing calmer as these words fell
upon her ear. Without uncovering her face, she ven-
tured to reply, in a sad tone: “If there is a God
indeed, Mr. Paul, He is kinder to all His creatures
than He has been to me.”

“And yet, ‘He hath not dealt with us after our
sins, nor rewarded us according to our iniquities, ”
Paul replied. “Oh, Miss Lizzie, open your heart to
the love of your Father in Heaven! It breathes forth
to you from every flower and leaf, it whispers in every
breeze, Jesus loves you! He will never break the
bruised reed! He waits to receive you to His
love!”

“TJ cannot feel that He loves me, Mr. Paul,” said
Lizzie, frankly.

“ He ransomed you with the blood of His own Son,
His only well-beloved Son, Miss Lizzie,” said Paul.
“ Jesus took on Himself our nature, and was tempted
and tried in all points as we are, so that He might be
able to succour us when tempted. Could He have
given us a richer gift? What but love could have
prompted such a gift?”

Lizzie made no reply, and Paul asked, “Would you



The Lamb Folded. 83

doubt the love of my mother for you, if, to save you
from some fearful peril, she should consent to sacrifice
my life?”

“Oh, Mr. Paul!” exclaimed Lizzie, with sudden
energy ; “I cannot imagine anything like that?”

“No, and how much less are we able to comprehend
the wonderful truth that God could give His only Son
to die for us, while we were not only sinners, but the
most persistent rebels against His law. He died to
redeem us from its righteous curse. Surely it was the
love of Jesus, Miss Lizzie,” said Paul, in a solemn
voice, “that made Him willing to suffer and to die
that we might live! It is love that makes Him now
our patient Friend, our wise Counsellor, our Advocate
and Mediator through all our sinful, wayward lives ;
and, after death, He becomes our Everlasting Portion.
' Oh, Miss Lizzie, these thoughts are, to me, perfectly
overwhelming !”

After a short silence Lizzie said, wearily, “I am
almost always too tired or too unhappy to think, Mr.
Paul. My lite is a burden to me. I am sorely tempted
and tried. When I hear your mother speak of the
Him for myself; but when I come home these desires
vanish, or are driven. out by anger and hatred. My
soul is in such a turmoil, that I cannot think a right
thought. Oh, I am so weary of this burden!”

“ And will you persist in bearing it, when Jesus so
tenderly invites you to ‘Cast your burden on the
Lord’? ‘Come unto me all ye that are weary and
I will give you rest.’ That means you, Miss Lizzie ;
will you come?”



84 Lissie Hepburie.

Lizzie shook with emotion, but could not trust her-
self to utter a word.

Paul opened her Bible and read: “ For we have not
an High Priest which cannot be touched with the
feeling of our infirmities, but was in all points tempted
like as we are, yet without sin. Let us, therefore, come
boldly unto the Throne of grace, that we may obtain
mercy, and find grace to help in time of need.”

“ But my heart is full of unbelief, Mr. Paul,” said
Lizzie, in a dejected tone. . “ And, although my lips do
not often utter them aloud, yet my heart is frequently
filled with the sentiments which you overheard this
afternoon, and murmurs to itself, ‘There is no God.’”

“Surely you have not admitted that sentiment as a
permanent and welcome guest in your heart, Miss
Lizzie?”

“No; I do not think that I have, Mr. Paul,” replied
Lizzie, thoughtfully. “The words you heard me speak
this afternoon were deeply impressed upon my mind
when I was a child, and under circumstances that fixed
them there indelibly. ‘They come to me very forcibly
whenever I am very tired and cast down, or when
I am vexed.”

“Surely this was not the teaching of your father,
Miss Lizzie?”

“Oh, no, indeed, Mr. Paul,” said Lizzie, earnestly.
“They were spoken to me by a young man on the
steamer, while J was coming to the North from my
Southern home, after papa and mamma were dead.”

«¢The fool hath said in his heart, there is no God,’”
sud Paul. “ Why, Miss Lizzie, I could spend hours
in proving to you that there is a God, from objects



The Lamb Folded. 85

' directly before you. ‘The heavens declare the glory
of God, and the firmament sheweth His handiwork.’
From this bit of sod, and from every drop of water in
the stream yonder, both swarming with life too minute
for unaided sight, but wonderfully perfect and adapted
to fulfil the designs of their Creator, to the sublime
vault above us, ‘sown thick with worlds,’ there would
come the same unanswerable argument—there is, there
must be a God. But you have it in your power to
satisfy your mind at once upon this point, if you will.”

“ How, Mr. Paul?” asked Lizzie. “I am very igno-
rant of all these things. and I have no teacher.”

“ By taking God at His word, Miss Lizzie. Come
to Jesus at once, just as you are, with your heart full
of unbelief and sin, simply because He bids you come.
In this path of obedience you will receive abundant
and all-satisfying proof that there is a God, and that He
is good. While there is no end to the arguments which
might be made to prove this truth, the simplest and
most convincing course for us is to put its reality to a
direct, practical test by our obedience. Jesus says,
‘If any man will do His will, He shall know of
the doctrine.’ Place yourself fearlessly in the hands
of this Heavenly Guide, Miss Lizzie, and your unbelief
will soon give place to the most delightful assurance of
faith in the existence and supreme goodness of God.”

“Do you tell me to come as I am, Mr. Paul? ‘Will
Jesus receive me with my heart full of sin? Would it
not be better to wait until I am calmer, or until I can
spend one day without getting angry or speaking sinful
words 1”

“ Jesus seeks you now, Miss Lizzie. He calls you



86 Lissie Hepburn.

now ; His time is the best. You will never be better
while you stay away from Him. Let your sins drive
you to your Saviour, for He only is able to cleanse you
from their pollution, and to deliver you from their
power. ‘The blood of Jesus Christ His Son cleanseth
us from all sin.’ ‘Though your sins be as scarlet, they
shall be as wool; and though they be red like crimson,
they shall be white as snow.’ Will you promise me,
Miss Lizzie,” said Paul, rising to his feet, “that you
will come to Jesus at once, and just as you are?”

“Yes, Mr. Paul,” said Lizzie, in a low, firm voice,
raising her eyes to his for the first time during their
conference, “ I will !”

“ And may God help you !” was the fervent response,
and Paul walked rapidly away.

Lizzie remained alone with her thoughts for a time,
then observing that the sun was already low down
towards the horizon, she called her flock together, and
turned them homewards. As she followed them she
fell upon her knees on the little green prairie, and cried
for forgiveness of her sins, and help from Him, who
never refuses to hear the feeblest voice of His return-
ing wanderers, and she then and there gave up her soul
to Him, as it was, ignorant, blind, and sinful.

She gathered the sheep into the fold, and secured
them for the night, And the good Shepherd brought
His lamb into the fold that night, and secured her
there for ever. She knew it not then as a glorious,
blissful certainty. She only knew that she felt a rest-
ful peace, entirely new, a quietude of mind in happy
contrast to the agitations of the past weeks.



CHAPTER X.

PAUL.



ei AUL was to leave home this fall. He had
4, devoted himself to the ministry, and he
d must pursue his preparatory studies in a
Fant city. This was a serious trial to the young
pastor, Mr. Hartwell, who had found himself greatly
strengthened and encouraged by the efficient aid of
this cheerful, active young brother. Indeed he felt
that it would be almost like losing his own right arm.
He had found a great deal of work to be done in
the new field, but there was a fine band of helpers all
ready to assist him, whose hearts were glowing with
the love and zeal of new converts. The church build-
ing under the efficient management of Mr. Cook, was
being rapidly prepared for the dedication appointed
for the coming spring; while the Sabbath-school was
reorganized, and other arrangements made to keep the
members in a healthful state of prosperity, both as to
numbers and spirituality.
Mrs, Winthrop was much occupied in preparations
for Paul’s contemplated journey’ and absence from
home. Indeed, she had given little thought to her



88 Lizzie Hepburn.

self or to the arrangements for supplying his place in

her home, and how she was to relieve her loneliness

when he was gone.

One evening, after all was done for her son’s com-
fort, she lay upon the sofa, absorbed in deep and
apparently painful thought. Paul came in after his
usual walk, and thinking his mother asleep, quietly
took his flute, and, seating himself on the porch,

played some soft airs with fine taste.

' ‘Tears trickled through the fingers of his mother, as
she listened, and a sense of the loneliness she was
about to experience oppressed her. -

“Paul!” she called to him, as he paused in his
music.

“ Have I disturbed you?” said Paul, laying aside his
flute, and entering the parlour.

“Oh, no! I was not asleep. I have enjoyed your
music, the more, perhaps, because I am so soon to be
deprived. of it.”

* You will be very lonely, mother?” said Paul, as he
took a low seat near the sofa, and clasped her hand in
his own.

“Very lonely, indeed, Paul. I have been so busy of
late that I have only begun to realize it. Your music
seemed to make me feel it sensibly.”

“Ts it best for you to spend the winter here alone,
mother ?”

“ Not if I can devise a better plan. I do not wish
.to keep a servant, and I prefer remaining in our own
home. There must always be ‘alight in the window,’
to attract my absent boy,” said Mrs. Winthrop, fondly.

“TI have been thinking of a plan, which, if it



Paul. 89

meets with your approval, I will endeavour to complete
at once,” said Paul.

“What is it, my son ?”

“To invite Lizzie Hepburn to spend the year with
you.”

“Lizzie Hepburn !” exclaimed Mrs. Winthrop.

“Yes, mother. She is, I think, a child of God, but
you can scarcely imagine a more unfavourable atmo-
sphere than surrounds her in her unhappy home.
Her growth in grace will be very slow if she remains
there.” ,

“Why does she never attend the meetings of the
church 4” ,

“She is never permitted to come, except to Sabbath-
school. Indeed, she is so over-worked and tired, that
I suppose she could not come, if permitted.”

“Indeed ! I did not know she was so unfortunately
situated.”

“Yes, I have been to her home, and know-that she
is subjected to harsh treatment, and she is so constantly
irritated that Iam sure she must often be grieved at
heart and discouraged.”

“T think she has a fine mind, naturally.”

“Quite so, but there -is little opportunity for its
cultivation in her present circumstances.”

“Well, even if I should decide that your plan was
the best for me, are you quite sure it is a practicable
one? Will Lizzie’s aunt consent to dispense with her
services for so long a period ?”

“There will be only one way to secure her consent,
I suppose, and that will be to pay her for Lizzie’s time.”

““T have felt much interested in Lizzie Hepburn



90 Lizzie Hepburn.

ever since J knew her, more especially since she became
a member of my class in Sabbath-school,” said Mrs.
Winthrop, thoughtfully. ‘“ Perhaps I can ‘be useful to
her now in the beginning of her Christian life, and the
task of instructing her will be a pleasant diversion to
me during the lonely days of your absence from home.
So you have my consent to secure her for me in any
way you may be able.”

““T hope you will never have reason to regret your
decision, mother. I will go to the farm in the morning,
and make the best arrangements I can with her aunt.
Ido not anticipate an easy conquest, for there seems
to be but one avenue open to her heart, and that is
through: her love of money.”

“ Are all other arrangements for your absence now
completed, Paul?” asked his mother.

“Yes, I believe so. I shall leave on Monday morn-
ing, and be in ample time to commence with the class.
Tam glad I am to spend my birthday with you before
that time.”

“Your twenty-first birthday.” said Mrs. Winthrop,
in an agitated voice.

“Yes, mother,” replied Paul, cheerfully.

“Then the time has come,” murmured his mother,
with deep emotion.

“What time, mother? The time to be a more devoted
son to my honoured mother? The time to cease from
childish things, and to gird on my armour for the
world’s broad field of battle? The time for renewed.
consecration and fresh labours for my Lord and Master?
The time to follow the clarion voice of my Captain, and
press onward, right onward in the fight ?”



Full Text

TITLE: Lizzie Hepburn, or, Every cloud has a silver lining.

PROJECT: JUV



Front Cover

Front Matter

Half Title

Frontispiece

Title Page

Table of Contents

Lizzie Hepburn. Chapter I: The Temple

Chapter II: The Sea Voyage

Chapter III: Westward

Chapter IV: The Village School

Chapter V: Changes

Chapter VI: New Friends

Chapter VII: Marah

Chapter VIII: The Sabbath-School

Chapter IX: The Lamb Folded

Chapter X: Paul

Chapter XI: An Old Acquaintance

Chapter XII: The Peaceful Fold

Chapter XIII: Confession

Chapter XIV: The Enemy

Chapter XV: Disappointment

Chapter XVI: Helen

Chapter XVII: Lizzie's Drive

Chapter XVIII: Jessie

Chapter XIX: A Hard School

Chapter XX: Visitors

Chapter XXI: The Wedding

Chapter XXII: Trouble At the Farm

Chapter XXIII: Restitution

Chapter XXIV: Surprises

Chapter XXV: The Manuscript

Advertising

Back Cover

Spine




Be NR ASET EN

sine ee EET
cae.


The Baldwin Library

University
of



LIZZIE HEPBURN;

oR,

EVERY CLOUD HAS A SILVER LINING.



LIZZIE HEPBURN;

oR,

EVERY CLOUD HAS A SILVER
LINING.



LONDON :

THOMAS NELSON AND SONS,
EDINBURGH AND NEW YORK,

1874,
CONTENTS.

I.—Tze Tremere a
Ii.—Tuz Sea Voyacz ..
III.—Wesrwazp ., ve
IV.—Tae Vittace Scxoon
V.—Cuanazs o
VI.—New Ferenps ee
VII.— Maran ‘ os
VIII.—Tuer SappaTu-scHoon
IX.—Taz Lams Foupep
X.—Pavu
XI.—An Onn AcauaInTrANcE
XII.—Tue Praczrot Fou
XITI.—ConFEssion .. oe
XIV.—Tue Enemy

XV.—DIsaPPoINTMENT .,

oe

108
lil
121
1380
vi Contents.

XVI.—Heren ,

. ee ee

XVIL.—Luizzm’s Drive

XVITI.—Jesstz,. oe .
XIX.—A Harp Scnoon .
XX.—VisiTors .. ae .
XXI—TuEe Weppine ., S
XXII.—Trovusie at tHe Farm...
XXTTI.— Restitution oe os

XXIV.—Surprises oe
XXV.—Tue Manvuscrirtr ee

oe
LIZZIE HEPBURN,

CHAPTER I.

THE TEMPLE,

freshingly through the open window, laden

Mi} with the fragrance of the orange groves,
swaying the light draperies from the bed with a gentle
motion: it brought a flush of relief to the wasted
cheek of the invalid. She had been propped up with
large pillows all this long, hot day; her thin, white
fingers, busy giving the final touches to a miniature
temple which now stood finished upon the table at her
side.

Fashioned from her own pretty design, in the
fragrant woods natural to the Southern clime, she had
covered it with minute delicately-coloured shells, the
foundation for the fanciful groups she had arranged
upon it. A casket of mother-of-pearl was inclosed
within the inner portion of the temple. About the
tiny pillars, which supported the temple, were twined
festoons of leaves and flowers, wrought from many-

Sh x B


2 Lisste Hepburn.

tinted shells and corals, completely hiding the casket
from view on the three sides. A narrow pavement
was laid in transparent plates of cameo, the slight
pinnacles formed from curious spirals, and the
dome covered with valves, light and beautiful as
snowflakes.

It now stood complete before her, and a look of
satisfaction almost drove the weariness from her face,
as she regarded the work of her skilful fingers, uncon-
scious, all the while, that the hectic was burning
deeper upon her cheek, and that this delightful task
had taxed too severely the waning powers of her life.

At this moment, the vines, that had been trained to
shade the window from the glare of the sun, were sud-
denly parted, and a child, nine or ten years of age,
bounded in noisily, followed by a great dog, with a
shaggy, black coat. Her cheeks were glowing with
health, and her large, black eyes flashing with the fun
and excitement of her romp with Rover in the garden.
The burning eyes of the mother welcomed the child
with an expression of intense love, while the hasty,
impulsive kiss was returned with impassioned caresses.
The eyes of the restless little girl soon fell upon the
temple of shells, and she turned eagerly towards it, ex-
claiming, “ Oh, mamma! what is that? How beauti-
ful! oh, how beautiful !”

“A temple for my darling. It is yours, Lizzie, all
yours, and always yours.”

“ And did you make it for me, you dear mamma?”
demanded the child, throwing one arm about her |
mother’s neck, but without removing her eyes from
her new treasure,
The Temple. | 3

Ves, dear, I made it for you; the last thing that I
can ever do for you, I fear, my child.”

“Oh, mamma, don’t talk so, please. You look so
much better to-day!” said Lizzie, kissing her mother
with more tenderness. “The new doctor will make
you well soon, I’m sure.”

“No, Lizzie, I shall never be well again,” replied
her mother ; “and there are some things I wish to say
to you while I have strength. So get your little chair
and sit close to the bed, for you must pay close atten-
tion to all I say to you to-day.”

“In a minute, mamma,” said Lizzie, diverted by the
dog, who was eager for another frolic. “ Here, Rover,
lie down, sir! I cannot play with you for such a long
time, I guess. You dear old fellow! Go io sleep,
Rover! There, now, mamma, I’m all ready.”

“Do you remember these beautiful shells, Lizzie ?”
asked her mother, taking the temple carefully in her
hands.

“Why, those are the ones papa brought me,
mamma?” :

“Yes, dear; and I have made them into this temple
so that you may always keep them to remind you of
his love for you. He brought them home when you
were a little one; and he used to like to see your baby
fingers playing with them as you tossed them about the
floor.”

“And did he give me that pretty box?” asked
Lizzie, pointing to the casket.

“No; that was his present for me; but it’s yours
now, dear. ‘here is a little secret spring to open the
cover. Press that small dark spot, Lizzie.”
4 Lissie Hepburn.

Lizzie obeyed, and the cover instantly flew open.
Quite delighted, she closed and opened the box re-
peatedly, her mother bidding her to be sure and never
forget the spot by which alone the casket could be
unlocked.

“Now, Lizzie,” said her mother, opening a small
cabinet at her side, “I will place in this casket some
very precious gifts from which I wish you never to
part. This locket holds a bit of your father’s hair and
of mine. These small portraits, that you may never
forget the faces of your father and mother. This ring,
which he placed upon my finger when I became his
wife.”

The mother held the plain band a moment, fondly
slipping it upon her finger, while memory recalled that
bright day in her history, and all the successive links
of time which connected that past with the painful
present. She was aroused from her reverie by the
impatient demand of her restless child.

“Ts-that all, mamma? May I shut the box now?”

“Wait a moment, Lizzie. I have one more gift to
place in your casket, then you may close it.” And she
produced a roll of papers closely written over by her
own hand.

“Qh. a story, mamma! Please read it to me first !”
exclaimed Lizzie, eagerly.

“No, dear, not now. Some day, when you are
older, you will read for yourself the story your mother
has written for you. But you may place it in the ;
casket now and shut the cover. Now hand me that
bit of pearly shell, which will be the door of your
temple,”
The Temple. 5

Placing the shell in its proper groove and carefully
sealing it, she hid the seams with the same devices
that adorned the other sides, and placed the pretty toy
in the hands of her child, who had watched her with
eager curiosity.

“Oh, thank you, dear mamma!” she exclaimed.
. “T never saw anything half as pretty as that little
temple! It’s just splendid !”

“Tam glad you like it so much, Lizzie, and I wish
you always to remember, that wherever you go, you
are never to part with your little temple. Always
keep this last gift of your mother, and let it serve to
remind you of your father and of me, and of our love
for our only darling child.”

*“Tndeed, I will always keep my temple,” Lizzie
readily promised. “But must I never open it,
mamma?”

“Not until you are at least sixteen years of age,
And never reveal to any one the secret of the pearly
door. Promise me that you will obey me, my child.”

“Tl mind you, mamma. T’ll never tell any one,
I’m sure, what is hidden in my pretty temple,” said
Lizzie.

“You know I have often told you, dear,” said the
mother, softly drawing Lizzie to her side, “that I must
soon leave you alone. Our dear Father in heaven has
called for me, and your mother must soon go to join
your dear papa, Lizzie. We shall there wait togethec
for our darling.”

“Oh, mamma,” said the child, quieted by her
mother’s earnestness, “you must not die! Who will
take care of me? How can I live without you?”

”
6 Liszste Hepburn.

“ God avill care for you, my darling. And Jesus
will restore us to cach other in His good time. “ He
will be your Saviour as He has been ours. I am sure
of it, Lizzio. Trust in Him, and He will never forsake
you.”

These words, fraught with such deep and holy
meaning, made, at this time, but a slight impression
upon the blooming little girl, full of health and viva-
city. For many months she had been accustomed to
her mother’s pale face and wasted frame, and she could
not think she was to die, nor did she know how deso-
late the wide world was to an orphan. She had in-
deed received her mother’s tender words with a sudden
fit of weeping, but with the buoyant elasticity of child-
hood, her tears were soon dried, and kissing her
mother back to smiles, she roused old Rover and re
sumed her noisy games with him. The weary invalid
was forced at length to ring for the nurse, and to bid
Lizzie good night. She soon sank into a heavy slum-
ber, which deepened, as the late hours of the night
came on, to a stupor from which she was never
aroused. The mother’s “good morning” to her
orphaned daughter will be in eternity.

The elegant house of Dr. Hepburn was about three
miles from one of the large cities in the South. Em-
bowered in luxuriant groves of orange and magnolia-
trees, it was adorned within and without with all that
a cultivated taste could devise and moderate wealth
procure. Here, with his wife and their only child;
Lizzie, he spent the years succeeding his return from
Europe in the unrivalled enjoyment of a home where
love reigns supreme. That love, which possessing God
The Temple. 7

as its highest object, thence shed its benign beams
; upon all within its hallowed influences.

For several years they had been permitted to enjoy
almost unalloyed happiness, finding a mutual delight
in cultivating the opening mind of their daughter, and
in displaying before her the treasures of knowledge as
she was able to comprehend them. And until the
period when our story opens, they had been able
almost wholly to occupy the ever-contested ground of
the human heart with influences for good. From the
earliest recollections, Lizzie had known the precicus
name of Jesus, and to her young mind the story of His
love had become an unquestioned fact.

The preceding summer had been a terrible one. All
day long and for many days the blazing sun had
poured its rays fiercely upon the scorched earth, which
had opened in deep seams like parched mouths plead-
ing for water. The springs failed, and the streams
either dried away, or were hidden beneath a dark,
heavy scum, full of malaria, ready to breed the dreaded
fever, which, in the Southern States, often gives so .
rich a harvest of human souls tc the Reaper Death.

Indeed, the dread report soon reached the cottage of
Dr. Hepburn that the plégue was already commenced
in the city. Those favoured ones who possessed suffi-
cient wealth, fled before it, panic-stricken, and sought
safe retreats in the North and West, until the glad
tidings of the first frosts should render it possible for
them to return ‘to their homes. Among the poorer
classes, the pestilence was sweeping like the besom of
destruction, and hundreds of the wretched people were
perishing miserably, with none to care for them, or to
8 Lissie Hepburn.

give them decent burial. A noble band of physicians
remained within the infected city, and by their side a
few devoted women, who braved death for themselves,
rather than desert their unfortunate fellows, leaving
them to struggle alone with their mortal agonies.

Among these Dr. Hepburn stood foremost. At the
first report, he bade his wife and child farewell, and
strong in the courage that “bravely dares the danger
nature shrinks from,” placed himself at once in the
front rank of those who were at work among the sick,
in infected alleys and miserable hovels, supplying their
wants, alleviating their sufferings, and pouring the
balm of sympathy into broken hearts. And here he
fell at his post, nor did many of that noble band
survive him.

Mrs. Hepburn, who had received daily messages
from her husband assuring her of his safety, was filled
with the most agonizing fears, when one long day
passed bringing her no tidings from him. Instantly
sending her child to a secure place in the country, in
charge of a trusty servant, with orders to remain until
she recalled them, she repaired to the city. She
found her husband at last, and, to her inexpressible
relief, was permitted to receive his last caress, his
directions as to her own future and that of their child ;
to close his eyes with her own hand, and to secure for
his precious dust a careful burial.

Mrs. Hepburn gave herself no time for the indul-
gence of selfish, passionate grief, but nobly standing
in the place where her husband had fallen, she
ministered to the bodies and souls of those about
her, who were now being “carried away as with a
The Temple. 9

flood,” until the pestilence lifted its dark wing from
over the desolated city, and peace was borne to it
upon the cool and healthful breath of the early frosts.
She escaped the infection, but the extraordinary
exposure and laborious efforts hastened the develop-
ment of the consumption, which had long lain hidden
in her system.

After her return home, the disease made such rapid
progress that she soon realized her days were numbered.
For her child she pleaded long and earnestly to be spared.
But when she could no longer doubt that the command
had gone forth that she must die, she began, with the
resignation of a chastened Christian, to “set her house
in order.”

The sweet home, in which had been spent the
happiest hours of her life, was disposed of at a price,
indeed, far below its value, for all real estate near
the city had greatly depreciated during the prevalence
of the pestilence. Everything that could affect the
future interests of her child was attended to with the
greatest care. Toa brother of her husband, a stranger
to her, but their only relative, who resided in the
North, she committed her daughter, requesting him
to come at once, that he might receive from her own
hands the orphan child of his brother, whom he was
to rear with his own children in his distant home.

An abundance of clothing was prepared for Lizzie,
and packed under the careful supervision of her mother.
Ample instructions were given to the faithful nurse,
who had promised to accompany Lizzie as far as
New York. With every heart-string throbbing with
yearning love for the child so soon to be left to
io Lissie Hepburn.

meet the stern realities of an unknown future alone,
Mrs. Hepburn felt that she should, indeed, sink
beneath the trial, but for the assurance that around
her were the “Everlasting Arms,” and under her
trembling feet was the Rock,—that Rock which ever
firmly upholds the sinking pilgrim, however deep and
dark the waves of sorrow, which may overflow, but
can never submerge it.

The construction of the miniature temple of shells
and the writing of the manuscript were the last efforts
‘the loving heart demanded of the failing hand. Robert
Hepburn arrived the morning after the decease of his
sister-in-law. As he found all business matters had been
arranged satisfactorily, he deemed it best to return
home immediately after the funeral solemnities had
been attended. Moreover, he felt almost powerless
before the heart-rending grief of the child Lizzie, and —
thought he might best divert her from it by the change
and pleasure incident to their long journey. In a few
days, therefore, Lizzie was carried one evening, while
sound asleep, on board the steamer which was to con-
vey her to her new home and friends,
CHAPTER I.
THE SEA VOYAGE.

WISH I knew! Oh, how I wish I knew !”

This sudden ejaculation fell from Lizzic’s

é i] lips, as she was left the following morning
in charge of her uncle, to amuse herself upon the deck
of the steamer, as the bright rays of the sun were gild-
ing the ever-restless waves of the occean. Robert
Hepburn soon became quite oblivious of the presence
of the child, being absorbed in the perusal of a paper,
which he had taken from his pocket.

Left to herself, Lizzie had drawn a low seat near the ,
guards, and sat quietly watching the new and glorious
scene before her, her arms clasped tightly over a large
doll in an unconscious embrace. Suddenly a strange
yearning darkened her eyes, and she exclaimed eagerly,
“T wish I knew! Oh, how I wish I knew!”

Then, rushing impulsively across the deck to the
easy chair where her uncle sat, she seized his arm, and
said : “I wish I knew! Uncle Robert, please tell me !”

“Tell you what, Lizzie?” said her uncle, good
humouredly.

_ “Ts that the way to heaven?” and the little hand


12 Lisste Hepburn.

pointed to the distant line, where the sky seemed to
rest upon the sea.

“The way to heaven!” exclaimed Uncle Robert,
aroused to something like animation by the strange
demand of the little girl. “ What a question! Why,
Lizzie, what put such an idea into your head?”

“Why, just look, Uncle Robert! Away out there
the clouds rest upon the water, don’t they? And if
we sailed right on it would bring us so near that we
could easily go to heaven, and then I could see my
mamma again,” said Lizzie, earnestly.

“You are talking nonsense, child,” said her uncle.
“ You will know all about this when you are older, so
don’t trouble your little head about things you cannot
understand just now. Go play with your dollagain, I
want to read.”

“T donot want my doll! I want to know now!
Papa always told me things when I asked him! I
want to know now, I say!” And the eyes flamed with
excitement, as Lizzie dashed the doll upon the deck
and burst into a passion of tears.

Completely bewildered by this encounter with the
strange child whom he was now to regard as his own,
Robert Hepburn was at a loss what course to pursue.
Summoning a little energy, he ordered her to go at
once to her nurse in the cabin, and resumed his
paper. He soon forgot both her and her troublesome
questions in a quict doze into which he quite naturally
fell. ‘

Not at all disposed to obey her uncle, Lizzie returned
to her seat near the guards, and, leaning over there,
she soon became interested in watching the little
Lhe Sea Voyage. 13

white caps as they chased cach other from the far
distant horizon, and broke into a gentle dash and
pleasant murmur against the vessel. Diverted by
the frolic of the waves, she ceased her angry sobs,
and smiles soon chased away the frowns that had
disfigured her face. But presently her attention was
again arrested by the meeting of the clouds and the
waters, and it seemed so real and so near!

The longing came back to her heart, and she mur-
mured, but sadly now, “I wish I knew! oh, how I
wish I knew!”

“What is it that you wish to know, little one?”
asked a pleasant voice quite near her.

Lizzie was somewhat startled when her eye met that
of astranger. But she was too much in earnest to
hesitate to speak, and she said, simply, “I wish to
know if that is the way to heaven! Can you tell
me, sir?”

This unexpected question brought a smile to the face
of the young man. Indeed, he would have laughed’
outright had not the earnest eye of the child been fixed
full upon him and checked his mirth.

Drawing a chair for himself close to her low seat, he
said, in a winning tone, “ We will talk a little about
that, my dear, but first you must tell me your name.”

“ Lizzie Hepburn,” said the child.

“And mine is Carl Wahlmar. You will call me
Carl, because that will be easier for you, and I will
call you Lizzie. Now then, we are introduced and shall
be very good friends, I think. ‘Will you tell me why
you asked such a very odd question?”

“ Because my papa and mamma are both dead and

—
14 Lissie Hepburn.

gone to heaven. Mamma said they would wait
there for me. And when I looked over there it
seemed so near and so easy to go to heaven. I
thought if we sailed right on I should see them again-
I am so lonely since mamma died !” added Lizzie with
a quivering lip. ‘I want to see her so much!”

Touched as he was by this sad complaint of the
orphan child, Carl did not check a scornful smile that
swept over his handsome features, and a wicked resolve
lent a startling energy to his voice, as he replied, “You
are too old, Lizzie, for such nonsense to be taught you
any more. There is no such place as heaven :”

Bewildered by this astounding answer to her ques-
tion the child sprang from her seat and stood motion-
less before him, her eye riveted to his with a frightened
expression that amused him. He sought to divert her
from the first effect of his words by explaining in a
pleasant manner the rotundity of the earth and the
natural causes for the apparent meeting of the clouds
and waters, assuring her, that, though they should sail
right on, the line would still appear far in the distance.

“But where are my papa and mamma then?” sud-
denly interrupted the child.

“You said they were dead, Lizzie.”

“ Yes, their bodics are dead, I know. But mamma
said our souls would never die. She said she would
wait for me in heaven, and that when it was best, Jesus
would send for me, too.”

* Your mamma told you that, I suppose,” said Carl,

‘so that you should not grieve so much when she was
gone. But it is not true, Lizzie. When people die,
that is the last of them. But dear, I do not like to
The Sea Voyage. ts

talk about dying. We are too young to think of such
gloomy subjects. There will be time enough for that
when we are older. You and I, and all who are young
and well, ought to be happy, to laugh and dance and
sing, anything rather than to be gloomy. At least,
Lizzie, we will not talk about these things now, they
make me angry sometimes.”

Lizzie seemed almost afraid of Carl. She made no
reply to him, but took her seat again with a look of
disappointment upon her young face, which he sought
to drive away by cheerful talk.

“ Away. over this blue water, Lizzie, is a country
called Germany. It is my fatherland, and there dwell,
in a great pleasant house, my father and mother and
little sister Katrine. She is just about your age, I
think, and a dear little girl I hope you may know
her some day.”

Carl forgot that he was presenting in his pleasant
talk, objects to the faith of this child, just after he had
‘struck it such a staggering blow, and he would have
felt deeply insulted had any one questioned the truth
of his assertions, or insinuated that he had told her
these, to him undoubted facts, simply to make her
happier at present.

“Some day,” he continued, “I will sail right on
over this great water, and it will bring me to my
father and mother and my little sister, and we shall
be happy together once more. But you have not told
me, Lizzie, with whom you are to live.”

“With my Uncle Robert over there,” at once said
Lizzie, pointing to the easy-chair and its sleeping
occupant, :
16 Lissie Hepburit,

“ And will you have cousins to play with?”

“ Yes, two; a boy older than I, named James, and
a girl just as old as I am, named Helen.”

“Ah! I expect you will have fine times together.
The boys and girls in the North are great romps.”

“ But I had a great deal rather not go,” said Lizzie,
wearily. “I had much rather stay in my home, or
keep on sailing on this beautiful ocean.”

“Have you never seen the ocean before, Lizzie?”

“No, they brought me here while I was asleep last
night, and when I awoke this morning and came upon
the deck, I thought there could be nothing so beautiful
as the ocean.”

“I think I could tell you some things about the
ocean that you would like very much, shall I, Lizzie?”

“Tf you please, Carl,” said Lizzie, with some degree
of returning animation.

Carl was interested in his little companion, and
could not understand why his words should have
affected her so deeply. He did not realize that to
doubt the truthfulness of her parents, or to question
the instructions they had given her, was a demand too
startling and too shocking for her to recover from at
_ once. He had unloosed, with daring hand, the little
boat from its secure moorings, and then marvelled that
it should tremble and shrink from entering the dark-
ness looming before it with no ray of light to guide its
journeyings.

But he resolved to try to win Lizzie back to smiles
again. So he talked to her of the wonders of the
ocean. He told her of the great fish that sported in
its waters, and of the dolphins, and of the pretty tales
The Sea Voyage. 17

the poets sing of their changeful hues when about to
die. Then he spoke of sea-mosses and ferns, and of
the vast coral reefs down deep beneath the waves. He
told her of their wonderful formation by myriads of
tiny creatures, who patiently and slowly mould into
flowers and leaves and delicate tendrils the gardens of
the deep, until, reaching the surface, they uprear the
strong foundations for the green islands which dot the
ocean.

Then he spoke of the great frozen seas of the North,
with their floating mountains of ice; of their long,
dark winter days and nights resplendent with auroral
magnificence. He told her of the dark, mysterious
open sea about the Pole, whose awful stillness has
never been broken, but by the song of birds; and
of the slow march of the huge icebergs towards the
South to their own detonating music, louder than the
most startling thunder, as they part their vast frag-
ments through the influence of the rays of the sun
above them, and the warm current of the Gulf-stream
beneath.

Lizzie listened to all these marvels of Nature with a
degree of interest, but in silence, which Carl felt to
indicate great indifference. Lizzie could not have
explained, had she been asked, why these truths had
failed to move her soul, as they would have done, if
they had been presented to her by her parents. It
was like offering to her the empty shell, after care-
fully removing all the nutriment and bidding her be
tilled and satisfied. He had presented to her mind
bright pictures of the wonderful works of God, then
marred them by a scornful denial of their great Author.

¢
18 Ligsie Hepburn.

Impatient, at length, at the continued silence of the
little girl, Carl suddenly resolved to deepen, if he could
not remove, the impression he had made upon her
mind. “The occan is very beautiful to-day, Lizzie,”
he said.

“Oh yes, very beautiful,” said Lizzie, enthusiasti-
cally. “Those little white waves chase each other
from away off there as if they were trying to see
which would reach us first. I lke to wateh them,
they sparkle so in the sun, and I like to hear their
music.”

“ And yet the ocean is sometimes a terrible monster,
Lizzie,” said Carl, in such an altered voice that the
child raised her eyes to him in surprise. “ Those little
white caps,” he continued, “which to-day are sparkling
and dancing about everywhere, will sometimes swell
into huge waves. Then the winds, with fearful
roaring, will catch them up, and toss them about
with great fury, and dash them with awful force upon
frail ships like this one upon which we are so quietly
sailing to-day. And then they go down! down!
down !

“T tell you, Lizzie, underneath these waves there lie
the white bones of men, women, and little children,
who sank out of sight in some awful tempest, vainly
shrieking to God for help! Poor souls! shrieking to
a God whom they called good for help, and yet sink-
‘ing down into the cold waves, with no.eye that could
pity them or arm that could save them!”

Carl’s face darkened as he proceeded: “There is no
God, or He would have helped them in their agony!
There can be no God who is not good. Even I, who
The Sea Voyage. 19

am not good, would have saved them, had I the power
of a God. I tell you, Lizzie,” Carl said, grasping the
arm of the child with almost painful violence, “there
is no God, no heaven, no Jesus. Never believe it
again. These dead ones are at peace beneath the
waves; their agony is over, and that is the last of
them! It is the last of them, I say, and when you
and I die it will be the last of us!”

Lizzie shivered with terror, and clung to the arm
of the young man, affrighted at his fearful words and
the vehemence of his manner. It was well that the
summons to dinner aroused Uncle Robert at this
moment from his nap, and that he led the: child
away.

Lizzie refused that night, for the first time in her
life, to repeat the little prayer her mother had taught
her, nor would she give any reason to the nurse, who
anxiously endeavoured to persuade her to perform the
accustomed duty. She could give no reason, for she
knew not why herself. The first dark drop of unbelief
had disturbed the placid waters of the child’s mind,
hitherto so carefully shielded from it. And who can
tell when its baleful influence will cease, or whither it
will tend?

That very night, one of the sudden and violent
storms common to that latitude at this season of the
year, swept down upon the ocean. The embattled
hosts of the storm-king rushed with wild shrieks
through the air, and the ship shook fearfully beneath
the tremendous strokes of the huge waves.

Within the cabin all was consternation and distress.
The affrighted passengers rushed from their state-rooms,
20 Liszie Hepburn.

and forbidden to go upon the decks, they filled the
spacious saloon with their cries of alarm and wild
prayers for help.

Carl, whom the unsteady light of the single lamp
revealed, supporting himself with one arm thrown
around a pillar, alone maintained a perfect silence. A -
smile of cold contempt rested upon his face as he
listened to the wild prayers of his fellow-passengers.

A single cry burst from the lips of the child
Lizzie, aroused from her deep sleep by the confusion
in the cabin, and the noise of the tempest. She was
found by her half frantic uncle and nurse, after
the storm had partially abated, her face white with
terror, pressed against the darkened window, vainly
endeavouring to catch a glimpse of the wild scene
without.

The nurse, much alarmed at her appearance, but
little dreaming of all the causes for it, carried Lizzie
back to her bed, and sat by her side, soothing her with
the songs she had heard her mother sing to her, until
the lids closed over the weary eyes, and the excited
little girl fell asleep. She did not awake until the
morning sun was shining clear and bright upon the
ocean, now calm and smiling again.

A few pleasant days followed, undisturbed by any
accident or incident worth noting. Lizzie shrank in-
stinctively from any further intercourse with Carl,
spending most of her time with her nurse, who made
an especial effort to amuse her during the remainder of
the voyage.

In New York Lizzie parted from Carl with a simple
good-bye ; but she clung with a passionate embrace to
The Sca Voyage. 2r

her kind nurse : her little heart being inexpressibly sad
at this separation from the last person who had helped
to make her life hitherto so pleasant and happy. The
railway cars soon bore the reluctant child and her
uncle to their new home.
CHAPTER III.

WESTWARD.




SA REAK ! Crank! Crash!

“There she goes! The thing’s broke at
Seen} ast !”

“What's the matter, John ?”

“Matter enough, I reckon. That for’ard wheel’s
broke to smash! Thats all.”

“Wheel broken! That’s bad. What's to be done,
John?”

«We'll have to camp out where we are for the night.
The roads is awful, and we're dead broke, sure. So
there’s no help for it. Here we must stay to-night.”

“But there’s no shelter on this open prairie, John,
and there’s a storm coming.”

“J know that, I reckon. Can’t be helped, though,
T tell you. Couldn’t go fur on three wheels over roads
like these, you bet. You and Jim ’ud better jump out
and help me rig up something for a shelter before yon
cloud breaks over us. A storm on the prairie, whether
wind or rain, is no joke, youll find. So hurry up!”

The white curtains of the vehicle, well known at
the West as a “prairie schooner,” were parted at this
Westward. 23

announcement, and Robert Hepburn leaped heavily to
the ground, followed by his son, and presently by his
wife. Two young faces peered out from the waggon,
watching the rapidly gathering darkness of the coming
storm, and the hasty preparations for their protection
from it, A tent was quickly constructed and secured
as well as their means and time allowed, under the
direct supervision of Lizzie’s aunt, Mrs. Hepburn, and
the family gathered under its shelter just as the storm
burst upon them in all its fury.

The little girls, Lizzie and Helen, sat near Uncle
Robert in the centre of the tent, conversing together in
low, frightened tones, whenever the lull of the storm
permitted their words to be heard. James assisted John
and his mother in holding and bracing the tent from
the violence of the wind, Mrs. Hepburn being the most
calm and self-possessed of all the group.

She was a tall, square-shouldered, angular woman,
with stern eyes, whose blue depths were often darkened
by an imperious temper, and rarely lightened by the
softer emotions which belong to her sex. She had a
loud, coarse voice and laugh, such as are sometimes
found in women, but are always suggestive of some
mistake in nature, and affect us as will a discordant
note in music when we are expecting perfect harmony.

Mrs. Hepburn was a self-reliant woman, full of that
rough sort of energy considered essential to constitute

-a thorough business character. She had a determined
will, before which all in her realm was forced to yield.
Any resistance to her will was sure to arouse a temper
which was both cruel and unrelenting. She had effec-
tually crushed out, if she ever possessed them, the
24 Lizzie Hepburn.

tender elements of affection and sweet sympathies,
ordinarily found in the character of a woman.

She was married, rather late in life, to Robert Hep-
burn. He was a quiet, little man, of whom his neigh-
bours said he was too indolent to care for himself, nor
could he keep awake long enough to make any business
profitable. He seemed, indeed, either physically or
mentally unfitted to assume or retain his proper posi-
tion as head of the family, and easily yielded the reins
to his wife. Mrs. Hepburn, comprehending the situa-
tion at once, assumed the sole management of their
affairs, and thenceforth exercised an absolute authority
in their household that he never ventured to oppose.

For her children Mrs. Hepburn had a sort of affec-
tion, which prompted her to provide for their physical
wants and to shield them from injury or insult from
others, as the wild animal will care for its young. The
sweet mother-love in all its holy meaning had never
blessed them in their early childhood, nor did it soften
the stern discipline which she now considered especi-
ally essential for their proper training.

James, who had inherited both her strong will and
energy, was already manifesting a restiveness under the
despotic authority of his mother, that bid fair ere long
to emancipate him from its yoke. In the meantime,
however, he exercised his own love of power by various
petty tyrannies over his sister Helen, and was already
attempting the same with his pretty and very spirited
cousin.

Helen resembled her father in her heavy features
and large, dull eyes, and seemed also to have inherited
both his physical infirmities and his indolence. But
Westward. 25

she was not in any respect a bad-tempered little girl
Exceedingly averse to work of any kind, and forced
to its performance by the inflexible commands of her
mother, she had, unfortunately, learned to avoid her
tasks by a variety of cunning deceits, by which her
regard for truth had become sadly blunted.

This, then, was the family, and these the home-
influences which were to surround Lizzie for several
years. Heretofore. she had been carefully shielded from
contact with such characters. Now they were to be
her daily companions and teachers. Removed from the
atmosphere of love in which she had been so tenderly
nurtured, deprived of all the elevating and refining
influences that had surrounded her in her own home,
and forced to intimate association with the coarse and
tude elements in this family, the conflict of the evil
with the good was to be carried on, with the chances
of success largely in favour of the former.

Robert Hepburn was a carpenter of average ability.
But he had pursued his calling with such small
success, that their accumulations had, thus far, been
exceedingly moderate. On his return from the South,
he proposed to invest the money in his possession, the
property of his orphan niece, for her especial benefit,
in accordance with the wishes of his deceased sister-
in-law, Lizzie’s mother.

This plan met the most decided opposition from
Mrs. Hepburn, who demanded that the money should
be submitted entirely to her disposal. After a feeble
attempt at resistance to this unlawful proceeding,
Robert Hepburn yielded, as usual; and, from that
time asked no questions, nor gave himself any concern
26 Lissie Hepburn.

about its disposal. He seemed to have forgotten the
whole transaction.

Mrs. Hepburn had long wished to emigrate to the
West, where, she believed, their prospects for the
future might be materially improved. She had been
prevented from realizing this wish hitherto by the
want of sufficient funds. When, therefore, the neces-
sary amount of ready cash was at her disposal, she
decided at once to carry out her long cherished plan,
and to invest Lizzie’s money in a farm, which she
knew she could make quite comfortable under her own
efficient management, if she owned the land herself.
This illegal appropriation of money that was not her
own. caused her not the slightest uneasiness. She was
well aware that there was no person living who could
offer the slightest interference to her proceedings, ex-
cept her own husband, from whom she had nothing to
fear, and her conscience was too thoroughly asleep at
this juncture to annoy her in the least.

With her accustomed energy, therefore, she pro-
ceeded to complete her arrangements. A neighbour,
well versed in the difficulties and dangers of overland
travel, was engaged to remove them to Minnesota, the
State she had chosen as their future home. She relied
upon her own sharp tact to choose the proper location,
after their arrival in some of the border towns of that
State. é

Their small property was soon disposed of, or securely
packed in the white-covered heavy waggon, in which
they were to make their journey. Every arrangement
had been completed but the examination and disposal
of Lizzie’s large trunk, which had until now remained


Westward. 29

unpacked. In order to be quite undisturbed in this
business, she granted the children the unusual indul-
gence of a day in the woods with their young com-
panions.

As Jane Hepburn rifled the trunk of its stores of
fine, neatly made clothing, sufficient for Lizzie’s use for
several years, she decided at once that they were not
suitable for her future life on a farm. Accordingly,
_ they were placed in a basket and condemned to be
sold, she being well aware that from the proceeds both
Lizzie and Helen could be fitted out in an abundance
of coarser clothing.

A variety of costly toys and trinkets, useless lumber
for the waggon, she decided to dispose of in the towns
- through which they were to pass, as she might need
the money they would bring. A small, well-stocked
writing desk, and a few richly-bound books, were for a
more immediate sale. At length her eyes fell upon the
miniature temple of shells, so beautifully wrought, and
they glistened with avaricious delight. Deciding at
once that the money she could get for so valuable a
toy would be of great advantage to her, she stopped
not a moment to consider how precious it might be to
the orphan child now thrown upon her care, but looked
about her for a purchaser for it.

Just then she bethought her of Mr. Stevens, who
lived in the handsome house upon the hill; and as ©
there was ample time before the return of the children
to offer it to him, she hastened to do so. Assuring
him that it was a gift from her husband to herself on
his return from the South, she had no difficulty in
persuading him that it was unfit for transportation to
28 CO Lissie Hepburn.

the West, and to induce him’ to purchase it for his
invalid daughter.

With some difficulty she managed, while Lizzie was
asleep at night, to dispose of her clothing to different
persons, to prepare some coarser garments, and to repack
the trunk, keeping the child in profound ignorance of
the entire proceeding,

Mrs. Hepburn congratulated herself that her affairs
had been most adroitly managed when she was seated
in the uncomfortable vehicle ready to begin her west-
ward journey, in less than two weeks after Lizzie’s
arrival, which had given her the means to accomplish
her purpose. From the child there had been as yet no
open outbreak of the spirit of rebellion, which she
often surmised might be raging within the young heart
of ber new subject. Lizzie had good reason to fear
that the heavy hand of her aunt would be laid upon
her if she manifested the slightest symptom of resist-
ance to her will, and suffered herself to be disposed of
quietly until the day came when their journey was to
begin. But when she was arrayed in a dark calico
dress and apron, and some thick shoes and coarse stock-
ings were fastened upon her feet,.her curls gathered
into a net and covered with a huge Shaker sun-bonnet,
her eyes blazed with pent-up wrath. She dashed the
bonnet and net upon the floor and stamped them with
her feet, and would have torn the dress from her, had
it not been made of the best material and securely
sewed, and ended by rushing from the house in a
passion of tears,

Mrs. Hepburn, who walked with perfect unconcern
over quivering heart-strings, straightened the abused
Westward. 29

bonnet, and coolly awaited the return of the sobbing,
excited little girl. Taking no notice of the swollen
eyes and flushed face that appeared before her an hour
after, she simply replaced the net and bonnet; but
there was something in her look and manner that
warned Lizzie that she stood ready instantly to quell
any further resistance to her will.

Regarding work as a very efficient means of “ break-
ing in” the wills of children, as she termed it, she
employed the long days of their slow journey in teach-
ing the inexperienced fingers of the child Lizzie the
mysteries of coarse sewing and the shaping of a stock-
ing. Distasteful as this was to Lizzie, she was not
capable of imitating the deceit with which she saw her
cousin Helen sometimes succeed in evading the tasks
imposed upon her by her mother. So, while her work
was completed with tolerable neatness and despatch,
her little heart was in a tempest of concealed wrath
and discontent during nearly all their journey. From
this, however, she was pleasantly diverted, at times,
by the varied and beautiful landscapes presented to
their view, and for which she had a cultivated and
appreciative eye. ,

They had nearly reached their destination when the
accident befell them, the breaking of the forward wheel
of the vehicle. For some time they were in imminent
peril in their nearly defenceless condition. Several
days were lost in repairing their damages, so that the
fine month of October was nearly gone before they
reached the little settlement which bore the euphonious
name of Monona, where Mrs. Hepburn had decided to
remain for the winter.
30 Lizsie Hepburn.

The only available house, a single log-room, with a
loft, received them and their goods, and here they were
quickly settled to await the long winter of this northern
latitude. And while Mrs. Hepburn looked about her
for some plans for the opening of spring, she decided,
in order to get them out of her way, to send the
children to school, Uncle Robert enjoyed the quiet
and rest from his daily tasks. He could doze and sleep
quite undisturbed, content that all arrangements for the
care of his family were in abler hands than his own.
CHAPTER IV.
THE VILLAGE SCHOOL.

aU NT Jane,” said Lizzie, one morning shortly
| after their arrival, “where are all the
pretty clothes that mamma made for me?”

“Tf you mean all the trumpery that you brought
with you, they are sold,” was the brief reply. “You
will find all you need in the trunk, and you and Helen
can unpack it and hang your clothes in the loft.”

“We have done so, Aunt Jane,” said Lizzie, “but I
cannot find the pretty temple mamma made for me.” ©

“That is sold too !” was the laconic reply.

“Oh, Aunt Jane!” exclaimed poor Lizzie, trembling
with excitement, ‘youdo not mean that you sold that,
do you? Mamma made that for me, and said it should
always be mine. Papa gathered the shells for me, and
she told me always to keep it, and I promised her
I would. Oh, please, Aunt Jane, buy back my
temple for me,” pleaded the child, her eyes filling
with tears.

“Your temple was not fit to bring out West with
us,” replied her Aunt, coldly. “It was sold before we
left Chester. You will never see it again, so think no


32 Liasie Hepburn.

more about it,” she added, motioning the child away
from her.

“T say I did not want my temple sold !” screamed
Lizzie, striking at her aunt in a wild passion. “It
was bad and wicked in you to sell it, and to steal all
my pretty clothes and make me wear these mean old
things. They were not yours,” she sobbed, stamping
her little foot furiously, “ you had no right to sell my
things, and I'll never love you as long as I live !”

“Go it, Liz!” shouted James, with a loud laugh ;
“but won't you get a licking, though !”

“ James, leave the room,” ordered his mother, as she
rose to quell the rebellion of her new little subject.

“Like to stay and see the fun, if you’ve no objec-
tions,” replied James ; but obeying, the next moment,
a look from his mother’s eye, he left the room and
stationed himself near a window where he could observe
the “fun,” as he termed it.

For the first time in her life the rod was laid upon
Lizzie’s shoulders in quick, hard blows by the strong
hand of her aunt, the only reply vouchsafed to the
demands of her wounded sense of justice. She screamed
with pain and terror, and was answered by a derisive
laugh near the window. ° Mrs. Hepburn then led the
child smarting with her punishment, and almost suffo-
cated with anger and grief to the table, where stood
the breakfast dishes still unwashed.

“Liz,” said Mrs. Hepburn, who used this abbre-
viation chiefly because it was distasteful to the child,
“wash these dishes, and hereafter consider that your
work.”

“Good!” chuckled Helen, as she glided from the











The Village School. 33

table, glad that her disagreeable task was assigned to
her cousin. “I hate dish-washing,” she added, as she
joined her brother out of doors.

Poor Lizzie! used all her life to be waited upon by
servants, made hard work of her unaccustomed task.
She scalded her hands, and cut her fingers and scorched
her apron, while tears of pain and vexation continually
blinded her eyes. But there was no love or sympathy
for her sore little heart in the hard eye fixed upon her,
or in the short, sharp commands that directed the
performance of her work.

“Ho! cry-baby !” said James, who ventured to open
the door sufficiently to point a finger at her, and then
ran away unrebuked by his mother.

“When the dishes are washed, Lizzie, you may go
to school with Helen and James,” said Mrs. Hepburn ;
and Lizzie knew that there would be no repeal of this
order, which filled her with renewed terror.

She had never had any other tutors than her fond
parents, and she shrank from mingling with the boys
and girls of the settlement, with whose uncouth
manners and rough language she already had an un-
pleasant experience in their intercourse with her cousins.
Her previous education and associations had quite un-
fitted her for these rough exigencies of pioneer life at
the West. But Mrs. Hepburn was firmly resolved
that Lizzie should go to school. Partly because she
had nothing else for the child to do, and partly, indeed
mostly, because she had conceived a dislike for tho
child—a dislike quite natural for one to feel towards
another whom one has wronged and has determined to
wrong—she wanted to get her out of the way.

D
34 Lissie Hepburn.

Fortunately James and Ielen ran off to school
without her, Lizzie going alone, happily relieved from
their taunting words and teasing laugh.. She was soon
seated upon the hard uncomfortable wooden bench in
the small poorly ventilated log school-house, where
were assembled the representatives of nearly every
family in the settlement..

The teacher, a young woman of very moderate
abilities, however well-qualified she considered her-
self to teach the alphabet and easy readings to the
other children under her charge, was not at all fitted to
guide and instruct a mind like Lizzie’s, whose attain-
ments she perceived at once to be superior to her own.
The first half day passed wearily to Lizzie. She read
and spelled, not only to the satisfaction, but quite to
the astonishment of her teacher. She was ordered to
her seat, and told to “do sums,” until school “ took
up” for the afternoon. Puzzled to know how this
strange order was to be accomplished, she sat in her
seat listlessly doing nothing, but watching the faces of
her new companions, until the children were dismissed
to partake of their noon luncheon.

Lizzie felt no desire to eat hers, and the rude play of
the children was not at all in accordance with her feel-
ings, so she quietly withdrew from the school-house,
and wandered off alone. There was a gentle roll of
the prairie near the school-house, running back to some
bold bluffs, which were crowned by a pretty grove.
The trees were gay with the gorgeous hues of autumn,
and looked particularly inviting beneath the nazy
atmosphere of the Indian summer, In general Lizzie
was attracted and soothed by a pretty landseape, but


Lhe Pitle te. Sehe }



a

this day it failed to divert her from the grief of the
morning. She sought now a quict place, where she
might relieve her aching little heart by a good cry,
unobserved by any one.

The eruel events of the morning came freshly back
to her mind, and, most cruel of all, the hopeless loss of
her beautiful temple, the last gift and work of her
mother, for whose love she now yearned so ardently.
She remembered well that bright evening in her beau-
tiful home, when she received the gift fresh from her
mother’s hands; and she almost seemed to hear the
words, “It is yours, Lizzie, always yours, all yours.”
Now it was lost, and she could never hope to reecive
back the precious gift, with its treasures so cunningly
hid within it. Perhaps some other hand would find
the secret spring, and reveal the contents to be
appropriated by strangers, who could not know their

value. Lizzie threw herself upon the ground, weep-

ing bitterly, and exclaiming aloud, “ Oh, mamma!
how could you leave me alone! Why did TI not die
too |”

Was it the ministering spirit of that dead mother
that soothed at this moment the wild grief of the child,
and breathed the dear name of Jesus in the ear of her
soul?

Was it a dark spirit of evil, that at the next moment
stirred the foul drop of unbelief left in her memory by
the words of Carl, and made her refuse to love that
dear name, and to pour her sorrows into His ever-
sympathizing ear?

Ah, who shall tell! Shall we ever know here the
conflict waged hy the powers of good and of evil for


35 Lisste Hepburn.

the possession of every human soul purehased by the
blood of Jesus ?

“What are you doing, Lizzic.” The voice was a
gentle one, and aroused Lizzie, who lay with her hot
face pressed against the cool wet leaves on the ground.
She raised her head quickly, and met the gaze of a
girl some three or four years older than herself, whose
large, soft black eyes had attracted her that morning
more than any other's in the school. Lizzie was longing
for companionship just then ; so she welcomed the girl
with a smile, as she answered,

“Tam doing nothing in particular just now, but if
you are willing, I would like to take a walk with you
before the bell rings for school.”

“Where shall we go?” asked Nellie.

“To the woods yonder, if you please. The trees are
very beautiful now, and this morning early they glittcred
with frost, like silver. I never saw anything like that
before, did you?”

“Oh yes! many times. But why have you never
seen them?”

“ Because we lived in the South. We had beautiful
flowers and trees there, but if the frosts came at all,
they never stay long enough, I guess, to sparkle in the
sun as these did this morning.”

“What made you ever come way up here, Lizzie?”

“Oh, my papa and mamma are both dead!” and
Lizzie began to weep again passionately, exclaiming
between her sobs, “Oh, I don’t know where they
are! I wish I did! I wish I was dead too! I
don’t like to stay here a bit! I hate my aunt
and cousins! They are so unkind to me, you don’t
The Village School. 37

know! Oh, I wish I could go to my own home
again |”

Nellie was startled at this outburst of stormy grief,
and stood silently regarding Lizzie with a puzzled look
upon her faee. At length she ventured to say gently,
“ Don’t ery so hard, Lizzie. I am away from my home,
too, and from my father and mother.”

“ Are they dead, Nellie?” asked Lizzie, a little con-
soled by the thought that perhaps her friend could
sympathize with her trials, from a similar experience.

“No, they are not dead, Lizzie, but 200 miles from
here, away to the north-west. It is a great deal colder
there than it is here, and there are very few houses,
for the land is covered with thick woods. And there
are very few white people around my home.”

“ What sort of people are they, Nellie? Negroes ?”

“ No, they are Indians.”

“Oh, Nellie! Aren't vou a bit afraid of Indians?”

“Not a bit! My mother is an Indian woman, but
iny father isa white man. And oh, he’s so splendid !”
and Nellie’s face lighted up with the warm glow of
her loving young heart.

“Ts he tall and handsome?” asked Lizzie, deeply
interested.

“ Yes, indeed ; a beautiful officer in the army! We
live in the Fort, and my father has the command of
the soldicrs stationed there. Nearly all the officers
and soldiers have Indian wives, and live without much
trouble from the tribe. But sometimes the Indians
from other tribes get angry with the whites, or drink
too much whiskey, and then my father has to fight
them with euns and cannon!”
38 Lissie Hepburn,

“Oh, Nellie! tell me all about it, will you?” said
Lizzie, eagerly.

“ Once,” chatted Nellie, “the Indians came around
the Fort in great numbers, and they were awful angry.
‘They shot their arrows into the Fort nearly as thick as
2 vain-storm, and they yelled horribly all the time.
One of my little brothers—that one that sat back of
me in school this morning—was fastened out of the
Fort before any one knew the Indians were coming, or
that he was not inside. But my father went right out
among them, snatched away my brother, just as an
ugly old Indian had raised his hatchet to kill him, and
brought him safely into the Fort! But there were
three arrows sticking in his arms and breast, and they
made great sores. You can see the scars yet. Now
isn’t my father a grand, brave man, Lizzie?”

“Yes, indeed!” exclaimed Lizzie, enthusiastically.
These stirring incidents of pioneer life, so new and
strange to her, interested her deeply, and quite diverted
her trom her own self.

“ But why don’t you live with your futher, Nellie?”
she asked.

Because they have no schools there, and my mother
cannot read or write, so she could not teach us, and my
father has no time. So he brought my brother Horace
and me down here to attend school, and we live with
my aunt, father’s sister.”

“Do you hate your aunt?” asked Lizzie, suddenly.

“Why, no, Lizzie! My aunt is very kind, and so
are my uncle and cousins, and I love them all very
much. We are very happy here.”

“ But were you not lonely when your father left yout”
The Village Schovl. 39

“Yes, very lonely for a while, until we became
better acquainted with our cousins. When father went
away, he took us in his arms and kissed us a great
many times, and only think! my brave, good father
cried when he bade us good-bye! So you must know
he loves us very much indeed.”

“But what will your mother do while you are
gone?”

“Oh, she will feel very badly, for mother loves us,
too, ever so much. When we came away, she came
down with us to the river, and when father pushed off
our little boat, she screamed and threw her blanket
over her head, and fell on the sand, and was there as
long as we were in sight. We had to leave her, for
we were in the current of the river, so we could not go
back.” ;

“Wow strange-it all seems!” said Lizzie. “ And
did you come down the river in an open boat?”

“Yes, and father rowed it with only one man to
help him. We slept on a great package of furs, which
he took afterwards to St. Louis, and sold for ever so
much money. Sometimes it rained, and we would get
wet ; but we did not mind that much, for when the
sun shone out we could get dry again. Once, I
remember, I was asleep when the rain began to fall,
and when I awoke I found that father had been hold-
ing a large tin wash-basin over my face, so that the
rain should not disturb me.”

Lizzie was much amused at the picture her friend
had drawn of this, to her, novel way of navigating tho
Mississippi.

“When father went home,” continued Nellie, ‘le
40 Lizste Hepburn.

took our pictures for mother. And then he bought a
red silk dress, and a yellow silk shawl, and a blue silk
bonnet for presents to her, because he knew these
would please her more than anything else. The
Indian women who marry white men are very proud,
and like to dress in bright colours, so as not to be like
the other women of their tribe.”

A clear ringing laugh burst from Lizzie over these
gorgeous presents, and then she asked, “ Will you ever
go back to live in the Fort?”

“Yes, in a few years. And then I mean to teach
my mother to read and write, and my little sisters too.
I think if my mother could read she would be much
happier. When I go home, I mean to take her a nice
Bible for a present, and teach her how to read in it.
We never learned anything about Jesus or heaven, as
the Bible tells us, until we came here, and my aunt
taught us. She gave me a Bible the other day to be
my own, and I am so anxious to be able to read it
myself.”

“Do you believe there is a God, and a Jesus, and a
heaven, Nellie ?” replied Lizzie, timidly.

“Why, ” yes exclaimed Nellie, astonished at this
question, ‘‘of course I believe these things. Aunt
taught me about them from the Bible. Don’t you, too,
Lizzie?”

“‘T do not know,” replied Lizzie, sadly. “ Mamma
used to read stories to me from the Bible, and told me
a great deal about Jesus and heaven. But when I was
on the steamer, a man named Carl told me these things
were not true at all, and that I must never believe
them again as long as I live.”
The Village School. 41

“T should think you would believe what your father
and mother told you,” said Nellie, simply, “ because
they loved you better than any one else could.”

“J always did until then, but now I do not know
what to think, I have never seen a Bible since I came
here. Ido not think that my uncle and aunt believe
these things, for they never talk to us about them.”

Nellie did not know what more to say to her com-
panion, who had all her life thus far basked in the
light, whose rays were just dawning upon her untu-
tored mind. Her simple faith had received the in-
structions of her aunt with unquestioning alacrity ;
and that any one could doubt these truths filled her
with wonder.

The two girls walked towards the school-house arm-in-
arm but quite silently, each busy with her own thoughts.
Awarm friendship had already sprung up between them,
and they were pleased to be allowed to share each other's
desk for the remainder of the winter. The maturity,
gentleness, and good sense of Nellie made her an agree-
able and suitable companion for the impulsive and pas-
sionate Lizzie, whose circumstances at present would
rather strengthen than correct these traits in her cha-
racter,

The afternoon school passed much more pleasantly
to Lizzie. Her tasks were easily and quickly performed,
and she found time to assist her friend, who, being in
the rudiments of learning, was patiently plodding her
way through easy readings and spelling. When the
day’s lessons closed, the two girls walked homeward
together, chatting quite merrily.

Their attention was suddenly attracted by loud shouts
42 Lizsie flepburn.

and peals of laughter from the ‘school-boys a short
distance in advance of them. Hastening to the spot,
they saw Horace, Nellie’s brother, who bore a much
stronger resemblance to the Indian race than she did,
in a fierce conflict with a young racoon, which he had
succeeded in chasing down, and was determined to
make his prisoner,

The black eyes of the boy fairly blazed with excite-
ment and wrath, as he returned the spiteful bites of
his little foe with energetic kicks and cuffs, by which
he steadily gained the advantage over the animal. The
battle between the erect little Indian brave and the
no less brave racoon, however, was well contested.
But it ended by Horace carrying off his prize trium-
phantly, entirely unmindful of the blood trickling from
his wounded fingers, to the great delight of his boyish
companions, whose acknowledged leader le at once
became.

Lizzie almost unconsciously joined in the shout that
greeted the little victor, for she had been an excited
spectator of the scene. When she parted from Nellie,
soon after, and drew near her home, she was happier
than she had been for several weeks. Why, she did
not know. Work, hard and disagreeable, awaited her,
she knew, as she entered the little cabin, and she could
expect no soothing influences of love to make her
willing and happy in performing her tasks. Still, she
had not the usual reluctance in entering her home that
night.

Her evening tasks were performed so willingly
and cheerfully, that her aunt congratulated herself
that she had pursued a wise and judicious course
The Village Schevt. 43
thus far in “ breaking in” the. rebellious little girl of
the morning. She knew not that it was the gentle
tones of Nellie’s voice still vibrating upon Lizzie’s ear,
and the entrance of this new love into her lonely little
heart, that had made her cheerful and directed her from
painful thoughts, and the memory of the morning
trouble.
CHAPTER V.

CHANGES.




KY IZZIE'S first winter at the North passed away
2) not altogether unpleasantly or unprofitably
@ to her. Her little frame expanded health-
fully, and her round, rosy cheeks and clear, bright eyes
attested to the good effects, physically, of her plain
food, and the work to which she was becoming daily
better inured. She advanced but little, indeed, in
mental acquirements, but she was learning, quite
unconsciously to herself, some important lessons in the
hard school at home.

Here her trials were unchanged; but she was be-
coming more adroit in avoiding the rudeness of James ;
was generally quietly submissive to her aunt’s authority
and she had even learned to entertain a sort of friendly
liking for the indolent, good natured Helen.

But this was only her outward behaviour; for
secretly Lizzie cherished a deep-seated hatred of her
aunt and of James, and a contempt for her weak uncle.
And she often gave way, when alone, to outbursts of
passionate temper, all the more furious because so long
and so closely pent.

Her soul, this winter, was left in the mazes of
Changes. 45

darkness, without a ray of truth to gnide it. She
rarely talked with the meek, kind Nellie upon these
subjects. Mrs. Hepburn, though often urged to do
go, never permitted Lizzie to visit Nellie, as it was
considered too great a waste of time. Thus she failed
to receive the benefit of the religious instructions of
Nellie’s aunt, Mrs. Cook.

As the Bible and religious books were considered
useless lumber by Mrs. Hepburn, the only reading she
allowed her family was such as they could glean from
a weekly paper, filled with sensational stories and poor
poetry. Unfortunately Lizzie acquired a taste for this
reading, and formed the evil habit, almost inseparable
from the constant perusal of this kind of literature, of
indulging in the most extravagant flights of imagina-
tion. This habit strengthened greatly during the next
few years, while the seeds of truth, so carefully sown
by her mother, lay dormant within her heart.

The succeeding spring Mrs. Hepburn purchased a
farm; about two miles from the settlement. She ap-
propriated Lizzie’s money for this purpose, without the
least compunction, reasoning with herself—her only
counsellor—that, as she had the trouble and expense of
the child, it was only just that she should be paid for
it. She made an excellent bargain, and the farm,
under her efficient management, satisfied her as to
the wisdom of her plan in emigrating to the West.
The farm promised to become, not only a means of
present support, but a valuable investment of her
money.

The succeeding seven years brought their round of
busy cares and hard work, in which all the family took
405

(
4



Lissie Hepburn.

their part. No time was allowed the children to
attend school, except during the winter months, and
this was frequently interrupted by the heavy snows,
which made the walk to the settlement quite impos-
sible. Most of the summer months and until late in
tho fall were occupied by Lizzie and Helen, as they
grew older, in herding the sheep. In this, as in their
other tasks, the larger share of the labour fell, as
usual, upon the former.

But she soon came to enjoy this employment. She
loved the timid creatures, who learned to know the
names which she gave them, and would come at her
call. In leading them to their pasturage or to the
springs for water, her inherent love of nature was con-
stantly gratified and stimulated by the panoramic dis-
play of rolling prairies and wooded knolls, the rocky
bluffs in the distance, and the small lakes and clear
streams which were to be found by easy walks, in
almost any direction. It was her peculiar delight,
while her bleating charge reposed during the heat of
the-day, beneath the branching trees, and Helen en-
joyed her coveted nap after luncheon, to find some
secluded, pretty spot, where she could indulge her
roving fancies undisturbed.

Seven years brought many changes in Monona. It
is one of the remarkable characteristics of our western
towns, that they are subjected to what is termed a
“floating population.” Emigranis enter government
lands, erect rough cabins, raise a little grain, keep a
few cows, pigs, and chickens, spending most of their
time hunting, fishing, and idling. In the meantime,
however, they are watching for the favourable oppor-
Changes.



tunity, and, when it comes, they sell oul, remove
further west, to repeat an operation which, if not
always conducive to prosperity, gratifies a certain rest-
lessness induced by this very mode of life.

Their farms and town property ave generally puz-
chased by a better class of settlers, some of whom come
with the intention of remaining permanently, and of
making homes for their young families in the land of
promise. These are known in after times as the “old
families” of the town, and form the material froin
which petty offices are filled, and they give the general
tone to society. Gradually, better schools are pro-
vided, chwrehes are erected, Sabbath-schools esta-
blished, a weekly paper published, offering -space for
the embryo talent of the village; railroads, either
actual or prospective, give an impetus to the business
interests of the town, and inducements offered to a
still more intelligent and valuable emigration. These
pwehase the property of the second class, many cf
whom by this time are ready to follow the lead of the
first, and to push farther on.

And, with a celerity that astonishes the sleepy old
towns of the East and South, the stirring West is sown
thickly with scttlements, which shortly assume the
pretensions of incorporated cities, with their full com-
plement of mayor and aldermen, and rejoice in well-
paved, shaded streets, great business blocks, elegant
residences, street cars, and gas !

Seven years, therefore, wrought many changes in
Monona. For, situated wpon the great river, with a
beautiful and excellent farming country back of it,
and with every facility for manufacturing interests, its
48 Lisste Hepburn.

bracing, healthful climate and fine location attracted
many new and valuable citizens to the place, and
families that promised, in time, to develop and elevate
the mental and moral status of its society. And, as is
often the case, there were life-histories in some of these
families more filed with events of startling interest,
than any that could be gleaned from the pages ot
fiction.

One of the most desirable sites in Monona was pur-
chased by an English widowed lady, who was, by com-
mon rumour, represented as belonging to the nobility
of that country. She, and her son, a young man of
about twenty years of age, without assuming any pre-
tensions of this kind, however, quietly proceeded to
erect a house, lay out and adorn the grounds, in a
manner suggestive of the sweet homes of England.

The cottage was tasteful in design and finish, and
the occasional glimpses afforded by the swaying of the
draperies from the low windows, revealed a cultivated
and tefined taste in the arrangement and harmony of
the moderately expensive carpets and furniture. About
the grounds the skilful disposal and luxuriant growth
of the flowers and shrubbery attested the care and
taste of the lady, who, in a suitable dress and shading
hat, assisted her son, through the summer, as he re-
deemed the fertile but uncultivated soil from weeds
and grass, causing it, literally, to blossom as the rose.
Indeed “ Rosedale,” as the lady appropriately named
their home, became one of the most attractive spots in
the village, and, ere long, a centre from which were to
radiate elevating and refining influences—influences
which were to have a quiet but healthful effect upon
Changes. 49

the strangely-mingled population of this thriving
town.

Lizzie had now reached the age of sixteen years.
She was a well-developed and perfectly healthy girl,
giving fair promise of a truly beautiful womanhood.
Her ill-fitting garments had not prevented the develop-
ment of a naturally fine figure, or interfered with the
grace of step and motion appropriate to her youth.
Her coarse face had not injured her fine complexion or
diminished the lustre of her eyes, while her life out of
doors, though frequently exposing her to winds and
storms, had not made her rough or uncouth in manner
or language. By some means our little shepherdess
had been preserved from losing the refinement which
was natural to her, or from assimilating to the vulgar
tastes and habits of those with whom her daily life
was associated.

When Lizzie was permitted to attend the village
school she made some advancement, although her
teachers were usually a succession of poorly-paid and
ill-qualified persons, who left her no wiser at the close
of the winter term than they had found her at its
beginning. Her early friendship for Nellie had
ripened into a strong love, and the intercourse afforded
her with the young girl during the sessions of the
winter school, was the most coveted pleasure she could
enjoy.

Nellie had advanced during these years quite
rapidly in knowledge, for she had eagerly profited by
the instructions she had received both at home and in
the school. She had become a gentle, womanly girl,
whose quick sympathies and kind offices made her a

E
59 Lissie Hepburit.

valuud member of her aunt’s family, and amply repaid
the care that had been bestowed upon her.

‘The last of these seven winters at school, and the
last Lizzie should be permitted to enjoy, her aunt had
said, was saddened, towards its close, by the whispered
announcement that letters had been received from
Nellie’s father; and that he was coming to Monona
towards the spring, and would take his children back
with him to their home in the far North, early in the
summer. This news caused Lizzie the most sincere
grief. For very tender and precious had been the
companionship of these young friends during this win-
ter, especially. Never, since her mother’s death, had
Lizzie felt the sweet influence of the love of Jesus,
drawing her to Himself so powerfully as now, when it
shone forth in the unquestioning faith and gentle
virtues of Nellie, His humble disciple. Often, when
comparing her conduct and her words with her own,
she had expressed an honest desire that she might
know for herself what it was that made Nellie so good
and so happy.

and to lose Nellie seemed to blot out at once every
bit of sunshine for her, and to quench any desire for a
better and holier life. She could not repress the tearful
exclamation, “ Oh, Nellie, how,can I live without you?”

“You will find new friends, dear,” was Nellie’s com-
forting rejoinder.

“ But none I shall love one-half as well as I do you,”
guid Lizzie, with her usual impulsiveness.

“Do vou suppose your aunt would allow you to
mike we one littl visit before I go?” asked Nelli,

ng her arm round Lizzi


Changes. 51

“Oh, Pm afraid not! How I wish she would!”
exclaimed Lizzie.

“ Ask her, any way, Lizzie. Auntie tells me that
we cannot do more than fail, and it is worthy a good
object to make an honest effort to attain it. I’m sure
thisis a good object, and perhaps, if you tell her that
I am going away for ever, she would let you come.”

“Well, Pl ask her, as soon as I know when you
are going to leave for your home,” said Lizzie, as tlie
whispered conference closed.

€
CHAPTER VI.

NEW FRIENDS,

a beautiful day in June a polite note reached
@) Mrs. Hepburn from Mrs. Cook requesting
ASA] the pleasure of a visit from Lizzie to her niece

ple o he
Nellie, who was about to leave them, probably not to
return.

“Who is this Nell?” demanded Mrs. Hepburn, who
delighted in abbreviated names.

“The best friend I have,” said Lizzie, whose eager
desire to accept the invitation from Mrs. Cook caused a
very perceptible tremor in her voice.

“Humph !” ejaculated her aunt. “That dark-skinned
girl you were so thick with last winter.”

“Yes,” said James, with a short laugh, “she’s a
nigger !”

“Indeed she is not, James,” said Lizzie, making a
strong effort to control the temper, which nothing
aroused so quickly as James’s vulgarity. ‘ Her mother
is an Indian woman,” she continued, turning to her
aunt.

“Well, I don’t care who her mother is,” said Mzs.
Hepburn, shortly. “Nigger’s good as Injuns, I
New Fricuds. 53

reckon. If I let you. go, who’ll do your work to
day ?”

“Praps Liz would let me mind the sheep for her
one day,” said James.

“ Oh, will you, James?” said Lizzie, eagerly, turning
to him with a pleased smile.

‘Makes you mighty pleasant to a feller, now, don’t
it?” he replied, tauntingly. ‘Guess I won’t though !
Catch me doing a girl’s work!” was his rude conclu-
sion as he went out, shutting the door with a bang.
“Better send my lady’s regrets, mother,” he shouted
back, as he left the gate.

The tears started to Lizzie’s eyes, for she could see
nothing but disappointment before her that day.

“Tl mind the sheep alone to-day, Lizzie,” said
Helen, good-naturedly.

“Will you, truly?” asked Lizzie, fearing lest Helen
should prove as treacherous as James.

“ Yes, I will,” said Helen.

“Oh, thank you, Helen! you are real kind. Now,
may I go, Aunt Jane?”

“Well, if the girl’s going away for good, I don’t
care so much. I should not allow such a piece of folly
again. Be sure to be home before sun-down, so’s to
‘tend the night chores,” was the reluctant permission
given at length.

Lizzie’s simple toilet: was soon made, and the walk of
two miles that beautiful day seemed short, and she
soon found herself in Mrs. Cook’s little parlour in
rapid and happy intercourse with Nellie and her aunt's
family. The hours of this pleasant day seemed to fly,
and Lizzie almost regretted the announcement that
A Ligste Hepburn.

uw

dinner was ready—it seemed to bring “sun-down” so
near. Towards the close of the afternoon, Nellie pro-
posed a walk, remarking, “You have never seen many
of the late improvements in Monona, have you, Lizzie?”

“No,” said Lizzie, “the new houses do not look
much better than the old ones in winter, and I am
always in a hurry to go home after school, so as not to
lose the short daylight. So I am only acquainted with
the old beaten track to and from the farm.”

“Well, then, I’ve something nice to show yon,”
said Nellie.

“You know I must start for home in good season,”
said Lizzie, suddenly remembering the last order from
her aunt.

“Oh, yes, I know, and Tll.go as far as the hill with
you,” said Nellie, “and that will make our walk the
longer.”

Lizzie took leave of Mrs. Cook and her family,
silently wishing that she might accept her kind invi-
tation for future visits, but simply thanking her for
the pleasure she had enjoyed. Nellie purposely
directed their walk, so that they should pass ‘“ Rose-
dale.” The place was now very attractive, with its
climbing vines, well-trained shrubbery and cultivated
“lowers.

“Oh, Nellie, how beautiful!” exclaimed Lizzie, the
memory of a pleasant picture of the past, lighting, for
a sweet moment, the harsh lines of her present life.
“Who owns this beautiful place?” she whispered,
fearing she might be heard by a lady whom she ob-
served busy among the flowers.

“Mrs, Winthrop and her son Paul, whom you see


+ poate
A ew Lien

ur
con

over there, tying up that vine,” said Nellic, dras ins
her arcund on another side.

They walked quietly along, but were observed by
Mrs. Winthrop. “Good afternoon, girls,” she said,
cordially. ‘I se you admire my flowers. Come in,
and my son will cut a bouquet for you.”

Paul Winthrop, hearing their voices, advanced with
a cordial smile to open the gate for the girls to cnter,
pushing his straw hat off from his forehead, wet with
his labour that hot afternoon, With an easy grace he
eut and arranged bouquets for them, chatting all ihe
while of the names and habits of the plants and flowers
from which he was selecting for them. Poor Lizzie
hoped he was unconscious of her painful embarrass-
ment, for she was sure that her dress must seem to
these people the coarsest and most unbecoming in
' the whole world, and her shoes the heaviest and most
clumsy.

“Now,” said Mrs. Winthrop, in the winning manner
quite natural to her, “after you have seen the flowers,
you must come in, and my son and I will give you
some music. I have rarely seen any one fond of
flowers who was not also fond of music. Paul will
show you in,”

Paul advanced to open the door, and Mrs. Winthrop,
who had slipped around the back way to remove her
garden-hat and gloves, stood ready to receive them in
her pleasant parlour. Nellie entered at once, with
gentle dignity,—ever the fruit of genuine humility,—
but Lizzie felt her face burning with shame on entering
the elegant parlour in the presence of so polished a lady
in a dress so unfit as hers,
55 Lissie Hepburn.

Mrs. Winthrop seated herself at the piano, and
mingled her clear voice with the deep tones of her son’s
rich bass. Such music Lizzie had never heard since
her early childhood, and her painful embarrassment
was lost in exquisite delight as she listened. She was

yen thankful for the huge proportions of her Shaker

gun-bonnet to hide the tears that were dropping rapidly
from her eyes. When the girls arose to go, Nellie
thanked Mrs. Winthrop in a modest, appropriate
manner for the pleasure she had given them. Lizzie
took the proffered hand, and raised her large eyes,
full of feeling, to the face of the kind lady, but was
unable to speak one word, although her heart was
full.

“Be sure and come and see me again, said Mrs.
‘Winthrop, kindly, leading the way to the door.

“T believe, young ladies, I shall beg permission to
accompany you in your walk for a short distance,” said
Paul; “I have a call to make which will be quite in
your way.”

“We shall be glad of your company,” said Nellie,
simply, as they bade Mrs. Winthrop good bye.

Paul entertained them so admirably with his cheer-
ful, chatty conversation, that Lizzie began to feel at
ease in his company. He told them of his home in
England, of the pleasant voyage across the Atlantic,
and how they had been led to make their home in
Monona, hoping that the delightful climate of Minne-
gota might prove beneficial to the delicate constitution
of his mother.

He then skilfully drew from the modest young
Nellie some stirring incidents connected with her life
New Friends. 7

ab the Fort, and soon the three were heartily laughing
over some of her wild adventures in the days of her
early childhood. ,

“But Miss Lizzie,” said Paul, suddenly turning to
the young girl clinging to Nellie’s arm, “you have not
told your story yet. We will be quiet now and let you
speak of your sheep. How do you spend your time on
the farm ?”

“T herd sheep !” said Lizzie, naively.

“ Ah, a shepherdess !” exclaimed Paul, gaily,

“who sits upon the grassy turf,
Inhaling healthful, the descending sun ;
While round your feet, the bleating flock
Of various cadence; and the sportive lambs,
This way and that convolved, in friskful glee,
Their frolics play.”

“Yes, Mr. Paul,” said Lizzie, eagerly, “that is just
the way. My sheep love me, and I love them. They
all know their names, and will come when I call them,
and even feed from my hand. Wherever I lead them,
they will follow.”

“ Your occupation is full of beautiful analogies, Miss
Lizzie,” said Paul. “Did you ever think of them?
You know Jesus makes frequent use of the most
striking objects in nature to teach us the sweetest
lessons of Himself. He says, ‘I am the good Shep-
herd and know my sheep, and am known of mine.’
You can readily perceive the force and beauty of that
comparison, can you not?”

“Oh yes, Mr. Paul. And I know if you or Nellie
should call my sheep, they would not come, even
though your voices were gentle and your hands full of
e3 Lissie Hepburn,
food for them. Quite likely they would run the other
way, In a great fright.”

“¢He calleth His own sheep by name, and leadeth
ihem out. He goeth before them, and the sheep follow
him, for they know His voice,” repeated Nellie,
timidly.

“* And a stranger will they not follow, but flee from
him, for they know not the voice of strangers,” added
Paul.

Lizzie was deeply interested, and wishing the con-
versation to continue upon a theme whose analogies
seemed so striking and familiar to her mind, she said,
«Whenever my sheep hear any unusual voice, they .
seem to fear an attack from a dog or a wolf; then
they will run to me and crowd about me ; and oh, how
plainly their eyes ask me to defend them! If I think
there is any real danger, I lead them home, and secure
them in the fold.”

“Even so, does Jesus care for us,” replied Paul.
“He says, ‘I am the good Shepherd : the good Shep-
herd giveth His life for the sheep. My sheep hear My
voice, and I know them, and they follow Me, and I
give unto them eternal life, and they shall never
perish, neither shall any man pluck them out of My
hand.”

«“¢The Lord is my Shepherd; I shall not want. He
maketh me to lie down in green pastures ; He leadeth
me beside the still waters,’” repeated Nellie ; a tone of
deep, quiet joy running through the words,

“* He shall feed His flock like a shepherd, He shall
gather the lambs with His arm, and shall carry them in
His bosom,’ ” added Paul, reverently. ?


New frici

“These aro beautiful words, Mr. Paul. Whore dil
you find them?” asked Lizzie.

“Have you never read them in the Lible,
Lizzie?” asked Paul, with astonishment.

“No, Mr. Paul,” replied Lizzie, with deep emotion ;
“T have never seen a Bible since my mother died. I
was too young then to recollect much that she taught
me. But I remember very well these words, almost
the last that she ever spoke to me, the very day before
she died: ‘Jesus is the Way, Lizzie. Go to Him, He
will be your Saviour, as He has been ows.’”

“ And have you never been to Him, Miss Lizzie?’
asked Paul, with deep interest.

“No, Mr. Paul, I never have,” said Lizzie.

“ Lizzie,” said Nellie, breaking the long silence that

ensued, “J will give you my Bible as a reminder of
me, when I am gone. Here it is; I intended it as my
parting gift. You will read it for my sake, I know,
and soon you will love it as I do,” she whispered
affectionately.
‘Lizzie received the plain moroeco-bound Bible with a
quivering lip and tearful eyes, and the silent pressure
of her hand upon the arm of her friend attested how
highly she prized this token of her love.

Their walk by this time brought them near a pleasant
house, recently erected by one of the new settlers in
Monona. }

“ Ah,” said Paul, “there are dear old Father and
Mother Pomroy enjoying the cool breeze of the after-
noon ;” and he bowed, in pleased recognition, to the
aged couple, who, in easy chairs placed beneath the
grateful shade of the forest trees left in the vard,



?

t
60 Lissie Hepburit.

were conversing together as the little party came in
sight.

Perfectly erect, with his iron-grey hair brushed
straight back from his forehead, Father Pomroy, as
he was reverently called, stood bravely up beneath
the burdens of nearly four-score years. He made it
his especial boast that, having discarded the use ot
spectacles when forty years old, he was able now, when
twice that age, to read both his Bible and newspaper,
without their aid, even by lamplight. His wife, who
was his junior by a few years, was much more feeble
and infirm, and was quite content to avail herself of
the usc of spectacles to assist her failing vision.
Both, however, were fine specimens of well-preserved
old age.

“Good. evening, good evening,” was the cordial
response he gave to Paul, and rising from his scat,
he said, “Come in, come in, Mr. Paul. Bring the
gitls in, too. We shall be happy, if you can give
us your company awhile this afternoon.”

“This is a fine evening, sir,” said Paul, grasping the
old man’s hand heartily, while Lizzie and Nellie fol-
lowed him up the walk and seated themselves in the
rustic porch, after being presented to the aged couple.

“J was thinking, sir,” continued Paul, “as I saw
you sitting here, that the bright close of this long day
bore a fine similitude to the beautiful evening of your
overlengthened life.”

“Mother and I were just speaking of that as you
came in sight,” replied Father Pomroy. “We have
journeyed together for over fifty years. But now the
day is nearly spent, and the night cometh—the short
New Fricnds. 61

night which will usher us into an eternal Day,” and
the old man bowed his head, reverently.

“Fifty years! A long, long journey,” said Paul.

“Yes, and our way has been beset with many and
sore afflictions which have made us nearly faint at
times. But the Lord has sustained us, and we are
brought hitherto by His great mercy.”

“ Yes,” joined in the voice of Mother Pomroy, “ we
have been afflicted, but we can truly say,

‘ E’en down to old age all His people shall prove
. His sovereign, eternal, unchangeable love.’”’

“JT have seen, somewhere, a beautiful idea. I cannot’
just now recall where it came from,” said Paul. “It
is this: that as the stones were fashioned for the
earthly temple in Lebanon, and then fitted in silence
and perfection to their appropriate place, so here we are
being made ready for. the spiritual temple in heaven.
One verse, I remember, was this:

“ From Nature’s quarries, deep and dark,

With gracious aim He hews

The stones, the spiritual stones,
It pleaseth Him to choose.

Hard, rugged, shapeless at the first,
Yet destined each to shine—

Moulded beneath His patient hand—
In purity divine.”

“hat expresses it, Mz. Paul,” said the old man,
delightedly. ‘The Lord never forsakes His people,
though He may hew and cut them, and even cast them
into the fire until their dross is consumed and they
made fit for His high and holier service.”
62 Lissie Hepburn.

“ And how long it takes us to learn to lie still and

receive His dealings quietly and submissively, since

Love directs every blow!” added his wife. “How
strangely we doubt His love !”

“Where is Miss Jessie this evening?” asked Paul,
after a little pause.

“Do you not hear the dear child, Mr. Paul, singing
like the home-bird that she is, while clearing away the
tea-table ?” demanded Father Pomroy, fondly.

“Ts Miss Jessie your only child, sir?” Nellie ven-
tured to ask.

“The only one spared to us, the youngest of a tlock
of seven,” replied Father Pomroy.

“What! are all dead 2” asked Lizzie.

“Yes,” replied Mother Pomroy ; “we left them all
sleeping in the cemetery near our old home. Three
boys and three girls.”

“Oh, how could you leave them, maam?” said
Lizzie. Ny

“Tt was a sad day for us. We had hoped to sleep wed
all together ; but we fancied that the same fatal disease
was fastening upon Jessie, and we cane here to seek a
healthier home for her.”

“ Miss Jessic seems entirely well now, sir,” said Paul.

“Yes, perfectly so; and we feel rewarded for the
sacrifice we made for her dear sake. She is truly the
stay and staff of our declining years.”

“ No child could be more dutiful and loving,” chimed
in the aged mother, fondly.

“T wished to see Miss Jessie a moment, about a
little matter of business,” said Paul; “but -anuther
time will answer, when she has more leisure.”
e

New Friends. 3

“Oh, dou't go just yet,” said a cheery vuice, and a
rosy-cheeked, bright-eyed young girl came to the door.
“Come in for awhile, won’t you?” she asked, after the
greetings were over. “I am afraid the air might be a
little too chilly for mother, but if you will come in we
should enjoy it very much.”

“Thank you,” said Lizzie, timidly ; “as I have quite
along walk before me, I must bid you good evening
and go.”

“T will go with you a little further, Lizzie,” said
Nellie, and the girls arose to take leave of their
pleasant acquaintances.

“ And as you two friends are so soon to part,” said
Paul, “ you will doubtless prefer to enjoy the remainder
of your walk alone; so I will take my leave of you
both now,” and he shook hands with them. Then bid-
ding all good evening, he sprang lightly over the fence
and took his way to the village, while Mother Pomroy,
leaning on the arm of her daughter, bade the girls
good-bye, cordially inviting them to come again, and.
followed her husband into the house.

Arm-in-arm Lizzie and Nellie pursued their walk
towards the farm. At the foot of the hill over which
stood the farm-house, Nellie silently opened her arms
and received Lizzie to them in a long, tearful embrace.
And thus they parted.

A few days afterward, Nellie and her brother accom-
panicd their father to their distant home. For several
years the paths of these friends will not run parallel
to each other, but the memory of each will retain the
most pleasant and tender remembrance of the other.

And He who “ guides with Ilis eye” the children
4 Lissie Hepburn.

whom He has redeemed, will regard this meek, faith-
ful disciple as she enters her rude home, and becomes
the patient teacher of her untutored sisters and mother.
He will note the steady burning of the light of her
lovely life, the only ray to enlighten the mental and
spiritual darkness of the minds both in and around the
Fort.

And when the sheaves are garnered in, doubtless it
will be said of Nellie, “Well done, thou hast been
faithful in a few things.” “She hath done what she
could.” “Come up higher.”
HAPTER VIL
MARAT.

Se ELEN was ordered to remain at home the
Yl following day, and Lizzie bidden to tend
etext! the sheep alone. It promised to be another
perfect day, and Lizzie was not sorry that she was
to be left alone to enjoy her own thoughts undis-
turbed. arly in the morning, while the green grass
was still sparkling with thé dew, she took her dinner-
basket and Nellie’s Bible, and started for the pasturage,

followed by the bleating flock.
' She intended to find a suitable place for the sheep
to feed, and then to open the Bible and search for the
verses which had fallen so sweetly on her ear the day
before. She expected to find a shady, pleasant nook,
where she could live over the scenes of yesterday, and
recall the words and tones of those whose talk and
friendship had made it a bright day for her. But, as
if to afford her a perfect contrast to that delightful day,
this one was destined to be filled with trials and dis-
appointments. :

Something possessed the sheep that day. Either
they were not particularly hungry, or did not relish

R


66 Lizzie Hepburn.

their food, for they wandered off into the forest, or
playfully bounded up and down the bluffs, filling their
. thick fleece with great burs, which Lizzie remembered,
must be carefully removed before the sheep-shearing,
now close at hand. She called them by name in the
most energetic manner, but only the staid old sheep,
that had for a long time eschewed the follies of the
young lambs, obeyed her voice. The others would
curve their pretty necks, and stand gazing at her ata
safe distance, with as mischievous a look as the faces
of sheep can assume, and then bounded away out of
sight in a moment.

Indeed, they were bent on having a frolic, and that
not upon the green grass of the open field, but in the
cool forest that opened so invitingly near them. And
Lizzie searched for them nearly all day, that none
might be lost. In and out of the wood, up and down
the bluffs, she toiled, panting and flushed with heat
and vexation. She tore her dress frightfully, scratched
her arms and hands with thorns, and cut holes in her
shoes, stout as they were, in her rough chase through
the almost unbroken wood.

She lost her dinner, for it was unceremoniously
pitched into the stream by a venturesome young lamb,
who tested the hardness of his head against her basket.
Her Bible, fortunately, had been more securely cared
for. To crown all, she was thoroughly drenched in
a thunder-shower, which, coming up suddenly and
rapidly, overtook her before she had succeeded in
securing her troublesome charge in the fold for the
night. ‘

Wet, weary and hungry, she turned towards the
Marah. 67

door of the house, her poor beart aching for one of the
many sweet words which had been music to her all the
pleasant yesterday. But alas! she was doomed still to
find the bitter.

“ Hallo, ragamuffin!” shouted James, with a loud
laugh at her forlorn appearance. ‘Been in a fight,
Liz?”

“ Oh, Lizzie, how you look!” and Helen joined in
the laugh of her brother.

“The sheep have been troublesome, and I was
caught in the rain,” replied Lizzie, hoping to avoid any
further contact with James.

“Guess your stuck-up friends would hardly like to
notice ‘our Liz’ just now?” said James. “Serves you

right! No business to be so grand! I saw you pink-
ing round with ’ristocrats yesterday, and shoughe you
would get a fall may be.”

“My friends are not aristocrats, sir,” said Lizzie,
angrily. “They are the best people that I ever saw !”

“Whew! and what a world of people you have
seen, to be sure. It’s so nice to eat humble pie with
big-guns, aint it, Liz? Then it’s so fine to come home
and talk to a poor fellow like me so grand about ‘my
friends,’ ‘the best people in the world,” said J: auTies;
mimicking her tones.

“Eating humble pie with good pase is certainly
more decent than to eat stolen fruit with thieves and

rascals,” said Lizzie.

“Took here, miss!” said James, rising to his ae in
anger, “you had better shut your mouth! I’m not to
be called a thief, or hear my friends called so, by any
tagged beggar like you!”
68 Lissie Hepburn.

“ The coat seems to fit you admirably, nevertheless ;
you are quite welcome to wear it,” retorted Lizzie.

“T told you to shut your mouth, miss!” James
shouted.

“And I do not choose to obey your orders, sir,”
replied Lizzie.

“Take that, then !” and James struck her a cowardly
blow, and strode from the rogm.

“iz!” said Mrs. Hepburn, at this juncture, “ you
may change your dress and eat your supper. After the
dishes are washed, you may iron those clothes in the
basket under the table.”

“Oh, I’m so tired, Aunt Jane!” Lizzie ventured to
remonstrate.

“ You seem to have spunk enough left yet! I guess
you can stand it! I was a fool to let you go off yester-
day. Folk’s no business to put notions in your head
that'll set you above your work.”

“They did no such thing, Aunt Jane!” exclaimed
Lizzie, who was extremely sensitive when her new
friends were attacked in this unjust manner. :

“Tt will not be well for you to give me any talk
back, Liz,” said Mrs. Hepburn, sternly. “That work’s
got to be done to-night, and the sooner you get about
it the better. P’raps it will take down your high
notions a little.”

“Tl wash the supper-dishes, Lizzie,” said Helen,
kindly, for she was really sorry for her cousin in her
miserable plight.

“Thank you, Helen,” said Lizzie, touched and
soothed by this unexpected act of kindness from her
indolent cousin. “Weary and disheartened, her work
“irarile 69

for the evening looked formidable. But she knew
there was no alternative, so spreading the ironing-table,
she began her task, and worked on in silence until the
late hour when it was finished and she was permitted
to retire to rest. Her aunt watched her with hard,
unsympathizing eyes, but there were no more words to
irritate and wound her already exasperated feelings.
She was especially glad to be relieved from James's
company. He had gone to the village to join a band
of hardened youth, with whom he was rapidly becom-
ing an adept in drinking, gambling, and kindred vices,
which seem to thrive remarkably in our new settle-
ments in the West. He did not return home until
long after Lizzie, full of bitter thoughts, had flung
herself upon the bed and sank into the heavy sleep
of the over-tasked.

Ah, how sweet would have been her rest, if the
mystic veil could have been withdrawn, and her eyes
beheld the good Shepherd, who even now was on His
_ way to seek and to save this sorely-tried lamb. Ah, if
we only knew, when treading the roughened path, that
Jesus loves and pities all !

“How every anguished pain and smart
Finds healing in that word!”
CHAPTER VIII.
THE SABBATH-SCHOOL.

OSE were pleasant little girls who called
here yesterday,” remarked Mrs. Winthrop
i to her son, the very day that brought so —
many trials to Lizzie.

“Yes, nice girls,” replied Paul. “We had a pleasant
talk together, during our walk, that evening.”

“JT was quite drawn to Lizzie, in particular,” said
Mrs. Winthrop.

“Yes, there is something remarkable about her,”
replied Paul. “I am quite sure she has not been
always used to her present rough life. There seems to
be a refinement about her superior to most of the other
children we have met.”

“ What a pity she cannot be placed in circumstances
more favourable to the development of her mind and
heart !”

“And she is not the only one who is growing up
in great ignorance in this village. You would be sur-
prised indeed to visit the school, which is of a poor
order, and see what a number of children there are


The Sabbath-school. 71

here, almost wholly in the rough, and with scarcely a
ray of religious instruction.”

“Something ought to be done, Paul,” said Mrs.
Winthrop, thoughtfully.

“Something must be done, and at once!” rejoined
Paul.

“ Have you devised any plan?”

“Partially. I propose to announce to the children
that a Sunday-school will be formed in that house as
early as next Sabbath, if possible. In the interval
between this time and that, I will visit the families as
generally as possible, and try to secure the attendance
of scholars, and see what material can be secured for
teachers.”

“That is a very good plan, thus far. Whom have
you for teachers? Oz, first, whom do you propose as
a superintendent for the school?”

“T talked the matter over with Father Pomroy,
and requested him to become superintendent, but he
declined.”

“Tt would be too much of a task for him, at his
great age.”

“Yes, but he promises to conduct the Bible-class
for adults, as long as he is able.”

“He would certainly be admirably adapted for that,
if you could succeed in forming such a class.”

“JT hope to do so, as there will be no other religious
service, at present, for them. I think Miss Jessie will
conduct the infant-class.”

“That is certainly a good choice. She is such a
cheery little body, and cannot fail to win the hearts of
the children,”
72 Ligsie Hepburi.

“T shall depend upon you and Mrs. Cook to teach
the older girls, and Mr. Cook and I must teach the
boys, until we can add to our corps of helpers.”

“Mr. and Mrs. Cook are very excellent people.”

“Most excellent. Indeed they have been the sols
- Christian element in the village, since its first settle-
ment until within the last few years.”

“Would he not make a suitable superintendent?”

“T think so, but he declines also. I believe I will
fill the office myself for the present. We cannot afford
to lose the time in seeking for a better man.”

“Well, your corps of workers will do very well for a
beginning. But a library, and papers, and singine-
books, and maps must be provided, for these children
must be attracted in some way, or we cannot retain
them long, I fear.”

“That is true. Mr, Cook leaves for St. Paul to-
morrow, and promises to return as early as Saturday
night with all these requisites,:if we can raise the
funds. I suppose that you and a few others will have
to make up the amount needed for the present emer-
gency. I will secure what I can from others, this
afternoon.” ‘ ,

Mrs. Winthrop immediately placed a generous sum
at her son’s disposal, promising, at the same time, her
co-operation in his efforts. A sufficient amount was
added by others to enable him to authorize Mr. Cook
to make the necessary purchases ; a commission very
acceptably performed, and in good season.

During the ensuing week Paul was industriously
occupied in visiting the families in the town and
near neighbourhood. His cheerful manners mado
The Sabbath-school. 73

him quite generally pleasing to the people, and he
secured, through his energetic, persevering efforts, the
promised attendance of nearly every child old enough
to come.

Lizzie was away with the sheep the morning that he
called upon her aunt. As a result of his visit, Mrs.
Hepburn informed her, at the close of Saturday. after-
noon, that a young man, calling himself Paul Win-
throp, had been there, and wanted “Jim” and Helen
and herself to attend a Sabbath-school, in town, the
next day.

“ What did you tell him, Aunt Jane?” asked Lizzie,
‘endeavouring to speak calmly, at the same time check-
ing a great throb of joy that caused the colour to
mount quickly to her forehead. “Jim spoke for him-
self,” said Mrs. Hepburn.

“Yes, and I told him, when I needed his teaching,
Td let him know !” said James, with a coarse laugh.

Lizzie coloured painfully, She felt ashamed that
Paul had been rudely treated in her aunt’s house.
Both Mrs. Hepburn and James saw and rather enjoyed
her confusion, Lizzie wisely refrained from provoking
him by any reply to his words.

“She said we might go, Lizzie,” said Helen.

“Oh, did you, Aunt Jane?” exclaimed Lizzie, eagerly.

“Yes; the youngster made such fair promises about
story-books which you should bring home each week,
and papers, for nothing, that I said, at last, that you
might go. But I expect they will be stupid things,
not worth house-room. But, remember, I'll have no
fine airs, or shirking of work! When it comes to that
yowll stay at home !”
74 Lizzie Hepburn.

“TJ should think .yowd had enough of Lizzie’s
going with them upstarts, by this time,” growled
James, s

“T have an easy way to manage that,” replied his
mother, ominously.

Ti was hard for Lizzie to hide the joy of her heart
from the cold, searching eye of her aunt. The even-
ing’s work was performed with alacrity, and she retired
to her room with a happier heart than for many days.
She had, indeed, no definite idea of what a Sabbath-
school was to be. But it would bring a welcome
release from her almost constant toil, and give her an
opportunity of seeing her new friends once a week, and
of hearing them speak of the subjects now possessing
so much interest for her.

The small school-house was filled in every part of it
the following morning. When Mrs. Winthrop entered
with her son, an impromptu choir was formed, and
some fine music rendered, which had been carefully
prepared the previous week. Quiet was instantly
- secured by this potent influence; for the rudest and
most ill-trained mind in the group could not but be
moved by the pleasing harmony of these voices, led by
Jessie’s clear soprano, and sustained by Paul’s rich
bass, the fine tenor of Mr. Cook, and Mrs. Winthrop’s
liquid alto.

The first half-hour was spent in singing, the children
learning quite rapidly to follow their patient and
accomplished leaders. After this a short lesson was
read from Luke, and explained in simple terms, and
a prayer offered by Father Pomroy. The venerable
appearance of the good old man secured respectful
The Sabbaih-school. 75

attention from this motley assemblage, most of whom
were wholly unused to the voice of prayer.

Classes were then formed as quietly as possible, the
bright, new books, cards, and papers distributed, the
lesson announced for the next Sabbath, and, after a
few appropriate remarks from the superintendent, the
children were dismissed, and allowed to go home.

Lizzie and Helen were both assigned to the class
taught by Mrs. Winthrop. Lizzie was delighted at
this, and inwardly resolved that her teacher should
never find her either absent from her place or with
her lessons imperfectly committed.

It was deemed best, by the band of teachers in this
Sabbath-school, to present at once to their pupils the
great themes of the Cross—

“That wonderful redemption,
God’s remedy for sin.”

These simple but sublime truths, the names and offices
of Jesus, and their wonderful adaptation to meet all
the wants and soothe all the woes of the human race,
were faithfully unfolded on each succeeding Sabbath
of this eventful summer. And fathoming lines were
dropped into the mysterious depths of that love, which
made it possible for God to be made like unto us, to
be “ manifest in the flesh.”

This precious seed, watered by the tears and nurtured
by the prayers of these few, earnest disciples, gave
promise, before the close of summer, that a harvest was
close at hand, The work increased rapidly upon their
hands. The school-house became too narrow for the
accommodation of the Sabbath-school, and the court-
76 Lizzie Hepburn.

room was secured for its use. Not only the children
came, but the Bible-class taught by Father Pomroy
attracted a large number of elderly people of both
sexes, who became greatly interested in the lessons and
general arrangements of the school.

After a few weeks, the solemn quiet that prevailed,
and the increasing interest of the pupils, betokened the
presence of the Holy Spirit moving upon their hearts.
A prayer-meeting was at once established for each
Sabbath afternoon. This also became thronged, and
there was soon abundant reason to believe that the
Lord was drawing near, and in great power.

It was now deemed advisable that Mr. Cook should
go again to St. Paul, to secure, if possible, some faithful
minister, who would come and break the bread of life
to these hungry souls. A wise and earnest man, the
pastor of one of the churches in the city, obtained
leave of absence for a few weeks to attend io this
Macedonian cry.

Meetings were begun at once. The way had been
most carefully prepared by a thorough work of religious
visiting performed by the teachers in the Sabbath-
school. No house, or hamlet, or haunt of vice was
passed by, but in every place men were urged, by the
most tender appeals, to come to Jesus and be saved
from their sins.

And then the work began. which the hand of God was so manifestly seen and
felt, that Christians could only wonder and adore while
they garnered the sheaves with songs of rejoicing and
glad triumph in the Lord, and the power of His grace.

There was not a family in the village or immediate
The Sabbath-school. 97

fe ehhouthood but felt, in some degree, the mysterious
influences of the Spirit upon their hearts. There were
those who utterly refused to hear his voice; there were
some, who run well for a season, and then turned
pack ; but there were many souls, w ho’ were permitted
to taste the sweet peace and to know the precious joys
which characterize the new birth.

A church of seventy members was organized as the
fruit of this glorious revival, and arrangements made to
erect a house of worship, and to secure a pastor. A
young but devoted labourer was found, willing to come
and take charge of this new enterprise. And while
they felt that they had secured a man after God’s own
heart in Mr. Hartwell, he regarded himself as peculiarly
blest in so promising a field, where his first labours in
the cause of Christ should be upon a soil still moist
from the recent gracious shower.
CHAPTER IX.
THE LAMB FOLDED,

ROM her first entrance into the Sabbath-school,
Lizzie became the subject of the stirrings of
the Spirit of God. Truth, presented to her
mind by her faithful teacher, Mrs. Winthrop, was
attractive, and soon became of absorbing interest to
her awakened mind. The opportunities for the study
of the Bible afforded her, while herding the sheep,
were generally very favourable, and she esteemed these
peaceful moments very highly. Many times she re-
solved to yield to the voice within her, wooing her to
Jesus and His love. But the hold of the enemy was
not to be yielded from this soul without a malignant
and determined struggle.

To Lizzie the miseries of her daily life at home
seemed never more painful and unendurable than now.
Her aunt, she was, quite sure, was never more harsh
and severe, constantly overtaxing her with work, and
keeping her harassed in body and in mind. James,
who was in constant ill-humour, when at home, vented
his malice upon her, subjecting her to a variety of petty



The Lamb Folded. "9

anhoyances and vexations which irritated and dis-
heartened her constantly.

With Helen, Lizzie was but little in sympathy. She
appreciated the general good nature of her cousin, which
prompted her at times to kindly help when most
needed. And she even suspected that Helen was really
interested in the themes that were now occupying her
own thoughts so constantly. But she never spoke to
Helen of these things, thinking that her sluggish mind
could not sympathize with the deep workings and
earnest stirrings going on within her own soul. Ah,
what mistakes we make in our pride and blindness!
Enwrapped in these, we are unable to perceive the
marks of our Redeemer’s presence, He, who so often
chooses the “weak things” of this world to show forth
His love and peace!

Thus, while the seeds sown in Lizzie’s tender mind
in early childhood began now to struggle into a feeble
life, they seemed likely to perish for want of that
shelter and culture they require for their growth and
perfection. And the foul seeds of unbelief, which,
strange as it may seem, find a favouring soil in the
human heart, began to rear their base heads more
boldly, threatening to crush out those tender exoties,
faith and love, from her soul.

Weary, perplexed and dispirited by these conflicts
within, and the outward trials of her life at home,
Lizzie was often bidden by the tempter, during these
days, to find rest and peace by cursing God and bidding
Him depart from her for ever! But He would not have
it so!

One fine day, near the close of the summer, Lizzie
80 Lissie Hepburi.

led her flock to their pasturage, and, while they were
quietly feeding, she sat upon the grassy bank near the
clear stream murmuring at her feet, and opened her
Bible, that she might prepare the lesson for the ensuing
Sabbath. It was from that wonderful armoury, whose
every polished shaft is aimed at the death of our arch
foe, Seur, the Sermon on the Mount.

Lizzie read aloud: “But I say unto you, love your
enemies, bless them that curse you, do good to them
that hate you, and pray for them that despitefully use
you and persecute you.” She finished the chapter, and
turned to the texts she had been. requested to commit
to memory by her teacher. ‘Let all bitterness and
wrath and anger and clamour and evil speaking be put
away from you, with all malice. And be kind one to
another, tender-hearted, forgiving one another, even as
God, for Christ’s sake, hath forgiven you. For if ye
forgive men their trespasses, your Heavenly Father
will also forgive you! But if ye forgive not men their
trespasses, neither will your Father forgive your
trespasses.”

The book fell from Lizzie’s hands, and she yielded
to the bitter reflections which filled her mind. She
thought of the hard life she had led since she entered
her aunt’s family. She remembered that everything
she had most valued. had been wrongfully taken from
her, and that she had been persistently thwarted in
every taste and desire natural to her. She had been
subjected to hard, thankless toil, coarse fare, unsuitable
and ill-fitting clothing, and shut out from all love and
sympathy that might have helped her, and made her
life less wretched. She had reached the age when she
The Lamb Folded. 81

painfully felt the lack of an education, for she had
advanced but little from where she had been left by
her parents. She was not permitted to attend the
prayer-meetings or the regular service of the church.
No opportunities were given her for rest and improve-
ment but the one short, precious hour in the Sabbath-
school.

And the future looked so dark! so hopeless! Was
it a good God who had snatched her from a beautiful
home, and the endearments of parental love, and all the
refining influences in which her childhood had been
nurtured, to cast her into a family from whom she had
received and should receive only bitter wrongs and
vexatious persecutions ?

“ And He requires me to forgive them, to love them
and‘to pray for them!” she murmured. “ Impossible!
I can never do that! The conditions are too hard !
’ Ecan never be a Christian! ‘There can be no God

who is not good! I tell you there is no God, no Jesus,
no heaven !’”

These words, uttered so long ago, rushed into her
mind at this moment with wonderful clearness and
force. Covering her face with both her hands, she
cried out in the anguish of her soul, “I believe it!
God is not good tome! There can be no God who is
not good! ‘There is no God!”

“A strange conclusion for you to come to, amid so
many evidences that there is a God, and that He is
good!” said a low, gentle voice near her. Lizzie knew
it was Paul’s voice, but she was too wretched now to
care, or even to wonder how he happened to be there.

“ He sendeth the springs into the valleys, which run

G
82 Ligsie Hepburn.

among the hills,” repeated Paul, in low, soothing tones.
“<«They give drink to every beast of the field. By
them shall the fowls of heaven have their habitation,
which sing among the branches. He watereth the
hills from His chanibers: He causeth the grass to grow
for the cattle, and herb for the service of men. O
Lord ! how manifold are Thy works! in wisdom hast
Thou made them all, the earth is full of Thy
riches !’”

Lizzie felt herself growing calmer as these words fell
upon her ear. Without uncovering her face, she ven-
tured to reply, in a sad tone: “If there is a God
indeed, Mr. Paul, He is kinder to all His creatures
than He has been to me.”

“And yet, ‘He hath not dealt with us after our
sins, nor rewarded us according to our iniquities, ”
Paul replied. “Oh, Miss Lizzie, open your heart to
the love of your Father in Heaven! It breathes forth
to you from every flower and leaf, it whispers in every
breeze, Jesus loves you! He will never break the
bruised reed! He waits to receive you to His
love!”

“TJ cannot feel that He loves me, Mr. Paul,” said
Lizzie, frankly.

“ He ransomed you with the blood of His own Son,
His only well-beloved Son, Miss Lizzie,” said Paul.
“ Jesus took on Himself our nature, and was tempted
and tried in all points as we are, so that He might be
able to succour us when tempted. Could He have
given us a richer gift? What but love could have
prompted such a gift?”

Lizzie made no reply, and Paul asked, “Would you
The Lamb Folded. 83

doubt the love of my mother for you, if, to save you
from some fearful peril, she should consent to sacrifice
my life?”

“Oh, Mr. Paul!” exclaimed Lizzie, with sudden
energy ; “I cannot imagine anything like that?”

“No, and how much less are we able to comprehend
the wonderful truth that God could give His only Son
to die for us, while we were not only sinners, but the
most persistent rebels against His law. He died to
redeem us from its righteous curse. Surely it was the
love of Jesus, Miss Lizzie,” said Paul, in a solemn
voice, “that made Him willing to suffer and to die
that we might live! It is love that makes Him now
our patient Friend, our wise Counsellor, our Advocate
and Mediator through all our sinful, wayward lives ;
and, after death, He becomes our Everlasting Portion.
' Oh, Miss Lizzie, these thoughts are, to me, perfectly
overwhelming !”

After a short silence Lizzie said, wearily, “I am
almost always too tired or too unhappy to think, Mr.
Paul. My lite is a burden to me. I am sorely tempted
and tried. When I hear your mother speak of the
Him for myself; but when I come home these desires
vanish, or are driven. out by anger and hatred. My
soul is in such a turmoil, that I cannot think a right
thought. Oh, I am so weary of this burden!”

“ And will you persist in bearing it, when Jesus so
tenderly invites you to ‘Cast your burden on the
Lord’? ‘Come unto me all ye that are weary and
I will give you rest.’ That means you, Miss Lizzie ;
will you come?”
84 Lissie Hepburie.

Lizzie shook with emotion, but could not trust her-
self to utter a word.

Paul opened her Bible and read: “ For we have not
an High Priest which cannot be touched with the
feeling of our infirmities, but was in all points tempted
like as we are, yet without sin. Let us, therefore, come
boldly unto the Throne of grace, that we may obtain
mercy, and find grace to help in time of need.”

“ But my heart is full of unbelief, Mr. Paul,” said
Lizzie, in a dejected tone. . “ And, although my lips do
not often utter them aloud, yet my heart is frequently
filled with the sentiments which you overheard this
afternoon, and murmurs to itself, ‘There is no God.’”

“Surely you have not admitted that sentiment as a
permanent and welcome guest in your heart, Miss
Lizzie?”

“No; I do not think that I have, Mr. Paul,” replied
Lizzie, thoughtfully. “The words you heard me speak
this afternoon were deeply impressed upon my mind
when I was a child, and under circumstances that fixed
them there indelibly. ‘They come to me very forcibly
whenever I am very tired and cast down, or when
I am vexed.”

“Surely this was not the teaching of your father,
Miss Lizzie?”

“Oh, no, indeed, Mr. Paul,” said Lizzie, earnestly.
“They were spoken to me by a young man on the
steamer, while J was coming to the North from my
Southern home, after papa and mamma were dead.”

«¢The fool hath said in his heart, there is no God,’”
sud Paul. “ Why, Miss Lizzie, I could spend hours
in proving to you that there is a God, from objects
The Lamb Folded. 85

' directly before you. ‘The heavens declare the glory
of God, and the firmament sheweth His handiwork.’
From this bit of sod, and from every drop of water in
the stream yonder, both swarming with life too minute
for unaided sight, but wonderfully perfect and adapted
to fulfil the designs of their Creator, to the sublime
vault above us, ‘sown thick with worlds,’ there would
come the same unanswerable argument—there is, there
must be a God. But you have it in your power to
satisfy your mind at once upon this point, if you will.”

“ How, Mr. Paul?” asked Lizzie. “I am very igno-
rant of all these things. and I have no teacher.”

“ By taking God at His word, Miss Lizzie. Come
to Jesus at once, just as you are, with your heart full
of unbelief and sin, simply because He bids you come.
In this path of obedience you will receive abundant
and all-satisfying proof that there is a God, and that He
is good. While there is no end to the arguments which
might be made to prove this truth, the simplest and
most convincing course for us is to put its reality to a
direct, practical test by our obedience. Jesus says,
‘If any man will do His will, He shall know of
the doctrine.’ Place yourself fearlessly in the hands
of this Heavenly Guide, Miss Lizzie, and your unbelief
will soon give place to the most delightful assurance of
faith in the existence and supreme goodness of God.”

“Do you tell me to come as I am, Mr. Paul? ‘Will
Jesus receive me with my heart full of sin? Would it
not be better to wait until I am calmer, or until I can
spend one day without getting angry or speaking sinful
words 1”

“ Jesus seeks you now, Miss Lizzie. He calls you
86 Lissie Hepburn.

now ; His time is the best. You will never be better
while you stay away from Him. Let your sins drive
you to your Saviour, for He only is able to cleanse you
from their pollution, and to deliver you from their
power. ‘The blood of Jesus Christ His Son cleanseth
us from all sin.’ ‘Though your sins be as scarlet, they
shall be as wool; and though they be red like crimson,
they shall be white as snow.’ Will you promise me,
Miss Lizzie,” said Paul, rising to his feet, “that you
will come to Jesus at once, and just as you are?”

“Yes, Mr. Paul,” said Lizzie, in a low, firm voice,
raising her eyes to his for the first time during their
conference, “ I will !”

“ And may God help you !” was the fervent response,
and Paul walked rapidly away.

Lizzie remained alone with her thoughts for a time,
then observing that the sun was already low down
towards the horizon, she called her flock together, and
turned them homewards. As she followed them she
fell upon her knees on the little green prairie, and cried
for forgiveness of her sins, and help from Him, who
never refuses to hear the feeblest voice of His return-
ing wanderers, and she then and there gave up her soul
to Him, as it was, ignorant, blind, and sinful.

She gathered the sheep into the fold, and secured
them for the night, And the good Shepherd brought
His lamb into the fold that night, and secured her
there for ever. She knew it not then as a glorious,
blissful certainty. She only knew that she felt a rest-
ful peace, entirely new, a quietude of mind in happy
contrast to the agitations of the past weeks.
CHAPTER X.

PAUL.



ei AUL was to leave home this fall. He had
4, devoted himself to the ministry, and he
d must pursue his preparatory studies in a
Fant city. This was a serious trial to the young
pastor, Mr. Hartwell, who had found himself greatly
strengthened and encouraged by the efficient aid of
this cheerful, active young brother. Indeed he felt
that it would be almost like losing his own right arm.
He had found a great deal of work to be done in
the new field, but there was a fine band of helpers all
ready to assist him, whose hearts were glowing with
the love and zeal of new converts. The church build-
ing under the efficient management of Mr. Cook, was
being rapidly prepared for the dedication appointed
for the coming spring; while the Sabbath-school was
reorganized, and other arrangements made to keep the
members in a healthful state of prosperity, both as to
numbers and spirituality.
Mrs, Winthrop was much occupied in preparations
for Paul’s contemplated journey’ and absence from
home. Indeed, she had given little thought to her
88 Lizzie Hepburn.

self or to the arrangements for supplying his place in

her home, and how she was to relieve her loneliness

when he was gone.

One evening, after all was done for her son’s com-
fort, she lay upon the sofa, absorbed in deep and
apparently painful thought. Paul came in after his
usual walk, and thinking his mother asleep, quietly
took his flute, and, seating himself on the porch,

played some soft airs with fine taste.

' ‘Tears trickled through the fingers of his mother, as
she listened, and a sense of the loneliness she was
about to experience oppressed her. -

“Paul!” she called to him, as he paused in his
music.

“ Have I disturbed you?” said Paul, laying aside his
flute, and entering the parlour.

“Oh, no! I was not asleep. I have enjoyed your
music, the more, perhaps, because I am so soon to be
deprived. of it.”

* You will be very lonely, mother?” said Paul, as he
took a low seat near the sofa, and clasped her hand in
his own.

“Very lonely, indeed, Paul. I have been so busy of
late that I have only begun to realize it. Your music
seemed to make me feel it sensibly.”

“Ts it best for you to spend the winter here alone,
mother ?”

“ Not if I can devise a better plan. I do not wish
.to keep a servant, and I prefer remaining in our own
home. There must always be ‘alight in the window,’
to attract my absent boy,” said Mrs. Winthrop, fondly.

“TI have been thinking of a plan, which, if it
Paul. 89

meets with your approval, I will endeavour to complete
at once,” said Paul.

“What is it, my son ?”

“To invite Lizzie Hepburn to spend the year with
you.”

“Lizzie Hepburn !” exclaimed Mrs. Winthrop.

“Yes, mother. She is, I think, a child of God, but
you can scarcely imagine a more unfavourable atmo-
sphere than surrounds her in her unhappy home.
Her growth in grace will be very slow if she remains
there.” ,

“Why does she never attend the meetings of the
church 4” ,

“She is never permitted to come, except to Sabbath-
school. Indeed, she is so over-worked and tired, that
I suppose she could not come, if permitted.”

“Indeed ! I did not know she was so unfortunately
situated.”

“Yes, I have been to her home, and know-that she
is subjected to harsh treatment, and she is so constantly
irritated that Iam sure she must often be grieved at
heart and discouraged.”

“T think she has a fine mind, naturally.”

“Quite so, but there -is little opportunity for its
cultivation in her present circumstances.”

“Well, even if I should decide that your plan was
the best for me, are you quite sure it is a practicable
one? Will Lizzie’s aunt consent to dispense with her
services for so long a period ?”

“There will be only one way to secure her consent,
I suppose, and that will be to pay her for Lizzie’s time.”

““T have felt much interested in Lizzie Hepburn
90 Lizzie Hepburn.

ever since J knew her, more especially since she became
a member of my class in Sabbath-school,” said Mrs.
Winthrop, thoughtfully. ‘“ Perhaps I can ‘be useful to
her now in the beginning of her Christian life, and the
task of instructing her will be a pleasant diversion to
me during the lonely days of your absence from home.
So you have my consent to secure her for me in any
way you may be able.”

““T hope you will never have reason to regret your
decision, mother. I will go to the farm in the morning,
and make the best arrangements I can with her aunt.
Ido not anticipate an easy conquest, for there seems
to be but one avenue open to her heart, and that is
through: her love of money.”

“ Are all other arrangements for your absence now
completed, Paul?” asked his mother.

“Yes, I believe so. I shall leave on Monday morn-
ing, and be in ample time to commence with the class.
Tam glad I am to spend my birthday with you before
that time.”

“Your twenty-first birthday.” said Mrs. Winthrop,
in an agitated voice.

“Yes, mother,” replied Paul, cheerfully.

“Then the time has come,” murmured his mother,
with deep emotion.

“What time, mother? The time to be a more devoted
son to my honoured mother? The time to cease from
childish things, and to gird on my armour for the
world’s broad field of battle? The time for renewed.
consecration and fresh labours for my Lord and Master?
The time to follow the clarion voice of my Captain, and
press onward, right onward in the fight ?”
Paul, QI

“Yes, my son, I trust the time has come for all
these, and that you are ready to obey its summons and
to spring to the front rank, and that you may be
accounted a soldier over whose record many may have
reason to rejoice.”

“ Pray for me, then, mother,” said Paul, tenderly. “T
can do all things through Christ which strengtheneth
me.”

“But another time has come, Paul,” resumed his
mother. “A time in which I was bidden to reveal to
you a history of yourself, of which you have been,
heretofore, entirely ignorant.”

“What can you mean, mother?” asked Paul, arrested
by the tender, yearning expression of the eyes, now
raised to his.

Mrs. Winthrop’s only reply was to place a small
velvet case in his hand. Paul opened it, and dis-
covered a miniature portrait of a young and very lovely
lady, whose features, however, were quite unknown
to him.

“That is certainly a very beautiful face, mother.
But I trust you have no designs upon my heart in
presenting me this portrait. You know my heart
must be free until my head is furnished, then ”—Paul
stopped, checked by the serious expression resting on
his mother’s face.

“That is the portrait of your mother, Paul!”

“Indeed!” exclaimed Paul, astonished at this an-
nouncement. “Time has certainly wrought wonderful
changes then, or the artist was a very unfaithful one,
for I tan see no resemblance to my mother in this
portrait.”

”
92 Lissie Hepburn,

“That is not my portrait, Paul, but that of your
own. mother.”

Paul met the earnest, tearful gaze of his mother,
with one of mute wonder; while in a voice, broken by
her emotions, she proceeded :

“Nearly twenty-five years ago, I was married to Sir
Robert Winthrop, and we removed at once to his home
in the south of England. For the next few years my
life was one of almost unalloyed happiness. My hus-
band was ever tender and considerate, and my home
certainly one of the sweetest on earth. Two children,
a son and a daughter, were given to us, and our cup of
happiness then seemed to be full. Ah, what plans we
laid for the future ! and how bright were our prospects !

‘But a malignant fever swept through that part of
the country and deprived me, in one short month, of
my husband and children. J was myself brought by
it to the very verge of the grave. I recovered very
slowly, however, and very reluctantly, for life now
seemed to me an evil and a bitter thing, and I had
no desire to have it prolonged. My heart wickedly
rebelled beneath the chastisements of my Heavenly
father. I would not hear His voice, assuring me that
what I knew not now, I should know hereafter, but I
demanded, with sinful impatience, why I should have
been thus afflicted ?

“T shunned society, shutting myself up to the
indulgence of selfish grief, refusing all consolation,
until I was plunged into the deepest darkness and
anguish of soul. Ah, if I had only then learned to
bury my sorrow, to tell it to Jesus, and then to have
gone forth to minister to the woes of others! My kind,
Pail, 93

patient Father in Heaven was preparing a work for
me, which should bring sweet healing to my wounded
spirit.

“ One evening the servant entered my lonely parlour,
and said a young woman was waiting below, who par-
ticularly requested to be admitted, as she wished to
speak with me. I suddenly resolved to see her, and
gave the order to that effect. A young and very
lovely woman. entered, who seemed to be either in
poor health, or so burdened with grief as to be scarcely
able to stand without support.

“T aroused myself at once and received her, seating
her in my own‘easy chair. A little babe was sleeping
in her arms. I took it and laid it upon my own couch,
and ministered to its suffering mother until she was
able to converse with me. Her sad story was broken
by the sobs which shook her slight frame with their
violence, and her utterance was frequently choked with
tears.

“Tt was an old story, Paul: a courtship from a
stranger, a yielding of a young, trustful heart, a mar-
riage, a short-lived happiness, and a cruel desertion.
’ The poor young girl found herself with enfeebled
health, and with a helpless babe and an aged mother
dependent on her for their support. She had heard of
my bereavement and present unhappiness, and resolved
to secure for her child a home with me, if possible.
For fondly as she loved her babe, she could not bear
to subject him to poverty.

“JT bent over the child and kissed it fondly. ‘Can
you take my boy and love him as you leved those who
are slexping in yonder church-yard?’ she demanded,
94 Lizeie Hepburn.

with a searching gaze into my face. Oh, how readily
I promised ! for my heart was hungry for the sweet,
clinging love of a child. I confessed in that hour
to my poor, young sister, how grieved and ashamed I
was that I had given indulgence so long to my sorrow,
when my afflictions seemed now so light, compared
with hers. I offered to share my home with her, and
to share with her the care of her mother and: her child.
But this she firmly refused.

“ Your mother then gave me this portrait and said,
‘Give this to my son when he has reached his twenty-
first birthday, and then tell him all. And tell him,
she added, with deep earnestness, ‘that there is no
stain upon his name or upon mine !’

“She took the little babe in her arms for the last
time, and oh, Paul, her sorrow was fearful! I can
never forget it. Her hot tears and impassioned kisses
aroused the little sleeper, who smiled in her face. She
could bear no more. Placing the child in my arms, she
rushed from the room and from the house. I never
saw her again.

“ A few weeks later I learned that a young woman,
with her mother, had taken passage for America. I
supposed it was my poor, unknown friend, as she
would doubtless think better opportunities would be
afforded her there for the support of her mother and
herself. I sought for her diligently, in order to assist
her to the extent of my power, but I never discovered
a trace of her from that time.

“And so you became my son, my idolized son, the

precious solace of my saddened heart and desolated
home. For your dear sake, I disposed of my property
Paul, 95

and removed to a more healthful part of England. A
selfish fear began to haunt me, as you grew older, that
some one might reveal to you the secret of your birth,
and that, if you learned the fact that you were not
truly my son, I should he deprived of a moiety of the
. love which I coveted so eagerly. It was this fear that
prompted me to remove, first to Scotland and then to
America, although in coming here, I was convinced a
nobler field could be found for the development of your
manhood.

“The time has come now, when I promised your
mother that I would reveal to you the history of your
birth, and give you the portrait, her only legacy for
her boy. I acknowledge that it has cost me a painful
strugele to overcome my selfish fears, and even to ap-
pear to resign the sweet place and name of mother to
my boy. Paul, have I redeemed the promise I made
your mother? Have I loved you and cared for you
as for my own? Must I now lose aught of the love
I prize so highly, the love of my son?” The weakness
of the clinging, tender heart of a woman, made her
voice tremble and her eyes fill, as she closed with these
questions.

“T have never known any other mother,” replied
Paul, with strong emotion. “I could not have been
more tenderly loved, more nobly cared for, more gene-
rously educated, or more wisely trained. And while
this portrait and its sad history will ever remind me
of one with whom my being has once been linked, and
will henceforth become most sacred and precious to
me, how can I fail to revere and tenderly love, even
as I now do, my dear, dear mother?”

>
96 Lissie Hepburn.

A long, silent embrace gave token how deeply the
nature of both mother and son had been moved by
this revelation of their relation to each other, and
which must henceforth remain concealed within their
own hearts. There was an unusual tenderness in the
evening prayer that night, and then Paul quietly retired
to his own room. He sat for a long time with his face
bent over the portrait, recalling its strange, sad history,
with which his own was so blended. He tried to
imagine what might have been the sufferings and after-
fate of the being whom he now knew for the first time
as his mother. At times he would resolve to go forth

into the world, which had been so cruel to her, and
endeavour to find some trace of her, so that, if living,
he might even now he a.solace to her.

But he did a wiser thing at that solemn hour of
midnight. He gave himself anew to God, and resolved
to prepare himself for a life-long warfare against sin.
Especially would he drag to the light and expose to
the truth that form of sin which had wrecked the
happiness of his mother, and was strewing its pathway
with other innocent victims.
.

CHAPTER XI.
AN OLD ACQUAINTANCE.

ing morning, and found Mrs. Hepburn alone.
| Helen was out attending to the sheep, and
Lizzie had been sent to town to make some purchases
for the family. Not at all daunted by the ungracious
reply to his cheerful greeting, Paul entered the house,
helped himself to a chair, and entered into a pleasant
conversation. The secret power of “ wise talking” he
perfectly understood, and by it he endeavoured to
prepare the way for the successful announcement of
his errand.

“T am about to leave home,” he said, at length, “and
shall be absent probably for nearly a year.”

No reply was vouchsafed to this remark, which was
received with perfect indifference.

“T came this morning, charged with an errand from
my mother,” continued Paul. “She has conceived a



‘great affection for your niece, Miss Lizzie, since she has

been a member of her Sabbath-school class. She re-
quests that you will allow her to spend the year with
her, as she will be quite alone after I am gone.”

H
08 Lisste Hepburn.

“She shan’t go a step !” burst forth from Mrs. Hep-
burn’s lips, an ominous frown gathering upon her
brow. “ Lizzie can’t be spared from the farm. Besides,
I'll not have notions put into her head, making her too
grand to work. Lizzie’s proud enough now! I’ve had
the trouble and expense of her all along, and now that
she can be of some use, I mean to get out of her a little
of what she’s cost me before she goes anywhere !”

“ But, madam,” replied Paul, whom this speech had
made more determined, if possible, to remove Lizzie
from such a home, “I will pay you liberally for Miss
Lizzie’s time. I must secure some one to remain with
my mother while I am absent who will be agreeable to
her. And, as she has quite set her heart on Miss Lizzie,
I am willing to pay you more than her work upon the
farm can be worth to you, providing you consent to her
remaining until my return undisturbed with my
mother.”

“You begin to talk sense now!” said Mrs. Hep-
burn, showing some signs of yielding. “ How much
do you think she is worth? What’ll you pay ?”

“One hundred dollars in quarterly payments, pro-
vided that you do not call her home until the close of
the year,” said Paul.

“ Aoreed !” exclaimed the woman, with eager satis-
faction, for she comprehended at once that the bargain
was an advantageous one for her. ‘ But,” she added,
“T shall expect you to clothe her beside. She'll not
require much. Your mother’s cast-off clothes ‘ll be
good enough for her.”

“T presume my mother will be quite willing to
attend to her clothing,” replied Paul, ‘“ Miss Lizzie
An Old Acquaintance. So

had better come early on Monday mornirg, for I shall
most likely leave then.”

Paul took his leave and walked rapidly homewards,
feeling quite satisfied with the arrangements he had
made for his mother. As he reached the top of the
hill, near the farm-house, he was surprised to see Lizzie
seated upon the ground, partially supporting the head
of a man, who had evidently been thrown from a horse
that was grazing close by. Paul Hastened to her
assistance. :

“What has happened, Miss Lizzie?” he asked.

“This young man has been seriously injured, I fear,
Mr. Paul. He was riding a short distance before me, when
his horse suddenly stumbled and fell, and the man was
thrown violently to the ground. His head struck this
stone, and he was quite unconscious when I came to
him. I was just wondering what I could do, when I
saw you coming up the hill.”

. Paul caught up Lizzie’s pail, which contained her
morning purchases, and, emptying the packages upon
the ground, he hastened to a spring close by, and
brought some water. He then loosened the clothing
from about the neck of the young man, and, with his
handkexchief bathed his face and head with the cold
water.

As the dust and blood were washed away, and the
hair pushed from the forehead, revealing more dis-
tinetly the features of the insensible young man, Lizzie
gave a sudden start, scanned the ‘face with eager
interest, her face flushing, then becoming quite pale
with the agitation she could not conceal. Paul in-
stantly relieved her from her painful position, and
100 Lissie Hepburit.

passed his own strong arm beneath the wounded head,
continuing the application of the water.

After a short time he began to revive. _ He opened his
eyes, gazed wildly about a moment, and closed them again
with a groan, as if in extreme pain. Lizzie removed
on one side, away from his gaze, with an expression
upon her face which both surprised and puzzled Paul.

“Ts he intoxicated, do you think, Miss Lizzie?”

“No, I do not think so, Mr. Paul,” replied Lizzie,
but not offering to assist in the care of the injured man.

“We must delay no longer, Miss Lizzie,” he said,
after listening anxiously to the broken breathing of the
young man. “This is a serious injury, I fear. A
longer delay might prove extremely dangerous. Are
you able to support his head again, and continue this
bathing, while I secure shelter and help for him ?”

“Oh, Mr. Paul,” exclaimed Lizzie, shrinking back,
“let me go for help: I will return very quickly.”

“No, Miss Lizzie,” replied Paul, firmly. “I can
find aid more speedily than you can, and it will be
better for you to remain here.”

Lizzie resumed her position as nurse, although Paul
observed that it was with some reluctance.

“T do not like to leave you alone,” he said, gently.
“T shall be gone but a short time, I assure you. Raise
your heart to Jesus, and do this for His dear sake,” he
added, as he walked rapidly towards town.

How Lizzie dreaded as Paul, to go to the village, left
her alone with the stranger, lest the young man should
open his eyes, and recognise her as she had him! For
there could be no mistake. That cold, handsome face
and curling lip had been indelibly impressed upon her
An Old Acquaintance. I0l

memory. She had not forgotten the words, “I tell
you there is no God! no heaven! no Jesus!” THe was
Carl!

Lizzie hoped, indeed, that, as years had wrought so
many changes with her, if he should open his eyes
again, she would be to him as a stranger, and that
her name had long since passed from his memory.
Still, she was inexpressibly relieved to see Paul ro-
turning.

The nearest house to the scene of this adventure was
that of Father Pomroy. Accordingly, Paul, realizing
the great need of haste in his efforts for the wounded
man, went direct thither, well assured that it would open
wide to such a call. He represented the dangerous con-
. dition of the wounded stranger, and secured a cordial
~ permission to remove him there, Miss Jessie promising
to prepare a bed for him in the parlour, and volunteer-
ing good care and nursing until he could be removed
elsewhere.

Paul, having procured a light, easy waggon, placed a
bed in it and returned, accompanied by a strong man
to assist him. He found Lizzie in the same position in
which he had left her, and faithfully applying the cold
water to the head of the sufferer, who was now moan-
ing as if in great distress.

“You have done bravely,” he whispered, bending
over her. “I thank you for the services you have
rendered to me and to this stranger.”

Carl was lifted gently, carried to the waggon, and
placed carefully upon the bed.

“Good-bye, Miss Lizzie!” said Paul, extending his
hand. “Tam to take him to Father Pomroy’s, who
102 ; Lissie Hepburn.

has gone for a physician. Miss Jessie offers every
attention.” ;

“Oh, is he to be taken there? I am so sorry!”
exclaimed Lizzie, involuntarily.

Paul was amazed at her words and manner, but
made no reply. He drove slowly away, leading the
horse of the wounded man after him.

Lizzie gathered her bundles together, and proceeded
homeward with a heavy heart. A chill of some great
dread was upon her, and made her shiver with appre-
hensions of evil from this unwelcome recognition of an
old acquaintance. She thought she might easily avoid
meeting him again, if she remained quietly at the farm.
But she feared, yet could hardly tell why, lest evil
might come to the home of dear old Father Pomroy,
by the introduction of this attractive stranger to their
sympathies and. hospitalities.
CHAPTER XII.

THE PEACEFUL FOLD.

HAT in the name of sense has kept you so

long, Liz?” was the greeting Lizzie re-
be4} ceived as she entered the door of the farm
kitchen and deposited her bundles upon the table.

“T was unexpectedly delayed,” Lizzie replied, apply-
ing herself at once to the appointed tasks of the day.

“Well, P’'m tired to death of your lazy, good-for-
nothing ways,” replied Mrs. Hepburn. “I thought
you would be of more account to do the errands, perhaps,
but you are no good for even that.”

Lizzie made no reply to this, although her cheeks
burned under the unjust accusation.

“The fact is,” resumed Mrs. Hepburn, “I’ve con-
cluded to put you out to service for the next year.”

Lizzie, who felt that any change would be a welcome
one to her, made no objection.

“Of course, your wages will be paid to me, and you
ace to be fed and clothed in the bargain.”

“Tf Lizzie’s going to be a servant,” said James, “she'd
better begin to learn her trade at home, I should judge.


104 Lisste Hepburi.

“Servants are not generally allowed to cat with their
betters.”

“J do not often cat with my betters at home!”
retorted Lizzie.

“ Tndeed, miss!” was the angry retort. “Thanks,
yowre not the judge of that! We're too good to be
eating humble pie all our days to get a smile from
the stuck-ups in town.”

“T do not choose to hear my friends spoken of in
this manner, James,” said Lizzie.

“Help yourself, if you can! J’ talk as I please
about ‘your friends.’ Too fine and stuck-up to speak
to a feller that don’t happen to wear a dress coat and a
spruce hat!”

“Ts no such thing, James! If you went with
decent company, yowd know better than to talk so!”

“My company’s decent as your's, miss !” said James,
coming towards her angrily. Lizzie was trembling
violently with passion, but wisely forbore any further
reply

“ Aren't you a pretty Christian?” broke in the voice
of her aunt, pointing derisively to her glowing cheeks
and cyes. ‘‘Setting yourself up for being better than
other people, yet here you are as mad asa March hare !”

“ James is enough to provoke a saint, Aunt Jane!”

“Specially Saint Lizzie !” said James, with a laugh.

“This all comes of that Sunday-school!” said Mrs.
Hepburn. “Tdon’t believe I could have made as good
a bargain as I did, by twenty-five dollars, if Paul Win-
throp had seen you in one of your tantrums.”

“Paul Winthrop !”’ exclaimed Lizzie.

* Yes; I’ve hired you to his mother for a year ;” and
The Peaceful Fold. 105

Mrs. Hepburn’s hard eyes w vratched the effect of this
announcement upon Lizzie.

“She’s proud enough!” exclaimed James. “ She'll
teach you to keep your place, miss!”

“For how long a time did you say, Aunt Jane?”
asked Lizzie, turning her eyes away.

“A year,” replied her aunt. “I did not care for
this winter much, for I never meant you should
waste any more time in school, and you'd never carn
your board at home.”

“ What did you charge for me, Aunt Jane?”

“One hundred dollars! More by half than you
ever brought me before,” said Mrs. Hepburn.

“ And you are to wear your dear lady’s cast-off clothes
besides,” said James, sneeringly.

“What can Mrs. Winthrop want of me, I wonder,
for a whole year?” Lizzie ventured to ask.

* Paul’s going away.”

“ When am I to go, Aunt Jane?” asked Lizzie.

“Next Monday. Young Winthrop will be off then,
and his mother wants you as soon as you can go after
that,” said Mrs. Hepburn, who little suspected the secret
joy that was in Lizzie’s mind.

“Can I not repair my glothes a Diss first, Aunt Jane?”

“No,” replied her aunt, shortly ; “your rig is good
enough. . You shall waste no time fussing here.”

Lizzie’s sensitive pride was wounded by being forced
to appear before her friend in her unsuitable attire.
But the joyful prospect of a whole year with her beloved
Sabbath-school teacher soothed her under this and
various other vexations, which she was forced to un-
dergo that intervening week,
106 Ligsie Hepburn.

On the following Monday, therefore, Lizzie, with a
small bundle of clothing in her hand, left her aunt’s
house, uncheered by a single blessing or word of Iove.
She had been often ill-tempered and miserable since the
day when, upon the green prairie, she had given her
heart to God, and she could not but acknowledge that
the reproaches of her aunt, unfeeling as they were, had
been founded upon some justice and truth. She knew
that the stormy temper, by which she had been so often
overcome, was in direct opposition to the teachings and
example of Him “who, when He was reviled, reviled
not again.” But how was she to help it?

Always over-burdened, she was dismayed and dis-
heartened at the very outset of her pilgrimage. But
the Good Shepherd, who will not suffer us to be
tempted above that we are able to bear, but will, with
the temptation, open a way of escape, was leading this
weary one to a peaceful fold, to be soothed, guided, and
taught of Him, that from thence she might go forth with

armour bright to meet the future conflicts of her life.

‘Lizzie met a cordial welcome from Mrs. Winthrop,
who comprehended at once the painfully embarrassing
circumstances in which she was placed. With the
delicate tact of a Christian lady, she sought to make
her feel at ease, avoiding all unnecessary questions.
With music, and some fine engravings and books, she
entertained her until evening. Before retiring to rest
Mrs. Winthrop remarked, “‘ We shall be very happy, I
hope, my dear, during the year we are to spend together.
[ have been employing myself in filling up your time
with work, for I expect to keep you very busy,” she
added, with a kind smile,


u




















The Peaceful Fold. 107

“Tl work hard for you, Mrs. Winthrop,” said Lizzie,
impulsively.

“We shall rise carly, you and I, and after the work
of the morning is done I shall wish you to read aloud
to me while I sew.”

“T shall enjoy that very much indeed,” said Lizzie.

“T have chosen a course of history for our reading
at present, because I consider a knowledge of past
events very essential to our forming correct views of
life.”

“Tam fond of reading,” Lizzie replied, “and shall
try to like the books you select. But I have always
considered history as very dry and uninteresting.”

“On the contrary, I am sure you will soon consider
history very interesting. But we will finish the details
of my plan, and see if you are pleased with it. After
the reading has been continued for one hour I wish you
to commence a course of study.”

“A course of study!” exclaimed Lizzie, her face
shining with delight. “Am I really to study ?”

“Yes, my dear,” said Mrs. Winthrop, pleased with
Lizzie’s ready acquiescence with her wishes. ~

“You are so kind, so very kind, Mrs. Winthrop,”
was all Lizzie could say, as she found the darling desire
of her heart, an education, within her reach.

“A portion of our time we will spend with our
sewing. To become expert and tasteful in the use of
the needle will always be serviceable. Our evenings
we will devote to music. You must develop the taste
you have for music, my dear, for this will add to your
usefulness as well as happiness.”

Lizzie could find no words to express her surprise
108 Lisste Hepburn.

and delight. But Mrs. Winthrop could read it all in
the young face before her.

After the evening prayer together, Mrs. Winthrop
conducted Lizzie to her own room, and bade her an
affectionate good night. The little bedroom was fur-
nished with neatness and tastefulness, and Lizzie
observed with what a loving care every arrangement
had been made for her convenience and happiness.
Oh, how rested she was already! As she fell upon
her knees to pour out her full heart in prayer, she
seemed to be nearer the Saviour in that quict, well-
ordered room than she had ever been in her cheerless
home at the farm.

Lizzie awakened early the next morning, bub on de-
scending she found Mrs. Winthrop already in the kitchen.

“ Let me prepare the breakfast, Mrs. Winthrop,” she
said. “Iam accustomed to work, you know.”

“So am I, my dear,” replied Mrs. Winthrop. “TI
am fond of work, too, and we shall both enjoy it better
while doing it together. There really is no drudgery
in woman’s work if it is assumed cheerfully and per-
formed faithfully, although it is sometimes described
as the weary treading of a mill. Indeed, I often think
a kitchen is a fine place in which to honour Christ. If
we prepare the meals or wash the dishes, believing that
these are the duties of the present hour, and perform
them to the best of our ability with cheerful activity,
we honour Him, because it is by His wise Providence
that we have been assigned to this place and to these
homely duties.”

Lizzie sighed softly. She remembered, with self
reproach, that she had failed to honour Christ, while
The Peaceful Fold. 109

struggling under the burdens and discharging the un-
welcome labours of the farm.

Mrs. Winthrop, who observed her sadness, continued
cheerfully, “Now, you and I, Lizzie, both love our
Saviour, and we will strive to honour Him in every way
and in every place ; in the kitchen and parlour, as well
as in the church.”

Mrs. Winthrop was an accomplished cook and an
excellent manager. She soon observed that, in these
essentials, Lizzie was quite deficient. The drudgery of
work Lizzie thoroughly understood, having learned it
by a hard experience at the farm. But the orderly and
economical arrangement of time and labour, by which
it could be despatched quietly and with greater ease,
was an art she was to learn from her accomplished
teacher.

Sewing was Lizzic’s particular aversion. She had

been compelled to make many of the coarser articles of
clothing at the farm ; but it was always an unwelcome
task, more reluctantly performed than any other de-
manded of her. Mrs. Winthrop prepared a suitable
wardrobe for her, but required her to cut, fit, and make
her clothing herself, under her own direction, however,
accepting only perfection in this branch of her educa-
tion. This frequently put the patience and love of
both teacher and pupil to a severe test.
_ But the important principles so often inculeated by
the counsels, and impressed by the example, of Mrs.
Winthrop, gradually became. a rule of life with Lizzie,
aiding her greatly, not only in her studies, in which
she took extreme delight, but in the performance of
duties for which she had a natural dislike,
t16 Lizzie Hepburn.

“Tn everything you do, aim to honour Christ,” Mrs.
Winthrop would remark. “ However small and insig-
nificant the task may seem in comparison with others,
if it is your duty to do it, let it always be done for His
inspection. Present duty is all that is required for the
present hour ; but to do that well may exercise all our
faculties and all our graces.”

In a short time Lizzie felt perfectly at home, and
engaged in her course of reading and study with great
ardour. Mrs. Winthrop was surprised to discover how
bright a jewel had been hidden from view in the mind
of this long-neglected child, although she had expected
to find her capable of great improvement. It was a
great pleasure to her to answer Lizzie’s eager questions
and to direct her studies. Music became almost a
passion with her, and her progress in it was certainly
remarkable. Her warm affection for her teacher, and
grateful appreciation of her patient efforts, made her
entirely docile and obedient to her wishes; and her
own innate refinement rendered her quick to discern
the appropriateness of Mrs. Winthrop’s suggestions, and
to avail herself of them.
CHAPTER XIII.
CONFESSION.

RQGILZZIE’S religious character now developed
harmoniously. Her quiet, peaceful life was
certainly very favourable to the culture of
her religious affections, and the strengthening of her
principles of action. Mrs. Winthrop was especially
gratified with her improvement in these particulars,
while Lizzie realized how easy it might be to be always
sweet-tempered and good, if she could only live with
her excellent friend and enjoy her love and counsels,
and suffer no interruption to her present course of study
and improvement.

The communion season was approaching—a service
that Mrs. Winthrop longed to share with the dear
young girl, to whom she was becoming daily more
attached. She longed to see Lizzie confess the name
of Jesus, and enrol herself among the people of God
at this time. Accordingly she suggested the subject to
Lizzie one morning, during the hour devoted to her
instruction in sewing—an hour in which some of her
most precious instructions were given to the young girl.

“T have often thought I would like to unite with



it2 Lissie Hepburn.

the church, Mrs. Winthrop,” Lizzie replied; “but I
cannot trust myself to do so yet.”

“Tam very glad to hear you say that, Lizzic. But
are you required to trust yourself, my dear? What
was that sweet counsel the Lord gave us this morning
at the family altar?”

“ give thee the desires of thine heart.’ ‘Commit thy
way unto the Lord, trust also in Him, and He shall
bring it to, pass) And He shall bring forth thy
righteousness as the light, and thy judgment as the
noon-day.’ ”

Lizzie’s voice grew firmer as she recited the beauti-
ful verses, and felt, as she had not before, their peculiar
adaptedness to her own case.

“ But,” she said, after a short silence, “I did not
mean that I could not trust in Jesus to forgive my sins,
but that Iam afraid to unite with the church until I
aun. stronger, lest I might dishonour my profession after-
wards. I find no difficulty in controlling my temper here,
or in being obedient to you, because I love you and
believe that you love me, and will not require anything
of me but what is just and right, and adapted to make
me happy. Butwhen I return to the farm it will be so
different. . I shall find it very hard to do right there.”

* But your Saviour will never leave you to contend
with your spiritual foes alone, my dear. He not only
came to purchase for us the forgiveness of our sins, but
redemption from their power. What is the meaning of
His name, Jesus, Lizzie?”

“ ¢ He shall be called Jesus, for He shall save His
people from their sins,’” repeated Lizzie,
Coufession. 113

“Then your privilege is to trust in Him to do this
work for you, Lizzie. You say it is easy to be obedient
to me, because you love me and know that I love you,
and will require nothing of you but what is intended
and adapted to secure your happiness. Will you con-
fide more readily in me, a finite creature like yourself,
than you will in Him whose word can never fail ?”

Lizzie was silent, absorbed in thought. Mrs. Winthrop
continued : “ When you learned that I had invited you
to come and live with me, why did you come?”

“ Because I wished to come very much, and I believed
you would receive me.”

“Well, when I promised to become your teacher and
to instruct you in music, how did you feel?”

“Perfectly joyful!” exclaimed Lizzie, a glad smile
brightening her face. “I had never dreamed of any-
‘thing so good as that for me. When I went to bed that
night, my heart beat so fast for joy that it was long
before I could sleep. When I did I dreamed of you,
and my love and gratitude have been more than I could
express ever since.”

“ And yet you only had my promise then, and have
only received its fulfilment day by day ever since.
What made you so happy that night, do you think ?”

“T think it was because I believed you would do as
you promised me you would. J knew you were per-
fectly able to do it, and I believed you were willing, so
I could not very well help being happy.”

“What motive did you think I had, Lizzie, in
making these offers and promises to you?”

“T believed it was because you loved me, Mrs.
Winthrop. Still I knew no reason why you should

ee
114 Lisete Hepburn,

love me. I felt that I was an ignorant, awkward girl,
with no claim whatsoever upon your love or kindness.
and oh, Mrs. Winthrop,” said Lizzie, colouring deeply,
“you do not know how ashamed I was when I came
here that morning in my patched, faded calico dress,
coarse sh@es, and great shaker bonnet.”

“ And why were you ashamed, my dear?”

“ Because I seemed so out of order every way with
everything in your beautiful home. But I knew, if I
came at all, I must come just as Twas. I shall never
forget your kind welcome that morning. I saw that
you had set your love upon me notwithstanding my
unworthiness, and this made me willing and grateful
to be clothed in the garments you had so generously
provided for me before I came.”

“ And then, did you begin to distress yourself, lest I
should in a few days command you to lay off those
garments, and to resume the unsuitable clothing again ?”
asked Mas. Winthrop, smiling.

“Qh, no! I never thought of such a thing!” ex-
claimed Lizzie. -

“Well, now, my dear, you will readily comprehend
the lesson I wish you to learn. You have come to
Jesus in some sense as you came to me, feeling that
you were very unworthy, very ignorant, and very
unhappy, and without the least claim upon His love
and kindness. You came, simply because He bade
you come, and because you believed His word, ‘ Who-
soever cometh unto Me, I will in no wise cast out.’
You believed Him to be able and willing to perform
this gracious promise to you. You came just as you
were, in all your sins, although you realized that you
Confesston. 115

were out of harmony with every other thing connected
with your Saviour, because you knew that you must
come as you were, or not come at all.

“Jesus met and welcomed you most lovingly, and
gave you His sweet peace to make you feel at home
with Him. There were no reproaches, nd reproofs.
He removed your loathsome sins from His sight for
ever. And He clothed you in the spotless robe of His
righteousness, which was prepared for you before you
came to Him. And to allay your fears of ever laying
aside this beautiful robe, He says, ‘My grace is sufficient
for thee.’ Lizzie, will you not accept these gracious
provisions and rejoice in God your Saviour? Will you
not give Him the loving obedience of your life? If you
find it easy to obey me because you love me, and believe
that I love you, will it be so very hard to love and obey
Him who has loved you with an everlasting love?”

Tears were dropping softly from Lizzie’s eyes. “Do
you mean that I shall never sin again?” she asked, ina
low, yearning tone.

“Would you wilfully do anything to displease and
grieve me, Lizzie? And if you had done. so under
strong temptation, would you persist in the act, after
you knew it was wrong?”

“Qh, no! I cannot think that I should ever become
so base and ungrateful!” exclaimed Lizzic.

“ Well, is there any sin that you love so much that
you will continue to indulge in it, after you know it is
displeasing to your Saviour, and that grieves the Spirit,
thwarting His gracious designs for you?”

“No, Mrs. Winthrop,” said Lizzie, firmly, “there is
not. I hate my sins, and as fast as I discover them, I
116 Lissie Hepburn.

turn away from them, and try not to indulge them.
But I have a quick and violent temper, and when it is
aroused, my heart seems full of bitterness, and my
tongue only too ready to give vent to it in wicked
words, I feel helpless before it, for however agonizing
my penitence over this sin, I can never trust myself,
but that I shall fall again with the very next provoca-
tion. And this isnotall, When Iam under the power
of this sin, I become selfish, vindictive, and rebellious,
not only against my aunt, but even against my God.”

“Sin is, indeed, an evil and a bitter thing, Lizzie,
else it would not have required so tremendous a sacrifice

- for its atonement as the only and Divine Son of God.
Sin is a tree whose firm, strong roots are perfectly
indigenous to the soil of our hearts, while the sweet
plants of grace are tender exotics, requiring the most
constant and careful culture to make them thrive. The
Christian life is a warfare, because the life of faith is
directly opposed to the life of self. Indeed, we have
great reason to fear that there is no vitality if there is
no warfare. If faith is not a purifying principle within
us, always contending against our sinful propensities
‘and selfish desires, our first great and solemn work
should be to examine ourselves, and see if we arc not
spiritually dead.”

“What shall I do, then, Mrs. Winthrop? I hate
my sins, and am overcome by them.”

“Tf you have discovered your weakness, my dear,
you have learned a very important truth,” said Mrs.
Winthrop, cheerfully. “ But there is a most excellent
and trusty armour provided for just such helpless ones

--as you and J, in this terrible conflict—the ‘girdle of
Confession. 117

truth ’—God’s truth, Lizzie, unchangeable as Himself ;
‘the breast-plate of righteousness ’—the righteousness
of Christ, remember, not our own, which can never
protect us from the assaults of our foes; ‘the sword of
the Spirit which is the word of God’—a noble weapon,
Lizzie, which you should ever have about you, ready
for instant service; ‘above all, the shield of faith
wherewith we are able to quench all the fiery darts
of the wicked ’—faith, unwavering faith in the Captain
of our salvation, who, having begun His work within
us, will complete and perfect it. Now, Lizzie, while I
believe that neither you nor I would indulge in known
sins, there are corruptions remaining within us that we
must fight until we are brought off conquerors, and more
than conquerors, through Him who has loved us. We
will be subject to temptations which will require us to
be always upon our watch-tower. ‘Watch and pray,
lest ye enter into temptation,’ is the warning Jesus has
left-us. “Our only safeguard is to be ‘looking unto
Jesus, who is the Author and Finisher of our faith.’ ”

“But why has the divine life been made so difficult ?” -
asked Lizzie, in a hesitating manner, fearing that her
question might not sound quite reverent.

“Because our Father in heaven loved us, Lizzie.
Suppose, when you came to live with me, I had sur-
rounded you with every luxury, pampered you with
every indulgence, clothed you in the costliest raiment,
and then required nothing of you but to enjoy yourself.
To eat, sleep, and be merry, while I assumed every
burden, and shielded you from every annoyance and
vexation. What would you have thought of my love?”

“T should have thought it very unwise, Mrs, Win-
118 Lizzie Hepburn.

throp, for I should not only have become more selfish
and indolent, but weak in body and in mind. Indeed,
however pleasant this might have seemed at first, I
should not have enjoyed it long, for life would soon
have become a burden, if I was forced to spend it in
this manner.”

“So in perfect wisdom and love has our heavenly
Father arranged our pilgrimage here, Lizzie. He calls
us to action to meet and overcome severe temptations ;
He subjects us to fiery trials. Scarcely are we brought
off through His grace victors from one struggle, before
we are plunged into another, perhaps even more severe.
If, breathless and weary, we would rest in some inviting
but forbidden spot, we are instantly assailed by our
restless enemies, and compelled to renew the conflict.
If our hearts begin to cling to some idolized object that
may attract us from him and from our heavenly inherit-
ance, thorns are placed in it to wound us deeply, or it
is snatched from us altogether. Now all this, Lizzie, is
not joyous but grievous to the natural man; but if we
become vigorous and healthful Christians, we shall owe
it to this salutary discipline of our heavenly Father.
Still, while we are thus tempted and tried on every
side, our inward peace becomes very precious and en-
during. Not one of the true disciples of Jesus is
willing to turn back or to yield the contest, or lose the
sweet joys which crown each new victory.”

“No, Mrs. Winthrop,” said Lizzie, in a decided tone ;
“weak and helpless as I feel, and however ashamed of
my frequent falls, I have never wished to turn back,
or to cease trying. I should shudder if I thought any
temptation would make me willing to return to the
Confession. 119

condition I was in only a short time ago. But it is
right to avoid every known temptation, is it not?”

Unquestionably, when you can do so consistently
with the duties you owe to others. These may often
lead you into known temptations, but you are never
required to meet them alone, or unarmed. You may
encounter temptations boldly, if you are strong in faith,
before which apparent mountains of difficulties are

- removed and cast into the sea.”

“And is that all I have to do, Mrs. Winthrop,
simply to exercise faith ?”

“‘ Apparently a very simple thing to do, my dear, but
you will find it a most difficult life to live. Theorizing
is easy, but the actual working out of theories until
they become fixed facts, is, indeed, a tremendous task,
beset with many difficulties. This is especially true of
the life of faith.”

_ “There are some aids to a spiritual life that I have
found very valuable in my own experience, Lizzie ; they
may be useful to you. One, is to feed my soul daily
with some portion of the Word of God; as, for in-
stance, committing to memory for one day a verse or
verses that contain a name or office of my Redeemer,
and making this the food for my thoughts while occu-
pied with my work, or for my meditations, when I retire
to rest, or, if I am awake in the night: -season, I make the
same use of a promise, or a counsel of God. I have found
this habit helps me in restraining my roving fancies and
selfish desires, and in keeping me beneath the ‘ Shadow
of the Rock,’ where temptations lose their power.
Another habit I have found to be vital to my growth
in grace, and may be valuable to you ; it is to cause every
120 _ Lissie Hepburn.

temptation to drive you to Jesus at once. Never allow
a sinful thought or act to remain a moment unconfessed.
Go with it at once to Jesus, the Fount where only you
can be cleansed from its stain and delivered from its
power. The tempter may suggest that you should wait
until your passion cools, or the power of the sin over
you be a little broken, before you come to Jesus with
it. This would be like one struggling with a deadly
disease, but neglecting to send for a physician until he
can discover some favourable symptom, or is in a better
condition to insure his recovery.

“ Now, my dear,” said Mrs. Winthrop, rising, and
folding her work to replace it in the basket, “I wish
you to consider what I have said to you, and decide if
you are ready to confess Christ before men, and if you
are willing to trust Him to ‘keep that which you have
committed to Him against that day.” And may you
be led to make a wise decision, one which you will
never regret.”

She left Lizzie alone until the tea-hour, engaged in
the deepest thought and earnest prayer. She met her
friend at the tea-table with a quiet peace upon her face,
which assured Mrs. Winthrop that all was well with her.
Lizzie had, indeed, renewed her vows before God in secret,
and surrendered more fully her helpless and ignorant
soul into His hands, to be moulded and trained for His
service, and made meet for His inheritance.

The following Sabbath, Lizzie stood up with several
others, and took upon herself her solemn vows in the
assembly of God’s people, vows made on earth, but
ratified in heaven.
CHAPTER XIV.
THE ENEMY.

qiIi Church in Monona had been greatly
strengthened and somewhat enlarged during
this winter, although not favoured with any
special outpouring of the Spirit, such as had marked
the summer. The healthful spirit of work which had
animated both pastor and people, produced its usual
happy effects in the steady growth of love and faith
among the converts, both old and young. The church
edifice was nearing its completion, and promised to be
ready by the beginning of summer for its solemn dedi-
cation to the service of God.

But the great spirit of Evil, that arch-foe of God and
His Church, was not at all disposed to yield the field
to the victorious disciples of Christ. He stirred up
his followers to the most persistent and malicious
efforts in his cause. Indeed, there had never been a
time in the history of the settlement when the votaries
of gambling and drinking had been more active or suc-
cessful in enticing their victims, especially from among
the young, into their haunts of vice.

The warfare, however, for some time, seemed evenly



122 Lizzie Hepburn.

drawn. The Church of God was also upon the alert,
and the prayers of His people encircled the town like a
wall of fire, while in all ways and in all eeasons, deadly
assaults were made upon the strong works of the foe,
shaking them to their very foundations. But Satan is
ever more successful in his covert attacks upon the
Church and upon individual Christians, than in his
open advances. It is the wolf which enters the fold in
sheep’s clothing that bites and devours; the villain
who “steals the livery of Heaven to serve the devil
in,” whose attacks are most to be dreaded. Evil was
preparing for the Church in Monona that would
seriously affect its ftiture peace and prosperity ; but
it came from a source whence it was wholly unex-
pected.

Paul, like the good Samaritan, had borne the
wounded and insensible stranger to the house of
Father Pomroy, which had hospitably opened for his
reception. A neat bed had been prepared in the quiet
parlour. Carl was laid gently upon it, and every
arrangement was made for his comfort. The physician
soon arrived, and made an examination of his injuries.
As Paul had feared, the brain had received a severe
shock, and the effect might prove fatal. The most
perfect quiet and careful nursing might, with the ad-
vantage of youth and a vigorous constitution, secure his
recovery. As it was impossible to remove the patient
at present, Jessie Pomroy cheerfully assumed the extra
care and labour involved in nursing the unfortunate
stranger.

Paul, who regretted that his absence from home
would prevent him from assisting in the care of the
The Enenty. 123

young man, interested Mr. Hartwell and Mr. Cook and
his mother in the case; and they all promised to aid
Miss Jessie in every possible way, until he should be
restored to health.

A long and dangerous illness followed. The uncon-
scious Carl raved wildly in the delirium of the fever,
sometimes shrieking as in mortal agony ; then raising
both hands, he would loudly call for father, mother, and
Katrine, until his weakened voice would be lost in
childish moans and sobs. After a time the hallucina-
tion seemed to possess his mind that he was once more
in his own home, and that those who so kindly minis-
tered to him were none other than his own parents and
his young sister.

He would call them “ Father,” “ Mother,” and “Sister
Kate,” who he declared had grown almost beyond his
recollection. Then he would talk wildly in English to
them of many things, all new and strange to their ears ;

-then, as if suddenly recollecting himself, he would

stop, and, with winning smiles, converse in German, of
which they understood not one word. Then he would
piteously reproach them, declaring that they looked
coldly upon him, and did not love him as they once
had.

The hearts of the good old people were strangely
drawn to the handsome young German, and they
learned to soothe him with tender words and caresses,
as if he had indeed been their own son. Even Jessie
would cheerfully answer to the call for “ Sister Kate,”
as with neat, nimble fingers she arranged his room with
a nice regard to the comfort of an invalid, smoothing
his pillows, and arranging the curtains to admit the
i24 Lisste Hepburn.

sunlight, as he was able to bear it; or prepared his
food to suit the delicate and changeful appetite.

The fever subsided at last, and he sank into a stupor,
from which he awakened not to death, as all feared,
but to life. Slowly the truth began to dawn upon his
mind, and then he knew that he was very sick, that he
had been even at death’s door, and that to the kind
care of this aged couple and their bright, pretty
daughter, he owed the life, now slowly returning to
his feeble limbs. Yet hardly had he recovered the
control of his mind ere the plans were formed, which,
maturing as circumstances became favourable, were des-
tined to wound most deeply the hearts of those who
had so long and so tenderly cared for him when sick
and wounded, and whom, although a stranger, they had
received beneath their roof.

To Father Pomroy and his wife, Carl seemed the
embodiment of perfection. He employed the long
hours of his convalescence, while Jessie would be occu-
pied with her household affairs, in entertaining them
with incidents of his extensive travels, or with interest-
ing facts drawn from his varied stores of knowledge.
His manner evinced the most winning reverence for old
age, and his voice was ever gentle ; and this made his
conversation extremely agreeable to the aged couple,
who, ‘like most old people, were easily touched by
respectful deference from the young.

He begged to be still permitted to address them as
father and mother, telling them of his home in the
German fatherland, where his parents had long watched
for his return. It was impossible to resist this appeal,
and, long before he left their roof, he seemed as a son
The Lueny. 12

tre

to them, almost as dear as the brave boys they had left
sleeping in the cemetery in their former home.

On one subject alone, Carl remained entirely reti-
cent. This ‘was the subject of religion. Quiet and
respectful always, when the Word was read in his sick-
room and prayer offered, he would even join his own
rich voice with Jessie’s in the morning or evening
hymn of praise. But he dexterously and successfully
avoided the repeated efforts of Father Pomroy or of
Mr. Hartwell to discover his real sentiments upon this
subject. For the present time, he concealed the unbe-
lief and hatred of the truth, which were rankling in
his heart.

Carl now no longer called Jessie by the name of “Sister
Kate,” and as he dropped the endearing title, his man-
ner towards her was marked by the most respectful
reserve. Indeed, it was only by an occasional glance,
an inadvertent word, or some slight act, that to the
happy young heart of Jessie was revealed the welcome
intimation that she was beloved by the handsome
stranger who had shared her home and been the ob-
ject of her care during the past few months.

Carl proposed to devote some of the weary hours of
his convalescence to the instruction of Miss Jessie in
music. Father Pomroy consented to this, doubting in
his fond heart, however, whether it was possible to
improve the charming voice of his “ home-bird ” by any
amount of culture. An instrument was procured and
lessons given, and Jessie’s advancement became most
gratifying to her teacher and her friends. She was

soon qualified to preside at the organ and to lead the
church choir.
126 Lissie [Tepburin,

The first day that Carl was able to endure the walk,
he accompanied the family to church, and attended with
apparent interest upon the services of the day. Lizzie
was surprised when she saw him enter the house of
God, but she made no comment upon it. She believed
that he had not recognised her, and she was careful not
to reveal to any one her previous acquaintance with
the German stranger, hoping to remain unknown to
him. She had frequently been sent by Mrs. Winthrop
with savoury dishes for the invalid; but they were
always entrusted to Miss Jessic, and her refusal to enter
the sick-room seemed only natural.

Soon after this, Carl became so far restored that he
left the house of his kind benefactor and secured lodg-
ings in the village. He repaid with generosity the
actual expenditures of his long illness, and expressed _
his thanks for the care and attention which he had
received in the most delicate and pleasing manner. He
now devoted himself with great assiduity to literary
pursuits and the cultivation of music, in which he espe-
cially excelled, performing skilfully upon several in-
struments.

He organized a band of amateur musicians, whom he
trained so successfully that their performances soon
gave welcome entertainment for the long winter evenings
to the citizens, who eagerly threw open their houses to
receive them. He frequently assisted Miss Jessie in
the choir, and finally accepted the leadership of it, and
the improvement was marked under his efficient tute-
lage. His attendance at church was regular, and his
conduct outwardly not worthy of especial blame. He
was even entrusted with a class of half-crown young
The Enemy. 127

men in the Sabbath-school, in accordance with theiz
request, although Mr. Hartwell felt misgivings at this
dangerous step.

In fact, Carl became extremely popular in Monona
with all classes. This was especially evident among
the young men, over whom he exercised a quict but
powerful influence. His varied accomplishments, and
the dignified courtesy of his manners, won for him a
cordial welcome in nearly every family. And thus
abundant opportunities were afforded him to sow secretly
the seeds of error in many unsuspecting hearts. Carl
was a wary foe. Not openly did he sow the tares, but
while men slept.

At first it was only a doubt aroused in the mind by
some inadvertent question; a covert sneer; a gentle
insinuation of an untruth, clouded in choice imagery
and beautiful language, of which Carl was quite a
master ; an invitation to read some work of literary
merit, in which were cunningly hidden poisoned
shafts against the truth : these were the potent agencies
by which Carl was undermining the faith of many souls
in the Church, and emboldening in eho sins many who
were without its pale.

After a time he gathered the young men of the
village into an association, which ambitiously styled
itself a “ Literary Club,” over which Carl presided, its
inspiration and controlling spirit. The members in-
cluded in their number most of the young men who
were the future hope of the Church, as well as those
who had remained unmoved by the claims of religion.
Most of these youths were possessed of quite moderate
abilities, and still more moderate culture. They were
128 Lizsie Hepburn.

fascinated by the varied and brilliant accomplishments
of their leader, and were casily won by the subtle
influence of his plausible logic. It was an easy task to
instil into such plastic minds the poison of infidelity,
and to secure the circulation among them of works of
the most dangerous character. ‘Truths which had
been received by several members of this “club”
as the voice of life to their souls, were made the
subjects of banter and ridicule, and not any were
bold enough to brave the sneers of their leader and
defend them.

At length the friends of Christ became alarmed.
Paul’s class of young men was broken up and dispersed,
declaring themselves “too old” to come to Sabbath-
school. One of the members of Carl’s class, Henry
Grant, said his teacher was an infidel, he knew, and
refused to attend with him any longer, preferring a seat
with Mr. Cook’s boys, who were much younger, than
to receive the instructions of one who was leading him
into error.

What was to be done? The pastor and the devoted
followers of Christ held many long and painful consult-
ations over this question, and prayers and tears denoted
the alarm. that was felt for the health and prosperity of
the Church. Carl maintained a faithful attendance
upon both church services and the Sabbath-school ; his
outward conduct was decorous, always dignified, and
perfectly sclf-possessed. It was hard to approach him,
and impossible to make him commit himself in any way
so that they could discover his real sentiments.

The young men, whose feet-were already fast in the
toils of the tempter, generously gathered about their
Lhe Enemy, 129

leader, and defended him from the suspicions and
attacks of his “ bigoted enemies,” as they had already
learned to style the Christians who sought to save
them, and more resoltitely refused to attend the religious
instructions they had been receiving.

Christians rallied to the rescue. Every agency which
had been hitherto employed was now used with re-
doubled diligence, and every new means adopted which
might prevent the further spread of the dreaded mis-
chief among the young. But the Church feared that it
was too late; the plague was already begun! In
despair, one good old man cried out in prayer, “Oh
Lord, either convert our enemy, or remove him out of
the way!” A prayer to be answered, in its latter
clause, but in a way that seemed to add to the grief of
the afflicted Church, for a cloud covered the mercy-seat,
which hid its gracious meaning.
CHAPTER XV.
DISAPPOINTMENT.

IIE winter and spring passed rapidly away.
Lizzie had steadily persevered in the course
of training marked out for her by Mrs. Win-

throp, and was rapidly developing in the graces of

both mind and soul, as well as in ease and polish of
manners. She was becoming cach day more endeared
to Mrs. Winthrop, and both were beginning to look
forward to the close of the summer with shrinking, for

Lizzie was then to return to the farm. The separation

took place sooner than either had expected.

One beautiful morning, in the early days of June,
‘Uncle Robert came to Rosedale. He found Lizzie in
the yard, clearing the weeds from a bed of tulips and
hyacinths which were now in full glory. Without any
introduction, Uncle Robert delivered the orders he had
received from her aunt, that Lizzie was to return imme-
diately to the farm. Poor Lizzie’s only reply was a
sudden and uncontrollable fit of weeping. Uncle Robert
looked at her helplessly for a moment, as if he would
like to comfort her if he only could; then, without
assigning any reason for this sudden change of plan, he
turned and left her without another word.


Disappointment. 131

Lizzie rushed into the house, and to her own room,
and threw herself upon her knees, and strove to pray.
She felt that she could not announce the news at once
to Mrs. Winthrop, and yet she knew not how to bear
her grief alone. Mrs. Winthrop quietly entered her
room a moment after. She had seen Uncle Robert
leaving the gate, and divined his errand, and knowing
well the grief it would bring to Lizzie, she sought her
at once. Drawing the weeping girl to herself, she
made no attempt to check her tears or to console her
until the violence of her grief had subsided.

“ God’s hand is in this, my dear,” she said, at last,
gently. “Can you not join me in saying, ‘ His will
be done’ ?”

“Oh, I am so disappointed,” Lizzie replied. “TI can
think of nothing else just now. It seems so hard!”

“Of necessity, our Father's will must be better than
ours. Try to calm yourself with the sweet assurance
that He holds your hand, even though the way is dark
in which He leads you.”

“But my studies, my music, my reading, Mrs. Win-
throp! Just as I was commencing botany, too, and
learning to know the flowers by name. All my pleasant
talks with you, and all your kind plans for me, to be
given up for—oh! I cannot tell you what for.”

“No, you cannot tell me what for, Lizzie, for you
know not yourself. Doubtless this dark path is paved
and guarded by love. Go cheerfully, even in the dark,
my dear; for His hand will unerringly guide you into
light.”

“Tt seems so strange that I must be sent back while
still so weak,” said Lizzie, despondingly.
132 Lizzie Hepburn.

“ ¢ What I do, thou knowest not now, but thou shalt
know hereafter,’ is the assurance Jesus gives to His
tried disciples.” ,

Lizzie remained silent a short time, struggling to be-
come calm; then she arose and quietly accompanied
Mrs. Winthrop to the kitchen. They prepared the
dinner together, each striving to be cheerful for the
sake of the other. After the table was cleared away,
they seated themselves to spend the afternoon with
their sewing. Lizzie was calmer, but the tears would
rush often to her eyes when she thought of what was
before her.

“ How selfish and thoughtless I have been, Mrs.
Winthrop !” she suddenly exclaimed. “ How entirely
alone you will be when I return to the farm! I
have been so absorbed in my own disappointment, that
T have just thought of that. What will youdo? Mr.
Paul will not return until October. You cannot stay
here alone, Mrs. Winthrop.”

“‘T shall miss you very much, indeed, Lizzie, for our
companionship has been very pleasant to me. The
house wiil seem very still and lonely when you are
gone out of it, my dear.”

“ But what will you do, Mrs. Winthrop ?”

“ This has come so suddenly upon me, that I hardly
know. Ihave had no time to devise plans. Something
will be provided for me, I know, that will be even
better than my own planning ; so I shall quietly wait.”

“JT wish I could learn to be quiet and wait, Mrs.
Winthrop. I cannot even think calmly about going
back to the farm. I dread the temptations and trials
that I know await me there, and I am afraid I shall
Disappointment. ° 133

fall before them. I think I have learned much about
the Christian life since I have been with you, and
understand better what it ought tobe. But I have had
nothing to try me here.”

“ Strive, my dear, to learn the. Gioia lesson
of seeking grace to live, moment by moment. You
will need not only to pray for general help through the
day, but by specific petitions you must seek grace for
each special trial you are likely to meet, and that you
may not be overwhelmed by those that are sudden and
unexpected.”

“ Tt is those suddeh trials that overwhelm me,” said
Lizzie, sadly, “ sudden, even though I ought to expect
them. I feel so perplexed and unable to meet them
without sin.”

“ Strive very earnestly to attain an inward stillness
and quietude of spirit, so that you will be able to hear
the voice of God within you, leading, guiding, and
controlling you, and giving you peace.”

“Oh, how can I, how can 1?” said Lizzie, help-
lessly. “ You do not know about James and my aunt
and ‘

“Tt is not best I should, dear,” interrupted Mrs.
Winthrop, gently. “Jesus knows it all; and if you
truly believe, and it is certainly true, Lizzie, that God’s
will, either absolutely or permissively, is in every event
of our lives, will it not help you to submit to them
cheerfully ?”

“These attainments seem so far above me, Mrs.
Winthrop. I have not yet mastered the simplest prin-
ciples of the Christian life. The more I know of my
own heart, and of the deep meaning of the command,


134 Lissie Hepburn.

‘ Be ye therefore perfect, even as your Father in heaven
is perfect,’ I become discouraged.”

“T believe your experience is quite similar, thus far,
to that of most Christians. Remember, my dear, you
are only a beginner in the way.”

“A child, a very ignorant child ; I think I do feel
that, Mrs. Winthrop,” said Lizzie, humbly.

“ Hiven those who have made the highest attainments
feel that the Model is still infinitely above them. Even
St. Paul, the greatest and the humblest of the apostles,
felt that he had not attained, but that he pressed for-
ward for ‘the prize of his high calling, forgetting the
things that were behind.’ Indeed, I do not think the
Christian will ever be satisfied with his attainments in
holiness. Eternity may find us ever rising towards, but
never able to equal the wondrous perfections of the glo-
rious Model presented tous in the verse you have quoted.”

“ What shall I do now, Mrs. Winthrop? I am so
surprised at this change in all my plans that I do not
know where to commence doing right.”

“ Walk straight forward, Lizzie, one step at a time,
as He shall give you light. What a precious thought is
hidden in this verse, ‘He leadeth me.’ Your present
duty is to obey your aunt and return to the farm.
This will, doubtless, bring trials that will aid in the
crucifixion of self. Painful as this is to nature, it is ab-
solutely essential ; for the flowers of holiness can only
spring from the dead seeds of self. You remember
those beautiful lines :—

““¢ Lead Thou me on!

Keep Thou my feet! Ido not ask to see
The distant scene; one step enough for me.’ ”
Disappointment. 135

“Oh, Mrs. Winthrop!” exclaimed Lizzie, “how I
wish I could learn to be calm and submissive as you
always are |”

“T hope you may not have to suffer so much as my
Father has found necessary for me, before He found me
willing to be led !” replied Mrs. Winthrop, tenderly.

“T did not think that you had suffered, Mrs. Win-
throp,” replied Lizzie, respectfully. “And yet I might
have known; for you have only Mr. Paul, and when
he is gone from home you are quite alone.”

“T have been afflicted in various ways, my dear, by
bereavements, by sickness, by losses, by disappointments,
and it took them all to make me willing to submit to my
Father’s will. And let me tell you, for your encour-
agement, Lizzie, the conflict is not yet over. I am not
yet delivered from this body of sin, in which I groan,
and, until I am, I shall doubtless be called to suffering.
This may not be external sorrow ; but the inward cruci-
fixion frequently requires suffering which would be
insupportable but for the grace which is ever suffi-
cient.”

“ Forgive me, Mrs. Winthrop, for my selfish repining,”
said Lizzie, rebuked by the evidences of pain. their con-
versation had caused her friend. “TI did not think I
was causing you to bring back unpleasant memories.”

“ These roughened paths are not altogether unplea-
sant memories, Lizzie,” replied Mrs. Winthrop, cheer-
fully. “ Had I not trod them, I could not sympathize
with and encourage you and others who are to tread
them in their time. And if Jesus had not ‘been
tempted and tried in all points like as we are,’ He would
not be ‘able to succour those who are tempted.’ ”
136 Lissie Hepburit.

“T thank you, oh, so much, Mrs. Winthrop, for all
you have done to help me,” said Lizzie, more cheerfully
than she had spoken since Uncle Robert left her after
his abrupt message, “I will go back to the farm in
the morning, and try to do the best I can ; and I hope
T shall learn, after a while, to make the best of my trials
there.”

“Tt will help you, dear, to remember and help those,
as far as possible, who are worse off than you are,
and Jesus will love you and help you always. Now,
as you must arrange your clothing, perhaps it had
better be done while I prepare the tea. I will send
your trunk and some books to the farm by the first
opportunity. I wish you to follow, as far as practicable,
the course of reading which I shall arrange for you, and
in our occasional visits together I can direct and assist
you, so that you need not stop your studies alto-
gether.”

“ Oh, how delightful that will be! I had not even
thought that I could read while at the farm! Thank
you for the suggestion. I can manage to secure some
time, I know.” : ;

Soon after breakfast the next morning Lizzie bade
Mrs. Winthrop quite a cheerful good-bye, and took the
familiar road that led to the farm. She was neatly and
suitably dressed, and as Mrs. Winthrop watched her
retreating figure, a glow of satisfaction warmed her -
heart, for the young girl, whom love had rendered sa
plastic in her hands, was greatly improved in person, in
mind, and in manners, from the shy, untrained and
awkward maiden who had timidly sought her roof some
ten months before,
Disappointment. 137

Lizzie had not been back to the farm since she had
left it to come to Mrs. Winthrop, and, as she walked
along with a quickened step, she began to wonder how
she should be received by her aunt and cousins, whom
she had not seen during all these months. She had
not gone more than half of the distance, when she was
startled by seeing Carl coming towards her from the
path which led to the woodland, which bordered the
prairie beyond the village. It was impossible to avoid
meeting him, and Lizzie walked on with the troubled,
conscious air of one who recognises an acquaintance,
but would fain not betray the truth by outward signs.

“Miss Lizzie Hepburn, I believe,” said Carl, stop-
ping, and politely raising his hat.

“Permit me the liberty of an old acquaintance,” he
added, offering her his hand.

Lizzie could do no less than to take it, which she did
with evident confusion. “I thought you had quite
forgotten me, Mr. Carl,” she said.

“No, Miss Lizzie, my memory serves me very well
yet,” he replied. “Time has wrought some changes
with us both, however, but you are not greatly changed
from the perplexed little girl whom I found first upon,
the steamer.”

“That seems a great while ago to me, Mr. Carl,” said
Lizzie, preparing to resume her walk.

“ As you are still at quite a distance from the farm,
Miss Lizzie, will you permit me to join you in your
walk? I shall like to talk over the past a little with
you, if you have no objections.”

Lizzie felt that she could not refuse this, so she
simply said, “ very well,” wondering how he knew that
138 Disappointment.

she was going to the farm. Then they walked :
together.

“« After I left you in New York, Miss Lizzie,” Can
commenced, “TI quite lost sight of you. I have seen a
great deal of the world since then; indeed, I have
visited nearly every place which could afford me any
entertainment, both in the old countries and in this
new and wonderful one. I was about to make a
leisurely journey through the most noted portions of
this State, when the accident occurred, by which I was
made to owe my life to you, as well as to ronew my
acquaintance with you.”

“Oh, Mr. Carl!” said Lizzie, hastily, “you do not
owe your life to me. I did very little indeed.”

“T presume I should have died then, Miss Lizzie, if
you had not found me just when you did,” said Carl,
quietly. “Iam quite willing to owe my life to you,”
he added, gallantly.

Lizzie was silent, for she felt embarrassed, and was
not quite certain what she ought to say.

“You have had a very pleasant time since you left
the farm last fall, Miss Lizzie,” Carl proceeded, appa-
rently not observing her silence.

“Yes, I have enjoyed every moment of the time,”
replied Lizzie.

‘“Mys, Winthrop is a very intelligent lady, and a
very good friend of yours.”

“The best one I ever had since mamma died,” said
Lizzie, warmly.

“It is unfortunate that you should be compelled
to return to the farm just now, Miss Lizzie. Your
life there has been very unpleasant.”
Lissie Hepburn. 139

“In some respects, yes,” said Lizzie, puzzled to
know how Carl had become so well acquainted with
her history in the past, or with her present plans.

“T cannot see why you are under any obligations to
go back to the farm and subject yourself to the annoy-
ances and insults which await you there,” he said.

“T acknowledge that it has cost me a struggle, Mr.
Carl,” replied Lizzie. “But Mrs. Winthrop has made
me see that it is best I should go.”

“By what logic has she made you see that?” asked
Carl.

“She made me feel that it was God’s will, and that
His will was better than mine,” said Lizzie, bravely,
but with a beating heart.

“Very good logic for children, Miss Lizzie. You
will soon be old enough, however, to come to a higher
plane. It is-your privilege and mine to be free. No
will contrdls me but my own, nor ever shall!” said
Carl, drawing his fine form up, haughtily.

“T have not found it very hard to be controlled by
God, since I learned to love Him,” said Lizzie, timidly.

“You. cannot love a myth, Miss Lizzie, can you?
Love must have some tangible object, something or
some one to be seen, or heard, or handled, it would
seem to me.”

“T think—I know, that I love God,” said Lizzie.
“But I do not know that I can tell just how it has
been or why, but I know that there has been a change
wrought within me. A change that has made me very
happy and desirous to know more of Him.” Lizzie’s
voice grew firmer as she spoke, and she began to feel
more at ease,
149 Lisste Hepburn.

“Has this being, whom you call God, been so very
good to you then, Miss Lizzie, that you can love Him ?”

“He has been good to me, although some of His
ways with me I do not now understand,” said Lizzie,
in a low voice.

“Fxeuse me, Miss Lizzie,” said Carl, with a smile,
“T can really see no goodness in the circumstances in
which you have been placed for the last few years.
This idea of a God who will place His helpless creatures
in circumstances where they can only find unhappiness,
and force them to remain there, seems absurd to me.
And pardon me, I think your plan of submitting your-
self willingly and voluntarily to these unhappy circum-
stances again, from a mere idea that it is the will of
some other being, shows that you have not reasoned
about these subjects.”

“T do not feel qualified to reason very much yet, Mr.
Carl. Ihave been taught that obedience is the highest
reason, You forget that I am still quite young, and
my education only just begun. Mrs. Winthrop has
assured me that I ought to go step by step as duty
scemed to be presented to me, and I have found her a
safe counsellor.” :

“In many respects she is, doubtless. But these
religionists are always narrow-minded and generally not
the best guides for persons of your age. You have a
fine mind, naturally, and have made unusual acquire-
ments for the opportunities that you have had. I wish I
could persuade you to break away from these trammels,
and experience for yourself the pleasure there is in
perfect freedom.”

“T do not quite understand you, Mr. Carl,” said
Disappointment : 141

Lizzie, who, unconsciously to herself, had imbibed his
pleasant flatteries, and was more ready to listen to him
than she ever thought she could be.

“Throw aside this idea of a God, Miss Lizzie, and
you will step at once into a glorious freedom of thought
and action. If a God exists at all, He is a cold, cruel,
powerful being, who does not trouble Himself about
us. We have the power to make our lives about
what we please. We shall live happy or unhappy, just
as we decide to rule our circumstances or be ruled by
them.”

“ But,” interrupted Lizzie, “what about death, Mv.
Carl? It is not possible to rule that by our own
will.”

“No,” said Carl, his brow darkening, “there will be
an end to us all after a while, that is our destiny—that
is the last of us. Opr happiness and our immortality
we must find here,—there is nothing beyond.”

“That seems a gloomy idea, Mr. Carl. I think I
had rather believe than to reason, if that is all it can
offer me.”

“Oh, well, the world is about equally made up of
bright and gloomy things, and the best way is to hold
the bright and forget the gloomy. There are frightful
things in the world now, and history is made up of
them, and I suppose it always will be. But we cannot
better these things by making ourselves unhappy about
them. There is sunshine everywhere, and if we will,
we may always have it for ourselves.”

Lizzie walked on in silence. Carl’s words fell coldly
upon her, and made her feel sad and heavy-hearted.
She wished most heartily that she had not encountered


142 Ligsie Hepburn,

him, for he had succeeded in making her fecl unsettled,
and had taken from her the peace with which she had
set out for the farm that morning.

“What sort of an idea have you of a God, Miss
Lizzie?” Carl asked, after quite a long pause.

“The most pleasant idea to my mind has been that
He isa God of love. I do not know that I can exactly
explain myself. It has made me happy to believe that
He has loved me, and there has been nothing that I
could think of about Him but has made me love Him
and be willing to obey Him.”

“You have been reading history, Miss Lizzie. You
believe that this God overrules all events. If He isa
God of love, how could He suffer individuals and
nations to destroy one another? How do you reconcile
this idea of a God with the bloody horrors of war?
How with the earthquakes which have swallowed up,
in a moment, whole cities with their miserable inhabi-
tants? How with the horrible tempest of red-hot ashes
which have destroyed cities, belching forth from the
voleanoes which, if He is God, He must have been able
to have controlled? Does love send helpless hundreds
in one night to a watery grave? or order the crashing
of trains, killing and mutilating other hundreds? No,
no, never! I tell you there is no God! no Jesus!
no heaven! Do not believe it, Miss Lizzie.”

These words, the same that Carl had uttered to her
to long ago, startled Lizzie, and aroused her to a sense
of the danger she was in. She was trembling with the
effect, his words had upon her, and she saw in a moment
that she had exposed herself to them without her
armour, The “sword of the Spirit,” the “shield of
. Disappointment. 143

faith,” where were they? She was too much confused
and bewildered now to recover and use them.

She was greatly relieved to find herself at the foot of
the hill, where Carl had fallen from his horse, and that
she was so near the farm. Carl, observing her agita-
tion, said politely, “Pardon me, if I have made your
walk less pleasant than I expected and intended. I
will take my leave of you here, and beg the favour of
being permitted to see you occasionally at the farm.” —

Lizzie took his proffered hand, and simply said,
“ Good-bye.” She was too much perplexed to know
what else to say.
CHAPTER XVI.
HELEN,

qI1ZZIE once more addressed herself to the plan
she had decided upon when she left Mrs,
ss=s4| Winthrop that morning. A few moments
more and she opened the farm-house door, and,
resolvitig.-40 lay aside the thoughts suggested by the.
conversation with Carl until she should have leisure
to reconsider them, she entered the familiar kitchen.
She was more cordially received by her aunt than she
had reason to expect. She returned a pleasant reply
to James’s ungallant “ How are ye, Liz?” and warmly
kissed Helen, who was really glad to see her again.

In a few days Lizzie had slipped into her old place
in the family, and seemed quite likely to have so much
to occupy her time, as to afford her but little leisure for
taking up again the broken thread of thought suggested
by Carl, as she had proposed to do, when she came
home. And it was well; work, hard, tiresome work,
will often help powerfully to drive off the tempter, espe-
cially if it is for the good of others, and involves us
in daily self-denial.

The lessons in housewifely skill and superior manage-


Flelen. 145

ment which Lizzie had received from Mrs. Winthrop
how proved very valuable to her. She succeeded, after
a while, in giving a more home-like and attractive ap-
pearance to the hitherto comfortless house, and the
coarse, scanty furniture. Her work was performed
thoroughly, butin a quiet and orderly manner, and
with far less fatigue than she used to experience.

Mrs. Hepburn noted the change in Lizzie, and,
although she forbore to commend her, it was a relief,
of which she was quite sensible, to have her at home
again, quietly assuming some of the burdens she had
found were heavy to be borne alone. Indeed, her
manner towards Lizzie was far less stern and hard than
it had ever been before.

Lizzie had not been home long ere she discovered
that some serious trouble was weighing heavily upon
the mind of her aunt, and that it arose chiefly from the
conduct of James. He was now a man in size and
strength, but heabsolutely refused to perform the smallest
labour required upon the farm, and stoutly defied all
authority or control from any one. He spent a large
portion of his time in the drinking and gambling
saloons of the village, occasionally during the summer
joining a party in long excursions-for hunting or fishing.
These were times of relief for the whole family, for he
would frequently return from his carousals in town
intoxicated. and quarrelsome. He was then regarded
by the family with absolute terror, except by his reso- .
sute mother, who defended herself from his violence,
and generally succeeded in securing him in his room
until he finished his debauch in a drunken sleep.

Another source of trouble to her aunt, Lizzie dis-

L
146 Lizsie Hepburt.

covered, arose from the great change that had taken
place in her Uncle Robert. He seemed now to be
rapidly falling into a state of helpless imbecility, dozing
away most of his time in his chair, apparently incapable
of any exertion, even to take care of himself. His con-
dition was xegarded by her aunt with undisguised
vexation and impatience.

And Helen had become a source of trouble, too.
Lizzie thought she did not seem well, and ventured
one day to remark this to her aunt. “ Nothing on
earth but laziness!” retorted her aunt, with the
greatest impatience, at the same time threatening the
severest measures if there was not an improvement
soon in her slow movements.

Lizzie took every opportunity of cheering and assist-
ing Helen, whose subdued, quict ways and evident
illness, which was more apparent every day, together
with a clinging love she manifested for herself, caused her
heart to yearn with tenderness towards her cousin. She
cheerfully assumed Helen’s share of the work whenever
it was possible, and shielded her from the harsh rebukes
of her aunt, often allowing blame to fall upon herself
rather than upon her cousin. Their opportunities for
conversation alone, however, were few. There was a
great deal of work to be done those summer days,
and when night came both were so tired that they were
glad to fall asleep at once after going to bed.

But one day there came a time of comparative rest at
the farm. The small army of harvesters and threshers
had performed their work and gone. The large kitchen
had been put in nice order, the fire suffered to go out
until time for dinner, and Lizzie had taken the first leisure
Helen. 147

time she had really enjoyed since she came home to
examine the books Mrs. Winthrop had sent to her, and
to find out what course of reading she desired her to
pursue.

Taking a book in her hand, she descended to the
kitchen, intending to sit under the trees in the yard
and read. She found Helen alone with Uncle Robert,
he asleep, as usual, in his chair. Aunt Jane had gone
to the village to dispose of some grain. Helen had been
endeavouring to alter one of her dresses. She was
awkward with her work, and seemed to have become
quite discouraged, She was resting her face upon her
hand, and Lizzie was startled to observe how thin and
pale she had grown.

‘Laying aside her book Lizzie took up the dress,
found and remedied the difficulty with skilful fingers,
and returned it to Helen for a missing button or two
to be replaced.

“Thank you, Lizzie!” said Helen, with a grateful
smile lighting her sad young face.

“Quite welcome, Helen dear,” was the cheerful
response. “ You are not well as usual to-day, are you
Helen?” ;

“No; I do not feel well, Lizzie. Mother says it
is because I am lazy, and perhaps itis. But my head
pains me at times terribly, and for some time I have
not slept well at night. I have such frightful dreams
when I do sleep,” said Helen, shuddering.

“Tdo not believe Aunt Jane knows you are so ill,
Helen,” said Lizzie, tenderly. ‘TI shall certainly try to
make her see it when she comes home, if I possibly can.”

“Oh, don’t say a word to mother, please, Lizzie,”
148 Ligsie Hepburn.

exclaimed Helen, hastily. “ Mother will not believe
it, and it will only make her angry with me if she
thinks I have been complaining to you. Mother has
so much trouble with James, that she hardly knows
what she is saying or doing at times, I think. Oh,
Lizzie! we have had awful times here while you were
gone. It has not been so bad this last summer as
_ it was during the fall and winter. While you were at
Mrs. Winthrop’s James was in town nearly all the
time then, and would come home often in his crazy
spells, and drive father and me out of doors. Mother
would have to fight him off to bed before we could
come in again.”

“ Poor Helen!” said Lizzie, in a tone of deep com-
passion, “I do not wonder that you are so ill! And I
was so happy all that time!”

“T am glad of that, Lizzie,” said Helen, “because
if you had been at home it would not have made
matters any better, and you would have been miser-
able too. But I was glad when mother sent for you,
for I used sometimes to be afraid that I should never
see you again. I think sometimes that I shall not live
very much longer, I am always so tired, especially
after my head has hurt me so much that I could not
sleep at night.”

“ And are you afraid to die, dear Helen?” asked
Lizzie, affectionately passing her arm about her cousin.

“Qh, no, dear Lizzie, not at all!” said Helen,
smiling. “Iam not afraid to go to Jesus, because I
love Him and Tle loves me. That is just what I
wished to say to you. You know we never talked
together of these things, even after we both went to
fTelen, 149

Sunday-school. I wanted to tell you that I love Jesus
and that I know He loves me, so that if I die soon you
may know that I have gone to Him.”

Yes, Lizzie remembered, with keen self-reproach, her
silence to her weak and tempted cousin on this subject,
and how often she had indulged herself in despising
her, holding herself aloof from her. But since the
Saviour had sought out and reclaimed this, His
neglected lamb, and had so impressed His own image
upon her, Lizzie was glad to sit at her feet and learn
of her.

“ After you went away,” Helen resumed, “I was
obliged to work hard, and mother became impatient
with me, because I am so slow and awkward. “James
was harsh and cruel, and this made me unhappy all
the time. It seemed to me that my heart would break,
and there was no one to whom I dared to tell my
sorrows. Mother never allowed me to go to Sunday-
school after you went away, because, she said, ‘it had
spoiled you, and she would have no more such work in
the family.

“T do not wonder that she thought so,” said
Lizzie.

“ Our teacher,” continued Helen, “gave me a Testa-
"ment; and after I could not go any more to the Sun-
day-school I thought a great deal of what she had
taught us, especially of the verses she required us to
commit to memory, so I thought I would try and find
them. Every moment I could get, when mother could
not sce me, I hunted in the Testament, and as fast as I
found one of the verses I put in a little mark of white
paper, And I found a great many more just made for

732
150 Lisste Hepburn.

me, and I marked them, too. And it seemed almost
like talking to a friend who loved me; it made me very
happy.

“One night when my head was paining me so that
I could not sleep, I lay in my bed wide awake,. and
thinking, as usual. Suddenly this verse came into my
mind, ‘Come unto Me all ye that are weary and heavy
laden, and I will give you rest.’ I did not understand
the other verses about the ‘yoke’ and the ‘burden ;’
but I knew that I was tired and wanted rest. Sol
said, right -out loud, ‘I would come if I only knew
how, but I am such an ignorant child.’ Then this
verse came to me, ‘Suffer little children to come unto
Me, and forbid them not, for of such is the kingdom of
heaven.’ Oh, how glad I was! That meant me; I
jumped right out upon the floor, and kneeled down and
asked Jesus to take me, a poor, ignorant child, and
hold me fast, and make me fit for heaven. And He
took me right in His arms that very night, Lizzie,”
added Helen, with such a light in her eye as shed a
radiance and beauty over her plain face that Lizzie had
never seen before. “I cannot tell you how He did it,
but I have felt rested ever since.”

How the miserable reasonings and cold philosophy
of Carl melted before the simple faith of this humble
child taught of God! They had frequently intruded
themselves upon Lizzie, especially of late, but at this
moment they seemed to have assumed their appropriate
place, and to have lost their influence upon her. She
kissed her cousin affectionately, saying, “I am so glad,
dear Helen, that we are both safe in the care of the
Good Shepherd ; and Iam glad now that I came home,
fTelen. . 151

go that we could learn to love each other, and talk
together of Jesus and heaven.”

“Tam glad too, Lizzie. I asked Jesus to send you
home, because I wanted to tell you these things, so
that you would know after I am gone.”

“But you must not talk about dying, dear Helen,”
said Lizzie, cheerfully. ‘‘ You have been overworked,
while I have been resting. Now you shall rest and
I will work. The hot days are nearly gone now,
and I hope you will grow stronger soon, and be well
again.”

“Perhaps so, Lizzie; but although I am young to
die now, I have not the least care about it. It seems
strange, but so it is, I feel perfectly quiet about the
thought of dying.

“ Let me tell you something that happened not long
ago. A carriage stopped at our gate, and a gentleman
jumped from it and lifted a little boy to the ground.
The boy was ten years old, I should think, and per-
fectly blind. He was tired with his drive, so his father
asked permission to lead him over the farm. He held
his hand, and led him so carefully, lest he should be
injured, talking all the while in such a pleasant way
about the green leaves and the flowers and birds, the
sheep and cows and the horses. The boy was quite
happy. Then he led him to the house and asked us to
give him a bowl of milk and some bread. He prepared
the food, and watched him with a tender smile while
he ate it. Afterwards he led him to the carriage and
drove away.

« And then I thought how much that was like the
way Jesus was taking care of me. I cannot see Him,
152 Lizsie Hepburn.

but I know He is always near me and guiding me and
loving me. Yes, I know it as much as that blind boy
knew that his father loved him and cared for him.
And I have not minded my troubles half as much since
T learned that lesson from the blind boy.”

Lizzie could only listen in silence, and wonder at the
change Divine Love had wrought in the sluggish Helen.
To Lizzie she now seemed to shine in all the graces. of
one of Christ’s “ hidden ones,” although herself uncon-
scious, in her sweet humility, of the glorious fact.

“T do not know why it is,” said Helen, after a
pause, “that I have never spoken to mother or James
about these things. It seems to me that I cannot do
it ; but I often talk to Jesus about them. And when
Iam gone, I wish you would give mother my Testa-
ment, and tell her that I loved her, and ask her to
read it for my sake. I did try last winter to spean
to father, and I think he did love Jesus then ; but now
he is so strange and sleepy that I do not think he
understands what I say to him.

“I remember once, in the Sunday-school, that Mrs.
Winthrop told us Christ was like a life-boat sent to
save the drowning people from a wrecked ship. And,
she said, He never refused to take in any, however
feebly they might cling to the boat. And, if they
only had strength to raise a hand or an eye to the life-
boat, they would be saved. And I think in some way
He will save my father, for I think he did once look to
Him.”

The two girls had dropped their work, and were so
intent upon their conversation, and the love that was
fast knitting their hearts together, that they were en-
Llelent, . 153
tirely unconscious how late it was, and that Mrs. Hep-
burn had returned home. They did not even hear her
heavy foot-fall until she stood before them.
frown was upon her face, and Lizzie well knew that a
storm was ready to burst upon them, upon the slightest
provocation.

With a quick movement, Lizzie shook out and folded
the dress which Helen had finished, with her assistance,
and then began the preparation for dinner. She re-
quested Helen, in a low voice, to set the table, while
she hastened to the cellar for the vegetables.

Some cruel strokes of the rod, and an agonized cry
from Helen, caused Lizzie to almost fly up the stairway
and into the kitchen again. “Oh, Aunt Jane!” she
eried, “please don’t whip Helen; she is ill, indeed
she is! You do not know how ill poor Helen is!”

“Tl!” almost shouted Aunt Jane, whom Lizzie
never remembered to have seen in such a terrible
passion, “I tell you she is not ill! She’s too lazy to
breathe! She is just like her good-for-nothing father
over there! Just look at that!” she cried, pointing
with a fierce gesture to some bread, which had been
suffered to become too light, and was running over the
pans upon the floor. “I told her to he sure and watch
that bread, and, when it was ready, to put it in the
oven. She’s too lazy to do even that, and so has let it
spoil! She’s needed a whipping long enough, and
now she’s got it!”

Helen was setting the table, quietly weeping, in such
a tired, patient way, that Lizzie could not restrain her
own tears. She hastened the dinner, and attended to
the afternoon work herself, finding no opportunity to
134 Lissie Llepburn.,

express her sympathy for Helen until they had retired
to rest. Their whispered prayers mingled with loving
words to each other, until Lizzie, who was quite tired,
fell asleep.

At midnight Lizzie was awakened by the moanings
of her cousin, She placed her hand gently upon
Helen’s face—it was burning with fever. Afraid to
arouse her aunt, Lizzie groped in the dark, until she
had secured a bit of cloth with which she gently bathed
the hot face and hands of her cousin in cold water.

She did not leave her bedside until day-break, when,
becoming much alarmed at the feverish ravings of
Helen, she aroused her aunt, assuring her that she was
indeed very ill. Mrs. Hepburn came to the bedside at
once, and seemed frightened into some maternal anxiety
and affection, when she saw how ill. Helen really was.
The eyes of her child were raised to hers in a wild de-
lirium, and her pitiful pleadings struck a pang of
remorse to the heart of the mother, as she exclaimed,
“Oh, please don’t whip me! I forgot all about it,
indeed I did! Iam go sorry !”

With her wonted energy, Mrs. Hepburn, thoroughly
aroused, used every means in her power to save her
child. She was quite an expert in the preparation of
hot herb drinks, and had usually been successful in re-
covering her family by the use of these simple remedies
from attacks of sudden colds, or from the fevers incident
to the climate. But, at midday, she saw that these
had all failed, and that Helen was growing worse.
Bidding Lizzie watch beside her cousin, she walked
rapidly to the village to summon the aid of a physician.

Lizzie, who had found the cold water more soothing







Flelen. 155

+

than any other remedy, resumed the bathing of her
head and face, and continued it until her aunt had
returned. She partially succeeded in quieting Helen’s
excitement, soothing her with tender words, or softly
singing some favourite song.

Once, Lizzie thought she knew her, as she laid the cool
napkin upon her head, for she looked up in a natural
manner, and. murmured, “ My Beloved is mine, and I
am His!” and returned the kiss Lizzie pressed upon
her lips. But the transient gleam was soon gone.
When her mother returned with the physician, she was
moaning and tossing restlessly, and gave no token of
recognition to any one. The most active remedies
were employed, and the utmost skill of the physician
exerted ; but it was all in vain, He gave them no
hope of her recovery.

Mrs. Hepburn never left her side. What her
emotions were as she bent over the neglected and now
dying child, none could know. That the stern, hard
heart was breaking beneath the severe blows that were
sent upon it now, might be read in the pale, rigid
countenance, and tearless, troubled eyes; but no word
escaped her lips. Refusing food or rest, she watched
beside her child with a hungry yearning to hear her
speak the one word, “Mother,” never so sweet and
precious as now, or to catch one gleam of recognition
from those wild, burning eyes.

But she watched in vain. The precious word never
came from those parched lips, the loving glance from
those wild eyes. Helen died on the third day of her ill-
ness, struggling in dreadful spasms during the last hours.
The neighbours came in and arrayed the body for the
156 Lizeie Hepburn.

grave. Significant glances were exchanged, forthe
marks of the cruel rod were still visible upon the
wasted body; but there were no words of reproach
spoken. None were needed, for the sight of those
dark lines was enough. They seemed to tear the heart
of the agonized mother as she recalled, with deep
remorse, her wilful blindness to tho weakness aml
illness of her child. :

When Helen was made ready for the grave, Mrs.
Hepburn shut herself up with the body of her child
alone; and then she prayed an agonized, remorse-
ful prayer, full of self-reproaches and of promises,
Lizzie could hear her voice, and occasionally her words.
They made her shudder. It seemed to her that such
a prayer was not meant for a tender, compassionate
Saviour, and that no peace would come on its wings to
the wounded heart of her aunt. Lizzie longed to com-
fort her, but she dared not onter the room ‘without
permission. So she “talked with Jesus” about her,
even as her dear cousin had done, whose pale, stil! lips
would never unclose again in prayer.
CHAPTER XVII
LIZZIE’'S DRIVE,

HE funeral services of Helen Hepburn were

largely attended. Mrs. Winthrop came,
: with many others, from the village. Lizzie
had not seen her friend, except for a short time -at
church, since she came back to the farm, and she had
not been able always to be present on the Sabbath ; so
that it was a pleasure to see her enter the farm-house,
even upon this sad occasion.

After the services Mrs. Winthrop asked permission
from Mrs. Hepburn that Lizzie should accompany her
for a short drive. Consent was given, and the long-
desired opportunity afforded for a conversation together,
without fear of interruption.

“Tell me all about dear little Helen,” said Mrs.
Winthrop, as they seated themselves in the carriage
and drove away over the smooth, pleasant road.

“Oh, Helen was such a beautiful Christian, Mrs.
Winthrop,” said Lizzie, warmly, relating the conversa-
tion she had had with her cousin the very day she was
taken ill, and the marvellous change that had been


158 Lizzie Hepburn.

wrought upon her by the love of Jesus; adding, “ She
never forgot you, nor ceased to love you, and it was
your instructions in the Sabbath-school that led her to
the Saviour.”

Tears gathered to the eyes of Mrs. Winthrop as she
heard these welcome tidings. A soul redeemed by the
instrumentality of her efforts! Ah! none but the
faithful teacher, who sows the precious, seed in the
ungenial soil of the human soul, and waters it with
tears, and nurtures it with prayers, often fainting, often
desponding ; one who waits and watches long for the
promise of fruitage, when the Lord of the harvest shall
gather from her class the golden and perfected sheaves
for Himself—can know the grateful joy welling from
the heart of Mrs. Winthrop as she heard the story of
the conversion of her young pupil, and of her fearless
encounter with the great

‘You have made me very happy, dear,” she said, as
Lizzie finished her story. ‘I shall return to my class
with renewed zeal and courage. Our Saviour, who
knows our feeble frame, cheers us at times by these
sweet tokens of His acceptance of our services, and
thus éncourages us to renewed and faithful labour for
Him. I am perfectly sure that the least work per-
formed for Jesus is precious in His sight, and that it
will not be fruitless, even if we are not permitted to
gather it ourselves. But we must patiently wait His
time, when ‘he that soweth and he that reapeth may
rejoice together’ as they bring the harvest home. And
our poor, weak faith, beset by human frailties, staggers
and would fall by the way if Jesus did not refresh us
occasionally and strengthen us for future conflict and


Lisste’s Drive. 159
victory by just such a precious feast as Ie has served
me to-day through you, Lizzie.”

“JT knew you would be glad to hear about Helen,
Mrs. Winthrop. It is pleasant for me, too, to think of
her at rest with the Saviour; but I am very lonely
without her. We were beginning to love one another
dearly, and I think we should have been very happy
together had she lived.”

“You are not sorry now that you returned to the
farm?”

“Qh, no, Mrs. Winthrop; indeed, I am very glad.
How strange it was that I should have been so rebel-
lious, when I thought I was perfectly willing to obey
God in all things.”

“Tt is quite casy to talk about submission and
obedience, especially when we are in easy circum-
stances, with all our natural tastes and inclinations
gratified. But when we are bidden to take up a cross
for His sake, our readiness to obey is often severely
tested. These crosses, which are placed all along the
Christian’s pathway, are absolutely essential to the
annihilation of self—that great victory which must be
achieved before we can truly feel that our ‘life is hid
with Christ in God.’”

#°It seemed to me,” said Lizzie, “that I could not
look upon my return to the farm as a cross I was to
bear for Jesus. I could think of nothing but my own
disappointment, and the obstacle it was to my course
of study with you.”

“A mistake we often make, Lizzie. In the trials
and disappointments of life we are apt to consider only
the secondary causes of them, which, after all, are only
160 Lissie Hepburit.

the instruments by which our Mcavenly Father cotit-
pletes His designs and works out His will. If we are
ill, we regard ouly the secondary causes that have
produced the illness. We summon a physician, and
rely wholly upon his skill If that fails we try
another, or seek a change of climate, or some noted
remedy, utterly ignoring the Great Physician, without
whose blessing these feeble instruments must all fail of
producing the desired results. When we are thwarted
in our plans, we are indignant at the secondary causes
of our disappointments. We forget that the eye of
God, that notes even the fall of a sparrow, suffers not
the slightest thing to pass without His knowledge and
permission. Consequently, we are so filled with grief
over our losses and disappointments that we are
blinded to the real desien of the trials, even though
we are assured that the final working out of them all
will be a ‘far more exceeding and eternal weight of
glory’ for us.”

Lizzie was silent for a few moments, thinking
of the remarks of her friend. At length she’ said,
with evident hesitation, “I think I see plainly now
the reason why I was sent back to the farm. I am
very glad that I came, but I do not see why I should
remain any longer. Aunt Jane has sold all the sheep,
and, until next summer, there is no more work than
one can easily do alone in the house.”

“You would like to come home with me, then,
dear 2”

“Yes, Mrs. Winthrop, if you are willing. I feel so
anxious to go on with my education. You know T am
nearly seventeen now, and I know so little yet.”
Lisste’s Drive. 161

“T should be very happy to take you back with me,
dear,” said Mrs. Winthrop, kindly; “but I do not
think you ought to forsake your aunt at present. She
will be very lonely now, and will miss Helen more and
more every day. The house would be so still and lonely
if you should go away now, Lizzie. If I can read your
aunt’s face right, she is in deep trouble, and will necd
your sympathy and love.”

“ Aunt Jane would never accept either sympathy or
love from me, Mrs. Winthrop,” said Lizzie, with a dash
of vexation and disappointment in her tones.

“ Have you ever offered them to her, Lizzie?” asked
Mrs. Winthrop, gently.

“No; never!” said Lizzie, frankly, conscious that
the deep-rooted aversion which she had ever enter-
tained towards her aunt had not been wholly overcome
by the workings of grace in her heart.

*T have never found a human heart so hardened,”
said Mrs. Winthrop, “as not to open to the softening
influences of love and sympathy. Ah! itis the golden
road, Lizzie, to the sin-burdened and often agonized
heart of man, by which he may be led back to the
Saviour. He ‘who has borne our griefs and carried
our sorrows,’ who has known every phase of human
suffering, by actual experience, from the cradle to the
grave, will never turn from the broken-hearted, or
break the bruised reed.”

“T do not know how to approach Aunt Jane,” said
Lizzie. “I have felt very sorry for her ever since
I came home, especially since Helen’s death; but
I do not know how to express my sympathy for
her,”

M
162 Liseie Hepburn.

“ Have you ever asked the Saviour to help you to
do so?” asked Mrs. Winthrop.

“No, Mrs. Winthrop,” replied Lizzie, colouring ;
“T am ashamed to say it, but I never thought of that |”

“ One of the little things which you deemed beneath
your heavenly Father’s notice, I suppose ?”

“T fear I have not’ learned to seek His guidance
in everything, Mrs. Winthrop.”

“ «Tn everything, by prayer and supplication, with
thanksgiving, let your requests be made known unto
God.’ Now, that must mean everything that concerns
us, however trivial, and everything which is impressed
upon us by conscience, the Word of God, or by the
indications of His providence.”

“Do you think, then, that it is my duty to stay with
Aunt Jane always?” asked Lizzie, suddenly breaking
a long pause in their conversation.

“One step at a time, my dear,” replied Mrs. Win-
throp, smiling. “ ‘Always’ is a long word. ‘Tread
the safe path of present duty without inquiring
why or how long. Remain with your aunt, at
present, and when the right time—God’s time, my
dear—shall come, you can make further plans for the
future.”

“Well, I suppose I can be of some use to Aunt
Jane,” said Lizzie; “I had no idea that she loved
Helen so much, or that she would be so sad over her
loss. Still I think her greatest trouble arises from
James’s conduct. And I cannot see how I can help
her about that, for I have no influence over James, and

. Aunt Jane conceals her trouble about him from me

and from every one,”
Lisste's Drive. 163

“Watch your opportunities, Lizzie. I have an im-
pression that you have a mission here, and that you
will yet rejoice that you decided to remain at home.
I am sure you can honour your Saviour so, and that
this will be a favourable opportunity to deny yourself,
and to cultivate the plants of grace within your heart.”

“Well, I will try and do the best I can,” said Lizzie,
with a sigh, for she could not wholly overcome her
disappointment.

“JT am glad to hear you say that. But,” and Mrs.
Winthrop smilingly turned to Lizzie as she spoke,
“you have not even inquired how I have managed to
get along without you, or whether I have not been
lonely without you all the summer.”

“No, I am always so intent upon my own self, that
T quite forget there are others in the world,” said Lizzie,
laughing. “Pardon me, and tell me, please, that you
have missed me just a little, that the house has seemed
lonely without me in it.”

“All of which will gratify that same spirit of self,
and make Lizzie much happier, I suppose ?”

“Yes, that is just the truth, Mrs. Winthrop,” said
Lizzie, frankly. “I am very far from being out of self
yet. The fact is, I find it an expert enemy. When I
think I have driven it from my heart, it suddenly lurks
in some unsuspected corner, and before I am aware I
am as much under its sway as ever.”

“ Well, I shall have to gratify it a little just now, by
confessing that I was quite desolate after you had left ;
but in a day or two I found it was all for the best, for
I was enabled to, offer a home for the summer, and,
perhaps, for a much longer time to Mr, Hartwell.”
164 Lissie Hepburn.

“Mr. Hartwell!” exclaimed Lizzic. “ How did that
happen ?”

“Mrs. Hartwell wished to make a visit to her friends,
and he wanted a quiet home until she returned. As I
wanted a quiet boarder, we were soon agreed, and he
has occupied Paul’s room ever since. The arrangement
has been an agreeable one to me, and afiords me a good
opportunity for keeping my house open, during my
son’s absence.”

“How beantiful Rosedale must have been this
summer,” said Lizzie, a little home sickness lurking
in her tone.

“Yes, I never saw the flowers more brilliant and
beautiful. I hoped you would come in while the roses
were in their glory.”

“T wanted to, very much, but we were too busy.
Did the seeds which I planted die in the ground during
the cold, wet days after my return to the farm?”

“Oh, no, they came up nicely, and the yard is quite
magnificent now with your dahlias and asters and
zinnias. The dark green foliage and rich colouring
of our autumn flowers I even prefer to the short-lived
beauties of the spring and summer.”

“T hope I shall be able to come in and see them
once at least before they are quite gone.”

“Oh, certainly, you must. And that reminds me,
my dear, I think I will try to make an arrangement
with your aunt by which you can come in once or twice
a week, and recite your lessons this winter, practise an
hour or so, and let me direct your reading. How would
you like that plan?”

“Oh, so much, Mrs. Winthrop! TI have plenty of
Liszies Drive. 165

time now, and I shall be so much better contented
to feel that I am not losing the whole of the winter
in my education.”

“ And there is a bit of gossip afloat too, of which I
intended to speak to you. It is rumoured that Jessie
Pomroy is soon to be married to that young German
who was so ill there last spring.”

“Oh, I am so sorry to hear that!” said Lizzie, with
so much energy as quite to surprise Mrs. Winthrop.

“Why are you sorry, Lizzie? Do you know any-
thing against the young man?”

“T think he is a bad man, Mrs. Winthrop, an un-
believer and a scoffer ;” and Lizzie proceeded to tell of
her first acquaintance upon the steamer with Carl, and
how the influence of his words and manner, at that
time, had clung to her like a foul and hateful garment ;
that she was not wholly rid of it even since she had
given her heart to the Saviour, but that it intruded
itself upon her, especially in her short hour for retire-
ment and devotion.

“He may be changed for the better since that time,
Lizzie ; Father and Mother Pomroy seem attached to
him, and he is quite regular in his attendance at
church.”

“T know he is, but I am satisfied it is for no good
reason. I have frequently heard James repeat what he
says in the ‘Literary Club, of which he is the leader.
He has had a great influence over James, and a very
bad one, and I feel it is the same with the other young
men.” ,

“Why have you never spoken of this to me before,
Lizzie?”
166 Lizzie Hepburn.

“Because I wished no-one to suspect my acquaint-
ance with him. I was in constant terror lest he should
recognise me, and seek to talk with me again. I
thought I was entirely successful, that years had made
so many changes that he had forgotten me. But the
morning that I left you, he met me, spoke to me at |
once, talked -as if he was well acquainted with all my
past history and present plans, and walked with me
almost to the farm.”

“ And did he venture to advance ary infidel senti-
ments to you?” asked Mrs. Winthrop.

“Yes, indeed; and I was so surprised and bewil-
dered by his conversation, that he obtained a complete
advantage over me. I do not know what mischief he
might have done, if he had not chanced to repeat the
very words he spoke to me upon the steamer. This
restored me to my senses, but I was not able to answer
him one word.”

“T am much concerned at what you have told me,
Lizzie. Mr. Hartwell and some of the other Christians
have felt alarmed because the young men in his ‘Club’-
have refused to attend any longer upon religious in-
struction, and even some of our Church members are
in the number. But it has been difficult to really fix
the blame upon him, as to all appearance he has been
exemplary in his conduct.”

“T am satisfied that he is a dangerous person, Mrs.
Winthrop. Is there no way of acquainting Miss Jessie
with his true character, and preventing the marriage ?”

“T fear it is too late. I hope, at least, he will be
a kind husband to her, and a good son to her aged
parents.”
Lizgeie’s Drive. 167

“T hope so,” responded Lizzie, as Mrs. Winthrop
reined her horse to the gate, and they alighted from
the carriage. After she entered the house? Mrs. Win-
throp politely requested that Lizzie might be allowed
to come in town to recite her lessons to her, as often as
- she could be spared from the farm. Mrs. Hepburn
made no objections to the plan, and Mrs. Winthrop
soon after took her leave and proceeded homewards,
her heart filled with painful forebodings lest evil should
befall her respected friends in their old age
CHAPTER XVII.
JESSIE.

A ARL’S visits to the house of Father Pomroy
were becoming more and more frequent, and
Sse were quite welcome to them all. He had
iene been regarded in the village.as the accepted lover
of Miss Jessie, although he had refrained as yet from
declaring his love to her, or making a formal demand
for her hand to her parents. . He waited until he
should be perfectly sure of success in his plans.

Ah! well he knew that the pure mind of the young
girl would shrink from his in horror at the first suspi-
-cion of the evil designs which he was harbouring in
his breast. These he carefully concealed under a seem-
ingly honest desire to know the truth, that he might
embrace it. When his dominion over the unsuspecting
and innocent Jessie became absolute, he believed he
might venture to a further development of his ultimate
designs.

It was a fine evening in the beginning of the Indian
summer, that glorious season, the sweetest of all the
year in this latitude. The air was soft and balmy,
and the moon shed a silvery radiance over the hazy


Fessie. 169

atmosphere, mellowing the brilliant colouring of the
autumn leaves, and bringing out in full relief the dark
pines which crowned the bluffs in the distance.

Jessie had thrown open the whole house during the
day to admit the pleasant air; and, as it still continued
warm even after twilight, she brought out the easy
chairs into the porch, and invited her parents to come
and enjoy the evening with her. Seated on the step
at their feet, she cheered them with her lively talk and
pretty songs, a hand clasped in each of theirs, until the
fair young moon had sunk from their sight.

Suddenly, the notes of a flute, played with masterly
skill, struck on the still air and floated past them in
waves of exquisite melody. The three became instantly
silent, while they drank in the music, which seemed an
appropriate close of the day’s delightful enjoyments.
The old people bowed ‘their heads upon their hands,
and the soft music, as it ever will when heard at night,
gently unlocked their hearts, and a host of memories
came trooping forth. In afew delightful moments they
lived over the past with its long, long years, marked
with joys and sorrows, and tears trickled softly through
their fingers, as they listened.

Jessie, who knew that the music could come from

*- only one, and that one Carl, yielded herself at once to

the delicious influences of the moment. Her. young
heart joyfully acknowledged to itself how dear had
become to her that unseen magician, whose soft har-
monies were swaying their souls at his will this night.

Thus. Carl found them, as, suddenly ceasing, he
emerged from the little strip of forest that skirted
the pathway leading from the village, stepped lightly
170 Lizsie Hepburn.

through the gateway, and quietly seated himself before
his listeners: A es glad welcome greeted him, and
then he preferred his great request to Jessie and her
parents.

Carl had.wisely chosen his opportunity. If the old
people had entertained any scruples before, or had been
suspicious that all was not right with the German
stranger, these had vanished now. The mother joined
their hands herself, while the father solemnly invoked
the blessing of God upon them.

Tt was well for him that the moon had sunk from
sight, and that the darkness had deepened, else surely
the parents would never have given Jessie, their best
jewel, to him, whose dark soul lowered through the
handsome features, as the name of God was invoked in
his behalf.

Slowly, cautiously, but persistently, from this time
did Carl assail the soul of his betrothed with all the
machinery of infidelity, employing the whole force of
his influence over her to unsettle the foundations of
her faith in God and in His Word. Specious argu-
ments, strong denunciations, sarcastic raillery, and
keen-edged wit, were used, in turn, upon the unsophis-
ticated mind and heart that love had rendered nearly
subject to his imperious will.

But there was a long struggle; there were many
days when the young girl would look wistfully back
to the unquestioning faith of her childhood, when truth
was the constant nourishment of her soul, received
with the same loving simplicity as the food for her
body, and from the same dear source, her honoured
parents. There were many days, when she looked
Sesste. ele

fearfully outward and onward, and she shrank back,
fearing to unloose from the safe moorings: whence she
might see the billows tossing and hear the tempests
raging, undismayed ; and to float out, even with him,
upon the open and shoreless sea of unbelief.

The struggle, however, was an uneven one; for,
however exalted her simple nature was above her
selfishness, however beautiful the development of the

‘elements of a true womanhood in her, crowning her

already with a notable dignity, her mind, imperfectly
trained, was unable to resist the attacks of the subtle
logic of which he was a master, or to answer the argu-
ments with which her faith was constantly assailed.

Jessie sorely felt the need of advice and guidance
during this struggle. But to whom could she go? She
sought, by every loving art, to hide from her parents
the true character of her betrothed, and the influence
he had already gained over her, and the success of his
efforts to destroy her faith in the God of her fathers.

When her Christian friends were becoming alarmed,
by the effects of Carl’s hypocrisy and subtlety in the
spread of infidelity among the young men of the
village, and hints and rumours were passing swiftly
about, Jessie stood firmly by his side, resisting and
resenting, with all the ardour of a loving young heart,
every attack made upon him. It was then that she
realized, for the first time, how greatly successful he
had been in disturbing and destroying her own reli-
gious faith.

Heretofore, it had seemed only natural to her to
yield a ready assent to the doctrines of the Biblé, in
which she had been nurtured. She had never thought
172 Lissie Hepburn.

of bringing them to the test of her reason. But Carl
had bidden her, “Come upon a higher plane, and
believe nothing she could not understand, and to
receive nothing as truth that was inconsistent with her
own reason!” And he ridiculed, with daring effron-
tery, the “secret things which belong to God,” and
scornfully rejected the precious “things that are
revealed, and belong to us and to our children.”

Jessie found herself rapidly drifting from the Bible.
3ewildered by Carl’s sophistries, she did not perceive
their false premises and conclusions, while a certain
kind of pride raised its inflated head in her heart,
through his cunning flatteries, and she felt how much
wiser she had grown since she had mounted that
“hioher plane,” where she stood side by side with him,
believing nothing that could not be reconciled to her
limited reason. She no longer took any delight in-
reading the Word, and forsook utterly the place of
secret prayer, and the quiet hour when, in outward
stillness, the human soul draws near, and takes hold
upon Omnipotence. |

Carl’s love became more precious to her than the love
of Jesus, and his approval more than “ His favour,
which is life, and His loving-kindness, which is better
than life.” She loved Carl wildly, blindly, and sought
to attach the trembling tendrils of her faith, which he
had rudely torn from the Rock, to the sandy founda-
tions on which he stood with proud self-confidence.

Jessie still retained her connection with the Church,
and her attendance upon its services. No one spoke to
her of the struggle which was going on in her mind,
if they suspected it. But that something was going
isi Zn ”
FESSiC 173

wrong with the buoyant young girl could be readily
seen by any one who knew her well. The sparkling
gaiety had faded from her eye, which kindled now only
in the presence of Carl; her cheek lost most of its
roundness and rosy glow, her step its springing grace,
and Father Pomroy complained that they were no
longer cheered by the merry songs of his darling
“ home-bird.”

Carl noted the change, and declared to Jessie that
she was dying for want of more gaiety in her life.
“The world is full of pleasures and delights, the
rumours of which are lost before they reach this quiet
town,” he would say. “These would soon restore to
you your spirit and beauty. And,” he would often
add, “I shall not long consent to bury the prize here
won, in this stupid place, where all the pleasure one
can have must be found in Sunday-schools and psalm-
singing.”

These were the first hints which Jessie received of
the plans revolving in Carl’s dark mind. Plans which,
in their development, were destined to wound and
blight her young life, but, in the end, were to prove
the thorny road by which, with torn and bleeding fect,
she was to retrace the way to the God whom she had
forsaken,
CHAPTER XIX.
A HARD SCHOOL.

ZHE autumn which succeeded the return of
| = Lizzie to the farm was a remarkably pleasant
Ha #} one. The air was cool and crisp, but the
sharp, biting cold, common to the season in this climate,
was unusually delayed. There was no heavy fall of
snow until after the close of the holidays; and,
although the trees grew brown and then bare under
the fingers of the nightly frosts, the grass beneath
them retained its verdure for many days longer.

These were days of trial to Lizzie at the farm. She
was lonely. Aunt Jane was strangely altered. Never,
in the slightest degree, affectionate towards Lizzie, or in
any way confidential with her; still, she was not now
unkind. It seemed more as if she was wholly obli-
Nious of Lizzie’s presence, and entirely indifferent as to
the manner in which she spent her time. Something
seemed to have paralyzed her energies. No longer
active and busy, she suffered the work of the farm to
remain undone, and the household cares to rest wholly
upon Lizzie.

Lizzie felt truly sorry for her aunt, as dae after day


A Hard School. 175

passed away, bringing her no relief from her secret
sorrow. Some violent grief was going on within that
cold, silent woman, but of its nature Lizzie could not
know; of its intensity she could only judge by the
remarkable change in her outward demeanour. She
watched her opportunity, as she had promised Mrs.
Winthrop, but she never seemed able to know when
or how to speak a sympathizing word, or assure her of
her desire to make her happy.

She conjectured that the chief source of*her aunt’s
trouble arose from the loss of Helen. And here, she
thought, they might surely sympathize with each other.

For the departure of that quict, humble little girl
had left the house and their hearts desolate indeed.
Lizzie longed to speak to her aunt of her, and to give
her the little red Testament, filled with its white marks;
but a stern silence upheld her, and she did not dare
offer even a word of comfort or sympathy.

Since Helen’s death James was absent nearly all the
time. This was a great relief to Lizzie, who frequently
found it difficult to avoid his rudeness and violence
when he was at home; but it seemed to be an addi-'
tional source of trouble to his mother, from whom he
obstinately concealed the object of his long excursions
and continued absence. Always refusing to perform
the slightest labour required upon the farm, he yet
impertinently demanded from her considerable sums
of money whenever he came home. His visits were
usually marked by the most violent disputes and
quarrels between himself and his unhappy mother, and
after them she seemed more wretched still.

Robert Hepburn, during all the summer and autumn,
176 Lissie Hepburn.

remained in a strange lethargic state, from which he
was not easily aroused, except by the demands of
hunger. If Lizzie attempted to talk with him upon
any subject, he would listen for a moment with an
effort to appear interested, but his mind would quickly
wander off, and his words would be a confused mur-
muring of matters quite irrelevant to those of which
she had been speaking. He was rapidly falling into a
state of mental idiocy ; and his physical powers failing
also, there was a prospect that he would very soon
become a helpless burden upon the family.

After Mrs. Winthrop’s visit Lizzie had entered upon
the course of study which her friend had advised, with
the ardour and delight natural to her. For a few
weeks she went regularly to the village, recited her
lessons, practised her music, and received directions for
the next time, and all this served to make her less
lonely and unhappy than she had anticipated. But
even before the end of the fine weather, which had
been so favourable thus far, Lizzie found, that it
would be impossible for her to pursue this delightful
plan. .

For besides her ordinary home duties, the care of her
helpless and dependent uncle was evidently to wholly
devolve upon her. Lizzie had never either respected
or loved her uncle, but to her mind and heart, now
renewed by grace, he had claims upon her, in his
neglected and miserable condition, that called for the
exercise of every gentle charity in word and in deed.
Besides, she regarded him with a new interest, as the
object of her dear Helen’s love and solicitude. So,
with great patience and care, she devoted herself to
A Hard School. 177

this new call upon her, ministering to his wants as to
those of a helpless child.

Bué this involved her in daily sclf-denials, privations,
and disappointments, that caused her many an hour of
tearful regret, and often moments of questionings and
repinings. She was forced to put her studies away, to
resign the precious hours of intercourse and instruction
they had afforded her with Mrs. Winthrop, and to con-
tent herself with the bare, painful discharge of duties
to others, uncheered even by the love and companion-
ship of one congenial friend.

And these were days of spiritual trial and tempta-
tion. Especially was this the case when, at the begin-
ning of the new year, a heavy and unprecedented fall
of snow covered the prairie, crowned the bluffs and
blocked the roads, little traversed in winter, which led
to the village; and the weather became too severe to
permit any visit for a long time to Mrs. Winthrop.
The house then seemed so still, although the great clock
ticked steadily and loudly, and the flame under the
logs in the fire-place roared up the chimney with as
cheerful a noise as it could make. Lizzie felt op-
pressed and gloomy. Within, her aunt was cold, stern,
and silent, her uncle cither breathing heavily in sleep
or talking in childish mutterings; while without the
chill winds whistled drearily over the prairie, and
around the house and beyond lay the great white
snow-wreaths and the impassable drifts.

She was now walking in darkness, and at times felt
ready to faint by the way. She longed for an educa-.
tion as the great desire of her heart, and this seemed
further removed from her than ever. The future looked

N
178 Liseste Hepburn.

dark before her, and to walk on in her present life
seemed cheerless and painful. Her faith often wavered ;
it was hard to follow un, without knowing whither,
why, or how long. She did not know that in the
school of suffering we often learn sweet lessons in
charity, and patience, and submission, the truest and
highest education.

One thing, however, Lizzie persevered in—the course
of reading designated by Mrs. Winthrop. Fortunately her
friend had abundantly supplied her with books, and these
she found not only a source of delight, but a great relief
to the loneliness of her life. She conceived the idea
of writing notes from memory, and of conversing with
imaginary individuals in her room, upon topics suggested
to her own mind by her reading. When questions
arose that could not be solved either by herself or these
imaginary friends, they were carefully reserved for dis-
cussion with Mrs. Winthrop. And unsatisfactory as
all this was, in many respects, it served to amuse her
and beguile the hours of this long winter.

One afternoon, in the latter part of the winter, Lizzie
was seated near the fire in the kitchen, engaged in
reading a new book. Her aunt was in another room,
‘while Unele Robert, quite comfortable in his great
arm-chair, seemed dozing as usual. But she was quite
startled to hear him speak to her in a natural tone of voice.

“What are you doing, Lizzie?” he asked.

“T was reading, Uncle Robert,” Lizzie replied,
striving not to betray her surprise in her looks or
tones.

“You are very like your father, Lizzie. He was
always cither reading or studying when he was a boy.”
A flard School. 179

“Oh, Uncle Robart!” exclaimed Lizzie, eagerly,
“please tell me about my father! You know I can
hardly remember him at all, and no one has ever told
me much about him.” Lizzie trembled now, lest her
uncle’s mind should wander again before he could
speak to her of her father, and she drew a low chair
near his, and took one of his hands affectionately in
her own.

He seemed greatly pleased by this unusual attention
from Lizzie, and he retained the use of his faculties
wonderfully. Memory seemed to be especially awakened
this afternoon.

“Your father was not at all like me, Lizzie,” he said,
“not even when we were boys together. Richard was
tall, and strong, and handsome, while I was a weakly
child, with no love for either books or play. Richard
was two years older than I, and always much larger
and stronger. Te was a good boy—everybody loved
him. I was always disagreeable to every one, and
was always afraid to speak or be seen. I never
remember. that any one ever cared for me except my
mother. She was weak and sickly herself, and every
one said I was just like her. I suppose I was, for she
knew how to pity me, and she loved me.”

“My father loved you, I am sure, uncle,” said Lizzie,
who hung upon his words, the precious reminiscences
of her father’s boyhood, of which she had known
nothing until this moment.

“Richard was always good and kind,” her uncle
continued, “but he was so different from me that he
could not love me much, I suppose. He went to col-
lege when he was only sixteen years old, and after that


180 Lissie Hepburit,

we were not much together. But there was Helen -—.
Yes,. Helen loved her father once,” he added, in a
wandering way.

“Indeed she did!” exclaimed Lizzie, forgetting her-
self in a moment in the eager desire she had of seizing
this long-sought opportunity of speaking to him of
Helen. “She loved you dearly, uncle, and talked
to me about you the very day that she was taken
ill.”

“Did she, the littl one?” said Unele Robert, in a
fond, weak way. ‘Helen was so like mother. I
always loved Helen. But how strange it was that I
never knew we loved each other until last winter. My
little giv] told me many pleasant things about—about—.
Strange that I cannot remember anything that I wish
to so much!” and he passed his hand over his fore-
head, with a tired look, which recalled Helen to Lizzie’s
mind very vividly.

“ Helen told you about Jesus, you know,” said Lizzie,
in a soothing tone.

“Yes, yes! that was it. Mother told me in the
game way that my little girl learned in the Sunday-
school.”

“You love Jesus now, do you not, uncle?” asked
Lizzie, anxiously waiting for his answer before he
should relapse into the lethargic state again, which she
saw was already beginning to steal upon him. Oh,
how she longed in this moment to be assured, from his
own lips, that her poor, weak uncle was safe in the
life-boat !

“Ttceld my little girl that I would try to love Him’
and ask Him to save my soul,” said her uncle; “ but that
A Hard School. 181

was so long ago—so long ago”—he munaured. “I’ve
forgotten all about it, and I guess He has too.”

“Oh, no, He has not, Uncle Robert!” said Lizzie,
earnestly, “ He never forgets us. Shall I read to you
about him in Helen’s Testament? See here!” she
exclaimed, holding before his eyes the little red book
with its numerous white marks.

“ Yes, read,” he said, in a low voice.

Lizzie obeyed, turning from one marked place to
another, and becoming so much interested herself that
she was quite unprepared to hear the heavy breathing
which betokened the return of the stupor in which
her uncle was bound in mind and body most of the
time. ;

She was sorely disappointed, and although she
watched long and patiently for another opportunity to
speak to him, it never came. He never seemed, from
that afternoon, to have sufficient control of his mind
to converse intelligently upon any subject ; and at the
opening of spring he had passed rapidly towards a state
of idiocy, from which he never rallied.

Lizzie was puzzled to understand her aunt’s conduct
under this fresh calamity. It seemed, at times, that
she strengthened herself to endure in silence each new
phase of trouble, and that she was growing sterner and
harder with every new affliction. Lizzie was still
forced to silence in all her intercourse with her aunt,
excep$ upon the everyday affairs of their quiet
life.

It was a pleasant change for the young girl when the
vast beds of snow began to melt away, and she could
hear the rushing of the streams over their rocky beds,
182 Lizzie Hepburn.

near the old pasturage for her sheep, as they received
the great body of water which had been so long locked
upon their banks.

She knew that the opening of spring would bring
work which, she hoped, would compel her aunt to some
of her accustomed activity. For even if this brought
new cares and Jabours to herself, any change was
preferable to the dreary life of the past winter, while
it might prove more healthful to the soul and body
of Aunt Jane than the present state of stolid grief,
CHAPTER XX.

VISITORS.

see Carl ride up to the gate of the farm,
Hears leading another horse by the bridle. Having
ened both he walked leisurely up the path, and
entering the open door he greeted Lizzie and her aunt
with os utmost ease and pol anes:

Ii had been one of those days which, in early spring,
seem to greet us with the welcome assurance that the
long reign of winter is over; a day when the air is
sa@ft and balmy, when the bees swarm from their hives
and the flies from their hiding-places, and there is a
hum of stirring life, as if the leaves and the flowers
were rousing themselves and making ready to beautify
the earth again with their verdure and fragrance: a
day when the windows and doors are suffered to stand
wide open that the fresh air may wander in and out,
and displace the close-heated atmosphere of the long
sinter.

“T called, Miss Lizzie,” said Carl, after some talk
about the weather and kindred topics, “to invite you
to ride with me this fine evening.”


184 Lisste Hepburn.

“You must excuse me, Mr. Carl,’ said Lizzie,
blushing. “I know nothing at all about riding on
horseback.”

“T shall take great pleasure in teaching you the art,
Miss Lizzie,” said Carl, politely. “I have a very
gentle, well-trained horse for you, and I flatter myself
that you will find me a patient and capable teacher.
I am quite sure the exercise will prove exhilarating and
delightful.”

“T do not doubt that, Mr. Carl,” said Lizzie, quite
confused. “Still I must beg you to excuse me.”

“May I ask why, Miss Lizzie?” asked Carl,
smiling.

“T have no suitable habit for riding,” replied
Lizzie, honestly ; “and there is no time now to pre-
pare one.”

“TY think that can be very easily arranged, Miss
Lizzie,” persisted Carl, throwing a quick glance around
the room. If your aunt will permit me to do so, I
would suggest that a very suitable skirt could be made
from her black dress hanging against the wardrobe.
She is so much taller than you are that the skirt will
be quite sufficient.”

“You had better go, Lizzie,” said Mrs, Hepburn,
bluntly ; and to her great surprise she took the dress
down, and by the aid of Carl's knife ripped the skirt
from the waist, leaving it attached to the belt and .
ready for immediate use.

“Now, Miss Lizzie, please bring your cloth basque,
which I have often scen you wear, and your habit will
be complete,” said Carl, quietly.

Lizzie did not know how to resist this arrangement,
Visitors, 185

the very boldness of Carl rendering her subservient to
his will in spite of herself He was not accustomed to
have his will resisted, and understood very well how
to make others submit to him. Even her aunt seemed
to feel the magnetism of his power, for she assisted in
the adjustment of her skirt and basque with more
alacrity and interest than Lizzie had observed in her
for a long time.

“The hat you have worn this winter will be quite
jaunty, and finish your costume very well,” said Carl,
drawing on his gloves, as a hint to Lizzie that she
would need hers also.

Lizzie put on her hat and gloves, and followed Carl
to the gate, her cheek burning with vexation that she
had voluntarily placed herself again under his power,
and thus subjected herself to an influence she was so
powerless to resist. Besides, as she knew nothing
whatever about the exercise of riding, she feared she
might excite his ridicule by her awkwardness.

“ Place your foot firmly upon my hand, Miss Lizzie,”
said Carl, as he mounted and rode to her side. “ Sit
easily and quietly upon the saddle, and yield yourself
to his motions. You need not have the slightest fear,”
he added, as he instructed her as to the manner of
holding her whip and rein. ‘“ He has an easy gait and
will ride slowly at first, until you become accustomed
to it.”

They took the road leading off towards the old
pasture grounds, whither Lizzie had led her sheep so
many times. She soon became accustomed to the
gentle motion of her horse, and availed herself, with
her usual readiness, of the suggestions of Carl, who
186 Lissie Hepburn.

excelled in this art. She soon ventured to try an easy
trot, and finally a canter, her confidence increasing as
she found herself able to govern and guide the animal
without any difficulty. The exercise, so pleasant to
Lizzie, caused her cheeks to glow and her eyes to
sparkle with delightful excitement.

“Let us slacken our speed a little, Miss Lizzie,” said
Carl, reigning his own horse to a walk again. “TI
thought, perhaps, we might find some flowers this
evening.”

“Tt is almost too early, My. Carl,” replied Lizzie.

“Not for the anemones and violets, I think,” and
Carl raised himself in his saddle and glanced sharply
over the brown prairie. “Ride slowly about here,
Miss Lizzie, for a few moments,” he said ; “I will return
with some in a short time.”

He galloped off over the prairie,which was still soft
and wet from the freshet. Lizzie saw him spring from
his horse near the wooded banks of the stream, which
was now swollen to quite a respectable river, and bab-
bling loudly of its new importance.

Lizzie walked her horse about, while she waited for
Carl’s return, and patted his beautiful neck, talking to
him and thinking how fond she should grow of him, if
he were her own. It seemed a short time to her, when
Carl rode rapidly back, with quite a large bouquet,
which he placed in her hands. “Iwas sure there were
some flowers,” he said. “The modest little things were
stowed away in odd nooks and corners, but [ was deter-
mined to have them. There is always something
peculiarly beautiful to me, in these first breathings
of the earth, awaking from its long winter's sleep.”
Visitors. 187

“So sweet, so simple, and yet so lovely,” responded
Lizzie, securing the bouquet in the loose belt of her
dress. “I have learned some pleasant lessons from
these quiet little things, as they peered up through the
brown, dead grass and leaves, and breathed out their
lives and their fragrance often unnoticed by any one.”

+ “May I ask what those lessons are, Miss Lizzie?”
‘asked Carl.

“JY do not know that I can tell them, so that you
will understand me, Mr. Carl,” said Lizzie, flushing
beneath his calm blue eyes, now turned full upon her
face. “ When I have felt rebellions, as I often do, and
unwilling to stay quietly upon the farm, and to do all
sorts of disagreeable things, and to give up everything
pleasant to me, these flowers have seemed to rebuke
me, and to show that it might be possible to lead a
sweet and a noble life, if I would be ready to stay
where I was and fulfil all that was required of me
here, simply and faithfully.”

“Your analogy is not a failure, Miss Lizzie. Flowers
spring up anywhere, as it may chance. But you have
reason and will, and have chosen your own cireum-
stances.”

“No, I have not surely chosen my present circum-
stances,” said Lizzie, quickly. “I am sure I should
have chosen very differently.”

“Why, then, are you where you are to-day, Miss
Lizzie 1”

“Because, Mr. Carl,” said Lizzie, quite firmly, “I
believe that it was the will of One wiser than I am
that I should be just where Iam. I do not agree with
you that the flowers spring up by chance, anywhere, or
183 Lissie Hepburn.

that we make our own circumstances. And it has been
my happiness, on the whole, to submit to the will of
Him whom I firmly believe has chosen my lot for me
visely and lovingly.”

“T confess, Miss Lizzie,” said Carl, “that these
sentiments seem to me exceedingly slavish. I cannot
understand how any one can find happiness in such
an absolute renunciation of one’s will.”

“J knew we could not see these things in the same
light, Mr. Carl, so you will excuse me from speaking
any further of the lessons I have learned from the
flowers,” said Lizzic, who dreaded being drawn into
any argument with Carl.

“Have you ever studied botany, Miss Lizzie?” he
said, bowing assent to her request.

“A very little, with Mrs. Winthrop, before I re-
turned to the farm. Since that time, I have had no
opportunity to pursue the study.”

“T would like you to examine some of those speci-
mens under the microscope. I have one in my pocket,
and if you will alight a moment, I will show them to
you. There are some rocks yonder which will furnish
us pleasant seats.”

Lizzie willingly complied. The horses were fastened,
and the rocks found to be smooth and dry. Carl laid
open a specimen of each of the flowers, causing her to
examine minutely the stamens and pistils, the tiny
seed-vessels, the texture of the corolla and calyx, the
slender filaments and branching rootlets. And, as he
placed them under the microscope for her inspection,
he explained, in his own inimitable way, the use and
adaptation of each part of the flower,
Visitors. 189

“How strange it seems, Mr. Carl,” said Lizzie, who
had been deeply interested in all he had told her,
“that these flowers should grow side by side, being
nourished by the same earth and the same moisture,
and warmed by the same sun, and yet one should he
pure whitg, while the other is a rich purple and gold.”

“Yes, and goon they will be surrounded by yellow
butter-cups and blue lark-spurs, and the crimson queen
of the prairie, and a host of other flowers, of every
shade of colouring, yet all drawing their hues from the
same substances.”

“Can you explain how this can be, Mr. Carl?”
asked Lizzie.

“T confess that I cannot, Miss Lizzie. The student
of nature will frequently encounter mysterics, to which
he will give names, perhaps, but which he is unable to
explain, with the light that he now possesses. These,
doubtless, will all be explained in the future, when the
human mind, now thoroughly awake and alive, will
grasp the mysteries that remain, as it has many in the
past, and make them clear as day.” .

Lizzie rose and silently followed Carl. Te assisted
her to mount her horse, and, seating himself in his own
saddle, they turned towards home.

“May I ask your thoughts, Miss Lizzie?” said Carl,

s she rode slowly and silently along.

“TJ was thinking, Mr. Carl,” said Lizzie, with some
hesitation, but with considerable firmness in her tone,
“that there is, there must be a God.”

“Why?” asked Carl. “From what have you drawn
such a conclusion ¢”

“From the flowers, this evening,”

rveplied Lizzie,
190 Lisste Hepburi.

with a little more confidence. “I cannot think that
so much beauty, order, adaptation, variety and perfec-
tion could possibly be the result of mere chance. These
flowers, if I had no other reason for believing it, have
taught me that there must be a Maker of them, and
that He must be wise and good.”

“Let me assure you, Miss Lizzie,” said Carl, coldly,
“if you are to study nature from such a stand-point,
- you will involve yourself in great difficulties at once.
Study nature and call it nature, not the works of God,
or by any other phrase coined by bigotry. You will
then find her a delightful study, constantly presenting
new attractions and new delights.”

“But why is it necessary to dismiss the idea of a
God while I study nature?” demanded Lizzie.

“ Because, as I said before, you will involve yourself
in difficulties that will perplex you, and which you
cannot solve. The assertions of the Bible will be con-
tradicted by the deductions of science, and at every
step you will find it hard to reconcile things as they
exist and as they have existed, with the idea of a God
as presented in that book. It is far safer and plea-
santer to accept nothing as truth which you are unable
to explain, to believe no further than is clear to calm
and pure reason.”

“And yet, Mar. Carl,” said Lizzie, timidly, “ you
say there are many things mysterious in nature which
you believe, and still are unable to explain.”

“ That is true, Miss Lizzie ; but you recollect that I
think and know that all these will be explained, in
time, by the unaided power of the human intellect.”

Lizzie made no reply, but touched her horse with the
; Visitors, 19t
whip, and they rode for some time at a quick canter,
slackening their speed as they drew near the farm-
house. As they stopped at the gate, but, before they
alighted, Carl drew a book from his pocket, and said :

“ Miss Lizzie, I have no time now to discuss these
questions as I would like to do with you. But as you
have enjoyed your ride so much, I hope I shall have
the pleasure of repeating it frequently during this sum-
mer. In the meantime, may I ask you to take this
book and read it carefully? It will throw more light
upon your mind, in relation to these subjects, than I
can in a limited conversation. I shall be happy to talk
with you about it some future time.”

Lizzie took the book. It was a handsomely-bound
copy of an attractive but poisonous work. She knew
nothing of the book or its author, and, as she held it
in her hand, she became lost in thought. She remem-
bered that the influence of Carl and his words, from
her first acquaintance, had been hurtful to her inward
peace and enjoyment; that he was considered by her

“Christian friends as a dangerous enemy to the cause of
her Saviour ; and she realized that just then she might
choose either to subject herself repeatedly to this influ-
ence, or turn from it now, and so secure a perfect
release from it. She was weak and helpless, but found
strength, at this moment, silently to lift her heart to
God in prayer for help, and it was well.

“Mr. Carl,” she said, at length, her voice trembling,
but her eye meeting his firmly, “I know that I am
quite ignorant; that in all knowledge you are vastly
my superior. You have given me much pleasure and
instruction this evening and at other times, for which
i92 Lisste Hepburn,

I am truly grateful. But I must tell you, frankly, I
do not wish to think as you do. I believe there is a
God ; I believe in Him as He is presented to me in
the Bible; I believe there is a Jesus, and that I am
His child, and I believe there is a heaven: ae

“ And is this all your ereed, Miss Lizzie?” interrupted
Carl, his lip curling scornfully.

“No,” said Lizzie, undaunted by his look and tone,
“TI believe that there has been a change wrought
within me, which I cannot explain, for it must be felt
to be understood. But it has brought so much peace
and joy to me even here, where everything outwardly
has been so unpleasant, that I cannot give it up. I
believe it is the germ of that which wrought so great
a change in my dear cousin Helen, and made her so
willing to die, young as she was, and that it will pre-
pare me to meet that event with calmness.”

“ And may I ask the conclusion of this proclaiming
of your ereed?” demanded Carl, impatiently.

“Yes, Mr. Carl, it is that I am determined to trust
in the God of the Bible, and must decline placing
myself at any future time in circumstances where my
faith will be attacked until I am better qualified to
defend it.”

“Truth should never fear the light, Miss Lizzie,”
Carl replied.

“ But even truth may receive injury while entrusted
to hands weak as mine. I love the truth, and will
defend it as far as I am qualified to do so; but I would
not be an equal champion against you, Mr. Carl.”

“ But surely you will read my book, Miss Lizzie?”
he asked,


Visitors. 193

“Excuse me, Mr. Carl; but I must retum it to you.
I know nothing about it, it is true; but it seems to
me that I do not need to arm myself with your weapons,
in order to better understand and defend the truth, as
I believe it.”

Carl took the book and replaced it in his pocket,
dismounted, and assisted Lizzie from her horse. As he
opened the gate, he said, coldly, ‘‘I am, then, to under-
stand that you decline receiving any further attentions
and assistance from me. Is that your decision, Miss
Lizzie ?”

“T do not wish to be rude, Mr. Carl, or to seem not
to appreciate your kind attentions ; but you will pardon
me, if I say honestly I do not think they will help me
to walk in the path I have chosen for myself, as it is
wholly different from yours,” said Lizzie, with great
embarrassment.

“ Tn other words, you wish to say, ‘Get thee hence,
Satan !’” said Carl, with a sneer.

Lizzie had the courage to bow assent.

“T accept your decision, Miss Lizzie,” was his sole
rejoinder, as he sprang into the saddle and rode away.
She never saw him again.

She experienced a sense of relief as she turned to
enter the house. The tempter, in this form at least,
had forsaken her, and she felt stronger for the effort,
painful as it had been to her.

“ Mrs. Winthrop!” she exclaimed, as opening the
door, she saw that lady sitting in the farm-kitchen,
quite alone.

“Yes, Iam here waiting for you, my dear,” she
said, warmly returning Lizzie’s kiss.

: 0
194 Lissie Hepburn.

“ Have you waited long? Where is Aunt Jane?”

“No, I've not waited long. Your aunt was not at
home; but this nice large kitchen looked so inviting
that I thought I would wait here. I believed you
would not be gone long.”

“Tam sorry I was out at all.”

“T am not, for you have had a pleasant ride. The
avening will be so mild, that I can easily ride home
after the moon has risen. So when you have laid aside
your habit, we will talk fast, for I have much to say to
you in a short time.”

“YT am all ready now,” said Lizzie, who seated her-
self in a moment by the side of her friend. /

“ First, tell me of your ride, Lizzie. Was not that
Carl Wahlmar ?”

“Yes, but as this has been my first ride, it will be
my last ;” and Lizzie proceeded to relate the circum-
stances of the afternoon, and the conversation she had
had with Carl.

“You were quite right, my dear,” said Mrs. Win-
throp. ‘While we pray, ‘Lead us not into tempta-
tion,’ we have no right deliberately to place ourselves
where we will be sure to be tempted. Nor is it safe
to stand halting between two opinions. I am very glad
you have been helped to be firm in this matter. Now
tell me what you have been doing all these long months.”

Lizzie related the manner in which she had spent
her time, and the reason why she could not come to
town before the great snow-storm, which had held her
a prisoner at home through the winter.

“ And are you sorry that you have remained on the
farm ?”
Visitors. 195

“ Oh, I have been so lonely and discouraged, and—~
discontented, too, Mrs. Winthrop,” said Lizzie, the
tears rushing to her eyes. “ But I am glad I came for
Helen's sake, and that I have stayed for Uncle Robert.
He needs my care so much nearly all the time now.”

“ And Iam quite sure you will yet rejoice for your
own sake, my dear,” said Mrs. Winthrop, tenderly.
“Tt has been a time of trial and disappointment, par-
ticularly in our plans for your education. But the
Great Teacher knows best what training we need.”

“ And yet my trials here have not been at all such as
I anticipated,” said Lizzie. “My aunt is not unkind
as she once was.”

“We need variety of discipline in our training, you
know, Lizzie. But as I must be off soon, I must ask
you if you think you can bear a little bad news just
now, dear?”

“J do not know, not very bad, I hope?”

“ Only as it involves fresh disappointments for your-
self.”

“ Please tell me then at once, Mrs. Winthrop, I shall
never be any stronger than I am now, I fear.”

“Well, I have decided to close my house, and to
spend the summer travelling with Paul.”

“That is bad news for me, indeed, for how can I
get along without you, Mrs. Winthrop?” said Lizzie,
her eyes filling quickly with tears.

“T have hesitated only on your account, Lizzie.
Paul only made a short visit home last fall, as his room-
mate, Mr. Stevens, to whom he is mueh attached, and
whose health has become seriously impaired, wished him
to spend a portion of his time with him. This summer
196 Lissie Hepburn.

he is to accompany him in journeying tor health, and
Paul insists that I become one of the party.”

“T ought to be glad to have you go, and I think I
shall be after a while,” said Lizzie, struggling with her
feelings. “But I shall be lost without you.”

“T shall be made happy to know that youare bravely
meeting this, and any other trial you may have, dear.

Remain patiently where you are, good will come of it, I
am perfectly sure, although you do not see how it can be.”

Lizzie adjusted her friend’s shawl and accompanied
her to the gate.

“T shall send you a box of new books, Lizzie, before
I go,” said Mrs. Winthrop, cheerfully, “and will write
to you of all that I see new or interesting. You may
fill up your letters with questions and difficulties, and
I will try to solve them, if possible.”

“Thank you, Mrs. Winthrop, you are so kind!”
said Lizzie, and forced herself to give her friend a
cheerful good-bye. But as she watched the carriage as
it disappeared over the hill, tears dropped from her
eyes, and she felt, oh, so desolate !

. Suddenly she thought of Uncle Robert lying in his
small dark room alone. He had not had his supper,
the fire in the kitchen had burned low, Aunt Jane was
still out, and the evening tasks were to be done. She
hastened in, and there was work enough to keep her
busy until a late bed-time, when her aunt came in.
Lizzie was glad to seek her own room, and too tired to
lic awake long.

Work, blessed work! Was ever a greater blessing hid-
den beneath deserved punishment, than when fallen man
was doomed to eat his bread “in the sweat of his face”?
CHAPTER XXI,
THE WEDDING.

HE wedding was a quiet one. It was a time of

mingled joy and sadness. The hearts of
Father Pomroy and his wife were comforted
with the hope that while they were giving up their last
child, they were to be rewarded with a son who should
be, with her, the stay of their declining years. To the
few friends who gathered about the fair young bride that
evening she seemed radiant with new-found happiness.
But deep in the recesses of her own soul there were
disquiet and uncertainty, that made her shrink from
trying an unknown future with him who had taken
from her her Lord, but had given her nothing in His
place.

And as she received the tender embrace of her aged
parents, she felt that she had in a measure severed her-
self from a love that had ever been faithful and true,
- for one that was new and yet to be tried.

The wedding over, Carl proceeded still further to de-
velop the plans which he had long devised and retained
‘in the depths of his own mind. He.had often told
Jessie that it was his wish to leave Monona, But she


198 Lissie Hepburn.

fondly hoped that he would not take her from her
home and parents while they lived. But he had fully
determined upon carrying his plan into effect, and had
quietly completed every necessary arrangement for if
before his marriage. Soon after that event he directed
Jessie to inform her parents of his intentions in order
to prepare them for it when the time should come.
His command fell coldly upon her heart, for she well
knew the grief it would cost them, so she deferred it
from day to day.

Carl urged her no further, but steadily adhered to
his purpose, and when all was ready, resolved to
announce the tidings himself. Te came in one day,
when Jessie was seated with her work, talking with the
old people. She knew at once what his message was
to be, and she sat almost paralyzed with fear of what
the consequences might be to them.

To her great relief, Carl assumed his most gentle and
winning manner, as he said: “T have received letters
from Germany to-day.”

« Ah! and are all well in the home in Fatherland?”
inquired Father Pomroy, kindly.

“No, the news is painful. My mother is danger-
ously ill, and they require my presence at home as soon
as possible.”

“You must go then at once,” said Father Pomroy.

“Yes, certainly, by the first steamer. Can you be
ready, Jessie, so that we can leave for New York the
first of next week?”

“Oh, must Jessie go too?” exclaimed her mother, in
a feeble broken voice.

“Certainly, mother,” said Carl; and Jessie was glad
The (Wedding. 199

that his tone was kind, though firm. “My mother, if
yet alive, must see my wife, and give us her blessing.”

“But how can I give up my only child? What
shall we do without her? Remember how old and
helpless we are, Carl!” pleaded the mother.

“T have thought of all that, mother,” said Carl,
kindly, “and I do not mean to leave you without
some one to take Jessie's place. J have already secured
for you a good, capable girl, who will not allew you to
suffer for want of care.”

“Cana hireling take the place of a loving daughter 1”
asked the mother, reproachfully.

“Certainly not, but I hope it will not be necessary
for us to remain away for along time. But remember
that my parents are old too, and I have not seen them
for many long years. Would you have me refuse to
attend this call, which may be their last 1”

“We will take good care of Jessie for you, if you
will entrust her to us until your return,” Father
Pomroy ventured to say,

“T cannot go without my wife, sir,’ Carl replicd,
respectfully, but decidedly. “I could not appear be-
fore them without the daughter of whom I have
written.”

Mother Pomroy was now weeping bitterly. Carl
grew impatient, but still preserving his usual calm ex-
terior, he said: “ Our time will be so short, Jessie,
that you had better commence your preparations at
once. The servant will be here this afternoon, and
will assist you, if necessary. I understand that Mrs.
* Winthrop leaves for New York soon. I will sce her,
and it may be we can make one party. That will be
200 Lissie Hepburn.

more pleasant for you,” he added, kindly, as he left the
room.

Jessie felt truly thankful that the dreadful announce-
ment had been made, and with so much regard to the
feelings of her parents. During the few days that
remained she was kept wholly occupied with the
necessary preparations for her long journey, and Carl
made every effort to divert her mind from painful
thought, by pleasant pictures of the new scenes which
would open to her in the different countries they were
to visit.

Father and Mother Pomroy followed all her move-
ments with fond eyes, and tenderly treasured her every
word. They made no more complainis but to Him to
whom they had for long years unburdened all their
griefs. And He knew how coldly desolate their home

‘would be, when they sent from it their last darling—
Jessie, the child of their old age.

Mrs. Winthrop proved an invaluable friend during
these trying days. She hastened her own plans, so as
to accompany Jessie as far as New York, promising her
mother that she would go with her to the steamer and
secure her comfort in every possible way. Her sym-
pathy and cheerfulness greatly comforted the old
people.

The day came at last. Jessie pale and tearful threw
herself in the arms of her father and then of her
mother, to receive their farewell and blessing. Few
words were spoken, for words seemed too weak to ex-
press the emotions which almost overwhelmed them.
They stood in the doorway side by side on that
beautiful summer morning, and saw the light of their
The Wedding. 201

home depart from them with hearts sinking with mis-
giving and grief:

“Though He slay me, yet will I trust in Hin,’”
murmured the mother, tears coursing silently down her
cheeks.

“Yes, we will, dear Mary,” replied the good old
man, reverently. “ His ways are hid from us now ;
but though he may cause our lamp to go out in
darkness, we know that it will be well with us in the
morning.”

The journey to New York was a pleasant one.
Jessie, diverted by its novelties, grew cheerful and even
merry, although she sent many a wistful thought back
to the home she had left, and the safe love that had
sheltered her thus far. On the steamer she parted
from Mrs. Winthrop, and then realized, as she had not
done before, that she had really entered upon an untried
future, whose happiness was to be made or destroyed
by him to whom she had given the love of her young
heart.

After a prosperous voyage, they landed in a large
strange city, and Carl informed her that their journey
was at an end. Deceit was no longer necessary, and he
could now safely expose the plan formed in the cold
selfishness of his heart, by which he was to blight the
young life which he had promised to love and cherish.
Jessie heard no more of the home or dying mother of
her husband, but, forbidden to remonstrate, she was
forced quietly to submit to his arrangements.

A large, elegantly furnished house was purchased,
and over this Jessie was established as mistress. To
Jessie’s dismay it soon became a noted centre for
202 Lizsie Hepburi.

gainbling and its attendant vices, where were gathered
from time to time persons from whom a pure woman
would shrink with abhorrence. Carl exerted all his
varied talents and accomplishments to allure to this
house the victims from whose ruin he was rapidly ac-
quiring a vast wealth. And he required his young
wife to give splendid entertainments, and to aid him in
his wicked plans by her beauty and superior attainments
In music.

This was abhorrent to Jessie, and her absolute
refusal to participate in his crimes subjected her con-
stantly to outbursts of his imperious temper, to harsh
reproofs and threats of violence, or to days of cold
neglect and disdainful silence, still harder to bear.

With the love and constancy of a true woman, she
sought to win her husband back to a better life by
every gentle means in her power. But it was all in vain.

We lift the veil that hides the next few years in the
life of Jessie, and that completes one of those tragedies
in real life, and mark the history of the motley popu-
lation which make up our villages and young cities in
the West. é

At length there came a weary month in which she
never saw her husband. As the days came and went,
and he still stayed away, her heart was filled with sick-
ening dread of some greater evil than had yet befallen
her. Another month succeeded, and still he came
not, and Jessie began to admit the fear to her reluc-
tant heart that her husband had forsaken her. And
when she was forced to know that this was certainly
true, all of life and hope seemed for ever blotted out to
the poor young wife, She aroused herself from this
The Wedding. 203

terrible blow, for the sake of her boy, the little Fritz,
and formed her plans for the future.

It was then that her resolution was taken. “I will
arise and go to my Father, and say unto him, I have
sinned.” She returned to the ever-compassionate
Father, confessing her sinful wandering from His love,
and humbly prayed to be received back, even as she
was in her wretchedness and great need. And while
yet afar off she found herself enfolded in the patient,
forgiving love, which waits only for the shortening
shadows that betoken the return of His penitent ones,
to welcome them home with songs of everlasting joy.

To return home was the demand of her broken heart,
hungry for its quiet peace and tender love ; but in all

- these cruel years she had not received one word from
her parents, or known that they had heard a word
from her Wer heart ascended in one strong cry, that
she might be permitted to find her parents yet alive, as
she set sail for New York, accompanied only by her
darling boy and his faithful nurse. And here, too, she
found the mercy she craved ; for ere long she was joy-
fully welcomed to her father’s house by the dear old

- couple who had mourned her as dead, and she was shel-
tered in the strong love which had blessed her childhood.

Chastened and subdued Jessie walked henceforth in
a humble nearness to her God. Her buoyancy was
indeed gone for ever, and the house no longer resounded
to the blithe songs of Father Pomroy’s “ home-bird.”
But the tender love and care with which she cheered
the declining years of her parents, satisfied their hearts,
while the ceaseless prattle and innocent mirth of hex
beautiful boy Fritz, drove the shadows from their home.
CHAPTER XXII

TROUBLE AT THE FARM.




HE spring and summer passed more rapidly
than Lizzie had anticipated. True, they
brought no pleasant change for her from
the life she had led at the farm; but she was learning
to tread the path she had ison bidden to walk with
quiet, if not cheerful submission. Her aunt had
aroused herself somewhat from her silent indifference,
and had directed the operations of the farm-work, as
the spring advanced, to Lizzie’s great relief. And the
time was so fully occupied during these busy months,
that she was hardly conscious of their flight.

She found some time to read, and perseveringly pur-
sted the judicious course suggested by Mrs. Winthrop,
and was laying up astore of useful information, invalu-
able to her in after years. She maintained a regular
correspondence with that lady, whose letters and
counsels were a constant source of pleasure and profit,
beguiling many hours of loneliness.

A sentence in one of these letters particularly served
to check her, when tempted to repinings. “ Be patient
and faithful, dear, for you, small as you may seem in
Trouble at the Farin. 205

your own eyes, are a part of God’s great creation, and
your fidelity in your little corner is necessary to the
working out of His great plan, which embraces all in
designs of infinite benevolence.”

James left home early in the spring, for one of those
excursions, the object of which, as usual, he concealed
from his mother, although he was aware that they filled
her with unéasiness and alarm. ‘This was especially
the case now, when the summer drew to its close and
he was still absent, and no news had been received
from him. His mother’s anxiety on his account be-
came more and more harassing, and the lines of
trouble upon her face deepened, as month after month
passed away, and brought her no tidings.

She deprived herself of necessary food and_ rest,
rarely retiring until after midnight, going often to the
door to watch for his coming, or to listen for his distant
footfall along the silent street. And when the harvests
were gathered, and the hurry of the season was over,
Lizzie perceived, to her dismay, that her aunt was
rapidly relapsing into the state of silent gloom which
had rendered her so wretched all the past winter.

It was late in September before James came home.
Lizzie was awakened one night by his heavy step
ascending the walk, and a moment after she heard his
voice, as he greeted his mother, who was waiting for him
asusual. She welcomed him with more tenderness than
Lizzie had ever observed in her aunt, and James’s voice
was so gentle and affectionate, that she was glad, for
once, that he had returned home. He inquired after
his mother’s health and that of his father, and how
matters were progressing upon the farm, and with so
206 Lissie Hepburia.

much apparent interest, that Lizzie, who could not
avoid hearing all that was said, hoped that the usual
quarrels between them would not take place.

“ You are looking thin and pale, mother,” said James,
almost tenderly. ‘I am really sorry to see it. You
have worked too hard, I think.” ;

“Tt’s not work, James,” said his mother. “TI can
stand work better than worry. Why have you stayed
away so long, and sent me no word?”

“Oh! you know I’m no hand at writing letters, and
business has kept me away. But I have thought about
you often enough,” he said, affectionately.

“T would have been better suited with deeds than
thoughts,” said his mother, coldly ; for, as Lizzie sur-
mised, her suspicions began to be aroused by this un-
ustial demeanour of her undutiful son. “ You have
certainly shown very little interest or care for us of late.”

“On the contrary, mother,” replied James, smoothly.
“T have been more occupied for you than for myself,
since I’ve been gone.”

“Tn what way?” demanded his mother.

* [ve been looking out for a new home further west,”
replied James.

“ For yourself, I suppose?”

“No; for us all, mother. There are few of us now,
and we will not separate.”

Mis. Hepburn made no reply. James proceeded : “I
have long felt that this locality was an unhealthy
one, especially for father ; and, beside, there are better
chances to make money in the place I have chosen.”

“You have certainly been very considerate,” said his
mother, bitterly.
Trouble at the Faritt. 207

“T have tried to be so,” said James, humbly. “ The
place is perfectly healthy, and we can grow rich as we
please in a short time.”

“ A fine prospect, truly,” replied Mrs. Hepburn, sar-
eastically. “But I prefer to wait until you go before
us to this new country and grow rich yourself.”

“JT do not wish to go alone, mother,” said James,
with a self-cbntrol that surprised Lizzie. “I came
home purposely to pursuade you to sell the farm, and
go with me to the place I have chosen, and which you
cannot help liking.”

* And then what?” said his mother.

“Then I will settle down and do so much better
in the future that I will make you forget the past.”

“Why not do this here? We can never find a
better farm; and as to health, we are as well here as
we should be anywhere.”

“T cannot stay here, mother,” said James.

“Cannot? Whyt”

“Well, no matter why, now; but if you will scll
the farm and come with me, you will soon see the
reason yourself.”

“ But the farm cannot be sold, James,” said Mrs.
Hepburn; and her tone, though low and kind, was
even and firm, and Lizzie understood perfectly well
that it precluded all possibility of relenting from what
she had just said.

“Why not, mother? The farm is in your own
hands, as I well know, and you can sell it if you will.
A farm like this, so near town, is valuable, and will
find purchasers easy enough.”

I know that very well, but I de not choose to sell
08 Lissie Hephtrn,

ht

the farm. The property is under my control now, and
Ido not intend to put it out of my hands at present.”

“ You can control it there as well as here, you know,
mother,” said James, persuasively.

“Tt is perfectly useless to say eny more about
this matter, James,” said his mother, impatiently.
“ This farm shall not be sold !”

James sprang angrily from his chair, and now his
voice was loud and as determined as his mother’s.
“T tell you, this farm must be sold!” he exclaimed.

“Must be sold!” repeated his mother, angrily.
“ Who'll force me to sell?”

“J will! I must raise some hundreds of dollars
within a very short time or leave the country! “So
take your choice !”

“What can you mean, James?” said his mother, the
firmness of her tones broken by the alarm his words
had aroused.

“ Just this! and you may as well face the truth at
once. The laws of this State call me a felon, and
there are rascals upon my track even now, who would
only be too glad to give me a stone house to live in and
a rope for a collar!” said James, laughing bitterly.

“Oh, James! James! has it come to this?” cried
his mother, and the concealed anguish of many months
was wrung from the stern heart at this moment.

“ Yos, it has! and either you must settle it or I will.
This way ! Look !” and he pointed a pistol at his head.

_ “No danger of that,” replied his mother, contemp-
tuously. ‘“ You are too great a coward to use a pistol
on yourself or others.”

“ You'll see!” said James, fiercely. “Tl never be
Trouble at the Farm. 209

caught alive by these law-hounds; you may bei your
life on that !”

“But what have you done, Jamcs?” asked his
mother. “And if I sell the farm, how will that help
the matter?” ;

“Tt will save me from everything, mother,” said
James, lowering and softening his voice. “Sell the
farm and give me a few hundreds of the moncy and I
can settle a part of the business; then we can leave
with the rest, before anything else comes to light to
harm me. Once out of the State, and I am safe
enough. ‘Will you do this to save me from disgrace
aud a prison?”

A long silence ensued. Mrs. Hepburn covered her
face with her hands, and struggled with her emotions,
lest they should overcome her. Her stern heart might
break beneath the troubles which had been sent upon
her, but she would not weep before the son, who had
dealt her the most cruel blow of all.

At length she said, in a low, steady voice, “The
farm cannot be sold, James, even to save you from
punishment |”

“ But why not?” James asked, petulantly.

“Tt does not belong to me !”

“What! Is it possible that you have already sold
ib?” c

“No, the farm is not sold, nor have I the slightest
intention of selling it, for I have no right to do so.”

“ Pray, who has the right, then?”

“This farm rightfully belongs to Lizzie, James,” said
Mrs. Hepburn, as if the words had been forced from
her very unwilling lips.

P
210 Lissie Hepburia.

“To Lizzie!” shouted James, with a terrible oath.
“ Curse that girl! She has always been in my road,
since I was so unlucky as to know her. Pray, how does
the farm belong to her?”

“Unless you wish Lizzie to hear all you say, you
had better lower your voice,” said his mother, calmly.
“ As to what I mean to say, the sooner she hears it the
better. This farm was bought with the money that
was left for Lizzie by her parents. Consequently it
rightfully belongs to her.”

“ Has it ever been transferred to her?” asked James,
in a low voice.

“No, it was conveyed to me; but I intend it shall
be made over to her before another day closes,” said
his mother, decidedly.

“Does Lizzie know anything about this?”

“No; she has not the slightest suspicion that wo
have been living so many years at her expense.”

“Who has turned up that is likely to make trouble
about the matter?”

“ No one; there is not a soul alive, I suppose, that
knows the secret. This is the first time it has passed
my lips.”

“Why need she ever know it, then? Why beggar
yourself and ruin me while she knows nothing of her
rights? The seeret is safe enough with you and me.
She has done well enough all along; let her be as she
is |”

“No, James,” said Mrs. Hepburn, firmly. “I will
not keep this farm in my unlawful possession another
day! The secret has burned in my soul long enough.
It has been a burden too great for me to bear ever since
Trouble at the Farm. 211

Helen died. I knew then that I ought to restore
what I had held wrongfully so many years, and I
promised I would do so; but I have never yet ful-
filled my promise.”

“Who did you make such a foolish promise to?”
interrupted James.

“To God Almighty !” said Mrs. Hepburn, solemnly.

James laughed insolently. “Iwas not aware that
you had become a ranter,” he sneered. ‘I thought
you did not believe there was a God?”

“T did not once believe it, that is true, James. But
when Helen sickened and died in the awful way that
she did, I found out that there was a God. And
He has been knocking with an iron hammer at the
door of my heart ever since! I knew, then, that I
was rushing upon the thick bosses of the Almighty,
and that I must give up the fight or perish. When
I found Helen in her wild ravings that morning, I
knew it was the punishment sent upon me for the
wrongs I had done to Lizzie during all these years ;
and a voice has haunted me ever since, everywhere,
demanding. restitution. Over Helen’s cold, dead body,
I believed that I had yielded. I promised God
Almighty then that I would give back my unlaw-
ful possessions.”

“ How absurd |” muttered James.

“ But I have never done it!” continued his mother,
not heeding his angry disapprobation. “ And ever
since this property has been like a mountain of lead

‘upon my soul, a curse by day and by night! T have
loved this farm, and clutched it with a hard grip; and
the Almighty is showing me that it is vain to contend
212 Lissie Hepburn.

with Him. His judgments pursue ime everywhere.
First, your miserable father has gone into that wretched
state, a weight for me to drag the rest of my days. I
knew why that was permitted to be, but I hugged my sin
- more closely than ever. I might have known a heavier
blow was preparing forme. And it has come to-night !
I will contend no longer! You my only child, whom,
since Helen’s death, I have loved as I never did any-
thing in the world before, you have brought disgrace
and ruin upon yourself and wretchedness upon me.
Better that you had died, as she did, than to live to
curse me as you have done !”

A great sob was wrung from the heart of this hard
woman. All resentment that had arisen in Lizzie’s
mind, as she learned, for the first time, the wrong that
had been done to herself, was lost in the sincere sym-
pathy she now felt for her aunt. But she was still
forced to quietly listen to the conversation.

“Mother!” exclaimed James, after a short pause,
“‘T never heard such an outrageous piece of folly. You
are too silly and superstitious to listen to any reason
to-night. All you have said about promises to the
Almighty is nonsense! If He knows or cares any-
thing about our affairs, He'll not betray us to others ;
and as no one else can reveal the truth, will you be
such a fool as to sacrifice a good property, secure in
your own power, for the most absurd notion that ever
crept into your head ?”

“There is no need that any one should reveal
this secret, James,” replied his mother, in a broken
voice. “TI tell you it is gnawing at my soul like
the worm that never dies. I shall never have rest
Trouble at the Farm. 213

until my promise is fulfilled and restitution made
to Lizzie.”

“Well, if you persist in such a silly step, why need
you give back the full price of the farm to her? It is
surely worth much more than the original purchase-
money. Listen tome. I can tell you how you can satisfy
your squeamish notions, and neither beggar yourself
nor me.” ;

“What can you tell me that will give me peace?”
asked his mother, in a troubled voice.

“Sell the farm, and from the proceeds repay the
original purehase-money to Lizzie. Then let her take
care of herself, and you retain the rest of the money.
It will take a considerable sum to get me out of this
scrape in which I am caught ; but if you will pay that,
we will take father, and in the new place J have
selected we can be happy together once more.”

Mrs. Hepburn listened in silence. James seemed
encouraged, and proceeded: “You shall never regret
giving your consent to my plan. I promise to leave
off all my bad habits and settle down and make you
forget the trouble I have caused you. Will you do
this, mother, to save me from prison, and, if it comes
to that, from a wretched death ?”

James’s voice was pleading and persuasive, and he
had evidently moved his mother deeply.

Another long silence followed. Lizzie lay in almost
breathless quiet, uncertain what she ought to do. Her
first impulse was to rise, dress herself, and go down and
resign her rights to the farm to her cousin. And if he
would indeed reform his life, and make her aunt happy
in the future, she would promise entire secrecy concern-
214 Lissie Hepburn.

ing the whole matter. But her judgment dictated that
she ought not to take so important a step without advice ;
so she waited the conclusion of the dispute between
her aunt and James.

At last she heard her aunt say, in a firm voice :
“ James, I will not consent even to this; even to save
you, my only child, from deserved disgrace.”

James sprang from his chair with such force as to
throw it with violence to the floor, and cursed his
mother with fearful oaths. She made no reply to this
outbreak of his furious temper, but when he was quiet
she said: “I will do this for you: Go tothe place you
have chosen, and I will follow you. Begin to live like
a decent man, and I will help you to acquire a property
you can honestly call your own. The loose property
upon the farm I am willing to sell, and from it we can
realize enough to begin in a small way in a new country.
You are young and strong, and I shall be able to work
for many years. We shall do well enough together.
Will you consent to this?”

“No, never!” said James, angrily. “I won’t go a
beggar! Sell the farm, and let me have enough to
clear me of this scrape, and give me a decent start, or
and I mean it—you shall never see my face again !”
“ You will never frighten me by such threats, James,”
said Mrs. Hepburn, calmly. ‘“ My mind is made up.”

“And you will find that Iam in dead earnest, too !”
replied James. “TI tell you I must not be seen about
here by daylight much longer. If you force me to go
away, it shall be to-night, and for ever! Sell the farm,
or I swear you shall never see my face again! Now,
then, yes or no! Will you sell or not?”


Trouble at the Farm. 215

“James, Tcannct! I dare not! I will not!” said
his mother, in a tone of utter wretchedness.

James strode heavily from the house, and closed the
door, with a crash, behind him.

Lizzie now rose quietly, and hastily dressing,
descended to the farm kitchen with a noiseless step.
Her aunt was bent over the table her head resting
upon her folded arms, while great sobs shook her
strong frame, and tears dropped rapidly from her eyes.
Lizzie glided softly to her side, and placing her arm
affectionately around her neck, she whispered, “I am
so sorry for you, Aunt Jane!”

“Why don’t you curse me too, child,” demanded her
aunt.

“ Because I love you, Aunt Jane,” said Lizzie,
quietly. ;

“ Don’t lie to me, Lizzie!”? The words were harsh,
but there was a hungry yearning in her tones; and
Lizzie understood what they meant. “You cannot
love me. Why should you?”

“T did not love you once, Aunt Jane,” said Lizzie,
frankly. “I loved no one but myself once. But
Jesus has taught me to love Him, and since then I
love everybody. I wish you would love Jesus, too,
Aunt Jane, He—”

“Don’t talk to me about that, Lizzie!” interrupted
her aunt, hastily. “It is too late for that !”

“T am sure it is not, Aunt Jane,” Lizzie ventured to
say. ‘It is never too late to love Jesus while we are
in this world.”

“T tell you not to speak to me of that now, child,”
said Mrs. Hepburn, in her decided manner, which
216 Lissie Hepburn,

Lizzie never dared to oppose. “ There is another
matter I must get off my mind first, or it will drive
me wild. It is about this farm—”

“JT know all about that now, Aunt Jane,” said
Lizzie, gently. “I happened to be awake when James
came home, and could not help hearing all that was
said.”

“Then you know that I stole your money, when you
were a little, helpless child, and that I kept my secret
from you and from everyone, until the Almighty found
me out. And you know that I have kept back all
that was rightfully yours, all these years?” :

“You have given me a home, Aunt Jane, and food
and clothes.” :

“Don't throw that in my face, child!” exclaimed
Mrs. Hepburn, bitterly. “I kept you like a beggar,
you know I did! and worked you like a dog!”

“Let us forget it all now, Aunt Jane,” said Lizzie,
soothingly. “ Let me be your child, and love me, for
dear Helen’s sake, and we shall yet be very happy
together, I am sure.”

“Oh, don’t speak to me of my poor little Helen,”
cried her aunt, with a strong, sudden sob. Oh, if she
had called me-‘ mother’ just once! Oh, if I could
only have made her understand how sorry I was that
I had not always been kind to her !”

“ Helen loved you very much, Aunt Jane.”

“Did she? Did she ever say that?” demanded
Mrs. Hepburn, sharply.

“Indeed she did, Aunt Jane. She used to pray for
you often. And she told me to give you this, some
time, for she was sure you would be glad to have it
Trouble at the Farii. 217

- some day, because it was once hers,” and Lizzie held up
the little red Testament.

Mrs. Hepburn grasped the book eagerly. “And did
my little girl leave this for her mother? And she
loved me and prayed for me! Did you say that,
Lizzie?”

“Yes, Aunt Jane, it is all true.”

“Well, I do not deserve even this,” said Mrs. Hep-
burn, the tears softly filling her eyes. “ But you have
made my heart lighter and happier than it has been for
manyaday.” And there was a more restful look upon
her face than Lizzie had seen since Helen died.

She sat in her chair, quietly turning the leaves of
the Testament, carefully preserving the numerous white
marks where they had been left by her daughter.
Lizzie prepared a cup of tea, a slice of toast, and an
egg, and urged her aunt to eat. Exhausted by the
excitements of the night, Mrs. Hepburn ate the food,
and retired to her bed, where she soon fell into a
refreshing slumber, with the precious Testament clasped
in her hands.
CHAPTER XXIII.

RESTITUTION.

MUST go to town to-day,” said Mrs. Hep-
burn, as the early dawn awakened her

id from her short rest. She was pale, but
quite eae although she wore a troubled look, as if she
was oppressed with a burden too grievous to be borne.
Her words were few, but she was kind, almost affec-
tionate to Lizzie.

“ Aunt Jane,” Lizzie ventured to say, “ please let the
farm remain as it is. I should never know what to
do with this property after it came into my possession.
I would much rather you should manage it, as usual.
Then you and I can live here and make a happy home
for each other.” /

“No, Lizzie,” replied her aunt, firmly. “The farm
shall not remain as it is, for I have vowed to make
restitution before this day closes. God is dealing with
me, child ; would you have me tempt His awful judg-
ments any longer? Remain here with your uncle until
I come back. If James should come here while I am
gone, would you be afraid of him %” she asked, suddenly
recollecting that her son was armed and desperate.


Restitution. 219

“No,” said Lizzie; “I do not think I should be
afraid. I do not believe James would injure me.”

“Arve you a Christian?” demanded her aunt,
sharply.

“Yes Iam, Aunt Jane,” said Lizzie, cheerfully,

“Well, then, if you are not afraid of God, you
ought not to be afraid of anything. It is for such as I
am to be afraid.”

“Oh, I wish you would not be afraid of God, Aunt
Jane! He loves us so much! He hates our sins, but if
we are willing to forsake them He forgives us all, and
becomes our reconciled and loving Father.”

“Tam not ready to hear you speak of these things
now,” said Mrs. Hepburn, impatiently. “I cannot even
think of anything else while this burden is on my
mind. I must roll it off, for it is crushing me. If
James comes, tell him I have gone to town. He will
understand my business.”

From her own private drawer, Mrs. Hepburn drew
forth a small tin box containing some papers, with
which she took her way to the village. James did not
return during her absence. He was already miles
away, a fugitive from the justice that never overtook
him in this world. Of his after history his family
never heard. His name came back to them occasionally
as one of a band of traders and trappers, among the
Indian tribes away to the north-west. But this was
all.

Mrs. Hepburn did not return until towards night.
Lizzie, in the meantime, arranged the house in the
most tasteful manner she could devise, to give a cheer-
ful welcome to her aunt. She ministered to the wants
220 Lissie Hepburn.

of her uncle with even more than her usual care and
tenderness, and seating herself with a book, she tried to
read,

But it was hard to study that day. She was too
much elated and excited by the circumstances in
which she had so suddenly found herself, to do any-
thing but think, She lived over the months which
had passed since she had so reluctantly returned to the
farm, and remembered with what unwilling feet she
had trod the path so plainly marked out by her
Heavenly Father. A thorny path, but strewn with
roses here and there, and likely at last to fill her heart
with gladness and her mouth with praise.

She had been honoured in being permitted to
minister to her dear cousin Helen, and to enjoy her
society and love for a brief but precious period. She
hoped she had been able to lead her poor uncle a little
nearer the Light. At least she had ministered to his
weak body, and made him more comfortable than he
would have been without her. And now, to crown
all, she was drawing nearer to her aunt, whose
heart had been seemingly so hopelessly shut against
her, and in a way of which she had never thought.

She laid aside her books, and, throwing herself upon
her knees, poured out to God the fulness of her
gratitude and love, and humbly sought the wisdom she
would need, if she was to be permitted to lead her aunt
to Christ.

Her verse for this day was that strong one for the
weak: “If any of you lack wisdom, let him ask of God,
who giveth to all men liberally and upbraideth not,
and it shall be given him. But let him ask in faith,
Restitution, 221

nothing wavering.” “Surely, I need wisdom,” she

reflected, ‘and here is abundant provision. In Him
are hid all the treasures of wisdom and knowledge ; and
if I am Christ’s, all things are mine, because all things
are His, and I am made to inherit with Him.” And
so Lizzie was strengthened to make her requests known
to God, realizing that it was her’s to ask, “nothing
wavering,” and His to give.

Supper was ready to lay upon the table, when she
saw her aunt coming up the hill. She ran to meet her
—it was so strange not to be repulsed with a frown!
Mrs. Hepburn looked tired, but was in a quict frame of
mind. .

“There, Lizzie,” she said, as they entered the room,
‘‘my promise is fulfilled. In this box are your deeds
and the necessary papers, all most carefully made out
in your own name. ‘Take good care of them, for
they are of great importance to you. This farm is
yours now to dispose of as you see proper. I am
lighter in heart than I have been since my little Helen
died, and happier than I ever supposed I should be
again.”

Lizzie took the box, and quietly replaced it in the
drawer where her aunt was accustomed to keep it, and
then urged her to sit down to supper.

“ Yes, I will eat something now,” said Mrs. Hepburn :
“T could eat no dinner. I think food would have
choked me before this business was off my mind. I
found the man whom I most wished to see was out of
town, so I had to wait until he came back. I was
determined not to come home until those papers were
all made out and properly recorded.”
222 Lissie Hepburn.

“JT am sorry they have caused you so much trouble,”
said Lizzie.

“Has James beem here?” asked her aunt, without
heeding her last remark.

“No; I have been alone with Uncle Robert all
day.”

“ He said I should never sec his face again,” replied
Mrs. Hepburn, gloomily, ‘and I never shall! Oh,
Lizzie, this has been a terrible blow to me! But I
have deserved it. Had I done, after Helen died, what
I have done now, this might not have come upon
me.”

“Don’t think any more about these things, please,
Aunt Jane,” pleaded Lizzie. “James may come back
some day and make you happy once more.”

Mrs. Hepburn shook her head, and finished her
supper in silence, apparently absorbed in painful
thought. Lizzie quietly cleared the table, finished the
evening work, and placed the lamp upon the stand.
Her aunt then drew Helen’s Testament from her pocket,
and turned from one white mark to another, in.a fond
but listless way.

“Helen loved that little book very much, Aunt
Jane,” said Lizzie, drawing a chair near the table.

“Where did she get it?”

“ Nis. Winthrop gave it to her in the Sunday-school,
and taught her many of the verses which you see she
has marked.”

« And yet I never allowed her to go after you left
home, although she cried every Sabbath, and was so
disappointed !” said Mrs. Hepburn, with keen self-
reproach.
Restitution, 223

“ But she went long enough to learn about Jesus,
and to love Him,” said Lizzie.

“And did that make my little girl happy?” asked
her aunt, with eagerness,

“Oh, yes, very happy! She knew she was going
to die, and that very day she was taken ill she talked
to me about it, and said she was not at all afraid. She
was glad to go to Him, and only wanted to live to help
vou and uncle and James to love Him too.”

Mas. Hepburn seemed not to have heard what Lizzie
had just said. She opened at one of the white marks,
and herattention seemed suddenly arrested. She read,
in a low voice to herself, “The blood of Jesus Christ
‘His Son, cleanseth us from all sin.” Then to another:
“This is a faithful saying and worthy of all accepta-
tion, that Jesus Christ came into the world to save
sinners, of whom I am chief.”

“T wish,” she suddenly exclaimed, shutting the
book, “ that I knew these words were meant for me!”

“Do you believe me when I tell you that Helen
loved you, Aunt Jane?” asked Lizzie, tenderly.

“ Yes, child, I believe that,” said Mrs. Hepburn, the
harsh lines of her face softening a little as she spoke.

“ And it makes you happy to believe that?”

“Yes ; that is, it is a ray of comfort to my wretched
heart. But I feel that I never deserved her love, for I
never gave her the love of a mother.”

“Will you let me try and help you a little, Aunt
Jane?”

“ Yes, for I need help. I never felt so weak as I do
now.” ;

“Well, then,” and now Aunt Jane listened to every
224 Lissie Hepburn.

word, “you believe me when I tell you that Helen
loved you and prayed for you until the very day she
was taken ill. I am only human and may err, ‘but
God, who cannot He, and will not deceive, has said in
His word, that Jesus loves you now, loved you even in
your sins, and died to redeem you from them, and to
secure for you eternal happiness. Can you not take
this to your own heart and let it make you happy?
Can you not believe Him?”

“ But I have been an awful sinner, Lizzie, every day
of my life, and I have lived fifty long years! Since
the hour when I stood over, Helen’s dead body, my
sins have stalked before me, haunting me by day and
night! Just think! all my long life, Lizzie, I have
done nothing but sin against God. I have shut my
eyes and ears against Him, and refused to hear His
voice, until He sent His arrows into my soul,. and
made these great wounds, which have ached and
bled ever since. And then he tells me, ‘The blood
of Jesus Christ His Son cleanseth us from all sin!’
Can you wonder that it is hard to believe that means
me?”

“ F wonder that it means any of us, Aunt Jane.
But what will become of us if it is not true. The
only way that I can at all understand the love of God
for us, is, that it is for the sake of Jesus, His only
well-beloved Son.”

“ But that all seems dark to me.”

“Perhaps it is something like this, Aunt Jane.
You love Helen, your only daughter, and although she
has gone from you now, you will love her the same
always. If there is anything you know Helen would
Restitution. 225

like you to do, you would be glad to do it for her sake,
because of the love you bear her. So God forgives us
and loves us for Jesus’ sake, who is His dear Son, and
who died to save us.”

“You must teach me these things, Lizzie,” said Mrs.
Hepburm, with a humility that surprised the young
girl. ‘“ How do I know that He will receive me, if I
should come to Him ?”

“Because he invites you, and says, ‘ Whosoever
cometh unto Me, I will in no wise cast out !’”

“Does He say that?” demanded her aunt, eagerly.

“ Yes, He does, Aunt Jane. Helen put a mark near
those words, and you will find it when you look. She
told me one day that she had bound that verse about
her as a girdlé.”

“And it would hold her, for she was so good,” said
Mrs. Hepburn, tenderly. “ But my sins make me afraid
to come to Him!”

“Aunt Jane, if James should send you a letter,
saying that he was ashamed and sorry for his conduct
towards you in the past, and desired to return home,
and show you by his love and obedience that he
intended to lead a different life in the future, how
would you receive him?”

“Oh, with such a glad welcome!” exclaimed Mrs.
Hepburn, her eyes lighting with an earnest, wistful
look.

“ And if you saw him returning in answer to your
invitation, coming up the hill, his face turned towards
home ?”

“T would go and meet him, and tell him the past
should be all. forgiven and forgotten, and I think I

a
226 Léisste Hepburn,

should be so happy that I could never remember again
that he had done wrong.”

* And if, after he came home, he should resume his
place upon the farm, and honestly strive to fulfil his
duties and to please you, but should make many
mistakes, and even some failures, would you feel
inclined to reproach him with his past life ?”

“ Oh, no, not if I knew that he loved me, and had
become a member of my family once more and was
trying to please me. Oh, Lizzie, you do not know
how I have longed for James’s love! If I had that I
could easily forgive all his mistakes and failures.”

“Tt has seemed to me that this is just the way we
are received and welcomed, if we come to our Heavenly
Father,” said Lizzie. “ He meets us while yet a great
way off and welcomes us. We shall never be re-
proached with the sins of the past, all is forgiven and
forgotten. If we give Him our love, our mistakes and
failures in the future will be borne with patiently, and
we helped to overcome them, until we are made con-
querors at last.”

“ Does the Bible put it in this way, Lizzie?”

“Yes, Aunt Jane, it is full of encouragements, and
promises and invitations. I could spend half the night
in looking them out for you.”

“Lizzie,” said her aunt, abruptly, “ you had better
go to bed! It is getting late; I don’t want to talk
any more.”

“May I pray with you, Aunt Jane?” asked Lizzie,
hesitatingly.

“Yes, pray if you can. It won't do me any good,
but it will please you, I suppose.”
Restitutioit. 227

She refused to bend before the cross herself, but hot
tears rolled from her softened face, as Lizzie prayed in
humble, fervent tones for her aunt, herself and the
absent James. She then went out, leaving her aunt
alone.

Mrs. Hepburn spent nearly the whole night in
reading Helen’s Testament, and the morning found her
struggling with still deeper convictions of sin and more
determined to seek God, but with no peace.

The struggle was a terrible one, lasting several days.
Lizzie felt that she could do nothing but pray for her,
and wait until Jesus should speak peace to her soul.
She often thought, during these days, that she would
like to ask Mr. Hartwell to come and advise her aunt,
for he was wiser than she, and could direct her better,
but Mrs. Hepburn was unwilling that Lizzie should
leave her.

At length, He who brings His wandering sheep into
the fold by His own power, breathed upon this troubled
soul, and there was peace.
CHAPTER XXIV.
SURPRISES.

IE summer passed away, the autumn glided
by, and the long, cold winter was followed
a ul by a late spring, ushering in yet another
summer, bringing with them all but few changes to
Lizzie, who still remained at the farm. Mrs. Hepburn
had insisted upon renting the farm from Lizzie, at the
usual fair price, a competent man had been hired to
cultivate it, under her own direction, and so far, affairs
had moved on prosperously and happily.

Mrs. Hepburn had united with the Church in
Monona, and became a consistent Christian woman.
Grace softened, but did not eradicate the harsh outlines
of her character, so that her Christian life was more
marked by the rough energy natural to her, than by its
finer developments. .

In the patient care of her invalid husband, she mani-
fested an unselfishness and even a tenderness, which
betokened how great 4 change had been wrought in her
hard unloving nature.

Lizzie maintained a constant correspondence with
Mrs. Winthrop, who had decided to remain near her



Surprises. 229

son until he should finish his college course. One large
letter was filled with the glad news of Mrs. Hepburn’s
coxversion, and the remarkable manner in which Lizzie
had become a property-holder, and closed with a re-
quest for advice as to where she should complete
her education, as she now had abundant means to pay
for her tuition in some school.

_ To her great disappointment, Mrs. Winthrop, after
giving her the most sincere congratulations, advised her
to pursue her studies under the direction of Mr. Hart-
well, and not to leave her aunt for the present for the
purpose of attending school elsewhere.

This, after a struggle, she did, and the hours were so
filled up with work and-study, and her daily life now
moved on so harmoniously, that she hardly realized the
flight of time.

One subject she had after much hesitation mentioned
to her aunt. Since the restoration to her of the pro-
perty that had been left her, a strong desire had arisen
in her mind to find out the fate of her beautiful temple
of shells, the last gift of her mother, and if possible to
purchase it back from its present owner.

Her aunt told her that it had been purchased by a
Mr, Stevens in Chester, and readily gave her consent
that Lizzie should make an effort to bay it back,
offering to write a letter herself and disclose her own
part in the transaction. Lizzie would not consent
to this, but wrote a letter stating why she valued the
temple, and begging to be allowed to buy it for her-
self.

But though one letter followed another in quick
succession for several weeks, no answer came, and
230 Lisste Hepburn.

Lizzie began to fear that it was useless fur her to try
to recover the lost temple with its, to her, priceless
treasures.

The third summer of her return to the farm was
drawing to its close, when letters from Mrs. Winthrop
announced the contemplated return of herself and Paul,
as early as the middle of the coming October, request-
ing Lizzie to open and prepare the house for their
reception, and to be there to welcome them herself back
to Rosedale.

As the time drew near, Lizzie chose an early day of
the month to go to town and begin her preparations for
their return. It was a beautiful morning. The clear
crisp air was becoming warmed beneath the rays of the
sun, and the haze of the Indian summer hung like a
veil of gauze over the billows of the prairie, over
the forests at its edge, now gay in their robes of
crimson and gold, and against the great bluffs in the
distance.

Lizzie felt particularly joyous this morning, as she
walked rapidly along, drawing in the pure, bracing air,
and noting the points in the beautiful landscape around
her. She whispered to herself, “ My Father made
them all ;” and a sense of His protecting care was upon
her, as she thought of her past life, and realized how He
had rolled away the clouds that had gathered about her
path and guided her feet into a large place.

As Lizzie approached the village and took the
familiar path to Rosedale she smiled at the recollection
of her first introduction there, when, in faded calico
dress, coarse shoes and shabby bonnet, she had shrink-
ingly approached Mrs. Winthrop’s elegant house to be
Surprises. 231

cordially welcomed, and to find in her the best and
truest friend. .

She was aware that she was greatly changed since
that day ; but, perhaps, it was more apparent to others
than to herself. She had entered the borders of
early and healthful womanhood. Her brow had long
ceased to darken with discontent, or the furious bursts
of temper to which she had once given way. The de-
velopment and improvement of the rare powers of her
mind, under the wise guidance of Mrs. Winthrop, gave
her a womanly dignity and intelligence, apparent
beneath the modest grace of her manners. Her dress
was simple and becoming, and in pretty harmony with
the bright, subdued glories of this lovely autumn day.
Above all, a chastened light sparkled in her fine largo
eyes, which bespoke a soul at peace within.

When she reached Rosedale, she proceeded leisurely
up the walk, noting the neglected appearance of the
usually neat and beautiful yard. On entering the
porch, she was surprised to find the door open, and a
great travelling trunk standing in the hall.

“They have come, then,” she said to herself, joyfully
hastening her footsteps. The parlour was in great dis-
order, travelling saits and books and brown-paper
parcels being scattered about upon the chairs, sofa and
piano. Lizzie was about to hasten into the kitchen to
greet them, when her eye fell upon an object which sent
such a flood of emotions to her heart as nearly caused
her to faint. Upon the mantelshelf carefully covered.
by a protecting arch of clear glass, stood her own
beautiful temple of shells !

Overcome with the rush of memories, at once tender
232 Lissie Hepburn.

and sweet, bitter and painful, Lizzie sprang to the
mantelshelf, clasped her arm around the glass shade and
burst into tears, sobbing violently.

These unusual sounds brought both Mrs. Winthrop
and Paul hastily into the parlour. Lizzie feund herselt
encircled in loving arms, and her hand in a warm,
friendly grasp.

“Oh, Mrs, Winthrop! Oh, Mr. Paul! Where did
you find my beautiful temple ?” she exclaimed, scarcely
returning their affectionate salutations.

“Your temple, Lizzie? Why, what do you mean,
my child?” replied Mrs. Winthrop in great surprise.

“Oh, itis mine; indeed it is! Mamma made it for
me just before she died!” Lizzie exclaimed. “ But I
have never seen it from that day until now! I thought
T should never find it again! Oh, please let me have
it in my hands !”

Lizzie shook so violently with agitation that Mrs.
Winthrop passed her arm affectionately around her and
drew her to the sofa, saying, ‘Calm _ yourself, dear,
Paul will bring the temple to you and you shall see if
it is yours. There may be some mistake.”

“Ohno! that cannot be!” she cried. “It is mine;
I know it is! I remember every stone-and shell as if
they were in my hands yesterday !” and she reached to
take the temple from Paul.

“This is my present to my mother,” said Paul. “I
was not aware that I was giving away that to which I
had no right.”

« And you must prove-it is yours, my dear,” added
Mrs. Winthrop, smiling, “before I give my pretty
present up, even to you.”
Surprises. 233

“T can soon do that, Mrs. Winthrop,” said Lizzie,
eagerly, “ if Mr. Paul will lend me his knife a
moment.”

Paul gallantly gave -her the desired article, which
Lizzie took, and with fingers trembling with excitement
she carefully removed the circle of small shells which
concealed the seams, and, loosening the bit of pearl, dis-
covered the tiny casket safely hidden within the temple.

“Qh, itismine! It is! itis!” she exclaimed to her
astonished friends. “Just as mamma leftit! See here!”
and she pressed the dark spot indicating the spring of
the casket. The cover flew open and revealed the
contents exactly as they had been left by her mother so
many years before.

Overcome with joy and gratitude, Lizzie could not
control herself, but clasping the precious temple in her
arms, she wept violently, while her whole frame shook
with her excited emotions.

“Lizzie,” said Mrs. Winthrop, kindly but firmly,
“you must not agitate yourself in this manner. Try
to control yourself, dear. I willingly resign all claim
to the pretty temple, for I see that it is yours; and I
am glad for your sake that it has been restored to you
in so wonderful a manner.”

“Where did you find it, Mrs. Winthrop?” asked
Lizzie, making a strong effort to control herself.

“ Perhaps you have heard mother speak of my friend,
John Stevens?” said Paul.

“Oh, yes, very often : and that is the very name of
the man to whom my temple was sold,” said Lizzie.
“ He lived in Chester.”

“Not when I knew him ; but I recollect now, that
234 Lisste Hepburn

that was their former home. They lave lived in New
York for several years.”

“ And that is why my letters have never been an-
swered,” said Lizzie.

“Then you have written to inquire about it?” asked
Paul.

“Not until lately, because I have never known
what became of it until within the last few months.
These stones and shells my father collected while absent
from home travelling in Europe and the Holy Land,
when I was quitea child. Mamma made them into this
pretty temple for me, which was the last thing she ever
did. How well I remember her; so weak and pale,
and yet so loving and kind!” And the tears quickly
gathered into Lizzie’s eyes again, as memory brought
back the picture so vividly to her mind.

“And yet you say it was sold!” exclaimed Mrs,
Winthrop.

“Yes; Aunt Jane knew nothing of its value to me,
nor did any one ; for mamma bade me never reveal the
secret locked within the temple, nor to open it myself
until I was at least sixteen years old. But,” she added,
tenderly, “I have been forced to wait beyond the time
she wished.”

“Why did your Aunt Jane sell it?” asked Paul, in.
dignantly.

“ Because she thought it was too frail to bring out
West,” said Lizzie, kindly. . “She told me a short
time ago where she sold it, to a Mr. Stevens, for his
invalid daughter, whom he tenderly loved. And I
have tried ever since to find them by letters, so as to
buy it back, if possible.”
Surprises. 235

“That was John’s sister Miss Evelyn,” said
Paul. “She was a most lovely young lady, one of
those to whom the command comes ‘Lie still and
suffer.’

“ And did she give you my temple?” asked Lizzie,

who was now growing quite calm.
_ “Yes; mother and I watched John ihvoudh huis
last okeag which was short. When his father came
to take his son home for burial, we accompanied him
and made a pleasant stay in the family. Miss Evelyn
gave this to me as a memento of our mutual love for
her brother ; and I gave it to mother,” said Paul.

“ What a wonderful chain of Providence !” exclaimed
his mother. ‘“ To think that we should be the ones to
restore Lizzie’s last gift from her mother, and that it
has been kept so perfectly safe for her all these years !
Truly God has been good to you, my dear,” she added,
tenderly embracing her. “ Now we will go out and
let you enjoy the hidden treasures of your little temple
alone.”

“ Oh no, donot, Mrs. Winthrop,” Lizzie entreated,
detaining her by the hand. “TI would much rather
you should stay, and Mr. Paul, too. Ido not distinctly
remember all mamma put in here,” she said, springing
the casket open again. “ Iwas a wild little thing, and
too much pleased with the temple to notice all it was
to hold.”

She drew forth the small roll of closely-written
papers, and laid it in her lap. “ Matnma’s wedding-
ring,” she said, slipping the plain band upon her own
finger. “Oh, J remember it all now! and this locket,
with a bit of their hair in it! And these are their
236 Lisste Hepburn.

portraits! Mamma’s is so natural ; but papa’s I cannot
remember so well! Oh, how precious these are!”
And she gazed upon the dear faces, as memory recalled
the familiar lineaments one by one.

Then passing the miniatures to Mrs. Winthrop and
Paul, she unrolled the manuscript, and, as she did so,
a third picture fell to the floor, unnoticed by Lizzie.
Paul stooped to restore it to her when the features were
exposed to his view. Deeply agitated in his turn, he
hastily left the room, retaining the picture. His
mother, who had observed his emotion, quietly followed
him, leaving Lizzie alone.

She unrolled the manuscript in the proper shape for
reading. It was written in a plain, neat hand, and
every line and word spoke to her of that dear mother
whose failing hand had traced them. It was the story
of her mother’s life.
CHAPTER XXYV.
THE MANUSCRIPT.

RY aly precious child,” Lizzie read, “as I endea-

fA a} =vour to write these pages for you, I would
fain pierce the dark, unknown future, and
to bow if you, my child, will-indeed be permitted to
read the words I am about to trace. J have asked,
despondingly, if this was the way my feet must tread #
to leave my only darling alone among strangers in a
world that has been cruel to.me! And I have cried
in my weakness, as tremblingly I knew the rugged
path was spread for me, and that I must go on in
darkness.

“But my Father sustains me in this bitter hour!
I feel His hand and hear His voice, and His love is a
Rock for my poor, weak feet, which can never be
moved! And I go leaving my fatherless and mother-
less child with Him, and He whispers, ‘I will not
leave thee nor forsake thee.’

“As I write, I remember that you are young, and
that I cannot expect you to remember all I wish to say
to you now, or to derive all the benefit I desire to
secure for you in this record of your mother’s life.



238 Lisste Ilepburn.

Therefore, [shall require you to wait until you are
older and sufficiently matured, before you read these
pages. And may this story, chequered as it is with
joys and sorrows, yet marked all along with the loving-
kindnesses of our heavenly Father, lead ‘you to love
and serve Him the more earnestly. He has been our
God, and His promise to be your God is the richest
legacy your parents can leave you.

“The home of my childhood was in a quiet, rural
town in the South of England. I was the youngest of
a small family, but the only one permitted to reach
maturity. We were poor, but as I was the sole object
of the tender love of my parents, I was never permitted
to want anything that it was possible for them to
supply. So I grew up, free from care and grief, as if
the world were not a thorny path through which we
are to tread.

“T had entered my seventeenth year, when I met
the first great sorrow of my life, in the sudden death
of my loving and indulgent father, by whose self-deny-
ing efforts I had thus far been shielded from want, and
had received an education superior to many in my station
in life. After his death, we were deprived of any steady
income ; and although we had a home, a very humble
one, I soon found it was necessary for me to devise
some plan by which I could support myself and my
mother, who never recovered the shock of father’s death,

“Tt is very hard in England for the poor to earn
the means of support. No resource was left for me
but the use of the needle, for I could not leave my
mother alone in those days. But work was hard to
procure, and badly paid when done, and we were often
The Manuscript. 239

forced to feel the want of food and clothes during the
year that succeeded my father’s death.

“ About this time, my hand was sought in marriage
by a handsome stranger, who came to spend the sum-
mer in our quiet town. I knew that, in station and
wealth, he was far above me, but as he pleaded the most
ardent love for me, declaring that the gift of my hand
was more to him than that of the greatest heiress in the
land, and that a happy home with me was more to be
desired than empty honours without me, I yielded.
He promised that wealth and ease should be ours, and
that the last days of my mother should be cheered by
our mutual care and love. I was young then, my
darling, and knew nothing of the evil in the world ;
I suspected nothing, and unhesitatingly gave him the
wealth of my confiding love.

“We were married in the parish church, and I
. enjoyed a short-lived, feverish happiness with him
whom I loved with a wild idolatry. For afew months
he was true to me and to his promises, and we
suffered no more from want. But he constantly
deferred presenting me to his family as his wife, and
rumours reached us of their scornful refusal. to recog-
nise one as such, who was from a station so inferior to
their own. I cared for none of these things, however,
while I retained his love. I was too happy to believe
that anything could separate me from him.

“But a change began to come, so gradually and so
unwelcome, that I long refused to perceive it. My
husband began to tire of me. The unyielding deter-
mination of his haughty family not to receive the
untitled bride of their son and brother into their circle,
240 Lisste Hepburn.

together with their persistent demands upon him to
forsake me, at length produced the effect they desired.
Oh, my darling ! may God shield you from the agony
of those dark days!

“T could not believe that my husband intended to
desert me, or that the separation would be a final one.
I waited for his return with fond hope and faith in him
for many weary wecks, until my heart grew sick with
repeated disappointments and terrible suspense.

“ At last a letter came to me. Our boy was then
a few days old. The fearful truth, written by a
stranger’s hand, that I was an unloved and deserted
wife, came with terrible effect upon me in my weakened
state, crushing out life and hope. I knew nothing
more for many days, for mercifully the fever that raged
in my veins burned out for the time all memory of the
past and present.

“When I finally arose from that bed of suffering, it
was to find myself with enfeebled health, more deeply
sunk in poverty than ever, and with my mother and
helpless babe entirely dependent upon my efforts. It
was during these days of weakness, suffering, and
affliction, that my Saviour sought me, and put forth His
hand to support me in the thorny way I was yet to tread.
Ah, how sweetly fell the healing balm of His love into
my bleeding heart! How precious were His comforting
words ta my tempest-tossed and bewildered soul! He
found me, Lizzie; He opened wide His everlasting
arms, and into this Refuge I hastened, and was at rest !

“T regained my strength very slowly, and during
this time our privations were very severe, and the
future looked dark before me. There was apparently
The Manuscript. 241

no resource left me to support myself and these depen-
dent ones. But at this time a lady who was about to
remove to America offered to take me with her to assist
in the care of the family, on condition that I would
give away my child, as she wished me to devote my
whole time to her own baby. She was willing that
my mother should accompany us, as she could be use-
fully employed with me, and she promised to assist us
in securing work as soon as we arrived in America.

“There was no alternative. I reflected upon my
enfeebled health and the necessity of some change to
enable me to work ; I felt brave to toil or suffer myself,
but I shrank from laying any heavier burdens upon my
aged mother. And when I gazed upon my beautiful
boy and knew that he, too, must share my poverty, and
that in England, I could never give him the education
my fond pride deemed worthy of so fair a son, I resolved,
though my heart should break, to part from him and
to find for him another home.

“ A lady was living near us in great seclusion, and in
circumstances of deep affliction, for death had, within
a short time, snatched from her both husband and
children, leaving her alone in a splendid but desolated
home. I knew that sorrow makes all human hearts akin,
so I took my child to her and asked her to receive him
as herown. And I shall never forget the sweet compas-
sion of that dear lady as she received my precious gift,
and promised to love and care for it as she would have
done for her own, who were gone for ever from her.

“ But, oh, my child ! when I gave that little smiling
babe into her arms, and realized that he would never
learn to know me, or to call: me by the swect name.of

R
242 Lissie [lepburn,

‘mother,’ and that I must resign these coveted joys to
a stranger, my heart sunk with faintness and dread. I
could bear no more, I thought, and live. I never saw
my boy again, or heard from him. We sailed for
America a few days after I had given him to his new
mother, and I could not trust myself to go to him
again.

“T had not been in America long, before my mother
sickened, and for several years was a helpless invalid.
Shortly after this news reached me that my husband had
met an untimely end, his death having been agera-
vated by dissipation. Most wonderfully was I
sustained and strengthened during these years of toil
and trial, all our wants being bountifully supplied by
the kind providence of God. My mother died during
this time, when I felt that I had little to bind me to
this world. But there were a few bright years in store
forme. Your dear father gave me the love of his noble
heart, and sheltered me from future trials, making our
mazried life almost perfect happiness.

“Tt is impossible for you to revere too highly the
memory of your father, my darling. You can never
know how tenderly he loved you, our only child, and
how fondly he watched over and guarded you in your
helpless infancy. A separation of one year, while he
was in Europe, was all that marred the happiness of
our lives, until he fell before the pestilence while
bravely striving to stay its terrible ravages among the
poor of the city.

“This then, my child, is the brief story of your
mother’s life. Learn from it that He alone, who took
upon Himself our nature, and passed through all our
Lhe Manuscript. 243

sulierings and temptations, from the cradle to the grave,
unscathed by sin—the source of our deepest woe—is
able to succour us when we are called to suffer. To-
day, my Father asks another sacrifice: to leave my
orphaned child to Him, and permits me not to know by
what way He will guide her, into what hands she will
fall, or what will be the portion of her cup. I tremble
with anxious forebodings. But faith cries, ‘Peace, be
still!’ ‘Not my will, but Thine.’ ‘Even in the dark,
my Father, if only close to Thee.’

“My darling child! my precious Lizzie! all will
yet be well with you. You may grow weary and way-
worn in the conflict of life, but I feel that we shall
meet again beyond the River, and even rejoice over all
the ways of our God towards us.

“The miniature I enclose is one taken in England
before my first marriage. Preserve it carefully with
the others in the casket. There is another, the coun-
terpart of this one, but of its history I know nothing.
If my son still lives it will some day be placed in his
possession, and then he will know of his mother.

“And now, farewell! Receive the choicest blessing
of your mother, whose last breath will be spent in
prayer for her darling child. Live to honour Christ, and
He will be your everlasting and all-satisfying portion,
as He has been mine.”

When Mrs. Winthrop returned to the parlour, she
found Lizzie absorbed in thought over the closing .
words of her mother’s history. She looked pale and
tired by the unusual excitements of the morning, but
she was calm now, and greeted her friend with a
cheerful smile.
244 Lizzie Hepburn.

“T should be glad to have you read this, Mrs. Win-
throp,” she said, handing the manuscript to her. “ It
is the story of my mother’s life.”

“T shall like to do so very much, my dear,” replied
Mrs. Winthrop. “ But first I will ask your assistance
in preparing the dinner. Then Paul will read it aloud
to us.”

Lizzie willingly consented to this arrangement, and
found in the gentle exercise a pleasant relief to her
overwrought feelings. Mrs. Winthrop was sure that
the manuscript would reveal some hithertounsuspected
connection between her son’s history and Lizzie’s, but
she wisely decided not to subject her to any further
excitement at present. So she forbore making any
allusion to the counterpart miniatures in Paul’s
possession, and directed her mind from the events of
the morning by talking with her of the matter con-
nected with her life at the farm,

“Your aunt is greatly changed Lizzie, is she not?”
she asked.

“Oh, yes! she is so kind now and affectionate! I
have hardly been lonely a day since she became a
Christian. I believe the farm will be a pleasant home
for us always now.”

“Then you do not care to come back and live with
me, Lizzie?” Mrs. Winthrop asked, with a peculiar
look.

“Oh, if Ionly could! But you have always made
me feel in some way that it was my duty to stay on
the farm,” replied Lizzie, flushing with pleasure at the
bare mention of such a possibility.

“ And you see now that it would have been unfor-
The Manuscript. 245

tunate for you to have returned with me after Helen’s
death, do you not?”

“Yes, indeed! I often think of that. But what a
struggle it cost me then to give up my will!” exclaimed
Lizzie.

“Tt does take a long time for us to learn that lesson,”
replied Mrs. Winthrop. ‘ We shall be truly wise when
we quietly follow the guidance of our heavenly Father,
however distasteful it may be to our natural feelings.”

“But I am sure I shall never be so rebellious
again!” said Lizzie, confidently. “I have had enough
to-day to make me remember, I am sure, that my way
is not always the best.”

‘Never is a long word, my dear,” replied Mrs. Win-
throp, smiling, “ You will always find that you have
ereat need to watch and pray, or you may fall with the
first temptation.”

“T have reason to remember that,” said Lizzie, hum-
bly. “For after all the assurances that I might have
had that I was in the best possible place for me, I was
never quite reconciled to it all until Aunt Jane became
so changed. I felt particularly aggrieved that I must
be so long separated from you,” she added, affectionately,

“And yet, my dear, I am quite sure you will
discover, perhaps before this day is over, that my long
absence was necessary to secure for you one of the
happiest events of your life,” said Mrs, Winthrop.

“T suppose, but for that, I should never have seen
my beautiful little temple again” said Lizzie, as she
t placed the dinner upon the table. ‘How strange it
seems that you should have become so intimately
acquainted with the very person to whom it was
246 Lisste Hepburn.

sold, and that you should be the one to restore it
to me!”

“And I think the end is not yet,” replied Mrs.
Winthrop, as she summoned Paul to dinner, without
regarding Lizzie’s puzzled look.

They sat down to the table and ate their meal, with
a subdued cheerfulness. Lizzie had nearly recovered
her usual quictude, but Paul was abstracted, often
betraying an emotion nearly equal to Lizzie’s a short
time before.

After dinner, Mrs. Winthrop requested Paul to read
the manuscript aloud. He complied, but his voice became
broken and agitated as he proceeded, and the tears often
gathered to his eyes, while, to Lizzie’s great surprise,
Mrs. Winthrop wept during nearly the whole reading.

When Paul had finished, he seated himself by
Lizzie’s side, and, drawing her closely to him, said, in
a tone whose depth of feeling almost prepared her for
his words: “God has given us to each other at last,
my sister! Lizzie, I am your own brother !”

“ My brother!” said Lizzie, in a bewildered tone.

“Yes, darling, for we had the same dear mother.
See here, Lizzie, here are the counterpart miniatures,
your mother and mine! This fell from your manu-
script when you unfolded it, the other is mine.”

“TJ cannot understand it at all,” said Lizzie, gazing
upon the two pictures. “What does it mean? Is
not Mrs. Winthrop your mother ?”

« Allthe mother I have ever known, Lizzie. But»
to-day we have been reading the story of her who gave
me, when a little infant from her arms and love, to this
dear lady who has so nobly fulfilled her trust. And
The Manuscript. 247

now these two portraits so wonderfully preserved and
restored to us, tell us that we had the same mother, and
that I havea sister. Lizzie, can you not give the love
of a sister to your own brother?”

Lizzie flung her arms impulsively about her brother’s
neck and warmly returned his kiss, exclaiming. “Oh,
Paul! are you truly my brother? I cannot believe it
all! This day has been so full of joy, that I do not
believe I could bear another drop! My brother! my
own brother!” and she took his face in her hands and
gazed so lovingly into his eyes, that Paul could no
longer doubt that his sister’s heart was ready to own its
new-found relationship.

He passed his arm tenderly around her, and, drawing
her to Mrs. Winthrop who was watching this scene
with unaffected pleasure, he said, with deep feeling :
“Mother, God has restored to you a son and a
daughter in place of those whom, long years ago, He
took from your arms to Himself. Receive us, dear
mother, and give us your blessing.”

“May God for ever bless you both, my dear, dear
children,” said Mrs. Winthrop, fervently, tenderly
embracing them both.

“And give us grace to render that gratitude and
affection to you, which your generous devotion to us so
richly merits,” added Paul, warmly.

“And make us happy in each other,” said their
mother, “and more devoted to Him who has fulfilled,
in so wonderful a manner, His promises to those who
put their trust in Him.” :

“ Oh, if mamma could only have known that all this
would come to pass?” exclaimed Lizzie, tearfully.
248 Lissie Hepburn.

“She would not have grieved so much to give us
both up !”

“ Doubtless she is with us now,” said Mrs. Winthrop,
reverently, “and rejoices with us in this glad reunion ?
and I think her songs of praise are now tuned to
deeper and fuller harmony.”

We leave thee now, Lizzie, child of our story!
Restored to a brother so worthy of your love, cherished
by a mother so tenderly beloved by you both, blessed
with the sweet influences of a Christian home, and
growing daily in the graces of the Spirit, whereby you
are kept in communion with Jesus your Elder Brother.

Your heart has well-nigh sunk in dismay, while
clouds gathered darkly above and around you, but as
they have broken and scattered, you have discovered
that they were silver-lined. And thus shall it ever
prove.

LONDON! PARDON AND SON, PRINTERS, PATERNOSIER BOW.


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i a oe ee

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Vv

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2



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{ILLUSTRATIVE OF THE INDUSTRIES, TOOLS, AND IMPLEMENTS
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WHO WAS THE FIRST ARCHITECT?
WHO WAS THE FIRST PAPER-MAKER?
WHO WERE THH FIRST MINERS?
WHO WERE THE FIRST BUILDERS ?
WHO WERE THE FIRST WEAVERS?

oO WO Np

T. NELSON AND SONS, LONDCN, EDINBURGH. AND NEW YORK.
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see 3



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Cyril Ashley. A Tale.

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St "i
al

ee









il!
\ wc

AZ



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THE JORDAN AND ITS VALLEY,

AND THE DEAD SEA.
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The Fall of Jerusalem; and the Roman Conquest of
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Story of Moravian Missions in Greenland and La-
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WONDERS OF CREATION.—Volcanoes and their
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NATURE'S WONDERS.— Pictures of Remarkable
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WONDERS OF THE VEGETABLE WORLD: With
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2



T. NELSON AND SONS, LONDON, EDINBURGH, AND NEW YORK.


Books of Eoxample and Encouragement

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==" KR
The Boy Makes the Man: A Book of Example and
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Tllustrated Wooks of Science and Wyistory.

(SE









THE QUEEN OF THE ADRIATIC;
OR, VENICE PAST AND PRESENT.

BY W. H. DAVENPORT ADAMS.

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Temples, Tombs, and Monuments of Ancient Greece
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Apamus. With one Hundred Illustrations, Post 8vo, cloth.
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The Land of the Nile: An Historical and Descriptive
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T. NELSON AND SONS. LONDON, EDINBURGH, AND NEW YORK
Ellustrated Wooks of Science and Wyistorp.
ee



















































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































THE BURIED CITIES OF CAMPANIA;
Or, Pompeii and Herculaneum: Their History, their
Destruction, and their Remains.
BY W. H. DAVENPORT ADAMS.
With Fifty-seven Engravings and a Plan of Pompeit.
Post 8vo, cloth. Price 2s. 6d.

Enterprise Beyond the Seas; or, The Planting of our
Colonies. By J. H. Fyre. With Seven Illustrations. Post 8vo,

cloth. Price 2s. 6d.

Merchant Enterprise; or, Commerce and its History
from the Earliest Times. By J. H. Fyre. With Six Mlustrations,
Post 8vo, cloth. Price 2s. 6d.

Triumphs of Invention and Discovery. By J. H.
Fyre. New Edition. With Seven Engravings. Post &vo, cloth.
Price 2s. 6d.

1 NELSON AND SONS, LONDON, EDINBURGH. AND NEW YORK.
EUlustrated Woosks of Seitence and Fyistory,









LIGHTHOUSES AND LIGHTSHIPS :

A Descriptive and Historical Account of their Mode of
Construction and Organization.

BY W. H. DAVENPORT ADAMS,
With Seventy IMustrations from Photographs and other Sources.
Post Svo, cloth. Price 2s. 6d.

Earthquakes and Volcanoes: Their History, Pheno-

mena, and Probable Causes. By Munao Pontoy, F.RS.E.
With Forty-six Engravings. Post Svo, cloth. Price 2s. 6d.

Life in the Primeval World. Founded on Meunier’s
“Les Animaux d’Autrefois.” By W. H. Davenport ADAMS.
With Eighty-nine Engravings. Post 8vo, cloth. Price 3s. 6d.



T. NELSON AND SONS, LONDON, EDINBURGH, AND NEW YORK.
Books of WAravel and EL doventure
FOR BOYS.
BY Ww. FH. G&G KINGSTON.





= = ==
THE WESTERN WORLD.

Picturesque Sketches of Nature and Natural Aistory in
North and South America.

WITH NEARLY TWO HUNDRED ENGRAVINGS.
Crown 8vo, cloth extra, Price 7s. 6d.







On the Banks of the Amazon: A Boy’s Journal of
his Adventures in the Tropical Wilds of South America. With
One Hundred and Twenty Illustrations. Crown 8vo, cloth extra,
gilt edges. Price 6s,

In the Eastern Seas; or, The Regions of the Bird of
Paradise. A Tale for Boys. With One Hundred and Eleven
Illustrations. Crown 8vo, cloth, richly gilt. Price 6s.

In the Wilds of Africa. With Sixty-six I/lustrations.
Crown 8vo, cloth, richly gilt. Price 6s.

Round the World: A Tale for Boys. With Fifty-two
Engravings. Crown 8vo, cloth extra. Price 5s.

Old Jack: A Sea Tale. With Sixty Engravings.
Crown 8vo, cloth extra. Price 5s.

My First Voyage to Southern Seas. With Forty-two

Engravings. Crown 8vo, cloth extra. Price 5s.

T. NELSON AND SONS, LONDON, EDINBURGH, AND NEW YORK.
Pictorial Weibrary of Hrabel and Ldbenture,

EXTRA FOOLSCAP, CLOTH. COPIOUSLY ILLUSTRATED.







DOCTOR KANE, THE ARCTIC HERO.

A NARRATIVE OF HIS ADVENTURES AND EXPLORATIONS IN THE
POLAR REGIONS.

By M. Jonrs. With Coloured Frontispiece and Vignette, and
Thirty-five Engravings on Wood. Price 2s.

Quadrupeds: What They Are, and Where Found. A
Book of Zoology. for Boys. By Caprain Mayne Reto, With
Coloured Frontispiece and Vignette, and Nineteen Page-Eneray-
ings on Wood, Price 2s.

The Young Crusoe; or, A Boy’s Adventures on a
Desolate Island. By Mrs. Horranp. With Coloured Frontis-
piece and Vignette, and Fourteen Engravings. Foolscap 8vo,
cloth extra. Price 2s. 6d.

Robert and Harold; or, The Young Marooners. A
Tale of Adventure on the Coast of Florida. By F. R. Goutptne.
With Six Tinted Plates. Post 8vo, cloth extra, illuminated side.
Price 2s. 6d.

T. NELSON AND SONS, LONDON. EDINBURGH, AND NEW YORK.
‘Books of AAravel and CLdventure
FOR BOYS.
BY R. M. BALLANTYNE,



MAN ON THE OCHAN.
A BOOK ABOUT BOATS AND SHIPS.

WITH EIGHT TINTED PLATES, AND UPWARDS OF ONE HUNDRED
4AND TWENTY WOODCUTS.

Post 8vo, cloth extra. Price 3s. 6d.

The Young Fur-Traders: A Tale of the Far North.
With Illustrations. Post 8vo, cloth. Price 3s,

Ungava: A Tale of Esquimaux Land. With I/lustra-

tions. Post 8vo, cloth. Price 3s.

The Goral Island: A Tale of the Pacific. With Illus-

trations. Post 8vo. cloth. Price 3s.

Martin Rattler; or, A Boy’s Adventures in the Forests
of Brazil. With Illustrations. Post 8vo, cloth. Price 3s.

The Dog Crusoe and his Master: A Tale of the

Western Prairies. With Illustrations. Post 8vo, cloth. Price 3s,

The Gorilla-Hunters: A Tale of Western Africa.
With Illustrations. Post 8vo, cloth. Price 3s.

The World of Ice; or, Adventures in the Polar
Regions. With Engravings. Post 8vo, cloth. Price 3s.

T. NELSON AND SONS, LONDON, EDINBURGH, AND NEW YORK.
Pictorial Weabrary of H&rabel and Ldbenture,

PRICE TWO SHILLINGS EACH.

Extra Foolscap, Cloth. Copiously Tllustrated.






AFAR IN
OR, PICTURES OF LIFE AND SCENERY IN THE WILDS OF CANADA.
BY MKS. TRAILL, AUTHOR OF ‘THE CANADIAN CRUSOES,” ETC.

With Coloured Frontispiece and Vignette, and Twenty-two
Engravings on Wood,

Pictures of Travel in Far-off Lands. A Companion
to the Study of Geography.—Ceytrat America. With Fifty
Engravings.

Pietures of Travel in Far-off Lands.—-South America.
With Fifty Engravings.

Round the World. A Story of Travel Compiled from
the Narrative of Ida Pfeiffer. By D. Murray Smira. With
Tinted Frontispiece and Vignette, and Thirty-five Engravings on
Wood.

Tv. NELSON AND SONS, LONDON. EDINBURGH, AND NEW YORK.









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'2012-05-25T18:20:11-04:00'
describe
'277005' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAGB' 'sip-files00148.jp2'
17f07a88664a4f49f31f12e16100c7ea
a9ae22acc69354a3520666cf6a624997e13dc224
'2012-05-25T18:15:30-04:00'
describe
'42301' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAGC' 'sip-files00224.pro'
7570dccf17f2e5055b88658a50d996d3
170fbef76567a521bbead1f282e0be3a844b59b3
'2012-05-25T18:16:10-04:00'
describe
'276938' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAGD' 'sip-files00183.jp2'
d7255cf08474b1580c97499d13cac437
01370f2dc48eb191359b84119cba53414b6d721a
'2012-05-25T18:26:02-04:00'
describe
'399998' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAGE' 'sip-files00162.QC2.jpg'
44281fdf781a0904b215aa890828fae6
aa6db5f8980bcfa0793d9a2e9c6eb6775a3ec3d3
'2012-05-25T18:24:16-04:00'
describe
'425667' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAGF' 'sip-files00056.QC2.jpg'
4a60a22a0cbde59c8afd9d8b496193b7
7408d0608fe77bd145c307994fd9b5fee9db6768
'2012-05-25T18:21:19-04:00'
describe
'165642' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAGG' 'sip-files00152.QC.jpg'
d22f1cea85d8648eba2df735da485237
3699a5d924d2c9c03efb6bb09a1953b95bc5e624
'2012-05-25T18:16:37-04:00'
describe
'49611' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAGH' 'sip-files00276thm.jpg'
5b4ef66afcf14a96a49d29852bcd75f2
01d58ad7208effa832292dfa2425ab4cfd4eb035
'2012-05-25T18:22:33-04:00'
describe
'2229112' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAGI' 'sip-files00109.tif'
9fbf47e592ac234325bb91d5f93ee592
b3d763766551b01c376426091cf2bd96ce6be017
'2012-05-25T18:20:02-04:00'
describe
'2228492' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAGJ' 'sip-files00190.tif'
e733cd69d3268e74287dea94cf795cba
2cdd65da92830446ada141d5351b5215842151cc
'2012-05-25T18:20:21-04:00'
describe
'276958' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAGK' 'sip-files00173.jp2'
69098e47972e49b0ce2045e4c5c497e1
5e8eca0307661b8d0d88789284295fe1c436cf61
'2012-05-25T18:25:19-04:00'
describe
'2433968' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAGL' 'sip-files00204.tif'
f3c63130e845a4ce2da647e2a469b57a
e9e105bcd71e5f3c32b9896a1385903078cb5dbf
'2012-05-25T18:25:58-04:00'
describe
'2228068' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAGM' 'sip-files00265.tif'
134bc4e3a644173cd60f30633a4598ff
99d0110cb2f69e7c43c1c747fd2e07fd13658d00
'2012-05-25T18:13:35-04:00'
describe
'438160' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAGN' 'sip-files00041.QC2.jpg'
fc286f9b792a5ab9dbbf33b58efc9219
4e17607601b4c89b6d337ed6c3b641dceecd7683
'2012-05-25T18:14:42-04:00'
describe
'839' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAGO' 'sip-files00271.txt'
a46d817910319bfbf5223f752f484a57
6fd249af68cfcc68ddc524a2eaea00827d805ed5
'2012-05-25T18:22:01-04:00'
describe
'306883' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAGP' 'sip-files00284.jp2'
7f93bc1e8b099113a5a6265928771ff2
574f167c6b93cb49d016625ecbc134c141a1e3ee
'2012-05-25T18:26:05-04:00'
describe
'327224' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAGQ' 'sip-files00239.jpg'
1ade31043d9dbbf9935724c98ec0eab3
e20c7b72e14ab9ffed26f51ebacda86dede59c98
'2012-05-25T18:16:01-04:00'
describe
'842' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAGR' 'sip-files00008.txt'
964931786461653f5884ccd1b01c6950
9245eea41604dad2be03d3c99824dc4d86dcf391
'2012-05-25T18:25:29-04:00'
describe
'2227024' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAGS' 'sip-files00140.tif'
26d3eae21ce0e94416f42eefaaa1f026
ab07e9bb92007b4bb343a7661a5b1ad03dd52073
'2012-05-25T18:13:56-04:00'
describe
'42695' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAGT' 'sip-files00116.pro'
f830dc4afe97f6f15936cfd746004238
5bdcd731c5bdbc771c888e2d27e75dae74535528
'2012-05-25T18:19:19-04:00'
describe
'438749' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAGU' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
41af9d989ad7086b372600703adea110
2220100f00b34dc67841d4e92557925ba79f9b9e
'2012-05-25T18:21:47-04:00'
describe
'1646' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAGV' 'sip-files00025.txt'
f0cc5c19bb2da0baccd014785a896e34
f47a2157054029b0585bc32b1c6fe039818ee317
'2012-05-25T18:15:08-04:00'
describe
'130036' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAGW' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
d3376fe90a7425c6620696844c2031d6
aa50724ac1b9fbe01aadffc8c58664835a5df30f
'2012-05-25T18:23:28-04:00'
describe
'436250' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAGX' 'sip-files00092.QC2.jpg'
dd1f66adfaa385d33619123c06f3f839
db768e9d5a63ef6e80ba07c223a28edfcf36aced
'2012-05-25T18:16:29-04:00'
describe
'424455' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAGY' 'sip-files00109.QC2.jpg'
04121aeb2304bf0c7cb70db48aa45b06
1c0ff2a77a1caf8c298310c5cb30bc2698000cd9
'2012-05-25T18:14:41-04:00'
describe
'276977' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAGZ' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
8d73e9c97d03872f0ce61e95f81fbaa2
2542538843d9db84485ce3961c6129da5f4aa005
'2012-05-25T18:24:05-04:00'
describe
'425275' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAHA' 'sip-files00244.jpg'
45c493492dc98bd7d59df8213c31c4b6
4a33b95f5f85eb25d70042d7ccb9aa196378d305
'2012-05-25T18:17:22-04:00'
describe
'418187' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAHB' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
72afb3e098b70d5d6e3d1c5560e7df97
4120c365bb39aa4c4e235319648a910b48c4a89e
'2012-05-25T18:26:12-04:00'
describe
'51715' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAHC' 'sip-files00142thm.jpg'
1c1f9c1bed315a3775487c8d959679b5
d2f6043d0b2b762015f09557a53d6485a606d72d
'2012-05-25T18:24:32-04:00'
describe
'40072' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAHD' 'sip-files00182.pro'
453faa3a74e8ff6e3b10a5ca9270f925
c907ce02236b3700ddcd797545bd9304be536a89
'2012-05-25T18:21:11-04:00'
describe
'40803' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAHE' 'sip-files00242.pro'
0e7514972a44b66d44756077415c7795
9e86aed9329aea63b7c0a67c593ddd0017f76f3a
'2012-05-25T18:15:12-04:00'
describe
'505513' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAHF' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
5d255dfe1b5c6aa3e16559cf46b2f6b5
51be64344f05ca4e474ec63fdaa083fa0afefb34
'2012-05-25T18:22:50-04:00'
describe
'2467944' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAHG' 'sip-files00286.tif'
c54883c52f6ef690a6bdbf5247f1c04b
d408d3397b4ef1a66d04cb612057b1ac1425bbbc
'2012-05-25T18:26:42-04:00'
describe
'42599' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAHH' 'sip-files00186thm.jpg'
f97a027d235c798655dd44c4779b9a30
11027e10a68375d1b49c268c5acaf89d7cbd2f4e
'2012-05-25T18:15:11-04:00'
describe
'2228736' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAHI' 'sip-files00103.tif'
c35af9dc50c0a44e1a25795efc2480c9
f1c0a396727157d05caf96f52ca0d9217533742a
'2012-05-25T18:18:03-04:00'
describe
'1668' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAHJ' 'sip-files00172.txt'
e46de6af2f296cc8e874c4028b79fcbe
feb0eab24633a5b7bb2a7e8009e6b17de919af61
'2012-05-25T18:20:37-04:00'
describe
'2227228' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAHK' 'sip-files00088.tif'
f7ba957b6ed31e45627055ca493d5cc9
a3f7501854180d124a0150e1690ae5ad3c2b0e62
'2012-05-25T18:16:21-04:00'
describe
'485855' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAHL' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
42eeff666c1da735ff819d51878ae9cc
6a3f93bb27419c94c9019086b727cadfdb6e3767
'2012-05-25T18:15:36-04:00'
describe
'370522' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAHM' 'sip-files00211.QC2.jpg'
5a364f1990006cb11270dcf59a487ecd
ca0a754e56ddeae1cb49f0efda77a878dc065de3
'2012-05-25T18:19:04-04:00'
describe
'49845' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAHN' 'sip-files00173thm.jpg'
d8e6c5964c620b1d6fd6130935b41408
7730787c117a249400ce721e3207f4c305c2d7ad
describe
'24453' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAHO' 'sip-files00239.pro'
984bdecffbabd8c533711337ad2927ef
b9fe6a47fc1cf8e63b9b3713f3e6d7299bde6a79
'2012-05-25T18:19:33-04:00'
describe
'1645' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAHP' 'sip-files00147.txt'
393b07329a85884696999d5b5fc834f0
3c3a50f80531eee4a47049e2ea93ee1321e7e785
'2012-05-25T18:21:48-04:00'
describe
'41511' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAHQ' 'sip-files00164.pro'
33c291ec733da188a7907c524824c8d9
8de33f659a7f9f837e6aa1c47200279e46874ef6
'2012-05-25T18:22:17-04:00'
describe
'40093' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAHR' 'sip-files00108.pro'
d20b768e2d2c8cf0d4e69182cc48f5b5
c04d332b4417465f8939221d15abf261de44d200
'2012-05-25T18:25:28-04:00'
describe
'402110' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAHS' 'sip-files00222.jpg'
efd9cef5265e243880cd24dbded5dc82
d0eff083e134f19a8d57e5015ebfc3bc1a49dcd1
describe
'148234' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAHT' 'sip-files00219.QC.jpg'
121908bfad7f0ed12417185f5409ddfb
f68fd58f3d3cd0445b977701d06f6bcdb3fdd31d
'2012-05-25T18:26:35-04:00'
describe
'233510' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAHU' 'sip-files00295.QC.jpg'
da259c29d34f926b1d7e72002713825e
961e9dfc784abaf78fadb4f90710acaa3e6b1241
'2012-05-25T18:24:52-04:00'
describe
'171388' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAHV' 'sip-files00156.QC.jpg'
bfad8af82b44cca5272ae7310d07d10f
b7d49cefa2b3e03bb26f8d841d455b3a4c669692
'2012-05-25T18:22:06-04:00'
describe
'36658' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAHW' 'sip-files00012.pro'
b4933caae3c3ab5c698a86d960a8ebd8
07742b65d708ec993b0b3ddc4ad0e984a2c9746f
'2012-05-25T18:18:26-04:00'
describe
'420979' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAHX' 'sip-files00159.QC2.jpg'
dc2bc353fda629c1a978d34c9f6cccfe
da8149817db69e39bd2b5b566b0fff9cad3f9d08
'2012-05-25T18:24:18-04:00'
describe
'535513' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAHY' 'sip-files00253.jpg'
f5f3a0adc52cba74828901a118dfdd7f
0441e5ed30463ad2635f60fded1bcaa7082b2b4b
'2012-05-25T18:24:40-04:00'
describe
'195107' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAHZ' 'sip-files00005.jpg'
f747ef48b62ecb9eb98f639d2a1c5907
04a28f07cdade0dd7ca7ab2e165eb7feafd021fc
'2012-05-25T18:20:48-04:00'
describe
'339124' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAIA' 'sip-files00186.QC2.jpg'
48af9b2380e98cd64a7e9d2249013bde
f9eed8f5dc3d53bc66a008c9daf89c5fd2f3e6b3
'2012-05-25T18:14:35-04:00'
describe
'51135' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAIB' 'sip-files00197thm.jpg'
9df07f3c817058bdab3213f0f2ac142a
fca8dd07c33c83428aed57f91c09316d073081d3
'2012-05-25T18:24:50-04:00'
describe
'26379' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAIC' 'sip-files00040.pro'
8a5abd8fdbb5f374e6e2b7ea268e183b
86b8d49225c2215d8b0adfe3be8c7ea9e67a51ac
'2012-05-25T18:24:59-04:00'
describe
'963' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAID' 'sip-files00276.txt'
44a6735eac508a2a1520d50d9ac794e2
b8ea9e9ec537801b7dcfb627ab2d4febda096be0
'2012-05-25T18:21:10-04:00'
describe
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Invalid character
'271123' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAIE' 'sip-files00007.QC2.jpg'
4b7799471905f2ac193977f140c61244
a54a2326d38170bd914decc6f1064479021a2e33
'2012-05-25T18:23:34-04:00'
describe
'37964' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAIF' 'sip-files00174.pro'
19fbf9ee137c636bf6decd2480c69de4
72acd50851cefb295cd7e35a649325e816f5e299
'2012-05-25T18:26:36-04:00'
describe
'1607' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAIG' 'sip-files00210.txt'
50d45a3a0a4abd2dd61d4335140260e6
eb732de03e2d2c41fcd08307cb6449418ee0c4b3
'2012-05-25T18:22:29-04:00'
describe
'1827' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAIH' 'sip-files00215.txt'
fc7ad4971b814d4b90e341d44ee10c37
3ef802b339da02a9a131bd8eeadc6713e6c5ae45
'2012-05-25T18:18:17-04:00'
describe
'51198' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAII' 'sip-files00201thm.jpg'
6662a170b7e306c4fe3c35b59e6adacd
3f46fa51e196bab6467820005e76fd6b17705ddf
'2012-05-25T18:25:59-04:00'
describe
'429254' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAIJ' 'sip-files00091.QC2.jpg'
22261f940aa9a96a7962b3873182b987
a65457527ff7f981779d4fa0b33a2fd925910c21
'2012-05-25T18:21:51-04:00'
describe
'38711' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAIK' 'sip-files00111.pro'
2383cf17426a7c434c1841fad05f2ec5
96f95b8d13e1373454503316667240eb1e644462
'2012-05-25T18:17:43-04:00'
describe
'277009' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAIL' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
1b327af9c347e6f7163cd39e4ce4b458
d5530b676926110923b8e563c1b69909999de585
'2012-05-25T18:14:38-04:00'
describe
'271386' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAIM' 'sip-files00155.jp2'
60db3af0b4fb979d35d899910c5e72fe
bf6522ce600cb7255682ece0ea5dd34ccfc1713c
'2012-05-25T18:17:46-04:00'
describe
'276984' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAIN' 'sip-files00161.jp2'
ef940787c945e4b0d4a123edb3c88a70
fd48584f5abeb18dd63616b698b350e936cc573a
'2012-05-25T18:20:16-04:00'
describe
'164206' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAIO' 'sip-files00148.QC.jpg'
23a30a1521b54f54fe30067ba7b55141
1991ab6b400be0bebd54b3f7b3b1ff563ce5030f
'2012-05-25T18:14:37-04:00'
describe
'52338' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAIP' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
6d6c3b52b1e3f39c30b7eb6d50de0f6e
51eb53283d8daa70c9107e09b74a82df9444bf51
'2012-05-25T18:18:50-04:00'
describe
'388859' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAIQ' 'sip-files00088.QC2.jpg'
5eaaf750b6e71ffe02e498bb9b42a90b
dba49091bcc211f08e429778162fe4045fa70390
'2012-05-25T18:14:52-04:00'
describe
'33393' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAIR' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
d973f13d7bcd9c965aa296f1059a59bd
ec51b5a07aede24f932b4d2a9784e467cf7b1935
'2012-05-25T18:20:24-04:00'
describe
'137389' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAIS' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
caba3f2a4a773652ec244057e30acf13
e41ea5c5aa0ddbb362ac06dec89812f8c1476714
'2012-05-25T18:14:21-04:00'
describe
'276981' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAIT' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
eea84de0eec278b60f080e028a4bc347
207fad99651eef9e9050fe1c62278226394e8968
'2012-05-25T18:21:46-04:00'
describe
'506512' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAIU' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
9c022133508d638b1624d441a01c4b52
0823c707017a1c3ee53b86ab8dbab96334131e67
'2012-05-25T18:17:19-04:00'
describe
'1609' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAIV' 'sip-files00235.txt'
82886e62b185c0a21a58b66e0ea547d9
0da548bad4fd9b37e4f19609d06cbce7da2d75c9
'2012-05-25T18:22:47-04:00'
describe
'152621' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAIW' 'sip-files00201.QC.jpg'
3eeac51fd104bb8415297ca6bd1464eb
a7e52f4e677d3854003baba7a670bd01f33bf981
'2012-05-25T18:23:03-04:00'
describe
'40480' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAIX' 'sip-files00134.pro'
d9d1500df8f011ea989a59fa8e01465d
410225a7e88451b9470f6d8e972f804a316359f6
describe
'273856' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAIY' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
f4de4d0ec4a0c0d3d709a171b5755f78
eb234b15d115a20940fcbcdf845f8dc995dbbb80
'2012-05-25T18:17:56-04:00'
describe
'517422' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAIZ' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
6edb61e222393668c7ba4ef55626ec98
987a4b76a45c6a2cc47f0cd9ae65dbf5d0ed9c06
'2012-05-25T18:15:45-04:00'
describe
'436703' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAJA' 'sip-files00201.jpg'
6c3d9841e7c7ee42d124a1974ab14525
9911b4aef362bc033e5d0781985c8ac28edb19a8
'2012-05-25T18:25:39-04:00'
describe
'53646' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAJB' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
8b406b61821518ff50b52099c9de2338
b26ce47adeb6cb49801a6d4c8bec3b9638a99c83
'2012-05-25T18:24:26-04:00'
describe
'1073' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAJC' 'sip-files00229.txt'
9a05f2f2aa84dc280005598da163e66b
41b9e1d32f4839e9100587b3caa168d3bb73135e
'2012-05-25T18:23:45-04:00'
describe
'313007' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAJD' 'sip-files00260.QC2.jpg'
2b128fa522c72b931327d37fc0ec7bb4
ff75b7a2137e37fe8cbfb52b735d2631dbd839ba
'2012-05-25T18:19:39-04:00'
describe
'1547' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAJE' 'sip-files00192.txt'
c2a5984446c0bae455f80a5deecc1392
f7ad1d27003aab86dd7c27e44a1cee11c1950685
'2012-05-25T18:15:41-04:00'
describe
'280133' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAJF' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
90854acf7cc64fa384e96bac3126a461
e482af639790281d588143c81f544c06dade29af
'2012-05-25T18:25:34-04:00'
describe
'2228876' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAJG' 'sip-files00178.tif'
3c3dd4383f38ff83007d3918d743d77f
c65efb71553592908fde2cceddb74b41a1372f50
describe
'261063' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAJH' 'sip-files00194.jpg'
954c0fff00e699cfe9d888fb8cd71936
b5fbefdb67e40948f93ac9134dbd946a2ae275e6
'2012-05-25T18:26:40-04:00'
describe
'49547' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAJI' 'sip-files00219thm.jpg'
8aaa96edf05a0fab6699c08ab0c4b3ec
2df57f40b6501481f184563c080d50fc711c2c9f
describe
'52046' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAJJ' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
59e0aad02c1e47bf430c4bf9602c6822
b407164e3a0e42bb62696f8a95c2fe67461615c3
'2012-05-25T18:16:18-04:00'
describe
'277024' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAJK' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
e824a92c064fc4f70fe83da5ddc0f834
1d1b02f0564058d1284f1f84715019ca1248fbfd
'2012-05-25T18:26:00-04:00'
describe
'35433' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAJL' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
1970273741f20710dd5a8d42876d73d6
45463aa732a0e63bdc79f22184aa873b79220ec2
'2012-05-25T18:24:41-04:00'
describe
'425945' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAJM' 'sip-files00181.QC2.jpg'
98e9df8a108f79abc5a340910fd5dd23
849a22e5527431a6049fea89ffc375033e9fce80
describe
'55525' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAJN' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
1a7db54bd692c1263cd840ee17dd8f20
60b3b053c99070407729cebcc9b34a3d9cb90e92
describe
'88888' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAJO' 'sip-files00194.QC.jpg'
513fe2a7f42493f6c015fdd9ddf95ef9
f55677623824f738c9f69cf76d760a7e97c2f780
describe
'270385' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAJP' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
1d7bc015cb7f8800adaeb1fafb919536
edcfa2569dd0d7fd7643c4d0c18b2b662ebcdf68
'2012-05-25T18:23:54-04:00'
describe
'277028' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAJQ' 'sip-files00250.jp2'
01f88a64483f5b6e472b869c01720574
93b3675396f1230a2b91416ef97db1d1e0028931
'2012-05-25T18:18:25-04:00'
describe
'41711' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAJR' 'sip-files00165.pro'
6ca6d424e1ed6c43f225bab3750d4163
e3b74bc6306b32135a132afc4501ee91312126a2
'2012-05-25T18:15:35-04:00'
describe
'462135' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAJS' 'sip-files00192.jpg'
ad0ad029e22539c56edbc81412558263
19034b481907eeb94851bc3e2342755dbc69f4bb
'2012-05-25T18:15:29-04:00'
describe
'451096' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAJT' 'sip-files00287.jpg'
5e987a01cb184b17c1ba249e6ef3b477
1281f97b4bf6c8fdb61f07a0f385f41cab7fcb0e
'2012-05-25T18:22:38-04:00'
describe
'2228708' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAJU' 'sip-files00153.tif'
b8a301f469d39af3e6ad776bda448cc2
6a0bdb1a6faf554f4c1ff32842fe36fcda0c336b
'2012-05-25T18:19:03-04:00'
describe
'277003' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAJV' 'sip-files00222.jp2'
40e63995ebb41ba8f428e1299db76af3
ddebd6ab2f51e1d8c7d4746f6fea5d5e859e438e
'2012-05-25T18:19:41-04:00'
describe
'379351' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAJW' 'sip-files00174.QC2.jpg'
04a41e9a7f2b1e93b55208c94fec8cf6
731c97658db0a6b9c8c009534d1cc9bd2976d1ca
'2012-05-25T18:25:57-04:00'
describe
'42237' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAJX' 'sip-files00058.pro'
2cf85e5e414993780d1363efe4c7d33b
1d6a331b05712a251a887630fa2b615c62b9e546
'2012-05-25T18:18:38-04:00'
describe
'277011' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAJY' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
31138f12909d0291f601601c183b7063
97f9f9e4b9c66c3733d06e1fcc55cb01cd28f0ee
'2012-05-25T18:24:35-04:00'
describe
'930' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAJZ' 'sip-files00274.txt'
e06ef5d1885d513f4eb055a6abc8d8b4
bb0ecc682ca66ee7f535ca41e19de425a0f9b4e3
'2012-05-25T18:22:32-04:00'
describe
'437165' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAKA' 'sip-files00226.jpg'
cc05979ecda2d6c6086b6536d480f9b9
d15267f0e62b456ef3813f7c5e07839c06ab5ff3
'2012-05-25T18:14:05-04:00'
describe
'1181' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAKB' 'sip-files00209.txt'
02ebf4e8de53a5f1389b376954147d05
385a614f4540632048cbe3424da885704a23dee0
'2012-05-25T18:15:52-04:00'
describe
'277016' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAKC' 'sip-files00238.jp2'
e80455912fd713467328256dc6f23529
8649b415c23fed55744dbf96ad5c3d938d0136f0
describe
'157053' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAKD' 'sip-files00171.QC.jpg'
0c723d51af896cf2b9e2270a6fa70689
af5f0b4ed8ff7fd75f4175001e7569592ad95f1e
'2012-05-25T18:23:48-04:00'
describe
'396261' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAKE' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
25556e30099a4d73c89849d4ba1d6e95
efbebbbcc9cd51f4642deb684412a98db1d7004f
'2012-05-25T18:23:55-04:00'
describe
'26310' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAKF' 'sip-files00230.pro'
efc2c36f74aafe0c4bab9ff8904afd56
433ff361f9f6b42cd32ab357e9a2fb36faad9176
'2012-05-25T18:17:57-04:00'
describe
'472800' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAKG' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
0f048dfa1d5bbdb95694d423ece2d3fd
b17180258f046a137c2ded1821920bc842791e7c
describe
'2226916' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAKH' 'sip-files00239.tif'
1752e92f9edc32d0e1770c89a2aaed9c
0963fecf622abd459876797ba48a50fe2e781f3f
'2012-05-25T18:25:52-04:00'
describe
'234187' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAKI' 'sip-files00261.jpg'
23c4d2d24e3d6bdb8e362504c2b3ca17
6f3953214beeb4a1ac198ec9120cf1788b6aede6
'2012-05-25T18:18:02-04:00'
describe
'357499' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAKJ' 'sip-files00200.QC2.jpg'
72d3c9defcc2dc3a6654d1f39cad0872
44baee7ff26c0a6f0a1affcd9db46cdbf53fdb95
'2012-05-25T18:16:25-04:00'
describe
'497144' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAKK' 'sip-files00280.jpg'
610e9e086a79e89be1d5eff6a51114cc
ea62e5aea2d10e6d234a20ee3ca34343cb2bb83b
'2012-05-25T18:17:38-04:00'
describe
'417686' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAKL' 'sip-files00143.QC2.jpg'
48f55de3599652bd8a49de72b5f67093
5d7a96f1bf1ae07f55b1cece7621b1542f12b391
'2012-05-25T18:24:58-04:00'
describe
'449265' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAKM' 'sip-files00002.jpg'
a646455bd94c739c96a85d173fe2902f
277e15ee45d2a85e2f576f41f975456934843107
'2012-05-25T18:20:45-04:00'
describe
'462867' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAKN' 'sip-files00279.jpg'
cbed4d81ebf7e83040113a47acbe84c2
b7549397614b0ca170260109f9778c6db0f0b917
describe
'39593' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAKO' 'sip-files00239thm.jpg'
3f53913c96da7c5bea8fc1b84c5ce0e7
2f0024eceec7357dcdd4260571646c0af992e1a4
'2012-05-25T18:23:13-04:00'
describe
'272269' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAKP' 'sip-files00163.jp2'
434d9dbd10c1227c6bc030c3f08c62a6
ea215ac2c1d02647a9a00ac5a3722e0c64246927
'2012-05-25T18:15:43-04:00'
describe
'52797' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAKQ' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
0aebdd74937f6e5a40a08314a794b7ed
b7890d74f7907fec69e0a049d60ad6235c30909a
'2012-05-25T18:26:01-04:00'
describe
'270381' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAKR' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
d1f231b2fbe4332d07db43c0c06c488c
36ff08a74dacde3064f4f5467f8440b0d6785395
'2012-05-25T18:20:17-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAKS' 'sip-files00097.txt'
8fc22be725d5ac370e153545838f3ab6
16c536c3eaada235d13beba207e8d277bf745f54
'2012-05-25T18:21:13-04:00'
describe
'44672' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAKT' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
2c3b501cc26599173544f8f12305eb90
2b0fe73de13f971f01afdb2821ae9b6ffbb2f386
'2012-05-25T18:23:09-04:00'
describe
'276976' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAKU' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
214162c748ac9f59a87424c95fa34206
31a99d44a52b5881be9b064cbdb82c065b8fa43c
'2012-05-25T18:19:59-04:00'
describe
'2229756' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAKV' 'sip-files00277.tif'
b3be42e51d418e6c637815970e2ba5ef
bb11d930504a94e69acaef40f14eab8a685f7a3a
'2012-05-25T18:23:36-04:00'
describe
'677' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAKW' 'sip-files00154.txt'
d62d772569e1f08ab2c49b483f2d181e
dff5eee309ddaa2b25a74fad6a7318f5475c5136
describe
'363749' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAKX' 'sip-files00180.QC2.jpg'
a7db407301339cadddaf6dc839f292fd
1dd5e5ceb625351eaa350850a7edd79164fc1763
'2012-05-25T18:21:44-04:00'
describe
'40876' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAKY' 'sip-files00255.pro'
181f3252652e9c65b8c90f434d14ad52
332bf088c897fa7822b99b804c089936b7b50154
describe
'150387' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAKZ' 'sip-files00207.QC.jpg'
e12946d761fce8ef5e67f7d36c6d8163
088271ac891e72f6456928c0f31c6ecf64716d9b
'2012-05-25T18:21:03-04:00'
describe
'496802' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABALA' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
bbdc98bacb6f02331c30220a436172f6
f9605f54d75faee76e21aba84837918c3d82ee28
'2012-05-25T18:25:20-04:00'
describe
'2228772' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABALB' 'sip-files00064.tif'
16a7a2b03cbe4964c81fe332c51e784c
7652390d66df6c512af3800e8aa78235e4652cd0
describe
'51014' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABALC' 'sip-files00291thm.jpg'
cedc2c29c1a5d8533c8ce6a8d5c50740
da5bb7b29912a0c10b8d166da029f52f930c0c8a
'2012-05-25T18:25:26-04:00'
describe
'26782' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABALD' 'sip-files00209.pro'
2e59f5e9e12495b83e8b6665de59b136
82f41d464694db9e516a66f367d5cc09e44021cf
'2012-05-25T18:19:57-04:00'
describe
'1561' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABALE' 'sip-files00219.txt'
6ef490c2c9364bd299eaf5eefc787df7
365d05af02f41760b3b0a7861576bb52018715cb
'2012-05-25T18:23:21-04:00'
describe
'65176' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABALF' 'sip-files00007a.QC.jpg'
e68c5db2f752ba154daa816745ca4391
6362d33113af6798651928079a571b1bead10df6
'2012-05-25T18:14:17-04:00'
describe
'55946' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABALG' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
aafe21088d0eec55557d817acb75c33b
ea7f70f5e6e81ab22c53325176be9549b5e2fcf5
'2012-05-25T18:25:36-04:00'
describe
'455829' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABALH' 'sip-files00257.jpg'
b3be9f6ef77f5fbe6773a24fd15d0e9b
30a8fb611daff96aa27ad45a795da6ad5f3b600f
'2012-05-25T18:23:25-04:00'
describe
'363859' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABALI' 'sip-files00267.QC2.jpg'
ba7365ef4a09a0175e8e795e727795b4
90a18ed85f33a67067540079bdd039c224e8e52b
'2012-05-25T18:16:28-04:00'
describe
'406332' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABALJ' 'sip-files00218.jpg'
9f1f8672a34532bb8d0a7fe1adc99c9f
6150690c5fe6bda2daf842dc70bb637763d86b1e
'2012-05-25T18:13:51-04:00'
describe
'169683' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABALK' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
e53882efd468f5b2ffa893d4c40ff51d
bcf86e3247cd1335bf64fe381460a9905d5a9e77
'2012-05-25T18:16:58-04:00'
describe
'165123' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABALL' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
3626a2ce36e23546d4eb9a47b411bee8
715c641c02df785998740c613643f35e27a51aa1
'2012-05-25T18:18:53-04:00'
describe
'151055' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABALM' 'sip-files00279.QC.jpg'
259e4986e3f0283ef57013f8db667514
ae0d3b3570ea1da54763d93b631cba1a04973a7d
'2012-05-25T18:15:40-04:00'
describe
'2228680' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABALN' 'sip-files00251.tif'
4b78d9d637205f8cc0c5bfad8e1ef5da
1af8d1df38538bb7fdbfcd8778b406aa31dc166b
'2012-05-25T18:25:16-04:00'
describe
'276986' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABALO' 'sip-files00221.jp2'
78e8f6c1896c4777c2edbc660fbc7fd0
b67fb52493aa44cab249c100b8dd8b815e4d759b
'2012-05-25T18:22:14-04:00'
describe
'40272' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABALP' 'sip-files00028.pro'
6968ef0d825275dcceda935177db2c90
8fadf49decb8811373fbcb14d9d75a0a8aa7ae8f
'2012-05-25T18:20:25-04:00'
describe
'1209' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABALQ' 'sip-files00132.txt'
1db11ac394010339923afb10703a4723
bece2e14d7e3e0e6693b5bad90fd30ac38fda7f0
describe
'417878' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABALR' 'sip-files00232.jpg'
6994ce84b2ae4cd3a928db52fd7da993
1d04ffd72bd1464a6c15168efe96ae3bacf38a24
describe
'2228644' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABALS' 'sip-files00246.tif'
d1ac695642b4ad08d264917cc8c0d98c
5d3242e8803eede58282ff4b453f6e974d95afb7
'2012-05-25T18:18:42-04:00'
describe
'416236' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABALT' 'sip-files00204.jpg'
92ad2eaf97ba96cdca81815ee4ce4a18
a06b856f0d39a503823a60fc815d2b6d4614f32c
'2012-05-25T18:15:01-04:00'
describe
'41247' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABALU' 'sip-files00126.pro'
b19d19961012ef660740a92d34feaa30
66ffe30b63dd816044c3946ca75652a8d811cd0e
'2012-05-25T18:24:47-04:00'
describe
'505125' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABALV' 'sip-files00262.jpg'
683fa172d41753aa6f1045fb363ddc9b
abcbe4ba7e91fac39ebedb989fcaf67e4b9459b7
'2012-05-25T18:17:23-04:00'
describe
'1732' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABALW' 'sip-files00198.txt'
8f7a73df5f52b4d897bc56b946b0fa7d
1863c1a360c774827b2ee708afbc0249125efff7
'2012-05-25T18:22:36-04:00'
describe
'2228932' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABALX' 'sip-files00026.tif'
e6c24ef5e18c2be74a36071f537a625e
4f8f3aa732701e62d9f5f1872ae36b9d2d917aaf
'2012-05-25T18:14:36-04:00'
describe
'177498' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABALY' 'sip-files00005.QC2.jpg'
82835c6e54f0ecb9f425c88e05792109
646b7eb428d1d01b8130a8951ff284b653208776
'2012-05-25T18:22:34-04:00'
describe
'277013' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABALZ' 'sip-files00168.jp2'
d23c8d7a38965871f5bbf4bceb2c49e6
7dcdba563b1476c109d6133d0cd336491ff10002
describe
'1161' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAMA' 'sip-files00230.txt'
67d9e9020d1e2ff78a9d472d5078f6e5
0a71e025e611762838ee3768aecf9b2633644a36
'2012-05-25T18:25:15-04:00'
describe
'147584' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAMB' 'sip-files00238.QC.jpg'
fdb2af8c8ebe675139a3f2badc3f0d99
790ff1b2e628b2decf6a9a9fc2f862bb1373aef4
describe
'2225916' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAMC' 'sip-files00179.tif'
608096b4d5a9be27a0861a4ee01b10ba
a65bd32155f58cfde672cc34c7d380295d9998a7
'2012-05-25T18:19:51-04:00'
describe
'1744' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAMD' 'sip-files00018.txt'
1e974b0b4a27cccf3faf9d0a9e2ddee0
35100ad2f1dfb5be520506957ce04a30ad9496d7
'2012-05-25T18:19:16-04:00'
describe
'483844' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAME' 'sip-files00143.jpg'
a5e62e6ee98220ca07e740f4613419fb
c8ff8a9d125f73febc4020716125193929494c9c
'2012-05-25T18:18:06-04:00'
describe
'38925' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAMF' 'sip-files00199.pro'
56b978f063220216d3f2c73a599e69b3
d685032348221f532cba6028e80ebda93dd61f7e
describe
'157296' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAMG' 'sip-files00267.QC.jpg'
51ad5a6beb6853d9b3ff04eadf219168
1c86d8f3520837429f15a5739b86b8c5c9fa13f0
'2012-05-25T18:19:43-04:00'
describe
'26594' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAMH' 'sip-files00075.pro'
68679792e7b17fa247b6d657e7e12d4a
6705e7205795b2ef796fe3b3d981af65f391aa43
'2012-05-25T18:17:33-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAMI' 'sip-files00257.jp2'
da21cfb71a7baa024d98916c1cc54b6f
266326d13b884caa5b8af907ea638aa8316a6391
'2012-05-25T18:21:25-04:00'
describe
'2224780' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAMJ' 'sip-files00005.tif'
9e0dc2c84c6080d569ab7f9179f34852
3112a1dbddf7a50cc3752a1280be4f658c70cb88
'2012-05-25T18:16:06-04:00'
describe
'41884' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAMK' 'sip-files00190.pro'
a155db11b1df860f63c0a6fcb2855ca7
4677bb77059715af961cb02d285d6c949cb76ab8
describe
'325905' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAML' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
b2e3e51d50543be5fa364b194e93d575
825ed0f453ad2b85602b1b69152cef5f2aaf0b16
'2012-05-25T18:24:48-04:00'
describe
'2227400' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAMM' 'sip-files00169.tif'
48bdde06079355e77f9500d99e2b30c9
eee88e4d5ed2f0a58c494871a627ae41030fee58
describe
'1655' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAMN' 'sip-files00142.txt'
4939cade3df554150bbab19c0fe20c39
69e62fc3ade6b589298e2bf623d8f45cf3a272cf
'2012-05-25T18:26:23-04:00'
describe
'38079' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAMO' 'sip-files00244.pro'
a9d4582e57971e4380be5c6ccc7a72d8
6cd05942b06db92355d63bf62f571c262acd4d74
describe
'2229024' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAMP' 'sip-files00253.tif'
c43bb9a5494b78f393ea8ddd64f354a3
0e37bd2b764ec9dcf1e2544687c41db1cfa2768c
describe
'498202' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAMQ' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
b6a41f85e8a727ef5ba481706427e73c
629fc891d0916e8a0f8459aea718bc0aa8566a29
'2012-05-25T18:23:47-04:00'
describe
'276937' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAMR' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
86b26037ca8d8a90d15b3369c793c330
97467a872139c9e786e04425afc0ec73e6ac21b0
'2012-05-25T18:25:22-04:00'
describe
'275467' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAMS' 'sip-files00074.QC2.jpg'
afda0fa2589aa011be302a023ca0b3e7
1eea46c248e124a968dbe4d53c9be58ddb28d290
describe
'447387' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAMT' 'sip-files00044.QC2.jpg'
096d19b50c8a48f3204b5144b7f831b6
fbc9b87858f39e7431e87758cacef0af42e50ff0
'2012-05-25T18:13:50-04:00'
describe
'2227604' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAMU' 'sip-files00020.tif'
12499a0f516226857e3dad4a7c21512e
c7b91fdc5ce11d0a2e666fb224c40b3a7228bad9
'2012-05-25T18:17:31-04:00'
describe
'621817' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAMV' 'sip-files00042.QC2.jpg'
29b5eff1cbe87309cd4ca3963b48e225
796d96029d0487454d33608e3f92c28f5f04686a
'2012-05-25T18:26:37-04:00'
describe
'164763' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAMW' 'sip-files00143.QC.jpg'
7e54d5562cfec3a58046f15d8693e629
6480e18c1191ebfc0a2acf1fdc74c55b35355618
describe
'143098' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAMX' 'sip-files00234.QC.jpg'
98a05d5b48c69b3b8a68aaec6954b826
6b6d86c6ea11a911d061e01ec753457dca79288a
'2012-05-25T18:20:22-04:00'
describe
'47865' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAMY' 'sip-files00234thm.jpg'
45bafd4bfd55faeb120a6f72ffe89fe3
e78d9f24b1d09d869ea648c1630c471f1adf71a1
'2012-05-25T18:24:02-04:00'
describe
'277025' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAMZ' 'sip-files00242.jp2'
a09aec50c215ad72d14178d715f84aff
b7d6af945cd5879079ad8c86ebcad27ff34cc6fa
'2012-05-25T18:19:09-04:00'
describe
'38826' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABANA' 'sip-files00118.pro'
13c309d6bf94a96973e430ff8f35dff2
d692dfdfb5f67e80d40ab3b15b3d8647dac17926
'2012-05-25T18:13:53-04:00'
describe
'277026' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABANB' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
b0a1ae34b174aa273f8c2310547306ba
287d0d60d1fa62dd4a1142ad57626b4e8053e92a
describe
'10159' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABANC' 'sip-files00009.pro'
df5e1c7539c5e8b250ca152c835b2d8d
d595c83e37bf7388b7a1043a517e95b87ff7397f
'2012-05-25T18:15:16-04:00'
describe
'276915' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAND' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
4ad39d7f3c7078f4365bc476316a7de6
3969cfb3c30fb86004d7b467a1987369736be0e6
describe
'27856' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABANE' 'sip-files00280.pro'
3c5a7d0ca0dc58d7f5afae0afedd0f0a
fd4730cf4b63f441d01125b57c36ee18feb19dca
'2012-05-25T18:17:41-04:00'
describe
'2160908' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABANF' 'sip-files00192.tif'
92429452459c1ee6010fd68ca2bf550b
7c1b8575b78463ff1c498983994e411a78dd5c0e
'2012-05-25T18:14:59-04:00'
describe
'276991' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABANG' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
350306b3233d370eca15e0e773fcc399
7b62266e7db705c778cbae2913299baf7e5f6e52
'2012-05-25T18:16:09-04:00'
describe
'438242' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABANH' 'sip-files00286.jpg'
57f4c75b87f34bf66ce51522c5d4fd16
140abd702dd4b4a84a4bce252585b4bef6e85fd4
'2012-05-25T18:17:59-04:00'
describe
'176638' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABANI' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
cdcf7a62ecdb5500e117536b35032c8f
f20536bee7a0b99888f3f52cdad3cee477b5cbdc
describe
'276990' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABANJ' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
d8a941c98952c00cfd2213816e6a98a3
dadfde10f48637eab65d3219696de1cd4b7c56e2
'2012-05-25T18:20:13-04:00'
describe
'50537' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABANK' 'sip-files00212thm.jpg'
5e395843451ba41f7d28548e1d76821f
9896f491b4e7c9462449c1c097e9658083ed7c58
describe
'248698' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABANL' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
46649d77174ccd720885922b49887234
8a4ae8db478dc4bf85dda72fc586a2158fb4a898
'2012-05-25T18:21:14-04:00'
describe
'2228436' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABANM' 'sip-files00213.tif'
ca25d24308c4bc43f4961f0ee1489326
0684a78f8330acbb6e7496b939650e074de672ee
'2012-05-25T18:16:32-04:00'
describe
'50322' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABANN' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
e60d6e07f635e4377839d35abe87c396
992ec27ba979073749ea504d1440b534f269ab7c
'2012-05-25T18:24:03-04:00'
describe
'1299' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABANO' 'sip-files00185.txt'
672393748f3cd1730ffa01faec3c7498
876681ec574b95d30c5edffc1e265f01df891f06
describe
'1698' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABANP' 'sip-files00051.txt'
548208882fddf9327087deed69827625
00e3f876408f56f07bec276e103e49cebf2fcbe7
describe
'2228820' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABANQ' 'sip-files00028.tif'
fc9197bfe903e49cea1ba2abbb0fd6fe
0808e57c0cd14a5e1efb4ee27f55c95d2e54be14
'2012-05-25T18:24:28-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABANR' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
979bf2c9fc9134e87f1d75e656a84103
e2fb9889aac53ded1f9e703e73955ed914590ad3
'2012-05-25T18:23:23-04:00'
describe
'169267' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABANS' 'sip-files00167.QC.jpg'
311c031c45d49736d33148878194beed
d2b13ed3f3c2203b04e4923f1ac144494556f3d8
describe
'269505' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABANT' 'sip-files00189.jp2'
e270ae6c989a7eaf4663172a80f56be1
28f7f918b99dca535512a6ed31b409528b193295
describe
'229888' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABANU' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
ff1b5091683b6520866a785653da018d
65cb8b4c3de01548ba2a2f1de936b9649ca87369
'2012-05-25T18:16:56-04:00'
describe
'276941' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABANV' 'sip-files00272.jp2'
ad3191597b57a5e431d007210bc2142c
0abf49f73d2972c93086095036c0d05777d4f7c6
'2012-05-25T18:13:48-04:00'
describe
'165614' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABANW' 'sip-files00189.QC.jpg'
a7d8e24149ea2b7590bc3f0cef6cf354
d57c394f5ec976fb57f882e76bb890da95e8aad1
'2012-05-25T18:16:50-04:00'
describe
'1166' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABANX' 'sip-files00040.txt'
9dc46b30c5cfb9e57f49c6bde28f8f87
e2b0b811ce5a6dae78c93b354bb9661c4fbd996a
'2012-05-25T18:13:52-04:00'
describe
'175381' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABANY' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
a4c721c9a0a6fe3b45de48eb8ee9282c
def7e27c77245523903eab29cad696bde86255c1
describe
'277017' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABANZ' 'sip-files00143.jp2'
565f27dfdc54713554370be51be0fc0c
7a963b3540e3e135228a965469bd83a9c12759e1
'2012-05-25T18:23:32-04:00'
describe
'407665' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAOA' 'sip-files00228.jpg'
44180872a0e9e8bddba6ef4d8f11e3b4
95a48d0047183f98fba7a40e058dd41f5fcd10d4
'2012-05-25T18:14:22-04:00'
describe
'431614' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAOB' 'sip-files00103.QC2.jpg'
d99118f4391b8ce7b059c3a240cd3907
15181ef9b0bb4f3f79afe97609d25ababfde587e
'2012-05-25T18:23:42-04:00'
describe
'50094' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAOC' 'sip-files00214thm.jpg'
239f816a08cbf1fd9bd74c33f2d7a998
9b96f34dcac6e6e2cc9af00f132806c489e8a760
describe
'2228668' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAOD' 'sip-files00056.tif'
b214a86709cba34f0415c32b9980df06
08dc08fa2ed4309f908aa121fc71c9b1d99ae6e5
'2012-05-25T18:20:59-04:00'
describe
'39249' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAOE' 'sip-files00178.pro'
3b4273572d5ceed0ecac8f581488674c
9d610e2c17176b042d1d816bf110af8a056fb077
'2012-05-25T18:26:31-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAOF' 'sip-files00233.tif'
6cfd6a6f1cde04c50fab7ff4cb5b08f1
b7bf4c5cae1f378385665d9ef8945870062dc31b
'2012-05-25T18:15:09-04:00'
describe
'7856052' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAOG' 'sip-files00002.tif'
1b04c32480fc7a4f4b237482ac72c343
aebdbde40e98648fb8d5e642286a0f5d24841135
describe
'1519' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAOH' 'sip-files00149.txt'
ce1eb94ccf1f277ee47990abcf5fd5f5
3b06bef53417861b312e3a0bfaa17868576ada5a
'2012-05-25T18:22:45-04:00'
describe
'2226816' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAOI' 'sip-files00260.tif'
90772c9be854ab00d95fca673ef7b3cf
0b68548978b01d747a15ec37e01a010a476aeba2
'2012-05-25T18:14:51-04:00'
describe
'294557' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAOJ' 'sip-files00296.jpg'
bf05370be1c268b1129962ccdfc0c232
0da20e6f49f24f82ee6e0c53075fab451926f6d8
'2012-05-25T18:17:32-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAOK' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
ec4c89269c6c53759b7da9788ce15411
baaca961dd0824be1d442bd5fa8e27a8d075e5ae
'2012-05-25T18:19:34-04:00'
describe
'161308' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAOL' 'sip-files00250.QC.jpg'
ec1df768f27a4a2d9a4da6a7b85406dd
17c5e98656fe297919669751ecaad48efef14182
'2012-05-25T18:15:13-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAOM' 'sip-files00207.jp2'
7a66c4ea0aaee95967606b24dca8f0b8
1b967b18cd51631e45877b18b1e32b3e4ff3b891
'2012-05-25T18:16:44-04:00'
describe
'165110' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAON' 'sip-files00188.QC.jpg'
047de409282bae20b57f7a597870f33e
b338ef59adf2efa8989b0340b8b242e048ae80f4
'2012-05-25T18:13:54-04:00'
describe
'352663' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAOO' 'sip-files00049.QC2.jpg'
ff7575740641484de5a28ce21ec1bc80
8c5e1021589221f9555aa190b3d003662e0b31a6
describe
'1733' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAOP' 'sip-files00146.txt'
77bc4ea5dcc013af610a402f1b52a306
e5532208d0e04bed3413820d90c4f0ec4554f4ed
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAOQ' 'sip-files00143.tif'
2a3658c96ef9f4a02bf2041d36209197
a22b9c99e7b2c774691ce75069507109bf5fcff8
'2012-05-25T18:17:14-04:00'
describe
'439939' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAOR' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
0cdd360f0df6af9a227af08ad4ed80bf
57bd871939aaad30d484ef5a762f540d40052da5
'2012-05-25T18:22:19-04:00'
describe
'2351240' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAOS' 'sip-files00008.tif'
0a8c9f84f6a47a8a5219649d795e14c9
43e2c7136ecdfcc5a7fbeb83269d5b47b4da8259
'2012-05-25T18:13:38-04:00'
describe
'277001' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAOT' 'sip-files00263.jp2'
aeeecb9c1c3fd59948ea632b68bda723
edd0c93c1b388598339d51c3e5369fa788137c2d
describe
'468716' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAOU' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
af11768b32fa39b7adf577e90d3afcfb
fc0126adf504389e6a9c738f1205849aadef70c8
'2012-05-25T18:20:01-04:00'
describe
'493195' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAOV' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
099df417a2ffd4f715a925fed86e8b16
24059511575987688e2d8a1c9a77e83a59dfcab1
'2012-05-25T18:25:55-04:00'
describe
'49488' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAOW' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
e838c287599fc03df1da210a31135642
539ec72d81e595b75b97a98da12ef4c5ad4167ad
'2012-05-25T18:22:21-04:00'
describe
'439149' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAOX' 'sip-files00199.jpg'
f7dda0414f20146048e807d34ffa5d0b
446df058e1aeafa4a0fff3e37035bdacbd4fb06d
'2012-05-25T18:18:10-04:00'
describe
'277012' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAOY' 'sip-files00226.jp2'
813f6b92ffbb1a352ce81cb3cbc60b9b
909acdbae01215dd6c29cdb17fcfb34d06ffe42e
'2012-05-25T18:23:39-04:00'
describe
'122655' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAOZ' 'sip-files00265.QC.jpg'
a830c3b0800122264ecd3426ad459ad3
5b2d30297e0663afa5a794d9deb318969fec5bff
'2012-05-25T18:15:06-04:00'
describe
'2228728' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAPA' 'sip-files00046.tif'
851aa2bb252cfe637ac91433330ab20a
15b42f59af095fe72601b4022e301b2eaf2716d2
describe
'347066' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAPB' 'sip-files00218.QC2.jpg'
0688f9e8c2030f4299cac86f1045026b
560524f0b5a8f68b53829ad2803e4e52e9a2bfcd
'2012-05-25T18:24:34-04:00'
describe
'328561' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAPC' 'sip-files00295.jp2'
8756ddf8fa1e961107c17ee57741ffde
a9f69dfd0a1378fb6917c277fae2542de1d2cabf
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAPD' 'sip-files00121.txt'
c17b7762dda936d57096467d64457331
5a94b7bb5b80523a12d7a70ba5a33d2a28be6b14
'2012-05-25T18:20:19-04:00'
describe
'394980' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAPE' 'sip-files00120.QC2.jpg'
b38da22a29e5f6ea8a6fd6371c75651e
4678ce5e9d7d5531926a6cf2b438b951e0daa1b6
'2012-05-25T18:19:10-04:00'
describe
'27816' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAPF' 'sip-files00284.pro'
7b0d4c5b26afad1aaabb0c55ccd100fb
723538a31f998d2ee63a18e329bf836c1658fff4
'2012-05-25T18:24:17-04:00'
describe
'250137' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAPG' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
95edb2050c8b667387495ea17ea45f5a
54d7de6ddf74bc7d85c95e30a7853862432003ac
'2012-05-25T18:26:22-04:00'
describe
'336132' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAPH' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
06a73c7b4e7d9ded065a3be8d2cb2639
44a0b6128cdddfc4e9dfb9f045f3828ee91004a4
'2012-05-25T18:14:06-04:00'
describe
'276897' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAPI' 'sip-files00246.jp2'
b6ee321cf015894e509b51e5d1c10e65
88893d06450beacc63131f851292d86d2ad61d02
'2012-05-25T18:21:15-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAPJ' 'sip-files00138.tif'
00243326f0c6f3cfc4056f262450f1fe
1921257dcea20a871863b9a92f1ac2d93794a1bd
'2012-05-25T18:25:00-04:00'
describe
'18' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAPK' 'sip-files00294.txt'
28b391a9b79ce3a269e90d01f22469ba
37691a904d03d1846afe347544c83f90b34fd864
'2012-05-25T18:23:00-04:00'
describe
'499814' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAPL' 'sip-files00167.jpg'
dea52c0430637873b372e0dd9321e0b6
fcbd3e8254b84a46f9a514838ad612f9fa971c62
'2012-05-25T18:14:24-04:00'
describe
'50991' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAPM' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
77ab0d95b3fdba13287ec1f4514d7f2b
95a1f714ed0fd16db871c93802942d4439587a00
describe
'361672' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAPN' 'sip-files00275.QC2.jpg'
455f46556cb26eeff619d020fd9ba133
4c82454c6741712ffcd258f247b7fa2ddf3ab29f
'2012-05-25T18:24:04-04:00'
describe
'1756' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAPO' 'sip-files00170.txt'
25802f1e3fd9c45060db48ef403ecbae
caf1a0033badbc01598b0add588a1882b47ce582
'2012-05-25T18:26:10-04:00'
describe
'495900' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAPP' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
7373aef7a1d8212d1ffdc1ab70e9f82b
dc66bfd9cd565ee15beb168b03f9063582145b82
'2012-05-25T18:22:31-04:00'
describe
'619767' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAPQ' 'sip-files00166.QC2.jpg'
80756a52f088bd77ab4f442236ea34c9
bd79cebf86a8a725d9ebd55f528b11e78437c49b
'2012-05-25T18:18:32-04:00'
describe
'158803' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAPR' 'sip-files00280.QC.jpg'
bd7b811bf02f460590c148b743a70a77
1d8c1cadcd5a9b5629778f07f6d02c61ab845f50
'2012-05-25T18:24:31-04:00'
describe
'276985' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAPS' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
bd9ad078f51502fd43ac73bbe18240e9
eae87ae84e3835d5c51d5d3ed19a9efd458857d8
'2012-05-25T18:25:48-04:00'
describe
'34518' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAPT' 'sip-files00099.pro'
232fad48012f9d12436a1f820f9f90f6
e36aff82325ef2b550fdc1684e3b65d2be887f72
'2012-05-25T18:25:41-04:00'
describe
'41398' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAPU' 'sip-files00243.pro'
30e557195f12c1717068dc304badd600
d06af3c4aaa8f8cb255c861867f3a572ae369bb9
'2012-05-25T18:17:54-04:00'
describe
'2021552' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAPV' 'sip-files00018.tif'
d051fe2e9ad29fe1c63c6b5dd10926cd
6b67c7c2796aab88056551c775fa5861662a69e4
'2012-05-25T18:23:05-04:00'
describe
'276946' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAPW' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
41c503fb63254f372d66410f4e65de7c
b7301816597ee5ea4fa7ea5e8631bc45043a4380
describe
'14972' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAPX' 'sip-files00008.pro'
79b3e9c3f5a937c1fa67cd0ac7508ec3
55ca3b35f5067162941da7922d5bd10da9b7452d
'2012-05-25T18:24:10-04:00'
describe
'1659' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAPY' 'sip-files00108.txt'
6a696a43a580cda7111821c0324794aa
016670d557f7b0c5bbaed5202ae8dc5cfa80be23
'2012-05-25T18:20:41-04:00'
describe
'1397' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAPZ' 'sip-files00117.pro'
dc60a5154a7bc4397fbcca78c314eddb
23d40c15022c58fb1b7eee9147effa61e6ec35ad
'2012-05-25T18:23:14-04:00'
describe
'155532' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAQA' 'sip-files00211.QC.jpg'
f19dabac90015dd6d7e724114fc38157
6ea2811947c54e17ed9d81d5269bad1291e774fe
describe
'50579' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAQB' 'sip-files00171thm.jpg'
0b8baf74cbae3600c5216539d0f2eb9b
86266b8992af98b82bf3f9cc0c2c5694eb004f12
'2012-05-25T18:14:03-04:00'
describe
'49893' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAQC' 'sip-files00177thm.jpg'
d40129a4358d1ae08980e31c263323c5
d225f220c1599e24a6395ffba920cf10f91d8ec2
'2012-05-25T18:22:09-04:00'
describe
'168481' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAQD' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
3957133f4b3e34917f17ddf186ea91f3
67ef9ad76e5f5b4c649bb2ba2d69cd7ead547d6c
'2012-05-25T18:18:34-04:00'
describe
'152107' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAQE' 'sip-files00244.QC.jpg'
8b9d4c1080da004713b3e71cd81fe409
94752ac77ac6c1832d9ea5a2118feea5f853ea80
'2012-05-25T18:25:40-04:00'
describe
'891' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAQF' 'sip-files00270.txt'
4779cd7f84847e72b37e2af370da2f80
6f775e98177f577ec764d464253a9188e906a670
'2012-05-25T18:21:28-04:00'
describe
'50410' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAQG' 'sip-files00176thm.jpg'
afbcb063d23494df2683d941378b6aa0
684228ee0b152d260ecadd06b07eebb6665a5e37
'2012-05-25T18:13:30-04:00'
describe
'48959' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAQH' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
bf61aa37f74efc1e2e1d881d6c78a611
ba2b506092814d64e41d97df7e3ab6e627e9c316
'2012-05-25T18:13:40-04:00'
describe
'2229120' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAQI' 'sip-files00291.tif'
7a264e494d73d33fcab28d13c6fb4e3f
ee8954cb4b07ae0299252efa96da1d2486fe59d2
'2012-05-25T18:16:24-04:00'
describe
'171764' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAQJ' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
2d92e28e97cf6c947ea9c9247e7d67c0
d181b755a387ad763c627d569b2e5d2aeba30867
'2012-05-25T18:23:01-04:00'
describe
'39570' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAQK' 'sip-files00204.pro'
b100581b4f93eba89ecc49a41cced40d
3de53c3305b6c644777658a9e405a9e6127cd047
'2012-05-25T18:17:11-04:00'
describe
'26034' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAQL' 'sip-files00240.pro'
d2ccc71850bb443d1aa8ad81b43f333b
5de7c83a0756306d244b041482d72c7628c7e274
'2012-05-25T18:18:44-04:00'
describe
'32403' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAQM' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
01635d2720d553b7be794487028f5bae
b0c3e75e02f8e601f7b2711022a77bf4cf6721a9
describe
'41871' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAQN' 'sip-files00153.pro'
5f3cdab9fc24a737d00205f86f0eaa6b
c291c8d3a98211517304bc45dad4a67da5de270e
describe
'33' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAQO' 'sip-filesprocessing.instr'
21f8c682a5eefad6076cb5b30b07f63a
6049cbc67c19b49e730e99a90941c7795b70b255
'2012-05-25T18:24:51-04:00'
describe
'162923' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAQP' 'sip-files00147.QC.jpg'
b617b87e39ac72b87f4cbfeeb0a20fe6
5f156059122d70f5a527c2f7c8bc978734a58a3f
'2012-05-25T18:19:50-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAQQ' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
bb605e28cbd33e7cb76d47e053a1b152
92baf30eab1b933a8d1d929b957b8cc6cfb4a1d8
'2012-05-25T18:15:00-04:00'
describe
'1743' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAQR' 'sip-files00055.txt'
56c6c6501825b6601a81a4e498d76e4b
eb0bcf77a17863d44a56fcb90f208d65c758a6ae
'2012-05-25T18:17:02-04:00'
describe
'49552' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAQS' 'sip-files00264thm.jpg'
b65a1d69cb0117061a9aaf4e84778bfb
d6cfa407b648140074ddd640c2fcda4ff9cc3f59
'2012-05-25T18:19:20-04:00'
describe
'492551' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAQT' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
647d2219662e7926aa34153d4a98cb12
2543fda43bcb1ed2dc02fa667d196aea27c248d0
'2012-05-25T18:23:16-04:00'
describe
'43412' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAQU' 'sip-files00215.pro'
e664d91df4aeb4161e0ad19a04967d34
2501726998e634ea9f24fbc8362225cd0616b815
describe
'39728' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAQV' 'sip-files00258.pro'
44a7c4678f9eca7894840f7f50fd1979
2b2d68e106b98d529b9ac4bda64776fc0ef2b5cc
'2012-05-25T18:13:37-04:00'
describe
'119582' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAQW' 'sip-files00260.QC.jpg'
e531bbc13b61a6726a6072d4c5d0549f
c662c5012c2e8d7471851584595440e886b424d7
describe
'1795' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAQX' 'sip-files00217.txt'
405e134107c812ff2291b75b88391f18
891f67d8c95e2c0d4e71415ed17ee60d72a9e5a1
describe
'28560' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAQY' 'sip-files00278.pro'
d1461a3e2285c305ef9daef37a82c074
d50bc9dbd3b792fe46cda3a6840f76b470924576
'2012-05-25T18:21:32-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAQZ' 'sip-files00225.jp2'
dca48031b7a8f81abca349147cc1a7f6
d4fa4d5a6f7ea8437f303be8077d4f5c1d0dd908
describe
'1678' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABARA' 'sip-files00093.txt'
b0d57e09075eca1a70a970f75d24f5a9
9db5d8a7ec1f4d09097e18f202dc3812e564a0e6
'2012-05-25T18:26:28-04:00'
describe
'46392' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABARB' 'sip-files00284thm.jpg'
24103fa8aa2193c2f58b0755192f978b
b2560697d93cdf6900f0736887cf120a05acbf43
'2012-05-25T18:22:11-04:00'
describe
'452590' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABARC' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
97bd02677550ac2711e9e0c8a1f4b3a8
1ba6fe451145c1599a9a5d2c10e0c450d677f719
'2012-05-25T18:24:30-04:00'
describe
'50654' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABARD' 'sip-files00224thm.jpg'
b8a75ec172bf6a586ec8c1f6099ea380
35c3a1318946c5edf5d4f9d2ffb8c69106b2494a
'2012-05-25T18:26:30-04:00'
describe
'476585' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABARE' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
6c28ddb7431297f5e86c0d5ee1f0727e
9ed57e879244350c5b7b1b4b164deeaffb690461
describe
'386067' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABARF' 'sip-files00058.QC2.jpg'
f86184b6891d07aaf12e2568e5fc99b0
cb22d937b8989da2952b8906b378c569fee0aa3e
'2012-05-25T18:15:24-04:00'
describe
'51011' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABARG' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
29894111c7c4279c437558182950081a
2614be32594035422c74dd87386dc7c1640717ea
'2012-05-25T18:23:12-04:00'
describe
'476236' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABARH' 'sip-files00288.jpg'
dc4a3380b39f91069fb70c4d8336a418
c88f06dd568a83cd078257532732d671535bba80
describe
'277023' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABARI' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
23b612f605b2a4769642316c4cca23a4
96517e35a2562dccb8a41eca63806e3b592994a0
describe
'1235' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABARJ' 'sip-files00280.txt'
88e68be6be3f880dde6d446cc11ac762
a857ffffab036952914c42f565ee61a1f30e01b3
'2012-05-25T18:15:37-04:00'
describe
'250133' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABARK' 'sip-files00215.jp2'
0847f746726750a7bc6a803e4198bc5a
be401bafbabe3e7fec016becd0ad8a74cff99bdd
'2012-05-25T18:21:16-04:00'
describe
'277014' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABARL' 'sip-files00254.jp2'
6def0af20cf914eddec088c0c6fcb0ea
657a651718f5a1e4611d2c06380c7ebefe5be26c
describe
'39641' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABARM' 'sip-files00027.pro'
4653926614a7a26cce76d13ed6fa7f1c
6297a594cfae9cc2985edc54737bc415f9ff7255
'2012-05-25T18:16:16-04:00'
describe
'2227260' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABARN' 'sip-files00080.tif'
f3ae1482aaf61915c5f0607311541f40
eccef488516687c278c16c45455db7c6c656b8b1
describe
'154976' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABARO' 'sip-files00202.QC.jpg'
5dd5b61cfe6248447e548ad9c742d718
a66b51682d2cd45849773b6c4a5ae2c4a00e280c
'2012-05-25T18:16:26-04:00'
describe
'42298' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABARP' 'sip-files00189.pro'
fd6f5d5daabd1c3089bf73748a94541b
30cf9e48fe9d5c7106bb08838fc678729ae19ceb
'2012-05-25T18:26:14-04:00'
describe
'434837' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABARQ' 'sip-files00211.jpg'
b27fab5f2697a5f6672d4cff9ca8ec7a
b13a83e3fbb74827070d3cf13037bdcc2cd3374f
describe
'128309' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABARR' 'sip-files00168.QC.jpg'
880680468395198fb2157f2fe15f5b8d
211836c7c657393fc5e0a4c9eee37c7a3319f2f8
describe
'268540' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABARS' 'sip-files00149.jp2'
42f7885710ead291bccc2e2e91efe691
96903fc1205157656f4a2dff9d3907db4e315612
describe
'440784' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABART' 'sip-files00231.jpg'
6bf3afdaad8557c8e018267e0b7a5681
8d5a1f822e7da3ace84677d2c265202efdc139ce
describe
'349563' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABARU' 'sip-files00281.QC2.jpg'
55f5a650a7ec7a63cda530012de65ba8
20d6e86966c96e281ed3af8caca9a834e2456e8e
'2012-05-25T18:15:19-04:00'
describe
'17482' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABARV' 'sip-files00287.pro'
346fc03ff68a00dea1cbf55b120115ee
7dcc3c822a8a87731d93f3d64f01ba464106759a
'2012-05-25T18:13:43-04:00'
describe
'2182356' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABARW' 'sip-files00155.tif'
6876f224f4d7272c95441a54495bd612
e601def5aeaadd1f40e752cfa785463e71b7d8aa
'2012-05-25T18:14:23-04:00'
describe
'1680' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABARX' 'sip-files00104.txt'
e00d6d3381781ef450a77dc97a45eb1e
9a1008dec0b5ca60fcc32baf1e28816a1161cfdd
'2012-05-25T18:13:55-04:00'
describe
'371071' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABARY' 'sip-files00066.QC2.jpg'
2ad904fdd5fbc3fea118f21620b381ab
34e73950f5d050975c541c6422ab8342714cee17
describe
'104' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABARZ' 'sip-files00296.txt'
858bc0f6ed9ba4cab167928c7a911c11
f21fa808df7f1e5ff45760982d908e7afc34bff1
'2012-05-25T18:23:31-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'276975' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABASA' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
78e1f77c69673d70c50b66396167f9d2
3b5dbc317a9ef57223121232eb71f3a26a6e0ca6
'2012-05-25T18:17:42-04:00'
describe
'42765' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABASB' 'sip-files00135.pro'
7640c2d7a50ccdad148eebef0517baf6
4848e542c09688542ba81ee4b1f55402f7e46129
'2012-05-25T18:20:27-04:00'
describe
'407955' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABASC' 'sip-files00252.QC2.jpg'
e69140ae9924f72ae6609957fbd69b13
86102a65629b8a10595078187879c22c3420260d
describe
'440738' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABASD' 'sip-files00281.jpg'
f43332084cb05b97208c48e2eab1e101
7b83b80858acb9fa997e05c72b5fdc952c20d29f
describe
'519179' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABASE' 'sip-files00266.jpg'
746d33737b7a9f54eb84aab8231a2824
3928fcb82b7c2dfae4cfd170a7464cbc75850f6b
'2012-05-25T18:22:48-04:00'
describe
'51949' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABASF' 'sip-files00278thm.jpg'
127c2abb352f4eb94d6e1ccc8083b34c
b581d847820da27c36f12c5c9f7017984c65e16f
'2012-05-25T18:21:49-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABASG' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
ab585b14545430b5b0808ea9c62b64f0
38aa043b8e62ce9983aa96064fe6879a354084a5
'2012-05-25T18:20:42-04:00'
describe
'42589' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABASH' 'sip-files00156.pro'
e6536f58a217caccd309b4abaf047956
6d37c1102986770e3b4a32b857f72c71c76852ae
'2012-05-25T18:20:35-04:00'
describe
'2228368' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABASI' 'sip-files00200.tif'
9c8514e2f575ccad899eb9cc9bc1a89d
6520f6fff3c8b1d7f9bb30d617518afaeec480f2
'2012-05-25T18:16:54-04:00'
describe
'2228764' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABASJ' 'sip-files00038.tif'
6fda2969427de3d5ea54919d5501db05
1b669c217b7e45c84b3254c0ad56b0601c202327
describe
'360584' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABASK' 'sip-files00219.QC2.jpg'
349dfb2fda18dedaeb5cfa00fc23bc36
aed00e708b3eb1883f99d0f5bf2f28be49c6334f
'2012-05-25T18:16:13-04:00'
describe
'511203' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABASL' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
88bc2e96288b8f56577761cad225ac19
150daa43e5d741a1fa4ebe1fe45c5504e898c6fd
describe
'482900' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABASM' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
ba2606c85d8e667a8cb18586535d9a79
007300c615f06566897de116317dcddd5480e099
'2012-05-25T18:20:07-04:00'
describe
'1699' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABASN' 'sip-files00242.txt'
e7cc66a9a3b219cb376a3d077b86a3b1
71237cdd4bb62af818213f52c253b22536f81a96
'2012-05-25T18:14:48-04:00'
describe
'1284' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABASO' 'sip-files00284.txt'
992db767b04b61e08061ba45d076c7f4
b470a10e92c8e1ab9c893ebb0450a0dff6879cd1
'2012-05-25T18:26:09-04:00'
describe
'454527' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABASP' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
73ac5183bfd81b1246a5df6e89f3e6d2
73cac4ab45a4c1db26a759f4eac3075406224d61
'2012-05-25T18:25:27-04:00'
describe
'263864' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABASQ' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
b017c7865e015757032ca471c1fb9806
9414cf6982be7629f67503328480ef0bdaa28717
'2012-05-25T18:18:56-04:00'
describe
'41430' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABASR' 'sip-files00015.pro'
539d71cf76f58b7d9eeea43dc46475e2
6dced35c34492550f701013e336ba9b7548e3954
'2012-05-25T18:20:50-04:00'
describe
'52617' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABASS' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
402d00170bd4d97cd89c89e1697f68e2
d96c7d08b8b1ee3e486283a49967d7a6a43f44db
'2012-05-25T18:19:31-04:00'
describe
'155656' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAST' 'sip-files00282.QC.jpg'
9c003b35758649c33b849d954ccc51c5
a42ad5930aca37d619c302d850a595d8a2d5667c
'2012-05-25T18:14:46-04:00'
describe
'145450' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABASU' 'sip-files00206.QC.jpg'
adab94b7a14a71045de77c970d89b0eb
ef00b33b7eb8dca5ef30f6da89fe297a401e29b4
describe
'153838' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABASV' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
9f652632e1767dfadb1203ee9c920d96
0d55c0be1569d56792aef1db7558ba3969b5b517
'2012-05-25T18:17:58-04:00'
describe
'398001' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABASW' 'sip-files00136.QC2.jpg'
038461ce23e51b0358c7f178edd77f21
1f9f1702513c79a8b9faefb3af7a0db8251aec8e
describe
'38583' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABASX' 'sip-files00160.pro'
58eecedb7bc84182ecc4201947493fc5
2575ac8b2630f64b2f90495f629ac51ee24731f4
'2012-05-25T18:22:27-04:00'
describe
'368' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABASY' 'sip-files00295.pro'
0b31d5cc4a3b917695f64a2d67a71ffd
a038794a882b877309e7894378fe47da00324b90
'2012-05-25T18:18:54-04:00'
describe
'2228788' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABASZ' 'sip-files00198.tif'
9814b0a6f78203ce62538f7198e3a5fe
221b07f48b8efc3b86cda23a32ea67b6c6832160
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABATA' 'sip-files00232.jp2'
a3807a018132c4197f37f4733839e12c
fec04c77744ddf0e834e10702b279f99683011d6
'2012-05-25T18:16:48-04:00'
describe
'278490' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABATB' 'sip-files00249.QC2.jpg'
1f9adcb4fa9dc582ca1d49dce0986578
c709f94371ce304a520ed2683da265032c44c8eb
'2012-05-25T18:22:00-04:00'
describe
'277002' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABATC' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
ae7aa95f7e2fc9c0448e9567d267a506
8283bcf858ba8d99750a3ea38e6f14929f5ba2ec
'2012-05-25T18:18:55-04:00'
describe
'271754' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABATD' 'sip-files00141.jp2'
b5a572ad0f49c53762d6936af6fbe44d
5e01a9f4522c9fac26c4ead30d1f400af7d6a296
'2012-05-25T18:26:43-04:00'
describe
'1661' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABATE' 'sip-files00259.txt'
5d79b5f5fac710e78d49810d795c07b5
0ffbef82300ff862515f401ee9eedfbdf037f370
'2012-05-25T18:13:49-04:00'
describe
'29310' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABATF' 'sip-files00121.pro'
6e0c6efb475374fac4abb032c61f92cc
c186fdd395b114d416759255aaa478c65e53f656
'2012-05-25T18:20:46-04:00'
describe
'293168' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABATG' 'sip-files00007.jpg'
80f5d03488cb17eacdadb566d28b517e
7784ed793079774ca3df59ae79bda67183479dce
describe
'171120' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABATH' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
3f7affcfcf82a82980cb4fceea9d897b
9e727b6bdbb85ea1631141a57811e3aa64c05ec2
describe
'117343' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABATI' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
e46ae5a7dab5dc789e9237249918666e
f52c27dfd3d2937b7e7e79893fbfb9e753ba2439
'2012-05-25T18:16:07-04:00'
describe
'460597' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABATJ' 'sip-files00175.jpg'
60888c036e4ddc6d1ffc3742bc1e9516
185dab30f5c7e8ccfa738cbc6e0c03f98fe1b497
'2012-05-25T18:19:07-04:00'
describe
'56628' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABATK' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
289fbfa37edb22ed47b4973fcc0af800
aabacbafc840dcb90c846aed6b9b25b867e1bf43
describe
'38581' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABATL' 'sip-files00083.pro'
76acbc182820ddcb9f28dd0714b46e62
66f9525ad75834534cf1815398515cb14c02ba47
describe
'52049' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABATM' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
b70bb92e551349d32fef704f17ed613a
7d6e86cbeeb215dfb1087e7cee2f8851ff692238
'2012-05-25T18:22:16-04:00'
describe
'41896' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABATN' 'sip-files00214.pro'
83264551452353e640a7a1e2b1ba8d71
cd54b0aa5bf8b4d3f37693a13e3df3f0d8beaf76
describe
'1059' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABATO' 'sip-files00062.txt'
8d40115880e33f052988c54dec23ec5a
a4d69c49f3570a50b01b9b2738a3e82a5ba3c3e9
describe
'449647' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABATP' 'sip-files00082.QC2.jpg'
e66aec664c722042c53b1035df54884c
e4b06c8aa1eb2dafbc72965ca06c93c069968d68
describe
'2227644' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABATQ' 'sip-files00031.tif'
97d78f124360f8b405bab084b6a35a39
8396107484d4a0088dccdc47b18aa0b338dcf9b0
'2012-05-25T18:22:20-04:00'
describe
'249040' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABATR' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
b75488a9c0a0b3ced1f32f39eb67fbd6
695daabb5f8c0826a8e08f6c47d9528de6cca55f
'2012-05-25T18:16:46-04:00'
describe
'40979' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABATS' 'sip-files00136.pro'
0e80c99f3fa93ab93b960bc08f7201b0
ae3ae5a9f0508269ea7e6a269796d05bb0f4278e
'2012-05-25T18:14:34-04:00'
describe
'147733' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABATT' 'sip-files00220.QC.jpg'
1666916a0bcbdab42303cfe9669a3326
a8da212f8c5cec2fc9ca02b82009546f97abff09
describe
'1656' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABATU' 'sip-files00011.txt'
eeeab823a8ab961b6c2dc40e79bfed2f
2470867e3dcd17d63655584b0fbe32954870ce74
'2012-05-25T18:16:35-04:00'
describe
'395475' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABATV' 'sip-files00141.jpg'
efd9c86df53ebde219881c8661d8c10c
d3eefd255fe01d2b550028a5923d0f331c735286
'2012-05-25T18:24:09-04:00'
describe
'276979' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABATW' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
3bfb29634eb5fc02a5cecac5258a0434
e51ad6adaaf71dc607757bf0616f9eb1edcbc3ed
'2012-05-25T18:18:51-04:00'
describe
'156825' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABATX' 'sip-files00176.QC.jpg'
ea291c78e469233e2846c0b759b3f2d9
25cc7e4ab246e7c58813907ab7180fe3d7cec01a
'2012-05-25T18:13:31-04:00'
describe
'153261' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABATY' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
ff2190e2fa2fbddeb8462716246814fc
c7fa2c2b7a54cf2adae981c9d8d690361e513b5b
describe
'416079' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABATZ' 'sip-files00266.QC2.jpg'
d28034ad927bd7ad4f519e1a08a2399f
3f88fd02c1ab0994b25daa2a3acc0d532d7ef3ca
describe
'9334' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAUA' 'sip-files00053.pro'
dc08c6a5342d0a7699a4cde5079ad467
d61192376737281ca469157097891e5815341459
describe
'276973' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAUB' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
468c8a4000948123e97092ae28cdcfd2
cc77a7e8fc652d143522d48ee09889f7be030ba5
'2012-05-25T18:20:57-04:00'
describe
'317482' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAUC' 'sip-files00209.QC2.jpg'
2e73d189085754f59da9fafe2a88face
bc06c0a9c75df86fa539a35e98a7597b5f509eb3
'2012-05-25T18:19:21-04:00'
describe
'53572' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAUD' 'sip-files00189thm.jpg'
a0788c6811fb954961c3530cdb4031a4
0c4fc1c5ec2982ec862675edf0457ab609900aad
'2012-05-25T18:14:15-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAUE' 'sip-files00243.QC.jpg'
55c0cef0141a06aa3d765c59a4a54331
750cd4015653cd970c4bb2b2fc55c1ade43f7b65
'2012-05-25T18:19:53-04:00'
describe
'277007' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAUF' 'sip-files00282.jp2'
01203dd09fec318eef5ef0fcaedd4bae
dc2c16d9d877e54b57f1100aed192a5d74369033
'2012-05-25T18:15:54-04:00'
describe
'433130' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAUG' 'sip-files00268.jpg'
de6bd516f221d72843415ac8f7cbc0e9
341bfa96ada91b3893f4ca8f66a1d4ddcb443a9d
'2012-05-25T18:16:41-04:00'
describe
'2228556' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAUH' 'sip-files00067.tif'
c04b617fdb83a9b80c4b6464c7a8dcb2
53f5add70bd478876ad1d3ee48b42738e30b055e
'2012-05-25T18:13:59-04:00'
describe
'276895' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAUI' 'sip-files00249.jp2'
5b9e0ffc85436a98902312adbb886805
992efab32c7eb2d0055406f2cdf0285c8b0ec1a4
'2012-05-25T18:20:56-04:00'
describe
'500180' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAUJ' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
8848123af0a70cf90c3a4bcbac29aab0
fc98767d42da24692a4e3b97febce8b72c012c2c
'2012-05-25T18:13:32-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAUK' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
1a5e90d60c4bb10ebd66f0d0bc130dc9
ad1d997c12b73c07fda680a40c31e82b89fe7dee
describe
'413052' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAUL' 'sip-files00017.QC2.jpg'
d0d4f233035142a2c18bd32cd42a510e
b3a3e9b82d57a0813a6a8ff0318ba0fb68b7e367
'2012-05-25T18:21:41-04:00'
describe
'49804' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAUM' 'sip-files00237thm.jpg'
bb270d23e75dbeafddb994c7b4f36567
932b8e1a420d5f95178394bd0921b646dbc73472
describe
'54336' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAUN' 'sip-files00203thm.jpg'
dad01b88ed187ad6a6969876fb17dd8d
1891029c225427f2cbd415d1b28ae1196e13d081
'2012-05-25T18:15:56-04:00'
describe
'47332' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAUO' 'sip-files00272thm.jpg'
c0816257926b59a4d4c257a5730a1979
bdeaa33e993bae9618a52ce639d8b3b4d7398095
describe
'1309' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAUP' 'sip-files00263.txt'
60211a6dbf1e43b649b263e3fe1265b8
367c318fc396e308c32df2faa7f945fc83278fee
describe
'58487' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAUQ' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
c920cbfe7ba0b141e08d2f74cf36a68f
e178da4561d43c5fef720c5a713b466c9b96fff0
'2012-05-25T18:25:01-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAUR' 'sip-files00023.tif'
188e60351109d22243cff1c00f3038cf
4b2055dd0a6710b3bf78d1393a4988f5452cf040
'2012-05-25T18:15:05-04:00'
describe
'59088' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAUS' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
f804f22d50ea6f4587578f90e4c139ab
f68230fe0a5afa855d12c128d881146078e857a0
'2012-05-25T18:24:00-04:00'
describe
'467257' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAUT' 'sip-files00253.QC2.jpg'
6125d8f98ee74d173abb73149aa45a8b
2a31c2a11ea159e090b29170d76dd9988e7c0ec4
'2012-05-25T18:20:38-04:00'
describe
'88082' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAUU' 'sip-files00292.QC.jpg'
f423be2ac053234a5241dae4fba91503
87202eea3eed93ba3b3c666c6de51d432c256c97
'2012-05-25T18:21:00-04:00'
describe
'40590' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAUV' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
ae22f220841c4347f856e45544956b57
6747daf2a7fbfe46ced919c4e7bc391d3808097f
'2012-05-25T18:22:18-04:00'
describe
'467012' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAUW' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
21a92baf8cc2fcf950b875ec7da85e24
394390e4a01a741c38de923925db332b9a5e5f16
describe
'1721' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAUX' 'sip-files00145.txt'
1c911722545035cb9f2fb8367c48ad09
8d3d4c36f4d6a4000f25b33b3088c82708aba072
'2012-05-25T18:16:47-04:00'
describe
'81' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAUY' 'sip-files00007a.txt'
f4900416a99218d65cff32dc33cc03d5
1e359c6ceff3fdf8c7b748f1170715d772795efe
'2012-05-25T18:25:02-04:00'
describe
'326' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAUZ' 'sip-files00296.pro'
7f4070f7c4b6abb23236b5c5766a0138
de5f553434c941d01a1e7fe6e4c8a4175b2e99c2
describe
'266636' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAVA' 'sip-files00203.jp2'
977e3d232dd215da495316ced488187b
a249bf2c6382019481b4d7d8160bd76efda1cc66
'2012-05-25T18:16:49-04:00'
describe
'155603' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAVB' 'sip-files00174.QC.jpg'
5419a8c48eab096025a0231eb4b0391b
7894eaaf776443de3995c7addbbf024d284a2bd9
'2012-05-25T18:21:34-04:00'
describe
'346083' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAVC' 'sip-files00210.QC2.jpg'
2950c51b82673f40f74dd46b978a57f3
4f43cd7ed9ce5aa6e62721deb1785c035b883720
describe
'35239' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAVD' 'sip-files00221.pro'
634aeb9170ab3aca49e76b4437add994
79f069393229247d3e16698d1f19a44ef26d1548
describe
'448695' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAVE' 'sip-files00090.QC2.jpg'
b8b9db616520958f2794bec4a415c5ed
f9a10d1d994de5d402a951cc613c956d5d9f5ddb
'2012-05-25T18:20:55-04:00'
describe
'1505' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAVF' 'sip-files00098.txt'
df2e76cd419b85b9d52257d71fe255a0
a5086b964aaf9f94cc987feea85343b78445a078
'2012-05-25T18:19:49-04:00'
describe
'1729' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAVG' 'sip-files00024.txt'
22d4a981ca09a1584445305550cebe3f
e47b2e53b6c141f442b225b7302820653ee4ca9c
'2012-05-25T18:25:51-04:00'
describe
'2225788' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAVH' 'sip-files00061.tif'
08c1518367870a5fccd57c0a6f59a852
2fe875c44c05f0f2a59f03a2062ab45adfd222c9
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAVI' 'sip-files00166.jp2'
379e04f06c0a8fae533d145dd60f8425
7310d91f459cd05f26c4fee16d7e5d810d65ecf1
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAVJ' 'sip-files00063.tif'
32659449e266a6f69cad798d85323e9f
4b426fdbe337031c6eb7980919a2d18fd1e10e5f
'2012-05-25T18:21:50-04:00'
describe
'417167' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAVK' 'sip-files00032.QC2.jpg'
7eb91f7837158c95db2e59594aa9e454
e7e20e7248aa826f57b5c173bbd593293eea98c4
'2012-05-25T18:16:52-04:00'
describe
'381657' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAVL' 'sip-files00046.QC2.jpg'
9af4870a70e7eca028777e51c66fa96d
d5c3b543fe59cac6585cf0542e88281073286bbd
describe
'1760' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAVM' 'sip-files00187.txt'
e602344c5bd05055d854f74869f3deb4
7858418ec6a25071e6c9cfabc992e4264342f8bb
'2012-05-25T18:18:19-04:00'
describe
'2253952' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAVN' 'sip-files00014.tif'
9b758fdbc5659bef3b7e4a3da6eb5e69
ca2c59bb91c6ea6bc9f6a592d59583497763547b
'2012-05-25T18:18:31-04:00'
describe
'51788' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAVO' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
49764448566aaa3c764e916a2984561a
29c31bf5435f5ea0158623288099342aaf4e1fdc
describe
'2228508' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAVP' 'sip-files00221.tif'
1bb7ccd02522ddcb6eaeb288b8b0a9d9
37856b36583badedb73b719e1dbb4b56575be281
'2012-05-25T18:14:26-04:00'
describe
'40531' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAVQ' 'sip-files00172.pro'
74c784d6263c1cfe53853ecbb8eb26c7
e32b47219e5bc02d129da21c6b3f57869197da46
'2012-05-25T18:25:46-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAVR' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
fe58a87f97809817cc25ff12243eec2e
3c77517748f43811b1091014f6fe1c113cd41846
'2012-05-25T18:17:52-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAVS' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
db396a947e217b12cc3f109f4392d1cf
014cee0b9ae5634dcc2c3453a57745e84cc06823
'2012-05-25T18:18:45-04:00'
describe
'169492' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAVT' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
008cb6887ff8ee8f88f9dd77f252de08
802199ed7f6cc99929d8f9b1abf8c7757f6538b4
'2012-05-25T18:18:27-04:00'
describe
'277010' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAVU' 'sip-files00261.jp2'
9d6210c44337ef8004fb4e001068ba11
b3d9ec6a8235bb6609240c7f65fd7a4fe9728ec0
'2012-05-25T18:15:14-04:00'
describe
'155593' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAVV' 'sip-files00223.QC.jpg'
c4414732ff2367e924084d6961ae5b91
ac428869dfca988a961ffb96f9c6ad3808afe404
'2012-05-25T18:25:32-04:00'
describe
'2228688' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAVW' 'sip-files00099.tif'
95208f0dec5c4700d408cddb113bdab2
b4a7d8c371529cd441975e92b35d7de5a65c3e70
describe
'276980' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAVX' 'sip-files00270.jp2'
cd297df8e8f8a5076c241f4b96440d7b
119280f96e84f6468e4bb44a333376081c326bf3
describe
'477334' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAVY' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
33ce2a5813eda9dc3ad5218523c00b01
818d343cff5345151c2e6d3a190c0d25a2932222
'2012-05-25T18:22:08-04:00'
describe
'1635' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAVZ' 'sip-files00085.txt'
8f0b68d0a1fd38255dada8a6be45373b
5ac9de41d21cdf96097e50eadf1a75237c1353fb
describe
'405496' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAWA' 'sip-files00183.QC2.jpg'
0ce6b1a96d42dd0bc80148c52f1953fc
2a1f7a08ee575b695b5cff03451d318342c059d4
'2012-05-25T18:22:22-04:00'
describe
'277021' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAWB' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
bc7600303f47f6ee45d37538b6c96b4c
bd1033b7f8b1cf2bed31738af7a9336f0650c5a3
describe
'48626' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAWC' 'sip-files00222thm.jpg'
67ee139f5c94e95b70889e92bb7adb79
821e7b740f32d9392bcc3c072d2e95af7315fcf6
describe
'35377' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAWD' 'sip-files00071.pro'
e3769c76fdd815257fd96b7252d815b4
6c835e624388078e30abfa7d91f87784c73840a0
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAWE' 'sip-files00169.jp2'
b1203d2d6663d00c1039e8d8f442dd60
7c855fbd1679b0970d48f72bd9e7778862ec8cc7
describe
'23587' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAWF' 'sip-files00062.pro'
0044c62dae57889360062bad8d1ab9ab
e012c9db1730f0ba974e9b9e8e7266425f2fc7ee
'2012-05-25T18:19:52-04:00'
describe
'384294' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAWG' 'sip-files00203.QC2.jpg'
5357e2192b1aa025685678c35f359761
4f313466144786c5ff0e0ba7a61fb20592d6f98d
'2012-05-25T18:25:03-04:00'
describe
'6900' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAWH' 'sip-files00030.pro'
c51b35d7895a9505c4b9a33e243faa84
581039a3fda8915899d34694b3d56b6631d63a5c
describe
'1134' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAWI' 'sip-files00169.txt'
5e95adea07a8d026e3c10ef368f61883
a58c94d744d29f2185c1af6fd2c3c80af7e59e08
'2012-05-25T18:23:07-04:00'
describe
'418820' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAWJ' 'sip-files00073.QC2.jpg'
42625a9261c617d23b616b2500ad8f60
5f465a52c96d2a0d3138aa454900563c9d84cd6f
'2012-05-25T18:19:28-04:00'
describe
'2229092' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAWK' 'sip-files00095.tif'
e2c289fad35f6d01b86970487078eee3
59b35080d07a1cde6790e74774f5a7aeb48a8951
'2012-05-25T18:23:26-04:00'
describe
'471069' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAWL' 'sip-files00255.jpg'
e3ad5d2c7e89479f7d23ac98747ef4b4
f0dee737305b5166ec4bdfc8f0327c02615cbd4f
describe
'626919' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAWM' 'sip-files00006.jpg'
59b488d8be4aa057a712084faeba4781
7a61324b166951029e07a294f04250642cae824e
'2012-05-25T18:21:37-04:00'
describe
'443525' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAWN' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
e6f79b75e31859277344c4a3f8201874
4063dd2c9fb301cfe15de55dfd0074695f157b3a
describe
'48278' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAWO' 'sip-files00286thm.jpg'
07e770c16d079723a10689960691596c
082c70782981aa8a911a46025c67edd495c7c10d
describe
'52948' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAWP' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
b743c2baef7a074b6b267dbaa9450661
206bcd43006ac9ae3a72bf8cf2900c8967e1385f
'2012-05-25T18:13:58-04:00'
describe
'408871' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAWQ' 'sip-files00142.QC2.jpg'
c221dec1f8b9df7831e7b0c899a32314
f2f7d036a78a87652b9d176090d9e93044dd5ae6
'2012-05-25T18:22:30-04:00'
describe
'383150' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAWR' 'sip-files00186.jpg'
bf8d69db3a07322a3243bd30e88114b3
32058cc493fc2b6339d1787bbefcfa52df2a8b7b
describe
'591606' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAWS' 'sip-files00006.QC2.jpg'
8e5ffd219c7adfa4c97e0cd2a5d445e9
b509842d9d8ce116cef814d07b6b3dcf859497b0
'2012-05-25T18:18:05-04:00'
describe
'2227676' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAWT' 'sip-files00122.tif'
648fc390e56f595426ccc6b99dff4aba
7b0a058302759a87904d174a655afc7e959fcd3f
'2012-05-25T18:18:36-04:00'
describe
'140975' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAWU' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
99227bd7046f1fa15c187348b436bbbc
3099c201470842c5e223f61321cdbba49b31492f
describe
'2227688' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAWV' 'sip-files00040.tif'
12f63bba6523006d4f35b691cdf25fb5
e5be4492f70a947e6e9a9f35cb1902b43839af43
'2012-05-25T18:23:58-04:00'
describe
'145' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAWW' 'sip-files00002.txt'
c09598206a5eed25fc3008afd5846ffe
e416fbb6a7db2a9f2730ac03b7c5256ca906b981
describe
'29208' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAWX' 'sip-files00269.pro'
b5adf795a9200d974452445ead780ef2
ff7bf16575e36e4efaa080a7a91b54a8fe823761
'2012-05-25T18:23:20-04:00'
describe
'472058' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAWY' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
a4d916ef4cbb78c6e381953f596680ae
5f1bfa669a6a395b3ce1a8cc91b8a6ec6b31335f
describe
'277006' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAWZ' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
3e15aa9f5cc1b1e8c8ef272d8f97e833
d5e6df397ab6e41ff412fba4e687b77ceee0cd78
describe
'42986' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAXA' 'sip-files00195thm.jpg'
fc61f23756ef052f11e518d17a784223
1a82ce2304cb99b3076138cb2692fd5ec96cb429
describe
'2228720' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAXB' 'sip-files00115.tif'
e92cd3f9b808302ecdced0d92d282907
6127462edc8bb8107bae7ae3e70f9f844ce38514
describe
'23308' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAXC' 'sip-files00031.pro'
25edda10fee7db582425d2228fb17a81
fc2514a3e7b2f391f728663592ee9356b7e9ec54
'2012-05-25T18:22:57-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAXD' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
026a7193d13d430e53dc8107432d26e1
4cac750fa4c573c3b007fe47eab1d1a8a2922779
'2012-05-25T18:24:46-04:00'
describe
'2228888' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAXE' 'sip-files00258.tif'
0ad4f753239eaa313f5d87c210498e2e
bdb3b674d800bfb95e309ee1fc2855b1c37ed1cd
'2012-05-25T18:19:18-04:00'
describe
'277008' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAXF' 'sip-files00220.jp2'
2347fce0fc5637b6e3c494064c9b3502
04e755ce777a1b8e68f8acd061d14bec387e3b76
describe
'1152' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAXG' 'sip-files00088.txt'
06d028d314ee3fa6063c4d723b451f36
670c4899b984061aa2f32205e3986947c9d02772
'2012-05-25T18:16:55-04:00'
describe
'18671' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAXH' 'sip-files00270.pro'
3cb5a6966218fbfb109321bced190de2
aa69f201208e788143e2fcaf7c5a7263d0272936
'2012-05-25T18:26:25-04:00'
describe
'2228504' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAXI' 'sip-files00223.tif'
908f7373aafd332726f0eae75d80047a
66e369dc3c232bf7831fac1f89146ea37d5d690c
'2012-05-25T18:15:38-04:00'
describe
'272323' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAXJ' 'sip-files00241.jp2'
07b37a71385128ea022646acb6803a37
57ab371a5bd0633b4e521d3adbef748f2c2e0f1d
describe
'2229044' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAXK' 'sip-files00264.tif'
fd9f6ca9bfd3846d41e18a3de3ea673a
4e74921d792c7da67c245c0020713a4db322711e
describe
'127437' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAXL' 'sip-files00140.QC.jpg'
03b53dd09f4fa758ddcdfb17891506c8
a9c6f0566a4b32220b9f85bb44759f6beb26402f
describe
'276931' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAXM' 'sip-files00177.jp2'
5b66cc8d3f275d7ecce3dbabc0e28501
a69a0f6db5565f1730eec0ac8ea5a7c64e5b3cab
describe
'553' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAXN' 'sip-files00194.txt'
6f34df3a824a678aa8f90b2e93092317
29636d9e88556d1f6adcc5dbbc37d3b25a857969
'2012-05-25T18:16:51-04:00'
describe
'154953' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAXO' 'sip-files00232.QC.jpg'
f4c6552359f1b8818dcb1436b3282a99
c183a20ddcf96f1900b3a9a89fffa261bfee7ad3
describe
'424850' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAXP' 'sip-files00089.QC2.jpg'
bb7009b0cff78709f58d946958ded5dd
b3be1cd4d19a15c11f9e363b10379eb9885415a6
'2012-05-25T18:21:59-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAXQ' 'sip-files00279.jp2'
ef5fbd7e5c2a0281933ff89b2d5f014e
76737998faa54fd585e52b47fe3d3f14a10bdc7d
'2012-05-25T18:15:03-04:00'
describe
'276948' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAXR' 'sip-files00277.jp2'
84a261cd3b59bf6f2d0efed49ebb72db
d4327f58a3a75f1535524d2754bcb636402d068c
describe
'38073' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAXS' 'sip-files00231.pro'
0e123dfbe080ffca6f4e072871790e42
7cee03ff9a62df4d6e40c20332461cacfa0cab37
'2012-05-25T18:23:50-04:00'
describe
'1628' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAXT' 'sip-files00094.txt'
1840d9561399ce17cb8da46b206b9317
0dec71913e32ab763fbf313bf100cfdf2fe88fb8
'2012-05-25T18:14:49-04:00'
describe
'272314' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAXU' 'sip-files00147.jp2'
7ce2fbb096dcb24c5c82ca2e9e410842
e60d334adead4aabbf2c2c40e62ed6441ca760dd
describe
'176844' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAXV' 'sip-files00253.QC.jpg'
2190cae66cce1fba91725134c0af8599
28492d64670b51560922857b344ccd74e74a97af
describe
'2227276' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAXW' 'sip-files00216.tif'
92dceddb966fbdf10dc2d7d415c1cc3c
e7f22966fdefd36680d5eee34cfbe8388f656031
'2012-05-25T18:21:22-04:00'
describe
'1540' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAXX' 'sip-files00228.txt'
a3aa7f999e0f0fe299774139d336c62e
e45406651509b57ca747ccb1a1cf7d1ed85b05f4
'2012-05-25T18:16:38-04:00'
describe
'46310' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAXY' 'sip-files00204thm.jpg'
b0c903ff1099adcaf22b03d5866a14a3
ac09faf87576b94bf23f32805aa0795f5efe2eda
'2012-05-25T18:25:13-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAXZ' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
adf9d539ee70e35a8f57533bf246e391
1a223c383dcf710829f056b1b1897580d3277dda
'2012-05-25T18:14:31-04:00'
describe
'41971' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAYA' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
f24168342ca2a3c24b155d6222064334
bb9e2d0f9b86ccae555ca3ba0ae43f44cc826fec
describe
'165075' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAYB' 'sip-files00266.QC.jpg'
f835d1c1b7cf35eabe79a8f6471ab77c
0673541d17f09f50073427d819402e2a6582e482
describe
'2228512' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAYC' 'sip-files00136.tif'
35ff61290a774ad394c08fd9762462e7
b2ae6e92b6d239787650fbe4220390910fb26981
'2012-05-25T18:14:45-04:00'
describe
'1274' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAYD' 'sip-files00290.txt'
3451232c28e20f9717d517ab4affbaef
69cdf64de4fa554af9d9ee0cd017f8a82bb0e48a
'2012-05-25T18:17:17-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'29638' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAYE' 'sip-files00079.pro'
24d62b4f7014c3985206d7940962e721
ae384883dc8d4df79f64e063689130368613dada
'2012-05-25T18:16:23-04:00'
describe
'409471' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAYF' 'sip-files00128.QC2.jpg'
82a9e3643c9a9e3460de3f6424714130
5b5fe24bea5468313c11372c2f357cf0fdbac123
describe
'167370' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAYG' 'sip-files00252.QC.jpg'
1a18b9c99020a2325dbd1c66077647bf
56ac97d5c6b10b57580ceb2a3767cbe363c0bd65
describe
'25346' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAYH' 'sip-files00005thm.jpg'
950fff9af61e58788d2d79ff8497ca6a
b0e1517db23732ededdc47b2058054d029354fc6
describe
'160469' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAYI' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
ea3d9fb3b3460c6993db866613f4d917
addb8a97fdb1bb29aefde7d102504c4981133628
'2012-05-25T18:16:43-04:00'
describe
'436904' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAYJ' 'sip-files00095.QC2.jpg'
6850c06d1a330a677c4158ffac34da7c
bb2ebcf60462186ddfd1be0c0db547994bce7c6b
'2012-05-25T18:26:15-04:00'
describe
'48635' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAYK' 'sip-files00172thm.jpg'
91f22df4d0b37d8de94e6eb38cec1313
cbc2c9597c8f4a9a6b0dd41bcab72ea5b06f8b1c
describe
'232006' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAYL' 'sip-files00194.QC2.jpg'
534ce151514a706c234257b717fc5f19
17742eecff6b015daecf29d98517799585f7dcf2
'2012-05-25T18:24:38-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAYM' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
0c4ea4236910ef8d8def97f2b1164ea4
0ccb340ede6835c8f2d6c7420f93b26dab7a08c5
'2012-05-25T18:22:44-04:00'
describe
'1616' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAYN' 'sip-files00231.txt'
f67b86d03bf752dc3d2a780c1c32997d
3b5e0ba577f5f88776e5679077dd6bee04592a41
'2012-05-25T18:15:18-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'1841' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAYO' 'sip-files00156.txt'
f537e31f1abd9fb159595a622bfa4c1f
0094cdd30ad3e255983f47e7fd18996eae53f315
describe
'38477' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAYP' 'sip-files00021.pro'
f5ab31bf8102ff0830c295670a02da5e
7ee22ebb980a8acd38cf693d728ba32bcf5f41d6
'2012-05-25T18:21:57-04:00'
describe
'2014460' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAYQ' 'sip-files00133.tif'
3f6127649479bcf73d7b92ae381b8916
285b6294a93fa1ec0a21d97daa89c793aaef347b
'2012-05-25T18:25:30-04:00'
describe
'431438' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAYR' 'sip-files00243.jpg'
f1908d5588dfdc1650756840d77be37e
53c33285d65f927890d1a7c535b6f0222d233326
'2012-05-25T18:20:39-04:00'
describe
'39275' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAYS' 'sip-files00066.pro'
68d7658691d54a7b5135e88bb9c20040
b3278482126d4dd0b37371e739fcf9fbc3bfe0e5
describe
'169934' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAYT' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
e4f92d900ab64a7e30ed3776c1153326
9683735ccc0d0fa8efe7365b8ae3666e1f7f4ea3
'2012-05-25T18:22:28-04:00'
describe
'469368' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAYU' 'sip-files00187.jpg'
afa1e3fbf0243b9743551a5493188ea2
1710eada3b684f96f5b4b09b67c66760b6d2daad
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAYV' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
d42d7f8807cff19e36af6d23ed0d18bf
b0f0ad6ab4d7511ab2abdb8b793079d0fd24be3f
'2012-05-25T18:17:16-04:00'
describe
'31676' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAYW' 'sip-files00179thm.jpg'
46e80da6f1d58573eeb462fb4cccd520
b952716c292f89ab07c13160d493ccc752e619ce
'2012-05-25T18:19:17-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAYX' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
aaf2a77e692663a525b2646866af8cbc
e4b530c349bda493d04c1ba2225b58f0538e76a2
'2012-05-25T18:24:24-04:00'
describe
'123229' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAYY' 'sip-files00209.QC.jpg'
406547b95175c63c6a5f0fb9defc9d2d
2529bf7e7182b0f4dcf43d12dc08ebe467bbe6bf
'2012-05-25T18:14:55-04:00'
describe
'318938' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAYZ' 'sip-files00195.QC2.jpg'
78f2f449faf9c48f451edebd66a02da7
393468a951f41cb826f8da483c0513e5c701d365
describe
'42987' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAZA' 'sip-files00127.pro'
8079a33567f08e7bb0cdbbfcb97d9c19
f4155829a1bcad8329215fc7ca30f8c30030a8b9
describe
'44' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAZB' 'sip-files00295.txt'
3d01033d4390c07430291aac59174255
5eae2813562c37b61e27d509be5cb2a70c9eadf4
describe
'2228972' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAZC' 'sip-files00269.tif'
14794269d6eb87a1bd07585c078c3ace
e7b9b5fd67cc3727e4f4047469236534e6843f54
describe
'323899' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAZD' 'sip-files00010.QC2.jpg'
bc5d69a6aa589ccfa69c19ae589833b6
2fabc660458dc61d7ac5f3fd0f8f36f5eff4cea2
describe
'463623' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAZE' 'sip-files00170.jpg'
35aa742eecc30d52850415784487d6eb
0c3a6681bfe22700b2eb99728e6640a1e41021b5
'2012-05-25T18:22:43-04:00'
describe
'499052' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAZF' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
e5c5e461b605138165cd2224bfc23f46
d33343b377130f5d2888d693742ec58f1f7dfed9
'2012-05-25T18:24:01-04:00'
describe
'163082' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAZG' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
6470775f11a7f45978fd899af96669bc
39e46b03e586b42483ec380e84677e2498c9c2bf
'2012-05-25T18:16:04-04:00'
describe
'54354' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAZH' 'sip-files00253thm.jpg'
871aa18694d93d9ed0618732448109fc
61576d65730d36b8ac8946f79429760f187a753f
'2012-05-25T18:21:09-04:00'
describe
'289492' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAZI' 'sip-files00009.QC2.jpg'
3956537ee75e033c735fd0c2549c7976
79308d6996e28a2a20bdcecb6be7d8f83e21ecf8
describe
'446945' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAZJ' 'sip-files00256.jpg'
db74ab1c78ccbf3791f43487b78a387a
9c543d9d6e09676baa8d0ffd61c06b3ce7e23eb9
'2012-05-25T18:20:52-04:00'
describe
'126226' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAZK' 'sip-files00195.QC.jpg'
821c59bbc52e4d68e6e79daa35d5422b
28082862e16ed4b9e5946279a0683c26db4cc84b
'2012-05-25T18:21:53-04:00'
describe
'132170' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAZL' 'sip-files00294.QC.jpg'
1a33e9e140fae439811d991afe10621c
ee4e3053ab2bca82a475347a9efaa647c60dabee
'2012-05-25T18:13:57-04:00'
describe
'140696' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAZM' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
d8c4b49825f6e27b8684070a76d9c71e
313d50844f1b64d65dc9b618001ab406398f461e
describe
'2227216' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAZN' 'sip-files00132.tif'
02e60e4147a99e4405f4878d57d5b19d
cd945adb8d8fd1ea65ae1fc92029303e5c969dd0
describe
'48698' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAZO' 'sip-files00206thm.jpg'
89d840fb3f6ff8137cbc7f442145e5f9
768b34208d8764a68ebabcb009b5433dc04c93dc
'2012-05-25T18:15:23-04:00'
describe
'37906' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAZP' 'sip-files00064.pro'
2c71b8fbefa896289e54d2b6991776d2
318424ed3bb3030c1ff77e3764004e0b982f8f59
'2012-05-25T18:19:56-04:00'
describe
'276949' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAZQ' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
e969e5d99134d80157178bc5947dcc6e
ef380080d1114ebf09559053408e4c31415cbe8b
describe
'1657' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAZR' 'sip-files00125.txt'
4d6808789e03d545f60f6eedb64df3f8
dafa6d311a89cf9cde3c959a8acafb559bef1ede
describe
'50254' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAZS' 'sip-files00243thm.jpg'
6f9d6ed14c2889b9991131d262f08487
b56dce64868cf042b9d0c075e5b7a0edc0cb757e
'2012-05-25T18:17:48-04:00'
describe
'2228620' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAZT' 'sip-files00125.tif'
0b449e8f34d36a440cda121a665f9961
77d6a0f4675ddc5d7226e7874b416c9ad92b2847
describe
'435842' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAZU' 'sip-files00027.QC2.jpg'
56eaeffbefdbd15d8dfced608069ab77
cf5d58f79c7317c1416fdf598b031d3639ba66d6
describe
'40285' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAZV' 'sip-files00124.pro'
518139dba27836b3c139e813ce6d68f5
18e5598f4fd41d5aa7e3008c99e552130fd62100
'2012-05-25T18:21:36-04:00'
describe
'1709' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAZW' 'sip-files00017.txt'
323135a70d7608e5bae582a129669e7f
50918e0c1cc9c08d1e7dac509b72cd9577f194cf
describe
'2228692' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAZX' 'sip-files00126.tif'
65ccbb545c857408ec680566ebf798ef
7451c1cc07e0e84ce330edcf2a21c558642a466e
'2012-05-25T18:22:41-04:00'
describe
'277020' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAZY' 'sip-files00264.jp2'
d9e544d461cdca60523322e1feea8b1b
3a95e03327ce38728876f6fedeaec804adefb872
'2012-05-25T18:15:25-04:00'
describe
'161833' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABAZZ' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
443b1ab5fd01fb21f2568387f875072e
58f2cbbdf05fbe91ef1b9bcc55c42c24a1366bac
'2012-05-25T18:18:28-04:00'
describe
'2228796' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBAA' 'sip-files00191.tif'
44effdce36ebe8982f221afe4da175ad
0634e7485003cbe54ba050cf859fa5bda2680002
'2012-05-25T18:25:45-04:00'
describe
'42875' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBAB' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
6e0245c2973f06271970c989b760c368
6f211c505ef0f7984359208ca00fae3de3fc48db
describe
'925' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBAC' 'sip-files00285.txt'
18e316d41eec8965b9ff29cf595fe047
0761360bd47f5b3ff6223b0d280563bb0eb5a0a4
'2012-05-25T18:16:17-04:00'
describe
'5177' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBAD' 'sip-files00261.pro'
db952eb96cb3d40cc8e87e7b1719d087
125de08946cef88cba30a2603a7b8d8537617895
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBAE' 'sip-files00206.tif'
b97f443754db7d51e22e3447916314b2
842b885886902831a83bbcf6c2025755db5f93a3
describe
'2225208' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBAF' 'sip-files00030.tif'
ceb635320cfc64137aa3d4071be50f8d
fc75724d34817940cb1fb6e0aeb17555c507b437
'2012-05-25T18:18:24-04:00'
describe
'15371' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBAG' 'sip-files00271.pro'
146f51d63f6fc869e398f2dc1cb07606
b0a12ebb3ce5991a797410d83e2e84a25af2f040
'2012-05-25T18:21:07-04:00'
describe
'28286' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBAH' 'sip-files00263.pro'
bf9455904ee97d4e2c47f67f0845221d
9d423ef549b8cfa1d788584500f7e493cb12c98a
'2012-05-25T18:21:02-04:00'
describe
'27301' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBAI' 'sip-files00155.pro'
267eb59daeedb8f8df414bd9199f8a35
b654c5569b44750ffce68dba70f06f01d31ffe52
'2012-05-25T18:18:41-04:00'
describe
'355705' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBAJ' 'sip-files00268.QC2.jpg'
a2b1582776d6e2afba5482718fcb4d9c
2194e8d72c6cb6c6b5069b5732219ad89b0ad953
'2012-05-25T18:21:08-04:00'
describe
'53332' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBAK' 'sip-files00146thm.jpg'
a61ed3abfdcf725366b33375b63fc27c
f612a58e199dbfbe01ea627bc0d9b06bd5cf387c
'2012-05-25T18:25:21-04:00'
describe
'2227740' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBAL' 'sip-files00010.tif'
3ab9e91c5097537768dd0c70087589f5
7b1fee101916550ee976e872a0d13ad4ae884743
'2012-05-25T18:15:58-04:00'
describe
'2228660' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBAM' 'sip-files00236.tif'
fff65ea8b559f5233067145931c4ae56
4b36433b5e95aca5335fcecce12b7c3573338ba7
describe
'276998' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBAN' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
65ee4c416972946899ee81821ca23f3c
3341a29e1c51d4d6416d237480984455ef7947da
'2012-05-25T18:20:28-04:00'
describe
'145736' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBAO' 'sip-files00287.QC.jpg'
bddf048f50d590994276f6e86044b121
a99e11e21636a0f788ae430e3bc599b4e5f3db45
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBAP' 'sip-files00250.txt'
ce6cfddb8a2d89c2a5badb5cf3f9bc5c
524e39c52328f4154e3ad436f42cac918c35f49d
describe
'415428' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBAQ' 'sip-files00152.QC2.jpg'
7ee92b3bf38827d346ba516afc22d65b
17694a665a40e1b483258c5d00e7d90df1c2e8ec
'2012-05-25T18:25:53-04:00'
describe
'384362' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBAR' 'sip-files00026.QC2.jpg'
96c76bfbf5a4226e0eb3d9f616c78086
03a1d1b462e0b960bd33f369d27f873a0f697320
'2012-05-25T18:19:06-04:00'
describe
'1754' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBAS' 'sip-files00183.txt'
7e88b7243124b8106c16518925d911f4
6544f294f7e379b76212185bb99be8284a9b8056
'2012-05-25T18:22:26-04:00'
describe
'1642' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBAT' 'sip-files00207.txt'
f95412ea97027ea188ecd8f5cf0b02d3
5aef8326be3bce8a36029bf6f117186610a99c84
describe
'508656' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBAU' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
a41e409223e5a0a47633d36c34d96f58
26fecf208a82286d063d050281bebd03cf027580
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBAV' 'sip-files00252.tif'
ae390ab10141a486848b35f39939ea15
13495abe95ed3ce2c9f55dddac37a89d4ac5d428
describe
'1610' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBAW' 'sip-files00050.txt'
32306690e994cca89aa7a02e8f8cf248
0cea8aaf537b35680dc31aea1a012d3e8c235c7d
describe
'26841' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBAX' 'sip-files00107.pro'
43f78c8f0afd31b81c56005009393515
22201ab9f8d28764ddfd527567c4d78993ed3cf7
'2012-05-25T18:21:33-04:00'
describe
'158541' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBAY' 'sip-files00257.QC.jpg'
62c8c67d1cfab78e44ca2102671070a8
28ab098bc3b2f219df881a0cd1e723d2aca8890f
describe
'390144' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBAZ' 'sip-files00140.jpg'
5c0f40f69672bc7b2214bced1b302d7a
04ea4375bee383072f097941b62122f9fa7238cf
describe
'365379' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBBA' 'sip-files00169.jpg'
1fd2016efbb89bc808a817cb823d13bc
75f7e228eb2365f71ea26521f075245e32fccc47
'2012-05-25T18:16:45-04:00'
describe
'52578' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBBB' 'sip-files00267thm.jpg'
a6d83c2cb64a38136b8466e664b1513a
aee8e4820bb372fcdf32e2390931f2f676ae9aa6
'2012-05-25T18:18:30-04:00'
describe
'51119' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBBC' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
1426e66ade6b7967614daea2c3ff94ad
0ef7f7f67d0b0e4dd87425472c8f9e756cf3fddf
describe
'41137' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBBD' 'sip-files00175.pro'
1f8f976dd05c235f215a7219b6bd480d
136da6c55aa0565e4b855d632fbe5a2f687d20a2
'2012-05-25T18:22:46-04:00'
describe
'22539' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBBE' 'sip-files00140.pro'
4aa07f66fbdd0689bbb0c12837730610
13a23ad155271c67cf0e9e82b89b15a3851885a9
describe
'2229008' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBBF' 'sip-files00281.tif'
a3f06d6a2fc88489a6cb568ad30ee03e
e9b190b622114f15db2271c2fc83fa27e814ec21
'2012-05-25T18:14:11-04:00'
describe
'39621' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBBG' 'sip-files00025.pro'
6ef81f8cd5b4754a45f95164ff053a46
b4b81b3b89e81756e5df8e92b5244c7d6ad879e3
'2012-05-25T18:15:53-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBBH' 'sip-files00276.jp2'
c714a1a215ec8c75202cd029f16eb121
813a58fbf3c2b0956efdc9f42da94ec16f8bdf2b
'2012-05-25T18:15:31-04:00'
describe
'154558' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBBI' 'sip-files00231.QC.jpg'
15cc86d53609b453ebfc1224bfc4e566
e667ec7aa94fcfd775b962e6fcae5b0e5b5bfd91
'2012-05-25T18:25:50-04:00'
describe
'456877' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBBJ' 'sip-files00278.jpg'
2f5b3f151c7d7751ec71e8ab221f3936
d08074d47a020418705ef0993de6028410fd1c65
describe
'50133' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBBK' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
bc7cf8ef896daf019612b5923ffae836
41b9c1216a2707dbf6124284df30d438e3dda133
'2012-05-25T18:22:37-04:00'
describe
'2174892' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBBL' 'sip-files00195.tif'
758752bf46e95efc9ec910ed8ae1592a
0f1ffdb4dd9af1ef202bc5dbe499668d7541a18a
describe
'452205' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBBM' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
d5d68f394791747bfcdb94ee91beedf7
489429239f5ab0523db3fa21da6d272c9ba8f985
describe
'164560' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBBN' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
a1fe6695e1af188c5fc5d8eee1c72f06
5788fcbfce55b96f091e25a72115006c77ef1ac9
'2012-05-25T18:24:43-04:00'
describe
'368371' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBBO' 'sip-files00288.QC2.jpg'
7004688dadf26b3e2041c42a16c5491b
af295eccbfe11d775d3fa7283216e666fd106abc
'2012-05-25T18:14:40-04:00'
describe
'1738' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBBP' 'sip-files00136.txt'
3516157714552c6c322aa8955816bfa7
8409588bab274a792d7f328412def1598df35786
'2012-05-25T18:20:26-04:00'
describe
'2228884' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBBQ' 'sip-files00244.tif'
547b990e1454dc0c652da84745697e43
8435eea30014ef2513a95e184fb1efb49fc3f78b
'2012-05-25T18:14:19-04:00'
describe
'277019' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBBR' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
6205890082aac8d5fd45eaaba8d9cc2d
206a4019d583aeb6d0ce47dee9b22393caea3e57
describe
'423898' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBBS' 'sip-files00016.QC2.jpg'
3460cbf50dd1f483d9e936c665a8746d
2f16f80c53d6ba525aa0107a5b73e765d7095d34
'2012-05-25T18:18:22-04:00'
describe
'271374' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBBT' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
116ffe8e9be7f64bee90b3124e622a0f
866f5478e06ff4eec101b5e4b71e4e1253403a98
'2012-05-25T18:21:23-04:00'
describe
'1195' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBBU' 'sip-files00180.txt'
9cf7499f82e1325092b0d94d2337b08f
2600bef0751ecc6df1d83bc97e072c82303ef5ec
describe
'130051' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBBV' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
91dc37d49ee4bcf4cb69cd35d53f5c59
8cfca6f96edea537bab4134e1ed4f6bbfe99206e
describe
'17250' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBBW' 'sip-files00267.pro'
a75cc7a20aa2e856c7dca8c7139e9510
869e576a95d35c395f4d6c27eb22aa327c479a1b
describe
'140351' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBBX' 'sip-files00271.QC.jpg'
36589c45c4d00ba35d55a099ea6dde42
597ecd7c1f6ca9be7e395c68a74cc5872c845eac
'2012-05-25T18:23:04-04:00'
describe
'127385' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBBY' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
992a50031f206f393cf7fde4440e7ff0
cf2796535888557f373db6afdd05e0907b6d438c
describe
'2168628' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBBZ' 'sip-files00193.tif'
9a0b00889ccea259059af544f6535ba4
a1f1125a13112b06f0912b94047c2804204782c3
'2012-05-25T18:25:31-04:00'
describe
'39935' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBCA' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
30632d29eaaa0bd48268cf48ab3f3745
a9afe59bb06bfc88af64d5449c3d9cc04d2882ef
describe
'358131' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBCB' 'sip-files00273.QC2.jpg'
40b45cdbe019816d5cc542662aace5f9
9da78ac425c275bcab9d06ef579a741551e9c549
describe
'1737' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBCC' 'sip-files00214.txt'
17b69805656cd207422075d81eda2056
32599dc272e5eaba5ba3002bca2ff0539b33078a
describe
'52894' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBCD' 'sip-files00157thm.jpg'
916bce9ad24cdaa2a634b469bee377e0
a70d4537a290b1e31041d76496563a77c9f29e9f
describe
'2229824' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBCE' 'sip-files00262.tif'
57286c6f6401206e2eff449052e11e58
3440b71206246f99fba41c7be7c80b18615399ba
'2012-05-25T18:13:36-04:00'
describe
'2229640' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBCF' 'sip-files00266.tif'
d3b8c99a595044350d4ba97e0257d110
465b187c56ed8b34163189bc9c65b561c605e484
'2012-05-25T18:20:36-04:00'
describe
'42248' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBCG' 'sip-files00202.pro'
85399b21647a8aa21922ac836d09d520
ada5d9dd29f82f822a1b0e3e22b1388fa6c62693
'2012-05-25T18:25:43-04:00'
describe
'157238' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBCH' 'sip-files00214.QC.jpg'
cd288ff5a49a3e9bfc29c183004663c6
ef063c128e11f19a4cad2656411ec599b0f99093
'2012-05-25T18:23:08-04:00'
describe
'2225076' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBCI' 'sip-files00053.tif'
b52c0f53f98a7794ccf5dec50c7a11be
e6d297f62c93fa300ce061f69e6475cd05019f1e
'2012-05-25T18:24:19-04:00'
describe
'1674' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBCJ' 'sip-files00102.txt'
7e919c05505d9802610dc47008432ff7
bf3c5e2c84cc95a1b999ed37e182c03ac7de29fd
describe
'128607' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBCK' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
a5bf11514e9dd9ea4f3ab0def470a782
6dcd85e3b6cee624125f68b6b3afb33e89684c33
describe
'406060' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBCL' 'sip-files00284.jpg'
e304d549183d647c6d559fc25f5a7fb0
448864b790d0e5d432b027d1070142b1e06c34fb
'2012-05-25T18:23:43-04:00'
describe
'436033' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBCM' 'sip-files00214.jpg'
97587bf86c8da3be64315b4fed43868f
9f67535ceb06c3f2470990948ba123a4372a2f98
'2012-05-25T18:26:33-04:00'
describe
'150233' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBCN' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
82117425ff15537cb1a889ee9e2e9683
165d534ab72b66e79a6f5f062e463a1d44ac1013
describe
'1652' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBCO' 'sip-files00131.txt'
4a251fd1f247702cab5f8c911b5f66c4
b62f6d9022c866f70d1a99638e4fe0074f10ad6a
describe
'42592' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBCP' 'sip-files00032.pro'
ddc460c0cd8a1c254d5a003046a4a9ea
811fa1e6ad2fd98694d2a6cd4b0290e9d421b15c
'2012-05-25T18:16:36-04:00'
describe
'2228452' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBCQ' 'sip-files00205.tif'
5edd92f8f71f761758e00a0ae08153d3
0dc636302ac61dddba849ffa1108f544f2bb36cc
'2012-05-25T18:24:37-04:00'
describe
'2228968' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBCR' 'sip-files00059.tif'
abb9a4aac666360c531f4e02fa6503d4
02f2efaa52619230240e9e4951250468023d19cc
'2012-05-25T18:13:39-04:00'
describe
'2228536' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBCS' 'sip-files00207.tif'
6bff9f75be49a4f880099d0326986b5d
c9516a88607deed2a9f55f5d6d2c8c4fa42750db
'2012-05-25T18:20:58-04:00'
describe
'50073' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBCT' 'sip-files00223thm.jpg'
dc79c48ab9aedb2f5936bc0e3378ab57
7664695b5193d9caca9e8799a70a0b803ca4fde9
describe
'276954' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBCU' 'sip-files00197.jp2'
be2ce5e700f35dc9da6bfb3bd7dc1576
525a1a40098f58184cadaaa7c26684166210a55e
describe
'158298' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBCV' 'sip-files00226.QC.jpg'
e6b327391844765c9b314d8b3b57c5bb
09113d0a1de05125768e66524ed9c49940dade95
'2012-05-25T18:20:12-04:00'
describe
'1654' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBCW' 'sip-files00070.txt'
5819bfe64ffeb177b30894003c10ad06
902e2fbecd2672712352a7628f782fe6a11f94c7
'2012-05-25T18:20:51-04:00'
describe
'276965' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBCX' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
cdb09ed7c5dba346481857a15ff22b17
78d678ccd33b6707042dd7d8f36ab65ce678825d
describe
'276856' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBCY' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
aecbdf2cb3accb01bc713dfe193d2e77
a038d286d68aecf8fa56a77df95b1fedbb1433f4
describe
'1508' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBCZ' 'sip-files00078.txt'
eb8401bb564438c9bb25cff9249a7a49
5b52e6f29e3e9e03ba8d158e9b9decbd40452a32
'2012-05-25T18:22:39-04:00'
describe
'278150' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBDA' 'sip-files00194.jp2'
3ec190526331e4d967497613fa512890
f9714f93b197a26b627edb1f6893bc555325728e
describe
'276857' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBDB' 'sip-files00292.jp2'
d4d8ffc1c9431a2c1dac58f646f16727
3ed87bc98599e3a98e0124322d71762b94c9d01d
describe
'46018' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBDC' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
efb2855f9ddee3f337a644c2351598f6
ae84bd974d572167b902ca54baf87057f81983b7
describe
'276988' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBDD' 'sip-files00259.jp2'
568af6266d56716a19ec99016bd5664b
ee1bc8532ccbcbdb4d6cdbe42688eb2a8a55dca9
'2012-05-25T18:18:16-04:00'
describe
'39831' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBDE' 'sip-files00225.pro'
44523378d433478cb91d693a09b4796c
5fc9b0ab1f8a47976faaba0cfc1f3f02591b1c6f
describe
'1230' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBDF' 'sip-files00107.txt'
acf0de8c319617e8b44b9fd38c65cfad
99ccee5d9b050c517db560722881d6ab45ec4f1a
'2012-05-25T18:23:10-04:00'
describe
'276996' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBDG' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
04de5ef4042b1085dcfe5551608d720a
28278f0793fd7a7a4505812a01f5f66aea807de8
describe
'683070' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBDH' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
7db648f9ec171813504e0df24cfb5ceb
14b387f61878246063b6ac0305421fb1583d81d1
'2012-05-25T18:24:25-04:00'
describe
'43549' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBDI' 'sip-files00180thm.jpg'
27502c416130e5fa18b28d2c70b9573a
b55401fffdeceedd59df80e334a89cc8b0dec48e
'2012-05-25T18:25:54-04:00'
describe
'53466' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBDJ' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
37cedfecaa5287a04fc9253d9392c21b
9d7df5c3e99275a926e0c7f8394ba3236fcf5dff
'2012-05-25T18:20:44-04:00'
describe
'437923' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBDK' 'sip-files00241.jpg'
4776a4c8d38f03ef9908df56a5a4f22b
f7ca80857fd61a445f6d63ba73f3ea97f902c8d3
describe
'482826' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBDL' 'sip-files00148.jpg'
15dfd85a022a1cf1f3a11fab3b33ea36
0f3ce6567879500569f0993c50a451c1ff1f5a7e
'2012-05-25T18:15:33-04:00'
describe
'2183780' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBDM' 'sip-files00090.tif'
97278020dfeb6065cbed93c5601d2293
204f8402e8c9d1d5b5868e608ce831f13b57bfd8
describe
'144954' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBDN' 'sip-files00285.QC.jpg'
b8ccaba3b6a406155998831c738ac961
f6ea382c38505819887380e9abcb0e12229a39fe
describe
'408191' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBDO' 'sip-files00165.QC2.jpg'
5a837e084f1f43d66866be1df0c4a4e4
eb6e321c94a2bf07fb338b6f9b6ee4ce3490b7c9
'2012-05-25T18:23:15-04:00'
describe
'2228628' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBDP' 'sip-files00225.tif'
83631a1027f98c48f815c3ce673f23fc
c27462a6229c5d07ceae5d3f765ed38744761a19
'2012-05-25T18:21:56-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBDQ' 'sip-files00148.txt'
1f34ecfae9b0cd7cc909b96f302bcd11
3c0fcd45e2e23fe84e30ea91b7a4581def52e208
'2012-05-25T18:25:42-04:00'
describe
'1631' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBDR' 'sip-files00150.txt'
75668f44fcb578db1f58dd00d54f9d98
c2f596300a706b340301b77df739dec54b829b8f
describe
'402647' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBDS' 'sip-files00059.QC2.jpg'
933ae4d5b23b670772beef71f44dae4f
a89da2284932dfa1644cf7e5d1df92570733be46
'2012-05-25T18:26:24-04:00'
describe
'291291' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBDT' 'sip-files00230.QC2.jpg'
abf299514b3b811751f8f8baef6aea91
411768d7f164027d869846a3a88a81a307fe4bfa
'2012-05-25T18:26:34-04:00'
describe
'1329' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBDU' 'sip-files00262.txt'
45296f26034a0dbd2153aec78dc7679d
16f7557b277f32a90acadee8ba406438c8245692
'2012-05-25T18:19:23-04:00'
describe
'277027' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBDV' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
3899bc2424bcd056948487c6dbfb3839
9e141efa58a9b6dccf32c2afc0f54e627fd318a2
describe
'276972' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBDW' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
14d14cb768bb5dc2c6d8eff05da7859a
5f1deded5dd96bc9fe365ac9fb127a62f2dfc4c3
'2012-05-25T18:24:42-04:00'
describe
'168727' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBDX' 'sip-files00181.QC.jpg'
4c115a1125a5b28437d6170ec70547ba
6ca34b495e37295c3cd0ba455177a5fef74cfcd0
'2012-05-25T18:15:26-04:00'
describe
'165446' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBDY' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
25fbcabe42377fb8c567457698cd4965
b41a5462307dcd4719f3583e1223c2ef4c251a83
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBDZ' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
15a1c7be4985b996bde21b2c02b83967
a4dbb8bf1642c1cbe1942514c2440a8f77773b40
describe
'39023' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBEA' 'sip-files00200.pro'
3548674401b7a8521e3cee8e025dcd48
6d9265f364c7ded5e60ac89b57d0780473a5ab7b
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBEB' 'sip-files00159.tif'
12ed145396c90f116dcc053671e1ca27
32e3dada4f2f8af54eef9a460e4867fbb34945ab
describe
'50359' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBEC' 'sip-files00227thm.jpg'
887e3043a2a760262c7b6b2ea2de29b9
48b0022c794465e76932504b28dcd917d08773b1
'2012-05-25T18:14:20-04:00'
describe
'40881' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBED' 'sip-files00167.pro'
1bc27a3c47a0732787b5a0cbc36608cf
770bbc75e42f161aa757c1228e7a0f6e168d0661
describe
'91596' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBEE' 'sip-files00296.QC.jpg'
deccffd80842c3e0b95bff9c65516a8e
a5c0cfaf83d73c7320342552383380efb25a405a
describe
'151849' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBEF' 'sip-files00177.QC.jpg'
2436d87b6262e8925e95960eac12ac81
272232d0e8ae83a12f8c3d0e25b73e7f675afd75
'2012-05-25T18:14:08-04:00'
describe
'41014' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBEG' 'sip-files00037.pro'
76eb670a2bce67a14d5c2cedc9420ab8
75516a9b3308b95385cda8e203ab3d4753be38d6
'2012-05-25T18:26:17-04:00'
describe
'50762' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBEH' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
ddef422ebc8e6b7c9ae9c286914836f6
58bea73898a95453044545559830bce99dadde2b
describe
'456860' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBEI' 'sip-files00289.jpg'
3a36d1f6f654408f7066d06ae465775c
6fea5ce207d095f86ac052eb8dd7eb34beaae252
'2012-05-25T18:24:15-04:00'
describe
'2228520' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBEJ' 'sip-files00176.tif'
54c50a3a6b3eaa97c6c1c700ada28b47
749f025d08bb0d598b35147894122e25e190993f
'2012-05-25T18:18:07-04:00'
describe
'190454' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBEK' 'sip-files00053.QC2.jpg'
0ec7c4a56c339a525000c4dfc928ec9c
3402b3a19564e00652c07a3d9c3733d2de161fac
'2012-05-25T18:19:27-04:00'
describe
'243211' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBEL' 'sip-files00296.QC2.jpg'
acbcd4d37602650c7a8273fd485259ca
612a4db8e9d406707ea4207046a98d3c0a18b23e
'2012-05-25T18:16:30-04:00'
describe
'276955' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBEM' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
e037950ae0ba62b7bdcafa9d90415c4b
67afdf09f26151c528176d7eb831cc5f51695971
describe
'2153888' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBEN' 'sip-files00094.tif'
9dc87bd8cc3190d815221f2c227c014f
ef6e9c3cfab3373c33fbea1b11e196d4e0d5bf1a
describe
'49128' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBEO' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
31ab5e0cb941d7d7e6cd05bc53a77011
126c31e829fe0b2e3ccb82a7d4f2619f9686c22a
describe
'368331' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBEP' 'sip-files00264.QC2.jpg'
37a8f248f9be09898206d28562a52c2e
768769ce13293b2b07c61c3c2dded1dbdbb8372d
describe
'2229040' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBEQ' 'sip-files00116.tif'
b584d9e81699dd44e069daeddbcae90c
fb27e3c3d46ed61eecde3e4cdd3f01e245941fed
'2012-05-25T18:18:23-04:00'
describe
'53397' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBER' 'sip-files00163thm.jpg'
0c94b44b72d756657da7c2d0ca59dbeb
c07fd62b923cb36236855e75830c9005025a866b
describe
'137890' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBES' 'sip-files00141.QC.jpg'
62d4659131468c220aaa80d9923edc67
82aeb5c6f4f27b1762cb82180cb1ff1b9df3b478
describe
'167800' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBET' 'sip-files00163.QC.jpg'
174d147c2a19c0f6d112640d0c022a11
430eb6feb2a99a3b9fb6d88b20f31dd036129bc4
describe
'1663' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBEU' 'sip-files00182.txt'
db0d427f3bc0b0e4994f63155af4130f
e84b6198435d8fc77b43d077ccbb4f83619c73dc
'2012-05-25T18:23:29-04:00'
describe
'398283' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBEV' 'sip-files00198.QC2.jpg'
e2b806f1073814ed4dd87ce542339e7f
94cd01437b4b6147a92140d16a962322e427480d
'2012-05-25T18:13:46-04:00'
describe
'36158' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBEW' 'sip-files00246.pro'
985e6caa388f7219cdce8480badb7255
89ea18d9cefee39e24ce91f70231b1e6804824c9
describe
'490187' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBEX' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
6f2876006c5d7abeecfc592f3308be0e
7bf9927ac843250133ea0c22db133e783a186b42
describe
'276875' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBEY' 'sip-files00005.jp2'
50f05c5b2856a7f4391c2673dced6dce
19620741739bdfd34c6a44d0df5f78218da66d24
describe
'39931' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBEZ' 'sip-files00148.pro'
2ac84bbb7776d857e0a0249d05fb8a5c
74777eae76f19b80b755538d58cae2664360db27
'2012-05-25T18:17:50-04:00'
describe
'313512' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBFA' 'sip-files00271.QC2.jpg'
b3711de52518bd5326f59c7d1b9323a9
b8d52db3f0867611b0b890c623b2b4c680f40db9
'2012-05-25T18:25:14-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBFB' 'sip-files00191.txt'
2a636ba5a36302e9ebd280540c74c52c
d8fbf9ee8272bee07c40c2192b090215c62147a3
describe
'50069' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBFC' 'sip-files00232thm.jpg'
7e8653ec0b7f44a663e88415a5cacc20
f0aea15e7a09e8580627ee50d86260408e37e422
'2012-05-25T18:14:09-04:00'
describe
'157992' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBFD' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
8ef784655aa27f5a53e34f9880ac1c02
3a76c062235d9d0085e71a8a33b20bf468e37bff
'2012-05-25T18:17:05-04:00'
describe
'171433' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBFE' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
a3ac21df14fd304661feb323e12ff7d0
7680e255a44172f7a3afe008fbf688d1bbb6f603
'2012-05-25T18:22:42-04:00'
describe
'375963' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBFF' 'sip-files00225.QC2.jpg'
35ed1df0a4f0d65d902b69154fa0b4b9
c22fa3b654ae21d4cce0f79e0cbfcdbb1a828510
'2012-05-25T18:22:51-04:00'
describe
'464202' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBFG' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
d875d5dd01a42b7b22f3a0226efef2d4
99043a8fbf960be151d124a69a42bb1b58af3d02
'2012-05-25T18:21:18-04:00'
describe
'165723' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBFH' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
e48f6d6219582a2c5ceea73cb04b4394
4e26e574e15129f41ccf08a824f3c0ffe67ce344
'2012-05-25T18:21:45-04:00'
describe
'52822' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBFI' 'sip-files00147thm.jpg'
dc1ecbbcc5dd9049f44185de2e6e76ea
ed2dc9449cede5c495b3fa4274ff4b148b314bd7
'2012-05-25T18:23:17-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBFJ' 'sip-files00069.txt'
49d47050db5e9aa5478dcb2c5ca6c9e9
aa3f2b7a565b585773b8a3d2cfd8ddcf133d6133
describe
'2090400' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBFK' 'sip-files00271.tif'
99eb27c62427c24a8e3a58484a5133fb
51adfb3bcc25034dceaae1cb55f96c9692971ac9
'2012-05-25T18:17:51-04:00'
describe
'405025' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBFL' 'sip-files00037.QC2.jpg'
9f3257773e6b33675e5288191d028d02
fb49f5970ec5b0ee3f132513b47d211d0b639902
describe
'1691' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBFM' 'sip-files00134.txt'
182c865826d8f9c6b6f8ccf52b4fdbe5
8299c02c4e899ecb65a91619ed15cb3a1ac667ee
'2012-05-25T18:14:47-04:00'
describe
'414743' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBFN' 'sip-files00184.QC2.jpg'
a4902f5639383f3e0a115ea97d3e2630
0ffd30be3c11a3260d776e1912c542fe4256d31a
describe
'2228912' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBFO' 'sip-files00100.tif'
cbaa8bfb3c0bb5c2ec54673a2f4c38bb
2ff85be79e7198a51788722500cd3b4ece5d0c22
'2012-05-25T18:23:22-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBFP' 'sip-files00187.jp2'
2d661755739d0b37495cb43636b18f67
ea4b2726a387cb9a50f5c38105fa7669598d15b0
'2012-05-25T18:15:02-04:00'
describe
'157981' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBFQ' 'sip-files00259.QC.jpg'
4a92b9ce90257d262cc0824a06a041ae
ccc2676418a52be99bb565844c7cfb5571445a04
describe
'42201' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBFR' 'sip-files00130.pro'
24b132f2420b3e9720efd94f5a77c566
1274dd7594c2703383ff9586b4762bafda25601c
'2012-05-25T18:20:04-04:00'
describe
'38686' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBFS' 'sip-files00085.pro'
a43167012e8901fcae7bfce856fc94c2
bdc230531e059d6d279d2cd9ae12aaf9aa06d069
describe
'51043' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBFT' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
535ef03ed5b88b36ff21615810030029
38ac02544b459207551532a0217d4b3ad6ef25d8
describe
'2235044' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBFU' 'sip-files00194.tif'
27f2919beb8afa228bd8c954f6dbcd28
a7267f121cacb15e01ea04573fbe0f66a932c8a6
'2012-05-25T18:24:23-04:00'
describe
'2168264' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBFV' 'sip-files00201.tif'
bfbad8846a1df7d91d295ee2ba78a10e
785d632c0ba9e7250b3c529e55eb417db2ac11c8
describe
'2226976' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBFW' 'sip-files00168.tif'
d355778cdc3bb7c2f2d5718a996248f3
9832e6e7b09f7f306d39891992b3dbae04f6a82c
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBFX' 'sip-files00152.jp2'
1150d8396b44878943814a77fbba48c8
271b3c1008151b2de7c8c23c6d6b6658d1225f3f
'2012-05-25T18:21:42-04:00'
describe
'2227388' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBFY' 'sip-files00180.tif'
d61e00c725803568bb462f301165ed34
f5f13f7b7a22c8f32fabb48c497506e04baa6e35
describe
'54295' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBFZ' 'sip-files00277thm.jpg'
78af5227cdadca5228afa13d922ead00
92808684e6057150ced10cb82755ada457e66abe
describe
'27832' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBGA' 'sip-files00262.pro'
f9e9be42e1b12a1c7993fcc8a7006117
e029d9a1b0a92064db21a91f9dc64b8c2c5d0c1c
'2012-05-25T18:19:47-04:00'
describe
'1151' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBGB' 'sip-files00249.txt'
e2e6f73c308d91ec66b6278a8e138f83
7003734738f6fab4538956bc05e9b4ca7720c998
describe
'2228940' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBGC' 'sip-files00290.tif'
e08328fd4137431b601e312c8924ef3d
237c3866b5272b2b43f9eb126a7a5ea9308c8142
'2012-05-25T18:17:09-04:00'
describe
'298439' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBGD' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
95c7cdd26dc6ddb06a01db095618be6e
2dba7534f5ab6ebd90277e9212c476ad0c8d54a3
'2012-05-25T18:19:22-04:00'
describe
'388058' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBGE' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
6eaf8aaed39027eec9ac6ef3625f2d58
f6602398800241b9f59b5e297a16a4dd4c0558e6
describe
'38270' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBGF' 'sip-files00210.pro'
4958c0a6d440355f032060b160594502
6d005992127ea1ba621965cb8478ba9f42bd76bf
'2012-05-25T18:17:39-04:00'
describe
'166063' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBGG' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
8ec96a5c2b7ffec7dd8325687d42ad33
7ad9e2aee7964a58ac72b4aea64957eb99c22d6c
describe
'2228328' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBGH' 'sip-files00219.tif'
ee02254bf9c8fdbaaeefbaf5de540995
51f1b2180a9aac531f8c25e4610391c149894d16
'2012-05-25T18:17:18-04:00'
describe
'172947' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBGI' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
b6e4ceeecb5ea163d01f071795454a99
da802e1c1cf6fdc9156dbabcf1fde984122b8306
describe
'431746' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBGJ' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
a34d38ee901781b48deaa01c746c82fd
2d396133512df27b9090d03b69a4bcf036e9dda9
'2012-05-25T18:24:54-04:00'
describe
'485158' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBGK' 'sip-files00165.jpg'
09464b3840768bb2eaa8207b74b15c59
b5731b098baf748b180d389fa2604de53bb0a001
describe
'49655' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBGL' 'sip-files00231thm.jpg'
a81e5505e06543db692b8e1457f21612
9ced2b0963f881dcae6bd40e37fb595b646e67d3
describe
'1787' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBGM' 'sip-files00043.txt'
12fd05c96b62e1520cfe21eee8c6af05
5783cd651803862bc729a7684b209561bb069258
describe
'334720' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBGN' 'sip-files00246.QC2.jpg'
0a06726d557a93d08a9d1b34b0983b14
e3b8b43473500443132486ec3d1109c8a94c02c1
'2012-05-25T18:25:47-04:00'
describe
'2228316' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBGO' 'sip-files00222.tif'
f1183da1748ef5e4fe233c58c2780af1
9797f9f5a177ef6ac2fab2797650bf5814362b15
'2012-05-25T18:16:27-04:00'
describe
'39680' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBGP' 'sip-files00142.pro'
c28cc96054719cc8ec0498f0e57b1044
d3b02c4acf38ce088802a894647d1ba925c2c63d
describe
'52086' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBGQ' 'sip-files00182thm.jpg'
d6936091acc51c86758ce26f04ece868
d8c7fccf4ad1c4cbe60c2cc01ed035a3f41d10af
describe
'403485' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBGR' 'sip-files00182.QC2.jpg'
5b5f8a5a027a2dd5a3d37ad6c457c82c
ab7b262fda71eaceddb66378a09053c79dbe493f
'2012-05-25T18:17:01-04:00'
describe
'2228584' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBGS' 'sip-files00131.tif'
25add1c514ef1c4d4e4e1c5ecc0e13c7
cbd11b620fa4dd1533eb983eaa10fb47b15dcf93
describe
'439659' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBGT' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
3fae1226b4e3f41801ba224cbc3fdd08
4fba6a41254bfe7a9e1e7100ef0c96690f055dd1
describe
'2229140' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBGU' 'sip-files00289.tif'
a6552db5151c5c3923387892110a8248
71a00fa9836593e7e0a904792c5e7e60e139c0d5
'2012-05-25T18:22:59-04:00'
describe
'492973' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBGV' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
c6948dca55c0740efce3182ee769c9aa
4904a3d7353f9cfb5e835f3136f8532bba1da764
describe
'2161364' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBGW' 'sip-files00149.tif'
1414202a81aaab7451383c8fead99d7c
9a1d6f2b9219c6ac1befbc95b82501941c668b34
describe
'42039' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBGX' 'sip-files00187.pro'
71e1396f309a522b0b99847f746323ce
8f44c0bec62cff086211e145e07ab78891b1a8d7
describe
'1228' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBGY' 'sip-files00186.txt'
e6b2cd98dc71d954770cb7007ba5038a
93970309606ac5399fe81ab9629ecc22e025861e
describe
'173972' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBGZ' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
cef2403db7597f0aa814095c8e2a95e2
58df08df0169604b521540bf240e04afe020ad3a
describe
'51317' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBHA' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
874d807a9d4e436fa8cc084fe813baf9
fe6c7e3f0482a5075cdacee8915f66c7ddcc9458
'2012-05-25T18:24:21-04:00'
describe
'385473' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBHB' 'sip-files00176.QC2.jpg'
bb273454927d0774fadc1f6499a0cfd0
bd890f8b6d9bf3c34114a8b9d5791377979b4db9
'2012-05-25T18:14:44-04:00'
describe
'49907' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBHC' 'sip-files00235thm.jpg'
74366e6bc651ef5c24054523b27617bd
5d4fab43d96590b5290dc7dce33694c64efbe8bc
describe
'2228016' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBHD' 'sip-files00172.tif'
697eb2bde045e8ae1876cc34d8c411eb
901f3b69d978f18e15d5c878748571886f4829ca
'2012-05-25T18:13:47-04:00'
describe
'2183396' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBHE' 'sip-files00243.tif'
51636a6731d5189e7573b27437f4e672
1f960e73f3122d4e416089adc53a35829a464b53
describe
'26366' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBHF' 'sip-files00020.pro'
35314dbf73a0b8959bbf77b984993e23
51016090d6fa5043a5158d028600162b0c3c6404
'2012-05-25T18:18:33-04:00'
describe
'165140' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBHG' 'sip-files00142.QC.jpg'
8a9f7c05ce00896f3511ad26800d0ea3
f3b02633949522071a2634ed4f611f9a83aa532c
'2012-05-25T18:23:35-04:00'
describe
'426494' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBHH' 'sip-files00247.jpg'
65e46d0c216b8287d5731c987d068d51
e967b84d7408dffee64559e50a3ee09de231b8a0
'2012-05-25T18:26:19-04:00'
describe
'231' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBHI' 'sip-files00006.txt'
dea5618feccf78ba1edbc00f1cdab0ff
29131de36f78d8d0f3a52c50f1f943c396ef0ede
describe
'1057' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBHJ' 'sip-files00281.txt'
8c630e43fecd48672138ede52d2849b3
07132c9b11ff3986651fd8a54ea7f6f7ba60aa4b
'2012-05-25T18:26:04-04:00'
describe
'303545' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBHK' 'sip-files00007a.jp2'
07c78ab4155685b092b02832cf5c9fda
c1a5848038c089bac13debc6f79681b63db732da
describe
'385571' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBHL' 'sip-files00024.QC2.jpg'
a50f92c8d6195b844157fcd07ce5655e
804dd893abb4d26a2b5161a3b44a146edbc208cb
'2012-05-25T18:20:14-04:00'
describe
'131624' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBHM' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
2a95158155a1eb66641735e75b213f3a
e9799fb67245edb03ed3c3b032013a182d7e3877
'2012-05-25T18:19:36-04:00'
describe
'481572' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBHN' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
b76238d664a55cea9b15e630752763d4
ff8e0d97331d68e9548d24c62dfa5e4967b02873
'2012-05-25T18:21:05-04:00'
describe
'39133' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBHO' 'sip-files00029.pro'
ec3a3b6af77ab933b0de69f9cbca5227
cb9489b761296e14ce0520684d45da5b7dc61041
'2012-05-25T18:21:31-04:00'
describe
'394723' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBHP' 'sip-files00029.QC2.jpg'
1ae479462334dc9711265ec5e1c22f07
0c2081de0b7864f91967561c82d58817b67dfb7e
describe
'148745' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBHQ' 'sip-files00205.QC.jpg'
579e6a220c034788e20a101c09a1f748
6ee9912bbb4024751dbcf54fe7f0603d53eb0b6b
'2012-05-25T18:15:17-04:00'
describe
'2228976' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBHR' 'sip-files00152.tif'
d33b5d31aee06a6c621de2a52b951097
e02045d8d04170a13dea31cc5c929f2e792ffa18
describe
'414810' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBHS' 'sip-files00158.QC2.jpg'
7a58bf574ebdcf7983a756b7ac086512
56b3e7b72048a2aaedeb377857f0e39c72b8329b
'2012-05-25T18:18:14-04:00'
describe
'40074' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBHT' 'sip-files00151.pro'
ab42ad908f68890e3a913aedafb522f3
8bed244f74ce42702c705d5bf6cede7113cdfe9d
'2012-05-25T18:16:19-04:00'
describe
'440661' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBHU' 'sip-files00093.QC2.jpg'
2c702ea467f8de052d93608efb90134e
7ffbaba22d47411c3fc11ed8677b23e68f5fe7f6
'2012-05-25T18:24:44-04:00'
describe
'419425' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBHV' 'sip-files00242.jpg'
159fc76a7dd1c834bdc7a06420206d62
37ff7e89270a3c79cb18134e3f3b167a6fe8cb3e
describe
'276798' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBHW' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
4de43cfe504d05f6a3c16fc28ed6af3d
7af986347347bf8f67d7dec755b03d61956ec0a3
describe
'276236' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBHX' 'sip-files00288.jp2'
721fc68135c928fc2a1633e6c2131982
4830e161f7677276fb046af2c8136d35b32c240c
'2012-05-25T18:21:39-04:00'
describe
'251215' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBHY' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
e795cb1b7157ac9e75d63c9d6872bf47
7c55912d1c971edda133e5289e499aca1b9aa790
describe
'39117' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBHZ' 'sip-files00201.pro'
09d924fec90f17ecfdcc6262c9e923f0
d814a48c09a77fb0c8d944e482d71c03ec4c3b44
describe
'145607' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBIA' 'sip-files00222.QC.jpg'
feeb64730ad73b5793382e94d611377b
d9cb67c97cae96d4640a679624ef9cbe9d15e83f
describe
'368673' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBIB' 'sip-files00122.QC2.jpg'
4398c49039becf656e0951c8a9851230
ba2120132308bc7057a567291a2c691fd76b9524
'2012-05-25T18:16:33-04:00'
describe
'53157' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBIC' 'sip-files00282thm.jpg'
e03b5d5c5beddffce9d59ccda53c3aa2
6a0baedcde43207cd6a3fb23ad2b2b9a9cff7a38
describe
'41036' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBID' 'sip-files00254.pro'
a89293fe24c8a14541dc7a538ee1c5b9
0f4700a036b26a7e5d2085b72fc207fb951c1ef3
'2012-05-25T18:22:35-04:00'
describe
'332855' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBIE' 'sip-files00001.jp2'
bb7fa4f09e169d9ab494f10a7970b279
3b4da3e020244bca5d2fde390f2e2403fdf805cd
describe
'371855' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBIF' 'sip-files00123.QC2.jpg'
09f1f75bb604ac822a5faa6179ab40e6
4f0cf8ff0f73e5f8d70a7647fe08733716008305
describe
'484464' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBIG' 'sip-files00159.jpg'
e8c527b2688897a082e0a78444ed0b74
e642eecef474a10f766560f5091a1b35834b70fd
describe
'439469' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBIH' 'sip-files00171.jpg'
4034b8358211d61cb238964872aee709
9e2d524aa0303207615b5f39cf218007fac99e46
describe
'160199' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBII' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
4ce9002fd7281543a4260706933e2dc0
4ea4db87e0c737381820af2425e4ab7e1eec7882
describe
'21239' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBIJ' 'sip-files00289.pro'
1bce9af1901fc1655190d3255e8de16d
50931d981e2ca74c1a315b7df18882b400f3f1a1
'2012-05-25T18:25:49-04:00'
describe
'437918' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBIK' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
735fa7471d2905b6faa5f694bdea1e0a
9e335cce19aa56b2d0f395eef5989adaac6078c7
describe
'2228596' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBIL' 'sip-files00212.tif'
c89b05b5711a5d5edc3ff2cadacbc9a5
eeb61508d1280972f93fa0396e49b6b6decc36fa
'2012-05-25T18:17:13-04:00'
describe
'72768' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBIM' 'sip-files00001thm.jpg'
633598a03b43badd96e0ee0f8f03d635
de38de5574d23e3825e10367d9c5b7b7ecbaffd2
'2012-05-25T18:21:29-04:00'
describe
'276959' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBIN' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
9125f9572c393acdcf45672e24ee31dd
7fd11a1f7f020cc7a90b89a0b29be1247b13eee9
'2012-05-25T18:14:53-04:00'
describe
'52707' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBIO' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
a1cde68e75dca2a435f8a7f9f31b07a5
a59bb50defbcca817a476c9a30469ed26eef8639
describe
'2228864' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBIP' 'sip-files00129.tif'
2eadfa0741b5f8a0b082cc8e95def6b3
0279eac7cce3aa6618ced1270c2818227aad50fc
'2012-05-25T18:17:20-04:00'
describe
'53095' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBIQ' 'sip-files00149thm.jpg'
2a26cd1f7ceb583786fe1a17b61b0297
cf9a9ea31dcbf4032522c59d332527e988f32eac
'2012-05-25T18:25:10-04:00'
describe
'1722' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBIR' 'sip-files00126.txt'
dda8f6ae5e7787ac15e356aca81c57cf
7e52e24a17d6ac86564ca223a9e43c12e4be9abe
describe
'154108' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBIS' 'sip-files00290.QC.jpg'
5fd51b51c9bb49de863505816932f29f
2aa9e46718e9a693d7178fa79d886769f5a58c9a
describe
'2229028' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBIT' 'sip-files00037.tif'
8c5790c2a702a5a4ceb0fd9844a032f1
599b4abb42f1007d3600ab9763725d8e89c32c6c
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBIU' 'sip-files00128.tif'
ca72e2bf49592916e14e94f885283eab
ab158c8e5546fe1994ec7b70e6717d92514f856d
'2012-05-25T18:19:58-04:00'
describe
'2228616' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBIV' 'sip-files00123.tif'
22b0ef948db43007de7e209eedcb7101
f7a46905e993fb209b31cbe0d0b63b83f0e27616
'2012-05-25T18:22:25-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBIW' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
280be9b4026648d0e00569585dafc16d
a19997cb3904f9d7704bb66e558de307270afd52
'2012-05-25T18:22:49-04:00'
describe
'1819' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBIX' 'sip-files00032.txt'
2341cf9d96b732aae25cd47b0021835f
065cb9f3ff0487bb84b943010aa4f473ac9cc1b8
describe
'370920' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBIY' 'sip-files00045.QC2.jpg'
64ae1f6c857dec40aed33aca612f3b67
324c92f39c70f9a76b9052b57bda04d587ffc3c6
describe
'163674' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBIZ' 'sip-files00255.QC.jpg'
177522af451a4bb7a6da8d89ee080086
ffa31ea4755890494fdf1b9b8bd105a99172d2d4
describe
'2228296' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBJA' 'sip-files00068.tif'
b02769027d0c23700ed2123feaedf94a
b37358ef747ff80276892cea601c473b5d818e84
'2012-05-25T18:23:49-04:00'
describe
'499358' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBJB' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
b6bacf0c6a2675233d1032077a40087c
ae30c95ecbc7654533a5b0e8d7c5b43b3847d14b
describe
'1042' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBJC' 'sip-files00277.txt'
e8ac7898cc6d3a41925c757d2c36bb44
a0bdb99ca8ac638e87af2f8f096384354cb2c0f7
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBJD' 'sip-files00161.tif'
fcc6872bc6c4dfe878ae59f446ac2956
5752b686e7bb634af922f898d047389503a24f26
describe
'45805' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBJE' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
c723955a23e79c4fffc1a0d60b9640d2
7932079c1b4b8f5ed8d085ebebcae59a0059f389
'2012-05-25T18:19:42-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBJF' 'sip-files00135.tif'
9dba1132afcb72370e80487daf59e5d6
c450b6951c0d0021e45b7bffd317dbdf17e07e39
'2012-05-25T18:26:16-04:00'
describe
'2226996' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBJG' 'sip-files00229.tif'
b565e4338c291c68cb9ae390a2eceeb1
7d9118afc84088f5f81adbe3c0ee375ba6bc11a6
describe
'489982' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBJH' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
9bed895b582036aea660e11516d1e2a6
cfc38cfc8749345ba7b146cc01dda2bf377a1824
'2012-05-25T18:21:20-04:00'
describe
'415525' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBJI' 'sip-files00144.QC2.jpg'
edfde4c28175dc26256cdb9b3d266157
6446f53648651f21395ae1fca07980d8b5b16014
describe
'336099' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBJJ' 'sip-files00230.jpg'
097e74bd11131f48dd0cd4464e95cc9b
e684bc444fcad01a0c741a60755d0ed541a85ff1
'2012-05-25T18:19:12-04:00'
describe
'1651' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBJK' 'sip-files00258.txt'
2211a4ed89239e591abd044ce0270dfd
6e3debadbe9efc46f67638b2466f580a139be6d2
describe
'169606' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBJL' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
eb29b24adc5acfd8b953422717863b25
b6d4197a3cbe3aac6b5a146ddaafe48acc8573b5
describe
'446038' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBJM' 'sip-files00176.jpg'
595e560aba2b8a8b557e180f39985b7f
011e726fb083ad1dc7c964587e015b6b97940dd6
describe
'1594' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBJN' 'sip-files00005.pro'
b739df5ccd70175fe780b99d402e5d3d
715c03dab326dbac537fc740eb31d77961274a1a
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBJO' 'sip-files00254.txt'
f8c1eb5d7ac8d1f5568344dc479358db
f73ed74a3d9dff772fedaee973e0e8ab89b402d6
'2012-05-25T18:19:46-04:00'
describe
'50720' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBJP' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
c430207c2335672e0a95596d7d81f17c
4901d4905a3422c1a88f2032c7d7ada9c099b480
describe
'2183464' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBJQ' 'sip-files00245.tif'
4825480e4615def9f3bdb6e47009430f
0ac62ab77295fdda604a0a707c15451abf43f509
'2012-05-25T18:16:11-04:00'
describe
'52002' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBJR' 'sip-files00159thm.jpg'
088b94fa73541d6591cd3ebc4908cd2a
2784d0f8507ea8e53cc2a5f18f60e36efb98ef0f
'2012-05-25T18:17:34-04:00'
describe
'1171' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBJS' 'sip-files00020.txt'
bdc8d782133e1d21461853ff9fe80c25
299c33398c13908c513eab0e30832dbd6f56a814
describe
'379120' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBJT' 'sip-files00224.QC2.jpg'
a55f423c3b6280695a4547c5dd6bba9e
a5c8f2aa33b0e5e2e4f6526a54956bae235a2708
'2012-05-25T18:23:56-04:00'
describe
'162565' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBJU' 'sip-files00145.QC.jpg'
90a89923acc9b0d8bef038cfa27464b6
6550995ee271327dfd46bd4016a557d805ccc657
describe
'37962' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBJV' 'sip-files00223.pro'
4437302b253436c5213c7002967e50c7
973518c20a606c0d9bf7a609c3edd1b0dd1976f6
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBJW' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
564c1839efc2370af9d5a13038104588
4d332ce24ab0e05c5e3bafd49d2c98d9a58032cb
'2012-05-25T18:17:10-04:00'
describe
'40565' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBJX' 'sip-files00241.pro'
d66a091efd7268c2f821c18d48373d85
7f3c6297c44ff369580b5affe015b10d8a1e1e75
'2012-05-25T18:22:54-04:00'
describe
'464169' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBJY' 'sip-files00258.jpg'
9c256e8cc1dfcb9e7b5f7fc9ce351c97
6ce556e16cd3e67a7ab89a760dad766ff664a01c
describe
'439685' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBJZ' 'sip-files00177.jpg'
dc64c6a3f7b4017ccefb24894547889c
3f0d0807293d7a129d04dfb06a0790b53880261f
describe
'478852' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBKA' 'sip-files00188.jpg'
5e270cdf962da5f3bc6af060ac5b656e
64eb13e848d000c9b50b3909485d4b0d74b55045
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBKB' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
739805da5b10bead18efefd45f85e3b2
1d96f0d357674a49c97e47e86ab5bb0636276a68
describe
'1723' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBKC' 'sip-files00059.txt'
09ff2ff3558775f9df3f157b30b3a7b9
ec762a03b332a1b83d206ec7e180f2eb5c940742
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBKD' 'sip-files00214.tif'
479211989656ee2a068f35b61fc70b47
b658f3a93d66b9454573daf66b9aa2e428658514
'2012-05-25T18:15:32-04:00'
describe
'345030' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBKE' 'sip-files00040.QC2.jpg'
bbd756e849a211c12c487e207209e46a
56882ae292a227a6a41d2b101d9c10ecd941be41
'2012-05-25T18:20:40-04:00'
describe
'395856' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBKF' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
6328d97bee8624d14ff372a56d88fa52
551a753f64c034e4fb638d33a46e4d794e1d29df
'2012-05-25T18:19:44-04:00'
describe
'356286' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBKG' 'sip-files00243.QC2.jpg'
8d91a0678a9894f740bfce3c6a0db555
0a64dc85a0e614e794a0feecbfa0940bdcfee5cd
'2012-05-25T18:21:30-04:00'
describe
'400579' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBKH' 'sip-files00111.QC2.jpg'
c806b9c6eede665984eeca17898c63d4
6f594233dcace2074b8fc0e67bb7655b98676db0
'2012-05-25T18:14:33-04:00'
describe
'2227284' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBKI' 'sip-files00054.tif'
1c026bae71977b3e2a269591d63e89dc
d26802bf96d737ff94eaa63e11d10e2c3a56affd
describe
'40820' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBKJ' 'sip-files00035.pro'
5d23f5ce5315f17127a035bd576e5820
478bceb548b79f641fc6bf4cbf66c61a978daf82
'2012-05-25T18:14:32-04:00'
describe
'42383' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBKK' 'sip-files00090.pro'
20069f9acbaf75d55af3c56430282b2b
0718311317117c8a3e6cbf54628abd38ae881e3d
describe
'1627' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBKL' 'sip-files00236.txt'
1123413d332c8ea842a2fd8865ad98b2
f2f7f878958d33af98c5a4a5f169555b7664e1d2
describe
'428919' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBKM' 'sip-files00207.jpg'
51e1e17404c3556c7a474acd3de39e3a
7f681526884a206777e6526f0755d1c7c13ab004
describe
'53435' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBKN' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
29df4ef0cbd4477c93bacf73db457fb8
bcb7cfea130d976bad89a5e9ba845c330d1f2caa
'2012-05-25T18:22:02-04:00'
describe
'975' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBKO' 'sip-files00140.txt'
f5bc508d194216e6cca011df6aa0f6ff
c46ea4f28a87afd1fbe4132fce9f435e437ded62
describe
'377632' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBKP' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
d7551af103b9bcaafa7f0f87f724175c
ad780f0c35e62577c571edb6614429d1bed1c935
describe
'1050' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBKQ' 'sip-files00265.txt'
e1bdf26950bf06947c88d924f4e69d91
d76a98403e3889f496817b9d18a588a410b1fbc8
describe
'126084' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBKR' 'sip-files00169.QC.jpg'
8ba994b25fb79d217c0a349f059ebaa4
49a8661fbfa85d1fec7dafb3ce22b2590d61b29a
describe
'52356' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBKS' 'sip-files00148thm.jpg'
093be60b07eba05df0c98b10872705d9
b0bb9046fa911d454bd57d4b109ff92d9b829ae7
describe
'154228' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBKT' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
3562691bcf12c5fda3c815d5015a9985
73adec3cda913845cd40e480b27675ff46a5a4ef
'2012-05-25T18:15:50-04:00'
describe
'99328' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBKU' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
e7367a1ab8ad471e84c0c88fd4b06eac
1e36dab53d3106b277a9c1aa54c5d7d49f4a3de8
'2012-05-25T18:16:12-04:00'
describe
'2228952' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBKV' 'sip-files00268.tif'
5647feb4b7b26e05128725f84aae0741
b488061c8a31e7aa9e85ddb6685043e17abeb5d6
'2012-05-25T18:18:46-04:00'
describe
'50805' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBKW' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
4a5b9ee16e77b4688411cf477ec9eaf7
54c02660df90b78cbc66fc31d43d6c43a604578b
describe
'1675' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBKX' 'sip-files00076.txt'
bcb1633304365b4a7efd55e8497cf315
ec11f6c7d6de1bf270f2f91f981e783c8bfb13f1
describe
'276921' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBKY' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
a61b551a18619fb42fa66245274d0aee
eabd05154b2f2a07f48cff757694c51e5f4a5342
'2012-05-25T18:25:35-04:00'
describe
'155083' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBKZ' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
c459b6d9775378fdfb18e190a615bed5
99565716ecc41a8aa35b222bef37f48429a30e0c
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBLA' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
0eb3069d643b16ee56ab1bd9dab21f84
8db41c44c440b90251446a24da56806b2cd18ce3
describe
'7930400' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBLB' 'sip-files00294.tif'
2d6b57a96bf73d9a391d88381911b8a3
5d46cfddae06e9932b94e20b8f00199b927268dc
'2012-05-25T18:19:48-04:00'
describe
'2227460' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBLC' 'sip-files00209.tif'
f6b816b200d76a8bc2f0767f3714db6c
adb233a42c01b771356804dab323d97a813d2a83
describe
'2227852' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBLD' 'sip-files00097.tif'
e50273b7091c9ae6d3a3b8aae330bb73
19020263eee6a3e61b0001b0a5f35792caa6150d
'2012-05-25T18:22:07-04:00'
describe
'399240' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBLE' 'sip-files00018.QC2.jpg'
d17024e1144af05804cc7bf31a55b689
ea85169c186882b36d408f780fa0be289a3e409d
'2012-05-25T18:18:08-04:00'
describe
'470826' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBLF' 'sip-files00217.jpg'
f171138702c55efbae4a824452e7d91f
85664ff8b74f3cd4501fe9495eb026a102f3ef03
describe
'468191' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBLG' 'sip-files00191.jpg'
e11cec040cc94ff5fa54aa5fcf7d86f4
4212412fc664632f3bb9a3f225f95f2b5c863440
'2012-05-25T18:18:40-04:00'
describe
'1753' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBLH' 'sip-files00130.txt'
22763d82d7bd55c620b1697dd9a18cff
029028c978216e2d4f0498cc428102eab3526a44
'2012-05-25T18:19:00-04:00'
describe
'39173' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBLI' 'sip-files00069.pro'
9e22d1206847efe74dd091aca460410a
2ddd22679ee829e50f8f25208290268f247590e5
'2012-05-25T18:18:59-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBLJ' 'sip-files00250.tif'
029fe6aa146b163568e9ebb5b786ae29
95a6199766610b8c34e0588138c04b6cf65b7242
describe
'2228060' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBLK' 'sip-files00072.tif'
37c3a0d6a1438b0b5e9cea48864ea5e7
beedbd0449e03e8bc408e07ca4b198f6d6eebd94
describe
'1280' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBLL' 'sip-files00079.txt'
54a7c52b23bdbcc0ceecfcb3a277018e
10df681fcecf591d107350dfc06848dc8cfa235d
describe
'42583' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBLM' 'sip-files00170.pro'
7695d138ac8ab726ac724d75427b12f8
d76c111d5ccc74c9b1f7d9f184248a9ad19f14fe
describe
'450943' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBLN' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
31ffa046c60ba7cb9624afcb70b3a956
7ef365be693a09abfe1817ff08aa356f902aad5e
'2012-05-25T18:13:45-04:00'
describe
'2228588' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBLO' 'sip-files00114.tif'
09fada84256c75e4b3411a1faa7f5cc3
d97d6ebfa9cfa454e051734e9a348bb602944edc
describe
'436080' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBLP' 'sip-files00011.QC2.jpg'
9f7a1a557821d90e31812fb6c9015afa
1d3a8b172df0011c649f1c23600cc6fb8abe864e
describe
'2191272' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBLQ' 'sip-files00163.tif'
c0737bf82b1e8859090063ff74e6f315
bde9be3d6a2ea49090c84bdf3964ea4cf226c8ed
describe
'76806' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBLR' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
fd90221303eb80ff01bc3c4b7b9e3c22
c4e0ae8da148b6f688337b85ac68e5c95a0d0da2
describe
'477284' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBLS' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
ddec66d4270ee8e017c511a9a2e81ba0
16bc384a76d8cddf0443c256a19e03eb37002ebe
'2012-05-25T18:20:15-04:00'
describe
'410869' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBLT' 'sip-files00210.jpg'
1b50f47e9d2404dae71d8257663fe660
3dfd7e4517397f5d88ef021a1b24ae7d68475731
'2012-05-25T18:18:39-04:00'
describe
'397172' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBLU' 'sip-files00133.QC2.jpg'
dee5d434420874cdce07deb3534b114d
6d423e869e8497e3f3d26f5dcd826835736ab7e6
describe
'21584' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBLV' 'sip-files00265.pro'
3cc456ff0b625a26ded2946c9c535760
8c04925fa0a225f2f9db2e64736ae1b9848122df
describe
'15703' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBLW' 'sip-files00154.pro'
3d139e2a225c2121150401eb494e98ac
ba72e22149d2d8b44bc1ba1ca39fee89ea0124eb
describe
'41859' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBLX' 'sip-files00265thm.jpg'
7bcd23e14f222d18c465996e990ec966
b155d693efc78cf76dbf2690080370b92e680012
describe
'401598' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBLY' 'sip-files00217.QC2.jpg'
d86d7ebe004fa41043033f68fd1f9f45
b9c6e4fdef25fd9089b2099fc8323e63777076e7
'2012-05-25T18:26:38-04:00'
describe
'446602' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBLZ' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
73ac7193269dff2fe67b65a35699c013
920639cff6e5035f1913315ea779809cda83bf0c
'2012-05-25T18:16:42-04:00'
describe
'1658' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBMA' 'sip-files00199.txt'
6e18683eead46e1bdde6bc6199745b24
96cc22d130631f8ad06a9572a474ef2ab8873ec6
describe
Invalid character
'53676' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBMB' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
bf74ea2dd036a2bed607eb429ed84f36
8f3268966cf0c39e1cf66840701dda3aa8c4591a
describe
'611' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBMC' 'sip-files00009.txt'
729e6c0be583d55f1ede2e48fef69945
192f81508c1e11bba418194fe060bd7c8e7e6438
describe
'17788' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBMD' 'sip-files00286.pro'
2deb21c7eb41cdad1d72f670062f59c4
f6be25794ea59033de6f7c24856139174d3c7e6f
describe
'603' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBME' 'sip-files00179.txt'
d41fc99ff865b8ec056fe7c4226660c0
4b01fbcf80aee032756c8c34147ec051baba9150
describe
'39031' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBMF' 'sip-files00065.pro'
44ae4166bcb13cabb3de762fbc515c47
42b2b516272e42b394ed53f6168eb8aa9c2679f0
'2012-05-25T18:18:00-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBMG' 'sip-files00158thm.jpg'
b6ebe9c1455d49f22cedd0b243c688b7
e0244d2cb16d905f04d9cb0d8b5a541fa5d12fe2
'2012-05-25T18:25:25-04:00'
describe
'276963' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBMH' 'sip-files00142.jp2'
003c39275a05ab27d1632ec2cc8d8c86
0638c13462db3c472df19f8604072dfecf8d40d4
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBMI' 'sip-files00177.tif'
03a292d58f133860e8233c56f43fc647
1adc7dc725a58d0b96a093b581ced1cc2d5c6e0a
'2012-05-25T18:13:29-04:00'
describe
'2187232' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBMJ' 'sip-files00011.tif'
0a80b0d3217429571dcfd31aadec28c6
46169e49da8182814e882c520368447182f78235
describe
'38840' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBMK' 'sip-files00084.pro'
7ad2b47c560740881ebef41da4cb1adc
2405da4a2e73a0cd3ed5e910d66d6cda2df51c2a
describe
'2226568' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBML' 'sip-files00248.tif'
15fb1cb33a29c27ae46fc6804dd8b1a5
08240e1428671c2b73ae86fe0bb732bf81266e1b
'2012-05-25T18:26:03-04:00'
describe
'314' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBMM' 'sip-files00030.txt'
f37f9887537719e8c05e52fc0898c38e
f17d2d17c36050514d37686a34b68bbeaaa76b5b
describe
'36582' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBMN' 'sip-files00227.pro'
4877c95069ef95d5cc0ff86865c6f837
fe409d87c10bc1dc88160641cb88f5696536677b
describe
'47994' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBMO' 'sip-files00218thm.jpg'
3005bfa3691d4b19c844194400eded7e
44a39b1d689f4655ace5aa2f73446170cbb04d2a
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBMP' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
ca514c937c29df4022274bd12eb2adeb
b5606f9de3a74d1bfe1a6adf5e4218826142c2b6
'2012-05-25T18:15:15-04:00'
describe
'344066' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBMQ' 'sip-files00228.QC2.jpg'
0ee753eeae6955e521059858a4dda8fe
6388b09bdc3128953bda0b7ffb52a3d9dcc53832
'2012-05-25T18:16:57-04:00'
describe
'41498' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBMR' 'sip-files00198.pro'
ee9c61592800558aa78631a554e33aeb
09e27b8f5face9183e53376441e5c77028f25245
'2012-05-25T18:17:03-04:00'
describe
'410620' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBMS' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
55a338fb0d76c79b07ff2a25c5e2752f
062a4865936429859160baf9327daf4c58066e4f
'2012-05-25T18:20:43-04:00'
describe
'354127' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBMT' 'sip-files00236.QC2.jpg'
ef9a6eec7ed4529d38e65d993b4c882f
ff1be132927a0d5ece1308091897d86e06496ef2
'2012-05-25T18:23:30-04:00'
describe
'267603' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBMU' 'sip-files00196.jp2'
4d052ca33f7e747ebb7ad690166911e6
ff22bec821e4ff49fe40bcfee6fe6f6591a3b0e4
describe
'513649' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBMV' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
4defb7433807355b732181c23946f9aa
7d239edd2603501406b3a0a1b3b277bc03aa61dd
'2012-05-25T18:19:08-04:00'
describe
'381871' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBMW' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
40c2c83d83d2cd95b3339ad562943ce4
0820ca8aaabac14e1469971b343c9951e9ef8a29
describe
'2106432' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBMX' 'sip-files00154.tif'
edc6e8de7ae53ef285a0e36666b943a5
da880de2edd9d5ec3d6be49b5a4855d716cb1a3e
describe
'484819' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBMY' 'sip-files00184.jpg'
5f671711de9ba60aae62b71570b5a172
f7a40d6c6c480c4d4791172003aac13c2f102dd8
describe
'512979' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBMZ' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
eb3cf864cce4c4e334242915da8b0831
2374a6d762e42a76fae08ff4b40f1229732371b1
describe
'285363' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBNA' 'sip-files00265.QC2.jpg'
3f05e810581a72baf73270264b384232
20b7da665980cd3e34bcc6e1646af1ba4a266a73
describe
'22989' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBNB' 'sip-files00281.pro'
8a37a93cbff28806d651326ca1aa9f9b
d609fb7f98539d8b0b23aad38508d6caf035b7c9
describe
'33920' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBNC' 'sip-files00234.pro'
9b44111297efbb91ea75fefd00d2aaae
11c1c6f42cb7a779c141d38d2366d518cf95d0eb
describe
'37524' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBND' 'sip-files00176.pro'
7e272752430de1a7ae180c8974eb5465
a4306512b6db15021ba11f8d848c003105da961a
describe
'365936' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBNE' 'sip-files00241.QC2.jpg'
64e983a823f559afb858df204ece93fb
9bc5539c0d7ccf073b699d551c5441a1e17c5e01
describe
'38938' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBNF' 'sip-files00247.pro'
bcb3bda7cfecf8c844c2a6dc3c10dfbc
48e056579af416f1db8bf35815706d6b0415e13b
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBNG' 'sip-files00217.tif'
c9563ce45913aa21d9999e38b5188b63
02f3953af2b9c5c6fc13bf57522fa624566e4c85
'2012-05-25T18:16:22-04:00'
describe
'494030' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBNH' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
4b13166fa6a009059e63f0fb27c9b49d
364a3ad609d1d8f88aac5adeef0e873cbeb9b202
describe
'51530' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBNI' 'sip-files00208thm.jpg'
ad967c101b4399c5803077ee1532b118
fd6cd42ecae63110b9711a2abe93a5f15010dc96
describe
'18778' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBNJ' 'sip-files00285.pro'
ea55dcd7fdb7c7172b508a1c84e22033
6cfb7c382e9475b9d2175873cec81fbf188feca0
'2012-05-25T18:19:25-04:00'
describe
'48272' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBNK' 'sip-files00131thm.jpg'
09621ec5779f8ed8bd8580431e440072
c3784eb59f9fefb9ddf827854ae159a54c546097
describe
'359436' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBNL' 'sip-files00070.QC2.jpg'
d7c5811e574751654c14031ed971f018
0409dff90c5064fc75ab7ddd5df3105fcf20e172
'2012-05-25T18:19:37-04:00'
describe
'1713' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBNM' 'sip-files00252.txt'
29468f8a80c0d792c7af81a50d637c7c
f3501a1525fed77e404ce09859d5af4f89f9d250
'2012-05-25T18:20:23-04:00'
describe
'51785' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBNN' 'sip-files00145thm.jpg'
7464ee2c7b92bc75186d55a7a4b7f026
6896db889c9f5cd51d5532ac231c93503fdd36ec
'2012-05-25T18:24:39-04:00'
describe
'51695' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBNO' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
9bec5c64d9722a43d9e91349e6516afa
bc1609cfc8d472e95d5d4e3b9e139f312af67d68
'2012-05-25T18:22:58-04:00'
describe
'347839' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBNP' 'sip-files00112.QC2.jpg'
bc44f8fb7295e66a59f20fe14c705952
9974da2a3ecb4b380c6b3b35f18636ca5bd4c0c9
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBNQ' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
e898cde302e5b13c611ea200c13229f2
c8decfe75b0a8925087c1e6a4c671c6b9f444e3f
describe
'1666' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBNR' 'sip-files00245.txt'
9f7929334a2eb774f0f1e742c94af466
a45ee649851703445bcd6853093e54fac382a26a
describe
'1687' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBNS' 'sip-files00119.txt'
636d96e327776783e196629ebc8deef2
53237fc039b4dd18daeecabc202b8a4fba84a9b7
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBNT' 'sip-files00027.tif'
50967beb7d01a4479d9e78c95f53b83f
3f678e304d4ef7396efd4a8923e27da2e6dd7322
describe
'38499' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBNU' 'sip-files00024.pro'
35f21b43e7da07bed9445256da7317ab
4feea04ea1f1fd4d7cc478097bc0f7ca3a5c1f04
'2012-05-25T18:17:40-04:00'
describe
'2428988' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBNV' 'sip-files00296.tif'
6899839e26f003807377de9d1d962f37
801b36593bf2820cd1e60730335a14b61cfc4d66
'2012-05-25T18:17:35-04:00'
describe
'1637' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBNW' 'sip-files00109.txt'
2a483a4750fb4f83402208eb7390e1e3
ea93c439410cf8cee6c1aabd7ed86fa6049eb0bf
describe
'42309' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBNX' 'sip-files00016.pro'
8b0178cf5065d4e0a56a76c5cbdd7df9
b7a93bcc3c06b5b65050ba15146350f6796d342f
describe
'381137' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBNY' 'sip-files00274.QC2.jpg'
f46dde7fedc22e7db529a6c7d6a10c33
e1117d8a249f9966b98d43960c9d193fae31d12f
describe
'21949' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBNZ' 'sip-files00248.pro'
c44206ebe6b4889fa933d85e53bed85d
c8655f1ebf4aa6c0371cee07f021b0c416fbe6b2
describe
'462272' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBOA' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
8bb00a07ca8f88353c2d95d39d6332ec
f67017b2c7b5d9d81acd4c47442a94ac41012bc4
describe
'1682' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBOB' 'sip-files00052.txt'
f1ae163c68276866ed3393f999662a57
02e14fcad7e6fe39e7444e67a1ffa635df6caa9d
'2012-05-25T18:15:57-04:00'
describe
'52229' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBOC' 'sip-files00196thm.jpg'
0a2468485f1d67f61954f735a95dfc54
08081dd99cdd63283633f54843dea6bcbf198691
describe
'459259' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBOD' 'sip-files00291.jpg'
f9eaccde77bc4d4625d4bef006a00bb4
125176a41ebe0f104463f2966d8beb7cd1fad93e
describe
'39094' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBOE' 'sip-files00143.pro'
10faedc2f442954fae10a78efabd3cde
97faede5ec5ab6234c99f1e5a5898d7adc72c318
'2012-05-25T18:21:06-04:00'
describe
'2183528' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBOF' 'sip-files00228.tif'
f391901ae5f4cfc0af27f765ceb3e68b
a4fed9b47abed35c0fe61bc78e03b7d1aae27e03
'2012-05-25T18:19:45-04:00'
describe
'158975' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBOG' 'sip-files00193.QC.jpg'
2e02652c9e55199b716b338263d4ff94
09ed5e8320fdf8b64b99caf29e28d246c49ef27a
'2012-05-25T18:26:08-04:00'
describe
'40137' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBOH' 'sip-files00131.pro'
6d45e52807b3cabed1cdbd580ed39506
c095dc0fd59ed0a0db8f4b5b12ac2844fb882957
describe
'341954' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBOI' 'sip-files00237.QC2.jpg'
da5dba8136d290150a7ed11bc5cef0c9
995547af462c72b141f579783300691430832261
'2012-05-25T18:19:05-04:00'
describe
'49478' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBOJ' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
7d4a6c987bf26b82ec9cc321f4e05a28
e7939a7a0ba504f7e2b347cfe99d8eb047cfbf3e
'2012-05-25T18:20:49-04:00'
describe
'428258' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBOK' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
b0d036a3399d842bf409efa0394a2fbd
6f59b91f948c0b95310185475d7140c8c64ad441
describe
'36180' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBOL' 'sip-files00063.pro'
26145eb39d404a58f4674d309ae338f6
99534b41979b8d6c2ce73afd7c3669a38c67d7d6
describe
'921' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBOM' 'sip-files00266.txt'
a51aafca7c0697dcae12a71be9599358
5a38cac44e01c4a4e5b4c9e1446e40492a63b6f1
'2012-05-25T18:22:23-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBON' 'sip-files00238.tif'
ee67dc814f8e86563f2d0618b9a65916
f9b9e9214f0f625e55c594be06f47da325f2fd3e
'2012-05-25T18:26:26-04:00'
describe
'39572' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBOO' 'sip-files00041.pro'
b36e147d49ce90a6815b406b40e8e5e2
d6d9449fbc845f101cc0fd7b5eb0686b8b954c51
'2012-05-25T18:16:05-04:00'
describe
'484085' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBOP' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
cd6c2dd32f0b9d8f91a37104aebbce31
1016ab678e25bf424174aa84dc7eb2c2e563c94e
describe
'276909' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBOQ' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
2fcde1e68caaa0ebe7118b8261706556
6b1a4b4cb7c728dc4ac236f1b5eba047e530095b
describe
'43511' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBOR' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
e4391b9307cbc9216567fb9ea2f9174a
37d3b35f73e3d399feb5b5b82ad2394417d99ed7
describe
'422243' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBOS' 'sip-files00137.QC2.jpg'
e54b09abcacc99be023688cb2bfa6068
59067fa7957d9f90315aba9126fafdca0f66eb9d
describe
'276971' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBOT' 'sip-files00175.jp2'
d8d047750ef10f709d4080762824b758
76d9efe9645718d5b9c15186995daf1f600d9aa9
'2012-05-25T18:26:29-04:00'
describe
'39990' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBOU' 'sip-files00086.pro'
a38f872420b6941a325d0a09995bfdaa
092c8d798e30fedcdab91349f81ef94b6be29841
describe
'401899' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBOV' 'sip-files00077.QC2.jpg'
ff7468f7ea201f7a2d4f41d50416eb0f
917952d7345687227892cb268e742106a5c7fde8
'2012-05-25T18:26:44-04:00'
describe
'376167' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBOW' 'sip-files00259.QC2.jpg'
f402ed474ce6d09b8f785fe643cb97b0
f1b15f0934fd36c4a4b31a633794b8049b1949f4
describe
'51923' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBOX' 'sip-files00160thm.jpg'
2d14e8e9615e6ad5efa69ec67dc238e7
ce1fd72f30b037c0381cf29f78b4d47ef9a687a0
describe
'37800' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBOY' 'sip-files00238.pro'
136afb7be95161f407b8db07615b6734
1d2ae7b8cf6ea5a4acad12937dccde21adfce4c5
describe
'214855' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBOZ' 'sip-files00030.QC2.jpg'
92a8bb01848fbba31330ed643d3be09c
8d340575672d5d149e1777ff8da692fa1676fb72
describe
'376797' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBPA' 'sip-files00051.QC2.jpg'
056a650397c9416c91b47575dd4d42a3
953d7f5dfb86cfe2b993628a027c33c170a201d3
describe
'2228372' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBPB' 'sip-files00065.tif'
169f3a52eef6d37398082c172f68b5d7
e2e996845b5545fb23180b469a48ed9162949a2a
describe
'43613' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBPC' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
58d7ecdeb047835927b1966078bdb241
2252a24f5ef37c2a349ee17236bc3268ef296b4c
'2012-05-25T18:23:51-04:00'
describe
'158612' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBPD' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
774c9428a982babd41ed85bfcf2f6bb5
b1e4996a06ce94ac0d1c84dfbe5221cb573d402d
describe
'550' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBPE' 'sip-files00061.txt'
e79c186e1ebd082a4840ab4f757eb2f3
6d8c1a83697739c41d4a6a230cd54d8191780437
describe
'1622' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBPF' 'sip-files00213.txt'
8fc62d6c43da08df309c74e38b9dcc62
873cd6b253c2099493b00bf3e6ec7093f4f9039b
describe
'52874' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBPG' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
bddd76e01294967f188b33def4a4e546
6c4ac63cf2dbd24facc0093219a1a5f75fa015b3
'2012-05-25T18:13:33-04:00'
describe
'39876' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBPH' 'sip-files00125.pro'
58984f8aba4fdd6f9439d714e43d682f
8fed5ee55536601455de1bf2bfc907d7ad168f17
'2012-05-25T18:24:33-04:00'
describe
'165081' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBPI' 'sip-files00277.QC.jpg'
0d456f79cf8e930eaa1f18eedc7396d5
1c0a9b6bf535312494c5382c9d5e0c1b32194edd
describe
'2228716' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBPJ' 'sip-files00144.tif'
baef4a2662bac32e104862c61c86e258
0e19fd1e987856f6e026f54608196479d99fc10a
describe
'1046' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBPK' 'sip-files00264.txt'
a8e67d27de9b45ea9f004c0b7b788271
19f6af806112962d5eb64fb69a55518ebe7aa19b
describe
'29174' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBPL' 'sip-files00141.pro'
976320154d63799e32f2a634d17c11eb
97230c967e256f3db9855df181ce0bac3d3e953a
'2012-05-25T18:24:56-04:00'
describe
'162645' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBPM' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
56ed8c13043e5113846560361c0dbaa3
db25320caf228889effda16ed77d17b567ab5cca
'2012-05-25T18:22:56-04:00'
describe
'402028' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBPN' 'sip-files00034.QC2.jpg'
7b184d5a4439fd041936ed1d9a62be79
e9c12f4e5d9afb128e9f888fc173111c4b32f201
'2012-05-25T18:24:49-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBPO' 'sip-files00184.tif'
0719a8988e0b0b38673b9f9bc8d1a93e
ee5c62d75cf351e1644b9c546b8fb261a96eeb66
'2012-05-25T18:15:44-04:00'
describe
'162029' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBPP' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
00dde17e45c71c1d27ac76ba914051d8
f7623f78caf2bcb76fdace9f98ef28a992d4cbde
describe
'455744' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBPQ' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
b1e75e40358c64dc18cb54c2e417639f
9284b07cd311ebd8acdfba0e2dc0f3f60af33c6c
describe
'52838' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBPR' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
13a5c6f2165efac68961acde0af91271
1120d308bf4a143a609592cd784a1a85aff4ce94
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBPS' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
d1e3268ba4fcf647d31d67bdb54094bb
034f352ffe6c61bf8e47fbc353aaffe98675ff0c
'2012-05-25T18:18:35-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBPT' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
25005bd15e7da2e8e28d0a901bef1608
a9f4fa65876680d6ab2d8b5f4ff902ec2e219c8d
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBPU' 'sip-files00248.jp2'
97186e56a774d8b4f5082fd1bfcd0e20
f7a39726b9c84969015e812cdf78a04795137392
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBPV' 'sip-files00012.txt'
feecfde898879d75b38fefc565e02fb6
eb54f206ba267b2bec70dac53b93b4908bce01af
describe
'2198264' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBPW' 'sip-files00202.tif'
1ee6a40e24c832c64f56439545d35283
65ec660c80962236f6a891cc7a5b2eae6e1ff9b6
describe
'1535' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBPX' 'sip-files00063.txt'
10394da68b91348581e3271bdca88e7a
e28a99d608dc2348f8d3ee6ae942347aca02f8a5
'2012-05-25T18:17:36-04:00'
describe
'358496' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBPY' 'sip-files00202.QC2.jpg'
4693c189c8da3df64a6c5064d3b23d9c
97d2471fb421ae008fdc449e96279b640ca1ae4c
'2012-05-25T18:18:47-04:00'
describe
'1592' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBPZ' 'sip-files00218.txt'
e6d975b1aed5e97fffcf8d5af430d3f9
93c86450b2ac21c39bec0675af84b012053b1934
'2012-05-25T18:17:45-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'41830' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBQA' 'sip-files00251.pro'
e56470a3b6a29b247301f1d1ca1ab342
e12abbea9164cb7b6f83e062ce9b518216945362
describe
'404354' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBQB' 'sip-files00164.QC2.jpg'
bd8161e4dd2065ac401c53dadd2d520c
a3d4f29116402bb53f4ef67a2606e8d909db851e
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBQC' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
ecc6ad10b81eb2bc4048acb51f7824e9
8deb3d4e97eed08d88560e98d99b5c0272173dda
describe
'401907' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBQD' 'sip-files00125.QC2.jpg'
15342a90548d884b09aa2cfa299e365f
12ca32dbabf9d9e23ab071606468a2e416952346
describe
'271288' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBQE' 'sip-files00228.jp2'
f46ecbb0764b93e6613336f22fa6d62b
5f22248951d4892e4cc9882edfc15202dbb9ecaa
'2012-05-25T18:14:27-04:00'
describe
'1612' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBQF' 'sip-files00065.txt'
53f39bf007bfe982775dd12212b99e70
1bb7dd3fdff26f00bba2a173bf9dd4e87d566b07
describe
'1586' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBQG' 'sip-files00100.txt'
cd972a61115a155ee558f30589f3076d
f4354ff251291622f429072e9d79d899f4fd2453
describe
'38746' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBQH' 'sip-files00260thm.jpg'
1475acbb4d5f917a2223a99ecb422926
42d573947f326ac458549cd26c5e3da1b4ee3305
describe
'419583' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBQI' 'sip-files00160.QC2.jpg'
fa055fd9feadc39d5fb96825dada6213
fbde2068c1f9311b661f67ffddc4282dc502e866
describe
'43261' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBQJ' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
b2a46019c61a4769ed932dd4e6054b44
b53cd443f97a8f9c643ee1ede7911b87914e0b9f
describe
'165630' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBQK' 'sip-files00164.QC.jpg'
f5f53d02454893b6e06064d19e9a5216
7a62923f7314a16603f11d249898c522c44241e9
describe
'52509' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBQL' 'sip-files00138thm.jpg'
c515b5c20705fa13dca8d2692a7b09f5
0d6bc01b85e6c05b1530d90e253446310284dd70
'2012-05-25T18:23:19-04:00'
describe
'1124' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBQM' 'sip-files00113.txt'
bef5515caa5c622caa38b52a7fbe8956
2b0660e3e19cc0ea212072e9bcdc76fb538f1ba8
describe
'855' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBQN' 'sip-files00112.txt'
736da604b7659d1d83f954f35b370083
c22f27634f150ef19ba1050bd0bad0109f02c416
describe
'397775' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBQO' 'sip-files00277.QC2.jpg'
0fd9cbb4a1394b89d55d4c08ff6a80f2
bd5eb9db24d83d28e39cc9f9c6b67512d24b8d44
describe
'48141' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBQP' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
734aee9a1add749142dd4cc9aaf0ffad
93509b805a074687acf4533518357041cb4573cf
describe
'276914' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBQQ' 'sip-files00159.jp2'
385331c70860304c404591dabecb3b42
e71a25aabcc867639a0140afdc3dd41ea32aeee9
describe
'276978' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBQR' 'sip-files00160.jp2'
b28fb2275d646dcd3591e1abdec1cee3
5b4cf7ff2c928734c2ea1b076e06c6aab2416825
describe
'276964' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBQS' 'sip-files00234.jp2'
fc311f7a8e99434eaeed0bfea9f2582a
3b02517dc6a2f0e036f3eb600adb1275fb864fdb
'2012-05-25T18:23:27-04:00'
describe
'1260' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBQT' 'sip-files00141.txt'
9e0e1704d77ee4433e9046d856d83721
d0bd0e88e6bb525f78c4d13850371d52dc124e76
describe
'2182532' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBQU' 'sip-files00185.tif'
82e790b8a0aefd38d0c3801d9bcd179e
164869d14b3399783d23e2e3dca0a9678980a2d3
'2012-05-25T18:24:14-04:00'
describe
'1701' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBQV' 'sip-files00138.txt'
3e761a715d5b7b854b9a26fcb81514d8
f21b7c2231be69a67dafee3be6b7567eff6ce89c
describe
'498661' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBQW' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
29de7d271d65019d1a91bbe2d2740a71
7a0af6ab20d7503dab5a1b8d28b418d1c990756a
'2012-05-25T18:14:01-04:00'
describe
'501046' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBQX' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
8825059f3fdb904a2d0474601e4ede58
dd83dea1fe73ee16c83b635902321a4daccdd76d
'2012-05-25T18:26:21-04:00'
describe
'273255' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBQY' 'sip-files00202.jp2'
f70494922fff7268968cccee07395392
08b02ace843b204ded84cc479c3026ffe4b748f6
describe
'237' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBQZ' 'sip-files00117.txt'
f82f55ff403e10a9647a8abf090a8f57
4587fbb1730f54cde1578ad573f7cf703eadf83a
describe
Invalid character
'2229212' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBRA' 'sip-files00167.tif'
d2ec0c9e1a9d348bcb9807edd73eea86
0d59e57b6b561c0447751b3d90feb09ea117aca2
describe
'2228984' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBRB' 'sip-files00145.tif'
fca71f1259e3dd2d5afe067b2cd19a39
93e7f81365c2cc800711c0b39bf2fe782ce89822
describe
'37746' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBRC' 'sip-files00046.pro'
7e79a4ad94bc8a23e7ed9a1b7cc8722b
91a693f4b4808c19adedd5761cb6b8d0d24f3987
describe
'1639' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBRD' 'sip-files00220.txt'
fadaf8618e0069e0e93e43e19f18db2e
a05e8ae6645942098e9b96ae0683eecf11e54d8e
describe
'276761' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBRE' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
a65e1bf8a5293771d4f7875a48cc757d
21e929c64d546a98287052a83c5ec70f3a88c642
'2012-05-25T18:23:24-04:00'
describe
'1831' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBRF' 'sip-files00129.txt'
9aa413efea4a3fefa648345b51c30439
623996d5b0ce2c3a2e50c53942deba796edbd1d5
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBRG' 'sip-files00028.txt'
fff9690b258483aa3d04d4c3b68deec5
e0beaddb225cab40182e9e4d9c85f013855a00ae
describe
'487669' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBRH' 'sip-files00161.jpg'
cbe692ad53cd7ac003007fe470d9293d
354dc25974f54dde2363d84fff5fdd970568d437
describe
'576' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBRI' 'sip-files00074.txt'
476ad06b97d55cabeedeb265bf9e4d94
1e3de073c5838892b3b6bb5148d71821bb4d399e
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBRJ' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
0bfd771e61a9f00ed6fc5ce1d96b8c08
8ddbd52fca22ba896393ba89681cec0dca2b50c1
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBRK' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
4c54808974a4b1f49cfe80f608d532fc
126eb26247bf74e786617e55166f4f9cf80ec224
describe
'94004' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBRL' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
4e51d0d5e765485b6a23410468817fbb
96905b8c2f2ae816e2cbab9ebba5b53cc5479a72
describe
'453686' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBRM' 'sip-files00116.QC2.jpg'
6b9c6764e4d27c9046db9dc50a2c1e64
f63b685011f5efd59e9082902722d624e971108a
'2012-05-25T18:21:55-04:00'
describe
'419694' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBRN' 'sip-files00100.QC2.jpg'
e73424df56e1bededad93a54a74b3f23
76d95a773e7de1e6a66169e70f4d2dfa81d3e715
describe
'2183620' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBRO' 'sip-files00208.tif'
a24d9317fe1a198840e965bbefd9c336
1ea3f727ab37c8a35cdf3188152d31f327ba578e
'2012-05-25T18:23:37-04:00'
describe
'2228828' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBRP' 'sip-files00130.tif'
3f24fdf76c91cfe73492910d2d1cd8fb
6cbbc3f14514b5ce176d0f069c539342b65e26eb
'2012-05-25T18:19:11-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBRQ' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
c9ed6b78eb8f35a908ff72afe2c012e2
a7d8bd1882226169dc79988e79c3b6548576e2fa
describe
'143140' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBRR' 'sip-files00246.QC.jpg'
d28b00bb8702241ded2b19eb53441b37
6f878f3bc44ea13660158ad433d85509e3b7a526
'2012-05-25T18:20:54-04:00'
describe
'277022' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBRS' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
424482ebda1c3c3cc57edec408c1963b
b998fad309db9cba3cfbc40c9383cf9d11ea08b7
describe
'489141' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBRT' 'sip-files00157.jpg'
f221195cab5579a39958617b7abad7fa
6f9a99064d06a91b757cfbdabd1fbcffc4b69e32
describe
'1757' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBRU' 'sip-files00202.txt'
71ad3f9f3d370f084a016d1b34994a20
e4c15d639cd91ff99881bc0d8ea1c0daeb67e751
describe
'289228' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBRV' 'sip-files00287.jp2'
9eb4f513691bfbe52db2631bec9c2545
775a0cc6c9e6a1072521045adf3642685a0f42d4
describe
'296463' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBRW' 'sip-files00003.jp2'
045dc386b94d0ead2104202636c5eb8e
8fb2eb9901f9ed09629954b21bc0dc5d80911289
describe
'160479' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBRX' 'sip-files00288.QC.jpg'
56dbafc4c99167979952af94542fa3b9
ca063f529a51a40a2531c38e5bb77e1d9a157eb2
'2012-05-25T18:17:26-04:00'
describe
'155037' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBRY' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
a0697f55b2b2ce7ad903924e9ca00d26
7e1b9bf4aee21463ad0d9f4cdb813b1c5585cbca
describe
'363740' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBRZ' 'sip-files00276.QC2.jpg'
71c2f8323c9b8cf44996b6cc7ac61162
5ebecaa27a617f1d086f430d7de8d9a115649ed1
describe
'468465' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBSA' 'sip-files00190.jpg'
745f9d630aac228d46bdd7c4d6678164
81b5603ade0adfd77856ec2eb70a440a05db411d
describe
'36477' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBSB' 'sip-files00067.pro'
ca4f58654b9a2a8f46d8898e06db4add
96ec89926be5756791b18ee932eda280eec6c13f
'2012-05-25T18:25:11-04:00'
describe
'385725' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBSC' 'sip-files00196.QC2.jpg'
0d928e5c39655434a50cf4d276a7009e
90c92d48055e09104946ebac147fe5703325e03e
describe
'419183' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBSD' 'sip-files00130.QC2.jpg'
80c222d388092dda48f2f69cd9c90275
67c2944c987cf2daa2901d1ac839811afc06c636
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBSE' 'sip-files00172.jp2'
71cc67dd7f2afdf5da773236fe9ab8c0
d90970d2fc316f7bd980511b747b2c4df1ba8778
describe
'472098' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBSF' 'sip-files00267.jpg'
b0054e21f924894a25c7aa00eab3e81e
41c1df4601de6771df2e0b1e111f17a7d2de73a8
describe
'291506' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBSG' 'sip-files00229.QC2.jpg'
656625678ba07c9a48fd79b6476b589a
8347561a074ff51c0a6568e5a100d9dbe04d91e6
describe
'348529' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBSH' 'sip-files00185.QC2.jpg'
008f110fd864296a8c637d56cc1686c3
616f2a12dad859061c5cffc7b317ea1a883da37f
'2012-05-25T18:15:34-04:00'
describe
'39462' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBSI' 'sip-files00191.pro'
86e7343d42b74c06bcb1e39e0b92f8ee
af73211cadba95706567d9463412d6fc8d92127c
'2012-05-25T18:26:13-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBSJ' 'sip-files00256.jp2'
ad54200d4081d68e99291b02671c54a0
b064cae892c117146735ddb694951cf55fe1adfe
describe
'2226796' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBSK' 'sip-files00112.tif'
29e276366119e9f92361fb38a733e206
7a0a61c52c5ea5a11b73590c57d5744c50ed6565
describe
'50795' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBSL' 'sip-files00281thm.jpg'
57669abaf29c6620b1f8d20fe588f6c7
47857e233d773763a01c5eb129b745eb80a10720
describe
'2229020' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBSM' 'sip-files00024.tif'
590586bb4373ad3e1f46e9658d0a6594
f956a61ac50f1c1415e30c7e0442e9b96ca34f3f
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBSN' 'sip-files00231.tif'
9c87927315c8c473dfc4c93d0c11ec22
1d9930b85181b96d596de5ea63c5e75a78be4d75
'2012-05-25T18:17:49-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBSO' 'sip-files00211.jp2'
01d59a99159565575c3ee66f54fd534d
bc73854902a0ce0847aabf4c6edde1954863e840
'2012-05-25T18:24:45-04:00'
describe
'50208' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBSP' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
1c7e26b840a2011fe16f5ca0bb9ae2ab
dcb7c9bf576a912e84c1ed21494844a93a8dc79c
describe
'50810' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBSQ' 'sip-files00178thm.jpg'
fb308febc5d376087162ab2d990157ec
14f6e475ae9d61833e7f3cf6f3e3856efa6e45d6
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBSR' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
013adfc899aba8fc1f8b5f8d8c5a5823
4819fa80484cab72f1782b5607afe3b447eec028
describe
'40441' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBSS' 'sip-files00120.pro'
87a6a85536a29b69b85ba13d550f706d
17f86d21d54e4aca3a871e29d6470775340eff30
'2012-05-25T18:18:49-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBST' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
2f4bc37f6e3c3005fde5eec76c5a5a2f
656ff8ea29e666772d3ff9ea18151f67e5d7e061
describe
'276927' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBSU' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
aa39f355ef197a1bc2f6a77ceda15994
9ed5013784e1d9ffe0ed42277026381c1f338f73
'2012-05-25T18:15:42-04:00'
describe
'21912' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBSV' 'sip-files00260.pro'
feb8c79599a76b969ad4d7b2e41f9d0c
f0f38d23ed7feb489e93e8c078f1b0669a46ce57
'2012-05-25T18:15:39-04:00'
describe
'53962' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBSW' 'sip-files00288thm.jpg'
b2d8d97b33af7d9a5a773a7fd22f9206
13f9c2348cdf6629c1c1a209cd9c4763752f3701
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBSX' 'sip-files00174.jp2'
d59ec101cb63cc3863fddbb7bdfb1c33
813ef4efb0c0fa878936aa8ee34fbbbd4c45eafc
describe
'40192' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBSY' 'sip-files00249thm.jpg'
a1df18a39a7ea1d15fd8f8ea03bde8ec
6a936928cd8540bf628f9a6e2afea7b9bba3e909
'2012-05-25T18:18:52-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBSZ' 'sip-files00263thm.jpg'
9e4583f464dee0491bb158ab95c144c9
584a8021a2ef1a4495cea6a1bd0db94b645e3ec5
describe
'460560' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBTA' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
a7817847c1f416c15b39510e808e66a8
896f79d58bf5eddf96aa9e0ee73b88d22f35b538
'2012-05-25T18:21:17-04:00'
describe
'161657' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBTB' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
604f263d4ccc320410ea5d61c6d9e648
27a51ae44b07e519fc26040333500e47e2239f5a
describe
'167209' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBTC' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
c6cbdcf6480589b42f1663945ee7abc8
c610b9b41836cb42c73f780c8d03d6d7b09f4236
'2012-05-25T18:17:27-04:00'
describe
'8003212' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBTD' 'sip-files00001.tif'
f1c7658bd920544a88f0b299b5ddc5b2
5753537307a53b13471fcb4b57cf1b8133f5e67b
describe
'38121' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBTE' 'sip-files00218.pro'
92be14f3d37946c62bdd42069789caa8
fa467c248da1ee65446b5411197d85f6272b37b9
describe
'26899' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBTF' 'sip-files00180.pro'
75ed1a56e62c2295e8e163c1fb90285c
cc1830b8c4fd806e5824fc899c5f3732cf6c82f1
'2012-05-25T18:26:07-04:00'
describe
'2185704' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBTG' 'sip-files00141.tif'
f31b10c82ca8eef14a76cc0fa306d124
649d60aa6b0046ce0e6941d5127c4afc040576ed
describe
'440074' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBTH' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
1c63f9f3f401991afd963252e73ca4ac
5589f646d3cab489945db63f57a8ade5d4a0a02c
describe
'1526' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBTI' 'sip-files00222.txt'
393b41c2577aecb59c7f80f137622646
98c89f1f3d42524d6285272a17f7a68411770b9f
describe
'116126' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBTJ' 'sip-files00240.QC.jpg'
7e92129ba69570f86079f3354c158822
3a1a50f02586e6496126b57c1cb700f9e6398f01
'2012-05-25T18:24:20-04:00'
describe
'441489' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBTK' 'sip-files00225.jpg'
7657e64096cefda96a6899005071f176
ba15666c9f6647df8700a7428ae84b3c2edaf976
describe
'53004' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBTL' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
48227267470b2f7b6644ed38a06cabe6
e38bd5659070265da39777c7aec1e54680a2e00a
describe
'49310' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBTM' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
e4c8b5df58b25dcf81305e5440c54b7c
50ab3c998cd1e2990999939fb36da60d81ec0022
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBTN' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
dc4fe009cccb22301270d87630d0516e
90e580bee58914297eba136f9ad55892e9f2bea5
'2012-05-25T18:26:11-04:00'
describe
'13109' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBTO' 'sip-files00268.pro'
b670275340f68f2670209bc900e9285f
16bd601e5fc73827819d6445f5fe51370e3e376b
'2012-05-25T18:25:38-04:00'
describe
'104578' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBTP' 'sip-files00154.QC.jpg'
faf3b75780486d05e0043c661624ac0e
06bc5bfc1021255f4d238741a7487490815cf155
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBTQ' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
f6564c227ee50ba36ef93cadecca9d16
2c9227d6a304d9dc0494b1873396c01a732bef3a
'2012-05-25T18:18:21-04:00'
describe
'1584' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBTR' 'sip-files00174.txt'
0078367552b20280006069e35506353c
9f13cf32af579f312dd6f822ecc7f570ef11d11e
'2012-05-25T18:15:04-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBTS' 'sip-files00091.txt'
358652f0853bb6b1f52302bb33fe1481
6b30e838d755c30d82b67fd6257de3810b00e4c6
describe
'53570' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBTT' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
3af826041e67bfff4f36544bcbc725be
6b9099a5bf5dcba476add3a3bd87d571e3872748
describe
'1702' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBTU' 'sip-files00208.txt'
985564f30e6475253e7c916af1207bc9
d8c187f98fa5aa3ba8b6f27e99ff86f51bddb633
describe
'2176580' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBTV' 'sip-files00013.tif'
6d91d2cc1a3a91e24dd69bc244fdc1b7
27aa718a4ffdd5ba98ab7a0d1f91b22d9c7036af
describe
'276952' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBTW' 'sip-files00205.jp2'
e5c2a274bdb435c42427fbc990b3df1e
5fb1a3e79fde5be1a32884bd8e4d8903f6b538df
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBTX' 'sip-files00237.jp2'
0e98ded970303860552f9e12eb537c3b
6ccf4985049db2d343b47a7bd6af9964bb529ce2
'2012-05-25T18:17:55-04:00'
describe
'352573' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBTY' 'sip-files00287.QC2.jpg'
91f60f80d361844c3541152b57114a52
733f8f17b6572800977a1b69067b14faae38303f
'2012-05-25T18:23:06-04:00'
describe
'37151' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBTZ' 'sip-files00115.pro'
0b62c275adc0d572da8ece85713f2a7c
fdc02aba035777bbf26c9ca3bf8928f804935882
describe
'169269' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBUA' 'sip-files00161.QC.jpg'
ea34fd08beeae2d345735d017f229584
aa3c6e921f792dd54e9c731151de24fbf83089c4
describe
'353573' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBUB' 'sip-files00204.QC2.jpg'
66e94e7a952ec52096605b5bf254f972
af4bc4bb8b8306f0c306afe18e77f4ad7a2a1206
describe
'376976' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBUC' 'sip-files00213.QC2.jpg'
0c18404426ac76982373c650b003de25
8ff7208e6ebd43985ce3bb0d458640db39e2d4ab
describe
'2227552' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBUD' 'sip-files00121.tif'
85e0df20e00bb0cf24df5115bd4b27ac
ecb22d3b9ac62dff2db69e7628b06e3821247b9e
describe
'377944' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBUE' 'sip-files00178.QC2.jpg'
2504fc529aac2cb2df2f304e456b31b4
e1eb3119f42c1ec99885606124d3b157a8434485
describe
'2436784' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBUF' 'sip-files00007a.tif'
d88ee5e4609b9d2e3e06aae54dfd3abf
00e99a8f80a42910004ebd88802c35b5966e58c4
'2012-05-25T18:26:18-04:00'
describe
'2292' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBUG' 'sip-files00006.pro'
b2a2002d9a947f8a0fa3202232170ec9
aad9a276432022eb545d6abeaed4a7280ff817f6
describe
'54472' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBUH' 'sip-files00192thm.jpg'
ad806ff2f727972220038459e00b1fa2
1f2cee6eedf83b4bb96deb1d00e51f21319c6e3c
describe
'168307' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBUI' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
3445e2079d1b6e5aeb317e55b003fbd3
fd40b712ffd5f648b2f6c7b569c956934b4b66f5
describe
'2228456' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBUJ' 'sip-files00197.tif'
6f2a4400028349df9538b10cf92e1a8d
a35664c2a142a4dc87cd0eed57c03864696c6f2a
describe
'333296' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBUK' 'sip-files00238.QC2.jpg'
6b12f38aac40150c685b8703622aab4b
e92ac746b6cbe0b42040465390bdbad14b04fc1f
describe
'50504' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBUL' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
47de408b4ef7714d5fb295d3b6d9fc92
70f1cb15faebe4d700473a7ec8db1af0e44ed753
describe
'47802' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBUM' 'sip-files00287thm.jpg'
b39c55e659920bf0300ea413a39445b9
046fcbf3f66e6b556272652f8ed7a4dd8a90f989
'2012-05-25T18:25:08-04:00'
describe
'118801' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBUN' 'sip-files00229.QC.jpg'
e400109a68f90d5e1f44921005c7ffdb
a10800714347f8b7635ead1a17547fe7dbf47318
describe
'51386' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBUO' 'sip-files00164thm.jpg'
e8d7029f47f99bcd3caa589ba5ee5832
cf2d3942126c4690b930817da09c92c1e00f9955
'2012-05-25T18:20:05-04:00'
describe
'438665' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBUP' 'sip-files00105.QC2.jpg'
54a0e8e91cdec0c966ddc085543c619f
93788b339b8c3719484e620af9999c2f553e7794
'2012-05-25T18:23:52-04:00'
describe
'471002' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBUQ' 'sip-files00164.jpg'
1d7a4fbdb4d59b31332e90f19b8a3886
5d2d05418c4e3c98d47947b5d3749af074f31651
describe
'511777' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBUR' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
721d976a214dca2f7de3817a33aabd1b
2be29d5b2cd16a93bac9ff8ddc62eea39174306d
describe
'1620' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBUS' 'sip-files00223.txt'
c936a2186425f6a608a4b0d239bb7899
327483f4fb52d107b05b7589ab6363b4ad3692f8
describe
'270443' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBUT' 'sip-files00227.jp2'
08629a7637480231c52480e3eef86d98
19038eb6db4dbbbffb8a4735eb2053358109a0da
describe
'1577' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBUU' 'sip-files00206.txt'
880bfcff3b96f25d09308ae1b89820cb
fd9637e50f794f896c7b8671a755601af5b6ad86
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBUV' 'sip-files00223.jp2'
315ffd0ba85d755eabfb36fdc1ba268e
b7bb15fc2b0da4720db2cc0d42a30104ed1c2be2
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBUW' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
be21196f109642df1de8e7eaed0fd6c1
13688283034c25d74547f2f5c9997209efee0559
describe
'153218' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBUX' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
66af08408fe301330c7c7898b8e3688b
b2e415b3917669145e9478dea2958a3088417148
'2012-05-25T18:14:10-04:00'
describe
'2134228' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBUY' 'sip-files00134.tif'
c20d6bc68f9d9730f8e9a12396367372
e217d98256db9cc9c11049c2536da9998a956cf6
describe
'254945' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBUZ' 'sip-files00006.jp2'
75ad856795914fc3ec436372b9d5bf65
888585d0c8586136ebed484bc8d534b6ca1f384a
'2012-05-25T18:17:53-04:00'
describe
'1630' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBVA' 'sip-files00111.txt'
4d1ed6a3bf271bbf99722471a9547a3c
2ab12b33c719df5939ff34f5a363a4425a4dd7d2
describe
'53168' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBVB' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
5fef84a8c6c423b309ae93dd3bed202e
f70f9dc2eb4778a25ff2ad3d89874ad85642ab7c
describe
'6130480' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBVC' 'sip-files00006.tif'
c26abee2d97dc1b79d64f49d3f02fec9
d9f968f943dfc56c37706d4f1fb3404ed13b9c7c
'2012-05-25T18:22:24-04:00'
describe
'917' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBVD' 'sip-files00248.txt'
f709ee02baef2cd76cb58cbba76ed1b9
b2b8ddf170328b4760cc60100e3a96d088289f1d
describe
'1671' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBVE' 'sip-files00201.txt'
4e13dacfabd5cbdba720adf44c7f9547
02981b6f9dfe81d6cbb6f6bbecdfa11e76d6ecc7
describe
'165760' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBVF' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
a8a82b6b9d7f49d14867deabc4889d3f
3daa4497155f0cd349cdaa62ee5525608574b4db
describe
'40795' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBVG' 'sip-files00026.pro'
45d34fe58e418ad4172c982eccbd26de
71612ef2441f0f24d6e498ce40838f955cf589ef
describe
'42642' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBVH' 'sip-files00044.pro'
e0e69362ae53612c6fffebe5ed5aa822
f5c40ef8a3ebdb61a1d3c16ec985d11da8e4b9f1
describe
'170404' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBVI' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
5b73df1f3db062daf9edcc3a2f421adf
705553494a7637669e574307847a80b8de4b08c8
describe
'1672' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBVJ' 'sip-files00225.txt'
26733c827db818316257c42a74a25553
e5e1dbee3f5c1e976156f8f06def5d253c1da426
'2012-05-25T18:14:18-04:00'
describe
'43148' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBVK' 'sip-files00253.pro'
e05d829a318ed58e451a5b4a5c0a24a0
371a6bf4e3d89192210bdfcd376b5202b59bff15
describe
'348740' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBVL' 'sip-files00260.jpg'
f7a1f7783e73b7e2054cf20ba668d833
50b90b8f38ffa11d8689b4957e16cd598f6d8137
describe
'357782' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBVM' 'sip-files00172.QC2.jpg'
3a1ed3ff125f0f0c82e7e25d67b7f3cf
b2a80d6e47a24ad1424f78bb1f0fb5cac1c89aa6
describe
'306921' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBVN' 'sip-files00286.jp2'
c075344a99e01c3e25c9565050ef0f4f
edb1bf0823d42d782fb3525dfe2b1cc710535db6
'2012-05-25T18:21:52-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBVO' 'sip-files00278.jp2'
c9a4254a65c2fb448e6ea6c225abd8d2
bf42c3443e53f7c135c5611433bbaa9db17ede37
'2012-05-25T18:20:31-04:00'
describe
'330184' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBVP' 'sip-files00294.jp2'
2279d3cd2f7da4ed72b08b163524bbf1
d24fd41798e876778aaf04b4b674ceec9353e652
'2012-05-25T18:21:40-04:00'
describe
'465777' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBVQ' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
9d10bbd0f12daaede59973b6ec7a62a7
26ce8c65f28ec469f8a99cad8ca025eee14a91ab
describe
'1579' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBVR' 'sip-files00115.txt'
b7d2ce8f766e9e9720147878e316d774
e9b8736fc6f01ee2f178de1d2370269ec4df0f6b
describe
'18562' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBVS' 'sip-files00274.pro'
b62b0ba2a52d021577ba3178ba9b3ff8
ef18ad588a5c22f8ed61e9c6b83d014f0d9e7246
describe
'350962' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBVT' 'sip-files00216.jpg'
89f9df3f878285a15acfdd9fe270ed8e
678fb9355819e638fc9e66223595ba2e291b80e9
describe
'406569' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBVU' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
7d84c23c73f6ef2f78a0c28efc4363a6
c420fb06cdb46f378936282f3353620ae797a168
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBVV' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
7fd8fefc0ac69f90fd99955ecc36f936
a0591b0601668e006290c26ab43c05569221628d
describe
'2227528' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBVW' 'sip-files00240.tif'
f3c18e41e6da16e8fae8f6b54fa6f27b
9dd2dcbd8541ef059be84201360852a5da82a6d1
describe
'40263' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBVX' 'sip-files00102.pro'
64e1556b9d48ae7c4bade5884843f369
aa95ccde4954e3497533105f7564db4e3b8eb43e
describe
'47576' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBVY' 'sip-files00285thm.jpg'
c2bfb83f5d5e2f7a2d4996967044999e
d3be55ebddb44d5de69c5ed5e07ee808d2aa132d
describe
'433156' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBVZ' 'sip-files00285.jpg'
2d702055d9ed6342edb6c1f6ff5ec430
b29ac31d26a84d1f1a3f1b093f559facf971fe3a
'2012-05-25T18:16:39-04:00'
describe
'430733' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBWA' 'sip-files00235.jpg'
22a01945f900bb55206c76dc657cd6f5
653203187ea1578c55605d9f5e7d6f01024f9809
'2012-05-25T18:18:01-04:00'
describe
'269489' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBWB' 'sip-files00201.jp2'
97952f544a634fc3e40ec5503e126a24
bd44739722154e112e0f442036626d4c1caaa698
'2012-05-25T18:20:29-04:00'
describe
'432044' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBWC' 'sip-files00156.QC2.jpg'
9db41addf91dda2083bd8bc19e81d1cd
83f36ad53dffa3a9d85bfe1f7d74ea68164d9ddd
'2012-05-25T18:20:20-04:00'
describe
'23778' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBWD' 'sip-files00010.pro'
6c691e21b66efade9a968f89e5bd3bd1
493198cd8e91dd30e649dedc1cf143d6916a20a5
describe
'276939' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBWE' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
3e352a341c67498c54a25b02b194be95
cc766d03cb6284be45505f1f6bbec655677d042f
'2012-05-25T18:25:44-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBWF' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
bf54f699a7a607c82010ce2c815a1b4e
821963184985551c467d9d61c6b8c0e309c4458b
describe
'445966' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBWG' 'sip-files00178.jpg'
66402f004dd9f31ab0c4c73576b4baac
13f50c96fc0321aed0e1b553b54e548315ec31c9
describe
'40749' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBWH' 'sip-files00230thm.jpg'
0ec820888949dc3b41b1ecfc615c69b4
18a2ddddfa2de9926f60f67f522bd63738cb8fe1
describe
'147675' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBWI' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
e1613a11f9a9d5364a06a4299f798357
4b9a50e55800415def8fec18a6c16e2ac83fb3de
describe
'2228648' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBWJ' 'sip-files00232.tif'
7154b23a96b856530e083a91bf833a78
5f96e8626b204e04bd27df6245e7b371f7f43d09
describe
'39612' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBWK' 'sip-files00294thm.jpg'
48dc1f378469cb190154de6ed8c5ed84
43a0cbbf2f9a202067b92b06b18feaa195a51639
describe
'168413' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBWL' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
750813d8def549cb120ab64f237de488
9ffa15e3cf4fd6ffc5e55f89361a7a93bb89c12c
'2012-05-25T18:16:02-04:00'
describe
'394654' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBWM' 'sip-files00185.jpg'
e2e6782b8b9f9f8174dca7189fe2a355
30de2faca6ecac80381cb8ebf0151cc5b7df3e1a
describe
'2153808' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBWN' 'sip-files00092.tif'
31bab28fb9e595194c020bb0ce2632da
f52967639360c52761a59ca613213ea84f609125
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBWO' 'sip-files00212.txt'
b1f736acbc7b147e4a339389512ac3b6
c9234611403c34124ed3ef3e0f3c1c4eaf87cb2c
describe
'414197' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBWP' 'sip-files00227.jpg'
3ee8aae89724cff2056cfcc5e184aa08
e47bd32e189e3364e87e00e66fc264c497988847
describe
'63919' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBWQ' 'sip-files00005.QC.jpg'
d1b0ca0df107a6c86686948780c7ba57
1ddcef7915737e743ccd6f4a82e96156830c9410
'2012-05-25T18:24:29-04:00'
describe
'1790' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBWR' 'sip-files00016.txt'
991545c6b8cd9bd20f39b107f1603b05
fc94506243599ddd1a9e8187f4981c59095a8701
describe
'276995' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBWS' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
ef252c996a026c9dd3d3cb45aa382b53
0d932b6aaf9127b6458ec7afece93511706d1f1f
describe
'2291924' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBWT' 'sip-files00009.tif'
bcdfd43de4de8bd50b46f7fd0860e03f
0ce5436522295e1e0822ca6990d31f811398f19a
'2012-05-25T18:18:57-04:00'
describe
'448484' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBWU' 'sip-files00150.jpg'
a5a488f75677e63d009101528537012a
a3bb46fe256219a6a84143bfbd348e631ab1b053
'2012-05-25T18:25:17-04:00'
describe
'29153' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBWV' 'sip-files00273.pro'
2678a4a04c6a2bbf7f5be48f2ffeb7d3
cf4181bf564a03414d24b9710c6809effbd2b51c
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBWW' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
76fb689694f723d36ede352ab9e35a9b
ac8299cc480e8a7abb086592fdf4dc885fefe3e1
'2012-05-25T18:20:30-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBWX' 'sip-files00271thm.jpg'
b97655a4804c6cc3b5c34baee74bc101
f245acc6c8067b7da729d44bbf143c36c55d40a5
describe
'433212' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBWY' 'sip-files00221.jpg'
629fa414a437830b266cb313f403f7d5
4627a9551c617e3aa501593aa6e5f87b0fa86ffb
describe
'165659' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBWZ' 'sip-files00262.QC.jpg'
4ab2aaf1ddec0eb88d63240723fb1874
0025a32ff6697518429ceff6f7ce699b68ab5847
describe
'42483' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBXA' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
cad80c34aa5ea92c70ae75f9edf20c70
2f6537d6b49f8bc1c8b281f0726d09ce0eeee5a4
'2012-05-25T18:25:24-04:00'
describe
'463407' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBXB' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
1a29de24db1cfe21cbcaf3f0375e93bc
3bd5e93e705e7e0e022a804e41e86f98481e9763
describe
'50149' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBXC' 'sip-files00245thm.jpg'
10901c2e9feb402df2544f7d4135d0f6
3ead86965cc372ad7aeeab1b15704a222dc4c47a
describe
'463967' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBXD' 'sip-files00102.QC2.jpg'
22cbde181b86ce519e0241e4fc61b10f
3c9bd512873c6f8a1191330011f2d38cc09752e3
describe
'387407' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBXE' 'sip-files00272.jpg'
83973c208a01d631786497ebf864584c
11f1c34fbdb921bb96e1168e9e71bdcc4b090452
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBXF' 'sip-files00185.jp2'
e8605af1a78b6aa41f0706bcc744bc81
9e1bd452c4d8913b40209c27856efce15a706f61
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBXG' 'sip-files00266.jp2'
34fe905eb16ab51ab3f18d1e397d1a22
065d273645095aa49ee2152ec51881aec7e6d963
'2012-05-25T18:21:43-04:00'
describe
'42257' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBXH' 'sip-files00033.pro'
dd6a23f532afecd0eb44000019b17ac1
ab0aa28a07a94999b30d8e51ee530789b09fce72
describe
'411788' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBXI' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
6b25cf738c8615edaf05af5bb7ab2e4c
1306b5b088044ff5e87aafb9184c911b2d9daeaa
describe
'16637' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBXJ' 'sip-files00279.pro'
0611e72ada2905fbc8b50d041e9cac87
6721413f8d346402aac0a28fbe745195165cf170
describe
'172859' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBXK' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
51ac0d9951fc6ab711f2295e0b378afd
60021dff80d2ddec5c007069ae74caf93bd8d651
describe
'377573' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBXL' 'sip-files00251.QC2.jpg'
88c9bd6efcd25897953b9f6c177ed69c
d01e65d47b7da45d7daee73c89c03aa1bff92515
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBXM' 'sip-files00153.jp2'
8782bf01fd1d0e8715e6f0e021591b61
d56938f125ccd4ab990b1210934bccccf9681fdd
describe
'170749' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBXN' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
33cc74e42c5e5cf83d859c3710a07c7b
ce107e90e141129189a85a7fecb5ea2ff5f26195
describe
'2161732' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBXO' 'sip-files00096.tif'
08313af316cc1925d3f4e32150ed63a9
889cb1de1d251e6463f4954999d7051b0aca4589
describe
'151862' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBXP' 'sip-files00275.QC.jpg'
9113b809460c1feeafe173a5ea708839
abd7b4ad3f442c53f66ef6015c876dc8006ee130
'2012-05-25T18:24:11-04:00'
describe
'457954' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBXQ' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
b307da485672fde132cc53cae9e41c1f
a3a41e4458248f193bdca4505dcc67fc5efa784c
describe
'1567' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBXR' 'sip-files00256.txt'
12ba75454e3d3be24cd266b353480bd2
68a16aa86f28449fb85f93dad9adcd772c604736
'2012-05-25T18:24:22-04:00'
describe
'151699' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBXS' 'sip-files00233.QC.jpg'
54c122fa42c6902ebd1061298cefd596
ad0c4ad464c09066d298952d8fe9a3c5e4a0d073
describe
'1641' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBXT' 'sip-files00162.txt'
8408ac39e3aff972145823f321a26de9
79b0b23cf383d08f61addb2ee3d2e664aecd68c8
describe
'2228936' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBXU' 'sip-files00279.tif'
481ba733c8c8c1ea1f03ee0cc601acd7
c1a6045ed342700a08c8bf7f5fa9d5b05891a540
describe
'65323' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBXV' 'sip-files00295thm.jpg'
88df956e5b1ba81d2c0840fb0b7f994c
99e10372719e09a97f6b03330ea384d116b49c78
describe
'276968' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBXW' 'sip-files00273.jp2'
b31921e087576b2a726f07ea2317a85d
698c330ecdbe2d479b7b6bcc2df0b5ae0425022d
'2012-05-25T18:17:30-04:00'
describe
'389080' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBXX' 'sip-files00257.QC2.jpg'
aa85447b5a8d845acf02e7a610d4bcfd
2b7e48ceba0dc1dec6d607ae36a2a407853e9c53
describe
'40775' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBXY' 'sip-files00138.pro'
ab930e447cd079843d431e98a9989624
129e5d1c361d06ab3e009dfa39aca903ff5f0ec1
'2012-05-25T18:21:12-04:00'
describe
'271390' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBXZ' 'sip-files00208.jp2'
f8427b0aafc609b10b3e82c49755072e
bd0db69bd2c2707782de28e3c7ae219a1c537b91
describe
'433322' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBYA' 'sip-files00167.QC2.jpg'
4a269202ee92ffd71df92e23b07d0eb4
79436db9c7eb414a370977e1ccdf72d672c150ce
'2012-05-25T18:14:57-04:00'
describe
'159015' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBYB' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
31160a6ec7127c6d13a556c129668e31
1eb31ea9c2485588c607a47b247f30f7ecfd7146
describe
'48894' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBYC' 'sip-files00200thm.jpg'
c5c441dad39ed4a198a5bb045a8642a5
c28a929fe6f96ad56c3588aa50c9af8adb2a8df5
describe
'408630' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBYD' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
3daad8bbd44c3529b4914863d9f7cc99
749b95a0742763545fea8bb7ce2717ecff30b318
'2012-05-25T18:16:00-04:00'
describe
'2229180' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBYE' 'sip-files00035.tif'
232405208105cc94d3ffc4d63984231f
84048ff8feaf2538c8d73586f472f38c2038bbfc
describe
'42825' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBYF' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
019fdc5448f9f7f775b8e59ba6d8b73d
ab04ded9c2acfb63ac64d7240cf303c102740184
describe
'162233' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBYG' 'sip-files00175.QC.jpg'
a0280d22b142400f22fc7755879dee5f
83711188dd060b6577caa120783b146660cf1fb1
describe
'52406' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBYH' 'sip-files00228thm.jpg'
e9b8122a5360662c8cd5458f3eff24e7
066701b14866226b84c4ea4ad6767ace8004cd6d
'2012-05-25T18:15:28-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBYI' 'sip-files00026.txt'
5c299eebd9412fb9e3b702a452d4338b
28d36956022482e7701cc93f8036cadd7d40a16c
describe
'52227' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBYJ' 'sip-files00137thm.jpg'
6f23e0020c251d7428ff649656a6d3d8
da8e658874b516820f8a1340795bab6a24a537ae
describe
'38288' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBYK' 'sip-files00002thm.jpg'
6c05338f2ce03051d8af991f0e1c76d2
2972c3a9b866b130eb600b9ac1497418a90d61cd
describe
'2229428' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBYL' 'sip-files00282.tif'
3992d92b972bb76525ee66a3cfdec69b
bdd3c7a5a24ff3bf686e7ce7cacdea893f142e2d
describe
'394225' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBYM' 'sip-files00170.QC2.jpg'
94ade289a765fb67b2fcc2e738f2b7f9
f87e1692753eb0b8da3e7df1fefa4454a76f1684
describe
'51030' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBYN' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
cbadb816c6cf6ceaccf7c3a1f619c0f7
a49eb5d98c1eb4c3e1e934efdab8fa3c99452845
describe
'20667' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBYO' 'sip-files00291.pro'
d1d318f72be740f81cb91d25e0ccd6bd
de9c2e5cf8cb5b423ce475fa3c4d179d161b1f93
describe
'99412' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBYP' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
ec5faa36c2a45e6563f82d4c68b8418b
e075b8bdd04827a6f8ed8c3e54c7504cc2d3e16e
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBYQ' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
927ac4af015cc8ed54688b739f7da5cc
dd9deab92ac3cf90e9a1e2a6e7c667ecd70e68b9
describe
'37715' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBYR' 'sip-files00256.pro'
bda7e3e61d6f503c0c923ad03799ce46
d050477ac417b3a8073245a2521d1b2327dae8fc
describe
'52053' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBYS' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
7495122c0bb21fd67493ff6e757ac205
40324e593a4f358afb2958ffb3a25960eb4632d0
describe
'160912' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBYT' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
de86bd66a731ddf8b68f6fd3e879404a
c109f240d62a3e30af7c939afe0e5a6f74080b46
'2012-05-25T18:22:53-04:00'
describe
'2228608' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBYU' 'sip-files00170.tif'
fd29da46da32b5818e4ddba37f6a732b
f7db900a529affff85df65cf4b31b3446757601b
describe
'1765' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBYV' 'sip-files00116.txt'
cc9b2ba359ccc18a00874765c2b6c281
ab67225897f3790f7236f128a45b259147a8af99
describe
'37' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBYW' 'sip-files00292.txt'
f0d4d16210a8fd95f67d77c1b5c60d1d
d5249cbf413e62e39ff480f92196d96377b0ee6c
describe
Invalid character
'276917' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBYX' 'sip-files00290.jp2'
9b8b4ed5ca2182834173b5d26bbe8844
736f511abe49bbbd91fd8bf2dba7f4b27f092e88
describe
'1562' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBYY' 'sip-files00176.txt'
6e51214992b8fa94ed0c46cbbefa2476
2963f28a4c18c9e924b5f4dab6ad3a533eba60e1
describe
'2229304' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBYZ' 'sip-files00158.tif'
dbb3c3bd3137155ac91659990f4a8a6e
621e00f18d383a84b62618f23203815cf1e9c044
describe
'1767' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBZA' 'sip-files00137.txt'
859857c2da68cb35d47de4191f7aefe5
d6caf129d828b6260d5fd4380ad5d641a68136bf
describe
'271696' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBZB' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
2c58e3f53b2dff058568e7abfca8470a
eed27e212f0eb24e8bf4468323350f60c705bbc3
describe
'49172' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBZC' 'sip-files00225thm.jpg'
4e5a633d1f4d2a95498979aeb95c086c
6029028c82ad2488900feccafd959f1c4577e43c
describe
'385737' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBZD' 'sip-files00081.QC2.jpg'
ba94f0c12b550f4446ab6f02c3813f09
508b823594feb757bc367d2a9baf372bf42ce259
describe
'310308' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBZE' 'sip-files00039.QC2.jpg'
81a38a02a2ecdc0f7a0aa015ac36b934
46797bc5d3074f536bbee0379198d47b27975acc
describe
'1585' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBZF' 'sip-files00177.txt'
80908f354e63930ecbd8976b7c1d9bc9
2b313ad2d77ee09e3a69177282d20bcbcea62ff2
describe
'163678' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBZG' 'sip-files00187.QC.jpg'
7c0ee84e78b60b302177e9b6a0d9f5f7
7ed5e8cae8f1266726e7b0238d42a6ab73bdba85
describe
'2191140' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBZH' 'sip-files00241.tif'
0f5cc14c5b70b0f062dd02c3525643f1
5a01e7865a185bf26697de9fdd79bc6704aec526
describe
'404544' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBZI' 'sip-files00036.QC2.jpg'
7ed77fe1fd2fb07a898cb9ad7be7dac0
8a0981e643d389e2606b182dd498aa7dcf9091ec
describe
'496671' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBZJ' 'sip-files00181.jpg'
a9118ea6f8a1a9a48b7fb68cfc3d4f1b
066ec8ffc53c091b3c2d8ce05afc6023d2146251
'2012-05-25T18:20:06-04:00'
describe
'194307' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBZK' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
d66cbd6053eaded39c203038cb781477
41fc32a2a3cdc24e1367fba132191cf489422b89
describe
'384644' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBZL' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
444475fe8a883ff239107c5577e4e87f
ef4d397d0d57796bbaae8460ed8b7ed8d3f85655
describe
'39082' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBZM' 'sip-files00245.pro'
6a4a347bd5a3f25d541c362cf4adf9ea
e46cf644ab8129292695454739f4fc51ba8744fb
describe
'51492' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBZN' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
713c2767d391bf7d2760078ba90c7c86
4645d227b3022c59f9458510e73ba0cfdddd6553
'2012-05-25T18:23:38-04:00'
describe
'378394' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBZO' 'sip-files00173.QC2.jpg'
c1d24c2100c64e2346593b413e303606
ba345ca0f4205771f06d4a83a1b9a6267db36e95
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBZP' 'sip-files00174.tif'
efeee60f23c305ec13c1080cdb57e342
7b447a349c4ce88026ea01dd92a4fcb7a185cb25
'2012-05-25T18:14:56-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBZQ' 'sip-files00237.tif'
4432f7004950cd59311535ca352dd1dd
04d89c1b5236bb77c3a542e0937851412b18b382
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBZR' 'sip-files00160.txt'
2938c21096b0833cad608496103c90aa
2de01f6b0f66c3514893835339169077df1ca172
describe
'52418' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBZS' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
d87f2dedf248c3d92a973bdd727efd0e
9e839fa69cbaf02f4b2771a79dad59c56d7a5577
describe
'394635' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBZT' 'sip-files00280.QC2.jpg'
c7f7a91eb38a30d5fdd0836b4833302d
a5cc2c4538ed0eba41b139c509571598c3246dc0
describe
'1776' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBZU' 'sip-files00127.txt'
5b71d551335c91b237c41e25ec129185
67137d8cff9caf94238e23fcc303d948e1865a0e
describe
'2384080' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBZV' 'sip-files00003.tif'
4ff0ed9028ead0d2f8873e603db07a41
acce4321e4dd37d790d7facd0c4c497dbc398cbd
describe
'1798' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBZW' 'sip-files00181.txt'
461c15aecbb4bcc85f4804916604a737
6bd2b892f1019b30d122896539214c6691830f69
describe
'163761' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBZX' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
dab929a1402731fbf228367ef632202d
59bff5a741e1716257053629ea407dd2ac49b701
describe
'493132' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBZY' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
bca0d302f3ad90fd326ae548d14c70af
f1888b531f288201b36df4989e259a29b84c0db7
describe
'42574' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABBZZ' 'sip-files00184.pro'
88bfdf986bab90c2cf3521753da032e4
ed3b21a893f2af98ac33b2743ca4ded7dc819447
describe
'306' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCAA' 'sip-files00261.txt'
7ae49017f2b6de3391bbd366b2ce3b1d
b41e7ebce430ee6fda2690a82798f4636eb39204
'2012-05-25T18:23:11-04:00'
describe
'51451' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCAB' 'sip-files00193thm.jpg'
f6915689ddc5bdfb7eb92ff5ac978828
80d44d10fe5f9d09fa26364efbf72ae5022991ab
describe
'2247000' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCAC' 'sip-files00015.tif'
acbfaaa841fef0aa5ad0382c5d9107f3
7348541cfd8862701630556ecb914fb3b8dbcd8d
'2012-05-25T18:22:12-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCAD' 'sip-files00146.tif'
0e0b37e47c1eda3c242f5d453f46286f
31148049e8f48e5eed996ca05519de6fa3d17920
describe
'50437' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCAE' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
c53e614d3ae7860191d7930c6010382d
63cebc75dd48bf1c92e6d0138eac26ca2ef14d85
describe
'152732' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCAF' 'sip-files00273.QC.jpg'
294f138a286c2dc4162a5392032cfd12
ffb31cb129868877ba464088eeeedf3613621336
describe
'25979' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCAG' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
73d54c8c12dd516a88416954088b4f73
7dd66dfff67f73917f7d5d86a1af1045138a9d5d
'2012-05-25T18:16:14-04:00'
describe
'38803' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCAH' 'sip-files00050.pro'
ecf1a2e97faf65f7ec1d45ac3ffb6f4d
3d63b6a296f4a3937d0e8b39c254177a421c04a3
describe
'50425' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCAI' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
4691db34fd8e39f4f18476e728bf08a2
f598aa9d35b4cc8b7cc263e1350dbd706a2e474a
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCAJ' 'sip-files00041.txt'
3b8c48c8d433087a442a1357a166bbc5
e6dd3aab3c9ca81b3f332a29dd31929a4942ff1c
describe
'2224472' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCAK' 'sip-files00292.tif'
f47cf19211bec1f1673405d987f3aa0b
c2418b27e3b9ecf64fb10ef9c9d318069b01c240
'2012-05-25T18:25:37-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCAL' 'sip-files00216.jp2'
3e9f92970120e6a8c9ba836606657527
dc2d5a95175be94419ad35c31539e43a197472c0
describe
'22970' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCAM' 'sip-files00087.pro'
3894adf7b19922cf1dad6f3d31589e0d
18475c8dde3c5947be2fcb77c1f393c6dc4aa1e6
describe
'167067' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCAN' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
c7536468bfcc53cbdbbc797acea26df8
f336bf200704409a81cbbaf828b297edc896d305
describe
'2146224' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCAO' 'sip-files00203.tif'
c0ee1c0d7ccbfe6a41709880830bec29
3e6bfc63e37c9b7601535ddd0f2c7f066011d5a2
'2012-05-25T18:20:53-04:00'
describe
'1422' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCAP' 'sip-files00234.txt'
92eca39458f230c6860a9f90bad2a023
8c8ee043d1a6ba8ad55d311c607eab601acd113b
describe
'438027' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCAQ' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
175e223814ec7769673a7969e7fab498
95fdb4aa38bed7ff286466378c1858b044d680ed
'2012-05-25T18:23:41-04:00'
describe
'52030' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCAR' 'sip-files00181thm.jpg'
f3e6a1474f4b4a48cdd1a8c9ab781270
9768eaffc5578dee36704c60231722bceb3bc0c7
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCAS' 'sip-files00022.txt'
cbc1da58caf81c5d794fa4551101c58f
2232b31c7bd1b91608821ea15a82d912aa89391a
describe
'25270' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCAT' 'sip-files00229.pro'
86d959a3da1dabe85bf8a34b027f0ed7
faf405a93f69378a34fa74a5ad2f06ec65219db8
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCAU' 'sip-files00190.txt'
bb3b63c8cf712af10c40cd35bcc430b7
c24dedf02164a662786546cb0f442febf77d462a
'2012-05-25T18:19:13-04:00'
describe
'1741' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCAV' 'sip-files00036.txt'
0e0c24f75d64710026f1f4654098046a
40470a9300553a6e69c04f29e17513b6e551f174
describe
'50539' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCAW' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
c35da0a321e074b8d7e53b969888a6f0
8176c9840ea79bb852607c3d878fdf8ec287c3fa
describe
'129971' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCAX' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
2f74cdb61ec47cbe14f8c170bbdcd704
32066b3ffa538aef3de6b69064a8da5d7398bd9e
'2012-05-25T18:23:57-04:00'
describe
'51320' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCAY' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
2b8c270e35c81e9d63922bcdf1a43245
d6dc0b61bf56cb204c0b5cf2bead4f9aa36a67a8
describe
'487559' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCAZ' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
0b553104e9f20f3cb297d28455a14b1a
7452f09caef3280b7b8185cfe2aa54a8ba42c7ab
describe
'41352' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCBA' 'sip-files00023.pro'
2eedec04c3ecd0e51151877e93e01d50
65d736a1d4bec58ca891f8c72d20f279c9c96e3a
describe
'51091' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCBB' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
215483b332dfba5694e3d18220a31257
bc8f1f01415d3792a9a2e17d6cd2fb7b8b6a3e8d
describe
'53163' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCBC' 'sip-files00152thm.jpg'
0ca1a5f74f9a6f8a2c381645aa355856
f7a20420058c67a4a99430c48735ba314a947c98
describe
'2228580' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCBD' 'sip-files00083.tif'
5043f60aaea634e00c7129f82c840ed6
22b861ad8bea225a4a0e8a84da7d3b682031fac3
'2012-05-25T18:21:21-04:00'
describe
'2228696' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCBE' 'sip-files00173.tif'
9408a6284a970bf0d188251c68bf4701
7b26a1973d935722c84392be380224c0f15be151
'2012-05-25T18:17:37-04:00'
describe
'414767' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCBF' 'sip-files00126.QC2.jpg'
efc09daa778a5f7ef09bf084acd5a455
e901b18caaf4a8cbf271c38b7529ef49724d1d1d
describe
'155047' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCBG' 'sip-files00241.QC.jpg'
9a689599bf9be1756bbe33406ce79144
9a3b89831c117c993f1f33962e7c453e8a912238
'2012-05-25T18:13:41-04:00'
describe
'242781' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCBH' 'sip-files00248.QC2.jpg'
333c71958d1bf4ef57e195eaac3abc08
1fdf5b641d03c28fe8ee59212f5e9c1d07097ecb
describe
'165494' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCBI' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
815b7dcbbd227af1eec2ef239b9407db
0506b266db4423ebe5eb77a152dae0f384e8e1bc
'2012-05-25T18:14:28-04:00'
describe
'48864' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCBJ' 'sip-files00270thm.jpg'
35094d7ed26c832c3ed94cb9bdb52296
ddcc9e635dfd63c536b60208a1d110f6ad59fc41
describe
'218838' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCBK' 'sip-files00261.QC2.jpg'
cb50ef77d6fec284d74b47a2e71af79d
76e87421eddc6bed64cde563af0b975327be785a
'2012-05-25T18:13:42-04:00'
describe
'53026' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCBL' 'sip-files00167thm.jpg'
7aebec63f4c08214cd2d2b05a1717dd5
1936ca7754eedeceea74e0c898249136c2c64a11
'2012-05-25T18:26:32-04:00'
describe
'174065' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCBM' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
24ec14d2ac4d700addc456350b9095b2
3e6badcdd5fcc2117f985a01831d9cc6f3130e6e
describe
'56367' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCBN' 'sip-files00165thm.jpg'
76d8a85ac4f15972218816f7cc84a4fe
cc3425244c4f1c8969e8d24417c2a2b762177299
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCBO' 'sip-files00044.txt'
94c877afc408ab6969c65870b752e386
49ae8ca96470b6c8542a05812658f87a2f837909
describe
'2223404' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCBP' 'sip-files00288.tif'
e0eefb45b8a27bd260c157e5b9792516
15eb22b3a0728e32c79679cedea219e1858b0052
describe
'413267' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCBQ' 'sip-files00035.QC2.jpg'
567f25de14fee675c158f341dc0ba0f5
31dd1e4ae5c2e288bfaa756150e73ba057501733
describe
'876273' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCBR' 'sip-files00295.jpg'
5407593232f9de36e3052eaf75e8d156
fed594de5e9e60eb7812f6f1d45ccceb91dd194e
describe
'1660' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCBS' 'sip-files00151.txt'
8f755904d64f233f82608fc0bd2eba2a
479daa70e88499b24df751fc3d7922d592938ed9
describe
'1623' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCBT' 'sip-files00083.txt'
7759ae618e7b238a481661870716212c
3f73e45587a2fd59680a57de92870800797548cb
describe
'50815' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCBU' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
9f4f58a1e37f3aa933d00e11b9439bb8
4dd3b77e2d1ebf7f58cc0376a9e186dd9cae4f6d
'2012-05-25T18:16:08-04:00'
describe
'362959' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCBV' 'sip-files00071.QC2.jpg'
80dd20e0e8a6548f646c3473b4d555ad
0cae424b24d2bd4686dc9464a6e4f263964367b3
describe
'418120' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCBW' 'sip-files00157.QC2.jpg'
fa803422d2d0bb11ac28dedc8f1d1196
488e160ac0ccdd24e615bb477202c34fc5aeb8a0
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCBX' 'sip-files00045.txt'
6fbac2dc2289ea278bc4cebbfed5ef69
f45e1d337e81f911f09015851488b77beb4871bc
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCBY' 'sip-files00206.jp2'
8c75791ed1a6344e8edfdc7a733b647a
c17a9a5a10c5e9d2334606a076c46b47eb3d3130
describe
'466736' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCBZ' 'sip-files00145.jpg'
5d0fed15d0034c8a6578458ac4de23b3
d7e1973da3519b47f682cccef45b87f3cae7be62
describe
'146442' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCCA' 'sip-files00281.QC.jpg'
cb9b883c8ab73b53b751e1025a77b118
fd7e4cb921df63ca3f539f136f33d78a02ddcb49
describe
'128720' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCCB' 'sip-files00002.QC.jpg'
a13d7b2d41fa4d8009e6e66b1d4274e9
02d606f126a43c2cca67ba7871127bf9ba069d1d
describe
'162804' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCCC' 'sip-files00144.QC.jpg'
9080f0ee304a503489a0f87c2e0abf84
79d1f9297b3b4b5e966a625cf20036d8a8fc5106
'2012-05-25T18:19:24-04:00'
describe
'2229296' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCCD' 'sip-files00280.tif'
0309607427c5d62a67068e2dc1e54f7f
341a06e1761c11f6bd7e0b07daa7e00b4726bbaa
describe
'379432' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCCE' 'sip-files00231.QC2.jpg'
88a1718dca8fbc9e1d0343173a0f9f07
796b254f29d195daa2dbec43440dbf5648754f31
describe
'166706' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCCF' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
8f49524a104bf43c09c72c6ae681a59d
629cc99d0ab46218992b3af82b9f342ab1bc5c22
describe
'1734' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCCG' 'sip-files00243.txt'
a4417b4f2e7340662a780c6576ac1d08
9996ec7f2d62628b42d6005b2f2ad9885054a93b
describe
'330992' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCCH' 'sip-files00087.QC2.jpg'
6f662b000021aad1e3edd2c7ba894a1e
d71cab9a860c853ad8be65e78a8b0bf41a63f996
describe
'40613' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCCI' 'sip-files00140thm.jpg'
9aca37b19a40879e4b5270aa3908ae82
69b6a6bc796014ef470d97fe20bc0a9abcc7e714
describe
'32400' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCCJ' 'sip-files00194thm.jpg'
3838cdf3717bda6f9c36b36c6ee2f5af
2a9eef7847f8f60362e53f6d81fbda59d4569cb6
describe
'432005' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCCK' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
5a2721850787f28f0c3178a6646ea36d
38631c28acaea9ead6514cbbc0dcf74919d851e9
describe
'51892' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCCL' 'sip-files00162thm.jpg'
b8548f8962185830787d2d89328fa316
00907f024ca8a2f80590fedb054bca7971b3dd29
describe
'315487' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCCM' 'sip-files00240.jpg'
453ccdc79a17f8a4c7b17aa29951df04
f11635a3cd3c48da39b69074b84db7169f9acdb9
describe
'197' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCCN' 'sip-files00166.txt'
c47723e822d2c4f92e695bd9fa61fd4d
31b2b98a86fe382775b8a250e06ec884a9623ddc
'2012-05-25T18:23:53-04:00'
describe
'51595' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCCO' 'sip-files00191thm.jpg'
edf7855842fc29a9676919f71e37ceb7
015815f9b61f01db4b5ab6258512b2acad836771
describe
'276930' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCCP' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
ec513649b34f728b201abd5a66cbb571
51560e9ad57e83e15aef6db3d2bd5e721d5868f3
'2012-05-25T18:18:43-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCCQ' 'sip-files00105.tif'
03224676ade1a051ae3ef11614b79fcc
c9e05623c9a08f6eade0d23ba18150aaf4ad1902
describe
'1504' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCCR' 'sip-files00246.txt'
fea6eb7436438587effd7c5fe50486ec
9df21f448ad287ed164f946c73dbfd311b1b1af7
describe
'2229416' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCCS' 'sip-files00267.tif'
44fd443a4f6493ea8d45392f1e8f3ec8
1762f59eac2a5001f44baf7ea35a71be71aabcac
describe
'41924' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCCT' 'sip-files00296thm.jpg'
995ad6662634444cab8c1f7f9c98420c
12004b72baab7e778ebc4d3b048c1c7e6d520352
describe
'50465' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCCU' 'sip-files00226thm.jpg'
e96def41664767d05978a99bd1ebe5b7
6ea3d8f78de5f5d3d286f3fa3390484ac56f8d28
describe
'327174' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCCV' 'sip-files00234.QC2.jpg'
a4412017d87e7a97b75ca4646015c70c
4c2a3cb6a812fa82c8d2603f76599c8653cba4b3
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCCW' 'sip-files00253.jp2'
cb70431d51ca51556b1d0cd137456a96
0ede25c95b19ba5ea2bc561038a37150289574e7
describe
'28104' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCCX' 'sip-files00216.pro'
3c18b2519b653aace8b94e4c7d0a8bf5
f56499e9a9af06d0309d8e5ade25871eff1a783a
'2012-05-25T18:18:04-04:00'
describe
'276902' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCCY' 'sip-files00140.jp2'
24ec88d5296d679f5b4797c1a0191f2c
0e9e7228dae9e5356217a20b022112f649ab3839
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCCZ' 'sip-files00247.txt'
1547cfdee8eb404f6e8a1d5c40a42d33
a7475a2ff3d7bb75d2ba16d68399feca21bc74db
describe
'320489' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCDA' 'sip-files00020.QC2.jpg'
4bad9a1106d8840d4cdd986b0c01bd4f
1bac0f968d5712a68c28e87ceb4910f30c64bdb5
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCDB' 'sip-files00027.txt'
aeb30ca0c314b2f481447b170f69ae23
afd0b9d97093459e2782f19170b8591ff5720c59
describe
'1718' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCDC' 'sip-files00038.txt'
66d10b86b25bae8f3577386ea3a4945d
22fe3fa71a8af174ae326f71abe6633abe772c38
'2012-05-25T18:16:40-04:00'
describe
'41391' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCDD' 'sip-files00209thm.jpg'
5bc5f9311c98476185c2e1dc0ada3fd8
82a195382f0c9b099819aa477bc5decee4980b94
describe
'1233' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCDE' 'sip-files00002.pro'
90be471a55af69332e97a1f0c6696da5
abe1938cd09b3b47ffc7a0a3c213a4ded3a74f05
describe
'151735' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCDF' 'sip-files00149.QC.jpg'
c2de01a573a0242dc3651c795396e212
d8222c8e990a8f17c6de7aa6bf50b2a4a271a671
describe
'426745' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCDG' 'sip-files00015.QC2.jpg'
c04bcc4039a2f5ebb94e4d6c4fb1cb9a
23baabc654ae1609077b7b9ff4d85e711952054b
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCDH' 'sip-files00254thm.jpg'
c0a3ac1ef719ea0c46ccc90cae53411d
fb80e3ca5dbd38e9c9095a30855cdd4316e38118
describe
'164486' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCDI' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
e6826a6c902e73f22d9232a3aec6945c
8ac581dcf134ea7a5bad59a5f627b7458bd618ca
describe
'51911' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCDJ' 'sip-files00289thm.jpg'
2cd97ab06b5826236d3efafa83af7e23
549339577b6797041b8f49a622c3f47bd2d12202
describe
'354702' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCDK' 'sip-files00227.QC2.jpg'
910d9b52aa22107fbcd63f8896582d37
12e680c4dca6d7da4bc2db10d604a3cb65c3c0a3
describe
'418240' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCDL' 'sip-files00161.QC2.jpg'
7747c9cbd473368afcffb58c9f468740
7360e51b31d4d5f4ff95f46954b055ae22991554
describe
'45664' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCDM' 'sip-files00155thm.jpg'
e68d119a5d080dd1a412efa7415a0bc9
600dfd813f0ca34ab563b0f2f7382707ddcdcc6a
describe
'1154' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCDN' 'sip-files00010.txt'
3da81d3c7cdd4b13c7e1afba56cae71c
2c819e7b1c90e35a8ef4d6ad31cf95d749c1f529
describe
'417855' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCDO' 'sip-files00025.QC2.jpg'
4ab5f4c9067747ca6db9d0bf4683205b
e9a4fe11592a8c41fe5101a3054eba2f2966cc97
describe
'375524' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCDP' 'sip-files00168.jpg'
c3ab0e8d3bd0406759883af4ed1d5635
1598dc8ebc3ad74a9ea33b0110a98fe7eb8f5836
describe
'50863' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCDQ' 'sip-files00290thm.jpg'
a2c3c8784508615891b4c9fc2291cb29
b7238b47992d2780cd2c1799e0b629bbffd26675
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCDR' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
2c406b8c30b8609bc19fd902c9a63866
770ab298fb6fe09ea2239ea98f448d039e1e5efe
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCDS' 'sip-files00119.tif'
ca9e426bcf0fc9b9ea100ec6d38d83ca
efe4ce1d7f2a7ce75827df2070f7966b3fb8a415
'2012-05-25T18:14:58-04:00'
describe
'44397' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCDT' 'sip-files00141thm.jpg'
d6059d155ed909d636dfd7b62dfdeb45
7dc870c3b387d2cbbefc0af769a944937b3e9bc4
describe
'42175' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCDU' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
ef16b1fcf008db13163de44b0230c2af
6eaf382e3f563cec3b9c20ab26f26b0d08f5818d
describe
'163993' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCDV' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
9af04b4aab6d7cd8154e410c48b94c98
f7867d217c3e18c6dcf9075a03bf5e524bc62d58
describe
'276873' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCDW' 'sip-files00162.jp2'
d1c4e2bae3fe6b34329757b7e04366ce
c85f4cc6383987806195630d2fc96f2ac202db9c
describe
'147654' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCDX' 'sip-files00269.QC.jpg'
4e149f19335d96049971b2967a2db283
1c44494b9ecb5710577f0423abbac2e702476485
'2012-05-25T18:15:20-04:00'
describe
'38141' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCDY' 'sip-files00100.pro'
b210f89e35a65d5a4e82cc1a6b022c7c
1774b7199bfa8357a8fd447b76c1b9dc34e832d3
'2012-05-25T18:24:55-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCDZ' 'sip-files00048.pro'
d71f7bb13afabd6fdb1e676849d14e1b
bd959a7dbc8cfc8dc303fd01b9e4ba6f2e7c7fe5
'2012-05-25T18:19:40-04:00'
describe
'432332' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCEA' 'sip-files00290.jpg'
5927d6e544df8a1cbf13159f3b849bb1
c5152d097b245f3cac827935bc3952b27e55ee95
describe
'383172' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCEB' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
65c86a514dfe45f8abe657c02860efde
749e31d1727832f1133c45acffaae9faac5ccae9
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCEC' 'sip-files00142.tif'
995f464e259a90a5e2b5e791daac958b
a2b7c340e1b50a868153e936fecb93e2495d8514
describe
'164013' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCED' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
cb292c5f13ce1b1754cc6cee64fb9eef
54f2427f58cff1487e79768667a165197dd64d4c
describe
'394913' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCEE' 'sip-files00246.jpg'
50cb7a727cde83ab38b6659497dd2684
5aedf087f11a666ef1734e78563a08d5d9c12c6a
describe
'355840' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCEF' 'sip-files00140.QC2.jpg'
27163433960f4b5141f360b4c0309de4
c320e5865c103c968cbaf462f943fd6e89b0367b
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCEG' 'sip-files00157.tif'
63fd0a6a302fcc12856e8c83a29147c0
73ed5396b249cf02f64d3a8f1a93f7dd86c91a00
describe
'403486' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCEH' 'sip-files00237.jpg'
295fa6025a42295e2087a92c9be75671
5b4731bbe787e4af57718c6fc27eab32c658e91b
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCEI' 'sip-files00247.jp2'
17fcb1150211911f4348e017cf783368
27c4de961681ac672564e15266e8698cebf3e044
describe
'75424' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCEJ' 'sip-files00261.QC.jpg'
b941f41526e6c7c90166713ce83d0ece
e7c2c8dd0af17ecf96a75921e6787cc474c47772
describe
'443335' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCEK' 'sip-files00174.jpg'
82e1722a345114c6ac236cf2601a6d3e
e4268c3437b38357314ca1afcda42f343e89c980
describe
'157751' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCEL' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
c15d2de57108dbdc4ea40b89835b2cab
7fdc0979947b3cba4cfbf48a634efd8a32a2eaff
describe
'26115' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCEM' 'sip-files00195.pro'
af73c03bd730541b3314c563af80204a
4345f3b9eefd7c34b2f14957c7f264cca8cba6b7
describe
'2228956' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCEN' 'sip-files00034.tif'
8b2556afe3347bd9db106c45c097eb25
6287ebeecd8c430c392f4aa7cdc8c9436bfaf8ea
describe
'380347' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCEO' 'sip-files00199.QC2.jpg'
4ab4edd49b2ae2ad9e4c65a3c9a79c2b
44fa61b67f7fa73717c52b8b757b0d07d829c3a9
describe
'164178' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCEP' 'sip-files00153.QC.jpg'
757fcc3f4ee85c4bafc035246aa09b0c
f2cd4f48dbfa5f0c35ec5e64b9204aa91150270e
'2012-05-25T18:15:22-04:00'
describe
'2360612' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCEQ' 'sip-files00285.tif'
7e20e25ccedf0d3ab7930b36be40f478
abe6b15030c27d5d608dfc26a9252eefa2c3585f
describe
'164001' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCER' 'sip-files00160.QC.jpg'
53497a1eb9f9475919ce2efa7d1fe4dd
83af2b881f342ff3848ce416bc92117664a1b0da
describe
'1238' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCES' 'sip-files00216.txt'
710f87ff6139fe6eed69006f1ff117a4
194c436d244dd5caa034a795c51b39bd6e96eebc
describe
'155132' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCET' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
de082a3fd8cc8ebecbee1044a5675b43
9607a6a194e76bce712944839d90eb910caf0d4b
describe
'49722' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCEU' 'sip-files00220thm.jpg'
d76a9276bc10556cb4c244f4f8831a1d
7682f2eba59754b879394aa3445ec139a6bb23b2
describe
'42463' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCEV' 'sip-files00095.pro'
6ffd13e19ad4b9333d2df488143b4e66
963a59ecd973943a9311356050abe1de630801a9
describe
'2227736' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCEW' 'sip-files00113.tif'
d7b0813ecdff61eafce90cdd6d6dc33c
2c32fa35061f2ed39fbd7708d0a319907bc95dc3
describe
'477388' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCEX' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
f0d8b578fba28b7904bc70ed49569a35
a7355a8558ef18aaddfc048f596708b42f7924e5
describe
'137272' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCEY' 'sip-files00284.QC.jpg'
28d0c7a4e376e1e3a955eb625e4c9d96
16344c0eb56ea7d3d9b27a4b0b1ceaafaa6d794c
describe
'40424' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCEZ' 'sip-files00197.pro'
f4df05a08f78243ee8db0636d0ec9a04
69210d24d76e674db2171536c5e514c16470d353
describe
'52047' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCFA' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
046115fce71d99350c0cb41e4e2824f3
a983b967d551730e4ba04b69660e64ebc23d93df
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCFB' 'sip-files00211thm.jpg'
2fb1925e5ba990a2ac2ed9448945b15f
d2b9dc882fa57a461c748ce10d7f3981c2e6d073
'2012-05-25T18:24:27-04:00'
describe
'36529' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCFC' 'sip-files00072.pro'
8cf9feeb959bb002ea8dcf3e4d50470a
912317b0391a6ef58dbd926b908401b81241da24
describe
'2225908' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCFD' 'sip-files00074.tif'
f80b2763fe1183167712d6b887f68fba
85b5d1bfb806e6606f3be8370ba2b7469dfe9024
describe
'477252' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCFE' 'sip-files00189.jpg'
dc0fcb2fd334272b4463417074ee8fa4
fb34ccb5e4612d45866953da89d5a75807aaa991
'2012-05-25T18:17:08-04:00'
describe
'372712' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCFF' 'sip-files00118.QC2.jpg'
b733ea85bd4ef59bac7bc8341c63409d
27df212c02ba711ee828a66f1d32072f3a54d6e8
'2012-05-25T18:14:43-04:00'
describe
'408567' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCFG' 'sip-files00189.QC2.jpg'
3f1c772f86b5904db183ecf8bf3fcfc1
179f9fe48768a9692aadfb545a1634d77556ca5a
describe
'152989' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCFH' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
85f1b6008d8cf0a8e38ad0cc4258344b
7895965bcecba33f1083040fd38c8be21d6a1b32
describe
'276960' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCFI' 'sip-files00158.jp2'
057252b1f0ee65296093e5da5a248416
bca301f96ae3cb094d13aeecb84268e171b2ce01
describe
'489716' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCFJ' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
ae8a609002cbbf77ff11571c00b9f0cc
8b58f3ddfd7ee2b792cfa566951dd51db3c46b82
describe
'1690' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCFK' 'sip-files00163.txt'
18bb824881c9130281cb3cba33e1dec5
464e9ce56089c1e08dc493b86af827f72304bb35
'2012-05-25T18:19:38-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCFL' 'sip-files00029.tif'
903d2542d457f5c1012a9fb333ba5a3d
2e9356161f99dc0049ba48933b30217b187e365f
describe
'2226932' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCFM' 'sip-files00087.tif'
7f335e53ac66bcf1ebc575e6b006406a
3be75abdea3e1005d4f9c43fdd6ca66b497c99f7
describe
'303282' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCFN' 'sip-files00292.jpg'
e5bc949fe22e1e9cdbfc91164783ad21
16fdfdeb6200c0fb4e480b1699495b9fca2d7b66
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCFO' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
7dfd6aec622cc1312dd5ba0f7c961a5d
1a7080fe666886e352441c3c4c644865ce5369f5
describe
'326761' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCFP' 'sip-files00002.jp2'
b5a9f6f4fb8ef94bde647e7a9a11b080
250f73900b7d3719d713df04aea6e1af087ec2c8
describe
'50586' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCFQ' 'sip-files00236thm.jpg'
014ce78323f7d6a39f93643876d16a88
a096db2820d1578bb35c873bc9a2ca050c5371c3
describe
'396428' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCFR' 'sip-files00271.jpg'
9b775668c71b246d1d2380bf07ebf082
46d500a82029bc587163f0af70f5658f4c0168d3
describe
'365385' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCFS' 'sip-files00075.QC2.jpg'
9e54d3c2c438f094a472802170d166c3
ba256af1c21bf06264d5fd769718892defef45b4
'2012-05-25T18:20:08-04:00'
describe
'155481' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCFT' 'sip-files00278.QC.jpg'
37bc0cd923b9dff69466ead7096a9f23
76f32ba71be3bc7aae4d285aea6d9abdeab0849f
describe
'1670' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCFU' 'sip-files00211.txt'
f6e939b0cf7a9b6da6c53f9f29ff28b2
4c54d8076ba5f90f2a7ee042d66a50b991d2bda5
describe
'419463' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCFV' 'sip-files00148.QC2.jpg'
e18b5de64fd1dacdeeb5fd50ed869e92
66d5b7fb6c8abf853e148bd168141c25f3d1fb05
'2012-05-25T18:15:47-04:00'
describe
'101587' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCFW' 'sip-files00248.QC.jpg'
482b660f05c147650bb90f76a6a037aa
88ef829d1035890be08366a5aa6e02e964844cb8
describe
'42092' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCFX' 'sip-files00226.pro'
c8b53ca5990d0025a7360dc7b806c41d
7a1da1f5a15fde61443f1309d092f7ae2fdf044f
describe
'36105' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCFY' 'sip-files00078.pro'
192bcf5adac27cc2e12c8131c5c64361
dfa98f1c5ee287044e8f308b561ec566ea867bc4
describe
'26512' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCFZ' 'sip-files00290.pro'
7f5f2802c72b62a23db3fd3938061d7c
9fe1a867d6fb0eaee0df28333fbbf6b1aef9508b
describe
'152470' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCGA' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
0bd46683cad0c1e97b41a6a4cb974314
b3f1a636d57b91051073e541d498f0fa526ab47c
describe
'41572' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCGB' 'sip-files00017.pro'
f5085fc943a8949da0c328f596e11f63
67cee7c3f880be9e4af0b5ae8c848fc66e7902f8
describe
'2228664' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCGC' 'sip-files00043.tif'
1c639923fa8dbfd3f798b207eb9a6bde
3c4759f3232cfc1fb516128c2ff19c69a5b91bc6
describe
'2228740' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCGD' 'sip-files00160.tif'
38b160087de6a4f1545f6db051396e75
6d58e3833158c9e2a440a169c326790e3a580ad2
'2012-05-25T18:18:15-04:00'
describe
'346876' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCGE' 'sip-files00232.QC2.jpg'
c6c2b3d9391cdbbc5e1b722bad1455fd
70fe5d87b906ae40a30de0f7d0b73c43923836d4
describe
'39478' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCGF' 'sip-files00240thm.jpg'
b328c8d0600c6e0302df2c3e8f385572
67fd6e3bb28fb4cb261481fa763395ebea4e55a2
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCGG' 'sip-files00191.jp2'
8dec6ee8f589b00fc04b294c55511bee
f70b2f9f8f7cc66bbb99d04e4953c18ab180e592
'2012-05-25T18:19:30-04:00'
describe
'408013' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCGH' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
520ab6e211aeb8956ff6bcfa1ed9a389
d0d9cc2f7a25e25fd31b3f65796cc6030b9e5fc2
'2012-05-25T18:20:18-04:00'
describe
'1648' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCGI' 'sip-files00066.txt'
f957d1eecaa9fa57e7c7a6f2cd766d77
7dd03d23ce9bbeb7c0c4c4abba46643690f3cca6
describe
'2228812' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCGJ' 'sip-files00104.tif'
e89e62c7e31b6c29894d1f4e185487d6
c1ae15907aa6911740fb46ac1436dc84dd2c4a70
describe
'144550' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCGK' 'sip-files00204.QC.jpg'
d4d56545170cf51fba630e454a39bd81
94afe2c6eaafdba9553f9e9ef1e648f9327ae292
describe
'386690' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCGL' 'sip-files00151.QC2.jpg'
229c6de3adafe9184102ad5bdf7c7b2a
ed617992317718801a1920368443b63fd06caee0
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCGM' 'sip-files00176.jp2'
0024dee990b54e55b46773f753020fb3
19cf7d224afd3c38cb3be17676fae90734a071bf
'2012-05-25T18:17:15-04:00'
describe
'434881' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCGN' 'sip-files00294.QC2.jpg'
af28a23c34437db79a6d62ecddd1dbd7
3c5275498bdbeb36a3e23251c2b0393e02aaa11c
'2012-05-25T18:16:03-04:00'
describe
'22061' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCGO' 'sip-files00264.pro'
a6747cb50100274ab19006781cba99d1
c6c14af04a8b90c68fa12f1cbe5d4a5aeae7aaac
describe
'49497' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCGP' 'sip-files00233thm.jpg'
28ea78c2af8badd260083698e71d82ed
423339995ef55cfd957281eb85e900c9f991cae0
describe
'42441' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCGQ' 'sip-files00056.pro'
790d4d45f2ebef3be3ad64f9f69a001f
9ab3cc53c4c2654088e353a68b0a7565dc3d7046
describe
'39177' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCGR' 'sip-files00109.pro'
6f8051b6741d6335e1c776beb69e9edd
ea62b6da1e033c637ab94edd0d788f38dc71d236
'2012-05-25T18:14:29-04:00'
describe
'401' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCGS' 'sip-files00042.pro'
00b1cb6790d18d4512a8a51b4a914371
1f3c103d73751687be4da340d50b99a063c6116e
describe
'3244' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCGT' 'sip-files00007.pro'
df687e427620d4471b3169bf004744b0
2aefb6b93c8fa671b927957e32818fef8a495710
describe
'2091956' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCGU' 'sip-files00012.tif'
5ffc65a22c8966d94bf304a7bc497ffc
741935b524b837eac4c8b45e55269585235eabd4
describe
'403877' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCGV' 'sip-files00192.QC2.jpg'
d24cf42296e9324776bd504545ece5dd
05a0bb29c53d77fe2600d7716ee3b118064375bb
describe
'173736' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCGW' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
01d39baf552278f5ce5c1cc12a5ebc0e
d4e600da2532442526729850323d276c6b01e53b
describe
'2228424' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCGX' 'sip-files00199.tif'
e75f54dc91082e7ec48ce3bcff4a7b86
b01d6f0e8b9a3a2695d97d87aa82daac7861d125
'2012-05-25T18:23:59-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCGY' 'sip-files00167.jp2'
6d201602d8158c379d95fbf95dfd11ec
0c9e053ce244eebce2b80bb1cfceac43b9fe6aab
describe
'23248' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCGZ' 'sip-files00080.pro'
e0c6f0131ed97cbc5b18acae02922051
59eccf6b3a0ec9bf39ed605d9339184581d8a6d7
'2012-05-25T18:21:04-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCHA' 'sip-files00161.txt'
7433d2fc68ec3f125c2239779436e9d3
5da06ab2f79721b09982d925e3e2ac9f4e0eb989
'2012-05-25T18:14:50-04:00'
describe
'320791' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCHB' 'sip-files00272.QC2.jpg'
b884189e642f1e11ce65dd9974f49ba8
597f20504965b8b762e38f8565c0f665ba817ffe
describe
'52985' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCHC' 'sip-files00188thm.jpg'
8a895b7a13df612a00c3fa2dc64a2c17
401cf98ee05ace3690160d6aac388c5403b9fbbb
describe
'480172' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCHD' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
6be3c0229c550f949fb7ac9c94366f8c
3ce908ab0c9f47ead757d838e26e971ec96b3c1e
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCHE' 'sip-files00171.jp2'
1493f865b70ae3600605b4cbe870554d
86120f6567b8eb4bb8e9efa65f15547a61ffdd01
describe
'145825' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCHF' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
5c0e2d03486219697936ba8815136404
f2da69603dad6d2286443371b585a209584d2c0f
describe
'259690' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCHG' 'sip-files00271.jp2'
40484bdf0a785a5e4041c98beb582256
513641978e13f8b045cdf70dbf3ace652e79c5cb
'2012-05-25T18:13:44-04:00'
describe
'343549' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCHH' 'sip-files00206.QC2.jpg'
70f1280d865b0fe5ae97c9f497572543
2d4a25f8f2b8681b792f92fa5c3c6816bd53cc67
describe
'401388' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCHI' 'sip-files00187.QC2.jpg'
c75597f141cf0c372f84441731d64ce5
1f6f155340b93192c9eac77092dbadae84a83361
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCHJ' 'sip-files00050.tif'
bc931c14d3c4be73835f753afd384af0
640b9380bec55b229c741fb014a4dab8377258d8
describe
'157642' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCHK' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
1080657c7fc1cc8ccd8afbca93962e53
2f42ee6c1bcc2a7260185fc5794f3b7c425dc358
describe
'1700' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCHL' 'sip-files00197.txt'
c8b935b9260dfd5a04efa3b65ac6bdff
d8da590f138986bde2b3a37dab6259c824b22b66
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCHM' 'sip-files00252.jp2'
b39104a29609cc7ea94f6b0f3711fd73
5060dd5a06413ff594251086a52a938be41b4d63
describe
'285269' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCHN' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
791c2edb252d3f5d43ae8e900fd1a7c6
16b512d4517b7c72ccc7dcc4bca9b8d0b72a0992
describe
'53723' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCHO' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
44513dc55a5bf38dd50ef92df30bc98d
6a7b2607dfde3dd7980f939017cdf64d21b200b5
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCHP' 'sip-files00229.jp2'
944137b6c0e76d9d8aa63dc930d9b0ce
a18dbbbbb1f0e563652c09e228bf925921e3f98d
describe
'433730' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCHQ' 'sip-files00094.QC2.jpg'
e987e3c10e203b4a2aae54d8c283c092
98e397ce6f657bee2cd6320d86bd3dea07718f37
'2012-05-25T18:21:38-04:00'
describe
'146875' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCHR' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
1de333a88bbc0c54e6114a8ea83e3669
ad1b1a8f4bf015b53de11921429d79a407dfba9c
'2012-05-25T18:25:05-04:00'
describe
'97140' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCHS' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
701b115fad01f2bd4bcba38ef1668a78
33ad0df0fcba7a55257c6d0e222c198b0ef69d7d
'2012-05-25T18:24:12-04:00'
describe
'1731' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCHT' 'sip-files00058.txt'
54104318e2218cf59f5fccab4e665d0a
67ca8403a9c6b3ebd4ef5fc776abd4aa80ded8f9
describe
'390795' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCHU' 'sip-files00150.QC2.jpg'
9edb3f45a39afa7954309465eaf10cb2
da0a6f1e24f8c3b564b708983fa3e8b561e2d62b
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCHV' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
9fa676fffaa11db64a6eda9450599db0
c57fede1549a51783b5d3ffedcaace8c24f322fb
describe
'1533' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCHW' 'sip-files00003.pro'
e7283d3aa6e0d6b2b3d0f9d9bb9cc208
fce4709bb6e3177ea3b4343cbceb0a280f96f5ac
describe
'1780' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCHX' 'sip-files00095.txt'
6028c1f01bdd6e3811481c469ccd7dba
8e56a66ea51668f8a1f4f550e21b6d938c92e321
describe
'380370' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCHY' 'sip-files00171.QC2.jpg'
c4d7c0fd729db5783190151bdec92f26
e7a3ba0d463f8dcb525e3b1eec9f619ede2b19c5
describe
'1205' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCHZ' 'sip-files00155.txt'
501b3e96b79eac9e3a9a7317da9c1529
979c33016c4a07bd45ea673b8cbb5b5cced84e14
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCIA' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
71f838c119c924ea6a78a7e3468a9db6
ac9a79626673a9097ad1d826c9209b8af84bc5a1
describe
'2228304' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCIB' 'sip-files00218.tif'
ff3df42bcbe3734b995dbd187415209d
72f6ffad7c24699c10c88ce5841a6b511d407643
describe
'372692' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCIC' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
bd557de44b2efee319ff587e63e5c98c
443b4b426cd7074b1dc5dc6a849036e4aaba98a7
describe
'50148' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCID' 'sip-files00279thm.jpg'
96fb94a26ece8d976a76daae8310538a
5498f53cde21fd1032251b22e5fa624d37d5e1b7
describe
'401212' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCIE' 'sip-files00215.QC2.jpg'
580a5aa12a19c79cce0e327bab25ef87
af35409269c36011b2547f2536ae58d62c80455c
describe
'987' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCIF' 'sip-files00289.txt'
393246abc3dd75c8ee3deabda98edf5f
1b52c774c46962caed9e47723c3da0eecc9e78c2
describe
'152137' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCIG' 'sip-files00263.QC.jpg'
c72551361b9e07e433263377fa535596
72d3053986d9f8aa0b9b159055eb21a2bf51f726
'2012-05-25T18:23:44-04:00'
describe
'292476' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCIH' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
b4ed7e34a15c75235ba2e2ba03523676
ee819607b06b54417e973043c569db873ce9d289
describe
'167319' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCII' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
a207066e6c0d32426d460dc71816d170
c0129f236063fb7b0a9c6ae1a119a005312ae4f1
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCIJ' 'sip-files00089.tif'
895688899f41caea69892d5ef15900b5
da6db66039502859786a1480294902bc2288ae37
'2012-05-25T18:23:46-04:00'
describe
'268602' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCIK' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
103b1f02d125043db6bd6cb7b55721ce
4e81621e8f7070db9b7be644fca2fd0d16b4cc09
describe
'344735' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCIL' 'sip-files00113.QC2.jpg'
38963362adbfe5716e7e7dc680c64aac
c5f682cb7f398fe423b845b1878448e9a5bfc585
describe
'151331' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCIM' 'sip-files00221.QC.jpg'
450e4e0810c338b78375e9feeb90f8f3
d945c4ebc6c962f765606cdaaf11ea6c1bb245d3
describe
'1725' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCIN' 'sip-files00153.txt'
4e56a705f233593509829ea192a255d1
632fa51fb59b39cff21991f90f6e568f3e6ea6e5
describe
'52371' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCIO' 'sip-files00144thm.jpg'
919cf0896ad139357dc4c6ed9136892b
064b56158965f2e3242b1c53802c825e36f494ec
describe
'355039' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCIP' 'sip-files00290.QC2.jpg'
4b50f472d202b6f1f91bf5fc6dacce73
0d4f992fbe5b8d50b3aee5a96117a5a489c008e5
'2012-05-25T18:20:34-04:00'
describe
'48445' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCIQ' 'sip-files00199thm.jpg'
8c5d87d833f8b148496ab22c5b21e038
ad4853887684809687337f28293fea3a97843f28
describe
'451050' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCIR' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
f1f927f69062893de1013b5f18b19d9b
f9e5ca17997eb847c6f78b70671b6534b185f001
describe
'403630' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCIS' 'sip-files00220.jpg'
4a3602d07020c0c5bdb08861ed091e35
0fd1bcc4e450c712be3ac4dc662c1e930ae3753b
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCIT' 'sip-files00280.jp2'
196ee65913d9757b2065afb8333cec18
bb412427e47f9cfda33f3599ea63bd95543e5529
describe
'472007' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCIU' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
30611ed0373e8335cd25f1ce76bf3293
991be94faed47f108fb919776feb98da4ae5f2e9
describe
'336020' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCIV' 'sip-files00107.QC2.jpg'
230395005ec726e61394baecbcf22a9f
2cf89c73218aa2b2fefc002f71d3e5ab4649b2e9
'2012-05-25T18:21:01-04:00'
describe
'49385' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCIW' 'sip-files00151thm.jpg'
18876fa99473899d75b31e70b3f6dccc
607f778601d6f16179b6ee08089f4d70d687f49f
describe
'2228908' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCIX' 'sip-files00111.tif'
75a3bbdaafadde9d212c3056ced308cd
bf18cea3a47705805f84f0ecd4c1832313c5bda8
describe
'376025' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCIY' 'sip-files00068.QC2.jpg'
73e059b304d78aebbbdc3fb8f01ae5e9
cdee1cbb911b4d954791ea4b0170cdf5a8616c44
describe
'2228656' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCIZ' 'sip-files00182.tif'
8c954a480a8d15c63fd5dbc884aab1c7
ec15a5b37d26033e42299843799aec8ed086f888
describe
'51326' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCJA' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
9642d5984103936246426e654560af3c
7a8f137162bac646daf58b08d85c6e227700c72f
'2012-05-25T18:17:47-04:00'
describe
'407803' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCJB' 'sip-files00180.jpg'
462128dad4a66ca93eaf2f05510461d5
442bf53748c2d86354c93d3a33f1a032f9a2755f
describe
'2229148' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCJC' 'sip-files00162.tif'
2f1fc21e24036825a1d5237634d66806
d69b947fcb6ba1120b4f935a83ae3458d8d037ba
describe
'474901' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCJD' 'sip-files00215.jpg'
701abeb65e0933c1bf63482aae39ab2f
e0137375a2fba98ee74260568939614ebbacc1da
describe
'161637' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCJE' 'sip-files00151.QC.jpg'
0794109005e57f7be540ba46b5868b1e
b305f57628e9e2237dfae52e8f453042ca0ba9e1
describe
'451683' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCJF' 'sip-files00250.jpg'
5cf4cc6f8953b954ecf866bae36358b4
6eaaa770bb267b2d9305ca9d7c6976ccc4863639
describe
'276891' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCJG' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
24c616efb23453bb767559ed63c0f309
a91e7bd0e86499a6dbdbfbaedc6deb1164820e8e
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCJH' 'sip-files00255.tif'
1007fef22618798eeca9617c4ae45b41
16728de7a381f7a9c0563ef50a9aa88ce38f4a4b
describe
'2229084' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCJI' 'sip-files00254.tif'
10f65afe32353d0b4dda99d48447e1f1
9d00bf8d2ab735871273c65f86368e554102c726
'2012-05-25T18:22:40-04:00'
describe
'419827' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCJJ' 'sip-files00002.QC2.jpg'
380a6b50d3f7fca0678b59c7fb7fff9a
939fda4b35175ac7bcbfd4e5a5f2d99eb6d4d5fe
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCJK' 'sip-files00268.jp2'
368433190cedb2af9a4b369f3a76dd48
f0214dc963ddcacbbecd07d4bad3a59200e38715
describe
'36740' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCJL' 'sip-files00228.pro'
8c73641277e13bb3e73d74c72db0a8b8
06e7f9c54f20de5f216c3e8fc172c14cf24d0d60
describe
'410419' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCJM' 'sip-files00012.QC2.jpg'
46e8ed8d87ca73656c569770d85df7a2
49c9b4c801603985896bf5ecf266622cda1465e3
describe
'485909' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCJN' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
10c08011784f354c167704c542a3ec11
5f64e572b045fc2d65f94f218118ad98eccd6b92
'2012-05-25T18:25:07-04:00'
describe
'267631' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCJO' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
c28764b51a717b75cd74d4f40b955fd0
fa555b546d9984cd7e87672064b7ea50c0058c0e
describe
'347079' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCJP' 'sip-files00242.QC2.jpg'
0ad18a683109d9a414a0df6fdb1e5057
608b74deafd12655e71bcb2a81b9aced1692e588
describe
'276992' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCJQ' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
ba2bf8ac76b1c8b49eb463a0075f5e42
7f79b69e81580630d2fbbbc5c727207401657aba
'2012-05-25T18:17:25-04:00'
describe
'398131' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCJR' 'sip-files00052.QC2.jpg'
ae3ac6e8a84a2cf1a23e432d1477a67e
9789775c0a775178deb5bf93e465a0b900449b8c
describe
'276994' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCJS' 'sip-files00144.jp2'
00699c250751c47c25c98d826c634cec
1b3ee9c54b2da565b5d378224a81e70fc3fec971
'2012-05-25T18:14:12-04:00'
describe
'453212' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCJT' 'sip-files00273.jpg'
191aa97bebed845732ea1b6e09f6cc3f
30f7392e5bb31d4a931b23172ba46d5ffadf8fcd
describe
'152214' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCJU' 'sip-files00242.QC.jpg'
1b808af58c1d3bf8a3b3c213fc5818d1
5d7a316cb6d7e1e6fba3a30a1d316136445dc79a
'2012-05-25T18:15:48-04:00'
describe
'305169' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCJV' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
bfb9771310f87ce46de1fc8b7bcecd56
f4a992eea8507a6b91d7a1f80a87c69621f87db3
'2012-05-25T18:24:13-04:00'
describe
'50260' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCJW' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
a21c30977b9d9d15e42cb664b183e25c
932ed57a8d92f69baf318c7d2f7b2cf30204131d
describe
'39852' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCJX' 'sip-files00229thm.jpg'
17cc1f0020803edd95cd841277884ede
f5dec08d42c0392c66386400e4d880a7e8350d27
describe
'276898' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCJY' 'sip-files00267.jp2'
cbae10720b9bac8517ba8881461901ed
15123dbf23e6bd7ce01e54fcb460a6aa471172d9
describe
'427535' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCJZ' 'sip-files00146.QC2.jpg'
62bed7eb502566557dc3dcb32b1d8a77
b43bfce974205731f3a0d95fd1fceb4258889a18
describe
'2227536' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCKA' 'sip-files00249.tif'
d4363efc81648e1993dfe54fffd7af26
e78b2021eb56d22ed4a60b3cd8231b132305cac4
describe
'360626' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCKB' 'sip-files00205.QC2.jpg'
38b7dc34e847374ea0ce23d7c98f6f58
6ed56e9628dbc6ea9d274fb3cad523bec18f9ecf
describe
'253385' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCKC' 'sip-files00001.QC.jpg'
b217179ea6dbc653edfea74d3f3b84fa
25465a97f32997d51e567644a5dac748303c59c9
describe
'42407' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCKD' 'sip-files00188.pro'
25ba3e356a41d6dde3eca2d75e96d9ea
bdc46321c4fca1fb148d4c3ac2db1e98c9aba633
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCKE' 'sip-files00224.tif'
86fca7b1327991e538e45d6009c24e18
371d3134e60f6ea9d614561efd61437acd60e206
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCKF' 'sip-files00283.jpg'
46142c2baf6771a0e604aface6de4c43
f411f3918aad7ff4422d611baf9a3bb4cd6d0605
describe
'49691' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCKG' 'sip-files00210thm.jpg'
e3fba09e03491bfecab493728625911b
0da860e7ada5bc7c0022623ff4df4cb1bff7c06f
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCKH' 'sip-files00171.txt'
6f361e91055be96294100355612960f0
8eaadeca473b422fce62b840fb5c70b4ba251021
describe
'394677' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCKI' 'sip-files00099.QC2.jpg'
bf682573e252345bbe425dac2cb75e2a
58d02321850529102c677b1e4313127fe7c0d435
describe
'23306' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCKJ' 'sip-files00277.pro'
b425e0477a2414549205cdd5c01455f1
01bf351c6cd43a545be0adaf509d68524f7c5c18
describe
'38637' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCKK' 'sip-files00022.pro'
9c057617adeb44b0ea8b2e127e2b0ab7
9ad2eaa6a3d4b4e5c509f0a19c1d2a27cfac024c
describe
'361211' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCKL' 'sip-files00289.QC2.jpg'
b7e989cdebd061ef0d39b5a53f22e6d4
34ca4941c2b94a0fbc1005b67ff5a58be5ea40fa
describe
'276925' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCKM' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
0c12189dcadd831df88d90626825b95f
bd59b33b25801e2b48cd6294459ddb88473e39c7
'2012-05-25T18:22:03-04:00'
describe
'365675' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCKN' 'sip-files00226.QC2.jpg'
db9e2f984f090755305426f165a53116
c5c30fa1635f83ebaf5bfc1ec2ba061439d8d242
describe
'268537' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCKO' 'sip-files00192.jp2'
6eee29541604f72f9e22d70b429a7632
afdb53475c1b690edf463489ffda3f90c82a0464
describe
'423983' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCKP' 'sip-files00134.QC2.jpg'
d67f574b067a90799e7fe4023336c17e
8a226c8da5b20b2cfcbd944b8d22fded5ff90a1f
describe
'127377' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCKQ' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
ce44bad95d99bef0a6993c7239229ad2
ba4cf487237878ee61d67eda7bd8b82ea05a677e
describe
'0' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCKR' 'sip-filesvalid.txt'
d41d8cd98f00b204e9800998ecf8427e
da39a3ee5e6b4b0d3255bfef95601890afd80709
describe
Zero-length file
'50797' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCKS' 'sip-files00244thm.jpg'
6e73e967f97f453933577d70469aadc6
e30de034ea7f49f7fc3285e8009391e55b69205e
'2012-05-25T18:23:18-04:00'
describe
'374564' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCKT' 'sip-files00201.QC2.jpg'
4eb06834dfc034232ebbcaebffb3caf1
f8900062a47265d4be0b6dff433fe1338682dbfc
describe
'2229360' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCKU' 'sip-files00033.tif'
679cbcf173c3efe6120062bb35ec2e2f
c438c61998fef42a9afe0f004b556ec174956cd5
describe
'438812' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCKV' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
642727551b86fe44c8c71206c73afedb
73cd4cd28721b01781288a432da834628931b9a7
describe
'48071' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCKW' 'sip-files00238thm.jpg'
6c4b1f172e84d8650bcc463396b7f64d
71373e715a7bb5fcb0814d84ec2ef0f013ebbe54
describe
'162575' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCKX' 'sip-files00158.QC.jpg'
375154fb85c5cc983cfcc9e62ea127bd
e16d47a0d3b4fc9af1855370cf3ff22399d2764c
describe
'49944' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCKY' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
78265add83c48cf9b46cb161caa2e256
2a1827577c7062d8c773e8302b85d45fd9466a6e
describe
'38697' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCKZ' 'sip-files00162.pro'
2817437449795f8b5e43e36bd97cc9b4
f2ba39d27c9d59249f078c56566bb72a62f6f68a
describe
'2003996' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCLA' 'sip-files00075.tif'
4f47d7d340212853867710ccd2bf6a8c
ae437840fe67894a1fc75bfd7a0924c9330656f8
'2012-05-25T18:14:14-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCLB' 'sip-files00205.txt'
5ab351aecbcf518eb8df9d845136253c
278541a59adf3899e882a41cbe4a0b1f5686baee
describe
'795' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCLC' 'sip-files00275.txt'
ae7ab8283de848736775954aff067d99
04c4ac0cb89b51659cfa0a9cbfb263361dd7daca
describe
Invalid character
'6659560' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCLD' 'sip-files00117.tif'
6f840609b3b703a5ac657bf19660b7a9
ea8a5ea94837503ac56a5fd29ac7211d71bedf3d
describe
'2228892' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCLE' 'sip-files00041.tif'
9b4324cfe6486dc5555f07473e323882
8f217ad06e8ea4d8eb187e89127b35b978f1aa67
'2012-05-25T18:16:20-04:00'
describe
'352304' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCLF' 'sip-files00097.QC2.jpg'
4cf237a30cecd60bd3775ba6bcf06d96
008c8a9f63ba41e41f593571bd38107f7623cc87
describe
'38123' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCLG' 'sip-files00150.pro'
bcfe09dd7bf64426b6cc1351d9f9ef07
d2dce870541c492f68277821deb6fae4eeb585e5
'2012-05-25T18:26:20-04:00'
describe
'153173' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCLH' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
1082d7d5ef607c2f95cbe599c57029a4
0df4653f356cfd45d30e9ba420960fa348e3912f
describe
'351888' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCLI' 'sip-files00285.QC2.jpg'
9502875bbfc7715e0f3e36949c6e5b0f
737000c2742704e74b67386ed38b7048d5a14277
describe
'2228748' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCLJ' 'sip-files00120.tif'
cce52a29b3054772d32f59e1b75f595c
ce55d118a3d037666571077bc253c59862e3ae94
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCLK' 'sip-files00209.jp2'
995787235f127da2b93df537ec08d890
0dc03fef223a6427ff873991d1eef9bfe62c2d21
describe
'31703' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCLL' 'sip-files00007thm.jpg'
d033e3a1887d0403de237e1c416d2d50
3a22d25bd29e7b8628ac005b46202f99278fae52
describe
'50683' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCLM' 'sip-files00136thm.jpg'
4850ea858ff595bf3f2c8da0bfbd4f1c
000564117b868f70802a18867ce21595720ca781
'2012-05-25T18:21:27-04:00'
describe
'56892' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCLN' 'sip-files00006thm.jpg'
743a3b7fcebf8d030810b05b9a96444e
0af541b5f5e9334787a20b7f7add95208336b562
describe
'168776' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCLO' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
68efcbdfc9c8188689fa8d2b997ec4f0
bac7b68f87dc07b846e89433c24db504b3225dbf
describe
'2228288' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCLP' 'sip-files00055.tif'
6c82c5125d0a9d501707f30453bca66e
43723ad774dbb56d8cea9809726b985d0ba8fa2b
describe
'462313' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCLQ' 'sip-files00147.jpg'
6968b97021e7c4c637eecfee6bb0ea0b
d8557caa64292fe016c9f7dc7bb0f7287290a237
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCLR' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
afdb14537e1babe86604532bab2864b2
7f7357c9e4c4398f24ab9c03336021f322d630f1
describe
'49877' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCLS' 'sip-files00257thm.jpg'
b55ccf15fafb4d72d8889cd83fb369ea
d444db8a18a5f71108883a21984aea3fec266023
'2012-05-25T18:14:54-04:00'
describe
'276989' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCLT' 'sip-files00198.jp2'
c261cca32fa4a66fc137dfba57043903
eb3ca423ce5f0a90b9632199030dad31e6fbcc91
describe
'444834' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCLU' 'sip-files00086.QC2.jpg'
74cef52176a885541c9b62283ed36d96
1fd9d255beeb0452c089caec5196db2cdcc14468
describe
'1380' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCLV' 'sip-files00273.txt'
cadf698898634095ddfa5175ebccbebc
e54668f992a84b7aefe095a1dff7e6781612384c
describe
'39868' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCLW' 'sip-files00082.pro'
c8ede9ea8a0775682eaa47922982966c
4b9983cb34df7acf37cdcda2b57d970f5690c286
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCLX' 'sip-files00240.jp2'
f21cd6189d9c3c4c8c077d1dea2c8952
098469775f29cc0b6567223eaf23903d88d866f2
describe
'396231' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCLY' 'sip-files00069.QC2.jpg'
c18bb54a368aaf369bd94d4aff155bae
99558636f58bb3f3fd60872824cdd56822f89185
describe
'443691' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCLZ' 'sip-files00023.QC2.jpg'
58e8e1c6cd4a5b9d39eb36ed5510daef
31acebb42af3e793b19c450ef777f1ca4130cc9c
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCMA' 'sip-files00212.jp2'
78eb38c6d4d734e292aad68ffa72fb3c
22c7e3c1f177eeb9ea62feb067b9444e184bbf7b
'2012-05-25T18:25:33-04:00'
describe
'352537' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCMB' 'sip-files00265.jpg'
86401cefe799017da08d46a29bef3bd5
69a8d728bd98c5d4d3c425987ed6fddf82b492b0
'2012-05-25T18:14:07-04:00'
describe
'391290' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCMC' 'sip-files00101.QC2.jpg'
d47ce5744280a05895e6c358f881a248
44e16d0167331558d77bfd6cd6d67ce7c224fff2
describe
'53118' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCMD' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
1d2887ee36c72d450dee16f041634df4
5afbad9932e912bb5a67fb86b10835a217a23dc4
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCME' 'sip-files00120.txt'
2fba9937a31158d1d862b30027b441ac
c399fa049a41a6ff49c5827cc68adbbce8f541b8
describe
'410872' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCMF' 'sip-files00188.QC2.jpg'
42c6050ca78efa394d35e3f164a7b5f0
843828d40451145b0e95088f3a96fda1a63601b7
describe
'471007' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCMG' 'sip-files00142.jpg'
2d759b32ff16382becf7d5dd7606b14e
4434cd6ad997658be51aecfb5eedec29c9c0e486
describe
'1040' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCMH' 'sip-files00080.txt'
4bb486f731117d9b8064f7d1e1cbf14d
9cffce0bce81e87ed3ef5d9745f8a9be038c1aa3
describe
'2228532' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCMI' 'sip-files00211.tif'
e5718bf77f1f3d131028cfda94ddca22
ce8d9e9bf67fbc72910c078e280e716f52f6363b
'2012-05-25T18:14:13-04:00'
describe
'134622' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCMJ' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
70e95eef95d96913b63c60a6205cf9fd
dd059bc28753c164c785691eac3cdc967882452d
describe
'475190' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCMK' 'sip-files00144.jpg'
280c6ade871c6bf1ffb89616e3923a0f
6e7548988212dbe211af4575b4f14eeb8dfdd9bb
describe
'428767' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCML' 'sip-files00202.jpg'
4d48ab64792aed9ae4690e082b717b5e
71e2f2746fab7e5b83ad689547994ba44d98ea92
describe
'164127' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCMM' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
7a41b4702a652e0bb36868d8f01cf450
3df561c634f1404681c03021aab83a8e81d57e5a
describe
'276874' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCMN' 'sip-files00186.jp2'
05f0378e32d763fc045050a09e1c3037
a373065c096c5129d62d88314d240ef7fe403e71
describe
'48727' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCMO' 'sip-files00207thm.jpg'
d7ef984b0caf6f43c0d89d67933d0cb6
1f7a05acfd261d43da634706624a516b86272294
describe
'35189' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCMP' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
ba4ba9d5a5816c6f69f8e5e08d5444f2
0e31799dc7ac8b2aeb5208f965f6c98561666210
describe
'41204' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCMQ' 'sip-files00132thm.jpg'
6eea9a73a68d6dc0657f5f9e4fefbff2
809272b1c2dd20e16338f13699119171128d0528
describe
'39734' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCMR' 'sip-files00073.pro'
d407931127951c5864720f3cec1842ab
833b841432cf4309f6fa75b4945cd36fcf717246
describe
'150913' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCMS' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
9e27e0caad6ffc44071ac9f86a5b1d22
1459696bf4e1e525c8568e0c27571ac297f892d8
describe
'415195' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCMT' 'sip-files00085.QC2.jpg'
da28062b8bd0391f59b66d9a2efaed35
749edc996d72b8e7f433ee910ecf80d39dc0ec21
describe
'148955' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCMU' 'sip-files00228.QC.jpg'
4e171ce950d4c733e704c11177f1a08f
af82021c4bf4bf3a77a97569b5576bd62897846b
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCMV' 'sip-files00239.jp2'
212251a02f7fdf0d5996db41eeddf1ba
bf55a8606d5cbcc195471edfe721714c62cb0740
'2012-05-25T18:20:32-04:00'
describe
'39125' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCMW' 'sip-files00091.pro'
88f0b0c92f4905a81a033966df5f849f
bdea80c53fa00c98e92512df25567f06fdac42cd
describe
'171631' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCMX' 'sip-files00215.QC.jpg'
fed727f37d64943a6d9dd498b58c0b4f
d6b7bc7cde8dc6dd0e0245ee9f19b579b0e9e308
describe
'48840' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCMY' 'sip-files00205thm.jpg'
edb1b52ef19a4fd57d011f6b7aa4d463
521aface803a035672c39f9bba9ed9fd995909d1
describe
'168243' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCMZ' 'sip-files00146.QC.jpg'
6a120c9a863b3203319d701b4e753853
8b8be82027be1d43decb212e00c1a57a86558681
describe
'41243' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCNA' 'sip-files00060.pro'
48c10c916b5c612d35cf2267dc5dac95
0c8dd5b6e2a7d6141ba02f8127a3213273468897
describe
'169438' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCNB' 'sip-files00254.QC.jpg'
0eef1fac88caedb19e92762836948665
c07f008293945127fa8a482fb1afe71d534e687b
describe
'37952' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCNC' 'sip-files00235.pro'
945b3d6ce323dfca988f0c7252121139
28faa81696441296605c1d1d179449cb79cdd5d2
describe
'34344' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCND' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
461f686cec95ff7d6faa2acd43e74bb5
d134974e6620d46033a944eb250a1a66a5481fcf
describe
'417244' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCNE' 'sip-files00205.jpg'
a5b4da8069fe3d196fcecd6ed82e09bb
a01ecec29f14118ad4467f34c5b380b13378ddda
describe
'301951' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCNF' 'sip-files00154.jpg'
9fb5b7854252bd43708ce94e0a03fdf4
762c9a651f016082b9991c120f74ec3b5f474ee6
'2012-05-25T18:17:28-04:00'
describe
'327385' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCNG' 'sip-files00132.QC2.jpg'
dfe7f381f644758db01d14e448d0e885
2a22041ec1563c5f44e025efe77f07f096c2808b
describe
'144300' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCNH' 'sip-files00218.QC.jpg'
99f0d63850358d50158ab9068dece0f2
1752fed808da8077ad492c72a1ed4ec9e0e0cec4
describe
'382221' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCNI' 'sip-files00177.QC2.jpg'
c3ceb0eb82aeea7aa770b46e48c6e751
363e683c38dc757db8da89ef7b1c5bd48524f913
describe
'27520' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCNJ' 'sip-files00168.pro'
4543c24b185770473e127500e9eeb020
3c84c910ceb35f94042678a4717976d0d105c1c3
describe
'40144' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCNK' 'sip-files00104.pro'
9ce4037d4137328247a24af1012abc8e
25b863f81f97e9b6afaef0d2783e30b82128d6df
describe
'1640' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCNL' 'sip-files00118.txt'
8dc9bdab38198b4a1b32ca5e787f6673
1d74244cea6c428f0f3a17ad22e6d344d17b9343
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCNM' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
cd98216daf97cb5c0a8b8f2141379a7d
02c5c2710698c22ce8b6733a28d9c39bf2dc6815
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCNN' 'sip-files00182.jp2'
4b1479815667f16a0dc7404b4b226a62
b161a01a0ddff8d9b368a1221030130041dafe3c
describe
'302778' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCNO' 'sip-files00204.jp2'
5396964e70d4a88e49664832140e62fe
067a3265c6fef40f6c7d756c67652ef73b2017d7
describe
'138556' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCNP' 'sip-files00272.QC.jpg'
9082a84e9bcdb073d5eb9d8c3ff68945
1da373dcacd1804f76b5c94756461abc8223418b
describe
'2013840' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCNQ' 'sip-files00215.tif'
9c4d9c21d4ee3d29ef5bc695085ab03d
296fa9f165f1a8b7afdd6aec8d4fd9821f301b98
'2012-05-25T18:18:09-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCNR' 'sip-files00233.jp2'
4dbe6f65afb4fea1e4bba7b4f3290c41
92af1908358c3e40b8ff9032a38220a24d347b3e
describe
'51002' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCNS' 'sip-files00190thm.jpg'
ec75a4481a019180b2594831fb149c1c
e9c9ffe416cf71f0dc191c2dbe159f543c824f1d
describe
'137535' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCNT' 'sip-files00270.QC.jpg'
442b4f0ba13605ae6a3032bac4153a85
78ddb9db4ebb362f30d874d5061f6212ab0b5164
describe
'1664' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCNU' 'sip-files00193.txt'
672d3398728707a91a86172df1df032d
fc4983f9641b654b0bdd0f72842e8c27c792da99
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCNV' 'sip-files00241.txt'
0b46e6370bca7c101b205d43623fbb1e
379186572cab40b279aae82906546726d1f6359a
describe
'54094' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCNW' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
7f2c9ea737f645b0f550cd786cdbe3d0
b66611d0e53c85983db2da0bc0c9be5b7ac1cdd7
describe
'167787' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCNX' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
e2d66387832af01b947a9aaca6d8677b
30132c34346604baf03f734a255480a21d76bda7
describe
'267613' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCNY' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
7cfb892b8d1e4a1227e2d1c0a2510ffb
390740cc42d22a60baff94235c8925164520f660
describe
'413711' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCNZ' 'sip-files00149.jpg'
c39440ea7b01bd401bea7a01b634b8fe
96d23447b11586360b48f9ae0efed0048124b88c
describe
'38032' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCOA' 'sip-files00068.pro'
d50aaa7b40b3aeb98321d561414f2d70
99957d7b6c894f54be2329aa11777f97632179d4
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCOB' 'sip-files00044.tif'
bbc6be143b83310b2b7f3e2d396b67d3
7565c3b2847d133bff8a2497974a238f69f92d97
describe
'2228844' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCOC' 'sip-files00084.tif'
1b7438595bd51587a3479d5f9823ea81
7a5999d9a497dc399d5834596d26a08254469290
'2012-05-25T18:18:20-04:00'
describe
'423823' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCOD' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
23be42befe85e08010afb7ff33ffe70e
f37a0287ab3473153b99dd5782b776d7c7dd337f
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCOE' 'sip-files00167.txt'
094a6f82788f122dfda379c4d06bd53b
dfddd88680d9e3214dfd4ef78dfa56e5c0bd86eb
describe
'355839' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCOF' 'sip-files00233.QC2.jpg'
6141585a4850f8fea1e0c6496357cc7b
2b130650a1bbf6dbe4be802cf6d95b6636222bcf
describe
'465945' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCOG' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
6909019f6e6d0ce87122062957becbe0
4f6c4f60499d2932ba4421a06feefbb64cb533e0
describe
'276961' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCOH' 'sip-files00251.jp2'
8c2e2654407a73bd2cc48284d55236c2
b30c8599837d49c8074d4ede6c502460ca6e207d
describe
'168557' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCOI' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
6a15c8c7cb39c4c394450843b70f541c
1292ed6592fa54bb86280f96d367a371c876002d
describe
'27354' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCOJ' 'sip-files00132.pro'
a3e61bd44b0dddb42abeb775c3727763
15f013fcafe76d914f91de4567083b0433df7ab3
describe
'406042' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCOK' 'sip-files00106.QC2.jpg'
631df8337447a5787c144ba328ca7568
495b76eacf2f153e2c85b3620d4ce230420c8ad7
describe
'2229356' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCOL' 'sip-files00017.tif'
7d2e48d54fadedc747da166df4148f24
3e90732ad183ee57647efe36d6aec83558628b38
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCOM' 'sip-files00046.txt'
45ba7c3ce62172e61a730e392ae7b064
9c80dd4faa0a4914a3db2e43ad337f7567b6b9b1
describe
'38493' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCON' 'sip-files00171.pro'
140751d61bb2d88d29d3129324e8aee5
132854dbb3138ada83cdce7a7f0e349399e6611e
describe
'36008' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCOO' 'sip-files00237.pro'
7e5110de4fa27e8928eaa0e884c16909
59628b49096e0a1cd63b1384dc9bcd6df0027622
describe
'2229336' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCOP' 'sip-files00016.tif'
6ea37a99a9ed9019f57df03fbb337e74
0caf667524aaf4b2baf6e3c218f5c69ecbc6ef44
'2012-05-25T18:21:54-04:00'
describe
'401185' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCOQ' 'sip-files00258.QC2.jpg'
d516b5ce5b81d73c2d8792a92934f14b
f0c5d7082e743142bb8b3446ebfbfc89fa2dd725
describe
'40487' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCOR' 'sip-files00123.pro'
8d5811f726a0ad1332b03b862d97c4a0
7b20da1c2373ac3c5054eda0c827b4f31a155aef
describe
'49586' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCOS' 'sip-files00242thm.jpg'
f0a184a4a1586fa55f5fe394a01d3e14
0522e4b5de10d39e51625a3e4e807b7644bc7097
describe
'51' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCOT' 'sip-files00001.txt'
869bdd57e4c9bd06fdbed80a7f77b76a
7ad2f0318184bca1d9007a355f3fca0a6a9d2ccb
describe
'50160' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCOU' 'sip-files00150thm.jpg'
cb511bcfd0a3663a818ddad77f040ff4
1c97edffb100e2e21734e3b2f8431b6d4bfe8383
describe
'1325' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCOV' 'sip-files00288.txt'
2ac05787da7181e04788dc6e69ff370a
b31f5b17f898582103604ba6db91f0bedf6531c3
describe
Invalid character
'276885' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCOW' 'sip-files00289.jp2'
2322b0486b37c28f0c8f4d02d459ea87
e716438a91e5c410870330780d46e2b907d7b372
describe
'144946' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCOX' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
ef4aed87749c80460e29b996b86b9256
4880653cc542e5db0f139032589bbf685a873169
describe
'169010' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCOY' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
a3931932421d7f83d3469acbffb1dfac
567ed805605c6e25269a4336fd2fd0e53255f98d
describe
'482264' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCOZ' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
eef99a167922214d6148f75cc1d2bd1d
c1d7b97efabd98c297f6809d0efcc6908850b3fa
describe
'1735' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCPA' 'sip-files00226.txt'
f2ecf802d4d59329e47ea450128f9e51
a2adf06a2c8ad2a30dba78882507c058cb0764c6
describe
'277018' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCPB' 'sip-files00217.jp2'
bf43b49a546d9b0315a8eeadc0d88f8e
090095969dfdac95e1231c11f6e65447a6e2893a
describe
'36222' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCPC' 'sip-files00149.pro'
db0f4de4f92fa87b87b4acb6c7878d55
b1f4c3e34646e2c2a7b7f5913fdc4d24073c07cd
describe
'40511' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCPD' 'sip-files00051.pro'
f3a88142671e973d9360c697fbef8e2a
e130128c17a555b2964cb4505dea09a2ff09ffb4
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCPE' 'sip-files00152.txt'
d40e6c5b6c0ddc43968ab64be415947a
b844fea67ba63a138b3882c1e01495218b85e133
describe
'426054' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCPF' 'sip-files00110.QC2.jpg'
2641db7555d85ea185a375297811502d
b58e55a4196be4be8f27e1de5e03d13f9d611886
describe
'52857' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCPG' 'sip-files00156thm.jpg'
aa71d3910883a51ee0206b8dc126a1ca
3c28dd7ea84292b9b955bb9a52fbe897f4ee3b3b
describe
'39007' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCPH' 'sip-files00236.pro'
9f01c0e94e7e71a44c9994fff562c5fa
d4c5354fa8a9cb9d8d4c72ebe46152e820157c22
describe
'428493' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCPI' 'sip-files00245.jpg'
844918f2972727c93a5749f39c879e1f
a30cbb485fbdf5e55cd8d8619d6dc9fa9a7a8dbe
describe
'49749' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCPJ' 'sip-files00221thm.jpg'
c85a57993f6d6075046a724a201c9875
873177a43e7f6c42306ed81f43c5978392806293
describe
'429341' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCPK' 'sip-files00098.QC2.jpg'
0111af821eeeeb7c651f6c9fee803ee5
c343c2fe05a137bbf31d9d9dfe955b14b74c5bdf
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCPL' 'sip-files00263.tif'
efc1ffd09ee91ec3e14ac7441cfd8b1a
f0677dfabd5522aa2460ac79ffd137281a9c8c0d
describe
'380600' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCPM' 'sip-files00067.QC2.jpg'
0122e5d07071e49647f1159ca1b709f7
2aedacd32cb61b348f0f6be4e9769f140da69140
describe
'464924' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCPN' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
1cf7399690c0207f34df5e49e3a2dbc7
ca1099a0a903be24a58ac2774fc27d39619b8fe2
'2012-05-25T18:20:47-04:00'
describe
'1625' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCPO' 'sip-files00047.txt'
02fa9ea1801ed663dc7d3ba823d47b72
dff951992d78a36f0af8bcd2305d14e5b5eb90b9
describe
'680415' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCPP' 'sip-files00166.jpg'
a52c2e753c93182cdea781612cd56c8d
246aa291d031a013ddf415a5fc80bc68a2f37ebc
describe
'276935' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCPQ' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
db27cba4541c598836096f568035cb17
ac43f954dd597e9dfd6b0c85a0e78207f69a04f3
describe
'1685' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCPR' 'sip-files00035.txt'
db1a9c4bb2eff64055303f78f6ebba76
fe1c3ca2bf152ba00af8b839367e896c12b49a75
describe
'1673' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCPS' 'sip-files00096.txt'
30115d141374fa16a3cca1b0c9f8d2e6
2302394c913ea085879368aa696eb0e4fa057a01
describe
'293494' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCPT' 'sip-files00285.jp2'
e03b405aee1502b46daa55633b266fa7
18bbaca02ba9703afa1545d9d55f5f20ab7bf9c2
describe
'50546' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCPU' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
4f12398a61a82820d665f9f3207c97df
388d326f1958989b7cbaa00beb0b66a6b24350c1
describe
'441637' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCPV' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
72609d744d7a4b3438fbce65328708c8
2215c3cab529f9c860ec37bd85a4846343d3c102
describe
'38639' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCPW' 'sip-files00213.pro'
d5fff3abc79967fff233b952c069d3ca
1214ae55b1a8181a3ae73991d2db4543e01c5300
describe
'396379' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCPX' 'sip-files00065.QC2.jpg'
270b74677855809e6cc01e7610b975cd
ad551a2e74d315a7e55683fc6fc5a4a971d068ef
describe
'473845' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCPY' 'sip-files00158.jpg'
70ad80e4149e066c6ab0ee258c926af5
41c217d7005ec225df612e53181afd8fa478456c
describe
'392785' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCPZ' 'sip-files00282.QC2.jpg'
1d7e1c7eff44986a5fa07ecb00ce65cb
a8e806dccfb7c60edae441d92ee818f43578b697
'2012-05-25T18:25:12-04:00'
describe
'445952' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCQA' 'sip-files00259.jpg'
dfaf704ebd0fd596ae9d019cc2f70b85
a656daef18e33e75458510d0ad1fba32600c7933
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCQB' 'sip-files00048.txt'
21fcb38f722357ff31b4a810bd898436
57a0c493b3c69751cb174d73e1215bfcae09e046
describe
'375695' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCQC' 'sip-files00055.QC2.jpg'
35d3d836447a08c3c8056a0cd2f08158
89c8d3e9a27ea09261c46da43e7a1c47c1b13f62
describe
'2227448' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCQD' 'sip-files00062.tif'
6eddd33d01c2aecdf989e97cb52f465b
6b4ce6cf1f0d7c26cec200527a73c9383aad1382
describe
'2452592' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCQE' 'sip-files00019.tif'
45819c0120315d9dc78d90a9add5dc37
20021f5de443b86449e9ecabd499097ac9f682b9
describe
'28894' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCQF' 'sip-files00106.pro'
1b245a153518faffa6156b6f22347a3b
2076a08e83a1478b0de587ee682a5ca61a24de44
describe
'42948' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCQG' 'sip-files00057.pro'
ebf6bd4a1d74ce3c6d7f81302a7c1035
733980860c56a4fec867e4a260a9b94033633b89
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCQH' 'sip-files00124.tif'
033edbe967b89bbc6c8ff435fa9c474d
6fa0e85649979af5773da1dd2113ad3b5f10d14a
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCQI' 'sip-files00037.txt'
837ba50a0b5050b5c6dad5b788074c31
17f3c66fc78d74c1dd0cb0c48f2d56987383a298
describe
'38383' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCQJ' 'sip-files00158.pro'
553c4a0c95d19d2fa447f12638ea5b96
aa27854f2b6c86be96dd0e0adbdbce8409808410
describe
'356193' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCQK' 'sip-files00208.QC2.jpg'
0fdb2e28ac46756a2df0df431bd059b2
a00835af8bcf28021ab16bef3870eace2a5efdcd
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCQL' 'sip-files00272.tif'
782410ec94d27b794cf2324700608c06
14c6c7609658f2e0ecd22fcb5692442c7c3ca43f
describe
'40888' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCQM' 'sip-files00036.pro'
772f57c545ac55da2e0c80a90cd246b3
8ee3808b6a422ccb3b28d4893ba155e20f4f02b8
describe
'53065' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCQN' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
ec6011377f9bc504ec87610c8a71fec7
43483c1c5b4b7bc3fee1067139a0e7bdec049025
describe
'2227792' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCQO' 'sip-files00107.tif'
530c0af0f9a24f46a645e0a8ffe85a0f
b4738b05ffa4aff85f9209c97d46f22d4566f72d
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCQP' 'sip-files00200.jp2'
8f1d4e2a7e4fff86f6df5fe9161f31e3
a80da51d50ff3e148e3945032b317d807cdc202a
describe
'437394' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCQQ' 'sip-files00078.QC2.jpg'
70dbdb30ea52805c0c8959fbcd43790e
62175c9cdebd0df51a4e3771581cb44d2d149639
describe
'54029' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCQR' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
6333f3a27396b7845c8e3cb2330af323
ec41d1a0221a5cfd0ef9113e74502ecdd1607114
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCQS' 'sip-files00067.txt'
8db94ef0eb65bfdf6acbb81a20c3f490
d5aa73febc248ec24246b68b70aaab1f0c5c0efd
describe
'162329' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCQT' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
4e47af7bc43938981937b378c577b903
fe163ceb03bb9e6a220d53001ca90825d3973642
describe
'679' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCQU' 'sip-files00268.txt'
c6b9bc26cf1a5c4d2fc7029ff45390b4
b29f6e0bd9b45408f41b0f3deea28034062cd7a9
describe
Invalid character
'2023512' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCQV' 'sip-files00098.tif'
eba9dda3d2aa948fbd9c50831b4a7a95
cec376468721208a04f02538c8a4033cf18504ad
'2012-05-25T18:19:26-04:00'
describe
'404311' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCQW' 'sip-files00013.QC2.jpg'
adcb0d4f75df1d75fa48d8cfc40119b3
92e424b3c8bb3734f8fff9436343bd85c75c04b1
describe
'2228480' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCQX' 'sip-files00151.tif'
44b32820cfa8e7d9ebb9975782be29cd
39151b529a6dc8dba271930ed7f2f1ffb1bfab10
describe
'49482' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCQY' 'sip-files00256thm.jpg'
80408f686bf0a5f460dd881f18317a42
2f0ef5eddf9fce3358d8935892c7260c4ba0e810
describe
'156305' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCQZ' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
7a6acdbce6e3aaf16ba31020dd9e4ac7
7244d96b2a2ea038e53fe90b624fb962c9b8685a
describe
'454470' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCRA' 'sip-files00151.jpg'
a6ba2efaaac932516439740d469bd907
99d30c2f4ce7ad77a3924533d22090dc2d64c6ef
describe
'425297' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCRB' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
d4d0a605f0b40904804e7794ef6b3117
850e854671d015abce7dc2c9c575cce5bd62e8ee
describe
'447836' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCRC' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
7b902a55a6b3413fa08a9e2c59867a72
9f787e54b0eaa03d92a9e89a660826171b281d1f
describe
'149693' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCRD' 'sip-files00200.QC.jpg'
a7e51a0a041320567d86b2538a327c16
678ae7da423e121eee71f5055222a16058b039e0
describe
'1000' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCRE' 'sip-files00291.txt'
8449574ef57a2493388d37eaad878ecc
7071237dacb6139acee39586e857118d854dd527
describe
'161963' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCRF' 'sip-files00258.QC.jpg'
88a1478c9e06cf1980c698f8547643ad
5035e019acbe825a0868dd9050d504e0d9354219
'2012-05-25T18:20:10-04:00'
describe
'463255' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCRG' 'sip-files00153.jpg'
7898857ab6aefec81cc06474b532500a
4ee9c719e07c91cedce12df9a6d6792ecd80fb1f
describe
'526594' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCRH' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
01dd010c0371a3ae4779d9fe057a5cd9
64ebbcce6bc4e9435d23ba5459312d30b985169f
describe
'277015' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCRI' 'sip-files00151.jp2'
c8f8f9977b02349f126e2bcff3314e5b
2ebc3c4bfa5a295d5fb708d2866d2cb85b2eb9fe
describe
'35506' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCRJ' 'sip-files00101.pro'
a88484568443176e48d4b91d06b26228
064d68c7f8282227d0b28d3f930a5afb4ece4575
describe
'276966' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCRK' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
b0b70ddadf0e6de42f3a0bff40e3154b
172d1f9e38fe480e7d9198a5de4c8a648ed5031c
'2012-05-25T18:17:29-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCRL' 'sip-files00226.tif'
e64ff095a4111edc2679d9db85a76afb
ad22b0d0c25bd3cab42b9f1d4fe41a84b67f8273
'2012-05-25T18:26:45-04:00'
describe
'38220' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCRM' 'sip-files00144.pro'
b2de558a81e3a7e3bb8aff89ed2d6e75
53f17d47bfa783edbd917ddd7dbd93a05906f945
describe
'40086' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCRN' 'sip-files00011.pro'
9b29b9b0f0491ee7c63c925ab9a62e80
4d870004d3afa06be4fffc9965b57f80078376b1
describe
'2001900' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCRO' 'sip-files00051.tif'
031dc9d8a557a8c2eadd4123a25cf6ff
7db045fe90e72c89b3296417ca22da5834c51992
describe
'154017' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCRP' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
51a01fa55f8f26c790e9e26722b327b8
fcf8f55ffba1a0be800e101d074c53fda0c9bd43
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCRQ' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
eccf45dbc858caa5d9b959e274610c98
4c273d5ed0a4b9fbbd3328c638cac35f272defee
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCRR' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
5478e91f8ed413a2f2be5c6945310e45
937d917e0795489ef9255dbfa60ad46205c5d001
describe
'41548' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCRS' 'sip-files00139.pro'
b0fd4fec913f5a778f5c4ce796027921
d8800d425ef5c345bf9313a0d637827e9304a88f
describe
'152604' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCRT' 'sip-files00235.QC.jpg'
ed2ab64123edae3c3940871f850af26c
bd2cf8936a347d8e73be359270e130ecbd47ec4e
describe
'157503' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCRU' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
e65b1a494dd53fc33437aec30bf7868d
c0d6c71db935fb2ec2e66563ff2f59a2bb1270da
describe
'2228704' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCRV' 'sip-files00070.tif'
2a74613ab5d374da9ea8166f7bcbaa10
2b7a4a854fc0d4d474c56ab3d29d408c4f662f44
describe
'170638' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCRW' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
c093724be188dc2a830ad496322a37d5
2a22a3a6e54bfec6b13ea2b62297ef0c5608ba4c
'2012-05-25T18:18:18-04:00'
describe
'481267' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCRX' 'sip-files00163.jpg'
b6057179ab9948fd58f3fe2c0e804f86
244c47a337ec888fdb85692d8d3ec84bc9c5a163
describe
'154823' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCRY' 'sip-files00213.QC.jpg'
31a10b537860202413900874fca66365
406d211d6644250ce1ac15b2517e772ed28dcc2f
describe
'1809' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCRZ' 'sip-files00189.txt'
1d66134bef392241c86b2a65449c6a6d
5220091235ae42d5841410bd76b6d9aa53243404
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCSA' 'sip-files00231.jp2'
44509e9aa8f36c4778558d7b2e4e4398
c786abcf3f737d5066f33a7ae0a829848ac94fcd
describe
'47051' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCSB' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
3aa48494f5e171ce259635f9fd8d681d
1f2ffd7f2d5bf58649a12effc921f73bc23f9a71
'2012-05-25T18:16:53-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCSC' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
33f6ae580cc2300cd6cba6507106709d
4a3830e8c03e4029a135fb382a40f0d2a9edf0b0
describe
'2326644' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCSD' 'sip-files00287.tif'
140f886cbef3676363f040bf7bd248ea
8691d468da96ef30c038e1659a6344604d413900
describe
'424676' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCSE' 'sip-files00115.QC2.jpg'
7a6dc2614cded42c670e72f7d3b2ebcb
952f1e9e2271817442c4cdc0a243649476065672
describe
'41328' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCSF' 'sip-files00250.pro'
3b53b03604438757546f69d6938df725
2914ea8ebe1dd72f18f7df0b949e112010f6d5cf
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCSG' 'sip-files00218.jp2'
f29f151a81c91bac44efd32820cd3ec6
6a641b4511b87ac4c143db8fe1f23d8c92833691
describe
'246973' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCSH' 'sip-files00165.jp2'
a3cf7920d07e6976bafd5279745a5989
f6c86b38c8119602aa98ab13a902cad13baa1c3e
describe
'39408' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCSI' 'sip-files00233.pro'
2f1a12a810a497c68b28122ad4efc20b
f3c4de65061b24c76cfd7b5685f4244e436d7097
describe
'163086' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCSJ' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
e4936089377232b3899b918916492e40
4af87ad61f8b186fb581e695cc41817758ca14bd
describe
'45675' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCSK' 'sip-files00185thm.jpg'
c5ebe91350cc12a56d57035c4c5bb7a2
6d68195594e5970c426be21a12811d261c670722
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCSL' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
7551c88599cdab5c02fbc8a94605c129
e498f30bcec4ea287f3d2fae2df3287859238ce1
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCSM' 'sip-files00171.tif'
27a97f1ddba6c1f254355ccc975e7724
7395f71eca8d43d158f6c5e81d2120d768dd04e1
describe
'27088' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCSN' 'sip-files00097.pro'
28146ccc3fd1e24fe8b58ef1f35e2f88
4a160342e88f739708eb61bba24cad0da9f92507
describe
'20390' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCSO' 'sip-files00112.pro'
2b114234792973629c6a0a5cf8e4506a
616f97292ad6e11188638ede663196a67fe05846
describe
'50701' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCSP' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
5e28f1b14e7ae4ed18d0a76dcbcfddc5
5678638778c28a966001c3c826e04bd056040fa4
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCSQ' 'sip-files00269.jp2'
3065397a1a75b657e90f72c61dc1085f
67a87f82fc4a78902e46716bc1520ebff3009be1
describe
'50582' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCSR' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
67e7fb481426b53ad1e1f8ff2415793b
9645496ecc5fa81d186d34cf21d314b8d3a899d1
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCSS' 'sip-files00181.jp2'
b52b2c032c339d744583095562d94a82
fd327f1ba4a6350f716f31f1a6d4b0c89ac6a303
describe
'461285' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCST' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
f6af801eda99abc7fd754a5ca151dced
dd6074a334352f14eb1e6050371f7f96cc227c7f
'2012-05-25T18:25:23-04:00'
describe
'138254' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCSU' 'sip-files00185.QC.jpg'
ba981d7e5bc5dd10bac0924a50a5db0c
ce417b4fcaecf56f4b35512941ee6ae04e950089
describe
'493032' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCSV' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
06cf246685429ac7ab6d2170d0baec85
0ff7f14e6111a43865b652a79139906a87b364fa
describe
'449636' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCSW' 'sip-files00104.QC2.jpg'
9b610dd70d8b994a0372f85ecdcd429f
70b86df6b6f700fca8774882bf7907ce56a22d98
describe
'494139' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCSX' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
65eb2a30904607368af2b981f051604e
105dc2477683b5925992a2a8ddc13338b0023ef6
describe
'166634' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCSY' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
39aeaac05d9623df209a3d6ee4742281
ffae431b08efc6430a8a9db4366c67f81b51fe8a
describe
'250237' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCSZ' 'sip-files00179.QC2.jpg'
06905b64725938768ff0fb2ad9eef2e9
df66ec517f82765bdfeed6face2826bb44aca9db
describe
'351515' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCTA' 'sip-files00286.QC2.jpg'
9f828c6f31d122cb711024b20636e146
7b9a6962dab8698c818bad01c7846926f971ac47
describe
'496396' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCTB' 'sip-files00274.jpg'
e2b507073f67765c5e2bd78135f7e2c7
cdad8a1aaa53af24a82d6e0646039ff028cae424
describe
'147084' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCTC' 'sip-files00227.QC.jpg'
b9dbf44931085d28285a079b2275e00e
b3ff69e4c2e8fa915e6b865775fd8db3091de638
describe
'1404' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCTD' 'sip-files00272.txt'
811669458b2126cd9e075f6e8551de17
7c3adec7133e74be9f879b5875150030cfa8754d
describe
'171844' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCTE' 'sip-files00165.QC.jpg'
9f6ca5059cd0de116f06a4caea1f7a2a
36b5e44ba64616022ffce5d75df5a409baa73dac
'2012-05-25T18:19:55-04:00'
describe
'51044' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCTF' 'sip-files00251thm.jpg'
3b1ca674afa98b01dd5fdd93e4fd290e
4fcd2bea2dc4e7585ec20269d71827d5c93bc98e
describe
'41996' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCTG' 'sip-files00003thm.jpg'
894c63949270d32612192f0f6334b330
2109cc304c0e0468bea995528a210158716531f5
describe
'276987' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCTH' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
b6e7109ca1e6c2014c8a210a2b9ba924
3d5db54a498435580faa743fcd01e4742259ce37
describe
'40825' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCTI' 'sip-files00145.pro'
63f0e07a465439cd53f6ba082066f418
e89e59746e4fb2cdb1b5dc945ee0cf18c3202db6
describe
'404645' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCTJ' 'sip-files00124.QC2.jpg'
5eb9d74e2493c635041b6eef68e8bea5
3f51a1398dac7f7432bd78f6215355a933f685f0
describe
'421651' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCTK' 'sip-files00236.jpg'
54bd2c9e696137a825ee4a8203974a39
4610f99aa1fc634ea52857d30462e2d5ac561815
describe
'1714' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCTL' 'sip-files00023.txt'
d5b3b26b58714b3a7eb5fd8f4e835b32
2ff8630f5fdbee92dc3e5f236946d13549302bb9
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCTM' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
425d2b93d786314171b7833216a66e94
5365338e22ca21ac11469e10416fa9f7288c4ecb
describe
'163060' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCTN' 'sip-files00251.QC.jpg'
9a9338b234e420a289663985edfbc69d
856475b7aeadcf37f57a754494f4e27aff8f7fe1
describe
'1484' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCTO' 'sip-files00099.txt'
d5b64e5b476f9026827876bbd0f666e5
93517e3c511792f614d72ab59ba97641c14b7a0b
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCTP' 'sip-files00071.tif'
166ea02a64f02febffa34d72a1057a0c
ccfeda9cb36d6abd1c1593e884c90b4556670853
describe
'449819' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCTQ' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
b77ff8453ee4f2a4421cde2815358a04
fbb5300e26e32755898affe2db202d0a3d09d9a8
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCTR' 'sip-files00021.tif'
7472f04ebb1c81ff9cc87576b9c37f64
433f5b2716e56e4d1b5d29b295394d74db024fb3
describe
'384216' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCTS' 'sip-files00057.QC2.jpg'
3321bd506c4ad2f6f436822d4b9ae78e
5c6ee92163b2cea33e52d48db3adf58568b349fb
describe
'362694' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCTT' 'sip-files00245.QC2.jpg'
21f78d1be72274785431b49d6a0212c8
7251643f1d6fbca1a55b912404319f6cddb4d82b
describe
'394512' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCTU' 'sip-files00145.QC2.jpg'
bccd741016837e9a3cb500139dc8d4b7
33f3ce6dfadfb85b0774fa9d83bc1ef4e194381c
describe
'51375' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCTV' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
539477ad998a626a83a6ed8d707cea53
af17b26372f029f77651b3757d8d3d77456507af
describe
'360917' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCTW' 'sip-files00247.QC2.jpg'
11b54be9b9185e7c3cf3bd2f8426142e
89b3c58844ae9ea8969a39553a620e40273f847a
describe
'1634' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCTX' 'sip-files00178.txt'
92bb8507f7d429297f99c102ad7cc7db
b82e87bb4cc7b18cede07d2d388e319b28253f46
describe
'394334' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCTY' 'sip-files00175.QC2.jpg'
4fca742e4382507d3c17af3275c38090
060ed6b7888b7504732a52997e8d86d698d2521b
describe
'527161' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCTZ' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
b5f14a88e95a90de71cd33a274aa5f14
05fc5c3354d513ae9d6b14f960b6fdbb0e162f11
describe
'164578' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCUA' 'sip-files00203.QC.jpg'
b6cea5b53264caad000ac4f30c0a8201
1222a47c08ef6497dde0c0477dfec5836ef32dd4
describe
'1711' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCUB' 'sip-files00060.txt'
c4cbc94a1a7b5dd6789b31f9e67a9d56
c4cdc04211c118b3ef3cbed688f8152ae3640b72
describe
'1351' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCUC' 'sip-files00269.txt'
641a2010187b898bc1e40b9965dce5ec
e70849faa911b400f7b82d765ec22ce321dca66f
'2012-05-25T18:18:13-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCUD' 'sip-files00064.txt'
4beb62fb13caa78221245d58d328a122
2e76f13cf0a68e265dbfa4c066406f2c109ba072
describe
'386559' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCUE' 'sip-files00043.QC2.jpg'
bfa74d25ffb40e99067410c156fb500e
919bde7ac7b4c130b37fa93569ba769d9726ee7c
describe
'156594' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCUF' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
d76d302bf5e71d9449b99c30eac53072
ab05edaf88798d3ef3cf0c8349358a3ec2b825b5
describe
'30909' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCUG' 'sip-files00272.pro'
63c0c482ec52eb4fe6152727d1646d1e
c47b4f0c9d1c9bcdba03c4c31589c02765d709c3
describe
'2468008' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCUH' 'sip-files00284.tif'
65776f848299df6bbda3e0447348fc06
57050a6b3ff3a1c7e92facb9d2e177ea342aa8e6
'2012-05-25T18:15:59-04:00'
describe
'142963' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCUI' 'sip-files00268.QC.jpg'
bbe6f9b9512004747f93f329e9cfaacb
a7a55cb9b631bc1600b769abbec64c9fc6f52aca
describe
'158032' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCUJ' 'sip-files00135.QC.jpg'
5f087eb6bdbee85beb768ee85372470e
3d1a438c843fe62c703db8daf9ccd21448be0af5
describe
'37205' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCUK' 'sip-files00205.pro'
03f55233b2653a7fe5b5bfcc99070cc5
df88a3379eeae40472dfbc4a41e49592f8a6c718
describe
'271370' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCUL' 'sip-files00245.jp2'
560d5e534a576c11f26170f5ad525baa
01125c2a0823b4ee1e691883941b61316f833922
describe
'2225376' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCUM' 'sip-files00261.tif'
b1a61527a85cb6256498ec9a5cca9855
062c6953fb697e11cf1878844964d5200b778624
'2012-05-25T18:23:02-04:00'
describe
'2228444' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCUN' 'sip-files00220.tif'
28fd813d39a59c8a71505dba3c8587a6
37693db5bc83552fb71d6bd85fa42265659dfcca
'2012-05-25T18:17:24-04:00'
describe
'2228460' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCUO' 'sip-files00257.tif'
b6f94db10b8af0b134eea7d923bfe961
805ec511af057d4c9c727e990dad65d7ead0651f
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCUP' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
30dda27e6a521ed07fe4ba6a9b91d94b
6037f0aa1768cea7ffb77fe984ac8d2e3bf5f19f
describe
'402774' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCUQ' 'sip-files00190.QC2.jpg'
0da8a13ae92a2588a3cf4aede2d97af4
c5959eb087096e07ed0227a93036edae4566109d
describe
'296465' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCUR' 'sip-files00007.jp2'
d3ef37bda70fedcce3c13778c550d214
72b60f473910cb67041946d08976996678734eb0
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCUS' 'sip-files00003.txt'
831f3f20c34f5bf707379e7ac6d10037
11873f23f5b34dc2be384d192e43efec09e8478a
describe
'465062' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCUT' 'sip-files00197.jpg'
9c4ec4b9a4eaf2f963d5491a7c3cf366
c4ccd9eb5cec5cf03e9d4097ea24e66980e439fc
describe
'41794' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCUU' 'sip-files00183.pro'
5fe7293f1cfec6e2c82725a65903b55e
ba12689305cff0b2236f8b21413a556fb18bee8b
describe
'34250' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCUV' 'sip-files00081.pro'
a7efa343d1c66c928ac9d78a4b8578a9
86996ad338ee02277be17df995a83bdc40082fe9
describe
'92643' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCUW' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
dfb591968588b52bedcfef77f1f32b01
d15f6868e1979c1c8315d2412cfa491ea4743671
describe
'1599' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCUX' 'sip-files00092.txt'
7e323a205cbe160256ca38df980db4fd
ba0175ddbfa365c07d76d73a73c5afb7a124c74f
describe
'443138' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCUY' 'sip-files00275.jpg'
cee41920dc4455fa75f2328ea36b1692
52a34a66eeb246fbe9340d9644447c270026d974
describe
'153239' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCUZ' 'sip-files00208.QC.jpg'
6908887abc4c248bdc5ecab294124bdf
4acca9eb07e500a45afa1466d54d81bf8e17692e
describe
'50825' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCVA' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
353d65e1206e3ba18579476b4210dd3f
49124cb5694ce2c061fe89a55ea25bb6ac2da6f4
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCVB' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
61328abd75b787fcf425b39b86dc4707
c96baad0f71c4812da6287e4baddacfabb531c4a
describe
'624428' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCVC' 'sip-files00117.QC2.jpg'
1057c765f7cb3af0878dc5bf6db2e724
6a65bc6f33daba616e85a1c5a139d1c9bfa656c3
describe
'53196' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCVD' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
84cc73d096d8b3e6696cae14b54ed90b
c6e75cc89c47756e325e4115ffb66bc89323a144
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCVE' 'sip-files00082.txt'
d59014831af88aaf34b25db4ede8a4c0
d74bc02ee0c68198211371986816bc3754fc5239
describe
'44331' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCVF' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
9123f1efb766182eb499d2334570d9cd
d9155b1d8cb55540e239a80f739189cccc62baf5
'2012-05-25T18:24:57-04:00'
describe
'6659184' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCVG' 'sip-files00166.tif'
c96f33e8c2223925b00faed9f82a91d3
ce71dcdb60b9aad09494fbc3b7cf7f1c30d4751b
describe
'141445' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCVH' 'sip-files00286.QC.jpg'
264cdfbc5f1b6e0cdb597a5a96b86426
acc54762855a50d94ef8f437b85d77fc2c5e6be5
describe
'48110' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCVI' 'sip-files00246thm.jpg'
c17b7cd34b145148067cb441828bba63
686f4d4255a63d37197b0ec3947529f942995478
'2012-05-25T18:26:39-04:00'
describe
'2229716' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCVJ' 'sip-files00274.tif'
2e17274000673e875d6b206a4010c872
9348acdd6a4eafb97fa33e16a1162d9d98e8dc36
describe
'492152' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCVK' 'sip-filesUF00027903_00001.xml'
928a4e556953b6eae2e80e7564010bf5
8556a9b3764e10e3e8daa902a061ec12e883a605
'2012-05-25T18:25:06-04:00'
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-07T04:26:15-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'915726' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCVN' 'sip-files00001.jpg'
12f24ee9d13c55de621fb7f316131852
ab6033f23015f2070adaeef219e3c63d83ba92f6
describe
'389970' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCVO' 'sip-files00003.jpg'
b3752830d83fd5d050514528c1321bd7
582d68021fc7b188dc627ba170990c95c3f96b9d
describe
'208361' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCVP' 'sip-files00007a.jpg'
038ec887bf1440c8d0600be00c28db55
371f584f9f4c2b8a4c75076c852051b80749e4e4
describe
'311083' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCVQ' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
868730f9fba489bd22da47f06d09ee0d
61902b87a9b8ad82ebd3e84d5408c964b24d2147
describe
'364561' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCVR' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
fb47c0e4fa8d90b2a1058f04d088921d
ca0b8ac0afd2a3f26334439d21f4f97f1ba2e5cd
describe
'485985' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCVS' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
c68005411ebefdf73aa0ccdbe4fa2e45
5efc9e37396240b95511bf8f360b978adc5a0b70
describe
'367148' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCVT' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
281bbdae3a9728713d13b54ec9dc81dc
fb7e3a1f3bfb3c93e87ba8c8f7dd3db1bbb11b35
describe
'463358' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCVU' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
f1325ef9544282c34fbb19528f9ff43f
bf412a118a922b578a7224f041c1c369a2ac742f
describe
'442464' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCVV' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
a09076e8835d4682d8d418158e073061
f5b0ce9ab5fc376977ad02044f709a299cb26389
describe
'450754' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCVW' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
8c212b4397a618ed1ac662fe6c7fd4a1
c6b5266deb2e2bf93b1e5e6cf29f8f441f1d199e
describe
'443428' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCVX' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
f78737960fc663f8439b26445adf3299
1da532ad8278d636f272624a966a1b6fd9032f38
describe
'463077' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCVY' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
299b6f5a0cf6bb256e13de062905dee5
a9e5be499b91305414da7b22b6cdf0cdc074540e
describe
'206725' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCVZ' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
f18bf84056a2a045336a8d00a2165c36
6ee556906903b94014a214c4475a4baaef725506
describe
'371001' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCWA' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
1decba03eb48622d639b4b9b542700b3
37e8026d93baa34a995f31b5a129f786a4dbbee1
describe
'435685' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCWB' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
3b40b190067d248509fc751fbc55547d
df85b87ef29a65e507f5cc83d84110f2f44ae18c
describe
'429816' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCWC' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
017de924b1d0605b69b0acc8876d1963
a1a3b2abb77855ed822b96ee48b64a6503926d02
describe
'456864' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCWD' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
26064d98959caab7d54b17703c04ed18
5ee0fc7499d26d21d14c984488988861f4969326
describe
'299833' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCWE' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
1b5ec27fb69ddd602ecfd5d17872700a
c3d51ae8a9b5fa7ce6696d9a498a59af47668cc1
describe
'481366' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCWF' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
d17c0705ea90a78581dec2c3bb5f8dbb
8e3bc64b830fe42b99f9965b034b4d8451de45f3
describe
'367124' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCWG' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
9cdd11e218c3900e2d8e5f2db2609983
06096ea194ad2846e8caab5f2f9fa22924434c31
'2012-05-25T18:25:04-04:00'
describe
'429260' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCWH' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
8a07438489c60a521e489098ebcdf14c
8afa6977eaae2361c3bd48b4fa1398de96602bd1
describe
'486154' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCWI' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
2c5d205b1fdc99e2b06cf03800d40f66
fa81af8eb078dae83a24f1dc4619c0e52fbe048c
describe
'495905' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCWJ' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
60aea7caa2b1a3249ffa824c48323d6b
c828c782e51fbcc9081da24bb984b3c84fa59c00
describe
'486024' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCWK' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
6e0742e14ea2ae00923d7bf1f7877a51
de4ed2a56780b1073dfee30c8f1328871318c6f2
describe
'449191' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCWL' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
b97df7e7b67d533f1a55df9589f8fb8c
5f738a0479daf21dbf59cf9003640ae869c5bdc7
describe
'493450' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCWM' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
dae0e1e3ffd4876e537c3ebf5004f65e
8163857b78daf7589b9c11e301422ff1a3c5eaa7
describe
'496029' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCWN' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
d8d1f51430cce506a9e3612fc16f10a6
a543cabd3e488a62df001c476f97b6a0dd256cf8
'2012-05-25T18:19:15-04:00'
describe
'689518' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCWO' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
c4964fbbb6109d80fef5815bb0aa0c24
79a7b4a63256dea236189a3f813cac240dd69d7e
describe
'434071' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCWP' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
94fc1aef4226713660382822566f3063
c820b6298641257b34ab077002c065dd1ee305d3
describe
'462469' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCWQ' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
bc6083cb7e27df7d025b710fa599413e
6e59d318ad9cba3e57a69f128678969410d52c5d
describe
'469852' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCWR' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
11546ff21bd76021061b24da868ea6df
32df22c8237ea985d9ab458b6fc67801d47563c5
describe
'471702' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCWS' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
21adcfa8ef4bbfd6eb4d50cb73e465ea
3a5124b1b610949ad513111702be09cf83746730
describe
'482309' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCWT' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
8b387b385cffaf8da7ba8b1c8fe8c124
3812d7645919ad0a07a7e95800b68d8aaea4e89e
describe
'464608' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCWU' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
4b61450797b6b495f3a09fb5f306f24a
bdf15a84fae132338b484d621eaa82256a7f4b5e
describe
'459792' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCWV' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
92b99ce8725a6edd907bb4cb5b1f22da
f7a8d59f2d81220253cde75f58915de2112877e8
describe
'476711' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCWW' 'sip-files00152.jpg'
c93848a96c5610fa1cba4892719292eb
94f958c06d8c12cbce44793765a427e5fda42590
describe
'499129' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAABYfileF20100203_AABCWX' 'sip-files00156.jpg'
27920a2b74060e30510672af87f74148
52153aef625256